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II^I1> 




ANOOVRD-HARVAltD THEOLOCtCAL LIBRAnY 
CAMBRIOOC, MASaACHUSETTa 



T h e A |ii'qpjp,|1) , "f e wish 
5679 

September 7, 1918, to September 24, 1919 

E4licd tv 

SAMSON D. OPI 

tor me 

AMERICAN JEWISH 




PHILADELPHIA 
Th« Jiwhh Pubucauoh Socicty r 
191S 



•<lr- •« 



L 

} 1 1'tM 



Tf BpryfmnAi JLiBlblllf 

DEC % 7 1918 

ANDOVER 



copymght, 1918, by 
The Jewish Publication Society of America 



Ik. 



PBEFACE 

The great war overshadows all other subjects in the minds of 
men, and most of necessity be strongly reflected even in a publi- 
cation like the American Jewish Tear Book, as will appear not 
only from the article on the collection of Jewish war statistics, 
but throughout the events of the year. An accurate estimate of the 
Jewish population of the United States is at present peculiarly im- 
portant, for othervdse it is impossible to obtain an idea of the 
proportionate contribution of American Jews to the war. To 
consider intelligently questions of this nature it is essential to 
possess a detailed knowledge of the Jewish population of each state 
as well as that of each American city or town of any considerable 
size. In the article dealing with the Jewish population of the 
United States will be found a mass of figures showing, in tabular 
form, how this population of the country is distributed. The 
methods used and the general results secured are briefly outlined, 
and much enlightening statistical data concerning the Jewish 
population of various classes of American cities are exhibited, 
together with an exhaustive and novel treatment of the subject of 
the Jewish population in New York City, which contains nearly 
one-half of the Jews of the United States. The Editor desires to 
acknowledge the great debt owing to Dr. Alexander Dushkin for 
his ingenious calculations. It may be of interest to mention that, 
according to the best estimates, the Jewish population of the 
United States amounts to over 3,300,000, while New York City 
alone has almost 1,500,000 Jewish inhabitants. 

The thorough manner in which the Bureau of Jewish Statistics 
and Research of the American Jewish Committee is laboring 
to secure detailed statistics relating to all Jews in the military 
and naval service of the nation is outlined by Mr. Julian Leavitt, 
who is in immediate charge of the practical division of that work. 
As will be readily comprehended, it is as yet impossible to present 
any deflnite statistics; but from the perusal of this sketch some 
idea may be gained of the painstaking thoroughness with which 
the work is being prosecuted, the excellent results that have so 
far been reached, and the expectations that may reasonably be 
entertained. In this connection the reader may also be referred 



VI PREFACE 

to the list of Promotions, Honors, and Elections, in the " Events " 
of the United States, which contains the names of some fifteen 
hundred Jewish commissioned officers. 

The Jewish Welfare Board is doing excellent work among the 
Jewish soldiers and sailors in the service of the United States, 
and has already gained recognition from all quarters. Mr. Chester 
Jacob Teller, the Executive Director of this Board, has given a 
lucid analysis of the aims and achievements of the Board. 

In addition, this volume contains an admirable survey of the 
inner life of the Jews of Serbia from the pen of Dr. I. Alcalay, 
chief rabbi of Serbia, and a brief but illuminating account of 
the formation of the New York City Federation for the Support 
of Jewish Philanthropic Societies, written by I. Edwin Goldwasser. 
As this is the twentieth volume of the American Jewish Year Book, 
it was deemed advisable to print an Index to the articles hitherto 
published in the Year Books. This Index was compiled by Miss 
Minnie Baum, to whom the Editor wishes to express his thanks. 

The Year Book for 5668 contained a Directory of Jewish Local 
Organizations in the United States. During the past eleven years 
the number of such organizations has been greatly augmented, 
and many changes have taken place in those which existed in 1907. 
It was therefore thought advisable to revise this Directory and 
bring it up to date for the present volume. But owing largely 
to war conditions so many unforeseen obstacles have presented 
themselves, that it was finally decided to defer the publication of 
this Directory to another season. This will explain the absence 
of the usual list of new local organizations. 

In conclusion the Editor desires to express his sincere thanks to 
the many persons who have rendered important assistance to him 
in his labor of preparing this volume, especially to Mr. Harry 
Schneiderman, Assistant Secretary of the American Jewish Com- 
mittee, Miss Rose A. Herzog, and Miss Ada Aneckstein; to Dr. B. 
Halper, Editor, and Mr. I. George Dobsevage, Secretary, of the 
Jewish Publication Society of America. The guidance and criti- 
cism of Dr. Cyrus Adler have been particularly helpful in enabling 
the Editor to solve the numerous difficult problems that have 
arisen during the last twelve months. 

AUGUST 9. 1918. S***'*"'"' ^- Oppenheim. 



SPECIAL ARTICLES IN PREVIOUS ISSUES OF THE 
AMERICAN JEWISH YEAR BOOK 

The Alliance Israelite Univebselle, 5661, pp. 45-65. 

The Jews of Roumanla. (two articles), 5662, pp. 25-87. 

The Amei&can Passport in Russia, 5665, pp. 283-305. 

The Passport Question in Congress, 5670, pp. 21-43. 

Directories of National and Local Organizations, 5661, pp. 67- 

495; 5668, pp. 21-430; 5669, pp. 19-64; 5670, pp. 146-189; 5671, 

pp. 229-253; 5672, pp. 217-265; 5673, pp. 217-263; 5674, pp. 

361-413; 5675,. pp. 276-327; 5676, pp. 286-339; 5677, pp. 221- 

270; 5678, pp. 332-364. 
Statistical Summary by States (Jewish Organizations in thk 

United States), 5662, pp. 126-156. 
The Jewish Population of Mabyland, 5663, pp. 46-62. 
A List of Jewish Periodicals in the United States, 5660, pp. 

271-282; and in subsequent issues. 
Preliminary List of Jewish Soldiers and Sailors Who Served 

IN THE Spanish-American War, 5661, pp. 525-622. 
The Hundred Best Available Books in English on Jewish Sub- 
jects, 5665, pp. 309-317. 
One Hundred Available Books in English on Palestine, 5666, 

pp. 153-162. 
A List of Available Stobies of Jewish Interest in English, 

5667, pp. 130-142. 
A Syllabus of Jewish History, 5666, pp. 163-170. 
Biographical Sketches of Rabbis and Cantobs Officiating in 

THE United States, 5664, pp. 40-108; 5665, pp. 214-225; 5666, 

pp. 119-125. 
Biographical Sketches of Jv^ws Prominent in the Professions, 

etc., in the United States, 5665, pp. 52-213. 
Biographical Sketches of Jewish Communal Workers in the 

United States, 5666, pp. 32-118. 



VIII SPECIAL ARTICLES 

Uriah P. Levy, 5663, pp. 42-45. 

Gebshom Mendez Seixas, 5665, pp. '40-51. 

Penina MoisE, 5666, pp. 17-31. 

Fbom Kishineff to Bialystok. a Table of Pogroms from 1903 
TO 1906, 5667, pp. 34-89. 

Sunday Laws of the United States and Judicial Decisions Hav- 
ing Reference to Jews, 5669, pp. 152-189. 

The Jewish Community of New York City, 5670, pp. 44-54. 

In Defense of the Immigrant, 5671, pp. x9-98. 

The Passport Question, 5672, pp. 19-128. 

The Jew and Agriculture, 5673, pp. 21-115. 

The Jewish ^Publication Society, 1888-1913, 5674, pp. 19-187. 

The Beilis Affair, 5675, pp. 19-89. 

Jewish Education in the United States, 5675, pp. 90-127. 

Jewish Population of the United States, 5675, pp. 339-378. 

Recent Jewish Progress in Palestine, 5676, pp. 24-158. 

The Federation Movement in American Jewish Philanthropy, 
5676, pp. 159-198. 

Solomon Schechteb, A Bioqbaphical Sketch, 5677, pp. 25-67. 

Joseph Jacobs, 5>77, pp. 68-75. , 

Jews in the United States Army and Navy, 5677, pp. 76-79. 

Jewish Calendar for One Hundred Years, 5678, pp. 24-34. 

The Jews of Latin America, 5678, pp. 35-105. 

Jewish Rights at International Congresses, 5678, pp. 106-160. 

The New English Translation of the Bible, 5678, pp. 161-193. 

Jewish Wab Relief Work, 5678, pp. 194-226-. 

Moses Jacob Ezekiel, 5678, pp. 227-232. 

Pedebated Jewish Charities in the United States, 5678, pp. 365- 
366. 

List of Rabbis and Instructors in Jewish Colleges in the 
United States, 5678, pp. 367-395. 

American Colleges in Which Hebrew is Taught, 5678, p. 406. 

Table Showing Enrolment of Jewish Students in American 
Colleges and Universities in 1915-16, 5678, pp. 407-408. 



CONTENTS 

FAGB 

Preface '. V 

Special Articles in Previous Issues of the American Jewish 

Year Book VII 

Calendars 1 

« 

Time of Sunrise and Sunset in Six Northern LATrrrnES IS 

■ 

Jewish Calendar for One Hundred Years 20 

The Jewish Population of the United States. By Samson D. 

Oppenheim 31 

The Jews of Serbia. By I. Alcalay 75 

The Jewish Welfare Board. By Chester Jacob Teller 88 

The Collection of Jewish War Statistics. By Julian Leavitt 103 

Federation for the Support of Je\i'ish Phii^nthropic 

Societies of New York City. By I. Edwin Goldwasser. . 113 

EhENTS IN 5678: 

Table of Contents 147 

A, United States 151 

B. Foreign Countries 232 

Directories: 

Jewish National Organizations in the United States 300 

List of Jewish Federated Charities in the United Statc-s. . 32« 

Jewish Periodicals Appearing in the United States 328 

Jewish Members of the Congress of the United States 337 

Statistics or Jews: 

A- Jewish Population of the World 33» 

B. Jewish Immigration into the United States 345 

C. Jewish Immigration into Canada 352 



X CONTENTS 

PAGE 

Index to Articles in First Twenty Volumes of American 

Jewish Year Book (5660-5679) 353 

Eleventh Annual Report of the American Jewish Com- 
mittee, November 11, 1917 362 

Report of the Thirtieth Year of The Jewish Publication 

Society of America, 1917-1918 409 



CALENDARS 



a 



n"i;"in-6678 

1917—1918 




1917 




5678 




1918 




Sept. 17 


New Year 


Tishri 


1 


Sept. 7 




Sept. 19 


Fast of Gedaliah 


Tishri 


3 


Sept. 9 


F 


Sept. 26 


Day of Atonement 


Tishri 


10 


Sept. 16 


Di 


Oct. 1 


Tabernacles 


Tishri 


15 


Sept.21 




Oct. 8 


Eighth Day of the Feast 


Tishri 


22 


Sept.28 


Eighl 


Oct. 9 


Rejoicing of the Law 


Tishri 


23 


Sept.29 


Rej. 


Oct. 16 


First New Moon Day (of Heshvan) 


Tishri 


30 


Oct. 6 


First New 


Nov. 15 


First New Moon Day (of Kislev) 


Heshvan 80 


Nov. 5 




Dec. 10 


Hanukkah 


Kislev 


25 


Nov. 29 




Dec. 15 


First New Moon Day (of Tebet) 


Kislev 


30 


Dec. 4 




Dec. 25 


Fast of Tebet 


Tebet 


10 


Dec. IS 




1918 








1919 




Jan. 14 


New Moon Day 


Shebat 


1 


Jan. 2 




Feb. 12 


First New Moon Day (of Adar) 


Shebat 


30 


Jan. 31 


First Ne 


Feb. 25 


Fast of Esther 


Adar 


13 


Mch. 2 First New 1^ 


Feb. 26 


Purim 


Adar 


14 


Mch. 13 




Mch. 14 


New Moon Day 


Nisan 


1 


Mch. 16 




Mch. 28 


Passover 


Nisan 


15 


Apl. 1 


• 


Apl. 12 


First New Moon Day (of lyar) 


Nisan 


30 


Apl. 15 




Apl. 30 


Thirty-third Day of 'Omer 


lyar 


18 


Apl. 30 


First N< 


May 12 


New Moon Day 


Sivan 


1 


May 18 


Thirt! 


May 17 


Feast of Weeks 


Sivan 


6 


May 30 


1 


June 10 


First New Moon Day (of Tammuz) 


Sivan 


30 


June 4 


] 


June 27 


Fast of Tammuz 


Tammuz 17 


June 28 


First New 


July 10 


New Moon Day 


Ab 


1 


July 15 


F 


July 18 


Fast of Ab 


Ab 


9 


July 28 


1 


Aug. 8 


First New Moon Day (of Elul) 


Ab 


30 


Aug. 5 




Sept. 1 


Selihot Services 


Elul 


24 


Aug. 26 


First Ne^ 


Sept. 6 


Eve of New Year 


Elnl 


29 


Sept.21 
Sept.24 


S 
E 



ARS 



9 








on 

S"in-B«80 
1919-1920 

• 








5(J79 




1919 




5080 






Tishri 


1 


Sept. 25 


New Year 


Tishri 


1 


lah 


Tishri 


3 


Sept. 28 


Fast of Gedaliah 


Tishri 


4 


lent 


Tishri 


10 


Oct. 4 


Day of Atonement 


Tishri 


10 


I 


Tishri 


15 


Oct. 9 


Tabernacles 


Tishri 


15 


Feast 


Tishri 


22 


Oct. 16 


Eighth Day of the Feast 


Tishri 


22 


Law 


Tishri 


23 


Oct. 17 


Rejoicing of the Law 


Tishri 


23 


f Heshiran) Tistiri 


30 


Oct. 24 


First New Moon Day (©f Heshyan) 


Tishri 


30 


»7 


KisleY 


1 


Nov. 23 


New Moon Day 


Kislsy 


1 




Eisley 


25 


Dec. 17 


Hanukkah 


Risler 


25 


»y 


Tebet 


1 


Dec. 22 


First New Moon Day (of Tebet) 


Kisley 


30 


et 


Tebct 


10 


1920 


■ 






►ay 


Shebat 


1 


Jan. 1 


Fast of Tebet 


Tebet 


10 


(of Adar) 


Shebat 


30 


Jan. 21 


New Moon Day 


Shebat 


1 


idarShenDAdar 


30 


Feb. 19 


First New Moon Day (of Adar) 


Shebat 


30 


er Adar Sheui 


11 


Mch. S 


Fast of Esther 


Adar 


18 


Adar Sheni 


14 


Mch. 4 


Purim 


Adar 


14 


>ay 


Nisan 


1 


Mch. 20 


New Moon Day 


Nisan 


1 




Nisan 


15 


Apl. 3 


Passover 


I^isan 


15 


(of lyar) 


Nisan 


30 


Apl. 18 


First New Moon Day (of lyar) 


Nisan 


30 


f Omcr 


lyar 


18 


May 6 


Thirty-third Day of 'Omer 


lyar 


18 


iy 


Siyan 


1 


May 18 


New Moon Day 


Sivan 


1 


ks 


Siyan 


6 


May 23 


Feast of Weeks 


Sivan 


6 


! Tammuz) 


Sivan 


30 


June 16 


First New Moon Day (of Tammuz] 


Sivan 


30 


uz 


Tammuz 17 


July 14 


Fast of Tammuz 


Tammuz 18 


^y 


Ab 


1 


July 16 


New Moon Day 


Ab 


1 




Ab 


9 


July 25 


Fast of Ab 


Ab 


10 


of Elul) 


Ab 


30 


Aug. 14 


First New Moon Day (of Elul) 


Ab 


30 


es 


Elul 


26 


Sept. 5 


Selihot Seryices 


Elul 


22 


sar 


Elul 


29 


Sept. 12 


Eye of New Year 


Elul 


29 



5679 

is called 679 (D"i;'in) according to the short system dy'ijS). 
It is a defective Leap Year of 13 months, 55 Sabbaths, 383 
days, beginning on Saturday, the seventh day of the week, 
and having the first day of Passover on Tuesday, the third 
day of the week; therefore its sign is jnr, i. e., t for seventh, 
n for defective (rr^Dn) and a for third. It is the seventeenth 
year of the 299th lunar cycle of 1.9 years, and the twenty- 
third year of the 203rd solar cycle of 28 years, since Creation. 



IBl 


S.Bept.7-Oct.e] TISHRI 30 


D«, 


[ns-n B87B 




E 






PENTAiEUCH«L 








SABBATHS, FESTIVALS, FASTS 


PORTLOriS 


PORTIONS 


Bept. 


Wtak 






ni'B-iB 


ni-it3Bn 




van 








7 


s 


1 


N(w Yeir njCfT 'IT 'K 


lNum.3»:l-S 


1 Ham. 1: l^t: 1(1 


8 


s 


2 


liew Year .IJB'H 'ni '3, 


1 Num%> 1 fl 


Jet. ai: 2-20 


9 


M 


3 


Fast ot Gtdiiiih n•S^) mv 


Ei. 83:11-14; 34: 1-10 


ias,vs' 


10 


T 


4 








11 


W 


6 








12 


■I'll 


6 








13 


P 


7 






rissff- 


14 
16 


s 


8 


naiB' nac .ijVKn 


Oeut. 32 


9 






fIa.57:H-68:U 


16 
IV 


M 
T 


10 
11 




] Num. S9: 7-11 

( Afternoon: Lev. 18 


1 Afte-maon: Jonah 
£ejih. add MiOHh 
[ ■^18-20 


18 


"W 


12 








19 


Th 


18 








20 


F 


14 








21 
22- 


S 


16 
"16" 


TiliernulH niSDl 'N 


lNum.3B:lS-lH 


Z«.h, U 


T.liernKlBt ni3D1 '3 


]fc1?t|" 


IKlngBB:a-21 


23 


M 


17 


■ 


isep^'M^'n-aa 




24 


T 


18 




Num. 29:2^-38 
ScpJi. 89:20-26 




25 


W 


19 


-iriDn Sin 


Kum. 28:23-81 
SepA. 28:28-18 




26 


Th 


20 




Si!p".'EB;2frBl 




27 
28 
29 


F 
S 


21 
22 


J ton Kire'in 


Num. 29:2fl-M 


lKi™8:Bt-M 


s 


23 


J Rgjolcinl he w__^^^ ^^^^ 


Deut.aa:l-8I:12 
Gun. 1: 1— S: B 
Num.S9:S&— 8G:1 


1 ,IOBh. 1 

1 S6|J(i. 1: l-» 


80 


M 


24 


in IIDN 






Oct. 












I 


T 


26 








2 


"W 


26 








3 


Th 


27 








4 


¥ 


28 






lISam.*0:l»-*2 


5 


S 


29 


mn '3D1 .n-trn-ia 


Gen. 1:1-0:8 


rsi""""* 


rj 


s 


30 1 H»« Mogn B-IH "n 'N 


Num. 28:1-16 | 



* The Book of Eocleslaatea la read. 



1918. Oct. 7-N 


y.i] HESHVAN 29 DAYS 


[)lE^6a70 




•s 


ji'iib 




PENTATEUCHAL 


PROPHETICAL 




S«BB*TMS. FESIIVALS, F»S1S 


PORTIONS 


PORTIONS 










nve-ifl 


nnoBn 


Oii. 




Eohna 








7 


M 


1 


N.* Moon BMn in '3 


Num. 28: 1-16 




8 


T 


2 








6 


W 


3 








10 


Th 


4 








U 


F 


6 








12 


S 


6 


ni 


Sen. a: 9-11: as 


i 18. M; l-Mt 6 
} Stph. M: 1-10. 


13 


s 


7 








14 


M 


8 








16 


T 


9 








16 


W 


10 








17 


Th 


11 








18 


F 


12 








19 


S 


13 


i'i' 


Gen.K:l-IT:ST 


Ib, W: a?— 41: 11 


20 


s 


14 








21 


M 


16 








22 


T 


16 








23 


"W 


17 




, 




24 


Th 


18 








26 


F 


19 








26 


S 


20 


KTl 


Gen.lB:I-ai:M 


1 Seph.'iri-M 


27 


s 


21 








28 


M 


22 








29 


T 


23 








30 


"W 


24 








31 


Th 


26 








Nov. 












1 


F 


26 








2 


S 


27 


rnn '3D1 .mr -n 


GeB.M;l-Efi:l» 


I King. 1:1-31 


3 


"sT 


28 








4 


M 


29 


pp -IIBD DT 







Si 






SABBATHS. FESTIVAU. FASTS 


nvene 


nnean 


Not, 




lu.. 








ii 


'1' 


1 


HaK Mton EHH PKI 


Nulli.M;l-lll 




6 


w 


2 








7 


Th 


3 








S 


K 


4 








9 


S 


5 


rni'in 


Qea. a: 19— M: ■ 


Msl.l; 1-8:7 


10 


s 


6 








11 


M 


7 








12 


T 


8 








IS 


W 


9 








U 


Th 


in 








15 
16 


F 
S 


11 

12 


wri 


O«ii.M:10-M:a 


(Hcw.I2:»-ll!M 

USit-ii-^-WK 


17 


s 


13 








18 


M 


14 








19 


T 


IB 








20 


W 


16 








21 


Th 


17 








22 


F 


18 






-^iK-VisJ 


23 


S 


19 


ni>c^ 


Gen.»S:*-SB;*3 


.c«;'sa'i,'rJ 


24 


.s 


20 








2.1 


M 


21 








26 


T 


22 








27 


W 


23 








28 
29 


Th 
F 


24 
26 


) Hannkkah. F«*l of DtdioUm 

' nDi:n 


lSepH,'e:'22— 7:17 




30 


S 


26 


[■nn '301 ,lt:"l 


JNSm.Tili^M" 


Zech. 2: l(— 4: ; 


Dec 
1 


s 

M 

T 


27 
28 
29 




Num. 7:2t-S5 

Pii 

S^7:»MI 





1918, Deo. 4—1910, Jan. 1] TEBET 29 DAYS 


[naiD 5670 


CiTil 
Month 


T«dt 


bvuk 
Moitli 


SABBATHS, FESTIVALS, FASTS 


PENTATEUCHAL 
PORTIONS 


PROPHETICAL 
PORTIONS 


Dec. 








4 
5 
6 


w 

Th 
F 


1 

2 
3 


New Moon BHn Vnf\ 
Eighth Day of Hanukkah 


J Num. 28: 1-16 
1 Num. 7: 42-47 
Num. 7: 48-69 
I Seph. 7: 48-63 

Num. 7:54—8:4 




7 
8 


S 

S 


4 
5 


, rpo 


Gen. 41:1-44: 17 


I Klngra 8: 16-4:1 








9 


M 


6 








10 


T 


7 








11 


W 


8 








12 


Th 


9 








13 


F 


10 


j Fast of Tebet 

1 nntD3 nnK'r div 


Ex. 82: 11-14: 84: 1-10 


j Is. 66: 6—66: 8 
1 Seph. none 


14 
15 


S 

S 


11 
12 


. K^ri 


Gen. 44 : 18—47: 27 


Ezek. 87: 16-28 






16 


M 


13 








17 


T 


14 








18 


W 


15 








19 


Th 


16 








20 


F 


17 








21 
22 


S 

S 


18 
19 


^nn 


Gen. 47: 28—60: 26 


I Kings 2: 1-12 








23 


M 


20 








24 


T 


21 








25 


W 


22 








26 


Th 


23 








27 
28 

29 


F 
S 


24 
25 


['nn 'ao] ,niD6?' 


Ex. 1: 1— <i: 1 


(18.27:6—28:13; 

< 29:22,28 

1 Seph. Jer. 1: 1—2: 3 


s 


26 








30 


M 


27 




« 




31 


T 


28 








Jan. 












1 


W 


29 


PP -11DD D1^ 







8 



MIS, jBn. B— Jan. 31] SHEBATSO DATS 


loac'wiTO 


«I 

■onk 


'•^Isa 


MBBRTHS FEtTIVALE FMTS 


"sas.""^ 


^ "RWW^ 




•wk;"""*" 




ni-enc 


nnoBn 


jiiiT 












2 


Tb 


1 


Haw Moon KHH B'W 


Nim.,a8:l-16 




3 


F 


2 








4 


S 


3 


N-1K1 


Bi. t=B-«;3£ 


M„,k.W,Bll-llli,!;l 


5 


s 


i 








6 


M 


6 








7 


T 


6 








8 


W 


7 








9 


Th 


8 








10 


P 


9 








11 


S 


10 


K3 


Rx. 10: l-lik Jfl 


.l,.r.M!«»" 


12 


s 


11 






13 


M 


12 








14 


T 


13 








16 


W 


14 








16 


Th 


16 


1 ""'""""-„,*„ „-T 






17 


F 


16 






18 


S 


17 


iri-E' nap .n^3 


Ri. 1»! IJ-IT: W 


I^TVi,"" 


19 


S 18 






20 


M '19 






21 


T ,20 






22 


W 21 






23 


Th'22 






24 


F ,23 






26 i S i 24 


:™i-3c:,-^n- r.-.u-.i-a^.iK 


^fel'.i'S'"-' 


261 8 [25 




. 


27 'm 26 






28 |T 27 






29 jW 28 






30|t1i.29 


:ep-rBz z~ 




SllF'30 


■—■■B rTT— T-B »iiii.J«:m 





,„..,.>..-» 


11.2] ADAH RI9HON 




IlllffK-. TIK B879 


sis 


^1 


SABBATHS. FESTIVALS, MSTS 


PCHIATEUCHAL 
PORIIOHS 




Feb. 
1 


s 


°"i1 


enn '■»! 'a .D'cntTD 


j N|ii^'M~l*lR " 


I*. H 


2 


H 


2 








3 


11 


3 








4 


T j 4 








6 


W 


6 








ti 


Th 


B 








7 


F 


7 








8 


S 


8 


nonn 


Bl. 26: 1-27! IB 


1 Kings 0:i«-a; IS 


ft 


-S 


9 








10 


IK 


10 








11 


T 


n 








12 


W 


12 








13 


Th 


18 








14 


F 


14 


IDp Dni3 






15 


S 


16 


nixn 


Bi[.a7!2o-ao:iD 


EMk.*8:10-« 


16 


R 


10 






17 


M 


17 








1R 


T 


IR 








10 


W 


19 








20 


Th 


2(1 








21 

22 


S 


21 
22 
23 


Ncn n 


B>.Bn:ll-3t;R.-> 


]IElDB8ie:t((n-S0)-» 


23 


s 






24 


M 


24 








2* 


T 


25 








2fi 


W 


26 








27 


TI. 


27 








28 


F 


28 


)op ^1B^ 01' 






1 


S 


29 


□■bpc 's I'nn 'aoi .^np'i 


liSSirS" 


III. KinKBlSil-lT 


2 


s 


30 


H<» Moon tnn m 'N 


1 Nura.28:]-1B 





1919.Mch.3-Mub311 ADAH SHENI 29 DAYS 


I'JB' niM 6878 


S. 


A 


llgDik 


GftBSATHS. FESTIVALS. FASTS 


PENTATEUCHAL 
P0RT10H8 

mt?nB 


PfiOPHETICAL 
PORTIONS 

nnoBn 


Kcli. 




Bktii 








S 


M 


1 


New Moon itnn 'IT '3 


Num. B8; lis 




4 


T 


2 








6 


W 


3 








6 


Th 


4 








7 
S 


s 


6 
6 


nips 


Ei.SS:31-40;S8 


1 1 EiUBi T:fil— gial 
1 Se„ft. T;WW 


9 


s 


7 








10 


M 


8 








11 


T 


9 








12 


W 


10 








13 


Th 


11 


FutolEtlhtr -inDW DIS 


Ei. 32: 11-lt; M; 1-10 


1 la. U: A— fid: B 
i Seph. none 


U 
16 


F 
S 


12 
13 


nnr 'B .K^p'l 


J L4ST. 1: l-Bj as 


tiaara.l6;&« 
1 Heph. 16:1-8* 


16 


s 


14 


Purlm.FMH of Either- Dnifi 


Ei. n: 8-ie 




17 


M 


16 


Shuthtn Purlm tjniB IB-W 






18 


T 


16 








19 


W 


17 








20 


Ti 


18 








21 
22 


F 
S 


19 
20 


niB 'a .IS 


] Num. in" * 


(Eiek.e8:lf>.8S 
1 SepA. 3a; Ifl-M 


23 


s 


21 








24 


M 


22 








26 


T 


23 








26 


W 


24 








27 


Th 


26 








28 
29 


F 
S 


26 

27 


Bnnn 'a ['nn 'aa] .•j-OB' 


)LeT.O;l-ll;« 
iEi.lS:l-20 


JEzBlt.lB;19-tB:lS 
(aeph.lB:ie— »8;;B 


30 


s 


28 






31 


M 


29 


[Cjp 11B3 D1' 







' ThB Book of Eatber 



1819, Apl. 1-Apl,a01 NISAN 30 DAYS 


EJO'J 6678 






J»1A 

■utl 


SABBITHS, FESTIVItl£. FUSTS 


nvena 


nnoen 


API. 




liHl 








1 


■r 


1 


N«« MMn Knn K>tt*l 


Nmn.38:l-1B 




2 


w 


2 








3 


Th 


3 








4 


F 


4 








5 


S 


5 


^xiin 


Lev.l2:l-18:6» 


II Kln«*:lS-S:l» 


6 


s 


6 








7 


M 


7 








« 


T 


8 








9 


W 


9 








10 


Th 


10 








11 
12 


P 
S 


11 
12 


^njn nac .y>vo 


L<IT.U;l-lK:Ba 


( Ual. 8: 1-M or 


13 


s 


18 








14 
16 


M 

T 


14 
16 


(FulptthaFlnl-Bpin 
PaHDvtr nDCT '« 


lNun!i.28:18-2B 


j'ft-5,K, 


16 
17 
18 
19 


W 
Th 
P 
S 


16 
17 
18 
19 


1 Puisvar. FIrat D» ot Oner 

1 nODI '3 

.TfflDn ^in 


jBx.a3tl2-.Bl:!« 


IEzek.SS: 87-17:14 
i Seph. 81: 1-14 


20 


s 


20 


) 


i5JSS-?.-'5i*-s 




21 


M 


21 i Putntr nODTt 




II Sam. 2: 


22 
23 


T 

W 


22 

23 


Pauovtr nOBI 'H 


{gS"nI:IJ:f^r'^ 


l8.10:>E-l»:il 


24 


Th 


24 








26 
26 


F 
S 


26 
26 


[Tin '301 .niD nnK 


Lev. M: 1-18:00 


rrAS;i*a;" 


27 


a 


27 








28 


M 


28 








29 


T 


29 








SO 


W 


30 J H«« *«n tnn "n •» 


Nnm-ssa-is 





* Th« Soar ot SODBi U n 



iei9. Miiri-Hiir38] iyar 2b days 


[■1"K 5678 


Ortl 


-1 


Iniib 


SIBBMHS, FESTIVAL. FASTS ' PDHTIOHS 


'W.S«s" 

ni-ioun 


*^ 




"^ 








1 


Th 


1 


H» mmh erin '^T 'a 


Num. £8^1-15 




2 
3 


F 
S 


2 
3 


O'cnp 


I*v.lt»: 1-20:37 


(S=S:';'K.r.i 

1 Sc]i(i. Biek. 30: 1 (o 


4 


s 


4 








6 


M 


6 








6 


T 


6 








7 


W 


7 








8 


Th 


8 








9 


F 


9 








10 


S 


10 


now 


Lev. ai: ]— 31: 38 


Eiek.M;lMl 


11 


S 


11 








12 


M 


12 








18 


T 


13 








u 


W 


14 


'aC HDD 






16 


Th 


16 








16 


¥ 


16 








17 


S 


17 


-'na 


lev. BB: 1-3.1:3 


Jor. 3S: ll-ST 


16 


s 


Is" 


33AD.yoC0niM ^D1I;3 J"S 






19 


M 


19 








20 


T 


20 








21 


W 


21 








22 


Th 


22 








23 


F 


23 








24 
25 


S 


24 


fnn '3D] ,'npna 


LBV.SB:a-37:S4 


.ler.W:W-n;U 


s 


26 








26 


M 


26 








27 


T 


27 








28 


W 


28 








29 


Th 


29 


"OP niED D1' 







1918. May 30-Jun8 3S] SIVAN 30 DAYS 


[(I'D sero 




>•' 






PENTATELCH«L 


PHOPHETICOL 


s 


j.i, 


iiSt 


SIBBATHa, FKTIVKLS. FMTS 


PORTIOHS 


PORTIONS 




Vwk 






ni'fiB 


nnoDH 


Mii7 




aim 








30 


V 


1 


Naw Mann tHO B-KI 


Nui^2S:l-]6 




31 


8 


^ 


13103 


NUQi.l;l-t;2(l 


Hob. 2:l-sa 


June 












1 


S 


3 








2 


M 


4 








3 


T 


6 








4 


TV 


6 


F«nt Df WMkt nwuin 'N 


IK'fcSif 


EmX. l:l-M;B-la 


5 


Th 


7 


Full of W««ki- nilHaBH '3 


1 Num. 28t 39-81 


tHab.8:M9 
lS«ph.2t 30-8119 


6 


F 


8 


jn now 






7 


8 


9 


Kfi?3 


Hum. 4: an: 8B 


Jud^s 13:5-28 


T" 


V 


10 








8 


M 


11 








10 


T 


12 








11 


W 


13 








12 


Til 


14 








IS 


F 


IB 








14 


S 


16 


^n71),■^3 


Hum. 8:1-11!: If. 


Zeoh, a: U— 4: T 


16 


s 


17 








16 


M 


18 








17 


T 


19 








18 


W 


20 








19 


Th 


21 








20 


F 


22 








21 

22 


S 

s 


23 
24 


[■nn '3D] 0^ n!?t!' 


Num. 18. 1-15: « 


jMh.« 








23 


M 


26 








24 


T 


26 








26 


W 


27 








26 


Th 


28 








27 


P 


29 


jap 11DD av 




riB.88 

{'TSkSVi..., 


28 


S 


30 


HiK Moon Bnn 'Tl '« ,mp 


^sr.i«^iT^^ 



* The Boole Of R 



lei».JuD*29— Julr27] TAMMUZ 29 DAYS 


[non MTO 


HTi] '" 




PENTATEUCHtL 


PHOPHETIML ~ 




514. 




SABBftTHS. FESTrVIU. F«STS PORTIOHS 


PORIIONt 




»nk 


taiii 


ni'p-is 


nnoDn 


i^e 










29 


s 


1 


N.W MBon inn '-n 'a 


NuQi.SB;l-lt 




30 


M 


2 








M> 












1 


:'T 


3 








2 


W 


4 








3 


Th 


6 








4 


P 


6 








6 


s 


7 


npn 


Num. 19:1-23; 1 


JudBeB11:l-» 


6 


s 


8 








7 


K 


9 








8 


T 


10 








9 


W 


11 








10 


Th 


12 








11 


P 


18 








12 


S 


14 


pV. 


Num.M:S-a6!B 


MloahBiS-fliS 


13 


8 


16 








U 


M 


16 








16 


T 


17 


IFxtatTuunui 1 „ g-. „ u-a..! m 


1^%^:^'" 


16 


W 


18 






17 


Th 


19 






18 


P 


20 






19 


S 


21 


Dnrol Num. S6: 10-80:1 


Jer. 1:1-1:1 


20 


s 


22 


I 




21 


M 


23 






22 


T 


24 






23 


W 


26 


' 




24 


Th 


26 


i 




26 


P 


27 






l^ 


S 


28 


pnn '301 ."K3D -mcD irum.»:3-l«:13 


)J*r.l:l'»;ri 

,fcj,'i-i-»-W:*:i.i 


27 


s 


29 


;DP nlE3 CI' 





181B.July28-Atijr.a!] AB 30 DAYS 


I3K 


OD 


.,'s. 




PENT*tEUCH»L 


~ "prophetic 




SABBATHS. FESTIVALS. FASTS 


PORTIONS 


PORTIONS 




W»k 






nvune 


ni-iDon 


July 




1.V 








28 


M 


1 


New Moon enn [?KT 


Num. 88:1-111 




29 


T 


2 








30 


W 


3 








31 


Th 


4 








"f 


r 


6 








2 


8 


6 


Ivn rac .onm 


Deut. 1:1— 8:32 


I8. 1:1-87 


3 


S 


7" 








4 
6 


M 
T 


8 
9 






6 


W 


10 




lM£ah7?ia-« 


7 


Th 


11 






8 


F 


12 






9 
10 


S 


13 


mm n3c .pnnNi 


Deut. 8:a(l-7Ml 


lB.tO:]-«a 


"s" 


14 








11 


M!16 








12 


T 


16 








18 


w 


17 








U 


Th 


18 








16 


F 


19 








16 


S 


20 


apr 


Deut.J:IS— 11:M 


l8.4B:l«-01:B 


17 


"s 


21 








18 


M 


22 








19 


T 


23 








20 


W 


24 








21 


Th 


26 








22 


V 


26 








28 


s 


27 


I'nn '201 ,nKT 


Dcut. ll:2»— lfl;i: 


lB.M;ll-66:6 


24 


s 


28 








26 


M '29 


\ap ■'laa dt 






26 


T '30 


New Moon [Tin 'IT 'K 


Num. 28: MB 





■The Book of LBmeDtatiODS I* read. 



i 1919, Aug. 27— Sept. 24] 



ELUL 29 DAYS 



6l^K W79 



ni^:^ 


Bit 
ofU« 


T- 2-1. 




PENTATEUCHAL 


PROPHETICAL 


OlTlI 

Mflnth 


Jcwiih 
Month 


SABBATHS. FESTIVALS. FASTS 


PORTIONS 


PORTIONS 




WMk 


Unl 


nme 


nniDDn 


Aug. 








27 


w 


1 


N«w Moon* tsnn "n '3 


Num. 28: 1-16 




28 


Th 


2 


^ 






29 


F 


3 








30 


S 


4 
6 


n^cQ^ 


Deut. 16: 18—21: 9 


Is. M:18— 6S:1S 


31 


S 






' 


Sept. 






' 




1 


M 


6 








2 


T 


7 








3 


W 


8 








4 


Th 


9- 








5 


F 


10 








6 

7 


S 

s 


11 
12 


• 


Deut. 21: 10— «: 19 


Is. 64: 1-10 








8 


M 


13 








9 


T 


14 








10 


W 


15 








11 


Th 


16 




i 




12 


F 


17 




1 




13 
14 


S 

s 


18 
19 


Kin o 


Deut. 86: 1-S9: 8 

1 


18.00 








15 


M 


20 




1 




16 


T 


21 








17 


W 


22 


1 


% 


18 


Th 


23 


• 






19 


F 


24 








20 
21 


S 

s 


25 
26 


^s•'1 ,D*nv3 


Deut. 29: 9 -81: 80 


Is. 61: 10-68:9 


Sellhot* nin^^bi) D^D^DK^D 






22 


M 


27 


1 

1 

1 

i 




23 


T 


28 








24 


W 


29 


n"i 1-^r 


• 





* The Sephardlxn say Sellhot during the whole month of Blul. 

17 



TIME OF SUNRISE AND SUNSl 



(Adapted, by permission, frot 



Day of 
Month 



Lat. 440 North 

(For Maine, Nova Scotia, 
Northern New York, Michi- 
gan, Wisconsin, Minnesota, 
North and South Dakota, 
Montana, Wash in art on. 
Northern Oreeron, Ngrth- 
ern Idaho) 

Portland, Me. 



5.53 
5.51 
5.47 
5.39 
5.29 
5.15 
5.01 
4.43 
4.26 
4.00 
3.41 
8.19 
2.52 
2.86 
2.16 
1.55 
1.47 
1.44 
1.55 
2.13 
2.27 
2.46 
8.06 
8.28 
8.40 
8.55 
4.07 
4.23 
4.85 
4.45 
5.00 
5.10 
5.20 
5.33 
5.89 
5.45 



u 
a 
p 


CQ 


7.37 


4.31 


7.36 


4.40 


7.80 


4.58 


7.19 


5.09 


7.07 


5.33 


6.53 


5.36 


6.87 


5.48 


6.21 


6.00 


6.03 


6.13 


5.40 


6.27 


5.24 


6.39 


5.07 


6.51 


4.49 


7.05 


4.37 


7.15 


4.26 


7.26 


4.17 


7.38 


4.14 


7.44 


4.14 


7.49 


4.18 


7.49 


4.24 


7.46 


4.83 


7.39 


4.46 


7.26 


4.57 


7.14 


5.07 


6.58 


fi.aa 


6.87 


5.83 


6.20 


5.45 


6.01 


5.58 


5.41 


6.09 


5.25 


6.23 


5.07 


6.88 


4.49 


6.51 


4.38 


7.04 


4.28 


7.17 


4.21 


7.37 


4.30 


7.84 


4.38 






6.16 
6.25 
6.35 
6.49 
7.01 
7.13 
7.24 
7.37 
7.49 
8.07 
8.21 
8.89 
9.01 
9.14 
9.87 
10.00 
10.13 
10.18 
10.10 
9.58 
9.44 
9.35 
9.08 
8.41 
8.30 
7.59 
7.89 
7.16 
6.59 
6.43 
6.38 
6.18 
6.18 
6.07 
6.08 
6.09 



Lat. 439 North 

(For Massachusetts, New 
Hampshire, Vermont, Cen- 
tral New York, Southern 
Michigan, Wisconsin, 
Northern Iowa, Wyoming:, 
Southern Idaho, Southern 
Oregon) 

Boston, Mass. 



ft ® 



5.48 
5.48 
5.48 
5.38 
5.39 
5.17 
5.03 
4.48 
4.30 
4.08 
3.49 
8.39 
3.07 
3.58 
3.35 
3.17 
3.11 
3.08 
3.13 
2.38 
3.37 
3.55 
8.13 
3:37 
3.44 
3.55 
4.07 
4.33 
4.88 
4.44 
4.58 
5.07 
5.18 
5.39 
5.87 
5.48 



a 

CQ 



7.30 
7.29 
7.24 
7.14 
7.04 
'6.50 
6.85 
6.21 
6.03 
5.43 
5.27 
5.11 
4.54 
4.44 
4.36 
4.25 
4.22 
4.28 
4.26 
4.82 
4.40 
4.52 
5.01 
5.11 
5.24 
5.34 
5.44 
5.56 
6.06 
6.18 
6.33 
6.44 
6.57 
7.10 
7.19 
7.26 



O 

a 

OQ 



4.38 
4.46 
4.58 
5.14 
5.26 
5.88 
5.50 
6.01 
6.12 
6.26 
6.35 
6.45 
6.59 
7.08 
7.18 
7.29 
7.35 
7.89 
7.40 
7.88 
7.32 
7.20 
7.09 
6.55 
6.86 
6.21 
6.04 
5.48 
5.29 
5.13 
4.55 
4.44 
4.85 
4.29 
4.28 
4.30 






6.20 
6.28 
6.36 
6.50 
6.59 
7.13 
7.23 
7.34 
7.46 
8.01 
8.13 
8.28 
8.47 
9.02 
9.18 
9.37 
9.47 
9.53 
9.54 
9.44 
9.35 
9.17 
8.59 
8.39 
8.16 
7.59 
7.38 
7.17 
7.00 
6.45 
6.30 
6.21 
6.14 
6.09 
6.08 
6.11 



Lat. i(P Nort 

(For Southern Ne^ 
Connecticut, Rhodi 
Pennsylvania, Nem 
Northern Ohio, Inc 
linois. Southern Ic 
braska. Northern C 
Utah, Nevada, Call 

New York Cit 
Chicago, 111. 





•g 

QQ 


5.46 


7.25 


5.46 


7.25 


5.45 


7.19 


5.87 


7.10 


5.29 


7.01 


5.17 


6.48 


5.03 


6.35 


4.49 


6.21 


4.33 


6.04 


4.12 


5.45 


3.54 


5.28 


3.86 


5.13 


3.16 


4.59 


3.02 


4.50 


2.46 


4.39 


2.32 


4.31 


2.27 


4.28 


2.25 


4.29 


2.28 


4.31 


2.38 


4.37 


2.50 


4.44 


3.06 


4.56 


3.19 


5.05 


3.34 


5.15 


8.50 


5.27 


4.00 


5.36 


4.12 


5.45 


4.25 


5.56 


4.35 


6.05 


4.45 


6.15 


4.57 


6.29 


5.09 


6.40 


5.17 


6.53 


5.27 


7.05 


5.35 


7.14 


5.41 


7.20 



• IN SIX NORTHERN LATITUDES 



be Jewish Elncyclopedia, VoL XI) 





Lat.380-3eo North 






rork, 
bland, 
kraey, 
ia,Il- 
«vNe- 
oindo, 
[(Ala) 

J 


(For District of Columbia, 
Delaware, Maryland, Vir- 
ginia, WestVlzginia, South- 
ern Ohio, Southern Indiana, 
Southern Illinois, Northern 
Missouri, Kansas, Central 
Colorado, Central Utah, 
Central Nebraska, Central 
California) 

Washingrton, D. C. 
Norfolk, Va. 


Tiat. 340-320 North 

(For South Carolina, North- 
ern Georeria, Alabama, Mis- 
sissippi, Louisiana. Texas, 
Southern New Mexico, Ari- 
zona, California) 

Savannah, Ga. 
Charleston, 8. C. 


Lat. 30O-28O North 

(For Florida,Southern Geo 
eia, Alabama, Mississip] 
Louisiana, Texas) 

Pensacola, Fla. 
New Orleans, La. 

« 






s 

a 

OQ 


CQ 


h 


53 


s 


s 

d 


■p 




s 

•c 

n 

CQ 


1 


.d 
if- 

I' 


6.22 


5.48 


7.19 


4.49 


6.25 


5.85 


7.08 


5.05 


6.38 


5.30 


6.57 


5.11 


6. 


8.29 


5.45 


7.19 


4.57 


6.81 


5.87 


7.08 


5.18 


6.39 


5.33 


6.58 


5.18 


6. 


6.8S 


5.43 


7.14 


5.08 


6.39 


5.37 


7.01 


5.20 


6.47 


5.83 


6.56 


5.25 


6. 


6.51 


5.36 


7.06 


5.22 


6.52 


5.81 


6.56 


5.32 


6.57 


6.29 


6.51 


5.37 


6. 


7.00 


5.27 


6.57 


5.31 


7.02 


5.25 


6.48 


5.41 


7.04 


5.22 


6.48 


5.45 


7. 


7.12 


5.16 


6.46 


5.42 


7.11 


5.16 


6.88 


5.60 


7.11 


5.15 


6.35 


5.52 


7. 


1.2? 


5.04 


6.38 


5.52 


7.21 


5.07 


6.28 


5.57 


7.19 


5.07 


6.26 


5.69 


7. 


7.32 


4.50 


6.20 


6.01 


7.31 


4.55 


6.19 


6.04 


7.26 


4.56 


6.16 


6.05 


7. 


7.44 


4.35 


6.05 


6.11 


7.41 


4.41 


6.05 


6.11 


7.35 


4.43 


6.05 


6.12 


7. 


7.56 


4.15 


5.46 


6.22 


7.58 


4.25 


5.49 


6.20 


7.43 


4.29 


5.50 


6.19 


7. 


8.08 


8.58 


5.81 


6.30 


8.05 


4.13 


5.87 


6.26 


7.50 


4.18 


5.39 


6.24 


7. 


8.21 


3.40 


5.17 


6.40 


8.16 


3.57 


5.25 


6.33 


8.00 


4.04 


5.29 


6.80 


7. 


B.32 


8.22 


5.02 


6.52 


8.32 


8.48 


5.13 


6.41 


8.11 


8.51 


5.17 


6.37 


8. 


6.45 


8.08 


4.58 


7.00 


8.45 


8.32 


5.05 


6.48 


8.20 


8.41 


5.11 


6.44 


8. 


9.00 


2.54 


4.44' 


7.09 


9.00 


8.22 


4.59 


6.54 


8.81 


8.38 


5.05 


6.50 


8. 


B.23 


2.41 


4.86 


7.18 


9.13 


3.18 


4.53 


7.01 


8.41 


8.24 


5.00 


6.55 


8. 


9.33 


2.86 


4.84 


7.23 


9.21 


3.11 


4.52 


7.05 


8.47 


3.22 


4.59 


6.59 


8. 


0.36 


2.85 


4.84 


7.28 


9.26 


3.10 


4.52 


7.10 


8.52 


8.22 


4.59 


7.04 


8. 


«.37 


2.39 


4.37 


7.19 


9.27 


3.18 


4.55 


7.11 


8.58 


8.25 


5.01 


7.05 


8. 


©.81 


2.47 


4.43 


7.27 


9.22 


3.19 


5.00 


7.10 


8.51 


8.30 


5.05 


7.03 


8. 


».21 


2.58 


4.51 


7.21 


9.12 


3.27 


5.05 


7.07 


8.45 


8.38 


5.11 


7.00 


8. 


O.06 


8.14 


5.00 


7.12 


8.58 


8.89 


5.13 


6.58 


8.83 


3.48 


5.19 


6.53 


8. 


B.50 


8.26 


5.08 


7.02 


8.44 


8.47 


5.19 


6.49 


8.23 


8.56 


5.24 


6.45 


8. 


8.33 


8.40 


5.18 


6.49 


8.28 


8.57 


5.26 


6.39 


8.08 


4.04 


5.29 


6.36 


8. 


8.10 


8.54 


5.29 


6.31 


8.06 


4.08 


5.35 


6.25 


7.52 


4.14 


5.37 


6.28 


7. 


7.54 


4.01 


5.87 


6.18 


7.51 


4.15 


5.40 


6.14 


7.39 


4.19 


5.42 


6.12 


7. 


7.86 


4.16 


5.45 


6.02 


7.32 


4.28 


5.47 


6.01 


7.28 


4.27 


5.47 


6.01 


7. 


7.16 


4.27 


5.56 


5.48 


7.13 


4.32 


5.54 


5.45 


7.08 


4.34 


5.58 


5.46 


7. 


B.58 


4.36 


6.04 


5.31 


6.58 


4.37 


6.00 


5.85 


6.57 


4.39 


5.59 


5.36 


6. 


B.43 


4.46 


6.14 


5.16 


6.45 


4.45 


6.07 


5.28 


6.45 


4.44 


6.06 


5.25 


6. 


B.31 


4.57 


6.29 


5.01 


6.31 


4.54 


6.16 


5.11 


6.84 


4.53 


6.14 


5.14 


6. 


8.21 


5.05 


6.40 


4.52 


6.28 


5.01 


6.25 


5.03 


6.27 


5.00 


6.21 


5.08 


6. 


•.15 


5.14 


6.58 


4.44 


6.18 


5.09 


6.85 


4.57 


6.28 


5.06 


6.29 


5.01 


6. 


8.11 


5.25 


6.59 


4.40 


6.18 


5.17 


6.44 


4.55 


6.21 


5.18 


6.88 


5.00 


6. 


e.ii 


5.88 


7.08 


4.88 


6.14 


5.28 


6.51 


4.55 


6.24 


5.21 


6.46 


5.01 


6. 


e.i4 


5.88 


7.14 


4.40 


6.17 


5.29 


6.57 


4.58 


6.28 


5.26 


6.52 


5.04 


V* 



JEWISH CALENDAR FOR ONE HUNDRED YEARS 

5585 (1824)-5684 (1924) 

The Jewish Year consists of 12 months, each month having 
29 or 30 days. An intercalated year has 13 months, an ad- 
ditional month, called Adar Sheni (second Adar), being added 
between Adar and Nisan. Nisan, Si van, Ab, Tishri, Shebat, and 
the first Adar (in an intercalated year) always have 30 days; 
lyar, Tammuz, Elul, Tebet, Adar (in a simple year, or Adar 
Sheni in an intercalated year) always have 29 days each. Hesh- 
van and Kislev sometimes both have 30 days, when the year 
is called "perfect'^ (Shelemah, indicated by letter ^), some- 
times both have 29 days each, when tlie year is called " de- 
fective^^ (Haserah, indicated by letter n), and sometimes 
Heshvan has 29 days and Kislev 30 days, when the year is 
called " regular ^^ (Kesidrah, indicated by the letter 3). 
Whenever the month has 30 days, the 30th day of the 
month is the first New Moon day of the following month, 
which has two New Moon days. When the month has only 
29 days the following month has only one New Moon day. 
In order to simplify the following tables, only one New Moon 
day is indicated, the one which is the first of the month. Thus 
when there are two New Moon days, the second alone is given. 

The Hebrew letters at the top of each column indicate the 
sign of the year. The first letter indicates the day of the 
week when the first day of New Year is celebrated ; the second 
letter indicates whether the year is " perf ect,^^ " def ective,^^ 
or ^^ regular '^ ; and the third letter indicates the day of the 
week on which the first day of Passover is celebrated. 





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30 



THE JEWISH POPULATION OF TlIK 
UNITED STATES 

BY SAMSON D. OPPENHKIM, J. D. 
DIBECTOB OF THE BUBfiAU OF JEWISH STATISTICS ANU KKSKAHt'H 

When the American Jewish Year Book for 5678 wuut to 
press in August, 1917, the returns for the ouuiuoration of 
Jews in the United States, which the Bureau of Statistic^H and 
Eesearch of the American Jewish Committee had boon oii^agod 
in making, were by no means complete. As a luatU^r of faut 
the work continued to extend well into the current year. TIuh 
article must consequently be regarded both as a mq\Hil and, in 
some measure, as a revised edition of that portion of tluj divi- 
sion- of statistics treating of the number of the J(!Wh of iiH» 
United States, which appeared in the Year Book for 1 9 1 7-1 9 1 8. 

All statistics regarding the number of Jews in the UniUsd 
States have, of course, been estimates. TIhj (?arli(;Ht approxi- 
mation seems to have been made in 1ft 18, by MonUicni M. 
Noah, who put the number at 3,000. Other noU;worthy (tHll- 
mates have been the following : 

Tear Jewish Population Authority 

1824 6,000 Solomon BttfnK 

1840 15,000 American Almanac; 

1848 50,000 M. A. Hcrk 

1880 230,000 William H, Jf&ckmthurH 

1888 400,000 Isaac Markens 

1897 937300 David Hulz\fermr 

1905 1,508,435 Jewish KtntycUfp^Ui 

1907 1,777,185 H^H^itai Hzold 

1914 2,933,^74 Jos^h JuA^Am, 

The 1D17 inquin- into th^ numU^r of JawH in ibtt c/fnuiry 
oatnrally divided itself into two yskrvi^: tlie ouh <x/ywfi;f StfW 

2 



32 AMERICAN JEWISH YEAR BOOK 

York City, and the other concerning the cities and towns out- 
side of the metropolis. 

The following are the principal important estimates that 
were made of the Jews of New York City, prior to 1917 : 

New York City 
Year Population Authority 

1790 385 U. S. Census Bureau (for New 

York Stata) 

1812 400 Gershom Mendes Seixas 

1826 950 S. Gilipan (for New York 

State) 

1846 10,000 Isaac Leeser 

1848 12,000 to 13,000 M. A. Berk 

1880 60,000 WiUiam B. Hackenburg 

1888 125,000 Isaac Markens 

1891 225,250 Charles Frank 

1892 250,000 Richard Wheatley 

1897 350,000 Jacob H. SchifC 

1905 672,000 Joseph Jacobs 

1907 850,000 Henrietta Szold 

1910 861,980 U. S. Census Bureau (for Yid- 

dish-speaking only) 

1911 905,000 Joseph Jacobs 

1912 975,000 Joseph Jacobs 

1912 1,250,000 Bureau of Education (New 

York Kehillah) 

1913 1,330,000 Professor Chalmers of Cornell 

University 

Judging by the two foregoing sets of figures, it was to be ex- 
pected that the number of Jews in 'New York City would, four 
years later, be found to amount to something in the neighbor- 
hood of one and one-half millions, or almost fifty per cent of 
the total Jewish population of the United States. Hence, in 
view of the fact that half of the subject matter of the entire 
inquiry was concentrated within a few square miles, it was con- 
sidered highly desirable to attack, in as intensive a manner as 
possible, the problem of ascertaining the number of Jewish 
inhabitants of the country^s largest city. On account of the 
enormous size of the New York community, individual esti- 



THE JEWISH POPULATION OF THE UNITED STATES 33 

mates, no matter how expert, could not be safely relied upon. 
Accordingly, arrangements were made, by which the co-opera- 
tion of the New York Kehillah, and especially that of Dr. 
Alexander Dushkin, of the Bureau of Education, were secured 
in approaching the problem from a different angle, a new 
method of approximation being invented and tried. 

It is a well-known fact that, whatever differences of belief 
or of religious attitude may exist among Jews, they are almost 
unanimous in observing the High Holidays (New Year, the Day 
of Atonement, and the Passover), practically all Jewish chil- 
dren refraining from attending school on these days. So, if the 
attendance in the public schools on these holidays were ascer- 
tained and were then compared with the attendance on normal 
days, we should get a fairly accurate estimate of the number of 
Jewish children in the public schools of JSTew York. If we 
could then find the proportion of Jewish children to the total 
Jewish population, we should be furnished with an excellent 
means of determining the Jewish population of the entire city. 

It was possible to obtain from the New York City Board of 
Education reliable data concerning the attendance in the New 
York public schools on the Jewish High Holidays in the years 
1913 and 1914, the information for 1915 and 1916 not being 
used, because in 1915 some of the Jewish holidays occurred 
during the registration week of the public schools, and in the 
early fall of 1916 the epidemic of infantile paralysis was still 
raging. The average school attendance for 1915-1916 was, 
however, used in computing the number of children of school 
age in that school year, after the general percentage co-efficient 
had been ascertained by the help of the 1913 and 1914 figures. 
When the 1913 and 1914 holiday figures were compared with 
the attendance on normal days during the same years, it Was dis- 



34 AMERICAN JBTWISH YEAR BOOK 

covered that about 40.5^ of the public school children stayed 
away from their studies on tlie Jewish holidays. Now no doubt 
a modicum of Jewish children attend school on the most 
important holidays, but on the other hand a number of non- 
Jewish children, especially in schools containing a large pro- 
portion of Jewish scholars, absent themselves on such days, 
because they know that the school work will have to be reviewed 
for the benefit of the large absentee contingent. The pro- 
portion of Jewish public school children in the entire city was 
for the purposes of this discussion, therefore, ultimately 
reduced to, or set at 38^, by boroughs, the percentages being 
fixed as follows : 

Manhattan 48^ 

Bronx 40^ 

Brooklyn 38^ 

Queens 7^ 

Richmond 5^ 

A significant check on these estimates is furnished by the 
data obtained in the investigation of the United States Con- 
gress Immigration Commission of 1910, whose method of 
inquiry consisted mainly in questioning children of the public 
schools concerning the nationality of their fathers. The per- 
centage of New York public school children designating their 
fathers as Hebrews, in 1910, was, as to the city's five boroughs, 
as follows : 

Manhattan 46.1^ 

Bronx 20.2^ 

Brooklyn 29.9^ 

Queens 3.5^ 

Richmond 2.8ji 

Considering that the figures of the Immigration Commission 
do not include such Jewish children as may have designated 
their fathers as of American, Eussian, German, or other origins 



THE JEWISH POPULATION OF THE UNITED STATES 35 

or races, the similarity here exhibited is, as Dr. Dushkin points 
out in his splendid monograph in the Jewish Communal 
Register for 1917-1918, very striking. 

The largest discrepancy between these figures and those of 
the estimate made a few years later is discovered in the case of 
the Bronx, where, it is a matter of common knowledge, there 
has been a very large influx of Jews within the past half-dozen 
years. It was ascertained, then, that there were nearly 280,000 
Jewish children in 1915-1916 in the elementary public schools, 
as appears more particularly set forth below. 

But in order to further corroborate the proportion-figure of 
Jewish children of school age obtained through the study of 
school attendance on Jewish holidays, another method of esti- 
mation was resorted to. The Bureau of Attendance of the 
Board of Education keeps a continuous school census of the 
population of New York. Some million and a half cards are 
filed in the census division of the Bureau, each of which repre- 
sents a complete family, parents as well as children, these cards 
covering all schools, both public and private. From these cards 
over 4200 families were selected, practically at random, repre- 
senting a total of 10,332 children of school age, i. e,, at intervals 
of about 350 cards, two cards were selected, the first cards of 
each pair forming Set I, and the second cards forming Set II. 

The names were judged by experts (Dr. Alexander Dush- 
kin and Mr. Meir Isaacs) as to whether they were Jewish or 
non- Jewish, the examiners being greatly aided in their decisions 
by the details noted upon the cards, which included the first 
names of the father and mother and of all the children, the 
nativity of the parents and of the children, the length of their 
stay in America, the year of their immigration, the country of 
their emigration, and the occupation of the father. It will be 



36 AMERICAN JEWISH YEAR BOOK 

readily seen that these data furnished good clues for determin- 
ing as to whether a family is Jewish or not. Even when German 
names, such as Bamberger, or Anglicized names, such as Brown, 
were encountered, the data on the cards, while not as helpful as 
in less puzzling cases, proved quite significant. Thus, if a 
child attended a Catholic parochial school, it would certainly be 
safe to assume that the family was non-J^ewish. Or if in an im- 
migrant family living on Canal Street the son's first name was 
the same as his father's, it would be reasonable to assume the 
family to be non-Jewish, because it is not customary among 
East-European Jews to name any of their children after a living 
father. 

The data furnished by the cards themselves were so help- 
ful in deciding the judgments in question, that only 196, 
or 4.6^ of the names considered, were included in the question- 
able category; while to guard against the temptation to call 
doubtful items Jewish, all cases about which there was any 
uncertainty were unhesitatingly counted as non-Jewish. For 
greater accuracy, the judgments were made in two sets, and the 
average was used in computing the proportion of Jewish school 
children. 

About thirty-three per cent of all the children of school age, 
in the public, parochial, and private schools of New York City 
were by this " card " system adjudged to be Jews. The results 
thus arrived at are in close agreement with those obtained by 
the public school attendance method above described. Since 
the thirty-three per cent represent not only the public school 
children, but also the children in private and parochial schools, 
there were added to the 730,755, in the elementary public school 
register of New York City for 1915-1916, the 200,000 children 
attending, according to the estimate of the Statistical Division 



THE JEWISH POPULATION OF THE UNITED STATES 37 

of the New York State Department of Education, the ele- 
mentary parochial and private schools of the city. This made 
a total of 930,755 children, in 1915, between the ages of five and 
fourteen, of whom 307,149 would appear to have been Jewish. 
931,000 children would mean a total population for New York 
City of 5,172,000, and that is just about what that city^s popu- 
lation was in 1915. 

By the holiday school attendance method it was computed 
that in 1915-1916, there were 277,687 Jewish children in the 
elementary public schools of New York City. To this number 
should be added at least the aggregate of the 20,000 Jewish 
children in private schools, making a total of 297,687 New 
York City Jewish children of elementary school age. The 
difference between the two approximating methods used is seen 
to be only about 9450, or a variation of three per cent. The 
agreement between the two computations is very striking, con- 
sidering the fact that actually not all of the Jewish children 
between the ages of five and fourteen can have been at school in 
the early fall of the year, some obtaining their working cer- 
tificates at the age of thirteen, and others being temporarily 
absent. In accordance with these calculations, the number of 
Jewish children of elementary school age, {i. e., five to fourteen 
years) in this city, in 1917, was found to be 300,000, or very 
close to that number, if anything a little greater. 

We must now proceed to investigate what bearing these 
results have upon the total population. According to the 
United States Census of 1910, the proportion of children 
between the ages of five and fourteen to the total population 
is approximately eighteen per cent, i. e., for every eighteen 
school children the existence of eighty-two other persons may 
be assumed, or one hundred individuals in all ; or where there 



38 AMERICAN JEWISH YEAR BOOK 

are one thousand children of school age, there are 5555 indi- 
viduals altogether. But it is difficult to say off-hand whether 
the proportion of children to adults among the Jews is lower 
or higher than it is in the case of the general population. 
From a study of over four thousand families selected at ran- 
dom from the census cards of the Bureau of Attendance of the 
Board of Education, referred to above, it was found that the 
average Jewish family has 2.5 children at school, whereas 
the average non- Jewish family has 2.35 children at school. 
This would imply a difference of fifteen children per hundred 
families. Assuming five to six individuals per family, this 
would mean a difference of 2.5^ to 3^ in the proportion of 
children as between Jews and non- Jews. On th^ other hand, 
the fact that New York^s Jewish community is so largely com- 
posed of immigrants would tend to make the proportion of 
Jewish children lower than that of the children of the general 
population. In the United States Census of 1910, Population, 
Vol. 3, the proportion of children between five and fourteen 
years in the native population is given as twenty-six per cent, 
whereas among the foreign-bom whites it runs as low as seven 
per cent. But as the Jewish immigration is largely a " family 
immigration,^' the proportion of children among Jewish immi- 
grants is probably twice as great as among other immigrants. 
Thus Samuel Joseph, in Jewish Immigration to the United 
States, shows that, whereas the age group " under 14 " (which 
includes also children below five) is 12.3^ for all European 
immigrants, it is twice as large, 24.8^, among Jewish immi- 
grants. One would therefore not be far wrong in assuming 
that the proportion of school children among Jews is little, if 
anything, above eighteen per cent. It is certainly not greater 
than twenty per cent. Allowing that every twenty Jewish 



THE JEWISH POPULATION OF THE UNITED STATES 39 

children represent only one hundred individuals, or that every 
thousand such children represent only five thousand Jews 
instead of five thousand five hundred and fifty-five, tlien, upon 
the basis of its 300,000 Jewish children of elementary school 
age, we should have in New York City a Jewish population of 
1,500,000, or over 45 per cent of the total Jewish population 
of the country, and in New York State approximately a half 
of the Jewish population of America. Or if we include, 
with New York City, Newark, Passaic, Paterson, Jersey City, 
Hoboken, New Eochelle, Mt. Vernon, Elizabeth, Bayonne, and 
one or two other near-by towns, as all within the New York 
metropolitan district, then there will be found within that dis- 
trict, equivalent in size about to an area of thirty miles square, 
fully one-half of all the Jews living in the United States. The 
second largest Jewish community ia the world, before the out- 
break of the war, it may be mentioned in passing, existed in 
Warsaw, which, in 1914, housed between 300,000 and 330,000 
Jews. 

As to the boroughs of New York, their Jewish quotas would 
seem to be as follows: 

Manhattan 695,000 

The Bronx 210,000 

Brooklyn 567,000 

Queens 23,000 

Richmond 5,000 

To revert to the question of the Jewish population of New 
York City. The number of public school children in this city 
was in the autumn of 1917 almost exactly 750,000. Even if 
we assume that the proportion of Jewish public school chil- 
dren was then only 35;^ instead of 38^ of all the public 
school attendants, we should have, as the Jewish public school 
population, 262,500, which, with the 20,000 private school 



40 AMERICAN JEWISH YEAR BOOK 

Jewish pupils, would give for Greater New York 282,600 Jew- 
ish school children, or over 280,000 Jewish persons between 
the ages of five and fourteen years. Let us now take for 
granted, what is not at all true, that one such Jewish person 
out of five, instead of 5.6, is a school child, between the ages 
of 5 and 14 years, and we have, as the Jewish population of 
New York City, in September, 1917, 1,412,500 souls, or by 
January 1, 1918, 1,422,000, a too conservative maximum 
it would seem, in view of the facts as they have been actually 
ascertained and of the drastic reductions that have been 
assumed. For the New York City population was estimated 
by the Bureau of Education of the New York Community to 
be, six years ago, 1,250,000;' and while this is considerably 
greater than was Dr. Joseph Jacobs' enumeration of 1912, the 
Kehillah's figures are upheld by Professor Chalmer's calcula- 
tions made in 1913, even though these may have been a little 
too liberal. Certainly it would be fair to presume that the cor- 
rect number of New York City Jews was, in 1912, very close 
to 1,200,000. This approximation is supported by data to be 
found in the 1910 United States Census reports. In that 
census the number of persons speaking Yiddish together with 
their progeny, in New York City, was given as nearly 862,000, 
to be exact, 861,980. But there must have been more than this 
number of Jews in the city at that time, as will be seen from 
the following : 

In 1880, before the last great immigrational influx began, 
there were sixty thousand Jews in New York City, not includ- 
ing Brooklyn, which at that time had at least twenty-five 
thousand. By 1910, all these with their descendants would 
have amounted, through natural increase (births over deaths) 
to about 150,000; and it is safe to say that in that year a very 



THE JEWISH POPULATION OF THE UNITED STATES 41 

small part of this group would have given Yiddish as their 
mother tongue, considering how many English, " Portu- 
guese/^ and " Bavarian " Jews there were among tlie original 
eighty-five thousand cited above, not to mention that among 
the immigrants arriving between 1881 and 1910 there were 
undoubtedly quotas from Germany, France, England, and 
Turkey, who also would not have given Yiddish as their 
mother-tongue. We may, therefore, confidently add at least 
one hundred and thirty-five thousand to the 862,000 in ques- 
tion, thus bringing the Jewish population of New York City in 
1910 up to 997,000, so that Dr. Jacobs' 1912 estimate would 
seem to have been too modest, especially in view of the immi- 
gration figures for the years 1910-1912. These show that 
between July 1, 1910, and December 31, 1912, 220,000 Jewish 
immigrants entered the United States, 128,000 intending to 
go to New York, of whom it is safe to say that 110,000 came 
to, and remained in, or soon returned to. New York City. If 
we add this 110,000 to the 997,000 referred to above, and 
allow only 43,000 for natural increases during the two years in 
question, we arrive at an aggregate of nearly 1,150,000 as the 
Jewish population of New York City in 1912. 

Support is provided for the assumption of a slightly larger 
total, however, by the following: The Jewish population of 
the state of New York was, in 1907, estimated as 905,000. 
Probably this figure was too low, but let us assume that it was 
not. By 1910, if there had been no immigration at all, the 
state's Jewish population would have, by natural increase, 
amounted to 960,000. But it could have gained not less than 
120,000 through immigration during those three years, since 
the total Jewish immigration into the country during the same 
period was only a trifie under 250,000. (See Annual Reports 



42 AMERICAN JEWISH YEAR BOOK 

of Commissioner General of Immigration, 1908, 1909, and 
1910). Hence the Jewish population of New York State, in 
1910, must have been at least 1,080,000. It was probably 
more. Yet, based on the number of persons who reported their 
mother-tongue as Yiddish, it is given in the 1910 Mother- 
Tongue Census as 912,692, which would indicate that only 
eighty-five per cent of the New York Jews reported their 
mother-tongue as being Yiddish. Assuming likewise that 
fifteen per cent of the New York City Jews failed to so report 
their mother-tongue, then the 862,000 Jews of this city, who, 
according to the 1910 census figures, did so report, can have 
constituted only about eighty-five per cent of all the Jews in 
New York City; and so, in 1910, the total New York City 
Jewish population would have been at least a million, especially 
since the city had, back in 1907, already over 800,000 Jews. 
(See table above.) Support is lent to this conclusion by the 
survey made in 1911 by Dr. Joseph Brill for the New York 
City Board of Health, his estimate being then 1,100,000. 

Taking the city's Jewish increase during the next two 
years as being at the rate of 80,000 per annum, we should 
have, as the Jewish population of the city in 1912, 1,160,000. 
In all these calculations no allowance has been made for what 
we may call domestic immigration, that is to say, persons com- 
ing from other parts of the country into the metropolis. There 
is no doubt that the aggregate of these, drawn as they would be, 
on account of the commercial and industrial opportunities 
afforded, to this immense financial, manufacturing, and 
shippping focus, cannot have been negligible. Surely their 
numbers can hardly have amounted to less than ten thousand 
in two years. Certainly five thousand in that time would be 
a reasonable expectation. Thus we get a total of 1,165,000. 



THE JEWISH POPULATION OF THE UNITED STATES 43 

Dr. Jacobs himself confirms the opinion that he was too con- 
servative in 1912, for later, in the American Jewish Year Book 
5675, he calculates that by January 1, 1915, there should be 
3,000,000 Jews in the country, in which prophecy he was fully 
justified by the event. And as New York City was even then 
rapidly approaching the point when it should come to contain 
nearly half of the Jewish population of the country, it must 
at the beginning of 1915 have contained very close to 1,300,000 
Jews. 

Starting then with a New York City Jewish contingent of 
1,165,000, in 1912, let us once more glance at the immigration 
figures. Jewish immigrants into the United States aggregated, 
for 1913 and 1914, 239,381, of this number 137,604 giving 
New York State as their destination. It is safe to say that a 
preponderating proportion of these came to, and remained in, 
or speedily returned to. New York City. Thus that muni- 
cipality may well be considered to have gained in population, 
through immigration, about 130,000 Jews, during the two 
years ending July 30, 1914. Certainly 120,000 would be for 
these two years a judicious estimate; since New York City's 
population had been just prior to 1912 forging ahead at the 
rate of about 80,000 additional Jewish inhabitants annually, 
of whom 20,000, on an average each year, were attributable to 
excess of births over deaths, and the balance to influxes, mainly 
immigrational, from without. Hence by July, 1914, the Jew- 
ish population of the city can hardly have been less than 
1,335,000. Since that time, there has been a total Jewish 
immigration into the United States of approximately 60,000, 
of whom 31,000 gave New York State as their destination, 
probably at least 25,000 remaining in New York City. 



44 AMERICAN JEWISH YEAR BOOK 

Totalling now, we shall have something like the following 
for the Jewish population of New York City on January 1, 
1918: 

Population in 1912 1,165,000 

Foreign immigration 1912-1918 145,000 

Domestic immigration 1912-1918 25,000 

Natural increases 150,000 

Total 1,485,000 

In all of these considerations it has been assumed that the 
general Jewish increase rate in this country has been no more 
than two per cent per annum; but as a matter of fact there 
is a strong probability that it has been somewhat greater, 
especially in New York City. In the first place it is well 
known that the death rate of a given Jewish community is 
always lower than the general local death rate. This is prob- 
ably accounted for by the lower infant mortality rate found 
among Jews and by their greater tendency toward longevity. 
Now the death rate of New York City has averaged during the 
last ten years in the neighborhood of fifteen per thousand, while 
the Jewish death rate, according to information furnished by 
the actuaries of the Metropolitan Life Insurance Co., would 
seem to be about eleven per thousand. Again, speaking in 
general terms, the Jews in the large American cities have 
shared fully in the great prosperity which the country has 
enjoyed during the past decade. It is also a well-known fact 
that there is a strong tendency among Jews to translate in- 
creasing prosperity into matrimonial terms. Hence it is very 
probable that the increase rate among Jews has been for a 
number of years greater than the traditional two per cent, and 
during the last half-dozen years, at least, probably nearer two 
and one-half per cent than two per cent in New York City. 



THE JEWISH POPULATION OF THE UNITED STATES 45 

On the other hand, there is nothing to show that the birth rate 
among Jews in our cities is markedly less than it is among 
their non-Jewish neighbors. 

If we are to hold that they have more than the average 
number of children at school, that fact would tend to support 
the foregoing contentions, and the apparent discrepancy be- 
tween the very large number of Jewish children, on the one 
hand, which would make it appear that there were more than 
1,500,000 Jews in New York City, and the diminished figure 
arrived at by the strict application of the two per cent rule of 
increase, and the twenty per cent assumption concerning 
school attendance among Jews, which would make it seem that 
there were less than 1,500,000 in this city, on the other hand, 
would tend to vanish. 

To conclude with New York City, which contains the largest 
Jewish community that has ever existed within the confines 
of a single municipality : It has over 2200 congregations and 
one hundred and eighty-one religious schools with 41,403 
pupils, exclusive of about 14,000 who attend private hedarim. 
It has over a hundred recreational and cultural agencies, more 
than one thousand mutual aid societies, nine hundred and 
sixty-five lodges, one hundred and ninety-three economic 
agencies, and one hundred and sixty-four philanthropic and 
correctional agencies. 

Over $17,000,000 was expended in 1917 by all these activi- 
ties, of which amount the two great philanthropic federa- 
tions, that of Manhattan and the Bronx and that of Brooklyn, 
expended during the past year $2,500,000. In these figures 
are not included the $6,000,000 raised in the year 1917-1918 for 
Jewish War Eelief abroad. Within the confines of the metrop- 



46 AMERICAN JEWISH YEAR BOOK 

olis are printed and published fifty-seven Jewish journals : five 
dailies; twenty-eight weeklies; eleven monthlies; one bi- 
monthly; one quarterly; one annual; ten occasional publica- 
tions. Of these twenty-three are published in English, three in 
Hebrew, two in Judeo-Spanish, and twenty-nine in Yiddish. 

The following table, which is taken from the New York 
Jewish Communal Register, pubh'shed by the New York 
" Kehillah,'' in 1918, affords details of the foregoing summary : 

Table Giving Estimate of Money Expended fob Jewish Purposes 
BY Jewish Communal Agencies in New York City 

AGENCIES SUB-TOTALS TOTALS 

Religious Agencies: 

Permanent Congregations $2,700,000 

Temporary Congregations 250,000 

Kashruth 3,000,000 

Burial Societies 50,000 

$6,000,000 

Religious Educational Agencies: 

Week-day Religious Schools 740,000 

Sunday Schools 50,000 

Parochial Schools 70,000 

Hedarim and Private Instruction 500,000 

1,360,000 

Cultural and Recreational Agencies: 

Young Men's Hebrew and Kindred Ass'ns . . 435,000 
Yiddish Press 2,000,000 

2,435,000 > 

Elconomic Agencies: 

Immigrant Aid Societies 250,000 

Employment Bureaus (not in Institutions) . 15,000 

Technical Schools 195,000 

Clara de Hirsch Home 42,000 

Loan Societies 60,000 

Mutual Aid Societies 1,000,000 

Lodges 1,900,000 

3,462,000 

*This does not include the amount of money spent on the 
Jewish theatre and in Jewish social clubs, both of which are of a 
distinctly Jewish recreational and cultural character. 



THE JEWISH POPULATION OF THE UNITED STATES 47 

Philanthropic Agencies : 

Relief Societies 725,000 

Day Nurseries 50,000 

Child Caring Agencies 975,000 

Hospitals and Convalescent Homes 2,090,000 

Old Age Homes 150,000 

Institutions for Defectives 150,000 

4,140,000 

Correctional Agencies •. 160,000 

Co-ordinating and Research Agencies 100,000 

The great majority of American Jews live in cities or towns, 
there being only about 20,000 Jewish farmers and other agri- 
culturists in the United States; and even most of these twenty 
thousand reside in little centers. Accordingly, to find the sum 
of the Jewish communities in all urban places would be to find 
practically the Jewish population of the nation. It was unfor- 
tunately not feasible to make a survey of the Jewish public 
school population in any of the major cities outside of New 
York. Therefore another method was adopted to ascertain, in 
the case of each town or city, how many Jews it contained. The 
Bureau of Jewish Statistics and Eesearch has a list of nearly 
four thousand congregations, rabbis, etc. To every rabbi or 
other head of a congregation (in some cases to lay officials), 
was sent a questionnaire, asking the recipient to give, among 
other things, a careful and conservative estimate of the number 
of Jews in the city in which he resided. 

The thousands of resulting returns were carefully compared 
with one another, as well as with other data obtained through 
the reports of various charitable organizations in each city, 
and additional information furnished by Young Men's Hebrew 
Associations, the Industrial Eemoval Office, and certain 
analogous organizations; and thus, finally, what is believed to 
have been a fairly accurate estimate in the case of each city 



48 AMERICAN JETWISH YEAR BOOK 

having a general population of more than twenty thousand was 
arrived at, the more conservative averages being generally given 
the preference in all computations, deductions, etc. Whenever 
an estimate seemed unduly large, further inquiries were made, 
and statements from new correspondents were asked, the 
estimate conforming most nearly to the total called for by the 
" rule ^' mentioned below being preferred. 

As to towns with a general population of at least one 
thousand and less than twenty thousand, it was not invariably 
possible to get a reliable estimate of their Jewish contingents. 
Sometimes, indeed, no response at all was received to the 
repeated inquires sent out. But so many replies were obtained 
from the numerous smaller places, as well as from practically 
all cities of larger size, that it became after a while possible to 
formulate a sort of law or rule governing the percentages of 
Jews in localities of various proportions. Indeed it was 
eventually found practicable in the case of smaller places, from 
which no adequate reply was to be procured, to estimate very 
closely their Jewish population by the aid of the " rule ^' in 
question. Quite frequently, after an estimate had been made, 
a return would come in from some little town, and in hardly 
any instance did the detailed report vary materially in its 
total of the Jews of that town from the estimate that had 
been made. 

To explain more particularly, it appears that between 
twenty-five per cent and twenty-seven per cent of the popula- 
tion of New York City are Jews, this city being with regard 
to its Jewish community unique. Next, in the group compris- 
ing Chicago, Philadelphia, Boston, Cleveland, St. Louis, Pitts- 
burgh, Baltimore, Newark, and Detroit, nine large manufac- 
turing centers, on an average a trifle under ten per cent of the 
population are Jews, as will be seen from the following : 



THE JEWISH POPULATION OF THE UNITED STATES 49 



TABLE A* 

Showing 9 Cities Containing an Aggregate of Oveb 9,200,000 
Inhabitants of Whom Nearly 900,000 Are Jews 



General Population 
(Estimated as of 
City Dec. 31, 1917) 

Chicago 2,572,000 

Philadelphia 1,785,000 

Cleveland 782,000 

Boston 765,000 

Baltimore 607,000 

St. Louis 867,000 

Pittsburgh 601,000 

Newark 409,000 

Detroit 841,500 



Jewish Population 

225,000 

200,000 

100,000 

77,500 

60,000 

60,000 

60,000 

55,000 

50,000 



Total 9,229,500 887,500 

In the remaining sixty-two American Cities of the first 
order, namely such as have a general population of at least 
100,000, the percentage of Jewish residents averages a little 
under 4.5^, as will be seen by the following : 

TABLE B 

Showing Sixty-One Cities of the United States, Bach Having 

A Population, in 1917, of 100,000 or More, and a Total 

Population of 12,640,000, with Jewish 

Population of Each 



Jewish 
City Population 

Birmingham, Ala 3,500 

Los Angeles, Cal 18,000 

Oakland, Cal 5,000 

San Francisco, Cal 30,000 

Denver, Colo 11,000 

Bridgeport, Conn 12,000 

Hartford, Conn 16,000 

New Haven, Conn 18,000 

Waterbury, Conn 6,000 

Wilmington, Del 3,500 

Washington, D. C 10,000 

Atlanta, Ga 10,000 

Indianapolis, Ind 10,000 

bes Moines, la. 3,200 



Jewish 
City Population 

Kansas City, Kan 3,500 

Louisville, Ky 9,000 

New Orleans; La 8,000 

Cambridge, Mass 8,000 

Fall River, Mass. , 7,500 

Lawrence, Mass 2,000 

Lowell, Mass 6,000 

New Bedford, Mass. ... 3,500 

Springfield, Mass 6,000 

Worcester, Mass 10,000 

Grand Rapids, Mich. . . . 1,000 

Duluth, Minn 2,300 

Minneapolis, Minn 15,000 

St. Paul, Minn 10,000 



^ In this and all other tables the Jewish population given is that 
of 1917. 



50 AMERICAN JEVWISH YEAR BOOK 

TABLE B (continued) " 

Jewish Jewish 

City Population City Population 

Kansas City, Mo 12,000 Reading, Pa 1,750 

Butte, Mont 1,000 Scranton, Pa 7,500 

Omaha, Neb 10,000 Providence, R. 1 15,000 

Camden, N. J 2,000 Memphis, Tenn 7,000 

Jersey City, N. J 12,500 Nashville, Tenn 3,000 

Paterson, N. J 15,000 Dallas, Tex 8,000 

Trenton, N. J 7,000 Fort Worth, Tex 2,250 

Albany, N. Y 7,000 Houston, Tex 5,000 

Buffalo, N. Y 20,000 Sa^ Antonio, Tex 3,000 

Rochester, N. Y 20,000 Salt Lake City, Utah... 2,500 

Syracuse, N. Y 12,000 Richmond, Va 4,000 

Akron, 2,000 Seattle, Wash 5,000 

Cincinnati, 25,000 Spokane, Wash 1,100 

Columbus, 9,000 Tacoma, Wash 900 

Dayton, 4,000 Milwaukee, Wis 20,000 

Toledo, 7,500 

Youngstown, 5,000 Total 513,000 

Portland, Ore 8,000 or about 4.1;^ 

As to cities of the second class, namely, those having a 
general population of between 50,000 and 100,000, their per- 
centage of Jews averages about three per cent. Generally speak- 
ing, with regard to both classes mentioned above, it may here 
be noted that the proportion of Jewish residents is greater than 
the mean in the East, and less than the average in the West. 
The tables given below are peculiarly instructive as exhibiting 
how the percentage of Jewish residents tends to become 
gradually lower as the total number of citizens decreases. 

TABLE C 

Showing Jewish Population of the Cities of the United States 
Having in 1917 a Population of 50,000, ob Mobe, and Less 

Than 100,000 

(a) Cities Having a General Population of 90,000-100,000 each, 
and a Combined Population of 1,035,100, With Jewish 

Population of Each City 

Jewish Jewish 

City Population City Population 

San Diego, Cal 600 Evansville, Ind 1,500 

Jacksonville, Pla 2,000 Lynn, Mass 7,500 

Savannah, Ga 5,000 Somerville, Mass 2,000 



THE JEWISH POPULATION OF THE UNITED STATES 51 



TABLE C (continued) 



Jewish 
City Population 

Schenectady, N. Y 3,500 

Yonkers, N. Y 5,000 

Oklahoma City, Okla 1,000 

Erie, Pa 1,500 



City 

Norfolk, Va. 



Jewish 
Population 

... 5,000 



Total 



.34,600 
or 3.3j^ 



(b) Cities Having a General Population of 80,000-90,000 Each, 

and a Combined Population of 591,570, With Jewish 

Population of Each City 



Jewish 
City Population 

Fort Wayne, Ind 1,650 

St. Joseph, Mo 3,300 

Manchester, N. H 600 

Elizabeth, N. J 5,000 

Troy, N. Y 3,000 



Jewish 
City Population 

Utica, N. Y 1,600 

Harrisburg, Pa 4,000 



Total 19,150 

or 3.2j^ 



(c) Cities Having a General Population of 70,000-80,000 Each, 
and a Combined Population of 884,590, With Jewish 

Population of Each City 

Jewish 



City Population 

Sacramento, Cal 900 

Tampa, Fla. 1,000 

East St. Louis, 111 1,000 

Peoria, 111. 1,750 

South Bend, Ind 2,000 

Terre Haute, Ind 500 

Wichita, Kan 300 



J. 
J. 



City 

Bayonne, N. 
Hoboken, N. 
Canton, Ohio . . . 
Johnstown, Pa. . 
Wilkes-Barre, Pa 



Jewish 
Population 

.10,000 
. 5,000 
. 1,000 
. 400 
. 3,000 



Total 26,850 

or 3.0^ 

(d) Cities Having a General Population of 60,000-70,000 Each, 
and a Combined Population of 1,149,060, With Jewish 

Population of Each City 



Jewish 
City Population 

Mobile, Ala 2,200 

Little Rock, Ark 1,500 

Pueblo, Colo 1,000 

RQCkford, 111 900 

Springfield, 111 700 

Sioux City, la 2,500 

Covington, Ky 350 

Portland, Me 2,500 

Brockton, Mass 1,500 

Holyoke, Mass 1,000 



Jewish 
City Population 

Saginaw, Mich 1,000 

Passaic, N. J. 6,000 

Springfield, 400 

Allentown, Pa 1,200 

Altoona, Pa. 1,000 

Charleston, S. C 1,900 

Chattanooga, Tenn 1,400 

El Paso, Tex 1,800 



Total 28,850 

or 2.5j^ 



52 



AMERICAN JBTWISH YEAR BOOK 



TABLE C (continued) 

(e) Cities Having a General Population of 50,000-60,000 Each, 

and a Combined Population of 1,022,145, With Jewish 

Population of Each City 



Jeiwish 
City Population 

Montgomery, Ala 1,650 

Berkeley, Cal 300 

New Britain, Conh 2,500 

Augusta, Ga 2,500 

Macon, Ga 550 

Davenport, la 600 

Topeka, Kan 1,000 

Haverhill, Mass 3,500 

Bay City, Mich 1,000 

Lansing, Mich 450 

Springfield, Mo 165 



Jewish 
City Population 

Lincoln, Neb 1,200 

Atlantic City, N. J 4,000 

Binghamton, N: Y 1,500 

Lancaster, Pa. 1,400 

York. Pa 700 

Pawtucket, R. 1 500 

Galveston, Tex 1,100 

Superior, Wis 800 



Total 25,415 

or 2.4^ 



As to towns of the next degree, namely, those having a 
general population of between 20,000 and 50,000, the Jewish 
population in such places averages a trifle over two per cent 
of the total population, as indicated in Table D, while in still 
smaller localities it falls to a little over one per cent, and in 
places with less than one thousand inhabitants to ^-^ of one 
per cent. 

TABLE D 

Showing Jewish Population of One Hundred and Fifty-Seven 

Cities, Bach Having a General Population of Between 20,000 

AND 50,000, With Jewish Population of Bach City 



Jewish 
City Population 

Fort Smith, Ark 300 

Alameda, Cal 200 

Fresno, Cal 400 

Pasadena, Cal 350 

San Jose, Cal 200 

Stockton, Cal 1,000 

Colorado Springs, Colo . . . 660 

Danbury, Conn 300 

Meriden, Conn 1,000 

New London, Conn 1,000 

Norwalk, Conn 550 

Norwich, Conn 1,500 



Jewish 
City Population 

Stamford, Conn 1,500 

Key West, Fla 200 

I'cnsacola, Fla 1,000 

Columbus, Ga 300 

Aurora, 111 300 

Belleville, 111 \50 

Bloomington, 111 275 

Danville, 111 625 

Decatur, 111 200 

Elgin, 111 500 

Evanston, 111 250 

Galesburg, 111 220 



THE JEWISH POPULATION OF THE UNITED STATES 53 



TABLE D 

Jewish 
City Population. 

Joliet, 111 1,100 

Moline, 111 60 

Quincy, 111 400 

Rock Island, 111 412 

Anderson, Ind 150 

Hammond, Ind 600 

Lafayette, Ind 300 

Muncie, Ind. ., 200 

New Albany, Ind 125 

Richmond, Ind 155 

Burlington, la 225 

Cedar Rapids, la 700 

Clinton, la. 65 

Council Bluffs, la 1,000 

Dubuque, la 450 

Ottumwa, la. 412 

Waterloo, la. 325 

Leavenworth, Kan 600 

Lexington, Ky 385 

Newport, Ky 300 

Paducah, Ky 250 

Shreveport, La 1,500 

Bangor, Me 1,000 

Lewiston, Me 275 

Cumberland, Md 600 

Brookline, Mass 200 

Chelsea, Mass 13,000 

Chicopee, Mass 250 

EiVerett, Mass 334 

Fitchburg, Mass. 528 

Gloucester, Mass 243 

Maiden, Mass 9,000 

Medford, Mass. .• 250 

Newton, Mass 400 

North Adams, Mass 500 

Northampton, Mass 400 

Pittsfield, Mass 1,500 

Quincy, Mass 1,250 

Salem, Mass 1,500 

Taunton, Mass 750 

Waltham, Mass 300 

Battle Creek, Mich 244 

Calumet, Mich 110 

Flint, Mich 385 

Jackson, Mich 300 



(continued) 

Jewish 
City Population 

Kalamazoo, Mich 900 

Muskegon, Mich 300 

Jackson, Miss 126 

Meridian, Miss 400 

Vicksburg, Miss. 532 

Joplin, Mo 250 

Butte, Mont 1,000 

South Omaha, Neb 262 

Concord, N. H 158 

Nashua, N. H , 350 

East Orange, N. J 300 

Montclair, N. J 75 

New Brunswick, N. J 3,000 

Orange, N. J 210 

Perth Amboy, N. J 5,000 

Plainfield, N. J 1,500 

Union, N. J 400 

West Hoboken, N. J 350 

Amsterdam, N. Y 300 

Auburn, N. Y 250 

Cohoes, N. Y 200 

Elmira, N. Y 1,200 

Gloversville, N. Y 600 

Jamestown, N. Y 125 

Kingston, N. Y 800 

Mt. Vernon, N. Y 3,000 

New Rochelle, N. Y 3,000 

Newburgh, N. Y 400 

Niagara Falls, N. Y 300 

Oswego, N. Y 300 

Poughkeepsie, N. Y 1,600 

Rome, N. Y 250 

Watertown, N. Y 230 

Charlotte, N. C 350 

Wilmington, N. C 400 

Winston Salem, N. C 116 

East Liverpool, Ohio • 300 

Hamilton, Ohio 260 

Lima, Ohio 300 

Lorain, Ohio 300 

Mansfield, Ohio 50 

Newark, Ohio 100 

Portsmouth, Ohio 128 

Sandusky, Ohio 143 

Steubenville, Ohio 400 



54 



AMERICAN JEWISH YEAR BOOK 



TABLE D 

Jewish 
City Population 

Zanesville, Ohio 250 

Muskogee, Okla 225 

Butler, Pa 150 

Chester, Pa 1,000 

Easton, Pa 800 

Hazleton, Pa 950 

McKeesport, Pa 3,000 

New Castle, Pa 610 

Norristown, Pa 220 

Pottsville, Pa 400 

Shamokin, Pa 235 

Shenandoah, Pa 550 

South Bethlehem, Pa. ... 1,300 

Williamsport, Pa 350 

Central Falls, R. 1 250 

Cranston, R. 1 400 

Newport, R. 1 500 

Warwick, R. 1 500 

Woonsocket, R. 1 900 

Columbia, S. C 281 

Knoxville, Tenn 350 

Austin, Tex 300 



(continued) 

Jewish 
City Population 

Beaumont, Tex 400 

Waco, Tex 1,500 

Ogden, Utah 125 

Burlington, Vt 850 

Lynchburg, Va 300 

Newport News, Va 2,000 

Petersburg, Va 400 

Portsmouth, Va 1,000 

Roanoke, Va. 300 

Bellingham, Wash 250 

Everett, Wash 150 

Huntington, W. Va. 310 

Charleston, W. Va 1,000 

Wheeling, W. Va 1,000 

Green Bay, Wis 300 

Kenosha, Wis 200 

La Crosse, Wis. 235 

Madison, Wis 500 

Oshkosh, Wis 100 

Racine, Wis 700 

Sheboygan, Wis 852 



Total 112,521 



The general population of these one hundred and fifty-seven 
cities was, according to the 1910 census, 4,278,000. It is now 
doubtless over 4,910,000. The Jewish population percentage 
is consequently 2.3^. 

The following table shows the Jewish population of fifteen 
cities in the United States, whose combined general population 
is 17,210,000, and which contain over 2,500,000 Jews: 

TABLE E 

Showing Fifteen Cities Containing Over Seventy-Five Per Cent 

OF the Jews of the United States 



Jewish 
City Population 

New York 1,500,000 

Chicago 225,000 

Philadelphia 200,000 

Cleveland 100,000 



Jewish 
City Population 

Boston 77,500 

Baltimore 60,000 

St. Louis 60,000 

Pittsburgh 60,000 



THE JEWISH POPULATION OF THE UNITED STATES 55 



TABLE E (continued) 



Jewish 
City Population 

Newark 55,000 

Detroit 50,000 

San Francisco 30,000 

Cincinnati 25,000 

Milwaukee 20,000 



Jewish 
City Population 

Buffalo 20,000 

Rochester 20,000 



Total 



2,502,500 
or 14.5^ 



On pages 342-344 will be found a list of one hundred and 
sixty-one cities in the United States, each containing one 
thousand or more Jews. The following cities have at least five 
hundred and less than one thousand Jews : 

TABLE F 

Showing Sixty-One Cities Whose Jewish Population is Five 
Hundred, ob Mobe, and Less Than One Thousand 

Jewish 
City Popul tion' 

Sacramento, Cal 900 

San Diego, Cal 600 

Colorado Springs, Colo 660 

Norwalk, Conn 550 

Macon, Ga 550 

Danville, • 111 625 

Elgin, 111 500 

Maywood, 111. . ; 700 

Oak Park, 111 750 

Rockford, 111 900 

Springfield, 111 700 

Hammond, Ind 600 

Indiana Harbor, Ind 650 

Terre Haute, Ind 500 

Cedar Rapids, la 700 

Davenport, la. 600 

Leavenworth, Kan 600 

Cumberland, Md 600 

Attleboro,* Mass 530 

Beverly, Mass 550 

Fitchburg, Mass 528 

Lexington, Mass 540 

North Adams, Mass 500 

Peabody, Mass 750 

Plymouth, Mass 510 

South Framingham, Mass. 500 



Jewish 
City Population 

Taunton, Mass 750 

Benton Harbor, Mich 580 

Kalamazoo, Mich 900 

Port Huron, Mich 500 

Vicksburg, Miss 532 

Manchester, N. H 600 

Portsmouth, N. H 550 

Red Bank, N. J 500 

Glen Falls, N. Y 500 

Gloversville, N. Y 650 

Kingston, N. Y 800 

Patchogue, N. Y 500 

Peekskill, N. Y 500 

Durham, N. C 500 

Fargo, N. D 600 

Tulsa, Okla 500 

Bradford, Pa 560 

Easton, Pa 800 

Farrell, Pa 550 

Hazleton, Pa 950 

Homestead, Pa 650 

Mount Carmel, Pa 550 

New Castle, Pa. 610 

Sharon, Pa 500 

Shenandoah, Pa 550 

Uniontown, Pa 600 



56 



AMERICAN JBfWISH YEAR BOOK 



TABLE F (continued) 



Jewish 
City Population 

York, Pa 700 

Newport, R. 1 500 

Pawtucket, R. 1 500 

Warwick, R. 1 500 

Woonsocket, R. 1 900 



Jewish 
Town Population 

Burlington, Vt 850 

Tacoma, Wash 900 

Sheboygan, Wis 852 

Superior, Wis 800 



It must not be imagined from this exhibit that no Jews are 
found in the smallest communities. As a matter of fact, of the 
thousands of minor towns, villages, or hamlets in the entire 
country, there are very few in which is not to be discovered 
a nucleus of Jews, sometimes, indeed, amounting to only one 
or two families, but still a potential Jewish community. The 
following list of villages, each containing less than one 
thousand inhabitants (those marked with an asterisk contain 
less than five hundred), indicates that even in the smallest of 
our American communities, there is probably to be found a 
small Jewish admixture : 

TABLE G 

Showing Jewish Population of Twenty-Nine Towns Each Having 
A General Population of Less Than One Thousand 

Jewish 
Town Population 

*Lehr, N. D 14 

♦Laura, 4 

♦Jacksonville, 4 

♦Pittsburg, Okla 5 

Hopewell, Pa 125 

♦Lane, S. C 6 

♦Ehrhardt, S. C 17 

Chapel Hill, Tex 13 

♦Birdsnest, Va : 5 

♦Cheritan, Va 10 

♦Weirton, W. Va 69 

♦Caso, W. Va 10 

♦Genesee, Wis 11 

♦Fenwood, Wis 2 



Jewish 
Town Population 

Panama, 111 5 

♦Denham, Ind 9 

Earl Park, Ind 2 

Milan, Ind 10 

Alberton, Md 14 

Kltzmiller, Md 1 

♦Boyne Falls, Mich 7 

Shelby, Miss 24 

♦Sunflower, Miss 14 

♦Warrenville, N. J 5 

Rosenhayn, N. J 300 

Carmel, N. J 450 

♦Ruidoso, N. Mex. 4 

♦Hunter, N. Y 200 

♦Bloomingdale, N. Y 14 



THE JEWISH POPULATION OF THE UNITED STATES 57 

While lack of space prevents the listing here of every town 
in the United States having a general population of more than 
1000, and less than 20,000, the following, which may be 
(Jescribed as fairly typical, are given at this point, together 
with their Jewish populations, the figure printed after the 
name of each town indicating how many thousands of indi- 
viduals the town contained according to the 1910 census, 
except as to those places situated in the states of Kansas, 
Massachusetts, New Jersey, New York, North Dakota, Ehode 
Island, South Dakota, or Wyoming, whose general population 
is given as of the year 1915. The total number of persons 
residing in these 500 small cities and villages is a little under 
4,200,000, while the total number of Jews living in them is a 
trifle less than 80,000. In this connection it must be recalled 
that the aggregate population of these municipalities has 
greatly increased since 1910, while the Jewish quotas are those 
of the present time. Making due allowances, therefore, it will 
be seen that the Jewish percentage averages between 1^ and 2^ 
of the general population in cities of this magnitude. 

TABLE H 

Showing Jewish Population of Five Hundred Towns Whose 
GfeNEEAL Population is Between 1000 and 20,000 

Jewish Jewish 

City Population City Population. 

ALABAMA Selma (14) 340 

Anniston (13) 220 Sheffield (5) 50 

Atmore (1) 8 Thomas (2) 15 

Bessemer (11) 110 Tuscaloosa (8) 55 

Decatur (4) 170 Uniontown (2) 22 

Demopolis (2) 107 

Dothan (7) 40 

Eufaula(4) 110 ^^^^^^ 

Florence (7) 197 Douglas (6) 100 

Gadsden (11) 107 Morenci (5) 3 

Huntsville (8) 60 Phoenix (11) 150 

Jasper (3) 29 Tucson (13) 40 



58 



AMERICAN JEWISH YEAR BOOK 



City 



TABLE H (continued) 

Jewish 
Population City 



ARKANSAS 

Cotton Plant (1) ... 

Helena (9) 

Hot Springs (14)... 

Jonesboro (7) 

Osceola (2) 

Paragould (5) 

Pine Bluff (15) 

Texarkana (6) 



CALIFOBNIA 



Bakersfield (13) 

El Centre (2) 

Huntington Park (1) 
Long Beach (18) . .. 

Marysville (5) 

Redlands (10) 

San Bernardino (13) 

Santa Ana (8) 

Santa Cruz (11) 

Santa Rosa (8) 

Sawtelle (2) 

Tulare (3) 

Tuolumne (1) 



32 
250 
309 
100 
67 
25 
400 
200 



125 
12 
88 

200 
55 
70 

250 
87 
64 
26 
15 
2 
10 



COLORADO 



Boulder (10) 100 

Cripple Creek * (6) 110 

Leadville (8) 79 

Trinidad (10) 250 

CONNECTICUT 

Ansonia (15) 150 

Branford (3) 60 

Colchester (1) 480 

Derby (9) 250 

East Hampton (1) 9 

Ellington (2) 225 

Moosup (2) 90 

South Norwalk (9) 1,000 

Wallingford (9) 200 

Willimantic (11) 250 



DELAWARE 



Middletown (1) 



Jewish 
Population 



34 



FLORIDA 

Fernandina (3) 17 

Miami (5) 175 

Ocala (4) 62 

GEORGIA 

Albany (8) 265 

Athens (15) 340 

Bainbridge (4) 103 

Brunswick (10) 138 

Cornelia (1) 2 

Dalton (5) 18 

Hazlehurst (1) 8 

Lumber City (1) 4 

Marietta (6) 1 

Rome (12) 250 

West Point (2) 84 



IDAHO 



Boise (17) 



200 



ILLINOIS 



Abingdon (2) 20 

Alton (18) 90 

Beardstown (6) 3 

Cairo (15) 375 

Centralia (10) 50 

Champaign (12) 150 

Clinton (5) 30 

Fort Sheridan (2) 20 

Kankakee (14) 260 

Lincoln (11) 73 

Maywood (8) 700 

Metropolis (5) 12 

Mount Vernon (8) 72 

Oak Park (19) 750 

Taylorville (5) 49 

Waukegan (16) 400 



THE JEWISH POPULATION OF THE UNITED STATES 59 



TABLE H (continued) 



City Population 

INDIANA 

Alexandria (5) 5 

Attica (3) 33 

Bedford (9) 20 

Columbus (9) 95 

CrawfordBville (9) 28 

eiwood 11) B7 

Frankfort (9) 2S 

Gary (17) 1,200 

Goshen (9) 78 

Greensburg (5) 34 

Howell (2) 5 

Indiana Harbor (5) 650 

Kokomo (17) 130 

Ligonler (2) 100 

Madison (7) 70 

Marion (19) 400 

Michigan City (19) 450 

Mount Vernon (6) 85 

Peru (11) 100 

Rockville (2) 20 

Union City (3) 3 

Vincennee (15) GO 

Wabaah (9) 150 

Washington (8) 17 

Whiting (7) 44 

Centerville (8) 130 

DowB (1) 10 

fort MadiBon (10) 65 

Keokuk (15) 143 

Mason City (17) 260 

Muscatine (16) 429 

Oaage (3) 52 

Webster City (6) 45 

AtchlBon (IB) 84 

Coffeyrille (16) 43 

Galena (6) 73 

Hntcblnson (19) 200 



City 

Junction City (6) . 

Manhattan (7) 

Pittsburg (18) .... 
Wellington (6) .... 

Henderson (11) 27E 

Hopkinavllle (9) 150 

Owensboro (16 ) 230 

Shelbyville (3) 39 

Alexandria (11) 450 

Baton Rouge (15) 165 

EogaJusa (2) 65 

Crowley (5) 66 

Donaldsonvllle (4) 100 

Lake Cliarles (11) 286 

Lecompte (1) 83 

Monroe (10) 360 

Morgan City (5) 220 

New Iberia (7) 105 

Plaquemlne (5) 58 

Auburn (15) 300 

Caribou (S) 26 

Ft. Fairfield (2) -4 

Gardiner (5) 70 

Houlton (6) 53 

Old Town (6) 194 

Presque Isle (3) 24 

Rockland (8) 150 

Rumford (6) 50 

MAKYLAND 

Annapolis (9) 240 

Bastport (2) 10 

Frederick (10) 144 

Hageratown (17) 250 



AMERICAN JEWISH TEAR BOOK 



TABLE H (COBTINUKD) 



Cilj- 



Populi 



UA8SACHUSBTTS 

Attleboro (18) 530 

Ablngton (6) 60 

Clinton {13 185 

LeomiDater (18) 210 

I^xlneton fi) 540 

Marlborough (15) 125 

Medway (3) 250 

Melrose (17) 200 

Middleborough (8) 40 

Millis (1) 110 

Mont^ue (S) 51 

Peabody (19) 750 

Plymouth (13) 610 

South Praminebam (9).. 500 

Stonebam 7) 85 

"Watertown 17) 60 

"Weatborough (6) 12 

Wlnthrop (13) 1,500 

Alpena (13) 50 

Ann Arbor (15) 300 

Benton Harbor (9) 580 

Cadillac (8) 72 

Crystal Falls (4) 165 

Escanaba 13) 83 

Hancock (9) 83 

Holland (10) 12 

Houghton (B) 166 

Iron River (2) 100 

Laurlum (9) 76 

ManlBtee (12) 33 

Marquette 12) 95 

Monroe (7) 30 

Negaunee (8) 90 

Petoskey (5) 89 

Port Huron (19) 500 

Sault Sainte Marie (13) . . 206 

Austin (7) 40 

ChlBholm (8) 83 



Cily Population 

Eveleth (7) 110 

Hibbing (9) 166 

Little Falls (6) 30 

Mankato (10) 115 

Stillwater (10) 25 

Virginia (10) 250 

MISBIBBIPPI 

Canton (4) 75 

Clarksdale (4) 220 

Columbus (9) 52 

Greenville (10) 360 

Hattieaburg (12) 125 

Laurel (8) 80 

Lexington (2) 83 

Natchez (12) 261 

Okolona (3) 24 

Port Gibson (3) 63 

Roiling Fork (1) 22 

Starkville 3) 38 

Summit (1) 27 

West Point (6) 14 

YazooClty (7) 78 

BrookBeld (6) 2 

Carthage (9) 69 

Columbia (10) 175 

Hannibal (18) 92 

Independence (10) 85 

Jeflerson City (12) 155 

Lexington (5) 8 

LoulBlana (4) 88 

Anaconda (10) 60 

BilUngB (10) 260 

Helena (13) 347 

Livingston (5) 15 

MiBBOula (13) 75 



THE JEWISH POPULATION OF THE UNITED STATES 61 



TABLE H (CONTlNtlED) 



City Population 

NEBEASKA 

Fremont (9) 100 

Nebraska City (5) 49 

NEVADA 

GJoIdfleld (5) 15 

NEW HAMPSHIRE 

Derry (3) 42 

Portsmouth (11) 550 

NKW JEBSEY ■ 

Allendale (1) 10 

Alpha (2) 15 

Aebury Park (11) 1.250 

Bernardaville (1) 30 

Bloomfleld (17) 1,000 

Boonton (5) 50 

Carteret (4) 150 

Dover (9) 300 

Gloucester City (11) 62 

Kackensack (14) 200 

Harrison (IB) 1,000 

Keyport (4) 166 

Lakewood (4) 376 

Long Branch (la) 1,300 

Maywood (1) 49 

MlllTiUe (13) 170 

Morristown (13) 200 

Oxford (3) 18 

Red Bank (9) 500 

Somerville (6) 250 

South Hiver (7) 250 

Westfleld (8) 80 

Woodbine (3) 1,900 

Albuquerque (11) 220 

HoBwell (6) 20 

San Marclal (1) 10 

Santa Rita (2) 2 

Tome (1) 10 



citr 



PopuU 



Balnbrldge (1) 12 

Batevia (13) 141 

Cold Spring (3) 17 

Dunkirk (18) 164 

Ellenvllle (3) 330 

Fonda (1) 11 

Freeport (7) 300 

Friendship (1) 12 

Fulton (11) 60 

Glen Cove (5) 281 

Glens Falls (16) 600 

Haverstraw (5) 220 

Hempstead (6) 88 

Hoosick Falls (5) 87 

Hudson (12) 450 

Huntington (5) 300 

Ithaca (17) 221 

Johnstown (11) 45 

Lindenhurst (2) 200 

Little Falls (13) IBO 

Malone (7) 20 

Mechantcsville (8) 52 

Medina (6) 60 

Newark (6) 18 

New York Mills (3) 326 

Ogdensburg (14) 55 

Olean (18) 150 

Oneida (9) 60 

Oneonta (10) 35 

Oriskany Palls (1) 10 

Patohogue (5) 500 

Peeksklll (16) 500 

Phelps (1) IS 

Flermont (1) 5 

Plattaburg (10) 205 

Port Chester (15) 1.000 

Port Jervls (9) 150 

Potsdam (*) 40 

Rlverhead (3) 77 

Rouses Ft. (2) 6 

Tarrytown (6) 400 

Tonawanda (S) 100 



62 



AMERICAN JEWISH YEAR BOOK 



TABLE H 

Jewish 
City Population 

Tupper Lake (4) 150 

Woodhull (1) 13 

NORTH CAROLINA 

Asheville (19) 250 

Durham (18) 500 

Gastonia (6) 39 

Goldsboro (6) 165 

Greensboro (16) 187 

Raleigh (19) 120 

Ramseur (1) 1 

Rocky Mount (8) 43 

Statesville ( 5 ) 55 

Tarboro (4) 55 

NORTH DAKOTA 

Bismarck (6) 22 

Dickinson (4) 51 

OHIO 

Alliance (15) 100 

Amsterdam (1) 11 

Bellaire (13) 440 

Bucyrus (8) 43 

Cambridge (11) 62 

Chillicothe (15) 51 

Fremont (10) 55 

Glendale (2) 10 

Ironton (13) 90 

Lancaster (13) 107 

Marietta (13) 80 

Marion (18) 100 

Middletown (13) 225 

Murray (1) 15 

Piqua (13) 60 

St. Marys (6) 33 

Sekitan (2) 18 

Shadyside (1) 20 

Troy (6) 19 

Van Wert (17) 17 

Wellsville (8) 23 



(continued) 

Jewish 
City Population 

OKLAHOMA 

Ardmore (9) 150 

Chickasha (10) 125 

Enid (14) 50 

Guthrie (12) 35 

Hartshorne (3) 18 

Lawton (8) 46 

McAlester (13) 37 

Tulsa (18) 500 

PENNSYLVANIA 

Aliquippa (2) 300 

Berwick (5) 157 

Bethlehem (13) 130 

Braddock (19) 1,600 

Bradford (15) 560 

California (2) 117 

Carbondale (17) 1,000 

Carnegie (10) 320 

Catasauqua (5) 50 

Chambersburg (12) 90 

Charleroi (10) 75 

Coatesville (11) 300 

Connellsville (13) 383 

Conshohocken (7 ) 63 

Corry (6) 34 

Coudersport (3) 8 

Danville (8) 104 

Dickson City (9) 174 

Du Bois (13) 186 

Dunmore (18) 109 

Duquesne (16) 350 

Edgewood (3) 11 

Exeter Bor. (3) 198 

Farrell (10) 550 

Freedom (3) 11 

Glassport (6) 120 

Homestead (19) 650 

Kittanning (4) 145 

Lebanon (19) 100 

Lock Haven (8) 200 

Lyndora (2) 53 



THE JEWISH POPULATION OF THE UNITED STATES 63 



TABLE H (contiktjbd) 



City 



McKeesRocks (15) 220 

Mahanoy Citv ( 16 ) 244 

MeadYille (13) 76 

Middletown (5) 8B 

Midland (1) 94 

.Blount Carmel (18) 350 

Nanticoke 19) 150 

New Kensington (8) 37& 

Northampton (D) 100 

Norlhumberland (4) 88 

OUClty (16) 380 

Old Forge (11) 263 

Olyphant (9) 280 

PhoenUville (11) 220 

Plttston (16) 320 

TottBtown (16) 32S 

Ihinsautawney (9) 27B 

Sharon (15) 500 

Southwest (2) 5 

Steelton (14) 250 

Snabury (14) 150 

Swlsgvale (7) ....-• 375 

TltUBville (9) 205 

Trafford (2) 14 

Unlontown (13) 600 

Warren (It) 102 

Washington (19) 400 

Wilklnaburg (19) 125 

Wlndber (8) 9S 

Bristol (10) 300 

Westerly (10) 212 

SOUTH CABOLINA 

Aiken (4) ...., 76 

Beaufort (2) 105 

BlackvlUe (1) 39 

Camden (4) 75 

Darlington (4) 83 

Florence (7) 49 

Georgetown (6) SO 



Greer (2) 17 

Spartanburg (IS) 120 

Sumter (8) 300 

Union (6) 40 

SOUTH DAKOTA 

Aberdeen (12) IBO 

TENNESSEE 

Binghamton (2) 40 

Bristol (7) 125 

Clarksville (9) 90 

Columbia (6) 55 

Dyersburg (4) 46 

GoodlettsvlUe (1) 8 

Jackson (16) 160 

Johnson City (9) 45 

Abilene (9) 5 

Arlington (2) 28 

Brenham (5) 150 

Brownsville (11) 65 

Brownwood (7) 9 

Bryan (4) 59 

Columbus (2) 22 

Corpus ChrlBtl (8) 110 

Corsicana (10) 200 

Denlaon (14) 36 

Denton (5) 17 

Ennis (6) 38 

Gainesville (8) 40 

Greenville (9) 32 

Hallettsvllle (1) 27 

Hempstead (S) 50 

Hlilaboro (6) 34 

Jefferson (3) 44 

Laredo (15) 93 

Marshall (11) 135 

Orange (6) S9 

Palestine (10) 9S 



64 



AMERICAN JEWISH YEAR BOOK 



TABLE H 

Jewish 
City Population 

Paris (11) 110 

Port Arthur (8) HO 

San Angelo (30) 22 

Sherman (12) 41 

Taylor (5) 57 

Temple (11) 55 

Texarkana (10) 150 

Tyler (10) 350 

Victoria (4) . . .• 120 

Waxahachie (6) 29 

UTAH 

Logan (8) 75 

VERM0^^T 

Bennington (6) 103 

Montpelier (8) 100 

Newport (3) 22 

West Rutland (2) S3 

VIRGINIA 

Alexandria (15) 72 

Berkley (6) 88 

Charlottesville (7) 50 

Cliftonforge (6) 26 

Danville (19) 150 

Fredericksburg (6) 66 

Hampton (6) 80 

Harrisonburg (5) 102 

Pocahontas (2) 81 

Staunton (11) 85 



(continued) 

Jewish 
City Population 

WASHINGTON 

Aberdeen (14) 40 

Centralia (7) 35 

Bllensburg (4) 21 

Walla Walla (19) 100 

VV^EST VIRGINIA 

Bluefield (11) 152 

Eramwell (1 ) 5 

Clarksburg (9) 245 

Elkins (5) 12 

Fairmont (10) 95 

Gary (1) 6 

Kimball (2) 45 

Morgantown (9) 120 

Parkersburg (18) 440 

WISCONSIN 

Appleton (17) 140 

Ashland (12) 22 

Beaverdam (7) 55 

Beloit (15) 167 

Fond du Lac (19) 125 

Hurley (3) 300 

Janesville (14) 83 

Marinette (15) 275 

Neenah (6) 33 

Stevens Point (9) 100 

Wausau (17) 225 

WYOMING 

Rock Springs (6) 28 



The following table shows the Jewish population of the 
country, by states: 

TABLE I 
Showing the Jewish Population of the Uniteh) States, by States 

Jewish Jewish 

State Population State Population 

Alabama 11,086 California 63,652 

Arizona 1,013 Colorado 14,565 

Arkansas 5,012 Connecticut 66,862 



THE JEWISH POPULATION OF THE UNITED STATES 65 



TABLE I (continued) 



Jewish 
State Population 

Delaware 3,806 

District of Columbia.. 10,000 

Florida 6,451 

Georgia 22,414 

Idaho 1,078 

Illinois 246,637 

Indiana , 25,833 

Iowa 15,555 

Kansas 9,450 

Kentucky 13,362 

Louisiana 12,723 

Maine -7,387 

Maryland 62,642 

Massachusetts 189,671 

Michigan 63,254 

Minnesota 31,462 

Mississippi 3,881 

Missouri 80,807 

Montana 2.518 

Nebraska 13,547 

Nevada 503 

New Hampshire 3,257 

New Jersey 149,476 

New Mexico 858 

New York 1,603,923 

North Carolina 4,915 



state 

North Dakota 

Ohio 

Oklahoma 

Oregon 

Pennsylvania 

Rhode Island 

South Carolina . . . 
South Dakota . . . . 

Tennessee 

Texas 

Utah 

Vermont 

Virginia 

Washington 

West Virginia 

Wisconsin 

Wyoming 

Porto Rico 

Alaska' 

Canal Zone 

Philippine Islands 
Virgin Islands . . . 

Guam 

Hawaii 



Jewish 
Population 

1,492 

. 166,361 

5,186 

9,767 

, 322,406 

. 20,502 

4,816 

1,262 

14,034 

. 30,839 

3,737 

2,221 

15,403 

9,117 

5,129 

28,581 

498 

200 

500 

200 

500 

70 

1 

•150 



Total 3,390,572 



From the above table it would appear that the Jewish popu- 
lation of the United States approaches a total of nearly 
3,400,000. But it is probably not quite so great. In a mass 
of computations, such as those here set forth, based from the 
beginning largely on estimates, however carefully such esti- 
mates may have been pared down, it is entirely possible that 
an aggregation of errors amounting to two or three per cent 
may have, in one way or another, crept in, no matter how 
vigilantly the labors of the collators may have been supervised. 
It is therefore considered advisable by the writer, in order that 
the figures here exhibited may not become liable to any charge 



ee AMERICAN JEWISH YEAR BOOK 

of having been padded or inflated, to assume some such per- 
centage of inaccuracy as that mentioned above, and there has 
consequently been allowed 2;^ for such potential errors, making 
the final estimate of the Jews of the United States 3,320,000, 
as of the beginning of the year 1918. 

In the following table there is presented, in each case, the 
Jewish population of each state in the United States, as well 
as the Jewish population of each of the staters larger cities or 
towns, together with the combined Jewish population of all of 
the staters small towns. By a larger city is here meant any 
municipality having a general population of more than 20,000, 
and by a small town is meant any town with a general popula- 
tion of less than 20,000 and more than 1000, the general 
population figures being in all instances taken from the 1910 
census, with the exception of the eight states of Iowa, Kansas, 
Massachusetts, New Jersey, New York, North Dakota, South 
Dakota, and Wyoming, where the 1915 census returns have 
been relied upon. 

TABLE J 
Showing the Jewish Population of Each State, by Cities 

Jewish Jewish 

City Population City Popula ion 

ALABAMA Texarkana 200 

Birmingham 3,500 ^1 small towns 3,012 

Mobile 2,200 

Montgomery 1,650 Total 5,012 

117 small towns 3,736 



CALIFORNIA 



Total 11,086 Alameda 200 

Berkeley 300 

ARIZONA Fresno 400 

OQ orv^oii f^^rr^o lAio LosAngelos 18,000 

o3 small towns 1,013 Oakland 5.000 

Sacramento 900 

Pasadena 350 

Fort Smith 300 San Diego 600 

Little Rock 1,500 San Francisco 30,000 



ARKANSAS 



THE JEWISH POPULATION OF THE UNITED STATES 67 



TABLE J 

Jewish 
City Population 

San Jose 200 

Stockton 1,000 

• 218 small towns 6,702 

Total 63,652 

COLORADO 

Colorado Springs 660 

Denver 11,000 

Pueblo 1,000 

54 small towns 1,905 

Total 14,565 

CONNECTICUT 

Bridgeport 12,000 

Danbury 300 

Hartford 16,000 

Merlden 1,000 

New Britain 2,500 

New Haven 18,000 

New London 1,000 

Norwalk 550 

Norwich 1,500 

Stamf«/rd 1,500 

Waterbury 6,000 

114 small towns 6,512 

Total 6b,862 

DELAWARE 

AVilmington 3,500 

15 small towns 306 

Total 3,806 

rUSTKICT OF COLUMBIA 

Washington 10,000 

FLORIDA 

Jacksonville 2,000 

Key West 200 

Pensacola 1,000 



(continued) 

Jewish 
City Population 

Tampa 1,000 

62 small towns 2,251 

Total 6,451 

GEORGIA 

Atlanta 10,000 

Augusta 2,500 

Columbus 300 

Macon 550 

Savannah 5,000 

117 small towns 4,064 

Total 22,414 

IDAHO 

Boise 200 

35 small towns 878 

Total 1,078 

ILLINOIS 

Alton 90 

Aurora 300 

Belleville 150 

Bloomington 275 

Chicago 225,000 

Danville 625 

Decatur 200 

East St. Louis 1,000 

Elgin 500 

Evanston 250 

Galesburg 220 

Joliet 1,100 

Moline 60 

Oak Park 750 

Peoria 1,750 

Qulncy 400 

Rockford 900 

Rock Island 412 

Springfield 700 

361 small towns 11,955 

Total 246,637 



68 



AMERICAN JEWISH YEAR BOOK 



City 



TABLE J (continued) 

Jewish 
Population City 



INDIANA 



Anderson 150 

Evansville 1,500 

Fort Wayne 1,650 

Hammond 600 

Indianapolis 10,000 



Lafayette 

Muncie 

New Albany 
Richmond . . 
South Bend 
Terre Haute 



300 
200 
125 
155 
2,000 
500 



191 small towns 8,653 



KENTUCKY 



Covington 

Lexington^ 

Louisville 

Paducah , 

97 small towns 



Jewish 
Population 



350 
385 

9,000 
250 

3,377 



Total 13,362 



LOUISIANA 



New Orleans . . 

Shreveport 

76 small towns. 



8,000 
1,500 
3,223 



'T^^al 25,833 Total 12,723 



IOWA 

Burlington 225 

Cedar Rapids 700 

Council Bluffs 1,000 

Clinton 65 

Davenport 600 

Des Moines 3,200 

Dubuque 45O 

Ottumwa 412 

Sioux City 2,500 

Waterloo 325 

205 small towns 6,078 



MAINE 



Total 15^555 



KANSAS 

Kansas City 

Leavenworth 

Topeka 

Wichita 

131 small towns . . . 



3,500 
600 

1,000 
300 

4,050 



Bangor 

Lewiston 

Portland 

113 small towns 



1,000 

275 

2,500 

3,612 



Total 



MARYLAND 



Baltimore 

Cumberland 

67 small towns. 



7,387 



60,000 

600 

2,042 



Total 62,642 



MASSACHUSETTS 



Total 



9,450 



Beverly . . . 

Boston 

Brockton . 
Brookline . 
Cambridge 
Chelsea . . 
Chicopee .. 
Everett . . . 
Fall River 



550 

77,500 

1,500 

200 

8,UU0 

13,000 

300 

500 

7,500 



THE JEWISH POPULATION OP THE UNITED STATES 



TABLE J (contibued) 



City Population 

Gloucester 343 

Haverhill 3.600 

Holyoke 1,000 

lAwrence 2,000 

Lowell 6,000 

Lynn 7.500 

Maiden 9,000 

Medford 250 

New Bedford 3,500 

Newton 400 

North Adams 500 

Northampton 330 

Plttafleld 1,500 

Qnlncy 1,260 

Revere 6,000 

Salem 1,500 

Somervllle 2,000 

Sprlnefleld 6,000 

Taunton 750 

Waltham 300 

Worcester 10,000 

268 amall towns 17,098 

Total 189,671 

MICHIGAIT 

BatUe Creek 244 

flay City 1,000 

Calumet 110 

Detroit 50,000 

nint 385 

Grand Raptde 1,000 

Jackson 300 

Kalamazoo 900 

Lansing 450 

Muskegon 300 

Saginaw 1,000 

139 small towns 7.565 

Total 63,254 



putatlon 



UINl^ESOTA 

Duluth 2,300 

Minneapolis 15,000 

St Paul 10.000 

145 small towns...... 4,162 

Total 31,462 

MISSISSIPPI 

Jackson 126 

Meridian 400 

Vlcksburg 532 

74 small towns 2,823 

Total 3,881 

MISSOUBl 

Joplin 250 

Kansas City 12,000 

St Joseph 3,300 

St. Louis 60,000 

Springfield 165 

216 small towns 5.092 

Total 80,S07 

MONTANA 

Butte 1,000 

34 small towns 1,618 

Total 2,518 

IIEBBASKA 

Lincoln 1.200 

Omaha 10,000 

South Omaha 263 

88 small towns 2.085 

Total 13,547 

22 small towns 503 



AMERICAN JEOTISH YEAR BOOK 



TABLE J (continued) 



CLty 



Concord 

Mancheeter 

Nashua 

68 small towns 

Total 

New JERSEY 

AUantic City 

Bayonne 

Camden 

East Orange 

Blizabetli 

Hoboken 

Irvlngton 

Jersey City 

Montclair 

Newark 

New Brunswick 

Orange 

Paasaic 

Paterson 

Perth Amboy 

Plainfleld 

Trenton 

Weat Hoboken 

West New York 

190 small towns 

Total 

NBW MEXICO 

3E small towns 

BEW YOBK 

Albany 

Amsterdam 

Auburn 

Binghamton 



city 



Jewiih 
Populatioi 



Buffalo 20,000 

IBS Cohoes 200 

600 Elmira 1,200 

350 Gloversville 650 

2,149 Jamestown 125 

■ — Kingston 800 

3.257 Mt. Vernon 3,000 

Newburgh 400 

New Rochelle 3.000 

.„.. New York 1,500.000 

,^■"0° Niagara Falls 400 

lO'^O^ OswGEo 300 

''■"Xrt Poughkeepsie 1,600 

. Ti Rochester 30,000 

I'lll Rome 250 

^■"™ Schenectady 3,500 

^•>tai Syracuse 12.000 

^^■f™ Troy 3.000 

'"" Utlca 1.600 

EirnnA Watertown 230 

^I'll^ Yonkers 6,000 

=•'1^^ 366 small towns 17,618 

isS ™«' '^^^^^ 

5,000 

1,500 ™«'^« CAEOLINA 

7,000 Charlotte 350 

400 Wilmington 400 

350 Winston Salem 116 

1,500 110 small towns 4.049 

16.041 

Total 4,915 

149.476 

Fargo 600 

858 34 small towns 892 

Total 1,492 

7.000 

300 "H'" 

250 Akron 2,000 

1.500 Ashtabula 209 



THE JEWISH POPULATION OF THE UNITED STATES 71 



TABLE J (continued) 



City PojJUlation 

Canton 1,000 

Cincinnati 25,000 

Cleveland 100.000 

Columbus 9,000 

Dayton 4,000 

Bast Liverpool 300 

Hamilton 260 

Lima 300 

Lorain 350 

MauBfleld 50 

Marion 100 

Newark 100 

Norwood 161 

Portsmonth 128 

Sandusky 143 

Springfield 400 

Sleubenville 400 

Toledo 7,500 

Toungatown 6,000 

Zanesvllle 250 

m small towns 9,710 

Total 166.361 

Huskogee 225 

Oklahoma City 1,000 

Tnlea 500 

m small towns 3,461 

Total 5.186 

OBEOON 

Portland 8.000 

SO small towns 1.T6T 

Total 9,767 

PENNSYLVANIA 

Allentown 1,200 

Altoona 1,000 

Braddock 1,600 



city 






150 



Butler . 

Chester . 

Baston 800 

Erie 1,500 

Harrisburg 4,000 

Hazleton 950 

Homestead 650 

Johnstown 400 

Lancaster 1.400 

Lebanon 100 

McKeesport 3,000 

Nanticoke 150 

New Castle 610 

Norrlstown 220 

Philadelphia 200,000 

Pittsburgh 80,000 

Pottsville 400 

Reading 1,750 

Scrantott 7,B0O 

Shamokln 235 

Shenandoah 560 

South Bethlehem 1,300 

Wasliingtoii 400 

Wilkes-Barre 3,000 

Wilkinsburg 125 

WiUianisport 350 

York TOO 

593 small towns 27,366 

Total 322,406 

BtlODB IBI^ND 

Central Palls 250 

Cranston 400 

Newport 500 

Pawtucket 500 

Providence 15,000 

Woonsocket 900 

32 small towns 2,9ba 

Total 20,502 



72 



AMERICAN JEWISH YEAR BOOK 



TABLE J 

Jewish 
City Population 

SOUTH CAROLINA 

Charleston 1,900 

Columbia 281 

77 small towns 2,635 

Total 4,816 

SOUTH DAKOTA 

Sioux City 200 

38 small towns 1,062 

Total 1,262 

TENNESSEE 

Chattanooga 1,400 

Knoxville 350 

Memphis * 7,000 

Nashville 3,000 

90 small towns 2,284 

Total 14,034 

TEXAS 

Austin 300 

Beaumont 400 

Dallas 8,000 

El Paso 1,800 

Fort worth 2,250 

Galveston 1,100 

Houston 5,000 

San Antonio 3,000 

Waco ■. . 1,500 

286 small towns 7,489 

Total 30,839 

UTAH 

Ogden 125 

Salt Lake City 2,500 

34 small towns 1,112 

Total 3,737 



(continued) 

Jewish 
City Population 

VERMONT 

Burlington 850 

51 small towns 1,371 

Total 2,221 

VIBQINIA 

Lynchburg 300 

Newport News 2,000 

Norfolk 5,000 

Petersburg 400 

Portsmouth 1,000 

Richmond 4,000 

Roanoke 300 

87 small towns 2,403 

Total 15,403 

WASHINGTON 

Bellingham 250 

Everett 150 

Seattle 5,000 

■ Spokane 1,100 

Tacoma 900 

67 small towns 1,717 

Total 9,117 

WEST VIRGINIA 

Charleston 1,000 

Huntington 310 

Wheeling 1,000 

92 small towns 2,819 

Total 5,129 

WISCONSIN 

Green Bay 300 

Kenosha 200 



THE JEWISH POPULATION OF THE UNITED STATES 73 



TABLE J (continued) 

Jewish Jewish 

City Population City Population 

La Crosse 235 Superior 800 

Madison 250 151 small towns 5,444 

Milwaukee 20,000 ^ ^ , 777^ 

Oshkosh 100 Total 28,581 

Racine 400 Wyoming 

Sheboygan 852 * 18 small towns 498 

Grand total 3,388,951 

The total Jewish population of the United States amounted, 
therefore, in 1917 to over 3,300,000. If to these be added the 
Jews of Canada and Latin America, it will be found that there 
are now in the Western Continent over three and a half million 
Jews. Twelve states of the Union, namely, California, Con- 
necticut, Illinois, Indiana, Maryland, Massachusetts, Michi- 
gan, Missouri, New Jersey, New York, Ohio, and Pennsyl- 
vajiia, as shown by Table K, contain nine-tenths of all the 
Jews in the country. 

TABLE K 

Showing Twelve States Which Contain Ninety Per Cent of the 

Jews in the United States 

Jewish Jewish , 

State Population State* Population 

California 63,652 Missouri 80,807 

Connecticut 6«,862 New Jersey . . , 149,476 

Illinois 246,637 New York 1,603,923 

Indiana 25,833 Ohio 166,361 

Maryland 63,642 Pennsylvania 322,406 

Massachusetts 189,671 

Michigan 63,254 Total 3,041,524 



The single state of New York, with a Jewish population of 
over 1,600,000, holds, it will be seen, nearly half of all the Jews 
in the United States. Wyoming and Nevada have less Jews 



74 AMERICAN JEWISH YEAR BOOK 

than any other state, namely, five hundred each, about the 
same number as there are in the Philippines. Alaska also has 
approximately five hundred. There are two hundred in the 
Canal Zone, and as many in Porto Rico, seventy in the Virgin 
Islands, and one in Guam. 

In making all the computations for the purposes of this 
census, no attention has been paid to places with a general 
population of less than one thousand. Thus if here or there 
some slight exaggerations have crept into our census, they will 
be, in a measure, neutralized through the omission of the Jewish 
quotas in the numerous townlets that have been disregarded. 
It may be of interest to note here that New York is not per- 
centage-wise the most Jewish city. Chelsea, Mass., has a 
general population of forty-six thousand, and contains thirteen 
thousand Jews, or a Jewish population of twenty-eight per 
cent. Eosenhayn, IST. J. has a general population of six 
hundred, and contains three hundred Jews, or a Jewish popula- 
tion of fifty per cent, while Carmel, N. J. has a general 
population of seven hundred and fifty, and contains four 
hundred and fifty Jews, or a Jewish population of sixty per 
cent. Woodbine, N. J., is practically entirely Jewish in 
population. 



THE JEWS OF SERBIA 75 



THE JEWS OF SERBIA 

BY I. ALCALAY, CHIEF RABBI OF SERBIA 

The Jews of Serbia represent a branch of a large group of 
what is known as Oriental Jewry, who left Spain in 1492 or 
thereabouts, and settled in Turkey. Until the middle of the 
last century they were, in the main, living under the political 
protection of the Turkish Government. All their religious 
and social concepts were identical with those of the Oriental 
Jews. When, in course of time, the portion of Europe now 
known as Serbia freed itself from the yoke of the Turkish rule, 
an entirely new position was created for the Jews residing in 
the liberated portion of the Balkans. At first they spoke 
Ladino and a little Turkish ; but with the formation of the 
Serbian Government, the Jews naturally found it very diffi- 
cult to respond to the hew environment and conditions, owing 
to the fact that they had to learn the Serbian language and 
to adapt themselves to a regime that belonged to the Greek- 
Orthodox Church, whereas formerly the Mohammedan faith 
had been predominant. As the Serbians at first considered 
the Jews loyal adherents of their former oppressors, they 
naturally made the Jews conscious of a civic or patriotic 
inferiority. In consequence, the first years under the new 
regime were not free from strife and struggle. But at no time 
did the Serbians openly display their antagonism or hatred 
towards the Jews, or accuse them of forming a distinct group 
which was not loyal to Serbia. For the Serbian Govern- 
ment, the rulers, and the princes not only found that the Jew 



76 AMERICAN JEIWISH YEAR BOOK 

was in no way disloyal, but on the contrary discovered him to 
be most patriotic in every respect. 

This process of readjustment lasted nearly a whole genera- 
tion. During this time the Jew living in Serbia under Serbian 
rule had every opportunity to adapt himself to the new con- 
ditions. He learned to understand the manners and customs 
of his Serbian neighbors, and, what is most important, he 
learned the Serbian language. Thus the Jew of Serbia until 
the present war began had full opportunity to develop him- 
self, and he became one of the important factors in the life of 
the State. It was not long before he proved his patriotism 
and loyalty by valor on the battlefield and by participating in 
the intellectual and economic progress of the State. 

Before entering upon details, I wish to qw)te some figures 
of statistical interest. When the war broke out, there were 
from thirty-five to forty thousand Jews in Serbia. More than 
half of them were late arrivals, who, after the Balkan war, 
had been attracted to Serbia from the Turkish empire. These 
newcomers constituted an important addition to the Sephardic 
community of Serbia. They had enjoyed the freedom of 
Serbia for a period of ten months, when the present war broke 
out and their further development was thereby interrupted. 
They had been and were still undergoing a transformation. 
In the main they lived like their coreligionists in Turkey. 
When, therefore, the Jews of Serbia are spoken of, that expres- 
sion is limited to the fifteen thousand Jews, who were in that 
country for many, many years prior to the outbreak of the 
Balkan war. Of these fifteen thousand Jews fully ten thou- 
sand were residents of Belgrade, the rest being scattered 
throughout the smaller towns of Serbia, such as Nish, Shabatz, 
Leskovotz, Pirot, Pojarevatz, Smederevo, and Kraguyevatz. 



THE JEWS OF SERBIA 77 

They were mainly occupied with commerce, although, of 
course, they were also to be found among the various crafts. 
Not the least important was the position many of them occu- 
pied in the various liberal professions, in which fields they 
made themselves especially valuable, so much so, that they 
reflected great honor upon the rest of Jewry. 

In consequence of the advantageous political position occu- 
pied by the Serbian Jews, which position they had earned for 
themselves, it was possible for every Jew to be proud of his 
religion and^ at the same time, gain the respect of his neigh- 
bors. It was his chief pride to make his life an open book, 
especially in relation to his non-Jewish neighbors, for he 
noticed that in governmental affairs, as well as in social inter- 
course, no attempt had ever been made to belittle him on 
account of his religion. On the contrary, he noticed a 
genuine interest displayed on the part of his neighbors in his 
religious practices. The king attended Jewish services; and 
on certain occasions the leading ministers and diplomats of 
other faiths came to pay homage and respect to the ancient 
religion of the Jews. All this made such a deep impression 
upon the Jew, that he developed a high regard and loyal love 
for the traditional, as well as for the ceremonial phases of the 
Jewish faith, thus becoming a better Jew and a better Serbian. 

The Serbian Jew is by nature deeply religious, and he is 
ever ready to make all personal sacrifices for the sake of 
Judaism, though he is far from being narrow-minded. He 
does not know the meaning of Eeform in contra-distinction 
to Orthodoxy; but he happens to have developed a type of 
Judaism in which the two are very happily blended. As far 
as the spirit of the times permits, the Jews of Serbia stand fast 
by Jewish traditions; but in their daily lives and in their 



78 AMERICAN JESWISH YEAR BOOK 

social relations they are absolutely up-to-date and modern in 
every sense. Their homes are thoroughly Jewish in spirit, as 
well as in practice. Every Jewish festival is strictly observed 
in accordance with the ritual. The most important phase of 
Jewish life, however, is brought out in the ceremonials of the 
synagogue, to which the Jews come dressed in their best and 
in which they deport themselves with all the dignity and 
respect that a house of worship should command. The litujgy 
has not changed from the accepted traditional form. In all 
the synagogues there are choirs. In Belgrade there is one 
synagogue with a mixed choir, which, in quSjlity and in artistic 
merit, compares favorably with the best choirs to be heard in 
any Jewish house of worship. Of course, all the singers are 
Jews and Jewesses. Many of the melodies rendered in the 
Serbian synagogues have come down to us from the time when 
our ancestors resided in Spain, and are the same as in Holland, 
New York, Montreal, and the West Indies, although these are 
separated from the Serbian Jews by four hundred years 
of history and by many thousand miles. In addition, how- 
ever, the latter have adopted some Hebrew melodies written 
by Sulzer, Lewandowski, and other modern Jewish religious 
composers. The organ is never played on Sabbath or on 
festival days. It is only at patriotic and private festivi- 
ties, occurring on week-days, that the peal of the organ 
ever resounds. The prayers are mainly read in Hebrew, 
but some' are translated into old Castilian or Serbian. 
In addition to festival sermons, special sermons are de- 
livered on Sabbaths, once a month, dealing invariably with 
ethics, history, and other subjects, including every modern 
question of Jewish interest. The sermons are delivered in the 
Serbian language, and attract not only Jews, but also many 



THE JEWS OP SERBIA 79 

persons belonging to other denominations, who come to hear 
the addresses and appear to be moved by the music. On 
Saturday afternoons services are arranged for the young folks, 
especially for the students of the Hebrew classes, which are 
attended by young men and young women, by boys and girls. 
These take an active interest in the services. The boys and 
young men render some of the prayers. Special sermons for 
the young people are delivered, calculated to develop in the 
young folks a sense of pride in matters Jewish. The services 
held on the king^s birthday are made so attractive that the 
leading dignitaries attend the synagogue and display a feeling 
of friendship and respect made stronger because of the whole- 
hearted spirit in which services of this type are conducted. 

The education which the Jewish youth of Serbia receive in 
the city schools is of a fairly high standard, and it may be 
asserted that these schools compare well with educational 
institutions in the most enlightened countries. Education in 
Serbia is compulsory. The Jewish children, however, are not 
satisfied with the public school education alone; they con- 
tinue their studies in high schools and other advanced institu- 
tions. Even children whose parents wish to have them take up 
a business career enter special commercial schools. Accord- 
ingly, the mercantile class contains men of high intellectual 
attainments. Apart from the young men who attend the 
Belgrade University, which, by the way, offers courses also to 
women, several Serbian Jews take courses at leading uni- 
versities of other countries. During the ten years of attend- 
ance in the public, elementary, and high schools, every Serbian 
child is compelled to take up religious instruction as well. The 
Jewish boy must furnish proof that he is receiving religious 
instruction, and unless he brings a certificate of special merit 



80 AMERICAN JEWISH YEAR BOOK 

in that respect, he is not allowed to be promoted. This has 
helped the Serbian Jews to perfect their religious schools to 
such an extent that they really constitute the foundation of 
Jewish life. Every Jewish community has its religious school 
which is in charge of men who, in addition to their knowledge 
of Hebrew, have a thorough modern education. The Jewish 
children, dujing the first four years of attendance at public 
school, are expected to take eighteen hours of Hebrew instruc- 
tion a week. While at the high school, they must necessarily 
curtail their Hebrew studies, so that they can devote only six 
hours to them. The hours for religious instruction never con- 
flict with those for secular education, and that is why the * 
scholars are able to take advantage of both to the fullest ex- 
tent. The children acquire a correct Hebrew pronunciation, a 
thorough knowledge of the Bible, both in the original language 
and in a Serbian translation, and a familiarity with Jewish 
history from the beginning down to modern times, including 
modem social movements. All of the traditional and ritual 
observances are explained to the child, so that he does not 
follow them blindly, but practises them intelligently and 
sincerely. The provincial schools have from one to two 
Hebrew teachers, but in Belgrade, where the number of 
Jewish children in the public, elementary, and high schools 
amounts to seven hundred, there are seven male teachers and 
one female teacher for Hebrew; the principal, who is usually 
a university graduate, also presides over certain classes which 
receive his personal instruction. The teachers are for the 
most part graduates of the Belgrade Jewish Seminary, which 
was supported by all of the Jewish communities of Serbia. 
Many of these teachers also taught in the regular public schools. 
However, since this Seminary has been closed, due to the 



THE JEWS OF SERBIA 81 

inability to attract candidates for this special field, it has been 
necessary to draw upon Palestine for teachers. The Bible is 
taught in Hebrew. Every other subject of Jewish instruction 
is imparted in Serbian. 

The manner in which these religious schools are conducted 
has greatly helped to make the Jews of Serbia a highly 
cultured element in the country. There is a very large group 
of Jewish young men who occupy splendid positions in the 
political as well as in social life. For example, there are over 
thirty-five Jewish physicians in Serbia, though the Jewish 
population amounts to only fifteen thousand. This compares 
favorably with the general community, for in the entire popu- 
lation of Serbia which, before the war, amounted to three 
millions, there was but one physician for every seven thousand 
souls. In every other branch of the professions the quota of 
Jews is in the same proportion. Three Jews have occupied 
positions as under-secretaries in the State Department, one of 
them having been appointed consul-general in one of the lead- 
ing European cities. There is a Jewish officer in the army who 
has worked his way up to the position of colonel, and consider- 
ing that he is only thirty-six years old, there is every reason 
to hope that a still higher military rank will be reached by him. 

The same is the case in the field of literature; the Serbian 
Jews have made their mark in prose as well as in poetry. The 
very same consul-general, alluded to above, Mr. Chaim 
Davitcho, was a writer of distinction, whose original contri- 
butions and translations of foreign dramas, principally from 
the Spanish, have made him one of the most prominent figures 
in the National Theatre and in the leading literary circles of 
Serbia. But apart from having devoted himself to general 
literature, he has also written on subjects of Jewish interest. 



82' AMERICAN JESWISH YEAR BOOK 

For example, he has produced a series of novels dealing with 
the life of the Belgrade Jews, beginning with the period when 
Serbia was under Turkish rule and bringing his material up 
to date. Throughout all of these novels, his special object was 
to bring out very forcibly the loyalty of the Jew to his God 
and the love that he bears his fellow-men. The incidents 
in congregational and home life are treated by him with such 
grace and elegance as to make them stand out like gems 
beautifully set. The brother of Chaim Davitcho, Mr. Benko 
Davitcho, who fell in action during the Balkan war, has also 
earned for himself a reputation as a litterateur. A score of 
others whose contributions to modern literature are most valu- 
able might be mentioned. All these prominent men are not 
only conscientious Jews, but are ever ready to give up their 
time in facilitating the progress of Jewish communal affairs, 
in their respective towns, in the fields which have a particular 
attraction for them. 

The rabbis of Serbia have various functions. They are not 
bound to the synagogue alone, but also devote part of their 
time to the Jewish social life. It often happens that some 
families owe their social and economic well-being to the 
active endeavors and the practical aid rendered them by their 
spiritual leaders. These diversified labors are greatly facili- 
tated by the recognition, aid, confidence, and authority that 
the rabbi enjoys on the part of the Government, as well as his 
community. A rabbi in Serbia, in addition to a diploma from 
a seminary, must, of necessity, have a university education, or 
must give proof of his Hebrew and talmudic learning by a 
document signed by one of the recognized spiritual leaders 
of Europe. He is elected by a committee consisting of the 
Executives of the community and of twenty-five delegates 



THE JEWS OF SERBIA 83 

elected by the Jews who hold a special meeting for their 
election. The Government is always advised of the appoint- 
ment of a rabbi, and it usually sanctions the choice of the 
Jewish community. This sanction carries with it the privi- 
leges accorded the rabbi. Then follows the installation of the 
rabbi with all due pomp and ceremony. Three days are 
devoted to this special celebration, in which non-Jews also 
participate as a mark of their respect to the newly elected 
religious leader. The celebration begins with services in the 
synagogue, and a prayer is offered for the well-being and the 
success of the rabbi. Banquets, receptions, and concerts are 
included in the three days of festivity. The rabbi is in more 
senses than one a state official, for, apart from performing 
religious and social duties, he has to discharge state functions 
according to the demands of the constitution. 

The Greek-Orthodox Church is related to the State to such 
an extent that it plays an important role in the life of the 
Government. The State is, therefore, compelled, in a sense, 
to allow the Jewish religious community to play a similar role. 
For example, marriages and divorces in Serbia are recognized 
mainly and chiefly as Church or religious functions. The laws 
of the State recognize only such marriages and divorces as 
have had the sanction of a religious authority, and do not 
require any separate license. Further, in all Government 
functions, such as taking the oath of office for military or civil 
service, or in legal proceedings, a religious leader must be 
present, in accordance with the provision of the law. The 
Jews have naturally developed the laws regulating marriages 
and domestic relations in such a way that they enjoy not only 
the religious sanctity and privileges accorded them by the 
State authorities, but also executive power to carry out 



84 AMERICAN JBIWISH YEAR BOOK 

decisions. They are even able to invoke the aid of the police. 

As a mark of the cultural development of Serbian Jewry, it 
is perhaps well to dwell upon the excellent work achieved by 
several organizations. First among these organizations, and 
perhaps the most important one, is the one devoted to the 
spreading of the knowledge of Judaism and Jewish history 
among the Serbian Jews. The second in importance is a Fund 
Organization, which has for its aim the grant of fellowships to 
Jewish young men who are desirous of pursuing higher studies 
in foreign universities but are economically unable to do so. 
Due to the efforts of this organization, many young men have 
returned to Serbia, and have repaid the sums spent on them 
not alone with actual money, but with the manifold services 
they are rendering. Then there is the Zionist organization in 
Serbia which has succeeded in uniting the various elements 
of Jewry. The Serbian Jews have always made it a point to 
send their delegates to the Jewish National Congress, have 
paid their shekels, and in every other respect have shared in 
all undertakings of the National Fund Organization. All this 
has been done despite the fact that in Serbia the Zionist move- 
ment has never been very strong; but one thing must be re- 
membered : we have never had an anti-Zionist movement. 

The leading social organization in Serbia is known as the 
Serbian Lodge of the I. 0. B. B. at Belgrade. That organiza- 
tion practically shapes the policy of social relations among 
Jews. This Lodge has been able, in the course of three years, 
to perfect its functions in such a manner as to play a part in 
the social and economic welfare of Serbian Jewry and to 
shape the political opinions of the Jewish community. Every 
member of the I. 0. B. B. considers it a privilege and an honor 
to belong to it, and only such are admitted as are deemed 



THE JEWS OF SERBIA 85 

satisfactory in every respect. The sessions of the Lodge are 
strictly formal, and the order of business is very carefully 
worked out. 

It is hardly necessary to point out that the Serbian Jews, as 
all other Jewish communities, take care of their poor, who are 
mostly strangers that have come to Serbia because of unfavor- 
able conditions in other parts of Europe. Whenever special 
collections are made in order to provide Matzoth, clothing, or 
other articles for the poor, the amount gathered is always in 
excess of the need. The surplus money thus raised is not laid 
aside as a permanent fund, but is at once transmitted either to 
Palestine, or to neighboring Balkan states, toward which a 
special kinship is naturally felt. The Jew of Serbia has never 
sought aid from his coreligionists outside of his country. 
When the Balkan war was declared, a special commission, 
under the leadership of Dr. Paul Nathan and Dr. Kahn of 
Berlin, and of Mr. Elkan N. Adler of London, who also rep- 
resented the American philanthropic organizations, asked 
what could be done for the Jews of Serbia by the Jews of 
America, England, and Germany. The reply was : " We accept 
your greetings and kindly oifer, and you may return with the 
satisfaction of knowing that we always have looked after our 
own and will continue to do so.^^ But apart from the charitable 
aid rendered, the Jewish leaders in Serbia made it a point to 
afford help to their coreligionists, who were temporarily in 
need, in a most dignified and honorable manner, by having 
founded for them what is known as the Jewish Bank. This 
institution is maintained by a membership, and also enjoys 
bequests specially left to it. It is not a free-loan society, be- 
cause all transactions are based on strictly commercial lines; 
it differs from other banks only in the fact that the rate of 




86 AMERICAN JEWISH YEAR BOOK 

interest is lower than in other financial institutions, and that 
credit is extended to many who could not secure a loan from 
any other source. 

The relationship between the Jew and non-Jew in Serbia is 
most amicable, and this is manifested not only between the 
hours of nine in the morning and five in the evening, bu,t also 
in private gatherings. Many of the larger concerns in Bel- 
grade have Jewish and non-Jewish partners, and when it is 
remembered that many of these firms have carried on business 
for over thirty years and that the partnerships have never been 
dissolved because of disputes or through legal proceedings, one 
may well realize how harmonious the relationship is. The 
question of religion never enters into the ranks of society. 
During all Jewish holidays and festivals the leading church 
dignitaries make it a point not only to visit the synagogue, but 
also to offer their congratulations in private by calling at the 
home of the rabbi and conveying their personal, as well as 
their church's congratulations. Whenever the king holds a 
reception, many Jews are specially invited. 

Although Jew and non- Jew live very harmoniously together, 
cases of intermarriage or conversion are extremely rare. Either 
act would be severely criticised on all sides, and the party guilty 
of su^h a misdeed would be boycotted by society at large. The 
Serbian Jew is eminently proud of his Judaism, and feels 
especially dignified by virtue of the fact that he, coming from 
Spain, can trace his ancestors without admixture for many, 
many generations, during which time they have happily been 
subjected to less cruelty and oppression than have been many 
of the Jews who have settled elsewhere. 

Because the Jews of Serbia have strictly observed their 
religious practices, they have been able to retain many customs 



THE JEWS OF SERBIA 87 

that the Jews in other parts of the Orient have perhaps aban- 
doned to a large degree. For example, during the seven days 
of Shiva the friends and relatives who visit the house of 
mourning concern themselves with all of the needs of the. 
mourners. All food required is brought from without, and the 
mourners are spared the troubW of providing any. On the 
Sabbath following a wedding the groom has a special seat of 
honor in the synagogue, which is usually decorated with 
flowers, and during the reading of the Torah he is given the 
honor of holding another scroll in his arms. As a final mark 
of honor, the entire congregation rises, and sings a chant, 
inviting him to read Genesis 24, 1-7. As he steps forward from 
his seat to the Tebah, flowers and candies are thrown from 
the ladies^ galleries by young and old. As he returns to his 
seat, a similar ovation is accorded him. 

This is but a brief outline of the religious, cultural, and 
social life of the Serbian Jews. Naturally, because of the 
terrible results of the present great war, all these facts, recol- 
lections, and associations come to the writer like the memory 
of a dream. The Serbian Jews have lost all'they possessed, and 
will be compelled to begin anew when the time comes to re- 
establish themselves. Their only consolation in their sorrow 
is that Serbia has been able to come into closer contact with 
America, and is better known by the Americans. They firmly 
believe that the Allies, Serbia among them, will be victorious 
in this war. They believe that Serbia will be restored to her 
independence and her place of honor among the nations. They 
are certain that, when the Serbian nation is restored and united, 
the Jews will again resume their happy life of the past, the 
horrors of the present will be forgotten, and, with the blessing 
of God, a yet brighter future will be opened up for all the 
Jews. 



88 AMERICAN JHWISH YEAR BOOK 



THE JEWISH WELFAEE BOARD 

BY CHESTER JACOB TELLER 
EXECUTIVE DIBECTOB^ JEWISH WELFARE BOABD 

Primarily the purpose of the Jewish Welfare Board is to 
help America win the war. Despite the basic American prin- 
ciple of a separate Church and State, or, to be more exact, 
because of it, the American Government in the first days of the 
war perceived the necessity of calling upon certain religious 
welfare agencies to co-operate with it. It sought this co- 
operation because it recognized the value of morale in warfare, 
and knew how close was the relationship between morale and 
modem community ways of life. With a breadth of view and 
a degree of foresight, perhaps never before equalled by a war 
administration of any other country, the United States Gov- 
ernment set itself to thinking out the war problems not only 
in terms of ships, guns, munitions, and supplies, but also in 
health, decency, personal improvement of the men, content- 
ment, esprit. In short, all those elements that go to make up 
the concept of morale in its broadest implications received the 
closest study and the most thorough-going application. 

A special Commission on Training Camp Activities was 
created, as a branch of the War Department, charged with the 
specific duties of making life in the new American camps and 
in the communities adjoining the camps as normal as con- 
ditions of actual war and the problems of an unprecedented 
national emergency would permit. This commission Srought 
to utilize the potential social resources of the country, and it 
early brought to bear on the problem the whole strength of the 



THE JEWISH WELFARE BOARD 89 

Young Men's Christian Association, with its nation-wide 
organization, so thoroughly alive to the needs of young men, 
and so excellently adapted to the nation's new work. 

In the same spirit and for the same purposes the War 
Department through this special Training Camp Commis- 
sion — ^the Fosdick Commission, as it has come to be known — 
invited the large Catholic group in America to participate in 
the national welfare program, with the result that the' Knights 
of Columbus was nominated by the Catholic Church and 
accepted by the American Government as the authoritative 
Catholic agency for war purposes. 

The selection of the third agency to represent what might 
be considered the third largest religious group in America, 
namely, the Jewish group, was fraught with difficulties. It is 
a commentary upon Jewish life in America, and particularly 
upon its work of national organization and management, that 
with 260 years of history behind it, and with literally thousands 
of organizations, no single agency could be selected as repre- 
sentative of the Jewry of America. True, one or two of them 
seemed to have some special claim to such recognition, but by 
reason of their limited constitution or platform, or for some 
other reason, they failed to secure the endorsement of the Jew& 
as a whole. The result was a meeting of representatives of 
some ten or more national Jewish organizations, at which it 
was decided that each organization present should delegate 
certain powers to a new agency. This was the beginning of the 
organization which has since become known as the Jewish 
Welfare Board, and which has obtained the official recognition 
of the Government and, indeed, its mandate to contribute on 
behalf of the Jews of America to the national work of welfare 
among the nation's uniformed men. 



90 AMERICAN JBIWISH YEAR BOOK 

As the officially recognized agency of the War Department 
and of the Commission on Training Camp Activities, the 
Jewish Welfare Board has been called to undertake high tasks 
and responsibilities. It has been charged with the nomination 
and selection of the Jewish welfare workers in the camps and 
cantonments of this country and in the hospitals and rest 
camps abroad. In these increasingly critical times, no task 
could be more exacting. The initial selection of men, however, 
is but part of it. It is necessary that they be carefully 
apprised of their duties as quasi-public officials, that they 
know thoroughly their relation to the Government, to its mili- 
tary establishment, to the Commission on Training Camp 
Activities, and to the welfare agencies with which we have 
joined hands, namely, the Y. M. C. A. and the K. of C. They 
must know the meaning of democracy in the American camp. 
They should understand what Americanization denotes and 
what it does not. They must be inspired with the ideal of an 
army and navy, selected from all races and creeds, to fight for 
the liberties of all peoples and for the rights of all religions, 
under our flag and under the flags of the A Hies. And our wel- 
fare workers must be trained to interpret these things to the sol- 
diers and sailors, to bring group closer to group and all men 
into clearer understanding of Americans ideals and aims in this 
war. The welfare agencies are not invited to do separatist 
work ; they are asked to join hands in fostering and promoting 
a joint welfare program. 

As its contribution to this program, the Jewish Welfare 
Board has placed one hundred and ninety-eight workers in 
the American camps, and has sent, in addition, countless 
others — volunteers who, as occasional or regular visitors in the 
camps, have preached the message of religion, have assisted 



THE JEWISH WELFARE BOARD 91 

in other ways at religious services, visited the sick in the hos- 
pitals, the men in difficulty in the guard-houses, or enter- 
tained men in groups and cheered and comforted them indi- 
vidually. As its contribution to the physical resources of the 
camps, the Welfare Board is erecting thirty buildings, not to 
overlap, not to duplicate, but to supplement the facilities 
created by other agencies, where such facilities were needed, 
either for the housing of our workers and the administration of 
their work, or for the general welfare needs of Jews and non- 
Jews alike. At Camp Upton, near New York, the Jewish 
Welfare Building, recently completed, is used for services by 
soldiers of every faith. On the other hand, the Welfare Board 
makes use of a general church headquarters, erected by the 
General War-Time Commission on the Churches, to the up- 
keep of which it contributes a substantial amount of money. 

Again, we have assisted the American Library Association 
in its nation-wide campaign for books. We have encouraged 
the giving of comforts and gifts to the soldiers and sailors, 
regardless of creed, for to draw distinctions between creeds 
would be to violate the very ethics of the democracy we cherish. 
As official representatives of the Government, we are called to 
minister to all men. 

This by no means implies that religious work has no place 
in the American welfare program, or that the welfare agencies 
must reduce their efforts to that colorless, meaningless some- 
thing which frequently goes by the name of non-sectarianism. 
On the contrary, the Jewish Welfare Board would not truly 
represent the American Government, unless it also represented 
the organized Jewry which created it. Indeed, specialized 
ministrations of each group to its own men in the camps are 
implied in the very organization which the War Department 



92 AMERICAN JEfWISH YEAR BOOK 

created with the help of the Commission on Training Camp 
Activities and the welfare agencies. 

Thanks to this large view on the part of the Government, we 
have in the Welfare Board, for the first time in the history of 
America, an organization which not only has the official en- 
dorsement of the Government, but likewise that of organized 
American Jewry. The board to-day counts among its societies 
no less than fourteeen prominent Jewish associations, among 
which are the Agudath ha-Rabbonim, Central Conference of 
American Rabbis, Council of Jewish Women, Council of 
Young Men^s Hebrew and Kindred Associations, Independent 
Order B^nai B'rith, Independent Order B^rith Abraham, Jew- 
ish Chautauqua Society, Jewish Publication Society of 
America, National Federation of Temple Sisterhoods, New 
York Board of Jewish Ministers, Order B^rith Abraham, 
Union of American Hebrew Congregations, Union of Ortho- 
dox Jewish Congregations, and the United Synagogue of 
America. 

The relationship between the Board and its parent bodies is 
for the most part steady and constructive. The rabbinical 
bodies have co-operated in the arrangement of an abridged 
prayer book for the use of soldiers and sailors of our faith. 
The Jewish Publication Society of America acts as the pub- 
lishing agency of the board, which has thus far placed orders 
with it for the publication of no less than one hundred and 
eighty thousand copies of the Abridged Prayer Booh and one 
hundred and sixty thousand copies of the Readings from the 
Holy Scripture, arranged with the help of the Society's editor. 

With the Agudath ha-Rabbonim (the Federation of Ortho- 
dox Rabbis) the Welfare Board has been active in an inquiry 
as to the demand for Kosher food on the part of the Jewish 



THE JEWISH WELFARE BOARD 93 

men in the camps, governmental sanction having been secured 
for the sale of Kosher non-perishable food products in the 
camps and cantonments wherever such supply is warranted by 
the demand therefor. 

A series of circuits for the conduct of lecture courses to sol- 
diers and sailors throughout the spring and summer months 
is being arranged under the joint auspices of the Welfare Board 
and the Jewish Chautauqua Society. 

To the town or community program of the Welfare Board 
substantial contributions ha^e been made by the Independent 
Order B^nai B^rith, which has organized some eight or nine 
community centers now operating as I. 0. B. B. branches of 
the Welfare Board. While these branches of themselves con- 
stitute a material donation to our total assets, the I. 0. B. B. 
and the Independent Order B^rith Abraham, as well as other 
national Jewish fraternities, are rendering large services of 
another kind through the campaigns for funds which they have 
furthered throughout their lodges and the moral backing and 
encouragement which they have from 'the beginning lent in 
unstinted measure. 

The Council of Young Men's Hebrew and Kindred Associa- 
tions has acted as our special advisory body wherever we have 
needed the viewpoint of the specialist in the inauguration of 
soldier activities in conjunction with Y. M. C. A. work. 

The American Jewish Eelief Committee, though in no way 
a constituent or affiliated organization, has rendered our work 
an immeasurable service by relieving us almost entirely from 
the labor and responsibility of fund-raising. Of the million 
or more dollars that have been contributed to welfare work to 
date, a very large part was secured in the special campaign of 



94 AMERICAN JEWISH YEAR BOOK 

the American Jewish Eelief Committee in New York City in 
December last, which brought together a fund of about five mil- 
lion dollars for the war sufferers and the Welfare Board con- 
jointly, and a large part of the balance of our total income to 
date has likewise been secured under the friendly auspices of 
this committee. 

To the American Jewish Conmiittee, under the leadership 
of Mr. Louis Marshall, we look for the adjudication of cases 
involving religious or other rights of Jewish men, and, in turn, 
we are helping the Bureau of Statistics of the American Jewish 
Committee in its special work of securing a list of the names 
of all Jews participating in the present war in the American 
military 'and naval forces, by sending to that bureau all the 
statistical data which it becomes possible for our agents to 
secure. 

We are also extending assistance and hospitality to the Jew- 
ish Legionaries enlisting in America for service in Palestine 
under the British flag, for which purposes we have made con- 
tributions through the" Zionist organizations. 

Further mention might be made of several other groups of 
organized Jewry, both national and local, that are aiding the 
welfare work in its library collections and in other ways, and 
still the list of our co-operating agencies would not be ex- 
hausted; but for the present purposes of illustrating our 
attachment and responsibility to the organized Jewry of 
America, it is probably not necessary to multiply examples. 

From the foregoing it will be seen that it is probably but fair 
to say the Jewish Welfare Board truly represents both the 
American Government and American Jewry — at least so far as 
the organizations of the latter are concerned. Unprecedented 



THE JEWISH WELFARE BOARD 95 

as this is in the entire history of Jewish life in America, the 
Welfare Board lays no claim to any special distinction for this 
achievement. It is the crisis which confronts America, the 
crisis of the World War, that has brought about this result, and 
if it may be accounted an advantage from the point of view of 
Jewish group life, it is an advantage for which we as Jews can 
assume no merit or distinction. We shall, on the other hand, 
merit rebuke and censure if, to the accomplishment created , 
by these unlftoked-for world conditions, we shall make no 
contribution of our own. We can neither truly speak for our 
Government nor for the organized Jewry of America, unless we 
also represent the unorganized Jewish people of America, and 
by this unorganized Jewish people we must understand the 
eighty thousand American soldiers and sailors of Jewish faith 
and the hundreds of thousands more whose interests are bound 
up with theirs. 

Difficult as it is to be true to the thoughts and sentiments of 
the Jewish people, the Welfare Board ardently desires so to be. 
With this general attitude toward its work, it assumes to preach 
no special -ism (except Judaism), and it permits none to be 
preached. In its religious work in the camps it attempts to 
meet the needs of the men as these needs are there ascertained. 
For Jews desiring an orthodox service it promotes orthodox 
services. For sons of Reform Jews it supplies reform services 
with the Union Prayer Book. For the preponderating group 
of soldiers of orthodox Jewish families, whose requirements 
are best met by what is called Conservative Judaism, appro- 
priate services are conducted accordingly. Without standard- 
izing any doctrine of its own, the Welfare Board endorses all 
degrees of doctrine, if soldiers of Jewish faith uphold them. 
4 



d 



96 AMERICAN JEWISH YEAR BOOK 

Without seeking to impose any ready-made program of its own, 
it gives encouragement to whatever the self-expression of the 
Jewish men demands. 

With the American Library Association the Board is 
co-operating in supplying Yiddish books and other reading 
matter to Yiddish-speaking men. It has prepared to date, for 
distribution in the camps, three pamphlets in Yiddish, one on 
Government benefits and two on problems of social hygiene, 
and it has at the present time in contemplation several addi- 
tional pamphlets in this language. For those who desire to 
conduct Jewish discussion circles it has now in preparation 
several subject outlines for guidance and instruction in the 
conduct of such circles. With a donation from the Jewish 
Publication Society of a library of Jewish books in each of the 
camps and cantonments, foundations have been laid for a Jew- 
ish library, to which the Board is making additions from week 
to week. 

In addition to these group activities along religious or edu- 
cational lines, the welfare workers specialize in what has been 
called personal welfare work, and it may be said without exag- 
geration that no personal welfare work that is being carried 
on in the American camps is more intensive or constructive 
than that of the representatives of the Jewish Welfare Board. 
The personal problems that come before the welfare workers 
have a vast variety of phases, including certain military and 
non-military problems of the men themselves, as well as ques- 
tions involving the men and their families. Our workers are 
regular visitors at the hospitals and guard-houses ; they assist 
and advise men in matters of transfer, leave, and real or fan- 
cied discrimination ; they advise them as to money and business 
matters, many of our representatives giving legal advice. 



THE JEWISH WELFARE BOARD 97 

Others who are rabbis perform individual religious ministra- 
tions of various kinds, particularly kt the embarkation camps. 
In cases involving the families of men, it is our policy to refer 
largely to the American Eed Cross,, to whom the Government 
has delegated these functions. A basis of co-operation has 
been established with the Eed Cross, but of necessity it is still 
tentative. The family difficulties of men in the service consti- 
tute a developing problem. It is a dynamic rather than a static 
situation that we are here dealing with, and the basis of 
co-operation between the welfare agencies and the Red Cross 
must of necessity be progressive rather than fixed, depending 
upon developing problems and experience, as well as upon 
changes in formulation of policy in the Eed Cross itself and 
as between the Red Cross and the War Department. The prob- 
lem of the welfare worker is not confined to the camp, however. 
He follows the soldiers wherever they go. In the near-by com- 
munities, the welfare worker makes the community welfare 
program, co-ordinating the hospitality activities, collecting and 
dispatching the comforts and gifts, managing the entertain- 
ments at the community center, and assisting soldiers and 
sailors in utilizing the religious or other facilities of the town 
or city. 

For the men overseas, a special group has been assigned. It 
comprises a commission of two workers, one of whom will 
remain in Paris to direct the overseas work, while the other 
will return with a report based upon his survey of existing con- 
ditions. A supplementary group will comprise some six or 
eight workers, trained in our American service, whose function 
it will be to initiate similar activities in the important posts in 
Prance, and to this group additions will be made from month 
to month, until an adequate force shall have been sent abroad. 



98 AMERICAN JEWISH YEAR BOOK 

In addition to the welfare workers, the Government contem- 
plates sending army chaplains of the various faiths, to the 
extent of one for each twelve hundred men. The Jewish chap- 
lains will be selected by the Government after endorsement by 
the Committee on Chaplains of the Welfare Board, which since 
the beginning of the war has acted as the Government's advi- 
sory agency, with reference to all Jewish chaplains. 

Though ostensibly limited in its work to the men of the 
United States Army and Navy, the Welfare Board conceives its 
task broadly. Under the latest military rulings, American sol- 
diers abroad are members of the army of the Allies, and with 
this breaking down of national distinctions, the scope of our 
work is correspondingly enlarged. Thus the Welfare Board has 
purchased ten thousand copies of the books for soldiers pub- 
lished by Dr. J. H. Hertz, chief rabbi of Great Britain, for 
distribution among the English-speaking Jewish soldiers of 
the Allies, five thousand copies of Psalms and five thousand 
copies entitled Jewish Thoughts. These are being distributed 
through Dr. Levy, chief rabbi of Paris, and Eabbi Voorsanger, 
chaplain with the American Expeditionary Forces. 

We have likewise made a subvention to the Jewish Commu- 
nity of Washington for welfare work among civilian workers, 
including women as well as men, and we are making a study 
of conditions among Jewish girls in New York as a result of 
revelations recently made with respect to places largely fre- 
quented by soldiers and sailors. 

Whether in all this work we represent the sentiments and 
viewpoints of the Jewish people, or whether we fail to represent 
it, would be difficult to say. Indeed, our Jewry of America is of 
such a composite nature, and the forces that play upon it are so 
varied and deep-rooted in their origin, that it is hard even to 



THE JEWISH WELFARE BOARD 99 

ascertain what these sentiments and viewpoints are. So far as 
the articulate groups are concerned, we know that we have been 
criticized now for being too Jewish, and again for not being 
Jewish enough ; for advocating what has been called ^^ segrega- 
tion ^\ and again for being exponents of what has been called 
the melting-pot theory ; on the one hand, for making martyrs 
of the Jewish men with the colors, because we have failed to 
furnish them with Kosher food, and, on the other, for making 
martyrs of them in our sympathy with those who desire such 
dietary restrictions. Fault is found with us for permitting 
Yiddish books to be circulated in the camps, and again we are 
blamed for not providing enough of this literature. 

Of one other important department of the welfare work scant 
mention has as yet been made — the work of our local Jewries. 
We hold that our purpose is unfulfilled, that we cannot truly 
represent either the Government or nationally organized 
Jewry, unless and until we also represent the locally organized 
Jewry, that is, the local Jewish communities. It is from these 
local communities that the Jewish soldiers have come. It is to 
these communities that they will return. Indeed, in ten or 
a score of years from now, the eighty or hundred thousand, 
or possibly one hundred and fifty thousand Jews of our 
National Army and Navy will be the prominent Jewish citi- 
zens, the upholders of our Jewish communities, the leaders 
and workers of our local Jewries. If we would have them 
remain steadfast to these communities throughout all the 
tragic days through which they must presently pass, they must 
be made to feel the spiritual forces of tlie communities behind 
them. They must know that these forces are with them wher-' 
ever they may go. Apart from this, the national Jewish Wel- 
fare Board is in the truest sense the child of the local commu- 



100 AMERICAN JEWISH YEAR BOOK 

nities, as well as of the national Jewish organizations. It is 
to the local communities that we turn for both moral and finan- 
cial support. We look to them, moreover, for definite service. 
We expect each community to send its Jewish boys into the 
service with a formal expression of its belief in them, so that 
each man may feel the power and strength of his community 
behind him. We expect each community to follow its soldiers 
with gifts, by correspondence and other aid, as well as by 
visitation to their families. We expect each community, mean- 
while, to prepare for the return of these young men, for their 
readjustment to civil life, for the rehabilitation of their 
families, and for the new adjustments in the work of the social 
agencies of each town. 

It was with all these ideals in mind that the Welfare Board, 
unlike the Knights of Columbus and the Y. M. C. A., incorpo- 
rated into its platform a program of town as well as of camp 
work. For the past six months it has worked incessantly in the 
organization of what it calls local branches. At the present day 
eighty-five Jewish communities have organized themselves as 
J. W. B. branches. Twenty more are in process of organiza- 
tion. Before the end of this year the Welfare Board plans to 
have organized no less than two hundred local Jewries as Wel- 
fare Board subsidiaries. The results of this policy have already 
proven the wisdom thereof. It has stimulated wide-spread 
interest in soldier and sailor work. This is particularly true 
of those centers of Jewish life which are somewhat remote from 
large encampments. In the camp cities or camp towns the 
presence of uniformed men has of itself stimulated this inter- 
est, and it may be truly said that the real welfare workers 
are. the Jews and Jewesses of these camp cities. In the very 
first days and months of the war, they were contributing their 



THE JEWISH WELFARE BOARD 101 

time and energies and giving of their means to the entertain- 
ment of men on leave, to visiting the sick, and to affording 
comfort to the lonely and dejected. But in the towns more 
remote from the camps this stimulation of interest has been 
provided by the organization of the J. W. B. branches. 

The fiscal policy of the Welfare Board was determined sev- 
eral months ago when its Executive Committee voted in favor 
of a central collection and disbursement of funds under which 
all moneys raised for and in behalf of the Welfare Board 
became payable to the national treasurer, the national body 
making itself responsible in turn for promoting and financing 
welfare work in the towns and cities as well as in the American 
and overseas camps. It was felt that, though this fund was 
procured from the local Jewries of the country, authority to 
spend it should proceed from the central office, which, by 
reason of its national and international perspective, could best 
decide as to the wisdom of expenditures, and thus guarantee 
to the local Jewries the best possible administration of the 
funds that they themselves had created. Any other policy 
would have been fatal, and would have made each community 
the collector and dispenser of its own welfare fund, thus lead- 
ing to excessive outlays for town hospitality, much of which 
is not only of no positive social value, but of a decided negative 
social value, while leaving without adequate resources the more 
immediately important work in the camps. Indeed to hiave 
adopted a less centralized system would have made impossible 
a truly responsible administration of tlie fund, such as the War 
Department justly expects of the agency which it has nomi- 
nated as the authoritative functioning body for its Jewish 
group of soldiers. The National Jewish Welfare Board desires 
to be in the truest sense the representative of local Jewries. It 



102 AMERICAN JEWISH YEAR BOOK 

is the local "communities organized, combined, and raised to 
national self-consciousness. In this view of the case, the 
national office is but the visible expression of a covenant or 
pact between all the local communities of America, each of 
which desires to serve the most by serving all the rest. 

The national office furnishes to each community under this 
pact the advantages of a broad perspective. It provides a 
means of contact with the Federal Government to which it is 
accredited by the Jews of America. It has to-day an organi- 
zation of nearly 200 workers associated for the purpose of 
carrying on the welfare work of the correlated communities of 
the country. It provides to these communities a school in 
which each month a new group of some twenty-five or more 
men from various sections are trained as community ser- 
vants — ^men who now give themselves to Jewish war work and 
will not fail the community when later called upon to help solve 
the even more trying problems of the post-war period. It 
places at the disposition of all local communities a Research 
Department for the study of the war aspects of community 
problems as they change and develop under the impact of the 
world struggle. 

Has not then an organization like this, created in an emer- 
gency — representing the American Government, organized 
Jewry, the plain Jewish people, and the local communities of 
America — a unique opportunity? And shall not American 
Jews avail themselves of it by rising now as never before to a 
true consciousness of the character, the scope, and the mean 
ing of their entire community ? 



THE COLLECTION OF JEWISH WAR STATISTICS 103 



THE COLLECTIOlSr OF JEWISH WAR STATISTICS 

BY JULIAN LEAVITT, 

IN CHARGE OF THE DIVISION OF WAS STATISTICS OF THE BUREAU OF 

JEWISH STATISTICS AND RESEARCH 

From the first days of the entry of the United States into the 
World War the American Jewish Committee felt the need of, 
and recognized the opportunity for, a complete record of Jewish 
service in the common cause. For reasons too well known to 
be enumerated here, statistics of an entirely reliable nature 
bearing upon Jewish service in the wars of the United States 
had never before been gathered. The work of Simon Wolf, 
The American Jew as Patriot, Soldier, and Citizen (1895), is 
obviously a bio-historical rather than a statistical record. The 
Preliminary List of Jews Serving in the Spanish- American 
War, compiled by Dr. Cyrus Adler and published in the Year 
Book 5661 (1900-1901), is, as its title implies, a tentative 
effort ; while the article on Jews in the United States Army and 
Navy, prepared by Captain Landes for the Year Book 5677 
(1916-17), is admittedly a rough approximation rather than a 
scientific census. The present moment, it was therefore felt, 
presented, for the first time in the history of American Jewry, 
an opportunity for the preparation of a contemporary record 
that should prove of service to the Jews of America for all time. 

To this end the American Jewish Committee assigned to its 
Bureau of Statistics and Research, as a major function, the 
task of collecting data bearing upon all Jews in the military 
and naval services of the United States, at home or abroad. 



104 AMERICAN JEWISH YEAR BOOK 

in the regular civilian service at Washington, in the newly 
established War Bureaus, and in the various auxiliary services 
where Jews are known to be rendering valuable aid — in short, 
to establish at this time^ and later to render possible the publi- 
cation of, a comprehensive historical and statistical record of 
Jewish contributions to the success of the United States in the 
greatest world war. 

But while the many advantages of such an undertaking were 
generally recognized, its difficulties were by no means under- 
estimated. It was known that the official records of the army 
and navy make no note of religious affiliations, so that a bare 
examination of the millions of names on the rolls, even if per- 
mission were granted to make such search, would in itself 
be an enterprise of considerable magnitude. It was also recog- 
nized that the Jewish quotas, coming as they would from 
widely scattered parts of the country, would contain thousands 
of men who had naturally drifted away from Jewish affiliations, 
other thousands who had, in the process of Americanization, 
changed their names, and some who would, for reasons of their 
own, even seek to conceal their racial or religious identity. In 
view of this, it was decided to approach the problem from as 
many angles as possible, in order to reduce to a minimum that 
percentage of error always inherent in a work of this nature. 
Three main channels of information are thus being explored : 
(1) Jewish sources; (2) official records at Washington; (3) 
other records of a public and private nature. 

From the very inception of this war statistics work, the 
closest possible co-operation has been fostered and maintained 
between the Bureau of Statistics and the agents of the Jewish 
Welfare Board stationed at various camps and ships and 
also at the front. These representatives are under instructions 



THE COLLEXJTION OF JEWISH WAR STATISTICS 105 

to send in to the Bureau or to the Board or both all information 
of a statistical character gathered by, or known to, them, 
including individual registration cards signed by the Jewish 
soldiers, religious censuses taken by the Board or by other 
agencies in the camps, holiday furlough records, recipients 
of Bibles, etc. The Board has also posted conspicuous notices 
in the camps, advertising the work in question, and has en- 
closed the proper material, such as blanks and registration 
cards, in the vast number of Bibles and Prayer Books which it 
has issued to the Jewish soldiers and sailors, as well as in the 
other literature which it is spreading broadcast. In short, it 
has lent its co-operation systematically and efficiently, thereby 
assuring to the Bureau of Statistics a steady flow of the most 
valuable information possible direct from camps, ships, and 
trenches. All other Jewish organizations, local and national, 
throughout the country — religious, fraternal, trade and labor, 
Zionist organizations, etc. — have likewise been circularized 
by the Bureau of Statistics with requests for lists of members 
who have been called to the colors. 

The response to date has been tremendously gratifying. To 
the rabbis of the country the Bureau of Statistics is particularly 
indebted for a great volume of information respecting the men 
in service belonging to their congregations, invaluable in qual- 
ity and quantity. All Jewish dailies and weeklies have been 
carefully searched and clipped for reports of enlistments, for 
group and local honor rolls, for news of service flag dedications, 
etc., and news items that suggest clues to other sources of infor- 
mation have been diligently followed up. Thus, a casual press 
clipping one day reported the organization of a Jewish Soldiers' 
Club at Camp Gordon. The secretary of the club was at once 



106 AMERICAN JEWISH YEAR BOOK 

communicated with, and he responded in due course with 
a remarkably painstaking list of the club's members. 

In addition, every effort is being made to reach all Jewish 
agencies likely to possess information of value — parents' asso- 
ciations, or other next-of-kin groups that are in touch with 
the men at the front ; Jewish publicists and communal workers ; 
Jewish newspaper men on the staffs of Jewish or non-Jewish 
papers; employers' and employes' associations in trades and 
industries wholly or preponderantly Jewish ; lodges, clubs, and 
the like. 

Eecognizing, however, that, because of the limitations 
already referred to, purely Jewish sources of information would 
be inadequate for the purposes in view, a determined effort has 
been made to gain access to departmental records in Washing- 
ton and at the various state capitals, in order to gather at the 
best original source whatever data might be secured as to 
Jewish enlistments, with the idea that the two inquiries — one 
into Jewish, and the other into non-Jewish channels of infor- 
mation — should serve to supplement and correct each other. 
For this purpose an office was opened, at the beginning of the 
present year, in Washington, in charge of the present writer. 
It was hoped that access might be secured either to the files of 
the War Risk Insurance Bureau, where are kept the original 
applications of all soldiers and sailors who have taken out 
insurance policies with the Government, as well as the allot- 
ment and allowance records, or to the files of the Adjutant- 
General's Office, the Statistical Division of which collects and 
tabulates all " service records " of the men in the army, includ- 
ing the invaluable " holiday furlough " records, or else to the 
files of the Provost Marshal General's Office, where all the draft 
records are to be found. Every assurance of co-operation was 



THE COLLECTION OP JEWISH WAR STATISTICS 107 

given by the officers in charge of these various records, but it 
was soon found that, because of the tremendous burdens which 
recent war developments have imposed upon all these bureaus, 
it would be advisable to ^ait with the actual procedure of search 
until the archives were in better order, since, in the present 
state of these records, the work of examination would be unduly 
complicated for all concerned. These searches have, therefore, 
been suspended for the present, with the exception of two 
bureaus: the Marine Corps, where, through the courtesy of 
Brigadier-General Laucheimer, permission to examine the files 
was freely granted, and where the files themselves were found 
to be in such perfect condition as to make the quest compara- 
tively simple, and the Office of the Surgeon-General, where 
searches are now under way. 

Outside of Washington, a great body of information respect- 
ing the National Guard and the Federalized Militia of the 
states is to be found in the offices of the Adjutants-General at 
the various state capitals. Arrangements have consequently 
been made to have their records systematically examined. The 
files at Albany have already been thoroughly searched by a 
representative of the Bureau of Statistics, Miss Ruth Hessberg, 
who has, with extraordinary skill and diligence, located thou- 
sands of names of Jewish soldiers. The search at Harrisburg 
and at a number of other leading capitals is now under way. 
In addition, the Army Orders and Assignments, Casualty 
Lists, etc., issued by the United States Adjutant-GeneraFs 
Office and published in the Congressional Record, the Official 
Bulletin, and in part in the metropolitan dailies, constitute 
a rich source of official information which is closely examined 
for Jewish data. Finally, there remain the records of the local 
draft and exemption boards, particularly in the districts 



108 AMERICAN JEWISH YEAR BOOK 

notably Jewish, or in leading centers of Jewish population. 
These records, although inferior to the others in certain 
respects, in so far as they supply data only as to the induction 
of the men and none at all as to their later service history, will 
nevertheless be of great value in complementing and correcting 
the other particulars available. 

Numerous subsidiary sources of information in non- Jewish 
quarters occasionally supply most valuable data and supple- 
ment the two main avenues of information, the strictly Jewish 
and the strictly oflBcial. Among these are the Eed Cross, 
whose Home Service Divisions maintain at their local offices 
records of dependency and cases requiring other home relief; 
the War Service Eosters of the leading colleges and universities 
of the country; the records of local historical societies; the 
forthcoming edition of the various professional directories, 
and so forth. Arrangements have recently been entered into, 
providing for an exchange of information with most of these 
agencies. 

From these various sources, some 60,000 records have at 
present (July 30, 1918) been collected, and are now being 
verified, classified, and tabulated. And since it is apparent 
that the value of the work as a whole will depend almost 
entirely upon the accuracy of the methods adopted to avoid 
duplication and confusion, it may be desirable, at this point, 
to present a brief description of the technique involved. First, 
as to the methods adopted for the identification of Jewish 
names. It is recognized, at the outset, that no perfect method 
has as yet been developed. To identify, with unerring certainty, 
Jewish names in a bare list of mixed names is utterly impos- 
sible. But a reasonable degree of accuracy is entirely feasible. 
To begin with, there is the great mass of information supplied 



THE COLLECTION OF JEWISH WAR STATISTICS 109 

by the Jewish Welfare Board and other organizations and indi- 
viduals, to whom the Jewish registrants are personally known. 
These names are accepted without question, as they are 
virtually certified. As to the remainder, there are names so 
unmistakably Jewish that, when taken in connection with their 
home addresses, next-of-kin, or branch of service — as, for ex- 
ample, in the case of oflBcers in the medical or dental corps 
bearing distinctly Jewish cognpmens — they may be accepted 
without further question. Where names have been anglicized 
or adapted in any way, the names of next-of-kin frequently 
remain unchanged, or perhaps the very form of the change 
may to a trained inind suggest the original. Other clues of like 
nature will at once occur to the reader — registration districts, 
if distinctively Jewish, birthplace or nativity of parents, the 
use of certain forenames or certain abbreviations of surnames — 
all these and other characteristics too numerous to mention, 
while not conclusive in themselves, tend nevertheless to furnish 
broad indications which, followed up by the skilled investigator, 
generally lead to satisfactory proof, positive or negative. 
Finally, it frequently happens that names coming from a non- 
Jewish source will be automatically checked, at the moment of 
filing, by a source unmistakably Jewish. Moreover, it is con- 
templated that, as soon as the local lists are reasonably com- 
plete, check lists will be made up by towns and cities, copies 
thereof to be sent to the local press and to the leading Jews in 
each community for revision and verification. Altogether, 
therefore, it may be confidently stated that, from present indi- 
cations, the final residuum of doubtful, uncertified names will 
be practically negligible. 

The cataloguing methods adopted will also serve, in a con- 
siderable degree, as a check against duplication and inclusion 



110 AMERICAN JEWISH YEAR BOOK 

of improper material. As the records are received they are 
copied, in triplicate, on cards having blanks for full name, 
home address, age, nativity of self and parents, branch of 
service, rank, regiment and company, camp or station, source 
of information received, and service record. These three cards, 
one original and two carbons, are filed in three separate 
catalogues, one arranged alphabetically and so devised as to 
bring together automatically all variant forms of names which 
are especially liable to misplacements because of common errors 
in reporting, copying, or transliterating; another catalogue 
arranged by branches of the service, with officers and honormen 
" signalled ^^ ; and a third arranged by states, cities, and towns. 
By this means it will be possible to report not only as to the 
service records of any individual, but also as the aggregate of 
enlistments, local quotas, distribution by branches of the ser- 
vice and by localities, number and proportion of officers, and 
similar data of general interest. Analyses and studies of this 
material may be made and published from time to time, as 
occasion may demand, before the completion of the entire work. 
Although the collection of military and naval statistics con- 
stitutes, of necessity, the major problem before the Bureau of 
Statistics at present, the record of civilian war service is by 
no means to be neglected. The Washington office has gathered 
all data available as to Jews in the Federal Civil Service and 
in the new War Bureaus, numbering to date some two thousand 
names and also much information as to Jews in the various aux- 
iliary services, such as four-minute men, Liberty-Bond sales- 
men, members of Draft Boards, and War Service committees 
throughout the country, while all other information obtainable 
as to Jewish contributious to the Red Cross, Hospital and 



THE COLLECTION OF JEWISH WAR STATISTICS m 

Ambulance Units, Bond Subscriptions, and other war service 
is being systematically collected and classified. 

From this brief account of the work undertaken so far 
it will be apparent that the measure of success which may 
ultimately attend the venture will depend in large part upon 
the co-operation of all elements in Jewish life. Tribute has 
already been paid to the service of the Jewish Welfare Board 
and to the magnificent co-operation of the spiritual and 
secular leaders of American Jewry. All the readers of this 
article can help definitely and notably by sending to the Bureau 
of Jewish Statistics and Research any data that comes within 
the scope of this work. At present this means any information 
whatsoever concerning the Jews in the present war. Con- 
cretely, the individual or organization desiring to assist in this 
most important work can do so in the following manner : 

( 1 ) By sending in names of individual soldiers and sailors, 
particularly those that do not ordinarily suggest a Jewish 
origin, and renewing the record from time to time with such 
fresh information as may develop, in the way of honors, pro- 
motions, or casualties; (2) by locating and notifying the 
Bureau of sources at which a considerable mass of information 
may be traced ; (3) by interesting any agencies of publicity that 
may be reached so as to enlist the widest possible number of 
people in the work; (4) by sending to the Bureau, either for 
immediate perusal or for permanent preservation in its ar- 
chives, letters from soldiers and sailors at the front, or other 
material of historical value. 

It would have been extremely desirable to conclude this 
article with a brief summary of the statistical results obtained 
thus far in the course of this inquiry. The vast material still 
remaining to be collated and digested, however, makes it ad- 



112 AMERICAN JEWISH YEAR BOOK 

visable to defer the presentation of actual figures until such a 
time as it may be possible to present them with that degree of 
fulness and accuracy which the importance of the subject 
demands. 

From indications already at hand, however, it may be con- 
fidently promised that the evidence, when fully developed, will 
show conclusively that the Jews of America are acquitting 
themselves magnificently, as soldiers and citizens, in this war ; 
that their contributions of men and means tend to exceed, bv 
a generous margin, their due quotas ; that the Jewish soldiers 
at the front fight with no less valor than their comrades ; that 
their losses are as great — and their rewards no less. 



JEWISH FEDERATION OP NEW YORK CITY II3 



FEDEEATION FOE THE SUPPORT OF JEWISH 

PHILANTHROPIC SOCIETIES OF 

NEW YORK CITY * 

BY I. EDWIN GOLDWASSER, EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR 

In the American Jewish Year Book for the year 5676 there 
appears a significant article on the Federation movement in 
American Jewish philanthropy by Dr. Joseph Jacobs. In 
describing the attempts that had been made to apply the 
methods of a Federation to the largest Jewish community in 
the world, the writer says : " The number of institutions with 
fairly large incomes was so considerable that one board repre- 
senting all might be of an ujQwieldy character. There are also 
in Manhattan several hospitals, many orphanages and generally 
a larger number of separate institutions of the same class than 
is found in other cities. To these and other arguments was 
added the consideration which had been urged in other cities, 
that Federation would destroy the personal interest in indi- 
vidual charities which led to such large endowments, dona- 
tions and bequests.^^ 

These diflSculties created what the author called *^ an unfor- 
tunate deadlock,'^ when, spurred on by the Heinsheimer 
bequest, a large number of the institutions conferred with 
the view of determining whether Federation would be practi- 
cable. 

* In preparing this article, passages have been frequently quoted 
from the following pamphlets: Plan of Federation, adopted June 
6, 1916; Report of Special Committee of Seven, March 12, 1917; 
By-Laws of Federation, adopted June 24, 1917. 



114 AMERICAN JEWISH YEAR BOOK 

It was left to Felix M. Warburg to re-open the consideration 
of the problem in 1916. After a long period devoted to 
personal conferences with leaders of the various institutions, 
it was decided to form a Committee to consider the organiza- 
tion of a Federation in New York City, with the view of formu- 
lating, if possible, a plan of Federation which might be accept- 
able to the institutions. 

This Committee on Federation consisted of the following: 
Samuel Greenbaum, Chairman; Leo Arnstein; Emil Baer- 
wald; Julius Ballin; George Blumenthal;. Joseph L. Butten- 
wieser ; Joseph H. Cohen ; William N. Cohen ; Abram I. Elkus ; 
William Goldman, Secretary; Sol Kohn; Lee Kohns*; Arthur 
Lehman; Samuel D. Levy; Adolph Lewisohn; Morton H. 
Meinhard; Joseph E. Newburger; Leopold Plant; Jacob H. 
SchifE; Mortimer L. Schiff; Louis Stern; Felix M. Warburg; 
Jacob Wertheim. 

On February 26, 1916, it appointed a Special Committee 
consisting of Abram I. Elkus, Chairman; Leo Arnstein; 
Joseph H. Cohen; Samuel Greenbaum; William Goldman; 
Jesse I. Straus; Felix M. Warburg; H. G. Friedman, Secre- 
tary. 

The Special Committee submitted its report pursuant to 
the resolution of the Committee on Federation, dated February 
26, 1916, " to consider all plans of Federation which have^been 
proposed, and all criticisms and suggestions thereon, and also 
to act as Committee on Conciliation of all suggestions with 
reference to the conditions under which a plan shall be put 
in operation." 

In accordance with these instructions, the Committee 
devoted twelve meetings during a period of nearly three months 
to the problems presented to Federation. It studied various 



JEWISH FEDERATION OF NEW YORK CITY 115 

plans proposed, including those of Mr. Nathaniel Myers, of 
Messrs. Chester J. Teller, and Morris D. Waldman, the plan 
formulated by the Advisory Committee of the Bureau of 
Philanthropic Research and the suggestions of Mr. Cyrus L. 
Sulzberger, and the Constitutions of Federations of other 
cities. Criticisms and suggestions from societies and persons 
interested were invited. Every effort was made to keep the pub- 
lic informed of the various steps in the development of the plan 
to be presented. More important than this, however, was the 
fact that the Committee was ready at all times to give careful 
consideration to any definite suggestion for modification of the 
plan, so that a substantial agreement might be reached. 

On May 25, 1916, the Special Committee presented its report 
to the Committee on Federation. 

On June 6, 1916, the last-named Committee adopted the fol- 
lowing resolution: ^^ Resolved, That the Plan of Federation 
formulated by the Special Committee be adopted; that the 
Plan be submitted to the societies therein named, such societies 
to notify the Secretary of the Committee on Federation of their 
assent to the Plan and to designate their representatives on 
the Organization Committee and on the Board of Delegates 
on or before July 15, 1916; that the Federation be organized 
as soon as the Plan shall have been assented to by societies 
receiving two-thirds of the total amount collected in 1915 in 
membership dues and subscriptions by the societies named in 
the Plau.'^ 

In connection with this resolution, the report of the Com- 
mittee was submitted, consisting of two parts, (1) a revised 
draft of the Constitution for the Federation and (2) a state- 
ment in explanation of the provisions of the Plan of Federa- 



116 AMERICAN JEWISH YEAR BOOK 

tion. Since this Constitution became the basis of the By-Laws 
under which the Federation is now operating, it is probable 
that the clearest statement of the Federation can be found in 
the explanation of the Plan as submitted by the Committee. 

The Committee proposed as the name for the organization 
the descriptive title of " Federation for the Support of Jewish 
Philanthropic Societies of New York City." 

Purpose 

It was proposed that the scope of the Federation be limited 
to the support of philanthropic societies ministering to the 
needs of Jews of the boroughs of Manhattan and the 
Bronx. Brooklyn had its own organization and it was felt that 
there should be no intrusion in that field. It was not the inten- 
tion of the committee, however, to make the location of a society 
the test of eligibility for admission to the Federation, but 
rather the territory from which its beneficiaries are drawn. 
Institutions located outside of New York City carrying on 
work primarily for the benefit of residents of Manhattan and 
the Bronx are entitled to the support of the Federation, equally 
with those located within these boroughs. 

Membership 

(a) Any person who subscribes and pays to the Federation at 
least ten dollars a year is entitled to be elected by the Board 
to regular membership therein, with the privilege to cast one 
vote in person or by proxy, and otherwise to participate in the 
meetings and affairs of the Federation and to hold oflBce therein 
as hereinafter provided; (b) any group of persons, unable to 
qualify as regular members, who jointly subscribe and pay to 
the Federation at least fifteen dollars a year, may in the dis- 



JEWISH FEDERATION OF NEW YORK CITY 117 

cretion and during the pleasure of the Board, be elected to a 
group membership therein, with the right to designate one of 
their group to exercise the privileges of a regular member; (c) 
any person under the age of twenty-one years who subscribes 
and pays to the Federation at least five dollars a year may, in 
the discretion of the Board, be elected a junior member therein 
during his minority, without the privileges of a regular 
member. 

It is planned to maintain the membership of the beneficiary 
societies. For this purpose the Committee proposed that where 
a member of the Federation failed to designate the beneficiaries 
for his contribution, but subscribed an amount equal to or in ex- 
cess of his aggregate membership payments in 1915 to the fed- 
erated societies, it was to be assumed that it was his intention 
to remain a member of those societies and to contribute to each 
of them the .same amount as in 1915. All other undesignated 
subscriptions are to be assigned by the Board of Trustees to the 
societies in such amounts as will enable each society to maintain 
its membership at no less than the amount received in 1915. 

For the convenience of members who desire to make a single 
contribution to all philanthropies, including societies not part 
of the Federation, Federation acts as a clearing-house, and pays 
►amounts designated to such outside organizations. 

In other words, a subscription to the Federation may com- 
bine the following: A subscription to the General Fund, a 
designated subscription to federated societies, and a designated 
subscription to unaffiliated societies. No subscriptions to 
unaflBliated societies are accepted, however, until the minimum 
subscription of $10 to the General Fund of the Federation 
or to one of the federated societies is included in the 
subscription. 



118 AMERICAN JEWISH YEAR BOOK 

The Admission of Religious Educational Societies 

The first and most important consideration here was the 
character of the activities which it is the purpose of the Federa- 
tion to foster and support. The second point was : What shall 
be* the basis for admitting or rejecting societies engaged in 
activities coming within the general purposes of the Federa- 
tion ? 

The purpose of the Federation is to support philanthropic 
societies. No doubt exists that the Federation should take in 
charitable and relief agencies, organizations for the care of 
the sick, the dependent and delinquent, societies for general 
educational and social activities. The question was raised 
whether or not the Federation should also embrace societies 
carrying on the work of religious education. The following 
excerpt from the report of the Committee is of interest : 

" The problem of religious education is highly complex. The 
societies in this field engage in work which is in part charitable 
and in part self-supporting. They provide facilities for 
religious education, and give free instruction to children who 
cannot aiford to pay. Some of these societies conduct also 
settlement activities, clubs, gymnasiums, and classes. There 
are in Greater New York some eighty week-day religious 
schools, known as Talmud Torahs, and Hebrew schools, etc.* 
These vary greatly in the character and value of their work, 
their standards and methods of instruction. Their support 
comes from two classes, those who themselves receive benefits 
from the society by sending their children or attending the 
synagogue usually connected with the school, and those who 
contribute from purely philanthropic motives in order to 
advance the purpose of the society. 



JEWISH FEDERATION OF NEW YORK CITY 119 

The problem .of religious education from the standpoint of 
Federation presents three phases which may here be noted: 
(1) While the work of these societies is undoubtedly of the 
highest value, not only from a religious standpoint, but from 
a lay point of view, there is not the unanimity of opinion in the 
community as regards the aims, methods, and purposes of 
religious educational work which exists with reference to the 
work of other charitable and social service agencies. (2) The 
organization of religious education is still in its beginnings. 
Its adequate development will require very large additions to 
the income of such societies and appropriations increasing very 
much more rapidly than the allotments for other philanthropic 
work. (3) The support of such societies is to a very great 
extent local rather than general. It is derived from very small 
contributions and the collection of such funds, and the reten- 
tion of this class of members is likely to present the* greatest 
difficulties.'^ 

For these reasons it seemed unwise for the Federation to 
complicate its problems at the beginning by taking over the 
support of institutions engaged in philanthropic religious 
activities. 

On January 8, 1917, however, a Committee of Twenty-five 
presented to the Federation a request that the Federation con- 
sider the financial aspect of Jewish religious education in New 
York City. On the same day the Chairman of the Organiza- 
tion Committee of the Federation appointed a Special Commit- 
tee of Seven to study in all its aspects the subject of Jewish 
religious education in New York City. In its report this com- 
mittee submitted the following considerations : 

"The application of religious schools for affiliation with 
Federation presents distinctly to Federation the problem of 



120 AMERICAN JEWISH YEAR BOOK 

admitting societies carrying on religious education as dis- 
tinguished from institutions engaged mainly in secular work. 
When the plan of Federation was adopted, it was agreed to 
be ^ unwise for the Federation to complicate its problems at 
the beginning by taking over the support of institutions 
engaged in philanthropic-religious activities/ The Committee 
which drew up the plan foresaw that the question of supporting 
societies engaged in philanthropic-religious activities should 
have to be considered again. The societies conducting re- 
ligious schools submit that this question be taken up now 
because Federation has made their present position, and, 
to a greater extent, their future development precarious. As 
Federation becomes more successful and allies to itself the 
various elements in the community, it will become increas- 
ingly difficult for them to secure funds as independent organi- 
zations. -The presidents of some of these societies stated that in 
many instances contributors have returned bills for dues with 
the single word ^ Federation ', and that as a result some of 
the schools may be obliged to close their doors.. 

It is further submitted by the applicant societies that if 
they were to form a Federation of their own in order to finance 
their activities and make an appeal to the public, the result 
would be detrimental to both the religious schools and to 
Federation, the community would be disorganized by the estab- 
lishment of more than one Federation, and the endeavor to 
unify philanthropic activities would be frustrated. There 
would result a separation in the community between those now 
active on behalf of secular philanthropies and those who are 
interested in religious education. 

The support of religious education presents grave problems 
for Federation. As noted by the Committee which framed 



JEWISH FEDERATION OF NEW YORK CITY i^l 

the plan of Federation, the community is not a unit in religious 
belief, and in Federation there are represented the most diver- 
gent shades of faith. Questions of conscience and conviction 
are involved, rather than those of policy and method. Grounds 
for differences are thus more deeply seated. Serious attention 
must, therefore, be given to objections to the inclusion in 
Federation of institutions with activities in reference to which 
there may be wide differences of opinion. 

Your Committee, however, is of the view that these objec- 
tions to the admission of religious societies to Federation are 
not sufficient to counterbalance the injury which might result 
from their exclusion, not merely to the cause of religious educa- 
tion, but also to the work- of these schools as moral influences 
in the community for bridging the gap between parent and 
child, and for maintaining the influence of the home and the 
family. 

Moreover, it is fundamental in the plan of Federation that 
each society shall have autonomy in its internal management, 
and so long as this principle is observed there should be no 
reason why the difference of opinion or belief among subscribers 
to Federation should constitute a bar to the admission of these 
societies. If religious societies are admitted, Federation must 
have nothing whatsoever to do with curriculum or religious 
beliefs. The control of the policies of the schools must be left 
to each individual institution, and there must be no grounds 
for any suspicion that the Federation is in the remotest degree 
seeking to influence them in the instruction which they are 
to give in the matters of religion.^^ 

In November, 1917, the conditions that had been set for the 
admission of the religious educational societies were properly 
met by the following bodies, which were declared affiliated with 



122 AMERICAN JEWISH YEAR BOOK 

the Federation: Schools and Extension Activities of the 
Bureau of Education, Central Jewish Institute, Down-Town 
Talmud Torah, Salanter Talmud Torah, Machzike Talmud 
Torah, and Up-Town Talmud Torah. 

Restrictions Upon Affiliated Bodies 

No beneficiary society, auxiliary society, nor any person in 
their behalf, was to give entertainments for the purpose of rais- 
ing-funds or soliciting donations or contributions .other than 
permanent endowments or legacies in behalf of such societies. 

Before making a special appeal to the community for build- 
ing funds or other extraordinary purposes, beneficiary societies 
are required to inform the Board of Trustees, and, if such 
appeal is approved, the societies receive the endorsement and 
support of the Federation. 

Co-operation in this respect between the societies of the 
Federation will undoubtedly prove of great benefit to the 
societies through the avoidance of the multiplicity of appeals 
of the same character at the same time. Appeals approved by 
the Federation will win for the society support from the entire 
community. 

Organization of the Governing Body 

The problem of organizing a governing body for the Federa- 
tion was attended by peculiar difficulties in New York. The 
societies themselves differed in the extent of the support 
which they received from the public, the number of their 
members, and their income. In addition to these. Federation 
created a new organization of contributors. Various plans 
were submitted to the Committee, involving two bodies, one 



JEWISH FEDERATION OF NEW YORK CITY 123 

elected by the members and another by the institutions, the 
one to serve as a check on the other, or one large body made 
up of the delegates of the societies and of representatives of 
the public electing in turn a smaller administrative body. 
The Committee did not favor the plan involving two bodies, 
one to exercise a veto power over the other. It was felt that 
such a system would result in friction and prove cumbersome 
in operation. The Committee did not approve an organization 
calling for indirect election and representation such as is 
involved in the selection of the Administrative Board by an 
intermediate body. It held fast to the position that the 
responsibility of the governing body should be direct to the 
societies and to the contributors. The following quotations 
from the By-Laws will show the plan of organization : 

" Section 1. The management of the Federation shall be 
vested in a Board of Trustees which shall adopt its own rules 
of procedure not inconsistent with the charter or By-Laws, 
by two-thirds of its total number of votes. Its action in matters 
within its jurisdiction shall be final, conclusive and binding 
upon all of the Beneficiary Societies. The Board of Trustees 
shall be constituted of Trustees designated by Beneficiary 
Societies and of ten Trustees-at-Large elected by the members 
of the Federation as follows: 

Section 2. One Trustee shall be designated by each society 
recriving an income from membership dues or subscriptions 
in the year 1915 of not less than $10,000 nor more than $50,- 
000, and two Trustees by each society receiving an income 
from membership dues or subscriptions in 1915 in excess of 
$50,000. 

Section 3. The Trustee or Trustees designated by a Bene- 
ficiary Society shall be entitled to cast a number of votes in 




<< 
<< 



124 AMERICAN JEWISH YEAR BOOK 

accordance with the income of the society from membership 
dues or subscriptions in 1915, as follows : 

$10,000 and over, but not exceeding $25,000, one vote 

Over $25,000, " " '* 50,000, two votes 

50,000, ** " " 75,000, three votes 

75,000, " " " 100,000, four votes 

100,000, five votes 

Section 4. A Trustee designated by a society entitled to 
designate two Trustees may in the absence of his colleague 
cast the total number of votes of both such Trustees. 

Section 5. Societies receiving an income from membership 
dues or subscriptions in 1915 of $3,000 or more, but not so 
much as $10,000, may combine for the purpose of designat- 
ing Trustees, and shall be entitled to designate one Trustee 
for each $15,000 of income received in 1915 from membership 
dues or subscriptions by the societies so combining. 

Section 6. The number of votes of Trustees designated by 
societies with an income of less than $10,000 from -membership 
dues or subscriptions, or allotments from the Federation, shall 
not exceed twenty-five per cent of the total number of votes 
of the Board of Trustees, unless the allotment to such societies 
shall exceed twenty-five per cent of the total appropriations 
of the Federation to all Beneficiary Societies. In case such 
allotment is less than twenty-five per cent of such total appro- 
priations, the Board shall reduce the number of Trustees to 
be designated by such societies, so that their votes shall not 
exceed twenty-five per cent of the total number of votes of 
the Board of Trustees. 

Section 7. Beneficiary Societies admitted after July 1, 
1917, may be authorized by two-thirds of the total number of 
votes of the Board of Trustees to designate Trustees on the 
basis of income from membership dues or subscriptions as pre- 



JEWISH FEDERATION OF NEW YORK CITY 125 

scribed above, except that the income from membership dues or 
subscriptions of a society so admitted shall be taken to be the 
average annual amount received during a period of not less 
than two years immediately before admission to the Federation. 

Section 8. Societies organized with the consent of the 
Board of Trustees may be authorized with the consent of the 
total number of its votes to designate Trustees on the basis of 
the amount of the appropriations allotted to them by the 
Federation, such appropriations to be regarded for this 
purpose as the equivalent of income from membership dues 
or subscriptions. 

Section 9. Societies shall give notice to the Federation of 
persons designated by them as Trustees and such Trustees 
shall serve until their successors are designated. 

Section 10. In December, 1919, and every third year there- 
after, the Board of Trustees shall reapportion the number 
of trustees and the number of votes assigned to beneficiary 
societies. The basis of reapportionment shall be the average of 
the annual amounts allotted to each society by the Federation 
during the three years elapsed, such average allotment to be 
regarded as the equivalent of the income from membership 
dues and subscriptions for determining ths number of Trustees 
and the number of votes to which a society shall be entitled. 

Section 11. The members of the Federation shall elect by 
ballot ten Trustees-at-Large, each entitled to cast one vote, 
from candidates nominated as follows : 

Section 12. Nominations for such Trustees shall be sub- 
mitted to the Board of Trustees and posted conspicuously in 
the oflSce of the Federation not less than forty-five days before 
the Annual Election by a Nominating Committee, appointed 
by the President of the Federation, consisting of twenty-five 



126 AMERICAN JEWISH YEAR BOOK 

members of the Federation, none of whom shall be a Trustee or 
a Delegate of the Federation or a member of an Executive 
Board of a Beneficiary Society. Nominations may also be 
made by a petition signed by no less than one hundred members 
of the Federation, and filed with the Federation twenty-five 
days before the date of the Annual Election. Nominations may 
be made at the meeting if the Nominating Commitee shall 
fail to dulv make its nominations or if its nominees shall be 
or become disqualified in whole or in part or if vacancies among 
the Trustees occur since the date of its report. The Nominat- 
ing Committee and all nominating petitions shall designate 
one or more persons to act as proxies, without prejudice to the 
right of any member to select his own proxy. 

Section 13. No member of the Federation shall be eligible 
for election as Trustee-at-Large unless he shall haye served 
for one year as member of the Board of Delegates. This 
provision shall not apply to Trustees-at-Large elected at the 
first Annual Election. 

Section 14. The term of office for Tru3tees-at-Large shall 
be three years, except that of the Trustees-at-Large chosen 
at the first Annual Election, three shall be elected for a term 
of one year, four for a term of two years, and three for a term of 
three years. 

Section 15. In the event of the resignation or death of a 
Trustee-at-Large, the Board of Trustees shall elect a member 
of the Board of Delegates to serve as Trustee-at-Large to the 
date of the next Annual Election, when a successor shall be 
elected for the unexpired term by the members of the Federa- 
tion.'^ 

In forming the Board of Trustees of the Federation, the 
Committee sought to meet conditions. Its aim was to appor- 



JEWISH FEDERATION OF NEW YORK CITY 127 

tion representation to the different societies in accordance with 
their income from the public and to give recognition to the 
contributors organized as a body in the Federation. In entrust- 
ing the election of the greater proportion of the Trustees to the 
institutions, the Committee endeavored to secure for Federa- 
tion continuity in the policies of our institutions, the interest 
and support of those who have been most active in the develop- 
ment of Jewish philanthropic endeavor and who have had 
most experience in the management of the societies. In plac- 
ing on the governing board a considerable number of Trustees 
to be elected directly by the members, persons not now con- 
nected with the executive boards of the societies, an oppor- 
tunity was given for representation to elements in the commu- 
nity not at present associated with the administration of our 
institutions. The Committee endeavored also to give just 
representation on the governing body to small societies. The 
only organizations excluded from representation are those 
with incomes of less than $3,000. Such societies are none the 
less eligible for admission to Federation and as their work 
is extended and their allotment increases beyond $3,000, they 
become entitled to representation on the same basis as other 
societies. 

Solicitation of Membership and Contributions 

The By-Laws provide : There shall be a Board of Delegates 
of the Federation, the function of which shall be to consider 
ways and means of enlisting the support of the community, 
to secure memberships and solicit funds for the Federation, 
and to perform such other duties as the Board of Trustees 
6 



128 AMERICAN JEWISH YEAR BOOK 

may prescribe. The Board of Delegates shall be chosen in 
the following manner : 

Each society shall designate to the Board two Delegates for 
each vote to which it is entitled in the Board of Trustees, pro- 
vided that each society shall designate at least one Delegate. 
Societies shall give notice to the Federation of persons 
designated by them as Delegates, and such Delegates shall 
serve until their successors are designated. 

The members of the Federation shall elect by ballot one 
hundred Delegates-at-Large to be nominated in the same 
manner as Trustee-at-Large. 

The term of office of Delegates-at-Large shall be three years, 
except that of the Delegates chosen at the first Annual Elec- 
tion, thirty-three shall be elected for a term of one year, thirty- 
four for a term of two years, and thirty-three for a term of three 
years. 

In the event of the resignation or death of a Delegate-at- 
Large, the President of the Federation shall appoint a member 
of the Federation to serve to the date of the next Annual 
Election, when a successor shall be elected for the imexpired 
term by the members of the Federation. 

The President of the Federation shall be President of the 
Board of Delegates. 

This plan aims to lend dignity and importance to member- 
ship in the soliciting body on behalf of the contributors by 
making the position dependent on election and in this way 
a representative one. It is noted further that one year's 
service in this body is a condition of eligibility for election 
as Trustee-at-Large. The number of elected members makes 
possible the representation from all elements of the community, 
and thereby enables the Federation to reach all classes in its 



JEWISH FEDERATION OF NEW YORK CtTY lg9 

behalf. The object in placing on this body dclogates from 
the institutions .was to give opportunity to tlic societies to 
designate those whom they knew to be most successful in secur- 
ing funds. Directors in the various organiRtttions acquftlntcd 
with their work and their clientele are assigned to serve on 
the soliciting body. These bring to it experience and the inter- 
est which comes from a knowledge of the needs of the insti- 
tutions. The advantage in this plan is that it (»ombines with 
the work of soliciting funds administrative duties in the con- 
stituent societies of the Federation. 

Apportionment of tub Funds of tub Fkubhatjon 

The following excerpts from the by-laws indicate the method 
of the apportionment of the Federation funds : 

*^ Section 1. Members of the Federation shall bo requesf^d 
to designate and may designate the Beneficiary Hocieties 
in which they desire membership and the amonnts to 
be paid to such soc^icties out of their contrihitions to the 
Federation; the contributions of a member to Beneflciary 
Societies prior to their admission Uf the Federatifrn shall Up 
deemed continuous designations ]jy sur'h memliers unless 
afl^rmatiTelj revoked or un]es.«^ his contribation to the Federa- 
tion shall not equal bis total contributions to such Benefi(riftry 
Societies; the Federation from among its members md s/? 
desfignating may nominate to any Benefidary HfK'iety, vpfri} 
rt» retpiesty a Srofficient number of members to mHWifi'm the 
membership roll of such society at the number which it had 
♦faring the fiscal year next prerreding its admission to the 
Federation; provided, however, that members so desig/)ated 
or nominated ahall be elected members by such Beneficiary 



130 AMERICAN JEWISH YEAR BOOK 

Societies in accordance with their by-laws without further lia- 
bility for membership dues or otherwise. 

Section 2. Out of the undesignated funds the expenses 
of Federation shall first be paid, and from the surplus there 
shall be allotted to each Beneficiary Society an amount which 
with the designated sums shall make the total appropriated 
by the Federation to each society equal the sum collected by 
it from (a) membership dues or subscriptions in the year 1915 
and (b) the average amount received in the years 1911-1915 in 
donations for purposes other than endowment, building, or 
special funds, and (c) the average annual amount of net pro- 
ceeds from entertainments received in the years 1911-1915, 
and (d) the amount paid by an auxiliary society to it or 
expended in its behalf in 1915. 

Section 3. The Board of Trustees may create and maintain 
out of the undesignated funds an emergency fund, which shall 
at no time exceed $300,000. Appropriations from this fund 
shall be made only to meet extraordinary conditions and 
emergencies and upon two-thirds of the total number of votes 
of the Board. 

Section 4. The Board of Trustees may in its absolute 
discretion make appropriations from the balance of any 
undesignated funds to Beneficiary Societies upon two-thirds 
of the votes of all trustees present, and not less than a majority 
of the total number of votes of the Board. Xn making 
appropriations from such ujidesignated balance, the Board 
shall consider the needs of each society and its income from 
all sources, but shall not consider as available income the 
amount received by a society in legacies and devises. 

Section 5. The Board of Trustees by two-thirds of the 
total number of its votes may make appropriations from the 



JEWISH FEDERATION OP NEW YORK CITY 131 

undesignated funds to organizations other than Beneficiary 
Societies, to be expended for philanthropic or philanthropic- 
religions purposes in behalf of the Jews of Manhattan and The 
Bronx. No part of the undesignated funds sliall, however* 
be appropriated for activities not primarily plulantliropic 
or philanthropic-religious. 

Section 6. The Federation may in its discretion receive 
from members funds designated for the use of organizations 
and not beneficiaries thereof, and sliall pay sucli funds \\\ 
accordance with the wishes of the contributors; but such fuiulH 
shall not be included as a membership payment of sucOi nioinbor. 

Section 7. The Federation shall discoumge the making' 
of legacies and devises to it and shall recommend that theHt» 
be made direct to the Beneficiary Societies. The Federation 
shall not accept legacies or devises by whi(5h the principal in 
to be held in trust by the Federation and only the inctome in 
to be available for distribution; and all legacies and devineH 
received shall, within a period of three years after receipt, he 
distributed to the Beneficiary Societies, or, upon two-tliirdH 
of the total number of votes of the Board of TrustecH, to new 
societies to be formed.'^ 

Kepresentatives of smaller societies, with expanding activi- 
ties, expressed the fear that the growth of their organizationn 
might be hampered unless they were assured of nwrntiMHl tuiuln 
to enable them to meet their commitments. 'J'he situation of 
the large institutions is not different from that of the Huuilhtr 
societies. Both classes of organizations look forward to enlarged 
activities, for which they must have additional fundn, 'J'he 
general experience under Federation elsewliere has been that 
the income of federated societies incTease^l thirty per cAsut or 
more. The purpose of Federation here is to Hiwiim ah great 



132 AMERICAN JEWISH YEAR BOOK 

an increase or a greater one, in order that all societies might 
have adequate support for their work. The Board of Trustees 
is free to use the increased funds to meet the requirements 
of the societies. 

Emergency Fund 

The Committee left the creation of an Emergency Fund 
optional with the Board of Trustees. To make the estahlish- 
ment of such a reserve mandatory might involve the tying-up 
of funds at a time when they were needed for immediate uses. 
It is proposed that the maximum amount for the fund shall be 
$300,000, and that, as this amount is reduced, appropriations 
may be made to replenish it. This fund should be available 
for use only to meet emergencies such as wide-spread business 
depression and other extraordinary occurrences which might 
in any year seriously reduce the income of the Federation, or 
give rise to exceptional demands. It is the intention that 
this fund shall be drawn upon only to meet the needs of Man- 
hattan and the Bronx. It should not be used to meet emergen- 
cies outside of New York City. The Committee believes it 
would not be proper to make appropriation from it for emer- 
gencies elsewhere in the United States or abroad, for the reason 
that the purpose of this reserve is to safeguard the work of the 
Federation. Such sums as might be voted from this fund 
for such other uses could doubtless be secured otherwise. 

This fund is to be regarded as available for use only in 
emergencies and not as a substitute for moneys which should 
be secured in subscriptions from the public. The Committee, 
accordingly, recommended that this reserve be safeguarded 
by requiring that appropriations from it should be upon two- 
thirds of all the votes of the Board of Trustees. '^ 



JEWISH FEDERATION OP NEW YORK CITY 133 

Legacies 

The Committee believed that it is for the best interests of 
the community that legacies be made to the constituent 
societies of the Federation. The function of the Federation 
should be to gather and distribute annual contributions and 
not to accumulate trust funds. The Federation should there- 
fore discourage legacies to itself and recommend that bequests 
be made directly to the beneficiary societies. It should further 
refuse to accept legacies or devises to be held in trust by the 
Federation. 

If legacies or devises are nevertheless left to the Federation, 
the principal is to be treated as part of the income of the 
Federation available for distribution to its beneficiaries. 
Where large amounts are involved, it may not always be 
expedient to distribute the total in one year. The budgets of 
the institutions are necessarily adjusted to their regular income, 
and it would not be desirable to expand activities to absorb 
an increased appropriation, the recurrence of which could 
not be counted upon. 

Again, there may be need for new activities, or new agencies, 
to the financing of which such funds could be most advan- 
tageously devoted. The Committee, accordingly, provided that 
the Board of Trustees have discretion to extend the distribution 
of legacies received over a period not to exceed three years, 
and also that the Board be authorized, upon a two-thirds' vote, 
to use the funds derived from legacies for financing new 
activities. 

Conditions for the Organization of Federation 

The Committee was of the opinion that the best method 
would be to organize the Federation in accordance with the 



134 AMERICAN JEWISH YEAR BOOK 

plan proposed and to proceed with a canvass. Federation 
was to be declared effective as soon as its financial success 
was established. 

Accordingly, in the fall of 1916, a systematic campaign was 
planned, the condition being that subscriptions to the amount 
of tvo million dollars must be secured in order to make 
Federation operative. In other words, the Committee recom- 
mended that the Federation should be declared operative when 
there should have been secured from subscribers to the Federa- 
tion an increase of $200,000 over the amount contributed by 
them in 1915 in membership dues or subscriptions and in 
donations other than for permanent or building funds to the 
beneficiary societies, or $700,000 in excess of the sum con- 
tributed by such subscribers in membership dues alone. The 
original Organization Committee consisted of ten represen- 
tatives, none of whom was a director or an officer of the 
societies named ; two representatives from each of the follow- 
ing: Montefiore Home and Hospital for Chronic Diseases, 
Mount Sinai Hospital and United Hebrew Charities; one 
representative from each of the following: Association for 
the Improved Instruction of Deaf -Mutes, Beth Israel Hospi- 
tal, Crippled Children's East Side Free School, Dispensary and 
Hospital for Deformities and Joint Diseases, Educational 
Alliance, Emanuel Sisterhood for Personal Service, Free 
Synagogue Social Service Department, Hebrew Free Loan 
Society, Hebrew Sheltering Guardian Society, Hebrew Tech- 
nical Institute, Hebrew Technical School for Girls, Home for 
Aged and Infirm Hebrews, Home for Hebrew Infants, Jewish 
Protectory and Aid Society, Joint Committee on Tuberculosis, 
Lebanon Hospital Association, Sanitarium for Hebrew 



JEWISH FEDERATION OP NEW YORK CITY 135 

Children, Widowed Mothers' Fund Association, Young Men's 
Hebrew Association, and Young Women's Hebrew Association. 

On January 1, 1917, Federation was declared operative, 
and the following ofl&cers were elected: Felix M. Warburg, 
President; Julius Goldman, Vice-President; Lee K. Frankel, 
Secretary; Harry Sachs, Treasurer; Harriet B. Lowenstein, 
Comptroller and Auditor; I. Edwin Goldwasser, Executive 
Director. 

On April 27, 1917, under Chapter 269 of the Laws of New 
York, the Federation was incorporated. The act of incorpora- 
tion was as follows : 

" Section 1. Felix M. Warburg, Leo Amstein, Emil Baer- 
wald, Mrs. Sidney C. Borg, Joseph L. Buttenwieser, Joseph H. 
Cohen, William N. Cohen, Julius J. Dukas, Mrs. William 
Einstein, Benjamin F. Feiner, Lee K. Frankel, Harry G. 
Friedman, Mrs. Henry Goldman, Julius Goldman, William 
Goldman, Emil Goldmark, Paul M. Herzog, Mark Hyman, 
Samuel I. Hyman, Sol Kohn, Lee Kohns, Mrs. Alexander 
Kohut, Edward Lauterbach, Arthur Lehman, Irving Lehman, 
Meyer London, Edwin S. Lorsh, Aaron E. Nusbaum, Leopold 
Plant, Theodore Eosenwald, Harry Sachs, Samuel Sachs, 
Fred M. Stein, Maximilian Toch, Mrs. Israel Unterberg, 
Jacob Wertheim, Charles A. Wimpfheimer, and Stephen S. 
Wise, together with such other persons as they may associate 
with them, and their successors, are hereby created a body 
corporate with perpetual succession by the name of Federa- 
tion for the Support of Jewish Philanthropic Societies of 
New York City, and by that name shall possess all of the 
powers which by the general corporation law are conferred 
upon corporations; and in addition thereto, shall have all 
the powers and be subject to all the restrictions which now or 



136 AMERICAN JEWISH YEAR BOOK 

hereafter may pertain by law to membership corporations, so 
far as the same are applicable thereto, and are not inconsistent 
with the provisions of this act. It shall also have the power 
to take and hold by bequest, devise, gift, purchase, lease, or 
by judicial order or decree, either absolutely or in trust for 
any of its purposes, or in trust for any of the corporations 
formed for charitable, benevolent or educational purposes 
referred to in the section thereof, any property, real or 
personal, without limitation as to amount or value, except 
such limitation, if any, as the legislature may hereafter 
specifically impose; to sell, mortgage, lease, exchange, convey, 
or otherwise dispose of or transfer such property; to invest 
and re-invest the principal thereof and the surplus income 
therefrom; to expend the principal and income of any trust 
fund which it may take and hold as herein provided, in accor- 
dance with the terms of the trust upon which the same shall 
be held, and to expend the principal and income of any 
property held by it absolutely, or in trust for its general 
purposes, in such manner as in the judgment of its trustees 
will best promote its objects. 

Section 2. The objects of said corporation shall be, and 
it is hereby further empowered, to aid, support, and advise, 
and to conduct, by itself or in co-operation with any charitable, 
benevolent or educational corporation, association, committee, 
or any other agency, now or hereafter existing which shall be 
affiliated with the corporation hereby organized, any or all 
philanthropic work which shall be carried on within the state 
of New York or elsewhere, and which shall be primarily for 
the benefit of the Jews of New York City, including the susten- 
ance, shelter and relief of the needy and of such persons as 
are dependent and sick, crippled, deformed, chronic invalids, 



JEWISH FEDERATION OF NEW YORK CITY 137 

convalescents, infants, orphans, widows, aged, infirm, forsaken, 
deaf, dumb, blind, defectives or delinquents ; the assistance of 
immigrants and their children ; the moral, religious and phys- 
ical training of the young and adolescent; the securing of 
employment for those in need thereof ; the promotion of self- 
support and other cognate ends ; but not excluding any other 
charitable or benevolent purposes not herein enumerated. 

Section 3. The objects of said corporation shall further 
be, to secure for the affiliated corporations referred to in section 
two hereof, heretofore or hereafter organized under any law 
of this state for any of the aforesaid purposes, adequate 
means of support in furtherance of the purposes for which such 
corporations shall be severally formed; to provide efficient 
methods for the collection and distribution of moneys or 
property contributed for their maintenance in accordance with 
the wishes of individual contributors, when expressed, and 
in default of any designation by the contributors, in such 
manner as it shall deem just and equitable; to relieve such 
corporations from making separate appeals to the public and 
independent collections of funds, so as to enable them the 
more effectively to carry on their philanthropic activities; to 
foster co-operation among them ; to avoid waste in administra- 
tion; to stimulate financial economy, and to encourage such 
further charitable, benevolent or educational work among the 
Jews of the city of New York as may not be sufficiently carried 
on by any existing organization. 

Section 4. The persons named in the first section of this 
act shall constitute the first board of trustees and members 
of the corporation. They, or a majority of them, shall hold 
a meeting to organize the corporation, and adopt By-Laws not 
inconsistent with this act, or with the laws of the state, which 



138 AMERICAN JEWISH YEAR BOOK 

shall prescribe the qualifications of members; the manner of 
their selection ; the amount of annual dues to be .paid by them ; 
their voting power, the number of trustees, not less than thirty- 
six, by whom the business and affairs of the corporation shall 
be managed; the classification of such trustees and the dura- 
tion of the terms of office of each class of trustees ; the qualifica- 
tions, powers and manner of selection of the several of the 
classes of trustees and of the officers of the corporation; the 
manner in which vacancies among the trustees occurring by 
death, resignation, increase in number, or in any other way, 
shall be filled; the creation of an executive committee with 
power to conduct the activities of the corporation between 
the several meeetings of the trustees, and of a board of 
delegates to represent this corporation and the philanthropic 
corporations or agencies referred to in the second section 
hereof, and define the powers to be exercised by or which may 
be delegated to them; the method of amending the By-Laws 
of the corporation, and such other provisions for its manage- 
ment and government, the disposition of its property and 
the regulation of its affairs, as may be deemed expedient. 
The by-laws may also prescribe the terms and conditions 
upon which the several philanthropic corporations or agencies 
specified in the second section hereof may become affiliated 
with this corporation as beneficiaries of its activities ; regulate 
the relations between this corporation and such affiliated 
corporations or agencies; make provision to carry out any 
agreement with, or any terms and conditions accepted by, such 
corporations or agencies or any of them which may be conferred 
on members of this corporation ; empower such corporations or 
agencies now or hereafter affiliated with this corporation to 
designate such number of trustees with such voting power 



JEWISH FEDERATION OP NEW YORK CITY 139 

as may be stated in the by-laws, in addition to the trustees 
selected by the members of this corporation. 

Section 6. This corporation is not established and shall 
not be maintained or conducted for pecuniary profit, but 
shall be and remain a charitable corporation. None of its 
trustees, oflScers, members or employees shall receive or be 
lawfully entitled to receive any pecuniary profit from the 
operations thereof, except reasonable compensation for services 
in effecting one or more of its corporate objects or as proper 
beneficiaries of its strictly charitable purposes." 

On June 24, in accordance with the Enabling Act, the 
Federation was formally organized with the following societies 
declared aflBliated : Association for the Improved Instruction 
of Deaf-Mutes, Beth Israel Hospital, Committee for the Care 
of Jewish Tuberculous, Crippled Children's East Side Free 
School, Educational Alliance, Emanuel Sisterhood, Free Syna- 
gogue Social Service, Hebrew Free Loan, Hebrew Orphan 
Asylum, Hebrew Sheltering Guardian, Hebrew Technical In- 
stitute, Hebrew Technical School for Girls, Home for Aged 
and Infirm Hebrews, Home for Hebrew Infants, Hospital for 
Deformities and Joint Diseases, Jewish Protectory, Lebanon 
Hospital, Montefiore Home, Mount Sinai Hospital, Sanitarium 
for Hebrew Children, United Hebrew Charities, Widowed 
Mothers' Fund, Young Men's Hebrew Association, Young 
Women's Hebrew Association, Ahawath Chesed Sisterhood, 
Amelia Eelief Society, Beth El Sisterhood, Blythedale Home, 
B'nai Jeshurun Sisterhood, Brightside Day Nursery, Ceres 
Sewing Circle, Children's Haven, Columbia Eeligious and 
Industrial School, Crippled Children's Driving Fund, Emanuel 
Brotherhood, Federated Employment Bureau for Jewish Girls, 
Federation Settlement, Fellowship House, Jewish Big Brother 



140 AMERICAN JEWISH TEAR BOOK 

Association^ Jewish Maternity Hospital, Jewish Sabbath 
Association, Jewish Working Girls' Vacation, Ladies Bene- 
ficiary, Ladies Fuel and Aid, Lakeview Home, Mount Sinai 
Training School for Nurses, National Desertion Bureau, 
National Hospital for Consumptives, Eecreation Rooms and 
Settlement, Rodef Sholom Sisterhood, Shaaray Telfila Sister- 
hood, Sisterhood of Spanish and Portuguese Synagogue, 
Stony Wold Auxiliary, Temple Israel Sisterhood. 

When Federation was declared operative, the total of sub- 
8(jriptions secured was $2,000,000, and the number of 
subscribers 9,500. At the end of the first year, the total 
of subscriptions was $2,400,000, and the number of subscribers 
had increased to 17,000. 

On June 24, 1917, when Federation was incorporated, the 
number of societies affiliated was fifty-five. On January 1, 
1918, the number of affiliated societies had increased to eighty- 
four. 

From the inception of Federation two vital aims have been 
held steadily before the Trustees. One was the securing of 
larger funds for the support of the philanthropic institutions 
of the city. The other was to increase the nu,mber of members, 
so that it might be said that Jewish philanthropy was receiv- 
ing the support of the entire Jewish community. 

In the fall of 1917 an organization was developed with the 
aim of canvassing every district in the city so as to reach 
those who had in the past not contributed to any of the 
organized philanthropies in the city. The campaign was con- 
centrated within a period of two weeks. A novel feature was 
the transformation of the regulation afternoon rallies, held 
for the purpose of receiving reports from the various workers, 
into meetings which were utilized for educational propaganda 



JEWISH FEDERATION OF NEW YORK CITY 141 

on the subject of Jewish philanthropic work in New York 
City. Five-minute addresses were delivered on various topics, 
all touching on the work of the Federation and its societies. 
The campaign was noteworthy also in that the co-operation 
was secured of the larger fraternal organizations, such as the 
Independent Order Free Sons of Israel, Independent Order 
B'nai Brith, Independent Order Brith Abraham, etc. In 
addition to the subscriptions of the members of these orders, 
the lodges themselves enrolled themselves as contributing 
members to the Federation. 

When the campaign was completed, over 51,000 new members 
had been enrolled, making a- total of upwards of 71,000 con- 
tributing members to the Federation. 

The Federation gu,arantees to the affiliated societies certain 
amounts based upon the receipts of the societies from member- 
ship dues, subscriptions, and donations in the year 1915. The 
guarantee to the affiliated societies is $1,429,262.52. The 
funds available for Federation purposes in 1918 are $2,600,- 
000. In other words, the Federation in the second year of its 
existence has raised funds over $1,100,000 in excess of what 
had been raised prior to the organization of the Federation. 
This is an increase of over eighty per cent. 

The experience in New York has demonstrated several 
things. In the first place, the deadlock has been broken. What 
ten years ago was deemed to be an impossibility is now an 
actuality. There is a Federation. It has been formed in 
accordance with the plan that has received the approval of all 
the constituent societies. The old fear that a Federation 
would interfere with the autonomy of the institutions no 
longer exists. In no way, directly or indirectly, has there 



142 AMERICAN JEWISH YEAR BOOK 

been any tendency to regulate the operation of the societies 
or to affect the administration of their work. 

As an agency for securing additional funds from the com- 
munity and increasing the number of subscribers to the 
General Fund, the Federation has demonstrated its success 
in a magnificent way. Upwards of $3,000,000 in annual con- 
tributions pass through the oflSce of the Federation, designated 
to Federation purposes and distributed to unaflBliated societies 
in accordance with the wishes of the contributors. Upwards 
of nine hundred societies receive funds in accordance with 
the designations of the members of the Federation — this in 
addition to the eighty-four societies aflSliated with the 
Federation. 

The entire community has been welded into a solid unit. 
There is no division of up-town or down-town nor any other 
sort of division within the Federation. Problems of the com- 
munity are considered in the broadest possible way, and the 
decisions are accepted by the constituent societies as the result 
of the most careful deliberation. The various campaigns 
have developed new groups of workers ; men and women never 
before connected with Jewish work have rallied to the cause 
of the Federation, and have contributed in no small measure 
to its remarkable success. 

The committees of the Federation are considering the general 
problems of community welfare, and for the first time in the 
history of the Jewish community in New York City opportu- 
nity is given for the full consideration of problems that affect 
many institutions. The possibilities for co-ordination and 
co-operation are practically unlimited. Up to the present very 
little has been accomplished in a positive way to show the 
results of these conferences. They carry withiQ themselves, 



JEWISH FEDERATION OF NEW YORK CITY 143 

however, potentialities that are immeasurable. The citation 
of some of these problems may be of interest as indicating the 
trend of thought. The following list is selected: 

What are the arguments for and against a single placing-out 
bureau for the two large child-caring institutions now afl51i- 
ated with the Federation? Would such a bureau be more 
economical and conserve the best interests of the community 
and of the institutions ? 

What institutions must be developed or created to care for 
foundlings who may be offered for adoption ? 

How can co-operation be established between the various 
institutions and the Department of Education of the city with 
the view of determining whether the City Department may not 
more effectively take over parts of the educational work now 
carried on in the institutions aflSliated with the Federation ? 

What plan can be formulated to co-ordinate all types of 
placement and vocational guidance work now carried on in 
the institutions with the view of making present work more 
effective and preparing for the demands that will be made 
upon employment agencies in the period of adjustment after 
the war? 

What plan will be most effective to care for cardiacs ? 

Is it possible to develop a committee for the social care 
of the Jewish sick, which shall consider all constructive plans 
of rehabilitating those who are temporarily or permanently 
incapacitated from carrying on their regular employment? 

What are the hospital needs of the Bronx ? To what extent 
can existing institutions be reorganized and merged so as to 
make adequate provision for this section of the Jewish com- 
munity ? 



144 AMERICAN JEWISH YEAR BOOK 

What are the needs and what are the present facilities of 
the institutions affiliated with the Federation with reference 
to summer recreation, either for a period of two weeks or for 
week-end holidays? What is the best method of developing 
existing facilities in order adequately to provide for the 
problem ? 

The Federation has already achieved one definite, co-ordi- 
nated plan. The preventive and after-care work for juvenile 
delinquents has been co-ordinated under a central committee, 
which represents four different agencies, all affiliated with the 
Federation. Adequate funds have been provided by the 
Federation, and for the first time in the history of the com- 
munity the problem is being properly taken care of in 
accordance with a plan which is comprehensive in outline and 
which has received the approval not only of the professional 
workers but of the directors of the various institutions 
concerned. 

An Advisory Purchasing Committee has been formed which 
has already effected joint purchases of goods in bujk. This 
will be greatly extended in the coming year with the idea of 
effecting even greater economies. 

A committee has been organized to consider the problem 
of the standardization of salaries paid to social workers and 
of developing a plan for providing pensions for all those in 
the service of the societies afi&liated with the Federation. 

Under the direction of Mr. Leopold Plant, the President 
of the United Hebrew Charities, Mr. A. Oseroff, the Executive 
Director, and Mr. Morris D. Waldman, formerly Executive 
Director of tlie United Hebrew Charities and now Executive 
Director of the Boston Federation, a plan is being developed 
wherebv all relief work is to be co-ordinated under the direc- 



JEWISH FEDERATION OF NEW YORK CITY 145 

tion of the United Hebrew Charities. The work of the sister- 
hoods is to be standardized, while the invaluable personal 
service rendered by the members of the sisterhoods will, in the 
opinion of those who are furthering the plan, not be in any 
sense reduced. 

Such, then, is a brief record of the organization of the New 
York Federation, its material growth in the first year and a 
half of its existence. 

One type of influence, however, which is being steadily 
exercised in the Jewish community, which cannot adequately 
be expressed in words nor can it be reduced to statistics is 
this : For a year and a half a Board of Trustees has met to 
consider the problems connected with the greatest Jewish com- 
munity in the world. This Board consists for the most part 
of Trustees delegated by the various institutions. With years 
of tradition behind them, it was but natural that they came 
strongly imbued with the feeling of institutional pride and 
of institutional accomplishment. A great forward step has 
been made in that the requirements of individual institutions 
are now considered subordinate in the deliberations of the 
Board of Trustees to the greater problems of the community as 
a whole. What were before conflicting elements are gradually 
coming together. Where there was in previous years a pulling 
apart there is now a steady forging ahead. Through direct con- 
tact in committees and at the meetings of the Board, the Trus- 
tees are beginning to widerstand one another. Institutions are 
coming to a better appreciation of the problems presented by 
fields other than those in which they are laboring. The workers 
themselves, the superintendents, are co-operating to the fullest 
extent. 



146 AMERICAN JEWISH YEAR BOOK 

The problems that are still to be met are many. The 
difiBculties to be overcome are great. There will be many 
anxious days ahead, but so firmly has the Federation planted 
itself in the institutional management of the Jewish commu- 
nity that those who are responsible for the success of the 
Federation feel that there is no problem so great but that 
Federation can find its solution. The feeling is optimistic 
in the highest degree. 

While the size of New York City seems to render it immune, 
for the time being at all events, there is discussion in certain 
quarters of New York and in many cities through the United 
States of a new form of Federation which is worthy of the 
closest study. Many cities have already organized war chests ; 
joint funds are accumulated to take care of all war needs and 
of local philanthropies as well. It is as yet too early to say 
what the outcome of this movement will be. It must not be 
forgotten that the demands for war-time activities will cease 
when peace once more is with us. In the meantime, the 
greatest care must be taken that the continuous and depend- 
able support of local philanthropies shall not in any way be 
placed in jeopardy by the combination of many funds into a 
single war chest. 

This is not to be interpreted in any sense as a questioning 
of the value of the war-chest idea. It is intended merely to 
serve as a note of warning indicating what should be the 
attitude of those upon whom must fall the tremendous 
responsibility of maintaining peace-time philanthropies in 
time of war, so that their efficiency may not be impaired and 
that their organization may be ready to take over at the close of 
the war the added burden which the period of rehabilitation 
and readjustment necessarily brings with it. 



EVENTS IN 5678— CONTENTS 147 



EVENTS IN 5678 
June 1, 1917 to May 31, 1918 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 
A. United States 



PAGE 



I. General Events of Interest to Jews 

Legislation; Civil Rights Laws; Religion in Public 

Schools, Institutions, etc. ; Miscellaneous 151 

II. Jewish Communal Life 

Anniversaries; War Relief Work; Activities of Organiza- 
tions; Jewish Congress Movement; Other Events 152 

Synagogues and Homes of Societies Dedicated 159 

III. Appointments, Honors, and Elections 

Civil 162 

Military 173 

IV. Necrology 227 

V. War Necrology 231 

B. Foreign Countries 

Australia and New Zealand 

I. General Events ', 232 

II. Appointments, Honors, and Elections 232 

III. Necrology 2 2 

IV. War 232 

Austria-Hungary 

I. General Events ^33 

n. Appointments, Honors, and Elections 235 

III. Necrology 235 

IV. War 235 

Belgium 

I. General Events 236 

II. Appointments, Honors, and Elections 236 



148 AMERICAN JEWISH YEAR BOOK 

PAGE 
BULGABJA 

General Events 236 

Canada 

I. General Events 236 

II. Appointments, Honors, and Elections 237 

III. Necrology 237 

IV. War 237 

China 

General Events 237 

Denmark 

General Events 238 

EJOYPT 

General Events 238 

France 

I. General Events 238 

II. Appointments, Honors, and EJlections 239 

III. Necrology 239 

IV. War 

Honors; Promotions; War Necrology 240 

Germany 

I. General Events 242 

II. Appointments, Honors, and Elections 244 

III. Necrology 244 

IV. War 

Honors; Promotions; War Necrology. , i 244 

Greece 

General Events 245 

India 

I. Appointments, Honors, and Elections 245 

II. Necrology 245 

Italy 

I. General Events 246 

II. Appointments, Honors, and Elections 246 

III. Necrology 247 

IV. War 

Honors; Promotions; War Necrology 247 




EVENTS IN 5678— CONTENTS 149 

PAGE 

Jamaica 

War 249 

Netherlands 

I. General Events 249 

II. Necrology 250 

Palestine 

I. General Events 250 

II. Necrology 251 

Poland 
I. General Events 252 

II. Appointments, Honors, and Elections 254 

III. Necrology 254 

ROU MANIA 

General Events 254 

Russia 
I. General Events 

Anti-Jewish Propaganda 255 

Attacks on Jews 259 

Growth of Pro-Jewish Sentiment 263 

Jews in Political Life 266 

Legislation 267 

Relief of War Sufferers 267 

Finland 268 

Ukraine 268 

Miscellaneous 269 

II. Jewish Communal Life 271 

III. Appointments, Honors, and Elections 275 

IV. Necrology 278 

V. War 

General; Appointments; Military Honors 278 

SlAM 

m 

Appointments, Honors, and Elections 279 

South America 

General Events 279 

Spain 

General Events 280 



150 AMERICAN JEWISH YEAR BOOK 

PAGE 

Sweden 

General Events 280 

Switzerland 

I. General Events 280 

II. Appointments, Honors, and Elections 281 

Tunis 

General Events 281 

Turkey (Except Palestine) 

General Events 281 

Union of South Africa 

I. General Events 281 

II. War 

Promotions; War Necrology 282 

United Kingdom 

I. General Events 282 

II. Jewish Communal Life 

Statement of Conjoint Foreign Committee; Zionist Propa- 
ganda; the British Declaration; Miscellaneous 284 

III. Appointments, Honors, and Elections 288 

IV. Necrology 200 

V. War 

Military Honors; Promotions; War Necrology 291 




EVENTS IN 5678— UNITED STATES 151 



UNITED STATES 



GENERAL EVENTS OF INTEREST TO JEWS 

LEGISLATION:— October 8. Washington, D. C: Bill provid- 
ing for the appointment of chaplains-at-large in the Army, to be 
selected from religious denominations, not represented in the 
body of chaplains, becomes law. 

CIVIL RIGHTS LAWS:— July 27. Governor Lowden, of Illi- 
nois, vetoes bill passed by State Legislature making racial dis- 
crimination against guests of public resorts unlawful. 

RELIGION IN PUBLIC SCHOOLS, INSTITUTIONS, ETC.: — 
June 10. Lake Charles, La.: Rabbi Joshua Bloch persuades 
superintendent of schools to substitute another text-book for 
"The Merchant of Venice" in high school classes having Jewish 
members. — September 13. Chicago, 111.: Board of Education es- 
tablishes course in Hebrew in high schools. — 30. Waco, Tex.: 
Reading of Halbert Bible Stories made compulsory in public 
schools. — October 2. Chelsea, Mass.: School Board, in response 
to petition of Jewish parents and children, adds Hebrew to the 
curriculum of elective studies in high school. — January 12. Waco, 
Tex.: Following protest to Board of Education by Louis Gross- 
man, president of Central Conference of American Rabbis, reading 
of Bible in public schools is discontinued. 

MISCELLANEOUS:— June. Chicago, 111.: Moses J. Gries re 
tires from pulpit of Congregation Tifereth Israel after twenty-five 
years* service. — 20. President Wilson sends Henry Morgenthau 
and Felix Frankfurter to Egypt for the purpose of making investi- 
gations into the best means of aiding the Jews in Palestine. — 
July 27. Formation of Russian-American Civilian Unit of Nurses, 
composed of Jewish registered nurses, to serve among civil popula- 
tion of Russia. — September 20. Washington, D. C: United 
States War Department recognizes Jewish Welfare Board as the 
official agency for welfare work among Jews in the army. — October 
19. American Jewish Friends of New Russia give twelve ambu- 
lances and one motor truck, as a contribution to American Red 
Cross. — Eighty-two American Jewish refugees arrive from Pales- 



152 AMERICAN JEWISH YEAR BOOK 



tine after five months' travel. Novembeb 2. Chicago, 111.: 
Julius Rosenwald contributes one million dollars as an endow- 
ment fund to be known as the Julius Rosenwald Fund for the 
purpose of educating poor children. — 10-11. New York City.: 
Mayor Mitchell issues proclamation designating these as days to 
be observed in special remembrance of sufferings of the peoples 
of Armenia, Syria, and Palestine, and for their relief. — 11. At 
11th annual meeting, American Jewish Committee adopts resolu- 
tion renewing allegiance " to our Government and to its flag which 
symbolize the most precious hopes of mankind '* and dedicating 
"to the perpetuation of American ideals and institutions, to the 
maintenance of the honor of our country and the preservation of 
the principles for which it stands, our lives, our possessions, and 
those we hold most dear, to the end that liberty shall not perish 
from the earth." — December 11. Washington, D. C. : Committee of 
American Union of Roumanian Jews received by President Wilson, 
who discusses with them the parliamentary and historic con- 
siderations of their status. — 14. Directors of the Federation of 
Galician and Bukovinian Jews of America send, through Louis 
Marshall, president of American Jewish Committee, statement 
to President Wilson pledging their loyalty to the United States. 
— 17. Washington, D. C: Rep. Lunn, Schenectady, N. Y., in- 
troduces in House of Representatives resolution congratulating 
Great Britain on the capture of Palestine and the city of Jerusalem, 
and upon the wise statesmanship exhibited in the Balfour declara- 
tion. — 23. New York City: Representatives of leading Jewish relief 
committees present testimonial to Dr. Otis Glazebrook, formerly 
consul at Jerusalem, and his wife, in appreciation of their work 
for the relief of the Jews there. — 25. Washington, D. C: Mass- 
meeting to celebrate taking of Jerusalem by the British. Addresses 
by Bishop Harding, of Washington, Rabbi Abram Simon, and 
Dr. James A. Montgomery. 



II 

JEWISH COMMUNAL LIFE 

ANNIVERSARIES:— September 1. Baltimore, Md.: William 
Rosenau celebrates completion of twenty-five years' service as 
rabbi of Oheb Shalom Congregation. — 15. Baltimore, Md.: Oheb 
Shalom Congregation celebrates its sixty-fifth anniversary. — 
October 17. Indianapolis, Ind.: Mayer Messing, of Indianapolis 
Hebrew Congregation, celebrates fiftieth anniversary of his 
service as rabbi. — 18. Paterson, N. J.: Nathan Barnett Memorial 
Temple celebrates its twenty-fifth anniversary, and dedicates new 
Assembly Hall. — 27. Brooklyn, N. Y.: Congregation Shaari 
Zedek celebrates its fifteenth anniversary. — 28. Boston, Mass.: 



EVENTS IN 5678— UNITED STATES 153 



Temple Israel celebrates Its tenth anniversary. — Novembeb 3-4. 
Philadelphia, Pa.: Temple Keneseth Israel celebrates seventieth 
anniversary of Its founding, thirtieth anniversary of leadership 
of Dr. Joseph Krauskopf, and twenty-fifth anniversary of worship 
in its present building. — 7. St. Louis, Mo.: Ben Akiba Ladies' 
Aid Society celebrates its twenty-fifth anniversary. — 10. New 
York City: H. Pereira Mendes celebrates fortieth anniversary of 
his installation at Shearith Israel. — Chicago, 111.: Congregation 
KehiUath Anshe Ma'arab celebrates its seventieth anniversary. — 
11. Milwaukee, Wis.: Hebrew Relief Association celebrates its 
fiftieth anniversary. — Easton, Pa.: Congregation Covenant of 
Peace celebrates its seventy-fifth anniversary. — December 9. 
Chicago, 111.: Daily Jewish Courier celebrates its thirtieth anni- 
versary. — 14-16. New York City: Temple Rodeph Sholom cele- 
brates its seventy-fifth anniversary. — 27-29. Youngstown, O.: 
Congregation Rodef Shalom celebrates its golden jubilee. — 28. 
New York City: Stephen S. Wise presented by Executive Council 
of Free Synagogue with a scholarship fund for rabbinical train- 
ing of young men, as a tenth anniversary tribute; celebrates his 
tenth anniversary as rabbi of Free Synagogue. — January 4-6. 
Baltimore, Md.: Rev. Dr. Schepschel SchafPer celebrates his 
twenty-fifth anniversary as rabbi of Shearith Israel Congregation. 
25. Roxbury, Mass.: Rev. Dr. P. Israeli celebrates tenth anni- 
versary as rabbi of Congregation Adath Jeshurun. — Buffalo: 
Rabbi Louis J. Kopald celebrates fifth anniversary as rabbi of 
Temple Beth Zion. — ^February 1. Philadelphia: Fiftieth anni- 
versary of the death of Rev. Isaac Leeser. — 2. New York City: 
I. O. B. B. District Grand Lodge No. 1 celebrates its seventy-fifth 
anniversary. — 8. New York City : Congregation Shaari Zedek cele- 
brates its eightieth anniversary. — New York City: Home for 
Daughters of Jacob celebrates its twentieth anniversary. — 26. 
Boston, Mass.: Temple Ohabei Shalom celebrates its seventy- 
fifth anniversary. — April 12. Chicago, 111.: Congregation Temple 
Sholom celebrates its fiftieth anniversary. — 17. New York City: 
Spanish and Portuguese Synagogue celebrates the one hundredth 
anniversary of its fourth place of worship. 

WAR RELIEF WORK:— June 5. Paterson, N. J.: Mass-meet- 
ing for relief of Jewish war sufferers raises over $13,000. — "Detroit, 
Mich.: $300,000 raised in ten-day campaign for War Relief Fund. 
— 12. Spokane, Wash.: $15,000 subscribed to War Relief Fund. — 
19. Ft. Wayne, Ind.: $13,000 subscribed to War Relief Fund.— 
August 24. New York City: Commission, composed of Boris 
Bogen and Max Senior, sent to Holland by Joint Distribution 
Committee to establish relief center in Europe. — October 19. 
New York City: Hebrew Sheltering and Immigrant Aid Society 
forwards $3000 to Yokohama, Japan, to provide suitable quarters 



154 AMERICAN JEWISH YEAR BOOK 



for stranded Jewish refugees from Russia. — 21. New York City: 
At conference of two hundred delegates from Roumanian organi- 
zations resolutions adopted urging the Joint Distribution Com- 
mittee to send an American Commission to supervise the dis- 
tribution of relief in Roumania. — 28. New York City: Reso- 
lution adopted at meeting at Synagogue Shearith Israel, of 
eleven hundred delegates, representing committees gathering 
funds for Jewish war relief, throughout the United States, 
appointing a committee of ten prominent Jews to ask Presi- 
dent Wilson to extend the work of the Belgian Relief Com- 
mission to Poland, Lithuania, and similar war-stricken countries. 
— Decembeb 15. New York City: Over $5,000,000 raised for war 
relief and Jewish welfare work. — 18. New York City: Joint Dis- 
tribution Committee appropriates additional $200,000 for relief 
work in occupied portions of Poland and Lithuania; additional 
$300,000 for work in Palestine; $100,000 for Roumania, and $50,000 
for Salonica; $25,000 for Turkey outside of Palestine, and $3500 
for Alexandria for the purpose of purchasing wheat wherewith 
to bake matzoth for the next Passover. — ^Januaby 4. Philadel- 
phia, Pa. : War Relief drive of 1917 yields $464,000.-13. New York 
City: At annual meeting of contributors to National Jewish Hos- 
pital for Consumptives at Denver, resolution adopted offering 
services of the hospital to the Government of the United States for 
the care of one hundred to one hundred and fifty soldiers and 
sailors. — 25. Brooklyn, N. Y.: At the Zionist Council of Greater 
New York, Brooklyn Zionist societies pledge themselves to raise 
$50,000, as their share towards the Million Dollar Restoration 
Fund. — 26. Rochester: Community contributes over $125,000 to 
War Relief Fund. — Febbuaby 8. New York City: Julius Rosen- 
wald presented with gold memorandum book by War Relief work- 
ers of San Francisco, in appreciation of his offer to contribute ten 
per cent of all the funds raised in this country for relief of Jewish 
war sufferers. During the year the following sums were appro- 
priated by the Joint Distribution Committee of the American 
Funds for Jewish War Sufferers: Poland, etc. (in enemy occupa- 
tion), $2,042,819.68; Russia, $1,690.00; Palestine, $648,697.17; 
Turkey, $257,706.30; Egypt (Palestinian refugees), $19,794.84; 
Jewish students and writers in Denmark and Switzerland, $3,- 
200.00; Greece, $56,671.88; Servia, $1,000.00; Roumania, $70,000.00; 
Persia, $16,700.00; Japan (Russian refugees), $80,000.00; kosher 
food for Jewish prisoners of war in internment camps, $15,500.00. 
Advanced on account of refugees from Palestine who have reached 
the United States, $12,298.12. Total, $4,914,387.99. These appro- 
priations make the total for the duration of the war as follows: 
Poland, etc. (in enemy occupation), $6,585,362.98; Russia, $2,832,- 
300:00; Palestine, $1,446,979.77; S. S. "Vulcan," $64,506.09; Turkey, 



EVENTS IN 5678— UNITED STATES 155 



$548,504.30; Egypt (Palestinian refugees), $56,394.84; Jewish 
students and writers in Denmark and Switzerland, $9,200.00; 
Greece, $90,671.88; Servia, $19,500.00; Roumania, $105,900.00; 
Bulgaria, $18,500.00; Tunis, Algiers, and Morocco, $9,000.00; desti- 
tute families of Russian Jews in France, $5,000.00; Spain (Turkish 
refugees), $8,000.00; Persia,. $16,700.00; kosher food for Jewish 
prisoners of war in internment camps, $15,500.00; Japan (Russian 
refugees), $80,000.00; advanced on account of refugees from Pales- 
tine who have reached the United States, $12,298.12. Total, $11,924,- 
317.98. 

ACTIVITIES OP ORGANIZATIONS:— June 3-5. Atlantic City, 
N. J.: Independent Order B'rith Abraham adopts resolutions (1) 
offering the nation the aid of every member of the order, dele- 
gates voting authorization of purchase of $100,000 of United 
States Liberty Bonds; (2) upholding the aim of Zionism; (3) 
donating $25,000 to War Relief Fund.— 27. Baltimore, Md.: 
Twentieth annual meeting of Federation of Ajnerican Zionists 
adopts resolutions (1) indorsing action taken by President Wilson 
in the war and pledging support of every Zionist to the cause of 
democracy; (2) expressing gratitude to him of the Zionists of 
America for having appointed a commission to investigate the 
needs of Jews in Palestine; (3) expressing complete loyalty 
to America. — 28. Baltimore, Md.: Provisional Committee for 
General Zionist Affairs holds constitutional convention; Mizrachi 
and Poale Zion groups seceding. — July 2. New York City: United 
Synagogue of Ajnerica, at fifth annual convention, adopts resolu- 
tions (1) expressing its sense of the imperative need of immediate 
succor for the starving Jewish population in Poland, Galicia, Rou- 
mania, and Palestine, and pledging all possible help by its members 
and its constituents in meeting this need; (2) conveying to the 
Government of the United States assurance of the unwavering sup- 
port of its constituent organizations in the prosecution of the war 
and of the readiness of all its members to make whatever sacrifices 
may be necessary for the attainment of a just and lasting peace.— 
4. Buffalo, N. Y.: Central Conference of American Rabbis at 
twenty-eighth annual convention adopts resolutions endorsing 
woman suffrage and pledging assistance of the members of the con- 
ference in the work of the Board for Welfare Work among the Jew- 
ish men in the Army and Navy. — 20. Asaf Publishing Company or- 
ganized for furtherance of Hebrew literature in the United States. 
— 29-30. Chicago, 111. : Executive Committee of Independent Order 
B'nai B'rith adopts resolution that a committee of fifteen be 
appointed to assist in caring for the spiritual, social, and material 
needs of Jewish soldiers and sailors and their dependent families. 
— August 6. St. Louis, Mo.: Hebrew League mails to all mem- 
bers of Board of Aldermen copy of resolution voicing opposition 
to the proposed closing on Sunday of all dry goods, clothing, shoe. 



156 AMERICAN JEWISH YEAR BOOK 



and women's apparel stores. — Seiptember 3. Boston, Mass.: Con- 
vention of New England Young Men's Hebrew Associations adopts 
resolution criticizing Harvard University for refusing to change its 
entrance examinations date falling on Rosh ha-Shanah. — 5. New 
York City: Meeting of the Agudath Horabbonim Hamafitim adopts 
resolution that all the Jewish rabbis of America be called 
in conference to petition the President of the United States, 
the Senate and the House of Representatives, as well as the 
other Powers, to consider favorably the restoration of Pales- 
tine to the Jewish people. — 13. Jewish Welfare Board and Ameri- 
can Soldiers' and Sailors' Welfare League of the Independent 
Order B'nai B'rith agree to co-operate to avoid duplication of 
effort and to increase efficiency. — 14. Minneapolis, Minn.: Con- 
ference of American Alliance for Labor and Democracy adopts 
resolution urging upon the President of the United States and the 
international congress which will negotiate terms of peace the 
legitimate claims of the Jewish people for the re-establishment 
of a national homeland in Palestine. — 21. Joint Distribution Com- 
mittee makes arrangements with Department of State for for- 
warding funds to ** occupied territories " and to Palestine through 
the United States Minister at the Hague and to S. Hoofien, of 
the Anglo-Palestine Bank of Jerusalem. — November 18. Wash- 
ington, D. C: American Union of Roumanian Jews opens 
national headquarters in that city. — 19. New York City: Execu- 
tive Committee of the Alumni Association of the Jewish Theo- 
logical Seminary of America adopts resolution endorsing the 
British declaration regarding Palestine and expressing gratitude 
at official recognition, by the British Government, of Palestine as 
the national home of the Jewish people. — 30. Buffalo, N. Y.: 
Convention of Federation of American Labor adopts resolution 
endorsing aspirations of the Jewish people for a national home- 
land in Palestine. — ^New York City: Jewish Community (Ke- 
hillah) issues call for special convention on January 13 for 
purpose of submitting plan of representation to delegates, to make 
Kehillah more widely representative of New York. — Jewish 
Welfare Board in the United States Army and Navy appoints 
committee to consider applications for Jewish chaplains in the 
army and navy. — 'December 4-5. Orthodox Jewish rabbis confer 
on practical plans for work in Palestine. — 16. Baltimore, Md.: 
Special Zicmist conference meets to discuss practical questions 
arising as result of British declaration for a Jewish home 
in Palestine. — Baltimore, Md.: Zionists, in special conference 
called by Provisional Executive Committee for General Zionist 
Affairs, launches campaign to raise one hundred million dollar 
fund for restoration of the Holy Land. — 20. Springfield, Mass.: 
Annual convention of Independent Arbeiter Ring adopts resolu- 
tion in favor of establishing a national Jewish home in Palestine, 



EVENTS IN 5678— UNITED STATES 157 



and calls on its members to strive to create in the prospective Jew- 
ish State favorable labor conditions. — 23. Philadelphia, Pa.: 
Resolutions in favor of making Palestine a Jewish State adopted 
at conference of Jewish labor organizations under auspices of the 
workmen's wing of the Zionist movement. — 28-30. New York 
City: Fifth annual convention of the Intercollegiate Menorah 
Society. — 30. Philadelphia, Pa.: Representatives of more than 60 
per cent of Jewish labor organizations of that city attend con- 
ference with the object of forming a society whose purpose shall 
be to determine how many of them are willing to aid in the 
colonization of Palestine. — ^January 4. Zionists of America start 
world-wide drive for funds with which to help restore Holy Land, a 
million dollars to be raised as preliminary to a total of $100,000,000. 
—11. New York City: School for training field workers in con- 
nection with army and navy work opened by Jewish Welfare 
Board. — 13. New York City: Delegates to Jewish Community 
(Kehillah) special convention adopt plan of democratic repre- 
sentation by districting the city into eighteen districts of 100 
Kehillah neighborhoods, and approves the British declaration 
and the Zionist aims. — 20. Boston, Mass.: Special Assembly of 
Zionist Societies of New England pass resolutions (1) pledging 
support to President throughout the war; (2) expressing gratitude 
to the British Government; (3) promising to assist the Provisional 
Zionist Committee to raise one million dollars for Palestine Resto- 
ration E\ind. — 25. New York City: At conference of the United 
Synagogue the formation of a Woman's League, to be affiliated 
with the parent organization, was decided on. — 27. New York City: 
At first annual meeting of the Federation of Jewish Philanthropic 
Societies announcement made of the completion of a successful 
two-weeks campaign to add members to the Federation. — New York 
City: At Mizrachi conference of all Mizrachi societies and local 
orthodox synagogues throughout the country $50,000 pledged, 
and resolution of thanks adopted to the British Government for 
its Palestine declaration. 

JEWISH CONGRESS MOVEMENT:— June 3. Cincinnati, 0.: 
At executive meeting of Union of American Hebrew Congregations 
resolution adopted opposing holding of an American Jewish Con- 
gress until after the war. — 8. National Workmen's Committee on 
Jewish Rights withdraws from American Jewish Congress. — ^July 
3. Buffalo, N. Y.: Central Conference of American Rabbis at 
twenty-eighth annual convention votes to withdraw from fur- 
ther participation in the Congress to be held at Washington. — 
October 4. Boston, Mass.: Mayor Curley invites American Jew- 
ish Congress to meet in Boston. — 14. New York City: Executive 
Committee for the Jewish Congress decides to postpone call for the 
Congress until peace negotiations are in sight. 



158 AMERICAN JEWISH YEAR BOOK 



OTHER EVENTS:— June 24. New York City: Jacob H. Schiff 
protests against discrimination shown by Red Cross in its an- 
nouncement that American citizens of German, Austro-Hun- 
garian, Bulgarian, or Turkish birth, as well as native Americans 
who are the children of fathers born in the countries just named, 
shall be excluded from Red Cross service. — December 9. Tacoma: 
Conference held with object of organizing soldiers' welfare work 
in Camp Lewis. — 14. Philadelphia, Pa.: The Misses Katherlne 
and Julia Mayer establish Evelyn Bomeisler Educational Trust 
Fund for the higher education of inmates of Jewish Foster Home 
and Orphan Asylum. — 23. Brooklyn, N. Y.: Samuel H. Craig, 
School Board chairman, at ceremony of dedicating Service Plag 
in P. S. 129, attacks Jews as being unpatriotic, and is subsequently 
removed by Governor Whitman. — ^January 10. Lakewood, N. J.: 
Mr. and Mrs. N. Jacobs turn over to the War Department the 
Lakewood Hotel, to be used as hospital for convalescent soldiers. — 
12. Washington: Dr. Constantino Angelesco, Roumanian Minister 
to United States, states, in an Interview with a committee of 
American Union of Roumanian Jews, that his Government will 
support the Zionist plans at the peace conference. — 20. Cin- 
cinnati, O. : Services held at the Hebrew Union College in memory 
of the late Edward L. Heinsheimer, president of the Board of 
Governors of the college. — 24. St Louis, Mo.: Julius Rosenwald 
donates $25,000 to the Colored Y. M. C. A.— 25. New York City: 
Jacob Wertheim donates $5000 to Board of Education for dis- 
tribution among pupils having highest records in sale of War 
Saving Stamps. — ^Louisville, Ky.: I. W. and B. Bernheim make 
gift of $100,000 to Jewish Hospital. — Baltimore, Md.: Announce- 
ment made, at Zionist Conference, of permit granted by British 
Government to the Hadassah to dispatch a medical unit to Pales- 
tine. — 26. Washington, D. C: Army headquarters issues order 
that every Jewish soldier be supplied with one pound of matzoth 
a day during Passover. — New York City: Through the efforts of 
Council of Jewish Women, arrangements made with two Free 
Burial Societies whereby Jews dying in Blackwell's Island may 
be buried in a Jewish cemetery. — February 1. Washington, 
D. C: Dr. Garfield, fuel administrator, suspends heatless regu- 
lation on February 22, Washington's birthday, in order to 
enable the workers to carry out their plan of turning over the 
proceeds of that day's labor to the Jewish War Relief Fund. — 
San Francisco, Cal. : The late Ignatz Steinhart bequeaths $250,000 
for the erection of an aquarium in Golden Gate Park. — ^New York 
City: Testimonial book presented to Jacob H. Schiff by the 
workers in the recent five million dollar drive, in recognition of 
his services as chairman of the Campaign Committee. — 12. Brook- 



EVENTS IN 5678— UNITED STATES 159 

lyn, N. Y. : Mrs. P. J. Schweitzer donates $25,000 for the establish- 
ment of an Eye Hospital in Palestine. — 12. Washington, D. C: 
Jules J. Jusserand, French ambassador to the United States, in an 
interview with Prof. Georges Baccarat, states that France will 
safeguard interests of the Jewish people and heed their claims to 
Palestine. — March 8. Richmond, Va.: Clarence Millheiser donates 
160,000 to Richmond College for gymnasium building. — 15. New 
York City: Julius Rosen wald contributes $25,000 to the War 
Camp Community Service Campaign Fund. — 22. New York City: 
Contribution, by the sixty-two thousand members of the Interna- 
tional Ladies' Garment Workers' Union, of $140,000 to the American 
Jewish Relief Committee as a result of their work on Washington's 
birthday. — April 5. Baltimore, Md. : Dr. D. I. Macht, instructor in 
pharmacology at Johns Hopkins University, announces the dis- 
covery of a new therapeutic agent, known as benzlye benzolate, a 
substitute for medicines derived from opium. — 19. New York 
City: Harry Fischel donates a $7500 automobile to the American 
Zionist Medical Unit, to be used by the Unit in its field operations 
in Palestine. — 19. New York City: Messrs. Weinstein Bros, give 
$75,000 to the fund for completion of the new building of the 
" Home of the Daughters of Jacob."— 22. Brooklyn, N. Y. The 
two weeks' drive of the Federation of Jewish Charities closes 
with a half-million dollars in subscriptions. — 26. Cleveland, O.: 
Joseph Schonthal, of Columbus, offers $10,000 to the Jewish Infant 
Orphan's Home, for erection of a wing in connection with pro- 
posed new building. — 28. New York City: The American Jewish 
Committee, at a special meeting, expresses its appreciation of the 
British declaration regarding Palestine and its readiness to aid 
in the realization of the declaration an4 to co-operate with 
'* those who, attracted by religious or historic associations, shall 
seek to establish in Palestine a center for Judaism, for the stimu- 
lation of our faith, for the pursuit and development of literature, 
science, and art in a Jewish environment, and for the rehabilita 
tion of the land." 

SYNAGOGUES AND HOMES OF SOCIETIES DEDICATED 

CALIFORNIA 
San Francisco. — Young Men's Hebrew Association, Oct. 22, 1917. 

CONNECTICUT 

Bridgeport. — Agudas Achim Synagogue, Aug. 5, 1917. 

Ein Jacob Synagogue, Nov. 18, 1917. 
Hartford. — Young Men's Hebrew Association, June 18, 1917. 

6 



160 AMERICAN JEWISH YEAR BOOK 

ILLINOIS 

Champaign. — Congregation Sinai, Mch., 1918. 
Chicago. — Northwest Fellowship Club, June 1, 1917. 

Community Center and Hebrew School of Congregation Anshe 
Sholom, Sept. 9, 1917. 
Spbingfield. — Temple Brith Sholom, Sept. 9, 1917. 

INDIANA 

PoBT Wayne. — Achduth Veshalom Synagogue, Dec. 28, 1917. 
Gaby. — Temple Israel, Nov. 4, 1917. 

KENTUCKY 
Louisville. — Agudath Achim Synagogue, Sept. 9, 1917. 

LOUISIANA 

New Obleans. — ^Jewish Communal School, Mch. 3, 1918. 

MAINE 
Old Obchabd. — Beth Israel Synagogue, Aug. 4-5, 1917. 

MASSACHUSETTS 

Bevebly. — Recreation Home, July 29, 1917. 
Boston. — Beth Hamedresh Hagodol, Dec. 9, 1917. 
Dobchesteb. — Mt. Moriah Hebrew School, Oct. 14, 1917. 
Havebhill. — Hebrew Free School, Oct. 28, 1917. 

MICHIGAN 

Detboit. — ^Jewish Old Folks* Home, Sept. 9, 1917. 
Congregation B'nai Moshe, Mch. 3, 1918. 

MISSISSIPPI 
Gbeenville. — New Congregation Beth Israel, Apl. 15, 1918. 

MISSOURI 

Kansas City. — ^Young Men's and Young Women's Hebrew Asso- 
ciation, July 19, 1917. 
St. Louis. — Shaare Zedek Synagogue, Sept. 2, 1917. 

Miriam Convalescent Home, Sept. 30, 1917. 

B'nai Abraham Synagogue, Oct. 14, 1917. 

Tipheres Israel Hachnossas Orchim, Nov. 11, 1917. 

NEBRASKA 
Omaha. — Jewish Old People's Home, Aug. 5, 1917. 



EVENTS IN 5678— UNITED STATES 161 



NEW JERSEY 

Orange. — Agudath Achim Anshe Orange, Sept. 9,. 1917. 
Trenton. — Young Men's Hebrew Association, Dec. 9, 1917. 

NEW YORK 

Grandview-on-the-Hudson. — Jewish Home for Convalescents, June 

17, 1917. 
Liberty. — Ahawas Achim Synagogue, Sept. 16, 1917. 
New Rochelle. — Temple Israel, Dec. 12, 1917. 
New York City 
Brooklyn and Queens. — New Utrecht Hospital, Nov. 18, 1917. 

Bikur Cholim Kosher Hospital, Jan. 13, 1918. 
Manhattan and the Bronx. — Sons of Israel of the Bronx, June 
10, 1917. 
Council of Jewish Women Headquarters, Oct. 21, 1917. 
Home for Friendless and Homeless Girls of Council of Jewish 

Women, Nov. 25, 1917. 
Temple Beth Israel, Dec. 9, 1917. 
Gates of Hope Synagogue, Dec. 9, 1917. 
Neighborhood House^ under auspices of Sisterhood of Spanish 

and Portuguese Synagogue, Mch., 1918. 
Jewish Communal School, Mch., 1918. 
New Jewish Centre, Mch. 24, 1918. 
Israel Orphan Asylum, May 5, 1918. 
B'nai Jeshurun Temple, May 12, 1918. 

West Side Community House, 128 West 95th, May 12, 1918. 
Rome. — ^Adas Israel Synagogue, Sept. 9, 1917. 

OHIO 

Cincinnati. — Jewish Shelter Home, Sept. 23, 1917. 

Avondale Synagogue (Adath Israel), Sept. 2, 1917. 

Keneseth Israel Synagogue, Sept. 9, 1917. 

Jewish Shelter Home, Sept. 23, 1917. 
Clairton. — Bnai Abraham Anshei Sephardim Synagogue, Mch., 

1918. 
Dayton. — Dayton Hebrew Institute, Oct. 14, 1917. 

PENNSYLVANIA 

Philadelphia. — Perez Joseph Synagogue, June, 1917. 

Tribes of Jeshurun, Aug. 19, 1917. 

Jewish DUy Nursery, Oct. 21, 1917. 
Pittsburgh. — Poale Zedeck Synagogue, Sept. 9, 1917. 
Reading. — Hebrew Institute, Oct. 28, 1917. 
Shenandoah. — ^Keheleth Israel Synagogue, re-dedicated, Aug. 19, 

1917. 
Wilkes-Babre. — ^Young Men's Hebrew Association, Feb. 10, 1918. 



162 AMERICAN JEWISH YEAR BOOK 

SOUTH DAKOTA 
Aberdeen. — Bnai Isaac Synagogue, Sept. 10, 1917. 

TEXAS 
Waco. — Young Men's Hebrew Association, Oct. 21, 1917. 

VIRGINIA 
Norfolk. — Oheb Sholom Temple, Apl., 1918. 

Ill 

APPOINTMENTS, HONORS, AND ELECTIONS 

Civil 

Abrahams, Joseph E., New Braunfels, Tex., appointed post- 
master, Apl., 1918. 

Adelman, Joseph, Philadelphia, Pa., elected select councilman, 
Nov. 6, 1917. 

Adler, Simon L., Rochester, N. Y., re-elected to State Legislature, 
Nov. 6, 1917. 

Alexander, Milton M., Detroit, Mich., appointed chairman of 
Board of Patriotic Advertising, Dec, 1917. 

Amster, Lewis J., New York City, appointed health commis- 
sioner, Jan. 26, 1918. 

Arnstein, Leo, New York City, appointed chairman of Execu- 
tive Committee N. Y. County Chapter of American Red Cross, 
Jan., 1918. 

Baer, William, St. Louis, Mo., appointed assistant circuit attor- 
ney, July 1, 1917. 

Bassett, Alexander, Brooklyn, N. Y., elected alderman, Nov. 6, 
1917. 

Beckerman, a.. New York City, elected alderman, Nov. 6, 1917. 

Beihilf, Joseph, New York City, appointed assistant corporation 
counsel, Feb., 1918. 

Berg, David E., Philadelphia, Pa., appointed secretary of the 
Charities Bureau, Nov., 1917. 

Bernstein, Edgar H., appointed aid to Coast and Geodetic 
Survey, Dec, 1917. 

Bernstein, Fred, Chicago, 111., appointed Master in Chancery 
of the Superior Court, Dec, 1917. 

Black, Louis, colonel, Cleveland, O., re-elected vice-president of 
Superior Savings and Trust Co., Jan., 1918. 

Block, M., New York City, elected to State Legislature, Nov. 
6, 1937. 



EVENTS IN 5678— UNITED STATES 163 



Block, Leon, Cincinnati, O., selected, by chairman of the Hamil- 
ton County Pood Control Committee, to fix prices of foodstuffs 
during the war, Jan., 1918. 

Blout, Morris, Attica, Ind., elected city treasurer, Nov. 6, 1917. 

Blumrerg, Samuel J., Philadelphia, Pa., elected common 
councilman, Nov. 6, 1917. 

Blumenthal, Benjamin, New York City, re-appointed commis- 
sioner of local School Board for five years, Jan., 1918. 

Blumenthal, Max, Etna, Pa., elected director of School Board, 
June, 1917. 

Boernstein, Ralph A., appointed vice-consul at Christiania, 
June, 1917. 

BooRSTEiN, S. W., appointed chief of Infantile Paralysis Hospi- 
tal established by Fordham Medical College, Aug., 1917. 

Brandeis, Louis D., Washington, D. C, appointed to collaborate 
with Colonel E. M. House in the collection of data to be used at the 
peace conference, Oct., 1917. 

Braunstein, Alexander, New York City, elected alderman, Nov. 
6, 1917. 

Brill, I. L., Portland, Ore., appointed assistant professor of 
medicine at University of Oregon, Nov., 1917. 

Bromson, Solomon S., Providence, R. I., appointed member of 
Lawyer's Committee of One Hundred, Apl. 19, 1918. 

Brown, G. J., New York City, elected to State Legislature, Nov. 6, 
1917. 

BuTZEL, Fred M., Detroit, Mich., appointed member of Michigan 
Child Welfare Commission, Oct. 1, 1917. 

Cain, Levi F., Philadelphia, Pa., elected common councilman, 
Nov. 6, 1917. 

Callman, Maurice C, New York City, elected alderman, Nov. 
6, 1917. 

Cantor, Jacob, New York City, appointed president of the Tax 
Board, Jan., 1918. 

Cardozo, Benjamin N., New York City, re-elected justice of 
Court of Appeals, Nov. 6, 1917. 

Castleman, Philip, Boston, Mass., appointed deputy health 
commissioner of the City Health Department, Sept., 1917. 

Cohan, Isaac F., New York City, appointed assistant corpora- 
tion counsel, Jan., 1918. 

Cohen, Blanche, San Francisco, Cal., awarded bronze medal 
by French Government for services on behalf of France, Feb., 1918. 

Cohen, Josiah, Pittsburgh, Pa., re-elected judge in State Courts, 
Nov. 6, 1917. 

Cohen, Julius Henry, New York City, appointed secretary of 
the War Board of the Port, Nov., 1917. 



164 AMERICAN JEWISH YEAR BOOK 



Cone, Mrs. Sydney M., Baltimore, Md., appointed member of the 
State Commission Women's Section of the Defence Council, Feb., 
1918. 

Costa, A. F., Wailuku, Hawaii, appointed postmaster, July 21, 
1917. 

CuKOR, MoREis, New York City, appointed Municipal Civil 
Service commissioner, Jan., 1918. 

David, Joseph B., Chicago, 111., re-elected to Superior Court, 
Nov. 6, 1917. 

Davis, Habby L., Cleveland, O., re-elected mayor, Nov. 6, 1917. 

Dbessneb, J. D., New Orleans, La., appointed assistant to the 
Uijiited States district attorney for Eastern Louisiana, Nov., 1917. 

Dbeyeb, Eugene C, St. Louis, Mo., appointed assistant to United 
States Food Administrator, Feb., 1918. 

Dbeyfus, Louis G., Jr., appointed consul at Malaga, June, 1917. 

DwoBSKY, Habby, Schenectady, N. Y., elected alderman, Nov., 
1917. 

Edelman, Samuel, Philadelphia, Pa., appointed vice-consul at 
Geneva, Aug. 23, 1917. 

EiDLiTz, Otto, Washington, D. C, appointed director of housing, 
Feb., 1918; appointed to Department of Labor. 

EiEBMAN, W., New York, elected to State Legislature, Nov. 6, 
1917. 

EiSENMAN, Chas., Cleveland, 0., appointed to the War Industries 
Board Committee on Supplies. 

Ellenbogen, a. E., New York City, re-elected to State Legisla- 
ture, Nov. 6, 1917. 

Ellis, David A., Boston, Mass., appointed Fuel Administrator 
for Massachusetts, Dec, 1917. 

Ellmann, James I., Highland Park, Mich., appointed associate 
justice, Apl., 1918. 

Evans, William S., New York City, re-elected to State Legisla- 
ture, Nov. 6, 1917. 

Eppstein, Joseph O., Toledo, 0., appointed special assistant to 
the Attorney General of the district, July, 1917. 

Feigenbaum, W. M., Brooklyn, N. Y., elected to State Legisla- 
ture, Nov. 6, 1917. 

Feinbebg, Philip J., Boston, Mass., re-elected to State Legisla- 
ture, Nov. 6, 1917. 

Feiss, Henby, Cleveland, O., decorated by French Government 
for distinguished medical service, Dec, 1917. 

Fels, Mbs. S. S., Philadelphia, Pa., appointed to investigate 
retail prices, Nov., 1917. 

Filene, a. Lincoln, Boston, Mass., appointed chairman of special 
committee on daylight saving of the United States Chamber of 
Commerce, Aug. 10, 1917. 

FiNELiTE, Alexandeb, Ncw York City, re-elected judge of City 
Court, Nov. 6, 1917. 



^ 



EVENTS IN 5678— UNITED STATES 165 



FiNKEL, Samuel B., Boston, Mass., elected to State Legislature, 
Nov. 6, 1917. 

FiNKLE, Herman, Cleveland, O., elected councilman, Nov. 6, 1917. 

Fleishhackeb, Herbert, San Francisco, Cal., re-appointed mem- 
ber of Advisory Council of the Federal Reserve Board, Feb., 1917. 

Flexneb, Abram, New York City, appointed to investigate 
health conditions in the Navy, June, 1917. 

Frankel, Edward T., New York City, appointed statistician to 
City Police Department, July, 1917. 

Frankel, Lee K., New York City, appointed member of State 
Board of Charities, Feb., 1918. 

Fbankelfield, David G., Philadelphia, Pa., elected select coun- 
cilman, Nov. 6, 1917. 

Freund, Hugo A., Detroit, Mich., appointed to Board of Health, 
July, 1917. 

Friedenberg, Benj., appointed aid to Coast and Geodetic Survey, 
Dec, 1917. 

Friedlander, Samson, elected judge of Municipal Court, Nov. 
6, 1917. 

Friedman, J., New York City, elected alderman, Nov. 6, 1917.^ 

Friedsam, Michael, New York City, appointed New York State^ 
merchant representative of the United States Food Administra- 
tion, Sept., 1917. 

Garfinkel, Chas. B., New York City, elected to State Legisla- 
ture, Nov. 6, 1917. 

Geismar, A. H., Brooklyn, N. Y., re-appointed city magistrate 
for ten years, Jan., 1918. 

GiTLOw, B., New York City, elected to State Legislature, Nov. 
6, 1917. 

GoDCHAux, Edmond, Sau Francisco, Cal., re-elected county re- 
corder, Nov. 6, 1917. 

GoDCHAux, Rebecca, San Francisco, Cal., awarded bronze medal 
by the French Government for service on behalf of France, Feb., 
1918. 

Goldberg, Mark, New York City, re-elected to State Legislature, 
Nov. 6, 1917. 

Goldsmith, Alfred, New York City, appointed head of electrical 
engineering department at College of the City of New York, Oct., 
1917. 

Goldstein, David P., New York City, appointed assistant cor- 
poration counsel, Jan., 1918. 

Goldstein, Jacob, appointed assistant district attorney, New 
York County, Jan. 25, 1918. 

Goldstein, Sidney E., New York City, appointed member of 
Commission on Food Conservation Propaganda, Aug., 1917. 

GoMPERS, Samuel, Washington, D. C, appointed member of 
Council on National Defence, June, 1917. 



166 AMERICAN JEWISH YEAR BOOK 



GooDFBiEND, Meyeb, New York City, awarded silver medal of 
the Soci6t4 Les Amis des Artistes, Paris, July, 1917. 

Gordon, Murray B., Brooklyn, N. Y., appointed assistant clinical 
professor of pediatrics at the Long Island College Hospital, Oct., 
1917. 

GoTTHEiL, Richard, New York City, elected corresponding mem- 
ber of Spanish Academy of History, ApL, 1918. 

Greenfield, Albert M., Philadelphia, Pa., elected common 
councilman, Nov. 6, 1917. 

Grossman, Moses H., New York City, appointed temporary city 
magistrate, Jan., 1918. 

Hablo, Louis H., New York City, appointed deputy comptroller, 
Jan., 1918. 

Harris, Louis I., New York City, appointed director of the 
Bureau of Preventable Diseases in the New York Department of 
Health, Sept., 1917. 

Hart, Benjamin T., Altona, 111., appointed postmaster, Aug. 
7, 1917. 

Hartman, Samuel, Cleveland, O., appointed Washington repre- 
sentative of Textile Division of the Cleveland War Industries 
Commission, Feb., 1918. 

Held, A., New York City, elected alderman, Nov. 6, 1917. 

Henoch, Sol., Ligonier, Ind., elected mayor, Nov. 6, 1917. 

Herbert, Edward, New York City, appointed secretary to the 
Red Cross Commission going to Roumania from the United States, 
Aug., 1917. 

Hertz, Mrs. Louis, San Francisco, Cal., appointed member of 
Board of Trustees of State Normal School of Manual Arts and 
Home Economics, Santa Barbara, Cal., Apl., 1918. 

Hess, Julius H., appointed professor and head of the division 
of diseases of children in the University of Illinois College of 
Medicine, and chief of the department of diseases of children of 
the Cook County Hospital, June, 1917. 

HiRSCH, Nathan, New York City, appointed chairman of Mayor's 
Committee on Taxation Problems, Feb., 1918. 

HiRscHBERG, HERBERT, Tolcdo, O., clcctcd president of Ohio 
Literary Association, Nov., 1917. 

♦ HiBSH, JosE L., Baltimore, Md., appointed pediatrist to the 
University Hospital, Mch. 1, 1918. 

HiRSHFiELD, David, New York City, appointed commissioner of 
accounts, Jan., 1918. 

Horowitz, Louis J., New York City, appointed director of the 
Foreign Department of the Red Cross Society, Nov., 1917. 

HoRWiTz, Charles Kalmen, appointed to organize and direct 
the " Smileage " campaign in American schools and colleges, Mch., 
1918. 

♦ Deceased. 



> 



% 



EVENTS IN 5678— UNITED STATES 167 



Jaffe, Lester A., Cincinnati, O., appointed instructor in political 
science at the city University, Feb., 1918. 

Kahn, Otto H., New York City, appointed to Emergency Divi- 
sion of Governor's War Cabinet, June, 1917. 

KAI.LMAN, D., New York, elected alderman, Nov. 6, 1917. 

Kantob, Jacob, Chicago, 111., appointed instructor in department 
of psychology, University of Chicago, Nov., 1917. 

Kablin, W., New York City, elected to State Legislature, Nov. 6, 
1917. 

Katz, Aaron G., appointed to Coast and Geodetic Survey, Feb., 
1918. 

Katz, E. Jeannette, Pa., elected burgess, Nov. 6, 1917. 

Kaufman, Joseph, Roxbury, Mass., receives Carnegie bronze 
medal for heroism, Apl. 26, 1918. 

KiRSTEiN, Louis E., Boston, Mass., appointed chairman of com- 
mittee to study conditions in the garment industry affecting the 
making of uniforms, Aug., 1917. 

Klingman, B. C, Brooklyn, N. Y., elected to State Legislature, 
Nov. 6, 1917. 

KoBNFEiiD, Joseph S., Columbus, O., elected president of Board 
of Education, Jan. 8, 1918. 

Krauskopf, Joseph, Philadelphia, Pa., appointed member of 
Commission on Food Conservation Propaganda, Aug., 1917. 

Krohn, Irwin M., Cincinnati, O., appointed head of Shoe De- 
partment U. S. Quartermaster's Department, Feb., 1918. 

KussY, Nathan, Newark, N. J., appointed assistant city attorney, 
Dec, 1917. 

Lazansky, Edward, Brooklyn, N. Y., elected judge of Supreme 
Court, Nov. 6, 1917. 

Levenson, Max, Boston, Mass., appointed assistant attorney 
general of Massachusetts, Apl. 16, 1918. 

Levy, Maurice Eli, appointed aid of the Coast and Geodetic 
Survey, June 2, 1917. 

Levy, Max, Philadelphia, Pa., awarded Edward Longstreth 
silver medal of the Franklin Institute, for devising " homocytome- 
ter," Jan. 16, 1918. 

Levy, Meyer, New York City, re-elected to State Legislature, 
Nov. 6, 1917. 

Lewisohn, Joseph L., Los Angeles, Cal., appointed deputy state 
attorney for Southern California, Feb., 1918. 

Lewisohn, Sam, appointed member of War Risk Insurance 
Bureau. 

Leypoldt, Harry, appointed junior hydrographic and geodetic 
engineer of the Coast and Geodetic Survey, June 2, 1917. 

LippMAN, Walter, New York City, appointed confidential assist- 
ant to Secretary Baker, June, 1917; appointed to collaborate with 
Colonel House, Oct. 10, 1917. 



168 AMERICAN JEWISH YEAR BOOK 



LowENSTEiN, Solomon, New York City, appointed deputy com- 
missioner of the American Red Cross Commission to Palestine, 
Apl., 1916. 

LxjFTMAN, Louis, Maiden, Mass., re-elected to Board of Alder- 
men, Dec, 1917. 

LuMPP, Albert B., Philadelphia, Pa., elected common council- 
man, Nov. 6, 1917. 

LuTSKY, Eddie, Boston, Mass., appointed United States deputy 
marshal, June, 1917. 

Lyons, Maurice F., Washington, D. C, appointed secretary to 
Committee on Public Information, Nov., 1917. 

Macht, David L, Baltimore, Md., appointed lecturer in pharma- 
cology at Johns Hopkins University, June, 1917. 

Mack, Julian W., appointed chairman of section on compensa- 
tion for soldiers and sailors, July, 1917. 

Mack, Millard W., Cincinnati, O., appointed chief of the War 
Insurance Bureau in France, Dec, 1917. 

Mandelkorn, Noah, Cleveland, O., elected councilman, Nov. 6, 
1917. 

Markewich, Samuel, New York City, appointed assistant dis- 
trict attorney, Jan., 1918. 

Marks, Jacob, New York City, elected judge of Municipal Court, 
Nov. 6, 1917. 

Marks, Lionel S., Cambridge, Mass., appointed to National 
Advisory Committee for aeronautics at the Bureau of Standards, 
July, 1917. 

Marks, Milton, San Francisco, Cal., appointed assistant city 
attorney, June, 1917. 

Mayer, Herbert, Chicago, 111., appointed private secretary to 
the American embassy to the Balkan States, Aug., 1917. 

Meyer, Abraham G., New York City, elected judge of City Court, 
Nov. 6, 1917. 

Meyer, Eugene, Jr., appointed director of the War Finance 
Corporation, May, 1918. 

Meyer, S. M:, New York City, re-elected to State Legislature, 
Nov. 6, 1917. 

MicHELMAN, Samuel, Northampton, Mass., appointed on City 
Council, Dec, 1917. 

Miller, E. H., New York City, elected to State Legislature, Nov. 
6, 1917. 

Miller, Harry, New York City, re-appointed city magistrate for 
ten years, Jan. ,1918. 

MoNASH, Edward, Denver, Colo., re-elected president of the 
City Commission of Charity and Correction, Nov., 1917. 

MoRGENSTERN, JuLiAN, Cincinnati, O., elected president of West- 
ern Branch of American Oriental Society, Feb. 22, 1918. 




EVENTS IN 5678— UNITED STATES 169 



MoBGENTHAu, Mrs. Henby, Ngw York City, receives decoration 
of Legion of Honor from French Government, for relief work in 
Turkey, Sept. 1, 1917. 

MoBBis, J. J., Brooklyn, N. Y., elected to State Legislature, Nov. 
6, 1917.. 

Moses, Joseph W., Chicago, 111., elected president of the Chicago 
Bar Association, June 8, 1915. 

MosKowiTz, Henby, New York City, appointed commissioner of 
markets, Oct., 1917. 

Moves, Jacob, Maiden, Mass., elected to Board of Aldermen, 
Dec, 1917. 

Myebs, Philip M., Philadelphia, Pa., elected common council- 
man, Nov. 6, 1917. 

Myebson, Abbaham, Roxbury, Mass., appointed professor of 
neurology at Tufts Medical School, July, 1917. 

Nathan, Edwabd, Philadelphia, Pa., appointed consul, Vigo, 
Spain. 

Newbubgh, Habvey, professor of medicine in the University of 
Michigan, Ann Arbor, Mich., admitted as member of the Associa- 
tion of American Physicians, limited to one hundred and fifty 
members, June, 1917. 

Oppenheim, Saul, New York City, appointed chief librarian of 
Columbia University, Nov., 1917. 

Oppen stein, Louis, Kansas City, Mo., appointed member of 
Election Board, Aug., 1917. 

Obb, S., New York City, elected to State Legislature, Nov. 6, 1917. 

Ottingeb, Nathan, Albany, N. Y., appointed justice of Supreme 
Court, Mch. 8, 1918. 

Palitz, Clabence Y., New York City, elected alderman, Nov. 
6, 1917. 

Pam, Hugo, Chicago, 111., re-elected to Superior Court, Nov. 
6, 1917. 

Panken, Jacob, New York City, elected judge of Municipal 
Court, Nov. 6, 1917. 

Pebes, Isbael H., Memphis, Tenn., appointed chancellor of 
Shelby County, Dec. 28, 1917. 

Phillips, Mbs. David, Philadelphia, Pa., appointed to investi- 
gate retail prices, Nov., 1917. 

PiNANSKi, Abbaham I,, Boston, Mass., appointed on Immigra- 
tion Board for three years, July, 1917. 

PoLAK, H., New York City, elected registrar of Bronx County, 
Nov. 6, 1917. 

Pool, David de Sola, New York City, appointed member of 
Commission on Food Conservation Propaganda, Aug., 1917. 

Pbince, Leopold, New York City, elected judge of Municipal 
Court, Nov. 6, 1917. 



170 AMERICAN JEWISH YEAR BOOK 



Ratsheshy, a. C, Boston, Mass., appointed vice-chairman of 
Board of Food Administration of Massachusetts. 

RoBiTZEK, Harby, New York City, elected judge of Municipal 
Court, Nov. 6, 1917. 

RosEXBAUM, Samuel, Philadelphia, Pa., appointed special assis 
tant to United States District Attorney, Dec, 1917. 

Rosenberg, E., New York City, elected to State Legislature, 
Nov. 6, 1917. 

Rosenberg, Wm. C, New York City, elected alderman, Nov. 
6, 1917 

Rosexfeld, Samuel, St. Louis, Mo., appointed Judge, to fill 
unexpired term of Judge Cave, resigned, Sept., 1917. 

Rosexow, Carl, Chicago, 111., appointed instructor in Depart- 
ment of Psychology, University of Chicago, Nov., 1917. 

Rosensohn, Saml. J., New York City, appointed confidential 
assistant to Secretary of War. 

Rosenthal, Moritz, New York City, appointed general counsel 
to Mitchell Palmer, alien property administrator, Nov. 30, 1917. 

Rothschild, Sylvester E., Louisville, Ky., appointed American 
vice-consul at Gothenberg, Sweden, Dec, 1917. 

Rowe, S. L., Philadelphia, Pa., awarded medal by the National 
Institute of Social Science, in recognition of his efforts to develop 
closer intellectual relations between Central and South America. 

Rubin, Bernard, New York City, awarded Carnegie medal for 
rescue from drowning, Nov., 1917. 

Saix)mon, Henry, New York City, re-appointed member of State 
Commission of Prisons, Mch., 1918. 

Salus, Herbert W., Philadelphia, Pa., elected select councilman, 
Nov. 6, 1917. 

Samuels, H. Bunyan, Augusta, Ga., receives Carnegie bronze 
medal for heroism, Apl. 26, 1918. 

Sandberg, Harry O., Boston, Mass., appointed commercial agent 
for United States Bureau of Foreign and Domestic Commerce, 
Oct., 1917. 

Sawyer, Meyer J., Boston, Mass., re-appointed Master in 
Chancery, Aug., 1917. 

Scheresonevsky, Pincus, appointed lecturer in Yiddish at the 
New York State College of Agriculture, Cornell, Sept., 1917. 

Schlaifer, Morris E., Omaha, Nebr., appointed assistant secre- 
tary of the American Legation at Stockholm, Jan., 1918. 

Schneider, Morris N., Oakland, Cal., appointed on Public Wel- 
fare Board of Alameda County, Nov., 1917. 

ScHON, Edward, Lynn, Mass., appointed member of Board of 
Library Trustees, Apl., 1918. 

ScHREiBER, Cornel, Toledo, O., elected mayor, Nov. 6, 1917. 

Schulein, Ben. M., St. Louis, Mp., appointed in Ordnance De- 
partment of United States, July, 1917. 



EVENTS IN 5678— UNITED STATES 171 



ScHWABACHER, ALBERT E., San Francisco, Cal., appointed fueJ 
administrator for California, Oct., 1917. 

Schwartz, U. S., Chicago, 111., re-elected alderman, Apl., 1918. 

Seligman, George R., Tamaqua, Pa., appointed in Ordnance 
Department of United States Army, Aug., 1917. 

Semenoff, Leon, Providence, R. I., appointed member of Law- 
yer's Committee of One Hundred, Apl. 19, 1918. 

Senior, Jack, appointed aid of the Coast and Geodetic Survey, 
June 2, 1917. 

Shapiro, Isaac, Chicp,go, 111., appointed commissioner of West 
Park Board, June, 1917. 

Shiplacoff, Abraham I., Brooklyn, N. Y., re-elected to State 
Legislature, Nov. 6, 1917. 

Shoolman, Benj. I., Maiden, Mass., re-elected to Board of Alder- 
men, Dec, 1917. 

SiLVA, A. H., Jr., Kahului, Hawaii, appointed postmaster, July 
21, 1917. 

Simmons, Maurice, New York City, appointed member of Board 
of Assessors, Jan., 1918. 

Simons, Charles C, Detroit, Mich., appointed member of Board 
of Commerce, Mch., 1918. 

Smith, Joseph, Providence, R. I., appointed member of Lawyer's 
Committee of One Hundred, Apl. 19, 1918. 

Spiegelberg, Frederick, New York City, elected judge of Munici- 
pal Court, Nov. 6, 1917. 

Steinberg, Max, appointed junior hydrographic and geodetic 
engineer of the Coast and Geodetic Survey, June 2, 1917. 

Steinbrink, Mrs. Meier, Brooklyn, N. Y., appointed member of 
local School Board, Dec, 1917. 

Steinman, David B., New York City, appointed associate pro- 
fessor of civil and mechanical engineering in the College of the 
City of New York, Sept., 1917. 

Stoneman, David, Boston, Mass., appointed member of Park 
and Recreation Department, Dec, 1917. 

Strasburger, Milton, re-appointed judge of the Municipal Court, 
District of Columbia, Mch., 1918. 

Strasburger, Montrose, New York City, appointed assistant 
corporation counsel, Feb., 1918. 

Straus,' Herbert, appointed member of Committee on Food 
Administration. 

Straus, Nathan, New York City, appointed to investigate health 
conditions in the Navy, June, 1917. 

Straus, Oscar S., New York City, re-appointed chairman of 
Public Service Commission for New York City, Mch. 13, 1918. 

Strauss, Albert, New York City, appointed personal represen- 
tative of Secretary McAdoo on the War Trade Board, Nov. 13, 1917. 



172 AMERICAN JEWISH YEAR BOOK 



Strauss, Ferdinand, Boston, Mass., appointed member of Board 
for Prevention of Social Evils Around Military Camps, Sept., 1917. 

Strauss, Moses, Cincinnati, O., appointed member of Cincinnati 
Committee on Federal Reserve, Feb., 1918. 

Strauss, Nathan, Portland, Ore., appointed director of Federal 
Reserve Bank, Nov., 1917. 

Swig, Louis, Taunton, Mass., appointed chairman of Board of 
Park Commissioners, Mch., 1918. 

Swig, Simon, Boston, Mass., re-elected to State Legislature, Nov. 
6, 1917. 

ToNKONOGY, Abraham G., New York City, appointed assistant 
corporation counsel, Feb., 1918. 

ToRBERG, Herman M., New York City, appointed assistant cor- 
poration counsel, Feb., 1918. 

Untermyer, Samuel, New York City, appointed legal adviser 
to the Commissioner of Internal Revenue in connection with the 
War Revenue Act, Nov. 28, 1917. 

Vladeck, B. C, Brooklyn, N. Y., elected alderman, Nov. 6, 1917. 

Waldman, L., New York City, elected to State Legislature, Nov. 
6, 1917. 

Warburg, Paul M., awarded honorary degree of Doctor of Com- 
mercial Science by New York University, June 5, 1917; re-desig- 
nated vice-governor of Federal Reserve Board, Aug. 10, 1917. 

Wasserman, Jacob, Boston, Mass., elected to State Legislature, 
Nov. 6, 1917. 

Whitehorn, Joseph A., Brooklyn, N. Y., elected to State Legis- 
lature, Nov. 6,. 1917. 

Wise, A. M., New York City, elected alderman, Nov. 6, 1917. 

Wise, Stephen S., New York City, receives honorary degree of 
Doctor of Laws from Temple University of Philadelphia, June, 
1917. 

Wolf, Edwin, Philadelphia, Pa., elected president of the Board 
of Education, Nov., 1917. 

Wolf, Gustave A., Grand Rapids, Mich., re-elected member of 
Board of Library Commissioners, 1917. 

Wolff, B., Brooklyn, N. Y., elected alderman, Nov. 6, 1917. 

Wolff, Leon, Portland, Ore., appdinted school inspector of City 
Health Bureau, Sept., 1917. 

WoLMAN, Leo, Baltimore, Md., appointed on Council of National 
Defence War Industry Board. 

WooLFSON, Jacob, Maiden, Mass., appointed to Board of Alder- 
men, Dec, 1917. 

Yeska, Joseph, New York City, appointed commissioner of 
education, Jan., 1918. 

Ziegler, Mark Victor, appointed assistant surgeon of Public 
Health Service, July, 1917. 

ZuKOR, Adolf, New York City, appointed to Emergency Division 
of Governor's War Cabinet, June, 1917. 



\ 



EVENTS IN 5678— UNITED STATES 173 



Military 

Aaeonson, Isaac, Baltimore, Md., lieutenant, ordnance, army. 

Abel, D. G., Hoquiam, Wash., second lieutenant, army. 

Abrahm, Henry, major, base hospital, army. 

Abramowitz, a. B., Newark, N. J., lieutenant, army. 

Abrams, Peter, Philadelphia, Pa., lieutenant, aviation corps, 
army. 

Abrams, Raub, New Rochelle, N. Y., second lieutenant, infantry, 
army. 

Abrams, Wm. B., Los Angeles, Cal., second lieutenant, cavalry, 
army. 

Abrams, William H., second lieutenant, marine corps, navy. 

Abramson, Samuel, Des Moines, Iowa, second lieutenant, army. 

Abbamson, Samuel, lieutenant, army. 

Abramson, Wm., Bayonne, N. J., lieutenant, army. 

Ackerman, Arthur, Lincoln, Nebr., lieutenant, army. 

AcKERMAN, Arthur, Omaha, Nebr., captain, field artillery, army. 

Ackerman, Geo. W., San Francisco, Cal., lieutenant, infantry, 
army. 

Ackerman, Gilbert E., Brooklyn, N. Y., second lieutenant, artil- 
lery, army. 

Adams, Mark I., Boston, Mass., second lieutenant, ordnance, 
army. 

Adams, Mark I., Brookline, Mass., second lieutenant, ordnance, 
army. 

Adiger, David, New Orleans, La., lieutenant, medical corps, army. 

Adler, Carl J., captain, infantry, army. 

Adler, Herbert C, Los Angeles, Cal., second lieutenant, infantry, 
army. 

Adler, Julius Ochs, New York City, captain, cavalry, army. 

Albert, Al., Bayonne, N. J., lieutenant, army. 

Albert, Louis, lieutenant, army. 

Alexander, John, Newark, N. J., second lieutenant, army. 

Alexander, Samuel L., lieutenant, infantry, army. 

Aloe, Alfred, St. Louis, Mo., major, promoted lieutenant-colonel, 
army. 

Aloe, Myron R., St. Louis, Mo., second lieutenant, aviation 
corps, army. 

Aluswitz, J. A., McKeesport, Pa., lieutenant, medical corps, 
army. 

Altman, EMHi, New York City, captain, army. 

Altman, Phillip C, New Orleans, La., second lieutenant, quar- 
termaster's corps, army. 

Altmayer, Magnus, Jacksonville, Fla., captain, army. 

Altschul, Frank, New York City, lieutenant, ordnance, army. 



174 AMERICAN JEWISH YEAR BOOK 



Amy, Henby J., New York City, lieutenant, army. 

Andbop, Serge, Chicago, 111., captain, medical corps, army. 

Arendt, Morton, lieutenant, navy. 

Abmon, Aaron H., Philadelphia, Pa., second lieutenant, quarter- 
master's corps, army. 

Arnheim, Pinkussohn Lewis, Savannah, Ga., second lieutenant, 
infantry, army. 

Arnoff, Arnold, second lieutenant, army. 

Arnoff, Joseph M., McCrory, Ark., second lieutenant, quarter- 
master's corps, army. 

Arnowitz, Harry, second lieutenant, army. 

Arnstine, Edgar J., Cleveland, O., second lieutenant ordnance, 
army. 

Arnstein, Gustav D., Chicago, 111., lieutenant, infantry, army. 

Aronowitz, M., Albany, N. Y., captain, army. 

Aronson, Joseph, Philadelphia, Pa., lieutenant, medical corps, 
army. 

Arsenstat, Albert, Chicago, 111., lieutenant, medical corps, 
army. 

AscH, Jacob, New York City, lieutenant, army. 

Aschaffenbebg, E. Lyle, New Orleans, La., lieutenant, army. 

Ash, M. Walteb, Lincoln, Neb., lieutenant, army. 

Ash, Walteb, Palestine, Tex., second lieutenant, infantry, army. 

Ash, Walteb M., Birmingham, Ala., lieutenant, quartermaster's 
corps, army. ' 

AsHER, Maurice, Newark, N. J., captain, army. 

Aub, Edgar A., Cincinnati, O., captain, field artillery, army. 

AuB, Joseph C., Cincinnati, O., lieutenant, army. 

AuEB, Chables, lieutenant, army. 

Auebbach, Hebbebt S., Salt Lake City, major, ordnance, army. 

AuGENSTEiN, Melvin M., Washington, D. C, lieutenant, dental 
corps, army. 

AviDAN, Maubice S., Newark, N. J., lieutenant, medical corps, 
army. 

Bach, Joe S., New York City, captain, quartermaster's corps, 
army. 

Bach, Julian S., New ^ York City, lieutenant, army. 

Bachabach, Emile E., Brookline, Mass., second lieutenant, army. 

Bache, Habold, NewHTork City, second lieutenant, army. 

Bachman, M. H., Pittsburgh, Pa., lieutenant, army. 

Badt, Hym., Texarkana, Tex., second lieutenant, cavalry, army. 

Baehb, GteOBGE, New York City, major, army. 

Baeb, Habby S., Pittsburgh, Pa., lieutenant, army. 

Baeb, Iba, St. Paul, Minn., second lieutenant, artillery, army. 

Baeb, Mobbis O., Chicago, 111., lieutenant, artillery, army. 

Baeb,^Sanfobd, Murphy sboro. 111., lieutenant, army. 



EVENTS IN 5678— UNITED STATES I75 



Baeb, Simon L., Pittsburgh, lieutenant, army. 

Baeb, Walter J., Chicago, 111., lieutenant, artillery, army. 

Bahny, Ellis, Pittsburgh, Pa., lieutenant, army. 

Ball, Benj. A., Pittsburgh, Pa., captain, army. 

Ballamy, David, New York City, second lieutenant, naval officers' 
training station, navy. 

Ballenberg, a. G., Chicago, 111., lieutenant, army. 

Balmey, a., Buffalo, N. Y., lieutenant, quartermaster's corps, 
army. 

Balmey, E. H., Olean, N. Y., lieutenant, army. 

Bamberger, Clarence, Salt Lake City, U., captain, army. 

Barnard, Chas. T., Melrose, Mass., second lieutenant, infantry, 
army. 

Barnet, Carl, Boston, Mass., lieutenant, infantry, army. 

Barnet, Carl J., Brookline, Mass., second lieutenant, quarter 
master's corps, army. 

Barnett Herman L., New Orleans, La., second lieutenant, coast 
artillery, army. 

Barnett, Lawrence, St. Louis, Mo., lieutenant, army. 

Barsky, Joseph^ Wilmington, Del., captain, medical corps, army 

Baruch, Herbert M., Los Angeles, Cal., second lieutenant, field 
artillery, army. 

Bassett, Aubrey, Jacksonville, Fla., captain, army. 

Batt, Joseph, Cleveland, O., second lieutenant, army. 

Bauer, Herbert, San Francisco, Cal., ensign, navy. 

Baylson, Isidore, Philadelphia, Pa., lieutenant, infantry, army. 

Bears, Sidney E., St. Louis, Mo., lieutenant, quartermaster's 
corps, army. 

Beck, Sam G., Easton, Pa., lieutenant, medical corps, army. 

Becker, Aaron Joseph, captain, infantry, army. 

Becker, Isidor, Chicago, 111., ensign, navy. 

Becker, Sam W. B., Houston, Tex., captain, army. 

Beckman, Harold E., Cincinnati, O., second lieutenant, quarter- 
master's corps, army. 

Bedrick, David, Fall River, Mass., captain, dental corps, army. 

Beer, Edwin, New York City, major, medical corps, army. 

Beer, Emil G., Long Island, second lieutenant, quartermaster's 
corps, army. 

Beerman, W. F., San Francisco, Cal., captain, medical corps, 
army. 

* Behar, E. Y. M., New York City, second lieutenant, quarter- 
master's corps, army. 

Behar, Manoel, New York City, lieutenant, ordnance, army. 

Behrens, Jerome, New York City, lieutenant, infantry, army. 

Behrman, Isadore E., Baltimore, Md., lieutenant, engineer 
corps, army. 

Behrman, Leon, Portland, Ore., lieutenant, infantry, army. 



176 AMERICAN JEWISH YEAR BOOK 



Beich, Thos. H., Boston, Mass., second lieutenant, infantry, 
army. 

Beisneb, Leon, Long Branch, N. J., lieutenant, dental corps, 
army. 

BEndel, Henry W., Greenville, Tex., lieutenant, infantry, army. 

Benjamin, Julien E., Cincinnati, O., captain, medical corps, 
army. 

Bennett, Solomon Charles, Norfolk, Va., second lieutenant, 
army. 

Benson, Sayle D., Shreveport, La., second lieutenant, infantry, 
army. 

Beboeb, , Cincinnati, O., second lieutenant, army. 

Bergeb, Chas., Omaha, Nebr., lieutenant, army. 

Beroeb, Geo., Port Chester, N. Y., lieutenant, medical corps, 
army. 

Bergeb, Louis S., Chicago, 111., lieutenant, army. 

Berkowitz, J. O., Waco, Tex., lieutenant, army. 

Berkowitz, Louis, Birmingham, Ala., second lieutenant, in- 
fantry, army. 

Berkowitz, Walter J., Kansas City, Mo., lieutenant, artillery, 
army. 

Berliner, Leo H., New York City, second lieutenant, army. 

Berlowitz, Oliver, Waco, Tex., lieutenant, army. 

Berman, Willard M,, lieutenant, field artillery, army. 

Bernard, Frederick, Hartford, Conn., second lieutenant, quarter- 
master's corps, army. 

Bernheim, B. M., Baltimore, Md., captain, medical corps, army. 

Bernheim, D., Chicago, 111., second lieutenant, army. 

Bernheim, Eli D., Philadelphia, Pa., second lieutenant, infantry, 
army. 

Bernheim, Lynn, Louisville, Ky., lieutenant^ navy. 

Bernheimer, Chas. Daly, New York City, captain, coast artil- 
lery, army. 

Bernheimer, Louis G., New York City, lieutenant, aviation, 
army. 

Bernstein, Albert, Lima, O., second lieutenant, aviation, army. 

Bernstein, Fred., Glen Cove, N. Y., lieutenant, army. 

Bernstein, Harry, Rochester, N. Y., lieutenant, army. 

Bernstein, Jacob, Brooklyn, N. Y., lieutenant, medical corps, 
army. 

Bernstein, Mortimer B., New York City, lieutenant, field artil- 
lery, army. 

Bernstein, Philip, lieutenant, army. 

Bettelheim, Edwin S., Jr., Philadelphia, Pa., battalion adju- 
tant, army. 

Bettman, Ralph, Chicago, 111., lieutenant, army. 



EVENTS IN 5678— UNITED STATES 177 



BiEDBicK, David S., Fall River, Mass., lieutenant, dental corps, 
army. 

BiERN, O. B., Huntington, W. Va., lieutenant, medical corps, 
army. 

BijuB, Sherman M., New York City, second lieutenant, army. 

BiNsiNGER, Frederick M., San Francisco, Cal., lieutenant, in- 
fantry, army. 

BiNswANGER, Melvin F., St. Louis, Mo., second lieutenant, field 
artillery, army. 

BiRNBAUM, Alfred, Cleveland, O., second lieutenant, quarter- 
master's corps, army. 

Black, Alan Harcourt, Montreal, Can., lieutenant, field artil- 
lery, army. 

Black, Leo S., Seattle, Wash., lieutenant, army. 

Blackman, W. H., Walla Walla, Wash., second lieutenant, army. 

Blass, Noland, Little Rock, Ark., captain, artillery, army. 

Blatt, Meyer H., Brooklyn, N. Y., lieutenant, medical corps, 
army. 

Blau, William, Cleveland, O., lieutenant, infantry, army. 

Blaugrund, Samuel, Trenton, N. J., lieutenant, army. 

Blaustein, Abraham, Brooklyn, N. Y., awarded French War 
Cross for bravery in action, Mch., 1918. 

Blech, Gustavos M., Chicago, 111., major, medical corps, army. 

Bloch, Arthur, lieutenant infantry, army. 

Bloch, Walter J., San Francisco, Cal., lieutenant, field artillery, 
army. 

Block, E. R., Portland, Ore., lieutenant, army. 

Block, Edgar, Buffalo, N. Y., captain, army. 

Block, Harry, lieutenant, dental corps, army. 

Block, Leon, lieutenant, medical corps, army. 

Block, Martin, Chicago, 111., lieutenant, army. 

Bloom, Frank R., Pine Bluff, Ark., first lieutenant, infantry, 
army. 

Bloom, Meyer, lieutenant, army. 

Bloom, Robert A., Newburgh, N. Y., second lieutenant, army. 

Blum, Herbert C, Chicago, 111., second lieutenant, infantry, 
army. 

Blum, Isidore, Washington, D. C, lieutenant, army. 

Blum, Otto, Portsmouth, O., second lieutenant, infantry, army. 

Blum, Walter J., Chicago, 111., second lieutenant, infantry, army. 

Blum, Wm. R., New York City, second lieutenant, army. 

Blume, Benj. F., ensign, navy. 

Blumenthal, Harold, Pine Bluff, Ark., captain, army. 

Blumenthal, Maurice, El Paso, Tex., lieutenant, signal corps, 
army. 

Blumenthal, S., Brooklyn, N. Y., lieutenant, army. 

Bluthenthal, Alvin, Memphis, Tenn., second lieutenant, quar- 
termaster's corps, army. 



1 78 AMERICAN JEWISH YEAR BOOK 



Blythe, Harby, New York City, captain, army, v 

Boas, Geo., New York City, lieutenant, army. 

Boas, George, Berkeley, Cal., lieutenant, army. 

BoH.xE, A., Buffalo, N. Y., lieutenant, army. 

BooxE, , Chicago, 111., lieutenant, medical corps, army. 

Born, Juxrcs L., Lafayette, Ind., second lieutenant, field artil- 
lery, army. 

BoRXSTEiN, F. Mark, Newark, N. J., lieutenant, army. 

Borxsteix, Hymax, Chicago, 111., captain, army. 

Borrows, Lawrexce, Boston, Mass., ensign, navy. 

BousFiELD, Harold W., New York City, captain, army. 

Bower, Joseph, East Boston, Mass., second lieutenant, army. 

Boxer, Hexry, Birmingham, Ala., captain, coast artillery, army. 

Bradt, Morris, lieutenant, army. 

Braff, Max, E. Boston, Mass., lieutenant, army. 

Braff, Michael, East Boston, Mass., second lieutenant, army. 

Braxd, Harry, Harrisburg, Pa., lieutenant, army. 

Braude, Bexxet, Philadelphia, Pa., lieutenant, army. 

Braux, , Farrell, Pa., lieutenant, medical corps, army. 

Braux, Harry, Syracuse, N. Y., lieutenant, infantry, army. 

Braux, Isu)ore, lieutenant, army. 

Breakstoxe, I., Cincinnati, O., lieutenant, army. 

Brex, M. R., Denver, Colo., major, army. 

Brickxer, Walter M., New York City, major, medical corps, 
army. 

Brhx, Abr. Altox, New York City, lieutenant, medical corps, 
army. 

Brodie, Louis F., ensign, navy. 

Brodsky, Lewis, Chicago, 111., lieutenant, army. 

Brodsky, Samuel, Bayonne, N. J., second lieutenant^ army. 

Bronstein, Edw., New York City, lieutenant, dental corps, army. 

Broxsteix, H. M., Philadelphia, Pa., lieutenant, army. 

Brotman, Gilbert, Vineland, N. J., lieutenant, infantry, army. 

Broude, Harry, Harrisburg, Pa., lieutenant, army. 

Brown, Alex., lieutenant, field artillery, army. 

Brown, H. A., Chicago, 111., lieutenant, army. 

Brown, Harry, New York City, lieutenant, infantry, army. 

Brown, Henry, Detroit, Mich., second lieutenant, infantry, army. 

Brown, Herbert A., Cincinnati, O., captain, army. 

Brown, Herbert L., Cincinnati, O., captain, army. 

Brown, Hubert A., Cincinnati, O., lieutenant, army. 

Brown, Israel, Norfolk, Va., major, army. 

Brown, James B., Galveston, Tex., lieutenant, army. 

Brown, Jerome Hofmayer, Albany, Ga., lieutenant, infantry, 
army. 

Brown, Julius, Ocela, Fla., lieutenant, army. 




EVENTS IN 5678— UNITED STATES 179 



Brown, Julius L., Lafayette, Ind., second lieutenant, field artil- 
lery, army. 

Brown, L., Cleveland, O., lieutenant, army. 

Brown, Leroy, Albany, Ga., captain, field artillery, army. 

Bruckner, C. A., Whittier, Cal., lieutenant, field artillery, army. 

Brumberg, Jos., Buffalo, N. Y., lieutenant, army. 

Brush, Harry L., Conneaut Lake, Pa., lieutenant, medical corps, 
army. 

Brushanski, Nathan, captain, army. 

Bry, Edwin, New York City, lieutenant, medical corps, army. 

Bry, M. E., Memphis, Tenn., lieutenant, medical corps, army. 

BucHALTER, BENJAMIN, Tcrre Haute, Ind., lieutenant, navy. 

BucHALTER, Jos., Tcrrc Haute, Ind., ensign, navy. 

BuERMAN, Robert, Newark, N. J., lieutenant, medical corps, 
army. 

BuKA, A. J., Pittsburgh, Pa., captain, medical corps, army. 

BuLLusKY, Jacob J., Fort Slocum, N. Y., lieutenant, infantry, 
army. 

BuRDicjc, Jean, Rhode Island, second lieutenant, infantry, army. 

BuRGHEiM, G. A., Houston, Tex., captain, army. 

BuRGUNDER, B. Berner, Baltimore, Md., second lieutenant, army. 

Burnett, Harry, Southboro, Mass., second lieutenant, infantry, 
army. 

Burrows, Lawrence, Brookline, Mass., ensign, navy. 

BuRSTAN, Jacob, New York City, lieutenant, medical corps, army. 

BuRSTAN, Rupert, New York City, captain, army. 

BuRSTEiN, Theodore, Cleveland, O., lieutenant, medical corps, 
army. 

Cahn, Chas. a., Coatesville, Pa., lieutenant, medical corps, 
army. 

Cahn, Henry E., Shreveport, La., lieutenant, army. 

Cahn, Morton D., Chicago, 111., second lieutenant, quarter- 
master's corps, army. 

Cain, Bernard, West Point, N. Y., lieutenant, army. 

Calisch, Alex. C, Richmond, Va., captain, medical corps, army. 

Calisch, Harold, Richmond, Va., lieutenant, engineer corps, 
army. 

Calloman, Clarence B., Pittsburgh, Pa., lieutenant, army. 

Calloman, Verner B., Pittsburgh, Pa., assistant surgeon, rank of 
lieutenant, medical corps, navy. 

Cantor, Samuel, Bayonne, N. J., second lieutenant, army. 

Capen, George C, Hartford, Conn., second lieutenant, army. 

Caplan, Frank, Cleveland, O., second lieutenant, infantry, army. 

Caro, Philip A., assistant paymaster, navy. 

Cartum, Albert, lieutenant, dental corps, army. 

C ashman. Bender Z., Pittsburgh, Pa., lieutenant, medical corps, 
army. 



180 AMERICAN JEWISH YEAR BOOK 



Cerf, Richabd B1, San Francisco, Cal., lientenant, army. 

Chastock, S. J., Philadelphia, Pa., lientenant, anny. 

Chebnaik, Samuel J., Philadelphia, Ea., lieutenant, medical 
corps, army. 

Chixski, Charlie, Beanmont, Tex., lientenant, army. 

Claib, Fredebick D., Philadelphia, Pa., lieutenant, medical corps, 
army. 

Clerman, Max, New York City, lientenant, medical corps, army. 

Climax, M., New York City, lieutenant, medical corps, army. 

CuoFiJuti, Michael, Philadelphia, Pa., lieutenant, infantry, army. 

CoAN, N. S., New Haven, Conn., second lieutenant, aviation, 
army. 

Cohen, A. Paul, Dorchester, Mass., lieutenant, aviation, army. 

Cohen, Aaron N., Portland, Ore., second lieutenant, infantry, 
army. 

Cohen, Abraham, lieutenant, infantry, army. 

Cohen, Benjamin, Pittsburgh, Pa., lieutenant, engineer corps, 
army. 

Cohen, Carl L., captain, infantry, army. 

Cohen, David A., Memphis, Tenn., second lieutenant, quarter- 
master's corps, army. 

Cohen, Edward M., Athens, Ga., lieutenant, quartermaster's 
corps, army. 

Cohen, Blkan, Oakland, Cal., lieutenant, army. 

Cohen, Emil J., Chicago, 111., lieutenant, infantry, army. 

Cohen, Felix, Kansas City, Mo., lieutenant, medical corps, army. 

Cohen, George L., New York City, second lieutenant, army. 

Cohen, George W., Los Angeles, Cal., lieutenant, army. 

Cohen, Harold, Pawtucket, R. I., lieutenant, aviation, army. 

Cohen, Harry I., New York City, lieutenant, field artillery, army. 

Cohen, Ira, captain, army. 

Cohen, J., Bayonne, N. J., lieutenant, army. 

Cohen, Jacob, Brooklyn, N. Y., second lieutenant, army. 

Cohen, L. Frederich, New York City, lieutenant, medical corps, 
army. 

Cohen, Leon Solis-, Philadelphia, Pa., lieutenant, medical corps, 
army. 

Cohen, Mandel A. I., Chicago, 111., lieutenant, army. 

Cohen, Marion Y., lieutenant, navy. 

Cohen, Meyer, Bayonne, N. J., lieutenant, army. 

Cohen, Meyer Solis-, Philadelphia, Pa., captain, medical corps, 
army. 

Cohen, Nathaniel, lieutenant, army. 

Cohen, Ralph, Winthrop, Mass., second lieutenant, infantry, 
army. 

Cohen, Robert L., Ohio, lieutenant, field artillery, army. 




EVENTS IN 5678--UNITED STATES 181 



Cohen, Sam, Bayonne, N. J., ensign, navy. 

Cohen, Samson K., Roxbury, Mass., lieutenant, engineer corps, 
army. 

Cohen, Samuel C, second lieutenant, quartermaster's corps, 
army. 

Cohen, Samuel K., Roxbury, Mass., lieutenant, engineer corps, 
army. 

Cohen, Victor H., New York City, lieutenant, army. 

CoHN, Alan F., New York City, lieutenant, infantry, army. 

CoHN, David, Spokane, fWash., lieutenant, army. 

CoHN, Eugene, Spokane, Wash., captain, army. 

CoHN, Franklin, Philadelphia, Pa., captain, medical corps, army 

CoHN, Harry I., New York City, lieutenant, coast artillery 
army. 

CoHN, Herbert A., New York City, lieutenant, army. 

CoHN, Louis M., Little Rock, Ark., lieutenant, artillery, 'army. 

CoHN, Ralph, Maiden, Mass., second lieutenant, infantry, army. 

CoHN, Samuel Francis, second lieutenant, infantry, army. 

Cole, Harry, Woonsocket, R. I., lieutenant, army. 

CoLMAN, George, lieutenant, aviation corps, army. 

CoLMAN, Jesse C., San Francisco, Cal., captain, infantry, army. 

Cone, Sidney M., Baltimore, Md., captain, medical corps, army. 

Cooley, Jacob J., Worcester, Mass., lieutenant, medical corps, 
army. 

Coons, Isidore, Wilkes-Barre, Pa., lieutenant, infantry, army. 

CooRMAN, Max, captain, army. 

Cowan, Edgar N., Philadelphia, Pa., lieutenant, medical corps, 
army. 

CowEN, Edwin, New York City, lieutenant, artillery, army. 

Cramer, Arthur A., New York City, second lieutenant, army. 

Cramer, David, Philadelphia, Pa., lieutenant, army. 

Cramer, Morris, Baltimore, Md., lieutenant, army. 

Crans, Aaron B., West Chester, Pa., lieutenant, medical corps, 
army. 

Cristal, Philip, Bowling Green, Ky., lieutenant, army. 

Cronheim, Sam P., Atlanta, Ga., captain, army. 

Crown, Phil. T., Waco, Tex., lieutenant, army. 

Cutler, Irwin H., Chicago, 111., lieutenant, army. 

Dalis, Maurice D., Philadelphia, Pa., lieutenant, army. 

Dalsheimer, Hugo, Baltimore, Md., lieutenant, coast artillery, 
army. 

Daniels, C. D'A., Philadelphia, Pa., lieutenant, medjcal corps, 
army. 

Daniels, Henry, Boston, Mass., lieutenant, signal corps, army. 

Dannenberg, Arthur M., Philadelphia, Pa., lieutenant, medical 
corps, army. 

Danziger, Samuel S., Columbus, O., lieutenant, army. 



182 AMERICAN JEWISH YEAR BOOK 



Dattelbaum, Habby a., Brooklyn, N. Y., lieutenant, army. 

Daube, Jebome F. O., lieutenant, army. 

David, Louis T., Chicago, 111., second lieutenant, infantry, army. 

Davidow, Leonabd H., New York City, second lieutenant, army. 

Davidowitz, Habry S., Philadelphia, Pa., chaplain, rank of lieu- 
tenant, army. 

Davidson, Habold S., Philadelphia, Pa., lieutenant, medical 
corps, army. 

Davidson, Joseph H., second lieutenant, coast artillery, army. 

Davidson, Lawrence, Sioux City, la., ensign, navy. 

Davidson, Leonabd, Ogden, Utah, second lieutenant, infantry, 
army. 

Davidson, Sam., Chicago, 111., lieutenant, army. 

Davies, Michael E., New York City, lieutenant, signal corps, 
army. 

Davis, Abel, Chicago, 111., major, army. 

Davis, Alexandeb P., Middletown, Conn., second lieutenant, 
quartermaster's corps, army. 

Davis, Emanuel, New. York City, captain, army. 

Davis, Hebbebt, San Antonio, Tex., second lieutenant, army. 

Davis, Ibving, Bayonne, N. J., lieutenant, army. 

Davis, John E., Cincinnati, O., lieutenant, army. 

Davis, Joseph A., New York City, captain, army. 

De France, Fbed E., second lieutenant, army. 

Degen, Mobton, Omaha, Nebr., second lieutenant, infantry, army. 

Degen, Sam M., Pittsburgh, Kansas, lieutenant, army. 

Deiscoph, Edwin, Boston, Mass., captain, army. 

Demelman, Walteb W., Boston, Mass., second lieutenant, in- 
fantry, army. 

Dannenberg, a. M., Columbia, S. C, lieutenant, army. 

Denzer, N. Bernard, New York City, lieutenant, medical corps, 
army. 

Desser, a. Lincoln, Chicago, 111., lieutenant, medical corps, 
army. 

Deutschman, a. L., Dorchester, Mass., second lieutenant, quar- 
termaster's corps, national army. 

Devin, Wm., Baltimore, Md., captain, infantry, army. 

Diamond, Joseph I., Philadelphia, Pa., second lieutenant, quar- 
termaster's corps, army. 

DiCKMAx, Joseph, New York City, lieutenant, army. 

DiENER, Louis, Baltimore, Md., lieutenant, army. 

DiSHARooN, LiNDSEY, Chicago, 111., lieutenant, army. 

DoKTORSKY, Maurice, Chicago, 111., lieutenant, army. 

Drechsel, Charles, Brooklyn, N. Y., lieutenant, infantry, 
national army. 

Dreschler, Maurice D., Brooklyn, N. Y., second lieutenant, in- 
fantry, national army. 



EVENTS IN 5678— UNITED STATES 183 



Drey, Adolph, St. Louis, Mo., lieutenant, aviation corps, army. 

Dreyfus, Walter, New York City, captain, army. 

Drucker, S. S., Cleveland, O., lieutenant, army. 

Du Mont, Ferdinand G., Philadelphia, Pa., lieutenant, army. 
. DuBiN, Benj. J., Chicago, 111., second lieutenant, infantry, army. 

Dutch, Henry S., Cincinnati, Ohio, lieutenant, army. 

Eber, S. I., Pittsburgh, Pa., captain, army. 

EcKERT, M. M., New York City, lieutenant, army. 

Eckstein, A., Pittsburgh, Pa., lieutenant, army. 

Eckstein, Jack, Pittsburgh, Pa., second lieutenant, engineer, 
corps, army. 

Edison, Samuel M., Chicago, 111., lieutenant, medical corps, 
army. 

Edlovitch, B. M., Ft. Wayne, Ind., lieutenant, medical corps, 
army. 

Edwards, Earl, San Francisco, Cal., lieutenant, aviation corps, 
army. 

Ehrlich, Louis B., Bainbridge, Ga., lieutenant, field artillery, 
army. 

Ehrlich, Wm. S., Evansville, Ind., captain, medical corps, army. 

EicHBERG, A. J., lieutenant, signal corps, army. 

EiCHlteLMANN, George, New York City, lieutenant, infantry, 
national army. 

EiCHHOLz, Theodore R., Pittsburgh, Pa., lieutenant, engineer 
corps, army. 

Einstein, Lesley, Fresno, Cal., lieutenant, infantry, army. 

EiNTRACHT, Ira S., Chicago, 111., lieutenant, army. 

EisEMAN, C. M., New Orleans, La., second lieutenant, infantry, 
army. 

EisEMAN, Millard C, Baltimore, Md., lieutenant, army. 

EisER, Maximilian, Jr., New York City, lieutenant, infantry, 
national army. 

Elkin, Newton C, Philadelphia, Pa., ensign, navy. 

Ellbogen, Chas. D., Chicago, 111., lieutenant, army. 

Ellis, A. J., Newark, N. J., lieutenant, army. 

Ellis, L. M., Astoria, Ore., second lieutenant, army. 

Elson, Jack, St. Louis, Mo., captain, army. 

Elzas, Lee L., captain, cavalry, army. 

Emsheimer, Herbert W., Wheeling, W. Va., lieutenant, army. 

Endel, Sol., lieutenant, navy. 

Engel, Irvin C, Birmingham, Ala., lieutenant, field artillery, 
army. 

Engel, William, Birmingham, Ala., lieutenant, field artillery, 
army. 

Engel, Wm., Lincoln, Neb., lieutenant, army. 



184 AMERICAN JEWISH YEAR BOOK 



Enole, I. M., Birmingham, Ala., second lieutenant, infantry, 
army. 

Engle, Jacob L., Philadelphia, Pa., lieutenant, medical corps, 
army. 

Enole, W. p., Birmingham, Ala., second lieutenant, infantry, 
army. 

Enqlehabt, Jeffkey L., New. York City, second lieutenant, quar- 
termaster's corps, army. 

Epstein, Henry, Brookline, Mass., ensign, navy. 

Epstein, Sam., Beaumont, Tex., second lieutenant, army. 

Ebb, Fred C, Lewiston, Ida., second lieutenant, army. 

Ernest, Rush, Plymouth, Pa., lieutenant, army. 

EsHNER, Augustus, Philadelphia, Pa., lieutenant, army. 

EsKiND, Ernest, Nashville, Tenn., second lieutenant, signal 
corps, army. 

Etshokin, Louis, Chicago, 111., ensign, navy. 

Ettbnheim, Edgar P., Milwaukee, Wis., ensign, navy. 

Ettenson, Seth, Leavenworth, Kans., lieutenant, army. 

Ettleson, Jesse, Portland, Ore., lieutenant, army. 

EzEKiEL, Gerald A., Richmond, Va., lieutenant, medical corps, 
army. 

Faber, Arthur L., Tyler, Tex., lieutenant, reserve force, navy. 

Fabian, Harold P., Salt Lake City, Utah, captain, army. 

Falk, , Bessemer, Ala., lieutenant, army. 

Falk, F., Seattle, Wash., lieutenant, army. 

Falk, Lester L., Chicago, 111., lieutenant, artillery, army. 

Falk, Myron S., New York City, major, ordnance, army. 

Falk, Ralph, Baire, Idaho, lieutenant, army. 

Falk, Randall M., Little Rock, Ark., second lieutenant, infantry, 
army. ^ 

Farber, , lieutenant, army. 

Farkas, George, Schenectady, N. Y., lieutenant, army. 

Farkus, Sam, Cleveland, O., lieutenant, army. 

Fawcett, R., Portland, Ore., lieutenant, army. 

P^DERBUSCH, I. S., Rochester, N. Y., lieutenant, army. 

Feibelman, H. M., Mobile, Ala., second lieutenant, quarter- 
master's corps, army. 

Feibleman, Sidney, New Orleans, La., lieutenant, infantry, 
army. 

Feibleman, T. K., New Orleans, La., second lieutenant, field 
artillery, army. 

Feil, Harold, Cleveland, O., lieutenant, army. 

Feinberg, Hyman, Bayonne, N. J., lieutenant, army. 

Feinberg, J. N., New York City, lieutenant, army. 

Feinberg, Moses N., New York City, lieutenant, medical corps, 
army. 

Feinburq, Jacob N., Newark, N. J, lieutenant, army 



EVENTS IN 5678— UNITED STATES 185 



Feingloss, Isbael, Baltimore, Md., lieutenant, army. 

Fein STEIN, H. H., Columbus, Miss., lieutenant, army. 

Feiss, Henby, Cleveland, O., captain, army. 

Felcheb, Geoege, Chicago, 111., lieutenant, army. 

Feld, Aaron S., Passaic, N. J., second lieutenant, army. 

Feldebman, Leon, Philadelphia, Pa., captain, medical corps, 
army. 

Feldman, Abthub J., Cleveland, O., second lieutenant, field 
artillery, army. 

Feldman, Gus, Portland, Ore., lieutenant, medical corps, army. 

Feldman, Hebman, lieutenant, field artillery, army. 

Feldman, J., Portland, Ore., lieutenant, army. 

Feldman, Leo, Richmond, Va., second lieutenant, army. 

Feldman, Maubice, Baltimore, lieutenant, army. 

Felman, Jacob, Philadelphia, Pa., second lieutenant, infantry, 
army. 

Febnbach, Joseph, Philadelphia, Pa., lieutenant, medical corps, 
army. 

Febnbebgeb, Samuel, Philadelphia, Pa., captain, infantry, army. 

Feetiq, Chables a., Hood River, Ore., second lieutenant, field 
artillery, army. 

Fettebman, Geobge E., Media, Pa., lieutenant, national army. 

FiLiKiNS, Babent L., Buffalo, N. Y., lieutenant, infantry, army. 

FiLLMAN, Henby I., Northampton, Mass., lieutenant, army. 

FiNBEBQ, Elmeb M., New York City, second lieutenant, army. 

Fink, Abraham Bebnstein, Providence, R. I., second lieutenant, 
infantry, army. 

Fink, Chas. M., New York City, captain, army. 

Fink, Hyman, Cleveland, O., lieutenant, medical corps, army. 

FiNKELSTEiN, S., Tcrrc Haute, Ind., lieutenant, army. 

FiNKELSTEiN, Samuel M., WiUiamsburg, Pa., second lieutenant, 
engineer corps, army. 

FiNKELSTEiN, SoLOMON, Ncw York City, lieutenant, field artillery, 
national army. 

FiNKLESTEiN, Nathan, Bostou, Mass., lieutenant, artillery, army. 

FiNKLESTEiN, Samuel, Terre Haute, Ind., second lieutenant, engi- 
neer corps, army. 

FiBESTONE, Sam., McKeesport, Pa., lieutenant, medical corps, 
army. 

Fischeb, Abbaham, Grand Rapids, Mich., lieutenant, quarter- 
master's corps, army. 

Fischeb, Philip S., Media, Pa., second lieutenant, army. 

Fischeb, Wilbub, La Cygne, Kans., second lieutenant, artillery, 
army. 

Fish, Habby C, Philadelphia, Pa., lieutenant, medical corps, 
army. 

FisHEL, Jebome, Washington, D. C, second lieutenant, ordnance, 
army. 



186 AMERICAN JEWISH YEAR BOOK 



Fisher, Lewis, Philadelphia, Pa., major, medical corps, army. 

Fisher, Melville B., Washington, D. C, lieutenant, medical 
corps, army. 

Fisher, Milton M., ensign, navy. 

Fisher, Milton R., captain, cavalry, army. 

Fisher, Sidney, Cleveland, O., lieutenant, quartermaster's corps, 
army. 

Fist, Henry L., Muskogee, Okla., lieutenant, army. 

Flamm, Nathaniel U., Boston, Mass., lieutenant, aviation corps, 
army. 

Fleischauer, J. Harold, captain, infantry, army. 

Fleischman, a. G., Des Moines, la., lieutenant, army. 

Fleischman, Max, Cincinnati, O., major, aviation corps, army. 

Fleisher, Forman, Philadelphia, Pa., second lieutenant, artil- 
lery, army. 

Fleisher, Harry, Philadelphia, Pa., lieutenant, dental corps, 
army. 

Fleisher, M. S., St. Louis, Mo., lieutenant, army. 

Fleisher, Ralph E., New York City, lieutenant, sanitary corps, 
army. 

Flexner, Morris, Louisville, Ky., lieutenant, army. 

Flexner, Simon, New York City, major, medical corps. 

Florscheimer, Marian H., second lieutenant, army. 

Florsheim, Bernard, Shreveport, La., lieutenant, infantry, army. 

Forcheimer, H. H., Mobile, Ala., captain, infantry, army. 

Forchheimer, Landon, Cincinnati, O., lieutenant, infantry, army. 

Forchheimer, Marian, Mobile, Ala., second lieutenant, quarter- 
master's corps, army. 

Foreman, Jules L., New York City, second lieutenant, aviation 
corps, army. 

FoRSCH, Albert, New York City, major, ordnance, army. 

Fox, Leon, Birmingham, Ala., lieutenant, medical corps, army. 

Fox, Leon A., New York City, lieutenant, medical corps, army. 

Frank, Alexander, Philadelphia, Pa., second lieutenant, engi- 
neer corps, army. 

Frank, Everett, Louisville, Ky., second lieutenant, army. 

Frank, Harold, lieutenant, army. 

Frank, Isaac, New York City, captain, army. 

Frank, Jacob, Kansas City, Mo., captain, army. 

Frank, Jacob, Burlington, Vt., captain, army. 

Frank, Joseph J., New York City, lieutenant, infantry, army. 

Frank, Nathan H., Jr., San Francisco, Cal., second lieutenant, 
field artillery, army. 

Frankel, Harry, Des Moines, Iowa, second lieutenant, army. 

Frankel, Hubert G., Cincinnati, O., lieutenant, dental corps, 
army. 



EVENTS IN 5678— UNITED STATES 187 



Frankel, J., Wilkes-Barre, Pa., lieutenant, army. 

Fbankel, Murray Bebnard, West Pittston, Pa., lieutenant, army. 

Fbankenberger, Samuel, lieutenant-colonel, field artillery, army. 

Frankenheimer, J. B., Stockton, Cal., captain, medical corps, 
army. 

Frankenstein, H. A., Dallas, Tex., lieutenant, army. 

Frankenstein, Herbert, Cincinnati, O., lieutenant, engineer 
corps, army. 

Frankenstein, Jack, Goshen, Ind., second lieutenant, army. 

Frankfubter, Felix, appointed major, and assigned to duty at 
the War College, June 15, 1917; appointed secretary of special 
mission to arbitrate peace terms between capital and Labor, Oct., 
1917. 

Franklin, Abe, Chicago, 111., lieutenant, army. 

Frankstein, Jack Frell, Goshen, Ind., second lieutenant, 
medical corps, army. 

Freed, Albebt E., lieutenant, navy. 

Fbeedman, Habbis, Buffalo, N. Y., second lieutenant, infantry, 
army. 

Fbeedman, Henby W., New York City, second lieutenant, army. 

Fbeedman, Louis B., Houlton, Me., lieutenant, engineer corps, 
army. 

Fbeeman, Geobge S., Easton, Pa., second lieutenant, army. 

Fbeeman, Henby W., New York City, second lieutenant, infantry, 
army. 

Fbeeman, Stanley L., Wilkes-Barre, Pa., lieutenant, medical 
corps, army. 

Fbeibebg, Albebt H., Cincinnati, O., captain, medical corps, army. 

Fbeibubgeb, M., New York City, lieutenant, medical corps, army. 

Fbenkel, Benedict, Cincinnati, O., second lieutenant, infantry, 
army. 

Fbeund, Otto A., New York City, lieutenant, army. 

Fbeundlich, Tom, Houston, Tex., lieutenant, army. 

Fbied, Mobtimeb, New York City, lieutenant, ordnance, army. 

Fbiedbebgeb, Wm., Stockton, Cal., lieutenant, medical corps, 
army. 

Pbiedenheit, Abthub, New York City, ensign, navy. 

Fbiedenthal, Chas. G., Seattle, Wash., lieutenant, infantry, 
army. 

Fbiedenwald, Edgab B., Baltimore, Md., major, medical corps, 
army. 

Fbieder, Chas., New York City, second lieutenant, army. 

Fbtedlaendeb, Wm. M., New York City, lieutenant, army. 

Friedlander, Albebt, captain, infantry, national army. 

Fbiedlandeb, Alfbed, Cincinnati, O., major, infantry, army. 

Fbiedlandeb, Alfbed, Cincinnati, O., lieutenant, medical corps, 
army. 



188 AMERICAN JEWISH YEAR BOOK 



Feiedlandee, B., Saginaw, Mich., lieutenant, army. 

Fbiedlandeb, David S., New York City, second lieutenant, army. 

ITbiedlandeb, Geobge, New York City, second lieutenant, army. 

Fbiedman, Clemont, Cleveland, 0., lieutenant, marine, navy. 

Feiedman, David, Portland, Ore., second lieutenant, army. 

Fbiedman, D. T., St. Charles, 111., second lieutenant, army. 

Fbiedman, Febdinand J., New York City, lieutenant, ordnance, 
army. 

Fbiedman, Joseph, Chicago, 111., captain, army. 

Fbiedman, Joseph C, Greenville, S. C, major, medical corps, 
army. 

Fbiedman, Monboe Maeks, Oakland, Cal., lieutenant, infantry, 
army. 

Fbiedman, Raphael N., Chicago, 111., major, army. 

Feiedsam, Michael B., New York City, quartermaster-general of 
New York State Guard, with rank of major. 

Feiend, E. M., Albany, N. Y., lieutenant, army. 

Feisch, S. J., lieutenant, army. 

Feoelich, Mobitz, Selma, Ala., lieutenant, quartermaster's corps, 
army. 

Fbohman, Louis H., New York City, lieutenant, quartermaster's 
corps, army. 

Fbohman, Nathan S., Cincinnati, O., lieutenant, ordnance, 
army. 

Fbomm, N. R., Albany, N. Y., captain, army. 

Feosh, H. B., Lincoln, Nebr., lieutenant, medical corps, army. 

Feybubq, W. F., Great Falls, Mont, second lieutenant, army. 

FuBMAN, B. A., Newark, N. J., lieutenant, medical corps, army. 

Gabbielson, C. D., Salem, Ore., lieutenant, infantry, army. 

Gaqgstatteb, Heney D., Albany, Ga., lieutenant, infantry, army. 

Galen, Robebt, Alliance, O., lieutenant, army. 

Gans, Robebt, Baltimore, Md., captain, coast artillery, army. 

Gabdneb, p. L., Greenville, Miss., lieutenant, army. 

Gabfinkle, Bebnabd L., Dorchester, Mass., second lieutenant, 
army. 

Gaskhx, Joshua N., Philadelphia, Pa., lieutenant, medical corps, 
army. 

Gates, Samuel J., Milwaukee, Wis., captain, artillery, army. 

Gates, Syd., Little Rock, Ark., lieutenant, army. 

Geisbnbebgeb, Bebnabd C., Natchez, Miss., lieutenant, infantry, 
army. 

Geisenbeboeb, Clabence, Natchez, Miss., second lieutenant, 
infantry, army. 

Geisenbebgee, Maubice, Natchez, Miss., lieutenant, army. 

Geisenbebgee, W. a., Natchez, Miss., lieutenant, infantry, army. 

Gelatt, Aethub, Kansas City, Mo., lieutenant, infantry, army. 

Gebbeb, Lipman, Plainfield, N. J., lieutenant, army. 




EVENTS IN 5678— UNITED STATES 189 



Gerst, Hebbert, Norfolk, Va., lieutenant, army. 

Gerstley, Jesse, Cincinnati, O., lieutenant, army. 

Getelson, Jos., Kansas City, Kans., captain, medical corps, army. 

GiLBEBT, Leon, Nashville, Tenn., lieutenant, army. 

GiLBEBT, MoBBis, White Plains, N. Y., lieutenant, infantry, army. 

Gelman, Fbedebick, New York City, captain, army. 

GiNSBEBG, Abb. Robebt, lieutenant, coast artillery, army. 

GiNSBEEiG, Max, New York City, second lieutenant, infantry, 
national army. 

GiNSBEBG, Wm., St. Paul, Minn., lieutenant, medical corps, army. 

GiNSBUBG, Abe., Wilkes-Barre, Pa., lieutenant, army. 

GiBSDANSKY, JOSEPH, New York City, lieutenant, medical corps, 
army. 

Glaubeb, Edwabd M., Cleveland, O., lieutenant, army. 

Glick, David, Pittsburgh, Pa., lieutenant, army. 

Glickman, Dave, lieutenant, army. 

Glik, Edwabd, St. Louis, Mo., lieutenant, army. 

Gluokman, Louis D., Wilmington, Del., lieutenant, medical 
corps, army. 

Gluick, Lewis, Port Chester, N. Y., ensign, navy. 

Godchaux, Paul L., New Orleans, La., second lieutenant, field 
artillery, army. 

Godhabt, Abthub L., New York City, lieutenant, ordnance, army. 

GoFF, H. Gale, Pittsburgh, Pa., lieutenant, army. 

Gold, Fbank A., Butler, Pa., second lieutenant, army. 

Gold, Nathan, Lincoln, Nebr., second lieutenant, army. 

Goldbebg, Aabon N., New York City, second lieutenant, national 
army. 

Goldbebg, David, Corsicana, Tex., chaplain, rank of lieutenant, 
navy. 

Goldbebg, Maubice, Philadelphia, Pa., lieutenant, medical corps, 
army. 

Goldbebg, Milton, Buffalo, N. Y., lieutenant, army. 

Goldbebg, Samuel L., Rockaway Beach, L. I., second lieutenant, 
infantry, national army. 

Goldblatt, Habby, lieutenant, medical corps, army. 

Golden, L. Nathaniel, Boston, Mass., lieutenant, army. 

GoLDEBMAN, Philip S., lieutenant-colouel, coast artillery, army. 

Goldman, Abbaham S., Dorchester, Mass., second lieutenant, 
army. 

Goldman, Alfbed M., lieutenant, field artillery, army. 

Goldman, Gilbebt, St. Louis, Mo., second lieutenant, army. 

Goldman, Habby, Baltimore, Md., lieutenant, medical corps, 
army. 

Goldman, Habby S., Terre Haute, Ind., second lieutenant, engi- 
neer corps, army. 

Goldman, Habby S., Chicago, 111., second lieutenant, army. 



lyo AMERICAN JEWISH YEAR BOOK 



Goldman, I. J., Cleveland, O., lieutenant, medical corps, army. 

GrOLDMAN, J., Ngw Orleans, La., lieutenant, army. 

Goldman, J. M., St. Louis, Mo., lieutenant, army. 

Goldman, Jay, St. Louis, Mo., lieutenant, quartermaster's corps, 
army. 

Goldman, Jerome, St. Louis, Mo., second lieutenant, infantry, 
army. 

Goldman, Lewis, Gloucester, Mass., lieutenant, army. 

Goldschmidt, Wm. F., Chicago, 111., second lieutenant, infantry, 
army. 

Goldsmith, Alan G., Middletown, O., captain, infantry, army. 

Goldsmith, Charles J., New York City, lieutenant, infantry, 
army. 

Goldsmith, Irving E., New York City, lieutenant, army. 

Goldsmith, Myron B., Washington, D. C, second lieutenant, 
infantry, army. 

Goldsmith, R. H., Scran ton, Pa., lieutenant, army. 

Goldsmith, Ralph N., Philadelphia, Pa., lieutenant, medical 
corps, army. 

Goldsmith, Walter J., New York City, lieutenant, ordnance, 
army. 

Goldstein, Abr., New York City, captain, quartermaster's corps, 
army. 

Goldstein, Davis W., Ft. Smith, Ark., lieutenant, medical corps, 
army. 

Goldstein, Emanuel De, New York City, major, engineer corps, 
army. 

Goldstein, Jacob, New York City, second lieutenant, infantry, 
army. 

Goldstein, Joseph, Brooklyn, ensign, navy. 

Goldstein, Joseph, Syracuse, N. Y., second lieutenant, army. 

Goldstein, Louis, New Orleans, La., captain, artillery, army. 

Goldstein, Louis S., Chicago, 111., second lieutenant, infantry, 
army. 

Goldstein, Max., St. Louis, major, medical corps, army. 
^ Gomez, Oscar J., New Orleans, La., lieutenant, infantry, army. 

GoMPERS, Samuel Philip, Washington, D. C, second lieutenant, 
aviation corps, army. 

Goodhart, Howard L., New York City, lieutenant, army. 

Goodlick, H., Seattle, Wash., lieutenant, army. 

GooDLiCK, Louis Sam, Seattle, Wash., lieutenant, medical corps, 
army. 

Goodman, Albert R., Fort Jay, lieutenant, medical corps, army. 

Goodman, Arnold H., Schenectady, N. Y., second lieutenant, 
army. 

Goodman, Arthur M., Detroit, Mich., lieutenant, infantry, army. 

Goodman, B. E., Brookline, Mass., lieutenant, army. 



EVENTS IN 5678— UNITED STATES 191 



Goodman, Ben., lieutenant, marine corps, navy. 

Goodman, Chas., New York City, major, army. 

Goodman, Edwin, Terre Haute, Ind., second lieutenant, infantry, 
army. 

Goodman, Hasbt, Terre Haute, Ind., lieutenant, army. 

Goodman, I. J., Cleveland, O., lieutenant, signal corps, army. 

Goodman, Leon, Terre Haute, Ind., captain, engineer corps, army. 

Goodman, Moe, captain, army. 

Goodrich, David M., New York City, major, national army. 

Goodwin, E., Bay City, Mich., lieutenant, medical corps, army. 

Goodwin, Edwin R., Terre Haute, Ind., lieutenant, army. 

Gordon, N. B., Birmingham, Ala., second lieutenant, cavalry, 
army. 

Gordon, Nathan, Birmingham, Ala., lieutenant, field artillery, 
army. 

Gordon, Sumner S., Boston, Mass., second lieutenant, cavalry, 
army. 

Gordon, Whuam H., New York City, lieutenant, medical corps, 
army. 

Gorfinkle, Benjamin, second lieutenant, army. 

GoRFiNKLE, Bernard L., Mt. Vernon, N. Y., chaplain, rank of 
lieutenant, army. 

GoTHOLD, DAvro J., Chicago, 111., lieutenant, army. 

Gottdiener, Isidore, Cleveland^ O., lieutenant, infantry, army. 

Gottfried, Mendel, Denver, Colo., lieutenant, army. 

Gottlieb, Abraham, Newark, N. J., lieutenant, army. 

Gottlieb, Chas., New York City, captain, army. 

Grabfield, G. Philip, Cincinnati, O., lieutenant, army. 

Graboff, Felix, lieutenant, army. 

Graff, Edwin D., New York City, captain, army. 

Grannick, J. D., Denver, Colo., lieutenant, army. 

Grannick, T. M., Denver, Colo., lieutenant, medical corps, army. 

Green, Albert L., San Francisco, Cal., second lieutenant, coast 
artillery, army. 

Green, David W., Salem, N. J., lieutenant, medical corps, army. 

Green, Htman, Boston, Mass., captain, medical corps, army. 

Greenbaum, Benno, Kansas City, Mo., lieutenant, infantry, army. 

Gbeenbaum, Edward S., New York City, captain, army. 

Greenbaum, Siqmund, Philadelphia, Pa., lieutenant, medical 
corps, army. 

Greenberg, a., Omaha, Neb., lieutenant, army. 

Greenhut, Frederick, captain, army. 

Green sfelder, Harry, St. Louis, Mo., lieutenant, army. 

Greensfelder, Louis, Chicago, 111., captain, army. 

Greenstein, Morris, Philadelphia, Pa., lieutenant, dental corps, 
army. 

Greenstone, S. A., Chicago, 111., second lieutenant, army. 



192 AMERICAN JEWISH YEAR BOOK 



Gkeenstone, Sam, Cleveland, O., lieutenant, army. 

Greenstone, Sam, Lincoln, Neb., second lieutenant, army. 

Greentbee, Mykon, Columbus, Ga., lieutenant, army. 

Groginski, p. S., Bayou, Tex., lieutenant, infantry, army. 

Grollman, Aaron, Baltimore, Md., lieutenant, army. 

Gross, Isadore T., Lansford, Pa., second lieutenant, infantry, 
army. 

Gross, Louis, Lebanon, Pa., second lieutenant, army. 

Gross, Samuel, Philadelphia, Pa., lieutenant, ordnance, army. 

Grossman, A., Cleveland, O., lieutenant, medical corps, army. 

Grossman, A. A., Portland, Ore., lieutenant, army. 

Grossman, A. B., Chicago, 111., lieutenant, medical corps, army. 

Grossman, Eugene S., Slippery Rock, Pa., second lieutenant, 
army. 

Grossman, H. Philip, Chicago, 111., second lieutenant, quarter- 
master's corps, national army. 

Grossman, Nathan, Lincoln, Neb., lieutenant, army. 

Gruenbaum, Bruno, Kansas City, Mo., lieutenant, Infantry, 
army. 

Grundfest, Sam., Vicksburg, Miss., lieutenant, army. 

Grunwald, Martin G., Brooklyn, N. Y., second lieutenant, artil- 
lery, army. 

GuBiN, Chas., Northumberland, Pa., lieutenant, army. 

Guggenheim, Harry F., New York City, lieutenant, aviation 
corps, army. 

Guggenheim, M. Robebt, New York City, lieutenant, infantry, 
army. 

GuNST, Gebold, Corpus Christi, Tex., lieutenant, army. 

GuTMAN, Emanuel H., New York City, second lieutenant, army. 

Haas, Albebt J., lieutenant, infantry, army. 

Haas, Arthur, New York City, lieutenant, quartermaster's 
corps, army. 

Haas, Edmund L., New York City, captain, ordnance, army. 

Haas, Geo. C, New York City, captain, artillery, army. 

Haas, Robt. K., New York City, lieutenant, infantry, army. 

Haas, S. L., San Francisco, Cal., lieutenant, medical corps, army. 

Haase, Monboe C, Cleveland, O., lieutenant, army. 

Haft, Henby, lieutenant, medical corps, army. 

Hahn, Albebt J., Mobile, Ala., lieutenant, artillery, army. 

Hahn, Manuel, St. Louis, Mo., lieutenant, aviation corps, army. 

Hahn, Milton, Washington, D. C, captain, medical corps, army. 

Halle, Samuel, Cleveland, O., major, army. 

Halle, Stanley J., New York City, lieutenant, aviation corps, 
army. 

Halpebin, D., St. Louis, Mo., major, army. 

Hambubgeb, Walteb W., Chicago, 111., major, medical corps, 
army. 



EVENTS IN 5678— UNITED STATES 193 



Hammerschlag, Robekt J., second lieutenant, infantry, army. 

Harris, Adriel, New York City, lieutenant, army. 

Harris, Benjamin, New York City, second lieutenant, army. 

Harris, Benjamin S., Lewisburg, Pa., second lieutenant, army. 

Harris, Elmer P., New York City, captain, ordnance, army. 

Harris, Eugene, El Paso, Tex., lieutenant, army. 

Harris, Harvey L., Chicago, 111., lieutenant, artillery, army. 

Harris, Jack, Philadelphia, Pa., lieutenant, quartermaster's 
corps, army. 

Harris, Lester Abraham, Lewisburg, Pa., second lieutenant, 
army. 

Harris, Milton, Portland, Ore., second lieutenant, cavalry, army. 

Harris, Robert L., New York City, lieutenant, army. 

Harris, Victor F., Chicago, 111., second lieutenant, infantry, 
army. 

Harrison, Jas., Boston, Mass., lieutenant, infantry, army. 

Hart, Abraham S., Chicago, 111., second lieutenant, infantry, 
army. 

Hart, Benj. Seixes, New York City, lieutenant, infantry, army. 

Hart, Henry L., lieutenant, infantry, army. 

Hart, Leonard, Meridian, Miss., captain, medical corps, army. 

Hartman, Joseph, San Francisco, Cal., second lieutenant, army. 

Harve, S. J., Akron, O., lieutenant, army. 

Haskins, Abraham, Boston, Mass., lieutenant, medical corps, 
army. 

Hast, Julian, Pittsburgh, Pa., lieutenant, army. 

Hays, Arthur, New York City, major, medical corps, army. 

Heilfron, Milton, San Francisco, Cal., second lieutenant, army. 

Heilprin, Benjamin E., Brooklyn, N. Y., lieutenant, medical 
corps, army. 

Heineman, Geo., San Francisco, Cal., second lieutenant, cavalry, 
army. 

Heineman, Henry C, San Francisco, Cal., second lieutenant, 
aviation section, signal officers' reserve corps, army. 

Heller, Joseph, Newark, N. J., second lieutenant, army. 

Heller, Lawrence J., Washington, D. C, second lieutenant, 
quartermaster's corps, army. 

Hendel, I., Philadelphia, Pa., lieutenant, medical corps, army. 

Herberts, Wm., Boston, Mass., lieutenant, army. 

Herman, Irving L., Bayonne, N. J., second lieutenant, army. 

Herman, Lester R., Chicago, 111., lieutenant, army. 

Herrick, Fred, Pittsburgh, Pa., lieutenant, army. 

Herrman, Henry, New York City, lieutenant, army. 

Hertman, Irvin, Louisville, Ky., second lieutenant, army. 

Hertman, Nathan, Louisville, Ky., second lieutenant, army. 

Hertz, John L., Lititz, Pa., lieutenant, medical corps, army. 

Hertz, Norman, Philadelphia, Pa., second lieutenant, army. 



194 AMERICAN JEWISH YEAR BOOK 



Heetzman, Ibwin, Louisville, Ky., second lieutenant, army. 

Hebtzman, Nathan, Louisville, Ky., second lieutenant, army. 

Hebzog, Geobge K., San Francisco, Cal., major, ambulance corps, 
army. 

Hess, Abthub Paul, New York City, second lieutenant, infantry, 
army. 

Hess, Chables M., Philadelphia, Pa., lieutenant, engineer corps, 
army. 

Hess, Edwin, New York City, lieutenant, infantry, national 
army. 

Hess, Henby Emu., assistant veterinarian, army. 

Hess, Julius, Chicago, 111., major, army. 

Hess, Seth, New York City, lieutenant, army. 

Hess, Seymobe, Baltimore, Md., lieutenant, coast artillery, army. 

Hess, Silas, Chicago, 111., lieutenant, army. 

Heyman, L. J., Lexington, Ky., lieutenant, infantry, army 

Heyman, Lawbence, Shelbyville, Ky., lieutenant, infantry, army. 

Heyn, Pbedebick, Omaha, Neb., second lieutenant, quarter- 
master's corps, army. 

Hillee, Mobton, Omaha, Neb., lieutenant, infantry, army. 

Hibsch, D. I., Monroe, La., lieutenant, army. 

HiBSOH, Edwin W., Chicago, 111., lieutenant, medical corps, army. 

Hibsch, Geo. Walteb, lieutenant, coast artillery, army. 

HiBSCH, Habby J., colonel, infantry, army. 

Hibsch, J. H., New York City, lieutenant, army. 

Hibsch, Lawbence J., New York City, second lieutenant, army. 

Hibsch, M. Habold, Newark, N. J., lieutenant, army. 

Hibsch, M. W., Memphis, Tenn., second lieutenant, army. 

Hibsch, Ralph, second lieutenant, field artillery, army. 

HiBSCHBEBG, S. B., Kausas City, Mo., lieutenant, army. 

Hibschfield, Ben, Lincoln, Neb., lieutenant, army. 

HiBSCHMAN, IsiDOBE S., Baltimore, Md., lieutenant, medical 
corps, army. 

HiBSCHMAN, Simon V., New York City, second lieutenant, infan- 
try, army. 

HiBSH, Habold M., Philadelphia, Pa., lieutenant, field artillery, 
army. 

HiBSH, MoBBis W., Memphis, Tenn., lieutenant, infantry, army. 

HiBSHBEBG, Leonabd, Baltimore, Md., lieutenant, army. 

HiBSHMAN, Sidney John, San Francisco, Cal., second lieutenant, 
army. 

Hibshfield, Ben., Birmingham, Ala., lieutenant, aviation corps, 
army. 

HiBSHOBN, Maubice S., assistaut paymaster, navy. 

HiBST, Fbank, Cleveland, O., ensign, navy. 

HocHWALD, Henby, Marshall, Tex., captain, quartermaster's 
corps, army. 



EVENTS IN 5678— UNITED STATES 195 



HocKSTEiN, M., Bayonne, N. J., second lieutenant, army. 

HocKWALD, Henby, Marshall, Tex., captain, army. 

Hoffman, Albebt, Yonkers, N. Y., second lieutenant, infantry, 
national army. 

Hoffman, Habby A., Chicago, 111., lieutenant, army. 

Hoffman, Jacob H., Tacoma, Wash., second lieutenant, coast 
artillery, army. 

Hoffman, Lawbence H., San Francisco, Cal., captain, medical 
corps, army. 

Hohenbebq, Julian, Selma, Ala., lieutenant, infantry, army. 

HoLLANDEB, Hebman C, VicksbuFg, Miss., lieutenant, infantry, 
army. 

Hood, Philip G., Newark, N. J., captain, army. 

HooTKiNS, Hibsch, Grand Rapids, Mich., lieutenant, army. 

HoBCHOW, Joseph, Portsmouth, 0., lieutenant, army. 

HoBCHOW, Reuben, New York City, lieutenant, quartermaster's 
corps, army. 

HoBNEB, David, Chicago, 111., captain, army. 

HoBOWiTZ, Joseph, New York City, lieutenant, army. 

HoBowiTZ, Nathan Hale, El Paso, Tex., lieutenant-colonel, army. 

HoBOwiTz, Wm., Pittsfield, Mass., lieutenant, army. 

HoBwiTz, Samuel, Bayonne, N. J., lieutenant, army. 

HoBwiTz, Sandob, Peoria, 111., lieutenant, medical corps, army. 

Houseman, Eugene B., Grand Rapids, Mich., second lieutenant, 
quartermaster's corps, army. 

Houseman, Felix, Grand Rapids, Mich., second lieutenant, army. 

Howell, Habby L., Bloomington, 111., captain, navy. 

HuTZLEB, Leboy, Richmond, Va., lieutenant, infantry, army. 

Hyman, Habold T., New York City, lieutenant, army. 

Hyman, Lawbence, Louisville, Ky., second lieutenant, army. 

Hyneman, Henby, Philadelphia, Pa., ensign, navy. 

Hyneman, Louis, Philadelphia, Pa., lieutenant, navy. 

Iglaueb, Louis B., Cleveland, O., lieutenant, ordnance depart- 
ment, national army. 

IsAACOwiTZ, H. I., Chicago, 111., lieutenant, army. 

Isaacson, Abbaham S., assistant surgeon, navy. 

Isaacson, Isidob, Brooklyn, N. Y., lieutenant, infantry, army. 

IsELAN, Henby, New York City, lieutenant, infantry, national 
army. 

IsBAEL, A. F., New York City, lieutenant, quartermaster's corps, 
army. 

IsBAEL, AcHiLLE F., New Orleans, La., lieutenant, army. 

IsBAELSON, Wm., Chicago, 111., lieutenant, army. 

IsBAELSON, Wm., Chicago, 111., lieutenant, medical corps, army. 

Jackson, Daniel F., Pittsburgh, Pa., captain, army. 



196 AMERICAN JEWISH YEAR BOOK 



Jacob, Frederick M., Pittsburgh, Pa., lieutenant, medical corps, 
army. 

Jacobi, Aaron L., San Francisco, Cal., second lieutenant, infan- 
try, army. 

Jacobosky, Cyrus, Wilkes-Barre, Pa., lieutenant, army. 

Jacobosky, Gilbert, Wilkes-Barre, Pa., captain, army. 

Jacobowitz, B., Long Island City, L. I., lieutenant, army. 

jACOBOwrrz, Jacob, lieutenant, marine corps, navy. 

Jacobs, Albert, Pittsburgh, Pa., lieutenant, navy. 

Jacobs, Alex. W., New York City, lieutenant, medical corps, 
army. 

Jacobs, Joseph, Seattle, Wash., major, engineer corps, army. 

Jacobs, L. A., Pittsburgh, Pa., lieutenant, army. 

Jacobs, Leopold Max, Philadelphia, Pa., lieutenant, medical 
corps, army. 

Jacobs, Le Roy R., Birmingham, Ala., lieutenant, infantry, army. 

Jacobs, Louis L., Baltimore, Md., lieutenant, army. 

Jacobs, Maurice, Vicksburg, Miss., lieutenant, marine corps, 
navy. 

Jacobs, Max L., Philadelphia, Pa., lieutenant, medical corps, 
army. 

Jacobs, Valentine C, New York City, second lieutenant, army. 

Jacobs, Wm., Washington, D. C, lieutenant, aviation corps, army. 

Jacobs, Wm. F., San Francisco, Cal., lieutenant, aviation corps, 
army. 

Jacobson, Joseph H., ensign, navy. 

Jacobson, Lester, Lawrence, L. I., second lieutenant, infantry, 
national army. 

Jaffe, Lopis J., Richmond, Virginia, second lieutenant, field 
artillery, army. 

Jaffb, Samuel, Philadelphia, Pa., captain, medical reserve 
corps, army. 

Jaffer, Jos. H., New York City, lieutenant, dental corps, army. 

Jamins, N., Fall River, Mass., second lieutenant, infantry, army. 

Janowitz, Alfred, Buffalo, N. Y., lieutenant, infantry, army. 

Jaucu, David, Providence, R. I., lieutenant, army. 

Jeffe, Ephraim, lieutenant, army. 

JoKL, Alexander, Buffalo, N. Y., captain, infantry, army. 

JoNAP, Alfred N., Cincinnati, O., lieutenant, army. 

Jones, Oscar, Brooklyn, N. Y., lieutenant, coast artillery, army. 

Joseph, S., Laurel, Miss., lieutenant, army. 

Josephs, Louis, lieutenant and surgeon, navy. 

JosEPHTHAL, Louis M., Ncw York City, promoted to rank of 
commodore and appointed paymaster-general of the Naval Militia, 
Oct., 1917. 

Kadesky, David, Aberdeen, S. Dak., second lieutenant, army. 

Kahan, E. 0., Seattle, Wash., lieutenant, army. 



EVENTS IN 5678-— UNITED STATES 197 



Kahn, Alfred, Jackson, Miss., captain, medical corps, army. 

Kahn, D. C, Atlanta, Ga., ensign, navy. 

Kahn, D. E., lieutenant, army. 

Kahn, David, Lexington, Ky., lieutenant, commissary, army. 

Kahn, I. S., Dallas, Tex., major, medical corps, army. 

Kahn, Lucien L., Cincinnati, O., lieutenant, infantry, army. 

Kahn, Moses R., Baltimore, Md., lieutenant, medical corps, army. 

Kaichen, Troy, Cincinnati, O., second lieutenant, cavalry, army. 

Kaier, a. J., New York City, lieutenant, army. 

Kaiser, Paul F., Salt Lake City, Utah, lieutenant, infantry, 
army. 

Kalbfleisch, Edw. p.. New York City, second lieutenant, officers* 
training service, navy. 

Kaledner, Edwin J., Philadelphia, Pa., lieutenant, medical corps, 
army. 

Kalis, Samuel, Columbus, Mo., second lieutenant, infantry, 
army. 

Kaliska, Wm., Buffalo, N. Y., major, infantry, army. 

Kalison, Samuel, Brooklyn, N. Y., lieutenant, army. 

Kallet, Herbert, lieutenant, medical corps, army. 

Kalmutz, Gustave, Wilkes-Barre, Pa., lieutenant, medical corps, 
army. 

Kann, Norman K., Pittsburgh, Pa., lieutenant, army. 

Kann, W. Lawrence, Pittsburgh, Pa., second lieutenant, ord- 
nance, army. 

Kaplan, — —, Richmond, Va., lieutenant, army. 

Kaplan, H., New York City, lieutenant, junior grade, medical 
department, navy. 

Kaplan, Irving E., Brooklyn, N. Y., second lieutenant, coast 
artillery, army. 

Kaplan, Joseph, Zanesville, O., second lieutenant, field artillery, 
army. 

Kaplan, M., Memphis, Tenn., lieutenant, army. 

Kaplan, Robert, McKeesport, Pa., lieutenant, medical corps, 
army. 

Kapner, Chas., Ft. Worth, Tex., lieutenant, army.^ 

Kay, Wm. De Young, Washington, D. C, lieutenant, army. 

Kastner, Lewis B., Seattle, Wash., second lieutenant, infantry, 
army. 

Kastor, Robert N., New York City, lieutenant, infantry, army. 

Katsh, Joseph, North Adams, Mass., second lieutenant, army. 

Katz, Benj., San Francisco, Cal., lieutenant, army. 

Katz, Henry, New York City, lieutenant, medical reserve corps, 
army. 

Katz, Sidney, Marion, O., lieutenant, engineer corps, army. 

Katz, William, St. Louis, Mo., lieutenant, dental corps, army. 



198 AMERICAN JEWISH YEAR BOOK 



Katzenstein, Boyd, Pittsburgh, Pa., captain, army. 

Katzman, Leo, Cleveland, O., lieutenant, aviation corps, army. 

Kaufman, Albert A., Marquette, Mich., second lieutenant, army. 

Kaufman, Abnold, lieutenant, medical corps, army. 

Kaufman, Davis, Bellefontaine, O., second lieutenant, ordnance 
department, army. 

Kaufman, B'bank, dental surgeon, navy. 

Kaufman, Isadobe, Fhiledalphia, Pa., second lieutenant, in- 
fantry, army. 

Kaufman, Joseph S., Schuylkill, Pa., second lieutenant, army. 

Kaufman, S. B., Fall River, Mass., lieutenant, medical corps, 
army. 

Kauffman, Cyrus S., Boston, Mass., second lieutenant, army. 

Kaubtman, Louis J., Fall River, Mass., lieutenant, medical 
corps, army. 

Kayser, Maier L., Los Angeles, Cal., captain, army. 

Keim, Melville, Chicago, 111., lieutenant, army. 

Kellerman, Harry, lieutenant, army. 

Kemmeb, Julius A., second lieutenant, coast artillery, army. 

Kempner, David, New York City, lieutenant, aviation corps, 
army. 

Kempner, Harry, Brooklyn, N. Y., captain, artillery, army. 

Ketzky, Joseph W., Baltimore, Md., lieutenant, medical corps, 
army. 

Kimmelman, Abraham, Passaic, N. J., lieutenant, army. 

Kinaz, a. S., Cleveland, O., ensign, navy. 

King, A. A., Philadelphia, Pa., major, army. 

KiNGSBACHER, Alvin, Pittsburgh, Pa., lieutenant, army. 

Kirschneb, Frederick J. P., Chicago, 111., lieutenant, army. 

Kirschner, Isadore, Waco, Tex., lieutenant, army. 

Klarchan, Joseph, Portsmouth, O., lieutenant, aviation corps, 
army. 

Klausman, M., Atlanta, Ga., captain, army. 

Kleeman, Julian, Terre Haute, Ind., lieutenant, ordnance, army. 

Klein, Allan, Ohio, lieutenant, aviation corps, army. 

Klein, David, Chicago, 111., captain, sanitary corps, army. 

Klein, Eugene, second lieutenant, army. 

Klein, Irving, Akron, O., second lieutenant, army. 

Klein, Irving, Youngstown, O., second lieutenant, infantry, 
army. 

Kleiner, Simon, Bayonne, N. J., second lieutenant, army. 

Kleiner, Simon B., New Haven, Conn., lieutenant, army. 

KuNB, Anch, Easton, Pa., lieutenant, army. 

Kune, D. R., Cleveland, O., lieutenant, medical corps, army. 

Kline, Emanuel, lieutenant, medical corps, army. 

Knobloch, Phillip, Passaic, N. J., lieutenant, army. 

Kobe, Wm. L., Massachusetts, second lieutenant, infantry, army 



EVENTS IN 5678— UNITED STATES 199 



KoHANSKY, I., Bayonne, N. J., lieutenant, army. 

KoHLMAN, Samuel H., Philadelphia, Pa., lieutenant, medical 
corps, army. 

KoHN, Gus., Trinidad, Colo., lieutenant, signal corps, army. 

KoHN, Joseph Philip, captain, coast artillery, army. 

KoLTUN, Meyer, second lieutenant, army. 

KoMEE, Nathan A., Detroit, Mich., captain, army. 

Kopetsky, S. J., New York City, lieutenant-colonel, medical 
corps, army. ' 

KoPMAN, B., Fall River, Mass., lieutenant; medical corps, army. 

KoBN, Joel, New York City, lieutenant, infantry, army. 

KoBN, Mabtin p., Philadelphia, Pa., captain, army. 

KoscHwiTz, Frederick H., New York City, lieutenant, infantry, 
national army. 

KosHLAND, Dan B*., San Francisco, Cal., second lieutenant, 
quartermaster's corps, army. 

KosHLAND, Robert J., Boston, Mass., captain, infantry, army. 

KoviNSKi, A., lieutenant, army. 

KowALSKi, DAvro B., Chicago, 111., second lieutenant, army. 

KowALSKi, M. B., Brownsville, Tex., lieutenant, army. 

KowALSKi, Mabtin B., Chicago, 111., lieutenant, army. 

KowALSKi, Mabtin G., New York City, lieutenant, infantry, 
army. 

KowALSKi, Paul O., Brownsville, Tex., second lieutenant, army. 

KowALSKi, Paul O., Chicago, 111., second lieutenant, army. 

•Kbameb, David, Philadelphia, Pa., lieutenant, medical corps, 
army. 

Kbameb, Leo J., Chicago, 111., second lieutenant, infantry, army. 

Kbaus, Sydney M., lieutenant-commander, navy. 

Kbaus, Walteb F., lieutenant, coast artillery, army. 

Kbaus, Walteb M., New York City, lieutenant, medical corps, 
army. 

Kbauss, Hebman E., New York City, second lieutenant, infantry, 
national army. 

Kbinsky, Lazabus, Chicago, 111., lieutenant, infantry, army. 

Kbitchbaum, J. R., Philadelphia, Pa., second lieutenant, quarter 
master's corps, army. 

Kbohn, Habby Mobbis, second lieutenant, coast artillery, army. 

Kbohn, Habby N., Denver, Colo., surgeon, rank of lieutenant, 
army. 

Kbohn, Robebt, Cincinnati, O., second lieutenant, engineer corps, 
army. 

Kbohn, Wm., Easton, Pa., lieutenant, aviation corps, army. 

Kbohngold, Jacob S., chaplain, rank of lieutenant, army. 

Kboll, Nathan, Dorchester, Mass., second lieutenant, infantry, 
army. 



200 AMERICAN JEWISH YEAR BOOK 



Kbone, Louis, New Orleans, La., lieutenant, medical corps, navy. 

Krowitz, Joseph L., Passaic, N. J., lieutenant, army. 

KuHN, Edward, Cincinnati, O., second lieutenant, infantry, army. 

KuHN, Samuel L., Cincinnati, O., second lieutenant, engineer 
corps, army. 

KuHN, Wendell S., San Francisco, Cal., second lieutenant, in- 
fantry, army. 

KuHNe, Ralph, Chicago, 111., lieutenant, army. 

KuLviNSKY, Max, Chicago, 111., lieutenant, army. 

KuPFEB, Louis R., Kansas City, Mo., captain, quartermaster's 
department, army. 

KuRZMAN, Geo. F., New York City, lieutenant, field artillery, 
army. 

KusHNER, Louis J., New Orleans, La., lieutenant, medical corps, 
army. 

Labsak, Alfred H., Lake Charles, La., lieutenant, engineer corps, 
army. 

Ladensohn, Samuel, Columbus, Mo., lieutenant, infantry, army. 

Ladinski, L. J., New York City, lieutenant, army. 

Lampert, Max, lieutenant, army. 

Lampke, L. J., Saginaw, Mich., captain, army. 

Landa, L. M., Houston, Tex., lieutenant, army. 

Landesman, Henry, Passaic, N. J., lieutenant, army. 

Landy, Jos. A., New York City, lieutenant, medical corps, army. 

Landy, Louis A., Cleveland, O., lieutenant, dental corps, army. 

Lang, James W., Brooklyn, N. Y., second lieutenant, coast artil- 
lery, army. 

Lang, Sylban, captain, army. 

Langendorp, Al., San Francisco, Cal., second lieutenant, army. 

Langendorf, Charles, San Francisco, Cal., second lieutenant, 
army. 

Langsford, Herbebt, lieutenant, army. 

Lansburgh, Richard, Catonsville, Md., lieutenant, army. 

Lapowski, Nathan, El Paso, Tex., lieutenant-colonel, infantry, 
army. 

Laschinsky, Sigmund J., Philadelphia, Pa., second lieutenant, 
army. 

Lasker, Harold, Jersey City, N. J., lieutenant, army. 

Lauchheimer, M. H., Washington, D. C, second lieutenant, artil- 
lery, army. 

Lauchheimer, Malcolm H., Baltimore, Md., second lieutenant, 
coast artillery, army. 

Lautman, M. F., Hot Springs, Ark., lieutenant, medical corps, 
army. 

Lavin, John A., Philadelphia, Pa., lieutenant, army. 

Lavine, Abr. Lincoln, Brookline, Mass., captain, army. 



EVENTS IN 5678— UNITED STATES 201 



Lavine, B. D., Trenton, N. J., lieutenant, army. 

Lawrence, Abraham, Denver, Colo., lieutenant, engineer corps, 
army. 

Lawrence, Heyman J., Lexington, Ky., lieutenant, army. 

Lazarus, Joseph, Louisville, Ky., second lieutenant, army. 

Lazrtvich, Wm., Sioux City, la., second lieutenant, infantry, 
army. 

Lederer, N. James, St. Louis, Mo., captain, army. 

Lee, Everett A., New York City, lieutenant, signal corps, army. 

Lefkowitz, Mh^ton, Canton, O., second lieutenant, quarter- 
master's department, national army. 

Lefkowitz, Wm., Bayonne, N. J., lieutenant, army. 

Lehman, Chester H., Pittsburgh, Pa., lieutenant, army. 

Lehman, Harold M., New York City, lieutenant, signal corps, 
army. 

Lehman, Herbert H., New York City, captain, ordnance, army. 

Lehman, PHn^iP, Omaha, Neb., lieutenant, army. 

Lehman, Robert, New York City, captain, artillery, army. 

Lehman, Warren L., Chicago, 111., lieutenant, artillery, army. 

Lemann, I. I., New Orleans, La., captain, medical corps, army. 

Lemle, Irwin W., Monroe, La., lieutenant, infantry, army. 

Lemlein, Harold, New York City, second lieutenant, quarter- 
master's corps, army. 

Lempert, Eugene, Toledo, O., captain, quartermaster's depart- 
ment, army. 

Leon, Harry C, Kansas City, Mo., lieutenant, infantry, army. 

Leon, Morton W., New York City, second lieutenant, infantry, 
national army 

Leonard, Benny, lieutenant, army. 

Leopold, F. N., Chicago, 111., lieutenant, army. 

Leopold, Samuel, Philadelphia, Pa., major, medical corps, army. 

Lesser, Leon E., Brooklyn, N. Y., lieutenant, medical corps, 
army. 

Lesser, Louis, Dorchester, Mass., lieutenant, medical corps, 
army. 

Letherman, Mark D., Maiden, Mass., second lieutenant, infan- 
try, army. 

Leve, Lee H., Chicago, 111., second lieutenant, infantry, army. 

Leverton, Ruben, lieutenant, army. 

Levi, Edgar A., Baltimore, Md., lieutenant, engineer corps, army. 

Levi, Edward, New Orleans, La., lieutenant, army. 

Levi, Emanuel, Louisville, Ky., second lieutenant, army. 

Levi, Henry, New Orleans, La., lieutenant, field artillery, army. 

Levi, Morris, Evansville, Ind., second lieutenant, infantry, 
army. 

Levi, Newton R., Philadelphia, Pa., second lieutenant, quarter- 
master's corps, army. 



202 AMERICAN JEWISH YEAR BOOK 



Levi, Sol., New Orleans, La., lieutenant, army. 

Levi, Wendel, Sumpter, S. C, lieutenant, army. 

Levin, A. L., New Orleans, La., captain, medical corps, army. 

Levin, Benj. M., Baltimore, Md., lieutenant, army. 

Levin, Joseph, Philadelphia, Pa., lieutenant, army. 

Levin, Lesteb L., Chicago, 111., second lieutenant, infantry, army. 

Levin, Oscar S., assistant surgeon, navy. 

Levin, R. I., Baltimore, Md., captain, army. 

Levin, Sidney S., St. Louis, Mo., lieutenant, medical corps, army. 

Levin, Wiixiam, Baltimore, Md., captain, army. 

Levine, Isidore, Altoona, Pa., second lieutenant, army. 

Levine, Isidore, Detroit, Mich., lieutenant, field artillery, army. 

Levine, Lionel, New York City, lieutenant, army. 

Levine, Oscar, New York City, lieutenant, infantry, national 
army. 

Levine, Sam M., Pine Bluff, Ark., lieutenant, infantry, army. 

Levine, Samuel A., Boston, Mass., lieutenant, army. 

Levinsohn, James G., Oklahoma City, Okla., second lieutenant, 
field artillery, army. 

Levinson, Adrian M., St. Louis, Mo., lieutenant, field artillery, 
army. 

Levinson, Frank, Baltimore, Md., lieutenant, army. 

Levinson, Horace C, lieutenant, coast artillery, army. 

Levinson, Lazarus, Chicago, 111., second lieutenant, artillery, 
army. 

Levinthal, Daniel H., Chicago, 111., lieutenant, medical reserve 
corps, army. 

Levitan, Moe, Chicago, 111., second lieutenant, army. 

Levy, Abraham, Atlanta, Ga., lieutenant-colonel, army. 

Levy, Adrian, Galveston, Tex., lieutenant, army. 

Levy, Arthur Gustavus, lieutenant, infantry, army. 

Levy, Arthur M., Brooklyn, N. Y., second lieutenant, quarter- 
master's corps, army. 

Levy, Bernard, Albany, N. Y., lieutenant, army. 

Levy, D. H., Waco, Tex., lieutenant, army. 

Levy, E. M., Franklin, La., lieutenant, medical corps, army. 

Levy, Edmond Harrison, captain, engineer corps, army. 

Levy, Eugene H., Chicago, 111., second lieutenant, artillery, army. 

Levy, George, Sumpter, S. C, second lieutenant, army. 

Levy, Gilbert, Memphis, Tenn., lieutenant, army. 

Levy, Harold M., New Orleans, La., ensign, navy. 

Levy, Henry, Pittsburgh, Pa., lieutenant, army. 

Levy, Joseph, Hartford, Conn., lieutenant, infantry, army. • 

Levy, Julius G., New York City, second lieutenant, infantry, 
national army. 

Levy, Louis, Memphis, Tenn., captain, army. 

Levy, Milford, Baltimore, Md., lieutenant, medical corps, army. 



EVENTS IN 5678— UNITED STATES 203 



I4EVY, MoisE, Galveston, Tex., lieutenant, medical corps, army. 

Levy, Richard M., captain, coast artillery, army. 

Levy, Robt. M., New York City, lieutenant, medical corps, army. 

Levy, Sam, Atlanta, Ga., second lieutenant, engineer corps, army. 

Levy, Solomon E., Biloxi, Tex., captain, infantry, army. 

Levy, Stanley, Philadelphia, Pa., second lieutenant, engineer 
corpB, army. 

Levy, Walter S., New York City, lieutenant, infantry, national 
army. 

Levy, Waverly, Sumpter, S. C, second lieutenant, army. 

Lewin-Epstein, Samuel, New York City, lieutenant, army. 

Lewinsohn, James, Oklahoma, Okla., second lieutenant, artil- 
lery, army. 

Lewis, J. Abram, North Haven, Me,, second lieutenant, army. 

Lewis, Reuben, Kansas City, Mo., lieutenant, army. 

Lewis, Samuel J., Kalamazoo, Mich., lieutenant, medical corps, 
army. 

Lewisohn, James, Oklahoma City, Okla., lieutenant, army. 

Light, Benj. J., Cleveland, O., lieutenant, dental corps, army. 

Lichtenberg, Chester, Schenectady, N. Y., lieutenant, engineer 
corps, army. 

Lichtenstein, Emil a., lieutenant-commander, navy. 

LicHTiG, Henry A., Cleveland, O., lieutenant, medical corps, 
army. 

LmERMAN, Harold P., Kansas City, Mo., second lieutenant, in- 
fantry, army. 

Liebman, , New York City, lieutenant-colonel, army. 

LiLiENTHAL, JoHN L., San Francisco, Cal., second lieutenant, 
aviation corps, army. 

Limbubg, Percy R., New York City, lieutenant, army. 

LiNDER, Israel, Bayonne, N. J., lieutenant, army. 

LiNz, Clifton, second lieutenant, field artillery, army. 

LippER, Lawrence, New Orleans, La., second lieutenant, army. 

Lippman, C. W., San Francisco, Cal., captain, medical corps, 
army. 

Lippman, Louis B., dental surgeon, navy. 

LiPscHUTz, Geo. U., Houston, Tex., captain, ambulance corps, 
army. 

LipSHiTZ, Louis, Bayonne, N. Y., lieutenant, army. 

Lit, Samuel D., Philadelphia, Pa., colonel, army. 

LiTTAu, Albert, Philadelphia, Pa., lieutenant, army. 

Dittau, Henry G., New York City, second lieutenant, national 
army. 

Livingston, Abraham, New York City, second lieutenant, army. 

Livingston, Brunn, New York City, lieutenant, army. 

Livingston, Louis, Chicago, 111., second lieutenant, artillery, 
army. 



204 AMERICAN JEWISH YEAR BOOK 



Livingstone, J. S., San Francisco, Cal., lieutenant, army. 

LoEB, Abe N., Lafayette, Ind., lieutenant-colonel, infantry, army. 

LoEB, Gus, Cincinnati, O., captain, army. 

LoEB, Hanau, St. Louis, Mo., major, medical corps, army. 

LoEB, Henby, Jr., Memphis, Tenn,. second lieutenant, army. 

LoEB, Julian, St. Paul, Minn., second lieutenant, artillery, army. 

LoEB, ViBGiL, St. Louis, Mo., captain, medical corps, army. 

Loeb, William L., Memphis, Tenn., second lieutenant, infantry, 
army. 

LoESEB, Alexander, Newark, N. J., lieutenant, army. 

LoEWENBEEG, MiLTON, Kansas City, Mo., second lieutenant, in- 
fantry, army. 

LoEWENSTEiN, Louis C, Bostou, Mass., consulting engineer, 
naval staff, stationed at Lynn. 

LoucHHEiM, Stuabt F., Philadelphia, Pa., captain, quarter- 
master's department, army. 

LowENBERG, David, Norfolk, Va., lieutenant, army. 

Lowenberg, Lawrence, Cincinnati, O., captain, army. 

LowENBERG, MiLTON A., captalu, cavalry, army. 

LowENSON, James, Oklahoma City, Okla., second lieutenant, 
army. 

LowENSTEiN, Henry Polk, Jr., Kansas City, Mo., ensign, naval 
reserve, navy. 

LowENSTEiN, MoNTiE, Cincinnati, O., lieutenant, infantry, army. 

LowENTHALL, ARTHUR, Brooklyn, N. Y., second lieutenant, in- 
fantry, national army. 

LuBiN, Benson, Huntington, W. Va., second lieutenant, army. 

LuBiNSKY, George, Fall River, Mass., second lieutenant, army. 

Lucas, Albert K., New York City, lieutenant, army. 

LuERY, Michael, Cincinnati, O., lieutenant, army. 

LuFKiN, Benj., lieutenant, cavalry, army. 

LuFTEN, Benj., Medford, Mass., second lieutenant, field artillery, 
army. 

LuRiE, G. A., Chicago, 111., lieutenant, army. 

LuRiE, Moses, Boston, Mass., lieutenant, medical corps, army. 

LuRiER, Israel N., Worcester, Mass., lieutenant, medical corps, 
army. 

Lyon, Geoffrey S., Chicago, 111., lieutenant, army. 

Lyon, Samuel E., Chicago, 111., lieutenant, infantry, army. 

Lyon, Walter Z., Chicago, 111., lieutenant, army. 

Maas, Henry Albert, Lufton, Tex., captain, army. . 

Maas, Monroe, Selma, Ala., captain, medical corps, army. 

Mack, Gustle, New York City, second lieutenant, engineer corps, 
army. 

Mack, Henry D., Douglas, Ariz., captain, army. 

Mack, Millard W., Cincinnati, O., captain, army. 



EVENTS IN 5678— UNITED STATES 205 



Mack, William J., Chicago, 111., captain, infantry, national 
army. 

Magnus, Saul, Cincinnati, 0., captain, infantry, army. 

Makleb, Jacob S., Philadelphia, Pa., lieutenant, army. 

Malefsky, Nathan, New York City, second lieutenant, infantry, 
army. 

Maize, Jacob M., Chicago, 111., second lieutenant, field artillery, 
army. 

Mallee, Beenabd L., Chicago, 111., second lieutenant, infantry, 
army. 

Manasses, Augustus, Montgomery, Ala., lieutenant, army. 

Mandel, Heney J., New York City, lieutenant, quartermaster's 
corps, army. 

Mandelzweig, Hyman H., Cleveland, 0., captain, engineer corps, 
army. 

Mann, Albebt, Wilkes-Barre, Pa., lieutenant, naval recruiting 
service, navy. 

Mann, Hammond, Wilkes-Barre, Pa., lieutenant, infantry, army. 

Mann, Lawbence, Canton, O., second lieutenant, quartermaster's 
corps, army. 

Mann, M. Hubebt, Schenectady, N. Y., lieutenant, army. 

Mannheimeb, Hughes J., St. Louis, Mo., second lieutenant, 
army. 

Manosevitch, G. H., Englewood, 111., lieutenant, dental corps, 
army. 

Mansbach, Edwin R., New York City, second lieutenant, army. 

Mantel, S. J., second lieutenant, army. 

Mabcus, Aenold, San Francisco, Cal., lieutenant, army. 

Mabcus, Ibvin, Louisville, Ky., second lieutenant, army. 

Marcus, Lee, Buffalo, N. Y., lieutenant, quartermaster's corps, 
army. 

Mabcus, Maevin, Jb., Buffalo, N. Y., lieutenant, artillery, army. 

Mabcus, Melvin M., Buffalo, N. Y., lieutenant, field artillery, 
army. 

Mabcus, Samuel, Philadelphia, Pa., lieutenant, army. 

Mabcus, Samuel, Chicago, 111., captain, medical corps, army. 

Mabkell, Samuel, Chelsea, Mass., ensign, navy. 

Maeks, Haeby, Selma, Ala., lieutenant, infantry, army. 

Maeks, Heney E., Syracuse, N. Y., lieutenant, medical corps, 
army. 

Maeks, Robebt D., Memphis, Tenn., second lieutenant, army. 

Maeks, Samuel I., assistant-paymaster, rank of ensign, navy. 

Masks, Samuel J., Phillipsburg, Pa., lieutenant, medical corps, 
army. 

Maeks, Selby, Oakland, Cal., lieutenant, medical corps, army. 

Maeshall, Feank G., Chicago, 111., .second lieutenant, infantry, 
army. 



206 AMERICAN JEWISH YEAR BOOK 



Marx, Edwabd P. J., lieutenant, field artillery, army. 

Mabx, Habby, lieutenant, army. 

Mabx, Josbph N., captain, cavalry, army. 

Mabx, Rene J., San Francisco, Gal., second lieutenant, quarter- 
master's department, army. 

Mabx, Robebt, New Orleans, La., second lieutenant, army. 

Mabx, Robt., Cincinnati, O., captain, infantry, army. 

Matassabin, Leon, Wichita, Kans., captain, army. 

Matheis, Aabon, Pittsburgh, Pa., lieutenant, army. 

Matz, Philip B., captain, army. 

May, Clabence W., Seattle, Wash., second lieutenant, field artil- 
lery, army. 

May, Gerald J., Detroit, Mich., second lieutenant, infantry, 
army. 

May, Hubebt, Charleston, W. Va., lieutenant, infantry, army. 

May, W. T., Baltimore, Md., lieutenant, army. 

Mayeb, Cabboll S., Baton Rouge, La., lieutenant, infantry, army. 

Mayeb, Chables D., Chicago, 111., second lieutenant, infantry, 
army. 

Mayeb, Edwabd, New York City, lieutenant, army. 

Mayeb, Ebwin E., Baltimore, Md., lieutenant, medical corps, 
army. 

Mayeb, Felix S., Cincinnati, 0., lieutenant infantry, army. 

Mayeb, Hebbebt Block, New Orleans, La., lieutenant, army. 

Mayeb, Julian, Birmingham, Ala., lieutenant, medical corps, 
army. 

Mayeb, William, San Francisco, Cal., second lieutenant, field 
artillery, army. 

Mayeb, Willabd, Ligonier, Ind., lieutenant, medical corps, army. 

Mayebs, Isaac, Harrisburg, Pa., lieutenant, army. 

Maze, Jacob M., Woodbine, N. J., second lieutenant, army. 

Mazub, Paul, Roxbury, Mass., captain, army. 

Mazub, Seymoub, Indianapolis, Ind., lieutenant, army. 

Medaua, Ijeon S., Brookline, Mass., captain, medical corps, army. 

Meissneb, Habby, Milwaukee, Wis., captain, army. 

Melasky, H. a., Taylor, Tex., captain, army. 

Melnick, Theodobe, Philadelphia, Pa., lieutenant, army. 

Melnikeb, Aabon A., Bayonne, N. J., lieutenant, army. 

Melnikeb, William, Bayonne, N. J., second lieutenant, army. 

Mendoza, David, Norfolk, Va., ensign, flying corps, navy. 

Menhauseb, Meyeb, New Orleans, La., lieutenant, medical corps, 
army. 

Menken, Habold Davis, New York City, ensign, navy. 

Mensteb, Leonabd, Cincinnati, O., second lieutenant, infantry, 
army. 

Metz, R. Waldbmab, New Orleans, La., lieutenant, army. 

Meyeb, A. M., Memphis, Tenn., lieutenant, army. 



EVENTS IN 5678— UNITED STATES 207 



Meyeb, Alexander, San Francisco, Cal., captain, infantry, army. 

Meyee, Emanuel L., second lieutenant, coast artillery, army. 

Meyer, H. A., Memphis, Tenn., captain, army. 

Meyer, Harry B., Washington, D. C, lieutenant, army. 

Meyer, Herman E., Chicago, 111., lieutenant, infantry, army. 

Meyer, J. A. S., Memphis, Tenn., lieutenant, army. 

Meyer, Julla.n, Selma, Ala., lieutenant, medical corps, army. 

Meyer, Jullan, Lincoln, Neb., lieutenant, army. 

Meyer, Leo B., New York City, captain, medical corps, army. 

Meyer, Leon L., Memphis, Tenn., captain, medical corps, army. 

Meyer, Louis A., second lieutenant, coast artillery, army. 

Meyer, Wilson, San Francisco, Cal., lieutenant, infantry, army. 

Meyers, Carlton, New Orleans, La., second lieutenant, infantry, 
army. 

Meyers, G. W. W., Los Angeles, Cal., second lieutenant, army. 

Meyers, Harold M., lieutenant, navy. 

Meyers, Herbert W., Seattle, Wash., captain, army. 

Meyers, Julian, Virginia, lieutenant, infantry, army. 

Meyers, Lloyd A., San Francisco, Cal., ensign, navy. 

Meyers, Paul A., San Francisco, Cal., second lieutenant, army. 

Meyers, SroNEY J., Louisville, Ky., major, army. 

Meyers, Wallace, New York City, second lieutenant, ordnance, 
army. 

Michael, J. C, Houston, Tex., lieutenant, army. 

Michael, Milton H., San Antonio, Tex., second lieutenant, army. 

Michael, P. L., Houston, Tex., captain, army. 

MicHELSON, Lawrence, Cincinnati, O., lieutenant, army. 

Middleberqer, Ethan A., New York City, lieutenant, infantry, 
national army. 

MiLASKY, Harris, Taylor, Tex., second lieutenant, army. 

MiLASKY, Manuel, Taylor, Tex., second lieutenant, army. 

MiLQRAM, Al., Kansas City, Mo., lieutenant, army. 

Milkman, Herbert, New York City, second lieutenant, infantry, 
army. 

Miller, Benj. H., New York City, lieutenant, quartermaster's 
corps, army. 

Miller, H. A., Portland, Me., lieutenant, army. 

Miller, Hyman S,, New York City, second lieutenant, infantry, 
national army. 

Miller, Jesse F., Lexington, Ky., lieutenant, army. 

Miller, Joseph, Narragansett Pier, R. I., second lieutenant, 
infantry, army. 

Miller, Leo E., New York City, lieutenant, infantry, national 
army. 

Miller, Samuel, Manchester, N. H., lieutenant, medical corps, 
army. 

Miller, Tobias, New York City, second lieutenant, army. 



208 AMERICAN JEWISH YEAR BQOK 



MiLTENBEBGEB, Abthur, Johnstown, Pa., lieutenant, medical 
corps, army. 

Minsk, Louis D., Colchester, Conn., lieutenant, army. 

MiscH, W. P., Providence, R. I., second lieutenant, army. 

MiSH, Sol., San Francisco, Cal., lieutenant, medical corps, army. 

MjsHEL, Wm. J., Roxbury, Mass., lieutenant, ordnance, army. 

Mitchell, Arthur, Chicago, 111., lieutenant, aviation corps, 
army. 

MocH, Edgab J., Cincinnati, O., second lieutenant, ordnance, 
motor section, army. 

MoLiN, Benjamin, Chicago, 111., lieutenant, medical corps, army. 

MoBEELL, Ben, St. Louis, Mo., lieutenant, civil engineer corps, 
navy. 

MoBGENBOTH, Alvin S., Ncw York City, second lieutenant, 
national army. 

Mobgenstbin, Abthub H., Grand Rapids, Mich., lieutenant, in- 
fantry, army. 

MoBiTZ, Albebt, New York City, commander, navy. 

MoBK, Ralph M., Cincinnati, O., second lieutenant, infantry, 
army. 

Mobningstab, Cabl Illava, New York City, lieutenant, cavalry, 
army. 

Mobningstab, Peecy P., New York City, lieutenant, aviation 
corps, army 

MoBBis, Edwabd, New York City, lieutenant, aviation corps, 
army. 

MoBBis, Joe, Sumpter, S. C, second lieutenant, army. 

MoEBis, Lewis S., New York City, second lieutenant, national 
army. 

MoBBis, Max, Chicago, 111., lieutenant, infantry, army. 

MoBBis, Mybon, captain, army. 

MoBBis, Raymond, New York City, second lieutenant, national 
army. 

MoBBisoN, Abbaham F., Braiutree, Mass., second lieutenant, 
army. 

MoETON, Leon, New York City, lieutenant, ordnance, army. 

MoBTON, Meyee, Chicago, 111., second lieutenant, infantry, army. 

MoscoviTz, Sam, McKeesport, Pa., lieutenant, medical corps, 
army. 

MosEB, Edmund, Lando, Tex., second lieutenant, army. 

Moses, Cabl B., Hazelton, Pa., ensign, navy. 

MosES, Emil, Philadelphia, Pa., major, navy. 

Moses, J. Walteb, Hazelton, Pa., ensign, navy. 

Moses, Stanffobd, Philadelphia, Pa., commander, navy. 

MosLEB, Henby, Hamilton, O., ensign, navy. 

Moss, SroNEY, Wichita, Kans., lieutenant, army. 

Mount, E. B., Greenville, Miss., lieutenant, army. 



EVENTS IN 5678— UNITED STATES 209 



MoYSE, Herman, Baton Rouge, La., lieutenant, infantry, army. 

Munch, Benj., Hartford, Conn., captain, infantry, army. 

Myers, Edmund, Boston, Maffs., lieutenant, army. 

Myers, Joe, Palestine, Tex., second lieutenant, field artillery, 
army. 

Myers, Joe P., second lieutenant, army. 

Myers, Joseph, Athens, Ga., second lieutenant, infantry, army. 

Myers, Lloyd A., San Francisco, Cal., ensign, navy. 

Myers, Paul, San Francisco, Cal., lieutenant, army. 

Naman, Wn^FORD, San Antonio, Tex., lieutenant, army. 

Namm, Benjamin H., Brooklyn, N. Y., captain, engineer corps, 
army. 

Napelbaum, Robert, Bayonne, N. J., second lieutenant, army. 

Narkinsky, Chas. S., Little Rock, Ark., lieutenant, artillery, 
army. 

Nathan, Harold, second lieutenant, artillery, army. 

Nathan, Simeon, Wilmington, N. C, second lieutenant, veteri- 
nary, army. 

Nathanson, D. M., New York City, lieutenant, medical corps, 
army. 

Nathanson, Joseph G., Providence, R. I., second lieutenant, 
army. 

Nelson, Harold G., New York City, lieutenant, army. 

Nemser, Chas., Dorchester, Mass., lieutenant, army. 

Netcher, Townsend, Chicago, 111., second lieutenant, ordnance, 
corps, army. 

Netter, R. J., Indianapolis, Ind., lieutenant, army. 

Neuberger, Harry H., New York City, lieutenant, artillery, 
army. 

Neuberger, Julius F., assistant surgeon, navy 

Neuberger, Lawrence, Mobile, Ala., lieutenant, army. 

Neuburger, Gilbert H., Philadelphia, Pa., lieutenant, medical 
corps, navy. 

Neufeld, Moe, second lieutenant, field artillery, army. 

Neufeld, Ralph, Chicago, 111., lieutenant, engineer corps, army. 

Neuman, David Leonard, lieutenant, engineer corps, army. 

Neuman, Lester, Washington, D. C, lieutenant, medical corps, 
army. 

Neustadt, Maurice W., New York City, captain, quartermaster's 
corps, army. 

Newberger, D. Alois, Chicago, 111., lieutenant, army. 

Newhauser, Meyer, New Orleans, La., lieutenant, army. 

Newman, Charles F., Jr., Brooklyn, N. Y., second lieutenant, 
infantry, national army. 

Newman, Leon, Chicago, 111., lieutenant, army. 

Newman, Nathaniel, New York City, second lieutenant, in- 
fantry, national army. 



210 AMERICAN JEWISH YEAR BOOK 



Newman, Ralph, New York City, second lieutenant, quarter- 
master's corps, army. 

Newton, Maurice, Trenton, N. J., lieutenant, army. 

NoLOSHiN, Ben J., New York City, lieutenant, medical corps, 
army. 

NoBDLiNGEB, Maubice, Washington, D. C, second lieutenant, in- 
fantry, army. 

Oakes, Adolph S., New York City, second lieutenant, cavalry, 
army. 

Oakes, Wm. Van Dyke, New York City, lieutenant, cavalry, 
army. 

Obebdorfeb, Eugene, Atlanta, Ga., lieutenant, army. 

Obebdobfeb, Henby D., Bloomington, 111., captain, ordnance, 
army. 

Odette, Abthub L. R., New York City, lieutenant, army. 

Okin, Habby, Cincinnati, O., second lieutenant, army. 

Ollendobf, Mabvin, Brooklyn, N. Y., second lieutenant, quarter- 
master's corps, army. 

Olstein, Mathew F., Peekskill, N. Y., lieutenant, medical 
corps, army. 

Oppenheimeb, Abthub, Grand Rapids, Mich., lieutenant, army. 

Oppenheimeb, B., New York City, major, army. 

Oppenheimeb, Leon Simon, second lieutenant, infantry, army. 

Oppenheimeb, William T., Jr., assistant surgeon, navy. 

Obnsteen, Abbaham M., Philadelphia, Pa., lieutenant, medical 
corps, army. 

Obnstein, Emanuel, New York City, lieutenant, army. 

Obnstein, Geo. G., Port Chester, N. Y., lieutenant, medical corps, 
army. 

OsHANSKY, A., Albany, N. Y., captain, army. 

OssoB, Samuel M., second lieutenant, army. 

OsTBA, M. N., Baltimore, Md., lieutenant, army. 

OxE, Max, Bayonne, N. J., lieutenant, army. 

Pake, B. H., Mobile, Ala., second lieutenant, quartermaster's 
corps, army. 

Pake, Bebtbam, Memphis, Tenn., lieutenant, quartermaster's 
corps, army. 

Palmeb, David A., Boston, Mass., captain, infantry, army. 

Paltbowitz, Ralph, Elmira, N. Y., colonel, medical corps, army. 

Pabisette, Jacob O., Brooklyn, N. Y., lieutenant, infantry, 
national army. 

Pastob, L. M., Bangor, Me., lieutenant, army. 

Patek, a. J., Milwaukee, Wis., lieutenant, army. 

Pattiz, Max, St. Louis, Mo., lieutenant, field artillery, army. 

Peck, A., Albany, N. Y., lieutenant, army. 

Peck, Sam, Goshen, Ind., second lieutenant, artillery, army. 

Pedott, Meyeb S., Chicago, 111., lieutenant, medical corps, army. 



EVENTS IN 5678— UNITED STATES 211 



Peixotto, Eustace M., San Francisco, Cal., second lieutenant, 
infantry, army. 

Pelton, Frederick, Denver, Colo., lieutenant, arnfy. 

Pepinsky, Bernard, Cincinnati, O., captain, field artillery, army. 

Perlman, Benjamin, Pittsburgh, Pa., lieutenant, navy. 

Perlman, Louis, lieutenant, army. 

Persky, Meyer A., Providence, R. I., second lieutenant, army. 

Petzgold, Benjamin, Philadelphia, Pa., second lieutenant, army. 

Peyser, Julius I., Washington, D. C, captain, army. 

Pflaum, Raymond, Cincinnati, O., second lieutenant, army. 

Phillips, Arthur, Little Rock, Ark., lieutenant, army. 

Phillips, Chas., New York City, lieutenant, army. 

Phillips, R. H., Hartford, Conn., second lieutenant, field artil- 
lery, army. 

Picker, David, Brooklyn, N. Y., second lieutenant, engineer 
corps, army. 

PiNCus, Solomon, New York City, lieutenant, army. 

PivAN, Earl A., Denver, Colo., second lieutenant, field artillery, 
army. 

Platt, Casper, Chicago, 111., lieutenant, army. 

Plaut, B. Michael, Cincinnati, O., captain, infantry, army. 

Plesset, David, Wilkes-Barre, Pa., lieutenant, army. 

PoLACHEK, Harold L., Chicago, 111., second lieutenant, infantry, 
army. 

PoLiN, Sterling M., Philipsburg, Pa., second lieutenant, army. 

Pollack, Leo A., New York City, second lieutenant, quarter- 
master's corps, army. 

Pollock, Adolph, lieutenant, army. 

Pollock, Benj. H., Philadelphia, Pa., lieutenant, army. 

Polsuker, Meyer, Buffalo, N. Y., lieutenant, army. 

Pomerantz, H., Philadelphia, Pa., lieutenant, medical corps, 
army. 

Poole, Abram, Chicago, 111., captain, infantry, army. 

PosENER, Jacob B., Forest Hills, L. I., lieutenant, medical corps, 
army. 

PosNER, Alfred, New York City, lieutenant, army. 

Poss, Maurice, second lieutenant, army. 

Praeger, Leon, lieutenant, army. 

Pressburg, Sol. B., Alexandria, La., second lieutenant, army. 

Price, Harold Chas., Washington, D. C, lieutenant, coast artil- 
lery, army. 

Price, Harold F., Denver, Colo., lieutenant, army. 

Price, Harry L., Oakland, Cal., lieutenant, army. ^» 

Price, Harry L., San Francisco, Cal., second lieutenant, infantry, 
army. 



212 AMERICAN JEWISH YEAR BOOK 



Peitzker, Habby N., Chicago, 111., second lieutenant, infantry, 
army. 

Pbosteednik, Eugene, Philadelphia, Pa., second lieutenant, army. 

Pulaski, Frank, Chicago, 111., lieutenant, army. 

Pullman, Bernard A., Maiden, Mass., second lieutenant, infan- 
try, army. 

Raab, Habby F., Philadelphia, Pa., lieutenant, ordnance, army. 

Raas, E. G., San Anselmo, Cal., second lieutenant, army. 

Rabin, J. H., Kansas City, Mo., lieutenant, army. 

Rabineb, a. M., Albany, N. Y., lieutenant, medical corps, army. 

Rach, Lawbence, Cincinnati, O., second lieutenant, army. 

Rakin, Wm. E., Philadelphia, Pa., lieutenant, medical corps, 
army. 

Ramee, Philip, Baltimore, Md., second lieutenant, army. 

Raphael, Ebnest A., Brookline, Mass., ensign, navy. 

Raphael, T., New York City, ensign, navy. 

Rappobt, David L., Pittsburgh, Pa., lieutenant, field hospital, 
army. 

Ratneb, David, Chicago, 111., lieutenant, army. 

Ravdin, Isadob, Evansville, Ind., lieutenant, medical corps, 
army. 

Ravitz, Leonabd, Cleveland, O., lieutenant, army. 

Rawitzeb, E. C, Memphis, Tenn., captain, army. 

Reed, Jacob, Worcester, Mass., ensign, aviation corps, navy. 

Reese, William C, Wilkes-Barre, Pa., lieutenant, army. 

Reich, Rudolph S., Cleveland, O., lieutenant, army. 

Reileb, Joseph M., Washington, D. C, surgeon, rank of major, 
army. 

Reinstein, L., Fresno, Cal., lieutenant, infantry, army. 

Reinthal, Abthub, Cleveland, O., lieutenant, army. 

Remeb, David, New York City, second lieutenant, army. 

Rich, Melvin S., Washington, D. C, lieutenant, ordnance, army. 

Richland, Hebbebt S., Newark, N. J., second lieutenant, quarter- 
master's corps, army. 

RiCHMAN, Al. a., Peekskill, N. Y., lieutenant, medical corps, 
army. 

Richtenbaum, Max, Austin, Tex., lieutenant, army. 

RiMMEBMAN, Abe, Rock Island, 111., lieutenant, army. 

RisEMAN, Joseph, Dorchester, Mass., second lieutenant, army. 

RiTCHEL, Chas., Centerville, la., captain, army. 

Robinson, Benjamin, Philadelphia, Pa., lieutenant, medical 
corps, army. 

Robinson, Chables S., San Francisco, Cal., second lieutenant, 
quartOKmaster's corps, army. 

Rock, S. W., New York City, lieutenant, army. 

Rodney, Archer, lieutenant, aviation corps, army. 




EVENTS IN 5678— UNITED STATES 213 



Rogers, E. W., Brookline, Mass., second lieutenant, field artil- 
lery, army. 

Rogers, Kivey, Boston, Mass., second lieutenant, infantry, army. 

Rogers, Ralph L,,San Antonio, Tex., lieutenant, army. 

RoGOViN, Julius, second lieutenant, field artillery, army. 

Rohr, B^nk, New York City, lieutenant, medical corps, army. 

RoLLMAN, Justin A., Cincinnati, O., second lieutenant, quarter- 
master's department, national army. 

Roos, Max W., Milwaukee, Wis., second lieutenant, army. 

Roos, Robert A., San Francisco, Cal., captain, army. 

Rose, Morris, Denver, Colo., second lieutenant, infantry, army. 

RosEMAN, Milton T., New York City, lieutenant-commander, 
navy. 

Rosen, Theodore, Philadelphia, Pa., second lieutenant, army. 

RosENAu, Milton, Boston, Mass., surgeon, rank of lieutenant- 
commander, navy. 

RosENAUER, Theodore, lieutenant, infantry, army. 

RosENBAUM, Archie, Philadelphia, Pa., captain, infantry, army. 

RosENBAUM, Harold, Chicago, 111., lieutenant, army. 

RosENBAUM, Jesse, Mt. Vernon, Ind., second lieutenant, quar- 
termaster's corps, army. 

Rosenberg, Abraham M., ensign, navy. 

Rosenberg, Arthur D., New York City, lieutenant, engineer 
corps, army. 

Rosenberg, Benj., New York City, second lieutenant, national 
army. 

Rosenberg, Ernest, Charleston, S. C, second lieutenant, army. 

Rosenberg, Ernest R., Baltimore, Md., lieutenant, cavalry, 
army. 

Rosenberg, Frederick G., lieutenant, cavalry, army. 

Rosenberg, Gus, Dallas, Tex., lieutenant, army. 

Rosenberg, Gus J., second lieutenant, infantry, army. 

Rosenberg, Jacob, Jersey City, N. J., lieutenant, medical corps, 
army. 

Rosenblatt, Martin S., San Francisco, Cal., lieutenant, infan- 
try, army. 

Rosenblatt, Samson H., lieutenant, coast artillery, army. 

Rosenbloom, Hyman G., Pittsburgh, Pa., second lieutenant, 
army. 

Rosenblum, Edward J., Bayonne, N. J., lieutenant, army. 

RosENBLUM, Eli, Flint, Mich., lieutenant, army. 

Rosenblum, Max M., Omaha, Neb., lieutenant, army. 

Rosenblum, Phillip, Chicago, 111., lieutenant, army. 

Rosenblum, Philip, Philadelphia, Pa., lieutenant, medical 
corps, army. 

Rosenfeld, Arthur, Pittsburgh, Pa., lieutenant, army. 



214 AMERICAN JEWISH YEAR BOOK 



RosENFELD, Abthue Samuel, Portland, Ore., lieutenant, medical 
corps, army. 

RosENFELD, James, New York City, lieutenant, army. 

RosENFELT, JoE, Dcs Moiues, Iowa, second lieutenant, army. 

RosENKBANz, Samuel V.,.Los Augeles, Cal., lieutenant, army. 

RosENsoHN, Samuel J., Washington, D. C, major, army. 

RosENSTEiN, MoBTON, Richmond, Va., ensign, navy. 

RosENSTiEL, Max, Chicago, 111., lieutenant, medical corps, army. 

Rosenthal, Abthub S., Portland, Ore., lieutenant, army. 

Rosenthal, Bebnabd, Petosky, Mich,, ensign, navy. 

Rosenthal, Boles A., surgeon, navy. 

Rosenthal, David H., Portland, Ore., second lieutenant, army. 

Rosenthal, G., Baltimore, Md., lieutenant, army. 

Rosenthal, Habby A., Cincinnati, O., second lieutenant, quar- 
termaster's department, national army. 

Rosenthal, Jean R., Richmond, Va., second lieutenant, army. 

Rosenthal, Louis J., Baltimore, Md., captain, medical corps, 
army. 

RosENWASSEB, Abe J., Ncw York City, captain, quartermaster's 
corps, army. 

RosENzwEiG, Hebbebt, lieutenant, marine corps, navy. 

RosNEB, Joseph, San Francisco, Cal., second lieutenant, quar- 
termaster's department, army. 

Ross, Louis W., Boston, Mass., second lieutenant, infantry, 
army. 

Rossen, Julius A., St. Louis, Mo., lieutenant, army. 

Roth, Edwabd B., Harrisburg, Pa., second lieutenant, army. 

Roth, S., lieutenant, army. 

Rothebnbubg, Sam, Newark, N. J., lieutenant, army. 

RoTHMAN, Busteb, Bayouuc, N. J., lieutenant, army. 

Rothschild, Mabcus A., New York City, captain, medical corps, 
army. 

RoTSCHiLD, Stanfobd, Baltimore, Md., lieutenant, army. 

RouFF, Melvin, Houston, Tex., captain, army. 

RoviTSKY, Chas. S., St. Louis, Mo., lieutenant, army. 

Rubel, Solomon, New York City, lieutenant, army. 

Ruben, Benj. D., Port Chester, N. Y., lieutenant, medical corps, 
army. 

Rubin, Habby, Philadelphia, Pa., lieutenant, medical corps, 
army. 

RuBiNOFF, Jacob, Vineland, N. J., second lieutenant, infantry, 
army. 

RuBiNSKY, S., New York City, lieutenant, navy. 

RuNDBAKEN, Fbed., Hartford, Conn, lieutenant, aviation corps, 
army. 

RusKiN, Abbaham W., Jersey City, N. J., lieutenant, army. 

Russette, Abe, Newark, N. J., lieutenant, army. 



EVENTS IN 5678— UNITED STATES 215 



RuTBERQ, J. James, Philadelphia, Pa., lieutenant, medical corps, 
army. 

RuTTENBEBG, , Chicago, 111., lieutenant, army. 

Sacheroff, L. B., Cleveland, O., captain, army. 

Sack, Leo R., Galveston, Tex., captain, army. 

Sachs, Howard J., New York City, second lieutenant, army. 

Saftel, Harry L., Dorchester, Mass., lieutenant, army. 

Sakland, Wm., Boston, Mass., lieutenant, aviation corps, army. 

Sale, Llewellyn, St. Louis, Mo., major, medical corps, army. 

Salk, R. S., Chicago, 111., lieutenant, medical corps, army. 

Salon, Joe, Ft. Wayne, Ind., lieutenant, army. 

Salon, Nathan, Ft. Wayne, Ind., lieutenant, medical corps, 
army. 

Saltzstein, Harry, Milwaukee, Wis., lieutenant, army. 

Saltzstein, Jerome, Milwaukeej Wis., second lieutenant, artil- 
lery, army. 

Salzberg, B. a., Kansas City, Mo., lieutenant, medical corps, 
army. 

Salzman, Otto, Philadelphia, Pa., second lieutenant, medical 
corps, navy. 

Sammet, Joel, Brooklyn, N. Y., second lieutenant, quarter- 
master's corps, army. 

Sampson, Willla^m Ashford, San Francisco, Cal., lieutenant, 
field artillery, army. 

Sampson, Wm. H., Aberdeen, Wash., second lieutenant, army. 

Samter, Stanley, Philadelphia, Pa., ensign, navy. 

Samuels, Albert, Bayonne, N. J., second lieutenant, army. 

Samuels, Bories L., San Francisco, captain, army. 

Samuels, Mh^ton, New York City, lieutenant, infantry, national 
army. 

Samuelson, Leo, Marshall, Tex., captain, army. 

Sanders, Theodore M., New York City, lieutenant, medical 
corps, army. 

Sandler, M., Brooklyn, N. Y., lieutenant, medical corps, army. 

Sanger, Max, Toledo, O., captain, engineer corps, army. 

Sandusky, Henry, Chicago, 111., lieutenant, army. 

Saper, Nathan, Kansas City, Mo., second lieutenant, army. 

SApmo, Milton D., San Francisco, Cal., lieutenant, signal corps, 
army. 

Saxe, Michael, Philadelphia, Pa., lieutenant, infantry, army. 

ScHACHET, , Denver, Colo., lieutenant, medical corps, army. 

ScHAEFER, Charles S., Philadelphia, Pa., lieutenant, medical 
corps, army. 

ScHAFFER, Ph. E., Charleston, W. Va., lieutenant, medical corps, 
army. 

ScHAFFER, Wm., Charleston, W. Va., lieutenant, engineer corps, 
army. 



216 AMERICAN JEWISH YEAR BOOK 



ScHAiE, Milton, New York City, lieutenant, army. 

ScHALLHEiM, A. H., Cleveland, O., lieutenant, dental corps, army. 

ScHAPiN, Jacob, New York City, lieutenant, signal corps, army. 

ScHAPiBA, S. W., New York City, captain, army. 

ScHABFF, Aason R., Natchcz, Miss., second lieutenant, field 
artillery, army. 

ScHECHTEE, B'eank I., Ncw York City, second lieutenant, in- 
fantry, national army. 

ScHECHTER, ISAAC, New York City, second lieutenant, army. 

ScHEiXENBERG, B. C, Brooklyn, N. Y., second lieutenant, army. 

ScHEUEB, Leon D., Berryville, Va., lieutenant, quartermaster's 
department, army. 

ScHiFF, Chaeles B., New York City, second lieutenant, quar- 
termaster's corps, army. 

ScHiFP, Nathan B., lieutenant, army. 

Schiller, Joseph Arnold, New York City, lieutenant, dental 
corps, army. 

Schilt, Alfred, Portland, Ore.', lieutenant, dental corps, army. 

Schlesinger, Alexander L.., Newark, N. J., lieutenant, field 
artillery, army. 

Schlesinger, Harold, Detroit, Mich., lieutenant, army. 

Schlesinger, L. W., San Antonio, Tex., lieutenant, army. 

Schlesinger, Victor E., Chicago, 111., second lieutenant, infan- 
try, army. 

Schlessinger, Leo, San Francisco, Cal., lieutenant, field artil- 
lery, army. 

Schlessinger, Melvin H., Lincoln, Neb., lieutenant, field artil- 
lery, army. 

ScHLOM, Chas. Hyman, Houstou, Tex., second lieutenant, engi- 
neer corps, army. 

Schlosberg, Richard T., Portland, Me., second lieutenant, army. 

ScHLOssBACH, IRVING, A'sbury Park, N. J., lieutenant, army. 

ScHLOSSBACH, ISAAc, lieutenant, navy. 

Schneeberger, Philip, Baltimore, Md., lieutenant, signal corps, 
aviation, army. 

Schneider, Benj., Brooklyn, N. Y., second lieutenant, infantry, 
army. 

Schneider, H. K., New York City, lieutenant, army. 

Schneider, Leon, Chicago, 111., lieutenant, infantry, army. 

Schneikraut, Irving, lieutenant, army. 

ScHOCHET, Sydney Siegfried, Chicago, 111., lieutenant, medical 
corps, army. 

ScHOEN, Aaron, St. Louis, Mo., second lieutenant, field artillery, 
army. * 

ScHOENBERG, , St. Louis, Mo., colouel, army. 

ScHOENFELD, J. D., Philadelphia, Pa., second lieutenant, infan- 
try, army. 



EVENTS IN 5678— UNITED STATES 217 



ScHOENFiELD, Leo, Youngstown, O., lieutenant, army. 

SciiOENFELD, Peeby L., New York City, lieutenant, infantry, 
national army. 

ScHOENSTEiN, RicHARD, New Orleans, La., second lieutenant, 
quartermaster's corps, army. 

ScHONFiELD, Leo, Pittsburgh, Pa., lieutenant, army. 

ScHORNSTEiN, RiCHARD, Galvcstou, Tcx., lieutenant, army. 

ScHOTT, Chas., Chicago, 111., captain, army. 

ScHEiER, Harold, Cleveland, O., ensign, navy. 

ScHULEM, Benjamin, Kansas City, Mo., lieutenant, army, 

ScHULMAN, Aubrey A., New York City, second lieutenant, army. 

ScHUR, Meyer L., Atlanta, Ga., second lieutenant, engineer 
corps, army 

Schwab, Herbert C, Cincinnati, 0., second lieutenant, quarter- 
master's corps, national army. 

Schwab, Herman C, New York City, second lieutenant, army. 

Schwab, Sidney I., St. Louis, Mo., captain, medical corps, army. 

ScHWABACHER, LAWRENCE, Ncw Orlcaus, La., second lieutenant, 
infantry, army. 

ScHWABE, iBViN, Charleston, W. Va., lieutenant, infantry, army. 

Schwartz, A. A., New York City, lieutenant, army. 

Schwartz, Abraham T., assistant surgeon, rank of lieutenant, 
navy. 

Schwartz, Benj., Waukegan, 111., lieutenant, medical corps, 
army. 

Schwartz, Chas. P., Chicago, 111., second lieutenant, infantry, 
army. 

Schwartz, Harry, Ardmore, Okla., lieutenant, aviation corps, 
army. 

Schwartz, Juston E., New York City, lieutenant, ordnance 
department, army. 

Schwartz, Milton D., Chicago, 111., lieutenant, army. 

ScHWARZ, Leon, Mobile, Ala., captain, infantry, army. 

ScHWARz, Herman, Mobile, Ala., ensign, navy. 

Schwarzenberg, JLottis, Cleveland, O., captain, ordnance depart- 
ment, army. 

ScHWEGLER, Jacob J., Kcnnct Square, Pa., lieutenant, medical 
corps, army. 

Seegar, Louis H., Indianapolis, Ind., lieutenant, army. 

Seelig, G., St. Louis, Mo., major, medical corps, army. 

Seessel, Howard T., Memphis, Tenn., lieutenant, field artillery, 
army. 

Seff, Isadore, New York City, lieutenant, army. 

Segael, Benj. I., Athens, Ga., lieutenant, infantry, army. 

Segal, Joseph, Boston, Mass., lieutenant, medical corps, army. 

Segal, Morris, Philadelphia, Pa., lieutenant, medical corps, 
army. 



218 AMERICAN JEWISH YEAR BOOK 



Segal, Samuel, Jr., surgeon, navy. 

Seidelman, Joseph, Milwaukee, Wis., second lieutenant, army. 

Seifekth, Solis, New Orleans, La., lieutenant, army. 

Seiler, Louis, Buffalo, N. Y., lieutenant, infantry, army. 

Seitner, Robert L., Saginaw, Mich., second lieutenant, quarter- 
master's department, national army. 

Selber, Aaron, Shreveport, La., lieutenant, army. 

Seligman, Fred H., Kansas City, Mo., captain, artillery, army. 

Selinger, Jerome, Washington, D. C, lieutenant, medical corps, 
army. 

Selinger, Morris, Washington, D. C, lieutenant, medical corps, 
army. 

Selling, Lawrence, Portland, Ore., captain, medical corps, army. 

Selz, Frank E., Chicago, 111., lieutenant, army. 

Semmelman, Barney S., West Point, Miss., major, army. 

Semmes, Raphael, Baltimore, Md., second lieutenant, infantry, 
army. 

Sentner, Harold A., New York City, lieutenant, aviation corps, 
army. 

Sered, Harry, Chicago, 111., lieutenant, army. 

Shaeffer, Clarence, lieutenant, infantry, army. 

Shafretz, Nathan, Philadelphia, Pa., lieutenant, army. 

Shapinsky, Milton, Louisville, Ky., second lieutenant, army. 

Shapinsky, Robert, Louisville, Ky., lieutenant, army. 

Shapiro, Harry, Erie, Pa., second lieutenant, infantry, army. 

Sherman, A. J., Albany, N. Y., lieutenant, army. 

Sherry, Israel, Chicago, 111., lieutenant, medical corps, army. 

Sheyer, Jesse, Wheeling, W. Va., lieutenant, army. 

Shifrin, , lieutenant, army. 

Shoen, Louis S., Chicago, 111., second lieutenant, infantry, 
army. 

Shohl, Alfred T., Cincinnati, lieutenant, army. 

Shoninger, Lee S., New Haven, Conn., captain, army. 

Shore, Howard E., Philadelphia, Pa., captain, engineer corps, 
army. • 

Shoven, Louis S., Chicago, 111., second lieutenant, infantry, 
army. 

Shube, Herman, Cleveland, O., lieutenant, army. 

Shubin, David X., Philadelphia, Pa., lieutenant, navy. 

Shuldiner, Henry, Brooklyn, N. Y., second lieutenant, quarter- 
master's corps, army. 

Shumacher, Leo, captain, army. 

Shurtleff, Harry W., Philadelphia, Pa., second lieutenant, 
medical corps, navy. 

Siegel, Alvin E., Philadelphia, Pa., first lieutenant, medical 
corps, army. 



EVENTS IN 5678— UNITED STATES 219 



SiEGEL, Hyman, New York City, second lieutenant, infantry, 
national army. 

SiEGEL, Reginald, Brooklyn, N. Y., second lieutenant, national 
army. 

SiEGEL, Samuel, New York City, lieutenant, quartermaster's 
corps, army. 

SiEGLE, Sam, New York City, lieutenant, army. 

SiLBEBMAN, Dan N., New Orleans, La., lieutenant, army. 

SiLBERMAN, David, Baltimore, Md., lieutenant, army. 

Silk, Harry, Bayonne, N. J., second lieutenant, army. 

Silver, Myer S., captain, cavalry, army. 

Silverman, Bernard, Wilmington, N. C, lieutenant, signal 
corps, army. 

Silverman, D. N., Franklin, La., lieutenant, army. 

Silverman, Max, Brockton, Mass., lieutenant, army. 

Silverman, Sam., Baltimore, Md., lieutenant, cavalry, army. 

Silverstein, Herman, Albany, N. Y., lieutenant, army. 

SiLVERSTEiN, Leo, New York City, second lieutenant, infantry, 
national army. 

Silverstein, Willis, Chicago, 111., lieutenant, army. 

Silverstone, H. J., Portland, Ore., second lieutenant, army. 

Simon, Abraham W., Philadelphia, Pa., lieutenant, infantry, 
army. 

Simon, Henry M., New York City, second lieutenant, army. 

Simon; Herbert J., San Francisco, Cal., lieutenant, aviation 
corps, army. 

Simon, Isaac B., Dorchester, Mass., lieutenant, infantry, army. 

Simon, J. B., Hartford, Conn., lieutenant, army. 

Simon, Theodore, Pater son, N. J., second lieutenant, army. 

Simons, L., Hartford, Conn., lieutenant, army. 

Simons, Philip W., Springfield, Mass., second lieutenant, quar- 
termaster's corps, national army. 

Sinai, Nathan, Stockton, Cal., lieutenant, army. 

Singer, Herbert, Jersey City, N. J., lieutenant, army. 

SisKiND, H., Maywood, 111., lieutenant, army. 

SissoN, Jean, Winthrop, Mass., second lieutenant, infantry, 
army. 

SissoN, WiLLARD C, Melrose, Mass., second lieutenant, infantry, 
army. 

Slawitsky, Sam, Cleveland, O., captain, army. 

Slepin, Benjamin, Philadelphia, Pa., second lieutenant, army. 

Sloane, Maurice, Philadelphia, Pa., lieutenant, army. 

Slobodien, B. F., Perth Amboy, N. Y., lieutenant, army. 

Smigelsky, Frank D., Mt. Carmel, Pa., lieutenant, army. 

Smith, R. R., Portland, Ore., lieutenant, army. 

Smith, Sam, Monroe, La., second lieutenant, infantry, army. 



220 AMERICAN JEWISH YEAR BOOK 



Smith, Samuel, Connecticut, second lieutenant, infantry, army. 

Smoler, Samuel, Buffalo, N. Y., second lieutenant, artillery, 
army. 

Solomon, Hakry M., Wilmington, N. C, second lieutenant, 
infantry, army. 

Solomon, Harry S., lieutenant, aviation corps, army. 

Solomon, Louis, Brooklyn, N. Y., lieutenant, infantry, ordnance 
department, reserve corps, army. 

SoMMER, Bernard, Philadelphia, Pa., lieutenant, cavalry, army. 

SoMMERHAusER, Harry L., Captain, cavalry, army. 

SoNDHEiM, Sidney, Baltimore, Md., lieutenant, infantry, army. 

SoRENSEN, Walter, Philadelphia, Pa., lieutenant, army. 

Spear, Sylvan, Baltimore, Md., second lieutenant, coast artillery, 
army. 

Speevack, Samuel I., lieutenant, infantry, army. 

Speier, Jack, Portland, Ore., captain, army. 

Speyer, Jess, Wheeling, W. Va., lieutenant, army. 

Spingarn, Joel E., major, infantry, army. 

Spingarn, Marcus G., Memphis, Tenn., lieutenant, medical corps, 
army. 

Spiro, Milton D., Oakland, Cal., lieutenant, army. 

Spitz, Julian H., Brookline, Mass., lieutenant, army. 

Spoout, E., Philadelphia, Pa., lieutenant, medical corps, army. 

Staden, Niles a., Newark, N. J., second lieutenant, army. 

Stahl, Louis, Gonzales, Texas, lieutenant, army. 

Stahl, Louis J., San Antonio, Tex., lieutenant, army. 

Stahl, Samuel, Manchester, N. H., lieutenant, dental corps, 
army. 

Stalberg, Samuel, Philadelphia, Pa., lieutenant, medical corps, 
army. 

Stamm, Camille J., Philadelphia, Pa., lieutenant, medical 
corps, army. 

Stansfield, Leon A., New York City, second lieutenant, national 
army. 

Startz, Irving, New York City, lieutenant, medical corps, army. 

Stearn, Henry S., Jr., New York City, second lieutenant, army. 

Stearn, Joseph H., Los Angeles, Cal., second lieutenant, 
infantry, army. 

Steckert, Frank, Bayonne, N. J., lieutenant, army. 

Steckler, Edw. L., New York City, lieutenant, infantry, army. 

Stein, Edwin, Stamford, Conn., second lieutenant, field artillery, 
army. 

Stein, Jake, Bessemer, Ala., captain, army. 

Stein, Maurice, lieutenant, base hospital, army. 

Steinbach, B. a., New Haven, Conn., lieutenant, finance de- 
partment, army. 



EVENTS IN 5678— UNITED STATES 221 



Steinback, FlsEDEBiCK C, Wildwood, N. J., second lieutenant, 
army. 

Steinbebg, Herbert G., Brooklyn, N. Y., second lieutenant, 
quartermaster's corps, army. 

Steinberg, James, lieutenant, medical corps, army. 

Steindleb, Leo F., Baltimore, Md., lieutenant, medical corps, 
army. 

Steinhabdt, Mortimer, second lieutenant, army. 

Steinhauer, Lawrence, Atlanta, Ga., lieutenant, army. 

Steinmetz, Wm. C, New York City, second lieutenant, infantry, 
national army. 

Stenberg, T. R., Worcester, Mass., second lieutenant, infantry, 
army. 

Stern, Alvin J., San Francisco, Cal., second lieutenant, en- 
gineer corps, army. 

Stern, EJdgar, Baltimore, Md., ensign, navy. 

Stern, Harry, Wahpeton, N. D., lieutenant, army. 

Stern, Harry, St. Paul, Minn., second lieutenant, quarter- 
master's corps, army. 

Stern, Henry, New York City, lieutenant, infantry, national 
army. 

Stern, Henry S., Virginia, second lieutenant, medical corps, 
army. 

Stern, J. H., Los Angeles, Cal., second lieutenant, army. 

Stern, Jacob, Chicago, 111., lieutenant, army. 

Stern, Louis, Kalamazoo, Mich., lieutenant, medical corps, 
army. 

Stern, Louis, Kansas City, Mo., lieutenant, marine corps, navy. 

Stern, M. H., Birmingham, Ala., lieutenant, infantry, army. 

Stern, M. L., Denver, Colo., major, army. 

Stern, Maurice J., New York City, second lieutenant, army. 

Stern, Mervyn H., Anniston, Ala., lieutenant, infantry, army. 

Stern, Milton J., Paris, Ky., lieutenant, medical corps, army. 

Stern, Peter, New York City, second lieutenant, army. 

Stern, Ralph J., ensign, navy. 

Stern, Richard, Philadelphia, Pa., captain, ordnance, army. 

Sternberger, Edwin, New York City, captain, medical corps, 
army. 

Sternberger, Fred E., lieutenant, field artillery, army. 

Sternheimer, Lawrence Mayer, Atlanta, Ga., second lieutenant, 
quartermaster's department, army. 

Stiebel, Harold L., Baltimore, Md., second lieutenant, coast 
artillery, army. 

Stix, Thomas S., Cincinnati, O., second lieutenant, field ar- 
tillery, army. 



222 AMERICAN JEWISH YEAR BOOK 



Stolper, Joseph H., Muskogee, Okla., lieutenant, medical corps, 
army. 

Stone, Alvin A., Cleveland, 0., lieutenant, medical corps, army. 

Stone, Jacob, North Adams, Mass., lieutenant, army. 

Stone, Jeffries, Danbury, Conn., captain, army. 

Stone, Joseph, Cleveland, O., lieutenant, quartermaster's de- 
partment, army. 

Stone, Louis, Worcester, Mass., captain, infantry, army. 

Stotter, Arthur Lesley, Cleveland, O., lieutenant, medical 
corps, army. 

Strahl, Milton S., Brooklyn, N. Y., lieutenant, army. 

Straus, Aubry, Virginia, lieutenant, medical corps, army. 

Straus, David C, Chicago, 111., captain, medical corps, army. 

Straus, Franklin J., Brooklyn, N. Y., second lieutenant, in- 
fantry, army. 

Straus, Herbert N., New York City, captain, army. 

Straus, Joseph, rear admiral, navy. 

Straus, Nathan, Jr., New York City, ensign, navy. 

Straus, Roger W., New York City, lieutenant, signal corps, 
army. 

Straus, Walter C, New York City, second lieutenant, army. 

Strauss, Abraham, Cleveland, O., lieutenant, army. 

Strauss, Allen, New York City, second lieutenant, army. 

Strauss, Arthur, St. Louis, Mo., lieutenant, army. 

Strauss, Chas. L., St. Louis, Mo., lieutenant, infantry, army. 

Strauss, D. D., Bennettsville, S. C, lieutenant, army. 

Strauss, Harold A., captain, coast artillery, army. 

Strauss, Jerome F., Chicago, 111., lieutenant, army. 

Strauss, Lucien I., Sumpter, S. C, second lieutenant, army. 

Strelitz, Malcolm, Marion, O., second lieutenant, quarter- 
master's corps, army. 

Stroley, Sidney, lieutenant, army. 

Strouse, Harold, Columbia City, Ind., second lieutenant, en- 
gineer corps, army. 

Sturman, Gus, Denver, Colo., major, army. 

SuBKis, J., New York City, lieutenant, army. 

SucHOFF, S. M., Paterson, N. J., lieutenant, medical corps, army. 

Sulzberger, Arthur H., New York City, captain, army. 

SwAAB, Jacques M., Philadelphia, Pa., lieutenant, aviation 
corps, army. 

SwARTZ, Burton A., San Francisco, Cal., second lieutenant, field 
artillery, army. 

SwrrzER, Sam L., Vicksburg, Miss., lieutenant, artillery, army. 

Sykes, Edw. S., Jr., New York City, second lieutenant, infantry, 
army. 



BVETNTS IN 5678— UNITED STATES 223 



SzoLD, Robert, Washington, D. C, second lieutenant, field artil- 
lery, army. 

Tabachnik, Abraham, captain, infantry, army. 

Tamm, Harold, Brownsville, Tenn., second lieutenant, field 
artillery, army. 

Tannenbaum, David, New York City, chaplain, 'rank of lieu- 
tenant, army. 

Tannenbaum, Julius, New York City, captain, coast artillery, 
army. 

Taradash, Max, Bayonne, N. J., second lieutenant, army. 

Taub, Ben, Ft. Worth, Tex., captain, army. 

Taub, Israel, Bayonne, N. J., lieutenant, army. 

Taub, Sam J., Chicago, 111., lieutenant, medical corps, army. 

Taussig, E. B., San Francisco, Cal., second lieutenant, cavalry, 
army. 

Teller, Jerome L., Philadelphia, Pa., ensign, navy. 

Thalheimer, Morton, Richmond, Va., lieutenant, army. 

Thalheimer, William F., second lieutenant, marine corps, 
navy. 

Theise, Wm. Jerome, Newark, N. J., second lieutenant, army. 

Tilles, Alvin S., Fort Smith, Ark., captain, infantry, army. 

Titche, Bernard, New Orleans, La., lieutenant, army. 

ToLz, Ralph E., Kalamazoo, Mich., second lieutenant, ordnance 
department, army. 

TooMiM, E., Waco, Tex., captain, medical corps, army. 

Trassoff, Abraham, Philadelphia, Pa., lieutenant, medical 
corps, army. 

Treister, C. D., lieutenant, medical corps, army. 

Tripler, S., New York City, lieutenant, army. 

Turner, Joseph, Philadelphia, Pa., lieutenant, army. 

Turner, Paul C, New York City, captain, army. 

Turtledove, David N., Portland, Ore., second lieutenant, army. 

TuRTLETAUB, S. D., Charleston, S. C, lieutenant, infantry, army. 

Ullman, J. S., Natchez, Miss., captain, medical corps, army. 

Ungar, Joseph, St. Louis, Mo., lieutenant, infantry, army. 

Unger, Chas. H., San Francisco, Cal., second lieutenant, cavalry, 
army. 

Unger, L., Chicago, 111., lieutenant, army. 

Unterbebg, Hillel, Cleveland, O., captain, medical corps, army. 

Unzerleider, Harry, captain, medical corps, army. 

Uran, Arthur W., New York City, lieutenant, army. 

Urband, Edward, Ithaca, N. Y., lieutenant, army. 

Urdang, Jacob, lieutenant, army. 

Uri, Morris, Louisville, Ky., second lieutenant, army. 

Van Os, Seymour, Shreveport, La., lieutenant, army. 

Van Raalte, Julius, St. Louis, Mo., second lieutenant, army. 

Verdickson, Carl, Boston, Mass., lieutenant, infantry, army. 

ft 



224 AMERICAN JEWISH YEAR BOOK 



VisAMKU, Ernest L., Baltimore, Md., lieutenant, cavalry, army. 

VisANSKA, E. L., Charleston, S. C, second lieutenant, cavalry, 
army. 

VoGEL, Benjamin M., Cincinnati, 0., lieutenant, dental corps, 
army. 

VoGEL, MiTCHEL J., Muncic, Ind., lieutenant, infantry, army. 

VooBSANGEB, Elkan C, St. Louis, Mo., chaplain, rank of lieu- 
tenant, army. 

Wachs, L. a., Cleveland, 0., lieutenant, dental corps, army. 

Waghalten, Meyee, Marshall, Tex., second lieutenant, army. 

Wallace, Louis B., Rochester, N. H„ lieutenant, infantry, army. 

Wallach, Chas., New Orleans, La., lieutenant, army. 

Wallebstein, Edwaed, Philadelphia, Pa., lieutenant, army. 

Walteb, Albeet Ulman, Baltimore, Md., lieutenant, field artil- 
lery, army. 

Waltee, Milton R., New York City, lieutenant, medical corps, 
army. 

Waltee, Raphael, Baltimore, Md., lieutenant, artillery, army. 

Wabbueg, James Paul, Washington, D. C, ensign, aviation 
corps, navy. 

Wabben, David, New York City, second lieutenant, army. 

Wabshaw, Eenest T., Jersey City, N. J., lieutenant, infantry, 
national army. 

Watkins, Habeis W., Camden, N. J., lieutenant, aviation corps, 
army. 

Wattneb, David I., Baltimore, Md., second lieutenant, infantry, 
army. 

Webeb, Jeeby, Chicago, lieutenant, army. 

Weil, Alvin, Montgomery, Ala., ensign, navy. 

Weil, Abthub, New Haven, Conn., lieutenant, medical corps, 
army. 

Weil, Chestee, New Haven, Conn., lieutenant, army. 

Weill, Michael, San Francisco, Cal., lieutenant, army. 

Weinbeeg, Alex. H., New York City, lieutenant, army. 

Weinbebg, Chaeles B., Philadelphia, Pa., lieutenant, medical 
corps, army. 

Weinbeeg, Samuel P., Philadelphia, Pa., captain, quartermas- 
ter's corps, army. 

Weineb, Benj., Pittsburgh, Pa., lieutenant, army. 

Weinstein, Isbael, San Francisco, Cal., lieutenant, engineer 
corps, army. 

Weiscopf, E. LeRoy, New York City, captain, army. 

Weiscopf, Edwin, Brookline, Mass., major, army. 

Weiskopf, Edw. F., New York City, second lieutenant, coast 
artillery, army. 

Weisman, Louis Goldman, assistant veterinarian, army. 

Weiss, Abbaham, Philadelphia, Pa., lieutenant, medical corps, 
army. 



EVENTS IN 5678— UNITED STATES 225 



Weiss, Adolph, New York City, lieutenant, medical corps, army. 

Weiss, Harry, New York City, lieutenant, infantry, army. 

Weiss, Herbert, Jacksonville, Fla., lieutenant, army. 

Weiss, Howard, Canton, O., second lieutenant, infantry, army. 

Weiss, Louis R., Minneapolis, Minn., lieutenant, army. 

Weiss, M. J., Bayonne, N. J., lieutenant, army. 

Weiss, Paul H., Cambridge, Mass., second lieutenant, field 
artillery, army. 

Weitz, David D., Philadelphia, Pa., second lieutenant, infantry, 
army. 

Weitzner, Samuel F., lieutenant, army. 

Wengeroff, Samuel, Bayonne, N. J., second lieutenant, army. 

Wertheim, Albert, New York City, second lieutenant, infantry, 
army. 

Weslow, Julian, Houston, Tex., lieutenant, army. 

Wesson, Philip D., Worcester, Mass., second lieutenant, infan- 
try, army. 

Westheimer, Ira, Cincinnati, O., lieutenant, aviation corps, 
army. 

White, Harry D., Boston, Mass., lieutenant, infantry, army. 

Whitman, Michael, Macon, Ga., captain, army. 

Wiener, Howard C, lieutenant, cavalry, army. 

Wiener, Joseph B., lieutenant, infantry, army. 

Wiesenfeld, Joseph, Baltimore, Md., general purchasing agent 
for the quartermaster's department, rank of captain, army. 

Wild^rman, Henry, Philadelphia, Pa., lieutenant, medical corps, 
army. 

WiLLARD, Maurice, San Francisco, Cal., captain, aviation corps, 
army. 

WiLLARD, Alfred J,, St. Louis, 111., captain, army. 

WiLLNER, Abraham J., Brooklyn, N. Y., lieutenant, quartermas- 
ter's corps, army. 

Wilson, Chas., Boston, Mass., lieutenant, motor ambulance 
corps, army. 

Wilson, James, Patchogue, N. Y., lieutenant, army. 

Wimpfheimer, Harold, New York City, lieutenant, army. 

WiNBARG, Albert A., Nacogdoches, Tex., second lieutenant, quar- 
termaster's corps, army. 

Winkler, Mose, Meridian, Miss., lieutenant, aviation corps, 
army. 

WiNOKUR, Joseph B., Philadelphia, Pa., second lieutenant, in- 
fantry, army. 

WiRKMAN, Emanuel W., Philadelphia, Pa., second lieutenant, 
army. 

Wise, Lester D., Long Branch, N. J., lieutenant, medical corps, 
army. 

Wishnack, Meyer, Paterson, N. J., lieutenant, medical corps, 
army. 



226 AMERICAN JEWISH YEAR BOOK 



WiTz, Chables, Baltimore, Md., second lieutenant, coast artil- 
lery, army. 

WoHL, Stanley S., Philadelphia, Pa., lieutenant, army. 

Wolf, Arthur M., New York City, captain, army. 

Wolf, Arthur S., Philadelphia, Pa., lieutenant, army. 

Wolf, Charles, New York City, lieutenant, medical corps, 
army. 

Wolf, Herbert H., New York City, captain, army. 

Wolf, Leonard, New York City, second lieutenant, infantry, 
army. 

Wolf, Louis J., Portland, Ore., lieutenant, navy. 

Wolf, Maurice A., Providence, R. I., captain, infantry, army. 

Wolf, Morris, Muncie, Ind., captain, medical corps, army. 

Wolf, Walter J., Greenwood, Mass., second lieutenant, in- 
fantry, army. 

Wolfe, Herman, Philadelphia, Pa., second lieutenant, artillery, 
army. 

WoLFERMAN, SIDNEY, Ncw York City, second lieutenant, medical 
corps, army. 

Wolff, Arthur M., New York City, captain, infantry, army. 

Wolff, Frederic R., New York City, second lieutenant, in- 
fantry, army. 

Wolff, George, San Francisco, Cal., lieutenant, infantry, army. 

Wolff, H. M., Oroville, Cal., second lieutenant, infantry, army. 

Wolff, Moses, New York City, captain, army. 

WoLFsoN, Henry, Reno, Nev., second lieutenant, army. 

WoLFSON, Wm., Brooklyn, N. Y., lieutenant, medical corps, 
army. 

WoLGEMUTH, MELVILLE, Pittsburgh, Pa., lieutenant, army. 

WooDARD, J. M., Houston, Tex., lieutenant, army. 

Wurtzburger, Clarence S., Memphis, Tenn., second lieutenant, 
infantry, army. 

Yasemoff, Leo, second lieutenant, army. 

Yellin, Hiram, Buffalo, N. Y., lieutenant, army. 

Young, Axel J., Roxbury, Mass., second lieutenant, field 
artillery, army. 

Zacharias, Ellis, Jacksonville, Fla., lieutenant-commander, 
navy. 

Zacks, Myron A., Philadelphia, Pa., lieutenant, medical corps, 
army. 

Zahn, Herman S., Philadelphia, Pa., second lieutenant, army. 

Zelenko, Wm., New York City, second lieutenant, national 
army. 

Zellermayer, Lewis, Philadelphia, Pa., captain, army. 

ZiELONKA, Samuel, Cincinnati, O., lieutenant, medical corps, 
army. 



EVENTS IN 5678— UNITED STATES 227 



ZiON, Peteb, Chicago, 111., lieutenant, army. 
ZiON, Philip P., Philadelphia, Pa., second lieutenant, army. 
ZoBEL, Sidney, Alamedo, Cal., lieutenant, infantry, army. 
ZupNiK, Joel V., Cleveland, 0., lieutenant, dental corps, army. 

IV 
NECROLOGY 

Abovitz, J., rabbi, Cleveland, O., June 26, 1917. 

Altmann, William, curator. Golden Park Memorial Museum, 
San Francisco, Cal., aged 40, Nov. 1, 1917. 

AscHAFFENBUBG, ALBERT, communal worker, New Orleans, La., 
aged 49, Jan. 13, 1918. 

Benedict, Joseph, Civil War veteran. Lake Minden, Mich., aged 
84, Dec. 23, 1917. 

Bernheim, Henby, communal worker, Cincinnati, O., June 11, 
1917. 

Bebbick, Solon, former assistant corporation counsel, New 
York City, Jan., 1918. 

Blumenfeld, Leonabd M., lieutenant. United States Army, 
Shreveport, La., Jan. 11, 1918. 

Bomeisleb, Evelyn, communal worker, Philadelphia, Pa., aged 
87, July 17, 1917. 

Bbown, Jacob G., communal worker, Detroit, Mich., Aug. 29, 
1917. 

Canteb, Solomon, communal worker, New York City, aged 82, 
June 14, 1917. 

Caplan, Isbael a., Hebrew scholar and educator, Brooklyn, 
N. Y., aged 79, June 9, 1917. 

Chase, Isidobe, member of Board of Education, Waterbury, 
Conn., Nov., 1917. 

CuTLEB, Nahum S., shoe manufacturer, former member of Massa- 
chusetts Legislature, Greenfield, Mass., aged 80, Sept. 5, 1917. 

Deutsch, Sigmund, physician. New York City, member of army 
medical reserve corps, United States Army, aged 41, Nov. 29, 
1917. 

Elsingeb, Joseph, philanthropist, St. Paul, Minn., June, 1917. 

Epstein, Barnett F., rabbi, Jersey City, N. J., aged 53, July 15, 
1917. 

Flobsheim, Simon, manufacturer, Chicago, 111., aged 80, Dec. 7, 
1917. 

Fox, Aabon, merchant and first mayor, Troutdale, Ore., aged 59, 
Dec. 10, 1917. 

Fbaley, Moses, communal worker, St. Louis, Mo., aged 74, Dec. 
24, 1917. 

Frankenheimer, John, lawyer, New York City, aged 65, Aug. 4, 
1917. 



228 AMERICAN JEWISH YEAR BOOK 



Friedman, Samuel, communal worker, Cleveland, O., aged 72, 
Nov. 17, 1917. 

Fbomme, Isaac, former registrar, New York City, at Asbury 
Park, N. J., aged 63, Sept., 1917. 

Feommer, Jacob F., rabbi. New Haven, Conn., aged 64, Jan. 13, 
1918. 

Gebson, Emily G., communal worker and writer, Philadelphia, 
Pa., Dec. 5, 1917. 

Gebson, Isaac, communal worker, Toledo, O., aged 65, Oct. 18, 
1917. 

Gluck, Adolph, Civil War veteran and former mayor, Dodge 
City, Kan., aged 70, Sept. 30, 1917. 

Goldsmith, Sol., philanthropist, San Francisco, Cal., aged 83, 
Jan., 1918. 

Greenberg, a. a., lieutenant, medical reserve corps. United 
States Army, Brooklyn, N. Y., aged 38, Aug. 7, 1917. 

Greenberg, David (Ben Yishai), poet and composer, Cincin- 
nati, 0., June 22, 1917. 

Gross, Mrs. Anna G., author. New York City, aged 70, June 4, 
1917. 

Grunewald, Jacob, philanthropist, Los Angeles, Cal., June 17; 
1917. 

Haas, Isaac G., former alderman in Savannah, Ga., Cleveland, 
O., aged 64, Aug. 1, 1917. 

Harris, Simon, rabbi, Portland, Ore., aged 65, June 2, 1917. 

Heiman, Max, merchant and philanthropist. Little Rock, Ark., 
aged 66, Nov. 6, 1917. 

Heinsheimer, Edward L., communal worker, Cincinnati, O., 
aged 56, Dec. 11, 1917. 

Herz, Adolph, civic and philanthropic worker, member of 
Chamber ot Commerce, Terre Haute, Ind., aged 74, Dec. 16, 1917. 

HuTKOFF, Nathan, communal worker. New York, City, aged 82, 
Nov. 20, 1917. 

Hyman, Samuf:l L, communal worker. New York City, aged 
41, July 12, 1917. 

Isaacs, Minnie H., communal worker, New York City, aged 47, 
Jan. 17, 1918. 

Jonas, Michael B., communal worker, St. Louis, Mo., aged 74, 
Dec. 19, 1917. 

Joseph, Moritz, communal worker, Cleveland, 0., aged 83, June 
7, 1917. 

Joseph Philip, former member City Council, Baltimore, Md., 
aged 71, July 13, 1917. 

Kahn, Arthur Lee, playwright, Los Angeles, Cal., Dec. 9, 1917. 

Kahn, Bernard, Civil War veteran, former member of Legis- 
lature from Jackson County, Cincinnati, O., aged 83, Aug. 13, 
1917. 



EVENTS IN 5678— UNITED STATES 229 



Kallen, Jacob David, rabbi, Roxbury, Mass., aged 71, Dec. 4, 
1917. 

Kaplan, Rose, New York City, head nurse of Jewish Refugees* 
Camp, Alexandria, Egypt, aged 50, Aug. 3, 1817. 

Katz, Abeam J., communal worker, Rochester, N. Y., Nov., 
1917. 

Kaufman, Chables A., merchant and municipal worker, New 
Orleans, La., aged 72, Oct., 1917. 

Kaufmann, Maueice, communal worker, Lancaster, Pa., aged 
59, Aug. 6, 1917. 

KmsHNEB, Raphael, portrait painter, New York City, aged 41, 
Aug. 2, 1917. 

Klein, Jacob, rabbi, Cleveland, 0., aged 77, Aug. 17, 1917. 

Kohn, Albebt, diagnostician, Mt. Sinai Hospital, New York 
City, aged 48, Jan. 21, 1918. 

KooFMAN, Joel, antiquarian, Brookline, Mass., aged 71, Dec. 27, 
1917. 

KowALSKi, Louis, Clerk of District Court for thirty years, 
Brownsville, Tex., aged 68, July 19, 1917. 

ICbantzman, Manashe, communal worker, Boston, Mass., aged 
54, Sept 30, 1917. 

Kubzman, Febdinand, lawyer and communal worker. New York 
City, aged 74, Jan., 1918. 

Lauff, Chables, captain, Marrin County, Cal., aged 29, July 24, 
1917. 

Lazabus, Henby L., judge, New Orleans, La., aged 64, Nov. 2, 
1917. 

Ledebeb, Emanuel, captain. Civil War veteran, New York City, 
aged 76, Aug. 21, 1917. 

Leipzigeb, Henby M., educator, founder of public lecture sys- 
tem. New York City, aged 63, Dec. 1, 1917. 

Leiseb, Oscab M., assistant director of Bureau of Public Health 
Education, captain, United States Marine Reserve, New York 
City, Dec. 8, 1917. 

Levy, Lipman, lawyer and communal worker, Cincinnati, O., 
aged 82, Mch. 25, 1918. 

Liebman, Lippman, rabbi, Hamilton, 0., aged 86, Jan. 20, 1918. 

LiPSHiTz, Lazabus, rabbi. Providence, R. I., aged 69, May 28, 
1918. 

Lissneb, Henby, lawyer, Brooklyn, N. Y., aged 52, July 6, 1917. 

Loeb, Mbs. Johanne M., philanthropist, Chicago, 111., aged 73, 
Oct 22, 1917. 

Mabcuse, Mbs. Emily M., lawyer, Oakland, Cal., Jan. 3, 1918. 

Mabgolies, Samuel, rabbi, Cleveland, O., aged 37, July 7, 1917. 

Meyeb, Gabe, member of City Council and School Board, Pine 
Bluff, Ark., aged 82, Dec. 3, 1917. 



230 AMERICAN JEWISH YEAR BOOK 



MiLLioNTHALEB, Louis, Hebrew scholar, Boston, Mass., aged 80, 
June 6, 1917. 

MoBEisoN, Morris, Yiddish actor, Brooklyn, N. Y., aged 60, 
Aug. 28, 1917. 

Nathan, E^ederick, Civil War veteran. New York City, aged 
74, Jan. 28, 1918. 

Netteb, Jacob, journalist, New York City, aged 76, Feb., 1918. 

Newburger, Morris, communal worker, Philadelphia, Pa., aged 
83, July 13, 1917. 

OsTHEiMER, Isaac, philanthropist, Erie, Pa., June 24, 1917. 

PicKERT, Lehman, philanthropist, Boston, Mass., aged 74, Nov., 
1917. 

Rabinowitz, S. H., rabbi, Philadelphia, Pa., aged 45, Nov. 1, 
1917. 

Reinheimer, Daniel, Civil War veteran, College Point, L. I., 
aged 94, Mch. 9, 1918. 

RosENDALE, Samuel, lawyer and Civil War veteran, Minneap- 
olis, Minn., aged 73, Nov., 1917. 

RosENFELDER, E. M., rabbi, Louisville, Ky., aged 75, Feb., 1918. 

Rosenthal, Samuel, Civil War veteran, Cincinnati, O., June 13, 
1917. 

Rosenthal, Samuel, communal worker, Baltimore, Md., aged 
63, Dec. 16, 1917. 

Rosenthal, Toby E., artist. New Haven, Conn., at Berlin, aged 
70, Dec. 28, 1917. 

Sadler, Bernard, rabbi, Easton, Pa., aged 63, July 13, 1917. 

Sadler, M. B., St. Louis, Mo., Civil War veteran, aged 77, Jan., 
1918. 

Salesky, J. L., rabbi, Brockton, Mass., Sept., 1917. 

Saulson, William, Detroit, Mich., former mayor, St. Ignace, 
Mich., at Redlands, Cal., aged 61, July 8, 1917. 

ScHOLLE, Albert W., banker. New York City, aged 57, Dec, 
1917. 

Schorr, Satt., rabbi, Fort Wayne, Ind., aged 70, Aug. 18, 1917. 

Semgman, Isaac N., financier, banker, and philanthropist. New 
York City, aged 51, Sept. 30, 1917. 

Seltzer, Barnet, councilman, Hartford, Conn., aged 56, June, 
1917. 

Sevely, Moris, rabbi. New York City, aged 56, Dec. 28, 1917. 

Shapiro, Abraham, rabbi, Philadelphia, Pa., aged 55, Aug. 3, 
1917. 

SiCHEL, Sigmund, communal worker and philanthropist, former 
Police Commissioner and Senator, Portland, Ore., aged 59, Dec, 
1917. 

SiDENBEKG, ALBERT, rabbi, Philadelphia, Pa., aged 53, Oct. 29, 
1917. 



EVENTS IN 5678— UNITED STATES 231 



Slimmer, Abraham, philanthropist, Dubuque, la., aged 82, Aug. 
15, 1917. 

SoNNEBORN, Henry, communal worker, manufacturer, Balti- 
more, Md., aged 92, Dec. 2^, 1917. 

Stern, Solomon, communal worker, Civil War veteran. New 
Orleans, La., aged 87, Nov. 4, 1917. 

Sterne, Samuel B., member of City Council, Birmingham, 
Ala., aged 33, Dec, 1917. 

Stone, Joseph, philanthropist and communal worker, Boston, 
Mass., iaged 61, Apl. 2, 1918. 

Sulzberger, Solomon, communal worker, New York City, aged 
79, Jan. 4, 1918. 

Tapolsky, Max, communal worker, Pittsburgh, Pa., aged 67, 
Nov. 19, 1917. 

WEroENTHAL, MAURICE, editor, Cleveland, O., aged 61, July 21, 
1917. 

Weil, Richard, physician, major, New York City, at Camp 
Wheeler, aged 41, Nov. 19, 1917. 

Weis, Albert, colonel. Civil War veteran, and head of American 
Theatrical Exchange, New York City, aged 78, May 3, 1918. 

Winter, William, communal worker, member of Legislature, 
City Council, and School Board, Shreveport, La., aged 68, Dec. 2, 
1917. 

Wolf, Adolf, former mayor, Silverton, Ore., aged 80, Jan. 6, 
1918. 

WoLiNSKi, Barnet, rabbi, Brooklyn, N. Y., aged 113, Sept. 26, 
1917. 

V 
WAR NECROLOGY 

Dattelbaum, Harry A., Brooklyn, N. Y., lieutenant, at Brook- 
lyn Hospital, Apl. 12, 1918. 

Davis, Oscar (Cohen), Philadelphia, Pa., Oct. 8, 1917. 

Flato, Walter C, lieutenant, aged 32, May, 1918. 

HiRSCHLER, Jerome J., New York City, at Newport, R. I., aged 
21, Jan. 21, 1918. 

Kaplan, Samuel A., Lawrence, Mass., Feb. 26, 1918. 

Marcus, Arnold, lieutenant, San Francisco, Cal., July, 1917. 

Mare, Milton S., St. Paul, Minn., in France, aged 19, Jan., 1918. 

Nelson, Harold G., lieutenant, New York City, at Rugby, 
England, aged 26, Jan., 1918. 

Roth, Myron, New York City, in France, aged 20, Feb., 1918. 

Schwartzberg, Abraham, corporal, New York City, aged 22, 
•Oct., 1917. 

Stein, Jake, captain, Bessemer, Ala., at Camp Beauregard, aged 
29, Jan. 15, 1918. 



232 AMERICAN JEWISH YEAR BOOK 

B 

FOEEIGN COUNTEIES 

AUSTEALIA AND NEW ZEALAND 

I 

GENERAL EVENTS 

OcTobEE 12. Brisbane: A. M. Hertzberg gives to Government 
sixteen allotments of land to be utilized by the War Council for 
repatriation purposes. 

II 

APPOINTMENTS, HONORS, AND ELECTIONS 

Cohen, John Jacob, Sydney, elected speaker of the Legislative 
Assembly, June, 1917. 

Cohen, Philh*, Melbourne, appointed metropolitan magistrate, 
April 26, 1918. 

Cohen, Samuel Sidney, Sydney, appointed consul-general in 
Greece, Mch., 1918. 

Isaacs, Isbael, Adelaide, re-elected mayor, Dec, 1917. 

Ill 

NECROLOGY 

Hertzberg, Abraham, president of the Brisbane Hebrew Con 
gregation, Jan., 1918. 
Mandel, Joseph, communal worker, Wellington, Apl., 1918. 

IV 

WAR 
Honors 
Military cross: H. M. Goldstein, captain, surgeon. 

Promotions 
Promoted captain: Roy H. Blashki. 

War Necrology 

Blashki, Roy H., captain, Sydney, Aug., 1917. 

Solomon, Bert, lieutenant, Australia, aged 34, Oct., 1917. 



EVENTS IN 5678— AUSTRIA-HUNGARY 233 



AUSTEIA-HUNGARY * 



GENERAL EVENTS 

June 29. Adolph Stand starts propaganda for congress of 
Austro-Hungarian Jews to consider general Jewish position, help 
to war sufferers, and opposition to restriction of the settlement 
of Jewish refugees from the eastern part of the empire in the 
western provinces. — August 24. During session of Reichsrath, 
in reply to motion of Polish deputies that ministry compile sta- 
tistics of the military effort made by each nationality and creed 
in empire, in order to discredit the Jews for their " insufficient 
response and lack of enthusiasm for field service," Deputy Strau- 
cher delivers speech proving that Jews are doing their duty and 
that in tenth Izonzo battle Jews greatly distinguished themselves. 
Names of four hundred and seventy-seven recently decorated 
Jewish officers, soldiers, and physicians are published in Jewish 
papers. — Badzentin, Kielce: Fire destroys four hundred houses; 
number of inhabitants perish, and twenty Sefarim are destroyed. 
Loss estimated at five million rubles ($2,500,000).— Khotin : 1200 
Jewish families in townlets and villages near Austrian frontier 
reconstruct their ruined homes at estimated cost of one million 
rubles ($500,000). Appeal made for help to open schools. — Deputy 
Straucher introduces interpellation in Reichsrath respecting con- 
tinued imprisonment of Leopold Hilsner, accused of ritual mur- 
der. — 31. Jewish communities protest against conscription of 
shohetim. — Octobee 5. Vienna: Largest synagogue severely 
damaged by fire. — Appeal is made to Jewish leaders to urge 
ministry to ameliorate condition of two hundred and fifty Vol- 
hynian Jews carried off to Sulzburg. — 12. Budapest: Government 
decides to expel from city all refugees from Galicia and Buko- 
wina; this woul,d affect many Jews. — Lemberg: Order issued 
that applicants for food cards state their religion; Jews object, 
because this would lead to discrimination against them in the 
shops. — November 9. Budapest: Jewish newspapers complain to 
emperor that Jewish fugitives are seized in the streets and com- 
pelled to return to their devastated home towns. — 14. Budapest: 
Persecution of Jewish fugitives recommenced after short lull. 
Galicians are hunted through the streets by mob, aided by militia 
and police. — December 14. Galicia: Government orders rabbis to 
excommunicate all Jews who speculate in food. — 28. Vienna: Ar- 
rival of hundreds of Jewish refugees from Jerusalem announced. 
— 28. Following vigorous agitation. Government abolishes con- 
centration camps for Jewish war refugees. Although those in- 
terned were innocent fugitives from places occupied by enemy, 

♦ Including Russian territory occupied by Austrian troops. 



234 AMERICAN JEWISH YEAR BOOK 



they had been cruelly abused by the camp authorities. Of 
9000 refugees, 3493 died, of whom 2381 were children. As result 
of severe cold and starvation rations in another camp holding 8000 
refugees from Brody, about 1000 died. — Dr. Straucher inter- 
pellates Minister of Education respecting action of Professor 
Godlewski, dean of medical faculty of the University of Cracow, 
who expelled non-matriculated students who registered as mem- 
bers of the Jewish nationality. — -January. Cracow: Entire Jew- 
ish quarter completely wrecked during food riots. — 11. Tlumatch 
(Galicia) : Jewish refugees, forced by authorities to return, find 
place nearly in ruins, the food supply extremely poor, and no 
means of livelihood available. — 18. Vienna: Accusation, against 
Dr. Braunn, of administering drugs, to help young men evade 
military duty, withdrawn. — Febbuaby 1. Jewish national fund 
receives from anonymous woman a cheque for 250,000 crowns, 
to be cashed after conclusion of peace. — 22. Report from Zurich 
that Jewish deputies succeed in persuading the Austrian Govern- 
ment to abolish the prohibition against Yiddish correspondence. 
— Mabch 1. Vienna: Press states that Count Czernin, Minister 
for Foreign Affairs, will, in the course of peace negotiations with 
Roumania, bring up the question of granting full rights to Jews. 
The Ungarische Wochenschrift, new Zionist organ, reports that 
Galician Jewish refugees are the victims of frequent atrocities. 
— 15. Lemberg: Police search headquarters of the Poale- 
Zionists and of Union of Jewish Workmen, and arrest several 
leaders. — April 2. Polna (Bohemia) : Leopold Hilsner, Jewish 
shoemaker, after serving a life term, upon conviction, in 
1900, on the charge of ritual murder, is pardoned by the 
emperor and released from prison. — Vienna: In an address 
to a deputation of the City Council, referring to the pending 
peace negotiations between the Central Powers and Roumania, 
Count Czernin, Minister for Foreign Affairs, states: "We 
shall solve the Jewish question. The Jews will henceforth be 
citizens with equal rights in Roumania. — 12. Budapest: In 
honor of his fiftieth birthday, Leo Luntshi donates a million and 
a quarter crowns for the establishment of a sanitarium for 
Hungarian war orphans. — 12. Jewish deputies call atten- 
tion of Government, to anti-Jewish riots in Galicia and the 
growth of anti-Semitic agitation. Mention is made of the 
Odzydzenie Polski, a movement demanding the destruction of 
Jewish power in Poland. The Polish press, however, accuses 
the German Government of disseminating antagonism between 
Poles and Jews, to secure support of the latter for the project 
separating the Ukraine from Russia. — 12. The statement in the 
Handbook of the Foreign Press , that Lord Northcliffe, recently 
appointed by the British Government Director of the Pro-Ally 
Propaganda in Neutral Countries, is a descendant of a Frfuikfort 



EVENTS IN 5678— AUSTRIA-HUNGARY 235 



Jewish family named Stern, precipitates anti-Semitic agitation. 
— 24. Cracow: Violent pogroms take place. — May 3. Vienna: 
Christian Socialist deputies in Reichsrath introduce interpella- 
tion demanding establishment of percentage norm for Jewish 
students in all higher educational institutions. Reichspost sup- 
ports interpellation, and suggests three per cent as liberal allow- 
ance of vacancies to be filled by Jewish students. — 31. Wieliczko, 
Galicia: Many Jews injured and all Jewish property destroyed 
during pogrom. — Cracow: Authorities permit distribution of proc- 
lamations accusing Jews of murder of a Christian girl who had 
been killed by the police during the pogrom. — Cracow: Premier 
and Minister of Interior receive deputations of Jews, headed by 
Deputy Stand and Rabbi Widenfeld, and promise to take measures 
against future outbreaks. — Cracow: Municipality adopts resolu- 
tion condemning the anti-Jewish pogrom. The bishop, Prince 
Sapieha, and the Mayor issue special appeals against further riots, 
but police prohibit publication of appeal. 

II 

APPOINTMENTS, HONORS, AND ELECTIONS * 

Baczsony, Wilhelm, Hungary, appointed Minister of Justice, 
July, 1917. 

GoMPEBz, RiTTEB, VON, appointed to House of Lords, July, 1917. 

GoNDO, Heinbich, chief Press Bureau, Hungary, appointed 
ministerial councillor, Feb., 1918. 

GuTTMAN, VON, appointed to House of Lords, July, 1917. 

Vabzzonyi, Wilhelm, Hungary, appointed member of cabinet, 
Feb., 1918. 

Waheb, , professor, elected rector of the Vienna University, 

Aug., 1917. 

Ill 

NECROLOGY 

Rosenblatt, Joseph Michael, professor at Cracow University, 
Baden, aged 64, Aug., 1917. 

SiNGEB, Wilhelm, editor and journalist, Vienna, Oct., 1917. 

Wintebnitz, Wilhelm, professor and physician, Prague, aged 
82, Sept., 1917. 

IV 

WAR 

Iron Cross (first class) : Sack, lieutenant (also ten other 

decorations). 

♦ Appointment of Alfred Stein to Upper House (see Year Book 
5678) not ratified. 



236 AMERICAN JEWISH YEAR BOOK 

BELGIUM 

I 

GENERAL EVENTS 

February 29. King Albert requests L. Coulbaut, Belgian consul- 
general, to confer upon M. Schrameck, governor of Madagascar, 
the insignia of commander of the Order of Leopold. — ^May 10. 
Brussels: M. L^vy-Moelle, president of one of the departments of 
Courts of Appeal, together with two other Belgian judges, deported 
to a German fortress, charged with ordering arrest of some 
Flemish intriguers. 

II 

APPOINTMENTS, HONORS, AND ELECTIONS 

Hymans, Paul, ambassador in London, appointed Minister for 
Foreign Affairs, Feb., 1918. 

BULGARIA 

GENERAL EVENTS 

April 5. Bulgarian Minister in Berlin, in an interview with 
representative of Judische Rundschau, states that his Govern- 
ment intends to press for the grant of full rights to Jews in Rou- 
mania, at the peace congress, and promises that steps will be 
taken to end mistreatment of Bessarabian Jews. — 26. Sofia: In 
addressing Parliament, Premier Radoslavoff, praises patriotism 
of Jews, and pledges his Government as an ally of the Jewish 
cause in the negotiations with Roumania. 

CAISTADA 
I 

GENERAL EVENTS 

July 2. Winnipeg: Fifteenth annual convention of Canadian 
Zionists adopts resolution affirming their ardent wish that at an 
eventual peace conference the Entente Powers grant the demand 
of the Jewish people for a publicly recognized and legally assured 
home in Palestine, and expressing the hope that the British 
Government will assume a protectorate over Palestine to assure 
to its inhabitants a strong, just, and liberal Government. — ^Apbil 
12. Montreal: Organization of a permanent Jewish Welfare 
League for Jewish soldiers. 



EVENTS IN 5678— CHINA 237 

II 

APPOINTMENTS, HONORS AND ELECTIONS 

Jacobs, Lyon W., Montreal, elected alderman, ApL; 1918. 

Jacobs, Samuel. Wm., elected Member of Parliament, Dec, 1917. 

Hendbick, Michael J., appointed consul of United States, at 
Windsor, Ontario, Mch., 1918. 

Mebetzky, Simon, Windsor, Ontario, elected alderman, Jan., 
1918. 

Simon, George, Alexandria, elected mayor, Mch., 1918. 

Tbitt, Samuel Gerald, Montreal, appointed chief returning 
ofllcer for George Etienne Cartier Division, Nov., 1917. 

Ill 

NECROLOGY 

Goldstein, S., rabbi, Montreal, Feb. 22, 1918. 

ScHULTZ, Samuel D., judge, Vancouver, B. C, aged 50, Aug. 25, 
1917. 

Sola, Meldola de, rabbi and vice-president of Union of Orthodox 
Jewish Congregations, Montreal, Canada, aged 65, Apl., 1918. 

IV 

WAR 
Honors 
Decorated: Meyer Cohen, Toronto. 

Promotions 
Promoted captain: T. D. Isaacs, Toronto. 

WAR NECROLOGY 

Lyons, A., lieutenant. 

Cohen, Meyer T., Toronto, lieutenant, in France. 

CHINA 

GENERAL EVENTS 

July 14. Shanghai: E. S. Kadoorie gives twenty-five thousand 
francs ($5000) for purchase of ambulances for French army. — 
November 20. Shanghai: Meeting of Zionists cables following 
resolution to British Prime Minister: "Jewish community of 



238 AMERICAN JEWISH YEAR BOOK 



British and Allied Nationalities of Shanghai desires to express 
appreciation and thanks to British Government for declaration 
of its policy of establishment of a Jewish National Home in 
Palestine.**-^23. Harbin: Jewish community establishes high 
school where Hebrew will be taught as living language. — 
February 8. Shanghai: E. S. Kadoorie, leading merchant and 
active Zionist, offers to English Zionist Federation $50,000 for 
a hospital in Jerusalem, agreeing to increase this amount if in- 
sufficient. 

DENMAEK 

GENERAL EVENTS 

January 4. Copenhagen: On ground of neutrality of Denmark, 
authorities prohibit demonstration by the Zionists to celebrate 
the official British declaration. — March 15. Copenhagen: The 
Actions Committee of the Zionist Organization charges the Jew- 
ish National Fund with the task of establishing a Tschlenow 
Colony in Palestine. — April 19. Copenhagen: Celebration of 
Professor Herman Oppenheim's sixtieth anniversary. 

EGYPT 

GBNEIRAL EVENTS 

August S. Zionist Organization of Egypt formed to guide all 
Zionist societies of the country. — November 11. Alexandria: 
Mass-meeting of eight thousand Jews celebrates the British 
declaration. — February 1. Cairo: At request of Zionist Committee, 
local military authorities release Jewish prisoners of war in 
Egypt, and co-operate in extensive relief work for Jerusalem, Jaffa, 
and the Jewish colonies. — March, Cairo: The members of the 
British Zionist Commission to Palestine are received by repre- 
sentatives of Sir Reginald Wingate, High Commissioner, and 
General Allenby. 

PEANCE 
I 

GENERAL EVENTS 

January 4. F6d6ration Sioniste de France sends message of 
congratulation to Arthur James Balfour on the British occupation 
of Jerusalem. — 11. Young Men's Hebrew Association organized 
at the front by Lieutenant B. L. Gorfinkle, of Boston, Mass., with 
the American Expeditionary Forces. 



EVENTS IN 5678— FRANCE 239 

II 

APPOINTMENTS, HONORS, AND ELECTIONS 

Beegson, Henri, elected vice-president of France-Norway Com- 
mittee, June 1, 1917; appointed member of C16menceau Cabinet, 
Nov., 1917. 

Bloch-Laboque, , appointed advocate-general at Paris 

Court of Appeals, July, 1917. 

BoESCH, Louis, Paris, awarded Order of the Legion of Honor, 
in recognition of distinguished service as eye surgeon, Feb., 1918. 

Cb^mieux, , chief engineer of naval artillery, appointed 

sub-chief of the Secretariat of the French Minister of Marine, 
Sept., 1917. 

David, Febnand, appointed Minister of Agriculture in Cabinet 
of M. Painlev6, Sept., 1917. 

Hendl6, , appointed director of the staff at the Ministry 

of the Interior, June, 1917. 

IGNACE, Edouaed, Paris, appointed Under-Secretary for War, 
Nov., 1917. 

Klotz, Louis Lucien, appointed Minister of Finance in Cabinet 
of M. 'Painlev6, Sept., 1917. 

L^VY, Picard-Ande6, appointed assistant chief of the Secretariat 
of the Prime Minister, Oct., 1917. 

Lyon-Caen, Charles, professor of law at the University of Paris, 
elected permanent secretary of the Academy of Moral and Po- 
litical Sciences, Jan.; 1918. 

Mandel, Geobges, Paris, appointed principal private secretary 
to Premier Cl^menceau, Jan., 1918. 

Masse, Pieebe, appointed Under-Secretary for War, Nov., 1917. 

Simon, Henei, appointed Minister of Colonies, Dec, 1917. 

Strauss, Paul, Senator, appointed president of the French 
Superior Labor Commission, Sept., 1917. 

Ill 

NECROLOGY 

DuRKHEiM, Emile, professor of pedagogics and sociology at the 
Sorbonne, Paris, Nov., 1917. 

Lehmann, Joseph, chief rabbi, chevalier of the Legion of Honor, 
Paris, aged 77, Nov. 22, 1917. 

Millaud, Alphonse, editor of Paris Press, Paris, aged 89, Apl., 
1918. 

Oppenheim, Robert, major, Paris, aged 42, Oct., 1917. 

PoLiAKOFF, Daniel S., Commander of the Legion of Honor, di- 
rector of the Russian Ambulance, Paris, aged 56, Sept., 1917. 

Schwab, Moise, Semitic scholar and author, Paris, aged 79, Mch., 
1918. 



240 AMERICAN JEWISH YEAR BOOK 



IV 

WAB 

Honors 

War Gross: Andr6 Bloch; Louis Bloch; L16011 Farach6; 
R6n6 Fulda; Paul Glaser; Ben Harrous; Gaston LfClouch (died 
Feb. 1, 1918) ; Georges Levy; Arthur Mitchell; Allen Henry Muhr; 
Henri Alphonse Olivetti; George Picard; Fernand Ruff; Malcolm 
Schloss; Georges Valensi. — War Cross with palm: Georges Bern- 

heim; Djoui; Gaston Lelouche; Maurice Leon; Isaac Levy; 

Marcel Meyer; Fernand Mordemann. — War Gross with silver star: 
Joseph Sachs; Pierre Ducret Wertheimer. — Commander of Legion 
of Honor: Lieutenant-Colonel Bechmann; Lieutenant-Colonel 
Ernest Georges Bedimann; Colonel Paul Emile Destaurens; 
Colonel Henri Raine. — Officer of Legion of Honor: Captain Desip6; 
Albert Bloche; Lieutenant-Colonel Urbain Cahen; Colonel Albert 
Franch; Major Alfred Samuel Hertz; Captain Georges Hinstin; 
Captain Robert Ley; Major Albert Levy; Lieutenant Charles 
Mordmann; Major Eugene SchmoW.^— Chevalier of Legion of 
Honor: Captain Alexis Aron; Samuel Charles Aboulker; Lieuten- 
ant Maurice Avon; Second lieutenant Gaspard Henri Bernheim; 
Captain Paul Jacob Bloch; Lieutenant Jean Blum; Marcel Braun- 
berger; Isaac Henri L^vy-Bruhl; Lieutenant Jules Charles Brun- 
schwig; Isaac Fernand Brunswick; Captain Jules Ernest Cahen; 
Marcel Cahen; Captain Paul Pierre Joseph Cerf; Captain R6n6 
Fulda; Captain Gaston Gimpel; Captain Henri Paul Goldschmidt; 
Georges Gomez-Vaez; Kolman Gruenblatt; Eugene Jacques Julien 
Halphen; Captain Pierre Salomon Herzog; Captain Paul Samuel 
Hinstin; Captain Marcel Kaan; Lieutenant Paul Kaan; Captain 
L6on-Jerome Kahn; Major L^on Zadoc-Kahn; Edmond Elie 
Lautz; George Louis Lehmann; Lieutenant Albert Lellouche; 
Lieutenant Albert Levi; Pierre Marcel Levi; Jacques R4n6 Levy; 
Major Max Levy; Captain Paul Levy; Captain Raymond Nathan 
Levy; Lieutenant Felix Mayer; Captain Edmond Metzger; Captain 
Maurice Auguste Emile Pereine; Captain Jaques Isaac Raynal; 

Captain R6n6; Albert Joseph Rok6ach; Captain Charles 

Rueff; Captain Georges Simon Schwab; Captain Eugene Silz; 
Captain Georges Bernard Silz; Lieutenant Eugene Simon; Lieu- 
tenant Diaz de Soria; Captain Raymond Simon Spine; M. Ulmo; 
Dr. B. Weill-Halle; Lieutenant-Colonel Abraham Prosper Ernest 
Weyl; Captain Lucien Robert Weyl; Captain George Wisner. — 
Cross of Legion of Honor: Captain Alexis Aron; Lieutenant 
Maurice Aron; Lieutenant Raphael Charles Albert Cahen d'An- 

vers; Ascher; Gaspard Bernheim; Captain Roger Bloch; 

Lieutenant Jean Blum; Lieutenant Gross; Captain Pierre 



EVENTS IN 5678— FRANCE 241 



Salomon Herzog; Major L16011 Zadoc-Kahn; L. Kone; Captain 
Edmund Metzger; Lieutenant Mortje; Captain George Si- 
mon Schwab; Major Ben Weil. — Silver medal (second class) : Mrs. 
L. N. Brunswig; Mark Percy Peixotto; Raphael Weill. — Bronze 
medal: Jacques Hollander; Albert Kohn. — Medal of honor: Anna 
Hermann; Catherine N. Hermann. — Military medal: George Bern- 
heim; Albert Hesse; Georges Hesse; Ben Harroiis; Gaston 
Lelouch (died Feb. 1, 1918); Marcel Jules Eugene Isidor; Marcel 
Meyer; Fernand Mordemann; Isaac Rottenburg. — English mili- 
tary medal: David Salfti. — Cross of Order of Saint Sierra 
(Serbian): Major Leon Zadoc-Kahn. — Mentioned for bravery: 
Gaston Prosper Abrahams; Andr§ Amselle; Jacob Athias; Victor 
Attal; Charles Attali; L^on Baehr; Pierre Benedictus; Jacob 
Benzekri; Jean Bernheim; Raymond BoUack; Jacob Bonaziz; Al- 
bert Broer; Georges Cerf; Henri Cohen-Lolae; Ben Simon David; 
David Marcel Dreyfus; Robert Dreyfus; Leon Farach^; Joseph 
Foksmann; Gaston Gimpel; Hirsch Goldstuck; Ben Harrous; 
Maurice Haziza; Henri L6on Hirsch; Joseph Hirsch; Seligman 
Hirsch; Armand Korsenty; Marcel Etienne Kirschbaum; L§on 
Jerome Kohn; Henri Kraemer; Adolphe L^vy; Louis Raphael 
Paul L6vy; Maurice Levy; Maurice Lop6s; Roger Benedict MStre; 

Georges Netter; Adrien Perquel; Michel R6n6; Justin Rotter; 

Schwab; Ben Simon; Gaston Solinski (killed in action); Roger 
Solinski (killed in action); Alfred Spigelstein; Adrien Daniel 
Stora; Alfred Tayeb; Isaac Tbika; Ernest Wahl; Paul Wahl; 
Robert Weill; Jacques Weismiller; Armand Weyl; Marcel Weyl; 
Alphonse Wolf; Wolff; Adolphe Zadok; Chaloum Zerbib. 

Promotions 

Promoted brigadier-general: Alexandre; L. Levy; A. 

Mayer. — Promoted colonel: Carvallo; Franck; 

Levy. — Promoted lieutenant-colonel: Urbain Cahen; Creange; 

Levy; A. B. M. L€vy; Magnus; Eugene Mayer; Emile 

Philippe Moog; Pompe; Theodore Reinach; Wahl. — 

Promoted major: Aron; Berr; 0. Bloch; Bloch- 

Laroque; Carval; E. J. Deutsch; Helbronner; Ibin- 

stein; E. Klotz; A. Lion; L. Meyer; Oppenheim. — Promoted 

captain: Paul Alphandery; Henri Bloch; E. J. J. Halphen; 
Edmond Kahn; Georges L^vy. — Promoted lieutenant: Andr6 

Bloch; Naquet; Daniel Sorano. — Promoted second lieutenant: 

— — Bloch; Israel; Marcel Mirtil; Andr6 Samuel Epernay. 

Wab Necrology 

Alexandre, Paul, second lieutenant, Apl., 1917. 

Beneditti, L60N, commander, aged 42, Sept., 1917. 

Bernard, Louis Andr6, lieutenant, Paris, at Verdun, Sept., 1917. 



242 AMERICAN JEWISH YEAR BOOK 



Bebnheim, Jean, second lieutenant, Sept., 1917. 
Bebb, Maxime, captain, aged 28, May 2, 1917. 
Bloch, Maubice, second lieutenant, Oct., 1917. 
Bbock, Gerabd von, second lieutenant, Apl. 12, 1917. 
Cahen, RfiN6, lieutenant-colonel, Apl. 17, 1917. 
Cahn, Lucien, second lieutenant, aged 25, Sept., 1917. 
Camondo, Nissim de, lieutenant, observer, aged 25, Oct., 1917. 
Enos, Edmond, lieutenant, June 27, 1917. 
GoLDSCHMiDT, Edmond, lieutenant, aviation, July, 1917. 
Halphen, Febnand, captain, June, 1917. 
Hayem, Henbi, lieutenant, Oct., 1917. 
Hemebet, Louis, lieutenant, aviator, Apl. 12, 1917. 
Hibsch, Adolph, lieutenant, July, 1917. 

Kahn, Edouabd Gaspabd Mabcel, chief of battalion, Apl. 16, 
1917. 
Leoni, Fbanqois, lieutenant, July, 1917. 
Levi, Geobges, second lieutenant, June, 1917. 
Levy, Robebt, lieutenant, aviation, July, 1917. 
LiBKiND, Geobges, second lieutenant, aged 20, July, 1917. 
Metbe, Rogeb, second lieutenant, Apl., 1917. 
Michel, Edgab, lieutenant, Mch., 1918. 
Molina, Paul, second lieutenant, at Verdun, June, 1917. 
MoBAU, Alexandbe, at Craonne, Apl. 16, 1917. 
Nathan, Andb6, second lieutenant, Dieppe, Apl. 30, 1917. 
Netbe, Rogeb Benedict, second lieutenant, Apl., 1917. 
OSTEB, Max, lieutenant, Battle of the Aisne, Apl. 20, 1917. 
PiCABD, Andb6, second lieutenant, Sept., 1917. 
Reittingeb, Guy, captain, age 26, Nov. 7, 1917. 
Rosenbaum, Leonce, chief adjutant, June, 191 <. 
RuEF, Jules, rabbi, at Verdun, Oct., 1917. 
Wieneb, Robebt, at Champagne, Apl. 16, 1917. 

GEKMANY * 
I 

GENERAL EVENTS 

June 22. Socialists in Reichstag Committee criticize Chan- 
cellor for forcing Jewish laborers in Poland and Lithuania to 
work for lower than standard wages. Committee adopts resolu- 
tion favoring treatment of Jewish workmen from Poland and 
Lithuania on an equal footing with Germans. — July 27. Oppeln 
and Breslau (Posen) : Austrian Jews expelled, although residents 
for decades. August 10. Berlin: Five orthodox representatives 

* Including Russian territory occupied by German troops. 



EVENTS IN 5678— GERMANY 243 



of Jewish community resign because of appointment of a radical 
reformer, Dr. Benzion Kellerman, as rabbi of the synagogue of the 
South-eastern district. — 24. Kamenetz, Grodno, Zsgov, Yezarna, 
Iliatanl (Courland) and Kolna (government of Lomza) : Great 
conflagrations destroy large parts of the townlets. Valuable 
Jewish library lost at Kolna. — Dombrova (Poland) : Police at 
request of local Christian authorities, close all synagogues, Jew- 
ish schools and hedarim, on pretext of alleged mismanagement. — 
September 14. Kovno, Wilna, Radin, Telsi, Lomza, and Grodno: 
Yeshivahs receive assistance from a committee founded for 
the purpose by orthodox Jews in Berlin. — 28. Wilna: Typhus 
fever prevalent. Flour, potatoes and barley not obtainable. Many 
soup-kitchens suspend for lack of supplies. Men are carried 
off at night and forced to work for the State. — October 14. 
Wilna: Dr. Arthur Hantke, president of the Zionist Federation of 
Germany, addresses Zionist mass-meeting on present state of the 
Jewish national movement. — 31. Centenary of birth of Heinrich 
Graetz. — ^November 9. Pinsk: Jewish women in neighboring 
townlet separated from their children and transported to do 
forced labor. Many attempt suicide by drowning. — Silesia: 
Several hundred Jewish miners from Austria-Hungary ex- 
pelled by German authorities who allege they are a burden 
upon German charitable institutions, more especially to those 
of Kattowitz. Interpellation on matter introduced in Reichstag 
Committee is evasively treated, and Jews are sent back in 
insulting manner. — 17. Munich: Major Endres, in an address 
delivered under Zionist auspices and sanctioned by the imperial 
authorities, intimates that Germany will support Zionist aims 
in Palestine. — December 14. Frankfurter Zeitung reports active 
preparations by anti-Semitic organizations for strong anti-Jew- 
ish campaign after the war. A work entitled "A Knife for the 
Jews" is distributed In hundreds of thousands of copies. — 
January 4. Berlin: Jewish Correspondence Bureau at the Hague 
informs that German Zionist Conference adopts the following reso- 
lution: " The German Zionist Association greets with satisfaction 
the fact that British Government has recognized in an oflScial 
declaration the right of the Jewish people to a national existence 
in Palestine." — Jews of Lithuania present to Central Council 
memorandum on relations between Jews and Letts, and appealing 
for the friendly co-operation of the two nationalities for the 
welfare of the State on the basis of the recognition of the national 
rights of the Jewish minority, especially in the domain of 
culture. — February 1. Berdichev: Jewish Congress decides to 
raise money to repatriate Galician Jews stranded in or around 
the city. — 15. Berlin: Talaat Pasha, grand vizier of Turkey, 
in interview given to Local Anzeiger, expresses hope that Otto- 



244 AMERICAN JEWISH YEAR BOOK 

man Government will maintain its sovereignty in Palestine, not- 
withstanding British occupation. — Makch 8. At a recent meeting 
of the Fatherland Union, the Blberfeld German People's Party 
resolves to request that in the future all professors and teachers of 
German, theatre managers, and contributors to the press in all 
German states, be of pure German lineage. — 15. BYankfort: Con- 
ference of orthodox Jewish organizations resolves that the support 
of a Jewish settlement in Palestine is the religious duty of all 
Jewry, and pledges itself to work for the emancipation of the Jews 
everywhere. — April 5. The Deutschvolkische Blatter, official 
organ of the German anti-Semites, states that the time has arrived 
to declare war on Jews openly, because of their alleged opposition 
to German war aims. Deputy Werner interpellates the Govern- 
ment in the Reichstag, and demands the adoption of measures 
" against the Jewish race, which agitates for strikes and raises 
the price of food." — May 31. Proposal of Herr Heins to disfran- 
chise the Jews in Prussia is withdrawn after two days' debate. 

II 

APPOINTMENTS, HONORS, AND ELECTIONS 

MiTTwocH, EuGEN, Berlin, appointed ordinary professor of Ori- 
ental languages at University of Berlin, Oct., 1917. 

Oppenheimeb, Franz, Berlin, receives title of professor, June, 
1917. 

Ill 

NECROLOGY 

Cohen, Hermann, philosopher and author, Berlin, aged 77, 
Apl. 19, 1918. 

DoKTOR, Max, rabbi and Semitist, Berlin, aged 47, Apl., 1918. 

HntscHBERQ, LuDwiG, piauist and professor, Berlin, Mch., 1918. 

KoHUT, Adolph, editor and author, Berlin, aged 69, Dec, 1917. 

Lewy, Israel, Jewish scholar, professor of Jewish Theological 
Seminary, Breslau, aged 77, Sept. 8, 1917. 

Mendelssohn, Robert von, banker, Berlin, aged 60, Aug. 22, 
1917. 

Rosenheim, Julius, banker, Berlin, June 11, 1917. 

Stadthagen, , writer. Socialist leader, Dec, 1917. 

IV 

WAR 
Honors 
Iron Cross (first class) : Herman Bock, aviator. 



EVENTS IN 5678— INDIA 245 

GEEECE 

General Events 

June 13. Salonlca: Elections by universal suffrage for dele- 
gates to the Congress of Salonlca Jews; fifteen thousand ballots 
cast; eighty delegates elected. — August 18. Salonica: Population 
homeless on account of fire. Fifty thousands Jews affected. Ap- 
peal made to Jews of United States for relief. — October 19. Sa- 
lonica: Mass-meeting sends deputation, including chief rabbi, to 
Athens, to appeal to Cabinet to withdraw bill expropriating 
land belonging to victims of the conflagration. — Three hun- 
dred thousand francs (|60,000) received by the Alliance Israel- 
ite Universelle in Paris, for relief of victims of the conflagra- 
tion. — ^January 4. Salonica: Pro-Israel sends telegrams to Mr. 
Balfour and Nahum Sokolow congratulating them on British 
advance in Palestine and for the declaration. Zionist societies 
adopt congratulatory resolution. — Salonica: David Florentin and 
Joseph Usiel, on behalf of Zionist societies and entire Jewish 
population, sends to Dr. Ch. Weizman and N. Sokolow tele- 
gram congratulating them on British declaration. — February i. 
Salonica: Deputation of the Jewish Congress congratulates 
General Milne, commander of the British troops in Macedonia, on 
the British declaration. — 8. Athens : Politis, Minister for Foreign 
Affairs, favors a national Jewish home, in Palestine. — Sa- 
lonica: In an audience granted to representatives of the pro- 
Israel organizations. King Alexander expresses his sincere 
sympathy with Jewish aspirations and joy at the deliverance of 
Palestine. — ^March 8. Salonica: Government decides to exempt 
Jewish Ottoman subjects living in Greece from the regulation 
prohibiting commercial transactions with subjects of enemy states. 

INDIA 

I 

APPOINTMENTS, HONORS, AND ELECTIONS 

Kadoorie, Ellis, Hong Kong, created knight, June 1, 1917. 

Montagu, Edwin Samuel, appointed Secretary of State for 
India, July, 1917. 

Stein, Sir Marc Aurel, inspector of Indian Archaeological Sur- 
vey, receives TchehadchefC Prize of three thousand francs (|600) 
from French Academy of Sciences for his explorations in Central 
Asia, Nov., 1917. 



246 AMERICAN JEWISH YEAR BOOK 

II 

NECROLOGY 

Pezarkar, Elijah Solomon, deputy collector in Sind, at 
Karachi, Oct., 1917. 

ITALY 

I 

GENERAL EVENTS 

June 8. Pope Benedict receives, in special audience, N. Soko- 
low, member of Zionist Executive .Committee, and declares him- 
self in sympathy with Zionist aims in Palestine. — Premier Boselli, 
in interview with N. Sokolow, states that Government is pre- 
pared to favor Zionist aims in Palestine. — ^July 20. Bologna: 
Union of Italian Rabbis formed. — Septembeb 21. Government 
prohibits export of palm branches (Lulovim) to Germany. Frank- 
fort Union appeals to pope for his good offices with the Grovern- 
ment. — December 28. Leghorn: Rabbi Colombo in cablegram to 
Dr. Hertz, chief rabbi of Great Britain, expresses, on behalf of 
Federation of Italian Rabbis, joy and felicitations on capture of 
Jerusalem, and thanking the British Government for its declara- 
tion. 

II 

APPOINTMENTS, HONORS, AND ELECTIONS 

Amab, Tobla Pio, Turin, major, created knight. 

DoNATi, Donato, elected dean of the faculty of law at the Uni- 
versity of Macerata, June, 1917. 

FiNzi, Clemente, Ferrara, receives bronze medal, Apl., 1918. 

LuzzATTO, Giuseppe, created commander of the Crown of Italy. 

Momigllano, Pilade, created officer of the Crown of Italy. 

MoBPUBGO, Elio, appointed Under-Secretary of State for Industry 
and Commerce, Nov., 1917. 

Ottolenghi, Belom, created commander of the Order of the 
Crown of Italy, Mch., 1918. 

Ravenna, Leone, appointed grand officer of the Crown of Italy, 
Apl. 26, 1918. 

Reggio, , appointed Under-Secretary of State for Transports, 

Nov., 1917. 

Sebvi, Ferbuccio, rabbi, editor of Vessillo IsraeliticOy Turin, 
created knight of the Crown of Italy, May, 1918. 

SoNNiNO, Sydney, baron, re-appointed Minister for Foreign 
Affairs, Nov., 1917. 



EVENTS IN 5678— ITALY 247 



Tebni, Vito, Ancona, receives Cross of Knight of Crown of 
Italy. 

Vecchio, Roberto Del, Ancona, created knight of Crown of 
Italy. 

Ill 

NECROLOGY 

Allatini, Lazzaeo, ex-consul of Italy, at London, aged 79, Apl., 
1918. 

FoA, Giuseppe, professor and chief rabbi, knight of the Crown 
of Italy, Turin, Oct. 22, 1917. 

LuzzATn, Giuseppe, engineer, Rome, June, 1917. 

Ottolenghi, Raffaele, professor and communal worker, Acqui, 
July, 1917. 

IV 

WAR 

Honors 

Gold medal: Lieutenant Giulio Blum; Amalia Toscano Levi; 
Oreste Servi. — Silver medal: Giuseppe Ancona; Raoul Ancona; 
Major Mario De Angeli; Captain Gino Graziani; Captain Angelo 
Astrologo; Lieutenant Isacco Astrologo; Lieutenant Arnoldo 
Beer; Lieutenant Umberto Beer; Arrigo Bernstein; Lieutenant 
Giulio Blum; Captain Silvio Cald; Captain Ezio Castelfranco; 
Lieutenant Salvatore Vitale di Cherasco; Giorgio Flach; Ernesto 
Ghiron; Lieutenant Augusto Levi; Lieutenant Dario Fausto 
Luzzati; Albert Modena; Captain Ugo Modena di Mos^; Umberto 
Montecorboli ; Umberto Orefici; Captain Alberto Padovani; 
Lieutenant Roberto Pontrenoli; Gracomo Provenza; Colonel 
Bmanuele Pugliese; Captain Amadeo Sacerdote; Ermanno 
Senigaglia; Attilio Valobra; Captain Massimo Adolf o Vitale; 
Captain Edoardo Vivanti. — Bronze Medal: Lieutenant Guido 
Almagid; Captain Adolf o Almansi; Lieutenant Giulio De Angeli; 
Captain Giulio Bergman; Lieutenant Enrico de Benedetti di 
Ezechia; Lieutenant Ruggero Finzi; Captain Giulio Augusto Fo&; 
Guglielmo Franco; Mario Genazzani; Vittorio Del Mar; Maurizio 
Levi Minzi; Captain Abramo Luzzatti da Moncalvo; Rodolfo 
Ottolenghi; Captain Claudio Pugliese; Nino Sacerdota; Captain 
Eraldo Sonnino; Adolf o Spitz; Lieutenant-Colonel Giuseppe 
Tedeschi; Attilio Teglio; Captain Gualtiero del Vecchio; Lieu- 
tenant Adolf o Viterbi. — Military medal: Captain Mois6 Cohen; 
Ettore Levi; Captain Giorgio Procaccia; Lieutenant Gustave 
Pugliese. — French War Cross: Major Mario De Angeli; Captain 
Mos6 Cohen ; Captain Gino Graziani ; Bianca Levi ; Ettore Levi. — 



248 AMERICAN JEWISH YEAR BOOK 



Cross of the knighthood of 8. 8, Maurizi and Lazzaro: 
Lieutenant-Colonel Aristide Luria; Lieutenant-Colonel Vittorlo 
Emanuele Coen Pirani. — Special mention for distinguished 
services: Lieutenant Vittore Zamorani. 

Promotions 

Promoted lieutenant-colonel: Clemente Pavia; Vlttorio 
Emanuele Coen Pirani. — Promoted major-general: Allegro Pavia; 
Emanuele Pugliese. — Promoted major: Mario De Angeli; Ettore 
Levi; Guido Segre. — Promoted captain: Adolf o Almansi; Edgardo 
Bassani; Giulio Bergmann; Mois^ Cohen; Annibale Gallico; Aldo 
Ottolenghi; Enzo Ravenna; Angelo Sanguinetti; Renzo Ravenna 
di TuUio; Massimo Adolf o Vitale; Adolf o Viterbi. — Promoted lieu- 
tenant: Cesare Amar di Alessandria; Giacomo Ascarelli; Umberto 
Bachi; Israel Cases; Terzo Coen; Arturo Segre; Daniele Zamorani. 

War Necrology 

Beer, Arnoldo, lieutenant Ancona, Nov., 1917. 
Bemporad, Duilio, major, Aug., 1917. 
Bemporad, Gino, second lieutenant, Sorano, Nov., 1917. 
Benedetti, Benedette De, lieutenant-colonel, Mantua, aged 77, 
Jan., 1918. 
Benedetti, Ebmanno de, lieutenant, Aug., 1917. 
Benedetti, Mario De, lieutenant, Turin, Dec, 1917. 
Blum, Giulio, lieutenant, Milan, Sept., 1917. 
Campos, Guido, second lieutenant, Cairo, Oct., 1917. 
CiviDAM, Claudio, lieutenant, Bologna, Oct., 1917. 
Erber, Riccardo, sub-lieutenant, Turin, aged 23, May, 1917. 
Ghiron, Ernesto, second lieutenant, Turin, Nov^ 1917. 
JoNA, Achille, lieutenant, Ivrea, Oct., 1917. 
JoNA, RuGGERO, sccoud lieutenant, Trieste, Sept., 1917. 
Lenghi, Guglielmo, lieutenant, Turin, Mch., 1918. 
Levi, Alberto, lieutenant-colonel, Jan., 1918. 
Levi, Alberto, lieutenant, Moreno, Sept., 1917. 
Levi, Decio, major, Ivrea, Sept., 1917. 
Levi, Eugenio Elia, captain, Genoa, Dec., 1917. 
LiEBMANN, Roberto, lieutenant, Feb., 1918. 
LowY, Dario, captain, aged 29, Oct., 1917. 
MoRELLi, MiCHELE, sccoud Ueutcnant, Turin, Dec., 1917. 
Orefici, Umberto, Florence, May, 1917. 
Ottolenghi, Aldo, lieutenant, Modena, Sept., 1917. 
Ottolenghi, Attilio, second lieutenant, Feb., 1918. 
Pugliese, Gustavo, lieutenant, Turin, Sept., 1917. 
Samuele, Alberto Esdra di, lieutenant, Rome, Sept., 1917. 
SEGRfe, Gino, lieutenant, Florence, July, 1917. 



EVENTS IN 5678— NETHERLANDS 249 



SiNiGAGLiA, GiACOMO, secoiid lieutenant, Ferraca, Mch., 1918. 
ToDEsco, Mabio, lieutenant, Venice, July, 1917. 
LowY, TuLLio, second lieutenant, Genoa, Dec, 1917. 
ViTEBBi, Adolfo, captain, Mantua, Nov., 1917. 

JAMAICA 

WAR 

Promotions. 

Promoted captain: Leslie de Cordova; Leslie Roy; Robert Karl 
Nunes; Dr. Alfred Errol Delgado; Cyril S. Gideon. — Promoted 
lieutenant: Eric M. Abendana. — Promoted second lieutenant: 
Kenneth Abendana; Vernon Rienzi Andrade; Thaddeus R. Gid- 
eon; Caryl Fred; Arthur de Souza; David I. Melhado; Vernon 
Melhado; Clifford Melhado; Michael de Cordova; Lionel Launce- 
lot Tennyson de Cordova; Dick de Cordova; Louis Victor Cohen 
Henriques; Robert Clinton de Pass; Caryl Danecourt de Pass; 
Allan V. Lyons; John E. Lyons; G. H. Errington Lyons; Aubrey 
H. Speyer; Andrew Earle DeLisser; By ran Lloyd Brandon; Ken- 
neth Korinaldi Levy; Frank de Mercado; Gordon Stuart Lindo. 

NETHEELANDS 



GENERAL EVENTS 

August 17. Movement to establish a Jewish settlement on the 
Island of Java. — September 12. Niemoe Rotterdamsce Courant 
publishes statement favoring Zionism made by Dutch Minister 
of Finance to a representative of the Joodsche Korrespondenz of 
the Hague. — October 5. Delegation of the Polei-Zion present to 
the Dutch-Scandinavian Socialist Committee at Stockholm 
memorandum suggesting following reforms for Palestine: 1) 
abolition of restricton of immigration and colonization by Jews, 
increased facilities for naturalization, and unrestricted freedom 
for institutions promoting Jewish colonization; 2) creation of 
modern, democratic legal conditions, and political measures for 
the development of the productive forces of the country; con- 
ferring upon Palestine self-government; 3) grant of national 
autonomy for Jews there. — November 24. The Hague: With co- 
operation of the Dutch Government, distribution of relief funds in 
territories occupied by Germany is resumed by representatives of 
the Joint Distribution Committee of the American Jewish Relief 
Committee, after suspension since the entry of the United States 
into the war. — January 4. Zwolle: Netherlands Zionist Federa- 
tion adopts resolution expressing gratitude to British Government 



250 AMERICAN JEWISH YEAR BOOK 



for its sympathetic attitude toward Zionism and for its declara- 
tion. — P^BBUAEY 1. As a result of series of conferences, Dutch 
Jewish leaders formulate following demands to be presented at 
the peace conference: 1) emancipation of the Jews; 2) recogni- 
tion of national rights in national states; 3) national concentra- 
tion of Jewish people in Palestine; 4) the cessation of con- 
temptuous and oppressive treatment of Jews. — Maech 29. The 
Hague: The Central Jewish Aid Committee sends 540,000 marks 
to Poland for the relief of Jewish committees and institutions. 

II 

NECROLOGY 

GoBiTZ, p. J., rector of Rabbinical Seminary. Amsterdam, aged 
52, Oct., 1917. 

Haetog, Jacques, author and lecturer on history of music, 
Amsterdam, aged 80, Oct., 1917. 

PALESTINE 



GENERAL EVENTS 

May 19. Galilee, Haifa, and Zichron Jacob: Jewish Committee 
for the Care of the Fugitives makes survey of position of fugitives. 
Central Committee for Galilee elected. Budget required is 
50,000 francs (gold) |10,000 a month. — 28. London: Palestine 
Wine and Trading Co. receives, through its representative in 
Switzerland, telegram from the Rishon-le-Zion colony stating that 
reports of persecution of Jews are completely false; that the Gov- 
ernment gives every protection to our vine growers and has not 
molested any of the laborers engaged in the industry. Palestine 
representative of the Jewish Colonization Association telegraphs 
to London that order prevails in all villages, and that all the re- 
ports spread of insecurity and oppression are completely false. 
The Government is affording relief to the Jewish population of 
JafCa which has settled in Galilee. — June 7. During opening 
sitting of the Zionist Congress at Petrograd, President Tschlenow 
reads telegram from Terestchenko, Minister for Foreign Affairs, 
announcing that information received regarding the atrocities 
committed by the Turks against the peaceful population of Pales- 
tine was of such a nature that it had been considered advisable 
to communicate witti the Allies, with a view to joint representa- 
tions to the Turkish Government through neutral Powers. — 20. 
Jaffa: Turkish Government permits expelled Jews to return 



EVENTS IN 5678— PALESTINE 251 



here, as well as to Tel Abib and other suburbs. — 27. Report from 
the Hague that Djemal Pasha states, in an interview, that all 
American, English, French, and Russian schools in Syria and 
Palestine had been closed, that he would never consent to their 
being reopened after the war, and that he regarded this as an 
indispensable step toward the rooting out of Entente influence 
in the post-bellum period; Jewish colonization was equally injuri- 
ous, and he would do his utmost to oppose it.-r~29. British, 
French, Russian, and Italian Ministers at the Hague make joint 
representations to the Dutch Minister of Foreign AfCairs, asking 
that the Netherlands Minister at Constantinople be instructed to 
approach the Turkish Government and to request that, in the 
name of humanity, a stop be put to Jewish persecutions. — Septem- 
BEB 14. Jerusalem: Ha-Herut, Hebrew daily paper, suspends 
publication. — 21. Reported that Djemal Pasha, military gov- 
.ernor of Syria, Is deposed by Government. November 30. Jaffa: 
According to Associated Press dispatch from Alexandria, lead- 
ing men of the colony are accused of espionage, and, on false 
evidence or by confession extorted by torture, are convicted by 
German court-martial and hanged. — Decembeb 9. Jerusalem 
captured by British troops on first day of Hanukkah. — 14. 
Renter telegrams to Amsterdam report that population of Pales- 
tine is suffering terrible privations; population reduced to one- 
third by hunger, sickness, and distress. Only twenty-three 
thousand of the sixty thousand Jews reported to be left In Jerusa- 
lem. — January 25. Reopening of the Anglo-Palestine Bank made 
possible by the transmittal of |200,000 by the Provisional Zionist 
Committee of the United States. — February 8. General Allenby, 
Commander of the British Expeditionary Forces, orders his troops 
to guard and preserve all historic and sacred sites and buildings 
and to keep watch over the inhabitants and their property. — 
Jerusalem : In a cable to Elkan N. Adler, of London, Dr. Wallach 
and Mr. Jonas Marx appeal for funds for the local Schaar6 Tzedek 
Hospital. — May 1. Jaffa: Baron Edmond de Rothschild extends 
financial aid to Mendel Beilis, chief figure in celebrated " ritual 
murder" case in Kiev, Russia, in 1913. — British Zionist Com- 
mission creates a department for administration of relief to Jews 
in the Holy Land, now the sole relief medium in Palestine. — 
British Zionist Commission takes over, and conducts, as Hebrew 
schools, the Hilfsverein schools closed by the British authorities. 

II 

NECROLOGY 

Finkelstein, Eleazar, ha-Shomer (Jewish guard), Ben She- 
men, Aug., 1917. 
Kamaxky, David Baer, rabbi, Tiberias, aged 75, Aug. 16, 1917. 



252 AMERICAN JEWISH YEAR BOOK 



POLAND 
I 

GENERAL EVENTS 

JxjTLY 20. Warsaw: At meeting of the Municipal Council, anti- 
Jewish members charge that Jews give the German and Austrian 
Governments the idea that two nationalities were the masters 
of Poland and of using the Influence of prominent Jews in Berlin 
and Vienna against the Poles. They oppose Jewish demands that 
the reform proposals settling the status of workmen in Russia 
should apply to Jews also. Jewish members of the municipality 
deny the libels, and charge anti-Semites with deliberate attempts 
to frustrate all efforts of an understanding between Jews and 
Poles. Jews persuade the municipality not to exclude Jewish work- 
men from the benefits of the new scheme. — August 3. Warsaw-: 
During debate in City Council on deplorable situation of Jewish 
mechanics, many of whom have been forced to sell their tools, 
Jewish delegates urge that Jewish master mechanics be given 
representation in council of trade masters which is being formed. 
Suggestion is opposed by Polish leader Ilsky, who declares that 
Jews are engaged in campaign to obtain mastery over the Poles. 
Session adjourned to prevent Jewish members from replying; all 
Jews leave Council Chamber as protest. — Polish students of War- 
saw University decide to bar Jews duly elected to Students' Coun- 
cil. Similar action taken at Polytechnic Institute, where protests 
of Jewish students evoke from the dean declaration that Jews 
are merely guests in Poland, and that their use of Yiddish is 
evidence of their opposition to Polish nationalism. — Jewish mem- 
bers of the City Council protest against announcement in Warsaw 
papers, April 28, that Jews would be barred from making bids 
to supply horses in connection with work on Roman Catholic 
cemeteries. Memorandum points out that city government which 
controls cemeteries, may thus be deprived of benefit of lower 
bids from Jews, and demands that a new bid be called for and 
that assurances be given that such discrimination will not re- 
cur. — Rabbinate decides on three days of " Prayer and Charity " 
on account of misery of Jews. Anti-Semites openly agitate for 
boycott against them, and urge closing of all business on Sundays. 
Priests, who trade with Jews, attacked. — 31. Following petition 
of leading Jews, Polish Council of State abolishes existing re- 
strictions respecting purchase of land by Jews. — Polish Council 
of State adopts resolution giving authorities power to open in 
existing schools separate classes for Jewish children, which shall 
be closed on Saturday, if a sufficient number of parents apply 
for such a privilege, and recognizing as private schools all Tal- 
mud Torahs and hedarim in which the teaching of Polish is to 



EVENTS IN 5678— POLAND 253 



be obligatory and in which instruction in all elementary secular 
subjects is to be given in Pplish. — September 14. Warsaw: Order 
of German authorities expelling from colleges and universities 
all students not natives of city affects large number of Jewish 
students. — 28. Warsaw Jewish Agricultural Society, Jewish So- 
ciety in Aid of Children, Jewish Society Supporting the Artisans' 
Schools, and the Organization " Daath " receive permit to organize 
a lottery for one million rubles ($500,000). — October 12. Kalish: 
Municipality rejects resolution of Jewish members providing for 
appointment of several Jewish officials capable of speaking Yid- 
dish and of dealing with Jewish people. — ^Warsaw: Orthodox and 
nationalist Jews protest against plan of assimilators to organize 
a reformed community. — 26. Poland and Lithuania: Jews of a 
townlet ordered to remove from three streets because commandant 
objected to meeting them on streets. In another townlet pom- 
mandant compels Jews to close their shops for three days 
for disobeying a restriction. — Jews imprisoned for failing to 
** subscribe " to the State Loan. Several are arrested and fined 
for being In way of German officers and not bowing to them. Jews 
and Jewesses abducted, not only for forced State labor, but often 
to supply men to assist officers in hunting or in other pleasures 
and games. — 28. Warsaw: Opening of the third Delegates' Con- 
ference of the Zionist Organization of Poland adopts resolution 
favoring recognition by forthcoming International Conference of 
right of Jews to create a Jewish national center in Palestine, and 
national autonomy for Jews in countries where they live in great 
numbers. Conference asks Central Committee to call Jewish 
congress in Poland. In a telegram. Conference thanks the Inner 
Action Committee of the Zionist organization for its work, 
and expresses confidence in its activity. — November 9. War- 
saw: Municipal Council refuses to approve plans for institution 
of Jewish schools. — 16. Bundist delegates on Municipal Council 
demand that Jewish elementary schools applying for municipal 
subsidy omit Jewish religious education and the study of 
Hebrew from curriculum. Aided by delegates of Right, Bundists 
defeat resolution of Zionists that arrangement of syllabus be 
referred to Jewish Communal Executive about to be established. — 
Twelve Jews appointed judges in various courts. — 23. Warsaw: 
Movement for Polish Jewish Congress for discussion of future 
of Jewry in Poland after the war. — December 14. Warsaw: 
Municipal authorities take over control of all bakeries, and 
decline to allow Jewish bakeries to close on Saturdays and 
work on Sundays. — 21. Warsaw: Fifty to seventy-five Jews 
brought daily to Jewish Hospital on verge of death from 
starvation. Most of them succumb. — 28. M. Kucharzewski, 
Polish Prime Minister, in interview with representative of 
Jewish press, states that he is not an anti-Semite; that 



254 AMERICAN JEWISH YEAR BOOK 

by mutual understanding Jews in Poland will receive equal 
rights; that the Home Secretary wojald accord the same rights 
and privileges to the Jewish as to the Polish press. — January 25. 
Warsaw: Fifth conference of Jewish Socialist Labor Party Poale- 
Zion. Resolutions adopted respecting Jewish municipal life and 
work of councillors in Polish municipal bodies. — Central Jewish 
Economic Bureau established by the Zionist Actions Committee 
for Poland to provide executives of Jewish congresses in America 
and Russia with material for economic restoration of Jewish 
population in Poland. — Febbuaby 8. Report from Zurich that, in 
an interview with Rabbis Lipshitz (of Kalish), Treistman (of 
Lodz), and Cahano (of Warsaw), the Polish Premier, Kucharzew- 
ski propiises to submit to the Political Department the rabbinical 
memorandum on anti-Semitic restrictions, still prevailing In 
Poland, and to satisfy the Jewish demands. — ^Mabch 8. Bobruisk: 
As a result of steps taken by pro-Jewish labor leaders, the ban 
against Jewish employees in the factories of the city is lifted. — 
22. Lodz: Municipality to maintain college for Jewish teachers; 
Hebrew to be the language of instruction for Jewish subjects, 
and Polish for other studies. — April 26. Warsaw: Three Jews 
elected members of State Council from among a total of fifty-two. 

II 

APPOINTMENTS, HONORS, AND ELECTIONS 

BoBOB, Raphael, Lemberg, elected to City Council, Apl., 1918. 
Dl^mond, Hebman, Lemberg, elected to City Council, Apl., 1918. 
Salamandba, David, Lemberg, elected to City Council, Apl., 1918. 

Ill 

NECROLOGY 
Pebetz, Eliezeb, mathematician, Warsaw, aged 46, Apl., 1918. 

ROUMANIA 

GENERAL EVENTS 

June 22. In cablegram to Jewish Morning Journal, Premier 
Bratiano states : " Our determination to give to Jews equal civil 
and political rights is unanimous and definitive. The king has 
pledged his royal word, and the Government, which represents 
the two political parties of this country, has made the same 
declaration in parliament. Technicalities of the Roumanian con- 
stitution oblige us to postpone the vote on this reform till after 



EVENTS IN 5678— RUSSIA 255 



the new elections which will take place only after the liberation of 
our territory." — 25. Jassy: M.' Jonescu states that ever since 
August, 1914, it had been decided to settle the Jewish question 
and place the Jews in Roumania on a footing of complete equality 
with their fellow-subjects. — 29. Yiddish conversation prohibited 
in the streets. Professor Jorga renews efforts against intended 
amelioration of position of Jews, and appeals to Russian troops 
not to interfere in internal Roumanian affairs. — August 10. 
Premier Bratiano, in conversation with M. Tisenhausen, delegate 
of Russian Council of Workmen and Soldiers, states that new con- 
dition in Russia is bound to bring emancipation of Roumanian 
Jews in near future, since fear of influx of Russian Jews on ac- 
count of persecution no longer exists. He advises, however, that 
no pressure be brought to bear upon Roumania from outside, as 
masses resent such pressure and regard it as a national insult. — 
December 14. Jassy: Government decides that all Jewish non- 
commissioned officers in the Roumanian army shall henceforth be 
regarded as citizens, with full political rights. As a result of the 
decision, two hundred Jews have been made second lieutenants. — 
Maboh 8. Press publishes the- statement by Jews, protesting 
against union of Bessarabia with Roumania and demanding that 
immediate granting of full equal rights to Jews in Roumania be 
included in peace conditions of Central Powers. — Apbil 5. Bucha- 
rest: In an interview with a delegation of the Comit6 Pro Causa 
Judacia, M. Misu, the new Minister for Foreign Affairs, promises 
his aid in bringing about the complete and immediate emancipa- 
tion of the Jews. — ^May. Peace treaty between Central Powers 
and Roumania provides, in Article XXVII, that Jews in Rou- 
mania shall be accorded " the same freedom and protection of the 
law and the authorities" as are enjoyed by persons of other 
religions. — 31. Bessarabia: Jewish community protests against 
anti-Jewish measures by the Roumanian commandant of Edinti. 

EUSSIA 
I 

GENERAL EVENTS 
Anti-Jewish Pbopaganda 

June 15. Tula, Penza, and Saratov: Real Russian leaders ar- 
rested for pogrom agitation. — Black Hundreds receiving large 
sums of money from secret sources for purpose of bribing popu- 
lace to create trouble for Jews. In this connection disappearance 
of Deputy Markoff causes anxiety to all friends of freedom. — 
Podolia and Tiraspol: Agitation of Black Hundreds appears to 

9 



256 AMERICAN JEWISH YEAR BOOK 



have been suppressed. — Black Hundreds create anti-Jewish feeling 
by desecrating churches and holy places. At Kiev their agent 
cut up the remains of Saint Pasia. Agitation against Jews fol- 
lowed, but local Administrative Committee traced act to hooligans 
and agitators, and arrest is made. — 22. Melinetz and Bokoutz 
(Bessarabia) : Peasants, stirred up by Real Russians, request 
Government to expel all Jews, but are informed such petitions 
are now illegal. — Conference of Army delegates adopts resolution 
against agitation by Black Hundreds. — Tcherkassi: Deputy 
Verkasin, reactionary priest, removes crosses from the church, 
and accuses Jews of the act. Impending outbreak causes Jews 
to close their shops. Militia exposes culprit, and restores order. — 
Odessa: Numerous reports of pogrom agitations. Incendiary circu- 
lars brought from Kharkov in great quantity. — Kiev: Black 
Hundreds plan massacre. Labor circles attempt organization for 
self-defence. — Tsaritsin: Black Hundreds and Cossacks plan 
massacre. Army prevents outbreak, and arrests ringleaders. — 
Ekateriooslav: Proclamations calling for massacre of Jews freely 
circulated; number of agitators arrested. — July 6. Onezki (near 
Kiev) : Conspiracy by Black Hundreds to fabricate ritual mur- 
der accusation laid bare. — ^Nizhni-Novgorod: Pogrom agitation 
assumes serious proportions. Eight ringleaders arrested. — Minsk, 
Tambov, Oof a, Malina, and Homel: Strong measures adopted by 
authorities to suppress pogrom agitation. At Homel militia dis- 
covers in houses of Black Hundreds lists of those marked as ob- 
jects of immediate attack. Priest Vitali, notorious Potchayev 
pogrom agitator, arrested. — 20. Minsk, Balta, and Kherson: 
Provincial organizations, including zemstvos, municipalities, 
committees of soldiers and workmen, town executives, etc., issue 
strong appeal to soldiers of first line troops to ignore all anti- 
Semitic incitement to attack Jews. — Bend6ry: M. Troshin, police 
commissary, dismissed for failing to protect the Jews during an 
attack. — Lausanne Committee on Aid of Prisoners of War, in reply 
to charge of Black Hundreds that Jewish prisoners of war in 
Germany ill-treated their Christian fellow-prisoners, reports that 
most cordial relations prevail, and all stories of Jewish oppression 
of Christians are without foundation. — Vitebsk: Anti-Jewish 
campaign by Black Hundreds; authorities issue appeal against 
anti-Semites. — 27. Nikolayev: As result of Black Hundred agita- 
tion, group of workmen employed by naval authorities sends 
protest against engagement of Jewish laborers by the Admiralty. 
Committee, asked by authorities whether petition represented 
views of workmen, convenes meeting which adopts vigorous pro- 
test against demands of the Black Hundreds. Workmen's Com- 
mittee asks authorities to ignore petition, and the anti-Jewish 
ringleaders are dismissed from Government employ. — August 3. 
Simferopol: New anti-Jewish league under name of "Red Glove" 



EVENTS IN 5678— RUSSIA 257 



incites populace to pogroms. Ukraine separation movement util- 
ized by Jew-baiters to stir up anti-Jewish feeling in Ukraine. At 
Kirsanov, Slutsk, Balta, and Zhitomir, preparations for pogroms 
discovered. At Odessa, Jews accused of molesting Christians 
going to church, and desecrating churches. — 10. Petrograd: Dr. 
Reuben Blank in telegram to Lucien Wolf, of London, states: 
" Extreme Russian reactionaries ally themselves with extreme 
revolutionaries, and Black Hundreds have entered into tacit 
coalition with the Lenine party. In the army the former agents 
and detectives of the political police carry on campaign for de- 
feat, and in the rear the former agents provocateurs prepare 
and direct endless troubles. In the press and proclamations 
they go so far as to throw upon the Jews entire responsibility 
for the war and for the obstacles in the way of a peace with 
Grermany." — Central Committee of Council of Workmen and 
Soldiers, learning of the revival of anti-Semitic activity, mainly 
in the north-western and south-western provinces, despatches 
fifteen delegates to the affected districts to counteract the agita- 
tion. — Simferopol : Headquarters of " Red Glove League " discov- 
ered; leaders, ex-police oflacials of the old regime, arrested. — 17. 
Moscow: Leninites proclaim Jews as a danger to the masses. — 
Petrograd: Anti-Semites among revolutionists, in demonstration 
against the Jews, tear up the banner of the " Bund." — ^Riga: Local 
police refuse to interfere in pogrom agitation. — Odessa: Battalion, 
ordered to the front, attempts anti-Jewish agitation; one ring- 
leader arrested. — Snezka (near Kiev): Blood accusation raised; 
agitators compel authorities to proceed with the inquiry, al- 
though medical examination fails to substantiate the libel. — 
Workmen and Soldiers' Committees and their organs call at- 
tention to the spreading anti-Jewish agitation of Black Hundreds, 
and appeal to revolutionary Russia to destroy the anti-Semitic 
plots. — Ekaterinburg: Jews accused of concealing food in ceme- 
tery. — Plot aiming at organization of pogroms in the Crimean pe- 
ninsula discovered. — 24. Petrograd: Public Prosecutor Kerinsky 
appeals to Government for promulgation of new law prohibiting 
anti-Jewish agitation. — 31. Novgorod- Vohlynsk and Chovol: Coun- 
cil of Workmen and Soldiers puts end to pogrom efforts. — Nizhni- 
Novgorod: Arrest of seven ringleaders in plot for anti-Jewish 
riots. — September 14. Petrograd: Arrest of ringleaders in plot 
organized by secret society " Holy Russia," which circulated 
a newspaper named Groza at the Front, mainly in the Rou- 
manian war zone and in the rear; paper contained attacks on 
the Jews and the Allies, urged an immediate peace, and declared 
the Jews responsible for the continuance of the war. — Petrograd: 
Anti-Jewish proclamation circulated demanding immediate ex- 
pulsion of Jews from Council of Workmen and Soldiers' Dele- 
gates. — 21. Petrograd: At meeting, anti-Jewish soldiers demand 



258 AMERICAN JEWISH YEAR BOOK 

that more Russian blood be put into the Council of Workmen and 
Soldiers, even if " with the aid of the Real Russian fisV'—Novoe 
Vremya prints imaginary interviews " with Jews in the street " 
who are alleged to clamor for the golden days under the Tsar.— 
Minskrat (Pavlovsk) : Pogrom proclamations circulated, accus- 
ing the Jews of attempting to assassinate Alexander Kerensky 
and overthrow the new regime. — Ekaterinoslav and Saratov: 
Organization discovered which had sent speakers and literature 
to various places for anti-Jewish and pro-monarchist agitation. — 
Zhitomir and Ovrutch: Peasants demand a Tsar instead of a 
" Jewish ministry." — Slutsk : Monastery closed because heads 
participated in reactionary and pogrom plots. — 28. Fastov: 
Blood accusation raised on occasion of detention by Jewish shop- 
keeper of peasant woman on charge of theft. — Retsitsa: Plot 
against Jews frustrated when Town Executive Committee dis- 
covers that hooligans had themselves hidden flour and arms which 
they accused the Jews of storing for the enemy. — Odessa: Vio- 
lent pogrom agitation; military hospitals, labor unions, and 
market affected by ill-feeling stirred up by priests. Jewesses em- 
ployed at post and telegraph offices resign as protest against the 
antagonistic attitude of colleagues. — October 5. Kharkov: At 
Railway Congress, speakers state that, in the Department of 
Ways and Communications, the same anti-Jewish prejudice is 
spreading as led to resignation of the Jewish employees at the 
Odessa postal and telegraph offices. — Bessarabia: Plots of German 
colonists and officials of old regime against Jews and the republic 
discovered. — Pavlovsk: After anti-Jewish disorders lasting sev- 
eral days, military authorities finally restore order. — 12. New re- 
actionary organization, " For the Tsar and Holy Russia," conducts 
vigorous anti-Jewish campaign; distributes millions of copies of 
circulars urging anti-Jowish uprisings. — 19. Tchernigov: Efforts to 
organize pogrom frustrated; Chtistian democratic elements send 
urgent appeal to the Government to replace local garrison with 
more reliable revolutionary troops. — Army commander circulates 
order against putting Jewish soldiers on guard, as they are un- 
trustworthy. Investigation by the Government instituted. — 22. 
Tambov: Pogrom lasting four days results in fifty casualties. — 
Tiraspol and Bend6ry: Pogroms raging. Seventy killed in 
Bend6ry alone. — 26. Kiev: Renewal of activity of Two-Headed 
Eagle Organization and of the Archangel Michael Union. In- 
vestigation reveals far-reaching conspiracy against Jews and the 
new regime. — November 2. Elizabethgrad : Libel that Jews hid 
food in cemetery widespread; a dozen graves are opened to prove 
the charge groundless. — Moscow: Windows of Great Synagogue 
broken by mob. — 16. Dvinsk: Black Hundreds attempt revival of 
blood accusation. — 30. Riga: Bolshevik soldiers' publication re- 
news accusation that Jews extended hearty welcome to the Ger- 



EVENTS IN 5678— RUSSIA 259 



mans on their entry. — December 7. Novogeorglevsk, Smolensk, 
and Orgeyev: Serious pogrom agitations. — Moghllev: Jewish 
community accused of having killed missing three-year-old boy 
for ritual purposes; when charge is disproved, Jews are ac- 
cused of storing food. — February 1. Ekaterinoslav: Stromenko, 
leader of the Bolshevik!, publicly threatens Jewish population 
because of its unfriendly attitude towards the Bolshevikl. — Petro- 
grad: At meeting of anti-Qolshevik soldiers, Jews are accused of 
the murder of General Dukhonln. — April 19. German Invaders 
remove Yiddish text from the Ukraine State Bank notes. 

ArrACKS on Jews 

June 22. Revel: Massacre of Jews. Number of Jewish houses 
burnt. — Sergeifskl (Tula) : Pogrom organized by police; troops 
sent to suppress it. — Borgoroditsk : Pogrom organized by police; 
troops sent to restore order. — Olrlopol: Pogrom in progress; 
police unable to stop it. Special deputation calls upon governor- 
general in Odessa, who telegraphs to Kharkov for military aid.— 
Bendery: Organized massacres take place; militia restores order. — 
Kishinev: Disorder prevails throughout whole province of Bessara- 
bia. — Talmas (Bessarabia) : Family of four women (head of family 
at battle-front) murdered. Police refuse to arrest the assassins; 
Jews, fearing further attacks, begin to leave the townlet; militia 
takes matter in hand. — Kiev: Jewish shop-keeper detains 
Christian girl on charge of stealing ribbon. Cries bring mob, 
which attempts to lynch Jew and pillage the shop. Militia re- 
stores order. — July 20. Krasnoyarsk: Pogrom plot, in which 
all houses of Jews are marked, frustrated by Committee of 
Soldiers and Workmen. Nevertheless, houses of Jews robbed 
and burned. — August 3. Petrograd: Anti-Jewish agitators incite 
mob to attack boot shop owned by a Jew named Markovitch, sus- 
pected of supplying boots abroad; five Jews seriously wounded by 
hooligans disguised as soldiers. — 10. Kosovo: Shops of Jews 
pillaged by company of mutineers of an Asiatic regiment. — 17. 
Pereyaslav: Mob threatens pogrom unless Chrustalev Nosar, 
anti-Semitic leader, is liberated from prison; Kiev militia re- 
quested to send re-inforcements. — Feodosia, Simferopol, Sebasto- 
pol, and Yalta: Anti- Jewish attacks planned to begin simultane- 
ously in these towns. — Tchita: A Jew named Gurevitch lynched 
when he urges mob to refrain from lynching several persons, 
believed to belong to a gang of thieves. — 31. Rostov: Anti- 
Jewish agitation leads to attack on Movshovitz, a Jewish wounded 
soldier. — ^Kalustch: Jewish townlet evacuated and destroyed. 
Jewish shops pillaged, and houses demolished. Many civilians 
killed. — September 7. Moscow: Serious anti-Jewish riots occur 
as result of fire at leather factory owned by Glnzburg. Mounted 
militia and leaders of the Council of Workmen and Soldiers' Dele- 



260 AMERICAN JEWISH YEAR BOOK 

gates summoned to disperse the mob. — Moscow: Conference of 
Jewish soldiers appoints committee of twelve to plan permanent 
soldiers' organization to combat anti-Semitism and protect the 
Jewish population from pogroms. — 21. Kutuzov (Volhynia) : 
Cossacks fire on mob to suppress anti-Jewish riot in which one 
Jew is killed. — 28. Odessa: Jewish Committee inquires into 
pogrom carried out by the deserters and vagabonds at 
Sholdoneshti. — Octobeb 12. Tsaritsin:^ Bankers and Trust Com- 
panies establish a company to sell insurance against casualties 
and losses resulting from pogroms. — Lubashevka (near Kher- 
son) : Peasant women attack Jewish shops and demand food at 
low prices. Shops are looted, and goods are taken by force. — 19. 
Petrograd and Moscow: Anti-Jewish rioting in suburbs in con- 
nection with shortage of supplies. Several Jews injured. At 
Moscow, mayor and members of Council of Workmen and Soldiers 
intervene, and issue vigorous pro-Jewish appeals to rioters. — 
Lugansk: Riots occur; several Jewish shops and houses looted 
and burnt before militia restores order. — 26. Kostroma: Anti- 
Jewish riot resulting from food conditions. Black Hundreds ac- 
cuse Jews of speculations. Hooligans loot many shops. — Poltava 
and Oryol: Similar attacks suppressed by militia and local or- 
ganizations. — Moghilev: Gates of many Jewish houses placarded 
with monarchist pogrom proclamations. — Saratov: Serious 
pogrom agitation among laborers on the Volga wharves. — 
Nikolayev: Pogrom activities reported. — Pereyaslavl (Poltava): 
Eight Jews killed and twenty wounded in an anti-Jewish out- 
break. — Roslavl (Smolensk) : Two Jews killed in attacks. — ^Novem- 
ber 2. Tambov, Belopolie, and Alexandrovsk : Grave food riots, 
accompanied by serious anti-Jewish disturbances. Black Hundreds 
accuse Jews of storing food, and loot houses and shops.-^9. Ooman 
(near Kiev) : Black Hundreds organize an anti- Jewish riot. — 
Kiev: Riot against Jewish tradespeople. — Kozlov: Many Jewish 
shops looted by Black Hundreds. — M. Ansky, Jewish writer, ap- 
peals to heads of Russian church to counteract widespread 
pogrom movement. — 16. Ekaterinoslav: Anti-Jewish riot; mob, led 
by experienced rioters, loots shops; militia finally restores 
order. — 23. Roslavl: Scarcity of leather results in wholesale at- 
tack on Jews and their property; eight killed, twenty wounded. 
Shops looted. — Bend6ry: Pogrom lasting five days results in loot- 
ing of houses and shops. — Kozlov and Tiraspol: Grave anti-Jewish 
riots. — Tambov: Pogrom leads to total ruin of businesses estab- 
lished by Jewish refugees from the war-zone. — Jewish leaders ask 
authorities to give oflBcial sanction to plan to arm Jewish self- 
defence corps. — 30. Bieltsi: Gang of two thousand of Bolshevikl 
troops, deserters, and Black Hundreds loots Jewish shops for 
three days. — Ostrog: Searches and looting carried on by similar 
gang. — Bend6ry, Kharkov, Staro-Sinava (Podolia), Bakhmut, and 



EVENTS IN 5678— RUSSIA 261 



Kiev: Pogroms aud looting result in casualties. — Leon Trotsky, 
in reply to deputation of Jews who ask his influence to arrest 
pogrom movement, states that as an Internationalist he sees no 
reason specially to defend the Jews. — December 7. Kostroma: Jews 
form self-defence corps. — Odessa.: General in command of garri- 
son announces that he would suppress attempts to attack Jews, 
but a large part of garrison openly declares its " neutrality " in 
the event of a pogrom. The Bolsheviki and Black Hundreds state 
they will disobey orders to disperse anti-Semitic rioters. — 
Belgorodsk, Skuria, and Rzev: Serious pogroms take place. — 
14. Soroki (Bessarabia) : Town Council of thirty-two members, 
including twenty-two Jews, unable to convene because hooligans 
threatened to attack any Council which numbers Jews among its 
members. — Voznesensk: Scene of grave rioting. Bolsheviki and 
Black Hundreds co-operate in looting shops and houses and as- 
saulting Jews. Thousands leave the town for neighboring 
places. — Slavita (Volhynia): Grave pogroms, during which 
Black gang, deserters, and Bolsheviki destroy houses and shops. 
Jews beaten and several Jewesses attacked. — 21. Priluki and 
Retsitsa: Property and houses of Jews suffer severely at hands 
of rioters. — ^Russian deserters, to excuse their retreat from Galicia, 
charge Jewish leaders at Czernowitz with betrayal of Russian 
confidence. — 28. Potchayev: Serious anti- Jewish rioting takes 
place. Deserters loot shops and houses. — Kherson: Deserters, led 
by Bolsheviki and Black Hundreds, loot the markets; many small 
traders lose all their possessions. — Leon Trotsky, in Council of 
Soldiers and Workmen Delegates, deals with demand for vigorous 
suppression of pogroms, and declares that he regards outbreaks 
as result of the despair of the masses, and is unwilling to give 
orders that the rioters be fired upon. — January 4. Odessa: Riot- 
ing against Jews occurs in some districts, and at Vinnitsa, 
Meyerovitch, a popular and rich Jewish merchant, is lynched by 
Bolsheviki soldiers on false accusation of stealing three rubles 
($1.50). — Zdolbunovo and Ruzin (near Kiev): Serious pogroms 
cause much damage to shops and houses. — Bend6ry: Second anti- 
Jewish riot within last few weeks. — Pogrebistche and Stavistche: 
Wrecked by pogroms. — Gluboki - (Wilna) : Deserters loot nearly 
all shops owned by Jews. — 11. Yampol: Deserters, led by a 
sailor, attack houses and shops of Jews, several of whom are 
killed. — Haisin (Podolia): Nearly all shops owned by Jews 
looted. — Litin (Podolia) and Ekaterinoslav: Anti-Jewish out- 
breaks occur. — 25. Bakhmut: M. Fleisher, mayor of the city, 
killed in the street by the Bolsheviki, because of his opposition to 
them. — ^Zhitomir: Entire Jewish family, in vicinity of town, 
murdered by rioters. — Petrograd: Red Guards arrest heads of 
authorized Jewish self-defence corps. — February 1. Ekaterino- 
slav: Jewish family of eight murdered by soldiers. — 8. Violent 



262 AMERICAN JEWISH YEIAR BOOK 



pogroms take place at Galitch (near Yaroslav), Edini (Bess- 
arabia), MakaroY (Kiev), Ribnitsa (Podolia), and Stolni 
(Minsk). — 15. Petrograd: Captain Tnimpeldor, formerly of 
British Zion Mule Corps, permitted by Bolsheviki Government to 
organize for self-defence a regiment of all Jewish soldiers in 
Petrograd district. Similar bodies organized at Kiev and 
Yuriev. — ^Baikamala (Jewish townlet in Bessarabia) set on fire 
and looted, and a number of Jewish inhabitants killed by desert- 
ers from Roumanian front — ^Mabch 1. Many Jewish families are 
victims of recent pogroms in Zikovka (Podolia), Penza, and 
Domashevitch. — Following repeated pogroms in the province, 
Bessarabian Jewish communities organize self-defence militia. — 
April 5. Rostov: Many wealthy Jews turn over to authorities 
threatening letters from a band of anarchists, demanding money; 
authorities appoint a committee to adopt measures for protection 
of terrorized Jews. — Stryzow (Galicia) : Following a violent anti- 
Jewish sermon by a priest, Jewish houses are attacked and looted 
by the mob. — 12. Petrograd: M. Greenbaum, the well-known 
Zionist leader and editor of the Petrograd Togblatt, was tried 
and acquitted by the Revolutionary Tribunal, on charge of printing 
advertisements of articles on which the Bolsheviki Grovernment 
has a monopoly. Farther publication of the Petrograd Togblatt, 
however, has been prohibited. — M. Kreinin, president of the 
committee in charge of arrangements of the Russo-Jewish 
Congress, has been imprisoned by the Government — Zionist 
deputies of Rada take exception to Mr. Silberfarb's declaration 
that Rada should approve or amend any bills relating to Jews 
before being submitted to a congress of Jews. They argue that 
recent communal elections showed that views on national ques- 
tions held by masses are not identical with those held by their 
representatives in Rada and the Jewish department. — 19. Vio- 
lent pogroms occur at Glukhov, Sebastopol, Simferopol, and 
Khokand. — ^Violent massacres occurring at Stry, Przemysl, and 
Kronmlk are attributed to the activities of a " Black Hand " 
organization operating also on the Przemysl-Mszana railway. — 
Derazhua (Podolia) : Violent anti- Jewish pogrom conducted 
by Ukrainian militia. — Lithuania: Despite all their efforts in 
that direction, the Jews are not yet permitted to obtain 
representation in the Lithuanian Diet or even organize a 
conference for the discussion of their position and status 
as one of Lithuania's nationalities. — The Central Rada hav- 
ing formally consented to the convening of a Jewish congress 
for the purpose of organizing a self-defence corps, the congress 
opened, but, civil war having broken out, was dissolved. A dele- 
gation, headed by Mr. Vogel, called on the commandant at Kiev, to 
find out the cause of dissolution. Mr. Vogel, however, was thrown 
into prison, and shot the following day. Incensed by such be- 



EVENTS IN 5678— RUSSIA 263 



havior, the Jewish members of the Rada left the sitting, and Mr. 
Silberfarb, secretary of the State for Jewish Affairs, resigned. — 
May 3. Petrograd: Central Committee of the "Bund" summons 
all its members to unite with Jewish factions in organization of 
self-defence bodies against pogroms. — Kishinev: Jewish self- 
defence corps suppressed, and seventy-three of its members, in- 
cluding their leader, arrested. — 5. Savran (Podolia) : Jewish 
Self-Defence Company overpowered by anti-Semitic gang which 
plunders all shops and houses of Jews and burns half the townlet. — 
10. Petrograd: Herman Bernstein cables New York Herald that 
a horrible wave of pogroms is spreading over Russia, and that the 
Bolshevist Council has adopted resolution protesting against these 
outbreaks. 

Gbowth of Pbo-Jewish Sentiment 

June 8. M. Margolin, a prominent Jewish lawyer, re-instated in 
legal profession, as result of revision of the Beilis case. Rud- 
zinsky, accomplice of Tcheberakova, arrested. — 22- Galicia and 
Bukowina: M. Ansky, a Jewish writer, submits to Premier Lvov 
memorial describing plight of Jews under officials of the old 
regime. Provisional Government appoints M. Etoroshenko ad- 
ministrator, and M. Trepov, former governor-general, is dismissed 
in disgrace. — July 6. Minister of Education invites Council of 
Jewish Education Society to send a permanent representative to 
participate In deliberations of Council of the Ministry. — Minister 
of War receives recommendations from many Russian generals 
who send in lists of Jewish men entitled to be officers. Two 
thousand six hundred appointments to be made. — 8. Petrograd: 
Council of Workmen and Soldiers Deputies adopts resolution de- 
claring that anti-Semitic agitation has served as a weapon of 
reactionaries, and in the war has led to the Jews distrest; 
that counter-revolutionists are seeking to divert attention of 
the ignorant and superstitious from the real causes of Russian 
crisis, and to furnish them with an opportunity to release 
the elements of dissatisfaction and unrest through anti-Jewish 
propaganda; that this anti-Semitic agitation is a grave danger 
for the Jewish people and the entire Russian revolution, which 
may be stained with racial bloodshed; that the interests of 
the masses and the honor of the revolution demand that the 
entire revolutionary democracy combat energetically every at- 
tempt at anti-Jewish agitation; that all local consuls be requested 
to watch the activities of anti-Semitic groups and agitators and 
to conduct an increasing educational campaign to counteract anti- 
Semitic agitation; and that the Central Committee is instructed 
to publish the necessary literature on the Jewish question. Reso- 
lution concludes with brotherly greeting to the Jewish working 



264 AMERICAN JEWISH YEAR BOOK 



people in the revolutionary ranks, and the assurance that the 
whole organized revolutionary democracy of Russia will defend 
Yanushkevitch willfully sought to cover his mistakes during re- 
them with their lives. — 13. Kishinev: President of the executive 
of the province, M. Szinsky, in greeting Jewish deputation, led 
by Dr. Kohan-Bernstein, asks the Jews to forget and forgive all 
past insults, sufferings, and libels. — 27. Department of Justice, 
with consent of Department of War, liberates about five thousand 
Jews in Siberia. — Government appoints committee to establish 
responsibility for expulsions, on account of charge that (General 
treat through Poland by throwing blame on the Jews and expelling 
them from the war-zone. — August 3. Dr. Lander appointed Ad- 
viser on Jewish Affairs to M. Doroshenko, Russian Chief Com- 
missioner for Galicia and Bukowina. Russian Minister decides to 
establish a committee to inquire into the misdeeds of the old 
regime in Galicia. Two Jews, Ginzburg and Zaidman, will be on 
the committee. — September 14. Government issues decree grant- 
ing to rabbis the same rights as are accorded by the military 
laws to priests. — 21. The Den and other papers show falsehood 
of charge that the terms " Jew " and " maximalist " are 
synonymous and that the Revolution is merely a Jewish intrigue. — 
Moscow: Utro Rossiy, organ of merchants, advises authorities 
to protect the Jews and to forbid searches for food in Jewish 
houses, which are being carried on in Moscow, Balta, Kiev, and 
other places. — Octobeb 5. Petrograd and Moscow: Municipalir 
ties issue strong appeals to the population to resist the pogrom 
movements and to regard Jews as brethren. Similar manifesto 
issued by the Ukraine Central Council against work of the Kiev 
Black Hundreds. — 26. Tambov: Municipality decides that Jews 
who observe Saturday as Sabbath cannot be compelled to abstain 
from trading on Sunday. — November 9. Kiev: Jewish ofllcers 
publicly cheered at theatre. — December 14. Kharkov: In response 
to appeal of rabbis, commander of the troops posts guards at Jew- 
ish burial-ground to prevent Bolsheviki and deserters from 
molesting funerals on pretext that Jews bury hidden stores. — 
Tchetchersk (Moghilev): Peasants of the district, in dividing 
pasture-ground, allot land to Jews possessing cattle, with proviso 
that Jews work on the land themselves and do not hire labor. — 
Jewish communal leaders in many towns appeal to educational 
authorities to excuse Jewish pupils from writing on Saturday, 
when secondary schools are open. — January 18. Odessa: Faculty 
of university rejects three Jewish candidates for professionsd 
posts. Municipal council adopts resolution condemning action 
and expressing sympathy with rejected candidates. — 25. Bendery: 
Municipality intervenes in favor of Jewish students enrolled by 
the heads of local Railway Institute, who were refused admittance 
by the other students. — February 22. Petrograd: In response to 



EVENTS IN 5678— RUSSIA 265 



request for the exclusion of Jews from the executive of the Peas- 
ants' Congress, the president, Mme. Marie Spiridonova, denounces 
the anti-Semitic group, and appeals to the peasants to abstain 
from anti-Jewish propaganda and participation in pogroms. — 
March 15. Pereyaslav: As result of pressure by leaders of demo- 
cratic and pro-Jewish elements, the anti-Jewish dictator, Chrusta- 
lev Nosar, is dismissed. — 22. Poland: Professor Dickstein and M. 
Eiger interview the Polish Premier, and request him to protect 
the Jewish patients in hospitals, who are unfairly compelled to 
pay for their maintenance, although they, like other citizens, are 
individually taxed for the maintenance of the hospitals. The 
Premier expresses his sympathy with these demands. — Minister 
of Education, in response to demands of representatives of Jewish 
bodies, permits opening of training colleges for Jewish teach- 
ers, cost of specific Jewish education to be borne by Jews, while 
the State is to defray cost of secular education. 

Jews in Political Life 

July 20. Petrograd: Thirty-one Jews (including M. Vinaver, 
M. Sliosberg, Leo Deitch, and Madame Gurevitch) successful at 
municipal elections. — 27. Union of Jewish People in Russia 
formed. Jews to be taught how to participate in the elections. — 
August 17. Petrograd: Twenty-six Jews selected to sit on the 
Central Municipality. Ukraina leaders propose to give to the 
Jews from eight to ten seats on the Central Committee, which 
will deal with the affairs of Ukraina and which will number one 
hundred members. — Kiev: Union of Polish Jews established to 
assist Poles in the creation of a unified Poland, governed on a 
democratic basis and ready to accord to Jews full equality and 
national rights. — 24. Moscow: Municipality elects twenty Jews, 
including Ossip Minor, chairman of the municipality. — 31. Jews 
elected at municipal elections in Poltava, Retsitsa, Slutsk, Tambov, 
and Astrakhan. — September 14. In municipal elections, twelve 
Jews returned at Homel, six at Kharkov, three at Feodosia, two 
at Krasnoyarsk, one at Rostov, and one at Batum. — Kiev: 
Polish Jewish Federation organized with following scope: 1) 
Union of all three parts of Poland under one politically independ- 
ent kingdom; 2) Institution of a Democratic Government in Po- 
land; 3) Work for full civil rights of Polish Jewry; 4) To defend 
the national rights of Polish Jews on the basis of the principle 
that every nation has a right to its own self-determination. — 
Ukraina Central Council to consist of fifty-seven members, five 
to be Jews. — 21. In municipal elections, fifteen Jews successful 
at Romni, twenty-five at Elizabethgrad, nine at Kherson, four at 
Nizhni-Novgorood, five at Penza, five at Kursk, eight at Saratov, 
four at Voronez, four at Orel, two each in Novorossiysk, 



266 AMERICAN JEWISH YEAR BOOK 



Yaroslavl, Tsaritsin, Vologada, and Borisoglebsk, and one each in 
Sebastopol, Rzev, Simferopol, and Mzensk. — Moscow: Thirty 
Jewish Municipal Councillors receive seats on all important com- 
mittees. — Mzaisk (near Moscow) : Socialist proclamations 
clamor for dismissal of Alexander Kerensky's Government de- 
nounced as " merely a tool in the hands of the Kaiser and the 
Rothschilds." Mob called upon to do away with " Jewish rule." — 
October 5. Moscow: Conference of the orthodox organization, 
" Freedom and Tradition," favors eight-hour work day and the 
right to strike. It approves principle of freedom of conscience, 
and deals with schemes of religious education for girls. Resolu- 
tion satisfying all sections adopted on the Palestinian question, 
and schemes for settling Jews on the land, as well as relating to 
communal organization, are considered. — 12. Odessa: Fourteen 
Jews, returned at municipal elections, to defend the Jewish cause 
directly; Bund secures eight more. Together with the total num- 
ber of Jews elected on the ticket of the other parties, Jews com- 
mand about one-third of the voting strength of the Council. The 
revised list shows: Homel, thirty-seven, including ten Zionists; 
Slutsk, nineteen. Including seven Zionists; Zhitomir, twelve; 
Krementchug, fourteen; Tchernigov, eleven; Poltava, eight; 
Veliz, eight; Mosir, five, including two Zionists; Alexandrovsk, 
ten; Kiev, eight; Kertch, four; Tambov, three; Uman, five; Tifiis, 
four; Tula, three; Starikrim, Tashkent, Revel, and Walki, one 
in each town elected. — ^November 2. Minsk: Twenty-six Jews sent 
to the municipality, including five Zionists and ten Bundists. — 
In municipal elections, twenty-two Jews elected at Moghilev; 
twenty-five at Nikolayev; sixteen at Priluki; nineteen at Rogat- 
chev; thirty-nine at Zhitomir, including fourteen Zionists; nine- 
teen at Ekaterinoslav, including nine Zionists; thirty-two at 
Klherson; twelve (all Zionists) at Kishinev. — December 7. Mos- 
cow: Jewish Communal Council elects nineteen Zionists, six 
Progressives, seven Orthodox representatives, five United Demo- 
crats, five Bundists, and three United Socialists. — 21. Petrograd: 
Bolsheviki arrest Pincus Ruttenberg, assistant commander of 
the Forces, to which office he was appointed by ex-Premier Keren- 
sky. — 28. Petrograd: M. Goldstein, leader of the Jewish People's 
Party, declares against Bolshevikism. — Odessa: Jewish Confer- 
ence decides to sever relations with internationalists of Jewish 
origin. — January 25. Petrograd: In the rural zemstvo elections, 
Jews elected as follows: Moghilev, one; Belinitzi, six (two Zion- 
ists) ; Alexandrinskoe (Kherson), one; Malaya Viska, two (both 
Zionists); Ladizin (Podolia), seven (five Zionists). — Bakhmut: 
Arrest, by the Bolsheviki, of Messrs. Vinaver and Gotz, and other 
Jewish leaders. — February 1. Petrograd: Red Guards and 
soldiers seal the stores of the Jewish Charitable Kitchen, because 



EVENTS IN 5678— RUSSIA 267 

an appeal by Vinaver that Jews vote for Cadet candidates for the 
constituent assembly is found on the premises. — Petrograd: A 
Jewish Bolsheviki daily appears. — 8. Revolutionary Committee at 
Polotsk releases M. Yoffe, justice of the peace, arrested by the 
Bolsheviki, because of his opposition to their methods, and driven 
together with criminals from prison to prison. — Of the members 
of the oflBcers* training corps who took part in defence of Pro- 
visional Government at Winter Palace against Lenine and Trotsky, 
50 per cent were Jews. Of these, thirty-five were killed. — Mabch 1. 
Krementchug: Left Socialist municipality rejects petition of 
Jewish delegation to restore a few synagogues at present occupied 
by revolutionary troops. 

Legislation 

June 29. Government is preparing Freedom of Conscience Law 
permitting citizens to change their faith without hindrance. 
Many converted Jews eagerly await measure, to return to Juda- 
ism. — ^November 2. Bokhara: Provisional Government recognizes 
Jews as Russian citizens, no longer subject to local alien laws. — 
Mabch 15. Replying to interpellation of Poale-Zionists on atti- 
tude of Government toward the persecution of Jews in Bessarabia 
and their position in Roumania, the Secretary of State for For- 
eign Affairs of the Ukraine Rada declines to lend himself to 
any course of action. — ^Apbil 5. Petrograd: Congress of Soviets 
adopts resolution granting self-determination only to such nation- 
alities as possess territories, and rejecting "personal autonomy" 
schemes for nationalities outside their territories. The resolu- 
tion is specially aimed at Jews desiring "national" rig:hts in 
Russia. 

Relief of Was Sufferebs 

August 3. Austrian Jewish prisoners of war in the distant 
provinces of Russia petition Government to accord to them the 
same privileges as are allowed to all Poles and Austrian Slavs 
who are prisoners of war, namely, the right to move from one 
town to another and to trade and work. Same privileges claimed 
by the Jewish Committee in aid of sufferers of war on behalf of 
the Galician civilian Jewish exiles who had been transported 
to Russia by late Grovernment from districts now occupied by 
the enemy. Efforts made also through Danish Government to 
arrange, if possible, for return of a large number of these 
exiles to Austria via Sweden. — 10. Odessa: Zionists send three 
hundred thousand rubles ($150,000) for relief of Jews in Pales- 
tine. — Septembeb 21. Moscow: Polish and Lithuanian Jews of the 
district collect sum of five hundred and twenty-five thousand 
rubles ($262,500), which Government permits them to transmit 
to the Russian minister at Stockholm for distribution among the 



268 AMERICAN JEWISH YEAR BOOK 



suffering Jews in the invaded provinces of Russia. — Octobeb 26. 
Government informs Relief Committee that, in view of unfavor- 
able financial position of the country, it cannot increase grants 
for refugees. Jewish leaders propose to divert to Siberia the 
stream of refugees from newly-threatened districts and to provide 
work for them. — December 14. Russia agrees to repatriate many 
Galician citizens, mostly Jews, arrested In Galicia by the oflacials 
of the old Russian regime and exiled to Siberia. 

Finland 

July 6. Jewish Emancipation Bill, with full approval of Russian 
Government, now in hands of Diet. To all Russian demands to 
hasten passage of the Bill the reply is made: " Your old regime 
taught us to hate Jews, and now we can only gradually train 
the masses to appreciate the J3lnancipation Bill." — 13. Finnish 
Diet submits Jewish Emancipation Bill to consideration of the 
Parliamentary Legislative Committee; during debate on bill 
anti-Semitic Old-Finnish Party delegates attack Jewish method 
of slaughtering. — 20. Olila: Governor prohibits issuing of bread 
tickets to Jews who are unable to satisfy authorities as to their 
right to reside there. Russian Government protests. — Anti- 
Semites, fearing removal of ban against Jewish method of 
slaughtering, circulate pamphlets elaborating on brutality of the 
"Jewish method." — August 3. Jewish Emancipation Bill passes 
second reading in Diet. — 17. Viborg: During municipal election, 
Leninites agitate against Jews, and accuse Council of Workmen 
and Soldiers' Delegates and Labor Ministers of having accepted 
bribes from them. — September 14. Reported that Jewish Emanci- 
pation Bill, though passed the Diet, will not come into force. 
Finnish Senate declares its intention to place the bill on the 
Statute Books. — December 21. Attempts made to prevent the Jew- 
ish Emancipation Bill, which has passed the Finnish Diet, from 
becoming a law. Leaders of the Revolution in Finland object to 
the sanction of Russia, and anti-Semites succeed in allowing bill 
to be suspended until the Diet and Senate agree on another method 
of dealing with the question. — February 8. Commission dealing 
with constitution of new republic approves Jewish Emancipation 
Bill adopted by the Diet some time ago. — 15. Bill granting full 
civil and political rights to Jews becomes a law. 



Ukraine 

December 28. M. Silberfarb, Minister of Jewish Affairs for the 
Ukraine Republic, announces abolition of office of crown rabbi. — 
January 4. Bill passed by the Rada which recognizes the Jewish 
people as a national unit in Ukraine. — The Ukraine Rada issues 
paper money bearing Inscriptions In Yiddish, Polish, and 



EVENTS IN 5678— RUSSIA 269 



Russian. — The Ukraine Rada resolves to frame a new law on 
Jewish communal organization in conformity with the interests 
of Jews. The executive has opened a department to deal with 
Jewish educational problems. — 25. The Ukraine Rada adopts reso- 
lution welcoming the British declaration. Mr. Vinitchenko, Min- 
ister for Foreign Affairs, expresses his joy at the event. — Februaby 
13. Recruiting oflacials instructed to discontinue recruiting 
Russian subjects under the Anglo-Russian Military Service Con- 
vention. 

MiSCEIXANEOUS. 

June 8. Petrograd: At conference of Lithuanian Jews, four 
Jews, headed by Deputy Friedman, are elected to the Council, 
although delegates representing refugees from Wilna oppose the 
participation of Jews at this time. — ^Rostov-on-the-Don : Five 
million rubles ($2,500,000) raised by Jews for war loan. — Odessa: 
Eighteen million rubles ($9,000,000) raised by Jews for war loan 
during first few days. — Kiev: Firm of Brodsky subscribes one 
millioh rubles (500,000) to war loan. — 15. Kharkov: M. Koffman, 
a Jewish student, beaten for publicly questioning Archbishop 
Anthony's loyalty to the new regime. Archbishop finally appeals 
to his followers to abstain from embittering feeling in the town 
still further and not to commit acts of violence. — 22. Reported 
that many Jewish students obtain commissions in the guards' 
regiments. — 29. Petrograd: Seventy Jews raise about twelve 
million rubles for Russian war loan. — Nizhni-Novgorod: Three 
million rubles subscribed by Jews to war loan. — Astrakhan : Three 
million five hundred thousand rubles subscribed by Jews to war 
loan. — Moscow: Thirty million rubles subscribed by Jews to v/ar 
loan. — July. Petrograd: Organization of Jewish women gathers 
funds for sending comforts to soldiers. Sixty thousand rubles 
($30,000) raised in two weeks. — 6. Inquiries on foot into acts of 
old regime tending to injure interests of the Jews. Proceedings 
instituted against a former governor, M. Gololubov, for organizing 
a pogrom against the Jews last year and for introducing a cam- 
paign of hatred against them among a population well disposed 
toward them. — Odessa: Case disclosed of Motel Isher, a Jew, 
tortured to death at a local police station in 1911 during regime of 
Tolmatchev, with knowledge of Minister of Justice, M. Tcheglo- 
vitov. — Case of murder of Stolypin, in connection with which 
libels were hurled at the Jews, re-opened. Responsibility being 
traced to the old secret police department, with General Kurlov, 
the Jew-baiter, at its head. — In connection with Beilis case 
inquiry, discovered that old police paid two thousand five hundred 
rubles ($1250) to M. Kamislovsky for conducting case against the 
defendant, and four thousand rubles ($2000) to the anti-Beilis 



270 AMERICAN JEWISH YEAR BOOK 



expert, M. Kosorotov. The Shulgin case, and a number of others 
in connection with the ritual murder trial, re-opened, and all 
banished officials and pro-Beilis witnesses re-called and xe- 
examined. — Over two hundred converted Jews residing in the 
two capitals formally give notification of their desire to return 
to the Jewish faith. — 20. Letts issue proclamation demanding 
autonomous government for themselves. Equal political and civil 
rights are promised to the Jews. — August 10. Petrograd: Agree- 
ment concluded by the Community with the Food Supply Com- 
mittee for an adequate supply of Kosher meat, to be sold on 
the ticket system in three shops situated in various districts. — 
24. Petrograd: The society providing hygienic houses for 
Jews bought war loan bonds amounting to one hundred and 
seventy-five thousand rubles ($87,500) ; Petrograd Jewish Com- 
munal Organization subscribes one hundred and twenty-five 
thousand rubles ($62,500). — Petrograd: M. A. Oiinsburg sub- 
scribes one million rubles ($500,000) to war loan. — Septembeb 7. 
New Government releases Dmitri Rubenstein, banker, imprisoned 
on charge of treason. — 14. Olefsk (Volhynia) completely burned 
down, four hundred houses being destroyed. Damage totals one 
and one-half million rubles ($750,000). Hundreds of families 
homeless. — October 12. Petrograd: Bund adopts resolution dis- 
approving of observance of Sabbath by Jewish workmen, in cases 
where development of industry would be adversely affected by 
two rest-days a week. — 26. Central Executive Committee of the 
Russian Councils of Workmen's and Soldiers' Delegates draws 
up a number of instructions for its delegates to the Inter-Allied 
Conference in Paris. One of these instructions relates to Rou- 
mania, and is in the following terms: " Roumania is to be re- 
stored within her old frontiers. She is to give a promise to grant 
autonomy to the Dobrudja, and solemnly to promise to put into 
immediate execution Article 3 of the Treaty of Berlin, dealing 
with the equality of Jews." — November 9. Full rights restored to 
Phineas Dashevsky, who was deprived of civil rights in conse- 
quence of sentence of imprisonment for attempted assassination 
of the late M. Krushevan, of Kishinev. — December 7. Petrograd: 
Deputation of Turkestan Jews draws attention of Government to 
anomalous position of the Bokhara Jews, who are subjects of no 
state since the conquest of Turkestan by Russia. Government 
orders the immediate recognition of all Jews of Turkestan, who 
are not subjects of other states, as Russian citizens. — December 
21. Petrograd: Arrest of Senator Vinaver by Bolsheviki Govern- 
ment reported. — February 1. Petrograd: Release of Jewish 
leader, M. Bramson, who, together with other members of Elec- 
toral Committee, of which he was vice-president, was arrested 
by the Bolsheviki Grovernment 



EVENTS IN 5678— RUSSIA 271 

II 

Jewish Communal Life 

June 5. Ekaterinoslav : First Congress of Jewish Colonists. — 
8. Kiev: Conference of three hundred and sixty-nine Jewish dele- 
gates from eight provinces in Ukraine, with population of over 
two million Jews. By majority of three hundred and thirty 
the conference decided to convene a preliminary conference which 
shall consider the inclusion, in the program of an All-Russian 
Conference, of the demand, at the peace congress, for national 
civic rights for Jews in all countries, especially Roumania, and 
an autonomous center in Palestine. — 22. Krementchug and 
Krukov: Overflow of Dnieper causes floods. Fifty thousand houses 
affected, of which one thousand five hundred were completely 
wrecked. Many lives lost, and damage amounts to eight million 
rubles. — Orsha, Ekaterinoslav, Minsk, and Novo-Orgievsk : Hun- 
dreds of houses damaged by floods. — 29. Council of the Jewish 
Polytechnic decides to remove the institution from Ekaterinoslav 
to Petrograd toward the end of the current year, and to open a 
Philosophical Faculty. — Kherson: Conference of representatives 
of the Jewish colonies in the south of Russia, representing 
eighteen colonies. MM. Lubarsky and Vaiman elected delegates 
to the district zemstvo council, the first Jews to participate in the 
deliberations of zemstvos. Decided to establish new administra- 
tive bodies for the colonies as well as new Jewish communal 
organizations. Decided to place at disposal of the army supplies 
to the largest extent possible, to prepare for the elections to the 
Constituent Assembly, to publish an agricultural organ, to organ- 
ize educational institutions, and to participate in the All-Russian 
Jewish Congress. Conference resolves that until meeting of the 
Constituent Assembly no changes shall be made in the owner- 
ship of land in the colonies. — Kiev : Conference of Jewish delegates 
from the southern provinces of Russia, Kiev, Volhynia, Podolia, 
Tchernigov, Ekaterinoslav, Poltava, Kharkov, and Kherson, on 
situation created by the change of regime, resolves to assist the 
Government with all the means at the disposal of Russian Jewry 
*' to prosecute the war in union with the Allies," and to support 
the formula of a peace without annexation and indemnities, and 
of a settlement securing the right for every nation to determine 
its future in a League of Nations. — July 6. Petrograd: First 
Congress of Zionists of all Russia decides in favor of a plebiscite 
of all Jews on question of Palestine. Result of such a referendum, 
it was held, should serve as a basis upon which a future congress 
could work in peace time, when the question of the creation of 
a center for Hebrew culture in Palestine must be raised. — Petro- 
grad: Zionist Conference, first in history of Zionist movement in 



272 AMERICAN JEWISH YEAR BOOK 

Russia to meet unmolested. Representatives of a Jewish de- 
mocracy assured the conference that the masses would respond 
in a Zionist spirit to the referendum on the question of a Jewish 
center in Palestine, decided upon on recommendation of M. 
Ussischkin, who also demanded of the Powers that Jewish rep- 
resentatives should be invited to the peace conference. — Petrograd: 
Union of Jewish communities organized with object to support 
the Government and to demand cultural national rights on the 
principle of recognition of the community as the unit of national 
autonomy. — Moscow: Rabbinical Union, headed by Rabbi Nurok, 
of Mittau, established. — ^Ekaterinoslav: High School established 
to provide teachers for the modern Jewish national schools. — 
Kiev: Jewish National Gymnasium opened. — 13. Grozni: Con- 
ference of Jews of Caucasus province adopts resolutions favoring 
measures tending to improve their economic and social life; also 
resolution of loyalty to the Provisional Government with petition 
to recognize their national rights. — Samarcand: Meeting of five 
thousand Jews adopts resolution in favor of discussing the Pales- 
tine question at the Russian Jewish Congress. — 20. Petrograd: 
All-Russian Zionist Conference debates whether religious matters 
should be separated from general communal affairs and be en- 
trusted to a distinct and self-governing body. Majority sided with 
rabbis, who opposed idea of separation. Conference discusses 
schemes of settling war refugees and Galician and Polish Jews 
in Palestine after the war; it proclaims that Jews in Russia formed 
one nationality claiming equality, freedom of conscience, facili- 
ties to rest on Saturdays, guarantees for the Jewish minorities in 
various districts, municipal rights, autonomy, and self-adminis- 
tration in purely Jewish schools. Moscow chosen as Zionist 
cultural center. Conference decides to co-operate with other 
nationalities in Russia in demands for national rights. — Failure 
to agree on program of Russian Jewish Congress causes decision 
to convene a special representative conference, and entrust it, in- 
stead of small committee now in charge of question, with task 
of fixing the program of the congress. — August 3. Kiev: Joint 
meeting of ITO (Jewish Territorial Organization) and Jewish 
Emigration Society. Deliberations mainly on questions of terri- 
torial autonomy and individual emancipation of the Jews, as well 
as on the emigration problem after the war and methods of 
concentrating it in a particular locality. ITO leaders decline to 
bind the organization to any particular Jewish party, and declare 
it would remain a non-party organization. — 10. Petrograd: Con- 
ference of Jewish Teachers in Russia decides to establish a Union 
of Jewish Teachers to be affiliated with the Union of All-Russian 
Teachers and to instruct M. Fialkotf, the Jewish representative 
on the Ministerial Education Committee, to urge abolition of re- 
maining restrictions discriminating against Jewish teachers. Dis- 




EVENTS IN 5678— RUSSIA 273 



cussion brings out fact that one hundred and forty-nine thousand 
Jewish children are receiving instruction in hedarim. — Moscow: 
Conference of the forty branches of the Orthodox League Hofesh 
U'Masorah (" Freedom and Tradition ") to form a union of all or- 
thodox Jewish societies in Russia. — 17. Nezah Yisrael established 
for preservation and spread of Jewish culture. — ^Reported that 
thirteen new Jewish periodicals have been founded since over- 
throw of old regime. They are: 'Volksl)latt; Dos Yolk; hoAm; 
ha-Dor; ha-8hUoah; Darkenu; 8hevilim; Zeire Israel; Yevreiskaja 
Mysl; Zeire Zion; On Guard; Young Judea and Tehiah. — ^Petro- 
grad: Russian Zionists purchase library of late Baron Giinzburg 
for half a million rubles, to be placed in Jerusalem after the war. 
Baroness G-unzburg and the Zlatopolsky-Persitz family contribute 
one hundred thousand rubles each. — 24. Petrograd: M. Lesin gives 
one hundred and forty thousand rubles ($70,000) to crown rabbi, 
Dr. Eiisenstadt, for Jewish cultural and educational purposes. — • 
Odessa: Conference of Hebrew teachers on Hebrew education to 
counteract propaganda for Yiddish as national language. — Septem- 
ber 14. Petrograd: Protests against position of the Bund in de- 
manding cultural autonomy, but opposing claims of nationalist 
Jewry. — 21. Petrograd: Scope of the Russian Jewish Congress 
agreed upon by a representative conference. Decided that situa- 
tion of the Jews in Poland, Roumania, and Palestine should 
be discussed; Zionists giving up their claim for a special and 
distinct place for Palestine on the agenda. Other matters will 
be national self-administration of the Jews in Russia, guarantees 
of the rights of the Jewish national minority in Russia, and 
communal organization. — Petrograd: First conference of the 
Zionist Caucasian district groups takes place. A number of 
resolutions are passed regarding the carrying out of active, 
national-educational work among the Je^s in the Caucasus. — 
October 5. Movement on foot in certain Jewish quarters to secure 
settlement of Jews in large numbers on land in new Jewish colo- 
nies. Jewish Colonization Association convenes conference of 
Jewish colonists and of those interested in promotion of agri- 
cultural work among Jews, to consider future of the Jewish colo- 
nies in Russia and possibilities presented for development of 
agricultural work among Jews under the new regime. — 26. 
Krivoirog: Jewish community appeals to Premier to permit it to 
name the first new Jewish gymnasium in the town the " Kerensky 
Gymnasium." — Vitebsk: Jewish hospital, in existence for sixty 
years, closed for lack of funds. — November 16. Odessa: College 
for Jewish music and hazzanuth organized. — 26. Petrograd: Cen- 
tral Zionist Committee of Russia presents address to Sir Robert 
Buchanan, British ambassador, conveying thanks of the Russian 



274 AMERICAN JEWISH YEAR BOOK 



Zionists for the British declaration. — December 14. Odessa: Jew- 
ish holiday proclaimed and many businesses closed in honor of 
British declaration. Over one hundred thousand people march in 
procession to British consulate and then to American consulate, 
where demonstrations take place. — Leaders decide to postpone 
elections for the All-Russian Jewish Congress. — 21. Petrograd: 
Jewish communal elections postponed on account of chaotic state 
of affairs. — 28. Kiev: Establishment of institute for training of 
teachers for Jewish secondary and higher elementary schools. — 
January 4. Kharkov and Ekaterinoslav: Steps taken to augment 
old colonization enterprises and to found new colonies in other 
parts of these governments. — Sum of 59,072 rubles ($29,536) 
raised by Russian Jews for purpose of inscribing Emancipation 
Day, March 21, 1917 (O. S.), in the Golden Book of the Jewish 
National Fund. — 18. Sionisty Trudoviky (Zionist labor party) 
organized. — 25. Minsk: Zionist conference decides to increase 
funds for support of settlements in Palestine, to adopt self- 
taxation for National Fund, and to support every Zionist under- 
taking in Palestine. — Odessa: Establishment of Jewish Musical 
College for study of Jewish music, as well as Jewish history and 
literature. — Petrograd: Mass-meeting to celebrate British declara- 
tion on Zionism. — Febbuaby 1. Kiev: Two thousand Jewish 
gymnasium students form organization for study of Hebrew. — 
Petrograd: Returns from elections for a new Jewish Communal 
Council, arranged on a broad democratic franchise system, are: 
Zionists, 35; Poale-Zionists, 1; Orthodox party, 9; Bundists, 8; 
People's party, 8; Socialists, 2; People's group, 5; Democrat, 1; 
Independent, 1. — 8. New Poltavka (Kherson) : Conference of 
Delegates of Jewish Colonists in Russia and of Jewish leaders 
interested in land problem, to (1) formulate requests to Con- 
stituent Assembly for allotment of more land to the Jews; (2) 
claim adequate representation of Jews on Land Settlement Com- 
missions; (3) plan for self-administration of colonies. — Petrograd: 
Commission, charged with preparations for Jewish congress, 
rejects the Bund's proposal that converted Jews wishing to do so 
be permitted to participate in election for delegates. — 15. Odessa: 
Zionists resolve to collect a million rubles to establish a colony 
in Palestine, in commemoration of the British declaration. — 
Apbil 19. News having reached Odessa of the ill-treatment 
Bessarabian Jews are subjected to by the Roumanian troops and 
the military authorities, Messrs. Ussischkin and Schwartz petition 
the British consul to intervene with the Roumanian Govern- 
ment. — Kiev: Jewish members in the Ukraine Rada are eighteen 
Zionists, thirteen Bundists, nine Poale-Zionists, thirteen United 
Socialists, and two of the People's party. These fifty-five members 
represent the Jews among the eight hundred and nine members of 
the Rada. 



EVENTS IN 5678— RUSSIA 275 

III 

APPOINTMENTS, HONORS, AND ELECTIONS 

Aabonson, , selected president of Witebsk General Schools* 

Committee, Oct., 1917. 

Alteb, , elected mayor of Kamenetz-Podolsk, July, 1917. 

Apfelbaum (Zinaviev), , elected to Constitutional Conven- 
tion, Dec, 1917. 

Beilis, , elected justice of peace, Aug., 1917. 

Bekebman, , Radom, Poland, appointed judge, Feb., 1918. 

Bebnstam, , appointed member of Senate, June, 1917. 

BixKiH, A., Petrograd, appointed member of new council of the 
Ministry of Justice, Sept., 1917. 

BoFF (Kamkov), , elected to Constitutional Convention, 

Dec, 1917. 

Bothner, , Moscow, appointed police official, June, 1917. 

Bramson, , elected member of Senate, Sept., 1917 ; appointed 

member of the Disciplinary Department of the Senate, Sept., 1917. 

Braunstein (Trotsky), Leon, elected to Constitutional Con- 
vention, Dec, 1917. 

Bbodsky, , Petrograd, appointed justice of peace, Sept., 

1917. 

Cohen, , Lodz, appointed judge, Dec, 1917. 

Davidowitch, D., Kherson, elected delegate to Constitutional 
Convention, Jan., 1918. 

DicKSTEiN, , appointed assistant public prosecutor, Dec, 

1917. 

DoLKovsKY, M., Petrograd, appointed assistant commissary for 
Jewish affairs, May, 1918. 

EiGER, , appointed member of Polish State Council, May, 

1918. 

Fisher, S., Petrograd, elected municipal judge, Nov., 1917. 

Fbeedman, , Odessa, appointed deputy mayor, Oct., 1917; 

appointed member of the Council of the Ministry of Justice, Nov., 
1917. 

Friedman, , elected member of new Constitutional Assem- 
bly, June, 1917. 

Geilman, , Petrograd, appointed commissary of the State 

Bank, Feb., 1918. 

GiNZBUBG, , elected vice-president of the Kolomensky mu- 
nicipal council, Aug., 1917. 

GiNZBURG, , appointed Government Labor Commissary for 

Donetz, Dec, 1917. 

Greenberg, , Moscow, appointed police official, June, 1917. 

Greenberg, M., Petrograd, appointed curator of Petrograd and 
neighboring district, Feb., 1918. 



276 AMERICAN JEWISH YEAR BOOK 



Grodski, B., Petrograd, elected municipal judge, Nov., 1917. 

Grusenbeko, , elected member of new Constitutional As- 
sembly, June, 1917; appointed by the Provisional Government to 
investigate affairs of the Russian admiralty during the old regime, 
Sept., 1917; appointed president of the Commission entrusted with 
the inquiry into the supply and fighting readiness of the navy, 
Oct., 1917. 

GtJNZBUBG, A. M., Kiev, appointed senior vice-president of the 
municipality, Sept., 1917. 

GtJNZBURG, B., appointed commissary for the Labor Supply and 
EJxchange of Petrograd, Sept., 1917. 

GuiTNiK, , Odessa, appointed Minister of Commerce, May, 

1918. 

GuBEViTCH, , member of the Peasants' Council, appointed 

assistant Minister of the Interior, Sept., 1917. 

GuTEBMAN, B., appointed commissary for the Labor Supply and 
Exchange of Saratov, Sept., 1917. 

Halpebin, Alexandeb, appointed general secretary of the Cabi- 
net, Oct., 1917. 

Halpebn, , elected vice-president of the Kolomensky munici- 
pal council, Aug., 1917. 

Hefez, , appointed assistant in Ministry of Justice, June, 

1917. 

Hilsbebg, , appointed justice at Lublin, Dec, 1917. 

HuBGiN, S., appointed vice-minister for Jewish afCairs, Jan., 
1918. 

Kahan, , appointed Justice at Petrokov, Dec, 1917. 

Kalmanovitch, , appointed prosecutor at district court of 

Minsk, June, 1917. 

Kaminetski, a., Petrograd, elected municipal judge, Nov., 1917. 

Kantobovitch, , elected member of new Constitutional As- 
sembly, June, 1917. 

Kempneb, , appointed judge at Lodz, Dec, 1917. 

Kebensky, Alexander F., Saratov, elected to Assembly, Dec, 
1917. 

Kohan-Bebnstein, , appointed assistant controller of the 

coal supply for the country, in Ministry of the Interior, Sept., 1917. 

Lazabovitch, , Odessa, appointed deputy-mayor, Oct., 1917. 

LiCHTENFELD, , Warsaw, appointed judge, Dec, 1917. 

Lublinsky, , appointed to Senate, June, 1917. 

LuBiA, , Petrograd, appointed commissary of the State 

Bank, Feb., 1918. 

Mandelbebg, , Zhitomir, elected deputy-mayor, Dec, 1917. 

Mandzin, , appointed assistant public prosecutor, Dec, 1917. 

Meyebovitch, , appointed assistant government commissary 

in fourth army, Oct., 1917. 

Minor, , elected chairman of Moscow municipality, Sept., 

1917. 




EVENTS IN 5678— RUSSIA 277 



Nathanson, , appointed member of Polish State Council, 

May, 1918. 

Pee, , Warsaw, appointed judge, Feb., 1918. 

Pekelman, , Saratov, appointed judge of judicial chamber, 

Sept., 1917. 

Peblmutter, , Warsaw, appointed member of Polish State 

Council, May, 1918. 

Pffefer, , appointed member of Polish State Council, May, 

1918. 

PoDGAYETz , MogWlev (Podolia), electcd deputy-mayor, 

Jan., 1918. 

PozNARSKY, , appointed judge of Court of Cassation, Dec, 

1917. 

Rabbinowitz, E., appointed commissary for the Labor Supply 
and Exchange of Tavrida, Sept., 1917. 

Rates, , Kiev, appointed by Ukraine Autonomous Govern- 
ment to join the ministry to administer local affairs, Oct., 1917. 

Ratner, , Nachichevansk, elected president of the city ad- 
ministration, Nov., 1917. 

Rosenfeld (Kamenev), ', elected to Constitutional Conven- 
tion, Dec, 1917. 

RuNDSTEiN, , appointed judge of Court of Cassation, Dec, 

1917. 

RuTTENBEBG, Phineas, appointed vice-commander of the Petro- 
grad militia, Oct., 1917. 

Sacks, M., Petrograd, appointed assistant commissary of edu- 
cation, Feb., 1918. 

Sax, , elected secretary of the Kolomensky municipal coun- 
cil, Aug., 1917. 

ScHREiBEB, K., appointed assistant prosecuting attorney in cir- 
cuit court of Irkutsk (Siberia), Dec, 1917. 

ScHREiDER, HiBSCH, Petrograd, elected mayor, July, 1917. 

SiLVERFARB, , clccted, by Ukrainian Congress, Minister for 

Jewish Affairs in Ukraine, Aug., 1917. 

Stechen, , appointed member of Senate, June, 1917. 

Steinberg, , Petrograd, appointed commissary of justice, 

Feb., 1918. 

Sterling, , Warsaw, appointed judge, Dec, 1917. 

Trachtenberg, B., Petrograd, elected municipal judge, Nov., 1917. 

Unshlicht, , Petrograd, appointed commissary, Feb., 1918. 

ViNAVER, , appointed member of Senate, June, 1917; elected 

to Constitutional Convention, Dec, 1917. 

Wainstein, , elected president of the city administration of 

Minsk, Nov., 1917. 

Warshavsky, M., Petrograd, appointed assistant commissary of 
Commerce, Feb., 1918. 

Yachnin, , Kherson, appointed commissary of Labor, Dec, 

1917. 



278 AMERICAN JEWISH YEAR BOOK 



YoNSTEiN, , Oriel, elected deputy-mayor, Oct., 1917. 

Wegmeisteb, , appointed member of Polish State Council, 

May, 1918. 

ZiTZERMAN, P., appointed assistant prosecuting attorney, circuit 
court of Irkutsk (Siberia), Dec, 1917. 

IV 

NECROLOGY 

Abbamovitch, Shalom Jacob (Mendele Mokeb Sforim), Hebrew 
and Yiddish novelist and essayist, Odessa, aged 82, Dec. 15, 1917. 

BoRocHow, David Ber, prominent leader of Jewish Social Demo- 
cratic Labor Party Poale-Zion (Workers of Zion) of Russia, Petro- 
grad, aged 36, Dec, 1917. 

Dembo, Isaac, physician and author, Petrograd, aged 71, June, 
1917. 

Drabkin, Abraham, ex-crown rabbi, Petrograd, aged 73, Aug., 
1917. 

Gurevitch, — — , chairman of the Soldiers' Committee of the 
Northern Army, on Riga front, Sept., 1917. 

Hendler, , member of Council of Workmen's and Soldiers' 

Delegates, Odessa, Oct., 1917. 

Weisblatt, S., engineer. State councillor, Petrograd, Sept., 1917. 

Zandberg, a., lawyer, Libau, at Petrograd, June, 1917. 

V 

WAR 

General 

July 27. Petrograd: Representative meeting of Jews condemns 
anarchy fostered by the extreme revolutionaries. Jewry dis- 
sociates itself from the anarchist campaign of a few converted 
Jews, and declares the war must be conducted in union with the 
Allies. — Anti-Jewish attitude of old oflScers and arrest of seventy- 
four Jews in one regiment, because two Jews were charged with 
intention to desert, leads Jewish officers and soldiers to form a 
league to combat anti-Semitism. — Kromenitz (government of 
Volhynia) : Military authorities permit organization of volunteer 
regiment of Jewish soldiers wishing to fight for new Russia. — 
August 15. Odessa: One hundred and fifty Jewish cadets pro- 
moted officers and ordered to the front. — 17. Conference of teach- 
ers and students of military colleges and Jews in officers' train- 
ing corps denounces regiments which refuse to receive Jewish 
officers. — 24. Three hundred Jewish military students made lieu- 
tenants in army. — September 14. Tashkent: Senior Jewish 
students at the military school, without awaiting their commis- 



k 



EVENTS IN 5678— SOUTH AMERICA 279 



sions, form a " Battalion of Death," and proceed to the front to 
serve as an example to the Leninite deserters and the old police 
and gendarmes drafted into the army, who abandon their posi- 
tions at the firing of the first shots. — October 5. Kiev: One hun- 
dred and thirty-nine Jewish students of military school receive 
commissions.— Odessa: One hundred and sixty-three Jews com- 
missioned in the army. — 12. Kiev, Odessa, and Kazan: Jewish 
officers, as well as Jewish students in local military schools, form 
committee which is entrusted with the work of placing itself in 
communication with the Jewish officers for the purpose of study- 
ing their position in the army and throwing light on their duties 
and requirements as Jews. — 19. Petrograd: Number of Jews 
submit memorial to the Ministry of War urging it to organize a 
Jewish legion to fight against Germany. — Peterhof : Two hundred 
Jewish students of military college appointed officers in the 
army. — ^Moscow: At Alexeyeff military college seventy Jews re- 
ceive rank of officer. — Qualifications of Jewish dentists in the 
army are disregarded by anti-Semitic commanders who deprive 
them of facilities offered to Christians to serve in medical corps 
instead of in ordinary battalions. — November 9. Minister of War 
requested to investigate two cases where commanders have sent 
back to the reserve groups of Jews transferred to first line bat- 
talions, although Jews were eager to fight. — December 21. Petro- 
grad: Fund in aid of permanently incapacitated Jewish soldiers 
raised; subscriptions received amount to two hundred thousand 
rubles. 

Appointments 

M. Isaacson, marine, appointed commander, navy. 

Military Honors 
Medal of St, George: Goldberg. 

SIAM 

APPOINTMENTS, HONORS, AND ELECTIONS 

Marcan, Alec, Bangkok, awarded Dusidhi Mala medal for 
Science. 

SOUTH AMEEICA 

General Events 

June 4. Argentina: President Irigoyen replies favorably to a 
Jewish delegation which appealed for the intervention of the Gov- 
ernment to bring about the cessation of massacres in Palestine. — 
August 3. Buenos Aires (Argentina) : Die Yiddishe Welt, a 
weekly, published. — January 11. Argentina: Report that Jewish 



280 AMERICAN JEWISH YEAR BOOK 

Colonization Association contemplates discontinuance of coloniza- 
tion work because of scant emigration from Russia and improved 
prospects for colonization in 'Palestine. — 25. Buenos Aires (Argen- 
tina) : Jewish colonists of province of Entre Rios found a 
Yeshibah, for which ten thousand pesos have been collected. — 
Rio de Janeiro (Brazil) : Messrs. Moritzio, Lamerda, and 
Koukalves introduce resolution in Parliament expressing to the 
British Government gratitude and appreciation for its Palestine 
declaration. 

SPAIN 

GENERAL EVENTS 

June 4. Madrid: According to Paris dispatch, Spanish Govern- 
ment has instructed its representatives in Berlin, Vienna, and 
Constantinople to present an urgent note demanding the cessation 
of the persecution, deportations, and looting practised against the 
Jews in Palestine. — ^Febeuaby 1. Madrid: Professor Abraham S. 
Yahuda, University of Madrid, sends a telegram thanking the 
king of England, in the name of a number of Jewish citizens, for 
the British declaration. 

SWEDEN 

GENERAL EVEXNTS 

November 20. Stockholm: The Svenska Daghladet prints open 
letter by Dr. Ehrenpreis to Premier C16menceau on the Jewish 
question in Roumania. — Febbuaby 3. Stockholm: Local Jewish 
press bureau states that the Dutch Zionist Federation published 
a protest against the fact that no Jewish representatives were 
present at the Brest-Litovsk peace negotiations, and Jewish 
circles contemplate sending a special Jewish delegation to Brest- 
Litovsk. 

SWITZEELAND 
I 

GENERAL EVENTS 

September 7. Berne: Ninety Jews from Jerusalem arrive en 
route for America. — November 9. Zurich: Committee appointed 
for purpose of convening a Jewish Congress in Switzerland. — 12. 
Berne: Zionist Actions Comit6 appeals to Central Powers, the 
pope, and the E^nglish Government to establish a boundary about 
the sacred places in Palestine, namely, Jerusalem, Hebron, Beth- 
lehem, the Mount of Olives, Rachel's Tomb, and a number of the 
Jewish colonies. — March 15. Report from Zurich that the only Jew 
with a seat on the new Polish State Council is the senior rabbi of 



EVENTS IN 5678— UNION OF SOUTH AFRICA 281 

Warsaw. — April. Zurich: Several ruffians break into synagogue 
on Good Friday and tear the Scrolls of the Law to shreds. Two 
are arrested. Remnants of Scrolls are buried in accordance with 
rabbinical laws; damage is estimated at ten thousand francs. — 19. 
Zurich: The Swiss Federal Council provisionally suspends the 
prohibition to slaughter animals according to the Jewish rite. 

II 

APPOINTMENTS, HONORS, AND ELECTIONS 

(JOETSCHEL, M. M., Dellemont, elected to National Council, Nov., 
1917. 

Stern, Leah, appointed professor at University of Geneva, May, 
1918. 

TUNIS 

GENERAL EVENTS 

September 19. Anti-Jewish riots; five Jews are hurt; shops 
pillaged and fixtures smashed. — February 1. Jewish compositors 
strike against working on the Sabbath; as a result, entire Tunis 
press, including the Tunisie Frangaise will hereafter appear on 
Sundays instead of Saturdays. — 8. Tunisia, new Jewish news- 
paper, issued. 

TUKKEY (EXCEPT PALESTINE) 

GENERAL EVENTS 

June 15. Jeroham El-Yachar, chief rabbi of Bagdad, addresses, 
through Swiss Government, to Sultan a protest against the cruel 
treatment of Jews in the Turkish empire. Not content with vari- 
ous forms of oppression and robbery, functionaries of the state, 
with the connivance of the police, strangle young Jews in prison, 
and then secretly throw their bodies into the Tigris. 

UNION OP SOUTH AFEICA 

I 

GENERAL EVENTS 

June 8. Johannesburg: In cablegram to English Zionist Fed- 
eration, the Executive Committee of the South African Jewish 
Congress protests against the statement issued by the Conjoint 
Committee of the Board of Deputies of British Jews and the Anglo- 
Jewish Association of London (see United Kingdom). — 23. Cape 
Peninsula: Meeting adopts resolution protesting against state- 
ment of Conjoint Foreign Committee, of London, respecting Pales- 



282 AMERICAN JEWISH YEAR BOOK 



tine. — November 20. Johannesburg: Mass-meeting adopts reso- 
lution favoring establishment of a national home for Jews in 
Palestine, and thanking the imperial Government for its sympathy 
and support. 

II 

WAR 

Promotions 

Promoted lieutenant-colonel: S. Solomon, Kimberley. — Promoted 
major: L. F. Lezerd, Kimberley. — Promoted captain: I. M. Cohen, 
Kimberley; M. Griemberg, Kimberley; H. S. Harris, Kimberley; 
Walter Harris, Kimberley; S. A. Liebson, Kimberley; John Wein- 
berg, Kimberley. Promoted lieutenant: Robert Dreyfus, Kim- 
berley; Gerald Harris, Kimberley; Leonard Isaac, Kimberley; 
William Joffe, Kimberley; Harry Herbert Levin, Kimberley; 
Harold Sager, Kimberley; Norman Sagar, Kimberley; Max Wein- 
berg, Kimberley. — Promoted second lieutenant: Isaac Kaplan, 
Kimberley; S. D. Krause, Kimberley; G. Regal, Kimberley. 

War Necrology 
Cohen, Benjamin, lieutenant. Cape Town, aged 26, July 3, 1917. 

UNITED KINGDOM 



GENERAL EVENTS 

June 3-4. Leeds: Anti-Jewish riots. Jewish quarter looted. 
Victor Lightman, J. P., and M. Abrahams, call upon chief consta- 
ble, who assures them that immediate steps would be taken to 
restore order. — 6. At annual meeting of East London Fund for 
the Jews, the Bishop of London expresses the hope that a Christian 
Power would control Palestine, and characterizes as folly of some 
unthinking Christians that the coming of the kingdom of God 
in the east would be hastened by filling Palestine with unconverted 
Jews, because that would result in the establishment of an outpost 
against the spread of Christianity. — July 22. At meeting of For- 
eign Jews* Protection Committee, resolutions adopted that, in view 
of announced intention of British Government to refuse facilities 
to families of Russian subjects of military age to accompany them 
to Russia, they refuse to leave their families behind them or to 
be forced into the British army; that if attempts are made by this 
means to force Russian citizens to remain in this country, Com- 
mittee will support all victims and their families and defend them 
in their fight against injustice and oppression; that a telegram 



EVENTS IN 5678— UNITED KINGDOM 283 



be sent to the Russian Government to acquaint it with the situa- 
tion. — 27. Police raid quarters of Foreign Jews' Protection So- 
ciety, seize documents and papers, and arrest two leaders of the 
movement on charge of conspiring to defeat Military Service Act 
as applied to aliens. — August 3. Leeds: Mass-meeting, under 
auspices of Jewish Representative Council, adopts resolution ex- 
pressing confidence in the organization, and requesting it to take 
necessary steps to protect the interests of those affected by the 
Convention with the Russian Government affecting Russian sub- 
jects of military age, and to endeavor to obtain for those intending 
to return to Russia facilities enabling their families to go also, 
or failing this, to obtain adequate provision for their families left 
behind. — ^War Office announces the formation of a special Jewish 
regiment with special emblem. — 19. London: Zion Association 
adopts resolution disapproving of the formation of a Jewish Le- 
gion, in view of the harmful effect such an action would have 
upon the interests of the Jews in Turkey and the whole Jewish 
position in Palestine. — 30. Deputation, consisting of chief rabbi. 
Lord Swaythling, Sir Philip Magnus, Sir Charles Henry, Sir 
Adolph Tuck, Sir Stuart M. Samuel, Major Lionel de Rothschild, 
Louis S. Cohen, N. Laski, Claude G. Montefiore, Edmund Sebag- 
Montefiore, Arthur E. Franklin, Albert M. Woolf, and L. J. Green- 
berg, wait on Lord Derby with reference to use of word " Jewish " 
in connection with the battalions being raised under the Conven- 
tion with Russia. Deputation is informed that these battalions 
would be given simple numerals, that they would wear the general 
service badge, and that the conditions of their service would not 
differ from those of the rest of his majesty's forces.— Septembeb 
25. London: Air raids cause Kol Nidre services to be curtailed. — 
Januaey 7. Parliamentary Committee of the British Trade Union 
Congress and Executive Committee of the Labor Party, in their 
memorandum on war aims, to be considered on January 28, recom- 
mend that Jews in all countries enjoy the common elementary 
rights of tolerance, freedom of residence and trade, and equal 
citizenship, and that Palestine be set free from the oppressive 
government of the Turk and formed into a free State, under inter- 
national guarantee, to which such of the Jewish people as desire 
to do so may return. — ^February 15. London: Major Lionel de 
Rothschild lends to the Government Gunnersbury Lodge, the resi- 
dence of the late Leopold de Rothschild, to be used as a hospital 
for wounded soldiers. — March 7. London: In an audience granted 
to Dr. Weizmann, the king expresses his gratitude to the Zion- 
ists for their useful work during the war. — 19. London: In reply 
to Mr. Caradoc Rees* inquiry in the House of Commons, the Under- 
Secretary of War, Mr. Macpherson, states that all recruits enlisted 
for Jewish battalions would be assigned to Jewish units in Pales- 
tine, and there employed. 



284 AMERICAN JEWISH YEAR BOOK 

II 

JEWISH COMMUNAL LIFE 

Statement of Conjoint Fobeiqn Committee 

May 24. London: The Times prints statement of the Conjoint 
Foreign Committee of the Board of Deputies and the Anglo- Jew- 
ish Association, declaring that while the Committee is favorable 
to the attainment of full civil, political, and religious rights and 
minor municipal privileges for Jews in Palestine and reasonable 
facilities for their immigration and colonization, it cannot co-op- 
erate with the Zionist movement unless the Zionists eliminate from 
their platform the proposal that Jewish settlements in Palestine 
be recognized as possessing a national character in a political 
sense, and the requirement that Jewish settlers in Palestine be 
invested with special rights in excess of those enjoyed by the rest 
of the population. — June 3 to July 17. Resolution condemn- 
ing action of Conjoint Foreign Committee and repudiating the 
views expressed in statement issued by it is adopted by the 
following bodies: Belfast Congregation; Moses Montefiore Lodge 
of Blackburn; Hebrew Congregation of Burkenhead; Dorshei Zion 
Association, Hebrew Congregation, and Order of Ancient Mac- 
cabeans of Cardiff; Zionist Society and Congregation of Dublin; 
Durban Congregation; Central Synagogue, Woolwich and Plum- 
stead Synagogue, and Hebrew Congregation of Edinburgh; Queen's 
Park Congregation, Jewish Representative Council, and Jewish 
Synagogue Conference of Glasgow; Hamboro Synagogue; Kirk- 
dale Fountains Road Synagogue; Jewish Representatives of Leeds; 
Limerick Congregation; Ain Jacob Synagogue, Order of Ancient 
Maccabeans) Travelers* Friendly Society, Shaw Street Congrega- 
tion, Hope Place Synagogue, and Nusach Ari Synagogue of Liv- 
erpool; North London Zionist Society, Anglo-Jewish Association, 
Order of Ancient Maccabeans, United Jewish Friendly Societies 
of Shoreditch, New Synagogue, Federation of Synagogues, Board 
of Deputies, Sjmagogue Committee, Artillery Lane Sjmagogue, 
and Board of Deputies of London; Old Hebrew Congregation, 
Kahal Chassidim Synagogue, Holy Law Congregation, and Jew- 
ish Representative Council of Manchester; Middlesborough Con- 
gregation; New Sjmagogue, Old Hebrew Congregation, and Yes- 
mond Congregation of Newcastle; Aaron Joseph Jacobs Lodge, 
and Congregation of Newport; Sheffield Congregation; South 
Shields Hebrew Congregation; Stockton Congregation; Hebrew 
Congregation and Beth Hamedros of Sunderland; Hebrew Con- 
gregation of Wallasey. — ^London: Council of Angl&Jewish Asso- 
ciation discusses statement on Palestine of Conjoint Foreign 
Committee. — ^Resolutions condemning action of Committee intro- 
duced by Joseph Cowen and Haham Gaster, but later withdrawn. — 
17. London: Board of Deputies adopts resolution expressing pro- 



EVENTS IN 5678— UNITED KINGDOM 285 



found disapproval of action of Conjoint Committee and loss of 
confidence in that body, and instructing its representatives on it 
to resign forthwith. — ^July 15. London: Board of Deputies votes 
44 to 14 to take immediate steps to terminate thearrangement be- 
tween the Board of Deputies and the Anglo-Jewish Association 
constituting the Conjoint Committee. — Septembeb 9. Anglo-Jewish 
Association resolves to terminate the arrangement between it and 
the Board of Deputies providing for the constitution of the Con- 
joint Foreign Committee, in accordance with the request of the 
Board, and to entrust, pending a new arrangement, foreign affairs 
to a special committee which shall have the same powers as the 
old Conjoint Committee. — January 20. London: Board of Depu- 
ties adopts plan for new arrangement with Anglo-Jewish Asso- 
ciation for a Conjoint Committee on Foreign Affairs, proposing 
that the Foreign Committees of each body shall hold joint sessions 
as the " United Committees," that, except in matters of routine 
and urgency, the parent bodies shall be consulted before action 
by the United Committees; that the question of Zionism shall be 
outside the purview of the United Committees unless specially 
referred to them by the parent bodies; and that this arrangement 
shall remain in force until the month of Sivan 5679 (1919). — 
February 8. London: Special meeting of Council of Anglo-Jewish 
Association elects eight members to compose the Committee on 
Foreign Affairs. 

Zionist Propaganda 

June 8. In cablegram to Jewish Morning Journal, of New York, 
Lord Northcliffe expresses complete sympathy with the idea of 
the restoration of the ancient Jewish patrimony and with estab- 
lishment of an autonomous Jewish State if practical. — In cable- 
gram to Jewish Morning Journal, of New York, Viscount Bryce 
states that for re-establishment of Jews in Palestine, Turkish rule 
must be extinguished not only in Palestine, but everywhere south 
and east of Taurus Mountains; a large body of American and 
other Jews must indicate a wish to return, and large funds must 
be provided to repair the ruin recently wrought by the Turks, and 
to enable the execution of irrigation and other works required to 
make Palestine support a larger population than it now can main- 
tain. — 9. Statement issued by Rabbi Kuk, on behalf of Committee 
of Rabbis (Vaad ha-Rabbonim), read in all the synagogues of 
East London, protests against all attempts to destroy the unity 
of the Jewish people. — 24. . London : Mass-meeting, under auspices 
of National Union for Jewish Rights, adopts resolution declaring 
its unalterable conviction that recognition of the principle of Jew- 
ish nationality is essential for the solution of the Jewish problem 
and pledging co-operation with similar organizations to secure 
for the Jews the right of independent nationality in all countries, 



286 AMERICAN JEWISH YEAR BOOK 



where that principle is publicly recognized, and the creation of 
a permanent home for the Jewish people in the Holy band. — July 
13. Glasgow: Jewish Representative Council adopts resolutions: 
Expressing approval of steps of Zionist organization to realize 
Jewish national aspirations, pledging sympathy and support of 
the institutions represented on the Council in furtherance of Jew- 
ish interests, and favoring a conference of Jews in the United 
Kingdom to urge upon the British Government the Jewish historic 
and inalienable claim to Palestine; to deal with the general Jew- 
ish problems which will arise after the war; and to organize the 
Jewish community in the United Kingdom upon a thoroughly 
representative basis. — October 14. London: Representatives of 
London Synagogues adopt a unanimous resolution favoring the 
reconstitution of Palestine as the national home of the Jewish 
people, and expressing the hope that his majesty's Government 
will use its best endeavors to facilitate the achievement of this 
object. — Order of Ancient Maccabeans adopts same resolution. — 
Manchester: Same resolution adopted at meeting of Zionists. — 19. 
Manchester: Kahal Chassidim Synagogue, at general meeting of 
members, adopts a unanimous resolution favoring the re-constitu- 
tion of Palestine as a legally secured home of the Jewish people, 
and trusts that his majesty's Government will use its best en- 
deavors to facilitate the achievement of this object. — 21. Meet- 
ings at London, Richmond, Manchester, Liverpool, Leeds, Dublin, 
Birmingham, Cardiff, Sunderland, and Newcastle-on-Tyne adopt 
resolutions endorsing Basle program, and requesting Government 
to employ its good oflfices in obtaining at the peace conference rec- 
ognition of Jewish nationality and according to Jews national 
rights in their ancient land. — December 22. London: Conference 
of Jewish National Fund resolves that chief aim of the Jewish 
National Fund be the acquisition of land in Palestine and the 
nationalization of the acquired land, in order to prevent, at least 
partly, the inconveniences and dangers of private landed property. 

The British Declaration 

November 2. In letter to Lord Rothschild, the Right Honorable 
Arthur James Balfour, Secretary for Foreign Affairs, declares that 
his majesty's Government view with favor the establishment in 
Palestine of a national home for the Jewish people, and will use 
their best endeavors to facilitate the achievement of this object, 
it being clearly understood that nothing shall be done which may 
prejudice the civil and religious rights of existing non-Jewish 
communities in Palestine, or the rights and political status en- 
joyed by Jews in any other country. — 15. British Headquarters* 
Council of Jewish Territorial Organization (ITO) adopts resolution 
welcoming Government declaration on Palestine and declaring its 
readiness to co-operate with the Zionists in the development of 



EVENTS IN 5678— UNITED KINGDOM 287 



Palestine. — 18. Law. and Parliamentary Committee of Board of 
Deputies adopts resolution conveying its grateful thanks to his 
majesty's Government for its sympathetic interest in the Jews, as 
manifested by the letter addressed to Lord Rothschild by the Right 
Honorable Arthur J. Balfour. — 29. Council of Anglo-Jewish Asso- 
ciation at special meeting unanimously adopts resolution convey- 
ing thanks to his majesty's Government for its sympathetic 
interest in the Jews, as manifested in letter of the Right Honorabl* 
Arthur J. Balfour. — December 2. London: Meeting of Thanks* 
giving for the British declaration presided over by Lord 
Rothschild; speeches by the chief rabbi, Dr. Gaster, Lord Robert 
Cecil, Herbert Samuel, Colonel Sir Mark Sykes, Captain Ormsby* 
Gore, and Israel Zangwill. — 9. First Lodge of England of the 
Independent Order B'nai B'rith adopts resolution expressing heart- 
felt gratitude for the British declaration. — London: Socialist Labor 
Party adopts resolution expressing satisfaction with Government 
declaration and particularly with safeguards for the political 
status of Jews outside of Palestine. — Manchester: Mass-meeting 
adopts resolution expressing heart-felt gratitude for the British 
declaration. — 14. Zionist representatives, Lord Rothschild, Dr. 
Tchlenow, N. Sokolow, Dr. Weizmann, and James de Rothschild, 
are received by War Cabinet, and express gratitude of Jewish 
people for declaration of November 2, and congratulations on 
capture of Jerusalem. — London: Zionist leaders confer with rep- 
resentatives of the Arab and Armenian populations in Palestine; 
assurance given Arabs that all Mohammedan sacred places will be 
given over to the Arabs, Similar assurance regarding Christian 
shrines given the pope. — January 4. Cardiff: Demonstration and 
conference to commemorate the British declaration. 

Miscellaneous 

June 15. Brighton: Lieutenant-Colonel Sir John Howard, noted 
engineer, bequeathes £40,000 ($200,000) to establish a John How- 
ard Hospital; £33,600 ($168,000) and the land on which it is built 
for the John Howard Convalescent Home; £600 ($3000) a year 
for twenty-one years for the Howard Charity for relief of dis- 
tressed widows and aged and sick poor of Brighton; £300 ($1500) 
to the Sussex County Hospital; £200 ($1000) to the St. Bernard's 
Home for Invalid Gentlewomen. — September 2. Shepherd's Bush 
Synagogue dedicated. — 9. Celebration of twenty-fifth anniversary 
of Hampstead Synagogue. — ^November 14. London: Organization 
of League of British Jews, with following objects: (1) To uphold 
the status of British subjects professing the Jewish religion; (2) 
to resist the allegation that Jews constitute a separate political 
nationality, and (3) to facilitate the settlement in Palestine of 
such Jews as may desire to make Palestine their home. — December 
10 



288 AMERICAN JEWISH YEAR BOOK 

16. Board of Deputies resolves to send telegram to General Allenby 
and his troops conveying congratulations of Jews of England 
on their triumph which culminated In the capture of Jerusalem. — 
21. London: First annual meeting of the Society for Distribut- 
ing Jewish Literature. — January 4. Jewish National Union 
adopts resolutions of congratulations to the British Govern- 
ment on the peaceful occupation of Jerusalem. — 25. Leeds: 
Conference of the Beth Din, attended by representatives of every 
congregation and chevrah of the city, adopts resolution recording 
their entire confidence in the Beth Din, and their determination 
to uphold its authority in the ecclesiastical administration of local 
afCairs.-«-MABCH 15. Zionist Bureau publishes Dr. S. Bernstein's 
book, The Policy of the Roumanian Government Towards Jews, 
in English, French, and German. — 22. London: Memorial meet- 
ing held for the late Dr. Tschlenow, under auspices of English 
Zionist Federation. — ^London: Meeting held in metaiory of the late 
Mendele Moker Sforim (S. J. Abramovitch), under auspices of 
West End Hebrew Circle. 

Ill 

APPOINTMENTS, HONORS, AND ELECTIONS 

Beddington, Mbs. R., London, receives Order of Mercy, Jan., 1918. 

Bergh, Henby Edwabd Vanden, appointed officer of Order of 
the British Empire, Jan. 1, 1918. 

Cablebach, Phit^ip, receives Order of St. Michael and St. George, 
June 1, 1917. 

Cohen, H. E., lieutenant-colonel, D. S. O., receives Order of St. 
Michael and St. George, Jan., 1918. 

Emanuel, P. H., lieutenant, elected Fellow of the Royal Geo- 
graphical Society, Nov., 1917. 

Enoch, C. D., mayor, receives Order of the Legion of Honor 
(French). 

Fox, John Jacob, appointed member of Order of the British Em- 
pire, Jan. 1, 1918. 

Franklin, Leonabd Benjamin, appointed officer of Order of the 
British Empire, Jan. 1, 1918. 

Fbeedman, Leon, lieutenant, appointed chief military repre- 
sentative of the West Riding Appeal Tribunal. ^ 

GoLDSMro, Lionel Fbederic, appointed officer of Order of the 
British Empire, Jan. 1, 1918. 

Henbiques, Philip Gutterez, appointed knight commander of 
Order of the British Empire, Jan. 1, 1918. 

INFELD, Loins, appointed officer of the Order of the British Em- 
pire, Jan. 1, 1918. 



EVENTS IN 5678— UNITED KINGDOM 289 



Isaacs, Sib Rurtis (Lord Reading), created earl, Nov., 1917; ap- 
pointed ambassador extraordinary and plenipotentiary at Wash- 
ington, on special mission, Jan. 11, 1918. 

Jacobson, Ernest Nathaniel Joseph, receives Order of the 
British Empire, Aug., 1917. 

Jessel, Herbert Merton, created baronet, June 1, 1917; receives 
Order of St. Michael and St. George, Jan., 1918. 

Kauffmann, I. B., London, receives Order of Mercy, Jan., 1918. 

Landau, Herman, appointed officer of Order of the British Em- 
pire, Jan. 1, 1918: 

Laski, Nathan, J. P., Manchester, selected chairman of Man- 
agement Committee of the City Magistrates, Jan., 1918. 

Lee, Sir Sidney, knighted, Jan., 1918. 

Leverson, J. J., colonel, receives Companionship of the Bath, 
Jan., 1918. 

Levi, Louis, appointed member of Order of the British Empire, 
Jan. 1, 1918. 

Magnus, Sir Philip, created baronet, June 1, 1917. 

Mandelberg, Goodman C, Manchester, knighted, Jan., 1918. 

Marks, Barnett Hove, elected chairman of the Education Com- 
mittee and chairman of the Finance Committee of the Corpora- 
tion, Nov., 1917. 

Marks, Geoffrey, receives Order of the British Empire, Aug., 
1917. 

MoNASH, Sir John, major-general, of Australia, knighted, Jan., 
1918; receives Order of the Bath. 

Montefiore, Edmund Sebag-, receives Order of the British Em- 
pire, Aug., 1917. 

Moses, Mark, elected chairman of Health Committee of Stepney 
Borough Council, London, Jan., 1918. 

Myers, Bernard Ehrenfried, lieutenant-colonel, receives Order 
of St. Michael and St. George. 

Myers, George, receives medal of Order of the British Empire, 
Jan. 1, 1918. 

Naar, Abraham, receives medal of Order of the British Empire, 
Jan. 1, 1918. 

Nathan, Walter Simeon, major, created commander of Michael 
and George, Apl., 1918. 

Phillips, Albert, Birmingham, appointed consul of Greece, 
Mch., 1918. 

Pinto, Philippe de, Leith, appointed vice-consul of Greece, Mch., 
1918. 

Rosenthal, Charles, receives Order of St. Michael and St. 
George, June 1, 1917. 

Rothschild, Lionel Nathan de, receives Order of the British 
Empire, Aug., 1917. 



290 AMERICAN JEWISH YEAR BOOK 



Rothschild, Lionel Nathan db, London, awarded medal for 
services on Military Tribunal of London, where he represents Min- 
ister of War in all appeals from drafted men in England, Nov., 
1917. 

Salenqer, Alfred, receives medal of Order of the British Em- 
pire, Jan. 1, 1918. 

Samuel, Mrs. Louise Victoria, appointed officer of Order of the 
British Empire, Jan. 1, 1918. 

Sandelson, David, London, appointed to supervise the Chinese 
laborers at Tsingtao, Jan., 1918. , 

Sassoon, Phujp, receives Order of St. Michael and St. George, 
June 1, 1917. 

ScniFF, Ernest, appointed member of Order of the British Em- 
pire, Jan. 1, 1918. 

Stanhill, D. B., London, elected Fellow of the Institute of 
Chemistry of Great Britain and Ireland, Nov., 1917. 

Stern, A. G., lieutenant-colonel, appointed Commissioner of 
the Mechanical Warfare (Overseas and Allies) Department, Nov., 
1917. 

WiQODER, P. I., elected member of the Conjoint Committee of 
the Manchester and Glasgow Odontological Society, Jan., 1918. 

IV 

NECROLOGY 

Baum, Asher, communal worker, Manchester, Dec, 1917. 

BiRN, Joseph, communal worker, London, Oct. 13, 1917. 

Briscoe, Abraham, communal worker, Dublin, Nov., 1917. 

Brown, Harris Leon, communal worker, Sheffield, at London, 
aged 75, Aug. 10, 1917. 

Core, Louis, communal worker, Manchester, aged 97, Sept., 1917. 

Cohen, Mrs. Julia Matilda, president Union of Jewish Women, 
London, aged 63, Dec, 1917. 

Davis, Alfred, engineer, Torquay, aged 73, JuDe 22, 1917. 

Freedman, Alfred Isaac, communal worker, Merthyr (Wales), 
aged 50, July 10, 1917. 

Garson, David Solomon, communal worker, Manchester, aged 
58, July, 1917. 

Gordon, Samuel, communal worker, Birmingham, June 10, 1917. 

Henriques, Mrs. Rose Emily, communal worker, Manchester, 
aged 73, Sept. 22, 1917. 

Horn, Friedrich, Zionist pioneer, founder and administrator 
of Colony of Samarin, Palestine, at London, aged 71, Jan. 5, 1918. 

Isaacs, Emanuel, president South Portland Street Synagogue, 
Glasgow, aged 68, Jan., 1918. 



EVENTS IN 5678— UNITED KINGDOM 291 



Joseph, Geobge S., communal worker, London, aged 73, Oct., 
1917. 

Joseph, "Walteb, councillor, Folkstone, Aug., 1917. 

Levison, Elchanan, communal worker, Sheflaeld, Aug., 1917. 

Lucas, Mbs. Lionel, communal worker, London, aged 83, Jan. 3, 
1918. 

Lyons, Sie Joseph, restaurateur, London, aged 70, June 21, 1917. 

Meza, Maubice de, communal worker, Blackpool, aged 62, Sept. 
6, 1917. 

MoscHELES, Felix, painter, Tunbridge Wells, aged 84, Dec. 22, 
1917. 

MosELY, Alfred, Doctor of Laws, educator, London, aged 62, 
July 22, 1917. 

Phillips, Phujp, rabbi, London, aged 90. Jan. 18, 1918. 

Pbice, Aabon, communal worker, Liverpool, Sept., 1917. 

Rittenbeeg, Bebnhabd, rabbi, London, aged 76, Dec., 1917. 

RoBEBTs, Ben, councillor, Leeds, Sept., 1917.' 

Rothschild, Alfbed Chables de, banker, London, aged 76, Jan. 
31, 1918. 

Rubin, Sheftel, talmudic scholar, Dublin, June 8, 1917. 

Tallebman, Daniel, Australian trader, knight of the Francis 
Joseph Order, author of publications on food, London, aged 84, 
July 28, 1917. 

Tchlenow, Jehiel, physician, head of the International Zion- 
ist Organization, London, Jan. 31, 1918. 

TuBiANSKY, B., communal worker, Edinburgh, aged 71, Oct. 30, 
1917. 

Valentine, J. H., rabbi and communal worker, Manchester, 
aged 71, Oct. l6, 1917. 

Zeffebt, , communal worker, London, Dec, 1917. 

Zlatowsky, Reuben, lawyer, London, aged 48, Jan. 25, 1918. 

V 

WAR 

Militaby Honobs 

Victoria Cross: Robert Gee, temporary captain; David Philip 
Hirsch, captain (posthumously); Jack White (Weiss). — Dis- 
tinguished Service Order: Rev. Michael Adler, major, senior 
chaplain; J. J. Abraham, major; A. P. Bamberger, major; 
Edward Henry Lionel Beddington; E. M. Hyman, major; H. V. 
Landsberg, acting major; Joseph Henry Levey, temporary lieu- 
tenant-colonel; Frederick Dudley Samuel, lieutenant-colonel. — 
Distinguished Conduct Medal: H. W. Abrahams; H. Caminer; 
P. Coriat; I. Jacks; William Mack Kurtzman (deceased) ; H. L. 



292 AMERICAN JEWISH YEAR BOOK 

Lewis; E. Nathan; Isaac Rosenthal; A. Samuels; SlUen- 

der. — Military Cross: E. C. Abraham, captain; L. Abraham, 
second lieutenant; S. Abrahams, second lieutenant; Cecil Aserman, 
second lieutenant; De Symons Lewis-Barned, lieutenant; L. S. H. 
Lewis-Barried, lieutenant; Edward Beddington Behrens, second lieu- 
tenant; M. Benjamin, second lieutenant; Maurice Arthur Benja- 
min, second lieutenant; Norman de M. Bentwich, second lieu- 
tenant; F. J. Benzimra, second lieutenant; Maurice Leon Bern- 
stein, second lieutenant; Eric Blashki, captain; Thomas Henry 
Boss, captain; Ernest Raphael Capper, second lieutenant; Ed- 
ward Cohen, second lieutenant; M. Cohen, second lieutenant; M. 
T. Cohen, lieutenant; A. H. David, lieutenant; S. Davis, captain; 
H. W. Durlacher, second lieutenant; Philip A. Durlacher, second 
lieutenant; N. Franks, lieutenant; Donald Henry Deaudet B^ee- 
man, temporary second lieutenant; Harold Augustus Freeman, 
second lieutenant; E. Franks, second lieutenant; N. Franks, 
lieutenant; Samuel- Montague Gluckstein, lieutenant; H. M. Gold- 
stein, captain; L. Hayden Guest, captain; M. W. Halford, acting 
lieutenant-colonel; Benjamin Harris, second lieutenant; Joseph 
Aubrey Hart, second lieutenant; H. D. Hyams, second lieutenant; 
Michael Isaacs, second lieutenant; Cyril Jacobs, captain; Ivan 
A. Jacobs, lieutenant; Sidney Jennings, captain; C. J. Joel, lieu- 
tenant; Arnold Kaufman; Henry Mark Keesing, acting captain; 
Gordon C. Kennard, major; E. R. Kisch, captain; John Kohn, 
second lieutenant; Elliot Krolik, captain; Edward Levien, lieu- 
tenant; Maitland Ben Levy, lieutenant; Ralph Paul Levy, acting 
captain; Walter Lewis, lieutenant; S. Liebson, captain; Jack de 
Meza, captain; William Sebag-Montefiore; C. F. Nathan, second 
lieutenant; Edward George Paul Nathan; Robert Percy Nathan 
lieutenant; William Price, second lieutenant; Clarence Abr. Pyke, 
captain; Arnold Reese, second lieutenant; Adolphus Noah Rich- 
ardson; Albert Abram Robinson, second lieutenant; Abraham 
Rothfield, second lieutenant; A. Rothfield, captain; George Fran- 
cis Rothschild; E. D. Samuel, captain; Ernest L. Samuel, 
second lieutenant; George Henry Lewis Marcus Samuel, second 
lieutenant; S. Samuel, second lieutenant; Frederick Arthur 
Samuels, second lieutenant; S. V, Samuelson, second lieutenant; 
Max Saphir, lieutenant; A. M. Sassoon, lieutenant; Reginald 
EUice Sassoon, lieutenant; Cecil Shekury, second lieutenant; 
Edward Simons, captain; A. C. Solomon, lieutenant; J. B. Solo- 
mon, temporary captain; Claude Meyer Spielman; G. K. Stein- 
berg, lieutenant; Frederick Claude Stein, captain; Theodore 
Henry Stern, captain; Bernard Lewis Strauss, acting captain; 
Kenneth Harry Tallerman, second lieutenant; Montague L. 
Tebbitt, second lieutenant; H. B. Van Praagh, captain; Frank 
Raphael Waley, acting captain; Neville Wallach, captain; Rich- 



EVENTS IN 5678— UNITED KINGDOM 293 



ard James Weil, captain; Edward M. Wolf, second lieutenant. — 
Military Medal: Jack Aarons; J. Abrahams; B. Adolphus; 
H. Babitzky; I. Barnes; H. Bloom; P. Blostein (deceased); 
W. Child; C. J. Aron; A. Cohen; E. Cohen; R. Cohen; Barney 
Cross; I. A. Drapkin; Moses Fleisig; A. J. Franks; Ralph 
Eric Fraser; Isaac BYiedman; A. Fyman; L, Goldstone; B. 
Haagman; W. Hernberg; J. Hyamson; A. Hyman; P. J. Isaac; 
C. Jacobs; A. Jacobson; Arnold Jackson; Barnett Jackson; Henry 
Kaufman; Sydney Jones Lawrence; A. Levie; A. Levy; B. Levy; 
B. R. Levy; J. M. Lyons; G. Moses; A. Moss (Berlinski); L. G. 
Phillipson; M. Raisman; H. S. Raphael; J. M. Rosenberg; S. 
Schottlander; Lewis Sefton; O. M. Selig; H. Sherman; W. H. 

Shiers; S. Simons; G. Solomon; Morris Solomon; Symona; 

S. Valentine; L. Zuidema. — Mentioned in Despatches: J. Abra- 
hams; Michael Adler, major, senior chaplain; E. H. L. Bedding- 
ton, temporary lieutenant-colonel; A. H. Beer, lieutenant; B. C. 
Behrens, captain; A. Benjamin, captain; R. H. Bergman, cap- 
tain; D. Boodson; Harry Brod; Philip Carlebach, lieutenant- 
colonel; S. M. Castello, lieutenant; A. F. Cohen, captain; C. D. 
Cohen, staff-lieutenant; Charles Waley Cohen, captain; H. B^. 
Cohen, major; H. E. Cohen, lieutenant-colonel; J. B. Brunei 
Cohen, captain; J. Waley Cohen, acting lieutenant-colonel; M. 
Cohen; C. Defries, captain; C. J. Blkan, temporary lieutenant- 
colonel; E. Ezra, lieutenant; D. I. Freedman, chaplain; I. Feld- 
man, captain; I. M. Gluckstein, captain; Stuart M. Green, lieu- 
tenant; E. S. Halford, second lieutenant; Archibald Isidore 
Harris, captain; L. J. Harris, lieutenant; Henry R. Hart, lieu- 
tenant; I. M. Heilbron, temporary major; Basil L. Q. Henriques, 
lieutenant; W. Q. Henriques, captain; W. Hyman, major; G. 
Isaacs; I. B. Isaacs, major; S. B. Isaacs, temporary major; A. 
Jacobs; H. C. Joel, temporary captain; H. D. Jonas, major; S. 
H. Joseph, acting major; H. V. Landsberg, captain; G. H. Lang- 
don, major; J. H. Levey, lieutenant-colonel; J. J. Leverson, brevet- 
colonel; E. Levy; L. A. Levy, lieutenant; B. S. Lion, lieuten- 
ant; H. M. Lion: S. Littmann; E. Marsden, lieutenant; D. 
G. Marks, major; T. Michael; J. Monash, major-general; D. A. H, 
Moses, lieutenant; G. Moses; S. Myer, temporary captain; 
Bernard E. Myers, lieutenant-colonel; A. A. Nathan, captain; F. 
L. Nathan, colonel; W. T. Pyke, captain; A. J. Raphael, assistant 
surgeon; C. Rosenthal, temporary brigadier-general; W. H. 
Samuel, temporary lieutenant-colonel; A. Schiff; H. S. Seligman, 
temporary brigadier-general; D. C. Solomon, captain; C. L. 
Symons. — Royal Red Cross j second class: Betty Angel. — Croix de 
Chierre (Belgian): M. Coplans, captain; Phillip Sassoon, 
captain; H. B. Schumann; S. Spero, captain. — Italian Military 
Medal: Julius Mendes Price. — Meritorious Service medal: S. M. 
Frankford. 



294 AMERICAN JEWISH YEAR BOOK 



Pbomotions 

Promoted "brigadier-general: Alexander; Gr6d€on peismar; 

P. S. Grumbach. — Promoted brevet-colonel: H. S. Seligman. — 
Promoted brevet-lieutenant-colonel: E. H. L. Beddington; C. J. 
Elkan. — Promoted lieutenant-colonel: C. Waley-Cohen; C. H. 
Leveson; Julian S. Marks; P. D. Samuel; S. Samuel; H. J. 
Solomon; Sir Edward D. Stern; H. Weisberg. — Promoted major: 
J. B. B. Cohen; W. J. A. Ormsby-Gore; J. J. Jacobs, S. H. Joseph; 

F. H. Klsch; H. V. Landsberg; S. Lipson, chaplain; Laurie 
Magnus; L. C. Mandelberg; J. S. Marks; V. B. Mocatta; A. A. 
Nathan; Herbert A. Nathan; H. L. Nathan; A. C. Oppenheim; 
R. W. Oppenheim; J. E. A. de Rothschild; L. Samuels; D, C. 
Stern; B. L. Strauss; W. R. Tuck; A. S. Waley. — Promoted 
adjutant: H. J. Behrens; E. G. Cohen; P. H. Emanuel; H. R. 
Hart; A. D. Kaufmann; C. M. Kohan; A. H. Myers; F. Schles- 
inger; A. J. Sington; J. C. Solomon. — Promoted captain: A. 
Abrahams; H. M. Adler; S. M. Adler; I. Alloun; E. da Costa 
Andrade; G. H. d'Avigdor; P. C. Balcon; H. T. Bamberger; 
W. J, Bamato; Arthur Behrend; A. F. Behrend; E. C. Behrens; 

G. S. Beirnstein; A. C. Bendit; A. L. Benjamin; E. V. Benjamin; 
H. S. Benjamin; H. H. Berlaudina; P. B. Berliner; E. Bromet; 
E. Cohen; E. G. Cohen; E. S. Cohen; P. L. Cohen; Myles Colt; 
Eric B. Binder Davis; E. D. Dowy; W. G. Dreschfeld; W. Dunkels; 
E. Duveen; H. N. Eppenheim; G. Frankan; S. Franks; J. Fred- 
man; S. Freedman; J. D. Genese; I. Gluckstein; G. H. A. Gold- 
berg; E. B. GoUin; S. Gosschalk; A. M. Gundle; Benjamin Hans- 
ford; H. H. Harris; D. H. Hartog; Leslie Holt; G. S. Hyams; 
H. Infeld; F. S. Isaac; G. R. Isaacs; S. Jacob; A. C. Jacobs; I. A. 
Jacobs; G. L. Jacobs; R. H. Jessel; A. F. Joseph; E, J. Kauf- 
mann; M. Krolik; J. Leon; W. S. Leveson; V. N. Levi; H. S. 
Levitt; L. H. Lion; W. Sebag-Montefiore; H. B. Moser; V. Myer; 

C. R. Myers; J. C. Myers; L. Myers; A. Nathan; C. H. Nathan; 
E. G. P. Nathan; Herbert A. Nathan; J. Nathan; L. H. Nathan; 
L. M. Nathan; G. N. Oppenheimer; M. Platnauer; H. F. Phillips; 
L. B. Phillips; F. M. Raphael; R. A. Raphael; G. H. Rossdale; 

B. H. Rothband; P. L. Rothband; J. E. A. de Rothschild; R. F. 
Rubinstein; A. Samuel; R. J. Samuel; W. H. Samuel; A, M. 
Sassoon; R. E. Sassoon; G. L. Schlesinger; T. A. Simons; 
A. J. C. Sington; P. H. Solomon; S. Spero; C. M. Spielman; H. 
E. Steinberg; T. H. Stern; C. A. Stiebel; E. B. Strauss; P. Treifus; 

D. B. Tuck; H. S. Warshawsky; V. M. Weil; H. L. Weinberg; 

C. G. L. Wolf; E. J. Wolfe; E. S. Woolf ; R. W. Woolfe.— Promoted 
lieutenant: J. Abraham; S. Abraham; P. S. Abraham; A. T. 
Abrahams; F. Abrahams; D. C. Abrahams; H. N. Abrahams; 
M. L. Abrahams; H. M. Adler; J. Afriat; C. A. Albu; I. Amsche- 
witz; D. J. Aron; V. R. Aronson; H. T. Bamberger; S. H. Lewis- 



EVENTS IN 5678— UNITED KINGDOM 295 

Bamed; H. Baron; Archibald de Bear; W. R. Beddington; 
D. H. Behrens; K H. Behrens; A. A. J. Benjamin; C M. B^a* 
min; H. S. Benjamin; M. A. Benjamin: R. N. Benjamin: T. T. 
Benjamin; S. Benzecry; S. J. Vanden Bergh; H. Bernheim; M, 
Besso; Alfred Blaiberg; E. J. Blaiberg; H. E. Blaiberg: J. L. W. 
Bles; H. Boas; W. B. Bonas; M. J. Bonn; K R Costello: H. A. 
Chetham; B. S. Ck>hen; C. D. Cohen; E L. Cohen; H. W. C<^en; 
K Cc^en; W. R Cohen; J. M. Coplans; A. H. da Costa; El Defries; 
B. EL Dreyfus; T. H. Dreyfus: M. N. Drucquer; I. M. Duparc; 
A. A. Dutch; W. Eidinow; Dr. Nathan Elijah; H. Emanuel; 
K L. Faick; C. O. EYank; G. N. Frankau; S. S. Frankenberg; 
J. BYanks; Donald H. D. Freeman; O. A. EYiedlander; Max 
W. Geffen; L. E. Geffen; J. Gluckstein; M. Gluckstein; N. P. 
Goldberg; J. W. Goldman; H. C. B. Goldsmith; U P. B. Gold- 
smith; B. A. Goldstein: H. P. Goldston; E. P. GollcH^; W, L. de 
Groot; W. G. Halford; B. B. Harris; S. H. Hart; Montague 
Arthur Hart; B. L. Q. Henriques: G. L. Q. Henriques; N. Hess; 

A. Hirschberg; W. Hurwitz; G. F. Hyams; R. S. Hyams; C. B. 
Hjmaji; N. E. Hyman; I. Ibbotson; G. F. Instone; Albert Isaacs; 

B. R B. Isaacs; J. C. Isaacs; L. R B. Isaacs; M. K Isaacs; J. L. 
Isaacson; V. Jabotlnsky; J. A. Jacob; A. E. Jacobs; A. H. Jacobs; 
A. de S. Jacobs; A. R Jacobs; C. J. Jacobs; Ivan A. Jacobs; 
Julius Jacobs; R Jacobs; R A. Jacobs; R S. Jacobs; T. C. 
Jacobs; I. JafEe; C. E. Jessel; R. H. Jessel; W. S. Joel; G. A. 
Joseph; H. Joseph; L. M. Joseph; P. R E. Josephs; P. W. G, 
Kann; J. C. Keyser; D. P. Kirstein; N. Kletz; C. M. Kohan; P. 
D. Krolik; M. Landauer; J. P. Lazarus; L. Levy; S. A. J. Levey; 

C. H. Levian; H. A. Levinson; K. A. Levy; H. M. Levy; J. Levy; 
L. Levy; M. Levy; M. A. Levy; M. P. Levy; N. B. Levy; S. W. 
Lewy; I. Liberman; H. F. Lindo; S. M. Lipsey; H. J. Lissack; 
M. S. Lissack; Saul E. Lyons; D. S. Marcus; E. V. H. Marcus; 
S. P. Marcus; J. S. Marks; Percy L. Marks; Charles V. S. J. 
Marsden; L. L. Melhado; C. S. Mendl; H. Meyer; E. Michaelis; 
R. Michaelis; O. B. Mocatta; H. M. Monteflore; R. N. Moritz; 
Noah Morris; H. R. Mosenthal; B. W. Moses; C. G. Myer; 
M. A. Myer; J. C. Myers; M. Myers; N. G. Myers; S. C, Myers; 
S. G. Myers; W. Myers; J. S. Naphtali; C. Nathan; D. Nathan; 
C. J. Nathan; B. G. P. Nathan; J. A. Nathan; R. P. Nathan; 
M. Nurock; A. Orenstein; G. B. P. de Pass; H. de Pass; R. D. 
de Pass; Benjamin S. F. Phillips; J. G. E. Phillips; C. D. de 
Pinna; E. R H. PoUak; W. S. Politzer; D. P. Pyke; F. Pyke; 
Joseph Leon Racionzer (Felix); O. P. Raphael; J. A, Romain; 
Sidney Solomon Roseberg; C. M. Rosenberg; E. Rosenfeld; J. 
Rosenfeld; Abraham Rothfield; L. V. Rothschild; I. Rothfleld; 
J. E. Rubenstein; G. R. Rudolph; A. L. Sagar; Sidney Salomon; 
C. M Samuel; H. B. Samuel; P. C. Samuel; R. J. Samuel; B. 
Samuels; R. E. D. Sassoon (retired); S. L. Sassoon; E. M. Selig- 



296 AMERICAN JEWISH YEAR BOOK 



man; O. J. Simon; V. A. Simon; F. H. Simons; I. J. Simons; 

D. R. Solomon; H. E. Solomon; Moses Solomon; R. B. Solomon; 
H. A. Solomons; Claude D. Soman; Richard George Somers; 
L. Spero; J. Spyer; H. S. Stern; L. Stern; S. L. Stern; M, L. 
Tebbitt; W. G. Tuck; M. P. Tuteur; E. G. Vandyk; A. Ventura; 
P. Vos; H. Lr. Weinberg; A. S. Woolf; C. N. S. Woolf ; E. S. Woolf ; 
P. S. Woolf; W. Woolf; H. Zeffertt. — Promoted second lieutenant: 
M. Abensur; A. Abrahams; C. R. Abrahams; K. D. Abrahams; 
L. I. Abrahams; S. Abrahams; W. G. L. Abrahams; H. Abraham- 
son; E. H. Ades; J. Adler; A. Asher; H. W. Auerbach; H. R. W. 
Bamberger; L. Barnett; P. Benda; A. L. Benjamin; B. B. Benja- 
min; E. M. Benjamin; H. D. Benjamin; L. A. Benjamin; M. 
Benjamin; A. H. Berg; J. S. Vander Bergh; J. T. Bergman; A. 
Besso; E. A. Bingen; H. E. Blaiberg; M. R. Blanckensee; I. 
Bloom; Harold Boodson; P. H. Brodziak; W. G. H. Bromet; 
H. L. Bronkhorst; W. Castello; Harry Claff; Arthur Montefiore 
Cohen; B. Cohen; E. Cohen; Hyman Cohen; H. A. Cohen; I. 
Cohen; J. Cohen; J. B. Cohen; Alfred Cowan; E. M. DaltrofC; 
L. Dreyfus; S. Duparc; G. W. Ellas; S. Epstein; L. L. Eskell; O. 
F, Falk; David Fox; George M. Frampton; C. J. Frankenstein; 
C. F. Franks; D. Fredman; W. Friedlander; H. A. Friend; S. 
Friend; E. J. Finzi; Lionel Alfred Furst; E. Gallop; P. S. Gaster; 
P. J. Goldberg; J. L. Goldman; L. L. Goldman; David Goldsmith; 
H. V. Goldsmith; A. A. Goldstein; P. D. Guggenheim; Arthur 
Harris; M. A. G. Hartog; E. H. Hassan; G. Heftel; D. E. Henochs- 
berg; E. Henriques; E. F. Q. Henriques; L. Q. Henriques; Charles 
Henry; L. Hess; E. S. Hyam; E. H. Hyman; F. L. Isaac; J. P. 
Isaac; F. H. Isaacs; G. H. Isaacs; G. L. Isaacs; H. Isodore-Isaacs ; 
J. B. Isaacs; V. H. Isaacs; A. Jacobs; A. A. Jacobs; E. J. Jacobs; 
J. Jacobs; M. R. Jacobs; P. J. Jacobs; S. Jacobs; S. N. Jacobson; 
F. V. Jacoby; L. Jellinck; G. W. Joel; L. Joel; W. E. Joel; C. 
Joseph; G. M. Joseph; J. R. Joseph; M. M. Joseph; W. J. Joseph; 

E. A. R. Josephs; P. Joshua; G. E. Kamm; B. G. Kaufmann; 
Alan G. Kaye; Sidney M. Keizer; J. F. Keif; C. H. Kisch; L. J. 
de Lara; Leonard H. Lazarus; R. Lazarus; L. C. Leapman; E. 
J. B. Leverson; E. Levey; B. J. Levi; F. J. Levi; H. H. Levin; 
M. J. Levine; A. G. Levy; B. L. Levy; F. Levy; H. B. Levy; J. 
Levy;M. Levy; P. Levy; R. F. Levy; D. Lewis; H. S. Libsteln; 
S. M. Lipsey; V. M. Lisbona; H. J. Lissack; S. Lotheim; J. 
Loupinsky; F. L. Lowy; G. A. Marks; J. H. Marks; L. Marks; 
M. Marks; C. E. Marsden; F. B. Mayer; L. Mendelssohn; M. G. 
Mendelsohn; E. G. Mendes; H. J. C. Mendes; W. E. Meyer; G. 
E. M. Michael; H. Michael; H. E. Michael; R. Michaelis; E. W. 
Michaelson; L. S. Milch; J. J. Mordecai; C. R. Moses; E. J. Moses; 
L. F. C. Moses; R. Moses; W. K. Moses; B. Myers; E. Myers; 
H. J. Myers; J. Myers; J. C. Myers; S. T. Myers; W. Myers; R. 



EVENTS IN 5678— UNITED KINGDOM 297 



S. Nathan; C. F. Nathan; E. Nathan; F. H. Nathan; G. S. M. 
Nathan; L. G. Nathan; M. Nathan; S. P. R. Jerrold-Nathan ; R. 
W. Norden; H. Oppenheimer; K. de Pass; J. B. Platnauer; I. R. 
Phillipowsky; E. B. Politzer; E. E. Pool; F. Van Praagh; L. 
Prins; W. Raffalovich; Jacob M. Rich; S. J. Rossdale; L. J. Roths- 
child; Frederick A. Rowe; C. C. Sagar; F. B. Sagar; G. Sagar; 
H. Sagar; A. D. Samuel; A. G. Samuel; E. H. Samuel; F. Samuel; 
J. F. Samuel; A. R. Samuels; S. M. Samuels; D. Sassoon; E. 
Saul; S. Schaverine; A. L. Schlesinger; Stanley Gustave 
Schwersee; Leopold Seligmann; H. Sherwood; J. Silverman; M 
D. Silverman; C. G. Simons; F. L. Simons; F. H. Solomon; H. 
Solomon; S. A. Solomon; S. A. R. Solomon; H. Solomons; L. P. 
Solomons; J. J. Somper; A. G. Sonnenthal; E. F. Sonnenthal (re- 
tired) ; E. F. Stein; H. K. Stein; R. D. Steinberg; M. J. Susskind; 
C. L. Symons; H. Tannebaum; E. A. Ullman; Moss Valentine; 
Joseph Wacks; R. G. Weil; B. Wolfe;* J. S. Wolfe; H. Wolfensohn; 
F. C. Woolf; L. D. Woolfe. Aviation officers: L. Abraham; T. N. 
Barling; A. C. Bencher; M. A. Benjamin; M. Besso; H. O. Eich- 
holz; J. Hirschberg; W. A. Isaacs; E. S. Jacobs; C. S. Joseph; 
W. E. Joseph; H. A. Keyser; J. C. Keyser; R. N. Keyser; S. P. 
Marcus; E. A. de Pass; E. R. H. Pollak; J. E. Rosselli; M. A. 
Rosenblatt; J. B. Solomon; S. Symons; J. B. Weiss. — Balloon 
officers: L. L. Falk; C. T. S. Mendl; H. H. Myers; D. R. Solo- 
mon. — Equipment officers: H. Cohen; H. JafEe; W. L. Joseph; N. 
J. Seline; H. R. Mosenthal; H. M. Solomon; A. A. Vandyk. — 
Chaplains: I. Frankenthal; D. I. Freedman; Lionel Geffen; 
David I. Hirsch; E. M. Levy; S. Lipson; H. L. Price. — Depart- 
ment assistant director of supplies and transport: I. M. Heil- 
bron. — Station transport officer: Harry Freeman. — Assistant di- 
rector requisition services: C. Waley-Cohen. — General staff officers: 
Anthony G. de Rothschild. — District adjutant-general: F C. Stern. 
— Department administrator: Miss C. R. Waley. 

War Necrology 

Arnold, Alfred Lewis, second lieutenant, aged 28, Aug. 15, 
1917. 

Barder, Sam Gerald, lieutenant, Sept. 30, 1916. 

Barron, L., lieutenant, Feb., 1918. 

Beaver, W. M., lieutenant, Oct., 1917. 

Beer, A., lieutenant, May, 1918. 

Behrens, Walter Louis, second lieutenant, aged 20, July 10, 
1917. 

Benjamin, Herrert S., captain, aged 27, Oct. 9, 1917. 

Benzecry, Solomon, lieutenant, aged 24, Nov. 30, 1917. 

Bergh, Seymour James Vanden, lieutenant, near Gaza, Oct. 27, 
1917. 

Bernstein, L., second lieutenant, Apl., 1918. 



298 AMERICAN JEWISH YEAR BOOK 



Blashki, Roy H., lieutenant, Aug. 3, 1917. 

Bbaun, Chables L., captain, at Nasirabad, India, aged 43, July, 
1917. 

Bowman, CIaAUde H., second lieutenant, aged 20, Aug. 16, 1917. 

Capper, Ernest R., captain, aged 36, Dec. 24, 1917. 

Cleef, H. V. Van, second lieutenant, Dec. 6, 1917. 

CoBUBN, C, second lieutenant, Mch., 1918. 

Cohen, B., lieutenant, July, 1917. 

Cohen, D. T., second lieutenant, Feb., 1918. 

Cohen, E., lieutenant, Sept., 1917. 

Cook, Norman George, second lieutenant, aged 20, June 28, 1917. 

Davis, Bash. R., lieutenant, aged 22, Sept. 20, 1917. 

Davis, C, captain, Oct., 1917. 

Davis, Clement John Burton, captain, aged 23, Sept. 25, 1917. 

Fink, Sidney, lieutenant, Apl., 1918. 

Fleet, Leonard, second lieutenant, aviator, aged 23, Oct. 27, 1917. 

Freedman, Bertie, lieutenant, aged 30, July 3, 1917. 

Freedman, Percy, second lieutenant, aged 24, Oct. 3, 1917. 

Friend, Joe, second lieutenant, Sept. 9, 1917. 

Gerber, E., Feb., 1918. 

Gluckman, p., lieutenant, Feb., 1918. 

Goldman, T., Feb., 1918. 

GoLLiN, E. B., captain, Nov., 1917. 

Henry, Arthur R., second lieutenant, Nov., 1917. 

Herbertson, A. H., lieutenant, aged 25, June, 1917. 

HuRSTBOURNE ( HiBSCHBEiN ) , WALTER H., sccoud Ucu tenant, aged 
23, June 23, 1917. 

Hyman, R., second lieutenant, Sept., 1917. 

Hyman, Robebt Leslie, second lieutenant, Aug. 22, 1917. 

Isaacs, Bebnard Cliffobd, second lieutenant, aged 26, Aug. 1, 
1917. 

Jacobs, Dabyl, second lieutenant, aged 26, Apl. 10, 1917. 

Josephs, H., second lieutenant, Feb., 1918. 

Joseph, S. H., acting major, Dec, 1917. 

Joseph, Wilfbid Gordon A, second lieutenant, Nov., 1917. 

Keyzor, Herbebt L. a., second lieutenant, aged 20, Mch. 9, 1918. 

Krolik, Elliot, captain, aged 22, Oct. 23, 1917. 

Lee, J., Feb., 1918. 

Leon, Edwabd Joseph, second lieutenant, aged 21, June, 1917. 

Leveson, R. M., lieutenant, Dec. 18, 1917. 

Levi, Habby, second lieutenant, Nov. 30, 1917. 

Lion, Neville I., lieutenant, Apl. 28, 1917. 

Lyons, E. T., second lieutenant, aged 30, Oct. 5, 1917. 

Mabtinson, Kabl L., second lieutenant, aged 20, June 1, 1917. 

Mendoza, H. K., lieutenant, July, 1917. 

Montagu, Richard H., lieutenant, aged 35, Sept. 21, 1917. 



EVENTS IN 5678— UNITED KINGDOM 299 



Morris, S., sergeant, Feb., 1918. 

Moses, Vivian Sylvester, second lieutenant, aged 19, June 4, 
1917. 
MYipts, Arthur Francis, lieutenant, Apl., 1918. 
Nathan, C. L., second lieutenant. May, 1918. 
Nathan, D., lieutenant, Sept., 1917. 
Nathan, R. P., captain, Apl., 1918. 
Nathan, W. S., second lieutenant, June, 1917. 
Nerson, Fernand Samuel, second lieutenant, Apl., 1917. 
Pass, William Hugh David de, lieutenant, Apl., 1918. 
Percival, a., lieutenant, aged 25, Oct. 15, 1917. 
Phillips, A. Z., captain, Jan., 1918. 
Platnauer, S. M., second lieutenant, Feb., 1918. 
Raphael, Harry George, second lieutenant, aged 24, July 31, 
1917. 
Reece, Arnold Aaron, second lieutenant, aged 21, Aug. 1, 1917. 
Reitlinger, Guy, captain, Dec, 1917. 
Rodney, W. B., second lieutenant, Jan., 1918. 
Rosenbaum, L. B., lieutenant. May, 1918. 
Rosenthal, Arthur, second lieutenant, aged 19, Nov. 24, 1917. 
Rosenthal, S., lieutenant, Oct., 1917. 

Rothschild, Evelyn de, major, in Palestine, aged 31, Nov. 19, 
1917. 
Samuul, Cecil Valentine, second lieutenant, Oct. 6, 1917. 

Samuel, Gerald George, lieutenant, aged 31, June 8, 1917. 

Samuels, G. B., second lieutenant, June, 1917. 

Samuels, Lesser J., major, aged 29, Sept. 29, 1917. 

ScHiFF, M. E. H., captain. May, 1918. 

ScHLoss, Lionel E., second lieutenant, aged 23, Aug. 1, 1917. 

Segal, Marcul, second lieutenant, aged 20, June 19, 1917. 

Simon, Victor H., major, June, 1917. 

Slowe, Abraham, second lieutenant, aged 24, Aug. 25, 1917. 

Smith, Cecil Owen, second lieutenant, aged 19, Aug. 20, 1917. 

Solomon, Alexander, lieutenant, aged 36, Aug. 15, 1917. 

Solomon, Arthur M., captain, Apl., 1918. 

Solomon, E. J., second lieutenant, Aug., 1917. 

Solomon, L. S., lieutenant, May, 1918. 

Spiers, A. L. C, lieutenant, aged 33, Sept. 26, 1917. 

Starfield, B., lieutenant, Jan. 19, 1918. 

Stern, Sydney, lieutenant, aged 18, July 19, 1917. 

Stern, Sydney L., lieutenant, Feb. 21, 1918. 

SuQARMAN, M., Feb., 1918. 

Vanderlinde, Simon, second lieutenant, aged 30, Oct. 18, 1917. 

Waley, Aubry John Simon, lieutenant, July 31, 1917. 

Weiss, E3dward Stanley, second lieutenant, Dec, 1917. 

Workman, M. J., lieutenant, June, 1917. 



300 AMERICAN JEWISH YEAR BOOK 



^ JEWISH NATIONAL OEGANIZATIONS IN THE 

UNITED STATES 

An asterisk (♦) indicates tliat complete information was not procurable. 



ALLIANCE ISRAELITE UNIVERSELLE 
Org. May, 1860. Office : 150 Nassau, New York City 



AMERICAN JEWISH COMMITTEE 

Org. Nov. Jl, 1906 ; inc. Mch. 16, 1911. Office : 31 Union Square West, 

New York City 

For report, see pp. 362-406. 



AMERICAN JEWISH HISTORICAL SOCIETY 

Org. 1892. Office: 38 Park Row, New York City 

Twenty-sixth Annual Meeting, Feb. 11-12, 1918, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Members, 390. 

Has issued twenty-six volumes of publications and an index to publica- 
tions 1-20. Maintains a collection of books, manuscripts, and historical 
objects in its room in the building of the Jewish Theological Seminary, 
531 W. 123d, N. Y. C. 

Officers : Pres., Cyrus Adler, Phila., Pa. ; Vice-Pres., Simon W. Rosen- 
dale, Albany, N. Y. ; David Philipson, Cincinnati, O. ; Julian W. Mack, 
Chicago, 111. ; Richard J. H. Gottheil ; Treas., N. Taylor Phillips ; Curator, 
Leon Htihner ; Cor. Sec, Albert M. Friedenberg, 38 Park Row ; Rec. Sec, 
Samuel Oppenheim, N. Y. C. 

EiXECDTivE Council : The Officers, and Chas. J. Cohen, Phila., Pa. ; Henry 
Cohen, Galveston, Tex. ; Herbert Friedenwald, N. Y. C. ; Lee M. Fried- 
man, Boston, Mass. ; Jacob H. Hollander, Baltimore, Md. ; Max J. Kohler, 
L. Napoleon Levy, N. Y. C. ; Max L. Margolis, Phila.. Pa. ; Alexander Marx, 
N. Y. C. ; A. S. W. Rosenbach, Mayer Sulzberger, Phila., Pa. ; Simon Wolf, 
Washington, D. C. ; Oscar S. Straus, N. Y. C, ex-offlcio, as past President 
of the Society. 

AMERICAN UNION OF ROUMANIAN JEWS 
Org. 1916. Office : 44 7th, New York City 

Second Annual Convention, Dec 30, 1917, New York City. 

Purpose : To further, defend, and protect the interests of the Jews in 
Roumania, to work for their civic and political emancipation, and for their 
economic reconstruction and rehabilitation, and to represent and further the 
interests of the Roumanian Jews in the United States and Canada. 

Officers : Pres., Pie;*re A. Siegelstein ; Vice-Pres., M. Y. Belber ; A. B. 
Goldenberg ; Z. Petreanu ; Treas., Sam Schwartz ; Sec, Edw. Herbert ; 
Jos. E. Braunstein ; A. L. Kalman. 

Executive Committee: Chairman, Leo Wolfson ; Vice-Chairman, Louis 
Diamant ; Vice-Pres., C. Berkowitz, Cuba ; J. Eaton. Rhode Island ; C. 
Edelstein, Massachusetts ; Isidor Escann, Maryland ; Reuben Fink, Wash- 



JEWISH NATIONAL ORGANIZATIONS 301 



ington, D. C. ; Sam Ghinsberg, California ; A. GUckman, Illinois ; D. Goldta, 
Michigan; A. Greenberg, Connecticut; Chas. Juster, Minnesota; H. M. 
Kaiserman, Canada; Oscar Leonard, Missouri; W. Markovich, Indiana; 
Jacques Nadler, Alabama; .Tac. Rosenberg, Florida; Louis B, Siegelstein, 
Ohio ; Paul R. Silberman, New Jersey. 

BARON DE HIRSCH FUND 
Org. Feb. 9, 1891 ; inc. 1891. Office : 80 Maiden Lane, New York City 

Twenty-seventh Annual Meeting, Feb. 3, 1918, New York City. 
The activities of the Fund fall under the following heads : 
I. Bahon db Hirsch Agricultural School, Woodbine, N. J., offer- 
ing to Jewish young men a course in Agriculture. 
II. Babon db Hirsch Trade School, 222 B. 64th, N. Y. C, offering 
to Jewish young men instruction in day classes in the following 
trades : Machinist, Plumbing, Electrical, House, Fresco, and Sign 
Painting, Printing, Sheet Metal Work, Woodworking and Car- 
pentry, and Operating Engineering. 

III. Woodbine Land and Improvement Company. 

IV. English Education to Immigrants. Day and Evening Classes. 
V. Relief Work. Through subsidized societies in Maryland : Balti- 
more. — Massachusetts : Boston. — New York : Brooklyn, New 
York City. — Pennsylvania : Philadelphia. 

Officers : Pres., Eugene S. Benjamin, 104 E. 25th ; Vice-Pres., Jacob H. 
Schiff ; Treas., Simon F. Rothschild ; Hon. Sec, Max J. Kohler, 52 William, 
N. Y. C. 

Trustees : The Officers, and Charles L. Bernheimer, Nathan Bijur, 
Abram I. Elkus, Alfred Jaretzki, Herbert H. Lehman, S. G. Rosenbaum, 
N. Y. C. ; S. S. Fleisher, Mayer Sulzberger, Phila., Pa. 

General Agent : B. A. Palitz. 



CANTORS' ASSOCIATION OF AMERICA 

(SUCCESSOR TO SOCIETY OF AMERICAN CANTORS) 

Org. June 1, 1908. Office: 77 Delancey, New York City 

Eighth Annual Meeting, May 14, 1917, New York City. 

Members, 250. 

Officers : Pres., Sol. Baum ; Vice-Pres., A. Gann, S. Lipsky ; Sec, A. 
Auerbach, Joseph Salzman, 312 E. 72d ; Treas., A. Aranoff, N. Y. C. 

Directors : N. Abramson, N. Cantor, A. Frachtenberg, S. Grafman, 
S. Lipltz, N. Metzoff, J. Rappaport, S. Salzberg, S. Singer. 



CENTRAL, CONFERENCE OP AMERICAN RABBIS 
Org. July 9, 1899. Office : Euclid Ave. Temple, Cleveland, O. 

Twenty-ninth Annual Convention, June 28-July 4, 1918, Chicago, 111. 

Members, 251. 

Has issued twenty-eight volumes of its Year Book ; and besides, the 
Union Prayer Book ; the Union Hymnal ; the Union Haggadah ; Prayers for 
Private Devotion ; a special Army Ritual for Soldiers of the Jewish Faith 
(1916) ; and various other publications. 

Officers, 1918-19 : Hon. Pres.. Kaufman Kohler, Cincinnati, O. ; Pres., 
Louis Grossman, Cincinnati, O. ; Vice-Pres., Leo M. Franklin, Detroit, Mich. ; 
Treas., Abram Simon, Washington, D. C. ; Rec. Sec, Abram Hirschberg, 
Chicago, 111. ; Cor. Sec, Louis Wolsey, Cleveland, O. 

Executive Board, 1918-19 : Edw. N. Calisch, Richmond, Va. ; Gotthard 
Deutsch, Cincinnati, Ohio ; Wm. Fineshriber, Memphis, Tenn. ; G. G. Fox, 
Fort Worth, Tex. ; Ephraim Frisch. N. Y. C. ; David Leikowitz, Dayton, O. ; 
Max Merritt, Evansvllle, Ind. ; Julian Morgenstem, Cincinnati, O. ; William 



302 AMERICAN JEWISH YEAR BOOK 



Rosenau, Baltimore, Md. ; Jacob Singer, Lincoln, Neb.; Joseph Stolz, 
Chicago, 111. 



COUNCIL OF JEWISH WOMEN 
Org. Sept., 1893. Office: 8437 Paseo, Kansas City, Mo. 

Eighth Triennial Convention, Nov., 1917, Chicago, 111. 

Sections, 91 ; Junior Auxiliaries, 31. 

The work of the Council is conducted under the following Committees : 
Religion, Religious Schools, Philanthropy, Junior Auxiliaries, Civic and 
Communal AflCairs, Peace and Arbitration, Education, Legislation, Sub-Com- 
mittee on Blind, Welfare of Jewish Deaf, Social Hygiene, Purity of the 
Press, and a National Department of Immigrant Aid with office in New 
York City, 242 B. Bway. Chairman, Helen Winkler. 

The National body supports a Department of Immigrant Aid, and the 
Sections are engaged in religious, philanthropic, and educational work. 

Officers : Pres., Janet Simons Harris (Mrs. Nath.), 114 South Av., 
Bradford, Pa. ; First Vice-Pres., Rose Brenner, Brooklyn, N. Y. ; Second 
Vice-Pres., Mrs. Israel Cowen, Chicago. 111. : Treas., Sara Messing Stern 
(Mrs. Leon), Terre Haute, Ind. ; Rec. Sec, Grace Goldstein, Dallas, Tex.; 
Ex. Sec, Mrs. Ernestine B. Dreyfus, 3437 Paseo, Kansas City, Mo. 

Directors : (1914-1920) Mrs. Richard D. Bakrow, Louisville, Ky. ; Mrs. 
S. M. Blumauer, Portland, Ore. ; Mrs. P. A. Johnson, Pittsburgh, Pa. ; 
Mrs. D. B. Levy, Norfolk, Va. ; Mrs. B. E. Pollak, N. Y. C. ; (1917-1923) 
Mrs. Leo H. Hertz, New Haven, Conn. ; Mrs Clarence E. Mack, Cincinnati, 
O. ; Mrs. Leopold Metzger, Minneapolis, Minn. ; Mrs. Leo Schwartz, Nash- 
ville, Tenn. ; Mrs. Wm. D. Sporborg, Portchester. N. Y. 



COUNCIL OF YOUNG MEN'S HEBREW AND KINDRED 

ASSOCIATIONS 

Org. Nov., 1913. Office: 31 Union Square West, New York City 

First Triennial Convention, Nov. 10-12, 1916, New York City. 

Societies, 372. 
. Purpose : To promote the religious, intellectual, physical, and social 
well-being and development of Jewish young men and women, and to that 
end to stimulate the organization, in the several States and Territories of 
the United States and in the Dominion of Canada, of Young Men's Hebrew 
Associations, to assist, advise, and encourage such associations when 
formed; to further the correlation of their activities and the mutual inter- 
change of the advantages which they afford, and to co-operate with other 
corporations or associations conducted under Jewish auspices. 

Officers : Pres., Julian W. Mack, Chicago, 111. ; Treas., I. Lehman ; Sec, 
Felix M. Warburg, 52 William, N. Y. C. 

Board of Trustees : Cyrus Adler, Phila., Pa. ; Adolph Lewisohn, 
N. Y. C. ; Julian W. Mack, Chicago, 111. ; Jacob H. Schiflf, and Herbert N. 
Straus, N. Y. C. 

Board of Managers : I. W. Bernhelm, Louisville, Ky. ; Alfred M. Cohen, 
Cincinnati, O. ; David A. Ellis, Boston, Mass. ; Harry B^schel, Samuel 
Greenbaum, N. Y. C ; Isaac Hassler, Phila., Pa ; Irving Lehman, N. Y. C. ; 
Jacob M. Loeb, Chicago, 111. ; Julian W. Mack, Chicago, 111. ; Louis Marshall, 
N. Y. C. ; Jacob Newman, New Orleans, La. ; Max C. Sloss, San Francisco, 
Cal. : Mrs. Israel Unterberg, Felix M. Warburg, N. Y. C. ; A. Leo Weil, Pitts- 
burgh, Pa. 

Comptroller : Miss H. B. Lowenstein, N. Y. C. 

Advisory Board : Samson Benderly, I. Edwin Goldwasser, M. M. Kaplan. 
J. L. Magnes, all of N. Y. C. 



JEWISH NATIONAL ORGANIZATIONS 303 

DROPSIE COLLEGE FOR HEBREW AND COGNATE 

LEARNING 

Inc. May 20, 1907. Broad and York, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Incorporated in State of Pennsylvania. 

Invested funds May, 1918, amount to $838,340.34. 

Library : Volumes and pamphlets, 18,300. 

Officers: Pres., Cyrus Adler; Vice-Pres., Mayer Sulzberger; Treas., 
Oscar B. Teller ; Sec, Ephraim Lederer, Phila., Pa. 

Board of Governors : The Officers, and Harry Frledenwald. Baltimore, 
Md. ; Louis Gerstley, Phila., Pa. ; Louis Marshall, N. Y. C. ; Simon Miller, 
A. S. W. Rosenbach, Horace Stern, Phila., Pa. ; Oscar S. Straus, N. Y. C. ; 
Edwin Wolf, Phila., Pa. 

Faculty: Pres., Cyrus Adler (M, A.. Pennsylvania; Ph. D., Johns Hop- 
kins) ; Professor in charge of the Biblical Department, Max L. Margolls 
(M. A., Ph. D., Columbia) ; Professor in charge of the Rabbinical Depart- 
ment, Henry Malter (Ph. D., Heidelberg) ; Instructor Department of 
Cognate Languages, Jacob Hoschander (Ph. D., Marburg) ; Instructor 
Historical Department, Abraham A. Neuman (M. A., Columbia ; H. L. D.. 
Jewish Theological Seminary of America) ; Instructor Biblical Department 
and Assistant Librarian, Joseph Reider (B. A., College of the City of New 
York ; Ph. D., Dropsie College) ; Instructor Talmud and Arabic, B. Halper 
(M. A., London; Ph.D., Dropsie College); Resident Lecturer in Jewish 
Jurisprudence and Institutes of Government, Hon. Mayer Sulzberger 
(LL. D., Jefferson, Temple; H. L. D., Jewish Theological Seminary of 
America). 

EASTERN COUNCIL OF REFORM RABBIS 
Org. Apl. 22, 1912. Office : 1098 Sterling Place, Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Twelfth Semi-annual Assembly, Apl. 28-29, 1918, New York City. 

Members, 46. 

Purpose : To offer a reaffirmation of the members* faith in the per- 
manent character and value to Israel and to the world of Liberal or 
Reform Judaism. 

Officers : Pres., Joseph Silverman ; VIce-Pres., Rudolph Grossman ; 
Treas., Joseph Gorfinkel ; Sec, Benj, Tlntner, N. Y. C. 

Executive Committee : Rudolph Grossman, Maurice H. Harris, Nathan 
Krass, Clifton H. Levy, Alexander Lyons, F. de Sola Mendes, Isaac S. 
Moses, Max Raisin, Max Reichler, Stephen S. Wise, all of Greater New 
York ; Marius Ranson, Paterson, N. J. 



EDUCATIONAL LEAGUE FOR THE HIGHER EDUCATION 

OF ORPHANS 
Org. 1896. Office : 336 Engineer's Bldg., Cleveland, O. 

Twenty-second Annual Meeting; July 8, 1917, Cleveland, O. 

Members, 2124. 

Officers : Pres., S. Wolfenatein, Cleveland, O. ; Vice-Pres., Mos«s J. 
Gries, Cleveland, O. ; Hon. Vice-Pres., Nathan Cohn, Tenn. ; Jacob Fnrth, 
Mo. ; Adolph Freund, Mich. ; Milton R. Hart, 111. ; Sol. S. KIser, Ind. ; 
Louis S. Levi, Southern Ohio ; Max S. Schayer, Colo. ; Simon Wolf, District 
of Columbia ; Treas., Alfred A. Benesch, Cleveland, O. ; Sec, Ekigene B. 
Wolf, Engineer's Blder., Cleveland, O. 

GovEBXOits : Adolf Kraus, Pres. I. O. B. B. ; A. B. Seelenfrennd, Sec. 
L O. B. B. ; and as ex-offldo members of the Board, the officers and members 




304 AMERICAN JEWISH YEAR BOOK 



of the Executive Committee of the I. O. B. B. ; David Alexander, Toledo, O. ; 
Myrtle W. Baer, Milwaukee, Wis. ; Block, Cleveland, O. ; Isidore Frei- 
berger, Cleveland, O. ; Bernard Ginsberg, Detroit, Mich. ; Edna Goldsmith, 
Cleveland, O. ; Mrs. Bernard Greensfelder, St. Louis, Mo. ; Grace Gross- 
man, Youngstown, O. ; Eugene Halle, Cleveland, O. ; Clarence J. Hays, 
Cleveland, 0. ; D. Huebsch, Cleveland, O. ; Mrs. Sigmund Joseph, Cleveland, 
O. ; J. Kobacker, Toledo, O. ; Samuel J. Kornhauser, Cleveland, O. ; B^ed 
Lazarus, Jr., Columbus, O. ; Mrs. David Lefkowitz, Dayton, O. ; Meyer 
Lovitch, Scranton, Pa. ; Joseph A. Magnus, Cincinnati, O. ; M. J. Mandel- 
baum, Cleveland, O. ; Charles Mayer, Lincoln, Neb^ Mrs. L. S. Musliner, 
Detroit, Mich. ; Emil Nathan, St. Louis, Mo. ; Sidney E. Pritz, Cincinnati, O. ; 
Mrs. Frank Rosenblatt, St. Joseph, Mo. ; Anna C. Roth, Toledo, O. ; Joseph 
Schonthal, Columbus, O. ; E. A. Schwarzenberg, Cleveland, O. ; Abba Hillel 
Silver, Cleveland, O. ; Philip Stein, Chicago, 111. ; Alex. Stern, Fargo, N. 
Dak. ; I. S. Stem, Madison, Ind. ; David Sternberg, Memphis, Tenn ; Emil 
Straus, Cleveland, O. ; Carl Vetsburg, St. Louis, Mo. ; A. Weinstein, Fort 
Wayne, Ind. ; Wm. Woolner, Peoria, 111. 



FEDERATED ZIONIST SOCIETIES OF THE MIDDLE WEST 

(MERGED IN ZIONIST ORGANIZATION OF AMERICA) 

Org, Oct. 25, 1898. Office: 1212 Ashland Blk., Chicago, 111. 

Twenty-first Annual Convention, Dec. 31, 1917-Jan. 3, 1918, Chicago, 111. 

Societies, 116. 

Aflaiiated with the Federation of American Zionists. 

Officers : Hon. Pres., Julian W. Mack, Chicago, 111. ; Pres., Max Shul- 
man ; Vice-Pres., H. M. Kallen, Madison, Wis. ; Nathan D. Kaplan, Chicago, 
111. ; Jacob M. Loeb, Chicago, 111. ; Hugo Pam, Chicago, 111. ; I. S. Sheinfeld, 
Milwaukee, Wis. ; Treas., B. Horwich ; Sec, S. A. Hoffman, 1212 Ash- 
land Blk., Chicago, 111. ; Chairman Executive Committee, Leon Zolotkoff, 
Chicago, 111. 

FEDERATION OF AMERICAN ZIONISTS 
Org. 1897. Office : 44 E. 23d, New York City 

Twenty-first Annual Convention, June 23-27, 1918, Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Number of Sheckel-payers, 120,000. Members, 30,069. 

Societies, 233 ; Camps of Order Sons of Zion, 90 ; Gates of Order Knights 
of Zion, 93 ; Hadassah Chapters, 61. Senior Young Judaea, 96 ; Inter- 
collegiate Zionist Societies. 25. 

The Federation issues the Maccahaian, a monthly, in English ; Doa Tid- 
diahe Folk, a weekly, in Yiddish ; and Young Judean. 

For Officers and Executive Committee, see Zionist Organization of 
America. 



FEDERATION OF JEWISH FARMERS OF AMERICA 
Org. Jan. 20, 1909. Office: 174 Second Av., New York City 

Ninth Annual Convention, Dec. 9-12, 1917, New York City. 

Members, 1235. 

Societies, 42. 

Purpose : To advance the interests of Jewish farmers. 

Officers : Ely Greenblatt, Botsford, Conn. ; Vice-Pres., Solomon Grudin, 
Hightstown, N, J. ; Sec, J. W. Pincus, 174 Second Av. ; Treas., A. M. Kuntz, 
Iselin, N. J. 



JEWISH NATIONAL. ORGANIZATIONS 305 



Directors : Paul Abelson, N. Y. C. ; J. H. Aronowitz, Hebron. Conn. ; 
Jacob Benenson, Napanoch, N. Y. ; Joseph Cohen, Woodbine, N. J. ; Samuel 
Friedman, Attleboro, Mass. ; Philip Goldstein, Montlcello, N. Y. ; Morris 
Guller, Nassau, N. Y. ; Samuel Hein, N. Y. C. ; BenJ. London. Colchester 
Conn. ; Louis Rosenblatt, Glenwild, N. Y. ; Sam'l Schindler, Hurleyvllle, 
N. Y. ; Morris Seidman, Landsdale, Pa. ; Jacob Weiner, EllenviUe, N. Y. ; 
Isidor D. Wolf, Woodridge, N. Y. ; Maurice Wolf. Porrineville, N. J. 



FEDERATION OF ORIENTAL JEWS OF AMERICA 
Org. 1912. Office: 356 Second Av., New York City 

Fourth Annual Meeting, Jtine, 1917, New York City. 

Societies, 32. 

Purpose : Americanization and betterment of condition of Oriental Jews. 

Officers : Pres., Joseph Gedalecia ; Vice-Pres., Joseph Hakim. Sabatai 
Menachem, Jacques Varon ; Treas., Albert Benadaba ; Sec, Albert J. 
Amateau. 

Advisory Board : Cyrus Adler, Phila., Pa. ; Sudie American, Mrs. David 
J. Benoliel, Mrs. Victor Brenner, Abram I. Klkus, Leon Sanders, Max Senior, 
Leo Sulzberger, Edward Valensi, Jacques Valensl, N. Y. C. 



FEDERATION OF ROUMANIAN JEWS OF AMERICA 
Org. Mch. 8, 1908. Office : 42 7th, New York aty 

Seventh Annual Convention, June 5, 1915, New York City. 

Members, 40,000. 

Branches, 50. 

Purpose : To aid Roumanian Jews here and in Eoumanla. 

Officers: Hon. Pres., P. A. Sl^elsteln, 220 E. 12th: Pres., Chtkriea I. 
Fleck ; Vlce-Pres., Morltz Graubard, Max Rublnger, and Herman Speler ; 
Treas., B. Cameol ; Sec., J. E. Braunsteln, N. Y. C. 

Trustees : L. £k:k6tein, L. Nusslnoff, and Wm. Schrell>er. 

Directors : H. Altbach, Mrs. S. Berkovitz, H. Blrnl>aum, H. Bookstaber, 
I. Braunstein, L. Eckstein, P. Ferester, Mrs. M. Hcbman, Zlg. Flchman, 
Cbas. I. Fleck, M. B. Friedman, Mrs. C. Glassberg, M. Gl&ssberg, I. M. 
Gllckman, C. Goldenthal, William Goodman. Harrv Greenberg, Ph. Jaeger, 
A, Klndler, R. Koemer, E. Koffler, Joseph Komer, Mrs. E. Kram«r, S. 
Kramer, Max Marcus, M. Markowltz, B. Milberg, h. Nussinoff, J. Pockcr, 
Mrs. S. Rosenthal, N. Rosenzweig. Chas. Rubinger. Max Rubiziger, A. Scbaif- 
ner, M. Schoenfeld, Sam Schwartz, Slgmund Scnwartz, B. £. Siegelstein, 
Leonard A. Snitkln, 6. Solomonidl, H. Speler, B. Stein, N. VladJinger, J. 
Weitzner. 



FEDERATION OF ROUMANIAN JEWS OF AMERICA 
Org. Mch. 8, 1908. Office : 185 Forsyth, New York C^ty 

Ninth Annual Convention, May 27-28, 1916. New York City. 

Members, 20,000. 

Branches, 40. 

Purpose : To aid Roumanian Jews in Roumania : local charity activities ; 
and to participate in all movements of J*- wish National character. Main- 
tains Jewish Home for Convalebceuts at Grand Vlt^w, on the Hudson, N. Y. 

Officers : Pres.. Samuel Goldntein ; Vice-Pres., Louis Weias, Nathan 
Sei^el. Rose Markowltz. Mrs, Clara Bereano ; Trea«., Michael Baumann ; 
Ex. Sec.. Chas. L. Ornstein. 

Trustees : Isaac Aberman, Jacob Balleuberg, Isaac Korman. Louis 
Naiderman, and Max Ornstein. 



306 AMERICAN JEWISH YEAR BOOK 



HADASSAH 

THE WOMEN'S ZIONIST ORGANIZATION 

(MERGED IN ZIONIST ORGANIZATION OF AMERICA) 

Org, 1912. Office : 44 E. 23d, New York City 

Fifth Annual Convention, June 24-27, 1918, Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Chapters, "61. 

Purpose: In America, to foster Jewish ideals and make Zionist propa- 
ganda : in Palestine, to establish a system of District Visiting Nursing. 

Affiliated with the Federation of American Zionists. 

Central Committee : Mrs. A. H. Promenson, Mrs. H. B. Lefkowitz, Lotta 
Levensohn, Jessie E. Sampter, Mrs. Jacob Sobel, Nellie Straus, Henrietta 
Szold, Mrs. Emll Weinhelm, Mrs. Charles Zunser. 



HAI RESH FRATERNITY 

Org. July, 1907. Office : St. Joseph, Mo. 

Tenth Annual Conclave, Dec. 28-30, 1917, St. Louis, Mo. 

Members, 350. 

Chapters, 22. 

Officers : Council Chief, Aaron M. WeitzenhofCer, Blackwell, Okla. ; 
Council Prophet, Myron H. Morreau, Cleveland, O. ; Council Scribe, Jack 
Furth, St. Louis, Mo. ; Council Installer, Rudolph W. Loeb, Atlanta, Ga. ; 
Council Historian, Milton Rosenau, Philadelphia, Pa. ; Council Editor, 
Milton Heidenheim, New Orleans, La. 



HEBREW SHELTERING AND IMMIGRANT AID SOCIETY 

OF AMERICA 
Office : 229-231 East Broadway, New York City 

An amalgamation of the Hebrew Sheltering House Association, organized 
Nov., 1888, and the Hebrew Immigrant Aid Society, organized 1901. 

Twenty-ninth Annual Convention, Mch. 14, 1918, New York City. 

Members, 76,033. 

Purpose : To facilitate the lawful entry of Jewish immigrants at the 
various ports in the United States, to provide them with temporary as- 
sistance, to prevent them from becoming public charges, to discourage their 
settling in congested cities, to encourage them to follow agricultural pur- 
suits, to prevent ineliglbles from Immigrating to the United States, tp foster 
American ideals, and to instill in them a knowledge of American history 
and institutions, and to make better known the advantages of desirable 
immigration. 

Officers r Pres., John L. Bernstein, N. Y. C. ; Vice-Pres., Isaac Heller, 
Boston, Mass. ; Leon Kamalky, N. Y. C. ; Louis Eldward Levy, Philadelphia, 
Pa. ; Max Meyerson, Jersey City, N. J. ; Leo S. Schwabacher, Seattle, Wash. ; 
Israel Silberstein, Baltimore, Md. ; Harry K. WolflC, San Francisco, Cal. ; 
Treas., Harry Fischel, N. Y. C. ; Hon Sec, Jacob Massel ; General Manager, 
Jacob R. Fain, N. Y. C. 

Board of Directors : Morris Asofsky, B. B. Berkowitz, Herman Bern- 
stein, John L. Bernstein, Henry G. Bralower, Joseph E. Eron, Harry Fischel. 
Isaac Friedkin, Adolph Held, Isaac Heller, Phillip Hersh, I. Hershfield, Ph. 
Jaches, Alexander Kahn, Mrs. Leon Kamalky, Leon Kamaiky, Aaron J. Levy, 
Louis Edward Levy, H. Linetzky, A. Lubarsky, Joseph S. Marcus, H. Mas- 
liansky, Samuel Mason, Jacob Massel. Max Meyerson, Leon H. Moisseiff, 
M. H. Phillips, Nathan Roggen, A. Rosenblatt, Leon Sanders, E. Sarasohn, 



JEWISH NATIONAL ORGANIZATIONS .307 



Leo S. Schwabacher, Bernard Semmel, B. Shelvin, Israel Silbersteln, 
Harry K. Wolflf. 

For Baltimore, Md. : Benjamin Beck, M. Henry Goldstone, Adolph Kres. 

For Boston, Mass.: M. Alman, Samuel Kabatznik, Harris Poorvu. 

For Philadelphia, Pa. : Jacob GInsburg, Andrew Kaas, Howard S. Levy. 

For San Francisco, Oal: I. J. Aschheim, Martin A. Meyer, M. Spiegelman, 

For Seattle, Wash.: Nathan Eckstein, Julius C. Lang, Henry C. Pickard. 



HEBREW UNION COLLEGE 

(See p. 321) 



HISTADRUT IBRITH 
Org. May 21, 1916. Office: 44 E. 23d, New York City 

Second Annual Convention, Apl. 28, 1918, New York City. 

Members, 1300. 

Societies, 32. 

Purpose : Hebrew culture and revival of language. 

Officeks : Hon. Pres., S. Levin ; Pres.. Reuben Bralnln ; Treas., A. 
Lubarsky; Sec, M. Bernstein, 2933 W. 27th, Coney Island, N. Y. ; N. 
Kamenetzky, 1269 Fifth Av., N. Y. C. 

Executive Committee : H. BavU, M. Bernstein, Reuben Bralnin, A. 
Friedland, I. Prishberg, I. GInsburg, Ab. Goldberg, S. Goldenberg, M. Halevi, 
S. Levin, B. Mossensohn, D. Persky, Z. Sharfstein, M. Shelnkin, B. Shelvin, 
N. Slousch, K. Whiteman. 

INDEPENDENT ORDER OF B'NAI B'RITH 
Org. Nov. 1, 1843. Office : 1228 Tribune Bldg., Chicago, 111. 

Tenth Quinquennial Convention, May 2, 1915, San Francisco, Cal. 

Members, 40,083. 

Lodges, 442 (in North America, Europe, Asia, and Africa). 

Districts, 11 (7 in the United States). 

Institutions founded by the Order in the United States : Hebrew Or- 
phan's Home, Atlanta, Ga. ; B'nai B'rith Cemetery, Chicago, 111. ; Free 
Employment Bureau, Chicago, .111. ; Jewish Widows* and Orphans' 
Home. New Orleans, La. ; Touro Infirmary, New Orleans, La. ; Home 
foe Aged and Infirm, Yonkers, N. Y. ; Cleveland Jewish Orphan 
Asylum, Cleveland, O. ; B'nai B'rith Free Employment Bureau, Pitts- 
burgh. Pa. ; Relief Committee. Hot Springs, Ark. ; B'nai B'rith Club, 
San Francisco, Cal. ; Home for Jewish Orphans, Los Angeles, Cal. ; Im- 
migrant Schools, at Kalamazoo. Mich., and Memphis, Tenn. ; Sabbath 
Schools, at Houghton, Mich. ; Trenton, N. J. ; Sharon, Pa., and Madison, 
Wis. ; B'nai B'rith Orphanage, at Erie, Pa. ; Leo N. Levi Hospital, Hot 
Springs, Ark. 

Officers : Pres., Adolf Kraus, Chicago, 111. ; First Vice-Pres., Lucius 
L. Solomons, San Francisco, Cal. ; Second Vice-Pres., Archibald A. Marx, 
New Orleans, La. ; Treas., Jacob B*urth, St. Louis, Mo. ; Sec, Alex. B., Seelen- 
freund, Chicago, 111. 

Executive Committee : Simon Wolf, Washington, D. C. : Charles Hart- 
man, N. Y. C. ; Henry Morgenthau. N. Y. C. ; E. N. Calisch, Richmond, Va. ; 
Jacob Singer, Phila., Pa. ; Philip Stein, Chicago, 111. ; Berthold Timendorfer, 
Berlin, Germany ; Adolphe Stern, Bucharest, Roumania ; Sol. Ehrmann, 
Vienna, Austria ; J. NIego, Constantinople, Turkey. 

Districts : I. Org. 1851. Lodges, 44. Territory : Connecticut, Maine, 
Massachusetts, New Hampshire, New York. Rhode Island, Vermont, and 
Eastern Canada. Sec, B. M. Kaplan, 2307 Broadway, N. Y. C. 



308 AMERICAN JEWISH YEAR BOOK 



II. Org. 1852. Ix)dges. 45. Territory : Colorado, Indiana, Kansas, 
Kentucky. Missouri, New Orleans, and Ohio. Sec, Victor Abraham, 504 
St. Paul Bldg., Cincinnati, O. 

III. Org. 1860. Lodges, 38. Territory : Delaware, New Jersey, Penn- 
sylvania, and West Virginia. Sec, Edward Hemple, Transportation Bldg., 
Pittsburgh, Pa. 

IV. Org. 1863. Lodges, 35. Territory : Arizona, California, Idaho, 
Montana, Nevada, Oregon, Utah, Washington, Wyoming, and British 
Columbia. Sec, I. J. Ascheim, 149 Eddy, San Francisco, Cal. 

V. Org. 1867. Lodges, 21. Territory : Florida, Georgia, Maryland, 
North Carolina, South Carolina, Virginia, and District of Columbia. Sec, 
Edwin H. Levy. P. O. Box 5, Richmond, Va. 

VI. Org. 1868. Lodges, 51. Territory: Illinois. Iowa, Michigan, 
Minnesota, Nebraska, North Dakota, South Dakota, Wisconsin, Manitoba, 
Ontario, and Alberta, Can. Sec, A. B. Seelenfreund, 1228 Tribune Bldg., 
Chicago, 111. 

VII. Org. 1873. Lodges, 85. Territory : Alabama, Arkansas, Louisiana. 
Mississippi. Tennessee, Texas, and Indian Territory. Sec, M. M. Goldman, 
Whitney Central Bldg., New Orleans, La. 



INDEPENDENT ORDER BRITH ABRAHAM 

Org. Feb. 7, 1887. Office : 37 7th, New York City 

Thirty-second Annual Convention, May 26, 1918, New York City. 

Members, 200,000. 

Lodges, 753. 

Officers : Grand Master. Leon Sanders, 217 Broadway ; First Deputy 
Grand Master, Max Silverstein. N. Y. C. ; Second Deputy Grand Master. 
Wm. Bluestone, Boston, Mass. ; Grand Sec, M. L. Hollander, 37 7th ; Grand 
Treas., David Goldberg, N. Y. C. ; Endowment Treas., Adolph Teitlebaum ; 
Counsel to the Order, Leopold Moskovltz. 



INDEPENDENT ORDER BRITH SHOLOM 
Org. Feb. 23, 1905. Office : 512 S. 5th, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Fourteenth Convention, June 9, 1918, Baltimore, Md. 

Members. 54,360. 

Lodges, 371. 

Officers : Past Grand Master, Solomon C. Kraus ; Grand Master, 
Louis S. Rubinsohn, Phila , Pa.; First Deputy Grand Master, Sol. Adolph, 
N. Y. C. ; Second Deputy Grand Master, A. S. Kanengieser, Newark, N. J. ; 
Third Deputy Grand Master. Louis M. Grant, Providence, R. I. ; Fourth 
Deputy Grand Master, Wm. Welnblatt, Baltimore, Md. ; Fifth Deputy Grand 
Master, Herman P. Koppleman, Hartford, Conn. ; Sixth Deputy Grand 
Master, Max Epstein, Pittsburgh, Pa. ; Seventh Deputy Grand Master, 
R. L. Halpern, Chicago, 111. ; Grand Sec, Martin O. Levy ; Assistant Sec, 
Adolph Rosenblum ; Grand Treas., I. Rosenbaum ; Endowment Treas., Harry 
Sacks ; Counsellor of the Order, Joseph L. Kun, Phila., Pa. 



INDEPENDENT ORDER FREE SONS OF ISRAEL 

Org. Jan. 18, 1849. Office : 21 W. 124th, New York City 

Ninth Quinquennial Convention, May 12, 1912, Rochester, N. Y. 
Triennial Convention, May 23, 1915, Atlantic City, N. J. 
Members (Jan. 1, 1918), 7176. 
Lodges, 80. 
Districts, 2. 



JEWISH NATIONAL ORGANIZATIONS 309 



Officers : Grand Master, Solon J. Liebeskind ; First Deputy Grand 
Master, Henry Jacobs; Second Deputy Grand Master, Benjamin H. Wasser- 
man, N. Y. C. ; Third Deputy Grand Master, Adolph Pike, Chicago, 111. *, 
Grand Sec, Abraham Hafer, 21 W. 124th ; Grand Treas., BenJ. Blumenthal ; 
Counsel to the Order, M. B. Blumenthal, N. Y. C. ; Chairman Committee on 
Death Benefit Claims, Samuel F.turtz. 

Executive Committee : M. Angelo Elias, Joseph I. Hartenstein, Jacob A. 
Hirschman, Henry Lipsky, Benjamin Nagelschmidt, Mayer D. Rosenbach, 
Henry V. Rothschild, Edward Schulhof, Henry E. Stern, Herman Stiefel, 
Samuel Strasburger, Emil Tausig, Morris A. Weinberg. 

Districts : I. Territory : Connecticut, Massachusetts, New Jersey, New 
York, and Rhode Island. II. Territory : Illinois, Kansas, Minnesota, 
Missouri, and Wisconsin. 



INDEPENDENT ORDER SONS OF BENJAMIN 
Org. Dec. 23, 1877. Office : 953 Third Av., New York City 

Twenty-seventh Annual Convention, Feb, 17, 1918, New York City. 

Members. 742. Underwritten by Metropolitan Life Insurance Company. 

Lodges, 18. 

Officers : Grand Master, Julius Gumpert ; First Deputy Grand Master, 
Myer L. Seixas, N. Y. C. ; Second Deputy Grand Master. Jacob Hyman, 
Boston, Mass. ; Grand Sec, Louis B. Franklin ; Grand Treas., Theodore 
Katz, N. Y. C. ; Chairman on Finance, Abraham Frankel ; Chairman on 
Mortuary Fund, Joseph Marmorstein ; Chairman on Appeals, Leopold 
Fuchs ; Counsel to the Order, M. Angelo Elias, N. Y. C. 



♦INDEPENDENT ORDER SONS OF ISRAEL 
Org. May 29, 1913. Office : 47 Mt. Vernon, Boston, Mass. 

Fourth Annual Convention, June 17-19, 1917, Boston, Mass. 

Members, 5000. 

Lodges, 50. 

Purpose : Fraternity and Disability Benefits. 

Officers : Grand Master. Henry H. Levenson, Boston, Mass. : First 
Deputy Grand Master, Jacob Rosenberg, Boston, Mass. ; Second Deputy 
Grand Master, Maurice Kronik : Third Deputy Grand Master, Harry Rubin ; 
Fourth Deputy Grand Master, Joseph Berman : Fifth Deputy Grand Master, 
Max Freedman ; Grand Treas., Joseph Kirshen ; Grand Sec, Robt. Silver- 
man, Boston, Mass. 

Directors : Tobias Berman, Harry Cohen, Louis Ellenbogen, Joseph 
L. Rogers, Jacob Sperber. 



INDEPENDENT ORDER OF TRUE SISTERS 
Org. Apl. 21, 1846. Office : 317 W. 139th, New York City 

One hundred and twenty-seventh Semi-Annual, or sixty-eighth Annual 
Session of the Grand Lodge, May 28, 1918, New York City. 

Members, 6000. 

Lodges, 21. 

Publishes a monthly, The Echo. Editor, Blanca B. Robitscher. 

Officers (for May, 1917 to May, 1919) : Grand Monitress, Mrs. Flora H. 
Fisch ; Grand Pres., Mrs. Emma Schlesinger ; Grand Vice-Pres., Mrs. 
Leopoldine Schwarzkopf; Grand Sec, Mrs. Bianca B. Robitscher, 317 W. 
139th ; Grand Financial Sec, Mrs. Fanny M. Marx ; Grand Treas., Mrs. 
Rosalie A. Eisner ; Grand Mentor, Mrs. Julia Levy ; Grand Warden, Mrs. 
Juliet B. Howard. 



310 AMERICAN JEWISH YEAR BOOK 

INDEPENDENT WESTERN STAR ORDER 
Org. Feb. 13, 1894. Office : 1127 Blue Island Av., Chicago, 111. 

Fourth Biennial Convention, Aug. 20, 1916, Buffalo, N. Y. 

Members (Jan. 1, 1917), 17,924. 

Lodges, 148. 

Officers : Grand Master, Max Levy, 526 Walnut, Cincinnati, O. ; Vice- 
Grand Masters : Leo Wolfson, N. Y. C. ; G. Roth, St. Louis, Mo. ; S. Noso- 
vitzky, Detroit, Mich. ; M. Sack, Phila., Pa. ; H. Lyons, Los Angeles, Cal. ; 
First Deputy Grand Master, H. M. Barnett, Chicago, 111. ; Second Deputy 
Grand Master, D. Steiner, Youngstown, O. ; Third Deputy Grand Master. 
M. Bernstein, N. Y. C. ; Grand Sec, I. Shapiro, 1127 Blue Island Av. ; Grand 
Endowment Treas., Jacob Schwartz ; Grand General Fund Treas., D. Arkln ; 
Grand Counsellor, Wm. A. Jonesi, Chicago, 111 ; Grand Medical Examiner, 
Dr. S. Stul, Chicago, 111. 



INDEPENDENT WORKMEN'S CIRCLE OP AMERICA, INC. 

Org. Dec. 28, 1906. Office : 9 Cambridge, Boston, Mass. 

First Annual Convention, May 28-30, 1917, Brockton, Mass. 

Members, 5609. 

Officers : Chairman. Morris Rosen, Boston, Mass. ; Vice-Chairman, Louis 
Hyson, Revere, Mass. ; Treas., Hyman Guberman, Maplewood, Mass. ; Rec- 
Sec, Morris H. Lubiash, Boston, Mass. ; General Sec, Sam'l. Bgdall, 
Maiden, Mass. 

Executive Committee : The Officers, and Samuel Albert, Boston, Mass. ; 
Sam'l. Malklel, Dorchester, Mass. ; Aaron Moldow, Alston, Mass. ; Morris 
Ossen, Everett, Mass. ; Samuel Osipaw, Lynn, Mass. ; Jacob Sim^s. Boston, 
Mass. ; Sam'l. Welsberg, Dorchester, Mass. 



INDUSTRIAL, REMOVAL OFFICE 

Org. 1900. Office: 174 Second Av., New York City 

Sixteenth Annual Meeting, Oct. 23, 1917, New York City. 

Agencies, 245. 

Officbbs and Board of Directors : Chairman, Reuben Arkush ; Vice- 
Chairman, Alfred Jaretzki ; Sec, Nathan Bijur ; Eugene S. Benjamin, 
N. Y. C. ; Jacob EMrth, St. Louis, Mo. ; Max Senior, Cincinnati, O. ; Lucius 
L. Solomons, San Francisco. Cal. ; Cyrus L. Sulzberger, N. Y. C. 

Assistant Manager : Isidore Frank. 



INTERCOLLEGIATE MENORAH ASSOCIATION 

Org. Jan. 2, 1913. Office : 600 Madison Av., New York City 

Sixth Annual Convention, Dec, 1917, New York City. 

Members, 4000. 

Societies, 62. 

Purpose: The study and advancement in American Universities of 
Jewish culture and ideals. 

Officers : Chancellor, Henry Hurwitz, 600 Madison Av., N. Y. C. ; Pres., 
Louis I. Newman, Columbia University, N. Y. C. ; Vice-Pres., Moses Barron, 
University of Minnesota; Hyman J. Ettllnger, University of Texas; Clara 
Goldberg, University of Iowa; Sec-Treas., Bernard J. Reis., N. Y. C. 



JEWISH NATIONAL ORGANIZATIONS 311 



INTERCOLLEGIATE ZIONIST ASSOCIATION OF AMERICA 

(MERGED IN ZIONIST ORGANIZATION OF AMERICA) 

Org. June 24, 1915. Office: 2554 McCulloh, Baltimore, Md. 

Fourth Annual Convention, June 25, 1918. 

Societies, 30. 

Purpose ; To study and promote the Zionist movement, to organize the 
Jewish student body of America on the basis of Jewish national conscious- 
ness ; to participate actively in all Zionist enterprises. 

Officers : Pres., Norman Winestine, N. Y. C. ; Vice-Pres., Aaron Schaffer, 
Jonas Friedenwald, Baltimore, Md. ; BenJ. Rosen, N. Y. C. ; Sarah C. 
Pitkowsky, N. Y. C. ; Sec, A. B. Baroway, Baltimore, Md. 

Governing Council: The Officers, and David S. Blondheim, Baltimore, 
Md. ; Felix Frankfurter, Cambridge, Mass. ; Harry Friedenwald, Baltimore, 
Md. ; Horace M. Kallen, Madison, Wis. ; Julian W. Mack, Chicago, HI. 



JEWISH ACADEMICIANS OP AMERICA 
Org. Aug. 21, 1916. Office: 125 B. 85th, New York City 

Members, 24. 

Purpose: To promote constructive scholarship, to elucidate the truths 
and principles of Judaism in the light of modern thought, and to apply the 
methods of modern science toward the solution of ritual problems. 

Officers : Chairman of Executive Committee, Bernard Revel, 9-11 
Montgomery ; Treas., B. D. Friedman, 74 E. 91st. ; Sec, Solomon T. H. 
Hurwitz, 217 E. 69th, N. Y. C. 

Executive Committee : Georges Bacarat, Bernard Drachman, J. D. 
Eisenstein, N. Y. C. ; Nathan Isaacs, 3305 Burnet Av., Cincinnati, O. ; 
Henry Keller, N. Y. C. ; David I. Macht, Baltimore, Md. ; Meyer Waxman, 
Brooklyn, N. Y. 



JEWISH AGRICULTURAL AND INDUSTRIAL AID SOCIETY 
Org. Jan. 23, 1900. Office: 174 Second Av., New York City 

Eighteenth Annual Meeting, Feb. 13, 1918, New York aty. 

Purpose : The encouragement of farming among Jewish immigrants in 
the United States. 

Activities : Maintains agricultural bureau of information and advice ; 
assists Jewish immigrants to become farmers by helping them to find 
suitable farms and by loans on favorable terms ; loans money to Jewish 
farmers who require financial assistance ; maintains Farm Labor Bureau 
for the placing out of Jewish young men as farm laborers. 

Publishes The Jewish Farmer, a monthly agricultural paper, in Yid- 
dish ; maintains itinerant agricultural instructors to lecture to farmers 
on agricultural topics, conduct demonstrations on their own farms, and 
organize the farmers into associations for their material, educational, 
social, and religious advancement ; grants free scholarships at agricultural 
colleges to children of Jewish farmers. 

Work Done since Organization : Farm loans, 4489, to 3691 farmers, 
amounting to $2,539,545.50 ; organized 19 credit unions, the first co- 
operative agricultural credit banks on American soil ; was instrumental 



312 AMERICAN JEWISH YEAR BOOK 



in the organization of the Federation of Jewish Farmers of America with 
58 constituent farmers' associations and a total membership of about 
1500 ; assisted in organizing a Co-operative Fire Insurance Company and 
other co-operative enterprises among Jewish farmers. 

^VORK IN 1917 : Farm loans, 389, to 442 farmers, amounting to $209,- 
453.73; farm loans outstanding (Doc. 31, 1917), $995,085.47; loans to 
credit unions, 21, amounting to $20,500 ; farm labor positions secured, 
1529 ; scholarships granted, 14. 

Officers : Pres., Alfred Jaretzki ; Vlce-Pres., Percy S. Straus ; Treas., 
Solomon G. Rosenbaum ; Sec, Cyrus L. Sulzberger, N. x. C. 

Directors : The Oflacers, and Eugene S. Benjamin, N. Y. C. ; Jacob G. 
Lipman, New Brunswick, N. J. 

General Manager : Gabriel Davidson. 



JEWISH AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION 
Org. Mch. 20, 19i0. Office: 356 Second Av., New York City 

Officers : Pres., Julius Rosenwald, Chicago, 111. ; Vlce-Pres., Louis 
Marshall ; Treas., Samson Lachman ; Hon. Sec, Henrietta Szold, 2 Pine- 
hurst Av., N. Y. C. 

Trustees : Cyrus Adler, Samuel S. Fels, Phila., Pa. ; Samson Lachman, 
N. Y. C. ; Julian W. Mack, Chicago, 111. ; J. L. Magnes, Louis Marshall, 
N. Y. C. ; Milton J. Rosenau, Boston, Mass. ; Julius Rosenwald, Chicago, 
111. ; Nathan Straus, N. Y. C. 

Managing Director : Aaron Aaronsohn, Haifa, Palestine. 



JEWISH CHAUTAUQUA SOCIETY 

Org. Apl. 29, 1893. Office : 1305 Stephen Girard Bldg., 21 S. 12th, 

Philadelphia, Pa. 

Twenty-sixth Annual Assembly, Dec. 22-27, 1916, New Orleans, La. 

Members, 5000. 

Correspondence Students, 344. 

Officers : Chancellor, Henry Berkowitz, Phila., Pa. ; Vice-Chancellor, 
Wm. Rosenau. Baltimore, Md. ; Vice-Prcs., Oscar Loeb ; Treas., Emil Selig, 
Phila., Pa. ; Sec, Jeannette Miriam Goldberg, JeflPerson, Tex. 

Board of Trustees : Henry Castleburg, Baltimore, Md. ; Israel Cowen, 
Chicago, 111. ; Arthur A. Fleisher, Walter Fox, Phila., Pa. ; Lee K. Frankel, 
N. Y. C. ; Perry Frankel, Phila., Pa. ; Jacob Goldbaum, Phila., Pa. ; Julius M. 
Goldenberg, Washington, D. C. ; Adolph Lewisphn, N. Y. C. ; David J. Loeb, 
Mrs. Max Margolls, Phila., Pa. ; Emil Mayer, St. Louis, Mo. ; Martin A. 
Meyer, San Francisco, Cal. ; Julius Peyser, Washington, D. C. ; Eugene 
Reefer, Kansas City, Mo. ; Jacob H. Schiff, N. Y. C. ; Abram Simon, Wash- 
ington, D. C. ; Horace Stern, Phila.. Pa. 

Honorary Members : Corrlne B. Arnold, Jacob Gimbel, Phila., Pa. ; 
Mrs. Chas. Heidelberger, Atlantic City, N. J. ; George W. Oaks, Phila., Pa, ; 
Simon Wolf, Washington, D. C. ; Louis Wolsey, Cleveland, O. 

Correspondence School Faculty : Wm. Rosenau, Dean, Baltimore, 
Md. ; Henry Berkowitz, Phila., Pa. ; Edward N. Calisch, Richmond, Va. ; 
Julius H. Greenstone, Phila., Pa. ; Isaac Landman, Ventnor, N. J. ; Eugene 
H. Lehman, N. Y. C. ; Martin A. Meyer, San Francisco, Cal. ; Abram Simon, 
Washington, D. C. ; David E. Weglein, Baltimore, Md. 



JEWISH NATIONAL ORGANIZATIONS 313 

JEWISH CONSUMPTIVE RELIEF ASSOCIATION OF 

CALIFORNIA 
Org. Sept. 28, 1912. Office: 207 S. Broadway, Los Angeles, Cal. 

Fifth Annual Convention, Jan. 6, 1918, Los Angeles, Cal. 

Members, 10,000. 

Auxiliary Societies, 4. 

Purpose : Sanitorium for treatment of pulmonary tuberculosis. 

Officers : Pres., B. Forer, 1422 Van Ness Av., Vice-Pres., J. Toblnsky, 
834 B. 20th. ; Sec, S. Raskin, 1626 Champlain Terrace ; Treas., Irving H. 
Uellman, Hellman Bank, all of Los Angeles, Cal. 

Executive Committee : A. Abrahamson, M. J. Abramson, J. Cantor, B. 
Citrin, H. Citrin, B. Cohen, G. Evans, B. Forer, all of Los Angeles ; 
B. Hatte, San Francisco ; A. Horwitz, H. Kaplan, B. Meyer, L. A. Pertson, 
S. Raskin, J. A. Rosenkranz, A. Shapiro, J. Tobinsky, all of Los Angeles. 



JEWISH CONSUMPTIVES' RELIEF SOCIETY 

Org. Jan. 2, 1904 ; inc. June 25, 1904. Office : 510-512 Klttredge Bldg., 

Denver, Colo. 

Fourteenth Annual Meeting, May 25-26, 1918, Chicago, 111. 

Contributors, 100,000. Income, 1917, $174,284. Capacity, 160 beds. 

Auxiliary Societies, 11. 

Publishes The Sanatorium. 

Officers : Pres., Philip Hillkowitz. 236 Metropolitan Bldg. ; Vice-Pres., 
David Gross, I. Rude, Mrs. I. J. Kolinsky ; Treas., Nathan Striker ; Sec, 
C. D. Spivak, 510-512 Kittredge Bldg., Denver, Colo. 

Trustees : Sol. Bloomgarden, S. L. Bresler, S. F. Disraelly, I. Flnesilver, 
H. H. Frumess, Ben Grimes, David Gross, Philip Hillkowitz, C. H. Kauvar, 
Mrs. I. J. Kolinsky, Goodman Levin, Max D. Neusteter, Louis Robinson, 
I. Rude, H. J. Schwartz, O. M. Shere, C. D. Spivak, Nathan Striker, Adolph 
Zederbaum, Denver, Colo. ; Mrs. L. Bloch, N. Y. C, representing New York 
Ladies' Auxiliary ; Mrs. Harry Crown, St. Louis, Mo., representing St. 
Louis Ladies' Auxiliary ; and Sol Schelinsky, N. Y. C, representing In- 
dependent Order Brith Abraham. 

Now York Office : Manager, I. Spectorsky, 230 Grand. 



JEWISH MINISTERS' ASSOCIATION OF AMERICA 
Org. Mch., 1917. Office: 74 E. 118th, New York City 

First Annual Convention, Dec. 4-5, 1917, New York City. 

Members, 65. 

Officers : Pres., Aaron Yudelowitz, 13 Otisfield, Boston, Mass. ; Vlce- 
Pres., Bernard Drachman, Moses Hyamson, M. A. Kaplan ; Treas., B. Pearse, 
118 W. 112th ; Sec, S. L. Hurowitz, 66 W. 118th, all of New York City ; 
Chairman of the Executive, S. Buchler, Bklyn., N. Y. 



JEWISH NATIONAL WORKERS ALLIANCE OF AMERICA 
Org. 1912. Office: 89 Delancey, New York City 

Annual Conference, Nov. 29, 1917, Trenton, N. J. 
Fifth Annual Convention, Je. 19, 1918, Rochester, N. Y. 
Members, 5200. 
Branches, 109. 



314 AMERICAN JEWISH YEAR BOOK 



Purpose : Prateraal, Social, and Educational Order. 

Officers : Pres., Isaac A. Hurwitch ; Vice-Pres., Joshua Gordon ; Treas., 
David Pinskl ; Sec, Meyer L. Brown» 83 Delancey, N. Y. C. 

ExECUTivB CoMMiTi'EE : The Officers, and 1. Berkenblith, I. Feder, Ph. 
Gingold, D. Herlich, Robert Merlis, M. Mosheritzky, R. Plattrot, Samuel 
Siegel, I. Tlckman. 



JEWISH PUBLICATION SOCIETY OF AMERICA 
Org. June 3, 1888. Office : 1201 N. Broad, Philadelphia. Pa. 

For the Report of the Thirtieth Year of The Jewish Publication Society 
of America, see p. 409, et seq. 



JEWISH THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY OF AMERICA 
Org. 1886. Office: 531 W. 123d, New York City 

Incorporated in State of New York. Library : Printed volumes, 58,980 ; 
Manuscripts, 1810. 

Thirteenth Biennial Meeting, March 24, 1912. 

Twenty-fifth Commencement, June 2, 1918. 

Graduates, Rabbinical Course, in 1918, 13. 

Whole number of graduates. Rabbinical Course, 119. 

Whole number of graduates, Teachers' Course, 152. 

Offici^rs of the Boabo : Chairman Board of Directors, Louis Marshall ; 
Hon. Sec, Sol. M. Stroock ; Treas., Daniel Guggenheim, N. Y. C. 

Directors : (for life) Daniel Guggenheim, Adolph Lewisohn, Xiouis 
Marshall, Jacob H. Schiff. Felix M. Warburg, N. Y. C. ; Philip S. Henry, 
Asheville, N. C. ; Cyrus Adler, Phila., Pa. ; Mayer Sulzberger, Phila., Pa. ; 
(term expiring 1920) Samuel Greenbaum, N. Y. C. ; Chas. I. HoflCman, New- 
ark, N. J. ; Irving Lehman, Simon M. Boeder, Sol. M. Stroock, N. Y. C. ; 
William Gerstley, Phila., Pa. ; Harry Friedenwald, Baltimore, Md. ; and 
David S. Ellis, Boston, Mass. 

ExBCUTivn Committee : Chairman, Louis Marshall, Cyrus Adler, Daniel 
Guggenheim, Simon M. Boeder, Jacob H. Schiff, Mayer Sulzberger. 

FACULTY : Acting President, Cyrus Adler, Ph. JD. (Johns Hopkins) ; 
Sabato Morals Professor of Biblical Literature and Exegesis, Israel Fried- 
laender. Ph. D. (Strassburg) : Professor of Talmud, Louis Ginzberg, Ph. D. 
iHeidelberg) ; Professor of History, Alexander Marx, Ph. D. (K5nigsberg) ; 
Professor of Homiletics, Mordecai M. Kaplan, M. A. (Columbia) ; Professor 
of Medieval Hebrew Literature, Israel Davidson, Ph.D. (Columbia); 
Professor of Codes, Moses Hyamson, B. A., LL. D. (Universitv of London) ; 
Instructors, W. P. Kotkov, Ph. D., and Morris D. Levine ; Hazan and In- 
structor in Hazanut, Rev. Simon Jacobson ; Instructor in Public Speaking, 
Walter H. Robinson. 

Library Staff : Librarian, Alexander Marx ; Cataloguer, Israel Shapira ; 
Assistant in Library, Sidney Breuer. 

Rbqistrar : Israel Davidson. 

Secretary : Joseph B. Abrahams. 

Teachers* Institute, 34 Stuyvesant Place. Principal, Mordecai M. 
Kaplan, 120 E. 93d. Instructors : Israel Friedlaender ; Ellas L. Solomon ; 
Morris u. Levine ; Joseph Bragin ; Assistant Instructors : Leo Honor ; Simon 
Ginzberg. Special Committee : Sol. M. Stroock, Chairman ; Mordecai M. 
Kaplan, Samuel Greenbaum, Irving Lehman, J. L. Magnes, Felix M. War- 
burg, Cyrus Adler. 



JEWISH NATIONAL. ORGANIZATIONS 315 

ALUMNI ASSOCIATION OP JEWISH THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

OF AMERICA 
Org. July 4, 1901 

Seventeenth Annual Meeting, June 17-18, 1918, New York City. 

Members, 90. 

Opficebs : Pres., Max D. Klein, Phila., Pa. ; Vlce-Pres.. Julius H. Green- 
stone Phila., Pa. ; Rec. Sec, Benj. A. Lichter, Far Rockaway, N. Y. ; Cor. 
Sec, Samuel Fredman, Phila.. Pa. ; Treas., Israel Goldfarb, Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Executive Committee : Herman Abramowitz, Montreal. Can. ; Paul 
Chertoff, N. Y. C. ; Max Drob. Buffalo, N. Y. ; Herbert S. Goldstein, N. Y. C. ; 
BenJ. L. Grossman, Washington, D. C. : Joseph Hevesh, Chicago, 111. ; 
Charles I. Hoffman, Newark, N. J. ; Mordecai M. Kaplan, N. Y. C. ; Chas. H. 
Kauvar, Denver, Colo. ; Eugene Kohn, Balto., Md. ; Morris Levine, N. Y. C. ; 
I. H. Levinthal, Bklyn., N. Y. ; Herman Llssauer, San Francisco, Cal. ; 
Jacob S. Mlnkin, N. Y. C. ; Abr. Nowak, Boston, Mass. 



JEWISH WELFARE BOARD 

Org. 1917. Office : 149 Fifth Av., New York City 

Affiliated Organization : 14. 

Officers : Chairman, Harry Cutler, Providence, R. I. ; Vice-Chairman, 
Cyrus Adler, Philadelphia, Pa. ; Treas., Walter E. Sachs ; Sec, Chester J. 
Teller. N. Y. C. 

Executive Committee: The Officers, and Henry J. Bernheim, Abram I. 
Elkus, I. Edwin Goldwasser. Maurice H. Harris, Chas. Hartman, Louis B. 
Kristeln, Irving Lehman, Julian W. Mack, M. S. Margolies, Louis Marshall, 
D. de Sola Pool, Wm. Rosenau, Joseph Rosenzweig, Bernard Semel, Mortimer 
L. Schiff, Israel Unterberg. 



KAPPA NU FRATERNITY 
Org. June 12, 1911. Office: 2937 Schubert Av., Chicago. 111. 

First Annual Convention, June 16-17, 1917, Rochester, N. Y. 

Members, 150. 

Chapters, 9. 

Purpose : An avowedly Jewish Greek-letter college brotherhood, laying 
particular stress on Jewlshhess. 

Officers : Pres., Nathaniel L. Sanow, 2937 Schubert Av., Chicago, 111. ; 
Vice-Pres., Marcus D. H. Sch5n, Roxbury. Mass. ; Treas., Myer Miller, 
Rochester, N. Y. ; Sec. Harry S. Mackler, 978 Union Av., N. Y. C. 

Executive Committee: The Officers, and Samuel J. Barll, Dover, N. J. ; 
Joshua Bernhardt, Baltimore, Md. ; Maurice Keesing. N. Y. C. ; Joseph A. 
Lazarus, N. Y. C. ; Louis J. Moskowitz, Rochester, N. Y. ; Abraham B. 
Solomon, Buffalo, N. Y. 



THE MIZRAHI OF AMERICA 

Org. June 5, 1912. Central Bureau : 86 Orchard, New York City 

Fifth Annual Convention, May 3-7, 1918, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Organizations, 159. 

Members, 18,000. 

Purpose : Following the Zionist movement, based on the Basle program. 
Fundamental principles : The land of Israel, for the people of Israel, guided 
by the law of Israel. 



316 AMERICAN JEWISH YEAR BOOK 

Officsks : Pres., Meyer Berlin ; Treas., Ch. Garflel, S. Wllner, J. I 
Bluestone, N. T. ; Sec, J. L. Fishman, N. Y. C. .„*»., 

ElXECUTiVB Committee : B. Abramowltz, St. Louis, Mo. ; A. M. Asnin 
sky, Pittsburgh, Pa. ; T. Braver, Akron, O. ; G. Bubllck, N. Y. C. ; N. H 
Bbin, Buffalo, N. Y. ; E. Epstein, Chicago, 111. ; Wolf Gold. Bklyn.. N. Y. 
I. Gordon, Toronto, Can. ; E. Inselbuch, Bklyn., N. Y. ; B. Kaplan, N. Y. C. 
B. L. Levinthal, Phlla., Pa ; M. Z. Margolies, New York City ; H. Monashe 
wltz, Cincinnati, O. ; T. Redelheim, N. Y. C. ; S. Silber, Chicago, 111. 



NATIONAL CONFERENCE OF JEWISH CHARITIES IN THE 

UNITED STATES 
Org. 1899. Office: 809-10 Neave Building, Cincinnati, O. 

Tenth Biennial Convention, May 12-15, 1918, Kansas City, Mo. 

I^embers 1T9 Societies 

Officers : Pres., Fred Butzel, Detroit, Mich. ; Vice-Pres., Felix M. War- 
burg, N. Y. C. ; David Benjamin, Kansas City, Mo. ; Bernard Greensfelder, 
St. Louis, Mo. ; Sec, Boris D. Bogen, Cincinnati, O. ; Treas., Sidney B. PrltB, 
Cincinnati, O. 

Executive Committee : Nathan Bijur. N. Y. C. ; Louis M. Cahn, Chicago, 
111. ; Aaron Cohen, Pittsburgh. Pa. ; Lee K. Frankel, N. Y. C. ; Chas. Friend, 
Milwaukee, Wis. ; I. Edwin Goldwasser, N. Y. C. ; Max Herzberg, Phila- 
delphia, Pa. ; Jacob H. Hollander, Baltimore, Md. ; Louis B. Kirsteln, 
Boston, Mass. ; Minnie F. Low, Julian W. Mack. Chicago, 111. ; Max Senior, 
Cincinnati, O. ; Cyrus L. Sulzberger, N. Y. C. 



NATIONAL FARM SCHOOL 

Inc. Apl. 10, 1896. School and Farms : Farm School, Bucks Co., Pa. 
Office : 407 Mutual Life Bldg., Philadelphia, Pa. 

Twentieth Annual Meeting, Oct, 7, 1917, Farm School, Bucks Co., Pa. 

Seventeenth Annual Graduation, Feb. 22, 1918. 

Number of Graduates, 1918, 12. 

Whole number of graduates, 232. 

Members, 2500. 

Officers : Pres., Joseph Krauskopf, 4715 Pulaski Av., Germantown, Pa. ; 
Vlce-Pres., Harry B. Hirsh ; Treas., Isaac H. Silverman ; Sec, Miss B. M. 
Bellefleld, 407 Mutual Life Bldg., Phila., Pa. 

Director : Bernhard Ostrolenk, Farm School, Pa. 

Executive Board : H. D. Allman, Henry Bronner, David Burpee, Harrv 
Felix, Morris Fleishman, Daniel Gimbel. Leo H. Heimerdinger. James G. 
Heller, J. H. Hinleln, Bernard Kohn, Manfred R. Krauskopf, Louis Nus- 
baum, Eugene M. Stem, George Wheeler, John Zimmerman. 

Honorary Trustees : (for ten years) H. Blumenthal, A. Eichholz, S. 
Frledberger, H. B. Hirsh, A. Israel, A. M. Klein, M. A. Kaufmann, Leon 
Merz, B. Selig, I. H. Silverman, J. N. Snellenberg. 

National Auxiliary Board : Louis I. Aaron, Pittsburgh, Pa. ; Max A. 
Adler, Rochester, N. Y. ; Geo. M. Alexander, Boise, Idaho ; Henry Beer, 
New Orleans, La. ; Melvin Behrends, Washington, D. C. ; I. W. Bernheim. 
Louisville, Ky. ; H. S. Binswanger, Richmond, Va. ; Nathan Eckstein, 
Seattle, Wash. : M. J. Freiberg, Cincinnati, O. ; Samuel Friedheim, Rock 
Hill, S. C. ; Milton D. Greenl»um, Baltimore, Md. ; A. Hirshheimer, La 
Crosse, Wis. ; Alfred B. Kalter, Indianapolis, Ind. : Isaac Landman. Far 
Rockaway, N. Y. ; Jacob M. Loeb, Chicago. 111. ; J. E. Oppenheimer, Butte, 
Mont. ; Louis Schlesinger, Newark, N. J. ; Morris Stern, San Antonio, Tex. ; 
David Sternberg, Memphis, Tenn. ; Isaac M. Ullman, New Haven, Conn. ; 
Eugene Warner, Buffalo, N. Y. ; Morris Weil, Lincoln, Nebr. ; Harrlf 
WelnBtock, San Francisco, Cal. ; Maurice Werthelm, N. Y. C. 



JEWISH NATIONAL. ORGANIZATIONS 317 



NATIONAL FEDERATION OF TEMPLE SISTERHOODS 
Org. Jan. 22, 1913. OrriCB : 62 Duttenhofer Bldg., Cincinnati, O. 

Second Biennial Meeting, Jan. 16-18, 1917, Baltimore, Md. 

Societies, 178. 

Purpose : Closer co-operation between the various Sisterhoods. 

The work of the Federation is conducted under the following Committees : 
Co-operation, Religion, Religious Schools, Propaganda, Scholarships, Union 
Museum, and War Emergency. 

Officers : Pres., Mrs. Abram Simon, Washington, D. C. ; Vice-Pres., 
Mrs. J. Walter Freiberg, Cincinnati, O. ; Treas., Mrs. Israel Cowen, 
Chicago, 111. ; Sec, Mrs. Ben Loewenstein, Cincinnati, O. 

E)XBCUTivB Committee : The OflBcers, and Mmes. Israel Aaron, Buffalo, 
N. Y. ; Max J. Brandenburger, Bklyn., N. Y. ; Edgar M. Cahn, New Orleans. 
La. ; Chas. Cohn., Nashville, Tenn. ; B. M. E}ngelhard, Chicago, 111. ; Dan 
Frank, Boston, Mass. ; Charles Freund, Paul L. Godchaux, New Orleans, La. ; 
Leon Goodman, Louisville, Ky. ; Moses J. Gries, Cleveland, O. ; Albert J. 
Johnson, New Haven, Conn. ; Otto Kempner, Brooklyn, N. Y. ; Kaufman 
Kohler, Cincinnati, O. ; Joseph Krauskopf. Phila., Pa. ; David Lefkowitz, 
Dayton. O. ; J. Leonard Levy, Pittsburgh, Pji. ; H. H. Mayer, Kansas City, 
Mo. ; Nathan J. Miller, N. Y. C. ; Sol. Moses, Cleveland, O. ; H. Oppen- 
heimer, Baltimore, Md. ; David Phlllpson, Cincinnati, O. ; B. H. Printz, 
Youngstown, O. ; T. Schanfarber, Chicago, 111. ; Robert F. Skutch, Baltimore, 
Md. ; Maurice Steinfeld, St. Louis, Mo. ; Harry H. Sternberger, Cincin- 
nati, O. ; Joseph Stolz, Chicago, 111. ; Louis Welt, Detroit, Mich. ; Joseph 
Wlesenfeld, Baltimore, Md. ; James Witkowsky, Chicago, 111. ; Leo Wolf, 
Wheeling, W. Va. ; Louis Wolsey, Cleveland, O. 



NATIONAL JEWISH HOSPITAL FOR CONSUMPTIVES 
Org. Dec. 10, 1899. Office : 3800 B. Colfax Av., Denver, Colo. 

Seventeenth Annual Meeting, Jan, 13, 1918, New York City. 

Members, 20,000. 

Patients treated, April 1, 1917, 3222. 

Officers : Pres., Samuel Grabfelder, Guarantee Trust Bldg., Atlantic 
City, N. J. ; Vice-Pres., J. Walter Freiberg, Cincinnati, O. ; Wm. S. Fried- 
man, Denver, Colo., David May. St. Louis, Mo. ; Harnwn August, N. Y. C. ; 
Treas., Ben, Altheimer, New York, N. Y. ; Sec. Mrs. S. Pisko, 3800 E. 
Colfax Av., Denver, Colo. 

Executive Committee : The Officers, and N. L. Dauby, Cleveland, O. ; 
B. Flesher, Denver, Colo. : Sol. S. Klser, Indianapolis, Ind. ; Adolph Kraus, 
Chicago, 111. ; Louis D. Shoenberg, New York, N. Y. ; Charles H. Studln, 
N. Y. C. 



NATIONAL JEWISH IMMIGRATION COUNCIL 
Org. Mch. 5, 1911. Office : 80 Maiden Lane, New York City 

Delegates and members at large, 18. 

Constituent societies, 10. 

Purpose : General supervision of all work for Jewish immigrants at 
the sea-ports of the United States. 

Officers : Chairman, Abr. I. Elkus, 111 Broadway, N. Y. C. ; Vice- 
Chairman, Max Mitchell, 76 Devonshire, Boston, Mass. 

Executive Committee: Chairman, I^on Sanders; Sec, D. M. Bressler, 
Abr. I. Elkus, Max J. Kohler, N. Y. C. ; Louis H. Levin, Baltimore, Md. ; 
Louis E. Levy, Phila., Pa. 

Members at Large : Nathan Bijur, Qscur S. Straus, N. Y. C. ; Simon 
Wolf, Washington, D. C. 



318 AMERICAN JEWISH YEAR BOOK 

NATIONAL UNION OF JEWISH SHELTERING SOCIETIES 
Org. July 30, 1911. Office : 229-231 B. Broadway, New Tork City 

Members, 36 communities. 

PuBPOSB : To help worthy wayfarers, put a check on habitual wan- 
derers, and prevent wife-deserters from using the Hachnoses Orchim as 
a means of escape from family responsibilities. 

Officbhs : Pres., Leon Sanders, N. Y. C. ; Vice-Pres., S. H. Brodsky, 
Newark, N. J. ; Mrs. H. Flnkelpearl, Pittsburgh, Pa. ; A. Kress, Baltimore, 
Md. ; M. Meyerowitz, Chicago, 111. ; Mendel Silber, Albuquerque, N. M. ; 
Treas., Max Meyerson ; Hon. Sec, I. Hershfleld, N. Y. C. 

Executive Board : M. J. S. Abels, Altoona. Pa. ; M. Blechshlager, Cin- 
cinnati, O. ; Mrs. S. Bloch, Indianapolis, Ind. ; M. J. Braude, Syracuse, 
N. Y. ; S. H. Brodsky, Newark, N. J. ; Henry J. Cohn, Richmond, Va. ; 
A. Coll, Spokane, Wash. ; A. Concors, N. Y. C. ; Mrs. H. Finkelpearl, Pitts- 
burgh, Pa. : I. Hershfleld, N. Y. C. ; Mrs. W. Klebansky, Phlla., Pa. ; A. 
Kress, Baltimore, Md. ; H. Masliansky, Jacob Massel, N. Y. C. ; M. Meyero- 
witz, Chicago, 111. ; Max Meyerson, N. Y. C. ; L. Pollakoff, Newark, N. J. ; 

Rissman, Chicago, 111. ; Leon Sanders, N. Y. C. : A. Ij. Schiller, 

Scranton, Pa. ; M. B. Schlom, Wllkes-Barre, Pa. ; A. J. Shon, Fall River, 
Mass. ; Mendel Silber, Albuquerque, N. M. ; I. Warsaw, Waco, Tex. ; W. 
Wittenstein, Bridgeport, Conn. 



ORDER BRITH ABRAHAM 

Org. June 12, 1859. Office: 266 Grand, New York City 

Forty-fourth Convention, June 10-14, 1917, Rochester, N. Y. 

Members, 58,000. 

Lodges, 365. 

Officers : Grand Master, Samuel Dorf ; First Deputy Grand Master, 
Morris M. Green, 306 Broadway, N. Y. C. ; Second Deputy Grand Master, 
Wm. Martin, Rochester, N. Y. ; Third Deputy Grand Master, B. Mantel, 
Indianapolis, Ind. ; Grand Treas., Barnet Friedman ; Grand Sec, Geo. W. 
Leisersohn, 266 Grand; Counsel to the Order, H. M. Goldfogle, N. Y. C. 



ORDER KNIGHTS OF JOSEPH 

Org. Feb. 14, 1^96. Office : 311-312 Society for Savings Bldg., 

Cleveland, O. 

Twentieth Convention, Feb. 27, 1916, Chicago, 111. 

Members, 16,000. 

Lodges, 85. 

Officers : Supreme Commander, D. B. Steuer, Cleveland, O. ; First 
Supreme Vice-Commander, A. Feld, Cincinnati, O. ; Second Supreme Vice- 
Commander, L. Goldflnger, Chicago, 111. ; Third Supreme Vice-Commander 
M. Taylor, Columbus, O. ; Supreme Sec, D. J. Zinner, Cleveland, O. ; Su- 
preme Treas., Jos. C. Bloch, Cleveland, O. ; Endowment Treas., A. Jacobs 



CmDER SONS OF ZION 

(MERGED IN ZIONIST ORGANIZATION OF AMERICA) 

Org. Apl. 19, 1908. Office : 44 E. 23d, New York City 

Membeff '7000^^'^''®°**'''^' '^"''® 30-July 2, 1917, New Haven. Conn, 

Camps, ioi. 

Purpose : Fraternal and Zlonlstic. 



JEWISH NATIONAL ORGANIZATIONS 319 



OFriCEBS : Nasi, Jacob S. Strahl ; Segan Rishon, Joshua Sprayregen ; 
Segan Shenl, Max Perlman ; Gisbor, H. B. Isaacson ; Maskir, Jacob Ish 
Kishor ; Counsel, Ph. I. Schick ; Chief Medical Examiner, S. Neuman. 

ElXECUTiVB COMMiTTKB : H. Abramowltz, M. Bloomberg, L. Elitzlk, N. 
Elkin, Ph. Gladstone, Abr. Goldberg, Em. Goldsmith, A. Isserman, Louis 
J. Jakovey, S. Markowitch, S. J. Nathanson, Abr. Price, Jacob Prombolm, 
V. Schwarz, S. Shulman, Samuel Welnstein. 

PI TAU PI FRATERNITY 
Org. Jan., 1908 

Seventh Annual Conclave, Dec. 27-31, 1917, New Orleans, La. 

Members, 350. 

Purpose : To bring into closer relation and promote sociability among 
the Jewish young men of the country and to aid the less fortunate. 

Officers : Pres., Louis B. Levi, EvansviUe, Ind. ; Vice-Pres., Wallace 
Spigel, Richmond, Va. ; Treas., Henry Stern, 233 Royal, New Orleans, La. ; 
Sec, Julien Caheen, c/o Caheen Bros., Birmingham, Ala. ; Editor-in-chief, 
Arthur S. Friedman, 1020 Downing, Denver, Colo. ; Historian, Bert B. Hene, 
3029 Davenport, Omaha, Neb. ; Chaplain, Edward A. Bamer, 219 W. Ever- 
green, San Antonio, Tex. 

PROGRESSIVE ORDER OF THE WEST 

Org. Feb. 18, 1896. Office : 406-7-8 Frisco Bldg., 9th and Olive, 

St. Louis, Mo. 

Twentieth Annual Convention, Aug. 5-7, 1917, Detroit, Mich. 

Members, 20,599. 

Officers : Grand Master, Jacob Goldberg, Chicago, 111. ; First Vice-Grand 
Master, Abe Levy, St. Louis, Mo. ; Second Vice-Grand Master, Louis Rosen- 
berg, Chicgo, 111. ; Third Vice-Grand Master, Chas. Goldberg, Baltimore, Md. ; 
Fourth Vice-Grand Master, Meyer Wechsler, Kansas City, Mo. ; Fifth Vice- 
Grand Master. Michael Sack, Phila., Pa. : Sixth Vice-Grand Master, I. Beck. 
Union Hill, N. J. ; Seventh Vice-Grand Master, Michael Schwartz, Mil- 
waukee, Wis. ; Eighth Vice-Grand Master, Jacob Zuckerman, Cleveland, O. ; 
Ninth Vice-Grand Master, S. D. Frey, Syracuse, N. Y. ; Grand Sec, Morris 
Shapiro, St. Louis, Mo. ; Grand Treas., Frank Dubinsky, St. Louis, Mo. ; 
Endowment Treas., Sam Feldman, St. Louis, Mo. ; Grand Counsellor, Sam 
Micon, Chicago, 111. ; Grand Medical Examiner, M. I. De Vorkin, St. Louis, 
Mo. 



PROVISIONAL EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE FOR GENERAL 

ZIONIST AFFAIRS 
(MERGED IN ZIONIST ORGANIZATION OF AMERICA) 

RABBI ISAAC ELCHANAN THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

Org. 1896. Office : 9-11 Montgomery, New York City 

Incorporated in State of New York. Invested funds, about $50,000. 
Library : Printed volumes, 9000 ; manuscripts, small collection. 

Commencement, 1917 (Adar 21). 

Whole number of graduates. Rabbinical course, 25. 

Purpose : To train rabbis and teachers. 

Officers : Pres., B. Revel ; Vlce-Pres., Harry Fischel ; Treas., Nathan 
Roggen ; Sec, L. Llpnik. 

Executive Committee: Chairman, Jacob Hecht, L. Altshule, J. D. 
Cohen, M. Gottesman, Nathan Lamport, B. W. Lewln-Epstein, H. Robinson, 
J. S. Schiff, S. R. Travis, Samuel Wilner. 

11 



320 AMERICAN JEWISH YEAR BOOK 

SIGMA ALPHA MU FRATERNITY 
Org. Nov. 26, 1909. Office: 370 W. 120th, New York City 

Eighth Annual Convention, Dec. 29-30, 1917, New York City. 

Members, 600. 

Chapters : Undergraduate, 15 ; Alumni, 4. 

Purpose : Greek-letter college fraternity for Jewish students. 

Officers : Pres., Michael E. Reltzenberg ; Treas., Louis Lichtensteln ; 
Sec, Harry Schlndler, Bklyn. 

Directors : The Officers, and A. Irvine Covell, Louis Y. Gaberman, 
Samuel Ginsburg, Irving J. Sands, Meyer Stone. 



♦SIGMA THETA PI SORORITY 
Org. 1909. Office : 3303 Woolworth Av., Omaha, Nebr. 

Seventh Annual Conclave, Oklahoma City, Okla. 

Members, 125. 

Chapters, 10. 

Purpose : Philanthropic and social work. 

Officers : Pres., Helen Elsinger, St. Paul. Minn. ; Vice-Pres., Mildred 
Hirsch, Atlanta, Ga. ; Sec, Hazel Degen, 3303 Woolworth Av., Omaha, 
Nebr. ; Treas., Beriha Brooks, Louisville, Ky. 



UNION OF AMERICAN HEBREW CONGREGATIONS 

Org. 1873. Office : Cincinnati, O. 

Twenty-fifth Council, Jan. 16, 1917, Baltimore, Md. 

Twenty-sixth Council will meet Mch., 1919, Boston, Mass. 

Members, 202 Congregations. 

Four Departments : I. Executive and Financial, Pres., J. Walter Freiberg, 
Cincinnati, O. II. Hebrew Union College ; Pres., Board of Governors, 
Alfred M. Cohen, Cincinnati, O. ; Pres., College, Kaufman Kohler. III. 
Board of Delegates on Civil Rights, Chairman, Simon Wolf, Woodward 
Bldg., Washington, D. C. IV. Board of Managers of Synagog and School 
Extension, Chairman, Charles Shohl ; Director, George Zepln, Cincinnati, O. ; 

Executive Board for 1917-1918 : Pres., J. Walter Freiberg, Cincinnati; 
O. ; Vlce-Pres., Chas., Shohl, Cincinnati, O. ; Harry Cutler, Providence, 
R. I. ; Julius Rosenwald, Chicago, 111. ; Isaac W. Bernhelm, Louisville, Ky. ; 
Jesse W. Lilienthal, San Francisco, Cal. ; Sec, George Zepin, Duttenhofer 
Bldg., Cincinnati, O. ; N. Henry Beckman, Cincinnati, O. ; B>ed E. Bruml, 
Cleveland, O. ; Josiah Cohen, Pittsburgh, Pa. ; David W. Eidelman, Los 
Angeles, Cal. ; Gustave A. Efroymson, Indianapolis, Ind. ; Isaac Goldberg, 
Detroit, Mich. ; Simeon M. Johnson, Cincinnati, O. ; Adolf Kraus, Chicago, 
111. ; Max Landauer, Milwaukee, Wis. ; Albert L. Levi, Brooklyn, N. Y. ; 
Lipman Levy, Banich Mahler. Cleveland, O. ; Max B. May, Cincinnati, O. ; 
Henry Morgenthau, N. Y. C. ; Jacob R. Morse, Boston. Mass. ; Emil 
Nathan, St. Louis, Mo. ; Adolph S. Ochs, N. Y. C. ; William Ornsteln, 
Cincinnati, O. ; Marcus Rauh, Pittsburgh, Pa. ; Sigmund Rhelnstrom, 
Cincinnati, O. ; Maurice D. Rosenberg, Washington, D. C. ; Simon W. 
Rosendale, Albany, N. Y. ; Jacob H. Schiff, N. Y. C. ; Louis Schlesinger, 
Newark, N. J. ; Jacob Schnadig, Chicago, 111. ; Isaac Schoen, Atlanta, Ga. ; 
Sigmund Sichel, I'ortland, Ore. ; Maurice Stern, New Orleans, La. ; Samuel 
Stra;us, Cincinnati, O. ; Joseph WMesenfeld, Baltimore, Md. ; Herman Wile, 
Buffalo, N. Y. ; Albert Wolf, Phila., Pa. ; Wm. B. Woolner, Peoria, 111. 

Board of Governors of the Hebrew Union College for 1918-1919 : 
Marcus Aaron, Pittsburgh, Pa. ; Samuel Ach, Cincinnati, O. ; A. G. Becker, 
Chicago, 111. ; Henry Berkowitz, Philadelphia, Pa. ; Oscar Berman, Cincin- 




JEWISH NATIONAL ORGANIZATIONS 321 



natl, O. ; Alfred M. Cohen, Cincinnati. O. ; Maurice J. Freiberg, Cincinnati, 
O. ; Moses J. Grles, Cleveland, O. ; Max Heller, New Orleans, La. ; Emll G. 
Hirsch, Chicago, 111. ; Harry M. Hofifheimer, Cincinnati. O. ; Felix Kahn, 
Cincinnati, O. ; Alfred M. Klein, Phlla.. Pa. : Jos. Krauskopf. Philadelphia, 
Pa. ; Max Landsberg, Rochester, N. Y. ; Simon I^zarus, Columbus, O. ; 
Charles S. Levi, Milwaukee. Wis. : Alfred Mack, Cincinnati. O. ; Ralph W. 
Mack, Cincinnati, O. ; David I'hilipson. Cincinnati, O. ; Emil Pollak, Cin- 
cinnati, O. ; Carl E. Pritz, Cincinnati, O. ; Wm. Rosenau. Baltimore, Md. ; 
Murray Seasongood, Cincinnati O. ; Jos. Silverman, New York, N. Y. ; Jos. 
Stolz, Chicago, 111. 

Board op Delegates ox Civil Rights p^or 1018 : Chairman, Simon 
Wolf, Washington, D. C. ; Isaac Adler, Birmingham, Ala. ; Milton L. 
Anfenger, Denver, Colo. ; Ralph Bamberger, Indianapolis. Ind. ; Lee Baum- 
garten, Washington, D. C. ; Leon Block, Kansas City, Mo. ; E. N. Calisch, 
Richmond, Va. ; Josiah Cohen, Pittsburgh. Pa. ; Myer Cohen, Washington, 
D. C. ; Morris M. Cohn, Little Rock. Ark. ; Nathan Cohn, Nashville, Tenn. ; 
Israel Cowen, Chicago, 111. ; Harry Cutler, Providence, R. I. ; B>lix J. Drey- 
fous. New Orleans, La. ; Abram I. Elkus, N. Y. C. : Harry Franc. Washing- 
ton, D. C. ; Nathan Frank, St. Louis, Mo. ; Leo M. Ftanklin, Detroit, Mich. 
J. Walter Freiberg, Cincinnati, O. ; Jacob Furth, St. Louis, Mo. ; Henry M 
Goldfogle, N. Y. C. ; Louis J. Goldman, Cincinnati, O. ; Joseph B. Greenhut 
Peoria, IlL ; Moses J. Grles, Cleveland, O. ; Henry Hanaw, Mobile, Ala. 
Joseph Hirsh. Vicksburg, Miss. ; Marcus Jacobi. Wilmington, N, C. 
Julius Kahn, San Francisco, Cal. ; Max J. Kohler, N. Y. C. ; Adolf Kraus 
Chicago, 111. : Julian W. Mack, Chicago, 111. : Lewis W. Marcus, Buffalo 
N. Y. ; David Marx, Atlanta, Ga. ; T. M. Mordecai, Charleston, S. C. 
Jacob Nieto. San Francisco, Cal. ; Julius Peyser, Washington. D. C. 
M. Warley Platzek, N. Y. C. ; Wm. Rosenau. Baltimore, Md. ; Simon W 
Rosendale, Albany, N. Y. ; Julius Rosenwald, Chicago, 111. ; Charles A 
Rubenstein, Baltimore, Md. ; Alfred SoUlgman, Louisville, Ky. ; Charles 
Shohl, Cincinnati, O. ; Abram Simon, Washington, D. C. : Lucius L. 
Solomons, San Francisco. Cal. ; ]\Ioses Sonneborn, Wheeling, W. Va. : Louis 
Stern, Washington, D. C. ; Isaac M. IJllman, New Haven, Conn. ; Samuel 
niman, Birmingham, Ala. : Henry Wallenstein. Wichita, Kan. ; Henry 
Wangenshelm, San Francisco. Cal. ; M. II. Wascerwitz. San Francisco, Cal. ; 
Jonas Weil, Minneapolis. Minn. ; Lionel Weil, Goldsboro, N. C. ; Eugene F. 
Westheimer, St. Joseph, Mo. : Morris S. Westhoimer, Cincinnati, O. ; Joseph 
Wiesenfeld, Baltimore, Md. ; Eli Winkler, Cincinnati, O. ; Leo Wise, Cin- 
cinnati, O. ; Edwin Wolf. Phila., Pa. ; Adolph Wolfe, Portland Ore. 

Board of Managers of Synagog and School Extension : George 
Zepin, Director ; Jacob D. Schwarz. Louis I. EgeLson, Assistants to Di- 
rector, 62 Duttenhofer Bldg.. Cincinnati, O. ; Mortimer Adler, Rochester, 
N. Y". ; Maurice Berkowitz, Kansas City, Mo. ; Joseph J. Corn. N. Y. C. ; 
Israel Cowen, Chicago. 111. ; Harry Cutler. Providence. R. I. ; Gustav A. 
Efroymson, Indianapolis, Ind. : Daniel B. Froedman, N. Y. C. ; J. Walter 
Freiberg, Cincinnati. O. : Frederick L. Guggenheimer, N. Y. C. ; Irving 
Lehman, N. Y. C. : David Loventritt, N. Y. C. : Nathaniel II. Levi, N. Y. C. ; 
Max B. May, Cincinnati. O. : Julius M. Mayer, N. Y. C. ; William Ornstein, 
Sigmund Rheinstrom. Cincinnati, O. : Julius Rosenwald, Chicago, 111. ; 
Max L. Schallek, N. Y. C. ; Joseph Schonthal. Columbus. O. ; Alfred Sellig- 
man, Louisville, Ky. ; Chas. Shohl. Cincinnati, O. ; Samuel Straus, Cincin- 
nati, O. ; Abr. J. Sunstein, Pittsburgh. Pa. ; Ludwig Vogelstein. N. 1". C. ; 
Herman Wile, Buffalo, N. Y. ; Otto Irving Wise. San Francisco, Cal. 

Hebrew Union College : Incorporated. Cincinnati. O. Amount of 
invested funds : $312,550 : Real Estate, low valuation, $250,000. Volumes 
in Library, 35,000 : Pamphlets in Library, 10.000. Faculty: I»res.. Kauf- 
man Kohler, Ph, D. (Erlangen), Professor of Homiletics. Theology, and 
Hellenistic Literature: (iotthard Deutsch. Ph.D. (Vienna), I'rofessor of 
Jewish History and Literature; Louis Grossmann, D. D. (H. U. C). 
Professor of Ethics and Pedagogy: David Neumark. Ph.D. (Berlin), 
Professor of Jewish Philosophy; Jacob Z. Lauterbach, Ph.D. (Gottingen), 



322 AMERICAN JEWISH YEAR BOOK 



Professor of Talmud; Moses Buttenwleser, Ph.D. (Heidelberg), Professor 
of Biblical Exegesis; Henry Englander, Ph. D. (Brown), Registrar and Pro- 
fessor of Biblical Exegesis and Biblical History ; Julian Morgenstern, Ph. D. 
(Heidelberg), Professor of Bible and Semitic Languages; Solomon B. Free- 
hof, B. A., Asst. Professor of Bible and Rabbinic Texts. 

Special Instructors: Boris D. Bogen, Ph.D. (New York University), 
Sociology with reference to Jewish Philanthropy; David Philipson, D. D., 
LL. D. (H. U. C), Lecturer on History of the Reform Movement and the 
Activities of the Rabbi ; Cora Kahn, Elocution. 

Corresponding Members of the Faculty: Aaron Hahn (1887) ; David 
Davidson (1892) ; Emil G. Hirsch (1901) ; Israel Abrahams (1912). 

Library Staff: Adolph S. Oko, Librarian ; David B. Wolfe, Cataloguer. 

ALUMNI ASSOCIATION OP THE HEBREW UNION COLLEGE 
Org. 1889. Hebrew Union College, Cincinnati, O. 

Annual Meeting, July 2, 1917, Buffalo, N. Y. 

Members, 176. 

Purpose : To promote welfare of the Hebrew Union College and to 
strengthen fraternal feeling among graduates of the college. 

Officers : Pres., Julian Morgenstern, Cincinnati, O. ; Vice-Pres., Isaac 
L. Rypins, St. Paul, Minn. ; Treas., Louis J. Kopald, Buffalo, N. Y. ; His- 
torian, Edgar F. Magnin, Los Angeles, Cal. ; Curator of Archives, Henry 
Englander, Cincinnati, O. ; Sec, Solomon B. Freehof, Cincinnati, O. 

Executive Committee : (For two years) Chas. J. Freund, Grand Rapids. 
Mich. ; Leonard J. Rothstein, Alexander, La. ; (for one year) Abram 
Hirschberg, Chicago, 111. ; Louis Witt, Little Rock, Ark. 

Advisory Board of Hebrew Union College : (For two years) Chas. A. 
Rubenstein, Baltimore, Md. ; (for one year) Marcus Salzman, Wllkesbarre, 
Pa. 



UNION OF JEWISH FEDERATIONS OF AMERICA 

Org. Feb., 1917. Office: 116 Nassau, New York City 

Societies, 7. 

Officers : Chairman. P. I. Siegelstein ; Vice-Chalrman, Sol. Neumann ; 
Treas., A. D. Katcher ; Sec, Jos. Seff. 

Committee : Samuel Bettelhelm, Jacob Carlinger, Joseph Gedalecia, Leo 
Lerner. 



UNION OF ORTHODOX JEWISH CONGREGATIONS OF 

AMERICA 

Org. June 8, 1898. Office : 125 E. 85th, New York City 

Eighth Convention, May 30-31, 1915, New York C^ty. 

Officers : Pres., Bernard Drachman, 128 W. 121st, N. Y. C. ; Vice- 
Pres., Moses Hyamson, M. Z. Margolies, Simon M. Boeder, N. Y. C. ; Treas., 
Jacob Hecht, N. Y. C. ; Sec, Isidore Hershfield, M. Engelman, Albert Lucas, 
20 Exchange PI., N. Y. C. 

Executive Committee : A. M. Ashinsky, Pittsburgh, Pa. ; Louis Bor- 
genicht, Bklyn., N. Y. ; I. M. Davidson, Youngstown, O. ; Julius J. Dukas, 
C. J. Epstein, Harry Fischel, Henry Glass, S. H. Glick, Herbert S. Goldstein. 
M. Gottesman, Jacob M. Guedalia, N. Y. C. ; S. Halpern, Hoboken, N. J. ; 
Philip Jaches, N. Y. C. ; J. D. Jurman, Boston, Mass. ; Philip Klein, Abr. 
Krumbein, M. Boas Lande, N. Y. C. ; J. Levinson, Albany, N. Y. ; B. L. Levin- 
thai, Phil^., Pa. ; H. Mandelbaum, H. Pereira Mendes, N. Y. C. ; Henry S. 
Morals, Bensonhurst, L. I.; J. Neulander, Yonkers, N. Y. ; David de Sola 
Pool, Nathan Rosenzweig, N. Y. C. ; G. S. Roth, Bklyn., N. Y. ; Abraham B. 
Rothstein, N. Y. C. ; S. Schaffer, Baltimore, Md ; W. Wittenstein, Bridge- 
port, Conn. 




JEWISH NATIONAL. ORGANIZATIONS 3^3 

UNITED ORTHODOX RABBIS OF AMERICA 
Org. Tammuz 24, 5662 (1902). Office: 121 Canal, New York City 

Fifteenth Annual Convention, May 13-15, 1917, New York City. 

Members, 120. 

Officebs : Hon. Pres., S. E. Jaffe, 207 B. Bway., N. Y. C. ; Second Hon. 
Pres^ Ph. Klein, 137 W. 119th, N. Y. C. ; Third Hon. Pres., B. L. Levinthal, 
716 Pine, Phila., Pa. ; Fourth Hon. Pres., T. Rosenberg, Jersey City, N. J. ; 
Pres., M. Z. Margolies, N. Y. C. ; Vlce-Pres., D. Glnzburg, Wilkes-Barre, Pa. ; 
Treas., L. Silber, Harrisburg, Pa. ; Chairman of Committee to organize Jew- 
ish Congregations In the United States, Isaac Siegel, Bayonne, N. J. 



UNITED SYNAGOGUE OF AMERICA 
Org. Feb. 23, 1913. Office : 531 W. 123d, New York City 

Sixth Annual Convention, June 16-17, 1918, New York City. 

Purpose : The promotion of traditional Judaism in America. 

Founder : Solomon Schechter. 

Officers : Pres., Ellas L. Solomon, N. Y. C. ; Vlce-Pres^, Louis Ginzberg, 
N. Y. C. ; Charles H. Kauvar, Denver, Colo. ; Mordecai M. Kaplan, N. Y. C. ; 
Herman Abramowitz, Montreal, Can. ; Rec. Sec, Jacob Kohn, N. Y. C. ; 
Cor. Sec, Chas. I. Hoffman, 45 Elizabeth Av., Newark, N. J. ; Treas., 
Meyer Goodfriend, N. Y. C. ; Supervising Director, Samuel M. Cohen, 
N. Y. C. 

Executive Council: The Oflacers, and Cyrus Adler, Julius H. Green- 
stone, Phila., Pa. ; A. M. Hershman, Detroit, Mich. ; Max D. Klein, Phila., 
Pa. ; William Levy, Baltimore, Md. ; Alexander Marx, N. Y. C. ; Wm. S. Rich, 
Newark, N. J. ; Herman H. Rubenovitz, Boston, Mass. ; Michael Salit, Bklyn., 
N. Y., Mrs. Solomon Schechter, N. Y. C. ; Herman Spivak, Chicago, 111. 



WOMEN'S LEAGUE OF THE UNITED SYNAGOGUE 

OF AMERICA 

Org. Jan. 21, 1918. Office : 531 W. 123d, New York City 

First Annual Convention, June 16-17, 1918, New York City. 

Purpose: To advance traditional Judaism by furthering Jewish educa- 
tion among women, by creating and fostering Jewish sentiment in the home, 
by promoting the observance of Jewish dietary laws and home ceremonials, 
Saboath and Festivals, and by generally strenghtening the religious insti- 
tutions of the home. 

Officers ; Pres., Mrs. Solomon Schechter, N. Y. C. ; Vlce-Pres., Mrs. 
Cyrus Adler, Phila., Pa. ; Mrs. Chas. I. Hoffman, Newark, N. J. ; Mrs. H. 
Pereira Mendes, N. Y. C. ; Mrs. H. H. Rubenovitz, Boston, Mass. ; Mrs. Israel 
Unterberg, N. Y. C. ; Treas., Mrs. Samuel I. Hyman, N. Y. C. ; Sec, Mrs. 
Jacob S. Minkin. 

Executive Committee : Mrs. L. D. Abrams, Brooklyn, N. Y. ; Hetty 
Behrend, Phila., Pa. ; Mrs. BenJ. Davis, Chicago, 111. ; Mrs. Max Drob, 
Buffalo^ N. Y. ; Mrs. J. Eisenberg, N. Y. C. ; Mrs. Edward Epstein, N. Y. C. ; 
Mrs. Harry Friedenwald, Baltimore, Md. ; Mrs. Julius Greenstone, Phila., 
Pa. ; Mrs. A. M. Hershman, Detroit, Mich. ; Rose A. Herzog, N. Y. C. ; Mrs. 
M. M. Kaplan, N. Y. C. ; Mrs. C. Hillel Kauvar, Denver, Colo. ; Mrs. Jacob 
Kohn, N. Y. C. ; Sarah Kussy, Newark, N. J. ; Mrs. Arthur Lamport, 
N. Y. C. ; Mrs. Max L. Margolis, Philadelpbia, Pa. ; Mrs. Simon Oppenhefmer, 
Washington, D. C. ; Mrs. Cecil B. Ruskay, N. Y. C. ; Mrs. Michael Salit, 
Brooklyn, N. Y. ; Mrs. Samuel Schimmel, Philadelphia, Pa. ; Mrs. Jacob 
Sobel, N. Y. C. ; Mrs, A. Solomon. N, Y. C. ; Mrs. Ellas Solomon, N. Y. C. ; 
Mrs. Samuel Spiegel, N. Y. C. 



324 AMERICAN JEWISH YEAR BOOK 

YOUNG JUDAEA 
(IMERGED IN ZIONIST ASSOCIATION OF AMERICA) 

Org. 1908. Officej 44 E. 23d, Now York City 

Tenth Annual Convention. Jun«? 28- July 2, 1018, Long Branch, N. J. 

Number of Circles. (512. 

PuKPosK : To advance the cause of Zionism ; to further the mental, 
moral, and physical development of the Jewish youth ; and to promote 
Jewish culture and ideals in accordance with Jewish tradition. 

Offickrs : Pres.. David de Sola Pool ; Vice-Pres., Chas. A. Cowen ; Sec, 
Samuel J. Borowsky. 

Executive Committee: Samuel Benjamin. Paul Chertoflf, Samuel M. 
Cohen, Edith Grossman, Eugene Kohn, Sylvan II. Kohn, Harry S. Medinets, 
Emanuel Neumann, Joshua H. Neumann, Fay Rutchlk, David Schneeberg, 
Joseph E. Silverstein, P^sther Zalkind. 

Advisory Board: Israel Friedlaender. Chairman; Joseph Barondess, 
Meyer Berlin, Mrs. Joseph Fels. Harry Friedenwald. S. T. H. Hurwitz, 
Sarah Kussy, Louis Lipsky. Hirsch Masliansky. Bernard Reuel, Isaac Rosen- 
garten. Jessie E. Sampter, Max Shulman, Henrietta Szold, Mrs. N. Taylor 
I»hillips, Stephen S. Wise. 



Z. B. T. FRATERNITY 

Org. 1898; inc. 1007. Office: (Supreme Council) 127 W. 88th, 

New York City 

Nineteenth Annual Convention, Dec. 27-20, 1917, New York City. 

Members, 2000. 

Also known as Zeta Beta Tau, ranking as an Intercollegiate Greek-letter 
fraternity, open to Jewish men. 

Officers: Supreme Nasi (Pres.); Richard J. H. Gottheil ; Vice-Nasi. 
A. Maurice I^evine ; Sopher (Sec). Benj. Rubinsohn, Phila., Pa.; Gisbar 
(Treas.), David Selfman. Rose Bldg.. Cleveland, O. ; Historian, A. H. Kallet, 
Syracuse. N. Y. ; Sec. of Supreme Council, Chas. J. Well, Montgomery. Ala. 



ZIONIST ORGANIZATION OF AMERICA 

Org. 1918. Office : 44 E. 23d, New York City 

Officers : Hon. Pres., Louis D. Brandeis, Washington, D. C. ; Pres., 
Julian W. Mack, Chicago, 111. ; Vice-Pres., Harry Friedenwald, Baltimore. 
Md. ; Stephen S. Wise, N. Y. C. ; Treas., E. W. Lewin-Epstein ; Asst. Treas., 
Louis Robison : Exec. Sec. Jacob de Haas ; Sec, of Organization, Louis 
Lipsky ; Sec of Education, Henrietta Szold ; Comptroller, Robt. D^ Kessel- 
man. N. Y. C. 

Executive Commii^ee: The Officers, and S. Abel, N. Y. C. ; David W 
Amram. Phila., Pa. ; M. L. Avner, Pittsburgh, Pa. ; Reuben Brainin, N. Y. C. 
Israel B. Brodie, BaltUjiore. Md. ; Chas. W. Cowen, N. Y. C. ; Harrv Cutler 
Providence. R. I. ; Allan Davis. Pittsburgh, I'a. ; S. Marcus Fechheimer 
Cincinnati. O. ; Mary Fels. N. Y. C. ; Felix Frankfurter. Washington, D. C. 
U A. Freed. San Antonio, Tex. ; Israel Friedlaender, N. Y. C. ; Abr. Goldberg 
N. Y. C. ; L. I. Goldberg. Norfolk, Va. ; George (iordon, Minneapolis, Minn. 
Mrs. R. Gottheil, N. Y. C. ; Max Heller. New Orleans, La. ; H. M. Kallen 
N. Y. C. ; Harry Kaplan, Cleveland. O. ; Nathan D. Kaplan. Chicago, 111. 
IjOuIs E. Kirstein. Boston, Mass. ; Leon Kohn. Newark, N. J. ; Zebi H 
Masliansky. N. Y. C. ; Eugene Mayer. Jr.. N. Y. C. ; Martin Meyer, San 
Francisco, Cal. ; Abr. A. Neuman. Phila., Pa. ; Hugo Pam, Chicago, 111. 
Benj. Rolialsky. Boston. Mass. ; Bernard (4. Richards, N. Y. C. ; Bernard A 
Rosenblatt, N. Y. C. ; Morris Rothenberg. N. Y. C. ; Wm. Sanber, Green Bay. 
Wis. ; Jessie E. Sampter, N. Y. C. ; David de Sola Pool, N. Y. C. ; Joshua 



JEWISH NATIONAL ORGANIZATIONS 325 



Sprayregen, N. Y. C. ; Jacob S. Strahl. Brooklyn, N. Y. ; Nathan Straus, 
N. Y^. C. ; Max Shulraan, Chicago, 111. ; Robert Szold, Washington, D. C. 

Constituent Okganizations : Federated Zionist Societies of the Middle 
West ; Hadassah : Intercollegiate Zionist Association of America ; Order 
Sons of Zion ; Young Judaea ; Zionist Society of Engineers. 



ZIONIST SOCIETY OF ENGINEERS 
(MKROBD IN ZIONIST ASSOCIATION OF AMERICA) 
Org. June 25, 1917. Office : 44 E. 23d, New York City 

Members, 135. 

Purpose : To utilize the technical knowledge and training of Jewish 
Engineers and Scientists : (a) to make a survey of the natural resources 
of Palestine ; (b) to plan and aid the upbuilding of Palestine along scien- 
tific lines ; (c) to project and develop the possible industries in I*alestine. 

OfficeHs : Hon. Pres., Leon S. Moisseiff. 69 Wall, N. Y. C. ; Pres., 
Geo. A. Lubarsky, 69 Wall, N. Y. C. ; Vice-Pres., I. Herbst, 3138 W. 15th, 
Chicago, 111. ; Boris Kazmann, 93 E. Van Buren, Battle Creek. Mich.; 
Benj. M. Ilalpern, c/o Worthington Machinery Works, Cudahy, Wis. ; I. J. 
Stander, 118 E. 28th, N. Y. C. : Treas., E. N. Mohl, 3d Av. & 6th ; Sec. 
Perez W. Etkes, c/o P. S. C, 49 Lafayette, N. Y. C. ; and M. A. Drucker. 
c/o P. S. C, 49 Lafayette, N. Y. C. 

Committees: Palestine Research, Chairman, Joseph Welnstein ; Hebrew 
Scientific Text Books. Chairman, U. Bernstein ; Library Committee, Chair- 
man, A. A. Rosenzweig ; Publication Committee, (Chairman, A. S. Orlans ; 
Membership, Chairman, S. Judenfreund, all of N. Y. C. ; Organization, 
Chairman, Henry J. Nurick, Bklyn., N. Y. 



AMERICAN JEWISH YEAH BOOK 






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328 AMERICAN JEWISH YEAR BOOK 



JEWISH PERIODICALS 

APPEARING IN THE UNITED STATES 

[Note. — Thirty-four publications listed in Year Books 5675-5677 
did not respond to inquiry as to whether they still exist, and are 
not included in this list. An asterisk (*) indicates that informa- 
tion was not procurable this year.] 

Alot O' Pep. 1020 Downing, Denver, Colo. Bi-monthly. Est. 1908. 
Organ of Pi Tau Pi Fraternity. 

* Adath Jeshubun News-Letter. Philadelphia, Pa. Monthly. 
Est. 1914. 
Organ of Adath Jeshurun Assembly. 

La America. 197 Eldridge, New York City. Judeo-Spanish. 
Weekly. Est. 1910. 

The American Hebrew and Jewish Messenger. 44 E. 23d, New 
York City. Weekly. Est. 1879. 

The American Israelite. N. W. cor. 7th and Elm, Cincinnati, O. 
Weekly. Est. 1854. 

American Jewish Chronicle. Aeolian Hall, New York City. 
Weekly. Est. 1916. 

American Jewish Review. 572 Elmswood Av., Buffalo, N. Y. 
Weekly. Est. 1912, at Atlanta, Ga. 

American Jewish World. 510 Tribune Annex Bldg., Minneapolis, 
Minn. Weekly., 

Est. 1912 as "The Jewish Weekly." 

Der Amerikaner. 77 Bowery, New York City. Yiddish. Weekly. 
Est. 1905. 

The Argus. P. O. Box 453. Scranton, Pa. Monthly. Est. 1910. 
Organ Young Men's Hebrew Association. 

The Ark. Cincinnati, O. Monthly. Est. 1912. 
Formerly " Young Israel." 

Beth El Scroll. 76th and 5th Av., New York City. Three 
issues a year. Est. 1915. 
Organ of Temple Beth El Sunday School. 

La Bos del Pueblo. 235 Eldridge, New York City. (In two 
editions, Friday and Sunday.) Judeo-Spanish. Est. 1915 as " El 
Progresso.' 



»> 



JEWISH PERIODICALS 329 



B*NAi B'eith Messenger. Los Angeles, Cal. Weekly. Est. 1897. 

B'nai Bbitii News. 1228 Tribune Bldg., Chicago, 111. Monthly. 
Est. 1908. 

Boston Jewish Amebican. Boston, Mass. Yiddish. Weekly. 
Est. 1908. 

Brooklyn Brownsville Post. 1778 Pitkin Av., Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Yiddish. Weekly. Est. 1910. 

Bulletin of Intercollegiate Zionist Association of America. 
2554 McCulloh, Baltimore, Md. 

The Bulletin of the Joint Distribution Committee of the 
American Funds for Jewish War Sufferers. 20 Exchange 
Place, New York City. Monthly. Est. Sept., 1916. 
Est. as " American Jewish Relief Committee Bulletin." 

The Bulletin. 59 W. 92d, New York City. Monthly. Est. Oct., 
1915. 
Organ of New York Section Council of Jewish Women. 

The Bulletin. 356 2d Av., New York City. Quarterly. Est. 1913. 
Est. as "The Friend"; name changed Xov. 15, 1013. Organ of Jewish 
Big Brothers. 

Butchers' Journal and Poultry Magazine. 140 Rivington, New 
York City. Yiddish. Weekly. Est. Jan. 15, 1915. 

The Chicago Israelite. 440 S. I>earborn, Chicago, 111. Weekly. 
Est. 1885. 

Congregational Record. 114th and 7th Av., New York City. 
Monthly. Est. 1914. 
Organ of Temple Anshe Chesed. 

The Daily Jewish Call. 1107 S. Halsted, Chicago, 111. Yiddish. 
Daily. Est. 1900 as " Der Taglicher Yiddisher Kol." 
See also Sunday Jewish Call. 

Daily World. 1128 Blue Island Av., Chicago, 111. Yiddish. Daily. 
Est. Oct. 14, 1917. 
Est. 1»07 as " Jewish Labor World." 

Dayton Jewish Life. 1026 Lindsey Bldg., Dayton, O. Weekly. 
Est. Nov. 2, 1917. 

Denver Jewish News. 1206 15th, Room 19, Walbrach Bldg., Den- 
ver, Colo. Weekly. Est. 1915. 
Organ of Central Jewish Council. 

The Echo. 317 W. 139th, New York City. Monthly. Est. 1834 
as " Ordens Echo." 
Official organ of the Independent Order of True Sisters. 

Emanu-El. Clunie Bldg., San Francisco, Cal. Weekly. Est. 1895. 



330 AMERICAN JEWISH YEAR BOOK 



Bmanu-El Review. 521 Fifth Av., New York City. Monthly. Est. 
1916. 
Organ of Temple Emanu-El. 

El Emiqrante. 18 Dennis, New Brunswick, N. J. Judeo-Spanish. 
Weekly. Est. Feb. 24, 1917. 

FoBTSCHRiTT. 31 Union Sq., New York City. Yiddish. Weekly. 
Est. Apl. 2, 1915. 
Official organ of Amalgamated Clothing Workers of America. 

Freie Abbeitee Stimme. 157 E. Broadway, New York City. Yid- 
dish. Weekly. Est. 1899. 

The Free Son. 375 Fulton, Brooklyn, N. Y. Monthly. Est. 1917. 
Official organ of Independent Order Free Sons of Israel. 

The Geocees' Guide and Modern Businessman (Deb Wegweiser). 
89 Delancey, New York City. Yiddish. Weekly. Est. Aug. 30, 
1912. 

Grosser Kundes (The Big Stick). 200 E. Broadway, New York 
City. Yiddish. Weekly. Est. 1908. 

Hadassah Buuetin. 44 E. 23d, New York City. Monthly. Est. 
1914. 
Published by Hadassah, the Women's Zionist Organization of America. 

Hai-Resh. New Orleans, La. Monthly. Est. 1911. 

Haibri. 86 Orchard, New York City. Hebrew. Weekly. Est. 1910. 

Hatoren. 44 E. 23d, New York City. Hebrew. Weekly. Est. 
1913 as monthly. Re-est. as weekly, Mch. 3, 1916. 

The Hebrew. 241 6th, San Francisco, Cal. Bi-monthly. Est. 1863 
as weekly. 

The Hebrew Standard. 87 Nassau, New York City. Weekly. 
Est. 1883. 

Hebrew Union College Monthly. Cincinnati, O. 
Organ of the students of Hebrew Union College. 

Jewish Advocate. 258 Washington, Boston, Mass. Weekly. Est. 
1905 as " Boston Advocate "; name changed May, 1909. 

Jewish Bulletin. 602 Paxton Bldg., Omaha, Neb. Weekly. Est. 
1916. 

Jewish Charities. 809-810 Neave Bldg., Cincinnati, O. Monthly. 
Re-est. 1910. 
Organ of National Conference of Jewish Charities. 

The Jewish Child. 356 2d Av., New York City. Weekly. Est. 
1912. 
Organ of Bureau of Education. 



k 



JEWISH PERIODICALS 331 



Jewish Chronicle. 314 Peter Smith Bldg., Detroit, Mich. 
Weekly. Est. 1916. 

Jewish Community Bulletin. Wheeling, W. Va. Monthly. Est. 
Jan., 1916. 

Jewish Community Joubnal. Lafayette, Ind. Monthly. Est. 
Dec, 1916. 

The Jewish Criterion. 502 Oliver Bldg., Pittsburgh, Pa. Weekly. 
Est. 1895. 

The Jewish Deaf. 42 W. 115th, New York City. Monthly. Est. 
1915. 

The Jewish Exponent. 608 Chestnut, Philadelphia, Pa. Weekly. 
Est. 1886. 

The Jewish Farmer. 174 2d Av., New York City. Yiddish. 
Monthly. Est. 1908. 
Published by the Jewish Agricultural dnd Industrial Aid Society. 

The Jewish Forum. 5 Beekman, New York City. Monthly. Est. 
Feb., 1918. 

The Jewish Guide. 324 Keap, Brooklyn, N. Y. Monthly. Est. 
1916 as weekly. 

Jewish Immigration Bulletin. 229 E. Broadway, New York 
City. Monthly. Est. 1912. 
Organ of Hebrew Sheltering and Immigrant Aid Society of America. 

The Jewish Independent. 102 St. Clair Av. N. W., Cleveland, O. 
Weekly. Est. 1906. 

The Jewish Ledger. 938 Lafayette, New Orleans, La. Weekly. 
Est. 1895. 

Jewish Monitor. 211 W. 11th, Fort Worth, Tex. Weekly. Est. 
1914 as " Southern Monitor and Texas Jewish Record." 

The Jewish Morning Journal (Der Morgen Journal). 77 
Bowery, New York City. Yiddish. Daily. Est. 1902. 

The Jewish Orphan Asylum Magazine. Cleveland, O. Quarterly. 
Est. 1903 as monthly. 

Jewish Quarterly Review. S. E. cor. Broad and York, Phila- 
delphia, Pa. New Series. Est. July, 1910. 
Published by the Dropsie College for Hebrew and Cognate Learning. 

The Jewish Review. 411 Meigs Bldg., Bridgeport, Conn. Weekly. 
Est. June 10, 1917. 



332 AMERICAN JEWISH YEAR BOOK 



The Jewish Review and Observer. 133 St. Clair Av., N. E., 
Cleveland, O. Weekly. Est. 1889. 

The Jewish Spectator. 148 Jefferson Av., Memphis, Tenn. 
Weekly. Est. 1885. 
Publication of Memphis and Nashville, Tenn., and New Orleans, Tja. 

The Jewish Teacher. 356 2d Av., New York City. Quarterly. 
Est. 1916. 

The Jewish Times. 50 Main, San Francisco, Cal., Weekly. Est. 
1855. 

The Jewish Tribune. Suite 714-716 Chamber of Commerce, Port- 
land, Ore. Weekly. Est. 1902. 

The Jewish Voice. 1040 Syndicate Trust Bldg., cor. 10th and 
Olive, St. Louis, Mo. Weekly. Est. 1884. 

Jewish Voice. Seattle, Wash. Weekly. Est. 1915. 

Jewish Workers' Voice. 89 Delancey, New York City. Yiddish. 
Monthly. Est. Oct. 15, 1914. 

Organ of Jewish National Workers' Alliance. 

The Jewish World. 50th and Woodland, Cleveland, O. Yiddish. 
Daily. Est. May, 1908. 
Absorbs Jewish Daily Press, 1914. 

The Jewish World. Philadelphia, Pa. Yiddish. Daily. Est. 
1914. 

Judaic Union Bulletin. Care L. Sulka, S. E. cor. Broad and 
Carpenter, Philadelphia, Pa. Quarterly. Est. 1910. 
Organ of Judaic Union. 

JtJDiscHE Gazetten. Ncw York City. Yiddish. Weekly. Est. 
1874. Weekly edition of " Judisches Tageblatt." 

JiJDiscHES Tageblatt. New York City. Yiddish. Daily. Est. 

1885. 

See also Jiidische Gazetten. 

The Leader. 148 E. 92d, New York City. Monthly. Est. 1913. 
Organ of Young Men's Hebrew Association of Brooklyn. 

Lend a Hand. 602-3-4 Washington Trust Co. Bldg., Pittsburgh, Pa. 
Occasional. Est. July, 1915. 
Organ of United Hebrew Relief Association. 

The Maccabaean. 44 E. 23d, New York City. Monthly. Est. 1901. 
Official organ of the Federation of American Zionists. 

Me-Hag Le-Hag (from Holiday to Holiday). 1029 E. Baltimore, 
Baltimore, Md. Hebrew. Three times a year, before the three 
festivals. Est. 1915. 



JEWISH PERIODICALS 333 



Menorah Bulletin. 600 Madison Av., New York City. Monthly. 
Est. Dec, 1917. 

Menobah Journal. 600 Madisonr Av., New York City. Bi-monthly. 
Est. 1915. 

Mikve Israel Record. Philadelphia, Pa. Monthly. Eight num- 
bers annually. Est. 1910. 
Published by Alumni Society of Mikve Israel Congregation. 

Milwaukee Wochenblatt. 828 Walnut, Milwaukee, Wis. Yiddish. 
Weekly: Est. Apl., 1914. 

The Modern View. 210 Olive, St. Louis, Mo. Weekly. Est. 1901. 

Naye Welt. 175 E. Broadway, New York City. Yiddish. Weekly. 
Est. 1913 as "Jewish Socialist"; name changed 1915. 

Dos Naye Wort. Boston, Mass. Yiddish. Monthly. Est. 1914. 
Published by Independent Workmen's Circle of America, Inc. 

The Neighbor. Newark, N. J. Occasional. Est. 1912. 
Organ of .Jewish Sisterhood and Day Nursery. 

New York Weekly Jewish News. 38 Park Row, New York City. 
Weekly. Est. Mch. 14, 1918. 

Oheb Shalom Review. Newark, N. J. Monthly. Est. 1911. 
Organ of Congregation Oheb Shalom. 

Observer. 1258 W. Taylor, Chicago, 111. Monthly. Est. 1912. 
Ofllcial organ of Chicago Hebrew Institute. 

Pannonia Bulletin. 709 N. Franklin, Philadelphia, Pa. Semi- 
monthly. Est. 1913. 
Organ of Pannonia Beneficial Association. 

Petach Tikvah News. Rochester Av. cor. Lincoln PI., Brooklyn, 
N. Y. Monthly. Est. 1915. 
Organ of Petach Tikvah Alumni Association. 

Philadelphia Jewish Morning Journal. Philadelphia, Pa. Yid- 
dish. Daily. Est. 1901 as "Philadelphia Abend-Post"; name 
changed June 1, 1907. 

Dus Ratzionale Leben (Rational Living). 61 Hamilton Place, 
New York City. Yiddish. Monthly. Est. 1910. 

The Reform Advocate. 7 S. Dearborn, Chicago, 111. Weekly. 
Est. 1891. 

♦La Renaslnsia. 235 Eldridge, New York City. Judeo-Spanish. 
Fortnightly. Est. Mch. 4, 1917. 

The Review. 1616 Master, Philadelphia, Pa. Monthly. Eight 
numbers annually. Est. 1905. Discontinued until end of the 
war. 
Organ of the Young Men's Hebrew Association. 



334 AMERICAN JEWISH YEAR BOOK 



RoDEPH Shalom Bulletin. 1347 Lexington Av., New York City. 
Monthly. Est. 1915. 
Organ of Temple Rodeph Shalom. , 

Sanatoetum. 510 Kittredge Bldg., Denver, Colo. Quarterly. Est. 
1907. 
Organ of the Jewish Consumptives' Relief Society. 

The Sentinel. 14 W. Washington, Chicago, 111. Weekly. Est. 
1910. 

The Shofab. Baltimore, Md. Monthly. Re-est. May" 27, 1917. 
Organ of Baltimore Hebrew Congregation. 

The Shofab. Kingshighway and Washington, St Louis, Mo. 
Quarterly. Est. 1916. 

Organ of Junior Congregation of Temple Israel. 

Sinai's Echo. 951-957 Stebbins Av., New York City. Monthly. 
Est. 1916. 
Organ of Sinai Temple of the Bronx. 

Dee Sonntag Coubieb. 1214 S. Halsted, Chicago, 111. Yiddish. 
Weekly. Est. 1887. 
Sunday edition of Der TSglicher Jiidischer Courier. 

Students' Annual. 531 W. 123d, New York City. English and 
Hebrew. Est. 1914. 
Organ of the students of Jewish Theological Seminary of America. 

The Sunday Jewish Call. 1107 S. Halsted, Chicago, 111. Yid- 
dish. Weekly. Est. 1900 as " Der Sonntag Kol." 
Sunday edition of the Daily Jewish Call. 

Deb Taqlicheb Judischeb Coubieb. 1214 S. Halsted, Chicago, 
111. Yiddish. Daily. Est. 1887. 
English title '* The Daily Jewish Courier." See also Der Sonntag Courier. 

The Tales of the Tents. Edgewater, Colo. Monthly. Est. 1914. 

The Temple. Denver Colo. Monthly. Est. January 1, 1917. 
Organ of Congregation Emanuel. 

Temple Isbael Bulletin. Kingshighway and Washington, St. 
Louis, Mo. Weekly. Est. 1915. 

Temple Isbael Review. 36 Banks, New Rochelle, N. Y. Monthly. 
Est. Mch. 1, 1917. 
Organ of Congregation Temple Israel. 

Temple News. Columbus, O. Monthly. Est. Sept., 1917. 
Organ of Temple Israel. 

Texas Jewish Hebald. 1205 Prairie Av., Houston, Tex. Weekly. 
Est. as " Jewish Herald " 1908 ; name changed 1914. 

Deb Tog. 183 E. Broadway, New York City. Yiddish. Daily. 
Est. 1914. 




JEWISH PERIODICALS 335 



The Toledo Israelite. 850 Nicholas Bldg., Toledo, O. Weekly. 
Est. 1915. 

Transactions of the Society of Jewish Academicians of America. 
5 Beekman, New York City. Annual. Est. June, 1918. 

Tri-City Jewish Chronicle. 409 State., Schenectady, N. Y. 
Monthly. Est. Dec, 1917. 

Union Bulletin. 62 Duttenhofer Bldg., Cincinnati, O. Monthly. 

Est. 1911. 

Organ of the Union of American Hebrew Congregations. 

Union Home Study Magazine. 62 Duttenhofer Bldg., Cincinnati, 
O., Monthly. Est. 1913. 

Unser Wort. 196 E. Broadway, New York City. Yiddish. Monthly. 
Est. Aug., 1915, in Chicago. 
Organ of Jewish Socialist-Territorialist Labor Party in America. 

The Voice of the Girls (Kol Ajlamoth). 31 W. 110th, New 
York City. Quarterly. Est. 1915. 
Organ of Young Women's Hebrew Association. 

Der Volksfreund. 95 Logan, Pittsburgh, Pa. Yiddish and 
Hebrew. Weekly. Est. 1889. 

VoRWARTS (Jewish Daily Forward). New York City. Yiddish. 
Daily. Est. 1897. 

Welfare Board Sentinel. 19 W. 44th, New York City. Est. March 
1, 1918. 
Organ of Jewish Welfare Board. 

Dos YiDDisHE Folk. 44 E. 23d, New York City. Yiddish. Weekly. 
Est. 1909. 
Yiddish organ of the Federation of American Zionists. 

Der Yiddisher Kaempfer. 266 Grand, New York City. Yiddish 
Weekly. Est. 1916. 

Der Yiddisher Record. 1127 Blue Island Av., Chicago, 111. Yid- 
dish. Weekly. Est. 1910. 

Yizr'el. 44 E. 23d., New York City. Hebrew. Monthly. Est. Jan., 
1917. 
Organ of Young Judaea. 

Young Judaea Leaders' Bulletin. 44 E. 23d, New York City. 
Monthly. Est. 1916 as " Leaders' Bulletin." 
Organ of Young Judaea. 

The Young Judaean. 44 E. 23d, New York City. Monthly. Est. 
1910. 
Official organ of Young Judaea. 



336 AMERICAN JEWISH YEAR BOOK 



Young Men's Hebrew Association Bulletin. 92d and Lexington 
Av., New York City. Monthly. Est. 1900. 
Organ of Young Men's Hebrew Association. 

Young Men's Hebrew Association News. New Orleans, La. 
Monthly. Est. 1902 as "Athenaeum." 

Y. M. H. A. News Letter. 3123 Troost Av., Kansas City, Mo. 
Monthly. Est. 1914. 
Organ of Young Men's Hebrew Association. 

Zeta Beta Tau Quarterly. Menasha, Wis. Est. 1912. 
Organ of Zeta Beta Tau Fraternity. 

Die Zukunft. 175 E. Broadway, New York City. Yiddish. 
Monthly. Est. 1892. 



JEWISH MEMBERS OF CONGRESS 337 



JEWISH MEMBEES OF THE CONGRESS OF THE 

UNITED STATES 

PAST 

Benjamin, Judah Philip, 1812-1884. Sen. from La., 1853-1861. 
Cantor, Jacob A., 1854- . Rep. from N. Y., 1913-1915. 
Einstein, Edwin, 1842-1906. Rep. from N. Y., 1879-1881. 
Emerich, Martin, 1847- . Rep. from 111., 1903-1907. 
Fischer, Israel F., 1858- . Rep. from N. Y., 1895-1899. 
Frank, Nathan, 1852- . Rep. from Mo., 1889-1891. 
Goldfogle, Henry M., 1856- . Rep. from N. Y., 1901-1915. 
GoLDziER, Julius, 1854- . Rep. from 111., 1893-1895. 
Guggenheim, Simon, 1867- . Sen. from Colo., 1907-1913. 
Hart, Emanuel B., 1809-1897. Rep. from N. Y., 1851-1853. 
Houseman, Julius, 1832-1891. Rep. from Mich., 1883-1885. 
Jonas, Benjamin Franklin, 1834-1911. Sen. from La., 1879-1885 
Lessler, Montague, 1869- . Rep. from N. Y., 1902-1903. 
Levin, Lewis Charles, 1808-1860. Rep. from Pa., 1845-1851. 
Levy, David. See Yulee, David Levy. 

Levy, Jefferson Monroe, Rep. from N. Y., 1899-1901, 1911-1915. 
LiTTAUER, Lucius Nathan, 1859- . Rep. from N. Y., 1897-1907. 
May, Mitchell, 1871- . Rep. from N. Y., 1899-1901. 
Meyer, Adolph, 1842-1908. Rep. from La., 1891-1908. 
Morse, Leopold, 1831-1892. Rep. from Mass., 1877-1885, 1887-1889 
Phillips, Henry Myer, 1811-1884. Rep. from Pa., 1857-1859. 
Phillips, Philip, 1807-1884. Rep. from Ala., 1853-1855. 
Pulitzer, Joseph, 1847-1911. Rep. from N. Y., 1885-1886. 
Rayner, Isidor, 1850-1912. Rep. from Md., 1887-1895; Sen. from 

Md., 1905-1912. 
Simon, Joseph, 1851- . Sen. from Ore., 1898-1903. 
Straus, Isidor, 1845-1912. Rep. from N. Y., 1894-1895. 
Strouse, Myer, 1825-1878. Rep. from Pa., 1863-1867. 
Wolf, Harry B., 1880- . Rep. from Md., 1907-1909. 
Yulee, David Levy, 1811-1886. Del. from Fla., 1841-1845; Sen. from 

Fla., 1845-1851, 1855-1861. 



338 AMERICAN JEWISH YEAR BOOK 

PRESENT 

(Members of the Sixty-Fifth Congbbss) 

Bachbach, Isaac, Republican, Representative, Atlantic City, 1915- 
Kahn, Julius, Republican, Representative, San Francisco, 1889- 

1902, 1905- 
Krauss, Milton, Republican, Representative, Peru, ind., 1917- 
London, Meyeb, Socialist, Representative, New York City, 1915- 
Sabath, Adolph J., Democrat, Representative, Chicago, 1907- 
Siegel, Isaac, Republican, Representative, New York City, 1915- 



STATISTICS OF JEWS 



STATISTICS OF JEWS 
A. Jewish Population op the Woeld 

The table of last year with regard to general statistics of Jews of 
the world Is here repeated, with Hoine modlQcatlons. 

The figures for the United Statea are those for the year 1917, as 
determined by the estimate made by the Bureau of Jewish Sta- 
tistics and Research of the American Jewish Committee for the 
Census Bureau of the United States Department of Commerce. In 
the case ol foreign countries no allowances for decreases due to war 
conditions, have been made. 

According to the latest revised flgures available, the total number 
of JewB of the world Is, divided among continents, as follows: 

Europe 10,891,917 

America 3,496.226 

Asia 357,070 

Africa 369,732 

Australia (including New Zealand) . . 19,J16 

Total 15,124,343 

NuiuEB or Jews ahd Peb Cent of Total Population bt Cohntbies 



CoimtriH 


,.„ 


rJSi.. 


,i;i. 


P*r 


■UKora 


1H18 


"11 

1!;S:S 

SlijoolfiW 
M9.H91 

6,428,133 
TpSQS.CCB 

IB.603,068 


2,2BS,262 

!0(»!0CI0 
6)6,021 

106 ! SOU 

^i;o» 

6,ej6!u90 

HKm 
aislflis 

























































































340 



AMERICAN JEWISH YEAR BOOK 



Number of Jews and Per Cent of Total Population by Countries 

(continued) 



Countries 



NORTH AMERICA 

Canada 

Cuba 

Jamaica 

Mexico 

United States 

SOUTH AMERICA 

Argentine Republic 

Brazil 

Dutch Guiana (Surinam) 

Curagao 

Peru 

Uruguay 

Venezuela 

ASIA 

Aden 

Afghanistan and Turkestan 

Dutch East Indies (Java, Maduro, etc.) 
Hong Kong and Straits Settlement . . . 

India 

Palestine 

Persia 

Turkey in Asia (other than Palestine). 

AFRICA 

Abyssinia 

Algeria 

Egypt 

Morocco 

Tripoli 

Tunis 

East African Protectorate 

Rhodesia 

Union of South Africa 

AUSTRALASIA 

Australia 

New Zealand 



Year 



1911 
1916 
1917 
1912 
1918 



1917 
1917 
1916 
1917 
1917 
1917 
1917 



1911 

1916 

1912 

1911. 

1911 

1916 



1914 
1907 

• • • • 

1911 
1914 
1916 
1914 
1911 



1911 
1916 



Total 
Population 



7,204,888 

2,627,536 

850,000 

16,501,684 

108,000,000 



9,000,000 

20,000,000 

88,760 

80,000 



• ••••• 



• • • • 



1,100,000 
2,755,685 



46,165 

6,000,000 

48,000,000 

366,145 

815,166,396 

700,000 

9,600,000 

20,660,000 



6,563,828 
11,287,369 
5,000,000 
528,176 
1,878,620 
4,038,000 
1,610,000 
5,973,394 



4,455,005 
1,099,295 



Jewish 
Population 



76,681 

2,000 

1,487 

600 

8,800,000 



110,000 
4,000 
882 
600 
300 
800 
476 



3,747 
18,816 
10,842 
685 
20,980 
86,000 
40,000 
177,500 



26,000 

70,271 

38,635 

103,712 

18,860 

54,664 

80 

1,600 

47,000 



17,287 
2,128 



Per 
ct. of 
total 



1.05 
.07 
.17 
.003 

3.2 



1.22 

.02 

.97 

2.00 

• • • • 

.02 
.01 



8.12 
.81 
.02 
.04 
.006 
12.00 

4.02 
.86 



1.2 
.34 

2.11 

3.6 

2.9 
.002 
.09 
.78 



.89 
.21 



Jews in Russian Empire in 1913 * 

European Russia . . 5,115,331 Siberia 58,730 

Russian Poland. . . 1,675,666 Central Asia 17,532 

Caucasus 78,831 

Total 6,946,090 

^ The Russian Year Book, 1916. 



STATISTICS OP JEWS 



341 



Jews in British Empire* 
Total, 472,853 

EUROPE ASIA 

Great Britain 258,500 Aden 3,747 

Ireland 5,148 India, 20,980 

Cyprus, Gibraltar, Hong Kong and 

Malta 1,445 Straits Settlement . . 685 

AMERICA AFRICA 

Canada 75,681 Union of South Africa 47,000 

Jamaica 1,487 Egypt 38,635 

Trinidad and Barba- East African Protecto- 

does 50 rate 80 

AUSTRALIA AND NEW ZEALAND 

Australia 17,287 

New Zealand 2,128 



Jews in Canada 

Province 1891 

Alberta 12 

British Columbia 277 

Manitoba 743 

New Brunswick 73 

Nova Scotia 31 

Ontario 2,501 

Prince Edward Island . 1 

Quebec 2,703 

Saskatchewan 73 

Yukon 

Northwest Territories 

Totals 6,414 



1901 


1911 


17 


1,486 


543 


1,265 


1,514 


10,741 


395 


1,021 


449 


1,360 


5,337 


27,015 


17 


38 


7,607 


30,648 


198 


2,066 


54 


41 


• • • • 


• • • • 



16,131 



75,681 



» English Jewish Year Book, 1917. 



AMERICAN JEWISH YEAR BOOK 



JEWS IN THE UNITED STATES 
Cities Havimb Oms Thousabd ob Mobe Jewish Inkabitants 



ati» 


ie» 


J907 


.910. 1 im 1 m 




Akron. Mil 


iilooo 

'"ioo 
■"soo 

2B.0OO 

i.loo 
i;ooo 

l|6O0 

'"soo 
'i'.oois 


s;6oo 

i.'aso 
iolooo 

'soo 

1,500 

«:«» 

3. BOO 

io'.obo 

'iiioo 
'siooo 
aslooo 

40,000 
<,000 

2)000 
jiaoo 

7,000 
'i^ooo 

l.£50 


'«iU7 

lii.m 
ioiiss 


3;600 J 

iolooo ic 

!6;6o6 « 

'iiooo 1 

j;ooo 1 
■aiooo » 
aooioro w 

e'.mo i 
■6;ooo I 
lelooo 11 

S.BOO s 

stooo so 
ziooo ! 

bIooo I 


nnn 


il&JJL- 


w» 










Atluitle CHIr. H. 1. 


000 














SS&i^;^:::::::::::::::::::: 


soo 




000 














mijS^Vy; ::;::::::::;:: 








amdm, N. J 


3 










Ouirlfflitown, W. V. 


ion 


























































^v^eeee::. 




































fTiJ-^N.^v;;.;.-;;. :.■;■::.:::;:: 


flflfl 











STATISTICS OP JEWS 



CiTus Havino Onb Thocbasd OB MoRK Jewish Inhabitan'to 
(Continued) 



GiUu 


190S 


1907 


IBIO- 


1812 JBI 




Boboken, N. J. 


'sImo 

IIS 

1,000 
'zItoo 

7,000 

's.m 

sioofl 
'iiooo 
'iioBa 

20,000 

6.000 

227 

slooo 
fl.ooo 

is.m 
is.ooo 


t.m 

1,300 
l',6D0 

ioiooo 
'mo 

8,000 

BM.OOO 

'flOO 
2,000 

slooo 

lOO^OOD 
2S,OO0 

jilooo 


■2;iT7 

ilooo 
's.iih 

"i.m 

"i.m 
m'.m 

'i.ixB 


2,SW i 
B,000 8 

'i',im 10 
2;ooo 2 

'i'Z 'i 

i;2oo 1 
iojooo 1* 

11J,0U0 8 
1.000 t 

e.m 7 

ib'.aoo It 
ilsoo 1 
k'.m 3 

36,000 Bt 
7i500 t 

's.ooh i 
lioou ' ( 

,s J 


m, 














Jeriey City, N.J 

j3i«, IIL 


100 
















200 


UltleKock, Ari 


noft 


























Meridfn, Oonn 

Milwaukee. Wli 


noo 


Uobilc, Ala 


din 




m 


SewBedlora/Vaai''.'.\V^V.V.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'. 


MO 


New Brunswick. N. J 


m 














SoH?'^"^"-''""'---"-'"-- 


oeo 










OkUhoma, OHa 

Omaha, Neb. 

ft^T^v. n.'j::::;:;;:;;::;;:::::::::! 


noo 








noo 






m 'J'S'iS' wT 


nno 


Pnrtlaim, M» 













344 



AMERICAN JEWISH YEAR BOOK 



Cities Having One Thousand or Mobe Jewish Inhabitants 

(Continued) 



Cities 



Poughkeepsie, N. Y. ., 

Providence, R. I 

Pueblo, Colo 

Quincy, Mass 

Reading, Pa 

Revere, Mass 

Richmond, Va 

Rochester, N. Y 

Saginaw, Mich 

St. Joseph, Mo 

St. Louis, Mo 

St. Paul, Minn 

Salem, Mass 

Salt Lake City. Utah. 

San Antonio, Tex 

San Francisco, Cal. ., 

Savannah, Ga 

Schenectady, N. Y 

Scranton, Pa 

Seattle, Wash 

Shreveport, La 

Sioux City, la 

Somerville. Mass 

South Bend, Ind 

South Bethlehem, Pa.. 
South Norwalk, Conn, 

Spokane, Wash 

Springfield. Mass 

Stamford, Conn 

Stockton, Cal 

Syracuse, N. Y 

Tampa, Fla 

Toledo, Ohio 

Topeka, Kan 

Trenton, N. J 

Troy, N. Y 

Utica, N. Y 

Waco, Tex 

Washington, D. C 

Waterbury, Conn 

West New York. N. J. 

Wheeling, W. Va 

Wilkes-Barre, Pa 

Wilmington, Del 

Winthrop, Mass 

Woodbine, N. J 

Worcester, Mass 

Yonkers, N. Y 

YoungstowTi, Ohio ... 



1905 



75 



800 



2,600 
5,000 

'i]iio 

40,000 
3,500 



800 

17,000 

1,500 

'"ibb 

420 



•••••• 

300 



5,000 



1,500 
3,000 



1,800 



2,000 
1,000 



40,000 
3,500 

'**760 
1.800 

30,000 
3,000 

*6[666 
4,000 
1,250 
1,026 

""m 



800 
1,500 



10,000 

'3,666 

"4,666 
1,800 

**"666 

5,000 



2,000 



2,100 
3.000 
3,000 
2,000 



1907 


19101 


200 
10,000 




350 




*3i666 

10,000 


**'86i 

9,602 


'2i666 


1 



18,870 
5,909 



6,254 



8,151 
2,499 



290 

'4!285 
'21456 

•••••• 

'4^646 



5.678 



1912 1918 



1.000 
13.000 

'1,666 
1,5U0 

*3',666 
12,000 

'3!666 

40,000 
6,000 

'5^666 
3,000 

25,000 
3,000 

'7[666 

4,500 
1,250 
1,400 

1,266 



1,000 
3,500 



5,000 

'2i666 
4,000 

■••••• 

1,000 
0,000 



8,000 



3,000 
8,000 

4,500 
4,500 



1,600 

15,000 
1,000* 
1,250 
1,750 
6,000 
4,000 

20,000 
1,000 
8,800 

60,000 

10,000 
1,500 
2,500 
3,000 

30,000 
5,000 
8,500 
7,600 
5.000 
1,500 
2.500 
2,000 
2,000 
1,300 
1,000 
1.100 
6.000 
1,600 
1,000 

12,000 
1,000 
7,500 
1,000 
7.000 
3,000 
1,600 
.5001 

10,000 
6,000 
1,600 
1,000 
8,000 
3,500 
1,500 
1,900 

10,000 
5,000 
5,000 



* From the Census Report of 1910, showing number of persons claiming Yiddish as 
their mother-tongrue together with their children. The remaining figrures are estimates 
of the Jewish Encyclopedia in 1905, the American Jewish Year Book in 1907, and the 
Industrial Removal Office in 1912. 



STATISTICS OF JEWS 345 



B. Jewish Immigration into the United States 

The following tables give the main figures relating to the Jewish 
immigration to the United States from the year 1881 to June 30, 
1918. For the earlier years, from 1881 to 1900, the results are 
only for the ports of New York, ' Philadelphia, and Baltimore; 
from 1899 onwards, the figures are from the reports of the Com- 
missioner-General of Immigration. In some instances the figures 
refer only to the year 1916-1917, continuing those of previous issues 
of the Year Book. 

Jewish Immigratiox, 1881-1900, through the Ports of New York, 

Philadelphia, and Baltimore 

Number Number 

Year . Admitted Year Admitted 

1881-84 74,310 1893 32,943 

1885 19,611 1894 22,108 

1886 29,658 1895 32,077 

1887 27,468 1896 28,118 

1888 31,363 1897 ....' 20,684 

1889 23,962 1898 27,409 

1890 34,303 1899 ^ 16,021 

1891 69,139 1900^ 49,816 

1892 ....: 60,325 

Total 599,315 

The complete statistics of immigration to the United States, as 
shown by the Commissioner-General's reports, are given below 
for the period 1899-1918. It will be seen that for this period of 
twenty years Jewish immigration has been approximately 1,548,600, 
amounting to 11 per cent of the total immigration. 



^ To July. Includes, for Philadelphia, the figures to Nov. 1. 



AMERICAN JEWISH TEAR BOOK 



,..„l„.,.l,...- 
1 „..,. 


All ItniDl. 


Ye»r' 


";;;.'.""'- 


All imnii- 


is»g : n.tib 

IMO 1 M,rB4 

;»M I «.«« 

i9Q»:V."'.'' le'.m 
IBM ■ 106, aaa 


9671048 
812,870 

i:i09,'7SS 


!B(B 

1910 .... 

]^]l 

ibit::::: 

ToUl.. 


101 
Zf 


m 
m 


■■I 
■,ffi 

■•s 

]« 


m 

an 

BIS 
8U 


1 


1.5«.Ii04 


18.T16 


M4 



Since 190S, the number of aliens leaving tbe United States Is 
given as well as the number admitted. It will be observed that for 
the eleven years the total number of Jews returning Is c 49,090. 
Approximately 7 per cent of the Jews admitted left the United 
States. Thla figure contr&sts Btrlkingly with the number oC Immi- 
grants of Other nationalities that leave the United States over 30 
per cent 



IHCBEASE TBBOUOK lUUIOKATION I 



! Umfted States, 1908-1918 



yeici 


NurabM 


Admitted 


Numbe 


Departed 


Ket 


..,,.., 


J»«i 


Tot.l 


Jewi 


Tot.1 


Jnrl 


TM, 




108,885 

iB.ioa 


78J.87D 
],lB7;89a 

''lis:™ 

305,403 
'108,811 


.':S 
11 

"200 


30S.073 

i-S 

833 law 


flS.OSB 

II 

B<>S3 
B.BUIl 


987 WW 




IS! 












































TOUMWB-IBIB.. 


71«,860 


7,738.097 


«,090 


£,Ee4,84T 


■"■'" 


6.171,160 



STATISTICS OF JEWS 



347 



The Jewish immigration since 1881 is approximately 1,880,000 
On the basis of the percentage leaving the United States since 1908, 
the total number departed during this period would be 150,000 
leaving a net increase through immigration of 1,730,000. 

Of interest in connection with the number of immigrants ad- 
mitted are the data for those rejected on application for admission 
and those returned from the United States after admission. The 
figures are shown in the table below. 

Immigrants Debabsed and Depobted 



Year I 


Number Debarred 


Number Deported 


Jews 


Total 


Jews 


Total 


1899-1910 


10,785 

1,999 

1,064 

1,224 

2,506 

1,898 

949 

307 

»800 


116,266 
22,849 
16,057 
19,938 
83,041 
24,111 
18,867 
16,028 
7,126 


1,808 

209 

191 

258 

817 

68 

79 

46 

220 


12,177 


1911 


2,788 


1912 


2,456 


1918 


8,461 


1914 


4,187 


1915 


2,670 


1916 


2,906 


1917 


1,918 


1918 


1,670 






Total, 1899-1918 


20,882 


278,772 


2,486 


84,183 







1 Year ending June 30. 
» Estimated. 



During a period of twenty years, the number of Jews rejected 
on application for landing was c. 20,800, or approximately 8 per 
cent of the total number of immigrants debarred. This is con- 
siderably less than the proportion which Jews form of the total 
immigration for the same period — 10 per cent. 

For the same period, the number of Jews returned after landing 
was c. 2486, or 8 per cent of the total number deported. This, 
again, is lower than the proportion of Jews in the total immi- 
gration. 

Immigration 1917-1918 

Ehiring the year ending June 30, 1918, there were admitted 
4006 Jews. The number departing was c. 200. The net increase 
through migration was thus 3806. The net increase for 1916- 
1917 was 17,013. The figures for 1917-1918 as also those for the 
two previous years betray the influence of the European war on 
Jewish as on general immigration. 



348 



AMERICAN JEWISH YEAR BOOK 



Below is shown the number of Jewish immigrants for the lead- 
ing ports, according to the data supplied by The Jewish Immigra- 
tion Bulletin. They are not the complete figures for the United 
States, and should not be compared in detail with the Govern- 
ment figures. 



Jewish Immigration at Leading Ports 
Year Ending June 30, 1917 



Ports 



New York 

Seattle 

San Francisco 

Boston 

Total, four ports.. 



Number of 
Immigrants 



4,564 

1,272 

827 

85 



6,788 



Jewish Immigration at Leading Ports by Countries of Origin 

Year Ending June 30, 1917 



Countries 



Russia.... 
Austria... 
Roumania 
Other . . . . 

Total. 



Port of 
New York 



3,849 

66 

40 

1674 



4,528 



Total, four 
ports 



5,802 

66 

74 

796 



6,738 



* For New York, the other countries of origin given by a considerable number of 
immigrants are: England, 174; Turkey in Asia, 80; France, 29; Egypt, 8; Germany, 
13; South America, 18; Scotland, 13; Holland, 18; Belgium, 2; Switzerland, 8; Ireland, 
5; South Africa, 4; Sweden, 2; West Indies, 15; Norway, 1; Canada, 5; Denmark, 4; 
Persia, 10; Cuba, 1; Finland, 3; Spain, 6; Portugal, 5; Greece, 108; Turkey in Europe, 
11; Servia, 10; Italy, 15; SjTia, 1; Bulgaria, 5. 

Complete data for the 1917-1918 immigration are not yet avail- 
able. The significant facts descriptive of the immigrants, the 
countries of origin, and their distribution in the United States, are 
here reproduced for 1916-1917. 



STATISTICS OF JEWS 



349 



Immigrants Admitted to the United States and Departing 

Therefrom, by States, 1917 



states 
Destination or Departure 



California 

Colorado 

Connecticut 

District of Columbia 

Florida 

Georgia , 

Illinois 

Indiana 

Iowa 

Kansas 

Kentucky 

Louisiana 

Maine 

Maryland 

Massachusetts 

Michigan 

Minnesota 

Missouri 

Montana 

Nebraska 

Nevada 

New Hampshire 

New Jersey 

New York 

North Carolina 

North Dakota 

Ohio 

Oregon 

Pennsylvania 

Philippine Islands 

Porto Rico 

Rhode Island 

South Carolina 

Tennessee 

Texas 

Utah 

Vermont 

Virginia 

Virgin Islands 

Washington 

West Virginia 

Wisconsin 

Other States and Possessions 
Not specified 

Total 



Number 
Admitted 



Jews 



417 
21 
224 
31 
15 
34 

1,096 
48 
49 
16 
13 
16 
23 
91 
653 

1.669 

392 

86 

83 

54 

• • • • 

12 

748 

9,438 

11 

33 
604 

35 
816 



38 
10 
20 
42 
21 
14 
47 

• • • • 

386 
18 

84 
189 



17,342 



Total 



16,354 

977 

7,389 

772 

4,369 

192 

10,690 

1,195 

1,335 

630 

105 

1,270 

8,878 

911 

29,606 

26,407 

6,412 

1,320 

4,690 

619 

381 

'4,302 

8.554 

84,639 

132 

1,848 

6,908 

1,878 

14,603 

20 

630 

4,486 

67 

175 

9,088 

965 

2,193 

1,396 

3 

11,842 

1,695 

2,297 

18,180 



295,403 



Number 
Departed 



Jews 



46 



3 



12 
6 
1 
2 



238 



3 

• • • 

10 

• • • 

• • • 



• • • 

• • • 



1 

i • • • 



329 



Total 



4,208 

198 

1,499 

229 

2,388 

23 

2,182 

129 

312 

67 

14 

342 

225 

158 

3,697 

1,170 

748 

199 

194 

120 

129 

267 

1,399 

20,377 

12 

165 

1,153 

187 

3,318 

16 

875 

655 

8 

13 

222 

161 

204 

125 

1 

768 

241 

329 

1,251 

16,300 



66,277 



Net Increase 



Jews 



871 
21 

224 
31 
15 
34 
1,092 
48 
49 
16 
13 
13 
23 
91 

641 
1,664 

391 
84 
83 
53 

• • • • 

12 

748 

9,200 

11 

33 
601 

35 
806 



38 
10 
20 
42 
21 
14 
44 

• • • • 

386 
18 
84 
38 



17,013 



Total 



12,146 

779 

5.890 

548 

1,981 

169 

8,508 

1.066 

1,023 

563 

91 

928 

8.653 

. 758 

25,909 

25,237 

5,664 

1,121 

4,496 

499 

252 

4,035 

7.156 

64,262 

J 20 

1,683 

6,756 

1,691 

11.285 

5 

245* 

3,881 

59 

162 

8,866 

804 

1,989 

1,271 

2 

11,074 

1.454 

1.968 

11.929 

16,300» 



229.126 



* Alabama, 8; Alaska, 1; Arizona, 1; Arkansas, 4; Delaware, 2; Hawaii, 4; Idaho, 
2; Mississippi, 3; New Mexico, 1; Oklahoma, 6; South Dakota, 6; Wyoming, 1. 

* Net decrease. 



360 



AMERICAN JEWISH YEAR BOOK 



Immiobants' Admitted to United States and Depabting 

THEBEFBOM, by Ck>nNTBIES 
Year Ending June 30, 1917 



AuBtria 

Hun^aiy 

Belgium 

D-mark 

France, including Corsica 

German Empire 

Greece 

Italy, including Sicily and Sardinia 

Netherlands 

Roumania 

Russian Empire 

Sweden 

United Kingdom « 

Other Europe 

Total Europe 

China 

Japan 

India 

Turkey in Asia 

Other Asia 

Total Asia 



Number 


Admitted 


Jews 


Total 


99 


857 


22 


401 


7 


398 


202 


2,744 


276 


8.187 


91 


1,857 


875 


23,974 


172 


84,596 


95 


2,235 


21 


66 


6,801 


12,716 


52 


6,368 


1,488 


16,141 


7 


1,463 


110,271 


n38,083 



Number 
Departed 

Jews Total 



3 

» • • 

1 
21 



6 
183 

I • • • 

11 



126 

112 

15 

489 

2,064 

315 

2,084 

12,642 

227 

16 

5,947 

969 

4,672 

88 



•229 *36,867 



Net Increase 



Jews 



97 

19 

7 

201 

254 

91 

874 

172 

95 

15 

6,618 

52 

1,472 

7 



610,043 



Total 



731 

289 

888 

2,255 

1,128 

1,642 

21,940 

22,054 

2,008 

60 

6,769 

6,399 

11,669 

1,376 



•97,766 



56 


2,237 


1 


1,871 


65 


12 


8,991 


1 


750 


11 


9 


109 


• • • • 


176 


9 


82 


393 


• • • • 


8 


82 


18 


1,026 


• • • • 


856 


18 


177 


12,756 


2 


8,161 


175 



366 

8,241 

67* 

885 

670 



9,662 



^Bulgaria, Servia, and Montenegro, 0; Norway, 16; Portugal, ' including Cape 
Verde and Azore Islands, 3; Spain, including Canary and Balearic Islands, 25; 
Switzerland, 13; Turkey in Europe, 12. 

* Bulgaria, Servia, and Montenegro, 151; Norway, 4659; Portugal, including Cape 
Verde and Azore Islands, 9975 ; Spain, including Canary and Balearic Islands, 10,232; 
Switzerland, 911; Turkey in Europe, 152. 

* Bulgraria, 1. 

^Bulgaria, Servia, and Montenegro, 191; Norway, 1633; Portugal, including Cape 
Verde and Azore Islands, 1353; Spain, including Canary and Balearic Islands, 2491; 
Switzerland, 159; Turkey in Europe, 24. 

'Bulgaria, 1*; Norway, 16; Portugal, including Cape Verde and Azore Islands, 8; 
Spain, including Canary and Balearic Islands, 25; Switzerland, 13; Turkey in 
Europe, 12. 

« Norway, 8026; Portugal, including Cape Verde and Azore Islands, 8622; Spain, 
including Canary and Balearic Islands, 7741; Switzerland, 752; Turkey in 
Europe, 128. 

* Net decrease. 



STATISTICS OP JEWS 



351 



IMMIGBANTS ADMITTED TO UNITED STATES AND DePABTINO 

Thebefbom, by Countbibs 
Ybab Bnding Junb 30, 1917 (continued) 



Number 


Number 


Admitted 


Departed 


Jews 


Total 


Jews 


Total 


lis 


666 


8 


108 


26 


1,014 


7 


882 


6,847 


106.390 


19 


18,994 


20 


2,078 


2 


680 


41 


17,869 


1 


812 


4 


128 


• • • • 


86 


271 


6,981 


47 


098 


71 


16,607 


14 


6,891 


1 


77 


• • • • 


• • • • 


17,842 


296,408 


829 


66,277 



Net Increase 



Total 



Africa 

Australia. Tasmania and New 

Zealand , 

Briti^ North America 

Central America 

Mexico 

Padfle Islands (not spedfled), 

South America , 

West Indies 

Othtr Obuntries 

Grand Total 



106 

19 

6,828 

18 

40 

4 

224 

67 

1 



17,014 



468 

682 

86,406 

1,648 

17,067 

98 

6,988 

9,616 

78 



229,288 



Sex of Immiobants Admitted, 1917 



Sex 


Jews 


Total 


Male 


8,982 
8,360 


174,479 
120,924 


Female 




Total 


17,842 


296,408 





Age of Immiobants Admitted, 1917 

Jews All 

Under 14 4,911 47,467 

14-44 10,991 214,616 

45 and over 1440 33,320 



Total 17,342 



295,403 



The larger percentage of women and children among Jewish 
immigrants is indicative of the permanent and family character of 
this immigration, an aspect which is further emphasized by the 
low percentage of Jewish immigrants departing from the United 
States. 

12 



352 



AMERICAN JE3WISH YEAR BOOK 



C. Jewish Immigration into Canada 

For a period of sixteen years, beginning July 1*1900, the Jew- 
ish immigration into Canada was 75,808. The immigration dur- 
ing the past fiscal year, ending March 31, 1916, was 65. 

Below are shown the yearly figures. It will be observed that 
during this period the Jewish immigration has amounted to ap- 
proximately 10 per cent of the immigration from all countries ex- 
clusive of the United States and the United Kingdom, but less than 
3 per cent of the total immigration. 

NuMBEB OF Jewish Immigrants and Total Numbeb of Immigrants 

Admitted to Canada 



Yeari 



1901 

1902 

1905; 

1904 

1905 

1906 

1907« 

1908 

1909 

1910 

1911 

1912 

1913 

1914 

I91i 

1916 

Total 



Jewish Immi- 
grants 



2,765 
1,015 
2,066 
8,727 
7,715 
7,127 
6,584 
7,712 
1,686 
8,182 
5,146 
5,322 
7,887 
11,252 
8,107 
65 



75,808 



Total Conti- 
nental-Immi- 
grants, etc. a 



19.352 
23,732 
37.099 
34,786 
37,864 
44,472 
34,217 
83,975 
84,175 
45,206 
66,620 
82,406 
112,881 
184,726 
41,734 
2,936 



835,681 



All Immigrants 



49,149 
67,879 
128.864 
180,331 
146,266 
189,064 
124,667 
262,469 
146,908 
208,794 
311,084 
854,287 
402,432 
884,878 
144,789 
48,587 



8,099,348 



* Fiscal year ended June 30 for 1900-1906; thereafter March 31. 

* Excluding immigration from the United States and the United Kingdom. 
» Nine month* ended March 31. 



Canadian Immigration Figures 



Immigration, July 1, 190 ) to March 81, 1916. 
Deportations, December, 1902 to March, 1916 
Rejections, December, 1902 to March, 1916 . . 



Total 



8,099,848 
11,718 
12,244 



Jewish 



75.808 
159 
762 



% 
Jewish 

to all 



2.46 

1.3 

6.1 



Jews to 
N 01^ Jews 



2.0 
1.4 
6.5 



INDEX TO ARTICLES IN FIRST TWENTY VOLUMES 353 



INDEX 

To Articles in First Twenty Volumes oi* American Jewish 

Year Book (5660-5679) 



Ahrahams, Israel, Selected He- 

braica and Judaica, 5661, 

p. 626; 5662, p. 1601; 5663, 

p. 147; 5664, p. 165; 5665, p. 

318. 
Adler, Gyrus, Solomon Schech- 

ter. A Biographical Sketch, 

5677, p. 25; Editor, Year 

Books 5660; 5661; 5662; 5663; 

5664; 5677; (in collaboration 

with Henrietta Szold) 5665; 

5666. 
Alcalay, 7., the Jews of Serbia, 

5679, p. 75. 
Agricultural Activities of the 

Jews in America, by Leonard 

G. Robinson, 5673, p. 21. 
Alliance Israelite Universelle, 

the, by Jacques Bigart, 5661, 

p. 45. 
American Colleges in Which 

Hebrew is Taught, 5678, p. 

406. 
American Jewish Committee, 

Annual Reports of, 5669, p. 

237; 5670, p. 237; 5671, p. 338; 

5672, p. 294; 5673, p. 291; 

5674, p. 437; 5675, p. 379; 

5676, p. 356; 5677, p. 288; 

5678, p. 434; 5679, p. 362. 
American Passport In Russia, 

the, 5665, p. 283. 
Anniversary and Barmitzvah 

Tables, 5676, p. 21; 5677, p. 

21; 5678, p. 21. 
Anniversary Celebrations of 

Congregations in the United 



States, 5662, p. 186; see also 
Events. 

Appointments, Honors, and 
Elections (in the United 
States), 5663, p. 187; 5664, 
p. 208; 5666, p. 189; 5667, p. 
181; 5668, p. 474; 5669, p. 117; 
5670, p. 224; 5671, p. 322; 
5672, p. 276; 5673, p. 274; see 
also Elections to National, 
State, and Municipal Offices; 
Events in 5674 and subse- 
quent issues; Decorations, 
Honors, and Distinctions. 

Army, Jews in the United 
States, by Lewis Landes, 
5677, p. 76. 

Articles by Jews in the United 
States, a list of, 5666, p. 171; 

5667, p. 148; 5668, p. 443; 
5669, p. 91; 5670, p. 204; 5671, 
p. 301. 

Articles of Jewish Interest In 
the Jewish and in the General 
Press, a List of, 5667, p. 143; 

5668, p. 438; 5669, p. 80; 5670, 
p. 194, 5671, p. 281. 

Artists, Jewish, in the United 

States, a List of Works by, 

5668, p. 467. 
Balkan Wars and the Jews, 

the, 5674, p. 188. 
Barmitzvah Tables, 5676, p. 21; 

5677, p. 21; 5678, p. 21. 
Bamett, Oeo. E., the Jewish 

Population <of Maryland, 5663, 

p. 46. 



354 



AMERICAN JEWISH YEAR BOOK 



Beilis Affair, the, 5675, p. 19. 

Bequests and Gifts by Jews to 
Jewish Institutions in the 
United States, 5661, p. 639; 
5662, p. 181; 5663, p. 175; 

5664, p. 193; 5665, p. 354; 
5666, p. 195; 5667, p. 188; 
5668, p. 480. 

Berlin, Treaty of (1875); see 
the Situation of the Jews in 
Roumania. 

Bernheimer, Charles L., Sum- 
mary of Jewjsh Organizations 
in the United States, 5661, 
p. 496. 

Bemsteifiy Herman^ Editor, 
Year Book 5675. 

Bialystok, from KIshlneff to, 
a Table of Pogroms from 
1903 to 1906, 5667, p. 34. 

Bible, the New English Trans- 
lation of the, 5678, p. 161. 

Bigart, Jacques, Alliance Israel- 
ite Universelle, the, 5661, p. 
45. 

Biographical Sketch of Com- 
modore Uriah P. Levy, by 
Simon Wolf, 5663, p. 42. 

Biographical Sketches of Jew- 
ish Communal Workers in 
the United States, 5666, p. 32. 

Biographical Sketches of Jews 
in the Fifty-Seventh Con- 
gress, 5663, p. 172. 

Biographical Sketches of Jews 
Prominent in the Professions, 
etc., in the United States, 

5665, p. 52. 
Biographical Sketches of Jews 

Who IHave Served in the Con- 
gress of the United States, 
5661, p. 517. 
Biographical Sketches of Rab- 
bis and Cantors officiating in 
the United States, 5664, p. 40; 
5665, p. 214; 5666, p. 119. 



Books and Articles by Jews in 
the United States, a List of, 
5666, p. 171; 5667, p. 148; 

5668, p. 443; 5669, p. 91; 
5670, p. 204; 5671, p. 301. 

Books in English on Jewish 
Subjects, 5665, p. 309. 

Books in English on Palestine, 
by William Popper, 5666, p. 53. 

Bureau of Jewish Statistics of 
the American Jewish Com- 
mittee, iVIemoir on the Jew- 
ish Population of the United 
States, 5675, p. 339. 

Calendar for One Hundred 
Years, Jewish, 5678, p. 24; 
5679, p. 20. 

Calendars, 5660,,p. 1; 5661, p. 1; 
5662, p. 1; 5663, p. 1; 5664, p. 
1; 5665, p. 1; 5666, p. 1; 5667, 
p. 3; 5668, preceding p. 7; 

5669, preceding p. 7; 5670, 
p. 3; 5671, p. 3; 567^, p. 3; 
5673, p. 3; 5674, p. 3; 5675, 
p. 3; 5676, p. 1; 5677, p. 1; 

5678, p. 1; 5679, p. 1. 
Cantors, Biographical Sketches 

of Rabbis and, officiating in 
the United States, 5664, p. 40; 
5665, p. 214; 5666, p. 119. 

Charities; see List of Federated 
Jewish Charities in the 
United States. 

Charitable Institutions, Dedica- 
tions of, see Homes of Chari- 
table Institutions Dedicated 
in the United States; see also 
Synagogues and Homes of 
Societies Dedicated. 

Collection of Jewish War Sta- 
tistics, the, by Julian Leavitt, 

5679, p. 103. 
Colleges and Universities, 

Table Showing Enrolment of 
Jewish Students in 1915-16 In, 
5678, p. 407. 



INDEX TO ARTICLES IN FIRST TWENTY VOLUMES 355 



Colleges, American, In Which 
Hebrew Is Taught, 5678, p. 
406. 

Communal Workers in the 
United States, Biographical 
Sketches of, 5666, p. 32. 

Congregations In the United 
States, Anniversary Celebra- 
tions of, 5662, p. 186; see also 
Events in subsequent issues. 

Congress of the United States, 
Biographical Sketches of 
Jews in the Fifty-Seventh, 
5663, p. 172. 

Congress of the United States, 
Biographical Sketches of 
Jews Who IHave Served in 
the, 5661, p. 517. 

Congress of the United States, 
Jews in, 5665, p. 213; 5666, p. 
126; 5667, p. 108; 5668, p. 436; 

5669, p. 70; 5670, p. 144; 5671, 
p. 228; 5672, p. 215; 5673, p. 
216; 5674, p. 421; 5675, p. 335; 
5676, p. 342; 5677, p. 274; 5678, 
p. 404; 5679, p. 337. 

Congress of Zionists, The Fifth 
International, 5663, p. 78. 

Congress, the Passport Ques- 
tion in, 5670, p. 21. 

Congresses, Jewish Rights at 
International, by Max J. Koh- 
ler, 5678, p. 106. 

Decorations, Honors, and Dis- 
tinctions Awarded to Jews, 
5663, p. 187; 5664, p. 208; see 
also Appointments, Honors, 
and Elections; Events in 
5674 and in subsequent is- 
sues. 

Directory of Jewish Local Or- 
ganizations In the United 
States, 5660, p. 105; 5661, p. 
185; 5668, p. 123; 5669, p. 43; 

5670, p. 170; 5671, p. 254; 
5672, p. 243; 5673, p. 247; 



5674, p. 394; 5675, p. 312; 
5676, p. 324; 5677, p. 260; 
5678, p. 356. 

Directory of Jewish Local Or- 
ganizations in the United 
States, Summary of the, 5668, 
p. 65. 

Directory of National Organ- 
izations In the United States, 
5660, p. 34; 5661, p. 65; 5662, 
p. 109; 5663, p. 87; 5664, p. 
109; 5665, p. 226; 5666, p. 129; 
5667, p. 104; 5668, p. 24; 5669, 
p. 43; 5670, p. 146; 5671, p. 
229; 5672, p. 216; 5673, p. 217; 
5674, p. 361; 5675, p. 276; 
5676, p. 324; 5677, p. 221; 
5678, p. 332; 5679, p. 300. 

Distinctions Awarded to Jews; 
see Decorations, Honors, and 
Distinctions. 

Dohsevaget I. George, A List of 
Available Stories of Jewish 
Interest in English, 5667, p. 
130. 

Education, Jewish, in the 
United States, by Julius H. 
Greenstone, 5675, p. 90. 

Elections to National, State, 
and Municipal Offices in the 
United States, 5666, p. 192; 
5667, p. 185; 5668, p. 477; 5669, 
p. 117; 5670, p. 224; 5671, p. 
322; 5672, p. 276; 5673, p. 274; 
see also Appointments, Hon- 
ors, and Elections in 5674 and 
subsequent issues. 

Electors, Jewish Presidential, 
1908, 5670, p. 145. 

Enrolment of Jewish Students 
in Amerfcan Colleges and 
Univeraittes in 1915-1916, 
Table Showing, 5678, p. 407. 

Europe, the Jews of, by Joseph 
Jacobs, 5660, p. 20. 



356 



AMERICAN JEWISH YEAR BOOK 



Events, a List of, 5660, p. 286; 
5661, p. 641; 5662, p. 188; 5663, 
p. 198; 5664, p. 217; 5665, p. 
375; 5666, p. 220; 5667, p. 
226; 5668, p. 507; 5669, p. 
131; 5670, p. 103; 5671, p. 99; 
5672, p. 129; 5673, p. 116; 5674, 
p. 221; 5675, p. 128; 5676, p. 
199; 5677, p. 80; 5678, p. 233; 
5679, p. 147. 

Ezekiel, Moses Jacob, by Sam- 
son D. Oppenheim, 5678, p. 
227. 

Federated Jewish Charities in 
the United States, List of, 
5678, p. 365 ; 5679, p. 326. 

Federation for the Support of 
Jewish Phiianthropic So- 
cieties of New Yorl( City, by 
I. Edwin Goldwasser, 5679, p. 
113. 

Federation iVIovement in Ameri- 
can Jewish Phiianthropy, by 
Joseph Jacobs, 5676, p. 159. 

Festivals, dates on which they 
occur, 5676, p. 20; 5678, p. 20. 

Fifth international Congress of 
Zionists, the, 5663, p. 78. 

France, Judaism in, by Rabbi 
Louis Germain L^vy, 5661, p. 
40. 

Freidus, A. fif., A List of Jewish 
Periodicals Published in the 
United States, 5660, p. 271. 

Friedenberg, Albert M., Sunday 
Laws of the United States and 
Leading Judicial Decisions 
Having Special Reference to 
the Jews, 5669, p. 152; the 
Year, 5670, p. 55. 

Friedenwald, Herbert, Editor, 
Year Books 5669;. 5670; 5671; 
5672; 5673; (in collaboration 
with H. G. Friedman) 5674. 

Friedman, JS. G., Editor (in 
collaboration with Herbert 
Frledenwald), Year Book 
5674. 



Gerson, Felix N., Simon Adler 
Stern, 5656, p. 409. 

Gifts by Jews to Jewish Insti- 
tutions in the United States; 
see Bequests and Gifts by 
Jews to Jewish Institutions. 

Government of the United 
States and Affairs of Interest 
to the Jews, the, 5667, p. 90; 
5669, p. 74; 5670, p. 141; 5671, 
p. 221; 5672, p. 205; 5673, p. 
211; see cUso Events in sub- 
sequent issues. 

Qoldwdsser, I. Edwin, Federa- 
tion for the Support of Jew- 
ish Philanthropic Societies of 
New York City, 5679, p. 113. 

Greenstone, Julius H., the Year, 
5667, p. 237; Jewish Educa- 
tion in the United States, 
5675, p. 90. . 

JSarby, Lee C, Penina Molse, 
5666, p. 17. 

Hebraica and Judaica, Selected, 
by Israel Abrahams, 5661, p. 
626; 5662, p. 160; 5663, p. 
147; 5664, p. 165; 5665, p. 318. 

IHebrew, see American Colleges. 

Heller, Maxmillian, the Year, 
• 5664, p. 17. 

Hermann, D. M., the Roumanian 
Jews in America, 5662, p. 88. 

Historical Exhibition, a Pro- 
posed American Jewish, 5662, 
p. 104. 

History of the Jews in the 
United States, a Sketch of, 
5663, p. 63. 

History, a Syllabus of Jewish, 
5666, p. 163. 

Homes of Charitable Institu- 
tions Dedicated In the United 
States, 5661, p. 638; 5662, p. 
185; 5663, p. 186; 5664, p. 207; 
5665, p. 371; 5666, p. 215; 5667, 
p. 223; 5668, p. 503; 5669, p. 
124; 5670, p. 234; 5671, p. 336; 
5672, p. 291; 5673, p. 288; see 



INDEX TO ARTICLES IN FIRST TWENTY VOLUMES 357 



also Synagogues and Homes 
of Societies Dedicated. 

Honors; see Appointments, 
Honors, and Elections. 

Immigrant, in Defense of the, 
5671, p. 19. 

Institutions Dedicated in the 
United States; see Homes of 
Charitable Institutions Dedi- 
cated. 

Institutions In the United 
States, Bequests and Gifts to; 
see Bequests and Gifts by 
Jews to Jewish Institutions. 

IsacLCSf Abram 8., the Jews of 
the United States, 5660, p. 14; 
Myer S. Isaacs. A Memoir, 
5667, p. 19. 

Isaacs, Myer S. A Memoir, by 
Abram S. Isaacs, 5667, p. 19. 

JcLco'bs, Joseph, Editor, Year 
Book 5676; The Federation 
Movement in American Jew- 
ish Philanthropy, 5676, p. 159; 
One Hundred Available Books 
in English on Jewish Sub- 
jects, 5665, p. 309; Jewish 
Population of the United 
States, Memoir of Bureau of 
Jewish Statistics of the 
American Jewish Committee, 

5675, p. 339; the Jews of 
Europe, 5660, p. 20. 

Jacobs, Joseph, by Mayer Sulz- 
berger, 5677, p. 68. 

Jastrow, Marcus, Tribute to, 
5665, p. 401. 

Jew and Agriculture, the, 5673, 
p. 21. 

Jewish Calendar for One Hun- 
dred years, 5678, p. 24; 5679, 
p. 21. 

Jewish Community of New 
York City, the, 5670, p. 44. 

Jewish Holidays and Festivals, 
Dates on Which They Occur, 

5676, p. 20; 5678, p. 20. 



Jewish Philanthropic Societies 
of New York City, Federa- 
tion for the Support of, by 
I. Edwin Goldwasser, 5679, p. 
113. 

Jewish Population of the 
United States, the, by Joseph 
Jacobs, 5675, p. 339; by Sam- 
son D. Oppenheim, 5679, p. 31. 

Jewish Publication Society 
Report of the, 5661, p. 645 
6662, p. 191; 5663, p. 203 
5664, p. 221; 5665, p. 381 
5666, p. ♦I; 5667, p. ♦ 1 
5668, p. ♦I; 5669, p. 259 
5670, p. 255; 5671, p. 355 
5672, p. 335; 5673, p. 315 
5674, p. 467; 5675, p. 419 
5676, p. 395; 5677, p. 411 
5678, p. 501; 5679, p. 409. 

Jewish Publication Society of 
America, the Twenty-fifth 
Anniversary of the Founding 
of the, 5674, p. 19. 

Jewish Rights at International 
Congresses, by Max J. Kohler, 

5678, p. 106. 

Jewish Subjects, One Hundred 
Available Books in English 
on, by Joseph Jacobs, 5665, p. 
309. 

Jewish War Relief Work, 5678, 
p. 194. 

Jewish War Statistics, the Col- 
lection of, by Julian Leavitt, 

5679, p. 103. 

Jewish Welfare Board, the, by 
Chester Jacob Teller, 5679, p. 
88. 

Jews In the Fifty-Seventh Con- 
gress, Biographical Sketches 
of, 5663, p. 172. 

Jews in the United States 
Army and Navy, by Lewis 
Landes, 5677, p. 76. 

Jews of Europe, the, by Joseph 
Jacobs, 5660, p. 20. 



358 



AMERICAN JEWISH YEAR BOOK 



Jews of Latin America, the, by 
Harry O. Sandberg, 5678, p. 
35. 

Jews of Serbia, the, by I. 
Alcalay, 5679, p. 75. 

Jews of the United States, the, 
by Abram Isaacs, 5660,- p. 14. 

Jews Prominent In the Profes- 
sions, etc., in the United 
States, Biographical Sketches 
of, 5665, p. 52. 

Jews who have Served in the 
Congress of the United 
States, Biographical SIcetches 
of, 5661, p. 517. 

Judaica; see Selected Hebralca, 
5661, p. 626. 

Judaism in France, by Louis 
Germain L4yy, 5661, p. 40. 

Judicial Decision Having Refer- 
ence to Jews; see Sunday 
Laws of the United States. 

Kishineff to Bialystolc, From, a 
Table of Pogroms from 1903 
to 1906, 5667, p. 34. 

Kishineff, the Voice of America 
on (Additions and Correc- 
tions), 5665, p. 378. 

Kohler^ Max J,, Jewish Rights 
at International Congn^esses, 

5678, p. 106. 

Landes, Lewis, Jews in the 

United States Army and 

Navy, 5677, p. 76. 
Latin America, the Jews of, by 

Harry O. Sandberg, 5678, p. 

35. 
Leavitt, Julian, the Collection 

of Jewish War Statistics, 

5679, p. 103. 

Levantine Jews in the United 

States, by David de Sola Pool, 

5674, p. 207. 
Levin^ Louis H,, the Year, 5668, 

p. 518; 5669, p. 190. 
Levy, Martha Washington, the 

Year, 5663, p. 14. 



Levy, Uriah P., Biographical 
SIcetch of, by Simon Wolf, 
5663, p. 42. 

Local Organizations In the 
United States; see Directory 
of Jewish Local Organiza- 
tions in the United States. 

Margolis, Max L., the Year, 5666» 
p. 229. 

iVIaryland, The Jewish Popula- 
tion of, by Geo. E. Barnett, 
5663, p. 46. 

Memoir on the Jewish Popula- 
tion of the United States, 
5675, p. 339. 

MoTse, Penina, by Lee C. Har- 
by, 5666, p. 17. 

National Organizations In the 
United States; see Directory 
of National Organizations in 
the United States. 

Navy, Jews In the United 
States; see Jews in the 
United States Army and 
Navy. 

Necrology, 5662, p. 187; 5663, p. 
196; 5664, p. 215; 6665, p. 372; 
5666, p. 216; 5667, p. 224; 
5668, p. 504; 5669, p. 127; 
5670, p. 103; 5671, p. 99; 6672, 
p. 129; 5673, p. 116; see 
also Events in subsequent 
issues. 

New York City, the Jewish 
Community of, 5670, p. 44; 
see also Goldwasser, I. Edwin. 

Oppenheim, Samson D., Editor, 
Year Book 5678; Moses Jacob 
Ezekiel, 5678, p. 227; the Jew- 
ish Population of the United 
States, 5679, p. 31. 

Organizations In the United 
States, Local; see Directory 
of Jewish Local Organiza- 
tions in the United States. 



INDEX TO ARTICLES IN FIRST TWENTY VOLUMES 359 



Organizations in tlie United 
States, National; see Dlreo- 
tory of National Organiza- 
tions in the United States. 

Organizations, Jewish, in the 
United States, Summary of, 
by Charles S. Bernheimer, 

5661, p. 496. 

Palestine, One Hundred Avail- 
able Books in English on, by 
William Popper, 5666, p. 153. 

Palestine, Recent Jewish Prog- 
ress In, by Henrietta Szold, 
5676, p. 25. 

Passport in Russia, the Ameri- 
can, 5665, p. 283. 

Passport Question, the, 5672, p. 
19; 5673, p. 196. 

Passport Question in Congress, 
the, 5670, p. 21. 

Periodicals, Jewish, In the 
United States, A List of, 
5660, p. 271; 5661, p. 636; 

5662, p. 178; 5663, p. 168; 5664, 
p. 189; 5665, p. 349; 5666, p 
181; 5667, p. 167; 5668, p. 460 



5670, p. 219 

5672, p. 270 

5674, p. 414 

5676, p. 340 

5678, p. 396; 



5669, p. Ill; 
5671, p. 317; 
5673, p. 268; 

5675. p. 328; 
5677, p. 271; 
5679, p. 328. 

Philanthropic Societies of New 
York City, Federation for the 
Support of Jewish, by I. 
Edwin Goldwasser, 5679, p. 
113. 

Philanthropy, American Jew- 
ish, the Federation i\^ove- 
ment In, by Joseph Jacobs, 

5676, p. 159. 

Phillips, N. Taylor, Rev. Ger- 
shom Mendez Seixas, 5665, p. 
40. 

Pogroms In Russia; see Kishi- 
neff to Bialystok, from; the 
Voice of America on Kishi- 
neff. 



Pogroms from 1903 to 1906, a 
Table of, 5667, p. 34. 

Pool, David de Sola, the Levan- 
tine Jews in the United 
States, 5674, p. 207. 

Popper, William, One Hundred 
Available Books in English 
on Palestine, 5666, p. 153. 

Population of i\^aryland, the 
Jewish, by Geo. E. Barnett, 
5663, p. 46. 

Population of the United 
States, the Jewish, by Joseph 
Jacobs, 5675, p. 3391; by Sam- 
son D. Oppenheim, 5679, p. 31. 

Presidentiaf Electors, Jewish, 
1908, 5670, p. 145. 

Professions, etc., in the United 
States, Biographical Sketches 
of Jews Prominent In the, 
5665, p. 52. 

Rabbinical Sieminarles, 5661, 
p. 514. 

Rabbis and Cantors Officiating 
in the United States, Bio- 
graphical Sketches of, 5664, 
p. 40; 5665, p. 214; 5666, p. 
119. 

Rabbis and Instructors In Jew- 
ish Colleges in the United 
States, 5678, p. 367. 

Recent Jewish Progress In 
Palestine, by Henrietta Szold, 
5676, p. 24. 

Representative Bodies, Jewish, 
5661, p. 567. 

Rohinsori, Leonard G,, Agricul- 
tural Activities of the Jews 
in America, 5673, p. 21. 

Roumania, tlie Jews of, from 
the Earliest Times to the 
Present Day, by E. Schwarz- 
feld, 5662, p. 25. 

Roumania, the Situation of the 
Jews in, since the Treaty of 
Berlin (1878), by E. Schwarz- 
feld, 5662, p. 63. 



360 



AMERICAN JEWISH YEAR BOOK 



Roumanian Jews in America, 
the, by Dy M. Hermalin, 5662, 
p. 88. 

Russia; see American Passport 
in Russia, the; p. 283. 

Sailors, Jewisli; see Prelimi- 
nary List of Jewish Soldiers 
and Sailors. 

Saiiors, Jewisli, Who Served in 
the Spanish-American War, 

5661, p. 525. 

Sandherg, Harry 0., the Jews 
of Latin America, 5678, p. 35. 

Schechter, Solomon. A Bio- 
graphical Sketch, by Cyrus 
Adler, 5677, p. 25. 

Schwarzfeld, JS7., the Jews in 
Roumania from the Earliest 
Times to the Present Day, 

5662, p. 25; The Situation of 
the Jews in Houmania since 
the Treaty of Berlin (1878), 

5662, p. 63. 

Seixas, Rev. Gershom Mendez, 
by N. Taylor PhilMps, 5665, 
p. 40. 

Selected l-lebraica and Judaica, 
by Israel Abrahams, 5661, p. 
626; 5662, p. 160; 5663, p. 147; 
5664, p. 165; 5665, p. 318. 

Seminaries, Rabbinical, 5661, p. 
514. 

Serbia, the Jews of, by L 
Alcalay, 5679, p. 75. 

Situation of the Jews in Rou- 
mania since the Treaty of 
Berlin (1878), the, by E. 
Schwarzfeld, 5662, p. 63. 

Sketch of the History of the 
Jews in the United States, a, 

5663, p. 63. 

Soldiers and S'ailors, Jewish, 
Who Served in the Spanish- 
American War, 5661, p. 525. 



Spanish-American War; see 
Soldiers and Sailors 'Who 
Served in the Spanish-Ameri- 
can War. 

State and l^unicipai Offices in 
the United States; see Elec- 
tions. 

Statistical Summary by States 
(Jewish Organizations in the 
United States), 5662, p. 126. 

Statistics, Jewish, 5660, p. 283 
5661, p. 623; 5662, p. 157 
5663, p. 143; 5664, p. 162 
5665, p. 306; 5666, p. 150 
5667, p. 127; 5668, p. 431 
5669, p. 66; 5670, p. 190 
5671, p. 277; 5672, p. 266 
5673, p. 264; 5674, p. 422 
5675, p. 336; 5676, p. 343 
5677, p. 275; 5678, p. 409 
5679, p. 339. 

Stern, Symon, Tribute to, 5665, 
p. 409. 

Stories of Jewish Interest in 
English, a List of. Compiled 
by I. George Dobsevage, 5667, 
p. 130. 

Students in American Colleges 
and Universities in 1915-1916, 
Tables Showing Enrolment 
of, 5678, p. 407. 

Sulzberger, Cyrus L., the Year, 

5665, p. 19. 

Sulzberger J Mayer, Joseph 

Jacobs, 5677, p. 68. 
Sunday Laws of the United 

States and Judicial Decisions 

l-laving Reference to Jews, by 

Albert M. Friedenberg, 5669, 

p. 152. 
Sunrise and Sunset in Six 

Northern Latitudes, Time of; 

see Table of Contents in Year 

Books from 5667. 
Syllabus of Jewish l-listory, a, 

5666, p. 163. 



INDEX TO ARTICLES IN FIRST TWENTY VOLUMES 361 



Synagogues and Homes of 
Societies Dedicated In tlie 
United States, New, 5661, p. 
638; 5662, p. 185; 5663, p. 185 

5664, p. 206; 5665, p. 369 
5666, p. 213; 5667, p. 221 

5668, p. 501; 5669, p. 124 
5670, p. 234; 5671, p. 336 
5672, p. 291; 5673, p. 288 
see also Events in subsequent 
issues. 

Szoldy Henrietta, Recent Jewisl\ 
Progress in Palestine, 5676, 
p. 24; the Year, 5661, p. 14; 
Editor, Year Books 5667; 
5668; (in collaboration with 
Cyrus Adler) 5665; 5666. 

Teller, Chester Jdcoh, the Jew- 
ish Welfare Board, 5679, p. 88. 

Translation of the Bible, the 
New English, 5678, p. 161. 

Treaty of Berlin (1878), the, see 
the Situation of the Jews in 
Rbumania. 

United States and Judicial 
Decisions Having Reference 
to Jews, Sunday Laws of the, 

5669, p. 152. 

United States, Biographical 
Sketches of Jewish Commu- 
nal Workers in the, 5666, p. 
32. 

United States, Biographical 
Sketches of Jews Prominent 
in the Professions, etc.. In the, 

5665, p. 52. 

United States, Biographical 
Sketches of Rabbis and Can- 
tors Officiating in the, 5664, 
p. 40; 5665, p. 214; 5666, p. 
119. 



United States, Jewish Educa- 
tion in the, 5675, p. 90. 

United States, Jewish Organi- 
zations In the (Statistical 
Summary by States), 5662, p. 
126. 

United States, Jewish Popula- 
tion of, 5675, p. 339. 

United States, List of Jewish 
Periodicals in the, 5660, p. 
271, and in subsequent issues. 

Universities and Colleges, 
Table Showing Enrolment of 
Jewish Students In 1915-16 In, 

5678, p. 407. 

Uriah P. Levy, Biographical 
Sketch of Commodore, by 
Simon Wolf, 5663, p. 42. 

Voice of America on Kishineff, 
the (Additions and Correc- 
tions), 5665, p. 378. 

War Relief Work, Jewish, 5678, 
p. 194. 

War Statistics, the Collection 
of Jewish, by Julian Leavitt, 

5679, p. 103. 

Welfare Board, the Jewish, by 
Chester Jacob Teller, 5679, p. 
88. 

Wars, the Balkan, and the Jews, 
5674, p. 188. 

Wolf, Simon, Biographical 
Sketch of Commodore Uriah 
P. Levy, 5663, p. 42. 

Year, the, 5661, p. JL4; 5662, p. 
15; 5663, p. 14; 5664, p. 17; 
5665, p. 19; 5666, p. 229; 5667, 
p. 237; 5668, p. 518; 5669, p. 
190; 5670, p. 55. 

Zionists, The Fifth interna- 
tional Congress of, 5663, p. 78. 



362 AMERICAN JEWISH YEAR BOOK 



• 



ELEVENTH ANNUAL EEPORT OF THE AMERICAN 

JEWISH COMMITTEE 



OFFICERS AND EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 

OFFICERS 
President, LOUIS MARSHALL. 

VIOE-PEESIDENTS, J^YRUS ABLER. 

I JULIUS ROSENWI^LD. 

Treasurer, ISAAC W. BERNHEIM. 

EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 

CYRUS ABLER (1919), Chairman Philadelphia, Pa. 

ISAAC W. BERNHEIM (1921) Louisville, Ky. 

HARRY CUTLER (1920) Providence, R. I. 

SAMUEL DORF (1921) New York, N. Y. 

JACOB H. HOLLANDER (1920) Baltimore, Md. 

JULIAN W. MACK (1919) Chicago, 111. 

JUDAH L. MAGNES (1919) New York, N. Y. 

LOUIS MARSHALL (1920) New York, N. Y. 

JULIUS ROSENWALD (1921) Chicago, 111. 

JACOB H. SCHIFF (1919) New York, N. Y. 

ISADOR SOBEL (1920) Erie, Pa. 

OSCAR S. STRAUS (1921) New York, N. Y. 

CYRUS L. SULZBERGER (1921) New York, N. Y. 

MAYER SULZBERGER (1921) Philadelphia, Pa. 

A. LEO WEIL (1919) Pittsburgh, Pa. 

ASSISTANT SECRETARY 
Harry Schneiderman, 31 Union Square, W., New York City. 

Telephone 3916 Stuyvesant. 

Cable Address, " WISHCOM, New York." 



REPORT OF AMERICAN JEWISH COMMITTEE 363 



MEMBERS AND DISTRICTS 

Dist. I: Florida, Georgia, North Carolina, South Carolina. 4 
members: Leonard Haas, Atlanta, Ga. (1922) ; Montague Trlest, 
Charleston, S. C. (1918). 

Dist. II: Alabama, Mississippi, Tennessee. 3 members: Otto 
Marx, Birmingham, Ala. (1918) ; Levi Rothenberg, Meridian, Miss. 
(1920) ; Nathan Cohn, Nashville, Tenn. (1918). 

Dist. Ill: Arizona, Louisiana, New Mexico, Oklahoma, Texas. 
5 members: Maurice Stern, New Orleans, La. (1919); Isaac H. 
Kempner, Galveston, Tex. (1921). 

Dist. IV: Arkansas, Colorado, Kansas, Missouri. 5 members: 
Morris M. Cohn, Little Rock, Ark. (1919); C. D. Spivak, Denver, 
Colo. (1918); Henry Wallenstein, Wichita, Kan. (1918); Jacob 
Billikopf, Kansas City, Mo. (1920). 

Dist. V: California, Idaho, Nevada, Oregon, Utah, Washington. 
7 members: Max C. Sloss, San B^ancisco, Cal. (1921); I. W. 
Hellman, Jr., San B^ancisco, Cal. (1922) ; Ben Selling, Portland, 
Ore. (1922); Emanuel Rosenberg, Seattle, Wash. (1919). 

Dist. VI: Iowa, Michigan, Minnesota, Montana, Nebraska, 
North Dakota, South Dakota, Wisconsin, Wyoming. 9 members: 
Henry M. Butzel, Detroit, Mich. (1919); Emanuel Cohen, Min- 
neapolis, Minn. (1920); Victor Rosewater, Omaha, Neb. (1919); 
Nat. Stone, Milwaukee, Wis. (1922). 

Dist. VII: Illinois. 8 members: A. G. Becker (1918); James 
Davis (1919); M. E. Greenebaum (1918); B. Horwich (1922); 
Julian W. Mack (1918); Julius Rosen wald (1920); Joseph Stolz 
(1919), all of Chicago, 111.; W. B. Woolner, Peoria, 111. (1921). 

Dist. VIII: Indiana, Kentucky, Ohio, West Virginia. 6 mem- 
bers: Samuel E. Rauh, Indianapolis, Ind. (1920); Isaac W. Bern- 
heim, Louisville, Ky. (1922); J. Walter Freiberg, Cincinnati, O. 
(1921) ; David Phllipson, Cincinnati, O. (1919) ; Edward M. Baker, 
Cleveland, 0. (1918) ; Louis Horkheimer, Wheeling, W. Va. (1920). 

Dist. IX. City of Philadelphia. 6 members: Cyrus Adler 
(1918); Ephraim Lederer (1922); B. L. Levinthal (1920); Louis 
B. Levy (1919); M. Rosenbaum (1920); Mayer Sulzberger (1918). 

Dist. X: Delaware, District of Columbia, Maryland, Virginia. 
5 members: Charles Van Leer, Seaford, Del. (1919); Fulton 
Brylawski, Washington, D. C. (1920); Jacob H. Hollander, Balti- 
more, Md. (1920) ; Siegmund B. Sonneborn, Baltimore, Md. (1920) ; 
E. N. Callsch, Richmond, Va. (1922). 

Dist. XI: Connecticut, Maine, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, 
Rhode Island, Vermont. 6 members: Isaac M. Ullman, New 
Haven, Conn. (1921); A. C. Ratchesky, Boston, Mass. (1922); 
Harry Cutler, Providence, R. I. (1921). 

Dist. XII: New York City. 37 members: Isaac Allen (1920); 
Joseph Barondess (1919); S. Bender ly (1920); Louis Borgenicht 



364 AMERICAN JEWISH YEAR BOOK 



(1920); Elias A. Cohen (1919); Samuel Dorf (1920); Julius J. 
Dukas (1919); Mrs. Wm. Einstein (1918); Harry Fischel (1920); 
William Fischman (1920); Israel Friedlaender (1919); Henry M. 
Goldfogle (1918); Jacob Kohn (1920); David Kornblueh (1920); 
Herbert H. Lehman (1918) ; Leo Lerner (1918) ; Adolph Lewlsc^n 
(1918); William Lieberman (1919); J. L. Magnes (1918); Louis 
Marshall (1920); H. Masliansky (1918); Jacob Massel (1918); 
H. Pereira Mendes (1918); Eugene Meyer, Jr. (1919); Leon Mois- 
seiff (1918); S. Neumann (1920); S. Rottenberg (1920); Leon 
Sanders (1920) ; Jacob H. Schiff (1919) ; Bernard Semel (1919) ; P. 
A. Siegelstein (1920) ; Joseph Silverman (1920) ; I. M. Stettenheim 
(1920); Cyrus L. Sulzberger (1920); Israel Unterberg (1919); 
Felix M. Warburg (1918); Jacob Wertheim (1919). 

Dist. XIII: New York (exclusive of the City). 3 members: 
Simon Fleischmann, Buffalo (1920); Benjamin M. Marcus, Olean 
(1921); Horace Wolf, Rochester (1918). 

Dist. XIV: New Jersey and Pennsylvania (exclusive of Phila- 
delphia). 4 members: Felix Fuld, Newark, N. J. (1919); Isaac 
W. Frank, Pittsburgh, Pa. (1922) ; Isador Sobel, Erie, Pa. (1921) ; 
A. Leo Weil, Pittsburgh, Pa. (1919). 

Members-at-Large for 1918: Herman Bernstein, Nathan Bijur, 
Abram I. Elkus, Irving Lehman, Oscar S. Straus, all of New York 
City; Herbert Friedenwald, Baltimore, Md.; Albert D. Lasker, 
Chicago, 111.; Jacob M. Loeb, Chicago, 111.; S. Marcus Fechheimer, 
Cincinnati, O.; Chas. Bisenman, Cleveland, O.; Albert W. Weil, 
New Haven, Conn. 

DELEGATES FROM ORGANIZATIONS 

Lee K. Frankel, National Conference of Jewish Charities. 
Samuel C. Lamport, United Synagogue of America. 



REPORT OP AMERICAN JEWISH COMMITTEE 365 



ELEVENTH ANNUAL MEETING 
November 11, 1917 

The Eleventh Annual Meeting of the American Jewish Com- 
mittee was held at the Hotel Astor, New York City, on Simday, 
November 11, 1917. Louis Marshall, Esq., presided^ and the 
following members were present: Cyrus Adier, Isaac Allen, 
S. Benderly, Jacob Billikopf, Nathan Bijur, Louis Borgenicht, 
Samuel Dorf, Julius J. Dukas, S. Marcus Fechheimer, Harry 
Fischel, William Fischman, Simon Fleischmann, Isaac W. 
Frank, Lee K. Frankel, Israel Friedlaender, Felix Fuld, Leon 
Kamaiky, Jacob Kohn, David Kornblueh, Samuel C. Lamport, 
Ephraim Lederer, Irving Lehman, Louis E. Levy, William 
Lieberman, Julian W. Mack, J. L. Magnes, H. Masliansky, 
Jacob Massel, H. Pereira Mendes, Leon Moisseiff, S. Neumann, 
Morris Eosenbaum, Julius Rosenwald, Leon Sanders, Jacob H. 
Schiff, Bernard Semel, Joseph Silverman, Isador Sobel, 
Oscar S. Straus, Cyrus L. Sulzberger, Israel Unterberg, 
Charles Van Leer, and Felix M. Warburg. 

Eegrets at their inability to attend were received from: 
Isaac W. Bemheim, Fulton Brylawski, Henry M. Butzel, 
Emanuel Cohen, Nathan Cohn, Harry Cutler, James Davis, 
J. Walter Freiberg, Herbert Friedenwald, Henry M. Goldf ogle, 
M. E. Greenebaum, Leonard Haas, Jacob H. Hollander, Louis 
Horkheimer, Henry S. Hutzler, Isaac H. Kempner, Herbert H. 
Lehman, Leo Lerner, Otto Marx, Victor Rosewater, Ben 
Selling, M. C. Sloss, C. D. Spivak, Maurice Stem, Joseph Stolz, 
Montague Triest, Isaac M. Ullman, A. Leo Weil, and Jacob 
Wertheim. 



366 AMERICAN JEWISH YEAR BOOK 

Death of Abeam J. Katz 

The President announced the death of Abram J. Katz, of 
Eoehester, diiring the past week, and upon motion the follow- 
ing resolution was adopted unanimously by a rising vote : 

We learn with sorrow of the death of our esteemed as- 
sociate and frien^i Abram J. Katz, and pause in our delibera- 
tions to enter upon our minutes an expression of the deep 
regret that we all feel at the passing of this kind-hearted 
gentleman, this loyal Jew, and this public-spirited citizen, 
who was ever ready to respond to the voice of duty. 

Report of the Executive Committee 
The Executive Committee presented the following report : 

TO THE MEMBERS OP THE AMERICAN JEWISH COMMITTEE : 

When the Committee met on November 12, 1916, it had 
completed ten years of its activity during all of which time 
our beloved country enjoyed the blessings of peace, both at 
home and with the other members of the family of nations. 
To-day we meet under entirely different circumstances. After 
patiently suffering many affronts and numerous acts of violence 
in defiance of the rights of our people, America has taken up 
arms in defence of its national integrity and honor, and has 
joined with the other nations that for the past three years 
have warred vigorously to safeguard their liberties. 

As was confidently anticipated by all who knew of the 
American Jew^s love for America, the many members of our 
faith who are. serving the United States in important capac- 
ities, the thousands who, less conspicuously but as needfully, 
are helping to make up the rank and file of the Army and Navy, 



r 



REPORT OP AMERICAN JEWISH COMMITTEE 367 

and that great host of workers in civil life who are pursuing 
the every-day tasks which are vital to success bring convic- 
tion that the Jews of America are just as loyal to the ideals 
of the United States and just as eager^ to live and, if need be, 
to die for them as is any other of thfe component parts of our 
citizenship. 

That our Government is convinced of this is evidenced by the 
eminent positions of trust and responsibility to which our 
brethren have been called. Among them are to be found sev- 
eral of the members of our organization and of our Executive 
Committee who have conspicuously aided the Government in 
the work of the Council of National Defence and of its Execu- 
tive Board, in the Liberty Loan Committee, entrusted with the 
placing of the Government's War Loans, and in the drafting of 
the Soldiers and Sailors' Allowance Compensation and Insur- 
ance Act, and in many other ways. Our coreligionists through- 
out the country have shown commendable interest and industry 
in connection with the launching of the two gigantic loans, as a 
result of which our armed forces will be completely and gen- 
erously equipped, and thanks to which the greatest war of 
history will be brought to a speedy and successful conclusion 
which shall add new guarantees to human liberty, for all time 
destroy autocracy and upon such terms as we trust and pray 
will leave no seed for a future harvest of blood. 

It is not at this moment known how many of our young men 
are serving in the United States Army and Navy. But unques- 
tionably it is far above our proportion of the population. Of 
those above draft age many are serving the nation as volunteers 
in Washington and elsewhere in all kinds of military and civil 
activities. 



368 AMERICAN JEWISH YEAR BOOK 

Upon those who stay at home devolves a special duty toward 
our coreligionists who are to bear the brunt of the battle. We 
must do everything in our power to extend to them such aid and 
comfort as will in a measure mitigate their physical hardships 
and will encourage and hearten them to endure privation and 
suffering. Your Committee is happy to report that this neces- 
sary and helpful work is being undertaken by an organization 
which was instituted with the help of members of your body 
and the present head of which is a member of your Executive 
Committee. The Jewish Board for Welfare Work in the 
United States Army and Navy was formed almost immediately 
after the declaration by our Government that a state of war 
existed. It is composed of representatives of the following 
organizations : 

Agudath ha-Rabbonim, 

Central Conference of American Rabbis, 

Council of Jewish Women, 

Council of Y. M. H. and Kindred Associations, 

Independent Order B'Nai Brith, 

Independent Order Brith Abraham, 

Jewish Chautauqua Society, 

Jewish Publication Society of America, 

National Federation of Temple Sisterhoods, 

New York Board of Jewish Ministers, 

Order Brith Abraham, 

Union of American Hebrew Congregations, 

Union of Orthodox Jewish Congregations, 

United Synagogue of America. 

At a meeting on April 15, 1917, your Executive Committee 
adopted a resolution expressing its willingness to co-operate 
with the Board and favoring the passage by Congress of a bill 



REPORT OF AMERICAN JEWISH COMMITTEE 369 

providing for twenty chaplains-at-large in the Army. Of this 
number it is expected that several will be Jewish ministers. 
Thanks to this bill, which became a law during the closing 
hours of the past session of Congress; the spiritual welfare of 
Jewish young men in the military forces of the Government 
will be ministered to by rabbis just as the spiritual welfare 
of non-Jews is safeguarded by clergymen of the Christian 
churches. 

Your Committee has recently been informed by the Alliance 
Israelite Universelle, that a number of the leading Jews of 
France are planning to establish in Paris a social center for 
American soldiers of our faith, where they could attend to their 
correspondence, read newspapers and books, and meet with 
French Jews who would interest themselves in our compatriots. 
The Alliance itself has generously offered the use of a part of 
its building for this center. 

Your Committee believes that an effort should be made to 
collect and record as much statistical and other information 
with regard to the participation of Jews in the military and 
civilian activities of the TJnited States in connection with the 
war as is possible to procure. With this end in view an arrange- 
ment has been made with the Jewish Publication Society of 
America, the Union of American Hebrew Congregations, the 
American Jewish Historical Society, and other organizations 
to prepare the material for a monograph on the Jews in the 
wars of the United States with special attention* to the present 
war. In this work the Committee itself and also its Bureau of 
Statistics is to co-operate. Your Committee feels certain that 
the possession of adequate information of this character will 
be of interest to all Jews. 



370 AMERICAN JEWISH YEAR BOOK 

Russia 

At the Tenth Annual Meeting, your Committee, in its 
report, was silent as to the condition of our brethren in the 
Eussian empire. It was impossible to describe the misery 
of our coreligionists which was, we venture to say, well known 
not only to Jews but to all people. As was pointed out in 
the Committee's publication " The Jews in the Eastern War 
Zone,'' the wretched condition of our brethren was due in large 
measure to the exceptional status which they occupied before 
the war. The conditions never looked more hopeless than in 
the winter of 1916, but the war, which so amply demonstrated 
the inhumanity of the condition of subjugation under which 
the Jews suffered, also demonstrated the inefficiency and cor- 
ruption which honeycombed the Eussian Government and 
which threatened to betray the Eussian people. A radical and 
thorough-going change was inevitable, and it came in the guise 
of the almost miraculous revolution which electrified the world 
in the spring of the present year. 

Your Committee greeted the event with great rejoicing. 
On March 21, 1917, the President, in the name of the Com- 
mittee, sent the following cablegram to Prof. Paul Miliukov, 
the then Minister for Foreign Affairs in the Provisional Gov- 
ernment established by the Ee volution : 

Every Jew hails free Russia's advent with prayer, thanks- 
giving and pledges for co-operation. The ideal of human 
rights now proclaimed by you and your associates with the 
voice of liberty has caused the horrible spectre of absolutism 
to vanish forever and the true Russia long hidden from the 
world to rise triumphant. 



REPORT OP AMERICAN JEWISH COMMITTEE 371 

The tremendous upheaval caused by the Eevolution naturally 
resulted in great confusion and in the attempt on the part of 
various groups to dominate the Government. Just at the time 
when our country formally recognized that a state of war 
between the United States and Germany existed, and pledged 
its all to help put an end to the conditions which brought about 
the greatest war in history, Eussia, one of the allies upon whose 
assistance a great deal of reliance had been placed, became the 
scene of internal dissension which threatened to nullify this 
assistance and to place upon the other allies, including the 
United States, the tremendous burden of supplying the de- 
ficiency threatened to be created by Eussia^s defection. Eumors 
of a propaganda for the conclusion of a separate peace between 
Eussia and the Central Powers reached this country, and 
caused a great deal of anxiety among the friends of the Eussian 
people. Your Committee felt moved to express to our corelig- 
ionists in Eussia this anxiety and the view that such a separate 
peace was regarded by the Committee as disastrous not only 
for the Jews, but also for the whole Eussian people. At the 
suggestion of the Committee our Department of State sent on 
April, 1917, the following cablegram to Prof. Miliukov: 

American Jewry is alarmed by reports that certain ele- 
ments are urging separate peace between Russia and Cen- 
tral Powers. A separate peace may, in our opinion, lead 
to the ultimate restoration of an autocratic Government and 
the degradation of the Russian Jews below even their former 
deplorable condition. We are confident Russian Jewry are 
ready for the greatest sacrifices in support of the present 
democratic Government as the only hope for the future of 
Russia JEUid its people. American Jewry holds itself ready 
to co-operate with its Russian brethren in this great move- 
ment 



372 AMERICAN JEWISH YEAR BOOK 

To this cablegram. Prof. Miliukov replied as follows : 

The Russian Provisional Government is very appreciative 
of the sympathy which the authorized representatives of 
American Jewish citizens are so good as to accord to its 
effort to assure the triumph of the great principles of 
democracy, of liberty, and of equality of all Russian citi- 
zens, without distinction of nationality or religion. 

As regards the uncertainty shown by the American Jewry 
on account of the rumors of agitation of certain elements 
for a separate peace, I can assure them that these rumors 
are wholly without foundation; no Russian party, whatever 
its political program, has contemplated or could contemplate 
the eventuality of a separate peace with the foreign ag- 
gressor. 

The great danger Which menaces new Russia and the 
entire world, if heed should be paid to the efforts which have 
for their end the maintenance of the fearful German mili- 
tarism, is only too well known here. 

In May of this year it was suggested by a number of 
European Jewish organizations that a commission made up of 
representatives of several Jewish national organizations of the 
allied countries be sent to Eussia to greet the Provisional 
Government in the name of the Jews of these countries and to 
endeavor to impress upon our Jewish coreligionists in Eu6sia 
the necessity for Russians vigorous participation in the war. 

Your Committee deemed conditions in Eussia too confused 
for such a step, and advised against the plan which was sub- 
sequently abandoned. 

Following the Eevolution, the censorship which had formerly 
prevailed, with the result that very little authentic information 
with regard to many Eussian matters, especially such as con- 
cerned the Jews, was permitted to reach the United States, 



REPORT OP AMERICAN JEWISH COMMITTEE 373 

was relaxed and subsequently abolished altogether. In view of 
this fact, your Committee discontinued its work in the direction 
of having the Eussian newspapers and magazines read and 
pertinent information extracted and published. 

Memorandum on Jewish Disabilities in Eussia 

Last year your Committee reported that it had in contempla- 
tion the preparation of a memorandum on Jewish disabilities 
in various belligerent countries, so that it might be in position 
to appeal for the amelioration of these conditions, should an 
opportunity arise during the war, or in connection with an 
eventual peace conference. Your Committee is now happy 
to report that such a memorandum, confined, however, to the 
Eussian empire, has been completed. 

The memorandum will make up a book of more than 600 
pages. It will give the historical background of anti-Jewish 
legislation in Eussia, and will show how the various restrictive 
laws originated and how they were developed and interpreted by 
judicial decisions and administrative regulations. The book 
will expose the whole fabric of legal persecution and restriction 
in various fields of life and activity; in separate chapters it 
will bring out clearly and graphically the net of laws and ad- 
ministrative orders which rendered the lives of the Jews of 
Eussia so miserable that one might well believe the charge that 
the Eussian reactionaries^ mode of solving the Jewish question 
was truly expressed in the well-known formula: one-third to 
be converted to the Greek Church; one-third to emigrate to 
America ; and one-third to die of starvation in Eussia. 

The book will contain chapters on the legal restrictions 
respecting domicile, education, land-holding, commercial pur- 



374 AMERICAN JEWISH YEAR BOOK 

suits, professions, agriculture, etc. ' In every easel there will 
be exact quotations from the statutes, the history of the events 
which led up to their enactment, an account of the important 
decisions of the Eussian Senate respecting the application of 
the law, and a survey of its effect upon its victims. Your 
Committee feels satisfied that the publication of this work will 
serve to show the world the enormous stride towards civilization 
which is certain to result from the abolition of the special laws 
against the Jews brought about by the Eussian Eevolution. 

Your Committee also has in its possession considerable infor- 
mation with respect to Eoumania and other countries in 
which the status of the Jews differs from that of the general 
population. 

International Jewish Conference 

• 

Shortly after our country entered into the war against the 
German empire, your Committee was invited to send delegates 
to a conference of representatives of Jewish organizations in 
allied countries which it was proposed to convene in a European 
city. The purpose of this conference was to discuss the situa- 
tion of the Jews in various countries and if possible to reach^an 
agreement as to the action to be taken by Jewish organizations 
on behalf of our coreligionists. 

Your Committee did not consider the time opportune for this 
conference, declined the invitation, and advised against the 
project. Shortly after this correspondence took place, the 
Eussian Eevolution occurred. This was another argument 
against the plan advanced, which was thereupon abandoned, 

Palestine 

In the spring of this year, the attention of your Committee 
was referred to a cablegram from Dr. M. Nordau and Prof. 



REPORT OF AMERICAN JEWISH COMMITTEE 375 

Yahuda, of Madrid, Spain, stating that they had received 
reports about the wholesale massacre of the Jews of Palestine. 
The cablegram stated further that the writers had approached 
the Spanish Government, and suggested that the Jewish organi- 
zations in America cable to the king of Spain pleading for his 
intervention and that the diplomatic representatives of the 
neutral states be asked to call the attention of their respective 
Governments to this matter. 

Your Committee transmitted to the Department of State the 
information received from Doctors Nordau and Yahuda. Our 
Government had already been informed of the situation, had 
directed our minister to Sweden to request the Swedish Gov- 
ernment to lodge a protest against the alleged atrocities with 
the Government of Turkey and her allies. The Spanish Gov- 
enunent also entered a protest through its ambassador at 
Constantinople. There has been no further communication 
on the subject, nor has there been any official confirmation 
of the reports referred to. 

Morocco 

That the condition of the Jews in Morocco is improving and 
is about to be placed on a firm legal basis is indicated by the 
statement of General Lyautey, recently Minister of War of 
France, and again Resident-General of the Protectorate of 
Morocco, that he intends to prosecute vigorously the work 
initiated by him before the war, to define the legal status of the 
Jews as French citizens and in this way put an end to their 
legal persecution at the hands of native tribunals. Recently, 
in a letter to Prof. Nahum Slouschz, whose explorations in 
Morocco and other regions of North Africa have contributed 



376 AMERICAN JEWISH YEAR BOOK 

valuable information concerning the Jews in those regions, 
General Lyautey stated that he intends to prosecute Jewish 
reforms in the most vigorous manner. 

International Pro-Falasha Committee 

It will be recalled that shortly after the outbreak of the 
European war, the Committee agreed to co-operate with the 
International Pro-Falasha Committee in the w^ork of minister- 
ing to the economic needs of the Jews of Abyssinia and in the 
educational work which the Pro-Falasha Committee had under- 
taken in that country under the supervision of Dr. Jacques 
Faitlovitch. The Committee at that time appropriated the 
sum of $5000 for this work, and agreed tovsupervise the col- 
lection of annual subscriptions to this work made by American 
Jews. Due, however,, to the war, it was not possible for 
Dr. Faitlovitch to proceed to Abyssinia. 

Jewish Orphan Asylum, Sofia, Bulgaria 

Due to the existing state of war, your Comfhittee was unable 
to transmit to the Jewish Orphan Asylum, Queen Eleonore, of 
Sofia, Bulgaria, the annual appropriation of $500 for the years 
1916 and 1917. This money is being held to the credit of the 
institution, and will be transmitted at the earliest opportunity. 

Immigration 

When the Committee met last year, the bill restricting 
immigration to the United States by the imposition of a 
literacy test had been passed by the House of Representatives, 
and was ready for action by the Senate at the succeeding 



REPORT OF AMERICAN JEWISH COMMITTEE 377 

t 

session of Congres^ in December, 1916. Your Committee re- 
ported that it had been active in endeavoring to mitigate the 
harshness of the literacy test provision and in having certain 
other amendments introduced which would secure for the im- 
migrant a full measure of consideration in the operation of 
the law. At the same time your Committee persisted in oppos- 
ing the passage of the bill because of the literacy test. 

On January 8, 1917, the Senate by a vote of fifty-six to ten 
passed the immigration bill, which was then sent to the Presi- 
dent for his signature. The President returned the bill with- 
out his approval and accompanied by the following broad- 
minded veto message : 

I very much regret to return this bill without my signa- 
ture. In most of the provisions of the bill I should be very 
glad to concur, but I cannot rid myself of the conviction that 
the literacy test constitutes a radical change in the policy 
of the nation which is not justified in principle. 

It is not a test of character, or of quality, or of personal 
fitness, but would operate in most cases merely as a penalty 
for lack of opportunity in the country from which the alien 
seeking admission came. 

The opportunity to gain an education is in many cases 
one of the chief opportunities sought by the immigrant in 
coming to the United States, and our experience in the past 
has not been that the illiterate immigrant is as such an 
undesirable immigrant. Tests of quality and of purpose 
cannot be objected to on principle, but tests of opportunity 
surely may be. 

Moreover, if this test might be equitably insisted on, one 
of the exceptions proposed to its application involves a pro- 
vision which might lead to very delicate and hazardous 
diplomatic situations 



378 AMBSRICAN JEWISH YEAR BOOK 

Despite this disapproval of the President, the bill was passed 
by both Houses by what was claimed to be the two-thirds 
majorities required by the Constitution, although some doubt 
has been expressed upon this point. 

The Committee succeeded, after various hearings before the 
Committee of the House of Representatives and conferences and 
correspondence with members of Congress, in securing a modi- 
fication of the literacy test, for the purpose of exempting from 
its provisions those who were subject to discrimination because 
of their race or faith in the lands of their nativity. The adop- 
tion of this amendment affords renewed evidence of the spirit 
of justice which permeates the American people;, and is an 
eloquent recognition by the Congress of the United States of 
the right of asylum. It reads : 

That the following classes of persons shall be exempt from the 
operation of the literacy test, to wit: All aliens who shall prove 
to the satisfaction of the proper immigration officer or to the 
Secretary of Labor that they are seeking admission to the United 
States to avoid religious persecution in the country of their last 
permanent residence, whether such persecution be evidenced by 
overt acts or by laws or governmental regulations that discriminate 
against the alien or the race to which he belongs because of his 
religious faith. 

After the bill had passed the House of Representatives, the 
Senate undertook to amend it by the insertion of a clause in 
Section 3 of the act, which excluded from admission to the 
United States, among others, ''the natives of any country, 
province or dependency situate on the Continent of Asia west 
of the one hundred and tenth meridian of longitude east from 
Greenwich and east of the fiftieth meridian of longitude east 
from Greenwich, except that portion of said territory situate 



I 
REPORT OF AMERICAN JEWISH COMMITTEE 379 

between the fiftieth and sixty-fourth meridians of longitude 
east from Greenwich and the twenty-fourth and thirty-eighth 
parallels of latitude north/' 

Although this clause purported to deal with any country, 
province, or dependency situated on the Continent of Asia, the 
boundaries of latitude and longitude which were specified in- 
cluded a substantial part of European Russia. They also 
embraced the most civilized parts of Siberia, including the 
cities of Tomsk, Tobolsk and Irkutsk, its chief commercial 
centers. The passage of this clause in the form in which it 
was adopted by the Senate would, under the then existing 
relations between the United States and Russia, have been 
most unfortunate. It would have afforded Russia a convincing 
argument against the making of a new treaty with the United 
States in lieu of that which had been abrogated, and would 
have embarrassed the United Stateef in its efforts to enforce 
the principles laid down in 1912 and 1916 in the political 
platforms of the Democratic, Republican, and Progressive 
parties in respect to the sine qtia non of such a treaty. It would 
have been argued, had this clause been adopted, that the 
United States was discriminating against natives of the Rus- 
sian empire. In consequence of the arguments presented on 
behalf of the Committee, the proposed clause was amended so 
as to eliminate any territory belonging to the Russian empire, 
both in Europe and Asia. 

Happily the recent march of history will in all likelihood 
render these amendments comparatively unimportant, but 
under the conditions which existed at the time of the passage 
of the act they were of primary importance. 



380 AMERICAN JEWISH YEAR BOOK 

It has not been possible, due to the immense falling-oflf in 
the number of immigrants because of the war, to observe the 
operation of the literacy test, or to arrive at any conclusions as 
to its consequences. The Kevolutionary Government in Russia 
has by a single stroke abolished all the onerous and humiliating 
restrictions which had for generations rendered the life of the 
Russian Jew so wretched. It is a question whether this action 
will bring about such a modification in the situation of the 
Jewish population in Russia as will curtail immigration from 
that source, which for several decades has contributed the 
bulk of Jewish immigrants to the- United States. It is to be 
hoped at least that the removal of educational restrictions will 
reduce to a minimum the number of Jewish immigrants from 
Russia who would not be able to pass the literacy test. At the 
present abnormal time it is impossible to make any forecasts as 
to the immigration of Jews to this country. 

Jewish Congress 

Last year your Committee reported that, following a number 
of conferences with other organizations, it had agreed to 
participate in the convening of an American Jewish Congress 
for which the date originally set was September 2, 1917. Your 
Committee was invited to nominate six delegates to the Con- 
gress, but due to its postponement from September 2 to Novem- 
ber 18, and subsequently to the close of hostilities, the Execu- 
tive Committee has deferred such nomination. 

United States Civil Service Commission Circular 

In February of this year the attention of your Committee 
was called to the fact that in a circular issued by the United 
States Civil Service Commission regarding an examination for 



REPORT OF AMERICAN JEWISH COMMITTEE 381 

*' Clerk qualified in modern language (male)^^ a statement 
appeared that "preference will be given to eligibles . . . . 
who are under no di8a1)ility to visit the Russian Empire/' 
The President of your Committee immediately addressed a 
communication to the Civil Service Commission asserting that 
such a statement " constjjtutes a disregard of the declared policy 
of the United States and a tacit recognition of the discrimina- 
tion practised against a part of our citizenship by the Govern- 
ment of Russia/' 

In response to this protest, the Committee was informed 
that the objectionable language would be omitted in future 
editions of the circular. This was done. 

Pennsylvania Civil Rights Law 

Your Committee wishes to call to your attention the passage 
by the Legislature of the State of Pennsylvania of a law " to 
prevent the publication and distribution of discriminating 
matter against any religious sect, creed, class, denomination or 
nationality and to punish the same.'' It is similar in aim to 
the amendment to the Civil Rights Law adopted by the New 
York Legislature at the instance of this Committee several 
years ago. The Pennsylvania Law prohibits the publication 
by any person connected with any public place of accommo- 
dation, resort, or amusement " intended or calculated to dis- 
criminate or actually discriminating against any religious sect, 
creed, class, denomination or nationality .... in the matter 
of furnishing or neglecting or refusing to furnish to them " 
the accommodations of such places. The person who is guilty 
of the violation of this law is liable to a penalty of not less than 
$100 and not more than $500 '* to be recovered by the person 



382 AMERICAN JEWISH YEAR BOOK 

aggrieved thereby/^ and will be guilty of a misdemeanor carry- 
ing a fine of not less than $100 or more than $500 or im- 
prisonment from thirty to ninety days, or both fine and im- 
prisonment. 

Bureau OP Jewish Statistics and Research 

During the past year the Bureau of Jewish Statistics and 
Eesearch of the Committee, which is maintained with the 
co-operation of the New York Foundation, has been engaged 
mainly in the work of making a census of Jewish religious 
organizations in the United States. The work was done at the 
request of the Bureau of the Census of the Department of 
Commerce, which is engaged in taking a religious census of the 
country. Dr. Samson D. Oppenheim, the Director of the 
Bureau, was appointed special agent of the Bureau of the 
Census, and was authorized to collect certain information with 
regard to Jewish congregations throughout the country. The 
work of collecting the data has occupied the Bureau for the 
past seven months, and Dr. Oppenheim is now proceeding to 
tabulate the information gathered. The Bureau took ad- 
vantage of this opportunity to collect, besides the information 
desired by the Government, a great volume of other data which 
will be of considerable value as the basis of a more reliable 
estimate of the Jewish population of the United States than 
has thus far been possible. 

The Bureau of Statistics has also collected information re- 
specting the operation of the draft law upon the Jewish 
population, and is now engaged in supplementing this with 
other facts respecting the participation of the Jews of the 
country in the war. 



REPORT OF AMERICAN JEWISH COMMITTEE 383 

The American Jewish Year Book, 5678, the nineteenth issue 
of that publication, issued by the Jewish Publication Society of 
America, which has received much favorable comment, was pre- 
pared under the direction of the Bureau of Statistics. Besides 
the permanent lists of Events for the year, National Organiza- 
tions, New Local Organizations, Rabbis and Instructors, Jew- 
ish Periodicals, the usual calendars, and the section on sta- 
tistics, the Year Book has several interesting special features. 
Among these is an extensive survey of the Jews of Latin 
America by Harry 0. Sandberg, Assistant Trade Expert of the 
Pan-American Union, an article on Jewish rights at Inter- 
national Congresses by Max J. Kohler, an account of the steps 
taken in this country on behalf of Jewish war relief work which 
was prepared in the office of the Committee, and an article 
on the new English translation of the Bible recently published 
by the Jewish Publication Society of America after many 
years of preparation. In addition to these features, there have 
been incorporated in the Year Book a Jewish Calendar for 
one hundred years and several interesting tables with regard 
to Jews in American universities. The Year Book contains 
also in permanent form the Tenth Annual Report of the Amer- 
ican Jewish Committee. 

Meetings 

Meetings of your Executive Committee have been held on 
the following dates: December 17, February 11, April 15, 
May 16, June 20, September 23, and November 10. 

Deaths 

Your Committee reports with great sorrow the death on 
December 27, 1916, of Moses R. Walter, a member-at-large 
13 



384 AMERICAN JEWISH YEAR BOOK 

from the State of Maryland, and on March 8, 1917, of Ceasar 
Cone, of Greensboro, a representative of the State of North 
Carolina. Your Executive Committee at its meeting on 
April 15 adopted the following resolutions expressive of its 
sentiments : 

The Committee records its sense of loss in the death of 
Moses R. Walter, of Baltimore, Md., who was a member-at- 
large since November, 1913, prior to which date he was chair- 
man of the Baltimore Advisory Council of the Committee 
for several years. Mr. Walter's learning, experience, and 
influence as one of the foremost membiers of the bar of his 
State were always at the call of the Committee and he mani- 
fested a deep interest in all the details of its work. His 
loss has deprived the Committee of an active worker and 
friend. 

The Committee has learned with sorrow of the death 
of Ceasar Cone, a member from Greensboro, N, C, who was 
an active colaborer of the Committee since his election on 
January 1, 1909. Every call made upon him for assistance 
met with a wholehearted and immediate response, and he 
made many sacrifices to participate in the councils and to 
co-operate in the work of the Committee. His affability, 
courtesy and modest demeanor will be ever remembered 
by all who knew him. In him the Committee has lost a 
willing and industrious member and a sincere friend and 
well-wisher. 

Your Committee reports with sorrow the death on Sep- 
tember 30, 1917, of Isaac N. Seligman, of New York. 
Mr. Seligman, though not a member of the Committee, was a 
generous contributor to its funds for many years, and re- 
sponded promptly whenever called upon for co-operation. 

The Committee is pained to report the recent death of 
Samuel I. Hyman, of New York, a representative of the Jew- 
ish Community (Kehillah) on the Committee. Mr. Hyman 



REPORT OF AMERICAN JEWISH COMMITTEE 385 

was for a number of years an active and helpful member of 
both the Jewish Community of New York City and of the 
larger community of the United States and was a fine type of 
an American Jew who, while a strict observer of the traditions 
of Judaism, was at the same time a loyal and patriotic citizen. 

Eemoval op Offices 

During the year the offices of the Committee and the Bureau 
of Statistics, which were formerly in the Hebrew Charities 
Building, 356 Second Avenue, New York City, were removed 
to 31 Union Square, West, as your Committee found that 
more space was needed than could be provided in the Charities 
Building. , 

Finances 

A statement of the receipts from the various districts 
follows : 

Sustaining Contributing Total 

District Members Members Amount 

I $15.00 $42.00 $57.00 

II 27.00 27.00 

III 135.00 71.00 206.00 

IV 202.00 119.00 321.00 

, V 165.00 104.00 269.00 

VI 220.00 117.50 337.50 

VII 1,385.00 133.00 1,518.00 

VIII 330.00 182.50 512.50 

IX 1,000.00 102.00 1,102.00 

X 260.00 56.00 316.00 

XI 286.32 83.00 369.32 

XII 7,835.77 221.75 8,057.52 

XIII 100.00 55.00 155.00 

XIV 189.00 151.00 340.00 



$12,123.09 $1,464.75 $13,587.84 



386 AMERICAN JEWISH YEAR BOOK 

A statement of receipts and disbursements follows : 

Receipts 

Balance on Hand, November 1, 1916 $2,035.86 

Contributing Members 1,457.75 

Sustaining Members 12,967.33 

Unexpended Balance from " The Jews in the Eastern 

War Zone " Fund 1,245.60 

Appropriated from Emergency Trust Fund for Prepara- 
tion of Memorandum of Jewish Disabilities in 
Russia 4,250.00 

Total to be Accounted for $21,956.54 

Disbursements # 

Salaries $4,072.00 

Postage 247.18 

Books and Periodicals 50.81 

Stationery and Printing: 

Reprint of 9th Annual Report $ 86.20 

10th Annual Report 293.91 

Miscellaneous 168.89 

549.00 

Telephone and Telegraph 222.54 

General Expense 411.98 

Furniture and Fixtures 228.89 

Rent 665.00 

Clipping Service 223.80 

Temporary Clerical Help 84.75 

$6,755.95 



REPORT OF AMERICAN JEWISH COMMITTEE 387 

Meetings: 

10th Annual Meeting . . . ^ $212.60 

Pro-rata Share Hotel Astor Con- 
ference 35.00 

Executive Committee Meetings . . . 25.00 

272.60 

Bureau of Statistics 2,000.00 

Transportation 123.02 

Membership Campaign 501.26 

Printing and Distributing Committee's Edition 
of "Jewish Disabilities in the Balkan 

States," by Max J. Kohler, Esq 211.50 

Russian Information Bureau 751.49 

Memorandum on Jewish Disabilities in Russia 6,153.03 



\ 



$10,012.90 



Total Disbursements $16,768.85 

Balance Unexpended 5,187.69 



$21,956.54 

Financial Statement 

Cash: 

Petty Cash Fund $50.00 

Union Exchange National Bank 600.00 

Balance with Treasurer 4,537.69 

$5,187.69 

Balance in Income and Expenditure Ac- 
count $5,187.69 



388 AMERICAN JEWISH YEAR BOOK 

During the past summer your Committee had printed a 
pamphlet entitled "The American Jewish Committee; A 
Brief Statement of its Organization, Aims and Work" and 
sent a copy of this pamphlet together with a letter to a con- 
siderable list of persons with a view to securing additional 
Contributing Members. In view of the present state of affairs 
and of the many calls which are being made upon the gener- 
osity of the Jewish people, the results of this campaign are to 
be regarded as gratifying. The following is a memorandum 

of the new contributors secured in this way : 

« 
Mbmobandum of New Contbibutobs 

Number Contribution Total 

49 ' $ 1.00 $ 49.00 

1 1.50 1.50 

31 2.00 62.00 

1 2.50... 2.50 

21 3.00 63.00 

51 5.00 255.00 

21 10.00 210.00 

1 12.00 12.00 

8 25.00 200.00 



184 $855.00 

Membership 

Your Committee begs to report that Messrs. Felix Fuld, of 
Newark, New Jersey, Jacob M. Loeb, of Chicago, and Irving 
Lehman, of New York, who were elected to membership at 
your last annual meeting have agreed to serve. The vacancy 
in District X caused by the resignation of Dr. Harry Frieden- 
wald was referred to the Advisory Council of that District, 
which elected Mr. Siegmund B. Sonneborn to fill the vacancy. 



REPORT OF AMERICAN JEWISH COMMITTEE 389 



District V. 



Your Committee did not deem it opportune to take any 
action towards putting into operation the modifications in the 
apportionment of members agreed upon at the special meeting 
of the General Committee held on May 14, 1916, pending a new 
estimate of the Jewish populcytion of the United States by the 
Bureau of Statistics of the Committee. It is expected that 
such an estimate will be completed within the next few months, 
when your Committee will immediately set about to make the 
changes decided upon. 

The terms of the following members expire this year : 

District I. Leonard Haas, Atlanta. 
District III. Leon M. Jacobs, Phoenix. 

J. H. Stolper, Muskogee. 

Harris Weinstock, San Francisco. 

Ben Selling, Portland. 

Max Landauer, Milwaukee. 

Bernard Horwich, Chicago. 

I. W. Bernheim, Louisville. 

Ephraim Lederer, Philadelphia. 

Henry S. Hutzler, Richmond. 

Lee M. Friedman, Boston. 

I. W. Frank, Pittsburgh. 

Successors are also to be chosen at this meeting to the follow- 
ing members of the Executive Committee whose terms expire 
on January 1, 1918 : 

Isaac W. Bernheim, Julius Rosen wald, 
Samuel Dorf, Cyrus L. Sulzberger, 

Mayer Sulzberger. 



VI. 
VII. 



District 
District 

District VIII. 

District IX. 

District X. 

District XL 

District XIV. 



390 AMERICAN JEWISH YEAR BOOK 

Your Committee recommends the election of the following 
as members-at-large : 
Herman Bernstein, New York City. 
Nathan Bijur, New York City. 
Abram I. Elkus, New York City. 
Charles Eisenman, Cleveland. 
S. Marcus Techheimer, Cincinnati. 
Herbert Triedenwald, Baltimore. : ' 

Albert D. Lasker, Chicago. 
Irving Lehman, New York City. 
Jacob M. Loeb, Chicago. 
Oscar S. Straus, New York City. 
Aaron Waldheim, St. Louis. 
Albert W. Weil, New Haven. 

Action on the Eepobt, Etc. 

Upon motion, the report of the Executive Committee was 
received. 

The report of the Bureau of Statistics and Research was 
presented by Dr. Cyrus Adler, the chairman of the committee 
in charge of the Bureau. 

Mr. Louis E. Levy, President of the Jewish Community of 
Philadelphia, presented a report on behalf of that organization 
which is printed as an appendix to this report. 

Dr. J. L. Magnes, Chairman of the Executive Committee 
of the Jewish Community of New York City, made a verbal 
report of the work of that organization during the past year. 



REPORT OF AMERICAN JEWISH COMMITTEE 391 

and stated that he would present a formal report in time for 
publication. 

Kesolution of Loyalty 

The President on behalf of the Executive Committee intro- 
duced the following resolution, which was adopted unanimously 
by a rising vote : 

It seems fitting that at this the Eleventh Annual Meeting of 
the American Jewish Committee — the first since our entrance 
into the war — at which are gathered representatives from all 
parts of the county, expression be given to the love, the devo- 
tion, the gratitude, and the loyalty which fill our hearts and 
souls toward the United States of America, the land where 
we were born or which with open arms adopted us, the 
sacred shrine of liberty and equality, where tyranny cannot 
exist, where human rights have ever been triumphantly 
maintained, and where justice and righteousness have 
reached their highest development. We recognize in the war, 
in which the entire American people is now engaged, a con- 
dition unsought but inevitable, a confiict willfully and delib- 
erately thrust upon a peace-loving nation that dreamt not 
of spoils or conquest, and the direct consequences of machi- 
nations long concealed which threatened our repose, our 
independence, our honor, and even our cherished freedom. 
In common with our fellow-citizens of every race and creed, 
we renew our allegiance to our Government and to its flag 
which symbolize the most precious hopes of mankind; we 
pledge to them our unstinting and wholehearted support; 
and we dedicate to the perpetuation of American ideals and 
institutions, to the maintenance of the honor of our country 
and the preservation of the principles for which it stands, 
our lives, our possessions, and those we hold most dear, to 
the end that liberty shall not perish from the earth. 



4 



392 AMERICAN JEWISH YEAR BOOK 

Upon motion of Mr. Dorf , it was resolved that a copy of the 
resolution be transmitted to the President of the United States. 

« ■ 

Place of Twelfth Annual Meeting 

A communication was presented from the Chamber of Com- 
merce of the City of Philadelphia inviting the American Jew- 
ish Committee to hold its next annual meeting in that city. 

After discussion, it was resolved that it was not advisable 
to decide upon the place for the next annual meeting so long in 
advance, and that the matter be left to the, discretion of the 
Executive Committee. 

Statistics op Jews in Military and Naval Service 

The matter of collecting complete and accurate statistics of 
Jews in the military and naval service of the United States 
was discussed, and, upon motion, it was resolved that the 
Bureau of Statistics be directed to make every effort to secure 
data of this character, and that the Executive Committee be 
empowered to appropriate for this work such a sum as it may 
deem proper, for its efficient prosecution. 

Patriotic Education 

Discussion was had as to the greater necessity for promoting 
education in the ideals and principles underlying American 
institutions and particularly as to the issues involved in the 
present war. 

Upon motion, it was resolved that the Executive Committee 
be directed to consider and to put into effect means for pro- 
moting educational activities in this direction either by the 



REPORT OF AMERICAN JEWISH COMMITTEE 393 

independent action of the Committee or by co-operation with 
other agencies devoted to the same objects. 

EOUMANIA 

The following communication from Dr. P. A. Siegelstein, 
President of the American Union of Eoimaanian Jews, was 
presented : 

LOUIS MARSHALL, ESQ., 

PRESIDENT, AMERICAN JEWISH COMMITTEE. 

Dear Sir: 

Having learned through the medium of the press of the 
annual convention of your Committee, I hasten to write 
these few lines in the name of the American Union of Rou- 
manian Jews, a national organization with branches all over 
the Union and Canada, and to respectfully submit for your 
consideration and action: 

First: The present status of the Jew in Roumania. 

Second : The advisability of appealing to our Government 
in his behalf. 

The plight of the Jews in Roumania is more pitiful from 
every standpoint, civic or economic, than that of any of our 
brethren in any part of the war zone. Figures of speech are 
not powerful and adequate to describe it; and yet, for 
reasons unknown, whenever and wherever we made an at- 
tempt to bring the matter to the attention of our American 
coreligionists, and through them to our Government, we were 
told and warned not to say or publish anything derogatory 
to Roumania, this being inadvisable, she being one of our 
allies. 

Moreover, we are to be satisfied and content because 
$75,000 was sent to Roumania, which under the best of cir- 
cumstances is only like a drop in the ocean and entirely 



394 AMERICAN JEWISH YEAR BOOK 

insufficient to cope with the situation or satisfy the im- 
perious hunger of the 260,000 Jews in Roumania. 

The method of persecution, oppression, ill-treatment and 
abuse, of our unfortunate brethren adopted by the authori- 
ties, both civil and military, are such that tend to exter- 
minate and annihilate them long before the war will be over, 
and when will we consider the time opportune to appeal to 
our Government to intervene in their behalf in order to bring 
about their emancipation and attain for them the right to 
live as free men. 

Trusting that you will seriously consider my appeal and 
take such immediate step in the matter as you may deem 
proper to bring about the desired result, I beg to remain, 
Respectfully yours, 

(Signed) Db. P. A. Siegelstein, President. 

The President, on behalf of the Executive Committee, an- 
nounced that this subject was engaging the earnest attention 
of the Committee. 

Discrimination by Government Contractors Against 

Jewish Carpenters 

Dr. H. P. Mendes, on behalf of a Conference of delegates 
of the Union of Orthodox Jewish Congregations, the Union 
of Orthodox Eabbis of America, the New York Board of 
Rabbis, and the New York Board of Jewish Ministers, drew the 
attention of the Committee to the anti-Jewish attitude of con- 
tractors engaged in building cantonments for the United States 
Government in the matter of advertising for and employing 
carpenters. The President stated that this matter had already 
been taken up by the Executive Committee with the Secretary 
of War and was receiving due consideration. 



REPORT OF AMERICAN JEWISH COMMITTEE 395 



Elections 

The Committee on 'Nominations made the following recom- 
mendations : 

For oflBcers : 

For President : Louis Marshall. 

For Vice-Presidents : Cyrus Adier and Julius Eosenwald. 

For Treasurer : Isaac W. Bernheim. 

For members of the Executive Committee to serve for three 
years from January 1, 1918 : 

Isaac W. Bernheim, Julius Eosenwald, 

Samuel Dorf, Cyrus L. Sulzberger, 

Mayer Sulzberger. 

To fill expired terms or vacancies : 



District 



I. 



District III. 



District IV. 



Leonard Haas, Atlanta, Georgia, to be re- 
elected for term expiring 1922. 

Bernard M. Cone, Greensboro, North Caro- 
lina, to succeed Ceasar Cone (deceased), for 
term expiring 1921. 

Bernard M. Friedman, Tucson, Arizona, to 
succeed Leon M. Jacobs, Phoenix, Arizona, 
for term expiring 1922. 

Marion M. Travis, Tulsa, Oklahoma, to suc- 
ceed Jacob H. Stolper, Muskogee, Okla- 
homa, for term expiring 1922. 

Henry Wallenstein, Wichita, Kansas, to fill 
vacancy existing in State of Kansas for 
term expiring 1918. 



396 



AMERICAN JEWISH YEAR BOOK 



District V. I. W. Hellman, Jr., San Francisco, California, 

to succeed Harris Weinstock of same city, 
for term expiring 1922. 
Ben Selling, Portland, Oregon, to be re- 
elected for term expiring 1922. 
Emanuel Eosenberg, Seattle, Washington., to 
fill vacancy existing in State of Washington, 
for term expiring 1919. 

District VI. Nat. Stone, Milwaukee, Wise, to succeed 

Max Landauer of same city, for term ex- 
piring 1922. 

District VII. Bernard Horwich, Chicago, 111., to be re- 
elected for term expiring 1922. 

District VIII. Isaac W. Bernheim, Louisville, Ky., to be re- 
elected for term expiring 1922. 

District X. Kabbi E. N. Calish, Richmond, Va., to suc- 
ceed Henry S. Hutzler of same city, for 
term expiring 1922. 

District XI. A. C. Eatchesky, Boston, Mass., to succeed 

Lee M. Friedman of same city, for term 
expiring 1922. 

District XIII. Eabbi Horace Wolf, Eochester, N. Y., to suc- 
ceed Abram J. Katz (deceased), for term 
expiring 1918. 

District XIV. Isaac W. Frank, Pittsburgh, Pa., to be re- 
elected for term expiring 1922. 

At Large Herman Bernstein, Nathan Bijur, S. Marcus 

Fechheimer, Herbert Friedenwald, Albert 
D. Lasker, Irving Lehman, Jacob M. Loeb, 
Oscar S. Straus, Albert W. Weil, Abram I. 
Elkus, Charles Eisenman, Aaron Wald- 
heim. 



REPORT OF AMERICAN JEWISH COMMITTEE 397 

There being no other nominations, the Assistant Secretary 
was requested to east one ballot for the nominees of the Com- 
mittee on Nominations, which he did, and announced the elec- 
tion of the several nominees. 

Upon motion, the meeting adjourned. 

EEPOET OF THE BUEEAU OF JEWISH STATISTICS 

AND EESEAECH OP THE AMEEICAN 

JEWISH COMMITTEE 

TO THE COMMITTEE IN CHARGE OF THE BUREAU OF JEWISH 
STATISTICS AND RESEARCH : 

Gentlemen : 

The principal labors of the Bureau of Jewish Statistics and 
Eesearch during the past year have been (a) the preparation 
of the American Jewish Year Book for 1918, and (b) the 
making of a Census of Jewish Eeligious Bodies in the United 
States. As to the contents of the Year Book, the following 
salient facts may perhaps properly be brought to the attention 
of this Committee : In view of the state of international affairs, 
the editors of the Year Book decided upon a quartet of timely 
leading articles for the current issue, upon these topics: A 
Survey of the Jews of Latin America, A Historical Eeview' 
of Jewish Eights at International Congresses, An Account 
of Jewish War Belief as Contributed by the Jews of this 
Country, and an essay on the New Jewish Translation of the 
Bible, together with a brief advance statement of the results of 
the Census of Jewish Eeligious Bodies, mentioned above, and a 
short sketch of the life and works of the celebrated Jewish 
sculptor Moses Ezekiel who died in March of this year. In the 
way of new features, there were initiated a Hundred Year 



398 AMERICAN JEWISH YEAR BOOK 

Calendar, a List of Federated Jewish Charities in the 
United States, and a new Directory of Rabbis and Instructors 
in Jewish Colleges, the last similar list having been published 
in the Year Book fifteen years ago. Other noteworthy addi- 
tions are the List of American Institutions of Learning in 
which Hebrew or Yiddish is taught, and certain statistics show- 
ing the enrolment of Jewish Students in American Colleges 
and Universities. 

The special articles of the next Year Book (the twentieth of 
the series) will be on the following subjects: 

The Jewish Population of the United States. 

The Jews of Serbia. 

The Jewish Welfare Board. 

The Collection of Jewish War Statistics. 

Federation for the Support of Jewish Philanthropic 
Societies. 

Jewish Welfare Work in the United States Army and Navy. 

A year ago the Committee in charge of this Bureau decided 
that it would be advisable to have a numerical estimate, or 
so-called census, made of the Jews in the United States. An 
effort to institute such an enumeration had accordingly just 
been planned, when, shortly after the commencement of the 
present calendar year, the Bureau of Census of the United 
States Department of Commerce, made a request to the chair- 
man of this Committee, that he recommend some person who 
might be able to conduct for that department an inquiry which 
should result in a census of Jewish Congregations and Eabbis. 
This census was to constitute a part of the Census of the Ee- 
ligious Bodies of the United States, to be made by the Govern- 
ment for publication in 1918. The inquirer was duly referred 
to the Director of the Bureau of Jewish Statistics, and as 



REPORT OF AMERICAN JEWISH COMMITTEE 399 

a sequel, arrangements were entered into whereby this Bureau 
was employed to undertake the work in question. Your 
Director was appointed a Special Census Agent, a small sum of 
money was granted to pay for some of the extra work involved, 
and part of the printing was furnished by the Washington 
authorities, while the use of the frank was freely given to this 
Bureau. 

The methods employed in carrying out the wishes of the 
Census Bureau have been fully described in the latest Amer- 
ican Jewish Year Book. Briefly they consisted of the sending 
out through the mails, of various forms of questionnaires, 
"follow-ups,^' etc., to all rabbis and congregations in the 
country, except in New York City, where canvassing was used 
as a means of obtaining the data sought. Where there was no 
congregation or rabbi, as in the case of very small towns, the 
name of some Jewish business-man, in lieu of that of a rabbi, 
was selected — generally from Bradstreet's. In this division of 
our labors we were greatly aided by Mr. Jacob Billikopf of the 
American Jewish Eelief Committee. In the City of New York 
the investigation was carried on personally by agents of the 
Bureau of Education, the results of their canvassing being 
kindly loaned by Dr. Benderly to the Bureau of Jewish Sta- 
tistics, thus saving us a considerable amount of labor and 
expense. 

The Census Bureau was desirous primarily of securing, in 
general, details regarding the following: Number of Jewish 
communicants; number, names and addresses, income, ex- 
penditure and indebtedness of congregations; number, loca- 
tion and value of synagogues and affiliated buildings, and cer- 
tain other financial statistics concerning congregational and 



400 AMERICAN JEWISH YEAR BOOK 

religious school expenses, outlays for charitable purposes, etc., 
salaries of rabbis and similar matters. The Bureau of Jewish 
Statistics was principally concerned with the work of ascertain- 
ing the number of Jews in each town or city throughout the 
nation. The inquiries sent out covered both interests. The 
contract with the Government has been completed, the last of 
the schedules prepared for Director Eogers having recently 
been shipped to Washington, It is gratifying to be able to 
state that on the whole our labors have been considerably more 
successful than could reasonably have been anticipated, in view 
of the many diflBculties encountered and the small funds avail- 
able. As to the Jewish population returns, these have, for the 
great majority of the states, cities, and towns throughout the 
United States, running from insignificant localities of less than 
one thousand inhabitants to the metropolis itself, been pains- 
takingly assembled, and in the Year Book for 1919, if not 
earlier, the resulting statistics will be set forth at length and 
discussed in detail. 

It may here be added that, besides the two major labors of 
this Bureau, a considerable amount of work in the way of 
assembling statistical material, during the past year, in rela- 
tion to the following topics, has also been effected : Jewish 
Women's Organizations, Jews in the Army and Navy of the 
United States, Jewish Communal Workers, Jews in Govern- 
ment Positions, Jewish Athletes and Athletics, Temporary 
Congregations, Jewish Defectives, Jewish Delinquents, and an 
Index to the articles of all the Year Books. This Bureau has 
likewise been engaged in collating material for a work, to be 
published in the future, on the subject of the Jews in the 
Wars of the United States. Several volumes for use in this con- 



REPORT OF AMERICAN JEWISH COMMITTEE 401 

nection, with regard to former conflicts, and a large quantity 
of data in relation to the current war, have been collected, and, 
of course, one of the Bureau's chief activities during the next 
twelve months, will be the assembling, classification, and cor- 
rection of many kinds of data, now coming in, with regard to 
Jewish soldiers, sailors, and civilians engaged in the service of 
the Government during the present struggle. Plans have 
been made whereby, with the co-operation of the Council of 
Young Men's Hebrew Associations, etc., there will, it is ex- 
pected, eventually be recorded in our files the names of 
practically all Jewish soldiers and sailors in the service of the 
nation, together with a list of all Jews employed by the Govern- 
ment in any quasi-military capacity. 

The ofiice of this Bureau has been removed to No. 31 Union 
Square, and its relations with the American Jewish Committee 
have thus been rendered much closer and more intimate, 
greatly to the advantage, it is believed, of both organizations. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Samson D. Oppbnheim, 

Di/rector. 

EEPOET OF THE JEWISH COMMUNITY 
(KEHILLAH) OF NEW YOEK CITY 

TO THE MEMBERS OF THE AMERICAN JEIWISH COMMITTEE: 

At the eighth annual convention of the Kehillah, held on 
April 28-29, 1917, the following resolution was passed: 

Be it Resolved, That the Executive Committee be authorized 
to make every effort and to take all necessary steps to make 
the Kehillah a genuinely democratic organization. In accordance 



402 AMERICAN JEWISH YEAR BOOK 

with the general outlines of the plan presented to this Convention, 
and as one step towards this end, 

Be it Further Resolved, That the Trustees of and donors to 
the Bureau of Education of the Committee of and donors to the 
Bureau of Industry, be requested to take such steps as may be 
necessary to establish the Bureaus on a firm basis independent 
of the Kehillah. 

The purpose >of this resolution was twofold: in the first 
place, to give the research Bureaus an opportunity of develop- 
ing unhampered ; and, in the second place, to clear the way for 
a genuinely democratic Kehillah. 

The Administrative Council of the Kehillah, together with 
the Executive Committee, has drawn up a plan of democratic 
Kehillah Organization. This plan divides New York into 18 
Kehillah Districts with 100 Kehillah Neighborhoods. The 
Districts and Neighborhoods are divided in accordance with 
their Jewish population. An elaborate study of the Jewish 
population of New York has been made showing the distribu- 
tion throughout the city of New York^s 1,500,000 Jews. The 
new plan of organization provides for representation in the 
Kehillah through organizations and through individuals. The 
Kehillah Register, which is soon to be issued in connection with 
the Special Convention of the Kehillah [January 13], shows 
that there are about 4,000 Jewish organizations of different 
kinds in New York City. 

It is not the function of the Kehillah to do the work of these 
4,000 Jewish organizations or of any one of them. These 4,000 
Jewish organizations spend upwards of $8,000,000 per annum. 
Nor is it the task of the Kehillah to collect this money. It is, 
however, the task of the Kehillah to draw up an annual Com- 



REPORT OF AMERICAN JEWISH COMMITTEE 403 

miiiiity Program, and to endeavor to see to it that this Program 
is carried out year by year. The chief force that the Kehillah 
can exercise is the force of public opinion. 

The Jewish problem in New York City has many aspects, and 
no one organization, however powerful, can hope to cope with 
all of its details. It therefore becomes the more necessary to 
create a platform upon which Jews of all parties and views 
may meet for the purpose of considering not only the Jewish 
To-day in New York City, but the Jewish To-morrow. One of 
the chief needs of a great community like that of New York is 
to distribute Jewish responsibility as far as possible over every 
street and every house and every family. This can be done only 
in "genuinely democratic ways, and the plans of the Kehillah 
provide for a thoroughgoing reorganization on democratic 
principles. 

Eespectfully submitted, 

J. L. Magnbs, 
Chairman, Executive Committee, 

EEPORT OF THE JEWISH COMMUNITY OF 

PHILADELPHIA 

TO THE MEMBERS OF THE AMERICAN JEWISH COMMITTEE : 

Gentlemen : 

The proceedings of the Jewish Community of Philadelphia 
during the year 1916-17 may be summarized as follows : 

During the early course of the year the Community, through 
its representatives before the Congressional Committees on 
Immigration, co-operated with the American Jewish Com- 
mittee and other organizations in opposing the inclusion of the 



404 AMERICAN JEWISH YEAR BOOK 

objectionable literacy test in the then pending and subsequently 
enacted Immigration Bill. 

At proper season during this period letters were sent to the 
local federal and state oflScials, coimty and city authorities, 
and to the heads of the public schools enclosing a calendar of 
the Jewish holidays of the current year and requesting leave 
of absence for employees or pupils desiring to be excused on 
those religious occasions. Most of these letters elicited favor- 
able response, the Superintendent of Public Schools especially 
requesting two hundred and fifty additional copies of the 
calendar for distribution through that department. 

Articles concerning the Jewish holidays, specially prepared 
with a view to publication in the daily press, were sent to the 
various local newspapers as occasion required. 

The moral and religious instruction of the Jewish prisoners 
in the Pennsylvania Eastern Penitentiary is being furthered 
by the Community in co-operation with the local district 
organization of the B^nai B'rith. The work is being carried on 
through the instrumentality of Dr. Joseph MedoflP, who visits 
the prison twice a week and whose enthusiastic services have 
been fruitful of very desirable results. 

The general effort made during the past summer of mobiliz- 
ing the older boys of the public schools for work on farms had 
the co-operation of the Kehillah through a committee specially 
organized for the purpose. This committee was afforded the 
assistance of the local society for the Protection of Jewish 
Immigrants through its paid oflBcials, and succeeded in placing 
a number of Jewish boys with Jewish farmers who were calling 
for help. 



REPORT OF AMERICAN JEWISH COMMITTEE 405 

The Equal Eights Bill promoted by the Community at the 
1915 session of the Legislature of Pennsylvania and which, 
after passing both Houses, was vetoed, by the Governor for 
technical reasons, was re-introduced at the recent session in a 
form modified as required, and, being passed by the Legislature, 
was approved by the Executive. This measure is practically 
similar to that recently enacted by the Legislature of the State 
of New York. 

At the request of the Director of the Bureau of Statistics 
of the American Jewish Committee, the Assistant Secretary of 
the Community gathered the statistics of the temporary con- 
gregations in Philadelphia during the recent high holidays. 
This list is being tabulated and will shortly be sent to the 
Bureau. 

The Jewish Educational Board authorized by the Com- 
munity has effectively promoted the organization in the south- 
eastern section of the city of a Young People's Congregation 
for Friday evening religious services, which gives promise of 
becoming an important factor in the religious activity in that 
section. 

In compliance with a formal request from the Section of 
Co-operating Organizations of the Food Conservation Commis- 
sion at Washington, the Community, through its constituent 
organizations, is co-operating in a concerted effort for the con- 
servation of food. 

Ephraim Lederer, Esq., whose term as a representative of 
the Community on the American Jewish Committee expires 
at this meeting, has been re-elected for the ensuing term of 
five years. 

The annual quota of $900.00 requested from the Phila- 
delphia Community by the Committee was over-subscribed. 



406 AMERICAN JEWISH YEAR BOOK 

and the sum of $965.00 has already been sent to the Com- 
mittee on this account. 

The seventh annual meeting of the Community will be held 
on Sunday, November 18, 1917. 

Eespectfully submitted, 

Louis E. Levy, 
President. 

SPECIAL MEETING 

At a special meeting of the American Jewish Committee, 
held in New York City on Sunday, April 28, 1918, the follow- 
ing statement relative to the attitude of the Committee with 
respect to the declaration of the British Government favoring 
the establishment in Palestine of a national home for the 
Jewish people was adopted : 

The American Jewish Committee was organized primarily 
to obtain for the Jews in every part of the world civil and 
religious rights, to protect them against unfavorable dis- 
crimination, and to secure for them equality of economic, 
social, and educational opportunity. These will continue to 
be its objects. 

The Committee regards it as axiomatic that the Jews, of the 
United States have here established a permanent home for 
themselves and their children, have acquired the rights and 
assumed the correlative duties of American citizenship, and 
recognize their unqualified allegiance to this country, which 
they love and cherish, and of whose people they constitute 
an integral part. 

This Committee, however, is not unmindful that there are 
Jews everywhere who, moved by traditional sentiment, 
yearn for a home in the Holy Land for the Jewish people. 
This hope, nurtured for centuries, has our whole-hearted 
sympathy. 



REPORT OF AMERICAN JEWISH COMMITTEE 407 

We recognize, however, that but a part of the Jewish 
people would take up their domicile in Palestine. The 
greater number will continue to live in £he lands of whose 
citizenship they now form a component part, where they 
enjoy full civil and religious liberty, and where, as loyal and 
patriotic citizens, they will maintain and develop the prin- 
ciples and institutions of Judaism. 

When, therefore, the British Government recently made 
the declaration, now supported by the French Government, 
that "they view with favor the establishment in Palestine 
of a national home for the Jewish people, and will use their 
best endeavors to facilitate the achievement of this object," 
the announcement was received by this Committee with 
profound appreciation. The conditions annexed to this 
declaration are regarded as of essential importance, stipu- 
lating as they do that "nothing shall be done which may 
prejudice the civil and religious rights of existing non- 
Jewish communities in Palestine or the rights and political 
status enjoyed by Jews in any other country." These con- 
ditions correspond fully with the general purposes for which 
this Committee has striven and with the ideals of the Jews 
of America. 

The opportunity will be welcomed by this Committee to 
aid in the realization of the British declaration, under such 
protectorate or suzerainty as the peace congress may deter- 
mine, and, to that end, to co-operate with those who, at- 
tracted by religious or historic associations, shall seek to 
establish in Palestine a centre for Judaism, for the stimu- 
lation of our faith, for the pursuit and development of 
literature, science, and art in a Jewish environment, and for 
the rehabilitation of the land. 



JEWISH PUBLICATION SOCIETY 409 



THE JEWISH PUBLICATION SOCIETY OF 

AMERICA 



OFFICERS 



PRESIDENT 

SIMON MILLER, Philadelphia 

FIRST VICE-PRESIDENT 

ABRAM I. ELKUS, New York 

SECOND VICE-PRESIDENT . 

HORACE STERN, Philadelphia 

TREASURER 

HENRY FERNBERGER, Philadelphia 

SECRETARY 

BENJAMIN ALEXANDER, Philadelphia 

ASSISTANT SECRETARY 

I. GEORGE DOBSEVAGE, Philadelphia 

EDITOR 

DR. B. HALPER, Philadelphia 

TRUSTEES 

Dr. Cyrus Adler * Philadelphia 

Hart Blumenthal * Philadelphia 

Charles Eisenman * Cleveland 

Abram I. Elkus * New York 

Henry Fernberger * Philadelphia 

Daniel Guggenheim * New York 

Joseph Hagedorn ■ Philadelphia 

S. Charles Lamport ■ New York 

Ephraim Lederer * Philadelphia 

Simon Miller * Philadelphia 

Julius Rosen wald * Chicago 

*Term expires In 1919. "Term expires In 1920. •Term expires In 1921. 



410 AMERICAN JEWISH YEAR BOOK 



SiGMUND B. SoNNEBOBN * Baltimore 

Horace Stebn ' Philadelphia 

Samuel Strauss ■ New York 

Hon. Seligman J. Strauss * Wilkes-Barre, Pa. 

Cyrus L. Sulzberger ' New York 

Hon. Mayer Sulzberger ' Philadelphia 

A. Leo Weil * Pittsburgh 

Harris Weinstock * Sacramento 

Edwin Wolf * Philadelphia 

honorary vice-presidents 

IsAAO W. Bernheim * Louisville 

Rev. Dr. Henry Cohen ' Galveston 

Louis K. Gutman * Baltimore 

Rev. Dr. Max Heller * New Orleans 

S. W. Jacobs * Montreal 

Louis E. Kirstein ■ Boston 

Hon. Julian W. Mack ■ Chicago 

Rev. Dr. Martin A. Meyer * San Francisco 

Hon. Simon W. Rosendale * Albany, N. Y. 

Murray Seasongood * Cincinnati 

Hon. M. C. Sloss * San Francisco 

Rev. Dr. Joseph Stolz ^ Chicago 

Hon. Simon Wolf ■ Washington, D. C. 

publication committee 

Hon. Mayer Sulzberger, Chairman Philadelphia 

Dr. Cyrus Abler Philadelphia 

Rev. Dr. Henry Berkowitz Philadelphia 

Dr. S. Solis Cohen Philadelphia 

Rev. Dr. Hyman G. Enelow New York 

Dr. Herbert Fbiedenwald New York 

Dr. Israel Friedlaender New York 

f^Lix N. Gerson Philadelphia 

Rev. Dr. Max Heller New Orleans 

Dr. Jacob H. Hollander Baltimore 

Rev. Dr. Jacob Kohn New York 

Rev. Dr. J. L. Magnes New York 

Dr. Max L. Margolis Philadelphia 

Dr. Alexander Marx New York 

Leon S. Moisseiff New York 

Rev. Dr. David Philipson Cincinnati 

Rev. Dr. Samuel Schulman New York 

^ Term expires in 1919. ' Term expires in 1920. ' Term expires in 1921. 



JEWISH PUBLICATION SOCIETY 4II 



Hon. Oscab Stbaus New York 

Samuel Strauss New York 

Henrietta Szold • New York 

JEWISH CLASSICS COMMITTEE 

Dr. Cyrus Adler, Chairman Philadelphia 

Rev. Dr. H. G. Enelow New York 

Dr. Israel Friedlaender New York 

Dr. Louis Ginzberq New York 

Rev. Dr. Kaufman Kohler Cincinnati 

Dr. Jacob Z. Lauterbach Cincinnati 

Dr. Henry Malter Philadelphia 

Dr. Alexander Marx New York 

Rev. Dr. P. De Sola Mendes New York 

Rev. Dr. David Philipson Cincinnati 

Rev. Dr. Samuel Schulman New York 

Hon. Mayer Sulzberger Philadelphia 

The Board of Trustees meets in January, March, May, and 
October. 

The Publication Committee meets in the afternoon of the first 
Sunday in January, February, March, April, May, June, October, 
November, and December. 



412 AMERICAN JEWISH YEAR BOOK 



THE ANNUAL MEETING OF THE JEWISH PUBLI- 
CATION SOCIETY OF AMERICA 

The Annual Meeting of the Jewish Publication Society of 
America was held on Sunday afternoon, March 24, 1918, at the 
Dropsie College for Hebrew and Cognate Learning, Philadel- 
phia, Pa. The meeting was opened with prayer by Rabbi 
Samuel Fredman, of Philadelphia. The President of the 
Society, Mr. Simon Miller, acted as Chairman, and Mr. Frank 
J. Rubenstein, of Philadelphia, acted as Secretary. 

The President then read his annual address. 

President's Address 

Ladies and Oentlemen : Thirty-one years ago a group of Jews 
met in Philadelphia to discuss ways and means by which the 
Jewish Community of America, numbering then about 400,- 
000 souls, might be supplied with the necessary books " giving 
instruction in the principles of the Jewish religion and in Jew- 
ish history and literature.'^ The founders of the Society were 
actuated by the belief that no people can be called great 
unless it possessed and had available a great literature. They 
felt that this literature, the common heritage, must be widely 
disseminated, if that people is to maintain its identity. Par- 
ticularly is this true of the Jews who are a minority people 
and must struggle against overwhelming odds to avoid being 
engulfed in their non-Jewish surroundings. 

How effectively the Society has been the medium for the 
wider dissemination of our sacred heritage the list of the one 
hundred and four books published and the number of copies 
distributed testify. That thousands of Jewish homes are being 



JEWISH PUBLICATION SOCIETY * 413 

supplied by us with shelves of Jewish books is a fact well known. 
This year alone we have printed and reprinted about 180,000 
books, bringing the total copies distributed by the Society to 
about 1,200,000. While we are far from our goal, it is note- 
worthy that our ratio of membership to Jewish population 
would represent in one of the dominant churches fully 100,000 
to 125,000 members. What publishing house, sectarian or 
secular, has such an assured distribution of its output ? That 
thousands of sets of Graetz's "History of the Jews,^^ and 
thousands of copies of the writings of such men as Schechter, 
Lazarus, Ginzberg, Ahad ha-^Am, Abrahams, Karpeles, Perez, 
and Zangwill form the permanent collections of Jewish books 
in Jewish households testify that the wished-f or consummation 
has been at least partially realized. 

Statistics at best are annoying, but may not one refer with a 
modest and justifiable pride to a membership of 15,000, about 
3500 of whom were enrolled during the year; to sales of books 
amounting to $46,000 ; to two editions of the Bible consisting 
of 40,000 copies, most of which have been distributed and sold ; 
to 60,000 copies of Prayer Books and Bibles intended espe- 
cially for the use of Jewish Soldiers and Sailors in the service 
of their country? Comparison with figures of previous years 
reveals a continued and progressive growth. In fact, when one 
watches the growth of Jewish intellectual movements in 
America, one is justified in agreeing with Mr. Jacob H. Schiff, 
who expressed the belief that on American soil the world will 
yet behold a Judaism rivalling the glorious spiritual and intel- 
lectual splendor of the Spanish period. Our Society is doing 
its share, in co-operation with the several institutions of Jew- 
ish learning, to hasten the realization of this desire. But to do 
this we require the help and good will of our people. If thirty 



414 ' AMERICAN JEWISH YEAR BOOK 

years ago we could aspire to a membership of ten thousand, we 
ought to have at least fifty thousand members now. A com- 
munity which numbers scores of national organizations with 
constituent memberships running into hundreds of thousands 
ought to be a fertile enough field for one large educational 
organization. We seek a larger membership because we desire 
to be of greater service. 

Our joy on this occasion is marred by the loss which our 
people and our Society have sustained in the passing away of 
two of our distinguished colleagues. Mr. Morris Newburger, 
. our first President, did pioneer work dujing the first ten years 
of the Society's existence, rendering inestimable service, and his 
co-operation as a trustee in the twenty years following was of 
an equally valuable character. His memory will always be a 
blessing. Dr. Henry M. Leipziger was first Vice-President of 
the Society since its organization and a member of the Publi- 
cation Committee for over seventeen years. He was a man of 
varied accomplishments and unremitting industry. His ear- 
nest labors in the cause of popular instruction made him a 
marked figure in the educational life of New York, and gave 
him a national reputation. Though feeble in health, he jour- 
neyed to Philadelphia to take part in our meetings and do his 
share in the work. His death is a loss to the Society and to the 
whole community. 

All the books sent to members of the Society last year have 
been favorably received by them and by the press. In The 
Story of Bible Translations Professor Max L. Margolis traces 
the history of the most important translations and the influence 
they exerted. He tells us how the translations spread through- 
out the world, how some were epoch-making, and how new 
reforms of thought resulted from them. The author's mastery 



JEWISH PUBWCATION SOGIEli'Y 415 

enabled him to treat the subject with authority and in a style at 
once attractive and popular. Following within a few weeks 
after the publication of the monumental new translation of 
the Bible, this volume served well to explain to Jew and non- 
Jew the importance of our version and the influence it would 
exert upon Jewish life in English-speaking countries. 

The American Jewish Year Booh for 5678 was generally ac- 
claimed the most successful issue since the first one appeared 
in September, 1899. This issue was edited by the accomplished 
Director of the Bureau of Jewish Statistics and Research, 
Dr. Samson D. Oppenheim. It contained, in addition to the 
store-house of timely Jewish statistics and other infprmation, 
an important article by Mr. H. 0. Sandberg, introducing the 
Jews of Latin America to us and bringing their history and 
present interests nearer to us. Mr. Max J. Kohler^s able article 
on Jewish Rights at International Congresses is of speci^-l 
value at this time. 

Miss Emily Solis-Cohen's translation of Judah Steinberg's 
collection of tales, issued under the title The Breakfast of the 
Birds and Other Stories, was the third book sent to our mem- 
bers. These delightful tales of Steinberg are fanciful, alle- 
gorical, and some satirical, but all of them are possessed of 
literary quality well worth rendering into any tongue. The 
make-up of the book as to format and type, particularly the 
four charming illustrations in color, prepared especially for 
the book by a girl fourteen years of age, and the attractive 
cover design, make this volume as fine a juvenile as could be 
desired. 

The second volume of Dubnow, bringing the record of the 
history of the Jews of Russia and Poland up to the time of 
Nicholas II, will appear shortly. 
14 



416 AMERICAN JEWISH YEAR BOOK 

It will be followed by a volume from the pen of Dr. Joseph 
Jacobs, dealing with the contributions the Jews have made to 
civilization. The work, the Publication Committee feels, is 
in many ways one of the most important which Dr. Jacobs 
wrote. It is a justification and explanation of the Jew's 
position in history, and is an answer to the insidious assump- 
tion of the higher anti-Semites of modem times. Its appear- 
ance at this time will be most opportune, and the Society is 
indeed privileged in being able to announce the publication 
of so important a work. 

The American Jewish Year Book for 5679 will maintain the 
liigh standard of previous issues. Among other special features, 
it will contain an essay on the Jewish population of the United 
States accompanied by a number of interesting tables. Dr. 
Alcalay, chief rabbi of Serbia, will give an intimate account 
of the inner life of our Serbian coreligionists. There will also 
be articles on the Jewish Welfare Board, Jewish War Sta- 
tistics, and on the Federation for the Support of Jewish 
Philanthropic Societies in New York City. 

To meet the demand for books of special interest to the 
young, the Society will issue a volujne by Professor A. S. Isaacs 
entitled Under the Sabbath Lamp, This will be followed by 
the third volume of Dubnow's History of the Jews in Russia 
and 'Poland, bringing this work up to recent date. 

The Society has among its assets a dozen manuscripts 
awaiting future publication. Among these manuscripts are 
N. Slousch^s Travels in Northern Africa; Professor Malter's 
volume dealing with Saadia ; Dr. Halper's Post-Biblical Liter- 
ature: an Anthology ; Dr. Isi'ael Abrahams' By-Paths in He- 
braic Bookland; Ginzberg's Legends of the Jews, volume V; 
Bentwich's Hellenism; and, last but not least, a collection of 



JEWISH PUBLICATION SOCIETY 417 

I 

essays by Professor Schechter which will form the third of the 
series of Studies in Judaism. In addition to these books there 
are many distinguished scholars in Europe and America work- 
ing on assignments, some of which the war has, of course, 
delayed ; but they are in the course of completion, and will be 
delivered to our Society. 

It is now a year since the new translation of the Bible has 
been published, and the Society has tkus far printed two 
editions of 20,000 copies each, 40,000 copies in all, and most of 
these have been distributed or sold. It is, of course, too early 
to estimate the importance the new Jewish version will have on 
the spiritual life of Israel or to indicate to what extent this 
rendition will effect Bible scholarship. Suffice it for the 
present to state that the reviews in leading biblical, religious, 
and literary periodicals have invariably spoken in the highest 
praises of the new translation. Various Christian Bible 
Societies in America and England have welcomed its appear- 
ance. There remains but one thing for Jews to do — dis- 
tribute it. In this way we may follow the example of our 
Christian neighbors. We must create or constitute ourselves a 
Jewish Bible Society. The American Bible Society was or- 
ganized in 1816. In 1916 over eight million Bibles were 
distributed, bringing the total issued since its organization to 
more than 125,000,000 volumes. The British and Foreign 
Bible Society in 1916 issued over 12,000,000 copies. Othei 
Bible Societies and commercial firms issued 27,000,000 copies, 
totalling over 47,000,000 copies in all. These were published in 
over 500 languages. This is equivalent to more than one vol- 
ume of the Scriptures for each second of the day and night of 
the 365 days of the year. What are we to do ? There are more 
than 3,000,000 Jews in America. There are about 500,000 



418 AMERICAN JEWISH YEAR BOOK 

Jewish families in the land. Our aim should he that at least 
one copy of the Bible is placed in every Jewish home in Amer- 
ica. To realize this we require the help of every rabbi and of 
every public-spirited Jew. 

Now that the Society has been relieved from the detailed 
labor which the revision of the Bible required, we are turning 
our attention to the publication of the commentaries of the 
Bible which will explain the Bible in the light of Jewish 
interpretation, thought, and tradition. The Society has def- 
initely committed itself to the undertaking of the publication 
of a series of popular commentaries to the books of the Bible. 
The details are being worked out by a committee, and will be 
announced soon. It is the intention of the Committee that the 
commentary should represent the results of sound scholarship 
without encumbering the reader with minute technicalities. 
It is to be a popular commentary. 

The work of the Jewish Classics is proceeding. No meetings 
of the Committee were held during the past year, it having been 
possible to consult by correspondence. Most of the volumes 
have been assigned, and the writers are in all cases at work on 
the books assigned them. The war is delaying the project, 
because, as was pointed out last year, the proper editing of 
texts is in a great measure dependent upon the photographing 
of manuscripts abroad. All of the photographs of manu- 
scripts required from England have now reached us, but some 
are lacking from Italy, and communication with Germany and 
Austria is of necessity closed. The manuscript of one volume 
of the Classics has already been completed, and is now in the 
hands of the members of the Sub-Committee for examination ; 
it is hoped that others will soon follow. Experiments with 
regard to the best form of Hebrew type to be used are being 



JEWISH PUBLICATION SOCIETY 419 

. made, and a general scheme for Hebrew type has been sub- 
mitted and is under consideration. 

When the United States entered the war, the Publication 
Society offered its services to furnish for free distribution to 
Jewish soldiers and sailors the books which they may require 
and would be helpful to them. In April, 1917, The Central 
Conference of American Eabbis, The Union of American He- 
brew Congregations, The Union of Orthodox Jewish Congre- 
gations, The Council of Young Men^s Hebrew and Kindred 
Associations, the Agudath ha-Eabbonim, the United Syna- 
gogue of America, together with the Jewish Publication Society 
of America, offered to publish an Abridged Prayer Book for 
these men, if agreement as to the text could be reached. A com- 
mittee of three was formed, consisting of Dr. Cyrus Adler, 
representing the United Synagogue of America, Dr. William 
Rosenau, representing the Central Conference of American 
Rabbis, and Dr. Bernard Drachman, representing the Union of 
Orthodox Congregations. This Committee prepared the vol- 

, unie which was issued under the title of Abridged Prayer Book 
for Jews in the Army and Navy of the United States, Of this 
Prayer Book 40,000 copies have been published and dis- 
tributed. Subsequently, it was realized that the soldiers would 
need a handy Bible, and it was seen that the Society's regular 
edition would be too bulky for practical use. Accordingly, a 
selection from nearly all the books of the Bible was made, and 
a little book of 276 pages, weighing but two ounces, has been 
issued. There has been a great demand for these books, and 
the Society will rush through the press as many editions as may 
be required. It is thought that at least 100,000 copies each of 
the Prayer Book and Bible will be wanted to su])ply the present 
demand. 



420 AMERICAN JEWISH YEAR BOOK 

The Society takes this opportunity to thank its many mem- 
bers and friends who have contributed generously to the fund 
for the publication and distribution of the soldiers' books. 
In connection with this, mention ought to be made of the fact 
that we have co-operated with our English brethren in welfare 
work, and have given permission to the chief rabbi of England 
to reprint, for the use of the soldiers, the book of Psalms from 
our new translation. The Society ^is also arranging to give 
Dr. Hertz permission to reprint the Society's translation of 
the Pentateuch and the Haftarot to be used in connection with 
the Weekly Readings, in Hebrew and . English. We have 
also appointed committees to consider the details connected 
with the establishing of a Hebrew press in America. A Hebrew 
press is wanted for the Society's use, so that it may publish 
the Classics as well as many other Hebrew books. It will also 
afford facilities for the publishing of Hebrew Bibles and the 
Weekly Eeadings. Such a press is also wanted for the publi- 
cation of Hebrew text-books of interest to the general Jewish 
public. 

The Society has also developed a new selling policy, so that 
the general trade may handle our books and in this way reach 
those whom we cannot ordinarily reach in the regular course. 

We have concluded the most successful year in our history. 
May the thirty-first year bring still further gains to our cause. 

Report of the Board of Trustees 
The Board of Trustees elected the following oflBcers : Treas- 
urer, Henry Femberger, of Philadelphia; Secretary, Ben- 
jamin Alexander, of Philadelphia; Assistant Secretary, I. 
George Dobsevage, of Philadelphia, who also is Secretary to 
the Board of Trustees and the Publication Committee ; Editor, 
Dr. B. Halper, of Philadelphia. 



JEWISH PUBLrlCATION SOCIETY . 421 

The following were chosen members of the Publication 
Committee : Mayer Sulzberger, of Philadelphia ; Cyrus Adler, 
of Philadelphia ; Henry Berkowitz, of Philadelphia ; Solomon 
Solis Cohen, of Philadelphia; Hyman 6. Enelow, of New 
York; Herbert Friedenwald, of Denver; Israel Priedlaender, 
of New York ; Felix N. Gerson, of Philadelphia ; Max Heller, 
of New Orleans; Jacob H. Hollander, of Baltimore; Jacob 
Kohn, of New York; J. L. Magnes, of New York; Max L. 
Margolis, of Philadelphia; Alexander Marx, of New York; 
Leon S. Moisseiff, of New York; David Philipson, of Cin- 
cinnati; Samuel Schulman, of New York; Oscar S. Straus, 
of New York; Samuel Strauss, of New York; Henrietta Szold, 
of New York. Mayer Sulzberger was elected by the Com- 
mittee as its Chairman. 

Publications 

The publications issued during 1917-1918 were as follows: 

1. The Story of Bible Translations, by Max L. Margolis. 

2. The American Jewish Year Book for 5678. 

3. The Breakfast of the Birds and Other Stories, by Judah 
Steinberg. Translated by Emily Solis-Cohen. 

4. History of the Jews in Eussia and Poland, by S. M. 
Dubnow, Vol. II. This volume was unavoidably delayed in 
publication, and will be issued in July. 

The publications to be issued in 1918-1919 are as follows: 

1. The American Jewish Year Book 5679. 

2. Jewish Influence: An Estimate, by Joseph Jacobs. 

3. History of the Jews in Eussia and Poland, by S. M. 
Dubnow, Vol. III. 

4. Under the Sabbath Lamp, by A. S. Isaacs. 



422 AMERICAN JEWISH YEAR BOOK 



Statement OF Financial Condition as of February 28, 

1918 

Cash in Bank $294.85 

Cash on Hand 100.00 

$394.85 

Dues Receivable $2,302.94 

Sales Receivable 42,084.50 

Income Receivable 909.01 

— $45,296.45 

Inventories 24,953.03 

• r^^ 

Gross Working Capital $70,644.33 

Debts 12,388.40 

Net Working Capital $58,255.93 

Fixed Assets (Invested) 71,736.67 

Advanced Payments 870.76 

Total $130,863.36 

Funds 

Loeb Fund $11,266.08 

Life Membership 8,575.80 

Bible Fund 14,984.53 

Classic Fund 57,148.87 



JEWISH PUBLICATION SOCIETY 423 



Statement of Receipts and Disbursements for Year Ending 

February 28, 1918 

Balance on Hand March 1, 1918. $3,667.56 

Receipts: 

Members Dues $43,559.11 

Sales of Books 28,609.19 

Income from Investments 3,540.78 

$75,709.08 

Soldiers and Sailors* Fund $8,701.47 

Sales of Bibles 5,164.63 

Sales of Investment and Securities 28,373.91 

Miscellaneous 20.00 

$42,260.01 

$121,636.65 
Disbursements : 

Salesmen's Commissions and Expenses. $17,718.88 

Publications 48,075.95 

Donation Expenditures (Bible) 25,305.43 

Donation Expenditures (Classic) 978.04 

Soldiers and Sailors' Fund 7,759.15 

Salaries 7,980.64 

General Expenditures 13,423.71 

$121,241.80 

Cash Balance February 28, 1918 $394.85 



iM 



AMERICAN JEWISH YEAR BOOK 



Statement of Membership as of Febbuabt 2S, 1918 



Alabama 
Alaska . 
Arizona 
Arkansas 



43 
1 

35 
45 



California 315 

Colorado 133 

Connecticut 275 

Delaware 61 

District of Columbia 112 

Florida 55 

Georgia 141 

Idaho 2 

Illinois 1044 

Indiana 170 

Iowa 67 

Kansas 13 

Kentucky 113 

Louisiana . .' 96 

Maine 16 

Maryland 774 

Massachusetts 563 

Michigan 305 

Minnesota 118 

Mississippi 49 

Missouri 303 

Montana 1 

Nebraska 27 

Nevada 1 

New Hampshire 8 

New Jersey 838 

New Mexico 30 

New York 3717 

North Carolina 46 



North Dakota 11 

Ohio 971 

Oklahoma 96 

Oregon 32 

Pennsylvania 2467 



Rhode Island . 
South Carolina 
South Dakota . 

Tennessee 

Texas 

Utah 

Vermont 



83 

88 

2 

80 

290 

37 

10 

Virginia 229 



Washington 

West Virginia 

Wisconsin 

Wyoming 

Australia 

British West Indies 



53 
83 
73 

2 
37 

3 



Canada 487 



Cuba 

Denmark 

Egypt 

England 

France 

Germany 

India 

New Zealand 

Philippine Islands 

Portugal 

Scotland 

South Africa 

Vancouver Island 



12 
1 
2 

31 
2 
1 
2 
1 
2 
1 
1 

73 
1 



Total Membership 

Annual Members ($3 a year) 12,976 



14,781 



Special Members ($5 " 
Library Members ($10 " 
Patron Members ($20 ** 

Friends 

Life Members 



(< 



<( 



) 
) 
) 



1,522 

198 

31 

3 

51 



Total Mbmbebship 14,781 



JHWISH PUBLICATION SOCIETY 



42 i 



Investment as of Febeuaey 28, 1918 

Bonds: Par value Cost value 

9 Electric & Peoples Traction Co. 4% $9,000.00 $8,972.50 

1 Lehigh Valley Cons. Mort. Loan 4Mi% 1,000.00 1,000.00 

1 " " " Annuity Bond 4i^%.. 1,000.00 1,030.00 
15 City of Phila. Coupon 4%, due 1939 15,000.00 15,037.50 

2 " " " " " " 1939 2,000.00 2,005.00 

2 " " " " •* " 1939 2,000.00 2,007.50 

1%" " "Registered" " 1942 1,500.00 1,505.62 

^^*^* Par value Cost value 

Coupons 15M Brooklyn Rapid Transit 5% 

Notes due 1918 $15,000.00 $15,018.75 

Notes due 1918 10,000.00 10,008.75 

Coupons IIM Long Island R. R. Refund 4% 11,000.00 9,971.20 

Coupons lOM Brooklyn Rapid Transit 5% 

Coupons 5M Canadian Pacific 6% Notes due 

1924 5,000.00 5,104.38 

Philadelphia, March 22, 1918: 
Your Committee has examined the securities of the Society 
and find them to agree with the above list. All coupons 
attached. Edward Loeb, Chairman, 

Adolph Eichholz. 



4J36 AMERICAN JEWISH YEAR BOOK 

Elections 

The Committee on Nominations presented the following 
report : 

President (for one year) : Simon Miller, of Philadelphia. 

First Vice-President : Abram I. Elkus, of New York. 

Second Vice-President : Horace Stern, of Philadelphia. 

Trustees (for three years) : Henry Fernberger, of Phila- 
delphia; Joseph Hagedorn, of Philadelphia; S. Charles Lam- 
port, of New York; Horace Stern, of Philadelphia; Samuel 
Strauss, of New York ; Seligman J. Strauss, of Wilkes-Barre, 
Pa. ; Cyrus L. Sulzberger, of New York. 

Trustee (for two years) : Abram I. Elkus, of New York. 

Honorary Vice-Presidents (for three years) : Isaac W. 
Bernheim, of Louisville ; S. W. Jacobs, of Montreal ; Louis E. 
Kirstein, of Boston; Julian W. Mack, of Chicago; Simon 
Wolf, of Washington. 

The Secretary was instructed to cast a unanimous ballot 
for the nominees, and the Chairman declared them duly 
elected. 

The portrait of Dr. Cyrus Adler, a member of the Board of 
Trustees, and of the publication Committee of the Jewish 
Publication Society of America, was presented to the Society 
by Mr. Simon Miller, on behalf of the Board of Trustees. 

The President introduced Mr. Chester Jacob Teller, the 
Executive Director of the Jewish Welfare Board, who deliv- 
ered an address on the work of the Jewish Welfare Board. 

At 4.40 p. m. the meeting was adjourned. 

Frank J. Eubenstein, 

Acting Secretary. 



JEWISH PUBLICATION SOCIETY 



427 



MEMBERS 



ALABAMA 



Alabama 



Berman, I. 



AndaluBla 



Bessemer 

Barr, Martin 

Erlick, Sam, 1701 Clarendon Av. 

Green, Morris 

Ileinberg, J., 1805 6th Av. 

Birmingham 

Abelson, I., 1111 S. 13th 

Abramson, H. 

Adler, Ike, 116% N. 2l8t 

Baker, Sam, 928 S. 14th 

liftlsnm, Jacob, 1205 Av. H. 

Bandman, G. G., 2804 Juniper Av. 

B'ham Bar-Mitzvah Club, 110 N. 

19th 
Blumberg. R., 1512 S. 20th 
Cantor, Max, 1127 N. 11th 
Cooley. Ben, 512 N. 16th 
Coplan. Mrs. Lena, 2217 Orange Av. 
Corenblum, B.. 1030 Central 
L-annenberg, Chas., 2222 2d. Av 
Emanu El Congr. Sunday School, 

2150 16th Av. S. 
Ezeklel, B. F., 1111 S. 20th 
Fcldstein, J., 1620 S. 15th Av. 
B'iller, J.. 724 N. 16th 
Forst. Louis, 3013 Mt. Av. S. 
Frledelson, David, 1407 S. 14th 
Friedman, J.. 2126 16th Av. S. 
Friedman, Mrs. M., 1926 Av. I 
Ginsburg, Samuel, 1019 Central 
Goldstein, M., 102 S. 20th 
Goldstein. S.. 1016 N. 13th 
Jacobs, Bertram, 2012 3d Av. N. 
Jacobs, Morris. 1310 Ina 
Kartus, Jos.. 1213 St. Charles 
Kimerllng. M.. 728 N. 10th 
Kroman. M., 1609 8th N. E. 
Kronenberg, I. A.. 2120 16th Av. S. 
Levy. Max, 1403 St. Charles 
Maril, Geo., 1005 E. 14th 
Mendelsohn, Rabbi J. I., 1512 8th 

Av., N. 
Mendelsohn. M., 1519 8th Av. 
Newtteld, Rabbi M., 2150 16th Av. S. 
F'hillips, T.. 2019 Qulnlan 
Rich. David. 1222 R. 12th 
lioseman. Max. 1422 8th Av. 
Rotholz, G.. 2211 17th Av. S. 



Segal, M., 2112 Av. H. 

Siegel, S., 728 12th 

Sokolove, A. E., 2121 First Av. 

Steiner, Leo K., 2173 Highland Av. 

Sterne, Roy M., 1915 Av. H 

Tenenbaum, M. S., 1609 S. 14th 

Weiss, H., 2125 1st Av. 

Demopolis 

Special Members 

Metzger, Lee S. 
Steinhart, L. L. 

Annual Members 

B'na Jeshurun, S. S. 
Franzlg, J. 
Kolda. Louis 
Funkensteln, S. 
Rosenbush, J. 
Well, Wm. 

Gadsden 

Frank, Ferd, 405 S. 12th 

Hecht, Hugo H. 

Zemurray, Isadore, Chestnut St. 

HuntsvlUe 

Levy, Sarol. H. 
Marx, Gustave 

Mobile 
Special Members 

Brown, Leo M., Box 953 
Hammel, Julius, Battle House 

Annual Members 

Altmayer. A. P., 501 Foot Ct. 
Bloch, Monroe D., P. O. Box 406 
Brown, II.. 59 N. Royal 
Cohen. H., Davis Av. 
Goldstein, M. P., 930 Government 
Hess. Henry. P. O. Box 406 
Knhn, M., 55 S. Bayon 
Kahn, S.. 250 Church 
liichtenstein, M., 215 S. Warren 
Loewenstein, V. T., 106 S. Dearborn 
Moses, Rabbi Alfred G., 64 Monterey 
I'earson, Abe, 53 Michigan Av. 
Schwa rz, Ix'on 



428 



AMERICAN JEWISH YEAR BOOK 



Alabama Schwarz, Mrs. R., Government & 

Hallet 
Shaaral Sbomayim Sabbath School 

19 S. Water 
Simon, J. S., 104 S. Dearborn 

Montgomery 

Beton, Sam, 18 S. Court 
Botcho, S. 

Ehrenreich, Rev. B. C, 906 S. Perry 
Bisenberg, M. L., 830 S. McDonough 
Eisenberg, Paul, 9 Park Av. 
Faerberg, Harry, 106 Herron 
Pinkelstein, L., 611 Jefiferson 
Frechling, Pauline, 310 Whittman 
Gerson, B. F., 211 S. Perry 
Goodman, A., 422 Randolph 
Grlei. Meyer. :^o;^ S. [jawrence 
Harris, L., Capital City Shoe Shop 
Hasson Jacob, 20 S. Court 
Horn, Jacob, 416 N. Hull 
Kahn, David, 1120 S. Court 
Ivahn, Mose, 435 S. Liawrence 
Kaufman, A. J., 716 S. Court 
Kennish, Sol., 633 Mildred 
Leibovitz, Jacob, 514 S. Ripley 
Lippman, I., 807 S. Hull 
Loeb, Lucieu S.. 5o6 Montgomery 
Marcu, I., 161 S. Heolt 
Marcu, M.., Jeflf Davis & Clev. 
Mayowitz, M., 68 Jeflf Davis 
Miller, Mrs. A., 117 Dexter Av. 
Miller, Adolph, 217 Pleasant Av. 
Mohr. M., 120 Sayre 
Monsky, A., 219 S. Hull 



Moritz, Chas. F., 424 S. Perry 

Rice, Saml., 61 Sayre 

Ross, Herman, 306 Bible 

Segall, Nathan, 412 S. Decatur 

Sanders A. 

Weil, Bert.'c, 720 S. Lawrence 

Weil, Harry, 401 S. Perry 



Opelika 



Menko, Henry 
Pinsky, S. 



Roanoke 



Halpern, J. 



Selma 

Benish, Hon. L., Lauderdale 
Elkan, H. B., 433 Lauderdale 
Hagedom, Max, 320 Broad 
Hohenberg, Morris, Water Av. 
Lehman, M. M. 
Maas, Leo. L. 
Maring, Harry, 420 Broad 
Meyer, M. J., 516 DallHs .vv. 
Roisinau, H., 606 Franklin 
Schuster. B. J., Box 466 
Tepper, Ben, 320 Broad 



Thomaston 



Lion, Chas. 



Tuscumbia 



Perry. Harry 



Alaska 



ALASKA 
Anchorage 
Library Member 
Loussac, Z. J. 



Arizona 



ARIZONA 



Douglas 
Special Mbmbeb 
Rosenfeld & Klein,. The Bazaar 

Annual Members 

Binshimol, David. P. O. Box 432 

Levy, Ben 

Margosin, Philip, 825 G A v. 

Miami 

Rosenberg. Dr. .7. A. 
Simon, S. A., Box 39 

Phoenix 

Marks,. Barnett E., 33 W. Willetta 
Oberfelder, S. 



Talney, Dave, 810 N. 5th 
Verans, Abr. I., 215 E. Culver 



Tucson 
Library Member 
Solomon, Chas. F. 

Special Member 

Jacobs, L. M., 187 W. Alameda 
Steinfeld, Albert 

Annual Members 

Brown, M. J., 123 W. Congress 
Kaufman, A., 335 E. 4th 



JEWISH PUBLICATION SOCIETY 



Anhqal Mgubebs 
Cohen. Lonls, 404 N. 21st 
Cohen, Wm. V.. 1000 N. 7th 
Ciflrlineky, C " ""■" " ' 



AREAHSAB 

LlttU Sock 
Special Membehs 
Abelea, Chas. I., 1423 Louisiana 
Luhn, Morris M., 1001 W. 2a 

Annual Mkubkes 
Bncfc, Win., 201 E. loth 
B'ne Israel CDDsr. Sabbatb School 
Cohn, Mark H.^ Abelea Apt. No. 8 



DbdU'i, Dbd, 969 



Keenherg, L., 1318 S, llth 


•TacobBOD, ChiiB, 2101 Galna 


I-iehermaD, S. 


r-iBker. Heorr, 201 Prospect At. 


Marks, M. H.. 411 N. 14tb 


Snoaers, M, B., 2100 Gaines 


N-akdlmen. I. n. 


Stlfft. Mrs. Chas. S.. 1802 Scott 


.■^'■.v, BuUoIpb 


Witt, Rabhl Louia, 020 W. Cedar 


Haltna 


Haivell 


Jacobs. Itabbi Plzer 


Krow, Ir.-i 




Pina Bluff 


Hot Spiing. 


DryfuB, laaac, OlO Main 


Ilouae of Israel Conirr Sabbath Sch'l 


Franklin, D. I,., 1521 8. Main 


RblDe, RabM A fif 315 W. GrSd 


Relnberger. Irving. 904 Main 




Koseniweig, Mrs. Wm., 71TH W. 2d 




Weil, Chas., 112 W. Barrqne 


Joneibora 


Tezarkana 


Tpmple, Israel 


Scherer, Julius, 604 Beech 


OAUFORHIA 


BakHifleU 




FHrbstein. Jacob, 2220 K 


ElDBtein, Louis, 1600 M 


Llehtenslein. M. M., 1414 19th 




Bnkele; 

Popper, Dr. Wm,, 6 The Alameda 


rruitvale 
Whirlow, Mra. H.. 2437 Delmar Ar. 






Ckico 


ShplBmoD, C, Imperiitl Ay. 



RoBenblum. H. 



Lai Angel at 
Ltpb Mehges 
Gross, David, 644 8. Hobart 



Bpictal si 
AronaoE, S.. 3335 Wllahire Blvd 
BrowD. Isidore, 1810 w. llth 
Fink. Albert. 1333 W. r.OtH 
Helliiiflu, Irving H., 674 Cnlnllni 
ilellman, M. B., 22E5 Harvard U 
IllllkowUl!. S.j S30 E. 9th 
Inaacs, L., B23 Lake 
I,o.-wcnlhal. Mni, 1833 S, Flows 
Raphael, I.. 610 5. Bonnie Bra 
HopbHel. R. t!., 1353 Alvarado 



430 



AMERICAN JEWISH YEAR BOOK 



Oalifomla Annual Members 

lenloflf, S., 745 S. Bway. 
Blackstone, Wm. E., 5425 Pasadena 

Av. 
Breftstein, Morris. 224 S. Spring 
Cahen, Dr. Caesar, 1220 Westlako 

Av 
Cahni Henry S., 629 S. Norton Av. 
Cole, Louis M.. 3240 Wllshlre Blvd. 
Cushner, Chas. I., 315 W. Pico 
Deutsch, Jncob, 236 N. Main 
Edelman, Dr. D. W., 1018 Elden Av. 
^isenberpT, Katz, 226 Townsend Av. 
Pinerman, Harry, 630 N. Bunker 

Hill 
Flnkelstpln, M. J.. 1210 W Adams 
Flnkelstein, Seller, 2436 Cincinnati 
Fish. Dr. .T. B.. Hans Bldg. 
Formaker, B., 321 W. 51st 
Fram. Harry, 1104 E. 22d 
Oerecht, E. F.. 418 Fay Bldg. 
(rlassman, BenJ. 
Goldstein, Herman. 726 N. Bunker 

Hill 
Greenberg, Chas., 174 S. KIngsley 

Drive 
Greene, Jos., 1115 S. Grand View 
Groman, Lou. 532 8. Bway. 
Grossman, M. I., 311 C. N. Beaudry 

Av. 
Gubln, Oscar. 515 S. Broadway 
Haber, P. R.. 1742 Westmoreland 
Hackel, A. W., 1142 W. 10th 
Hecht, Rev. Dr. S.. 817 Beacon 
Hlller, H., 820 N. Soto 
Isensteln, Chas.. 1247 Arapahoe 
Isensteln, P., 245 S. Thomas 
Jonas, .Tos. L.. 042 Elden Av. 
Kahn, P., 208 N. Granada 
Karl. Pinches, 2165 Echo Park Av. 
Kaufman Mrs. Jules. 692 Kingsley 

Drive 
Kingsbacker. B.. 1617 S. Flgueroa 
Kornblum, M. S., 966 Westmoreland 

Av. 
Krystal, Noah, 305 S. Manhattan PI. 
Lnznrd, Dr. E. M., 332 S. Kinsley 
» Drive 
Lewinsohn. J. L., 620 Berendo Av. 
Llndenbaum, Morris. 1443 W. 11th 
Llssner, Dr. H. H., 2156 S. Hobart 

Blvd. 
Loeb, Joseph B., 735 Harvard Blvd. 
Los Angeles I>odge, No. 487, I. O. 

B. B., 711 W. 17th 
L<>8 Angeles I'ubllc Library 
Magnin, Edgar F.. 9th & Hope 
Margolies, S., 4923 Wall 
Marks, D. H.. 118 W. 54th 
Moses, Jos.. 1315 Sutherland 
Moses, Marks, 2211 Elsinorc 



Newmark, Marco R.. 977 Arapahoe 
Xt'wmark, S. M., 627 S. Kinsley 

Drive 
Pehr, M. H.. 200 M. St. Andrews PI. 
I'ertson, Dr. L. A., 1920 E. 4th 
Plttler. I., 639 Stanford Av. 
Preluzsky, Jos. I., 1644 Gramerey 

PI. 
Prlgprson, Samnol F.. 128 Main 
Rablnowltz. L.. 2731 W. 14th 
Reich, Mrs. Jacob. 1616 Wlnfleld 
Relss, Dr. Oscar. 160 S. Gromsocy 
Rosenberg, S. R., 414 St. Andrews 

Place 
Schierson. J.. 3814 S. Grand Av. 
Silverberg, Dr. H. M.. 706 Haas 

Bldg. 
Well, Adolph, 103 Oak Terrace 
Welsbaum, Harry L., '* Rex Arms " 



Marysville 



Cheim, H. 



Henlo Park 
Special Membeb 
Walter, Clarence P. 

Oakland 

Library Member 
Lavenson, A. S., 657 Walsworth 

Special Members 

Abrahamson, Henry, 1444 San Pablo 

Av. 
Jonas, Abraham, Hotel Oakland 
Kahn, Fred'k, 673 Walsworth Av. 
Schneider, Morris N., 348 Grand Av. 

Annual Members 

Chelemsky, Harry, 767 Lakeshore 

Av 
Epstein. Mrs. M. D., 760 Calmar Av. 
Goldwater, M.. 358 Grand Av. 
Lesser, Jacob H.. 9th & Washington 
Meltzer, Jos.. 228 Ricardo Av. 
Mosbaeher, B. I.. 624 Oakland A v. 
Oakland Lodge. No. 252, I. O. B. B. 
C)akland Zion Society 
Samuels, Hon, (ieo., 1469 Harrison 

Blvd. 
Samuels, Dr. H. J., Dalzlel Bldg. 
Silverstein, Bernard, Dunsmur Apts. 

Ontario 
Fink, Ben., 21 Parkford Bldg. 

Oznard 

Cohn, David, 410 F 
Lehmann, L., 159 D 



JEWISH PUBLICATION SOCIETY 



431 



PaBadena 

Annual Members 

B'lexner, David, 36 B. Peoria 
Harris, I., 337 E. Washington 
Minslsy, Bernard, 524 S. EI Molina 

Redlands 

l':pstein, K., 903 6th 

Frug, M. A.. 45 E. Pearl Av. 

Weisberg. Max., 428 Clay 

Riverside 
Bamberger, F., 1107 Chestnut 

Sacramento 

Cohen, Israel E., 1142 39th 
Davis, Herman, 3131 25th 
Elkus. Albert, 9th & K 
Fried, Rev. Michael. 1905 O 
Lubin. S. J., 1300 39th 
Wahrhaftig, M. S., 1611 17th 

San Bernardino 

Cohn. C, Court & K 

Greenhood, R., 2087 D 

Rubin, Myer C, Anderson Bldg. 

San Diego 

Special Membeu 

Wolf. Hyman S., 915 25th 

Annual Members 

Halprin, Rabbi J. H., Hotel St. 

James 
Meyer. M. E., 5th & H 
Rosenthal. A., 5th & Grape 
Sobel, Leopold, 1352 30th 

San Francisco 

Life Members 

Flhrman, M.^ 2618 Jackson 
Jacobs, Isidor. 1811 California 
Levi, J., Jr., c/o H. Levi Co. 
Lllienthal, E. R., Stanford Ct. Apts. 
Meyer, D.. Alaska Commercial Bldg. 
Neustadter, Mrs. J. H., Hotel St. 

FU'ancis 
Rosenthal. I. L., 1964 Pacific Av. 
Scherline, S., 1431 Leavenworth 
Toklas. Ferdinand, The Union 

League Club 
Weinstock. Harris. 19 Presidio Ter. 
Wiel, Louis P., c/o Buckingham and 

Hecht 
Wiell, Raphael 



Patron Member Californ 

Stahl, Adolfo, 310 Sansome, c/o 
Schwartz Bros. 

Library Members 

Goldstein. Alex., 16 California 
Gordon, Raphael, 94 Jones 

Special Members 

Anspacher, Philip, Hotel El Drisco 
Anspacher, Simon, 315 Clunie Bldg. 
Benfield, Bernard. Palace Hotel 
Bleadon, C. L., 163 Douglas 
B'nai B'rith Library, 149 Eddy 
Koshland, M. S., 3800 Washington 
Levison. J. B.. 2420 Pacific 
Levy, Miss Amelia, 2315 Webster 
Meyer, Rabbi Martin A., 3108 Jack- 
son 
Newman, Juda, 1980 Jackson 
Redllck, Henry, 1264 Page 
Silverman, Morltz, 1062 Market 
SInshelmer, Henry, 110 Market 
Sloss, Mrs. M. C, 840 Powell and 

Ross 
Speigel, L. M., 200 Washington 
Walter, Isaac N., 1803 Franklin 
Wangenheim. Sol., 1040 Van Ness 
Av. 

ANNUAL Members 

Alter, Marcus, 60 Moss 
Altmayer. A.. 3641 Jackson 
Aronson. Mrs. A., 2120 Pacific Av. 
Ballen, P. L., 509 Sansome 
Benas, Louis H., 1410 Hyde 
Bender, Albert M.. 1369 Post 
Bendheim, Ferd, 581 16th A v. 
Bernstein, Wm., 819 Dlvisadero 
Blenfleld, H. L., 423 31st Av. 
Blum, Max, 3216 Jackson 
Cerf, Dr. Alvin E., Ill Ellis 
CoflPee, Mrs. M. H., 754 3d Av. 
Cowen, A. H., 24 California 
Davldow. B., 3000 California 
Dlnkelsplel, H. G. W., Chronicle 

Bldg. 
Rdlln, H. N., 877 Market 
Gabriel, Seymour, 349 14th Av. 
Goldman, Heim. 307 Mills Bldg. 
Greenebaum, E., 3620 Clay 
Gruhn, J. M.. 1916 Pine 
Harrison, Mrs. R. C, 1405 Van Ness 

Av. 
Hattam, Joshua, 1194 Green 
Helnl>erg, J. A., 508 Scott 
Heller. E. S., Nevada Bank Bldg. 
Hepburn, Miss Daisy, 1125 Filbert 
FTerzberg, Saml. .A., 1713a Eddy 
Hyman. Jos., 1916 California 



432 



AMERICAN JEWISH YEAR BOOK 



California Jacobi, J. J., 2855 Pacific Av. 

Jacobs, Mrs. Hyam, 3555 Jackson 
Kahn, Hon. Julius. 2712 Webster 
Kuhn, Snml.. 2036 Hvde 
Langer, Sam!.. 600 Dlvisadero 
Lesser, A. Al., 877 Alurket 
Leyison, Harry, 134 Tresidio Av. 
Lissauer, Rabbi Herman, 3160 Clay 
Ijowenthal, Marvin Max, 1401 Jones 
Lovich, I.. 167 Post 
Martin, Mrs. Rabia A., 1194 Green 
Mehdy, M., 1533 California 
Musin, B. H., 106 Ord 
Ordenstein, Max, 2131 Dlvisadero 
Packscher, Miss Hazel, 2521 Sacra- 
mento 
' Peixotto, Edgar D., 3956 Wash. 
Rabinowitz, J., 1714 Steiner 
Kingolsky, G. C, 3d & Market 
Samuelson, S., 1511 Goldengate Av. 
Sapiro, A. L., 919 First Natl. Bk. 

Bldg. 
Savannah, M., 1856 Franklin 
Scbloss, Ben., 226 16th Av. 
Scbwabacher, L. A., Hotel St. 

Francis 
Spiegel man, Morris, 1646 Sanchez - 
Starr. N., 2318 Mission 
Straus, Louis, 112 Walnut 
Tanszky, E.. 1770 Pacific Av. 
Thompson, D. S., 1194 Green 
Tuchler, Dr. A. S., 703 Van Ness Av. 
Waiss, Milton, 1424 Polk 
Wascerwitz, M. H., 550 Baker 
Wise, Otto I., Hobart Bldg. 
WolflP, Harry K., 1782 O'Farrell 
Zussman, Dr. L., 1411 Scott 



Santa Ana 
Ilurwitz, Saml., 515 E. 2d 

Santa Rosa 

Levin, Mrs. Lillian 

l{osenberg. Max, 511 B 

Tracbman, Dr. H. J., 801 Humboldt 

Sierra Hadre 
Schlesinger, T., Box 424. 

Stockton 

Arndt, S. M., 1581 N. San Joaquin 
(^ohen, Albert E., The Sterling 
Davidson, H. B.» 945 S. Center 
Franklin, Rabbi H. B., Hotel Stock- 
ton 
Ounzendorfer, F., 432 B. Main 
Ryhim Aboovim Congr. Sabbath 

School, Temple Israel Box 405 
Stein, M. P., 33 W. Rose 

South Pasadena 

SUBSCBIBER 

Ruth, Anna F., 1503 El Centro 

Venice 

Brick, Alex., 34 Thornton Av. 
Liknaitz, Rev. D., 740 Marco PI. 



Levis, Leon 
Borach, B. 



Visalia 
Yolo 



Colorado 



COLORADO 



Colorado City 

Feldman. L.. 712 Colorado A v. 
Leafshine, M., 511% Colorado Av. 
Av. 

Colorado Springs 

Harris. Lewis H., 516 E. Bijou 
Nathan. H J., 27-29 Huerfano 
Rosenberg, A., 112 S. Conejos 
Schaefer, Dr. S. W., 1029 N. Nevada 
Wasserstrom, A., 810 S. Nevada 

Denver 

Special Members 

Grimes. Ben., 1575 Lafayette 
Rodetsky, M. S., 768 Gilpin 
Rude. Mrs. I., 1272 Washington 

Annual Members 

Adelman, Dr. Louis, 1240 Ogden 
Aid Assn. for Ex-Patients of Denver 
Sanatorium. 3135 W. Colfax Av. 



Anfenger, M. L., 322 Svmes Bldg. 
Baron, Rebekah J., 114 Corona 
B. M. H. Religious School, 2211 

High 
Berger, B., 404 E 20th A v. 
Berman, I. A., 626 Emerson 
Block, Morris H., 2241 High 
Blumberg, Dr. A. M., 3135 W. 

Colfax Av 
Blumenthal, Wm. R.. St. Francis 

Hotel 
Borwick, Ben., 1654 Adams 
Braines, L., 1576 Federal Blk. 
Claflf, Benjamin. 1052 Detroit . 
Cohen, A. M., 2416 Williams 
Cohen, Goodman, 1758 Curtis 
Dveirin, Dr. H. E.. 1483 King 
Eisner, Dr. Jno.. Box 395 
Emeson, Myer. 2734 W. Colfax Av. 
Fablsh. Max., Savoy Hotel 
Fino, John S., 1315 E. 13th Av. 
Fox, Michael, c/o Y. M. C. A. 



JEWISH PUBLICATION SOCIETY 



433 



Frankle, H.. 1240 Humboldt 
GInsborg, Morris, 1437 Hooker 
Gross, Davfd, 2613 Callfomlfl 
Halpern Rabbi E. S., 2779 W. Colfax 

At. 
Hayutin, Henry, 3243 W. Colfax Av. 
Heller, Simon .)., 2543 Humboldt 
Hillkowltz, Dr. P., 1376 Madison 
Hornbeim, Philip, 1124 Steele 
Jaffa, Jos. S., 1110 Pennsylvania 
Kahn. Isaac, 1870 W. 14th 
Kalischer, S., 5000 Montview Blvd. 
Katz, Moe M., 1417 11th 
Kauvar, Rabbi C. H., 2211 High 
Kleiner, Dr. M., 1301 Franklin 
Kolinsky, Is. J.. 1721 Park Av. 
Korengold, S., 1606 Julian 
Krohn. Dr. H. M.. 630 William 
Levy, M. M., 2011 Arapahoe 
1.PVV. Dr. Robt., 1528 Ogden 
Lewln, Edward, 1500 E. 7th A v. 
Lieberman. Jac. 965 Madison 
Lorber, J. M., 1689 Adams 
lx)vln8, .1. A.. 2301 Chnmpa 
Miller. Dr. L. I., 2715 Humboldt 
Mishkind, Dr. A., 256 Metropolitan 
Monash, Edward, Metropole Hotel 
Morris, Ernest, 1559 Vine 
Morris, J. W., 1376 Lowell Blvd. 
National Jewish Hospital for Con- 
sumptives, 3800 R. Colfax A v. 
Neusteter, Meyer, 677 Gilpin 
Priess, Saml., 2814 Marion 
Quiatkowsky, P., 2533 W. Colfax 
Av. 



Robinson. M. 11., 1425 felng 
Radinsky, A. D., 1432 Zum 
Schayer, M. S., 1354 Clayton 
Schwartz, H. J.. Shirley Hotel 
Schwartz, N., 2730 Downing Av. 
Segal, Sol., 2159 Osceola 
Shapiro, Dr. Jos. M., 1443 Federal 

Blvd. 
Shere, Dr. O. M.. 1443 Adams 
Shwayder, .L, 2053 Gaylord 
Simon, D. P.. 646 Marion 
Spivak, Dr. C. D., 1421 Court PI. 
Striker, Nathan, 1357 York 
Taussig:, A. S.. 305 Gilpin 
Waskin, J., 2701 Larimer 
Yaker, M., 324 W. 13th Av. 
Zigmond, Jos., 1568 S. Ogden 

Edgewater 
Marsha k. Dr. M. I. 

Pueblo 

Kaplan. Sam., 912 E. 2d 
Taub. J., 222 W. Abnendo 

Trinidad 

Jaffa, Sol. H., 214 E. 3d 
Sanders, Leopold, 458 W. Main 
Strasburg, Max, 105 W. Main 

Woodmen 

Rosenthal, Samuel, c/o Woodmen 
Sanatorium 



Colorado 



CONNECTICUT 



Connecticu 



Ansonia 
Aaronson, Dr. Michael S., 410 Main 

Bridgeport 
Special Member 
Hoffman, M., 209 Knowlton ' 

Annual Members 
Abrams, Ned. 1290 Main 
Badesch, S.. 1188 Main 
Bernstein, Dr. A., 472 State 
Bernstein, Snml., 643 E. Main 
Blume, Dr. Wm. J., 835 Colorado 

Av. 
Rrody. Saml.. 14.'^ Parrott A v. 
Bufferd, Chas., 84 Maple 
Cohen, .Jacob, ir>H Bench 
Elson, Irving, 1401 Fairfield Av. 
Flnkelstone, Lavvronco S., 87 James 
Flamm, J.. 1128 FahflcUl Av. 
Goldberg, Paul, 105 Sanford 
Goldman, Max. 108 Rarnum Av. 
Goldstein, H. A.. 1188 Main 
lllrsch. Mil reus, «57n K. Main 
Horn, Dr. M. I., 015 North Av. 



Horwitz. Dr. M. T.. 605 TTnion Av. 
Katzoff, Simon, M. D., 1001 State 
Klein, J. B.. «i?*7 Fairfield Av. 
Klein, Simon, 565 E. Main 
Kornbliit, l^iiis A., 54 (irove 
Kotler, Rev. H., 72 Center 
Lifshiz, Ely, 880 Main 
Molliij^. Saml.. 26S1 Fairfield A v. 
rolokewich, S., 257 Cedar 
Reich, Saml., 1188 Main 
Rubinstein, B., 1204 Main 
Snltman, Henry, 120 Savoy 
Saltman. B. R., 11)4 Savoy 
Schiioe, A., 2024 North Av. 
Schnoe, S. N.. Ill Capitol Av 
Schwartz, Max, 240 Wash. At. 
Shalet, J., 463 E. Main 
Shapiro, ('has. 11.. 312-14 Meigs 

Bldff. 
Silverstlne. Harry, 978 E. Main 
Smirnow, Dr. li., 38r> Noble A v. 
Solomon. Joseph, 1310 Vnvk A v. 
Steiber. Theo. E., 886 Main 
Steinlauf. Sam.. 843 Kossuth 
Weiss, Dr. M. H., 32 Whittler 



434 



AMERICAN JEWISH YEAR BOOK 



Jonnecticut Y. M. C. A., 181 State 

Yurdlii, Sam.. 5r>0 E. Main 
Ziminer, Sam'l, 250 Lincoln Av. 

Colchester 

Oellert, Saml. 

Man is, Ellas. Kox 24 

Greenwich 

Spkcial Mkmbku 

Eckstein, Alice R., Applejack Farm 

Hampton 
Menken, Mrs. J. S. 

Hartford 
Life Memrrr 
Herrup. Sol. F., 100 Windsor Av. 

SrKCiAL Membebs 

Eisner. Solomon, 277 Windsor Av. 
Greenberg, Leon, 518 Prospect Av. 
Katz, liouls 11. , 6 Florence 
fi.von. B.. 140 Wnrrlneton Av. 
Rosenberg, A., 65 Barbour 
Wise, Isidore. 810 IMMspect Av. 

Annual MRMnRR.s 

Abramson, M., 114 Oakland Ter. 
Baiimstein & Lieberman 
Berman, Wm. G., 23 Mahl Av. 
Blumenthal, Max, 79 LeDnoz 
Cohen, Dr. G. H., 120 Capitol Av. 
Cohn, Ellas, 36 Pliny 
Dragat, Harris, 340 Windsor Av. 
Epstein. Herman L, 280 Snrgeant 
Ettelson, Rev. Harry W.. 260 Sisson 
Falk, Morris S.. 27 Pleasant 
Farber, M. I., 103 Maple Av. 
Finkelstein, Frank, 178 State 
Fischer, Dr. A., 563 Albany Av. 
Freedman, Jos. M., 1020 Main 
Goldberg, L R.. 1100 Main 
Goldenthal, M., 161 Affleck 
Graff, M., 44 Belden 
Hartman, E. M., 581 Farmington 

Av. 
Hartman, Saml., Highland Court 

Hotel 
Heilporn, Jos. S., 287 Sargoant 
Hoffenberg, Jos. A.. 16 Village 
Hoffman, Abraham, 35 Brook 
Hurwltz, Dr. H. M.. 65 Windsor Av. 
.Toseph. Henrv. n« Elmer 
Katz, A. A., 102 Oakland Ter. 
Katz, J., 21 Winthrop 
Kopplemann. 11. P., 83 Canton 
Leavitt. S.. 78 Edwards 
Levin. H., 33 Congress 
Levine, Dr. Sinclair S., 69 Windsor 



Levy, H. P., 96 Main 
I*evy, .loslah W., 904 Main 
r.ieberraan. A.. 24 Morgan 
Lieberman, F., 195 Capen 
Liftlg, Dr. M. D., 112 Windsor A v. 
Lurle, Miss Ida. 91 Bellevue 
Malsler. Max. 378 Windsor Av. 
Margold, C. W., 9 Pleasant Av. 
Mcister, R., Box 810 
Melrose, Henry, 26 Kennedy 
Newfleld, E., 1044 Main 
Older, Morris, 47 Mahl Av. 
I'orlsR. U.. 128 Bellevue 
Porris. r., 322 Maple Av. 
Rabinoflf. Geo. W.. 252 Windsor Av. 
Kosenthal, Saml., 96 Windsor 
Rosenthal, Simon M., 27 Seyms 
Schatz, N. A., Pilgard Bldg. 
Schenker, S., 19 Blue Hill Av. 
Schwolsky, .Tacob. 91 Wooster 
Sechtman, Wm. F., 1326 Broad 
Shulman. Max.. 207 Sison Av. 
Spaltor. S., 15 Center 
Sudarsky. John. 120 Windsor Av. 
Suisman, Jacob I.. 1026 Main 
Suisman, M., 141 Windsor 
Troub, Leonard M., 904 Main 
Tnch. Dr. M., 1333 Main 
Zinman, Miss Mary, 28 Oakland Ter. 

Heriden 

Bush, Alexander, 45 W. Main 
ijpriTktor. R., 39 Crown 
Mag, J. Henry, 72 Twiss 

Hiddletown 

Polimer, Jacob, 458 Main 

Milford 

Rosenbaum, S. S. 

New Britain 

• 

Drazen. Edward, 56 Winthrop 
Dunn, Dr. M., 434 Main 
Flerberg, Maurice, 294 Main 
Goldstein. I. M., 26 Howard 
(rrossman, H., 306 Main 
LeWItt, CJeorge. 227 North 
LeWItt, M. C, 71 Russel 
Mag. N. E., 35 Seymour 
Shiirbprc. S.. 60 Franklin 
Volkenheim, Dr. M., 458 Main 
Weliusky, S., 146 Hartford Av. 

New Haven 

Si'KoiAL Mrmbkus 

Kraft. Herman, 87 Norton 
Ihibin, .7. II., 102 Aton 
Sngal, D. M., Hotel Taft 
Wolfe, Isaac, 42 Church 



JEWISH PUBLICATION SOCIETY 



435 



Annual Members 

Abramowitz, Chas., 257 Oak 
Adier, J., 506 WInthrop Av. 
Agins, Jul., 8 Vernon 
Alderman, Jos. C, 40 Spruce 
Alderman, M. H., 61 Park 
Alderman. S. B.. 1.5 Ailing 
Alpert, Dr. R. n., 47 Sylvan Av. 
Alpert, Saml., 39 Center 
Asher, Harry W., 674 Orange 
Bezner. Jacob IT., 491 rhapel 
Botwinik. Harris, 21 Sylvan Av. 
Botwinlk, Hyman, 21 Sylvan Av. 
Campner, Saml., 129 Church 
Caplan. .Jacob, 42 Church 
Chapnick, John M., 85 Howard 
Cohen, Chas., 865 Chapel 
Cutler, J.. 15 Norton 
Drazen, Harry, 27 Ward 
Kngell, A. G., 262 York 
Epstein, Israel, 792 George 
Feldman. Chas., 154 Winrhrop Av. 
Fiold. Saml. Z.. .393 Winthrop Av. 
Fox, Isidor, 336 Norton 
Freedman, Ellas, 204 Chapel 
Friedman, A. x\I.. 388 Whallov Av. 
Glouskln, Ellas L.. 272 Dwlght 
Goldberg, Geo., 37 Sylvan Av. 
^^Jordon, Israel, 696 Elm 
Gurian, Morris, 395 Orangp 
Hoffman, Bernard E., 293 Division 
ITorwitz, Herman N., 260 Portsea 
Hyman, Robert E., 88 Crown 
.Jacobs, Alexander. 7 Waverly 
Kleiner, Isaac L., 39 Howe 
Kleiner, Dr. Israel, 733 Whitnev Av. 
KomroflP. Saml.. .'S24 Winthrop Av. 
Kraft, J. M.. 170 Gilbert A v. 
Kurlian, Jacob, 464 Oak 
Lander, A.. 234 Whalley Av. 
Lax, Dr. Albert, 825 Grand Av. 
Tyar. Dr. Maxwpll. 33 Svlvnn Av 
Levenberg, Rabbi J., 36 Kossuth 
J^evy. Dr. I. 

Lublnsky, B. B., 619 Congress Av. 
Lupntin, Israel T.. 274 Hamilton 
Mann, Rabbi Louis L.. 262 Canner 
Marantz, Dr. B. C. 714 StntP 
Merrian, S. B., 513 Howard Av. 
Michll, Herman, 19 Garden 
Moscovltz, Dr. I. S., George & 

Meadow 
Nathanson, S. J., 18 Howe 
Newman, Jacob J., 386 St. Roman 
Notkins, Matthew, 374 Sherman A v. 
Pearlin, Nathan. 843 Howard Av. 
Persky, Simon, 882 Howard Av 
Prince, L., 190 Ellsworth Av. 
Resnlk, I. W., 37 Kensington 
Resnik, Jos., 813 Chapel 
Rice, Morris, 12 Vernone 



Roodburg, S., 60 Asylum 
Kosenfeld, Louis, 69 Congress Av 
Rosenthal, P. M., 749 Grand Av. 
Sachs, M., 97 Oak 
Saltser, Isaac, 539 Orange 
Salzman, Henry, 111 Sherman A v. 
Schneider, Chas., 325 Shelton Av. 
Sharp, Dr. J., 62 Thomas 
Siegel, David, 77 Golff 
Silverman, Saul, 36 Vernon 
Smirnow, Dr. M. R., 862 Howard Av. 
Sosensky, N. W. 

Stelnbach, A. I)., 191 Sherman Av. 
Suttin, P. W., 577 Orange 
The B'nair, 87 Asylum 
Toft, Paul, 222 State 
Toplitske, Dr. E. A., 889 Howard 

Av. 
niinan, Isaac M., 558 Whitney Av. 
THlman, Jos. A.. 115 Linden 
Y. M. H. A., 200 Orange 

New London 

Gerskin, Isidor. 7 Shapley 
Denkle. P. A., 51 Federal 
Hollandersky, P. J., 247 Huntington 

Norwalk 
Weinstock, Loon, 5 Main 

Norwioh 

Alofsen, Herman, 2d, 18 Sturtevant 

Av. 
Budnick, Fannie, 12 N. High 
Cramer, A., 66 School 
Goldberg. Saml.. 251 W. Main 
Gordon, Chas. M., 259 W. Main 
Gordon, David N., 259 W. Main 
Kadish, S., 89 Mechanic 
Kaplan. Emannol. 79 Williams 
JMant. Sara. 63 Cliff 
Pollock, Louis. 443 Main 
Rosenberg, J. N.. 255 W. Main 
Rubin, Ch.. 200 W. Main 
Shereshevsky. D., 54 Asylum 
Silver, Rabbi .Jos.. 4 W. Main 
Silverman, M. I., 24 Asylum 
Smith. Elkln. 55 W. Main 
Stamm. Rev. Max. 21 N. High 
Sternliob, Bessie, 223 W. Main 
Yurman, H., 20 N. Thames 

South Norwalk 

Davis, .L, 29 Main 

Gnns, Edward M.. 49 West A v. 

Josem, Wm., 51 Lowe 

Nevas, H., 68 Woodward Av. 

Roodner, H., 106 Cedar 

Rooduer. Saml. S., Norwalk Cor. 

Yedlin, M. 



Connecti 



1 



436 



AMERICAN JEWISH YEAR BOOK 



>«nnecti«ut Stamford 

LlBRABT MSMBUB 

Lipetz, A., 70 Urban 

Special Member 
Phillips, Albert. 55 Forest 

Annual Members 

Adier, Noah, 49 HawtHorn 

Cohen, Abraham B.. 42 Clark's Hill 

Av. 
Cohen, Miss Jeanette L., 49 Brown 

Av. 
Cramer, M., 42 Pacific 
Dichter. Dr. C. L.. 19 St. John's PI. 
Epstein, J., 49 Hawthorn 
(rordon, Saral.. 29 Hawthorn 
Karp, David, 85 Hawthorn 
Karp, Max, 60 Hawthorn 
Perlman, M., 85 Main 
Rosenblum, S., 26 St. Johns PI. 
Speike, A., 392 Summer 
Wagner, S., 139 Atlantic 
Warshaw, Max, 120 Myrtle Av. 



Wolfsey, Abraham, 85 Paclflc 
Zatkln. 8., 737 Main 

Thompsonvlll* 

Block, Max.. 199 Enfield 
Slslskv, Saml., 20 Pearl 
Squirsky, Harry, 173 Enfield 

Wallingford 

Goldberg, Meyer, Gaylord Farm 
Sanatorium 

Waterbury 
Special Member 
Greenberg, M., 154 S. Main 

Annual Members 

Alexander, Julius, 278 N. Main 
Berman, Dr. M. D., 220 N. Main 
Herzenberg Bros., 215 Bank 
Herzenberg. John J., 42 Spencer Av. 
Soslavsky, N. L.. 154. S. Main 
Spirt, Morris. 135 Willow 
Wellington, S. A., 34 Walnut Av. 



Delaware 



DELAWARE 



Hiddletown 

Berkman. Joseph 
Fogoi. Mrs. A. 

Seaford 

Special Members 

Greenabaum, B. 
Van Leer, Chas. 

Wilmington 

Special Members 

Levy, Morris, 223 Market 
Liebowitz, J. L., 2505 Washington 
Schagrin, C. W., 608 Market 
Snellenburg, David, 218 W. 14th 
Topkis, Chas., 1914 Boulevard 
Topkis, Louis, 2302 Boulevard 
Topkis, Wm., 2100 Boulevard 
Wintner J. J., 903 W. 10th 
Wolters, Mrs. R. W., 600 N. Broome 

Annual Members 

Barsky, Nathan. 904 West 
Blum, H.. 815 Kirk wood 
Braunstein, Geo., 1803 Tatnall 
Braunstein, H., 610 Market 
Breuer, Chas. K.. 724 Market 
Breuer, Max, 305 Market 
Brodsky, Harry, 307 Branch 
Brown, M., 207 W. 2d 



Cannon, Saml.. 900 W. 2d 
Caplan, Ph., 733 B. 7th 
Cohen, I., N. E. cor. 6th & Spruce 
Darevsky, M., 231 Market 
Faber, Jacob, 724 King 
Feinberg. Saml.. 806 King 
Finger, Aaron, 304 W. 26th 
Flnkelstein, I. B., 16 B. 44th 
Freedman, H., 614 N. Van Buren 
Ginns, James N., 1910 Boulevard 
Gluckman, Barnet. 401 W. 20th 
Himler, J., 510 E. 11th 
Kanofsky, H., 426 McCabe Av. 
Katz, Louis. 705 Market 
Keil, Max, 300 B. 4th 
Kety. Harry, 7th & Spring 
Kreshtool, Dr. I. K., 835 Market 
Main, Charles 
Miller, H., 122 Market 
Miller, Nathan, 612 Broome 
Poland, M. D., 503% Market 
Rabinowitz, Rabbi S., 2 Marquette 

Apts. 
Rich, B. O., 2421 Madison 
Rosenblatt, Jacob, 312 W. 14th 
Rosenblatt, Louis, 2519 Washington 
Roth, Ignatz, 522 W. 20th 
Saltsman, Ralph, 415 W. 21st 
Scher. David N., 3d & King 
Shloman, Wm., 725 Market 
Shtofman, N., 612 King 
Slonsky, L., 6th & Lincoln 



JEWISH PUBLICATION SOCIETY 



.427 



Stern, Samson, 417 Market 
Swiren, Rabbi D. B., 702 Lombard 
Tanaer, Morris, 7th & Church 
Thompson, Jacob. 301 W. 7th 
Topkis, Harry, 413 W. 21st 
Weiss, Herman, 117 W. 22d 



Weiss, S., 600 Union D«lawar« 

Wilmington Institute Free Library 
Wintner, George, 6th & Church 
Wolfman, Benj.. 1317 Washington 
Zion, Dr. S. H., Herald & New Castle 
Av. 



DIBTBICT OF OOLUXBIA 



Washington 

Patron 

Berliner, E., 1458 Columbia Rd. 
Simon, Louis, 1709 35th 

Library Members 

Brandei». Hon. l^ouis D. 

Cohen, Myer, 2146 Wyoming Av. 

Hecht. Alex.. 515 7th, N. W. 

Lyon, R. B. H.. Congress Hall Hotel 

Meyer, Eugene, Jr., 1609 K N. W. 

Special Members 

Behrend, R. B.. 3814 Keokuk 
Cohen, Louis J.. 1400 4th, N. W. 
Gichner, Fred S.. 1214 D, N. W. 
Herzmark, D., 705 Florida Av. 
Sachs, Wm. M.. 918 M, N. W. 
Rworzyn. Morris. 1210 O. N. W. 
Wolf son, Morris, 1227 Wisconsin Av. 

Annual Members 

Aaronson, R., 1106 Fairmount 
Abramson, H., 7th & L, N. W. 
Abramson, M.. 1250 7th 
Albert, I., 222 Eye, N. W. 
Alpher, B., 432 9th 
Alpher, Dave, 907 G, N. W; 
Askin, M. W., 735 7th, N. W. 
Atlas, S., 927 D, N. W 
Behrend, E. A.. 2118 P. N. W. 
Berkman, A. W., 901 F, S. W. 
Berman, Harry. 1682 32nd 
Berman, Saul, 2701 P, N. W. 
Brill, Leon, Jr., 1425 Tea 
Buckner, J. H., 1310 7th. N. W. 
Cohen, Dr. L., 1656 Euclid 
Cohen, Max, 501 7th, N. W. 
Cohen, Samuel I., 722 4th, N. W. 
Daitch. Joseph, 3207 M, N. W. 
Dinowitzer, I., 2221 Georgia Av., 

N. W. 
Dirk, Louis. 1544 First, N. W. 
Felsen, A. E., 729 H, N. E. 
FIshel, A. N., 2614 Conn. Av., N. W. 
Fishman, Max, 1127 4th. N. W. 
Freedman, J., 1021 Florida Av., 

N. B. 
Freedman, .Tos., 21 4th, N. E. 
Friedman, S., 447 7th. S. W. 



Garfinkle, M., 602 M, N. W. 

Gelman, Elias, 217 10th, S. W. 

Clanzman. H., 919 1^ 9th, N. W. 

Glushak, Dr. L., - The St. James " 

Gordon, Dr. Chas., 704 M, N. W. 

Gottlieb, L. S., 615 Irving 

Gritz, Jacob, 533 8th 

Grossman, Rev. Ben. L.. 435 Mass. 
Av N. W. 

nais.*'Saml..* 1300 4i^, S. W. 

Harris, Mrs. Bessie, 229 G, N. W. 

Hellprln, G. F., 2«20 University PI. 

Hillman, Joel, 1016 Penn. Av., N. W. 

Hochman, Max, 526 11th, S. W. 

Jacobson, M. L.. H430 Mt. Pleasant 

Kaplan, Alex., 501 Etholhurst Apt. 

Kocnigsberger, L., 1306 Belmont 

Korman, Marcus, 1335 7th 

Kraft, Louis, 1634 Wisconsin Av. 

Kur. IT., 430 9th. N. W. 

Levy, Harris. 2820 M. N. W. 

Liebster, J., 1316 F, N. W. 

Lyon, R. B. H.. 701 Evans Bldg. 

Lyon. Simon, The Ontario Apts. 

Mendelsohn, A., Ill 6th, N. W. 

Meyerowitz, Jos., 1213 7th 

Michaels, A. M., 1607 7th. N. W. 

Mintz, I., 938 F, N. W. 

Mitchell, Sam'l., 1300 Harvard. 
N W 

Musheri N., 710 14th, N. W. 

Xewhouse, Dr. Benj., 1205 D, N. E. 

Oppenheimer, Mrs. G., 1316 Bolmont 

Opponheimer. Mrs. S.. 905 F. N. W. 

Ostrow, Walter W.. 1414 a 2th, N. W. 

Park Morris, 1031 20th 

Poysor. J. I., 1833 19th, N. W. 

Pilzer, Chas., 201 E, S. E. 

Rosenson, Rev. B., 1314 13th, N. W. 

Renmcr, Edward, Coblentz Apts. 

Rich, AT. M.. 1448 Harvard. N. W. 

Sacks. Dr. Saml. M.,'1000 N, N. W. 

Samuel. Leonard. 1822 Vernon, 
N. W. 

Schneldor. Benj. B., 3145 Mt. Pleas- 
ant, N. W. 

Schoen. A., 1404 First. S. W. 

Schwartz. C, 708 7th, N. W. 

Schwartz, T. D.. 909 H, N. W. 

Schwartz, Nathan B., 123 You, N. E. 

Scottish Kite, The, 16th & S 

Segal, Mrs. Sarah, 2922 M. N. W. 

Sells. Jacob R.. 3421 M, N. W. 



District of 
Columbia 



43a 



AMEIRICAN JEWISH YEAR BOOK 



District of Shapero, Harris, 2501 Georgia Av., 
Columbia N. W. » 

Shefferman, Rev. A., 435 Mass. Av., 
N. W. 

Shoub, R., 2601 V, N. W. 

Simon, Rev. A., 2802 Cathedral Av. 

Small, Isador E.. 724 5th, N. W. 

Solomon. Joseph, 1811 Wyoming 
Av. Apt. 43 

Stanger. B. Z.. 1101 Euclid Apt. 106 

Stein, Jos. B., 486 Louisiana Av., 
N. W. 

Stein, J. M., 1421 Belmont, N. W. 

Stein, Morris, 1533 9th, N. W. 

Stern, Rev. L., 1315 Columbia Rd. 

Stolar, Mrs. L., 2913 M, N. W. 

Strasburger, Milton, 315 John Mar- 
shall I'h, N. W. 

Strausburger. Jos., The'Kenesau 

Tash, Abe, 1246 7th 

Tash, Wm., 1407 5th 

Tendler, Morris, 913 D. N. VV. 



Tepper, J. L., Jenifer Bldg. 

Tobriner, Leon, 317 John Marshall 

Waltzman, Chas., 25 I 

Waranow, Chas., 1428 N, N. W. 

Washington Heb. Congr., A. M. 
Fishel, Pres., 728 7th 

Wasspr, Isaac, 445 Q. N. W. 

Weckser, Rev. M. S., "The La- 
fayette " 

Wiluer, J. A., 144 Randolph PI. 
.\. VV. 

Wisotzicy, S., 3423 M 

Woerner. A. E., 1755 Columbia Rd. 

Wolf. Alexander, 2653 Woodley Rd. 

Wolf, Hon. Simon, 63 Woodward 
Bldg. 

Wolpoff, Mrs. A., 3126 Dumberto 
Av. 

Y. M. H. A., Penn. Av.. 1 11th 

Yndolovit. Philip. 807 D, N. W. 

Zarin, J., 1146 Conn. Av., N. W. 



Florida 



FLORIDA 



Arcadia 

Special Member 



Rosin, S. 



Jacksonville 
Special Member 
Levison, A., 325 W. Ashley 

Annual Members 

Aronovitz, Dr. S.. 419 W. Duval 
Davis, Mrs. D., 630 Hogan 
Elsbach. Leo 

Pinkelstein, Neal, 139 W. Ashley 
Hlrschberg, Julius, 1417 Blvd. 
Jacobs, Hyman S.. Burbridge Hotel 
Kaplan, Rjabbi I. Ij., Laura & Ashley 
Llpman, Gabe, 524 Hogan 
Novitzky, H. R., 1524 Laura 
Panken, Master Herbert, 1127 Mar- 
ket 
Ranzin, J., 802 Florida Av. 
Rubin, Mrs. Max, 1706 E. Church . 
Sabbath School, Temple Ahavath 

Chesed 
Weinkle, M. J., 809 W. Duval 
Zacharias, I. A., 1492 Laura 

Key West 

Holtsberg, Frank, 600 Duval 
Holtsberg, Theo. 
Lebovit, J., 128 Duval 
Rosenthal, Max 
Y. M. H. A. 



Miami 

Abenson, S., 702 Av. G 

Blajjck, 1*. (}. 

Cassel, I. M., Box 565 

Cohen, Isidor 

Cromer, Daniel, 125 8th 

Dubler, Max 

Engler, A. 

Engler, J., 1714 Av. D 

Oinsburg, Max 

Miller. A., 208 Av. G 

Zion, M., 109 7th 

Pensacola 

Ackonnflin, Rabbi Wm., 503 N. Bar- 
celona 
Forcheimer. N. G., 21 N. Belemont 
Herschkowitz, Jos., 411 N. Spring 
Klein. Albert, 109 S. Palafax 
Levey, Morris, 206 N. Gregory 
Levy, Dave, 113 N. Boylem 

Bt. Au^stine 

Bokowskyi Miss R., 67 Central Av. 
Pinkoson, W. A. 
Ross, J. 

Tampa 

Special Members 

Maas, Isaac 

Steinberg, E. H., 2812 Nebraska 

Annual Members 

Augenstein, Dr. L. S., 306 Curry 

Bldg. 
Blumberg, M. S. 



JEWISH PUBLICATION SOCIETY 



439 



Cracowance, Daniel, 1012 Franklin 
Fa Ik. O., 821 S. Edison Av. 
Hecht, Alex., 714 Main 
Katz, Manuel, 719 Main 
Mass. Rrnest, 835 S. Edison Av. 
Maas, Isaac, 223 Hyde Park Av. 
Maas, Julius, 223 Hyde Park Av. 
Seckback, Mrs. M.. 907 S. Rome Av. 
Steinberg, Oscar, 2806 Nebraska Av. 



Wohl, Simon, 2503 5th Av. 
Y. M. H. A. 

West Palm BeAoh 

Schupler, Josef 
Sirkin, Max 

Ybor 

Katz, Adam, 1430 7th 



Florida 



OEOBOIA 



Georg^ia 



Albany 
Special Member 
Forkas, Sam 

Annual Members 

Landau, Rev. B. A.. 511 Commerce 
Stern, Siegmund, 504 Pine 

Americus 
Glanz, Nathan, 701 Hancock Av. 

Athens 
Library Member 
Brpman, J. B., 515 Washington 

Annual Members 

Baley, Sol. J., 120 Dougherty 
Cutler, Louis, Bway. & Market 
Cutler, Sam, 259 Waddall 
Davis, J., 441 Broad 
Domblatt, J., 259 Hancock Av. 
Joel. Jake, Jr., 130 Hancock A v. 
Michael, M. G., Box 22 
Morris. Lee 
University of Georgia, Library of 

Atlanta 

Special Members 

Clarke. Dr. L. B., 568 Washington 
Dittler. Emil, 536 Washington 
Goldberg, Jos., 405 Capitol Av. 
Haas, Isaac H., 479 Washington 
Meyer. A. A., Atlanta Natl. Bk. Bldg. 
Silverman, Harry. 908 North Av. 

Annual Membkrs 

Abelson, Harry. 216 Capitol Av. 
Abelson, M., 490 N. Jackson 
Apt, D. J.. 425 Washington 
Berman, Gus. 234 Richardson 
Brady, I. A., 282 Gordon 
Boehra, Julian V., 233 Myrtlo 
(^astleton & Castloton, 312 Ilealey 

Bldg. 
Cleln, B. J. & E., 107 Capitol Av. 
Commins, M., 234% Washington 



Davis, H. I., c/o Mass. Mutual Ins. 

Co. 
Dorfan, Joel, 91 Gilmore 
Elson, P., 305 Central Av. 
Feibelman, Melaine, 461 Washing- 
ton 
Frank, M., 1011 Atlanto Nat' 1. Bank 

Bldg. 
Frankel, I., 61 Forest Av. 
CJeffen. Rabbi Tobias, 293 E. Hunter 
Gershon, Geo. A., 53 W. 14th 
Goldstein, J. H., 215 Peters 
Goldstein, M. F., 336 Myrtle 
Goldstein, Meyer M., 337 Washing- 
ton 
Goettinger, B., 31 Ponce de Leon 1*1. 
Greenfield, Mrs. A. D., 340 W. 

Peachtree 
Greenfield, Mrs. M. P., 303 Ponce de 

Leon Av. 
Guthman, S., 73 W. 14th 
Haas, Edwin R.. 92 Waverly Way 
Haas, Herbert J., 303 Washington 
Hadas, D., 17 Hill 
ITorzberg, M.. 22 Howell PI. 
Heyman, Arthur, 507 Conolly Bldg. 
Hirsch, Harold, 70 Waverly Way 
Ilirshberg. I. A.. 218 Washington 
Hirsowitz. I. B.. 136a Capitol Av. 
Horwitz, Jos.. 142 Edgewood Av. 
Kaplan. H.. 174 Bass. Apt. 7 
Kaufman. N., 142 Pullean 
Klein, Milton, 1180 Piodmont Av. 
Kohn, Geo. M., 424 Wnshincton 
Lovitas, Louis J., 29 S. Prvor 
Lichtenstein, H., 300 Capitol A v. 
Lichtenstein, M., 192 E. Fair 
Liebman. I.. 311 Washington 
Lipschutz, Alex.. 173 Forest Av. 
Marx, Rev. David. 354 Washington 
Mondel, H.. 130 Washington 
Montag, Ed., 345 Myrtle Av. 
Montag. Sig., 24 Oakdale 
Oberdorfer. E.. 1124 Piedmont A v. 
Paradies, J. Jacob, 201 Peters. 
Rice. Milton S.. 74 Trinity Av. 
Rosonbaum. Ralph, 49 W. 14th 
liosenfeld. A., 218 Ponce de Leon Av. 
Rouglin, Dr. L. C, 409 Washington 
Saul, II., 11 Trinity Av. 



440 



AMERICAN JEWISH YEAR BOOK 



Georgia Saul, Jos. J., 37 S. Pryor 
Saul, J. S., 33 E. Mitchell 
Schaul, Harry H., 173 Richardson 
Schoen, Isaac, 806 Washington 
Schoen, S., 214 Washington 
Silver, Wm., 47 B. Hunter 
Solomon, Rabbi H., 295 S. Pryor 
Spielberger, Fannie, 190 Capitol Av. 
Sternhelmer, A. G., 779 W. Peach- 
tree 
Well, Sigmund, 325 Washington 
Wilensky, H.. 272 Washington 
Wiseberg, Ben H., 153 Myrtle 
Wiseberg, S. W., 38% Alabama 
Wolfshelmer, Carl, 608 Empire Bldg. 
Zalian, Sam, 120 Pulllan 

Augusta 

Cohen, C. H. 

Frunkle, Max, 1117 Green 

Grad, F., 1242 Broad 

Meyers, Sam H., 1103 Milledge Rd. 

S.Mwilowsky, J., 965 Broad 

Scharflr, Louis " II," 2525 Raymond 

Av. 
Schneider, C. H., 1206 Greene 
Schneider, J., 1441 John's Rd. 
Shapiro, J., 1215 Broad 
Shunoflr, P. M., 1030 Reynolds 
Sluskv, Moses, 2605 Walton Way 
Sonderl, J., 1249 Ellis 
Steinberg, R., 1214 Broad 
Tannenbaum, H., 1340 Ellis 
Tannenbaum, N., 1007 Reynolds 

Brunswick 

Mendes, A. de Sola 
Pfeiffer, Fred 

Columbus 

Special Members 

Guttman, M. E., 1101 Broad 
Hirsch, Addle, 1341 3d Av. 
Loewenberg, Albert S., 1439 4th Av. 

Annual Members 

Arenovitch, I., 537 First Av. 
Buhler, M. L., 1230 2d Av. 
Cohn, L. S., 1137 2d Av. 
Frank, Bros., 625 Broad 
Greentree, D., 1325 2d Av. 
Julius. Herman, 1324 1st Av. 
Lafkowitz, A., 720 First Av. 
Levy, Deronda. 1227 Broad 
Loeb, Morris, 1230 2d Av. 
Rosenberg, Max, 1029 2d Av. 
Rosenthal. Rabbi F. L.. 1215 5th Av. 
Rothchlld, David, 1220 3d 
Rothchild, H., 1314 4th Av. 



Straus, A., 934 3d Av. 
Wise, Albert, 1315 4th Av. 
WolfSon, Dan R., Front & 10th 

Douglassville 
Austell, Alfred, R. F. D. 6 

OrifEln 

Austin, H. H. 
Goldstein, S. W. 
Haisfield, B. S. 
Ruskin, A. 

La Orange 

Brenson, Thos. L., Box 290 
De Lancey, J., 10 Main 
Ginsberg, A. 
Goldman, E. 
Goldstein, M., S. Louis 
Kurtz, Chas. 
Sturlitz, S. 

Macon 
Special Member 
Block, A., 810 Mulberry 

Annual Members 

Albert, N., 121 Academy 

Alexander, N., 1039 3d 

Bach, Albert, Vinevllle Buford PI. 

Barnett, M., 355 Walnut 

Barnett, S., 408 Mulberry 

Bloch, W., 140 Appelton 

Burg, M. R., 1204 B'way 

Chain, B., 770 Hazel 

Cong. Beth Israel. Rabbi H. Weiss 

Danneman, A., 653 B'way 

Danneman, M., 627 Poplar 

Flatau, Mrs. I., 864 Mulberry 

Fleischer, D., 215 New 

Goldgar. R., 403 Spring 

Gordon, E., 157 B'way 

Gordon, H., 205 New 

Hirsch. jHOoh. 610 4th 

Keissler, Marks, 153 5th 

Massell, H., 672 Poplar 

Progress Club 

Schiflr, A., 239 College 

Schwartz, L. E., 514 Penn. Av. 

Ulman, E., 314 New 

Weinstein, M., 273 Wash. Av. 

Wisenberg, Sol. L., 764 Cherry 

Zarkes, M., 121 Broadway 

Milledgeville 

Goldstein, A. 
Rubin, C. 

Oxford 
Magath, Prof. J. 



JEWISH PUBLICATION SOCIETY 



441 



Borne 
Frenkel. S. H., P. O. Box 32 

Savannah 
Special Mbmbebs 
Alexander, A. R., 118 Bryant, W. 
Gazan, Jacob, 122 E. 37th 
Mohr, A., 7 Gordon. W. 
Rosenthal, E. W., 15 E. 36th 
Silver, A. J., 2113 Bull 
Silver, I., 405 B. Huntington 

Annual Members 
Apple, Mark, 306 Liberty, W. 
Bluesteln, L., 312 E. Huntingdon 
Blumberg, I., 119 E. Liberty 
Blumenfeld, M.. 222 Montgomery 

Av 
Blumenfield, I., 409 E. Huntingdon 
Blumenthal, M., 115 W. 36th 
Cohen. H.. 516 W. York 
Dub, B., 3 Gordon, W. 
Ehrenreich, H. S., 116 W. 39th 
Feidelson, C. N., 513 E. Broughton 
Freedman, N., 120 W. Taylor 
Friedman, S., 525 W. York 
Gardner, J., 209 I'ark A v. 
Garfinkel, Mrs. A. J., 226 E. Hunt- 
ingdon 
Harris. L., 117 W. 37th 
Hurowitz. H., 355 W. Broad 
Jewish Educ. Alliance 
Lehwald, S., Congress & Whitaker 
Levin, Miss Dena, 703 Barnard 
Lewln, Geo., 211 E. Jones 
Llpsltz, M., 120 W. Rroujrhton 
Lipsitz, Rubin, 120 Broughton 
Marcus, Wm., 122 N. Park 



Mendel, Alex., 517 W. 137th 
Miller, A. H., 302 Waldburg Av. 
Mirsky, Louis, 412 W. Broad 
I'aderewski, Mrs. A.. 351 W. Broad 
Palitz, Rev. Dr. Leonard M., 5 W. 

37th 
Rauzin, A., 318 W. Park Av. 
Raskin, Harry, 1 W. 31st 
Schoenberg, L., 1911 Whitaker A v. 
Small, A. L., 327 Whitaker 
Smith, A. E., 106 W. 36th 
Solomon, Rev. Dr. G., 19 E. 46th 
Sutker, Jacob, 324 Bryan, W. 
Sutker, L., 413 W. Jones 
Victor, Sydney S., 216 W. Hull 



Georgia 



Cohen, M. A. 
Gillman, A. 
Silver, S. 



Sparta 



Tallulah Park 
Magid, Louis B. 

Thomson 
Steine, Myer 

Warrenton 
Steine, J. R. 

Waycross 
Rosenthal, J., 12 Mary 

West Point 

Cohen, J. S. 
Heyman, Mrs. B. 
Hagedorn, Phillip 
Stein, Lee 



Blackfoot 
Simon, Charles 



Alton 
Gould, Saml., 314 Plasa 



IDAHO 

Idaho Falls 

Citron, I. M. 
Citron, J. M. 
Gasas, Barney 
Locks, Jacob 

ILLINOIS 

Annual. Member 

Kuhn, Isaac, 304 W. Hill 



Idaho 



Illinois 



Bloomington 

Livingston, Sig., Livingston Bldg. 
Ochs, Herman S., Greisheim Bldg. 

Champaign 

Special Member 

Wolff, C. A.. 309 W. University Av. 



Chicago 

Life Members 

Fish, Mrs. Jos., 1811 Prairie Av. 
Rosenwald, Julius. 4901 Ellis Av. 

Patron 
Turner, A., 1318 Independence Blvd. 



35 



444 



AMERICAN JEWISH YEAR BOOK 



Illinois Sulton, Dr. Geo., 3325 W. 12t h 
Van Gelder, 2231 W. Madison 
Ware, S. N., 4537 Woodlawn Av. 
Well, Emanuel. 5833 Calumet Av. 
Weinberg, Geo., 308 W. Division 
Weinberg, Morris A., 1411 Harris 

Tr. Bldg. 
Weinstein, Adolpb, 543 Melrose 
Weisz, Alex., 4505 N. Whipple 
. White, Alex., 79 W. Monroe 
Wishnach, Carl, 1024 N. Robey 
Wolf. Benj., 3844 Congress 
Woolner, S. J., 5024 RlHs Av. 
Wormser, Leo P., 4745 Kimbark Av. 
Zolla, David M., 5012 Prairie Av. 
Zolla, Emil N., 3507 Douglas Blvd. 

Annual Mrmbeks 

Aaron, Harry, 1100 W. Ol'.d 
Aberg, M., 923 Irving Vk. Blvd. 
Abrahamson, B., iH't Hiue Island Av. 
Abrahamson, Dr. S., 3612 W. 12th 
Abram, Harry, 1425 S. Trumbull Av. 
Abrams, Gussie, 711 O'Brien 
Abrams, Morris M.. 7042 I.iiella Av. 
Ackerman, B. P., 701 Independence 

Blvd. 
Adelsdorf, S. L., 1011 Harris Trust 

Bldg. 
Adler, Miss C, 1219 K. n.-^d 
Adler, Mrs. D., 4921 Ellis Av. 
Agranat, Dr. A. J., 1405 N. Fair- 
field Av. 
Alban, Jos., 3533 W. Madison 
Alschuler. M., 1023 E. 53d 
Altbach, L., 1866 S. Avers Av. 
Auis, Albert A.. 2438 N. Albany Av. 
Apter, J. W., 658 E, 51st 
Arbetman, Florence, 619 Addison 
Aren, Dr. M. L., 739 W. 12th 
Arkin, A. E., 848 La Fayette Pkway. 
Arkin, I. C, 5306 S. Michigan 
Arkin, Dr. M. L., 1122 N. Oakley 

Blvd. 
Armin. Mrs. Chas., 1549 W. 69th 
Ascher, M. F., 312 E. 53d 
Austern, E., 3048 E. 92d 
Augustus, M., 175 W. Jackson Blvd. 
i;ach, Leopold, 237 E. 113th 
RMch, Saml.. 11322 Calumet Av. 
Bach, Sam'l J., 11209 Perry Av. 
Baddin, Louis, 3209 W. Crystal 
Barnett, Dr. II., 1620 W. 1-Mh 
Rarnett. H. M.. 2019 de Kalb 
Bauer, L. Lester, 4046 N. Ashland 

Av. 
Becker, Harry, 3249 W. 12th 
Becker. I. N., 5658 Prairie Av. 
Becker, Louis, 1238 W. 14th 
•Beckman, I.. 105 W. Monroe 
• Belersdorf, S. R., 831 Sheridan Rd. 



Beilin, L., 2437 N. Albany Av. 

Bellack, B. H., 5720 Harper Av. 

Bendheim, Moritz, 1621 W. Division 

Benenzweig. Sam. 1570 N. Hoyne 

Benjamin, A., 630 W. 12th 

Benslnger. B. E., 623 S. Wabash Av. 

Berenzweig, H., 2056 IMerce Av. 

Berezniak. L. A.. 441 Uoslyn PL 

Berger, M. I., 4567 Woodlawn Av. 

Berger, W. B., Ill W. Monroe 

Bei'kman, Mrs. Harry J. 

Berkson, E., 1256 Independence 

Berkson, J.. 643 W. 63d 

Berkson, M., 1213 Independence 
Blvd. 

Berkson. Morris. 816 W. 64th 

Berlin, S., 516 E. 50th 

Bermonel, Harry D., 5203 Ingleside 
Av. 

Bernard, A., 1269 Milwaukee Av. 

Bernheim, J., 1335 Newberry AV. 

Bernstein, B. H., 1001 Ashland Blk. 

Bornsteln. G. D.. 4607 Calumet Av. 

Bernstein, S., 1551 S. Spaulding Av. 

Bernstein, S. L., 1305 Farwell Av. 

Blllikopf, A., 1038 N. Van Buren 

Binkowltz. S. D.. 954 W. 21st 

Bloch, Louis, 3323 Wash. Blvd. 

Bloch. M. M., 3136 Douglas Blvd. 

Bloch, Rami. A.. 3605 Palmer 

Bloch, Walter, 5134 S. Pack Av. 

Block. A. L.. 8413 Buffalo Av. 

Bloom. David, 144 S. Wabash Av. 

Bloom, S., 1019 S. Halsted 

Blum, H. S., 1619 S. Millard 

Blum. Dr. Jos., 2001 W. Division 

Blumenkrantz, Dr. L., 9154 Com- 
mercial Av. 

Blumenthal. B., 1364 N. Sedgwick 

Bofman, Julius, 6035 S. Aberdeen 

Bolotih, H., 3317 W. 12th 

Boosel, Jos., 2911 Fillmore 

Borges, B. E., 1436 E. 65th 

Bornsteln. M., 1217 E. 47th 

Borovik, J., 3254 Pierce Av. 

Brnmson. D., 1214 S. Spalding Av. 

Brandt. Eli. 543 Belmont Av. 

Brazen, Harry, 1654 S. Hamlin Av. 

Breger, Louis, 117 14th, N. Chicago 

Bregstone, Judge Philip B., City 
Hnll 

Bron stein. Rabbi David. 58 M. D. 
Hall, University of Chicago 

Brown, B. J., 905 Ashland Blk. 

Brown, I. J., 5228 Drexel Av. 

Buding, S. M.. 4852 Prairie Av. 

Buchsbaum, II. J., 219 S. Dearborn 

Ca liner, Jos. M.. 3151 W. 15th 

Cantor, J. L., 649 E. 50th PI. 

Chcrnuskin, Jos. A., 5524 W. Chi- 
cago 



JEWISH PUBLICATION SOCIETY 



445 



Chesler, M., 1310 S. Albany Av. 
Chevlen, L., 2518 N. Kedzle Blvd. 
Choncs, Win., VM Washluijton 
Chulock. Dr. A. W., 1234 N. Hoyne 
CoflPee, Rabbi Rudolph I., Hamilton 

Club 
Cohans, L. M., 5206 S. Homan Ay. 
Cohen, A. E., 1611 S. Trumbull Av. 
Cohen, Adolph, 3127 Douglas Blvd. 
Cohen, Archie H., 3829 Fillmore 
Cohen, C. E., 1812 S. Troy 
Cohen. Geo. B., 4636 Drexel Blvd. 
Coht'n, H. A.. 3913 Wentworth A v. 
Cohen, M- J. E., 1503 S. Haistead 
Cohen, J., 3607 Douglas Blvd. 
Cohen, Jacob, 1407 S. Halsted 
Cohen, L., 1407 S. Halsted 
Cohen, L. S., 1422 S. Trumbull Av. 
Cohen, Louis A., 1351 N. Hoyne Av. 
Cohen, M., 3346 Douglas Blvd. 
Cohen, N. A., 919 S. Irving 
Cohen, S. J., 25 S Market 
Cohen, Saml. L., 1607 Ft. Dearborn 

Blvd. 
Cohn, A. E., 4055 N. Spnuldlng A v. 
Cohn, Archie, 172 W. Adams 
Cohn, C. H., 5948 Calumet 
Cohn. Jos.. 5400 S. Michigan Blvd. 
Cohn, S., 837 W. Adams 
Cohns, Chas. L., 237 W. Madison 
Cohon, Rabbi S. S., 343 S. Central 

Park Av 
CoIItz, Louis, 1254 S. Troy 
Comroe, Dr. Jos. I., 4809 St. Lawr- 
ence Av. 
Cone, Maurice, 3723 Greenshaw 
Conheim, Max, 5820. Prairie Av. 
Cooper, Saml., 5842 S. Park 
Cowan, Percy, 331 E. 60th 
Cowen, Millie. 3218 S. Park Av. 
Crains, Jacob L, 1432 N. Robey 
Cramer. J. li., 3206 W. 12th 
D'Ancona, E. N., 1038 Stock Exchg. 

Bldt?. 
Daniels, H., 3829 Cottage Grove Av. 
Daniels, S. B., 318 E. 43d 
Daughters of Israel, 810 S. Ashland 

Blvd. 
David. Mrs. J. B., 4359 Grand Blvd. 
Davidson, J. A.. 6220 Vernon Av. 
Davis, A. S., 5480 Blackstone Av. 
Davis, Abel, 5125 Ellis Av. 
Davis, Mrs. S. P., 3128 Washington 
De Kofsky, A. S.. 1324 S. lloraan A v. 
De Kofsky, F., 1304 S. Sawyer Av. 
De Koven, Dr. B., 3532 Douglas 

Blvd. 
Delson, Louis J., 105 W. Monroe 
Dentlebaum, Leopold, c/o Chicago 

Home for Jewish Orphans 
Dettelbach, D., 5433 Indiana Av. 



pputsch, Dr. Herman S., 3842 W. IMinofa 

15th 
Doutsch, Dr. S. B., 3703 W. 12th 
Deutsch, Sanil., 4036 Ellis Av. 
Doctor, A. M., 5139 Ellis Av. 
Doctor, Jacob, 2200 N. Lamon Av. 
Dolnick, M. D., 820 S. Lincoln 
Dottenheim, 11. H., 4901 Forrestville 

Av. 
Drebin, A., 1921 S. Sawyer Av. 
Drefkoflf, M. M., 155 N. Clark 
Dubowich, John, 5250 Michigan Av. 
Dunsay, Albert, 1306 Independence 

Blvd. 
Edelraan, L., 510 Ashland Blk. 
Edelson, Jos. H., 1401 S. Harding 

Av. 
Edelson, Robert, 3425 Douglas Blvd. 
Einstein, D. G., 5211 Indiana A v. 
Eisenberg, C. J., 179 W. Washington 
Eisendrath, B. D.. 130 N. 5th Av. 
EiHenstaedt, K., 431 E. 48th 
Elfenbein, Rabbi Israel. 2309 

Thomas 
Eliassof, H., 5938 Indiana Av. 
KIkan, H.. 18 W. Austen 
Ellor. Emanuel, 901 W. 12th 
Ellman. Rabbi A., 1817 S. Clifton 

Park Av. 
Elman. H.^ 1355 W. 14th 
Emanuel Sabbath School, 3608 

Rokeby 
Eniln, Isaac. 4942 Champlain Av. 
Enelow, B. F., Westminster Bldg. 
Epstein, Benj. P., 5047 St. Lawrence 

Av. 
Epstein, Harry. 5047 Sheridan Rd. 
Kttelson, Julius, 913 Gait Av. 
Ettenson, C. M., 411 Oakwood Blvd. 
Fagin, Jos. E., 6528 Newyard Av. 
Falker. J. B.. 5410 Indiana Av. 
Falker, M. E., 4459 Ellis Av. 
Farber, Dr. A. J., 3161 W. 12th 
FaHH'r. Wm.. 914 Ashland Blvd. 
Farland, Ben, 326 Lincoln 
Feinberg, M. S.. 1415 S. Millard Av. 
Feinberg, S., 6440 S. Ortunora 
Feingold, I. H.. 5849 Michigan Av. 
Feldman. E., 1551 S. Kedzie Av. 
Ffldman, J., 29 S. La Salle 
Feldstein, Sam., 520 N. Monticello 

Av. 
Felsenthal, Eli B., 4608 Drexel Blvd. 
Fonchel, R. II., 910 Glengyle PI. 
Ferson, Mrs. B., 26 S. Hamlin Av. 
Feuer, Harry. 6312 Drexel Av. 
Fionborc. J., 2541 Cottage. Grove Av. 
Fine. Chas.. 2638 N. Spaulding Av. 
Fine. Doris B., 745 Independence 

Blvd. 
Fine, Jacob M.. 1404 N. Kedzle Av. 
Fisher, L, 531 Ins. Exchg. Bldg. 



446 



AMERICAN JEWISH YEAR BOOK 



Illinois Fisher, Hon. M., City Hall 

Flatau, Sol., 230 B. Garfield Blvd. 
Flexnor, Bprnard. Union League 

Club 
Fllcht, Michael, 4430 Magnolia Av. 
Foreman, Henry (J., Sakota Hotel 
Foreman, Oscar G., 30 N. LaSalle 
Fox, Leon B.. 2802 W. North Av. 
Fox, Dr. N. I.. 3403 Douglas Blvd. 
Frank, Henry L., 1608 Prairie Av. 
Frank, Jacob. 1751 W. Madison 
Frank, Louis, 3404 Jackson Blvd. 
Frank. Dr. Mortlner, 1059 Hyde 

Blvd. 
Frankenstein, W. B., 110 S. Dear- 
born 
Franklin, I. J., 1248 N. Kedzie A v. 
Franklin, J. A., 5414 S. Park Av. 
Freed. I. B., 901 Jackson Blvd. 
Freeman, D., 1504 N. Washtenaw 

Av. 
Freller, Mrs. M. J., 5135 Drexel Av. 
Fridstein, S. H., 10 S. La Salle 
Fried, Isidore, 1219 Conway Bldg. 
Friedman, Mrs. M., 1460 Belmoral 

Av. 
Friedland, Morris N., 834 Oakley 

Blvd. 
Fried len. H. L., 1317 Millard 
Fuchs, Jacob, 5636 Kenwood Av. 
Furth, J. E., 356 B. 35th 
Ganser, Dr. S. H., 4201 Fullerton 

Av. 
Gardner, D. S., 2611 Indiana Av. 
Garflnkel, Wm. J.. 1109 S. Robey 
Garmisa, M., 3126 E. 92d 
Garteustein, Dr. J.. 1006 W. 12th 
Gasaman, I.. 8728 Commercial Av. 
Geliebter, D., 1415 Washtenaw Av. 
Gerard, Maurice, 1518 E. Marquette 

Rd. 
Ginzberg. M. P., 1214 S. Halsted 
Girson, Philip, 1411 S. Turner Av. 
Gllckman, Philip, 1631 S. Hamlin 

Av. 
Gllck'son. O.. 1410 R. Albany Av. 
(4olan, M. J.. 1020 Ashland Blvd. 
(rolant, A. M., 726 S. Winchester Av. 
Goldberg, Anna, 823 S. Winchester 

Av 
Goldberg, B., 1326 Blue Island Av. 
(Joldberg. E. L., Ashland Blvd. & 

Madison St. 
Goldberg, H. N., 1311 S. Halsted 
Goldberg, J. A., 3602 Douglas Blvd. 
Goldberg, Dr. J. B., 3200 Douglas 

. Blvd. 
(J«.ldberg. Jos. H.. 3623 W. Polk 
Goldberg, M. S., 1306 S. Troy 
Goldberg, Max, 0020 Commercial Av. 
(Joldberg. Max, 3911 W. 19th 
Goldberg, N., 139 N. Clark 



Goldberg, S. B., 1636 S. Millard Av. 

Golden, Dr. I. J. K., 2238 North Av. 

Goldflne, Max, 303 E. 29th PI. 

Goldman, Mrs. M., 3417 Adams 

Goldsmith, Dr. Alex. A., 29 E. Madi- 
son 

Goldstein, A. H.. 3212 Potonlac Av. 

Goldstein, D.. 1410 Thorndale Av. 

Goldstein, I. O., 5425 Glenwood Av. 

Goldstein, Isndore. 2336 Iowa 

Goldstein, Morris, 3211 Crystal 

Goldstein, Dr. P. H.. 2307 Iowa 

Gomberg, Meyer, 837 S. Wood 

Goodman, A. L., 1448 S. St. Louis 
Av. 

Goodman, I., 4511 Grand Blvd. 

Goodman, I. K., 2639 Crystal 

Goodman, Isaac. 520 E. 42d 

Goodman, Max D., 1000 N. Oakley 
Blvd. 

Gordon, Harry, 3256 Black A v. 

Gottlieb, H. A., 5639 Michigan Av. 

Gould, L. L., Esq., 1725 Wash bourne 
Av. 

Green, Herbert. 3322 N. Ashland Av. 

Greenbaum, Ben. I., 4510 N. Hermi- 
tage Av. 

Greenbaum, B., 4510 Grand Blvd. 

Greenbaum, I. S., 1425 Solon PI. 

Greenbaum, J. C, 323 Ashland Blk. 

Greenberg, Dr. 1. M., 2000 W. Divi- 
sion 

Greenberg, Dr. Philip, 908 Belmont 
Av. 

Greenberg, Saml., 11726 Parnell Av. 

Greenblatt, Isadore, 4847 Vlncennes 
Av. 

Greene, Ben., 1426 Birchwood 

Greengard, Ben, 1521 S. Millard Av. 

Greiver, Simon, 2648 N. Troy 

Grombacher, L. L., 110 S. Dearborn 

Gross. Louis J., 5356 Michigan Av. 

Grossberg, J. G., 344 E. 56th 

Grossfeld, S. E., 430 St. James PL 

Grossman, B. J., 426 S. Halsted 

Grossman, H. A., 1659 S. Trumbull 
Av. 

Grossman. J. F., 5821 Michigan Av. 

Grossman, M. M., 1331 Independence 
Blvd. 

Guettel. A. J., 541 Melrose 

Gulalstein, A., 2437 N. Albany Av. 

Gumblner, Ij. H., 4717 Lincoln Av. 

(Jnsfleld, J. J.. 5022 Grand Blvd. 

Gutman, Matilda, 1408 S. Albany 
Av. 

llackner, Ellas, 129 S. Market 

llalperln. Dr. R., 1017 Ashland Blvd. 

Halpern, Bernard, 1928 Humboldt 
Blvd. 

Handler, David, 957 N. Oakley Av. 



JEWISH PUBLICATION SOCIETY 



447 



Handmacher, M., 4442 Sheridan Rd. 
Harris, A., 3245 Douglas Blvd. 
Hartman, A.. 4527 Ellis Ay. 
Ilatowskl, Ph., 170 N. Taylor A v. 

Oak Park 
Hefter, M., 4910 Vincennes Av. 
Heldman, J. N., 108 S. LaRalle 
Heller, S., 1214 Blue Island Av. 
Herron. C. I., 1417 S. Millard 
Herst, F., 4536 Drexel Blvd. 
Hevesh, Rabbi J., 640 Gary PI. 
Hexter, S., 36 S. State 
Heyman, H. D., 2306 W. Iowa 
Hirsch, Morris, 1102 S. Lincoln 
Hlrschberg, Rev. A., 2634 Lake 

View Av 
Homer, Hon. H., 4801 Forrestville 

Av. 
Hornstein, 6.. 75 W. Van Buren 
Inlander, S., 1459 W. Garfield Blvd. 
Irshay, Andrew, 2330 N. Halsted 
Isacowltz, J. H., 3127 W. 12th 
Isaiah S. School, 45th & Vincennes 

Av 
Israeistam. H.. 1417 S. Millard Av. 
Jacobs, I. B., 1523 B. 60th 
Jacobson, A. I., 4919 Michigan Av. 
Jacobson, Isaac W., 1811 S. Hamlin 

Av 
Jacobson, J. S., 720 E. 50th PI. 
Jadwin, B., 1227 S. Avers Av. 
Jaffe, Ernst M., 4751 Forrestville 

Av. 
Jameson. J. J., 3556 Douglas Blvd. 
Jerusalimsky, S., Bello, 720 W. 12th 
Jonesi, Wm. A., 1255 S. Lawndale 

Av. 
Josephson, Dr. V,, 1339 Kedzie Av., 

S. 
Kahn, Dr. H.. 5246 S. Park Av. 
Kahn, Julius M., Tribune Bldg. 
Kahn, Louis, 7324 Oglesby Av. 
Kahn, Marcus, 9020 Commercial Av. 
Kahn, M. T., 7640 Bond Av. 
Kahn, Max, 1426 S. Kedzie Av. 
Kalish, K., 3248 Douglas Blvd. 
Kalish, L. P., 5811 Indiana Av. 
Kanne, J., 3230 S. State 
Kantor, H. E., 6448 Greenview Av. 
Kantor, J. M., 3127 Douglas Bldg. 
Kaplan, M. P., 1410 N. Hoyne Av. 
Kaplan, Marks, 1543 Milwaukee Av. 
Kaplan, N. J., 3339 Douglas Bldg. 
Karl, Israel, 1411 S. Racine Av. 
Karn, M. S., 5427 S. May 
Karno, L., 1141 Independence Blvd. 
Kassel, S., 3837 W. 18th 
Katz, H., 1302 N. Uncoln 
Katz, H., 833 Wash. Blvd. 
Katz, Mayer, 1244 W. Division 
Katz, Samuel, 1517 N. Irving Av. 

15. 



Katzenstein, Hugo, 2004 Continen- lUlnoig 

tal Commerce Bank Bldg. 
Kaufman, Sanders, 1432 N. Clare- 

mont Av. 
Kealer, R. H., 3228 Leland Av. 
Kempner, L., 546 E. 34th 
King, Dr. M. B., 1501 S. Kedzie Av. 
Kite, B., 2559 W. North Av. 
Klawans, Nathan M., 619 Gary PI. 
Klein, Herman, 2045 Wellington Av. 
Klein, .Tullus. 1870 S. Kedzie Av. 
Klein, Rabbi Israel, The Madison & 

Kedzie State Bank 
Klempter, Dr. D.. 1903 N. Oakley 

Blvd. 
Koch, Philip E., 5616 Wabash Av. 
Koenigsberg, D., 1410 Milwaukee Av. 
Kolb, David, 1833 N. Leavltt 
Kompel, Morris, 102 S. Hamlin Av. 
Koolish M., 848 Ainslee 
Koplon, Julius, 601 Ashland Blk. 
Koretz, Leo, 1000 Rector Bldg. 
Korshak, M. M., 1820 S. Kedzie Av. 
Krainer, Mrs. S., 4641 N. Spaulding 

Av. 
Kramer, Jos., 719 W. 62d 
Kranz, H., 817 S. Marshfleld Av. 
Kraus, Adolph, 4518 Drexel Blvd. 
Kraus, J., 306 W. Lake 
Krltchesky. W., 6807 East End Av. 
Krupnick, Ira, 4859 Champlain 
Kubreener, Stanley, 4924 N. St. 

Louis Av. 
Kuppin, Gilbert, 6209 S. Halsted 
Kurtzon, M., 1250 Independence 

Blvd. 
Kurz, Adolph. 208 S. T^ Salle 
Lacknow, R., 5463 W. Madison 
Lackrltz, P. N., 1918 Humboldt 

Blvd. 
Ijandauer, H., 5326 Flyde Pk. Blvd. 
Lanskl, Dr. .Jacob, 1021 W. 14th 
Lasker, I.. 908 S. Ashland Blvd. 
Lazarus, M. H., 913 Lawrence Av. 
Lazar, J. G.. 5138 Grand Blvd. 
Lazer. S., 4005 Granshaw 
Leavltt, Dr. S. H., 2634 W. North 

Av. 
Lebensohn, Dr. M. H., 3928 Jackson 

Blvd. 
Le Bosky, J. C, 2115 W. North Av. 
Lebovltz, H., 2843 Wentworth 
Lebowitz, H. J., 6413 S. Halsted 
Lebowitz, J. M.. 8442 Green Bay Av. 
Leschin, J., 831 Ainslie 
Lesser, Lee J., 5125 Ingleside Av. 
lievin, E., 2144 Alice PI. 
Levin, L., 709 Wells 
Levin, Mollle, 1225 Independence 

Blvd. 

Levin, S., 3618 Douglas Blvd. 



AMERICAN JEWISH YBAH BOOK 



aiiaelM Levin, Dr. S. A.. 2101 W. DItUIoo 
Levin. T., S4H1 W. 12th 
Levlne. Jacob. SS04 W. IGth 
Levlne, WUHflm, 4701 Drake Av. 
LevlQBer, Habbl L. J„ 715 B. BOth 
PI. 

leVltOD, Aafuii, jui^ avumv . 

levltOD. M., 1837 Bvergreen At. 
Levitt, Geo. (i^ 5154 IncllttQn Av. 
Levy, Aaron H., 1216 N. Hoyiie A 
: «r7. Albert, IG4 K. lluD(lul[ib 
: ..evj. Dr. B. Newton 



., 2120 



■e PI. 



^vy. F. A„ sei Melrose 
Levy, O.. 34 Bl DoiieIhb Blvd. 
I^vy, Bldnev B., 610S Rbodea At. 
Lewlnaobn. L., 5168 Inaiane At. 
Lewis. r*.jn L., 5B11 Cornell Av. 
Llcbterman, L. H., 130.1 N. Call- 

Ueberman, Jacob, BIIO Mleblgan 

Uebling. A. v.. 121G B. Ractne 
Ltaaauer, A. U., It) B. Wella 
LInenthBl. J.. 3746 Douglas Blvd. 
Link, A. B.. 1422 N. Hojne At. 
Llpmaa, Joseph, AS3l B. Aahland 

Lfpaky. H. A., 4gS0 Michigan At. 

Livingston. A. KISO Greenwood AT. 

Llvltan. Benl., 1414 E. AlbOBT At. 

Loeb, I. A.. IRS N. Clnrk, R. 322 

Loeb, J. M., 4800 KImbark Av. 

Loebner, J. B., 1127 Blue Island AT. 

I^Ddon, A,, 817 S. MnrahfleM At. 

LoreoE, J. M.. 292(1 Edeewood Av. 

LowenberK. M. !..., 31BS W. 12th 
LowenthBl, B. M., 4740 Klmbart At. 

Lowenthal, Leo B., 7S1S S. Green 

I.uHe. Geo. B.. 284B W. Division 

Lurle. Mrs. I. H.. 6(137 Michigan Ai. 
I^ona, Rev. J. F., 828 Belden At. 

Lfiins, Sam!., B200 Ens le aide A v. 

Mack. Wm, J., 208 La Salla 
Magldaohn, Joe. B317 F 

Malkr- ' 

Malte 

Malti. , ... 

Mnltz, 8. W., less 

Mann, A. I., 4748 _. 

Mann, L. P., 12B8 Milwaukee 
MarcuB, A., S400 Winthrop At. 
HarcuB. H.. 1444 8. Trumbull At. 
Marcus, Isidore. 2525 Drake Av. 
Marcus, Jesse. 243S Thomas 
Margolls, B., 1816 Millard Av. 
MargoIiB, H.. 607 Milwaukee Av. 
Margolls. Rev. Dr. Jos. H., ei43 S. 

Park At. 
Uarfcowlti, Pb., 3422 W. Adams 



I. Aflhlno 



MarkK, SsTmour. 130S Independenc* 

Blvd. 
MarkBon, A. D., S430 Burle; At. 



Mayer, Mrs. LevT, Blackstoae Hotel 
Mayer, Uai, BSIS KImbark *> 
Melles. U. L., 2020 W. 12th 



Bldg. 

Meslrow, B. 8., 10B7 N. OaklevBlTd. 
Meslrow, Dr. B. B., 1*41 Wicker 

Park At. 
Meslrow, H. 8., 3023 Dlversey At. 
Metienberg. L.. 6330 Greenwood At. 
Metier, A.. 6825 HlcbleaD At. 
Meyer, Mrs. A. E., B202 Lakewood 

Meyer, S. B., 130 N. Clark 
Mlcon, 8., 1628 Dnlty Bldg. 
Mlcon, Wm. M., IBOif Unity Bidg. 
MllkPwltcb, M. A., 1123 Indepen- 
dence Blvd. 
Miller, B. E., 1621 W. Division 
MlUer, Mrs. B. H., 1620 S. Kedile 



_I. I.. 39 B. LflSsHe 

Moll. Sraeat. 2937 Logan Blvd. 
Moment, H., 3416 Lexington 
Morris, B. 1.. 20 S. I^Balle 
Morris, H., 114S Independence Blvd. 
Morris, L., 3246 Dooilas Blvd. 
II — .. . D 440 BlyerBeT Pkway. 
., 2632 N. SpanldlUE 



Morris, L. H., 



., 5642 Prairie . 



NabiD, Robert 8., 137T Madison Pk. 
Naaatlr, Benl., 1239 B. Turner At. 
Nasntir, H. A., 123B B. Turner At, 
Nathan, B.. 123B Haisted 
Natbao. M. J.. 1S18 8. Central Pk. 



NechiD, I 



ro. Dr. A. . 



, Ashland 



Neuman, Maler. 748 First Natl. Bk. 

Bldg. 
Neualadt. M., B842 B. Park At. 
Newman, A. B,, Standard Club 
Newman, Dr. B., 1130 Hermitage 
Newman, Rev. M., 2729 Hlrsch Blvd. 



JEWISH PUBLICATION SOCIETY 



449 



Niederman, M., 1417 Milwaukee Ay. 
Noskin, H., Snell Hall, Univ. of 

Chicago 
Ochakoff, Barney, 2032 W. Potomac 
Qienick, H., 1224 Independence Bldg. 
Olshan, Dr. A. G., 1900 W. Division 
Oppenheim, C. 41 S. Central Park 

Oppenheimer, Leo, 5928 Prairie Ay. 
Oppenheimer, M., 3059 E. 92d 
Osherman, Miss M. E.. 1030 S. San- 
gamon 
Osman, S. H., 1237 N. Lincoln 
Ostrowsky, Arthur, 1255 S. Halsted 
Ovson, M., 811 S. Spaulding Av. 
Parvln, Morris, 1418 Milwaukee Av. 
Passovay, A. 

Pennish, Lewis E., 8 S. Dearborn 
Pereria, Morton L, 5757 Michigan 
Perlman, I. B., 818 Independence 

Blvd. 
Perlmutter, Maurice, 1570 N. Hoyne 

Av. 
Perlstein, I., 1941 Milwaukee A v. 
Perlstein, M., 3304 Douglas Blvd. 
Pflaum, A. J., 707 Stock Exchange 

Bldj?. 
Pimstein, Hyman, 6118 Ellis Av. 
Pines, Albert, 1941 Fowler 
Piser, Thomas, 1648 S. Clifton Park 

Av 
Pittik. S., 54 Snell Hall, University 

of Chicago 
Pizer, Chas., 2931 Milwaukee Av. 
Piatt. B. N., 1414 8. Albany 
Piatt, Louis, 327 W. Jackson Blvd. 
Plotke, Isidore, 111 W. Monroe 
Polishuck, Dr. I., 2224 Potomac Av. 
Pollack, S. S., 5855 Magnolia Av. 
Pollak Chas., 3938 Jackson Blvd. 
I*olonsky, Hyman, 737 Independence 

Blvd. 
Price, J. S.. 5740 S. Park Av. 
Priess, S. M., 1237 Independence 

Blvd. 
Qiiadow. N. L.. 3312 Douglas Blvd. 
RabinofT, Abr.. 2315 N. Kedzie Blvd. 
Rabinowitz, Chas. Z., 1539 W. Polk 
Rabinowitz. Philip. 1500 Bdgemont 
Raclin, A. L, 648 Grace 
Radbel, G., 8901 Commercial Av. 
Rappaport, Rev. J., 2128 Crystal 
Hechtman, Jos.. 1058 Oakley Blvd. 
Redner, A., 1482 Milwaukee Av. 
Reinschreiber, H., 8225 Oreenshaw 
Reis, Mrs. Ignace, 4463 Berkely Av. 
Relss, Armin, 5829 Woodland Av. 
Renberg, H. 

Rhein, Jos. A., 6011 S. State 
Richman. H., 1224 Independence 

Blvd. 
Bichter, Simon, 4935 Michigan Av. 



Rindskoff, H., 6214 Ebenhart Av. lUinoif 
Ringer. Jacob. 4743 Drexel Blvd. 
Rish, D., 1533 S. Lowdale Av. 
Riskind, I., 8844 Commercial Av. 
Rittenberg, Wm., 4728 S. State 
Robensteln, Dr. H., 1618 W. 12th 

Blvd. 
Robins, Max, 3129 Fullerton Av: 
Robinson, Joseph H., 1858 Berteau 

Av. 
Roe, A. S., 2832 Cambridge Av. 
Roe, H. M., 4024 Sheridan Bd. 
Rogal, A., 112 Otis Bldg. 
Rohde, A. M., 2037 Iowa 
Roman, M., c/o Henry Horner Co., 

1244 Wood 
Romberg, Mrs. E., 2213 Calumet Av. 
Rosen, B. H., 844 Milwaukee Av. 
Rosen, Sam, 1117 S. Central Pk. 

Av. 
Rosenbaum, A. G., 5203 Indiana Av. 
Rosenbaum, Joseph 
Rosenbaum. W.. 417 Postal Tele- 
graph Bldg. 
Rosenberg, A. H., 2052 Pierce Av. 
Rosenberg. Edward H., 2101 N. 

California Av. 
Rosenberg, H. J., 859 B. 56th 
Rosenberg, Mrs. J., 3754 Michigan 

Av 
Rosenberg, Jos., 876 N. Sacramento 

Blvd. 
Rosenberg, Michael. 1501 S. Sawyer 

Av. 
Rosenblutt. L., 737 S. Halstead 
Rosenfeld, H.. 2654 Hirsch Blvd. 
Rosenfels H. H.. 6031 S. Park Av. 
Rosenfleld, L, 169 W. Randolph 
Rosenheim, Mrs. David, 4404 Vin- 

cennes Av. 
Rosenman. Sam'l., 37 S. Central 

Park Blvd. 
Rosenson. Abe, 1468 W. Taylor 
Rosenson, I. L., 1183 S. Halsted 
Rosenstein, Harry. 632 W. 12th 
Rosenstein. J.. 6326 S. Ashland Av. 
Rosenstock. Hattie. 1800 Selden 
Rosenthal, W. W., 4727 ForrestvlUe 

Av. 
Rosen wasser, E. M., 9154 Commer- 
cial Av. 
Rosin, Julius, 417 Ashland Blk. 
Rothblum. Nottie, 139 N. Clark 
Ruben, Chas.. 3022 Archpr Av. 
Rubenstein, A., 815 City Hall Sq. 

Bid?. 
Rubin, Nathan. 1516 W. 13th 
Rubinstein, J. B.. 155 N. Clark 
Sabath, M., 1914 S. Ashland Av. 
Sabel, Joseph, 6656 Stewart Av. 
Sable, Harry. 3221 Lincoln Av. 
Sachs, F., 6122 S. Halstead 



450 



AMERICAN JEWISH YEAR BOOK 



Illinois Sachs, L. A.. 3131 Lincoln Ay. 

Sackheim. M.. 1316 S. Lawndale Ay. 
Safrans. M. H.. 180 N. Dearborn 
Sakanovsky, H.. 1511 Milwaukee Av. 
Salk. Moses. 1134 W. 12th 
Salvat, H., 5425 Ellis Av. 
Samuels, Ben., 6225 Drexel Ay. 
Sandack, J. M., 5727 Calumet 
Sanofsky, J. L., 732 Federal 
Schaar, B. E.. 6146 S. Park Av. 
Schack, Jos., 1730 Milwaukee 
Schaffer, Isaac 

SchaflTer, Mitchell M., 1915 Fowler 
Schaflfner, Daniel, 1623 N. Hum- 
boldt 
Schanfarber, Rev. T., 5016 Grand 

Blvd. 
Scheftel, Ben., 1643 S. Clifton Pk. 

Av. 
Schenker. Helen R., 6702 Sheridan 

Rd. 
Schetnitz, Mrs. E., 539 N. Cicero Ay. 
Schiff, B. J., 614 Ashland Blvd. 
SchiflT, S. B., 3516 Hasting 
Schloesinger, H. J., 1701 S. Clark 
Schoenbrod, N. S., Cunard Bldg. 
Schooler, N., 1037 N. Robey 
Schor, I., 1031 Blue Island Ay. 
Schulman. B., 3520 Greenshaw 
Schultz, M. B., 5717 Michigan Av. 
Schwartz, Ed., 1358 N. Lincoln 
Schwartz, C. P., Criminal Court 

Bldg. 
Schwartz, Rev. I., 824 S. Mansfield 

Av. 
Schwartz, J. C, 5002 Forrestville 

Av. 
Schwartz, M. D., 10-18 W. Austin 

Av. 
Seckbach, A. M., 5616 S. Park Av. 
Seelenfreund, A. B., 1228 Tribune 

Bldg. 
Segal, A., 607 Wells 
Segal. Henry, 5822 Prairie Av. 
Segall, Frank, 1424 Congress. W. 
Selden, Frank, 27 E. Monroe 
Seipp, Mrs. M., 2716 Evergreen A v. 
Selig, Sidney H., 5645 Prairie Av. 
Sentinel Publishing Co., 14 W. 

Washington 
Shabad, H. M., 4041 Indiana Av. 
Shaeffer. S. J.. 155 N. Clark 
Shnffner, Chas.. 024 E. 46th 
Shaffner, Herman, 4845 Michigan 

Blvd. 
Shapera, C. M., 849 W. 12th 
Shapinsky, Dr. J. T., 572 W. 12th 
Shapiro, I., 3351 Douglas Blvd. 
Sheff, Harry, 1459 W. 47th 
Sherman, Chas., 1230 Washburne 

Av. 



Shnaper, L. A., 1205 W. Chlcag 

Av 
Shulman, M., 1108 Ashland Blk. 
SIcherman, J., 542 W. 63d 
Sideman, D., 3242 Douglas Blvd. 
Sideman, J., 3204 Douglas Blvd. 
Siegal, Nathan A., 1526 S. St. Loul 

Av 
Siegei. J., 8417 Burley A v. 
Siegel, Jacob, 2102 W. Division 
Sigel, Dr. A. S.. 3540 Douglas Blvd 
Silbert, M., 1135 Independence Blvc 
Silver, Rabbi S., 729 Ashland Blvd 
Silverman, Anna, 1318 S. Alban; 

Av. 
Simon, A. M., 4436 Magnolia Av. 
Simon, A. M.. 2303 S. State Av. 
Simon, Ben, 1250 N. Washtenaw Av 
Simon, Edw., 951 N. Oakley Blvd. 
Simon, Geo. W.. 2108 Crystal 
Simon, S. J., 11338 Michigan Av., S 
Singer, W. R., 5932 Indiana Av. 
Sissman. Peter, 140 N. Dearborn 
Sitkin, S.. 1922 W. Madison 
Slatzin, Miss Frances, 3407 W. 13th 

PI. 
Slavitsky, S. T., 155 N. Clark 
Sloan, Bernard L., 3313 Douglas 

Blvd. 
Smidt, Jos., 1250 S. St. Louis Ay. 
Smith, Samuel, 2116 W. North Av. 
Smoler, M., 1638 Clifton Av. 
Smollar, L., 1116 S. Francisco Av. 
Snower, M., 822 Montrose Av. 
Soble, Aaron, 2732 N. Kedzle Ay. 
Soboroff, Dr. S. H., 1101 N. Western 

Av. 
Solinger, Leonard, 1318 S. Albany 

Av. 
Solomon, Mrs. H. G., 4406 Michigan 

Av. 
Somach, Harry. 205 Evergreen 
Sommer, L., 3065 E. 92d 
Sonncnschein, Dr. R., 4534 Michi- 
gan Av. 
Sopkin, B., 1125 Independence Blvd. 
Sopkin, L., 915 Margate Ter. 
Sosna, M. W., 1391 Milwaukee Av. 
Spencer, Isidor, 1125 S. Troy 
Spiegel. M., 1315 S. Spaulding Av. 
Spinner, Isidore. 3127 Douglas 
Spinner, M., 1506 S. Albany Av. 
Spira, S., 3119 N. Kedzle Av. 
Spira, Sam, 326 S. Market 
Spitz, Ignatz. 3234 Cortez 
Spitzer, Saml., 1400 S. Albany 
Stadeker, Ralph, 4556 Grand Blvd. 
Stangle, Sam. 6410 Sangamon 
Starr, M., 2417 N. Albany Av. 
Stein, A., 720 S. Paulina 



JEWISH PUBLICATION SOCIETY 



461 



stein, Louis, 4837 Michigan Av. 
Stein, LouiB, 2018 W. Fowelery 
Stein, Louis, 901 S. Halsted 
Stein, Moritz, 5842 S. Paris Av. 
Stein, Saml., 001 S. Halsted 
Steinberg, P., 3708 Douglas Blvd. 
Steiner, Sam, 4822 Michigan Av. 
Stenge, B.. 2154 N. Kedzle Blvd. 
Stern, Bert, 452 N. Jefferson 
Stern, Chas. H., 3258 Douglas Blvd. 
Stern, H. H., 2524 N. Kedzie Blvd. 
Stem, H. B., 5319 Michigan Av. 
Stern, Max, 1826 Evergreen Av. 
Stern, Max, 18 W. Austin 
Stol, Dr. S., 1911 S. Spaulding Av. 
Stolz, Rev. Dr. J., 4827 Langley Av. 
Stone, Mrs. J., 4642 Woodlawn Av. 
Straus, M. M., 4343 Vincennes Av. 
Straus, Meyer Xi., Lakota Hotel 
Strauss, Sig. L., 175 W. Jackson 
Stulman, Dr. S. J., 218 E. 39th 
Sultan, Philip, 747 Brompton Av. 
Sulzberger, S. L., 4404 Michigan Av. 
Sumner. S. J.. 237 S. Market 
Swesnick, H. B., 500 S. 5th Av. 
Switton, M., Old Jewish Home 
Tabak, S.. W. Division 
Tay, Dr. C. D., 1406 W. Taylor 
Teller, Carrol A.. 5206 Woodlawn 
Tepper, L, 1750 W. Taylor 
Tepper, N., 837 S. Wood 
TIcktin, C, 6443 Green 
Tint, Dr. L., 121 S. Ashland Blvd. 
Tipp, Minnie. 1650 S. St Louis Av. 
Tropp, Sam'l, 828 S. Leavitt 
Trotzkey, B., 1550 S. Albany Av. 
Tuchinsky. Sam, 739 O'Brien 
Turk, Alex., 4727 Indiana Av. 
Tuska, Leo, 5408 Mich. Av. 
Udolowich, Max, 1225 Independence 

Blvd. 
T'manskl, Morris, 108 S. La Salle 
Try, L B.. 2913 W. Division 
Van Gelder, Jacob, 3542 W. Jackson 

Blvd. 
Van Gelder, Sol, 3540 Jackson 

Blvd. 
Vescelus, C. E., 4229 N. Irving Av. 
Wald, Benedict, 1445 K. 55th 
Wallerstein, H., 1022 W. 12th 
Weil, Edgar J.. 530 Bolmont Av. 
Weil. Saml.. 3348 Douglas Blvd. 
Weinberg, A. B., 4607 Grand Blvd. 
Weinberg, S. B., 447 W. 37th 
Weinberger, Henry, 5723 Michigan 

Av. 
Weinberger, Saml. B.. 1346 Gran- 

ville Av. 
Weiner. I. H.. 5655 Calumet Av. 
Weiner, Dr. S. H., 1431 S. Halsted 
Weinshenker, Saml. E., 1001 S. Ash- 
land Blvd. 



Weis, Berthold, 1221 Blue Island lUinois 

Av. 
Weisenbach. J., Tribune Bldg. 
Weiss, Philip, 1441 N. Talman 
Weissburg, Ed., 4728 N. Rockwell 
Weissburg, Zollan D., 2718 Leland 

Av. 
Wien] Genevieve, 1310 S. Lawndale 

Av. 
Wilk, Harry, 1129 S. Paulina 
Wllk, J. R.. 1127 Snn Francisco A v. 
Wlneberg, I., 566 W. 12th 
Winegrad, Rabbi, 736 S. Ashland 

Blvd. 
Witepskie, Isidore, 1634 Monticello 

Av. 
Witowskv, D., 1220 Hyde Park Blvd. 
Wittenberg, H., 1214 S. Kedzie Av. 
Witz, Samuel, 1133 N. California 
Wohl, Mark, 2209 N. Kedzie Blvd. 
Woldenberg, A., Elms Hotel 
Woldenberg, M., 1500 Pratt Blvd., 

Rogers Park 
Wolf, A., 5339 Calumet Av. 
Wolf, Dr. Benzlon, 1159 W. 12th 
Wolf. H. M.. 3914 Ellis Av. 
Wolf, J. D., 2324 Thomas 
Wolf. Rose C. 1315 S. Avers Av. 
Wolff, J., 2030 Burling 
Wolfson, Sam, 5250 Michigan Av. 
Wollock, Mary, 1103 S. Wood 
Wolpert, Dr. B. E., 8700 Commer- 

cial Av 
Zeitlin, a! Z.. 3618 Douglas Blvd. 
Zelitsky, Nathan, 2649 Iowa 
Zemans, D. M., 5008 Vincennes Av. 
Zevin, M., 1637 Trumbull Av. 
Zlatnick, Harry, 1223 Cample Av. 
Zollne, Dr. N. J., 3137 W. Pith 
Zolotkoff, L., 1613 Ashland Blk. 
Zuckerman, M. U., 1617 W. Polk 

Subscriber 
Lewek, Rev. J. P., 3719 W. 12th 

OUnton 

Henoche, H., Boston Store 
Shapiro, L., 214 B. Main 
Tick, Jacob 



OoUinsvlUe 



Mann, Abe 



Danville 

Bregstone, H. H., American Bank 

Bldg. 
Epstein, Mris. B. J., 408 W..Main 
Goldberg, Saml., 026 N. Vermilion 




452 



AMERICAN JEWISH YEAR BOOK 



Illinoii Salt St. Lonii 

Beck, Jacob, 606 St. Clair Av. 
Burger, Rabbi Adolph, 631 N. 9th 
Chackes, Louis, 114 St. Clair Av. 
HurwltB. Meyer, 667 N. 19th 
Robert, S. J., 719 Colllnsvllle Ay. 

Elgin 

Brenner, I. 
Rosengarten, M. 

Evaniton 

Drosdoff, N., 1112 Main 
Preedman, A., 1039 Jackson At. 

Oalesburg 
Special Mbmbsb 
Gross, Jos. 

Annual Mbmbebs 
Frollch, Sol. 
Nlrdllnger, S. 

01encoe 
Glaser, Edw. J. 

Hegewisch 

Annual Membebs 

Brown, A., 13319 Baltimore Av. 
Brody, E., 13313 Baltimore Av. 
Siegel, H. 
Yalovitz, J., 13322 Baltimore Av 

Highland Park 
Special Mbmbeb 
Schaffner, R. 

Homewood 
Elsenstaedt, Dr. M. 

Joliet 
Kaplan, Wm. A., 807 N. Center 

Kankakee 

Bauer, D. I., 410 S. Schuyler Av. 
Birk, M., 839 S. WUdwood Av. 
I.assers, H., 141 N. Schuyler Av. 
Perlman, L., 529 S. Greenwood Av. 

La Grange 
Kalish, B. R., 406 N. Kensington Av. 

La Salle 
Special Member 
Neustadt, Geo. 



Annual Mbmbbbs 

Goldsmith, M. N.. 614 7th 
Hlrsh, Dr. S., 2 S. Marquette 
Hodes, S., 966 2d 
Ramensofsky & Son, M. 

Linooln 
Simon, Dan, 208 Aglesby Av. 

KadisoB 

Blumenfeld, M., 206 Weaver Av. 
Schermer, Joe, 12th & Madison 

Koline 

Dolkart, L.. 614 10th 
Rosenstein, L., 2419 7th Av. 
Sklovsky, Max., 624 10th 

Mounds 
Subscriber 
Galvln, Rev. J. P. 

Oak Park 

Jacoby, H. S., 639 N. East Av. 

Peoria 

Patron 
Woolner, W. B., Jefferson Hotel 

Special Membbrs 

Szold, Jacob, 515 George 

Woolner, Adolph, Jr., 439 Moss Av. 

Annual Members 

Abraham, B., 407 George 
Bellock, D., 116 6th Av. 
Kottighelmer, Kev. S. G., 206 Brad- 
ley A v. 
Braverman, A. 
Cappel, Chas. 

Chernevitz, Max, 540 E. 5th 
Cnlipii. Uahbi A., 509 S. 6th 
Prankel, Harry, 704 7th 
Friedman, D. S., 1618 N. Monroe 
Goodfriend, H., c/o Peoria, D. G. Co. 
Gordon, M. E. 
Gross, Ludwlg, 404 Evans 
Hlrsch, Jacob, 1107 5th 
Horwitz. Dr. S.. 401 Bowland 
Ketay, Sam, 605 S. Adams 
Largman, S., 4112 S. Adims 
Lehman, Edw., 1201 N. Monroe 
Lehman, Sam, 1005 Lehman Bldg. 
I^viDSon, Isaac J., 910 N. Madison 
r^vitin. Dr. E. Z.. 516 JelTerson 

Bldff. 
Marcu, Harry, 523 Fifth A v. 
Miller, M. C, 143 High 



JEWISH PUBLICATION SOCIETY 



453 



Nathan, ChaA., Jefferson Hotel 

Solomon, N., 204 First 

Wagner, M.. 121 7th 

Wolner, Mrs. Sam'l, Jefferson Hotel 

Wolfner, W. F., High & Elizabeth 

Quinoy 

Ohsiuan, M., 520 N. 6th 
I'rocrass, Frank, 614 Hampshire 

Bockford 

Special Members 

Burke, L., 1525 Harland Blvd. 
Goldman, E. R., 424 Napoleon 
Mayer, Slg., c/o Hotel Aiayer 
Oppenheim, E., 986 N. Court 
Udelowich, P., 1622 Harlem Blvd. 

Annual Membebs 

Pizer. [>.. 403 fi. State 
Rosenthal, Dr. Leo V., Base Hospi- 
tal, Camp Grant. 
ShaiinouBe. Chas., 10.S5 Haskell Ay. 
Stewart, Ben A., 2514 20th Av. 

8eis«r 
Jackson, E. J. 

Bprinfffleld 
Special Member 
Myers, Louis M., 1115 S. 7th 

Annual Members 

Bloom, Rev. Irwing M., 108 Charles 
Eckstein, M., 1826 S. 4th 
Lange, B. A., 710 8. 7th 
Meyers, J. M., Meyers Bldg. 
Myers, Albert, 811 S. 7th 

Bprlnf Talley 
Rosenzweig, B., 222 St. Paul 



Staunton 

Kptler, A. 
Sherman, Max 

TaylorviUe 

Marblestone, Sol 

Summer, Harry, 214 B. Vine 



Illinois 



Tiskilwa 



Nathan, Abe 



TTrhana 

Lowenstein, M. A. 

Litman, Prof. Simon, 807 W. Cali- 
fornia 
University of Illinois, Library of 

Subscriber 

Baldwin, Prof. E. C, 1002 S. Lin- 
coln Av. 

Waukegan 

Ardlin, Sam, 776 Marion 
Blumberg, J., 541 N. Genesee 
Eisenberg, Sani. 60 10th 
Glass, Sam, 308 S. Genesee 
Goodman, E., 1352 Wadsworth Av. 
Gordon, C., 017 Genesee 
Jacobs, C, 311 Julia 
Morris C, 126 GilUtte Av. 
Morrison, S., 220 N. St. Jnmes 
Rosenblum, Mrs. H., 116 E. Wash. 
Rubin, A. M., 132 Gillette Av. 
Rubin. M. H., 720 Count v 
Seidenfeld, S. M., McAllister & May 
Stern, Max, 910 lOth 

Wlnnetka 

Berkson, Maurice, 272 Poplar 
Moses, Harry S., 410 Cedar 
Spiegel, Mrs. J., 411 Sheridan Blvd. 



Anderson 

Glazen, Joe, 625 Nitton 

Glazer, Geo. I. 

Glazes, Wm., 1601 Main 

Kursch, Alven, 2109 Noble 

Seligman, I. Louis 

Zeigler, Mrs. Joseph, 1234 Jackson 



Attica 
Special Mbmbeb 
Levor, Mrs. Levi S. 



miAJKA 

Annual Member 
Schwa rts, Harry 



Indiana 



Bedford 

DabrowslcT, D. A. 
Jacobs, Abe 8. 
Marcus, Paul 
Seletz, I. 

Bloomlngton 

Becovits, Ben. 

Hirsch. Alex F.. 642 College 
Kadison, Joe, 518 B. 7th 
Kahn, Pred 




454 



AMERICAN JEWISH YEAR BOOK 



Indiana Blnffton 

Spbcial Mbmbbb 
Ijevenson, Ben. 

Annual Member 
Salinger, Ben, W. Market St. 

Oolumbui 

Kroot, Jos., 115 Jackson 
Tross, A., 227 Washington 

Oonnersville 

Drebin, M. 

Guttman, Harry, 417 Eastern Av. 

Orawfordville 
Warner, Lee S., 704 B. Main 

East Ohioago 

Special Members 

Lewin, A. B., 702 Chicago Av. 
Lewin, M., 1359 Amy Av. 

Annual Member 
Given, Albert, 502 Chicago Ay. 

Ellwood 

Special Member 
Wolf, T., 1121 S. Anderson 

Evansville 

Special Member 

Bernstein, D. S., 1511 S. 2d 
Rardin, Dr. M., 426 Grant 

Annual Members 

Anchilevich, Max, 203 S. 4th 
Belgrade, Jack, 1104 rowell Av. 
Bitterman, Adolph. 204 Main 
Chivian, Philip, 423 Upper 8th 
Frey, Philip, Citizens Natl. Bank 
Fuchs, Israel, 518 Upper 4th 
Goldberg, A. P., 405 W. 4th 
<;rnsin, S. H.. 1621 First Av. 
Heimann, Dr. L., Citizens Trust 

Savgs. Bldg. 
Horn, Ellas, 715 Cherry. 
Kaiser, M., 615 Upper 6th 
Lassen, Rabbi A., 1527 Mulberry 
L«vy. Henry, 916 Powell Av. 
Ravdin, Dr. M., 426 Grant 
Salm, I., 1205 S. 6th 
Skora. Philip. 1021 Upper 8th 
Trockman, H., c/o J. Trockman's 

Sons 
Weil, Elizabeth. 1100 Powell Av. 
Wolf, Karl, 504 S. 4th 



Fort Wajme 
Frank, M., Frank's Dry Goods Stort 
Frankenstein, Solly K., Penn Place, 

R. F. D. 1 
Heiligman, A. S., 1723 S. Lafayette 
Hurwitz, Rev. M., 1323 Maumel Av. 
Lehman, A. J., 1423 Calhoun 
Lehman, Mrs. B., 508 West Berry 
Levy, Ben., 916 W. Berry 
Wartell, B., 1217 Webster 
Young, C, 1019 Webster 

Gary 

Library Member 
Koltlnsky, Max, 7th Av. & Bway. 

Special Members 

Morris, J., 1525 Adams 
Zinder, M., 1301 Wash. 

Annual Members 

Bernstein, H., 820 Madison 
Bloom, I., 776 Delaware 
Feder, William, 1112 Broadway 
Glaser, Paul P., 425 Monroe 
Kahn, Miss Kate G., 701 Delaware 
Kan, Dr. Alex. M.. 1740 Broadway 
Katz, Miss Anna, 777 Adams 
Lieberman, Morris, 2200 Broadway 
Senslbar, M.. 1028 W. 6th Av. 
Silverman, B., 1528 B'way 
Silverman, Ned, 1526 Broadway 

0O8hen 

Lewis, Sam, 410 S. Main 
Salinger, N. 

Oreenoastle 

Sudranski, C, Huntington & Vine 
Sudranski, Sol. L. 

Hammond 

Golden, S., 493 E. State 
Marcus, L. A., 252 Treeman Av. 
Silver, Saml., 177 E. State 

Hartford Oity 
Smilack, Mrs. E. 

Indiana Harbor 

Special Members 

Aronoff, M., 3722 Ceden 
Seifer, L. H„ 4120 Parrish Av. 

Annual Members 

Brenman, Morris, 3515 Cedar 
Marcowich, Wolf, 3716 Cedar 
Unterman, Isaac, 3414 Deodar 



JEWISH PUBLICATION SOCIETY 



455 



Indianapolis 

Special Mbmbbbs 

Bamberger, R., 2937 Washington 

Blvd. 
Borinstein, L. J., 4137 Meridian 
Kiser, Sol. S., 2128 N. Penna. 
Koor, Harry L., 1113 Maple 
Rauh, Chas. S.. 3024 N. Alerldian 
Rosenthal, I. M., 1924 N. Meridian 
Wolf, Louis, 1901 N. Meridian 

Annual Mbmbebs 

Abrams, Henry, 806 Merchants Bk. 

BIdg. 
Bamberger, M., 1829 N. Delaware 
Berg, Ben, 507 Lombard Bldg. 
Bernstein, N. M., 820 Accidental 

Bldg. 
Blieden, Jos. C, 306 W. Washington 
Bloom, Mrs. H., 229 E. Washington 
Bloom. Oscar, 2166 Broadway 
Brill, Henry, 1919 N. Meridian 
Cohn, Ernest, 3929 Graceland Ay. 
Davis, Lawrence B., 860 Broadway 
Efroymson, G. A., 2036 N. Delaware 
Efroymson, Meyer 2207 N. Penna. 
Epstein Brothers, 528 S. Capital 
Ettlnger, Leo, 410 Indiana Ay. 
Evans, Rowland, 1436 N. Alabama 
Falender, Louis. 731 Lexington Ay. 
Felbleman, Isidore. 2345 N. Penna. 
Feuerllcht, Rev. M., 8034 Washing- 
ton Blvd. 
Fishbein, P. B., 4 W. 19th 
Goldberg, Orle, 615 Russell Ay. 
Gordon. Max, 735 Union 
Hecht Leon, 2215 N. Meridian 
Hirshovitz, P., 1001 Maple 
Ind. State Library, 47 State House 
Indianapolis Heb. Congr., 3308 N. 

Illinois 
Jewish Federation of Indianapolis, 

923 8. Meridian 
Kuppin, Joseph, 1519 Ashland Av. 
I^pinska. Dr. T., 4305 N. Senate At. 
Levin, Eph., 107 W. 38d 
r^ewis, E. I.. Apt. 8, Hampton Court 
Lewis, H., Belmont & Turner Avs. 
Lyman, B., 2457 N. Delaware 
Mantel. Emll. 205 W. Washington 
Medlas, C, 721 N. Dalner 
Messing, Rev. M., 8258 N. New Jer- 
sey 

Neustadt, Mrs. Minnie, 739 Union 
Rauh, C. S., 3024 N. Meridian 
Schur, A. Jos., 713 Merchants Natl. 

Bk. 
Sebel, Wm., 1722 N. Alabama 
Selig, Moses, 2063 N. Delaware 
Serrensky, Louis R., 1320 Union 



Simon, M. N., 31 W. 26th Indiana 

Sommers, C. B., Apt. E., Mc Buck- 
ingham 

Wolf, Isaac, 1832 N. Capitol Av. 

Zuckerman, Sam., 1042 N. Capitol 
Av. 

Kokomo 

Special Member 
Levi, J. S. 

Lafayette 

Bercovltz, C. D., 644 Main 
Pearlman, Dr. S.. 119 N. 6th 
Singer, Jacob. 1630 Main 
Stein, Mrs. Virginia, Public Library 

Lawrenoeburg 
Harris, S. B. 

Ligonier 

Henoch, S. 
.Jacobs, Irvin 

Straus, Simon J., The Straus Bros. 
Co. 

Linton 
Bach, Ben., E. & N. Main 

Michigan City 
Moritz, M., 602 Spring 

MUhawaka 

Feldman, Mary, 724 N. Division 
Marks, Henry, 5034 Main 
Rosen stein. S., 208 N. Mill 
Stein, William, 202 E. Joseph 

Kitohell 
Effron, Jacob 

Kunole 

Friedman, Louis 
Roberts, G. D., 613 W. Jackson 
Schwartz. S., 914 E. Jackson 
Zeigler, Ben., 1905 University Av. 
Zeigler, Mrs. M., 624 S. Council 
Zlgler, Harry, 614 S. Liberty 

New Oastle 
Abrams, Mike 
Dalinsky, J., 1506 Broad 
Epstein, H. I., 903 Spring 
Schuffman, A. E., 1500 N. Broad 

North Yernon 
Special Member 
Gumble & Son, Wolf 



AMERICAN JEWISH YBAB BOOK 



Ann DAL UiuBBKa 
Fred, aaml., ISS 8. 14th 
Boae, BldDST, care of BallrMliI Btoie 
VU™n. "— ' " '-" " 



Scbirarti, Sam, eZS W. CaUaX At. 
Belbert, Babbl JdIIu*. 132 S. Scott 
BhBpIro, Rabbi M., 600 W. Wayne 
BtelD, Leonard, 1121 W. Dlvtiton 
Boath Bend Public Ubrarr 
Diiger, Bam J., BIT B. Bontb 



ml. 8, 4BU 8. lltb 



EpatdD, Jacob,. 116 W. 2d 
Bcbati. Hyrnan, BO* W. Sd 
BhuBtec, Iirael, 21S W, 3d 

■oottiborK 

SbaklnBkj, fl!"' 



Slunc. Q., 10 N. Chcitnut 
BhalbrrUl* 

LtBUBI MBUBU 

Joeeph. Julius 



Warner, L. 

Tene Hante 

Bpkiai. Uihbeb 
Hen, A., S09 6. 8th 

Ahndal MausBvB 
Blumbers, Ben,, Star Bldg. 



Levin, 

Levin, MorrM L.. 227 Ken. _.. 
Raffln. Mrs. L D.. 621 Poplar 
Bchlff, Harry, 315 Dennine 
Btern, 8. M.. 669 Oak 
Talelman, Mra. J. 
Temple Israel Sabbatb School, e 



Sachs, I., SI I 






■, LoqIb, 



133 S. Laurel 



.■, Dr! J.. «2h Clli 

CIralBky, Ira. S2G E. JelTcrsoa BlTd, 
Cdhn, 8. C, IllB a. MlcStgnn 
De Relboum, Z., SfiO Farmera Trust 
Frledmiin, Meyer, B20 8. Scott 
Gilbert, Meyer, 1207 B. Main 
Greenblatt, H., 122 B. Parla 
Hurlwleh, Mi ' 



Ahhual Ububbbs 



Whltlllt 
LlBBASI MnMBn 
Selfer. F., 42S Laport At. 



Ahni 






:, Dr. I 



Reebt. S., 119 C 



Hbubbbs 

l."'Car^oU ^ri«'D,°i.'625 'Ichraae 
WWA 

Ahnital & 
Pctersberger, liaae 



ODonell Blnffi 
Hocbman, 0., 91S etb At. 
Roienletd, Jollua, 222 S. Ttb 

SaTanport 
Special Mbubib 
Adier, B. P., 2104 Main 



At. 

Bllberateln, Mai, 2B26 Brady 



JEWISH PUBLICATION SOCIETY 



457 



Des Moinei 
Special Mbmbbbs 

Goldman, M. D., 400-11 Walnut 
Marks. R., 213 W. 8d 

Annual Mbmbbbs 

Blotcky. A., 704 Buchanan 
Bramson, A. A., 417 Walnut 
Brody, A., 812 Court Av. 
Brody, Harry. 1408 10th 
Brody, J. I., 024 Penn At. 
Buchen, M., 1425 12tli 
Cohen. Herman M., 033 W. 8d 
Cohen, Louis B., 1351 E. Walnut 
Cohen. M. H.. 727 Fleming Bldg. 
Cohen, O., 000 W. 4th 
Davidson. J. L.. 1158 7th 
Davidson. Jacob, 1410 W. 7th 
Davidson. Louis, 1084 Arlington Av. 
Frankel. A.. 41st & Grand Av. 
Frankel. Mrs. B.. 210 37th 
Frankel. Mrs. Belle G.. 220 W. 87tb 
Gordon. M. M.. 420 University 
Gutmann. Isaac, 221 3d 
Israly Bros.. 410 E. Grand 
Jacobson. Ben. L., 605 Crocker Bldg. 
Katz. Dr. B. A.. 2205 E. 12th 
Lappen. Robert, 1400 Bluff 
Leener. A., 035 8d 
Mannhelmer. Rabbi E.. 108 Inger- 

60 11 Av. 
Mendelsohn, Bro.. 2032 Cottage 

Grove Av. 
Mendelsohn, H. L.. 1826 N. 6th 
Press, Dr. H. P., 1307 Penn Av. 
Robinson, S.. 004 W. 18th 
Rosenbaum, C. H.. 1001 N. 3d 
Rosenfleld. Mrs. M.. 207 W. 87th 
Siegel, I. L.. 816 E. 7th 
Silver, Marcus. 820 Walnut 
Silverman. Chas., 1012 Penn Av. 



Strauss, Oscar. Crocker Bldg. 
Unger, Dr. D., 628 B. Locust 
Zion, Saml.. 1016 4th 

Keokuk 
Weil, J. B., 628 Orleans Av. 



Sioux City 

Spbcial Membebs 

Davidson. Abe. 805 10th 
Davidson, Dave. 1700 N<»bra8ka 
Sternhelm, Rabbi E., 1400 Douglas 

Annual Members 

Baron, B., 1810 Pearl 
Brodsky, Max. 600 Center 
Cohen. Mrs. J. H.. 1602 Jackson 
Free Jewish Library, 601 Pearl 
Galinsky. A. L., 1524 Summit Av 
Galinsky, Herman, 2301 Jackson 
Goodsite. A., 412 4th 
Helfgott. Dr. M. A., 2100 W. 8d 
Kulakofsky, A. I.. 618 Court 
Mt. Sinai Library, 1400 Douglas 
Pessin. N., 018 W. 6th 
Plckus. N. W., 1415 Dace 
Slotsky. Wm., 301 Davidson Bldg. 
Stepakoff. H.. 1116% Pierce 
Stillman, A.. 400 4ili 



Iowa 



Vinton 



Urbach, J. L. 



Waterloo 



Harrison, Sol. 



KANSAS 



KansiiM 



Oawker Oity 
Rothchild, Jacob 



Kansas City 

Brenner, A., 716 Packard 
Glatt, Ben., 328 Washington Blvd. 
Glatt, Meyer S.. 1613 E. 10th 
Lustig, L., 26 N. James 
Shaw, M., 1605 Minnesota Av. 

Leavenworth 
Spbcial Membbb 
Ettenson, Mrs. Henry, 114 Pott 



Pittsburg 

LiBBABT MBMBEB 

Schlanger, A. H., 311 S. Olive 

Annual Membebs 

Degen. Harry, 316 W. Washington 
Israel. S. 
Rose. S. A. 

Wichita 

Croney. S., 3424 B. Maple 
Wallensteln, H., 832 N. Topeka Av. 



458 



AMERICAN JEWISH YEAR BOOK 



Kentucky 



KENTirOKY 



Ashland 



Special Members 



flyman, Sam. 

Josselson, Ben., 114 W. Greenup Av. 

Katz. Rabbi I. 

Lipsltz, Louis, 13th 

Strauss, Geo., 804 Win Av. 

Oatlettsburg 
Special Members 

Gordon. H. 
Krlsh, H. 

Annual Mkmkkrs 

Engel, Philip, Box 323 
Josselson, Alex., Box 535 
Maslnter, Sol. 
TMIlemer, Jacob 
Shero, L. 
Thorf, Jacob 

Oynthiana 

Gold!)erg. M. 

Gordon, M. 

Pollack. Nathan, 17 Locust 

Signer, A. 

Wolf. M. J. 

Danville 

Cronstein & Lovitch. Main St 
Lyons, S., 3d St. 

Frankfort 
Special Member 
Davis, I., 120 W. Todd 

Hopklnsvllle 
Sabel, Max 

Lake Charles 
Bloch, Rev. Dr. J. 

Lexington 

Kaufman, M., 504 W. High 
Kohn, Sol., Georgetown 
lievy, Isador 

Newburger, B., c/o Lexington 
Creamery Co. 

LonisviUe 
Patron 
Bernheim. I. W., Main St. 

LiBRART Member 
Bernheim, B., 648 Main 



Grossman, Louis, 1312 S. 2d 
Rothstein, A., 10 Belvedere Apts. 
Swltow, M.. 135ft 8. 2d 
Washer, B. T., 1335 Second 

Annual Members 

Adath Israel Congr.. 834 8d 
Ades, L B., 115 S. 6th 
Ades, Mrs. Jncob. 708 W. Market 
Ades, Moses W., 406 E. Chestnut 
Baron, S. S.. 815 W. Main 
Benber, Isaac. 214 W. Chestnut 
Berman, B., 705 Lucas PI. 
Blieden, I., 628 W. Market 
Bliti, W., 331 E. Walnut 
Branijson, L., 421 S. 4th 
Brith Sholom Relig. School, c/o Her- 
man Meyer, 111 W. Hill 
Bronner, Dr. H., Atherton Bldg. 
Brooks, Mrs. M.. 1508 S. 1st 
Cohen, L., 714 S. Brook, Apt. 6 
Cohen, Meyer, Auditorium Apt. 
Ebrman. Hilmar, 1230 3d Av. 
Evans. J. S., 208 E. Market 
Finkelstcin. H.. 639 S. Ist 
Freedman. M.. 216 S. Preston 
Galanter, Dr. II., 232 W. Market 
Goldberg, Dr. I., 670 S. 2d 
Goldstein, Hattie. 927 S. 1st 
Goodman, Harrv, 704 W. Market 
Hoenig, Nat, 2022 S. 3d A v. 
Ilorvltz. M., 343 K. .Tefferson 
Isaacs, Minnie D.. 315 E. College 
Klevansky, Rabbi S.. 222 E. Madison 
Lazarus. .Tos., 417 Kensington Court 
Levy, S. J., 217 B. Madison 
Llebschutz, N., 828 S. 1st 
Linker, Barnet, 110 W. Ormsby 
I^ulsville Free Public Ubrary 
Mann, Maurice, Y. M. C. A., R. 713 
Marx, Gus, 2104 New Main 
Meyer, Herman, 111 W. Hill 
Meyers, Dr. Sidney J., 1451 2d 
Mueller. Rev. Dr. Ign., 1116 Brook 
Pressman, Sam, 317 S. Preston 
Ranch, Rabbi J., Temple Adath Is- 
rael 
Rosenberg, G. S., 1229 1st 
Rosenthal, L. A.. 333 B. Walnut 
Schulman, M. W., 408 B. Walnut 
Selligman, Alfred, Paul Jones Bldg. 
Selligman, Jos., Paul Jones Bldg. 
Shapinsky, Allan, 315 W. Hill 
Shapinsky. Simon, 1245 S. 4th At. 
Simons. L. L., 1317 Highland Av. 
Sloss. Stanley E., 421 Park At. 



JEWISH PUBLICATION SOCIETY 



45J) 



Stavltzky, S., 136ft 2d 
Steinfeld. E., 1642 Lucia Av. 
Strull, Chas., 2077 Sherwood Av. 
Taustine, J., 119 W. Market 
Turnheim, S., 628 Paul Jones Bldg. 
Winner, Mrs. Rose, 212 W. Ormsby 
Wolkow, I. Leo, 303 B. Madison 
Y. M. H. A., 729 8. 2d 
Zarchy, Rabbi A. L., 330 E. Walnut 

Maysyille 

Alper, Simon, 128 Market 
Fischer, Moses 
Merz, A. L. 
Merz, Eugene 
Middleman, Saml. 

Mount Sterllnf 

Click, Saml. 
Morris, Isaac 
Newmeyer, S. M. 
Sandberg, Herman 



Newport Kentucky 

Jacobs, Herman, 807 Monmouth 
Marx, M., 732 Maj)le A v. 
Slegel, BenJ. M., 717 Columbia 

Paducah 
Special Member 
Simon, Moses, 335 V^ N. 7th 

Annual Members 

Israel Temple Sabbath School 
Levlnger, Rabbi L. J., 812 Jefferson 

Paris 
Elvove, J. 

Friedman, B., 825 Walker Av. 
Stem, Morris 

Shelhyville 
Salinger, J. 

Winchester 
Feld, M., 12 N. Main 



AhheTille 

Silverman, D. 
Weill. J. & Bro. 



Alexandria 

Bauer, Geo., 405 3d 
Broida, Sam, 816 St. Ann 
Gehr, Gus, 406 Elliott 
Mann, Dav. E. 

Rothstein, Rabbi L. J., 804 Murray 
Simon. A. E. 

Temple Religious School, c/o Rabbi 
L. J. Rothstein, P. O. 2492 

Crowley 
Special Member 
Frankel, J. 



LOiriSIAKA 

Lake Charles 

Bloch, Rev. Dr. J. 
Gross, Dallas, 815 Rvan 
Kaufman, L, 725 Bilbo 
Packman, Henry, 1127 Hodge 



Annual Member 



Meyer, B. 



DonaldsonviUe 



Bloch, Leo 
Netter, Adolph 
Samuelson, S. J. 



Jeanerette 



Monroe 

Kaliski, J. L., 403 Catalpa 

Kaplan, Saml. 

Kr.'iuss, L. 

Meyer, Mrs. Jonas, 217 N. 2d 

Meyer, Mrs. Sol, 128 Catalpa 

Morgan City 
Goldman, Mrs. J. J., Box 92 

Natchitochei 
Semmelman, Marshall 

New Iberia 
Special Member 
Dreyfus, Leon, 1834 Opperllne' 

New Orleans 

Life Member 

District Grand I^dge. I. O. B. 
212 Whitney Central Bldg. 



Louisiaiifl 



B.. 



Wormson, C. 



Lafayette 



Abramson, H. 



Library Member.s 

Repp. Bert rand. 40.S.'> St. Charles A v. 
Kaufman. .T.. 1609 Robert 
Steinborg, M., 1421 Penlston 



460 



AMERICAN JEWISH YEAR BOOK 



Louisiana Special Members 

BoDart, Sam, Paydras & Rampart 
(.jodchauz, Mrs. K, 1287 Jackson Ay. 
Goldberg, A., 1527 7th 
Julius Weis Home, care of Laura 

Infy, 817 Groveer 
Kohlmeyer, C, 5127 Prytanio 
Levy, Chas., 701 Pine 
Levy, G. D., 1820 Berlin 
Pokorny, Mm. Dave, 2113 St. 

diaries Av 
Sternhardt, A., 1529 Amelia 
Weinberger, Chas., 708 Union 
Wolflf, Solomon, 1522 Alins 
Zemurray, Saml, Whitney Bldg. 

Annual Mem^ebs 

Aletrino, G., 1930 Gen. Taylor 
Bratmun, H., 5015 Constance 
Cahn. Edffar M.. 320 St. Charles 
Cohen, J., 640 S. Ramport 
Cohen, J., 221 Chartres 
Cohen, Miriam. 436 Lowerllne 
Cohn, J. S., 1738 Robert 
Dresner, J. D., 1412 Carondelet 
Feingold, Dr. M., 4206 St. Charles 

Av. 
Feldman, Wm., 2504 Chestnut 
Flomacher, Lee, 1938 Berlin 
Ginsberg, Geo. J., 1412 Carondelet 
Godchaux, A., 497 Audubon 
Goldberg, Rabbi M. H., 1625 Baronne 
Goldman, A., 825 Baronne 
Greenblatt, L. A., 1421 Canal 
Grossman, Mrs. Ad., 1518 4th 
Guuibel, Lester, 2320 Prytania 
Hansmann, L., 1568 Webster 
Hayem, L., 817 Gravier 
Heller, Rev. Dr. Max, 1828 Marengo 
Hess. Bernard, 1721 State 
Hirshfelder, M., 1626 Clio 
Hochstein, A., 4723 Baronne 
Hyman, L., 704 S. Rampart 
Israel, Sam, 3331 St. Charles Av. 
Jewish Orphan Home, St. Charles & 

Ppters AvR 
Kahn, F., 7725 St. Charles Av. 
Kaufman, J., 129 N. Solomon 
Kaufman. L., 4117 Prytania 
Kaufman, P. S., 2134 Milan 
Kern, K., 4900 St. Charles Av. 
Kling, P., 1529 Nashville Av. 
Kohlman, E., 1501 Gen'l Taylor 
Kohlman, Sig, 1544 State 
Kohlman, Dr. W., 1544 State 
Kohn, Jos., 18 Audubon PI. 
Korn. Marcus, 4721 Mngazine 
Kottwltz, Mrs. M.. 5417 S. Franklin 
Ladles Guild of Temple Sinai 
Leipziger, Rev. Dr. Bmil W.. 1708 

Du fossa t 



Lemle, G., 8413 St. Charles Av. 
Levey, M. B., 2846 St. Charles Av. 
Levy, Jake, 1823 Robert 
Levy, S., 1640 Palmer Av. 
March, D. H., 3625 St. Charles Av. 
Marksteln, J. C. 1901 Octavla 
Marx, Archibald A., 2030 Octavla 
Mayer, Erhard, 1781 Milan 
Meyerowitz, Rabbi B., 2029 Baronne 
Mintz, S., 2608 Penetson 
Moss, W. I., 1311 Vahnont 
Nelken, Dr. A., 1638 Dufossat 
Newman, Mrs. H., 3512 St. Charles 

Av. 
New Orleans Pub. Lib. 
Nudel, I., 137 W. Lee 
Oury, Mrs. H., 2220 St. Charles Av. 
l*ai)et. Eiias, 1050 Carondelet 
Regenbogen, B., 220 Royal 
Rittenberg, J., 172 S. Ramport 
Robbins, Isidort. 2207 Baronne 
Rosenberg, E., 7927 St. Charles A v. 
Rosenfeld, J. S.. 1829 Robert 
Rosenson, D. & Son, 1600 Baronne 
Saal, I. R.. Penlston & Pitt 
Schwartz, L. E., 6215 St. Charles 
Schwarz, Lewis, 2102 Octarla 
Schwarz, Ralph. Perrln Bldg. 
Shushan, G., 2033 Milan 
Silversteln, A. N., 1334 Louisiana 

Av. 
Simmons, N., 3203 Prytania 
Simon, E., 1229 Prytania 
Sinai, Joseph, 4218 Perrier 
Stern, M., 5115 St. Charles 
Stem, P., Octavla Apts. 
Weil, J., 2900 St. Charles A v. 
Weis, L. C, 1731 Robert 
Weiss, Sol., 1806 Robert 
Weiss, Theo., 1731 Robert 
Wolbretta. D.. 2323 Magazine 
Wolf, A. J.^ 1731 Scale 
Y. M. H. A., St. Charles Av. & Elm 

St. 
Zllberman, M., 618 Baronne 

Opelousaa 

Haas. I^on S. 
London, J. 

Bhreveport 
Library Membbb 
Herold, S. L., 554 Stoner Av. 

Annual Members 

Abramson, Dr. Louis, 722 Cotton 
Bath, M. L., 310 Stoner Av. 
Bernstein, Ernest R., 1239 Park PI. 
Freycr. A. B.. 616 Jordan 
Gold, Louis. 721 Texas 
Goldstein, Nathan, 314 Stoner Av. 



JEWISH PUBLICATION SOCIETY 



Graeber, Jos., 1BS9 Adds 
Herald, J. K., BBS Stoner At. 
Hlr«ch, W. B., SIC Crti^kett 
Hochbtrger, S. B., T09 Teiu 
Jacobutn, BBbbI M. P., 21 B 
Koaakotalir, Jog.. 123 McNel 
Leman, Q. M., 819 Market 



Well, ri. M. BI9>aD 



EsBrlg, Rabbi D ISG Nevbut; 



BUdtford 
Palakowltch, Lewla, 120 MalD 

eardlner 
Kd3s ft Orou, High ft Brldse 

LawUton 
Brawoiteln, H., SOS Ubion 

Portland 
BpnciAb HBMBnaa 
Bennan, J. E.. TO HomloK 
Freaman, H., 64 T- A Cousrem 
MarkBon, E., SS Melbourne 



Brenner. J., 01 lAwrence 
r'anlaa. Dr. El I a a. 81 Marntne 
DaltoD, Mn. Eather B., G90 Can- 

DavlB, Dr. John L., 62 Homing 



. ,. , 1W2 Newbnrj 

flennan. A., IIT Franklin 
HerinnD,A., 21 S Cumberland At. 



., 1S2 Oxford 



LeTlne. Mark. 78 Beckett 
Lurle. Falk. lOB Federal 
Rackoit, Rev. H. L„ 180-B Newborj 
Ronrn. Maurice R.. SS Hicbann 
Selger, 8., 84 Morning 
Siegal, I.. GS Cangresa 
SIlTerman, M. J., S2 Hampahlra 
SImonda, Mar, 14 Alder 
Bultowltch. M. A„ 11 W Ttne 
Ticker, S., 26 Honument 
WelnatelD, J., 37 Middle 
WelBberg, Iiaae, ISS Newbarr 



At. 



>. M,, 108 Cumberland 



■UBTLAVD 

Upman, Job.. Main Aahn 

Miller, A.. 44 Weat 

SbackB, Oscar, 37 West 

WelBB. Charles, 182 Pilnce Oeorte 



BlltlBIM* 
LlBKABT UBKAIB* 

Berur, Albert, 2249 Eutaw PI. 
Cone, Mra. Moaea H., 1800 Bntaw 

PL 
Frieflenwaia, Mra. Jane, 224B Kataw 

Place 
LeT7. jDllua, lOB Btdgwood Rd, 



Atlaa Club. The. ISIO H. Baltimore 
Bamberger. Wm, 
Sank, 8. M., S12 Hanover 
CaBtelle, Oeorge. 20IS Butaw PI. 
Cllne. Bernhard, 403G Belle At., 

N. Foreat Pk. 
Cohen, Bertha, 41B N. Charlea 
Cone. Dr. a^dney M., 232S Eutaw PI 
Dalshelmer, Simon, Lord Baltimore 

DaTldaon, laaac, 801 N. Howard 
Bpateln, laeob. 2582 Eutaw PI. 
Follck. I.. 1606 UeCnllob 
Oamse, Herman, Courtland * Sara- 



462 



AMERICAN JEWISH YEAR BOOK 



Maryland Goldenberg, Mrs. M., The Esplanade 
Outman, L. K., 112-122 N. Eutaw 
Hamburger, Mrs. H. I., 2245 Eutaw 

PI. 
Hamburger, S.. 2315 Eutaw PI. 
Hanline, Alex M., 2208 Linden Av. 
Hebrew Youne Men Sick Relief 

Assn., 1039 N. Broadway 
Hecht, Mrs. J. F.. 1916 Eutaw PI. 
Hochschild, M., Id2r Eutaw PI. 
Hutzler, Albert D., 10 Lauvia Ed., 

Sta. P 
Hutzler, Mrs. David, 1801 Eutaw 

PI. 
Ind. Order Brith Sholom, 1012 E. 

Balto. 
Kohn, Benno, Mt. Washington 
Kohn, Louis B., Howard & Lexing- 
ton 
Lewis, Jack, 1411 E. Baltimore 
Lichtenberg, I., 9 S. Greene 
Malkln, S., 1136 E. Pratt 
Mandelbaum, Mrs. Seymour, Hotel 

Belvedere 
Michelson, R. A., 1420 E. Baltimore 
Moses, Leslie Wm., American Apts., 

Eutaw PI. 
Pear, Jos. J., 829 Brooks Lane 
Pritzf elder, M. C, 219 W. Lexington 
Rayner. A. W., 8 E. Lexington 
Rice, Mrs. S. A., 1700 Eutaw PI. 
Schiff, Harry, 139 Jackson PI. 
Schloss, Meyer, 2234 Linden Av. 
Schloss, Michael, 11 Carroll Rd., 

Windsor Hill 
Schwartzman, H., 2307 Madison Av. 
Seff. Robert. 215 Courtland 
Shalevitz, M., 824 S. Charles 
Silverstein, Israel. 145 Jackson PI. 
Sollod. Nathan, 2231 E. Pratt 
Sonneborn, Mrs. H., 1608 Eutaw PI. 
Sonneborn, Dr. F., Esplanade Apts. 
Sonneborn, S. B., 2420 Eutaw PI. 
Stein, M., 2262 Linden Av. 
Strous, Benj., Riviera Apt. 
Tifereth Zion Assn. of Balto., 1910 

E. Balto. 
Trupp, N., 1232 Oreenmount Av. 
Walter, Mrs. M. R.. 2801 N. Charles 
Weinberg, Abr. I., 2310 Eutaw PI. 

Annual Mbmbbbs 

Abell, I., 547 Columbia Av. 
Abramowitz, H», 123% S. High 
Abramson, C, Windsor Hill Rd. & 

Lyndhurst 
Adalman, H., 1826 E. Baltimore 
Alexander. Mrs. Fannie, 2112 Green- 
mount Av. 
Alter, Isidore, 1713 E. Eager 



Anna Sindler Literary Socy., 1816 

E. Baltimore 
Anschowitz, Jos., 593 N. Gay 
Applefeld, Saml. C, 221 W. Balto. 
Applestein, Ben. S^ 2022 E. Pratt 
Aronson, I., 1216 E. Baltimore 
Ashman, David B., 2226 K, Madison 
Ashman, Jesse, 1111 E. Balto. 
Austerlitz, John, 1410 E. Lombard 
Baker, Tobies, 2309 Mondawmin Av. 
Balachow, Jos. D., 1211 McBlderry 
Balder, Cnas. M., 131 Jackson PI. 
Bamberger, Jacob, 404 McMechen 
Bank, Morris, 38 E. Montgomery 
Barber, Sam, 139 N. Bway. 
Baroway, Aaron, 2554 McCulloh 
Bass, Charles, 118 S. Exeter 
Bass, Byman, 2701 Fait Av. 
Baum, E. M., 210 N. Chester 
Baylin, Dr. M. J., 212 Aisquith 
Bearman, Sol., 2215 E. Pratt 
Beck, Benj., 804 Reservoir 
Becker, Herman, 1641 Ruxton At. 
Benesh, Morris A., 1240 Scott 
Benesh, Sam'l, 651 W. Lexington 
Benjamin, Benj., 1622 McElderry 
Benjamin, I., 215 N. Bond 
Bereston, Dr. A.. 1724 E. Baltimore 
Berger. M., 2139 Linden Av. 
Berkaw, Nathan, 916 W. Balto. 
Berkowltz, Jos. M., 232 N. High 
Berman, Jos., 231 Courtland 
Bemey, B. S., 2426 Callow Av. 
Bernstein, M. M., 2409 Linden Av. 
Bpmsteln. Saml.. 246 N. Exeter 
Blatt, Dr. D. F., 1202 E. Monu- 
ment 
Blaustein, S., 821 E. Baltimore 
Bllves, Aaron, 129 W. Montgomery 
Block, Jacob, 43 E. Cross 
Block, Simon J., 2107 Brookfleld Av. 
Block, Wm., 2111 E. Pratt 
Blocker, Jos., 1855 W. Pratt 
Bloom, M. L., 3310 Auchentoroly 

Ter 
Blum,' B., 447 Druid Hill Av. 
Blumberg, Alex. 2204 Linden Av. 
Blumberg, H., 13 S. Ann 
Blumberg, I., 1521 E. Pratt 
Blumberg. Ralph. 6 S. Liberty 
Board of Jewish EJducatlon, 106 

Jackson Place 
Board of Jewish Education, 2100 

Westwood Av. 
Boker, Miss Minnie, 314 Tremont 

Av., N. 
Bordensky, Dr. N. B., 2114 Wilkens 

Av. 
Brenner, L. I., 821 Chauncey Av. 
Brenner, Sol M., 937 Brooks Lane 
Brenner, W. M., 402 E. Balto. 



JEWISH PUBLICATION SOCIETY 



463 



Brodie, I. B., 2005 Cheston At. 
Brown, B.. 328 S. Paca 
Brown, Jacob, 1406 Gough 
Buckner, Israel, 4702 Garrison Av. 
Bugatch, I. S., 622 N. Central Av. 
Burdwise, A., 2331 Druid HUl Av. 
Burka, Meyer, 1009 Pennsylvania 

Av 
Cahn', Frank B., 2401 Eutaw PI. 
Calmen, Samuel, 1815 Barclay 
Cantor, I. M., 207 W. Camden 
Caplan, David, 2018 McCulloh 
Caplan, H. L., 2230 Mondawmln Av. 
Caplan, Meyer, 2900 Huntlnj?ton 

Caplan, Michael, 1321 B. Madison 
Caplan, Nathan, 1616 Appleton 
Caplan, Oscar, 620 E. Balto. 
Caplan, R. J., 1125 N. Fulton Av. 
Carmel, Saml. M., 1808 E. Baltimore 
Charkatz, Harry, 1419 E. Baltimore 
Cherry, Julius, 516 Light 
Chldeckel, Dr. M., 216 N. High 
Chlzuk, Emunah Congr., c/o B. 

EJrkes. 321 Wilson 
Clark, Emile. 2349 Eutaw PI. 
Cohanl, J., 504 Pulaski 
Cohen, A. M., 2543 McCulloh 
Cohen, Aaron, 2409 Madison Av. 
Cohen, Dr. Abraham, 1744 Park Av. 
Cohen, B., 1709 Linden 
Cohen, Mrs. B. M., 3415 Beech Av., 

Walbrook 
Cohen, Hyman, 186 N. Broadway 
Cohen, Julius, 616 S. Charles 
Cohen, L. J., 709-11 Union Trust 

Bldg. 
Cohen, Louis, 4 N. Broadway 
Cohen, M., 2308 Tioga PI. 
Cohen, Max, 2116 E. Baltimore 
Cohen, Nathan A., 2319 Madison Av. 
Cohen, S.. 129 N. Pine 
Cohen, Simon, 1006 N. Broadway 
Collector, S.. 671 W. Balto. 
Cooper, Miss Florence, 2120 Brook- 
field Av. 
Coppel, B., 2250 McElderry 
Coralsh, I., 720 E. Baltimore 
Cordish, L., 1708 Mondawmin Av. 
Crockln, Emil, 2124 Chelsea Ter. 
Dahne, E. G., 2030 E. Falrmount 

Av. 
Da Laviez, Saml., 777 Columbia Av. 
Danker. Dr. I.. 244 Aisquith 
Dashew, Jacob, 1019 E. Baltimore 
Davidson, I. W.. 402 W. German 
Davidson, Rubin, 2545 McCulloh 
Dealham, S., Marlborough Apts. 
Debuskey, R. M., 24 N. Montiord 
Demberg, Lee, 220 Law Bldg. 
Dickler. Wm.. 500 E. North Av. 
Dlnovltz, Isidore, 1600 E. Fayette 



Drucker, Saul, 22 N. Broadway Maryland 

Dubois, Henry, 4200 Sprlngdale Av. 

Eggnatz, I., 720 N. Howard 

Eisenberg, BenJ., 2 W. Ann 

Ellin, Morris, 1109 E. Balto. 

Ellison, D., 1627 B. Madison 

Ember, Aaron, Lawlna Rd. 

Engel, Jacob, 2422 Eutaw PI. 

Ephraim, R. L., 2228 Linden Av. 

Brkes, Charles, 2110 Callow Av. 

Erlanger Bros., 519 W. Pratt - 

Escann, Isidore, 946 W. Fayette 

Etelson. Morris, 2338 Penna. Av. 

Evnin, N., 1137 E. Baltimore 

Fader, A., 210 E. Baltimore 

Farbman, H., 1119 Watson 

Farbman, J., 2107 McElderry 

Fax, J., 834 E. Pratt 

Federleicht, L., 324 W. Baltimore 

Felkin, B., 124 N. Eutaw 

Feikin, Mever, 721 W. Baltimore 

Feldman, D., 2230 Madison Av. 

Fell, Mrs. D., 1619 Smallwood 

Filtzer, B. J., 1814 Moreland Av. 

Fine, Israel, 411 W. Baltimore 

Fine, Louis, 228 Mondawmin Av. 

Fineihan, S., 800 Newlngton Av. 

Fink, Jos., 100 N. Charles 

Flam, Carl J., 25 S. Broadway 

Flax, S. J., 125 N. Broadway 

Fleischer, Jos., 235 N. Gay 

Fleischer, Milton, 2109 Linden Av. 

Fleischer, S. M., 1700 Eutaw PI. 

Fleishman, D., 1217 W. North Av. 

Floam, Dave, 11 S. Exeter 

Folkoff, Saml.. 208 S. Patterson 

Pkway. 
Ford, David, 718 W. Lexington 
Fox, Michael J., 2305 Whittler Av. 
Fox, Morton, c/o Union Stock Yards 
Frank, E. L., Marlborough Apts., 

Wilson & Eutaw PI. 
Frank. EH, 1504 Bolton 
Frank, Minnie, Esplanade Apt. 
Frank, Mrs. Rebecca, 1829 Eutaw 

PI. 
Frank. Sol., Emersonian Apt. 
Franklin, Dr. David, 122 W. Lee 
Freed. I., 1808 E. Falrmount Av. 
Freedman, B., 22 E. Centre 
Freodmau. H.. 2234 Mondawmin av. 
Freedman, Mrs. R., 1442 E. Balto. 
Freedom, Dr. A. G., Edmondson Av. 

& 14th 
Froiman, Jos. O., 108 S. Caroline 
Frcnkll, Isaac, 1706 Mondawmin 

Av. 
Friedel, Mayer, 1415 E. Baltimore 
Fricdenwald, Mrs. B., 1616 Linden 

Av. 
Friedenwald, Dr. Harry, 1029 Mac. 

son Av. 



AMERICAN JEWISH YEAR BOOK 



Mu7liDd FrlMlesiTlia, Dr. J., lOlS N. Chsrlei 
Friedman, B., 109-11 W. Lambard 
Friedman, LouIb, 1419 W. Balto. 
Vrledmu, Mai. 12S Colvln 
Frlednmn, Saml., 846 W. Lexington 
Fuld. Uanea E.. The MartborouBb 
Furman, I.., BIK a. Paca 
Oaller, Jack H,, 438 N. Caroline 
Galoon. Sarah. lOT S. Exeter 
Gann, Loula A., 1300 Light 
Geare. M.. 219 S, Bethel 
Glllman, Ulaa R,, ZZOO a. Monument 
GUIman, MIbs Rebecca, 2200 B. Man- 



1, 27 N. BroBdwtlT 



hot Rd., Windsor litUa 
GurwlW, Etta, 2308 Dnild Hill Ay. 
Gutman, J., Gmereoalan Apt. BS 
□adasB, M., 2026 Madlaon Av. 
Halle, iHaac, 1004 Eutaw PI. 
Halle, M. 8., 2222 Callow At. 
Ualperln. Dr. S., 1143 B. BaltliDOre 
IlamhurgeT, Or. L. P., 120T BDtaw 



., 1829 E. Battimor 



3 W. North At. 



GlBS 



, Hjmi 



,' 1S12 E. Monn- Harrla, Hbi. 2040 B. Bal 



Gllckman, 309 E. Lanvale 
Gold, H.. 137 N. Broadwaj 
Gold. Mai, 877 W. Fayette 
Goldhers. A.. SOT Holimi 
GoldberE. Cbas. B.. SOS Saoford PI. 
GoldberR, D.. 339 Forrest 
GoldberE. Jonas, 2124 E. Lomhard 
Goldberg, Morrla. 21 S. Eieter 
Goldbers. Wm., 2 S. HaooTer 
Goldhloom, U S.. 613 r~-- 



HarrlB. S. A.. 2753 W. North At. 
Harris, 8am., 212 S. Eieter 
Harsh, G. M., The Riviera Apt 
HartogenslB, B. H., 1940 Linden At. 
Hebrew Children Shelterlna & Pro- 
tective Assn., 22 N. Broadway 
Hebrew Educ. Socletj. 126 Asqolth 
IIplKott. Dr. Nathan J., 109 8. 



e/n B. 

i rutiixea 



GoldfuBB. A.. eB2 N. Gaj 
Goldhelm, Mrs. U i "" 



llettleraan, Joseph, 2IS Cou 
2218 Callow Herman, 8., 5 Commerce 

HIeaer, Davis. ei4 S. BpoHdway 
Ulgbken, Dr. Jos., 1607 B. Bi 



Goldman. L.. 232 8, Broad wot 
Qoldamltb, J. 8.. 233K Bntaw PI. 
Qoldimltb, Job., ill Dolphin 
Ooldamlth. M. B., Baplanade AptS. 
Goldstein, H.. 130 W. Cross 
Goidatone, M. H., 123 N. Broadway 
GomboroT, I., 43 Enlckerbocket 

Bids. 
Goodman. laaac, 2308 Druid Bill At. 
Gordon, Irving. 162S Appletan 
'Gordon. P.. 2236 MoDdavmln At. 
Greenbaum, Danl., Esplanade Apt. 
GreenliRum, L. E.. 1814 Eutaw FI. 
Greenbaiim. M. D., 2208 Linden At. 
Greenbaum, Simon, 1301 W. Balto. 
Greenbprg, Dr. J. A.. 8S0 E. BaJto. 
Green hers. Louis. 212 Dolphin 
Greenfeld, Miss Roae, ISOO E. Pratt 
Green apoD, Dr. B. A., Johns Hop- 

klna Eoapltal 
OrloaCelder, Mrs. H., 2020 BuUw PI. 
Grollman, O. 8., 2333 Madison At. 
Grollman. 8., 2620 McCutloh 
Grossmao, Joe, 200 N. Ann 



nillman. C, 1913 Bntsw 
Hlllmaa, N.. 2S39 McCulloh 
Qlmmel. 8.. 2038 Eutaw PI. 
Hlmmelfarb. H. D., 112 E. Centre 



.'. L, 438 Equitable Bldg. 
.M.u, ^aizih C. 804 Ho^llns 
Hoffman, Jos.. 1531 W. 36th 
Hoffman, L. B.. JI29 S. Broadway 

HDllander, l',' 127"j'ad 
nornsteln. I. L., 821 W. Lellngton 
Uopnstelti, J. D., Esplanade Apts. 
Hornstein, Simon, 821 E. Pratt 
Horrlnger, N., 139 Jackson PI. 
Horwitz, E. H.. 910 Wbltelock 
Howard Club. 935 HanoTer 
Hurwlti. A., BOO B. Lombard 
Hurwltz, F., 919 B. Baltimore 
Hurwltz. H.. 914 E. Lombard 
Hutiler. A. G., 1801 Eutaw PI. 
Hntzter. Edwin. 212 N. Howard 



JEWISH PUBLICATION SOCIETY 



465 



Hyman, Sol. I.. 2025 B. Baltimore 
Isaac, Louis, 3668 Falls Road 
Jacob, Fannie E., 2326 E. Baltimore 
Jacobs, J. H., 1726 N. Payson 
Jacobson, Carl, 1069 Myrtle Av. 
Jacobson, H., 436 Aisquith 
Kanton, H. S., 1822 Ruzton Av. 
Kaplan, Joe S., 1507 Penna Av. 
Kartman, M. A, 2319 W. North Av. 
Katz, Chas., 24 Hanover 
Kat2, H., 2334 Madison A v. 
Katz, J. O., 2305 Elsinor Av. 
Katz, Jos., 952 Brooks Lane 
Katz, J. L.; 1434 Gough 
Katz, Meier. 2214 Linden Av. 
Katzen, Prank. 200 Aisquith 
Katzen, J., 1919 B. Pratt 
Katzenstein. Mrs. B., Esplanade 

Apts. 8 B 
Kaufholz, Fred, 1114 N. Patterson 

Pk. Av. 
Kaufinanl D. J., 1029 W. Fayette 
Kaufman, Lawrence, 2002 McCulloh 
Keilis, Miss C. 1105 E. Madison 
Kellman, H. T., 2545 Madison Av. 
Kessler, Milton, 1603 N. Monroe 
Klpner, Hyman, 2129 B. Lombard 
Kirsh, Jacob, 604 W. Baltimore 
Klrsner> Dave B., 1707 Linden Av. 
IClaff, Harry. 2210 B. Baltimore 
Kling, Morris, 2127 E. Pratt 
Kohn. Rabbi E., 2427 Lakeview Av. 
Kohn, M. J., Paca & German 
Kolker. Ben.. 30 N. Chester 
Kopilnick, Meyer, 1445 N. Mount 
Kovens. A., 401 N. Eden 
Kramer, H., 113 E. Baltimore 
Kramer, L, 2206 Brookfleld Av. 
Kramer, M., 1818 Bentolou 
Krelow, Sam'l., 1703 E. Balto. 
Kremer, N. D., 2032 E. Balto. 
Kresser, S., 1518 Madison Av. 
Krlegel, J., 2503 McCulloh 
Krieger. Dr. E., 109 S. Broadway 
Kronacher. Joseph, 410 Continental 

Trust BIdg. 
Kroopnick, A., 326 Gilmor, N. 
Krupnick, Ellis G., 132 N. Ann 
Kupersmidt, Geo., 2329 Madison Av. 
Kurland, Israel, 1223 Clendenan 
Kushner. Isaac. 253 S. Caroline 
Ladensky, S. Saml., 700 E. Preston 
Landa, Hyman. 2031 E. Baltimore 
Landy. David Z., 1610 E. Fayette 
Laucnheimer, C. H., 1524 Eutaw PI. 
Lauchhelmer, J. M., 2122 Bolton 
Lauchheimer, S. H., 1524 Eutaw PI. 
Lauer, Mrs. L.. Esplanade Apt. 3A 
T^uer. M.. 2001 Eutaw PI. 
Lazarus, Max, 2131 Callow Av. 
I>ebow. Lewis J.. 327 W. Balto. 
Lebowitch, L., Windsor Hill Apts. 



Lebowitz, Sam'l. V., 2574 McCulloh Maryland 

Lehman. Judah, Emersonian Apts. 

Lehmayer, M., 663 Calvert Bldg. 

Leibowitz, Wm., A., 916 Chauncey 
Av. 

Leopold, Dr. E. I., 803 Park Av. 

Leopold, I., 2218 Eutaw PI. 

Levenson, Reuben, 2038 B. Fair- 
mount 

Levin, Ellis, 825 N. Gay 

Levin, Harry O., 832 Brooks Lane 

Levin, I., 1633 E. Balto. 

Levin, I. A., 1734 B. Fayette 

Levin, L. H.. 2104 Chelsea Ter. 

Levin, R., 904 W. Balto. 

Levlne, A. H., 220 E. Baltimore 

r^vinson, M. A., 21 N. Broadway 

Levinstein, I., 2341 Madison Av. 

Levitt, Joseph, 2022 Edmondson Av. 

Levy, Barney, 1603 B. Baltimore 

Levy, Chas. S., 2913 O'Donnel 

Levy, N. A., 1732 Bentalou 

Libaner, M., 1830 Fairmount Av. 

Lichtenstein, William, 130 Jackson 
PI. 

Lipman, M. D. H., 1626 Madison Av. 

LIpnIck, J., 207 W. Camden 

Lipnick, K., 1642 Ruxton Av. 

liipnlck, R.. 654 N. Baltimore 

Lit, M., 137 N. Broadway 

Livingston, I. L., 1924 E. Baltimore 

London. H.. 1421 E. Fayette 

London, Meyer S., 2529 Madison Av. 

Lutzky, Jerome, 5746 Hunter 

Lutzk^, Louis, 1805 Moreland A v. 

Lutzky, Miss Rose, 2201 Division 

Maass & Kemper, 2336 Eutaw PI. 

Macks, Dr. Isaac M., 1802 B. Bal- 
timore 

Malnen. Caiman, 1426 E. Pratt 

Malowltz, S. R.. 1801 Madison Av. 

Mandelburg. A. H.. 1410 E. Fayette 

Mansbach, Dr. I. T., 2306 Madison 

Av 

Margolls, A. J., 2477 Druid Hill Av. 

Margolls. I.. 752 W. Franklin 

Marks, Miss R., 1230 Orleans 

Mask. Joseph, 2036 E. Fairmount 
Av. 

Mazor, Blanche R., 9 S. Broadway 

Meisel, Abel, 1600 E. Fort Av. 

Mendelsohn, Dr. A. H., 1016 E. 
Fnyette 

Merin, Frank, 4. N. Caroline 

Meyer, Bernard, 2568 McCulloh 

Meyerhoflf, Mrs. Fannie, 2424 Wood- 
brook Av. 

Meyerhoflf, Jos., 2311 Druid Hill Av. 

Meyrowitz, T., 2302 Callow Av. 

Michaelson, N. J., 1827 E. Balto. 

Michelson, E. L, 909 Penna. Av. 



466 



AMERICAN JEWISH YEAR BOOK 



Maryland Michelson, I., 2113 E. Baltimore 

Michelson, Jerry, 1719 W. North Av. 
Miller, Dr. C. E., 1605 B. Baltimore 
Miller, Harry J., 1200 Park Av. 
Miller, M., Lembrose Apts. 
Miller, Max, 2111 Bolton 
Miller, S. S., 1407 E. Pratt 
Miller, Tobias, 2027 E. Balto. 
Miller, Mrs. Wm., Esplanade Apts. 
Millerman, J. H. 
Millman, L., 2008 Eagle 
Mindel, I., 918 Balto. 
MIntz, Julius, Lake Court Apt., 

Linden Av. 
Mitnick, Dr. J. H., 424 N. Greene 
Mitnick. Jos. S., 2572 McCulloh 
Mohr, J. L., 2103 E. Balto. 
Morovltz, Louis M., 1435 E. Pratt 
Morris. L., 1618 W. Lanvale 
Morstein, M., 1602 E. Fayette 
Morstein, N., 124 Jackson PI. 
Morstein, Wm., 2020 E. Baltimore 
Moses. J. M.. 2324 Eutaw PI. 
Naiditch, Harry L., 913 E. Bal- 
timore 
Nathanson, Dr. A. J., 1813 E. Bal- 
timore 
Nathanson, J., 104 Aisquith 
Needle. H. A., 3000 Brighton 
Newhouse, D. H., 506 S. Fremont 
Nordin, Dr. E., 223 S. Broadway 
Notkln, M.. 25.39 McCnlloh 
Nudel, I., 1641 N. Monroe 
Nyburg, S. L., 2414 Linden A v. 
Obeb Sholom Congr. Sunday School 
Oppenhelmer, H., 1411 Eutaw PI. 
Oppenhelmer, Wm., 3819 Clifton Av. 
Ostrov, Nathan, 614 Hanover 
Ottenheimer, B. M., 2028 Linden Av. 
Ottenhelmer, R. M., 2113 E. Olive 
Palay, M., 321 Wilson 
Paulson, D., 2104 B. Fairmount Av. 
Paymer, Morris, 1619 Appleton 
Pearlman, Isidore, 1613 Ruxton Av. 
Pelovitz, A.. Balto. & Frederick 
Pels, Dr. I. R.. 922 W. North Av. 
Peregoff. M., Baltimore & Eden 
Perel. M., 312 S. High 
Phoenix Club, 13 Eutaw PI. 
Pimes, M., 2204 Callow Av. 
Pincus, Louis, 2147 Eagle 
Plven, Joe. 2106 Lombard 
Pleet, E. E., 3605 Cottage Av. 
Pleet, Paul, 2233 E. Pratt 
Pogorelskin, Alex., 141 N. Broadway 
Polan, J. N., 2306 Tioga PI. 
Poland, Saul, 120 S. Eden 
Polikoflf, A., 720 N. Eutaw 
Pontiac Club. 100 Jackson PL 
Porner, Morris, 1738 N. Monroe 
Potts, Isaac, 511 N. Kenwood Av. 
Pressman, M., 929 Penna. Av. 



Proser, S., 2045 Fleet 
Pumpian, M., 713 Poplar Grove Av. 
Pushkin, Dr. BenJ., 1503 E. Bal- 
timore 
Pushkin I., 2300 Druid Hill Av. 
Putzel Memorial Library, 1020 E. 

Baltimore 
Quitt, Dr. Sol., 1403 B. Baltimore 
Quitt, Dr. Wm., 2512 Madison Av. 
Rabinowich, S., 930 S. Charles 
Ribakow, B. I., 629 N. Patterson 

Pk. Av. 
Rivkin, Anna, 21 N. Washington 
Rivkin, Rabbi R.. 16 W. Hill 
Robinson, L. B., 2420 McCulloh 
Robinson, M., 1602 Ruxton Av. 
Robinson, M. R., 1603 Ruxton Av. 
Robinson, Maurice. 2025 McCulloh 
Robinson, Paul, 2518 Madison Av. 
Rodman, S. J., 1642 E. Baltimore 
Rogers, S., 114 N. Pine 
Rolnick, J. R.. 1708 Appleton 
Rombro, Jacob, 106 S. Patterson Pk. 

Av. 
Rombro, Morris, 24 S. Patterson 

Pk. Av. 
Rombro, Herman, 1251 E. Fayette 
Rome. M. A.. 2225 Linden Av. 
Romm, M., Balto Av. & Frederick 
Rosen, F., 2021 E. Baltimore 
Rosen, M. L., 1043 Ridgely 
R6sen, Raphael, 2026 Madison Av. 
Rosen, Dr. S., 1510 E. Baltimore 
Rosenau, Rev. Dr. W., 1515 Eutaw 

PI. 
Rosenberg, D. B., 1527 Penna. Av. 
Rosenberg, N., 332 S. Patterson 
Rosenblatt, S., 1433 Mt. Royal Av. 
Rosenbloom, J., 812 Hollins 
Rosenbloom, S., 3410 Auchentoroly 

Terrace 
Rosenblum, Wm., 2441 Lakeview Av. 
Rosenfeld, A., 114 N. Howard 
Rosenfeld, Aaron, 1642 Ashburton 
Rosenfeld, Mrs. G., 1720 Butaw PI. 
Rosenfeld. Louis, 1611 Ashburton 
Rosenfeld, Morris, 131 S. Bond 
Rosenfeld. Wm. A.. 1108 Scott 
Rosenthal. J. J.. 1622 Linden Av. 
Rosenzwog, M. J., 779 Columbia Av. 
Rothholz, Julius. 2108 Bolton 
Rothholz, S., 2527 Brookfield Av. 
Rottman. Abe, 1808 E. Balto. 
Round, Solomon, 1924 W. Lafayette 

Av 
Rovner, H., 1210 E. Baltimore 
Rubinstein, Abr., 424 W. Pratt 
Rubenstein, Rabbi C, 2318 Callow 

Av. 
Rubenstein, Eli.. 429 W. Pratt 
Rudo, B. H., 723 N. Patterson Pk. 

Av. 



JEWISH PUBLICATION SOCIETY 



467 



Sachs, Isaiah, 116 W. Lee 

Sachs, Philip, 2823 Parkwood Av. 

Sachs, Raymond, 2115 Pennsylyanla 

Av. 
Sachs, Sarah, 2254 Madison Ay. 
Sacks, Herman Z., 1824 Falrmount 

Av. 
Safranek, H., 139 N. Broadway 
Salabas, Jos., 3200 Clifton Av. 
Salganis, Louis P., 1631 Ruzton Av. 
Samuels, L., 642 Equitable BIdg. 
Samuelson, Rcse, 1017 Howard 
Sandler, J. S., 1800 E. Baltimore 
Sapero, Ralph J., 827 William 
Saron, Louis L., 1727 Braddish Av. 
Sauber, N., 3003 Garrison Blvd. 
Savage, Dr. M., 1729 Madison Av. 
Savage, N., 23 W. Chester 
Saxon, Wm,, Nelmar Apts 
Schaffer, Rabbi S., 2566 McCulloh 
Schapiro, D., 117 N. Fremont 
Schaplro. Moses. 820 Hollins 
Schein, M., 116 Key Highway 
Scheuer, Lieut. L. D., 1902 Eutaw 

PI. 
Schpnthal, S., 929 Brooks Lane 
Schpr, J. W.. C 3 Seville Apts. 
Schiller, Louis. 1911 Fulton Av. 
Schlaen, M.. 829 E. Pratt 
ScbloBS, L. S., 2541 McCulloh 
Schloss, N., 2410 Eutaw PI. 
Schloss, Toney, 1933 E. Baltimore 
Schnaber, J., 809 Penna. Av. 
Schreiber. A. J.. 1423 E. Baltimore 
Schulman. Jacob. 1403 E. Pratt 
Schulman, N., 1801 N. Fulton Av. 
Schuman, Rev. J., 2415 Lakeview 

Av. 
Schwab, Solomon A., Hotel Rennert 
Schwartz, Ben., 2312 Mondawmin 

Av. 
Schwartz, H., 3214 Evergreen Ter. 
Schwartz, Dr. H. B.. 2216 McCulloh 
Schwartz, Mrs. M., 2510 McCulloh 
Schwartzberg, Maurice, 1725 Penna. 

Av. 
Schwartzman, A., 20 S. Chester 
Schwartzman, J., 619 E. Balto. 
Schwartzman, M.. 1216 Whitelock 
Schweitzer, A., 737 N. Center Av. 
Seidel. Dr. H.. 1931 E. Pratt 
Seldel, Myer, 223 N. Wolfe 
Seidman, Alex., 2100 McCulloh 
Seldman, Theo., 1000 Linden Av. 
Sclonkow. M. E.. 2315 Madison Av. 
Sellkovltz, Max. 115 N. Broadway 
Sells, Leopold, 2000 Madison Av. 
Seltzer, Samuel, 132 W. Castle 
Senker, Sol., 1649 Ruxton A v. 
Serkln, Myer L., 519 Sanford PI. 
Shalowltz, Abr., 156 N. Exeter 
Shalowitz, Hyman, 115 N. Bway. 



Shaman, Sam., 1022 HolUns 
Shank, Sam'l., 902 W. Balto. 
Shapiro, Mrs. I., 2308 Tioga PL 
Shapiro, Oscar, 515 Sanford PI. 
Shapiro, S., 17 S. Exeter 
Sherman, Daniel, 3634 Cedar Av. 
Shochet, A. S.. 2108 E. Pratt 
Shochet, J. Louis, 416 Equitable 

Bldg. 
Shomer, I., 40 E. Eden 
Shpritz, BenJ., 647 W. Lombard 
Shpritz, D. A. S., 2101 Wilkins Av. 
Shuham, M.. 1817 E. Baltimore 
Siegel, Isreal, 2706 Reisterstown Rd. 
Siegel, M., 31 S. Washington 
Silberman, Harry M., 811 W. Balto. 
Silberman, J. H., 1625 Ruxton Av. 
Silberman, T., 2000 Madison 
Sllesky, B. M., 850 W. North Av. 
Silver, Hyman, 425 Hanover 
Silver, L. M., 435 N. Broadway 
Silverman, Arnold, 2916 Parkwood 

Av. 
Silverman, S., 2428 Lakeview Av. 
Silverstein. Dr. S., 1121 E. Bal- 
timore 
Simon, Aaron J.. Ill N. Charles 
Sindler, Bessie. 1804 E. Baltimore 
Singer, S. M., 327 W. Balto. 
Sinsky, Dr. H. L., 1610 E. Baltimore 
Sinsky, I., 754 W. German 
Siskind, Abe, 4 W. Hill 
Slovin, Samuel L., 1507 E. Lafayette 

Av. 
Slusk'y, Sara. 913 K. Madison 
Small, P.. 507 S. Broadway 
Smeyne, Moses, 3038 E. Baltimore 
Smotrltsky. J. B., 720 N. Edpn 
Sobelman. .7os.. Elgin Av. & Denison 
Sol)eloflf. Simon, 502 Hoffman Bldg. 
Social Service uept., c/o Henry Son- 

neborn & Co. 
Sodie, Isaac, 115 N. Ann 
Solomon, David, 311 W. 29th 
Sondhelm, W., 1621 Bolton 
Sopher, Isadore, 1382 N. Calhoun 
Soypher. Benjamin. 400 E. Oliver 
Speert, H., Lombard & Albemarle 
Speert. S., 2453 W North Av 
Spring Club Inc., 29 N. Broadway 
Stambler. !«. O.. 115 S. Hanover 
Stein. Israel, 808 Hollins 
Steinberg, Jacob, 1011 W. 36th 
Steinberg, Sam'l.. 103 W. Pine 
Stofberg. N.. 2026 E. Baltimore 
Straus, A., Si 6 Equitable Bldg. 
Strauss, I). M.. 4 Riviera Apts. 
Strauss, M.. Esplanade Apats. 8 F 
Strauss, Mrs. Wni. L.. 9-2 Alhambra 

Ai)ts. 
Streich, Dr. Henry, 601 N. Gay 
Stulman, M., 2127 Bolton 



Maryland 



468 



AMERICAN JEWISH YEAR BOOK 



MaiylAiid Sugar, Max M., 207 N. Broadway 
Suls, Maxwell. 1728 N. Smallwood 
Sykes, A., 1602 Mondawmtn Av. 
Sykes, Philip L., 26 N. Chester 
Thaler, Louis, 107 N. Patterson Pk. 

Av. 
Thalheimer, S., Riviera Apts. 
Theodore, N., 1630 Ruxton Ay. 
Traub, Sydney R., 2140 Brookfleld 

Av. 
Trepolsky, Al., 1736 B. Balto. 
Tumbler, M. H., 807 W. North Av. 
Union, P. 

Van Leer. M., 2218 Brookfleld Av. 
Wagenheim, Mrs. Lena, 1828 E. 

Balto. 
Waldman. B., 1719 B. Pratt 
Watner, David I., 2828 Guilford Av. 
Waxman, M. B., 2615 Madison Av. 
Waxman, Nathan. 1609 Bentalou 
Wegleln, D. E., 2400 Linden Av. 
Weigert, Louis, 2201 Brookfleld Av. 
Weinberg, D., 626 Columbia A v. 
Weinberg, H. E., 2416 Madison Av. 
Weinberg, Harry M., 2669 McCuUoh 
Weinberfr Henry, 2639 Madison Av. 
Weinblatt, Wm., 128 N. Bond 
Weinman, M., 2128 Callow Av. 
Welnstein, A., 1618 N. Smallwood 
Welnstein, Morris, 1026 W. 86th 
Welskopf, Hiram J., UN. Charles 
Werlin, Rev. Isaac, 723 Aisqulth 
Werthelmer, L., Biltmore Apts. 
Wiesenfeld, B.. 2328 Eutaw PI. 
Wiesenfeld, Mrs. H., The Emer- 
sonian Apts. 
Wiesenfeld, J., 1712 Linden Av. 
Wilkls, Samuel, 1711 Barnes 
Winter, Simon, 1004 N. Gay 
Wolman, Dr. S., 2407 Madison Av. 
Woolf, B. S., 1512 W. Saratoga 
Woolf. D. H., 700 Druid Hill Av. 
Workmen's Circle Free Library, 

1200 E. Lexington 
Wyman, J. H., 1630 McCulIoh 
Wyman, M., 19 W. Lexington 
Yoffe, Nathan, 649 W. Lexington 
Yoken, Dr. N. P., 113 S. Broadway 
Zetzer, J. S., 1732 E. Balto. 
Zlnser, Max, 2429 McCulloh 

Belair 

Cohen, Joseph 
Getz, David B. 

Brunswick 
Special Member 
Werntz, H. N. 



Annual Mbmbbbb 

Kaplan, Victor 
Wa ranch, A. L. 

Oambridge 
Jacobson, D. I., 84 Poplar 

Cumberland 
LiBRABY Member 
Waingold, B., 802 N. Mechanic 

Special Mbmbxbb 

Rnsenbaum, 8.. 67 Washincrton 
Rosenbaum, Simon, 70 Washington 

Annual Members 

Baron, Rabbi M., 626 Green 
Hebrew Library Soc^ Be'er Chajim 

Congr., c/o Rabbi Baron 
Frank, Harry, 108 Mechanic 
Gersteln, Israel, 6 Davidson 
Gurson, Ike, 253 Columbia Av. 
Kaplan, S. W., 93 Balto. 
Klawan, Jos., 18 Decature 
Kline, A. J., 130 Arch 
Kline, L., 98 Bedford 
Kline, M., 244 1^ N. Centre 
Miller, Benj., 42 Polk 
Rosenbaum, Mrs. Marie, Box 83 
Sheffler, Saml., 28 S. George 
Siegel, M., 77 N. Centre 
Swartz, S., 69 Highland 
Yankelowitz, S., 43 Polk 

Curtis Bay 
Bross, Dr. A. A., 902 Pennington Av. 

Ellicott City 

Caplan, Mrs. R. 
Ellis. Edw. Paul 
Goldberg, Harry 
Horwitz, Abraham 
Levinson, Saul 
Rosenstock, H. J. 
Sherr, Jacob M. 
Snyder, Rev. Dr. J. 

Frederick 

Blumberg, M., 134 W. Patrick 
Jacobson, Karl. 75 S. Market 
Lowenstein, Mrs. Lavid, New City 

Hotel 
Rosenstock, J. 
Weinberg, Leo, 211 N. Market 

Frostburg 

Abramson, Julius 
Abramson. S., 41 Main 
Edelman, Leslie, 53 Main 



JEWISH PUBLICATION SOCIETY 



469 



Fine, Isaac, 79 Main 

Meyers, Jacob, 10-12 Broadway 

Stern, George 

Harerstown 
Special Mbmbbb 
Brenner, Joe., 121 W. Jonathan 

Annual Mkmbebs 

Adelman, Nathan, 244 Frederick 
Angenstein, Dr. M. M., Kohler BIdg. 
Berkson, Jacob H. 
Gerber, J. H., 262 S. Potomac 
Kaplan, Ellik, 50 N. Jonathan 
Liby, Harry, 121 W. Franklin 
Lyon, Louis, 42 E. Arie 
Lyon, Mrs. M R., 218 B. Wash- 
ington 
Meyers, Louis, 331 W. Washington 
Polack, Jacob, 312 W. Prospect 
Rubin, Max., 10 S. Potomac 
Sallow, Harry, 125 B. Franklin 



Mazor & Witebsky 
Schreter, Adolph 

HyattsrUU 
Ediavitch, Moses 

Laurel 
Block, Harry A. 

Lonaconing 
Special Membbb 
Rosenberg, I. 

Annual Member 
Shearer, Abe 

Riderwood 

Billstein, A. M. 
Billstein, Nathan 



Maryland 



Rook Hall 
Blaustein, J. M. 

Salisbury 

Special Member 
Benjamin, I. L., 223 Main 

St. George 
Levy, Paul S. 

MA8SA0HTJSETTB 
Allston Harrison, S. H., 672 Washington 

Aronson. Philip J., 1066 Common- S}j?£5*^^'d- ^7,P W"^^*'^**^" 
wPiiith Av Mirsky, L,_32 Otis 



Hanoook 

Conn, Nathan 
Joffe, Isidor 
Rosen, H. N. 

Havre-de-Orace 

Davis, Jacob 
Hecht, Emanuel 



Massa- 
chusetts 



Attleboro 



X. M. H» A. 



Boston 
Patron 
Kirstein, U B., c/o Filene & Co. 

Libbabt Members 

Agoos, S., 207 South 
Agoos, S. L., 145 South 
Brin, Alexander, 7 Water 
Ind. Worklngmen's Circle of Amer- 
ica Inc., 9 Cambridge 
Knplan, J. J., 161 Devonshire 
Rutstein & Sons, B., Ill Fulton 

Special Members 

Adelman. S., 153 Mass. Av. 
Amdur, Noah W.. 166 Lincoln 
Gordon, Harry, 79 Milk 



Saltz. Dr. S. M.. 113 Chambers 
Tunstall, Wm. B. 

Wyzanski, Max B., 199 Washington. 
Uoom 707 

Annual Members 

Alberts, M. J., 129 Devon 
Albertstam, J. D., R. 204 Pemberton 

Bldg., Pemberton Sq. 
Apple, Max, 69 Chauncey 
Arkin, Dr. L., 866 Commonwealth 

Av. 
Askowltch, Dr. Chas.. 110 Tremont 
Baer, D., 196 Columbia Rd. 
Hail en, Jacob, 10 Tremont 
IJnilen, Saml. L.. 814 Tremont BIdg. 
Baumwald. Abraham, 605 Board qt 

Trade Bldg. 
Real. Julius. 43 Tremont 
Boarak. Joseph, 20 Pemberton Sq. 
Belin. Mrs. II., 7 Chambers 
Bcndotson. David. 120 North 
Boigsoii. Harry. 18 Tremont 




470 



AMERICAN JEWISH YEAR BOOK 



Massa- ^lack, Jos., 30 Leverett 
chusetts Bloomfleld, Meyer, 6 Beacon 
Brln, Alexander, 258 Wash. 
Broomfleld, Ruben R., 334-170 Sum- 
mer 
Bon, Josiah, 27 School 
Brody, B. J., 74 Elm Hill Av. 
Brown, Hyman J., 75 Leverett 
Burroughs, Harry E., 39 Chambers 
Byer, Louis E., 17 Beach 
Byer, Selick J., 26 Angell 
Caplan, Moses, 35 Hancock 
Casson, S. K., 18 Tremont 
Castleman, Dr. Philip, 483 Beacon 
Cohen, A. K., 646 Beacon 
Cohen, Abraham, 15 Nightingale 
Cohen, B. & Son, 332 Harrison Av. 
Cohen, David, 316 Newbury 
Collins, A. M., 132 Lincoln 
Cushner, Dr. J. W., 12a Chambers 
Dana, Meyer, 204 Pemberton Bldg. 
Dana, Saml. S., 34 School 
Edelstone, Harry E., 17& Federal 
Edelstone, Wm. W., 65 Beverly 
Elionsky, M. I., 15 Albany 
Ellis, David A., 12 Keswick 
Empire Grocery Co., 56 Fulton 
Epstein, Abr. J., 52 Chauncy 
B^yges, H. A., 18 Tremont 
Feder. Jewish Charities, 43 Hawkins 
Feins, Raphael, 60 Summer 
Finkelsteln, Dr. H., 342 Hanover 
Flink, Dr. A. H. N., 210 Hanover 
Fox, Isidor, 206 Barristers Hall 
Frank. D., 81 Milk 
Freedman, Dr. L. M., 419 Boylston 
Friedman, Lee M., 206 Bay State Rd. 
Friedson, S. B., 30 I^everett 
Gcrstein, Carl, 18 Tremont 
Ginsburg, Paul M., 60 Summer 
Ginzberg, A. A., 294 Washington 
Glasser, H., 68 Essex 
Glenn, M. G.. 9 Allen 

Goldberg, Edw. B., 811 Pemberton 

Bldg. 
Goldberg, Jos., 112 Marion 
Goldberg, Lewis, 98 Post Office Bldg. 
Golden, H. B.. 165 Blackstone 
Golden, Leo, llWolcott 
Goldings, S. J., 36 Washington 
Goodman, Mrs. S.. 148 Townsend 
• Gorfinkle, B. L., 78 Devonshire 
Goulston, E. S., Hotel Lenox 
Green, Chas., 751 B. Tremont 
'Grosberg, Mrs. O., 572 Washington 
Guterman, H. N., 127 Devon 
Halperin, Philip, 57 Meridian 
Halpern, C. K., 38 La Grange 
Herman, A., 131 State 
Herman, Mrs. J. M., 424 Marl- 
borough 



Horbllt, Mark M., 78 Devonshire 
Hurwich, Louis, 90 Journal Bldg. 
Hurwitz, Dr. Simon, 32 McLean 
Jacobson, A. H., 60 Chambers 
Jacobstein, Dr. BenJ., 11 Allen 
Kladky, Harris A., 145 South 
Klayman, H., 43 Tremont 
Klayman, Harry, 18 Tremont 
Koplow, Nathan, 77 Bedford 
Kubn, B., 698 Washington 
Leavitt, M. J.. 17 Homestead 
Leavitt, P. M., 99 Richmond 
Lebowich, I., 19 Eliot 
Lebowich, Jacob, 27 School 
Levenson, Abe, Pemberton Bldg. 
r^evenson, J. M., 749 Old South Bldg. 
Levenson, Max L., 749 Old South 

Bldg. 
Levin, S. L., 141 Milk 
Levine, Henrv M., 125 Tremont 
Levins, Dr. N. N., 30 Chambers 
Levitt. M.. 30 Salem 
I^vy, B. F., 137 Oliver 
Levy, Ben. A., 73 Tremont 
Lewenberg, Solomon, Tremont Bldg. 
Lewis, Hyman, 42 Washington 
Liebman, Dr. Wm., 1069 Boylston 
Litler, Oscar, 135 Leverett 
Lurie, A. C, 209 Wash. 
Lurie, Abraham, 27 School 
Lurie, M. S., 209 Washington 
Malkiel, S., 88 Causeway 
Markwett. L., 57 Kneeland 
Massell, Dr. (James) H., 120 Boyls- 
ton 
Medal la. Dr. Leon S.. 483 Beacon 
Mehllnger, Albert, 1868 Common- 
wealth 
Meyers, A., 2343 Washington 
Meyers, Dr. S., 93 Lexington 
Mittel, Hannah, 36 Bromfleld 
Morrison, Dr. H., 103 Glenway 

Grove Hall 
Morse, M. M., 904 Beacon 
Moskowitz. J., 25 Kingsbury 
Mydans, M. I., 18 Tremont 
Niditch, Isador, 10 Castlegate Rd. 
Orkin, Harry. 373 Washington 
Orkin, Wm. J., 53 Stratton 
Oshry Bros., 12 Spring 
Padover, Simon, 29 Troy 
Pokroisky, L., 10 Sunderland, Rox- 

bury 
Potash. Philip, 48 Billerlca 
Price, H.. 162 Harrison Av. 
Public Library 

Rabalsky, B., Charles Bank Homes 
Bobbins, Victoria, 30 Chambers 
Roberts, M., 27 School 
Robinson, Robt, 7 Chambers 
Rombach, H. M., 1857 Common- 
wealth Av. 



JEWISH PUBLICATION SOCIETY 



471 



Rose, A. E.. Pemberton Sq. 
Rosen, Dr. David W., 321 Hanover 
Rubenowltz, Rev. H. H., 76 Hutch- 

Ings 
Rubenstein, Philip, 60 State 
Rubin, Dr. M. S., 213 Lexington 
Rubin, Samuel, 106 Bedford 
Rudnick, Carl, Scollay Bldg., 40 

Court 
Rudnick, J.. 16 Gannett 
Salow, Blvin, 102 Broad, cor. Wharf 
Samuel, B., 77 Summer 
Sandberg, H. O., 1801 Custom House 
Schmidt, S. M., 1 Beacon 
Schwartz, Simon, 25 Potter 
Shapiro, J. J., 105 Mountfort 
Shiffman, Morris, 9 Allen 
Shocket, A., 104 Hanover 
Shpunt, Saml., 119 North 
Silverman. J. J., 43 Tremont 
Simmons, L, 80 Kingston 
Singer, Charles, 37-39 Perry 
Siskind, Henry, 53 State 
Slobodkin, Harris A., 36 Lowell- 
Slutzkl. Wm., R. 53. 5 Broomfleld 
Small, Dr. S., 35 Alpha Road 
Smith, L J., 76 Leverett 
Solomon, Oscar H., 36 Salem 
Solomon. Wm.. 52 Chauncey 
Stein, Albert A., 43 McLean 
Stone, Elihu D., 27 School 
Stone, Mark. 43 Tremont 
Stoneman, David, Pemberton Bldg. 
Temple Mlshkan Teflla, Moreland & 

Copeland 
Tltlebaum, Albert, 42 Washington 
Trustman, Dr. Israel, 59 Chambers 
Victorson, H. S., 219 Allen 
Walbarst, Max, 12 Lowell 
Webb, S. L., 704 Old South Bldg. 
Werby, A. Benj., 108 Howland 
White, Nathan I., 148 Hanover 
Winkler, P. N., 85 Waumbeck 
Wiseman, J. L, 21 Homestead 
Wolf son, Lewis W., 109 Kingston 
Wolper. I., 44 Canterbury 
Yaffe, Frank I., 59 Temple PI., c/o 

The Boston Silk Shop 
Zionist Bureau of New England, 27 

School 

Brockton 

Green, Jos., 201 Center 
Perkins, Louis, 28 Center 
Y. M. H. A., 50 Main 
Zaremsky, M. H., 29 Crescent PI. 

Brookline 
Special Member 
Norton, S. M., 202 St. Paul 



Annual Members 

Amster, N. S., 6 Howes 
Andrews, J., 149 Winthrop Rd. 
Charak, Wm., 134 Fuller 
Eichler, Rev. M. M., 10 Fuller 
Fineberg, Simon, 67 Kenwood 
Gilbert, Harry, 24 Elba 
Glnzberg, Barnard, 7 Parkman Rd. 
Hailpam, Mrs. R., 129 Addington 

Rd. 
Hurwitz, Dr. A. J., 397 Harvard 
Levi, Rabbi Harry, 24 Verndaie 
Phillips, Isidor, 18 Fuller 
Pouzzner, B. S., 159 CooUdge 
Rosenbush, A. A., 135 Thorndike 
Rubin, Jacob, 12 Kilsy Rd. 
Sawyer, M. J., 1870 Beacon 
Slater, Mrs. John S., 35 Westbourne 

Ter. 
Solomon, Jacob, 79 Gibbs 
Solomon, Miss P., 20 Amory 
Waldman, Morris D., 1412 Beacon 

Cambridge 

Horowitz. Geo. J., 51 Grays Hall 
Kellner, D. D., Prof. Max L., 7 

Mason 
Promboira, Jacob, 464 Windsor 
Zax, O., 10 Hamlin 

Subscriber 

Gavin, Rev. Frank. St. Francis 
House, 38 Winthrop 

Chelsea 

Braverman, J., 83 Chestnut 
Caro, Maurice. 161 Shurtleff 
Gushing, L, 48 Summer 
Davidson, Dr. A., 155 Chestnut 
Garb, Chas., 78 Franklin Av. 
Goldberg, Dr. Elins, 198 Chestnut 
Gordon, Geo. E., 3 Maverick 
Lourie, David A., 11 Clark Av. 
Lourie, Jacob. 50 Parker 
Markell, Saml., 123 Franklin Av. 
Pollack, Dr. J. T., 212 Chestnut 
Resnick, Louis H., 72 Williams 
Salter, Abram, 147 Franklin Av. 
Silverman, M. B., 144 Bloomingdale 
Slotnick,.S., 167 Shurtleff 
Smith, Harry, 208 Chestnut 
Tobey, Maurice, 25 County Rd. 
Wolf, M., 192 Chestnut 
Yunes, M. L, 87 Orange 

Chloopee 

Cohen, M. H., 98 Dwight 
Wiener, Saml., 43 Pine 



Massa- 
chusetts 



in 



AMERICAN JEWISH YEAR BOOK 



chusctts 



Ohloopee Falli 
Special Mbmbeb 
Cohen, Hyman J., 23 Cochrane 

Annual Mbmbebs 

Cohen, H., 19 Grove 
Wernick, L., 67 Market 
Wernick, S., 24 Church 
Wolfson, A., 86 Market 

Doroheiter 

LiBRABT MBMBSB 

Agoos, Lb, 60 Canterbury 

Spkcial Mbmbbbs 

Alberts, Mrs. I., 20 Brinsley 
Cauman, Meyer, 28 Topliff 
Goldwasser, D., 52 Spencer 

Annual Mbmbers 

Berger, Wolf, 4 Michigan At. 
Herman, Dr. M. I., 1063 Blue Hill 

Av. 
Bloom, S*., 27 Bradshaw 
Brody, Israel, 478 Geneva Av. 
Castleman, Saml., 30 Michigan Av. 
Cherry, Lillian, 482 Geneva Av. 
Chertok, Dr. M. A.. 822 Blue Hill 

Av 
Cohen, A., 11 York 
Cohen, Mrs. H., 7 Michigan Av. 
Cohen, Louis, 141 Milk 
Cohen, M. W., 110 Glenway 
Dana, Moses L., 27 Blcknell 
Daniels, Julius, 4 Harlem 
Davis, Isaac, 20 Hewins 
Davis, Lazarus, 28 Angell 
Flanders, A. N., 6 Morse 
Friedman, J., 17 Greenwood Av. 
Ginsberg, L., 947 Blue Hill Av. 
Goldberg, Isaac, 67 Fowler 
Goldman, A. C, 38 Canterbury 
Goldman, A. K., 39 Esmond 
Goldman, O, 34 Tremlett 
Goldstein, H. M., 31 Johnston Rd. 
Goldstein, Meyer, 57 Stratton 
Golub, Dr. J. J., 857 Blue Hill Av. 
Gordon, A. O., 205 Columbia Rd. 
Grimm, Anna, 27 Page 
Guttentag, J., 64 Charles 
Jacobson, J. L., 16 Wolcott- 
Jolles, L. 8., 22 Nightingale 
Katz, C, 18 Haymarket Sq. 
Katz. S. J« 578 Blue Hill Av. 
Lebowich, Max, 11 Melville Av. 
Levowlch, H. N., 41 Glenway 
Libman, Louis, 1 Page 
Lourie, Myer, L., 50 Bradshaw 
Lubit, Jos. M., 38 Harlem 
Lumiansky, Nathan, 44 Wolcott 



Nlgrosh, Max, 60 Fowler 
Podblskv, Jacob, 59 Deering Rd. 
Prokesch, S. Z., 160 Canterbury 
Reingold, Rubin. 18 Mountain Av. 
Rose, Alexander, 18 Wheatland Av. 
Scott, David, 90 Fowler 
Sellg, Mrs. H. L., 22 Angell 
Sedar, Moses L., 41 Stratton 
Shur, H. I., 36 Harlem 
Sichel, H., 7 Strathcona Rd. 
Stoler, BenJ., 41 Wolcott 
Thurman, Jacob, 15 York 
Waldstein, Solomon, 23 Topliff 
Wyner, Henry, 29 Aspinwall Rd. 

Everett 
Portney, Barnet, 96 8d 

Fall Biver 
Special Mbmbeb 
Yamins, Louis U, 411 Columbia 

Annual Mbmbers 

Bloom, Morton, 682 2d 
Nerenberg, C, 497 Ferry 
Radovsky, David R., 1316 Highland 

Av. 
Radowsky, Jos., 272 Whipple 
Schaichetman, S.. 194 Columbia 
Shagam, BenJ., 159 Walnut 
Snell, M., 2814 Columbia 
Wexler, H., 43 Tecumsek 
Winarsky, J. L., 44 South 

Fitohburg 
Musnitzky, Rev. C, 37 Bontelle 

Gardner 
Kessler, Israel, 69 Parker 

Gloucester 
Livshitz, Ellas, 105 Main 

HaverhUl 
Glagovsky, Simon, 325 Washington 

Holyoke 
Life Member 
Barowsky, Jos. H., 1662 Dwlght 

Annual Members 

Afsensky, S., 64 Hampshire 
Barowsky, D. H., 1552 Dwlght 
Barowsky, J. L., 6 Laurel 
Bernstein, M. M., 101 Elm 
Cohen, B. W., 13 Willow 
Cohen, M., 9 Adams 
Gold, Mrs. BenJ., 2 Ferguson PI. 
Hertzmark, Wm., 65 Pleasant 



JEWISH PUBLICATION SOCIETlr 



in 



Hlrsch, Morris, 250 Pine 
Jacobson, Max, 5 Spring 
Koplinsky, I., 80 Masher 
Miller, Eli, 229 Chestnut 
Muslcat, Henry, 88 Hampshire 
Potolski, L. M., 88 Westfleld 
Robinson, Ben., 171 Hi^rh 
Rosenbloom, Dr. C. W., 848 Dwiffht 
Saltman, Jos.. 845 Main 
Slotnlck, M. N., 25 Unden 
Spies, M. S.. 846 High 
Stein, Max, 289 Elm 
Stone, N., 295 Walnut 
Weinberg, S., 970 Hampden 
Wolman, BenJ., 87 Longwood Av. 

Hyde Park 
Shapiro, Jos. S., 67 Milton At. 

Indian Orchard 
Coven, Ida, 174 Main 

Leominster 
Davis, Judge C. K., 108 Mechanic 

LoweU 

Carp, Max. 284 Pine 
Goldberg, B., 01 Howard 
Goldman, Abr., 218 Heldreth Bldg. 
Silverblatt, Bennet, 71 Central 

Lynn 

Bayard, Ben., 810 Western Av. 
Frankel, S., 25 Kensington Pk. 
Goodman, H., 9 Pierce Rd. 
Klivansky, Jno., 94 Mall 
Schon, Dr. Edw., 279 Summer 
Turow, Dr. Abram A., 10 Crosby 

Maiden 

Special Members 

Hoberman, Dr. S., 217 Bryant 
Sigilman, Saml., 80 Grace 

Annual Mbmbebs 

Cohen, Harry, 41 Newton 
Covner. Louis R., 42 Belmont 
Gana, Mrs. S. A., 119 Webster 
Glaser, M., 330 Salem 
Isaacson, Meyer H., 73 Mt. Vernon 
Levitzky, P., 254 Broadway 
Morrison, Henry I., 368 Ferry 
Norman, Dr. J. P., 241 Bryant 
Rotman, Nathan, 25 Boyleston 
Segal, Mandell, 37 Harvard 
Slobodkin, H. E., 39 Upham 
Slobodkin, Myer H., 28 Clark 
Slobodkin, Dr. S. H., 395 Cross 
Solomont, Simon, 188 Walnut 



lUnhteld 
Fteinberg, B. M. 

lUttapam 

Mittell, Abr., 107 Wellington Hill 

Xedford 
Friedman, Saml., 188 Forrest 

Hew Bedford 

Bamet, Saml., 501 Coggeshell 
Berkowitz, Julius, 106 South 
Davidow, W., Crape 
Kaplan, Abraham, 917 S. Water 
Lipman, Abraham, 86 Atlantic 
Margolls, Max, 202 Mt Pleasant 
Rosenberg, Solomon, 406 l^urchase 
Roymond. Jos., Wing 
Russotto, Barnet A., 481 Mill 
Wolfson, Fisher, 1820 Acushnet Av. 
Y. M. H. A., High & Purchase 

North Adams 

Ark, Barnett, Eagle cor. Center 
Chain, H.. 3 Chesefo rough Av. 
Green, Sam., 23 Center 
Horowlts, Abe, 88 Hudson 
Kronick, H. H.. 174 Liberty 
Weln. ^arry, 19 Millard 

Northampton 
Special Mbmbkr 
Barger, A., 25 Hancock 

Annual Members 

Albert, B., 12 Fromt 
Astman, Harry, 252 Prospect 
August, Isaac, 17 Woodbine A v. 
Berger, L. W., 182 Prospect 
Levin, I., 29 Eastern Av. 
Mlchelman, Mrs. Dora, 86 Buttlcr 

PI. 
Mlchelman, I., 13 Cherry 
Mickelman, Meyer A., 84 Grover Av. 

Peabody 
Bluestone, David, 88 Acorn 

Plttilleld 
Special Member 
BTUgland, Simon, 187 Wendell A v. 

Annual Members 

Davis, Jacob L^ 95 Daniels Av. 
Eisner, M. L., 69 Commonwealth 
i>ans, Isaac, U32 North 
Halperin, K., 43 Francis 
Katz. Rabbi M.. 553 North 



<^UMttS 




474 



AMERICAN JEWISH YEAR BOOK 



Massa- Klein, I. L., 164 Newell 
chusetts MIchelman, Abe M., 28 Hamlin 

Rosenthal, M. G., 158 Frances Av. 

Plsrmoutli 

Kaplovltz, Harris. 52 High 
Sadow, Max, 29 Russell 

Quincy 

Berman, John, 117 Quincy 
Grossman, Louis, 22 Federal Ay. 

Severe 

Flttlngotr, Jos. F., 80 Thornton 
Fritz, M. M., 50 Nahant Av. 
Miller, Leon, 42 Bradstreet Av. 
Seidenberg, Harold. 11 Dana 
Shafer, H., 65 Shirley Av. 
Tuttle, S. S., 181 Shirley Av. 

Boxbury 

Special Members 

Marcus, B. W., 51 Mt. Pleasant Av. 
Mishel, M., 100 Slater 

Annual Members 

Abramson, L. A., 77 Bedford 
Adelman, Mrs. A., 62 Hutchings 
Aronson, Mrs. H. I., 64 Lawrence 

Av. 
Brilliant, Frank, 100 Maple 
Brown, M., 19 Wyoming 
Drucker, Jno., 159 Ruthven 
Feingold, David, 114 Elm Hill Av. 
Glunts. James D., 278 Humboldt 

Av. 
Goldman, S., 109 Waumbeck 
Gorovltz, Rabbi A.. 1204 Fremont 
Green, Jacob L., 69 Homestead 
Greenhood, Mrs. B., 86 Harold 
Heller, Isaac, 41 Howland 
Helpern, Myron E., 76 Hutchings 
Holzman, Mrs. G. A., 108 Crawford 
Holzman, Dr. J., 1 Elm Hill Av. 
Hurwltz, Dr. M., 357 Blue Hill Av. 
Israeli, Kev. Dr. P., 87 Devon 
Kasanof, D. M., 235 Blue Hill Av. 
Krensky, Carl, 121 Howland 
Levin, Mrs. C, 250 Seaver 
Levlne, Edward, 167 Homestead 
Loewenberg, H., 86 Equitable Bldg. 
Mann, Gertrude E., 68 Waumbeck 
Marget, Arthur W., 157 Homestead 
Markow, S. S., 3 Bower Pk. 
Moskin, S. A., 122 Howland 
Navison, Jos., 63 Balnbrldge 
Neuhoff, Simon, 125 Homestead 
Palais, Maurice, 139 Harold 
Plnanski, Nathan, 15 State 



Rabinovitz, J., 145 Homestead 
Rabinowltz, Jos., 24 Charlotte 
Ratzkoff, J., 120 Tremont 
Roberts, Harry, 151 Homestead 
Rosenblatt, I., 12 Devon 
Rosenthal, A. R., 159 Ruthvan 
Savitz. H. A., 35 Hollander 
Schneider, Mrs. J., 83 Waumbeck 
Schooner, S. G., 32 Brookledge 
Shohan, W., 94 Harrlshoff 
Wagner, Mrs. Chas., 69 Waumberck 
Wolbursht, J. L., 96 Devon 
Wolkowlch, E., 278 Humboldt Av. 

Salem 

Davis, A. J., 1 Wisteria 
Goldberg, Max, 10 Roslyn 
Goldman, C. A., 6 Boardman 
Winer, Dr. M., 70 Washington 

Somervllle 
Special Member 
Hillson, H. M., 16 Taylor 

Annual Member 
Cohen, J., 103 Sycamore 

South Framingham 
Mason, Harry, 230 Waverly 

Springfield 

Special Members 

Cheiffetz, A., 198 Central 
Lasker, Henry, 244 Summer Av. 

Annual Members 

Aaronson, A. Paul. 15 Massasoit PI. 
Abrams, S., 144 Franklin 
Ack, Frank E., 24 Salem 
Adaskin, H., 44 Summer Av. 
Adler, D., 592 Belmont Av. 
Bassin, M., 286 Summer Av. 
Becker, Bernard J., 131 Cass 
Belkin, Mitia, 53 Bancroft 
Blanc, Neil, 85 Jefferson Av. 
Bloome, Chas. P., 22 Riverdale 
Brod, Hyman, 100 Main 
Brook, K. I., 477 Belmont Av. 
Brooks, Richard S., 68 Lakeside Av. 
Brown, H., 46 Allendale 
Cohen, Eli, 11 Jefferson Av. 
Cohen, Julius A., 387 Main 
Cohen, Meyer, 1304 North 
Cohen, Morris A., 56 Huntington 
Cohen, W. H., 38 Morgan 
Cohn, Frederick, 244 Main 
Cohn, Louis, 54 Grays Av. 
Daniel, Harry, 26 Mass. Av. 
Davidson, M. L., 58 Grosvenor 



JEWISH PUBLICATION SOCIETY 



475 



Davison, P. L., 782 Sumner 
Ehrllch, Hyman, 540 Dickinson 
Ehrlicb & Ehrllch, 244 Main 
Feiner, B. S., 59 Church 
Felner, S. J., 522 Chestnut 
Flnkelsteln, Michael. 96 Bond 
Fisher, J., 60 Church 
Freedman, Rev. I. P., 1120 North 
Gaylor, Chas. E.. 46 Emery 
Gelfman, Abr., 1497 North 
Gelfman. Jos. W., 82 Calhoun 
Gelin, Wm.. 514 Main, 
Ginsburg, Jacob. 161 Magazine 
Gluskin, Is., 55 Church 
Goldenberg, George, 10 Belveder Av. 
Goldln, Jos., 34 Grenada Terrace 
Goldstein, N. E., 390 Summer Av. 
Goldstick, Isidore, 58 Sharon 
Granstein, H.. 453 Summer Av. 
Green, Samuel, 51 Adams 
Halpren, S. P., 26 Hebron 
Harvey, N. M., 37 Grenada Ter. 
Hechler, Herman, 102 Belle Av. 
Henin, Dr. C. C, 274 Forrest Pk. Av. 
Hlrsch. Dr. H. L., 172 Main 
Jacobsohn. I. C, 54 Clinton Av. 
Katz, Louis, 526 Main 
Keller, Harry, 37 Thomas 
Keller, Morris. 368 Dickinson 
Kelson, P., 244 Main 
Kingsberg, J. D.. 36 Sumner Terrace 
Klein, M., 10 Allendale 
Klein. Dr. Saml., 117 Main 
Kovalsky, Rev. M., 38 Grays Av. 
Kovarsky, S., 62 Sharon 
Kurnitsky, I., 366 N. Main 
Krushner, Isaac, 44 Hebron 
Leikin, Dr. Leon H., 80 Massasoit 
Levin, E. M., 31 Saratoga 
Levin, Louis A., 787 North 
Levin, S. M., ll Morgan 
Levison, S., 1030 Worthington 
Magaziner, J., 464 Chestnut 
Markels, Ceasar, 1324 North 
Marshak, H. M., 33 Trafton Rd. 
Mehlman, Harry I., 52 Huntington 
Mirkin, S., 15 Walter 
Xatow, Jos., 73 Ferry 
Naurlson, Dr. J. Z., 172 Main 
Nirenstein, N., 83 Sergeant 
Palmer, Dr. A. E., 13 Franklin 
Penn, Abr. B., 296 Franklin 
Penn, Marcus, 533 Dickinson 
Pessin. Rabbi Sol., 364 Chestnut 
Price, Rev. Saml.. 345 Belmont Av. 
Prowler, J. E., 470 Summer Av. 
Rabinovitz, Dr. B., 1082 North 
Rabinowltz, F., 61 Sorrento 
Radding, Ed., 162 Pearl 
Radding, Julius, 55 Sharon 
Radding, Max, 68 Bryant 



Riner, Mandel, 37 Grove 
Robinson, BenJ., 464 Chestnut 
Silbert, P. S., 244 Main 
Slavin, A. H., 85 Firglade Av. 
Slutskin, Dr. M. S. 120 Main 
Squirsky, F., 85 Sharon 
Wessler, Dr. M., 82 Woodside Ter. 
White, A., 536 Chestnut 
Ziff, Wm. M., 33 High 
Zimmerman, Henry, 721 North 

Taunton 
Berkover, Lewis, 34 Wlnthrop 

Waltham 
Special Member 
Bayard, H., P. O. Box 78 

Annual Member 
Mendelsohn, C. M., 319 Moody 

Westfleld 

Saffer, Ph. M., 92 Franklin 
Simkowitz, Sam 

West Somerville 
llillson, J., 44 Powder House Blvd. 

Winchester 
Antin, Miss Mary 

Woroester 
Special Member 
Wolf son, Mrs. S., 74 Providence 

Annual Members 

Arkus, N., 95 Providence 
Cantor, I., 105 Houghton, N. 
Cohen. Abe Max, 49 South 
Ellas. Saul. 320 Highland 
Feingold, Louis E., 51 Providence 
Freed, Rev. Meyer, 45 Providence 
Friedman, S. G., 152 Elm 
Goldstein, Saml. I., 112 Elm 
Grace, Harris, 10 Coral 
Grodberg & Hlrsch, 43 Pleasant 
Ilillman, A. M., 75 Providence 
Isenberg, David B., 840 Main 
Israel, A., 46 Providence 
Katz, Julius, 66 Woodland 
Mlntz, Max, 08 Dorchester 
Rochocz, Dr. B., 4 Assonet 
Rome, Nathan, 178 Russell 
Rosenthal, J., 49 Arlington 
Seder, Jos. S., 100 Harrison 
Wolkowltch, B., 49 Providence 



Massa- 
chusetts 



476 



AMERICAN JEWISH YEAR BOOK 



Michigan 



Bacharach, 
Maume 



Adrian 
Theresa 



B., 621 W. 



Ahmeek 
Glass, Mrs. Fruma 



Schoffman, 



Alpha 
David 



Amasa 
Special Mbmbbb 
Marks, Louis 

Ann Arbor 

Greenburc:, Rebecca, 404 S. 6th Av. 
Sharfman, I. Leo, 1039 Baldwin Av. 

Baroga 
Cohl, B. 

Battle Greek 

Franklin. M. J. 
Harris, A., 181 South Av. 
Kapp, August, 8 College 
Kapp, Henry, 38 Calhoun 
Seaman, J., 54 Fremont 

Bay City 

Felngarten, J. R., 226 N. Jefferson 

Goldberg & Berner, 1104-08 Colum- 
bus Av. 

Goldman, .T. B.. 421 Van Rnren 

.Tacobson. E.. 1101-3 Columbus Av. 

Kessler, David, 1720 10th 

Kessler. Sam., 1000 11th 

Light, Rabbi D. G., 1412 Columbus 
Av. 

Mitchell, Miss Julia, 115 S. Farragut 



Rnttonberg, 



Oalumet 
Oscar 



Crystal Falls 
Warshawsky, Nathan 



Detroit 

LiFB Member 

Rosenberg, Louis J., Hammond Bldg. 

LiBRABT MBMBEICS 

Berman, Julius, 1317 Dime Bank 
Brown, David A., 98 Lawrence Av. 
Kahn, Albert, 62 Rowena 
Victor, N., 209 Hendrie 



laOHZOAN 

Special Members 

Beisman, Dr. Jos^ 1058 Brash 
Berman, B., 168 B. Ferry Av. 
Bernstein, Dr. E. J., 1212 Kresge 

Bldg. 
Blumberg, Morris H., 883 Clalrmont 
Buchhalter, Wm., 1136 Russell 
Butzel, F. M., 1012 Union Trust 

Bldg. 
Butzel, H. M., 1012 Union Trust 

Bldg. 
Cohen, I., 891 2d Av. 
Cohen, S. M., 70 Burlingame Av. 
Ehrlich, Moe, 310 Edison 
Ellman, James I., 26 Waverly, High- 
land Pk. 
Fishman, M., 276 Ferry Av., B. 
Frank, Chas., 770 Brush 
Frank, Harry, 108 Garfield Av. 
Frank, Saml., 95 Rowena 
Freud, J. L., 585 Marlborough A v. 
Freud, Julius, 80 High, E. 
Friedberg, Morris, 122 B. Hancock 
Goldberg, Isaac, 85 Seward Av. 
Goldman, Bros., 893 Hastings 
Gordon, Saml., 106 Frederick 
Heavenrich, S., 45 Pingree Av. 
Heineman, D. E., 1706 Dime Bank 

Bldg. 
Horwitz, Harris, 483 Atkinson Av. 
Jacob, A., 100 Rowena 
Jacobs, A., 235 John R. 
Jacobson. A., 638 Hastings 
Keidan, H. B., 598 Gratiot Av. 
Klein, A., 93 Eliot 
Krell. B., 145 Farnsworth 
Krolik, Mrs. H. A., 95 Rowena 
Krolik, Julian H., 435 Chicago Blvd. 
Lleberman, M., 1002 2d A v. 
MItshkun, Dr. M. D., 576 Hastings 
Nathan, J., 122 Farnsworth 
Pressman, Dr. J., 468 Antolne 
Rabinowitz, J., 630 St. Antolne 
Rablnowltch, Samuel, 330 Penob- 
scot Bldg. 
Robinson, D., 106 Rowena 
Rosenzweig, S. D., 66 Connecticut 
Sarasohn. S., 309 Gratiot Av. 
Schiller, Dr. A. B., 3 Madison Av. 
Sempliner, A. W., 457 Chicago Blvd. 
Shetzer, Isaac, 2897 E. Grand Blvd. 
Shnlder, M. A., 206 E. KIrby Av. 
Simons, D. W., 72 Erskine 
Smilansky, H. H., 202 Chamber of 

Commerce 
Smilansky, L., 202 Chamber of Com- 
merce 
Spivak, Samuel L., 1