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III 



A GREAT HISTORY OF A GREAT PEOPLE 

AN EPOCH-MAKING WORK COVERING A PERIOD 
OF ABOUT FOUR THOUSAND YEARS 

PROF. HEINRICH GRAETZS 

HISTORY OF THE JEWS 

THE MOST AUTHORITATIVE AND COMPREHENSIVE 

HISTORY OF THE JEWS IN THE ENGLISH LANGUAGE 

HANDSOMELY AND DURABLY BOUND IN SIX VpLUMES 

Contains more than 4000 pages, a Copious Index of more than 8000 Subjects, and 

a Number of Good Sized Colored Maps. 

SOME ENTHUSIASTIC APPRECIATIONS 

DIFFICULT TASK PERFORMED WITH CONSUMMATE SKILL 

*'Graetz's 'Geschichte der Juden' has superseded all former works of its kind, and has been 
translated into English, Russian and Hebrew, and partly into Yiddish and French. That some 
of these translations have been edited three or four times — a very rare occurrence in Jewish 
literature — are in themselves proofs of the worth of the work. The material for Jewish history 
being so varied, the sources so scattered in the literatures of all nations, made the presentation 
of this history a very difficult undertaking, and it cannot be denied that Graetz performed his 
task with consummate skill"— TA« 7swUh Entydoptdia. 

QREATEST AUTHORITY ON SUBJECT 

"Professor Graetz is the historiographer pur «xc*lUne* of the lews. His work, at present the 
authority upon the subject of Jewish History, bids fair to hold its pre-eminent position for 
some time, perhaps decades."— Pr#/a«« m Initx r^lum*. 

MOST DESIRABLE TEXT-BOOK 

"If one desires to study the history of the Jewish people under the direction of a scholar 
and pleasant writer who is in sympathy with his subject, because he is himself a Jew, he . hould 
resort to the volumes of Graetz.'— 3l«v|«w ef^viturs (New York). 



SPECIAL OFFER TO MEMBERS 

SIGN AND RETURN THIS ORDER FORM TO 
THE JEWISH PUBLICATION SOCIETY OF AMERICA 
608 Chestnut Street, Philadelphia, Pa. 
Gentlemen : 

Kindly send me, oxpressage prepaid, a set of Graetz's "History of the Jews," 
in six volumes, cloth bound, for which 1 am to pay you $8.50, this being the speoiai 
prioo for members. 

Signed, 

Address ... 

City 



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The American Jewish 
Year Book 

5669 

September 26, 1908, to September 15, 1909 



Edited by 

HERBERT FRIEDENWALD 

for the 

'Aiftet^itn" Jewish^ Cohitnittee 



PHILADELPHIA 

The Jewish Publication Society of America 

1908 



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coptbioht, 1908, bt 
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PEEFACE 

The present, which is the tenth issue of the American Jew- 
ish Year Book, appears under a slightly different arrange- 
ment than has heretofore obtained with regard to this annual. 
Though the publisher is still The Jewish Publication 
Society of America, the compilation of the work has been 
taken over by the American Jewish Committee. The Year 
Book, which was first edited by Dr. Cyrus Adler, afterwards 
by Dr. Adler and Miss Henrietta Szold in collaboration, and 
later by Miss Szold, was found by the Publication Society 
to entail too great a charge upon its annual budget, and that 
Society had the intention of relinquishing the task. The 
American Jewish Committee being persuaded of the im- 
portance of the Year Book for the purpose of organizing the 
Jews of America into a compact whole and of its usefulness to 
its own organization, a joint arrangement has been entered 
into whereby the American Jewish Committee is responsi- 
ble for the cost of the compilation of the book, and the Publi- 
cation Society for its actual issuance. In view of this 
arrangement, it has been thought proper to include in this 



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VIII PREFACE 

volume a report of the activities of the American Jewish 
Committee as well as the usual one of The Jewish Publi- 
cation Society of America. 

The work of the Year Book was definitely taken over by 
the American Jewish Committee during the month of 
December, 1907, and the lists and statistical information here 
given were kept up by Miss Szold, the Secretary to the Publi- 
cation Committee, from July 15 to December, 1907. There 
have also passed over from her hands to the American Jewish 
Committee, important lists of various kinds kept up for 
nearly eight years, upon some of which the present issue is 
based, whilst others are in its keeping for such use as future 
need may dictate. 

In order that the Year Book should not prove too great a 
tax upon the energies and resources of either organization, it 
has been brought down to the smallest possible limits con- 
sistent with its purpose of recording and preserving in con- 
venient form facts of importance to Jews in America. To 
effect this, some subjects heretofore treated have been omitted. 
The list of new local organizations, following so closely upon 
the very elaborate directory published last year^ gives an inter- 
esting idea of the rapid growth and distribution of communal 
organizations. 



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PREFACE IX 

The summary of Sunday legislation and court decisions^ 
for which we are indebted to Albert M. Priedenberg, Esq., 
presents in succinct form material on a subject which has en- 
gaged the attention of a large number of Jewish citizens and 
of other Americans who either belong to creeds not observing 
Sunday as a Sabbath, or who are concerned with the general 
problem of religious liberty. 

I especially desire to make acknowledgment to Mr. I. 
George Dobsevage, the assistant secretary of The Jewish 
Publication Societt, for the valuable aid he has rendered. 

Hehbebt Priedenwald. 



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SPECIAL ARTICLES IN PEEVIOUS ISSUES OF THE 
AMERICAN JEWISH YEAR BOOK 

The Aujance Isba^ute Univebselle, 6661, pp. 45-65. 

The Jews of Roumania (two articles), 5662, pp. 25-87. 

The Amebican Passfobt in Russia, 5665, pp. 283-305. 

Dnu&CTOBY OF National and Local Oboanizations, 5661, pp. 67-495, 

and 5668, pp. 21-430. 
Statistical Stjmmaby by States (Jewish Oboanizations in the 

United States), 5662, pp. 126-156. 
The Jewish Population of Mabyland, 5663, pp. 46-62. 
A List of Jewish Pebiodicals in the United States, 5660, pp. 

271-282. 
Pbeliminaby List of Jewish Soldiebs and Sailobs Who Sebved 

IN THE Spanish-Amebican Wab, 5661, pp. 525-622. 
The Hundbed Best Available Books in English on Jewish Sub- 
jects, 5665, pp. 309-317. 
One Hundbed Available Books in English on Palestine, 5666, 

pp. 153-162. 
A Syllabus of Jewish Histoby, 5666, pp. 163-170. 
Biogbaphical Sketches of Rabbis and Gantobs Officiating in 

THE United States, 5664, pp. 40-108; 5665, pp. 214-225; 

5666, pp. 119-125. 
Biogbaphical Sketches of Jews Pbominent in the Pbofessions, 

etc., in the United States, 5665, pp. 52-213. 
Biogbaphical Sketches of Jewish Communal Wobkebs in the 

United States, 5666, pp. 32-118. 
VBiAn P. Levy, 5663, pp. 42-45. 
Gebshom Mendez Seixas, 5665, pp. 40-51. 
Penina MoiSE, 5666, pp. 17-31. 
Fbom Kishineff to Bialystok. a Table of Pogboms fbom 1903 

to 1906, 5667, pp. 34-89. 
A List of Available Stobies of Jewish Intebest in English, 

6667, pp. 130-142. 



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CONTENTS 

PAOR 

Preface VII 

Special Articles in Previous Issues of the American Jew- 
ish Year Book X 

Time of Sunrise and Sunset in Six Northern 

Latitudes following Contents 

Calendars 3 

Directory of Jewish National Organizations in the United 

States 19 

Additions to the Directory of Jewish Local Organizations 
in the United States Published in the American Jew- 
ish Year Book for 5668 43 

Summary of the Dfrectory of Jewish Local Organizations 
in the United States Published in the American Jew- 
ish Year Book for 5668 65 

Jewish Statistics 66 

List of Jewish Members of the Congress of the United 

States 70 

The Government of the United States and Affairs of 

Interest to the Jews 74 

A List of Articles of Jewish Interest in the Jewish and in 

the General Press 80 

A List of Books and Articles by Jews in the United States 91 
A List of' Jewish Periodicals Appearing in the United 

States Ill 

Appointments, Honors, and Elections 117 

Synagogues and Homes of Societies Dedicated in the United 

States 124 

Necrology 127 

A List of Leading Events in 5668 131 

Sunday Laws of the United States and Leading Judicial 
Decisions Having Special Reference to the Jews, by 

Albert M. Priedenberg, of the New York Bar 152 

The Year 5668, by Louis H. Levin 190 

Report of the American Jewish Committee, November, 1906, 

TO June 1, 1908 237 

Report of the Twentieth Year of The Jewish Publication 
Society of America, 1907-1908 259 



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TIME OF SUNRISE AND SUNSET 



(Adapted, by permission, from " "ht 1 







Lat. U° North 






Lat. 420 North 




Lat. 4ff> North 




Day of 


(For Maine, Nova Scotia, 
Northern NewYork, Micbi- 
ff'an, WlBconsin, Minnesota, 
North and South Dakota, 
Montana, Washington, 
Northern Oregon, North- 
ern Idaho) 


(For Massachusetts, New 
Hampshire, Vermont, Cen- 
tral New York, Southern 
Michigan, Wisconsin, 
Northern Iowa, Wyoming, 
Southern Idaho, Southern 
Oregon) 


(For Southern New Tr 
Connecticut, Rhode hU 
Pennsylvania, New J«ry 
Northern Ohio, Indian 
linois. Southern Iowa, .\, 
braska. Northern CoUra 
Utah, Nevada, Califoma 


Month 




Port.1and, Me. 






Boston, Mass. 




New YOTK uity 
Chicago, 111. 




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7.87 


4.81 


6.16 


5.48 


7.80 


4.88 


5.46 


7.25 


4.43 


fl.2- 


10 


5.61 


7.86 


4.40 


6.25 


5.48 


7.29 


4.46 


6.28 


5.46 


7.25 


4.51 


6,2< 


20 


5.47 


7.30 


4.53 


6.85 


5.48 


7.24 


4.58 


6.36 


5.45 


7.19 


5.03 ^:i 


Feb. 1 


5.39 


7.19 


5.09 


6.49 


5.88 


7.14 


5.14 


6.50 


5.37 


7.10 


5.18 <•., 


10 


5.29 


7.07 


5.22 


7.01 


5.29 


7.04 


5.26 


6.59 


5.29 


7.01 


5.29 :.:. 


20 


5.15 


6.52 


5.86 


7.12 


6.17 


6.50 


5.38 


7.12 


5.17 


6.48 


5.40 :i 


Mar. 1 


5.01 


6.87 


5.48 


7.24 


5.02 


6.35 


5.50 


7.28 


5.03 


6.35 


5.51 l2 


10 


4.43 


6.21 


6.00 


7.37 


4.48 


6.21 


6.01 


7.84 


4.49 


6.21 


6.01 1 :.:^ 


20 


4.26 


6.03 


6.12 


7.49 


4.80 


6.08 


6.12 


7.46 


4.33 


6.04 


6.11 ' ?4 


April 1 


4.00 


5.40 


6.27 


8.07 


4.08 


6.43 


6.26 


8.01 


4.12 


5.45 


6.24 1 :.s 


10 


8.41 


5.24 


6.89 


8.21 


8.49 


6.27 


6.35 


8.13 


3.54 


5.28 


6.88 1 ^,(1 


20 


8.19 


5.07 


6.51 


8.89 


8.29 


5.11 


6.45 


8.28 


3.86 


6.13 


6.43 \i 


May I 


2.52 


4.49 


7.05 


9.01 


8.07 


4.54 


6.59 


8.47 


3.16 


4.59 


6.55 S5 


10 


2.86 


4.87 


7.15 


9.14 


2.58 


4.44 


7.08 


9.02 


8.02 


4.50 


7.04 ' \^ 


20 


2.16 


4.26 


7.26 


9.87 


2.35 


4.86 


7.18 


9.18 


2.46 


4.39 


7.14 U 


June 1 


1.55 


4.17 


7.88 


10.00 


2.17 


4.25 


7.29 


9.87 


2.82 


4.81 


7.34 :J') 


10 


1.47 


4.14 


7.44 


10.12 


2.11 


4.22 


7.85 


9.47 


2.27 


4.28 


7.29 !»; 


20 


1.44 


4.14 


7.49 


10.18 


2.08 


4.28 


7.39 


9.58 


2.25 


4.29 


7.34 . Dj 


July 1 


1.55 


4.18 


7.49 


10.10 


2.12 


4.26 


7.40 


9.54 


2.28 


4.81 


7.35 'J.5 


10 


2.12 


4.24 


7.46 


9.58 


2.23 


4.82 


7.38 


9.44 


2.38 


4.37 


7.38 ^i 


20 


2.27 


4.82 


7.39 


9.44 


2.87 


4.40 


7.32 


9.35 


2.50 


4.44 


7.27 ^i 


Aug. 1 


2.46 


4.46 


7.26 


9.25 


2.55 


4.52 


7.20 


9.17 


3.06 


4.56 


7.16 9( 


10 


3.06 


4.57 


7.14 


9.03 


3.12 


5.01 


7.09 


8.59 


8.19 


5.05 


7.06 Is? 


20 


8.38 


5.07 


6.58 


8.41 


3.27 


5.11 


6.55 


8.89 


3.34 


5.15 


6.58 ' 5 5 


Sep. 1 


3.40 


5.22 


6.87 


8.20 


8.44 


5.24 


6.86 


8.16 


3.50 


5.27 


6.33 1 8] 


10 


8.55 


5.88 


6.20 


7.59 


8.55 


5.84 


6.21 


7.59 


4.00 


5.86 


6.19 : 7f 


20 


4.07 


5.45 


6.01 


7.89 


4.07 


5.44 


6.04 


7.88 


4.12 


5.46 


6.02 


7 . 


Oct. 1 


4.22 


5.58 


5.41 


7.16 


4.23 


5.56 


5.48 


7.17 


4.25 


5.56 


5.43 


7,' 


10 


4.35 


6.09 


5.25 


6.59 


4.33 


6.06 


5.29 


7.00 


4.85 


6.05 


5.31 


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20 


4.45 


6.22 


5.07 


6.48 


4.44 


6.18 


5.13 


6.45 


4.45 


6.15 


5.16 6. 


Nov. 1 


5.00 


6.88 


4.49 


6.28 


4.58 


6.83 


4.55 


6.80 


4.57 


6.29 


4.59 0; 


10 


5.10 


6.51 


4.88 


6.18 


5.07 


6.44 


4.44 


6.21 


5.09 


6.40 


4.49 , 6^ 


20 


5.20 


7.04 


4.28 


6.12 


5.18 


6.57 


4.35 


6.14 


5.17 


6.58 


4.39 6 


Dec. 1 


5.82 


7.17 


4.21 


6.07 


5.29 


7.10 


4.29 


6.09 


5.27 


7.05 


4.84 6 


10 


5.39 


7.27 


4.20 


6.08 


6.87 


7.19 


4.28 


6.08 


5.35 


7.14 


4.83 6 


20 


5.45 


7.84 


4.23 


6.09 


5.43 


7.26 


4.30 


6.11 


5.41 


7.20 


4.86 1 6 



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IN SIX NORTHERN LATITUDES 

le Jewish Encyclopedia," Vol. XI) 





Lat. 880-a8o North 




1 






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and. 


(For District of Columbia, 
Delaware, Maryland, Vii> 
grinia. West Viigrinia, South- 


Lat. 340-3SO North 
(For South Carolina, North- 


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em Georeria, Alabama, Mis- 
sissippi, Louisiana, Texas, 
Southern New Mexico, Ari- 


(For Florida,Southern Geoi 


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Louisiana, Te 


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Missouri, Kansas, Central 


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zona, California) 


Pensacola, Fla. 


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Central Nebraska, Central 
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Savannah, Ga. 


New Orleans, La. 




Charleston, 8. C. 






* 


Washlngrton, D. C. 












Norfolk, Va. 












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4.49 


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7.03 


6.3 


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5.45 


7.19 


4.57 


6.31 


5.37 


7.03 


5.18 


6.39 


5.88 


6.58 


6.18 


6.4 


.38 


5.43 


7.14 


5.08 


6.39 


5.37 


7.01 


6.20 


6.47 


6.82 


6.56 


5.25 


6.5 


;.5i 


5.86 


7.06 


5.22 


6.52 


5.31 


6.56 


5.32 


6.57 


5.29 


6.51 


6.87 


6.£ 


.00 


5.27 


6.57 


5.81 


7.02 


5.25 


6.48 


5.41 


7.04 


6.22 


6.48 


6.45 


7.C 


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5.16 


6.46 


5.42 


7.11 


5.16 


6.88 


5.50 


7.11 


6.15 


6.85 


6.52 


7.1 


'.22 


5.04 


6.33 


5.52 


7.21 


5.07 


6.28 


5.57 


7.19 


6.07 


6.26 


5.69 7.1 


.32 


4.50 


6.20 


6.01 


7.31 


4.55 


6.19 


6.04 


7.26 


4.56 


6.16 


6.05 7. Si 


.44 


4.85 


6.05 


6.11 


7.41 


4.41 


6.05 


6.11 


7.35 


4.48 


6.06 


6.12 


7. J 


r.56 


4.15 


5.46 


6.22 


7.53 


4.25 


5.49 


6.20 


7.43 


4.29 


5.50 


6.19 


7.i 


J. 08 


3.58 


6.31 


6.30 


8.05 


4.18 


5.37 


6.26 


7.50 


4.18 


5.89 


6.24 


7.4 


L21 


8.40 


5.17 


6.40 


8.16 


8.57 


5.25 


6.33 


8.00 


4.04 


5.29 


6.80 


7.fi 


5.32 


8.22 


5.02 


6.52 


8.82 


8.43 


5.13 


6.41 


8.11 


3.51 


5.17 


6.87 


8.( 


$.45 


3.08 


4.58 


7.00 


8.45 


3.82 


5 05 


6.48 


8.20 


8.41 


5.11 


6.44 


8.1 


).00 


2.54 


4.44 


7.09 


9.00 


8.22 


4.59 


6.54 


8.81 


8.83 


5.05 


6.50 


8.i 


).23 


2.41 


4.86 


7.18 


9.18 


8.13 


4.53 


7.01 


8.41 


8.24 


5.00 


6.55 


8.5 


^32 


2.36 


4.84 


7.23 


9.21 


3.11 


4.52 


7.05 


8.47 


8.22 


4.59 


6.59 


8.2 


).36 


2.35 


4.34 


7.28 


9.26 


8.10 


4.52 


7.10 


8.62 


8.22 


4.59 


7.04 


8.^ 


).37 


2.39 


4.37 


7.19 


9.27 


8.13 


4.55 


7.11 


8.53 


8.25 


5.01 


7.05 


S.4 


?.31 


2.47 


4.43 


7.27 


9.22 


3.19 


&-.00 


7.10 


8.51 


8.80 


5.05 


7.03 


8. J 


).21 


2.58 


4.51 


7.21 


9.12 


8.27 


5,05 


7.07 


8.45 


8.88 


5.11 


7.00 


8.i 


).06 


3.14 


5.00 


7.12 


8.58 


3.39 


5.13 


6.58 


8.88 


8.48 


5.19 


6.58 


8.S 


^.50 


3.26 


5.08 


7.02 


8.44 


8.47 


5.19 


6.49 


8.22 


8.56 


5.24 


6.45 


8 1 


S.83 


3.40 


5.18 


6.49 


8.28 


3.57 


5.26 


6.39 


8.08 


4.04 


5.29 


6.36 


8.( 


8.10 


3.54 


5.29 


6.31 


8.06 


4.08 


5.35 


6.25 


7.52 


4.14 


5.87 


6.28 


7 4 


r.54 


4.01 


5.37 


6.18 


7.51 


4.15 


5.40 


6.14 


7.39 


4.19 


5.42 


6.12 


7.i 


r.36 


4.16 


5.45 


6.02 


7.32 


4.28 


5.47 


6.01 


7.23 


4.27 


5.47 


6.01 


7. J 


7.16 


4.27 


5.56 


5.43 


7.13 


4.82 


5.54 


5.45 


7.08 


4.34 


5.53 


5.46 


7.( 


8.58 


4.36 


6.04 


5.81 


6.58 


4.87 


6.00 


5.35 


6.57 


4.39 


5.59 


5.86 


6.1 


6.43 


4.46 


6.14 


5.16 


6.45 


4.45 


6.07 


5.23 


6.45 


4.44 


6.06 


5.25 


6.' 


5.81 


4.57 


6.29 


5.01 


6.81 


4.54 


6.16 


o.ll 


6.34 


4.58 


6.14 


5.14 


6. J 


6.21 


5.05 


6.40 


4.52 


6.23 


5.01 


6.25 


5.03 


6.27 


5.00 


6.21 


5.08 


6. J 


6.15 


5.14 


6.53 


4.44 


6.18 


5.09 


6.35 


4.57 


6.23 


5.06 


6.29 


5.01 


6.i 


6.11 


5.25 


6.59 


4.40 


6.18 


5.17 


6.44 


4.55 


6.21 


5.13 


6.88 


5.00 


6. J 


6.11 


5.83 


7.08 


4.88 


6.14 


5.23 


6.51 


4.55 


6.24 


5.21 


6.46 


5.01 1 6. J 


6.14 


5.38 


7.14 


4.40 


6.17 


5.29 


6.57 


4.58 


6.28 


5.26 I 6.52 


S.'^ 



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Family Events 



5609 

1908*1909 



\ 



Digitized by VjOOQlC 

1 



CALENDARS 



Digitized 



by Google 



CALEWD 







nnn 










Jr 






ncin-6«88 










orn^ 






1907-1908 










IttHl 


1907 






5668 


1908 






Sep. 


9 


New Year 


Tishri 


1 


Sep. 


26 


Newie 


Sep. 


11 


Fast of Gedaliah 


Tishri 


3 


Sep. 


28 


Fast of Get 


Sep. 


18 


Day of Atonement 


Tishri 


10 


Oct. 


5 


Day of AtoL 


Sep. 


28 


Tabernacles 


Tishri 


15 


Oct. 


10 


Tabernic 


Sep. 


30 


Eighth Day of the Feast 


Tishri 


22 


Oct. 


17 


Eighth Day of 


Oct. 


1 


Rejoicing of the Law 


Tishri 


28 


Oct. 


18 


Rejoicing o{] 


Oct. 


8 


First New Moon Day (of Heshvan) 


Tishri 


80 


Oct. 


25 First New Moon Dti 


Nov. 


7 


New Moon Day 


Kislev 


1 


Nov. 


24 


First New MooEbj 


Dec. 


1 


Hanukah 


Kislev 


25 


Dec. 


19 


Hannkj 


Dec. 


6 


New Moon Day 


Tebet 


1 


Dec. 


24 


First New Moo^l), 


Dec. 


15 


Fast of Tcbet 


Tebet 


10 








1908 










1909 






Jan. 


4 


New Moon Day 


Shebat 


1 


Jan. 


3 


Fast olT, 


Feb. 


2 


First New Moon Day (of Adar) 


Shebat 


SO 


Jan. 


23 


New Moon 


Mar. 


3 


FirstNewMoon Day (of AdarSheni) 


Adar 


30 


Feb. 


21 


First New Mooiid 


Mar. 


16 


Fast of Esther Adar Sheni 


13 


Mar. 


4 


Fast of Ej 


Mar. 


17 


Purim AdarSheni 


14 


Mar. 


7 


Putin 


April 


2 


New Moon Day 


Nisan 


1 


Mar. 


23 


New Moon 


April 


16 


Passover 


Nisan 


15 


April 


6 


PasaoT, 


May 


1 


First New Moon Day (of lyar) 


Nisan 


30 


April 


21 


First New Moon] 


May 


19 


Thirty-third Day of 'Omer 


lyar 


18 


May 


9 


Thirty-third D| 


May 


81 


New Moon Day 


Sivan 


1 


May 


21 


New Mooi 


June 


5 


Feast of Weelcs 


Sivan 


6 


May 


26 


Feast ot^ 


June 


29 


First New Moon Day (of Tammuz) 


Sivan 


30 


June 


19 First New Moon D| 


July 


16 


Fast of Tammuz 


Tammuz 17 


July 


6 


Fast of Tai 


July 


29 


New Moon Day 


Ab 


1 


July 


19 


New Mooi 


Aug. 


6 


Fast of Ab 


Ab 


9 


July 


27 


Fast Of 


Aug. 


27 


First New Moon Day (of Ellul) 


Ab 


80 


Aug. 


17 


First New Moon 


Sep. 


20 


Selihot Services 


Ellul 


24 


Sep. 


12 


Selihot g( 


Sep. 


25 


Eve of New Year 


Ellul 


29 


Sep. 


15 


Eve of He^ 














Zr\r\n\t 



ENDARS 



3H 

](l0a-19O9 



ew Tear 

of Gedaliah 

t Atonement 

l)emacles 

ay of the Feast 

ig of the Law 

311 Day (of Heshvan) 

on Day (of Kislev) 

annkah 

oon Day (of Tebet) 



5669 
Tishri 
Tishri 
TiBhri 
Tishri 
Tishri 
Tishri 
Tishri 
Heshyan 80 
Kislev 25 
Kislev 80 



of Tebet 
^oon Day 
:)on Day (of Adar) 
ot Esther 
urim 

»Ioon Day 
ssover 

)on Day (of lyar) 
I Day of • Omer 
^oon Day 
of Weeks 



Tebet 10 

Shebat 1 

Shebat 80 

Adar 11 

Adar 

Nisan 

Nisan 

Nisan 

lyar 

Sivan 

Sivan 



14 

1 

15 

80 

18 

1 

6 

1 Day (of Tammnz) Sivan 80 
Tammnz Tammuz 17 

joon Day Ab 1 

t of Ab Ab 9 

on Day (of Ellul) Ab 80 

t Services Ellul 26 

New Tear Ellul 29 



• • • •• 

— » — ■ ■ ■■ -■ 



• • • Mwrf • •••••••••••• 



mn-MTo 

1900-1910 



1909 
Sep. 
Sep. 
Sep. 
Sep. 
Oct. 
Oct 
Oct 
Nov. 
Dec. 
Dec. 
Dec. 

1910 
Jan. 
Feb. 
Mar. 
Mar. 
Mar. 
April 
April 
May 
May 
June 
June 
July 
July 
Aug. 
Aug. 
Sep. 
Sep. 
Oct. 



16 New Tear 

18 Fast of Gedaliah 

25 Day of Atonement 

80 Tabernacles 

7 Eighth Day of the Feast 

8 Rejoicing of the Law 
1 5 First New Moon Day (of Heshvan) Tishri 
14 New Moon Day Kislev 

8 Hanukah Kislev 

18 New Moon Day Tebet 

22 Fast of Tebet Tebet 



5670 
Tishri 
Tishri 
Tishri 
Tishri 
Tishrt 
Tishri 



11 

9 

12 

24 

25 

10 

24 

9 

27 

8 

13 



New Moon Day Shebat 1 

First New Moon Day (of Adar) Shebat 80 



New Moon Day 
Fast of Esther 

Purlm 

New Moon Day 

Passover 

First New Moon Day (of lyar) 

Thirty-third Day of 'Omer 

New Moon Day 

Feast of Weeks 



Adar Sheni 1 
Adar Shenl 13 
Adar Sheni 14 

Nisan 

Nisan 

Nisan 

lyar 

Sivan 

Sivan 



1 

15 

80 

18 

1 

6 

30 

Tammuz 17 



7 First New Moon Day (of Tammuz) Sivan 
24 Fast of Tammuz 

6 New Moon Day Ab 

14 Fast of Ab Ab 

4 First New Moon Day (of Ellul) Ab 

26 Selihot Services Ellul 

8 Eve of New Year EIInT 



1 

9 

80 



5669 

39 (o"Din) according to the short system (p'W). 
Eect common year of 12 months, 61 Sabbaths, 355 
ming on Saturday, the seventh day of the week, 
I the first day of Passover on Tuesday, the third 
week; therefore its sign is ae^r, i. e., 'T for seventh, 
jct (hdSk'), and 'a for third. It is the seventh year 
;h lunar cycle of 19 years, and the thirteenth year 
[ solar cycle of 28 years, since Creation. 



Digitized by VjOC 5 (j 

2,\ 



1908,Sep.26-Oot.25] TISHRI SO DAYS I'-CH 6669 


OiTil 




JewiA 


SABBATHS, FESTIVALS, FASTS 


PENTATEUCHAL 
PORTIONS 


PROPHETICAL 
PORTIONS 

nnoan 


Sep. 
26 


8 


Hitoi 
1 


New Year nJCn 'IT 'N 


(Gen. 21 

1 Num. 29: 1-6 


I SanL 1: 1-2: 10 


27 

28 

29 

'30 

Oct. 

1 

2 
3 


S 
M 
T 
W 

Th 

F 

8 


2 
3 
4 
5 

6 

7 
8 


New Year fUB'n 'm '3 
FattofGedallah H^IJ OIV 

Halts' n3B>, Mnxn 


j Gen. 22 

1 Num. 29: 1-6 

Ex. 82: 11-14; 84: 1-10 
Deut.32 


Jer.81:2-20 
j 18.66: 6-66: 8 
( Seph, none 

rHo8.14:2-10 

Joel. 2: 14-27 

Sep7i.Ho8. 14:2-10 
lMfcah7:18-20 


4 
5 
6 

7 

8 

9 

10 


S 
M 
T 
W 
Th 
F 
8 


9 
10 
11 
12 
13 
14 
15 


Day of Atonement *)1&3 fil^ 
Tabernacles ni31Dn '« 


( Lev. 16 

-^ Num. 29: 7-11 

( Afternoon: Lev. 18 

(Lev. 2ft 26-28: 44 
1 Num. 29: 12-16 


f Is. 67: 14-68: 14 
I Afternoon: Jonah; 
\ Seph, add ^icsLh 
I r:18-20 

Zech. 14 


11 
12 
13 
14 
15 
16 
17 


S 
M 
T 
W 
Th 
F 
8 


16 
17 

18 
19 
20 
21 

22 


Tabernacles ni31Dn '1 

(The Great Hosannah 
JldhthDayofthePeisV^^^^^ 

1 mvr ^roK^ 


(Lev. 22: 26-28: 44 
Num. 29: 12-16 
Num. 29: 17-26 
Scp/i. 29: 17-22 

, Num. 29: 20-28 
SepTi. 29: 20-25 
Num. 29:28-31 
Sep/i. 29: 28-28 
Num. 29: 26-84 
SepTi. 29: 26-31 
Num.29:2&-84 
SepTi. 29.29-84 

jDeut.l4:82-16:17 

1 Num. 29: 86-30:1 


I Kings 8: 2-21 

( I Kinffs 8: 64-66, or 


18 
19 
20 
21 
22 
23 
24 


S 

M 

T 

W 

Th 

F 

8 


23 
24 
25 
26 
27 
28 
29 


t Rejoicing of the Uw 

an noK 
cennn '3D] n^e^K-in 


lDeut.33:l-34;12 
-^ Gen. 1:1-2: 3 
I Num. 29: 86-30:1 

Gen. 1:1-6: 8 


j Josh. 1 
1 Seph, 1: 1-9 

(I Sam. 20: 18-43 
< Seph. ctdd 
(Is. 61: 10; 63: 6 


25 


S 


30 


New Moon K^nn "IT 'K 


Num. 28: 1-15 





* The Book of Ecclesiastes is read. 

7 



jOOglc 



1908,Oct.26-Nov.24] HESHVAN 30 DAYS 


1 


Kmt\ 


•ftL 






PENTATEUCHAL 


PROPHETICAL 


VlTU 

Hwtt 


Hootk 


SABBATHS, FESTIVALS. FASTS 


PORTIONS 


PORTIONS 




TnIc 






nVBHS 


niTDBn 


Oct. 




HMkm 








26 


M 


1 


New Moon tnn "IT '3 


Num. 28: 1-15 




27 


T 


2 








28 


W 


3 








29 


Th 


4 








30 


P 


5 








31 


S 


6 


n: 


Gen. 6: 9-11: 83 


j Is. 64: 1-66: 6 
1 Seph. 64: 1-10 


Nov. 












1 


s 


7 








2 


M 


8 








3 


T 


9 








4 


W 


10 








5 


Th 


11 








6 


F 


12 








7 


8 


13 


1^^ 


Gen. 12: 1—17:87 


18.40:27-41:16 


8 


S 


14 








9 


M 


15 








10 


T 


16 








11 


W 


17 








12 


Th 


18 








13 


P 


19 








14 


8 


20 


i5-|^l 


Gen. 18: 1-22: 24 


J II Kings 4: 1-87 
1 Seph. 4: 1-28 


15 


S 


21 








16 


M 


22 








17 


T 


23 








18 


W 


24 






1 


19 


Th 


25 






1 


20 


F 


26 








21 


8 


27 


[cnnn 'n»] niK> ^^n 


Gen. 28: 1-26: 18 


I Kings 1:1-81 


22 


S 


28 








23 


M 


29 


pp nisi DV 






24 


T 


30 


New Moon CTin "1^ 'K 


Num. 28: 1-16 





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by Google 



1908, Nov. 25— Deo. 24] 



KISLEV 30 DAYS 



h^DDMoe 



QtII 
bitk 


VMk 


Jevisk 
HoBtk 


SABBATHS, FESTIVALS. FASTS 


PENTATEUCHAL 
PORTIONS 


PROPHETICAL 
PORTIONS 

niTODn 


Nov. 




IkleT 








25 


w 


1 


New Moon BHn '"11 '2 


Num. 28: 1-16 




26 


Th 


2 








27 


F 


3 








28 


8 


4 


mh^n 


Gen. 26: 19-28: 9 


MaL 1: 1-2: 7 


29 


S 


5 








30 


M 


6 








Doc. 












1 


T 


7 








2 


W 


8 








3 
4 
5 


Th 
F 
S 


9 

10 
11 


[n^n-^rn ididi ^tDi k^i 


Qen.28:l(V-«:8 


rHo8.12:lS-14:10; 

or 11: 7-12: 12; 

or 11: 7-14: 10 
.Seph.ll:7-12:12 


'6 


s 


12 








7 


M 


13 








8 


T 


14 








9 


W 


15 








10 
11 


Th 
F 


16 
17 






rHo8.l2:l»-14:10; 
or 11: 7-12: 12; 


12 


S 


18 


rh^'>^ 


Gen. 82: 4-86: 48 


or Obad. 1 
LSep/i.Obad.1 


13 


s 


19 








14 


M 


20 








15 


T 


21 








16 


W 


22 








17 


Th 


23 








18 
19 


P 
8 


24 
25 


i Hanukah, Feast of Dedication 

1 nawn .[K^inn 'no] le^^i 


r Gen. 87: 1-40: 28 
Num. 7: 1-17 
Scp/i. 6: 22-7: 17 
Num. 7: 18-29 


Zech. 2: 14-4: 7 


20 
21 
22 
23 
24 


S 
M 

T 
W 
Th 


26 
27 
28 
29 
30 


New Moon {Tin '11 'H 


Num. 7: 24-36 

S6p/i.7:24-29 

Num. 7: 80-41 

' Sep;i.7:80-35 

Num. 7: 8»-47 

Sei»;i.7:86^1 

Num. 28: 1-16 

< Num. 7: 42-68 

(Sepfe.7:42-47 





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1908. Deo. 26-1908, Jan. 22] TEBET 29 DAYS [n30 8666 


CiTll 
Hcotk 


tftL 

TMk 


JnUk 
Initk 


SABBATHS, FESTIVALS, FASTS 


PENTATEUCHAL 
PORTIONS 


PROPHETICAL 
PORTIONS 

nnoBH 


Deo. 
25 

26 


F 
8 


Mwt 

1 

2 


Mew Moor Bnn "Tl '3 
Eighth Day ol Hanukah f*|:iD 


Num. 28: 1-16 
•^ Num. 7:48-58 

Sep/1.7: 48-68 
J Gen. 41:1-44: 17 
1 Num. 7: 64-8: 4 


I Kings 7: 40-60 


27 
28 
29 
30 
31 

Jan. 

1 

2 


S 
M 
T 
W 
Th 

P 
8 


3 
4 
5 
6 

7 

8 
9 


B'ri 


Gen. 44: 18-47: 27 


Ezek. 87: 15-28 


3 

4 
5 
6 
7 
8 
9 


S 

M 

T 

W 

Th 

P 

8 


10 
11 
12 
13 
14 
15 
16 


j Fa«t of Tebet 


Ex. 82:11-14; 84: 1-10 

Gen. 47: 28-60: 26 


» 18. 66: 6-66: 8 
1 Seph, none 

IKinfir8 2:l-12 


10 
11 
12 
13 
14 
15 
16 


S 

M 

T 

W 

Th 

F 

8 


17 

18 

19 

20. 

21 

22 

23 




Ex. 1: 1-6: 1 


18.27:6-28:18; 

29:22,38 
Seph. Jer. 1: 1—2: f 


17 
18 
19 
20 
21 
22 


S 
M 
T 
W 
Th 
P 


24 
25 
26 
27 
28 
29 


pp IIDD DV 







10 



Digitized 



byGoogk 



I 
190e,Jan.23-Feb.21] SHEBAT 30 DAYS 


L0nfi^66Q8 


CiTil 
Month 


Twk 


InriA 
loatk 


SABBATHS, FESTIVALS, FASTS 


PENTATEUCHAL 
PORTIONS 

nrcna 


PROPHETICAL 
PORTIONS 

nnDBH 


Jan. 

23 


8 


SlMbtt 
1 


New Moon tnn "t .KIKI 


j Ex. 6: 2-0: 86 
1 Num. 28: 9-16 


18.66 


24 


S 


2 








'26 


M 


3 








26 


T 


4 








27 


W 


5 








28 


Th 


6 








29 


P 


7 








30 


8 


8 


K3 


Bx. 10: 1-18: 16 


Jer. 46: 18-28 


31 


S 


9 








Feb. 












1 


M 


10 








2 


T 


11 








3 


W 


12 








4 


Th 


13 








5 

6 


F 
S 


14 
15 


( New Year lor Tree* i 


Bx. 13: 17-17: 16 


JJudfire8 4:4-6:31 
1 Seph. 6: 1-81 


7 


s 


16 








8 


M 


17 








9 


T 


18 








10 


W 


19 








11 


Th 


20 








12 
13 


F 
8 


21 
22 


nn^ 


Bx. 18: 1— aO: 26 


j Is. 6: 1-7: 6; 9: 6. 6 
1Sep?i.6:l-13 


14 


S 


23 








15 


M 


24 








16 


T 


25 








17 


W 


26 








18 


Th 


27 


tDp -I1B3 DV 






19 
20 


F 
8 


28 
29 


[Knnn 'n»] n'hp^ 'a ^d^obk^d 


j Ex. 21: 1-24: 18 
iBx. 30: 11-16 


J II Klnfirsl2:l-17 
1 Seph, 11: 17—12: 17 


21 


S 


30 


New Moon KHR 'm 'K 


Num. 28: 1-16 





11 



jOO 



gle 



1909, Feb. 22-Har. 22] ADAR 29 DAYS 


[-|nK560G 1 


CiTil 
loitk 




)«wuk 
llntk 


SABBATHS. FESTIVALS. FASTS 


PENTATEUCHAL 
PORTIONS 


PROPHETICAL 
PORTIONS 

nntDsn 


Feb. 




idtr 








22 

23 


M 
T 


1 

2 


New Moon enn '-n 'a 


Num. 28: 1-16 




24 


W 


3 








25 


Th 


4 








26 


F 


5 








27 


S 


6 


nonn 


Ex. 26; 1-27: 19 


I Kings 6: 26-6: 13 


28 


s 


7 








Mar. 












1 


M 


8 








2 


T 


9 








3 

4 
5 
6 


W 

Th 

P 

S 


10 
11 
12 
13 


FattolEtlhor inOM 01V 

1131 'fl ,nixn 


Ex. 83: 11-14; 34: 1-10 

J Bx. 27: 20-30: 10 
iDeut. 26: 17-19 


(18.66:6-66:8 
] Seph, none 

j I Sam. 16: 2-34 
1Sep/».16:l-34 


7 
8 


s 

M 


14 
15 


Purlm.Fea«tofE«ttiw* QniS 
ShMthan Purlm oniB ICnB^ 


Ex. 17: 8-16 




9 


T 


16 








10 


W 


17 








11 


Th 


18 








12 
13 


F 
S 


19 
20 


me 'B ,»vn o 


(Ex. 30: 11-34: 36 
1 Num. 19 


(Ezek. 36: 16-88 
ISepTL 36: 16-38 


14 


s 


21 








15 


M 


22 








16 


T 


23 








17 


W 


24 








18 


Th 


25 








19 

20 


F 
S 


26 

27 


^^^.^^np'fl.npDii^np.^ 


i Ex. 35: 1-40: 38 
1 Ex. 12: 1-20 


j Ezek. 46: 16-46:1^ 
1Sep?i.46:18-46:16 


21 


s 


28 








22 


M 


29 


pp niDD DV 







* The Book of Esther is read. 



12 



Digitized 



by Google 



1909, Mar. 23— April 21] 


NISAN 30 DAYS 


[)D'3 5669 




X 








PENTATEUCHAL 


PROPHETICAL 


Civil 

¥nnt)i 


Jewish 
Moatk 


SABBATHS, FESTIVALS. FASTS 


PORTIONS 


PORTIONS 


loaui 


TMk 








nVCHQ 


nnoan 


Mar. 




HiMI 










'23 


T 


1 


New Moon 


\inn"^ 


Num. 28: 1-16 




24 


W 


2 










25 


Th 


3 










26 


P 


4 










27 


S 


5 




K-^P^i 


Lev. 1:1-6: 26 


18.48:21-44:28 


28 


s 


6 










29 


M 


7 










30 


T 


8 










31 


W 


9 










April 














1 


Th 


10 










2 


P 


11 








r Mai. 8: 4-24; or 
Jer. 7: 21-8: 3; 


1 3 


8 


12 




Snan 'K' •iv 


Lev. 6: 1-8: 3C 


9: 22-28 
-Sfep/i. Mal.8:4-24 


!4 


S 


13 










■ 5 


M 


14 


IFattof theFlrttBoni 






) 


Dni3n norn 




Josh. 8: 6-7; 

6:2-6:1.27 
Seph, 5: 2— «: 1, 27 


6 


T 


15 


Panover 


HDDT 'K 


j Ex. 12: 21-51 
Num ?M- 1(1-2*^ 


7 


W 


16 


. PaMover. First Day of 'Omer 

1 nODT '3 


A^ LAUl. <60« All A>J 

Lev. 22: 26-23: 44 
Num.28:l&-^6 


ai Kingrs 23:1 (or 4) 
) -9; 21-26 


8 


Th 


17 


■^ 




Ex. 13: 1-16 
Num. 28: 19-26 




9 


P 


18 


-nriDH h)n 




Ex. 22: 24-23: 19 
' Num. 28: 19-25 




10 


8 


19 


* 




Ex. 33: 12-34: 26 
' Num. 28: 19-25 


( Ezek. 36: 37—37: 14 
{ Seph. 37: 1-14 


11 


S 


20 


^ 




j Num. 9: 1-14 
1 Num. 28: 19-25 




12 


M 


21 


Passover 


noBn 'T 


j Ex. 13: 17—15: 26 
1 Num. 28: 19-26 


II Sam. 22 


13 


T 


22 


Passover 


noQT 'n 


( Deut. 16: 1^16: 17 
(Num. 28: 19-25 


Is. 10: 32—12: 6 


14 


W 


23 




in nD« 






15 


Th 


24 










16 


F 


25 








( II Sam. 6: 1—7: 3 or 
< 7:17 
Seph, 6: 1-19 


17 


8 


26 


[K^nn '3D] ^j^Dcr 


Lev. 9: 1-11: 47 


18 


S 


27 










19 


M 


28 










20 


T 


29 










21 


W 


30 


New Moon 


Knn "n 'k 


Num. 28: 1-16 





* The Sonar of Sonffs is read. 
13 



Digitized by 



Google 



1906, April Sa-Ma^aOl lYAR 29 DAYS 


[-)«*K M68 


OiTtt 
■wtk 




Jnriik 

l<atk 


SABBATHS. FESTIVALS, FASTS 


PENTATEUCHAL 
PORTIONS 


PROPHETICAL 
PORTIONS 

nnoDn 


April 




ly« 








22 


Th 


1 


New Moon Bnn "IT '3 


Num. 28: 1-15 




23 


P 


2 








24 


8 


3 


riiVDi »»"*tn 


Lot. 12: 1-16- 33 


UKin88 7:S-20 


25 


S 


4 








26 


M 


5 








27 


T 


6 








28 


W 


7 








29 


Th 


8 








30 

May 
1 


F 
S 


9 
10 


D*m^p^ mo »inK 


Lev. 16:1^20:27 


'Alllos9:T-15;or 
Bzek. 22: 1-19 (or 
-1«) 

8<ph. Ezek.20:2 

. lorl)-20 


2 


S 


11 








3 


M 


12 








4 


T 


13 








5 


W 


14 


The Second Passover '•Xf nOS 






6 


Th 


15 








7 


F 


16 








8 


8 


17 


11DK 


Lev. 21: 1—24:28 


Ezek. 44: 15-31 


9 


S 


18 


33d Day oromer IDIM J'6 






10 


M 


19 








11 


T 


20 








12 


W 


21 








13 


Th 


22 








14 


F 


23 








15 


8 


24 


[tnnn 'aoi ^npnai '•yo ina 


Lev. 26: 1^7: 34 


Jer. 16: 19-17: 14 


16 


S 


25 








17 


M 


26 








18 


T 


27 








19 


W 


28 








20 


Th 


29 


pp 11B3 DV 







14 



Digitized 



by Google 



190e,Ma721-Junel9] SIVAN 30 DAYS 


[jVD 6669 


Ciril 


oftL 

TNk 


Jewiik 
■ontk 


SABBATHS, FESTIVALS, FASTS 


PENTATEUCHAL 
PORTIONS 

nvtns 


PROPHETICAL 
PORTIONS 

nntian 


MB7 




SiTU 








21 


S 


1 


New Moon gnn 'T 


Num. 28: 1-16 




22 


2 


lanoa 


Num. 1: 1—1: 20 


Hoe. 2: 1-22 


23 


s 


3 








24 


M 


4 








25 


T 


5 








26 
27 
28 
29 


W 

Th 

F 

S 


6 

7 
8 


Feut of Weeks nm3KTK 
Fewt of Weeks* nwUBH '3 


< Ex. 19: 1-aO: 26 
1 Num. 28: 26-81 
r Dout 15: 19—16: 17 
(Num. 28: 26^ 


Bzek.l:l-28;8:12 

JHab.8:l-19 
ISeph. 2: 20-3: 19 


9 


«&i 


Num. 4: 21-7: 89 


Judges 13: 2-25 


30 


s 


10 








31 


M 


11 








June 












1 


T 


12 








2 


W 


13 








3 


Th 


14 








4 


F 


15 








5 


S 


16 


inSrna 


Num. 8: 1—12: 16 


Zech. 2: li-i: T 


6 


s 


17 








7 


M 


18 








8 


T 


19 








9 


W 


20 








10 


Th 


21 








11 


F 


22 








12 


S 


23 


itmrm 'aoi n^ rh^ 


Num. 13: 1-15: 41 


Josh. 2 


13 


S 


24 








14 


M 


25 








15 


T 


26 








16 


W 


27 








17 
18 
19 


Th 
F 
S 


28 
29 
30 


New Moon BHn "n 'K ,n"ip 


1 Vum. 16: 1-18: 83 
1 Num. 28; 9-16 


(18.66 

< Seph. add 1 Sam. 

1 20:18-42 



* The Book of Ruth is read. 

15 uiyiiized by 



Goo^.v_ 



1900, June 20-JuIy 18] TAMMUZ 29 DAYS 


cnon 5669 


CiTil 




Jnridi 
llwU 


SABBATHS. FESTIVALS. FASTS 


PENTATEUCHAL 
PORTIONS 


PROPHETICAL 
PORTIONS 


June 




noma] 








20 


S 


1 


New Moon tHHn "^T '3 


Num. 28: 1-16 




21 


M 


2 








22 


T 


3 








23 


W 


4 








24 


Th 


5 








25 


F 


6 








26 


S 


7 


npn 


Num. 19: 1-22: 1 


Judfire8ll:l-«3 


27 


S 


8 






1 


28 


M 


9 








29 


T 


10 








30 


W 


11 








July 
1 


Th 


12 








2 


F 


13 








3 


S 


14 


Pb 


Num. 23: 2—26: 9 


Micah6:(^-6:8 


4 


s 


15 








5 
6 

7 


M 
T 

W 


16 
17 
18 


S Fast of Tammuz 

1 nonn nw tw2^ div 


Ex. 82: 11-14; 84: 1-10 


j Is. 66: 6—56: 8 
1 Seph, none 


8 


Th 


19 








9 


F 


20 








10 


S 


21 


Dm^B 


Num. 26: 10-80: 1 


Jer.l:l-2:8 


11 


S 


22 








12 


M 


23 








13 


T 


24 








14 


W 


25 








15 


Th 


26 








16 
17 


F 
S 


27 
28 


i^nnn 'no] ^i?ddi moo 


Num. 80:^-36: 13 


j Jer. 2: 4-28; 8: 4 

1 SepK 2: 4-28; 4: 1. 2 


18 


s 


29 


pp nis5 Di^ 







16 



jOOglc 



1909, July 19-Aug;. 17] AB SO DAYS 


[3X5600 


CiTil 
loalk 

Jnly 


TmJc 


Jniib 
■wtk 


SABBATHS. FESTIVALS. FASTS 


PENTATEUCHAL 
PORTIONS 


PROPHETICAL 
PORTIONS 

nnoDn 




U 








19 


M 


1 


New Moon tn.1 "1 


Num. 88: 1-15 




20 


T 


2 








21 


W 


3 








22 


Th 


4 




• 




23 


F 


5 








24 


S 


6 


prn '^ .Dnan 


Deut.l:l--8:SB 


18.1:1-87 


25 


s 


7 








26 

27 
28 
29 


M 
T 
W 
Th 


8 
9 

10 
11 


FtstofAb* a«anwnDiv 


(Deut.4:25-40 

1 Bx!lK'-14;W:l-10 


Morning: 
Jer. 8: 18-9:23 
Aftemonn: 
18.55:6-56:8 

SepK Hob. U: 2-10; 
L Mioah 7:18-90 


30 


¥ 


12 








31 


S 


13 


\Dn2 ^ ,pnn«i 


Deut. 8:28-7: 11 


Is. 40: 1-S6 


Aug. 

1 


s 


14 








2 


M 


15 


3K3 iB^ ntron 






3 


T 


16 








4 


W 


17 








5 


Th 


18 








6 


F 


19 








7 


S 


20 


3pr 


Deut.7:12-ll:25 


18.49:14-51:8 


8 


s 


21 








9 


M 


22 








10 


T 


23 








11 


W 


24 








12 


Th 


25 








13 


F 


26 








14 


8 


27 


[tnnn ao] nx-^ 


Deut. 11:28—16:17 


la. M: 11-65: 5 


15 


S 


28 








16 


M 


29 


pp 11DD DV 






17 


T 


30 


New Moon KHn ^T 'K 


Num. 28: 1-lB 





♦ The Book of Lamentations is read. 
17 



mzeu u, Google 



1909,Aufir.l8-Sep.l5] ELLUL 29 DAYS 


6l^K6660 




omL 






PENTATEUCHAL 


PROPHETICAL 


Ciril 


Jeviib 

llAntk 


SABBATHS, FESTIVALS, FASTS 


PORTIONS 


PORTIONS 


Monui 


VMk 


■onu 




ni»Ens 


nnasn 


Aug. 




lUnl 








18 


w 


1 


New Moon* BHn 'IT '3 






19 


Th 


2 








20 


F 


3 






1 


21 


S 


4 


D'CBIC 


Deut 16: 18—21:0 


Is. 51: 13-52: IS 


22 


s 


5 








23 


M 


6 








24 


T 


7 






j 


25 


W 


8 








26 


Th 


9 








27 


F 


10 








28 


8 


11 


KVn»3 


Deut. 21: 10—25: 19 


Is. 54: 1-10 


29 


S 


12 






j 


30 


M 


13 








31 


T 


14 






1 


Sep. 










1 


1 


W 


15 






) 


2 


Th 


16 








3 


F 


17 








4 


S 


18 


Kun »3 


Deut26:l-2»:8 


18.60 


5 


s 


19 








6 


M 


20 








7 


T 


21 








8 


W 


22 


. 




1 


9 


Th 


23 




• 




10 


F 


24 








11 
12 


S 

s 


25 


n^n DUV3 


Deut.2S:»-81:80 


18.61:10-63:9 


26 


Sellhot* flin'^d^ D'D'DBTD 






13 


M 


27 








14 


T 


28 








15 


W 


29 


n"i yv> 







* The Sephfurdim 8ay Sellhot during the whole month of EUul. 
18 O 



DIEECTOEY OP JEWISH NATIONAL OBGANIZA- 
TIONS IN THE UNITED STATES 

[An asterisk (*) indicates that no response was received] 

ALLIANCE ISRAELITE UNIVERSELLB 

Org. May, 1860. Office : 160 Nassau, New York City 
Branches : Baltimore, Md. ; Boston, Mass., 2 ; Blmira, N. Y. ; Hoboken, 
N. J. ; Jersey City, N. J. ; New York City ; Philadelphia, Pa. ; Worcester, 
Mass. 



AMERICAN FEDERATION OP THE JEWISH TERRITORIAL 

ORGANIZATION 

(ITO) 

Org. April, 1906. Office: New York City 

E/XECDTiYB Committee: Chairman, Cyrus L. Sulzberger, 516 West 

End Av., N. Y. C. ; Sec. Goodman Lipkind, N. Y. C. ; Daniel Guggenheim, 

Louis Loeb, Bernard G. Richards, Herman Rosenthal, all of N. Y. C. ; 

Solomon Soils Cohen, Mayer Sulzberger, both of Phila., Pa. 

Branches : Baltimore, Md. ; New York City ; Philadelphia, Pa. 



THE AMERICAN JEWISH COMMITTEE 

Org. Nov. 11, 1906. Office : 356 Second Av., New York City 

For report, see pp. 237-258. 



AMERICAN JEWISH HISTORICAL SOCIETY 
Org. 1892. Office: 631 W. 123d, New York City 

Sixteenth Annual Meeting, May 18, 1908, New York City. 

Members, 265. 

Has issued sixteen volumes of " Publications.'* Maintains a collection 
of Books, Manuscripts, and Historical Objects in its Room in the Building 
of the Jewish Theological Seminary, 531 W. 123d, N. Y. C. 

Officers : Pres., Cyrus Adler, Washington, D. C. ; Vlce-Pres. : Simon 
W. Rosendale, Albany, N. Y. ; David Philipson. Cincinnati, O. ; Charles 
Gross, Cambridge, Mass. ; Richard J. H. Gottheil, New York City ; Treas., 
N. Taylor Phillips, N. Y. C. ; Curator, Leon Hflhner, N. Y. C. ; Cor. Sec, 
Max J. Kohler, 42 Broadway, N. Y. C. ; Rec. Sec, Herbert Friedenwald, 
866 Second Av., N. Y. C. 

Executive Council : The Officers, and Charles J. Cohen, Phila., Pa. ; 
Henry Cohen, Galveston, Tex. ; Albert M. Priedenberg, N. Y. C. ; Charles 
I. Hoffman. Newark, N. J. : Jacob H. Hollander, Baltimore, Md. ; Joseph 
Jacobs, N. Y. C. ; J. Bunford Samuel, Phila., Pa. ; Judge Mayer Sulzberger, 
Phila., Pa. ; Simon Wolf, Washington, D. C. ; Oscar S. Straus, Washington, 
D. C, ex bfficio, as past President of the Society. 



Digitized 



by Google 



20 AMERICAN JEWISH YEAR BOOK 

ARBEITER RING 

(The Workmen's Circle) 

Org. Sept. 4, 1900. Opfick : 24 Rutgers, New York City 

Eightli Annual Meeting, May 7-10, 1908, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Members, 16,700; 

Branches, 208. 

Officers : Pres., Joseph Weinberg, N. Y. C. ; Treas., Abraham Epstein, 
N. Y. C. ; Sec, Jehlel Welntraub, 24 Rutgers, N .Y. C. 

Directors : The Officers, and Bernard Spinard, Harry Z. Levine, Isaac 
Cohen, Samuel Savetzky, Abraham Walltzky, Harris Sack. 

Branches : California : San Francisco ; Colorado : Denver ; Connec- 
ticut : Ansonia, Bridgeport, Hartford, Meriden, New Britain, New Haven, 
New London, Norwalk, Norwich. South Norwalk, Stamford, Waterbury ; 
District of Columbia : Washington ; Delaware : Wilmington ; Georgia : 
Atlanta ; Illinois : Chicago ; Indiana : Indianapolis, South Bend : Iowa : 
Des Moines, Sioux City ; Kentucky : Newport ; Maryland : Baltimore ; 
Massachusetts : Boston, Brockton. Chelsea, Haverhill, Lawrence, Maiden, 
Worcester ; Michigan : Detroit ; Minnesota : Minneapolis, St. Paul ; Mis- 
souri : Kansas City, St. Joseph, St. Louis ; Nebraska : Omaha ; New Jersey : 
Atlantic City, Bayonne, Camden, Carteret. Elizabeth, Hoboken, Jersey City, 
Newark, Passaic, Paterson, Perth Amboy, Plainfleld, Trenton, Vlneland, 
West Hoboken ; New York : Albany, Brooklyn, Buffalo, GloversvUle, Kings- 
ton, Newburgh, New Rochelle, New York, Patchogue, Rochester, Schenec- 
tady, Syracuse, Tarrytown, Troy, Utica; Ohio: Cincinnati, Cleveland, 
Columbus, Toledo ; Pennsylvania : Altoona, Butler, Easton, Harrlsburg, 
Northumberland, Philadelphia, Pittsburg, Scranton, Wilkes-Barre ; Rhode 
Island : Providence ; Texas : San Antonio ; Virginia : Richmond ; Wisconsin : 
Milwaukee ; Canada : Montreal, Winnipeg. 

THE BARON DE HIRSCH FUND 
Inc. March, 1890. Office : 42 Broadway, New York City 
The activities of the Fund fall under the following heads : 
I. Reception and distribution of immigrants. 
II. English education : Day and evening classes for Immigrants. 

III. Mechanical education. 

IV. Agricultural and Industrial work : Controls the Woodbine Land 

AND Improvement Company ; establishes and aids colonies and 
settlements ; and affords an opportunity for an agricultural 
education. 
Branches : Baltimore, Md. ; Boston, Mass. ; Philadelphia, Pa. ; Pitts- 
burg, Pa. ; St. Louis, Mo. 

Officers : Pres., Eugene S. Benjamin, 440 Lafayette ; Vlce-Pres., 
Jacob H. Schlff ; Treas., Murry Guggenheim ; Hon. Sec., Max J. Kohler, 
42 Broadway ; all of New York City. 

Executive Committee : The Officers, and Abraham Abraham, Brook- 
lyn, N. Y. ; Nathan Bljur, N. Y. C. ; Abram I. Elkus, N. Y. C. ; S. S. 
Fleisher, Phila., Pa. ; William B. Hackenburg, Phlla., Pa. ; Henry Rice, 
N. Y. C. ; S. G. Rosenbaum, N. Y. C. ; Louis Slegbert, N. Y. C. ; Mayer 
Sulzberger, Phlla., Pa. 

Agents : Gen. Agt., H. L. Sabsovich ; Ass*t Agt., Louis J. Cohn. 



THE CENTRAL CONFERENCE OF AMERICAN RABBIS 
. Org. July 9, 1889 

Nineteenth Annual Convention, July 1-8, 1908, Frankfort, Mich. 

Members, 201. 

Has issued seventeen volumes of Its " Year Book " ; the " Union Prayer 
Book " ; the " Union Hymnal " ; the " Union Haggadah *' ; and " A Set 
of Holiday Sermons," and various other publications. 



Digitized 



by Google 



DROPSIE COLLEGE 21 



Officers : Hon. Pres., Kaufmann Kobler, Cincinnati, Obio ; Pres., 
Dayid Philipson, Beechwood Ay., Rose Hill, Cincinnati, Ohio; Vice-Pres., 
Max Heller, New Orleans, La. ; Treas., Charles 8. Levi, Peoria, 111. ; Rec. 
Sec, David Lefkowlts, 242 Lexington Ay. ; Cor. Sec, Julian Morgenstern, 
3450 Highland Place, Cincinnati, Ohio. 

Directors : Henry Berkowitz, Phila., Pa. ; H. G. Enelow, Louiayille, 
Ky. ; William H. Greenburg, Dallas, Tex. ; Moses J. Gries, Cleveland, O. ; 
Adolph Guttmacher, Baltimore, Md. ; S. Hirschberg, Milwaukee, Wis. ; 
Dayid Marx, Atlanta, Ga. ; Morris Newfleld, Birmingham, Ala. ; I. L. 
Rypins, St. Paul, Minn.; Samuel Scbulman, New York City; Joseph Stols, 
Chicago, 111. 

COUNCIL OF JEWISH WOMEN 
Org. Sept., 1893. Office : 448 Central Pk., W., New York City 

Fourth Triennial Convention, Dec 5-12, 1905, Chicago, 111. 

Members, 10.000. 

Sections. 77 : Senior Sections, 57 ; Junior Sections, 20. 

The national body gives financial support to Its National Committee on 
Immigrant Aid. 

Thie Sections engage in philanthropic and Jewish educational and 
religious work. 

Officers : Pres., Pauline H. Rosenberg (Mrs. Hugo), Hotel Schenley, 
Pittsburg, Pa.; Hon. Pres., Hannah O. Solomon (Mrs. Henry), 4406 Michi- 
gan Av., Chicago, 111.; First Vice-Pres., Lizzie Barbe (Mrs. Martin), 
4230 Grand Blvd., Chicago, 111.; Second Vice-Pres., Mellda Pappe (Mrs. 
Julius), 1501 Nebraska, Sioux City, Iowa; Treas., Rebecca Judah (Mrs. 
J. B.), 1528 Everett Av., Louisville, Ky. ; Sec, Mrs. Eli Strouse, 1617 
Madison Av., Baltimore, Md. ; Auditor, Mrs. Cesar Mlsch, 601 Elmwood 
Av., Providence, R. I. 

Executive Secretary: Sadie American, 448 Central Park, W., New 
York City. 

Directors (1902-1908) : Mrs. Max Landsbenr, Rochester, N. Y. ; Mrs. 
M. L. Margolis, Cincinnati, Ohio; Mrs. M. B. Schwab, Cleveland, Ohio; 
Mrs. Hattie M. Sloss. San Francisco, Cal. ; Miss Goldberg, Jefferson, Tex. 
(1905-1911); Mrs. E. Eckhouse, Indianapolis, Ind. ; Mrs. Harry Hart, 
Chicago, 111. ; Mrs. Julius Andrews, Cambridge, Mass. ; Mrs. Ben. Lowen- 
stein, Cincinnati, Ohio ; Miss Hettie Abraham, National Farm School, Bucks 
Co., Pa. 

Sections : Albany, N. Y. ; Alexandria, Va. ; Ashevllle, N. C. ; Atlanta, 
Ga. ; Baltimore. Md. ; Birmingham, Ala. ; Boston, Mass. ; Bradford, Pa. ; 
Brooklyn. N. Y. ; Buffalo, N. Y. ; Charleston, S. C. ; Chicago, 111. ; Cin- 
cinnati, O. ; Cleveland. O. ; Colorado Springs, Colo. : Dayton. O. ; Elmira, 
N. Y. ; Fort Worth, Tex. ; Greenville, Miss. ; Indianapolis, Ind. ; Kansas 
City, Mo. ; Lafayette, Ind. ; Louisville, Ky. ; Macon, Ga. ; Marlon, O. ; 
Minneapolis, Minn. ; Mobile, Ala. ; Montgomery, Ala. ; Nashville, Tenn. ; 
New Orleans, La.; New York City, N. Y. ; Norfolk, Va. ; Oakland, Cal.; 
Oil City, Pa. : Pensacola, Pla. ; Philadelphia. Pa. ; Pittsburg, Pa. ; Port- 
land, ()re. : Providence, R. I. ; Richmond, Va. : Rochester, N. Y. : San 
Antonio, Tex. : San Francisco, Cal. ; Savannah, Ga. ; Seattle, Wash. ; 
Selma, Ala. : Sioux City, la. ; Sumter, S. C. : Syracuse, N. Y. ; Terre Haute, 
Ind. ; Toledo, O. ; Toronto, Can. ; Trl-City, Davenport, Moline, Rock 
Island ; Tyler, Tex. ; Washington, D. C. : Worcester, Mass. ; Youngstown, O. 

DROPSIE COLLEGE FOR HEBREW AND COGNATE 

LEARNING 

Org. Sept 17, 1895. Inc. Mny 20, 1907. Temp. Office: 316 Race, 

Philadelphia, Pa. 

OvriCERS : Pres., Cyrus Adier, Washington, D. C. ; Vice-Pres., Judge 

Mayer Sulzberger, 1303 Girard Av. ; Treas., Oscar B. Teller ; Sec, David 

Sulzberger, 816 Race ; all of Philadelphia, Pa. 



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22 AMERICAN JEWISH YEAR BOOK 



BOABD OF Governors : The Officers, and Harry Frledenwald, Baltimore, 
Md. ; Louis Gerstley, William B. Hackenburg, Bphraim Lederer, all of 
Phila. ; Louis Marshall, N. Y. C. ; S. Schechter, N. Y. C. ; Oscar S. Straus, 
Washington, D. C. ; Paul M. Warburg, N. Y. C. ; Edwin Wolf, Phila., Pa. 

THE EDUCATIONAL LEAGUE 

FOR THE HIGHER EDUCATION OF ORPHANS 

Org. 1896. Office : Jewish Orphan Asylum, Cleveland, O. 

Twelfth Annual Meeting, July 12, 1908, Cleveland, O. 

Members, 1645. 

Officers : Pres., Moses J. Gries, Cleveland, O. ; Vlce-Pres., Nathan 
Cohn, for Tenn. ; Adolph Freund, for Mich. ; Milton R. Hart, for 111. ; 
Emil Joseph, for Northern Ohio ; Louis S. Levi, for Southern Ohio : Ernest 
Morris, for Colo. ; Treas., S. Wolfenstein, Cleveland, O. ; Sec., Alfred A. 
Benesch, 620 Society for Savings Bldg., Cleveland, O. 

Governors : Selma E. Althelmer, St Louis, Mo. ; Herman August, 
Cleveland, O. ; Myrtle W. Baer, Milwaukee, Wis. ; Henry Berkowits, Phila., 
Pa. ; Garfield A. Berllnsky, Cincinnati, O. ; Amelia Buchman, Cleveland, 
O. ; Mrs. Rosalie L. Cohen, Columbus, O. ; Mrs. S. H. Einstein, Cleveland, 
O. ; Morris H. Flarshelm, Louisville, Ky. ; Nathan Glicksman, Milwaukee, 
Wis. ; Isidore Glueck, St. Louis, Mo. ; Miriam D. Goldman, Detroit, Mich. ; 
Henry Greenebaum, Chicago, 111. ; Simon Greenebaum, Cincinnati, O. ; 
Louis Grossman, Cincinnati, O. ; Mrs. Edwin Haas, Atlanta, Ga. ; Minnie 
Halle, Cleveland, O. ; Mrs. Michael W. Heller, Cleveland, O. ; Sol. S. Kiser, 
Indianapolis, Ind. ; S. J. Kornhauser, Cleveland, O. ; Emil W. Leipziger, 
Terre Haute, Ind. ; Elsa Littman, Cleveland, O. ; Meyer Lovitch, Paducah, 
Ky. ; Louis D. Marks, Cincinnati, O. ; Martin A. Marks, Cleveland, O. ; 
Charles F. Morltz, Montgomery, Ala. ; Beatrice Moss, Cleveland, O. ; Bmll 
Nathan, Memphis, Tenn. ; John Neethe, Galveston, Tex. ; Mrs. Jacob 
Ottenheimer, Cincinnati, O. ; Sidney Pritz, Cincinnati, O. ; Anna C. Roth, 
Toledo, O. ; B. A. Schwartzenberg, Cleveland, O. : S. W. Slawitzky, Chicago, 
111. ; Mrs. Charles A. Stix, St. Louis, Mo. ; Mrs. Aaron Waldhelm, St. Louis, 
Mo. ; Henry Wallenstein, Wichita, Kansas ; Eugene F. Westheimer, St. 
Joseph, Mo. ; Louis Wolsey, Cleveland, O. 

The members are distributed as follows : Alabama : Demopolis, Mont- 
gomery, Opellka, Selma; Colorado: Cripple Creek, Denver, LeadvlUe, 
Pueblo ; District of Columbia ; Washington ; Illinois ; Champaign, Chi- 
cago, Rochelle ; Indiana : Evansville, Goshen, Indianapolis, Lafayette, 
Madison, Marion, Mt. Vernon, Muncie, Terre Haute ; Iowa : Des Moines, 
Oskaloosa ; Kentucky : Louisville, Maysville, Newport, Paducah, Vance- 
burg ; Louisiana : Donaldsonville, New Orleans, Shreveport ; Maryland : 
Baltimore, Cumberland ; Michigan : Cadillac, Detroit, Gaylord, Houghton, 
Kalamazoo, Saginaw ; Minnesota : St Paul, Winona ; Mississlnpi : Co- 
lumbus, Greenville, Gunnison ; Missouri ; Farmington, Kansas City ; 
Louisiana, Mexico City, St Joseph, St Louis ; Montana : Helena ; Ne- 
braska : Beatrice, Grand Island ; New Jersey : ■ Jersey City ; New York : 
Brooklyn, Buffalo, New York City ; North Dakota : Fargo ; Ohio : Akron, 
Cincinnati, Cleveland, Coldwater, Colllnwood, Columbus, Dayton, Defiance, 
Eaton, Fremont, Lima, Mt. Gilead, Ottawa, Toledo, Youngstown ; Pennsyl- 
vania : Allegheny, Philadelphia ; South Carolina : Sumter ; Tennessee : 
Chattanooga, Knoxville, Memphis, Nashville ; Texas : Dallas, Galveston, 
San Antonio, Victoria ; Utah-: Salt Lake City ; West Virginia : Charles- 
ton ; Wisconsin : Ashland, Milwaukee ; Canada : Montreal ; Germany : 
Wttrzburg. 

FEDERATION OF AMERICAN ZIONISTS 
Org. 1897. Office: 204 E. Broadway, New York City 
Eleventh Annual Convention, July 10-15, 1908, Atlantic City, N. J. 
Number of Shekel payers, 16,892. 
Societies, 210. 



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FEDERATION OF AMERICAN ZIONISTS 23 



The Federation publishes leaflets, pamphlets, and brochures ; also " The 
Maccabaean " is issued under its supervision. 

Ofpicbrs : Pres., Harry Friedenwald, Baltimore, Md. ; Vice-Pres., J. L. 
Magnes, N. Y. C. ; Sec, Joseph Jasin, Fort Worth, Tex. ; Treas., Henry 
Jackson, Pittsburg, Pa. 

EIXECCTivB Committee : H. Epstein ; I. Friedlaender ; R. Gottheil ; 
li. D. Livinsrston ; I. Mai tin ; A. M. Radin ; D. Schneeberg, all of N. Y. C. ; 
Louis H. Levin, Baltimore, Md. ; N. Prensky, Brooklyn, N. Y. ; T. Isaacs, 
Cincinnati, O. ; H. Newstad, Stamford, Conn. ; B. L. Gordon, Phila., Pa. ; 
S. Shapinsky, Louisville, Ky. 

'Chairmen of Committees: On Yiddish Publication, S. Abel; on Pro- 
paganda, A. H. Fromenson ; on Organization, S. Joseph ; on National Fund, 
Ellas Margolis ; on Ehiglish Publication, Louis Lipsky ; on '* The Macca- 
baean,*' D. H. Lleberman ; on Palestine, E. W. Lewin-Epstein ; on the Jewish 
Colonial Trust, P. Blausteln, all of N. Y. C. ; on Education, J. H. Green- 
stone, Phila., Pa. 

Societies : Alabama : Birmingham, Montgomery, 2 ; Arizona : Bisbee ; 
Arkansas : Little Rock ; California : Los Angeles, 3, Oakland, San Diego, 
San Francisco, 2 ; Colorado : Denver, 6 ; Connecticut : Ansonia, Bridgeport, 
Hartford, 2, New Britain, New Haven, Stamford, Waterbury ; District of 
Columbia : Washington ; Florida : Jacksonville ; Georgia : Atlanta, 2, 
Augusta, 2, Savannah, 3 ; Illinois : Chicago ; Indiana : Indianapolis ; Kan- 
sas : Leavenworth ; Kentucky : Louisville, Newport ; Louisiana : New Or- 
leans ; Maine : Auburn, Bangor, 2, Lewiston, Portland ; Maryland : Balti- 
more, 5, Hagerstown ; Massachusetts : Boston, 7, Brockton, Cambridge, 
Fitchburg, 2, Haverhill, 2, Holyoke, 2, New Bedford, Salem, Worcester, 
2 : Minnesota : Chisholm. Minneapolis, 3, St. Paul, 2 ; Michigan : Detroit, 
2 ; Mississippi : Rolling Forks, Vlcksburg ; Missouri : Kansas City, 2, St. 
Louis, 4 ; North Carolina : Wilmington ; North Dakota : Fargo, Grand 
Forks ; New Hampshire : Manchester, 2 ; New Jersey : Alliance, Atlantic City, 
Camden, Jersey City, 3, Norma, Paterson, 2, Perth Amboy, New Bruns- 
wick, Newark, Trenton, 2, Woodbine, 2 ; New York : Albany, Bedford 
Station, Brooklyn, 5, Buffalo, 2, Mmira, 2, Lake Placid, Newburgh, New 
York, 19, Rochester, 6, Sag Harbor, Syracuse, 3, Troy, 3, Watertown ; Ohio : 
Bellaire, Cincinnati, 5, Cleveland, 4, Columbus, Dayton, Lorain, Youngs- 
town, 3 ; Oregon : Portland ; Pennsylvania : Bradford, Butler, Doylestown, 
Greensburg, Harrisburg, Philadelphia, 6, Pittsburg, 2, Punxsutawney, 
Scranton, 2, Sharon, Shenandoah, Washington ; Rhode Island : Pawtucket, 
Providence, 2, Woonsocket, 2 ; Tennessee : Chattanooga, KnoxviUe ; Texas : 
Austin, Dallas, 2, Fort Worth, 2, Houston, 2, San Antonio, Terrell, Tyler, 
Waco ; Vermont : Burlington, 2 ; Virginia : Lynchburg, Newport News, 
Norfolk, 2, Portsmouth ; Washington : Bellington, Seattle, 2, Spokane. 

SOCIALIST ORGANIZATION POALE-ZION OF AMERICA 

(Affiliated with the Federation of American Zionists) 

Org. Dec. 21, 1904. Office: 63 Avenue A, New York City 

Third Annual Convention, Dec, 1907, Boston, Mass. 

Members, 1500. 

Branches, 41. in the United States and Canada. 

Issues a weekly paper, " Der Yiddisher KSmpfer," maintains a publish- 
ing society, "Verlag Kftmpfer," National Fuijd, and Bank Bureaus, and a 
Bezalel organization. 

General Secretary : Hayim Fineman, 53 Avenue A, N. Y. C. 

Branches : Albany, N. Y. ; Baltimore, Md. ; Bangor, Me. ; Boston, 
Mass. ; Bridgeport, Conn. ; Brockton, Mass. ; Buffalo, N. Y. ; Cambridge, 
Mass. ; Chicago, 111., 3 ; Cincinnati, O. ; Cleveland, O. ; Columbus, O. ; 
Denver, Colo. ; Detroit, Mich. ; Hamilton, Ont. ; Hartford, Conn. ; Kansas 
City, Mo. ; Lornn, Mass. ; Milwaukee, Wis. ; Minneapolis, Minn. ; Montreal, 
Can. ; New Haven, Conn. ; Newark, N. J. ; Newport, Ky. ; New York City, 
2; Omaha, Neb.; Passaic, N. J.; Paterson, N. J.; Philadelphia, Pa.; 



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24 AMERICAN JEWISH YEAR BOOK 



Pittsburg, Pa.; Providence, E. I.; Rochester, N. Y. ; St Louis, Mo. 
Syracuse, N. Y. ; Thatford, Me. ; Toledo, O. ; Toronto, Can. ; Troy, N. Y. 
Washington, D. C. ; Winnipeg, Can. 



♦ INDEPENDENT ORDER AHAWAS ISRAEL 
Org. 1893. Office: Germania Bank Bldg., 190 Bowery, New York City 

Sixteenth Annual Convention, March 17, 1907, Brooklyn. N. Y. 

Members, 16,963. 

Lodges, 132. 

Officers : Grand Master, Simon Friedman, 209 B. 124th, N. Y. C. : 
First Deputy Grand Master, Louis Morris. Philadelphia, Pa. ; Second 
Deputy Grand Master, Morris Lelnkram, N. Y. C. ; Grand Treas., Samuel 
Hauben, N. Y. C. ; Grand Sec, L. Herman, 190 Bowery (Germania Bk. 
Bldg.), N. Y. C. 

Lodges : Albany, N. Y. ; Baltimore, Md. ; Bayonne, N. J. ; Brooklyn, 
N. Y. ; Chester, Pa. ; Cleveland. O. ; Denver. Colo. ; Bllzabeth, N. J. ; 
Hartford, Conn. ; Jersey City. N. J. ; Louisville, Ky. ; Newark. N. J. ; 
New Haven, Conn. ; New York City ; Norma, N. J. ; Paterson, N. J. ; Phila- 
delphia, Pa. ; Providence, R. I. ; Sag Harbor, L. I. : Scranton, Pa. ; Utica, 
N. Y. ; Waterbury, Conn. ; Willimantic, Conn. ; Wilmington, Del. ; Wood- 
bine, N. J. ; York, Pa. 



♦ INDEPENDENT ORDER BRIS ACHIM 
Grand Master, Samuel Weis, N. Y. C. 



INDEPENDENT ORDER BRITH ABRAHAM 
Org. Feb. 7. 1887. Office: 87 7th, New York City 

Twenty-second Annual Convention, May 24-26, 1908, New York City. 
. Members. 113,187. 

Lodges, 48p. 

Officers : Grand Master. Max Stem, 279 B. 3d, N. Y. C. : First Deputy 
Grand Master, Max L. Hollander: Second Deputy Grand Master, Henry 
Steer, both of Brooklyn ; Grand Sec, Jacob Schoen, 37 7th ; Grand Treas., 
Wolf Sprung. 262 Rivington ; both of N. Y. C. ; Endowment Treas.. Henry 
Kalchheim, Brooklyn : Counsel to the Order. Leopold Moschcowita, N. Y. C. 

Lodges : Albany, N. Y., 2 ; Allentown. Pa. : Ansonia, Conn. ; Attleboro, 
Mass. : Baltimore, Md., 6 ; Bayonne, N. J. : Binghamton, N. Y. : Birminsr- 
ham. Ala. ; Boston, Mass., 36 ; Braddock. Pa. ; Brockton, Mass. ; Brooklyn, 
N. Y.. 24; Buffalo. N. Y. : Cnmbridge. Mass., 2: Carmel, N. .T. ; Carteret, 
N. J. ; Chelsea, Mass., 10 ; Chicago, 111.. 16 ; Cincinnati. Ohio, 3 : Cleve- 
land, Ohio, 4 ; Collinsville, Mass. : Columbus, Ohio ; Concord. N. H. ; 
Conshohocken. Pa. : Corona, L. I. : Denver, Colo., 2 : Detroit, Mich. ; Bliza- 
bethport, N. J. ; BImira. N. Y. : Fall River, Mass.. 5 ; Glen's Falls, N. Y. ; 
Harrisburg, Pa. ; Hartford, Conn., 3 : Haverhill, Mass., 2 : Holyoke, Mass. ; 
Homestead, Pa. ; Indiana Harbor, Ind. ; Indianapolis, Ind. ; Jersey City, 
N. J., 2 ; Kansas City, Mo. ; Kingston, N. Y. ; Lawrence, Mass., 2 ; Louis- 
ville. Ky. : Lynn, Mass., 2 ; Maiden, Mass., 2 ; Manchester, N. H., 2 ; 
Meriden, Conn. ; Milwaukee, Wis., 3 ; Minneapolis, Minn. ; Morristown, 
N. J., 2; Newark, N. J., 6; New Bedford, Mass.; New Brighton, S. I.; 
New Haven, Conn., 3 ; Newport, R. I. ; Newport News, Va. ; New Rochelle, 
N. Y. ; New York City, 159 ; Norfolk, Va. ; North Adams, Mass. ; North- 



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INDEPENDENT ORDER FREE SONS OP ISRAEL 25 

ampton, Mass. : Norwich, Conn. ; Passaic, N. J., 2 ; Paterson, N. J., 2 ; 
Phfladelpbia, Pa., 33 ; Pittston, Pa. ; Portland, Me. ; Portland, Ore. ; 
Portsmouth, Va. ; Pottstown, Pa. ; Poughkeepsie, N. Y. ; Providence, R. I., 
7 ; Quincy, Mass. ; Reading, Pa. ; Rochester, N. Y., 2 ; Rosenhayn, N. J. ; 
Sag Harbor, L. I. ; St. Joseph, Mo. ; St Louis, Mo., 8 ; St. Paul. Minn., 2 ; 
Salem, Mass., 2 ; Schenectady, N. Y. ; Scranton, Pa., 4 ; Someryille, Mass. ; 
South Bethlehem, Pa. ; Springfield, Mass., 2 ; Stoughton, Mass. ; Syracuse, 
N. Y., 2 ; Torrington, Conn. ; Troy, N. Y., 2 ; Utica, N. Y., 2 ; Washington, 
D. C. ; Waterbury, Conn. ; West Orange, N. J. ; Wilkes-Barre, Pa., 2 ; Wood- 
bine, N. J. ; Woonsocket, R. I. ; Worcester, Mass., 3 ; Yonkers, N. Y. ; York, 
Pa. 

INDEPENDENT ORDER BRITH SHOLOM 
Org. Feb. 25, 1905. Office: 612 S. 5th, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Fourth Annual Convention, June 7, 1908, Baltimore, Md. 

Members, 11,320. 

Lodges, 101. 

Officers : Grand Master, Benjamin F. Miller, 227 Church ; First 
Deputy Grand Master, Samuel Berkowitz ; Second Deputy Grand Master, 
Benjamin N. Berman ; Grand Secretary, Martin O. Levy, 1323 S. 6th; 
Financial Secretary, Samuel J. Blumberg; Grand Treas., S. C. Kcaus ; 
E!ndowment Treas., L. S. Rubinsohn ; Counselor of the Order, Joseph L 
Kun ; all of Phila., Pa. 

Lodges : AUentown, Pa. ; Baltimore, Md., 9 ; Burlington, N. J. ; 
Columbus, O. ; Harrisburg, Pa. ; Hartford, Conn. ; Newark, N. J., 3 ; 
Passaic, N. J. ; Philadelphia, Pa., 76 ; Providence, R. I., 3 ; Scranton, Pa., 
2 ; Trenton, N. J. ; Woodbine, N. J. 



INDEPENDENT ORDER FREE SONS OF ISRAEL 
Org. Jan. 18, 1849. Office : 21 W. 124th, New York City 

Eighth Quinquennial Convention, May 26, 1907, Atlantic City, N. J. 

Members, 10,950. 

Lodges, 102. 

Districts, 2. 

Publishes a monthly, '* Independent Order Free Sons of Israel." 

Officers : Grand Master, M. S. Stem, 2013 Fifth Av. ; First Deputy 
Grand Master, S. Iloltheimer; Second Deputy Grand Master. AdOlph 
Finkenberg. all of N. Y. C. ; Third Deputy Grand Master, Adolph Pike, 
Chicago, 111. ; Grand Sec, Abraham Hafer, 1161 Madison Av. ; Grand 
Treas., Louis Franken thaler ; Chairman Committee on E)ndowment, Henry 
Lichtig; Counsel to the Order, Samuel B. Hamburger, all of N. Y. C. 

Executive Committee : J. L. Hartenstein, N. Y. C. ; Wm. Bookheim, 
AIlMiny, N. Y. ; Julius Harburger ; Henry Jacobs ; Maurice S. Keller ; all 
of N. Y. C. ; Isaac A. Loeb, Chicago, 111. ; M. S. MeyerhoflC, I»hlladelphia, 
Pa. ; Chas. M. Obst, Boston, Mass. ; Raphael Rosenberger, N. Y. C. ; Henry 
M. Shabad, Chicago, 111.; Philip Stein, Chicago, 111.; Herman Stiefel, 
N. Y. C. 

Districts: I. Territory: Connecticut, Massachusetts, New Jersey, 
New York, and Rhode Island. II. Territory : Illinois, Kansas, Minnesota, 
Missouri, and Wisconsin. 

Lodges : Albany, N. Y. ; Amsterdam, N. Y. ; Atlanta, Ga. ; Baltimore, 
Md. ; Boston, Mass., 2 ; Brooklyn, N. Y., 4 ; BuflCalo. N. Y. ; Chicago, Iil., 
12; Cincinnati, O., 2; Cleveland, O., 2; Dallas, Tex.; Detroit, Mich.; 
Greenville, Miss. ; Hartford, Conn. ; Kingston, N. Y. ; Leavenworth, Kan. ; 
Louisville, Ky. ; Memphis, Tenn. ; Meridian, Miss. ; Milwaukee, Wis., 2 ; 
Minneapolis, Minn. ; Nashville, Tenn. ; Newark, T>^. J., 3 ; New Haven, 
Conn. ; New Orleans, La. ; Newport, R. I. ; New York City, 46 ; Norfolk, 



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26 AMERICAN JEWISH YEAR IBOOK 



Va. ; Philadelphia, Pa., 3 ; Pittsburg, Pa., 2 ; Port Gibson, Miss. ; Provi- 
dence, R. I. ; Rochester, N. Y. ; Richmond, Va. ; St. Joseph, Mo. ; St. Louis, 
Mo., 2 ; San Francisco, Cal. ; Schenectady, N. Y. ; Springfield, Mass. ; 
Syracuse, N. Y. ; Troy, N. Y. ; Vicksburg, Miss. ; Williamsport, Pa. 



INDEPENDENT ORDER FREE SONS OF JUDAH 
Org. Feb. 12, 1890. Officb : 78 Second Av., New York City 

Eighteenth Annual Convention, April 26, 1908, New York City. 

Members, 19,000. 

Lodges, 119. 

Officers : Grand Master, Isaac Grossman, 709 Sixth, N. Y. C. ; First 
Deputy Grand Master, Chas. Baruth, Brooklyn ; Second Deputy Grand 
Master, Meyer Caplan, Baltimore, Md. ; Grand Sec., Slgmund Fodor, 78 2d 
Av. ; Grand Treas., Alfred Furst, 1824 Park Av. ; Endowment Treas., 
Joachim Spira, all of N. Y. C. 

Lodges : Baltimore. Md., 3 ; Bayonne, N. J. ; Binghamton, N. Y. ; Brad- 
dock, Pa. ; Brooklyn, N. Y., 3 ; Buffalo, N. Y. ; Chicago, 111. ; Cleveland, 
Ohio, 3; Detroit, Mich.; Fall River, Mass., 2; GloversviUe, N. Y. ; Hart- 
ford, Conn. ; Haverstraw, N. Y. ; Jersey City, N. J., 2 ; Louisville, Ky. ; 
McKeesport, Pa., 2; Newark, N. J., 3; Newburgh, N. Y. ; New Haven, 
Conn. ; New York City, 75 ; Philadelphia, Pa., 6 : Pittsburg, Pa. ; Provi- 
dence, R. I., 2 ; Rochester, N. Y. ; Scnenectady, N. Y., 2 ; Scranton, Pa. ; 
Stamford, Conn. ; Tarrytown, N. Y. ; Washington, D. C. ; Woonsocket, 
R. I. ; Youngs town, Ohio. 

INDEPENDENT ORDER OF B'NAI B'RITH 
Org. Nov. 1, 1843. Office: 1248 Tribune Bldg., Chicago, 111. 

Tenth Quinquennial Convention, March 17, 1905, New Orleans, La. 

Members, 30,500. 

Lodges 420 (in North America, Europe, Asia, and Africa). 

Districts 10 (7 in the United States). 

Institutions founded by the Order in the United States: Hebrew 
Orphans' Home, Atlanta, Ga. ; B'nai B'rith Cemetery, Chicago, 111. : 
Free Employment Bureau, Chicago, 111. ; Jewish Widows* and Orphans* 
Home, New Orleans, La. ; Touro Infirmary, New Orleans, La. ; Home for 
AOED AND Infirm, Yonkers, N. Y. ; Cleveland Jewish Orphan Asylum, 
Cleveland, Ohio; B'nai B'rith Free Employment Bureau, Pittsburg, Pa. 

Officers : Pres., Adolf Kraus, Chicago, 111. ; Chancellor, Julius Bien, 
New York City ; First Vice-Pres., J. B. Klein, Bridgeport, Conn. ; Second 
Vice-Pres., Lucius L. Solomons, San Francisco, Cal. ; Treas., Jacob Furth, 
Cleveland, Ohio ; Sec., Alex. B. Seelenfreund, Chicago, HI. 

Executive Committee : Simon Wolf, Washington, D. C. ; Jacob Singer, 
Philadelphia, Pa.; Rabbi B. N. Calisch, Richmond, Va. ; Philip Stein, 
Chicago, 111. ; Joseph Hirsh, Vicksburg, Miss. ; Berthold TImendorfer, 
Berlin, Germany ; Dr. Adolphe Stern, Bucharest, Roumania ; Adalbert 
Skall, Prague, Austria. 

Districts : I. Org. 1851. Lodges, 49. Territory : Connecticut, Maine, 
Massachusetts, New Hampshire, New York, Rhode Island, and Vermont. 
Sec, S. Berliner, 1161 Madison Av.. New York City. 

II. Org. 1852. Lodges, 40. Territorv : Colorado, Indiana, Kansas, 
Kentucky, Missouri, New Mexico, and Ohio. Sec, Victor Abraham, 1308 
Traction Bldg., Cincinnati, Ohio. 

III. Org. . Lodges, 45. Territory : Delaware, New Jersey, Penn- 
sylvania, and West Virginia. Sec, M. K. Cohen, 227 Mint Arcade, Phila., 
Pa. 

IV. Org. 1863. Lodges, 25. Territory: Arizona, California, Idaho, 
Montana, Nevada, Oregon, Utah, Washington, and Wyoming. Sec, I. J. 
Aschheim, 1880 Sutter, San Francisco, Cal. 



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INDEPENDENT ORDER OF B'NAI B'RITH ' 27 

V. Org. 1867. Lodges, 33. Territory : Georgia, Maryland, North 
Carolina, South Carolina, Virginia, and District of Columbia. Sec, Joseph 
L. Levy, 210 E. Cary, Richmond, Va. 

VI. Org. 1868. Lodges, 39. Territory : Illinois, Iowa, Michigan, 
Minnesota, Nebraska, North Dakota, South Dakota, and Wisconsin. Sec., 
A. B. Seelenfreund, 1248 Tribune Bldg., Chicago, 111. 

VII. Org. 1873. Lodges, 74. Territory : Alabama, Arkansas, Florida, 
Louisiana, Mississippi, Tennessee, Texas, and Indian Territory. Sec., Nat. 
Strauss, 2337 Magazine, New Orleans, La. 

Lodges : Albany, Ga. ; Albany, N. Y., 2 ; Albuquerque, N. M. ; Alex- 
andria, La. ; Allentown, Pa. ; Altoona, Pa. ; Amsterdam, N. Y. ; Appleton, 
Wis. : Ardmore, Okla. ; Atlanta, Ga., 2 ; Atlantic City, N. J. ; Augusta, Ga. ; 
Austin, Tex. ; Baltimore, Md., 3 ; Baton Rouge, La. ; Bay City, Mich. ; 
Bayou Sara, La. ; Beaumont, Tex. ; Bessemer, Ala. ; Birmingham, Ala. ; 
Bloomington, 111. ; Bluefield, W. Va. ; Bois6, Idaho ; Boston, Mass., 2 ; 
Braddock, Pa. ; Brenliain, Tex. ; Bridgeport, Conn. ; Brooklyn, N. Y., 3 ; 
BrownsvUJe. Tinii. i Bruns^wick, Ga. ; Buffalo, N. Y. ; Burlington, Iowa; 
Butte, Mfjrit. : Ciilumet, Mich.; Calvert, Tex.; Camden, Ark.; Canton, 
Miss. ; Champaign, 111. ; Charleroi, Pa. : Charleston, S. C. ; Chattanooga, 
Tenn. ; Chicago, 111., 6 ; Cincinnati O. ; Cleveland, O. ; Clinton, La. ; 
Colorado Springs, Colo. ; Columbus, Ga. ; Columbus, Miss. ; Columbus, O. ; 
Corry, Pa. ; Cripple Creek, Colo. ; Crowley, La. ; Cumberland, Md. ; Dallas, 
Tex. ; Danville, 111. ; Danville, Pa. ; Danville, Va. ; Darlington, S. C. ; 
Davenport, Iowa ; Dayton, O. ; Demopolls, Ala. ; Denver, Colo. ; Des Moines, 
Iowa ; Detroit, Mich. ; DonaldsonvIUe, La. ; Donora, Pa. ; Duluth, Minn. ; 
Baston, Pa. ; Eau Claire, Wis.; Ellwood, Pa.; Elmira, N. Y. ; El Paso, 
Tex. ; Erie, Pa. ; Eufaula, Ala. ; Evansville, Ind. ; Fargo, N. D. ; Fort 
Smith, Ark. ; Fort Wayne, Ind. ; Fort Worth, Tex. ; Gainesville, Tex. ; 
Galveston, Tex. ; Goldsboro, N. C. ; Grand Rapids, Mich. ; Green Bay, 
Wis. ; Greensboro, N. C. ; Greenville, Miss. ; Greenwood, Miss. ; Harrisburg, 
Pa. ; Hartford, Conn. ; Hazleton, Pa. ; Helena, Ark. ; Hoboken, N. J. ; Home- 
stead, Pa. ; Hot Springs, Ark. ; Houston, Tex., 3 ; Huntsvllle, Ala. ; Indian- 
apolis, Ind., 2 ; Jackson, Mich. ; Jackson, Miss. ; Jackson, Tenn. ; Jackson- 
ville, Fla. ; Jersey City, N. J. ; Jonesboro, Ark. ; Joplln, Mo. ; Kalamazoo, 
Mich. ; Kansas City, Kan. ; Kansas City, Mo. ; Keokuk, Iowa ; Kingston, 
N. Y. ; Kinston, N. C. ; KnoxvUle, Tenn. ; La Crosse, Wis. ; Lafayette, Ind. ; 
Lafayette, La. ; Lake Charles, La. ; Lancaster, Pa. ; Lab Vegas, N. M. ; 
Leavenworth, Kan. ; Lexington, Ky. ; LIgonier, Ind. ; Lincoln, III. ; Lincoln, 
Neb. ; Little Rock, Ark. ; Los Angeles, Cal. ; Louisiana, Mo. ; Louisville, 
Ky. ; McKeesport, Pa. ; Macon, Ga. ; Madison, Ind. ; Marshall, Tex. ; Marys- 
ville, Cal. ; Meadville, Pa. ; Memphis, Tenn. ; Meridian, Miss. ; Milwaukee, 
Wis., 3 ; Minneapolis, Minn. ; Mobile, Ala. ; Monroe, La. ; Montgomery, 
Ala., 2 ; Muncie, Ind. ; Muskogee, Okla. ; Nashville, Tenn. ; Natchez, Miss. ; 
Natchitoches, La. ; Newark, N. J., 3 ; New Brunswick, N. J. ; Newburgh. 
N. Y. ; New Castle, Pa. ; New Haven, Conn. ; New Orleans, La., 6 ; New 
York City, 23 ; Norfolk, Va. ; Oakland, Cal. ; Omaha, Neb., 2 ; Opelousas, 
La. ; Owensboro, Ky. ; Paducah, Ky. ; Palestine, Tex. ; Paterson, N. J. ; 
Pensacola, Fla. ; Peoria, 111. ; Petersburg, Va. ; Philadelphia, Pa., 6 ; Pine 
Bluff, Ark.; Pittsburg, Pa., 6; Pittsfield, Mass.; Plattsburgh, N. Y. ; 
Port Gibson, Miss. ; Portland, Ore., 2 ; Pottsvllle, Pa. ; Poughkeepsle, N. Y. ; 
Providence, R. I. ; Pueblo, Colo. ; Quincy, 111. ; Raleigh, N. C. ; Richmond, 
Va. ; Rochester, N. Y. ; Sacramento, Cal. ; Saginaw, Mich. ; St. Joseph, Mo. ; 
St. Louis, Mo., 2 ; St. Paul, Minn. ; Salt Lake City, Utah ; San Antonio, 
Tex.; San Bernardino, Cal.; San Diego, Cal.; San Francisco, Cal., 10; 
San Jose, Cal. ; Savannah, Ga. ; Scran ton. Pa. ; Seattle, Wash., 2 ; Sedalia, 
Mo. ; Selma, Ala. ; Sharon, Pa. ; Shreveport, La. ; Sioux City, Iowa ; Spo- 
kane, Wash. ; Springfield, 111. ; Starkville, Miss. ; Stockton, Cal. ; Summit, 
Miss. ; Syracuse, N. Y. ; Terre Haute, Ind. ; Texarkana, Tex. ; Toledo, O., 
2 ; Trenton, N. J. ; Trinidad, Colo. ; Tuscaloosa, Ala. ; Tyler, Tex. ; Union- 
town, Ala. ; Unlontown, Pa. ; Vicksburg, Miss. ; Victoria, Tex. ; Vincennes, 
Ind. ; Wabash, Ind. ; Waco, Tex. ; Washington, D. C. ; Washington, Pa. ; 



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28 AMERICAN JEWISH YEAR BOOK 



Waterbury, Conn. ; Wheeling, W. Va. ; WIlkes-Barre, Pa. ; Wilmington, 
Del. ; Wilmington, N. C. ; WoodyiUe, Miss. ; Worcester, Mass. ; Yonkers. 
N. T. ; Youngstown, O. ; ZanesviUe, O. 



INDEPENDENT ORDER OP TRUE SISTERS 

(UNABHANGIGER ORDEN TREUB SCH WESTERN) 

Org. April 21, 1846. Office: 238 W. 131st, New York City 

One Hundred and Fifteenth Semi-Annual Session of the Grand Lodge, 
May 26, 1908, New York City. 

Members, 3169. 

Lodges, 16. 

Publishes a monthly, " Ordens Echo.** 

Officers : Grand Monitress, Mrs. Lena B. Weingart, 7th Av. and 122d ; 
Grand Pres., Mrs. Rosalie A. Eisner, 158 E. 72d; Grand Vice-Pres., Mrs. 
Frieda Bloch, Grand Treas., Mrs. Sarah Markewltz; Grand Sec, Mrs. 
Bianca B. Robitscher, 238 W. 13l8t; Grand Mentor, Mrs. Rose Baran, 
all of N. Y. C. ; Grand Warden, Mrs. Hulda Lissner, 115 Prospect Park, 
W., Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Lodges : Albany, N. Y. ; Boston, Mass. ; Brooklyn, N. Y. : Chicago, 111., 
2 ; Newark, N. J. ; New Haven, Conn. ; New York City, 7 ; Philadelphia, 
Pa., 2. 

♦ INDEPENDENT ORDER OF UNITED HEBREWS 
Org. Sept. 9, 1904. Office: 7 Water St., Boston, Mass. 

Fourth Annual Convention, June 7, 1908, Boston, Mass. 

Officers : Pres., Manashe Kranzman, 9 Asylum ; Grand Treas., A. J. 
Bennett ; Sec, Louis Davis, 7 Water. 

Executive Committee: The Officers, and S. Goldman, A. Gottesman, 
H. Murray Pakulski, I. L. Pollack, G. B. Radio, H. Robinson, Louis Taylor, 
A. Yaffe. 

Lodges : Boston, 5 ; Cambridge ; Dorchester ; Fall River, 3 ; Maiden ; 
Worcester. 



INDEPENDENT ORDER SONS OP BENJAMIN 
Org. Dec 23, 1877. Office: 953 Third Av., New York City 

Seventeenth Annual Convention, April 14, 1907, New York City. 

Members, 20,336. 

Lodges, l50. 

Officers : Grand Master, Abraham Rosenberg ; First Deputy Grand 
Master, Hugo Sternfeld ; Second Deputy Grand Master, Nathan Pimental ; 
Third Deputy Grand Master, James Saltman ; Grand Treas., Richard 
Cohn ; Grand Sec, Louis B. Franklin, 209 E. 69th, New York City. 

Lodges : AirbnDy, N. Y. ; Baltimore, Md., 2 ; Bangor, Me. ; Binghamton, 
N. Y. ; Bosiijti. Maaa., 5; Bradford, Pa.; Bridgeport, Conn.; Brooklyn, 
N. Y„ 7: liiifTwlo, N. Y., 2; Chicago, 111., 5; Cincinnati, O., 2; Cleveland, 
0„ y ■ Coliiinbufi, O. ; Dayton, O. ; Denver, Colo. ; Detroit, Mich. ; Erie, Pa. ; 
Fnll lllvcr. Mjiss. ; Hartford, Conn. ; Hoboken, N. J. ; Indianapolis, Ind. ; 
Ithaca, N. Y. ; Kanstis City, Mo., 4 ; Milwaukee, Wis. ; Minneapolis, Minn., 
'£ ; HontrfiaI» Can., ii ; Newark, N. J., 4 ; Newburgh, N. Y. ; New Haven, 
Conu., 2 ; Newixirt News, Va. ; New York City, 60 ; Norfolk, Va. ; Paterson, 
N, J. : Pblladi^Jplila, Pa., 7 ; Pittsburg, Pa., 2 ; Providence, B. I., 2 ; 
Uochesttr* K. Y. ; St Louis, Mo., 2 ; St. Paul, Minn. ; San Francisco, Cal., 
3 ; Springfield^ Mms, ; Syracuse, N. Y. ; Toledo, O. : Troy, N. Y. ; Wash- 
iugtuu, D. C. ; WIlkes-Barre, Pa. ; Wilmington, Del. ; Worcester, Mass. ; 
Slftoeavllle, O* 



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THE INDUSTRIAL REMOVAL OFFICE 



INDEPENDENT ORDER SONS OF JACOB 

Org. April, 190S. Office: Fifth and Lombard, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Third Annual Conyention, Aug. 25, 1907, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Memhers. 5563. 

Lodges, 60. 

Officers.: Grand Master, Abraham Weitzenfeld, 228 . Vine ; First 
Deputy, Phil in Mendelsohn ; Second Deputy, Nathan B. Weiss ; Grand 
Sec, Joseph Klein. 500 S. 5th ; Grand Treas., Lipman . Rosenberg ; En- 
dowment Treas.. Benjamin Cooper, all of Philadelphia, Pa. 

Lodges : Akron. O. ; Allen town. Pa. ; Baltimore, Md., 2 ; Bayonne, 
N. J. ; Bradford, Pa. ; Bridgeport, Conn. ; Carbondale, Pa. ; Cleyeland, O., 
4 ; Derby, Conn. ; Hnrtford, Conn. ; Lancaster, Pa. ; Newark, N. .T., 8 ; 
New Haven, Conn., 2 ; Norma. N. J. ; Old Forge, Pa. ; Passaic, N. J. ; 
Paterson, N. J. ; Philadelphia, Pa., 30 ; Plainfleld, N. J. ; Scranton, Pa., 2. 



INDEPENDENT WESTERN STAR ORDER 
Org. Feb. 13, 1894. Office: 183 W. 12th, Chicago, III. 

Fifteenth Annual Convention, Aug. 16, 1008, Peoria, 111. 

Members. 8647. 

Lodges, 96. 

Officers : Grand Master, N. T. Brenner, 21st and Sangamon ; Vice 
Grand Master, H. M. Bamett, both of Chicago, 111.; First Deputy Grand 
Master. William Haffner, St. rx>ui8. Mo. ; Second Deputy Grand Master, 
Sam. Cohen, Toledo. Ohio ; Grand Sec, Isaac Shapiro, 183 W. 12th ; 
Grand Endowment Treas., I. Russakov; Grand General Fund Treas.. J. 
Mills, all of Chicago. 111. 

Lodges : Altoona. Pa. ; Bay City, Mich. ; Bellaire, O. ; Benton Harbor, 
Mich. ; Bradford, Pa. ; Canton, O. : Carnegie, Pa. ; Chicago, 111., 38 ; 
Chicago Heights, 111. ; Cleveland. O., 4 ; Columbus. O. : Dayton, O. ; 
Detroit, Mich. ; East Chicago, Ind. ; Evansville, Ind. ; Grand Bapids, 
Mich. : Indiananolis, Ind. ; .Johnstown, Pa. ; .Toilet. 111. : KalaroaEoo. Mich. ; 
Lock Haven, Pa. : Louisville, Ky. ; Marietta. O. ; Milwaukee, Wis., 3 ; 
Oil City. Pa.; Oshkosh, Wis.; Peoria, 111.: Philadelphia, Pa., 4; Pitts- 
burg. Pa.. 2 : Saginaw, Mich. : Sharon. Pn. ; Sheboygan, Wis. ; South 
Bend, Ind. ; Springfield, 111. : Steubenville, O. ; St. Louis, Mo., 8 ; St. 
Paul, Minn., 2 ; Toledo, O., 2 ; Waukegan, 111. ; Youngstown, O. ; Zanes- 
vlUe, O. 



THE INDUSTRIAL REMOVAL OFFICE 
Org. 1900. Office : 174 Second A v., N?w York City 

Officers : Chairman, Cyrus L. Sulzberger ; Vice-Chairman, Alfred 
Jaretzkl ; Secretary, Heuben Arkush, 174 Second Av., all of N. Y. C. 

Board of Directors : The Officers, and Nathan Bijur, N. Y. C. ; Max 
Senior, Cincinnati, O. ; Jacob Furth, Cleveland, O. ; Mark Hyman, N. Y. C. 

General Manager : David M. Bressler. 

Agencies : Albany, N. Y. ; Altoona, Pa. ; Atlanta, Oa. ; Beaumont, 
Tex. ; Birmingham, Ala. ; Buffalo, N. Y. ; Borllngton, Iowa ; Cedar Rapids, 
Iowa; Charleston, S. C. ; Chattanooga, Tenn. ; Cincinnati, Ohio: Cleveland, 
Ohio ; Colorado Springs, Colo. ; Columbus, Ohio ; Dallas-, Tex. ; Des Moines, 
Iowa ; Detroit, Mich. ; Dubuque, Iowa ; Evansville, Ind. ; Fort Smith. 
Ark. ; Fort Worth, Tex. ; Gainesville, Tex. ; Galveston, Tex. ; Grand 
Rapids, Mich. ; Hannibal, Mo. ; Hot Springs, Ark. ; Houston, Tex. ; 
Hutchinson, Kan. ; Indianapolis, Ind. ; Joplln, Mo. ; Kansas City, Mo. ; 



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30 AMERICAN JESWISH YEAR BOOK 



KnoxTiUe, Tenn. ; Lake Charles, La. ; Lancaster, Pa. ; Leavenworth, Kan. ; 
Lincoln, Neb. ; Little Rock, Ark. ; Los Ansreles, Cal. : Loulsyllle, Ky. ; 
Macon, 6a. ; Marshall, Tex. ; Memphis, Tenn. ; Milwaukee, Wis. ; Minne- 
apolis, Minn.; Mobile, Ala.; Montgomery, Ala.; Nashville, Tenn.: Natchez, 
Miss. ; New Orleans, La. ; Omaha, Neb. ; Ottumwa, Iowa ; Pensacola, 
Fla^; Peoria, 111. ; Pine Bluff, Ark. ; Pittsburg, Pa. ; Pueblo, Colo. ; Phila- 
delphia, Pa. ; Richmond, Va. ; Rochester, N. Y. : Rock Island, III. ; St. 
Joseph, Mo. ; St. Louis, Mo. ; St Paul, Minn. ; San Antonio, Tex. ; San 
Francisco, Cal. ; Savannah, Ga. ; Scranton, Pa. ; Sherman, Tex. ; Shreve- 
port. La. ; Sioux City, Iowa ; South Bend. Ind. ; Terre Haute, Ind. ; 
Toledo, Ohio ; Topeka, Kan. ; Tyler, Tex. ; Vlcksburg, Miss. ; Waco, Tex. ; 
Wichita, Kan. ; Wllkes-Barre, Pa. ; Wilmington, Del. ; Youngstown, Ohio ; 
and a number of other places. 



INTERNATIONAL JEWISH CONGRESS 
Org. March 24, 1907. Office : 107 E. 103d, New York City 
80 Societies, Lodges, etc., In New York City, have Joined the movement. 
Branches ate in process of formation in other cities. 
Officers : Pres., Abraham S. Schomer, 6 Beekman ; Treas., Arnold 
Kohn, State Bk. ; Acting Sec, Morris i. Levine, 1976 Lexington Av. ; all 
of N. Y. C. 



THE JEWISH AGRICULTURAL AND INDUSTRIAL AID 
SOCIETY 
Org. Jan. 23, 1900. Office: 174 Second Av., New York City 
Officers : Pres., Cyrus L. Sulzberger ; Vlce-Pres., Alfred Jaretzki ; 
Treas., ESugene Meyer ; Sec, Percy S. Straus, care of R. H. Macy and Com- 
pany, Broadway and 84th, all of New York City. 

Directors : The Officers, and Eugene S. Benjamin, Morris Loeb, and 
Solomon G. Rosenbaum, all of New York City. 
General Manager : Leonard G. Robinson. Address, 174 Second Av. 



THE JEWISH AGRICULTURISTS' AID SOCIETY OF AMERICA 

Org. Oct. 28, 1888 ; Inc. Jan. 24, 1900. Office : 607 S. Marshfleld Av., 

Chicago, 111. 

Eighth Annual Meeting, Feb. 6, 1908. 

Members, 882. 

Summary of work during 1907 : 31 families, comprising 170 persons, 
located on 31 farms. 

Jewish farmers settled since the Society began operations, 383. 

Officers : Pres., Morris Weil ; Vlce-Pres., Maurice W. Kozminski ; 
Treas., Edward Rose; Sec, Hugo Pam, The Rookery; Cor. Sec, A. R. 
Levy, 507 S. Marshfleld Av., all of Chicago, 111. 

Directors : Israel Cowen, Emil G. Hirsch, Jacob L. Kesner, Maurice 
W. Kozminski, A. R. Levy, Leo A. Loeb, Hugo Pam, David M. Pfaelzer, 
J. Rappaport, Edward Rose, Julius Rosen wald, Emanuel F. Selz, Leo 
Straus, Simeon Straus, Morris Weil, all of Chicago, III. 

GENERAL Manager: Nathan D. Kaplan, 1610 Ashland Blk., Chicago, 



THE JEWISH CHAUTAUQUA SOCIETY 

Org. April 29, 1893. Office: 643 Drexel Bldg., Philadelphia, Pa. 
Twelfth Annual Summer Assembly, July 13-19, 1908, Buffalo, N. Y. 
Members, 300Q. 

Digitized by VjOOQIC 



JEWISH CONSUMPTIVES' RELIEF SOCIETY 3I 



Officers : Chancellor, Henry Berkowitz, 1823 North 33d, Philadelphia, 
Pa. ; Pres., Israel Cowen, Chicago, 111. ; VIce-Pres., Perry Frankel, Phlla., 
PA. ; Treas., Prank Newburger, Phlla., Pa. ; Sec. and Director, Charles 
Edwin Fox, 988 Drexel Bldg., Phlla., Pa.; Field Sec, Jeanette Miriam 
Goldberg, Jefferson, Tex. 

Board of Trustees : William B. fiackenburg, George W. Ochs, Jacob 
Glmbel, Emll Selig. Isaac Hassler, Louis Getstley, Perry Frankel, Alfred M. 
Klein, Samuel Grabfelder, Miss Corlnne B. Arnold, Mrs. Joseph H. Rubin, 
Mrs. Fannie Muhr, Mrs. Charles Heidelberger, Mrs. H. Berkowltz, all of 
Phlla., Pa. ; Jacob H. SchlfF, Alfred H. Newburger. and Mrs. Rose Frank, 
all of N. Y. C. ; Rev. Tobias Schanfarber, Chicago, 111. ; Rev. Abram Simon, 
Washington, D. C. ; Jacob Klein, Bridgeport, Conn. ; Emll Mayer, St. IjOuIs, 
Mo. ; Frederick Lazarus, Columbus, O. ; Frederick Ullman, Buffalo, N. Y. ; 
Hon. Simon Wolf, Washington, D. C. 

Educational Council : Max Herzberg, D. W. Amram, Julius H. Green- 
stone, Louis W. Stelnbach, Miss Ella Jacobs. Joseph Krauskopf, all of 
Phila., Pa.; Charles S. Bemhelmer, Maurice H. Harris, Richard Gotthell. 
Lee K. Frankel, Morris Loeb, Solomon Schechter, Miss Julia RIchman, all 
of N. Y. C. ; Gerson B. Levi, Emll G. Hlrsch, Joseph Stolz, A. B. Yudelson, 
all of Chicago, 111. ; Harry Levi, Wheeling, W. Va. ; Kaufmann Kobler, 
Cincinnati, O. ; William S. Friedman, Denver, Colo. ; Henry Fisher, Atlantic 
City, N. J. ; Nathan Stern, Trenton, N. J. ; Barnett A. Elzas, Charleston, 
S. C. 

Circles : Albany, Ga. ; Appleton, Wis. ; Ashevllle, N. C. ; Atlanta, Ga. ; 
Baltimore, Md. ; Bloomlngton, 111. ; Bridgeport, Conn. ; Brooklyn, N. Y., 2 ; 
Brunswick, Ga. ; Bucyrus, O. ; Buffalo, N. Y. ; Canton, Miss. ; Carthage, 
Mo. ; Champaign, 111. ; Charleston, S. C. ; Charlotte, N. C. ; Chattanooga, 
Tenn. ; Cincinnati, O. ; Cleveland, O., 3 ; Coatesville, Pa. ; Columbia, Mo. ; 
Columbia, Tenn. ; Columbia City, Ind. ; Columbus, O. ; Columbus, Miss. ; 
Danville, 111. ; Dayton. O. ; Demopolls, Ala. ; Donaldsonvllle. La. ; Duluth, 
Minn. ; Eau Claire, Wis. ; El Paso, Texas ; Erie, Pa. ; Bufaula, Ala. ; 
Fort Wayne, Ind. ; Germantown, Pa. ; Goldsboro, N. C. ; Goshen, Ind. ; 
Grand Rapids, Mich. ; Green Bay, Wis. ; Greenville, Miss. ; Greenwood, 
Miss. ; Hamilton. Ont. ; Henderson, Ky. ; Indianapolis, Ind. ; Jackson, 
Mich. ; Jacksonville, Fla. ; Joplln, Mo. ; Kalamazoo, Mich. ; Lafayette, La. ; 
Lansing, Mich. ; Lexington, Miss. ; Llgonler, Ind. ; Louisiana, Mo. ; Madison, 
Wis. ; Mansfield, O. ; Marlon, Ind. ; Marlon, O. ; Milwaukee, Wis. ; Minne- 
apolis, Minn. ; Mlneola, Texas ; Mobile, Ala. ; Mount Vernon. Ind. ; 
Nashville, Tenn., 3 ; Natchez, Miss. ; Natchitoches, La. ; Newark, N. J., 2 ; 
New Orleans, La. ; New York City ; Niagara Falls, N. Y. ; Northern City, 
La. ; Oklahoma City, Okla. ; Paducah, Ky. ; Passaic, N. J. ; Petoskey, Mich. ; 
Philadelphia, Pa., 4 ; Reading, Pa., 2 ; Saginaw, Mich. ; Sandusky, O. ; 
Savannah, Ga. ; Schenectady, N. Y. ; Scranton, Pa. ; Seattle, Wash. ; Selma, 
Ala. ; Shreveport, La. ; St. Louis, Mo. ; Statesvllle, N. C. ; Tampa, Fla. ; 
Terre Haute, Ind. ; Toronto, Can., 2 ; Troy, N. Y. ; Tuscaloosa, Ala. ; Vicks- 
burg, Miss. ; Waco, Texas ; West Point, Ga. ; Wheeling, W. Va. ; Williams- 
port, Pa. ; Wilmington, N. C. ; Worcester, Mass., 2 ; Youngstown, O. 



JEWISH CONSUMPTIVES' RELIEF SOCIETY 

Org. Jan. 2, 1904 ; Inc. June 25, 1904. Oppicb : 1421 Court PI., Denver, 

Colo. 

Fourth Annual Meeting, Feb. 23, 1908, Denver, Colo. 

Members, 12,000. Income for 1906, $32,300. 

Publishes the bi-monthly " The Sanatorium." 

Officers : Pres., Philip HlUkowitz, 1427 Stout ; VIce-Pres., L. M. 
Weiner; Treas., A. Zederbaum ; Sec, C. D. Spivak, 1421 Court PI., all of 
Denver, Colo. 

Trustees : Sol. Bloomgarden. S. L. Bressler, Henry Cohen, S. F. 
Disraelly, Ed. Grimes, Philip HiUkowltz. A. Judelovltz, Louis Hahn, C. H. 



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AMERICAN JEWISH YEAR BOOK 



Kauvar, Goodman Levin, Louts Levy, Louts LIpshltz, Max Ltnkwald, 
M. S. Radetsky, Louis Robinson. O. M. Shere, C. D. Splvnk, TiOuts Welner, 
Sol. Weiss, Sol. Wolf, Adolf Zederbaum, all of Denver, Colo. ; and Max 
Stern, New York. 

Auxiliary Societies : Allentown, Pa. ; Baltimore, Md. ; Chicafiro, 111. ; 
Cincinnati, Ohio ; Cleveland, Ohio ; Denver, Colo. ; Des Moines, Iowa ; 
Kansas City. Mo. ; New York City, 4 ; Philadelphia, Pa., Providence, R. I. ; 
St. Joseph, Mo. ; St Louts, Mo., 2 ; St. Paul, Minn. ; San Francisco, Cal. 
Has support of Federated Charities in Cleveland, Toledo, Milwaukee, 
Chicago, and Memphis. 



JEWISH PUBLICATION SOCIETY OP AMERICA 
Oi^. June 3, 1888. Office : 608 Chestnut, Philadelphia, Pa. 
For the Report of the Twentieth Year of The Jewish Publication 
Society op America, see pp. 259-349. 



JEWISH SOCIALIST-TERRITORIALIST LABOR PARTY 

OP AMERICA 

Org. Feb. 3, 1906. Office: 54 Canal, New York City 

First Annual Meeting, Oct. 18-21, 1906, Boston, Mass. 

Members, 3000. 

Branches (of 25 members or more), 38; Groups (of less than 25 
members), 18. 

Central Committee : R. Awerbach. A. Brachman. A. Fifemacher, L. 
FIfemacher, J. Globus. A. Goldbere. N. Snyrkin, and J. Slonim, all of New 
York City ; M. Chernlak. 376 Selkin Av., Winnipeg. Can. ; W. Goldstein. 
B. Zuckermnn. both of Cleveland. Ohio ; M. Llppman. Chicago, 111. ; M. 
Shevltz, 1637 E. Fayette, Baltimore. Md. ; Charles Shnayer, Montreal, Can. 

Secretary: Alex. Brachman. 629 E. 5th, N. Y. C. 

Branches and Groups : Aunrusta, Ga. ; Baltimore, Md. : Boston, Mass. ; 
Bridgeport, Conn. : Buffalo, N. Y. : Chelsea, Mass. ; Chicago, 111., 2 ; 
Cincinnati, Ohio: Cleveland, Ohio: De Kalb, 111.: Denver, Colo.; Detroit, 
Mich. : Gloversvllle. N. Y. ; Grand Forks. N. D. ; Hartford. Conn. ; Kansas 
City, Mo. ; Maiden, Mass. ; Milwaukee, Wis. ; Minneapolis, Minn. ; Montreal, 
Can. ; Newark, N. J. ; New Haven, Conn. : New Orleans. La. ; New York 
City, 12 : Omaha. Neb. ; Perth Amboy, N. J. ; Philadelphia, Pa. ; Pittsburg, 
Pa. : Rochester, N. Y. : St. Louis, Mo. ; San Francisco, Cal. ; Schenectady, 
N. Y. ; Springfield, Mass. ; Toronto, Can. ; Trenton, N. J. ; Waterbury, 
Conn. ; Winnipeg, Can. ; Worcester, Mass. 



THE JEWISH THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY OP AMERICA 
Org. 1886. 531 W. 123d, New York City 

Eleventh Biennial Meeting, March 29, 1908. 

Fifteenth Commencement, June 7, 1908. 

Graduates, Rabbinical Course, In 1908, 7. 

Whole number of graduates. Rabbinical Course, 45. 

Graduates. Teachers* Course, in 1908. 4. 

Whole numlKs ,\( firadiiatts. Teachers* Course. 15. 

Offtceus r l*res,, K. i?clnM:hter; Chairman Board of Directors, Louis 
Mnrshsll : VIce-Chnfrmnti ; Ni?wraan Cowen ; Hon. Sec, Irving Lehman; 
Treai!,. Daniel Otif^gt^nhdm* nil of New York City. 

DniEOTons (for life): Jacob H. Schiff; Daniel Guggenheim; Simon 
Gugneptiheim t FellaE M. WaibnTg; Philip S. Henry; Louis Marshall; 
Adolpb Lewlacihn ; nil of Nrw York City; Mayer Sulzberger, Philadelphia, 
Pa. ; CyruH Adler. Washington, D. C. ; Adolphus S. Solomons, Washington, 



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NATIONAL CONFERENCE OF JEWISH CHARITIES 33 



D. C. ; (term expires in 1910) ; Newman Cowen ; Simon M. Roeder ; Irving 
Lehman ; Samuel Greeubaum ; Morris Loeb, ail of New Yorlc City ; Wil- 
liam Gerstley, Philadelphia, Pa. ; and Harry Friedenwald, Baltimore, Md. 

ExECDTivB Committee : Chairman, Louis Marshall ; Cyrus Adler ; 
Jacob H. Schiff ; Daniel Guggenheim ; Mayer Sulzberger ; Simon M. Roeder ; 
Newman Cowen, ex officio. 

Faculty : Pres., and Professor of Jewish Theology, Solomon Schechter, 
M. A., Lltt. D. (Cantab.) ; Sabato Morals Professor of Biblical Literature 
and Exegesis, Israel Friedlaender, Ph. D. (Strassburg) ; Professor of 
Talmud, Louis Ginzberg, Ph.D. (Heidelberg); Professor of History, 
Alexander Marx, Ph. D. (Koenigsberg) ; Professor of Uomiletlcs, Joseph 
Mayor Asher, B. A., M. A. (Owens' College, Victoria University, Man- 
chester) ; Instructor in the Talmud, Joshua A. JofT^ ; Instructor in 
Hebrew and Rabbinlcs, Israel Davidson, Ph. D. (Columbia) ; Professor 
of English Literature and- Rhetoric, Joseph Jacobs, B. A. (Cantab, at 
London), Lltt. D. (University of Pennsylvania) : Uazan and Instructor in 
Uazanut, Rev. Simon Jacobson ; Tutor of Elocution, Grenville Klelser. 

Library Staff: Librarian, Professor Alexander Marx; Assistant Li- 
brarian, Dr. Israel Davidson ; Cataloguer, Israel Shapira ; Assistant in 
Library, Samuel Abrahams. 

Registrar : Professor Joseph Jacobs ; Clerk, Joseph B. Abrahams. 

Branches : Baltimore, Md. ; Denver, Colo. ; Montreal, Can. ; Newark, 
N. J. ; New York City ; Philadelphia, Pa. 

ALUMNI ASSOCIATION OF THE JEWISH THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 
OF AMERICA 

Eighth Annual Meeting, June 8-9, 1908, New York City. 

Officers : Pres., Charles I. Hoffman. 147 Monmouth, Newark, N. J. ; 
Yice-Pres., Herman Abramowitz, Montreal, Can. ; Rec. Sec, Marvin Nathan, 
1829 N. Franklin, Philadelphia. Pa.; Cor. Sec, Nathan Wolf, 254 7th, 
Hoboken, N. J. ; Treas., L. H. Elmaleh, 117 N. 7th, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Executive Committee: E. L. Solomon, New York City; A. H. 
Herschman, Detroit, Mich. ; M. Mandel, Allentown, Pa. ; M. M. E)ichler, 
Boston, Mass. ; Julius H. Greenstone, Philadelphia, Pa. ; S. Z. Prokesch, 
New York City. 

JUDAIC UNION 

Org. May 31, 1880. Office: 2322 N. Woodstock, Philadelphia, Pa. . 

Twenty-eighth Annual Convention, Feb. 9, 1908, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Members, 733. 

Lodges, 6. 

Officers: Grand Master, A. L. Weinstock, 968 Randolph, Phila- 
delphia. Pa. ; Vice-Grand Master, Arthur Cohen ; Grand Sec, S. J. Marx, 
2322 N. Woodstock, Philadelphia, Pa.; Treas., H. H. Heilbron ; Grand 
Conductor, M. H. C. Gealt. 

Executive Committee: The Officers, and Harry Feldenhelmer ; Her- 
man Klonower; Benjamin Lewis: Isaac Sadler; Albert Solms ; and I. N. 
Weinstock. 

Lodges: Baltimore, Md. ; Philadelphia, Pa., 5. 



THE NATIONAL CONFERENCE OF JEWISH CHARITIES IN 
THE UNITED STATES 
Org. 1899. Office : 411 West Fayette St., Baltimore, Md. 
Fifth Biennial Convention, May 4-6, 1908, Richmond, Va. 
Members, 117 Societies. 

Officers: Pres., Dr. Jacob H. Hollander, Baltimore, Md. ; Vice-Pres., 
Martin A. Marks, Cleveland, Ohio ; Mrs. Max Landsberg, Rochester, N. Y. ; 



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34 AMERICAN JEWISH YEAR BOOK 

Treas., Bernard Greensf elder, St. Louis, Mo. ; Sec., Louis H. Levin, 411 
W. Fayette St., Baltimore, Md. 

ExECDTiYB CoMMiTTEB : Maz Senior, Cincinnati, O. ; Max Herzberg, 
Philadelphia, Pa.; Julian W. Maclc, Chicago, 111.; Nathan Bijur, N. Y. C. ; 
Joseph H. Cohen, N. Y. C. : Samuel S. Flelsher, Phila, Pa. ; Dr. Lee K. 
Fraxikel, N. Y. C. ; Julius Rosenwald, Chicago, 111. ; Lucius L. Solomons, 
San Francisco, Cal. 

Constituent Societies : Albany, N. Y., ^ebrew Benevolent Society ; 
Alexandria, Va., Hebrew Benevolent Society; Atlanta, Ga., Federation of 
Jewish Cht^rities, Hebrew OrpbaDet' ilouiu ; Baltimore, Md., Federated 
Jewish Charities, Hebrew B&nevoietit SycN-ty, United Hebrew Charities; 
Birmingham, Ala., Unltt^il Hebrew Cbarlties ; Bloomington, 111., Jewish 
Ladies' Aid Society ; Button, lilasa.. Federation of Jewish Charities. Hebrew 
Women's Sewing Society : Braddot^k, Pa.. Braddock Lodge, No. 516, Inde- 

gmdent Order of Bnal B rlth; BufftUo, N. Y., Federated Jewish Charities; 
utte, Mont., Hebrew BeDevolcnt A^^ssodatton ; Charleston, S. C, Hebrew 
Benevolent Society; Chicago, HL, Bureau of Personal Service, Council 
of Jewish Womep, Uovie tor Jewlijb Fi-U'ndless and Working Girls, Jewish 
Aid Society; Cincijiimtl, Ohio. Unltea Jewish Charities; Cleveland, Ohio. 
B^ederation of the Jew^»b ChEiritlei^ o£ Cleveland, Jewish Orphan Asylum; 
Colorado Springs, Colo., Hebrew Benevolent Association; Columbus, 
Ohio, Jewish Charities ; Dallas, Tex., Hebrew Benevolent Association ; 
Dayton, Ohio, Dayton Provident Loan Association; Denver, Colo., Jewish 
Relief Society; Des Moines, la., Hebrew Ladies' Benevolent Society; 
Detroit, Mich^ United Jewish Charities; Duluth, Minn., Temple Aid 
Society ; El Paso, Tex., Mount Sinai Congre&ration ; Evansville, Ind., 
Hebrew Benevolent Society; Fort Wayne, IndL, Jewish Relief union; 
Gainesville, Tex., Hebrew Benevolent Society; Galveston, Tex., Hebrew 
Benevolent Society; Hot Springs, Ark., Hot Springs Relief Society; 
Houston, Tex., Jewish Women's Benevolent Association ; Indianapolis, 
Ind., The Jewish Federation ; Ithaca, N. Y., Jacob Rothschild ; Kala- 
mazoo, Mich., Congregation B'nai Israel: Kansas City, Mo., Hebrew 
Ladies' Relief Association, United Jewish Charities; Lancaster, Pa.. 
United Hebrew Charity Society; Lincoln, Neb., Jewish Ladies^ 
Aid Society; Little Rock, Ark., Hebrew Relief Society; Los Angeles, 
Cal., Hebrew Benevolent Society; Louisville, Ky., Congregation Adath 
Israel, United Hebrew Relief Association; Macon, Ga., Congregation Beth 
El ; Mattapan, Mass., Leopold Morse Home for Infirm Hebrews and Orphan- 
age; Memphis, Tenn., Hebrew Ladies' Relief Association, United Hebrew 
Relief Association; Meridian, Miss., Meridian Jewish Orphan's Home and 
Benevolent Association ; Milwaukee, Wis., Hebrew Relief Association ; Min- 
neapolis, Minn., Hebrew Ladies' Benevolent Society ; Mobile, Ala., United 
Hebrew Charities; Montgomery, Ala., United Hebrew Charities; Muncie, 
Ind., Congregation Beth-El ; Nashville, Tenn., Hebrew Relief Society ; Nat- 
chez, Miss., Hebrew Relief Association ; Newark, N. J., Hebrew Benevolent 
and Orphan Society ; New Haven, Conn., Hebrew Benevolent Society ; New 
Orleans, La., Association for the Relief of Jewish Widows and Orphans, 
Touro Infirmary and Hebrew Benevolent Association ; New York City, 
Baron de Hirsch Fund, Council of Jewish Women, The Free Synagogue, 
Hebrew Free Loan Association, United Hebrew Charities, Young Men s He- 
brew Association ; Niagara Falls, N. Y., Ladles' Hebrew Benevolent Society ; 
Norfolk, Va., Ladies' Hebrew Benevolent Society ; Oakland, Cal., Daughters 
of Israel Relief Society ; Paducah, Ky., Congregation Temple Israel ; 
Pensacola, Fla., Congregation Beth El. ; Peoria, 111., Hebrew Relief Society ; 
Philadelphia, Pa., Home for Hebrew Orphans, Jewish Foster Home and 
Orphan Asylum, Orphans^ Guardian Society, United Hebrew Charities, 
Young Women's Union; Pine Bluff, Ark., Hebrew Relief Association; 
Pittsburg, Pa., United Hebrew Relief Association of Allegheny Co. ; 
Portland, Ore., First Hebrew Benevolent Association, Jewish Women's 
Benevolent Society; Portsmouth, Ohio, Ladies* Aid Society; Reading, Pa., 
Ladles' Hebrew Aid Society ; Richmond, Va., Congregation Beth Ahabah, 



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JEWISH HOSPITAL FOR CONSUMPTIVES 35 

Ladles* Hebrew Benevolent Association; Rochester. N. Y., Jewish Orphan 
Asylum Association of Western New York, United Jewish Charities; St. 
Joseph, Mo., Jewish Ladies' Benevolent iSocletv ; St. Louis, Mo., Jewish 
Charitable and Educational Union ; St. Paul, Minn., Blkur Chollm Society, 
Jewish Relief Society, Sist£rs of Peace Benevolent Society; Salt Lalce 
City, Utah, Jewish Relief Society: San Antonio, Tex.. Monteflore Benevo- 
lent Society ; San Francisco, Cal., iCmanu-Cl Sisterhood, Bureka Benevolent 
Society; Savannah, Ga., Ladies' Hebrew Benevolent Society, Congregation 
Mickve Israel ; iScranton, i'a., Hebrew Ladies' Relief Society ; Seattle. 
Wash., Hebrew Ladies' Benevolent Society ; Sioux City, la., Jewish Ladles' 
Aid Society ; Staten Island, N. Y., Hebrew Benevolent Society ; Syracuse, 
N. Y., United Jewish Charities; Terre Haute, Ind., Jewish Aid Society; 
Toledo, Ohio, Ladies' Benevolent Society ; Troy, N. Y., Ijadies' Society 
B'rith Shalom ; Vicksburg, Miss., Associated Jewish Charities, Ladies' 
Hebrew Benevolent Society ; Waco, Tex., Hebrew Benevolent Associa- 
tion ; Washington, D. C, United Hebrew Charities; Wheeling, W. Va., 
United Hebrew Charities; Wilkes-Barre, Pa., Ladles* Auxiliary YoUng 
Men's Hebrew Association ; Wilmington, Del., Hebrew Charity Association ; 
Youngstown, Ohio, The Federated Jewish Charities. 

THE NATIONAL FARM SCHOOL 
Inc. April 10, 1896. Office: Farm School, Bucks Co., Pa. 

Eleventh Annual Meeting, Sept 29, 1907, Farm School, Bucks Co., Pa. 

Seventh Annual Commencement, May 31, 1908. 

Number of graduates, 1908, 11. 

Whole number of graduates, 59. 

Members, 1469. 

Officbbs : Pres., Joseph Krauskopf. 4715 Pulaski Av., Germantown, 
Pa. ; Vlce-Pres., Morris A. Kaufman ; Treas., Isaac H. Silverman ; Sec, 
Isaac Landman, 334 Mutual Life Bldg., Philadelphia, Pa. 

Dibector: j. H. Washburn. 

Executive Board: A. Bamberger; Hart Blum«nthal; W. Atlee Bur- 
pee: Jacob Cartun; Adolph Elchholz ; H. Felix; Simon Frledberger; S. 
Grabfelder ; H. B. Hirsh ; Abrum Israel ; Alfred M. Klein ; Arnold Kohn ; 
Howard A. Loeb; Leon Merz; Barpey Sellg; J. N. Snellenburg; all of 
Philadelphia, Pa. 

National Auxiliarit Board : Louis I. Aaron, Pittsburg, Pa. ; Julius 
Adler, Portland, Ore. ; Henry Beer, New Orleans, La. ; I. W. Bernheim, 
LoaisvlUe, Ky. ; Henry Frank, Natchez, Miss. ; M. J. Freiberg, Cincinnati, 
O. ; Bernard Ginsburg, Detroit, Mich. ; Mrs. Jacob H. Hecht, Boston, 
Mass. : A. Hlrshhelmer, La Crosse, Wis. ; M. Horkhelmer. Wheeling, W. 
Va. ; Adolph Lewlsohn, N. Y. C. ; Leon Mandel, Chicago, 111. ; Louis New- 
burger, Indianapolis, Ind. ; Edw. E. Richards, Mobile, Ala. ; E. Raab, 
Ulchmond. Va. ; Alex. Sanger, Dallas, Tex. ; David Sternberg, Memphis, 
Tenn. ; Sigmund Sonneborn, Baltimore, Md. ; Harris Weinstock, Sacra- 
mento, Cal. ; Ferdinand Westheimer, St. Joseph, Mo. ; A. Younker, Des 
Moines, la. 

THE NATIONAL JEWISH HOSPITAL FOR CONSUMPTIVES 
Org. 1899. Office: 622 E. and C. Bldg., Denver, Colo. 

Eighth Annual Meeting, July 26, 1908, AtlanUc City, N. J. 

Members, 8750. 

Patients treated, 1207. 

Officers : Pres., Samuel Grabfelder, Merchant and Mariner Bldg., 
Philadelphia, Pa. ; Vlce-Pres., Louis Gerstley, Phila., Pa. ; Treas., . Ben. 
Althelmer, St. Louis, Mo. ; Sec, Alfred MuUer, 522 E. and C. Bldg., Denver, 
Colo. 

Executive Committee : The Officers, and William S. Friedman, Den- 
ver, Colo. ; Leo A. Loeb, Chicago, 111. ; J. B. Schoenberg, N. Y. C. 



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36 AMERICAN JEWISH YEAR BOOK 

ORDER BNEI ZION 

Org. April 26, 1008. Office: 204 E. Broadway, New York City 

Members, 800. 

Lodges, 20. 

Officers: Nasi (Pres.), David Biaustein, 184 Eldridge; Sgan Rishon 
(First Vice-Pres.), J. I. Blues tone ; Sgan Sheni (Second Vice-Pres.), 
Benjamin L. Gordon; Gisbor (Treas.), Leopold Kehlman ; Maslcir (Sec), 
Joshua Sprayregen, 132 Nassau, all of N. Y. C. 

Executive Committee: Hyman I. Barnett, Harris Bronstein. Gedalia 
Bublik, Nathan Chasan, Hyman J. Epstein, Max Friedland, A. Isn-Kishor, 
E. W. Lewin-Epstein, Harris Masliansky, and Nathan Prensky. 

Lodges : Brooklyn, N. Y. ; Holyoke, Mass. ; Newark. N. J. ; New 
Britain, Conn.: New York City, 8; Paterson, N. J.; Philadelphia, Pa.; 
Scranton, Pa., 2 ; Springfield, Mass., 2 ; Stanford, Conn. ; Waterbury, Conn. 



ORDER BRITH ABRAHAM 
Org. June 12, 1859. Office: 266 Grand, Nev York City 

Twenty-fourth Biennial Convention, May 12, 1907, Syracuse, N. Y. 

Members, 55,958. 

Lodges, 331. 

Officers : Grand Master, Samuel I>orf, Florence Bldg., New York 
City; First Deputy Grand Master, Abraham Heller, 1114 Gates Av., 
Brooklyn ; Second Deputy Grand Master, David Grody, 21 4 W. Fayette, 
Syracuse, N. Y. ; Third Deputy Grand Master, Bmil Mantel, 205 W. Wash- 
ington, Indianapolis, Ind. ; Grand Treas^ M. S. SUill, 54 W. 3d, New York 
City ; Grand Sec, Leonard Leisersohn, Florence Bldg., Second Av. and 1st, 
New York City ; Counsel to the Order, Henry M. GoTdfogle, 271 Broadway, 
New York City. 

Lodges: Albany, N. Y. ; Atlanta, Ga. ; Baltimore, Md., 5^ B&yonne, 
N. J. ; Biddeford, Me. ; Binghamlon, N. Y. ; BiruiiQglianu Ala. ; Boatofif 
Mass., 33; Brooklyn, N. Y., 10; Buffalo, N. Y,, 2; BurUogtoo. Yt. ; 
Cehterville, la. ; Chester, Pa. ; Chicago, 111., 27 ; Cleveland. O., i Dallas, 
Tex., 2 ; Denver, Colo., 3 ; Des Moines, la. ; Detroit, Mich., 2 ; Duluth, 
Minn., 4; Elmira, N. Y. ; Fall Uiver, Mass., 2; Hartford, Conn., 2; Oaver- 
hill, Mass.; Hazleton, Pa.; Holyoke, Mass.; Houston, TejL, ; Hudson, 
N. Y. ; Indianapolis, Ind., 3 ; Johnstown, Vn. ; Kuosaa City, Mo., 'd ; 
Keystone, W. Va. ; La Crosse, Wis. ; Lafayett*?, lod. ; La Sall^, 111. ; 
Lawrence, Mass., 2 ; Lewlston, Me. ; Los Angeles, Cal. ; l^nUvllk. Ky.* 11 ; " 
Macon, Ga. ; Manchester, N. H. ; Milwaukee, Wls.« 2 ; Minneapolis, Minn., 
6 ; Newark, N. J., 8 ; New Bedford. Mass. ; Nc^w Britain, Comi. ; New 
Haven, Conn. ; New London, Conn. ; Newport News, Va. ; New York City, 
108 ; Norfolk, Va. ; Norwich, Conn. ; Omaha, Neb. ; Paterson, N. J., 2 ; 
Peekskill, N. Y. ; Peoria, 111.; Philadelphia, Pa., 8; Pittsburg, Pa., 4; 
Portland, Me. ; Providence, R. I., 7 ; Reading, Pa. ; Richmond, Va. ; 
Rochester, N. Y., 2 ; St Joseph, Mo. ; St. Louis, Mo., 10 ; St. Paul, Minn. ; 
Salem, Mass., 2 ; San Antonio, Tex. ; San Francisco, Cal., 3 ; Savannah, 
Ga. ; Schenectady, N. Y. ; Scranton, Pa. ; Shreveport, La. ; South Norwalk, 
Conn. ; Springfield, Mass. ; Syracuse, N. Y., 3 ; Toledo, O., 2 ; Troy, N. Y. ; * 
Utica, N. Y., 2 ; Waco, Tex. ; Washington, D. C. ; Waterbury. Conn., 2 ; 
West Superior, Wis. ; Wilkes-Barre, Pa., 2 ; Woonsocket, R. I. ; Worcester, 
Mass., 2 ; Youngstown, O. 



♦ ORDER FREE SONS OF ZION 
Org. June 4, 1907. Office : New York City 



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ORDER UNITED HEBREWS OF AMERICA 37 

ORDER KESHER SHEL BARZEL 
Org. 1800. Office: 342 B. 60th, New York City 

Biennial Convention of District Grand Lodge No. 1, Feb. 23, 1908, New 
Yorlc City. 

Members, 500. 

Lodges, 34. 

Officebs: Pres., A. N. Rotholz, 123 Liberty, New Yorlc City; Sec, 
Moses Greenbaum, 342 E. 50tb, New York City. 

Executive Committee: William Bernard, H. Ossinsky, S. Luckstone, 

Lodges : Albany, N. Y. ; Boston, Mass. ; Brooklyn, N. Y., 2 : Buffalo, 
N. Y. ; Elmira, N. Y. ; Uartford, Conn. ; Jersey City, N. J. ; Kings^n, 
N. Y. ; Newark, N. J., 2 ; New llaven. Conn. ; New York City, 18 ; Ogdens- 
burg, N. Y. ; Poughkeepsie, N. Y. ; Rochester, N. Y. ; Syracuse, N. Y. ; 
Troy, N. Y. 



ORDER KNIGHTS OF JOSEPH 
Org. Feb. 14, 1896. Office: 34 Blackstone Bldg., Cleveland, Ohio 
Seventh Biennial Convention, Aug. 12-16, 1906, Philadelphia, Pa. 
Members, 8986. 
Lodges, 57. 

Officers : Supreme Commander, A. Ellis, 971 Liberty, Pittsburg, Pa. ; 
First Vice-Supreme Commander, N. Meyers, Buffalo, N. Y. ; Second Vice- 
Supreme Commander, U. Adelstein, Cleveland, O. ; Third Vice-Supreme 
Commander. A. Blachschleger, Cincinnati, O. ; Supreme Sec, D. J. Zlnner, 
Cleveland, O. ; Supreme Treas., N. L. Uolstein, Cleveland, O. ; iilndowment 
Treas., A. Jacobs, Cleveland, O. ; Supreme Counsellor, J. C. Bloch, Cleve- 
land, O. 

Lodges: Buffalo, N. Y., 4; Camden, N. J.; Chicago, 111., 8; Cin- 
cinnati, O., 5 ; Cleveland, O., 7 ; Columbus, O. ; Indianapolis, Ind. ; Louis- 
ville, Ky. ; Nashville, Tenn. ; New Haven, Conn. ; Puterson, N. J., 2 ; 
Philadelphia, Pa., 9 ; Pittsburg, i'a., 5 ; Rochester, N. Y. ; Rock Island, 
111. ; St. Louis, Mo., 4. 



ORDER KNIGHTS OF ZION 
(WESTERN FEDERATION) 
Org. Oct. 25, 1898. Office: Chicago, III. 
Eleventh Annual Convention, Jan. 10-13, 1908, Chicago, 111. 
Members, 2000: Male, 1600 ; female, 100. 
Gates, 25. 

Officers : Grand Master, Leon Zolotkoff, Criminal Court Bldg. ; Grand 
Vice-Master, George Sultan ; Grand Treas., Max Goodman, Grand Sec, 
Max Shulman, 1014 Ashland Blk. ; all of Chicago, 111. 

Gates : Chicago, 111., 11 ; Lafayette, Ind. ; Lincoln, Neb. ; Marinette, 
Wis. ; Maywood, III. ; Milwaukee, Wis., 3 ; Omaha, Neb., 3 ; Shreveport, 
La. ; Sioux City, la., 3 ; South Bend. Ind. ; Wichita, Kan. 



♦ ORDER UNITED HEBREWS OF AMERICA 
Headquarters : Boston, Mass. 
Annual Convention, June 2, 1907. 
Officers : Grand Master, William Slutskl ; Grand Sec, S. Goldman. 

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38 AMERICAN JEWISH YEAR BOOK 

PROGRESSIVE ORDER OF THE WEST 

Org. Feb. 13, 1896. Office : 11th and Franklin Ay., St Louis, Mo. 

Twelfth Annual Convention, July 26, 1908, Chicago, 111. 

Members, 6012. 

Lodges, 50. 

Officebs : Grand Master, B. Frank, 3103 Thomas, St. Louis. Mo. ; 
First Deputy Grand Master. Gus. Cytron, St. Louis, Mo. ; Second Deputy 
Grand Master, B. Stone, Chicago, 111. ; Third Deputy Grand Master, M. 
Droelich, Kansas City, Mo. ; Grand Sec, 3am. Schwartzberg, 1334 Walton 
Av., St. Louis, Mo. ; Grand Treas., H. Blbert, St. Ix>uis, Mo. ; Beneficiary 
Treas., John EUman, St Louis, Mo. ; Counsellor of the Order, M. Barnett, 
Louisville, Ky. 

Lodges: Charleston, W. Va. ; Chicago, IlL, 15; Cincinnati, O. ; Cleve- 
land, O. ; Dallas, Tex. ; Detroit, Mich. ; Fort Worth, Tex. ; Houston, Tex. ; 
Indianapolis, Ind. ; Kansas City, Kan. ; Kansas City, Mo., 3 ; Louisville, 
Ky. ; Milwaukee, Wis., 3; Minneapolis, Minn., 2; St Louis, Mo., 16; 
St Paul, Minn. 

THE SOCIETY OF AMERICAN CANTORS 
Org. May 27, 1903. Office: New York City 
Third (Fifteenth) Annual Convention, June 24, 1907, Philadelphia, Pa. 
Members, 35. 

Officers : Pres., Ed. Kartschmaroff, 1185 Lexington Av., N. Y. C. ; 
Sec, Wm. Loewenberg, 2034 N. 11th, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Executive Committee: The Officers, and William Armhold, Theo. 
Guinsburg, J. Schwanenfeld, and H. Silverman. 



THE SOCIETY OF JEWISH ART 
Org. Feb. 4, 1908. Office: 489 5th Av., New York City 

Members, 200. 

Officers : Pres., Jacob Teschner, 134 E. 61st ; Vlce-Pres., Louis Loeb, 
Samuel Strauss, Henrietta Szold. all of N. Y. C, Julian W. Mack, Chicago. 
111.: Treas., Alfred E. Peck; Sec, Louis Lipsky, 489 5th Av., both of 
N. Y. C. 

Executive Council: The Officers, and B. Cassel, Herbert Frieden- 
wald, Rubin Goldmark. Richard Gottheil, Lewis M. Isaacs, Joseph Jacobs, 
Beatrice Lowensteln, J. L. Magnes, Leon MoisseieiT, David Pinski, Bernard 
Q. Richards, Mrs. S. Schechter, and Max Spicker. s 



SOUTHERN RABBINICAL ASSOCIATION. 
Org. 1902 

Fourth Annual Convention (postponed), Dec 24-26, 1907, Nashville, 
Tenn. 

Members, 30. 

Publication : ** Conference Papers and Sermon delivered at the Fourth 
Annual Convention." 

Officers : Pres., Isidore Lewlnthal, 810 Demonbreun, Nashville, Tenn. ; 
Vlce-Pres., Henry Barnsteln, Houston, Tex. ; Treas., Morris Newfield, 
Birmingham, Ala. ; Sec., Moise Bergman, 1036 Sonlat, New Orleans, La. 

Executive Committee : Max Heller, New Orleans, La. ; David Marx, 
Atlanta, Qa. ; B. C. Ehrenreich, Montgomery, Ala. 



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UNION OP AMERICAN HEBREW CONGREGATIONS 39 



THE UNION OF AMERICAN HEBREW CONGREGATIONS 
Org. 1873. Offics: Cincinnati, O. 

Twentieth Council, Jan. 16-17, 1907, Atlanta, Ga. 

Members : 181 Congregations. 

Three Departments : 
I. Hebbew Union College. Pres. Board of Governors, fiemhard 

Bettmann, Cincinnati, O. 
II. Board of Dklrqates on Citil Rights. Chairman, Simon Wolf, 
700 X4th, N. W., Washington, D. C. 

in. Board of Synagogue and School £)xtension. Chairman, Louis 
Krohn ; Director, Alfred T. Godshaw ; both of Cincinnati, O, 

Officers : Pres., Louis J. Goldman, 4th and Elm, Cincinnati, O. ; 
Vlce-Pres., Harry Hart, Chicago, 111. ; Treas., Louis Krohn, Cfnclnnatl, O. : 
Sec, Lipman Levy, Fourth Nat'l Bk. Bldg., Cincinnati. O. 

Board of Directors : Isaac W. Bemheim, Louisville, Ky. ; Bemhard 
Bettmann, Cincinnati, O. ; Josiah Cohen, Pittsburg, Pa. ; Solomon Fox, 
Cincinnati, O. ; J. Walter Freiberg, Cincinnati, O. ; Bernard Ginsburg, 
Detroit, Mich. ; Chas. Hutzler. Richmond. Va. ; Samuel Kats, Omaha, Neb. ; 
Adolf Kraus, Chicago, 111.; Victor H. Kriegshaber, Atlanta, Ga. ; Moritx 
Loth, Cincinnati, O. ; Baruch Mahler, Cleveland, O. ; Martin A. Marks, 
Cleveland, O. ; Max B. May, Cincinnati, O. ; Ellas Michael, St. Louis, Mo. ; 
Adolph S. Ochs, N. Y. C. ; Abram Oppenhelmer, Buffalo, N. Y. ; Marcus 
Rauh, Pittsburg, Pa. ; Sigmund Rhelnstrom, Cincinnati, O. ; Julius Rosen- 
wald, Chicago, 111.; Jacob H. Schiff, N. Y. C. ; Emil Selig, Phila., Pa.; 
Charles Shohl, Cincinnati, O. ; Isaac Strouse, Baltimore. Md. ; Solomon 
Sulzberger, N. Y. C. ; Julius Weis, New Orleans, La. ; Samuel Woolner, 
Peoria, 111. 

Congregations : Akron, O., Akron Hebrew ; Albany, Ga., B'nai Israel ; 
Albany, N. Y., Beth Emeth ; Alexandria, La., Gemiluth Hassodim; Alex- 
andria, Ya., Beth EI ; Altoona, Pa., Mountain City Hebrew Reform ; Am- 
sterdam, N. Y., Temple of Israel ; Anniston, Ala., Beth El ; Atlanta, Ga., 
Gemilath Chesed (Hebrew Benevolent) ; Atlantic City, N. J., Beth Israel ; 
Augusta, Ga., Children of Israel ; Baltimore, Md., Baltimore Hebrew, Oheb 
Shalom ; Bay City, Mich., Anshe Chesed ; Beaumont, Tex., Emanuel ; 
Birmingham, Ala., Emanu-El ; Bloom ington. III., Moses Montefiore ; Brook- 
lyn. N. Y., Temple Beth Elohim, Temple Israel ; Brunswick, Ga., Beth 
Tenllah ; Buffalo, N. Y., Temple Beth Zion ; Cairo, 111., Montefiore ; Camden, 
Ark., Beth El Emeth; Charlestown, W. Va., Hebrew Educational Society; 
Charlottesville, Va., Beth Israel ; Chattanooga, Tenn. Mizpah ; Chicago, 
111.. Anshe Mayriv, Chicago Sinai, Isaiah Temple, North Chicago Hebrew; 
Cincinnati. O., Bene Israel, Bene Yeshurun, Sherlth Israel Ahabat Achim ; 
Cleveland, O., Tif ereth Israel ; Columbia, S. C, Tree of Life ; Columbus, 
Ga., B'nai Israel ; Columbus, O., Benai Israel ; Cumberland, Md., Be'er 
Chayim ; Dallas, Tex., Emanu-El ; Davenport, Iowa, B'ne Israel ; Dayton, 
O., Bnai Yesnurun ; Demopolis, Ala., B'nai Jeshurun ; Denver, CoIo.> 
Emanuel ; Des Moines, Iowa, Bnai Yeshurun ; Detroit, Mich., Beth El ; 
Easton, Pa., Brith Sholem ; El Paso, Tex., Mount Sinai; E>rie, Pa., Anshe 
Chesed Reform ; Evansville, Ind., Bnai Israel ; Forth Smith, Ark., United 
Hebrew; Fort Wayne, Ind., Achduth Yesholom ; Fort Worth, Tex., Beth 
El ; Fremont, O., Fremont Hebrew ; Gainesville, Tex.. United Hebrew ; 
Galesburg, III., Sons of Judah; Galveston, Tex., Bnai Israel; Goldsboro, 
N. C, Oheb Scholem ; Grand Rapids, Mich., Emanuel ; Greenville, Miss., 
Hebrew Union ; Greenwood, Miss., Beth Israel ; Hamilton, O., B'nai Israel ; 
Harrisburg, Pa., Ohev Sholom Reform ; Hazleton, Pa., Beth Israel ; Helena, 
Ark., Beth El ; Helena, Mont, Emanu-El ; Henderson, Ky., Adath Israel ; 
Honesdale, Pa., Beth Israel ; Hot Springs, Ark., House of Israel ; Hunting- 
ton, W. Va., Oheb Sholem ; Huntsville, Ala., Bnai Sholom ; Indianapolis, 
Ind., Indianapolis Hebrew ; Jackson, Mich., Beth Israel ; Jackson, Miss., 
Beth Israel ; Jackson, Tenn., B'nai Israel ; Jacksonville, Fla., Ahavatb 



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40 AMERICAN JEWISH YEAR BOOK 



Chesed ; Jonesboro, Ark., Temple Israel ; Kalamazoo, Mich., B'nal Israel ; 
Kansas City, Mo., B'nai Jehudah ; Knoxville, Tenn., Beth-El ; Kokomo, Ind., 
Shaare Shomaylm ; La Crosse, Wis., Anshe Chesed ; Lafayette, Ind., Ahavas 
Achim ; Lafayette, La., Lafayette Congregation ; Lake Charles, La., Temple 
Sinai ; Lancaster, i'a., Shaaray Shomalm ; Leadyille, Colo., Israel ; Lexing- 
ton, Miss., Lexington Hebrew ; Ligonier, Ind., Ahavath Sholom ; Lima, O., 
Ahabath Achim ; Lincoln, 111., Beth El ; Lincoln, Neb., Bnai Jeshurun ; 
Little Rock,, Ark., B'nai Israel ; Logansport, Ind., Beth El ; Los Angeles, 
Cal., Bnai Brith ; Louisville, Ky., Adath Israel ; Macon, Ga., Beth Israel ; 
Madison, Ind., Adath Israel; Marshall, Tex., Moses Monteflore; Meadvllle, 
Pa., Meadvllle Hebrew ; Memphis, Tenn., Children of Israel ; Meridian, 
Miss.. Beth Israel ; Milwaukee, Wis., Emanu-El ; Mobile, Ala., Shaarai 
Shomaylm ; Monroe, La., Bnai Israel ; Montgomery, Ala., Kahl Mont- 
gomery ; Mount Vernon, Ind., Anshe Israel ; Muncie, Ind., Beth El ; 
Nashville, Tenn., Temple Ohavai Sholom ; Natchez, Miss., B'nai Israel ; 
Natchitoches, La., Benai Israel; Newark, N. J., B'nai Jeshurun; New 
Iberia, La., Gates of Prayer ; New Orleans, La., Gates of Mercy of the 
Dispersed of Judah, Temple Sinai ; New York City, Ahawath Chesed Shaar 
Hashomayim, Temple Beth El, Temple Emanu-El, Kodeph Sholom ; Niagara 
Falls, N. Y., Temple Beth El ; Omaha, Neb., Temple Israel ; Owens boro, 
Ky., Adath Israel ; Paducah, Ky., Temple Israel ; Palestine, Tex., Beth 
Israel ; Pensacola, Fla., Beth-El ; Peoria, 111., Anshei Emeth ; Peru, Ind., 
Or Zion; Petersburg, Va., Kodef Sholem ; Philadelphia, Pa., Keneseth 
Israel, Kodeph Shalom; Pine Blulf, Ark., Anshe Emeth; Plqua, O., Anshe 
Emeth ; Pittsburg, Pa., Rodeph Shalom Reform ; Plaquemine, La., Ohavei 
Sholom; P«rt Gibson, Miss., Gemiluth Chassed; Portland, Ore., Beth 
Israel ; Portsmouth, O., Beneh Abraham ; Providence, R. I., Sons of Israel 
and David ; Quincy, 111., B'nai Sholem ; Reading, Pa., Ohev Sholom ; 
Richmond, Va., Beth Ahabah ; Rochester, N. Y., Berith Kodesh ; Sacra- 
mento, Cal., Bnai Israel ; Saginaw, Mich., Beth El ; St Joseph, Mo., Adath 
Joseph ; St. Louis, Mo., Temple Israel, Shaare Emeth ; St. Paul, Minn., 
Mount Zion Hebrew; San Antonio, Tex., Temple Beth El; San Diego, 
Cal., Beth Israel ; Sandusky, O., Beth Israel ; San Francisco, Cal., Emanu- 
El, Sherith Israel ; Savannah, Ga., Mickve Israel ; Schenectady, N. Y., 
Schaari Schamajim ; Scranton, Pa., Anshe Chesed ; Selma, Ala., Mishkan 
Israel ; Shreveport, La., Hebrew Zion ; Springfield, Mo., Temple Israel ; 
Springfield, O., Ohev Zaduka ; Stockton, Cal., Ryhim Ahoovim ; Syracuse, 
N. Y., Society of Concord ; Tampa, Fla., Schaarai Zedek ; Terre Haute, 
Ind., Temple Israel ; Texarkana, Tex., Mount Sinai ; Titusvill.e, Pa., B'nai 
Zion ; Toledo, O., Shomer Emonim ; Trinidad, Colo., Aaron ; Uniontown, 
Pa., Temple Israel ; Vlcksburg, Miss., Anshe Chesed ; Victoria, Tex., 
Bnai Israel ; Wabash, Ind., Rodef Sholom ; Washington, D. C, Washington 
Hebrew ; Wheeling, W. Va., Leshem Shomaylm ; Wichita, Kan., Emanu-El ; 
Wilkes-Barre, Pa., B'nai Brith; Williamsport, Pa., Beth Hasholom ; York, 
Pa., Beth Israel, Hebrew Reform ; Youngstown, O., Rodeph Sholem ; 
Zanesville, O., Keneseth Israel. 

HEBREW UNION COLLEGE 
724 W. 6th, Cincinnati, O. 
Org. Oct., 1875 . 
Twenty-fifth Commencement, June 27, 1908, Cincinnati, O. 
Graduates, 1008, 3. 
Whole number of graduates, 126. 

Officebs : Pres., Bemhard Bettman, Cincinnati, O. ; Vice-Pres., Ed- 
ward L. Heinsheimer, Cincinnati, O. ; Sec, Isaac Bloom, P. O. Box 266, 
Cincinnati, O. 

Governors : The Officers, and Henry Berkowltz, Phila., Pa. ; Alfred M. 
Cohen, Cincinnati, O. ; Nathan Drucker, Cincinnati, O. ; Maurice J. Frei- 



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UNION OF ORTHODOX JEWISH CONGREGATIONS 41 



berjr, Cincinnati, O. ; Emll G. Hlrsch. Chlcasro, III. ; Harry M. Hoffhelmer, 
rinclnnntl, O. ; Arnold Kohn, Phlla.. Pa. : Joseph Krnnskopf. Phlla. Pa. ; 
Jacob Kronacher. Cincinnati, O. : Max Landsberg. Rochester. N. Y. : Chas. 
S. T^vl. Peoria, 111. : J. I^onnrd Tievy, Plttsburjr, Pa. : Myer Oettln|?er. Cin- 
cinnati, O. : .Jacob Ottenhelmer, Cincinnati, O. : David Phlllpson, Cincinnati, 
O. ; Emll Pollak, Cincinnati, O. ; M. Samfleld. Memphis, Tenn. ; Joseph 
Silverman, N. Y. C. ; Louis Stern, N. Y. C. : Joseph Stolz. Chicago, 111. 

Faculty : Pres.. and Professor of Homlletlcs, Theology, and Hellenistic 
Literature. Rabbi Kaufmann Kohler. Ph. D. : Professor of Ethics and Peda- 
p:ogy. Rabbi Louis Grossman, D. D. ; Professor of Jewish History and 
Literature (Registrar), Gotthard Deutsch, Ph.D.; Professor of Talmud, 
Ephralm Feldman, B. D. ; Professor of Jewish Philosophy, David Ncumark, 
Ph. D. ; Instructor In Exesretlc and Targumic Literature, Slegmund Mann- 
helmer, B. L. : Instructor In Biblical Exegesis, Moses Buttenwleser. Ph. D. ; 
Instructor In Bible and Semitic Languages, .Julian Morgenstern, Ph. D. 

Special Instructors : Sociology with reference to Jewish Philanthropy, 
Boris D. Bogen, Ph. D. ; Elocution, Jennie Mannhelmcr, B. L. ; Lecturer on 
Hlstorv of the Reform Movement, and the Activities of the Rabbi, Rabbi 
David Phlllpson, D. D. ; Traditional Jewish Music, Joseph Mandelberg and 
A. Grodsky. 

Librarian : Adolph S. Oko. 

Corresponding Members of the Faculty: Aaron Hahn (1887). 
David Woolf Marks (1891), David Davidson (1892), Emll G. Hlrsch 
(1901). 

ALUMNI ASSOCIATION OP THE HEBREW UNION COLLEGE 
Org. 1883 
Twenty-second Annual Convention, July 4, 1908, Frankfort. Mich. 
Officers : Pres., Leo M. Franklin, Detroit, Mich. ; Vlce-Pres., Morris 
Newfield, Birmingham, Ala. ; Treas., Marcus Salzman, Wllkes-Barre, Pa. ; 
Sec, Jonah B. Wise, Portland, Ore. 



THE UNION OP ORTHODOX JEWISH CONGREGATIONS OP 

THE UNITED STATES AND CANADA 

Org. June 8, 1898. Office : 99 Central Pk. W., New York City 

Fourth Biennial Convention, June 9, 1907, New York City. 

Officers: Pres., H. Perelra Mendes, 99 Central Park W., New York 
City ; Vlce-Pres., Meldola de Sola, Montreal. Can. ; H. Frledenwald, Balti- 
more, Md. ; Simon M. Roeder, New York City ; Treas., Jacob Hecht, New 
York City; Sec, Isidore Hershfleld, New York City; J. Buchhalter, New 
York City ; Albert Lucas, 56 W. 106th, New York City. 

Executive Committee: H. Abramovltz, Montreal, Can.; Cyrus Adler, 
Washington, D. C. ; Joseph Mayor Asher, N. Y. C. ; A. M. Ashlnsky, Pitts- 
burg, Pa. ; Joseph Baum, N. Y. C. : Gustav Cohn, Phlla., Pa. ; Gabriel 
Davidson, N. Y. C. ; Jacob de Haas, Boston. Mass. ; B. Drachman, N. Y. C. ; 
Julius J. Dukas, N. Y. C. ; Henry Flschel, N. Y. C. ; Meyer Goldberg. N. Y. 
r. ; Henry P. Goldstein. N. Y. C. ; J. H. Greenstone, Phlla., Pa. ; Jacob 
M. Guedalla, N. Y. C. ; Hyman Helsman, Brooklyn, N. Y. : Henry llloway, 
N. Y. C. ; Philip Jaches, N. Y. C. ; Mordecal M. Kaplan, N. Y. C. ; Edwin 
Kaufman, N. Y. C. ; C. H. Kauvar, Denver, Colo. ; Philip Klein, N. Y. C. ; 
Louis E. Levy, Phlla., Pa. ; E. Lewln-Bpsteln, N. Y. C. ; M. S. Margolles, 
N. Y. C. ; Henry S. Morals, N. Y. C. ;M. Neustaedter, N. Y. C. ; M. H. 
Phillips, N. Y. C. ;Slmon Roeder, N. Y. C. ; Henry V. Rothschild, N. Y. C. ; 
Abraham E. Rothstem, N. Y. C. ; S. Schaflfer, Baltimore, Md. ; H. W. 
Schneeberger, Baltimore, Md. ; Hyman S. Shoher, N. Y. C. ; Abraham L. 
Wolbarst. IS. Y. C. 



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43 AMERICAN JEWISH YEAR BOOK 

UNITED CJLOTH HAT AND CAP MAKERS OP NORTH 
AMERICA 
Org. Mar. 20, 1001. Office : 62 B. 4th, N. Y. C. 
Sixth Annual Convention, May 1, 1907, N. Y. C. Meets biennially 
thereafter. 

Members, 3000: Male, 2600; female, 400. 
Locals, 25. 

Secbbtart : M. Zuckerman, 62 E. 4th, N. Y. C. 

BxBCUTiATB Committee: 8. Balsam, A. Bloom, L. Epstein, H. Hinder, 
H. Levin, M. Mannes, L. Rosenbloom, I. Shapiro, and M. Wartenberg. 

Locals : Albany, N. Y. ; Baltimore, Md. ; Boston, Mass., 2 ; Brooklyn, 
N. Y. ; Chicago, 111., 2 ; Cleveland, Ohio ; Detroit, Mich. ; Hartford, Conn. ; 
Indianapolis, Ind. ; Milwaukee, Wis. ; New Haven, Conn. ; New York City, 
7 ; Philadelphia, Pa. ; Providence, R. I. ; San Francisco, Cal. 



* UNITED GARMENT WORKERS OP AMERICA 

Office: Bible House, New York City 
Officers : Pres., Thomas A. Rickert, 275 La Salle, Chicago, III. ; 
Treas., Charles Baker, 1109 Lodi, Syracuse, N. Y. ; Sec, B. A. Lafrger, 116 
Bible House, New York City; General Auditor, I. Hashkins, 458 Pulaski, 
Brooklyn. 

Executive Committee : Robert Noren, Chicago, 111. ; Tictor Altman, 
Buffalo. N. Y. ; Maler Schwarz, Cincinnati, O. ; S. L. Landers. Hamilton, 
Ont, Can. ; Margaret C. Daley, New York City ; B. Abrams, N. Y. C. ; 
Abraham Gordon, Baltimore, Md. 

Locals : Albany, N. Y. ; Baltimore, Md. ; Boston, Mass. ; Brooklyn, 
N. Y. ; Buffalo, N. Y. ; Montreal, Can. ; New York City ; Perth Amboy, 
N. J. ; Philadelphia, Pa. ; Pittsburg, Pa. ; Rosenhayn, N. J. ; St. Louis, Mo. 



UNITED ORTHODOX RABBIS OP AMERICA 
Org. Tammuz 24, 5662 (1902) 
Sixth Annual Convention, July 25, 1908, Paterson, N. J. 
Members, 85. 

Officers : Pres., Bernard L. Levlnthal, 716 Pine, Philadelphia, Pa. ; 
Vice-Pres. : S. Sivitz, Pittsburg, Pa. ; S. Rosenberg, Buffalo, N. Y. ; Sec, 
Jehudah P. Israelite, 196 Chestnut, Chelsea, Mass. 



Z B T FRATERNITY 
(ZION BE-MISHPAT TIPPADEH) 
Now known as Zeta Beta Tau, ranking as an Intercoliegifite Greek- 
letter fraternity, open to Jewish men. 

Org. 1898; Inc. 1907. Office: New York City 
Ninth Annual Convention, Dec. 23, 1907, New York City. 
Members, 300. 

Officebs : Supreme Nasi (Pres.), Arthur S. Unger, SO W. 128th; 
Supreme Sophar (Sec), Simon Judah Juenefsky, N. Y, University, both 
of N. Y. C. 

Chapters located at the Boston University, College of the City of New 
York, Columbia University, Cornell University, Jefferson Medical College, 
Ix>ng Island Medical College, New York University, and the University of 
Pennsylvania ; has a Graduate Club in N. Y. C. 



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California] LOCAL ORGANIZATIONS 43 



ADDITIONS TO THE DIBECTOBY OF JEWISH 

LOCAL ORGANIZATIONS IN THE 

UNITED STATES 

Published in the American Jewish Year Book for 5668 

The following list supplements the Dibectoey of Jewish Local Oe- 
GANizATioNS IN THE UNITED STATES published In the Ameeican Jewish 
Ybab Book. 5668. It enumerates the organizations which have come into 
existence since July 15, 1907, and it includes, also, a few oider organiza- 
tions, inadvertently omitted from the Directory in the prieceding Teae 
Book. The information contained in this list was obtained from news- 
paper accounts or secondary sources. 

The following abbreviations have been eniployed : Cbm. = Cemetery ; 
Co. = Congregation ; Che. = Charity ; CL. = Club ; Bduc. = Educational ; 
M. B. = Mutual Benefit. 

ALABAMA 

BIBXIKaKAX 

Cl. Harmony Glnb. 

Young Women's Hebrew Association, 

XONTGOXERY 
CO. Beth £1. Org. May 1, 1908. Louis Pizitz. 

ARIZONA 

BISBEE 

Co. Congregation. Org. Oct., 1907. Sec, Abraham B. Cummins. 

ARKANSAS 

HOT SFBINaS 
Educ. Daughters of Xiriam (for Bible study). Org. Oct., 1907. Sec, 
Stella Fellheimer. 

CALIFORNIA 

LOB AKGELES 

Co. Independent Sons of Israel. Org. Sept., 1907. Cantor, J. Weinstock. 

Che. Hebrew Oimllus Hasodim Association, 114 Rose. Org. 1901. H. 

Brandman, 150 S. Utah. 

Jewish Orphan Asylum. _ 

Cl. Independent Political Club. Re-org. Feb. 12, 1908. Sec, Harry 

Lyon. 
Educ. Moses Mendelssohn Settlement House, 738 Turner. Pres., Mrs. B. 
Hlrach Baruch, 1168 W. 38th. 
Talmud Torah, Rose St. 



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44 AMERICAN JEWISH YEAR BOOK [Connecticut 

OAKLAND 
Co. Beth Ahntham. Org. Dec, 1907. Pres., I. Livingstone. 
Educ. Hebrew School. Dr. B. Mayerowitz. 

PASADENA 
Cg. Agndath Achim. Org. Aug., 1907. H. Lipsky, 430 Lincoln At. 

SAN FBANOISOO 
Co. Bnai David. 

Mikvat Israel, 19th lH>t. Talencia and Guerrero. 
Mokem Israel. Inc. 1907. Morris Cohler. 
Cl. The airls' Clnh, 410 Utah. Snpt., Miss Wolfsohn. 

Philomath Cluh. Org. 1894. Sec. HattJe Shetdemar. 
Educ. Jewish Educational Society, California and Webster. Re-org. Feb. 
11. 190«. Sec. Dr. .T. NIeto. 1769 Bush. 
Little Women Settlement, Potrero Av. and 17th. Org. 1901. Sec, 

F. O. Redlick, 1264 Page. 
Xachzlkal Torah. Org. Sept., 1007. Connected with Cong. Keneseth 
Israel. Study of Hebrew Literature. Instructor, Abraham Epp. 
M. B. Boumanlan Hebrew Protective Leagne. Org. March 23, 1908. Sec, 
O. Bloomfield. 

COLOEADO 

OOLFAZ 
Educ. West Colfax SettlemeBt. 

CBIPPLE CBEEX 
Educ. Jewish Sunday School. Org. Feb., 1908. 

DENVEB 
Chr. Sheltering Home for Jewish Children. Org. Feb., 1908. Sec, 
Sol. Wolf. Inc April, 1908. 
Society for the Home for Incurables. Sec, Mrs. Wolfner. 
Cl. Tuesday Club. Mrs. M. Kleiner. 

West Side Debating Society, 16th A v. and Pearl. 
The Women's Club, Olenarm St. Sec, Mrs. Grace Curtis. 
M. B. Mutual Benefit Society. Organized by patients of the National 
Jewish Hospital. Supt, Dr. Collins. 

PTIEBLO 
Co. Orthodox Jewish Congregation (1907). 
Cl. Helaesheaa. 

Jewish Political Club. 

TBINIDAD 
Cl. Trinidad Club. 

CONNECTICUT 

ANXENSYILLE 
M. B. Jewish Mutual Aid Society. Org. 1908. 

BRIDGEPOBT 
Chr. Hebrew Aid Association. Org. Feb. 11, 1908. Sec, A. Donnenberg. 

DANBTTBY 
Chr. Hebrew Belief Association. Org. 1908. 



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Florida] LOCAL ORGANIZATIONS 45 



KA&TFOSB 

Cem. Hartford Free Burial Booiety. 

Louii Feiner Lodge, I. 0. B. A. Cemetery, Whittemore Park. 
Chr. Hebrew Ladiei Benevolent Booiety and Home for the Aged, 83 

Wooster. Orjf. 1901. Sec, Mrs. I. Newman. 
Cl. Crimson Soolal Clnb. Inc. Sept, 1007. Louis P. Seligman. 

Family Association. Org. May 8, 1008. Sec, Morris R. Freiberg. 
M. B. Hebrew ProtectlTe Association. 

HEBIDEir 
Chr. Hebrew Belief Society. 

Bduc. Hebrew Institute. (School and synagoguej Sec, BenJ. Krents- 
man. Ladies' Auxiliary. Sec, Mrs. S. Freedman. 

MIBDLBTOWK 
Co. Congregation, Union St. 

NEW HAYBir 
Chr. Bisters of Zlon Charitable Booiety. Org. 1002. Sec. Mrs. Maretz. 
Educ. Hebrew Institute, 255 George. Supt, Bzekiel LeiiTltt 

NEW LONDON 
Ckm. Four Cemeteries, all at Jordan, belonging respectively to Congre- 
fmtion Ahavat Chesed (2), New liOndon Independent Sick Benefit 
Society, and Order Brith Abraham. 

NOKWICH 

Cg. Sons of Israel. Org. 1007. 

BTAHFOKD 

Cl. Hebrew Bodal and Political Club. 

WAT£ftBtTBT 
Cl. Hebrew Kepublloan Club. Org. Sept., 1007. 

WILLIKANTIC 
Cem. Aaron P<Bck Hebrew Association. Inc. July, 1007. 
Co. Anshe Sholom Org. April 20, 1008. Sec. Samuel Ballon. 

DISTEICT OP COLUMBIA 

WASHINGTON 
Cem. United Hebrew Cemetery, Glen Echo, Rockyille, Md. 
M. B. Anshey Bphard Kranken UnterstUtzungs. Org. Dec, 1007. Sec, 
M. Schnitzer. 

FLORIDA 

JACKSONVIZiLE 
Cl. Hebrew Democratic Club. Pres., Harry Glickstein. 

Jewish Women's League. Pres., Mrs. A. Zacharlas, 217 B. Monroe. 

HEY WEST 
Cl. Young Men's Hebrew Association. Org. Feb., 1008. Pres., J. Englar. 
4 



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46 AMERICAN JEWISH YEAR BOOK [Illinois 



QEOKGIA 

ATLANTA 
Educ. Atlanta Kelnrew School. Org. 1908. Supt, J. M. Leyln. 

BAINBBIDOS 
Co. Oonfregation. 

BKVKBWICX 
Chb. Bnmiwlek Hebrew Aisooiatlon. Org. Aug., 1907. 

ILLINOIS 

CHAMPAXOK 
Cl. " Ivrim." 

CHIOAOO 
Co. Dovar Bholem. 413 La Salle Av. Rabbi Lercy. 
Chr. B'nai B'rith Free Employment Bureau. Supt., H. Eliassof. 
Helping Hand Charity Society. 
Home Findinr Aiiociation. Org. 1907. Sapt., Jennie Mandel, 53d 

and Ellis Av. 
Home for Boys, 1813 Indiana Ay. Org. Sept., 1907. Pres., Mrs. 

Joseph Wolf, 36 Roslyn PI. 
Hungarian Charity Society. Org. 1871. Pres.. Dr. A. D. Wemir. 
Jewish Aid Society of Onicago. Org. Oct. 22, 1907. Sec., Louis 

M. Kahn. 
Jewish Orthodox Hospital. 

Toung I oiks Charity Oluh. Pres., Hattie Schreiber. 
Cl. Chrystal Cluh, Molner Hall. Sec, Dr. D. J. Weiss. 

Desoath Oluh (Alpha Chapter). Sec, Le Roy L. Schloss, 674 48th 

PI. 
Oretchen Oluh. Sec., Mabel Lewis. 
Helping Hand. Sec, A. O. Epstein. 
Jewish Civic League, Blue Island Av. and 12th. Org. May, 1908. 

Sec. M. Shulman. 
Kuth Oluh. 3622 Calumet Av. Org. Nov. 19, 1905. Sec, Mrs. H. S. 

Schlossman. 
Scepter Cluh, Ellis Club House. 3516 Ellis Av. 
Thursdsy Oluh. Sec, Mrs. I. Weil. 
TJlmus Oluh, 3140 Indiana Av. 
▼eroniar Oluh, Unity Club House. 
Educ. Esther Falkenstein Settlement, 714 Humboldt. 
M. B. Beaconsfleld Oluh. Sec, Charles Schiff. 

New Light Society. Org. 1897. Sec, Joseph Hauser, 1069 E. 56th. 

JOLIET 
Chb. Hebrew Belief Association. Supt., Samuel Rabinovit<*h. 
Cl. Independent Hebrew League. Inc. April 6, 1908. Sec, Lewis K. 
Cohen. 

KAXTKAKEE 
Co. Aaron Evelove, S. Washington Av. 

XATWOOD 
Cem. Cemetery. 

SPBINa YALLEY 
Chr. Hebrew Aid Society. Org. 1907. Sec. Mollie Shonhouse. 



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Kentucky] LOCAL OROANIZATIONS 47 



INDIANA 

ANDEH80K 
Chr. Friday Afternoon Olnb. Mrs. B. L. Bing. 

INDIAKAP0LX8 
Co. Bene Jaoob. 
Chr. Jewldi Foiter Home. Org. 1907. Matron, Mrs. Jackson, 84 S. 

Meridian. 
Cl. Indianapolis Olnb, N. Meridian St. Org. 1907. Henry Kahn. 

HEW ALBAlSnt 
Chr. Oomelia Memorial Orpbans' Home. 

SOTTTH BEND 
Chr. Hebrew Bisters' ZK>an Assooiation. 
Cl. West End Hebrew. Literary Society. 

IOWA 

DAVENPOBT 
Chr. Trl-Oity Jewlsb Associated Cbarities. Org. Sept. 22, 1907. Treas., 
J. J. Taxman, Rock Island, III. 

DEB KOINEB 
Chr. Hebrew Free Loan Bociety. Org. Oct., 1907. Sec, B. Mendelsohn. 

1CA80N OITT 

Cg. Oongregation. Rabbi, D. Margules. 

BIOUX CITY 
Cg. Adath Bholom. Org. 1907. 
Cl. Birthday Olnb. Mrs. Louis Hattenbach. 

Literary Olnb. Rabbi Ranch, 1501 Nebraska. 

Thursday Olnb. Mrs. Greenbanm. 

Wednesday Sewing Olub. Mrs. G. I. Trauerman. 
Educ. Jewish Free Library Association. 

KANSAS 

KANSAS OITT 
Cl. Jewish Bepnblioan Olnb. Sec, L. Rashbaum. 

KENTUCKY 

LEXINGTON 



Cl. Tovng Men's Olnb. 



LOXnSVILLE 



Cl. Musical Study Olub. Sec, Mrs. Fred. Levy 
Neighborhood House. 
Woman's Olub. 



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48 AMERICAN JEWISH TEAR BOOK [Hassachnsetts 

LOUISIANA 

Ve# Orleaiii 
Chr. Hebrew Benevolent Society. 
Sophie ITewooml) Inititution. 

MAINE 

ATTOUSTA 
Cg. Congregation. 

POKTLAND 
Chr. TTnited Hebrew Charitiei of Portland. Sec., J. Rosenberg. 

SAKDOLPH 

Educ. Keligioni Society. Joseph Caplan. 

MAEYLAND 

BALTIXOBE 

Chr. Tonng Ladies' Benevolent Legion. Sec, Mary Shavitz. 

Cl. Oalvert Olnb, Biddle and Eutaw. Org. April, 1008. Sec, James S. 

Nusbaum. 
Cheliea Club. 

East Baltimore League. Pres., A. li. Nathanson. 
Hebrew Democratic Association, First Legislative District, 1208 E. 

Baltimore. Org. Oct., 1907. Pres., David Davis. 
Hebrew Democratic Aisoolation, Third CoDgressional District, 1110 

E. Baltimore. Sec, S. Singer. 
Jewish Current Topic Club. 
Pansy Club, 125 Aisqnith. 
Progress Club, 125 Alsquith. 
Union Hebrew Club, Aisqaith and Fayette. 

MASSACHUSETTS 

BEVEBLY 
Co. Sons of Abraham, Rantoal and PleasHnt. Org. Feb. 11, 1908. Rabbi, 

G. Zax. 
Educ. Hebrew School, Pleasant and Rantoul. Rabbi Gabriel Zax. 

BOSTOK 

Cg. Agudath Achim. 

Ahavath Achim. 

Hadrath Israel. Org. 1908. Sec, Morris Greenblatt. 

TTnited Hebrew Orthodoz Congregations of Greater Boston. Org. 
Nov., 1907. Pres., Isaac Heller. Constituent Congregations: 
Beth Israel, Beth Hamidrash, Haqodel Anshe Sfard, Beth 
Israel (Cambridge), Agudath Achim, Beth Jacob, Ohel Jacob, 
Ahavath Achim, Ein Jacob, Zemach Zedeck. 

Zemach Zedek. 
Chr. Charity Entertaining Circle. Sec, M. Gordon. 

Hebrew Helping Hand Society. Sec, Mrs. Isaac Stem. 

Jewish Kosher Kitchen. 

Jewish Tuberculosis Association. Org. Oct., 1907. Sec, Anna 
Saneiper. Members, 50. 

Passover Aid Committee. Treas., B. Aaronson. 



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MaraiuzhuBetts] LOCAL ORGANIZATIONS 49 



BOSTON (oontinued) 
Cl. Gibraltar Olul). Org. 1007. Sec, H. Finberg. 

Hebrew Citizem Club, 1208 Tremont Org. July 31, 1007. Sec, 
Samuel Goldbrand. 

Hebrew Demooratio Club. Org. Sept., 1907. Sec, Isaac Jacobs. 

Hebrew Sepublioan Club. Org. Sept., 1907. Sec, Louis Goldstein. 

Idle Hour Olub. Michael Porter. 

Imperial Aisooiatioii. Sec, Charles Caslick. 

Jewish People's Institute. Org. 1907. Sec, I. Harris. 

Laytzim Association. Org. 1901. 

Mayfair Olub. Sec, MUdred Goldstein. 

Progressive Literary Society, 13 Poplar. Qrg. Nov., 1907. 

Biga Literary Association, 9 Eaton. Sec, Jacob Cohen. 

TTiuted Hebrew Oitisens League. Sec, Charles S. Russell. 

Women's Scholarship Association, Metaphysical Hall, 30 Hunting- 
ton Av. 

Toung Ladies' Progressive League. Sec, Etta M. Rosenwald. 

Toung Men's Excelsior Association. 
Educ. North End Hebrew School, Baldwin Place. Pres., H. Gudinsky. 

West End House. 
M. B. Jewish Physicians Protective Association. Org. April, 1908. 

Merets Progressive Association, 88 Charles. Sec, Miss A. Schon- 
kind. 

BBOOXTOV 

Cg. Anshe Sphard, Plymouth St. 

Cl. Hebrew Social and Educational Circle. 



CAMBBIOaE 

(Ashkens 

arshall. 



Cg. Congregation (Ashkenaz). Org. Sept., 24, 1907. Sec, D. A. 
Mbh" " 



BOBCHESXEA 
Chb. Home for Jewish Orphans. 

FALL BIYEB 
Cem. Hebrew Cemetery Association. Sec, Charles Levis. 
Chr. United Hebrew Benevolent Association. 

Young American-Hebrews' Aid Society, Quarry St. Sec, Jacob 
Rosenberg. 
M. B. Hebrew Ciino Association. Org. 1907. Sec, A. Dashoff. 

HAYEBHILL 
Chr. Federation of Jewish Charities. 
Hebrew Ladies' Aid Society. 

HOLTOXE 
Cl. Ivria. Org. 1907. 

HYDE PABK 
Cg. Congregation. Rabbi, Moses Kapfoff, 83 Pierce. 

LAWBENCE 
Cbm. Sons of Israel Cemetery. 

Toung Men's Progressive Cemetery. 
Chr. Hebrew Ladies Council. Sec, Mrs. S. Hartman. 
Cl. Toung Men's Hebrew Debating Society. 
Educ. Hebrew Educational Society. Sec, Sadie Shock. 
M. B. Hebrew Weavers' Benefit Association, 132 Valley. Sec, Max Karan. 



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50 AMESIICAN JEWISH YEAR BOOK [Mlchisaii 

LTSnr 

Co. B'nal Jacol), Flint St. Babbi, Israel Lit. 
Cl. Hebrew ProsreMive Olub. 

Lynn Hebrew Oitiieni Club, 63 Church. Pres., Lewis Wolf. 
Educ. Lynn Hebrew BchooL Sec., Samuel Green. 
M. B. Hebrew Working Men's Oirole. 

XALDEH 
Cl. Alpha Gamma Olnb. 

NBW BEDFOBD 
Co. Linas Hasedek, 526 S. Water. Org. May 3, 1908. Sec, Abraham 
Shear. 

HEWTOH 
Co. Anshe Bfard. Org. Oct., 1907. Pres., Abraham Schrier. 

HO&TH ADAMS 
Cl. Yonng Men's Hebrew Assoolation« Org. Oct 20, 1907. Herman 
Green. 

axniroY 

M. B. Lenas Zedeok. Org. Dec 1, 1907. Sec, Jos. Ssathmary, 303 Water. 

KOZBVBT 
Co. Sons of David, Intercolonial Hall. 
Educ. Jewish Endeavor Society. Uabbi N. Blechman. 

BOMERViXLE 
Cl. Hebrew Educational Society of Somerville. Pres., N. FUnzlig. 

SPBUrOFZELD 
Cub. Hebrew Free Loan Association. Sec, Wm. Gelin. 
Eddc. Hebrew Free School. 

TAUKTON 
Cem. Taunton Hebrew Fraternal Association. 



WOBimV 

_^hteen ceme 

and Everet 



Cem. Montvale. Eighteen cemeteries belonging to Jews of Boston, Chelsea, 
' " ett. 



W0B0E8TE& 
Chr. TTnlted Hebrews Charity Assoeiation. 

Worcester Hebrew Helping Hand Assoeiation. Org. March 16, 1908. 
Sec, Ralph Bogage. 
Cl. Hebrew Socialist Olub. 

MICHIGAN 

BAY CITY 
Cem. Jewish Oemetery Aid Society. Sec, Mrs. S. Melster. 

DSTSOIT 
Chr. Anshe Chesed Shel Emeth. Org. 1007. 

First Benevolent Sode^. Pres., Ben Selling. 

Home for Old Folks, Winder and Brush. ^., M. Smith. 



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Mlasouri] LOCAL ORGANIZATIONS 51 



DETBOXT (continued) 
CL. Aleph Oimmel Fraternity. Org. Feb., 1905. 
Euelid Club. Mrs. Oscar Lowman. 

Ja-Boa-Ooe Walking Olnb. Org. April, 1908. Sec, Jay Jatoysky. 
Jewisli Workinamen's Club, 8o Napoleon. Sec, Harry Mittelman. 
Wednesday Study Club.. Mrs. Sugene Sloman. 
Young People's Jewish Society, 47 Diyision. Org. Nov., 1907. 

WIHDSOK 
Co. Congregation. 

MINNESOTA 

MAKXATO 
Cg. Congregation. Org. Oct., 1907. Rabbi, M. Wolff. 

KINNBAPOLIS 
Chr. Jewish Home for the Aged. 

Bnssian Hebrew Charity Aisooiation. 
Cl. Clara de Hirsoh Sooiety. Pres.. Dora Sachs. 

Esra. Org. Oct., 1907. Sec, A. Cohen. 
Bduc. Hebrew Free School (Talmud Torah) of the North Side. Dr. George 
J. Gordon. 

Jewish Study Circle. Miss Baum. 

S. 0. 0. 3>. Club. Sec, Ben Rouch. 

TJniTersity Jewish Literary Association. Bertha Sanford. 

Young Hen's Hebrew Association (1907). 

Young Women's Educational Alliance, 610 Lyndale Ay. 

Young Women's Hebrew Association. Sec, Jessie Kahn. 

ST. PAUL 
Co. Sons of Israel, Fairfield Ay. and Robertson St. 
Chb. Young Men's Aid Society. Sec, Harry Solomon. 
Cl. JewiUL Study Circle, 377 Robert. Gustayus Loyenger. 
Sixth Ward Hebrew Citizens League. Org. March, 1908. 
Young Maccabees' Association. Mr. Kadowitz. College Ay. and 
Wabash. 

MISSISSIPPI 

BBOOXHAVSir 
Cg. Orthodox Congregation (1907). 

OOLTTMBUS 
Cl. Mississippi Jewish Sabbath School Teachers' Association. Org. Feb. 
1, 1908. Sec, Max Raisin, Meridian. 

DUVCAKSLEY 
Edug. Religious Society. Mrs. L. Friedberg. 

OBEEinriLLS 
Cl. Olympia Club (1907). 

MISSOURI 

CLIMTON 
Co. Ansha ZsraeL Org. Oct.. 1907. Sec, Max Jacoby. 



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52 AMERICAN JEWISH YEAR BOOK [Nebraska 

HANNIBAL 
Cg. Ck>nfregatloii. 

JOPLIN 
Cl. Je^wiah literary Society. Sec., Big. Klein. 
Blioeiilx Olub. 

KANSAS OITT 
Cg. Beth Jacol), Independence Ay. Rabbi, S. L. Schochet. 

Tiferei Israel, Admiral Blvd. and Tracy Ay. Sec, M. Kasoi. 
Cl. Aphrodite. Sec, Helen Flohr. 

ST. JOSEPH 
Co. Bene Yaakoy, 8th and Patee (1907). 
Cl. Etude Club. 

'Lanmod Literary Society. Sec, Harry Abraham, 411 S. 6th. 

ST. LOVIS 
Co. B'nai Tiferes Israel. Org. Sept., 1907. 
Chb. Bnsy Bee Sewing Society. Sec, Mrs. S. Wolff. 

Central Belief Association. Org. Jan. 27, 1908. Babbi, Z. Bosenfield, 
1007 N. 10th. 

Eait St Louis Hebrew Association. Sec, Louis Chacke. 

aertrude Charity Society. Sec, Mrs. Herman Rindskopf. 

Hachnosas Orchim. 

Home for Incurables. Mrs. L. Rothschild, 2823 Washington Ay. 

Montcflore Ladies* Charity Society. 

Mt. Moriah Hospital. 
Ci'. Albion Club. Org. 1908. Sec, Jake Baer. 

Alliance Literary Society. 

Congregational Club. Uabbi Samuel Sale, 4621 Westminster. 

Fast Workers' Sewing Circle. 

Ladies' Friday MuslofQe Club. Miss Carolyn Bienenstok. 

Progressiye Literary Society. 

St. Louis Society for the Promotion of Art. Pres., Lewis Godloye. 

Schumann Musical Society. Pres., Mrs. Edward Sicher. 

Westwood County Club. Org. Oct., 1907. Sec, C. M. Rice. 
Educ. Talmud Torah, 1727 Can. Conducted by the Moses Monteflore Ladies* 
Charity Society (1907). 

Webster Literary Society, Toung Men's Hebrew Association Bldg., 
Taylor and Oiiye. 
M. B. United Hebrew Workmen, Star Hall, 1026 Franklin Ay. 

MONTANA 

ANACONDA 
M. B. Toung Ken's Beneyolent Society. J. A. Cohen. 

NEBRASKA 

OMAHA 
Co. Hungarian Congregation, 19th bet. Bush and Webster. 
Cl. Century Literary Club of South Omaha. Rabbi Frederick Cohn, 
1302 Park Ay. 
Monteflore Pleasure Club. Sec, Richard M. Schlaes. 
Toung Ladies Social Club. Treas.. Mrs. B. H. Eddy. 



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New Jeraey] LOCAL ORGANIZATIONS 53 

NEW HAMPSHIRE 

Iff AttTTTTA 

Cem. Cemetery, HolUs Boad. 

NEW JERSEY 

BAYOKVE 
Educ. Bajonne He1)rew Free Sohool, West 20th St. Ladles' Auxiliary. Org. 
Jan., 1908. Sec, Mrs. Richards. 

BELXAB 
Co. Bom of Israel. Org. Oct., 1907. 

B&XDGETOir 
Educ. Hebrew Aisooiatloii 

OAHSJ^H 
Educ. Hebrew Free Bohool, 8th and Syracuse. 

ELIZABETH 
Chb. Hebrew Free Loan Association. 
Cl. Talmud Torah. Org. 1908. Fres., William Roth. 
M. B. Ohave Zedek Siok Benefit Assoolation. 

OBSENYILLS 
Cg. Obab Sholom, Warner St. 

Cl. Hebrew Social Club, Danforth Hall, 120 Danforth Ay. Org. August, 
1907. Sec, Louis Bennett. 
Young Men's Hebrew Association. Org. Feb., 1908. Sec, Michael 
Gerson, Bayview Av. 

HARBISON 

Cg. B'nai Jehudah. Ellas Rosenberg. 

HOBOSEH 
Cg. Beth Jacob, Clinton Ay. and Hague St. Inc. 1906. 
Educ. Talmud Torah. 

JERSEY CITY 

Cg. Mount Sinai, 126 Sherman Av. Org. 1907. 
Cl. Hebrew ynion League. Sec, James J. Slmm. 
Jewish Boys' Club. Sec, Jacob Jaffl, 316 5th. 
Educ. Hebrew Jeshevath Xneseth Israel. Inc. Dec, 1907. Rabbi Jacob 
Goodman. 

LONG BRANCH 
Cl. Independent Hebrew Citizens' League. Rev. Dr. Abraham Geller. 
Young Men's Hebrew Association. Pres., M. Margolius. 

MILLVILLE 
Cg. Religious Society. 

NEWARK 
Cg. Congregation, 48 N. Canal. 

Chb. Frauen Yerein Naohstenliebe. Org. 1852. Sec, Mrs. Belle P. 
Doctor (1907). 



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54 AMB21ICAN JEWISH YEAR BOOK [New York 



KEWABX {continued) 
Cl. Hebrew DTamatio Leagiie. Org. May 22, 1908. Sec, Abraham 
Svoroff. 

Jewiih Literary Society. Rabbi Joseph Leacht, 344 High. 

Owl Athletic Anociation, 65 13th Av. Pres., Jacob Lasser. 

The Philomeniani. 

Tonng People*! Hebrew Aiaociation, Iroquois HalU 
M. B. Dubner Kranken Unterstfitsiiiigi Yerein. 

Jewish Bakers' Union. 

Bonmanian Young Men's Association. 

United Hebrew Butchers' Assooiation. 

VO&TH HUDBOV 
Cl. Young Men's Hebrew Assooiation. 

PA68AI0 
Chb. Young Ladies' Hebrew Charitable Association. Org. Feb. 16, 1908. 

Sec, Anna Levin. 
Cl. Young Men's Hebrew Association. 

PATEBSOV . 

Chr. Fidelity Aid Society. Roy Baron, 39 Temple. 

Cl. Hebrew Progressive League. Org. May, 1908. Sec, Leo Levlne. 

Progressive Women's Association, 66 Metlockl 
M. B. Mutual Aid AssocUtion. Sec, T. Popkin. 

PERTH AMBOY 

Chr. Hebrew Sheltering Society. Sec. Meyer Karkus, Fayette St. 
Cl. Tree Hebrew School Society, Madison Av. Sec, A BeckhofP. 

T&EHTON 
Co. People of Bight. Inc Sept 24, 1907. Hyman Rosenthal, 6 Decatur. 
Chr. Hebrew Temple Aid Society. Sec, D. Newton. 

Ladies' Hebrew Aid Society. Org. AprU 26, 1908. Sec, Mrs. A. 
Rosenblatt 
Cl. V ew Era Literary Society. 

Progressive Bepublican Club, 632 S. Warren. Org. 1908. Sec, 

Harris Feistel. 
Young Men's Hebrew Association. Re-org. Sept 29, 1907. Sec, 
Samuel Swerenefsky. 

WOODBINE 
Cl. Woodbine Borne Seekers' Club. Org. 1907. Sec, B. A. Palitz. 

NEW YOEK 

ALBANY 

Cl. Hebrew Educational Institute. Pros., Rabbi Ladowski, Ferry and 
Franklin. 

ASTOBIA, L. I. 
Cl. Young Men's League. Org. Feb. 10, 1908. Sec, Bamet Kaplan. 

BBOOEXYN 
Cem. Tillie Memorial Society (Free Burial Society), Mount Carmel 
Cemetery. Sec, Mrs, M. L. Wundoehl. 



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New York] LOCAL ORGANIZATIONS 55 



BKOOEXYH (continued) 
Cg. Adai Bnal Inrael, 57 Graham Ay. bee., Samuel Finkelsteln (1907). 
Aliavas dieted, 742 Jefferson Ay. Org. 1904. Sec., B. Friedman. 
Anihe Litenwioh, 314 Stone Ay. Mr. Wolff, 693 Stone Ay. 
• Beth Jaooh Affudas Aohim B'nai Xoyno, Prospect PI. near Hopkinson 

Ay. 
Beth Sholom Temple, Benionhiirtt. Sec, A. A. Greenhoot. 
B'nai Jehuda, 513 Jerome, cor. Black Ay. 
PeopU's Bynagorne of Borough Park. Org. Noy., 1907. B. and S. 

Michael, 1431 45th. 
Shaare Torah of Flathuih, Masonic Hall, 824 Flatbush Ay. A. 

Steinman, 256 Clarkson (1907). 
Bhomxei Emunoh of Borough Park, Masonic Hall, 66th and New 

Utrecht Ay. Rabbi, I. Wiernikowsky. 
Vnien of Orthodox Congregations. 
Chr. Bemhard H. Beckel Belief Society* Mrs. C. Seidenberg. 
£ast New York Bispensary, Watkins near Pitkin Ay. 
Hebrew Ladies' Aid Society of Williamsburg, Cook and Graham Ay. 
Henrietta Aid Society. 
Jewish Kosher Xitohen, 67 McKlbben. 
Ladies' Beneyolent Society of the Western Distriet. 
Ladies' Hebrew Beneyolent Society of the Eastern Bistriet. Sec, Mrs. 

C. Morits. 
Williamsbnrgh Fresh Air Fund Society. Org. Aug., 1907. Sec, 

Sadie Schwartz. 
Young Folks' Aid Society, 305 Stone Ay. Org. 1907. Pres., Ike 

Bpstein. 
Cl. Choral Society, Pitkin Ay. and Watkins. Pres., Key. Dr. Bernard 

Steinberg. 
Hebrew Democratic Organisation, 124 Hopkins. Sec, Joseph A. 

Boorsten. 
Mutual Advancement Association. Org. Oct. 1, 1907. Sec, Mac 

Schneider. 
Painters' Educat ion al Club* 
Btuyvesant Hebrew Social Club, 80 Reid Ay. Org. Oct. 6, 1907. 

Sec, Maurice Kahn. 
Toti Literary Bocie^. Sec, Matthew Weiner. 
TTniversity Club of East Vew York. 
Webster Literary Circle. Sec, Hyman Bierbeman. 
Young Folks' Choral Society. Org. Feb. 9, 1908. Sec, Hanna 

Traeman. 
Yeung IsraeL Pres., Joseph Prensky. 
Young Men's Hebrew Association. Sec, BenJ. Lullius. 
Young Women's Hebrew Association of East New York. Org. 1907. 

Sec, Bertha Goldberg. 
Bdug. Hebrew School, 327 S. 9th. Dr. Martin A Meyer, 22 St Francis PI. 
M.B. Progressive Plasterers' Benevolent Society (1907). 

Bussiaa Young Men's and Ladies' Aid Society, 410 Stone Ay. 
Bsessower TJnterstfttsungs Yerein, 56 Montrose Ay. 

BUFFALO 
Co. Congregation. Sec, L. J. Cohen. 
Bdug. Jewish Endeavor Society of Buffalo. 

Jewish Library Assooiatlon, William and Monroe. 

EAST 7XEW 
Chb. Solomon and Betty Loeb Mamorlal Home for Convalescents. 

ELXIBA 
Chb. Hebrew Free Loan Association. 



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56 AMERICAN JEWISH YEAR BOOK [New York 

FAB BOCXAWAT, L. I. 
Bduc. Fax Bookaway Hebrew School, Nebenzahl Bldg. Pres., Rey. A. H. 
Nieto. 

OLOYEBBYILLE 
Chb. Fvlton Oounty Hebrew Benevolent Aieooiatlon. Org. 1906. Sec, 
M. Phillipson. 

HEWBUBaH 
Cl. Befh Jacob Dramatic Olub. S. N. Levy, 125 Johnston. 

HEW BOCHELLB 
Cl. Young Men'i Hebrew Aisociation. 

HEW YOBX CITY 

Cg. Agiidath AcMm AiiBhe Ch«ied» 6 th Av, and Jersey. Org. 1896 
Ahawaa €heflsd) J^tF&rijoii ^r. 
American Czatnowitz CoQercgation, 410 K. 9th. 
Beae Scholem of HArlem, The Elieamiire, 80 W. 126th. Rabbi. D. 

IXJweiithut, 125 K. H4tb. 
Beth Aaron Ciaflidim B'Keidanow, iS Orchard. 
Beth Abrabam of the Bronx, iilii E. 14(ith. 
Jahu<la Halevi, iBijtli and Morris Av. 
Mogen Doyid Anshe Ol^hon, tiB Moatgompry. 
Mount Moriah» Madl&on Av, and 121at 
Bona of Israel^ Id Pike, 
Young People's SyaagogriB, 107 W. 116tfa, 
Che. Bertha Caiman Aid Society of BarlenL Pres., Abner W. Rosenthal. 
B'nai L&sle {Chavra}, Tbe I'ust^do, Madlgon Av. and 69th. Sec, 

A r no 111 Skfjlnv* 
Btonx Charity ieagiifl, Sec, Dr» D* I. Frey. 

Council of Jewish Commnnal Inatltntlons, a66 2d Av. Org. Dec 14 
. , UH)*. Sf>c.t Ed;?ar Nathan. , * 

Downtown Biaterhood, 229 E, Broadway, Org. Jan., 1908 
Harlem Belief Circle. Sec, WUliam Teeser, 30 Great Jones. 
Helptnff Hand Society, 220 Henry. Org. Jao., 1908. Pres., Blanche 

ZLrlcsky. 
IndependBQt Ladies* Aid Society of the Bron*. Sec, Mrs. D. Elkan 
Jewish Kosher Kitchen, 22u i:a:^l Broadway. Org. Jan.. i908. 
Junior Leartie of Charity Workera, 31H B. S2d. Sec. Belle M. Uhry. 
Hlnaker B nos Israel Franen Yeroin^ t*Q^^ E. Broadway. 
Torkville Charity League. Sec, Miss A. Kessler. 
Yorkvlllo riiapensary ajid Hospital for Women and Children. 246-8 

E. S2d. Fre^,. Henriette Striiusg, 
^ Young Folka^ Leagae for the Home Treatment of Tuberculosis. 

ren^ple Emaniiel Gth Av. and 4:2a. Sec, Pauline S. . Schenberg. 
C;.. Amateur Choral Club, I'res., Arthur Rost^natein. 708 West End Av 
Deaf Mutes' Union League CiuK « »*«* Ji-uu a v. 

Emanon Literary Cluh. TrefiS., Gertrude Davidson. 
Federation of Polish Hebrews of AmsTlca. Org. May 3. 1908. 
rode rati on <hf Roumanian Jews. Org. March 8, 1908. Sec, Dr. P. A. 

Fellowship club. 

Jacob Oordin Literary Circle, 151 Clinton. 

'•^■t ^•*8^«» T^^* Org. June 10, 1908. Sec, B. G. Richards. 204 

Ju. Broadway. 
Mount Zion League, Riverside Hall, 125th and 7th Av. Sec, MUs R. 

Ijehman. 
People's OWo League, The. Org. June 11, 1908. Sec, A. Ron- 

gursky, 152 Henry. ' 



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New York] LOCAL ORGANIZATIONS 57 



NEW TOKX CITT (conUnucd) 
Cl. Progrresi Oluh, Staten Island. Pres., Jesse D. Schwartz, Clifton. 
ProgTesBive Dramatic Club, 162 Madison. 
Qneen Esther Ladies' Society* 
TTnion of Orthodox Xabbls and Preachers. Org. Sept., 1907. Sec, 

Rabbi S. L. Hourwich, 99 Monroe. 
TTnited Immlgrrant Children'! Aasooiation. Hebrew Sheltering House, 

299 E. Broadway. Org. Feb., 1908. 
Women's Self-Educational Society, 414 Gran'd. 
Tod Kaf Tav Fraternity, 629 W. 128d. 

Toung Folks' League. Julias Schwartz, 187 Richmond Av. 
Young Knights of Judah, 107 \y. 116th. Director, M. Lunevsky. 
Young Men's Social Olub, 338 W. 85th. Org. Dec. 80, 1907. Sec, 

Morris Krakauer, 120 W. 90th. 
Zionist Choral Society. 
Educ. Austrian Talmud Torah, 77 Sheriff. Sec, William Fischman, 119 

Ludlow. 
Bronx Educational Alliance, 1697 Washington Av. 
Etz Chaim Yeshlbah, 85 Henry. Sec, L. Llpnlck. 
Harlem Educational Institute, 132 E. 111th. 
Horeb Home and School for ihe Deaf, 99 Central Park, West, 
jehudia (Talmud Torah), 225 B. 104th. Pres., Mr.Ish-Klshor. 
Xabbenu Solomon Kliger Yeshlbah, 184 Ridge. Sec, N. Rlttermaa 
Tremont People's Hebrew School, 758 E. 173d. 
Washington Heights Hebrew Free School, 9 Audubon Av. Pres., 

David E. Goldfarb. 
M. B. Antipoler Young Men's Benevolent Association, 96 Clinton. 

Bialystoker Bricklayers' Progressive Benevolent Association, 21 Suf- 
folk. 
Brisker Immigrants' Aid Society, 83 Forsythe. 
Oraiwer Young Men's Benevolent Association, 177 E. Broadway. 
Hebrew Actors' Protective TTnion, 8 Union Sq. 
Jewish Bookbinders' Union, 96 Clinton. 

Lebedower Young Men's Benevolent Association, 138 Eldridge. 
Minsker Brotherhood Association, 206 E. Broadway. Org. 1900. 

Sec, M. Smltaner, 59 Jefferson. 
Ostrower Young Men's Benevolent Association, 80 Clinton. 
Babbi Israel Eisenstein TTnterstiitzungs Yerein. Sec, M. Tomkin, 

68 B. 112th. 
Samuel Tichner Society. Org. 1882. Sec, Abraham Fisher. 
Sbarayer Circle, American, 423 6th. Pres., Dr. Marcus Neustaedter. 
Shlkyoner Young Men's Benevolent Association, 88 E. 4th. Sec, 
- Philip Sachs. 
Sokolower Young Ladies' Benevolent and Educational Society, 90 

Columbia. 
TTnited Sisters of Onesen. Org. May. 1908. Sec, Adolf Okraust. 
Warschauer Progressive Arbeiter TTniersttlttungs Verein, 8-10 Av. D. 
Washlikover Young Men's and Ladies' Aid Association, 209 B. 

Broadway. 
Winigroder Progressive Aid Association, 106 Forsyth. 

POET CHESTER 
Cl. Country Olub. Org. Oct. 14, 1907. Sec, Eva Miller. 

POTTOHKEEPSIE 
Educ. Sabbath School. 

ROCHESTER 
Chs. Associated Hebrew Charities of Rochester. Sec, Lester Nusbaum, 

55 Clinton Av., N. 
Cl. Jewish Young Men's Association, 8 Franklin Sq. Sec, A. M. Hart. 
M. B. Ikaterineslaver Aid Society. Inc. Feb. 28, 1908. Meyer Levin. 



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58 AMBRICAN JEWISH TEAR BOOK [Ohio 



ST. OEOSOE, 8. I. 
Bduc. Agndai Aohlm Talmud Toran. 

BTAPLETOV, B. X. 
Co. Tlfereth Xirael. Pres., J. Wetepskl. 

BTHACnrSE 
Bduc. Hebrew ProgrreisiTe Lilnary. 

The Bettlement Home. Org, 1008. 

T7VI0V HILL 
Co. Temple Emanuel (1007). 

TTTICA 
Cg. Shomre Shahhei. Inc. Nov. 5, 1007. Morris Stalrman. 
Cl. Toung Men'i Hebrew Aitociation. 
M. B. Agudai Aohim Ostrov. Org. 1008. Loais Freedman, 06 Whitesboro. 

NOKTH CAROLINA 

ASUEVILLE 
Chr. Jewish Ladies' Boolety. Pres., Mrs. L. Blomberg. 

NORTH DAKOTA 

A8HLET 
Cg. Congregation Xlva Bender, P. O. Box 172. 

OHIO 

AKRON 
Cem. Orthodox Jewish Cemetery. 
Cl. Temple Literary Soolety, S. High. Sec, Stella Reder. 

CINCINNATI 
Cg. Congregation. Org. Oct. 20, 1007. Pres., Moses Isaacs. 

Roumanian Congregation, Ninth and Cutter. Org. Sept., 1007: Sec, 
Samuel Josephs. 
Chr. United Jewish Bettlement. Pres., Moses Fraley, 781 W. 6th. 
Cl. Cincinnati Club. Sec, Lawrence Lowenberg. 
Dramatio Art Society. 

CLEVELAND 
CG. Ets Chaim, E. 27th and WoodlaDd Av. Org. 1007. 
Chr. Camp Wise Aisooiation. Org. 1007. Sec, Mollie Stem. Camp at 
Noble, Ohio. 
Cleveland Independent Aid Society. Sec, Ben Fenlger. 
Hebrew Free loan Association. 
Independent Aid Society. Sec, C. C. Rich. 
Linen Circle. Mrs. B. Salberg. 

Society for Promoting the Interest of the Blind in Cleveland, Good- 
rich House. 
Young Women's Jewish Relief Corps. Org. 1008. Sec, Sophia 
Messing. 



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Oregon] LOCAL ORGANIZATIONS 59 

OLETELAHI) (continued) 
Cio Abrahain Aeform Friendly AMooUtioa. 
Amity Club. Sec, Adolph M. Klein. 

B. L. B. LiteruT Society. Org. Oct., 1907. Sec., Miss R. Q. Spero. 
DecembuB. Org. 1007. Pres., Yetta Klein 
Dnqneme Social Olnb. Sec, N. Fish. 

Emenon Olnb. Pres.. Mrs. Nathan Weisenberg, 8617 Carnegie Ay. 
Fidelia Clnb. 324 Garfield Bldg. Org. Noy., 1907. Sec, I. J. 

Kabatchinick. 
Jolly Social Olnb. Moses Dlener. 

Junior Social Clnb, Scoyill At. and E. 65th. Sec, Kate Goldstein. 
Lorient Olnb. Sec, Henry Levkowiti. 
Xacoabean Literary Society. Sec, Jacob Friedland. 
Standard Olnb, Euclid Ay. and B. 7l8t. Inc. Sept., 1907. Sec, 

Ernest Schwarti. 
Student's Circle. Sec. Herman lesler. 
TT-No-irs-Olnb. Org. March 11, 1908. Pres., Reada Adier, 2811 E. 

48d. 
Tonng Women's Hebrew Association. Org. May 31, 1908. Sec, 

Miss Klein. 
Educ. Adas Israel Association, E. 37th. Sec, M. Jacobs. 

Jewish Religions Edncation Association, Org. May, 1908. Sec, 

S. H. Silbert. 
M. B. Cleyeland Beneilt and Social Society. Sec, William Scheibel. 
Ladies' Galician Aid Society. Sec, Mrs. Opper. 
Ladies' Frogressiye Society. 

OOLUMBtrS 

Cl. Fellowship Club. Org. Oct., 1907. Sec, J. Myers. 

DATTOH 

Cl. German Club. 

LIMA 
Chr. Jewish Ladies' Aid Society. 
Cl. Standard Olnb. 

MARION 
Chr. Sewing Socie^. 
Cl. Commercial Olnb. Frank Lcyy. 

Tonng Men's Hebrew Guild. Sec, Mollie Schonberg. 

TOLRDO 
Ckm. Beth Abraham. B. Bellman, 1801 Tates. 

Hungarian Aid Society. 
M. B. Ladies' Frogressiye Society. 

TOTJKOSTOWK 
Chr. Federated Hebrew Charities. Sec, Mrs. M. O. Guggenheim. 

Ladies' Sheltering Society. 
Cl. Rxcelsior Clnb, 314 W. Federal. Org. March, 1907. Sec, H. Spiro. 

Ladies of Zion Society, 117 E. Rayen Ay. 

Webster Debating Club. 

Tonng Men's Hebrew Association. Org. 1907. Sec, Henry Lefkowits. 
Bddc. Hebrew Institute, 117 E. Rayen Ay. Org. 1908. Sec, M. Alt- 
schuler. 

Talmud Torah. 



Chr. Jewish Relief Society. 



OEEGON 
PENDLETON 



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60 AMERICAN JEWISH YEAR BOOK [Pennsylvania 

PORTLAND 
Chr. Jewiili Relief Society. Org. Jan. 23, 1908. Sec, Dr. N. Hosessohn, 
616 Chamber of Commerce. 
T7nlted Helirew Cliarltlei of Portland. Org. April, 1908. 

PENNSYLVAOTA 

ALLEGHENY 
Co. Seth Israel. Mrs. Julius Arkin. 

ALLEKTOWN 
Co. Sons of Israel, N. 6th near Tilghman. Sec, Jacob Schatenstein. 
Cl. Hebrew Club. Sec, Nathan Schatenstein, 619 Hamilton. 

Young Ken'i Hebrew Aiiociation. Inc. March 4, 1908. Sec, Morris 
Siegel. 

ALTOOVA 

Chr. Hebrew Free Loan Society of Altoona. Org. Feb., 1908. Pres., M. 
Berman, 13th and 11th Ay. 

BEAYEB FALLS 
Cl. Beaver Valley Hebrew Social Club. Org. 1907. 

BBADDOCK 
Chr. Helping Hand Society. 

CHARLEBOI 
Co. Congregation. 

COATESVILLE 
Co. Kesher Israel. Org. 1905. Sec, M. Churtock. 
Cl. Young Ken's Hebrew Association, Pierce Bldg., 2d Ay. and Main. 

Org. Aug. 18, 1907. Sec, Conrad Apfelbaum. 
Educ. Talmud Torah. 

CONNELLSYILLE 
Co. B'nai Israel. Rabbi H. Orafman. 

DTTBOIS 
Co. Congregation. 

ETNA 

Co. Congregation, 28 Prospect. Rabbi, W. Rizlem. 

OREENSBURG 
Cl. Young Ken's Hebrew Association. Sec, Eugene Reuben. 

HARRISBTTRG 
Cl. Country Club. Org. April. 1908. Sec. J. S. Lowengard. 
Educ. Hebrew School. Rabbi S. Friedman, 235 Kellar. 

LEBANON 

Co. Beth Israel. Org. Sept., 1907. Sec, Louis Cohen, 1008 Cumber- 
land. 

KcEEESPORT 
Co. Tree of Life. Org. 1893. Rabbi, W. Leyine. 
Cl. Hebrew Political Club. 



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Pennsylvania] LOCAL ORGANIZATIONS 61 

KoKEEB ROOKS 
Cbm. Burial Bodetsr. 
CHB. Helnrew Ladies' Aid Society. 

Cl. Yovnff Ken'i Hebrew Literary Society, 818 Chambem At. Org* 
1907. Sec, J. S. Young. 

NEW CASTLE 
Cl. Twentieth Oentnry Olub. 

Young Ken'f Helnrew Social Olub. Sec, M. J. Krous. 

PHILADELFHIiL 
Co. Abavaf Oheied, C610 Germantown At. Org. 1906. 

Brith Bholom. Org. Sept., 1907. Sec. Henry L. Engel. 

Hebrew Oongregation of Weft Philadelpbia, 6826 Chestnut. Org« 

May, 1907. Sec, J. L. Marshall. Auxiliary Society : Ladles* 

Sisterhood. 
Jewish Kate Congregational Society. Org. Not. 8, 1907. Sec, 

Rebecca Rosensteln. 
Konteflore Oongregation, 8th and Cambria. Org. 1907. Sec, A. 

Wolfsohn. 
Chr. Jewidi Relief Committee. Sec, Victor Abus. 
JuTenfle Aid Committee, 616 N. 4th. 
Ladies' Emigration Aid Society of Philadelphia. Pres., Mrs. Lena 

Greenblatt. 
Lebanon Hospital. DaTld Mandel. 

Tonng Ladies' Philanthropic Society. Sec, Mary Sharitz. 
Cl. Ardentes Club. Pres.. A. L. Schaefer. 

Cliaue Cliane Clan. Katherine Abrams, 4640 Green, Germantown. 
Emanon Social and Literarr Olnb. Pres., Fair Berger, 2703 N. 11th. 
Oraphic Sketch Club. Samuel Fleischer, 2220 Green. 
Hebrew American ProtectiTC Leagne, 249 Pine. Org. Jan., 1908. 

Pres., J. Friedman. 
Hebrew Citisens' Leagne. 
Hebrew Cnltnre Association, 948 N. Franklin. Sec, Edna Lamb, 

3608 Germantown At. 
Kaccabean Literary Society. Sec, Charles J. Hessler, 7126 German- 
town At. 
Pow-Wow Olnb, T. Square. 
ProgressiTC Educational Club. 

Society for the AdTancement of Jewidi Institntions. 
T7nion of Jewidi Literary Societies. 
Webster Literary Society. 
Konc. Benjamin F. Teller Memorial School. S. W. Cor. Broad and Jefferson. 
Besallel Society of Philadelnhia, 249 Pine. Sec, Moses Schleinholtz. 
Ellen Phillips Sunday School. 
Jewidi Sunday School of Germantown. Supt, Miss Steiger, 6600 

Boyer. 
iCeneseth Israel Lyceum and Rodelph Shalom Institute. Sec, Linda 

Strauss. 
Northeastern Talmud Torah, 820 N. 6th. Org. 1896. Sec, M. I. 

Sadler. 
Southern Hebrew Sunday School. 
Yiddidi Publication Committee of Philadelphia, 310 Catherine. Org. 

April 20, 1908. Sec, DaTid Blank. 
M. B. Hortheastem Beneflcial Association. Solomon Joseph, 1634 N. 

Marshall. 
R. S. Taad ha-Kadirus, composed of delegates of all the down town 

congregations. 

PHILIPSBTIRG 
Cg. Oongregation, Odd Fellows Bldg. Sec, Bert FInkelstein. 

6 



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62 AMERICAN JEWISH YEAR BOOK [South Carolina 



PITTSBTTBG 
Co. Ohevra Torah Anslie Sinai, Fulton and Clark. Sec, S. J. Rogulsky. 
Chb. Emma Farms Association, near Harmarvllle. Org. May 26, 1908. 
Pres., Isaac Kaufman, 5035 Forbes Av. 
Hebrew Ladies' Sick and Relief Society. Org. 1906. Sec, Mrs. M. 

Levy, 1311 Locust. 
Hebrew Loan Fund. Org. 1906. Abraham Llpman, 9th and Liberty. 
Jewish Crisis Belief Association. Rabbi A. M. Ashlnsky, 1204 Col- 
well. 
Konteflore Training School for Nurses. 
Cl. Allegheny County Political Club (1907). 
Beaver Valley Hebrew Social Club. 
Chevra Kishnayis. 

Fort Pitt Club, 1106 Bluff. Org. Oct. 6, 1907. Sec, Lewis B. Berger. 
Pittsburg Kenorah. Org. Sept., 1907. Sec, E. Sunstein. 
Swastica Dramatic Club. 
Young Folks' Civic League. 

SHENANDOAH 
Cl. Young Ken's Hebrew Association. 

SOTTTH BETHLEHEM 
Cl. Young Ken's Hebrew Association. Inc. March 4, 1908. 

STEELTON 
Educ. Hebrew Free School. 

WEST BERWICK 
Co. Congregation. Org. 1908. 

WEST CHESTER 
Chb. Hebrew Aid Society. Treas., Louis Piatt. 

Young Ken's Hebrew Association. Org. 1908. 

WILLIAMSPORT 
Co. Orthodox Congregation, Odd Fellows' Temple. 

EHODE ISLAND 

BRISTOL 
Cl. Young Ken's Hebrew Association. Org. July 15, 1896. Sec, Jacob 
Baron. 

PROVIDENCE 
Chr. Home for Jewish Orphans. 

Ladies' Union Aid Society. Pres., Mrs. Isaac Woolfe. 
Cl. Young Ken's Endeavor Association. Sec, M. Graubart. 
Eouc. Hebrew Institute, 243 N. Main. Inc. Oct., 1907. Pres., Caesar 

Mlsch. 
M. B. Hebrew Bakers' TTnlon. Org. Aug., 1907. 

WOONSOCKET 
Co. Anshe Sfard. Rabbi, Aaron Gorwltz. 
Educ. Hebrew Free School (Talmud Torah). 

SOUTH CAEOLINA 

COLTTKBIA 
Cg. Beth Sholom. Inc. Oct., 1907. Sec, H. Grossman. 



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Virginia] LOCAL ORGANIZATIONS 63 

TENIfESSEE 

CHATTANOOGA 

Co. Temple, Broad St. 

MEMPHIS 

Chb. Purlm AssocUtlon. Ore. 1908. Rabbi M. Samfield, 218 Adams Av. 

Willing Hand Sewing Circle. Mrs. Louis Morris. 

Young Ladles' Aid Society. Org. June 11, 1907. Sec, Fannie 
Bllder. 
Cl. Columbia Club. Org. Oct. 1, 1907. Sec, C. B. Levltch. 

Comus. Org. Feb. 3, 1907. Sec, Alfred A. Plough. 

Progress Club. Org. Feb., 1908. Sec, Sam Frledlander. 

TEXAS 

ATTSTIV 
Cl. Jewish Students' Literary Society. 

BEAXTMONT 
Co. Kol Israel. Inc Sept. 11, 1907. H. Rudnick. 
Cl. Young Men's Hebrew Association. Sec, J. Rudnick. 

DALLAS 
Cl. Concordia Club. Mrs. Philip Sanger. 

Jewish-American Constitutional Club. Sec, A Goldstein 
Menorah Society. Org. March, 1908. Pres., Dr. W. H. Greenburg, 
301 S. Harwood. 
Educ. Hebrew Free School. 

FORT WORTH 
Educ. Free Immigrant Night School. Org. 1907. Pres., Mrs. A. M. Friend. 

HOTTSTON 
Cl. Jewish-American Constitutional Club. 

SAN ANTONIO 
Cl. Jewish Literary Club. 
Educ. Solomon Halff Industrial SchooL 

UTAH 

SALT LAKE CITY 
Cl. Young Men's Hebrew Association. Org. Dec, 1907. Sec, E. Eck- 
stein. 

VERMONT 

MONTPELIER 
Co. Congregation. Louis Con, 8 Vidure. 

VIRGIlSriA 

HAMPTON 
Cl. Hampton Hebrew Independent Political Club. Sec, W. H. Rappaport 



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64 AMERICAN JEWISH YEAR BOOK [Wisconsin 

KEWPOBT NEWS 
Cl. Yonng X«n'f Helirew Asfooiatlon. Sec, H. Gross. 

PETEBSBTIBG 
Cem. Briih Achlm Cemetery. 
Bodef Bholem Cemetery. 

BICHXOND 
Cl. Hebrew Literary and Debating Society. Sec, Minnie Fisher. 
Phalanges Club. 
Presidents' Club. 

Young Ken's Hebrew Association. Org. Feb., 1908. Sec, J. 6. 
Doumbrauer. 
Bduc. Hebrew Educational League, 1561 E. Main. Sec, B. Gray. 

Hersl Talmud Torah, 18th and Franklin. Org. Oct. 6, 1907. Sec, 
J. G. Doumbrauer. 

WEST VIEGINIA 

WHEELIKO 
Co. B'nal Israel, Duyal and Jefferson. Org. Oct, 1907. Pres., Harry 
Siyitz. 

wiscoNsiisr 

BELOIT 
Co. Congregation. Robert Selenslsy. 

HAWKIirS 
Co. Congregation. 

KILWAUXEE 
Co. Anshe Lebowlts. 
Educ. Kllwaukee Hebrew Institute. Inc. July 7, 1908. 

8HEB0TGAK 
Cl. Colony of Israel. Sec, John Raffieson. 



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LOCAL. ORGANIZATIONS 



65 



SUMMARY OF THE DIRECTORY OF JEWISH LOCAL OROANIZATIONS IN THE 

UNITED STATES PUBLISHED IN THE AMERICAN JEWISH 

YEAR BOOK FOR 5668 

The following table gives the number of organizations by States, and indicates the 
number of separate organizations in the United States. The organizations are grouped 
under six general divisions: I. Congregations; II. Charities; HI. Mutual Benefit 
Societies; IV. Educational Societies; V. Miscellaneous Organizations: Literary, 
Musical, Social, Civic, Athletic, and Military Clubs, Communal Organizations, and 
Labor Unions; VI. Cemeteries. These divisions often overlap each other, the Con- 
gregations occasionally performing the work of Mutual Benefit Societies, or Free 
Loan Societies, etc, or they do educational work. Again, the charities are largely 
educational in character, and there are some clubs that are educational and chari- 
table in tlieir purposes. 

Mut. Ben. 



Cong. 
14 

1 

11 
27 
17 
30 

2 

4 

7 



Arizona 

Arkansas 

California 

Colorado 

Connecticut 

Delaware 

District of Columbia. 

Florida 

Georgia 17 

Idaho 1 

Illinois 81 

Indiana S6 

Iowa 19 

Kansas 7 

Kentucky 11 

Louisiana 24 

Maine 7 

Maryland 34 

Massachusetts 77 

Michigan 32 

Minnesota 26 

Mississippi 19 

Missouri 21 

Montana 8 

Nebraska 11 

Nevada 1 

New Hampshire 5 

New Jersey 86 

New Mexico .... 3 

New York 710 

North Carolina 10 

North DakoU 6 

Ohio 78 

Oklahoma 4 

Oregon 5 

Pennsylvania 158 

Rhode Island 19 

South Carolina 9 

Tennessee 17 

Texas 88 

Utah 8 

Vermont 5 

Virginia 21 

Washington 6 

West Virginia 6 

Wisconsin 30 

Wyoming 1 



Char. 
14 

6 
87 
13 
18 

1 

8 

1 
19 



24 

4 
3 
12 
16 



Total 



1746 



54 
16 
16 
9 
32 
2 
5 



1 
221 
6 
3 
55 

6 
97 
9 
7 
10 
26 
3 
2 
13 
10 
4 
21 



942 



13 

1 
12 
2 



1 
10 
24 

1 



15 



333 

1 



Educ. 
2 

1 
1 
1 
6 



22 

1 



Misc. Cem. Total. 

8 15 63 

2 8 

6 9 83 

5 17 100 

9 7 48 
10 12 88 

2 8 10 

5 2 14 
4 7 19 

6 18 68 
1 2 

18 24 214 

7 18 87 
1 12 36 
1 6 18 

7 7 41 

3 20 64 

3 1 18 
83 16 128 
73 28 277 

8 12 71 

4 7 63 
3 IS 44 

12 12 87 

2 7 

1 6 27 

1 

8 9 

40 83 256 

181 61 1570 

6 22 

6 16 

39 36 240 

12 8 

1 6 19 

67 67 434 

8 8 61 

11 27 

8 8 46 

10 87 107 

8 9 

1 1 10 

14 14 64 

1 6 28 

2 ;b 16 
8 11 68 

1 



288 606 682 4696 

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29 



1 

16 
1 
2 



66 AMERICAN JEWISH YEAR BOOK 



JEWISH STATISTICS 

The statistics of Jews in the world rest largely upon estimates. 
In Russia, Austria-Hungary, Germany, and a few other countries, 
official figures are obtainable. In the main, however, the num- 
bers given are based upon estimates repeated and added to by 
one statistical authority after another. 

For the statistics given below various authorities have been 
consulted, among them the " Statesman's Year Book " for 1908, 
the English " Jewish Year Book " for 5668, " The Jewish Ency- 
clopedia," Judische Statistik, and the Alliance Israelite Uni- 
verselle reports. Some of the statements rest upon the authority 
of competent Individuals, as for South Africa and Guracoa. 

THE UNITED STATES 
Estimates 

As the census of the United States has, in accordance with the 
spirit of American institutions, taken no heed of the religious 
convictions of American citizens, whether native-born or natural- 
ized, all statements concerning the number of Jews living in this 
country are based upon estimates. 
The Jewish population was estimated 

In 1818 by Mordecai M. Noah at 3,000 

In 1824 by Solomcm Etting at 6,000 

In 1826 by Isaac G. Harby at 6,000 

In 1840 by the American Almanac at 15,000 

In 1848 by M. A. Berk at 50,000 

In 1880 by Wm. B. Hackenburg at 230,257 

In 1888 by Isaac Markens at 400,000 

In 1897 by David Sulzberger at 937,800 

Distribution 

The following table by States presents two sets of estimates. 
In the left-hand column is given the estimated Jewish population 
of each State for 1905 as it appears in the " Jewish Encyclopedia," 
Vol. XII, pp. 371-374, in the article "United States." In the 
right-hand column are the estimates made up from figures fur- 
nished by correspondents who interested themselves in the 
Directory of Jewish Organizations in the United States com- 
piled foF the American Jewish Year Book, 5668 (p. 432). 



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JEWISH STATISTICS 



67 



States 



Alabama 

Alaska 

Arizona 

Arkansas 

California 

Colorado 

Connectiout 

Delaware 

District of Columbia. 

Florida 

Georgia 

Hawaiian Islands 

Idaho 

Illinois 

Indiana 

Iowa 

Kansas 

Kentucky 

Louisiana 

Maine 

Maryland 

Massachusetts 

Michigan 

Minnesota 

Mississippi 

Missouri 

Montana 

Nebraska 

Nevada 

New Hampshire 

New Jersey 

New Mexico 

New York 

North Carolina 

North Dakota 

Ohio 

Oklahoma 

Oregon 

Pennsylvani a 

Philippine Islands. . . . 

Porto Rico 

Rhode Island 

South Carolina 

South Dakota 

Tennessee 

Texas 

Utah 

Vermont 

Virginia 

Washington 

West Virginia 

Wisconsin 

Wyoming 



1st. Jew. Pop. 


Ktt. Jew. Pop. 


1M6 


1M7 


(•The Jewish KncTelopedie" 




Tol. XII, pp. 871474 
ArUcle "dotted StoUe" 


IndiTidaftl eorreepondmti of the 


Amsstoan Jbwiih Ybas Book 


7,000 


7,000 


. 


600 


8,066 


8,066 


88,000 


^000 


'^Sffi 


6,600 


8,600 


28,000 


^'SS 


1,600 


8,600 


6,100 


aooo 


8,000 


7,000 


9,800 


100 


100 


800 


800 


100,000 


110,000 


26,000 


12,000 


6,000 


6,000 


8.000 


1,600 


Jf'SS 


10,000 


12,000 


12,000 


6.000 


6,000 


20,600 


41,000 


?^»SK 


00,000 


16,000 


16,000 


18,000 


13,000 


8.000 


8,800 


60.000 


62,000 


2,600 


1,600 


8,800 


6,600 


300 


300 


1,000 


1.000 


40,000 


70,000 


800 


800 


820,000 


906,000 


6,000 


1,600 





1,000 


60,000 


86,000 





1,000 


6,000 


6,000 


116,000 


160,000 




100 





100 


1,600 


12.000 


2,600 


2,500 


260 


300 


7,000 


io,noo 


17,600 


16,000 


1,000 


1,000 


700 


1,00() 


16,000 


10,000 


2300 


6,600 


1,600 


1.500 


16,000 


16,000 




300 



1,608,436 



1,777,186 



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68 



AMERICAN JEWISH YEAR BOOK 



Immigration ^ 

The total Jewish immigration to the United States, through the 
three principal ports of entry, New York, Philadelphia, and Balti- 
more, from 1881 to June 30, 1908, is stated to have been 1,339,872. 

The immigration at the same ports from July 1, 1907, to June 
30, 1908, was as follows: 



Port of New York 



July.... 
Auerust. 
Sept.... 

Oct 

Nov 

Dec... 

Jan 

Feb 

Mar.... 

Apr 

May.... 
June... 



Aas- 
triani 

1,606 



987 

891 

1,866 

1430 



406 

474 



Ron- Raa- 
maaiaui bUdi 

8,808 
0.608 



717 
768 
626 
446 
860 
683 
267 
422 102 
47U 236 
168 
108 
120 



6,049 



8.747 
6,878 
8.886 
2,843 
3,167 
2,272 
1.640 
2,686 



Olhera 
1,022 

i,i;2 

777 
741 
946 
660 



223 
170 
828 
804 



ToUiiat 
N«w York 

l'»,068 
18,626 
0,288 
6.001 
12,418 
8,108 
4,889 
8.686 
4.006 
2.020 
2.486 
8,484 



Port of 
Philn- 
d«lphte 
ToUls 

080 
667 
784 
260 
646 
488 
877 
141 
800 
108 
71 
271 



Port of 
B«itl- Port or 



TutalB Totals 
600 



812 

640 
182 
701 
682 
272 
168 
118 
106 
67 
261 



614 
882 
163 
706 
147 
160 
147 
184 
142 
46 
OS 



ToUla 
for fonr 
Porta 

13,060 
16,600 
10,068 
6,606 
14,470 
0.826 
6,606 
4.141 
4.661 
8,801 
2,660 
4,000 



Totol 
0«n«ral 

Immi- 
Cratkm 

07482 
08 826 
08,604 
111,618 
117.476 
66,674 
27.220 
28.881 
82^17 
41,274 
86,817 
31,947 



11,080 4,907 60,166 6,708 82.801 6,184 4,402 2,998 96,380 782,870 

For the preceding year, 1906-1907, the total number of immi- 
grants at the three principal ports was: New York, 117,468; 
Philadelphia, 8,854; Baltimore, 7,791; in all, 134,113. 

The above figures relating to immigration have been furnished 
the American Jewish Yeab Book through the courtesy of Mr. 
H. S. Sabsovich, General Manager of the Baron de Hirsch Fund, 
New York; Mr. I. Irving Lipsitch, Representative of the United 
Hebrew Charities, Immigration Station, Port of New York; Mr. 
Louis H. Levin, Secretary of the Federated Jewish Charities of 
Baltimore; Mr. George B. Billings, Commissioner of Immigration, 
Port of Boston. The statistics of general immigration were ob- 
tained by courtesy of the Department of Commerce and Labor. 

THE BRITISH EMPIRE 



British Isles 220,304 

Australasia 17,403 

Canada and British 

Columbia 50,000 

Barbadoes 21 

Trinidad 50 

Jamaica 2,000 

India 18,228 



South Africa 40,000 

Gibraltar 2,000 

Aden 3,059 

Cyprus and Malta 165 

Hong Kong and Straits 

Settlements 680 



Total 353,910 



1 For a more detailed statement of Jewish immierration into the United 
States than here follows, see the American Jewish Year Book for 
6660, pp. 283-4. 



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JEWISH STATISTICS 



69 



GENERAL JEWISH STATISTICS 



United States 1,777,185 

British Empire 353,910 

Abyssinia (Fala- 

shas) 120,000 

Argentine Republic... 30,000 

Austria-Hungary* 2,076,378 

Belgium 12,000 

Bosnia, Herzegovina.. 8,213 

Brazil 3,000 

China 300 

Costa Rica 43 

Cuba 4,000 

Denmark 3,476 

France 90,000 

Algeria 63,000 

Tunis 62,540 

Germany* 586,948 

Greece 5,792 

Italy 52,115 

Luxembourg 1,201 

Mexico 8,972 

Morocco 109,712 



Netherlands ^... 103,988 

Curacoa 1,000 

Surinam 1,168 

Norway 642 

Persia 49,500 

Peru 498 

Roumania 260,000 

Russia 5,215,805 

Servia 5,729 

Spain 2,500 

Sweden 3,402 

Switzerland 12,264 

Turkey* 463,686 

Bulgaria 33,717 

Egypt 30,578 

Tripoli 18,660 

Crete 1,150 

Turkestan and Af- 
ghanistan 14,000 

Venezuela 411 



Total 11,577,473 



1 861.878 In Hunsrary. 
s 393,822 in Prussift. 
> 78.000 in Palestine. 



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70 AMERICAN JEWISH TEAR BOOK 



LIST OF JEWISH MEMBERS OF THE COJSTGEESS 
OF THE UNITED STATES 

PAST 
Benjamin, Judah Phujp, 1812-1884. Sen. from La., 1853-1861. 
Einstein, Edwin, 1842-1906. Rep. from N. Y., 1879-1881. 
Emebich, Mabtin, 1847- . Rep. from 111., 1903-1907. 
Frank, Nathan, 1852- . Rep. from Mo., 1889-1891. 
GoLDZiEB, Juuus, 1854- . Rep. from 111., 1893-1896. 
Habt, Emanuel B., 1809-1897. Rep. from N. Y., 1851-1853. 
Houseman, Julius, 1832-1891. Rep. from Mich., 1883-1886. 
Jonas, Benjamin Franklin, 1834- . Sen. from La., 1879-1885. 
Lessler, Montague, 1869- . Rep. from N. Y., 1902-1903. 
Levin, Lewis Charles, 1808-1860. Rep. from Pa., 1845-1851. 
Levy, David. See Yulee, David Levy. 
Levy, Jefferson Monroe. Rep. from N. Y., 1899-1901. 
LiTTAUER, Lucius Nathan, 1859- . Rep. from N. Y., 1897-1907. 
May, Mitchell, 1871- . Rep. from N. Y., 1899-1901. 
MEYER, Adolph, 1842-1908. Rep. from La., 1891-1908. 
Morse, Leopold, 1831-1892. Rep. from Mass., 1877-1885, 1887-1889. 
Phillips, Henry Myer, 1811-1884. Rep. from Pa., 1857-1859. 
Phillips, Philip, 1807-1884. Rep. from Ala., 1853-1855. 
Pulitzer, Joseph, 1847- . Rep. from N. Y., 1885-1886. 
Simon, Joseph, 1851- . Sen. from Ore., 1898-1903. 
Straus, Isidor, 1845- . Rep. from N. Y., 1894-1895. 
Strouse, Myer, 1825-1878. Rep. from Pa., 1863-1867. 
Yulee, David Levy, 1811-1886. Del. from Fla., 1841-1845; Sen. 
from Fla., 1845-1851; 1855-1861. 

PRESENT 
(Members of the Sixtieth Congress) 

Goldfoole, Henry M., Democrat, of New York City, was born 
in New York City; educated in the public schools; admitted 
to the bar after having passed the examination at the head of 
his class; was elected Justice of the fifth district court of 



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JEWS IN CONGRESS 71 

New York in 1887, and re-elected in 1893 without opposition; 
became one of the judges of the municipal court of New 
York; retired from the bench on January 1, 1900, to resume 
the practice of law; during twelve years of judicial service 
he enjoyed the creditable record of having been reversed in 
but two cases; drafted and secured the enactment of a law 
by the State legislature which allows an execution against the 
body to issue against a delinquent debtor on a judgment in 
favor of a working woman for services performed by her; 
is the author of the present law in that State providing for 
an expeditious remedy to collect judgments obtained by 
laborers, mechanics, and other wage-earners for wages earned 
or labor performed; served several terms as grand president 
of District No. 1 of the Independent Order B'nai B'rith, and 
is one of the judges of the court of appeals of that order; 
is prominently identified with many of the leading fraternal 
organizations, clubs, and societies in his city and with several 
financial institutions; was for years a governor of the Home 
for the Aged and Infirm at Yonkers; director of the infant 
asylum; one of the advisory committee of the Educational 
Alliance; is Vice-President of Temple Rodeph Sholom; has 
been delegate to almost every State convention since he 
attained his majority; in 1892 was an alternate to the 
national Democratic convention, and in 1896 a delegate to 
the national Democratic convention; was elected to the 
Fifty-seventh, Fifty-eighth, and Fifty-ninth Congresses, and 
re-elected to the Sixtieth Congress, receiving 7276 votes, to 
3586 for Morris Hillquit, Socialist, 2734 for C. S. Adler, 
Republican, and 53 for T. N. Holden, Prohibitionist; was a 
delegate from the American Congressional Group to the 
Interparliamentary Conference held in Brussels, Belgium, 
and in London, England, and in the Belgium Congress he 
delivered an address on international arbitration. He has 
introduced and secured the passage of several resolutions 
concerning Russia's refusal to honor the U. S. Government's 
passports held by American Jewish citizens. He has also 
delivered a number of addresses in the House on the question 
of Immigration. Committees: Claims, Expenditures in the 
Department of Justice; Industrial Arts and Expositions. 

Guggenheim, Simon, Republican, of Denver, was born in Phila- 
delphia, December 30, 1867, the son of Meyer and Barbara 
(Myers) Guggenheim; graduated from the public schools of 
Philadelphia, after which he studied languages in Europe 
for two years; was married in New York City, November 24, 
1898, to Olga H. Hirsh; was engaged in the mining and 



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72 AMERICAN JEWISH YEAR BOOK 



smelting business in the United States and Republic of 
Mexico; went to Pueblo, Colo., in 1888, later moving to 
Denver; was elected to the United States Senate to succeed 
Thomas M. Patterson, Democrat. His term of service will 
expire March 3, 1913. Committees: Chairman of Select Com- 
mittee on Expenditures in the Navy Department. Member: 
Audit and Control of the Contingent Expenses of the Senate; 
Census; Claims; Manufactures; Pacific Railroads; University 
' of the United States; Post Offices and Post Roads. 

Kahn, Julius, Republican, and endorsed by Labor Union Party, of 
San Francisco, was born on the 28th day of February, 1861, 
at Kuppenheim, Grand Duchy of Baden, Germany; came to 
California with his parents in 1866; was educated in the 
public schools of San Francisco; after leaving school he fol- 
lowed the theatrical profession for ten years, playing with 
Edwin Booth, Joseph Jefferson, Tommaso Salvini, Mr. and 
Mrs. W. J. Florence, Clara Morris, and other well-known stars. 
He returned to San Francisco in 1890 and began studying 
law; in 1892 was elected to the legislature of the State of 
California; in January, 1894, was admitted to the bar by the 
supreme court of California; was elected to the Fifty-sixth, 
Fifty-seventh, and Fifty-ninth Congresses, and re-elected to 
the Sixtieth Congress. In the great confiagration of April 
18-20, 1906, out of ten assembly districts comprising the 
Fourth Congressional District seven were completely devas- 
tated and the other three were partially destroyed. In 1904 
there were 50,000 registered voters in the district In 1906 
there were fewer than 12,000. Mr. Kahn received 5678 votes, 
to 3012 for D. S. Htrschberg, Democrat and Independence 
League, and 399 for Oliver Everett, Socialist. Mr. Kahn is a 
member of the Independent Order B'nal B'rith, the Eureka 
Benevolent Society, the First Hebrew Benevolent Society, and 
the Jewish People's Home. Committees: District of Colum- 
bia; Military Affairs. 

Rayneb, Isidob, Democrat, of Baltimore, was born in that city 
April 11, 1850; was educated at the University of Maryland 
and the University of Virginia; at the University of Virginiia 
he took the academic and law courses, and upon his return to 
Baltimore was admitted to the bar in 1870, and has been 
practising law in that city since that time. He has held the 
following public offices: In 1878 he was elected to the Mary- 
land legislature for two years, and served on the judiciary 
committee and was chairman of the Baltimore city delega- 
tion; in 1885 he was elected to the State senate for four years, 
serving on the judiciary committee; he resigned his place in 



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JEWS IN CONGRESS 73 



'the State senate in the middle of his term and became the 
Democratic candidate for Congress, and in 1886 was elected 
to the Fiftieth Congress and served on the Committees on 
Foreign Affairs and Interstate and Foreign Commerce; he 
was again elected to the Fifty-second Congress, serving on 
the Committees on Foreign Affairs and Coinage, Weights, and 
Measures, and was re-elected to the Fifty-third Congress and 
served on the same committees; he declined a re-election for 
a fourth term, and was elected attorney-general of Maryland, 
serving from 1899 to 1903; in 1904 he was elected to the 
United States Senate to succeed the Hon. Louis E. McComas, 
Republican, for the term beginning March 4, 1906. His term 
of service will expire March 3, 1911. Committees: Civil 
Service and Retrenchments; Education and Labor; Expendi- 
tures in the Department of Justice; Geological Survey; In- 
dustrial Expositions; Judiciary; Pacific Islands and Porto 
Rico; Transport Routes to the Seaboard. 

Sabath, Aoolph J., Democrat, of Chicago, was bom April 4, 
1866, at Zabori, Bohemia; attended grammar and high schools 
until he emigrated in 1881 to the United States, locating at 
Chicago, attended Bryant and Stratton Business College, and 
graduated from the law department of the Chicago College 
of Law in 1891, and received the degree of LL. B., from Lake 
Forest University 1892; was admitted to practise law in 1891, 
and engaged therein in Chicago from 1891 to 1895; was elected 
a Justice of the peace for Cook County in 1895; appointed 
police magistrate for city of Chicago in 1897, and served in 
that capacity until elected to the Sixtieth Congress, receiving 
9545 votes, to 8634 for A. M. Michalek, Republican, 2373 for 
J. Krai, Socialist, and 177 for H. Graff, Prohibitionist. He 
is a member of the Independent Order of B'nai B'rith; Marks 
Nathan Orphanage (Director); Orthodox Jewish Old People's 
Home; Independent Western Star Order; and the Hebrew 
Institute of Chicago. Committees: Alcoholic Liquor Traffic; 
Immigration and Naturalization. 

Wolf, Habby B., Democrat, of Baltimore, was bom at Baltimore, 
Md., June 16, 1880; after attending the public schools of that 
city, entered the Maryland University School of Law, and 
from there was graduated as a lawyer June 3, 1901, receiving 
the degree of LL. B. ; since that time has been practising his 
profession in Baltimore; was married in 1904; was elected 
to the Sixtieth Congress, receiving 15,725 votes to 14,841 
for W. W. Johnson,. Republican, and 617 for J. P. Jarboe, 
Socialist. Committees: Elections No. 3; Expenditures in the 
Navy Department 



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74 AMERICAN JEWISH YEAR BOOK 



THE GOVEEISTMENT OF THE UNITED STATES AND 
AFFAIRS OF INTEREST TO THE JEWS 

1907 
Dec. 2. Bill (H. R. 147), introduced by Rep. A. J. Sabath (111.), 
proYldlng for repeal of section eight of act of June 
29, 1906, establishing a Bureau of Immigration and 
Naturalization. 

2. Bill (H. R. 246), introduced by Rep. Hayes (Cal.), to 
regulate the coming into and residence within the 
United States of Chinese, Japanese, Koreans, Tartars, 
Malays, Afghans, East Indians, Lascars, Hindoos, and 
other persons of the Mongolian or Asiatic race, and 
persons of Chinese, Japanese, Korean, Tartar, Ma- 
layan, Afghan, East Indian, Hindoo, or other Mon- 
golian extraction, and for other purposes. 

2. Bill (H. R. 482), introduced by Rep. Bonynge (Colo.), 
with regard to the expatriation of citizens and their 
protection abroad. 

5. Bill (H. R. 4897), introduced by Rep. Amos L. Allen 

(Me.), to further protect the first day of the week 
as a day of rest in the District of Columbia. 

6. Bill (H. R. 4929), introduced by Rep. J. Thomas Heflin 

(Ala.), prohibiting labor on buildings, etc., in the 
District of Columbia on the Sabbath Day. 
9. Bill (H. R. 6167), introduced by Rep. James E. Watson 
(Ind.), providing for an educational test for all immi- 
grants. 

12. Bill (S. 2246), introduced by Sen. Asbury C. Latimer 
(S. C), prohibiting more than fifty thousand immi- 
grants of any one nationality entering in any year 
and containing other restrictionist provisions. 

12. Bill (H. R. 7694), introduced by Rep. J. H. Moore 
(Pa.), providing for an immigrant station at Phila- 
delphia, Pa. 

12. Bill (H. R. 7628), introduced by Rep. Oscar W. Under- 
wood (Ala.), providing for a fine of two hundred 
dollars against any transportation company bringing 
in an immigrant belonging to the excluded classes. 

16. Bill (H. R. 9177), introduced by Rep. John L. Burnett 
(Ala.), providing for an educational test for all im- 



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U. S. GOVERNMENT AFFAIRS OF INTEREST 75 



migrants, and the inspection of all immigrants by 
U. S. officials at the port of embarkation. 
17. Bill (S. 2643), introduced by Sen. C. D. Clark (Wyo.), 
regulating immigration into the territory of Hawaii. 

19. Bill (H. R. 10,568), introduced by Rep. W. P. Hepburn 

(Iowa), regulating immigration into the territory of 
Hawaii 
21. Bill (H. R. 11,326), introduced by Rep. Augustus P. 
Gardner (Mass.), providing for an educational test 
for all immigrants. 
1908 

Jan. 8. Resolution (H. Res. 126), introduced by Rep. George 
B. Waldo (N. Y.), expressing sympathy with the 
Russian people in their struggle for liberty, with the 
members of the Duma who have been punished for 
exercising freedom of speech, and directing the Com- 
mittee on Foreign Affairs to inquire into the expedi- 
ency of requesting the President of the United States 
to intercede with the Russian Government for the 
liberation of the members of the Duma in prison. 

10. Bill (H. R. 13,079), introduced by Rep. W. S. Bennett 

(N. Y.), providing for the deportation of aliens con- 
victed of a felony at the expiration of their sentence. 

11. Bill (H. R. 13,274), introduced by Rep. John A. Keliher 

(Mass.), providing for the erection of an immigrant 
station at Boston. 

13. Bill (H. R. 13,471), introduced by Rep. Robert Lamar 

(Mo.), prohibiting work in the District of Columbia 
on the first day of the week commonly called 
Sunday. 

14. Bill (S. 3940), introduced by Sen. Joseph F. Johnston 

(Ala.), requiring certain places of business in the 
District of Columbia to be closed on Sunday. 
17. Bill (H. R. 14,271), introduced by Rep. Charles P. 
Edwards (Ga.), providing for the erection of an 
immigrant station at Savannah, Ga. 

20. Bill (S. 4120), introduced by Sen. B. Penrose (Pa.), 

providing for the erection of an immigrant station 

at Philadelphia, Pa. 
20. Bill (S. 4121), introduced by Sen. H. C. Lodge (Mass.), 

providing for the erection of an immigrant station 

at Boston. 
20. Bill (H. R. 14,373), introduced by Rep. Charles G. 

Edwards (Ga.), providing for the erection of an 

immigrant station at Savannah, Ga. . 



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76 AMERICAN JEWISH YEAR BOOK 



20. House of Representatives passes bill (H. R. 7694) for 
the erection of an immigrant station at Philadelphia. 

27. Bill (H. R. 15,239), introduced by Rep. John W. Lang- 
ley (Ky.), requiring certain places of business in the 
District of Columbia to be closed on Sunday. 

27. Bill (H. R. 15,268). introduced by Rep. Sydney E. Mudd 
(Md.), providing for the erection of an immigrant 
station at Baltimore, Md. 

31. Senate passes bill for the erection of immigrant station 
at Boston. 
Feb. 3. Resolution (H. Res. 214), introduced by Rep. Arthur 
L. Bates (Pa.), expressing sjrmpathy for the Poles 
of Prussia in their efforts to maintain their property 
rights. 

3. Senate passes bill for the erection of an immigrant 

station at Philadelphia. 

4. Senate, on motion of Sen. H. C. Lodge (Mass.), orders 

statistics of immigration at New York to be printed 
as a document. (Sen. Doc. 220.) 

4. Resolution (H. Res. 223), introduced by Rep. H. M. 
(Joldfogle (N. Y.), as follows: 
Resolved J That the Secretary of State be, and he hereby 
is, requested to communicate to this House, if not 
incompatible with public interests, the correspond- 
ence relating to negotiations with the Russian Oov- 
emment concerning American passports since the 
adoption of the resolution by the House of Represen- 
tatives relating to that subject on the twenty-first 
day of April, nineteen hundred and four; and also 
a copy of the circular letter issued by the Department 
of State to American citizens advising them that 
upon the Department receiving satisfactory informa- 
tion that they did not intend to go to Russian 
territory or that they had permission from the 
Russian Government to return, their application for 
a passport would be reconsidered; and also a copy 
of the notice accompanying such letter Issued by the 
Department of State, dated May twenty-eighth, nine- 
teen hundred and seven. 

6. President approves bill providing for the erection of 
an immigrant station at Philadelphia, Pa. 

6. Bill (S. 5083), introduced by Sen. H. C. Lodge (Mass.), 
providing for increased space allotted to steerage 
passengers. 



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U. S. GOVERNMENT AFFAIRS OF INTEREST 77 

7. Concurrent Resolution (H. Con. Res. 28), Introduced 
by Rep. W. S. Bennett (N. Y.), deploring massacres 
and acts of toiture and inhumanity, planned and 
effected by Russian police and military authorities: 
Resolved, That the Congress of the United States de- 
plores such acts of violence and inhumanity which 
shock the civilized world and retard universal pro- 
gress. 
10. Letter from the Secretary of State respecting Rep. 
Goldfogle's resolution of Feb. 4, presented to the 
House of Representatives as follows: 

Department or State, 
Washington, February 8, 1908. 
The Hon. Adin B. Capron, Chairman of the Sub- 
committee. Committee on Foreign Affairs, House 
of Representatives. 
Sib: I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt 
of your letter of February 5, bringing to the Depart- 
ment's attention a resolution introduced in the House 
of Representatives, February 4, by Mr. Goldfogle, of 
New York, asking that the Secretary of State be re- 
quested to communicate, if not incompatible with the 
public interests, copies of correspondence with the 
Russian Government concerning the validity of 
American passports, since the adoption by the House 
of Representatives of the resolution of April 21, 1904, 
on that subject; also a copy of the circular letter 
and notice issued by the Department to American 
citizens who desire to proceed to Russia. 

In the volume of Foreign Relations of the United 
States for 1904, page 790, may be found the beginning 
of the correspondence between this Government and 
the Russian Government when the resolution of April 
21, 1904, was submitted to that Government. 

It is not deemed compatible with the best public 
interests to communicate the subsequent correspond- 
ence. 

I enclose a copy of the printed circular or notice 
now in use and which, before the introduction of the 
resolution, had been substituted for the former cir- 
cular, to which some objections were made. 
I have the honor to be, sir. 

Your obedient servant, 

Elihu Root. 



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78 AMERICAN JEWISH YEAR BOOK 



(Enclosure) 
RUSSIA 
Notice to American Citizens, Formerly Subjects of 
Russia, Who Contemplate Returning to 
THAT Country 
Under Russian law, a Russian subject who becomes 
a citizen of another country without the consent of 
the Russian Government is deemed to have com- 
mitted an offense for which he is liable to arrest and 
punishment if he returns without previously obtain- 
ing the permission of the Russian Government 

This Government dissents from this provision of 
Russian law, but an American citizen, formerly a 
subject of Russia, who returns to that country places 
himself within the jurisdiction of Russian law, and 
can not expect immunity from its operations. 

No one is admitted to Russia unless his passport 
has been visaed, or indorsed, by a Russian diplomatic 
or consular representative. 

Elihu Root. 

11. Consideration by the House of Representatives of 
Rep. Goldfogle's resolution. Speeches by Reps. F. B. 
Harrison (N. Y.), for, and Frank O. Lowden (111.), 
for, and Adin B. Capron (R. I.), against, the reso- 
lution. Laid on the table by a vote of 120 to 101. 

18. Concurrent Resolution (S. Con. Res. 38), introduced 
in Senate by Sen. Albert J. Hopkins (111.), same as 
resolution introduced into House, Feb. 7, 1908. 

18. Action taken on Sen. H. C. Lodge's bill of Feb. 6. 

29. Bill (H. R. 18,442), introduced by Rep. Sydney E. Mudd 
(Md.), providing for the erection of an immigrant 
station at Baltimore, Md. 
Mar. 2. Bill (H. R. 13,079), for deportation of felons (see Jan. 
10) defeated. 

19. Resolution of Virginia Legislature printed in the Con- 

gressional Record on motion of Sen. Thomas S. 
Martin (Va.), as follows: 
Resolved, By the senate of Virginia (the House of 
Delegates concurring). That our Representatives in 
both Houses of Congress be, and they are hereby, 
requested to oppose in every possible manner the 
influx into Virginia of immigrants from Southern 
Europe, with their Mafia and Black Hand and murder 
societies, and with no characteristics to make them 
with us a homogeneous people, believing as we do. 



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U. S. GOVERNMENT AFFAIRS OF INTEREST 79 



that upon Anglo-Saxon supremacy depend the future 
welfare and prosperity of this Commonwealth; and 
we view with alarm any effort that may tend to cor- 
rupt its citizenship. 

Agreed to by the General Assembly of Virginia, 
February 14, 1908. 

JoHir W. Williams, 
Clerk, House of Delegates, and 
Keeper of the Records of Virginia. 

27. Bill (H. R. 19,965), introduced by Rep. James Hay 
(Va.), for the proper observance of Sunday as a day 
of rest. 
April 7. Bill (S. 6535), introduced by Sen. Joseph F. Johnston 
(Ala.), for the proper observance of Sunday as a day 
of rest. 

14. President in message refers to requests to State Depart- 

ment to intervene in behalf of Jews and others. 

15. Hearing before Senate Sub-Committee on the District 

of Columbia on Sunday legislation for the District 
of Columbia. 
May 1. Bill (S. 3940, see above Jan. 14), reported to Senate. 
11. Senate passes bill (H. R. 13,851), providing for the 
erection of an immigrant station at Boston, Mass. 

15. Senate passes bill (S. 3940), for the proper observ- 

ance of Sunday as a day of rest in the District of 
Columbia. 

16. Bill (S. 3940), for the proper observance of Sunday as 

a day of rest in the District of Columbia reported to 

the House and referred to Committee on District of 

Columbia. 
27. House passes bill (S. 5083), providing for increased air 

space for steerage passengers. 
29. House passes bill for immigrant station at Boston. 



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80 AMERICAN JEWISH YEAR BOOK 



A LIST OF AETICLES OF JEWISH INTEEEST 

IN THE JEWISH AND IN THE GENERAL PRESS 
August, 1907, to July, 1908 
List of Abbbeviations 
Ag. — August. J. L. — ^Jewish Ledger. 
A. H. — ^American Hebrew. Jl. — July. 
A. I. — ^American Israelite. J. O. — Jewish Outlook. 
Ap. — April. J. R. — Jewish Review and Ob- 
Char. — Charities and The Com- server. 

mons. J. V. — Jewish Voice. 

Chaut. — Chautauquan. Mac. — Maccabsean. 

D. — December. Mr. — March. 

F. — February. M. V. — ^Modern View. 

F. R. — Federation Review. My. — ^May 

H. S. — Hebrew Standard. N. — November. 

Ind. — Independent. N. A. R. — North American Re- 

Ja. — January. view. 

J. C. — Jewish Comment. O. — October. 

J. Crit. — Jewish Criterion. R. A. — ^Reform Advocate. 

J. E. — Jewish Exponent. R. R. — ^Review of Reviews. 

Je. — June. S. — September. 

Abyssinia, Mission to. Nis8im Behar, J. E., My. 15, '08. 

America and the Jew. Abraham Anspacher. A. I., Je. 11, '08. 

Amebican Jew. Louis Meyer. Missionary Rev., D., '07. 

Amebican Jewess. L. Weisa. J. O., Ja. 10, '08. 

Anabchists. Ind., Mr., '08. 

Anabchists and Immigrants in Amebica. E. Tohenkin, World 
To-day, My., '08. 

Antisemite, Conversion of an. Edward Singer, J. C, Mr. 20, 
'08. 

Abt Exhibit, Jewish, An Intebestinq. J. C, Mr. 6, '08. 

Abt, Jew in. Ephraim Keyser. J. E., Mr. 6, '08. 

Abt, Jewish. Richard Gottheih J. C, Ap. 3, '08. 

Abts and Pbofessions, Eminence of the Amebican Jew in the. 
F. J, Oppenheim. J. V., Mr. 20, '08, et aeq. 



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ARTICLES OF JEWISH INTEREST gl 

AssiMUJLTiON A17D NATIONALITY. Joseph Lee, Char., Ja. 25, '08. 
Austria, Jew in. 0. Leonard, M. V., F. 28, '08. 

[AVERBUCH, LAZABUS.] CHICAGO SETTLEMENT^ AND SOCIAL UnBEST 

AND THE AVEBBUCH Affaib. J. Addams, Char., My. 2, '08. 

Senjamin, Judah p. Jacob L. Newman, A. I., Je. 18, '08. 

Bible in Foub Hundbed Tongues. W. G. Fitz-C^ald. Harper. O., 
'07. 

Bible in Public Schools. Emil O, Hirach, R. A., Mr. 23, '07. 

Bible in Public Schools. Jacob Voorsanger, Emanu-El, D., 6, 
'07. 

Bible in Public Schools. Martin ZieJonka. A. I., Mr. 19, '08. 

Bible in Public Schools. See also Public Schools and Religion. 

Bund, The, and Theib Relation to Religious and Civil Law. 
Aaron Brav, J. E., Ag. 12, '07. 

Boston Jewbt, Open Lettebs to. Jacob de Haas, Boston Advo- 
cate, O. 4, '07, et seq. 

Browning, Robebt, Debt of the Jew to. Mary M, Cohen. H. S., 
Ap. 10, '08. 

Bubo, Meno: A Modern Jewish Ideal. Max Schloessinger, J. C, 
N., '07. 

Catholics and Jews. A Symposium. Homiletlc Rev., Ja., '08. 

Chabity of the Jews. Max Heller, Pensacola Journal, F. 16, '08*. 

Chess, Jewish. Albert Porter. A. H., D. 27, '07. 

Child-Cabing, Modern Methods in Jewish. 0. J, Teller. J. B., 
Ap. 17, '08. 

Children of the SLtrMS, Better Chance for. Oharlea W. Eliot. 
outlook, Ag. 10, '07. 

Children's Theatre: A Little Paradise in the New York 
Slums. Jeannette S, Porter. Woman's Home Companion. 
S., '07. 

Chinese Jews, The. Oliver Bainbridge. Nat. Geog. Mag., O., 
'07. et aeg. 

Christ, Did the Jews or Romans Crucify? B. H. Hartogensia. 
Baltimore Sun, Ap. 19, '08. 



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82 AMERICAN JEWISH YEAR BOOK 

[GoNOESTiON.] Consequences of Oyebcbowding. Felix Adler, 
Char., Ap. 4, '08. 

Criminals, Feweb Jewish. J. C, Ja. 10, '08. 

David, The National Hebo of the Jews. W. A. Oilh Munsey, 
D., '07. 

Dbeyfus Affaib Continued. Ind., Je. 11, '08. 

Dbeyfus Infamy Again. Outlook, Je. 27, '08. 

Education, Jewish, in America. Bamson BenderJy, J. E., Ja. 
17, '08. 

Educational Alliance in New York City. JJ. E, Rood. Metro- 
politan, Ja., '08. 

Ehblich, Arnold Booumil: Greatest of Living M'forshim. 
Jacob Goldstein. H. S., F. 7, '08. 

Elephantine Bamah, The, A Piece of Forgotten History. Max 
L. Margolia, J. C, Je. 26, '08. 

Ellis Island as Seen by the Camera-Man. J. A. Dimock. World 
To-Day, Ap., '08. 

Ellis Island, Morning at. Joseph Krauskopf. J. V., Ja. 3, '08, 
ei seq. 

Emigrant at Home and in America. Maurice C. Lipman. World 
To-Day, Ja., '08. 

Emigrant, Return of the. L. M. Mackay. Ldving Age, O. 5, 
'07; Mr. 28, '08. 

Evil Eye among Hebrews. Aaron Brav. J. E., Mr. 27, '08; Ap. 
3, '08. 

Exclusion, Spirit and Letter of. Oscar 8. Straus. N. A. R., 
Ap., '08. 

Exodus, Jewish: Home Making of a Million and a Half of 
Fugitives. Walter E. Weyl. Sat. Eve. Post, D. 21, '07. 

Farm College Settlements. Joseph Leiser. J. E., Ja. 31, '08. 

Farmers, Jewish. Kellogg Durland. Chaut., Ap., '08. 

Farming: Jewish Colony at Hirsch, Canada. E. N. Adler. 
J. O., Ja. 17, '08. 

Fictions of the East Side. Ahram Lipsky. A. H., D. 6, '07. 

Frohman: Dictator of Dramatic Destinies. John Gordon. 
Human Life, S., '07. 



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ARTICLES OF JEWISH INTEREST 83 

FuTUBE Life in Hebrew Thought Dubing the Pbe-Pebsian Pebiod. 
John D. Davis. Princeton Theol. Rev., Ap., '08. 

Ghetto, The, Tbansplanted Stjbvival. G, G, Bain, Overland, 
Mr.. '08. 

Ghetto, Wobk and Play in the. Adolph Danziger. Broadway, 
O., '07. 

Handicbaft, Jewish View of. Henry Bamatein. Review 
(Phila.), F., '08. 

Hebbew Monotheism. H. Jf . Wiener, Bibllotheca Sacra, O., '07. 

HiLSNEB, Leopold, Powebful Appeal fob. Friedrich Elbogen, 
J. C. D. 27. '07. 

HiBscH, Rabbi Samson Raphael. Bernard Revel, J. E., Je. 19, 
'08. 

HiBSCH, Samson Raphael, Centenaby of Bibth of. G. Deutsch, 
J. C, May 29, '08. 

Immigbant, Pboblem of the. G, B. Levi, R. A., My. 16, '08. 

Immigrant, What the. Thinks of Amebica. Philip Davis. 
Ghaut., D., '07. 

Immigbants, Cbiminal. J. C., Ja. 10, '08. 

IMMIQBANTS, DiSTBiBUTiON OF JEWISH. D, M. BressUr, J. Grit, 
D. 20, '07. 

Immigbants, Education of. Abraham 8. Bchomer, F. R., Mr., 
'08. 

Immigbants, Effect of Public Schools on. David Blauatein, 
N. Y. Sun, Ag. 18, '07. 

Immigbant's, Stoby of an, Expebience. Philip Davis, Ghaut, S., 
'07. 

Immigbants, What abe Ours Worth in Dollars and Gents? S. 
A, Reeve, N. Y. Herald, Ag. 18, '07. 

Immigbation. J, W, Mack. Chicago Examiner, Ja. 5, '08. 

Immigration, American, New Aspects of. H. F, Sherwood. Ind., 
N. 28, '07. 

Immigration and Anarchists. Ind., Mr. 12, '08. 

Immigbation, Bill to Limit. A. C. Latimer. Evening Post, N. 
29, '07. 



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84 AMERICAN JEWISH YEAR BOOK 



Immigration Cloud, Silveb Lining of the. L. B. Stowe. Circle, 
O., '07. 

Immigration: Galveston Movement. Henry Cohen, F. R., Mr., 
'08. 

Immigration, Jewish, Figures Concerning. F, P. Sargent, A. H., 
Ja. 3, '08. 

Immigration Law, The New. Robert De C, Ward, N. A. R., 
Jl. 19, '07. 

Immigration Problem, National. Jacob Voorsanger. A. I., Mr. 
12, '08. 

Immigration, Restricting. Adolph Kraus, A. I., Mr. 26, '08. 

Immigration, Restriction of. Elkan Adler, J. Crit, N. 22, '07. 

Immigration, Restriction or Regulation for. J, H, Schiff, J. O., 
N. 15, '07. 

Immigration, Speech on. Before the Boston City Club, March 
20, 1908. H. C, Lodge. Gov. Ptg., '08. 

Immigration, Wheeler and 21angwill on. H. S., N. 1, '07. 

Intermarriage. Scribe, Ja. 10, '08. 

International Congress in United States. Abraham 8. Schomer. 
J. E., Mr. 13, '08. 

Israel's Contribution to American Freedom. Rudolph I, Coffee. 
J. Crit., Ap. 17, '08. 

Israel's Laws and Legal Precedents. Harold M. Wiener, Bib- 
liotheca Sacra, Ja., '08. 

ITO, The, to Land in North Africa. Israel Zangwill, A. H., D. 
27, '07. 

Jehoash, The Yiddish Bard of the Rockies. C. D. Spivak. J. C, 
O. 11, '08. 

Jehuda Halevi's Philosophy. David Neumark, Catalogue of 
Heb. Union Coll., Cincinnati, '08. 

Jew and, the Currents of His Age. A, 8, Isaacs, Atlantic 
Monthly, JL, '08. 

Jewish Communal Activities, Unification of. J. H. Hollander, 
J. C, My. 8, '08. 

Jkwish Educational Institutions, Need of a Distinctly Jewish 
Tendency in the Conduct of. Louis Marshall. J. B., My. 8, 
'08. 



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ARTICLES OF JEWISH INTEREST 85 

Jewish Home. A, 8. Isaacs, N. A. R., Ag. 16, '07. 

Jewish Life in German Novels. Max SchJoessinger, J. C, Mr. 
27, '08. 

Jewish Paintebs and Musicians. J. C, Ap. 3, '08. 

Jewish Question, Count Witte and. A. H., Jl. 31, '08. 

Jewish Rest-Day. Ind., Ap. 9, *08. 

Jewish Temple in Egypt B. C. 525-411. Bibliotheca Sacra, Ja., 
'08. 

Jewish Tbatelebs. J. L., D. 13, '07. 

Jews and Chbistmas in England. J. C, Ja. 10, '08. 

Jews in Agbicultube. H. L, Sahsovich, J. E., D. 20, '07. 

Joachim, Joseph: Jupiteb of Violinists. Current Lit., O., '07. — 
Remembbance. E. Sichel, Liying Age, S. 14, '07. 

Judaism, Libebal. J, H, Oreenstone. J. E., Je. 12, '08. 

Judaism, Pbesent Cbisis in. J. I. Landsmann. M. R., D., '07. 

Law, Jewish Regabd fob. Joseph Stemherger. J. E., Je. 19, *08. 

London, EIast, Tenement Dwelling. Samuel Gordon. J. C, My. 1, 
'08. 

Mahleb, Gustav: An Autocbat in Music. Daniel O. Mason. 
Outlook, Ag. 24, '07. 

Mabbiage Among the Eably Babylonians and Hebbews. Kerr D. 
Macmillan, Princeton Theol. Rev., Ap., '08. 

Mabbiage Between Jews and Roman Catholics. O. Deutsch. 
A. I., F. 6, '08. 

Medicine, Jew in. Louis Qrossmann, A. I., Mr. 5, *08, et seq. 

Memoirs of a Govebnob. Prince 8. D. Urussov, A. I., S. 26, '07. 

Merchant of Venice: Shall this Play be Read in Oub Public 
Schools. H, Barnstein. J. R., F. 7, '08. 

Michelson, Albebt a.: Winneb of the Nobel Pbize. H, T, 
Wade, R. R., Ja., '08. 

MoDEBNisT Cbisis in the Jewish Chubch. R. R., Ja., '08. 

MoNTBEAL, Jews of. E, R. Lipsett. R. A., Mr. 28, '08. 



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86 AMERICAN JEWISH YEAR BOOK 



Mobtality: Low Death Rate Among Jews. R. R., O., '07. 

Mosaic Obioin of the Atomic Theory. J. Knott. Nature, Mr. 26, 
'08. 

MosLEB, Hekby, The Abt of. Florence Finch Kelly, Broadway, 
S., '07. 

Music AND Max Zach. M. Bienenatok. M. V., D. 20, '07. 

Music, Tbaditional Jewish. A. H., Ja. 3, '08. 

Natubalization, Impboved, System. Alford W. Cooley. R. R., 
Ap., '08. 

Nazimova, Alla. James Anderson. Metropolitan, Ag., '07. — 
Ada Patterson. Theatre, Ag., '07. — Anne Peacock, Theatre, 
S., '07.— Anna McClure Sholh Lippincott, N., '07.— LOMi* 
Untermeyer. Theatre, Ag., ' 07. —Rennold Wolf. Smith, O., '07. 

New Yobk Jewish Histoby: A Quabteb-Centuby Subyey. Mau- 
rice H. Harris. A. H., N. 8, '07. 

New Yobk, Jews in, Numbeb of. Ernest Kahn. J. O., Mr. 13, '08. 

New Yobk the Centbe of Gbeatest Jewish Population since the 
Destruction of Jerusalem. Jacob Voorsanger. A. I., Ap. 
23, '08. 

Palestine as a Centre of Jewish Culture. Asher Oinshurg. 
Mac, Ja., '08. 

[Palestine.] In Quabantine Off the Palestinian Coast. H. 
Pope. Am. Cath. Quart., Ap., '08. 

Palestine, Jewish Colonies in. A. H., Ja. 10, '08. 

[Palestine.] Out-of-Doob in the Holy Land. H. Van Dyke. 
Ladies' Home Jour., O., '07, et seq. 

[Palestine.] Riding Down to Egypt. Hf. Duncan. Harper, Jl., 
'08. 

Palestine To-Day. S. 8. Bradford. Travel, D., '07. 

Passoveb and Easteb. L. Weiss. J. R., Ap. 10, '08. 

Passoyeb vs. Assimilation. S. Fyne. J. E., Ap. 10, '08. 

Passpobts, Amebican, to Russia. F. 0. Lowden. Speech in House 
of Representatives, F. 11, '08. Cong. Rec., Mr. 10, '08. 

Passpobts fob Jews, House of Repbesentatives on. A,. H., F. 14, 
'08. 



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ARTICLES OF JEWISH INTEREST 87 



Patbiotism of the Jew. J, O. Pumpelly. N. Y. Tribune, Ja., 6, 
'08. 

Physical Culture [and the Jew]. M. M, Eichler. J. E., Ja. 10, 
'08. 

PooBOM, How the Spibit Developed. Isaac A. Hounvich. A. H., 
Ag. 16, '07, et aeq. 

Politics op Jews, Views on. M, Khomiakoff. J. C, Ja. 10, '08. 

Pbe-Existence of the Soul in the Book of Wisdom and in the 
Rabbinical Writings. F, C. Porter. Amer. Jour. Theol., Ja.. 
'08. 

Pboselttism: Vain Attempt to Convebt the Jews. Charles 
Fleischer, Boston Herald, O. 27, *07.^Why Jews Will Not 
be Contebted. J. E., Ja. 10, '08. — ^Apostasy Among the Jews. 
R. R.. S., '07. 

Pbovidence, R. I., Jews of. P. V. Marcus. H. S., Ja. 31, '08. 

PtiBiM, Wine, and Song. Israel Davidson. A. H., Mr. 13, '08. 

[Public Schools and Religion.] Chbist in the Public Schools. 
Bookman, Ja., '08. 

[Public Schools and Religion.] Chbistmas Without Chbist. 
Current Lit, Ja., '08. 

[Pumlic Schools and Religion.] EIxclusion of Religious Instbuc- 
TiON from the Public Schools. E. J. Qcodwin. Educ, Rev« 
F., '08. 

[Public Schools and Religion.] Religion in Public-School Edu- 
cation. Biblical World, Ap., '08. 

PuuTZEB, Joseph: Fatheb of Modern Journalism. Hartley 
Davis. Broadway, D., '07. 

Rachel [Elizabeth Rachel Felix]: Histobic Rivalry of Two 
Queens of Tragedy. Current Lit., Ja., '08. 

Rashl C. D. Matt. J. E., Ja. 24, '08 

Religious Thebapeutics among Jews, Need of. Joseph Leiser. 
J. E., Ap. 3, '08, et seq. 

Reminiscences. Ootthard Deutsch. J. C, Jl. 19, '07. 

Rent Stbikes and Crowded Neighbobhoods. 0. S. Bernheimer. 
Outlook, Ja. 18, '08. 

Rent Stbikes in New Yobk. E. W. Dinwiddie. Char., Ja. 4, '08. 
—William Mailly. Ind., Ja. 16, '08. 



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88 AMERICAN JEWISH YEAR BOOK 

Rents, High, on New Yobk's East Side. C. B. Bemheimer, 
Char., Ja. 18, '08. 

Rome, Isbael and. M. M. Eichler. J. E., Mr. 20, '08. 

RouMANiA AND Its Jews. M. 8, Handman, J. Crit, D. 13, '07. 

RouMANiA AND THE JEWS. Herman Rosenthal, N. A. R., N., '07. 

RouMANiA, Jews of. A. I., F. 6, '08. 

Roumanian Anti-Semite's Defeat. 0. Leonard. J. B., My. 22, '08. 

Russia, Black Hundbed of. R, O, Long. Cosmopolitan, Ja., '08. 

Russia, Effect of, on a Jew. B. H. Bauer. J. S., Mr. 14, '08. 

Russia, Famine Relief Work in. B. J. Barrows. R. A., Je. 20, 
'08. 

Russia, Jews in, Economic Condition of. /. M. Rubinow. Bui. 
of Bur. of Labor, S., '07, No. 72. 

Russia, Present Situation in. 8. N. Harper. World To-Day 
N., '07. 

Russia, Rural, in Despair. B. N. Harper. A. I., S. 19, '07. 

Russia, The Jew in. Isaac A. Hourwich. A. H., Jl. 12, '07, et seq. 

Russian Army, Jews in. J. C, Mr. 13, '08. 

Russian Books and the Revolution. Leroy Bcott. Outlook, O. 
26, '07. 

Russian People, Union of the. Isaac A. Hourwich. A. H., O. 5, 
'07, et seq. 

Russian Revolution, The Jews of Poland and the. B. C. Reis. 
A. H., N. 15, '07, et seq. 

Russian Revolution, Women of the. Kellogg Durland. Worn. 
Home Comp., Ap., '08, et seq. 

Russia's Persecution of the Duma. 8. N. Harper. World's 
Work, Ja., '08. 

Russia's Second Douma. 8. N. Harper. World To-Day, Jl., '07. 

San Francisco Jewry after the Earthquake. Jacob Voorsanger. 
A. I., Mr. 19, '08. 

Samaritans, Modern. B. L. Israels. Good Housekeeping, D., 
'07. 

Schschteb, Professor Solomon. Joseph Jacobs. A. H., D. 6, '07. 

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ARTICLES OF JEWISH INTEREST 89 

Shylock, Not the Typical Jew. Nathan Erasa, A. I., Ap. 9, 

'08. 

Slauohtebing, Pbize fob Device fob Humans. Henry Bergh, 
H. S., Mr. 6, '08. 

Social Disabilitt of the Jews. E, J. Kuh. Atlantic Monthly, 
Ap., '08. 

Stage Fiction, Jews as Pobtbated in. Edgar Mela. R. A., Ap. 
4, '08, et aeq. 

Steebage Conditions, Ubgenct of Imfboved. Kellogg Durland. 
Chaut., N., '07. 

Stbaus, Osgab Solomon. Alfred Henry Lewis. Human Life, 
Ag., '07. 

Sunday Schools, Jewish. Richard Morse Hodge, H. R., D., '07. 

Synagogue. Arnold N, Brunner. A. H., Ag. 2, '07. 

Sybacuse, a Histoby of the Jews of. Maurice Brodzky, H. S., 
N. 15, '07. 

Talmud. Pearson, Mr., '08. 

Talmud Manuscbipt, Only Complete. Max L. Margolis. J. C, 
F. 28, '08. 

Tenement Dwelling. See London, East. 

Theateb, Hebbew. Adolph Danziger, Metropolitan, D., '07. 

Theatbe that Abbaham Goldfaden Cbeated. Hyman Strunsky. 
J. C, Ja. 17, '08. 

Tbaining School, Jewish, What is the Matteb with? J. A. 
Bache, R. A., F. 29, '08. 

Tunis, Jews op, Life and Customs of the. Paul Berghem. R. A., 
F. 8, '08. 

Twentieth Centuby Jew. Ezra Brudno. J. Crlt., F. 21, '08. 

United Hebbew Chabities, The Constbuctive Wobk of the. Lee 
K. Frankel. A. H., Ja. 10. '08. 

United States, Is the, in Contemplation of Law, a Chbistian 
CouNTBY? Joseph L. Lewisohn, A. I., S. 12, '07. 

[United States] Is Oubs a Chbistian Countby? Samuel Sale. 
M. v., D. 13, '07. 

Vatican and the Jews. Marquise de Fontenoy, Scribe, Ja. 10, 
'08. 



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Wabfield, David. Louis V, De Foe, Red Book, Ja., '08. 

Wabfield, David, Rise of. Walter Prichard Eaton, American, 
Ja., '08. 

Women, Jewish, Fair and Famous. Francis M. Bforkman. 
Broadway, N., '07. 

[Woodbine, N. J.] Fibst Self-Govebninq Community Singe the 
Fall of Jebusalem. David Blaustein. R. R., S., '07. 

Yiddish, Is, the National Language of the Jew? Trans, from 
Moses Loeh Lilienhlum. A. H., D. 13, '07. 

Yiddish Litebature. Solomon Bloomgarden. J. O., Mr. 6, '08. 

Yiddish Stage has Detebiobated. Ja^oh Gordin, J. C, F. 28, '08. 

Zeisleb, Fannie Bloomfield. Wallace Rice, World To-Day, Ag., 
'07.— Musician, Ja., '08. 

Zionism and Patbiotism. Cyrus L, Sulzberger, A. H., S. 20, '07. 

Zionism ob Socialism. Which Will Solve the Jewish Question? 
Saul Beaumont, Arena, Ja., '08. 

Zola, Emile. Sam'l Hirschberg, A. I., Ap. 9, '08. 



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AMERICAN JEWISH BIBLIOGRAPHY 91 



A LIST OF BOOKS AND ARTICLES BY JEWS IN 

THE UNITED STATES 

August, 1907, to July, 1908 

[The following list is an attempt to record the literary output 
of the Jews in the United States in certain limited directions. It 
aims to include books, magazine articles, and notable newspaper 
articles written by American Jews, whether on Jewish or on other 
subjects. Strictly scientific and professional work, as in medicine, 
chemistry, philology, etc., or relating to the technic of the arts 
and crafts, has not been fully drawn within the purview of the 
list. Also articles published in the Jewish press of the United 
States have not been noted here. They are indirectly made ac- 
cessible to the inquirer by the complete " List of Jewish Period- 
icals Appearing in the United States," printed on pp. 111-16, and 
the most important of them are listed on pp. 80-90, under the 
heading, "A List of Articles of Jewish Interest in the Jewish 
and in the General Press."] 

Abrams, Albebt. The Blues: Causes and Cure, New York: E. B. 
Treat and Company, 1908. 

Abkams, Lk Roy. A New Maple from Southern California. Tor- 
reya, 7, 1907. — Studies on the Flora of Southern California, 
Bull. Torrey Bot. CI. 34, 1907. 

Adlbs, Cyrus. The Smithsonian Institution. Independent, August 

15, 1907. 

Adleb, Feux. Consequences of Overcrowding. Charities and 
The Commons, April 4, 1908. 

Altshelleb, Joseph Alexander. Young Trailers: A Story of 
Early Kentucky. New York: D. Appleton and Company, 1907. 

American Jewish Historical Society. Publication Number 

16, 1907. Articles: P. A. Helfman, Some Further Notes on 
the History of the Jews in Surinam; Leon Htihner, Struggle 
for Religious Liberty in North Carolina, with Special Refer- 
ence to the Jews; Max J. Kohler, Some Jewish Factors in the 
Settlement of the West; Ludwig Geiger, Jacob Philadelphia 
and Frederick the Great; Samuel Oppenheimer, An Early 
Jewish Colony in Western Guiana, 1658-1666; Julius F. 
Sachse, Jacob Philadelphia, Mystic and Physicist. 

Amiel ipseud.). Little Bits of Judaism. Baltimore: Press of 
Fleet-M'Ginley Company, 1907. 



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AuESBACH, Joseph S. University Journal, North American Re- 
view, May, 1908. 

AusTBiAN, Delia. Curtains and Draperies. American Homes and 
Gardens, September, 1907. — Women Who are National Types, 
World To-Day, December, 1908. 

Baab, Hebmann. Talks to Jewish Children: Addresses on 
Homely and Religious Subjects. New York: Bloch Publish- 
ing Company, 1907. 

Beeb, Geobge Louis. British Colonial Policy, 1754-1765. New 
York: Macmillan Company, 1907. — Democracy, Nationalism, 
and Imperialism. Putnam, September, 1907. 

Bebenson, Bebnhabd. Northern Italian Painters. New York: G. 
P. Putnam's Sons, 1907. 

Bebo, Ebnest Julius. Generation, Transmission, and Utilization 
of Electric Energy. New York: McGraw Publishing Company, 
1907. 

Bebo, Leo. A Review of the Cohitioid Fishes of the Basin of the 
Amur. Washington, D. C; Smithsonian Inst. U. S. Nation. 
Mus. Proc. 32, 1907. — A Review of the Species of the Ten- 
Spined 8tickle-Backs or Pygosteus from East Asia. Ibid. 

Bebman, Henby. Oift Bearers. New York: Grafton Press, 1907. 

[Bebnheim, Albebt] Translator. Diseases of the Stomach, by 
Ismar Boas. Philadelpia: F. A. Davis Company, 1907. 

Bebnheimeb, Chables S. New York's Street-Cleaning Department 
and the East Side. Charities and The Commons, July 27, 
1907. — High Rents on New York's East Side. Ibid, January, 
1908. — Rent Strikes and Crowded Neighborhoods. Outlook, 
January 18, 1908. — Lower East Side Dwellers. University 
Settlement Studies, March, 1908. 

Blatt, William M. Cupid's Camp: A Comedy, 1907. 

Blaustein, David. The Chilf between Immigrants and Their 
Children. New York Times, August 18, 1907. — The First 
Self-Ooverned Jewish Community since the Fall o* Jerusalem. 
Circle, September, 1907. 

Bloch, Regina Mibiam. Storm Wind. Living Age, November 2, 
1907. 

Bloch, Rudolf (Bbuno Lessinq, pseud.). Sing Ho for Isidore 
Haimovitzl Cosmopolitan, September and October, 1907. — 
The Courtship of Janoshevsky, Ibid, March, 1908. — Jake or 
Sam. Ibid, April, 1908. — The Meanest Man that Ever Lived. 
Ibid, May 1908.— T/ie Sin Buyer. Ibid, July, 1908. 



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AMERICAN JEWISH BIBLIOGRAPHY 93 

[Blondheim, David S.] Translator. Some Prohlems of Modem 
Jewry. By Bmil Cohn. New York: Federation of American 
Zionists, 1907. 

Bloomfheld, Maxtbice. A Vedic Concordance. Boston: Ginn and 
Company, 1907. — Religion of the Veda: The Ancient Religion 
of India. New York: G. P. Putnam's Sons, 1907. 

Bloomgabden, Sol. (Jehoash, pseud.). Collected Poems (Yid- 
dish). New York: A. M. Evalenko, 1907. 

Blxtmenfeld, Ralph D. Revival of Pageants in England. Town 
and Country, July 13, 1907. — Cockney Accent a Barrier to 
English Success. Ibid, July 27, 1907.— JTinor Edward's Birth- 
day Honors. Ibid, August 3, 1907. — Spread of Socialism in 
England, Ibid, August 10, 1907. — Annual Exodus from Lon- 
don. Ibid, August 17, 1907. — Continental Misunderstandings 
of London. Ibid, August 31, 1907. — King Edward at Marien- 
J>ad. Ibid, September 7, 1907. — Permanence of British Insti- 
tutions. Ibid, September 14, 1907. — Trade in Bogus English 
Antiques. Ibid, September 28, 1907. — American Citizens on 
English Visiting Lists. Ibid, October 12, 1907. — American 
Plays in London. Ibid, October 26, 1901 .—Intricacies of 
British Naturalization. Ibid, November 2, 1907. — Adeline 
Oenee: A Disciple of Terpsichore. Ibid, November 16, 1907. — 
Streets of Paris. Outlook, October 26, 1907. — Streets of Lon- 
don. Ibid, February, 1908. 

BouDiN, Louis B. The Theoretical System of Karl Marx in the 
Light of Recent Criticism. Chicago: Kerr and Company, 
1907. 

Bbandeis, Lewis Dembitz. How Boston Solved the Gas Problem. 
Review of Reviews, November, 1907. 

Bbandon, David. By Way of Dead. Horse Oulch. World To-Day, 
August, 1907. 

Bbodskt, Chaim S. Sermons. Newark, N. J., 1907. 

Bbudno, Ezba. The Twentieth Century Jew. Lippincott's, Feb- 
ruary, 1908. — The Tether. Philadelphia: Lippincott and Com- 
pany, 1908. 

Bbunneb, Max A. R. New Umbrella. Independent, December 12, 
1907. 

BuBSTEiN, Maubice J. The Ideal System of Finance. New York: 
J. S. Ogilvie Publishing Company, 1907. 

Calish, Lionei.. Electric Incandescent Lamps. Cassier's, August, 
1907. 



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Casseres, Benjamin de. The Stage Instinct. Theatre, Septem- 
ber, 1907. — Momus Toujours. Ibid, December, 1907. — Prayer, 
Cosmopolitan, October, 1907. 

Caufman, Mbs. Madelon. The Belles of Hades: or the Daughters 
of Satan (musical farce), 1907. 

Central Conference of American Rabbis. Year Book, Vol. XVII. 
New York: Bloch Publishing Company, 1908. 

Cohen, Alfred J. (Alan Dale, pseud.). The Theatre's Respon- 
sibility, Cosmopolitan, July, 1907. — The Sad Case of the 
Society Play, Ibid, September, 1907. — Has Simple Love 
Ceased to he Dramaticf Ibid, October, 1907. — English Beauty 
on the Stoge. Ibid, November, 1907. — Actor's Imaginary 
Oreatness. Ibid, November, 1907. — Defense of the Actor, 
Ibid, January, 190S.— Why Plays Fail, Ibid, March, 1908.— 
Success of Belasco, Ibid, March, 1908. — Heroes that Women 
Like, Ibid, April, 1908. — Tyranny of Clothes, Ibid, May, 
1908.— Are Stage Characters Rationalf Ibid, June, 1908. — 
Acting off the Stage, Ibid, July, 1908. — Summer Show. Ibid, 
August, 1908. 

Cohen, Julius B. Organic Chemistry for Advanced Students, 
New York: Longmans, Green and Company, 1907. 

Cohen, Louis. Influence of Frequency on Resistance and Induc- 
tance of Solenoidal Coils, (Standards Bureau, Reprint 74.) 
Monthly Catalogue issued by Superintendent of Documents. 
Washington: Government Printing Office, January, 1908. 

Cohen, Emilt Solib. David the Oiant Killer and Other Tales of 
Grandma Lopez, Philadelphia: The Jewish Publication So- 
ciety of America, 1908. 

Cohen, Solomon Sous. Life in the Hot Weather, Saturday 
Evening Post, August 10, 1907. — Causes and Prevention of 
Children's Summer Diseases, Ibid, August 24, 1907. — Occu- 
pation and Diversion in Relation to Health. Ibid, September 
7, 1907. 

[CoHN, Adolphe] Editor, Montaigne: the Essays (French Clas- 
sics for English Readers). New York: G. P. Putnam's Sons, 
1907. — Americans of the Legion. Bookman, June, 1908. — Why 
M. Fallidres is an Ideal French President, Review of Reviews, 
July, 1908. 

Da Costa, Hebman. A Little Child Shall Lead Them, Bohemian, 
August, 1907. — The Lamp of Surprises. Scrap Book, Septem- 
ber, 1907.— Jes' orhopin' (Poem). Century, May, 1908. 



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AMERICAN JEWISH BIBLIOGRAPHY 95 



Dale, Alan (pseud.). See Cohen, Alfbed J. 

Danenbaum, Roby. Zelia Nuttall: Archwologist of Mexico. World 
To-Day, April, 1908. 

Danzigeb, Adolph. Work and Play in the Ghetto. Broadway, 
October, 1907. — The Hebrew Theatre^ Metropolitan, December, 
1907. 

David, A. Intimate Auditorium. Architectural Record, March, 
1908. 

Davidson, Israel. Parody in Jewish Literature. New York: 
Columbia University Press, 1908. 

Davis, Philip. A Russian Immigrants Story. Chautauquan, 
September, 1907. — What the Immigrant Thinks of America. 
Ibid, December, 1907. — Child Labor and Vagrancy. Ibid, May, 
1908. 

[De Mattos, a. Teixeiba] Translator. Exploits of Arsdne Lupin, 
by Maurice Leblance. New York: Harper Brothers, 1907. 

Deutsch, Gotthabd. Israel of Bruna. Boston: Richard G. Badger, 
The Gorham Press, 1908. 

De Young, Michel Harry. Achievements of Portraiture. Over- 
. land, February, 1908. 

DouTZKY, M. M. The Regret. A Drama, produced in New York 
City, September 6, 1907. 

Druckeb, a. p. The Trial of Jesus from Jewish Sources. New 
York: Bloch Publishing Company, 1907. 

Dublin, Louis I. The Life and Habits of the Ants. New York: 
D. Appleton and Co., 1907. — "Natural and Artificial Mixed Ant 
Colonies. Scientific American, November 7, 1907. 

Edun, William. WorldrFamx)us Operas (Yiddish). New York: 
Hebrew Publishing Company, 1908. 

Eichler, M. M. The Jew in America. Government, September, 
1907. 

Eisendrath, Daniel Nathan. Text Book of Clinical Anatomy. 
Philadelphia: W. B. Saunders, 1907. 

Ellner, Joseph. The Making of a Doctor. Scrap-Book, October, 
1907. — On to Colorado. Ibid, November, 1907. 

Elmaleh, Leon H. Esther, The Queen. New York: Bloch Pub- 
lishing Company, 1908. 



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96 AMERICAN JEWISH YEAR BOOK 



ELSHEM13S, Louis Michael. Fragments and Flashes of Thought: 
also Lost Love and Poems and Ballads. New York: Eastman 
Lewis, 1907. — Mammon: A Dramatic Poem. Ibid, 1907. — 
Moods of a Soul: Lyrics. Ibid, 1907. — Poet and Elegiac Poems. 
Ibid, 1907.— ^'annie; A Song of the Heart Boston: Richard 
G. Badger, The Gorham Press, 1908. 

Elzas, Barnett Abbaham. Penina Moise (1797-1880). Sunday 
News, Charleston, S. C, February, 1908. — Leaves from My 
Historical Scrap Book. Charleston, S. C, 1907. 

Bnelow, H. G. What Do Jews Believe, Jewish Tracts issued by 
the Central Conference of American Rabbis (No. 1), Cin- 
cinnati, O., 1908. 

FiDLEB, Henby. Note on Construction of Mild Steel. New York: 
Longmans, Green and Company, 1907. 

ITleischeb, Chableb. A series of articles on diverse Jewish topics 
in The Herald, Boston, 1907. 

Fu:iscHMANN, Max C. An Up-to-date African Hunt. Cosmopoli- 
tan, September, 1907. 

Flexneb, Abbaham. Situation of History in Secondary Schools. 
Nation, September 26, 1907. 

Flexneb, Bebnabd. Adult Responsibility Laws. Charities and 
The Commons, March 14, 1908. — Juvenile Court Laws. Ibid, 
July 4, 1908. — Social Legislation in Kentucky. Ibid, August 
1, 1908. 

Flexneb, Simon. Tendencies in Pathology, Science, January 24, 
1908. 

FoBEMAN, Henby G. (part author). The Chicago Parks. World 
To-day, September, 1907. 

Foreman, H. J. Esperanto Congress at Cambridge. Harper's 
Weekly, September, 1907. — The Progress of Esperanto. North 
American Review, October, 1907. 

Fbank, Henby. Meaning of the Invasion of European Socialism. 
Arena, September, 1907. — The Doom of Dogma and the Dawn 
of Truth. New York: Progressive Literature Company, 1907. 
— Shrine of Silence. Ibid, 1907. — The Kingdom of Love. New 
York: R. F. Fenno and Company, 1907. 

Fbankel, Lee K. The Cost of Living in New York. Charities and 
The Commons, November 16, 1907. 

Fbiedman, I. K. The Radical. New York: D. Appleton and Com- 
pany, 1907. 



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Fbohman, Ghables. Our Dramatists: Why Some Fail. Theatre, 
December, 1907. 

Fbohman, Daniel. Theatres and the Panic. Independent, Janu- 
ary 30, l^OS.-'Fishing for the Great American Play. Harper's 
Weekly, February 1, 1908. 

Gebson, Emilt Goldsmith. A Modern Esther. Philadelphia: 
Julius H. Greenstone, 1908. 

Gebson, Vieoinia. The Happy Heart Family. New York: Duffield 
and Company, 1907. 

Goetz, p. B. "New Year's Thought. Lippincott, January, 1908. 

[Goldberg, E. C] Editor. Jack, by Alphonse Daudet. New York: 
Macmillan Company, 1907. 

Goldbebgeb, Joseph. Typhoid ''Bacillus Carriers'' Washington, 
D. C, Treasury Dept., Pub. Hlth. Mar. Hosp. Serv., Hyg. Lab., 
Bull., No. 35, 1907. — Yellow Fever: Etiology, Symptoms and 
Diagnosis. Ibid, Yellow Fever Inst, Bull., No. 16, 1907. 

Goldfaden, Abraham. Ben Ami. Yiddish play produced in New 
York City, 1907.— Dat7id in War. Drama in Hebrew, pro- 
duced in New York City, April 20, 1908.— Doctor Kohn. Yid- 
dish adaptation of the original, by Max Nordau; produced in 
New York City, 1908. 

Goldin, H. E. Ivrith; First Year in Hebrew. New York: S. 
Druckerman, 1907. 

Goldmabk, Josephine. Summary Changes in Child Labor Laws. 
Charities and The Commons, October 5, 1907. — The United 
States Supreme Court and Working Women. Ibid, March 14, 
1908. 

Goldstein, E. Two-fold Line Spectra of Chemical Elements. 
Astrophysical Journal, January, 1908. 

Goodman, J. E. Sicilian Marionette Theatres in New York. Bohe- 
mian, December, 1907. — Our Stage, Is It to Become Religious f 
Ibid, December, 1907. 

Gobdin, Jacob. Ohn a Heim (Drama in Yiddish). Produced in 
New York City, October, 1907. 

Gottheil, Richabd J. H. Dhimmis and Moslems in Egypt. Old 
Testament and Semitic Studies in Memory of W. R. Harper. 
Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1908. 

GoTTSCHALK, A. L. M. Ccmcnt in Mexico. Daily Consular and 
Trade Reports, No. 3145, April 8, 1908. 



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98 AMERICAN JEWISH YEAR BOOK 



Greenstone, Julius H. Statistical Data of the Jewish Religious 
Schools of Philadelphia. Philadelphia: Gratz College, 1907. 

Gbundmann, Julius. New Method of "Walking, World To-Day, 
January, 1908. — Transporting a Big Tree, Ibid, March, 1908. 

GuiTEBMAN, Abthub. Bctcl Nuts (Rhymes). New York: Paul 
Elder and Company, 1907. — Quest Book (Verses). Ibid, 1907. 
— Money and a Friend (Verses). Ibid, 1907. — Fame (Poem). 
Munsey, September, 1907. — Spying on Santa Claus, Suburban 
Life, December, 1907. — Wireless. Ainslee, December, 1907. — 
A Whole Day. Woman's Home Companion, January, 1908. — 
Why Tigers Can't Climb. St. Nicholas, February, 1908. — 
Washington at Twenty-One (Poem). Current Literature, 
April, 1908. — Modern Instance (Poem). Outlook, May 30, 
1908. — ^Large number of Poems in the New York Times. 

GuTMAN, LuDWio. Motorman and His Duties. Chicago: Wilson 
Company, 1907. 

GuTTMACHEB, Adolf. A Sahhoth School Companion. New York: 
Bloch Publishing Company, 1907. 

Hagedo'bn, Hebmann, Jb. Silver Blade (A Drama in One Act). 
Cambridge, Mass., Harvard Co-operative Press, 1907. — Song 
of Returning (Poem). Lippincott, April, 1908.— -Peace of 
Love (Poem). Scribner's, March, 1908. 

Hamboubo, Mabk. Music and Language. Etude, January, 1908. 
Hameb, Sam H. Story of " The Ring." New York: Dodd. Mead 
and CJompany, 1907. 

Habbis, Maubice H. History of the Mediwval Jews, From the 
Moslem Conquest of Spain to the Discovery of America. New 
York, 1907. 

Hebbew Encyclopedia. Volume II. New York City: Jehuda 
David EUsenstein, 1908. 

Helfman, p. a. Some Further Notes on the History of the Jews 
in Surinam. American Jewish Historical Society, Publication 
Number 16, 1907. 

Hebman, Henby {Joint Author). Silver King. Drama in four 
acts. New York: Samuel French, 1907. 

Hebts, Minnie. Children's Educational Theatre, New York City. 
Atlantic Monthly, December, 1907. 

Hebzbebo, M. J. Negro's Dogs. American, December, 1907. 

Hebzoo, Felix Benedict. Higher Photography and Art Cosmo- 
politan, August, 1907. 



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AMERICAN JEWISH BIBLIOGRAPHY 99 



Hess, Ralph H. Standard of Value and Prices, Journal of Poli- 
tical Economy, July, 1907. — Passing of the Riparian Rights 
Doctrine. American Political Science Review, November, 
1907. 

HnxQuiT, MoRBis. Immigration in the United States, Interna- 
tional Socialist Review, August, 1907. — The Socialist **Plan** 
of Wealth Distribution. Putnam's April, 1908. — Recent Prog- 
ress of the Socialist and Labor Movements in the United 
States. Chicago: Charles H. Kerr and Company, 1907. 

Hibschfeld, Albebt M. Standard Handbook on Wines and 
Liquors. New York: Popper and Company, 1907. 

Hollandeb, Jacob H. Financial Difficulties of San Domingo, 
Annals of the American Academy of Political and Social 
Science, July, 1907. — Taxation of Intangible Wealth in Mary- 
land, Quarterly Journal of Economics, February, 1908. 

Hopp, Julius. Dolls, A play produced in New York, 1907. 

Houdini, Habby ipseud.). Unmasking of Robert Houdini. New 
York: Conjuror's Magazine Publishing Company, 1908. 

[Huebsch, Daniel A.] Translator, Religion and Histobical 
Faiths. By Otto Pfleiderer. New York: B. W. Huebsch, 1907. 

HtJHNEB, Leon. Struggle for Religious Liberty in North Carolina, 
with Special Reference to the Jews. American Jewish His- 
torical Society, Publication Number 16, 1907. 

HuBwiTZ, W. A. Note On the Definition of an Abelian Group by 
Independent Postulates. Amr. Math., Cambridge, Mass., 8, 
1907. 

Independent Obdeb of B'nai B'bith. Leo N. Levi Memorial 
Volume. 1907. 

Isaacs, Abbam S. The Jewish Home. North American Review, 
August 16, 1907. — Famous Streets Abroad. World To-Day, 
March, 1908. — The Jew and the Currents of His Age. Atlantic, 
July, 1908. 

Isaacs, Samuel Hillel (Halevy). The Boundaries of the Prom- 
ised Land. 

IsBAELs, Belle Lindneb. Imported Neighborhood Spirit, Chari- 
ties and The Commons, September 21, 1907. — Another Aspect 
of the Children's Theatre. Ibid, January 4, 1908. — Poverty 
and Insurance of the Unemployed. Ibid, June 6, 1908. — 
Modern Samaritans. Good Housekeeping, December, 1907. 

Jacoby, Habold. The Case against Mars. American, April, 1908. 
— Astronomy, New York: Macmillan and Company, 1908. 



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100 AMERICAN JEWISH YEAR BOOK 



Jastrow, Joseph. The Advancement of Teaching. North Amer- 
ican Review, October, 1907. — Au Chapeau Bleu, Century, July, 
190S.— Psychology. Science, May 15, 1908. 

Jabtrow, Mobbis, Jr. New Hittite Records. Nation, February 
27, 1908. — An Omen School Text. Old Testament and Se- 
mitic Studies in Memory of W. R. Harper. Chicago: Uni- 
versity of Chicago Press, 1908. — Religion of Ancient Israel. 
Chicago: Open Court Publishing Company, 1908. 

Jehoash ipseud.). See Bloomoarden, Sol. 

Jonas, Rosalie M. Sermon in Bl<ick and White. McClure, Janu- 
ary, 1908. 

Kahn, Alexander N. Printers' Yade Mecum. New York: A. N. 
Kahn, 1908. 

Kane, Louis C. Revolution in Postal Car Construction. Scientific 
American, August 10, 1907. 

Kaplan, Bernard M. The Triumph. A Three-act Play, produced 
in San Francisco, May 3, 1908. 

Kino, Morris A. Practical Bookbinding. International Studio, 
January, 1908. 

Klein, Chakles. The Lion and the Mouse. (Novelized by Arthur 
Hornblow). New York: Grossett and Dunbar, 1908. 

Klein, Herman J. Recent Progress in Astronomy. Scientific 
American Supplement, September 28, 1907. 

Klein, Nicholas. Agricultural Development in Hungary. Inter- 
national Socialist Review, November, 1907. 

Knopf, Siegmund Adolph. Tu})erculosis As a Disease of the 
Masses. New York: Charity Organization Society, 1907. 

Kohler, Max J. Some Jewish Factors in the Settlement of the 
West. American Jewish Historical Society, Publication 
Number 16, 1907. 

Kohn, Annette. Jeweled Chain (Poem). Independent, Novem- 
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KoLOTOBOYSKY, IsiDOBE. The Cofivert, A drama in Yiddish, pro- 
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KoPLOwrrz, Isidob. The Messiah, New York; Bloch Publishing 
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Kbauskopf, Joseph. From Jesus, the Man, to Christ, the Deity. 
Philadelphia, 1908. 

Kbausz, Siomund. Schlaraffla: A World Society. Appleton, Nov- 
ember, 1907. 

Kboesch, Samuel. Formation of Compound Words in Oothic. 
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KuH, Edwin J. The Social Disability of the Jew. Atlantic 
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KuHN, H. A. Substantial Prosperity, Pittsburg, 1907. 

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Laskeb, Emanuel. Chess: The Oame of the Future, North 
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Latteineb, Joseph. My Wife's Friend. Yiddish drama, produced 
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Leavitt, Ezekiel. Songs of Orief and Gladness and Deborah 
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Lessing, Bbuno {pseud.). See Bloch, Rudolf. 

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Levi, Maubice. The Soul Kiss. Musical Comedy, produced in 
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Levin, Josefh M. Sermons. Wilkes-Barre, Pa., 1907. 

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Levy, Flobence N. The American Art Annual, 1907-1908. 

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Levy, Leo. Ten Cents to the Ferry. Overland, October, 1907. 

Levy, Nathan M. The Lazy Man. Munsey, December, 1907. 

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LiPMAN, J. G. Bacteria in Relation to Agriculture. New York: 
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LoEB, Jacques. Concerning the Theory of Tropisms. J. Exp. 
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[Mandell, Max S.] Translator. Revizdr, A Comedy, by N. V. 
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Marcosson, Isaac F. How to Invest Your Savings. Philadelphia: 
Henry Altemus, 1907. — Ehh-Tide in Watered Stock. Satur- 
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Mabks, Jeannette. a Walking Trip Through the Connecticut 
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Mabks, Mabcus M. Retiring from Business. Review of Reviews, 
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MuENSTEBBEBG, HuGO. American College for Germany, Science, 
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City Government, New York: D. Appletcm wmA OmL^aaj 
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RuBiNCW, I. M. Economic Conditions of the J^^s »« ^x^ra* 
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Sachs, Juuus. Intellectual Reactions of Coedmr^^/%> TA u*^ 

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SCHEBEISCHEWSKY, JOSEPH W. (Jotni Authf/r t 7'^%.hr/mA. /'* 

Character and Effects, United States Ps^:> H^a-'ii ft^*^ ^^ 
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ScHiFF, Jacob H. Our Journey to Jmpmm. S^rw Y'jrtr rv ■ >^^ 
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ScHiFFMAN, Samuel. The Spell i Druna » , !>'.'' 

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ScHOMEB, Abraham S. A Perwimment Imter%^f^y%^ J^-ru^. Cv«^ 
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SiCHEL, Edith. Joseph Joachim. Liiving Age, September 14, 1907. 

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SiDEBSKY, D. Industrial Uses of Caseine. Scientific American, 
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SiMKHOYiTCH, V. G. Marxism versus Socialism. Political Science 
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Steines, Habbt Lee. How to Keep Farm Accounts, Toledo: 
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8 



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Evening Post, October 12, 1907. 

WfciDMAN, Samuel. (Geology of North Central Wisconsin, Madi- 
son, Wis.: Wisconsin Geological and Natural History Survey, 
1907. 

Weil, Habbt E. Municipal Bond Issues Explained. Annals of 
the American Academy of Political and Social Science, Sep- 
tember, 1907. — Physical Condition of a Municipality Issuing 
Bonds, Ibid. 

Weinstock, Harbis. a Business Man*s View of College Training. 
Overland, September, 1907. 

WncNEB, Habold M. Hebrew Monotheism, Bibliotbeca Sacra, 
October, 1907. 

WmcNSKT, Bebnhabdt. a Wise Woman, Drama in Tiddish, 
adapted from the German. Produced in New York City, 
February, 1908. 

WiNOHEVSKY, MoBBis. Storics of the Struggle. Chicago: Kerr 
and Company, 1908. 

Wise, Stephen S. Shall the Pulpit he Free? New York City: 
Bloch Publishing Company, 1908. 

Wolf, Emma. Louis d'Or, Smart Set, August, 1907. 

Zevin, Israel J. Their Rich Uncle, People's. October, 1907. 



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LIST OF JEWISH PERIODICALS m 



A LIST OF JEWISH PERIODICALS 
Appeabing in the United States 



August, 1907, to July, 1908 



[An asterisk (*) placed before the name of a periodical In the 
following list Indicates that the Editor of the American Jewish 
Teab Book has not been able to secure a copy of the publication 
Issued during 5668, or authentic information about It. Its appear- 
ance In this list Is Justified by references to It In other periodi- 
cals.] 

♦Adath Jeshubun Monthly Recobd. Philadelphia, Pa. Est. 1906. 
Organ of Congregation Adath Jeshurun. 

The American Hebrew and Jewish Messenger. Weekly. New 
York. Est 1879. 

The American Israelite. Weekly. Cincinnati, O. Est. 1854. 
Bee also The Chicago Israelite. 

Dee Amerikaner. Yiddish. Weekly. New York. Est. 1904. 

Der Arbeiter. Yiddish. Weekly. New York. Est. 1904. 

English title, "The Workman." Organ of the Socialist Labor Party 
and of the Industrial Workers of the World. 

Dee Baltimorer Wegweiser. Yiddish. Weekly. Baltimore, Md. 
Est 1897. 
English title, " The Baltimore Guide.'* 

*The Blxte and White. Monthly. Philadelphia, Pa. Est. 1906. 
Published by the " Aids of Zion." 

B'nai B'rith Messenger. Semi-monthly. Los Angeles, Cal. Est. 
1897. 

The Boston Advocate. Weekly. Boston, Mass. Est. 1905. 

Boston Jewish American. Yiddish. Weekly. Boston, Mass. 
Est. 1908. (First Issue, February 28.) 

The Chicago Israelite. Weekly. Chicago, 111. Est. 1854. 
Chicago edition of The American Israelite. 

Emanu-El. Weekly. San Francisco, Cal. Est. 1895. 

Entertainer. St. Louis, Mo. Est. 1907. (First Issue In Decem- 
her.) 
Official organ of the United Hebrew Entertaining Circle. 



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112 AMERICAN JEWISH YEAR BOOK 

EsPA£i<ABiA. Hebrew. Monthly. New York. Est. 1907. 
Organ of the Hebrew Literary Society of America. 

The Fedebation Review. Monthly. New York. Est. 1904. 

Established as " Israelite Alliance Reylew." First number under new 
name (Vol. II, No. 1), August, 1907. Organ of the Federation of 
Jewish Organizations, State of New York. 

Freie Abbeiteb Stimme. Yiddish. Weekly. New York and Phila- 
delphia. Est. 1899. 

Deb Fbeund. Yiddish. Weekly. Baltimore, Md. Est. 1907. 

The Galaxy. Monthly. Norfolk, Va. 

The Gleaneb. Monthly. Farm School, Pa. Est. 1901. 

Published by the students of the National Farm School, Doylestown, Pa. 

Ha- Am. Hebrew. Monthly. New York. Est. 1908. (First issue 
in April.) 

Ha-Leom. Hebrew. Weekly. New York. Est. 1901. 
English title, "The Nation." 

The Hebbew. English and German. Weekly. San Francisco, 

Gal. Est. 1863. 
The Hebbew Standabd. Weekly. New York. Est. 1883. 

Independent Obdeb Fbee Sons of Isbaei^ Chicago, 111. Est. 1903. 

Organ of the Order. 
♦The Jewish Advocate. Rochester, N. Y. 

The Jewish Amebican. Weekly. Detroit, Mich. Est. 1900. 
Official organ of Congregation Beth El. 

The Jewish Chautauquan. Monthly. Philadelphia, Pa. Est. 
1908. (First issue in January.) 
Organ of the Jewish Chautauqua Society. 

Jewish Comment. Weekly. Baltimore, Md. Est. 1895. 

The Jewish Cbitebion. Weekly. Pittsburg, Pa. Est. 1895. 

Jewish Daily Pbess. Yiddish. Daily. Cleveland, Ohio. Est. 
1908. (First issue. May 1.) 

The Jewish Exponent. Weekly. Philadelphia, Pa. Est. 1886. 

The Jewish Fabmeb. Yiddish. Monthly. New York City. Est. 
1908. (First issue in May.) 
Organ of the Agricultural and Industrial Aid Society. 

The Jewish Fobum. Monthly. New York City. Est. 1907. (First 

issue in September.) 

" Devoted to the Jewry of the Bronx and to the Dissemination of 
Progressive Judaism In America." 

The Jewish Hebald. Weekly. Salt Lake City. Est. 1907. (First 
issue, September 8.) 



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LIST OF JEWISH PERIODICALS 113 



The Jewish Hope. Monthly. Waco, Texas. Est. 1906. 
Official oivan of the Zionist Organizations of 1?exas. 
Suspended publication in Oct., 1907. 

The Jewish Independent. Weekly. Cleyeland, O. Est 1906. 

The Jewish Ledger. Weekly. New Orleans, La. Est. 1895. 

Official organ of the Joint lodges of New Orleans, Independent Order of 
B'nai B'rlth. 

* Jewish National Bulletin. Yiddish (with an English column). 

Philadelphia, Pa. Est. 1906. 

Zionist Organ devoted to the interests of the Jewish National Fund, 
and published by the Jewish National Fund Society. 

The Jewish Orphan Asylum Magazine. Monthly. Cleveland, O. 
Est. 1903. 

The Jewish Outlook. Weekly. Denver, Colo. Est. 1903. 

Jewish Pbess. Yiddish. Dally. Chicago, 111. Est. 1888. 

See also Jewish Pbogbess. 
Jewish Pbogbess. Yiddish. Weekly. Chicago, 111. Est. 1888. 

Weekly edition of Jewish Pbess. 

The Jewish Quabtebly Review. London and New York. Est. 
1889. 
Suspended publication, July, 1908. 

The Jewish Review and Obsebveb. Weekly. Cleveland, O. Est. 
1889. 

The Jewish Spectatob. Weekly. Memphis and Nashville, Tenn.; 
and New Orleans, La. Est. 1885. 

The Jewish Standaed. Weekly. Chicago, 111. Est. 1907. 

The Jewish Times. Weekly. San Francisco, Cal. Est. 1855. 

The Jewish Tbibune. Weekly. Portland, Ore.; Seattle and 
Tacoma, Wash.; and Sacramento, Cal. Est. 1902. 

The Jewish Voice. Weekly. St. Louis, Mo. Est. 1884. 

Jewish Voice. Monthly. Hartford, Conn. Est. 1908. (First 
Issue, January 1.) 

The Jud^an. Weekly. Minneapolis, St. Paul, and Duluth, Minn. 
Est. 1905. 

Jth)iscHE Gazetten. Yiddish. Weekly. New York. Est. 1874. 
Ehiglish title, "The Jewish Gazette." Weekly edition of JtJDiscHBS 
Tagbblatt. 

Die JfTDiscHE Post. Yiddish. Weekly. Pittsburg, Pa. Est 1903. 
Bngllsh title, " The Jewish Post." 

JtTDiscHES Tageblatt. Yiddish and English. Daily. New York. 
Est 1885. 
Bngllsh title, "Jewish Daily News." See also JCdischb Oazettbn. 



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114 AMERICAN JEWISH YEAR BOOK 

Deb Kibetzeb. Tiddlsh. Monthly. New York City. Est 1908. 
(First issue, April 16.) 

*Th£ LiTTiiE WoBLD. Hebrew. Monthly. Cleveland, Ohio. Est. 
1906. 
Hebrew title, " 01am Katon." Published by the Ivrlah. 

The MAccABiEAN. Monthly. New York. Est. 1901. 

Published under the supervision of the Federation of American Zionists. 

The Menobah. Monthly. New York. Est. 1886. 

The Modebn View. Weekly. ^ St. Louis, Mo. Est 1901. 

Monthly Buluctin. New York. Est. 1900. 
Organ of the Young Men's Hebrew Association. 

Deb Mobgen Joubnal. Yiddish. Daily. New York. Est. 1902. 
English title, ''The Jewish Morning Journal." 

News Letteb. Bi-monthly. Kansas City, Mo. Est 1907. 

Organ of the United Jewish Charities of Kansas City, and published by 
the Council of Jewish Women, Kansas City Section. 

Obdens Echo. German. Monthly. New York. Est. 1884. 
Official organ of the Independent Order of True Sisters. 

OuB Review. Weekly. Bedford Station, N. Y. Est 1906. 
Published by the inmates of the Monteflore Country Sanitarium. 

Deb Papieb-Sigabetten Maoheb. Yiddish. Weekly. New York. 

Est 1907. (First issue, July 7.) 

English title, " The Paper Cigarette Maker." Published by the Advisory 
Board of the Cigarette Makers' Unions. 

Philadelphia Abend-Post. See Philadelphia Jewish Mobning 

JOUBNAL. 

The Philadelphia Jewish Amebican. Yiddish. Weekly. Phila- 
delphia, Pa., Est 1908. (First issue, March 6.) 

Philadelphia Jewish Mobning Joitbnal. Yiddish. Daily. Phila- 
delphia, Pa. Est. 1899 as Philadelphia Abend-Post. 
Name changed June 1, 1007. 

The Refobm Advocate. Weekly. Chicago, lU. Est. 1891. 

The Review. Eight numbers annually. Philadelphia, Pa. Est. 
1905. 
Organ of the Young Men's Hebrew Association. 

The Roumanian-Amebioan. Monthly. San Francisco, Cal. Est. 
1908. (First issue in April.) 
Organ of the Roumanian Hebrew Protective League. 

The Sabbath Joitbnal. Yiddish and English. New York. Est 

1905. 

Organ of the Sabbath Co-operative Association of the Mlsrahi in 
America. 



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LIST OF JEWISH PERIODICALS 115 



The Sanatorium. Bi-monthly. Denver, Colo. Est. 1907. 
Organ of the Jewish Consumptives* Relief Society. 

Thb Scbibe (Deb Scheeibeb). Englisli and Yiddish. Minneapolis 
and St. Paul, Minn. Est. 1907. (First issue, October 11.) 

Deb Sonntao Ck>UBi£B. Yiddish. Weekly. Chicago, III. Est. 

1887. 

English title, " The Sunday Jewish Courier." Sunday edition of Dbr 
TJLglicheb JCdischeb Coubieb. 

Deb Sonntag Kol. Yiddish. Weekly. Chicago, 111. Est. 1900. 

English title, "The Sunday Jewish Call." Sunday edition of Dbb 
TXqlicheb Yiddisheb Kol. 

SouTHEBN Guide (Deb Southebneb Wbg Weiseb). Yiddish. 
Weekly. Atlanta, Ga. 
Suspended puhUcation, March, 1908, 

Deb Stebn. Yiddish. Quarterly. Philadelphia, Pa. Est. 1906. 
English title, *' The Star." Organ of the Maccabean Zion Society. 

Deb Taolicheb JI^discheb Coubieb. Yiddish. Daily. Chicago, 

111. Est. 1887. 

B>nglish title, "The Dally Jewish Courier." See also Deb Sonntag 
Coubieb. 

Deb Taglicheb Yiddisheb Kol. Daily. Chicago, 111. Est. 1900. 
English title, " The Daily Jewish Call." See also Deb Sonntag Kol. 

Texas Isbaelite. Monthly. Fort Worth, Texas. Est. 1908. 
(First issue, April 20.) 

Das Volk. Yiddish. Monthly. New York City. Est 1907. (First 
issue in November.) 
Organ of the Jewish Socialist-Territorialist Labor Party of America. 

Deb Volksadvokat. Yiddish. Weekly. New York. Est. 1891. 
Weekly edition of Die Warheit. 

Deb Volksfbeund. Yiddish and Hebrew. Weekly. Pittsburg, Pa. 
Est. 1889. 

Deb Vobsteheb. Yiddish. Daily. St. Louis, Mo. Est. 1906. 

VoBWABTS. Yiddish. Daily. New York and Philadelphia. Est. 
1896. 
Bnglish title, " Forward." See also Deb Zeitgeist. 

Die Wabheit. Yiddish. Daily. New York. Est 1894. 

English title, "The Truth and Daily Herald." See also Deb Volks- 
advokat. 

The Weekly Bvlletls of the Refobm Conobeqation Keneseth 
ISBAEL. Philadelphia, Pa. Est. 1896. 

The Yiddish Advocate. Boston, Mass. Est. 1907. (First issue, 
February 22.) 



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116 AMERICAN JEWISH YEAR BOOK 

The Yiddish Daily Advocate. Boston, Mass. Est 1907. (First 
issue, October 7.) 

YiDDisHE Abbeiteb Welt. Weekly. Chicago, 111. Est 1908. 
(First issue, July 17.) 
Organ of the Jewish Socialist Publishing Association. 

Der Yiddishes Kamffeb. Weekly. New York. Est. 1906. 
Bngllsh title, "The Jew Militant.'* Organ of tiie Poale Zion. 
Siispended temporarily. 

Young Israel. Weekly Sabbath School Journal for Jewish Chil- 
dren. Detroit, Mich. Est 1907. (First issue, November 29.) 
Issued under the auspices of the Union of American Hebrew Congre- 
gations. 

YouNO Men's Hebbew Association Magazine. Semi-monthly. 
New Orleans, La. Est 1903. 

♦Youth, The. New York. Monthly. 

Der Zeitgeist. Yiddish. Weekly. New York. Est 1905. 

English title, " The Spirit of the Times." Weekly edition of YoBWiLBTS. 

The Zionist. Monthly. Washington, D. C. Est 1907. (First 
issue in August.) 
Organ of the Young People's Union of Zion. 

Die Zukunft. Yiddish. Monthly. New York. Est 1892. 
English title, " The Future." 

Annuals and Year Books 
Annuals or Year Books were published in 1907, or for 1907- 
1908, by the following societies and congregations: 
American Jewish Historical Society, New York City. 
Beth Israel, Philadelphia, Pa. 
B'nai B'rith, Los Angeles, Cal. 

Central Conference of American Rabris, Frankfort, Mich. 
Keneseth Israel, Philadelphia, Pa. 
*Ohavei Sholem, Nashville, Tenn. 
Rodeph Shalom, Philadelphia, Pa. 

The Jewish Publication Society of America, Philadelphia, Pa. 
Tifereth Israel, Cleveland, O. 
Union of American Hebrew Congregations, Cincinnati, Ohio. 

Series of Sermons 

Free Synagogue Pulpit. Published Monthly by the Free Syna- 
gogue, New York City. 

Keneseth Israel Sunday Discourses. Series XX. Philadelphia, 
Pa. 

The Reform Pulpit. Sixth Series, 1907-08. Containing the Sun- 
day lectures of Rabbi J. Leonard Levy, D. D., Pittsburg, Pa. 



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APPOINTMENTS, HONORS, ELECTIONS Ijy 



APPOINTMENTS, HONORS, AND ELECTIONS 
July 16, 1907, to July 31, 1908 

Abehle, Daniel, St. Paul, Minn., appointed President of the Board 

of Park Commissioners, 1908. 
Adleb, Chables S., New York City, selected Presidential elector 

by the Republicans, 1908. 
Adleb, Cybus, Washington, D. C, elected President of the Dropsie 

College for Hebrew and Cognate Learning, Philadelphia, Pa., 

1908. 
Appel, Aabon H., appointed deputy-surgeon general, with the rank 

of lieutenant-colonel, December, 1907. 
Bambeb, Ck)LDiE, of Boston, Mass., appointed by Governor Guild as 

Trustee of the Industrial School for Boys at Boston. 
Beblin, Ralph F., of Pensacola, Fla., awarded a bronze medal 

by the Carnegie Hero Fund Commission for saying two 

persons from death by drowning. 
Bebnstein, Maubice, Cleveland, Ohio, elected Councilman of Ward 

Fifteen, November, 1907. 
Bettmann, Bebnhabd, Cincinnati, Ohio, appointed Collector of 

Internal Revenue at Cincinnati, September, 1907. 
Bbunneb, Abnold, architect. New York City, appointed a member 

of the New York Civic Art Commission, by Mayor McClellan. 
Oabo, Victob, Milwaukee, Wis., appointed Park Commissioner for 

a term of five years, by Mayor David S. Rose. 
Cohen, Joseph F., Louisville, Ky., elected School Trustee, Novem- 
ber, 1907. 
Cohen, Josla^h, Pittsburg, Pa., elected Judge of the Court of 

Common Pleas No. 4, November, 1907. 
Cohen, Myeb A., appointed to the Board of Charities of the 

District of Columbia, December, 1907, for the term ending 

June 30, 1908. 
Cohen, Otto, Louisville, Ky., elected Councilman, November, 1907. 
CowBN, Phhjp, New York City, appointed Inspector in Charge of 

the Division of Information of the Bureau of Immigration 

at the port of New York, November, 1907. 
David, Joseph, New York City, appointed by the Federal Govern- 
ment Superintendent of railroad construction on the Isthmus 

of Panama. 



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118 AMERICAN JEWISH YEAR BOOK 

Deutsch, Gotthabd, Cincinnati, Ohio, elected a member of the 
Board of Education from Ward Thirteen, November, 1907. 

Einstein, Mteb, Dunkirk, N. T., elected Mayor, August, 1907. 

Elzas, Babnett a., Charleston, S. C, appointed member of the 
State Historical Commission, by the Governor, 1908. 

Eschneb, Mbs. E., Philadelphia, Pa., elected School Directress, 
February 18, 1908. 

Fels, Mbs. Joseph, Philadelphia, Pa., elected School Directress, 
February 18, 1908. 

Fenigeb, Ben, Cleveland, Ohio, appointed Assistant Police Court 
Prosecutor. 

FiNELiTE, Alexandeb, New York City, elected Justice of the City 

Court, November, 1907. 
Fink, Jacob, elected Mayor of Helena, Ark., April, 1908. 

FoBEMAN, Henby G., Chicago, 111., re-appointed Commissioner of 
South Park Board, 19P8. 

FoBST, IsiDOBE, Louisville, Ky., elected President of the Board of 

Councilmen. 
Fbank, Isaac, New York City, promoted to a captaincy of police, 

December 1, 1907. 
Fbiedman, H. G., appointed a Special Agent of the Labor Bureau, 

December, 1907. 
Fbiedman, Moses, formerly of Cincinnati, Ohio, appointed Super- 
intendent of the Carlisle Indian School, Carlisle, Pa., 1908. 
Gimbel, Ellis A., Philadelphia, Pa., selected Presidential elector 

by the Republicans, 1908. 
Gluck, Samuel A., Brooklyn, N. Y., re-elected Assemblyman from 

the Twenty-first District, November, 1907. 
Goldbebo, Mabk, New York City, reelected Assemblyman from the 

Eighteenth District, November, 1907. 

GoLDSHMiDT, Bebnhabd, Ncw York City, elected Alderman, from 
the Twenty-seventh District, November, 1907. 

GoTTSCHALK, AxFBED L. M., New York City, nominated by the 
President as a Consul-General at large, March 3, 1908. 

Gbaubabd, Mobbis, New York City, elected Assemblyman from the 

Eighth District, November, 1907. 
Gbeenbebo, Abbaham, New York City, elected Assemblyman from 

the Thirty-first District, November, 1907. 

Haas, Feuz, Portsmouth, Ohio, re-elected a member of the School 
Board, November, 1907. 



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APPOINTMENTS, HONORS, ELECTIONS HQ 

Haase, Lewis, New York City, appointed a member of the Board 
of Education, by Mayor McClellan, 1908. 

Hackenbubo, William B., Philadelphia, Pa., elected Grand Treas- 
urer of the Grand Lodge of Masons, December 4, 1907. 

Hambuboeb, Simpson, New York City, elected Grand Marshal 
of the Grand Army of the Republic, in 1907. 

Hammebstein, Oscab, New York City, appointed a Knight of the 
Legion of Honor, by the French Government. 

Hass, Isidobe, Grass Valley, Cal., elected Mayor, by the Board of 
Trustees, 1908. 

Hebbman, Moseb, New York City, appointed Police Magistrate by 
Mayor McClellan, September, 1907. 

HiBSCH, EiMiL G., Chicago, 111., receives degree of LL.D., from 
Temple University of Philadelphia, February 15, 1908. 

Hollandeb, Jacob H., Baltimore, Md., appointed a member of the 
Board of State Aid and Charities, by the Governor, 1908. 

HoBvrrz, Samuel J., Pittsburg, Pa., appointed special a^ent for 
the Department of Commerce and Labor to investigate woman 
and child labor in America, 1908. 

HoBwiTZ, Nathan, elected First Lieutenant, December, 1907. 

HuBwiTZ, Wallace A., Joplin, Mo., awarded the Parker fellowship 
at Harvard University. 

Jacobbon, Jacob, St. Louis, Mo., appointed President of the St. 

Louis Police Board. 
Jaffa, Nathan, Roswell, N. Mex., appointed Secretary of New 

Mexico, by President Roosevelt, August, 1907; reappointed for 

four years on January 14, 1908. 

Jastbow, Mobbis, Professor of Semitic Languages and Librarian 
of the University of Pennsylvania, appointed by Department 
of State, as delegate to represent the United States Govern- 
ment at the Fifteenth International Congress of Orientalists, 
Copenhagen, and at the International Congress on the History 
of Religions, Oxford, September, 1908. 

Joseph, M. V., Birmingham, Ala., appointed Assistant Quarter- 
master-Greneral, with the rank of Colonel, 1908. 

Katzenbebg, Max, New York City, appointed member of the Board 
of Education by the Mayor. 

Kaxtfman, Gsobge H., Minneapolis, Minn., appointed factory in- 
spector by Governor Johnson. 

Kbameb, Samuel E., Cleveland, Ohio, elected Councilman of Ward 
Twenty-two, November, 1907. 



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120 AMERICAN JEWISH TEAR BOOK 

Kbaub, Joseph, Cleveland, Ohio, elected Councilman at large, 
November, 1907. 

Kbulewitch, Samuel, New York City, appointed Assistant Ap- 
praiser of Merchandise in the District of New York, in the 
State of New York, May 14, 1908. 

Laskeb, Henby, Springfield, Mass., elected Alderman, 1907. 

Levin, Louis H., Baltimore, Md., appointed by Governor Crothers 
of Maryland to revise the laws relating to non-support and 
wife desertion. 

Levine, Manuel, Cleveland, Ohio, elected Judge of the Police 
Court, November, 1907. 

Levine, Max S., New York City, re-elected Alderman from the 
Eighth District, November, 1907. 

Lewinthal, Isidobe, Rabbi at Nashville, Tenn., appointed member 
of the State Board of Charities, by the Governor. 

Levy, Aabon J., New York City, elected Assemblyman from the 
Fourth District, November, 1907. 

LiEBUNG, Julius, Chicago, 111., chosen a Republican Presidential 
• Elector, 1908. 

LiEBMAN, Walteb H., New York City, elected Assemblyman from 
the Twenty-ninth District, November, 1907. 

LouBiE, David A., Chelsea, Mass., elected chairman of the Board 
of Health. 

Mansbach, Meyeb, Trinidad, Colo., elected School Director, May 
4. 1908. 

Mabix, Adolph, Captain, U. S. N., Supervisor of the Naval Auxil- 
iaries on the Atlantic Coast, appointed to be the Chairman of 
the Lighthouse Board of the Department of Commerce and 
Labor. 

Mabks, Jacob, New York City, elected Justice of the Municipal 
Court, from the Sixth District, November, 1907. 

Mabx, Samuel, New York City, elected Alderman from the Thirty- 
third District, November, 1907. 

Michelson, Albebt a.. Professor at University of Chicago, 
awarded the Nobel prize for physics, for 1907, for the dis- 
covery ot a new method of measuring the velocity of light. 
Awarded the Copley Medal, by the British Royal Society, with 
the approval of the King, 1907, for optical investigation. 

Michelson, Selig J., selected Democratic National Committeeman 
for Arizona, July, 1908. 



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APPOINTMENTS, HONORS, ELECTIONS 131 

MoBAWETZ, Albert R., nominated by President Rooeevelt, March 
3, 1908, Consul-Gencral at large. 

Moses, Israel, Natchez, Miss, elected to the lower house of the 
Mississippi Legislature. 

Moses, Jacob M., Baltimore, Md., appointed Judge of the Juvenile 
Court by the Governor. 

MosESSOHN, David N., Portland, Ore., appointed by Judge Cameron 
a Deputy District Attorney. 

MosKowiTz, Adolph, New York City, elected Alderman from the 

Sixth District, November, 1907. 
Nathan, Edwabd I., Philadelphia, Pa., appointed United States 

Consul to Patras, Greece, August, 1907. 

NoBDEN, Felix A., Chicago, 111., appointed member of the Board 
of Local Improvements. 

PiNANSKi, Abraham Edwabd, Roxbury, Mass., awarded the Wil- 
liam H. Baldwin prize, by the National Municipal League of 
Philadelphia, for his successful monograph entitled "Rela- 
tion of the Municipality to the Transportation Service." 

Prince, Leopold, New York City, elected Justice of the Municipal 
Court, from the Eighth District, November, 1907. 

Rhine, A. B., of Hot Springs, Ark., elected a member of the Board 
of Education, May 20, 1908. 

RiESENBERG, Henry, elcctcd vice-president of the National Rivers 
and Harbors Congress for the State of Indiana. 

RosENBAUM, G., Kalamazoo, Mich., appointed Police Commissioner, 
April, 1908. 

RosEWATEB, Victor, Omaha, Neb., selected a member of the Re- 
publican National Committee for Nebraska, June 18, 1908. 

RowE, Leo S., Philadelphia, Pa., receives degree of LL. D., from 
the National University of Chile, June 8, 1907, from the 
National La Plata University, Argentine, and from University 
of St. Marcos, Lima. Appointed Chairman of the U. S. Govern- 
ment Representatives to the Pan-American Scientific Congress 
at Santiago, Chile, to be held December, 1908. 

Sass, Abraham, Carbondale, Pa., elected Mayor, February, 1908. 

Schanfarbeb, Tobias, Chicago, 111., appointed one of the Chaplains 
to officiate at the Republican National Convention. 

Schlesinoer, Mark M., New Rochelle, N. Y., elected Police Justice, 
November, 1907. 

ScHLoss, Joseph, New York City, re-elected Assemblyman from 
the Seventeenth District, November, 1907. 



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122 AMERICAN JEWISH YEAR BOOK 

dcHWABZ, Leon, Mobile, Ala., appointed Lieutenant and Quarter- 
master in the First Infantry Regiment. 

Sellioman, Alfred, Louisville, Ky., appointed a member of the 
Sewer Commission. 

Sellioman, Joseph, Louisville, Ky., elected County Attorney, 
November, 1907. 

Sgutt, Juijus, Harvey, N. D., elected Mayor, November, 1907. 
Silverman, Jesse, New York City, elected Assemblyman from the 
Thirty-second District, November, 1907. 

Silvebstein, David, Fall River, Mass., appointed Master in Chan- 
cery by the Governor of Massachusetts, February, 1908. 

Silvebstein, Louis, New York City, chosen a Republican Presi- 
dential elector. 

Snellenbubo, Abbaham, Philadelphia, Pa., chosen a Republican 
Presidential elector. 

Sobel, Isadob, EJrie, Pa., elected First President of the Pennsyl- 
vania Association of Postmasters, April 22, 1908. 

SouNSKY, Habbis, Nashvillc, Tenn., appointed a member of the 
staff of the Governor of Tennessee. 

Solomon, Henby, New York City, appointed member of the State 
Prison Commission, by Governor Hughes. 

Spiegel, Fbedebick S., Cincinnati, Ohio, re-elected Judge of the 
Superior Court, November, 1907. 

Spdsoelbebo, Fbedebick, New York City, elected Justice of the 
Municipal Court, from the Fifth District, November, 1907. 

Stein, Jacob, Florence, Ala., elected City Engineer, November, 
1907. 

Steinthal, Mabtin, New York City, nominated as Elector for 
District Twelve. 

Stebn, Adolph, New York City, re-elected Assemblyman from the 
Sixth District, November, 1907. 

Stebn, J. Ludwig, New York City, appointed Chaplain at the 
Branch Workhouse, at Hart's Island, New York. 

Stebn, Samuel, New York City, re-appointed member of the Board 
of Education by the Mayor. 

Stbaus, Oscab S., Washington, D. C, re-appointed by the Presi- 
dent a member of the permanent arbitration court at The 
Hague. 

Stbauss, Isaac Lobe, Baltimore, Md., elected Attorney-General of 
the State of Maryland, November, 1907. 



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APPOINTMENTS, HONORS, BLE3CTI0NS 123 



Stbauss, Paul, Pittsburg, Pa., appointed President of the Council 
of Supervision of Public Relief. 

Stbauss, Solomon, New York City, elected Assemblyman from the 
Twenty-sixth District, November, 1907. 

TuHOLSKE, Hebman, St. Louis, Mo., elected President of the St. 
Louis Medical Society. 

Ullman, Isaac M., New Haven, Conn., appointed a member of the 
Platform Committee for the Republican National Convention, 
June 18, 1908. 

Ullman, Joseph N., Baltimore, Md., appointed by Grovernor 
Crothers to revise the laws relating to non-support and wife 
desertion. 

Ungeb, Henby W., New York City, appointed magistrate of the 
Sixth District Municipal Court, by Mayor McClellan, January, 
1907. 

Waldman, Louis I., New York City, chosen Republican Presi- 
dential elector. 

Wabbubg, Felix M., New York City, chosen Republican Presi- 
dential elector. 

Waxman, Samuel Montefiobe, Roxbury, Mass., appointed, from 
Harvard University, to the Fellowship of the Ministry of 
Public Instruction of the French Republic for 1908-1909. 

Weil, David L., New York City, elected Justice of the Municipal 
Court, from the Seventh District, November, 1907. 

Weil, Isadobe T., Memphis, Tenn., appointed Assistant Quarter- 
master of the United Confederate Veterans of the United 
States. 

Weil, Samuel, Jb., Cincinnati, Ohio, elected Director of the Board 
of Public Service, November, 1907. 

Weis, Chables, New York City, awarded a prize of $2000 by the 
Carnegie Hero Fund Commission, for saving a woman from 
drowning, on September 28, 1906. 

WooLNEB, Saml., Peoria, 111., appointed by Gov. Deneen as a dele- 
gate to the National Deep Waterways Congress, December, 
1907. 

ZiNNEB, David J., Cleveland, Ohio, elected Councilman of Ward 
Sixteen, November, 1907. 



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124 



AMERICAN JEWISH YEAR BOOK 



SYNAGOGUES AND HOMES OF SOCIETIES 
DEDICATED 



1907 
August 



Septembeb 



OCTOBEB 



4. 

11. 

18. 
25. 
25. 
30. 

30. 



1. 
1. 
1. 
1. 
1. 

1. 
1. 

1. 

1. 
1. 
1. 
1. 
2. 
6. 
8. 
8. 

15. 
29. 
13. 

13. 



IN THE United States 
July 16, 1907, to July 31, 1908 

Keneseth Israel, Pittsfield, Mass. 

Agudas Achim, Chelsea, Mass. 

Tiferes Israel Anshe Llto, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Northeastern Talmud Torah, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Temple Emanuel, Paterson, N. J. 

Beth Israel, Hebrew Reform Congregation, York, 

Pa. 
Brith Sholom, Easton, Pa. (re-dedicated). 
Ahawath Achim Anshe Hungarian, New York 

City. 
Adath Israel (Temple Israel), Boston, Mass. 
Ahavat Achim, Newburyport, Mass. 
Beth Israel, Pittsburg, Pa. 
Bnai Jacob, Middletown, Pa. 
Bronx-Tremont People's Hebrew School, New 

York City. 
Emanu El, San Francisco, Cal. (re-dedicated). 
Gemilath Chesed Austria-Hungary, Brooklyn, 

N. Y. 
Jewish Orthodox Home for the Aged, Cleveland, 

Ohio. 
Shaare Zedek, Pittsburg, Pa. 
Sherith Israel, Nashville, Tenn. 
Talmud Torah, Washington, D. C. 
Tifereth Israel, Des Moines, Iowa. 
Up-Town Talmud Torah, New York City. 
Rodeph Shalom, Pittsburg, Pa. 
Beth Israel, Atlanta, Ga. 

United Hebrew Congregation, St. Louis, Mo. (re- 
dedicated). 
Knesseth Israel, Laurel, Miss. 
Jewish Foster Home, Indianapolis, Ind. 
Annex to the Marks Nathan Jewish Orphan 

Home, Chicago, 111. 
Shear ith Israel, Atlanta, Ga. 



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SYNAGOGUES AND HOMES DEDICATED 



125 



w 



NoYEMBEB 2. Young Men's Hebrew Association, Philadelphia, 
Pa. 
3. Beth Moshav Sekenim Society, St. Louis, Mo. 
3. Standard of Israel, Watertown, N. Y. 
December 1. Ahavath Achlm, Atlanta, Ga. (re-dedicated). 
1. Amelia Relief Society Sisterhood Home, New 

York City. 
1. Beth Israel, Atlanta, Ga. (re-dedicated). 

1. Kehillath Israel of the Bronx, New York City. 
8. Anshea Sefard, Lawrence, Mass. 

8. Clara Schwab-Kuppenheimer Memorial Hall at 
the Home for Jewish Orphans, Chicago, 111. 

8. Orthodox Home for Aged and Infirm Hebrews, 

Cleveland, O. 
26. Congregation Sons of Israel, Lakewood, N. J. 
29. Congregation Agudath Achim, Columbus, O. 
— . B'nai Jacob, Lynn, Mass. 

5. Adath Israel, Washington, D. C. 

5. Beth Jacob, Oakland, Cal. (re-dedicated). 

12. Agudas Achim Anshe Libowitz, Brooklyn, N. Y. 

17. B'nai Israel Temple, Oklahoma City, Okla. 

29. Beth Israel Hospital (new building), Newark, 

N. J. 

1-3. Bnai Israel, Columbus, Miss. 

2. Rodef Shalom, Key West, Fla. 

2. Wise Memorial Hospital, Omaha, Neb. 

9. Beth Israel Temple, Philadelphia, Pa. 
14. Bnai Israel, Columbus, Ga. 

16. First Hungarian Congregation Ohab Zedek, 

Schenectady, N. Y. 
16. Ohave Sholom, Chelsea, Mass. 
23. Agudas Achim, Schenectady, N. Y. 
March 20. Benjamin F. Teller Memorial School of Rodeph 

Sholom Congregation, Philadelphia, Pa. 
22. Chevra Torah Anshe Sinai, Pittsburg, Pa. 
22. North End Hebrew Free School, Boston, Mass. 

29. Beth Jacob, Oakland, Cal. 
April 5. Sons of Israel, St. Paul, Minn. 

9. Adath Israel, Evansville, Ind. 

12. Staff of Aaron, Yonkers, N. Y. 

13. Tiferes Israel, Kansas City, Mo. 
26. Adath Israel, Evansville, Ind. 

26. Miriam Wolf Infirmary and new wing to the 
Jewish Foster Home, Philadelphia, Pa. 

30. Crippled Children's E3ast Side Free School, New 

York City. 



1908 
January 



February 



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126 AMERICAN JEWISH YEAR BOOK 

MA.Y 3. Harlem Federation for Jewish Communal Work, 

New York City (Second Building). 
3. Hebrew Congregation and Sunday School of 
West Philadelphia, Philadelphia, Pa. 

10. Garden of Children of Jerusalem (Jewish Day 

Nursery), New York City. 

22. Temple Israel, Omaha, Neb. 

23. Monteflore Hospital, Pittsburg, Pa. 
31. Jewish Library, Minneapolis, Minn. 
31. Zion Hall, Minneapolis, Minn. 

(end). B'nai Israel, Hamilton, O. 

June 3. Ahavas Chesed, Mobile, Ala. 

3. Hebrew Institute, New Haven, Conn. 

11. Home for Jewish Consumptives, Baltimore, Md. 
14. Hachnosas Orchim u-Moshav Z'keinim (Jewish 

Sheltering Home for the Homeless and Aged), 

Philadelphia, Pa. 
17. Hebrew Ladies' Moshav Zekainim Association, 

Dorchester, Mass. 
21. Bnai Abraham, Terre Haute, Ind. 
21. Home for Jewish Orphans, Providence, R. I. 
21. Jewish Home for the Aged, Minneapolis, Minn. 

28. Beth Israel, Beaufort, S. C. 

29. Temple de Hirsch, Seattle, Washington. 
July 5. Hebrew School, New Britain, Conn. 

6. Home for Jewish Orphans, Providence, R. I. 

12. Ezras Israel Anshe Motilla, Chicago, 111. 
12. Beth Sholom Temple, Brooklyn, N. Y. 
26. Congregation Emanuel, Pueblo, Colo. 



f 



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NECROLOGY 



127 



DIED 

1907 
July 


17. 




19. 
24. 


August 


1. 




6. 




15. 
27. 


September 


9. 




10. 




11. 




22. 


OCTOBEB 


15. 




27. 
28. 




30. 




31. 


NOVEMBEB 


7. 




10. 




18. 




25. 



NECROLOGY 
July 16, 1907, to July 31, 1908 



Angelo Heilprin, naturalist, geologist, and trav- 
eler. New York, aged 54. 

Bernhard H. Gordon, Rabbi, Chicago, aged 58. 

A. W. Edelman, Rabbi, Los Angeles, Cal., aged 
75. 

Hirsh Bernstein, Hebrew scholar, Tannersville, 
N. Y., aged 61. 

Judah Wechsler, Rabbi, Indianapolis, Ind., aged 
74. 

Joseph Joa6him, violin virtuoso, Berlin, aged 76. 

Moritz Ellinger, Journalist, record clerk of the 
Surrogate Court, New York City, aged 76. 

Simon Cook, Commander United States Navy, 
St. Louis, Mo., aged 51. 

Madame Zadoc Kahn, widow of the Grand- 
Rabbin of France. 

Randolph Guggenheimer, lawyer. New York City, 
aged 59. 

Ernest Blum, dramatist and Journalist, Paris, 
aged 72. 

Maurice Loewy, astronomer. Director of the 
Paris Observatory, Paris, aged 74. 

Hillel Lipschitz, Chief Rabbi of Lublin, Poland, 

Marion Moss Hartog, authoress, London, aged 
86. 

Esther J. Ruskay, writer and communal worker. 
New York City, aged 50. 

Gustave Lehmann, communal worker. New Or- 
leans, La. 

Jacob Horowitz, Chief Rabbi of Dtisseldorf, 
Germany, aged 70. 

Julia Herzl, wife of the late Zionist leader 
Theodor Herzl, Vienna, aged 38. 

Baroness Adolphe de Rothschild, at Geneva, 
Switzerland. 

Alexander Abramson, member of the Second 
Duma, Kovno, Russia, aged 48. 



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128 



AMERICAN JEWISH YEAR BOOK 



December 



1908 
January 



1. Gershom Ravinson, Rabbi, Cleveland, O., aged 59. 
5. Samuel A. Tuska, communal worker, New York 
City. 

12. Philip Bondy, Rabbi, Prague, aged 77. 

13. Nathaneel Sichel, painter, Berlin, Germany, aged 

63. 
21. Oskar E. Liassar, dermatologist and hygienist, 

Berlin, aged 68. 
23. Ernest F. L. Gauss, librarian, Chicago, 111., aged 

65. 
23. Herman N. Hyneman, artist, Philadelphia, Pa., 

aged 59. 
23. John Paley, Yiddish Journalist, New York City, 

aged 37. 

25. Isaac Cohen, Rabbi, Dallas, Tex., aged 60. 

26. David Avner, communal worker, Pittsburg, Pa., 

aged 64. 

26. Aaron Adolf de Pinto, jurist. The Hague, Hol- 
land, aged 79. 

26. Gustav Kussy, communal worker, Newark, N. J., 
aged 83. 

28. Otto Gras, professor of chemistry at the Poly- 

technic School of Prague, Prague, aged 68. 

29. Hyman P. Bush, brigadier-general in National 

Guard of California, San Francisco. 

30. Max Horb, painter, Prague, Austria, aged 70. 
30. Abraham Levy, communal worker, London, aged 

59. 
— . I. Benchimol, Director of the Mayer Rothschild 

Hospital, Palestine. 
— . Judah Bendahan, formerly Headmaster of the 

Old English School, Morocco, aged 84. 
— . Bernard Frankl, Hofrat, Vienna, Austria, aged 

61. 
— . David Isaacson, Rabbi, Roman, Roumania, aged 

,90. 
— . Emile L6vy, Chief Rabbi of Bayonne, officer of 

the French Legion of Honor, Tours, aged 49. 
— . Leopold Marks, communal worker, Helena, 

Mont., aged 77. 
— . S. R. Melli, Rabbi, Trieste, Hungary, aged 83. 
— . Feiwel Taubes, Rabbi, Jassy, Roumania, aged 68. 

2. Sigmund Kohner, court councillor, Budapest, 

Austria, aged 68. 
2. August Michel L6vy, engineer, geologist, and 

mineralogist, Paris, aged 63. 



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NECROLOGY 129 



' 6. Alois Kaiser, cantor and composer, Baltimore, 

Md., aged 68. 
9. Abraham Goldfaden, Yiddish dramatist. New 
York City, aged 68. 
12. Bernhard Felsenthal, Rabbi, Chicago, 111., aged 
86. 

15. David Neumann, Rabbi, Pressburg, Germany. 
20. Eduard Bacher, Editor of the " Neue Freie 

Presse," Vienna, aged 62. 

20. Madame Lia F61ix, actress, sister of Rachel, 
Paris, aged 77. 

20. Ronetti Roman, poet, at Jassy, Roumania, aged 
55. 

22. Samuel Simeon Oppenheim, communal worker, 
London, England, aged 82. 
Febbuabt 4. Solomon W. Levi, communal worker and philan- 
thropist, Cincinnati, O., aged 48. 

16. L. B. Perel, journalist, Amsterdam, Holland, 

aged 70. 

16. Morris Van Thai, superintendent of the Board of 

Shehita, London, Ehigland, aged 68. 
29. L. Sternheim, Rabbi, Vienna, Austria, aged 72. 
(end). Camilla Sacerdote, philanthropist, Turin, Italy. 
Mabch 2. Isaac Nahum Levy, communal worker, Jeru- 

salem, aged 42. 

5. Lily Hanbury Guedalla, actress, London, aged 

33. 

6. Sigmund Drechsler, Rabbi, Cleveland, O., aged 

64. 
8. Paul Hirsch, communal worker, Leeds, England, 
aged 73. 

8. Adolph Meyer, congressman and Civil War vet- 

eran. New Orleans, La., aged 66. 

9. Gerson Bernstein, Rabbi, Chicago, 111., aged 71. 

10. Jehudah Steinberg, Hebrew writer, Odessa, 

Russia, aged 44. 

11. Isaiah Bershadsky (pseudonym for Domoshe- 

vitzky), novelist, Warsaw, Russia, aged 34. 
11. Henry Louis Bischoffsheim, philanthropist, Lon- 
don, aged 79. 

17. Gustav Solomon Oppert, Orientalist, Berlin, aged 

72. 

18. Gregory Gershuni, Russian revolutionist, Switz- 

erland, aged 40. 

19. Solomon Lurie, Rabbi and Hebrew poet, Kiev, 

Russia, aged 50. 



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130 AMERICAN JEWISH YEAR BOOK 



21. Joshua Steinberg, writer and educator, Wilna, 
aged 69. 

23. E#ugene Pereire, financier and communal worker, 
Paris, Prance, aged 76. 

29. Nathan Stix, communal worker, Cincinnati, 0., 
aged 72. 
(end). Marco Alatri, statesman, Rome, Italy. 
April 6. Gabriel Lindo, lawyer and communal worker, 

London, England, aged 70. 

11. Arthur Levysohn, editor-in-chief of the " Berliner 
Tkgeblatt," Meran, Austria, aged 67. 

13. Hartwig Derenbourg, Orientalist, Paris, Prance, 
aged 64. 

27. Jacob Voorsanger, Rabbi, San Prancisco, Cal., 
aged 56. 

27. Josef Wertheimer, Rabbi, Geneva, aged 75. 

— . Haim Yechl^l Halaivi Epstein, Rabbi, Novo- 
horodok, Minsk, Russia. 

— . Wolf Wahrmann, Hebrew scholar and philan- 
thropist, Botoschani, Roumania, aged 52. 
May 1. Issach Raffael Tedeschi, Rabbi of Ancona, aged 

82. 
8. Eduard Olaser, traveler and Arabist, Munich, 

aged 53. 
8. LfUdovic Hal6vy, dramatist and novelist, Paris, 
aged 74. 

17. Percival S. Menken, communal worker, New 
York City, aged 43. 

21. Albert Loewy, Rabbi and communal worker, 
London, England, aged 84. 

— . Moritz Lowy, Chief Rabbi of Temesvar, Austria, 
aged 60. 
June 1. Abraham Brodsky, Philanthropist, Odessa, Rus- 

sia, aged 72. 

21. Bechor Eliyahu Hazzan, Haham Bashi of Alex- 
andria, Egypt, aged 63. 
July (end). Donato Levi, Rabbi of Geneva, Italy, aged 72. 

— . Dr. Edward Spiegler, Professor of Dermatology 
at the University of Vienna, at Gainfarn, Aus- 
tria, aged 45. 



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A LIST OF LEADING EVENTS 131 



A LIST OF LEADING EVENTS IN 5668 

July 16, 1907, to July 31, 1908 
A dash ( — ) before an event indicates that the source from 
which the information was obtained did not specify the exact date. 
In all such instances it is safe to assume that the event occurred 
during the month under which it is recorded in this list. 

1907 
July 17. The alleged detention of a Mussulman woman 

in the Jewish quarter of Teheran, Persia, leads 
to fighting. Twenty Jews injured. 

18. Dispatch announcing a massacre of Jews at 

Skonitz. 

19. Heinrich Maas, on the anniversary of the fiftieth 

year of the existence of his woolen yarn firm 
in Berlin, creates a pension fund for the em- 
ployees, to which he contributes 150,000 marks. 

19. The Austrian Jewish Union offers a reward of 

20,000 kronen for the discovery of the Polna 
murderers, or for proof of the innocence of 
Leopold Hilsner. 

20. District Courts in Saxony, Germany, exclude 

Jews from juries and from the positions of 
Assistant Judges (Assessoren). 

25. A large mob of men and women attack the 

Kosher butcher shops in the southeastern sec- 
tion of Philadelphia, as a protest against the 
rise in the price of meat. Fifty shops attacked 
and the meat spoilt with acid and gasoline. 

26. The Association of Orthodox Rabbis calls upon 

all Jews to boycott New York Yiddish news- 
papers that are published on the Sabbath day. 
31. The Monarchists of the Government of Saratov 
demand equal rights for the Jews in their 
program. 
August 2. The Kabyles near Casablanca, Morocco, revolted, 

because the harbor works were in the hands of 
the French and because a Frenchman was ap- 
pointed Director of Customs. A French battle- 
ship bombarded the town to oppose the attacks 
of the Moors upon the town, and the Arab 



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132 



AMERICAN JEWISH YEAR BOOK 



tribes in turn attacked the 6000 Jews in the 
Mellah, killing 30, wounding 60, violating 
many women, carrying off 250 young women 
and girls. The Jewish quarter was ruined, and 
more than half the Jewish population fled to 
Tangier, Ceuta, Gibraltar, and elsewhere. 
12. Imolgany, Russia, destroyed by an incendiary 
fire. Jews sustain great losses. 
14-21. Eighth Zionist Congress held at The Hague. 
Septembeb 2. The Black Hundreds attack the Jews of Odessa. 
Four killed, and sixty wounded. The police 
remain impassive for two hours. In the even- 
ing the Union of Genuine Russians adopts a 
resolution to annihilate, with the help of Cos- 
sacks, the members of the Jewish Self-Defense 
Organization. 
4. " Hazeman,'* " Volkszeitung," " Das Wort," and 
" Volksstimme," Russian Jewish papers, He- 
brew and Yiddish, suppressed by the au- 
thorities. 
8. The Jewish community of Florence appeals to 
the Minister of Commerce and Industry to 
revise the new Sunday law so that Jewish shop- 
keepers who observe the Sabbath may open 
their places of business on Sunday. 

8. An attack upon the Jews of Krementchug, 

Russia, by the Union of Genuine Russians. 
60 Jews wounded. 

9. A pogrom at Kishinefif. Many Jews reported 

killed. 

Finnish passport laws enforced against Jews. 

The Roumanian Government issues an order to 
frontier towns forbidding the authorities to 
admit Russian Jews even In time of pogroms. 

The Russian authorities issue ordera to revoke 
the rights of the Jews who had joined the 
Greek Catholic Church, and who have recently 
returned to Judaism. 
OcTOBEB 1. In response to a request, the members of the 

Jewish community of Posen are permitted to 
open their shops on Sunday, provided they are 
kept closed on Saturday. 
2. The Governor of Mohilev, Russia, permits the 
Jews of Homel to open their shops on Sunday, 
on account of the many Jewish holidays of the 
previous month, but are prevented from doing 



10. 
10. 



13. 



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A LIST OF I^ADING EVENTS 133 



business by the threats of massacre by the 
Union of Genuine Russians. 
3. Of the instigators of the pogrom at Tiraspol, 
Russia, the telegrapher and four peasants were 
sentenced to a four years' term in the galleys, 
and three other rioters to one year's imprison- 
ment. 

7-9. The Union of Genuine Russians leads numerous 
attacks upon the Jews of Odessa, following 
upon the murder of Dalfinsky, Assistant Chief 
of the Russian Police. 

10. A Government order makes it compulsory to 
keep all places of business closed on Sunday 
in Budapest. 

10. Ernesto Nathan, a Jew, elected mayor of Rome. 

15. Fire damages the synagogue of the Washington 
Hebrew Congregation to the extent of |15,000. 

25. Russian Jewish Organ of Winawer's Volks- 
gruppe, the " Svoboda e Ravenstuo," indefi- 
nitely suspended, by order of Prefect of St. 
Petersburg. 

25. 5000 Moroccan Jews emigrate to the south of 
Spain, and are well received. 

25. Assistant Secretary of Commerce Schtoff re- 
moved from oflace because he granted per- 
mission to admit about one hundred Jewish 
students to fill vacancies in the Poly technical 
Institute of Kiev, Russia. 

25. Four members of the Slipian Group of Zionist- 
Socialists sentenced to long terms of prison for 
belonging to that organization. 

25. The Board of Directors and Professors of the 
Polytechnical Institute of Kiev, resign in a 
body as a protest against Stolypin's order ex- 
pelling 100 Jewish students from that Institute. 

28. Many Jewish towns in Russia destroyed by fire. 
500 Jewish houses destroyed in Zwolin. 

28. Anti-Jewish demonstrations in Minsk. 

28. The town of Zwonitz, Podolia, Russia, burned, 
and eight hundred Jewish families left in dis- 
tress. 

28. Czar orders a statue of Peter the Great from L. 
Bernstamm, a Jewish sculptor. 

28. Prince Ukhtomsky publishes in his newspaper 
" Peterburgskiya Vedomosti " a blood accusa- 
tion article. 



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134 AMERICAN JEWISH YEAR BOOK 



28. Anti-Jewish outrages in tbe village of Tatfalu, 
Hungary. 

28. Anti-Jewish excesses in Minsk, Russia. 

— . Judge Michael Ross, of Kansas City, Mo., rules 
that Jews who have always observed Saturday 
as a day of rest may transact business on 
Sunday, but that those who once adopted Sun- 
day as their day of rest are not entitled to the 
privilege. 

— . Mayor Dempsey, Cincinnati, Ohio, orders the 
theatrical managers of the city to cover up the 
posters bearing caricatures of Jews, in response 
to a protest of a delegation which followed 
action taken by the Independent Order of B'nai 
B'rith. 

— . New agrarian law in Roumania adopted pro- 
hibiting Jews from controlling more than 4000 
hectares of farm lands. 
November 1. "Hilfsverein der deutschen Juden," Berlin, con- 
tributes 22,500 francs to the Central Committee 
of the Roumanian Relief Committee. 
1. Professor Albert A. Michelson, of the University 

of Chicago, receives Nobel Prize. 
1. Rabbi Maurice H. Harris, New York City, cele- 
brates the twenty-fifth anniversary of his con- 
nection with his congregation. Temple Israel 
of Harlem. 
5. " Society for the Dissemination of Correct Infor- 
mation about the Jews " organized in Moscow. 
8. Henry Feldman re-elected Mayor of Hull, Eng- 
land. 
8. Arnold Bloom unanimously elected Mayor of 

Birkenhead, England. 
8. Protest of Austro-Hungarian minister at Bucha- 
rest to the Roumanian government, against its 
action in sending expelled Jews to Austria or 
Hungary. 

12. Cholera raging in Jewish Pale of Settlement, 
Russia. 

12. Gaston Raynal appointed Principal Secretary to 
the Minister of Agriculture, France. 

12. The War Department of Germany recommends 
the distribution of a book " Mein Werk dem 
Konige," among the Jewish soldiers in the* 
German Army. The book was written by Dr. 
Beerman, a Jew. 



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A LIST OF LEADING EVENTS 135 



14. Third Russian Duma opens. Two Jewish mem- 
bers: L. N. Niselovitch, of Courland, and 
Friedman, of Kovno. 

16. Herr Dinzinger elected a member of the Town 

Council of Munich, being the first Jew in more 
than twenty years to occupy a seat in that body. 

17. Opening day of the Jewish Art Exhibition in 

Berlin. 
17. Congregation Adereth El, New York City, cele- 
brates its fiftieth anniversary. 

19. Chicago Jews oppose the use of the Bible as a 

text-book in schools. 

20. Professor David Woolf Marks, the "father" of 

Anglo-Jewish Reform, celebrates his 97th birth- 
day. 

20. Two Hundred and Fiftieth Anniversary of the 
death of Manasseh ben Israel. 

23. Samuel Oompers re-elected President of the 
American Federation of Labor. 

25. Joseph Hal6vy awarded prize of 6000 francs by 
Acad6mie des Inscriptions et Belles Lettres, 
Paris, for his latest work. 
27-28. Pogrom in Odessa. About twenty persons seri- 
ously wounded. 

29. Leon Harrison, elected rabbi for life by Congre- 
gation Israel, St. Louis, Mo. 

29. Report of gift of 3000 liras to Jews' Infants' 

School, Italy, by the King and Queen. 

30. Baron Edmond de Rothschild elected President 

of the Central Consistory, France. 
30. Max Weyl, landscape painter, Washington, D. C, 

celebrates 70th birthday, 
(end). Emperor of Austria-Hungary confers honors on 

a number of Jews. 
— . Weill, appointed to one of the highest posts at 

the French Ministry of Finance, Administra- 
tor to the General Directory for Registration, 

Domains, and Stamps. 
— . Setatt, Casablanca, plundered by native tribes, 

Jewish population fled. 
— . Matthew Nathan appointed governor of Natal, 

South Africa. 
December 5. Senate issues statement that Jewish machinists 

employed on the railroads have the right to 

live in any part of Russia. 



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136 AMERICAN JEWISH YEAR BOOK 

6. M. Klotz, member of the Chamber of Deputies, 
France, elected President of Group formed in 
Chamber to study question of electoral reform. 

6. Pogrom at Orscha, Russia. 30 Jews killed. 

6. Sultan of Turkey grants interview to Herr David 

Wolffsohn, president Zionist Actions Comity. 
10. Agitation in several cities of the United States 
against celebration of Christmas in Public 
Schools. 
13. Bible barred from the Chicago Public Schools. 

13. Report that thirty-two Jews were executed dur- 

ing the month of October, in Russia, for alleged 
political offenses. 

14. Roumanian Minister of Domains orders that 

Jews who are not naturalized shall not be 
employed in the petroleum industry. Also that 
two-thirds of ail employees in factories must 
be Roumanians. 

14. Council of Jewish Communal Institutions formed 
in New York City. 

17. Society of Jewish Art formed in New York City. 

20. Zionist Central Bureau at Cologne reports fav- 
orable negotiations with the Sultan of Turkey. 

20. Dispatch announcing that Baroness Adolphe de 
Rothschild bequeathed 3,600,000 francs to sev- 
eral Jewish institutions of Paris. 

20. Brooklyn School Board prohibits celebration of 
Christmas in Schools. 

24. All Jewish Clubs in Poland ordered closed by 
Governor-General of Warsaw. 

24. United Hebrew Charities, of New York City, 

closes temporarily, owing to lack of funds. 

25. Jews defended by Social Democrats in the Duma. 
27. Emperor Menelik, of Abyssinia, grants letter of 

protection to Haim Nahoum and a number of 
others, who were sent by the "Alliance Isra- 
elite Universelle " to study the condition of the 
Falashas. 

27. Jews of Hungary celebrate the fortieth anni- 
versary of grant of equal political rights with 
the Hungarian population. 

27. Chief Council of the Union of Genuine Russians 
requests its branches to collect signatures for a 
petition to be presented to the Czar, <mi June 
30, 1908, demanding that Jews be considered 
as foreigners. 



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A LIST OF LEADING EVENTS 137 

31. Large mass-meeting at Helsingfors, Finland, ad- 
dressed by several Deputies of the Diet, pro- 
tests against the expulsion of Jews. 

31. 169 members of the First Russian Duma, who 
signed Viborg Manifesto, condemned to three 
months' imprisonment and loss of civil rights. 

— . All Jews ordered to leave Vladivostok within 
four days, except land and house owners, who 
are allowed eighteen days in which to leave. 

— . Committee of Jews appointed to erect a monu- 
ment in Berlin to Moses Mendelssohn. 

— . The "Neue Freie Presse," Vienna, publishes in 
special supplement an appeal addressed to the 
Emperor, by Dr. Friedrich Elbogen, on behalf 
of Leopold Hilsner. 

— . Shehitah (ritual slaughter) prohibited in 
Saxony, Germany. 

— . W. Ehrlich elected to the first representative 
Government under the new constitution, Bloem- 
fontein. South Africa. 

— . Isidore Frankenburg re-elected for the third 
time Mayor of Salford, Eng. 

— . L. N. Niselovitch elected Secretary to the Finan- 
cial Committee of the Duma. 

— . A number of Jews receive the Order of the Red 
Eagle from the Kaiser of Germany. 

— . Fr6d6ric Reitlinger, elected Ofllcer of the Legion 
of Honor, Paris, France. 

— . The Rothschilds give Dr. Jean Charcot 40,000 
francs for a Polar expedition. 

— . William Yager re-elected for the third time 
mayor of Kimberley, South Africa. 
1908 
January 2. Nathan Birnbaum of Vienna, noted Jewish Na- 

tionalist, arrives in the United States to deliver 
lectures on nationalism. Is received by Presi- 
dent Roosevelt. 
3. Benjamin Goldberg, of Hartford, Conn., arrested 
and charged with violating the Sunday law by 
keeping his cigar store open. The Court ruled 
that any person who conscientiously observed 
Saturday, could keep his store open on Sunday, 
provided no one else was disturbed in public 
worship. 
3. L. N. Niselovitch, St. Petersburg, appointed mem- 
ber of Commission on Religion. 



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138 AMERICAN JEWISH YEAR BOOK 

3. M. I. Duparc, Holland, promoted to post of Chief 
Clerk of the Interior. 

3. Augusto Mortara, Italy, appointed Director-Gen- 
eral of the Public Debt. 

3. Rent strike on the East Side of New York City. 

3. Dr. Rebecca Korngold, a medical graduate of the 

University of Cracow, appointed physician at 
the Jewish Hospital. First woman to become a 
physician in Austria. 

4. Czar pardons number of pogrom makers, who 

were sentenced to long terms of imprisonment. 
4. " Merchant of Venice " eliminated from the Eng- 
lish Course in the High School, £21 Paso, Texas. 
4. Municipal authorities of St. Petersburg, Russia, 
legalize the Society for the Regulation of Jew- 
ish Emigration. 
6. Jewish tenants of Chicago strike for lower rents. 
9. Protest meeting in London, England, against 
Lord Avebury's proposed bill Prohibiting Sun- 
day Trading. 

10. Reports of continued Anti-Jewish riots in Odessa, 
Russia. 

10. Dispatch announcing that Wilna administration 
refuses permit to Jews to organize a Jewish 
literature and art society. 

10. Verdict of Supreme Court of Kiev, that Dr. 
Frankel, member of the First Duma, must 
serve a term of prison of two years because of 
certain articles he had written concerning 
First Duma, is sustained. 

16. Dispatch announcing that the fortieth anni- 
versary of Joseph Kisch's literary activity is 
being celebrated throughout Hungary. 

18. Dispatch stating that the Minister of Education 
has granted a permit to Jews of Yekaterinoslav, 
Russia, to open a Jewish gymnasium. 

20. Count Isaac de Camondo, patron of music and 
the fine arts, made Commander of the Legion 
of Honor, Paris, France. 

20. Leopold Bernstamm, prominent Jewish sculptor, 
made Commander of the Legion of Honor, 
Paris, France. 

20. A gold medal awarded to Judah M. Cohen, of 
Tangiers, Morocco, by the Government of 
France, in recognition of the services he ren- 



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A LIST OF LEADING EVENTS 139 



dered in connection with the recent exhibition 
held near Paris. 

20. Twenty-fifth Anniversary of the " Kadimah " 
celebrated by the Federation of Jewish Nation- 
alist Students of Austria, at Vienna. 

28. A Society of Jewish Art and Literature organized 
at Bialystok, Russia. 

30. Date of telegram received from Tangiers, Mo- 

rocco, stating that Mouley Hafid has imposed a 
tax of 1200,000 on the inhabitants of Marra- 
kesh, forcing the Jews to pay a third of the 
value of their properties built on the new 
quarters assigned them twelve years ago, in 
addition to which they are in future to pay 
ground rent. 

31. M. Samuel, chief librarian to the Senate, France, 

appointed Chevalier of the Legion of Honor. 

31. Report received by the "Hilfsverein der deut- 
schen Juden " stating that the expulsion of 
Jews from the villages in Moldavia (Rou- 
mania), which was commenced at the time of 
the disturbances in March, 1907, has been 
ruthlessly continued. Even widows not exempt 
from outrages. 

— . Hebrew residents of Ansonia, Conn., notify 
authorities they will keep places of business 
open on Sunday, despite enforcement of blue 
laws. 

— . Hamburg High Court decides that refusal of 
Rabbinate to allow ashes of cremated bodies in 
family vaults in Jewish Cemetery is illegal. 
¥isBXUARY 1. New law enacted in Roumania forbidding " for- 
eigners" to engage in the wine business. It 
requires that innkeepers must be Roumanians, 
possessing both political and civil rights. 
There being but twenty-five Jews in Roumania 
who have been recognized as citizens, the law 
was obviously directed against the Jews. 
Thousands of Jews at present engaged in the 
business will thus be ruined. 
2. Charles Lyon-Caen appointed Vice-President of 
the Council of the University of Paris, France. 
2. Max I. Friedlander, one of the foremost authori- 
ties on old Dutch and German paintings, ap- 
pointed Director of the Royal Copper-Plate 
Prints Cabinet. Berlin. 



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140 AMERICAN JEWISH YEAR BOOK 



2. Gold Medal of the Social Museum, Paris, France, 
given to Luigi Luzzatti, the eminent Italian 
statesman, on a visit to Paris. Also received in 
private audience by the President of the 
Republic. 

4. Dispatch announcing that many Jews are being 

expelled from Yaroslav, Rus»ia. 
5-7. Repeated massacres at Setatt, Morocco. Jewish 
colony devastated. 

5. Dispatch stating that the Jewish community of 

Belgrade received a subsidy of 48,000 kronen 
from the Servian Grovernment for educational 
purposes. 

5. Dispatch announcing that Corporal Balint, who 

killed the Jewish soldier Hershkowitz, was 
sentenced to three years' imprisonment. 

6. Alfred L^vy, of Lyons, elected Grand Rabbin of 

France. 

6. Dispatch announcing that fifty-four of the ac- 

cused participants in the Kiev pogroms were 
acquitted, and sixteen others sentenced to sev- 
eral months' imprisonment. 

7. Dispatch announcing removal of Rabbi H. S. 

Penwas, of Odessa, by the Governor-General, 
no reason being given by him for this action. 

11. Discussion in House of Representatives regard- 

ing Russia's treatment of American passports. 
Result of protest against the circular issued on 
May 28, 1907, over the signature of Secretary 
Root. The objectionable circular ordered with- 
drawn by President Roosevelt, when brought 
to his notice. Congressman Harrison, of New 
York, comments on same as a most surprising 
and deplorable chapter in American diplomacy. 
Letter from Secretary Root, dated February 
11, addressed to Messrs. Louis Marshall and 
Edward Lauterbach, of New York, in reply to 
their letter of protest dated February 1, gives 
assurance that every effort was being made to 
get rid of the discrimination the Russian Gov- 
ernment practised, also that a new circular had 
been substituted in lieu of the objectionable 
one in question. 

12. Czar pardons twenty-five peasants of Province of 

Tchernigov, condemned to hard labor for parti- 
cipation in pogrom that resulted in death of 
several Jews. 



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A LIST OF LEADING EVENTS 141 



14. Solomon Strauss introduces a bill in the New 
York Assembly permitting those who consci- 
entiously observe the seventh day of the week 
as the Sabbath and refrain from secular busi- 
ness and labor on that day, to carry on secular 
business and labor on Sunday. 

14. Report that Kiev police continue expulsion of 

Jews who cannot prove that they possess the 
right of residence. 

15. Dispatch announcing that Governor-General of 

Odessa has decided that the wife of a Jewish 
emigrant to America may obtain a foreign 
passport on presentation of a letter from her 
husband asking her to join him. 
15. Committee of the Jewish Territorial Association 
in Warsaw disbanded by the government. 

17. Report that Sultan of Turkey appoints his phy- 

sician, Dr. Bier, a Jew, his adjutant. 

18. Law passed by Ministry of Bulgarian Govern- 

ment providing for state aid to Jewish schools. 
18. Senator Hopkins, of Illinois, introduces a reso- 
lution in Congress deploring the continued 
persecution of Jews by officials of the Russian 
Government. 

23. Twenty-fifth anniversary of the dedication of 

the synagogue of Congregation B'nai Israel, 
Elizabeth, New Jersey. 

24. Jacob H. Schiff visits Jerusalem. 

25. Report of a further massacre of the Jews in 

Morocco. Residents of Setatt attacked, and 
Jews fiee to Casablanca for shelter. 

28. Jews in Denmark commemorate their 250th anni- 
versary with a Jewish exhibition. 

28. Society for the promotion of Jewish art and 
poetry formed at St. Petersburg, Russia. 

28. Date of circular issued by the Prefect of the 
District of Jassy, Roumania, ordering the ex- 
pulsion of foreigners from the rural communes. 

— . Solomon N. Ziman, of New Zealand, selected as 
a Rhodes Scholar. 

— . A number of Jews decorated with various orders 
by the King of Italy. 

— . Jewish miners ordered out of Yekaterinoslav, 
Russia. Those who begged for mercy to re- 
main until the passing of the inclement 
weather were driven to the railway depot like 
herds of cattle. 



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142 AMERICAN JEWISH YEAR BOOK 



March 1. The Czar grants a free pardon to nineteen Cos- 

sacks, who participated in the Jewish mas- 
sacres in the provinces of Cherson, Tchemigov, 
and to fourteen Poltava rioters. 

1. Russian Senate decides that Jewish women pos- 
sessing the right to reside outside the Pale of 
Settlement lose their privileges on marrying 
husbands who are not allowed to live outside 
of the Pale. 

1. Large numbers of Jews expelled from Sebastopol 
and the villages near Yekaterinoslav. 

1. Twenty-fifth anniversary of the Machzike Tal- 

mud Torah, New York City. 

2. Henry Bergh, of the Society for Prevention of 

Cruelty to Animals, New York City, offers a 
prize of |500 for a more humane method of 
slaughtering animals for food. 

4. Date of telegram from St. Petersburg, Russia, 
stating that the organ of the Union of Genuine 
Russians announces that the Czar has granted 
a pardon to fifteen persons who were convicted 
by court-martial at Odessa last autumn, for 
participation in the pogroms in the Tiraspol 
district 

4. At the Congress of the Union of Genuine Rus- 
sians held at St. Petersburg, the proposal to 
transfer the Jews of Russia to Kamchatka or 
Sakhalien is enthusiastically approved. 

8. A society, to be known as "Herzl Union," 

formed in London, England, by prominent 
Jews. 

9. Lord Avebury, London, England, introduces a 

Sunday Closing Bill which provides that all 
shops be kept closed Sunday throughout the 
day, and no person shall sell, or expose, or 
offer for sale any article, in any street or 
public place on that day. 

9. The Chamber of Deputies, Paris, France, passes 
a Bill by which Joseph Reinach, who was 
cashiered in consequence of his active work in 
the defense of Captain Dreyfus, is re-instated 
with full seniority to the rank of Captain of 
Cavalry in the Territorial Reserve. 

9. Morris Alexander elected to the House of As- 
sembly of the Cape Colony Parliament, South 
Africa. 



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A LIST OF LEADING EVENTS I43 



10. The Council of the Union of Genuine Russians 

resolved to send a petition to the Minister of 
Education demanding that Jews he not ad- 
mitted to secondary schools, that in the Pale 
the right to establish private schools for Jews 
be granted to Christians only, and that the 
teachers in these schools be Christians and not 
Jews. 

11. Committee on Codes of New York Assembly 

grant a hearing on Assemblyman Strauss's 
bill (Feb. 14). Representatives of a number of 
Jewish bodies, and also of the Seventh Day 
Baptists and Seventh Day Adventists, pre- 
sented arguments in favor of the bill. A dele- 
gation of about 200 Jews from New York, 
Albany, and other cities were present. 

11. Finnish Diet takes up Bill introduced by the 
Social Democratic faction, demanding the 
amelioration of the condition of the Jews in 
Finland. 

11. Telegram received by the " Hilfsverein der deut- 

schen Juden" from Kiev that the expulsion 

of those Jews from Kiev .who cannot prove that 

- they possess the rights of residence is being 

prosecuted with great severity. 

13. Great fire in the Jewish quarter of Haskeuy, 

Constantinople, Turkey; 500 houses destroyed, 
and 5000 persons left without shelter. Cable- 
gram from Constantinople to Oscar S. Straus, 
Secretary of Department of Commerce and 
Labor, asking for assistance. 

14. Official announcement received in St. Petersburg, 

Russia, that four-fifths of the Jewish residents 
of Vladivostok have been expelled from the 
city, and all those remaining must leave before 
April 1. This expulsion is in violation of the 
regulations which give governors of ports 
power to discriminate and allow Jews to re- 
main on special permit from the Ministry of 
the Interior. 

14. Police and soldiers of Jaffa, Palestine, attack 

Jews, wounding thirteen. 

15. Dispatch announcing that Arnold Lydachovsky, 

a young Jewish artist, won the grand prize at 
the spring exhibition of the St. Petersburg 



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144 AMERICAN JEWISH YEAR BOOK 



Academy of Art far his painting entitled " Job 
and His Friends." 

15. Gyms Adler elected President of the Dropsie 
College, Philadelphia. 

15. Dispatch announcing that Nahum Sokolow, 
editor of " Ha'Olam " and the "Welt," has 
been sentenced to three months' imprisonment 
and a fine of 300 rubles, for articles published 
in " Hazefiro " and the " Telegraph." 

15. Report that Russian Minister of the Interior 
decides that Jews living in towns without the 
Pale are not to be elected to municipal offices 
within the Pale. Even where they form ninety 
per cent of the population they may not hold 
more than five per cent of the municipal offices. 

17. Lord Ayebury, of London, England, introduces 
for the second time his Sunday Closing 
Bill, making trading on Sunday illegal. Bill 
strongly opposed by Lord Swaythling, formerly 
Sir Samuel Montagu, who claimed that half the 
Jews of Eiast London would be seriously af- 
fected by the Bill. 

17. At the latest conference of the Union of Genuine 

Russians, resolutions were adopted demand- 
ing the immediate dissolution of the Duma and 
the Stolypin cabinet, and the banishment of 
all foreigners, particularly the Jews, to the 
island of Sakhalien. 

18. Report that the Prime Minister, and the Min- 

ister of EJducation of Bulgaria, pay an official 
visit to the Chief Rabbi. The Minister of Edu- 
cation issues an order permitting Jewish pupils 
in public schools to absent themselves on all 
Jewish holidays. The Minister of War grants 
leave of absence for the Jewish holidays to all 
Jewish soldiers. The Minister of the Interior 
permits Jewish butchers who keep their shops 
closed on Saturday, to keep them open on 
Sunday. 

20. Dispatch stating that at a peaceful assembly of 
Jews at Kharkov, Russia, which discussed the 
Jewish question, sixty-two Jews were arrested 
and later imprisoned, without trial or even 
formal charges of any kind being preferred. 

20. Report that twenty-five Real Russians, accused 
of participating in the Veliki Luky massacre. 



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A LIST OF LEADING EVENTS 145 



having petitioned the Czar against the " in- 
tolerable " attitude of the judges toward them, 
have been pardoned. 

23. Report that the Vice-President of the Duma, 
Baron Meyendorff, delivered a speech in one 
of the Committees of the National Assembly, in 
favor of emancipating the Jews as a method of 
improving Russian finances. 

23. The Governor-General of Moscow refuses to allow 
a few Jewish students of the St. Petersburg 
Polytechnic to visit Moscow on a scientific 
expedition, though accompanied by their pro- 
fessors. 

23. Medal of Honor awarded by the Minister of the 
Interior, Paris, France, to Isaac Bruhl, a phy- 
sician attached to the hospitals in Paris, in 
appreciation of exceptional devotion during 
a recent epidemic. 

23. Four Jews promoted Officers, and nine others 

appointed Chevaliers, of the Legion of Honor, 
in connection with exhibitions at Milan, Tour- 
coing, and Amiens. 

24. Czar pardons all participants in the pogroms of 

1905. 

25. Date of dispatch stating that the Roumanian 

Grovemment has initiated a most rigorous per- 
secution of the Jews, thereby violating article 
44 of the Berlin Treaty of 1878. Local author- 
ities in Roumania are receiving instructions to 
lexpel thousands of Jews from districts in 
which they have resided for years, even gen- 
erations. Their total number approximates 
10,000. The expelled Jews are reduced to desti- 
tution. The " Tageblatt " of Berlin urges that 
the signatory Powers to the Berlin Treaty 
should intervene and compel Roumania to treat 
the Jews properly. 
28. Lord Avebury's Sunday Closing Bill passes 
through the Committee of the House of Lords. 
Lord Swaythling moved an amendment to the 
Bill giving Jews who observe the Sabbath the 
right to trade up till 3 p. m., on Sunday, on 
condition that no Christians be employed by 
them in Sunday work. Amendment objected 
to by Lord Avebury on the ground that it 
would leave to a small number of Jewish shops 



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146 AMERICAN JEWISH YEAR BOOK 



a monopoly of Sunday Trade. Later in the 
month Lord Swaythling withdrew the amend- 
ment. 

28. Czar grants another pardon to participators in 
Jewish massacres. Fifteen men convicted last 
autumn by court-martial and sentenced to im- 
prisonment for killing, wounding, or robbing 
Jews, have been released by decree signed 
personally by the Czar. The petition begging 
the release was presented by the Union of the 
Russian People. 

30. Bishop of St. Asaph, London, England, intro- 
duces into the House of Lords an Elducation 
Bill, that provides for the teaching of " Cowper 
Templeism '' in the schools at the cost of and 
under the control of the local authority; pro- 
vides for denominational teaching, where the 
parents desire it, being given on three days a 
week, the cost of such teaching to come from 
the denominations themselves; abolishes reli- 
gious tests in the appointments of teachers, 
who, however, are not to be debarred from 
giving denominational instruction if they are 
willing to do so. Bill objected to as it makes 
no provisions for Jews or Roman Catholics. 

30. Family of the late Wolf Wissotsky, of Moscow, 
Russia, donate to the " Hilfsverein," of Berlin, 
the sum of 250,000 francs for the purpose of 
establishing a Jewish Technical School in 
Palestine. 

— . A new Weekly Rest-Day Bill introduced into 
Parliament (England), by C. C. Price, pro- 
viding that every person working for an em- 
ployer have the twenty-four hours of Sunday 
as a rest-day in each week, or where Sunday 
labor is necessary, having one Sunday of 
twenty-four hours in a fortnight and a rest- 
day during the intervening period. Provision 
made in favor of Jews, and any employer or 
person who conscientiously and habitually 
observes the seventh day of the week as the 
Sabbath, and actually refrains from labor or 
work on that day. 

— . Volume I of the Russian Jewish Encyclopedia 
published. 



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A LIST OF LEADING EVENTS 147 



— . Chief Rabbi Niemirower, of Jassy, Roumania, 
fined for contempt of court, for persistently 
refusing to administer the humiliating oath 
" more Judaico." The Rabbi appealed and he 
was requested by the President of the Upper 
Court to prepare a memorandum on the sub- 
ject. It is also stated that the Rabbi is threat- 
ened by the Crown Attorney with expulsion for 
rebellion. 

— . Herr Albert Ballin, General-Director of the Ham- 
burg-American Line, receives the Order of the 
Crown, First Class. The first Jew to receive 
such an honor. 

— . New Society, "The National Jewish Duties," 
organized in St. Petersburg, for the purpose 
of improving the legal and economic status of 
the Russian Jews. 

— . Mass meetings held in many Austrian towns in 
order to secure a new trial for Hilsner. 

— . In the elections for the Galician Landtag six 
Jewish candidates were successful. 

— . Georges Benedite, appointed Conservator of the 
Department of Egyptian Antiquities at the 
Louvre, France. 
April 1. Report that over a hundred pogromists, some of 

whom were sentenced to life imprisonment, 
are pardoned by the Czar. 

1. Eighty-eight Jewish families exiled from Sebas- 

topol, and many others receive orders to leave 
the city. 

2. Many Jews honored by the Khedive of Egypt. 
4-5. Telegrams from Kiev to the " Hilfsverein der 

deutschen Juden " in Berlin stating that the 
expulsions of those Jews who cannot prove 
their right of residence are becoming more 
numerous. The police made extensive raids on 
Jewish houses, and eighty-four Jews were ar- 
rested and subsequently expelled. 

6. Report from Jaffa that the Turkish Police Pre- 
fect who instigated the attack upon the Jews 
on March 16, has been recalled to Constanti- 
nople. 

6. Prefect of Moscow issues an order that the 
directors of the hospital should not accept any 
Jewish patients who have no right to live in 
Moscow. 



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148 AMERICAN JEWISH YEAR BOOK 



6. Russian Senate decides that Jewish workingmen 
residing outside the Pale of Settlement can in 
no way be deprived of their privilege to live in 
any part of the Empire, if, in addition to their 
registered occupation, they conduct other busi- 
ness there. 
6. Warsaw authorities inform heads of private 
schools that in future they must endeavor to 
limit the number of Jewish scholars to thirty 
per cent. 

10. Date of cablegram to' the effect that the Jewish 
Territorial Organization, whiQ}i had been pre- 
viously legalized in Russia, has now been pro- 
hibited by the Government. 

12. Disastrous fire in Chelsea, Mass., destroys almost 
the entire Jewish settlement, rendering hun- 
dreds of Jewish families homeless. Destroys 
three synagogues. 

14. Public Seder held on Ellis Island, with the per- 
mission of the Immigration Authorities. 

28. David Lubin, of California, the American repre- 
sentative on the permanent Committee of Agri- 
culture of the International Institute of Agri- 
culture, at Rome, Italy, reinstated by Secretary 
Root. 

— . Upwards of sixty Jews and Jewesses appointed 
Officers of Public Instruction and of the Acad- 
emy, Paris, France. 

— . Rabbi Reines, of Lida, Russia, receives official 
permission to open a Rabbinical Institute. 

— . The Strauss Sabbath Bill (Feb. 14). defeated. 

— . Two new laws added to the Legal Rights of 
Jews residing outside the Pale: 1. The right 
given to a Jewish nterchant of the first guild 
to employ men that otherwise have no right 
to reside outside the Pale holds good only 
when the firm is conducted by himself person- 
ally and not through a manager. 2. A Jew 
permitted to reside outside of the Pale on 
account of his profession does not forfeit this 
right even if he is not actively engaged in 
his profession. 
May 1. Joseph Hal6vy, of Paris, France, elected a mem 

ber of the Imperial Academy of Sciences in 
St. Petersburg. 



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149 



1. Report that J. H. Amschewitz, graduate of the 
Royal Academy, wins the limited competition 
for the decoration of the Liverpool Town 
Hall, England. 

7. Joint Committee of Congress adopt a resolution 

accepting, on behalf of the Grovemment, a 
marble head of Abraham Lincoln, executed 
by Gutzon Borglum, and presented by Eugene 
Meyer, Jr., of New York. To be placed in the 
Capitol at Washington, D. C. 

8. Fiftieth anniversary of the founding of Temple 

Beth Israel, of Portland, Ore. 
8. Anti-Semitic demonstration in the Duma during 
the Executive Session. Immediate exclusion of 
Jews from the Army urged by Deputy Zamis- 
lovsky, and motion made by Deputy Krupensky 
to strike off Jewish recruits from the conscript 
list and to impose upon them a head tax. 

10. Fiftieth anniversary of Temple Beth Israel, of 
Portland, Ore. 
(middle.) The Duces-Aubert prize, consisting of fourteen 
hundred francs and a gold medal, awarded to 
Lieutenant-Colonel Bernard, by the Geograph- 
ical Society of France, 
(middle). Grade of Brigadier-Greneral conferred on Dr. J. 
Greiwer, a surgeon in the Sultan's court. 

19. Dr. Ferdinand Widal, member of the Academy 
of Medicine, of Paris, appointed member of 
the Superior Council of Hygiene of France. 
June 15. Report of Jewish Massacre at Dorbian, Russia. 

Eighty houses and two synagogues demolished 
28 injured and 3 killed. 

17. Selig Brodetsky, of London, England, awarded 
first honors in the mathematical tripos senior 
wranglership at Cambridge University. 

19. Republican National Convention adopts the fol- 
lowing plank in its platform : " We recommend 
the vigorous efforts made by the administra- 
tion to protect American citizens in foreign 
lands, and pledge ourselves to insist upon the 
just and equal protection of all our citizens 
abroad. It is the unquestioned duty of the 
Government to procure for all our citizens, 
without distinction, the rights of travel and 



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150 AMERICAN JEWISH YEAR BOOK 



sojourn in friendly countries, and we declare 
ourselves in favor of all proper efforts tending 
to that end." 

22. Cablegram stating that the participants in the 
Bialystok massacre of 1905, which resulted in 
the death of 73 Jews and 11 Christians, have 
been sentenced very lightly, one of the con- 
demned being sentenced to three years' penal 
servitude, thirteen, from six months' to a year's 
imprisonment, and fifteen were acquitted. Four 
were found guilty of actual participation in 
the killing of the Jews, the others being con- 
victed of pillage. 

27. Twenty-fifth anniversary of the Hebrew Union 
College, Cincinnati, Ohio, 
(end). Report that 75 Jewish artisans with their fam- 
ilies have been arbitrarily expelled from Wor- 
onesch, Russia, 
(end). Graccovno Levi-Cinita, Mayor of Padua, and Dr. 
Pio Foa, Professor at the University of Turin, 
appointed to the Senate by the King of Italy. 
July 9. Democratic National Convention adopts the fol- 

lowing plank in its platform: "We pledge 
ourselves to insist upon the just and lawful 
protection of our citizens at home and abroad, 
and to use all proper methods to secure for 
them, whether native-born or naturalized, and 
without distinction of race or creed, the equal 
protection of law and the enjoyment of all 
rights and privileges open to them under our 
treaty; and if, under existing treaties, the right 
of travel and sojourn is denied to American 
citizens, or recognition is withheld from Ameri- 
can passports by any countries on the ground 
of race or creed, we favor prompt negotiations 
with the Grovemments of such countries to 
secure the removal of these unjust discrimina- 
tions. We demand that all over the world a 
duly authorized passport issued by the Gov- 
ernment of the United States to an American 
citizen shall be proof of the fact that he is an 
American citizen and shall entitle him to the 
treatment due him as such." 

12. (Councillor Halpem, a member of the Russian 
Ministry, appointed Vice-Director of the second 
Department of the Ministry. 



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A LIST OP LEADING EVENTS 151 



13. Henri Aron, and Lieutenant-Colonel Bernard, of 

Paris, appointed Commanders of the Legion of 

Honor. 
23. Fiftieth Anniversary of the Political Emancipa- 
tion celebrated by the Jews of England. 
— . Reactionary press of Russia demands immediate 

dismissal of all converted Jews from Russian 

Government positions. 
— . Georges Berr, Leon Oulmont, of Carcassone, and 

Levy-Strauss, of Paris, France, appointed to 

the Legion of Honor. 
— . Justice Greenbaum of the New York Supreme 

Court, decides that a Rabbinical divorce 

granted in Russia is legal here. 
— . Councillor Cassell, Leopold Rosenow, and Dr. 

Gershel, re-elected from Berlin, Germany, to 

the Prussian parliament. 



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152 AMERICAN JEWISH TEAR BOOK 



SUNDAY LAWS OP THE UNITED STATES AND 

LEADING JUDICIAL DECISIONS HAVING 

SPECIAL REFERENCE TO THE JEWS 

By Albert M. Friedenbebg 
of the new york bar 

This summary is devoted to an examination of the Sunday 
laws now (1908) in force in the United States and of the 
leading reported decisions in which the courts of justice have 
sought to construe these statutes. 

Sunday Laws 

The Sunday laws in effect in the States of the United States 
were collected for the Massachusetts Labor Bidletin,' in 1905. 
They are here reproduced, the material having been brought 
down to date (1908). 

Alabama, — Any person who compels his child, apprentice, or 
servant to perform any labor on Sunday, except the customary 
domestic duties of daily necessity, or works of charity, etc., and 
any merchant or shopkeeper (except a druggist) who keeps open 
store on Sunday, is subject to a fine or a fine and imprisonment; 
these provisions do not apply to the running of railroads, stages 
or steamboats, or other vessels navigating the waters of this 
State, or any manufacturing establishment, which requires to be 
kept in constant operation. [Chap. 195, Sec 5542, Code of 1897.] 

^ All the Sunday statutes of the different States, of Canada and 
of European countries are collected in Labor Bulletin of the 
Commonwealth of Massachusetts, No. 36 (June, 1905), reprinted 
in Report [on] Observance of the Lord's Day, Boston, 1907, p. 41 
et seq. The reader is also referred to papers and notes by the 
present writer in Publications of the American Jewish Historical 
Society, Nos. 11, 12, and 13. 



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SUNDAY LAWS AND JUDICIAL DECISIONS 153 

/ Arkanscis. — Every person who shall on the Sabbath or Sunday 
be found laboring, or shall compel his apprentice or servant to 
labor or to perform other services than customary household 
duties of daily necessity, comfort, or charity, shall be fined. 

Every apprentice or servant compelled to labor on Sunday shall 
be deemed a separate offense of the master. 

The provisions of this act shall not apply to steamboats and 
other vessels navigating the waters of this State, nor to such 
manufacturing establishments as are required to be kept in con- 
tinual operation. 

No person who from a religious belief keeps any other day than 
the first day of the week as the Sabbath shall be required to 
observe the first day of the week usually called the Christian 
Sabbath, and shall not be liable to the penalties enacted against 
Sabbath-breaking, provided that no store or saloon shall be kept 
open or business carried on there on a Christian Sabbath, and 
provided, further, that no person so observing any other day shall 
disturb any religious congregation by his avocations or employ- 
ments. Every person who shall keep open any store or retail 
any goods, wares, and merchandise on Sunday, shall be subject 
to a fine. [Chap. 48, Sees. 2030 to 2042, Digest of 1904.] 

California. — Every employer who causes his employees or any 
of them to work more than six days in seven, except in the case 
of emergency, whether the employee is engaged by the day, week, 
month, or year, and whether the work performed is done in the 
day or night, is guilty of a misdemeanor. [Sec. 653e, Codes and 
Statutes 1885 and Chap. 158, Acts of 1901.] 

Colorado. — A penalty is imposed upon any person carrying on 
the business of barbering on Sunday in any city of the first or 
second class, whether incorporated by general law or special 
charter. [Chap. 73, Acts of 1893.] Places where liquors are sold 
shall be closed from 12 o'clock Saturday night until 6 o'clock 
Monday morning. [Chap. 36, Sec. 1346d, 1891-1905.] 

Connecticut. — Persons are forbidden under penalty of a fine to 
do any secular business or labor, except works of necessity or 
charity, or keep open any shop, warehouse, or any manufacturing 
or mercantile establishment, or expose any property for sale, or 
engage in any sport, between IZ o'clock Saturday night and 
12 o'clock Sunday night. [Chap. 89, Sec. 1369, General Statutes 
of 1902.] 

The statute exempting Seventh-Day Sabbatarians is discussed 
below. 

No railroad company shall run any trains on any road operated 
by it within this State between sunrise and sunset on Sunday, 
except from necessity or mercy, provided that trains may be run 
carrying the United States mail, and such other trains as may be 



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154 AMERICAN JEWISH YEAR BOOK 



authorized by the railroad commissioners on application as being 
required for public necessity or for the preservation of freight. 

No such company shall permit the handling, the loading or the 
unloading of freight on any road operated by it between sunrise 
and sunset on Sunday, except from necessity, provided that this 
provision is not applicable to the handling, the loading or the 
unloadinjg: of freight by transfer of said freight between steam- 
boats ajid cars until 8 o'clock in the forenoon, where it is found 
that t)ie same is required by public necessity. 

Violations of these provisions are subject to penalty. [Chap. 
215, Sees. 3749 to 3751, General Statutes of 1902.] 

No law affecting travel, business, or labor on Sunday, or the 
operation on Sunday of any railroad or railway, shall apply to any 
railroad company or street railway company so as to prohibit or 
limit the operation on Sunday of electric cars. [Chap. 217, Sec. 
3875, General Statutes of 1902.] 

Delaware. — A fine is imposed upon any person performing any 
worldly employment, labor, or business on the Sabbath (except- 
ing works of necessity and charity) . 

A fine is also imposed upon any carrier, peddler, or driver of any 
public stage or carriage, who shall travel or drive with his horse, 
pcuik, wagon, stage, or carriage upon the Sabbath, as well as 
upon any retailer of goods who exposes the same to sell on the 
Sabbath. It is provided that any justice of the peace may stop any 
such person so traveling upon the Sabbath, and detain him until 
the following day. [Chap. 131, Sec. 4, Revised Code of 1893.] 

Any person who carries on or engages in the business of shav- 
ing, hair cutting, or other work of a barber, or who opens or 
allows to be open his barber shop for the purpose of carrying on 
business on Sunday, shall be deemed guilty of misdemeanor, and 
shall be subject to a fine or imprisonment. [Chap. *264, Acts of 
1899.] 

District of Alaska. — Any person keeping open a store, shop, 
grocery, bowling alley, billiard room, or tippling house for the 
purpose of labor or trafllc, or any place of amusement on Sunday, 
shall be punished by a fine, provided that this provision does not 
apply to the keepers of drug stores, doctors, undertakers, livery 
stable keepers, barbers, butchers, and bakers; and all circum- 
stances of necessity and mercy may be pleaded in defense, the 
treatment of such subjects to be determined by the jury. [Chap. 
429, Title 1, Acts of U. S. Congress, 1898-1899.] 

District of Columhia. — A penalty is imposed upon any person 
performing work or doing any bodily labor on Sunday, and upon 
any person compelling or allowing servants to do any manner of 
work or labor on the Lord's Day (works of necessity and charity 
excepted). [Chap. 16, Sec. 107, Compiled Statutes.] 



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SUNDAY LAWS AND JUDICIAL DECISIONS 155 



Florida, — ^Whoever follows any pursuit, business, or trade on 
Sunday, either by manual labor or with animal or mechanical 
power, except it be work of necessity, shall be punished by a fine. 

Whoever keeps open store or disposes of any wares or merchan- 
dise on Sunday, or sells or barters the same, shall be punished 
by a fine. In cases of emergency or necessity, merchants and 
others may dispose of the necessaries of life to customers or 
others without keeping open doors. 

Whoever employs his apprentice or servant in labor or other 
business on Sunday, except it be ordinary household business of 
daily necessity or works of charity, shall be punished by a fine. 
[Part 5, Title 2, Sees. 2638 to 2640, Revised Statutes of 1891.] 

Nothing contained in the laws of Florida shall be construed so 
as to prohibit the preparation or printing between the hours of 
midnight Saturday and 6 in the morning Sunday of any newspaper 
intended to be circulated and sold on Sunday, or to prohibit the 
circulation and sale on Sunday of same, or to prohibit the circu- 
lation or sale on Sunday of any newspaper theretofore printed. 
[Chap. 5164, Acts of 1903.] 

Georgia. — If any freight train, excursion train, or any train 
other than the regular trains run for the carrying of mail or 
passengers, shall be run on any railroad on the Sabbath, the 
superintendent of transportation of such railroad company, or the 
oflftcer having in charge the business of that department of the 
railroad, shall be liable to indictment in each county through 
which such train passes, and shall be punished as for a mis- 
demeanor. The following are the exceptions to this provision: — 

A train which has one or more cars loaded with live stock, and 
which is delayed beyond schedule time; a freight train running 
over a road on Saturday night, if the time of its arrival at des- 
tination according to schedule be not later than 8 o'clock Sunday 
morning; special fruit, melon, and vegetable trains, the cars of 
which contain no other freight except perishable fruits, fish, 
oysters, fresh meats, etc., and which trains shall be loaded and 
leave the station from which they start in this State before 
midnight on the Saturday night previous to the Sunday on which 
they are operated; to trains on railroads where the line of 
said railroad begins and ends in another State, and does not run 
a distance greater than thirty miles through Georgia. 

Any person who shall pursue his business or work of ordinary 
calling on Sunday (works of necessity or charity excepted) shall 
be guilty of misdemeanor. [Penal Code, Dlv. 10, Sec. 420 and 
Sec. 422, Code of 1895.] 

Hawaii, — All labor on Sunday is forbidden (excepting works of 
necessity or charity), except that on Sunday until 9 o'clock in the 
morning barber shops may be kept open; and fresh meat and fresh 



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156 AMERICAN JEWISH YEAR BOOK 



fish sold and delivered; until 9 o'clock in the morning and after 3 
o'clock in the afternoon milk may be delivered, and cattle, sheep, 
and swine may be slaughtered; that during the entire day meals 
may be sold to be eaten on the premises; drugs, medicines and 
surgical appliances may be sold; personal baggage may be con- 
veyed to and from vessels leaving and arriving at port on that 
day; that railroads may carry passengers on Sunday to connect 
with steamers; and public carriages, horse cars, and licensed shore 
boats may convey rassemrers for hire; and that all labor which 
may be lawfully conducted on Sunday shall be conducted, so far as 
possible, so as not to interfere with the right of the community. 
Penalty is provided for violation of this provision. 

Sunday, within the meaning of the provisions of this act, is the 
first day of the week, and includes the time between the midnight 
preceding and the midnight following the same day. [Chap. 35, 
Sec. 317 to Sec. 321, Penal Laws of 1897.1 

Despite the Governor's veto, the Hawaiian Legislature of 1905 
passed a bill allowing sports on Sunday, and permitting cigar 
and other stores to keep open on that day. 

Illinois. — A penalty is imposed upon any person disturbing the 
peace and good order of society by labor on Sunday (works of 
necessity and charity excepted ) . Exceptions are made in the cases 
of watermen and railroads landing passengers, or watermen load- 
ing or unloading cargoes, or ferrymen carrying over water travel- 
ers, or to persons who, according to their rights of conscience, 
think proper to keep any other day as the Sabbath. 

It shall be unlawful for any person to keep open any barber 
shop, or carry on the business of shaving, hair cutting, or tonsorial 
work on Sunday. [Ch. 38, Sees. 259 to 262, Revised Statutes of 
1906.1 

*. Indiana. — Whoever, being over fourteen years of age, engages 
in common labor or at his usual avocation on Sunday (works of 
charity and necessity excepted), shall be subject to a fine; but this 
restriction shall not be construed to affect such as conscientiously 
observe the seventh day of the week as the Sabbath, travelers, 
families removing, keepers of toll bridges and toll gates, and 
ferrymen acting ajs such. [Chap. 5, Sec. 2086, Annotated Statutes 
of 1894, Revision of 1901.] 

Iowa. — A fine is imposed upon any person found engaged in 
buying or selling property of any kind, or in any labor on Sunday, 
except that of necessity or charity; this provision shall not extend 
to those who conscientiously observe the seventh day of the week 
as the Sabbath, or to prevent persons traveling or families emi- 
grating from pursuing their journey, or keepers of toll gates, toll 
bridges, and ferrymen from attending the same. [Sec. 5040, Code 
of 1897 and Supplement of 1902.] 



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SUNDAY LAWS AND JUDICIAL DECISIONS 157 



/ 



Kansas. — ^Every person who shall either labor himself, or compel 
his apprentice, servant, or any other person under his charge or 
control to labor or perform any work other than the household 
offices of daily necessity, or other works of necessity or charity, 
on Sunday, shall be subject to a penalty therefor. This provision 
does not apply to any member of a religious society who observes 
as the Sabbath any other day than the first day of the week, nor 
to prohibit ferrymen from crossing passengers on any day in the 
week. [Chap. 31, Sees. 2341 to 2345, General Statutes of 1905.] 
,/ Kentucky. — ^No work shall be done on Sunday except ordinary 
household duties or other work of necessity or charity, or work 
required in the maintenance or operation of a ferry, steamboat, or 
steam or street railroads. If any person on Sunday shall himself 
be found at his own or any other trade, or shall employ his 
apprentices or other persons in labor or other business, whether 
it be for profit or amusement (unless as stated above), shall be 
subject to a fine for each offense. Persons who are members of a 
religious society, and who observe as a Sabbath any other day 
in the week than Sunday, if they observe as a Sabbath one day 
in each week, shall not be liable to penalty. 

Any person who engages in the business of barbering on Sunday 
shall be deemed guilty of a misdemeanor, and upon conviction 
shall be fined or imprisoned, or both. [Chap. 36, Sees. 1321, 1322, 
and 1323, Statutes of 1903.] 

Louisiana. — All places of public business, stores, shops, saloons, 
etc., are required to be closed at 12 o'clock on Saturday night and 
to remain closed continuously for twenty-four hours, during which 
time it shall be unlawful for the proprietors thereof to sell, trade 
or exchange any article of merchandise kept in any such estab- 
lishment. 

Penalty shall be imposed upon the violation of these provisions; 
exemption is made in the cases of newsdealers, keepers of soda 
fountains, places of resort for recreation and health, watering 
places, and public parks, and the sale of ice. 

The provisions of this act shall not apply to newspaper offices, 
printing offices, book stores, drug stores, apothecary shops, under- 
takers' shops, dairies, livery stables, railroads, whether steam or 
horse, hotels, boarding houses, steamboats and other vessels, ware- 
houses for receiving and forwarding freights, restaurants, tele- 
graph offices and theatres, or any place of amusement, provided no 
intoxicating liquors are sold in the premises; stores may be open 
for the purpose of selling anything necessary in sickness and for 
burial purposes. [Revised Laws of 1897.] 

.' Maine. — Any person keeping open his shop, warehouse, or place 
of business, or any one who travels, or does any work, labor, or 

11 



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158 AMERICAN JEWISH YEAR BOOK 



business on Sunday, except works of necessity or charity, shall be 
^ punished by fine. 

No person i^onscientiously believing that the seventh day of the 
week ought to be observed as the Sabbath, and who actually 
refrains from labor on that day, is liable to said penalties for 
doing such business or labor on the first day of the week as does 
'not disturb other persons. [Chap. 125, Sees. 25 and 28, Revised 
Statutes of 1903.] 

Maryland, — ^Whosoever does any bodily labor on Sunday, and 
any person who compels or allows children or servants to labor 
on Sunday (works of necessity or charity eKcepted) are pun- 
ishable by fine. 

It is unlawful that barbering should be done on Sunday, or that 
any barber shop should be open. [Art. 27, Sees. 365 and 367, 
Public General Laws, Code of 1903.] 
. y Massachusetts, — ^Whoever on the Lord's day keeps open his 
shop, warehouse, or workhouse, or does any manner of labor, 
business or work, except works of necessity or charity, or takes 
part in any sport, game, play, or public diversion, except a concert 
of sacred music or an entertainment, shall be punished by a fine 
of not less than $50 nor more than $500 for each offense. 

These provisions shall not be held to prohibit the manufacture 
and distribution of steam, gas, or electricity for illuminating pur- 
poses, heat, or motive power, nor the distribution of water for fire 
or domestic purposes, nor the use of the telephone or telegraph, 
nor the retail sale of drugs and medicines, nor articles ordered by 
the prescription of a physician, or mechanical appliances used by 
physicians or surgeons, nor the retail sale of tobacco in any of its 
forms by licensed innholders, common victuallers, druggists, and 
newsdealers whose stores are open for the sale of newspapers 
every day In the week, nor the letting of horses and carriages or 
of yachts and boats, nor the running of steam ferryboats on 
established routes, nor the running of street railway cars, nor 
the preparation, printing and publication of newspapers, nor the 
sale and delivery of newspapers, nor the wholesale or retail sale 
and delivery of milk, nor the transportation of milk, nor the 
making of butter and cheese, nor the keeping open of public 
bath houses, nor the making or selling by bakers or their 
employees before 10 o'clock in the morning and between the hours 
of 4 o'clock and 6.30 o'clock in the evening of bread or other 
food usually dealt in by them; nor the carrying on of the busi- 
ness of bootblacks before 11 o'clock in the forenoon. [Chap. 414, 
Acts of 1902, allows the sale of ice cream, soda, etc., by licensed 
innholders.] 

Whoever conscientiously bejieves that the seventh day of the 
week ought to be observed as the Sabbath, and actually refrains 



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SUNDAY LAWS AND JUDICIAL DECISIONS 159 



from secular business and labor on that day, shall not be subject 
to the penalty prescribed if he disturbs no other person. 

The Board of Railroad Commissioners may authorize the run- 
ning on the Lord's Day of such steamboat lines and such trains 
upon any railroad as, in the opinion of the Board, the public 
necessity and convenience require, having regard to the due 
observance of the day. 

The Board of Railroad Commissioners may, if in their opinion 
the public interest, convenience, health or welfare so requires, 
authorize the running of steamboats on the Lord's Day for the 
entire year or any part thereof, upon such conditions as they 
deem Judicious to prevent disorderly conduct or the disturbance 
of public worship; and may at any time revoke such authority. 

The Lord's Day shall include the time from midnight to mid- 
night. These provisions shall not constitute a defense to an action 
for a tort or injury suffered by a person on the Lord's Day. [Chap. 
98, Sees. 2, 3, 4, 14, 15, 16, and 17, Revised Laws with amendments 
of 1902 and 1904.] No intoxicating liquor sold on Sunday except 
by licensed innholders to guests between 6 a. m. and 11 p. m. 
[Chap. 100, Sec. 17, Revised Laws.] 

/ Michigan. — A fine is Imposed upon every person keeping open 
his shop, warehouse, or workhouse, or doing any manner of labor, 
business or work (except works of necessity and charity), on the 
first day of the week. A penalty for the performance of secular 
business or labor on Sunday shall not apply to any person who 
conscientiously believes that the seventh day of the week ought 
to be observed as the Sabbath, and who actually refrains from 
secular business and labor on that day, provided that he disturb 
no other person. 

The avocation of barbering is prohibited on Sunday, except 
when the exercise of such a calling is necessary in relation to 
a deceased person on said day. 

It is unlawful for any person or persons to keep open their 
places of business on Sunday, except those persons who observe 
the seventh day of the week as the Sabbath. [Chap. 154, Sees. 
5912, 5918, 5920, 5921, 5922, Compiled Laws of 1897.] 

Minnesota. — The first day of the week being by general consent 
"set apart for rest and religious uses, the law prohibits the doing 
on that day of certain acts which are serious interruptions of the 
repose and religious liberty of the community. 

The first day of the week includes all the time from midnight to 
midnight. 

All labor on Sunday is prohibited, excepting works of necessity 
or charity, which include whatever is needful to be done 
during the day for good order, health, or comfort of the com- 



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160 AMERICAN JEWISH YEAR BOOK 



munity. Keeping open a barber shop on Sunday for business 
purposes is strictly prohibited. 

It is a sufficient defense to a prosecution for servile labor on the 
first day of the week that the defendant uniformly keeps another 
day of the week as holy time, and does not labor on that day; and 
that the labor complained of was done in such manner as not to 
Interrupt nor disturb other persons observing the first day of the 
week as holy time. 

All trades, manufactures, mechanical employments upon Sunday 
are prohibited, except in cases of necessity, when they can be 
conducted so as not to interfere with the religious liberty of the 
community. 

The violation of these provisions is punishable by a fine or 
imprisonment. [Revised Laws of 1905, Sees. 4980 to 4986.] 

Mississippi. — If any person on Sunday shall himself labor at his 
own or any other trade, calling, or business, or shall employ his 
apprentice or servant in labor, except it be in the ordinary house> 
hold duties of daily necessity or works of necessity or charity, he 
shall be subject to a fine, provided that this provision does not 
apply to labor on railroads or steamboats. 

A merchant, shopkeeper, or other person shall not keep open 
store or dispose of any wares on Sunday; a violation of this pro- 
vision is punishable by fine, but this provision has no application 
to apothecaries or druggists who open stores for the sale of 
medicines. [Chap. 29, Sees. 1291 and 1292, Revised Code of 
1892.] 

t Missouri. — Every person who shall either labor himself or 
compel or permit his apprentice or servant, or any other person in 
his charge or control, to perform any other work than household 
offices of daily necessity, or works of necessity or charity, on 
Sunday, shall be punishable by a fine. 

This provision shall not apply to any person who is a member 
of a religious society by whom any other than the first day of 
the week is observed as the Sabbath, so that he observes such 
Sabbath, nor to prohibit any ferryman from crossing passengers 
on Sunday. 

To carry on the business of barbering on Sunday is strictly 
prohibited. [Chap. 15, Sees. 2240, 2241, and 2245, Revised Statutes 
of 1899.] 

No employee shall be permitted or required to work in a biscuit, 
bread, or common bakery, or confectionery establishment more 
than six days in any one week, said work to commence at a stated 
time, "post meridian," on Sunday, and to terminate not later 
than the corresponding time on Saturday of the same week, 
exception being made of the time on Sunday for setting the 



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SUNDAY LAWS AND JUDICIAL DECISIONS 161 



sponges for the night's work following. [Chap. 161, Sec. 10088, 
Revised Statutes of 1899.] 

Montana. — Persons opening barber shops on Sunday, for the 
purpose of conducting the business of hair cutting, shaving, or 
shampooing, are punishable by fine. [Penal Code, Sees. 531 and 
532, Codes and Statutes of 1895.] 

Nebraska. — A fine is imposed upon any person of fourteen years 
of age or over engaged in common labor on Sunday (works of 
charity and necessity excepted); but this does not apply to 
persons who conscientiously observe the seventh day of the week, 
nor to prevent families emigrating from traveling, watermen from 
landing their passengers, or superintendents or keepers of toll 
bridges or toll gates from attending and superintending the same, 
or to ferrymen for conveying' travelers over the water, or to 
persons moving their families on such days; railroad companies 
are not prevented under this act from running necessary trains. 
[Criminal Code, 1907, Chap. 23, Sec. 7915, Compiled Statutes.] 

New Hampshire. — No person shall do any work, business or 
labor of his secular calling to the disturbance of others on the 
Lord's Day, except works of necessity or charity, and the making 
of necessary repairs upon mills and factories which could not be 
made otherwise without loss to operatives. 

No person shall keep open his shop, warehouse, cellar, restau- 
rant, or workshop for the reception of company, or shall sell or 
expose for sale any merchandise on the Lord's Day; but this 
does not prevent the entertainment of boarders, nor the selling 
of milk, bread, and other necessaries of life, nor drugs and 
medicines. 

Penalty is prescribed for the violation of these provisions. 

No violation of any provision stated shall be sustained unless 
begun within thirty days after commission of the offense. [Chap. 
271, Sees. 3, 5, 10, and 13, Public Statutes of 1891.] 
v.. New Jersey. — Every person of the age of fourteen years or over 
doing traveling, worldly employment, or business, ordinary or 
servile labor or work either upon land or water, on Sunday (works 
of necessity and charity excepted), shall be punishable by a fine; 
except that it is lawful for any railroad company to run one 
passenger train each way over their roads on Sunday for the 
accommodation of citizens. 

The driver or proprietor running any stage through any part of 
this State on Sunday, except suflOicient reason be given to show 
that the case was one of necessity or mercy, or that the United 
States mail was being carried to or from any post-office, shall be 
punishable by a fine. 

No goods, merchandise, or cattle shall be carried through this 
State or offered for sale, or any business transacted therewith on 
Sunday. 



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162 AMERICAN JEWISH YEAR BOOK 



No transportation of freight except milk. The tran^ortation 
of United States mail by railroad of public hire and the regular 
trips of ferryboats are allowable. 

Every inhabitant of this State who religiously observes the 
seventh day of the week as the Sabbath shall be exempt from 
observing Sunday, provided that the work or labor performed 
on Sunday be done in his or her dwelling house or workshop, 
and that it does not disturb other persons in their observance of 
the first day of the week as the Sabbath; and provided, further, 
that persons observing the seventh day shall not be allowed to 
openly expose to sale any goods, wares, or merchandise. 

It is lawful for any person or corporation to print, publish, and 
sell newspapers, to sell and deliver milk, or to walk, ride, or drive 
for recreation, and to hire horses and carriages or other convey- 
ances for riding or driving, on Sunday. [General Statutes of 
1895.] 

New Mexico. — Any person found engaged in any labor on Sun- 
day, except works of necessity, charity, or mercy, shall be pun- 
ished by a fine or imprisonment. It shall be lawful in cases 
of necessity for farmers and gardeners to irrigate their lands, 
and for cooks, waiters, and other employees of hotels and restau- 
rants and of butchers and bakers to perform their regular duties 
on said day. 

Sunday is defined as the time between sunrise and midnight of 
said day. [Title 9, Sees. 1368, 1370, 1372, Compiled Laws of 
1897.] 

V New York. — ^All labor on Sunday is prohibited, except works of 
necessity or charity. 

Those persons keeping another day of the week as holy time 
other than the first day of the week are exempt from provisions 
of this law, provided they do not interrupt or disturb other 
persons in the observance of Sunday. [Penal Code, Sees. 259 to 
277.] 

All trades, manufactures, agricultural, or mechanical employ- 
ments upon Sunday are prohibited, except when absolutely neces- 
sary, when they must be conducted In such a manner as to not 
interfere with the religious liberty of the community. 

Public selling or offering for sale of any property on Sunday 
is prohibited, except that articles of food may be sold before 10 
o'clock in the morning, and that meals may be eaten on the 
premises, and that tobacco, milk, ice, and soda water in places 
other than where spirituous or malt liquors are kept, and fruit, 
fiowers, confectionery, newspapers, drugs, medicines, and surgical 
appliances may be sold at any time on Sunday. The provisions 
shall not be construed to allow or permit the public sale or de- 



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SUNDAY LAWS AND JUDICIAL DECISIONS 163 



livery of uncooked flesh, or meats, fresh or salt, at any hours of 
the day. [Laws of 1901, Chap. 392.] 

No person may engage in the business of barbering on Sunday 
except in the city of New York, in the village of Saratoga Springs, 
where barber shops or other places where a barber is engaged in 
shaving and like work may be kept open and the work of a barber 
carried on until 1 o'clock of the afternoon. Any violation of the 
above restrictions is punishable by a fine. 

' North Carolina, — No tradesman, laborer, or other person, four- 
teen years of age or over, shall perform any labor on Sunday 
(except works of charity and necessity). [Chap. 61, Sec. 3782, 
Code of 1883.] 

No railroad company shall permit the loading or unloading of 
any freight car on Sunday, nor shall permit any train of cars or 
locomotive to be run on Sunday, except for the purpose of trans- 
porting the United States mail and passengers with luggage, and 
ordinary express freight in an express car exclusively and except 
trains run for the purpose of transporting fruit, live stock and 
perishable freights, providing that Sunday shall be construed to 
mean that portion of the day between sunrise and sunset; trains 
in transit having started on Saturday may, in order to reach the 
terminus or shops, run until 9 o'clock a. m. on Sunday, but not 
later, nor for any other purpose than to reach the terminus or 
shops. Penalty attached for violation of the law. [Chap. 49, 
Sec. 1973 (amended by Chap. 92, Acts of 1885, and Chap. 126, Acts 
of 1897). Code of 1883.] 

V North Dakota. — The acts prohibited on Sunday are servile labor, 
public sports, trade, manufactures, mechanical employments, pub- 
lic traflSc, and serving process. In servile labor only works of 
necessity or charity are excepted. Any person keeping holy 
another day of the week rather than the first day is exempt from 
the provisions of this act. 

Public selling or exposing for sale any commodities on Sunday 
is prohibited, except that meats, milk, and fish may be sold before 
9 o'clock in the morning, that food may be sold to be eaten on 
the premises where sold, and that drugs and medicines and 
surgical appliances may be sold at any time during the day. 

Penalty attached to violation of the statute. [Penal Code, Chap. 
4, Sees. 6840-6847, Revised Codes of 1899.] 

The business of barbering on Sunday is strictly forbidden, 
exception being made in preparing the dead for burial. [Chap. 
30, Sec. 9, Acts of 1901.] 

\JOhio. — A fine is imposed upon any person fourteen years of 
age or over who opens any place of business on Sunday, or engages 
in labor, or allows any one under his control to engage in labor, 
on Sunday, except that the labor be works of necessity or charity. 



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164 AMERICAN JEWISH YEAR BOOK 



This restriction does not apply to persons who observe the seventh 
day of the week as the Sabbath, nor does it prevent families 
emigrating from traveling, or watermen from landing their 
passengers, or keepers of toll bridges, toll gates, or ferries from 
attending the same on Sundays. [Part IV, Sec. 7033, Annotated 
Statutes of 1905.] 

Oklahoma. — The acts forbidden to be done on Sunday are servile 
labor, public sports, trades, manufactures, and mechanical employ- 
ments, and public traffic; also serving process, unless authorized 
by law so to do. 

Servile labor excepts works of charity or necessity. 

Any person uniformly keeping another day of the week as holy 
time does not come under the provisions applicable to Sunday. 
Violation of the act is punishable by fine. [Chap. 25, Sees. 1960 
to 1972, Statutes of 1903.] 

Oregon. — Any person keeping open a store, shop, grocery, bowl- 
ing alley, billiard room, or tippling house for the purpose of labor 
or traffic, or any place of amusement on Sunday, is liable to fine. 
This provision does not apply to theatres, to keepers of drug 
stores, doctor shops, undertakers, livery stable keepers, butchers, 
and bakers, nor to any circumstances of necessity or mercy. 
Barbering forbidden on Sunday. [Title 19, Sees. 1968, 2097, 2098, 
Annotated Codes.] 

Pennsylvania. — A fine is imposed upon any person performing 
any worldly employment or business on Sunday, works of charity 
or necessity excepted. This provision does not prohibit the ordi- 
nary work to be performed in private families, hotels, etc., nor 
does it apply to watermen, ferrymen, persons removing with their 
families, nor does it apply to the delivery of milk or the neces- 
saries of life before 9 o'clock in the morning nor after 5 o'clock 
in the afternoon. [Sec. 3, Digest of 1895.] 

No employee shall be required or permitted to work in a bakery 
or confectionery establishment more than six days in any one 
week, said week to commence on Sunday not before 6 o'clock post 
meridian, and to terminate at the corresponding time on Saturday 
of the same week. [Digest of 1893-1903.] 

Porto Rico. — Commercial and industrial establishments, except- 
ing public markets, bakeries, hotels, restaurants, caf6s, and places 
where refreshments only are served, also public utilities and 
works of emergency, shall remain closed, and do no business after 
12 o'clock on Sunday. This prohibition does not extend to thea- 
tres or other places devoted exclusively to amusement or to 
charitable purposes. 

The municipal council of any city may by ordinance require 
commercial and industrial establishments to remain closed at all 
hours on Sunday, except works of emergency. 



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SUNDAY LAWS AND JUDICIAL DECISIONS 165 

Violation of the law is punishable by fine. [Sees. 553-556, Penal 
Code.] 

u Rhode Island. — Every person performing any business or work 
of his ordinary calling on Sunday, or allowing any person under 
his control to do such work, except works of necessity and charity, 
shall be fined. Any person belonging to any church or society 
observing the seventh day of the week as the Sabbath shall be 
exempt from the provisions of this law; but this exemption does 
not give him the privilege of opening shops or stores on Sunday 
for the purpose of trade or merchandise. [Chap. 281, Sees. 17-20, 
General Laws of 1896.r 

8outh Carolina. — ^No person fifteen years of age or over shall 
perform any worldly labor, except works of charity or necessity, 
on Sunday. No person shall expose or sell any goods or mer- 
chandise on said day. No person shall direct any other person 
under his control to work in any machine shop or shops on Sun- 
day, except in cases of emergency. Violation of the law is 
punishable by fine. [Chap. 24, Sees. 500, 501, 503, Code of 1902]. 

Sunday labor on railroads is prohibited to a certain extent. 
Trains laden with perishable fruit, and mail trains, and such 
passenger or freight trains as can reach their destination by 
6 o'clock in the forenoon, are allowed to be operated. Trains are 
also authorized to be run for the transportation of passengers to 
and from religious services. A fine is imposed for violation of 
the act. [Chap. 50, Sees. 2121-2124, Code of 1902.] 
{/ South Dakota. — Sunday includes all time from midnight to mid- 
night. Servile labor on Sunday is prohibited, except works of 
necessity or charity. When another day of the week is uniformly 
kept holy, and persons do not labor upon that day, they shall not 
be obliged to keep holy the first day of the week. All trades, man- 
ufactures, and mechanical employments are prohibited. Penalty is 
imposed for violation of the act. [Penal Code, Sees. 41-49, Revised 
Codes of 1903.] 

Tennessee. — Any person performing the common avocations of 
life, or permitting any one under his control to perform such 
duties, on Sunday, except works of necessity or charity, shall be 
punished by fine. [Sec. 3029, Code of 1896.] 

The business of harboring on Sunday is strictly forbidden, and 
is punishable by fine. [Sec. 3030, Code of 1896 (Chap. 114, Acts 
of 1891).] ' • 

\y Texas. — A fine is imposed upon any person laboring or compel- 
ling others to labor on Sunday. The following are exemptions of 
the act: household duties, works of necessity or charity, works on 
farms or plantations to prevent loss of crops, running of steam- 
boats, rail cars, wagon trains, common carriers, the delivery of 
goods by them, receiving of said goods by parties to whom de- 



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166 AMERICAN JEWISH YEAR BOOK 

livered, those who carry the United States mail and passengers, 
foundries, sugar mills, herders, persons traveling, ferrymen or 
toll keepers, keepers of hotels, boarding houses, restaurants, keep- 
ers of livery stables and their employees, and people who con- 
scientiously believe that the seventh day is the Sabbath, and 
observe such day. 

Trafficking on Sunday is forbidden, except in the case of 
markets or dealers in provisions before 9 o'clock in the morning, 
the sale of burial materials, newspapers, ice, ice cream, milk, or 
the sending of telegraph and telephone messages at any hour of 
the da/, or keepers of drug stores, hotels, boarding houses, res- 
taurants, livery stables, and bath houses. [Penal Code, Title 7, 
Revised Statutes of 1895.] 

Utah. — Any person keeping open any workshop, store, bar, 
saloon, or other place of business, for the purpose of transacting 
business on Sunday, is punishable by fine. The following exemp- 
tions are made: those conducting hotels, boarding houses, baths, 
restaurants, taverns, livery stables, retail drug stores, or such 
manufacturing establishments as are kept in continuous opera- 
tion; also irrigation works. [Title 75, Revised Statutes of 1898.] 

Vermont. — A fine is imposed upon any person performing any 
business or employment between 12 o'clock Saturday night and 12 
o'clock Sunday night. 

The railroad commissioners may authorize the running of such 
trains as are deemed absolutely necessary. [Chap. 225, Sees. 5140 
and 5141, Statutes of 1894.] 

\. Virginia. — Any person laboring or allowing others to labor on 
Sunday, except in household work or works of necessity or 
charity, shall be punishable by fine. This does not apply to those 
persons who observe the seventh day of the week as Sunday. No 
railroad company shall allow cars to be loaded or unloaded or 
transported on Sunday, except such cars as are used for the 
relief of wrecked trains, for the transportation of the United 
States mail, for transporting of passengers and their baggage, 
the transportation of live stock or of perishable articles. The 
word g^day in this section embraces that portion of the time 
betweeh sunrise and sunset. [Chap. 185, Sees. 3799-3804, Code of 
1907.] Certain restrictions as to navigation of steamboats on 
Sunday. [Chap. 49, Acts of 1889-90.] 

Washington. — Persons are forbidden to open their stores or es- 
tablishments on Sunday for the purpose of trade or sale of goods. 
This provision shall apply to hotels only so far as the sale of in- 
toxicating liquors is concerned, and shall not apply to drug 
stores, livery stables, or undertakers. Penalty imposed. [Title 39, 
Sec. 7251, Codes and Statutes of 1897.] 



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SUNDAY LAWS AND JUDICIAL DECISIONS 167 

Barbering on Sunday is strictly forbidden, and is punishable by 
fine. [Chap. 55, Acts of 1903.] 

lowest Virginia. — A fine is imposed upon any person laboring at 
any trade or calling, or allowing others to so labor, on Sunday. 
Household duties and the works of necessity or charity excepted. 

This provision does not apply to the running of railroad trains 
or steamboats on Sunday, nor to such persons as conscientiously 
believe the seventh day of the week ought to be observed as the 
Sabbath, provided that such persons refrain from secular busi- 
ness and labor on that day. [Sees. 4367 and 4368, Code of 1906.] 
,^ Wisconsin, — Sunday includes the time between the midnight 
preceding and the midnight following that day. Any person 
keeping open his store or workhouse or doing any manner of labor 
or business on Sunday, except works of necessity and charity, is 
punishable by fine. This does not apply to persons who con- 
scientiously believe the seventh day of the week to be the 
Sabbath, and refrain from secular work on said day. [Chap. 186, 
Sees. 4595 and 4596, Annotated Statutes.] 

Wyoming. — Any person, company, or corporation keeping open 
a barber shop, store, or other place of business, for the transaction 
of business on Sunday, shall be punishable by fine. This restric- 
tion does not apply to newspaper printing offices, railroads, tele- 
graph companies, hotels, restaurants, drug stores, livery stables, 
news depots, farmers, cattlemen and ranchmen, mechanics, furn- 
aces, or smelters, glass works, electric light plants and gas works, 
venders of ice, milk, fresh meat and bread, except as to the sale 
of liquors and cigars. [Title 20, Sec. 2644, Revised Laws of 1899.] 

United States. — No malt, grain, or other material shall be 
mashed, nor any mash, wort, or beer brewed or made, nor any still 
used by a distiller, at any time between the hour of 11 in the 
afternoon of any Saturday and the hour of 1 in the forenoon of 
the next succeeding Monday; and any person who shall violate the 
provisions of this section shall be liable to a penalty of one 
thousand dollars. 

From the foregoing resume of the Sntfdc^'4ft#a«H*^¥ifebft»-«- 
observed thatflMlftal or servile labor, sometimes referred to as 
" Worldly employmjent/^ with the exception of worlds of charity 
or necessity, is forbidden on Sunday in Alabama, Arkansas, 
California, Connecticut, Delaware, Florida, Georgia, Illinois, 
Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Kentucky, Maine, Maryland, Massa- 
chusetts, Michigan, Minnesota, Mississippi, Missouri, ]^e- 
braska, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New York, North Caro- 



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168 AMERICAN JEWISH YEAR BOOK 

lina, North Dakota, Ohio, Oklahoma, Oregon, Pennsylvania, 
South Carolina, South Dakota, Tennessee, Texas, Virginia, 
West Virginia, and Wisconsin (36) ; Alaska, Hawaii, and New 
Mexico (3) ; and the District of Columbia. 

Public sports and amusements are expressly prohibited on 
Sunday in Connecticut, Kentucky, Massachusetts, North Da- 
kota, Oklahoma, Oregon (6) ; and Alaska. 

Two states — North Dakota and Oklahoma — do not allow the 
services of process on Sunday. In New York, State writs may 
be served on Sunday (Code of Civil Procedure, § 2015). 

Public traffic, unless of an emergent nature or in relation 
to the United States mails, is forbidden on Sunday in Con- 
necticut, Delaware, Georgia, Illinois, Maine, New Jersey, 
North Carolina, North Dakota, Oklahoma, South Carolina, 
and Virginia (11) ; and Porto Eico. 

The carrying on of Sunday trade and business, in one form 
or another or generally, save in medicinal and sumptuary ar- 
ticles, is prohibited in Alabama, Arkansas, Colorado, Connecti- 
cut, Delaware, Florida, Georgia, Illinois, Iowa, Kentucky, 
Louisiana, Maine, Maryland, Massachusetts, Michigan, Minne- 
sota, Mississippi, Missouri, Montana, New Hampshire, New 
Jersey, New York, North Dakota, Ohio, Oklahoma, Oregon, 
Pennsylvania, Khode Island, South Carolina, South Dakota, 
Tennessee, Texas, Utah, Vermont, Washington, Wisconsin, 
and Wyoming (37) ; Alaska, Porto Eico (2) ; and the District 
of Columbia. 

Manufactures and mechanical employments are generally 
interdicted on Sunday in Connecticut^ Florida, Minnesota,. 
Missouri, New York, North Dakota, Oklahoma, Pennsylvania, 
South Carolina, South Dakota (10) ; Porto Eico, and under 
the Federal law. 



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SUNDAY LAWS AND JUDICIAL DECISIONS 169 

Of the statutes exempting Seventh-Day Sabbatarians from 
the operation of Sunday laws those in force in Arkansas, Illi- 
nois, Kansas, Minnesota, Missouri, Nebraska, New Jersey, 
New York, South Dakota, Texas, and Virginia (11) permit 
only manual or servile labor ; while those in force in Connecti- 
cut, Indiana, Iowa, Kentucky, Maine, Massachusetts, Michi- 
gan, North Dakota, Ohio, Oklahoma, Khode Island, West 
Virginia, and Wisconsin (13) affect both manual or servile 
labor and trade or business. 

As has been seen, the following twenty-four states have in- 
corporated in their statutes clauses of exemption of Seventh- 
Day Sabbatarians from the provisions of their Sunday laws : 
Arkansas, Connecticut, Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Ken- 
tucky, Maine, Massachusetts, Michigan, Minnesota, Missouri, 
Nebraska, New Jersey, New York, North Dakota, Ohio, 
Oklahoma, Ehode Island, South Dakota, Texas, Virginia, 
West Virginia, and Wisconsin. 

It may be premised that Sunday laws have been sustained 
by courts of law mainly upon the ground that they are police 
regulations, enacted to promote the common welfare. 

A typical exemption law, so far as manual labor is con- 
cerned, is the statute (1860) now in force in the State of New 
York. 

Its design is stated to be to protect " persons observing an- 
other day as a Sabbath," and it reads as follows: "It is a 
sufficient defense to a prosecution for work or labor on the 
first day of the week, that the defendant uniformly keeps 
another day of the week as holy time, and does not labor on 
that day, and that the labor complained of was done in such 
manner as not to interrupt or disturb other persons in ob- 
serving the first day of the week as holy time.'^ * 

' Penal Code, §264. 

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170 AMERICAN JEWISH YEAR BOOK 

In Illinois the exemption law (1889) takes the following 

form : 

Whoever disturbs the peace and good order of society by labor 
(works of necessity and charity excepted), or by any amusement 
or diversion on Sunday, shall be fined not exceeding twenty-five 
dollars. This section shall not be construed .... to prevent the 
due exercise of the rights of conscience by whomever thinks 
proper to keep any other day as a Sabbath.* 

The statute of exemption in force in Khode Island (1882) 

reads as follows: 

ESvery professor of the Sabbatarian faith or of the Jewish 
religion, and such others as shall be owned or acknowledged by 
any church or society of said respective professions as members of 
or as belonging to such church or society, shall be permitted to 
labor in their respective professions or vocations on the first day 
of the week, but the exception in this section contained shall not 
confer the liberty of opening shops or stores on the said day for 
the purpose of trade and merchandise, or lading, unlading, or of 
fitting out of vessels, or of working at the smith's business, or 
any other mechanical trade in any compact place, except the 
compact villages in Westerly and Hopkinton [Seventh-Day Baptist 
settlements], or of drawing seines, or fishing, or fowling in any 
manner in public places, and out of their own possessions; and in 
case any dispute shall arise respecting the person entitled to the 
benefit of this section, a certificate from a regular pastor or priest 
of any of the aforesaid churches or societies, or from any three of 
the standing members of such church or society, declaring the 
person claiming the exemption aforesaid to be a member of or 
owned by or belonging to such church or society, shall be received 
as conclusive evidence of the fact.* 

The Arkansas clause of exemption (1887) would appear to 
permit trade other than shop-keeping on Sunday by Seventh- 
Day Sabbatarians. It reads thus : 

That no person who from religious belief keeps any other day 
than the first day of the week as the Sabbath shall be required to 
observe the first day of the week, usually called the Christian 
Sabbath, and shall not be liable to the penalties enacted against 
Sabbath-breaking; Provided, that no store or saloon shall be kept 

• Revised Statutes of 1906, ch. 38, §261. 

* General Laws of 1896, ch. 281, §20. 



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SUNDAY LAWS AND JUDICIAL DECISIONS 171 

open or business carried on therein on the Christian Sabbath; 
And provided further, that no person so observing any other day 
shall disturb any religious congregation by his avocations or 
employments.* 

The Connecticut statute of exemption (1907), referred to 
more particularly below, permits both trade and labor to be 
carried on and performed by Seventh-Day Sabbatarians on 
Sunday. 

There is no Federal Sunday law, although the distillation of 
spirituous liquors on the first day of the week is prohibited. 
California has had no Sunday law on the statute-book since 
1883, unless the recent act (1901) to prohibit labor by any 
employee on more than six days out of every seven " may be so 
construed. In Colorado only trafl5cking in liquors and barber- 
ing are prohibited on Sunday (1886), and in Montana the 
statute (1895) applies merely to barbering. 

Leading Cases 

Alabama. — Alabama has no statute exempting observant 
Jews from the operation of the Sunday law (1874), but a 
manufacturer whose establishment is required to be kept run- 
ning constantly is permitted to labor on Sunday.^ 

An important case in this jurisdiction is that of Frolick- 
stein,* the reasoning of which has often been adopted by other 
courts. There the appellant had been convicted of the viola- 
tion of an ordinance of the City of Mobile by having sold 
shoes on Sunday. He contended that, as an orthodox Jew who 
performed no labor of any kind on the Jewish Sabbath, he 
should be exempted from the penalty of the ordinance, es- 

» Laws of 1887, ch. 2, §1. 

« Acts of 1901, ch. 158. 

' Code of 1897, ch. 195, §5542. 

« Frolickstein v. Mayor of Mobile, 40 Alabama, 725 (1867). 



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172 AMERICAN JEWISH YEAR BOOK 

pecially as by the law of Moses and his faith and church it 

was his religious duty to labor on six days of the week. Thus 

the question of exempting observant Jews from the provisions 

of a local law prohibiting labor on Sunday was squarely 

raised. The court held : 

The law does not hurt, molest, or restrain the appellant in the 
entertainment or expression of what he regards as a religious 
sentiment or persuasion. It simply prohibits the performance of 

an act, which he supposes to be required by a religious duty 

Acts must at least be the fruit of a sentiment or persuasion, in 
fact, religious, in order that an immunity from legislative pro- 
hibition may be claimed.* 

Arka/nsas. — ^The statute (1838) prohibiting labor on Sun- 
day in Arkansas holds immune those who observe any other 
day as the Sabbath (1853 ; 1887) . But no store or saloon may 
be kept open on Sunday, no games of chance played, and no 
religious assembly disturbed." In the Scales case," which 
aJSEected the rights of a Seventh-Day Baptist, the court held 
broadly that Sunday laws are civil regulations and ought to 
apply with equal force to those persons who observe another 
day as the Sabbath. But the opinion of the justices in this 
case turned upon the construction of a law passed by the legis- 
lature of 1885 repealing an earlier statute of exemption 
(1853). 

California. — ^As has already been noted, California has now 
no Sunday laws. In the Newman case " where the court con- 
strued an early local statute prohibiting the sale of clothing 
on Sunday in San Francisco, a Jew claimed exemption from 
the provisions of the act by reason of his solemn and uniform 

• Ibid., p. 727. 

^^ Digest of 1904, ch. 48, §§ 2030-2042. 

"Scales V. State, 47 Arkansas 476 (1886). And see Seelig v. 
State, 43 Arkansas, 96 (1884). 
**Ex parte Newman, 9 California, 502 (1858). 



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SUNDAY LAWS AND JUDICIAL DECISIONS 173 

observance of his own Sabbath. In declaring the statute 
under which Newman was punished unconstitutional, the 
court gave it as their opinion that the law was passed as the 
result of an intention " to enforce, as a religious institution 
the observance of a day held sacred by the followers of one 
faith, and entirely disregarded by all the other denominations 
within the State/* " Justice Stephen J. Field dissented from 
this decision, maintaining that the act was constitutional as a 
valid exercise of the civil authority or police power; in a later 
case," his views were adopted. Both cases have now only an 
historic interest by reason of the adoption of the act of 1901 
already referred to. 

Connecticut — Connecticut has recently (1907) enacted a 
law which amply exempts observant Seventh-Day Sabba- 
tarians from the operation of the act against labor on Sunday 
(1793). It reads thus: 

No person who conscientiously believes that the seventh day 
of the week ought to be observed as the Sabbath, and actually 
refrains from secular business and labor on that day, or who 
conscientiously believes that the Sabbath begins at sundown on 
Friday night and ends at sundown on Saturday night, and 
actually refrains from secular business and labor during said 
period, and who has filed written notice of such belief with 
the prosecuting attorney of the court having jurisdiction, shall 
be liable to prosecution for performing secular business and 
labor on Sunday, provided he disturbs no other person who is 
attending public worship." 

" Ibid., p. 505. 

"Ex parte Andrews, 18 California, 680 (1861). And see Ex 
parte Westerfield, 55 California, 550 (1880); Ex parte Koser, 60 
ibid., 177 (1882); Ex parte Jentzsch, 112 ibid., 471 (1896). 

"Public Acts of 1907, ch. 189, §1. For the earlier laws, see 
General Statutes of 1902, ch. 89, §§1369, 1372. But a Fitchville 
farmer, who attempted to employ a Turkish laborer to work on 
Sunday for him, was fined $27. See Norwich BuUetiny May 23, 
1908. 

12 

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174 AMERICAN JEWISH YEAR BOOK 

A feature of this act is that requiring those who are entitled 
to the benefit it confers to file written notice of their religious 
belief in the office of a public prosecutor ; this appears to be 
repugnant to the American principle of religious equality em- 
bodied in all our constitutions. 

In a case in one of the minor courts of Hartford it was held 
that an observant Jew may keep his store open for the trans- 
action of business on Sunday if it be closed from the mid- 
night, or indeed the sunset, of Friday to the midnight of 
Saturday," 

District of Columbia. — ^The highest court in the District of 
Columbia has recently (1908) held" that the act of the legis- 
lative assembly of Maryland of 1723 " imposing a penalty for 
working on Sunday is no longer in force in the District. The 
court declared that a State has full authority in the exercise 
of its police power to legislate for the health, the morals, 
and the general welfare of its people. But the legislature may 
impose upon the citizen only obligations of a civil,, not a re- 
ligious, nature. Naturally, therefore, the court regarded the 
early colonial Sunday statute, with its penalties against blas- 
pheming Jesus or the Trinity, as obsolete. It was an act to 
prevent the desecration of Sunday and to enforce its strict 
religious observance. The court said : 

That a State has full authority in the exercise of its police 
power to legislate for the health, the morals, and the general 
welfare of its people, can not be disputed. Laws prohibiting labor 
on the Sabbath day have been upheld by the courts, not that such 
laws are intended to limit the freedom of the citizen as to his 

" Cohn's Case, The Hartford Courant, January 17, 1906. 

"District of Columbia v. Robinson (January 21, 1908), 26 
Washington Law Reporter, 101 (February 14, 1908). And see 
The American Hebrew, February 28, 1908, p. 433. 

" Ch. 16, §10. 



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SUNDAY LAWS AND JUDICIAL DECISIONS 175 

religious belief, or impose upon bim any religious duty incom- 
patible with the free exercise of the dictates of conscience, but to 
prescribe a rule of civil duty for all persons within the juris- 
diction of the State upon the Sabbath day 

In the States and the District of Columbia, the legislatures 
and Congress have enacted laws in place of these colonial statutes 
that define the civil duties of the citizen in the observance of one 
day in seven (Sunday) as a day of rest. It is defined as a duty 
the citizen owes to society in promoting the health, morals, and 
general welfare of the people. The duty of observing the Sabbath 
day as a religious obligation, is left with the individual and is 
a matter beyond the pale of legislative interference." 

Illinois. — In Illinois the Eden ease* holds that a statute 
prohibiting barbering on Sunday cannot be justified as an ex- ' 
ercise of the police power of the State on the ground that it is 
class legislation (1846). 

Indiana. — ^The Indiana statute against Sunday labor (1855; 
1881) specially exempts Jews from its provisions.*' Indeed in 
an important case before the Supreme Court of this State," it 
was strongly intimated that a Sunday statute which did not 
exempt Seventh-Day Sabbatarians from its operation would 
be looked upon as unconstitutional and invalid. For 

the framers .... meant to leave it to the consciences and 
Judgments of the citizens to choose between the first and the 
seventh day of the week. It was not the purpose of the law- 
makers to compel any class of conscientious persons to abstain 
from labor upon two days in every week." 

Iowa, Kansas, and Kentucky, — ^The exemption law in Iowa 
(1858) is similar to that in Indiana.** No cases of interest 
have arisen under the statutes of Kansas and Kentucky. 

"26 Washington Law Reporter, pp. 102, 103 (1908). 
~Bden v. People, 161 Illinois, 296 (1896). 
" Annotated Statutes of 1894, revision of 1901, ch. 5, §2086. 
"Johns v. State, 78 Indiana, 332 (1881). 
» Ibid. 

"•Code of 1897, §5040; see Sayre v. Wheeler, 31 Iowa, 112 
(1870). 



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176 AMERICAN JEWISH YEAR BOOK 

Louisiana, — In Shreveport, Louifliana, a local ordinance 
(1873) was passed which permitted Jews to engage in business 
on Sunday. Considering its constitutionality the Suprenoie 
Court * made use of the following words : 

Before the constitution Jews and Gentiles are equal; by the law 
they must be treated alike, and the ordinance of a City Council 
which gives to one sect a privilege which it denies to another, 
violates both the constitution and the law» and is therefore null 
and void." 

Maine. — No cases of importance have been reported which 
construe the Sunday laws of Maine. 

Maryland. — In an early case*' in Maryland, where as we 
have seen the statute upon this subject has remained practi- 
cally unaltered since 1723, the court held : 

.... The Sabbath is emphatically the day of rest, and the day 
of rest here is the "Lord's Day," or christian's Sunday. Ours 
is a christian community." 

And so, in a much more recent decision involving a Seventh- 
Day Baptist," it is stated : 

It is undoubtedly true that rest from secular employment on 
Sunday does have a tendency to foster and encourage the Christ- 
ian religion [But by the constitution the Seventh-Day Sab- 

atarian has the right to observe his own Sabbath.] But it would 



^' 



"City of Shreveport v. Levy, 26 Louisiana Annual, 671 (1874). 
The Sunday Statute of the State dates from 1886. 

*» Ibid., p. 672. And see Corporation of Minden i?. Silverstein, 
36 Louisiana Annual, 912 (1884); State ex rel. Walker and Merz 
V. Orleans Judge, 39 ibid., 132 (1888). 

In the last cited case the court held a Sunday closing law valid 
because it did not deny equal privileges or immunities to a par- 
ticular class, nor the rights to life, liberty, property, and due 
process of law. 

"Kilgour V. Miles, 6 Gill and Johnson, 268 (1834). 

" Ibid., p. 274. So in the original report. 

*Judefind v. State, 78 Maryland, 510, at pages 516 and 516 
(1894). 



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SUNDAY LAWS AND JUDICIAL DECISIONS 177 

scarcely be asked of a Court, in what professes to be a Christian 
land, to declare a law unconstitutional because it requires rest 
from bodily labor on Sunday .... and thereby promotes the 
cause of Christianity Whilst Courts have generally sus- 
tained Sunday laws as " civil regulations," their decisions will 
have no less weight if they are shown to be in accordance with 
divine law as well as human. 

Massdchusetts. — The statute (1791) now in force in the 
State of Massachusetts provides that a person who conscien- 
tiously believes that the seventh day of the week ought to be 
observed as the Sabbath, and actually refrains from secular 
business and labor on that day, shall not be subjected to the 
usual fine prescribed if he disturbs no other person. And on 
Sunday no shop, warehouse, or workhouse may be kept open, 
and no manner of labor or business, except works of necessity 
or charity, may be carried on ; no sports or games of any kind 
may be indulged in on that day except sacred concerts or enter- 
tainments." In 1906 an attempt was made to have the Gen- 
eral Court enact a much more rigid Sunday statute, but it 
failed of success. 

The earliest decision under this law dates from 1869." It 
was held there that as this case arose out of an indictment for 
selling intoxicating liquors on Sunday, and by statute any 
and all sales of such commodities are strictly prohibited (^ 
this day, the defendant could not plead his observance of an- 
other day as the Sabbath in confession and avoidance. The 
court added: " . . . . His conscientious belief might pro- 
tect him from a prosecution for ... . acts of secular labor 
on the Lord's day (see §9), provided he violated no other 
law.''" 

••Revised Laws, ch. 98. 

•^Commonwealth v, Hyneman, 101 Massachusetts, 30 (1869). 

••Ibid., p. 31. 



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178 AMERICAN JBWISH TEAR BOOK 

In a case determined in 1877 " a merchant was tried and 

convicted for having kept his shop open on Sunday. The 

court observed : 

Keeping open a shop is in itself a solicitation to do business, 
and thus an invitation to commit acts which the Legislature has 
treated as violations of the day. While those, who, for conscien- 
tious reasons, observe the seventh day of the weidk as the Sabbath, 
may do business or perform labor which does not interfere with 
others, they are not entitled by keeping open their shops to invite 
the violation of the provisions of the act, even if their ordinary 
business is shop-keeping. The law prohibiting labor on Sunday 
is tantamount to a police regulation for the general welfare.** 

Michigan. — ^Both the law and the decisions thereunder gov- 
erning labor .on Sunday are reasonable in tqne in Michigan. 

Besides the usual statute of exemption, which is practically 
the one prevailing in New York, there are laws permitting 
Seventh-Day Sabbatarians to do servile labor on Sunday, if 
this does not disturb persons attending places of woTship, and 
to keep open their places of business on that day." 

"Commonwealth v. Has, 122 ibid., 40 (1877). 

*«Ibid., p. 41. See Commonwealth v. Marzynski, 149 ibid., 68 
(1886); Same v. Dextra, ibid., 28 (1886). Commonwealth v. 
Starr, 144 ibid., 359 (1887), holds that an observant Jew win not 
be permitted to keep his meat-shop open on Sunday. Here the 
defendant opened his shop only to his own customers, all of whom 
were Jews: the court declared, however, that there were no 
degrees of opening a shop, and it must be kept closed absolutely 
on Sunday. In the case of Commonwealth v. Alexander, 185, 
ibid., 551 (1904), the exception in the statute relating to enter- 
tainments for charity on Sunday clearly applied. Commonwealth 
V. Kirshen, 80 Northeastern, 2 (1907) reaffirmed the decision in 
the Starr case. On Sunday a Jew may not labor; he disturbs 
those at worship on that day. 

"Compiled Laws of 1897, ch. 154, §§5912, 5918, 5920, 5922. 
The last provision is expressly negatived by the statutes in force 
in Arkansas, New Jersey, and Rhode Island. 

The case of The People v. Michael Bellet, 99 Michigan, 151 
(1894), contains the interesting statement that, if a statute 
against barbering on Sunday specially exempts Seventh-Day 
Sabbatarians from its operation, it is not unconstitutional as a 
piece of class legislation. 



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SUNDAY LAWS AND JUDICIAL DECISIONS 179 

Minnesota. — A recent case in Minnesota holds that a Jew 
who uniformly observes his own Sabbath may not, despite that 
fact, perform acts of servile labor on Sunday. Such of neces- 
sity, it was held, disturb those persons who are attending a 
religious assembly.** The statute of exemption (1888) here is 
precisely similar to that of New York." 

Missouri. — The statute of exemption (1854) in force in 
Missouri is of the usual tenor." 

In the Ambs case * the court held that 

.... the Sunday law was not intended to compel people to go 
to church, or to perform any religious act, as an expression of 
preference for any particular creed or sect, but was designed to 
coerce a cessation from labor, that those who conscientiously 
believed that the day was set apart for the worship of God, might 
not be disturbed in the performance of their religious duties. 
Every man is free to use the day for the purpose for which it is 
set apart, or not, as he pleases 

In a recent case the St. Louis Court of Appeals ^ referred to 
Sunday laws in the following terms : 

However, these laws reckon with the well-known fact that as a 
Christian people the larger element of our citizenship conscien- 
tiously believe the Sabbath to be hallowed time which should 
be devoted to rest and worship rather than to business pursuits. 
That these good people may enjoy the right of conscience in the 
fullest measure and devote the day to repose and the worship of 
Deity without being molested or chagrined by the noise and 
turmoil incident to the pursuits of active business, these penal 
provisions have been enacted. Such is the fundamental notion 
Involved in the Sunday laws, as we understand it 

"State V. Weiss, 105 Northwestern, 1127 (1906). 

"Revised Laws, 1905, §§4980-4986. 

""Revised Statutes of 1899, ch. 15, §§2240, 2241. See State v. 
Ambs, 20 Missouri, 214, at p. 218 (1854). 

"• Cited in the preceding note. 

•January 7, 1908; Judge Wm. H. Wallace of the court below, 
has declared that " Bnglish common law .... is permeated with 
ChrisUanity." 



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180 AMBRICAN JEWISH YEAR BOOK 

Nebraska. — In Nebraska a canficientious Seventh-Day Sab- 
batarian may perform *^ common ^^ labor on Sunday.** 

An important case in this State disclosed the fact that the 

accused kept his place of business open on Saturday as well as 

Sunday.** Of his plea for exemption the court remarked : 

Th/e ordinance provides that its provisions shall not extend to 
those who conscientiously observe the seventh day of the week 
as the Sabbath, and, therefore, as plaintiff does not "observe" 
that day as a Sabbath, he is not within its provision.^ 

New Jersey, — ^While Seventh-Day Sabbatarians are exempt 
from the compulsory observance of Sunday in New Jersey 
(1866), the work or labor they do on that day must be per- 
formed within their workshops or dwelling-houses.** 

New York. — In N"ew York, specially in New York City, 
with its large Jewish population, the rigid enforcement of the 
law prohibiting general labor on Sunday (1860) is bound to 
work much hardship. Yet, the Court of Appeals has held that 
" the Christian Sabbath is one of the civil institutions of the 
State, and that the legislature for the purpose of promoting 
the moral and physical well-being of the people, and the peace, 
quiet, and good order of society, has authority to regulate its 
observance and prevent its desecration by any appropriate leg- 
islation is unquestioned.^^ ** 

In the Anonymous case ** the statement is made : 

Is it not obvious that by reason of keeping a store open for 
business on Sunday a temptation is presented to those who have 

** Criminal Code, 1907, ch. 23, §241. 

^Liieberman v. State, 26 Nebraska, 464 (1889). 

« Ibid., p. 469. 

** General Statutes of 1896, V. II. §§33, 34. 

« People V. Moses, 140 New York, 214, at p. 215 (1893). A 
statute (Laws of 1901, ch. 392), absolutely forbidding the sale of 
raw meat in cities on Sunday was obviously enacted in the labor 
interest. 

"•Reported in 12 Abbott's New Cases, 455 (1882). 



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SUNDAY LAWS AND JUDICIAL DECISIONS 181 

no regard for Saturday as holy time to violate the law? If a 
Hebrew merchant hired only Hebrew clerks, and sold only to 
Hebrew customers, there probably would be but little Inducement 
for him to keep open on Sunday. The only exception in favor 
of those ^ who keep Saturday as holy time has no relation to 
trades, manufactures, or mechanical employment. It has rela- 
tion only to servile labor 

It must appear, therefore, that the accused uniformly keeps 
another day holy, and that he does not then labor, and yet this 
does not protect him from arrest. It can only be shown as a 
defense to a prosecution.'^ 

In the famous Lindenmuller case,* where the plaintiff in 
error had been convicted under the statute of April 17, I860,** 
for maintaining a theatrical exhibition in New York City, 
Sunday, May 20, 1860, his counsel contended in their brief 
before the Appellate Court that the Sunday law was un- 
constitutional. 

They said : 

We insist that so long as the plaintiff in error conducted 
proceedings at his theatre in an orderly manner, did nothing 
calculated to produce, a breach of the peace, or to disturb his 
neighbors, or those in his vicinity, he had a legal right to give 
theatrical exhibitions on Sunday. It was purely a matter of taste 
and conscience with him and his auditors "^ 

III. The compulsory observance of the first day of the week 
is not necessarily a part of Christianity; nor does the power 
to enforce such observance arise from any recognition of Christi- 
anity. Like other legislative power, it emanates from the con- 
stitution. If the legislature can compel the observance of the 
christian sabbath, this is an enforcement by law of that tenet 
of the christian faith which holds the first day of the week to 
be that which the commandment refers to. This is giving a pre- 
ference, especially as, while the Jew is compelled to observe our 
sabbath, we are legally authorized utterly to disregard his. And 
if the legislature can thus legislate against the Jew as to one 
tenet, why not as against any other, and treat the ceremonies 

« Ibid., pp. 456, 457. "^ 

* Lindenmuller v. The People, 33 Barbour (Supreme Ck>urt), 548 
(1861). But see People v. Hemleb, 111 New York Supplement, 
690 (1908). 

^LawB of 1860, eh. 501. 

"* Lindenmuller v. The People, 33 Barbour, 548, at p. 551 (1861). 



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182 AMERICAN JEWISH YEAR BOOK 



of the synagogue as Illegal because they conflict with the rites 
of Christianity. These remarks apply to Seventh-Day Baptists, 
whose adherence to that day as the sabbath has been recognized 
and protected by statute. 

IV. It may be that police laws can be passed regulating, 
perhaps entirely prohibiting, theatrical performances on any day 
of the week; but such law, to be operative, must not give directly 
or Indirectly any such preference as is above stated. The effect 
of such a statute on the Jewish lessee of a theatre who con- 
scientiously regarded his own sabbath, would be to deprive him 
of the enjoyment of his property for two days of the week, the 
christian being only so deprived on one. Such a distinction Is 
both unconstitutional and unjust.*^ 

But Justice Allen, writing for the court, was of a different 
opinion : 

The constitutionality of the law under which LlndenmuUer 
was Indicted and convicted does not depend upon the question 
whether or not Christianity Is a part of the common law of this 
state. Were that the only question Involved, It would not be 
difficult to show that It was so. In a quallfled sense — not to the 
extent that would authorize a compulsory conformity In faith and 
practice, to the creed and formula of worship of any sect or 
denomination, or even In those matters of doctrine and worship 
common to all denominations styling themselves christian, but 
to the extent that entitled the christian religion and its ordi- 
nances to respect and protection, as the acknowledged religion of 
the people. Individual consciences may not be enforced; but 
men of every opinion and creed may be restrained from acts 
which interfere with christian worship, and which tend to revile 
religion and bring it into contempt The belief of no man can 
be constrained, and the proper expression of religious belief 
is guaranteed to all; but this right, like every other right, must 
be exercised with strict regard to the equal rights of others; and 
when religious belief or unbelief leads to acts which Interfere 
with the religious worship, and rights of conscience of those 
who represent the religion of the country, as established, not by 
law, but by the consent and usage of the community, and existing 
before the organization of the government, their acts may be 
restrained by legislation, even if they are not indictable at com- 
mon law. Christianity is not the legal religion of the state, as 
established by law. If it were, it would be a civil or political 

« Ibid., pp. 558, 559. 



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SUNDAY LAWS AND JUDICIAL DECISIONS 183 

institution, which it is not; but this is not inconsistent with the 
idea that it is in fact, and ever has been, the religion of the 
people. This fact is everywhere prominent in all our civil and 
political history, and has been, from the first, recognized and 
acted upon by the people as well as by constitutional conventions, 
by legislatures and by courts of justice." 

And he continued: .... Every act done maliciously, tending 
to bring religion into contempt, may be punished at common 
law, and the christian sabbath, as one of the institutions of that 
religion, may be protected from desecration by such laws as the 
legislature, in their wisdom, may deem necessary to secure to 
the community the privilege of undisturbed worship, and to the 
day itself that outward respect and observance which may be 
deemed essential to the peace and good order of society, and to 
preserve religion and its ordinances from open reviling and con- 
tempt — and this not as a duty to God, but as a duty to society 
and to the State. Upon this ground the law in question could be 
sustained, for the legislature are the sole Judges of the acts 
proper to be prohibited, with a view to the public peace, and as 
obstructing religious worship, and bringing into contempt the 
religious institutions of the people." 

.... In this state the sabbath exists as a day of rest by the 
common law, and without the necessity of legislative action to 
establish it; and all that the legislature attempt to do in the sab- 
bath laws is to regulate its observance."^ 

.... The christian sabbath is then one of the civil institutions 
of the state, and to which the business and duties of life are^ by 
the common law, made to conform and adapt themselves. The 
same cannot be said of the Jewish sabbath, or the day observed 
by the followers of any other religion. The respect paid to such 
days, other than that voluntarily paid by those observing them 
as days of worship, is in obedience to positive law. There is no 
ground of complaint in the respect paid to the religious feeling 
of those who conscientiously observe the seventh rather than 
the first day of the week, as a day of rest, by the legislation upon 
that subject, and exempting them from certain public duties and 
from the service of process on their sabbath, and excepting them 
from the operation of certain other statutes regulating the observ- 
ance of the first day of the week. It is not an infringement of 
the right of conscience, or an interference with the free religious 
worship of others, that Sabbatarians are exempted from the 

"Ibid., pp.560. 561. 
" Ibid., p. 567. 
•* Ibid., p. 569. 



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184 AMERICAN JEWISH YEAR BOOK 

service of clyll procees and protected In the exercise of their 
religion on their sabbath " 

In an early case it was held that an award of arbitration 
made on Sunday, but not published or declared until the next 
day, was lawful and proper." Yet a corporation, even if or- 
ganized for religious, not secular, objects, may not hold its 
annual meeting on Sunday.** 

North Carolina. — ^The statute (1741) in North Carolina 
does not exempt observant Seventh-Day Sabbatarians from its 
operation. An early case "* contains, however, several interest- 
ing statements. The court said : 

The truth is, that it [Sunday labor] offends us, not so much 
because it disturbs us in practising for ourselves the religious 
duties, or enjoying the salutary repose or recreation of that day, 
as that it is, in itself, a breach of God's law, and a violation of the 
party's own religious duty. But we do not perceive how it can 
become an offense at common law even when the labor is both 
openly and publicly performed, as in a town, for example, except 
upon a process of reasoning of this kind: That the Christian 
religion is a part of the common law, that it forbids work on 
Sunday, not only as a sin in itself, but as a disturbance to others 
and an injury to the State, and therefore that the law prohibits 
such profanation and punishes it. But we cannot believe that 
such a principle was established at the common law 

.... Although it may be true, that the Christian religion is a 
part of the common law, it is not so in the sense that an act 
contrary to the precepts of our Saviour or of Christian morals is 
necessarily indictable. ...."* 

"Ibid., pp. 569, 570. The reasoning of this opinion was ex- 
pressly approved by the Court of Appeals in NeuendorfC v. 
Duryea, 69 New York, 557, at p. 561 (1877). And see People v. 
Havnor, 149 New York, 195 (1896); Moore v. Owen, 109 New 
York Supplement, 585, at p. 589 (1908). 

"•Isaacs V, The Beth Hamedash Society, 1 Hilton, 469 (1857). 
This was a decision by Judge Chas. P. Daly. It was followed 
in Ehrlich v. Pike, 53 Miscellaneous, 328, at p. 333 (1907) by 
Justice David Leventritt 

"In re Agudath Hakehlloth, 18 Miscellaneous, 717 (1896). 

"State V. Williams, 4 Iredell, 400 (1844). 

" Ibid., pp. 403, 404. 



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SUNDAY LAWS AND JUDICIAL DECISIONS 185 

And so the court held that a profanation of Sunday by per- 
forming labor on that day was not an indictable oflEensfe at 
common law in North Carolina." 

North Dakota. — No cases of moment have arisen under the 
North Dakota statute regulating labor on Sunday. 

Ohio. — A Seventh-Day Sabbatarian in Ohio may keep his 
place of business open on Sunday in order to perform works 
of charity or necessity." 

The late Judge Thurman made the following interesting 

observations in an important case** in this State: 

The .... principles upon which our [Sunday] statute rests 
are wholly secular; and they are none the less so because they 
may happen to concur with the dictates of religion. Thus the day 
of rest, prescribed by the statute, is the Christian Sabbath, yet 
.... it would be equally constitutional and obligatory, did it name 
any other day, and it derives none of its force from the fact 
that the day of rest is Sunday " 

« See King v. Taylor, 1 Ventris, 293 (1676). Here Sir Matthew 
Hale held that Christianity is parcel of the laws of England. 

* Annotated Statutes of 1905, part IV, §7033. The statute of 
exemption, cited above, has been sustained as to its constitution- 
ality in a number of cases. See Cincinnati v. Rice, 15 Ohio 
R^)orts, 225 (1846), where a local ordinance which did not 
exempt observant Jews from its operation was declared to be 
invalid. So a contract made on Sunday was held good in 
Bloom V. Richards, 2 Ohio State, 387 (1853). This case contains 
an able opinion by Judge Allen G. Thurman, for many years a 
Senator, and candidate for Vice-President of the United States in 
1888. And, where a statute seeks to compel the observance of 
Sunday by Jews as well as Christians, and does not except works 
of charity or necessity, or labor by observant Seventh-Day Sab- 
batarians, it is unconstitutional. Canton v. Nist, 9 Ohio State, 439 
(1859); Strauss v. Village of Conneaut, 23 Ohio Circuit Court 
Reports, 320 (1902). Of course, whether a Jew who claims ex- 
emption under a Sunday labor law observes his own Sabbath, is, 
as we have already seen under Nebraska, largely a question of 
fact. Billigheimer v. State, 32 Ohio State, 435 (1877). And see 
The Occident, V. Ill, p. 57. 

«McGatrick v. Wason, 4 Ohio State, 566 (1855). 

" Ibid., p. 571. 



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186 AMERICAN JEWISH YEAR BOOK 

- And in an earlier case, to which reference has heen made,** 
Judge Thurman held as follows : 

Of course, it Is no objection, but on the contrary, is a high 
recommendation, to a legislative enactment, based upon justice 
or public policy, that it is found to coincide with the precepts of a 
pure religion; but the fact is nevertheless true, that the power 
to make the law rests in the legislative control over things 
temporal, and not over things spiritual. Thus the statute upon 
which the defendant relies, prohibiting common labor on the 
Sabbath, could not stand for a moment as a law of this State, if 
its sole foundation was the Christian duty of keeping that day 
holy, and its sole motive to enforce the observance of that duty. 
For no power over things merely spiritual has ever been delegated 
to the government; while any preference of one religion over 
another, as the statute would give upon the above hypothesis, is 
directly prohibited by the Constitution. 

.... But the General Assembly of Ohio is not, as we have 
shown, a guardian of the sanctity of any day. If it may protect 
the first day of the week from desecration because it is the 
Christian Sabbath, it may, in like manner, protect the sixth day 
because it is the holy day of the Mahometan, and the seventh 
day because it is the Sabbath of the Jew and Seventh-Day 
Baptist. . . . . " 

Ohldhoma,—Ok\ahomA has no cases of interest to us upon 
the subject. 

Pennsylvania, — The law prohibiting general labor on Sun- 
day (1794) is very rigid in the commonwealth of Pennsyl- 
vania. Jews are not excepted from it. 

An early case, dating from 1816, is authority for the propo- 
sition that a conscientious Jew can neither perform worldly 
labor on Sunday nor claim exemption from the operation of a 
statute which prohibits it, on the score of his faith." 

•* Bloom V. Richards, 2 Ohio State, 387 (1863). 

« Ibid., pp. 391. 392. 

"•Commonwealth v. Wolff, 3 Sergeant and Rawle, 48 (1816). 
And a charitable society may not conduct a secular trial of a 
member on Sunday. Society v. Commonwealth, 52 Pennsylvania 
State, 125 (1866). See Commonwealth v. Beck, 22 Pittsburg 
Legal Journal, N. S., 310 (1892). 



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SUNDAY LAWS AND JUDICIAL DECISIONS 187 

And in the Specht case " counsel for the appellant laid 
stress in their brief on these arguments which the court com- 
pletely ignored in the decision: 

L While it is true that Christianity was a part of the com- 
mon law, it was not an offense at common law to transact in- 
nocent business on Sunday. 

2. While the legislature may pass a law prohibiting labor 
on the Sabbath, by reason of the more or less sacred character 
of the day, law-makers cannot competently declare which day 
of the week is the Sabbath. 

Rhode Island. — Ehode Island, too, offers us no cases of im- 
portance in which its statute (1882) exempting Seventh-Day 
Sabbatarians from the operation of the local Sunday law was 
construed. 

South Carolina. — In South Carolina the Sunday laws 
(1691; 1837) contain no exemptions in favor of Seventh-Day 
Sabbatarians." Here the decisions in adjudicated cases have 
uniformly proceeded upon the theory that Sunday laws are a 
legitimate exercise of the police power of the government, for 
the good of society and in aid of law and order, not of re- 
ligion. Hence, no exemption in favor of Jews and others who 
do not observe Sunday need be incorporated in these statutes." 

South Dakota. — South Dakota presents no cases of value 
tons. 

Tennessee. — ^The Sunday laws in Tennessee (1896) contain 
no exemptions in favor of Seventh-Day Sabbatarians.^* 

•"Specht V. Commonwealth, 8 Pennsylvania State, 312 (1848). 
« Code of 1902, eh. 24, §§500, 501, 503. 

••Columbia v. Duke, 2 Strobhart's Law, 530 (1833); Charleston 
17. Benjamin, ibid., 508 (1846). 
'• Code of 1896, §3029. 



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188 AMERICAN JEWISH YEAR BOOK 

A loosely-reasoned case in Tennessee " aflfecting a Seventh- 
Day Baptist, holds in effect that a general statute against labor 
on Sunday extended to those persons who conscientiously ob- 
served Saturday as the Christian Sabbath. 

Texas. — Seventh-Day Sabbatarians are expressly excepted 
from the operation of the Sunday law in force in Texas," 
where a case ^ holds that Sunday laws are valid and do not 
violate the constitutional rights of Jews under the bill of 
rights in the State constitution whereby equal rights and free- 
dom of worship are guaranteed to all. 

Virginia and West Virginia, — In Virginia, and also in West 
Virginia (1882), Seventh-Day Sabbatarians are expressly ex- 
cepted from the operation of the Sunday statute (1877)." 
But only household labor and works of necessity or charity are 
really included in this exemption, and a Seventh-Day Sab- 
batarian may not compel an apprentice or servant not of his 
belief to do secular work or business on Sunday. 

Wisconsin, — ^Wisconsin has a statute exempting Seventh- 
Day Sabbatarians from the operation of its Sunday law, but 
no case of interest to us has been decided under it by the 
courts. 

In conclusion, the reader's attention is directed to what the 
late Judge Thomas M. Cooley, of Michigan, in his great work 

'* Parker v. State, 16 Lea, 476, at p. 480 (1886). For Utah see 
State V. Sopher, 60 Lawyers* Reports Annotated, 468; S. C, 25 
Utah, 318 (1903). 

" Penal Code, 1901, art. 197. 

"Ex parte Sundstrom, 25. Texas Appeals (Criminal), 133 
(1888). 

'' Code of 1904, ch. 185, §§3799-3804. See The Occident, V. Ill, 
p. 417; ibid., V. IV, p. 297 et seq., p. 615; Ex parte Marx, 86 Vir- 
ginia, 40 (1889). 



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SUNDAY LAWS AND JUDICIAL DECISIONS 189 

on Constitutional Limitations,^ has said of the American Sun- 
day laws : 

But the Jew who is forced to respect the first day of the week, 
when his conscience requires of him the observance of the 
seventh also, may plausibly urge that the law discriminates 
against his religion, and by forcing him to keep a second Sab- 
bath in each week, unjustly, though by indirection, punishes him 
for his belief /• 

" Seventh edition, by Victor H. Lane, Boston, 1903. 
^« Ibid., p. 675. 

Note. — Idaho. — The act of 1907 prohibits horse racing, and the 
keeping open of saloons, and places of business and amusement on 
Sunday. (Laws of 1907, p. 223; see State v. Dolan, 13 Idaho, 693; 
14 L. R. A., N. S., 1259.) 



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190 AMERICAN JEWISH YEAR BOOK 



THE YEAE 
5668 

BY LOUIS H. LEVIN 

There are no incidents of unusual significance in the Jew- 
ish year 5668. By comparison with the high-spirited years 
that preceded it, something of a reaction is discernible. This 
is mainly true in Russia, but Bussia still gives tone and char- 
acter to contemporaneous Jewish history. Liberal ideas have 
lost ground in that country; the revolution, if it still exists, 
has been driven completely underground; and the reaction- 
aries are so palpably in the ascendancy that the liberals of 
the Third Duma patiently allowed them to set the pace, and 
only mildly asserted themselves on occasion. However, the 
Duma still exists, and may be regarded as an evidence that 
some progress is making toward constitutional government 
and the ultimate triumph of freedom and justice. Roumania 
continued its policy of expulsion by gradual but continuous 
restriction in the teeth of the Berlin treaty, 'and the Algeciras 
convention has been forgotten since the descent on the Jewish 
settlements in Morocco by the various contenders and preten- 
ders, who have racked that imhappy country. In Germany 
and Austria there are no changes to tell of, but in England , 
and America the continued influx of immigrants has admin- 
istered a shock to their philanthropic systems which is one of 
the most disturbing features of the general situation. There 
are incidents of a more reassuring character, and they will be 
noted in the course of this article. They hardly save the year 
from exhibiting, on the whole, a slight loosening of grip, a 



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THE YEAR 191 

weakening of the basis of our hopes for a speedy betterment 
of Jewish conditions. With few exceptions the items of the 
year are routine happenings, the by-product of more or less 
active communities scattered over the globe. In a minor way 
the year has been marked by agitation for Sunday laws, which 
came to the front in the United States, Canada, England, 
Prance, Germany, Italy, Russia and Hungary, and by the 
spread of the Jewish art movement. Art societies were organ- 
ized in New York, Bialystok, and St. Petersburg, and there 
were exhibitions in Berlin, Vienna, Copenhagen and Jeru- 
salem. 

THE UNITED STATES 

Immigration. — For several years past the rising tide of 
immigration to this country has given observers grave con- 
cern, as it furnished, on the one hand, a plausible though 
superjBcial argument in favor of restriction, and, on the other, 
compelled the Jewish authorities to face an ever increasing 
and continually complicating problem. The impact was felt 
most strongly in New York, the great port of immigration, 
but it was also encountered in Boston, Baltimore, and Phila- 
delphia. The absolute necessity of keeping America open to 
Jewish exiles from abroad began, in some quarters, to give 
way before the difficulties of acclimatizing new accessions at 
the rate of twenty-five hundred a week. Congress, which has 
been very cautious in the matter of immigration legislation, 
had authorized an Immigration Commission, which has vis- 
ited Europe, but has not submitted its report. Meanwhile 
the popular demand for legislation almost vanished after the 
financial crisis last fall, which completely changed the com- 
mercial and industrial aspect of the country, and sent thous- 



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192 AMERICAN JEWISH YEAR BOOK 

ands of immigrants back across the water to their homes — a 
striking object-lesson of how powerfully economic causes in- 
fluence immigration. Hard times is the best diminisher of 
immigration ; prosperity and immigrants come together. The 
following figures, for the port of New York, show the change 
in Jewish immigration in nine months in 5667 as compared 
with the same nine months in 5668 : 

Jewish Immiobation at the Pobt of New York 

Sept. 1, 1906 Sept. 1, 1907 

to June 1, 1907 to June 1. 1908 

From Russia 58,141 39.164 

" Austria 9,711 7,048 

" Hungary 5,710 3.203 

?' Roumanla 2,645 3,317 

" all other countries 1,164 1,807 

Total 77,371 54.539 

Several months are included in the second list antecedent to 
the " panic,^^ and it was some time after the crash before im- 
migration felt the change. Nevertheless Jewish immigration 
declined over thirty per cent, and that from Eussia nearly 
thirty-three per cent. The increase from Roumania in spite 
of adverse economic conditions demonstrates what a power of 
expulsion is behind this migration. Immigration in 1908 as 
a whole exhibits consistent decline, and at the present rate 
there will not be enough to serve as a stimulus to drastic anti- 
immigration laws. 

The Bible in the Pxtblic Schools, etc. — Perhaps the 
most noticeable feature of the year in America has been the 
demand in certain quarters for the complete secularization 
of the public institutions of the country, what may be deemed 
the demand of the Jews for their full constitutional rights. 
Justice Brewer^s artide aaserting that this is a Christian 



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THE YEAR 193 

country has been challenged more than once, and the idea 
was formally combated in papers by Dr. Herbert Frieden- 
wald, of New York, Isaac Hassler, Esq., of Philadelphia, 
and Rabbi Ephraim Frisch, of Little Eock, Ark. The 
legal and theoretical argument was supplemented in a practi- 
cal way by a widespread opposition to Bible readings and 
Christmas carols in public schools, an opposition specifically 
decided upon by the Central Conference of American Rabbis. 
In New York the agitation against the carols produced a 
counter-demonstration in their favor, and the matter seems 
to have been left to the discretion of the individual teacher. 
In Philadelphia, Cincinnati, St. Paul, and maybe elsewhere, 
there were similar movements and counter-movements, and 
the question may yet return to plague us. The objection to 
the Bible in the public schools eliminated it as a text book in 
Chicago, and in Denver Rabbi Friedman made a plea for 
absolutely secular schools — a position contrary to that taken 
by Cardinal Gibbons on the eve of his trip to Europe. Some- 
thing analogous has been the attempt to exclude the Merchant 
of Venice from the public schools, and in several cities, — 
Cleveland, 0., and Austin, and El Paso, Tex., perhaps in a few 
other places, — ^the play has disappeared. This agitation has 
not been without criticism from Jews who are unwilling to put 
the Shakespearean classic on the Index Expurgatorius. Here 
may be mentioned also the campaign against the Jew in 
vaudeville. In isolated instances actors have not been per- 
mitted to perform their parts, and the Mayor of Cincinnati 
directed that objectionable posters be covered. Except in a 
few places the vaudeville Jew still goes through his gyrations, 
without occasioning excitement or even attracting the atten- 
tion of the Jewish community. 



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194 AMERICAN JEWISH YEAR BOOK 

Philanthbopy. — Nothing has occurred in the Jewish char- 
ity and philanthropic field to engage the attention of charity 
workers so seriously as the condition of the United Hebrew 
Charities of New York. For three years the society's annual 
deficit was made up by a few generous men of wealth, and at 
the end of the term, according to understanding, they asked 
the community to assume the burden. A money stringency 
at the time militated against additional contributions, but 
previous experience, in prosperous days, would at best not 
have furnished ground for optimistic expectation. Attempts 
to supply the deficiency proving futile, the United Hebrew 
Charities closed its doors for the first time in December. 
It was deemed wisest to spend each month the instalment 
of income, and then to suspend work until the first of the 
next month. Such measures during a hard winter when 
thousands were unemployed emphasized the inadequacy of 
the societ/s support. During this period of crippled service 
Dr. Lee K. Frankel resigned as manager in order to take up 
an investigation for the Russell Sage Foundation, and the 
United Hebrew Charities lost the help of the most prominent 
Jewish charity administrator in the country. In time Mr. 
Morris D. Waldman, who had been in charge of the Galveston 
Immigration Bureau, was placed in control, and gradually 
the income of the society was increased. The plan of federa- 
tion now in common use did not commend itself to the 
Boards of the various New York associations, and a source 
of income, available elsewhere, was missed here. Whether 
the Council of Jewish Communal Institutions, which is New 
York's approach to the federation idea, has benefited the 
society's finances, must be answered by those in charge, but 
it seems to have such possibilities. The Charities of Boston 



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THE YEAR 195 

were subjected to an unusual strain owing to a fire at Chelsea 
in April, which destroyed six to eight hundred houses occupied 
by Jews, rendering two thousand people homeless. Three 
synagogues also were destroyed by the flames. 
- Other Work. — Almost as much attention was attracted by 
the resignation of Dr. David Blaustein, long the directing 
head of the Educational Alliance of New York, the premier 
Jewish settlement institution. He entered the banking busi- 
ness, but still maintains his interest in social questions. The 
Alliance, which has long stood in a class by itself, will soon 
have a friendly competitor in the association recently organ- 
ized in Chicago for educational and social work. The ina- 
bility of the "United Hebrew Charities to give its customary 
relief, and the withdrawal of Dr. Blaustein, coupled with an 
unusually hard season for the poor, may have had something 
to do with a feeling of disorganization, manifesting itself on 
the East Side in a rent strike of large proportions and short 
duration, and, later on, in an excited announcement of wide- 
spread hunger among Jewish children. In spite of these ex- 
citements and exaggerations the East Side bore the period of 
depression with remarkable calm, and, in mutual aid, fur- 
nished effective assistance to its own poor. The Hebrew Free 
Loan Society had its hands full, loaning, in 1907, $445,369, 
and receiving in payments $416,565.69. A note struck dur- 
ing the year with lasting effect is the need of more Jewish- 
ness in Jewish institutions, and it found its best expression 
in a paper by Mr. Louis Marshall, read at the National Con- 
ference of Jewish Charities in Richmond. It received sup- 
port from such diverse sources as Rabbi Emil G. Hirsch of 
Chicago, who advocated a kosher department for the Michael 
Reese Hospital of that city, and Rabbi H. P. Mendes of New 



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196 AMERICAN JEWISH YEAR BOOK 

York, who asked the Mt. Sinai Hospital why it did not make 
such provision. 

Education. — ^In the autumn of 1909 the Dropsie College 
for Hebrew and Cognate languages will be opened at Phila- 
delphia, a notable addition to the Hebrew educational insti- 
tutions of this country. The officers of the college are: Dr. 
Cyrus Adler, president; Hon. Mayer Sulzberger, vice-presi- 
dent; David Sulzberger, secretary; and Oscar B. Teller, treas- 
urer. Dr. Adler, it is said, will resign his position at the 
Smithsonian Institution, in order to devote his entire time 
to the new college. The faculty of the Hebrew Union College 
was substantially strengthened by the calling of Dr. David 
Neumark to the chair of Jewish Philosophy, and his large and 
erudite volume on Jewish philosophy, issued immediately be- 
fore his coming, has been followed by a scholarly study of the 
philosophy of Jehuda Hallevi, in the Catalog of the Hebrew 
Union College. The college graduated at the twenty-fifth 
anniversary of its first commencement three rabbis, and the 
Jewish Theological Seminary sent forth seven new men. The 
former celebrated its anniversary with appropriate ceremonies, 
in which the four graduates of the first class, Eabbis Philip- 
son, Aaron, Berkowitz, and KJrauskopf, took part. After 
thirty-three years of service, Mr. Bemhard Bettmann, presi- 
dent of the Board of Governors, retires. Quite a diflEerent ex- 
perience fell to the lot of the Yeshibah Elchanan Spector. A 
strike among its students, not the first, against being denied 
a secular education, resulted in the appointment of Eabbi B. 
L. Levinthal, of Philadelphia, President of the Association of 
Orthodox Babbis, as its director. His experience in Philadel- 
phia as rabbi of a large community ought to avail him in his 
new position. Having educational value of a different kind 



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THE YEAR 197 

are the Menorah Society of Harvard University, to which Mr. 
Jacob H. Schiff has offered an annual prize of $100 for the 
best essay on a Jewish subject by an undergraduate, and the 
Hebraic Club of Yale. Mention may also be made of the 
Society of Jewish Art, which organized with enthusiasm at 
a meeting held at Temple Bmanu-Bl, New York. 

Beligious Matters. — ^Judaism in America has become so 
set in its ways that it would be a surprise if the year offered a 
new aspect. However, the increase of Jewish adherents of 
Christian Science should be noted. How far there is a turn- 
ing among Jews to the movement inspired by Mrs. Eddy is a 
question that has not been accurately answered, but the fact 
that rabbis on the Pacific Coast, in the South, the Middle 
West, and even in the East have felt called upon to combat it, 
argues that it has made some appeal. An attachment of this 
kind lends itself naturally to exaggeration, and any statement 
of the number so afl&liated should be closely scrutinized. The 
Central Conference of American Eabbis issued a new edition 
of its Hjrmnal and Haggadah, put out its first tract, " What 
do the Jews Believe,^' by Rabbi H. G. Enelow, and established 
a Lyceum Bureau of Lectures, which will probably not be 
numbered among its successes. Its Union Prayer Book, the 
sale of 100,000 copies of which has brought it substantial 
financial returns, was criticised as inadequate and wrong in 
principle by Eabbi Jacob Voorsanger and defended by Eabbi 
Max Heller. The criticism has not been supported by other 
rabbis. The Association of Orthodox Rabbis suggested a boy- 
cott of Yiddish papers issued on the Sabbath, and the boycott 
has been seriously proposed, and perhaps attempted, in order 
to enforce Sabbath observance. In New York bakers banded 
together for the purpose of eliminating Sabbath work, and a 



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198 AMERICAN JEWISH YEAR BOOK 

like report has come from other places; but the boycott has 
not established a reputation for availability in this connec- 
tion. Shehitdh has not escaped criticism, and the Society 
for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals, with Shehitdh 
probably in mind, offered a prize of $500 for a better way of 
slaughtering animals than any in use. A curious event of 
the year was the theatrical return of Samuel Freuder, for 
seventeen years a Christian minister, to the fold of Judaism. 
Friction. — Those who seek the rough edges between Jews 
and Christians will find an instance here and there to point a 
moral and adorn a tale. An attack upon Jewish lawyers by 
William H. Corbin before the Chenango County Society 
brought a warm retort from Mr. Louis Marshall and «^n ex- 
planation from the original speaker. The refusal of the Hotel 
Eenaissance of New York to receive a Jewish sub-lessee drew 
from Justice Wauhope Lynn a spirited defence of the Jews 
and a judgment in favor of their acceptability as tenants. 
Judge William H. Wallace of Kansas City caused a ripple 
by attacking Jews in the theatrical business in his desire to 
enforce the Sunday law, while William Waldorf Astor, not 
uncharacteristically, excluded them from a new apartment 
house. Feeling was aroused by the alleged attempt of Aver- 
buch to kill Chief Shippy of Chicago, who managed to dis- 
patch his assailant. The subsequent rough and unwarranted 
action of the police towards the inhabitants of the foreign 
quarter of Chicago brought from Jane Addams a defence of 
the foreigner in America that our statesmen should take to 
heart. Circumstances surrounding the death of Averbuch 
have raised doubts whether he really made an attempt on the 
life of the policeman, and these doubts remain in spite of an 
inquiry. Not long after the death of Averbuch, one Silver- 



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THE YEAR 199 

stein, a weak-minded individual, destroyed himself and 
another man in New York by exploding a bomb, which was 
assumed to have been meant for the police; and these two 
incidents, together with one or two more of the same kind, 
gave the order by the Secretary of Commerce and Labor 
directed against foreign aiiarchists timely significance ; but it 
did not prevent Rose Pastor Stokes from declaring at a public 
meeting that she preferred the red flag to the stars and stripes. 
The breaking up of a Zionist meeting in Philadelphia shows 
how far police suspicion went at the time. Some literature 
not productive of the best feelings between Jews and their 
neighbors appeared. In a volume of essays, Mr. J. C. Van 
Dyke expatiated on the materialism of the Jews, and in an 
article in the "Atlantic Monthly^' Dr. Edwin J. Kuh exhibited 
Jewish weaknesses without proportion or proper setting. A 
later article in the same monthly by Dr. Abram S. Isaacs may 
be taken as an antidote to the former. On the other hand, 
there was considerable fraternizing between Jews and Chris- 
tians, particularly in union Thanksgiving services, which 
were held in Detroit, Dallas, Indianapolis, San Francisco, 
Boston, New Orleans, and perhaps in other places. 

The Government. — One event of the year was of national 
importance. It grew out of a circular prepared by the State 
Department concerning the issuing of passports to American 
citizens available in Russia. It told the Jews by name to 
take heed that an American passport could not protect 
them in that country. The circular, it seems, escaped 
attention for several months, and when it was discovered and 
brought to the notice of the Department, it was recalled, and 
another issued, which was likewise obnoxious to American 
Jewish citizens. Mr. Louis Marshall and Mr. Edward 



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200 AMERICAN JEWISH YEAR BOOK 

Lauterbacli, for the American Jewish Committee, addressed 
communications to Secretary Eoot, pointing out that the 
law in the strongest language guaranteed equal protection 
to all American citizens abroad, whereupon the second cir- 
cular was withdrawn, and another issued from which the 
objectionable features were omitted. The incident was the 
occasion for speeches in the House of Representatives, by 
Congressmen Lowden, Capron, and Harrison, the last especi- 
ally criticising the action of the Department, and character- 
izing the incident as deplorable. The circular in its final 
evolution is technically correct, but the Russo- American pass- 
port debate is exactly where it was before the circular was 
withdrawn and the strong speeches delivered. Mention may 
be made here that both the Democratic and Republican parties 
adopted clauses in their platforms pledging them to use all 
proper means to secure the recognition of the American pass- 
port, whether held by native-born or naturalized citizens. 

Meetings. — Though this was the most public achievement 
of the American Jewish Committee, it did much more in a 
quiet way. It helped the plundered Jews of Morocco, and 
sent $1075 to Constantinople when the Jewish quarter was de- 
vastated by fire. It compiled the records for the American 
Jewish Year Book, having undertaken to keep the excellent 
volume, edited by Miss Henrietta Szold, up to date. It also 
elaborated and began to put into effect a plan for the exten- 
sion of its membership by adding sub-committees in all the 
original districts. This democratizing process, it is hoped, 
will make the committee representative beyond cavil. The 
oflBcers of the American Jewish Committee, elected at a meet- 
ing held November 10, are: President, Hon. Mayer Sulz- 
berger ; Vice-Presidents, Judge Julian W. Mack and Isaac H. 



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THE YEAR 201 

Kempner ; Treasurer, I. W. Bemheim ; Secretary, Dr. Herbert 
Friedenwald; Executive Committee, Dr. Cyrus Adler, Harry 
Cutler, Eabbi Emil G. Hirsch, E. W. Lewin-Epstein, Pro- 
fessor Morris Loeb,* Eabbi J. L. Magnes, Louis Marshall, 
Cyrus L. Sulzberger, and Jacob Voorsanger.* The various 
national associations held their annual meetings, elected offi- 
cers, and transacted business. The American Jewish Histor- 
ical Society, which met in New York on May 17, broadened its 
scope so that it can pursue inquiries into foreign matters con- 
nected with immigration to this country. Dr. Cyrus Adler was 
re-elected president. At Eichmond, Va., the National Confer- 
ence of Jewish Charities held its sessions, electing Professor 
J. H. Hollander to succeed Mr. Nathan Bijur as presiding 
officer. The Central Conference of American Eabbis had 
another pleasant meeting at Frankfort, and re-elected Eabbi 
David Philipson as president. After a long attachment to 
Atlantic City, the Jewish Chautauqua tried Buffalo with suc- 
cess, and Mr. Geo. W. Ochs gave way to Mr. Israel Cowen 
as president. Two novel gatherings were of Sabbath school 
teachers of Arkansas at Little Eock and those of Ohio at 
Cleveland. Both occasions were so successful as to warrant 
the belief that the idea will spread. On May 24 the Jewish 
Publication Society of America held its usual annual meet- 
ing in Philadelphia, re-elected Mr. Edwin Wolf president, 
expressed its satisfaction at having 5229 members, pointed 
with pride to a career of twenty years during which it pub- 
lished seventy works and distributed over 350,000 copies of 
its publications, and particularly congratulated itself on its 
output for the year, namely, The American Jewish Year 

* Succeeded by Isador Sobel. 
» Succeeded by Jacob H. Schiff. 



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202 AMERICAN JEWISH YEAR BOOK 

Book (with its comprehensive directories), the completest it 
has ever published, "David the Giant Killer and Other 
Tales," by Emily Solis-Cohen ; " Stories of Jewish Home 
Life," from the German of S. H. Mosenthal, and the remark- 
able " Studies in Judaism " of Professor S. Schechter. 

From Abroad. — ^The year brought its quota of visitors, 
some to remain a while, others to abide with us. Dr. Xathan 
Birnbaum, Zionist, agitator, Yiddish enthusiast, made a short 
lecture tour as a 'financial venture. He found much to praise 
in the Yiddish newspaper and Yiddish theatre, called on 
President Boosevelt, and visited a number of cities, where he 
was greeted by nationalists and others. His criticism of 
American Jewry since his return home does not encourage the 
belief that his tour was a complete success. Professor Paul 
Milyukoff, the Constitutional Democratic leader, was here 
a short while, during which time he expressed himself in 
the cautious manner which his party has assumed in speaking 
of Jewish emancipation. Mr. Joseph Cowen of the Jewish 
Colonial Trust came, probably in connection with the attempt 
to establish a branch of the Trust in N'ew York, and Dr. Jacob 
Klatzkin, recently connected with the Hilfsverein der devi- 
schen Jvden, made a partial study of American conditions. 
Professor T. C. Masaryk, of the University of Prague, spoke 
for publication once or twice, expressing the liberal senti- 
ments one expects from him, and Dr. David de Sola Pool 
came to remain as the assistant of Babbi H. P. Mendes of 
New York. Dr. Chayim Shitlovsky has also cast his lot in 
with Americans, and joined the ranks of New York editors. 

Conclusion. — The year in America has a record of con- 
siderable activity in various fields, much well-meant eflEort 
in educational, religious, and charitable matters, an attempt 



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THE YEAR 203 

at self-improvement, dignified self-assertion, and a desire to 
help communities less fortunate than those in America. All 
the respectable and usual elements are in evidence, little that 
is not respectable, and nothing extraordinary. 

ABROAD 

Abyssinia. — Abyssinia deserves a place in the narrative 
by reason of the visit of the Alliance Israelite Urmerselle 
Commission to Emperor Menelik. The Falashas, with 
whom Dr. Faitlovitch established communication several 
years ago, have become an object of interest to European 
Jews, and even American organizations have been approached 
in their behalf. For reasons not quite clear, the Alliance first 
took up Dr. Faitlovitch, and then selected M. Haim Nahoum 
of Constantinople to head its commission. M. Faitlovitch 
carried his protest to England and Italy, and was championed 
in the latter country, where the pro-Falashas movement has 
made headway since the King approved the establishing of a 
school for the Falashas at Erythrea, and the ICA voted a sub- 
vention for three years. The Eilfsverein also has promised 
help. Meanwhile the Alliance sent out M. Nahoum, who had 
the honor and satisfaction of telegraphing to Paris that he 
had called upon Emperor Menelik, attended by the French 
consul in full official uniform. Algeria, thoroughly Galli- 
cized, passed a peaceful year, making full use of its Alliance 
schools. An estimate placed its Jewish population at 63,000. 
In Argentina the colonists were fairly prosperous, crops 
abundant, and the population increased by ten per cent, being 
13,212 according to the latest advices. A new congregation 
was formed at La Plata. The repute of the colonists was re- 
flected in an article in El Municipio of Eosario, which spoke 



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204 AMERICAN JEWISH YEAR BOOK 

of them in warm praise. Australia loomed up as a possible 
ITO-land, but some bungling diplomacy and opposition on the 
part of the general population gave the idea its quietus. The 
annual report of the Melbourne congregation significantly 
complains of the lack of progress, a condition probably char- 
acteristic of Australian communities. In New Zealand some 
opposition to Shehitah developed, and it furnished a Rhodes 
scholar in S. N". Zimon. 

Austria. — The four Jewish members of the Austrian 
Reichsrath, Gabel, Mahler, Stand, and Straucher, formed the 
Jewish Club to act in concert on all Jewish questions. Re- 
ceived at first skeptically, the club has persevered, and done 
what can be done to protect Jewish rights. The premier, Frei- 
herr von Beck, expressed to Dr. Straucher his satisfaction 
with the aims and objects of the club. When the mistreat- 
ment of Jews in the army was reported, Gabel called on the 
Secretary of War, and showed statistically that the number of 
Jews who had served during the last twenty years exceeded 
the Jewish proportion. A flurry was caused in the Reichsrath 
by an attack, led by Lueger, against Jews in Austrian Uni- 
versities, and Professor Marsaryk came valiantly to the de- 
fence. Six Jews managed to be elected to the Diet of Galicia, 
where, according to Dr. S. R. Landau, two-thirds of the Jews 
of Austria are gathered, most of them in the direst poverty. 
The strength of the Zionist vote induced the provincial gov- 
ernment of Galicia to introduce a bill for the establishment of 
a Jewish theological institute at Lemberg, a demonstration of 
the advantage of political strength. In Budapest a govern- 
ment order closed all places of business on Sunday. The im- 
portant meeting in Austria was the Convention of the General 
Jewish Union at Vienna, April 37, and succeeding days. 



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THE YEAR 205 

About 150 delegates were present representing 90 congre- 
gations, and a national organization was effected. For the 
first time in years the communities co-operated in large 
numbers, and the conference was deemed a success. Dr. Al- 
fred Stern, president of the Vienna community, was elected 
president. The thirty-fifth general meeting of the Israeli" 
iische Allianz of Vienna showed that 176,500 kronen had 
been collected for Eoumanian relief, of which nearly one- 
third came from America. Dr. Kaminka, secretary, after a 
trip to Roumania, declared that the only hope for the Jews of 
that country lies in emigration. Anti-Semitism flourishes in 
high quarters, two new members of the Austrian ministry, 
Gessman, Minister of Labor, and Bbenhoch, Minister of Agri- 
culture, being spoken of as anti-Semites. In the army it led 
to the shooting of recruit Michael Herschkowitz by his cor- 
poral, a tragedy that Dr. Gabel made the basis of an interpella- 
tion. Lueger as usual carried Vienna at the election, and 
Weingartner, the new leader of the Court Opera House (bom 
a Jew, succeeding Mahler, also a Jew by birth), thought to 
please the public by dismissing Fraulein Else Band, a favorite 
singer, with the explanation, " I cannot use a singer who is 
praised to the skies by the Jewish [meaning liberal] press." 
In Budapest Apponyi was sarcastic at the Jews' expense, and 
the Jews were much exercised when their chief rabbi and pres- 
ident of the community failed to receive the usual invitation 
to the Emperor's birthday dinner. On the other hand, there 
were protests in the German part of Bohemia against Lueger, 
and the Bector of the Vienna University accorded recognition 
to "the Jewish nationality.'' The Emperor graciously con- 
ferred the order of Francis Joseph on Mr. Ephraim Cohen of 
the Laemmel School, Jerusalem. The unfortunate Hilsner 
14 



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206 AMERICAN JEWISH YEAR BOOK 

was not forgotten, and Dr. Friederich Elbogen's appeal to the 
Emperor excited attention, but did not re-open the case. The 
Austrian Jewish Union offered a reward of 20,000 kronen for 
the discovery of the Polna murderer, or for proof of Hilsner's 
innocence. Jewish girls continued to disappear behind con- 
vent walls, and there was a case in Dubrow, Tamow district. 
Voluntary withdrawals from the Jewish community keep up, 
though in March they numbered 46 in Vienna, which is below 
the average of last year. The Jewish art movement, mani- 
festing itself in many countries, showed in Austria in connec- 
tion with the Emperor's Diamond Jubilee, when many notable 
works of Jewish artists were exhibited. Dramatic art came to 
the fore in connection with Dr. Arthur Schnitzler, who re- 
ceived the Grillparzer prize of the year for a successful play. 
The Kadimah, the oldest Jewish university society, celebrated 
its twenty-fifth anniversary in Vienna. 

Bulgaria exhibits a welcome change from the usual tale of 
Jewish oppression. The Jews appear to be at perfect peace 
with the government and with their neighbors. Prince Ferdi- 
nand received the rabbi and a committee on the occasion of 
the celebration of the twentieth anniversary of his accession, 
and felicitations were exchanged. The new ministry evinces 
philo-Semitic tendencies, and there is an absence of causes 
for friction. Jewish children attending Christian schools 
must show certificates that they are receiving proper religious 
instruction. The Zionists and the gymnastic societies, known 
under the name of Maccabaeus, met and displayed on Easter. 
Nevertheless there was a blood accusation, quickly put down 
by the authorities, and a serious complaint of the degeneracy 
of Jewish girls. A society was founded to further Judeo- 
Spanish literature in Bulgaria. Canada was chiefly concerned 



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THE YEAR 207 

with questions growing out of Eoumanian immigrants, with 
whom Canadians have not had satisfactory experience. Dr. 
Sonnenfeld, representative of the ICA, who toured the country, 
estimates the entire Jewish population at sixty thousand, of 
whom about thirty thousand live in Montreal, eight to ten 
thousand in Toronto, and six to seven thousand in Winnipeg. 
The size of the colonies is given as follows: Hirsch (estab- 
lished in 1892), 41 families, Qu'Appelle (1899), 153 farmers, 
Bender group, 24 families, besides about three hundred scat- 
tered farmers. The Zionists dedicated an imposing institute 
at Toronto, and held enthusiastic meetings. The inevitable 
Sunday law came to the front, and was written on the statute 
book. Eabbi Meldola de Sola celebrated his twenty-fifth anni- 
versary as minister of the Portuguese synagogue at Montreal.. 
The congregation at Havana, Cuba, considered the advisa- 
bility of engaging a permanent rabbi. In Denmark the two 
hundred and fiftieth anniversary of the Jewish settlement was 
celebrated. At the meeting in memory of Dr. Alfred Noble, 
Eabbi Wohlstein delivered the address, and the Society of 
Industry held a Jewish exhibition in Copenhagen. The in- 
creased attention paid Judeo-Spanish is indicated by the es- 
tablishment of the Vara printed in that language at Cairo, 
Egypt, where a new building for the Jewish Free School came 
into existence. Alexandria launched the Jewish Fraternal 
Union, devoted to Judaism and Jewish interests. Chief Rabbi 
Hazzan of that city visited the Sudan, where he was cordially 
received by the English governor. Sir Reginald Wingate, who 
invited the Jews to settle in the country. Three months later 
Rabbi Hazzan died, mourned by the Jews of his part of the 
world. 



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208 AMERICAN JEWISH YEAR BOOK 

England. — The Aliens Act continued to receire the sharp- 
est criticism from English Jews, whose sustained attempt to 
ameliorate its rigors dieserved better success than they 
achieved. The criticism may be summed up in the statement, 
" One never knows in what unexpected form the capacity for 
cruelty in this act and its administration may be elicited/' 
The Board of Deputies of London formally resolved to for- 
ward to the Prime Minister a memorial praying an amend- 
ment of the Act, but the minister is no more, and the present 
government has not heeded the request. Even Arnold White 
riddles the act — and the Jews at the same time. In 1907 
there were 974 exclusions against 931 in 1906, and the final 
deportations (1907) were 802, of whom 398 were sent away 
for medical reasons. The expulsions were 317 against 294 
for the previous year. The injustice of the act was pointed 
out by an English surgeon, who maintained that deportations 
for trachoma were often made when the existence of the dis- 
ease had not been absolutely ascertained. London has many 
Roumanian transmigrants, generally on the way to Canada, 
some of them fine specimens of manhood. The financial trou- 
bles of the Jewish Board of Guardians became so acute that a 
large meeting was called in its behalf. Lord Rothschild pre- 
siding. Funds were raised, but not sufficient to putthe Board 
on its feet. Mr. Nathan Straus of New York invaded Eng- 
land with his milk depots, and a number of them were grate- 
fully received. The White Slave traffic warranted the forma- 
tion of a Jewish association for the protection of girls and 
women. Lord Swaythling continued his fight against Mr. 
Montefiore and Mr. Abrahams as members of the board of 
religious education, and Chief Rabbi Adler thundered against 
intermarriage. Mr. Montefiore and Mr. Abrahams remain 



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THE YEAR 209 

on the board, and intermarriages continue. The Koyal So- 
ciety for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals was able at 
last to approve the casting apparatus used by Jewish slaugh- 
terers in Ijondon, and for the first time kosher tinned meats 
were imported from Australia. Zangwill, aided by the Hilfs- 
verein, made arrangements with the North German Lloyd 
Steamship Company, by which Jewish passengers were to get 
kosher food during the voyage. Lord Avebury was ou hand 
with a strict Sunday law, and the protests of former years 
were repeated. A Jewish interest was given to politics by 
Winston ChurchilFs bid for the Jewish vote of Manchester, 
and after his defeat a spirited discussion arose in regard to 
the wisdom of mixing politics with religion. A distinct addi- 
tion to the Jewish population of London was the coming of 
Asher Ginsberg (Achad Ha^Am), who abandoned Odessa for 
the English metropolis. Dr. Adolph Buechler was appointed 
principal of Jews' College, succeeding Professor Michael 
Friedlaender, who became principal emeritus; Mr. Israel Gol- 
lancz was chosen to preside over the destinies of the Macca- 
beans, and Dr. Joseph Hochman became minister of the West 
End synagogue, succeeding the late Eev. Simeon Singer, the 
publication of whose literary remains was one of the literary 
features of the Jewish year. The " Jewish Quarterly ^' made a 
welcome reappearance, the Mocatta library was opened, Nor- 
dau and Shaw had a characteristic debate, a proposal for a 
University in Jerusalem was discussed and buried, and Dr. 
Gaster announced his discovery of a Samaritan version of the 
Book of Joshua, a discovery that has been received with cau- 
tion by the learned world. Among the King's birthday 
honors was a knighthood for J. J. Duveen, who had presented 
a wing to the Tate Picture Gallery. 



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210 AMERICAN JEWISH YEAR BOOK 

France. — ^Eabbi Alfred Levy of Lyons was ehosen to suc- 
ceed the late Zadoc Kahn as Grand-Rabbin of France, and was 
inducted into office on April 6. Besides the Grand-Kabbin, 
the following were elected rabbis of the Central Consistory: 
Eabbi Israel Levi, editor of the Revise des Etudes Juives, and 
Eabbi Joseph Lehmann, director of the Eabbinical Seminary. 
The Union Liberate, the so-called reform organization, selec- 
ted M. Louis L6vy as rabbi, and began services on the first 
day of Hanukah. The call for Sunday legislation penetrated 
to France, and a law upon the subject was passed. The Sepa- 
ration Law had the curious eflEect of raising a cry against 
those public schools wherein the great majority of the pupils 
were Jews. The Socialists and the League of the Rights of 
Man agitated for the closing of four municipal schools, which 
they called Jewish schools, and M. de Pressens6 pushed the 
agitation with vigor. There was even talk of prohibiting the 
Abrahamic rite as performed by the Mohelim, and the ques- 
tion is not yet settled. In the municipal election in Paris 
the anti-Semites were defeated, though M. M6ry of the 
Libre Parole managed to win. An echo of the rabbinical 
conference of last year, which mitigated some Sabbath re- 
strictions, was the protest of Eabbi Lubetsky, fortified by the 
opinion of Chief Rabbi Adler of London and other prominent 
rabbis, against permission to ride in the tramcar on the 
Sabbath, and changes in marriage regulations. Perhaps the 
greatest sum available for Jewish charity during the year 
was derived from the estate of Baroness Adolphe de Roth- 
schild, who left ten million francs for charitable purposes. 
Out of this sum the Board of Guardians of Paris will build a 
Jewish hospital, the need of which has been long felt. M. 
Moise Schwab, the librarian of the Bibliotheqiie Nationale, 



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THE YEAR 211 

achieved the double distinction of publishing a Eeport on the 
Hebrew Inscriptions in Spain, which brought him special 
commendation, and of being elected president of the Societe 
des Etudes Juwes. The income of the Consistorial Associa- 
tion of Paris footed up for the year 991,676 francs. An esti- 
mate of the Jewish population of France puts the number at 
two hundred thousand; figured on the basis of deaths, Paris 
was found to have 55,000 Jews. Two cases during the year 
brought the Jews in unpleasant connection with the French 
government where the French are most sensitive, namely, 
with its martial service. Jacob Law, a Eussian Jew, riding 
on a tramcar, suddenly, without apparent reason, fired a 
revolver at passing troops. The punishment for his unpar- 
donable crime wa^ fifteen years at hard labor and twenty 
years^ banishment from France. The other was the case of 
Charles B. UUmo, an ensign in the navy, found guilty of sell- 
ing military secrets to a foreign power. He is said to have 
confessed. On February 22 he was sentenced to DeviFs Is- 
land for life. The fact that there has been no demonstration 
in his behalf argues either that he is guilty or has no influ- 
ential friends. The year would be incomplete without a Drey- 
fus episode, and it came theatrically enough. On the occa- 
sion of the removal of the remains of Zola to the Pantheon, 
with elaborate ceremonies, a crack-brained journalist, one 
Gregori, fired upon Dreyfus and wounded him in the arm. 
The attempt of the people assembled to lynch his assailant 
indicates how far we have traveled since the days of the 
original agitation. 

Germany. — ^The Verband der deutschen Juden held its 
second general meeting at Frankfort in October, at which 
over four hundred delegates were present. The meeting was 



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212 AMERICAN JEWISH YEAR BOOK 

considered highly satisfactory, and a number of questions con- 
fronting the Jews were discussed by able men. Professor 
Hermann Cohn read a paper on " Eeligious Postulates," and 
Professor Martin Philippson presented a paper, " State In- 
terests in Jewish Policy." The Verband expressed itself 
strongly in regard to discrimination against Jews in Germany, 
and formulated its demands in a vigorous appeal for reform. 
There was definite complaint against the treatment of Jewish 
foreigners, who are not allowed naturalization. The flagrant 
case of an Austrian-Jewish engineer who had been expelled 
from the country gave point to this protest. The German 
Union of Jewish Women met at Frankfort about the same 
time, to discuss the White Slave traffic, which unfortunately 
engages the attention of Jews in many countries. The Con- 
ference of the German Union of Liberal Eabbis, which met in 
Berlin in June, determined upon a new translation of the 
Bible for home and school use. The orthodox rabbis are con- 
testing the field with their reform or liberal brethren, and if 
the latter can point to the new home of the Lehranstalt fur 
die Wissenschaft des JudenthumSj the orthodox can pride 
themselves on the magnificent new synagogue of the Israeli- 
tische Religionsgesellschaft in Frankfort. In Bavaria there 
was some friction between the two wings, the orthodox desir- 
ing government recognition, and declaring against the revis- 
ion of the " Jewish Edict," which compels Jews to belong to 
Jewish congregations. In Saxony Shehitdh fell under the 
ban, and the Sunday closing movement came up in Berlin, 
Cologne, Mayence, and Kitzingen. On the other hand, the 
Prussian budget for the first time provides for an expenditure 
in the interest of the Jewish religion, forty thousand marks, 
and one hundred thousand marks for a chapel for Jewish 



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THE YEAR 213 

prisoners. The Emperor was gracious enough to contribute 
seven thousand marks towards the erection of a synagogue at 
Schirmeck, Alsace. The elections for trustees of the Berlin 
community showed apathy, for whereas three years ago forty- 
four per cent of the electors participated, this year but seven- 
teen per cent voted. The revenue for the past year was 2,416,- 
510 marks. The proportion of the Jews to the general popu- 
lation has declined in five years from 1.40 per cent to one per 
cent, though the Jewish population of Berlin has increased. 
Conversions are on the increase, being 417 for the last trien- 
nial, against 377 for the preceding three years. Anti-Semitic 
pin-pricks continue, though Count Piickler found his way to 
the insane asylum, towards which he has been gravitating for 
some years. There was an agitation against the Verjvdung 
of the public high schools, at once a tribute to Jewish desire 
for education, and a testimony to the universality of Jewish 
characteristics. The Frankfurter Zeitung complained of dis- 
crimination against German Jewish travelers in Eussia, in 
spite of the supposed settlement of this question. The general 
attitude is better expressed in such incidents as a judicial 
decision that calling a Jew a " Hebrew '^ is not actionable, 
and the fining of a Jewish minister in Dornheim for attend- 
ing a Christian funeral in his ministerial robes. Monuments 
to Jews were considered in some places. A committee in 
Berlin was appointed to erect a monument to Moses Mendels- 
sohn, and at Munich a meeting determined upon a national 
memorial to Heine. Heine monuments were not received 
with universal approbation, and both Cologne and Frankfort 
rejected such a memorial. His art, nevertheless, is not treated 
so cavalierly, and the Frankfurter Zeitung made an appeal 
for the purchase of the collection of Heine's letters in the pos- 



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314 AMERICAN JEWISH YEAR BOOK 

session of his nephew, Baron Ludwig von Embden. The im- 
portant centenaries of the birth of Seligman Baer Bamberger 
(November 6) and of Samson Raphael Hirsch (June 20) 
were celebrated. A minor celebration was that of Professor 
Dr. Israel Levy, who reached the twenty-fifth year of service 
at the Jewish Theological Seminary at Breslau. Among per- 
sonal distinctions may be mentioned the acceptance of Dr. 
Felix Adler as Eoosevelt professor at the University of Ber- 
lin; the decoration of Albert Ballin, the shipping magnate, 
with the Order of the Crown, first class, the first Jew to be so 
distinguished; the election of Herr Dinzinger to the Town 
Council of Munich, the first Jew who has sat in that body for 
twenty years; the appointment of Leo Graetz, son of the his- 
torian, as regular professor of physics at the University >>of 
Munich. In fact, the list of these minor honors can be ex- 
tended almost indefinitely. In accord with the spirit of the 
times, Berlin had an exhibition of the works of Jewish artists 
at the Gallery of Ancient and Modem Art, at which over 
sixty artists exhibited. No account of Germany could be 
complete without reference to the work of the Hilfsverein der 
deutschen Juden and its eflScient director. Dr. Paul Nathan. 
An account of its activities would stretch this review to inor- 
dinate length. Its membership has increased to eighteen 
thousand located in over five hundred German cities, and its 
income from dues to 130,000 marks. It supports thirty-five 
schools with four thousand pupils, and in 1907 spent 750,000 
marks in philanthropic and social work. It was made joint 
trustee of a fund of a quarter of a million francs from the 
family of the late Wolf Wissotsky of Moscow, to which it will 
add a like sum, all to be used in the establishing of technical 
schools in Palestine and the East. Dr. Nathan spent three 



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THE YEAR 215 

months in Syria and Palestine, inspecting the country and 
the Jewish inhabitants. He was not optimistic over the pres- 
ent ability of Palestine to receive large accessions of Jewish 
immigrants. Whatever it may be able to do hereafter, now 
conditions are not favorable. He is inclined to do mainly edu- 
cational work in the Holy Land, and has arranged for the in- 
crease of the Hilfsverein schools in that country. Dr. Nathan 
also visited Russia, and was even more pessimistic as to con- 
ditions there. He sees no immediate prospect of relief, and 
sane and hopeful as he is, he could only say of Eussia, " The 
general condition of Jewry is alarming.'^ 

Holland. — Two notable conferences took place in Holland, 
the Peace Conference, of which the Jews had vague hopes 
which were not realized, and the Eighth Zionist Congress, of 
which more hereafter. The first conference of ^^ Ibriah,^^ the 
association for the development of Hebrew as a living lan- 
guage, with headquarters at Berne, also met at The Hague; 
shortly before the Zionist congress. Holland was the place 
of the meeting for the purpose of bettering the admin- 
istration of the Edlukah in Palestine. The famous jurist T. 
M. C. Asser celebrated his seventieth birthday, and A. A. de 
Pinto, president of the High Court of Justice, who welcomed 
the Zionists, died at an advanced age. The Jewish communi- 
ties appear to be growing by Russian accessions, favored by 
the general good position the Jews occupy. Two important 
philanthropic works were initiated, a consumptive hospital 
for children at Katw'JK-on-Sea, and an insane asylum for 
Jews at Apeldoorn. — " I have been bom a Jew and have ever 
been proud of belonging to Judaism,^' wrote Signor Ernesto 
Nathan to the Jewish congregation at Fiinfkirchen, Hungary, 
when congratulated upon his election as Mayor of Rome. The 



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216 AMERICAN JEWISH YEAR BOOK 

election was accepted as a matter of course in Italy, and the 
King sent his congratulations, but it created an impression 
in the world at large. There was clerical muttering, but the 
Nathan family is too well established in Italy to be disturbed 
by partisan criticism. To the imaginative the election was 
one of the events of the year. Italian Jews have taken up the 
movement in behalf of the Falashas, and a Committee Pro- 
Falashas has been formed, consisting of Professor Margulies 
of Florence, Professor Moise Funzi, and Advocate R. Otto- 
lenghi, who have begun operations by proposing to establish 
a school for educating the Falashas, at Erythrea. The Sun- 
day law gathered to itself some new enactments. The new 
building of the International Institute of Agriculture, for 
which so much has been done by David Lubin, an American 
Jew, was opened in Rome. A blood accusation pamphlet 
made its appearance in Malta, but the police prosecuted the 
author so promptly and energetically that he was only too 
glad to apologize; and he was released upon the entreaty of 
the Jews themselves. We are so used to Russia as the classic 
ground of persecution that the sufferings of the Jews of 
MOEOCCO receive little attention, yet during the past year they 
have been beaten and plundered in a way that makes the 
pogrom lose its unique distinction. The Jews of Casablanca 
were attacked by the soldiers themselves in September, and in 
March were massacred. Moroccan Jews knew what to expect 
when Mouley Haiid declared a holy war against Mouley Abd 
el Azis, for holiness has often meant the destruction of their 
lives and property. To finance his war Mouley Hafid de- 
manded twenty-two years^ arrears of poll-tax from the Jews 
of Marrakesh, who made the best bargain they could. The 
war brought death and destruction, the Jewish colonists at 



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THE YEAR 217 

Setatt being rooted out, and those in Mzab massacred in orien- 
tal fashion. The distress at Tangier and Casablanca, where 
numerous fugitives gathered, was marked. The Hilfsverein 
sent 12,500 francs through the Alliance Israelite Vniverselle, 
which organization inaugurated in March a Girls^ School at 
Mogador. According to M. Jean Hess^ book on Israel in 
Morocco, the Jewish population of the country is between 
one hundred and fifty thousand and two hundred thousand. 
This is a substantial increase over the Alliance estimate of 
one hundred thousand. 

Palestine. — Palestine had the benefit of the visits of three 
observers, Mr. Jacob H. Schiff, Dr. Paul Nathan, and Mr. 
Davis Trietsch. Mr. Schiif remained only a short while and 
confined his visit mainly to Jerusalem, which benefited by his 
usual generosity. He did not return enthusiastic over present 
prospects in Palestine, but is open-minded as to its future 
possibilities. Mr. Trietsch saw only progress. Dr. Nathan 
spent three months in Syria and Palestine, as has been 
mentioned. In reporting to his executive committee he dwelt 
on the growing importance of Hebrew as the vernacular, 
and deprecated the teaching of a European language as if 
it were an elementary necessity. The late Dr. Jacob Voor- 
sanger, who visited Palestine early in 1907, declared on his 
return to America in August, that the country was of no 
value to the Jews. The failure of rain brought famine 
and distress to Jerusalem, where provisions rose almost to 
prohibitive prices. Yet there can be no doubt that the 
country is making progress, and that its commercial and 
economic outlook is an improvement on what it was not so 
long ago. The London Economist devoted a long and fav- 
orable article to Palestinian development, and the British 



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218 AMERICAN JEWISH YEAR BOOK 

Consular Report shows that in one year the cambined exports 
and imports increased from 814,000 pounds sterling to 
1,160,000. The advance is put down in great measure to the 
Jewish influx. The Haifa-Jerusalem branch of the Hedjez 
railroad will be soon begun, and will be finished in two years. 
A building boom in 1907 added about one hundred houses to 
Jerusalem. There is mention of a Land Development Com- 
pany to be chartered in England with a capital of £50,000 for 
the purpose of buying land in Palestine, dividing, improving, 
and then renting or selling. The Society Agudat Netaim, 
organized for plantation and commercial purposes, and the 
Society B'nai Jehvdah opened a special branch, Kodesh Mik- 
dash, to encourage the sale of Palestinian products abroad. 
In New York the Ahusat Nahlah was formed for land and 
- agricultural purposes. There is no lack of associations for the 
improvement of the condition of Palestine. In the religious 
field may be noted the selection and installation of Elijah 
Panigel as Haham Bashi of Jerusalem, and the final govern- 
ment confirmation, after much travail, of Babbi Jacob Me'ir 
as Chief Rabbi of Salonica. A religio-economic item is the 
arrival of Rabbi I. Horowicz to take charge of the (Jerman- 
Dutch Halukah, sent by the Amsterdam committee. A little 
spice was given to religious discussion by a warm debate be- 
tween Griinhut, orthodox, and the radical Ben Jehudah, who 
proved equal to the task of finishing the second part of his 
great dictionary and sustaining his side in the argument. 
Something was added to the picturesqueness of the colonies 
by the establishment of a colony near Petah Tihwah by Cau- 
casian mountaineers. One of the periodic reports that the 
Sultan was in favor of liberal concessions to the Jews of 
Palestine made its appearance, and he must be well-disposed 



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THE YEAR 219 

towards them, for when, through the neglect or the conni- 
vance of the Kaimakan of Jaifa, thirteen Jews were wounded 
in a riot on Purim, as soon as the facts were known in Con- 
stantinople, the officer was summarily dismissed. On Lag 
be-Omer what has become the art event of the year took place, 
the second exhibition of the Bezalel Art School. There were 
six divisions: 1. Drawing and Modeling. 2. Work of Pre- 
paratory Class. 3. Carpet Production. 4. Work of Masons. 
5. Work of Night School. 6. Department for Woodwork. 
The exhibition reflected the wisdom and zeal of its director, 
Boris Schatz. Professor 0. Warburg is president of the organ- 
ization, and Dr. Paul Nathan, first vice-president. The first 
graduation will take place in March, 1909. 

EouMANiA. — As has been remarked, increased Eoumanian 
immigration to this country in spite of adverse economic con- 
ditions, evidences the pressure at home. The government is 
engaged in a deliberate and sustained campaign against the 
Jews. An order was issued refusing Eussian Jews permission 
to enter Eoumania even when fleeing from a pogrom, and, fol- 
lowing the riots of last year, a limit was set upon the amount 
of land fi Jew may control. Expulsions from villages which 
began in March, 1907, were continued throughout the year, 
and industrial establishments, even when owned by Jews, 
were not allowed to have more than one-third of their em- 
ployees of that persuasion. The Bucharest gas company was 
flned for not complying with this order. A new law was made 
forbidding ^^ aliens ^^ to engage in the wine business, and 
thousands were ruined. Conditions among the Jews were 
described as terrible, and they are continually getting worse. 
Members of the United States Immigration Commission vis- 
ited Eoumania, where they had an opportunity of seeing how 



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220 AMERICAN JEWISH YEAR BOOK 

immigrantB are manufactured by law. Dr. Kaminka, of the 
Allianz of Vienna described the conditions in this terse phrase, 
" silent and bloodless massacre.^^ The criticism of Eoumania's 
action is found in Professor Von Bar's (Gottingen) essay in 
the Revue des Droits Internationales, in which he demonstrates 
that Roumania has no right to deny to native Jews, not sub- 
jects of foreign powers, the right of citizenship. It is estimated 
that some ten thousand were affected by the expulsion decrees. 
M. Eonetti Roman, a native of Galicia, but a Roumanian poet 
of note, died at Jassy, and his death evoked encomiums for 
his contribution to Roumanian literature. The Jewish com- 
munity at Belgrade, Servia, is estimated at 3500 souls. It 
receives an annual grant of $2000 from the Servian govern- 
ment. There was a little anti-Semitism in the press of South 
Africa, but in general the tone maintained in all English 
countries prevailed. W. Ehrlich was elected at Bloemfontein 
to the first representative body of the newly-formed common- 
wealth, Wm. Yager was for the third time elected mayor 
of Kimberley, and Morris Alexander, of Cape Town, was 
elected a member of the Assembly of Cape Colony. The 
celebration of the fiftieth anniversary of the congregation 
at Port Elizabeth reminds us that the Jews have been there 
some time. Johannesburg has a Maccabean Society lately 
organized, but the complaint in that city is on account of 
the lack of organized work. The Talmud Torah was de- 
scribed as "costly and unsuccessful.^^ Immigrants fleeing 
from Morocco were welcomed in Southern Spain^ and the 
well-known friend of the Jews, Senator Angelo Pulido, 
founded, in Madrid, the Revista Critical in which one section 
is devoted to " Sephardic Letters,'^ being communications sent 
by Sephardic Jews to the editor. The Jewish congregation at 



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THE YEAR 221 

Elartoum, in the Soudan, was organized, and the late Chief 
Babbi Hazzan of Alexandria inducted the rabbi into oflSce. 
In the Canton of Zurich, Switzebland, Dr. David Farb- 
stein, a Russian Jew, was elected on the local Socialist ticket. 
— A fire visited the Jewish quarter in Constantinople on 
March 16, leaving six thousand Jews homeless and without 
food. An appeal to the American Jewish Committee was 
quickly answered, and with contributions from other places, 
some of the damage was repaired. Much was made of the 
dedication of the handsome Hirsch Hospital at Salonica on 
May 3. The Sultan, alive to the possibilities of his Asiatic 
dominions, appointed a commission to study the economic re- 
quirements of Syria. Dr. Bier, his private physician, was 
further honored and made adjutant to the Sultan, whom 
Vamb^ry called "a friend to the Jews."- According to re- 
port, the Turkish ruler received the Chief Rabbi of Turkey 
in private audience, and intimated that he was ready to con- 
sider concessions to the Jews. A committee headed by David 
Wolffsohn was given the delicate task of carrying the nego- 
tiation forward. 

EUSSIA 

The election for the Third Duma found the Jews almost 
apathetic. For the First Duma they went in body and soul, 
and elected a delegation of their ablest men; during the sec- 
ond campaign they divided into parties, broke their strength^ 
and sent a small and willing, but not unusually able repre- 
sentation. At the time of the third election they had been ex- 
hausted, the Black Hundreds were pressing them at every 
point, the revolution had disappeared, with it had gone most 
of Jewish hopes, and the government, bent upon getting the 
15 



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222 AMERICAN JEWISH YEAR BOOK 

kind of Duma it wanted, put every difficulty in the way of 
the Jews. The result was the election of " the Duma of land- 
lords/' in which the Jews had two representatives, Niselo- 
witch and Friedman, and which sat from November, 1907, to 
June, 1908, without considering the Jewish question. A 
feeble attempt at getting Jewish strength into the Duma was 
made when a nomination at Odessa was offered to Asher Gins- 
berg (Achad Ha' Am), but he declined to trauslate his advo- 
cacy into practical action, though he approved such action by 
the Jews who were finally elected. 

The two Jewish delegates to the Duma proved themselves 
worthy and able men, and boldly agitated for Jewish emanci- 
pation, even against the advice of their own party, the Con- 
stitutional Democrats, who thought at one time of expelling 
Niselowitch because he attacked them for their inactivity on 
the important matter. From the beginning, almost in the 
first week of the Duma, both delegates expressed themselves 
in favor of raising the Jewish question at all hazards. In 
the Duma itself, the Jewish representatives were properly 
treated, and received regular assignments on committees, Nis- 
elowitch being elected secretary of the Duma Finance Com- 
mittee, and Friedman appointed a member of the Committee 
on Education. The former announced that he was a Jew 
first and then a Constitutional Democrat, and the announce- 
ment caused no demonstration, though Milyukoff, for present- 
ing the views of the Constitutional Democrats, had the honor 
of being called traitor by Puriskewitch, and challenged to 
mortal duel. Ostrogorsky, probably remembering his own sad 
experience, advised against the introduction of the Jewish 
question in the Duma, which took good care to eschew every 
subject that might invite a threat of dismissal. Niselowitch 



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THE YEAR 223 

also called the attention of the Committee on Freedom of 
Conscience to the fact that two girls had been forcibly taken 
to the Catholic convent at Grodno; declared his intention 
of submitting a bill in favor of Jewish emancipation; with 
his colleague he replied to the criticisms of Krupensky; and 
joined in the famous debate in regard to the Jews in the 
Eussian army. Looking back over the record of the Third 
Duma, would he be willing to repeat the statement he made 
in December : " I believe in the sense of justice of the Eussian 
people. I am confident that the better classes of the nation 
will recognize our claim as correct**? 

As early as March the question to recruit or not to recruit 
Jews for the army was raised, and Niselowitch showed by 
official figures that the charge that the Jews would not serve 
was groundless. According to government statistics, the 
Jewish quota and the number actually recruited were as 
follows : 

Quota Actually served 

1902 13,164 1»,705 

1903 13,250 19,911 

The total number of Jews in the Eussian army is given as 
54,276, 4.37 per cent of all, whereas the Jews constitute only 
4.15 per cent of the population. In May the great debate 
came ofiE, and though few seriously took the stand of the 
Novae Vremya, that the Eussian defeats in the East were 
due to the presence of Jewish soldiers in the Eussian ranks, 
Gutchkoif, a leader of the Octobrists, gave the following 
reasons why they should be excluded: they avoid military 
service, they failed during the recent war, they are revo- 
lutionists. If the Jews avoid the service, it would be un- 
necessary for the government to exclude them. One can 



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224 AMERICAN JEWISH YEAR BOOK 

imagine the hearing Jews would get when they could not even 
say that they were ready to defend their country. From the 
beginning the Constitutional Democrats made up their mind 
to have none of the Jewish question, and M. Komiakoff, imme- 
diately after his election as president of the Duma, announced 
that it was " inadvisable ^^ to take the matter up, and Milyu- 
koflE excused action on the ground that considering Jewish 
emancipation would only stir the reactionaries to passion. 
Neveriiheless, liberals were stigmatized as "friends of the 
Jews,^' and the situation can be understood when it is remem- 
bered that this was a reproach. Some of the Kussian leaders 
considered the advisability of denationalizing the Jews after 
the manner of Roumania, and Professor Kapustin^s argument 
against permitting Jews to remain in villages and in favor of 
educational restrictions was not needed, for expulsions were 
common, even in large cities like Kiev, and the reactionaries 
succeeded in forcing the resignation of Kauffmann, Minister 
of Education, and Gerasimoff, his assistant, for lacking in 
severity, and were relieved when Schwartz, a good reactionary, 
became minister. An incident was the resignation of certain 
professors of the Polytechnic Institute at Kiev on account of 
Stolypin^s order expelling Jews. This happened before the 
convening of the Duma, nevertheless the general verdict is 
that the government was more favorable to the Jews than the 
national legislature. 

When last August the Czar indorsed " read with pleasure,^* 
upon an address of the Grenuine Russians, he gave an impetus 
to that organization which it hardly needed in its work of 
reaction and destruction. Its progress has been accelerated 
since then, and it has been denominated " master of the situa- 
tion.^' It is the greatest political power in Russia. Count 



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THE YEAR 225 

Konovnitzin, the Odessa leader, transmitted the encourage- 
mient he received from the authorities to Ms followers, and 
the result in Odessa was appalling. Why should they re- 
strain themselves when the Count could report in the name of 
the Czar, " I give you my imperial word that none of these 
sentences against these heroes shall be carried out?^^ The 
promise must have been made, for the feature of the year was 
the pardons distributed after the trial of the pogromists of 
Kiev and Bialystok*. After the convictions at Kiev, the 
" court petitioned for amnesty/^ As heretofore, the Genuine 
Russians placarded many anti- Jewish proclamations, and 
pogroms, as usual, were the outcome, one at Kishinev in Sep- 
tember being particularly serious. In Odessa they were al- 
most continuous. In the latter part of February the organ- 
ization held a grand conference, where much attention was 
paid to the Jews. Konovnitzin was president of the assembly, 
and the conference was opened with grand ceremonies, at 
which high officials and the first vice-president of the Duma 
were present. The League of Consumers and the Working- 
men^s Guilds of Volhynia urged the combating of Jews, the 
Minsk branch advocated more restrictions, the monk Ilidor 
proved by a series of bloodthirsty sermons that their motives 
were imbued with Christian love. DavidoflE was for fresh 
legislation, and Dubrowin argued comprehensively in favor of 
every means to expel the Jews. The patriot Puriskewitch, 
irritated at President Dubrowin^s handling of the funds of 
the Union of Genuine Russians, threatened to establish a 
union of his own, more genuine and more Russian. Can this 
be a rift in the lute ? 

Odessa holds the primacy in oppression during the year, 
ranging from an attack on Achad Ha* Am to a charge of 4000 



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226 AMERICAN JEWISH YEAR BOOK 

roubles a year for water for the Jewish hospital, though no 
other similar institution has to pay. A subsidy of 17,000 
roubles was also withdrawn, though twenty-five per cent of 
the patients were and are Christians. Dr. Charles W. Du 
Bouchet, an American citizen, at one time United States vice- 
consul at Odessa, one of the most eminent surgeons of the 
city, who had incurred oflScial displeasure because of his 
assistance to victims of the pogroms of 1905, was arrested 
on flimsy charges, and directed to leave town, ten days 
being allowed him in order to perform several necessary 
operations. Not only did the Genuine Eussians make Odessa 
a hell for the Jews, but there were police persecutions and 
press incitement besides. In November the situation was 
described as one of " disorder and disorganization,^^ in Janu- 
ary there was a "reign of terror .^^ The Prefect, General 
Novitzky, was absolutely unable to keep order, and a Jew- 
ish deputation went to St. Petersburg to complain of his 
incompetence, if nothing worse. In the outbreak on Novem- 
ber 27, seven Jews suffered, and the next day the Prefect 
died. He was succeeded by Beifal, who in time gave way 
to Tolmatcheff, who innocently remarked to the Genuine 
Eussians, " It is possible to be a Genuine Eussian and yet be 
on friendly terms with other nationalities.^^ Little came of 
this proper sentiment, and even converted Jews felt the hand 
of the Genuine Eussians. They had men in the Town Coun- 
cil, and expressed their sentiments by conferring on Neid- 
hardt, a former prefect, removed because of his complicity in 
the great Odessa pogrom of several years ago, the title of 
honorary citizen of Odessa. At Passover the Jews had been 
so reduced in circumstances that ten thousand families ap- 
plied to the charities for help. 



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THE YEAR 227 

Eussian retribution had its turn, and the signers of the 
Viborg manifesto were subject not only to three months^ im- 
prisonment, but were deprived of political rights. Thus 
Winaver, Katzenelenson, Ostrogorsky, Lewin, Eosenbaum, Ja- 
cobson and others were eliminated permanently from Eussian 
public life, and the Jews made so much poorer politically. 
Sokolow was tried m absentia for publishing unauthorized 
articles in Die Telegraff, sentenced to three months^ im- 
prisonment, and fined three hundred roubles. From Cologne 
he views in undisturbed serenity the progress of Eussian jus- 
tice. He had merely published a reply of the Czar to a depu- 
tation of Genuine Eussians. Other papers had their trou- 
bles, and in Wilna Hazman, the Volhszeitung, the Wochenr- 
llatt, the Wort, and the VolJcsstimme were suppressed, and 
the same fate befell Winaver^s Svohoda e Ravenstuo. Yazkan, 
editor of the Tagellatt, and Tennebaum, editor of Haint, had 
the distinction of being imprisoned. The discriminating 
police of Kiev forbade Sholem Asch from giving readings in 
Yiddish. 

Calling aloud for constitutional rights and political free- 
dom, the Finns nevertheless showed no disposition to extend 
these blessings to the Jews. On the contrary, they frankly 
took the Eussian point of view, and declared with emphasis 
against any granting of Jewish rights. They were quite as 
anxious as the most genuine Eussian could be to see the Jew 
a political pariah. In the Finnish Diet the position was 
stated categorically, and both the Old Finns and the Young 
Finnish party refused to favor a petition for Jewish emanci- 
pation. The political possibilities of race antagonism have 
been learnt even by these strugglers for race preservation. 
In May the Danish critic Georg Brandes lectured in Hel- 



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228 AMERICAN JEWISH YEAR BOOK 

singfors, where Jewish brains are appreciated if Jewish rights 
are not, and a Jewish deputation seized the opportunity to 
wait on the eminent litterateur and to ask his consideration 
of their position. Unable to lecture his hosts on their politi- 
cal manners, Brandes could give no comfort to the deputa- 
tion, but he took an opportunity later to tell the Finns that 
a comparison between their attitude and that of the Eussian 
governor during the suspension of the Finnish constitution 
was in favor of the latter. So much for the liberty-loving 
Finns. 

Besides the negative virtue of refraining from extending 
Jewish rights, the Russian government and officials found 
time to do a number of positive and petty things. The Senate, 
which appears to have some kind of appellate judicial powers, 
busied itself constructing restrictions for the Jews, and made 
it unlawful for merchants of the first guild to employ Jewish 
clerks residing outside of the Pale. A blood accusation was 
scared up near Wilna, to subside in due course. Even the 
Sunday law, long a dead letter, was refurbished for the pur- 
pose of harassing the Jews. There were expulsions by the 
wholesale from Vladivostok, and Advocate Kalesh, who 
thought it advisable to return to Judaism after a period of 
conversion, was deprived of his title. Arrests have been so 
numerous as to lose all significance. It may interest Ameri- 
cans to recall the arrest of Mr. and Mrs. William English 
Walling and Mr. Kellogg Durland in St. Petersburg. E. 
Levine, correspondent of the Frankfurter Volksstimme, an 
Italian subject, had a more serious experience, for he was 
imprisoned and subjected to indignities. 

In spite of manifold discouragements the Jews exhibited 
activity in other than political matters. A Palestinian organ- 



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THE YEAR 229 

ization was able to draw an attendance of two thousand to a 
Purim ball in St. Petersburg, in Moscow a synagogue was 
dedicated for the fall holidays, Rabbi Eeines of Lida was 
granted permission to open a Eabbinical Institute, and a con- 
ference of the newly founded Society for Regulating Jewish 
Emigration was held in St. Petersburg. It arranged for the 
instruction of emigrants in English. The ICA founded a 
Bureau of Information for emigrants, which has had some 
success, and established a fortnightly magazine, The Jewish 
Immigrant, in connection with the work. A so-called syndi- 
cate was spoken of for the purpose of opening Jewish schools 
in Poland, the necessity of which is apparent, for, a little 
later on, the Warsaw authorities informed private schools that 
they must limit their Jewish pupils to thirty per cent of their 
whole number. Several attempts were made at larger organ- 
ization, beginning with the proposal of Rabbi Lurie of Minsk 
for a union of all rabbis. An agreement was reported among 
the four Jewish parties, Zionists, Jewish People's Group, 
Jewish People's Party, and Jewish Democratic Group, and a 
conference, described as important, between the Zionists and 
the Socialist party took place. Deputy Friedman of the Duma 
urged the formation of a general Jewish organization for the 
purpose of increasing Jewish representation in the Duma, but 
none of these suggestions have advanced beyond the stage of 
proposal. In the communal elections in Warsaw, the Zionists, 
aided by the Hassidim, managed to elect a number of their 
men. 

Balked in practical affairs, the Jews turned to art for con- 
solation, and a Society of Jewish Art and Literature was 
organized in Bialystok, of pogrom reputation. In St. Peters- 
burg, too, such an association was formed, calling itself the 



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230 AMBRICAN JEWISH TEAR BOOK 

Society for the Promotion of Jewish Art and Poetry. At the 
exhibition of the St. Petersburg Academy of Art, the feeling 
against the Jew could not prevent the awarding of the Grand 
Prize to Arnold Lydachovsky for his " Job and his Friends.^^ 
Finally the Czar ordered a statue of Peter the Great from the 
Jewish sculptor, Bemstamm. 

A Bussian census gives the Jewish population as 5,225,803, 
being 4.15 per cent of the entire population. The Peters- 
burger Zeitung criticises the oflScial figures and puts the 
Jewish population at 9,000,000, or 6.01 per cent of the total 
population. The number of Hedarim is estimated at twenly- 
five thousand. 

In July, King Edward of England met the Emperor of 
Russia at Eeval, and report has it that the King was in- 
formed of pending changes for the benefit of the Jews. 

ZIONISM AND TEEEITORIALISM 

The Eighth Zionist Congress was held in August, 1907, at 
the Gebouw van Kunst en Wetenschappen in The Hague, 
which was chosen in order that the attention of the delegates 
to the Peace Conference, in session at the same time, might be 
drawn to a movement meaning so much for the peace of the 
Jews. President Wolffsohn presided with tact and ability, 
and increased his reputation as a competent leader. The key- 
note of the Congress was " practical work in Palestine,^' and 
there was little developed to please those Zionists who see 
success only through the acquisition of a guaranteed charter 
granting ample powers. Noteworthy reports at the Congress 
were those of Warburg for the Palestinian Commission, 
Schmaryahu Lewin on National Education in Palestine, and 
the report concerning Schatz^s Bezalel. From the Congress 



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THE YEAR 231 

came authorization for the change of the charter of the Jew- . 
ish Colonial Trust in order to restrict its activities to Pales- 
tine and adjacent countries. At the hearing of the case in 
London on affidavits presented by Zangwill and others on one 
side, and Gaster and others on the other, the court ordered 
the ascertainment of the wishes of the stockholders in regard 
to the proposed change. A comparatively small proportion of 
the stockholders expressed their wishes, and at the final hear- 
ing Zangwill, in a brilliant address, pointed out that the 
shareholders had not enough interest in the change to express 
an opinion. The court dismissed the petition, stating that as 
the charter stands there was no necessity of doing work out- 
side of the limited area mentioned, so long as a majority of 
the shareholders did not demand wider activity. The loss in 
expense and prestige to the movement by the failure of the 
petition was considerable. An English court rendered another 
adverse decision when the estate left by an Englishman, A. 
J. Kenward, to the Zionist Congress, was distributed among 
his next kin, because the vagueness of the will was held to be 
fatal to its validity. The Partei Fund was established with 
Professor Warburg as president and Dr. Hantke as vice-presi- 
dent and secretary, and Hebrew was declared the official lan- 
guage of the Zionist Congress. The new undertakings of the 
Palestinian Commission were: 1, Olive Tree Society; 2, Pal- 
estine Land Development Company; 3, Palestine Bureau. 
President Wolffsohn made a number of trips in behalf of the 
movement, being received in audience by the Sultan, and re- 
porting the details to the meeting of the Greater Actions 
Committee in Berlin on January 6 ; but particulars have not 
been made public. He also visited London at the time of the 
hearing in the matter of changing the charter of the Trust, 



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232 AMERICAN JEWISH YEAR BOOK 

and made a " moderate " speech at a mass-meeting. In an 
address made in Germany in February Mr. WolflEsohn de- 
clared that the Sultan was in sympathy with the Zionist 
movement, and he also stated at the time that there were al- 
ready ten thousand olive trees in the Herzl forest. Perhaps 
the most important trip was that to Stolypin, at St. Peters- 
burg, the result of which was to remove the objections of the 
Eussian government to the Zionist movement. The usual 
annual Conference of the Federation of American Zionists was 
held, this time in Atlantic City, where a larger number of dele- 
gates gathered than at any previous conference. Dr. Harry 
Friedenwald was re-elected president, and Babbi Joseph Jasin 
was chosen secretary in place of Rabbi J. L. Magnes, 
who became vice-president. The chief result of the confer- 
ence was the determinaton to conduct a more thorough and 
better organized campaign of propaganda. Arrangements 
are being perfected for the establishment of a branch of the 
Jewish Colonial Trust in New York, which requires a special 
act of the legislature. Perhaps it is worth while mentioning 
that the students at both agricultural schools, Doylestown and 
Woodbine, have formed Zionist societies. Zionism can still 
provoke a public discussion, as is manifest from the debate 
that sprang up last summer, when Mr. Jacob H. Schiff ad- 
dressed a letter to Professor Schechter outlining his views 
on Zionism. The Zionists construed the letter as a reflection 
on their American patriotism, and at a meeting at Cooper 
Union, September 14, they asserted their right to full Ameri- 
can citizenship. The statement to which exception was taken 
was, ^^ I cannot for one moment concede that one can be, at 
the same time, a true American and an honest adherent of 
the Zionist movement.'^ Later Mr. Schiff explained his state- 



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THE YEAR 233 

ment, and the warmth has died out of the debate, the views, 
however, of each side apparently remaining unchanged. 
Canada, besides dedicating a handsome new Zionist building 
in Toronto, furnished a series of sympathetic expressions of 
opinion from several cabinet ministers. Mr. L. J. Greenberg 
resigned from the secretaryship of the English Federation, 
leaving control with Dr. Gaster, and a legacy of imperfect 
sympathy with the new regime. The Mizrahi met in Berlin 
and declared that Zionism in no wise contravenes the princi- 
ples of orthodox Jews, and in Austria, besides obtaining 
recognition as members of a distinct nationality, Zionist stu- 
dents ^^ demonstrated *^ in Vienna, when Professor Arnold, a 
convert, made depreciatory remarks about Herzl and Nordau. 
Zionist warmth extended to Bulgaria, where Rabbi Ehrenpreis 
became involved in a dispute with Zionists. The movement 
took on a new lease of life in Australia, and Shanghai exhibits 
unusual activity. During the year, the Grand Duke of Baden, 
who arranged the interview between the German Emperor and 
Herzl, died. The last report of the Jewish Colonial Trust 
did not show the growth expected; the profits of the Anglo- 
Palestine Company admitted of a dividend of 3f per cent. 
The ITO's Galveston work slackened after the financial panic, 
and it closed the year 1907 with something less than 900 im- 
migrants to its credit. At various times during the year Mr. 
Zangwill spoke in public intimating that his movement would 
soon be ready for action, and a number of guesses have been 
hazarded as to where ITO-land will be found. At present writ- 
ing a commission is about to go to North Africa to investigate 
a possible location. The novelist has abandoned much of his 
literary activity to devote himself to the fortunes of the ITO, 
and his ability, steadfastness, and devotion to the cause can 



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234 AMERICAN JEWISH YEAR BOOK 

hardly be overestimated. Outside of England the ITO has 
grown mainly in Russia, and there are bureaus in Kie£f, War- 
saw, Yekaterinoslav, Bialystok, Kovno, Wilna, Grodno, Zito- 
mir, Barditchev, and other places. Dr. N. Syrkin, a former 
Zionist, came to this country and made propaganda in the in- 
terest of the Territorialist-Socialists. 

LITERATUEE 

Prom a long list of books by Jews and on Jewish subjects, 
the following volumes have been selected as indicating the 
character of the literary output for the year : " History of the 
Jewish Philosophy of the Middle Ages,^^ by David Neumark; 
" Judaism,'^ by Israel Abrahams; two Columbia doctoral the- 
ses, " Parody in Jewish Literature,^' by Israel Davidson, and 
"The City of Gaza,'' by Martin A. Meyer; "A History of 
the Jews of England," by Albert M. Hyamson; "Israel in 
Europe," by G. P. Abbott; "History of Israel" (sixth vol- 
ume), by W. Javitz; "History of the Jews in Modem Times 
from the Prench Kevolution" (Vol. I), by Martin Philipp- 
son; Volume I of the Kussian Jewish Encyclopedia; Volume 
II of the Hebrew Encyclopedia; "Sect, Creed, and Custom 
in Judaism," by Jacob S. Eaisin; "The Literary Eemains 
of the Kev. Simeon Singer"; "Religion, Natural and Ee- 
vealed " (new edition), by N". S. Joseph ; " History of My Life 
in the Army," by Meno Burg; "Itinerary of Benjamin of 
Tudela," by Griinhut and Adler (eds.) ; "Eeligion and Wor- 
ship in the Synagogue," by Osterly and Bos; "Eecherches 
Bibliques" (Vol. IV), by Joseph Halevy; "Judah P. Ben- 
jamin," by Pierce Butler; "Hebraische Melodien — eine An- 
thologie," by Dr. Julius Moses; "Collected Writings of Da- 
vid KauflEmann" (Vol. I), edited by Dr. Brann; a new 



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THE YEAR 235 

edition of the "Historical Geography of the Holy Land/' 
by Geo. Adam Smith; "Jiidische Apologetik im Nentesta- 
mentlichen Zeitalter/' by D. J. Bergmann ; " Three Aramaic 
Papyri/' edited by Sachau. Dr. Max L. Margolis announced 
his intention of writing a concise grammar of the Talmud 
Babli; Urussov's Memoirs, translated by Herman Rosenthal, 
were gotten out by Harper's; and a German library for 
Jewish children, called Saron, was begun. Attention should 
be called to Mr. I. M. Rubinow's article on the Jews in 
Russia, printed by our Department of Labor and Conmierce, 
and to an article called " Some Problems of Modern Jewry/' 
by Rabbi Emil Cohn in the Preussische Jdkrhucher, Vol. 
CXXII. The books of the Jewish Publication Society have 
already been mentioned. The novel and the drama were 
represented by Sholem Asch's, "The God of Revenge," and 
' Nordau's " Dr. Kohen," a new uniform edition of ZangwilFs 
works, with illustrations by Mark Zangwill and J. H. Am- 
schewitz, was issued, and Samuel Gordon added another novel, 
" The New Galatea," to his rapidly increasing list. 

NECROLOGY 

The deaths include Judah Steinberg and Joshua Bershad- 
ski, Jewish writers; Joshua Steinberg of Wilna; Abraham 
Goldfaden (Starokonstantinoff, 1840 — New York, January 9, 
1908), the ''father" of the Yiddish drama, whose "Ben 
Ami" was in the course of production at the time of his 
death; Gregory Gershuni, revolutionist and agitator; Mme. 
Julie Herzl, widow of the Zionist leader, aged 37, at Alt- 
Aussee, on November 10; Mdme. Zadoc Kahn, widow of the 
late Grand-Rabbin of France (September 10) ; Baroness 
Adolphe de Rothschild (at Geneva, November 18), whose 



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236 AMERICAN JEWISH YEAR BOOK 

benefactions have already been mentioned; Charles L. Hall- 
garten of Frankfort, and Henry L. BischoflEsheim, of London, 
both bankers and philanthropists; the Oriental scholars Hart- 
wig Derenbonrg (Paris, June 17, 1844 — April 13, 1908), and 
Gustave Solomon Opperi; (Hamburg, 1836 — Beriin, March 
1?, 1908); the poet Eonetti Koman (1852— January 20, 
1908) ; the Eev. Professor Dr. Loewy (Aussee, December 10, 
1816 — ^London, May 22, 1908) ; Ludovic Halevy, novelist and 
dramatist; Edward Bacher, editor; Maurice Loewy, director 
of the observatory of Paris; Ignatz Brill, composer; Joseph 
Joachim, violinist; Herr Back, proprietor of the "Eetch*'; 
Eduard Glaser, explorer and Orientalist; and the venerable 
Isaac Eaphael Tedeschi, rabbi at Ancona. The American list 
includes Bemhard Felsenthal, rabbi and Zionist (Miinchs- 
weiler, January 2, 1822 — Chicago, January 12, 1908) ; Jacob 
Voorsaoger, rabbi aod editor (Amsterdam, November 13, 
1S52 — California, April 27, 1908) ; Alois Kaiser, cantor and 
composer (Szobotist, November 10, 1840 — Baltimore, Janu- 
ary 5, 1908) ; Angelo Heilprin, geologist and traveler (1853 
— July 17, 1907); Adolph Meyer congressman; Kandolph 
Guggenheimer, lawyer and public man; John Paley, editor; 
and Esther Ruskay, communal worker and author. 



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REPORT OF AMERICAN JEWISH COMMITTEE 237 



REPOKT OF THE AMERICAN JEWISH COMMITTEE 
November, 1906, to June 1, 1908 



OFFICERS AND EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 

PRESIDENT 

MAYER SULZBERGER, Philadelphia 

VICE-PRESIDENTS 

JULIAN W. MACK, Chicago 
ISAAC H. KEMPNBR, Galveston 

TREASURER 

ISAAC W. BERNHEIM, Louisville, Ky. 

EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 

CYRUS ADLER, Washington, D. C. 

HARRY CUTLER, Providence, R. I. 

EMIL G. HIRSCH, Chicago 

E. W. LEWIN-BPSTEIN, New York 

J. L. MAGNES, New York 

LOUIS MARSHALL, New York 

JACOB H. SCHIFF, New York 

ISADOR SOBEL, Erie 

CYRUS L. SULZBERGER, New York 

SECRETARY 

HERBERT FRIEDENWALD, 356 Second Ave., N. Y. City 

MEMBERS AND DISTRICTS 

Dist. I: Florida, Georgia, North Carolina, South Carolina. 2 
members: Moses H. Cone, Greensboro, N. C. (1911); Montague 
Triest, Charleston, S. C. (1909). 

Dist. II: Alabama, Mississippi, Tennessee. 2 members: Jac- 
ques Loeb, Montgomery, Ala. (1908); Nathan Cohn, Nashville, 
Tenn. (1908). 

Dist. Ill: Arizona, Louisiana, New Mexico, Texas. 2 mem- 
bers: Isidore Newman, New Orleans, La. (1909) ; Isaac H. Kemp- 
ner, Galveston, Tex. (1911). 

Dist. IV: Arkansas, Colorado, Kansas, Missouri. 3 mem- 
bers: Morris M. Cohn, Little Rock, Ark. (1909); David S. Leh- 
man, Denver, Col. (1911); Ellas Michael, St. Louis, Mo. (1910). 

16 I 

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238 AMERICAN JEWISH YEAR BOOK 

DiBt V: California, Idaho, Nevada, Oregon, Utah, Washing- 
ton. 3 members: Max C. Sloss, San Francisco, Cal. (1911). 

Dist. VI: Iowa, Michigan, Minnesota, Montana, Nebraska, 
North Dakota, South Dakota, Wisconsin, Wyoming. 4 members: 
Henry M. Butzel, Detroit, Mich. (1909) ; Victor Rosewater, Omaha, 
Neb. (1909); Max Landauer, Milwaukee, Wis. (1912). 

Dist. VII: Illinois. 7 members: Edwin G. Foreman (1909); 
Emil G. Hirsch (1908); B. Horwich (1912); Julian W. Mack 
(1908); Julius Rosenwald (1910); Joseph Stolz (1909), all of 
Chicago, 111.; Samuel Woolner, Peoria, 111. (1911). 

Dist. VIII: Indiana, Kentucky, Ohio, West Virginia. 5 mem- 
bers: Louis Newberger, Indianapolis, Ind. (1910); Isaac W. 
Bemheim, LouisYille, Ky. (1912) ; David Phllipson, Cincinnati, 0. 
(1909); J. Walter Freiberg, Cincinnati, 0. (1911); E. M. Baker, 
Cleveland, 0. (1908). 

Dist. IX: New Jersey, Pennsylvania. 9 members: Louis 
Hood. Newark, N. J. (1908); Isaac W. Frank, Pittsburg, Pa. 
(1912); Wm. B. Hackenburg (1909); B. L. Levinthal (1910); M. 
Rosenbaum (1910), all of Philadelphia, Pa.; Isador Sobel, Erie, 
Pa. (1911); Mayer Sulzberger, Phlla.. Pa. (1908); A. Leo Weil, 
Pittsburg, Pa. (1909); Benjamin Wolf, Phila., Pa. (1912). 

Dist. X: Delaware, District of Columbia, Maryland, Virginia. 
3 members: Cjrrus Adler, Washington, D. C. (1910); Harry 
Friedenwald, Baltimore, Md. (1910); Jacob H. Hollander, Balti- 
more, Md. (1910). 

Dist XI: Connecticut, Maine, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, 
Rhode Island, Vermont. 3 members: Isaac M. Ullman, New 
Haven, Conn. (1911); Lee M. Friedman, Boston, Mass. (1912); 
Harry Cutler, Providence, R. I. (1911). 

Dist. XII: New York. 17 members: Nathan Bijur (1911); 
Joseph H. Cohen (1912); Daniel Guggenheim (1908); Leon Ka- 
maiky (1908); Edward Lauterbach (1912); E. W. Lewin-Epetein 
(1908); Adolph Lewisohn (1912); David H. Lleberman (1909); 
Morris Loeb (1909); J. L. Magnes (1911), all of N. Y.; Louis 
W. Marcus, Buffalo, N. Y. (1908); Louis Marshall, N. Y. (1908); 
H. Pereira Mendes, N. Y. (1910); Simon W. Rosendale, Albany, 
N. Y. (1911); Jacob H. Schiff (1910); Isidor Straus (1912); 
Cyrus L. Sulzberger (1910), all of N. Y. 

CONSTITUTION 
Adopted November 11, 1906 



GENERAL DUTIES OF THE COMMITTEE 

The purpose of this committee is to prevent infringement of 
the civil and religious rights of Jews, and to alleviate the con- 



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REPORT OF AMERICAN JEWISH COMMITTEE 239 

sequences of persecution. In the event of a threatened or actual 
denial or Invasion of such rights, or when conditions calling for 
relief from calamities affecting Jews exist anywhere, correspond- 
ence may be entered Into with those familiar with the situation, 
and if the persons on the spot feel themselves able to cope with 
the situation, no action need be taken; If, on the other hand, 
they request aid, steps shall be taken to furnish it. 

DISTBICT BEPBESENTATION 

The members of the committee shall be based on the following 
districts: 

I. North Carolina, South Carolina, Georgia, Florida. 2 mem- 
bers. 

II. Tennessee, Alabama, Mississippi. 2 members. 

III. Louisiana, Texas, Arizona, New Mexico. 2 members. 

IV. Arkansas, Missouri, Kansas, Colorado. 3 members. 

V. California, Washington, Oregon, Utah, Idaho, Nevada. 3 
members. 

VI. Minnesota, Iowa, Wisconsin, Montana, Wyoming, North 
Dakota, South Dakota, Nebraska, Michigan. 4 members. 

VII. Illinois. 7 members. 

VIII. Indiana, Kentucky, Ohio, West Virginia. 5 members. 

IX. Pennsylvania, New Jersey. 9 members. 

X. Maryland, Virginia, Delaware, District of Columbia. 3 
members. 

XI. Maine, New Hampshire, Vermont, Massachusetts, Connec- 
ticut, Rhode Island. 3 members. 

XII. New York. 17 members. 



The committee shall at tfie first meeting be divided into five 
groups by lot, which groups shall hold ofllce for one, two, three, 
four, and five years respectively, their successors to serve five 
years. 

Members whose terms expire shall be succeeded by residents 
of the same district, and shall be elected by the Advisory Councils 
of the resi)ective districts. Elections shall be held on or before 
October 1 of each year, and the Secretary of the Committee shall 
be notified of the results on or before October 15 of each year. 

OFFICERS 

The officers of the committee shall be a President, two Vice- 
Presidents, and a Treasurer, selected from among the members, 
and a Secretary who need not be a member of the committee, and 
who shall be elected by the Executive Committee, unless otherwise 
ordered. The officers shall serve for one year or until their 
successors are elected. 

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240 AMERICAN JEWISH TEAR BOOK 



EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 

The committee shall elect nine members, who, with the four 
officers, President, Vice-Presidents, and Treasurer, shall constitute 
an Executive Committee, of which five shall be a quorum for the 
transaction of business. 

The powers of the Executive Committee shall be oo-extensive 
with the powers of the whole committee at all times when the 
whole committee is not in session. Their action shall be reported, 
at their discretion, to the members of the committee by mail, or 
to the whole committee by mail, or to the whole committee at its 
next meeting. Special committees may be designated by the 
Executive Committee from the body of the whole committee, 
which shall report to the Executive Committee from time to time. 

MEETINQ8 

A stated meeting of the whole committee shall be held annually 
on the second Sunday in November at the City of New York, 
unless the Elxecutive Committee in their discretion determine 
otherwise. Special meetings shall be called upon the written 
request of 25 members of the committee or may be called by the 
Executive Committee of its own motion. Twenty-one members 
shall constitute a quorum of the whole committee. 

Regular meetings of the Executive Committee shall be held at 
least once every three months. Special meetings of the Executive 
Committee may be held at the ins>tance of the chairman or at 
the request of three members of that committee. 

Notice of special meetings of the whole committee or of the 
Executive Committee shall be given by mail or telegraph to the 
members, stating as nearly as possible, within the discretion of 
the Executive Committee, the purpose for which the meeting is 
called. 

VACANCIES 

Vacancies caused by death, disability or resignation, shall be 
filled by the Advisory Council of the district in which the 
vacancy occurs. 

Upon the occurrence of a vacancy the Secretary shall notify 
the secretary of the district in which the vacancy exists, and an 
election shall be held by the Advisory Council of such district, 
within one month from the time of receiving such notification, 
and the Secretary shall be promptly notified of the result 

OFFICES AND AGENCIES 

The principal office of the committee shall be established in the 
City of New York, and other offices and agencies may be estab- 
lished outside of New York as the whole committee or the Exe- 
cutive Committee may from time to time deem necessary. 



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REPORT OP AMERICAN JEWISH COMMITTEE 241 



AMENDMENTS 

This Constitution shall be subject to alteration, revision, or 
amendment at any regular meeting, or at a meeting called for 
such purpose, provided that thirty days' notice be given of the 
proposed change, and that the motion for amendment be carried 
by a majority of at least 20 votes. 

ADVISORY COUNCIL 

I. OENERAIt POWEBS 

1. There shall be organized in each district, in the manner 
hereinafter provided, an Advisory Council for the following pur- 
poses: 

2. To take such action as shall from time to time be expressly 
delegated to it by the General or Executive Committees. 

3. To report promptly to the General or Executive Committees 
with respect to any subject that shall be referred to it for 
information or investigaticm. 

4. To consider such matters of Jewish interest as shall be 
brought to its attention through any agency, and to make such 
recommendations thereon to the General or Executive Committees 
as shall be deemed advisable, but in no case to initiate, authorize, 
or take any action except as specially thereunto delegated as 
hereinbefore provided. 

II. MEMBEBSHIP 

1. On or before October 1, 1907, the members of the General 
Committee from each district shall nominate to the Executive 
Committee ten Jewish residents of such district for every member 
of the Greneral Committee allotted to said district, and upon 
confirmation of such nominations by the Executive Committee, 
the persons so approved, together with the members of the 
General Committee from said district, shall constitute the Ad- 
visory Council thereof. Should the ExecutiTe Committee reject 
any nominee, new nominations shall be submitted for approval 
until the membership of the Advisory Council shall be complete. 
The General Committee or the Executive Committee may, by 
resolution adopted at any meeting, authorize an increase of the 
membership of the Advisory Council of any district, in which case 
the additional members shall be chosen in the manner herein- 
before provided, or their election or appointment by such Advisory 
Council may be authorized. 

2. Upon receiving notice of their selection members of the 
Advisory Council of each district shall organize in the manner 
designated by the members of the General Committee of each 
district. Each Council shall elect a chairman and such other 



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242 AMERICAN JEWISH TEAR BOOK 

officers as shall be deemed necessary. The members of said 
Ck>uncll other than those who are members of the General Com- 
mittee shall be allotted by the Secretary into five groups, who 
shall hold office for one, two, three, four, and five years respec- 
tively, and thereafter elections shall be held annually by the 
members of the Council to choose successors to those whose terms 
shall have expired, for a term of five years. Meetings of each 
Council shall be held from time to time as it shall by rule provide. 
3. All vacancies occurring in the membership of the Advisory 
Council subsequent to the formation of the original Advisory 
Council of each district, shall be filled by election by the Advisory 
Council of each district 

m. ELECTION OF MEMBEBS OF OENEBAI. COMMITTEE 

Vacancies in the General Committee shall be filled by the Ad- 
visory Councils of the respective districts. 

IV. EXPENSES 

The expenses of administration of each Advisory Council shall 
be borne by its district 

SPECIAL AND ANNUAL MEETINGS 

Meetings of the whole Cammittee were held during the year 
1907 on May 30, and on November 10. During the year 
1906-07 the Executive Commlittee held eight regular meet- 
ings and one special meeting. 

Eeports of Executive Committee 
May 30 and November 10, 1907 
organization 
At the first meeting of the Executive Committee, Mr. Sam- 
uel Woolner, of Peoria, was elected a member from District 
VII, and Rev. Dr. H. P. Mendes and Judge Samuel Qreen- 
baum were elected members from District XIL At subse- 
quent meetings the following persons recommended by the 
Executive Committee to fill vacancies, were elected by the 
members: 



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REPORT OF AMERICAN JEWISH COMMITTEE 243 

Montague Trieet^ District I. 
Jacques Loeb^ District II. 
Isaac D. Adler, District VI. 
Louis Newberger, District VIII. 
Isaac W. Bemheim, District VIII. 
Benjamin Wolf, District IX. 
Isaac W. Prank, District IX. 
Louis Hood, District IX. 
Isaac M. Ullman, District XI. 
Lee M. Friedman, District XL 
Isidor Straus, District XII. 
Louis W. Marcus, District XII. 

FUND FOR SAN FBANOISCO INSTITUTIONS 

At the meeting of the General Committee held on Novem- 
ber 11, 1906, the needs of the Jewish religious and educa- 
tional institutions of San Francisco, by reason of the earili- 
quake and fire, were placed before the Committee by Eev. Dr. 
Jacob Voorsanger. A resolution was adopted to raise the sum 
of $100,000, and the Executive Committee were directed to 
take the necessary steps to carry out the resolution. Early in 
December an appeal was issued to the members of the Com- 
mittee. Up to May 30, 1907, it was reported that $35,940.55 
had been subscribed. (Up to June 1, 1908, the total sub- 
scriptions amounted to $37,822.74.) 

ADVISORY COUNCIL 

A plan for the formation of an Advisory Council was pre- 
pared. (Adopted at the meeting held on May 30, as printed 
in this Eeport, pp. 241-2.) 



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244 AMERICAN JE2WISH YBAR BOOK 

EELATI0N8 WITH OTHBB 0BGANIZATI0N8 

The Committee established relations with the Alliance 
Israelite TJniyerselle^ the Jewish Colonization Association, 
the Busso-Jewish Committee^ the London Board of Deputies 
of British Jews, the Jewish Territorial Organization, the 
Anglo-Jewish Association, the Hilfsverein der deutschen 
Juden and the Central Zionist Bureau in Europe, and with a 
number of national organizations of this country. 

IMMIGRATION, LEGISLATION, ETO. 

The Committee watched with concern the discussions in 
Congress respecting immigration legislation, and when, under 
the act of February, 1907, a commission was selected to inves- 
tigate the subject of immigration, the President by request 
of the Executive Committee addressed the following letter to 
the Commission: 

Han, William P. Dillingham, Ohairm^in of the Immigration Comr 
mission, Washington, D. O. 

Deab Sm: At a recent meeting of the Executive Committee 
of the American Jewish Committee, I was directed to address the 
Immigration Cotmmission on a matter in which we have a serious 
interest, in addition to the concern which every citizen of the 
United States has in all things pertaining to the public welfare. 

As the Commission are well aware, the Jews of Russia, who 
prior to the year 1881 contributed no sensible proportion to our 
immigration, have since that time been subjected to such harry- 
ing persecutions and assassinations that many of the most active 
and enterprising have sought safety in flight, and have, in 
considerable numbers, emigrated to this country. The real im- 
pulsion to the movement is a dreadful mediseval persecution for 
conscience sake. On this ground alone all our sympathies would 
go out to any people so circumstanced, and we should be interested 
in seeing that no unnecessary obstacles should be put in the way 
of human beings fleeing from a place where the merest elementary 
rights of man are disregarded. Our interest is naturally in- 
creased by the fact that these are our brethren in race and faith, 

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REPORT OF AMERICAN JEWISH C50MMITTEB 245 

and that the persecution is due to the very opinions which, under 
our happy institutions, are openly professed by two millions of 
citizens and considerately respected by government and people. 

We are keenly alive to the right and duty of every government 
to protect its people against the incursion of criminals, paupers, 
lunatics, and other persons who would be public charges, but we 
deprecate most sincerely any nerveless or unmanly timidity about 
evils which may be coolly and sanely guarded against, without 
violating our national traditions and the dictates of common 
humanity, or depriving our country of a natural and healthy 
means of increasing its population and prosperity. 

As in all public questions, many persons interested are carried 
away by passion and see things through a magnifying or distort- 
ing medium. Sad experience has taught us to observe facts 
calmly and to present them with moderation. We therefore 
respectfully urge the following requests: If the Commission shall 
conclude to hear testimony upon the subject of their investigation 
at various places here or abroad, we crave the privilege of having 
notice of such intended meetings from time to time, and the 
further privilege of presenting evid^ice wherever we may think 
that such presentation would tend to increase or to modify the 
knowledge imparted by others. It is a matter of common knowl- 
edge that in many European countries political parties are 
organized, whose platform contains a plank inculcating hatred 
of Jews as such. That prejudices so promulgated oolor the minds 
of many well-meaning persons in such environment is inevitable, 
and that these prejudices tend to be reflected in testimony that 
may be offered before you is highly probable. We deem it our 
duty to offer you our best services in avoiding this kind of error 
or indeed any kind of error which may impede the objects of your 
Commission. Our sole purpose is to enable the Commission to 
learn the facts most fully and most accurately. In presenting 
evidence we would exercise the most rigorous care to ofCer such 
testimony only as would give facts, without color or prejudice. 

As it is possible, or even probable, that the testimony at 
various places will have reference to conditions more or less 
local, it would seem important that all sources of trustworthy 
information should be open to the Commission, and that it should 
not be in danger of receiving testimony without adequate means 
of checking its accuracy or truthfulness. 

Hoping that our petition may be favorably considered, I have 
the honor to be 

Very truly yours, 

(Signed) Mater Sxtlzbebgeb, 

President, 

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246 AMBRICAN JEWISH TBAR BOOK 

To which the following reply was received : 

April 27, 1907. 
Sib: Senator Dillingham, Chairman of the Immigration Com- 
mission, directs me to acknowledge the receipt of your communi- 
cation of the twenty-fourth instant relative to certain features of 
the question to be investigated, and to assure you that when the 
feature of the work mentioned by you is taken up he will be 
pleased to communicate with you as suggested. 

Respectfully, 

(Signed) W. W. Husband, 
Secretary, The Immigration Commission, 

HILSNER OASE 

The attention of the Committee having been directed to the 
case of Leopold Hilsner, said to have been convicted in Austria 
of a ritual murder^ an investigation was made and it was 
found that this Committee was not in position to take any 
action. 

RUSSIA 

The Committee followed the situation of the Jews in Eussia 
with great care and took whatever steps might be expected to 
bring forth good results to alleviate their unhappy condition. 

CONSTANTINOPLE 

Relief Fund 
It having been brought to the attention of the Executive 
Committee on March 22 that the Jews of Constantinople had 
suffered greatly by reason of the disastrous fire, the Com- 
mittee voted to endeavor to raise the sum of $1000, to be 
transmitted to Constantinople for the relief of the. suflEerers. 
An appeal was accordingly issued, and in response thereto 
the sum of 5537.60 francs was remitted to the Alliance 
Israelite Universelle for distribution through their agency in 
Constantinople. 

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REPORT OP AMERICAN JEWISH COMMITTEE 247 
EEV. DH. VOOBSANGEB 

At their meeting, held on May 10, 1908, the Executive Com- 
mittee adopted the following resolution, prepared by Dr. 
Magnes, which was transmitted to the family of Dr. Voor- 
sanger: 

The Executive Committee of th6 American Jewish Committee 
has learned, to its profound regret, of the death of on6 of the 
members of the Executive Committee, the Reverend Dr. Jacob 
Voorsanger, of San Francisco, California. 

The Committee acknowledges, with gratitude, the aid given it 
by Dr. Voorsanger from its inception and mourns the loss to it 
of his sturdy manhood, his ripe judgment and his loyalty to 
Judaism. 

The members of the Committee would record also their sense 
of personal loss in his death and they desire to extend to their 
colleague's bereaved family, the expression of their sincere 
sympathy. 

CONFERENCE WITH THE INDEPENDENT 0Rl)EE OP B^NAE B^RITH 

AND THE UNION OP AMERICAN HEBREW 

CONGREGATIONS 

At the invitation of Mr. Adolph Kraus a Committee of three 
were appointed to confer with similar Committees of the 
B^nai BMth and the Union of American Hebrew Congrega- 
tions for the purpose of coining to some amicable understand- 
ing with regard to the work which each should undertake. A 
conference was held in New York City on the evening of 
April 20, 1907, but had no practical result. 

ROUMANIA 

At the time of the outbreaks against the Jews in Eoumania 
in March, 1907, the National Committee for the Eelief of 
Sufferers by Eussian Massacres, at the request of this Com- 
mittee, voted to expend the sum of $10,000 for the relief of 
the sufferers. Information as to the extent of the damage and 

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248 AMBRICAN JEWISH TEAR BOOK 

of the relief measurefl proposed was received from the Hilf s- 
verein of Berlin, the Alliance Israelite Universelle of Paris, 
the Anglo-Jewish Association, and the Board of Deputies of 
London, and the Israelite Alliance of Vienna. 

THE AMERICAN PASSPORT IN RUSSIA 

In January last, it was discovered that the Department of 
State was issuing to applicants for passports, who formerly 
were Bussian subjects, the following circulars : 

CITIZENSHIP 
Department of State, Washington, , 190 — . 



Sib: The Department is in receipt of an application for a 

passport of , from which it appears that 

bom in . Your attention is invited to the enclosed 

notice to former subjects of Russia who contemplate returning 
to that country from which' you will perceive that it is a pun- 
ishable ofCense under Russian law for a Russian subject to obtain 
naturalization in any other country without the consent of the 
Russian Giovemment. While this Government dissents from this 
requirement, it cannot encourage American citizens whom it is 
likely to affect to place themselves within the sphere of its 

operation. Upon receiving satisfactory information that 

not intend to go to Russian territory, or that permission 

from the Russian Government to return, the application for a 
passport will he reconsidered immediately. 

Returning the application, the certificate of naturalization, 

and the sum of $1 ( ), 

I am, sir. 

Tour obedient servant, 



Chief, Bureau of Citizenship, 

(Inclosure) 

RUSSIA 

Notice to Amebigan Citizens Fobmebly Sttbjects of Russia Who 

Contemplate Retubnino to that Countbt 

A Russian subject who becomes a citizen of another country 

without the consent of the Russian Government commits an 

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REPORT OF AMERICAN JEWISH COMMITTEE 249 



offense against Russian law, for which he is liahle to arrest and 
punishment, if he returns without previously obtaining the per- 
mission of the Russian Government 

This Government dissents from this provision of Russian law, 
but an American citizen formerly a subject of Russia who returns 
to that country places himself within the jurisdiction of Russian 
law and can not expect immunity from its operations. 

Jews, whether they were formerly Russian subjects or not, 
are not admitted to Russia unless they obtain special permission 
in advance from the Russian Government, and this Department 
will not issue passports to former Russian subjects or to Jews 
who intend going to Russian territory, unless it has assurance 
that the Russian Government will consent to their admission. 

No one is admitted to Russia without a passport, which must 
be visaed, or indorsed, by a Russian diplomatic or consular repre- 
sentative. 

Elihu Root. 
Department of State, Washington, May 28, 1907. 

The matter was taken up in Congress by Representatives 
Goldfogle and Harrison (see pp. 76, 77-8, of this volume), and 
the following correspondence took place between Messrs. Louis 
Marshall and Edward Lauterbach on behalf of this Committee 
and the Department of State : 

New Yobk, February 1, 1908. 

To the Honorable EUhu Root, Secretary of State, Washington, 
D. C, 

Sib: In a circular letter, dated May 28, 1907, issued by the 
Department of State over your signature, appears the following 
paragraph : 

"Jews, whether they were formerly Russian subjects or not, 
are not admitted to Russia, unless they obtain special permission 
in advance from the Russian Government, and this Department 
toill not issue passports to former Russian subjects, or to Jews 
who intend going into Russian Territory, unless it has assurance 
that the Russian (Government will consent to their admission.'* 

The meaning of this announcement cannot be misunderstood. 
It segregates from the mass of American citizens those of the 
Jewish faith, whether naturalized or native-bom, and withholds 
from them one of the privileges of citizenship if they harbor the 

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250 AMERICAN JEWISH TEAR BOOK 



intention of visiting Russia without hayine first secured the 
consent of the Russian GrOTemment. All other citizens, of what- 
ever race or creed, are assured an unlimited passport, and are 
gruaranteed the absolute protection of our flag. They encounter 
no discrimination at the hands of our Government. They are 
subjected to no humiliation. They are not compelled to submit 
to any inquisitorial intrusion into their private purposes; nor are 
they forced to conform to any religious test. 

Under the plain implication of this regulation, however, an 
American citizen applying to the State Department, for a pass- 
port, who is suspected of being a Jew, is for the first time in 
our history obliged to disclose his faith, and must, if he be a 
Jew, satisfy the Department that he does not intend to avail 
himself of the privilege of going to Russia, secured to him, in 
common with all of his fellow-citizens, under the treaty solem- 
nized between the United States and Russia in 1832. 

Hitherto Russia alone has violated that treaty openly and 
notoriously. Hitherto our Government has consistently remon- 
strated against such breach, and against the practice of Russian 
officials, of making examinations into the religious faith of Ameri- 
can citizens. Heretofore our State Department has declared to 
Russia again and again the principle formulated in the following 
terms by Mr. Adee, in his note to the Legation at St. Petersburg 
on July 5, 1895: 

"The Russian Government cannot expect that its course in 
asserting inquisitorial authority in the United States over citizens 
of the United States, as to their religious or civil status, can ever 
be acceptable or even tolerable to such a government as ours, and 
continuance in such a course after our views have been clearly 
and considerably made known may trench upon the Just limits of 
consideration." 

Now, however, there seems to have occurred a reversal of a 
time-honored policy and it is our Government that seeks to in- 
dulge in these inquisitorial practices and to apply an unconsti- 
tutional religious test to upwards of a million of our own citizens, 
not only naturalized but native-bom, thus practically justifying 
Russia in the violation of her treaty obligations and condoning 
her contemptuous disregard of the American passport. 

Believing that the promulgation to which your attention has 
been directed Is the result of inadvertence, you are respectfully 
requested to reconsider the subject and to cause the circular 
letter to be withdrawn. 

Very truly yours, 

Louis Mabshall, 
Edward Lautebbach. 

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REPORT OF AMERICAN JEWISH COMMITTEE 251 

Depaetment of State, Washington, February 11, 1908. 
Messrs, Louis Marshall and Edward Lauterhach, New York, N, Y, 

Deab Sibs: I have received your letter of February 1, 1908, in 
which you quote from a Department Circular of May 28, 1907, 
relating to the issue of passports to Jews intending to enter 
Russian territory, and in which you request that the subject of 
this circular be reconsidered and the circular be withdrawn. 

The circular had its origin in the fact that there is no naturali- 
zation treaty between the United States and Russia, so that a 
naturalized citizen of the United States going to Russia is sub- 
jected to Russian laws which treat the naturalization and return 
of a native as a criminal offense; that under these circumstances 
the effect of United States passports has been, not to protect the 
persons returning to Russia, but rather to mislead them into 
ignorantly subjecting themselves to hardship and imprisonment 
in reliance upon a document which does not really protect them. 

In the meantime the Department has been endeavoring and is 
endeavoring to secure from Russia a naturalization treaty which 
will practically dispose of the diflaculty. 

Before your letter was written, however, my attention was 
called to the fact that this reference to the discrimination made 
by Russia was deemed to be objectionable by those to whom it 
referred, and the circular was accordingly withdrawn and another 
substituted in its place, a copy of which I enclose. 

Should you see anything objectionable in the circular, which is 
now in use, I should be very glad to be advised of it. 

Very truly yours, 

Blihu Root. 
( IncloBure) 
Notice to American Citizens Fobmeblt Subjects or Russia Who 
Contemplate Retubning to that Countbt 

Under Russian law a Russian subject who bet^omes a citizen 
of another country without the consent of the Russian Govern- 
ment is deemed to have committed an offense for which he is 
liable to arrest and punishment if he returns without previously 
obtaining the permision of the Russian Government 

This Government dissents from this provision of Russian law, 
but an American citizen formerly a subject of Russia who returns 
to that country places himself within the jurisdiction of Russian 
law and cannot expect immunity from its operations. 

No one is admitted to Russia unless his passport has been 
visaed, or endorsed, by a Russian diplomatic or consular repre- 
sentative. 

Elihu Root. 
Department of State, Washington, January 25, 1908. 

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252 AMERICAN JEWISH YEAR BOOK 



New York, February 13, 1908. 
To the Honorable EUhu Root, Secretary of State, Washington, 
D.O, 

Deab Sib: We are in receipt of yours of the llth iiust., enclos- 
ing a circular, bearing date January 25, 1908, issued by the 
Department of State as a substitute for the objectionable circular 
of May 28, 1907, which you inform us, to our great satisfaction, 
has been withdrawn. 

Availing ourselTes of your courteous suggestion, that if we 
should see anything objectionable in the circular, which is now 
in use, you would be very glad to be advised of it, it occurs to us 
that the cautionary and humane objects of the circular would be 
fully subserved, without at the same time militating against the 
historic policy of our Government, if the words "and cannot 
expect immunity from its operations," were stricken from the 
second paragraph. 

You are of course thoroughly familiar with the provisions of 
Chapter 249 of the Act of July 27, 1868, which are embodied in 
Sections 1999 to 2001 of the United States Revised Statutes, which 
we nevertheless deem it desirable to quote, in order to give point 
to our remarks in favor of the proposed amendment of the new 
circular. 

" Section 1999. Whereas the right of expatriation is a natural 
and inherent right of all people, indispensable to the enjoyment 
of the rights of life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness; and 
whereas in the recognition of this principle this Grovemment has 
freely received emigrants from all nations, and invested them 
with the rights of citizenship; and whereas it is claimed that 
such American citizens, with their descendants, are subjects of 
foreign states, owing all allegiance to the governments thereof; 
and whereas it is necessary to the maintenance of public peace 
that this claim of foreign allegiance should be promptly and 
finally disavowed: Therefore any declaration, instruction, opin- 
ion, order, or decision of any ofllcer of the United States which 
denies, restricts, impairs, or questions the right of expatriation, 
is declared inconsistent with the fundamen^l principles of the 
Republic." 

" Section 2000. All naturalized citizens of the United States 
while in foreign countries, are entitled to and shall receive from 
this Government the same protection of persons and property 
which is accorded to native-bom citizens." 

" Section 2001. Whenever it is made known to the President 
that any citizen of the United States has been unjustly deprived 
of his liberty by or under the authority of any foreign govern- 
ment, it shall be the duty of the President forthwith to demand 

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REPORT OF AMERICAN JEWISH COMMITTEE 253 

of that government the reasons of such imprisonment; and if it 
appears to be wrongful and in violation of the rights of American 
citizenship, the President shall forthwith demand the release of 
such citizen, and if the release so demanded is unreasonably 
delayed or refused, the President shall use such means, not 
amounting to acts of war, as he may think necessary and proper 
to obtain or effectuate the release; and all the facts and proceed- 
ings relative thereto shall as soon as practicable be communicated 
by the President to Congress." 

These sections proclaim to all the world, the American doctrine 
of the right of expatriation; the right of all naturalized citizens 
of the United States, while in foreign countries, to receive from 
our Government the same protection which is accorded to native- 
born citizens; the duty of the President, to demand the release 
of any American citizen unjustjy deprived of his liberty by or 
under the authority of any foreign government, in violation of 
the rights of American citizenship as defined in these sections, 
and they denounce any declaration, instruction, or opinion by any 
officer of the United States, which questions the right of expatria- 
tion, as inconsistent with the fundamental principles of our 
Government. 

Although the circular of January 25, 1908, announces that our 
Government dissents from the Russian claim, which denies the 
right of expatriation, it nevertheless adds, that an American 
citizen, formerly a subject of Russia, who returns to that country, 
cannot expect immunity from the operation of the Russian law. 
This, it seems to us, is a declaration which questions the right of 
expatriation, and which restricts the scope and meaning of 
Sections 2000 and 2001 of the United States Revised Statutes. 
These sections clearly declare, that any interference by a foreign 
government with the liberty of a naturalized citizen, based on his 
exercise of the right of expatriation, imposes upon our Govern- 
ment the obligation, of securing to such citizen immunity from 
the operations of the law of a foreign government, which is 
" inconsistent with the fundamental principles of the Republic." 

To declare that immunity cannot be expected by an American 
citizen formerly a subject of Russia, under these circumstances, 
is a tacit recognition of the contention of the Russian Government, 
which is at war with our fundamental principles, and is an implied 
invitation to that government, not only to violate the rights of 
American citizenship, but also to disregard the obligations of the 
treaty of 1832 solemnized between the United States and Russia. 

The least that our citizens can expect from our Government is, 
that it shall continue to assert the principles embodied in this 
statute, and that it shall not, directly or indirectly, give sanction to 
a contrary contention on the part of any foreign power, or relax 

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254 AMERICAN JEWISH YEAR BOOK 



to the slightest degree, in the vigor of its assertion and protection 
of the rights of American citizenship, as thus defined. 

Very truly yours, 

Louis Mabshall, 
Edwabd Lautebbach. 

Depabtment of State, Washington, February 18, 1908. 

Messrs. Louis Marshall and Edward Lauterhach, S7 Wall Street, 
New York, N. Y. 

Deab Sibs: I have your letter of February 13, in which you 
suggest that that part of the Department's notice to American 
citizens, formerly subjects of Russia, who contemplate returning, 
which states that they cannot expect immunity from the operation 
of Russian law, has a tendency to militate against the historic 
policy of this Government, and inform you that I have directed 
that the words which you think objectionable shall be withdrawn 
and a new edition of the circular issued. 

Very truly yours, 

Robebt Bacon, 
Acting Secretary. 



MISCELLANEOUS ACTIVITIES 

N"umerou8 other affairs were considered, and in many cases 
acted upon by the Executive Committee, but owing to their 
confidential nature or the fact that the matters involved have 
not yet been brought to a conclusion, the Committee deem it 
inadvisable to refer to them further at this time. 

Special Meeting of the Committee 

May 30, 1907 

The resignations of Messrs. Max Senior, Adolf Kraus, 
Simon Wolf and Milton L. Anfenger were accepted with 
regret. 

Mr. E. G. Foreman, of Chicago, was elected to fill the 
vacancy in District VII, and Mr. Samuel Grabfelder to fill 
that in District IX. Dr. Cyrus Adler was transferred from 

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REPORT OF AMERICAN JEWISH COMMITTEE 255 

District IX to District X. Dr. Emil G. Hirsch was elected to 
fill the vacancy on the Executive Committee occasioned by the 
resignation of Mr. Adolf Kraus. 

It was resolved to send the sum of $25,000 subscribed for 
relief of Jewish institutions of San Francisco to the Hon. 
M. C. Sloss as agent of the Committee, to be distributed by 
him and his associates of the Committee in District V, among 
the institutions in proportion to their needs. 

It was resolved that the traveling expenses of every mem- 
ber of the Executive and General Committee in going to and 
from places of meeting should hereafter be defrayed out of the 
general fund of the Committee. 

Eesolutions were passed expressive of the sense of the Com- 
mittee that the continuance of the American Jewish Year 
Book was necessary for the work of the Committee, and 
authorizing the Executive Committee to make arrangements 
to prepare the manuscript, the publication to be issued by the 
Jewish Publication Society of America as heretofore. 

A minute on the death of Dr. Lewis N. Dembitz was 
adopted in which tribute was paid to hie character as citizen 
and his services to American Judaism. 

Annual Meeting 
November 10, 1907 

The Executive Committee reported to the annual meeting 
upon the work carried on since the special meeting was held. 

On August 8, 1907, the sum of $20,000 was forwarded to 
Judge Sloss for distribution among the San Francisco insti- 
tutions, and on November 9, the further sum of $5000 was 
authorized to be sent. A sub-committee consisting of J. L. 

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256 AMERICAN JEWISH YEAR BOOK 

Magnes, Chairman, Judge Sloes, and Joseph H. Cohen, were 
appointed on October 6, 1907, to further the raising of the 
sum determined on. 

In the uprisings at Casablanca, Morocco, in August, a num- 
ber of Jews lost their lives, many were wounded, and some 250 
women and children were carried off by the Kabyles. On 
August 29, a resolution was adopted requesting the National 
Committee for the Eelief of Sufferers by Eussian Massacres to 
appropriate 5000 francs for the relief of the sufferers and to 
make a further appropriation of 20,000 francs in case similar 
amounts were appropriated by the Alliance Israelite XJni- 
verselle and the Anglo-Jewish Association, and that sum was 
required. On September 6, the sum of 5000 francs was for- 
warded by the N"ational Relief Committee to Paris. The Com- 
mittee authorized the President in his discretion to seek the 
aid of the Department of State should an emergency arise re- 
quiring such action. 

The Executive Committee expressed their thanks to Mr. 
Albert M. Priedenberg, of New York, for his courtesy in pre- 
paring, for the use of the Committee, a Digest of the Sunday 
Laws of the United States. 

The Executive Committee recommended the adoption of a 
plan for organizing Advisory Councils, prepared by a sub- 
committee consisting of Isador Sobel, Chairman, Emil G. 
Hirsch, and the Secretary. 

The following recommendations made by the Executive 
Committee were adopted by the Committee : 

That $2200 be apportioned for the expense of the statistical 
Bureau and that the additional sum of $1800 be appropriated 
for keeping up the American Jewish Year Book, provided 
that the last mentioned sum be raised. 

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REPORT OF AMERICAN JEWISH COMMITTEE 257 

That for the ensuing year the sum of $12,500 be raised for 
the expenses of the Committee, this sum to be apportioned as 
follows, among the respective districts : 



District No. 


1 


$250 


District No. 7 $1500 


it t€ 


2 


250 


" 8 625 


** « 


3 


375 


" 9 1250 


(« « 


4 


375 


" 10 500 


« « 


5 


250 


" 11 625 


« « 


6 


250 


" 12 6250 



The Executive Committee were authorized to forward to 
Judge Sloss any contributions made toward the San Fran- 
cisco fund. 

It was resolved that during any hearings held by the United 
States Immigration Commission it shall be the duty of the 
Executive Committee to see that the interests of the Jews were 
safeguarded. 

The report of the Committee on the Eevision of the Consti- 
tution was adopted as printed above. 

It was resolved that the Executive Committee have power 
to make the necessary rules governing the election of members 
by the Advisory Councils. 

It was resolved that each member of the Executive Com- 
mittee may in contemplation of absence, depute a member of 
the General Committee to act in his stead. 

The following officers were elected : 

Pres., Mayer Sulzberger, Phila., Pa. ; Vice-Pres., Julian W. 
Mack, Chicago, 111., Isaac H. Kempner, G-alveston, Tex.; 
Treas., Isaac W. Bemheim, Louisville, Ky. 

The following were re-elected members of the Executive 
Committee : 

Cyrus Adler, Washington, D. C. ; Harry Cutler, Providence, 
E. I.; Emil G. Hirsch, Chicago, 111.; E. W. Lewin-Epstein, 

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258 AMERICAN JEWISH YEAR BOOK 

Morris Loeb, J. L. Magnes, Louis Marshall, Cyrus L. Sulz- 
berger, all of New York City ; Jacob Voorsanger,* San Fran-* 
Cisco, Cal. 

The following were elected members of the Committee to 
fill vacancies: 

District IV, Morris M. Cohn, Little Rock, 1909. 

District IV, David S. Lehman, Denver, 1911. 

District VIII, J. Walter Freiberg, Cincinnati, 1911; E. M. 
Baker, Cleveland, 1908. 

District IX, Wm. B. Hackenburg, Philadelphia, 1909. 

The following were re-elected members of the Committee 
for the term ending 1912 : 

District V, Jacob Voorsanger,* San Francisco, Cal.; Sig- 
mund Sichel, Pori;land, Ore. 

District VI, Max Landauer, Milwaukee, Wis., to succeed 
I. D. Adler. 

District VII, B. Horwich, Chicago, 111. 

District VIII, I. W. Bernheim, Louisville, Ky. 

District IX, I. W. Frank, Pittsburg, Pa.; Benj. Wolf, 
Philadelphia, Pa. 

District XI, Lee M. Friedman, Boston, Mass. 

District XII, Joseph H. Cohen, Edward Lauterbach, 
Adolph Lewisohn and Isidor Straus, New York City. 

♦ Deceased. 



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REPORT 



OF THE 



TWENTIETH YEAR 



OF THE 



JEWISH PUBLICATION SOCIETY 
OF AMERICA 

I 907 -I 908 



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JEWISH PUBLICATION SOCIETY 261 



THE JEWISH PUBLlCATIOISr SOCIETY OP 
AMERICA 



OFFICERS 

PRESIDENT 

EDWIN WOLF, Philadelphia 

TICE-FEESIDENT 

DR. HENRY M. LEIPZIGER, New York 

SECOND VICE-PBESIDENT 

SIMON MILLER, Philadelphia 

TBEASUBEB 

HENRY FERNBERGER, Philadelphia 

SECBETABY 

DR. LEWIS W. STEINBACH, Philadelphia 

ASSISTANT SECBETABY 

I. GEORGE DOBSEVAGE, New York 

SECRETARY TO THE PUBLICATION COMMITTEE 

HENRIETTA SZOLD, New York 

TRUSTEES 

Dr. Cyrus Adleb * Washington, D. C. 

Henby Fernberoer ^ Philadelphia 

Edwin A. Fleisher * Philadelphia 

Daniel Guggenheim ' New York 

Joseph Hagedorn * Philadelphia 

Daniel P. Hays ^ New York 

Efhraim Lederer * Philadelphia 

Dr. Henry M. Leipziger ' New York 

Simon Miller * Philadelphia 

Morris Newburger ■ Philadelphia 

Julius Rosenwald ' Chicago 

Sigmund Sonneborn ^ Baltimore 

Horace Stern * Philadelphia 

Samuel Straus * New York 

Seligman J. Strauss * Wilkes-Barre, Pa. 

» Term expires in 1909. = Term expires in 1910. * Term expires in 1911. 

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262 AMERICAN JEWISH YEAR BOOK 



Ctbus L. Sulzbeboeb * New York 

HoK. Mayeb Sttlzbebgeb ' Philadelphia 

A. Leo Wkil » Pittsburg 

Habbib Weinstock * Sacramento 

Edwvx Wolf * Philadelphia 

S. WoLTENSTBiN * Cleveland 

H0I70BABT VICS-FBBSIDENTS 

Isaac W. Bebnheim^ Louisville 

Mabcus Bebnheimeb* St Louis 

Rkv. Henby Cohew » Galveston 

Louis K. Gutman ' Baltimore 

Jacob Haas * Atlanta 

Mbs. Jacob H. Hecht * Boston 

Rev. De. Max Helleb * New Orleans 

Miss Ella Jacobs * Philadelphia 

A. LIPPMAN * Pittsburg 

Hon. Julian W. Mack* Chicago 

Hon. Simon W. Rosendale * Albany, N. Y. 

Alfbed Seasonqood * Cincinnati 

M. C. Sloss • San Francisco 

Rev. Db. Joseph Stolz * Chicago 

Hon. Simon Wolf * Washington, D. C. 

publication committee 

Hon. Mayeb Sulzbebqeb, Chairman Philadelphia 

Db. Cybus Adleb Washington, D. C. 

Rev. Db. Henby Bebkowitz ; Philadelphia 

Db. S. Solis Cohen Philadelphia 

Db. Hebbeet Fbiedenwald New York 

Felix N. Gebson Philadelphia 

Db. Chables Gboss Cambridge, Mass. 

Rev. Db. Max Helleb New Orleans 

Db. Jacob H. Hollandeb Baltimore 

Db. Joseph Jacobs New York 

Rev. Db. J. L. Maones New York 

Rev. Db. David Philipson Cincinnati 

Db. Solomon Schechteb New York 

Rev. Db. Samuel Schulman New York 

Hon. Oscab S. Stbaus Washington, D. C. 

The Publication Committee meets in the afternoon of the first 
Sunday of January, February, March, October, November, and 
December. 

*Term expires in 1909. *Term expires in 1910. 'Term expires in 1911. 



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JEWISH PUBLICATION SOCIETY 263 



MEETING OF THE TWENTIETH YEAR 

The annual meeting of the Jewish Publication Society of 
America was held Sunday afternoon, May 24, 1908, in the 
Assembly Hall of the Keneseth Israel Temple, Broad Street, 
above Columbia Avenue, Philadelphia, Pa. 

The President of the Society, Mr. Edwin Wolf, called the 
meeting to order, and introduced Eev. Dr. F. de Sola Mendes, 
of New York, who delivered the opening prayer. The Presi- 
dent then read his annual address. 



President's Address 
Ladies and (Gentlemen: 

It gives me pleasure to welcome you to our Twentieth Annual 
Meeting. We are gathered here to-day to listen to the report of 
the work accomplished during the nineteenth year of our Society's 
existence, and to discuss the important work we have ahead of 
us. 

Our pleasure, however, on this occasion is clouded by the death 
of three of our oldest and most active members. In the death of 
the Rev. Dr. Bernard Felsenthal, of Chicago, who gave his life 
to American Judaism, and whose saintly character was an in- 
spiration, the American Jewish community lost a great leader, 
and the Jewish Publication Society, a member who gave his 
services to it, with unstinting devotion, from the very beginning 
of its organization. The Society has lost by the death of Mr. 
Solomon Blumenthal of Philadelphia, one who as a member, 
trustee, and Second Vice-President, gave faithful and efficient 
service, and who always responded generously when the Society 
needed his valuable advice and practical wisdom. Likewise, in 
the passing away from our midst of the extremely able and 
learned Rev. Dr. Jacob Voorsanger, of San Francisco, the com- 
munity lost a most precious member. We take this opportunity 
to pay respect to the memories of these loyal sons of Israel. 

In the nineteen years of the Society's activity it has issued over 
seventy works of Jewish history, literature, religion, philosophy. 



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264 AMERICAN JEWISH YEAR BOOK 



ethics, poetry, biography, and fiction. The Society has distrib- 
uted oyer three hundred and fifty thousand copies of its publica- 
tions. During the fiscal year 1907-1908, the Society has distrib- 
uted about twenty-five thousand volumes. The volumes published 
this year were: 

The American Jewish Tear Book, 5668, edited by Miss Henri- 
etta Szold, has been the most successful Year Book of the entire 
series. Not only does it contain accurate and exhaustive lists 
of various character, but the merit and usefulness of the Direc- 
tory of Organizations can scarcely be overestimated. More than 
any other medium it enables us to form a general idea of the 
distribution of Jewish population and activity in this country. 
The Jewish Encyclopedia several years ago took a census, as it 
were, of the Jewish population in the United States. It was left 
for the Year Book to revise and bring up to date the statistics of 
Jewish population, until we find that to-day we number about 
1,800,000 strong. An enlightened Jewry of 1,800,000, presenting 
an united front, can certainly be powerful enough to accomplish 
any desirable results. It is such an united Jewry that the Society, 
through its publications, is striving to call into being. 

The volume by Solomon Herman Mosenthal, " Stories of Jewish 
Home Life," translated especially for the Society, contains six 
stories of Jewish life. This volume has been very favorably 
received by our membership and by the press, and even those 
who might have felt that there is a surfeit of Jewish stories, 
could not but admit the attractiveness of the book, and the intense 
pleasure it affords the reader. 

The volume of remarkable essays by Professor Solomon Schech- 
ter, entitled ** Studies in Judaism," Second Series, has been ac- 
claimed the literary event of the year in Jewish letters. The 
mine of valuable information the volume contains, the vivid and 
graceful style in which it is conveyed, and the eminence of the 
author, have attracted attention to the book. The publication 
of this book has called forth a number of very complimentary 
letters from our membership, than which there can be no better 
sign that they are pleased. 

The fourth book, issued under the title of " David the Giant 
Killer and Other Tales of Grandma Lopez," was written by Miss 
Emily Solis-Cohen, of Philadelphia. It contains a number of 
stories dealing with Biblical episodes, and it is written primarily 
to appeal to young readers, though it may be perused with profit 
by the older members of the family. The volume is very attract- 
ively made up, and contains several illustrations. 

In all these publications special attention has been paid to the 
mechanical make-up of the books, so that in this respect, too, 
they can compare favorably with standard publications. 



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JEWISH PUBLICATION SOCIETY 265 



For the current year the Publication Committee promises the 
following books, in addition to the aforementioned Biblical sto- 
ries, which are now being distributed: 

The American Jewish Tear Book, for 5669, the manuscript for 
which book will be furnished by the American Jewish Committee, 
whose statistical bureau qualifies it to supply the required data 
for the Year Book. 

The Book of Mlcah, with a Commentary, by Professor Max L. 
Margolis.' This book will form the first of a proposed series of 
Bible commentaries. 

The most important publication of the year, and one that prom- 
ises to be an epoch-making work, will be a volume entitled 
"Legends of the Jews." It is the work of Dr. Louis Glnzberg, 
Professor of Talmud in the Jewish Theological Seminary of 
America, who is one of the most eminent Jewish scholars in the 
world. The whole work will be in three volumes of about five 
hundred pages each. Volume one will cover all the legends deal- 
ing with Bible times and characters from the Creation to Moses. 
Volume two will deal with Bible times and characters from 
Joshua to Esther. Volume three will contain a General Intro- 
duction treating of the history and value of Jewish Legends, 
notes to the text, an index to the two volumes, and other valuable 
data. 

The " Legends of the Jews " will form the first complete and 
exhaustive treatment of Jewish legends, not only in the English 
language, but in any language. It will be a source book for 
preachers, and an excellent reading book for laymen. 

An examination of the report of the Treasurer and of the 
Assistant Secretary shows that the total membership of the 
Society on April 30, 1908, was 5229, an accession of 1419 new mem- 
bers since May 1, 1907, offsetting the loss of 1320 members 
through resignations or delinquencies, the number of members 
in good standing on May 1, 1908, being 3852. In Canada alone 
our membership Increase has been from 12 to 112. We have 
members in nearly all parts of the world, and recently our mem- 
bership has extended to David Street in Jerusalem, Palestine. 

To secure these 1419 new members entailed an expense of 
about $1900, or about $1.40 per capita, as against more than twice 
the same expenditure during the year preceding. The Board is, 
nevertheless, investigating the matter of new members, and it 
is very likely that the soliciting department will be so consti- 
tuted as to insure more satisfactory results. Steps will have to 
be taken to increase the number of members paying more than 
three dollars a year, inasmuch as the increased cost of production 
and office maintenance make some efTorts in that direction im- 
perative. 



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266 AMERICAN JEWISH YEAR BOOK 

By means of circular adyertising, we have been enabled to sell 
almost twice as many books as we did up to about two years ago. 
The increase in the income from the sales of books amounts to 
almost 1800 over that of last year. Graetz's "History of tlje 
Jews " still continues to be the best seller. 

Never before has the Society spent so much for its publications. 
The total amount is almost 112,000.00, exceeding the expenditure 
of last year by 12500.00. The Year Book and " Studies in Juda- 
ism" were particularly expensive publications, which, in a meas- 
ure, accounts for the outlay. 

The permanent fund still aggregates 118,000.00 only, the So- 
ciety not having been favored with any donations, bequests, or 
legacies, of any kind, in many years. It is regrettable that a 
Society with so lofty a mission, and so honorable a record, should 
not be sufficiently endowed, and placed on a footing to enable it 
to prosecute its important work with greater effectiveness. 

I am sure that the membership and the Jewish public will 
welcome the announcement that the Board has at last been en- 
abled to make arrangements with regard to the Bible Transla- 
tion, which will insure the successful execution of that gigantic 
undertaking in a very short time. A detailed plan has been com- 
pleted by which the Bible will be ready for distribution within 
a period of about three years. It is also very likely that the 
Central Conference of American Rabbis will co-operate with the 
Society, either in the preparation of the translation or by mak- 
ing the translation the official version of that body of American 
Rabbis. The version of the Bible in English, issued under Jewish 
auspices, will be free from all non- Jewish interpretations. When 
completed, the Bible will be made accessible to all English-speak- 
ing Jews, inasmuch as it is our intention to issue an edition at a 
nominal cost, so as to enable every Jewish household to possess 
a copy. The expenses connected with so big an enterprise are 
such as to require a special Bible Fund of at least $50,000.00 to 
carry out this important project. The amount available at pre- 
sent is about 16000.00, and it behooves " the people of the Book," 
to respond liberally to the appeal for the remaining amount. 

Mr. A. Leo Weil, of Pittsburg, was called upon by the 
President to act as Chairman of the meeting, and in assum- 
ing the chair, delivered a short address. 

Mr. I. George Dobsevage, of New York, acted as secretary 
of the meeting. 



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JEWISH PUBLICATION SOCIETY 267 

Eeport of the Board of Trustees for 1907-1908 
The Report of the Board of Trustees was as follows : 
The Jewish Publication Society of America has concluded 
its twentieth year. 

The Board of Trustees elected the following oflBcers: 
Treasurer, Henry Fernberger, of Philadelphia; Secretary, 
Lewis W. Steinbach, of Philadelphia; Assistant Secretary, I. 
George Dobsevage, of New York; Secretary to the Publica- 
tion Committee, Henrietta Szold, of New York. 

The following were chosen members of the Publication 
Committee : Mayer Sulzberger, of Philadelphia ; Cyrus Adler, 
of Washington; Henry Berkowitz, of Philadelphia; Solomon 
Solis Cohen, of Philadelphia; Bernard Felsenthal, of Chi- 
cago; Herbert Friedenwald, of New York; Felix N. Gerson, of 
Philadelphia; Charles Gross, of Cambridge, Mass.; Max Hel- 
ler, of New Orleans; Jacob H. Hollander, of Baltimore; 
Joseph Jacobs, of New York; J. L. Magnes, of New York; 
David Philipson, of Cincinnati; Solomon Schechter, of New 
York; Samuel Schulman, of New York; Oscar S. Straus, of 
Washington. Mayer Sulzberger was elected by the Committee 
as its Chairman. 

Publications 
The publications of the year were as follows : 
American Jewish Year Book 5668, edited by Henrietta 

Szold. 

Stories of Jewish Home Life, by S. H. Mosenthal. 
Studies in Judaism, Second Series, by Solomon Schechter. 
David the Giant Killer and Other Tales of Grandma Lopez, 

by Emily Solis-Cohen. 



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268 AMERICAN JEWISH YEAR BOOK 

Amendments to the By-Laws 
The Board presents the following amendments for the con- 
sideration of the members : 

1. Amend Article III, Section I, by inserting the word 
" twenty-one " in place of " fifteen," the object being to in- 
crease the number of Directors to twenty-one. 

Strike out the second paragraph and add to said section : 
" At the annual meeting to be held in May, 1908, there shall 
be elected eleven Directors, seven to serve for three years, two 
to serve for two years, and two to serve for one year; and at 
every subsequent annual meeting, seven Directors shall be 
elected for three years." 

2. Amend Article III, Section II, by substituting the word 
" twenty-one " for the word " fifteen." 

Edwin Wolf, 
President, 
Philadelphia, May 1, 1908. 



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JEWISH PUBLICATION SOCIETY 269 



REPORT OP THE TREASURER 
Showing Receipts and Disbursements fbom May 1, 1907 to April 

30, 1908 

Henry Fernberger, Treasurer, 

In account with The Jewish Publication Society of America. 
Dr. 

To Balance, as audited. May 26, 1907 $6,782 11 

To cash received to date: 

Members' dues $14,504 00 

Sales of Books 3,398 76 

Interest 916 64 

Year Book advertising 67 50 

Year Book Fund 410 00 

Bible Fund 1,870 00 

Refund from Bible Fund to General 
Fund 276 56 

21,443 46 

$28,225 57 
Cr. 
By Disbursements to date: 

Canvassers' and Collectors* commissions, $1,981 51 

Salaries of Secretaries 3,649 84 

Cost of publications, authors' fees, etc. 11,424 81 
Office expenses for office work, postage, 

stationery, and delivery of books 2,667 41 

Bible Fund 494 81 

Mortgage 1,500 00 

21,718 38 

Balance $6,507 19 

Balance deposited with Fidelity Trust Co.: 

General Fund $ 352 07 

Permanent Fund 200 03 

Bible Fund 5,955 09 

$6,507 19 

Respectfully submitted. 

Signed, Henry Fernberger, 
May 1, 1908. Treasurer, 



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270 AMERICAN JEWISH YEAR BOOK 



PERMANENT FUND 
The Permanent Fund amounts to $18,202.53, as follows: 
Michael Heilprin Memorial FMnd: 

Donation of Jacob H. Schiff $5,000 00 

Donation of Meyer Guggenheim 6,000 00 

$10,000 00 

Morton M. Newburger Memorial Fund 500 00 

Bequest of J. D. Bemd 500 00 

Donations 105 81 

Life Membership Fund 6,800 00 

Bequest of Lucien Moss 100 00 

Bequest of Simon A. Stem 100 00 

Bequest of A. Heineman 96 72 

Total $18,202 53 

r 

THE PERMANENT FUND IS INTE8TED AS FOLLOWS: 



Cost 



Par 
Value 



Electric and People's Traction Company's 4 

per cent bonds $8,972 50 $9,000 00 

One bond, 4% per cent Lehigh Valley con- 
solidated mortgage loan 1,000 00 1,000 00 

One bond, 4% per cent Lehigh Valley first 

mortgage 1,030 00 1,000 00 

Mortgage, 2200 Woodstock Street, Philadel- 
phia 2,200 00 2,200 00 

Mortgage, 2221 Carlisle Street, Philadelphia. 1,300 00 1,300 00 

Mortgage, 420 Dudley Street, Philadelphia. . 1,000 00 1,000 00 

Mortgage, 445 Dudley Street, Philadelphia. . 1,000 00 1,000 00 

Mortgage, 1808 Reed Street, Philadelphia. . 1,500 00 1,500 00 

Cash on hand, uninvested 200 03 200 03 

Total $18,202 53 $18,200 03 

The accounts of the Treasurer and of the Assistant Secretary 
have been examined and found correct. The cash and securities 
have been examined and found correct. 

Adolph Eighholz, 



Philadelphia, May 11, 1908. 



Edwabd Loeb. 



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JEWISH PUBLICATION SOCIETY 



271 



MEMBERSHIP 



The Membership by States and Territories is as follows : 



Alabama 29 

Arizona 3 

Arkansas 5 

California 153 

Colorado 29 

Connecticut . . . ., 105 

Delaware 16 

District of Columbia 34 

Florida 7 

Georgia 24 

Idaho 2 

Illinois 181 

Indiana 33 

Iowa 14 

Kansas 8 

Kentucky 24 

Louisiana 50 

Maine 2 

Maryland 256 

Massachusetts 162 

Michigan 37 

Minnesota 21 

Mississippi 13 

Missouri 70 

Montana 1 

Nebraska 7 

Nevada 1 

New Hampshire 4 



New Jersey 316 

New Mexico 9 

New York 2052 

North Carolina 13 

Ohio 184 

Oklahoma 6 

Oregon 27 

Pennsylvania 1008 

Rhode Island 32 

South Carolina 12 

South Dakota 1 

Tennessee 17 

Texas 36 

Utah 5 

Virginia 27 

Washington 20 

West Virginia 10 

Wisconsin 33 

Australia 2 

Austria 1 

Canada 112 

Central America 1 

Dutch West Indies 1 

England 4 

Germany 6 

Mexico 1 

Portugal I 

South Africa 1 



Of these there are: 

Life Members 68 

Patrons 22 

Library Members paying $10 48 

Special Members paying |5 260 

Annual Members 4831 



5229 



Total 5229 



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272 AMERICAN JEWISH YEAR BOOK 

Recommendations of the Committee on the Report of 
THE Board op Trustees 
The Committee appointed to consider the report of the 
Board of Trustees consisted of Mr. Louis Marshall, of New 
York; Mr. Isaac Hassler, of Philadelphia, and Mr. Samuel 
Fleisher, of ^Philadelphia. 

To the Members of the Jewish Publication Society: 

The Committee, to whom has been allotted the duty of passing 
on the report of the Board of Trustees for the year which has 
just expired, deems it important, in the first instance, to call 
attention to the fact, that, financially, the Society remains in 
practically the same condition as it was at the close of the last 
fiscal year. It has not been further endowed, nor has its surplus 
been measurably increased. It has now 5229 members, 99 in 
excess of a year ago. It is rather surprising, that during the year 
there were lost, by resignation or delinquency, 1320 members, 
more than 25 per cent of the entire membership, and that during 
the same time new members were secured to the number of 1419, 
presumably through the activity of the canvasser, and, neces- 
sarily, at considerable expense. This expense, however, was less 
than one-half that of last year. When one considers the import- 
ance of this Society, and the fact, that it confers substantial 
benefits on every member, it is astonishing that its membership 
should be of so shifting a character. It is further significant, 
and, possibly, affords some explanation for the condition just 
adverted to, that, of the present membership, subscriptions have 
been paid to date by 3852 only, and that subscriptions to the 
number of 1377 remain unpaid, 822 of these being subscriptions 
of old members, and 555 of new members. Without possessing 
adequate knowledge of the methods of collection which have been 
heretofore pursued, it would seem as though an improvement in 
the system could be devised, which would be productive of more 
satisfactory results. It would be no hardship to new members, 
to ask them to pay their annual dues with their subscriptions, 
and vigorous efforts, in the direction of reminders to old members, 
coupled with the fact that they are in receipt of books for which 
payment is required, should lead to a diminution in the list of 
arrears. An examination of the report would indicate, that, in 
the present unpaid subscriptions, is to be found the potentiality 
of a loss of membership for the coming year equal to the losses 
of last year. One might also infer, from the fact that more than 
40 per cent of the new subscriptions remain unpaid, that due 



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JEWISH PUBLICATION SOCIETY 273 



discrimination in the taking of subscriptions may not have been 
exercised. Hence, the suggestion that no subscription should be 
accepted without accompanying payment. Under the circum- 
stances, $4131 of unpaid membership accounts can scarcely be 
treated as an asset. We understand, however, that the Board of 
Trustees are giving careful consideration to this matter, and no 
doubt the improvement made this year over last will be continued 
until the vexing problems involved are minimized or solved. 

A large part of the trouble about losses of members lies in the 
fact that members joining erroneously consider that they are 
merely subscribers for one year; the membership idea is not 
strongly enough impressed upon them. Probably we shall always 
have this difficulty until our machinery for holding the members 
in a closer bond is improved. Persons not living in Philadelphia, 
or New York, or not having special facilities or inclination to 
keep in touch with matters Jewish, would only think of the 
Society on the occasional visit of a book and bill. The Magazine, 
if we ever undertake it, and we ought to as soon as it is reason- 
ably possible, will furnish the necessary link to remind members 
that they are such; and that aside from the fact that they obtain 
value for their membership fees, we are a Society entitled to 
support, because we are doing what is probably at least as im- 
portant a Jewish work as any of our Jewish agencies. 

The Committee may be pardoned for calling attention at this 
time to the report, that the Jewish Quarterly Review is about to 
be discontinued. If that is the fact, why can it not be revived, 
either by this Society, or by some other organization which it 
may set in motion? It would be the occasion for lasting regret, if 
a publication which has proven to be so useful a medium for 
Jewish scholarship should cease to exist. 

A gratifying circumstance is the increased sale of books, dis- 
tinguishing these from books distributed to members. These 
sales aggregate 13520.35 which represents $800.00 more than last 
year and twice the amount of two years ago. As this was done 
by circular advertising, possibly this means might also help to 
attract members. 

Passing from the financial, to the literary side of the work of 
the Society, a more pleasing view unfolds itself. The publica- 
tions of the past year, -have exceeded the high standard marked 
.by the past achievements of the Society. 

The American Jewish Year Book is a monument to the industry, 
the intelligence, and the self-sacrificing spirit of the accomplished 
editor. Miss Henrietta Szold. The "Directory of National and 
Liocal Organizations in the United States " which it contains, is 
a revelation of the vastness of Jewish activity in this country, in 
the synagogue, in the charitable and . philanthropic institutions in 

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274 AMERICAN JEWISH YEAR BOOK 

the lodge, and in literary and religious endeavor. For the first 
time in the history of American Jewry has there been afforded 
so complete a bird's-eye view of Jewish life, and so thorough a 
compilation of facts, indicative of the extent of the interest which 
the Jews of this country are taking in Jewish affairs. The 
utility of this work cannot be questioned. It creates a link which 
renders possible co-operation, intercommunication, and unifica- 
tion between the manifold organizations which it discloses. It 
affords the means of acquainting the Jews of the several sections 
of the country with one another. It creates broader vistas, and 
tends to disillusionize those whose theories have heretofore been 
bounded by parochial lines. The recognition of these facts has 
Induced the American Jewish Committee to undertake the con- 
tinuance of the American Jewish Tear Book, and has led its Sta- 
tistical Department to make provision for the continuation of 
the Directory, to the end that it may at all times be kept up to 
date. The task of maintaining the standard of thorough efficiency 
established by Miss Szold will put her successors on their mettle. 

A word of appreciation of the article on the Tear of 5667, by 
Mr. Louis H. Levin, contained in this volume, is deserved. 

A triumph for the Society is the publication of Dr. Schechter's 
"Studies in Judaism, Second Series." It is a remarkably fine 
production from every standpoint. As a specimen of typography 
and of book-making, it has never been equaled by the Society. 
It is a fitting receptacle for the gems which it contains. Whether 
one considers the contents as the work of an historian, of an 
essayist, of a student of mankind, of a thinker, or of a litterateur, 
they stand forth in bold relief, and are, at the same time, impres- 
sive and fascinating. They are profound and scintillating. They 
have the picturesqueness of outdoor life, and the scholasticism 
of the student's closet. They have the polish of literary artisan- 
ship and the ruggedness of vigorous thought. The reader be- 
holds, in their habit as they lived, the Jews of the age of Jesus 
ben Sira, two hundred years before the Christian era. He unites 
in the ecstasy of the mystics, who dwelt in Safed in the sixteenth 
century, and has a sympathetic interest with Caro and the Legists 
of that age. The personages who pass within his ken are men of 
fiesh and blood. Names which have hitherto degenerated into a 
sneer now represent to him beings of a type most lovable, evok- 
ing admiration and gratitude. The veil is lifted from the East, 
and sunshine streams Westward. Again the magic wand permits 
us to behold the life of a German Jewess of the seventeenth 
century, with all its vicissitudes, joys, sorrows, and humanity* 
depicting phases which needs must give pause to those familiar 
with present conditions. There pass before us, in stately pro- 
cession, the Jewish Saints, a class to most of us hitherto un- 

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JEWISH PUBLICATION SOCIETY 275 



known, the consideration of whose lives, of their simplicity, their 
honesty, their modesty, is elevating and ennobling. Then we 
delve into the Horde of Hebrew Manuscripts, dry, musty manu- 
scripts, and yet how big with promise, how replete with fruitful 
suggestion and material, which will tend, more and more, to 
bridge the chasm between the present and the past. 

This work again demonstrates, that Judaism is not a mere 
collection of whited bones, but that it ever has been, and ever 
will be, a living thing. It requires but the master to give it 
direction. 

The translation of Mosenthal's " Stories of Jewish Home Life " 
is deserving of high commendation. These stories have long 
been famous, and the English reader will find that the work of 
the translator has been well done, and that the wit, humor, and 
pathos of the original have been preserved. These stories are 
annals of the beautiful simplicity of Jewish home life, as it 
existed in Germany half a century ago. The elemental virtues 
are admirably depicted, an atmosphere of wholesome sentiment 
has been created, and the characters are convincing and genuine. 
Even the blas^ reader will find his best emotions stimulated by a 
perusal of these stories. 

The latest publication, " David the Giant Killer," refiects great 
credit on the authoress, Emily Solis-Cohen. No better book for 
juvenile readers is to be found in the Society's list. The subjects 
are well selected, the stories are charmingly told, and cannot fail 
to attract young and old. The framework which contains these 
stories of the Bible introduces us to an amiable family, to pleas- 
ant memories, and to the rare beauty of the ancient ceremonies 
prevailing in enlightened Jewish households. 

This book likewise indicates a marked advance in the physical 
properties of the publications of the Society. The binding, includ- 
ing the colored cover, makes the very handling of the book 
pleasurable. 

The work outlined for the coming year gives promise of new 
achievements in fields which it is well to cultivate, and gives 
renewed indication of the wisdom and intelligence which have 
characterized the management of this institution from its very 
beginning. 

It is of exceeding importance to the Jewish people that the 
translation of the Bible shall be continued by the issuing, during 
the coming year, of the Book of Micah, with a Commentary by 
that learned scholar, Professor Max L. Margolis. The increase 
of the Bible Fund merits the attention of Jewish intelligence 
and means. The Legends of the Jews will be the subject of an 
important contribution from the pen of Dr. Louis Ginzberg. 
The shorter history of the Jewish people to be written by Pro- 

17 

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276 • AMERICAN JEWISH YEAR BOOK 

fessor I. Friedlaender, of the Jewish Theological Seminary of 
America, will he a valuable asset in Jewish education for those 
for whom Lady Magnus is too juvenile and Graetz too extensive. 
Other works are in contemplation indicating that the Society 
has before it a rich future of usefulness and high accomplish- 
ment. 

It was moved that the report be referred to the Board of 
Trustees for such action as it might deem desirable. 
The motion was adopted. 
The Committee was then discharged with thanks. 

The Chairman appointed the following as a Committee on 
Nominations: Mr. William B. Hackenburg, Chairman; Mr. 
David Sulzberger, and Mr. Louis N". Fleisher, all of Phila- 
delphia. 

Mr. Ephraim Lederer, of Philadelphia, moved that the pro- 
posed amendment to increase the number of trustees from 15 
to 21 be acted upon. 

Mr. Henry Fernberger, of Philadelphia, moved that the 
amendment be adopted as read, and the motion was carried. 

Elections 

The Committee on Nominations presented the following 
nominations : 

President (for one year) : Edwin Wolf, Philadelphia. 

Vice-President (for one year) : Henry M. Leipziger, New 
York City. 

Second Vice-President (for one year) : Simon Miller, Phila- 
delphia. 

Trustees (for three years) : Cyrus Adler, Washington, D. 
C. ; Henry M. Leipziger, New York; Morris Newburger, 
Philadelphia; Julius Rosen wald, Chicago; Mayer Sulzberger, 

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JEWISH PUBLICATION SOCIETY ^ 277 

Philadelphia; A. Leo Weil, Pittsburg; Edwin Wolf, Phila- 
delphia. 

Trustees (for two years) : Sigmund Sonneborn, Balti- 
more; S. Wolfenstein, Cleveland. 

Trustees (for one year) : Horace Stern, Philadelphia; 
Samuel Straus, New York. 

Honorary Vice-Presidents (for three years) : Marcus Bern- 
heimer, St. Louis; Henry Cohen, Galveston; Louis K. Gut- 
man, Baltimore; M. C. Sloss, San Francisco; Alfred Sea- 
songood, Cincinnati. 

The Secretary was instructed to cast the unanimous ballot 
of the meeting for the nominees, and the Chairman declared 
them didy elected. 

On motion, the meeting adjourned. 

I. George Dobsevage, 

Secretary, 



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AMERICAN JEWISH YEAR BOOK 



MEMBEES 



Alabama 



Anniiton 
Saks, Joseph 

Blrmlnflrluun 
Lesser, Emll, Metropolitan Hotel 
Loveman, Birs. A. B., 924 B. 19th 

Oolnmblaiui 
Erlick, Mrs. Ph. 
Gordon, Miss Gertrude 

Deoatnr 
Falk, L. M. 

Bemopolii 
Eny. M. 
Mayer, Lewis 
Mayer, Morris 

Mobile 
Bloch. Alexander 
Eichold. L. 
Hammel, L. 

Hess, C, 10 North Royal 
Hess, Henry, 19 S. Water 
Leinkauf, H. W. 



Levy A* G 

Moses, Rabbi Alfred G., 407 Conti 

Pollock, J. 

Schwarz, R. M., 160 St Emanuel 

Shaarai Shomayim Sabbath School, 

19 S. Water 
Spira, A. H. 
Weiss, J. W., 303 Church 

Montgomery 
Ehrenrelch, Rey. B. C, 58 Saya 
Kahn, M. 

Lehmann, Adolphe, 41 Holcombe 
Loeb, Jacques 

Selma 
Kaplan, Rey. Dr. Jacob H., Hotel 

Albert 
Meyer, M. J. 
Schuster, Benjamin J. 

Shei&eld 



Tuskegee 



Arizona 



Phoenix 
Goldman, Mrs. Leo 



Arkansas 



Helena 
Stolz, Rey. Dr. J. H. 

Little Bock 
Mayer, Max 
Witt, Rey. Louis 



Miller, A. J. 

Marx, S. 

ARIZONA 

Tucson 
Goldschmidt, Leo, The Owls 
Jacobs, Lionel M. 

Pine Bluff 
Dryfus, Isaac, 610 Main 
Eisenkramer, M. 
Frisch, Rabbi Ephraim 



California 



OALirOBNIA 

Bakersfleld 
Jastro, Henry A. 
Weill, A. 

Ohico 

Annual Member ^^®^' ^' ^ ^^^ 

Rosenthal, Henry, 7356 Park Kryawsky, M. 



Alameda 
Lirs Member 
Anspacher, A., 1409 Morton 



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JEWISH PUBLICATION SOCIETY 



379 



Fresno 
Einstein, Louis, 948 K 
Goodman, S. B., 1039 N 



Dayidow, B. 



Kenwood 



Larkspur 
Armer, A. 

Los Angeles 
Black, George N., 906 Union Trust 

Bldg. 
Edelman, Dr. D. W., Bradbury Blk. 
Finkenstein, M. J., 718 Sunset Blvd. 
Hecht, Rev. S., 817 Beacon 
Hoffman, H., 135 S. Spring 
Kafka, Mrs. I., 227 N. Flower 
Klngsbaker, Benjamin, 1617 S. 

Flgueroa 
Korn, J., 322 W. 4th 
Kornblum, M. S., 806 B. Washing- 
ton 
Los Angeles Lodge No. 487, I. O. 
B. B., Henry E. Elkeles, Sec, 831 
S. Broadway 
Lowman, I. L., 131 S. Spring 
Marshutz, S. G., 133 S. Spring 
Newmark, Mrs. H., 837 Westlake 

Av. 
Newmark, Marco R. 
Newmark, S. M., 909 Beacon 
Norton, Isaac, 627 Bonnie Brae 
Prenzlauer, A., 957 Beacon 

XarysYiUe 
Cheim, H. 

Xenlo Park 
Special Member 
Walter, Clarence P. 

Merced 
Helmer, Mrs. Arabella 

Modesto 
Plato, G. D. 

Oakland 
Abrahamson, Hugo, 576 Albion 
Coffee, Mrs. M. H., 763 14th 
Frank, Miss Esther, 81 Pearl 
Friedlander, Rabbi M., 173 E. Moss 

Av. 
Jones, Mrs. M., 638 12th 
Samuels, Hon. George, 1267 We«t 
Samuels, S., 1269 West 



Cohn, David 
Lehmann, L. 



Oznard 



Petaluma California 

Neuburger, Morris 

Sacramento 
LiFB Membbb 
Weinstock, Harris 

Annual Members 
Bonheim, Albert 
Coney, Miss J., 313 K 
Elkus, Mrs. A., 1515 N 
Fried. Rev. Michael, 700 L 
Jaffe, M. S., 321 K 
Mitau, Henry 

San AnseUno 
Rosenthal, Joseph 

San Bernardino 
Cohn, C. 

San Diego 
Blochman, L. A., 3260 First 
Irwin, Isaac I., P. O. Box 80 
Meyer, M. E., 5th and H 
Naumann, J., 1250 9th 
Rosenstadt, E.^ 3744 6th 
Wolf, H. S., 650 6th 

San Francisco 
Life Members 

Altschul, C. 

Anspacher, A., 1409 Morton 

Brown, L^ £2state of. Van Ness Av. 
and O'Farreir 

Castle, Frederic L., Estate of 

Davis, Ansley G. 

Ehrman, M., 2618 Jackson 

Gerstle, Louis. Estate of 

Greenebaum, Sigmund 

Hecht, A. B., Estate of, 2103 Pacific 
Av. 

Heller, Samuel, 2016 Pacific Av. 

Hellman, I. M. 

Heyman, Henry W., Estate of, 1770 
Pacific Av. 

Jacobs, Isldor, 2018 Webster 

Levi, J., Jr. 

Llllenthal, E. R„ 1801 Gough 

Lilienthal, P. N., Anglo-California 
Bank 

Meyer, Mrs. C. 

Meyer, Daniel, 212 Pine 

Neustadter, Mrs. J. H., 2504 Jack- 
son 

Rosenbaum, Moses, Estate of, 2108 
Jackson 

Rosenstock, Samuel 

Rosenthal, I. L., 1107 Van Ness Av. 

Samuel, M., 132 1st 



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AMERICAN JEWISH YEAR BOOK 



California Scheeline, B., 4827 California 

Shainwald, Herman, 1366 Butter 
SIoss, Mrs. Louis, 1807 Gough 
Btern, Jacob, 2016 Pacific Ay. 
Strauss, Levi 
Butro, Adolph, Estate of, 2323 

Washington 
Toklas, Ferdinand 
Walter, Emmanuel 
Weill, Raphael 
Wiel, Louis, P., 1817 Jackson 

Special Members 
Bachman, L. S., 2369 Devisadero 
Haas, A., 2001 Van Ness Av. 
Heller, Moses, 3590 Clay 
Koshland, M. B., 3800 Washington 
Slnzheimer, Henry, 1848 Pine 
Walter, Isaac N., 1803 Franklin 

Annual Members 
Arnhold, B., 2342 Devisadero 
Badt, Mrs. L., 3038 Jackson 
Barnett, A. F., 1909 Sutter 
Bender, Albert M., 150 Pine 
Bernstein, Sylvan L. 
Bienenfeld, Bernard* 621 Wells Far- 
go Bidg. 
Bloch, E., 1342 Bush 
Brenner, G., 2308 Buchanan 
Cowen, A. H., 529 Market 
Fabian, P., 3641 Clay 
Flelshhacker, M., 2418 Pacific Av. 
Frank, Nathan H., 3214 Jackson 
Gabriel, Seymour, care of Hoffman, 

Rothschild & Co. 
Goldberg, J., Cor. Pacific Av. and 

Franklin 
Greenebaum, E., 3620 Clay 
Greenebaum, L., 2370 Washington 
Greenebaum, M., Cor. 6th and South 
Gnihn, J. M., 479 Grove 
Haber, Miss R. S., 2478 Broadway 
Hecht, Col. M. H., care of Bach- 

ingham & Hecht 
Heineberg, J. A., 529 Market 
Heller, E. S., 2020 Jackson 
Hyman, Joseph, -1916 California 
Jacobs, Julius, Assistant Sec, U. S. 

Treasury * 

Kaufman, J. M., 2872 Pine 
Kaufmann, William, Cor. Post and 

Van Ness Av 
Lachman, A., 3600 Washington 
Levison, H., 312 Baker 
Levy, H., 1417 Post 
Levy, Meyer H., 1768 O'Farrell 
Levy, Oscar B., 2197 Devisadero 
Lippman, Mrs. H., 3404 Clay 
Moss, Herman, 2268 Jackson 
Newman, Judah, 1980 Jackson 



Newman, Simon, 2070 Jackson 
Nietx), Rev. J.. 1719 Bush 
Ordenstein, Max, 2131 Devisadero 
Redlich, Henry, 1264 Page 
Rinaldo, H.. 2562a Market 
Rosenthal, Marcus, 1018 Ellis 
Rothschild, Mrs. C, 2257 Union 
Savannah, M., care of The Paragon, 

Van Ness Av. and Post 
Scheeline, 9. C. 4827 California 
Schlesinger« Hon. Bert, 3920 Clay 
Schloss, Benjamin, 17-19 Beale 
Schwabacher, Louis A., 2100 Jack- 
son. 
Schwnbacher, Ludwig, 2000 Gough 
Schweitzer, Maurice, 3600 Clay 
Silverman, Moritz, care of Golden 
Gate Cloak and Suit House, 1062 
Market 
Sloss, Mrs. Max C, 3498 Clay 
Solomons, Lucius L., 1812 Laguna 
Splegl, L. M., 1080 Fulton 
Stahl, Adolph, 1880 Jackson 
Straus, Louis, 658 Missouri 
Wangenheim, S., 2344 Devisadero 
Wascerwitz, M. H.. 240 Laurel 
Wiener, Louis, 1822 Post 
Wise, Otto Irving, 1907 Sutter 
Zentner, J., 1937 Golden Gate 

Sanger 
Frankenau, Max 

Santa Rosa 
Rosenberg, Max 
Spector, Mollie, 706 4th 
Trachman, H. J., D. Box 95. 

Sherman 
Horowitz, Alexander 

Sierra Xadre 
Bchlesinger, T., Hotel Lankersheim 

Btodkton 
Cohen, Albert E., The Sterling 
Ellinger, Rev. Bmil, 219 E. Acacia 
Frankenheimer. Samuel, 129 B. 

Magnolia 
Gunzendorfer, F^ 432 E. Main 
Manasses, M., 15 N. El Dorado 
Ryhim Ahoovim, S. S. Safferhill, 

305 E. Main 
Stein, M. P. 
Stelnhart, C. 



Levis, Leon 
Levy, Julius 



Viialia 



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JEWISH PUBLICATION SOCIETY 



281 



COLORADO 



Colorado 



Denver 
ADfenger, Hon. Milton L., 822 

Symes BIdg. 
B. M. H. Teachers Ass'n, 2929 

Welton 
Eisner, Dr. John, 1014 14th 
Friedman, Rev. W. S., 1060 Emer- 
son 
Goldsmith, Herman, 1304 Vine 
Harrison, J. H. .• 
Hillkowitz, Dr. Philip, 1427 Stout 
Kauvar, Rahbl C. H., 2929 Welton 
Krohn, Dr. M. J., 2705 W. Colfax 

Av. 
Kubltshek, H., 1435 Stnart 
Levy, Lesser, 1613 Market 
Lewln, Edward, 1645 Lawren<»e 
Lieberman, Jacob J., 2147 Larimer 
Ix)vin, J. A., 2002 Chanipa 
Mecklenburg, Abram, 946^ 19th Av. 



Morris, Ernest, Kittredge Bldg. 
Muller, Mrs. Alfred, Ernest and 

Cranmer Bldg. 
Public Library 
Saly, M. A., 1607 Larimer 
Well Bros., 1401 Larimer 
Welner, Lewis, 3256 Curtis. 
Zwetow, Samuel R., 1230 16th 

Pneblo 
Cohen, Rev. M. N. A., P. O. Box 622 
Herman, Henry 

Kohn, M., care of Colorado Bedding 
Co. 
. Shloss, S., 802 S. Union 

Trinidad 
Rascover, P. 
Sanders, Leopold 



OONHEOTICTTT 



Connecticut 



Ansonia 
Bellin. H. S., 493-496 Main 
Komblut, Louis A., 244 Main 
Lurie, Kalman. 63 Canal 
Morganstem, Mrs. R., 55 Jackson 
Rubin, J., 549 Main 

Bridgeport 
Dolgoff. Mrs. J., 297 Congress 
Oeduldlg, A. S., Sanford Bldg. 
Gorman, Wm., 1166 Main 
Gushaler, Benj., 563 Water 
Harris, Sam, 1154 Main 
Hirschberg, S., 519 Water 
Klein, J. B. 

Lesser, Mrs. B. L., 759 Myrtle Av. 
Moraus, Saml., 511 Water 
Moss, Isaac, 257 Williams 
Neuberger, Miss Bertha B., 103 

Benham Av. 
Oelsner, B., 189 State 
Rosen, Dr. M., 493 Fairfield Av. 
Sachs, B., 541 Water 
Schlne, D., 513 B. Main 
Shapiro, Charles H., 307-309 Meigs 

Bldg. 
Stein, Max, 842 Norman 
Taft. Daniel, 151 Middle 
Walder, H. W., 1116 Main 

Derby 

Cerowlcz, M. 

Hartford 
Bienstock, Samuel, 990 Broad 
Blkin. Rev. M., 637 Albany 
Glaszer, Samuel, 868 Main 



Glotzer, Samuel J., 167 Bellevue 
Goldenthal, M., 15 Affleck 
Gordon, M., 239 Windsor 
Greenberg, Leon, 72 Trumbull 
Greenberg, M., 17 Winthrop 
Haas. L. B., 152 State 
Herrup. Morris, 45 Kinsley 
Husinsky, Dr. M. J., 4 Village 
Katz, IjouIs H., 902 Main 
Klein, Isaac, 16 Church 
Levin, Dr. Herman, 904 Main 
Levy, H. P.. 96 Main 
Lewitt. Dr. Abraham. 71 Windsor 
Lyon, Bernhard, 14 Shultas PI. 
Malslen, Max, 1035 Broad 
Older, Morris, 11 Central Row 
Rickman, Samuel J., 166 Windsor 
Rosenthal, N., 96 Windsor Av. 
Sack, John, 300 Park 
Silver, Dora B., 26 Winthrop 
Silverman, H., 6 Ellsworth PI. 
Snisman, M., 141 Windsor 
Wilson, Samuel, 119 Bellevue 

Xeriden 
Bush, Alexander 

New Britain 
Fischer, L. J. 
Lewitt, M. C, Main 
Random, Max, Park and Elm 

New Haven 
Adler, Max 
Alderman, Morris, 171-173 Congress 

Av. 
Bengin, M., 27 Congress Av. 



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AMERICAN JEWISH YEAR BOOK 



Connecticut p^rcSusky. D.. 3flO Georj^e 

iVr^rmiin. Harnett Kichfltig* Bl%. 
t Jiplitn. JnCRb, 42 Cliurci 
Kbrlleh, Nj^w^hq, 23 CtiuEXti 
Frlpdinati. A. M,* V* 0» Boi fiOS 
Oloiiekln, EUfts L., 163 Elm 
(iCjldinjin, Mrst, JnroTi i\, 66 Howi? 
OtflilMpJfi, A., Priiice 
CiDpenlj^liii, J^, 10 Church 

Jacolm. Al^atflnder, 12 Day 
.Taroba, Mai; lOTS Chnpel 
Kafkn. A., 142 E^lward 
Kanif'Q, ElU R.» 734 Grand Av. 
Kapslnowr Hftrry, 128 Wnalilii^ton 
Kap??lnow, M., 4ft7 State 

Kloinrr, C 310 KiChflDgt? Bidg. 
Klf^fii^^r. Isaac !#. 
Kllirf^raafi, M., 16 Orchard 
Koskoff. S., 241 Congress At. 
KriilU Geo. D-, 12 Temple 
KufjelT .Ti?Qnk E., 110 Oak 
Ijpvy, Rev. Dnvirt, ftfi Audy^D 
T-Pvj-t Is^nac n.. 634 Howard At. 
Mann, Miss Gertrude, 70 Pearl 
Nathati^soti. Samuel J., 865 Chapel 
Nft\s^man. Jacob J., 41 Park 
PIckus, B. D., 2fl5 Tenter 
Fr^Hjj, JoRcph, 158 Elm 
Kapoport. H,, 41 GUI 
Rpjinlk, H., 1.'12 DaTPnport At. 
Salxman, n., C07 Elm 



Schoenberger, Win., 718 Oran^ 
Shonlnger, B. 

Steinbach, A. D., 273 State 
Steinberg, D., 92 Ward 
Stock, Bfitchel, 8 George 
Ullman, Isaac M., 621 Chapel 
Weinberg, Mrs. J., 1193 Chapel 
Weissman, J., 694 Howard Av. 
Wersburg, Meyer, 198 Lawrence 
Wolfe, Isaac, 157 Church 
Zunder, Theodore 

Korwalk 
Schachat, Hyman, 106 Harbor Av. 
Stull, Morris, 99 Main 

fkrath Korwalk 
Dayis, Joseph 
Gans, Edward M. 
Greens teln, Samuel 
Harris, Alexander 
Joseen, William 

Btamford 
Oonskion Harris Co., 48 Park Row 
Bmaitin. N., 621 Main 
Kronholtz, A. M., P. O. Box 895 
Nelson, Louis, 21 Pacific 
Newstadt, H., 210 Atlantic 

Thompeonville 
Aronson, A. P. 



Delaware 



DELAWARE 



Seaford 
G reenabaum, B. 
Van Leer, Charles 

Wilmington 
Barsky, Nathan, 409 King 
Cramer, Maurice, 200 W. 2d 
Finger, Louis, 421 W. 2d 
Frank, Adolph, 10 E. Front 
Goldstein, Samuel, 6th and Church 

District of DISTBIOT OF 

Columbia Washington 

Library BIxmber 
Berliner, E., 1438 Columbia Road 

Annual Members 
Adler, Dr. Cyrus, The Mendota 
Baumgarten, Julius, 440 H, N. W. 
Behrend, A, 1441 Rhode Island Av. 
Berenteo, W. L., 215 7th S. W. 
Blout, I. L.. 710 7th 
Coblenzer, Mrs. Bertha, The Lenox, 

1523 L 
Cohen, B., 1541 M, N. W. 

24 



Greenbaum, Samuel, 304 Market 
Jellnick, Chas., 1202 Jefferson 
Kent, Joseph S., 811 B. 7th 
Kirshbland, Benjamin F., 226 King 
Levy, Mrs. D. L., 708 Van Buren 
Levy, Morris, 223 Market 
Miller, J., 122 Market 
Roth. Ignatz, 200 Market 
Topkis, Charles, 417 King 
Topkis, Louis 

OOLTrMBIA 

Cohen, Louis, 231 1st 
Cohen, Max, 509 7th, N. W. 
Cohen, Meyer, 936 F, N. W. 
Cohen, Nathan, 617 K, N. W. 
Glchner, Fred. S., 411 4th, N. H. 
Heilprin, Giles F.. 926 B. S. W. 
Hlrsh, Arnold, 1028 7th, N. W. 
Kahn, Hon. Julius, House of Bepre> 

sentatives 
Leon, Benj. K.. 1229 Pa. av., W. 
Lewin, S., 1400 Pennsylvania Av. 
Luchs, Mrs. M., 1915 Calvert 
Lyon, Simon. 1416 F, N. W. 
Markoff, Walter B., 1718 Pa. Ay. 



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JEWISH PUBLICATION SOCIETY 



283 



Oppenheimer, Mrs. Simon, 1406 

I2th. N. W. 
Perskin, Israel H., Juniper Bldg. 
Rich. M. M., 1448 Howard, N. W. 
Rosenau, Mrs. M. J., 3211 13th, 

N. W. 
Rosenfeld, I., 1134 7th, N. W. 
Scottish Rite. Third and E. 
Simon, Rev. Abram, 2606 University 

PI. 
Solomon, A. S., 1206 K, N. W. 



Stearman, Mark, 816 L, N. W. Difltrict of 

Stein, C. J., 626 PennsWvania Av. Columbia 
Stem, Rev. L., 1816 Columbia Road 
Stone, N. I., 227 New Jersey Av., 

Sworzyn, Morris, 419 9th, N. W. 
Tepper, Joseph L., 608 B, N. W. 
WashinjTton Hebrew Congregation, 
I. L. Blont, Pres., 806 7th, N. W. 
Wolf, Hon. Simon, 700-706 14th 



FLORIDA 



Florida 



Pensaoola 
Cahn, Solomon 

Friedman, Louis, 222 N. Cervantes 
Oreenhut, A. 

Schwartz, Rabbi Jacob D., 11 N. 
Spring 



Tallahassee 
Diamond, Julius 
Hirschberg, Julius 



Britowitz, M. 



Tampa 



OEOROIA 



Georgia 



Albany 
Brown, Mrs. D., 416 Broad 
Landau, Rev. Edmund A. 
Sterne, Sigmund 

Atlanta 
Bigler, Mrs. J., 806 S. Pryor 
Brown, Julius B., Jos. B. Brown 

Bldg. 
Frank, M., 341 Washington 
Haas, Aaron, 206 S. Forsyth 
Haas, I. H.. 386 S. Pryor 
Haas, Jacob, 321 Washington 
Heyman, Arthur, 366 Washington 
Kaufman, David, National Straw 

Hat Works 
Lazear, P., 127 Richardson 
Lichtenstein, E., Ill B. Bills 
Lichtenstein, M., 78 Decatur 
Loeb, Rev. J. T., 411 Central Av. 



Marx, Rev. David, 497 Washington 
Saul, Joseph, 11 Bdgwood Av. 
Silverman, H., 286 Rawson 

Oolnmbus 
Hirsch, Miss Addle, 1124 4th Av. 

Macon 
Heimer, M., 108 6th 

Savannah 
Byck, D. A., 121 W. 36th 
Dryfus, Mrs. M., 2003 Bull 
Mendel, J. 

Witkover, H. W., Germanla Bank 
Bldg. 

West Point 
Heyman, Mrs. B. 



Bois6 City 
Mayfield, Max 



IDAHO 

Pooatello 
Rosenberg, Mrs. J. 

ILLINOIS 



Idaho 



Illinois 



Ohioago 

LiBBABT MElfBEB 

Morris, Nelson, Union Stock Yards 

Special Members 
Becker, A. O., 6182 Bast Bnd Av. 
De Lee, S. T., 8634 Prairie Av. 
Rosenwald, Mrs. J., 4901 Bills Av. 

Annual Members 
Abraham, A., 238 92d, South Chi- 
cago 



Adler, Miss Celia, 166 34th 
Adler, Mrs. D., 3643 Ellis Av. 
Altschul, Hugo, 7528 Jaginaw Av., 

Windsor Park 
Aren, Dr. M. L., 284 W. 12th 
Bach, Mrs. B,, 8432 Michigan Av. 
Bacharach, H., 238 B. Randolph 
Bamett Miss Minnie, 8 De Kalb 
Bauer, Rev. S. H., 666 N. Hoyne Av. 
Beck, Dr. Carl, 42 Roslyn PI. 
Becker, Benjamin V., 4469 Berkeley 

Av. 



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AMERICAN JEWISH YEAR BOOK 



Illinois Becker, L., 5000 Drexel Blvd. 

Bensinger, B. E., 263 Wabash Ay. 
Binswanger, A, 1520 Fort Dearborn 

Bldg. 
Birkenstein, David, 396 La Salle 

Av. 
BIrkenstein, Louis, 12 Lane PI. 
Blum, Julias, 4327 Grand Blvd. 
Blum, Simon S., 4051 Washington 

Park Pi. 
Braunsteln, M.. 4815 L-^neley A v. 
Bregstone, Philip P., DO I^ Ralle 
Buchbaum, S., 5430 Michigan At. 
Burger, Nathan, 447 La Salle At. 
Cohen, Abraham, 2646 Cottage 

(JroTe 
Cowen. Israel, 672 E. 4Rth 
Cowen, Miss Millie, 8218 S. Park 

At. 
D'Ancona, E. N., 108 La Salle 
David, Mrs. J. B.. 4463 Ellis Av. 
Davis, Abel, 655 N. Hoyne Av. 
Davis, James, 1060 Milwaukee Av. 
Despres, I., 3249 Rhodes Av. 
Deutelbaum, Leopold, Home for 

Jewish Orphans, Drexel A v. and 

62d. 
Deutsch. Samuel. 4908 Ellis At. 
Diamond. Dr. I. B., 294 W. Division 
Dolkart, Leo, 483 W. Belmont Av. 
Dreyfus, J., 214 Michigan 
Drucker, Saul, 592 N. Wood 
Ederheimer, M^ 3926 Grand Blvd. 
Eisendrath, B. D., 4339 Grand Blvd. 
Eisendrath, H. J., 591 E. 46th 
Eisendrath, S. J.. 4340 Grand Blvd 
Elsenstaedt, I., 230 Market 
Elsenstaedt, R., 674 48th 
Ellbogen, M., 3700 Forest A v. 
Epstein, EHias, 1011 Douglas Blvd. 
FaroU, Mrs. B., 6222 Lexington 

At. 
Felsenthal, Rgt. Dr. B., 4535 Prarte 

Av. 
Felsenthal, Eli B., 4108 Grand 

Blvd. 
Fisher, H. M., 806 Tribune Bldg. 
Florsheim, Simon, 4913 Grand Blvd. 
Foreman, Oscar G., 3415 Michigan 

Av. 
Fox, Leo, 3355 S. Park Av. 
Frank, Henry L., 1608 Prairie Av. 
Frank, Louis, 868 E. 48th 
Freund, Mrs. G., 4416 Michigan Av. 
Furth, J. E., 192 E. 35th 
Gans, Leopold, 4331 Drexel Blvd. 
Gatzert, J. L., 220 Adams 
Ginsburg, Miss Goldie, 473 S. Hal- 

sted 
Ginsburg, Louis, 475 Sangamon 
Glaser, E. L., 3311 Michigan Av. 
Goodman, Magnus, 4533 Ellis Av. 



Gordon, Dr. L. E., 487 S. Halsted 
Greenebaum, Elias, 4510 Grand 

Blvd. 
Gross, P. A., 159 La Salle 
Guettel. M., care of RIes & Co., 126 

Market 
Haas, Mrs. Charles, 3331 S. Park 

At. 
Hahn, Herman F., 3622 Grand 

BlTd. 

Hammel, Fred, Vincennes Hotel 
Harris, Joseph 3420 Michigan At. 
Ilartmann, Hugo, 200 Jackson Blvd. 
Hartmann, Joseph S., 200 Jackson 

Blvd. 
Heldman, Julius N., The Teinple 
Heyman, Mrs. David A., 4350 Grand 

BlTd. 
Honv^ch. P.. 211 W, 12th 
lljmnn. Jmoph, 4ftl7 Ell la A v. 
Jjtalnh Sahbath ScIii^oL care of Dr. 

Jaippb Sfnlz. 4SH r^ncley Av. 
.Tfirrili??rtii. D., 4nol* Elli=* Av, 
.iiic'uUv, Enipst. W Wabash At. 
Kiinri; N. H.. ill K. Ashland Av. 
K2i]ilan. Narhan D., 5^ Clark 
Kjirp^n, Ailolph. Ui&2 Sht>Hdtn Rd. 
Kiirp^n, L., 45^^! Michigan At. 
KiiT/. Eiifjt^ni^, 2tit^ WashinetoQ 
iC.Ml. 1^0, 4H^1 ChnniiAniu Av. 
Kawln, N., 4T43 FottiHtTllle Av. 
Kelm, Isaac, 4117 Grand Blvd. 
Kline, S. J., 4941 Grand BlTd. 
Kline. Solomon, 230 Adams 
Kraus. Adolph. 4518 Drexel BlTd. 
Kreeger, N., 313 W. 63d 
Kroiich, G., 4952 Washington Park 

ri. 

Kubreener. S., 1055 W. North At. 

i^aemmle, Carl, 196-198 Lake 

Landau, K., 155 Market 

Landauer, H., 220 Adams 

Laurence, Mrs. Rebecca, 1027 War- 
ren At. 

Lederer, Mrs. S., 4800 ForestTille 
At. 

Leopold, Harold E., 159 La Salle 

LeTin, Samuel, 4630 Indiana Av. 

Levy, Rev. A. R., 487 Ashland 
Blvd. 

Lewissohn, L., 743 B. 46th 

Loeb, Adolph, 3622 Grand Blvd. 

Loeb, Emanuel, 4535 Vincennes At. 

Loeb, F., 4719 Kenwood Av. 

Loeb, Isaac A.. 59 Clark 

Loewenstein, Mrs. L., 3316 Calumet 
At. 

Ix)e wen thai, B., 221 Chamber of 
Commerce 

Lyon, Mrs. Mark T., 4950 Ellis Av. 

Mack, Hon. Julian W., 706 Court 
House 



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Mandel, Mrs. Emanuel, 8400 Michi- 
gan Ay. 

Mannheimer, Rev. Leo, 20 Roslyn 
PI. 

Mannheimer, Mrs. M., 1620 Michi- 
gan Ay. 

Marks, I. L., 450 S. Halsted 

Mautner, S., 167 Wabash A v. 

Mayer, Mrs. Leyy, American Trust 



Menkin, Edward, 3571 Rhodes Ay. 
Moses, Adolph, 4139 Drexel Blyd. 
Oppenheim, M. J., 4818 Forestyille 

Pfaelzer, Dayid M., 4109 Grand 
Blyd. 

Pflaum, A. J., 153 La Salle 

Pick, George, 4736 Kimbark Ay. 

Piatt, B. N., 1197 Douprlas Blvd. 

Pritzker, Dr. Louis J., 667 N. Rohey 

Rappaport, Rey. Julius, 150 Crystal 

Rose, Edward, 4710 Grand Blyd. 

Rosenbaum, Dayid, 770 N. Trying 
Ay. 

Rosenbaum, Joseph, Auditorium 
Annex 

Rosenblatt, Mrs. A., Lakota Hotel 

Rosenfeld, Mrs. M., 1620 Michigan 
Ay. 

Rosenfleld, L., Lakota Hotel 

Rosenthal, Mrs. James, 6046 Jeffer- 
son Ay. 

Rosenwald, M. S., 4907 Grand 
Blyd. 

Schaffer Isaac, 1047 Milwaukee Ay. 

Schaffner, Robert, 178 La Salle 

Schanfarber, Rey. T., 4049 Grand 
Blyd. 

Schiff, Samuel, 6242 Wentworth 
Ay. 

Schlesinger, L., State and Madison 

Schloessinger, Henry J., 230 Wash- 
ington 

Schneidig, Jacob, 4202 Drexel 
Blyd. 

Seelenfreund, A. B., 1248 Tribune 
Bldg. 

Seifer, Nathan, 7860 Boulevard Ay. 

Seligman, Julius, 1722 Addison 

Selz, Mrs. Morris, 1717 Michigan 
Ay. 

Shaffner, Wm. Chas., 4714 Drexel 
Blvd. 

Shapera, Morris L., 320 W. 12th 

Shulman, M., 160 Johnston Ay. 

Silber, Frederic D., 5632 Washing- 
ton 

Sommerfleld, Julius, 6319 Michigan 
Ay. 

Spiegel, Mrs. J., 3344 S. Park ay 

Spiegel, Jonas, 218 La Salle 

19 27 



Steele, Mrs. Henry B., 3216 Michi- XUinois 
gan Ay. 

Stein, Adolph, 369 Ashland Blyd. 

Stein, Mrs. B., 4829 Vincennes Ay. 

Stein, Hon. Philip, 4840 Grand 
Blyd. 

Stein, Samuel, 372 S. Halsted 

Stern, Dayid, 314 W. Madison Ay. 

Stolz, Rey. Joseph, 4827 Langley 
Ay. 

Straus, Leo, 2965 Prairie Ay. 

Straus, Meyer L., 171-173 W. Madi- 
son 

Stumer, Louis, M., 4404 Grand Blyd. 

Sulzberger, Solomon L., 4404 Michi- 
gan Ay. 

Walpert, Dr. B. E., 8739 Commer- 
cial Ay. 

Weil, Julius E., 4921 Ellis Ay. 

Weissenbach, Joseph, 159 La Salle 

Welcher, Harry, 46 Potomac Ay. 

Wise, Mrs. Mark, E. 3d, Mt. Carmel 

Witkowsky, Mrs. C, 2802 Prairie 
Ay. 

Witkowsky, D., 4942 Vincennes Ay. 

Wolf, Henry M., The Wlnamae, 
Ellis and Oakwood Av. 

Woolner, Chas. K., 5026 Calumet 
Av. 

Yudelson, Rev. A. B., 3707 Indiana 
Ay. 

Zeisler, Mrs. Fannie Bloomfleld, 
6749 Woodlawn Ay. 

Elgin 



Frelller, Philip 

Miller, Mrs. B., 826 Spring 

Oalesburg 
Froehlich, Solomon 
Nirdlinger, L. 

Oeneseo 
Waterman, Henry 

Peoria 
Anshei Emeth Sabbath School, care 

of Rabbi C. S. Levi, National 

Hotel 
Greenhut. J. B., 148 High 
Lauterbach, Dr. J. Z. 
Levi, Rev. Charles S., National 

Hotel 
Szold, Joseph, 2418 S. Adams 
Wolfner, W. F., 206 Moss Ay. 
Woolner, Samuel, 817 Perry 



Lowenstein, M. 



Urbana 



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286 



AMERICAN JEWISH YEAR BOOK 



Indiana 



nmiASTA 



Attioa 
I^eTor, Mrs. Levi S. 

EYansvUle 
B«»rn8tein. David S., 1511 T'pper 2d 
BItterman. Adolph, 300 Maine 
Slcara. Philip, 923 W. Franklin 
Strouse, Abraham. 1039 Upper 1st 

Ooahen 
Salinger, Harry 
Saiinger, Louis 
Salinger, N. 

Indianapolis 
Bamberger, Ralph, 706 Stevenson 

BId«. 
Efroymson, G. A., 1424 N. Jersey 
Efroymson, M., 2107 N. Delaware 

Av. 
Feuerllcht, Rev. Morris M., 2024 

N. Alabama. 
Fishbein, B.. 302 Commercial Bldg. 
Indinnapolis Hebrew Congregation, 

2238 Talbott Av. 
Jewish Federation of Indianapolis, 

821 Meridian 
Kiser, Solomon, 306 Indiana Trust 

Bldg. 



Mantel, B., 716 N. New Jersey 
Messing, Rev. M., 523 N. Delaware 
Neuberger, Louis, Columbia Club 

Bldg. 
Rauh. S. E.. 3020 N. Meridian 
Rothschild, S. G., 2224 Talbott Av. 
Selig, Moses, 2214 N. Penn 
Wineman, Joseph, 2037 N. Dela- 
ware Av. 

Ligonier 
Goldsmith, Abraham 
Straus, J. 
Straus, S. J. 



Moritz, B. 



Michigan City 



Orleans 



Cohn, Bennett 

Bichmond 
Saffer, Solomon, 331 S. 6th 

Sonfh Bend 
Cohn, D. & Sons, 1011 S. Michigan 

Sununitville 
Marcus, Wm. & Sons 



Iowa 



IOWA 



Cedar Rapids 
Salomon, Oscar 

CenterviUe 
Salinger, Lewis 

Davenport 
Petersberger, Isaac, 43 Whitaker 

Bldg. 
Rosenthal, A. E. 
Silberstein, Martin, 206 W. 2d 

Des Moines 
Mannheimer, Rabbi Eugene, Hotel 
Victoria 



Dubnque 



Levi, James 



Keokuk 



Stein, I. 

Marshalltown 
Bernstein, Mrs. A., 401 E. Church 
Bernstein, Mrs. Charles, 107 W. 

Church 
Pappe, Henry 

Sioux City 
Free Jewish Library, care of M. 
Goldman, Secretary 



Tama 



Diamond, Max 



Vinton 



Urbach, J. L. 



Kansas KAHBAB 

Leavenworth 

Ettenson, Henry, 514 Pottowatomie 
Llknaitz, Rev. David 
Rabinowltz. H. 
Woolfe, B. B. 

28 



Pittsburg 



Degen, Harry 
Fleischaker, Isidor 



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JEWISH PUBLICATION SOCIETY 



287 



Sallna 



Bondi, August 



Topeka 
Snattinger, M., 309 W. 10th 



Kansas 



KENTTTCKY 



Kentucky 



Henderson 
Baldauf, M. 

Lexington 
Kaufman, M. 
Shane, Miss R. 

Louisville 
Patron 
Bernheim, I. W., 1108 3d Av. 

Special Member 
Bernheim, B., 202 W. Ormsby Av. 

Annual Members 
Adath Israel Religious School, 

Broadway and 6th 
Barkhouse, Louis, 1433 3d Av. 
B'rith Sholom Religious School, 

Herman Meyer, Sec, 1128 1st 
Brooks, Mrs. M., 226 B. Market 
Ehrman, Hilmar, 231 E. Brecken- 

ridge 



Enelow, Rev. Hyman G., 1115 Hep- 
burn Av. 
Flarsheim, Morris H., 1410 1st 
Flexner, Bernard, 1001-05 Columbia 

Bldg. 
Kohn, Aaron, 1066 3d 
Louisville Free Public Library 
Mueller, Rev. Ignatius, 1127 S. 

Floyd 
Rubinowitz, Rev. Herman 
Schaifner, Nathan, 6th and Main 
Selligman, Alfred, 2006 First 
Shapinsky, Simon, 215 E. Walnut 
Sloss, Stanley E., 1517 2d 
Young Men's Hebrew Association, 
619 First 

MaysviUe 
Hechinger, D. 

Faducah 
Benedict, J., 507 W. 7th 
Friedman, Mrs. Joseph L., The 
Pines 



L0T7ISIANA 



Louisana 



Abbeville 
Kaplan, Henry 
Wise, Solomon 

Alexandria 
Bauer, G. 
Rothstein, Rabbi L. J., Box 92 

Baton Bonge 
Farnbacher, Solon 

Henderson 
AschefTenburg, L. 

New Iberia 
Dreyfus, Jules 
Dreyfus, Leon, Maine St 

New Orleans 
Life Member 
District Grand Lodge No. 7, I. O. 
B. B., care of Nathan Strauss, 
2331 Magazine 

Special Member 
Wolff, Solomon, 507 Hibernian 
Bldg. 

Annual Members 
Adler, Jacob, 1633 Bordeaux 
Adler, William, 6153 St. Charles 
Av. 



Ascheffenburg, A., 5414 St. Charles 
Beer, Bertrand, 325 Baronne 
Benjamin, Edward, 3316 St. Charles 
Bergman, Rabbi Moise, 5914 Pitt 
Bratman, H., 2107 Magazine 
Bruenn. Bernard, 905 Etennen Bldg. 
Cahn, Edgar M., 320 St. Charles 
Feibleman, B., 21 S. Peters 
Feingold, Dr. M.. 124 Baronne 
Friedman, M., 1616 Carondelet 
Friend, Joseph E., 1139 Jackson 
Goldberg, Rev. M. H., 1705 S. Ram- 
part 
Heidenheim, A., 3425 St. Charles 

Av. 
Heller, Rev. Max, 1828 Marengo 
Hess, Bernard, 1721 State 
Hyman, Samuel, 3323 St. Charles 

Av. 
Jewish Orphans Home, St. Charles 

and Peters Avs. 
Kahn, Gabriel, 1373 Annunciation 
Kohn, Joseph, 1208 Phillip 
Korn, Rabbi J., 1735 Carondelet 
Kory, Max A., 5112 Pitt 
Ladies Guild of Temple Sinai, care 
of Mrs. P. L. Godchaux, 1237 
Jackson Av. 
Lemann, M., 4132 St. Charles Av. 
Leucht, Rev. I. L., 844 Carondelet 
Levy, Leopold, 133 Canal 
Mayer, Erhard, 1224 S. Thomas 



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AMERICAN JEWISH TEAR BOOK 



Looifluia Newman, Henry, S612 8t Charles 

Av. 
Newman, Isldor, 8007 St Charles 

Av. 
Pokomy, D., 21 IS St Charles At. 
Bobbins, H., 1709 S. Rampart 
Rosen, Charles, 1112 Hibernian 

B\6g, 
Schwaoacher, Max, 1446 Josephine 
Seckbach, A., 1123 Prytania 



Banffor 
Cumminss, Samuel, 26 H Hay- 
market Sq. 
Friedman, Adolph B., 102 Bxehange 



Stem, Manriee, 5115 St Charles 
Stem, Morris, 426 Canal 
Weinberger, Frank, Pitt and Henry 
Clay Av. 

Bhreveport 
Herold, Joseph K. 
Herold, Simon 
Phelps, B., Shreveport St 



Portland 
Caplan, Dr. Blias, 316 Congress 



Maryland 



MABTLAHD 



Baltimore 
Life Member 



Frank. Mrs. Bertha Rayner, 8 B. 
Lexington 

Patroks 
Outman, Mrs. Joel. 1803 Bntaw PI. 
Gntman, L. K., 112-122 N. Bntaw 

Library Members 
Brager, Albert A., Futaw PI. and 

Laurens 
Hutzler, D.. 1801 Butnw PI. 
Kann, Lewis, 1800 But aw PI. 
Levy, William, 2352 Eutaw PI. 
Rosenthal, Samuel, Jr., 1905 Butaw 

PI. 

Special Members 

Coblenz, L. C, 1919 Linden Av. 

Bpsteln, Jacob, 1729 Park A v. 

Gottschalk, Joseph, 1508 Bolton 

Hamburger, Jonas. 1727 Bolton 

Hamburger, Samuel, 2414 Eutaw PI. 

Hecht, Albert S., 1913 Eutaw PI. 

Hecht, Emanuel, 1616 Eutaw PI. 

Hochschild, M., 1922 Eutaw PI. 

Kohn, Benno, 2119 Callow Av. 

Levy, Julius, 2901 N. Charles 

Macht, Bphraim, 310 Equitable 
Bldg. 

Rosenfeld, Bphraim, 32 S. Paca 

Schloss, David B., 5 E. Lexington 

Sonnebom, Mrs. Henry, 1608 Eutaw 
PI. 

Sonnebom, Sigmund B., 2420 Eutaw 
PI. 

Strouse, Benjamin, 1704 Butaw PI. 

Strouse, Isaac, 1706 Eutaw PI. 

Strouse, Moses I., 1919 Butaw PI. 

Suburban Club of Baltimore, Sta- 
tion B 



Annual Members 

Abramowitz, Morris, 1210 B. Balti- 
more 

Ades, Mrs. Harry, 711 W. North Av. 

Adler, Charles, 1313 Butaw PI 

Adler, Louis A., 2307 Madison Av. 

Adler, Mrs. S. J.. 2109 Bolton Av. 

Ambach. David. 1510 Eutaw PI. 

Applestein, Benl. S., 2022 E. Pratt 

Ash, Mrs. L., 2136 Bolton Av. 

Bamberger, E., 1306 Linden Av. 

Bamberger, Jacob, 1715 McCnlloh 

Bandes, Julius, 1602 E. Fayette 

Benesch, Max, 2416 Eutaw PI. 

Benesch, Mrs. William, 2430 Butaw 
PI. 

Benjamin, B., 749 W. Lexington 

Berman, Joseph, 1927 E. Baltimore 

Bernheimer, F., Rldgewood Av., W. 
Arlington 

Bernstein, Mrs. M. M., 2409 Linden 
Av. 

Blllstein, Nathan, Rider P. O. 

Blaustein, Solomon, 821 B. Balti- 
more 

Block, Hon. M. J., 422 Law Bldg. 

Blum, Gumpert, 1816 Madison Av. 

Brodie, Israel B., 818 Equitable 
Bldg. 

Bronsteln, G., 116 W. Curley 

Bronsteln, Jos. I., 1601 E. Balti- 
more 

Bronsteln, Max S., 214 N. Bond 

Bronsteln, Morris, 1110 E. Balti- 
more 

Brownold, S. M., 412 N. Howard 

Burgunder, Henry, 1718 Butaw PI. 

Burk, Charles, 617 E. Baltimore 

Chidekel, Maurice, 1512 E. Balti- 
more 

Cohen, Dr. Abraham, 1744 Park Av. 

Cohen, B., 1709 Linden Av. 

Cohen, Miss Bertha, 415 N. Charles 



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Cohen, Jacob, 1606 B. Baltimore 
Cohen, L. J., 801 Fidelity Bldg. 
Cohen, Louis, Helping Hand Home, 

Fort Av. 
Cohen, M. S., 14 S. Calvert 
Cohen, Mendes, 826 N. Charles 
Crockln, Bmll, 2124 Chelsea Ter- 
race, Walbrook 
Crystal, J., 130 Alsquith 
Dalshelmer, Simon, 1702 Linden 

Av. 
Davidson, Isaac, 815 N. Howard 
Dealham, Samuel, Jr., 1614 Madison 

Av. 
Denison, Michael, 221 S. Eden 
Duval, L. M., The News, Calvert 

and Fayette 
Elseman, Mrs. G., 1910 Butaw PI. 
Ember, Dr. Aaron, 201 S. High 
Bngelman, Benjamin, 112-120 S. 

Bden 
Brlanger Bros., 519 W. Pratt 
Erlanger, Max R., 1821 McCulIoh 
Fader, A., 210 B. Baltimore 
Federlelcht, L., 25 W. Baltimore 
Flneman, L., 653 W. Lombard 
Fleischer, Silas, 2010 Madison Av. 
Frank, Alexander, 1506 Eutaw PI. 
Frank, Ed. L. 2042 Linden Av. 
Frank, Ell, 1504 Bolton 
Frank, Samuel, 1616 Madison Av. 
Frank, Solomon, 1407 Eutaw PI. 
Frank, Sydney S., 1325 Eutaw PI. 
Franklin, Dr. Fabian, 103 W. Monu- 
ment 
Freedman, H., 507 Alsquith 
Freudenthal, Rev. S., Hebrew Or- 
phan sAylum 
Frledenwald, Mrs. A., 1616 Linden 

Av. 
Frledenwald, Dr. Harry, 1029 Mad- 
ison Av. 
Frledenwald, Joseph, 1511 Guilford 

Av. 
Frledenwald, Dr. Julius, 1013 N. 

Charles 
Friedman, B., 41 Liberty 
Frlsch, W., 1005 N. Charles 
Fuechsl, B. S., 10 W. Lexington 
Gamse, Herman, 315 W. German 
Gans, Mrs. Charles, 2222 Eutaw PI. 
Gerber, Mrs. L. A., 250 N. Exeter 
Glchner, Joseph, 1516 Madison Av. 
Ginsberg, S.. 734 W. North Av. 
Goldenberg, Julius, 1736 McCulloh 
Qoldenberg, Mrs. M., 1628 Bolton 
Goldsmith, Meyer B., 722 W. North 

Av. 
Gomprecht, Jacob, 2537 Madison 

Av. 
Gordon, Paul, 228 N. Front 



Gottschalk, Mrs. Levi, 1805 Butaw Maryland 
PI. 

Grauer, Mrs. M. F., 1029 N. Broad- 
way 

Greenbaum, Daniel, 1908 Eutaw PI. 

'Greenbaum, Leon B., 1604 Butaw 
PI. 

Greenbaum, Milton D., 610 Fidelity 
Bldg. 

Greif, Simon, 1710 Butaw PI. 

Grlnsfelder, Mrs. Joseph, 406 
Presstman 

Gusdorf, I. A., 1505 Madison Av. 

Gutman, Julius, 1714 Butaw PI. 

Gutman, L. N., 16 W. Lexington 

Guttmacher, Rev. A., 2239 Bolton 
Av. 

Halle, Isaac, 1904 Butaw PI. 

Halle, M. S., 2222 Callow Av. 

Hamburger, Mrs. Henry I., 2246 
Eutaw PL 

Hamburger, Leon, 2205 Callow Av. 

Hamburger, Dr. Louis P., 1210 
Eutaw PI. 

Hamburger, P., 16-20 S. Eutaw 

Hamburger, Sol., 1426 Madison Av. 

Hanline, Alexander M., 23 S. How- 
ard 

Harsh, George M., 2309 Maryland 
Av. 

Hartogensis, B. H., 1940 Linden Av. 

Hellman, Jacob, 1927 W. Franklin 

Herschman, Morris, 111 S. High 

Hess, Michael, 1212 W. North Av. 

Hlllman, Charles, 2126 McCulloh 

Hirsh, Dr. Joseph L, 1819 Linden 

Hlrshberg, Nathan H., 1807 Madi- 
son Av. 

Hochheimer. Lewis, 208 Courtland 

Hollander, Joseph, Liberty Rd. and 
Windsor Av., Walbrook 

Hollander, Dr. J. H., 335 Dolphin 

Homstein, Jacob D., 2400 McCulloh 

Hutzler, A. G., 1801 Eutaw PI. 

Hutzler, Edwin, 212 N. Howard 

Hyman, Julius H., 1530 McCulloh 

Isaacs, J. L., 2908 Clifton Av., Wal- 
brook 

Jacob, John A., 426 W. North A v. 

Jelenko, Julius D., 2323 Callow A v. 

Jewish Library Association, S. 
Benderly, 126 Alsquith 

Josephson, Dr. J. C, 230 S. Bond 

Kahn, Jacob M., 1311 Madison Av. 

Kaiser, Rev. A., 1713 Linden Av. 

Kappalman, L., 30 S. Broadway 

Katz, Joseph, 637 W. Lombard 

Katzenstein, Mrs. B., 1512 Butaw 
PI. 

Kauflman, Harry, Gay and Forest 



81 



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AMERICAN JEWISH YEAR BOOK 



Mtiylaiid Kaufman, Louis, 601 N. Calhoun 
Kemper, I. L., 11 E. Lomliard 
Kerber, Adolph, 613 W. German 
Kohn. L. B.. 2029 Eutaw PI. 
Kolker, Benj., 168 Market PI. 
Landin, Jacob, 324 N. Front 
Lauchhelmer, C. H., 1524 Eutaw PI. 
Lauchheimer, J. M., 2122 Bolton 
Lauer, Mrs. Leon, 2024 Eutaw PI. 
Lauer, Martin, 2001 Eutaw PI. 
Laupheimer, Henry, 2004 Bolton 
Lehmayer, Martin, 563 Calvert 

Bldg. 
Leopold, Harry I., 306 W. Balti- 
more 
Leopold, Isaac, 2218 Eutaw PI. 
Levi, Louis, MarUwrousrIi Apts. 
Levin, Charles J., 331 N. Charles 
Levin, Louis H., 2104 Chelsea Ter. 
Levison, 905 E. Fayette 
Lion, John S., Roslyn Av., Wal- 

brook. 
Lipsitz, D., 616 Hanover 
Lobe, H. I., 307 W. Baltimore 
Lobe, Napoleon B., 3021 St. Paul 
Lutzky, Louis, 2011 McCulloh 
Mandelbaum, Mrs. S., 607 Fidelity 

Bldg. 
Merwitz, I., 1926 JeflPerson 
Metzger, Louis A., 2104 Callow Av. 
Miller, C. F., 1516 McCulloh 
Miller, Mrs. William. 1907 Eutaw 

PI. 
Morris, Moses, 1 S. Frederick 
Moses, Mrs. Abram, 1803 Eutaw 

PI. 
Moses, Jacob M., 2321 Linden A v. 
Nassauer, F., care of Joel Gutman 

& Co. 
Newman, Milton S., 2000 Linden 

Av. 
Oettinger, Mrs. H., 1608 Park Av. 
Oheb Shalom Cong. S. S., Eutaw PI. 

and Lanvale 
Oppenheimer, Henry, 1411 Eutaw 

PI. 
Ottenheimer, Ell, 2072 Linden Av. 
Ottenheimer, R. M., 1634 Linden 

Av. 
Perel, Max, 123 Aisquith 
Phoenix Club, Eutaw PI. 
Pollock, Mrs. Uriah, 112 W. Mt. 

Royal Av. 
Preiss, Miss Fannie, 18 W. Saratoga 
Proses, S., 1220 Jefferson 
Raflel, J. M., 2002 Bolton Av. 
Rome, Morris A., 435 Equitable 

Bldg. 
Rosenau, Rev. Dr. William, 1515 

Eutaw PI. 



Rosenburg, Simon, 807 N. Charles 
Rosenfeid, Mrs. G., 1718 Eutaw Pi. 
Rosenthal, Abel, 116% Aisquith 
Rosenthal, Isaac, 2025 Frederick 

Av. 
Rosenthal, Dr. Melvin, 1811 Linden 

Av. 
Rosenthal. Sol. W., 246 S. Eden 
Roten. Adolph, 1412 Mt. Royal Av. 
Rotholz, Julius, 2108 Bolton 
Rubenstein, Rabbi Charles, 2313 

Callow Av. 
Rubin. Samuel, 545 N. Gay 
Salabes, S., 1708 Eutaw PI. 
Sauber, Nathan, 8 N. High 
Savage, Dr. M., 1121 E. Baltimore 
Schafler, Rabbi S., 2566 McCulloh 
Schatzman, Leon, Bond and Pratt 
Schlaen, Morris M., 829 E. Pratt 
Schloss, Michael, 500 W. Baltimore 
Schloss, Nathan, 2410 Eutaw PI. 
Schneeberger, Rev. H. W., 2014 

McCulloh 
Seideman & Co., Gay and En.st 
Selenkow, M. E., 1024 E. Baltimore 
Seligman, Dr. Joseph A., 1920 Lin- 
den Av. 
Shapiro, Isaac, 2446 McCulloh 
Shochet, A. S., 7 S. Carolina 
Shulman, Jacob, 1407 E. Pratt 
Shuman, M., 904 E. Pratt 
Sllberman. T., 2000 Madison Av. 
Simon. Frank. 1726 Linden Av. 
Slesinger, Mrs. A. D., The Marl- 
borough 
Sondheim, Walter, 1621 Bolton 
Stein, Simon H., 2324 Eutaw PI. 
Steppacher, L., 1626 McCulloh 
Stern, Mrs. A., 2354 Eutaw PI. 
Stone, Dr. B., 1135 E. Baltimore 
Straus, Aaron, 111 N. Howard 
Strauss, Alexander, 2340 Eutaw PI. 
Strauss, Mrs. William L., 1628 

Eutaw PI. 
Strouse, Mrs. Eli, 1619 Madison 

Av. 
Strouse, Leopold, 1821 Eutaw PI. 
Strouse, Mrs. Leopold, 1821 Eutaw 

PI. 
Thalheimer, Samuel, 2037 McCulloh 
ITlman, Joseph, 10 Belair Av. 
Van Leer, Mrs. S., 1427 McCulloh 
Walter, Mrs. M. B., 609 Union 

Trust Bldg. 
Walter, M. R., 407 Herald Bldg. 
Weglein, David E., 1833 Linden A v. 
Weinberg, Abraham I., 2310 Eutaw 

PI. 
Weinberg, Mrs. C, 1518 Mt Royal 
Wiesenfeld, Bernard, 1926 Eutaw 
PI. 



32 



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JEWISH PUBLICATION SOCIETY 



291 



Wlesenfeld, Joseph, Baltimore and 

Howard 
Wyman, Maurice, 19 W. Lexington 

Cumberland 
Gottlieb, Jacob, 111 N. Center 
Hebrew Library Society, Be'er Cha- 

yim Congregation 
Levy, David L., P. O. Box 571 
Rosenbaum, Simon, 70 Washington 
Rosenbaum, Susman, 86 Bedford 

Ellicott City 
Rosenstock, H. I. 



Frederick 
Cowenstein, Mrs. David, care 

Lowenstein & Wertheimer 
Rosenstock, J. 

Frostburg 
Kaplan, Robert 
Stern, George 

Laurel 
Block, Harry A. 

Whiteford 
Reamer, Edward 



Maryland 



Of 



MASSACHT7SETT8 



Massa- 



Boston 

Life Member 

Hecht, Mrs. Jacob, Hotel Victoria 

Annual Members 

Adams, George, 8 Dale 

Adelberg, Samuel, 293 Washington 

Amster, N. L., Hawes and Col- 
chester, Brookline 

Bailen, Samuel I., 814 Tremont 
Bldg. 

BankofT, Herman A., 77 Bedford 

Carver, Samuel, 43 Tremont Bldg. 

Charak, Wm., 27 School 

Davis, Benjamin F., 15 Kenilworth 

Dutch, Sarah, 14 Lowell 

Ehrenfried, Mrs. Geo., 10 Claremont 
Park 

Ehrllch, Mrs. A., 42 Beech Road, 
Brookline 

Ellis, David A., 82 Harold 

Federation of Jewish Charities, 45 
Hawkins 

Frank, B., 23 Beach 

Frank, Daniel, 232 Washington 

Friedman, Max, 162 Lincoln 

Ginsberg, Simon, 18 Tremont 

Ginsburg, Paul M., 60 Summer 

Ginzberg, Albert A., 601-603 Old 
South Bldg. 

Goldoff, Benj., 11 Belle Island Av. 

Goodman. Joseph, 93 Brighton 

Gordon, A. M., 1704 Washington 

Gordon, Harry, 27 School 

Gordon, Isaac, 12 Cobb 

Green, Dr. A., 1 Allen 

Grosberg, Mrs. O., 572 Washington 

Haas, J. de, 6 Devon 

Harris, Isaac, 43 Tremont, Carney 
Bldg. 

Harrison, S. H., 660 Washington 

Hellbron, Jacob, 503 Washington, 
Brookline 

Herman, Mrs. J. M., 424 Marl- 
borough 



Hirschberg, A. S., 406 Washington chusetts 

Hurwitz, A. J., 34 Chambers 

Hurwitz, Samuel, 642 Tremont 
Bldg. 

Hurwitz, Simon, 137 Chambers 

Iroderman, B., 12 Allen 

Isldor, Walter, 66 Appleton 

King, Dr. Maxwell B., 624 Chamber 
of Commerce 

Koch, Henry A., 22-24 Summer 

Kuhn, Honry, care of Leopold 
Moore Co. 

Kurtz, Gustavus E., 154 Humboldt 
Av. 

Lebowich, I., 18 Summer 

Levenson, Henry H., 177 Black- 
stone 

Levenson, Julius, 177 Blackstone 

Leventall, Abraham, 42 Court 

Lowenberg, Solomon, Old South 
Bldg. 

Mlntz, Dr. S. C, 11 Parmenter 

Morse, Godfrey, Exchange Bldg. 

Morse, Jacob, 875 Beacon, Brook- 
line 

Nelson, Stella, 1647 Beacon 

Norton, S. M., Chauncey St. 

Podolsky, Jacob, 252 Chambers 

Public Library 

Reinherz, I. B., 5 Stillman 

Romonoz, Morris T., 58 Chambers 

Rosenbaum, Louis, 36 Fenway 

Rosenl)erg. Dr. Isaac. 170 Hanover 

Rosenbush, A. A., 146 Lincoln 

Rubenstein, Philip, 30 Court 

Saltz, Dr. Sydney M.. 62 Chambers 

Sawyer, Meyer, 43 Tremont 

Shohan, Joseph, 548 Warren 

Slgllman, Samuel, 6 Beacon 

Silberman, Jacob J., 12 Worcester 
Sq. 

Silverman, Robert, 31 McLean 

Slobodkin, Harris A., 40 Lowell 

Slobodkin, M. A., 57 Salem 



33 



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Google 



.JBL 



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^» . ' 



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j by Google 



I PUBLICATION SOCIETY 



293 






- i 



lain 



Worcester 
Chelffetz, A., 6 Winter 
Ellas, Saul, 320 Highland 
Goding, J., 36 Wellington 
Goldstein, Samuel 0., 406 Main 
Katz, Julius, 86 Vernon 
Levinthan, Mm 221 Front 
Lewis, Alex. S., 868 Main 
Popeler, Dr. E. H., 133 Green 
Reed, S., 102 Providence 
Rothstein, 116 Front 
Wolfson, Mrs. Samuel, 74 Provi- 
dence 



chusetts 



MICHIGAN 




East Lansing 




Heller, C. S., Agricultural College 




Grand Baplds 




Hart, Joseph S., 100 Washington 




Houseman, Joseph 

Pantlind, J. B., Morton House 

Wolf, G. A., Michigan Trust Bldg. 


•tool, C&ft 




rtid 


Hawks 


; Lincoln 


Horwltz, Harris 


.Voodward 


Kalamazoo 




Bernstein, Dr. E. J., 627 S. Burdick' 


>a|jde 


Blumenberg, A. L. 


Desenberg, Mrs. B. L. 


13S iCra- 


Desenberg, M., Sr., 516 S. Park 
Flexner, A. L. 


17 Seldcn 


Folz, Samuel 




L'Anse 


twbprry 
115 llfeb, 


Levitan, D. 


Maroellus 


At. 


Stem, S. 




Marquette 




Bending, Mrs. F., Hewitt and Front 


Ti rsou Av. 


Nlles 


■^ 


Jutius, Charles 


i-h, E. 


Sault Ste. Marie 


( 


Moses, D. K. 


MIlOfESOTA 



Michigan 



Minneapolis 
lurke, 638 B, Abeles, Abble M., 2116 Aldrlch Av. 
So. 
Adelsheim, E., 2310 Colfax Av., S. 
Cohen. Emanuel, 313 Nicollet Av. 
Frank, M. W., 18 3d 
^ Goldstein, Simon, 251 1st Av. 

Gordon, Dr. George J., 801 8th, S. 



Minnesota 



86 



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Google 



292 



AMERICAN JEWISH YEAR BOOK 



I- Springer, Dr. O. If., 66 Chamben 

■ StTouse, Myer, 27 Ckhool 
TltletMiiim, N. J., 104 Hanover 
Weil, Mrs. Charles, 268 Newbury 
Wysanski, Max B^ 18 Tremont 
Y. M. H. A., 39 B. Concord 

Brookton 
Barger, L., 49 Walnut 

Oamliridge 
Andrews, Julius, Riverbank Court 
Fleischer, Bev. Charles, 40 Con- 
cord Av. 
Gross, Dr. Charles, 11 Putnam Av. 
Kellner, Prof. Max D., 1 Berkely 

Ohelsea 
Freedman, Dr. L. M., 193 Chestnut 
Garb, Charles, 78 Franklin Av. 
Gelfond, O.. 145 Chestnut 
Goldberg, B., 218 Chestnut 
Hirshon, M. G., 360 Broadway 
Horwlts, Harry, 16 Lambert Av. 
Kahn, Henry, 32 Grove 
Kamlnsky, G., 8 Everett 
Levenson, Joseph M., 77 Pearl 
Lorie, Myer, 823 Spruce 
Lourle, David A., 74 Congress Av. 
Lourie, Jacob. 78 Franklin Av. 
Marget, Morris, 106 Broadway 
White, David, 42 Court 
Wilinsky, Chas. F., 80 Green 
Wolfson, Lewis W., 77 Bedford 
Wolkinch, Erwin, 101 Waumbeck 

Dorchester 
Cohen, A., 11 York 
Cohen, M. W., 112 Glenway 
Laurie, Meyer L., 50 Bradshaw 
Massell, Dr. Joseph, 51 Waldeck 
Mendelsohn, I., 158 Glenway 
Mydans, Max I., 27 Rosedale 
Solomont, Morris, 34 Bloomfield 
Yeslawsky, Mrs. L. M., 19 Blm St. 



Shear, A. A. 



Everett 

34 Shawmut Av. 



Fall River 
Radowsky, David R., Hudner Bldg. 

Holyoke 
Judelson, I. M., 694 East 
Levine, A., 537 Northampton 
Levinson, Jas. W.. 412 Maple 
Silverman, B., 389 Main 
Wolman, M., 16 Church 



LoweU 
Strauss, Alexander, 78 Middlesex 
Tepper, Fred., 40 Hampshire 

Lynn 
Frankel, S., 86 Congress 
Goldman, H., 84 Market 
Goodman, H., 6 Hubert 
Llebman, William, 180 Summer 
Biarkell, M. B., 24 Shepard 
Stone, JOS. W., 148 Blossom 

Xalden 
Angenstein. J., 103 Water 
Bythower, Dr. Victor, 206 Cross 
Goldman, Charles, 184 Walnut 
Green, Fred^ 11 Milton 
Hoberman, Dr. S., 129 Bryant 
Morris, A., 24 Milton 
Ruby, Im, 238 Broadway 
Shear, I. J.. 238 Broadway 
Winrise, Philip, 238 Broadway 

Pittsfleld 
Rosenthal, M. G. 

Revere 
Shafer, H., 12 Nahant Av. 

Roxbury 
Adelman, Mrs. A, 2 Ellis 
Baitler, Chas. A., 73 Clifford 
Bleckman, Nathan, 36 Gasten 
Davldov, Dr. K. M., 31 Howland 
Bichler, Rev. M. M., 165 Harold 
Eyges, Leon R., 116 Hutchins 
Forman, J., 20 Favston 
Gerstein, Dr. Maurice, 493 Warren 
Goldsmith, Lillle O., 108 Seaver 
Goldsmith, Mrs. Minnie, 137 Cedar 
Hailparn, Mrs. Aaron, 17 Homestead 
Hirshberg, Is.. 36 Hollander 
Israeli, Rev. Phineas, 19 Intervale 
London, M. A., 127 Devon 
Svik, Israel, 62 Clifford 

Somerville 
Baker, Jacob. 26 Trull 
Cohen, Joseph, 103 Sycamore 
Goldman, A. C, 440 Medford 
Goldman, A K., 442 Medford 
Roberts, Harry, 91 Sacramento 
Stone, E., 41 Dartmouth 

Sprlngfleld 
Boyarsky, David, 94 Greenwood 
Brooks, Richard S., The Republican 



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293 



Brooslin, Sam. B., 874 Worthington 
Cohen, Julius A., 496 Main 
Cohn, Frederick. 276 Biain 
Goldin, Joseph, 4 Ferry 
Kopeliner, J. H., 196 Main 
Lasker, Henry, 310 Main 
Levison, S., 350 Main 
Miller, Alfred S., 606 Main 
Slutskin, Dr. M. L., 120 Main 

Walfham 
Bayard, H., 6 Common 



Worcester 
CheifFetz, A., 6 Winter 
Elias, Saul, 320 Highland 
Coding, J., 36 Wellington 
Goldstein, Samuel O., 405 Main 
Katz, Julius, 86 Vernon 
Levinthan, M^ 221 Front 
Lewis, Alex. S., 368 Main 
Popeler, Dr. B. H., 133 Green 
Reed, S., 102 Providence 
Rothstein, 116 Front 
Wolfson, Mrs. Samuel, 74 Provi- 
dence 



chusetts 



MICHIGAN 



Oalumet 
Heller, Nachman 

Oryatal Falli 
Warshawsky, Nathan 

Detroit 
Beth Bl Temple Sab. School, care 

of L. M. Franklin 
Blumenthal, D., 90 Alfred 
Blumrosen, Moses, 84 Alfred 
Brilling, Mrs. Ilenry, 96 Lincoln 

Av. 
Butzel, Henry M., 406 Woodward 

Av. 
Frank, Meyer, 282 Hastings 
Ginsburg, Bernard, 84 Adelaide 
Goldman, A., 299 Beaubien 
Helfman, Mrs. Hannah, 138 Ers- 

kine 
Hershman, Rabbi A. M., 47 Selden 

Av. 
Jacobson, Benjamin, 26 Newberry 
Krolick, Mrs. Henry A., 115 High, 

Lipsitz, M. A., 47 Selden Av. 
Rosenzweig, J., 231 4th 
Rosenzweig, S. D., 105 Beech 
Scheinmann, I. L., 31 Rowena 
Schloss, Sellgman, 184 Jeiferson Av. 
Sillman, Joseph, 134 Jones 
Simon, A., 33 Alfred 
Simons, David W., 64 High, B. 
Sloman, Adolph, 451 4th Av. 
Van Baalen, I., 51 Sproat 



Michigan 



East Lansing 
Heller, C. S., Agricultural College 

Grand Rapids 
Hart, Joseph S., 100 Washington 
Houseman, Joseph 
Pantlind, J. B., Morton House 
Wolf, G. A., Michigan Trust Bldg. 

Hawks 
Horwitz, Harris 

Kalamazoo 
Bernstein, Dr. E. J., 627 S. Burdlck" 
Blumenberg, A. L. 
Desenberg, Mrs. B. L. 
Desenberg, M., Sr., 516 S. Park 
Flexner, A. L. 
Folz, Samuel 

L'Anse 
Levitan, D. 

Marcellus 
Stem, S. 

Marquette 
Bending, Mrs. F., Hewitt and Front 

Niles 
Jutius, Charles 

Bault Ste. Marie 
Moses, D. K. 



MINNESOTA 



Minnesota 



Dulufh 

Lefkowitz, Rabbi Maurice, 638 B. 

Third 
Silberstein, B. 



Fairfax 



Weisberg, Ben. 



Minneapolis 
Abeles, Abbie M., 2115 Aldrich Av. 

So. 
Adelsheim, B., 2310 Colfax Av., S. 
Cohen, Emanuel, 313 Nicollet Av. 
Frank, M. W., 18 3d 
Goldstein, Simon, 251 1st Av. 
Gordon, Dr. George J., 801 8th, S. 



35 



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294 



AMERICAN JEWISH TEAR BOOK 



UinnesoU Harpman, J., 1811 9th Ay., S. 

Heller, Mrs. A., 2012 Aldrich Av., 
So. 

Helperin, Mrs. Morris, 8352 Colum- 
bus Ay. 

Mtkolas. Mrs. Lillie R., 2548 Clin- 
ton Ay. 

Moss, Mrs. Charles, 101 1st Ay., N. 

Sternberg, Mrs. Chas., 529 9th St., 
So. 

Weil, Isaac 42-44 S. 6th 



Weinberg, B. L.. 428 20th Ay. 
Weiskopf, Henry, 31 5th, S. 
Wolff. Maurice, 316 Nicollet Av. 
Woolpy, J. H., 1915 11th Ay., S. 



Aberle, D. 



St. Paul 
736 Lincoln Ay. 



Winona 



Kahn, Dayid 



MI8BI88IPPI 



Missouri 



BrookhaYea 
Lewinthai, Max, Lock Box 183 

Oolnmlrai 
Hers, Rey. J. 
Loeb, Simon 

OreeaYllle 
Goldstein, Nathan 

Meridian 
Loeb, Alex. 
Raisin, Rabbi Max 

Olinton 
Degen, Solomon 



Kansas Oity 
Askanas, A. L., care of Nebraska 

Clothing Co. 
Block, Solomon, 1300 B. Armour 

Blvd. 
B'nai Jehuda Congregation, 11th 

and Oak 
Brenner, S. H., 415 S. W. Blyd. 
Carol. Julius B., 1720 McGee 
Davidson, Julius, 302 Kemper Bldg. 
Flohn, Jacob. 2501 Forest Av. 
Lyon, Mrs. Lee, 1219 Prospect 
Mayer, Rabbi Harry H., 1720 Jeffer- 
son 
Reefer, M. C. 
Rosenwald, Dr. L., 408 Argyle 

Bldg. 
Rubin, Heiman, 306 Gnmble Bldg., 

8th and Walnut 
Wolf, Dr. I. J., 202-203 Argyle 

Bldg. 

Louisiana 

Michael, Isadore 

St. Joseph 
LiBRABY Member 
Joseph Lodge No. 73, I. O. B. B., 
care of M. C. Strauss, 121 N. 2d 



Threefoot, H. M. 
Threefoot, K. 

Hatches 
Bnal Israel Library 
Bottigheimer, Rev. S. (1. 
Gelsenberger, A. H., 834 Main 

Port Gibson 
Bernheimer, Jacob 

Vicksburg 
Hirsh, J. 
Rose, Mrs. A., 110 South 



MISBOTJIU 



Annual Members 
Newburger, Bemhard 
Westheimer, Ferdinand 

St. Louis 
Library Member 
Ebn Ezra Lodge No. 47, I. O. B. B., 
Henry H. Furth, Sec, 307 Mis- 
souri Trust Bldg. 

Special Members 
Altheim, Benjamin, 217 N. 4th 
Bernheimer, Marcus, 4356 Llndell 

Blvd. 
Michael, Elias, 4383 Westminster 

PI. 
Stix, William, 4642 Lindell Blvd. 

Annual Members 
Bass, Simon S., 1109 Clark Av. 
Boehm, Dr. Joseph L., 717 W. 8th 
Bowman, Samuel, 18 N.- 8th 
Congregation Shaare Emeth 
Drey, Mrs. Adolph L., care of Mrs. 

I. A. Schoen, 5067 Washington 

Av. 
Emanuel, E. R., 4327 N. Pine 
Epstein, J. I., 4314 Lindell Blvd. 
Fraley, Moses, 313 N. 9th 
Freund, F. S., 1903 Lafayette Ay. 
Freund, Simon, 1722 Missouri Av. 



36 



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JEWISH PUBLICATION SOCIETY 



295 



Friedman, Lester, 4208 Maryland 
Av. 

Friedman, N., 8th and Lacas Av. 

Fuller, A., 4062 Llndell Blvd. 

Furth, Jacob, 3951a McPherson Av. 

Godlove, Louis, 2344 Whitmore PI. 

Goldman, Simon, 4191 Morgan 

Greensfeider, B., 701 Bank of Com- 
merce Bldg. 

Guntzler, Theodore L., 5341 Ridge 
Av. 

Harrison, Rev. Leon, 4131 Mary- 
land Av. 

Hay, Miss Josephine R., Supt. Sel- 
ma Michael Day Nursery 

Hellman, Moritz, 608 N. 2d 

Horwitz, Dr. Alexander E., 4360 
Page Blvd. 

Ittleson, H., 5153 McPherson Av. 

Jackson, Charles S., 5589 Page 
Blvd. 

Jacobson, Hugo, 312 N. Main 

Jewish Educational Alliance, N. W. 
cor. 9th and Carr 

Lippelt, Lewis A. J., 824 Chestnut 

Messing, Rev. Dr. H. J., 4439 Del- 
mar Av. 

Public Library 

Rice, Jonathan, 3733 Pine 



Rosentreter, Rev. Adolph. 4311 W. Missouri 
Bell PI. 

Russack, Max, 4350 McPherson Av. 

Sale, Lee, Commercial Bldg. 

Sale, M. N., 4525 McMillan Av. 

Schwab, Isaac N., 4622 Llndell Av. 

Schwab, Leon J., 5106 Washington 
Av. 

Schwab, M., Schwab Clothing Co. 

Shroder, S. W., 5077 Washington 
Blvd. 

Stix, Charles A., Grand Leader 

Summerfeld, M., 5217 Delmar Blvd. 

Summerfeld, Moses, 214 N. Main 

Treichllnger, David, 813 Spruce 

Tuholske, Dr. H., 4496 Westminster 
Av. 

United Hebrew Congregation Sab- 
bath School, 814a N. Kings- 
highway 

Waldheim, A., 4414 Pine 

Wasserman, B., 4537 Maryland Av. 

Weiss, Max L., Globe Democrat 
Bldg. 

Wolff, Mrs. Sigmund, 5098 West- 
minster PI. 

Young Men's Hebrew Association, 
Taylor Av. and Olive 



MONTANA 

Helena 

Klein, Rabbi Israel 



Montana 



Grand Island 
Wolbach, S. N. 
Brandies, Mrs. Arthur, 500 S. 38th 



NEBRASKA 

Levy, Morris, 2037 Dodge 
Omaha Public Library, Edith Tob- 
litt. Librarian 



Nebraska 



Plattsmouth 
Pepperberg, Julius 



Omaha 
Cohn, Rev. Frederick, 1302 Park 
Av. 

NEVADA 

Bene 

Schwarzschild, Julius, Box 108 



NEW HAMFSHIBE 
Oonoord Resnik, Israel, 224 Greene 

Newmarket 
London, M. H. 



Nevada 



New 
Hampshire 



Saidel, Leon 

Manoheiter 
Chase, E. M., 90 Harrison 



Atlantic City 
Life Member 
Gusky, Mrs. Esther, Royal Palace 
Hotel 



NEW JERSEY 

Annual Members 
Barbash, Dr. Samuel, 1906 Pacific 



New Jersey 



Av. 

Braunstein, M., 504 Pacific Av. 



37 



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296 



AMERICAN JEWISH TEAR BOOK 



N«w Jenegr Cohen and Schwab, The New Bom- 

an House 
Fisher, Rabbi Henry, Royal Palace 

Hotel 
Goldstein, J., 1107 Atlantic At. 
Grossman, Joseph, New Liberty 

Hall 
Hansteln, Mrs. Clara L., Royal 

Palace Hotel 
Hlrsch, Aaron, 1606 Atlantic Ay. 
Hoffman, Harry, 1734 Atlantic Ay. 
Hyman, William Isiesworth 
Jeitles, H. A, P. O. Box 284 
Lustgarten, Adolph, 18 S. Misaonri 

Av. 
Marcus, Dr. H. O., 130 Pacific Ay. 
Morris, B., 1706 Atlantic Ay. 
Muhlrad, William, 16 S. Delaware 

Av. 
Press, J. B., 1206 Atlantic Av. 
Weintrob, A., 810 Atlantic Ay. 
Winkleman, Joseph, 1610 Atlantic 

Av. 

Bayonne 

Austin, S., 103 Broadway 
Bennett, Max L., 661 Av. C 
Epstein, Henry, 516 Boulevard 
Epstein, Louis, 516 Boulevard 
Garsson, M., 77 W. 30th 
Goldweber, Dr. W. M., 23d St. and 

Broadway 
Grotsky, Charles, 476 Av. D 
Herman, J., 549 Boulevard 
Herman, Meyer. 94 W. 31st 
Laski, B., 788 Broadway 
Levy, Max, 459 Av. C 
Marshasz, N., 74 B. 22d 
Mendelwager, Abraham, 989 Av. D 
Sollnsky, Max L., Blvd. and 19th 
Strauss, J., 65 W. 8th 
Touls, M. T.. 366 Av. D 
Tuttletaub, S., 77 W. 25th 
Warshaunsky, P., 499 Broadway 

Brldgeton 
Axelman, S., 31 E. Commerce 
Fisher, I. 

Horwitz, Max, 22 E. Commerce 
Portnoff, Joseph, 41 N. Laurel 

Camden 
Blank, Jacob Z., 1103 Broadway 
Cohen, Maxwell, The Garden Hotel 
Pox, Wm., 1325 Park Blvd. 
Fuhrman, Abraham, 444 Broadway 
Fuhrman, N., 933 Broadway 
Puxman, A., 804 Princeton Av. 
Heine, Samuel, 1112 Bering 
Hermann, Samuel, 445 Kalghn Av. 
Klelnberg, Abraham, 1101 Kaighn 
Av. 



Llchtensteln, H. S., 1014 S. 3d 
Welnsteln, B. J.. 441 Kalghn Av. 
Zlegler, Max, 1138 Pear 

Oarmel 
Rosen, I. 
Segal, Dr. Julius 

Carteret 

Special Membehs 
Levenson, Jacob 
Shapln, H. 

Annual Member 
Steinberg, Jacob 

Chrome 

Special Members 
Gorber, Adam 
Juskowltz, Sam. 

Annual Member 
Kahn, Bernard 

Deal Beach 
Zuckerman, Mrs. Henry 

East Orange 
Back, Mrs. A., 16 N. Arlington Av. 
Blumenthal Bros., 18 Halstead 
Burstlner, Joseph, 590 Main 
Hurwitz, Max, 480 Main 
Levin, A. S. 

Elizabeth 
Barr, Samuel, 95 Broad 
David, A. J., 68 Broad 
Fern, Max, 10 First 
Friedlander, A., 148 1st 
Hochberg, B., 850 Elizabeth Av. 
Jacobson, Saml. M., 183 4th 
Kaufman, Alexander, 314 S. Spring 
Kaufman, David, 314 S. Spring 
Kessler, Harry, 212 3d 
Koestler, Samuel, 207 Broad 
Leavit, N. R., 81 Broad 
Levlnson, M., 1017 Magnolia Av. 
Levy, B., 435 Court 
Schleimer, Saml., 207 Broad 
Singer, Max, 661 Elizabeth Av. 
Stamler, John J., 207 Broad 
Stein, Dr. Emll, 155 2d 
Wagner, Dr. H., 84 3d 

Elizabethport 
Jacobson, B., 414 S. Park 
Rosenstock, Bernhard, 438 S. Park 

Englewood 
Levlsohn, Joseph, 15 Tenefly Road 



88 



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JEWISH PUBLICATION SOCIETY 



297 



Hubronok Heights 
Prokesch, Jacob, Madison and Ter- 
race Avs. 

Hoboken 
Brannsteln, B., 121 Washington 
Fisher, A. C, 11th and Clinton 
Goldram, N. M., 71 Washington 
Greenberg, L.. 110 Washington 
Hal pern, David, 112 Adams 
Llchtenstein, Julius, Hudson Trust 

Bldg. 
Nass, Bernard, 128 River 
Piatt, Louis, 519 Bloomfleld 
Pollak, Henry, 408 Washington 
Schiller, Albert S., 609 Bloomfleld 
Waller, Mrs. J., 102 Hudson 

Jersey City 
Babchin, H., 107 Newark Av. 
Berman, Harold, 356 York 
Breslov, M., 340 Grove 
Goldstein, Abraham J., 209% War- 
ren 
Goldstein, S. D., 182 Warren 
Gross, Emanuel, 895 Bergen Av. 
Grundel, Morris, 215 Bay 
Horowitz, Ph., 343 Henderson 
Jacobson, L., 214 Warren 
James, Peter, 76 Montgomery 
Marais, Jacob, 411 Grove 
Marks, Charles, 86 Montgomery 
Max, Lewis, Jr., 375 Johnston Av. 
Mayer, Gustave, 314 York 
Pollock, B. S., 241 Grove 
Rachlnonelth, N^ 218 Second 
Rosensteln, Dr. I. L., 135 Wayne 
Shacter, I. M., 54 Newark A v. 
Sugarman, Harold S., 220 Washing- 
ton 
Wolf, Rabbi Nathan, 341 Montgom- 
ery 

Madison 
Isaacs, E. A. 

milville 
Sheffer, Harry, 318 Main 
Sutzick, A., 214 Oak 

Montolalr 

Fisher, Mrs. A. J., 204 Lorraine 

Av. 
Huebsch, Dr. Daniel A., 44 Mont- 

clair Av. 

Newark 
Special Members 
Berla, Amzl, 213 Plane 
Goetz, Joseph, 27 Clinton 
Michael, Oscar, 715 Broad 
Scheuer, Simon, 983 Broad 
Schlesslnger, Louis, 46a James 



Annual Members New Jersey 

Abeles, Emanuel, 176 Peslime 
Anspach, Euj^ene J., 575 Broad 
Bamberger, Louis, 147 Market 
Bernstein, Louis, 415 Bank 
Block, Mark, 53 Peslime Av. 
Block, Max, 209 Bruce 
Buckbinder, B., 125 Mulberry 
Cohen, Bamett, 183 Howard 
Cohen, S., 213 Spruce 
Danzler, Dr. M., 46 Mercer 
Davidson, Dr. Louis L., 116 Spruce 
Delxel, Abraham 

De Roy, Emanuel, EHm and Colum- 
bia 
Dunzis, Joseph, 565 Market 
Echenson, L., 24 Vesey 
Elkln, Dr. Joseph, 156 Spruce 
Emll, Dr. H. S., 292 Llttlestone Av. 
Federman, P. H., 145 S. Orange Av. 
Fisch, Joseph, 351 Washington 
Flschman, Dr. R. E., 128 Spruce 
Foster, Rev. Solomon, 264 Clinton 
Getter, Henry, 171 Springfield Av. 
Greenfield, William, 800 Broad 
Grotta, Mrs. Theresa, 20 Nelson PI. 
Haelperin, Dr. C. J., 34 16th Av. 
Hahn. Henry, 63 Avon PI. 
Hftlt^rlt], Philip, 167 BtMinont Av. 
HolTmnn, l^ev, CharJeis I., 158a 

rrr>ii;nir1i^r, Joseph, 164 Spruce 

Ho.YcK \t a., 978 Rroad 

jQtler, Dr. M., 362 Warren 

Kallfifh, Aboer, 02 Markfft 

Kallscli, Samuel, 0S8 BroJid 

Ivflplfin. Dr, Ben J. W*.. 771 Bergen 

Kanfroan, Dr. O., 137 Springfield 

Ki?ft?4ler, Dr, Henry B*. 14 '4 Norfolk 

Klnsr, Nathaniel, MB Clinton Av. 

Kotlen, Dr. Marcus M,, 136 Spring- 
field Av. 

Kohn, Jacob, 232 F?;."; 'rid 

Kohn, Leon A., 292 bpriii-iield 

Kruger, Abraham, 66 16th Av. 

Kupperman, Isaac, 191 Spruce 

Kussy, Herman, 294 Springfield Av. 

Kussy, Mrs. Max, 90 Baldwin Av. 

Kussy, Nathan, 142 Hunterdon 

Lehman, Lesser, 144 Front 

Lepold, I., 229 W. Kinnev 

Lesser, Miss Frances, 121 Waverly 
Av. 

Levlne, Wm., 156 Hunterdon 

Lewit, Julius, 154 Spruce 

Levy, Dr. Julius. 450 High 

Lobel, Charles, 800 Broad 

Lowenstein, Isaac, 12 Baldwin Av. 

Melsel Bros., 196 Ferry 

Mendel, William, 679 High 

Metzger, Mrs. A^ 58 James 

Newman, Jacob U, Lawyers Bldg 



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298 



AMERICAN JEWISH YEAR BOOK 



Kew Jtney Oheb Shulom Hebrew School 

Parsonnet, Dr. Victor, 134 W. Kin- 
ney 
Penn, H. M., 28 Hillside Place 
Plalne, Nathan. 34 13th Ay. 
Plaut Memorial School, care of Mrs. 

Emma Plant, Prince St. 
Plaut, Moses, 707-21 Broad 
Prokocimer, Edward, 195 Spring- 
field Av. 
Proskauer, Joseph, 634 Clifton 
Raymond, Thomas, 164 Market 
Reich, Dr. Louis, 66 Morton 
Relifcious School Cong. Bnal Jesh- 

urum 
Rich. William S^ 206 Hunterdon 
Rodin, Dr. H. R., 234 Springfield 

Av. 
Rubin, Michael, 138 Prince 
Scher, Miss Ida, 23 Rutgers 
Schortland, Philip J., 828 Broad 
Schwartz, Samuel. 30 Osbom Ter. 
Schwarz, Dr. E., 561 High 
Seidman, Dr. Marcus, 580 High 
Sllberfeld, Rev. .Tulius, 346 High 
Soshlnsky, I., 04 Charlton 
Stadtner, Leo, 211 Belmont Av. 
Stahl, .Tulius, 52 Bleecker 
Stein, Dr. Harry, 105 Springfield 

Stein'. Leo, 257 S. 7th 
Stelner, .Toseph, 51 Baldwin Av. 
Straus, Mrs. Fred, 28 Central Av. 
Unger, Samuel, 114 Pacific 
Warshawsky, Dr. Reuben, 66 West 
Wechsler, Dr. Emil, 62 Beacon 
Weinberg, Harry, 354 S. Orange Av. 
Weiss, Dr. Louis, 227 S. Orange Av. 
Woolf, Dr. B. H., 173 Spruce 

New Brunswick 
Cohn, Theodore, 47 Church 
FIschler, Morris, 37 Hiram 
HIrsch, Isldor P. 
Komblutt, B., 90 Church 
Landsberg, Henry 
Marks, M. S., 86 Remsen 
Schwartz, Herman, 8 Peace 
Shapiro, Leah, 310 Burnet 
Welnrub, A., 357 George 
Wolfson's, A., Sons 

Norma 
Goldman, Meyer 
Krassensteln, C. 

Orange 

Abrams, David, 80 Parrow 
Crupnltsky, Isldor, 44 Centre 
Gleser, L., 82 Parrow 
Green wald, Bernhard, 65 South 
Tlurwitz. H., 59 Parrow 



Passaic 
Friedman, Rev. E., 58 2d 
Meyers, Harry, 126 Pennington Av. 
Rlngler, 58 3d 

Paterson 
Aronsohn, Samuel J., 300 Ellison 
Bamert, N., 258 Broadway 
Basch, Isaac, 99 Main 
Cohn, Marcus, 229 Broadway 
Edelsteln, A., 255 Fair 
Fabian, Jacob, 209 Main 
Gordon, David, 112 Ellison 
Isaacs, Dr. Abram S., 471 Ellison 
Joelson, Dr. M. S.. 132 Patterson 
Katz, Mrs. Ph., 419 Broadway 
Kitay. Mrs. S. E., 15 N. Main 
Klelnfeld, Rev. A. S., 51 Fair 
Meyer, Mrs. L., 221 Broadway 
Rosensteln. B. S., 86 Main 
Schwartz, M. A., Market and Main 
Simon, I., 443 Ellison 
Surnamer, Dr. I., 89 Bridge 
Welngartner, Moses, 278 Carroll 

Perth Amboy 
Special Members 
Eucherman, D., 515 State 
Metzandorf, A. N. 
Polinsky, I., 31 William 
Schwartz, Jos., 334 Madison Av. 

Annual Members 
Alpern, Isaac, 186 Smith 
Beckhoff, A., 331 State 
Ellis, Herman, 90 S. 1st 
Goldberger, Leo, 122 Smith 
Goldberger, Max, 338 State 
Green, S. N., 393 State 
Levine, Philip, 88 Smith 
Rlppenheimer, Morris, 5 Division 
Slobodien, Joseph, 126 Smith 
Wagner, Sadie, 377 State 
Wedeen, Hyman 

PUinfleld 
Danziger, David 
Levy Bros., 115 W. Front 
Mann, Hyman, 919 W. 3d 
Newcorn, William, 204 W. Front 
Rosenbaum, Henry, 237 W. Front 
Rothberg, Samuel, 206 W. Front 
Schloss, Moses, 326 E. Front 
Woledersky, Meyer D., Ill Liberty 

Bed Bank 

Eisner, Slgmund 

Kridel, Mrs. J., E. Front St. 

Salz, Joseph 



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299 



Sosenhayn 
Joseph, J. H. 

Love, N. L., P. O. Box 78 
Greenwood, Dr. N. S. 
Yudelowitz, S. 

Bomerville 
Mack, Mrs. Adolpli 
Schwed, Charles 

South Orange 
Beck, Charles 

Cohen, Jacob, 810 Academy 
Fuld, Felix, 602 Centre 
Roth, Mrs. M., 153 Academy 

Summit 
Frank, Joseph, 268 Springfield Av. 

Trenton 
Levin, Harris, 346 Brunswick Av. 
Wlrtschafter, Henry, 25 S. Broad 

NEW 
Albuquerque 
Schwelzer, Herman, Las Vegas 

Las Yegaa 
Bonnhelm, Rev. B. A., P. O. Box 
734 

NEW 
Albany 
LiFB Member 
Rosendale, Hon. Simon W. 
Annual Members 
Barnet, William, 251 Hamilton 
Beth Emeth S. S. Library, care of 

A. H. Marx, 309 S. Pearl 
Bookhelm, L. W., 98 Green 
Friedman, J. S., 367 State 
Fuld, David, 345 State 
Helser, Mrs. S., 128 Lancaster 
Hessberg, Albert, 222 Lancaster 
Hessberg, Samuel, 38 Wlllett 
Illch, Julius, 56 N. Pine Av, 
Kantrowltz, Morris, 201 Hamilton 
Kessler, H. L., 252 S. Pearl 
Laventhal, Julius, 138 State 
Lipman, Henry W., 614 Madison 

Av. 
Mann, B. A., 10 Madison PL 
Mannesovltch, William I., 245 S. 

Pearl 
Marx, Albert I., 42-44 State 
Muh If elder, David, 50 Jay 



Ylneland 
Cohen, Wolfe, 538 Boulevard 
Gassel, M.. 536 Almond 
Joseph, John 
IJpman, R. M. 

Opachlnsky, Minnie, Route No. 6 
Pressman, A. 
Rublnoff, J., 701 Landls Av. 

Woodbine 
Abramson, William, P. O. Box 278 
Bayard, M. L. 
Danerhlrsh, L. 
Ecker, S. 
Elsenberg, W. 
Geller, Henry W., Supt. Baron de 

Hlrsch Farm School 
Grobaman, Miss Rosalie 
Janofsky, Max, P. O. Box 238 
Koenig, Lazar 
Levin, Eva E. 
Lipman, W. L. 
Palitz, Bernard A. 
Pincus, J. W. 
Rabinowltz, Joseph 
Rosenfeld, A. 

MEXICO 

Davis, Isaac 

Friedman, H. 

Hebrew Ladles' Benevolent Society 

Raisin, Rev. Jacob S., 821 11th, E 

Stern, Jacob, 1027 8th 

YOBK 

Muhlf elder, Isidor, 126 Lancaster 
Newman, Leo H., 194 State 
Schleslnger, Rev. M., 334 Hudson 

Av. 
Sporlwrg, Mrs. Henry J., 106 Lake 

Av. 
Stern, Charles M., 158 S. Knox 
Wachsman, Isidore, 19 S. Pine Av. 
Waldman, Louis I., 78 Wlllett 
Waldman, Mrs. L. S., 365 State 
Waldman, Milton C, 310 State 

Blnghamton 

Frechle, S. M., 81 Main 

Brooklyn 

Patron 

Abraham, A., care of Abraham and 

Straus, Pulton St. 

Special Members 
Chilton, Forrest, 177 Pennsylvania 

Av. 
JaflTe. Lewis J., 156 Prospect Park 
Kaufman, Edward, 821 Carroll 



New Jerse} 



New Mexic< 



New York 



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AMERICAN JBWISH TEAR BOOK 



New York Annual Membsrs 

Abelow, Samuel, 172 Pulaski 
Abels, S.. 989 78d 
AbramoTits, Lasar, 1900 Douglas 
AbramoYlts, Louis, 484 Bedford Ay. 
Adelman, Louis, 400 Rockaway Ay. 
Apfelbaum, H., 1639 55th, Borough 

Pk. 
Aron, Mrs. A, 436 Lorlmer 
Bagley, Frances, 11 Gates Ay. 
Bagley, U. 11 Gates Ay. 
Becker, John, 1210 40th 
Becker, Samuel, 4205 12th Ay. 
Bernstein, A. N., 758 Flushing Ay. 
Bernstein, John u, 399 E. 11th 
Bernstein, Maurice, 352 Wyona 
Blakeman, Hyman, 100 Powell 
Block, Bernard; 80 Manhattan Ay. 
Block, Dr. Siegfried, 848 Greene Ay. 
Blum, B. C, care of Abraham and 

Straus 
Blum, Dr. Samuel. 233 S. 3d 
Blumenau, L., 161 Smith 
Brandess, M., Graham and Cook 
Bregman, DaYld, 463 Broadway 
Brenner, Hon. Jacob, 252 Carroll 
Brooklyn Hebrew Orphan Asylum, 

373 Ralph Av. 
Brownstein, A. D., 97 Osborn 
Cahan, Dr. L. L., 432 New Jersey 

Av. 
Capland, D. M., 626 Washington 

Chasin, Louis, 236 8th 
Chugerman, Saml., 70 Graham Av. 
Cohen, B., 230 17th 
Cohen, M. A., Stone and Sutton 

Cohen, Rev. Simon R., 1383 Dean 
Cohn, Dr. M. A., 1152 Herkimer 
Cohn, M., 969 De Kalb Av. 
Cook, Harry, 1633 8th Av. 
Coyne, Dr. W. J., Pitkin and Stone 

Damsky, Abraham, 226-228 McKlb- 

ben 
Dattelbaum, Dr. M. J., 458 Stone 

Av. 
Dlamont, L., 876 De Kalb Av. 
Edlin, Wm., 477 E. 16th 
Engel, Walter M., 331 Quincy 
Epstein, H., 70 Graham Av. 
Epstein, Solomon, 70 Graham Av. 
Feder, Chas. S., 734-736 Broadway 
Fine, Morris, 8636 21st 
Feinzilber, Emil, 197 Floyd 
Finkelstein, Reuben, 1569 Eastern 

Parkway 
Freger, Joseph, 134 Watkins 
Fried, Charles, 970 St. Marks Av. 
Fried, Jacob, 5516 4th Av. 



Friedman, Dr. B. L., 66 Tompkins 

Av. 
Friedman, Marcus, 162 Pulaski 
Gardstein, Samuel, 1114 4l8t 
German, L., 552 5th Av. 
Gludc, Dr. Sam. A., 42 Humboldt 
Gluckman, Dr. Herman, 870 Flush- 
ing Ay. 
Goldbei^, P., 783 Broadway 
Goldfarb, Rabbi Israel, 15 Strong 

PI. 
Goldman, Max, 486 Leonard 
Goldsmith, A., 286 Clinton 
Goldstein, Hyman, 1011 40th 
Goldstein, Joseph, 1752 Pitkin Av. 
Goldstein, Joseph, 335 Stone Av. 
Goldstein, Louis, 376 Rockaway Av. 
Gomberg, David, 377 Rockaway Av. 
Gordin, I. M., 256 Madison 
Gordon, A., 691 Wllloughby Av. 
Gordon, M., 333 Stone Av. 
Gottscho, Samuel H., 462 15th 
Greenberg, Mandel, 32 Moore 
Greenspoon, Benzion S., 519 Sutter 

Av. 
r;rr*f>tif*torn\ Meyt^r. 582 Atlantic A v. 
(;rodpn, Morris, 2<»S Hart 
Gmppprt B.t 615 Cintrni A v. 
Hnirra. Moaes J.. 543 3d 
Harroylch. Max. 73 Manhattan Av. 
Heisman, H*. 76 RiiBh 
Of III* r, Jacob. 465 4th 
FTellpr, S., 153 Gn^eDpofnt A v. 
Flelprlti. Dr B. E., 479 Stone Av. 
Tlf^nrlqiies, Miss Eatello, 69 Halsey 
Herbert, Edwafd, 1325 54th 
ni?prjiun. AltrnTiEim. L!TS S. 3d 
Trji-Tini. Dr. Fr i ■ lewes 
Heracovicli, 11. iS., i>-0 De Kalb Av. 
Hertz, Emanuel, 345 Stone Av. 
Hirsh. Hugo, 391 Fulton 
Hurwitz, Mrs. W., 128 Clinton Av. 
Hyman, Paul P., 542 9th 
Isaacson, Sam. D., 22-24 Manhat- 
tan Av. 
Israelson, M., 470 Bergen 
Jacobs, H. B., Watkins cor Blake 

Av. 
Jacobs, J. Jonas, 156 Diamond 
Joachim, B., 591 Putnam Av. 
Joachim, Charles J, 149 Bainbridge 
Joffe, Dr. M. S., 68 McKlbben 
Jonas, Nathan S., 787 Quincy 
Kalet, I., 97 Graham Av. 
Kaplan, Jeanette, 1773 Pitkin Av. 
Kathlowitz, Morris, 617 Wllloughby 

Av. 
Kaufman, Dr. B., 482 Stone Av. 
Kaufman, L., 430 Stone 
Kempner, Otto, 53 Linden 
Klionsky, George, 206 Livonia Av. 
Kolb, Samuel, 861 De Kalb Av. 



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JEWISH PUBLICATION SOCIETY 



301 



Kraus, S. B., 935 Broadway 
Krimsky, Dr. Jos., 290 Bradford 
Lamport, N., 4602 13th Av. 
Lamport, S., 1265 51st 
Lazinsky, Mrs. ESmll, 254' Carlton 

Lebovltz, B., 675% 3d Av. 
Levi, A. L., 343 Stuvvesant Av. 
Levi, Alexander, lleyer, Jr., 61 

Pennsylvania Av. 
Levi, N. H., 297 Decatur 
Levlne, Joseph R., 423 Sackman 
Levy, Mrs. A. M., 702 Putnam Av. 
Levy, Chas. H., 734 Broadway 
Levy, Dr. Isldor, 702-704 Broadway 
Levy, Joseph, 397 So. 2d 
Lewis, Gustave, 554 Macy Av. 
Llbson, Isaac, 141 Court 
Llmberg, Dr. L., Dumont and Geor- 
gia Avs. 
Llpnltzky, J., 145 Floyd 
Londoner, Dr. J., 61 Tompkins Av. 
Lorentz, Moses L., 596 Monroe 
Lourla, Dr. Leon, 249 Hewes 
Lublenskl, Miss Belle M., 1636 49th 
Lyon, Charles, 116 Vernon Av. 
Lyons, Rev. Alexander, 526 8th 
Maltlln, Joseph, 2298 Pitkin Av. 
Mashbln, Bessie, 1697 Eastern 

Parkway 
Masllansky, Rev. H., 359 Kosciusko 
Matz, I., 606 Bedford Av. 
Mayper, Morris I., 1400 Eastern 

Parkway 
Mendebaum, Dr. A., 329 Stone Av. 
Mendlowitz, Herman, 271 Berry 
Meserltz, Isaac, 47 Bogart 
Meyer, Charles H., 536 Cleveland 
Meyer, Dr. M. A., 22 S. Prances PI. 
Mlckelbank, David, 1597 Pitkin 
MUlman, James, 1778 Pitkin Av. 
Mitchell, W. L., 122 Summer Av. 
Newman, Emanuel, 158 Hancock 
Nussbaum, L., 140 7th Av. 
Pearlman, Joseph, 113 Penn 
Pecker, W. R., 521 Stone Av. 
Pellman, S. M., 510 12th 
Pensak, Dr. Julius. 347 Watklns 
Pirodney, A., 1550 Pitkin 
Pollner, G., 65 Osborn 
Prensky, N., 80 Graham Av. 
Price, Alexander, 39 Graham Av. 
Price. M. J.. 1057 40th 
Rabblnowltz, Dr. Samuel, 71a Sum- 
mer Av. 
Rachlin. Dr. D^ 34 Tompkins Av. 
Reiss, Max, 235 Lynch 
Rhine, Meyer, 894 Wallabout 
Rich, Maurice B., 113 Manhattan 

Av. 
Richman, A., 357 Pennsylvania Av. 
Robins, Dr. L. H., 104 McKlbben 



Rolnlck, Dr. Jacob, 21 Manhattan New York 

Av. 
Roppel, William, 484 Rockawav Av. 
Roshansky, Dr. Herman, 1627 Pit- 
kin Av. 
Rosenberg Bros., 600 Blake Av. 
Rosenberg, M., 733 Lafayette Av. 
Rosenblith, S., Cor. 41st and 13th 

Av. 
Rosenfeld, Dr. Robert, 504 Stone 

Av. 
Rosenthal, Slgmund, 607 Decatur 
Rosier, Dr. BiT, 26 Morrell 
Rostow, Joseph, 68 McKlbben 
Roth, William B., 821 Stone 
Rothschild, S. P., care of Abraham 

and Straus, Pulton St. 
Rotzon, Michael N., 64 McKibben 
Rubin, Solomon, 464 Bergen 
Russianoir, Dr. Isldor, 462 Stone 

Av. 
Sadoransky, Julius, 609 Monroe 
Sallt, Michael, 826 Fulton 
Saltzman, M., 15th Av. and 64th 
Samuels, H., 800 Marion 
Sarafein, Rev. A., 133 Thatford Av. 
Sartorius, Otto, 184 Washington 

Pk. 
Schachter, Marcus A., 27 Somer 
Schlang, A., 87 1st PI. 
Schlockow, Oswald, 1162 Pacific 
Schnade, Jacob, 403 Putnam Av. 
Schoenfeld, N^ 1214 46th 
Schreiber, S. J., 2601 Atlantic Av. 
Schuman, Rev. J., 301 6th 
Schwartz, Mrs. David, 107 6th Av. 
Schwartz, Jos. J., 361 Stone Av. 
Schwartz, Solomon S., 69 Thatford 

Av. 
Schwartzman, S., 818 Osborn 
Segalowitz, Nathaniel, 336 Sackman 
Seldman, Louis L., 339 Stone Av. 
Seley, Jacob, 1091 Manhattan Av. 
Selinkoff, Joseph, 91 Ames 
Shaft, J, 1410 59th, Borough Park 
Shamforoflf, I., 418 Miller Av. 
Shapiro, Morris, 1749 Pitkin Av. 
Shapiro, Dr. Simon, 430 Stone Av. 
Shifrin. N., 210 17th 
Shllmowltz, Hirsh, 1831 Pitkin Av. 
Shlivek, Abe, 157 Richmond 
Shonkoir, Abner, 281 Mldwood 
Silverman, Sol., 544 9th St 
Simon, A. H., 50 Thatford Av. 
Slote, B. W., 46 Graham Av. 
Slote, Dr. S. H.. 75 McKibben 
Sobel, Jacob, 184 Rutledge 
Sobel, Samuel, 211 Rutledge 
Sobel, Sol., 62 McKibben 
Spevack, Morris, 382 Stone Av. 
Springer, Isidore, 1459 Eastern 

Parkway 



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AMERICAN JEWISH YEAR BOOK 



New York Stoinberff. T>.. 508 Rocknway A v. 

BteiDfield. Dr. Ella« T.. 117 Man- 
hattan Av. 
Rtoloff. B«'nJ., 72 Thatford Av. 
Stranwnsser, Joseph, 442 New Jer- 
sey Av. 
Siifrin. Solomon, 109 S. 0th 
Tanenbaum, Samuel. 1135 40th 
TarshiB. J.. 523 10th 
Teperman. E., 522 Rockaway Av. 
Tepfer, Esther. 4ri4 llopklnson Av. 
Thaler. Jacob. 1255 4Hth 
Tonkin. Nathaniel. 356 Fulton 
Tonkonogy. George. 1765 Pitkin Av. 
Treuhold, Morris, 586 10th 
I^lman. Nathan. 612 Lll^erty Av. 
Waton, Harry, 1752 Pitkin Av. 
Waxman, Miss It. I).. 451 Pulaski 
Webster, George K.. 50 Liberty Av. 
Well. E., 728 Qulncy 
Weil, Theodore, 641 5th A v. 
Welner, Harris, 625 Washington 

Av. 
Weinsteln. Samuel S., 60 Graham 

Av. 
Weiss. M., 421 Bushwick Av. 
Werbelowsky, Jacob. 93 Meserole 
Werbelovsky, Moe, 76 Graham Av. 
Wlnogrod, Louis, 287 Division 
Wolodarsky, Meyer D., 1761 Pitkin 

Av. 
Zelta, H., 114 Prospect Pk.. W, 
Zevln, Israel J., 1169 46th 
Zlpchls, Jacob. 278-80 S. 2d 
Zlporkes, Dr. Wm. J., 337 Wyona 
Zirn, Harry, 14 Graham Av. 

Buffalo 
Aaron. Rev. Dr. Israel, 748 Auburn 

Av. 
Aronson. A. S., 611 Bird Av. 
Bing. B. Beecher, Lenox Hotel 
Cohn, Isidore, 33 Whiting PI. 
Crlstall, S., 110 Whiting PI. 
Fischer, M., Main and Utlca 
Flelschmann, Simon, 190 EMward 
Glntzler, H., 23 Superior 
Haas, Ignatius, 34 Tracy 
Hofeller, Theodore. 59 Ashland Av. 
Jacobson, S., 978 Broadway 
Keiser, Leopold, 566 W. Ferry 
Miller, L. H., 165 Howard 
Morrison, Solomon, 10 W. Parade 

Av. 
Newman. Samuel, 554 Williams 
Polakoff, Chas.. 200 Main 
Risman, Samuel, 301 S. Division 
Rosen, Louis, 446 Williams 
Rosing. Jacob, 326 WMlllam 
llothschlld, r>eo, 417 Llnwood 
Rothschild, Samuel. 348 Richmond 

Av. 



Schuman. Wm.. 789 Ellicott 

Sons and Daughters of Zlon, care 

of H. L. Levin, 588 Spring 
Weiss. Julius, 655 Ellicott 
Weiss, Morris. 220 Carlton 
Wile, Herman. 354 Franklin 

Centerville 
Glass, Dr. Jacob 

Cooperttown 
Belsman, H. 

EUenville 
Manlloff, Jacob 

Elmira 
Levy, Benjamin F., 454 W. Water 
Rosenfleld, Mrs. Benjamin, 421 W. 

Gray 
Society for Aid of Jewish Prisoners, 
State Reformatory 

FlihklU Landing 
Schwartz, A. 

Fort Plain 
Schoen, Adolph 

Glen's Falls 
Wurtenberg, A. 

Jamaica 
Ginsburg, Harry, McAuley Av. cor. 
Carll 

Kingston 
Baker, Max, 71 Hasbruck 
Marbletone, H., 241 Wall 

Liberty 
Mallsoflf, Dr. A., 210 N. Main 
Rayevsky, Dr. Chas. 

Long Island City 
Trait, Benjamin D., care of Trait 
Marble Co. 

Mount Vernon 

Babrowsky, B., 9th Av. 

Bibas, Edgar S., 436 S. Columbia 

Corrls, Isador, 72 Elm 

Davidov, Mrs. R., 37 S. 13th Av. 

Isaacs, Mrs. M., St. Hellers, North- 
umberland 

Levy, Louis, 740 Wallace Av. 

Mann, Leon, 14 Cottage Av. 

Roblson, Mrs. G., Jr., 348 N. Ful- 
ton 

Temple Slnal Library, Cary Av. 
and Sidney 



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303 



Newbnrgh 
Hlrscliberg, M. H. 
Stern, F. 

New Brighton, S. I. 
Mord, M.. 396 Richmond Terrace 

New Sochelle 
Bolnick, Heyman, 305 Main 
Concors, Arthur, 302 North Av. 
Levlson, S., 192 Main 

New York City 

Life Members 
Bruehl, Moses, 21 W. 88th 
Buttenwieser, L L., 233 Lenox Av. 
Einstein, Edwin, Estate of, 49 Cliff 
Elkus, Abram J., 26 E. 61st 
Goodhart, P. J.. 21 W. 81st 
Heller, Emanuel L., 12 E. 77th 
Lewisohn, L, Estate of 
Loth, Joseph, 65 Greene 
Marshall, Louis, 47 E. 72d 
Naumburg, E., 48 W. 58th 
Samuel, M., 686 Greenwich 
Schafer, Samuel M^ 35 Wall 
Schiff, Mrs. Jacob H., 52 William 
Schlff, Mortimer U, 52 William 
Straus, Hon. Oscar S., 42 Warren 
Sulzberger, Cyrus L, 516 West End 

Warburg, Mrs. Felix M., 18 E. 72d 

Patrons 
Cohen, Joseph H., 81 E. Broadway 
Goldman, Julius, 132 E. 70th 
Guggenheim, Daniel, St. Regis Hotel 
Hays, Daniel P., 141 Broadway 
Lauterbach, E., 22 William 
Loeb, Dr. Morris, 273 Madison Av. 
Ochs, Adolph S., N. Y. Times 
Salomon, William, 1020 5th Av. 
Schiff. Jacob H., 52 William 

Library Members 
Ballln, Julius, 398 Broadway 
Benjamin, Eugene S., 436 Lafayette 
Dettelbach, M., 411 West End Av. 
Goldsmith, August, 36 W. 69th 
Gruber, Abraham, 170 Broadway 
Guggenheim, Simon, 71 Broadway 
Hamburger, Samuel B., 1 Rector 
Kohns, Lazarus, 23 W. 56th 
Kohns, Lee, 127 W. 79th 
Levi, Emil S., 29 W. 71st 
Tjevi, Henlein, 313 W. 81st 
Levy, Abram, 209 W. 136th 
Mayer, Otto L, 164 Water 
Nathan, Edgar J., 127 W. 74th 
Ottinger, Moses, 23 W. 75th 
Perlman, L. H., 1988 Madison Av. 



Platzek, M. Warley, 15 E. 48th 
Rosen wald, Slgmund, 145 Water 
Seligman, Isaac N., 36 W. 64th 
Silberman, Sam. J., 133 E. 79th 
Sondhelmer, J., 514 Broadway 
Stern, Leopold, 27 W. 87th 
Stern, Sigmund, 68 Nassau 
Thalman, Ernst, 25 Broad 
Unger, Hyman W., 241 E. 39th 
Unterberg, I., 86-94 Franklin 
Young Men's Hebrew Association, 
92d and Lexington Av. 

Special Members 
Altmayer, Sanders B., 15 E. 83d 
Arkush, Reuben, 159 W. 77th 
Ascheim, M. J., 60 Broadway 
Auerbach, Joseph S., 257 W. 92d 
Aurbach, A. L, 4 W. 91st 
Baerman, T. B., 17 E. 97th 
Bamberger, Levi, Hotel Netherland, 

5th Av. and 59th 
Bendheim, A. D., 134 Grand 
Bendheim, Henry, 42 W. 89th 
Bendit, Louis A., 186 Franklin 
Benjamin, Joseph J., 235 W. 76th 
Bernstein, Saul, 1845 7th Av. 
Berolzheimer, Emil, 377 Broadway 
Bijur, Nathan, 161 W. 75th 
Bloomlngdale, E. W., 42 W. 69th 
Bloomingdale, J. B., 11 E. 67th 
Boehm, Abram, 31 Nassau 
Borg, Sidney, 20 Nassau 
Bressler, David M., 174 2d Av. 
Brill, Samuel, 314 E. 5th 
Cahn, Arthur L., 27 Pine 
Cantor, Jacob A., 9 W. 70th 
Cardozo, Benjamin N., 52 Broadway 
Cardozo, Ernest, 128 Broadway 
Cohen, S., 707 Broadway 
Cohen and Hirsch, 120 W. 18th 
De Leon, Edwin W., 52-54 William 
Dittenhoefer, Hon. A. J., 17 B. 83d 
Dittenhoefer, I. M., 96 Broadway 
Dryfoos, M., 307 W. 100th 
Dukas, Julius J., 335 Broadway 
Dushkind, Chas., 5 Beekman 
Eckstein, M. L., 1194 Lexington Av. 
Einstein, I. D., 443 Broadway 
Eiseman, Samuel, 41 W. 89th 
Eisemann, Emil. 68 W. Houston 
Brianger, A. L., 214 W. 42d 
Erlanger, Hon. M., 2030 Broadway 
Brianger, Sydney B., 241 W. 122d 
Ernst, J. L., 170 Broadway 
Ernst, M. L., 152 W. 122d 
Ersteln, L., 134 Spring 
Erstein, M., 43 E. 63d 
Fischlowitz, Dr. G. G., 1298 Madi- 
son Av. 
Fleck, Sadie N., 95 W. 119th 



New York 



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AMERICAN JEWISH TEAR BOOK 



New Toik Flelschman, Oustay J., 170 Broad- 
way 
FlelBchman, Samuel, 245 E. 48tli 
Fleisher, Benjamin, The Plerrepont, 

Broadway and W. 32d 
Prank, Alfred, 201 Wooster 
Frank, Jnlius J., 52 William 
Frank, Mrs. Rose, Hotel Buckinsr- 

ham, 5th Av. and 50th 
Frankenberg, Solomon, 1239 Madi- 
son Ay. 
Freeman. William, 2 W. 88th 
Fried, Herman, 304 E. Broadway 
Fried, Samson, 47 W. 87th 
Friedlander, Isidor, 107 W. 120th 
Fuhs, Louis, 237 W. 139th 
Gans, Howard S., 27 William 
Gartner, Louis W.. 301 W. 108th 
Glass, Henry, 142 W. 121st 
Goldenberg, S. L., 109 5th Ay. 
Goldfarb, H., 585 Broadway 
Goldfogle, Hon. Henry, 271 Broad- 
way 
Goldsmith, Abram, 85 Nassau 
Goldstone, Julius, 36 W. 24th 
Goldstone, Wm. H., St Urban, 

89th St. and Central Park. W. 
Goodfrlend, Jacob, 305 W. 100th 
Goodfriend, Meyer, 274 W. 113th 
Gottschall, Simon, 245 W. 113th 
Greenbaum, Hon. Samuel, Supreme 

Court, County Court House 
Grossman, Mrs. Moses H., 115 

Broadway 
Grossman, William, 115 Broadway 
Guggenheim, Murry, 71 Broadway 
Guggenheim, Solomon R., 105 

Broadway 
Harzburger, Julius, 57 St. Marks PI. 
Hecht, Myer, 6 Jacob 
Heilner, Emanuel, 35 W. 90th 
Helman, Julius, 000 Broadway 
Heller, Samuel, 600 W. 136th 
Hendricks, Mrs. Charles, 340 W. 

72d 
Hemsheim, Isidore, Hotel Nether- 
land 
Herrman, Henry S., 54 E. 80th 
Herrman, Nathan, Com Exchange 

Bank Bldg. 
Hershfleld, Isidore, 28 W. 116th 
Herzog, Paul M., 41 W. 68th 
Hochstadter, D., 19 E. 79th 
Hochstadter, Harry S., 137 W. 71st 
HolTman, Charles, 1239 Madison 

Av. 
Homthal, L. M., 25 W. 96th " 
Hyman. Samuel J., 52 E. 10th 
Ickelhelmer, Henry R., 49 Wall 
Isaacs, Bendit, 358 West End Ay. 
Jacoby, Morris, 1215 Madison Ay. 
Jellinek, Felix, 11 William 



Kahn, Loais, 170 Broadway 
Kahn, O. H., 54 William 
Kastor. Adolph, 109 Duane 
Klein, Jos. S., 225 E. 79th 
Kom, 8. W., 45 E. 74th 
Lachman, Samson^ 313 W. 106th 
Laderer, Samuel L., 340 Greenwich 
Lehman, Arthur, 22 William 
Lehman. S. M., 16 William 
Leyentrltt, Hon. Dayld, 34 W. 77th 
Levi, Joseph C, 50 W. 91st 
Levy, Aaron J., 260 Henry 
Levy, Eugene N., 112 Bleeker 
Levy, Herman. 72 Greene 
Levy, Isaac, lo5 E. Broadway 
Levy, Israel N., 216 W. 141st 
Levy, Louis W., 580 Broadway 
Levy, Napoleon L., 18 W. 72d 
Levy, Samuel H., 170 Broadway 
Levy, William I., care of William 

Levy & Bros., 684 Broadway 
Lichten, M. C. 23 E. 76th 
Liebman, Walter. 55 E. 82d 
Lindheim, M., 149 Broadway 
Lipper, Arthur, 137 W. 75th 
Loeb, Louis, 58 W. 57th 
Loewenthal. R. A., 261 Central Pk. 
Lorsch, Arthur, 2 W. 89th 
Lorsch. H., 250 W. 82d 
Ludwlg, B. J., 51 E. 80th 
Lyons, Raphael, 622 W. 114th 
Manheim, Jacob, 302 Broadway 
Marcus, Joseph S., 315 Riverside 

Drive 
Marcus, Nathan, 121 Canal 
Markel, Max, 7 E. 87th 
Marks, Marcus M., 687 Broadway 
Meyer, D. P., Hotel Majestic 
Meyer, Isaac, 19 W. 127th 
Mordecai, B., 319 W. 105th 
Morganthau, Henry, 20 Nassau 
Morganthau, Maximilian, 135 

Broadway 
Momingstar, J., 48 Park Place 
Morris, Abram, 1887 7th Av. 
Morris, Jacob H., 673 Broadway 
Moss, Isaac, 35 Nassau 
Nathan, Clarence S., 251 W. 87th 
Nelson, Abram, 30 Pine 
Neustadt, S., 11 Pine 
Newburger, Hon. Joseph E., Su- 
preme Court Bldg. 
Ottinger, Marx, 20 E. 70th 
Phillips and Phillips, 116 Nassau 
Phillips, Hon. Taylor N., Dept. of 

Finance 
Popper, William C, Pearl and Elm 
Rafalsky, Mark, 611 W. 110th 
Rice, Ignatius, 122 E. 79th 
Robinson, Louis, 163 Mercer 
Rlchter, Daniel, 627 Broadway 



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Robinson, Mrs. S., 516 W. 122cl 
Roeder, S. M., 174 B. 95th 
Rosalsky, Hon. Otto A., 32 Frank- 
lin 
Rose, William R.. 809 W. 81st 
r V ,,,. willinm, 207 W. 34tll 
I: ..:i!vu]. B., m Murray 
lioaeiitbai* H. 11, 707 Broadway 
Rost'n»we!g, Josephs OD Nasii^u 
Eotfiolis, A. N., 123 Liberty 
Rothschild, Harpy S., Hotel Savoy, 

59th aod 5th At. 
RothHchlld, U^yt^r IX, 14 Cburch 
Bnchfl, Kdward 60 E. SOlh 
Saehs, Louis, 1044 Madison At. 
Saks, Isadore, 1305 Broadw^ay 
Samstag, H. F., 557 Broadway 
Schloss, I. M., care of I. Pfelpper, 

92 William 
Serphos, Solomon N., 5 W. 91st 
Seutner, Richard. 138 E. 94th 
Sllberman, Morris, 125 E. 95th 
Sllbersteln, Abraham, 22 Mt. Morris 

Park, West 
Sllverstein, Ellas, 320 Convent Av. 
Solomon, Mortimer W., 299 Broad- 
way 
Sondhelm, Phlneas, care of Heldel- 
bach, Ickelheimer & Co., 37 Wil- 
liam 
Stelnam, A., 162 Greene 
Stelnhardt, Jacob, 69 W. 73d 
Stern, A., 62 E. 61st 
Steuer, Max D., 56 W. 88th 
Stiefel, Herman, 1980 7th Av. 
Stiefel, Mrs. J. K., 23 E. 94th 
Strasburger. Samuel, 74 Broadway. 
Straus, Nathan, 27 W. 72d 
Stroock, Solomon M., 320 Broadway 
Tannenbaum, L., 640 Broadway 
Teschner, Dr. Jacob, 134 B. 61st 
Toch, M., 261 W. 71st 
Uhry, M., 1190 Madison Av. 
Ullman, Albert, 101 W. 80th 
Untermeyer, Mrs. E., 62 B. 91st 
Vorhaus, Louis J., World Bldg., 61 

Park Row 
Wachsman, Siegfried, 535 W. 148th 
Wallenstein, Jacob J., 149 W. 118th 
Warburg, Paul M., 52 William 
Wasserman, H., 161 B. 65th 
Well, David L., 74 Broadway 
Weil, L., 308 W. 100th 
Weil, L. v., 86 B. 75th 
Well, Samuel, 196 Franklin 
Weinman, Moses, 987 Madison Av. 
Werner, SamueL 117 W. 111th 
Wlmpfhelmer, Cfhas. A., 18 W. 76th 
Wise, B. B., Commercial Exchange 

Bldg., 19 William 
Wolfensteln, Samuel C, 39 Spruce 
Wolff, Bmll, 443 Broadway 



Wurzberger, B., 43 Leonard New York 

Zinke, Louis, 290 Broadway 
Zucker, Peter, 45 Broadway 

Annual Members 
Abel, Dr. Samuel, 1525 Madison Av. 
Abelman, Max, 1325 Clay Av., 

Bronx 
Abelson, Isldor I., 260 Henry 
Abelson, Paul, 160 E. 91st 
Abrahams, Joseph, 131 E. 110th 
Abrahams, Dr. R., 43 St. Marks PI. 
Abramowltz, Harry, 177 Brook Av. 
Abrams, Gustave, 1 E. 100th 
Abrams, Maurice D.. 7 Pine 
Abramson, Moses, 24 Allen 
Ackerman. Dr. L., 58 2d Av. 
Adelson, Philip, 140 B. 92d 
Adelson, Thomas, 625 Broadway 
Adleman, J. L., 124 E. 118th 
Adler, Charles, 813 Broome 
Affenkraut, Charles, 67 W. n5th 
Aguz, A. a, 376 B. 8th 
Albert, A. B., 79 B. 4th 
Alexander, A., 46 W. 115th 
Alexander, Bernard, 49 St. Marks 

PI. 
AUmayer, Emanuel, 83 Crosby 
Altman, Dr. Emil, 746 B. 5th 
Altman, M., 1944 Madison Av. 
Amdur, Louis, 1132 Vyse 
Amdur, M., 871 Macy PI., Bronx 
American, Miss Sadie, 448 Central 

Park. W. 
Andron, Jacob L., 67 B. 104th 
Ansorge, M. P., 102 W. 132d 
Anspach, Mrs. Isabella, 260 W. 70th 
Arbib, Alexander. 53 B. 9th 
Arnsteln, A., 1125 Madison Av. 
Amsteln, Simon, 924 Madison Av. 
Aronson, B., 58 Canal 
Aronson, Samuel, 51 B. 75th 
Ash, Louis, 229 E. 56th 
Ash, Mark, 316 W. 103d 
Asher, Mrs. Joseph M., 61 E. 93d 
Auerbach, Samuel, 40 W. 77th 
Aventis, Aaron, 1059 Morris Av. 
Axelrad, Dr. Morris, 110 B. 1st 
Bachrach, Irving. 74 E. 92d 
Badanes, Saul, Simpson St. 
Baer, A., 220 Riverside Drive 
Baer, Morris B., 542 5th 
Baker, William S.. 204 W. 118th 
Balaban, Joseph, 2065 Ryer Av. 
Balklnd, J. L., 8 W. 119th 
Baltuch, Simon, 181 Allen 
Bamberger, William, 100 Broadway 
Barashlk, Harry A., 2007 3d Av. 
Barinsky, E. N., 157 B. 95th 
Barnard, H., 231 Pearl 
Bamett, H. I., 132 Nassau 
Barnett, Samuel, 960 Grant Av. 



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AMERICAN JEWISH YEAR BOOK 



New Tork Baron, Sam., 104-06 2d 

BaroDdess, Joseph, 165 E. Broad- 

Barth, J., 310 B. lOlst 

Basil. Rabbi Alexander, 1012 E. 

156th 
Baum, Dr. Joseph, 1275 Madison 

Av. 
Bayiinson, Uarrr. 30 Montgomery 
Beck, Gustave, 246 Henry 
Becker, D., 42 W. 116th 
Becker, Max, 24 Ist 
Beckhardt, Moses, 450 E. 141st 
Beekman, Isaac, 163 Greene 
Beekman, Marx, 224 W. 140th 
Beer, George Louis, 329 W. 71st 
Behren, A. H., 110 5th Ay., care of 

I. Storch Co. 
Behrman, Dr. I. P., 130 Madison 
Belais, H., 102 W. 75th 
Bell, Victor C, 699 Madison Av. 
Benedict, Abraham, 2508 Broadway 
Beneglrt, I. A., 1167 Vyse Av. 
Benjamin Deane School for Girls, 

144 Riverside Drive 
Benjamin, George, 55 Central Park, 

Benjamin, M. W., 43 W. 88th 
Berkowltz, H., 31 Green 
Berkowltz, Harry, 312 E. 5th 
Berlin, Dr. S., 22 E. 108th 
Berlin, S. N., 26 E. Houston 
Berman, Joseph G., 2 B. 97th 
Berman, Leo, 376-78 Grand 
Bembaum, Bernard, 320 Broadway 
Bernfeld, Dr. Samuel J., 273 Rlv- 

Ington 
Beraheim, Chas. L., 409 Lafayette 
Bemhelm, I. J., 138 Maiden Lane 
Bernhelm, Julius, 143 W. 79th 
Bernheimer, Dr. Charles S., 184 

Eldridge 
Bernheimer, Leopold A., 7 E. 57th 
Bernheimer, Max E., 128th and 

Amsterdam Av. 
Bernstein, A. J., 61 Park Row 
Bernstein, B., 626 Broadway 
Bernstein, Chas., 107 E. 96th 
Bernstein, Jacob, 113 W. 117th 
Bernstein, Dr. James, 51 E. 7th 
Bernstein, Jos., 57 Suffolk 
Bernstein, Louis, 204 Henry 
Bernstein, Max, 129 W. 126th 
Bernstein, Miss Rachel, 58 E. 128th 
Bers, Jos. D., 10^ Desbrosses 
Bershod, P., 2 B. 107th 
Beth El Sabbath School, 5th Av. 

and 76th 
Bieber, Dr. J., 383 E. 8th 
Blerman, Mrs. I., 42 E. 69th 
Bljur, Moses, 944 Park Av. 
Blldersee, B., 213 W. 105th 



Bimberg, Charles, 10 B. 23d 
Bimerids, Morris, 00 E. 8th 
Binhak, Carl, 931 Park Av. 
Birkenfeld, B., 318 W. 105th 
Birkhahn, C. D., 70 E. 93d 
Blanck, Max, 23 Washington PI. 
Blausteln, Dr. Abraham J., 302 

Broome 
Blausteln, Dr. David, 184 Eldridge 
Blickstein, Nathan, 147 Orchard 
Blitz, Max, 47 Maiden Lane 
Bloch Publishing Co., 738 Broad- 

BIoSe^ Abraham, 5 W. 117th 
Block, Dr. John, 242 Henry 
Block, J. W., 42 Canal 
Bloomingdale, E. W.. 42 W. 69th 
Bluen, M. J., 69 E. 92d 
Blum, David B., 69 E. 3d 
Blum, Sydney, 200 E. Broadway 
Blnmenthal, Maurice B., 35 Nassau 
Blumenthal, Sidney, 329 W. 87th 
Blumenthal, Theressa, 334 W. 84th 
Blumgart, Louis, 116 Riverside 

Drive 
Blyer, Jos., 20 E. 21st 
Blyn, J. M., 461 W. 153d 
Bodenheimer, Henry, 1239 Madison 

Boehin, Dr. William, 113 E. 116th 
Bogart. John, 61 Park Row 
Bogen, Lazarus, 248 Broome 
Bogin, Rosa, 122 Bowery 
Bonhem, Julius, Spruce and Union 
Bonlme, Dr. Ellis, 1519 Madison 

Av. 
Bookman, Dr. S., 9 E. 62d 
Borgenicht, Louis, 74 E. 91st 
Bosch, Rev. Fred. H., 142 W. 123d 
Bowsky, M., 309 E. 59th 
Brand, Herman, 404 E. 48th 
Brandt, I. W.. 60 W. 129th 
Brandt, M., 394 Broadway 
Breckstone, Mrs, J., 227 W. 131st 
Breckstone, Miss Minnie, 119 E. 

123d 
Bregman, Isaac, 25 E. 110th 
Brenner, Victor D., 114 B. 28th 
Brentano, Simon, Union Square 
Breslan, A., 300 E. 86th 
Bresler, M. M., 152 Henry 
Brick, Mrs. Louis, 501 W. 121st 
Brick, M., 60 E. 11th 
Brlckman, S., care of Schrecken- 

dorf, 54 1st 
Brlckner, Dr. Samuel M., 136 W. 

85th 
Brill, Miss Anna, 314 E. 5th 
Brill, Herman, 314 E. 5th 
Brill, Louis, 314 E. 5th 
Brill, Wm., 102 W. 49th 
Brlndze, Henrietta, 15 E. 128th 



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307 



Brinn, Solomon, 62 Park Row 
Brodman, Dr. H., 186 Suffolk 
Brody, M., 500 W. 172d 
Broude, B. C, 595 Lexington 
Brower, Julius L., 104-106 2d 
Brown, Jacob, Lebanon Hospital 
Brown, Dr. Maxwell, 108 Pitt 
Brownhold, Mrs, C, 361 W. 122d 
Brucar, Dr. D., 251 E. 10th 
Bmckman, Arthur, 112 Bleecker 
Buch, Dr. S. M., 224 Henry 
Buegeleisen, S., 925 Home 
Bulkowstein, Dr. M., 147 Clinton 
Bullowa, Arthur M., 46 B. 66th 
Burger, Alexander. 1446 Park Av. 
Burger, Pincus, 443 Greenwich 
Burgheim, Dr. L., 176 E. 79th 
Butler, I. L., care of J. Unterberg, 

90 Franklin 
Cahen, Dr. H. B., 3 Rutgers 
Cahen, Isaac J., 689 West. End Av. 
Cahn, Arthur L., 27 Pine 
Cahn, Emanuel S., 161 E. 79th 
Cantor, H. I., 902 E. 158th 
Caplin, Stephen, 45 Beekman 
Carlebach, Moses, 106 E. 96th 
Caspe, Dr. A., 210 E. Broadway 
Caspe, Dr. M., 29 W. 113th 
Chapera, J., 47-53 Delancey 
Cheffetz, Edward, 161 Clinton 
Cherurg, Dr. L., 52 Bldridge 
Chess, Benjamin, 302 Broadway 
Chopak, Paul, 250 W. 137th 
Chrenberg, Sidney P., 1184 Lexing- 
ton Av. 
Cinberg, Dr. M., 146 Stanton 
Cisin, Dr. M., 145 Av. B 
Citron, Dr. M. B., 66 E. 111th 
demons. Miss Julia, 124 E. 81st 
Clug, Dr. Simon, 79 W. 115tU 
Cohen, A., 175 Henry 
Cohen, A. H., 17 Battery PI. 
Cohen, Aaron, 118 E. 97th 
Cohen, Adolph, 1232 Madison Av. 
Cohen, B., care of E. I. Lubovitz, 

119 Pearl 
Cohen, Barnet, 400 E. Houston 
Cohen, Benno, 308 W. 94th 
Cohen, E., 1334 5th Av. 
Cohen, E. A., 171 Broadway 
Cohen, Mrs. Harris, 21 W. 69th 
Cohen, Isaac, 19 E. 94th 
Cohen, M., 4 W. 118th 
Cohen, Maurice S., Woodycrest, 

Highbrldge 
Cohen, Max, 239 E. 13th 
Cohen, Dr. Saml., 206-12 Chrystie 
Cohn, Dr. Alfred E., 64 B. 66th 
Cohn, Charles L., 271 Broadway 
Cohn, Eugene, 99 Nassau 
Cohn, Isadore, 104 E. 116th 
Cohn, Isidore, 334 Grand 



Cohn, Louis, 1 Madison Av. 
Cohn, Louis, 116 E. 61st 
Cohn, Morris, 107 W. 114th 
Cohn, Morris S., 22 W. 115th 
Cohn, Samuel, 2126 3d Av. 
Cohn, Solomon, 782 Prospect Av. 
Cohn, Mrs. Theo., 76 E. 92d 
Coleman, Aaron, 50 W. 68th 
Conheim, Herman, 70i/4 Pine 
Content, H., 55th and 5th Av. 
Coon, Lewis, 31 Nassau 
Cooperman, Miss B., 53 E. 95th 
Corn, Joseph J., 2041 5th Av. 
Corn, Mrs. Rosalie, The Ashton, 

93d and Madison Av. 
Cosel, Julius, 109 W. rOth 
Cowen, Charles A., 2 Wall 
Cowen, Newman. 35 E. 60th 
Cries. N. A., 230 E. 14th 
Curiel, H., 18 Desbrosses 
Cushner, Meyer B., 22 William 
Damm, Albert, 2398 Morris Av. 
Danziger, Isaac J., 242 E, 58th 
Daub, William, Lebanon Hospital 
Dauson, Dr. S., 187 Henry 
David, Dr. Solomon, 55 Delancoy 
DavidoflP, Dr. M., 249 E. Broadway 
Davldoflf, R., 15 Eldridge 
Davidowitz, D., 18 E. 120th 
Davidson, Rev. David, 59 E. 86th 
Davidson, Gabriel, 22 W. 115th 
Davis, Edward. 27 E. 95th 
Davis, G. Richard, 135 Broadway 
Davis, Moses, 670 Broadway 
Davis, Robert, 265 Division 
Dazian, Henry, 144 W. 44th 
De Boer, D. H., 481 Washington 
Deiches, E., 461 6th Av. 
Deiches. S., 1845 7th Av. 
Deltz, S., 170 E. Houston 
Dellavie, Julius, 116 E. 81st 
Diamant, S., 75 2d Av. 
Diamondstein, Dr. J., 100 W. 114th 
Diamont, Louis, 132 Nassau 
Dinkelspiel, Dr. Leo, 64 W. 91st 
Dittenheim, W., 1131 Forrest Av. 
Dittman, Charles, 108 E. 60th 
Dobzoezinsky, I., 302 Broadway 
Doniger, H., 21 W. 4t.h 
Dorfman, Reuben, 10 1st Av. 
Douglas, A., 198 E. Broadway 
Dreyfus, I., 245 W. 113th 
Drockln, J., 1223 Union 
Drosin, Dr. L., 1650 Lexington Av. 
Druckman, Simon, 50 Canal 
Druskin, Dr. L., 214 E. Broadway 
Dryfus, Otto E.. 4 E. 80th 
Dunkirk, Miss W., 14 E. 87th 
Dworsky, Abraham J., 53 E. 93d 
Edelman, Selig, 132 Nassau 
Edman, S., 61 Mornlngside Av. 
Eichberg, Mrs. S., Hote' Hargrave 



New York 



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AMERICAN JB2WISH TBAR BOOK 



New York Eichhorn, Dr. Herman, 67 B. 7th 
Einstein, B. F., 71 E. 80th 
Einstein, D. L., 39 W. 57th 
Einstein, S. E., 25 Broad 
Eiseman, Julius, 1574 Madison At. 
Einstein, Mrs. William, 121 E. 57th 
Eisemann, Rev. Aaron, 184 B. 72d 
Eisenberg. 1., 1281 Madison Av. 
ElseiJbpnr, Isldor. l^l B. 3d 
El&pnberg, laJdor* '2\\ K. Broadway 
EEseuberg. J.. 4 A^c^ruoQ Av., Averne 
KieeitK^rg, Louls^ 2M Centre 
Elser, H., 02 Ulster 
Elsl^r. 1., f>00 Brondway 
KlBEer. Jacob, 465 i i ntral Park, W. 
ElpQtuch, Irving: M.. 49 Rutgers 
K 11(1 9, lion. Atbcrr, J., 18 W. 7l8t 
Ellasoif, U. N., l^Cl 7th Av. 
Elkeles, Mrs. S., 1878 7th Av. 
Ellenbogen, Meyer, 136 2d 
Ellner, Joseph, 1054 3d Av. 
Elsberg, Herman A., 73 E. 66th 
Emanu-El Temple School Com- 
mittee, 43d and 5th Av. 
Endel, Charles W., 28 W. 127th 
Endel, J. W., 37 Hamilton PI. 
Engel, Dr. Irving H., 54 B. 108th 
Engel, Jacob B., 132 Nassau 
Englander, Oscar, 302 Broadway 
Epstein, A., 53 W. 112th 
Epstein, Mrs. B., 1110 Jackson Av. 
Epstein, Harry J., 250 Henry 
Epstein, M. W., 639 E. 169th 
Epstein, Morris, 1105 Forest Av. 
Epter, Jacob, 1735 Madison Av. 
Erb, Newman, 25 E. 74th 
Erlanger, A. L., 214 W. 42d 
Erlanger, Abraham, 65 Worth 
Erlanger, Leo, 124 W. 112th 
Erllch, Jacob, 28 W. 20th 
Eron, Joseph Ell, 175 E. Broadway 
Esman, H., 304 W. 99th 
Essman. Karl, 505 E. 140th 
Etlng, S., 27 W. 21st 
Falk, B. J., 14 W. 33d 
Feder, Harry, 640 Broadway 
Feder, Morris H., 32 W. 97th 
Felgensohn, Dr., 1675 Madison Av. 
Feiginow, J. R., 881 6th 
Felnberg, Dr. Israel, 104 W. 119th 
Feist, Max, 245 W. 139th 
Feldman, Max, 991 E. 163d 
Feldman, Samuel, 8 Attorney 
Feust, Dr. P., 214 Rlvlngton 
Fldler, Dr. BenJ., 18 E. 107th 
Fiehandler, Dr. George, 20 E. 100th 
Fine, Dr. A., 1427 Madison Av. 
Fine, Simon, 54 B. 122d 
Fineman, S., 1973 2d Av. 
Fink, Isaac, 1995 7th Av. 
Finkelstein, A O., 271 Madison 



Finkelsteln, Dr. H., 1861 Madison 

Av. 
Finkelsteln, Isidor, 21-23 First Av. 
Finkelsteln, M. R., 136 W. 132d 
Finkelsteln, Morris J.. 136 W. 132d 
Firetag, S. A., 240 W. 102d 
Fischel, Harry, 61 Park Row 
Fischer, Joseph, 1171 Park Av. 
Fischer, Dr. liouls, 65 E. 90th 
Fischman. Miss B., 182 B. 72d 
Fisher, Henry, 74 Stanton 
Fisher. Miss Miriam, 9 W. 58th 
Fisherman, Dr. Harry, 130 Second 
Fishman, Mrs. Arthur, 239 E. 18th 
Fishman, Dr. Mary, 544 E. 5th 
Flegenheimer, A., 8th Av. and 23d 
Fleischer, N., 115 Broadway 
Fleischman, I^eon, 170 Broadway 
Flower, Benjamin, 241 Henry 
Folkopt, Samuel H., 4 W. 16th 
Fox, David J., 127 B. 79th 
Fox, Emanuel R, 628 9th Av. 
Frank, Isidore, 174 2d Av. 
Frank, Ivan, 783 Broadway 
Frank, J.. 16 B. 105th 
Frank, James, 185 Broadway 
Frank, L. J., Beth Israel Hospital 
Frank, Sadie, Clinton Hall 
Frankel, A. J., 48 B. 197th 
Frankel, Jacob, 1060 Clay Av. 
Frankel, Mrs. Joseph, 89th and 

Central Park, W. 
Frankel, Dr. Julius, 191 2d Av. 
Frankel, Dr. Lee K., 356 2d Av. 
Frankel, M., 60 W. 119th 
Freedman, Mrs. B. L., 57 W. 55th 
Freedman, Mrs. Charles, 55 W. 76th 
Freedman, M., 64-66 E. 112th 
Freedman, M., 135 W. 86th 
Frelman and Geneson. 38 B. 10th 
Freudenthal, Dr. W., 1003 Madison 

Freundllch, A., 101 W. 118th 
Freundllch, I., 25 Waverly 
Freundllch, Mrs. M., 28 W. 127th 
Freundschaft Society, 72d and Park 

Av. 
Fried, Isadore, 220 Broadway 
Frledenwald, Dr. Herbert, 356 2d 

Av. 
Frledenwald, J., 185 Henry 
Friedlaender, Dr. Israel, 531 W. 

123d 
Friedman, B. M., care of Dr. Ken- 
sal, 329 Grand 
Friedman, Emanuel, 368 Lenox Av. 
Friedman, H. C, 16 B. 92d 
Friedman, Louis, 107 Attorney 
Friedman, Dr. N.. 188 St. Nicholas 

Av. 
Friedman, Dr. S., 107 Attorney 
Gabriel, S., 122 5th Av. 



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Galewskl. A., 50 W. 119th 
Galewski, Clias., 280 Broadway 
Gam, Dr. J. A., 119 Attorney 
Gans, William, 2 Rector 
Garfunkel, Aaron 102 W. 119th 
Gerber, Dr. Samuel, 104 Rlvlngton 
Gershenson, Dr. Edward, 46 Henry 
Ghelerter, Morris, 305 E. 8th 
Ghertler, Dr. M., 50 St. Marks PI. 
Glchner, Miss P., Clara de Hirsch 

Home, 225 E. 63d 
Ginsburg, L., 69 E. 92d 
Ginzberg, -Dr. I., 251 E. Broadway 
Ginzberg, Dr. Louis, 60 W. 115th 
Girzdansky, Dr. Max, 239 E. Broad- 
way 
Gisnit, Morris, 66 2d Av. 
Glass, Rev. Dr. M. H., 56 Rivlngton 
Glassheib, S. H., 30 Pine 
Glatstone, S., 793 Home 
Gleichenhaus, J. E., 148 Henry 
Glick, Bernard, 325 W. 93d 
Gluckman, Max, 113% Bowery 
Glucksman, J., 23 Washington PI. 
Goldberg, Dr. Henry, 255 2d 
Goldberg, I., 171 E. Broadway 
Goldberg, M., 222 W. 122d 
Goldberg, Samuel W., 310 W. 95th 
Goldenkrantz, S., 68 St. Mark's PI. 
Goldenkranz, Joel, 111 W. 132d 
Goldenthal, Dr. Carl, 5 St. Marks 

PI. 
Goldin, M., 249 Broome 
Goldin, Simon, 618 Broadway 
Goldman, Dr. Charles, 128 Henry 
Goldman, William, 58 E. 83d 
Goldmark, Emil, 27 Williams 
Goldschmidt, A., 1 W. 69th 
Goldschmidt, W., 814 Lexington Av. 
Goldsmith, Mrs. David, 2 W. 89th 
Goldsmith, Milton, 783 Madison Av. 
Goldsmith, S. J., 652 West End Av. 
Goldstein, Dr., 156 Clinton 
Goldstein, Dr. I., 17 W. 113th 
Goldstein, Rev. Jacob, 785 St. Nich- 

Goldstein,* Maxwell, 32 Pike 
Goldstein, Nathan, 234 Eldridge 
Goldstein, Robert, 73 First 
Goldstein, Dr. S., 156 Clinton 
Goldstone, Mrs. Dora, Ashton Apts. 
Goldstone, Henry, 76 W. 86th 
Goldwasser, J. B., 143 W. 111th 
Goldwater, Dr. A. L., 84 W. 119th 
Goldwater, John L., 484 Willis Av. 
Goldwater, Dr. S. S., Mt Sinai 

Hospital 
Gomez, Dr. Horatio, 230 W. 97th 
Goodell, Rev. Charles L., 136 W. 

130th 
Goodman, Dr. A. H., 425 Grand 
Goodman, Dr. A. S., 263 W. llSth 



Goodman, Dr. W. L., 1143 Lexing- New York 

ton Av. 
Gordon, David, 132 Nassau 
C^orrlon, Mrs. H., X*,'^ W. S2d 
Gordon. Dr. M., 1720 Madison Av. 
Gordon, Milton J.. 41 Park Row 
(lOrdoo, L'hiDEaB, !> Bond 
Ooslnr. L P.. 148 W. SSth 
Gotierroan, D. S„ 154 Nassau 
Ooitesman, Dr, M.. 150 Stanton 
Cottheil, Dr. Richard, m W. 85th 
<iiLtrfh<^lf, P,, 22f> West End Av. 
<;otihafft^r, Jneob, 1032 E. I64th 

'UoiUcliail, Meyer, til E. 117th 

Grabenheimer, N., 2643 Broadway 

Granet, Adolph, 65 2d 

Grant, Adolph, 471 Central Pk., W. 

Graubard, M., 86 Orchard 

Green Samuel, 27 E. 83d 

Greenbaum, M. J., 649 Broadway 

Greenbaum, Nathan, 132 Nassau 

Greenbaum, S., 143 W. 140th 

Greenberg, Jacob, 1135 Vyse Av. 

Greenberg, Dr. L., 310 E. 4th 

Greenberg, Meyer, 99 Nassau 

Greenfield, Rabbi S., 26 W. 119th 

Greenfield, Dr. S., 356 E. 4th 

Greenstein, Dr. Harry, 341 B. 52d 

Greenwald, Henry, 24 E. 93d 

Gropper, Charles, 55 Delancey 

Gross, Max, 309 Broadway 

Grossbaum, Mrs. I. M., 350 Man- 
hattan Av. 

Grossman, Rev. Dr. Adolph, 1347 
Lexington Av. 

Grossman, Edw., 266 8d Av. 

Grosvald, A., 145 W. 27th 

Gruber, Max, 69-71 B. 103d 

Gruenberg, Dr. A., 240% B. 
Houston 

Gruenberg, John, 502 Broadway 

Grunauer, Reuben, 216 W. 141st 

Guggenheim, Benjamin M., 52 
William 

Guggenheim, William, 500 5th Av. 

Guggenheimer, Mrs. J. C, 308 W. 
94th 

Guggenheimer, Mrs. R., 923 6th 

Guinzberg, Victor, 21 W. 89th 
Guinzburg, Rev. Theo., 21 W. 69th 
Gumbinner, Paul, 455 Broadway 
Gusman, Maurice, 195 A v. A 
Gutman, A. L., 142 W. 87th 
Gutman, Melvin, 1070 Madison Av. 
Haas, Dr. Jacob, 73 2d Av. 
Haber, Louis I., 508 W. Broadway 
Haimavitz, Morris, 87 Hester 
Haldensteln, I., 206 W.-132d 
Hamburger, S., 222 E. 68th 
Hammer, Marx, 23 B. 2l8t 



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AMBRICAN JEWISH YEAR BOOK 



New York UancL Solomon S., care of Edelson 
and Shapiro, 38 Llapenard 
Ilarkavy. Alexander, 309 E. 120tli 
Harknvy, Dr. Samuel, 193 Broome 
Harris, D., 122 5th Av. 
HarriH. 1. A., 180 St. Nicholas Av. 
Harris, Isaac, 23 Washington PI. 
Harris, Isidore, 51 E. 106th 
Harris, Dr. J. W., 10 W. 127th 
Harris, Jacob C, 67 W. 125th 
Harris, Rev. Dr. M. H., 254 W. 

103d 
Hart, Mrs. Julius, 322 W. 58th 
Hartman, Charles, 24 New Cham- 
bers 
Hartojrensls. Dr. A. E.. 314 W. 53d 
Hast, Rev. Bernard, 237 W. 113th 
Hauswirth, Dr. Louis. 236 W. 113th 
Hays, David S., 11 Broadway 
Hazay, Dr. M. H., 274 E. 10th 
Hebrew Orphan Asylum, 137th and 

Amsterdam Av. 
Hebrew Sheltering Guardian So- 
ciety, Broadway and 150th 
Hebrew Tabernacle, 218 W. 130th 
Hecht, Jacob, 46 Walker 
Heidelbach, Louis, 2 E. 45th 
Heilprin, Louis, 210 W. 139th 
Hein, Mrs. H., 60 White 
Held, Isidore W., 75 1st 
Helfman, Simon, 253 E. Broadway 
Heller, Philip, 620 E. Broadway 
Hendelman, K., 113 University PI. 
Herbst, Dr. Louis, 228 E. 7th 
Herman, J., 192 Henry 
Herman, Simon, 40 W. 52d 
Hernshein, Joseph, 307 W. 106th 
Herrmann, Maurice, 149 W. 122d 
Herrmann, U., Produce Exch. 16 A 
Herrnstadt, H., 27 W. 115t h 
Herschfleld. R. N., 622 Broadway 
Herscovltz, Sam., 428 E. Houston 
Hershfield, Aaron, 231 W. 141st 
Hershfield, L. N., 115 Broadway 
Hershfield, Levi, 624 Broadway 
Herskovitz, Albert, 60 E. 11th 
Herskowitz, David, 7 E. 3d 
Herzberg, Joseph M., 375 Central 

Park, W. 
Herzig, H. P., 58 W. 15th 
Herzog, I., 772 St. Nicholas Av. 
Hess, Ferdinand, 65 Duane 
Hess. Jacob, 236 W. 112th 
Heyman, Charles E., 53 E. 10th 
Heyman, S. E., 772 Park Av. 
Heymann, B., 256 W. 97th 
Hill, F. W., 320 Broadway 
Hlmovich, Dr. A. A., 130 Henry 
Himowich, Nathan, 113 Canal 
Hirsch, Herman, 431 Riverside 

Drive 
Hirsch, Jacob, 624 10th Av. 



Hirsch, M. J., 9 E. 92d 
Hirschberg, Adolph, 28 W. 125th 
Hlrschberg, Qustave, 15 Waverly 

PI. 
Hlrsh, Adolph, 161 W. 76th 
Hochdorf, Harold, 76 W. 113th 
Hochschild, B., 565 West End Av. 
Hochstadter, Mrs. Albert F., 313 

W. 71st 
Hochstadter, S., 227 Front 
Hoexter, Joseph W., 860 Broadway 
Hoffman, Hon. B., 271 E. 7th 
Hoffman, L., 18 Spruce 
Hollander, B. S., 157 Suffolk 
Holzman, Benjamin M., 13 W. 90th 
Honlg. Sigmund, 280 Broadway 
Horowitz, Joseph, 693 Union Av. 
Horowitz, L., 1636 Madison Av. 
Horwitz, August, 59 2d A v. 
Hlihner, Leon, 64 E. 58th 
Hurwltz, Abraham E., 140 E. 

Broadway 
Hurwltz, Jos., 140 W. 20th 
Hutkoff, Isaac, 34 Hubert 
Hyman, Dr. Charles, 11 W. 111th 
Hyman, Isaac. 119 Nassau 
Hyman, Mrs. M., 1270 Madison Av. 
Hyman, Morris, 170 Forsyth 
Hyman, Dr. S. J., 326 E. 4th 
lUoway, Dr. H., 1113 Madison A v. 
Ingerman, M., 1735 Washington Av. 
Isaacs, Dr. A. E., 240 E. Broadway 
Isaacs, Benjamin, 132 Nassau 
Isaacs, R.. 829 West End Av. 
Israels, Charles, 31 W. 31st 
Israelson, J., 28 W. 88tli 
Jaches, Rev. Philip, 52 E. 118th 
Jackson, Charles, 20 W. 71st 
Jacobs, Jonas, 145 W. 82d 
Jacobs, S. R., 89 Riverside Drive 
Jacolmnn. B, W., 2162 3d Av. 
.Tacohscpn. Hvman, K120 W, 26th 
Jiiec*bsoc, Ruv. E., 501 W. 121st 
JneoTiys, r>r, Tbecidijre, 336 E. 50th 
JiiLnilty, U.. ia4 SprlnK^ 
JjilTf, Moses. 51 rharabers 
Jo Is, ,T. YK, 217 W. imth 
Jjii-f ekv, Dr, H.. 115 W. 121st 
Jarmnlowsky. L., 50-56 E. 96th 
Jfinimlowsky* M*, 1242 Mudison Av. 
.TaniinUjwsky, S., 54 Cimal 
Jestiunm. Dr. Gc-ocgc, 207 Clinton 
Jewish Agricultural aud Industrial 

Aid SociptT. 174 Second A v. 
Jewisib Hu'oloLdinl Rp ml nary, 531 

\v. i2oa 

Jonas, William, 51 E. 97th 

Joseph, Samuel, Clinton Hall, 151 

Clinton 
Josephl, E. A., 853 West End Av. 
Josephl, Isaiah A., 321 Riverside 

Drive 



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Josephson, Dr. J., 214 Forsyth 

Judis, Irving, 215 W. 125th 

Kahan, M. J., 2 Av. A 

Kahn, H., 77 Av. C 

Kahn, Joseph M., 60 St. Nicholas 

Av. 
Kaiser. Mrs. David, Beresford, 1 

W. 81st 
Kalmus, Benjamin, 246 W. 128th 
Kambe, Jacob, 00 White 
Kandel, Dr. Samuel M., 8 Rlvington 
Kann, Edward, 227 W. 113th 
Kanner, Samuel, 537 E. 139th 
Kan tor, George, 1334 Prospect 
Kantrowltz, S., 58 Canal 
Kapell, Max, 51 Greene 
Kaplan, B. D., 71 E. 91st 
Kaplan, Martin, 195 Av. C 
Kaplan, Rev. Mordecal M., 320 E. 

86th 
Kariinsky, Joseph, 3231 5th Av. 
Kamofsky, Otto, 241 Clinton 
Kartschmaroff, Rev. E., 1143 Lex- 
ington Av. 
Kassel, Mrs. A., 120 E. 73d 
Kassel, M., care of N. Sacewltz, 44 

E. Broadway 
Kassel, S., 87-89 E. Houston 
Kaster, Sigmund, 109 Duane 
Katz, Jacob, 124 E. 85th 
Katzenelenbogen, J., 66 Canal 
Katzenelenbogen, M., 50 Canal 
Katzensteln, L., 72 W. 91st 
Katzman, E., 194 E. Broadway 
Katzman, K., care of Dr. M. Plltt, 

140 Stanton 
KaufCman, Rev. S., 50 W. Morning- 
side 
Kaufman, Edwin 1248 Madison A v. 
Kaufman, Frederic W., 200 W. 

113th 
Kaufman, Julius, 56 W. 112th 
Kaufman, Samuel, 56 W. 115th 
Kehlman, Chas., 178 Center 
Kehlman, Leopold, 330 E. 43d 
Keller, Dr. Henry, 181 Stanton 
Kempner, E., 633 9th Av. 
Kempner, Isidore, 20 W. 95th 
Kempner, N., 626 8th Av. 
Keller, Dr. Morris, 24 Rutgers 
King, Dr. M., 175 Henry 
Kirk, Frederic, Clinton Hall, 151 

Clinton 
Klrschberg, Ellas, 30 W. 128th 
Kirsohenbaum, Dr. Henry, 444 

Grand 
Kirschenbaum, Jacob, 48 Clinton 
Kittenplaz, M., 220 W. 136th 
Klatzke, Isidore, World Bldg. 
Klaw. M., 214 W. 42d 
Klein, D. E., 16 B. 96th 
Klein, Emanuel, 277 Stanton 



Klein, Eugene, 1326 Madison Av. New York 

Kleinert, I. B., 31 W. 87th 

Klelnman, Dr. M., 239 7th 

Klepper, Wm., 1314 Brook Av. 

Klinger, Benjamin, 35 Nassau 

Klugman, Julius, 84 University PI. 

Klugman, Nathan, 42 Pike 

Knopf, Samuel, 32 Union Square 

Kohier, Max J., 42 Broadway 

Kohn, Solomon, 203 Broadway 

Kohut, George Alexander, 781 West 

End Av. 
Konovltz, Wm., 42 Maiden Lane 
Kopoloy, Charles, 50 E. 115th 
Kopolsky, Harry, 54-56 E. 3d 
Korn, Isidore S., 31 Nassau 
Korn, Jacob, 43 E. 76th 
Koso, David, 163 E. 4th 
Kottler, H., 36 E. Broadway 
Kowalsky, Col. Henry I., 49 Wall 
Kowarsky, S., 1107 Forest Av. 
Krainln, Julius, 552 Lenox Av. 
Krakaur, A. P., 590 Columbus Av. 
Kraus, M„ 219 Greene 
Krlmke, Dr. Max, 1704 Lexington 

Krimskal, Dr. N., 329 Grand 
Kroll, E. L., 38 John 
Krowenberg, Miss Minnie, 106 E. 

116th 
Krower, Alfred, 37 Maiden Lane 
Kruger, Albert, 302 S. Broadway 
Krulewltch, Bernard, 39 W. 4th 
Krulewltch, Harry, 523 W. 122d 
Kuge], Simon H., 61-65 Park Row, 

World Bldg. 
Kuhn, August, 141 Broadway 
Kuhn, Ferdinand, 312 W. 99th 
Kurzman, Charles, 38 Pearl 
Kurzman, .Joseph, 169 Broome 
Kurzman, Seymour P., 13 E. 49th 
Ladlnskl, Dr. L. I., 1289 Madison 

Av. 
Lamport, A., Courtrlght Apts. 
Lande, Louis, 290 Broadway 
Landesman. Harry, 58 E. 118th 
Landman, Dr. Samuel M., 220 E. 

19th 
Lang, Mrs. M., 1239 Madison Av. 
Langstadter, Aaron, 265 W. 127th 
Lasker, Mrs. Celia, 987 Madison Av. 
Laskow, Joseph, 584 10th Av. 
Lasky, S. D., 320 Broadway 
Lasner, Isidor, 119 Bleecker 
Lax, Dr. Albert, 343 E. 5th 
Lazare, Morris, 114 2d 
Lazarus, Anna, 82 Lenox Av. 
Leader, Joseph, 73 Ridge 
Leaf, Dr. William, 383 Grand 
Lebhaar, W. J., 62 E. 108th 
Lefkowitz, H. B., 59 E. 05th 
Lehman, Mrs. A., 26 W. 88th 



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AMERICAN JEWISH TEAR BOOK 



New York Lehman, Irving, 30 Broad 

Leibowits, Dr. I., 117 Second Av. 
Leipziger, Dr. H. M., 1860 Madison 

Av. 
Leon, A. J., 180 Broadway 
Lesser, M. A., 302 Broadway 
Leszynsky, J., 51 E. 68th 
Levene, Dr. Samuel A., 1664 Madi- 
son Av. 
Levenkrohn, Samuel, 161 Clinton 
Levens, Samuel, 17 W. 112th 
Levensohn, Miss L., 260 Willis Av. 
Levenson, Joseph, 241 Canal 
Leventhal, Philip, 68 Orchard 
Levi, Mrs. Leo N., 114 W. 111th 
Levi, M., 224 B. 68th 
Levin, Abraham, 1 B. 101st 
Levin, William, 1976 Lexington Av. 
Levine, Edmund K., 7 Waverly PI. 
Levinsohn, Dr. H., 227 B. 10th 
Levinson, BenJ., 320 Broadway 
Levinson, Charles, 316 W. 84th 
Levinson and Shapiro, 08 Canal 
Leviseur, Dr. Frederic J., 74 Madi- 
son Av. 
Levy, A. J. G., 10 E. 130th 
Levy, Barnet, 120 Division 
I^vy. David W., 158 W. 80th 
Levy, George S., 5 Union Square 
Levy, Herman, 139 W. 123d 
Levy, Herman. 56 B. 75th 
Levy, I. H., 52 E. 87th 
Levy, Jacob, 1886 Lexington Av. 
Levy, Julia, 80 Edgecombe 
Levy, Julius, 132 Nassau 
Levy, M. G., 119 W. 96th 
Levy, Mandel, 15 W. 116th 
Levy, Murray L., 2274 3d Av. 
Levy, Mrs. R. J., 102 E. 73d 
Levy, Samuel D., 290 Broadway 
Levy, Samuel M., 115 Broadway 
Levy, Mrs. Wm., 61 B. 74th 
Lewin, Mrs. Isaiah, 130 Rivlngton 
Lewin, Israel, 132 Nassau 
Lewin-Epsteln, E. W., 1036 Trinity 

Av. 
Levy, Wm., 90 W. Broadway 
Lewi, Isidor, 515 Tribune Bldg. 
Lewine, F., 813 Lexington Av. 
Lewine, Lester, 1125 Lexington Av. 
Lewinson, B., 119 Nassau 
Lewisohn, Ado! ph. 9 W. 67th 
Lewkowitz, H., 106 Eldridge 
Lewkowitz, L., 73 Nassau 
Lewy, Arthur. 5 Union Square 
Liberal Immigration League, 150 

Nassau 
Lichtenauer, I. M., 20 Broad 
Lidz, Israel, 27 E. 95th 
Lieberman, David H., 547 Broadway 
Lleberman, Leo, 400 Manhattan Av. 
Llebeskind, A., 104 W. 72d 



Liebling, Mrs. Joseph, 307 W. 70tb 
Liebman, Dr. S. J., 1 W. 112th 
Liebovitz, Abraham, 1391 Madison 

Av. 
Liedaber, A.. 68 E. 96th 
Llghtstone, Dr. A., 268 Willis Av. 
Lind, Alfred D., 69 B. 93d 
Lindenberg, I., 600 B. 11th 
Lindenstem, Miss Fannie, 161 B. 

60th 
Lindner. Walter, 176 Broadway 
Llndo, August A, 1 Broadway 
Lipklnd, Eev. G., 311 W. 137th 
Lipkovitz, Simon, 92 Clinton 
Lippe, Charles, 3 W. 128th 
Lippman, Mrs. Leo, 113 R 81st 
Llppeman, Heyman, 177 E. Broad- 
way 
Lipshitz, Charles W., 1418 Prospect 

Av. 
Lipshitz, Isaac, 3 E. 106th 
Littman, S., 243 W. 46th 
Loeb, Harry, 1212 Fulton Av. 
Loeb, Herman, 83 Crosby 
Loeb, Herman A., 12 W. 84th 
Loeb, James, care of Kuhn, Loeb & 

Co., William and Pine 
Loeb, Mrs. Louis, 139 Riverside 

Drive 
Loebl, William, 860 Broadway 
Loewenthal. Rev. B., 125 B. Il4th 
Loewy, Benno. 206 Broadway 
London, A., 302 Broadway 
London, S., 699 Broadway 
Lorsch, Miss Fannie, 266 Lenox Ay. 
Louchhelm, Harry, 168 B. 7th 
Louis, Leopold, 46 White 
Louis, Mrs. M. D., 9 Livingston PI. 
Lowe, Ignatius, 366 W. 127th 
Lowensteln, Max, 106 W. 118th 
Lowenstein, S. A., 132 Nassau 
Lowensteln, Solomon, care of He- 
brew Orphan Asylum, Amsterdam 
Av. and 138th 
Lubarsky, Abraham E., 165 B. 

Broadway 
Lubetkin, Louis, 143 E. 111th 
Lunenfeld, Dr. J., 119-21 Suflfolk 
Lunevsky, S., 4 W. 118th 
Lurie, Dr. M., 309 E. Broadway 
Lusgarten, Wm., 277 Broadway 
Lynch, Frederick, Hotel Wlnthrop, 

7th Av. and 125th 
Lyon, Mrs. A. H., 693 Union Ay. 
Lyons, J. J., 76 William 
McMillan, Dr. Duncan J., 226 W. 

129th 
McMullen, Rev. Wallace, 46 B. 60th 
Mack, Harry, 54 William 
Mack, Hugo S., 309 W. 82d 
Mack, J. W., P. O. Box 168 
Magid, Mrs. M. O., 309 E. 10th 



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M^nes, Dr. J. L., 67 Riverside 

Drive 
Mainster, L. M., 1211 Madison Av. 
Mainthow, Samuel M., 61 E. 11th 
Mandel. Edward, 524 Grand 
Mandelbaum, Dr. F. S.» 1308 Madi- 
son Av. 
Mandelkem» Israel, 1670 Madison 

Av. 
Mandril, K,, 24 Howard 
M II D fried, Max, 41 Park Row 
Mjinhelmer^ John, 150 Nassau 
Manhelraer, Sellgman. 212 E. flOth 
Man 1^0 C, Dr. Joaeph, 32 E. 119 th 
ManklewJcz, Louis, 72 W. BBtb 
Mann, Mr. Abe, T E. 105th 
Margollcs. Samuel, 636 E. 5tn 
Marenliea. David G., 3D1 E. 7tb 
Miirk, 3., care of N. Saoewltz, 44 E, 

Markowitz'/H., 228 W. 112th 

Marks, Henry, 208 W. 137th 

Marks, I. D., 153 W. 86th 

Mafks, M. M., 622 W. 137th 

Marks, 0«C!ir, 964 Forest At. 

Martin. P. 1.., 65 Nasaau 

Mars, Dr. Alexander, 512 W, I22d 

Man, Mrs. E., ISl E. T4tb 

Marx, J. L., 325 Central Park, W. 

Massel, Jacob, 234 Henrr 

Maj, H. G.. Keraple Bldj;., 15 White- 

liall 
Mayer, Dr. A., 40 B. 60th 
Mayer, Benjamin, 534 Broome 
Mayer, Bernard, 41 E. 72d 
Mayer, Hon. Julius M., 43 Ex- 
change PI. 
Mayer, M., 52 William 
Mayers, Joseph, 1 E. 106th 
Medoff, Aaron, care of Moskowitz, 

429 E. 5th 
Mehrlust, J., 69 E. 87th 
Melamed, Raphael A., 531 W. 123d 
Meltzer, Dr. J. S., 13 W. 121st 
Mendel, Dr. A., 130 E. 2d 
Mendelsohn, M., 43 Leonard 
Mendes, Rev. Dr. F. De Sola, 154 

W. 82d 
Mendes, Rev. Dr. H. P., 99 Central 

Park, W. 
Menhausen, Simon A., 359 Madison 
Menline, E., 200 W. 112th 
Mesibavsky, J., 433 Broome 
Messing, Herman J., 457 Broadway 
Metzger, Mrs. Jacob, 57 E. 72d 
Mever, Mrs. Alfred, 785 Madison 

Meyer, Eugene, 135 Central Park, 

Meyer, H. D., care of Spielberg and 

Son, 151 Greene 
Michael, I. L., 146 W. 121st 



Millard, Morris, 88-90 E. 1st 
Miller, Nathan J., 250 W. 82d 
Mindheim, Max, 19 E. 93d 
Mindlin, H., 122 Bowery 
Mintz, Jacob J., 126 Rivlngton 
Mirkin, Samuel, 24 Rutgers 
Mirsky, I., 40 E. Broadway 
Mirsky, M. D., 123 Bleecker 
Misch, Moses, 168 W. 130th 
MIsllg, Dr. M., 330 B. 72d 
Mitchell, William, 92d and Lex- 
ington Av. 
MIttelman, Dr. J. H., 116 Columbia 
MoIsselfC, Leon S., 3 B. 106th 
Mondschein, Morris, 29 W. 118th 
Morals, Rev. Henry S., 120 W. 

116th 
Mordecal, A. L., 1 W. 92d 
Morgenbesser, Dr. H., 120 Rivlng- 
ton 
Morgenstein, Joseph, 104 Rivlngton 
Morgenthau, Miss Rebecca, 20 W. 

107th 
Morltz, Commander Albert, 153 B. 

73d 
Morltz, Isaac P., 61 B. 73d 
Mornlngstar, J., 48 Park PI. 
Morrison, I. D., 320 Broadway 
Mortlnson, Dr. J., 295 B. 10th 
Moses, Rev. Dr. I. S., 222 E. 61st 
Moses, SIgmund, 121 B. 82d 
Mosesson, Dr. S., 254 Madison 
Mosher, Samuel, 159 Crosby 
Moshkovltz, Dr. Z., 314 E. 3d 
Mosklewita, Dr. Max, 159 Clinton 
Moskowitz, Dr. Henry, 300 Madison 
Moss, Aaron, 211 B. Broadway 
Myers, Nathaniel, 135 Central Park, 

West 
Myers, Simon, 51 B. 96th 
Myres, M. M., 58 B. 93d 
Nachtigall, Simon, 130 Greene 
Nagel, Morltz, 340 Lenox Av. 
Nathan, Mrs. Frederick, 162 W. 

86th 
Nathan, Harold, 27 William 
Nathan, Dr. William P., 110 E. 

78th 
Nathanson, A., 140 Allen 
Naum, Nathan, 174 2d Av. 
Naumoff, Philip S., 20 Rutgers 
Necarsulmer, N., 109 B. 70th 
Neuberger, Max, 115 E. 95th 
Neufeld, Emil, 195 Stanton 
Neuman, Morltz, 114 W. 120th 
Neumann, Dr. S., 317 6th 
Newburger, Alfred H., 100 Broad- 
way 
Newburger, Harry, 66 Broadway 
Newburger, Lester M.. 100 Broad- 
way 



New Tork 



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AMERICAN JEWISH YEAR BOOK 



New York Newman, Anna, 1064 Morris Av., 

Bronx 
Newman, Dr. I.. 234 W. 112th 
Newman, Dr. J. L.. 263 Henry 
New York Public Library, 425 

Lafayette 
Netter. I., 115 2d 
Norden, Joseph, 1878 7th Ay. 
Nusbaum, Myer, 261 Broadway 
Ok\18, Samuel, 45 Henry 
Ohlbanm. Dr. J.. 216 E. 104th 
Ollendorf. I., 135 W. 119th 
Oppenheimer, Dr. Harry S., 741 

Madison Av. 
Oppenheimer, Herman H.. 100 W. 

141st 
Oppenheimer, Seymour, 45 E. 60th 
Orently, A., 160 5th Av. 
Orlnns, Nathan, 7 Essex 
Orllansky, Rabbi Hirsch, 13 W. 

112th 
Ortman, Dr. M. J., 130 Norfolk 
Oshlnsky, Joseph, 233 B. 68th 
Oshlag, Dr. I., 1622 Av. A 
Oshlag, Dr. I., 58 2d Av. 
Panken, Jacob, 382 Grand 
Paris, M., 5 E. 98th 
Passman, Charles, 60 E. 8th 
Passman, Joseph. 60 E. 8th 
Paves, L.. 158 3d 
Pearlsteln, Israel S., 34 E. 10th 
Peiser, Albert 31 Liberty 
Pellman, D., 135 Grand 
Perlman, Dr. Max, 295 Henry 
Perlmutter, Dave, care of M. 

Drimer, 30 Rivlngton 
Perlmutter, M., 11-13 Rivlngton 
Perlsteln, Meyer S., 2 W. 120th 
Peyser, George B., 313 E. 42d 
Pfeiffer, I., 92 William 
Phillips, Albert L., 114 E. 82d 
Phillips, Miss Ellen C, 104 W. 79th 
Phillips, H., 635 Broadway 
Phillips, Louis S., 49 Broadway 
Phillips & Phillips, 271 Broadway 
Pincus, Paul, 62 E. 120th 
Pinkus, Wm., 56 New 
Pitzele, Ellas, 81 Chambers 
Piza, Miss Rebecca, 311 W. 136th 
Pizer, Solomon, 182 Centre 
Platz, Max L., 312 W. 99th 
Pleckner, Marcus, 42 Broadway 
Plonsky, Ezekiel, 374 Broadway 
Plonsky, Gustave, 1391 Madison A v. 
Plotz, Dr. I. I., 1722 Madison Av. 
Polacsek, Maurice, 113 Bowery 
Pollak, Charles N., 125 E. 47th 
Polow, Dr. Max L., 228 E. 10th 
Pomerantz, Dr. B., 177 Madison 
Ponch, A., 23 W. 32d 
Popper, Dr. William, 260 W. 93d 
Porges, C, 254 W. 105th 



Posner, S. C, 12 E. 87th 
Post, J. L., 36 E. 14th 
Powell, Henry M., 62 W. 124th 
Prager, A. L., 25 E. 99th 
Prager, Dr. Jacob B., 309 E. 4th 
Prager, W., 263 W. 136th 
Prager, William, 129 E. 74th 
Present. D., 696 Broadway 
PretzfeRl, Mrs. B., 43 W. 89th 
Price, Miss Ruth, 19 E. 48th 
Prokesch, Jacob, 140 W. 16th 
Prokesch, S. Z., Hawthorne School 
Psaty, 66 E. Ist 
Pulaski, M. H., 488 Broadway 
Rablnovltch, Samuel, 42 W. 117th 
Rablnowitz, L., 22 B. Broadway 
Rablnowitz, Dr. M., 243 E. Broad- 
way 
Radln, Rev. Dr. A. M., 844 Teasdale 

PI. 
Radln, Theodore, 241 W. 111th 
Rafkln, Maurice, 204 E. Broadway 
Raphael, Mrs. E. R., 285 Central 

Rapp, Maurice, 222 W. 138th 
Rapp, Dr. Samuel, 134 E. 79th 
Rappoport, Joseph, 58 W. 15th 
Rasch, Simon, 346 Broadway 
Rashbo, Louis, 1845 Lexington Av. 
Ratner, Aaron, 1804 Arthur Av. 
Ratner, Dr. Leo, 1536 Madison Av. 
Ranch, Dr. D. L., 1283 Madison Av. 
Rees, Louis J., 1219 Madison Av. 
Reich, I. J.. 164 7th 
Relnhardt, S., 1694 Lexington Av. 
Reinthaler, Dr. J. E., 80 E. 81st 
Reitzfeld, Dr. J., 1672 Lexington 

Av. 
Reser, Rev. A., 19 W. 137th 
Reshower, J., 256 W. 130th 
Reubenstein, Raymond, 128 Broad- 
way 
Rice, Henry, 377 Broadway 
Rice, Jerome, 510 Broadway 
Richman, Miss Julia, 9 Montgomery 
Richter, Bruno, 627 Broadway 
RIchter, Max, 22 B. 94th 
Ries, Ellas E., 218 W. 112th 
Riglander, J. W., 49 Maiden Lane 
Rlngel, G., 114 E. 102d 
Ringer, Adolph, 6 Willett 
Rittenberg, Isaac, 206 W. 82d 
Ritterband, Soils D., 57 W. 75th 
Robbins, B., 102 W. 139th 
Bobbins, B. R., 51 B. 50th 
Robbins, Benjamin, 70 E. 108th 
Robert, Samuel, 906 Park A v. 
Robins, Dr. David, 130 Madison 
Robinsohn, Dr. D., 245 B. Broadway 
Robinson, Dr. E. M., 275 E. Broad- 
way 
Robinson, L. G., 174 2d Av. 



56 



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315 



Rodef Shalom Religious School, 
Rev. Dr. R. Grossman, 1347 Lex- 
ington Av. 
Roganitsky, Sigmund. 21 E. 3d 
Rogers, Gustave A., 63 Park Row 
Rogers, Mark H., 183 Canal 
Roggen, Selig, 1391 Madison Av. 
Rogglen, Harry, 1391 Madison Av. 
Rogoff, Harry, 143 Av. B 
Rogoff, M., 409 Broome 
Roman, P. S., 233 W. 83d 
Rose, M., 354 Grand 
Rose, Mrs. M., 137 W. 110th 
Rose, Morris, 37 E. 4th 
Rosebanlt, Walter M., 309 Broad- 
way 
Rosen, Samuel. 21 E. 15th 
Rosenbaum, Mrs. Helena, 103 W. 

117th 
Rosenbaum, Dr. M., 604 5th 
Rosenbaum, S. G., 207 W. 24th 
Rosenberg, M. H., 202 St. Nicholas 
Rosenberg, Moses. 107 E. 81st 
Rosenblum, David, 225 E. 116th 
Rosenblum, Diana, 150 E. Broad- 
way 
Rosenblum, Hyman J., 60 Allen 
Rosenbluth, Benjamin, 1718 Madi- 
son Av. 
Rosenbluth, Dr. Jacob, 258 E. 7th 
Rosenfeld, George, 116 Riverside 

Drive 
Rosenfeld, William I., 1 Maiden 

Lane 
Rosenfleld, Miss Jessie, 119 W. 87th 
Rosenheim, Ix)uls, 248 W. 136th 
Rosenheim, Mrs. P. S., 67 Greene 
Rosenstam, S. S., 345 W. 84th 
Rosenstein, Henry, 308 E. 72d 
Rosenstlel. Maurice, 20 E. 8th 
Rosenstock, Miss Fanny, 1200 Madi- 
son Av. 
Rosensweig, B., 34 Rlvington 
Rosenthal, Abraham, 180 Allen 
Rosenthal, Joseph, 7 W. 120th 
Rosenthal, Samuel, 92 Bleecker 
Rosenwasser, Harry, 213 W. 137th 
Rosen wasser, M., 472 Broadway 
Rosenzweig, Emanuel, 86-88 Av. B 
Rosenzweig, William, Arthur Hotel, 

Madison Av. and 96th 
Rosett, M., 114 Liberty 
Rosner, Dr. D., 83 E. 7th 
Rosoff, Samuel R., 2412 7th Av. 
Ross, J., 28 Canal 
Roth, Dr. Henry, 663 E. 140th 
Roth, Ignatz, 216 E. eoth 
Roth, Leopold, 4 Av. D 
Rothberg, Sam. 5 E. 106th 
Rothenberg, Max, 1293 Lexington 

Av. 
Rothkowitz, I., 165 Stanton 



Rothman, Abraham, 340 E. 13th New York 

Rothschild, Henry V., 290 Broad- 
way 

Rothschild, Meier, 1227 Boston Rd. 

Rothschild, V. H., 43 Leonard 

Rothstein, A. C, 124 E. 112th 

Rothstein, A. E., 131 Bleecker 

Rottenberg, Dr. Ignatz M., 105 W. 
118th 

Rouse, Callman, 1207 Park Av. 

Rubenst^in, Abe, 201 E. Broadway 

Rubin, Edward, 1294 Lexington A v. 

Rubin, M., 124 E. 103d 

Rublnger, Charles, 5 Beekman 

Runkel, H., 624 West End Av. 

Runkle, Maurice, 1851 7th Av. 

Rusinoff, Dr. Charles, 22 Rutgers 

Rutgers Club, The, 216 Lenox Av. 

Ryttenberg, Clarkson P., 63 E. 78th 

Sabbath School of Temple Hand in 
Hand, 3106 Park Av. 

Sabsovich, H. S., 42 Broadway 

Sachs, Ralph L, care of The Lang- 
ham 

Sadowsky, R., 546 Broadway 

Safro, Aron, 145 Mulberry 

Sakawltz, S., 6 W. 117th 

Saks, A., 34th and Broadway 

Salant, Aaron D., 58 E. 94th 

Salant, S., 113 W. 122d 

Salem, Morris, 208 E. Broadway 

Salomon, Samuel, 101 W. 113th 

Samilson, Miss Sadie R., 1270 Madi- 
son Av. 

Samplin, Myer, 1464 5th Av. 

Sampter, Morris, 426 Broome 

Samuel, Samuel, 13 Astor PI. 

Sanger, J., 106 E. 61st 

Saperstein, J., 189 E. Broadway 

Sarner, Mrs. Max, 61 E. 86th 

Sarnya, Abraham L., 320 Broadway 

Sass, Samuel, 23 Park Row 

Saul, Julius, 401 West End Av. 

Schaap, A., 32 W. 120th 

Schaap, Michael, 61 Park Row 

Schachne, Louis, 163 E. 94th 

Schaeffer, Morris, 100 W. 115th 

Schafran, B., 925 Home, Bronx 

Schechter, Morris, 47 SherlflP i 

Schechter, Dr. S., 512 W. 122d i 

Schechter, Simon, 73 E. 1st 

Scheinberg, Dr. Louis, 296 Madison 

Schepper, Abraham, 302 Broadway 

Scherman, Marcus A., 54-58 Canal | 

Scheuer, J., 625 Broadway i 

Schiller, M., 134 Spring 

Schllt, Mrs. L., 329 W. 101st 

Schlager, Rev. Simon, 23 E. 124th 

Schlesinger, A., 256 W. 97th 

Schleslnger, David. 49-51 Stanton ' 

Schlesinger, Leo, Savoy Hotel I 

Schlesinger, Mark M., 20 Broad ! 



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AMERICAN JEWISH YEAR BOOK 



New York Schmidler, Leopold, 928 Madison 

Av. 
Schoemann, H. I., 107 W. 114th 
Schoenberg, Dr. M. J.. 319 E. 10th 
Schonben. Max, 150 Spring 
Schorr. Lawrence, 48 Pike 
Schottenfels. Miss Sarah, 228 W. 

138th 
Schotz, Joseph, 136 Suffolk 
Schreiber, Samnel, 41 Attorney 
Schulman, David. 1554 3d Av. 
Schulman. Rev. Samael. 55 E. 92d 
Schwab, Noah, 41 White 
Scbwalbe. S., 403 E. 104th 
Schwartz, A., 138 E. Houston 
Schwartz, Dr. A. L, 51 St Marks 

PI. 
Schwartz, Dr. P. J., 173 Forsyth 
Schwartz, Dr. H. B., 124 Columbia 
Schwartz, Dr. J. M., 1771 Madison 

Av. 
Schwartz, Max, 255 E. Houston 
Schwartz, Dr. M., 26 Canal 
Schwartz, M. E., 213 Henry 
Schwartz, Samuel, care of Wasser- 

man, 387 E. 3d 
Schwarzbaum, Adolph, 227 W. 

12l8t 

Schwarzschlld, Selig M.. 1469 Lex- 

in^on Av. 
Seadler, B. F., 59 Momingside Av. 
Seasongood, Clifford, 43 Cedar 
Seedner, Wm., 511 E. 82d 
Seidman, J. A., 61-63 Park Row 
Seidman. Rev. S., 54 B. 99th 
Selferheld, C. 114 B. 71st 
Seley, John, 175 West End Av. 
Seligman, Albert 124 E. 80th 
Seligman, Prof. E. R. A., 324 W. 

86th 
Seligman, James, 11 E. 69th 
Semel, B., 84 Eldridge 
Semel, George, 983 Lexington Av. 
Shaff, Carl, 21 W. 4th 
Shapiro, Miss Anna, 58 E. 118th 
Shapiro, B., 82 E. 113th 
Shapiro, Tobias, 69 Av. C 
Sharfin, Dr. Z., 148 Henry 
Sheffield, Dr. H. B., 329 B. 5l8t 
Shllvek, Chas., 20 E. 90th 
Shllvek, H., 813 E. 163d 
Shomer, A., 3-9 Beekman 
Shoninger, Henry, 174 W. 88th 
Shufro, Joseph, 418 B. 82d 
SIdenberg, Richard, 157 W. 57th 
Slegel, Barnet 119-121 B. 104th 
Slegelstein, Bennet, 175 Forsyth 
Siegeltuch, Isidor, 132 Nassau 
Siff, Mrs. M. L., 320 Manhattan Av. 
Silverman, Herman, 56 E. 87th 
Silverman, Rev. Dr. Joseph, 45 B. 

75th 



Silverman, Samuel, 221 Henry 
Silverstein, Morris, 234 Av. A 
Simon, Kassel, 58 E. Broadway 
Simon, Morris, 127 W. 120th 
Simon, Samuel, 53 Greene 
Simon, Dr. Samuel, 794 Lexington 
Av. 

Slti^'f-r, Dr, Chns., 71 Clinton 
SinjTPr, Louis, 175 E. Broadway 
SSrottn, n,. B^^ Broadway 
SramovllE. J.. 2m Mfldls^on 
PI a V in, W., 130 (Irpene 
?lUUsk<», William, 90 FninkllTi 
Slutslvv. Dr. Maxwell E.. 66 Lcwlfr 
gmplovlta^ Sam, 145 Ebsci 
Smith, 1. R.T 783 Ma<Jlson At. 
?iolwl, Jiicob. 8T 1st At. 
gok&l. Julius, 1S9 E. Broadw^ay 
^..iW ^n^^ Elvira N. ^'21 W, 74th 
Soiii, i^^u-o N., 30 Broad 
Solomon. Rev. Ellas L., 1030 Cauld- 

well Av. 
Solomon, Henry, 58 E. 65th 
Solomon. S.. 316 E. 13th 
Solot, Dr. Joseph, 24 Attorney 
Solot, Dr. M.. 89 Av. C. 
Sommerfeld, Miss Rose, 225 E. 63d 
Sonn, Louis, 320 Broadway 
Spachner, Leopold, Kalich Theatre 
Spanier, Dr. Louis, 103 Cannon 
Sovrin, Nathan, 451 Grand 
Spear. ReV. Dr. J. D., 128 B. 105th 
Spector. Joseph, 241 E. 68th 
Spectorsky, Joseph, 61 E. 86th 
Spenadel, Henry, 151 A v. B 
Speyer, James, 257 Madison Av. 
Speyer, Leo, 17 E. 82d 
Spiegel, Adolph, 1566 W. 120th 
Spiegel, Max, 149 E. Broadway 
Spiegelherg, F., Com Exchange 

Bldg., 19 William 
Spiegelbersr, I. N., 1017 Madison 

Av. 
Spiegelherg, Mrs. L., 145 Greene 
Spier, Dr. O. A., 1670 Lexington 

Av. 
Spingam. Dr. L., 1878 7th Av. 
Spinner, Dr. Jonas, 119 Pitt 
Springer, S. J., 119 W. 11th 
Stander, Israel J.. 747 B. 168th. 

Bronx 
Stapler, A. L., 331 Lexington Av. 
Stark, Louis, care of Kramer, 45 

Stanton 
Starr, Hyman, 121 W. 114th 
Steckler, David, 320 Broadway 
Stelgman, Dr. Philip, 118 Rivington 
Stein, Or. Isidore, 226 E. 79th 
Steinberg, Dr. Henry, 226 E. 10th 
Stelner, Joseph, 23 Washington PI. 
Steinhardt, Henry, 140 W. 70th 



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317 



Stelnman, L., care of M. Peckie, 175 

Madison Ay. 
Stem, A., 52 E. 61st 
Stern, Dayid, 947 Madison Av. 
Stern, Harry, 288 Houston 
Stem, Henry, 320 Broadway 
Stem, Irene M.. 500 W. 122d 
Stem, Louis, 36 W. 23d . 
Stem, Mayer, 325 E. 50th 
Stern, Mrs. N., 368 W. 117th 
Stem, Nathan B., 101 W. 130th 
Stem, R. S., 634 Broadway 
Stemllcht, Dr. Isaac, 49 St. Marks 

PI. 
Stlefel, Dr. I., 112 Rlvlneton 
StlUposs, Dr. William, 184 1^ E. 7th 
Stlner, Mrs. Max, 149 W. 120th 
Stokes, J. G. Phelps, 100 William 
Stone, Henry, 11 B. 108th 
Stone. Nathan H., 60 Eldridge 
Strassman, M., 1064 Llnten Ay., 

Bronx 
Straus, Hon. A. D., 20 E. 76th 
Straus, Hlmch, 207 W. 27th 
Straus, Mrs. Isldor, 105th and 

Broadway 
Straus, Jesse I., care of R. H. Macy 

& Co. 
Straus, Marcus, 241 W. lOlst 
Straus, Simon, 14 Mornlngside Ay. 
Strauss, Nathan, 128 E. 80th 
Strauss, Dr. S., Ill W. 119th 
Strelffer, Dr. Henry, 80 St. Mark's 

PI. 
Strelltas, Miss Anna, 197 E. Bway 
Stroock, Mrs. M. J., 1350 Madison 

Ay. 
Strouse, Mrs. M., 316 W. 84th 
Strochsteln, Dr. A., 331 6th 
Stmloyltz, Morris, 312 E. 6th 
Strunskx, Ellas, 1469 Lexington Ay. 
Strunsky* S., 1384 Bristow 
Sulzberger, Leo, 516 West End Av. 
Sulzberger, Solomon, The St. Law- 
rence, 88th and Madison Ay. 
Sundelson, Mrs. Ray Wllner, 1873 

Madison Ay. 
Super, S., 20 W. 118th 
Sussman, Dr. P., 13 St. Marks PI. 
Sussman, William, 238 W. 115th 
Syedgal, S., 79 Clinton 
Szold, Miss Henrietta, 628 W. 123d 
Tannenbaum, Abner, 207 W. 147th 
Tannenbaum, Bennie, 275 Grand 
Tannenbaum, Llppman, 3 W. 12l8t 
Tauber, Bemard, 340 E. 13th 
Taunebaum, Henry, 600 W. 146th 
Tausig, Emll, 1969 7th Ay. 
Teltelbaum, D., 130 Green 
Thorner, Rey. Dr. Maurice, 3106 

Park Ay. 

21 59 



Tllbor, Meyer, 14 Charles Ay., Port New York 

Richmond 
Tim, Mrs. Louis, 16 W. 74th 
Tobias, Dr. Leo, 326 E. 52d 
Toch, Lucas, 958 Prospect Ay. 
Tolmnch, E,, 184 Forsyth 
Tombachtr. L. 24 W. UMH 
Topruii. :M[sh; Bf^rtha. 120 W. 116th 
Toplltz, (ieoi-ffe, 45 Greene 
TratiK Solamoci, 111 E. SOth 
Tr&sky, N., 2S5 E. Broadway 
TunJck, Dr. S. S.. 258 Henry 
TutplmflQ, N., 173 Wooater 
Tynlierff, Dr, S., 1329 Madison Av. 
ITfliiDei; Abrahflm. 200 W. 113th 
Tniman. Kftthan, 49 W. asth 
ITupen H,. 115 Worth 
ruper, W.. 1231 Madtson Ay. 
Vafpntlne, S.. 24 R m\h 
Van Raalte. E., 5t3 E. 123d 
Vaii EaaUp, Z., 58 E. iStst 
VI flavor, Nathan. 116 Nassau 
Vlneberg. Mrs. H, N., 751 Madison 

Av. 
Voffel, Dr. Heinrich, 1425 Madisou 

Ay. 
Vogelstein, L., 17 W. 82d 
Wacht, Gustaye, 21 W. 115th 
Wachtell, Saml. R., 14 E. 103d 
Walden, Dr. Henry, 132 2d Ay. 
Waldman, Morris D., 356 Second 

Ay. 
Wjildytcin. R., 1S2 K. Itifh 
Hnllach, K&H M.. 240 E. 7eth 
WiiiiiiclK Leopold. a3 Wall 
\Va](fr, Mrs. W. I., HE W. 5Tth 
WarhiirET, Mvs. ¥. M., IS E. T2d 
WflsJnyliy^ Sam, 17 Hestor 
WasRprman, Samuel, 2013 6th Ay, 
Watorman, F^Hx, 265 W. 127th 
Wplister, Dr. K., SS27 Sd A v. 
Wfchsler, Aron, 245 EldHdee 
Wechsler, Dr, I. K, 29 R. 7tli 
Well, Jonas B., m WIlllHTn 
We!nber£:< I, A., 268 D^Iancey 
Wplnhci-ff, Meyer, 632 Broadway 
Wplnherff. Morris, 129 Powell 
W<?lal>latt. Cli&rles. IIT Forsyth 
WeSner, Samuel. 222 N. 137th 
Welnfrfift, I., 59a Broadway 
W^ingaFtPn, Hrs, Dh* J177 Broadway 
Wptnicrepn. ,1., lift W. 117th 
Welnhandlf^r, Mrs, S.. 54S W, 113th 
Weinstf In, Dr. ,loseph, 210 W. 1234 
WdDRteln, Dr. Joseph, 71 B. 91 at 
Wfloetcin* Dr. Julius, 61 E, miih 
Welntraub, Louts. 12 Av» A 
Wplabeteer, In^in^ H., 304 E. 78th 
Welser, P., 15.1 Orchard 
We Ism an. Max, 123 lat Ar. 
Weiss, Henry, 027 3d Av. 
Weiga, Joseph, 524 E. IS&th 



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318 



AMERICAN JEWISH YEAR BOOK 



New York Weiss, Mofria, ITS Forsyth 
Weiss, Dr. Samuel, 02 Av. D 
W*la, lildore, 2013 Broadway 
Werner. IjouU, 2ra W, lOSrf 
Wcrtheimer, Lruuls, >%02 Broadway 
Waxier, Kuhln. ao lilvin^ton 
Wiel^r. Mm 84 Ofchard 
Winner, Adam^ %2fi [irtrndwiif 
Wk'dpr, SfliiiueL 2411 7th Av% 
Wit'rnlk. rVl^F, r^lTs V. 4lh 
Wlh^v, Louis. ,'W W. x-.i 
Wllbelm, Max, 805 Canal 
Williams, Rev. Leighton, 812 W. 

54tli 
Williams. M., 464 Grand 
Wilner, Dr. Amos S., 133 W. 12th 
Wilson, Jerome, 12 Oak Terrace, 

Bronx 
Wimpfheimer, Adolph, 904 Park Av. 
Wineburgh, Mrs. Claribel, 06 B. 

94th 
Winer, Herman L., 7 W. 117th 
Winkler, Chas., 327 Church 
Wise, Mrs. Leo H., 64 Leonard 
Wise, Rev,. Dr. Stephen S., 46 B. 

68th 
Witt, J. M., 265 W. 113th 
Witten, M., 40 B. 112th 
Wolbarst, Dr. A. L., 105 B. 19th 
Wolf, Abraham, 2 W. 86th 
Wolf, Alfred M., 119 W. 26th 
Wolf, Miss Augusta, 15 E. 108th 
Wolf, Dr. J. Irving, 220 Henry 
Wolf, Jacob, 42 W. 120th 
Wolf, Max, 120 E. 72d 
Wolf, Mrs. Morris L., Hotel Ma- 
jestic, 72d and Central Park, W. 
Wolf, Simson, 203 Broadway 
Wolff. A., Jr., Hotel Lorraine. 2 B. 

45th 
Wolff, H.. 92 Centre 
Wolff, Mrs. J. R.. 31 W. 54th 
Wolfner, B. R., 1980 7th Av. 
Wolfson, Charles, 244 W. 102d 
Wolfirel, A.. 5 Essex 
WoUman, H., 20 Broad 
Wollstein, Louis. 2 W. 128th 
Wright, C. St. Croix Merle, 215 W. 

126th 
Wulfahrt, Dr. W. G., Beth Israel 

Hosp. 
Young Women's Hebrew Associa- 
tion, 1584 Lexington Ay. 
Younker, Herman, 31 TTnion 
Yunker, Falk, 262 W. 132d 
Zadek, H., 1186 Madison Av. 
Zander, Max, 436 Lafayette 
Zeltlen, H. M., 208 B. Broadway 
Zevin, Dr. I., 56 St. Mark's PI. 
Zilevltz, Bamet, 851 Cauldwell Av. 
Zimmerman, M.. 318 E. Houston 
Zinsler, Rabbi L., 77 W. 128th 



Znckerman, L., 11-13 Rivington 
Zunser, Charles, 203 Henry 

Viagura FaUi 
Amherg, Max, 734 Main 

Ogdanihnrg 
Frank, Nathan 

Oleaa 
Marcus, H. W. 

Otaining 
Society for the Aid of Jewish Pris- 
oners, Sing Sing Prison 

Pelham 
Isaacs, Lewis M. 

Port Blohmond 
Goldfard, Rev. Albert 
Hamburg, Daniel M., 103 Richmond 
Terrace 

Poughkaepiie 
Friedman, B., 102 Main 

Rocheitar 
Adler, A., 261 University Av. 
Adler, Isaac, 25 Buckingham 
Biumenstiei, Joseph, 501 Cox Bldg. 
Cohn, Herman C, 61 Westminster 

Road 
Hebrew Library, 164 Chatham 
Holtx, A. U, 82 N. St. Paul 
Katz, Abram J., 345 East Av. 
Landsberg, Rev. Dr. Max, 420 E. 

Main 
Marine, Joseph, 507 Cox Bldg. 
Miller, William, 571 University Av. 
Present, Philip, 60 S. Union 
Rosenbloom, M., 68 Cumberland 
Rosenbloom, Max Z., 14 Oregon 
Samuelsohn, Lesser, 264 Gibbs 
Schwartz, Julius, 178 Richmond Av. 
Solomon, M., 289 Westminster Road 
Stern, Charles, 42 Tick Park 
Wile, Julius M., Powers Hotel 

Bookaway Park 

Sanitarium for Hebrew Children 

Bondoiit 
Lakinsky, U, 149 Hasbrouck Av. 
Sherman, Max, 63 W. Union 

Boilyn 
Mackay, Mrs. Clarence, Harbor Hill 



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JEWISH PUBLICATION SOCIETY 



319 



Baranao Lake 
Feustm&n, Maurice M., P. O. Box 
405 

Baratofa 
Goldsmith, B. J. 

Soheneotady 
Colonade Club, Davidson Bldg., 254 

State 
Reichler, Max, Temple Schaari 

Schamajim 
Stein, Mrs. Samuel, 21% Ferry 

Syracuse 

Belloft, L. A., 738 Harrison 

Braude, Rev. Moses J., 523 Har- 
rison 

Bronner, Mrs. H., 719 B. Genesee 

Eisner, Dr. H. L., Fayette Park 

Guttman, Rev. Dr. A., 102 Walnut 
PI. 

.Tacobson, Dr. N. 

Junior Kadimah Zlon Society, 662 
Madison Av. 

Levy, Dr. I. H., 717 B. Genesee 

Rosenbloom, Henry 

Sauber, R., Union News Co., 301 W. 
Water 

Solomon, S. D., 1 Empire Blk. 

Stolz, Benjamin, 718 E. Jefferson 

Well, Samuel, 222 Cedar 

Tottenville 
Levinson, Henry 



Troy 

Goodthingy Max, 28 Klne 
Herman, Xouis, 239 Pawling Av. 
Jacobs, James 
Laub, Chas. L., 1641 5th Av. 

TTtioa 
Abelson, Barney, 47 Rutger 

Westbrookville 
Snayerson, B. 

White PlalBi 
atron, Nathan, 51 Battle Av. 

Yonkers 
Bamberg, Anna B., 39 Prospect 
Berger, A., 27 Palisade Av. 
Bonoff, Dr. Harold, 108 Hawthorne 

Av. 
Engel, D. S., 40 Hawthorne Av. 
Finkelstein, M., 90 Riverdale Av. 
Fox, Jacob, 4 Palisade Av. 
Freedman, Dr. S., 16 Hudson 
Freudenheim, M., Marshall Road 
Jacobs, Dr. Joseph, 434 Hawthorne 

Av. 
Katz, Ignatz, P. O. Box 162 
Klein, Lewis, 118 Ashburt Av. 
Lindner, A., 34 Riverside Av. 
Mittler, Louis, 46 Main 
Prince, Julius 

Rosenblatt, Henry, 2 School 
Shiman, Abraham, Station A 
Zimmerman. Mrs. E., 21 Riverdale 



New York 



AsheviUe 
Henry, Ph. S., Zealandia 
Liplnsky, S. 
Whitlock, Mrs. A. 

Blowinf Bock 
Cone, Mrs. M. 

Goldsboro 

Epstein, M. N. 
Rosenthal, Joseph 



Adler, J. 



Akron 
27 Goodwin Av. 



VOBTH OABOLIHA 

Weil, Mrs. Henry 
Weil, Mrs. Solomon 

Greensboro 
Cone, Ceaser 
Lindau, I. W. 

Irew Benie 
Rosenthal, B. W. 

Wilmington 
D. Jacobl Hardware Co. 
Mendelsohn, Rev. Dr. S. 

OHIO 

ChUlioofhe 
Schachne, Morltz 



North 
Carolina 



Ohio 



Bellaire 



Blum, Mrs. J. 
Rubin, N. G. 



Cincinnati 
Lira MauBEB 
Union of American Hebrew Congre- 
gations 



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320 



AMERICAN JEWISH YEAR BOOK 



Ohio Special Membibs 

Fox, Solomon, 2651 Highland Av., 

Ht. Auburn 
Senior, Ed., 2220 Frances Lane 
Senior, Max, Mitchell Bldg. 

Annual Members 
Abraham, Victor, 2622 May, W. H. 
Ach, S.. Forest and Burnet Ay., 

Avondale 
American Israelite, The, Leo Wise, 

Editor 
Anb, Mrs. Samuel, 714 S. Crescent 

Ay., Avondale 
Auer, M., 709 Glenwood Av., Ayon- 

dale 
Herman, A., 941 W. 9th 
Bettman. Alfred, First National 

Bank Bldg. 
Bettman, B., N. E. Cor. Sycamore 

and Canal 
Blng, Samuel, Forest and Burnet 

At., Avondale 
Block, Abraham, 810 Main 
Block, J., 810 Main 
Block, Leon, 1846 Myrtle Av., W. H. 
Bloom, Isaac, 8511 Burnet Av. 
B*nal Jeshurun S. S. Library, Plum 

St 
Bogen, Boris D., 963 Elberton Av. 
Bruner, Simon, 2642 Stanton Av., 

Walnut Hills 
Cohen, Alfred M., S. W. Cor. Wal- 
nut and 3d 
Davis, Charles K., 650 Prospect PI., 

Avondale 
Dine Ph., 1123 Main 
Drucker, Nathan, 2379 Park Av., 

W. H. 
Dryer, Mrs. Adolph, 3457 Harvey 

Av., Avondale 
Eichberg, Dr. Joseph, 619 Oak 
Einstein, S. S., 832 Windham Av., 

Avondale 
Ezeklel, Henry C, 334 Main 
Fellheimer, M., 3446 Wilson Av. 
rrelberg. Dr. Albert H., 3576 

Alaska Av., Avondale 
Freiberg, I. W., 3583 Alaska Av., 

Avondale 
Frtlbere, Joseph, 751 Greenwood 

Av., Avondale 
Freibergf, Maurice J., 3677 Alaska 

Av., Avondale 
Freiberg, Sigmund, 1322 Locust 
Friedlander, Mrs. A. J., 678 Gholson 

Av., Avondale 
Friedlander, J. J., care of The Mad- 
rid, 4 Burnet Av., Avondale 
Fries, Gustave R., 3221 Fairfield 

Av. 



Goldman, Louis J., 853 Beecher St., 

Goldsmith, A. W., 3225 Harvey Av., 

Avondale 
Greenbaum, Simon, 3597 Bogart 

A v., Avondale 
Grossman. H., 846 Lexington Av., 

Avondale 
Grossman, Rev. Dr. Louis, 2212 

Park Av.. W. H. 
Helnsheimer, Edward, 3584 Alaska 

Av. 
Herbst, Miss Eva, 1308 Locust 
Hessberg, Mrs. Daniel, 840 Glen- 
wood Av., Avondale 
HiUkowitz, Dr. William, 19 W. 7th 
Hoffhelmer, Hon. Harry M, 2335 

Grandview Av. 
Isaacs, Aaron, 702 W. 9th 
Joseph, Joseph, Forest and Alaska 

Av., Avondale 
Joseph, Leopold, 3573 Bogart Av. 
Kahn, Felix, Reading Road 
Kahn, Lasard, 824 Windham Av. 
Eandel, I., 228 W. 4th 
Kohler, Rev. Dr. K., 3016 Stanton 
Krohn, Louis, 2902 Gilbert Av., 

W. H. 
Kronenberger, Louis, 9th and 

Broadway 
Levi, Louis S., 532 Prospect PL, 

Avondale 
Levi, Reuben, 342 Heame Av. 
Levi, Solomon W., 529 Walnut 
Levy, Harry My 2933 Fairfield Av. 
Levy, Lipman, 861 Beecher Av. 
Mack, Alfred, S. W. Cor. 3d and 

Walnut 
Mack, Mrs. M. D., 2414 Ashland 

Av W H 
Mack',' Mlilard W., Traction Bldg., 

6th and Walnut 
Mandel, Henry, 16 Haydock Flats, 

Grandview Av. 
Mannheimer, Dr. S., 639 June, 

Avondale 
Marks, L. V., 223 Forest A v. 
Marks, Martin, 698 S. Crescent Av., 

Avondale 
Marks, M. H., 2321 Kemper Lane, 

W. H. 
Marx, Louis, 2837 Melrose Av. 
Mayer, Charles, 2321 Highland Av., 

Meis*, Henry, 13 W. Pearl 

Meyer, S. R., Hull and Harvey Av. 

Mielziner, Rev. Jacob, 519 Prospect 

PI., Avondale 
Moch, Moses E., Reading Road, 

opp. S. Crescent Av., Avondale 
Newburgh, Louis, 2327 Highland 

Av., W. H. 



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JEWISH PUBLICATION SOCIETY 



321 



Newburgh, Major S., 2300 High- 
land Iv., W. H. 

Oettlnger, Myer, 824 Beecher, W. 
H. 

Ottenheimer, Jacob, 338 Rockdale 
Av. 

Phillips, Ellas H., 746 E. Rldgeway, 
AYondale 

Phillips, Godfrey J., 1816 Locust, 

Phllilpson, Rev. Dr. David, 852 
Lincoln Av. 

Plant, Nathan, 656 Forest Av., 
Avondale 

Pollak, Mrs. E}mil, 2648 Stanton 
Av., W. W. H. 

Prltz, Benjamin, 3859 Reading 
Road 

Prltz, Sydney E., 909 Sycamore 

Rauh, Frederic, 629 Forest Av., 
Avondale 

Rels, Mrs. Julius, 2979 Gilbert Av., 
W H 

Rhelnstrom, sigmund, 771 Green- 
wood Av., Avondale 

Roettlnger, Ph., 906 Fourth Nat- 
ional Bank Bldg. 

Rollman, I., Alaska Av., Avondale 

Roth, Solomon, 2330 Highland Av., 
W. H. 

Sachs, Mrs. Samuel B., 824 Hutch- 
ins Av., Avondale 

Schloessinger, Dr. Max, 2635 Mel- 
rose Av., W. H. 

Schottenfels, Jacob, First National 
Bank Bldg. 

Seasongood, Alfred, Hotel Almo, 
Walnut Hills 

Seasongood, A. J., Gilbert Av. and 
Beecher, W. H. 

Seasongood, Lewis, Reading Road 
and Crescent Av., Avondale 

Seinsheimer, H. A., 3641 Reading 
Road, Avondale 

Seinsheimer, Mrs. Samuel, 3630 
Reading Road, Avondale 

Silberberg, Max, 30 W. 3d 

Stark, Dr. Slgmar, 1108 E. Mc- 
Millan 

Steinharter, Corinne, 692 Glenwood 
Av., Avondale 

Stem, Dr. D., 108 Garfield PI. 

Straus, I. S., 22 W. Pratt 

Trager, Isidore, 571 Hale 

Trost. Samuel. 510 Forest Av. 

Well, S., 2632 Kleinview Av., W. H. 

Weiss, Alexander. 18 Arcade 

Westheimer, P., 317 Main 

Winkler, Isaac, 3682 Washington 
A v., Avondale 

Workum, David J., 678 N. Crescent 
Av., Avondale 



Workum, Mrs. H. B., Clinton Ohio 

Springs Av., Avondale 
Wyler, A. E.. S. W. Cor. McMillan 

and Ingleside 

Cleveland 

Bialosky Bros, and Co., 780 Kins- 
man 

Blalosky, S. J., 52 Thackeray Av. 

Blskind, Dr. I. J., 2553 E. 40th 

Deutsch, A. G., 207 Kennard Av. 

Dobrln, A. E., 253. Beach 

Einstein, F. H., 1093 Case Av. 

Einstein, H., 294 Forest 

Einstein, Leopold, 1336 Willson Av. 

Eiseman, Charles, 1029 Citizens 
Bldg. 

Erlanger, Mrs. J., 1279 WUlson Av. 

Ettinger, Chas., 1272 Willson Av. 

Feder, Marcus, 2234 E. 55th 

Feiss, Julius, 113 St. Clair 

Feiss, Paul L., 113 St. Clair 

Glauber, J. H., 7513 Euclid Av. 

Gries, Rev. Moses J^ 2045 E. 93d 

Grossman, Louis J., 206 Society 
for Savings Bldg. 

Guggenheim, H., 54 Beech 

Haas, Mrs. Manuel, 999 Case Av. 

Halle, Salomon P., 95 Euclid Av. 

Halle, Samuel H., 263 Bolton Av. 

Hays, Kaufman, 316 Amesbury Av. 

Jewish Orphan Literary Union, care 
of Orphan Asylum 

Joseph, Emil, 1077 E. Madison Av. 

Joseph, Isaac, 113 St. Clair 

Joseph, S., 349 Amesbury Av. 

Kohn, David S., 68 4th Av. 

Kohn, Mrs. William S., 6016 Thack- 
eray Av., S. B. 

Kolinsky, Abraham, 2387 E. 39th 

Kolinsky, M., 527 Scovlll Av. 

Komhauser, Mrs. D. H., 1877 E. 
75th 

Levi, Isaac, 1268 Willson Av. 

Loeser, Nathan, 206 Society for 
Savings Bldg. 

Marks, M. A., 1886 E. 93d 

Meisel, Max B., 1409 Williamson 
Bldg. 

Pesklnd, Dr. A., 1377 Willson Av. 

Prentke, S., 57 Sanford 

Rosenwasser, Dr. M., care of Mrs. 
M. Rohrheimer, 1246 E. Madison 

Schlesinger, S., 5713 Euclid Av. 

Schwab. Mrs. M. B., 1076 Case Av. 

Sinks, Bernard H., lOOl Case Av. 

Stearn, Abraham, 1030 Case Av. 

Temple Library, Willson and Cen- 
tral Av. 

UUman, Monroe A., 100 Beech 

Ulman, M., 1292 Willson Av. 

Well, Meyer. 1306 Citizens Bldg. 



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AMERICAN JEWISH TEAR BOOK 



Ohio Wiener, A., 1082 Case At. 

Wolfenstein, Dr. S., Jewish Orphan 

Asylum 
Wolsey, ReT. Lonls 
Zeligzon, Dr. M., 773 ScoTili At. 

Oolvmbus 
Annual Members 
Gamble, Henry, 781 Bryden Road 
Lefkowltz, Rabbi David, 120 Lex- 
ington At. 

Dayton 
Ash, Ferdinand 

Sast LiTtrpool 
Bendheim, O. 

Findlay 
Gordon, I. J. 

Ham i lton 
Mints, Miss MoIIle 

Xonnt Yenon 
Dabinsky, Mrs. J., 410 W. High 
Hyman, Mrs. Lewis, Cooper Blk. 
Meyers, Mrs. Max 



Flesh, Henry 
Wendel, Jacob 



PiQua 



Oklahoma 



Ardmore 
Daube, S. 
Goldsmith, Joseph 

0l6T6land 
Heyden, H. 
Ratner, Dave 



Oregon 



Baker City 



Baer, S. L. 

Oreffon Oity 
Garde, Solomon 

Portland 
Special Members 
Frank, Slgmund. 312 12th 
Selling, Benjamin 
Wolfe, Adolph, 189 King 

Annual Members 
Bernstein, Mrs. Alexander, 
Overton 



Portsmouth 

Horchow, Samuel 
Labold, Simon 
Schaplro, Rev. A. 

BprlnglLold 
Levy, M. D., 220 S. Limestone 
Salzer, Gus W., 45 W. High 

Btoubenville 
Altman, Miss R. A. 
Munker, Jonas 

Toledo 
Frankenberg, B., 2136 Scottwood 

Av. 
Kaufman, N., 2110 Scottwood Av. 
Kobacker, Mrs. Joseph I., 2050 

Franklin Av. 
Kobacker, Mrs. M., 2237 Glenwood 

Av. 
Silverman, I., 2222 Lawrence Av. 

Yonngstown 
Livingstone, M., 825 Bryson 
Rodef Scholem Congregation Sab- 
bath School, care of M. Guggen- 
heim, 275 Arlington 
Silber, 8. 
Wilkoff, D. J., 330 Arlington 

Zanosvillo 
Frank, Julius 
Starr, A. E. 

OKLAHOMA 

Lawton 
Epstein, Mrs. A. 

Oklahoma Oity 
Spltzer, Ignats 

OEEOOV 

Beth Israel Religious School, 12th 

and Main 
Blumauer, Mrs. S. M., 146 N. 17th 
Cohen, David Soils, 31 Washington 

Blk. 
Cohn, Marcus, 182 1st 
Council of Jewish Women, Hlrsch- 

Selling Bldg. 
Dreyer, Mrs. Abraham 
Gevurtz, Louis, 225 10th 
Gevurtz, Philip, 180 1st 
Hexter, Mrs. U, 768 Park Av. 
Hlrsch, Mrs. Solomon, 6th and 

Jeflterson 
Kafka, Samuel, 16 Grand Av. 
776 Kohn, Charles, 3d and Pine 

Lipman, Mrs. S., 184 St. Claire 



64 



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JEWISH PUBLICATION SOCIETY 



323 



Mosessohn, David N.» 616 Chamber 

of Commerce 
Ostrow. M., 44 N. 3d 
Rlcen, Dr. Leo, 811 Dekum Bldg. 
Segal, M., 794 Water 
Shemanski, J., Washington and 

10th 



Slchel, M., 288 Washington 

Simon, Hon. Joseph 

Tilzer, Dr. A., The Morgnam Bldg. 

Bosehurg 

Josepbson, Mrs. M. 



PENVBTLYAirZA 



Oregon 



Pennsyl- 



Allegheny 
Cohen, Hon. Josiah, 1205 Payette 
Hamburger, Ph., 1131 Fayette 
Hanauer, A. M., 1123 Fayette 
Harter. A., 107 B. Pearl 
Himmelrlch, H., 1237 Payette 
Joseph, Meyer, 1328 Locust 
Levias, Casper, Gusky Orphanage 

and Home 
Raah, A. L., 1102 Western Av. 
Sunstein, C, 1132 Fayette 

Allentown 
Goldhammer, J., 738 Hamilton 
Haltzel, Henry S. 
Hess Bros. 

Kline, Charles, 807 Hamilton 
Mandel, Rev. Morris, 1223 Walnut 
Merkel, Mrs. Joseph, 1424 Walnut 
Nathan, Abraham, 504 N. 2d 
Samuels, Mrs. A., 737 Hamilton 

Altoona 

Bendheim, Ferdinand 

Berman, Jacob, 1928 Union Av. 

Berman, M., 1309% 11th Av. 

Chomas, M., 1802 19th Av. 

Dudley, Charles B. 

Freshman, Samuel, 1808 13th Av. 

Leopold, B., 2201 Broad Av. 

Rablnowitz, Samuel, 1927 7th Av. 

Rosenberg, Harry, 1310 9th 

Beaver 
Freund, Mrs. Jacob de Sourdis, P. 
O. Box 517 

Beaver Falli 
Salmon, Mayer 

Berwick 
Levy, M. 
Schaln, J. M. 

Bloomsbiirg 
Lowenberg, Mrs. D., Bst. of 

Braddock 
Adler, J., care of Katz and Gold- 
smith, 621 Corey Av. 



Goldsmith, L. J., care of Katz and ▼»»»* 

Goldsmith, 621 Corey Av. 
Hochs tetter, H., 928 Braddock A v. 
Katz, Leo A. 
Newman, L - 

Bradford 
Greenwald, D. C. 
Greenwald, J. C. 
Mayer, Mrs. A., 101 Center 
Silberberg, Frederic 



Brownsville 



Goldstein, H. 



Carbondale 

Singer, S. 
Swartz, D. 

Carliile 
Berg, Charles 
Berg, Miss Selma 
Kronenberg, Mrs. S., 141 E. Main 
Rosenau, Mrs. Arthur, The Bon Ton 

Carnegie 
York, Jacob T. 

Chambersbnrg 

Stine, Isaac 

Chester 
Levy, Moses, 15 W. 3d 
Rosenblatt, L., 114 W. 3d 
Turk, Simon, 306 Market 
Victor, Emll, 3d and E#dgmond 

Coatesville 

Braunstein, Isaac, 587 Chestnut 

Ginns, J. 

Marcus, J., 121 Main 

Columbia 

Morris, William, 241 Locust 

Danville 
Lowenstein, S. 

Donora 

Harris, Mrs. Nathan E., The Iron- 
dale 



65 



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324 



AMERICAN JEWISH YEAR BOOK 



▼ania 



Dnihore 
Leverton, Mrs. M. 

Easton 
Menline, M. 

Erie 
Baker, Isaac, 421 W. 6th 
Loeb. Alexander, 425 W. 11th 
Sobei, Isidor, 806 State 
Zacks, Jacob H., 1018 Holland 



Baer, J. W. 



Marks, L. 



FinleyvUle 



Franklin 



Oreensbnrr 
Kahanowitz, I. 

Harrlsbnrr 
Abramson, Sarah, 628 Brlggs 
Appell, N., 9 S. 3d 
Baturin, Moses. 639 Boas 
Brenner, Joseph, 1020 Berryhill 
Bychlelsner, wm., 1805 N. 2d 
Claster, Henry C, 2001 N. 3d 
Cohen, Albert, 103 Filbert 
Cohen, Levlne, 718 N. 7th 
Forman, J., 523 N. 4th 
Friedman, Albert L., 114 Short 
Oaroylck, D., 409 Cumberland 
Goldsmith, Joseph, 209 Locust 
Goldstein, Ely 
Hoffman, M., 506 Market 
Kahn, Joseph, 803 N. 2d 
Krentaman Sisters, 341 Cameron 
Kuhn, Samuel and Solomon 
Levi, Jacob, 600 Walnut 
Nathan, Lewis. 24 Aberdeen 
Obrasky, S., 1614 N. 6th 
Sherman, David, 1018 N. 7th 
Veaner, Joseph P., 627 Cumberland 
Williams and Friedman, 10th and 

Walnut 
Wlnfield, M. B., 60 State 
Zacks, liOuis, 414 Broad 

Hazleton 
Friedlander, Isadore, 2132 Wyoming 
Friedlander. M. 
Hyman, Julius 

Homestead 
Frankel, Mrs. Morris, 537 Heisel 
Lasdiesky, S., 337 8th Av. 

Houtzdale 
Feldman, Mrs. A 



Johnstown 
Gottdiener, A., 103 Broad 
Holzman, Solomon, 118 Broad 
Katzenstein, J., 300 Market 
Nathan, M. 

Lancaster 
Brush, Mrs. E. M. 
Cohn, E. M. 
Hirsch, Monroe B. 
Leitz, Saml., 150 N. Queen 
Mayer, Jacob, 618 N. Duke 
Rosenstein, Albert 
Rosenthal, M., 46 E. Orange 
Schaarai, Shomayim Congregation 
Library, care or Rev. J. Rosenthal 

Latrobe 
Lowenstein, Frederic, 218 Depot 

Lock Haven 

Claster, Harris 

Claster, Morris L., 46 Bald Eagle 

Hecht, Edward 

Luzerne 
Freedman, Max, Main 
Greenwood, M. 

XcKeesport 
Blattner, J. S., 547-49 6th Av. 
Firestone, Mrs. Emanuel, 621 5th 

Av. 
Friedman, Henry, 422 Locust Av. 
Haber, Louis J. 
Raden, Louis, 715 5th Av. 
Roth, Mrs. J., 530 Shaw Av. 
Sunstein, Dr. Noah, 608 Shaw Av. 

XcKees Bocks 
Ruslander, M., 635 Woodward Av. 

Mahanoy City 
Cohen, Hyman, 137 W. Centre 

Masontown 
Hershfield, Henry L. 

Minersville 
Cohen, I. 
Schloss, H. B. 

Monessen 
Tanzer, Alfred 

Xonongahela City 
Goldstein, Harry 



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325 



Xontrose 

Dessauer, M. S. 

New Castle 
Cosel, Mrs. J., 35 N. Mercer 
Feuchtwanger, Mrs. M., 123 N. 

Mercer 
Wlntemitz, B. A. 

New Kensington 
Claster, Isaac 

Korristown 
Levi, R. A., 12 E. Main 

Oil City 

Council of Jewish Women, Miss 
Lena Manhelm, Sec, 232 Wash- 
ington Ay. 

Jacobs, Max, 211 Pearl 

Lowentrltt, Mrs. R., 505 W. 1st 

Olyphant 
Raker, David M. 
Rosenfeld, B. 

Philadelpliia 
Life Members 

Bloch, S. L., 12th and Market 

Louchhelm, Joseph, Estate of, 1421 
N. Broad 

Muhr, Simon, ELstate of 

Newberger, Morris, The Majestic 

Sllberman, Mrs. Simon, 1727 Spring 
Garden 

Snellenburg, Nathan, 12th and 
Market 

Snellenburg, Samuel, 12 th and 
Market 

Teller, Benjamin F., Estate of. Com- 
monwealth, 12th and Chestnut 

Teller. Mrs. Benjamin F., 1727 
Spring Garden 

Patrons 
Fels, Maurice, 4305 Spruce 
Fels, Samuel S., 3640 Chestnut 
Flelsher, Edwin A., 228 S. 6th 
Gerstley, Louis, N. E. cor. 16th and 

Poplar 
Grabf elder, S^ 405-6 Mariners and 

Merchants Bldg. 
Miller, Simon, 1544 Norrls 
Segal, Adolph, 305 Drexel Bldg. 
Sulzberger, Hon. Mayer, 1303 Gl- 

rard Av. 
Wolf, Albert, 508 Ludlow 
Wolf, Benjamin, 1313 N. Broad 
Wolf, Clarence, 1420 Glrard Av. 
Wolf, Edwin, 1607 N. Broad 
Wolf, Louis, Elklns Park 



Organizations Pennsyl- 

Keneseth Israel Congregation, ^*°** 

Broad above Columbia Av. 
Mercantile Club, Broad above Mas- 
ter 
Young Men's Hebrew Association, 
1616 Master 

Library Members 
Bamberger, Max, 111 Arch 
Blum, Gabriel, 1011 Market 
Blum, Ralph, 1011 Market 
Blumenthsa, Solomon, 1430 Glrard 

Av. 
Fleischer, Meyer, 2223 Green 
Flelsher, S, B„ 3220 Green 
Gimbel, Jacob, 9th and Market 
Kobn, Harry E„ 1127 N. 02d 
Lit, Ja5!0b D.. 8th and Market 
Lit, Samuel D., 1507 N. IQtli 
Myers, AngelOf IS23 Spring Garden 
Eothacbiltl. E. L., EotbaiJhIld Bldg. 
Stem, W. A., 1416 Glrard At. 
Wolf, Aug^stj Broad and Falrmoont 

Av. 
Wolf, Edward, 13123 N. Broad 

Special Members 
Aaron, Max N., 217 Apsley, Gtn. 
Abrahams, Simon, 3119 Diamond 
Abrahams, William, 2312 Montgom- 

Alfman, Herbert D.. 1214 Market 
Bamberger, A. J., 1828 Glrard Av. 
Bamberger, Edmund J., 1913 Glr- 
ard Av. 
Bamberger, L. J., 606 Chestnut 
Behal, Louis, 2005 N. Park Av. 
Behal, Myer, 1851 N. Park Av. 
Coons, Mrs. Eva, 1510 Glrard Av. 
Peldenhelmer, Joseph, Hotel Ma- 
jestic 
Peustmann, Moses, care of Kauf- 
man & Rubin, 715 Arch 
Flelsher, Benjamin W., 2301 Green 
Flelsher, Louis, 2045 Green 
Flelsher, Samuel S., 2220 Green 
Furth, Emanuel, 13th and Chestnut 
Gerstley, William, 1409 N. Broad 
Glmbel, Benjamin, 9th and Market 
Glmbel, Charles, 1703 Spring Gar- 
den 
Greenberg, Solomon, 1319 Franklin 
Guckenhelmer, Joseph, 117 S. 2d 
Hackenburg, William B., 612 Arch 
Hackenburg, Mrs. William B., 953 

N. 8th 
Hagedorn, Joseph H., S. W. Cor. 

3d and Brown 
llecht, I., De Lone Bldg. 
Hertz, E. J., 101 S. 13th 



67 



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326 



AMERICAN JEWISH TEAR BOOK 



Pennayl- Ilinchberg, Harry* 125 N. 3d 
▼ania Hynenian, J. B., 420 Walnut 

Hyneman, a IL, 1684 Grand Title 

Bldg. 
Kaas, Andrew, Wyncote 
Kaufman, Morris A, 2110 Spring 

Garden 
Kimmelman, Dr. 8., 1380 S. 4th 
Kirschbaum, Simon, The Lorraine 
Kohn, Loub, S. W. Cor. 8th and 

Vine 
MohD. Samuel, 723 Mtrlc^t 
KohD, SI mo a L. 122 Market 
Lang, Morris, 60 W. Oieltpn A v. 
liangHdorf, I,, 1432 Qlrnrd A v. 
Lang^sdoff, Mrs. M., 4427 3pmce 
Uni^Uater, I, B.. 426 Mint Arcade 
Ij&vS. Max. 145 Mapl4?wood At. 
Uverl^ht, Mrs. Blmon, OlO N. Broad 
Loeb, Homcf*, ^i-T rTii="5rn^if 
Loeij, Jacob i\, o27 Chcistnut 
Loeb, Leo, 798 Drexel Bldg. 
Loeb, M. B., 1321 N. Franklin 
Louchheim, Joseph A., 1809 Spring 

Garden 
Lubin, S., 21 S. 8th 
Mandel, David, Jr., 3218 Diamond 
Marks, Albert A., 2308 N. 13th 
Marquis, A., 2119 Green 
Miller. William W., 1712 N. 18th 
Morris, William, 702 Chestnut 
Muhr. Mrs. Fannie, 907 N. Broad 
Neumann, Morris D.. 2034 Park At. 
Newburger, Samuel M., 1817 Spring 

Garden 
Ochs, George W.. Public Ledger 
Plfferling, B., 1739 N. 18th 
Raken, Simon C, 007 Betz Bldg. 
Roedelheim, Mrs. Alfred M., Hamil- 
ton Court 
Rosenbach, Ph. H., 1505 N. 15th 
Rosenheim, Mrs. Adolph I., 919 N. 

15th 
Rosenheim, S. A., 3224 Oxford 
Samuel, John, 1809 Pine 
Selig, Bmil, Broad and Carpenter 
Selig, Solomon, 1417 Brie At. 
Singer, Jacob, Bailey Bldg., 1218 

Cnestnut 
Sinzheimer, A., 3d and Brown 
Snellenburg, Joseph W., 2305 N. 

Broad 
Stern, Edward, 112 N. 12th 
Straus, K., 1720 Memorial Av. 
Strouse, Nathan B., 1936 Diamond 
Sulzberger, J. E., 1303 Girard Av. 
Sycle, Meyer, The Brantwood 
Teller, O. B., 128 Chestnut 
Walter, Henry I., De Long Bldg. 
Wasserman, B. J., Hotel Majestic 
Wasserman, Isaac, 1845 N. 17th 
Weil, David G., 4739 Cedar Av. 



Weinmann, M. and Bro., 3143 Dia- 
mond 
Weyl, jQlius, 112 N. 12th 
Wolf, David, 4220 Parkside Av. 
Wolf, Frank, 4220 Parkside Av. 
Wolf, Herman, 826 N. 7th 

Annual Members 
Abeles, Simon, 806 N. 7th 
Acran, J., 421 S. 8th 
Alexander, B., 925 Chestnut 
Alexander, Charles, 860 N. 22d 
AlkuB, Morris, 2018 N. 22d 
Allman, Justin P., 1708 Jefferson 
Allman, Sydney K., 1522 Chestnut 
Aloe, Mrs. Sidney A., The Brant- 
wood, 4130 Parkside Av. 
Altman, Tobias, 1417 Diamond 
Amram, David W., 5353 Magnolia 

Av., Gtn. 
Apotheker. H., 729 Jackson 
Appel, Alexander, M., 720 N. 20th 
Arnold, Arthur S., S. B. Cor. 5th 

and Walnut 
Arnold, Miss Corinne B., 1626 N. 

18th 
Arnold, Mrs. Miriam, Hotel Ma- 
jestic 
Arnold, Ph., 2113 Spring Garden 
Asher, Dr. Joseph M., 1335 N. 

Broad 
Bacharach, A., 1517 N. 7th 
Bacharach, S., 1222 N. 7th 
Bachman. Frank H., 121 S. 5th 
Back, Felix, 718 N. 2d 
Baemcopf, Samuel. 4157 Leidy Av. 
Balasky, BenJ., 821 Catherine 
Bamberger, Mrs. Fannie, 1913 Gi- 
rard Av. 
Barbour, Dr. M., 1037 S. 5th 
Barcus, Dr. A. L., 923 N. 8th 
Bauer, Mrs. Benjamin, Jr., 2109 N. 

Camac 
Bauer, Gustav, 1817 Venango 
Bauer. Jacob, 508 Ludlow 
Baum, Isidore, 1723 Diamond 
Baum, L. S., 3216 Diamond 
Baum, Nathan. 2125 Gratz Av. 
Baum, Samuel, 110 N. 3d 
Bayersdorfer, H., 1629 Diamond 
Baylson, Mary, 1413 S. 23d 
Bayuk, Max, 50 N. 3d 
Behal, Harry S., 114-16 S. 4th 
Behrend, Jacob, 1331 N. Franklin 
Beigman, Miss F., 508 N. 5th 
Belber, Aaron S., Melrose and Cres- 
cent Avs. 
Belber, Dr. M. V., 518 Pine 
Benn, Marcus A., 1535 S. 6th 
Berg, Abram, 887 N. 23d 
Berg, David, 141 Apsley, Gtn. 
Berg. Miss Gertrude, 3331 N. 16th 



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by Google 



JEWISH PUBLICATION SOCIETY 



327 



Berg, Joel M.. 3115 N. 16th 
Berg, Max, 2314 N. Broad 
Berg, Walter S., 161 N. 12th 
Berkowltz, Rev. Dr. Henry, 1823 

N. 33d 
Berkowltz, Samuel, 629 South 
Berllzhelmer, D. T., 2020 N. Park 

Av. 
Berman, Aaron, 6134 Vine 
Bemhelm, Dr. Albert, 1411 Spruce 
Bemhelmer, Leo G., 1804 N. Frank- 
lin 
Bemhelmer, Morris, 904 Richmond 
Bernstein, M., 612 S. 6th 
Bernstein, S., 4344 Germantown Av. 
Bershoa, Dr. Leonard, 1103 Spruce 
Blernbaum, Max H., 926 Stephen 

Glrard B\6e. 
Binswanger, Bamet, 1619 N. 16th 
Blsslnger, M., 2252 N. 13th 
Blanckensee, Leon, 1804 N. 26th 
Blank, David, 1521 S. 6th 
Blitz, M. J., 48 N. 3d 
Blltzsteln, Dr. Rosalie M., 402 But- 

tonwood 
Bloch, B. B., 2029 Park Av. 
Bloch, Mrs. M., 1633 N. 33d 
Bloom, Samuel S., 925 N. Franklin 
Blum, I., Bank or Commerce 
Blumberg, Dr. N., 814 5th 
Blumenthal, H., 1921 Park Av. 
Blumenthal, Jacob, 128 N. 3d 
Blumenthal, Mrs. Joseph, 106 Mar- 
ket 
Blumenthal, W., 221 Church 
Blumenthal, William, 332 S. 19th 
Bochroch, Dr. M. H., 937 N. 8th 
Bodek, W., Co., 527 Market 
Bonnem, Mrs. G^ 3101 N. 15th 
Bprtln, David, Bailey Bldg., 1218 

Chestnut 
Bowers, A. J. S., 1606 N. 15th 
Bowers, L. S., Ashbourne 
Brandels, Irwin, 1623 N. 8th 
Brandes, Moses, 1931 Diamond 
Brav, Dr. Aaron, 912 Spruce 
Brav, Dr. Herman A., 926 N. Frank- 
lin 
Brerowsky, Bamett, 511 S. 4th 
Brlnkman, Dr. M., 251 N. 18th 
Brlskln, Osher, 1709 S. 5th 
Brown, Nicholas, 1512 S. 13th 
Brunhild, L., 253 N. 3d 
Brylawsky, Mrs. E., 2038 N. Park 

Av. 
Bumsteln, Jacob I., 1936 N. 7th 
Bythlner, Louis, 1715 Master 
Cahan, L. H., 218 S. 4th 
Clair, Max, 3223 Turners 
Cohen, A. J., 2107 Locust 
Cohen, C. J., 312 Chestnut 
Cohen, Mrs. C. J., 334 S. 21st 



Cohen, Joseph I., 1715 Diamond Pennsyl- 

Cohen, Mrs. Judith S.. 1537 N. 8th vania 

Cohen, Miss Mary M.. 419 S. Broad 

Cohen, Max, 16 S. 3d 

Cohen, Dr. Myer Soils, 4110 Park- 
side Av. 

Cohen, Ralph, 332 Reed 

Cohen, Dr. S. Soils, 1525 Walnut 

Cohen, W., 707 Vine 

Cohn, Albert S., 2548 N. 17th 

Cohn, Mrs. E., 3013 Berks 

Cohn, Gustave, 56 N. 3d 

Cohn, Harris J., 3221 Montgomery 
Av. 

Collin, Martin, 925 Chestnut 

Coltune, Jos. J., 1546 S. 13th 

Coons, David, 3204 Columbia Av. 

Cooperman, Dr. M. B., 308 Cather- 
ine 

Cottar, S.. 309 Spruce 

Coyne, Mnr^^ball A., 28ft0 N. Broaa 

Dalslmer, Hftrbfirt, 1204 Market 

Dalslmer, Leon. Ifl54 N. 10th 

Daniel, G., 2022 Wallace 

Daniels, J, S., t)21 N, 8th 

Dannenbaum, Morrl?. S08 Arch 

Davidson, D, K., 41fi4 Leldv At, 

Davidson, Mtsa Eltzalxtb, i407 N. 
12th 

Degenstein, David, 1210 Race 

Deutsch, Morris B., 2240 Front 

Deutsch, Samuel, 529 Berks 

Dilshelmer, F., 3021 Diamond 

Dlntenfass, Benjamin, 411 Drexel 
Bldg. 

Drelfus, B., Arcade Bldg. 

Dreifus, M., 1529 Diamond 

Dubrow, Isaac. 632 South 

Eckstein, William, 1809 N. 11th 

Edelsteln, T^, 3219 Ridge Av. 

Ehrlich, Joseph, S. B. Cor. 3d and 
Walnut 

Ehrlich, M., 323 Spruce 

Elchholz, Adolph, 2125 Spring Gar- 
den 

Blnfeld. William J., N. W. Cor. 8th 
and South 

Elnhom, Adolph, 323 Race 

Elseman, Frank F., 817 N. 2d 

Eliel, Mrs. L. S^ 1421 N. Broad 

Ellerman, L. W., 1916 Franklin 

Elmaleh, Rev. Leon H., 117 N. 7th 

Ellis. Kain, 329 Pine 

Erschler, Rev. A. H., 515 S. 9th 

Espen, B'rank B., 4200 Parkslde Av. 

Espen, Miss Hannah, 1908 Spring 
Garden 

Fagen, Solomon, 2422 N. 19th 

Fefnberg, Louis, 413 Christian 

Felix, Harry, 262 Apsley 

Fellman, Dr. M. W., 2356 N. Front 

Fels, Joseph, 4305 Spruce 



69 



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328 



AMERICAN JEWISH YEAR BOOK 



Pennsyl- Fernberger, Hennr. 1306 N. Broad 
vanU Fildennan. Sol., 618 S. 4tli 
Finberg, B., 635 Walnut 
Fineman, Samuel S.. 217 S. 6th 
Fischer, Dr. J. A., 827 N. 6th 
FUchler, Herman, 1316 N. 12th 
Fisher, Dr. Lewis, 1628 S. 4th 
Fleischer. A A., 2301 Green 
Flelsher, Mrs. A.. 6357 Sherwood 

Road, Overbrook 
Flelschman, Rev. S. IL, Jewish 

Foster Home, Mill St., Gtn. 
Flelsher, H. C, 513 Market 
Flelsher, Penrose, 1901 Spring Gar- 
den 
Flelsher, Mrs. Rosa, 5000 Wood- 
bine A v., Overbrook 
Folz, Leon H., 909 Walnut 
Frank, Dr. A, 859 N. 6th 
Frank, Jacob S., 2023 Spring Gar- 
den 
Frank, Martin, 718 Arch 
Frank, Meyer, 961 Franklin 
Frank, Robert. 104 N.JiOth 
Frankel, Dr. J. J., 131^. 5th 
Frankel, Perry, 1733 N. 33d 
Frechie, A. M., 1529 N. 7th 
Frechle, Mrs. A. M.. 1529 N. 7th 
Frechie, M. S., 2109 Ontario 
Free Library, 1217 Chestnut 
Freedman, Aaron, 1335 S. 7th 
Freedman, Lucille, 859 N. 66th 
Freides, Dr. R., 1421 S. 6th 
Friedman, H., 2119 21st 
Friedman, Isidore J., 419 Locust 
Friedman, Mrs. Samuel G., 1422 N. 

16th 
Gable, B., 1317 S. 8th 
Gans, Aaron, 2020 Green 
Gans, Leon, 434 Market 
Gerber, Miss Minnie, 1714 Park Ay. 
Gerson, Felix N., 2131 Green 
Gerstley, Mrs. H., 1622 N. 15th 
Getzor, Dr. Joseph A., 232 Pine 
Geuss, Dr. A. S., 1324 S. 4th 
Glmbel, Mrs. B. A., 906 N. Broad 
Glmbel, Mrs. I., 1511 N. 16th 
Glmpel, D. Leo, Hotel Lorraine 
GlnsWg, P., 1329 S. 6th 
Glnsburg, Mrs. Dora, 1816 N. 22d 
Glnsburg, Jos., 819 Race 
Glnsburg, Louis S., 1208 Common- 
wealth Bldg. 
Glnsburg, Dr. S. A., 1019 S. 4th 
Glazer, William, 323 Dickinson 
Goepp, Miss Judith, 1407 N. 12th 
Goldberg, Albert M., 237 S. 5th 
Goldberg, S. J., 215 Lombard 
Goldenberg, Ix)uls, 50 N. 7th 
Goldensky, Ellas, 270 S. 2d 
Goldhaber, J., 5th and Wharton 
Goldman, Saml., 3223 Page 



Goldsmlthp Edwin M., 413 E, 

Coultor, Glii. 
GoLdsGPtltb, jDseph, 1542 Diamond 
Gold&mJtb. Mtss Kstberijie. 1311 

Columbia Av. 
aoldstefn, E. C, 1512 Girnrd Av. 
Goldstein, Lonls, 429 Green 
Goldstein, M.. 1039 S. 5th 
Goo<lfrien4, Louis, 1823 ML Yernoti 
Goodmnn, J. H.. ms N. Broail 
Gordon. jDr. Benjamin L,, 1316 S. 

5th 
Gottlieb. Katbaa J,, 002 Walnut 
Ctoward, Gpor<ge, 1616 N. Marshall 
Grabo?ky. Satuuel, 118 N. 3d 
Grata Ci)llP)?e, 117 Tth 
Green. Dr. Mark. 1333 S. 4tb 
Gt-e<?iabaum. Dr. Leo, R. E. T. Bldg. 
Grf'eiir*oum, Mrs. M,, 1814 H. lOth 
QreeDebauiii, Mrs. A., 2l21> N, 18th 
Grct'i]**l>fluia, Rlmon, 1822 Diamond 
Gri^enewald, Dr. D. F., 2417 MasSi^r 
Groimewald, D. Frank, f>14 N. Broad 
G[<'.u<jwal<i. Joseph L.T 1935 Dia- 
mond 
Greenfield, Albert M., 230 S. 4th 
Greenhouse, M. E., 1507 N. 16th 
Greenspan, Dr. Leoo J., 1445 N. 7th 
Greenstone, Rev. J. Ft., 915 N. 8th 
Gribbel, John, 151J; l£a.ce 
Gusdorff, Albert, 2a::0 N. Broad 
Haber, M., 1627 N, 33d 
Hagedom, Mrs. J. J., 3d and 

Brown 
Hahn, Mrs. Henry, 1403 N. 19th 
Hahn, Henry, 1806 N. Franklin 
Halpen, Jacob, 439 Snyder Av. 
Halpern, Dr. J. I., 868 N. 3d 
Hamberg, Dr. Isldor, 1320 S. 5th 
Hamberg, Miss M., 1715 N. 8th 
Hammerschlag, P., 1209 N. Han- 
cock 
Hano, Horace, 1207 Chestnut 
Harris, Bernard, 1517 N. 6th 
Harrison, Alfred, 642 E. Chelten 

Av., Gtn. 
Hassler, Isaac, 2261 N. 21st 
Hebrew Sunday School Society, 

10th and Carpenter 
Hebrew Sunday School Society, 
care of Miss A. J. Allen, 1412 
N. 13th 
Heldelberger, Charles, 961 N. Frank- 
lin 
Heldelberger and Co., 219 S. 2d 
Hellbron, Mrs. S., 4252 Parkside 

Av. 
Henley, Jacob, 831 Arch 
Henly, Elkan, 16th and Reed 
Herold, Milton, Elklns Park 
Hersh, David, 832 Vine 
Herzberg, G., 1715-17 Chestnut 



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329 



Herzberg, Max, Commonwealth 

Bld^. 
HessrMrs. Fannie B., 1805 N. 15th 
Hess. Mrs. L. E., 1903 N. 33d 
Hessler, Chas. J., 7126 Germantown 

HllliorTi. P. S.. 2146 N. 12th 
BlneMn, A., 1S41 S, 7th 
Hitidln, Wm., 806 S, 5th 
Hirsch, H. H,. ai30 Clifford 
Hlrsch, Mai, 1717 N. FraokllD 
Hirsts, Mrs. A,, 1713 Spring Garden 
Htrsh, OabrH. iJi^ll Green 
Hlrfih, H., 141S N. Iflth 
Hlrsh, H. B.» 22i5 Qvvm 
Hlmh, MasDD, Elklns Park 
Hlcsh, Ralph B., 608 Chfsttitit 
Hlrslilcrt Moses, The iHajeetic 
Hoffman, Ross, 17 W. Walnut Lane* 

Gtn. 
Horn, Emanuel, 1013 Randolph 
Horwltz, Frank. 1137 S. 8th 
Husik, Isaac, 612 8. lOtb 
Huslk, Dr. Paul, 2502 N. 17th 
Ingber, J. M., 718 Arch 
Israel, Isidore, Pennsylvania Bldg. 
Jacobi, M., 1312 8. 5th 
Jacobs, Miss Ella, 2032 N. Park Av. 
Jacobs, Miss Fannie A., 2040 Mt. 

Vernon 
Jacobs, Samuel, 1540 N. Gratz 
Jacobs, Simon, 148 Vine 
Jacobson, H. M., 1905 N. 33d 
Jastrow, Mrs. M., 3228 Montgomery 

Av. 
Jastrow, Dr. Morris, Jr., 248 8. 

23d 
Jonas, Henry, 1847 N. Park Av, 
Jurist, Dr. toula, 1^1 a N. Broad 
Kahn, Harry C, The Brantivood 
Katz, Arnold, 71(5 Walnut 
Katz, Marcus, 1SS4 N. 22d 
Katz, Simon, 2251 N. Park Av. 

fauffman, Jact>b, 101 N. 14th 
auffman, L., 1520 N, 8th 
Kaufman^ Arthur, ai32 Clifford 
Kaufman, Eugene M., 1S9 W. TJpaal 
Kaufman. Mtb. Leo. 16^9 N. 33d 
Kaufman, William, 1528 N. 17th 
Kayser, Samuel, 1522 Christian 
Keyser, Max M., Mt. Sinai Hospital 
Kimmelsman, Harris, N. E. Cor. 4th 

and Wharton 
Kirschbaum, Mrs. A., 1315 N. Broad 
Klein, Alfred M., 927 Market 
Klein, B., 3626 York Rd. 
Klein, Gutman and Son, S. W. Cor. 

5th and Lombard 
Klein Moses, 129 W. Gorgas 
Kleinsmith, Emil, 400 8. Broad 
Kline, Emanuel, 129 Pine 
Kline, Henry P., 1601 N. 33d 



Kline, Jacob A., 921 N. Randolph Pennsyl- 

Klonower, Oatftr» 1435 Bucltd Av. vania 

Knopfer, &, C 1719 N, IBth 

Koch, Dr. I. M., 2302 Greea 

Koch, Joaepb. 706 N. 20th 

KoliD, Abrabajn M., 1847 N. 17th 

Kohn, Arnold, 219 N. 35th 

Kohn, Mlaa On I re, 1320 Franklin 

Ko&n, Dnvld, 1816 Diamond 

Kohn, .Tames. 1500 l^nd Titte Bldg. 

Kohn, Jos. E . 1504 Bth 

Kohn, Mr.^. Morrts, ISKi Berks 

KorB, ChartC5i Hm The Brantwood 

KratKOk, David O.. 218-20 I^mbard 

Kraus, a C, 2001 N. M3d 

Kraua, Svdn^y L., 3250 N. Broad 

Kraiiskopf, Ilev. Dr. Josepb, 4716 
Pulafckl Av. 

Kransko^f, L., 430 N. 3d 

Krlegc^r. B,, 1848 N. 24 tH 

KrSf^^t^r. 8., 1810 N. 18th 

Laiw^ Benjamin. 231 N. 3rl 

La be. Mrs* J., Tbe Brant wood 

Lam, Charles, 3412 N, 2 let 

l^ntr. Isiiac M., 327 Market 

Lnn;.-fHd. A. M„ 2018 Green 

r.rtiitcfeld, Morris F., 1849 N. 17 th 

L!lnL^jatndter. Solomon, 716 Market 

Li^l^rman, Mrs. A., 2229 N. 12th 

lA^r'Tt^'T, Ephralm, Pecin Square 
Bldg. 

Leinweber, Harry, 326 Reed 

Lemisch, Max, 1935 8. 7th 

Leopold, Mrs. B., 1905 N. Park Av. 

Leopold, Dr. Isaac, 1518 N. Frank- 
lin 

LevGDthal. Dr, N. L, 855 N. 6ch 

LevJ. I. D.. D43 N. &th 

Lev!, Jnliua C 3016 Diamond 

Levi, S. G.. 2040 N. IStft 

I^eviti, T., 1700 B. rvth 

Ijevln. J., 1022 N. 2d 

Levltifton. David, 1236 S. 4th 

LevlDthaU i^ev. B. L.. 716 Pine 

Levlson, Ezra, 1803 N. Slst 

l^vy, Benjamin F., 1507 Diamond 

Lew. L. E., 8fi4 N. 8th 

Lijwia. Wm, M., #02 Walnut 

Llchten, William, 1853 Park Av. 

Lichtenstein, M., 933 Market 

Lipper, M. W., 1516 Girard Av. 

Llpscheutz, Gustav, 1419 Diamond 

Lisan, M., 1428 S. Lawrence 

Lisberger, L., 335 Market 

Lit, Mrs. J. D., Glenslde 

Liveright, Mrs. H., 718 N. 20th 

Liveright, Max, Hotel Majestic 

Liveright, Morris, 4258 Parkside 

Loeb,* A. B., 1417 Brie Av. 
Loeb, Arthur, 1510 Oxford 
Loeb, Edward, 4200 Parkside Av. 



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330 



ABfBRICAN JEWISH TEAR BOOK 



Penmorl- Loeb. Mrs. FerdUnd L.» 10th and 
vania Market 

Loeb, Mrs. Harrr. 1853 N. ITth 
Loeb, Herbert B., 1525 Poplar 
Loeb, Herbert E.. 1402 N. 16th 
Loeb, HermaD, 428 N. 13th 
Loeb, Howard A., 2030 N. 60th 
Loeb, Joseph. 957 N. 8th 
Loeb, Leopold, The Brantwood 
Loeb, Oscar, 234 Dock 
Loeb, M. B., 914 N. Broad 
Loeb, Simon, The Lorraine 
Loewenberg, Dr. Samuel, 1528 S. 

5th 
Loewenberg, Rev. William, 2034 

N. 11th 
Lonchheim, Samuel K., West End 

Thist Bldg. 
Louchhelm, Vralter C, 6334 Sher- 
wood PI. 
Lowenfn*und, Ernest, Land Title 

Bldg. 
T^wenstein, B., 3117 Diamond 
Lowenthal, Mrs. M.. 2424 Park Av. 
Lupin, Dr. E. I., 1247 S. 7th 
Lustgarten, Harry. 603 S. Lerthgow 
Malmln, H.. 328 Market 
Manasses, Dr. J. L., 3110 Diamond 
Margolin, A. J., 534 S. 4th 
Margolles, Marcus J., care of H. B. 

Smith ft Co., 728 Arch 
Margolis, A., 4th and Monroe 
Mark, Emanuel, 1717 Spring Gar- 
den 
Markowltz Bros., 323 Market 
Marks, Slgmund, 3613 Spring Gar- 
den 
Marks, William, 931 Market 
Mastbaum, Jules E., Wyncote 
Mayer, Alfred, 903 N. 8th 
Mayer, A. B., 407 N. 3d 
Mayer, Charles S., 2805 Diamond 
Mayer, Clinton C, 907 N. 16th 
Mayer, G. H., 728 Sansom 
Mayer, I., 1643 N. Broad 
Mayer, I^vl, 826 N. 7th 
Mayer, Marx S., 1547 N. 6th 
Mayer, Morris B., 407 N. 3d 
Mayer, Misses, 208 N. Franklin 
Meier. David, 2852 Tulip 
Mendelsohn, M., 1510 Tioga 
MendofT, Bamet J., 533 Pine 
Meyers, D., Jr., 3330 N. 16th 
Meyers, H. J., 810 S. 5th 
MIckve Israel Congregation School, 

117 N. 7th 
Miller, B. F., 227 Church 
Miller, Charles, 16th and Reed 
Miller, Jacob, 16th and Reed 
Miller, Solomon, 1710 Mt. Vernon 
Mitchell. D., 520 Wilder 
Moskovltz. Morris, 1621 South 



Moskwits, L., 1210 N. 42d 
Myerson, Myer. 635 S. 52d 
Nathan, Miss Hortense, 3217 Clif- 
ford 
Nathan, Rev. Marvin, 2213 N. Na- 
trona 
Nathans, Mrs. Horace A., 1427 N. 

Broad 
Nathanson, H. M.. 12th and Market 
Neff. Dr. Joseph, 1347 S. 7th 
Netter, Mrs. D., 2316 N. Broad 
Neuberger. Lester M., 207 Chestnut 
Neuman. B.. 1427 S. 7th 
Newburger, Alfred H., 527 Chestnut 
Novak, Dr. I. L., 1017 S. 4th 
Nusbaum, Ellas, 143 W. Sharpnack, 

Gtn. 
Nusbaum, I., 153 W. Sharpnack 
Oldstein, Dr. H. J., 939 S. 3d 
Ostheim, Isaac, 3114 N. Broad 
Osthelmer, William I., Mutual Life 

Bldg. 
Oxenfeld, Edw. A., 2025 S. 5th 
Pack. Nathan, 511 S. 8th 
Parris, M. B.. 1045 S. 5th 
Passon, Rae, 413 S. 8th 
Pereyra, Miss Almee, 1529 N .7th 
Perlberg, Isidor, 1625 N. 33d 
Pfaelzer, Morris, 1624 N. 16th 
Phtllipa. Dfivlrt, 14 S. Broad 
lions ky, lienry. The Brantwood 
Pockrass. Bernara* 213 S, Oth 
Pollock, Ixmls, 873 N, 23(1 
I'owolatsky. L.. 437 Christian 
Ptpsbiiiu. S. U. a02 nrt'xel Bldg. 
Pres^pr. S., 2^5 N. S4th 
lielnhrlmer, Bam net, 2Z2Q Park Av. 
Keinish. J, C. 1515 N, 7tb 
Rflss. A,. 227 Pine 
Rice. Mrs, Isaac, 3142 nifford 
liiiv. J, .!„ 1721 .\. 15 Ml 
Kie^man, Dr. David, 16^4 Spruce 
Roedelheim, Slgmund, Randolph and 

Jefferson 
Rogasner, Solomon, 1810 N. 11th 
Roggenburger, Mrs. A., 3d and 

Cherry 
Rohrheimer, M., 4529 Pulaski Av. 
Rosenau, Charles J., 1508 Girard 

Av. 
Rosenau, Simon, 3223 Oxford 
Rosenbaum, H., 2139 Green 
Rosenbaum, M., 609 S. 3d 
Rosenbaum, Samuel, 1733 N. 32d 
Rosenberg, Morris, 716 Franklin 
Rosenberg, Morris, 1711 Girard Av. 
Rosenblatt, S., 2605 Germantown 

Av. 
Bosenheimer, Rudolph, 925 Chest- 
nut 
Rosensteln, Alfred A.. 2127 W. 

Ontario 



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331 



Rosenthal, Albert 132 N. IStli 
Rosenthal, Mrs. Harry, 2631 Ken- 
sington At. 
Rosin, Sigmund M., 2142 Orats Av. 
Rosskam, William B., 2013 N. 38d 
Rothenheim, Solomon IL, 925 Chest- 
nut 
Rothman, Joseph, 765 S. 2d 
Rothschild, Henry, 2224 Green 
Rothschild, H., 2620 N. 13th 
Rothschild, Meyer, 1832 N. 17th 
Rothschild, S., 8236 N. Broad 
Rothschild, Solomon, 1814 N. 16th 
Rothschild, William, 415 South 
Rotman, Dave, 959 N. 6th 
Rovno, Dr. Philip, 423 Pine 
Rubel, B., 1507 N. 10th 
Rubin, Joseph H., 715 Arch 
Rubin, Nathan L^ 822 N. 5th 
Ruderman, Mrs. K. H., 314 Reed 
Sacks, S., 3015 Oxford 
Sakolove, Alexander. 812 S. 4th 
Sailer, J., care of A. Cohen, 2355 

Van Pelt 
Sailer, Louis, 4224 Parkside Av. 
Samuel, J. Bunford, 1609 Spruce 
Samuels, Barney, 1914 Franklin 
Sax, Percival M., 6429 Drexel Road, 

Overbrook 
Schamberg, Dr. Jay F., 1922 Spruce 
Schamberg, Lewis M., 1428 Girard 

Av. 
Schamberg, Dr. Morris L, 1636 

Walnut 
Schlesinger, Abraham, 2115 Green 
Schmockler, Dr. Henry, 1320 S. 5th 
Schneyer, Louis A., 33 N. 3d 
Schoenfield, M., 3137 Diamond 
Schwab, N. 2003 N. 33d 
Schwartz, I., 16th and Reed 
Schwartz, J. A., 5132 Wayne Av., 

Gtn. 
Schweriner, Theodore, 5725 Main, 

Gtn. 
Selden, Bernard, 631 Federal 
Selig, B., 2110 Spring Garden 
Selig, Ely K., 1315- N. Broad 
ShapiUi Isidor, 345 7th 
Shapiro, B. S., 624 Catherine 
Shapiro, Dr. Henry S., 1430 N. 

Franklin 
Shapiro, Morris, 139 N. 9th 
Shatz, L. A., 3215 Diamond 
Shenkin, Harry A.. 205 Chestnut 
Shoyer, Louis, 412 Arch 
Shulman, Harry, 643 Franklin 
Shulman, Louis, S. E. Cor. 4th and 

Race 
Sfckles, A.. Hotel Majestic 
Sickles, Edward, 726 Chestnut 
Sickles, Louis, 2309 Park Av. 
Sickles, S., 726 Chestnut 



Siedenbach, Mrs. A., 1707 Diamond Pennsyl- 

Siedenbach, Louis, 1915 Girard Av. vania 

Siegel, Bemhard S., 3117 N. Morse 

Silverman, Charles, 6th and South 

Silverman, I. H., Jenkintown, Pa. 

Silverman, Mrs. Leo, 2027 N. 33d 

Simon, David E., 1516 Diamond 

Simon, Max, 1430 Moore 

Simon, Mrs. S., 3105 Columbia Av. 

Simons, Mrs. A., 3144 Berks 

Simpson, Alexander, 1538 N. 8th 

Sklar, Dr. W., 1005 S. 3d 

Slominsky, Mrs.. 311 Reed 

Slominsky, Dr. Geo. 

Soils, Albert B., 5532 Thompson 

Solomon, S., 2143 N. 8th 

Sommer, H. B., 628 Arch 

Sondheim, J., Ill Arch 

Speaker, Rev. Henry M., 2257 N. 

Camac 
Speiser, Maurice J., 950 Drexel 

Bldg. 
Spitz, Emanuel, 1501 N. 8th 
Spitz, Nathan, S. E. Cor. 9th and 

Arch 
Stalberg, Dr. Samuel, 1331 S. 6th 
Stamm, Joseph, 3215 Columbia Av. 
Stecher, Louis, 3220 Diamond 
Stein, Isaac, 917 N. Marshall 
Steinbach, Dr. L. W., 1309 N. Broad 
Steinberg, Mrs. P., 1631 K. 33d 
Steinberg, Wm., 1428 S. 9th 
Steppacher, Walter M.. 146 N. 13th 
Stem, Benjamin, 928 N. 4th 
Stern, David, 1421 N. 15th 
Stern, E. M., 4236 Parkaide A.v 
Stem, Horace, 1520 N. 17th 
Stem, Isadore, 536 Spruce 
Stern, Israel, 1935 N. 12th 
Stern, Mrs. Jennie, 817 South 
Stem, Levi, 2302 Green 
Stern, Louis, 1901 N. 18th 
Stem, Dr. Max J., 711 Franklin 
Stem, M. H., 1609 Diamond 
Stem, Morris, 907 N. 8th 
Stem, Sidney M., 110 W. Coulter, 

Gtn. 
Strouse, Mrs. Abraham, 213 N. 3d 
Strouse, Henry, 1315 Real Estate 

Tmst Bldg. 
Sulzberger. D., 1220 N. 12th 
Swaab, Mrs. Mayer M., 1900 N. 

18th 
Switky, Israel, 1731 N. 8th 
Taylor, Joseph, 200 Market 
Techner. Charles, 1611 N. 10th 
Teller, Jacob, Hotel Lorraine, Broad 

and Fairmount A v. 
Teller, Louis A., 927 N. 19th 
Teller, Dr. William H., 1713 Green 
Thalheimer, B., The Clinton 
Thonhnuser, S., 915 N. 16th 



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PemmyX- Tlerkel, David B.. 327 Manton 
vania Trachtman, M.. 1918 S. 10th 

Tutelman, Harry, 3201 Basque- 

hanna At. 
Tutelman, William, 3214 Columbia 

Uffen'heimer, A. J., 1518 N. 17th 
Vendig. Charles H.. 1922 N. 12th 
Verbitsky, Harry, 3124 Clifford 
Wachs, A., 4201 Girard 
Wallerstein, David, 607 Land Title 

B\6g. 
Waltman, Abe, 51 N. 9th 
Wasserman. Mrs. Joseph, 6123 

Green. Gtn. 
Wattstein, Matthew 8., 860 N. 6th 
Weber, David, 323 S. 5th 
Weber, Herman. 712 Girard Av. 
Well, Jacob, 4833 Pulaski At., Gtn. 
Weintraub, A, 14 8. 5th 
Welsman, David B^ 881 N. Marshall 
Welsman, P., 1236 Marshall 
Weitzenfelld, Abe, 478 N. 4th 
Wertheimer, L., 826 N. Sth 
Wessel, Henry N., 1112 Chestnut 
Westheimer, Mrs. M., 1629 N. 33d 
Weyl, Maurice N., 731 Lincoln 

Drive 
Whitehill, Edw., 619 Market 
Wiener, J.. 866 N. 7th 
Wiener and Poline, 15 N. 4th 
Wiemik, M., 1931 N. 12th 
Wineland, Mrs. E., 1435 Diamond 
Winhold, Dr. Morris. 970 N. 5th 
Wise, August, 335 Market 
Wiseman, Harry S.. 239 N. 58th 
Wolf, Mrs. Abraham S., 1530 Green 
Wolf, Mrs. Ellas, 1420 Girard Av. 
Wolf, Isaac, Jr., 4220 Parkside Av. 
Wolf, Morris, 1607 Broad 
Wolf, Simon, 1815 N. 18th 
Wolfe, Dr. Abraham, 941 Christian 
Wolfe, B., 701 S. 3d 
Wolinsky, Chas., 122 N. 6th 
Zack, Mrs. S. R., 919 S. Vodges 
Zaresky, Jacob, 802 S. 9th 

Pittsburg 
Library Member 
Frank, Isaac W., 5601 Irwin Av. 

Annual Members 
Aaronson, Leonard I., Breckenridge 

Av. 
Adler, Louis J., 214 Stratford Av. 
Ashinsky, Rabbi A. M., 1204 Colwell 
Avner, Maurice L., 1723 Bluff 
Baer, Morris, 350 Graham 
Baum, H., Hotel Schenley 
Bernstein, A., 1113 Bluff 
Cerf, Herman, 361 S. Fairmount 

Av. 



Coffee, Rev. Rudolph I., 174 Robin- 
son 

Cohen, Mrs. Aaron, 380 Winebiddle 
Av. 

Davis, Baruett SI 5 Bluff 
De Hoy, Dr. AaroD, 5405 Joral 
De Roy, Israel, 218 Market 
Oinoiond, Harry, 234 PAclfic Av. 
Diamonds tone, Mrs. Louis, 1117 

Bhiff 
Drej-fui^^t Barney, 903 Farmers 

Bank Bldg, 
EtiirelEbf?rg, Leon, 1627 Centre 
Flsch, Stmon, 1120 N. St Clair 
Kriedman, Mrs. Max, 2S Federal 
G«lfkr, IsrtAC. 514 Wyile Ay. 
*;rjl(iberger, A.t S^2S Bouquet 
nuldamlth, S., 5174 Liberty Av. 
<iriM^nb€rger» Jacob, 503 Banb for 

(iroiss. A., mi Bfltley-Farrell Bldg. 

Umn. Mrii. M , 1^14 Sarah 

iJa.st, William A., 1530 Denniston 
Av. 

Isaacs, I. E., McClure Av., E. E. 

Isgood, Samuel, 819 Sth Av. 

Jackson, Isaac, 954 Liberty 

Kann, Mrs. Meyer M., 336 Atlantic 
Av. 

Kann, Mrs. W. L., 156 Blthridge 

Karsten, M., 708 N. St. Claire Av. 

Kaufman, Nathan, 330 Graham 

Kaufman, Theodore^ 330 Graham 

Kaufmann, Isaac, 5035 Forbes Av. 

Kaufmann, Ludwig L., 443 Graham 

Kaufmann, Morris, Benton and 
Murdock 

Kingsbacher, M., 6602 Northumber- 
land Av. 

Klee, William B., 1505 Shady Av. 

Lasday, Max, 820 5th Av. 

Lasday, Wul, 719 Melton, B. E. 

Levy, Rev. J. Leonard, 1526 Dennis- 
ton Av., E. E. 

Levy, M. M., 823 Liberty Av. 

Lewin, Robert, 14 Smithfleld 

Lippman, A., 5621 Northumberland 

Lipman, H. M., 235 5th Av. 

Little Alexander, 921 5th Av. 

Mayer, Mrs. H., 230 S. Rebecca, 
E E 

Mayer, W. I., 604 Libert y 

Mohr, Simon P., 3220 Bouquet 

Newman, Bennie, 1403 5th Av. 

Orgood, Saml., 819 5th Av. 

Perley, J. A., 5800 Center Av. 

Perlman, William. 92 Franklin 

Rauh, Enoch, 5837 Bartlett, E. B. 

Rauh, M., 5621 Northumberland Av. 

Richtman, Victor, 139 Moultrie 

Rosenberg, Mrs. Hugo, 706 Arrott 
Bldg. 



74 



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JEWISH PUBLICATION SOCIETY 



333 



Rosenthal, Meyer, 605 Wylle Av. 
Sachs, Charles H., 5541 Hays 
Sacks, Mrs. J., 1522 Centre Av. 
Sailer, M., 507 Market 
Shapira, M. J., 1125 N. St. Claire 

Av. 
Shenkan, Isaac, 814 Wylle Av. 
Sidenberg, Hugo, 819 Liberty Av. 
Sirvan, Harry C, 1018 5th Av. 
Smith, Louis, Forbes and Marlon 
Solomon, K., More wood Av., East 

End 
Spear, M., 210 Stratford Av. 
Stadtfleld, Joseph, 1115 Frlck Bldg. 
Stein. Harry M., 3206 Elsmore 
Stein, Mrs. Nathan, 5301 Ellsworth 

Av. 
Well, A. Leo, 6931 Howe 
Weisberpr, Max, 923 VIckroy 
Wertheimer, Emanuel, 125 1st Av. 
Wlldberg, I., 204 Stratford Av. 

Pittston 

Berkowltz, Edward, 1124 Wyoming 

Av. 
Brown, A. B. 

Cohen, Harry A., Main and Water 
Fleischer, Miss Cella, 51 Church 
Gompert, Isldor, 114 Phlla. Av. 
Sachs, M. F., 65 N. Main 
Schlosser, M., 123 Broad 
Yaseen, Ben J. D., Water and Main 

Pottstown 

Cohen. Hyman, 150 High 

Miller. Isaac 

Pollock, Mayer, 355 Jefferson Av. 

Printz, J., 450-452 High 

Schwartz. E.. 370 High 

Wolf, A., 449 Bush 

PottsvUle 
Cohn, Samuel C. 
Gellert. I., 411 W. Norwegian 
Lillenthal, Miss Llllle, 117 W. Mar- 
ket 
Rublnsky, Israel, 619 W. Market 
Spicker, Morris H. 

Priceberff 
Goodman, Abe 

Reading 
Frank, Rabbi Julius, 36 S. 9th 
Goldman, E., 436 Penn Sguare 
Kline, Ignatz, 422 Penn Square 



Soottdale 



Morris, S. R. 
22 



Bcranton 

Brown, Gustave N., Cornell BIdg. 

Cohen, M. J., 108 W. Market 

Ebin. Rabbi N. H., 620 N. Washing- 
ton 

Freedman, Dr. A. S., 306 Wyoming 
Av. 

Goodman, Dr. I., 332 N. Wash. Av. 

Halpert, Dr. Henry, 317 Linden 

Harris, David, 802 Adams Av. 

Ish-Kishor, J., 333 Dupont Av. 

Krotosky, Isidore, 501 N. Washing- 
ton 

Levy, Jos., 612 Vine 

Moskowitz, M. M., 620-21 Cornell 
Bldg. 

Phillips, George, Coal Exchange 
Bldg. 

Prinsteln, Dr. Lyons, 1207 Mulberry 

Roos, Dr. B. G. 

Schllle, A., 577 Olive 

Schiller, A. L., Ill Penn Av. 



Pennsyl- 
vania 



Belin's Grove 



Weis, S. 



Sharon 



Cohen, Simon 



Sheffield 
Epstein, Leo 

Shenandoah 
Davison, G. C, 116-118 N. Main 

Steelton 

Baker, David P., 544 S. 3d 
Prumm, Max J., 37 N. Front 
Robbln, Joseph, 357 S. Front 
Zacks, Joseph, 109 S. Front 



Sunbnry 



Blow, Ely 



Tarentum 
Pichel, Louis, 5th Av. and Corbet 

TTnlontown 

Cohen, Miss Belle, 64 E. Fayette 

Cohen, Mrs. Jennie, 104 E. Fayette 

Davis, Jacob 

Friedman, S. 

Molans, Harry, 24 B. Lafayette 

Rosenbaum, Joseph 

Rosenbaum, Solomon J. 



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334 



AMERICAN JEWISH YEAR BOOK 



Pennsyl- Wterea 

v"»** Ball. Dr. M. V. 
Shear. D. 

WaahlBffton 
Goldfarb, Rev. J.. 34 N. Franklin 
Herzl, Dr. Theodore, ZIon Society, 

care of Paul Oroginsky 
Sctaoenthal, Henry 

Wast Elisabeth 
Daniell Bros. 

Wilkes-Bane 

Patron 
Strauss, Sellgman J. 

Special Member 
Long, Bernhardt 235 S. Franklin 

Annual Members 

Brandt, .Tacob 

Casper, Max. 20 W. Ross 

Cohen, Jacob. 100 S. Main 

Coons, Joseph D. 

Coons, Joseph S. 

Fisher, Mrs. Louis I., 40 N. Wash- 
ington 

Galland, Mrs. George, 78 N. Frank- 
lin 



Galland, Mrs. Max, Hotel Sterling 

Gallen, Mrs. Cella S., 21 S. Frank- 
lin 

Goodstein, B., 327 Hancock 

Heinz. Maurice 

Karp, Harry, 9 S. Main 

Kaufman, Dr. Albert, 43 S. Wash- 
ington 

Levene, M., 55 East Market 

Levi. Felix J., 421 S. Franklin 

Levlson, I. G., 33 E. Main 

Uebson. Joseph, 2 B. Market 

Lons. Dr. Charles 

Long. Millard F. 

Lowensteln, Mrs. B., 212 S. Main 

Afarks A. 

Salzman, Rev. Marcos 

Schloss, Louis 

Slavin, Dr. S., 89 S. Main 

Sprlnsrer. N. 

Stakulsky, Hyman. 27 S. Main 

Stern. Harry F. 

Temole Religious School, care of 
Rabbi Salzman. 94 N. Ross 

Weitzenkom, J. K. 

York 

Grumbacher, Max 

Hepz, Mrs. Carrie. 105 W. Market 

Lehmayer, Mrs. Nathan 



Rhode 
Island 



SHOPS 

Central Falls 
Altschuler, Abraham, 384 High 



Newport 
Rabbi B. H., 



28 Bliss 



Rosengard 

Road 
Schreier, Eugene 

Pawtucket 
Shartenberg, Jacob 

Providence 
Bellin, Frank H., 49 Westminster 
Brooks, George B., 27 Mulberry 
Chester, Dr. Hyman, 20 Benefit 
Cohen, Chas. B., 400 Westminster 
Cong, of Israel and David, Sabbath 

School, Friendship and Foster 
Cutler, Harry, 7 Eddy 
Englander, Henry, 181 Reynolds Av. 
Fabler, Sol. 412 Banlgan Bldg. 
Felnstein, Jacob, 122 N. Main 
Fishman, Dr. A. P., 22 Douglas A v. 



ISLAHD 
Frlendson, S. H., 140 N. Main 
Golden, A., 8 Jenks 
Gomberg, Dr. Max B., 61 Benefit 
Gorman, Joseph A., 82 Broad 
Hoflfman, Felix V., 38 Abom 
Kapland, S., 508 N. Main 
Lederer, B., 100 Stewart 
-Manshel. Chas., 150 Doyle Av. 
Marlses, Ph.. 254 N. Main 
MarkofT, Edward E., 268 West- 
minster 
Misch, Mrs. Caesar, 601 Elmwood 

Av. 
Priest. Samuel, 233 Smith 
Rabbinowitz, Abraham, 14 Benefit 
Rablnowitz, Nathan, 224 N. Main 
Robin, Dr. A., 402 Westminster 
Robinson, I. A., 78 Charles 
Streicher, M., 110 W. Exch. PI. 

Woonsocket 
Botkowsky, A., 28 Main 
Cole, Adolph, 30 Social 
Gorovitz, Rabbi A. 
Kamoroff, Sam., Box 140 



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JEWISH PUBLICATION SOCIETY 



335 



SOUTH 


CAROLINA 


South 


Bennettyille 


V Florence 


Carolina 


Strauss, Simon 


Cohen, A. A. 
Sulzbacher, Isaac 




Charleston 






Elzas, Rev. Barnett A. 


MayesviUe 




Furchgott, M., 20 Meeting 
Loeb, Mrs. Lee, 128 Wentworth 


Strauss, A. A. 








Mordecal, T. M. 


St. Matthews 




Vlsanska, Mrs. I. M., 2 Bull 


Pearlstlne, S. 
Soryea, I. H. 




Darlington 






Bloch, Mrs. B. 


Sumter 




Weinberg, Mrs. A. 


Moise, Marion 




SOUTH 


DAKOTA 


South 


Deadwood 


Ipswich 


Dakota 


Jacobs, D. 


Tre Fethren, E. B. 





TENNESSEE 



Chattanooga 
Abelson, A., 8 Fannin 
Adler, H. C. 
Block, Dr. M., 308 High 
Cohn, H., 214 Houston 
Fort, Col. Tomlison 

KnoxviUe 
Arnstein, Max B. 
Rosenthal, D. A., Box 62 

Memphis 
Bensdorf, H. 

Children of Israel S. S. Library, 
care of Dr. Samfleld, 104 Adams 



Gates, Ferdinand, 302 Manasses 
Gronauer, H., 731 Jefferson 
Haase, Mrs. Charles, 1269 Peabody 
Hirsch, Samuel, 658 Poplar 
Lowenstein, E. 
Nathan, Emil, 404 Main 
Oppenheimer, I., 404 Main 
Wahrhaftig, H., 316 N. Main 

Nashville 
Lefkowitz, Jacob, 705 Demonbreun 
Lewinthal, Rev. I., 1912 West End 
Av. 



Tennessee 



Austin 
Drucker, Rev. Aaron, 707 Guada- 
lupe 

Beaumont 
Elkin, Rev. Herman J. 

Brownsville 
Kowalskl, Benjamin 

Dallas 
Goodman, Charles 
Greenburg, Rev. William, 301 S. 

Harwood 
Moses, I. B. 
Sanger, Eli L. 

EI Paso 
Alexander, Dr. E. 

Aronstein, Mrs. S., 817 N. Oregon 
Bloomstein, Dr. Harry, Box 317 

22% 77 



TEXAS 

Goodman, A., 708 N. Oregon 

Kohlberg, Mrs. B. 

Mathias, A. 

Stalaroff, A. 

Stalaroff, Mrs. J., 819 N. Oregon 

Fort Worth 
Bath, Felix P. 

Galveston 



Texas 



Cohen, Rev. Henry 
Lovenberg, I. 

Houston 
Beth Israel Sabbath School, Monte- 

fiore Hall 
Freundlich, S., 1612 Bell Av. 
Prince. H. 

La Orange 
Friedberger, G. 



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336 



AMERICAN JEWISH YEAR BOOK 



Texas Klneola 

Bromberg, I. G. 
Sodekson, S. N. 



Sherman 
Exsteln, Isaac 
Exstein, Jacob 



Miller, L. 
Maier, S. 



Utah 



Virginia 



Orange 
Palestine 

Paris 

(ioidman, Louis 

Bockdale 
Loewenstein, B. 

San Antonio 
Baer, Leon A., 315 E. Quincy 
Washer, N. M. 

Ogden 
Kline, Samuel, 315 24th 

Salt Lake City 
Bamberger, J. E. 
Boehmer, Joseph, 421 S. 4th, E. 

Berryville 
Scheurer, Louis 

Christianhnrg 
Kohen, Samuel 

Cnlpeper 
Dlener, S. 

Lynohbnrg 
Guggenhelmer, Max 

Newport Hews 
Meyers, A. B., 2707 Washington 

Norfolk 
Abramson, Vivtor J., 564 Church 
Altschul, B., 287 Fenchurch 
Crockin, H., 480 Church 
Crockin, Jacob, 561 Church 
Margolius, R., 455 Freemason 
Myers, Charles, 244 Holt 
Seldner, A. B., 119 Hill 



Sulphur Springs 



Yesner, M. 



Upstate, J. 



Tyler 



Victoria 



Dreyfus, Benjamin 
Levi. G. A., 407 Liberty 

Waco 
Goldstein, I. A. 
ITTAH 

Freund, Rabbi Charles J., 160 9th 

Rhode, George 

Shapiro, J.. 66 E. 2d 

Spiro, Solomon, P. O. Box 1067 



YIBGIHIA 

Petersburg 
Kull, Eli, 25 Old 



Portsmouth 
Cockin, Nathan 
Levlttan, Abraham 

Biohmond 
Blnswanger, H. S., 114% S. 1st 
Binswanger, M. L, 1101 W. Frank- 
lin 
Bottlghelmer, E., 319 E. Clay 
Callsh, Rev. E. N., 1037 W. Frank- 
lin 
Hutzler, Charles, 315 E. Broad 
Hutzler, Henry S., 1 N. 10th 
Levy, Dr. H. H., 500 E. Grace 
Whltlock, Philip, 205 E. Grace 

Staunton 
Loeb, Julias 
Shultz, Albert 

West Point 
Morvltz and Cabe 



Washington 



Seattle 

Dinkelsplel, Miss A., 1623% Sum- 
mit Av. 

Friedenthal, Solomon, 515 Broad- 
way 

Koch, Rabbi Samuel, 814 Minor 
Av. 



WASHIHGTOH 

Kreielsheimer Bros., 209 1st Av., S. 
Lang, I. p., care of National Gro- 
cery Co. 
Lurie, Mrs. I., 1202 Madison 
Plechner, Mrs. L. R., 1416 Seneca 
Rosenbaum, Lewis N., 209 Oriental 
Bank 

78 



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JEWISH PUBLICATION SOCIETY 



337 



Rosenberg, B., 409 Ist Ay., S. 
Silver, Harry, 117 Tesler Way 
Stem, Leopold M., 702 Boren Av. 



Spokane 
Weil, R. 

Tacoma 

Lino Mbmbeb 
Gross, David 

WEST YIBGIKIA 
Charleston 
Frankenberger, Philip, 415 Virginia 



Annual Membebs Waahingto 

Bachrach, Mrs. J., 1002 Division 

Av. 
Cheim, Mrs. J., 515 N. J. 
Jacob, Mrs. Meyer, 308 N. 1st 
Klaber, Mrs. Bertha, 813 N. 2d 
Pincus, Mrs. J.. 710 N. 3d 
Winkleman, Miss Julia, 1031 S. E. 



Morgan town 
Ilirschman, Milton 



West 
Virginia 



Charlestown 
Kahn, William 
I>almbaum, M. and Bro. 



Orafton 



Friedman, F. 



Wheeling 

Hebrew Sunday School Library, 

care of Rabbi H. Levi 
Horkheimer, Morris 
r^Vl, Rabbi Harry, 87 16th 
Rice, S. M., 45 15th 
Sonnebom, M. 



WISCONSIN 



WisconBin 



Appleton 
Gerechter, Rev. B., 1671 Washing- 
ton 
Hammel, David, 682 Washington 
Hammel, Frederic 
Hammel, Jacob 
I^yon, M. 

TJllman, Gabriel, 802 Oneida 
ITUman, J. 

La Crosse 
Hirshheimer, A. 
Illrshheimer, H. J. 

Madison 
Jastrow, Mrs. Joseph, 247 Langdon 

Medford 
Shapiro, Jacob 

Milwaukee 
Aarons, Lehman, 681 Van Buren 
Cohen, Jonas, 260 Broadway 
Eckstein, S. A., care of Wrights 

Drug Store 
Fein, Solomon, 570 B. Water 
Friend, Dr. Samuel H., 146 Irving 

PI. 



Gartenlaub, Dr. J., 2101-5 North 

Av. 
Gimbel, Mrs. Louis, 671 Franklin 
Glicksman, Nathan, 485 Terrace Av. 
Gollush, Henry, 20-22 Cawker Bldg. 
Hammel, Leopold, 2717 Chestnut 
Hirshberg, Rev. Samuel, 643 Mur- 
ray Av. 
Landauer, Max, 290 Prospect Av. 
Miiller, Morris, 250 Pleasant 
Pereles, J. M., 529 Astor 
Pereles, Thomas J., 535 Astor 
Rich, Adolph W., 638 Astor 
Sldenberg, Paul, 260 Ogden 
Tabor, Mrs. L. L., 237 Prospect Av. 
Temple Bmanu BI Religious School, 
Broadway and Martin 



PlatteviUe 



Block, J. -S. 



Ripon 



Strauss, B. M. 

Superior 
Siegel, A., 1124 Hammond Av. 



Hertzberg, Albert 



Watertown 

Lieberman, A. B., 305 2d 

WTOMIHG 

Cheyenne 

Marks, M. 

AUBTBALIA 

Brisbane 

Hertzberg, A. M., Charlotte St 

70 



Wyoming 



Australia 



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338 



AMERICAN JEWISH YEAR BOOK 



Uelgrium 



BELGnrx 

Antwerp 
Goldschmidt, Albert, care of Leyy and Goldschmidt 



Canada 



OAVABA 



Hamilton 
Lazarus, J. L. 
Ljons, Saul, 82 Victoria 
Shacofsky, Biyer I., 36 Wilson 
Sweet, Dave, 18 Merrick 

Xassey 

Sadowsky, David 

Montreal 
Special Member 
Levlne, A., 502 St Paul 

Annual Members 
Abel, J., 788 St. Urbaln 
Abramovitz, H., 17 Hutchinson 
Adel stein, Louis, 215 St. Lawrence 

Blvd. 
Albert, Moses, 294 St. Lawrence 

Blvd. 
Alexander, A. J., 127 Lewis A v., 

Westmount 
Bernstein, Dr. D. H., 573 Cadiena 
Blaustein, S., 244 St. Lawrence 
Blumer, L., 202 St. Lawrence Blvd. 
Budyk, Dr. J. S., 896 St Lawrence 

Blvd. 
Clamon, S., 235 St Lawrence Blvd., 

Westmount 
Cohen, A. L., 27 Notre Dame, E. 
Cohen, J., 5 Buckingham 
Crown, Myer, 87 Anderson 
Davis, Mortimer B., 540 Pine Av. 
Davlfl. Harry E.. 11 St. Marks 
D putsch, Sally. 6sr> 8t. Lawrence 
Ellison, B.» 41ft Saopiunett 
FHeflnian, H. N., 237 Bishop 
Giirdtier. B.. 6S McGlU 
OlipJnnan. L, 95 Sliotr^r 
Gliekman. Philip. 40 St Louis 
(Goldberg, Max. TiOS St Paul 
Goldatefii, B., 207 Bishop 
Goldstein, I. B,, 225 Clnrke Av. 
Godln&fey, N., 4S8 St Dominique 
Gordon, Harry, 1332 St Lawrence 
Gordon, Rev. Nathan, 549 Dor- 
chester 
Gross, Dr. C. J., 108 Park A v. 
Hart, Lewis A., 236 Elm Av. 
Hart, Samuel, 215 Sherbrooke, W. 
Hellllg, Lyon, 206 McGill 
Holstein, Louis, 320 Notre Dame, 

W. 
Huff, Ellas, 522 St Lawrence Blvd. 



Jacobs, S. W., 52 McGlll College Av. 
Jewish GlrFs Literary Club, 23 

Ontario 
Kaplan, Eev. M„ 166 lobn 
Kert, A., 237 Daly Av, 
Klrschl^rg, rsaac, 87 Tupper 
Lande, N.f 442 Banglnnett 
LanK, D:., 3Q5 Bleury 
Laut(?rman» Dr. M.* 106 Feet 
Laaser, A., 225 Craig, W, 
Levin, Rev. M. ■\.. 800 rity Hall 

Av. 
Levin, M. L., 635 St Urbaln 
Levinoff, H. M., 20 W. Pine 
Levinson, Joseph, 53 Bishop 
Levinson, Joseph, 107 Drummond 
Lightstone, Dr. H., 185 Bleury 
Louis, Lewis, 4464 Sherbrooke 
Manolson, Jacob, 1621 N. Dame 
Mayberg, Louis S., 151 St. James 
Monteflore Club, M. J. Hirsch, Sec, 

2488 St Catherine 
Morris, A. Z. A., 64 Mance 
NathanSon, B., 57 Widmer 
Ogulwir, S. M., 438 Clarmount Av., 

Westmount 
Orkla, J. M„ 239 Clarke Av. 
Pierce, A., 463 Pkaaant Av. 
Knliitiovlfch, Or, U.. 133 Bleury 
Hosc'iib^Tfr, Ct 60 Sherbrooke, West 
RuSf^nlilat, TL, 3 Laval Av. 
Rosen til al. A., 02 Metcalfe 
Ruhlii. Joahua, 83 St Lawrence 
Uublnflvtoh. J. B., .^45 Notre Dame 
SchBCher, R. OSS St Lawri?nce 
Smex; S., 1081 Notre Dame, W, 
Silver. Nab In » 9 Souvenir A v. 
Sola. Clarence L de, 180 St James 
Sola, Rev, Meldolft de, 425 Sher- 
brooke, W. 
Sommer, A., 282 St Catherine 
Sperber, Dr. S. S., 1461 St. Law- 
rence 
Stern, Dr. Joseph, 102 St Lawrence 

Blvd. 
Talmud Torah Literary and Debat- 
ing Society, 85 St Urbaln 
Tannenbaum, M., Ill Metcalfe 
Teplitzky, L., 477 St Denis 
Trltt Samuel G., 18 Mitchison 
Wershoff, Aaron, 298 Church 
Vineberg, A. H., 151 St. James 
Vlneberg, H., 163 St James 
Weine, A., 42 Park Av. 
Weinfleld, Henry, N. Y. Life Bldg., 
1 Place d'Armes 



80 



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JEWISH PUBLICATION SOCIETY 339 

Weinfield, John J., 121 Bleury Bat Portage Canada 

Wenn, H., 85 St. Franklin Shragge, A., P. O. Box 324 

Wiseman, Dr. Max, 489 St Law- * 

rence Blvd. St. John 

Segal, M. 

Ottawa Toronto 

Adler, Morris, 391 Rldeau Arkush, S. F., Room 108, Toronto 

Epstein, L, 223 Bank Union Station ^ «.^ « . 

Plnkelstein, Max, 371 Wellington Josephl, Miss Kate, 215 Spadma 

Florence, A. L., 75 Dalhouse , Road 

Friedman, J., 615 King Levy, Jake, 229 Wellesley 

Fnimav, A. J., 24 Russell Miller, Miss Rose, 605 Yonge 

Garflnkle, M., 517 Sussex Scheuer. Benno. 386 Sackvllle 

Holofsomer, I. D., 648 Cumberland Singer, J., 51 Kendall Av. 

Holzman, J., 83-87 McKenzie A v. Toronto Daughters of Zlon, 249 

Lerner, E. M., 4 Somerset, E. Slmcoe 

Pullan, H., 477 Wellington Winnipeg 

Silver, J. H., de, 119 Sparks Heppner, Max, 102 Charles 

CEKTBAL AMERICA Central 

Guatemala America 

Klrsch, Gustave 

ENGLAND England 

London Jacob, J., 149 Edgeware Road, 

Cohen, Mrs. N. L, 11 Hyde Park i>„??ffi ^?S.„v„,„ t^„„ TT^a,.«foi 
Terrace Raphael, Abraham, Jews Hospital, 

Cowen, Joseph, 4 Marlboro Hill West Norwood 

FRANCE ^^^°*^® 

Paris 
LiFB Member 
Well, Meyer, 10 Rue St. Ceclle 

GERMANY Germany 

Berlin Heidelberg 

Cohn, Emll, 68 Mauerstrasse Freldenrelch, Myra, care of Rheln- 

Levy, William B.. 22 Llndenstrasse Ischen Credit Bank 

Munich 



Darmstadt 



B<^enheimer, Dr. S., Rhelnstrasse ^argolls. Rabbi Max L., Turken- 

Frankfort-on-the-Main ^*'**^^® ^^ ^ 

Kauffman, Dr. F., Bornestrasse 41 

MEXICO Mexico 

Mexico City 
Loeb, Max, Abartado 503 

PORTTTGAL Portugal 

St. Miguel, Aiores 
Bensande, Jos4 

SOUTH AFRICA South 

Cape Town Africa 

Alexander, Morris, 7 Hastings 

TRANSVAAL Transvaal 

Johannesburg 
Blumenthal, Mrs. P., P. O. Box 3037 

81 

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340 AMERICAN JEWISH TEAR BOOK 



CHABTER 

The terms of the charter are as follows : 

The name of the corporation is The Jewish Publioathon 
Society of America. 

The said corporation is formed for the support of a benevo- 
lent educational undertaking, namely, for the publication and 
dissemination of literary, scientific, and religious works, giv- 
ing instruction in the principles of the Jewish religion, which 
are to be distributed among the members of the corporation, 
and to such other persons and institutions as may use the 
same in the promotion of benevolent educational work. 

The business of said corporation is to be transacted in the 
city and county of Philadelphia. 

The corporation is to exist perpetually. 

There is no capital stock, and there are no shares of stock. 

The corporation is to be managed by a Board of Trustees, 
consisting of fifteen members^ and by the following oflBcers: 
President, Vice-President, Secretary, and Treasurer, and such 
other oflBcers as may from time to time be necessary. 



82 

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JEWISH PUBLICATION SOCIETY 341 



BY-LAWS 

ARTICLE I 
Membership 

Section I. — ^The Society shall be composed of Annual 
Members, Special Members, Library Members, Patrons, 
Friends, and Life Members. Any person of the Jewish faith 
may become a Member by paying annually the sum of three 
dollars ($3), or a Special Member by the annual payment of 
five dollars ($5), or a Library Member by the annual pay- 
ment of ten dollars ($10), or a Patron by the annual pay- 
ment of twenty dollars ($20), or a Friend by the annual 
payment of fifty dollars ($50), or a Life Member by one 
payment of one hundred dollars ($100). 

Sec. II. — Any Jewish Society may become a Member by 
the annual payment of ten dollars ($10). 

Sec. III. — Any person may become a Subscriber by the 
annual payment of three dollars ($3), which entitles him or 
her to all the publications of the Society to which members 
are entitled. 

ARTICLE II 

Meetings 

Section I. — The annual meeting of this Society shall be 
held in the month of May, the day of such meeting to be 
fixed by the Directors at their meeting in the previous March. 

Sec. II. — Special meetings may be held at any time at the 
call of the President, or by a vote of a majority of the Board 
of Directors, or at the written request of fifty members of 
the Society. 

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342 AMERICAN JEWISH TEAR BOOK 

ARTICLE in 
Officers and their Duties 

Section I. — ^There shall be fifteen Directors, to be elected 
by the Society by ballot 

At the first meeting all of the said fifteen shall be elected, 
five of them to serve for one year, five for two years, and five 
for three years, and at every subsequent annual meeting five 
shall be elected for three years. 

Sec. II. — Out of the said fifteen, the Society shall annu- 
ally elect a President, Vice-President, and Second Vice- 
President, who shall hold their offices for one year. 

Sec. III. — The Society shall also elect fifteen Honorary 
Vice-Presidents, in the same manner and for the same terms 
of office as the Directors are chosen. 

Sec. IV. — The Board of Directors shall elect a Treasurer, 
a Secretary, and such other officers as they may from time to 
time find necessary or expedient for the transaction of the 
Society^s business. 

Sec. V. — The Board of Directors shall appoint its own 
committees, including a Publication Committee, which com- 
mittee may consist in whole or in part of members of the 
Board. 

The Publication Committee shall serve for one year. 

ARTICLE IV 

Quorum 

Section I. — Forty members of the Society shall constitute 
a quorum for the transaction of business. 

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JEWISH PUBLICATION SOCIETY 343 

ARTICLE V 
Vacancies 
Section I. — The Board of Directors shall have power to 
fill all vacancies for unexpired terms. 

ARTICLE VI 

Benefits 
Section I. — Every member of the Society shall receive a 
copy of each of its publications. Contributing societies shall 
receive a number of copies of said publications proportionate 
to the amount of their annual subscriptions. 

ARTICLE VII . 

Free Distribution 
Section I. — The Board of Directors is authorized to dis- 
tribute copies of the Society^s publications among such insti- 
tutions as may be deemed proper, and wherever such distri- 
bution may be deemed productive of good for the cause of 
Israel. 

ARTICLE VIII 

AuQciliaries 
Section I. — Other associations for a similar object may 
be made auxiliary to this Society, by such names and in 
such manner as may be directed by the Board of Directors, 
and shall have the privilege of representation at meetings. 
Agencies for the sale and distribution of the Society's publi- 
cations shall be established by the Board of Directors in 
different sections of the country. The Society shall have the 
right to establish branches. 

85 

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344 AMERICAN JEWISH YEAR BOOK 

ARTICLE IX 
Finances 
Section I. — Moneys received for life memberships, and 
donations and bequests for such purpose, together with such 
other moneys as the Board of Directors may deem proper, 
shall constitute a permanent fund, but the interest of such 
fund may be used for the purposes of the Society. 

ARTICLE X 

Amendments 
These By-Laws may be altered or amended by a vote of 
two-thirds of those entitled to vote at any meeting of the 
Society; provided that thirty days' notice be given by the 
Board of Directors, by publication, to the members of the 
Society. 



BALTIMORE, MD., U. S. A. 
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346 ADVERTISEMENTS 

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HISTORY 

HISTORY OF THE JEWS.— By Pbof. H. Graktz. Portrait; maps. 
12.00 per volume. |9.00 per set of six volumes. 

OUTLINES OF JEWISH HISTORY.— By LiAdy ACangus. 388 pp. 

Library Edition, |1.00; Sehool Edition, 75 cents. 
JEWISH HISTORY.— By S. M. DuBwow. 184 pp. |1.00. 
A SKETCH OF JEWISH HISTORY.— By Gustav Kabpeles. 109 

pp. 30 cents. 
JEWS AND JUDAISM IN THE NINETEENTH CENTURY.— By 

Gustav Kabpeles. 83 pp. 30 cents. 
*JEWISH LIFE IN THE MIDDLE AGES.— By Isbael Abrahams. 

452 pp. 11.75. 
OLD EUROPEAN JEWRIES.— By David Phiupson. 281 pp. 

11.25. 
THE MESSIAH IDEA IN JEWISH HISTORY^-By Julius H. 

Greenstone. 348 pp. |1.25. 

THE PERSECUTION OF THE JEWS IN RUSSIA.— 87 pp. 25 
cents. 

♦WITHIN THE PALE.— The True Story of the Anti-Semitic Per- 
secution in Russia. — By Michael Davitt. 300 pp. |1.20. 

THE VOICE OF AMERICA ON KISHINEFF^-Edited by Cybus 
Adler. 499 pp. 11.00. 

BIOGRAPHY, ESSAYS, AND MISCELLANEOUS 

WORKS 

RASH I. — By Maurice Liber. Translated by Adele Szold. 278 

pp. 11.00. 
MAIM0NIDE8. — By David Yellin and Israel Abrahams. 239 

pp. 11.00. 
SOME JEWISH WOMEN.— By Henry Zirndorf. 270 pp. 11.25. 

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ADVERTISEMENTS 347 



80NQ8 OF EXILE. By Hebrew Poets. Translated by Nina 

Davis. 146 pp. 75 cents. 
JEWISH LITERATURE AND OTHER ESSAYS.— By GUSTAV 

Kabpeles. 404 pp. 11.25. 
CHAPTERS ON JEWISH LITERATURE.— By Israel Abrahams. 

275 pp. 11.25. 
THE TALMUD. — By ArsI:ne Dabmesteteb. 98 pp. 30 cents. 
TH E TALM U D. — ^By Emanuel Deutsch. 30 cents. 
READINGS AND RECITATIONS.— Compiled by Isabel E. Cohen. 

294 pp. 11.25. 
LEGENDS AND TALES.— Compiled by Isabel E. Cohen. 260 

pp. 75 cents. 
JEWISH SERVICES IN SYNAGOGUE AND HOME^-By Lewis 

N. Dembitz. 487 pp. 11.75. 
THE ETHICS OF JUDAISM, PARTS I AND II.— By M. Lazabus. 

12.50. 
*STUDiES IN JUDAISM, First Serles^By S. Schechteb. 359 pp. 

11.75. 
STUDIES IN JUDAISM, Second Series.— By S. Schechteb. 362 

pp. 12.00. 
SABBATH HOURS. — By Liebman Adleb. 338 pp. 11.25. 
HEARTH AND HOME ESSAYS.— By Estheb J. Ruskat. 96 pp. 

30 cents. 
JEWS IN MANY LANDS^-By Elkan Adleb. 259 pp. 11.25. 
PAPERS PRESENTED AT THE FIFTH ANNUAL SESSION OF 

THE SUMMER ASSEMBLY OF THE JEWISH CHAUTAU- 
QUA SOCIETY. 30 cents. 
PROCEEDINGS OF THE FIRST CONVENTION OF THE 

NATIONAL COUNCIL OF JEWISH WOMEN. 426 pp. 11.00. 
PAPERS OF THE JEWISH WOMEN'S CONGRESS. 270 pp. 

$1.00. 
AMERICAN JEWISH YEAR BOOK.— Edited by Cybus Adleb, 

Henbietta Szold, and Hebbebt Fbiedenwald. 

For 5660 ( 1899-1900) . 290 pp. 75 cents. 

For 5661 (1900-1901). 763 pp. |1.00. 

For 5662 (1901-1902) . 321 pp. 75 cents. 

For 5663 ( 1902-1903 ) . 321 pp. 75 cents. 

For 5664 ( 1903-1904 ) . 329 pp. 75 cents. 

For 5665 (1904-1905) . 517 pp. |1.00. 

For 5666 (1905-1906). 367 pp. 75 cents. 

For 5667 ( 1906-1907 ) . 307 pp. 75 cents. 

For 5668 ( 1907-1908 ) . 662 pp. |3.00. 

For 5669 ( 1908-1909 ) . 362 pp. 75 cents. 

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FICTION 

THE VALE OF CEDARS AND OTHER TALE8^-By Grace 

AoucLAB. 428 pp. 11.50. 
STRANGERS AT THE GATE.— By Samttel Gordon. 458 pp. 

11.60. 
SONS OF THE COVEN ANT^By Samuel Gordon. 500 pp. |1.50. 
IDYLS OF THE GASS. — By Martha Wolfensteik. 295 pp. $1.25. 
A RENEGADE AND OTHER TALES^— By Martha Wolfen- 

STEIN. 322 pp. 11.25. 
UNDER THE EAGLE'S WINQ^— By Sara Mhjjsr. 229 pp. 75 

cents. 
LOST PRINCE ALMON.— By Louis Pendleton. 218 pp. 75 

cents. 
DAVID THE GIANT KILLER AND OTHER TALES OF 

GRANDMA LOPEZ. — By Emily Sous-Cohen. 250 pp. $1.25. 
IN ASSYRIAN TENTS- — By Louis Pendleton. 248 pp. 75 cents. 
♦THEY THAT WALK IN DARKNESS.— Ghetto Tragedies.— By 

L Zanowill. 486 pp. $1.50. 
♦DREAMERS OF THE GHETTO.— By I. Zangwill. 537 pp. $1.50. 
♦CHILDREN OF THE GHETTO^— By L Zangwill. 2 vols. 451 

pp., 325 pp. $2.50. 
IN THE PALE.— By Henrt Iuowizl 367 pp. $1.25. 
RABBI AND PRIEST.— By Milton Goldsmith. 314 pp. $1.00. 
THINK AND THANK.— By S. W. Cooper. 120 pp. 50 cents. 
VOEGELE'S MARRIAGE AND OTHER TALES.— By Louis 

Schnabel. 83 pp. 25 cents. 
BEATING SEA AND CHANGELESS BAR.— By Jacob Lazarre. 

133 pp. 75 cents. 
STORIES AND PICTURES.— By Isaac Loeb Perez. 456 pp. 

$1.50. 
STORIES OF JEWISH HOME LIFE.— By S. H. Mosenthal. 388 

pp. $1.25. 
SIMON EICHELKATZ— THE PATRIARCH^Two Stories of 

German Jewish Life. — ^By Ulrich Frank. 432 pp. $1.25. 

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