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Full text of "Amherst Alpha Delta Phi. 1837-1887"

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HARVARD COLLEGE 
LIBRARY 




GIFT OF THE 

GRADUATE SCHOOL 
OF EDUCATION 



cww 



AMHERST 



ALPHA DELTA PHI 



I 83 7-1 88 7 



NEW YORK 
PRESS OF FLEMING, BREWSTER & ALLEY 

31-33 WEST 23D STREET 
1887 






v/ 



committee of arrangements for the semi- 
centennial celebration. 

John Elliott Sanford, '51. 
William Hayes Ward, '56. 
Francis Draper Lewis, '69. 
E. Winchester Donald, '69. 
Henry B. Richardson, '69. 
Talcott Williams, '73. 
Alfred Ely, '74. 
Joseph Converse Gray, '76. 
Frank Lusk Babbott, '78. 
Charles M. Pratt, *79. 
B. W. Hitchcock, *8i. 
And. Porter Alvord, '87. 
William Tyler Bliss, '87. 
Howard Ogden Wood, '87. 



editors of the memorial volume. 

Talcott Williams, '73. 
Henry C. Folger, Jr., '79. 



NARVAPtO COI • CGF LIBRARY 

UATL $C^0OL Of ^OUCATIW -^ 

^UL J 4 1926 



PUBLIC EXERCISES 
College Hall, Tuesday A.M., June 28, 1887, 

10.30 o'clock 

MUSIC 
PR A YER 

The Rev. Michael Burnham, D.D., '67. 

MUSIC 
INTRODUCTORY ADDRESS 

The Rt. Rev. Frederic Dan Huntington, 
D.D., LL.D., '39. 

COMMEMORATIVE ADDRESS 

The Rev. Richard Salter Storrs, 
D.D., LL.D., *39. 

MUSIC 



BANQUET 

Pratt Gymnasium, Tuesday P.M., June a8, 1887, 

9 o'clock 

Introductory Remarks by the Toastmaster. 

Hon. John E. Sanford, '51. 

The Relation of Greek Letter Societies 
TO College Discipline. 

President Julius H. Seel ye. 

A Half Century Ago. 

Rev. E. E. Bliss, D.D., '37. 

The Chivalry oy AA $. 

Hon. Algernon S. Sullivan, Miami, '45. 



A J $iv THE Pulpit. 

Rev. E. K. Alden, D.D., '44. 

A J $ m PouTics. 
Hon. George William Curtis, Brunonian, '54. 

Fifty Years of American Scholarship. 
Rev. William Hayes Ward, D.D., LL.D./56. 

The Fraternity ovA A ^, 

Hon. Joseph H. Choate, Harvard, '52. 

Greek Letters and Letters Literary. 

Prof. F. A. March, '45. 

Brotherhood Within and Without. 

Hon. H. S. Stockbridge, '45. 

Love the Sisterhood. 

President T. J. Backus, Rochester, '64. 

♦The Law and the Chapter. 

Hon. F. W. Rockwell, '68. 

♦Henry Ward Beecher and Roswell D. 
Hitchcock, Som of Amherst and of A A $, 

Rev. E. W. Donald, D.D., '69. 

♦The Chapter as it is. 

E. C. Huntington, *88. 

♦The Past and Future of the Chapter. 

Prof. H. H. Nbill, '66. 

♦Our Sister Chapters. 

F. L. Stetson, Williams, '67. 
£. M. Shepard, Manhattan, '69. 



* Owing to the lateness of the hour, these toasts were not 
called for. 



PUBLIC EXERCISES 



INTRODUCTORY ADDRESS. 

THE RT. REV. FREDERIC DAN HUNTINGTON, 

D.D., LL.D., '39. 



I 



The Amherst Chapter of the Alpha 
Delta Phi, celebrating with joy its semi- 
centennial, has inquired which one of 
its strong brotherhood ought to be its 
spokesman. Studying the catalogue of 
names, now nearly four hundred, repre- 
senting most of the departments of learn- 
ing and action in American society — many 
of them eminent, and all of them, we 
believe, honorable — agoing from the bot- 
tom to the top, and from the top to the 
bottom, has fixed with confidence upon 
the name of Richard Salter Storrs. No 
man and no woman who has heard his 
voice needs to be bidden to listen while 
he speaks. 

I count it a special personal privilege 
and pleasure to introduce the orator of \ 

the day, my classmate and my friend, the 
Pastor of the Church of the Pilgrims. 



THE BROADER RANGE AND 

OUTLOOK OF MODERN 

COLLEGE TRAINING. 

RICHARD S. STORRS, D.D., LL.D., '39. 

Mr. P resident y Brothers of Alpha Delta Phi^ 
Ladies and Gentlemen : 

An institution like this, whose annual 
commencement attracts and greets us, has 
its peculiar indwelling life, which ever 
freshly reveals itself through the constant 
impulse to expansion and growth. De- 
partments of study are added one by one 
to those which had preceded, while each 
of those before established seeks to afford 
wider instruction, with more exact training; 
new teachers are added, more fit and ade- 
quate apparatus of instruction is diligently 
sought and considerately supplied, and the 
whole scheme of study becomes more prac- 
tical and more generous, aiming to meet 
continually wider and finer needs, and to 



lO AMHERST CHAPTER 

furnish to prepared and inquisitive minds 
a completer supply of what they seek of 
training and of truth. This is the law of 
such institutions, only in fulfilling which 
do they show themselves worthy of honor 
or of maintenance ; in the absence of cor- 
dial obedience to which they become in- 
evitably, after a little, groups of sparsely 
occupied buildings covering acres which 
the plough might more usefully traverse. 
The vigor, abundance and fruitfulness of 
the life of any college are manifested and 
measured by the changes which progres- 
sively take place in the courses and meth- 
ods of its instruction, and in the physical 
structures and instruments through which 
it imparts this. Therefore it always needs 
liberal friends, and an ampler endowment ; 
and the time never comes when it can 
say that its desires arc answered, its equip- 
ment is complete. 

It is not, therefore, an occasion of sur- 
prise when we return here to find that en- 
largements and alterations, manifold and 
conspicuous, have taken place in our ab- 
sence ; and if we look back, as some of us 
to-day do, over a term of fifty years since 
the infant chapter of our fraternity found 



ALPHA DELTA PHI. II 

here its incipient life and early cradle, we 
expect to discover, upon recalling that 
long-ago, that the changes accomplished 
and still gping on have made almost an- 
other college of that with which we were 
familiar. The same skies are above us, 
effulgent in the dawn with sunrise lights 
which we used to see or shiveringly to watch 
for at six in the morning, resplendent at 
sunset with a glory which none of us has 
seen surpassed, amid whatever ethereal 
charm or purple glow of Italy itself. The 
same landscape is before us, rimmed with 
hills, but stretching far outward toward 
the west, now rich with verdure, blazing 
in autumn in the vast vestment of many 
colors, while always lovely in its modulated 
lines, with the reflected flash of waters 
touching it at points with sparkling shim- 
mer. Some of the same buildings are here, 
tarrying, perhaps, beyond what those who 
have to use them conceive the fitness of 
things to require, but connecting the col- 
lege as now presented, through somewhat 
rude and rusty links, with the college as it 
was, while making us all glad to know that 
the law of progress, elsewhere so effective, 
has undergone no final suspense before 



12 AMHERST CHAPTER 

their ancient and homely walls ; and the 
same village, though far more beautiful, is 
around us now that was here when as boys 
we trod these streets, were lodged, per- 
haps, in some of these houses, strolled over 
these fields, or took, it may be, our private 
spin — very private ! — behind whatever 
horses could be hired, on the neighboring 
roads. 

These remain ; but in almost everything 
which directly pertains to the college, the 
scene is one of transformation. One pro- 
fessor continues here — long may he con- 
tinue ! — under whom some of us ploughed 
our way through parts of Livy, or grappled 
the condensed martial sentences, with the 
tone of tragic battle in them, of the great 
master Tacitus, or caught some swift and 
inspiriting glimpse of Attic philosophy, 
eloquence, poetry, story. All the others 
have passed from the scenes in which they 
were to us at the time illustrious persons, 
and their places are filled by others. Dif- 
ferent buildings, another chapel, a new 
library, a new observatory, a new and 
splendid gymnasium are before us ; and the 
physical apparatus of instruction is widely 
diverse from that with which those of us 



ALPHA DELTA PHI, 13 

who have passed our threescore years, and 
are rapidly completing the supplementary 
ten, were formerly familiar. The change 
has not been startlingly rapid in its par- 
ticulars, but it has been persistent, continu- 
ous, general, and we may hope that it has 
been prophetic ; that other changes are to 
follow, as needful as these, and yet more 
wide. It is a fact always impressive, and 
one which lifts our thoughts forward with 
spontaneous impulse on an occasion like 
this, that such an institution counts scores 
of years as in personal life we count the 
months ; that classes coming and classes 
going are but recurring incidents in its 
history, and that to its incorporeal life the 
century is not long. 

The most significant change of all 
which we observe has been in the broader 
scope and the fresh elasticity given to the 
courses of study pursued here, with the 
more various and large opportunity sys- 
tematically offered for a more comprehen- 
sive and elaborate training than in our 
time was proposed or was possible. The 
college remains a college for training, not 
aspiring to become a university, which in 
its intent represents a universal cyclopaedia 



14 AMHERST CHAPTER 

of knowledge, housed in libraries, but sup- 
posed to be also vitally incorporate, and 
the more accessible because peripatetic, in 
a multitude of teachers. Such an institu- 
tion has, beyond question, important ad- 
vantages ; but this is not such an one. Its 
purpose is, as it was at the beginning, to 
discipline men in the use of their powers, 
while opening to them inviting opportuni- 
ties for profitable study, in large part now 
along lines of inquiry which they select. 
But the variety of these lines of study is 
far more abundant and attractive than it 
was, and the developing life of the college 
has been shown in this direction almost 
more distinctly than in any other. 

When some of us were here as students, 
a half century ago, the courses of training 
were all arranged with reference to the 
professional studies, in law or medicine, 
or especially in theology, which it was 
implicitly assumed were to follow. Even 
as so planned and maintained they were 
meagre, restricted, sharply mandatory. 
We had, of course, Latin and Greek, gram- 
matically taught, till some of us wished 
that republican Rome had never existed, 
and that the Persians had conquered 



ALPHA DELTA PHI, 1 5 

Greece. We had mathematics, which to 
many were a weariness to spirit and mind, 
as well as to the flesh. We had more or 
less of natural science, as then understood ; 
something of philosophy, with dear Dr. 
Brown's mellifluous lectures on the human 
mind for our principal text-book ; some- 
thing, no doubt, of instruction in ethics, 
though I cannot remember what author 
was expected to serve as our enlighten- 
ing guide and friend. We had moderate 
courses in rhetoric and logic, and a very 
slight smattering of French. Besides 
these, I do not remember anything of im- 
portance in the field of survey opened to 
us. We had no German, Italian or Span- 
ish ; no history ; very little, if anything, of 
political economy ; no instruction in art.; no 
leadership into the life of the Old World 
and the secrets of its renown, and no elec- 
tive studies whatever. The grooves were 
definite and constrictive, and we were to 
move along them as we might, looking out 
at the end, as I have suggested, on one or 
other of the three professions toward which 
the college was to open the way. 

From that to this the change is apparent, 
of large reach, and of radical importance. 



ALPHA DELTA PHI, 1 7 

place for preserving, in security, no doubt, 
but in utter secrecy, any book which had 
drifted into it from a clergyman's shelves, 
now contains nearly fifty thousand vol- 
umes, most of them freshly selected, in all 
departments of study, and is still steadily 
increasing. Meantime, the new and superb 
gymnasium gives opportunity and constant 

• 

incentive to a graceful and finished physi- 
cal culture ; and history appears, the true 
preserver and mistress of knowledges, estab- 
lished in a principal place among elective 
studies from the beginning of the junior 
year onward. 

No one, I am sure, will question the wis- 
dom of changes like these, or will fail to be 
gfrateful for the successive gifts and endow- 
ments which have rendered them possible, 
as no one, either, can fail to see to what a 
vastly widened outlook for the effect of 
colleg^e-training such changes and expan- 
sions point. Where it was the rigorous 
aim to train men for one of the three pro- 
fessions then called " learned," the object 
now evidently is to give the more liberal, 
many-sided instruction, which shall fit men 
for useful, happy and illuminated lives, in 
any department of future activity, profes- 



1 8 AMHERST CHAPTER 

sional, educational, editorial, artistic, or 
commercial, social and domestic. To ac- 
custom men to right methods of study, 
and to form in them the habit of pursuing 
such methods, thus starting them fairly on 
their courses of independent inquiry, while 
giving them just and liberal views of the 
changing thought and life of the world, 
that they may be more cultivated persons 
wherever afterward they may live, and 
whatever work they may accept — this is 
now the purpose of the college. It is a 
wise and beautiful purpose, which must 
command the approval of all. In a con- 
stantly increasing multitude of persons, 
throughout widening circles, life will be 
silently but generously enriched by the 
studies here pursued. In all walks of life, 
and not only in the professions, those will 
appear who feel themselves owing a debt of 
gratitude to the text-books and the teachers 
from whom they received early guidance 
with an energetic and continuing impulse. 
Let me illustrate this somewhat more 
distinctly, by noticing the peculiar and per- 
manent benefits of that study of history 
which, as I said, was here formerly wholly 
ignored, but which now has a place so 



ALPHA DELTA PHI. 1 9 

prominent and constant sympathetically as- 
signed to it. This special instance will, 
perhaps, present as clearly as any, both the 
extent and the benefit of the change which 
has here taken place. 

Of course the recorded annals of man- 
kind cannot be exhibited, can hardly be 
sketched in more than vague outline, by 
the most accomplished and diligent teacher, 
in the term of two years. But the great 
periods in history can be distinguished ; 
the places of some eminent persons in its 
inter-connected though complex develop- 
ment can be fairly indicated, and the 
general trend of the forces which it shows, 
in particular ages or in the whole far- 
spreading progress, can be clearly set forth. 
What is better still, those who enter on the 
study can have their taste for it cherished, 
can learn the rewarding methods of in- 
quiry, can be assisted to a fairly critical 
judgment of authors, and be distinctly set 
' upon the path toward wider, finer and 
more exact knowledge to be subsequently 
gained ; and these are effects important 
in themselves, while alive with promise, 
which will make any two years of study 
of memorable value. 



20 AMHERST CHAPTER 

The mind is always expanded and liber- 
alized by what puts distant lands and times, 
with the exacting and disciplinary experi- 
ences of one*s own ancestors or of other 
peoples, distinctly before it. To a certain 
extent foreign travel does this, as it sets the 
immeasurably wider expanses, filled with 
energetic and laborious life, in contrast 
with the narrower scenes with which one 
before had been familiar ; and he who has 
stood with any thoughtfulness amid the 
crowded immensities of London — an em- 
pire in itself, who has looked through 
curious whirls of reminiscence upon the 
ancient streets of Paris or its stately boule- 
vards, or who has followed the Unter den 
Linden from the Schloss to the Branden- 
burg Gate, before whom Munich, Vienna, 
Venice, Florence, Naples, Milan, Madrid, 
have opened their treasures, to whom Rome 
has appeared, across the Campagna, a city 
ascending out of the past, but with the 
dome of later date roofing the throne of its 
existing empire of souls — such a man can 
never again be in mind, in range of thought, 
in intellectual sympathy, what he was be- 
fore the broadening experience. It is thus 
that the easier modern modes of foreign 



ALPHA DELTA PHI. 21 

travel become educational, and that those 
are multiplying in all our communities who 
have been essentially widened in view, by 
their acquaintance with other lands, for the 
contemplation of proximate questions. The 
parish period has almost disappeared from 
even our popular mental development. 

But history, when carefully studied — 
studied as it should be, with maps, topogra- 
phic plans, careful itineraries, photographs 
of monuments or of sites — does the same 
thing for the home-keeping student, and 
does it in some important respects in a yet 
freer and bolder fashion. Egypt, Greece, 
Assyria, Persia, the scanty and rugged 
strip of Palestine from which influences 
have come to regenerate the world, India, 
China, the vast outstretch of Russia, from 
lands of the olive and the fig, the pome- 
granate and the palm, to the lands of the 
frozen mammoth and the midnight sun — 
we may not traverse these in our journey- 
ing, unless we give our life to the business, 
but they come before us in the intelligent 
study of history, in panoramic breadth, 
with photographic distinctness. The cen- 
turies of the past present themselves in 
perspective. We see the vast cosmical 



22 AMHERST CHAPTER 

movements from which states have been 
born, in which subsequent civilizations 
took rise, and in which the devout mind 
discovers silent procedures of Providence. 
We learn how far removed from us were 
initial influences that are now flowering 
into results, and how our life is affected at 
this hour by political combinations and 
military collisions which preceded by ages 
the invasion of England by the Normans 
or the splendid schemes of Charlemagne. 

It is quite impossible that one who reads 
with comprehensive attention, till this im- 
mense and vital picture is in a measure 
opened before him, should not be con- 
sciously broadened in thought, expanded 
even in mental power ; that he should not 
freshly and deeply feel how limited is his 
individual sphere ; how local, although mul- 
tiplied by endowments from the past, are 
his personal opportunities ; what a vast 
scheme it is which is being evolved through 
stir of discussion, rush of emigration, com- 
petitions of industries, crash of conflict, by 
the power which gives its unity to history, 
and which is perpetually educing great 
harmonies out of whatever seeming dis- 
cords. An influence of the same kind 



ALPHA DELTA PHL 2$ 

descends upon one in the review of geologic 
periods, or in the contemplation of that 
stupendous celestial architecture which 
shows the infinitesimal minuteness of the 
spinning globe on which we live. But the 
influence of the study of historical life, 
crowning the planet with the mystery and 
majesty of personal forces in long career, 
makes always a keener appeal to our con- 
sciousness, while it inevitably associates 
itself, by natural impulse, with those sub- 
lime scientific speculations which trace 
the fire-mist as it rounds into a world, and 
which show the universe, in the immeas- 
urable co-ordination of its physical forms 
under the rule of harmonious laws, a house 
of beauty for beautiful souls. 

Not merely a general expansion of 
thought, and, one may say, of the compass 
of the mind, comes with this larger study of 
history. It trains directly, with vigorous 
force, in fine proportion, each chief intel- 
lectual faculty. In this respect it is often 
misconceived by those who regard it as a 
pleasant exercise, to be pursued at one's 
leisure, but not to be reckoned on as im- 
parting to the mind elastic vigor, any fresh 
robustness and alertness of power, or any 



24 AMHERST CHAPTER 

refined capacity of perceptive insight Of 
course the memory will be trained, perhaps 
all will admit, by the effort to hold distant 
periods and persons distinctly in view ; to 
keep epochs, and the movements which 
marked them, from becoming confused and 
entangled in thought ; and to recall, with- 
out reference to books, the points at which 
tendencies affecting subsequent centuries 
slowly or suddenly became apparent, or at 
which important tributary influences came 
in to reinforce them. But beyond the 
memory, it often is doubted if history offers 
any energetic or symmetrical discipline to 
the mind which pursues it. On the other 
hand, it seems too evident to be questioned 
that the vigilant, anal)rtic, and reconciling 
judgment, by which we separate things 
that differ, and harmonize and associate 
things that agree, however unlike in out- 
ward show ; by which we extricate the 
governing forces beneath phenomena, and 
set in their historic synthesis the individual 
designs and the public aspirations which 
co-operate in movements of general impor- 
tance — ^that this noble power is essentially 
trained, as it is certainly constantly exer- 
cised, in any true study of history. I 



ALPHA DELTA PHI. 25 

think that many present will agree that for 
themselves no other form of mental prac- 
tice has had closer relation to such an in- 
timate and enduring effect ; and I am 
quite satisfied that in either of the pro- 
fessions, in journalism, in educational work, 
or in the simply private life of an edu- 
cated citizen, this effect will appear ; that 
one accustomed to wide and searching his- 
torical inquiries will be more expert in 
judging of urgent practical questions pre- 
sented to-day, and will have a more dis- 
cerning apprehension of the forces work- 
ing to modify legislation and to mould 
society — forces which are often more for- 
midable, or more replete with victorious 
energy, because subtle and occult. 

It seems to me plain, too, that the intui- 
tive moral reason to which the most con- 
spicuous action must give its account, and 
by which its character is interpreted and 
ad judged, which puts a candid estimate upon 
motives, and sets whatever historic achieve- 
ment presents itself for review in fair con- 
nection with special environments of time 
or of place, must here find as fruitful 
activity, as systematic and quickening a 
nurture, as in any department of human 



26 AMHERST CHAPTER 

research ; and that the historical imagina- 
tion — which of course does not rank with 
the creative imagination of the poet, but 
which is surely akin to that, and perhaps 
not less capable of giving incitement and 
beautiful pleasure in common experience — 
that this has such impulse and sustenance 
in the study of the past as cannot be fur- 
nished an)rwhere else. So it is that many 
of the aspiring and superior minds which 
have wrought in letters have taken this 
study for their own, and have by their suc- 
cesses in it made the world of readers their 
grateful debtors. The " personal equation " 
has continually appeared among them, in 
their judgment of motives, of movements, 
and of men ; but in order to form any judg- 
ment at all, which the discerning would 
respect, they have had to cultivate moral 
insight, as well as a discursive and com- 
manding intelligence. Records of the cen- 
turies, buried in the crypts of archives and 
libraries, have had to yield up to the sur- 
vey of their genius living forms ; vanished 
times have had to be reconstructed by their 
thought, in their outward phenomena, and 
their constitutive moral and social forces ; 
the manifold sensibilities, desires, passions, 



ALPHA DELTA PHI, 27 

which belong to our nature, have had to be 
recognized, and their operation in public 
affairs to be patiently exhibited, while the 
impressions of peoples on each other have 
filled to the edge the crowded canvas. 

No teachers, therefore, have done more 
than these to educate broadly the ethical 
and the mental faculty in those whom they 
addressed, and before whom they unrolled 
the immense panorama of action, passion, 
collision, catastrophe, in the story of nations, 
with the energies exerted at critical points 
by particular persons, the deeper and more 
controlling power belonging to tendencies. 
It is strictly true, what Macaulay said : " He 
[who reads history] learns to distinguish 
what is local from what is universal ; what 
is transitory from what is eternal ; to dis- 
criminate between exceptions and rules ; 
to trace the operation of disturbing causes; 
to separate the general principles, which 
are always true and everywhere applicable, 
from the accidental circumstances with 
which in every community they are blended, 
and with which, in an isolated community, 
they are confounded by the most philoso- 
phical mind. Hence it is that in general- 
ization the writers of modern times have 



28 AMHERST CHAPTER 

far surpassed those of antiquity. The 
historians of our own country," he adds, 
"are unequaled in depth and precision of 
reason ; and even in the works of our mere 
compilers we often meet with speculations 
beyond the reach of Thucydides or Tacitus." 
This is the testimony of one who delighted 
to tear the vigor and flower of his life from 
the Bar and the Senate, from official dis- 
tinction and the rarest social opportuni- 
ties, that he might survey with ampler 
scope, while investigating with microscopic 
minuteness, the records of the past ; read- 
ing a week to fashion a sentence ; finding 
reward for laborious journeys in the more 
precise outline of a character, or the more 
exact picture of a scene, in even the more 
lively turn of a phrase or the more lucid 
completeness of a paragraph. If one 
needs to see, in near example, the fitness of 
historical studies to quicken and maintain 
high mental enthusiasm, and to discipline 
and enrich as well as to enlist rare and 
various mental powers, he may certainly 
find the immediate demonstration in the 
instance of Lord Macaulay. 

A college like this, too, and an audience 
like the present, can never fail gratefully 



ALPHA DELTA PHL 29 

to recognize the large and beautiful moral 
impulse delivered upon spirits prepared to 
receive it through their contact in history 
with great, serene and masterful person- 
alities, as these present themselves in the 
crowded passages which study explores, 
daring or suffering in the conflicts of their 
time. In common life we can, at best, but 
rarely meet such. The saintly and superior 
souls are not mustered in regiments. Mul- 
titudinous companies of elect spirits do not 
yet surround us on earth. It seems, some- 
times, as if the enormous secular advances 
of which our times are so full and so proud 
were lowering the height and dimming 
the lustre of the moral ideal, as represented 
in the actual of life. Sending messages by 
lightning, traveling at forty miles to the 
hour, crossing in a week the ocean which 
the Mayflower perilously breasted, in our 
sumptuous vessels, framed of iron, luxurious 
in appointment, propelled from within, and 
gay with color as so many swimming sum- 
mer-gardens — these applauded achieve- 
ments do not tend of necessity to the up- 
building of nobler courage, to the develop- 
ment of a luminous moral wisdom, to the 
culture of even philosophical refinement, 



30 AMHERST CHAPTER 

or the nurture of the temper of devout 
aspiration. On the other hand, do we not 
sometimes feel that virtue among us is 
coming to be too much a matter of manners; 
that the intense subjective processes from 
which august character is derived are in a 
measure being superseded by the mechan- 
ical contrivances and the physical successes 
with which our noisy years resound ; and 
that the grand and lovely spirits, which are 
present still, and in which, whensoever we 
touch them, we find strange charm and in- 
spiration, are fewer and lonelier than they 
were ? Surely we do not meet them often, 
and cannot command their presence at our 
need. 

But in history they abound, and are 
always at our service. Marcus Aurelius, 
saddest of men, yet imperturbable in a 
falling empire, and amid the mad whirl of 
an unexplained universe ; Bernard, with 
the flaming intensity of his spirit, com- 
mander of kings and counselor of pontiffs 
while the friend and protector of the low- 
liest of the poor, crushing before him the 
insolent noble, and facing the fierce fury of 
the mob on behalf of the Jew ; Melanch- 
thon, with his beautiful enthusiasm for 



ALPHA DELTA PHI, 3 1 

letters, writing Greek more easily than 
German, modest, peace-loving, yet firm in 
conviction, devoted to the Master in almost 
passionate love, the very St. John of the 
stormy Reformation ; William of Orange, 
fronting with majestic endurance the ap- 
parently irresistible power which swept the 
Netherlands with flame and blade, and re- 
covering for freedom the land which his 
ancestors might literally be said to have 
plucked from the sea — these will come to 
us when we want them; and with them 
all, orators, statesmen, theologians, artists 
leaders of crusades like Godfrey of Bouillon, 
who would not wear a crown where his 
Master had borne the cross, rulers of king- 
doms like St. Louis, poets, philanthropists, 
heroes, martyrs, the women with the men, 
of whom the world of their time was not 
worthy, by whom the world is made 
worthier to-day. We may wait years, or 
we may journey thousands of miles, to 
meet in the present the special spirit whose 
office it is, and whose charming preroga- 
tive, to kindle and ennoble ours. It is 
but to step to the library shelf to come 
face to face with such in the past, if 
we know where to find them ; nay, it is 



32 AMHERST CHAPTER 

but to let the thought go backward, over 
what has become distinct to our minds, and 
the silent company is around us ; the com- 
munion of rejoicing and consecrated souls, 
the illustrious fellowship, in the presence 
of whom our meanness is rebuked, our 
cowardice is shamed, and we become the 
freer children of God and of the Truth. 

Not only the romance of the world is in 
history, but influences so high in source 
and in force as to be even sacred descend 
through it. Benedictive, sacramental, is 
its touch upon responsive souls. We become 
comparatively careless of circumstances ; 
aware of kinship, in whatever heroic ele- 
ment may be in us, with the choice, tran- 
scendent spirits ; regardless of the criti- 
cism, or the snarling scoffs, which here may 
surround us, if only conscious of a deeper 
and more complete correspondence with 
those whose elate and unsubduable tem- 
per remains among the treasures of man- 
kind. I think that to our times, especially, 
the careful and large study of history is 
among the most essential sources of moral 
inspiration. The cultivation of it, in ever 
larger and richer measure, is one of the 
finest and noblest exercises proposed to 



ALPHA DELTA PHI, 33 

young minds. Any college which introduces 
to the society of the spirits which have 
made centuries illustrious, takes splendor 
and majesty from the office. 

The importance of individual life and 
effort is also magnified by it, instead of 
being diminished or disguised, as men 
sometimes fancy ; since one is continually 
reminded afresh of the power which belongs 
to those spiritual forces which all may 
assist in animating and moulding civiliza- 
tions. Of course an imperfect study of 
history, however rapid and rudimental, 
shows how often the individual decision 
and the restraining or inspiring action of 
great personalities have furnished the pivots 
on which multitudinous consequences have 
turned ; how, even after long intervals of 
time, the effects of such have made them- 
selves evident, in changed conditions and 
tendencies of peoples ; and so it reminds 
us, with incessant iteration, of the vital in- 
terlocking of every energetic personal life 
with the series of lives which are uncon- 
sciously dependent upon it, of the reach 
of its influence upon the great complex 
of historical progress, and of the service 
which each capable or eminent spirit may 



34 AMHERST CHAPTER 

render to the cause of universal culture 
and peace. But those to whom our thoughts 
are thus turned have been for the most 
part signal men in their time, remarkable 
in power, distinguished in opportunity, in- 
tuitively discerning the needs of the age, 
and with peculiar competence to meet 
them. With such we by no means may mate 
ourselves; and, so far, the lesson which 
history teaches may easily seem to be one 
of discouragement rather than of impulse, 
inclining us to rely upon occasional great 
men as the true pioneers and champions of 
progress, and to feel that for ourselves we 
have no place and no responsibility in the 
assistance of large and permanent public 
advancement. 

But a deeper inquiry shows us at once 
that such a place and such an obligation 
belong to each, since each may aid, in the 
measure of his influence, to establish or 
renew those spiritual forces which erect 
and sustain the great and beautiful civiliza- 
tions. It was, we know, the Hellenic spirit, 
which not only wreaked itself on immortal 
expression in the choicest marbles and 
temples of the world, in the eloquence, the 
tragedy, the comedy, and the song, the 



ALPHA DELTA PHI. 35 

high Speculation, and the simple or the 
stately story, which have for mankind a per- 
ennial charm, but which also faced and 
fought the Persian, and made the names of 
Marathon and Salamis shine resplendent in 
the crowded firmament of the world's recol- 
lections ; only in the decadence of which did 
Greece yield to the mastery of Macedon. 
It was the Anglo-Saxon temper which the 
Norman could not extinguish at Hastings 
or trample into the bloody ground, which 
outlived its invaders, conquered its con- 
querors, and in the end forced them to 
accept, while modifying in turn, its lan- 
guage, its laws, its popular liberties, and, 
in great measure, the free spirit of its 
religion. And it was not, fundamentally, 
by William or by Maurice — conspicuous as 
they are on the copious and picturesque 
pages of Motley — ^but it was by the spirit, 
indestructibly regnant among common 
people, that the otherwise defenseless 
Batavian plains were saved from the furious 
ravage of Spain. The men and women 
who were ready to suffer the loss of all for 
a King in the heavens — ^the ministers, by no 
means accomplished always in the learning 
of the schools, but who read and expounded 



36 AMHERST CHAPTER 

the Holy Word in upper rooms, by the light 
of the flames in which their brethren in 
faith and in service were being offered as 
a sacrifice in the resounding squares below 
— ^the common sailors who would blow up 
their ships and find graves in the deep, 
rather than see the vessels which they 
manned the prey of their enemies — the 
promiscuous populations, young and old, 
nobles and burghers, who would tear away 
dykes and drown the land, before they 
would accept for themselves and their 
children the domination of Philip — ^these 
were they who saved their country, giving 
to their leaders an indomitable power, 
snatching success from the cruel and 
haughty hands of what appeared an invin- 
cible invasion ; and to them, supremely, 
the world owes the immense augmentation 
made by that struggle of eighty years to the 
freedom, prosperity and culture of Europe. 
So, after Jena, Prussia was regenerated, 
under the lead of Von Hardenberg and 
Von Stein, by the system of common 
school education ; and they, more radi- 
cally than Bismarck and Von Moltke, 
have contributed to make that recent king- 
dom the centre of the German Empire, 



ALPHA DELTA PHI. 37 

the arbitrating power in the interna- 
tional politics of Europe. It was true, as 
the military attach^ wrote to his master, 
the lesser Napoleon, that the schoolmaster, 
not the needle-gun, triumphed at Sadowa. 
So Scotland, also, with a comparatively 
sparse population, on a sterile soil, and 
under unpropitious skies, has become the 
seemingly inexhaustible source of great 
teachings in all departments, industrial, 
philosophical, theological, poetic. Out of 
the instructed and invigorated life of the 
Scottish people have come not only the 
looms of Paisley, and the vast industries 
on the Clyde, but Scott and Jeffrey, 
Erskine and Hume, Chalmers, Guthrie 
and Hugh Miller, Burns and Carlyle. 

Even in the physical world invisible and 
impalpable forces are those which govern : 
the light, which strikes without indenting the 
infant's eye, which no balances can weigh, 
and whose secret remains undiscovered by 
man ; the lightning, which subtly paces 
the wires, and sheds illumination on streets 
and squares, but which shows its effect, 
never itself, in the blazing edges of cloven 
clouds ; the cohesive attractions which build 
and bind all organized bodies, but which 



38 AMHERST CHAPTER 

the microscope cannot discern ; the life, 
which no man can analyze or can see 
except in operation ; the inclusive and 
vast energy of gravitation, which holds at 
once each pebble on the beach, each flying 
foam-fleck driven by winds, while it reaches 
the farthest nebulae in its grasp, the very 
muscle of omnipotence compacting the 
universe in its integrity. Tremendous, im- 
measurable, as this power is, before its oper- 
ation no slightest rustle is stirred amid the 
quiet air. So everywhere, structures decay 
and forms disappear, the things unseen are 
the things eternal. It is the same law 
which manifests itself in national develop- 
ment. Moral forces are always behind 
the palpable phenomena. The historical 
progress that moves our admiration has 
been initiated, and been afterward assured 
and guided, by spiritual energies. We have 
never reached the secrets of history till we 
apprehend these. And every man and 
every woman has his or her work in the 
world plainly set forth under the light of 
this great lesson. It is for each, in the 
measure of the power and opportunity of 
each, to cherish and diffuse the temper 
out of which in their time the great and 



ALPHA DELTA PHI, 39 

benign changes shall come. Neither the 
eloquent and stimulating speech which 
went before our civil war, nor the military 
judgment, fortitude, valor, which presided 
on its historical fields, would have carried 
to success the vast revolution which we 
have seen, and for which the country to- 
day rejoices from the Lakes to the Gulf, 
except for the patient love of freedom and 
hatred of slavery which had been nurtured 
in quiet homes, by peaceful firesides, in the 
preceding years. In dispersed villages the 
real battle was fought, not at Gettysburgh 
or at Shiloh. The splendid burst of our 
century-plant into a bloom as rich and as 
brilliant as the continent ever can show, 
went back to hidden and homely roots. 
And until that great experience is forgot- 
ten, the lesson which all the study of his- 
tory imperatively teaches cannot lose its 
emphasis for us : that every one in a civil- 
ized and advancing community has the 
opportunity to do something for the future 
as well as for the present, and that on each 
is set the crown of this noble right, and 
this imperious obligation. 

I have no function as preacher here, but 
I may be permitted to add that history is 



40 AMHERST CHAPTER 

a department of study leaving, in my judg- 
ment, as distinct and salutary religious im- 
pressions as does any form of secular 
knowledge opened to man. Ours is a his- 
torical religion ; coming to us through 
historical books, exhibiting its energy 
through two thousand years, in the re- 
corded advancement of mankind ; which 
may be studied almost as distinctly in the 
moral and social progress of peoples under 
its inspiration as in the writings, of nar- 
rative and epistle, which represent the 
source and the government of that progress. 
Certainly a force incalculable by man was 
exerted by this religion in the conversion of 
the Roman Empire from the fierce passions 
and vices of Paganism to even the partial 
and qualified acceptance of the pure and 
austere Christian rule. Make all the al- 
lowance which the skeptic can ask for the 
political and military ambitions which con- 
sented to or conspired with the spiritual 
changes introduced by Christianity, and it 
still remains an astonishing fact, wholly 
inexplicable by human analysis, that a re- 
cent, unattractive and foreign religion, 
hated and fought with the utmost fury 
by those whose only moral alliance was 



./ 



ALPHA DELTA PHI. 41 

through their common antagonism to it, 
should in less than three centuries have 
changed the gardens of Nero into resorts 
for Christian worship ; should have scat- 
tered its assemblies and their institutions 
over the whole civilized world, and have 
blazoned the cross on the standards of the 
Empire. It must have had a Divine energy 
with it and in it to accomplish an effect so 
strange and stupendous. On any other 
hypothesis the chances were millions on 
millions to one, as even thoughtful unbe- 
lievers admit, against its success — against, 
indeed, its continued existence. The as- 
tonishing changes wrought by it are to this 
day almost incredible to those who know 
what Rome had been under Tiberius, and 
what it had come to be in the time of The- 
odosius. A power invisible but also invin- 
cible, behind the movement, is as evident 
as are the subterranean fires in the shining 
outbreak of volcanoes, or as are the vast 
subterranean forces beneath the shatter- 
ing tremble of earthquakes. 

Almost equally afterward, in the con- 
quest of barbarian tribes, in the fusion, the 
restraint and the moral education of the 
savage, nomadic and relentless populations 



42 AMHERST CHAPTER 

from which have gradually come into being 
the Christian states of modern Europe — 
in the immense constructive energies which 
silently wrought, but wrought with amazing 
breadth and effect, amid the mediaeval 
chaos — in the astonishing reformation of 
religion, opening the Bible to the study 
of mankind, and using pulpit and printing 
press for its conquering instruments against 
majestic establishments of hierarchical 
power — in the work already in part accom- 
plished upon this continent, and which is 
swiftly going on in Europe and the East, 
in India, Africa, the islands of the Pacific 
— the same celestial, unsubduable energy 
everywhere confronts us, inhering organi- 
cally in our religion, while also inseparably 
associated with it in cosmical operation. 
No miracle of the Master's time, however 
fully accredited, shows more distinctly the 
might of God under the human muscle 
which it clothed, than do these vast devel- 
opments in history His intervening thought 
and will. One sees sometimes in a studio 
or a gallery a veiled statue, every charac- 
teristic line of form and face visible be- 
neath what seems a thin film of lace-work, 
which itself, however, is wrought in the 



Jl-V- 



ALPHA DELTA PHI. 43 

marble. So the very earth on which we 
stand is coming to show the face of the 
Christ, wrought into it from above, and 
revealed through the reticulated hardness 
of its slowly yielding civilization. And the 
mind of Him from whom sprang the gen- 
ius of the sculptor is supremely declared 
in this effect. 

There is something more, therefore, in 
the history of Christendom than philoso- 
phy teaching by example. It infolds and 
expresses the Christian Religion, working 
itself into partial, difficult, but progressive 
exhibition, through intractable materials, 
against stubborn opposition, with a power 
unyielding and undecaying because it is of 
God. To one who listens with reverent 
heart, the voice of the Master still sounds 
amid the uproar of passionate tempests, 
and still commands the final calm. The 
entire history is, in fact, a kind of second- 
ary rubricated Scripture, immense in ex- 
tent, covering the continents, written in 
colossal Roman and Gothic characters, the 
initial letters stamped sometimes in gold 
and sometimes in blood, but the vast, con- 
fused and tangled text holding in it still 
the song of angels, the benedictions on the 



44 AMHERST CHAPTER 

Mount, the story of Bethlehem, Capernaum 
and the cross, the illustrious Ascension, and 
the terrible triumph of the Apocalypse. 

A divine purpose in all history becomes 
gradually apparent to him who with discern- 
ing thought surveys its annals. The Bible 
proceeds upon the assumption of such a 
plan, though perhaps no one of its separ- 
ated writers had a full conception of that 
which he was in part portraying. Back 
beyond the beginnings of history, onward 
to the secure consummation, lovely and 
immortal, which prophecies prefigure, ex- 
tends this plan. Parts of it are yet in- 
scrutable to us, as parts of the heavens are 
still unsounded by any instruments. But 
the conviction becomes constantly clearer, 
among those to whom the records of the 
past unfold in a measure not contents only 
but glowing portents, that a divine mind 
has presided over all ; that every remotest 
people or tribe has had its part to do or to 
bear in the general progress ; and that at 
last, when all is interpreted, the unity of the 
race, with the incessant interaction of its 
parts under the control and in the concord 
of a divine scheme, will come distinctly 
into view. Mysterious movements, as of 



ALPHA DELTA PHI. 45 

the peoples who from woods and untamed 
wastes inundated Europe, and before whose 
irresistible momentum bastions and ram- 
parts, the armies and ensigns of the mistress 
of the world went hopelessly down, will be 
seen to have had their impulse and direc- 
tion as well as their end. Great passive 
empires, as of China, will be found to have 
served some primordial purpose ; and the 
Mind which sees the end from the be- 
ginning will be evidenced in the ultimate 
human development as truly as it is in the 
swing of suns or in the constitution of un- 
measured constellations. 

The British Empire a week ago was 
ringing and flaming with the august and 
brilliant ceremonies which marked the 
completion of fifty years in the reign of 
one whose name is with us, almost as gen- 
erally as in her own realms, a household 
word. American hearts joined those of 
their kinsmen across the sea, around the 
world, in giving God thanks for the purity 
and the piety with which the young maiden 
of fifty years since has borne herself amid 
gladness and grief, overshadowing change 
and vast prosperity, and for the progress 
of industry and of liberty, of commerce. 



46 AMHERST CHAPTER 

education and Christian faith by which her 
times have been distinguished. But some- 
thing more than the wisdom of statesmen, 
or the valor of captains, or any silent or 
resonant work of man, has been involved 
in all this. An unseen power has been 
guiding events to the fulfillment of plans 
as wide as the world, and far more ancient 
than Dover cliffs, with the narrow seas 
which gleam around them. The ultimate 
kingdom of righteousness and of peace is 
nearer for these remarkable years. It was 
well to render grateful praise, in church 
and chapel, in cathedral and abbey, in 
quiet homes and great universities, to Him 
who has given such lustre to the fame and 
such success to the reign of the wise and 
womanly and queenly Victoria. 

But as with her reign, so with all that 
advancing history of mankind in connec- 
tion with which this brilliant half century, 
of feminine supremacy and imperial ex- 
pansion, has to be set to reveal its signifi- 
cance. It everywhere discloses the silent 
touch and the sweeping command of Divine 
forecasts. It reverberates with echoes to 
superlative designs. I know of no other de- 
partment of study, outside of the Scriptures, 



ALPHA DELTA PHI. 47 

more essentially or profoundly religious. 
A Christian college may well hold it in 
honoring esteem, and give it in perma- 
nence an eminent place among the studies 
which it proposes. 

In our recent country, in our times of 
rapid and tumultuous change, it seems to 
me that we specially need this, as the 
thoughtful among us are specially inclined 
to it, since it is vital to the dignity and 
self-poise of our national life that we feel 
ourselves constantly interknit with the life 
of the world, from which the ocean does 
not divide us ; that we recognize our mag- 
nificent inheritance in the opulent results 
of the effort and the struggle of other 
generations. It is a distinct and encourag- 
ing indication of the best qualities of the 
American spirit, as well as of the vigor and 
vivacity of the American mind and the 
variety of its attainments, that such studies 
are eagerly prosecuted among us, and that 
those who have given to tfiem, with splen- 
did enthusiasm, laborious lives — like Pres- 
cott. Motley, our honored Bancroft — have 
been among the most inspiring of our 
teachers, have gained and will keep their 
principal places in that Republic of letters 



48 AMHERST CHAPTER 

from which the Republic of political fame 
must always take grace and renown. 

But I have taken this study of history, 
Ladies and Gentlemen, not so much to par- 
ticularize the various and profuse benefits 
of it — for which, of course, volumes would 
be needed, instead of paragraphs — as to 
indicate by it with a sharper distinctness 
the broadened range and brightened out- 
look which belong to the college course of 
to-day, as compared with that to which we 
were accustomed a half century ago. Then, 
as I said, nothing of history was here 
taught, except as perhaps obscurely sug- 
gested by Latin or Greek vocables and 
constructions. Now it has this prominent 
place among the elective studies of two 
years; and the change is significant of 
much. The same tendency appears on 
other sides, especially, for instance, in the 
courses of study now proposed in the mod- 
ern languages. These, too, are both for 
training and for culture. They come with 
the study on which I have dwelt, in an as- 
sociation at once natural and close. The 
languages of Goethe and Schiller, of 
Dante, of Cervantes — the intelligent mas- 
tery of these is not for ornament only or 



ALPHA DELTA PHI, 49 

chiefly, nor even for directer access to the 
manifold knowledges distributed in them, 
but that one may come to more intimate 
contact with the life expressed in Euro- 
pean literature in its original forms, and 
that the sense of being able to converse 
with the masters of thought in their own 
tongues may add vigor to faculty, a gen- 
eral wealth and lustre to life. So with all 
the connected changes in what was of old 
the narrow range of the studies here of- 
fered. The aim has clearly been, as I have 
said, to give to those going forth from the 
college, to whatever departments of ex- 
perience and of labor, an ampler knowl- 
edge, a finer and a nobler power, new instru- 
ments for happiness and for useful activity. 
The training of faculty, in studious minds, 
is still the governing primary aim, with the 
impression of the Christian truth and law 
and temper. But the wider culture is now 
recognized as auxiliary to this, while in it- 
self of a beautiful value ; and the college 
is unquestionably to widen its range to 
further bounds as years go on, and thus 
to make itself helpful and dear to more 
numerous minds, in more various depart- 
ments of skillful work, as generations follow 



50 AMHERST CHAPTER 

in their silent succession. So will it continue, 
and so will it become yet more and more, a 
beautiful power in the civilization to which 
it contributes. It is the expectation of this, 
and not merely the memory of the past, 
which animates our hearts as we gather 
here to-day. Not with every year, perhaps, 
shall this growing oak add another con- 
centric ring of equipment or of discipline 
to its previous substance, but when another 
half century shall have passed how many 
shall have been these silent augmentations ! 
How broad the shadow, and how solid the 
strength, of that which here in our own 
time was anxiously planted, in poverty, but 
with prayer ! 

Gathered as we are by this special an- 
niversary, it is a question which naturally 
meets us, and toward which this rapid and 
imperfect discussion has constantly tended. 
What is the native and normal relation of 
a fraternity like ours to this great change 
in the customary courses of college in- 
struction, and to the wider effects which it 
contemplates ? and this is a question the 
answer to which is not far to seek. 

By gathering to itself, as has been the 
effort of this fraternity, those of choice 



ALPHA DELTA PHI. 5 1 

intellectual parts, and of earnest and ca- 
tholic literary tastes, as well as of whole- 
some moral instincts and agreeable social 
manners, it systematically reinforces among 
its members the spirit of generous scholar- 
ly enterprise. Knitting students together in 
personal affiliation for intellectual purposes, 
it makes their minds interactive on each 
other, not in public competitions, but in 
the private communications of defined and 
limited circles, while any distinguished 
success of either becomes a part of the 
pride of the chapter. Students so related 
necessarily and constantly educate each 
other, maintaining among them the common 
aspiration for widened knowledge, for more 
various accomplishments, a more carefully 
trained intellectual force. The familiar 
criticism which they continually meet is 
cheering and quickening, not discouraging. 
In all kindness and confidence they search 
each other, till each is likely to learn the 
lesson of the legend inscribed over the 
statue of Tycho Brahe in the Thein church 
at Prague (Professor Tyler is responsi- 
ble for the old-fashioned pronunciation): 
" Esse potius quam haberi" The common 
desire to make the finest use of their 



52 AMHERST CHAPTER 

powers, if not in one particular department 
then in another, is as natural to students 
so associated as friendship is to sympa- 
thetic households. One might almost say 
that it comes as certainly as any effect of 
physical law, in the perfumed breath which 
steals forth from gardens, or in the lush 
foliage of June. It is native, not imported ; 
and it has a power of its own, not only to 
sustain the nobly ambitious, but even to 
curb the unruly and to animate the slug- 
gish. 

An influence of this kind is always im- 
portant, not easy to secure, of great value 
when gained, in any college ; and some 
plan of the sort with which we are 
familiar seems almost indispensable to it, 
since the mind of the student takes in- 
centive and guidance from the minds of 
others of his own standing, or but slightly 
advanced, quite as readily at least, and 
quite as richly, as from any minds of 
older teachers, which are to him relatively 
remote. It is an influence peculiarly im- 
portant, it seems to me, in our time, when 
the taste for athletic competition and 
achievement has become so wide and so 
engrossing. The change in this respect 



ALPHA DELTA PHI, 53 

from the college of our earlier day, with 
its swings and rough bars in the open air, 
its creaking spring-board and wheezing 
foot-ball, is as striking as any that has 
occurred. It came almost as suddenly as 
a cyclone, though it came to stay. A 
bright young man in one of our older 
Eastern colleges was rusticated in his 
junior year for visiting a bowling alley too 
often. Being a man of good habits, of 
fair scholarship, and of excellent character, 
he came back to his class, was graduated 
with honor, and two years after was ap- 
pointed tutor, one of the duties of his 
tutorship being to see that the men in his 
division went regularly to the work of the 
gymnasium, in which the bowling alley was 
a principal feature. The change is wise, 
and greatly beneficial. It is plainly a 
return, even if in the somewhat boisterous 
American fashion, toward the Greek idea 
of simultaneous and harmonious training of 
body and of mind as necessary to a com- 
plete education. But there has been some 
danger, perhaps, that the element coming 
in with this later vehemence might disturb 
and obscure that to which it has been 
added, as the rushing Arve muddies the 



54 AMHERST CHAPTER 

clear blue of the Rhone into which it is 
absorbed. The temper of intellectual 
aspiration, quickened and sustained by 
frequent and intimate intellectual fellow- 
ships, must keep its pre-eminence, or the 
college would soon become a mere shouting 
and stormy athletic club. A fraternity like 
ours, working normally, works always in 
the needed direction. It animates the 
taste for variety in study, and is thus in 
constitutional sympathy with the entire 
intellectual movement within the colleges 
in recent years. It puts the stimulated 
minds of its members face to face, for 
mutual discipline, reciprocal incentive ; 
and it is always study which it helps, a 
manifold culture, rather than any develop- 
ment of muscle. Its running matches are 
in the fields of the Muses. Its applauded 
achievements are in the domain of letters 
and the arts. The leap and wrestle which 
it encourages, are between minds moving 
from thought to thought, and from author 
to author. 

It has even a distinctly moral influence, 
as evident as the mental, and yet more 
beneficent. Instances are within my 
knowledge in which certain bright and 



ALPHA DELTA PHI, 55 

eager young men, peculiarly susceptible to 
college temptations, while peculiarly fit for 
college successes, have been restrained from 
bad associations, have been excited to 
better ambitions, have been enveloped, to 
their permanent advantage, in a govern- 
ing spirit within the chapter which wrought 
for a gentler and nobler manhood. I cannot 
but think that a wise faculty will always 
shelter, favor and cherish any association 
which works in this temper for ends so 
important. 

A beneficial influence belongs also, in- 
herently, to such an organized fraternity, 
arising from the fact that whatever has been 
done by its older members, after gradu- 
ation, in the way of distinguished liter- 
ary work, of eloquent speech, of effective 
assistance to generous movements, is kept 
more distinctly before the minds of those 
tarrying in the chapters from whose active 
exercises the others have withdrawn. A 
certain sense of special fellowship unites 
therein the younger with the older, which 
in its way, and in the measure of its reach, 
is an educating power. The students of 
a college are always glad, and properly 
proud, when one of its graduates attains 



56 AMHERST CHAPTER 

high distinction in the literary, the profes- 
sional, or the political field. But the mem- 
bers of a chapter have a clearer and a 
closer sense of just gratification when one 
whose name is borne on their rolls achieves 
a useful and high distinction. Old stories 
are recalled of his earlier efforts ; his 
subsequent methods, in study and in the 
culture of style, are more carefully scanned ; 
a fresh ambition is started in those who 
have their own place to attain in the world ; 
and I cannot doubt that many responsive 
and on-looking minds, in this chapter and 
in others, have been inspired to greater 
ardor in appropriate studies, and greater 
persistency in intellectual exercise, to ac- 
quire for themselves a noble and an ex- 
quisite English style, to master the power of 
high and rich and discriminated thought, 
to prepare themselves for large offices 
in the world — because belonging to chap- 
ters bearing in eminence on their rolls 
names like those of Frederic Huntington, 
Algernon Sullivan, Truman Backus, of the 
Choate who adds new honor to the name, 
of the Curtis whose touch of velvet smooth- 
ness, in daintiest sentences, hides behind it 
a sensitive conscience, with purposes strong 



ALPHA DELTA PHI, 57 

as sinews of steel. Each member feels a 
fresh responsibility resting upon him to 
keep himself worthy of companionship like 
theirs ; to prepare himself to stand, when 
the time has come, in the ranks upon which 
abides a lustre from names so honored. 
Even names which death has crowned with 
stars — like that of the accomplished 
scholar, the eloquent teacher, the wide- 
minded theologian, whose presence we 
had gladly expected to-day, and sadly miss 
— have a continuing power to bless. They 
do not fade from eye or thought, but 
beckon us up to higher levels, while we a 
little longer linger, 

A peculiar sense of union with others 
closely and happily associated with one in 
such a fraternity goes forward with him, 
too, into subsequent life, wherever and in 
whatsoever vocation his lot may be cast ; 
and this brings its own beauty and blessing. 
It is inevitable, as I have said, that the out- 
come of the college system, as it now is 
presented, should be shown on more diver- 
sified fields of subsequent labor than were 
contemplated a half century ago. Not all 
men trained in such institutions as this is 
rapidly coming to be are to be ministers. 



58 AMHERST CHAPTER 

lawyers, or physicians. Some will be archi- 
tects, painters, sculptors ; some will be 
editors, authors, teachers ; some will be 
scientists, inventors, explorers, or civil 
engineers; and some will be cultured 
merchants, perhaps, manufacturers, bank- 
ers, railway officers, or men of property 
and leisure. Their paths will diverge more 
and more, as life goes on, and. their sepa- 
rated employments will tend to keep them 
apart from each other. Without some in- 
fluence in the opposite direction, the effect 
may be to prevent the invigorating con- 
tact of their minds with each other, by 
absorbing each, with a narrowing rigor, in 
his special pursuit. It is well and salutary, 
under circumstances like these, that there 
be strong and vital sympathies uniting 
them in after life, arising from com- 
mon glad recollections of sympathetic as- 
sociation in the earlier days ; that they go 
back together to the pleasant reunions, 
intellectual and social, of the chapter-house 
and its meetings ; that the earlier collisions 
and happy affiliations of mind with mind 
come freshly to their remembering thought. 
So will be likely to be kept alive in them a 
certain healthful and beautiful correspon- 



ALPHA DELTA PHL 59 

dence of spirit and aim, in the broader life 
into which they have entered. The college 
itself will have for their memories a livelier 
charm. The earlier aspiration will more 
surely survive in their souls. Unconscious- 
ly, even, they will heed and fulfill the noble 
advice which the Marquis de Posa, accord- 
ing to Schiller, sent by the Queen to his 
pupil, Don Carlos: "To revere in manhood 
the dreams of his youth, and not to be led 
astray when by the wisdom of the dust he 
hears enthusiasm blasphemed." In our 
hurried American society, full as it is of 
secular ambitions, of rapidity, noise, and 
the clamor for success in whatever depart- 
ment, this seems to me peculiarly needful ; 
and certainly the impulse of a fraternity 
like this, and like others established with 
similarly discreet plans and aims, must sup- 
ply here a force of essential value, and of 
permanent efficiency. 

It tends as well, I am equally sure, in the 
measure of its influence, to remove the prej- 
udices which used to exist between the 
students of different colleges, and even to 
bring the institutions themselves into hap- 
pier relations, as members of the several 
chapters of the fraternity, in the various 



6o AMHERST CHAPTER 

colleges, meet in a co-operative sympathy, 
and honor and rejoice in each other's suc- 
cess. The old temper was one, we must 
admit, rather of distrust, or of positive dis- 
like, between the colleges of the sea-board 
and these among the hills ; between the 
latter, among themselves. In my time 
here, the typical Harvard student was to us 
one who did not greatly exercise his brain, 
but who wore glasses, carried a cane, was 
curled and perfumed, and studiously parted 
his hair in the middle. His conception of 
us was, doubtless, a caricature equally gro- 
tesque, but in a widely different direction. 
From those of not a few other colleges we 
expected vigor, pluck, intellectual push, 
but with palpable deficiencies in refine- 
ment and grace. Many causes have modi- 
fied this spirit of mutual disrespect, largely 
ameliorating if they have not abolished it. 
One of the causes operating in this way, 
with an excellent effect, has been the fre- 
quent communications between the chapters 
of general fraternities extending into many 
colleges. The more distinguished students 
in each have become known to the others. 
The governing sense of common aims, and 
a common work, has been constantly 



ALPHA DELTA PHI. 6 1 

reinforced in each toward the rest. A cer- 
tain solidarity, of harmonious aspiration and 
of reciprocal interest, comes by degrees to 
be established among them. The time is 
certainly hastened in its approach when all 
the colleges scattered over the land will 
recognize themselves as only local con- 
stituent members of the real and great 
American University ; which will have no 
single cathedral city, but the campus of 
the continent, for its seat, and which will 
be richer than in any renown derived from 
the past through the fame which it wins 
by training men for great utilities, noble 
offices. By training meny I have said ; but 
the training of women, through similar 
methods, with an equal effect, is a part of 
the modern widened movement among 
American colleges, as important as the 
other which I have sketched, in close har- 
mony with it, and assuming rapidly equal 
proportions. Newnham and Girton have 
lately surprised the English universities by 
the accurate and large learning imparted 
in them. Smith College and Amherst will 
have as well their friendly rivalries and 
eager competitions, and the vexed problem 
of co-education may be held, I think, by 



62 AMHERST CHAPTER 

the most exacting and fastidious critic, to 
have found in them its proper solution, un- 
less Amherst and Northampton are farther 
from each other than they used to be when 
I was young. The final University which 
is thus magnificently arising among us will 
embrace in itself all such equipped and ad- 
vancing schools, of training and culture, in 
any State, for either sex. Its vastness and 
opulence will have had no parallel among 
the comparatively restricted institutions 
across the sea, to which kings and 
prelates have made contribution. Its 
spires will shine from the sounding 
Atlantic onward to the ocean of Peace. 
Multitudinous associations, clinging more 
tenaciously than tentacles of ivy, will 
robe its far extending walls, as the pave- 
ments of its corridors are worn by the 
feet of successive generations. Its chiming 
bells, with musical triumph, will ring in the 
era of assured liberty, of popular intelli- 
gence with a refined and ripened culture, . 
of thriving enterprise, and of Christian 
faith. 

So, Mr. President, ladies and gentle- 
men, and brothers of the fraternity, I join 
with you in gladness at the fact that the 



ALPHA DELTA PHI. 63 

fifty years since this chapter was organized 
have seen it growing in strength and fame, 
keeping at least in equal advance with the 
college in which it is embosomed ; and I 
join with you equally in the hope that when 
another half century, shall have passed it 
may have only an ampler power, a richer 
promise, a nobler fame. The traveler in 
Switzerland not unfrequently sees in the 
eastern sky what he takes to be a patch of 
cloud, fair but fleeting, white beneath the 
morning light, silently transfigured, as if 
charged from within by golden, chrysolite, 
opaline lustres, when the sun has passed 
the meridian. Its permanence gives it 
interpretation. It is not a cloud, but a 
mountain peak, solid as the earth from 
which it arises, though delicate in outline, 
and burning in the air like a translucent 
gem. This chapter which we love seemed 
to some, no doubt, in the days when the 
morning light lay on our path, a passing 
whirl of mist-laden air, hovering for a 
season in the sky of the college. It has 
kept its place, never expanding to large 
proportions, but growing more eminent and 
more variously lucent before our thought 
as the sun for us has descended in the west. 



64 AMHERST CHAPTER 

I trust that it will be as permanent as the 
college, and will be constantly clothed 
upon with a more attractive and various 
charm, as the sun which is to mark the 
following centuries in the life of the college 
seeks its, as yet, unseen horizon. 



A ^ 



BANQUET 



REMARKS OF THE TOAST-MASTER 

HON. JOHN E. SANFORD, '51. 

Brothers of the Alpha Delta Phi^ Ladies 
and Gentlemen : 

If the man who invented the calendar 
had had the advantage of fifty years* ex- 
perience in this society, and had thereby 
gained some adequate conception of what 
would be a suitable allotment of time for 
a semi-centennial celebration, I do him the 
justice to believe that he would have made 
his day consist of more than twenty-four 
hours ; but, as a consequence of his origi- 
nal and irrevocable blunder, the few and 
fleeting hours that remain to us, as well as 
this list which I hold in my hand, remind us 
that the last and best course of the evening, 
the course of speech and song, must not 
be long delayed. 

We close to-night, brethren, with this 
banquet, a glad and memorable day in the 
history of our beloved Amherst Chapter, 
a day most auspiciously and splendidly 



68 AMHERST CHAPTER 

opened in the public exercises of the 
morning, a day to be closed, I hope, not 
less fittingly and happily here to-night. I 
trust I know too well the nature of the 
duty which has been assigned to me to 
abuse its privilege or to trespass upon your 
indulgence. He who has the honor to 
preside — they sometimes call him the 
speaker of the assembly — must never be 
its speech-maker. I am here as a means 
to an end simply, and you, not I, constitute 
that end. I know that there is no brother 
here whose heart is not full of thoughts 
if not of words. I may not speak here of 
the memories and traditions of these fifty 
years, the influences, the aspirations, the 
helpful and uplifting fellowships which 
Alpha Delta Phi has given to us ; in a 
word, all that our beloved fraternity has 
done for us and been to us. I am only too 
glad that these will find more fitting ex- 
pressions at your lips. Let me content 
myself, then, with voicing only the con- 
gratulations of the day and the hour. Let 
me speak the welcome of every brother 
here to every, other brother, to all honored 
guests as well, and let me not forget these 
spectators, these better angels of our 



ALPHA DELTA PHI. 69 

nature, whose presence here to-night adds 
a new and welcome charm and zest to 
this occasion. 

Fifty years is surely long enough to 
test the relation of our Society, and of 
like societies, and the occasion naturally 
suggests what the true relation has been 
and shall be. No one can more fully dis- 
cuss that question than the president of 
the college. I have, therefore, the honor 
to propose the first subject, " The Relation 
of Greek Letter Societies to College Dis- 
cipline,*' and to introduce to you President 
Seelye. 



THE RELATIONS OF GREEK LET- 
TER SOCIETIES TO COLLEGE 
DISCIPLINE. 

PRESIDENT JULIUS H. SEELYE. 

Every one familiar with the facts in the 
case must judge favorably of the Greek 
letter societies in Amherst College. With- 
out a doubt they exercise a wholesome 
energy both upon their individual members 
and upon the college. Combination is 
strength, whether with young men or old, 
and where men combine for good ends 
better results may, of course, be looked for 
than where the same ends are sought by 
individuals alone. 

Now the aim of these societies is cer- 
tainly good. They are not formed for 
pleasure simply, though they are one of 
the most fruitful sources of pleasure in a 
student's college life. Their first aim is 
the improvement of their members — im- 
provement in literary culture and in manly 



ALPHA DELTA PHL J I 

character. They are all of them literary 
societies. An effort was made not long 
since to introduce among us a new society 
with prominently social rather than literary 
aims, but it not only failed to receive the 
requisite assent of the president of the 
college, but was not favored by any con- 
siderable number of the students, many of 
whom stoutly opposed it. 

The aim of these societies is, I say, im- 
provement in literary culture and in manly 
character, and this aim is reasonably justi- 
fied by the results. It is not accidental that 
the foremost men in college, as a rule, be- 
long to some of these societies. That each 
society should seek for its membership the 
best scholars, the best writers and speakers, 
the best men of a class, shows well where 
its strength is thought to lie. A student 
entering one of these societies finds a 
healthy stimulus in the repute which his 
fraternity shall share from his successful 
work. The rivalry of individuals loses 
much of its narrowness, and almost all of 
its envy, when the prize which the indi- 
vidual seeks is valued chiefly for its bene- 
fit to the fellowship to which he belongs. 
Doubtless members of these societies often 



72 AMHERST CHAPTER 

remain narrow-minded and laggard in the 
race, after all the influence of their society 
has been expended upon them, but the in- 
fluence is a broadening and a quickening 
one, notwithstanding. Under its power 
the self-conceit of a young man is more 
likely to give way to self-control than oth- 
erwise. 

One of the happiest features of society 
life at Amherst, introduced, like every 
other, by your own society, fair mother of 
us all, is the life in the chapter-houses. 
There are no better residences, and none 
better kept, in the village than these. 
They are not extravagant, but they are 
neat and tasteful; they have pleasant 
grounds surrounding them, the cost of 
rooms in them is not greater than the 
average cost in other houses, and they not 
only furnish the students occupying them 
a pleasant home, but the care of the home 
and its surroundings is itself a culture. 

There need be no objection to these 
societies on account of their secrecy. The 
secrecy is largely in name ; is, in fact, 
little more than the privacy proper to the 
most familiar intercourse of families and 
friends. Treated as the societies are 



r- --n.?; 



ALPHA DELTA PHI. 73 

among us, and occupying the ground they 
do, no mischief comes from their secrecy. 
Instead of promoting cliques and cabals, 
in point of fact we find less of them than 
the history of the college shows before the 
societies came. The rivalry between them 
is a healthy one, and is conducted openly 
and in a manly way. 

The societies must give back, to the col- 
lege the tone they have first received. I 
observe that good Dr. McCosh, at Prince- 
ton, is solicitous about their influence there, 
but I am persuaded that in any college 
where the prevailing life is true and earnest, 
the societies fed by its fountain will send 
back bright and quickening streams. They 
certainly give gladness and refreshment to 
our whole college, life at Amherst. 

If, for me, having my name enrolled in 
a society not yet crowned with the laurels 
of fifty years of such a history as is repre- 
sented here to-night, it be proper to make 
a suggestion to the Amherst chapter of 
the Alpha Delta Phi, I beg leave to ask 
whether, leading all our history, as you 
have so honorably done, you may not 
introduce another new departure, in the 
endowment of fraternity scholarships or 



74 AMHERST CHAPTER 



fellowships for advanced students, under- 
graduate or graduate ? Better, I think, 
than any other large expenditure in behalf 
of the society, would such endowments 
serve both the society and the college. 

I thank you, Mr. President and gentle- 
men, for the honor done me, and the 
pleasure afforded by the invitation to be 
present at these festivities. I accept the 
invitation, as officially given to the presi- 
dent of the college, and I gratefully rec- 
ognize, in behalf of the college, both what 
this fraternity has already done in making 
its history so brilliant with illustrious names, 
and what it is doing to-day in adorning and 
strengthening the college in making its 
members purer, braver, truer men, and in 
using its increasing power for increasing 
growth in all that is honorable and of good 
report. I look upon its past and its pres- 
ent as the bright dawn of a brighter day. 



A HALF CENTURY AGO. 



REV. £.♦£. BLISS, D.D., '37. 



Brothers of the Alpha Delta Phi : 

I need not assure you that it gives me 
great pleasure to be present at this our 
semi-centennial. So far as I remember, it 
is the first time I have met anything like 
the general gathering of the Fraternity 
during the fifty years that have elapsed 
since I was graduated. You must, therefore, 
my brethren, understand with what an 
appetite, after fifty years of famishing, I 
come to your banquet to-night. And now, 
in rising to speak a few words — for they 
will be few — in regard to those fifty years 
ago, I beg your indulgence for the imper- 
fections of my speech. 

I have been, as has been stated, fifty 
years in a foreign land on the other side of 
the Atlantic, and have been obliged to speak 
to my fellowmen in another language than 
the English, so that my English tongue is 
a good deal tied. And what is worse, 



76 AMHERST CHAPTER 

living among a people whose great watch- 
word is, " Slowly, slowly," the impress has 
come upon my body and my mind. The 
conductors of your street-cars say to me, 
"Step lively!" Well, we do not step lively 
in Turkey. I feel sometimes a great danger 
of being overrun and trodden under foot, 
and I am inclined to turn to those behind 
me and say, "Slowly, slowly." If I were 
seeking employment in this country I do 
not know but I would ask for a position 
as street preacher, and take my position 
upon some street in Boston and say to the 
crowd, "Slowly, slowly." The effect has 
been to make me and my mind move slowly, 
in sympathy with those men of the slow 
country, and you may well understand that 
I feel rather dazed here to-night amidst 
the evidence of the movements of these 
modern times. I feel like a man who has 
come out from a mine. In fact, my prin- 
cipal work in the mission with which I am 
connected, has been in the publication 
work, and, like the miners, we walk and 
work under great disadvantages; but, by 
and by, though I am not a prophet or the 
son of a prophet, you will see some great 
changes in the Turkish country. 



ALPHA DELTA PHI, 77 

But I must hasten to the fifty years ago, 
or I shall never get there. I suppose the 
colleges of fifty years ago were rather slow. 
When I came to college I was not helped 
by steam ; I footed it. And we did not 
have very much assistance from the light- 
ning in communicating our ideas. We dug 
into the ground, and we were not very sure 
of what we found there. It was a slow 
time ; but, brethren of the Alpha Delta 
Phi, progress was beginning to come. Mr. 
Eells's spirit was beginning to be felt. The 
result was the organization of the Amherst 
Chapter of the Alpha Delta Phi. 

There were some preliminary movements 
in the direction of historical study, of 
which Dr. Storrs has spoken so eloquently 
to-day. This branch grew out of the 
desire for the pursuance of these historical 
studies. We did organize, there was nobody 
to refuse us, and so we gathered on the 
principle of elective affinity, and we soon 
found that we were in communication with 
congenial spirits of other institutions. We 
were a small company and our numbers 
were modest as compared with what greets 
my eye on this semi-centennial. I remem- 
ber very distinctly the small room in the 



78 AMHERST CHAPTER 

small entry to what was then called South 
College. I speak not derogatively of 
college studies nor those who were our 
teachers, but we felt that it would be a 
benefit for us to extend our thoughts and 
widen the scope of our imagination and 
seek for things which were excellent in 
other lines than those which were in the 
regular college course of studies. We 
adopted the motto — I think it was 
Coleridge's : " Plain living and high think- 
ing.** We thought that motto might be 
transferred to another field, and we made 
it ours. Well, we have gone on in the line 
of plain living — some of us have been 
obliged to — but whether we have accom- 
plished anything in the way of high think- 
ing I will not undertake to say. Some of 
our Fraternity have attained to their ideals 
to some extent. Others have not, but we 
rejoice in the benefit and happiness we 
have derived from association. I have 
often met with members of this society 
who have come traveling in the East, and 
it has always been a great pleasure to give 
them the hand of fellowship. 

I rejoice in the evidence of growth which 
I see continually, and in the success which 



ALPHA DELTA PHI. 79 

has attended this organization. It has 
come to be a power far greater than any- 
thing we could have expected in those days. 
May your future be as prosperous as has 
been your past, and success always attend 
this, our society. 



THE CHIVALRY OF ALPHA DELTA 

PHL 

HON. ALGERNON S. SULLIVAN, Miami, '45. 

Mr. President and Gentlemen : 

After the splendor of oratory which has 
shone upon us to-day, I can almost imagine 
that the real purpose of the Amherst Chap- 
ter on this occasion was not to celebrate its 
fiftieth anniversary, but to exhibit to the 
world that, although its matchless trinity of 
orators has been broken by the translation 
of Henry Ward Beecher and Roswell D. 
Hitchcock, it still remains true that the 
brightest star and the fairest flower in the 
field of American eloquence still abides in 
the possession of the Amherst Chapter. Dr. 
Storrs gave the key to all the thought that 
must continue to the end of the celebration 
and the festivities, placed upon it by the 
inexorable law, his own conception of what 
it is to be an Alpha Delta Phi. 

My toast, as I look at it, seems to me to 
be a little too heroic, and yet the very cir- 
cumstances which the speaker mentioned — 



ALPHA DELTA PHI. 8 1 



my knowledge of the foundation, although 
not contemporary with it, of the first child 
of Alpha Delta Phi in the organization of 
the Hamilton Chapter and my acquaintance 
with the brothers whose names have been 
mentioned — make it necessary that I should 
at once accept the term " The Chivalry of 
the Alpha Delta Phi," in a sense that was 
made obvious to-day. Taking it to mean 
that faith which knights to knighthood 
bore, how at once our hearts come in sym- 
pathy with it as a proper toast somewhere 
in the order of proceedings this evening ! 
Faith, inspiration, aspiration, duty, high en- 
deavor and high achievement, if, indeed^ it 
be the right thing to say in the presence of 
an intelligent company like this that there is 
not high achievement except with high en- 
deavor. Certainly it is not true that there 
is high achievement without high endeavor 
when we are considering the subject on the 
plane of action which ought to be above 
all. 

Tracing the succession of thought that 
occurred to me on the acceptance I give 
to the term " chivalry,'* it occurred to me 
when thinking a few moments ago of the 
approach of the summons to respond to 



82 AMHERST CHAPTER 

this toast, what a kinship there is, what a 
potent action there is in all ideal plans. 
The ideal of knighthood I have sketched, 
but how true it is that all ideal paths 
move nearly in parallel lines in this respect 
of the advance of thought along a line 
that is not only forward but is always up- 
ward, until it will bring us to just that 
plane which I have defined. 

Now, gentlemen, it is true that I come as 
a delegate from one of the western chapters 
of this Fraternity, and come under circum- 
stances and with reminiscences that make 
it peculiarly interesting to me if, for a 
moment, I can hope to make it interesting 
to you. You will bear, in mind — and I in- 
dulge in the reference to it the more readily 
because it has not yet been referred to — 
that our society, that its character and its 
qualities, had the personal characteristics 
that belonged to our founder, Samuel Eells. 
He wrote no creed; there is no constitu- 
tion which was to be subscribed to. There 
were no pledges. No man can find any 
writing from him, or contemporary with 
him, giving that law which every mem- 
ber of the Fraternity realizes and feels 
to be impressed upon him, and yet he 



ALPHA DELTA PHI. 83 

knows that it is absolutely true that 
Samuel Eells's character, Samuel Eells's 
methods, Samuel Eells's aims, his inten- 
tions, his purposes, his efforts, his whole 
being, gave at once, when he formed this 
society and when he formed the chapter in 
which I had the honor to be initiated — he 
gave to it and to its members the impress 
of his own character, of his own feelings. 
It has abided until to-day, it has culminated 
in an assembly here in these classic grounds, 
a convention representative of all that is 
strong, active, noble, elevating, influential, 
beautiful in the life that is coming out as 
being the expression of American thought 
and American ideas and American pur- 
poses. 

I remember when I left my little village 
home in Indiana and moved to Oxford, 
Ohio, to attend the Miami University. Im- 
mediately on my arrival the subject of dis- 
cussion, as usual when any new class ar- 
rived, was with regard to the societies con- 
nected with the college. First and fore- 
most was always mentioned the name of 
the little society Alpha Delta Phi. Mr. 
Eells had then died, but the coterie per- 
sonally selected by him still continued in 



84 AMHERST CHAPTER 

existence, and I soon learned, when I had 
the honor of being requested to become 
a member of the society, that the entire 
membership looked to Samuel Eells with a 
sentiment that was akin to devotion. He 
seemed to make such an impression, not only 
upon members of the society but upon the 
college, that there wa^ no more honored 
name than that of Samuel Eells. And I 
may be permitted here to say that in that 
college, which could fairly be described as 
being almost a frontier college, there was 
gathered a body of the members of the 
Alpha Delta Phi, who, with one exception, 
the speaker, have gone out into life and 
have continued to live shining lives, and 
who do so at this very hour. I only wish 
some of this company whom I could name 
on that list, instead of myself, as the repre- 
sentatives and delegates from that first- 
born chapter of Alpha Delta Phi, were 
here to speak for it and duly represent it. 
I remember when, after leaving college 
to study law, selecting Cincinnati for my 
home, I entered there again into active 
fraternal intercourse with the men who had 
learned to know Mr. Eells during the four 
years that remained to him of his life after 



ALPHA DELTA PHL 8$ 

he went to Cincinnati for the purpose of 
making it his home. 

I may be permitted to recall again what 
is mentioned in our book of authority and 
records, that, as Brother Salmon P. Chase 
loved to say privately and at all times, 
Samuel Eells displayed, as the founder 
of Alpha Delta Phi, his character as a 
Christian. I have heard Governor Chase, 
again and again, speak in terms of almost 
idolizing fondness of his youthful partner, 
who died so soon after the opening of his 
career in Cincinnati. 

Now, gentlemen, this matter of the chiv- 
alry of a society means, necessarily, a great 
deal when there is a convention at the end 
of fifty years of the existence of any chap- 
ter or of any order ; in this, that the his- 
tory of the society has already made itself 
— in its past and for the future as well. 
This society is to-day and will be just that 
which it has lived up to and lived out in 
its fifty years, and I ask you if it be not 
fairly true that there has been a vital force 
impressed upon it. In its nearly twenty 
chapters there has come to be a uniformity 
in the high standard, as Samuel Eells in- 
tended it, of morals, of character, as being 



S6 AMHERST CHAPTER 

preferable to mere intellectual culture or 
the accumulation of knowledge. He him- 
self has said that this end of character of 
the development of the entire man in its 
manhood; moral, social, as well as intel- 
lectual, was the purpose and aim that he 
had in assembling kindred spirits and in 
founding this organization. Has it not 
come to be true of the organization ? I ask 
you to turn your thoughts back for a brief 
ten hours from the moment when I am 
speaking and ask you if it were otherwise 
than I have supposed — if it could have 
been possible that Dr. Storrs, in com- 
ing to make this semi-centennial oration, 
could have felt that the occasion, the au- 
dience, the Fraternity about him, was of 
itself the occasion and the impulse of that 
masterly and beautiful review and study, 
the educative effect of history in an aca- 
demic course and in the course of forma- 
tion of character — character that was to be 
in sjrmpathy, wholly, with the law and the 
example which he put forward almost un- 
intentionally and irresistibly as the sum of 
human character as developed in realization 
of the law of Him who spake as man never 
spake. It came from him as the expres- 



ALPHA DELTA PHL 87 

sion of his own conception that that which 
he knew would alone meet the requirement 
and expectation of a convention of the 
sons of Alpha Delta Phi. It constitutes, 
in my mind, the best of all testimonials 
as to the history and the nature and the 
essential quality of the association. 

Now, gentlemen, it is very easy for us to 
say this in general, but there is not a day 
nor an hour in which there is not, in the 
call directly presented to every such asso- 
ciation and to every individual of it, a call 
for the manifestation of the sentiments and 
principles which constitute the foundation 
and keystone of our order. I never thought 
of it more than I did in an incident which 
occurred to me during the day. I stood, 
on a stormy and dark night only a week or 
two ago, on the heights above Hoboken. 
It happened that I was down there and 
was detained by a storm, and as the storm 
had passed I went to the brink of the hill 
and there had that exciting and beautiful 
view, the like of which is to be found in 
few countries, for it is not often that there 
is a great city near which there is a 
high beetling cliff as a point of outlook. 
As I stood there watching the lights that 



88 AMHERST CHAPTER 

mark the homes and movements of nearly 
three million people, extending almost 
from my feet eastward and southward for 
nearly a score of miles, not a man was dis- 
cernible, not a sound from their existence 
was heard, and yet I could feel that I was 
on the shore of this sea of humanity — all 
moved by the same hopes and the same 
plans. And following some of these mov- 
ing lights my eye was arrested by one which 
fixed and attracted and held my attention, 
and in a moment my fancy reminded me 
of what it was. I could not see what was 
beneath it, but I knew that, raised and 
pointing far into the upper air, it was the 
blazing beacon upheld by the hand of the 
Statue of Liberty. There it was! And 
so it is that over every community there is, 
to the eye that will look for it, some beacon 
and some signal that will be a pointer and 
a monitor to tell that it was there for a 
purpose, that it relates to and calls out the 
proper sentiments and the sense of duty 
towards one's fellow-man. I knew I could 
not see that figure, but I knew it was 
there. I knew what that beacon told. I 
knew that it reminded me of the fraternity 
between fraternal nations. I knew that it 



ALPHA DELTA PHI, 89 



reminded me of the guardianship and great 
trusts that were put upon the people of 
the city of New York. I knew that it re- 
minded me of the hearty sympathies of all 
the world towards America. I could but 
then, as I do now, feel almost an unuttered 
prayer : Oh, ye gods of the winds, touch 
lightly that central herald in our harbor ! 
Oh, ye mists that come in from the ocean, 
string and gem it so that it will shine like 
diamonds in the morning sun, but never 
hide it from the faithful sons of Alpha 
Delta Phi, who gather in such an increas- 
ing colony in the cities about that harbor ! 
Let it be for ages that it, too, shall stand 
there as a consecration of the chivalrous 
sentiments, the freedom and the spirit of 
evangelism and good citizenship, to all 
that are within its reach. So it will be, and 
so it is, and so I can speak not only for 
the western representation of the Alpha 
Delta Phi, but for the Fraternity entire. To 
the voice of chivalry calling from that 
statue they respond by recognizing the 
duties, the claims of manhood and good 
citizenship. 

So it will ever be, my brothers. I never 
realized it so fully as now, when I see the 



90 



AMHERST CHAPTER 



magnetic attraction that has assembled 
this rare convention, and I am only glad 
that it is recognized, that it is more than 
a mere mechanical line of beauty for the 
sons of Alpha Delta Phi, and that there 
is that spirit of gallantry and courage of 
truth, of high endeavor, to which, without 
great extravagance, the term "chivalry" 
can be applied. 



ALPHA DELTA PHI IN THE 

PULPIT. 

E. K. ALDEN, D.D., '44. 
lOnfy Partially Reforted,^ 

Mr, President and Brethren : 

Of the original five members who com- 
menced Alpha Delta Phi, three were law- 
yers, one was a teacher, and one was a 
minister. That proportion has been con- 
tinued to the present day. Of the 4,500 
members now constituting our honored 
Fraternity, a little over 800 represent the 
pulpit, and of these about 125 the Amherst 
Chapter. Of these 800, speaking now in 
round numbers, about 225 are Congrega- 
tionalists, 175 are Presbyterians, 140 are 
Episcopalians, bishops included, 80 Meth- 
odists, 80 Baptists, and about 100 are dis- 
tributed among the other varied and vari- 
ous denominations. 

I am called to speak of "Alpha Delta 
Phi in the Pulpit," describing them all in 
one ideal man. The Congregationalist 
and Presbyterian, which mix up pretty well 



92 AMHERST CHAPTER 

together, is a fine looking face always. You 
take the general run of ministers as you 
will see them gathered together in a large 
room, and the solid, substantial element will 
be the Congregational and Presbyterian. 
The Episcopalian comes in for ornament — 
a very handsome ornament, too — and the 
Baptists and Methodists for vigorous action. 
Now, in describing this ideal man, the 
"Alpha Delta Phi in the Pulpit," the first dis- 
tinguishing characteristic — for no other 
fraternity can say we do not lead in one 
remarkable particular — is that he is Apos- 
tolic, When this topic was sent me a few 
days ago with the request for a brief ad- 
dress, I immediately took down my Greek 
concordance and ran over the allusions to 
Alpha Delta Phi in the New Testament, and 
I found precisely 424 distinct references, 
with the names of quite a number of the 
brothers. The very first disciple who was 
called by our Lord to lead the glorious 
company of His disciples to the end of 
time is definitely described in the first 
chapter of the fourth gospel, as* Alpha 
Delta Phi ["a(5«A.<p"] Simon Peter. Con- 
sult your Greek Testament and you will 
find it there. The man who first led Simon 



ALPHA DELTA PHL 93 

into the presence of the Master^ was also an 
^^AdeXtp '* named Andrew. The two sons of 
Zebedee, John and James, are both defi- 
nitely called *<A8eX<p," Look up the old 
Greek Testament — good reading occasion- 
ally for lawyers and teachers as well as 
ministers — and you will find abundant il- 
lustrations. One case is quite remarkable. 
When Saul of Tarsus saw a light from 
heaven and was arrested on his persecuting 
career at Damascus, and when he needed 
one word instantly to arouse, cheer and 
start him on his . upward path, " a man 
named Ananias " was the elect instrument 
to speak that word, and this was the word : 
*' ASeXq), Saul, arise." He arose, and 
you know what came of it, and how su- 
perbly he led forward the great movement 
of the Lord's advancing kingdom. Read 
his epistles and you will find frequent allu- 
sions to Alpha Delta Phi, <'A8eXq) Timo- 
thy ; " <<A8£X<p, Titus;" **A8eX(p, Epaph- 
roditus ; " " Love the dSeXtp" and so on 
to the end of the chapter. That was the 
first ''Chapter'' of Alpha Delta Phi. We 
may in the presence of the representatives 
of all other Greek letter societies rightfully 
claim that AA ^ has an apostolic beginning. 



94 AMHERST CHAPTER 

The second characteristic of this ideal 
man is that he is scholarly. [Here the 
speaker introduced a long and honored list 
of representatives of the fraternity, includ- 
ing Profs. Austin Phelps, Henry B. Smith, 
Roswell D. Hitchcock, and many more, 
closing, as last and by no means least, with 
**the man who sits before me, Prof. E. P. 
Crowell."] So much for the scholarly fea- 
ture in the ideal " Alpha Delta Phi in the 
Pulpit." 

Add to this the general style of man for 
practical service, solid, substantial, sound, 
faithful and true — the average AA^ wher- 
ever found, at home or abroad — a splendid 
worker. [Here followed the names of sev- 
eral representative men, some of them mis- 
sionaries in the broadest aggressive work 
of the Church in foreign lands, including 
the veteran who was present, a graduate 
of fifty years ago, Dr. Edwin E. Bliss, of 
Constantinople, including also several in the 
audience in the immediate vicinity of the 
speaker, special reference being made to 
the brothers in the classes of '42 to '46, 
Lawyer Stockbridge and Professor March, 
who sat one on each side of the speaker, 
being on account of their rare excellences. 



ALPHA DELTA PHL 95 

claimed as in a sense preachers — March 
having, in reality, begun in this line even 
in his Freshman year, when he first joined 
Alpha Delta Phi.] 

Put all these men together, letting them 
pass one by one before the photographic 
plate, something of each going into the one 
face thus caught, and you begin to see 
what is meant by " Alpha Delta Phi in the 
Pulpit." 

This will be more vividly presented by 
looking at the members of one class spec- 
ially honored in the public services of the 
day. The first time I attained to the dig- 
nity of being present at an Amherst College 
commencement — indeed, of any college 
commencement — was when I was quite a 
boy. It was in the year 1839. I had 
never before seen a college class, and that 
class of '39 was a great and wonderful 
sight to my juvenile eyes. I recall the ora- 
tions of that red-letter day. There was 
one exceedingly youthful graduate, not 
quite eighteen years of age. His venera- 
ble father, whom I had often seen at my 
father's house, was present, wearing quite 
an anxious look. When that young man 
rose to speak, the old gentleman — I 



96 AMHERST CHAPTER 

remember the exact expression of his coun- 
tenance as I sat watching him — was evident- 
ly somewhat apprehensive as to the success 
of the inexperienced youth, especially as he 
had chosen for his topic of discourse " The 
Joys of the Scholar," a subject which at 
that time, of course, he knew a great deal 
about. When he began, his father's head 
dropped instantaneously ; but after two or 
three sentences had been pronounced in a 
clear, ringing voice, that bowed head began 
slowly to lift, and after the fourth or fifth 
sentence the whole body straightened up, 
and from that time that gratified father, out 
of his deep-set eyes, looked steadily and just 
a little proudly at the young orator, who 
swept ever3rthing before him. That was the 
first time I ever listened to a public address 
from Richard Salter Storrs, Jr. I recall 
also the valedictory from a young man of 
decided promise bearing the name of Fred- 
eric Dan Huntington. Also an oration — 
philosophical I think it was — from a curly- 
headed youth called Edward Bates Gillett. 
As this last-named brilliant brother is re- 
ported in the papers as occasionally occu- 
pying the sacred desk in Amherst College 
Church and other favored localities, I here 



ALPHA DELTA PHI. 97 

and now, in the name of Alpha Delta Phi, 
claim Gillett as one of the representatives 
of the pulpit. Now, put together these 
three men as they are to-day, members of 
one class, adding, if you please, from the 
same class, another of our fraternity, 
" Father " Augustine Francis Hewitt, of 
the Holy Catholic Church. Mix them up 
in good proportions, give them full liberty, 
each and all — that freedom of utterance of 
which we hear so much in these times — let 
them have a fair chance to show what in 
their best condition they can do, and you 
have a favorable representative of "Alpha 
Delta Phi in the Pulpit." If this does not 
fully meet our ideal, we can throw in also 
from the same fraternity Henry Ward 
Beecher, Phillips Brooks and Edward 
Everett Hale — if Bishop Huntington will 
keep an eye on Dr. Hale's theology — and we 
shall certainly have a somewhat brilliant 
and effective man. I commend him to the 
younger members of the brotherhood as 
the ideal Alpha Delta Phi of the pulpit of 
the future. 

Should I select for this coming man a 
double motto toward which we might begin 
to aspire, even now, " each according to his 



pS AMHERST CHAPTER 

several ability," it would be the two epi- 
taphs upon the memorial stones of the two 
brothers, Henry and John Lawrence, who 
achieved so noble a work in critical times 
in India. One represents the modest esti- 
mate a faithful and true man is permitted 
to have of himself. The other represents 
the estimate which his friends, who know 
his genuine worth, may give as their tes- 
timony when his work is done. Henry 
Lawrence was buried, where as a brave 
soldier he fell, at Lucknow, and his epi- 
taph, suggested by himself, reads : ^'Here 
lies Henry Lawrence^ who tried to do his 
duty" His brother is buried in Westmin- 
ster Abbey, and above his dust is inscribed 
the epitaph suggested by his friends — may 
God enable us all so to finish our course 
that we may merit the same ! — " Here lies 
John Lawrence J who did his duty to the last.'* 



ALPHA DELTA PHI IN POLITICS. 

HON. GEO. WILLIAM CURTIS, Brunonian, 'S4' 

Mr, President and Brethren : 

I was delighted to learn early in the 
spring that the flag of victorious Alpha 
Delta Phi had been raised at last over the 
haughty and heroic heights of Boston 
under the leadership of Major-General 
Choate. I was extremely sorry that I was 
unable to take part in the final assault, for 
I was holding the post on Staten Island, 
and I am glad to report to you that of the 
40,000 inhabitants of Staten Island I think 
there are not more than 39,999 still outside 
of our mystic order. General Choate, fol- 
lowing the example of his distinguished 
predecessor. General Washington, has 
transferred his headquarters from Boston 
to New York, which he occupies in great 
force, sallying forth from time to time and 
doing prodigies of eloquence against the 
Sigma Phis, Psi U's, Tau Gammas, and 
other hostile Greek tribes ; while across 



lOO AMHERST CHAPTER 

the river, in Brooklyn, our brother, the 
orator of the day, as you may well believe, 
offers persuasive benefits of clergy which 
melt the hearts of the most depraved 
and awaken even the hope of regeneration 
in the most desperate and abandoned Delta 
Kappa Epsilons. 

This has been an uncommonly favor- 
able season for the Greek letter societies. 
It began with the New York dinner for 
the Greek school at Athens. It was con- 
tinued by the triumphant assault at Bos- 
ton. It goes on to-day when the Alpha at 
Dartmouth celebrates the centennial of 
Phi Beta Kappa. But the culmination of 
the season is here, and now I speak rever- 
ently of Phi Beta Kappa, as of our common 
mother ; but Alpha Delta Phi is the prince 
royal of the majestic Greek line, and her 
semi-centennial here at Amherst is the apex 
of this memorable year. I am only sur- 
prised, Mr. President, that I find myself 
speaking in ^ny other language than that 
of Demosthenes or Pindar. I observe, as 
I know you did, gentlemen, that our dis- 
tinguished chairman of the evening could 
with difficulty save himself from lapsing 
into the Dorian mood, and wholly in vain 



ALPHA DELTA PHL lOI 

he Struggled to escape from the Eolian 
melody. As for what I may have to say I 
can only hope that what it may lack in 
Greek it may make up in intelligence, and 
I even trust that by some of the younger 
members of the Fraternity, at least, I may 
be understood if I venture to speak only 
in my native Yankee dialect. 

The felicity of this day is of many kinds, 
but all great transactions require a fitting 
scene. I look out upon this historic land- 
scape, these beautiful hills to the east where 
Shay's rebellion staggered and fell dead, 
that luxuriant meadow to the north where 
the flower of Essex was plucked by savage 
hands, the broad valley to the west where 
the river gods of the Connecticut dwelt, 
and I behold the proper theatre of this 
day's event. Here, also, is the scene of the 
most romantic and inspiring of New Eng- 
land legends, and if your neighbor, Mr. 
George Sheldon, of Deerfield, may dissolve 
the tale in the alembic of truth, he cannot 
destroy the significance of that tradition 
which romance and poetry and the in- 
stinct of heroism in the human heart will 
not let die. As I look out and see this gar- 
den of New England, Holyoke and Tom 



I02 AMHERST CHAPTER 

guarding, like sentinels, the southern gate, 
and Toby, in solitary state watching the 
northern approach, I know that I look not 
only upon a scene of beauty, but upon 
homes of prosperity, of peace, of freedom ; 
homes of intelligence, industry and moral 
constancy, such as no human eye ever saw 
in any other land at any other time. 

Alpha Delta Phi in politics ! What is 
it, gentlemen, but the integrity, the in- 
dependence, the courage, the flower of 
Puritan virtues which have given this 
region its renown and made it so fair? 
There is a great deal of fun made of the 
scholar in politics. Let the scholar in 
politic restort that he also serves who il- 
luminates his own thought and experience 
by which we all move with the thought and 
experience of all the ages ; that the man 
who trains himself by the best knowledge, 
who masters history not only in the spirit 
and in the sense, but for the purpose and the 
result that were so magnificently unfolded 
to us this morning, is a man quite as useful 
in American politics as the man who reads 
only a party organ and holds that **soap " 
is the true political solvent, and that honor 
and honesty are a super-celestial ambrosia 



ALPHA DELTA PHI. 103 

altogether too fine and good for the daily 
food of politics. You will hear, gentlemen, 
those of you who to-day set forth upon your 
journey in life — ^ybu will hear a great deal 
of Sunday-school statesmanship. But you 
will see a great deal more of saloon states- 
manship, and I beg you to remember that 
the country into which you are born and 
which you are to serve, came from the 
Sunday-school and not from the saloon. 
If to keep your hands clean in politics is to 
be a dude, then " dude " is a taunt to be borne 
as a wreath like the taunt of " Methodists'* 
hurled at Wesley, or of "whig " at the old 
opponents of despotism, or of "Yankee 
doodle *' at our fathers of the Revolution ; 
and if some of these young hearts shrink 
and quiver at those dreadful taunts of 
" Pharisee ** and " goody-goody " — not yet, 
not yet, brethren, have they the lofty faith 
and the fiery heart of righteousness, of 
which the mystic symbol is Alpha Delta Phi. 
Now, there seem to be two ways in which 
this Fraternity can serve American politics. 
The first is as a body of educated, intelli- 
gent, self-respecting men, in assuaging the 
fury of party spirit, a spirit which becomes 
more furious just in the degree that the 



I ©4 AMHERST CHAPTER 

real significance of parties disappears. In 
this country, gentlemen, we all work 
through political parties, but a party is, 
after all, the servant and the voter is the 
master. But the servant constantly strives 
to become the master, and generally suc- 
ceeds. I do not need to rehearse to you 
the purely partisan spirit. In one of his 
letters Swift says : " Even the ladies are 
splitting asunder into high church and 
low church, and such is their zeal for 
religion that they have hardly time to say 
their prayers.** Addison, with the same 
delicate touch of humor, describes that 
charming old Tory fox-hunter in the time 
of George the First, who swore that there 
had been " no decent weather in England 
since William the Third sat upon the 
throne;** and that other delightful inn- 
keeper, who said that really during 
the year he had not been able to go 
to church, but he trusted that he had 
served the Lord by heading the mob 
to pull down a few dissenting meeting- 
houses. This is the mildest statement of 
the ferocity of party spirit. The better 
one is Dr. Johnson's definition of port 
wine : " Why, gentlemen, it is black, it is 



ALPHA DELTA PHI, 1 05 

thick, and it makes you drunk. What more 
do you want ? " Blackguards enough you 
will meet in your career. Let this be our 
distinction, that the absence of the black- 
guard in politics marks the presence of 
the Alpha Delta Phi. 

There is one other way in which we may 
serve our politics, and that is in never being 
afraid to stand alone or in the minority. A 
man is not necessarily right because he is 
in the minority, but remember that every 
great movement begins with a minority. It 
is not the child of the Medici lounging in 
the frescoed corridors of the Vatican, lapped 
in all the luxury of ecclesiastical pomp, 
and infallibly supreme, from whom we an- 
ticipate the impulse of religious purification 
and progress, but from some solitary monk 
in scholastic seclusion, whose first faint 
word is like the earliest glimmer of a spark 
in universal gloom, that deepens on into 
the noontide glory of the religious liberty 
in which we live. When Garrison began, 
the mayor of Boston, the curled darling of 
Faneuil Hall, wrote : " I have ferreted out 
the paper and its editor. His office is in 
an obscure hole, his only visible auxiliary is 
a black boy, his only known supporters are 



Io6 AMHERST CHAPTER 

a few insignificant persons of all kinds and 
colors." Yes, your honor, yes ; " but give 
me a place on which to stand," said Archi- 
medes, " and I will move the world." In 
an obscure hole Garrison rested his moral 
lever and lifted and heaved the opinion of 
the continent. 

Gentlemen, the majority rightfully gov- 
erns, the majority rightfully rules in elec- 
tions and in legislation, because for those 
purposes there is no expedient yet devised so 
sure and wise. But the majority leaves this 
conscience of mine and those consciences 
of yours absolutely unruled. No man, I 
say, is right because he is in the minority, 
but a man is wrong when he fears to be 
in the minority. . In all human progress 
somebody must go first. In the purifica- 
tion and elevation of American politics 
let Alpha Delta Phi lead. This is the 
spirit of our Fraternity. What else has 
been the spirit which was not only un- 
folded to us in the glowing eloquence of 
the morning's discourse, but which has 
invested the life and the career of our 
orator with an unfading lustre ? Fifty 
years ago another scholar at another col- 
lege — and the words were recalled to me as 



ALPHA DELTA PHI, I07 

I listened this morning — reproducing in our 
own literature, in our own matchless prose, 
the very thought of Schiller in Don Carlos, 
which the orator quoted — Ralph Waldo 
Emerson said to the graduates of Dart- 
mouth as they left its doors : " When you 
shall say, as others do so must I, I re- 
nounce, I am sorry for it, the dreams of 
my youth, I must eat the fat of the land 
and let learning and romantic inspiration 
go until a more convenient season, then 
dies the man in you, then perish the buds 
of art, of poetry, of science, as they have 
died already in a thousand, thousand men. 
The hour of that choice is the crisis of your 
history. See to it that you hold yourself 
fast by the intellect." 

What else, gentlemen, was the spirit of 
him, our brother, whom we had hoped to 
see with us this evening, and whose death 
is like the sudden extinction of a pure and 
bright light by which men were guiding 
their footsteps ? Of late years I have seen 
little of Dr. Hitchcock, but that same sim- 
plicity and earnestness, that same broad 
sympathy and charity and kindly humor, 
that vigorous and vigilant mind, that glow- 
ing heart and burning word of patriotism 



Io8 AMHERST CHAPTER. 

which lifted and held and strengthened 
men in our great national controversy — all 
these I knew when wandering with him in 
other lands in other summers when the 
days were long. But that inflexible con- 
stancy, that moral independence, that mod- 
esty, that urbanity, that uncompromising 
fidelity to duty, let them be not only the 
glory of our friend and teacher, let them 
be also a tie of Alpha Delta Phi. "Where 
flies the white plume of Navarre," said the 
old French poet, " there follows victory !" 
And how shall we serve our mother so well, 
how so truly approve ourselves her chil- 
dren, how so surely make her countenance 
radiant to all beholders, as by forcing the 
cry, where honor and honesty appear in 
politics, " There rides Alpha Delta Phi and 
Victory at her side ! ** 



FIFTY YEARS OF AMERICAN 
SCHOLARSHIP. 

WILLIAM HAYES WARD, D.D., LL.D., '56. 

During the fifty years since our loved 
fraternity was introduced to this loved col- 
lege there has been nothing less than a 
revolution in the aims and methods of 
American scholarship, and in this revolu- 
tion our own members have had their noble 
part. Scholarship used to be — I hope it 
still is — the chief test by which were gauged 
the young candidates for initiation. We 
aimed for good scholars, men ambitious 
of honestly doing what they came here 
professedly to do. No other one thing 
would tell so well what was their calibre 
and what their executive power. Out of 
such men we would get some leaders. 

Our country has now fairly entered upon 
the second stage of her scholastic history. 
The first period was a long one, that of 
reception. Our best scholars were little 
other than school-boys. They learned what 



no AMHERST CHAPTER 

Others had put in books, and even the 
books were few. Dr. Wayland said forty 
years ago that there were not the books in 
this country to allow the production of a 
thoroughly scholarly treatise. Our fathers 
had scarcely the materials or the incitements 
to devote themselves to the higher tasks of 
original scholarship. What had descended 
to them, what other scholars had discovered 
and written down, these men taught, so far 
as they found it, to their pupils. They 
taught them to do what they had done, to 
receive and retain, and nothing more. 

Of course there were some noble excep- 
tions to this rule, but it was a general one. 
But besides such sporadic exceptions 
there was in the history of American 
scholarship just one grand exception, and 
that was in theology. New England was 
settled by the most independent thinkers in 
theology of their day, and the breed has 
never become extinct. Every generation 
has had its freshened theology. The 
younger Edwards enumerated ten points in 
which his father had made what he called 
"Improvements in Theology," and he 
straightway proceeds to add to their num- 
ber. It is not the Edward A. Park and 



ALPHA DELTA PHI. HI 

the Egbert C. Smyth of our generation 
alone that we must honor for their produc- 
tive as well as receptive power, but before 
them Taylor and Emmons and Hopkins 
and Bellamy, and chief among them the 
greatest factor in theologic progress which 
this country has yet seen, President Ed- 
wards. When I speak of a revolution in 
scholarship in our own days, I expressly 
exclude theology, a science peculiarly 
American. 

The second stage in the history of 
American scholarship is the productive. 
We have begun to learn to increase and 
not simply to preserve knowledge. There- 
by we pass out of the eddy into the cur- 
rent. A study of Chinese art and science 
is worthless. It shows us a path lost in the 
sands. Those little-headed people had a 
feminine power of worshiping their ances- 
tors and retaining what they had given. 
But they had not the masculine power of 
striking out anything new. If you want 
to study productive and useful history, you 
must follow the widening current, beginning 
at the fountain-head of art and learning on 
the shore of the Persian Gulf, where Nim- 
rod fought the wild bulls about Eridu the 



112 AMHERST CHAPTER 

Blessed ; then going north a little to old 
Sippara, where the Chaldean historian tells 
us that Noah buried the records of the 
antediluvian world, and from which he 
dug them up after the Flood ; then north 
again to Assyria ; thence westward through 
old Carchemish and the Hittite Kingdom to 
the Sidonian shore; then along the coast and 
islands inhabited by awakening Hellenic 
tribes, Sardis, Smyrna and Cyprus, till we 
reach glorious Greece, in whose development 
it seemed for a while that we had attained 
the highest possible ridge of progress and 
could go no higher. But then, after some 
centuries of rest, there came in a new moral 
force from Judea, which, taken up at last, 
with the scientific principles of Aristotle, 
into the blood of fresh nations, produced, 
through Italian and Teutonic and Norman 
races, the marvel of modern industrial and 
scientific, helpful, progressive and pro- 
ductive civilization. Only within the last 
few years has America got fairly into the 
current of this progress and begun to add 
to its force. 

It was natural that the new era should 
begin with science. Geology led the way, 
under the impulse of two great men, 



ALPHA DELTA PHI. 1 13 

% 

Benjamin Silliman, of Yale, and Edward 
Hitchcock, of Amherst. The latter we 
claim as one of our brothers, born out of 
due time; but his sons, are they not ours by 
true birth ? A little later Torrey and Gray 
became the fathers of American botany. 
Most important of the natural sciences, 
biology did not exist until Agassiz was im- 
ported to teach in Harvard College. But 
that great teacher left behind him a great 
company of enthusiastic pupils, each more 
advanced than he. Now there is no depart- 
ment of the natural sciences, unless it be, 
possibly, chemistry, in which we need feel 
ashamed of our record by the side of that of 
England, Germany or France. Not one of 
those nations possesses to-day more active, 
original investigators than Hall, Hayden, 
Dana, Leconte, Marsh, Cope and a dozen 
others, who could be mentioned in geol- 
ogy and palaeontology ; than Gray, Wilder, 
Coues, Verrill and the younger Agassiz in 
biology ; than Newcomb, Peters, Holden, 
Young, Gould, Langley, Newton and Asaph 
Hall in astronomy ; or than Rutherfurd, 
Rowland, Bell and Edison in physics. 

Linguistics owes a mighty debt to two 
American scholars, the one of them. 



114 AMHERST CHAPTER 

William D. Whitney, of Yale, and the other, 
Francis A. March, of Lafayette. The one 
is the father of all them that study Sanscrit, 
and the other of all them that love the Anglo- 
Saxon and the early English. The latter 
we are proud to honor as a brother of our 
chapter. There is no more vigorous school 
of Sanscritists in the world than those that 
call Whitney their father ; and among them 
no one has done more honorable original 
work than he who is, perhaps, the oldest 
of them, our own Amherst brother — Profes- 
sor Avery, of Bowdoin College. We con- 
gratulate the other institutions that have 
got so many of our great scholars. Pro- 
fessor March's pupils, who have taken 
up the history of European languages, 
are younger men, but we shall hear from 
them. 

The study of the other oriental languages 
is yet more recent with us. Twenty-five 
years ago Hebrew was taught in a dreamy 
way in fifty seminaries, perhaps, and 
nothing was known of it. It was a Penn- 
sylvania German theological professor 
who spoke of Hebrew as that tongue which 
he had siebenmal gelernt und siebenmal ver- 
gessen. Yale had one man semi-attached 



ALPHA DELTA PHL II5 



to it who was understood to understand 
Arabic ; but less than ten years ago, when 
a student at Harvard handed in a thesis 
on Arabic studies with a view to the Ph.D. 
degree, there was no one in Cambridge 
who could pass on it, and it had to be 
sent to the aged secretary of the Orien- 
tal Society at New Haven. Now we have 
not only our summer schools of Hebrew, 
where all the Semitic languages are taught 
to everybody, but within these last ten 
years, not to say five years, our theological 
seminaries have been manned with active 
and productive Hebraists ; at least three 
men are at work in original Syriac investi- 
gation, editing new texts, and Assyrian is 
taught by competent young men in half a 
dozen institutions, while creditable addi- 
tions have been made by Lyon, Smith and 
others, to our knowledge of Assyrian liter- 
ature and art. We are yet behind in some 
things — no one knows anything of Egypt- 
ology — ^but in no country is the promise 
better. There are many more students of 
Assyrian in America than in England or 
France — more than in Germany. 

Let me say a word of the latest of the 
sciences. Sociology, from which we cannot 



Il6 AMHERST CHAPTER 

disconnect history and the science of gov- 
ernment. I honor the men who, outside 
the schools, under the impulse of the old 
political economy or of mere politics, have 
made their studies of imposts and tariffs 
— ^such men as Carey, and Atkinson, and 
Henry George. But within a very few 
years a new science of public affairs has 
risen, and on a more scientific and induc- 
tive basis. It is yet in an inchoate con- 
dition. It is yet feeling about for its facts 
and has not wholly^found out its principles. 
It does not yet quite know whether it is a 
science of selfishness or of altruism. In 
this work the schools have led the way — 
Columbia, Johns Hopkins, Cornell, and last. 
Harvard and Yale. All these universities 
have fine departments of political science, 
and they publish two quarterly journals 
than which nothing better appears in 
Europe. It is only just to say that one of 
our Amherst brothers. Professor Burgess, 
of Columbia College, has been more than 
any other man the leader of this new move- 
ment. The fate that took him from Am- 
herst College I have mourned more than 
any other misfortune the college has met 
since I have known it. Out of what other 



ALPHA DELTA PHL II7 

influence like his came that troop of young 
men that had awakened in them the true 
scholar's ambition, and that flocked to 
Germany and to our own new Johns Hop- 
kins that they might learn not only how 
to learn but how to produce ? He has 
found, perhaps, a wider field there than he 
could have found here, although as I look 
over the list of the editors of those pro- 
jected cyclopedias of sociological science 
that are so soon to come out under the 
editorship of Professor Burgess and his as- 
sociates, and find six out of nine of them 
prepared by Amherst men, I wonder if 
Amherst College has been moved to New 
York. 

The history of the new development of 
American scholarship is the story of a few 
great teachers — Silliman, Hitchcock, Gray, 
Agassiz, Whitney, March, Burgess. It 
expressed itself in the founding of Johns 
Hopkins University, and the annexing of 
true postgraduate university departments 
to Yale, Harvard and Columbia, and latest 
Princeton, colleges. 

We see the fruit of it in our chairs 
of instruction, where no man can now ex- 
pect to get a position who has not studied 



Il8 AMHERST CHAPTER, 

abroad, and who cannot talk German and 
French and perhaps modern Greek (not 
yet Latin, alas !) as well as English. He must 
be a citizen of the world and acquainted 
with all that the great Republic of Letters 
is doing. That is not now the best college 
which teaches best how to acquire the old 
learning, but that which inspires most the 
noble ambition of adding something to the 
world's stock of useful knowledge — that 
ambition which is most akin to the Chris- 
tian ambition to increase the store of the 
world's goodness and happiness. The re- 
view of the period covered by the history 
of our chapter surprises me as I see how 
large a part this fraternity has had in this 
American renaissance. Perhaps there has 
been something in the spirit of our order 
that has been in touch with the best spirit 
of the age, and has taught us that they 
best serve God and men who can lead in 
the van. 



THE FRATERNITY OF ALPHA 
DELTA PHI. 

HON. JOSEPH H. CHOATE, Harvard, '52, 
PRESIDENT OF THE FRATERNITY. 

Mr, President and Brethren^ and may I 
not also say Sisters of Alpha Delta 
Phi: 

The average Amherst brain must be very 
elastic. We have always known that the 
true Alpha Belt's cranium is insatiable and 
inexhaustible, but after the experience of 
the last twentv-four hours it seems to me 
that the moment has come to cry a halt. 
My poor brain will hold no more, and I 
should deem myself guilty of an outrage 
indeed if I undertook to add one serious 
thought to the terrible load which has been 
imposed upon you since the sun rose to- 
day. Just think of it ! The Ivy oration, 
that peerless oration of Dr. Storrs, which 
has excited the admiration, the envy and 
the applause of this community ; the Grove 



I20 AMHERST CHAPTER 

oration, I believe they call it, and the six 
or seven orations which have now been 
delivered in your presence. I therefore 
refuse to say one serious word, and I pro- 
pose to devote the five minutes allotted to 
me, as the President of this Fraternity, in 
speaking without saying anything, which, I 
believe, has always been recognized as the 
true merit and art of after-dinner speaking. 
But before I proceed to speak on the toast 
assigned me, it seems to me that I ought, 
at least, to attempt to vindicate the much 
abused character of a brother of the Har- 
vard chapter, the only brother, I believe, 
in this vast assembly to-day representing 
that time-honored chapter. That was the 
unkindest cut of all this morning. With 
all the beauty of Amherst before him, and 
all its manliness behind him, for this peer- 
less orator of the day to cast such obloquy 
upon the Harvard brother ! 

Now, I never had the pleasure and honor 
of knowing Amherst before, except by tra- 
ditions that had lingered in Harvard on a 
visit that was made to that institution near- 
ly fifty years ago by two rustic brethren of 
the class of '39 from the Amherst chapter. 
They came to extend the blessings of the 



ALPHA DELTA PHL 121 

Fraternity and to visit their far remote 
and somewhat cool brethren at Cambridge. 
They came with the hayseed of Hampshire 
in their hair. Their hair, from being parted 
in the middle, was, in fact, not parted at 
all. It is true they brought with them no 
cane, but they carried upon their shoulders 
the old familiar umbrella which had come 
down from a prehistoric period. It is true 
they wore no gloves, but they wore their 
trousers in their boots, and I need not say 
to you that they left an impression in the 
Harvard mind which has taken all the 
glorious demonstrations of this day to ef- 
face from the memory of their repre- 
sentative. Well, gentlemen, I will let the 
Harvard chapter speak for itself. Litera- 
ture, I believe, has been the first great 
end and aim of Alpha Delta Phi, and if 
the Harvard chapter had done nothing 
for the Fraternity, and the world, but to 
give it James Russell Lowell, the Harvard 
chapter would rest content. In view of 
this unkind reflection passed upon me, and 
those whom I hold near and dear, by the 
orator of the day, I will not throw any ad- 
ditional laurels upon those which already 
crown his brow. There was one criticism 



122 AMHERST CHAPTER 

on his oration, however, which did strike 
me with great interest and delight. It was 
that which he received before he had said 
a word. His reputation had drawn to the 
body of the house all that was manly and 
learned and strong in the surroundings of 
Amherst. It had attracted to the gallery 
all the women that sympathize with Alpha 
Delta Phi — and what true woman does not ? 
— and not only the women, but the babies 
too. And when he unrolled and laid upon 
the desk that copious and ponderous manu- 
script from which he was to speak, that in- 
fant cry from the North convulsed my heart. 
Who was that youthful stranger? You 
have heard of the kinship of Alpha Delta 
Phi, he was the son of a true Alpha Delt. 
He was precocious, audacious, it was true. 
He had come to hear the oration, but when 
he saw that grand manuscript unfolded, he 
said to himself and to his mother, " This is 
too much," and he retired before a single 
blow was dealt. He retired in dismay, be- 
cause, however much he may grow to the 
stature of the perfect Alpha Delt, he saw 
that that was not milk for babies, but 
strong meat for men. 

Now, in my service as President of this 



ALPHA DELTA PHI, 1 23 

Fraternity, I have been very much struck 
with some things. As I have attended the 
convention at New York, at Ithaca, at 
Boston, and at Amherst at last, the pres- 
ence of women in our deliberations and at 
our festivities has struck me with interest 
and admiration. Co-education, as Dr. 
Storrs demonstrated this morning, in that 
close tie that binds Amherst to Northamp- 
ton, is already accomplished. In the per- 
formance of my duty as President of the 
Fraternity it has been my pleasure to read 
the reports as they have come from all the 
undergraduate chapters, and from those 
where co-education was really carried into 
practice, I have been very much struck with 
one significant, harmonious, and uniform 
report. You know the younger brethren 
of all the chapters like to magnify the 
position and relations within their respec- 
tive colleges, and all these uniformly re- 
port that "the highest honor in our college 
has been carried off by a woman, but the 
best man is an Alpha Delt." 

Now, I know of no remedy for this state 
of things but that we admit them into full 
fraternity. By and by we shall have a 
chapter of sisters who will come up with 



124 AMHERST CHAPTER 

the Star and crescent upon their breasts. I 
echo the fine oration on the chivalry of 
Alpha Delta Phi : When our sisters so 
come, they will be received by the brethren 
with open hearts, and arms extended wide. 
Now of the Fraternity and of my duties 
as President of the association. It has 
been happily compared by Mr. Curtis — 
the office of President of this Frater- 
nity — with that of the President of the 
United States. There is much in com- 
mon between the two dignified positions. 
In the first place, there is but one man 
among the sixty millions of American citi- 
zens who can occupy the position at the 
same time. In the second place, the salary 
of the President is, I believe, altogether in- 
adequate to the great duties he has to per- 
form. I have found it almost necessary to 
abandon my usual calling and give myself 
up to its duties. Journeys to Ithaca, jour- 
neys to Boston, journeys to Amherst — all 
richly repaid by that grand feast of reason 
that I found there — but none of the usual 
material profit. And I found another thing 
— Mr. Curtis will correct me if I am wrong, 
for he knows who said that the real avenue 
to his brain is through the stomach ; so your 



ALPHA DELTA PHI, • 1 25 

President has found that it has been neces- 
sary for that organ to be cultivated so to 
enable him to perform the duties pertaining 
to the office. We sat down to a banquet 
beginning at one o'clock in the morning, 
and at Boston we sat nearly until daylight. 
Here there is one feature which certainly 
has not been tried, however inspiring it is 
— it is the first Alpha Delta Phi banquet 
that I have ever attended which is on the 
true prohibition temperance style. How- 
ever much that may impair our digestion, 
it appeals to our patriotism, to our sense 
of duty as good citizens. 

I have not been entirely satisfied with 
the review of the last fifty years of Alpha 
Delta Phi. It does seem to me that suffi- 
cient credit has not been claimed for the 
achievements of the Fraternity. When 
you compare the benighted condition of 
mankind as it was before this Fraternity 
was established, with what it is to-day, in 
every realm of human interest and human 
knowledge and human character, how in- 
finite is the debt which the world owes to 
the founders of this Fraternitv. I claim 
the credit of all the great things that have 
been done as the immediate and direct 



126 AMHERST CHAPTER 

result of the foundation of this society and 
its development in the last fifty years. Mr. 
Curtis has said a great deal about Alpha 
Delta Phi in politics. He has given you 
something in the abstract. This society 
has given to the world something in the 
concrete. When you consider the great 
reform that is now going on in American 
politics and American public life, when you 
look for the men who have done the most 
to put an end to the corruption and in- 
competency in office, to make it a real fact 
that public office is only a public duty and 
a public trust, who are the men to whom 
the world may well point as chief factors 
in the result ? Does not the first and fore- 
most sit beside me at this table. And when 
you look for his coadjutors in that great 
service, where will you find the names of 
men who have done more to uphold his 
hands than our brothers Everett P. Wheeler 
and Charles F. Fairchild, who now occupies 
the post of the Secretary of the Treasury. 
But I am afraid I am getting serious. I 
did not intend it, I never meant to, and I 
must apologize for it. There is one idea 
which seems worth drawing out, that is 
the advancing of this great cause of the 



•.- v^ - — •— - / -jt- • k. jf. .»'.:_ 



ALPHA DELTA PHI. 1 27 

promotion of the civil service. Inasmuch 
as these three brothers of ours have done 
so well, why would it not be a good plan 
to extend the service throughout all the 
branches of this Fraternity ? In these 
days there is no distinction that is discern- 
ible between a member of one party that 
exists and a member of the other. Why 
would it not be a good plan, Mr. President 
and brethren, to form a new party upon this 
platform; that the public service in all its 
branches should be entrusted to the mem- 
bers of Alpha Delta Phi ? We would know 
then that every public duty would be well 
performed. It is true there are not enough 
to fill all the offices, but 6,000 members of 
this Fraternity would fill all the principal 
ones — all that were worth having, or that 
were acceptable. That is something that 
I would throw out for the consideration of 
the representatives of the various chapters 
to contemplate and act upon. 

Mr. President, a word has been said by 
President Seelye of the good influence that 
this Fraternity has exercised in the various 
colleges of the land. But I do not think, 
after all, that we can claim all of the credit 
of civilization as it exists to-day. I did 



128 AMHERST CHAPTER 

think so once. I do not know the true 
merits of the case which he presents, but 
last winter, in my honored capacity as 
President of this Fraternity, I received a 
most striking compliment. That society 
which has stood side by side and shoulder 
to shoulder with ours in all the various 
colleges of the land, celebrated in New 
York the 50th anniversary of its birth, and 
I was invited, as your representative, to a 
seat at their board. It was the first time 
that any encroachment had been made 
upon those barriers of separation and 
hostility which had so long divided that 
association from ours. You may imagine 
what a telling sermon I was able to preach 
to them, reviewing our careers, the rivalry 
of emulation, of actual hostility at times, 
pointing out to them how they had warred 
upon us with relentless fury in all the 
colleges. I took for my text one that they 
fully appreciated : " Love your enemies ; 
bless them that curse you ; do good to 
them that despitefully use you." 

Now, brethren, I am sorry for you — you 
have to listen to eight more orations and 
I fear you will have to sit here until two or 
three in the morning until all the orators 



ALPHA DELTA PHI. 1 29 

have had their say. I trust you will all 
survive. I trust the members now 
present will be able to come down to 
New York about the month of May next 
and show no worse for the torrents of 
oratory and floods of wisdom with which 
you have been overwhelmed at Amherst. 



GREEK LETTERS AND LETTERS 

LITERARY. 

PROF. F. A. MARCH, '45. 

Here and now there can be only three 
letters to speak of, A j^ $ — emblems of 
friendship, of fraternity among scholars — 
emblems, therefore, of the deepest and 
richest sources of all that is best in litera- 
ture. Intellect is a servant of nature, the 
creative power in literature. Genius springs 
from the affections. In college recitations 
and halls of debate we sharpen our wits 
for the battle of life. We may get to be as 
sharp and as smart as one of Shakespeare's 
fools ; but it is in the cosy rooms oiA/i ^, 
or on summer evenings, perhaps, on the 
chapel steps, crooning with a brother in 
A A $y siS we sit looking westward on all 
the wondrous beauties of our valley, or 
skyward, where the crescent moon with a 
single star at her side reigns o'er half a 
heaven of blue, that those thoughts arise 
which make us free of the realm of beauty 



ALPHA DELTA PHL I3I 

and truth. Here wit tempered with love 
becomes humor. Here knowledge steeped 
in the affections becomes wisdom. Here 
talent, new born, becomes genius. 

The serene temper, the genial manner, 
the radiant face of a whole-souled bVother 

« 

of a scholar's Fraternity are " the brave 
complexion which leads the van and swal- 
lows up the cities." 

A chapter of ^ ^ ^ is a nursery of genial 
manhood, an eyrie where genius broods its 
wings. 



BROTHERHOOD WITHIN AND 
WITHOUT. 



HON. H. S. STOCKBRIDGE, '45. 



Mr, President: The theme which you 
have assigned to me has been, at least in 
one of its departments, so thoroughly 
covered by our president that it seems to 
me, as at the Methodist meetings after the 
sermon, there needs only a few words. But 
it is due to myself that I should say, in one 
respect at least, I am not unlike the good 
old deacon, in the land of steady habits for 
too great an indulgence in that which in- 
ebriates more than it cheers. He said : 
" While I cannot deny the fact, I deny 
the criminality, for I have prayed that 
this thing might depart from me, and now 
I have shifted the responsibility." You 
are aware, Mr. President, that I endeavored 
and asked that I should not be imposed 
upon this audience ; therefore I have, 
as the good old deacon did, shifted the 
responsibility. 



ALPHA DELTA PHI, 133 

But when we come to speak of the 
brotherhood within our own breasts it is a 
thing to be felt and not talked about. The 
spirit engendered in our chapter -house 
on yonder hill, stretching over continent 
and ocean, has drawn men here to this 
semi-centennial anniversary from all 
quarters of the globe, and from all voca- 
tions and pursuits of life, to review again 
the strongest and most lasting attachments, 
as well as the most cherished friendships, 
of their lives. I am sure no one who has 
been away from his chapter as long as I, 
has ever found any attachment in life, 
in friendship, so abiding as those which 
they formed in Alpha Delta Phi of Amherst 
College. I have always found members of 
the Alpha Delta Phi, from whatever chapter 
they came, true to the pledges they have 
assumed, ready to recognize a brother by 
the kindred of blood, to do him a favor 
on every opportunity. I have found them 
most entitled to the particular and marked 
attention and respect, not of the brother- 
hood alone, but of the world at large. This 
is the brotherhood of the Alpha Delta Phi 
— nobility and unselfishness of purposes, of 
aspirations, of aim, and it is as lasting as 



134 AMHERST CHAPTER 

the lives of the men who enter into that 
brotherhood. 

But when we speak of the brotherhood 
without, the gentleman who sat beside me 
a few minutes ago suggested the words of 
the apostle, " Bless them that curse you ; 
do good to them that despitefully use you." 
While we do not mean to say by any means 
that all without are barbarians, we do mean 
to say that all that are without should not 
be kept there. Speaking of the brother- 
hood without, I suppose the first thing this 
brotherhood will embrace, as suggested by 
the orator of the day, is the institution 
across the river at Northampton. I am 
sure the younger members would be glad 
to recognize that as a branch. 

But there is another thought. Looking 
over the world's history we find that the 
struggle has not been for brotherhood but 
for mastery. We have had the pleasure of 
seeing, within the last few years, that these 
great struggles for mastery which have 
bathed the world in blood and desolation, 
have taken a different course. We find 
that when the influences that control our 
chapter, here and elsewhere, prevail, a 
different way has been found of settling 



ALPHA DELTA PHI. 1 35 

the world's disagreements than that one 
which has set them at the cannon's mouth. 

Now, then, as the world progresses, and 
principles which we learn to inculcate pre- 
vail, we shall find, if we live until the mil- 
lennium, that the brotherhood of man is 
that consummation, that flower of the ages, 
towards which all things are tending and 
to which brotherhoods like this more than 
perhaps any other thing, unless it shall be 
the Christian Church, shall tend to advance. 

But I insist, Mr. President, considering 
what the president of the organization has 
said, that I should not inflict another word 
upon him or the Fraternity. 



LOVE THE SISTERHOOD. 

PRES. TRUMAN J. BACKUS, Rochester, '64. 

Brothers in Alpha Delta Phi : 

As I have recalled the post-prandial 
scenes of recent years, and reminded myself 
of the one sentiment usually assigned to 
me for a response, a train of reflection has 
been awakened which naturally separates 
into three parts : first, the men of one 
idea ; secondly, the men who are supposed 
to have but one idea ; thirdly, the one idea. 

In discussing a theme so perplexing to 
you, so simple and familiar to me (for per- 
plexity and simplicity are relative to think- 
ers), we may serve our mutual convenience 
by adopting the homiletical method of the 
negro divine whose text suggested its own 
division ; the world, the flesh, the devil. As 
he did, so will we, discuss the first point 
briefly, touch lightly upon the second, and 
hasten on to the third as rapidly as pos- 
sible. 

The man of one idea, Hazlitt has em- 
balmed the prototype. The progeny, how- 
ever widely scattered, display the features 



ALPHA DELTA PHI, 137 

of their lineage, are known to all men, and 
meet an affected and universal disapproval. 
But, in fact, all men admire and envy 
them ; and every aspirant after mortal 
glory hopes, at some day, and soon, to lose 
himself in the immensity of an idea. In 
this concealed aspiration the man of our 
generation is reasonable ; for this is the 
age of scientific research, and science is 
the product of analytical method, and 
analysis is but another name for classifica- 
tion, and classification evokes the special- 
ist, and the specialist is a man of one idea 
— the great man of our generation. 

The unthinking company at the ban- 
queting table, refusing to hear the " crank*' 
and "fanatic,*' still hail righteousness and 
eternal fitness in the fact that the followers 
of one certain calling are men of one idea. 

Secondly^ the men who are supposed to have 
but one idea. They are the presidents of 
colleges for women, and the masters of 
high schools for girls. The world seems 
never weary of their theme. At the public 
corner, and in the mystic retreat where the 
star never dims and the crescent never 
wanes, the listener appeals for sentiments 
from these priests of one idea. 



138 AMHERST CHAPTER 

Thirdly^ the one idea. 

The great idea of this generation is the 
higher education of women. It is bring- 
ing neatness, order, vivacity, patience, gen- 
tleness, devotion and scholarliness into 
the schoolrooms, and there they will abide 
and increase, and will develop our schools, 
from the lowest to the highest, until the 
dreams of the lovers of youth are fulfilled. 
It is working as leaven in our churches, 
assimilating dry doctrines, transmuting 
them into principles of righteousness, and 
giving them issue again in thoughtful guid- 
ance of the wayward and the poor. It is 
reorganizing the penitentiary, cleansing the 
air of hospitals, managing refuges for the 
Magdalen and the foundling, preaching the 
good news of sanitation, checking the ar- 
rogance of King Alcohol, and arraigning the 
maladministration of government in our 
cities. You, yourselves, are witnesses of the 
inspiring advance along these lines, made 
during the last twenty years. Whence the 
inspiration ? It has come from the organ- 
ized work of women. They have found 
their leaders ; these leaders are themselves 
women who know the power attained by 
patient, methodic, mental training. 



ALPHA DELTA PHI. 1 39 

It happened that the exigencies of the 
Civil War summoned women to the field. 
They did much of the work of the Sanitary 
and Christian commissions. They were 
there learning to be active parts of gigan- 
tic organizations. They tasted the sweet- 
ness of heroism, and made it impossible for 
the noble of their sex to be satisfied with 
inactivity. It happened, also, while the 
war was going on, while patriotism was 
making the dullard ardent, and the youth 
serious, that Matthew Vassar, both prophet 
and apostle of a new idea, was raising a 
temple commemorative of his sympathy 
with the intellectual ambitions of women. 
When the war was over, the temple was 
builded, its doors were opened, and thither 
went the aspiring daughters of the land. 

The schools of a generation ago laid but 
a thin film of scholarship upon young 
women — a cheap electroplating of ethics 
and aesthetics, — astronomy without mathe- 
matics, and art copied from the flat. Re- 
mind yourselves of that pretentious super- 
ficiality, and from it turn to look upon 
the throngs of young women climbing the 
steep ascents of learning, along the rugged 
ways which have been builded at Vassar, 



14© AMHERST CHAPTER 



at Wellesley, at Smith, at Brjm Mawr, and 
at a score of colleges where brother and 
sister are panting towards the summit — ^the 
weary brother pushed along — the ambitious 
sister pulling at the reins — ^and when you 
have noted the contrast between the old- 
time "female education," and "the higher 
education of women," you will have recog- 
nized the force in our social life which is 
giving us new industries, larger education, 
broader philanthropy, and better adminis- 
tration of all public affairs. 

When Mr. Vassar gave his large wealth 
to endow the college which bears his name, 
he startled America and Europe by the 
boldness and novelty of his philanthropy. 
Facetious people styled his institution 
" Vassar's Folly." It was an experiment. 
For the man of the world, the experiment 
was to prove whether young women in 
numbers sufficient to organize a college 
would deny themselves the pleasures of 
social life, and pay the time and effort de- 
manded as the price of a scholastic degree ; 
for the special friends of education the ex- 
periment was to decide whether the physical 
and the mental constitution of woman was 
capable of enduring the strain of an ad- 



ALPHA DELTA PHI. 141 

vanced and rigorous course of study. There 
were no other questions involved. Young 
women in large and ever-growing numbers 
seek the training offered by their colleges ; 
and these colleges to-day are wielding one 
of their most beneficent influences in train- 
ing their students to attain the dignity of 
fine physical development. 

Twenty years ago the popular faith be- 
lieved that there is " sex in education." 
Now you may transpose the courses of 
study at Amherst and Vassar, at Smith and 
Cornell, and the students will not know 
that they have been unsexed, nor will the 
professors discover that their students have 
lost or gained in the number of mental 
faculties. Then a college for women was 
supposed to be a seminary for sentimental- 
ism. Now a college is admitted to be a 
school where advanced lines of training 
in mathematics, in natural and physical 
science, in literature and language, are 
given, regardless of the question whether 
the students find their supplementary train- 
ing in boat-racing or in embroidery. The 
Old theory of " sex in education " is stranded 
and abandoned. 

The surprising educational achievements 



142 AMHERST CHAPTER, 

of these twenty years are due, chiefly, to 
the earnestness of young women at college. 
They have demanded that there be no pre- 
tense, no substitute for a thorough and 
difficult curriculum. They have been in 
communication with young men at college, 
have kept themselves informed as to the 
kind and the degree of training given at 
Amherst, Harvard and Yale, and have been 
prompt in challenging the necessity, the 
wisdom, the honesty of any modification of 
requirements whereby the young woman 
might secure the easier graduation. Every 
college official knows the potency of the 
moral sentiment among students, in con- 
straining the legislation of a college fac- 
ulty ; and that constraint has been opera- 
tive in colleges for women, compelling their 
conformity to the severe course of study 
assigned at the highest colleges for men. 
So Vassar, Smith, Wellesley have drifted 
from the quiet moorings selected for them 
by friendly theorists of twenty years ago, 
and have been borne along the deep 
channel which has been worn by the move- 
ment of two centuries of American college 
history. That channel has broadened, 
has changed its direction by slow processes, 



ALPHA DELTA PHI. 1 43 

but the main channel as it runs to-day, is 
kept by the novel craft, a woman's college. 
The sources of error regarding woman's 
limitations in the world of learning were 
near the surface. It was believed that her 
body could not endure the strain of a col- 
lege course — an honest belief, now proved 
to be erroneous. Statistics offer the perfect 
refutation — indeed they discovered a law 
that the health of a young woman improves 
under the collegiate discipline. It is natural 
that this result should appear ; for, entering 
college, she is transferred from social life, 
where over -feeding and under - sleeping 
impair health, from the home where her 
wish, however injudicious, is the will of 
the family ; * and she is brought into a 
life where self-respect exacts industry and 
conformity to regulations, where she must 
have constant regard for others in order 
that others may have regard for her, where 
the hours for sleep and the hours for eat- 
ing are ordered by the faultless tyranny of 
a clock from whose decree there is no ap- 
peal. Living under such regulations, and 
debarred from her brother's excesses, she 
is usually in condition better than his for 
the exactions of the class-room. 



144 AMHERST CHAPTER 

There was a sentimental theory about 
the native intuitional power of woman — a 
power which was supposed to lift her above 
the need of advanced training, and at the 
same time, to disqualify her for sustaining 
protracted logical processes. Now, what- 
ever a woman's intuitional gifts may be, 
they do not make her an idiot, they do not 
debar her from severe work in mathematics 
and psychology. For my part, I think 
that the talk about woman's intuition is 
bald nonsense, and that the facts advanced 
for its support are perverted. It is, doubt- 
less, a fact that women are more ready to 
admit the claims of duty than are men. A 
man and a woman look at such a claim ; 
the woman promptly bows to it, while the 
man squints, looks aside and quibbles un- 
til he is compelled to face the claim. Then 
he gallantly lies about the superiority of 
woman's intuition. All facts submitted in 
support of this hypocritical theory are, 
singularly enough, from the realm of 
ethics. No woman's unthinking intuition 
ever solved Sturm's Theorem, or trans- 
lated the Preface of Livy, or detected 
Kant's distinction between the reason and 
the understanding. 



ALPHA DELTA PHL I45 

There was an undertone of sentiment, 
deep and charming, to the effect that a 
woman should be a wife and a mother ; 
but that sentiment, once advanced with 
potency against the collegiate education 
of women, has lost its significance, for a 
thousand experiments have proved that a 
woman graduated from college may be a 
wife and a mother. 

All other solicitudes and objections were 
insignificant when compared with the 
dread men had lest collegiate education 
should make women masculine. You had 
it ; so had I. How preposterous now to 
one who sees the intellectual refinement, 
the aesthetic pleasures, the social dignity of 
many a home made conspicuous in these 
charms by the graces and powers devel- 
oped in the mistress of that home under 
the training of her college days. 

We once said that young women would 
not give the time demanded by the col- 
lege, and many people still think that they 
should not. But what is a young woman 
to do after leaving the secondary school ? 
It is a time most critical in the forming 
of character. Social tyranny forbids her 
serving an employer. The hand of idle- 



146 AMHERST CHAPTER. 

ness will hold her hand ; and she will be 
of heroic mould whom idleness does not 
betray into flirting with things in male 
apparel, or forming undying loves for 
other women, or writing poetry. No peo- 
ple have so much leisure as the daughters 
of well-to-do parentage just when the col- 
lege invites them to her shelter. 

Such barren and treacherous arguments 
once arrayed the public sentiment against 
the movement favorable to the higher edu- 
cation of women. But all observing people 
have seen the futility of such objections, 
and concede that brother and sister have 
like organs of sense, have like native pow- 
ers of perception and reason, and under 
the inexorable laws of thought, must think 
in the same forms of syllogistic reasoning. 

The higher education of woman is the 
eminent social achievement of our age ; 
the college girls, themselves, despite popu- 
lar prejudice and the inefficiency of their 
teachers, have achieved the victory. 

Brothers in Alpha Delta Phi, how full 
of chivalry and common sense are the 
words of our presiding officer when he 
summons us to " Love the Sisterhood ! " 



MEMBERSHIP OF THE CHAPTER 



CHARTER MEMBERS. 

LuciAN Barbour L Z, 

Edwin Elisha Bliss . . N. 2, 

Whiting Griswold . . . EC, X\ 

Nathaniel Lynds Lord . . . A, M, 
John Alexander McKinstry . . O, P^ 
Jonathan Bryant Marshall . . O, T. 

Horace Maynard E", A" 

Alexander Montgomery . . . A, T, 
George Bliss Morris . . . . P,A. 

Joseph Peckham E. B, 

William Barrett Reed . , A, J, 

Daniel Rice E. X. 

Joel Edson Rockwell . . . . E.A, 
Curtis Benjamin Minor Smith . . P, F, 
James Smith Thayer . . E. A, K, 

Charles Ellery Washburn . B,T*, 

Henry Warren Williams P, A^ 



ADDRESS LIST. 



ABBE, WILLIAM ALANSON, '57. 
New Bedford, Mass. 

ABBOTT, ASA GEORGE, '65. 
Died July a, 1870. 

ADAMS, GEORGE MOULTON, REV., '44. 
Holliston, Mass. 

ALDEN, EDMUND KIMBALL, REV., '44. 
I Somerset St., Boston, Mass. 

ALDEN, EDMUND KIMBALL, »8o. 

" Century" Co., 33 East 17th St., New York City 

ALLEN, ADDISON, »88. 

Columbia. Colle£:e Law SchooL 

ALLEN, GLENN SEVIENNE, *Sg. 
Amiierst Colleg^e, Amherst, Mass. 

ALLEN, WASHINGTON IRVING, »6a. 
Silver Reef, Utah. 

ALVORD, ALFRED ELY, '84. 
40 Water St., Boston, Mass. 

ALVORD, ANDREW PORTEIL »87. 
175 Herkimer St., Brooklyn, N. Y. 

AMES, HERBERT BROWN, '85. 

Care of Ames, Holden & Co., Montreal, Canada. 

APPLETON, SAMUEL EDWARDS, '84. 
48 West Ninth St., New York City. 

ARMSBY, LAUREN, REV., »43. 
Coundl Grove, Kansas. 

ARMSTRONG, COLLIN, '77. 

*• Sun " Office, Park Row, New York City. 

ARNELL, DAVID REEVE, »4o. 
Died July 25, 1852. 

AUSTIN, HARMON, »88. 

Amherst College, Amherst, Mass. 

AVERY, JOHN, '61. 
Brunswick, Maine. 



^ I 



152 AMHERST CHAPTER 

BABBOTT, FRANK LUSK, LL.B., '78. 
13th Ave. and 25th St., New York Citjr. 

BALL, WILLIAM CREIGHTON, '(A, 
Terre Haute, Ind. 

BANCROFT, FREDERIC AUSTIN, '8a. 
Freiburg, Baden, Germany. 

BANCROFT, JACOB HENRY, REV., '39. 
Died August 35, 1844. 

BARBOUR, LUCIAN, '37. 
Died 

BARKER, JAMES LAWRENCE, *6s, 
SanU Barbara, Cal. 

BARROWS, JOHN OTTIS, REV., '60. 
Newington, Conn. 

BARROWS, WILLIAM HENRY, REV., •59. 
Montour, Iowa. 

BARTON, HOMER ROLLIN, »63. 
Died August is, 1863. 

BARTON, WALTER, REV., '56. 
Attleboro*, Mass. 

BATEMAN, CLIFFORD RUSH, '76. 
Died February 6, 1883. 

BEATTIE, DAVID, '59. 
Troy, N. Y. 

BEECHER, HERBERT FOOTE, '76, 
Port Townsend, Washington Territory. 

BEECHER, HENRY WARD, REV., '34. 
Died March 8, 1887. 

BEST, JAMES, '85. 
Kinderhook, N. Y. 

BICKNELL, THOMAS WILLIAMS, '57. 
Worcester Station, Boston, Mass. 

BILLINGS, CHARLES MORRIS, M.D., '63. 
Nashua, Chickasaw Co., Iowa. 

BILLINGS, RICHARD SALTER, REV., »47. 
Danbury, Conn. 

BISBEE, JOSEPH BARTLETT, •80. 
Poughkeepsie, N. Y. 

BISHOP, GEORGE SAYLES, REV., '58. 
14 Burnet St., East Orange, N. J. 



ALPHA DELTA PHI. 153 

BISHOP, JAMES LORD, LL.B., '65. 
115 Broadway, New York City. 

BLAKE, LUCIEN IRA, Ph.D., '77. 
Rose Polytechnic, Terre Haute, Ind. 

BLAKE, MAURICE BENAIAH. '66. 
Died February 8, 1886. 

BLANCH ARD, JOSEPH NATHANIEL, REV., '71. 
St. John's Rectory, Detroit, Mich. 

BLATCHFORD, PAUL, '82. 
375 La Salle Ave., Chicago, 111. 

BLISS, CHARLES LINCOLN, '88. 
Amherst College, Amherst, Mass. 

BLISS, EDWIN ELISHA, REV., '37. 
Newton Centre, Mass. 

BLISS, EDWIN MUNSELL, REV., '71. 
Bible House, Constantinople, Turkey. 

BLISS, FREDERICK JONES, REV., '80. 
Amherst, Mass. 

BLISS, HOWARD SWEETZER, REV., '82. 
Amherst, Mass. 

BLISS, WILLIAM DWIGHT PORTER, '78. 
Lee, Mass. 

BLISS, WILLIAM TYLER, '87. 
32 Halsted St., East Orange, N. J. 

BOARDMAN, JOSEPH, REV., '55. 
Bamet, Vermont. 

BOLTWOOD, HENRY LEONIDAS, REV., '53. 
Evanston, 111. 

BOND, EPHRAIM WARD, LL.B., '41. 
Springfield, Mass. 

BOND, NELSON FREEMAN, '64. 
Fitchburg, Mass. 

BOWLER, FRANK, REV., '76. 
Grand Rapids, Mich. 

BOYDEN, ARTHUR CLARKE, '76. 

State Normal School, Bridgewater, Mass. 

BOYDEN WALLACE CLARKE, '83. 
Easthampton, Mass. 

BRACKETT, GILBERT ROBBINS, REV., '57. 
8 Wragg St., Charleston, S. C. 



154 AMHERST CHAPTER 



BRADLEY, LEVERETT, REV., '73. 
Andover, Mass. 

BRANSCOMBE, CHARLES HENRY, '45. 
Topeka, Kansas. 

BRAYTON, EDMUND CULLEN, M.D., »67. 
Died September 7, 1875. 

BRAYTON, GEORGE, REV., '66. 
Died June 9, 1873. 

BREED, BOWMAN BIGELOW, M.D., '53. 
Died December 16, 1873. 

BREED, DANIEL HENRY, '57. 
Died December 13, 1885. 

BREWSTER, WILLIAM LEWIS, '88. 
Amherst College, Amherst, Mass. 

BRIGHAM, DON FERDINAND, '63. 
114 Wooster St., Hartford, Conn. 

BRIGHAM, JEROME RIPLEY, '45. 
525 Cass St., Milwaukee, Wis. 

BROOKE, EDWIN ATLEE, '46. 
Bradford, Pa. 

BROOKS, CHARLES GROSVENOR, M.D.. '68. 
z Saratoga Place, East Boston, Mass. 

BROOKS, STEPHEN DRIVER, M.D., '75. 
Evansville, Ind. 

BROUGHTON, NATHANIEL HOOPER, REV., '47. 
Died June 2, 1866. 

BROWN, SAMUEL EDWARD, '55. 
10 Burling Slip, New York City. 

BROWNELL, CHARLES HENRY, '71. 
Peru, Ind. 

BROWNELL, WILLIAM CRARY, '71. 
205 West 56th St., New York City. 

BUCHANAN, ABNER THOMAS, M.D., '68. 
204 North Third St., St. Louis, Mo. 

BUCK, CHARLES WENTWORTH, REV., '55. 
Cambridge, Mass. 

BUFFUM, CHARLES ALBERT, '75. 

Williston Seminary, Easthampton, Mass. 

BURGESS, EBENEZER PRINCE, M.D., '52. 
Died May 14, 1877. 



J 



ALPHA DELTA PHI. 1 55 

BURGESS, JOHN WILLIAM, '67. 
323 West S7th St., New York City. 

BURLEY, CLARENCE AUGUSTUS (Burleigh), »73. 
Room 824, 112 Clark St., Chicago, 111. 

BURNETTE, FRANCIS ELLSWORTH, '67. 
Reed's Ferry, N. H. 

BURNHAM, MICHAEL, REV., '67. 
85 Elliott St., Springfield, Mass. 

BURR. CHARLES WOLCOTT, '90. 
Aubumdale, Mass. 

BURT, FRANCIS, '57. 
Died September 9, 1863. 

BUTLER, SAMUEL PATTERSON, '71- 

♦♦ Herald" Office, Park Row, New York City. 

CARSON, FRANK MARTIN, REV., '79. 
Matteawan, N. Y. 

CHANCELLOR, WILLIAM ESTABROOK, '89. 
Amherst College, Amherst, Mass. 

CHAPIN, FRANKLIN PERRY, REV., '52. 
Easton, Mass. ^ 

CHAPIN, GEORGE MOOAR, '79. 
16 Montauk Block, Chicago, 111. 

CHAPIN, LUCIUS DELISON, REV., '51. 
Hyde Park, 111. 

CHAPIN, WALLACE TORRY, '87. 
Hyde Park, 111. 

CHEAVENS, HENRY MARTYN, M.D., '52. 
Ashland, Boone Co., Mo. 

CHICKERING, WILLIAM HENRY, LL.B., '71. 
206 Sansome St., San Francisco, Cal. 

CHILD, CHARLES JESSE, ^84. 

American Legation, Bangkok, Siam, 

or Richmond, Mo. 

CHOATE, RUFUS, JR., '55. 
Died January 15, 1866. 

CHOATE, WASHINGTON, REV., '70. 
Irvington, N. Y. 

CHURCH, GEORGE EVERETT, '72. 

Oxford Grammar School, Providence, R. I. 

CLAFLIN, JAMES FITZGERALD, '59. 
262 Ashland Boulevard, Chicago, 111. 



156 AMHERST CHAPTER 

CLAFLIN, WILLIAM, »83. 
154 Lake St., Chicago, 111. 

CLAPP, ALFRED DWIGHT, '65. 
Died November 32, 1863. 

CLAPP, DEXTER, REV., 'ag. 
Died July 27, 1868. 

CLAPP, WALTER CLAYTON, '83. 
118 West 129th St., New York City. 

CLARK, ALFRED HASTINGS, »86. 
46 New York Ave., Brooklyn, N. Y. 

CLARK, JEFFERSON, LL.B., '67. 
32 Nassau St., New York City. 

CLARK, JOSEPH BOURNE, REV., '58. 
36 Bible House, New York City. 

CLARK, ROBERT BRUCE, REV., '76. 
Goshen, N. Y, 

CLARK, WILLIAM BREWSTER, M.D., '76. 
50 East 31st St., New York City. 

CLARK, WILLIAM BULLOCK, '84. 
Brattleboro', Vt. 

COATES, HALLAM FREER, '86. 
Alliance, Ohio. 

COBURN, EDWIN, »4i. 
Died in 1867. 

COMSTOCK, EDWARD, '61. 
Rome, N.Y. 

COOK, ROSWELL DICKINSON, '43. 
Died June 9, 1842. 

COOLEY, NOAH SAXTON, '66. 
Windsor Locks, Conn. 

COOLEY, ORRIN, M.D., '65. 
Died January 7, 1877. 

COOMBS, ZELOTES, W., '88. 
Amherst College, Amherst, Mass. 

COPELAND, GEORGE WARREN, '56. 
Maiden, Mass. 

CORNISH, AARON SPOONER, '68. 
21 North Market St., Boston, Mass. 

COWAN, PEREZ DICKINSON, REV., '66. 
Wcllesley, Mass. 



ALPHA DELTA PHI, 157 



CRANE, WHITING SANFORD, '64. 
88 Perry St., Detroit, Mich. 

CRAWFORD, SIDNEY, REV., '61. 
Tampa, Florida. 

CRAWFORD, WILLIAM, REV., '57. 
Sparta, Wis. 

CRITTENDEN, WILLIAM BACON, '78. 
Bucyrus, Ohio. 

CRITTENDEN, WALTER HAYDEN, ♦81. 
206 Broadway, New York City. 

CROCKETT, GEORGE KIMBALL, '40. 
Died January 4, 1879. 

CROWELL, EDWARD PAYSON, '53. 
Amherst, Mass. 

CURTIS, JOSEPH SEAVER, '51. 
Died May 15, 1878. 

CUTLER, SANFORD LYMAN, '85. 
Groton, Mass. 

DAMON, FRANK WILLIAMS, '73. 
Honolulu, Oahu, Hawaiian Islands. 

DANE, MYRON BENJAMIN, '70. 
Died October 12, 1870. 

DARLING, CHARLES ROSS, LL.B., '74. 
West Publishing Co., St. Paul, Minn. 

DARLING, EDWARD PARRY, '51. 
38 River St., Wilkesbarre, Pa. 

DARLING, HENRY, REV., '42. 

Hamilton College, Clinton, Oneida, Co., N. Y. 

DAVIS, WILLIAM VAIL WILSON, REV., '73. 
Worcester, Mass. 

DELABARRE, EDMUND BURKE, '86. 
Conway, Mass. 

DELABARRE, FRANK ALEXANDER, '90. 
Amherst College, Amherst, Mass. 

DELANO, HENRY GILES, '58. 
Died February 19, 1859. 

DELANO, CHARLES, V- 
Died January 23, 1883. 

DENISON, GEORGE, '55. 

5175^ Chestnut St., St. Louis, Mo. 



158 AMHERST CHAPTER 



DERBY, HASKET, M.D., '55. 
350 Beacon St., Boston, Mass. 

DICKINSON, CORNELIUS EVARTS, REV., »6o. 
Marietta, Ohio. 

DICKINSON, EDWARD, ♦84. 
Lock Box 108, Amherst, Mass. 

DICKINSON, RICHARD SALTER STORRS, REV. 
*44. Died August 28, 1856. 

DICKINSON, WILLIAM AUSTIN, LL.B., '50. 
Amherst, Mass. 

DICKINSON, WILLIAM COWPER, REV., '48. 
College Hill, Ohio. 

DICKINSON, WILLIAM EASTMAN, REV., '55. \ 

Chicopee, Mass. 

DIKE, SAMUEL JOHNSON, '66. ; 

5 East 32d St., New York City. 

DONALD, ELIJAH WINCHESTER, REV., '69. 
7 West loth St., New York City. 

DOW, FRANK FOWLER, M.D., '74. 
43 South Ave., Rochester, N. Y. 

DRURY, LEANDER MUZZY, '41. 
Canandaigua, N. Y. 

DUDLEY, JOHN LANGDON, REV., '44. 
230 Martin St., Milwaukee, Wis. 

DUFFY, EDWIN, '90. 

Amherst College, Amherst, Mass. 

EDDY, THOMAS JAMES, '77. 
Fall River, Mass. 

ELY, ALFRED, LL.B., '74. 

29 Nassau St., New York City. 

ELY, WILLIAM BREWSTER, REV., '75. 
Died May 11, 1880. 

EMERSON, BENJAMIN KENDALL, '65. 
Amherst, Mass. 

EMERSON, CHARLES, '38. 
Died May 27, 1845. 

EMERSON, JOHN MILTON, '49. 
Died August 3, 1869. 

EMMONS, HENRY VAUGHAN, REV., '54. 
Oxford, Me. 



ALPHA DELTA PHI, 159 

FAIRBANKS, FRANCIS JOEL, REV., '6a. 
Amherst, Mass. 

FAIRBANKS, JOSEPH WHITCOMB, '66. 
16 Summit Ave., St. Paul, Minn. 

FALLOWS, EDWARD HUNTINGTON, '86. 
Box 462, Exeter, N. H. 

FIELD, LEVI ALPHEUS, REV., '46. 
Died October 23, 1859. 

FIELD, WALTER TAYLOR, '83. 
Hyde Park P. O.. Chicago, 111. 

FISKE, ARTHUR SEVERANCE, '84. 
499 La Salle Ave., Chicago, 111. 

FISKE, ASA SEVERANCE, REV., '55. 
Ithaca, N. Y. 

FISKE, DANIEL TAGGART, REV., '42. 
Newburyport, Mass. 

FISKE, GEORGE FOSTER, M.D., '81. 
499 La Salle Ave., Chicago, 111. 

FISKE, SAMUEL, REV., '48. 
Died May 32, 1864. 

FLEMING, LOUIS ISIDORE, 47. 
Jacksonville, Fla. 

FLICHTNER, GEORGE FREDERIC, REV., '67. 
Montrose, South Orange, N. J. 

FOLGER, HENRY CLAY, JR., LL.B., '79. 
26 Broadway, New York City. 

FOWLER, CHARLES CHAUNCEY, '51. 
Died October 28, 1876. 

FOWLER, WILLIAM WORTHINGTON, '54. 
Died September 18, 1881. 

FRENCH, CHARLES BROWN, '86. 
1 133 Hennepin Ave, 

or 8 South nth St., Minneapolis, Minn. 

FRENCH, JOHN, M.D., '66. 
Died August 24, 1879. 

FRENCH, JAMES PAULUS, '59. 
Died January 13, 1867. 

FRENCH, SOLON TENNEY, '72. 
103 S. Clark St., Chicago, 111. 

FRENCH, STEWART WHITNEY, '89. 
Amherst College, Amherst, Mass. 



l6o AMHERST CHAPTER 

FRENCH, THEODORE FRANCIS, '49. 
Died September 31, 1865. 

FRISBIE, ALVAH LILLIE, REV., '57. 
Des Moines, Iowa. 

FULLER, HORACE SMITH, M.D., '58. 
Hartford Conn. 

GAGE, NEHEMIAH HUTCHINSON, '66. 
Died July 1, 1866. 

GARDNER, GEORGE ENOS, '85. 
Room 103, 405 Main St., 

or 60 Coral St., Worcester, Mass. 

GARDNER, WILLIAM, '84. 

46 Brown Hall, Princeton, N. J. 

GATES, HERBERT WRIGHT, '90. 
Amherst College, Amherst, Mass. 

GAY, EDWARD, '56. 

55 Kilby St., Boston, Mass. 

GILLETT, ARTHUR LINCOLN, REV., '80. 
Grand Forks, Dak. 

GILLETT, EDWARD BATES, '39. 
Westfield, Mass. 

GILLETT, FREDERICK HUNTINGTON, 
LL.B., '74. Springfield, Mass. 

GLADDEN, FREDERICK COHOON, '85. 
Birmingham, Ala. 

GLEASON, WILLIAM STANTON, M.D., '85. 
Workhouse Hospital, Blackwell's Island, N. Y. 

GODDARD, WILLIAM HENRY, »59. 
Montrose, Dak. 

GOLDTHWAIT, WILLIAM COLTON, »39. 
Died November 18, 1883. 

GOODRICH, GEORGE DICKINSON, REV., '53. 
Died July a6, 1870* 

GOODMAN, RICHARD, JR., LL.B., »69. 
Lenox, Mass. 

GOODRICH, WILLIAM WINTON, LL.B., »5a. 

59 Wall St., New York City. 

GOODWIN, FRANK JUDSON, '84. 
51 East 69th St., New York City. 

GOOLD, CHARLES BURTON, '79. 
135 Eagle St., Albany, N. Y. 



ALPHA DELTA PHI, l6l 

GORDON, HENRY EVARTS, '79. 
Trinidad, Col. 

GOULD, GEORGE HENRY, REV., '50. 
Worcester, Mass. 

GRAVES, JOHN LONG. '55. 
P. O. Box 1698, Boston, Mass. 

GRAVES, SAMUEL LAWRENCE, '70. 
Fitchburg, Mass. 

GRAVES, THADDEUS, '56. 
Hatfield, Mass. 

GRAY, GEORGE DICKMAN, »6s. 

10 California St., San Francisco, Cal. 

GRAY, JOSEPH CONVERSE, LL.B., '77. 

Rooms 71 and 72, 23 Court St., Boston, Mass. 

GREENE, FREDERIC WILLIAM, REV., '82. 
Andover, Mass. 

GREENE, JOHN MORTON, REV., '53. 
Lowell, Mass. 

GRISWOLD, WHITING, '38. 
Died October 28, 1874. 

GROSVENOR, GEORGE SUMNER, '58. 
Trenton, N. J. 

HALL, GEORGE CYRIL, '71. 
161 La Salle St., Chicago, 111. 

HALL, GORDON ROBERT, M.D., '72. 
266 Clinton St., Brooklyn, N. Y. 

HALL, LYMAN BEECHER, '73. 

1630 Chestnut St. , Philadelphia, Pa. 

HAMILTON, CHARLES WOODMAN, '83. 
298 E. Water St., Milwaukee, Wis. 

HAMILTON, HENRY HARRISON, REV., '68. 
Hinsdale, N. H. 

HAMILTON, JOHN ALEXANDER, REV., '53. 
Congregational House, Boston, Mass. 

HAMLIN, ALFRED DWIGHT FOSTER, '75. 
138 East 40th St., New York City. 

HAMMOND, CHARLES, REV., '44. 
Died November 7, 1878. 

HANNAFORD, DAVID OSHEAL, '52. 
Died January 19, 1861. 



l62 AMHERST CHAPTER 

HARDY, ASA STRONG, '6i. 
Unioaville, Lake Co., Ohio. 

HARDY, JACOB, »so. 

Koloa, Kauai, Hawaiian Islands. 

HARRINGTON, BRAINERD TIMOTHY, '52. 

Westchester, N. Y. 

HARRINGTON, NATHAN, LL.B., ^64. 
Toledo, Ohio. 

HARRINGTON, SAMUEL, '62. 
27 Bowdoin St., Boston, Mass. 

HARRINGTON, THOMAS BALLARD, '49. 
Died February 16, 1861. 

HARRIS, AUSTIN, '63. 
East Machias, Me. 

HARRIS, GEORGE, JR., REV., '66. 
Andover, Mass. 

HASKELL, PLINY NELSON, LL.B., '71. 
444 W. Washington St., Chicago, 111. 

HASTINGS, ROBERT WORTHINGTON, '88. 
Amherst College, Amherst, Mass. 

HAYWARD, CHARLES CAPEN, '42. 

Spring Garden St., Dorchester District, Boston^ 
Mass. 

HAYWARD, JAMES, LL.B., '73. 
Hannibal, Mo. 

HEAP, ARNOLD NELSON, LL.B., '73. 
95 and 97 Washington St., Chicago, 111. 

HEWIT, AUGUSTINE FRANCIS, REV., '39. 

St. Paul's Church, 9th Ave. and 59th St. , New York, 

HILTON, GEORGE PORTER, '8i. 
Hilton Bridge Co., Albany, N. Y. 

HITCHCOCK, BRADFORD WASHBURN, 

LL.B., '81. 44 West 20th St., New York City. 

HITCHCOCK, CHARLES HENRY, '56. 
Hanover, N. H. 

HITCHCOCK, EDWARD, REV., '45. 
Died February 27, 1864. 

HITCHCOCK, EDWARD, M.D., '49. 
Amherst, Mass. 

HITCHCOCK, EDWARD, JR., M.D., '78. 
Ithaca, N. Y. 



ALPHA DELTA PHL 163 

HITCHCOCK, JOHN SAWYER, 'Sg. 
Amherst College, Amherst, Mass. 

HITCHCOCK, ROSWELL DWIGHT, REV., '36. 
Died June 16, 1887. 

HOBBIE, JOHN REMINGTON, M.D., '73. 
ai9 East 17th St., New York City. 

HOBBIE, WILLIAM ROSCOE, '69. 
Greenwich, N. Y. 

HOLBROOK, DAVID LEVERETT, REV., '72. 
Lake Geneva, Wis. 

HOLMES, HENRY MARTYN, REV., '60. 
Meriden, N. H., or Ayer, Mass. 

HOMES, FRANCIS, REV., »48. 
Easton, Cochesset P. O., Mass. 

HOWARD, CHARLES SAMUEL, '80. 
712 Greenwich St., San Francisco, Cal. 

HOWELL, LUTHER CLARK, '64. 
Died October 16, 1866. 

HOWLAND, GEORGE, '50. 

1420 Wabash Ave., Chicago, 111. 

HOWLAND, WALTER MORTON, '63. 
57 Portland Block, Chicago, 111. 

HOWLAND, WILLIAM, '46. 
Died December 20, 1880. 

HOWLAND, WILLIAM WARE, REV., \i, 
Oodoville, Tappia, Ceylon. 

HOYT, JAMES HUMPHREY, LL.B., '73. 
105 Public Square, Cleveland, Ohio. 

HUMPHREY, HENRY MARTYN, »42. 
Died July 4, 1841. 

HUMPHREY, LEONARD, '46. 
Died November 30, 1850. 

HUMPHREY, ZEPHANIAH MOORE, REV., '43. 
Died November 12, 1881. 

HUNT, JOHN SAVAGE, '87. 
Utica, N. Y. 

HUNTINGTON, ELLERY CHANNING, '88. 
Amherst College, Amherst, Mass. 

HUNTINGTON, FREDERld DAN, RT. REV., '39. 
Sjrracuse, N. Y. 



l64 AMHERST CHAPTER 

HUNTTING, SAMUEL, REV., '44. 
Died September 10, 1849. 

HUTCHINSON, HENRY ELIJAH, '58. 
1346 Pacific St., Brooklyn, N. Y. 

HUTCHINSON, HORACE, REV., »39. 
Died March 7, 1846. 

HUTCHINSON, PROPER KIMBALL, M.D., '41. 
Died November i, 1872. 

HYDE, GEORGE MERRIAM, »88. 
Amherst College, Amherst, Mass. 

IRWIN, DAVID ALBION, '64. 

Ret. Captain U. S. Army, Zellwood, Fla. 

JAMES, ARTHUR CURTISS, '89. 
Amherst College, Amherst, Mass. 

JEWETT, GEORGE BAKER, REV., '40. 
Died June 9, 1886. 

KELLY, ARTHUR WILLARD, REV., '79. 
Auburndale, Mass. 

KELLY, EDWARD PARKER, '90. 
Amherst College, Amherst, Mass. 

KELSEY, HENRY SYLVESTER, REV., 55. 
499 La Salle Ave., Chicago, 111. 

KEMP, JAMES FURMAN, »8i. 

443 Washington Ave., Brooklyn, N. Y. 

KIDDER, WILLIAM MAGEE, '87. . 
18 Wall St., New York City. 

KIMBALL, DAVID MATHER, '44. 
Died October 23, 1857. 

KIMBALL, FRANK FARNUM, '76. 
215 Ryerson St., Brooklyn, N. Y. 

KIMBALL, JOSEPH, '57. 
Andover, Mass. 

KNAPP, GEORGE SPENCER, '71. 
267 Wabash Ave., Chicago, 111. 

KYBURG, GEORGE WILSON, '90. 
Amherst College, Amherst, Mass. 

LADD, CHARLES ELLIOTT, »8i. 
Portland, Oregon. 

LADD, WILLIAM MEAD, '78. 
Portland, Oregon. 



ALPHA DELTA PHI. 1 65 



LAMB, WILLIAM GEORGE, '85. 
South Hadley Falls, Mass. 

LANE, CHARLES STODDARD, REV., '80. 
Union ville. Conn. 

LANE, JAMES PILLSBURY, REV., '57. 
Norton, Bristol Co., Mass. 

LARNED, STEPHEN HOLMES, '69. 
74 Lincoln St., Worcester, Mass. 

LEARNED, SAMUEL JULIUS, '45. 
Lake Forest, 111. 

LELAND, GEORGE ADAMS, M.D., »74. 
349 Marlborough St., Boston, Mass. 

LEWIS, FRANCIS DRAPER, LL.B., ^69. 
411 Walnut St., Philadelphia, Pa. 

LEWIS, JAMES. REV., '61. 
205 N. Scott St., Joliet, 111. 

LEWIS, THOMAS AUGUSTUS, '59- 
Died July 9, 1865. 

LEWIS, ZECHARIAH EDWARDS, M.D., '62. 
JJew Rochelle, N. Y. 

LINDSAY, GEORGE WALTER, '86. 
Care of W. C. R. R., Waukesha, Wis. 

LINNELL, JONATHAN EDWARDS, M.D., '44. 
Norwich, Conn. 

LINNELL, NATHAN SEABURY, '43. 
Died September 10, 1843. 

LIPPITT, ANDREW CLARK, JR., LL.B., '66. 
New London, Conn. 

LITTLE, ARTHUR MITCHELL, '88. 
Amherst College, Amherst, Mass. 

LITTLE, REV. GEORGE OBADIAH, '60. 
ai6 I St., N. W., Washington, D. C. 

LITTLE, JOSEPH BREWSTER, REV., '60. 
224 East 12th St., Davenport, Iowa. 

LIVERMORE, AARON RUSSELL, REV., '37. 
Fairhaven, Conn. 

LORD, NATHAN LYNDS, REV., '37. 
Rochester, Fulton Co., Ind. 

LORING, ROBERT PEARMAIN, M.D., '74. 
Newton Centre, Mass. 



X66 AMHERST CHAPTER 

LYON, APPLETON PARK, '70. 
180 Fifth Avenue, New York City. 

LYON, WALTER HUNTINGTON, »5i. 
Died November 13, 1853. 

MARBLE, CHARLES FRANCIS, "96, 
7 Beaver St., Worcester, Mass. 

MARCH, CHARLES AUGUSTUS, '70. 
195 Lake St., Chica£:o, 111. 

MARCH, DANIEL, REV., '38. 
Woburn, Mass. 

MARCH, DANIEL, JR., M.D., '65. 
Winchester, Mass. 

MARCH, FRANCIS ANDREW, '45. 
Lafayette College, Easton, Pa. 

MARCH, FREDERIC WILLIAM, REV., '67. 
Tripoli, Syria. 

MARCY, ALEXANDER, M.D., '59. 
Camden, N. J. 

MARSH, FRANK BALLARD, '83. 
79 Spring St., New York City. 

MARSHALL, JONATHAN BRYANT, '38. 
Died June 30, 1861. 

MARTIN, EDWIN KONIGMACHER, '71. 
Lancaster, Pa. 

MATTHEWS, HENRY MARTYN, '69. 
116 La Salle St., Chicago, 111. 

MAYNARD, EDWARD, '62. 
Died January 10, 1868. 

MAYNARD, HORACE, '38. 
Knoxville, Knox Co., Tenn. 

MAYNARD JAMES, »74. 

1340 R St. N.W., Washington, D. C. 

McELHINNEY, JOHN WILLIAM, LL.B., '72. 
Clayton, St. Louis Co., Mo. 

McGLATHERY, WILLIAM, REV., '6a. 

Middletown, N. Y. 

McKINSTRY, JOHN ALEXANDER, REV., '38. 
Richfield, Summit Co., Ohio. 

McMANUS, PARKER WHITTLESEY, »63. 
Davenport, Iowa. 



:.T.-aN^^M^i.AAali 



ALPHA DELTA PHI. 167 

MEARS, LEVERETT, '74. 
Williamstown, Mass. 

MILLER, ALBERT BARNES, '70. 
Died June 7, 1871. 

MILLER, JOHN HAMILTON, '88. 
Amherst College, Amherst, Mass. 

MILLER, SAMUEL FISHER, '48. 
Died October 28, 1870. 

MILLIKEN, ARTHUR NORRIS, LL.B., '80. 
15 Ashburton Place, Boston, Mass. 

MILLS, CHARLES SMITH, REV., '82. 
Springfield, Vt. 

MILLS, FRANK SMITH, »87. 
Andover, Mass. 

MONTELIUS, WILLIAM PIPER, '63. 
Died June 16, 1865. 

MONTGOMERY, ALEXANDER, REV., 'yj- 
Died February 25, 1859. 

MORRIS, GEORGE BLISS, LL.B., '37. 
Died July 7, 1872. 

MORSE, JASON, REV., '45. 
Died October 14, 1861. 

MORSE, LEONARD, '71. 
Hartford, Conn. 

MOSMAN, WALTER BEMIS, '78. 
26 Broadway, New York City. 

NEILL, HEMAN HUMPHREY, REV., '66. 
Amherst, Mass. 

NEWHALL, GEORGE HARRISON, REV., '45. 
Died August 24, 1853. 

NEWLIN, ELLIS JAMES, REV., »4i. 
Died December 12, i88to. 

NORRIS, KINGSLEY FLAVEL, REV., '73. 
1336 Jeff erson St., N. E., Minneapolis, Minn. 

NORTHROP, EDWIN FITCH, '90. 
Amherst College, Amherst, Mslss. 

NORTHROP, HENRY DAVENPORT, REV., '57. 
831 North Broad St., Philadelphia, Pa. 

NOYES, STEPHEN DUTTON, REV., '66. 
93 Fair St., Kingston, N. Y. 



1 68 AMHERST CHAPTER 

OSBORNE, THEODORE MOODY, 'yi- 
6 Carpenter St., Salem, Mass. 

PACKARD, ABEL KINGMAN, REV., '45. 
Highland Lake, CoU 

PACKARD, FRANK EDWARDS, »8o. 
Campello, Mass. 

PAINE, ALBERT GEORGE, M.D., '72. 
3964 Drexel Boulevard, Chicago, 111. 

PAINE, CHARLES GOODELL GOBDARD, '61. 
22 Selden Ave., Detroit, Mich. 

PAINE, LYMAN MAY, '72. 

175 Dearborn St., Chicago, 111. 

PALMER, JAMES HENRY, '57. 
Died 

PARK, CHARLES WARE, REV., '67. 
Birmingham, Conn. 

PARK, EBENEZER BURGESS, '64. 
Osaya Mission, Kansas. 

PARSONS, JOHN, REV., '73. 

1121 Seventeenth St., Denver, Col. 

PAULLIN, HENRY, '76. 
Cherokee, Iowa. 

PEASE, EDMUND MORRIS, M.D., REV., '54. 

Care Rev. A. O. Forbes, Honolulu, Hawaiian Isl. 

PECKHAM, JOSEPH, REV,, '37. 
Died May 17, 1884. 

PECKHAM, WILLIAM CLARK, '67. 
Adelphi Academy, Brooklyn, N. Y. 

PEPPER, GEORGE DANA BOARDMAN,REV.,»57. 
Waterville, Me. 

PERRY, JOSEPH HARTSHORN, '82. 
35 West St. , Worcester, Mass. 

PETTIBONE, BENJAMIN WELCH, '60. 
Winchester Centre, Conn. 

PETTIBONE, IRA WELCH, '54. 

188 and 190 Washington St., Chicago, 111. 

PHELPS, AUSTIN, REV., '38. 
Andover, Mass. 

PIERCE, EDWARD WILLARD, '59. 
Died September 13, 187 1. 



ALPHA DELTA PHI, 1 69 

PLIMPTON, SALEM MARSH, REV., '46. 
Died September 14, 1866. 

PLUMMER, HENRY IRVING, '78. 
Died December 30, 1874. 

PRATT, CHARLES MILLARD, '79. 
26 Broadway, New York City. 

PRATT, CHARLES RANSOM, '(^ 
Elmira, N. Y. 

PRATT, FRED. BAYLEY, '87, 

232 Chnton Ave., Brooklyn, N. Y. 

PRATT, GEORGE HARLOW, REV., '64. 
Talcottville, Comi. 

PRATT, THEODORE CONSTANTINE, REV., '57. 
Auburn, N. H. 

PRATT, WILLIAM ORRIN, ^77. 

The Pratt Institute, Ryerson St., Brooklyn, N. Y. 

PRENTICE, EZRA PARMELEE, '85. 
Room A, 55 Dearborn St., Chicago, 111. 

PRENTICE, PIERREPONT ISHAM, '90. 
10 Tower Place, Chicago, 111. 

PRESTON, JAMES WILLARD, '39. 
Longwood Avenue, Brookline, Mass. 

PRICE, SAMUEL HARRISON, '39. 
Lewisburgh, W. Va. 

PRIEST, SYLVANUS CHICKERING, '58. 
Died August 25, 1858. 

RAE, ALEXANDER, M.D., '83. 
21 Clinton St., Brooklyn, N. Y. 

RAND, EDWARD GILLETT, »8i. 
466 Broad St., Providence, R. I. 

REED, GEORGE MILTON, LL.B., »62. 
246 Washington St., Boston, Mass. 

REED, WILLIAM BARRETT, M.D., »37. 
Died December 6, 1846. 

REEVES, THOMAS, REV., '75. 
Woonsocket, R. I. 

RHEES, RUSH, '83. 
Plainfield, N. J. 

RICE, DANIEL, REV., '37. 

Macalester College, Macalester, Minn. 



I70 AMHERST CHAPTER 

RICE. STILLMAN, '56. 
Gloucester, Mass. 

RICHARDS, JAMES AUSTIN, M.D., ♦si. 
Died June 4, 1859. 

RICHARDSON, HENRY BULLARD, "^ 
Amherst, Mass. 

RICHARDSON, JOHN KENDALL, ^69. 
Newton, Mass. 

ROBBINS, EDWARD COMBS, »63. 
3504 Lindell Ave., St. Louis, Mo. 

ROCKWELL, FRANCIS WARREN, M.D., '65. 
6 Lafayette Ave., Brooklyn, N. Y. 

ROCKWELL, FRANCIS WILLIAMS, LL.B., W. 
Pitts field, Mass. 

ROCKWELL, JOEL EDSON, REV., '37. 
Died July 99, 1882. 

ROCKWELL, ROBERT CAMPBELL, '71. 
Lenox, Mass. 

ROOT, HENRY DWIGHT, '52. 
Died September 3, 1855. 

ROWLAND, LYMAN SIBLEY, REV., '58. 
Lee, Mass. 

SALTER, SUMNER, *^^. 

15 Capitol Place, Atlanta, Ga. 

SANDERS, ORREN BURNHAM, M.D., '78. 
376 Columbus Ave, Boston, Mass. 

SANFORD, ABBOTT, '77. 
Everett, Mass. 

SANFORD, BAALIS, '45. 
Died , 1875. 

SANFORD, ELLIOT, LL.B., »6i. 
95 Nassau St. New York City. 

SANFORD, JOHN ELIOT, '51. 
Taunton, Mass. 

SARGENT, WILLIAM ARTHUR, LL.B., '79. 
39 Equitable Building, Boston, Mass. 

SAVILLE, HENRY MARTYN, M.D., '54. 
Died January 11, 1881. 

SAWYER, JOSEPH HENRY, '65. 
Easthampton, Ma.ss. 



ALPHA DBLTA PHI, 171 

SAYLOR, FRANCIS HOFFMAN, '65. 
357 South 4th St., Philadelphia, Pa. 

SCOVILLj:, FRANK CHURCHILL, REV., '^s. 
Greenwich, N. Y. 

SESSIONS, ROBERT HARVEY, 'SS. 
Amherst College, Amherst, Mass. 

SHATTUCK, ELIJAH CARTER, »so. 
Berlin, Worcester Co., Mass. 

SHEPARD, EDWARD OLCOTT, '60. 
37 l^quitable Building, Boston, Mass. 

SHEPARD, LUTHER DIMMICK, D.D.S., '6«. 
xoo Boylston St., Boston, Mass. 

SHEPARDSON, DANIEL, REV., '39. 
Granville, Ohio. 

SIEBERT, CHARLES ALBERT, '72. 
414 Olive St., St. Louis, Mo. 

SKEELE, ARTHUR FESSENDEN, REV., '75. 
Aug^usta, Me. 

SKEELE, WALTER FISHER, '88. 
Amherst College, Amherst, Mass. 

SLEEPER, WILLIAM WASHBURN, REV., '78. 
Care of A. B. C. F. M., Boston, Mass. 

SMART, ISAAC CHIPMAN, REV., '81. 
Pittsfield, Mass. 

SMITH, BRYANT, •87. 
Milwaukee, Wis. 

SMITH, BENJAMIN ELI, '77. 

The Century Co., 33 East 17th St., New York. 

SMITH, BENTLEY HOWARD, »5i. 
Joanna Furnace, Pa. 

SMITH, CHARLES FULLER, »38. 
Died December 8, 1863. 

SMITH, CURTIS BENJAMIN MINOR, »37. 
Died June 18, 1877. 

SMITH, CHARLES SPRAGUE, '74. 
Columbia College, New York City. 

SMITH, EDWARD ROBINSON, »76. 
1337 Broadway, New York City. 

SMITH, HORACE PAYSON, REV, »54. 
Died March 13, 1877. 



172 AMHERST CHAPTER. 

SMITH, THEODORE, *86. 
Cimarron, New Mexico. 

SMITH, THOMAS SNELL, REV., tA. 
Tillipally, Jaffna, Ceylon. 

SMITH, VINCENT. HENRY, '43. 
Died Aus^ust 99, 1868. 

SPAULDING, SAMUEL THOMSON, '39. 
Died October 7, 1877. 

SPAULDING, TIMOTHY GRIDLEY, »73. 
Northampton, Mass. 

SPENCER, JOHN LAURENS, '48. 
Died October 13, 1851. 

SPOFFORD, HENRY MARTYN, •40. 
Died August 90, 1880. 

SPROUT, WILLIAM BRADFORD, »8^ 
Room 119, 405 Main St., Worcester, Mass. 

STANTON, GEORGE FRANCIS, REV., '^ 
31 Congfregfational House, Boston, Mass. 

STEBBINS, FRANK EDWARD, •80. 
U. S. Patent Office, Washington, D. C. 

STEBBINS, MILAN CYRUS, REV., 'si. 
Cornwall, Vt. 

STEVENS, HENRY AUGUSTUS, REV., '57. 
Bristol, R. I. 

STILES, FRANKLIN OSGOOD, '56. 
Died January 36, 1857. 

STOCKBRIDGE, HENRY (SMITH), »45. 
313 St. Paul St., Baltimore, Md. 

STOKES, HARRY SHELBY, LL.B., '71. 
Died January, 1875. 

STOKES, JAMES FRAZER, LL.B., »67. 
Terrene, Bolivar Co., Miss. 

STOKES, WILLIAM CAMPBELL, '69. 
Died February s, 1869. 

STONE, HENRY DWIGHT, '44. 
Died October 37, 1869. 

STONE, TIMOTHY PORTER, »63. 
Died 1864. 

STONE, WILLIAM PIERCE, *t^ 
Died November 9, 1863. 



ALPHA DELTA PHI, 173 

STORRS, HENRY EDWARD, •64. 
Jacksonville, 111. 

STORRS, HENRY MARTYN, REV., '46. 
Orange, N. J. 

STORRS, RICHARD SALTER, REV., '39. 

80 Pierrepont St., Brooklyn, N. Y. 

STORRS, RICHARD SALTER, '53. 
Died 

STOWE, TIMOTHY, REV., \^. 
Died August 11, 1866. 

SUMNER, GEORGE, JR., '39. 
Died October 29, 1852. 

SYBRANDT, WILLIAM HENRY, REV., '76. 
14th St., Troy, N. Y. 

TAYLOR, HORACE WILLARD, '48. 
Rockford, 111. 

TEAD, EDWARD SAMPSON, '75. 
Somerville, Mass. 

TENNEY, ALBERT FRANCIS, '69. 
Madison, N. J. 

THAYER, JAMES SMITH, »38. 
Died January 19, 1881. 

THOMPSON, ALBERT HENRY, REV., '72. 
Wakefield, N. H. 

THOMPSON, AMHERST LORD, REV., '51. 
Died August 25, i860. 

THOMPSON, FREDERIC MINER, •87. 
175 Herkimer St., Brooklyn, N. Y. 

THOMPSON, JOHN HOWLAND, »5o. 

81 Clark St., Chicago, lU. 

THRESHER, ALMON UNDERWOOD, '65. 
Granville, Ohio. 

THURSTON, HIRAM EDWARD, '79. 
Box 626, Providence, R. I. 

THURSTON, THATCHER THAYER, »8i. 
Fall River, Mass. 

TITUS, JOSEPH AUGUSTUS, '63. ' 
Worcester, Mass. 

TOBEY, RUFUS BABCOCK, REV., 77. 
Ashbumham, Mass. 



174 AMHERST CHAPTER 

TOMSON, TRUMAN, 'da. 
Died November 7, 1866. 

TORREY, DAVID, REV.. '43. 
Cacenovia, N. Y. 

TOWER, FRANCIS EMORY, REV.. '6a 
Bristol, Conn. 

TOWNE, EDWARD SOUTHWORTH, REV., '64. 
Vineland. N. J. 

TRAIN, GORHAM, »5a. 
Northampton, Mass. 

TREADWAY, ALLEN TOWNER, '86. 
Stockbridge. Mass. 

TUCKER, EDWIN BENJAMIN, '85. 
358 West 30th St., New York City. 

UNDERBILL, JOHN WINN, REV., '54- 
Died October 17, 1862. 

WACKERHAGEN, PHILIP MAYER, '81. 
756 Broadway, Albany, N. Y. 

WADHAMS, RALPH HOLBERTON, '89. 
Amherst College, Amherst, Mass. 

WAITE, GEORGE WHITE, '61. 
Oberlin, Ohio. 

WALKER, WILLISTON, '83. 

Emilien Strass, 13, Leipzig, Germany. 

WARD, JAMES WILSON, REV., »a6. 
Died February, i, 1873. 

WARD, JAMES WILSON, JR., REV., '60. 
Died October 30, 1875. 

WARD, JOHN LORD HAYES, '59. 
Died August i, 1859. 

WARD, WILLIAM HAYES, REV., '56. 
*• The Independent," New York City. 

WARNER, AARON EDWARDS, LL.B., »6i. 
Died 

WARREN, FREDERICK MORRIS, •8a 
Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Md. 

WASHBURN, CHARLES ELLERY, M.D., '38. 
Died April 10, 1865. 

WASHBURN, WILLIAM IVES, LL.B., '76. 
3 Broad St., New York City. 



ALPHA DELTA PHI, 1 75 



WEEDEN, CHARLES FOSTER, '84. 
HoBmer Hall, Hartford, Conn. 

WEEDEN. WILLIAM ORNE, REV., »77. 

Care of Clinton R. Weeden, Providence, R. I. 

WELLMAN, ARTHUR HOLBROOK, LL.B., '78. 
24 Congress St, Boston, Mass. 

WELLS, GEORGE HUNTINGTON, REV., '63. 
Montreal, Can. 

WELLS, WILLIAM HARVEY, '36. 
Died January ai, 1885. 

WHEELER, WILLARD HAYDEN, '84. 
374 Washington Ave., Brooklyn, N. Y. 

WHIPPLE, WILLIAM WARD, REV., »4i. 
Camp Point, IlL 

WHITE, WILLIAM PRESCOTT, REV., »67. 
Germantown, Philadelphia, Pa. 

WHITING, WILLIAM HAMMOND, '64. 
Died December 99, 1874. 

WHITNEY, HARRY MARTIN, JR., '78. 
Honolulu, Hawaiian Islands. 

WILDER, JOSEPH EELLS, '63. 
Died April 8, 1864. 

WILDER, WILLIAM FRANKLIN, '56. 
Colorado Springs, Col. 

WILLARD, THOMAS CLIFTON, '87. 
814 Boltwood Ave., Cleveland, Ohio. 

WILLIAMS, ELIJAH HAWLEY, '73. 
Springfield, Mo. 

WILLIAMS, GEORGE HUNTINGTON, Ph.D. V8. 
John Hopkins University, Baltimore, Md. 

WILLIAMS, HORACE ROBBINS, REV., »6a 
Clinton, Mich. 

WILLIAMS, HENRY WARREN, '37. 
Died 1877. 

WILLIAMS, HINCKLEY WRIGHT, '66. 
Died August 25, 1864. 

WILLIAMS, JOHN CAMP, '82. 

Care of Crane Bros. Mfg. Co., Chicago, 111. 

WILLIAMS, JOHN HEALY, REV., '68. 
2008 East Seventh St., Kansas City, Mo. 



176 AMHERST CHAPTER. 

WILLIAMS, STALHAM LEON, JR., '90. 
Amherst College, Amherst, Mass. 

WILLIAMS, TALCOTT. '73. 

Philadelphia *' Press," Philadelphia, Pa. 

WILLIAMS, WILLIAM HERBERT, '76. 
Springfield, Mo. 

WILSON. ANDREW. REV., '43. 
Died February 27. 1878. 

WILSON, PETER HOWARD, '89. 
Amherst College. Amherst, Mass. 

WILSON, THADDEUS, REV., '43. 
Shrewsbury, N. J. 

WITHINGTON, NATHAN NOYES, '51. 
Newburyport, Mass. 

WITHINGTON, WILLIAM SHERBURNE, '41. 
Died May 20, 1841. 

WOOD, HOWARD OGDEN, '80. 

80 St. Mark's Place, Brooklyn, N. Y. 

WOOD, IRA COUCH, »86. 
Oak Park, Cook Co, 111. 

WOOD, ISAAC WILLARD, LL.B., '68. 
Grand Rapids, Mich. 

WOOD, WALTER CHILDS, '86. 

19 Argyle Place, Edinburgh, Scotland. 

Care of Brown, Shipley & Co, London, England. 

WOODBRIDGE. FREDERICK JAMES EUGENE, 
'89. Amherst College, Amherst, Mass. 

WOODBRIDGE, JOHN. '49. 

80 Dearborn St., Chicago, 111. 
WOODBRIDGE, JOHN, JR., '73. 

80 Dearborn St., Chicago, 111. 
WOODMAN, GEORGE SULLIVAN, M.D., '46. 

Newtonville, Mass. 
WRIGHT, CHARLES HANDEL, '78. 

40 West Broadway, New York City. 
WRIGHT, RUSSELL MEDAD, '44. 

Castleton, Rutland Co., Vt. 
WYMAN, HENRY NEHEMIAH, LL.B.,'45, 

San Francisco, Cal. ^ 

WYMAN, WALTER, M.D., '70. 

U. S. Marine Hospital Service, Battery, New York. 
VOE, LUCIEN GURNEE, '68. 

43 River St., Chicago, 111.