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/ 



Hn 



Spun Silk Yarns, 



Manufactured by the 

GRISWOLO WORSTED CO 

(lilMITED), 

In All Numbers and Qualities, 
^ suitable for 

Hosiery, Underwear, Sewing Silks, 

Fringes, &c.. 



•SS^^^^^ 






Warps for Plushes, Dress Goods and 

Flannel. 



CASSIMERE SILK YARNS. 



Office, 3QQ CHESTNUT STREET, 



^f 



BROWN BROTHERS & GO. 

NBW YORK, 

PHILADELPHIA, BOSTON. 



■AND- 



ALE)(ANDER BROWN & SONS, 

BALTIMORE, 

MEBiBEBS OF N^W YOBK. PHILADELPHIA AJiTD BALTI- 

MORE STOCK EXCHANGES, 

Execute Orders for all Investment Securities, 

AND SELL BILLS OF E! 





-ON- 



GREAT BRITAIN AND IRELAND, FRANCE, GERMANY, BELGIUM, 

HOLLAND, SWITZERLAND, NORWAY, DENMARK, SWEDEN, 

AUSTRALIA, ST. THOMAS, ST. CROIX AND 

BRITLSH WEST INDIES. 



Issue Commercial and Travelers' Credits 

Available in any part of the world, in Francs, for use in Martinique and 
Guadaloupe, and in Dollars for use in this country, Canada, 

Mexico and West Indies. 



MAKE TELEGRAPHIC TRANSFERS OF MONEY 

BETWEEN THIS COUNTRY, EUROPE, AND BRITISH AND DAN- 
ISH WEST INDIES. 

MAKE COLLECTIONS OF DRAFTS 

Drawn abroad on all points in the United States and Canada, and of Drafts 
drawn in the United States on foreign countries. 



Their London House, Messrs. BROWN, SHIPLEY & CO., 
receive accounts of American banks, firms and individuals 
upon favorable terms. 



BROYTN, SHIPLEY & CO., 

Liverpool. London. 

Financial Agents for the United States Government in England. 



AMERICAN 

SILK MANUFACTURE. 

nv . — 

WM. C- WYCKOFF. 



{Under the cmphes of llu- Silk Associatkn af Am.ric.t.) 



446 BROOME STREET, 
Nkvv Vokk. 



printed by 

The John L. Murphy Publishing Co., 

trenton, n. j. 



> For more than half a century American Silk Manu- 
facture has been steadily developing itself. Various 

, circumstances have helped or hindered, but none have 

\ interrupted its growth. The following sketch is m^eant 

'^. to give a connected account of this development^ show- 

jj ing its extent and charatter, in successive periods, to 

A the present time. 

^ IV. c. w. 

December jistj 1886, 



CONTENTS. 

♦ 

PAQB. 

Brief History of the Silk Industry.... 7 

I. Two Centuries of Silk Culture 7 

II. Connecticut's Domestic Industry lo 

III. Manufacturing by Power.. i 13 

IV. Morus Multicaulis 16 

V. Some of the Silk Companies « 19 

VI. Work During the Mania , 25 

VII. The End of Silk Culture 31 

VIII. Sewing-Silk Manufacture Established 34 

IX. Strokes of Fortune 38 

X. The War Period 41 

XI. Recent Growth ^ 45 

Annual Report Silk Association of America, 1886 49 

Statistics of Annual Report 71 

Directory of American Silk Manufacturers 87 

Directory of Raw Silk Importers and Brokers 137 

Business Announcements 141 

Index 157 



AMERICAN SILK MANUFACTURE. 



I. 

TWO CENTURIES OF SILK CULTURE. 



The course of the silk industry in America has been marked by 
radical changes in its aims and character. A sketch of its early 
history will assist in showing the causes of its present development. 

There are two great divisions of the industry : silk culture and 
manufacture. These terms explain themselves, except that it is fiow 
customary to include in **silk culture" the work of reeling silk from 
cocoons. 

During the entire colonial period the mother country followed a 
uniform line of policy with her American settlements : she encour- 
aged them liberally in the production of raw material, while holding 
them in check as to any attempt at manufacture. This policy con- 
fined the development of the industry to silk culture from the settle- 
ment of the country to the date of the Revolution ; even for fifty 
years after the United States became a nation, this colonial idea 
seemed to be impressed upon silk enterprises. 

Extraordinary efforts were made to carry out the British pro- 
gramme in the Southern colonies. In Virginia, planters were urged 
to raise silk by a series of royal instructions and acts of Parliament ; 
by the free gift of mulberry seeds and si Ik- worm eggs ; by heavy 
fines (payable in tobacco) for neglecting to plant mulberry trees, 
contrasted with large premiums for them when fairly growing; 
and by liberal bounties for raw silk. The results of all this effort, 
extending over most of a century, were strangely insignificant. 
Claimants appeared for bounties, mostly for planting; in one 

(7) 



8 AMERICAN SlLK MANUFACTURE. 

instance for 70,000 growing trees. But the raw silk produced in 
Virginia was never enough in any single year to attract official 
notice and fix an historical record of its amount. 

Similar efforts in the Carolinas and Georgia, beginning a century 
later than in Virginia, met with better though transient success. 
The trustees of Georgia reserved power to revoke grants of land 
where a settler failed to plant a hundred mulberry trees to every ten 
acres. From time to time new bounties were offered for raw silk, 
the premiums being in some instances twice or thrice the value of 
the product. A filature was built at Savannah, which, during ten 
years of its highest prosperity, received 100,000 pounds of cocoons. 
Charleston, jealous of such good fortune, got. the promise of a fila- 
ture from the trustees of South Carolina. But the whole business 
faded away when the heavy bounties were modified or withdrawn. 

The rewards offered for producing raw silk in other colonies, 
though liberal, were not extravagant. Toward the middle of the 
last century, prominent citizens, among whom was Dr. Benjamin 
Franklin, urged the advantages of silk culture in Pennsylvania, and 
induced many persons to try the experiment. A filature was estab- 
lished at Philadelphia : there is a record of its business for only one 
year, when it received 2,300 pounds of cocoons, produced chiefly 
in New Jersey. Very interesting experiments, of which records are 
preserved, were performed elsewhere in Pennsylvania, and in Con- 
necticut and Massachusetts during colonial times. About 1 747-50 
Governor Law and his daughter wore habiliments made of New 
England silk, and at a later date a president of Yale College was 
arrayed in an academical gown of like material ; but there are no 
records of the production of silk in any considerable quantities. 

Silk culture in this country was almost extinct before the Declara- 
tion of Independence. At the South it had been supplanted by 
more profitable industries ; at the North it had scarcely advanced 
beyond experiment. There were no manufacturers here, and little 
use was found for silk in homespun fabrics. We read of elegant 
dresses, made of American silk, being presented to noble and even 
to royal personages, but the goods were woven in England. No 



AMERICAN SILK MANUFACTURE. 9 

home market existed, and the raw product ha^d to be sent abroad 
to find a purchaser. It is evident that if silk culture had survived 
till the outbreak of war, that event would have stifled the business. 
Nor is it surprising that a blank of several years in silk history fol- 
lows the era of the Revolution. A factory for making bolting-cloth 
was built at Wilmington, Delaware, in 1 796, with a view, it is said, 
of using Georgia silk ; but the supply of that product had fallen in 
1790 to 200 pounds, and the result of the Delaware enterprise has 
escaped record. 



lo AMERICAN SILK MANUFACTURE. 



II. 

Connecticut's domestic industry. 



Connecticut was the first State that awakened to a lively interest 
in the silk business. Her legislature, in 1784, offered a bounty of 
ten shillings per hundred for mulberry trees, and three pence per 
ounce for "raw silk,*' which perhaps meant cocoons. The effect 
of this stimulus was soon perceptible. Thomas Barrens and thirty- 
one others were incorporated, in 1788, as **a company to manufac- 
ture silk in the State of Connecticut.** In 1790 Dr. Nathaniel 
Aspinwall had 50,000 mulberry trees growing near New Haven, 
where fifty families were engaged in raising silk. At Northfield, 
thirty families were similarly employed, and, in the same year, a 
piece of cloth, 400 yards long, made of home-grown silk, was there 
exhibited. The production of raw silk at Mansfield was 200 pounds 
in 1789, and 362 pounds in 1793. 

This time the industry came to stay, because it had a domestic 
market. True, the manufacture was a household art; neither the 
spindle nor the loom was power-driven. But in that very fact lay 
the adaptation of one branch of the industry to the other. The 
good housewives could, with care, work up their badly-reeled silk 
on their slow-moving spindles, ultimately making a fair article of 
"sewings,** which was readily bartered at the village store. The 
waste, or "silk tow,'* after more laborious treatment, was woven 
into homespun cloth. 

Statements from different sources shed much obscurity over each 
other in estimating the amount or worth of this domestic industry 
in Connecticut. The quantities and values given as product may 
apply to cocoons, raw silk or sewing-silk, and sometimes include the 
waste silk, which formed a large proportion of the weight. Thus 



AMERICAN SILK MANUFACTURE. n 

one authority gives the annual product of three counties, New Lon- 
don, Windham and Tolland, in 1810, as ^28,500. Another states 
that the product of the town of Mansfield alone was ^27,000 at 
that date, and ^54,000 in 1825. A township census, in 1827, gave 
127,373 as the silk product for Windham county. A memorial to 
Congress states the quantity for the same year, in Mansfield and 
vicinity, as 7,000 pounds. A communication, in 1828, from Daniel 
Bulkley, a manufacturer of Windham county, who was running *'a 
small establishment for spinning by water, with a machine similar 
to a throstle-frame of a cotton mill," gives only 2,430 pounds as 
the product of Mansfield, and 1,867 pounds for four other towns. 
He adds a remark that several towns in which much silk is made, 
furnished no returns. The raw silk, he says, is worth $4 per pound ; 
"the value increases one-fourth in manufacturing." According to 
Barber's History of Connecticut, the whole amount raised in the 
State in 1830 was 3,200 pounds, and that is mentioned as if it 
were the largest annual quantity. It is not easy to reconcile such 
statistics. 

The business of throwing silk by- machinery driven by water- 
power had assumed large dimensions in England, beginning in 
1718 with the great silk mill of Sir Thomas Lombe. An act of 
Parliament was passed in 1774, **To prevent the exportation to 
foreign parts of utensils made use of in the cotton, li-nen, woolen 
and silk manufactures of the kingdom." Even after the repeal of 
the act, there were difficulties in the way of importing into the 
United States machinery for throwing silk, and at length Yankee 
ingenuity began to be exercised to supply the deficiency. 

Credit is fairly due to all the chief promoters of silk culture, as 
pioneers of the industry, for the help they gave it; to those whose 
efforts ended with rearing the silk-worm, as well as to those — and 
there were many of them — who retained a direct or a family con- 
nection with manufacture when the interest in culture had subsided. 
The sewing-silk branch of the business in the New England States 
was undoubtedly the offspring of silk culture. Success in making 
"sewings" by power led to the development of nearly all the other 



12 AMERICAN SILK MANUFACTURE. 

branches of manufacture. Fringes, trimmings and like goods form 
the only exception. Their manufacture began rather earlier than 
that of sewing-silk, and ran a course mostly distinct ; so that, for 
convenience, it will be considered later in these pages. 



AMERICAN SILK MANUFACTURE. 13 



III. 
MANUFACTURING BY POWER. 



The Hanks family, of Connecticut, has a long record in connection 
with the industry. Mr. William Hanks, of Mansfield, was among 
the largest silk raisers in 1768, when he associated himself with 
several other persons of Windham county, similarly engaged, in- 
tending ultimately "to bring about a silk manufactory'* — a term 
sometimes applied by writers of that day to. a cocoonery with appli- 
ances for hand-reeling. It is said that a building was erected for 
the purpose at Lebanon, but there is no reason to believe that any- 
thing more than the use of hand -power was attempted. In 1800 
Horace or Horatio Hanks patented a "double wheel-head," which 
gave an enormous increase of speed to the spindle. Ten years 
later, Rodney and Horatio Hanks built a small mill at Mansfield, to 
manufacture sewing-silk by water-power. A silk mill of larger 
dimensions was built at Gurleyville, in 181 4, by the same parties, 
associated with Harrison Holland and John Gilbert. Both these 
enterprises were short-lived. In 1821 Rodney Hanks built another 
mill at Mansfield for making sewing-silk, and operated it till 1828; 
his son George R. Hanks assisting in the later years. The business, 
in spite of a long interruption, has survived through successive 
generations, and the firm of P. G. & J. S. Hanks is at the present 
day manufacturing machine twist at Gurleyville. 

Although the praiseworthy efforts of Mr. Hanks were abandoned 
as failures in 1828, a new and more extensive attempt immediately 
followed to utilize water-power in silk manufacture. The Mansfield 
Silk Company was chartered in 1829, and began business with 
machinery made by Edmund Golding, who was familiar with Eng- 
lish methods of construction. The company afterward bought a 



14 AMERICAN SILK MANUFACTURE. 

mill with power, at Gurleyville, that had been used for wool manu- 
facture. This mill was the first in America where practical success 
was attained in making sewing-silk by power. The company seems 
also to have been the earliest to utilize Asiatic raw silk, and it cer- 
tainly preceded all others in successfully reeling from native cocoons 
by water-power. One of the results of this enterprise was to furnish 
silk culturists with a market for their product, the company being 
ready to take all the cocoons that were offered. A feature of nearly 
all early attempts in manufacture was the endeavor to construct 
power-driven machinery that would make good threads or yarns 
from badly-reeled silk — a mechanical problem that has never yet 
been solved. 

The corporators of the Mansfield Silk Company were Alfred Lilly, 
who had charge of procuring machinery ; Captain Joseph Conant, 
William A. Fisk, William Atwood, Storrs Hovey and Jesse Bing- 
ham. A Mr. Brown, who was engaged in the tassel manufacture 
at Boston, and anxious to obtain his stock as cheaply as possible, 
devised and superintended the construction of the successful power- 
reel. Nathan Rixford, a manufacturer of machinery at Mansfield 
Hollow, made for the company some improved doubling and wind- 
ing frames and a new spinner. He became the chief builder of 
silk machinery in the country. 

Within five or six years from the start of the Mansfield Silk Com- 
pany, there were several similar enterprises in New England. Of 
these the most prominent ones were at Northampton, Mass., and 
Hartford, Conn. ; that of the Cheney Brothers, at South Manches- 
ter, being two or three years later. Great efforts were made about 
this time to extend the culture of the mulberry tree. The Ameri- 
can Institute of the city of New York had taken a deep interest in 
the matter, even at its first meeting in 1828, and continued its 
exertions in this line for many years. It being supposed that home- 
reeling could be improved by the use of better reels, the literature 
of that era teems with notices of such inventions, and the American 
Institute sold large numbers of one of these newly-devised contriv- 
ances at ^5 apiece. A considerable increase in the production of 



AMERICAN SILK MANUFACTURE. 15 

silk had already resulted from the extensive planting of mulberry 
trees, the widespread experiments in nurturing the silk- worm, and 
the improvements in reeling, both by hand and power. The whole 
business was in a transition state. Possibly the great gulf between 
culture and manufacture was about to be spanned, when an extraor- 
dinary episode occurred, by which, eventually, the whole existing 
structure was demolished. 



i6 AMERICAN SILK MANUFACTURE. 



IV. 
MORUS MULTICAULIS. 



There is nothing like the multicaulis speculation in the history of 
any other industry. Its nearest parallels are the tulip mania and 
the South Sea bubble. But, unlike those, it attacked the most 
intelligent as well as the most enterprising portion of a hard-fisted, 
penurious race, and led them to invest their means and efforts in 
enterprises which — it seems easy now to see — were hopeless at the 
start. This took place, moreover, during a period of severe depres- 
sion in business, following closely upon the heaviest and most wide- 
spread commercial failures this country has ever known. 

Undoubtedly, the credit of planting the first morus multicaulis 
tree in America is due to Gideon B. Smith, of Baltimore, in 1826. 
But though Mr. Smith, who was famous as a writer on silk culture, 
took a full share in making known the supposed merits of the mul- 
ticaulis, it was most widely advertised from a specimen planted by 
Dr. Felix Pascalis, in an old churchyard that faced on Cedar street, 
in New York City. The Doctor wrote about it abundantly, until 
the American Institute took it under its patronage. Then slips 
from the churchyard tree were furnished to silk culturists and agri- 
cultural societies" in all the Eastern and Middle States, and even as 
far off as Ohio. Newspapers overflowed with accounts of the new 
marvel; legislatures and other public bodies, even Congress itself, 
responded to the general demand for essays and reports on the 
subject. Nearly every State gave liberal bounties for planting mul- 
berry trees and raising cocoons, and this course was followed also 
by several large associations. 

Between 1829 and 1839, many stock companies were formed, 
with capitals varying from ^30,000 to $250,000 and over, for raising 



AMERICAN SILK MANUFACTURE. 17 

and manufacturing silk . It is not practicable to rescue all of these 
from oblivion, but the following is a partial list. [A brace indi- 
cates that within this period a new company took the place of a 
previous one, dissolved] : 

MASSACHUSETTS. 

NorthamDton J Northampton Silk Manufacturing Company. 

I New York and Northampton Silk Company. 
Dedham New England Silk Company. 

Nantucket J Atlantic Silk Company. 

1 Mitchell Silk Factory. 

Newburyport Newburyport Silk Company. 

Roxbury Roxbury Silk Company. 

Boston and Framingham ...Massachusetts Silk Company. 

RHODE ISLAND. 

Providence | Rhode Island Silk Company. 

I Valentine Silk Company. 

CONNECTICUT. 

Mansfield Mansfield Silk Company. 

Hartford Connecticut Silk Manufacturing Company. 

South Manchester Mt. Nebo Silk Manufacturing Company. 

Norwich Norwich Silk Company. 

Lisbon (William Carpenter's) Silk Company. 

Windsor Name uncertain. 

Poquonnock Name uncertain. 

NEW HAMPSHIRE. 
Concord New Hampshire Silk Company. 

NEW YORK. 

Albany Albany Silk Company. 

Troy. Troy Silk Company. 

Poughkeepsie Poughkeepsie Silk Co. (Gamaliel Gay's.) 

New York New York Silk Company. 

2 



i8 AMERICAN SILK MANUFACTURE. 

NEW JERSEY. 

Burlington Burlington Silk Growing and Manuf g Co. 

Freehold ...Monmouth County Silk Manufacturing Co. 

Warren Warren Silk Company. 

PENNSYLVANIA. 

Philadelphia Morodendron Silk Company. 

Philadelphia (Mr. Strong's) Silk Company. 

Columbia Columbia Silk Company. 

Lancaster Lancaster Silk Company. 

Economy Harmony Society (Mr. Rapp's). 

Beaver Meadow Beaver Silk Culture and Manufacturing Co. 

Bethlehem Moravian Silk Cpmpany. 

Germantown Highfield Cocoonery. 

West Chester Chester Silk Company. 

OHIO. 

New Lisbon .New Lisbon Silk Company. 

Mount Pleasant Ohio Silk Company. 

Cincinnati Mulberry Grove Silk Company. 

Zanesville Name uncertain. 

VIRGINIA. 
Alexandria Potomac Silk Company. 

KENTUCKY. 

Pleasant Hill Shaker Society. 

Newport ..Campbell County Silk Company. 

TENNESSEE. 
Nashville Nashville Silk Manufacturing Company. 



AMERICAN SILK MANUFACTURE. 19 



V. 
SOME OF THE SILK COMPANIES. 



The career of some of these companies must be briefly sketched, 
as they were related to subsequent enterprises. The New York and 
Northampton Silk Company, originally having a more modest title, 
was formed in 1833-4, and owed existence to the enthusiasm of its first 
president, Samuel Whitmarsh, who, in 1832, had some silk machinery 
made for him by Nathan Rixford, and placed in a building known 
as the "Old Oil Mill," on the Mill river, at the site where now is 
the flourishing village of Florence, Mass. Among Mr. Whitmarsh's 
associates in the enterprise were two members of the firm of Russell 
& Co., of China. 

The company built, at Northampton, a brick mill of four stories' 
height and 100 feet in length, and did enough manufacturing busi- 
ness there and at Florence to find the supply of native silk quite 
inadequate. The multicaulis speculation brought the company, to 
grief in 1839, but its mills were kept running under the supervision 
of Captain Conant, of Mansfield, till the end of 1840. In 1841 
the company sold out to the Northampton Association of Educa- 
tion and Industry, in which Captain Conant, S. L. Hill and others 
were interested; somewhat later the concern was known as the 
"Nonotuck Steam Mill,** and finally the present Nonotuck Silk 
Company was formed, with S. L. Hinckley as president and Mr. 
Hill secretary. 

The New England Silk Company was organized in 1835 at Ded- 
ham, Mass., by Jonathan H. Cobb, distinguished as a jurist and as 
the writer of the most popular Manual published in the multicaulis 
era. His interest in silk culture dated from 1828. The mill at 
Dedham made 200 pounds of sewings per week and other goods. 



4o AMERICAN SILK MANUFACTURE. 

It was closed in 1839-40, but was operated by another company of 
the same name for four years afterward, under the management of 
C. Colt, Jr., until it was burnt, in 1845. 

The Atlantic Silk Company, of Nantucket, was formed in 1 835 by 
Aaron Mitchell, associated with Mr. Gardner. A steam engine fur- 
nished motive power for the mill. It was equipped with machinery 
made for it by Gamaliel Gay, of Poughkeepsie, N. Y., and after- 
ward obtained some of the best constructions of Nathan Rixford. 
During a brief existence, the company produced goods in consid- 
erable variety that were much admired. Failing in 1838, it was 
reopened the next year as the Mitchell Silk Factory. Charles P. 
Crane and V. J. Messinger were engaged in the latter enterprise, 
which was conducted with good success till 1841 ; at its close, part 
of the machinery went to Messinger & Brother, at Canton, Mass.^ 
who laid the basis of their successors, now the Eureka Silk Company. 

The Rhode Island Silk Company, of Providence, formed in 1835, 
was soon succeeded by the Valentine Silk Company, which succumbed 
in 1840. This concern, and all the companies named in the State of 
New York, used machinery made by Gamaliel Gay. 

Some account has already been given of the formation of the 
Mansfield Silk Company, which conducted a good manufacturing 
business until involved by the mulberry speculation in 1839. Most 
of its corporators kept some connection afterward with silk manu- 
facture. Mr. A. T. Lilly, son of the Alfred Lilly who was foremost 
in the Mansfield enterprise, became and still is the treasurer of the 
Nonotuck Silk Company, of Florence, Mass., and has, within recent 
years, fixed his place in silk literature by an admirable monograph 
on the development of the industry in Connecticut. Captain 
Conant and William Atwood, with Harvey Crane, formed, about 
1835, the firm of Atwood & Crane, who manufactured silk at Mans- 
field till 1840, when they dissolved partnership. Mr. Atwood after- 
ward built a silk mill on Mount Hope river, at the locality since 
called Atwoodville. Edmund Golding, who helped in devising the 
machinery of the Mansfield Company, became connecteti in 1839 



AMERICAN SILK MANUFACTURE. 21 

with Zalmon Storrs & Son, a firm which had been engaged in silk 
manufacture at Mansfield since 1832. 

Christopher Colt, of Hartford, who for many years had taken an 
interest in silk culture experiments, formed, in 1835, the Connecticut 
Silk Manufacturing Company. Judge Cobb, of Dedham, had some 
part in the organization. The company received |i 1,000 from the 
Silk Manufacturers' Bank, soon afterward the Exchange Bank ; the 
sum named being part of a bonus which the bank was obliged to 
pay in obtaining its charter. J. H. Hayden and Thomas Dale 
acquired their first knowledge of silk manufacture with this com- 
pany. Mr. Hayden formed a partnership with Mr. Haskell for 
carrying on the business at Windsor Locks, Conn., in 1838. Mr. 
Dale was a manufacturer at Willington in 1843. The Connecticut 
Silk Company had, in 1837, 70 to 80 looms employed in weaving 
Tuscan braid (silk warp and straw filling, for bonnets]!^ but it failed 
in 1839. 

Ward, Rush, Frank and Ralph Cheney (four brothers) began to be 
interested in silk business in 1834, and started the Mount Nebo Silk 
Mills, at South Manchester, Conn., in 1838; another brother, Seth 
Cheney, joined the concern very shortly afterward. The equip- 
ment of the mill was the best attainable; it included a "friction- 
roller" machine, constructed by Nathan Rixford, and regarded as 
one of his most efficient devices. Silk culture at that time chiefly 
engaged the attention of the brothers at South Manchester ; they 
bought land and planted mulberry trees in New Jersey, Georgia and 
Florida. These interests appearing more immediately important, 
the mill was closed within a few months of its opening, and the 
brothers went to Burlington, N. J., to look after their large planta- 
tions and cocooneries. While there, they issued a monthly maga- 
zine entitled "The Silk Grower and Farmer's Manual.** In 1841 
they gave up silk culture entirely, returned to South Manchester, 
reopened the mill and began manufacture under the name of 
Cheney Brothers. 

The foregoing list of companies does not include numerous enter- 
prises of silk culturists whose names have not been coupled with 



22 AMERICAN SILK MANUFACTURE. 

attempts at manufacture. Among these were many celebrated pro- 
moters of the industry, such as Gideon B. Smith, of Baltimore, a 
distinguished essayist; Mr. Jerome, of Princeton, N. J., who had 
a million of multicaulis trees growing in 1838; William Kenrick, 
of Newton, Mass., who had over 100,000 healthy trees at about the 
same date, and wrote a silk manual that was highly commended. 
As for the smaller silk-growers, their name is legion. Several of the 
sewing-silk manufacturers did not follow the prevailing fashion of 
merging their business into stock companies ; there were three or 
four such exceptions in Mansfield, Conn., O. S. Chaffee and Zalmon 
Storrs & Son being of the number. Montogul's large silk factory, 
in Washington street, Boston, does not seem to have been incor- 
porated. The manufacturers of fringes, trimmings, tassels and the 
like, though consuming a considerable quantity of raw silk in their 
business, weref not much involved in the current speculation. 

A number of large societies or associations were formed for the 
general promotion of silk industry. Their efforts were expended 
on silk culture rather than manufacture. Of these the most promi- 
nent were the American Silk Society of Baltimore, the United States 
Silk Society of Washington, the United States Silk Agency of Phila- 
delphia, the New Jersey Silk Society of Trenton, and the Wethers - 
field Silk Society of Connecticut ; the two last-named being auxiliary 
to the Baltimore Association. Similar efforts were strenuously put 
forth by the American Institute of New York City, and the Franklin 
Institute of Philadelphia. 

It would be a great mistake to regard the stock companies we have 
enumerated, as the mere froth of the multicaulis excitement. Most 
of them had been fully started when that mania took possession of 
our forefathers, and all of them were in existence before the days 
when trees of a season's growth could be sold for I5 t</|7 apiece, 
or budding switches were worth ^25 a dozen. In general it may be 
stated that the silk companies were formed with a clearly outlined 
programme, in which silk culture was to precede all manufacture ; 
and that they fell victims to a speculative tendency for buying land 
and attempting doubtful experiments, which characterized the period. 



AMERICAN SILK MANUFACTURE. 23 

and was peculiarly tempting in their case, because apparently in the 
direct line of their business. There is a curious letter of 1838 
extant, evidently written by a careful observer, which shows that 
the forming of such corporations was even then regarded as over- 
done, some of them having already collapsed. 

Though nearly all the companies attempted manufacture, that 
part of the business was regarded as secondary and not at the 
time important. Thus the observer we have referred to men- 
tioned as a bad feature of the New York and Northampton Silk 
Company's affairs that its lands were offered for sale, and its opera^ 
tions were to be "in future confined to the factory.*' In the very 
next issue of The Northampton Courier^ the public was assured that 
the company still possessed 100,000 growing trees, and had only 
offered some of its acres for sale because of the great price they 
commanded after being stocked with multicaulis. A letter of the 
period from the Hon. Peter S. Duponceau, of Philadelphia, who 
was for years a great promoter of silk culture, strongly opposes the 
starting of factories that might have to obtain material from France, 
Italy or China; and says that it is better to wait twenty years, if 
necessary, till we can make a perfect raw silk and export it for some 
years to Europe, than to begin manufacturing too soon. The pre- 
vailing sentiment at that time was shown by the Cheney Brothers, 
when, for the sake of giving full attention to silk raising, they closed 
and left their mill, just after equipping it for active service. 

The question has been often asked, what became of the silk pro- 
duced in this country during the multicaulis period ? The fact is, 
that there was never enough to keep existing machinery fully era- 
ployed. Factories were ready to take cocoons or fairly reeled silk, 
but could not get a supply of either, and there were constant com- 
plaints pf the deficiency. Friends of the industry, in 1838-9, 
asserted, perhaps with justice, that speculation in planting, buying 
and selling trees, withdrew attention from ** the legitimate business *' 
.of raising silk-worms, and thus diminished the production of cocoons. 
It is more certain that the multicaulis excitement checked manu- 
facture by diverting capital to silk culture. Fortunes were to be 



24 AMERICAN SILK MANUFACTURE. 

made in a few months, it seemed, by buying land and planting 
mulberry slips; and the silk companies, with scarcely an exception, 
sank their means in this form of investment. When the crash came, 
in the Fall of 1839, farmers all over the country realized with bitter- 
ness that they had thrown away much spare cash for worthless sprouts 
and switches; but the silk corporations lost their capitals, and within 
a twelvemonth nearly all of them had succumbed. In 1841 only 
one of these companies was surviving under its original name, and 
that one had been reorganized; it perished four years later. No 
industry in this country has ever suffered such complete disaster. 



AMERICAN SILK MANUFACTURE. 25 



VI. 
WORK DURING THE MANIA. 



Although precise details are wanting of the silk manufacture from 
1830 to 1840, and, if attainable, would seem paltry beside the devel- 
opment of the present day, there was yet enough to be well worthy 
of record, at least as the beginnings of a great industry. Native 
ingenuity and skill furnished all the power-driven reels for winding 
from the cocoon, and most of the throwing machinery and looms 
used in New England. Elsewhere in the United States many of 
the machines were obtained from abroad. ' Bishop, a good authority 
on American manufactures, says that between 1828 and 1833 about 
a dozen silk mills had been erected, chiefly in New England, with a 
view of using imported raw silk '* till a domestic supply could be 
had.*' Sewing-silk was by far the chief article of manufacture. In 
Tuscan braid (silk warps) and in fringes, trimmings and the like, there 
was a very considerable business, while a great variety of other 
goods was made, though in smaller quantities. Joseph Ripka, a 
manufacturer of Silesia cloths, at Manayunk, Penn., exhibited at a 
fair, in 1831, black silk plush, made chiefly of native with a small 
admixture of foreign silk. Thirty broad looms are mentioned as 
part of the Mansfield Company's equipment in 1833. The Monto- 
gul mill, at Boston, starting about 1831, was four years later employ- 
ing 300 female operatives ; had 150 to 200 looms running on Tuscan 
braid ; made also gimp and ribbons, besides its own organzine and 
tram, and sold 800 to 1,200 bonnets per week. Among the fabrics 
made by different manufacturers, there are cited dress goods, bro- 
cades, serges, satins, ribbons, flags, handkerchiefs, vests and even 
pantaloons. At Baltimore there was, in 1840, an establishment 
using 15 or 20 Jacquard looms in making silk-and-worsted vestings. 



26 AMERICAN SILK MANUFACTURE. 

The company at Providence displayed a dozen different articles 
woven on their looms. But it is not quite clear to what extent the 
manufacture of various fabrics passed beyond the bounds of experi- 
ment and into the realm of practical business. 

The use of imported raw silk at this period (1830-40) was limited 
by poor facilities for transportation to the interior. Even at the 
sea-coast cities the price was high. Montogul's factory, at Boston, 
using 30 to 50 pounds of imported silk per week, paid for it ^11 a 
pound. Notwithstanding the excessive cost, nearly all the Eastern 
manufacturers were compelled to use foreign silk, because they 
could not get enough of home- growth. The imports of China silk 
were large, but they were to a great extent balanced by exports, 
being brought here via Cape Horn, and barely pausing at our sea- 
ports till reshipped to Europe. The following figures are given for 
the invoice values of raw silk imported in 1830 : from Great Britain, 
^17,985; France, ^3,240; Italy, ^8,153; China, 189,696; total, 
^119,074. The duty on raw silk, at first 15 and later i2j^ per 
cent., must be added in estimating the value of the portion con- 
sumed in this country. In general, a part of the imports of raw 
silk for any given year appears as part of the exports in the next 
year, but in 1832 they were nearly balanced, and, starting from that 
point and using two-year periods, we obtain the estimates of the fol- 
lowing table : 



AMERICAN SILK MANUFACTURE. 



27 



FOREIGN RAW SILK. 





IMPORTS. 


EXPORTS. 


CONSUMPTION. 


YEAR. 


Two-year 
• Periods. 


Estimate 
per year. 


18^^ 


$135,438 
78,706 

10,715 

37,507 
211,694 

29,938 

39,258 
234,235 


$66,546 
139,256 

4,114 


[ $8,342 
I 44,108 

[ 43,947 
68,572 


$3,000 

5,000 

22,000 


10j^"f9»»» ...... 

l8^q 


1836.. 

l8l7 


22.000 


118.434 

79,251 
4,682 

200,239 


22,000 


**'j/ ••••••••••••••••• 

1838 

18^0 


22,000 
35,000 
34,000 


*«-'jy"»»»»« 

i8ao... 


« wa^wr.. .•••••••••••••• 



Graver difficulties beset us in estimating the production of native 
silk in the whole country during this period. We have seen how 
conflicting were the accounts of contemporary authorities as to the 
amount of raw silk raised at the chief seat of culture, in Connecti- 
cut, but perhaps we may accept as correct a fairly authentic state- 
ment which gives $35,000 as the value of the product of the town 
of Mansfield in 1835. ^^^ ^ow shall we estimate the production 
of seventy families in and near Canton, Ohio, who were ''making 
silk** in 1836; or of Mr. White, of Jefferson county, in the same 
State, who, about that time, had many thousand trees growing, 
raised and reeled his own silk, imported a loom and a weaver, and 
sold ** large numbers** of silk handkerchiefs, readily, at $3 apiece ? 
We know that the group of silk culturists in Beaver county, Penn- 
sylvania, where the Harmony Society started in 1S28, were able to 
produce more than enough silk for their own factories, and sent a 
surplus to the Philadelphia market ; but the figures of the business 
are wanting. Most of the statistics in the literature of the period 
consist in estimates of the future. 



28 AMERICAN SILK MANUFACTURE. 

We may, however, accept as not improbable, the census compila- 
tion for 1840, giving production for the previous year in the United 
States as 61,552 pounds, valued at f 250,000. The capital employed 
in silk manu&cture is stated as f 274,374. Probably the consump- 
tion of raw silk, both domestic and foreign, during any one year in 
the period under consideration, did not exceed a value of f 300,000, 
and the goods made may have been worth f 600,000, or even more, 
since the sewing-silk made in Massachusetts, in 1837, was valued at 
f 150,000. 

Out of the ruins of the multicaulis speculation, our present silk man- 
ufacture arose ; at first, however, very slowly and with uncertain steps. 
Silk culture was not given up without a faithful and prolonged strug- 
gle for its success. In the Fall of 1843, ^ national convention of 
silk growers and manu&cturers was held in New York City, at the 
call of the American Institute. About 150 silk culturists responded 
in person or by letter; some of these were also manufacturers. 
Among the questions of a circular of inquiry sent out in advance 
by the secretary of the convention, were some relating to manufac- 
turing operations. On such matters, the published replies are not 
numerous; not one letter is exclusively devoted to that subject. 
Nobody yet suspected that the business of manufacturing might 
dispense with silk culture. 

We miss some of the familiar features in this report. There is 
scarcely an allusion to that standard theme, silk culture in Mansfield, 
but the letters from Z. Storrs & Son and Rixford & Dimock mention 
the amount of sewing-silk they are making by machinery. Similar 
accounts come from the Northampton Association of Education and 
Industry. Only one of the old companies is mentioned, but some 
names of greater permanence appear. In the appendix (1844), 
Cheney Brothers, of South Manchester, are referred to, as making 
200 pounds of sewing-silk per week, though the fact is not noticed 
that this is the largest amount of manufacture named in the report. 
Next in this order of magnitude is a firm established in New Jersey. 

Here was a case where the disaster of 1839 had scattered the 
implements of manufacture, and they had fallen into more prosper- 



AMERICAN SILK MANUFACTURE. 29 

ous hands. After the breaking up of the Connecticut Silk Manu- 
facturing Company, of which Mr. Colt was president, his son took 
some of the machinery to Paterson, N. J., and there made a brief 
and futile attempt at manufacturing sewing-silk. In the summer of 
the same year, John Ryle, aided financially by G. W. Murray, 
bought this machinery, and soon started it in successful operation. 
Thus was begun Mr. Ryle*s career, which has brought him deserved 
honors as the founder of Paterson's great industry. Of course, no 
glimpse of such distinction appears in the report of 1843-4, which 
contains a letter from the firm of Murray & Ryle, stating the amount 
of sewing-silk they were making, the number of looms running, etc. 
The report, which reached the dignity of a second edition, boasts 
an ** Index of Subjects,** and calls the attention of readers to it, as 
perfecting the literary labor. Will it be believed? — there is no 
mention in the index of any of the manufacturers we have named, 
nor of their works, except a reference to an experiment by one of 
them in feeding worms under an open shed. 

Among the manufacturers* letters which the compiler of the 
remarkable index has neglected to notice, is one from Moses R. 
King, of Newark, N. J., reciting some details of the consumption 
of raw silk at that city, amounting to 500 pounds per year, in 
making fringes, tassels, gimp and coach lace. This branch of 
manufacture vies in antiquity with the production of sewing-silk ; 
something akin to it — the making of silk and thread laces, edgings, 
etc. — was started at Ipswich, Mass., in 1790, and rose to 42,000 
yards per year ; the business after a while declined, and its machin- 
ery was employed in cotton manufacture. But the pioneer in the 
fringe and tassel business was Mr. Hoeckly, who began the manu- 
facture at Philadelphia, in 1 793, and was succeeded by Wm. H. 
Horstmann, who established the existing firm of Wm. H. Horst- 
mann & Sons. In 1824 Mr. Horstmann introduced the first braid- 
ing machines, and in 1825 the first Jacquard loom used in this 
country ; in 1838 he constructed power looms of his own design for 
weaving narrow goods, and then and repeatedly afterward antici- 



30 AMERICAN SILK MANUFACTURE. 

pated European manufacturers in applying power to newly-devised 
machinery. 

A considerable number of firms was early engaged in making 
fringes^ trimmings, coach lace, etc., in the smaller towns, ^ at 
Quincy, Reading ^nd Roxbury, in Massachusetts, in 1837, and at 
Mansfield, Conn., in 1843. '^^^ business was started at New York 
in 1830, by John McRae, and in 1842 by Hirsch Heinemann, each 
of whom founded permanent establishments, the latter being event- 
ually succeeded by the present firm of J. Silbermann & Co., ribbon 
manufacturers. In 1834 B. 6. Tilt began making ladies' dress trim- 
mings, at Boston ; he afterward became interested in a general silk 
manufacture, out of which arose the present concerns of Dexter 
Lambert & Co. and the Phoenix Manufacturing Co., both located 
at Paterson. 

The manufacture of ribbons, which led the way to these changes, 
was not at first distinguished as a separate branch of business. 
Ribbons were made by all the firms we have named as trimmings' 
manufacturers. Mr. Heinemann made a specialty of ladies* belt 
ribbons in the very beginning of his New York enterprise (1842), 

Among the sewing-silk manufacturers starting between 1840 and 
1844 were Enoch Hovey & Son, at South Coventry, Conn., having 
removed thither from Gurleyville; B. Hooley, at Philadelphia; 
James Lovett, 1842, and Gurney & Co., 1844, at Newark, N. J.; 
and J. Conant & Co., consisting of Captain Conant, Dwight Swift 
and O. S. Chaffee, near Northampton, in 1844. The convicts in 
the Auburn (N. Y.) State Prison made in 1841, ^12,762 worth of 
very good sewing-silk. William H. Jones, who began at North 
Manchester, Conn., in 1840, was noted as the last of Eastern 
manufacturers to cling to the production of cocoons. His sewings 
and twist were much admired. 



AMERICAN SILK MANUFACTURE. 



3« 



VII. 



THE END OF SILK CULTURE. 



An intelligent estimate of the production of raw silk in the 
United States for the year 1841 placed it at 30,000 pounds. At 
the West and Southwest there was a considerable amount of manu- 
facture depending exclusively on native silk. Of these the two 
most prominent examples were located in the valley of the Ohio 
river; John W. Gill's, at Mt. Pleasant, O., and Mr. Rapp's, at 
Economy, Penn., both under the superintendence of John Fox. 
An astonishing variety of goods was made, especially at Mt. Pleas- 
ant. The chief articles were dress silks, satins and velvets ; sew- 
ing-silk was neglected. The multicaulis fever did little harm at 
the West and South ; more than 20,000 pounds of cocoons, in 
1843, w^^^ raised in Tennessee. The following was the eighth 
resolution passed by the silk convention at New York : " Resolved, 

that 1843 ^^^^ ^o^^ ^ ^^^ ^^* ^^ ^^® history of the silk culture in 
the United States.** But a severe blight killed many mulberry 
trees, in 1844, and thenceforth the efforts at culture ceased. 

At this point a brief summary seems appropriate. All of the 
advantages enjoyed by silk culture in the period under considera- 
tion — 1828 to 1844 — cannot be hoped for in a future trial of its 
merits : 



SILK CULTURE. 

Being the elder branch of the in- 
dustry, silk culture had the benefit 
of much practical experience in 
this country, and it was fairly 
established in Connecticut. 



SILK MANUFACTURE. 

The machinery and methods of 
manufacture were almost unknown 
here, and to a great extent had to 
be invented. 



32 



AMERICAN SILK MANUFACTURE. 



The culture had the support of 
enlightened public opinion, and 
was warmly espoused by distin- 
guished publicists and able writers. 

Numerous manuals and costly 
translations, mostly provided at 
public expense, gave every detail 
to facilitate culture. 

Large sums of money were in- 
vested in silk culture. 

Liberal bounties were given by 
States and associations to encour- 
age culture. 

A duty was imposed on foreign 
raw silk, as follows : 
1816 to 1832, 15 per cent. 
1832 to 1 841, 12} per cent. 

1 841 to 1842, 20 per cent. 

1842 to 1846, 50 cents per pound. 
This protected the culture. 

All parties attest that the raw 
silk raised in this country was of 
excellent quality. 



Raw silk of American growth 
was in great demand. Good coc- 
oons sold readily at $4 per bushel. 
There was a market for the product 
in the large cities, as well as at the 
sites of manufacture. 

Silk culture suffered an immense 
loss, both of capital and prestige, 
by the multicaulis speculation. 



Leaders of public opinion were 
opposed to attempting any manu- 
facture before culture should be 
established. 

Very little information on the 
art of manufacture is given in the 
abundant silk literature of the 
period. 

Comparatively small amounts 
were invested in manufacture. 

Scarcely anything but a medal 
was given for any success in 
manufacture. 

As the home-growth of raw silk 
was always insufficient, the duty 
on the foreign material was wholly 
a burden on the manufacture. 



Asiatic silk was at that time so 
bad as to be scarcely fit for use, 
while European raw silk was very 
high priced. 

The goods made by our manu- 
facturers have had, in every in- 
stance, a long and severe struggle 
to obtain a home market in the 
face of foreign competition. 



Silk manufacture suffered an 
equal loss by diversion of capital 
and utter discredit, prostrating all 
business. 



AMERICA^^ SILK MANUFACTURE. 



33 



Silk culture revived between 
1840 and 1843. 

In 1844 silk culture, with all its 
advantages, was generally aban- 
doned as unprofitable. 



Manufacture revived during the 
same period at about the same rate. 

In 1844, under all its disadvan- 
tages, silk manufacture was on the 
high road to success. 



In New England, silk culture ceased entirely ; but elsewhere it 
lingered for several years, scarcely known outside of its localities, 
and steadily declining in amount. The largest of the Western 
establishments in its palmiest days did not claim to be making 
f 10,000 worth of goods per year. Sewing-silk was one of the 
least in amount of the various articles manufactured from native 
silk at the West ; those were chiefly fabrics which could not then, 
nor indeed for many years afterward, be made at a profit where 
they would come into competition with imports from Europe. But 
the means for transporting goods to the interior of the country 
were limited; we recall an instance as late as 1848, when a silk 
dress was sent by mail (because no express could undertake to 
deliver it) to an address in a large town in Georgia. The same 
difficulties interfered in another way, and none of the Western or 
Southern concerns followed the lead of the East in the. transition 
to the use of Chinese raw silk. All of them passed away without 
leaving successors, direct or remote. The production of native 
silk in 1850 is stated as 10,843 pounds, valued at ^54,215 : of this, 
1,900 pounds were raised in Tennessee, 1,700 in New York, 1,500 
in Ohio and 1,200 in Kentucky. 

3 



34 AMERICAN SILK MANUFACTURE. 



VIII. 
SEWING-SILK MANUFACTURE ESTABLISHED. 



From 1845 ^^ i^5o> the following events in silk manufacture are 
recorded: in Connecticut, Tobias Kohn started at Hartford, M. 
Heminway at Watertown, and James Royce, at Gurleyville, Mr. 
Royce soon afterward associating himself with L. D. Brown ; Has- 
kell & Hayden rebuilt the old mill at Windsor Locks; Charles 
Cheney returned from Ohio to South Manchester, and withdrew 
from silk culture at the West. In Massachusetts, the burning of 
the mill at Denham ended Judge Cobb's silk enterprises there ; at 
Northampton, William Skinner engaged in the business of dyeing 
silk; Joseph Warner joined the firm of Conant & Co., in 1848, 
and a year later that of Warner, Holland & Co. At New York 
City, in 1849, J. Maidhof began making silk trimmings, fringes, 
etc., and at Philadelphia, J. C. Graham started a similar enterprise 
in 1850. 

For several years the silk manufacture of this country was almost 
wholly confined to two branches: sewing-silk in 1850 constituting 
two-thirds, and fringes, trimmings, etc., nearly one-third of the 
entire production, which amounted to Ji, 809,476. "Silk cloth,'* 
in value less than one per cent, of the silk goods total, if the census 
of 1850 may be relied on, was made by only two concerns: we 
suppose, by Cheney Brothers and John Ryle. This census col- 
lected returns from 27 manufacturers of sewing-silk, having ^428,350 
capital, and employing 295 male and 554 female operatives; and 
from 38 manufacturers of trimmings and like goods (including 
ribbons), with about half as much capital, but employing a some- 
what larger number of workers. 

A new tariff act passed in 1846 made all duties ad valorem, and 
15 per cent, of the value was substituted for 50 cents per pound on 



AMERICAN SILK MANUFACTURE. 



35 



raw silk. The new rate of duty was, at the time, a fair equivalent 
for the old one, the invoices of China raw silk for 1844-46, 
averaging little over ^3 per pound ; but afterward, when, improv- 
ing in quality, the Asiatic product i^se in price, the ad valorem 
rate imposed a much heavier burden. 

Under the designation of ^'raw silk" at that time, and even as 
late as 1862, two classes of imports were included in Custom 
House parlance: **Raw silk as reeled from the cocoon," and 
'' Raw silk not more advanced in manufacture than singles, tram, 
thrown or oxganzine." In the statistics taken under the tariff of 
1846, the two kinds were not separated, and the exact proportion 
of each cannot now be ascertained. Also, under that ad valorem 
tariff, it was not thought necessary to keep a record of the quanti- 
ties, /. e. the number of pounds imported. These deficiencies 
make statistics of raw silk imports from 1846 to 185 7 less satisfactory 
than at other periods, for determining the amount used here in 
manufacture. The following table will at least offer approximate 
figures: 

PROGRESS IN SEWING-SILK. 1844 TO 1850. 





FOREIGN RAW SILK. 


SEWING-SILK. 


YEAR. 


Imports. 


Exports. 


Net Imports. 
Duty, ^oc. p. ft. 


Estimated 

Value 
Manufact*d. 


Value 

Imported. 

Duty, $2 p. lb. 


1844... 


$172,953 


$7,102 


$165,851 


$500,000 


$496,745 


1845... 


208,454 


4,362 


204,092 
Duty, I5p.ct. 


600,000 


431,632 
Duty, 30 p. ct. 


1846... 


216,647 


23,999 


192,648 


600,000 


354,649 


1847... 


250,074 


8,385 


320,91 1 


700,000 


455,046 


1848... 


340,769 


19,858 


310,723 


900,000 


561,027 


1849... 


366,238 


55,515 


378,873 


900,000 


551,840 


1850... 


386,281 


7,408 


404,342 


1,200,000 


489,487 



36 AMERICAN SILK MANUFACTURE. 

The struggle of the sewing-silk manufacturers to obtain an equal 
footing with their European competitors had been long and severe, 
but the steady progress in the column of production, as shown in 
the above table, already indicated the winning side. The claim 
was justly put forward, as early as 1843, ^^^^ ^^^ American goods 
were the best in the market, and after a protracted qffort, this fact 
was impressed upon consumers. The practice of imitating foreign 
labels was abandoned. Imports of sewing-silks reached their highest 
figures in 1848-49, and thenceforth dropped rapidly to a point 
where their competition ceased to be of prime importance. 

Sewing-silk manufacture in this country cannot be regarded as 
the offspring of protection, paying, as it did in its infancy, a duty 
of 15 per cent, on its raw material, while only 30 per cent, was 
imposed on the foreign goods with which it had to compete. Suc- 
cess under the many adverse conditions we have enumerated, was 
more than creditable — it was surprising. It resulted from the 
superior merit of the goods that were made here, and, in the last 
analysis, must be attributed to the genius of our inventors, by which 
notable improvements in the machinery and methods of manufac- 
ture were achieved. 

Between 1850 and i860, the number of silk manufacturing estab- 
lishments was more than doubled. In Connecticut the following 
events are recorded : Captain Conant came back from Massachu- 
setts and built a mill at a locality since known as Conantville; Mr. 
Chaffee, also returning from Northampton, established the still 
existing firm of O. S. Chaffee & Son, at Mansfield Centre. At 
Gurleyville, L. D. Brown bought the mill of A. A. & H. E. 
Conant ; George B. Skinner started in silk dyeing at Mansfield ; 
George R. Hanks erected a mill on the site where his father had 
built one, more than thirty years before. The firm of Dimock, 
Campbell & Co. was formed at Mansfield in 1853, ^^^ succeeded 
by Dimock & Saunders in 1855, the leading partner in each firm, 
being Ira Dimock, now of the Nonotuck Silk Co. Mr. Dimock 's 
father and grandfather had been interested in silk culture, the 
earlier establishment at Mansfield being known as Shubael Dimock's 



AMERICAN SILK MANUFACTURE. 37 

cocoonery. Conant & Bottum, originally silk dyers at Mansfield 
Centre, bought manufacturing machinery there in 1857, and took 
it to Paterson, N. J., in 1858. Mr. Bottum soon afterward re- 
turned to Connecticut, and connected himself with J. H. Holland 
& Co., who bought Captain Coriant's mill at Conantville. All the 
above-named concerns were engaged upon sewing-silk or machine 
twist. During this period Cheney Brothers built a mill at Hartford, 
and widely extended the variety of their woven goods, making a 
specialty of handkerchiefs ; they seem also to have been the only one 
of the Eastern sewings and twist concerns largely engaged in making 
ribbons. But the most noteworthy advance of this firm was in the 
successful manufacture of spun silk, a new branch of the industry, 
which soon brought a serviceable silk dress within the reach of a 
slender purse, and helped largely to popularize American fabrics. 

In Massachusetts, during this interval, Warner & Suydam suc- 
ceeded Warner, Holland & Co. ; William Skinner removed to 
Haydenville, and there began sewing-silk manufacture; Charles 
Foster and J. W. C. Seavey were engaged with Messinger & Brother, 
at Canton; and Dexter, Lambert & Co., at Boston, succeeded Tilt 
& Dexter in the manufacture of dress trimmings and ribbons. 

At New York, John McRae was succeeded by Thomas C. McRae 
& Co., and Hirsch Heinemann, by Heinemann & Silbermann; and 
business was begun by S. Bertschy & Co., and Deppeler & Kam- 
merer. These firms were all engaged in making trimmings or rib- 
bons, or both. At Philadelphia, H. W. Hensel started in similar 
business. 

The advantages of Paterson, N. J., began to attract attention. 
The goods of John Ryle figured among the exhibits at the London 
"World's Fair,*' in 1853, and the next year he built the Murray 
Mill; Hamil & Booth were his first competitors; Stelle & Walthall 
(throwsters) established themselves at Paterson in 1856. The 
machinery brought thither by Conant & Bottum in 1858 was 
operated by Mr. Conant from 1859 to 1861, and then was sold to 
Thomas N. Dale. In i860, Paterson held seven-eighths of the silk 
manufacture in New Jersey, sewings and twist being the main busi- 
ness, though a few looms were kept running. 



38 AMERICAN SILK MANUFACTURE. 



IX. 
STROKES OF FORTUNE. 



Two circumstances of great importance to the industry occurred 
in the period under review. The first was the production of "ma- 
chine twist," a kind of thread exactly suited for the sewing-machine, 
and first adapted to that use in 1852, by the Nonotuck Silk Co. 
This country was then beginning to supply itself and the rest of 
the world with sewing-machines, and before i860, was making 
100,000 of them a year. A business in the manufacture of machine 
twist was speedily developed ; it kept pace with the development of 
the sewing-machine, and has ever since held a prominent position in 
the silk industry. 

But the pressure of the tariff on raw silk was severely felt, and it 
became (according to a compiler of the U. S. Census for i860) the 
cause of a decline in the manufacture of sewing-silk for two or 
three years after 1854. The amount of duty paid between 1843 ^.nd 
1857 exceeded || 1,000,000. The removal of all duties from raw 
silk by the tariff of 1857, lifted the burden. This was one of the 
few alterations of the tariff which did little harm to anybody at the 
time, which has done good ever since, and which has not yet been 
disturbed by our legislators. The amount of native silk raised in 
i860 was 11,944 pounds, valued at ^47,000. Three-fourths of this 
was produced in Ohio and Illinois, and no portion of it helped to 
supply our mills with raw material. The last noteworthy displays 
of goods made from native silk seem to have been those of the New- 
port Silk Manufacturing Company of Kentucky, at the fairs of the 
American Institute, in 1852 and 1855. It will be seen by the fol- 
lowing table, that, in consequence of the removal of duties, the 
imports of raw silk, which were ^950,000 in 1857^ rose to ^1,500,- 
000 in 1858, and ^1,600,000 in 1859. 



AMERICAN SILK MANUFACTURE. 



39 



PROGRESS IN SEWINGS AND TWIST, 1851 TO i860. 



YEAR. 



185I... 
1852... 
1853... 
1854... 
1855... 
1856... 

1857... 
185$... 
1859... 
i860... 



FOREIGN RAW SILK. 




1448,198 
360,836 

712,092 

1,085,261' 25,010 



74?,25i 
991,234 



953,734 

1,542,195 
1,619,157 

1,340,676 



63,279 
4,255 

4,163 

94,092 

21,157 

177,881 



Net Imports. 
Duty, 15 p. ct. 



{^404,342 

353,693 
711,810 

1,060,251 

678,972 

986,979 

Free. 

949,571 
1,448,103 

1,598,000 

1,162,795 



SEWINGS 


AND TWIST. 


Estimated 

Value 
Manufact'd. 


Value 

Imported. 

Duty, 30 p. ct. 


{^1,300,000 


»489,487 


1,200,000 


379,455 


2,000,000 


173,799 


3,000,000 


238,525 


2,000,000 


332,301 


2,900,000 


. 189,220 


■ 


Duty, 24 p. ct. 


2,800,0Q0 


250,138 


4,000,000 


211,723 


4,000,000 


123,904 


3,600,000 


252,097 



Although raw silk was "free" after 1857, ten per cent, duty 
had to be paid till 1865 on any Asiatic silk which was reshipped 
in Europe, because coming from countries beyond the Cape of 
Good Hope. This ** reshipped Asiatic," during the years 1858-65, 
amounted in value to 11,174,624, and, of course, paid 1117,462 in 
duties. 

The United States census of i860 contains a very good report on 
the silk industry. Having given its figures a careful study, we regard 
them as, in general, authentic. It candidly acknowledges one of its 
defects — ^the absence of returns for silk fabrics, except from a con- 
cern at West Newton, Mass., which made |ii 8,000 worth of such 
goods, using 6,000 pounds of raw silk. According to this census^ 
the total value of silk goods made at that time in the whole 



40 AMERICAN SILK MANUFACTURE. 

country, was over |6,6oo,ooo. Of this, about 13,600,000 was 
sewing-silk and machine twist, 34 per cent, of which was made in 
Connecticut, 27 in New Jersey, and 17 each in Massachusetts and 
Pennsylvania. Tram, organzine and thrown silk for fringe-making, 
are evidently classed with sewings and twist ; so that the raw silk 
stated as having been used in the latter manufacture — 455,660 
pounds — is neatly the total consumption for all branches. In the 
process of manufacture, 10 per cent, was lost, and only 409,429 
pounds produced ; but in Connecticut this loss was much less than 
in other States, and seems not to have exceeded 3 per cent. The 
average value of the sewings and twist made was, in Connecticut, 
JI8.40 per pound ; New Jersey, $S.S6 ; Pennsylvania, I9.13 ; Massa- 
chusetts, JI9.08; New York, |8.i6; for the whole, II8.78. 

While the business of making sewings and twist had risen in i860 
to nearly thrice the volume of 1850, that of fringes, trimmings, etc., 
had increased in a much larger proportion, producing a value of 
212,804,322, which is nearly five times what was given in the pre- 
vious census. The bulk of the trimmings manufacture was concen- 
trated in two cities: over || 1,100,000 at Philadelphia and nearly 
|8oo,ooo at New York ; about ^600,000 worth was made in Massa- 
chusetts, but very little in New Jersey. The entire manufacture of 
silk goods amounted to 3^ times as much as in 1850 ; but sewings 
and twist, employing 42 establishments, gave 54 per cent, instead 
of two-thirds (as in 1850) of the whole production, while trimmings, 
etc., with 90 concerns at work, amounted to 43 per cent, in place 
of the former one-third. Considering the total value of silk pro- 
duction by States, Pennsylvania took the lead with 27 per cent, of 
the whole ; Connecticut and Massachusetts are each credited with 
20 per cent.. New York with 17 and New Jersey with 15. 



AMERICAN SILK MANUFACTURE. 41 



X. 
THE WAR PERIOD, 



We now come to the war period ; the most important of any, in 
its effects upon our industry. For a short time before and after the 
outbreak of hostilities, business of almost every kind was para- 
lyzed ; the imports of raw silk dropped to a third of their previous 
average, and, it is worthy of note, the imports of silk goods fell 
off in like proportion. The raising of the tariff on foreign silks, 
in 1 86 1, at first to 30 and then to 40 per cent., helped to reduce 
their importation. The four years of civil war show a very irregu- 
lar consumption of raw silk, but averaging very nearly that of pre- 
vious years, while the importation of European fabrics reached less 
than half its former volume. The actual progress of the silk industry 
was most apparent at Paterson, where, between i860 and 1864, the 
number of manufacturing concerns, and of their operatives, was 
doubled. The leaders at Paterson, in 1864, were John Ryle, Hamil 
& Booth, the Phoenix Manufacturing Company, the Dale Manufac- 
turing Company and L. R, Stelle & Sons. 

The tariff act of June 30th, 1864, imposing a duty of 60 per 
cent, upon imports of silk fabrics, brought strength and steadiness 
to the development of silk manufacture. The declaration of peace, 
in 1865, gave an impulse to trade that was shown in every depart- 
ment, and in 1866, even the importations of silk goods, notwith- 
standing their increased tariff, rose to the average of years before 
the war. But neither the peace nor the tariff proved so effective a 
lever for a few years, in raising up American silk manufacture, as 
did the high price of gold. Competition with various European 
woven fabrics, especially ribbons, handkerchiefs and lining silks, 
first became practicable when gold rose to a premium that confined 



42 AMERICAN SILK MANUFACTURE. 

imports to the other classes of goods which we were not yet ready 
to make. The branches of manufacture thus founded, being sup- 
ported by the tariff, gained a permanent place, and have since 
developed largely. 

The following changes, etc., among silk manu£u:turers during 
the war period and a few subsequent years are noted: Between 
i860 and 1866, in Massachusetts, J. W. C. Seavey & Co. (prede- 
cessors of Seavey, Foster & Bowman and the Eureka Silk Manu- 
facturing Co.) succeeded Messinger & Bro., at Canton ; in Connec- 
ticut, Belding Brothers & Co. established themselves at Rockville ; 
O. S. Chaffee & Son built at Mansfield Centre; J. H. Hayden 
succeeded Haskell & Hayden, at Windsor Locks; J. H. & G. 
Holland, preceding the Holland Manufacturing Co., organized at 
Willimantic ; and marked improvements were effected in the manu- 
facture of machine twist. 

Strange & Bro., of New York City, began making ribbons in 
1 86 1, and started a factory in the vicinity in 1863; this was suc- 
ceeded, in 1868, by the establishment of William Strange & Co., at 
Paterson. Louis Franke, who also eventually removed to Paterson, 
began the manufacture of fringes, etc., at New York City, in 1863. 
John N. Stearns & Co. commenced making broad silks at New 
York in 1865, and Wolfsohn, Meyenberg & Co. (preceding S. M. 
Meyenberg) wove nets and veiling in 1866. A. G. Jennings, at 
Brooklyn, N. Y., began making silk laces in 1871 ; Hugo Funke 
started the ribbon manufacture shortly afterward at College Point, 
L. I. The Oneida Community, in the interior of New York State, 
began sewings and twist manufacture in 1 866. The firm of L. R. 
Stelle & Sons, predecessors of the Sauquoit Silk Manufacturing Co. 
(near Utica, N. Y.) was formed in 1861, but started their business 
at Paterson, N. J. 

The removal from Boston to Paterson of B. B. Tilt & Son, 
founding the Phoenix Manufacturing Co. in 1862-63, and of the 
firm of Dexter, Lambert & Co., in 1867, has been already 
mentioned. The Dale Silk Manufacturing Co. (Thomas N. Dale 
& Son), built at Paterson in 1864; J. H. Booth & Co., throwsters. 



AMERICAN SILK MANUFACTURE. 43 

started in 1865 ; Dunlop & Malcolm (preceding John Dunlop) and 
John D. Cutter — each manufacturers of sewings and twist — ^began 
at Paterson in 1866; Weidmann & Greppo (preceding J. Weid- 
mann), were established there in silk dyeing, the same year; 
Pelgram & Meyer started ribbon manufacture at a later date. 

Outside of Paterson, in New Jersey, the manufacture of sewing- 
silks was begun at Newark, by the Singer Manufacturing Co., in 
1862 ; John Marr made silk nets and laces at Trenton, in the same 
year ; P. G. Givernaud began making dress goods at West Hoboken 
in 1866. 

At Philadelphia, Aub & Hackenburg were established in the 
manufacture of sewings and twist in 1863, and Werner Itschner & 
Co., of ribbons, in 1864. Towles & Tallerman began making 
ribbons and trimmings at Baltimore in 1861. 

No use can be made of the figures concerning silk manufactures 
given in the United States census of 1870. We extract the follow- 
ing as a specimen : 

'*' Connecticut : 

"Silk goods not specified: No. of establishments, 20; produc- 
tion, 13,138,620. 

'* Sewings and twist : No. of establishments, 3 ; production, 
1176,225.'' 

From data such as the above, there is compiled in that census a 
statement showing a total for silk manufacture in the United States, 
of 86 establishments producing 1112,210,662 worth of goods. The 
statement is very elaborate, and its figures allow for the deduction 
of returns from two concerns engaged in silk winding ; which is 
like varnishing a soiled chromo. 

The following table may prove of service : 



44 



AMERICAN SILK MANUFACTURE. 



IMPORTS, 1861 TO 1873. 





FOREIGN RAW SILK. 


MANUFACTURED 
GOODS. 


YEAR. 


Imports. 


Exports. 


Net Imports. 


Value Imported. 


1861 


11478,794 
489,526 

1,018468 

2,057,964 

1,193,870 
3,437,900 

2469,001 
2,520404 
3,3^8496 
3,017,958 
5,739,592 
5,625,620 

6460,621 


1124,104 

21,412 

. I4,"2 

31,501 
480,193 
198,429 

26,276 

245,657 
57,031 
43,031 
64,783 

133,370 
45,892 


11,354,690 

468,114 
1,004,356 
2,026463 

713,677 

3,239471 
2,442,725 

2,274,747 
3,261465 

2,974,927 
5,674,809 

5492,250 
6414,729 


123,657,269 


1862 

1863 


7,588,376 
/2,890,76o 


1864 


20,597,723 


1865 


8,439,145 


1866 


28,508,696 


1867 


18,357,052 


1868 

1869 

1870 

I87I 

1872 


16,908,533 
22,288,669 
23,870,142 
32,341,001 
36448,618 


1873 


29,890,035 



One of the moving causes which brought about the formation of 
the Silk Association of America, was the necessity felt by the trade 
for having such errors corrected; they "belittled the industry." 
The first object named in the call (June, 1872,) for forming the 
association, was " The gathering of accurate statistics and reports 
on the silk trade and manufacture." This object began to be 
accomplished at an early date in the association's history, and 
returns were obtained for the year ending December 31st, 1872, 
from 147 manufacturing concerns, representing a production of 
finished goods at least 50 per cent, greater than that of the census of 
1870. The entire production was very evenly divided at this time 
under three heads : one-third, sewings and twist ; a little over a third, 
broad goods and ribbons ; nearly a third, trimmings, laces, etc. 



AMERICAN SILK MANUFACTURE. 45 



XI. 
RECENT GROWTH. 



The year 1876 was signalized by the opening of the Centennial 
Exhibition, at Philadelphia. Hundreds of thousands of our people, 
for the first time in their lives, learned there that the silk goods 
made in this country met every want of the consumer ; combining 
elegance in design, strength of material and cheapness in prices. 
These facts were widely advertised through the publications of the 
Silk Association of America, which furnished the material for 
innumerable articles in newspapers throughout the Union, justly 
applauding the triumphs of American industry. A marked advance 
in the production of several branches of manufacture — notably of 
handkerchief and ribbons — ^was the immediate result. The avenues 
of domestic trade thus opened have never been closed, though some- 
times narrowed by changing fashions or clogged by the waves of 
depression which at intervals overspread all commercial interests. 

The following compilation will show the growth of the industry 
in the years named. In using the invoiced value of imports of 
foreign goods, for comparison with manufacture here, large allow- 
ance must be made for the undervaluation of invoices; and the 
duties collected (averaging 58 to 59 per cent.) must be added, as 
well as charges, importers' profits, etc.: 



46 



AMERICAN SILK MANUFACTURE. 



GROWTH OF SILK INDUSTRY, 1874 TO 1880. 



YEAR. 


Imports 

of 

Raw Silk.* 


Production in 

United States, of 

Finished Goods. 


Imports of 

Manufactures of 

Silk, at N. Y. 


1874. 


{^3,854,008 
4,504,306 
5,424,408 

6,792,937 

5,103,084 

8,371,025 

12,024,699 


{^16,262,157 
21,269,081 
21,201480 

16,613,743 
20,791,055 

29,983,630 
34,519,723 


1^23,292,551 
23,168,118 

• 

21,192,386 

19,992,741 
20,042,730 

25,830,829 

33,305,460 


***/** ••••••••••••••••••••••• 

1875 


1876 


1877 


1878 


sw^v.a ••••••••••••• ••••••••• 

1870 


AV/y..a*** ••• ••••• 

1870-80 


**'/if ^^^••••••••••••••••••m* 



The number of silk manufacturing establishments reported in the 
census year, 1879-80, was 382. In the Directory which accom- 
panies the present work, it will be seen that now (December, 1886) 
not less than 575 concerns are so engaged, and many of these have 
separate groups of mills at other sites than the parent establish- 
ments. 

With so large an increase in the number of manufacturers, it 
becomes impossible to give in the present work a synopsis of the 
more noted changes and new firms starting since 1872, as we have 
done for previous periods. To do equal justice, such an attempt 
would require three or four pages of mere names and dates. To 
pick out a few of the more prominent ones would seem invidious 
to those who were neglected. Yet it must be said that many who 
have started in later years, have deservedly risen to equal eminence 
with those who were earlier in the field ; and we can only refer our 
readers for particulars, in these cases, to the ample pages of our 
Directory. 

By the census of 1880, a more accurate knowledge was attained 



*This does not include waste s!lk, pierced cocoons, noils or other raw material imported. 



AMERICAN SILK MANUFACTURE. 47 

of the growth of the industry and the conditions of its success, 
than had before been possible. The facts therein compiled were of 
the highest service to the defenders of protection to American 
industry, in our State and National Legislatures; and since the 
publication of these facts, and the analysis and display of them by 
our public speakers, no serious attempts like those of former years 
have been made to break down the defenses of our industry. It 
was shown that prosperity has been brought within very recent 
years to many new sites where silk factories have been established, 
and related forms of industry have followed in their wake ; while 
an army of operatives, the majority of whom are women and youth, 
have obtained healthful and profitable employment in a thousand 
silk mills. The reduction of the rate of duty on silk fabrics by the 
tariff of 1883 from 60 to 50 per cent, was a large concession to the 
need of revenue reform, and quite enough for several years to come, 
though there is a general belief that an equitable distribution of the 
burdens and benefits of the tariff may be better attained by means 
of specific duties. 

Many influences besides those we have named have powerfully 
affected the silk industry. Steamship and railroad, telegraph and 
telephone, have revolutionized the methods of business. The mar- 
velous facilities of modern commerce are open to all who choose to 
employ them. A better raw material at a lower price is now acces- 
sible alike to the silk manufacturer of this country and his foreign 
rivals, but the speed and cheapness of ocean transport for manufac- 
tured goods, help only his competitors. More than all else, in every 
branch of the American silk industry which has obtained control 
of the market and distanced European rivalry, a home competition 
has arisen which is more relentless and severe than the old conflict 
with the foreigner. Beside all these, there are now the troubles 
with organized labor, of which our forefathers were happily ignorant. 

Hence the business of the present day offers none of the lavish 
gifts of fortune ; it is conducted within close lines of prudence, with 
marked economies in manufacture and care in management, giving 
at best only a slender margin of profit. But these conditions, 



48 AMERICAN SILK MANUFACTURE. 

though arduous, are in the main healthful ; great successes are rare, 
but so also are great failures. 

Referring to the accompanying annual report of the Silk Asso- 
ciation of America for particulars of imports of raw silk and Euro- 
pean manufactures in the last few years, the present condition of the 
industry in the United States may be estimated in round numbers 
about as follows : 

Production in finished goods |6o,ooo,ooo 

Capital invested ^{^30,000,000 

Number of operatives employed in mills 5o»ooo 

The production may be divided as follows : nearly three fifths, 
broad goods and ribbons ; somewhat more than a fifth, sewings and 
twist; one-fiflh, trimmings, etc., and mixtures. No approach to 
accurate statistics on these points can be attained except from actual 
returns taken by such methods as were used in the last census, sup- 
plemented by careful scrutiny to correct errors of accident or design. 
The above figures may, however, serve to meet a demand which has 
been frequently made within recent months, for such information. 



XIII. — XIV. 



Annual Report 



Silk Association 



OF AMERICA. 



Weonesiiay, June 30, 1886. 



TABLE OF CONTENTS. 

4 

PAGE 

Officers of the Association, 1886-1887 53 

Members of the Association, June 30th, 1886 55 

Secretary's Report 59 

Statistics 71 

Imports of Raw and Waste Silk, etc., in lbs. avoirdupois 73 

Imports of Raw Silk in Calendar Years 74 

Imports of Raw Silk in Fiscal Years 75 

Imports of Raw Silk by Countries 76 

Imports of Waste Silk, Pierced Cocoons and Noils ^ ^^ 

Imports of Silk Manufactures in Calendar Years 78 

Imports of Silk Manufactures in Fiscal Years 79 

Imports of Silk Manufactures by Months 80 

Sugar, Molasses, etc., Duties in Detail 81 

Wool and Woolen Manufactures, Duties in Detail 81 

Silk Manufactures, Duties in Detail 82 

Cotton Manufactures, Duties in Detail 83 

Duty-paying Imports of the United States 84 



THE 

SILK ASSOCIATION OF AMERICA. 



OFFICERS, 1886-1887. 



FRANK W. CHENEY, 

B. RICHARDSON, 

C. LAMBERT, . 
WM. STRANGE, . 

LOUIS FRANKE, . 



F. O. HORSTMANN, . 
IRA DIMOCK, 
JOHN N. STEARNS, . 
M. M. BELDING, . 
A. G. JENNINGS, 
S. W. CLAPP, . 
WM. T. RYLE, 
JOHN T. WALKER, 
JAMES BOOTH, . 
ALBERT TILT, 
JOSEPH LOTH, . 
BENJ. A. ARMSTRONG, 
RICHARD WALTER, . 
HUGO FUNKE, 
C. CHAFFANJON, ' 
SILAS D. WEBB, . 
WM. C. SKINNER, 
JOHN D. CUTTER, 
E. D. WOODRUFF, . 
W. L. STRONG, 



President, 



Vice Presidents, 



Hartford, Conn. 

New York. 
Paterson, N. J. 



<( 



t ( 



Treasurer, 



Directors. 



New York. 

Philadelphia. 
Hartford, Conn. 
. New York. 

. Brooklyn, N. Y. 
New York. 



<( 



<< 



Paterson, N. J. 



(( 



(( 



New York. 
New London, Conn. 
Morrisania, N. Y. 
College Point, L. I. 
Union Hill, N. J. 
New York. 



(< 



(< 



WM. C. WYCKOFF, 



Secretary, 



Auburn, N. Y. 
New York. 

446 Broome St., N. Y. 

(53) 



LIST OF MEMBERS 

OF 

THE SILK ASSOCIATION OF AMERICA 

JUNE 30, 1886. . 

♦ 

Aral, R , . . 46 Howard Street, New York. 

Armstrong, Benjamin A., . . New London, Conn. 

Arnold, Frank, . 477-481 Broome Street, New York. 

Atwood, Eugene, ..... Stonington, Conn. 

Auffmordt, C. A. & Co., . . 33-35 Greene Street, New York. 

Barnes, D. A., Paterson, N. J. 

Bavier, Meyer & Co., . 458 Broome Street, New York. 

Belding, A. N., . . . . Rockville, Conn. 

Belding, D. W., Cincinnati, Ohio. 

Belding,' H. H., Chicago, 111. 

Belding, M. M., . 455 Broadway, New York. 

Boettger, Henry W., . . . 32 Mercer Street, New York. 
Boissiere, E. V. de, . . Williamsburg, Franklin Co., Kansas. 
Booth, James, ...... Paterson, N. J. 

Bridge, Frederick, . . 34-38 Burling Slip, New York. 

Brown, L. D. & Son, ..... Middletown, Conn. 

Busch, Peter, . no Grand Street, New York. 

Butler, H. V., Jr., Paterson, N. J. 

Chaffanjon, C, . . . . Jersey City Heights, N. J. 

Chaffee, O. S. & Son, .... Mansfield Centre, Conn. 
Cheney, F. W., . . . . South Manchester, Conn. 
Cheney, Harry G., . . . *' '* ** 

Cheney, Knight D., . . . '' '' ' *' 

Cheney, James W., . . . . " 

(55) 



56 



THE SILK ASSOCIATION OF AMERICA. 



Cheney, John S., . 
Cheney, Richard O., . 
Christie, Robert. 
Clapp, S. W., 
Comby, John, . 
Cutter, John D., . 
Dimock, Ira, . 
Eaton, E. W., 
Eldridge, Henry, • . 
Erskine, James M., 
Farley, Gustavus, Jr., 
Franke, Louis, 
Funke, Hugo, . 
Griswold Worsted Co., 
Hackenburg, W. B. & Co., 
Hayes, Thomas F., 
Heinemann, Paul, 
Horn, C, . 
Horstmann, F. O., . 
Itschner, Werner, 
Jennings, A. G., 
Jennings, Oliver T., 
Jennings, Warren P., 
Kursheedt, Alex. E., 
Lambert, C, . 
Loewenstine, J. H., 
Loth, Joseph, . 
Middleton & Co., 
Morgenroth, Gustavus A. , Jr 
Morlot, George, . 



South Manchester, Conn. 



(( 



(( 



it 



34-38 Burling Slip, New York. 

441 Broadway, ** ** 

. West Hoboken, N. J. 

44 East 14th Street, New York. 

. Hartford, Conn. 

23-25 Greene St , New York. 

560-562 Broadway, 

52 Greene Street, 

. 64 South Street, 

no Grand Street, 

. College Point, L. I., N. Y. 

Philadelphia, Pa. 



<( 



(( 



<< 



a 



n 



<( 



<( 



(( 



(C 



it 



5-9 Union Square, New York. 
112 Water Street, 
70 Mercer Street, 

Philadelphia, Pa. 



n 



t( 



(( 



(( 



(C 



C( 



. Brooklyn, N. Y. 
62-64 Greene Street, New York. 



<< 



(( 



i( 



<< 



(( 



(< 



(( 



190-194 So. Fifth Ave., 

Paterson, N. J. 
43 Greene Street, New York. 
65 *' 

66 Pine Street, 
159 Maiden Lane, New' York. 

Paterson, N. J. 
52 Greene Street, New York. 



(( 



(( 



tt 



tt 



it 



tt 



tt 



tt 



Murray, Russell, 

New York Silk Conditioning Works, 13 Mercer Street, 

O'Donoghue, D., . . . 91 Grand Street, 

Paul, Frank, Montreal, Canada. 

Pelgram & Meyer, Paterson, N. J. 



THE SILK ASSOCIATION OF AMERICA. 



57 



Pinkney, J. H. & Co., 

Pomefoy, S. W., Jr., 

Rice, A. H. & Co., 

Richardson, B., 

Rossmassler, Richard j 

Ryle, Wm. T., 

Silbermann, J., 

Simon, Herman, 

Simon, Robert, 

Simonds, J. H., 

Skinner, William, 

Skinner, Wm. C, 

Smith, Benjamin D., 

Smith, Isaac, 

Smith, L. O., 

Stearns, John N., 

Stelle, Louis R., . 

Strange, Theodore, 

Strange, William, 

Streuli, Alfred, 

Strong, W. L., 

Struss, Henry W., 

Takaki, Teisaku, 

Tilt, Albert, . 

Twombly, Horatio N. 

Walker, John T., 

Walter Richard, . 

Wamsley, Philip, 

Warner, Luther J., 

Webb, Silas D., 

Westervelt, E., 

Wilson, H. B., 

Woodruff, E. D., 

Yoshida, Jiro, Consul of Japan, 



(( 



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29 West 23d Street, New York. 
. 60 Wall Street, *' '* 

Pittsfield, Mass. 

43 Mercer Street, New York. 

Philadelphia, Pa. 

54 Howard Street, New York. 

35 Mercer Street, " ** 

Easton, Pa. 

Town of Union, N. J. 

Warehouse Point, Conn. 

Holyoke, Mass. 

508 Broadway, New York. 

113 Water Street, 

446 Broome Street, 

Philadelphia, Pa. 

68 Greene Street, New York. 

Sauquoit, '* 

96-98 Prince Street, ** 

Paterson, N. J. 

57-59 Greene Street, New York. 

75-77 Worth Street, 

no Grand Street, 

7 Warren Street, 

Paterson, N. J. 
34-38 Burling Slip, New York. 
. 81 Pine Street, " 

Morrisania, N. Y. 

34 Greene Street, New York. 

Northampton, Mass. 

34-38 Burling Slip, New York. 

.41 Liberty Street, 

33-35 Greene Street, 

Auburn, N. Y. 
7 Warren Street, New York. 



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58 THE SILK ASSOCIATION OF AMERICA. 

HONORARY MEMBERS. 

Allen, Franklin, . 156-158 Broadway, New York. 

Haywood, George M., . Hartford, Conn. 

Low, Seth, Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Ryle, John, Paterson, N. J. 

Sheehan, Daniel J., Secretary, . . . ** ** 

Takaki, Samro, Yokohama, Japan. 

Tomita, Tetsnoski, London, Eng. 



SECRETARY'S REPORT. 



In conformity with the by-laws of the Association, the Secretary 
has the honor to submit the following report, prepared under direc- 
tion of the Board of Government, and presenting a review for the 
past two years and to June 30th, 1886, of silk manufacturing in- 
terests and the transactions of the Silk Association of America. 

At the time when the last report of this Association was in prepa- 
ration, the lull in trade which usually precedes a presidential 
election was manifest throughout the country. The change of 
administration which followed brought fresh excuse for hesitation 
in business ventures, since many persons thought it possible that 
alterations in the tariff were likely to ensue with a new party in 
power. The session of Congress in the Winter of 1884-5 was not 
fruitful in tariff legislation, and the only useful measure on the 
subject was brought forward too late for passage. This was Mr. 
Hewitt's bill for the rectification of obvious blunders in the present 
tariff, and to secure greater efficiency in executing the customs laws. 

The same bill, brought into the present Congress, has shared the 
fate of the Morrison tariff bill to which it was unwisely appended. 
This is unfortunate, since the measure provided for restoring the 
hat-trimming clause in the tariff to its former signification, and cor- 
recting the error about cartons — matters in which all silk manufac- 
turers are deeply interested. 

The question of substituting specific for ad valorem duties on silk 
goods has received renewed attention from the Association, in 
consequence of inquiries on the subject by the Secretary of the 
Treasury. A schedule of specific duties to meet these inquiries has 
been prepared and forwarded to the Treasury Department. More 
recently that Department has recommended to the Committee of 

(59) 



6o THE SILK ASSOCIATION OF AMERICA. 

Ways and Means a schedule of similar character, but with rates of 
duty lower than those which were suggested by this Association as 
fair equivalents for present ad valorem rates. 

For more than a year after the date of our last report, silk manu- 
facture shared with all other dry goods interests in a long-continued 
period of depression. This applied to every branch of our trade, 
and the demand for goods being light, prices were gradually forced 
down to a point where the margin of profit was scarcely percepti- 
ble. This report* will mainly consider the affairs of the twelve 
months now just past, in which there have been some features of en- 
couragement, and a slight relief from the monotony of hard times. 

In the year ending June 30th, 1884, the imports of manufactured 
silk goods had reached the very high figures of ^34,000,000. In each 
of five previous years the importation had exceeded 130,000,000. 
Extreme dullness in trade brought down this amount for the year 
ending June 30th, 1885, to |26,ooo,ooo. For the present, year, 
which ended June 30th, 1866, the figures are substantially similar to 
those of the previous twelve months. 

It is worthy of note that while (as will hereinafter be shown) our 
domestic industry, measured by the volume of imports of the raw 
material, has increased about 40 per cent., the importation of man- 
ufactured goods has remained at the level of the previous year, 
which was at least 20 per cent, below the average of five previous 
years. At this rate of progress it will not be long before our annual 
tables will show a total importation of raw silk apparently equaling 
in amount that of foreign silk fabrics. This may give rise to mis- 
leading inferences. 

The two sets of figures are not directly comparable. The * ' value ' ' 
of dutiable imports in our statistics includes neither the *' charges'* 
of the invoices nor the duty on the. goods, and fails to take account 
of undervaluation, for all of which, as well as importers' profits, 
due allowance must be made in considering the value of European 
goods in our market. Nevertheless, it seems an interesting fact 
that (adding the imports of waste silk, etc., to those of raw silk) 
we have at present an annual consumption of || 20, 600,000 worth of 



THE SILK ASSOCIATION OF AMERICA. 6i 

raw material, against an importation of 1 26,000,000 (invoice value) 
of finished foreign goods. 

Examining the figures more closely, it is seen that the imports of 
piece-goods have fallen off in the last year about 8 per cent., while 
laces have increased 13 per cent. The largest addition is in silk 
and cotton mixtures — about 22 per cent. Velvets, ribbons, and 
other articles generally, show little change from last year; up to 
that point the importation of velvets had been continually increas- 
ing ; possibly it has now reached its highest limit. 

The table herewith presented compares imports of 1883-4 with 
those of the past year ; the differences being far greater and more 
noteworthy than between 1884-5 ^^^ 1885-6. 



62 



THE SILK ASSOCIATION Of AMERtCA. 



IMPORTS OF SILK MANUFACTURES AT NEW YORK. 



FISCAL YEAR 1 883-4 COMPARED WITH 1885-6. 





PER CENT. OF 
EACH KIND. 


INCREASK. 


DECREASE. 


Articlks. 
















1885-6. 


1883-4. 


Amount. 


Per cent. 


Amount. 


Per cent. 


Silk piece-goods .... 
Satins 


1 

ii 


54 
I 






$7,000,759 


38 


2 


Ji2Co.ooi: 


140 


Crapes 


2 


I 


^ J 


69,805 


15 


Pongees 




S7,707 


234 
12 






Plushes 


6 


4 154,021 






Velvets 


10 


1 ^^' 
8 




83,674 

1.154,746 


1 


Ribbons 


5 
7 


8 




52 


Laces 


6' 




106,287 


14 


Shawls 


1 


1 
42,0^6 


67 






(xloves 


2 


• ■ • • — »7 J 

2 


/ 


149,119 


21 


Cravats 




1 
1 11,020 


55 
41 





Handkerchiefs 


I 


A0.20C 






Hose 


I 


I 


-r^» J 




47,126 

34,593 
636,754 


15 


Threads and yams... 
Braids and bindings. 
Silk and worsted.. 


I 






17 


3 
I 


4. 




48 


I 


I 76.OQO 


98 
32 




Silk and cotton 


16 


9 1,041,109 






Silk and linen 




2,101 


52 












Total 


100 


100 






;j;7,892,o62 


23 






v/ 



The increase in the amount of raw silk imported during the past 
year (ending June 30th, 1886,) is remarkable. The statistics of the 
pre^^ious twelve months gave no indication of a growth of the in- 



THE SILK ASSOCIATION OF AMERICA. 63 

dustry. In fact, there was scarcely any difference between the 
totals of importation for the year ending June 30th, 1884, and 
those of June 30th, 1885; ^^i^ch summing up 23,000 to 24,000 
bales, valued at nearly 1 14, 000, 000. But in the twelve months 
now just elapsed, the imports have risen to 33,000 bales, valued 
at nearly |j2o,ooo,ooo. This increase, though at a decidedly greater 
rate in the last six months, was fairly distributed throughout the 
year. Measured by quantity, /. ^., lbs. avoirdupois, the advance 
beyond the preceding year is 38 per cent. ; estimated by values, it 
is 41 per cent. 

The greatest quantity of raw silk ever brought to this country by 
one vessel, was carried by the steamer "Belgic,** which arrived at 
San Francisco February loth, 1886, with 2,300 bales, valued at 
|i, 400,000. The imports of December, 1885, and January, 1886, 
each about 5,000 bales, exceeded any previous months in the records 
of our industry. 

Within two years the relative proportions of raw silk received 
from different sources have somewhat changed. One-fourth of the 
whole supply continues to be of European production. The ship- 
ments from Japan have increased so that nearly one-half of the 
whole value of raw silk, received at this market, now comes from 
Yokohama. China furnishes the remaining fourth of our supply. 
Imports from Hong Kong have fallen off actually as well as rela- 
tively; scarcely more than one-twelfth of all our raw silk is sent 
from that quarter, which two years ago supplied a sixth. From 
Shanghai the increase has been greater than from any other source ; 
it has doubled since 1884, and its ratio to the whole supply has risen 
from a seventh to nearly a fifth. 

To save detail in the following table, since the imports of 1884-5 
did not differ largely from those of 1883-4, an average of the 
two years is used as a basis for showing the increase or decrease of 
1885-6 from each source of supply. 



64 



THE SILK ASSOCIATION OF AMERICA. 



IMPORTS OF RAW SILK. 



TABLE OF PERCENTAGES IN FISCAL YEARS. 



DESCRIPTION OF SILK. 



Strictly European.. 
Reshipped Asiatic 

From Japan 

From Hong Kong 
From Shanghai.... 

Total 



PROPORTION OF EACH KIND IN THE 
YEAR NAMED. 



1885-6. 



Per 

cent. 

of lbs. 



25 
2 

43 

9 
21 



100 



Per 
cent, 
of $. 

25 
3 

49 
7 

17 

100 



1884-5. 


188 


Per 


Per 


Per 


cent. 


cent. 


cent. 


of lbs. 


of $. 


of lbs 


25 


28 


26 


I 


I 


I 


43 


46 


41 


10 


8 


17 


21 


17 


15 


100 


100 


100 



Per 
cent, 
of $. 

30 
I 

44 

13 
12 

100 



COMPARISON BETWEEN 1 88 5-6 AND THE AVERAGE OF THE TWO 

PREVIOUS YEARS. 





INCREASE. 


DECREASE. 


DF-SCRIPTION OF SILK. 


Per cent, 
of lbs. 


Per cent, 
of |. 


Per cent, 
of lbs. 


Per cent, 
of $. 


Strictly European 


■17 lA 




From Japan 


Of 

42 


53 






From Hong Kong 


I 


4 


From Shanghai 


76 


70 








Total 


44 


42 













THE SILK ASSOCIATION OF AMERICA. 65 

Since a bale of raw silk from Europe may weigh twice as much 
as one from Asia, it is evident that comparisons of imports by num- 
ber of bales from all ports, are likely to be somewhat misleading, 
especially while the proportions from different ports are changing. 
Your Secretary will, therefore, endeavor to give, hereafter, the 
statistics of raw silk in pounds avoirdupois, as well as in bales and 
dollars. Hitherto, waste silk, pierced cocoons and noils have been 
thrown together in one table; hereafter they will be separated. 
Statistics will also be given covering the imports at all ports of the 
United States instead of only New York and San Francisco ; the 
chief item of increase thus included being about 1 100,000 worth of 
silk noils annually coming to Philadelphia. 

There were no features of interest in the sewing-silk and twist 
trade before the sudden rise in raw silk took place last Fall. Until 
that time, prices had been gradually falling under the pressure of 
home competition. An effort was made to stop the decline and to 
raise the selling prices, so as partially to meet the increased cost of 
raw material. A measure of success attended this effort, and a small 
advance in prices was generally secured for a short period. The 
business of sewings and twist has been steadily expanding in volume, 
and probably exceeds by 1 2 or 1 5 per cent, that of last year. 

Gum silks had been sold very close to cost, before the rise in raw 
silks took place ; and, after that, the prices could not be brought 
up to an equivalent for the increased cost of material. In the Fall 
season, however, commission throwsters found full occupation for 
their machinery, and were able to obtain a small advance in prices. 
Their business has continued fairly active, though at narrow mar- 
gins, up to the present time. 

During the earlier months of the year just past, the business of 
ribbon manufacture was exceedingly dull, and prices were continu- 
ally cut down by close competition. A demand gradually arose, 
however, for ribbons with picot edges, and this feature of the trade 
expanded into large proportions. The low prices fixed in the early 
part of the season were, however, still ruling, and, with a very 
active business, manufacturers were not able to reap a corresponding 

5 



66 THE SILK ASSOCIATION OF AMERICA. 

profit. Orders were largely taken for the Spring trade at the prices 
of last Fall. 

In the height of this activity, and when there was a fair prospect 
for this season's trade, the trouble with the laboring classes broke 
out and disorganized business, even in cases where complete strikes 
were not attempted. 

When the labor troubles were at last settled, the season was too 
far advanced and its opportunity was lost. Many orders that would 
have been taken here went abroad. In the uncertainty of affairs, 
our manufacturers were unwilling to make contracts for the delivery 
of goods, except with a clause, "orders taken subject to strikes.'* 
This naturally discouraged purchasers. It is believed that not less 
than a million dollars' worth of orders was lost in consequence of 
these difficulties, the buyers preferring the certainties of European 
contracts, and losing faith in the ability of our manufacturers to 
supply their wants. 

Even since the settlement of the strikes, labor has been in an 
unquiet condition. The working people have spent their evenings 
in meetings and discussions prolonged to late hours, and in conse- 
quence have been less fit for work in the daytime. The practical 
result to the manufacturer has been an increased cost of labor in 
proportion to the amount of production. 

The chief demand, as before stated, has been for ribbons with 
fancy edges, satin gros-grains thus made being most called for ; in 
fact, the quantity of gros-grains required was larger than has been 
the case in some years. Early in the season there was an active 
demand for gauze ribbons, but this was very brief. The widths of 
ribbons most called for during the season were 9*s, 12's and id's. 
For sashes there was less demand than usual, and the business in 
them was very light. 

Owing to the extreme dullness of the preceding year, the prices 
of silk laces went down to a lower point than was ever before 
reached. Undervaluation as well as domestic competition tended 
to this result. Mixed laces of silk and cotton are more largely worn 



THE SILK ASSOCIATION OF AMERICA. 67 

than ever before, but the orders for them are given abroad and their 
production in this country has not increased. 

For lace mitts there has been a very good demand. Those of 
American make have been the favorites, but the prices are very low, 
owing to a severe home competition. Yak laces came into vogue 
this year, and for a very brief period there was an active demand for 
" silk-and-yak *' laces — a mixture of silk and wool. But the fashion 
dropped off quite suddenly, and manufacturers have since sold these 
goods at 25 cents on the dollar. 

We make as large a quantity of trimmings in this country as 
anywhere^ else in the world, France and Germany not excepted. 
The workmanship and taste displayed in these goods have given 
them high repute ; they are considered to be better suited to our 
market than the foreign articles. The proportion of silk in these 
trimmings is not, however, so great as formerly. During the 
Spring and Fall of 1885 ^^^ favorite fashion for silk trimmings was 
in chenille. Since then, worsted and bead trimmings have largely 
taken the place of silk. But a fair business has been done at low 
prices tn ladies' dress, cloak and mantilla trimmings, and also in 
furniture and upholstery trimmings in general. 

For broad silks there has been little demand, and few novelties 
were attempted. Low-priced surahs and rhadames, and some plain 
colored silks have been sold, keeping business alive at prices that 
barely covered the cost of production. Early in 1886, however, a 
prospect of more lively trade opened, and manufacturers were much 
encouraged. The labor troubles then broke out, checked the demand 
by prostrating business everywhere, and thus prevented the sale of 
accumulated stocks. 

In broad goods, as in ribbons, when the labor troubles were 
quieted, the opportunity of the season's business had passed away. 

No advance in the price of fabrics was secured, when, in the 
Fall, the value of raw silks rose during a short period of specula- 
tion. Manufacturers in general sold their goods at the low prices 
previously established. It may be safely asserted that the risie in 
raw silks did not at all advance the prices of broad goods. 



68 THE SILK ASSOCIATION OF AMERICA. 

During the dull season, there was a fair trade done for a while in 
handkerchiefs ; not a very large business, but good l)y comparison 
with other branches. 

A moderate supply of black grenadines has been sold this season 
at satisfactory prices. 

Plain velvets were not in demand at all last season, and it. was 
supposed that the market was overstocked. Hence many of the 
European firms stopped production. The effect has been shown 
within the last thirty days by an advance, estimated at 7^ per cent., 
in the prices of plain velvets. 

A considerable quantity of printed goods has been sold this sea- 
son, but the variety of styles required, cutting the orders into small 
lots, has been more troublesome than usual. 

In general, it may be stated that the demand for costly silk fabrics 
has been very light, and business has been done chiefly in cheap 
goods. 

Many new silk mills have been built, and the facilities of manu- 
facture are largely increased. In several instances the policy of 
building new mills in localities far removed from the early ^ites of 
manufacture has been adopted, and the list of branch establishments 
in neighboring States has been considerably extended. 



THE SILK ASSOCIATION OF AMERICA. 69 



Since the date of our last report, the Association has been called 
upon to mourn the loss of one of its most valued members, Mr. A. 
B. Strange, who was an active vice-president for many years, and 
retired from that office only on account of failing health. On Feb- 
ruary nth, 1886, at a meeting of the Board of Government, the 
following resolutions were adopted : 

Whereas, Our late friend and colleague, Mr. Albert B. Strange, 
hath, in the order of Divine Providence, been called to his eternal 
rest; be it 

Resolved^ That the members of the Silk Association of America 
sincerely sympathize with the family of our departed friend in their 
great bereavement ; and that we place on record our testimony that 
Albert B. Strange was one of the worthies of the silk trade of Amer- 
ica — an honorable merchant, a kind man and a true friend. 

And that an engrossed copy hereof be presented to his son, Mr. 
William Strange, the representative of the family. 



The foregoing report was read, accepted, and ordered to be 
printed, at the annual meeting of the Silk Association of America, 
held at its office. No. 446 Broome street. New York, July 2d, 1886. 

WM. C. WYCKOFF, 

Secretly, 



STATISTICS, 



A brief explanation of the following statistics may contribute to 
their usefulness. There are complete tables of the imports of raw 
silk, waste silk and pierced cocoons at the ports of New York and 
San Francisco ; the quantity that arrives elsewhere in the United 
States is inconsiderable. A statement is, however, presented, show- 
ing total receipts at all ports, and giving the quantity, in pounds 
avoirdupois, of each kind of raw material. The different sources 
of supply are separately exhibited. 

The tables of imports of silk manufactures at the port of New 
York are based upon valuations furnished in Custom House returns. 

In drawing deductions from the figures of these tables, two things 
should be considered : First, the values assigned are those of the 
invoices (from which all "charges'* have been deducted) and are 
made as low by the importer as the Custom House authorities will 
permit ; it is known, in fact, that the goods are largely undervalued. 
The official reports of investigating commissions appointed by the 
United States Government have estimated the undervaluation as on 
the average not less than 25 per cent. Second, the duty paid on 
the goods, as well as invoice charges and importers' profits, should 
be added, in any calculation of the value of these imports in United 
States markets. Of all the silk goods brought into this country, 
94 to 95 per cent, come to the port of New York. 

The tables of imports of both raw silk and manufactures give the 
details by fiscal as vceW as by calendar years. 

Judging from the amount of raw silk imported, the finished goods 
made from it in the United States exceed in value ^[50,000,000 per 
year; and although, for reasons already alleged, such figures cannot 
be directly compared with those which represent the importation of 

(71) 



72 THE SILK ASSOCIATION OF AMERICA. 

European fabrics, it seems clear that of all the silk goods used in 
this country, one-half, in value, is now contributed by our factories. 
The table of the United States imports entered for home con- 
sumption shows distinctly the sources of the public revenue from 
Customs duties. Silk goods stand high in the list of articles con- 
tributing to that revenue, and the greater part of it is derived from 
a few sources. 



THE SILK ASSOCIATION OF AMERICA. 



73 



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THE SILK ASSOCIATION OF AMERICA. 



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SILK GOODS 



DIKECTOEY. 



CONTAINING 



MANUFACTURERS AND DYERS, 



AND 



Raw Silk Importers and Agents. 



Compiled by WM. C. WYCKOFF. 



1887. 



AMERICAN SILK GOODS, 



MANUFACTURERS AND DYERS. 



CALIFORNIA. 



Belding Bros. &'Co. (See RockvilUy Conn,) F. W. 
Brown, Superintendent. Machine Twist, Sewings, 
Embroidery, Knitting Silks, Tram, etc. Selling 
Agents, Carlson & Currier, 585 Market St. Mill, 
948 spindles Stevenston and Ecker Sts., San Francisco 

Columbat, Mrs. A. Dress Trimmings, Upholstery, 
etc. Factory 105 Rose St., San Francisco 

Cutter, John D. & Co. (See Newark, N, /.) C. W. 
R. Ford, Selling Agent 532 Market St., San Francisco 

Ettinger, M, Dress, Upholstery and Military Trim- 
mings. Factory 105 Post St., San Francisco 

Eureka Silk Manufacturing Co. (See Canton, Mass,) 
Yates & Hunter, Selling Agents, 537 Market St., San Francisco 

Fromm & Schaefer. Dress and Upholstery Trim- 
mings. Factory 543 Market St., San Francisco 

Higinbotham & Co. Tram and Fringe Silk. Fac- 
tory ; -357 Tehama St., San Francisco 

Nonotuck Silk Co. {^tt Florence, Mass.) Brown & 
Metzner, Selling Agents 535 Market St., San Francisco 

Norcross & Co. Flags, Embroidery, Regalia, Mili- 
tary and Dress Trimmings. Factory. .6 Post St., San Francisco 

Pacific Fringe Factory. Auerbach & Thompson. 
Dress Trimmings, Fringes, Gimps, etc. Factory.. 

751 Market St., San Francisco 

Pacific Manufacturing Co. Xavier Van De Casteale, 
President. Dress Goods San Jos6 

(89) 



90 



SILK GOODS DIRECTORY.— CONNECTICUT. 



CONNECTICUT. 

« 

^tna Silk Co. Robbins Battell, President; J. B. 
Eldridge, Treasurer; Joseph Selden, Agent and 
, Secretary. Sewing Silk and Machine Twist. 
Offices, 463-467 Broadway, New York; 323 Arch 
St., Philadelphia; and 218 Devonshire St., Bos- 
ton. Mills Norfolk 

Allen, Dwight. Throwster. Hayden Mill Windsor Locks 

Atwood, Orlo & Sons. Machine Twist and Sewing 

Silk. Throwsters of Organzine and Tram New London 

Atwood, W. O. Throwster and Dyer. Mill Guilford 

Barrows, S. C. Mill Mansfield 

Belding Bros & Co. Sewing Silk, Machine Twist, 
Floss, Embroidery and Fringe Silks, Tram and 
Organzine. Salesrooms, 455-457 Broadway, New 
York ; 30 Summer St., Boston ; 136 Race St., Cin- 
cinnati ; 183-187 Fifth Av., Chicago; 624-626 
Washington Av., St. Louis; 622 Market St., Phila- 
delphia; Third and Jackson Sts., St. Paul, Minn. ; 
585 Market St., San Francisco; 12 St. James St., 
Montreal, Canada. Mills, Rockville, Conn., North- 
ampton, Mass., San Francisco, Cal., and Montreal, 

Canada. Principal mills Rockville 

Billings & Hitchcock. Silk Hosiery and Mittens. 
Selling Agents, Kibbe, Chaffee & Co., 43 Worth 
St., New York; 82 Chauncy St., Boston; 235 
Chestnut St., Philadelphia; 16 Hanpver St., Bal- 
timore ; Mills Hartford 

Bottum, A. D. Machine Twist, etc South Coventry 

Brainerd & Armstrong Co. (The). Sewing Silk and 
Machine]Twist,^Embroidery[Silk, etc. Salesrooms, 
469 Broadway, New York; 35 Kingston St., Bos- 
ton ; 621 Market St., Philadelphia ; 5 Hanover St., 
Baltimore. Mills New London 



SILK GOODS DIRECTORY.— CONNECTICUT. 91 

Bridgeport Coach. Lace Co. Coach Lace, Fringe and 
Tassels. Factory and salesroom 88 John St., Bridgeport 

Bridgeport Silk Co. Dress, Carriage, Umbrella and 
Upholstery Silks. M. C. Patterson, Manager Bridgeport 

Brown, L. D. & Son. Sewing Silk and Machine 
Twist. Salesrooms, 27 Lincoln St., Boston, and 
486 Broadway, New York. Mills Middletown 

Cady & Robinson. Sewing Silk and Machine Twist, Willimantic 

Chaffee O. S. & Son. Sewing Silk, Machine Twist 
and Embroidery Silk. Salesroom, Mansfield Cen- 
tre. Mills Willimantic and Mansfield Centre 

Cheney Brothers. Silks, Satins, Dress Goods, Printed 
Silks, Handkerchiefs, Spun-silk Yarns and Fabrics, 
Ribbons, Organzine and Tram. Salesrooms, 477- 
481 Broome St., New York; 79 Chauncy St., Bos- 
ton; 186 Franklin St., Chicago. Financial Office, 

South Manchester, Conn. Mills 

Hartford and South Manchester 

Clark, R.. S. Sewing Silk, Machine Twist, Floss Silk 
and Tram Mount Carmel 

Clercy, Joseph A. Silk Throwster Mansfield 

Conant, H. E. Organzine, Tram, Sewings and 
Twist. Mills Willimantic and Stonington 

Eureka Silk Manufacturing Co. (See Canton^ Mass.) 
Mill at East Hampton 

Globe Silk Works. Marvin & Pardee. Machine 
Twist, Sewings, Floss and Embroidery Silks, Or- 
ganzine and Tram. Factory and salesroom New Haven 

Goodman, B. (The) Manufacturing Co. Silk Web- 
bings. Office, 20 Walker St., New York. Mill.. Bridgeport 

Hammond & Knowlton. Sewing Silk, Machine and 
Button-hole Twist. Salesroom, 524 Broadway, New 
York. Mills Putnam 

Hanks, J. S. Machine Twist, Embroidery Silk, etc. Gurleyville 

Hanks, P. G. Silk Throwster Gurleyville 



92 SILK GOODS DIRECTORY.— CONNECTICUT. 

Heminway, M. & Son's Silk Co. M. Heminway, 
President; H. Heminway, Treasurer. Sewing 
Silk and Machine Twist. Salesrooms, 78 Reade 
and 99 Church Sts., New York; 716 Arch St., 

Philadelphia. Mills Watertown 

Holland Manufacturing Co. Ira Dimock, Manager; 
S. L. Burlingham, Attorney. Sewing Silk and 
Machine Twist. Salesrooms, H. Eldridge, Agent, 
561 Broadway, New York ; 19 High St., Boston ; 

428 Market St., Philadelphia. Mills Willimantic 

Jackson, F. L. Silk Dyer. (Since removed). . .Mansfield Centre 
Joslyn Mills. W. B. Lincoln & Co. Silk Knit 

Goods South Manchester 

Kohn, Tobias. Silk Cord and Fringes Hartford 

Leigh & White. Tram and Knitting Silk New Haven 

Leonard Silk Co. Sewing Silk and Machine Twist. 
J. H. Simonds, President and Treasurer. Sales- 
rooms, 140 Church St., New York ; 41 High St., 
Boston; 414 Arch St., Philadelphia; 27 German 

St., Baltimore. Mills Warehouse Point 

Macfarlane, James S. Sewing Silk, Machine and 
Button-hole Twists. Salesroom, 24 Walker St.. 

New York. Mills Mansfield Centre 

Mallory, D. D Mystic 

Merrick & Conant Manufacturing Co. Sewing Silk, 
Machine Twist and Spool Cotton; also Silk Throw- 
sters Easthampton 

New England Silk Co Winchester 

New Haven Web Co. Suspender and Garter Webs, 
etc. Salesroom, 73 Leonard St., New York. 

Factory New Haven 

Osbom, W. H. Silk Braid Willimantic 

Pardee, C. H. &gj. H. Booth. Coach Laces and 

Carriage Trimmings 9 Wooster St., New Haven 



SILK GOODS, DIRECTORY.— CONN., ILL. 93 

Ratie, Joseph. Floss, Organzine and Tram, Com- 
mission Throwing Winsted 

Smith & Co. Machine Twist Gurleyville 

Turner, A. G. Throwster Willimantic 

Turner, P. W. & Co. Ribbons, Handkerchiefs, Gum 
Silk and Machine Twist. Salesrooms, J. A. 
Smadon & Co., 18 Summer St., Boston; 88 Prince 
St., New York, and Marsh, Kenyon & Gill, 114- 

116 Wabash Av., Chicago. Mills Turnerville 

Washburn, Alanson. Fringe Silk South Coventry 

Willimantic Silk Co. John M. Hall, President; 
WiUiam H. Osborn, Treasurer. Hat Bands and 

Bindings Willimantic 

Winsted Silk Co. Eugene Potter, Manager. Ma- 
chine Twist, Sewing, Embroidery and Floss Silks. 
Mill West Winsted 



ILLINOIS. 

CHICAGO. 

Baum & Ernst. Fringes, Cords, Tassels, Gimps. Fac- 
tory and salesroom 150-154 Fifth Av. 

Belding Bros. & Co. (See Rockvilte^ Conn,) Sales- 
rooms 183-187 Fifth Av. 

Carson, Perie, Scott & Co. Dress Trimmings 108 State St. 

Cheney Brothers. (See South Manchester y Conn,) 
Salesroom 186 Franklin St. 

Cutter, John D. & Co. (See Newark, N.J.) Sales- 
room 409 Opera House Building 

Eureka Silk Manufacturing Co. (See Canton, Mass.) 
G. H. Foster & Co, Selling Agents. Salesroom . . 

147-149 Fifth Av. 



94 SILK GOODS DIRECTORY.— ILL., LA, 

Fiedler, A« B. Dress Trimmings, Fringes, Cord, 
Tassels, etc. Factory, 449-451 N. Wells St. Sales- 
room 48 E. Madison St. 

Foster, G. F., Son & Co. Cords, Fringes, Tassels, 

Society and Military Trimmings. Office. ... 23 Washington St. 

Hackenlnirg, W. B. ^ Co. (See Philadelphia,) 

Salesroom 152 Fifth Av. 

Hcuer & Brockschmidt. Upholstery Trimmings 16 Fifth Av. 

Jacobs, W. W. & Co. Fringes, Tassels, Cords and 

Upholstery Trimmings 185-187 Wabash Av. 

Jennings Lace Works. TSee Brooklyn^ N, K) 

Charles H. Smith, Agent. Salesroom 221 Fifth Av. 

Kursheedt Manufacturing Co. (See New YorkS) 

Salesrooms 87-89 Wabash Av. 

Lipper, M. W. & Co. (See Philadelphia.) Sales- 
room 144 Wabash Av. 

Nonotuck Silk Co. (See Florence , Mass.) Sales- 
room 278-280 Madison St. 

Peters, M. Upholstery Trimmings, Cords, Tassels 
and Fringes 61 Washington St. 

Richardson Silk Co. (See B elding, Mich.) Sales- 
room 234 Fifth Av. 

Skinner, William. (See Holyoke, Mass.) Salesroom, 144 Fifth Av. 

Sutro Bros. (See New York City,) 126 Franklin St. 

Stevenson, J. H. & Co. Fringes and Tassels Chicago. 

Turner, P. W. & Co. (See Turnervilley Conn,) 

Salesroom of Selling Agents 11 4-1 16 Wabash Av. 



LOUISIANA. 

Herbelin, J. Silk Reeling. Office, 63 Customhouse 
St., New Orleans. Filature Lewisburg 

Nonotuck Silk Co. (See Florence, Mass.) Sales- 
room 26 Camp St., New Orleans 



SILK GOODS DIRECTORY.— ME., MD., MASS. 95 

MAINE. 

Adams, D. E., Silk Manufacturing Co. (See Athol, 

Mass.) Office. (Since removed) Portland 



MARYLAND. 



BALTIMORE. 



Billings & Hitchcock. (See Hartford^ Conn.) Sales- 
room of Selling Agents 16 Hanover St. 

Brainerd & Armstrong Co. (The). (See New 
London, Qonn,) Salesroom 5 Hanover St. 

Carpenter, John. Fringes and Undertakers* Trim- 
mings ZZ South Eutaw St. 

Hackenburg, W. B. & Co. (See Philadelphia,) 
Salesroom 92 Greene St. 

Leonard Silk Co. (See Warehouse Point, Conn.) 
Salesroom 27 German St. 

Munder, Theophilus. Upholstery Trimmings. . .81 Lexington St. 

Sisco Bros. Trimmings, Flags and Regalia 50 N. Charles St. 

Tallerman, Gustav. Fringes and Dress Trimmings. 

150 Lexington St., cor. Howard 

Wells, Mrs. F. M. Undertakers* Trimmings . . . .321 Lombard St. 



MASSACHUSETTS. 



BOSTON. 



Adams, D. E. (See Athol, Mass.) Selling Agent, 

Fred. J, Ham 5 Chauncy St. 

Abercrombie, Geo. N. Fringes, Cords, Tassels, But- 
tons, etc. Office and factory 129 Tremont St. 



96 SILK GOODS DIRECTORY.— MASSACHUSETTS. 

-^tna Silk Co. (See Norfolk, Conn,) 218 Devonshire St. 

Belding Bros. & Co. (See RockmlU, Conn.) Sales- 
room 30 Summer St. 

Brainerd & Armstrong Co. (The). (See New Lon- 
don, Conn.) Salesroom 35 Kingston St. 

Billings & Hitchcock, {^qq Hartford, Conn,) Sales- 
room of Selling Agents 82 Chauncy St. 

Brown, L. D. & Son. {^^t MiddUtown, Conn.) Sales- 
room 27 Lincoln St. 

Burr, Brown & Co. (See Hingham, Mass.) Sales- 
rooms 163 Devonshire and 24 Arch Sts. 

Cheney Brothers. (See South Manchester, Conn.) 

Salesroom 79 Chauncy St. 

Cutter, John D. & Co. (See Newark, N. J. ) Sales- 

room 488 Washington St. 

Eureka Silk Manufacturing Co. (See Canton, Mass.) 

S. R. Bowman, Selling Agent 104 Arch and 25 Otis Sts. 

Farwell, Isaac, Jr., & Co. (See Watertown, Mass.) 

Salesroom 92 Arch St. 

Fiedler, Moeldner & Co. Dress and Cloak Trim- 
mings. Factory, Roxbury. Salesroom 60 Summer St. 

Frost, George & Co. Frill Edge Silk Elastic. . 287 Devonshire St. 

Glendale Elastic Fabric Co. (See Easthampton, 
Mass.) Salesroom 127 Summer St. 

H ol 1 and Manufacturi n g Co . (See WiUimantic, Conn. ) 

C. G. Littlefield, Agent. Salesroom 19 High St. 

Kelsea, C. W. (See Antrim, N H.) Salesroom of 

Selling Agent. (Since removed) 179 Washington St. 

Leonard Silk Co. (See Warehouse Point, Conn.) 

Salesroom 41 High St. 

Linneman, C. A. Silk Fringes and Trimmings.. . . 28 Chauncy St. 

Mahew Silk Co. (See Shelburne Falls, Mass.) Sales- 
room of Selling Agents 37 High St. 

Neal, Mrs. Charlotte. Fringes, Cords, Tassels, etc. . 

128 Tremont St. 



SILK GOODS DIRECTORY.— MASSACHUSETTS. 97 

Newry, Joshua E. Skein Silk Dyer 812 Albany St., Roxbury. 

Nonotuck Silk Co. (See Florence^ Mass.) Sales- 
room 18 Summer St. 

Polhaus, Ernest. Silk Dyer Jamaica Plains 

Schoenfuss, F. & Co. Fringes, Buttons and Cords.. 

383 Washington St, 

Seavey, Foster & Bowman. (See Eureka Mantifac- 
turing Co) 104 Arch St., and 25 Otis St. 

Skinner, William & Sons. (See Holyoke, Mass J) 
Salesroom 18 Chauncy St. 

Turner, P. W. & Co. (See TurnervillCy Conn,) ... 18 Summer St. 

Wilson, D. & Co. Military and Regalia Trimmings. Boston 

Ziegler, Alfred. Suspender Web, Upholstery Trim- 
mings, Fringes, Gimps and Silk Ties. Factory, 
Decatur Av., cor. Pynchon St. Salesroom 5 Chauncy St. 

Ziegler, Conrad. Silk Dyer 54 George St., Roxbury 



MASSACHUSETTS— Continued. 

Adams, D. E. Machine Twist. Offices, 5 Chauncy 
St., Boston; 437 Broadway, N. Y., and formerly 

at Portland, Me. Mill Athol 

Alden, Lilly & Watson. Silk Noils Springfield 

American Braid Co. Elastic Braids Springfield 

Belding Bros. & Co. {^t^ Rockvilhy Conn,) Mill. Northampton 

Bottum, C. L. Silk Dyer Northampton 

Burr, Brown & Co. Fringes, Gimps, Cords, Tassels, 
Carriage, Military and Upholstery Trimmings. 
Salesrooms, 163 Devonshire St. and 24 Arch St., 

Boston. Factory Hingham 

Colton, George. Elastic Fabrics Easthampton 

7 



98 SILK GOODS DIRECTORY.— MASSACHUSETTS. 

Dresser, T. P. Manufacturing Co. J. M. W. Hall, 
President; William H. Breed, Treasurer; T. P. 
Dresser, Superintendent. Silk and Worsted Goods. Medford 

Eureka Silk Manufacturing Co. Seavey, Foster & 
Bowman. Sewing Silk, Machine Twist and Em- 
broidery Silks. Salesrooms, 441 Broadway, New 
York; 25 Otis St., Boston; 421 Arch St., Phila- 
delphia; 147 Fifth Av., Chicago; 707 Washington 
Av., St. Louis; 160 Main St,, Cincinnati; 537 
Market St., San Francisco, and Gloversville, N. 
Y. Mills Canton and Easthampton, Conn. 

Farwell, Isaac, Jr., & Co. Sewing Silk and Machine 

Twist. Salesroom, 92 Arch St., Boston. Mill... Watertown 

Glendale Elastic Fabrics Co. Joseph W. Green, Jr., 
Treasurer. Elastic Cords, Braids, Narrow Webs. 
Salesrooms, 127 Summer St., Boston, and 74-76 
Worth St., New York. Factory Easthampton 

Glenwood Mills. O. G. Webster & A. S. King. 
Dress Goods, Organzine and Tram and Machine 
Silks. Selling Agents, C. G. Landon & Co., 419- 
421 Broome St., New York. Mills Easthampton 

Gold Medal Braid Co. H. A. Daggett, President. 

Silk Fishing Lines. Factory Attleborough Falls 

Kaiser, F. W Florence 

King, Albert. Silk Dyer Florence 

Lawrence Line Co. Silk, Linen and Cotton Fishing 

Lines Lawrence 

Leonard, J. N. & Co. Sewings and Twist Northampton 

Mahew Silk Co. Machine Twist, Sewing Silk, Fringe 

Silk, Tram and Organzine. Selling Agents : H. 

H. Sanderson, 32 Mercer St., New York, and D. 

P. Bedell, 37 High St., Boston. Mills Shelburne Falls 

Mansfield, G. H. & Co. Braided Fishing Lines, 

Silk and Linen Braids Canton 

Martin, T. & Bro. Silk Garter Webs Chelsea 



SILK GOODS DIRECTORY.— MASSACHUSETTS. 99 

McCullum, Constable & C^o. Hosiery Holyoke 

Nonotuck Silk Co. Ira Dimock, Pr^ident ; E. W. 
Eaton, Treasurer. Machine Twist, Sewing and 
Knitting Silks. Mills at Florence, Leeds and 
Haydenville, Mass. Salesrooms, 23-25 Greene St., 
New York; 18 Summer St., Boston; 278-280 
Madison St., Chicago; 408 Broadway, St. Louis; 
26 Camp St., New Orleans; 88 W. Third St., Cin- 
cinnati; 101-103 ^- Fourth St., St. Paul, Minn. ; 
535 Market St., San Francisco, and at Gloversville, 
N. Y. Principal mills Florence 

Phipps & Train. Spun Silk, Noils, Noil Yarns. Sales- 
room, cor. Howard and Mercer Sts., New York. 
Mill Newton Upper Falls 

Revere Rubber Co. Garter Webs, Frills and Sus- 
penders 

Rice Silk Co. Sewings, Machine Twist and Braid. 
Agencies in Boston and New York. Mill 

Scotton, Thomas. Silk Gloves 

Skinner, William & Sons. Unquomonk Silk Mills. 
Sewing Silk, Machine Twist, Sleeve Linings, Serges, 
Silk and Mohair Braids and Bindings. Salesrooms, 
508 Broadway, New York; 18 Chauncy St., Boston, 
and 144 Fifth Av., Chicago, III. Mill 

Smith, S. K. Silk and Mohair Braids. Mill 

Springfield Braid Co. Silk and Mohair Braid. Sales- 
room, 96 Spring St., New York. Factory 

54 Taylor St., Springfield 

Sutro Bros. (See New York City, ) Salesroom . . . . i Columbia St. 

Warner, Luther J. Sewing Silk, Machine Twist and 
Embroidery Silk. Mills and Salesroom Northampton 

Worcester Silk Co. E. M. Kennedy, Proprietor. 
Plain and Fancy Schappe Gros-grain Ribbons. 
Agent, George R. Kennedy, Worcester, Mass. 
Mill Worcester 



Chelsea 

Pittsfield 
Needham 



Holyoke 
Becket 



■ J J ' 



loo SILK GOODS DIRECTORY.—MICH., MINN., MISS., MO. 

MICHIGAN. 

Richardson Silk Co. George P. Richardson, Man- 
ager. Sewings and Twist. Chicago Office, 234 
Fifth Av. Mill fielding 



• MINNESOTA. 

Nonotuck Silk Co. (See Florencey Mass,) Sales- 
room 101-103 E Fourth St., St. Paul 

The St. Paul and Minneapolis Silk Co. N. H. 
Hemiup, President; E. W. Chipman, Manager 
and Treasurer. Mill St. Paul 



MISSISSIPPI. 
Doche & Vaccarino. Filature Corinth 



MISSOURI. 



ST. LOUIS. 



fielding Bros. & Co. (See Rockville, Conn.) Sales- 
room 624-626 Washington Av. 

Berthold & Hoffmeister. Fringes and Tassels 

Eureka Silk Manufacturing Co. (See Canton, Mass.) 

Salesroom 707 Washington Av. 

Nonotuck Silk Co. (See Florence, Mass.) Sales- 
room 408 Broadway 

Schacht & Bro. Dress Trimmings 326 Market St. 



SILK GOODS DIRECTORY.— N. H., N. J. loi 

NEW HAMPSHIRE. 

Kelsea, C. W. Sewing Silk, Machine Twist and 
Handkerchiefs. Agent, W. J. Baker, formerly at 
Washington St., Boston. Mills and Salesroom .... Antrim 



9 



NEW JERSEY. 



PATERSON. 

Adams, Robert & Co. Ribbons. Office, i6 Greene 
St , New York. Factory, Hamilton Mill Mill St. 

Alcock, Frederick W. Dress Goods, Handkerchiefs, 
Grenadines, Ribbons, Tie Silks. Office, 98-100 
Franklin St.j New York. Factory, Dale Mill. . . . Railroad Av. 

American Braid Co. Benjamin Carley, Proprietor. 
Silk and Mohair Braids. Watch Guards, Eye-glass 
Cord. Mill 85 Bridge St. 

American Silk Finishing Co. Silk Finishers. Works., Empire Mill 

Anderson, John & Sons. Handkerchiefs, Dress Goods, 
Ties and Scarfs. Totowa Mills 48 Redwood St. 

Ashley & Bailey. Tie Silks, Dress Goods and Hand- 
kerchiefs. Office, 458 Broadway, New York. Mill.. River St. 

Baare, Frederick. Soft Silk Winding 166-168 Van Houten St. 

Ball, William. Handkerchiefs 93 River St. 

Bamford Bros. Silk Manufacturers and Throwsters. 
Selling Agents, Grosvenor & Carpenter, 72 Worth 
St., New York Crescent Mill 

Barlow, John. Silk Dyer Shady and Lowe Sts. 

Barnes & Peel. Silk and Mohair Braids, Cords, Or- 
ganzine and Tram. Granite Mill Grand St. 

Berry, William. Dress Goods and Handkerchiefs. 

Factory O'Blenis Hall, Arch St. 



I02 SILK GOODS DIRECTORY.— PATERSON, N. J. 

Bruchet, Louis. Handkerchiefs 93 River St. 

Booth, (The) J. H. Co. Tram, Organzine, Floss and 
Sewings. Office with Wm. Ryle, 54 Howard St., 
New York. Jaffray Mills Market and Spruce Sts. 

Bowles, Robert 175 Marshall St. 

Cardinal, Andre. Dress Goods and Handkerchiefs. 
Selling Agents, A. Person, Harriman & Co., 457- 
459 Broome St., New York. Mill 62-66 Water St. 

Caspers, Peter. Ribbons, Broad Silks, Sewing Silk, 
Veilings. Office, 76 Greene St., New York. Mill.. 

7-1 1 Fair St. and 50 Washington St. 

Cliff, Arthur. Silk and Cotton Trimmings. . . . .94 Sheridan Av. 

Cochran & Smith. Designers and Card Cutters. ... 171 Market St. 

CoUe, J. Chenille 360 Main St. 

Con forth & Co. Tie Silks, Handkerchiefs and Muff- 
lers Ketcham Mill 

Crew, Alfred. Silk Finisher. Office, 52 Greene St., 

New York Barnet Mill 

Crouchley, C. Handkerchiefs and Dress Goods. 

New Barnet Mill 62 Railroad Av. 

Cuger & Putoy . Silk Dyers Clay and Huron Sts. 

Dale, Frederick S. Silk and Mohair Braids and 
Bindings and Commission Throwster. Mathews, 
Blum & Vaughan, 85 Leonard St., New York, Sell- 
ing Agents. Dale Mill Railroad Av. 

Davis, Thomas. Dyer and Finisher 45-47 River St. 

Day, John. Handkerchiefs 93 River St. 

Day, Joseph. Ribbons 66 Mechanic St. 

Devonshire Lace Co. Lace Novelties 144 Division St. 

Dexter Lambert & Co. Ribbons, Dress Silks, etc. 
Dexter Mill and Lambert Mills, Paterson, N. J, ; 
Bellemont Mill and Nelson Mill, Hawley, Pa. 
Salesrooms, 33-35 Greene St., New York, Princi- 
pal mill at Straight St. 



SILK GOODS DIRECTORY.—PATERSON, N. J. 103 

Doherty & Wadsworth. Dress Goods, Handkerchiefs 
and Millinery Silks. Selling Agents, Spielmann & 
Co., 45 Greene St., New York. Arkwright Mill . 

Beach and Morton Sts. 

Dunkeriy, John E. Piece Goods and Handkerchiefs. Paterson 

Dunlop, John. Union Silk Works. Organzine, 
Tram, Sewing Silk, Machine Twist, Saddlers* and 
Embroidery Silks. Salesroom, 521 Broadway, New 
York. Mill Morton and Straight Sts. 

Dwyer, John & Co. Ribbons Jackson Mill 

Dynan, Thomas J. Throwster Lock Box 695 

Ewing, J. B. Silk Designer. Voorhis Factory 

Washington, below Fair 

Fletcher, John & Son. Silk Plush Meyenberg Mill, Ward St. 

Fletcher, Joseph. Commission Throwster and Plush 

Manufacturer 119 Tyler St. 

Franke, Louis. Organzine, Tram, Twist, Fringe Silk 
and Braids, especially prepared for Trimming Man- 
ufacturers. Salesroom, no Grand St., New York. 
Factory cor. Bridge and River Sts. 

Freeman, H. H. & Co. Broad and Fancy Silks, 

Handkerchiefs and Grenadines. Mill 

44-64 Front, cor. Preakness Av. 

Frisch, Jacob & Co. Dress Goods, Veilings, Gren- 
adines, Scarfs, Ties, Handkerchiefs, etc 93 River St. 

Frost, George & Sons. Thrown Silk and Soft Silk 
Winding 36-50 Madison St. 

Geldermann, F. H. Dress, Cloak and Hat Trim- 
mings, Fringes, Cords, Tassels, etc. Mill 62 Railroad Av. 

Giannetti, A. Organzine and Tram. Barnet Mill, 

62 Railroad A v. 

Giannetti, G. Dress Goods. Barnet Mill 66 Railroad Av. 

Greenwood, A., Jr. Silk Throwster, Tram, Organ- 
zine, Cloth Fringe and Machine Twist 7 Broadway 

Greenwood Bros. Commission Throwsters. Mill, 51 Mechanic St. 



104 SILK GOODS DIRECTORY.— PATERSON, N. J. 

Greenwood, Samuel. Commission Throwster. Dale 

Mill Railroad Av. 

Greenwood, W. S. Commission Silk Throwster, 

Organzine and Tram ^ 119 Tyler 

Grimshaw Bros. Grimshaw Mill. Handkerchiefs), 
Tie Silks, Scarfs, Dress and Millinery Silks. 
Megroz, Portier, Grose & Co., 85 Grand St., New 
York, Selling- Agents. Mills. . .Dale Av., Slater and Prince Sts. 

Grimshaw, Henry Watson Building 

Grish, John. Broad Silks, Handkerchiefs, Millinery 
and Dress Trimmings. Grosvenor & Carpenter, 
54-56 White St., and James Talcott, 108-110 
Franklin St., New York, Selling Agents. Mill, 62 Railroad Av. 

Gruters, Gustave. Fringes and Gimps 247-255 Main St. 

Hamil & Booth. Tram and Organzine, Fringe Silks, 
Millinery and Fancy Silks and Ribbons. Sales- 
room, 96-98 Grand St., New York. Passaic Silk 
Works and Hamil Mills. Office of Mills Ward St. 

Hand, John. Ribbons 177 Market St. 

Hawks, M. J. & Co. Prussian Bindings, Galloons, 
etc. Selling Agents, Duxbury & Co., 118 Frank- 
lin St., New York. Hamilton Mill Mill St. 

Hartley, J. Handkerchiefs 93 River St. 

Hassel, Fulton & Co, Tapestries, etc. Jackson Mill, 164 Ward St. 

Hilton & Taylor Washington Market Building 

Holmes, W. D. Dress Goods and Handkerchiefs. 
Salesroom, 20 Greene St., New York. Barnet 
Mill Railroad Av. 

Hopper & Scott. Organzine and Tram.'' Hope 

Mill Mill St. 

Horandt & Son. Ribbons. Hoeninghaus & Curtiss, 
Selling Agents, 473-47^ Broome St., New York. 
Mill 114 Kearney St. 

Inglish, William & Co. Throwsters Jackson Mill 



SILK GOODS DIRECTORY.— PATERSON, N. J. 105 

Jackson, Joseph. Thrown Silks. Factory 

Grant Locomotive Works 

Johnson, Cowdin & Co. Ribbons. Salesroom, 77 

Greene St., New York. Mill Riverside 

Kunz, Julius. Handkerchiefs, Scarfs, etc. Barnet 
Mill Railroad Av. 

Libeny Silk Works. Jas. Nightingale, Superintend- 
ent. Fine Grades Handkerchiefs, Dress Goods, 
Satins, Tie Silks, Tissues and Gauzes. Iselin, 
Neeser & Co., Canal and Greene Sts., New York, 
Selling Agents. Boudinot Mill Straight St. 

Little, Wm. & Co. Totawa Mill. Dress Goods and 
Handkerchiefs. Mathews, Blum & Vaughan, Sell- 
ing Agents, 85 Leonard St., New York. Mill. . . .Preakness Av. 

Locket t, E. Handkerchiefs, Dress Goods, Scarfs and 
Millinery Silks. Mathews, Blum & Vaughan, Sell- 
ing Agents, 85 Leonard St., New York. Dale 
Mills ; Railroad Av, 

Lucas, Samuel. Dress, Millinery and Tie Silks, etc. 
Factory Washington Market Building, Fair St. 

McAlister, James & Co., Silk Throwsters. Watson 

Mill Railroad Av. 

Mackay & Rowson. Throwsters. Barnet Mill Grand St. 

Magill, John A. Handkerchiefs. Barnet Mill. . . 62 Railroad Av. 

Magill, John & Co. Dress Silks. Factory Paterson 

McCulloch, Robert. Spun Silk, Fine Yarns, Sewing 

Silks, Filoselle, Crewels, Embroidery Silks. . . 42 Van Houten St. 

Meding, C. E. Ribbons. E. Oelbermann & Co., 57- 

63 Greene St., New York, Selling Agents Granite Mills 

Mentalent, P. Silk Dyer 7 Washington Av. 

Miesch, John & Son. Ribbons Dale Mill 

Mills (late Todd & Mills). Plushes, Velvets, etc... 51 Mechanic St. 

Morlot, George. Silk Dyer. Office, 454 Broome St., 
New York. Works Thirty-second St. and Tenth Av, 



io6 SILK GOODS DIRECTORY.— PATERSON, N. J. 

Naef Silk Manufacturing Co. Limited. Silk Dress 

Fabrics Dunlop Mill 

Ncuburger Braid Co. L. H. Neuberger & Co. Silk 
Braids, Fancy Goods, Bindings and Silk Throwing 
on Commission. Salesroom, lo Greene St., New 
York. Mill Van Houten St. 

New Jersey Silk Manufacturing Co. Otto Wise, 
President ; Wright Smith, Superintendent. Dress 
Silks. Salesroom, 527 Broadway, New York. 
Franklin Mill Mill St. 

Nightingale, James, Jr. Dress Silks, Satins, Rhadames, 
Serges and Ottoman Damass6. John Stewart & Co., 
55 Mercer St., New York, Selling Agents. Factory, 
Dale Mill Railroad Av. 

Palmer, Thomas. Throwster Watson Mill 

Paterson Braid Co. A. D. Winfield, Manager. Silk 
and Mohair Braids. Alexander Dugan & Co., 364- 
366 Broadway, New York, Selling Agents. Factory, 
Weaverton Mill Eighteenth St. and Twelfth Av. 

Paterson Dyeing Association. Pierre Thonnerieux, 
Manager. Silk Dyers. Works, Franklin Mill . . . 

Mill St. opp. Ellison St. 

Paterson Ribbon Co. George F. Kuett, President ; 
William T. Cole, Treasurer; William Hollings- 
worth. Manager. Silk Ribbons. Dale Mill Railroad Av. 

Paterson Silk Finishing Co. Finishers of Broad Silks, 
Satins, etc , Dale Mill 

Pelgram & Meyer. Ribbons and Dress Goods. Sales- 
rooms, 58-60 Greene St., New York. Mills at 

Boonton, N. J., Harrisburg, Pa., and 

cor. Temple and Matlock Sts. 

Phoenix Manufacturing Co. Albert Tilt, President 
and Treasurer ; John R. Curran, Secretary. Hand- 
kerchiefs, Brocades, Dress Goods, Fancy Ribbons 



SILK GOODS DIRECTORY.— PATERSON, N. J. 107 

and Ties. Greef & Co., 20-26 Greene St., New 

York, Selling Agents. Mills at Paterson, N. J., 

■ and Ailentown, Pa. Principal mill, Phoenix Mill, 

Van Houten St. 

Pioneer Silk Co. John Ryle, President. Tram, 
Organzine and Ribbons. Mills at Ailentown and 
Stroudsburgh, Pa., and Murray Mills, Mill St. 

Ramsey & Gore. Throwsters Watson Building 

Rebottom, G. P. & Co. Silk Finishers 25 Dale Av. 

Reed & Lovett. Throwsters New Barnett Mill 

Riley, Edward. Silk Dyer. Murray Mill Mill St. 

See & Sheehan. Silk Dyers. Office, 464 Broome St., 

New York. Works ; Paterson St. 

Seymour, Francis. Throwster 123 River St. 

Sherratt, Thomas. Dress Goods and Handkerchiefs, 

60 Railroad A v. 

Simpson, J. & Co. (Limited.) Mufflers, Handker- 
chiefs, Ties, etc Franklin and Church Sts. 

Smith, M. Soft Silk Winding and Doubling on 

Commission 1 23 River St. 

Smith, Wright. Ribbons and Umbrella Silks. Union 
Manufacturing Co River St. 

Standard Silk Co. H. E. Knight, President; F. B. 
Coffin, Treasurer; A. Pocachard, Superintendent. 
Broad Silks, Grenadines and Handkerchiefs. A. 
D. Julliard & Co., 66 Worth St., New York, Sell- 
ing Agents. Mills Phillipsburg, N. J., 

Tobyhanna, Pa., and ... Straight and Morton Sts. 

Straub, William. Silk Designing and Card Cutting. 

Office 34 Hamburgh Av. 

Sugden, Eben. Chenilles, Curtains, Ribbons, Vel- 
vets, etc. Salesroom, 204 Church St., New York. 
Factory Straight and Morton Sts. 

Taylor, John W. Silk Manufacturer. Dale Mills. . Railroad Av. 



io8 SILK GOODS DIRECTORY.—PATERSON, N. J. 

The William Strange Co. Silk Goods, Ribbons, 
Millinery and Dress Silks, Tram and Organzine. 
Salesroom, Strange & Bro., 96-98 Prince St., New 
York. Mills Essex and Paterson Sts. 

Thorpe, Samuel. Commission Throwster Granite Mill 

Townsend, 'Thomas. Handkerchiefs and Dress 

Goods. Barnet Mill Railroad Av. 

Urbahn, A. Ribbons / 93 River St. 

Vacher, Jerome. Dress Silks, Veilings. . .Johnson and Austin Mill 

Valley of the Rocks Silk Dye Works. Charles Ver- 
moraU Proprietor. Organzine and Tram, Fringe 
and Sewing Silk 

Walthall, James & Son. Floss and Embroidery Silks, 
Tram, Sewing Silk, Machine Twist and Saddlers' 
Twist. , 93 River St 

Weibler & Shoeres. Throwsters, Organzine and 
Tram Prospect St. 

Weidmann, J. Silk Dyer. Office, 52 Greene St., 

New York. New Works at Riverside, N. J 

cor Ellison and Paterson Sts. 

White, . Throwster. Mill 93 River St. 

Whiteside, James. Paul Crawford, Superintendent. 
Handkerchiefs, Scarfs and Dress Goods. Office 
with Abegg, Daeniker & Co., 90-94 Grand St., 
New York Dale Mill 

Winfield Manufacturing Co. Silk and Mohair Braids, 
Prussian Bindings, Galloons and Coat Hangers. 
John Stewart & Co., 55 Mercer St., New York, 
Selling Agents. Weaverton Mill. i8th and 12th Sts. 



SILK GOODS DIRECTORY.— NEW JERSEY. 109 

NEW JERSEY— (Confinued.) 

Alexander, W. A. Silk Dyer. Near Warren St., Jersey City Heights 

Bannigan, P. & I. Ribbons, Dress and Millinery 
Silks, Veilings, Brocades, Grenadines and Hand- 
kerchiefs. Salesroom, 66 Greene St., New York. 
Factory Lake View 

Bergen wood Silk Mills. Herman Spahn, Selling 
Agent, 466-468 Broome St., New York. Mills. .Town of Union 

Carrughi, James C. Dress Goods. Mill West Hoboken 

ChafTanjon, C. Favorite Silk Mills. Broad Silks, 
Gros-grain, Serges and Satin de Chine. Salesroom, 
484 Broadway, New York. Mills at Sterling and 

177-189 South St., Jersey City Heights 

Clifton Silk Mills (The). F. Grossenbacher, Man- 
ager. Broad Silks. James McCreery & Co., 801 

Broadway, New York, Selling Agents. Mills 

Athenia, Weehawken, Union Hill 

Continental Embroidery Works. Heckscher & Leiser, 
Proprietors. Embroidery. Office, 137 Greene St., 
New York. Factory 106 Washington St., Hoboken 

Comby, John. Black and Colored Gros-grains. 
Salesroom, C. Passavant & Co., Agents, 320 Church 
St., New York. . Mills, West St. and Paterson Av., West Hoboken 

Cutter, John D. & Co. Sewing Silk, Machine Twist, 
Gros-grains, Dress Goods, Serges, Satin de Chine 
and Sewing Silk Braids. Salesrooms, 44 E 14th 
St., New York ; 488 Washington St., Boston ; 1017 
Chestnut St., Philadelphia; 409 Opera House 
Building, Chicago; 532 Market St., San Fran- 
ciso. Mill Newark 

Ehler, A. & B. Progress Mills. Dress Goods, Serges 
and Satin de Chine. .564-566 Palisade Av., Jersey City Heights 

Englewood Silk Manufacturing Co. Throwsters Englewood 



no SILK GOODS DIRECTORY.— NEW JERSEY. 

Erskine, Joha & Co. Ribbons and Silk Goods. 

Office, 476-478 Broome St. , New York. Mill Union 1 1 i II 

Favorite Silk Mills. (See C. Chaffanjon). 

Fessler, Henry. Bindings, Galloons, Cigar Ribbons 

and Card Fringes. Mill Union Hill 

Francon, M. Silk Mill and Dye Works. Barlow & 

Grundy's Mill Riverside 

Gelan, C. Rhadames and Ottoman Silks Union Hill 

Givemaud Bros. Dress Silks, Serges, Satin de Lyon, 
Damass^, Satins and Armures. Office, 31 Greene 

St., New York. Mills West Hoboken, 

Homestead and Hackensack 

Hemburg, William. Silk Dyer Midland Park 

Jersey City Embroidery Co. . .45 Lincoln St., Jersey City Heights 

Rluessner, Andrew. Steam Silk Works. West Hoboken 

Laubsch, Charles. Dress Goods and Neckwear Silks. 
E. M. Benjamin, Selling Agent, 22 Greene St., 
New York. Post-office, Weehawken. Factory. . . 

Palisade Av. and Columbia St., Union Hill 
Meyenberg Silk Works. Millinery, Dress and Tie 
Silks, Scarfs, Ribbons, etc. Salesroom, F. Vietor 
& Achelis, 66-72 Leonard St., New York. Fac- 
tory Hoboken 

Monastery Silk Mills. J. Schwarzenberg L^ndis. 
Dress Goods. Office, E. Otiz, Manager, cor Grand 

and Wooster Sts., New York. Mill West Hoboken 

Naef, E. & Co. Broad Silks. Mill Linden 

Pages, J. B. Silk Dyer. .^ 101-103 Adams St., Hoboken 

Pelgram & Meyer. (See Paterson, N. y.) Mill at Boonton 
Perks, George A. & Co. Upholstery Trimmings. 

Salesrooms, 39-41 N 2d St. , Philadelphia. Mill . . Camden 

Pinkney, James H. & Co. Dress Silks, Serges and 
Satin de Chine. Salesroom, 29 W 23d St., New 
York. Mills West St. and Paterson Av., West Hoboken 



SILK GOODS DIRECTORY.— NEW YORK CITY. in 

Poidebard Silk Manufacturing Co. A. Poidebard, 
President; G. Bierwirth, Treasurer; P. Ulrich, 
Secretary. Silk Dress Goods. F. Vietor & Achelis, 
66-72 Leonard St., New York, Selling Agents. 
Factory Summit Av. and Hicks St., Jersey City Heights 

Ratti, Joseph. Commission Silk Throwster 

Paterson Av., West Hoboken 

Rittenhouse Manufacturing Co. Tapestries Passaic 

Ross & Baker Handkerchiefs. Kibbe, Chaffee & 
Co., 48 Worth St., New York, belling Agents. 
Mills at Port Oram and Dover 

Simon, R. & H. Dress Goods and Fancy Silks. 
Salesrooms, 57-63 Greene St., New York. Post- 

Office, Weehawken. Factories 

Easton, Pa., and Garden and Morgan Sts., Town of Union 

Singleton, George (The) Silk Manufacturing Co. 
Throwsters Dover 

Sontag, H. Dress Trimmings 

219 Congress St., Jersey City Heights 

Spangenberg, C, Jr. Upholstery Trimmings. Fac- 
tory and Salesroom , 221 Park Av., Hoboken 

Standard Silk Co. (See Paterson, N, J.) Mill. . . . Phillipsburg 

Stohm, Charles. Button Cloth! 

579 Palisade Av., Jersey City Heights 

Town of Union Mills. Luckemeyer, Schefer & Co., 
Proprietors. A. Stapfer, Superintendent. Dress 
Goods. Salesrooms, 476-478 Broome St., New 
York. Mills Town of Union 



NEW YORK CITY. 

Ackerman, W. C. Upholstery Trimmings 233 Sixth Av. 

Adams, D. E. (See Athol, Mass.) Salesrooms. • . .437 Broadway 
Adams, R. & Co. (See Paterson, N, J.) Sales- 
room 16 Greene St. 



112 SILK GOODS DIRECTORY.— NEW YORK CITY. 

iEtna Silk Co. {^t Norfolk^ Conn.) Joseph Selden, 

Selling Agent. Office 463-467 Broadway 

Aiken & Co. Ribbons 523 W 45th St. 

Aitken, Son & Co. Ribbons, Laces, Millinery and 
Trimmings. Salesrooms, 873-875 Broadway. Fac- 
tory 523 W 45th St. 

Alcock, F. W. (See Paterson, N. /.) Office 

98-100 Franklin St. 
American Silk Label Manufacturing Co. George 
Hey, Manager. Silk Labels and Coat Hangers. 

Salesroom and Factory 420 Broome St. 

Ashley & Bailey. (See Faterson, N, J.) Office 458 Broadway 

Bamford Bros. (See Faterson, N. J.) Office of 

Selling Agent 72 Worth St. 

Bannigan, P. k I. (See Lake View, N. J.) Sales- 
room 66 Greene St. 

Barnard, O. H. Undertakers' Trimmings. Factory 

and Salesroom 51 1-5 13 W 30th St. 

Baxter, J. B. Dress Trimmings 33 Wooster St. 

Beiersted, Carl. Upholstery Trimmings 138 Canal St. 

Belding Bros & Co. (See Rockville, Conn.) Sales- 
room 455-45 7 Broadway 

Bernheim, Samuel. Embroideries 470 Mulberry St. 

Bernstein, A. Millinery and Dress Trimmings 

1 714 Lexington Av. 
Bernstein, Benjamin Franklin. Dress Trimmings. . 114 E 14th St. 

Bernstein & Co. Cords, Tassels and Specialties 133 Mercer St? 

Belts, Jacob. Silk Braids 519W 45th St. 

Billings & Hitchcock. (See Hartford, Conn.) Sales- 
room of Selling Agents 43 Worth St. 

Blun, S. M. & Co. Jersey Cloths and Lace Mitts. 

Salesroom, 475 Broadway. Mill Morris and West Sts. 

Boesen, Pauline. Fringes and Passementerie 29 Mercer St. 

Boettger & Hinze. Finishing of Broad Silks and 

Satins. Office, 32 Mercer St. Factory 92d St. and ist Av. 



SILK GOODS DIRECTORY.— NEW YORK CITY. 113 

Boettorting, Pertz & Co. Ribbons. . .52d St., nth and 12th Avs. 

Bodmer & Hurlimann. Silks. A. Person, Harri- 
man & Co., 457-459 Broome St., New York, Sell- 
ing Agents. Mill 52d St., bet nth and 12th Avs. 

Booth, (The) J. H. Co. (See Paterson, N. /.) 
Salesroom 54 Howard St. 

Brainard & Armstrong Co. (The). (See New Lon- 
dofiy Conn,^ Salesroom 469 Broadway 

Brooks, Frank L. Cords, Fringes and Tassels 7 E. 4th St. 

Bromley, J. & Son. (See Philadelphia^ Pa,) Sales- 
room of Selling Agent 317 Broadway 

Broomhall, George L.* (See Pater son y N, J.) A. 
Person, Harriman & Co., Selling Agents 457 Broome St. 

Brown, Edward G. Upholstery Trimmings.. . . 787-789 Broadway 

Brown, L. D. & Son. (^t^ MiddletaivityConn.) Sales- 
room 486 Broadway 

Brown, William P. Ribbons. Iselin, Neeser & Co., 
Selling Agents, 339 Canal St. Mill 457-463 W. 45th St. 

Brussels Tapestry Co. Silk and Mixred Curtains, 

Crapes and Ottoman Cloths 231-235 E. 42d St. 

Buschmann, Carl F. Fringes, Dress Trimmings, 

Cords and Tassels 738 Broadway 

Buschner 733 Broadway 

Camp, John T. & Co. Trimmings, Fringes, Cords 
and Tassels. Factory and Salesroom 33 E. 17th St. 

Cardinal, Andre. (See Paterson, N. J. ) Office. . . 

457-459 Broome St. 

Cash, J. & J. Ribbons, etc .92 Greene St. 

Caspers, Peter. (See Paterson^ JV, JJ) 76 Greene St. 

Chaffanjon, C. (See Jersey City Heights ^ N. /) 
Salesroom 484 Broadway 

Cheney Bros. (See South Manchester, Conn.) Sales- 
rooms 477-481 Broome St. 

8 



114 SILK GOODS DIRECTORY.— NEW YORK CITY. 

City Button Works. Erlanger & Liebman, Proprie- 
tors. Silk and Crochet Buttons. Factory, ii6 
Walker St. Office 238 Canal St. 

Clifton Silk Mills. (See Athenia, Town of Union, 
N. y.) Salesroom 801 Broadway 

Cohn & Klotz, Dress and Cloak Trimmings 19 Mercer St. 

Collet, A. & Co. Upholstery Trimmings, Cords, 

Fringes and Tassels 21 E. 1 7th St. 

Comby, John. (See West Hobokeny N, J,) Sales- 
room of Selling Agents. . . .' 320 Church St. 

Continental Embroidery Works. (See Hoboken, 

N. J. ) Office 137 Greene St. 

Copcutt, William H. & Co. (See Yonkers, N. Y,^ 
Salesrooms of Selling Agents 457-459 Broome St. 

Crew, Alfred. (See Paterson, N. J J) 52 Greene St. 

Crosley, C. W. Cloak and Dress Trimmings, Cords, 

Fringes and Tassels 920 Broadway 

Cutter, John D. & Co. (See Newark, N. J.) Sales- 
room 44 E. 1 4th St. 

Cylindograph Embroidering Co. A. Gonzenbach, 

Manager 548 W. 23d St. 

Dale, F. S. (See Paterson, N, J.) Salesrooms of 

Selling Agents 85 Leonard St. 

Dalton, Joseph. Hair Nets, Laces and Canvas. 

Factory 476 W. 26th St. 

Danzer & Meier. Silk Dyers 148 Mulberry St. 

Deppeler, John & Sons. Fringes and Dress Trim- 
mings 132 Greene St. 

Derbohlaw, John. Cords, Fringes and Tassels 793 Broadway 

Dexter, Lambert & Co. (See Paterson, N. JJ) 

Salesrooms 33""35 Greene St. 

Doherty & Wadsworth. (See Paterson, N. J.) Sales- 
rooms of Selling Agents 45 Greene St. 

Dorgeval, P. Gros-Grains, Serges, Black and Colored 

. Silk 7-11 E. 13th St. 



SILK GOODS DIRECTORY.— NEW YORK CITY. 115 

Dreyfus Bros. Fringes, Upholstery Trimming and 
Passementerie. Factory and Salesroom 52 Lispenard St. 

Drey fuss & Toff. Ladies* Dress and Cloak Trim- 
mings 51 Greene St. 

Dunlop, John. (See Pa/erson, N. J.^ Salesroom. .521 Broadway 

Eicke, Edward. Military and Schuetzen Trimmings.. 157 Canal St. 

Ellison, Adolph S. Fringes, Passementerie Cords, 
Tassels, Chenille, Buttons and Novelties. . . . 103-105 Greene St. 

Elwood, B. H. & Co. (See Fort Plain, N. K) Sales- 
rooms of Selling Agents 45 Greene St. 

Engel, Henry R. Braids 238^ E. 39th St. 

Ennis, George W. & Co. (See Philadelphia, Pa.) 

Salesroom of Selling Agents 64-66 White St. 

Erskine, John & Co. (See Union Hill, N. J.) Sales- 
room 476-78 Broome St. 

Eschbach, S. & Son. Silk Dyer 348 W. 44th St. 

EurelfaSilk Manufacturing Co. (See Canton, Mass.) 
Salesrooms 441 Broadway 

Excelsior Silk Knitting Co. (See Brooklyn, N. Y.) 

Salesroom 70 Worth St. 

Excelsior Silk Manufacturing Co. (See Brooklyn, 
N. Y.) Salesroom 8 Walker St. 

Excelsior Quilting Co. L. Schultz & Co 202 Greene St. 

Fessler, Henry. Cigar Ribbons, Galloons and Prus- 
sian Bindings 343"345 ^« 37th St, 

Fisher, M. Dress Trimmings 471 Broadway 

Franke, Louis. (See Paterson, N. /.) Salesroom. .110 Grand St. 

Franker, S. Dress Trimmings 430 Broome St, 

Freitag Manufacturing Co. Block & Baar. Em- 
broideries 72 Grand St. 

Friend, Hermann. Trimmings and Passementerie. .98 Greene St. 

Frowen, Bros. & Co. Ribbons 417 E. ,91st St. 

Funke, Hugo. (See College Point, N. Y.) Sales- 
room 23-25 Greene St. 

Gartner & Freidenheit. Ribbons 8x Grand St. 



Ii6 SILK GOODS DIRECTORY.— NEW. YORK CITY. 

Gehlert, Edward. Fringes, Dress Trimmings and 
Passementerie 2327 Fourth Av. 

Gerold, Imhof. Dress Trimmings 1 73 Canal St. 

Gerson, J. Dress Trimmings 27 Mercer St. 

Givernaud Bros (See Hobokeriy N.J.) Salesroom.. 31 Greene St. 

Glendale Elastic Fabrics Co. (See Easthampton, 
Mass.) Salesroom 74-76 Worth St. 

Glen wood Mills. (See Easihamptoriy Mass.) Sales- 
room of Selling Agents 419-421 Broome St. 

Glyn, Walter. Dress Trimmings 7S8 Broadway 

Graham, John & Son. Upholstery and Undertakers* 
Trimmings. Factory and Salesroom. ..... .516-24 W. 35th St. 

Graf, Jacob. Embroider)^ by Hand and Machine. 

Salesroom 254 Canal St. 

Green, Samuel & Co. Dress and Millinery Trim- 
mings 57-61 Prince St. 

Greenbaum, Louis & Son. Curtain Cords and 

Tassels 6 Howard 

Grimshaw Bros. (See Paterson, N, J. ) Salesrooms 

of Selling Agents Grand, cor. Greene Sts. 

Grish, John. (See PatersoUy N. J.) Salesroom of 
Selling Agents 54-56^White and 108-110 Franklin Sts. 

Godshalk, E. H. (See Philadelphia, Pa.) Sales- 
room 323 Broadway 

Goodman, B. (The) Manufacturing Co. (See Bridge- ' 

porty Conn.) Office 20 Walker St. 

Haefelfinger, Fritz. Fringes and Dress Trimmings. . 

343-45 W. 37th St. 
Haefelfinger, Jacob. Fringes and Dress Trimmings. 

444 W. 38th St. 

Haefelfinger, John. Dress Trimmings 462 Tenth Av. 

Hahn, L. Dress and Cloak Trimmings 54 Lispenard St. 

Hall, Thomas R. Silk and Cotton Elastic Bandages. 

211 E. 22d St. 



SILK GOODS DIRECTORY.— NEW YORK CITY. 117 

Hamil & Booth. (See Paffrson, N. J,) Salesroom. 

96-98 Grand St. 

Hammond & Knowlton. {See Putnam ^ Conn,) Sales- 
room 524 Broadway 

Haraux & Co. European Embroidering Co. . 146-148 Wooster St. 

Haskell Silk Co. (See Saccarappa^ Me.) Salesroom 
of Selling Agents 36 Lispenard St. 

Haubner, Emil F. Upholstery Trimmings 153 W. 46th St. 

Hawks, M. J. & Co. (See Faterson, N, J.) Sales- 
room . 118 Franklin St. 

Hayes, Thomas F. Fringes and Dress Trimmings. 

Factory and Salesroom 5-9 Union Square 

Hayes & Cauly. Dfess Trimmings. . . . .- 163 Greene St. 

Hecht & Livingstone. Dress and Cloak Trimmings. . 67 Greene St. 

Heidenreich, John. Silk* Dyer 423 W. 53d St. 

Heinemann, Asa. Dress Trimmings 55 Mercer St. 

Heminway, M. & Sons Silk Co. (See Watertown, 

Conn,) Salesrooms 78 Reade St. and 99 Church St. 

Hentze, Marcus. Upholstery Trimmings and Fringes. 

7 Washington Place. 

Hepner & Co. Cords, Fringes and Tassels .22 Walker St. 

Hertlein & Schlatter. Fringes and Dress Trimmings. 
Salesroom, 31 Mercer St. Factory 417 E. 91st St. 

Hess, Goldsmith & Co. (See Wilkesbarre, Pa,) 
Salesrooms 89 Grand St. 

Hirsch, L. Cords, Tassels, etc 20 Bond St. 

Hofman & Ellrodt. Millinery Trimmings, Braids, 

Cords and Tassels 91 Mercer St. 

Holland Manufacturing Co. (The). (See Williman- 
tic, Conn,) H. Edridge, Agent. Salesrooms. .. .561 Broadway 

Holmes, W. D. (See Paterson^ N, J,) Salesroom. . 20 Greene St. 

Horandt & Son. (See Paterson^ N. J,) Salesroom.. 

473-75 Broome St. 

Horn Chas. "L'Etoile** Silk Ribbons. Salesroom, 

70 Mercer St. Factory 447 W. 42d St. 



Ii8 SILK GOObS DtRECTOkY.-N£W VORR CItV. 

Howard, E. & S. Silk Veiling 511 W. 42d St. 

Howard George. Millinery Silks 225 W. 28th St. 

Horstmann, Wm. H. & Sons (See Philadelphia^ 
Pa,) Salesrooms 106 Grand St. 

Hurlimann, J. G. (See Brooklyn, N. K) Selling 
Agents 476-7S Broome St. 

Hyman, L. Upholstery Trimmings. Office, 115 

Worth St. Factory 504-6 W. 38th St. 

Itschner (Werner) & Co. (See Philadelphia.) Sales- 
room 5 7-59 Greene St. 

Jacobson, N. Ribbons 523 W. 45th St. 

Jennings, A. G. & Sons (See Brooklyn.) Salesrooms.. 

62-64 Greene St. 

Johnson, Cowdin & Co. {See Pa/erson, N, /.) Sales- 
rooms 79 Greene St. 

Judson, Charles. Webs and Suspenders 73 Leonard St. 

Kammerer, C. E. & Co. Dress Trimmings 429 Broome St. 

Kammerer & Bockstoever. Fringes, Dress Trimmings, 

Cords and Tassels iii Greene St. 

Kaufman, Strouse & Co. (See Philadelphia. ) Sales- 
room 598 Broadway 

Kayser, Julius & Co. (See Brooklyn,) Salesroom. . 

33-35 Greene St. 

Kelly, G. L. & Co. (See Brooklyn, N, Y.) Sales- 
room .'853 Broadway 

Klein, Baer & Rosenberg. Millinery Trimmings. . .43 Mercer St. 

Klein,^ C. E. & Co. Dress, Cloak and Millinery 

Trimmings and Hat Cords 604 Broadway 

Klotz, Herman. Silk and Half-Silk Woven Labels 
and Coat Hangers 19 Mercer St. 

Krause, R. Embosser and Printer on Silks, Velvets 

and Plushes ; also Ribbon- Watering 138 Wooster St. 

Krumsick, Rudolph. Fringes and Dress Trimmings, 29 Howard St. 

Kursheedt Manufacturing Co. Laces, Embroideries, 
Quiltings, Trimmings, etc. Salesrooms, 69-71 



SILK GOODS DIRECTORY.—NEW YORK CITY. 119 

Greene St., New York; 87-89 Wabash Av., Chi- 
cago, 111. Factories, S. 5th Av., Thompson St. 
and W. 19th St., New York. Business Office.. . . 194 S. 5th Av. 

Kunz, Samuel. Ribbons , 4^3 E. 25th St. 

Laubsch, Charles. (See Union Hilly N, y.) Sales- 
room 22 Greene St. 

Laurent, Eugene. Needle- Wrought Silk Buttons.. 225 E. 125th St. 

Lauterbach, William. Machine Twist, Floss Sewing 

Silk, Tailors* Twist, etc. Factory and Office. ... 131 S. 5th Av. 

Leiter, L H. Upholstery Trimmings 210-12 Canal St. 

Leonard Silk Co. (See Warehouse Point, Conn,) 
Salesroom 140 Church St. 

Leschhorn & Reigetrnann. Dress and Cloak Trim- 
mings, Cords, Tassels, Chenilles and Buttons. . . . 

21-23 Howard St. 

Levey Bros. Ribbons, etc.. 314 Church St. 

Liberty Silk Works. Van Liew & De Forest. James 
Nightingale, Superintendent. Selling Agents, 

Iselin, Neeser & Co., 339 Canal St. Mill 

5 2d St. and Eleventh Av. 

Liebermuth, A. & Co. Fringes and Dress Trim- 
mings ' 69 Mercer St. 

Linden thai, L. Upholstery and Drapery Trimmings. 

Factory and Office Broadway and 38th St. 

Lipper, M. W. & Co. (See Philadelphia.) Sales- 
room 77 Franklin St. 

Lips, Joseph. Silk Refinishing 141 W. Broadway 

Little, William & Co. (Sec Palerson, JV. /.) Sales- 
room T ! 85 Leonard St. 

Lobenstein, S. Upholstery Trimmings 38 E. 14th St. 

Lockett, E. (See Palerson, N, y.) Salesroom. . .85 Leonard St. 

Loewenstein, J. H. & Bro. Silk Mitts, Gloves, 
Laces, Jersey Cloth and Hair Nets. Salesroom, 
41-43 Greene St. Factory Desbrosses and Greenwich Sts. 



I20 SILK GOODS DIRECTORY.— NEW YORK CITY. 

Logan Silk Mills. (See Auburn, N. K) Selling 

Agents, MathewSy Blum & Vaughan 85 Leonard St. 

Lothy Joseph & Co. Fine Silk Ribbons. Salesroom, 

65 Greene St. Factories 

517 to 523 W. 45th St. and Tenth Av., cor. 156th St. 

Macfarlane, James S. (See Mansfield Centre, Conn,) 

Salesroom 24 Walker St. 

Macfarlane, William & Co. (See Yonkers, N. K) 

Salesroom 55 Mercer St. 

Maidhof, J. Fringes and Dress Trimmings, Cords, 
Tassels and Chenille Fringes. Factory and Sales 
room 99 Greene St. 

Mandel, Henry. Dress Trimmings, Braids, Cords 
and Molds 147 Mulberry St. 

Martin, Charles N. Sewing Silk and Twist 348 Canal St. 

Martin, Thomas & Co. Covering Bonnet Wire. .550 W. 46th St. 

Matter, John. Silk Dyer 333 W. 44th St. 

Maul, Hugo & Co. Dress Trimmings 19 Bond St. 

May hew Silk Co. (See Shelburne Falls, Mass ) Sales- 
room of Selling Agent 32 Mercer St. 

McNaught & Co. Glasgow Printing Co. Printing 

on Silks 107 Walker St. 

Meding, E. (See Pater son, N, J.) Salesroom of 

Selling Agents 57~63 Greene St. 

Mende, Paul. Dress, Cloak and Millinery Trim- 
mings 1 39 W. Broadway 

Menges, A. Dress and Cloak Trimmings 644-46 Broadway 

Menhaffey & Phillips. Dress Trimmings 437 Broadway 

Metzger, Louis. Trimmings and Novelties. ..'.... .555 Broadway 

Meyenberg Silk Mills. (See Hoboken, N. J,) Sales- 
room 66-72 Leonard St. 

Meyer, G. L. Fringes, Gimps, Cords and Tassels. .424 Broome St. 

Moeller & Littaur. Silk and other Yarns 109 Mercer St. 

Monastery Silk Mills. (See West Hoboken, N. /) 

Office of Manager Cor. Grand and Wooster Sts, 



SILK GOODS DIRECTORY.-NEW YORK CITY. 121 

Morlot, George. (See Paterson, N. J.') Office. . . 454 Broome St. 

Moll, August. (See Brooklyn^ N, Y.) Salesroom . . 15-1 7 Mercer St. 

Morrison, James. Dress and Cloak Trimmings. ... 28 Howard St. 

Muller, Ernst. . Millinery Trimmings 127 Grand St. 

National Suspender Co. Silk Suspenders, etc. Office.. 

75-77 Leonard St. 

Neuburger Braid Co. (See Paterson, N. J.") Sales- 
room 10 Greene St. 

Neudorfer, L. Fringes and Dress Trimmings 23 Howard St. 

New Haven Web Co. (See New Havens Conn,) 
Salesroom 73 Leonard St. 

New, Jacob. Ribbons. Salesrooms, 109-113 Grand 

St. Factory 529-33 W, 54th St. and 522-26 W. 55th St. 

New Jersey Silk Manufacturing Co. (See Paterson, 

N, J.) Salesroom 527 Broadway 

New York Woven Label Manufacturing Co. Geo. 
H. Friedhof. Woven Silk Labels, Hangers and 
Badges. Factory and Office 262 Canal St. 

Nightingale, James Jr. (See Paterson, N. /.) Sales- 
room of Selling Agents 55 Mercer St. 

Nonotuck Silk Co. (See Florence, Mass.) Sales- 
room 23-25 Greene St. 

Nordheim & Deimel. Upholstery Trimmings. ..... 29 W. 23d St. 

Novelty Embroidery Co. Embroideries by Hand and 

Machine 1-3 Walker St. 

O'Brien, Maurice. Worsted, Silk and Silk-Mixed 

Upholstery Trimmings 90-92 Bowery 

Oneida Community. {StQ Community , N, Y.) Sales- 
room 53 Walker St. 

Opper, H. L. Trimmings 75 Spring 

Osenkop, O. H. & Co. Trimmings 8 Greene St. 

Paine, Byrne & Co. Lace-Dyeing and Ribbon- 
Watering 9 Walker St. 

Paterson Braid Co. (See Paierson, N, /.) Sales- 
room 364-66 Broadway 



122 SILK GOODS DIRECTORY.— NEW YORK CITY. 

Patterson, James T. (See Bridgeport ^ Conn.). : 75 Greene St. 

Pelgram & Meyer. (See Paterson^ N. y.) Sales- 
room 58-60 Greene St. 

Phoenix Manufacturing Co. (See Paterson, N. /,) 

Salesroom 20-26 Greene St. 

Phillips, A. L. & Co. Cloak, Furriers' and Hatters* 
Trimmings. Factory and Salesroom 106 Greene St. 

Phipps & Train. (See Newton Upper Falls y Mass,) 

Salesroom Howard and Mercer Sts. 

Pick, Jacob. Trimmings 127 Crosby St. 

Piek, S. Fringes and Cloak Trimmings. Iselin, 
Neeser & Co, Selling Agents, 339 Canal St. Fac- 
tory Cor. S. 5th Av. and Bleecker St. 

Pinkney, J. H. & Co. (See West Hoboken, N. /.) 
Salesroom 29 W. 23d St. 

Poidebard Silk Manufacturing Co. (See Jersey City 

Heights, N. J.) Salesroom 66-72 Leonard St. 

Prosnitz & Greenbaum. Trimmings 246 Canal St. 

Reed, Oscar ^ 52 Grove St. 

Reitmeyer & Co. (See Brooklyn, N. K) Sales- 
room 260 Canal St. 

Reshower, Joseph & Co. Dress Trimmings, Fringes 
and Ornaments . , 81 Spring St. 

Rockwell, Charles B. (^t^ Brooklyn, N. K) Office. . 56 Reade St. 

Romann, William. Cords and Tassels 555 Broadway 

Ross & Baker. (See Dover, N. y.) Salesroom. ... 43 Worth St. 

Ryer & Wagner. Upholstery Trimmings, Frame 

Fringes, Tassels, Cords, etc 167-169 Canal St. 

Sacks & Bro. Silk Fringes i33~35 Greene St. 

Salzer & Wolf. Cloak and Dress Trimmings 271 Canal St. 

Sandmann, Philip. Furriers', Dress and Cloak Trim- 
mings. Salesroom 72 E. 4th St. 

Saranac Silk Mills Co. Undertakers* Trimmings. 

Factory, 706 Arch St., Philadelphia. Office 93 Duane St. 



SILK GOODS DIRECTORY.- N£W YORK CITY. li^ 

Sauquoit Silk MarAifacturing Co. (See Saitquoitj 
N, Y.) Salesroom 54 Howard St. 

Schloss & Sons. Castle Braid Co. Mohair and Silk 
Braids and Millinery Novelties 101-3 Thompson St. 

Schmadeke & Beetson. Trimmings 8 E. 14th St, 

Schmid, Francis J. Coach Laces and Carriage Trim 

mings. Factory and Salesroom 540 E. 157th St. 

Schmid, Philip 144 E. 50th St. 

Schmidt, C. A. Drapery and Upholstery Trimmings. 

Factory, 449 W. 14th. Salesroom 

83-85 Chambers and 65-67 Reade St. 

Schmutz, Martin. Dress and Millinery Trimmings. 
Salesroom 519 W. 45th St. 

Schnitzler, B. Cords and Tassels 639 Broadway 

Schwaub, Hoffmann & Co. Ribbons 523 W. 45th St. 

Schwensen, Wm. Fringes, Dress Trimmings, Che- 
jiille, Cords, Tassels and Ornaments. Factory and 
Salesroom 460 Broome St. 

Seavey, Foster & Bowman. (See Eureka Silk Manu- 
facturing Co., Canton, Mass.") Salesroom 441 Broadway 

Seckel, M. & Co. Dress and Cloak Trimmings and 

Fringes 1 5-1 7 Mercer St. 

See & Sheehan. (See Paterson, N. /.) Salesroom . . 464 Broome St. 

Selling, H. & Co. Undertakers' Supplies 254 Elizabeth St. 

Silbermann, J. & Co. Bonnet and Belt Ribbons, 
Dress Trimmings, Silk Handkerchiefs and Piece 
Goods. Factories, 452-456 Tenth A v. and at Main 
St., Poughkeepsie. Salesroom 35 Mercer St. 

Silberstein & Mayer. Cloak and Millinery Trim- 
mings, Cords and Tassels. Salesroom 113 Mercer St. 

Simon, E. B. Cords, etc 27 Barclay St. 

Simon, Leon. Trimmings 144 S. 5th Av. 

Simon, R. & H. (See Union Hill, N. y., and Easton, 
Fa,) Salesroom 5 7-63 Greene St. 



124 SILK GOODS DIRECTORY.— NEW YORK CITY. 

Skinner, William & Son. (See Holyoke, Mass.) •Sales- 
room 508 Broadway 

Smith, Jos. Trimmings 105 E. 13th St. 

Splitdorf, Henry. Silk Covering to Telegraph Wire... 176 Worth St. 

Springer, R. & Co. Trams, Flosses, Twist, Organ- 
zine, Tassels, etc. Salesroom, 464 Broome St. Fac- 
tories 177 Grand St., New York, and Paterson, N. J. 

Sprung, I. Dress and Cloak Trimmings 40 Walker St. 

Standard Silk Co. (See Paterson, N. /., Phillips- 
burgh and Tobyhanna, Pa.) Salesroom 66 Worth St. 

Stanton Brothers. Commission Merchants and Man- 
ufacturers of Silk and'Lace Novelties 458 Broadway 

Stearns, John N. & Co. Black and Colored Gros- 
Grain Silks, Brocaded Dress Silks, Plain and Fancy 
Handkerchiefs. Factories, 213-221 E. 42d St. and 
214-224 E. 43d St. Salesrooms 68 Greene St 

Steinborn, H. Trimmings 363 Rivington St. 

Steinborn, J. D. (See Brooklyn, N. Y.) 263 Rivington St. 

Steinhardt, A. Cords and Tassels 147 Wooster St. 

Steinhardt, R. Ribbons 552 W. 50th St. 

Stiffsonn, S. J. Bullion, Fancy and Chenille Fringes, 
Borders, Galloons, Gimps, Cords and Tassels. 
Salesroom 145 Fifth Av. 

Strange, (The) William Co. (Stt PaUrson, N. /.). . 

96-98 Prince St. 

Straus, F. A. Cotton, Worsted and Silk Yarns. ..74-76 Greene St. 

Sturzenegger, Edm. Embroidery 96 Spring St. 

Sugden, Eben. (See Paterson, N. J. ) Salesroom . . 204 Church St. 

Sundheimer Bros 93-95 Greene St. 

Sutro Bros. Silk, Mohair, Cotton and Silk Braids 

and Braided Cords. Factory and Salesroom. . 109-11 Grand St. 

Thorp, James H. & Co. (See Brooklyn.) Sales- 
rooms 429 Broome St. 

Thorp, Robert & Sons. Galloons, Prussian Bindings, 

Ribbons, Silk, Cotton and Mohair Braids 127 Spring St. 



SILK GOODS DIRECTORY.— NEW YORK CITY. 125 

Thurkauf, Virgil. Silk Dyer 13-17 Crosby St.* 

Town of Union Mills. (See Town of Union, -^'J') 

Salesroom 476-478 Broome St. 

Tingue, House & Co. Mohair, Genappe, Worsted, 

Cotton and Spun-Silk Yarns 56 Reade St. 

Turner, P. W. & Co. (See Turnersville, Conn,) 

Salesroom • ^% Prince St. 

Underbill, F. K 127 Spring St. 

Unicorn Silk Manufacturing Co. (See Catasaqua, 
Fa,) Selling Agents, C. A. Auffmordt & Co. . 33-35 Greene St. 

Union Braiding Works. Jobn Henry Vogt. Silk, 
Cotton and Worsted Braids, Dress and Millinery 
Trimmings 270 Bowery 

Unkelbacb, P. Cords, Fringes and Tassels 119 S. 5tb Av. 

Van Liew& De Forest. Dress Goods. Iselin, Neeser 
& Co., Selling Agents, 339 Canal St. Factory. . . 

Eleventb Av. and 27tb St. 

Vickers & Weston. (See Philadelphia, Pa.) Sales- 
room 62 Wbite St. 

Vogel, August. Trimmings 445 W. 45tb St. 

Walter, Ricbard. Morrisania Silk Mills. Organzine, 
Tram and Ribbons. Mills. .1102-6 Railroad Av.'near i66th St/ 

Webendorfer, H. Cords, Fringes, Tassels and Trim- 
mings 480 Broome St. 

Weidmann, J. (See Paterson, N, /,) Office 52 Greene St. 

Weil, Samuel. Dress and Cloak Trimmings 75 Greene St. 

Weinberg, C. & Co. Upholstery and Drapery Trim- 
mings. Salesroom. 31-33 W. 23d St. 

Wherlin, M & Co. Silk Dyers 341-43 E. 29th St. 

Whiteside, James. (See Paterson, N, /.) Office. .90-94 Grand St. 

Wicke, William & Co. Cigar Ribbons 31st St. 

Williams, P. H. & W. Upholstery Trimmings. ... 72 W. 23d St. 

Williams Silk Manufacturing Co. C. G. Williams, 
President ; S. P. Williams, Treasurer. Lining Silks. 
Salesroom, 524 Broadway. Factory 204-6 E. 43d St. 



126 SILK GOODS DIRECTORY-BROOKLYN. 

Winfield Manufacturing Co. {See Paferson, N. J.) 

Salesroom of Selling Agents 55 Mercer St. 

Wimpfheimer & Bassett. Dress Trimmings 106 Greene St. 

Yates, S. H. Cords, Fringes and Tassels 7 University Place 

Yonkers Silk Co. (See Yonkersy N. Y.) Salesroom. .98 Greene St. 
Zaisser, William. Silk Dyer '. 105 Greene St. 



BROOKLYN, 

Brooklyn Knitting Co. Silk and Worsted Knit 
Goods. Office, Broadway and 8th St., New York. 
Factory 942 Gates Av. 

Estberg, E. Shade Tassels and Cords. Factory . . . 

72-76 Hamburg Av., E. D. 

Excelsior Silk Knitting Co. Silk Underwear. Gros- 
venor & Carpenter, Selling Agents, 70 Worth St., 
New York. Mill 17 S. 3d St., E. D. 

Excelsior Silk Manufacturing Co Black Gros-Grains. 

Salesroom, 8 Walker St., New York. Mill 

Flushing Av. and Steuben St. 

Hurlimann, J. G. Ribbons, etc. Luckemeyer, Schefer 
& Co., 476-478 Broome St., New York, Selling 
Agents. Mill 287 Union St., E. D. 

Jennings, A, G. & Sons. Guipure, Thread, Blonde, 
Brussels and Spanish Laces, Lace Mitts, Gloves and 
Hair Nets. Salesrooms, 62-64 Greene St., New 
York, and 221 Fifth Av., Chicago, III. Factory.. 

Jennings* Lace Works, Park Av. and Hall St. 

Kayser, Julius & Co. Silk Gloves, Silk Mitts, Laces, 
etc. Salesrooms, 33-35 Greene St., New York. 
Factories. .. .11-15 Debrosses St., New York, and 

47-55 Clymer St., E. D. 



SILK GOODS DIRECTORY.— NEW YORK STATE. 127 

Kelty, G. L. & Co. Upholstery Trimmings, Curtain 
Materials, Cords, Gimps, Tassels and Fringes. 
Salesroom, 853 Broadway, New York. Factory. . . 

475-479 Keap St., E. D. 

Maynard, A. & Co. Upholstery Trimming. . . .... 

100 S. 6th St., E. D. 

McLure, S. Upholstery and Dress Trimmings, 

Fringes, Cords, Tassels and Gimps 261 Fulton St. 

Moll, August. Braids. Salesroom, 15-17 Mercer St., 

New York. Factory 235-247 Lynch St., E. D. 

Naul, J. Cords and Braids 122 Myrtle St. 

Reitmeyer & Co. Fringes and Dress Trimmings. 
Salesroom, 260 Canal St., New York. Factory. . . 

17-27 S. 3d St., E. D. 

Rockwell, Charles B. Columbia Mills. Fancy Silk, 
Mohair and Worsted Yarns. Office, 56 Reade St., 
New York. Factory 52-56 Columbia Heights 

Soar, Henry G. H. Nottingham Laces and Hair 

Nets. Factory 176 N. 4tK St., E. D. 

Steinborn, John D. German-American Braiding 
Works. Dress Trimmings and Laces. Office, 263 
Rivington St., New York. Factory. . .57-59 Scholes St., E. D. 

Thorp, James H. & Co. Furniture Gimps. Sales- 
room, 429 Broome St., New York. Factory 

Cor 4th and 5th Sts., E. D. 

Vanderwegen, William. Silk Dyer. 190 Atlantic Av. 

Will, Jacob. Hat Cords 357 S. 3d St., E. D. 



NEW YORK STATE— (C^«//««^^). 

Bodmer, Edward. Silk Dyer Astoria, L. I. 

Copcutt, William H. & Co. Ribbons, Handkerchiefs 
and Piece Goods. A. Person, Harriman & Co , 
457-459 Broome St., New York, Selling Agents. 
Mills Nepperhan A v. , Yonkers 



128 SILK GOODS DIRECTORY,— NEW YORK STATE. 

Elwood, B, H. & E. E. Dress Goods and Handker- 
chiefs. Spielman & Co., 45 Greene St., New 
York, Selling Agents. Mill Fort Plain 

Eureka Silk Manufacturing Co. Sewings. Tread- 
well, Selling Agent 117 Main St., Gloversville 

Funke, Hugo. Rhenania Silk Works. Ribbons, 
Organzine and Tram. Salesroom, 23-25 Greene 
St., New York. Rhenania Mills College Point, L. I. 

Haiges, M. Dress, Upholstery and Decorative Trim- 
mings. Factory, 401 Main and 9 Clinton Sts. 
Office Room 46, Arcade Building, Buffalo 

Hilton, Isaac. Dress Trimmings 179 River St., Troy 

Irving, John, Silk Plush. Factory New Brighton, S. I, 

Jewell & Bassett. Central City Ruffling and Lace 

Goods. Factory 43"47 Monroe Block, Syracuse 

Kunz, Samuel. Ribbons and Bindings College Point, L. I. 

Lacy, Lawrence, Lace Goods 48 S. Salina St., Syracuse 

Logan Silk Mill. E. D. Woodruff, President; A. 
G. Beardsley, Treasurer. Piece Goods and Hand- 
kerchiefs. Mathews, Blum & Vaughan, 85 Leon- 
ard St., New York, Selling Agents. Mill Auburn 

Macfarlane, William & Co. Tram, Organzine, Fringe 
and Twist. Office, 55 Mercer St., New York. 
Mill at Yonkers 

Nonotuck Silk Co. (See Florence ^ Mass.) Office 
at Gloversville 

Oneida Community (Limited). Sewing Silk and 
Machine Twist. Thomas Handy, Salesman, 53 
Walker St., New York, Mill and General Office. Community 

Sauquoit Silk Manufacturing Co. L. R. Stelle, Pres- 
ident ; Richard Rossmassler, Treasurer. Tram, 
Organzine and Fringe Silks. Factories, Sauquoit, 
^ear Utica, N. Y. ; Scranton, Pa., and Philadel- 
phia. Salesrooms, cor. Columbia Av. and Ran- 



SILK GOODS DIRECTORY.— OHIO. 129 

dolph St., Philadelphia, and 54 Howard St., New 

York : . . . Sauquoit 

Silbermann, J. & Co. (See New York, N. Y.) 

Mill Main St , Pougbkeepsie 

Starin Silk Fabric Co. Silk Mitts, Gloves, Hosiery, 
Jersey Cloths, etc Fultonville 

Vogt Manufacturing Co. (The.) Dress and Decor- 
ative Trimmings and Casket Decorations.^ Fac- 
tory 1 16 N. St. Paul St. , Rochester 

Yonkers' Silk Co. William Skinner. George B. 
Skinner, Agent. Tram, Organzine, Fringe Silk, 
Sewing Silk and Machine Twist. Salesroom, 98 
Greene St., New York. Mill Yonkers 



OHIO. 

CINCINNATI. 

Atkins, A. Dress Trimmings 102 W. 5th St. 

Belding Bros. & Co. (See RockvilUy Conn.) Sales- 
room ... 136 Race St. 

Broegelman, F. Upholstery Trimmings. Salesroom.. 204 Vine St. 

Eureka Silk Manufacturing Co. (See Canton, Mass.) 
Stanton & Bowman, Selling Agents 160 Main St. 

Hackenburg, W. B. & Co. (See Philadelphia, Pa.) 

Salesroom 65 W. 3d St. 

Hoffmeister, F. Fringes and Passementerie. Fac- 
tory and Salesroom 152 W. 4th St. 

Hoffmeister, Louis. Fringes, Tassels, etc 206 Vine St. 

Nonotuck Silk Co. (See Florence, Mass,) Sales- 
room 88 W. 3d St. 



PENNSYLVANIA. 

PHILADELPHIA. 

iEtna Silk Co. (See Norfolk, Conn.) Salesroom. . 323 Arch St. 
Alexander, W. B. Gimps and Tassels 16 N. 4th St. 

9 



I30 SILK GOODS DIRECTORY.-PHILADELPHIA. 

Allen, Samuel & Co. Furniture Trimmings. Office, 

115 Worth St., New York. Mill 181 1 Howard St. 

Barlow, Noah. Upholstery, Raw and Spun Silk . . 

53d and Westminster Av. 

Barnes & Beyer. Upholstery Trimmings 

Lehigh Av. cor. Hancock St. 

Bechman, Carnell & Co. Upholstery Trimmings. . . 

1712 N. Front St. 

Belding Bros. & Co* (See Rockvillet Conn.) Sales- 
room 622 Market St. 

Billings & Hitchcock, {^te Hartford , Conn.) Sales- 
room of Selling Agents 235 Chestnut St. 

Brainerd & Armstrong Co. (The. ) (See New London, 

Conn.) Salesroom 621 Market St. 

Bromley, Wm. H 2226-2228 Fox St. 

Bromly, John & Sons. Silk Upholstery, Carpets, 
Rugs, etc. T. B. Schaff, Selling Agent, 317 
Broadway, New York. Mill Front and York Sts. 

Bromly & Burns. Dyers* Yarns and Silk Noils 

4036 Orchard St., Frankford 

Brooks, Geo. & Son. Upholstery and Furniture Cov- 
erings 55th St. and Westminster Av. 

Brown, Jas. Jr. & Co 4459 Main St., Manayunk, Pa. 

Clark & Hamilton. Upholstery Trimmings.. . . 2162 Dickinson St. 

Coleman, Wm. Upholstery Trimmings 25 N. 6th St. 

Crawford, Wm. R. Upholstery Trimmings 

Fair Hill St. near Lehigh Av. 

Culbert, James. Upholstery Trimmings, Somerset cor. Hancock St. 

Cumberland Mills. Wm. Hunter & Son. Raw and 

Spun Silk Tapestries 2 213-2219 E. Cumberland St. 

Cunningham, W. B. Upholstery Trimmings 34 S. 2d St. 

Cutter, John D. (See Newark, N. /.) Salesroom. . 

1017 Chestnut St. 

Davenport, George & Edwin. Upholstery Trim- 
mings Susquehanna Av. and American St. 



SILK GOODS DIRECTORY.— PHILADELPHIA. 131 

Davenport, Henry. Upholstery Trimmings 134 York St. 

Davenport, H. & Co. Gimps and Tassels. . .4th and Somerset Sts. 

Davenport & Spencer. Upholstery Trimmings 

N. Front and Coral Sts. 

Deginther, George. Upholstery Trimmings 1224 Arch St. 

Dobson, John & James. Silk Plush 26 N. Front St. 

Dolan, Thos. & Sons. Silk Mixtures Howard and Oxford Sts. 

Ennis, George W. & Co. Upholstery Trimmings. 

Lehigh Av. and N. Front St. Salesroom 

64-66 White St., New York 

Eureka Silk Manufacturing Co. (See Canton^ Mass,) 
G. C. Oakes, Selling Agent 421 Arch St. 

Failey, Keeler & Phipps. Silk and Chintz Down 
Quilts and Down Clothing. Industry Mills. Mill. . 

22d St., from Hamilton St. to Pennsylvania Av. 

Fair Hill Manufacturing Co. Fringes and Tassels. . . 

N. 1 3th and Hamilton Sts. 

Faulkner, Levi. Upholstery Trimmings 16 N. 6th St. 

Flavell, G. W. & Co. Surgical Bandages 248 N. 8th St. 

Folwell, John. Silk Mixtures 3d and Cambria Sts. 

Freyer, Henry F. Dress Trimmings 727 Jayne St. 

Given, S. R. Fringes, Gimps, Tassels, etc 731 Filbert St. 

Godshalk, E. H. & Co. Dress Trimmings. N. 24th 
cor. Hamilton St. Salesroom 323 Broadway, New York 

Graham, John C. Dress Trimmings. . . .N. 19th cor. Hamilton St. 

Greasley, E. Jr. Turcoman Curtains and Fringes. .405 N. 8th St. 

Griswold Worsted Co. (Limited.) (See Darby^ Pa, ) 
Office 322 Chestnut St. 

Hackenburg, W. B. & Co. Sewing Silk and Machine 
Twist. Salesrooms, 25 N. 3d St., Philadelphia; 
526 Broadway, New York; 92 Greene St., Balti- 
more; 65 W. 3d St., Cincinnati; 152 5th Av., 
Chicago. Factory 244-248 N. Front St. 

Hall, L. C. Jr. & Co. Silk and Worsted Knit 
Goods 6th and Arch Sts, 



132 SILK GOODS DIRECTORY.— PHILADELPHIA. 

Hamill, B. & Co. Silk Noils and Woolen Yarns. . . 

Cumberland and Mill Sts., German town 

Hanifen, J. E. & Co. Jersey Cloth Savery and Thompson Sts. 

Hansen, S. R. & F. Upholstery Trimmings 21 N. 4th St. 

Hayes, Thos. F. (See New York City.) Salesroom. . 831 Arch St. 

Hellwig, Albert. Silk Dyer 122 Eutaw St. 

Heminway, M. & Son. (See Watertown^ Conn J) 

Salesroom ... 716 Arch St. 

Hensel, CoUaday & Co. Dress Trimmings 51 N. 7th St. 

Holland Manufacturing Co. (See Wtllimantic^ Conn,) 

428 Market St. 

Hooley B. & Son. Twist and Fringe Silk. . . .442-448 N. 13th St. 

Horstmann, William H. & Sons. Gum Silks, Dress 
and Cloak Trimmings, Ribbons, Fringes, Floss, 
Upholstery Trimmings, Coach and Carriage Laces 
and Trimmings, Military Equipments, Regalia, 
Theatrical Goods, Silk Flags, Bunting, Sashes and 
Scarfs. Salesrooms, 106 Grand St., New York, 
and at Factory Cor. N. 5th and Cherry Sts. 

Hoyle, Harrison & Kaye. Upholstery Trimmings. . 

3d St. and Lehigh Av. 

Hunter, Wm. & Son. Upholstery Trimmings 

61 1 -6 1 7 Dickinson St. 

Itschner (Werner) & Co. Ribbons and Piece Goods. 
712 Market St. and N. 19th near Westmoreland. 
Salesroom, 57-59 Greene St., New York. Mills. . 

Tioga Station, Germantown 

Kates, Horace N. Silks 622 Chestnut St. 

Kaufroann, Strouse & Co. Dress, Millinery and 

Upholstery Trimmings 4th and Race Sts. 

Lazarus, Schwarz & Lipper. Dress and Upholstery 
Trimmings. Salesrooms, 393 Broadway, New 

York, and 65 Chauncey St., Boston. Factory 

25th and Biddle Sts. 



SILK GOODS DIRECTORY.— PHILADELPHIA. 133 

Leonard Silk Co. (See Warehouse Point, Conn.) 
Salesroom 414 Arch St. 

Lewis, Robert. Upholstery Trimmings 

Emerald St. and Alleghany Av. 

Lipper, M. W. & Co. Keystone Braid Mills. Dress 
Trimmings. Salesrooms, 144-146 N. 5th St., 
Philadelphia; 144 Wabash Av., Chicago; 77 
Franklin St., New York. Mills at Wayne Station 

Lotte & Mazere. Silk Dyers 185 Canal and 947 N. 2d Sts. 

Marco & Carson. Upholstery Trimmings 13 10 Lawrence St. 

Mast, Lewis. Dress Trimmings 2314 9th St. 

Mauer, T. W. & Son. Upholstery Trimmings 529 Arch St. 

Mcllwain & Co. Upholstery Trimmings 1647 Marshall St. 

McPherson, Samuel. Turcoman Curtains and Fur- 
niture Trimmings 2632 Mascher St. 

Merklee, Daniel C. Upholstery Trimmings 36 N. 4th St. 

Metcalf, W. J. Raw Silk and Chenille Curtains .... 2215 Otis St. 

Miner, Herbert 910 Filbert St. 

Montague, W. Silk Noil Yarns Howard and York Sts. 

Morrell, Chas. & Son. Silk Dyers 2219 Richmond St. 

Oehele Bros. & Co. Upholstery Trimmings 1004 Arch St. 

Parker, John. Surgical Hosiery 1002 Arch St. 

Partridge & Richardson. Dress Trimmings 17 N. 8th St. 

Perry, Fergus. Surgical Elastic Bandages 

Wakefield bel. Wistar St., Germantown 

Perry, Vincent & Co. Silk and Cotton Surgical 

Hosiery 48 Harvey St., Germantown 

Ridgway, Edward. Upholstery Trimmings 

N. 62d and Hamilton Av. 

Ritchie, Robert J. & R. Upholstery Trimmings ... 

Howard bel. Jefferson St. 

Rose, Charles. Fringes, Gimps, Tassels, etc 326 N. 3d St. 

Roth, M. & Co. Upholstery Trimmings 175 Girard Av. 

Sauquoit Silk Manufacturing Co. (See Sauquoit, 
N. K) Mill and Office Cumberland Av. cor. Howard St. 



Ii4 SILK GOODS DIRECTORY.— PENNSYLVANIA. 

Schmidt, C. & G 1845 Hazard St. 

Schultheiss, Edward. Dress Trimmings 31st and Poplar Sts. 

Shrack & Sherwood. Dress Trimmings 231 Market St. 

Shultz, George H. Broad Silks, etc 11 10-1116 Noble St. 

Snape, Daniel. Upholstery Trimmings 

German town A v. near Broad St. 

Spencer & Burns. Embroidery 304-308 Master St. 

Stead & Miller. Upholstery Trimmings 

Fourth and Cambria Sts. 
Sullivan, John & Sons. Gimps, Braids, Bindings . . 

Montgomery Av. above Ninth St. 
Vickers & Weston. Hosiery and Gloves. Sales- 
room, 62 White St., New York. Factory 

Tulip cor. Palmer St. 

Walliser, August. Dress Trimmings 25 1 N. Eighth St. 

Walliser, Charles. Dress Trimmings 619 Arch St. 

Way, J. H. & Co. Ontario Mills. .Second St. and Columbia Av. 

Wedge, John. Surgical Elastic Bandages 

4517 Miller St., Germantown 

Wilson, Thomas H. Shawls and Dress Goods 

Howard bel. Jefferson St. 

Winck, W. B. Clifton Mills Third St. and Lehigh Av. 

Woodhead, Frank. Derlin*s Mill. Shawls 

Hancock St. and Lehigh Av. 

Wright, S. D. & Co. Dress Trimmings 1017 N. Front St. 

Wynkoop, H. Gimps and Plushes 

Howard St. and Montgomery Av. 
Yardley, E. Clark. Upholstery Trimmings 1020 Chestnut St. 



PENNSYLVANIA— ( Continued). 

Adelaide Silk Factory. Phoenix Manufacturing Co. 

(See Paterson, N. y.) Mills at AUentown 

Bethlehem Silk Co. Throwing. Charles Soldiac, 

President ; Charles H. Moore, Treasurer. Mill . . Bethlehem 



SILK GOODS DIRECTORY.— PENN., R. I. 135 

Cutter, J. D. & Co. (See Newark, N. /,) Mill to be 

built at Bethlehem 

Dexter, Lambert & Co. (See Paterson, N. y.) 

Bellemont and Nelson Mills Hawley 

Dexter, Lambert & Co. (See Paterson, N. /,) Mill 

at Honesdale 

Fichter & Martin. Fancy Ribbons South Bethlehem 

Grimshaw Bros. (See Paterson^ N. /.) Mill at. . . Reading 

Griswold Worsted Co. (Limited.) T. Wistar Brown, 
Treasurer. Spun Silk, Yarn Warps for Plushes. 
Office, 322 Chestnut St., Philadelphia. Mills at. . Darby 

Hess, Goldsmith & Co. Broad Silks. Salesroom, 89 

Grand St. , New York. Mill Wilkesbarre 

Lipps & Sutton. Broad Silks Bethlehem 

Meding, C. E. (See Paterson, N. J.) Mill Mauch Chunk 

Pelgram & Meyer. (See Paterson, N. J. ) Mill at . . Harrisburg 

Rockland Silk Co. Tram and Organzine Meadville 

Ryle, J. C. & Co. Throwsters Stroudsburg 

Sauquoit Silk Manufacturing Co. (See Sauquoit, 

N, Y.) Mills at Scranton 

Simon, R. & H. (See Weehawken, N.J.) Mill Easton 

Standard Silk Co. (See Paterson, N J.) Mills. . . 

Phillipsburg and Tobyhanna 
Unicorn Silk Manufacturing Co. Machine Twist, 
Knitting and Embroidery Silks and Spun Silk 
Yarns. John F. Degener, President; Alexander 
Pfeffer, Manager. C. A. Auffmordt & Co., 33-35 
Greene St., New York, Selling Agents. Mill. . . . Catasauqua 
Wilkesbarre Lace Co. Mill Wilkesbarre 



RHODE ISLAND. 

Bradford Manufacturing Co. Noils, Yarns, etc Woonsocket 

British Hosiery Co. R. W. Cooper, Manager. 

Hosiery. Mill Olneyville 



136 SILK GOODS DIRECTORY.— UTAH, VT., CAN. 

What Cheer Silk and Mohair Braid Co. Silk and 
Mohair Braids Providence 

UTAH TERRITORY. 

Egbert, D. K. Dress Goods and Sewing Silk < Kaysville 

Utah Silk Association. Sewing Silk and Machine 
Twist. Hon. Alexander C. Pyper, President and 
Superintendent. A. M. Musser, Secretary and 
Treasurer. Factory and Office Salt Lake City 

VERMONT. 
Stearns, J. F. Sewing Silk and Twist Brattleboro 



CANADA. 



Belding, Paul & Co. Sewing Silk and Twist. (See 

RockvilUy Conn.) Salesrooms and Mill 

28-30 St. George St., Montreal 



RAW SILK DIRECTORY.— IMP. & ACTS. 137 



RAW AND SPUN SILKS. 



IMPORTERS AND AGENTS. 

Arai, R., Agent of Doshin Silk Co., Yokohama. . . .46 Howard St. 

Bavier, Meyer & Co 482 Broome St, 

Bing, Ferdinand & Co. Waste Silk 106 Grand St. 

Bourdis, J. & Co., Agent of Nabholz & Ossenbrug- 

gen, Shanghai and Yokohama. 19 Mercer St. 

Cayard, J. English Silk and Silk Waste 20 Walker St. 

China and Japan Trading Co. (Limited) 34-38 Burling Slip 

Courian, Paul 109 Grand St. 

Farley, Gustavus Jr. , Agent of Fraser, Farley & Co. . . 64 South St. 

Fearon, Low & Co., China 112 Front St. 

Feldstein, A., Agent of His, Zellweger & Co. . . . 87-89 Greene St. 

Franke, L. & Co no Grand St. 

Frazer & Co., China and Japan 124 Water St. 

Gerli, C. & E., Brothers & Co 52 Greene St. 

Givernaud, Joseph, Agent for Pietro Gavazzi, Milan . . 83 Mercer St. 

Gribble & Nash 134 Pearl and 100 Water St. 

Guerin, Vve & Fils, Lyons. B. L. Leydier, Manager,, 45 Greene St. 

Hadden & Co 109-111 Worth St. 

Heinemann, Paul, Agent of Paul Heinemann & Co., 

Japan 112 Water St. 

Longhi, C, Agent of Veuve Guerin & Fils 45 Greene St. 

Middleton & Co., Japan 108 Water St. 

Milton, W. F. & Co 159 Maiden Lane 

Montgomery, G. L., Agent of Jardine, Matheson & 

Co 74 Wall St. 

Paladine, E., Agent of P. H. Barbezat, Lyons, 

France 29 Greene St. 



138 RAW SILK DIRECTORY.— IMP., ACTS. & BROKERS. 

Richardson, B. & Son 43 Mercer St. 

Russell & Co., China and Japan 60 Wall St. 

Rylc, Wm 54 Howard St. 

Thairwally Wm. C. Spun Silks 38 Lincoln St. , Boston 

Wamsley, Philip. Spun Silks 34 Greene St. 

Seed & Denby. Silk Noils 83 Reade St. 

Sieber, Hans P., China and Japan i Greene St. 

Smith, Baker & Co., Japan 140 Pearl St. 

Stoecker & Gwalter., Agents of A. Andreae & Co., 

and F. Desgeorges & Co 25 Mercer St. 

Taff, Alfred, Agent for H. T. Gaddum, Manchester 

and London. Spun Silk 96 Spring St. 

Telford, George A. Raw and Spun Silk Broker. ... 43 Grand St. 

Vivante, A. Sr 96 Spring St. 

Walker, John T., Son & Co 81 Pine St. 

Watts & Co., Agents of Watts & Son, Manchester. .83 Mercer St. 
Westervelt, Ellsworth 41 Liberty St. 



BROKERS IN RAW AND SPUN SILK. 

Barnard, William H 70 Mercer St. 

Chinn, Charles. Soft and Hard Waste 

10 Smith St., Paterson, N. J. 

Hannsen, H. J 34 Mercer St. 

Johnson, Rowland 441 Broadway 

O'Donoghue, 91 Grand St. 

Richardson, B. & Son 43 Mercer St. 

Simes, Charles F 76 Greene St. 

Smith, Isaac 446 Broome and 4 Cedar Sts. 



DIRECTORY.— SILK ASSOCIATIONS, ETC. 139 



SILK ASSOCIATIONS, ETC. 



-♦- 



Silk Association of America. F. W. Cheney, Presi- 
dent ; William C. Wyckoff, Secretary 

446 Broome St., New York 
Silk Industry Association. William Strange, Presi- 
dent ; Daniel J. Sheehan, Secretary 

Washington Hall, Paterson, N. J. 
Serrell Silk Reeling Co. Herman Drisler, President ; 

Charles Lyman, Secretary and Treasurer 

15 Broad St., New York 
Western Silk Association. R. W. Hare, President ; 

W. A. Stanton, Secretary and Treasurer 

278-280 Madison St., Chicago, 111. 
Woman's Silk Culture Association of the United 

States. Mrs. John Lucas, President 

1222 Arch St., Philadelphia 



2— «r 



^5. 




^ 



Ti^— 2 



Business Announcements. 



S— ^ ^ ^ - ^ 



^ 




•^ 



i^-Ht 



Business Announcements. 



-♦- 



CATALOGUE OF NAMES'. 

PAGE. 

« 

American Magazine.. 155 

American Silk Journal 152 

Arai, R ,..., 144 

Atkinson, J. & Co 147 

Atwood Machine Co 146 

Barnes 8c Peel 154 

Bocttger & Hinze 150 

Brainerd & Armstrong Co 153 

Brown Brothers & Co 0pp. Title 

Chaffanjon, C 149 

Cheney Brothers 156 

Crew, Alfred 146 

Doherty & Wadsworth 149 

Eastwood, Benjamin 149 

Erskine, John & Co 151 

Franke, Louis : 144 

Griswold Worsted Co ^ Front Page 

Hall, I. A. & Co 147 

Itschner, W. & Co " 155 

Jennings Lace Works 153 

Morlot, George 146 

Nonotuck Silk Co 148 

Paterson Reed and Harness Co 150 

Riley, Edward 147 

Ryle, William 144 

Royle, John & Sons 151 

Simon, R. & H 143 

Skinner, William & Sons 151 

Strange, William 154 

Walder, Jacob 150 

Walker, John T., Son & Co 144 

Weidmann Silk Dyeing Co 145 

(142) 



BUSINESS ANNOUNCEMENTS. 143 

R. & H. SIMON, 

SUM Minifaelifsis. 



-FACTORIES :- 



UNION HILL, N. J., 

and EASTON, PA. 



Salesrooms: — 57-63 GREENE STREET, 

Ken) Jflork. 



144 BUSINESS ANNOUNCEMENTS. 

Louis Franke & Co., 

IMPORTERS OF ITALIAN, CHINA AND JAPAN 

Raior Silks, 



AKO MAXUFACTt'RERS OF 



Throvra Silk, 

ORGANZINE. TRAM, FLOSS, TWIST AND FRINGE IN GUM, 



Louis Fkankb. 



iuSS/w:s™ss "0 fiRAHO ST., NEW YORK. 

Pn-BB Bosch. MUls, Paterson, N. J. 



WM. RYLE, 

IMPORTER OF ALL DESCRIPTIONS OF ASIATIC AND EUROPEAN 

RAW SILK, 



And Dealer in Trama, Organzinea, Twiat and Frinsea in Onm, 
and All Varietiea of Thrown Silk. 

FINE PURE DYE 0R6ANZINES FOR THE WOOLEN TRADE A SPECIALTY. 

FOREIGN AND DOMESTIC SPUN SILK. 

No. 54 Howard Street, New York. 

JOHN T. WALKEB, SON k CO.. 

IMPORTERS OF 

Raw Silk, 

81 Pine Street, NEW YORK. 




R. Aral I ^^J /^ 'C ^y¥//yY/^. S. Takakl 



N. Y. GENERAL REPRESENTATIVE 

OF THE 

DOSHIN SILK CO., YOKOHAMA. 

{DOSHIN KWAISHA.) 

46 HOWARD STREET Main Officb: Branch Officb: 

NEW YORK. Hon Cho, Yokohama, Japan. lo Rue Pizay, Lyons, France 



BUSINESS ANNOUNCEMENTS. 



145 



WEIDMANN SILK DYEING CO, 







— OF- 




TRAMS AND 



BLACKS, 



WWMM WiTMW 011 WM 




■'M..MXJ 



E'«* * **^*» 



A SPECIALTY. 



Pure and IVeighted Colors 



— FOR — 



DKESS GOODS. 

French Twist for Fringe tjanufacturers, 

FAST COIiOBS FOB XJMBBELLA GOODS, 
PUBE DYE AND -WEIGHTED. 

DYB ysroit:Ks, pjltbrson, jst. j. 

Office, 52 Greene Street, New York. 

10 



146 BUSINESS ANNOUNCEMENTS. 



AT WOOD MACHINE CO., 



BUILDERS OF 



Improved Silk Machinery 

OF ALL KINDS, 
FOR BOTH THROWING AND WEAVING. 

Also, Special Macliines and Appliances. 

EUGENE ATWOOD, Treasurer and Manager. 



ALFRED CREW, 

SILK FINISHER, 

Dale Avenue, Paterson, N. J. 

FINISHER AND IMPROVER OF EVERY DESCRIPTION OF 



H^^^All Goods Insured Against Fire. 





^^ ^^»^^/' 



SIIvK DYKR 



-OF 



Organzine, Tram, Fringe, Twist, Sewing and Embroidery Sillcs. 

COLORS AND BLACK, 

PURE AND WEIGHTED, 

For Ribbons, Fancy Goods, Dress Goods and Serges. 



Works— PATERSON, N. J. 

Office— 454 RBOOME ST., NEW YORK, 



BUSINESS ANNOUNCEMENTS. 147 

EDWAED EILEY, 

KINK SILKS AND SEWINGS. 
bi.a.c:ks Airzj colors. 

Pure Ove and weighted, 

Por Ribbons, Serges, Fancy and 

DRESS GOODS. 





Works— Paterson, New Jersey. 


-' 


^ -■ -■ 1. A. HALL & CO., 




{(eed^ SDd HaPDBWi 




Nos.4.6 AND 8 WEST, 




Cor, Ri.=r si , PaterBOn, H. 1. 




LinBoei and Mails. ShuKlej. Pickers, 
Harness, Twine, &c. 




hn"^ a"spedah™' "' 




Telaphon* No. 4»B A. 



J. ATKINSON 4, CO., 

All Desoriptions of Spools and Bobbins, 

FOR ConOH. SILK. WOOLEN AND FLAX MILLS. 

Silk Swifts, Swift Sticks, Soft Silk Risers, &c. 
95 ABD 97 RIVER STREET, PATERSON, N. J. 



148 BUSINESS ANNOUNCEMENTS. 

NoNOTUCK Silk Company, 

MANUFACTURERS OF 

OOBTIOELLI Spool and Skein Silk, U aotaine and Button-hole 

TvlBt, Florence Soft-finish Knitting and Ebnhroldering 

Silks, Silk Underwear, Hoatery, Mittens, 

Wriaters, &o., &c. 



CORTICELLI SILK 

Has " Great Supiriority ai lo Strength and Kfpilarily" (see Report of the 
Judges of Awards, at Philadelphia, 1S76,) and was the onfy American Silk for 
which a Prize Medal was awarded at the Paris Expoution, 1878. The " Supeki- 
ORTTV" of these Silks has likewise been acknowledged by the Award of 

©HIF^iFEEN Gold 0)EDAIiS 



MILLS at Florence, Leeds and Haydenville, Mass. 

ESTABUSHED AT FLORENCE 1838. 

SAI.ESICOOMS 1— NEW VORK, 13 and ts Greene Sneel; BOSTON, iS Summer 
Streel: CHICAGO, 17* and iSo Madiion Street; CINCINNATI, SS Wot TWrd Street; 
ST. LOUIS, 408 Broadway. NEW ORLEANS, >6 Cuop Street ,- GLOVERSVILLE,N. Y. 



BUSINESS ANNOUNCEMENTS. 




DOHERTY & WADSWORTH, 

U\ Manufacturers, 

PATERSON, N. J. 

SPIELMAN & CO., 45 Oreene St., SeUiner Affente, 
New YORK. 

BENJAMIN _ EASTWOOD, 
SILK MACHINERY, 

ShafUns, Polleya, Hanger*, SCc, 
WaatilitB Haoliliiei for Cotton and Silk Waste and Xianndry 



PATERSON, XT. J. 

E Call. ; 



C. CHAFFANJON, 

Favorite Silk Nliiis. 

BLACS AND COLOBED QBOS- 

OSAIN BBItaBa FOB 

COAT LININGS. 

SATIN DE CHINE. 

'177, 179, ISI, 183, 185, 187, 139 South Street, Jersey City Heights, 1 J. 



ISO BUSINESS ANNOUNCEMENTS. 



NEW YORK 

Silk Refinishing Establishment, 



ESTABLISHED 1868. 



BOETTGER & HINZE, 

Offloe, 32 Meroer St., New York. 

FINISHING OF BROAD SILKS AND SATINS. 

All Goods Insured A^^ainst Lioss by Fire. 

HENRY W. BOETTGER. ADOLPH HINZE. 



ALBERT S. LABER. AUGUST STOLZ. 

PATERSOII REED AND HARNESS CO,, 

Manufacturers and Dealers in all kinds of 

SOLDERED REEDS AND HARNESSES, 

Brass, Glass and Steel Mails, Weavers' Supplies, and all 
kinds of Qlassw^are for Silk Machinery, 

120 Van Houten Street. Paterson, HI. c/. 



JACOB WALDER, 

MANUFACTURER OF 

Reeds, Harness. Brass and Steel Mails, 

IiINQOES, PIiXJSH AND VELVET TVIRBS, SHUTTLEB, 
QUIIiliS, AND QENEBAL WEAVEBS' SUFFIilES, 



AND DEALER IN ALL KINDS OF 



Swiss and English Harness, Twines' and Glass Mails, 

188 RIVER STREET, PATERSON, N. J. 



BUSINESS ANNOUNCEMENTS. 151 

I Improved Silk Machinery: 

PIANO MACHINES, 

REPEATERS, 

QUir.LTMi FRAMES, 
WARPERS, BEAMERS, DOISBIES, Erf. 

JOHN ROYLE & SONS, 

R. R. At«. and Orond St., naar Erie Depot, 

PATERSON, N. J. 

ESTABLISHED 1848. 

UNOUOMONK SILK MILLS, 

HOLYOKE, MASS. 

WILLIAM SKINNER & SONS, 

Safin Sleeve [minings, 

]Ki:OXIja.IR BRA.IDS. 

Pure Dye Silk Braids; Silk Serges. Colored and Black; 
Machine Twist, Butlon-Hole Twist, Sewing Silk. 

SALESROOMS : 



JOHN ERSRINE k CO., 

Manufacturers of Silk Goods, 

476 AND 478 BROOME STREET, 
o.,.."iJS,N.j. NEW YORK. 



152 BUSINESS ANNOUNCEMENTS. 



THE 




merican Silk Journal, 



DKVOTED EXCLUSIVELY TO THE INTERESTS OF THE 



AMERICAN 
SILK INDUSTRY AND TRADE, 

fublighed M@nlhlY, 



■BY- 



BYRON ROSE, 



AT- 



No. 93 Duane St, New York. 



Subscription, $2.00 per Annum, in Advance. 

SINGLE COPIES, 20 CENTS. 

To Foreign Subscribers the price is $2.50 per 

Annum, in advance ; postage prepaid 

by the publisher. 



ADVERTISING RATES SENT ON APPLICATION. 



BUSINESS ANNOUNCEMENTS. 



JENNINGS LACE WORKS, 

SPA NISH SCARFINGS, 

GUIPURE SCARFS, 

AND SILK VEILINGS. 

SPANISH LACE, and 

EDGINGS, PURLINCS, 

INSERTIONS, ^c, &-f., (^€. 



F THE LEADING STYLES Of 

mmM. KACES 

FOR DRESS TRIMMINGS, MILLINERY PURPOSES AND LADIES' NECK WEAR. 

Silk-Lace Mitts and Gloves, 

SILK HAIR-NETS, ALL HAIH-SHADES. 
^r<;ENTENNIAL DIPLOMA AND MEDAL AWARDED TO OUR GOODS. 

Laoe Warks, at Park Ave. and Hall St., Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Salesrooms, 62 and 64 Greene St., N. Y., and 221 Fifth Ave., Chicago, III. 

A. G, Jennings & Sons. 



the: brainerd & Armstrong go.. 

Silk Manufacturers, New London, Conn., 

St.Tuostun; s'llanover "st" Baltimiirr.' " *" 

ADDRKSS, NEW LONDON. CONN. 



IS4 BUSINESS ANNOUNCEMENTS. 

D. A. BARNES. 

BARNES & PEEL, 

Manufacturers of Pure Dye 

Silk and Mohair Braids, 

Cords, Organsine and Tram, Trimmings, die. 

GRANITE MILL, PATERSON, N. J. 

THE WILLIAM STRANGE COMPANY, 

MANUFACTURERS OF 

RIBBON'S. 



MILLINERY AND DRESS SILKS 
Superior Silk Kabrics, 

FOR MERCHANT TAILORS' USE AND THE CLOAKING TRADE. 

STMI&E I BlOTllB, 

Sellinq Agents, 

96 and 98 Prince Street, NEW TOEK. 

]iaiX.X.S, - - PAXEinSOTT, TT. J. 



BUSINESS ANNOUNCEMENTS. 155 

WERNER ITSCHNER. ALFRED STREULI. 

Werner Itschner & Co., 

MANUFACTURERS OF 

Sill^ RibbsBS and SpeSS S§§ds, 

AND IMPORTERS OF 

ITALIAN RAW SILK. 

57 &59 GREENE STREET.] ^^f,^^^. ( 71Z MARKET STREET, 
New York. I ' I Philadelphia. 

€:i)e American JHaga^inc. 

BEAUTIFULLY ILLUSTRATED. 



Sample Cupy of current number mailed upon receipt of 25 cents; back 
numbers, 15 cents. Address, p ^ pygj, ^ gj,^ Publishers, 

130 AND 183 Pearl Sweir. N. Y. 



156 



BUSINESS ANNOUNCEMENTS. 





m 





anumc^i^U^ 



South Manchester, Conn. 



Hartford, Conn. 



SALESROOMS : 

NEW YOBK^477, 479 and 481 Broome Street. 
BOSTON--79 Chaunoy Street. 
CHICAGO— 186 Franklin Street. 



Velvets and Plushes. * 

Solid Colors, Striped, Embossed. 

Foulards. 

All kinds and widths, Plain, Figured, Printed, for Dress Goods and 
Decorative purposes. 

Handkerchiefs and Mufflers. 

Printed, Plain and Brocaded. 

Satins and Twills. 

Printed and Solid Colors. Millinery Silks, Parasol Goods, Lining 
Silks, Marcelines, Florentines, Grenadines, Gauze, Black and Col- 
ored Gros-Grains, Rhadames, Tricots, Armures. 

RIBBONS. 

OroB-Grain, Satin and Pioot Edge. 

TRAMS, ORGANZINES AND FINE PATENT SPUN^SILKS 

FOR MANUFACTURERS' USE. • 



SILKS FOR SPECIAL PURPOSES TO ORDER. 



I— ^ 



=^ 



^(^m&i-^ 



^^ 



Ts— § 



I NDKX. 



^-^I^.(^r^•^^^ 



INDEX. 



[Names that are alphabetically arrang^ed, as in the List of AKembers of the 
Silk Association, and in the Directory, are omitted from this index*] 



• 

PAGE. 

Albany Silk Co 17 

American Institute, of New York 14, 16, 22, 28 

American Silk Society 22 

Aspinwall, Dr. Nathaniel 10 

Atlantic Silk Co 17, 20 

Atwood, William 14, 20 

Atwood & Crane..... ; 20 

Atwoodville, Connecticut, manufacture at 20 

Aub & Hackenburg 43 

Auburn, New York, manufacture at 30 

Baltimore, manufacture at 25 

Barrens, Thomas 10 

Beaver Silk Culture and Manufacturing Co 18 

Belding Bros. & Co 42 

Bertschy, S. & Co 37 

Bingham, Jesse 14 

Bolting Cloth, factory for making 9 

Booth, J. H. & Co 22, 25, 30, 37, 42 

Boston, removal from 42 

Bottum, C. L 37 

Braiding machines, the first 29 

Brooklyn, New York, manufacture at 42 

Brown, L. D .'.. 34, 36 

Brown, Mr., tassel manufacturer, at Boston 14 

Bulkley, Daniel 11 ' 

Burlington, New Jersey, silk enterprise at 21 

Burlington Silk Growing and Manufacturing Co 18 

Campbell County Silk Co 18 

(159) 



I 

i6o INDEX. 

PAGE. 

Canton, Massachusetts, manufacture at 20, 41 

Canton, Ohio, production at.. 27 

Capital Invested in 1886 48 

Carolinas, silk culture in 8 

Carpenter, William 17 

Census of 1840 28 

Census of 1850 34 

Census of i860 39 

Census of 1870 43 

Census of 1880 47 

Centennial Exhibition, effect of 45 

Chaffee, O. S 22, 30 

Chaffee, O. S. & Son 36, 42 

Cheney Brothers 14, 21, 23, 28, 34, 37 

Cheney, Charles 34 

Chester Silk Co 18 

Cobb, Jonathan H 19, 21, 34 

College Point, Long Island, manufacture at 42 

Colonial Silk Industry 7 

Colt, C. Jr 20, 29 

Colt, Christopher 21,29 

Columbia Silk Co 18 

Companies, stock, for silk culture and manufacture 17, 24 

Conant, A. A. & H. E 36 

Conaijt, Capt. Joseph 14, 19, 20, 30, 36, 37 

Conant, J. & Co 30 

Conant & Bottum 34 

Conant & Co 34 

Conantville, Connecticut, manufacture at 36 

Connecticut, early silk industry.., 10 

Connecticut, quantities of raw silk produced.. 10, 11 

Connecticut Silk Manufacturing Co ..17, 21, 29 

Cotton manufactures, duties in detail 83 

Crane, Charles P 20 

Crane, Harvey 20 

Cutter, John D 43 

Dale Silk Manufacturing Co... 41, 42 

Dale, Thomas 21 



INDEX. i6i 

PAGE. 

Dale, Thomas N 37 

Dale, Thomas N. & Son « 42 

Dedham, Massachusetts, manufacture at , 19, 34 

Delaware, silk factory in 9 

Deppeler & Kammerer 37 

Dexter, Lambert & Co 30, 37, 42 

Dimock, Campbell & Co 36 

Dimock, Ira 36 

Dimock, Shubael 36 

Dimock & Saunders 36 

Dunlap & Malcolm 43 

Duponceau, Hon. Peter S 23 

Duties, change of, in 1846 34 

Duties paid on raw silk, 1843-57 38 

Duty on Asiatic silk reshipped 39 

Duty on manufactured goods, reduction of, in 1883 47 

Duty on raw material, effect of 26, 36 

Duty, tariff of 1864 41 

Duty-paying imports of the United States, duties in detail 84-86 

Economy, Pennsylvania, manufacture at 31 

Eureka Silk Manufacturing Co a 42 

Exchange Bank «. 21 

Exports of raw silk 27 

Filature at Savannah 8 

Fisk, William A 14 

Florence, Massachusetts, manufacture at 20 

Florida, mulberry tree planting in 21 

Foster, Charles , 37 

Fox, John 31 

Franke, Louis 42 

Franklin, Dr. Benjamin 8 

Franklin Institute of Philadelphia 22 

Fringes, trimmings, etc 12, 24, 29, 30, 34, 40, 43, 48, 67 

Funke, Hugo 42 

Gay, Gamaliel : ; 17, 20 

Georgia, mulberry tree planting in 21 

Georgia, silk culture in 8 

II 



i62 INDEX. 

PAGE. 

Gilbert, John 13 

Gill, John W 31 

Givernaud, R. G 43 

Golding, Edmund 13, 20 

Graham, J. C 34 

Gurleyville, Connecticut, manufacture at 13, 34 

Gurney & Co 30 

Hamil & Booth 37, 41 

Handkerchiefs, manufacture of.... 41, 45, 68 

Hanks, George R 13, 36 

Hanks, Horatio 13 

Hanks, P. G. & J. S 13 

Hanks, Rodney.. 13 

Hanks, William ., 13 

Harmony Society ". 18,27 

Hartford, manufacture at 34, 37 

Haskell & Hayden 21, 34, 42 

Hat-trimming clause in the tariff. 59 

Hayden, J. H 21,42 

Haydenville, Massachusetts, manufacture at ,... 37 

Heminway, M.... % ; 34 

Hensel, H. W 37 

Heinemann, Hirsch 30, 37 

Heinemann & Silbermann 37 

Hewitt's tariff bill.. 59 

Highfield cocoonery 18 

Hill, S. L 19 

Hinckley, S. L '■ 19 

Holland, Harrison 13 

Holland, J. H. & Co 37, 42 

Holland Manufacturing Co 42 

Hooley, B 30 

Horstmann, Wm. H. & Sons 29 

Hovey, Enoch & Son 30 

Hovey, Storrs 14 

• 
Illinois, production of silk in. 38 

Imports of manufactured silk goods 44, 46, 60 

Imports of raw silk, 1830-40 „ 26, 27 



INDEX. 163 

PAGE. 

Imports of raw silk, 1844-50 35 

Imports of raw silk, 1851-60 '39 

Imports of raw silk, 1861-73 44 

Imports of raw silk, 1874-80.... 46 

Imports of raw silk, recent 60, 64 

Ipswich, Massachusetts, manufacture at 29 

Itschner, W. & Co 43 

Jacquard loom, the first .'. 29 

Jennings, A. G 42 

Jones, William H 30 

Kenrick, Wm 22 

Kentucky, production of silk in 38 

King, Moses R 29 

Kohn, Tobias 34 

Labor troubles ;....; 47, 66 

Laces, silk 66 

Lancaster Silk Co 18 

Law, Governor, garment of native silk 8 

Lilly, Alfred.. 14, 20 

Lilly, A. T 20 

Lombe, Sir Thomas, silk mill of. .' 11 

Lovett, James 30 

Machine Twist, first manufacture of. 38 

Maidhof, J 34 

Manayunk, Pennsylvania, manufacture at 25 

Mansfield, Connecticut, manufacture at... 10, 19, 20, 22, 25, 27, 28, 36, 42 

Mansfield, earliest silk mill 12 

Mansfield Silk Co 13, 14, 17, 20, 25 

Marr, John 43 

Massachusetts Silk Co. 17 

McRae, John 30, 37 

McRae, Thomas C. & Co 37 

Messinger, V. J 20 

Messinger & Brother... 20, 37, 42 

Meyenberg, S, M 42 

Mill, silk, earliest 13 

Mills, silk, new 68 

Mitchell, Aaron 20 



i64 INDEX. 

FAGS. 

Mitchell Silk Factory .....17, 20 

Mitts, silk lace ■ 67 

Monmouth County Silk Manufacturing Co 18 

Montogul's Factory, Boston 22, 25, 26 

Moravian Silk Co : *.. 18 

Morodendron Silk Co 18 

Morrison's tariff bill 59 

Morus multicaulis speculation 16 

Mount Nebo Silk Mills 17, 21 

Mount Pleasant, Ohio, manufacture at 31 

Mulberry Grove Silk Co 18 

Mulberry tree, blight of, in 1844 ; • 31 

Murray & Ryle 29 

Nantucket, Massachusetts, manufacture at 20 

Nashville Silk Manufacturing Co 18 

New England Silk Co 17, 19 

New Hampshire Silk Co 17 

New Haven, silk culture in and near 10 

New Jersey, mulberry tree planting in 21 

New Jersey, silk culture in 8 

New Jersey Silk Society •.... 22 

New Lisbon Silk Co 18 

New York City, manufacture at 30, 34, 37, 42 

New York City, silk convention at 28 

New York Silk Co 17 

New York and New England Silk Co : 17 

New York and Northampton Silk Co 19, 23 

Newark, New Jersey, manufacture at ..29, 30, 43 

Newburyport Silk Co... 17 

Newport Silk Manufacturing Co 38 

Newton, Massachusetts, mulberry tree planting at 22 

Noils, silk, importation of. » 6$ 

Nonotuck Silk Co 19, 36 

Nonotuck Steam Mill 19 

North Manchester, Connecticut, manufacture at 30 

Northampton Association of Education and Industry 19, 28 

Northampton Courier^ (The) 23 

Northampton, Massachusetts, dyeing silk at 34 



INDEX. 165 

PAGB. 

Northampton, Massachusetts, manufacture at 14, 28, 30 

Northampton Silk Manufacturing Co 17 

Northfield, Connecticut, raising silk at 10 

Norwich Silk Co 17 

Ohio, production of silk in. 38 

Ohio Silk Co 18 

Oneida Community.. 42 

Onedia, New York, manufacture at 42 

Parliament, act of, to prevent export of machinery 11 

Pascalis, Dr. Felix i 16 

Paterson, New Jersey, manufacture at 29, 30, 37, 41, 42, 43 

Pelgram & Meyer 43 

Pennsylvania, silk culture in.. 8 

Philadelphia, manufacture at 29, 30, 34, 37 

Phcenix Manufacturing Co 30, 41, 42 

Potomac Silk Co 18 

Poughkeepsie Silk Co 17 

Princeton, New Jersey, mulberry tree planting at 22 

Printed goods, silk, in 1887 68 

Production of native silk, 1830-40 27, 28 

Production of native silk, 1850 33 

Production of native silk, i860 38 

Production of silk goods, 1844-50 35 

Production of silk goods, i860 40 

Production of silk goods, 1872 44 

Production of silk goods, 1874-80 46 

Production of silk goods, 1886 47 

Providence, Rhode Island, manufacture at .20, 26 

Quincy, Massachusetts, manufacture at 30 

Raw silk, cost of, 1830-40 26 

Raw silk, greatest quantity by a steamer 63 

Raw silk, imports. (See Imports of raw silk.) 

Raw silk, imports of, classified by countries of export 76 

Raw silk, imports of in calendar years 74 

Raw silk, imports of in fiscal years 75 

Raw silk, proportions from different sources 63 

Raw and waste silk, etc., imports of in pounds avoirdupois yy 

Reading, Massachusetts, manufacture at 30 



i66 INDEX. 

PA6S. 

Rhode Island Silk Co ^ 17, 20 

Ribbons, manufacture of 30, 37, 41, 43, 45, 65 

Ripka, Joseph 25 

Rixford, Nathan ^ 14, 19, 21 

Rixford & Dimock 28 

Rockville, Connecticut, manufacture at « 42 

Roxbury, Massachusetts, manufacture at 30 

Roxbury Silk Co 17 

Royce, James 34 

Russell & Co 19 

Ryle, John... 29, 34, 37, 41 

Sauquoit Silk Manufacturing Co 42 

Seavey, Foster & Bowman 42 

Seavey, J. W. C 37 

Seavey, J. W. C. & Co 42 

Sewing-machine, connection of with silk industry 38 

Sewing silk importation, 1848-49 36 

Sewing silk manufacture, 1828-33 25 

Sewing silk manufacture in New England 11 

Sewing silk, production of, 1844-50 34, 35 

Sewing silk and twist manufacture, 1851-60 39, 48, 65 

Shaker Society i 18 

Silbermann, J. & Co. 30 

Silesia cloth, manufacture of. 25 

Silk Association of America '. 44 

Silk Association of America, I3th-i4th annual report 59 

Silk culture, the end of 31 

Silk culture and silk manufacture contrasted 31, 32 

Si/k Grower and Farmers' Manual, 21 

Silk Manufacturers* Bank 21 

Silk manufactures, duties in detail -, 82 

Silk manufactures, imports of at New York, in calendar years 78 

Silk manufactures, imports of at New York, in fiscal years 79 

Singer Manufacturing Co 43 

Skinner, George B 36 

Skinner, William 34, 37 

Smith, Gideon B 16, 22 

Societies for promotion of silk industry 22 



INDEX. 167 

PAGB. 

South Coventry, Connecticut, manufacture at 30 

South Manchester, Connecticut, manufacture at 21, 28, 34 

Specific duties on silk goods 59 

Statistics, explanation of. 72 

Stearns, J. N. & Co 42 

Stelle, L. R. & Sons ', , .41, 42 

Stelle& Walthall 37 

Storrs, Zalmon & Son 21, 22, 28 

Strange, Albert B.: 69 

Strange, William & Co , 42 

Strange & Brother 42 

Strikes 66 

Sugar, molasses, etc., duties in detail 81 

Swift, Dwight 30 

Tennessee, silk culture in 31 

Tilt, B. B 30 

Tilt, B. B. & Son 42 

Tilt & Dexter 37 

Towles & Tallerman 43 

Troy Silk Co 17 

United States Silk Agency 22 

United States Silk Society 22 

Valentine Silk Co... .17, 20 

Velvets, manufacture of in 1887 » 68 

Virginia, silk culture in ..1 8 

War, the effect of upon silk industry 41 

Warner, Holland & Co 34, 37 

Warner, Joseph ., 34 

Warner & Suydam 37 

Warren Silk Co , 18 

Waste silk, cocoons and noils, imports of. 77 

Waste silk, etc 63 

Watertown, Connecticut, manufacture at 34 

Weidmann, J 43 

Weidmann & Greppo 43 

West Newton, manufacture at 39 

West, The, silk culture and manufacture at 33 

Wethersfield Silk Society 22 



i68 INDEX. 

PAGE. 

Whitmarsh, Samuel 19 

WillimantiCy Connecticut, manufacture at 42 

Willingrton, Connecticut, manufacture at 21 

Windsor Locks, Connecticut, manufacture at 21, 34, 42 

Wolfsohn, Meyenberg & Co 42 

Wool and woolens, duties in detail ; 81 

Woven goods, manufacture of in 1886 48 

Yale College, president of, wearing native silk 8