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Full text of "Ancestry of Simeon Breed Williams and of his wife, Cornelia Johnston Williams .."

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929.2 

¥6739wi-t 

1713544 



REYNOLDS HISTORICAL 
GENEALOGY COLLECTION 



1833 01398 6929 



ANCESTRY 



SIMEON BREED WILLIAMS , 



AND OF HIS WIFE 



C ORNELIA JOHNSTON WILLIA MS ^ 



compiled by 
Cornelia Bartow Williams. 



"The Genealogical and Biographical Record 
OF New London County. Connecticut." 



J. H. BEERS « CO., 
190S. 



1713541 



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-^l^-^^yf?!^/'^.^ / 



,^^ 



SIMEON BREED WILLIAMS. 



SIMEON BREED WILLIAMS, son of Wil 
liam Coit Williams and Nancy Breed, was born in 
Norwich, Conn., Feb. 3, 181 5. He left his home in 
1831 at the early age of sixteen to join an uncle in 
Pittsburg. It took him ten days to make this jour- 
ney, going by stage to Essex Ferry on the Connecti- 
cut river ; by steamboat to New York and to South 
Amboy, N. J.; thence by stage to Bordentown, N. 
J. ; by steamboat to Philadelphia, Pa., and to Balti- 
more, Md. ; thence by stage across the state of Penn- 
sylvania and over the Allegheny mountains to Pitts- 
burg. He remained there until about 1840, for four 
years employed in the dry-goods business of his 
uncle, George Breed, and later in the commission 
house of Atwood & Jones. During this time he 
went on a collecting tour by steamboat down the 
Ohio river, and up the Mississippi, Illinois and Wa- 
bash ; traveling by stage and on horseback through- 
out the interior of Kentucky, Indiana and Illinois. 
In 1844 he removed to Cincinnati, Ohio, where he 

, . (3) 



Was engaged in mercantile and manufacturing busi- 
ness. There he married, June 29, 1848, Cornelia 
Johnston (daughter of Wilham Sage Johnston, of 
that city, and Clarina Bartow, of Westchester, N. 
Y.), and they had six children: (i) Clarina John- 
ston (married June 17, 1873, Moses Lewis Scudder, 
and had four sons, Marvyn, Harold, Philip John- 
ston, and Lawrence Williams), (2) Mary Breed, 
(3) Anna Perkins, (4) Cornelia Bartow, (5) Lillie, 
and (6) Lawrence, president of the Oliver Type- 
writer Company (married Sept. 20, 1S83, Adele Hol- 
brook Wheeler, and had four children, Cornelia, 
Dorothy, Lawrence, Jr., and Wheeler). 

In 1865 Mr. Williams removed with his family 
to Chicago (making his home in the suburb of Lake 
Forest), and for many years occupied himself with 
real estate transactions. In 18S7 he sold his resi- 
dence in the country and moved into the city. He 
was very fond of travel, and besides being familiar 
with his own country (including Alaska) had vis- 
ited Mexico and made several trips to Europe. It 
was while he was abroad in 1902 that he died, Sept. 
3d, in his eighty-eighth year, in Berlin, Germany. 
Mr. Williams reached a ripe old age. His reverend 
and beautiful face and fine physique made him a 
striking personality, and his intelligence and mental 
alertness and widespread interest in the work of the 
world, were unusual in a man of his years. He was 
a true friend in his interest and generosity, ever 

(4) 



ready with tlie helping hand in encouragement and 
aid ; and his uniformly kind and courteous manner 
marked him a true gentleman of the Old School. 
As he grew venerable, he retained not only the 
physical, but the intellectual, vigor of a far younger 
man. His noble life, well rounded out in years and 
good example, could not fail to leave its impress on 
those about him. 

Although so' early removed from the home of 
his boyhood, Mr. Williams was always loyal to Nor- 
wich and made frequent pilgrimages there as to a 
shrine that he loved. He took a vital interest in the 
place of his birth and the numerous friends and re- 
latives there. His ancestry includes many of the 
pioneers and settlers, not only of Norwich, but of 
all New London county and of many Massachu- 
setts towns as well, as will be seen by referring to 
the chart shown herewith. 

Williams. — Ancestry of Simeon Breed Wil- 
liams. (I) John Williams, born about 1600, emi- 
grated in 1633 (probably) from Newbury, Eng- 
land ; settled first at Newbury, Mass., on the Merri- 
mac river; was one of the petitioners in 1640 (with 
Rev. John Ward and others) to found a new town, 
Haverhill; was admitted freeman there in 1642; and 
in 1667, received his share of the town lands, as one 
of the original proprietors of Haverhill. 

(H) Joseph Williams (1647-1720) — took the 
Colonial oath in Haverhill, ^Mass., in 1677 ; removed 

- . (5) 



to Norwich, Conn., and settled on Poquetannock 
creek, Brewster's Neck. His name is included in 
the list of Norwich citizens, in 1702, as a "whole- 
share man, respecting lands." 

(III) Capt. John Williams (1680-1742) re- 
moved with his father from Haverhill, >.Iass., to 
Norwich, Conn. ; was one of three Norwich citizens 
appointed in 1734 to present a petition to the Gen- 
eral Assembly with reference to holding the Su- 
preme Court in Norwich, as well as New London ; 
was commissioned by General Assembly at Hartford 
as lieutenant in 1721 ; and captain in 1735. 

(IV) Capt. Joseph Williams (1723- 1776) was a 
wealthy merchant in Norwich, Conn. ; was commis- 
sioned by the General Court at Hartford as ensign 
in 1746; lieutenant in 1754; and captain in 1758. In 
1774, he removed to the township of Brattleboro, on 
the Hampshire Grants, thus being one of the pio- 
neer settlers of Vermont. Five of his sons served 
in the war of the Revolution. 

(V) Gen. Joseph Williams (1753-1800) was 
with the Connecticut troops at New York in 1776, 
and later engaged in fitting out armed vessels from 
Norwich and New London. In one of these he made 
a voyage to the West Indies, had action with a Brit- 
ish cruiser, came oflf winner and became a popular 
hero. After the peace he took an active part in or- 
ganizing the Connecticut militia, and became major, 
colonel and brigadier general (the highest rank in 

(6) 



the State). He was an influential member of the 
Connecticut Legislature (i 791 -1798) and was in- 
terested in the settlement of the Western Reserve in 
Ohio ; was incorporator and director of the Norwich 
and New London Union Bank in 1792 ; also of the 
Norwich Bank, organized in 1796. His industry 
and enterprise were untiring. His vessels traded 
with the West Indies and with Europe. He was a 
friend and correspondent of Gen. Washington, Gen. 
Putnam and Gov. Trumbull; and was buried with 
military honors. 

(VI) Capt. William Coit Williams (17S1-1818), 
drowned at sea March 9, 1818, was a ship owner and 
master, and as such visited many parts of the world. 
Many of his letters are in the possession of his 
family, and are of great interest. He married 
Nancy Breed, daughter of Shubael Breed (V). 

(I) Edward Fuller and (II) Samuel Fuller 
(1608-1683) came in the "Mayflower" in 1620. Ed- 
ward and his wife Ann died the first winter (1621) 
and (II) Samuel, then a lad of twelve years, was 
left to the care of his uncle. Dr. Samuel Fuller (who 
proved to be one of the most valuable members of 
that primitive community and memorable as being 
the first physician who came to New England). The 
Colony recognized (II) Samuel's claims upon it, for 
in the division of land, in 1624, three shares were 
apportioned to him. In 1634 he was made freeman 

(7) 



of the colony. In 1635 he removed from Plymouth 
to Scitiiate, where he married Jane, daughter of 
Rev. John Lothrop. He was constable in 164 1, and 
his name occurs frequently as juryman and on com- 
mittees; and he was one of the thirty-eight "pur- 
chasers." He was the only one of the "Mayflower" 
passengers who settled in Barnstable, whither he 
removed from Scituate in 1641-1644. 

(H) Rev. John Lothrop (15S4-1653) was the pio- 
neer and founder of the Lothrop family in America. 
He had an eventful career ; was graduated at Cam- 
bridge; removed to Edgerton, Kent County, where 
he was curate of the parish. In 1623 he espoused the 
cause of the Independents and was called to the 
First Independent Church in Southwark, London 
(to succeed Henry Jacob), and was there eight 
years. In 1632 he was taken prisoner under Arch- 
bishop Laud. Forty-five members of his church 
were also apprehended for unlawful meetings. He 
was confined in the old Clink Prison in Newgate, 
and in the Gate House, and lingered there for 
months. He was brought before Laud, with others 
of his congregation, in 1634. The prisoner peti- 
tioned for his release, under promise to go into for- 
eign exile. This was granted him and his congre- 
gation, and upon their release they sailed for Boston, 
Mass., where they arrived in September, 1634. He 
settled first at Scituate ; later removed with most of 

(8) 



his corlgregatioil to Barnstable. During the four- 
teen years he was pastor there, such was his influence 
over the people that the power of the civil magis- 
trate was not needed to restrain crime. His daugh- 
ter Jane, born in England, became the wife of (II) 
Samuel Fuller, of the "Mayflower." 

(Ill) Samuel Lathrop (1622-1701) came to 
America with his father and was at Boston, Sci- 
tuate and Barnstable. In 1648 he removed to New 
London, Conn, (then Pequot), with John Winthrop, 
Jr., and party, and at once became an important citi- 
zen. He was assigned to places of responsibility and 
honor, in conjunction with John Winthrop, Jr., 
Lieut. Thomas Minor, Lieut. James Avery and 
Jonathan Brewster. In 1668 he removed to Nor- 
wich, where he was chosen constable in 1673-1682, 
and townsman in 1685 — dignified local offices in 
those days. 

(V) Capt. Ebenezer Lathrop (1703-1781) was 
a man of note both in civil and military aflfairs. He 
was commissioned as ensign in 1740; lieutenant in 
1742; and captain in 1745. He was captain of mili- 
tia (Col. Latimer's Regiment) at Saratoga in 1777. 
His daughter (VI) Sarah married (V) Capt. Will- 
iam Coit, and his daughter (VI) Anna married 
Jabez Perkins, 3d. 

< (I) Thomas Wheeler (1602-1686) emigrated to 
this country in 1635, settling first at Lynn, Mass., 
was made freeman there in 1642 ; removed to Ston- 

. . ■ (9) 



ington, Conn., in 1667, was made freeman there in 
1669; chosen commissioner by the General Court 
in 1669 ; and deputy for Stonington in 1673. 
''■ (III) WiUiam Wheeler ( 16S1-1747) was the first 
white child born in Stonington. 

(I) Robert Parke (1585-1665) emigrated from 
Preston, England, in 1630 ; returned to England the 
same year, carrying an order from the governor of 
Massachusetts to his son John in England to pay 
money, probably the first bill of exchange drawn in 
America. On his return to America Robert Parke 
settled with his son Thomas in Wethersfield, Conn. ; 
was admitted freeman there in 1640; was deputy to 
the General Court in 1641, 1642; and juror 1641- 
1643. He removed to Pequot (now New London) 
in 1649. He finally settled at Mystic, in Stonington. 
He and his son Thomas served in the Colonial wars. 

(H) Capt. John Gallop came to America in 
1630; settled in Boston, Mass., and became a large 
landowner there. He was a skillful mariner. He 
obtained a colonial and later a national reputation by 
a successful encounter with the Indian murderers of 
John Oldham. This has been called the first naval 
battle on the Atlantic coast, and was the beginning 
of the great Pequot war. 

(Ill) Capt. John Gallup, 2d, (1615-1676), emi- 
grated to this country in 1633 ; in 1640 he went to 

(10) 



Taunton (then a part of Plymouth Colony) ; in 
165 1 to New London, Conn.; and in 1654 to Ston- 
ing^on, settling upon a grant of land given him by 
New London in 1653, in recognition of the dis- 
tinguished services of himself and father during the 
Pequot war. He represented the town at the General 
Court in 1665 and 1667. In King Philip's war he 
was in the fearful "Swamp Fight" (Dec. 19, 1675) 
at Narraganseft, and fell with five other captains in 
that memorable battle. 

(Ill) Rev. Joseph Coit (1673-1750) was the first 
native of New London, Conn., to receive a collegiate 
education; was graduated at Harvard in 1697, and 
admited to a Master's Degree at the first Commence- 
ment of Yale College in 1701. He preached in Nor- 
wich in 1698; and was settled pastor in Plainfield, 
1705- 1 748. 

(IV) Col. Samuel Coit (1708-1792) removed 
from Plainfield to Griswold (Preston), where he 
spent a long and honored life. In 1758 he had com- 
mand of a regiment (raised in the neighborhood of 
Norwich) that wintered at Fort Edward. He rep- 
resented Preston in the General Assembly in 1761, 
1765, 1769, 1771, 1772, 1775 ; sat as Judge on the 
Bench of the County Court, and of a Maritime Court 
in the time of the Revolution ; in 1774 was moder- 
ator of the Town meeting on the Boston Port Bill, 
and one of the Preston Committee on Correspon- 

C") 



dence. Pic was excused from active service in tlie 
Revolution because of his age, but owing to his miU- 
tary experience he was attached to the reserves 
under Saltonstall with the rank of colonel. 

(V) Capt. William Coit (1735-1821) was a 
shipmaster and merchant in Norwich. He served 
in the Revolutionary war, was commissioned as 
lieutenant in April, 17S0, and captain in July of the 
same year. His daughter (VI) Abigail married 
(V) General Joseph Williams. 

(I) Lieut. Thomas Leffingwell (1622-1714) ap- 
peared in Saybrook, Conn., in 1637. In 1645 ''^ 
gave relief to Uncas, the Mohegan Sachem, when 
closely besieged by the Narragansetts. For this 
service Uncas gave him a deed to the township of 
Norwich. He removed to Norwich in 1659, was 
sergeant until 1672, ensign until 1676, and lieutenant 
thereafter. He was one of the local judges of the 
Court of Commission, and was representative in 
the Connecticut General Court fifty-three sessions 
(1662-1700). He was in King Philip's war in 1676, 
and was one of Queen Anne"s Royal Commission- 
ers in 1704. His great-granddaughter (IV) Lydia, 
married (V) Capt. Ebcnezer Lathrop. 

(I) Lieut. Thomas Tracy (1610-16S5) came 
from Gloucestershire, England, emigrating to New- 
England in 1636; was first at Salem, Mass.; then 

(12) 



at Wethersfield, Conn., Saybrook, and finally settled 
at Norwich, where he officiated on all important 
committees, and as surveyor, moderator and towns- 
man. He was chosen twenty-seven times as deputy 
to tlie General Court (1662-1684). In 1666 he was 
chosen as ensign of tlie train-band (the first one or- 
ganized in Norwich) ; in 1673 became lieutenant 
of the New London County Dragoons, Capt. James 
Avery's company, and was quartermaster of Drag- 
oons in King Philip's War in 1675. In 167S he was 
appointed on the Commission of the Peace and as 
Justice. 

(II) Dr. Solomon Tracy ( 165 1- 1732) was one of 
six sons who were all active and leading men in the 
early history of Norwich. He was a physician and 
filled the offices of townsman and constable ; was 
frequently elected representative to the General As- 
sembly, serving in 171 1 as clerk of the House, and 
in 1717 as speaker. In 1698 he was chosen ensign 
of the train-band and in 1701 was appointed lieu- 
tenant. 

(I) Walter Palmer (i 585-1 661) emigrated in 
1628; went first to Salem, Mass., and was one of 
the founders of Charlestown, building the first dwell- 
ing-house there. With William Cheeseborough and 
others he removed to Plymouth Colony and founded 
Rehoboth, where he was elected as first represen- 
tative to the General Court at Plymouth. With his 

(13) 



son-in-law, Lieut. Thomas Minor, he joined William 
Cheeseborough and Thomas Stanton in their new 
settlement at Stonington, Conn., and his name is on 
the monument erected there in memory of these 
four early settlers. 

(I) Allen Bread (1601-1692) came to this coun- 
try with Gov. Winthrop and party in 1630, and 
was one of the founders of Lynn, Mass., and one of 
the original grantees of Southampton, L. L, 1640. 

(IV) Gershom Breed (1715-1777) removed from 
Stonington to Norwich about 1750; was a shipping 
merchant and importer, and in 1774 captain of mili- 
tia. He was the great-great-grandfather of Presi- 
dent Timothy Dwight, of Yale College. 



(Ill) Capt. George Denison (1620-1694) emi- 
grated to New England with his father in 163 1, set- 
tling first in Roxbury, Mass. In 1643 he returned 
to England, where he won distinction, serving under 
Cromwell in the army of the Parliament. He came 
back to Roxbury in 1645 ; removed to tlie Pequot 
settlement (now New London) in 165 1 ; and in 
1654 settled in Stonington on land still owned by 
some of his descendants. He was a frequent repre- 
sentative at the General Court at Hartford (1671- 
1694) and for forty years a trusted military leader 
against the Indians and was the most distinguished 



soldier of Connecticut in her early settlement (ex- 
cepting only Major John Mason). 

(!) Rev. John McLaren (1667-1734) was an 
eminent minister of Tolbooth Church, St. Giles' 
Cathedral, Edinburgh. His son (II) Patrick emi- 
grated to America and was a merchant in Middle- 
town, Conn. He married (V) Dorothy Otis. 

(IV) Judge Joseph Otis (1665-1754), born in 
Scituate, Mass., was Judge of the Court of Com- 
mon Pleas for Plymouth Colony (1703-1714) and 
deputy to the General Court in 1710, 1713. He re- 
moved to New London, North Parish (now Mont- 
ville), Conn., in 1721, where he was much in public 
employment; moderator of town meetings and on 
parish and church committees almost yearly. His 
daughter (V) Dorothy married Patrick McLaren, 
son of (I) Rev. Jolui ^IcLaren. 

(I) William Thomas (i 574-1651) was one of 
the merchant adventurers (1620-1627) and one of 
the founders of New Plymouth Colony ; was deputy 
from Barnstable in 1641 and from Marshfield in 
1646; was chosen Assistant in 1642-1651, and one of 
the Council of War in 1642. 

(II) Capt. Nathaniel Thomas (1606-1674) emi- 
grated with his father; was deputy for IMarshfield 

( 15 ) 



in 1642; ensign in 1640; lieutenant in 1643; and 
captain in 1644. 

(Ill) Judge Nathaniel Thomas (1643-171S) was 
a member of the town council in Marshfield, Mass., 
in 1675 ; lieutenant in King Philip's War in 1675 ; 
deputy for Marshfield eight times (1672- 1692) ; on 
Council of War, 1681-1685 ; captain of militia, 1681 ; 
associate for Plymouth, 1685 and 1690; clerk of the 
County Court of 1639 ! J^idge of Probate for Plym- 
outh county, 1702, 1707; Judge of Court of Com- 
mon Pleas, 1692-1712; and Justice of the Superior 
Court, 1712-1718. 

(Ill) Capt. Jabez Perkins, ist (1677-1742), was 
admitted an inhabitant of Norwich in 1701 ; and in 
1721 was commissioned by the General Court as 
captain. 

(V) Jabez Perkins, 3d (1728-1795), was cap- 
tain's clerk on the State man-of-war in 1778; con- 
tractor and dispenser of public stores; Gov. Trum- 
bull's "right hand man" during the whole Revolu- 
tionary war and one of the perpetual "Council of 
Safety." His daughter (VI) Lydia married (V) 
Shubael Breed. 

(Ill) Major Thomas Leonard (1641-1713) em- 
igrated with his father (II) James from Wales in 
1643, and became a distinguished person in 
Plymouth and Massachusetts colonies. He was ap- 

. . (16) 



pointed by the General Court as ensign in Taunton, 
in 1665; captain in 1690; major in 1709; Judge of 
the Quarter Sessions, 1685-1713 ; Associate for Bris- 
tol County, in 1685 and 1690; Justice of the Peace; 
Justice of the Court of Common Pleas, 1702-1715 ; 
and deputy for eight sessions. 

(I) Robert Hicks (1580-1648) came in the "For- 
tune" in 1621, his wife and children in the "Ann" 
in 1623. 

(II) Capt. Henry Hodges (1652-1717) was a 
leading man in the early settlement of Taunton, 
Mass. ; was deputy to General Court for five years ; 
selectman twenty-eight years ; was commissioned as 
ensign in 1690, and as captain in 1703. 

(I) Thomas Bliss (1580-1650) was a wealthy 
landowner of Belstone Parish, Devonshire, England ; 
espoused the Puritan and Parliamentary side in the 
civil and religious troubles of the reign of Charles 
I, and suffered imprisonment and loss of property on 
account of his opinions. His two sons emigrated to 
America in 1635. 

(I) Francis Bushnell ( 1646) was one of 

the early settlers of Guilford, Conn., and signed the 
Plantation Covenant. 

(17) 



(I) Mathcw Marvyn (1600-1678-80) was an 
original settler and proprietor in Hartford, Conn., 
and one of the pioneers at Norvvalk. 



(I) Simon Huntington (1610-1633) was a noted 
Puritan in Norwich, England, who for the sake of 
unmolested worship emigrated to America in 1633. 

(II) Simon Huntington (1629-1706) came with 
his parents from England in 1633, joined the colon- 
ists in 1660, who settled in Norwich, Conn., and 
stood among the first both in church and state of 
that important settlement. 



(I) John Clarke ( 1673) was an early settler 

at Cambridge, IMass. ; was made freeman there in 
1632; removed to Hartford, Conn., about 1636; 
fought against the Pcquot Indians in 1637; was 
juror in 1641 ; was deputy to nearly every session 
of the General Court at Hartford, first from Hart- 
ford and afterward from Saybrook (1641-1665); 
was one of the patentees of the Royal Charter in 
1662; removed to IMilford in 1665 ^"d represented 
that town for some years, and was ruling elder in 
the church there in 1672. He was one of the most 
influential settlers in tlie Colony. 

(18) . : 



(V) CORNELIA JOHNSTON, the wife of 
Simeon Breed Williams, was also of Connecticut and 
Massachusetts lineage. We give herewith her an- 
cestry. 

(II) Thomas Johnston, Jr. (1708-1767), a mem- 
ber of the Ancient and Honorable Artillery Com- 
pany, Boston, Mass., was an escutcheon-maker, en- 
graver, and artist of much repute; also one of the 
earliest New England organ builders. He is buried 
in King's Chapel burying-ground. He married 
(IV) Bathsheba Thwing. 

(III) Major Samuel Johnston (1756-1794), of 
Boston, IMass., and ]\Iiddletown, Conn., was adju- 
tant, 3d Battalion, Wadsworth's Brigade (com- 
manded by his father-in-law. Col. Comfort Sage), 
in 1776; adjutant and brigadier major, Col. Sher- 
burne's regiment, 1777-1779. He married (V) 
Sarah Sage. 

(IV) William Sage Johnston (1791-1S69), born 
at Middletown, Conn., commenced his business ca- 
reer in New London, and removed in 18 17 to Cin- 
cinnati, Ohio, where he had a long and honorable 
career. In 1865, he moved with the family of his 
daughter (V. Cornelia Johnston Williams) to Chi- 
cago and Lake Forest, 111. He married Clarina 
Bartow, of Westchester, New York. 

(I) Benjamin Thwing (1619-1672) emigrated 
from London in 1635 ; was admitted townsman 

(19) 



Boston, Mass., 1642 ; and was proprietor in Water- 
town and Concord. 

(IV) Bathsheba Thwing married (II) Thomas 
Johnston, Jr. 

(I) David Sage (1639-1703) emigrated from 
Wales in 1652, and was one of the early pioneers at 
Middletown, Connecticut. 

(IV) Gen. Comfort Sage (1731-1799) was a 
merchant and man of influence in Middletown ; was 
appointed quartermaster of troop of horse in the 
6th Regiment, Connecticut Militia, in 1757; lieu- 
tenant in 1761 ; captain in 1763. On news of the 
battle of Lexington, he marched his troops to Eos- 
ton ; in Alay, 1775, was appointed lieutenant colonel 
in Col. James Wadsworth's 23d Regiment, Connec- 
ticut Militia, was member of General Assembly in 
May, 1776, and at tliat session appointed lieutenant 
colonel of the regiment, "now to be raised and sta- 
tioned at New London;" was appointed in June, 
1776, colonel of the 3d Battalion, Wadsworth's Bri- 
gade (Maj. Samuel Johnston, his future son-in-law, 
was his adjutant) ; colonel of the 23d regiment, Oc- 
tober, 1776; and brigadier general of the 2d brig- 
ade in 1784. He was a member of the General As- 
sembly (with few exceptions), from 1776 to 1786. 
He married (IV) Sarah Hamlin, and their daugh- 
ter, (V) Sarah Sage, married (HI) Major Samuel 
Johnston. 

• (20) 



(I) Dr. Comfort Starr ( 1660) emigrated 

from Kent County, England, in 1635 ; settled first 
in New Town (Cambridge), later in Diixbury, and 
finally in Boston. He was a physician of much re- 
pute. His great-granddaughter' (IV) Hannah, mar- 
ried (H) John Sage. 

(H) Capt. Joseph Weld (1595-1646) emigrated 
about 1635 and settled at Roxbury, Mass., where he 
was admitted freeman in 1636, chosen deputy to 
General Court six times (1636- 1644) ; was captain 
Roxbury Military Company. His name stands third 
on the original roll of the Ancient and Honorable 
Artillery Company, of which he was ensign and 
then captain. His daughter (HI) Marah married 
(HI) Comfort Starr. 

(I) Thomas Coleman (1598-1674) emigrated 
in 1634-35 ; was a prominent man in Wethersfield, 
Conn.; settled there in 1636; was Juror frequently 
(1639-4S) ; deputy to-General Court in 1650-51-52- 
53-56 and repeatedly thereafter ; removed with Rev. 
John Russell and others to Hadley, Massachusetts. 



(I) John Forter ( -164S) emigrated to 

Windsor, Conn., in 1639; was appointed constable, 
1639, 1640; juror, 1640; grand juror, 1643; deputy 
to General Court, 1646, 1647. 

(21) _ ; 



(II) Thomas Wright (1610-1670) came from 
England with John Winthrop in 1630 ; was first at 
Watertown, Mass.; was one of the Massadiusetts 
Court of Assistants before the Colonial government 
was establislicd at Boston; removed to Wethers- 
field, Conn., about 1639; recorded as man of influ- 
ence and high standing; was deputy to General 
Court of Connecticut in 1643; selectman, 1658; 
constable, 1668-69 ; on State jury at Hartford, 1668- 
69 ; and was prominent in church controversy which 
led to the removal to Hadley, Massachusetts. 

(I) Jonas Weed ( 1676) came from Eng- 
land with W'inthrop in 1630, went to Watertown, 
Mass., in 163 1 ; and settled in Stamford, Conn., 
1640; later in Fairfield. 

(I) Giles Hamlin (1622-1689) settled in Middle- 
town, Conn., as early as 1654; was a Puritan and 
justly styled one of the pillars of the Colony. He 
was occasionally commissioner of the United Col- 
onies; representative for Middlctown nearly every 
year from 1666 to 1684; and was assistant from 
1685 to 16S9. 

(II) John Hamlin (1658-1732-33) was com- 
missioner, or justice of the peace, for Middletown, 
1691-1693 ; appointed town clerk in 1696; deputy to 
the General Assembly seven sessions, 1690-1693; 
assistant at eighty-one sessions, 1694-1729; member 
of the council of the governor at fifty-nine sessions, 

. . (22) 



1702-1727; judge of the court of Hartford County, 
1716; and judge of tlic Superior court, 1716-1721. 

(III) Col. Jabez Hamlin (1709-1791) was a 
lawyer, magistrate and soldier, and mayor of the 
city of Middletown from its incorporation. During 
the Revolution he was a member of the Council of 
Safety. 

(IV) Sarah Hamlin married (IV) Gen. Comfort 
Sage. 

(I) John Crow (1606-1686) came to America in 
1634, went through the wilderness with Rev. 
Thomas Hooker in 1636, and settled Hartford, 
Conn. He was a wealthy man, of much influence, 
associated in business with his father-in-law, Elder 
William Goodwin, and was one of the founders and 
settlers of Hadley, Mass., in 1659. His daughter 
(II) Esther (or Hester) Crow, married (I) Giles 
Hamlin. 

(II) Rev. Nathaniel Collins (1641-1684) grad- 
uated from Harvard College in 1660, and was or- 
dained in 1668 ; was the first pastor of the church 
at Middletown, and was a famous minister in his 
days. His daughter (III) Mary Collins, married 
(II) John Hamlin. 

(I) Elder William Goodwin (1598-1673-74) 
emigrated from London, England, in 1632; was one 

(23) ■ . . 



of the Braintrce Company ; was admitted freeman 
in Newtown (now Cambridge), Mass., in 1632; 
removed to Hartford, Conn., in 1636; and with 
Rev. Mr. Hooker's Company settled the town of 
Hadley, Mass., in 1659; subsequently removed to 
Farmington, Conn., where he died. He was one of 
the pioneers, proprietors and settlers of Hartford, 
Conn., and one of the large landholders there. His 
daughter (H) Elizabeth married John Crow. 

(I) Major William Whiting ( 1647) emi- 
grated from England and settled in Hartford, 
Conn.; was admitted freeman in 1640; made treas- 
urer of the Colony, 1641-1647; assistant, 1642-1647; 
magistrate, 1642-1647. He was appointed major 
and commander-in-chief in 1647. His daughter 

(H) Mary Whiting married (H) Rev. Nathan- 
iel Collins. 

(H) Richard Christophers (1662-1726) was one 
of the most prominent citizens of New London, 
Conn.; was assistant of the Colony of Connecticut 
(1703-1723), judge of the county court, judge of 
the Probate court and justice of the peace in 1700. 

(HI) Christopher Christophers (1683-1728), 
was graduated from Yale College, 1702; was assist- 
ant of the Colony (1723-1729), judge of the County 
court and judge of the Probate court in New Lon- 
don. He married (IV) Sarah Prout, and his 

(24) 



1713544 



daughter, (V) Mary, married (III) Col. Jabez 
Hamlin. 

(II) Capt. Timothy Proiit (1620-1702) was an 
early inhabitant of Boston, I\Iass. ; master of the 
"Increase" in 1657; surveyor of the Port of Boston, 
1682; captain of the forts and artillery, 1683; repre- 
sentative, 1685-1692; selectman 1684-1690. 

(III) Capt. John Prout (1649-1719) was a sea 
captain and mariner of Plymouth in i66g, and pro- 
prietor in New Haven, Conn., in 1685. 

(I) Elder William Brewster (1566-1644) was 
the first prominent layman who refused to conform 
to the Church of England; was the chief of those 
taken prisoner at Boston, England; and suffered 
greatest loss. He went to Holland in 1607-08 with 
William Bradford and others for the free enjoy- 
ment of worship ; was ruling elder of the church at 
Leyden; was one of the oldest and principal pas- 
sengers on the "Mayflower," which came to 
Plymouth, Mass., in 1620; and became one of the 
founders of the religious and civil government of 
this country. 

(II) Jonathan Brewster (1593-1659), came to 
Plj-mouth, Mass., in the "Fortune"' in 1621 ; re- 
moved to Duxbury, 1630; was deputy there; re- 
moved to New London, Conn., about 1649; ^^^ 

(25) 



lived in that part which was afterward Norwicli; 
was deputy 1650, 1655- 1658. 

(Ill) Elizabeth Brewster married Peter Brad- 
ley, of New London. 



(I) Gen. Bertaut was "a French Protestant who 
removed from Brittany, France, to England in 1572, 
at the time of the massacre of St. Bartholomew. 

(V) Rev. John Bartow (1673-1726-27) was 
born in 1673 at Crediton, England ; graduated from 
Christ Chapel, Cambridge, in 1692 ; entered the min- 
istry, and became curate, then vicar of Pampisford, 
Cambridgeshire. In 1702, he came to America to 
the Province of New York and settled at West- 
chester, where he was the founder of St. Peter's 
Church, his parish including Eastchester, Yonkers 
and ]\Ianor of Pelham. He also performed mission- 
ary duty at Hempstead and Jamaica, on Long 
Island, and at Shrewsbury, Amboy and Freehold in 
New Jersey. He married (II) Helina Reid. 

(I) John Reid (1655 )was sent to Amer- 
ica by the proprietaires of New Jersey as a surveyor, 
sailing from Leith, Scotland in 1693 ; settled at 
Freehold; was member of the Assembly, and in 
1702 appointed surveyor general of New Jersey. 

(I) John Punderson (-16S1) emigrated in 1637 
(«6) 



with Rev. John Davenport, Thcophilus Eaton and 
others, who were among the first settlers in New 
Haven, Conn., in 1638. He was one of the "seven 
pillars" of the First Church there. 

(IV) Rev. Ebenezer Punderson (1705-1764) 
graduated at Yale College in 1726; studied theology 
and became pastor in the North Parish in Groton, 
now the town of Ledyard (Poquetannock). In 
1734 he avowed himself a conformist to the Church 
of England, and in April went to England for or- 
ders, returning the following October as "Itinerant 
Missionary of the Venerable Society for New Eng- 
land." He settled in his old parish at Poquetannock, 
officiating in Norwich, Hebron and other neighbor- 
ing places (1738-1750). In 1753 he was trans- 
ferred to Trinity parish, New Haven, having Guil- 
ford and Branford also under his care. In 1762 
he became rector of the church at Rye, in the Prov- 
ince of New York. He married (V) Hannah 
Miner. 

(II) Lieut. Thomas Minor (1608-1690) emi- 
grated with Gov. Winthrop in 1630, settled first at 
Charlestown, Mass. ; removed to Saybrook, Conn., 
in 1634, with John Winthrop, Jr., and his party, and 
with them formed the settlement of New London, 
where he took an active and important part; was 
elected townsman, and "Military Sergeant of the 
town of Pequot" in 1649; deputy to General Court 

( 27 ) 



in 1650, 165 1 ; removed in 1653 to Mystic (Quinni- 
baug Cove, Stonington) ; in 1655 was appointed 
chief military officer of the train-band at Mystic; 
in 1665, captain in King Philip's v. ir ; in 1675, ap- 
pointed with Capt. Avery and Ca[>t. Dcnison to 
"raise forces and destroy the enemy" ;:n 1676 was an 
officer in the expedition against Ca:- iichct (chief of 
the Narragansetts) ; was appointcl on the court 
martial for New London county witli Major Palmer, 
Capt. Avery and Capt. Alason; wr.s deputy from 
Stonington in 1679, 16S0, 1682, and on various im- 
portant committees. He was one of the four early 
settlers of Stonington whose names arc on the monu- 
ment erected in their honor. He married (H) Grace 
Palmer, daughter of (I) V/alter Palmer. 

(HI) Lieut. Ephraim Miner (1642 ) was 

one of the early settlers at Stonington, Conn. ; justice 
of the peace for New London county ( 1703- 171 1) ; 
deputy to General Court twelve times (1676- 1724) ; 
ensign in 1699; lieutenant in 1714; and served in 
King Philip's war. He married (IV') Hannah 
Avery. (V) Hannah Jilincr married (IV) Rev. 
Ebenezer Punderson. 

(H) Capt. James Avery (1620- 1700) emigrated 
with his father (I) Christopher, about 1640; settled 
first at Gloucester, Mass. ; removed to New London, 
Conn., in 1650; and to Soutli Groton (Poquonnoc) 
in 1656. In 1660 he was chosen townsman and held 

(28) 



the office for more than twenty years ; was commis- 
sioner to the county court at New London many 
years ; twelve times deputy to the General Court at 
Hartford, 1658-16S0; in the Commission of the 
Peace and assistant judge in the Prerogative court; 
ensign in 1662 ; lieutenant, 1665, and captain, 1C73. 
He served throughout King Philip's war as captain 
of the New London County Dragoons; and com- 
manded the Pequot allies at the Great Swamp fight 
at Narragansett, in 1675. Plis daughter (III) Han- 
nah Avery married (III) Ephraim Miner. 

(II) Rev. John Pell (1611-1685) was graduated 
from Trinity College, Cambridge, England. In 
1654 he was appointed by Oliver Cromwell ambas- 
sador to the Swiss Cantons ; recalled in 165S ; admit- 
ted to Holy Orders in 1661, and obtained from the 
Crown the rectory of Fobbing and Lavingdon, 
Essex; and became domestic chaplain to the Arch- 
bishop of Canterbury. He was an eminent mathe- 
matician ; became professor of mathematics at Breda, 
in Holland, appointed thereto by his patron, William, 
Prince of Orange. He wrote and published several 
important books and corresponded with many dis- 
tinguished men of his day. 

(III) John Pell (1643-1702) emigrated from 
England to America in 1670, to take possession of 
the Manor of Pelliam (Province of New York), 
which he inherited from his Uncle Thomas Pell, 

(29) 



first proprietor of said Manor; was appointed by 
James II in 1685 justice of the peace for West- 
chester county and judge of the court of Common 
Pleas 1688-1700; in 1687 was created Lord of the 
Manor of Pelham by Gov. Dougan; deputy at the 
first Legislative Assembly which met at New York in 
1691, and so continued until 1695; was appointed 
captain of horse in 1684, and major in 1692; served 
in French and Indian wars, and on Committee of 
Defence for the Frontier, and as chairman of the 
Grand Committee. He married (II) Rachel Pinck- 
ney, daughter of (I) Philip Pinckney, who emi- 
grated from Fairfield, England, and was one of the 
first ten proprietors or patentees of Eastchester, N. 
Y. (V) Bethsheba Pell married (V) Theophilus 
Bartow. 



:(3o):-3/ 



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