(navigation image)
Home American Libraries | Canadian Libraries | Universal Library | Community Texts | Project Gutenberg | Biodiversity Heritage Library | Children's Library | Additional Collections
Search: Advanced Search
Anonymous User (login or join us)
Upload
See other formats

Full text of "An abstract of the catalogue of the archaeological collection of Joseph Jones; preserved at his residence, 1138 Washington Avenue, New Orleans, Louisiana"

V JONES x 

An Abstract of the Catalogue of the 
Archaeological Collection. 




HN flBSTRflCT 



OF THK 



CHTflLOGUE 



COLLECTION 



JOSEPH JONES, M. D., LL. D. 



ED AT HIS RESIDENCE, 1138 WA,^ 

NKW ORLEANS, },< 




1901 

PRESS OF SEARCY & PFAFF, 
NEW ORLEANS. 



U RN HBSTRRCT 



OF THF. 



CATflLOGUE 



OF THE 




OF 



JOSEPH JONES, M. D., LL. D 



PRESERVED AT HIS RESIDENCE, 1138 WASHINGTON AVENUE, 
NEW ORLEANS, LOUISIANA. 




1901 

PRESS OF SEARCY & PFAFF, 
NEW ORLEANS. 



PREFACE. 

THE antiquities described in this archaeological 
catalogue relate chiefly to North, Central and 
South America, as well as to works of ancient art 
derived from Europe, Africa and Asia. 

Many of the implements of war, and the em- 
blems of religious worship illustrating the arts of 
the ancient pre-historic races of North America were 
taken from the aboriginal graves and mounds Nvith 
my own hands. 

All of the objects described in this collection 
and recorded in this catalogue were either obtained 
by me during my explorations and travels, or were 
directly purchased from their original discoverers 
and owners. 

In most instances I have given to the objects 
those names which best describe their origin, use or 
locality. 

In the catalogue the first number indicates the 
number of the object in the collection, then follows 
the name and description, the locality where found, 
and finally the dimensions. 



January, 1896. 



SECTION I. 



ANCIENT POTTERY OF THE STONE GRAVES AND BURIAL 

MOUNDS, SITES OF ABORIGINAL FORTIFICATIONS, 

SITES OF SETTLEMENTS, SACRIFICIAL 

AND RELIGIOUS MOUNDS OF THE 

GREAT INTERIOR VALLEY OF 

NORTH AMERICA. 



Fig. i. Ornamented Burial Vase from Stone Grave, on Big 
Harpeth River, 2% miles from Franklin, Tenn. Height 8 
inches, greatest circumference 27 inches, length of neck 2 inches, 
diameter at base 3.5 inches. 




Figure l. 

This sketch was made when the colors of the paint were 
fresh and distinct. The vase is composed of red clay and 
crushed shells, ornamented with black bands. 



Fig. 2. Painted vase from Sacred 
Mound, opposite Nashville, Tennessee. 
Height 8 inches. One of group figure 
35. P a e 74. Explorations "Aboriginal 
Remains in Tennessee." 




Figure 'i. 



Fig. 3. Painted vase from Stone 
Grave on Big Harpeth River. 
Height 9 inches. Largest circum- 
ference 18.25 inches, made of yellow 
clay and crushed shells. Page 59, 
figure 26, Explorations Aboriginal 
Remains in Tennessee. 




Figure 3. 




Figure 4. Base of same object as Fig. 3. 



Fig. 5. Earthenware vessel 
in shape of frog, from Old Town, 
Harpeth River, Tennessee. 

Height 3.5 inches, circumfer- 
ence 20 inches. See Ex. Ab. 
R. in Tennessee, page 83. 



Figure n. 

Fig. 6. Earthenware vessel from 
Stone Grave, Old Town, Harpeth 
River, Tennessee. Height 3 inches, 
circumference 17 inches. Diameter 
of mouth 4 inches. See Ex. A. R. 
in Tennessee, page 83. 




Figure 6. 




Fig. 7. Small vasefound 
near Nashville, Tennessee. 
Height 2.5 inches, circum- 
ference 10.25 inches. Dia- 
meter of mouth 1.6 inches. 
Ex. Ab. R. in Tennessee, 
page 40. 



Figure 7. 



Fig. 8. Dark vase with raccoon 
head, found 9 miles from Nash- 
ville, in a large stone grave. 
Height 7.7 inches, 20.2 inches in 
circumference. See page 54, Ex. 
Ab. R. in Tennessee. 




Figure 8. 




Fig. 9. Black terra cotta vase 
from stone grave on Big Harpeth 
river, composed of black clay and 
crushed shells, ornamented with 
head resembling that of hedge hog. 

Very exact late measurements 
give the height of this vase as 5.5 
inches, circumference 24 inches. 
See page 84, Ex. Ab. R. in Ten- 
nessee. 



Figure 9. 




Figure 



Fig. 10. Terra cotta drinking vessel from stone grave near 
Brentwood, Tennessee. About one-half natural size. 
Page 41. Ex. Ab. R. in Tennessee. 



Fig. n. Vase from burial mound, Coa- 
homa county, Mississippi. Height 6 inches; 
^ greatest circumference 15 inches. 




Figure 11. 




Fig. 12. Terra cotta vase 
or cup from Mound Bottom, 
opposite St. Louis, Missouri, 
representing a corpulent or 
swollen man. Height 3.5 
inches; greatest circumference 
10.5 inches. Diameter of 
mouth 2% inches. 



Figure 12. 




Figure 13. 



Fig. 13. Group of vases from stone graves at Old Town in 
the vicinity of Franklin, Tennessee. 
Page 84. Ex. Ab. R. in Tennessee. 




Figure 14. 

Fig. 14. Group of vases composed of crushed shells and 
clay from stone graves within the ancient works on Harpeth 
river, two and one-half miles above Franklin, Tennessee. 
About one-fourth natural size. 

See page 74. Ex. Ab. R. in Tennessee. 

Fig. 15. Reddish 
yellow cup or pot 
made of fine clay 
from stone grave, 
valley of Cumber- 
land river, Tennes- 
see. Height 3.5 
inches; circumfer- 
ence 12.5 inches; 
width of month 3 
inches. 

See page 64. Ex. 
A,b. R. in Tennes- 
see. 

Figure 16. 




SECTION II. 



POTTERY AND WORKS OF ART IN TERRA COTTA IN VARIOUS 
SHAPES OF ANIMALS AND OF HUMAN BEINGS, MOST 
PROBABLY USED IN RELIGIOUS WORSHIP AND 
AS TRIBAL AND SACRED SYMBOLS. FROM 
THE STONE GRAVES, BURIAL AND SAC- 
RIFICIAL MOUNDS OF THE ANCIENT 
INHABITANTS OF THE GREAT 
INTERIOR VALLEY OF NORTH 
AMERICA. 




Figure 16. 

Fig. 1 6. Terra cotta vessel in shape of a fat bear from stone 
grave, Old Town, Tennessee. Height 4 inches; circumference 
of body 1 8. 8 inches. 




Figure 17. Figure 18. 

Figs. 17 and 18. Head ornamenting paint bowl; from 
stone grave, Big Harpeth river. 

NOTE The head of the warrior is here ornamented with a 
helmet, comparable in form to that of the Greeks and executed 
with great boldness and skill. Very fine specimen. Height 
from bottom to summit of helmet 4.25 inches. 




Fig. 19. Clay vessel in shape 
ot a child's foot and leg, found 
in stone coffin 8^ feet long, 
enclosing a large skeleton with 
feet to the East. Height of vase 
8.6 inches; greatest circumference 
12 inches. Found on Big Har- 
peth river, near Franklin, in 
burial mound. 

Page 60. Ex. Ab. R. in Ten- 
nessee. 



Figure lit. 



Fig. 20. Terra cotta hollow 
figure representing a squatting 
female figure in great pain. 
Height 9 inches; circumference 
1 9, } 2 inches. From Mound 
Bottom, opposite St. Louis, 
Missouri. 




Figure 20. 



TERRA COTTA IMAGES FROM ABORIGINAL GRAVES AND 

MOUNDS. 



Figs. 21 and 22. Hol- 
low image from Cumberland 
valley, composed of fine- 
cream colored clay. Height 
6)'2 inches; greatest cir 
cumference 8 inches. A dis- 
tinct cross on right shoulder. 

See page 77. Ex. Ab. 
R. in Tennessee. 




Figure 21. 



Figure 22. 




Fig. 23. Terra cotta image of 
deformed female from stone grave 
near Brentwood, Tennessee. 
Height 4.5 inches. 

Page 41. Ex. Ab. R. in Ten- 
nessee. 



Fig. 24. A small hollow idol of 
black clay, 5 inches in height, from 
stone grave near Nashville. De- 
formed fem;ile figure. 

Page 41. Ex. Ab. R. in Ten- 
nessee. 

Figured in error. Dr. Jones hav- 
ing presented this idol to his brother, 
Col. Charles C. Jones and it may 
be found in his fine collection. 



Fig. 25. Image almost 
black, from stone grave of 
a child on burial and sacri- 
ficial mound, banks of 
Cumberland river, opposite 
Nashville, Tennessee; one- 
fourth the natural size. 
See page 44, Ex. Ab. R. 
in Tennessee. 



Figure 25. 



10 
SECTION III. 



STONE IMAGES OR IDOLS FROM THE SACRIFICIAL, CERE- 
MONIAL AND BURIAL, ABORIGINAL MOUNDS OF 
THE GREAT INTERIOR VALLEY OF 
NORTH AMERICA. 




Fig. 26. Stone idol of hard 
grey sandstone from Cumber- 
land Valley, Middle Tennes- 
see, discovered in the neigh- 
borhood of pyramidal mounds 
and stope graves. Height 
13,^ inches, breadth of shoul- 
ders 13.5 inches. 

Fig. 27. Female idol of 
hard grey sandstone, found in 
same locality. Height 1 1 
inches. 



Figures 26-27. 



Fig. 28. Profile head of stone image 
carved out of compact white fluor 
spar, from Pyramidal Mound, Henry 
Co. Tennessee. 

This is but a fragment of an idol 
destroyed by fire in 1857 and this por- 
tion alone escaped. 

Length 5.5 inches, width 5 inches. 
Page 130, Ex. Ab. R. in Tennessee. 




Figure 28. 




Flsrure 29. 

Fig. 29. Remarkable stone implement of aboriginal art, 
formed of hard green serpentine, with head fashioned in the 
shape of a human being. Length 13 inches, diameter of shield 
or guard 5 inches. Length of handle 4 inches, length of 
chisel-like blade 6.7 inches. 

This instrument may have been used for hollowing out 
canoes, probably a relic of the aboriginal inhabitants of the 
south sea islands. 



11 

SECTION IV. 



PIPES FASHIONED OF STONE AND CLAY BY THE ABORI- 
GINES. AND USED FOR CEREMONIAL AND DO- 
MESTIC PURPOSES FROM THE MOUNDS, 
FORTIFICATIONS AND SITES OF ABOR- 
IGINAL SETTLERS IN THE 
GREAT INTERIOR VALLEY 
OF NORTH AMERICA. 




Figure 30. 

Fig. 30. Stone pipe of a chocolate colored stone carved in 
the shape of a parrot, found near Murfreesboro, Tenn. 

Length of pipe 12.4 inches, height 4 inches, howl 2.5 inches, 
depth of bowl 3.8 inches. See page 76, Ex. Ab. R. in 
Tennessee. 




Figure 31. 

Fig. 31. Stone pipe in shape of Eagle, highly polished and 
finished from stone fort near Manchester, Tennessee. About 
one-half natural size. Page 103, Ex. Ab. R. in Tennessee. 




Fig. 32. Stone pipe from Louisiana, beautiful!}' carved in 
the form of a duck, from hard, green serpentine. Length of 
pipe 8 la inches; height 4 inches; diameter of bowl 2 inches. 



12 




Figure 33. 



Fig. 33. Pipe of highly polished black slate. This beauti- 
ful specimen of carving was brought by an officer of the United 
State army (Capt. Pittfield) from the Northwestern coast of 
North America during the Mexican war. Length 12.5 inches; 
greatest breadth 5 inches. 



Fig. 34. Stone pipe carved from dark yellow sand- 
stone in the shape of a frog in a sitting posture, weighing 
19)^ pounds. This immense pipe was found about 1806 
by Mr. Wm. Ellis, near a large mound in the neighborhood 
of Port Gibson, near the banks of the Mississippi river. 

Not illustrated. 




Figure 35. 



Figure 36. 



- 35- Clay pipe in the form of a sitting figure, from 
Shell Ridge mound, near mouth of Bayou Lafourche, La. Width 
of base of pipe 4 inches, bowl 2 inches. 

Fig. 36. Partially formed stone pipe of dark brown sand 
stone from same locality. Length of base 5.2 inches; diameter 
of bowl 2.3 inches. 



13 
SECTION V. 



STONE WEAPONS BATTLE AXES STONE HATCHETS STONE 
WEDGES STONE SCRAPERS, ETC. 



The weapons and implements of stone were, without doubt, 
used by the aborigines of North, Central and South America, 
for various purposes, the same instrument or weapon being 
used indiscriminately for peace or for war. Thus a stone wedge 
when properly bound to a handle, might be used as a hatchet 
or battle axe, or for scraping skins, digging out canoes or 
boats, or for agricultural purposes. We now know that the 
ordinary arrow and spear head is used by the Esquimaux and 
other northern tribes as a knife when fastened into a wooden 
handle. It is also evident from ancient Peruvian figures that 
stone spears and arrow heads were similarly used in ancient 
times. 




Figure 37. 

Fig. 37. Double headed green stone axe with stone handle. 
Formed of hard green stone (chloritic slate) susceptible of 
high polish. Handle and stone blade carved from a single 
piece of stone. Taken from burial mound on the banks of the 
Cumberland river opposite Nashville, Tenn. This remarkable 
mound appears to have been occupied by a sacrificial vase 
formed of crushed shells and clay, varying in thickness from 
one to two inches, and almost forty-four inches in diameter. 
The stone coffins were arranged around this central vase or 
sacrificial altar. Mound fully described in Explorations of 
Aboriginal Remains in Tennessee, Smithsonian contributions 
to knowledge, p. 42. Length of stone hatchet, including han- 
dle, 14.25 inches; diameter from edge to edge of double blade 6 
inches; width of blade large 2.5 inches; width of handle 2^ 
inches. The head of the handle has three notches and the end 
a ring in it. 

See page 46. Ex. Ab. R. in Tennessee. 

NOTE Dr. Jones considered this to be the most beautiful 
and perfect stotie implement which he had observed in Europe 
or America, being especially interesting as developing the idea 
of a perfect double-headed stone axe without any contact with 
civilization, and also as showing the manner in which the 
aborigines fastened the handle to the axe. 



14 




Figure 38. 

Fig. 38. Spade shaped implement of hard 
green stone, from ancient works at Gen. De- 
Graffenreid's, Big Harpeth River, Tennessee, 
2/4 miles from Franklin, Tennessee. Length 
18 inches, greatest width of blade 2)2 inches, 
thickness of handle % inch. Length of spade 
3^ inches. 

See page 87, Ex. Aboriginal Remains in 
Tennessee. 



Fig 39. Leaf shaped stone or spear of 
symmetrical form with serrated edges of fossil 
stone of a dark, hard siliceous texture. This 
stone spear was found in the ancient earth 
works of the Big Harpeth River, about -2% 
miles above Franklin, Tennessee. It was 
taken from a hexagonal grave in the centre of 
a Burial Mound. Length 21.75 inches, width 
2 inches, thickness 0.3 inches. 



NOTE This has been regarded as the most 
remarkable stone implement in existence in 
this or any other country, and conveys a high 
idea of the skill and perseverance of the an- 
cient inhabitants of Tennessee in the manu- 
facture of stone implements. Page 58, Ex. 
A.b. R. in Tennessee. 



Figure 39. 



15 



SECTION VI. 



DISCOIDAL STONES, BICONCAVE STONES, USED FOR GAMES, 

'FOR MEDICINE BOWLS, PAINT BOWI.S 

AND MORTARS. 



Fig. 40. Biconcave stone disc, 
from stone grave, Valley of the 
Cumberland River. Diameter 5.25 
inches, thickness 1.65 inches, dia- 
meter of central opening 3.12 inches. 
See page 74, Ex. Ab. R. in Ten- 
nessee. 




Figure 40. 




Fig. 41. Biconcave stone disc, 
from stone grave, Valley of the 
Cumberland. Diameter of stone 
6/ inches, diameter of opening 
4)6 inches, height -2% inches. 
See page 51, Ex. Ab. R. in Ten- 
nessee. 



Figure 41. 

This collection contains in addition a very large number of 
stone wedges, chisels, battle axes, both single and double, 
scrapers, fleshers and arrow heads too numerous to be figured. 
Many are mentioned in Explorations of Aboriginal Remains in 
Tennessee. 

See page 75, figures 39 and 40; page 87, figure 55 ; page 139, 
figures 75 and 76; page 140, figures 75, 78 and 79. 

Others were obtained in different localities in various parts 
of the Southern States, forming exquisite specimens of Indian 
art and crafts. 



16 
SECTION VII. 

STONE AND TERRA COTTA PESTLES, CRUSHERS OF GRAIN 
AND PAINT AND SMOOTHERS OF SKINS, ETC. 





Figure 42. 



Figure 43. 



Figure 44. 



Fig. 42. Skin smoother, composed of clay and crushed 
shells from aboriginal settlement in neighborhood of Sacred 
Mound, opposite Nashville, Tenn. Diameter 4.7 inches, 
length 4 inches from base to top of handle. End of handle 
cleft or forked. Surface of disc is highly polished. 

NOTE As far as Dr. Jones' information extends this form 
of instrument was first discovered and described by him. 

Fig. 43. Skin smoother, found in mound in north Nash- 
ville, composed of clay and crushed shells. Diameter 5.75 
inches, height from base to end of handle 3 inches. 

Fig. 44. Skin smoother from banks of Cumberland River. 
Greatest diameter 5.35, short diameter 3.85. Height 3 inches. 
Page 143, Ex. Ab. R. in Tennessee. 

SECTION VIII. 



PLUMMETS, SINKERS, PERFORATED STONES USED AS 

SINKERS FOR LINES AND NETS, ALSO FOR SPINNING 

THREAD AND FOR ORNAMENTS. 



Fig. 45. Stone implement of 
hard brown stone, found at Stone 
Fort, near Manchester, Tenn. 




Figure 45. 




Fig. 46. Plummet of black, magnetic iron ore, 
found at line of Ancient Works. Big Harpeth 
River. Length 3.25 inches, diameter 1.25 inches. 
Page 141, Ex. Ab. R. in Tennessee. 



Figure 46. 



17 



SECTION IX. 



OBJECTS OF DOUBTFUL OR UNKNOWN ORIGIN. 



Fig. 47. Cone of haematite from Cum- 
berland Valley. See page 141, Ex. Ab. 
R. in Tennessee. 




Figure 47 



SECTION X. 



SPEAR HEADS ARROW HEADS. 



Spear heads of various patterns, perfect in all their parts, 
and typical of the skill of the aboriginal inhabitants of North 
America. 

Some have sloping edges in opposite directions, so construc- 
ted as to cause a rotary motion of the spear or javelin when 
thrown through the air. They vary in length from 4.75 inches 
to 2.4 inches; composed of variously colored silex, and are from 
Tennessee, Mississippi, Arkansas and L/ouisiana. 




Figure 48. 




Figure 49. 



Figure 50. 



18 
SECTION XI. 



CARVED SHELL ORNAMENTS. 



Fig. 51. Carved shell 
from stone grave, Big Har- 
peth river, Tennessee. Great- 
est length 7.5 inches. 




Figure 52. 

Fig. 52. Carvings on sea shell. Fig. 51. 
See page 60. Ex. Ab. R. in Tennessee. 




53- Engraved shell from 
stone grave, Sacred Mound.on banks 
of Cumberland river, opposite Nash- 
ville. 

Page 43. Ex. Ab. R. in Ten- 
nessee. 



Fig. 54. Reverse of above, sup* 
posed to have been worn suspended 
around the neck. 

Page 43. Ex. Ab. R. in Ten- 
nesseee. 



Figure 54. 



19 



Fig- 55- Various forms of 
shell beads from stone coffins in 
mounds opposite Nashville, Ten- 
nessee. 

See page 42. Ex. Ab. in Ten- 
nessee. 






Figure 56. 



Figure 55. 



Fig. 56. Shell ornament cameo. 
From stone grave of a child, foot of 
Burial Mound, Cumberland river. Long 
diameter 2 inches; short diameter 1.36 
inches. 

Page 48. Ex. Ab. R. in Tennessee. 



SECTION XII. 



BONE IMPLEMENTS. 



In this section is contained a large number of needles, bod- 
kins, etc., made from the polished bones of the American deer 
and chiefly found in the mounds of Tennessee, and the shell 
mounds ot Bayou des Allemands, Lafourche parish, Louisiana. 

SECTION XIII. 



TERRA COTTA AND STONE HEADS AND MASKS OF MEN, 
ANIMALS, BIRDS, ETC. 



Fig. 57. Terra Cotta head 
of do<; from Aboriginal Mound, 
near Florence, Alabama. 




Figure 57. 



20 




Fig. 58. Terra Cotta figure, 
from Mound Valley of the Ten- 
nessee river, near Florence, Ala., 
almost natural size. 



Figure 58. 



Fig. 59. Terra cotta head, prob- 
ably intended for that of a Panther, 
from Burial Mound, Copiah Co., 
Mississippi. Length of head i inch, 
length of head and neck 2 inches. 




Figure 59. 




Fig. 60. Terra cotta fig- 
ure, from Mound near Flor- 
ence, Ala. Height 3.5 
inches, breadth 2.25 inches. 

This figure has been called 
the "Alabama Isis." 



Figure 60. 



21 



Fig. 61. Terra cotta head 
from Florence, Ala., Valley 
of the Tennessee River. 




Figure 61. 




Fig. 62. Terra cotta head from 
Burial Mound on the Tennessee 
River, near Florence, Ala. 



Figure (52. 



Fig- 63. Terra cotta 
head from Shell Mound, 
Deer Island, nearBiloxi, 
Miss. Probably intended 
for handle to a vase. 
Length of head> inches, 
length of neck 2 . 5 inches. 




Figure 63. 



22 

SECTION XIV. 



METAL ORNAMENTS COPPER AND IRON AND STONE FROM 
THE ABORIGINAL MOUNDS AND STONE GRAVES 
AND SITES OF ANCIENT ABORIGINAL SETTLE- 
MENTS. 




Fig. 64 Remarkable copper plate 
from Mound in Alabama on the banks of 
Tennessee river. Length of plate 18 
inches; width of plate 5.5 inches. 

The figure is stamped on the copper. 



Figure 64. 




Figure 65. 

Fig. 65. a. Represents a plume. Long diameter 14 inches; 
broadest portion 3.3 inches. 

b. Represents a sceptre on which is very distinctly figured a 
serpent. Length 10 inches; greatest breadth 4 inches; both 
the scepter and the plume have handles of bone; the several 
parts are ingeniously held together with copper rivets. Smaller 
ornaments made of copper. 



23 




Figure 66. 

Fig. 66. a. Large stone wedge 9 inches long, 3 inches 
wide. b. Beautiful polished stone axe of dark green chloritic 
slate perfoiated by hole in the center. Length 7 inches; width 
5 inches, c. Fine copper axe of pure metal, showing the 
effect of having been beaten. Length 8.5 inches; greatest 
width 2 inches. This collection of relics is of great impor- 
tance as showing the copper and stone implements found side 
by side in the same prehistoric grave. 

The foregoing articles were found near Stevenson, Alabama, 
while mining for coal. 



SECTION XV. 



1. Implements employed in ancient mining operations by 
the aborigines of North America. 

2. Iron and stone weapons of war used by the aborigines 
of North America, after the colonization by Europeans, and 
still in use by the Western and Northern tribes. 



24 
SECTION XVI. 



PRE-HISTORIC, ABORIGINAL RELICS FROM THE MOUNDS 
AROUND NATCHEZ, AND FROM THE SELTZERTOWN 
MOUND AND SURROUNDING COUNTRY ON THE 
EAST AND WEST BANKS OF THE MISSISSIPPI 
RIVER. STONE IMPLEMENTS, WEAPONS 
OF WAR, CELTS, DISCOID AL STONES, 
PLUMBS, SINKERS, BEAD GOR- 
GETS, BOAT SHAPED IMPLE- 
MENTS, ETC., VASES, 
STONE AND TERRA 
COTTA PIPES. 




Figure 67. 



Fig. 67. Stone pipes from vicinity of Fort Rosalie near 
Natchez, Miss. Stone pipe Length 4 inches; height 2.5 
inches. Stone pipe with human head Height 3 inches; 
length 4 inches. 




Fig. 68. Vase in shape of 
frog, from vicinity of Natchez, 
Miss. Greatest diameter 4 5 
inches, height 2.5 inches. 



Figure 68. 



25 




Fig. 69. Highly ornamented and 
glazed black vase from Mound in the 
vicinity of Natchez, Miss. 

Circumference 20 inches, diameter 
of neck i 85 inches. Diameter of 
base 3 inches, height of vase to neck 
9 inches. 



Figure 69. 

Fig- 70. Group of 
vases from the country of 
the Ancient Natchez In- 
dians in Mississippi. 

Fig. 71. Stone vase, 
contents of Burial Mound, 
and Aboriginal relics from 
the place of Mr. John 
Slate, on the Taliahatchie 
River, Lafayette Co., Mis- 
sissippi. Vase found 16 
miles west of Oxford, Miss. 




Figure 70. 



innes west or (Jxlord, Miss. 

Height 11.5 inches, long diameter 22 inches, short diameter 

15 inches, depth of bowl 8.5 inches. 




Figure 71. 

NOTE Without doubt one of the most perfect and remark, 
able aboriginal relics ever found in North America. 

See page 144, Ex. Ab. R. in Tennessee. 

The extremely poor cut gives no idea of the beauty of this 
vase. 

Under this section are numerous boards and jars containing 
articles too small to be dealt with separately and are not illus- 
ratei in this catalogue. 



SECTION XVII. 



ABORIGINAL TERRA COTTAS, IDOLS AND CARVINGS FROM 

MEXICO. 




F'gure 72. 

Fig. 72. Terra cotta figures from Mexico, of which there 
is a very large number in various forms, from 2 to 3 and 4 
inches long. 




Figure 73. 

Fig. 73. Terra cotta figures from Mexico, about 14 inches 
in height. 



27 




Figure 74. 




Fig. 74. Carving of stone 
frog from Tuxpan, Mexico. 
Length 10 inches, height 5 
inches. 




Figure 75. 



Figure 75 Small stone figures from Mexico. Under this 
head are a large number of small idols not herein illustrated. 




Fig. 76. Stone idol from Tux- 
pan, Mexico. Height 19.5 inches; 
width 7.5 inches. 



Figure 76 




Fig. 77. Basaltic mask, Tuxpan, 
Mexico. Length 5 inches; width 4.25 
inches. 



Figure 77. 

Fig. 78. Boulder of stone 
carved with human face and 
hands. From Tampico, 
Mexico. Length 11.5 inches; 
breadth 9.5 inches. 




Figure 7 




Fig. 79. Stone carving or idol from 
Tampico, Mexico. Height 26.5 inches; 
greatest width 11.2 inches; thickness of 
slab 2 inches. 



Figure 79. 




Fig. So. Jade mask 
from temple of Sun 
and Moon, Street of 
the Dead, near City 
of Mexico. Length 4 
inches; width 2.25 
inches. 



Figure 80. 



29 




Figure 81. 



Fig. 81. War decoration of the Aztecs or Toltecs beautifully 
carved, of green jade. Discovered in an excavation made in 
the Temple of Cholula, Mexico, October 2, 1878. Length 2.75 
inches; width 2 inches. 




Fig. 82. Green jade ornament, 
heart shaped, with carving of human 
head of exquisite shape and high polish, 
from ancient Aztec ruins near City of 
Mexico. Length 2 inches; width 1.25 
inches. 



Figure 82. 



SECTION XVIII. 



CARVINGS AND TERRA COTTAS FROM CENTRAL AND SOUTH 

AMERICA. 



Fig. 83. Vase or jug of terra cotta, excavated from bed of 
Guano on an island off the coast of Honduras. Height 23.5 
inches; greatest circumference 33.25 inches. Not illustrated. 



30 




Fig. 84. Stone image 
from Honduras, represent- 
ing a monkey apparently 
in great pain. Height of 
figure 8 inches. 



Figure 84. 




Fig. 85. Stone matata 
from Honduras, Central 
America. Roller attach- 
ed. Length 13 inches; 
height of figure 10 inches. 



Fig. 86. Stone carving re- 
presenting skull or death's 
head, frcm Copan, Honduras. 
Height of head from chin to 
top of ornament 9.5 inches; 
Length 8 inches; width 7.5 
inches. 



Figure 86. 



Fig. 87. Stone sphynx 
with head of bird, from Copan, 
Honduras. Length n inches; 
height 7.5 inches, breadth 
6-5 inches. 




Figure 8 



31 



A 




Figure 88. 

Fig. 88. Carving representing a foot with sandal or shoe 
from Copan, Honduras. Length of sole of foot 11.25 inches; 
breadth of toes 5.25 inches; circumference around ankle 19 
inches. Smaller foot from Chichen Itzen, Honduras. Battle 
axe, hard green stone curiously carved, from Copan, Honduras. 
Length 4.5 inches; breadth 4 inches; thickness 1.75 inches. 




Figure 89. 

Fig. 89. Idols of hard porous lava from Pacific coast of 
Mexico and Central America, about 12 inches in height. 



Fig. 00. Stone carving 
representing Armadillo of 
South America, of hard, 
compact light brown sand 
stone. Length 16 inches, 
height 8 inches. 




Figure 90. 



32 




Figure 91. 

Fig. 91. These hard stone idols (male and female) were 
found in a hillside cut on the line of the Costa Rican railroad, 
about 40 miles inland from Port Liraon, Costa Rica. 

Height of male idol 36 inches, breadth 15.5 inches, greatest 
circumference 57 inches. 

Height of female idol 24 inches, breadth 14 inches, greatest 
circumference 52.5 inches. Both are fashioned of hard porous 
lava. 




Figure 92. 

Fig. 92. These three figures were found in a vase, while 
excavating a mound near San Pedro, Spanish Honduras. 
Height of larges*: figure 5 inches, breadth of base 3.5 inches, 
circumference around the abdomen 7 inches. The figures are 
of terra cotta, black and highly polished. 




Figure 



Figure 94. 



33 



Figs. 93-94. Terra cotta vases of reddish brown clay, highly 
polished and grotesquely ornamented. The legs (three in 
number) are hollow and contain balls of clay, which produce 
a rattling sound. About 2.5 inches in height. Northern part 
of South America. 




Figure 95. 

Fig. 95. Terra cotta, representing head of Cougar or 
Panther, from Guatemala. Height 3.75 inches, greatest length 
4.75 inches. 

ANCIENT PERUVIAN POTTERY. 




Figure 96. 



Figure 97. 



34 




Figure 98. 

Fig. 98. A most exquisitely carved image of the Hindoo 
God Vishnu, composed of black basalt. 

Height from top of carving to base 38 inches, greatest width 
of shoulders 10.5 inches. 

Brought from India by the Rt. Rev. Bishop Wilmer of Louis- 
iana, and presented by his widow, Mrs. Wilmer, to Dr. 
Joseph Jones in 1879. 



35 




Figure 99. 



Fig. 99. Hindoo masks, formerly worn by the priests of 
the serpent worshipers, from a Temple on the Island of Ceylon, 
made of light wood brilliantly colored. 




Figure 100. 

Fig. 100. This collection contains a large number of Mound 
Builders' skulls, carefully numbered and measured. See page 
no, Explorations aboriginal remains in Tennessee, also a 
large number of those of various nationalities of modern times. 



This small catalogue gives a very meagre idea of the 
collection made by the late Joseph Jones, physician and scien- 
tist. He was an earnest student of Archaeology and made 
during the years of 1868-1869, most interesting explorations 
into the mounds lying in the valleys of the Tennessee and 
Cumberland Rivers. These researches were published by the 
Smithsonian Institution under the title of "Explorations of the 
Aboriginal Remains in Tennessee," Smithsonian Contribution 
to Knowledge, No. 259. The work is largely illustrated with 
cuts, figuring the results of these explorations; skulls, vases, 
idols, pipes, celts, stone implements and shell ornaments of 
various kinds, and plans of the earth works and general 
position of the mounds from which they were taken. 

The originals of the articles thus described form the greater 
part of this collection; there are in addition many beautiful 
objects obtained in Louisiana and others which were acquired 
by careful purchase from Mexico, Central America and Peru, 
and by a gift from India. 

The collection also contains fine examples of Indian bead 
work, and handsome specimens of the pottery of the Zuni and 
Navajos Indians, and of the Indian tribes of Central and South 
America. 

SUSAN POLK JONES. 

1138 Washington Ave. , New Orleans, 
October, 1901. 



THE LIBRARY 
UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA 

Santa Barbara 



THIS BOOK IS DUE ON THE LAST DATE 
STAMPED BELOW. 



Series 9482 



3 1205026442549 



UC SOUTHERN REGIONAL LIBRARY FACILITY