(navigation image)
Home American Libraries | Canadian Libraries | Universal Library | Community Texts | Project Gutenberg | Children's Library | Biodiversity Heritage Library | Additional Collections
Search: Advanced Search
Anonymous User (login or join us)
Upload
See other formats

Full text of "André Chénier; opera in four acts. Libretto by Luigi Illica"

r^ 

;C\1 



c\j 



CD 



Giordano, Uinberto 
c Andrea Che*nier. 

Libretto. English & 

Italian 

Andre Che'nier 

Rev. ed. 



ML 

50 



mi 



40 CENTS 



OPERAH 



METROPOLITAN 

^* > ^s<^- ""^ 



GRAND 



OPERA 



GIUL1O GATTI 

GENERAL MANAGER 



THE ORIGINAL ITALIAN, 
FRENCH OR GERMAN 
LIBRETTO WITH A 
CORRECT ENGLISH 
TRANSLATION. 



ANDREA CHENIER 




17 EAST 42nd STREET, NEW YORK CITY 

THE ONLY CORRECT AND AUTHORIZED EDITION 

KNABE PIANO USED EXCLUSIVELY 



ANDRE CHENIER 



OPERA IN FOUR ACTS 



MUSIC BY 

UMBERTO GIORDANO 

LIBRETTO BY 

LUIGI ILL1CA 



First Produced at La Scala, Milan, March 28th, 1896 
Rrw American Production at the Academy of Music, November i 3th, 1896 



Revised Edition Copyright. 1921, by Fred Rullman. Inc. 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTC 
25041 

EDWARD JOHNSON 
MUSIC LIBRARY 



PUBLISHED BY 

FRl.D RULLMAN, INC., NEW YORK, N. Y, 



50 

?\ 

JUL 25 1967 




OF 



SYNOPSIS 



ACT I. opens in the Ball-room at the Chateau de Coigny. Gerard, a ser- 
vant, is straightening up the room. He is grumbling over his many years of 
unrequited service. He is secretly in love with Madeleine, the daughter 
of the Countess. The Countess and Madeleine enter, and discuss the guests 
who are expected at the ball. The guests arrive, and the Countess receives 
them graciously. Among the guests are the Abbe, and also Andre Chenier, 
a poet. Madeleine makes a wager with her companions that she will make 
Chenier rhyme, and she approaches him with a request that he favor her 
with a harmless poem that might amuse a school-girl. He grants her re- 
quest, and sings to her of the wrongs suffered by the poor, hoping in this 
way to arouse the seriousness in her. As the dancing is about to begin 
again, Gerard appears at the head of a group of ragged beggars, who beg 
for alms. They are driven out by the Countess, and the gayeties are resumed. 

ACT II. In Paris, at the Cafe Hottot, several years later. Chenier meets 
his friend Roucher at the Cafe. Chenier has incurred the disfavor, of the 
revolutionists by denouncing Robespierre, and Roucher brings him a pass- 
port and urges him to escape, but Chenier refuses. Bersi, Madeleine's old 
nurse, has brought him an unsigned letter, written by the girl, who begs 
him to come to her aid. A spy, who has watched Bersi hand the letter to 
Chenier, reports to Gerard, now one of the leaders among the revolutionists, 
and tells him where the meeting is to take place. At night-fall, Madeleine 
comes, and Chenier recognizes her. The spy also recognizes Madeleine, 
and runs to notify Gerard. Gerard finds them, and the two men fight with 
swords. Gerard, is wounded, and the lovers make their escape. 

ACT III. At the Court of the Revolutionary Tribunal. Gerard, now re- 
covered from his wound, enters and makes a plea for money for France, and 
the people give very generously. The spy comes and informs Gerard of 
the whereabouts of Chenier, who has been captured, but there is no 
trace of Madeleine. The spy persuades Gerard to write the indictment 
against Andre Chenier, whom he denounces as a dangerous man and a 



traitor. Madeleine comes to plead for her lover, and is ready to give 
herself to Gerard in order to save the life of Chenier. Gerard, moved by such 
love, promises to try to save Chenier. The Judge and Jury enter, and Chenier 
is brought before them. Chenier defends himself, and Gerard confesses to 
the court that the indictment had been written by him, and that it was all 
a lie. The mob, however, demands the life of Chenier, and the Jury comes 
in with a verdict of "Death". 

ACT IV. Andre Chenier is writing verses in the Prison of St. Lazare f 
Roucher comes in, and they bid each other farewell. Madeleine is also per- 
mitted a final interview with Chenier. She bribes the guard to let her take 
the place of another young woman who is awaiting death, and together 
Chenier and Madeleine go to the scaffold. 



CHARACTERS 



ANDRE CHENIRR 

MADELEINE 

BERSI 

COUNTESS 

GERARD 

FLEVILLE 

MAJOR-DOMO 



ABBE 
MATHIEU 
A SPY 
ROUGHER 

FoUQUIER-TlNVILLE 

DUMAS 
SCHMIDT 



BEGGARS, FISHWIVES, SANCULOTS, GENDARMES, GUARDS, SERVANTS, EtC : 



ANDRE CHENIER. 



QUADRO PRIMO. 

(Sola da ballo al Cast ell o di Coigny. 
Air alzarsi delta tela, sotto i comandi 
di un gallonato MAESTRO DI CASA, 
corrono LACCHE, SERVI, VALLETTI 
carichi di mobili e vasi, completando 
I'assetto dalla serra. CARLO GERARD, 
in livrea, entra sostenendo con altri 
serz'i un pesante' sofa.) 

IL MAESTRO DI CASA. 

Questo azzurro sofa 
la collochiam... 

(Gerard e i lacche eseguiscono, poi 
il Maestro di Casa accenna ver^j 
le sale interne e vi entra seguito da 
tutti i lacche. eccettnato Gerard che, 
inginocchiato avanti all'azzurro sofa 
ne liscia le frangie, sprimacciando i 
cuscini). 



GERARD (al sofa). 

Compiacente a' colloqui 

del cicisbeo 

che a dame maturate 

porgeva qui la mano ! 

Qui il Tacco Rosso al Neo 

sospirando dicea : 

"Oritia... o Clori... o Nice... incipriate, 

Vecchiette e imbellettate, 

io vi bramo 

ed, anzi sol per questo, forse, io v'a- 

mo!" 
Tal dei tempi il costume! 

t(Da/ giardino si avanza il padre di 
Gerard. Qnesti guardando com- 
mosso allontanarsi il padre) 

'Son sessantanni, o vecchio, che tu ser- 

vi!... 

A'tuoi protervi 
arroganti signori 
hai prodigato fedelta, sudori, 
la forza dei tuoi nervi, 



1'anima tua, la mente... 

e quasi non bastasse la tua vita 

a renderne infinita 

eternamente 

1'orrenda sofferenza 

hai data 1'esistenza 

dei figli tuoi... 

Hai figliato dei servi ! 

(si asciuga sdegnosamente le lagrime, 
e torna a guardare Heramente in- 
toriio a se la gran serra.) 

T'odio, casa dorata ! 
L'imagin sei d'un secolo 
incipriato e vano!... 
Fasti, splendori, orgogli di Re Sole ! 
Regno di Cortigiane tu, o Reggenza, 
e dei Lebel 
onnipotenza 
tu, Luigi Lussuria !... 
O vaghi dami in seta ed in merletti, 
volgono al fin le gaje vostre giornate 
e le serate 

a inchini e a minuetti ! 
Fissa e la vostra sorte ! 
Razza leggiadra e rea, 
figlio di servi e servo, 
qui giudice in livrea 
ti grido: giunta 1'ora della Mor- 
te! 

(La contessa, Maddalena e Bersi ap- 
pajono al di Id dell'arco d'ingresso 
alia serra. La contessa si s offer ma 
a dare alcnni ordini al Maestro di 
Casa. Maddalena si avanzo- lenta- 
mente con la Bersi.) 

MADDALENA. 

II giorno 

intorno gia s'insera 

lentamente ! 

In queste misteriose 

ombre forme fantastiche 

assumono le cose!... 

Or Tanime s'acquetan* 

timanamente !... 



A.NDRE CHENIER. 



ACT I. 

(The Ball-room at the Chateau de 
Coigny. As the curtain rises enter 
the Major-domo, follozved by Ser- 
vants carrying furniture with which 
to ornament the rooms. Gerard, in 
livery, helps other servants to carry 
in a heavy sofa.) 



MAJOR-DOMO. 

Set the blue sofa down 
There, in its place! 

(The Major-domo moves on to rooms 
beyond, leaving Gerard behind, who 
smoothes the cushions of the couch 
and dusts the faded silk.) 



GERARD (to the Sofa). 

Thou hast patiently listened, 

As gallant beaux to dames whose 

charms had ripen'd, 
Their passion here protested! 
Here, Corin came to woo, 
As he said with a sigh: 
''Orynthia! O Chloris ! Oh, nymphs 

with paint bedizen'd 
" T o deck your features wizen'd, 
"I implore you, 
"Have pity upon him who must adore 

-on !" 
'Tis the mode of the moment! 

(Gerard's father enters, carrying a 
flower-stand, and as the old man 
ic parts by the garden-way, Gerard 
gazes at him wistfully.) 

Full sixty years, oh ! my father, 
Hast thou served them, 
Devoting ever to thine arrogant mas- 
ters 



Strength of thy manhood, loyally un- 
bounded ; 

For them thy limbs have toil'd; 
They had thy brain, thy spirit, 
And yet, as tho' thy life were not 

sufficient, 

A life of drudgery and toil unending, 
Its load of shame and sorrow 
By thee hath been transmitted 
Unto thy sons! Thou'rt a father to 
slaves ! 



(Surveying the sumptuous apart- 
ment.) 

Gilded house, I abhor thee! 
Of that vain world the image, 
As fair, and false and painted! 
Pretty ladies, in rich brocade and laces, 
Swift advancing, 
Dance minuets and gay gavottes 
With your modish airs and graces \ 
Dance ! yet your doom awaits you. 
Frivolous, infamous gang! 
Lackey, and son of a lackey, 
Though a menial, yet your judge, I 

warn ye: 
The hour of doom is nigh ! 

(The Countess, Madeleine, and Bersi 
appcai at back. The Countess 
stops to speak to the Major-domo. 
Madeleine with Bersi slowly en- 
ters.} 



MADELEINE. 

The daylight fades ; 
And dusk around is gently falling: 
Now, in the dim mysterious twilight 
Things take another shape, 
Ethereal, fantastic; 

Now unto weary spirits Nature yields 
her solace ! 



ANDR CHfiNIEE 



GERARD (frase). 

Delia bellezza 

blanda commozione .- 
Quanta dolcezza, 

per te, nell'anima 

soave penetra! 

Muojon le idee; tu soppravvivi ai se- 

coli 

eterna... e aristocratica, 

tu, la Eterna Canzone ! 

(entra la Contessa) 

CONTESSA. 

Via, v'affrettate 
e alia lumiera 
luce date! 

(a Gerard) 
E dite tutto e pronto? 

GERARD. 
Tutto ! 

CONTESSA. 

1 cori? 

GERARD. 
Stanno di gia vestendosi. 

CONTESSA. 
E i suonatori? 

GERARD. 
Accordan gli strumenti 

CONTESSA. 
A momenti 
arriveranno gli ospiti... 

MADDALENA. 
Uno e il signer?... 

CONTESSA. 

Uno scrittore emerito... 
un romanzier pensionato dal Re, 
Anton Pietro Fleville. 

MADDALENA. 
El'altro chie? 

CONTESSA. 

L' Abate, 1'AbatinoL. 
un improvvisatore !... Un dicitore !... 

MADDALENA. 
Un viene dallTtalia ?... 

CONTESSA. 
L'Abate da Parigi! Maddal&ia 



MADDALENA. 

ancor cosi? Ancor non sei vestita? 

(esce.) 



BERSI (a Maddalena}. 



Sospiri ? 



MADDALENA. 



Si ; io penso alia tortura 
del farsi belle ! 

BERSI. 

Ah tu, si, belle fai le vesti ! Si!- 
Io le fo brutte tutte!... 
Tutte... Tutte!... 

MADDALENA. 
Soffoco... moro 
tutta chiusa 
in busto stretto 
sia pur "squame di moro" 
o in un corsetto, 
si come si usa, 
in seta di nakara !... 



BERSI. 



II tuo corsetto 
e cosa rara! 



MADDALENA. 

La orribile gonnella 

"coscia-di-ninfa-bianca" 

mi inceppa e stanca 

mi sfianca tutta 

e, aggiungivi un cappello 

"Cassa-di-sconto" o quello 

alia "Basilio" od alia "Montgolfw. 

e tu sei sorda e cieca 

e, nata bella, 

eccoti fatta brutta. 

(La Contessa rientra.) 

MADDALENA 
(affrontandola corraggiosa). 

Per stasera pazienza ! 
Mamma, non odi? 

CONTESSA. 
Sono di gia gli ospiti ! 

MADDALENA. 

Cosi mi metto : Bianca vesta 
ed una rosa d'ogni mese in testa F 

( esce. 



ANDRfi CMNIER 



GERARD (aside). 

How hem her presence 
My soul in sorrow 
Doth gladness borrow ! 
Death, that devonreth all, 
Yet over thee hath no might, 
Spirit of Beauty divine! 

(Enter Countess.) 

COUNTESS. 

Haste now, bestir you ! 
See that the candles all are lighted ! 

(to Gerard). 
Then every thing is ready? 



GERARD. 



Yes, madame. 



COUNTESS. 
And the singers? 

GERARD. 
Now for their parts are dressing. 

COUNTESS. 
A.nd the musicians? 

GERARD. 
Their instruments are tuning. 

COUNTESS. 
(n c moment 
The guests will be arriving. 

MADELEINE. 
One is ... Monsieur Fleville. 

COUNTESS. 
A. Jamous author. 

MADELEINE. 
And who is the other? 

COUNTESS. 
The little Abbe. 

MADELEINE. 
One of them comes from* Italy ? 

COUNTESS. 

Yes ; Fleville does ; 

!The Abbe comes from Paris. 



But what is this Madeleine? 
You're not yet dressed, my daughter! 

(Exit.) 

BERSI (to Madeleine). 
You're sighing? 

MADELEINE. 

Yes ! to think of all one suffers 
For looking beautiful. 

BERSI. 

But you will make your gowns look 

far more lovely ; 
And mine seem always hideous! 

MADELEINE. 

As in a vice one struggles, gasping, 
One's waist encircled in a coat of 

armour, 

That votaries of fashion call a corset 
Oh, villainous invention! 

BERSI. 

But in your corset you look so charm- 
ing! 

MADELEINE. 

When girt in gown appalling, 

Closely, so closely fitting 

That seams are splitting, 

To move is torture ! 

And then with hat gigantic, 

Ultra- romantic, 

The very latest style they call it 

"Montgolfier" 
Your toilette is completed, 
And from a beauty you become a 

fright ! 

(Enter Countess.) 

MADELEINE. 

Well, this evening, excuse me! 
Mother, do you hear them? 

COUNTESS. 
Yes, for now the guests have come; 

MADELEINE. 

I know what I'll wear: 
Gown of white; and just a rose in my 
hair! 



ANDRfi CHfiNIER 



(Gia si anima tutto il castello. I val- 
letti corono animatamente in su ed 
in giu apparecchiando le torcie nel- 
I'attesa delle slitte.) 

CONTESSA 

(nervosa, impart e ordini, ora all'nno, 
ora all'altro). 

Presto avvertite i cori ; 

ed a tempo opportune 

pastorelle e pastori! 

E che non manchi alcuno ! 

Su,presto, i suonatori in cantoria ! 

(II Maestro di Casa annuncia ad alia 
voce. ) 

MAESTRO DI CASA. 

Madama de Bissy e il cavaliere di 
Villacerf !... 

CONTESSA 

(al cavaliere di Villacerf). 
Oh! quanto commifo! 
Come elegante... 
e voi gentil Galante! 

MAESTRO DI CASA. 

La marchesa d'Entragnes e il barone 
Berwik ! 

CONTESSA (al barone'). 
Vera galanteria ! 

MAESTRO DI CASA. 

La duchessa di Villemain e il marchese 
d'Harcout ! 

CONTESSA (al marches^). 
A ben piu d'una brama 
la vostra dama 
accender sapra 1'escaL. 

MAESTRO DI CASA. 

La principessa di Saint-Medard e il 
conte d'Aubetaire ! 



CONTESSA (alia principessa). 
Mi ricordate 
i di della Reggenza... 
La Parabere, ecco, mi rassembrate ! 

MAESTRO DI CASA. 

Donna Anna da Torcy e don Enrico 
de Nangis ! 



CONTESSA 

(a don Enrico de Nangis). 
Quanta inunificenza ! 

MAESTRO DI CASA. 

La contessa Etiolle d'Etoile e il reve 
rendo Fragment ! 

CONTESSA 

(alia vecchia dama colla quale senza 
inchinarsi si abbracciano, vecchia da- 
ma che ha a cavaliere un grosso ec- 
clesiastico ) . 

Appariscente e fresca 

sempre ! Contessa, 

sempre, sempre la stessa ! 

MAESTRO DI CASA. 

La marchesa di Lorge e il conte 
Fleuri ! 

CONTESSA 
(alia bella marchesina, accarezzandole 

la guancia). 
Come siete vezzosa ! . 
Siete un amore ! 

MAESTRO DI CASA. 

La baronessa Boisguilbert e Tabat^. 
Crecy ! 

CONTESSA (all' abate' Crecy). 
Con voi me ne congratulo... 
Quale arnica!... PerfettaL. 

(alia baronessa). 
Sublime ! Quanta grazia ! 

(ad altra dama). 

Dotta maestra !... Invero e maestria ! 
Mirabile toeletta! 
(Cavalieri e dame si affannano intorrj 

alia Contessa interrogandola:) 
Chi avremo? Dite! 
Mesmer? 
Dugazon ? 

L'arlecchino Bordier ?... 
Vestri ? 
Jeannot ?... 

CONTESSA 
(misteriosa abbassando la voce). 

L'Abate I 

TUTTI (con gridi di gioja). 
L'Abatino?... 
(Entrano Fleville, I' Abate e Chenier.) 

MAGGIORDOMO. 
II cavaliere Anton Pietro Fleville. 



ANDR CHNIEK 



COUNTESS (to her servants). 
Hasten to call the singers 
And, at the proper time, 
The shepherds and the shepherdesses ; 
See that none be missing ; 
Hurry! send the musicians up to the 

stand ! 

MAJOR-DOMO. 

Madame de Bissy and Chev. Villa- 
cerf! 

COUNTESS. 
Oh, How stylish 
And fashionable you are! 
A gallant cavalier indeed! 

(to Villacerf). 

MAJOR-DOMO. 

The Marquise d'Entragnes and Baron 
Berwick ! 

COUNTESS. 
Vastly gallant,! vow ! (to the Baron). 

MAJOR-DOMO. 

The Duchess of Villemain and the 
Marquis of Harcourt! 

COUNTESS. 

Oh ! take care, my lord Marquis ! 
Your lady's eyes will surely work 
fresh havoc! (to the Marquis). 

MAJOR-DOMO. 

The Princess of St. Medard and the 
Count of Ailbetaire ! 

COUNTESS. 
You remind me 

Of the days under the Regency 
And of the beautiful Parabere! 

(to the Princess). 

MAJOR-DOMO. 

Donna Anna da Torcy and Don Hen- 
ry de Nangis ! 

COUNTESS. 
What a kingly guest! (to Nangis). 

MAJOR-DOMO. 

The Countess d'Etoile and Rev. Frag- 
nont! 



COUNTESS. 
Why, you're as fair and young as 

ever ! 
Yes, Countess, just as youthful as 

ever! (to the old dame). 

MAJOR-DOMO. 

The Marquise of Sorge and Count 
Fleury ! 

COUNTESS. 

Oh ! How sweet and charming ; 
How lovely you are ! 

(to the Marquise). 

MAJOR-DOMO. 

The Baroness Boisguilbert and the 
Abbe Crecy! 



COUNTESS. 
I congratulate you ; 
Your friend is perfectly sweet! 

(to the Abbe). 
Sublime ! How graceful ! 

(to the Baroness). 
Very clever indeed ! 
You're wonderfully dressed! 

(to another lady). 

(The hostess is being surrounded by 
inquisitive guests eagerly question- 
ing her:) 

Do tell us who is coming! 
WillhebeMesmer? 

Or Dugazon ? 
That harlequin Bordier? 
Is he Vestri? 

Or Jeannot ? 

COUNTESS. 

(mysteriously, in a whisper). 
The Abbe! 



ALL (joyously). 
The little Abbe! 



MAJOR-DOMO. 
Chevalier Antoine Pierre Fleville. 

(Enter Fleville, the Abbe, and Che- 
nier.} 



10 



ANDRfi CHNIER 



FLEVILLE. 

Commosso... lusingato... 
a., tanti compliment! 
e... a questo, piu che omaggio... 
...amabil persiflaggioL. 
Ch'io vi present! Flandro Fiorinelli, 
e cavaliere, italiano e musico ! 
e Andrea Chenier... 
un che fa versi e... che promette molto. 
(Maddalena entra). 

IL MAGGIORDOMO (annuncia). 

Sua Reverenza 1'Abate... 

(Le dame a questo annuncio si com- 
muovono, rompono V or dine fino al- 
lora tenuto e rumor osamente, con 
piccoli gemifi di gioja, attorniano il 
mioi'o personaggio, soffotandolo 
quasi sotto le cortesie). 



MARITI. 



I 'Abate ! 
r Abate ! 



fi 1'Abate ! 



LE DAME. 



I CAVALIERI. 



I MARITI. 



Finalmente ! 



LE DAME. 
Venite da Parigi? 



Da Parigi? 



Si? 



Dite? 



TUTTI. 



LE DAME. 



I CAVALIERI. ' 



I MARITI. 
Che novelle della Corte? 

LE DAME, 
Noi siam curiose ! 



P.esto! 



Dite ! dite ! 



I CAVALIERI. 



TUTTI. 



L'ABATINO. 
Debole e il Re... 



Ha ceduto? 



L'ABATINO. 
Fu male consigliato !... 

CONTESSA. 
Necker? 

L'ABAflNO. 

Non ne parliamo ! 

(Degusta la marmcllata sospirando in 
atto di suprcma afftizione.) 



TUTTI. 



Ouel Necker!... 



DAME. 

Noi moriamo 
dalla curiosita ! 

L'ABATINO. 
(questa volt a attacca risolutamente la 

marmellata penetrandovi con tutto il 

cucchiajo.) 
Abbiamo un Terzo stato! 

TUTTI. 

Oh! Ah! Ah! Oh! 
Ma no ! Ma no ! 



E ho veduto 
offender... 



Chi? 



L'ABATINO. 

TUTT.I. 
L'ABATINO. 



La statua 

di Enrico IV ! 



Orrore ! 



TUTTI, 



DONNE. 
Dove andremo a finire?... 

L'ABATINO. 
Cosi giudico anch'io! 

CONTESSA. 
Non temono piu Dio ! 

L'ABATINO. 
Assai, madame belle, 
sono dolente de le mie novelle... 



ANDRE CHENIEK 



1 1 



FLEVILLE. 

T^elighted, I assure you, 
At this auspicious meeting; 
And flattered, vastly flattered, 
By such a cordial greeting! 
Let me present Fernando Fiorinelli, 
A distinguished Italian musician 
Andre Chenier writer of verses, 
Who so they say, has talent [ 

(Enter Madeleine). 



MAJOR-DOMO. 

His reverence the Abbe! 

{ The Ladies leaving their places 
in confusion rush toward the 
new comer an 4 eaoerly surround 
him. The Abbe is fairly smoth- 
ered with courtesies. ) 

THE LADIES. 

The Abbe at last ! 
It is the Abbe. 



THE GENTLEMEN. 



At last! 



MADELEINE. 
So you've just come back from Paris! 



From Paris? 



Is it true? 



CHORUS. 



THE LADIES. 



THE GENTLEMEN. 
Anything new? 

CoUNTESb. 

What news at Court, I pray you? 

MADELEINE. 
We are dying to hear, 

THE LADIES. 
Yes, do tell us, please! 

CHORUS. 
Let us hear, quickly! 



ABBE. 
The King, alas, is weak! 

THE GENTLEMEN. 
Is he yielding? 

ABBE. 
He has been ill-advised ! 



COUNTESS. 



Ah, Necker 



ABBE. 
( Sadly helping himself to a mar- 

melade. ) 
Let us not speak of him! 

CHORUS. 
That Necker! 
We are dying to know; yes, we are? 

ABBE. 
( Vigorously attacking the marme 

lade with his spoon. ^ 
We've now the "Third Estate" ! 

CHORUS. 
Oh! Oh! This seems absurd! 

ABBE. 
And they've insulted even 

CHORUS. 
Whom? 

ABBE. 
The statue of Henri Quatre ! 

CHORUS. 
Oh, horror! 

THE LADIES. 
Gracious! where will it end? 

ABBE. 
That's what I'd like to know ! 

COUNTESS. 
No fear have they of God! 

ABBE. 

Enough, my beauteous ladies; 
Much am I griev'd no gladder news t& 
bring you ! 



12 



ANDR CMNIER 



FLEVILLL. 

Passiam la sera 

allegramente ! Delia primavera 

a i zefiri gentili 

codeste nubi svaniranno ! II sole 

noi rivedremo e rose e gigli e viole 

e udrem ne Taria satura de'fiori 

1'eco ridir 1'egloghe de' pastori 

TUTTI (a mcenda). 
O soave bisbiglio ! 
il vento ! 
fi zefiro !... 

mormorio di fonte !... 
fruscio d'ali 
Bacio e di nubi !... 
Molce il cuor ! 
Vallea 

veggiamo aprica ! 
lo, un prato ! 
Tin ruscelletto 
ascolto mormorar! 
Parian le fronde! 
Sospira un sake ! 
Querula la canna 
di Dafne geme. 
Ecco il suo gregge ! 
Rezzo 
divin ! 

FLEVILLE. 
questo il mio romanzo ! 

PASTORELLI. 

Pastorelli, addio! Ne andiamo 
verso, ahi ! lidi ignoti e strani ! 
Ahi! sarem lungi dimani! 
Questi lochi abbandoniamo I 
Non avra, fino al ritorno, 
gioje il cuore! 

Non piacer fino a quel giorno, 
non amore ! 

PASTORELLI. 

O pastori, ahi ! che dolori 
-igli acerbi vostri detti ! 
Treman dentro ai nostri petti 
languidetti i nostri cori ! 
Ed... ahi ! ahi ! fino al ritorno 
che cruciori ! 

Non piacer fino a quel giorno, 
non amori ! 

L'ABATINO. 

||I1 Volpe e 1'Uva, favola. 
"Un volpe rodomonte sospinto dalla 

fame 

"sovra alta vite tremula, vermilia 
"rama carca di grappoli 



"adocchia e cura 
"ammaliato. 
"Ma... oh !... come 
"tropp' alto pende il pampino! 
. "E il -volpe esclama: Oh, cosa vana 
'Tuva immatura ! 
"E, sospirando, s'allontana! 
''Del volpe chi sa il nome?... 
"Terzo stato!" 

CONTESSA (si awicina a Chenier.) 
Signer denier... 

CHENIER. 
Madama la Contessa? 

CONTESSA. 
La vostra Musa tace? 

CHENIER. 
fe una ritrosa 
che di tacer desia. 

CONTESSA. 
La vostra Musa e la Malinconia \ 

(dFleville). 
Davver poco cortese! 

FLEVILLE. 
fe un po* bizzarre ! 

ABATING. , 

Musa ognor pronta e donna a molti 
vieta!... 

CONTESSA. 
Musa ognor pronta !... ver... Ecco il 

poeta!... 

(Prende il brae do dell'Abatino e con 
lui si awicina a Fiorinelli, inducen- 
dolo gentilmente al clavicembalo). 

MADDALENA (alle compagne). 
To lo faro poetare ! Scommettiamo ?... 
(si awicina a Chenier). 

MADDALENA. 

Al mio dire perdono ed al mio ardire L 
Ma viva bramosia. 
mi spinge... Poi... son donna e son cu- 

riosa ! 

Bramo di udire... 
un'egloga da voi o una poesia 
per monaca o per sposa. 

LE AMICHE. 
Benissimo ! 
Per monaca o per sposa ! 



ANDRfi CHfiNIER 



FLEVILLE. 

What matters that, my friends? 

We'll all be merry ; 

And ere returns the spring-tide, 

With light, and scent of flowers, 

Dispers'd shall be the storm that 
lowers ! 

There, on a bank of violets and frag- 
rant roses, 

The breeze shall bear to us, on pinion 
light, 

Echoes of song, chants of the merry 
shepherd ! 

'Tis the sigh of the breezes ! 

ABBE. 
'Tis the zephyrs ! 

CHORUS. 
Tis the wind ! 

FLEVILLE. 
'Tis the murmor of the fountain ! 

CHORUS. 
'Tis the sound of wings ! 

ABBE. 

Methought I heard the rippling 
stream ! 

FLEVILLE. 
Behold, my dream comes true! 

CHORUS. 

Oh, gentle nymphs, adieu! 
To lands afar we're flying. 
Oh, hear us, a-sighing! 
Heigho! Heigho! 
To distant lands we roam 
Before the morrow ; 
To part with you, alas! 
Brings bitter sorrow. 
Ah, well-a-day! 
Adieu! we must away! 

CHORUS. 

Alas! The bitter pain 
In our trembling heart 
Now that we must part 
Heigho! Heigho! 
Until you come back 
How it will ache 
And our mind will rove 
For want of pleasure 
And of love! 



ABBE. 

A hungry fox was spying 
With an envious eye 
The sweet ripe grape 
Hanging from a high vine 
But seeing that it was 
So hard to reach it 
She went away musing : 
It is sour after all! 
Now that fox has a name 
And it is? "Third Estate." 

COUNTESS (approaching Chenier) . 
Monsieur Chenier! 

CHENIER. 
Madame, your most obedient! 

COUNTESS. 
Your Muse, in truth, is silent ! 

CHENIER. 

Aye, for 'tis wayward, 
And rather would be dumb! 

COUNTESS. 
Your Muse is Melancholy so it seems ! 

(to Fleville). 
Indeed, 'twas scarcely courteous! 

FLEVILLE. 
He's so eccentric ! 

ABBE. 

Rare is the dower of ready song, we 
know it! 

COUNTESS. 
Well said! Behold our poet! 

(Takes the Abbe's arm and ap- 
proaches Fiorinelli, whom she leads 
to the harpsichord). 

MADELEINE (to her companions.) 
I'll make him rhyme, I warrant ! 
Shall we wager? 

(approaches Chenier). 
MADELEINE. 

I would pray you to pardois 

My seeming boldness ; 

A woman, as you know, 

Is nothing, if not curious. 

Will you not favour us with some- 
thing of your own? 

Some harmless poem that might 
amuse a school-girl? 

CHORUS. 
That might amuse a school-girl ! 



X4 



ANDRfi CHNIER 



CHENIER. 

Desio che muove da due labbra rosa 
e comando gentile a gentil cuore. 
Ma ohime la fantasia 
non si piega a comando o a prece umi- 

le... 

e capricciosa assai la poesia... 
a guisa dell'amore !... 

(Maddalena e le ragazze ridono.) 

CONTESSA. 
Perche ridete voi? 
Chec'e? 
Chec'e?... 
Che avviene ? 
Dite! 

LE AMICHE. 

Udite ! Udite che il racconto e bello ! 
II poetino e caduto in un tranello. 

MADDALENA. 

A ttia preghiera, mamma, disdegnoso 
op-oneva un rifiuto... 
Alter .bizzarre 
pensier mi venne... 

LE AMICHE. 
vero... 
La vendetta ! 

MADDALENA. 
lo dissi : Scommettiano ?... 

CONTESSA E Turn. 
Di che cosa? 

MADDALENA. 

Che nel risponder alle preci nostre 
volgarmente parlato avria d'amore. 



Ebben? 



Ebben? 



CONTESSA. 



Turn. 



CHENIER (in atto di preghiera). 
No, signorina ! 

MADDALENA. 
Ebbene... 

(imita Chenier). 
Levo la f ronte al cielo ! 
Chiamo la Musa! E la implorata 

musa 

per sua bocca ridisse la parola 
che a me voi ? 



(si rivolge ad un vecchio ridicolo). 
voi, 

(a un abate). 
e voi, 

(a un mar che se grasso). 

e voi, piu volte 

(a un giovinotto strano per la sua 

brnttezza). 

a me dite ogni sera... senza Musa. 
(tutti ridonv). 

CHENIER. 

Colpito qui m'avete... ov'io gelosc 

celo il piu puro palpitar deH'anima. 

Or vedrete, fanciulla, qual poema 

e la parola "Amore" per voi scherno! 

Un di all'azzurro spazio 

guardai profondo, 

e ai prati colmi di viole, 

pioveva 1'oro il sole 

e folgorava d'oro 

il mondo ; 

parea la Terra un immane tesoro, 

e a lei servia di scrigno il firmamento. 

Dal cuore de la Terra a la mia fronte 

veniva una carezza viva, un bacio. 

Gridai, vinto d'amore: T'amo, t'amo 

tu che mi baci, tu divinamente 

bella, o patria ! 

E volli pien d'amore 

pregar !... 

Varcai d'una chiesa la soglia ; 

la un prete ne le nicchie 

de'santi e de la Vergine 

accumulava doni... e al sordo orecchic 

un tremulo vegliardo invano 

chiedeva pane e invan stendea la ma- 
no! 

(Sensasione) . 

Entrai nell'abituro ; 

un uom vi calunniava bestemmiando 

il suolo che 1'erario a pena sazia 

e contra a Dio scagliava e contro a li 
uomini 

le lacrime de' figli. 

In cotanta miseria 

e di cose e di genti qui la patrizia 
prole 

a che pensa e che fa? 

Sol Focchio vostro esprime umana- 
mente 

qui un guardo di pieta, 

ond'io ho guardato a voi si come a ur 

angelo. 

E dissi : Se bugiardo fu il miraggio 

che mi venne dal sole, 

eccola la bellezza della vita 

nel glauco raggio 

soave di pieta che vibra in voi ! 



ANDRE CHfiNIER 



CHENIER. 

Your request, mademoiselle, 
Is for me a command. 
Yet, alas ! sweet Fancy's coy, 
Nor will heed, thougn commanded, 
Or e'en entreated. 
A most capricious is the Muse, 
As fanciful as Love ! 

(Madeleine and her friends burst out 
laughing). 

COUNTESS. 
What causes all this mirth ? 

CHORUS. 
What is it? 

Oh, listen, for 'tis Vastly diverting! 
He is trapped in a way most discon- 
certing. 

MADELEINE. 

When your entreaty, mother, 
He curtly refused, 
I thought I'd try 'twas in sport 

CHORUS. 
Just for mischief! 

MADELEINE. 
I said : Girls, let us wager 

COUNTESS. 
Wager what, pray? 

MADELEINE. 

That I would make him speak of 
love! 



COUNTESS. 



Yes well? 



MADELEINE (mockingly). 
The Muse he summoned ; 
And she, the nymph capricious, 
Thro' his lips hath discoursed 
Of the theme of which to me 

(addressing a ridiculous dotard), 
You! 

(to an Abbe). 

And you! 

(to a fat Marquis). 
Ah, yes, and you, too, 

(io a singularly ugly youth), 
And you, often speak, 
Unaided by the Muses! 



(General mirth) 

CHENIER. 

Your scorn hath touched me here, 
Where jealously are guarded 
All the secrets of the soul inviolate: 
You shall know, now, fair maiden, 
What a poem lies in that little word 

"love," 

By you thus derided ! 
I gaz'd o'er the blue expanse of 

heav'n unclouded ; 
O'er fields with violets enamell'd ; 
The world around, above me, 
In glimm'ring golden glory was 

shrouded ; 
The spacious earth seem'd as one 

mighty gem 
Enclosed within her casket, the bound. 

less heaven ! 

Softly from earth, to me as a greeting, 
There floated upon the wanton breezes 

a caress ! 

Then, in a transport I cried: 
Ah ! I love thee, my country, 
Divine in all thy beauty, oh land, mine 

own ! 

By Love inspired, I sought to pray ; 
Swift thro' a church-door then I 

pass'd : 
A priest collected offerings for the 

Virgin, 
By all the faithful given; yet never 

heeded 

Nor heard its piteous pleading 
Of one poor aged beggar, 
With hands held out in vain! 

(Sensation). 

And then a workman's hut I enter'd, 
Where one in desperation loudly curs'd 

his country ; 

He curs'd his rich employers ; 
To God above in fury, 
And unto men he hurl'd them, 
His children's bitter tears ! 
Ah! ye pamper'd patricians, 
How do ye right all this wrong? 
'Twas in your eyes alone, 
Oh, lovely maiden, that gentle pity 

seem'd to dwell, 
And so I turn'd to you, as to an angel 

fair, and said : 
"Love from out those beauteous eyes 

is shining!" 
But when, as in scorn you addressed 

me, 
'Twas then that my heart by grief 

anew was shaken! 



ANDRfi CHENIER 



Ma, poi, 

a le vostre parole, 

un novello dolore 

m'ha colto in pieno petto... 

O giovinetta bella, d'un poeta 

non disprezzate il detto : 

Udite! Amate pria 

e prima di schernir sappiate Amore ! 

(Indignazione generate). 

MADDALENA (aChenier). 
Perdonatemi ! 

CONTESSA. 

Creatura strana assai ! Va perdonata !.. 
Ii capricciosa e un po' romantichetta. 
Ma... udite!... il gajo suon de la 

gavotta. 

Su, cavalieri ! Ognun scelga la da- 
ma!... 

(Mentre i servi fanno posto e i cava- 
lieri e /e dame si preparano, lonta- 
nissime, si sentono venire avvicinan- 
dosi Confuse cantilene.) 

LE Voci (si avviciano. Sono lugu- 
bremente dolorose, gemiti che ri- 
suonano cupi e minacciosi). 

La notte e il giorno 

portiamo intorno 

il dolore ; 

Siam genti grame 

che di fame 

or si muore ; 

A mammelle avvizzite 

chieggon le vite 

de'bimbi moribondi ! 

Affamati, languenti 

cadiam morenti 

sovra suoli infecondi! 

(All'arco d'ingresso delta serra appare 
Gerard alia testa di una folia di 
gente stracciata). 

GERARD (imitando il maggiordomo). 
Sua Grandezza la Miseria ! 

(mentre quegli stracdoni, lamentosa- 
mente stendendo le mani, susurra- 
no:) 

Anime umane, 
deh, le nostre preghiere 
non ci tornino vane ! 
Genti cristiane, 
sollievo a queste fiere 
torture aspre, inumane! 



CONTESSA (livida dall'ira). 
Chi ha introdotto costoro ? 

GERARD. 
lo, Gerard! 

CONTESSA (ai snoi valletti, lacchc). 
Questa ciurmaglia via ! 

fa Gerard). 
E tu pel primo ! 

GERARD. 

Si, me ne vo Contessa ! 

questa livrea m'e di tortura ; 

e vile per me il pane 

che qui mi sfama ! 

La voce di chi soffre a se mi chiama! 

Vien, padre mio, con me ! 

(al padre che intercede}. 
Perche ti curvi ai pie 
di chi non ode voce di pieta? 
(poi, strappandosi la livrea di dussa, 

grida:) 
Dalle mie carni via questa vilta 

CONTESSA (imbizzita). , 
Via!... Via!... Via!.. 

(// Maestro di Casa, i servi, i lac che, 
gli staffieri, respingono la folia. La 
Contessa si lascia cadere sul sofa 
ansante dalla bile). 

CONTESSA. 

Ah ! quel Gerard !... L'ha rovinato il 

leggere !... 

Credetemi... Fu 1'Enciclopedia !... 
Ed io... che... tutti i giorni... facevo 

Telemosina 
e... a non fare... arrossire... di se la 

poverta... 
perfin m'ho fatto... un abito costume di 

pieta !... 

(al Maestro di Casa che torna). 
Son tutti .andati ? 



MAESTRO DI CASA. 



Si. 



CONTESSA (agli invitati). 

Scusate! L'interrotta, 

mie dame, ripigliamo, gentil, nobil ga, 

votta 

Invitate le dame! 
Ritorni rallegria! 

CALA LA TELA. 



ANDR CHfiNIER 



Believe me, beauteous maiden 
The word of a poet, oh, despise not ! 
Oh, hearken! Naught do you know 

of love! 

Hear me Love is divine; 
Spare it your scorn ! 
The flame that lights the universe, 
Tis Love! 

(General indignation.) 

MADELEINE (to Chenier~). 
\ ray you, pardon me ! 

COUNTESS (to her Guests) 
;he\ -juch a flighty girl ! 
(to Madeleine). 

*'here, I forgive you! 

She's so capricious .' 

Inclin'd to be romantic! 

But listen ! The merry ound the 

gavotte ! 

Now, cavaliers, pray choose your part- 
ners! 

(As the dance is about to begin, a 
tismal sviind of chanting is heard 
without. Ccrard appears at the head 
cf a group ,\ f ragged beggars.) 

CUORUS OF PAUPERS. 



Each day, each 

Brings woe and sorrow* 

Tor bread we're crying; 

Cur children are dying. 

We're starving! Will non* fccar tfS 

calling? 
Oh, save us from famine appalling ! 

GERARD (mimicking the pompous 
Major-domo). 

His Serene Highness, Prince Poverty ! 

COUNTESS (angrily). 
Who admitted those beggars? 

GERARD. 
Twas I, Gerard ! 



COUNTESS. 

Out ! drive the rabble out I 
And gp you first ! 

GERARD. 

Yes, I'll be gone, my lady ! 
I'll doff this hateful livery 
That I loath and detest! 
Your bread, your food, it chokes me, 
While round me all my fellow-men 
are starving! 

(to his father t who intercedes). 

Come, father, come with me! 

Why dost thou bend the knee to them, 

Since pity dwells not in their hearts! 

(stripping off his livery). 

Off with this livery vile! 
Off, badge accursed! 

(The footmen eject the beggars and 
Gerard is hustled out.) 

COUNTESS (as she sinks proztr~.j 
upon a couch). 

Oh ! that Gerard ! 

'Tis reading that has ruined him ! 

To me, of all people ! 

I who daily give away unto the poori 

Through regard for their feelings, 

When I supply their needs, 

I wear a modest gown, designed 

For charitable deeds! 

(to the Major-domo.) 
They have all gone, then? 

MAJOR-DOMO. 
Yes, my lady ! 



COUNTESS (to her guests). 

Excuse me, ladies fair! 
Our gavotte, by your leave, let us fin- 
ish. 
Now mirth once more shall reign! 



CURTAIN. 



iS 



ANDRfi CHSNIER 



QUADRO SECONDO. 

(Parigi in un giorno del Giugno 1794,^ 
col Caffe Hottot e la Loggia del 
Fogliantisti. A dritta un altare de- 
dicato a Marat con su un busto di- 
questi. Dietro la, "Cours-la-Reine" 
e il ponte Perronet sulla Senna. 
Chenier seduto solo ad una tavola. 
Mathieii "Populus" indica ad Ora- 
zio Coclite il busto di Marat che egli 
ha tolto dall' altare e ripulisce, a sfer- 
zate energiche di fazzoletto, dalla 
polvere). 

MATHIEU. 
Per Tex inferno ! 
ecco ancor della polvere 
sul capo di Marat !... 
(strisza I'occhio all'amico e accenna 
alia Bersi seduta con la Spia.) 

Che ci covasse scherno?... 

Ah, troppo spesso 

da un poco sgualdrineggiano 

qnelle donnine la !... 

i male!... male!... male!... 

Benedetto, o Rasojo nazionale !.. 

Tu sol, tu solo non risenti il sesso !... 

(Entrano degli striUoni. Matliicn 

compra un giornale, ma si accorgc 

che c vecchio.} 

M'ha appioppatq un giornale 
di cinque mesi fa ! 

BERSI (all'Incredibile.') 
vcr che Robespierre allevi spie?... 

L'TNGREDIBILE. 

Vnoi dire, cittadina "Osservatori 
dello spirito pubblico..." 



BERSI. 



Come tu vuoi. 



L'lNCREDIBILE. 

Non so, 

ne lo posso sapere f 

Hai tu a temere? 

BERSI. 
Temer?... Perche? Perche temer do- 

vro? 

Non sono, come te, una vera figlia 
autentica della Rivoluzione? 
Amo viver cosi !... Vivere in fretta 
di questa f ebb re gaja d'un godere 
rapido, acuto e quasi inconsciente !... 
Qui il giuoco ed il piacere... lr\ la mo~- 

teL. 



Qui il suon de le monete e il biribisso ! 
Laggiu il cannone e il rtillo de'tam- 

buri! 
Qui inebria il vino... laggiu inebria il 

sangue 

Qui riso e amore ; 
la si pensa e s'odia! 
Qui la Meravigliosa e 1'Incredibile 
che brindan col Bordeaux, collo 

Sciampagna ; 

(Verso Vex Cours-la-Reine di dove 
sbocca il "piccolo paniere" carico di 
condannati condotti alia ghigliotti- 
na.) 

le mercatine la e le pescivendole 
e la carretta di Sanson che passa ! 

(esce.} 



L'lNCREDIBILE. 

No, non m'inganno ! Era proprio con 

lei 
la bella bionda!... Ho scovato la trac- 

cia!... 

(estrae di tasca un piccolo taccuino e 
vi scrive su rapidamente:) 

La cittadina Bersi, far sospetto 
di corruzione non spontanea; 
guardo Chenier di sottecchi. Osser- 

varla ! 
Andrea Chenier per qualche ora in at- 

tesa 
con febbril ansia evidente. Osservarlo ! 

(esce.} 
(Roucher enlra dal Cours-la-Rei^j>) 

CHENIER (vcdcndolo). 
Roucher! 

ROUGHER. 

Chenier!... Tutto il giorno ti cerco! 
La tua salvezza tengo!... 

CHENIER. 
Un passaporto? 



ROUGHER. 

Qui tutto intorno e periglio per U ! 
La tua preziosa vita salva ^parti ! 

CHENIER. 
II mio nome mentir !.. Fuggire !... No I 



ANDRfi CHfiNIER 



ACT II. 

(The Scene shows us Paris on a day 
in June, 1794, with the Cafe Hottot 
and the Terrasse des Feuillants. To 
the right an altar dedicated to Ma- 
rat, on which stands his bust. At 
the back, the "Cours la Rcine" and 
the Peronnet Bridge across the 
Seine. At one of the tables Chenier 
is seated alone. Mathieu and Ho- 
race are arranging the altar, and 
Mathieu is dusting Marat's bust 
with a handkerchief. Bersi and the 
Spy are seen at one of the tables.) 

MATHIEU. 

By all that's infernal! There's still 
such a heap of dust 011 the head 
of Marat! 

(Newsboys enter and Mathieu buys 
a paper. Soon he discovers that it is 
an old one.) 

Why, he's sold me a paper that's fully 
five months old ! 

BERSI (to the Spy). 
Is it true that Robespierre has char- 
tered spies? 

SPY. 

Not "spies," my worthy citizen ; 
"Observers of the temper of the pub- 



BERSI. 



As you will! 



SPY. 

I know not ; 

Indeed, why do you ask me? 
Are you afraid, then? 

BERSI. 

Afraid ? Not I ! 

What cause have I to fear? 

Am I not, like yourself, a true and 

loyal child 

Of the glorious Revolution? 
No life but this for me! 

Swift as a whirlwind, borne ever on- 
ward 

T^own the tide of pleasure ; 
Never a nause to think ; 
Net a moment of lei?' 1 ^ ; 



Here, gambling, song, and laughter ; 

And yonder, death ! 

Here, chink of golden lotiis and rattle 

of dice-box ; 
There, boom of cannon, rolling of the 

drum! 

Here, wine intoxicates ; 
Down there, they're drunk with blood ! 
Here, smiles and friendship ; there, 

undying hate! 
While here we quaff our brimming 

bumper of champagne, 
Out in the market, there, 
Folk sell their fish and fruit- 
Meanwhile the headsman's cart goes 

nast ! 

(The death-cart passes, followed 
by an excited crowd.) 

(Exit.) 

SPY (aside). 

I'm not mistaken ! 

'Twas with her I saw the blonde- 

hair'd beauty ! 
Now the clue I've discovered ! 

(writing in his book.) 

"Citoyenne Bersi rouses suspicion 
Of conduct one may call seditious. 
She gave Chenier such a sly glanc .' 
Watch he closely! 
Andre Chenier here several hours has 

waited. 

No doubt for some important message. 
Watch him closely!" 

(Exii). 

(Roucher enters from 'the Cours la 
Reine.) 

CFENIER (seeing Roucher). 
Roucher ! 

ROUGHER. 
Chenier ! 

All day long have I sought you ! 
Here I have it ! your safeguard ! 

CHENIER. 
Ah ! Tis a passport ! 

ROUGHER. 

On ev'ry side there is danger for you ;, 
Ah! Save your life; 'tis precious;, 
flee! 

CHENIER. 
What? Escape like a coward? 



20 



ANDR CHSNIER 



ROUGHER. 
Te ne prego, Chenier! 

CHENIER. 

Credi al destine?. . . 
lo credo ! . . . Credo a una possanza 

arcana 

che benigna o maligna i nostri passi 
or guida or svia pei diversi sentieri 
de T esistenza umana ! Una possanza 
che dice a un uomo : Tu sarai poeta ! 
A un altro: A te una spada, sii sol- 

dato! 
Or bene, il mio destin forse qui vuol- 

mi !. . . 
Se quel che bramc mi si avvera, resto ! 

ROUGHER. 
Se non si avvera?. . . 

CHENIER. 

Allora partiro! 

Seguo il destino umano dell' amore. 
lo non ho amato ancor f . . . 
Pure sovente nella vita 
ho sentita 

sul mio cammin vicina 
passar la donna che il destin fa mia ; 
passare tutta bella ideal, divina 
come la poesia ; 

passar con lei sul mio cammin Tamor ! 
Si piu volte ha parlato 
ia sua voce al mio cuore ; 
udita io 1'ho sovente 
con la sua voce ardente 
dirmi: "Credi airamore; 
tu sei Chenier, amato ! 
(e preso sottobraccio Roucher lo al- 
lontana dal caffe Hottot, warrandogli 
confidenzialmente. ) 

Da tempo mi pervengon strane lettere 
or soavi ed or gravi or rampogne, or 

consigli ! 

Scrive una donna misteriosa ognora! 
In quelle sue parole vibra un'anima ! 
-Chi sia, indagato ho invano! 

ROUGHER. 
Ancor?. . 



CHENIER. 
Ah ! la vedro ! 

ROUGHER. 
La misteriosa alfm solleva il velol, 



CKENIER. 



Non ridere! 



ROUGHER. 

Vediam ! 

Calligrafia 

invero f emminil ! Carta elegante ! . . . 

Ma, ohime! profumo "alia Rivolu- 

zioneir 

Questo gentil biglietto, 
a profumo di rosa, 
provocatore, 

non m'inganno, io giuro, 
esce da un salottino 
troppo noto aH'amore : 
Chenier, te Tassicuro, 
il tuo destino 
ti ha dato il cuor... d'una Meravi 

gliosa 
Riprendi il passaporto e . . . via la let 

tera. 



Non credo ! 



CHENIER. 



ROUGHER. 



Tu non credi? 

CHENIER. 
No, non credo! 

ROUGHER. 

La femminil marea parigina 
in gaje onde irrequiete or qui rovescia! 
Io le conosco tutte ! Passeranno, 
ed io ti mostrero la misteriosa 1 



CHENIER. 

Finora ! 
Ma or guarda ! 

ROUGHER (legge). 
Qui un ritrovo? 



CHENIER (colpito), 

Una Meravigliosa 

la bella creatura 

del mio pensier sognata?! 

Non donna, ma. . . 



ANDR CMNIER 



ROUGHER. 
Nay, hear me, Chenier ! 

CHENIER. 

No! No! 

Do you believe in Fate, as I do ? 

Faith have I in a secret power 

That guides the steps of mortals, 

For good, or else for ill, 

Along the devious pathways of exist- 
ence. 

'Tis this that says to one man : "Be a 
poet !" 

And to another: "Wield the soldier's 
sword !" 

Maybe Fate bids me to stay here ! 

If what I long for come to pass, I'll 
stay. 

ROUGHER. 

If not, what then? 



CHENIER. 

Why, then, my friend, I'll go ! 
The destiny that guides me 
No other is than Love. 
I :m r er yet have loved ! 
Though the bright presence long- 

desir'd 
Of beauteous lady hath my life in- 

spir'd ; 

Of one alone 

That fate shall make mine own! 
Ideal divine ; star of my stormy sea ; 
With her, then life v^ere Paradise for 

me! 

Full oft in my dreams, 
Like some strange melody haunting, 
Her 7oice from out the rnjdnight 
Calls me in tones enchanting, 
And murmurs : "Love is divine !" 
"Chenier, at last 'tis thine ! 'tis thine !" 
For long while past, strange letters 

I've received ; 
Sometimes charming, 
Or alarming, 

To reprove me or to warn me ! 
It is a woman writes 
In such strange fashion; 
Her words upon the page 
They glow with passion ; 
Vainly I sought to find her. 



ROUGHER. 

Vainlv. did vou sav? 



CHENIER. 
Until now, 
But see here! 

ROUGHER. 
A rendezvous? 

CHENIER. 
At last I shall meet her! 

.ROUGHER. 
The mysterious woman unveils! 

CHENIER. 
Why do you laugh? 

ROUGHER. 
Let me see! 

ROUGHER (looking at letter). 
Aye, 'tis indeed a thorough woman's 

hand! 

Choicest of paper ! 

But oh ! the perfume reeks of Revolu- 
tion 1 

This little dainty letter, 

With its perfume designed the senses 

^ to fetter, 

Chenier, I swear it, believe me, 
It comes from a salon noted 
For the cult of the tender passion. 
The Fate you trust rewards you with 

the heart 

Of some fine dame of fashion ! 
Come ! take your passport ; fling aside 

the letter! 



CHENIER. 



I doubt you ! 



Do you? 



Rather ! 



ROUGHER. 



CHENIER. 



this 



ROUGHER. 

The modish dames of Paris 
By way of diversion, frequent 

cafe; 
I know them all by sight ; and as they 

pass 

To you will I point out your most 
mysterious fair! 

CHENIER (in amazement). 
Some fine lady of fashion, 
She, the beautiful being divine 
Of whom I dreamed ? 
Not a woman, but 



22 



ANDR CHfiNIER 



ROUGHER. 

. . .una cosa. 

CHENIER. 

Una car^catura?! 
Una moda ? ! 

ROUGHER. 
..Una faccia imbellettata ! 

CHENIER. 
La sconosciuta mia? 

ROUGHER. 
La tua divina 
soave poesia 

CHENIER. 

in fisciu a la Bastiglia ! . . . 
. . .ed il nero alle ciglia?! 

ROUGHER. 
...e con rimesse chiome!... 

CHENIER. 

Oh, cosa senza nome!. . . 
Accetto il passaporto ! . . . 

ROUGHER. 
provvido consiglio! 

ROUGHER. 

Vedi ? al ponte Peronnet 
s'agglomera la folia. 

CHENIER. 

La eterna cortigiana ! 
Vi si schiera 
per incurvar la fronte 
al nuovo iddio ! 

MATHIEU. 

Evviva Robespierre! 
CHENIER (accennando a Robespierre) 
Egli cammina solo. 

ROUGHER. 

E quanto spazio ad arte fra il nume 
i sacerdoti ! Ecco Tallien !. . . 

CHENIER. 
L'enigma ! 

ROUGHER. 
Ultimo, vedi? 

CHENIER (ironico). 
Robespierre il piccolo ! 

LA FOLLA. 
Ecco laggiu Gerard ! 
Gerard ! . . Viva Gerard 1 



(Entra Gerard.) 

LA FOLLLA (entra Robespierre). 

Evviva Robespierre! 
Barere ! 

Collot d'Herbois! 
Quello e Conthon ! 

Saint-Just ! 

David. 
Tallien ! 

Freron ! 

Barras ! 

Foucht i 
Le Bas 

Sieves ! 
Thuriot ! 

Carnot ! 

e Robespierre ! 

L'INCREDIBLE (a Gerard). 

La donna che mi hai chiesto di cercare 
e bianca e bionda?. . . 

GERARD. 

Azzurro occhio di cielo 

sotta una fronte Candida; 

bionda la chioma con riflessi d'orc 

una dolcezza in viso 

ed un sorriso 

di donna non umano ; 

nel suo vestir modesto; 

pudico velo 

sovra il tesoro 

d'un puro sen virgineo 

ed una bianca cuffia sulla testa. 

Dammi codesta creatura vaga! 

ti dissi Cerca! Indaga ! 

Dinanzi mi e passata qual baleno 

un di, ma poscia 

io 1'ho perduta ! 

To piu non vivo ; peno ! 

Mi salva tu da questa grande angoscia 

e. . .tutto avrai!. . . 

L'lNCREDIBILE. 

Stasera la vedrai ! 

ROUGHER (a Chenier). 

Eccole ! . . Strani tempi ! La vanno 

i pensatori. 
Qui lo stormo chiassoso, di que' vivi 

bagliori. 
Tu presso a me ti poni ! Di qui facile 

cosa 
sara scoprir chi sia la tua misteriosa! 



ANDR CHfiNIER 



ROUGHER. 

A mere thing. 

CHENIER. 
Just a caricature or a fashion plate? 

ROUGHER. 
A painted face. 

CHENIER. 

That of my unknown Dame ? 

ROUGHER. 

The beauteous lady that your life in- 
spired 
Wears a Bastille foulard. 

CHENIER. 
And has darkened lashes? 

ROUGHER. 
And hair all crimpled. 

CHENIER. 

Oh ! the nameless thing ! 
Here! Give me the passport! 

ROUGHER. 

Aye, take my good advice ! 
See how yonder, by the bridge, 
A surging mob assembles. 

CHENIER. 

The eternal courtesan 
Bending low, in abject adoration 
To their new idol. 

MATHIEU. 

Long live Robespierre! 

CHENIER (pointing to Robespierre}. 
He goes alone. 

ROUGHER. 

And what gulf 'twixt idol and ador- 
ers! 
Here comes Gallien. . . . 



CHENIER. 



The sphynx. 



ROUGHER. 

And Robespierre's brother 
Comer last. 

CHENIER (ironical), 
1A little Robespierre. 

(Enter Gerard.) 



THE MOB. 

There goes Gerard ! Long live Gerard ! 
(Enter Robespierre.) 

Long live Robespierre! 
Barere ! 

Collot d'Herbois! 

Here is Couthon! 

Saint-Just ! 

David ! 
Tallien ! 

Freron ! 

Barrar \ 

Fouche ! 
Les Bas, 

Sieyes ! 

Thuriot! 

Carnot ! 

Robespierre ! 

SPY. 
The lady whom you bade me seek, 

pray, tell me, 
Is she pale and fair? 

GERARD. 

Her eyes are blue as the heavens; 
Whiter than snow her beauteous brow 
And all her hair more bright than bur- 

nish'd gold ; 

The sweetest of all faces ; 
Her smile hath graces 
Entrancing to behold ; 
Most neat her dress and simple ; 
She wears a wimple, 
White, yet not whiter than her bosom 

sweet ; 
It shrouds her head, and at her waist 

doth meet. 

Find me this lovely maid that I adore ; 
I pray you search, explore! 
Before my gaze she flashed 
Like a flame in the night ; 
But now that I have lost her, 
Life is void of delight! 
If from this torture you can save me. 
Then all is yours ! 

SPY. 
This evening you shall see her ! 

ROUGHER. 

Here they come! Strange times, in- 
deed'! 

First march the careworn thinkers, 
Then the seekers of pleasure ! 
And now, as they pass by us, 
We'll mark your dame mysterious. 



ANDR CHfiNIEB 



CHENIER. 
Partiamo ! 

ROUGHER. 
Guarcla ! Guarda ! 

CHENIER. 
No ! non voglio : partiamo ! 

BERSI (a Roucher). 
Non mi saluti? 

(Rapidamente gli susurra.) 
Qui trattien Chenier. 
Son spiata ! qui f ra poco tornero ! 

L'lNCREDIBILE. 

Procace Bersi, 

qui sono ancor per te! Meco giu 
scendi ? 

BERSI (sorridendogli indifferente). 
Per poco? 

L'INCREDIBILE. 
iNon ti chiedo che una Trenitz. 

BERSI. 
perche no ? 

L'lNCREDIBILE. 

Scendiam ? 

BERSI. 
Scendiam ! 

(Scendono nei sotterranei del Caffe.) 

LE MERAVIGLIOSE (vedendo Barras 
discendere nei sotterranei del 

Caffe Hottot.) 
Ah, riderem davver. 
E la Barras ! 

La sua rivoluzion nome ha "piacer" 
Ci aspetta la 

fra il giuoco ed il bicchier. 
Siam Riso, siamo Baci, siamo Amor 
anche in di di Terror. 
Uno oggidi baciato diman muor. . . 
Vedove. . . e spose ognor. 
Repubblicani, eroi o aristocratici 
che importa a noi, 
purche sia Amor? 
Amante innamorato 
cosi lo vuole il cuor 
soltanto e ognor ! . . . 
Siam Riso, siamo Baci, siam 1'Amor. . 
Vedove ... e spose ognor ! . . . 

(Scendono nei sotterranei del Caffe. 



CHENIER. 
Una meravigliosa ! 

ROUGHER. 
Ho indovinato? 
Son male esche d'abbocco!. . . 

CHENIER. 
Tutta\ia. . . 
Che mi vuol dir?. . . 

ROUGHER. 

sera!... Ora propizia ! 
E all'alba di domani. . . Via!. . . It 
cammino ! 

CHENIER. 
O mio bel sogno, addio ! . . . 

(Si vede ritornare la Bersi.) 

BERSI. 

Andrea Chenier! 

Fra poco, a te, una donna minacciata 
da gran periglio qui verra. 
La attendi! 

CHENIER. 
Dimmi il suo nome ! . . . 

BERSI. 
II suo nome . . . Speranza ! 

ROUGHER. , 

La ignota tua scrittrice ! No... e un 
tranello ! 

CHENIER. 
lo la verro ! . . . 
(Bersi fugge via). 

ROUGHER. 
un agguato. 

CHENIER. 
M'armero!. . . * 



ROUGHER. 



(Escono). 



Ah! vegliero su lui! 

(E gia sera.) 

(Mathieu riappare. Viene a dar 
htme alia lanternina dell' altare a 
Marat.) 

L'INCREDIBILE (esce gu&rdingo dal 
Caffe e va a porsi allo sbocco della 
via later ale al caffe, nascondendowsi 
dietro I'angolo.) 

Ed il mio piano e fatto ! . . . Ora at- 
tendiamo ! 

( Una forma di donna si avanza cauta- 
mente). 



ANDR CMNIER 



CHENIER. 
Let us depart. 

ROUGHER. 
Now just look there! 

CHENIER. 
Np. Let's go. 

BERSI (to Roucher). 
Won't you salute me? 

(In a rapid whisper.) 
Beware! Keep Chenier here! 
I'm being watched ! 

SPY. 

My good friend, Bersi, 
I'm at your service, now ; 
Shall we go in, then? 



If you like. 



BERSI. 



SPY. 



I should like some light refreshment. 

BERSI. 
So should I ! Let's go ! 

(They enter the cafe.) 

CHORUS. 

Ah ! We will make merry 
With that Barras 
Whose revolution is "pleasure." 
He's down here 
Gambling and drinking. 
Even in these days of terror 
We like to laugh, to kiss and to love. 
The man you kiss to-day will be dead 

by to-morrow, 

And we are in turn widows and brides. 
Republicans, heroes or aristocrats, 
What do we care 
As long as they love us? 
A fervent lover, 

That's what our hearts crave for. 
We like to laugh, to kiss and to love, 
And to be in turn widows and brides. 
(They enter the cafe.) 

CHENIER. 
A lady of fashion ! 

ROUGHER. 
I guessed as much! 



CHENIER. 
What could she tell me? 

ROUGHER: 

'Tis night-fall ! hour most propitious ; 
Before the morrow dawns, escape ! Be- 
gone! 

CHENIER. 
Ah ! lovely dream, farewell ! 

(Bersi hurries out of the cafe and 
approaches Chenier.) 

BERSI. 

Andre Chenier! 
Ere long to you a lady 
Threaten'd by grievous peril 
Will come ; await her here ! 

CHENIER. 

Tell me her name! 



(Exit.) 



BERSI. 
Her name is "Speranza." 

CHENIER. 
Now we shall meet. 

ROUGHER. 

Your unknown correspondent . 
Nay, 'tis a trap, an ambush ! 

CHENIER. 
I'll get my sword! 

ROUGHER. 
Ah ! I'll protect him, now ! 

(Exeunt.) 

(It is now growing dark. The pa- 
trol passes, and Mathieu enters with a 
lantern, which he places on the altar. 
The Spy enters, on the watch for 
Madeleine.) 

SPY. 

So ! All my plans are laid ! 

Here I'll await them! (Hides.) 



ANDR CHfiNIER 



MADDALENA. 
Viene 1'altare... 
(si guarda iniorno; impaurita di quel 

jilenzio). 
Nessuno!... Ho paura! 

L'lNCREDIBLE. 

Ecco gia il maschio ! 

(entra Chenier). 
MADDALENA. 
Ah, e Ini ! 
Andrea Chenier! 

CHENIER. 
Son io!... 
(Maddalena tenia parlare, la comma- 

zione sua e grande e non pud prof- 

ferire parola.) 

CHENIER. 

(sorpreso di quel silenzio.*) 
Deggio seguirti ?... 
(Maddalena risponde con un gesto: 

No!) 

Sei mandata?... 
Dimmi da chi ? Di' chi mi brama ! 

MADDALENA. 
To. sono! 

CHENIER. 

(sorpreso ed ingannato all'abbiglia- 

mento da officiosa di lei). 
Tu? Ebben, che sei? Di ! 

MADDALENA. 

Ancor ricordi?... Ascolta!... 
(e Maddalena, per richiamar glisi alia 
mente, gli ricorda le parole che Che- 
nier le ha rivolto la sera del loro in- 
contro al castello di Cogny.) 

CHENIER. 
Si : mi ricordo !... Udita io ti ho di 

gia!... 

Ah nuova la tua voce non mi parla. 
Cb'io ti veggaL. 

MADDALENA. 
Guardatemi ! 

CHENIER. 
Ah, Maddalena di Coigny !... 

L'INCREDIBILE. 

Ah e lei! La bionda!... Or tosto da 
Gerard ! 

(e cautamente si allontana), 

CHENTFP. 
Voi? Voi!... 



MADDALENA 
Guardate la! 

CHENIER, 
Dove? 

MADDALENA 
La!.. Un'ombra! 

CHENIER. 

(ra alTangolo dove priina era l'i 
dibile, ma non vede alamo). 
Nessun !... Pur questo loco e perigliosc 
E qui... sola... 

MADDALENA. 
Fu Bersi che 1'ha scelto. 
Or essa e la, giu, al giuoco e se un 

periglio... 

ne minacciasse... Sono un'officiosa 
che le viene a recar la sua mantiglia ! 

CHENIER. 

La mia scrittrice?... Voi la mia celata 
arnica ognor f uggente ? ! 

MADDALENA. 

Eravate possente, 

io invece minacciata ; 

pur nella mia tristezza 

pensai sovente d'impetrar da voi 

pace e salvezza, 

ma... non Tosai ! 

E ognora il mio destino 

sul mio cammino 

vi sospingea ! 

Ognora io vi seguivo, e strano assai, 

ognor pensavo a voi 

come a un fratello! 

E allora vi scriveva 

quanto il cuore o il cervello 

dettavami alia mente. 

Si, il cuore mi diceva che difeso 

avreste quella che v'ha un giorno ofTe- 
so. 

Al mondo Bersi sola mi vuol bene 

(e lei che m'ha nascosta). Ma da un 
mese 

v'ha chi mi spia e m'insegue. E Bersi 
pure ! 

Mntammo nascondiglio, e piu veemen- 
te 

era la caccia!... Ove fuggir?... Fu allo- 
ra 

che pure voi non piu potente seppi, 

e son venuta. Udite ! Sono sola ! 

Son sola e minacciata ! To piu non reg- 
go ! 

Son sola al mondo! Sola ed ho paura 

Io soero in voi ! Proteggermi vplete ? 



ANDRfi CHfiNIER 



MADELEINE (enters cautiously'). 
Here is the altar! 

As yet there's no one. How I trem- 
ble! 

(Enter Chenier.) 
Tis he! 
Andre Chenier ! 

CHENIER; 

Tis I! Say, shall I follow? 
Who sent you thither? Who needs 
my help? 



MADELEINE. 



I do. 



CHENIER. 
And who are you ? 



CHENIER. 

There's no one! 

And yet this place is one of peril ! 



MADELEINE. 

Twas Bersi chose it; 
But if danger now should threaten 
I'll play the serving-maid 
Who's brought a mantle for her mis- 
tress. 



CHENIER. 

You, my fair scribe? 
Was it you the friend so long un- 
known, 
And lost so long? 



MADELEINE. 
Do you remember? 



Ye< 



CHENIER. 
-I remember ! 



MADELEINE (repeating his words ad- 
dressed to her once at Coigny). 
"Naught do you know of Love 1 
"Hear me Love is divine ; 
"Spare it your scorn !" 

CHENIER. 

Where have I heard that strange, 

sweet voice? 
Let me see you ! 

MADELEINE. 
Behold my face ! 

CHENIER. 
Ah ! Madeleine de Coigny ! You ! 

SPY (aside). 

Tis she ! the blonde ! 
Now I'll inform Gerard! 

(Exit.) 

MADELEINE (terror-struck}. 
See yonder there ! A phantom ! 



MADELEINE. 

In the day of your power 

By peril grave was I threaten'd ; 

Yet often in my sadness 

I fondly hop'd to gain thro' you 

Safety and gladness. 

I dar'd not, then ; but now 'tis Fate's 

decree 

That thrown together we should be. 
Hope had I no other ; 
My trust I gave to you 
Gave, as to a brother. 
Then, letters oft I wrote you, 
By heart or brain dictated, 
In days and hours ill-fated. 
I knew your loyal heart 
Would have nobly requited 
Her who long since your genius 

slighted. 

In all the world no friend have I but 

Bersi ; 

('Twas she who help'd to hide me!) 
But now for a month by spies am I 

hunted ; 

How to escape? 

Then came the news that you had 

fall'n from pow'r; 
To you I come ! 

Ah ! hear me ! I'm alone, beset by dan- 
ger; 

All helpers fail me, 

Dark fears assail me, 

Oh ! say, will you protect me ? 

In you I trust! 



38 



ANDRfi CHNIER 



CHENIER. 
Ora dolcissima, 
sublime ora d'amore !... 
Possente 1'anima 
sfida il terrore !... 
Tn mi fai puro il cuore 
d'ogni vilta !... 
Bramo la vita, 
ma non temo la morte. 
Ora dolcissima 
cbe segni la mia sorte, 
deh, rimani infinita! 

MADDALENA. 

Vicina nei perigli? Vicina nel ter- 
rore?... 

CHENIER. 
Si ! Vieni al braccio mio ! Tu sei 1'a- 

more !... 
Fino alia morte insieme? 

MADDALENA. 

Fino alia morte insieme ! 

(Append Chenier e Maddalena hanno 
fatto pochi passi, dietro il Caffe 
cone verso di loro Gerard, seguito 
dall'Incredibile.) 

GERARD. 
Maddalena, contessa di Coigny! 

MADDALENA ( terrorizzata ) . 
Gerard ! 

GERARD. 

A guisa di notturna 
io vi ritrovo a notte intorno... 

CHENIER. 
Segni 
per la tua strada e non dar noja a 

gente 
che si rincasa !... 

GERARD. 
(awentandosi contro Chenier per 

strap par gli Maddalena.) 
merce pro'ibita ! 

CHENIER (a Rancher). 
Salvala ! 

GERARD (all'Incredibile). 
FuggeL. Inseguila! 

ROUGHER. 

(spiana contro all'Incredibile un pajo 

di pistole da tasca). 
A te bada!... 



L'lNCREDIBILE. 

(arretra e appigliandosi a piu pruden- 

te consiglio). 
Alia sezione! 

(* fugg') 
GERARD. 

(buttandosi armato di spada contro a 
Chenier) . 

CHENIER. 

Ah, tu non sei che un frate!... Sei 
Chabot?... 

10 ti rubo a Sanson ! 

GERARD (ferito, cadendo). 
Son coltoL. 

CHENIER. 
L'hai voluto!... 

GERARD. 
Odi, Chenier... 
Fuggi !... II tuo nome gia Fouquier 

Tinville 

ha noto!... Va... 
Proteggi Maddalena! 

(Chenier fugge^) 

(Entra Mathteu L'Incredibile con 
guardie nazionali.) 

MATHIEU. 
Gerard ferito?! 

L'lNCREDIBLE 

11 feritore... 

LE MERAVIGLIOSE. 
Assassinate? Chi? 

GERARD. 

(sollevandosi, fa uno sforzo e guar- 
dando I'lncredibile trova ancora 
I'energia di impedirgli di parlare, 
balbettando:) 

IgnotoL. 

(e smene) 

MATHIEU. 
L' han fatto assassinare i Girondini! 

ALCUNL 
Gerard ! 

LE MERAVIGLIOSE. 
Gerard ? 

Morte agli ultimi Girondini! 
CAL\ LA TELA. 



ANDRfi CHfiNIER 



29 



CHENIER. 

Hail! bright golden hour, 

For which my heart was yearning! 

By Love's immortal pow'r 

My grief to gladness turning ! 

Thou of earthly baseness 

Shalt purify this heart ! 

Tho' life's joys invite me, 

Death shall ne'er affright me! 

Golden hour of love, ah ! stay ! 

MADELEINE. 

In danger's hour beside me, 
To guard me and to guide me ! 

CHENIER. 

Tis Love's bright star shall guide us ; 
Pale Death may ne'er divide us. 

MADELEINE. 
In life, in death, forever thine ! 

(As they are going, enter Gerard, 
who bars their passage.) 

GERARD. 
Madeleine de Coigny ! 

MADELEINE (horror-struck). 
Gerard ! 



GERARD. 

At night-fall, here I find you? And 
disguis'd ? 

CHENIER. 
Stand back, sir ! Go your ways ! 

GERARD. 

GERARD (endeavoring to seize Made- 
leine.} 
Forbidden fruit! 

(Roncher and the Spy enter.) 

CHENIER (to Roucher). 
Save her! 

GERARD (to the Spy). 
Follow her ! 

ROUGHER (threatening the Spy). 
Back there! (Exit with Madeleine.) 



SPY. 
I'll fetch the gendarmes ! 

(Exit.) 

(Gerard draws his sword and at- 
tacks Chenier.) 

CHENIER (mockingly). 
Why, you fence like a friar or a 
clown ! 

GERARD (furiously). 
I'll rob the headsman of his prize ! 

CHENIER. 
Are you not Chabot? 

GERARD. 
I am wounded. 

CHENIER. 
It's your own fault. 

(Gerard is ^vounded, and falls.) 

GERARD. 
Ah! 

You are Chenier ! Then flee ! 
Your name's on Fouquier-Tinville's 

death-list ! 

Begone! Save Madeleine! 
(Chenier escapes.) 

(Enter Mathieu, the Spy, and others, 
with gendarmes.) 

MATHIEU. 
Gerard is wounded. 

SPY. 
And his assassin is 

CHORUS. 
And his assassin? 

GERARD (zwth a desperate effort to 

prevent the Spy from speaking.) 
I know not! (Swoons. ) 

MATHIEU. 

The Girondins have done this bloody 
deed! 

THE MEN. 
Gerard! 



THE WOMEN. 



Gerard ! 



CHORUS. 
Death to the villains, one and all! 

CURTAIN. 



AXDRfi CHflNIEK 



OUADRO TERZO. 

(L'aula del Tribunale rivoluzionario, 
Accanto a un' itrna colossale sn'l 
banco della presidenza Mathieu ar- 
ringa la folia e solledta contribu- 
zioni). 

MATHIEU. 

...Dumouriez traditore (muoja pres- 
to!) 

e passato ai nemici (il furfantac- 
cio!); 

Coburgo, Brunswick (Pitt crepi di 
peste!) 

e il vecchio lupanare dell'Europa 

tutta, contro ci stanno!... Oro e sol- 
dati! 

Onde quest' urna ed io che parlo a voi 

rappresentiam 1'imagin della patria! 

(Un gran silenzio accoglie il discorso 
di Mathieu, pero nessuno va ad of- 
rire). 

Nessun si muove? Che la ghigliottina 
ripassi a ognun la testa e la coscienza ! 
(Alcuni, pochij vanno e gittano nella 
grande urna oggetti e denari. Ma- 
thieu riprende). 

& la patria in periglio!... A Nostra 

Donna 

il vessil nero sventola ! Io pure 
or, come gia Barere, io levo il grido 

di Louverture : Liberta' e patate! 

(vedendo sopraggiungere Gerard). 

Ma, to'... laggiu a Gerard! Convale- 
scente 

appena accorre ove il dover Io chiama. 

Ei vi trarra di tasca gli ex luigi 

con paroline ch'io non so... 

M'infischio 

io de' bei motti... Ed anche me ne van- 
to! 



TUTTI. 

Gttadino Gerard, salute !... 
Evviva ! 

MATHIEU. 
La tua ferita? 

GERARD. 

Grazie, cittadini ! 

La forte fibra mia m'ha conservato 

alia mia patria ancora ! 



MATHIEU (indicandogli I' urna). 

Ecco il tuo posto ! 

(poscia seniprc colla sua voce mono- 
tona acccnnando al drappo si ri- 
volge al pubblico ripetendo). 

la patria in pe... 

(ma, accortosi die la pi pa gli si e 
spcnta, conclude indicando Gerard). 

Cedo la parola. 

GERARD (con vcro accento di dolore). 

Lacrime e sangue da la Francia! 

Udite ! 

Laudun ha inalberato 
vessillo bianco! 
in fiamme la Vandea ! 
E la Bretagna ognora ne minaccia! 
E Austriaci, e Prussian!, e Inglesi, e 

tutti 

nel petto della Francia 
gli artigli armati affondano ! 
Occorre e 1'oro, il sangue! 
L'inutil oro e gemma ai vostri vezzi, 
donne francesi, date ! 
Donate i vostri figli alia gran madre, 
o voi. madri francesi ! 



LE DONNE. 

(commosse, gittano dentro tuito quan- 
ta hanno in dosso di denaro o d'or- 
namcnto) . 

Prendi !... un. ricordo! 

A te ! Un anello ! 

fi un braccialetto ! 

Otto di di lavoro ! 

Una fibbia d'argento! 

Ouanto posseggo ! 

Son due bottoni d'oro ! 

(S'avanza una vecchia cieca con un 
gioi'inetto guindicenne) . 

LA VECCHIA. 

Fatemi largo, fatemi ! 

Son la vecchia Madelon ; mio figlio e! 
morto ; 

avea nome Roger; mori alia presa 

della Bastiglia ; il primo figlio suo 

ebbe a Valmy galloni e sepoltura. 

Ancora pochi giorni, e io pur morro. 

il figlio di Roger! L'ultimo figlio, 

rultima goccia del mio vecchio san- 
gue... 

Prendetelo ! 

Non dite che e un faricmllo! 

j> f ^ r f P ! p uo combattere e morire!..- 



ANDR CHfiNIER 



ACT III. 

(The Court of the Revolutionary Tri- 
bunal. On the President's table a 
colossal urn, near which stands 
Mathieu, haranguing the crowd, 
and inviting contributions.) 

MATHIEU. 

Dumotiriez the traitor, the villain, 
Has gone over to th' enemy! (lying 

scoundrel!) 

Coburg and Brunswick, 
(Pitt, the devil take him!) 
That ancient lupanar call'd Europe, 
All are in arms against us ! 
Money and soldiers ! That's what we 

need. 
This urn and I we're pleading now 

to-day 
For funds to help our country ! 

(Profound silence; yet no one con- 
tributes.) 

Will none come forward? 
Then may the guillotine make short 
work of you all! 

(Some advance and throw contribu- 
tions into the urn.) 

Our country's in danger! 
Barere, he's told you so, 
And to my cry now listen all : 
"What's a home without ha'pence?" 
(As Gerard approaches.) 
But here's our worthy Gerard! 
Maybe he'll draw the money from 

your pockets 

With words that I could never find. 
A plague on pretty speeches ! 
They're not my style at all ! 

CHORUS. 

To our worthy Gerard welcome and 
greeting ! 

MATHIEU. 
Your wound is better? 



GERARD. 

Thank you, fellow-citizens : my con- 
stitution's sound ; 

'Tis this hath sav'd me yet to serve 
my country. 

MATHIEU (to Gerard). 
Your place is there ' 



(Braiding out once more:) 
And the country's in 

(Finding that his pipe is out and 
stopping short.) 

(to Gerard.) 

Speak to them yourself! 



GERARD. 

Citizens ! 

France now sheds her .tears of blood ! 
Loudun the white flag has hoisted ; 
La Vendee is in flames; Brittany 

threatens us ; 
While Austria, Prussia, England all 

Europe 

With vast and mighty armies 
Now strives to crush our Fatherlan .'. ! 
She needs your gold, your blood ! 
The useless gold on all your trinkets 
Women of France, now give! 
And give your stalwart sons to the 

Great Mother, 
Mothers of France! 

(The women fling coin and trir.kc's 
i::to the urn.) 

THE WOMEN. 

Take them ! They're my ear-rings ! 

And this ! Here's my bracelet ! 

My brooch! And here's my last 

week's wages! 
Here's an old silver buckle ! 
And here are two gold buttons ! 
Here's all I possess! 
Here's my little cross ! 

(And old blind woman advances 
with a lad of fifteen.) 



OLD WOMAN. 

Make way, there! 

I am old Madelon ! 

My son is dead ; his name was Rr~ 

He was killed at the siege of the 1 

tille. 

His eldest boy, who fought at Valmy, 
Promotion won, yet perish'd. 
Tis but a little while and I shall die! 
Here I've brought you Roger's son, 
The youngest, the last ; 
T Vs all I live for; he is all I love! 
^ike him ! Don't say he's but a child ! 
He's strong, though, and for France 

can fight and die ! 



3 2 



ANDRfi CHfiNIER 



GERARD. 
Noi 1'accettiamo! Dinne il nome suo? 

LA VECCHIA. 
Roger Alberto. 

GERARD. 
A sera partira! 

(allora la vecchia abbraccia forte il 
fanciullo che la bacia) . 

LA VECCHIA. 
Prendetemelo via ! 

LA VECCHIA. 
Chi mi da il braccio?... 
(Brancola mtorno per tin appoggio e 
vien condotta fnori). 

CORC) 

(ballando al suono della Carmagnola) 

Amici, orsu ! Beviam ! Danziam ognor 

Colmo bicchier Allieta il cor! 

Cantare e ber! 

Viva la liberta ! 

Danziam la Carmao-nola 

al tuon, al suon del cannon ! 

(L'lncredibile si aTvlcina a Gerard'). 

L'lNCREDIBILE. 

L'uccello e nella rete! 

GERARD. 
Lei?!... 

L'lNCREDIBILE. 

No ; il maschio. 
E al Lussemburgo ! 

GERARD. 
Quando ? 

L'lNCREDIBILE. 

Stamattina. 



E come? 



II caso! 



Dove? 



GERARD. 



L'lNCREDIBILE. 



GERARD. 



L'lNCREDIBILE. 

La a Passy, 
presso a un amico. 

GERARD. 
E lei? 



L'lNCREDIBILE. 

Nessuna traccia ! 

Ma tal richiamo e il maschio per la 

femmina 

che volontariamente (penso e credo!) 

essa a noi ne verra. 

GERARD. 
No ; non verra !... 

(Lontano un gridio acuto e confuse 
da ogni parte.) 

L'lNCREDIBILE. 

Ascolta ! 

GERARD. 
Grida son... 
Monelli aizzati. 

L'lNCREDIBILE. 

No ; i soliti strilloni ! 

(Passa e lo si vede dall'arco di in- 
gress o della sezione venendo dalla 
via di destra une strillone che urla 
a t '11 ft a go! a:) 

L'arresto importantissimo 

d'Andre^i Chenier, nemico della patria ! 

L'lNCREDIBILE. 

Oueste grida 
arriveranno a lei ! 

GERARD. 
Va, tentatore ! 
E poscia?... Ebben? 

L'lNCREDIBILE. 

Donnina innamorata 

che d'aspettar s'annoja, 

se e gia passata 

1'ora e il perche non sa 

di quel ritardo del suo amico al nido, 

sfido! (e ch' io mnoja!) 

se la bella presaga 

all'ansia vinta 

non ti discende ratta per la via 

cosi, com'e, discinta ! 

Esce correndo... E indaga ! 

E vola ! E scruta ! E spia ! 

To' ! passa uno strillone ? E vocia ufi 

nome? 

Oh, come tntta impallida ! 
Ma non vacilla o china!... 
Possanza dell' amor! 
In quel dolor 

cessa la donna ed eccola eroina! 
Tutto osera! 
Laonde, per mia scienza 
* tu la vedrai ! Pazienza ! 
Si, a te verra! 
Si ; questo e il mio pensiero 
nn po'incredibll, ma altrettanto vero! 



ANDR CHfiNIEB 



33 



GERARD. 

Yes, we'll accept him. What is his 
name? 

OLD WOMAN. 
Albert Roger! 

GERARD. 
He'll be sent away to-night. 

OLD WOMAN (as she tearfully bids 

the lad good-bye.) 
Darling, good-bye! 
Take my darling boy! 
Who will give me an arm? 

(Groping for support, she is led 
out.) 

CHORUS (as they dance to the tune of 

the Carmagnole). 
Come dance and drink, good friends, 

to-day ; 

With song and wine drive care away ! 
The flagon fill that cheers the heart, 
And bids all sorrow swift depart. 
Drink, then, to Freedom's cause ! 
Down with the despot's laws! 
We'll dance the Carmagnole, 
Though loud the cannon roar ! 

SPY (approaching Gerard). 
The bird is in the snare ! 



She? 



GERARD. 



SPY. 



No, the man! 

He's at the Luxembourg. 



GERARD. 



Since when? 



SPY. 
Since this morning. 

GERARD. 
Why, how's that? 



SPY. 



GERARD. 
Where was he? 

SPY. 
At Passy, at his friend's. 



And she? 



GERARD. 



SPY. 



As yet, no trace of her ; 

But for the "she" the "he" has such 

attraction, 

That, if I'm not mistaken, 
She'll come back of her own accord. 



GERARD. 

Nay, she'll not come ! 
(Cries heard without.) 

SPY. 

Do you hear the street-lads selling pa- 
pers? 

(Boy passes shouting out, "Arrest 
of Andre Chenier!") 
That cry is bound to reach her ears ! 



GERARD. 



What of that? 



SPY. 



A mere chance ! 



When love-sick dame, complaining, 

Awaits her laggard lover, 

And trysting-time is over, 

What resource has she remaining? 

Alarm'd and most dejected 

To find herself neglected, 

If love won't bind him, 

She'll go herself and try to find him! 

Swift thro' the streets she's flying, 

And watching, waiting, prying 

Ha! There's a newsboy bawling; 

What's that he's calling? 

What name ? Oh, Heaven, his name ! 

Endow'd with courage stoic, 

By Love's tremendous pow'r, 

In grief's dark hour, 

Weak woman gains a fortitude heroic ! 

For Love she would risk all ! 

"Mark what I say ; 'tis true. 

Patience! She'll come to vou 

Before the fall of night. 

It sounds unlikely ; but I'm right : 



34 



ANDRfi CHfiNIER 



GERARD. 
Ah, ancor piu fieramente m'odiera! 

L'lNCREDIBILE. 

Che importa? Nella femmina 

vi sono assai distmi corpo e cuore ! 

Tu scegli il corpo! la parte mig- 

liore. 
Stendi 1'atto d'accusa! Andrea Che- 

nier 

Sia tosto al Tribunal, qui, deferito ! 
Fouquier Tinville aspetta. 

GERARD. 
Ah, se avvenisse... 

L'lNCREDIBILE. 

Scrivi !... 

GERARD. 
Ed essa... 

L'lNCREDIBILE. 

Scrivi !... 

GERARD. 
Esito dunque? Andrea Chenier se- 

gnato 
ha gia Fouquier Tinville ! II fato 

suo 
e fisso! Oggi o diman... 

(deponendo la penna) 
No, e vile ! Ii vile ! 

L'lNCREDIBILE. 

Oh, come vola il tempo !... Affollan gia 
le vie... 

GERARD. 

(riprende la penna; riflette). 
Nemico della patria?! 

(ride) 

veccia fiaba !... 

(scrive) 

Beatamente ognor la beve il popolo. 

(scrive) 

Nato a Constantinopoli ?... 

(riflette, poi esclama e scrive:) 

Straniero ! 

Studio a Saint-Cyr?... 

Soldato !... 

Di Dumouriez un complice? 

Traditore ! 

poeta? 

Sovvertitor di cuori e di costumi !... 

Poi... m' ha ferito?... Scrivo "odio po- 
litico !" 

(ma a quest' ultima accusa la penna 
gli fugge dalle tnani) 

Un di m' era di gioja passar fra 
morte e mnrie 



fra gli odi e le vendette, puro, inno- 
cent e e forte ! 

Da sangue or fango e lacrime la mia 
superba idea.. 

Un vil piccino io sono L. 

Gigante mi credea !... 

Io sono sempre un servo!... 

Ho mutato padrone !... 

Sono il servo obbediente di violenta 



passione 



Ah, peggioL. Uccido e tremo! 

Cosi fra sangue e fango 

senza coraggio passo, e, mentre uccido, 



10 piango 



10 della Redentrice figlio pel primo ho 

udito 

11 grido suo pel mondo e vi ho il mio 

frido unito... 
Or smarrita ho la fede_nel sognato 

destino?... 
Com* era irradi'ato di gloria il mio 

cammino !... 
La coscienza nei cuori ridestar de le 

genti!... 
Raccogliere le lacrime dei vinti e sof- 

ferenti !... 
Vincere le tenebre!... Diritto la Sa- 

pienza!... 
Dovere 1'Eguaglianza !... L'amore In- 

telligenza!... 
Fare del mondo un Pantheon!... Gli 

uomini in dii mutare 
e in un sol bacio e abbraccio tutte le 

genti amare !... 
Ah, di Chenier la voce fu, voce d" 

poeta 
che luminosa allora tracciata m'ha la 

meta. 
Or rinnego il poeta? Rinnego il san- 

to grido 

che m' ha redento? Ah in lui la 

mia coscienza uccido! 
Soll'odioL. L'odioL. L'odioL. Io 

d'odio ho colmo il cuore 
e chi cosi mi ha reso, fiera ironia! 

e 1'amore ! 
Sono un voluttuosoL. Ecco il novo 

padrone : 
il SensoL. Bugia tutto! Sol rero 

la Passione! 



L'lNCREDIBILE. 

Sta bene! Ove trovarti se.. 

GERARD. 

Qui resto! 

(Ulncredibile si allontana.) 



ANDRE CHNIER 



GERARD. 



The fiercer, then, her hate for me ! 



SPY. 

What matter? 

There are two parts to a woman 

Her body and her soul. 

You choose her body : of the two, 'tis 

the better! 

Now, draw up the indictment! 
Andre Chenier must be denounced to 

the Tribunal ! 
Fouquier-Tinville awaits him ! Write ! 

GERARD. 
But should it happen. . . . 



Write! 



That she. . 



SPY. 



GERARD. 



SPY. 



Do write, I say! 



GERARD (aside). 

Whv do I hesitate? 

Andre Chenier marked out by the At- 
torney-General ? 

Ah ! then his fate is seal'd to-day or 
to-morrow. 

(Throws down the pen.) 
No! 'tis vile! 

SPY. 

Haste! forjhe time is flying. 
And all the streets are throng'd. 



"Born at Constantinople ; an alien ; 

"Student at St. Cyr; a soldier; 

"and a traitor; Dumouriez's accom- 
plice ; a poet ; a dangerous man ; 
a sower of sedition." 

(The pen falls from his hand.) 

Time was when I rejoic'd 

That passions vile could never sway 
me; 

Innocent, pure, and brave, 

I deem'd myself a giant ; 

I'm still a slave! 

'Tis a mere change of masters ! 

I'm now but the bondsman of infam- 
ous passion! 

Worse than that! A murderer senti- 
mental, 

Who while he murders, weeps ! 

Son of the glorious Revolution, 

When first her cry "Be free!" rang 
thro' the world, 

To her voice my own then made re- 
ply: 

How have I fallen from my glorious 
pathway ! 

Once, like a line of radiant light it lay 
before me ! 

To establish the hearts of all my fel- 
low-comrades ; 

To bid the mourner weep no more, 

Console the weary sufFrer, 

Make of this world a Paradise, 

Where men should be as gods, divine ; 

To bind all comrades in one vast em- 
brace ! 

The holy task I now abandon. 

With hate my heart is fill'd ! 

What wrought this change? Irony 
grim! Twas Love! 

I'm a mere voluptuary ; 

The master I serve now is Passion ! 

All eke is false! The one thing real 
is Passion! 



GERARD (musingly). 
The "Enemy of his Country"? 
(Laughing.) 

Ah ! that's an old tale ; 
But one that never fails to touch the 
mob. 

(Writing.) 



SPY (reading the indictment). 

'Tis well! Where shall I find you, 
if 



GERARD. 
I shall be here ! 



(Exit Spyi) 



ANDRfi CMNIEK 



MADDALENA (entrando). 
Carlo Gerard? 

MATHIEU. 
Si;c'e! Entra! Stala! 

MADDALENA (con voce tremante). 
Se ancor vi sovvenite 
di me, non so! 
Son Maddalena di Coigny. 
Ah, non m'allontanate !... Deh, mi 
udite ! 

GERARD. 

lo t'aspettava ! lo ti voleva qui !... 
lo son che come veltri ho a te lanciato 
orde di spie! 
Entro a tntte le vie 
la mia pupilla e penetrata 
e ad ogni istante ! 

lo, per averti qui, preso ho il tuo 
amante ! 

MADDALENA. 
A voi ! Qui sto ! 
Signore, vendicatevi ! 

GERARD. 
Non odio ! 

MADDALENA. 

T ^ndicatevi ! Son 1' ultima 
Jel nome mio ! 

GERARD. 

Non odio ! 

MADDALENA. 

Perche, dunque, m' avete qui voluta? 
GERARD. 

Perche cio e scritto nella vita mia ! 

Perche cio e scritto nella vita tua! 

Perche cio voile il mio voler possente ! 

Era fatale, e, vedi, s' e avverato!... 

lo 1' ho voluto allora 

che tu piccina 

giu pel gran prato 

con me correvi lieta in quell'aroma 

d'erbi infiorate e di selvaggie rose! 

e poi lo volli il di che mi fu detto : 

''Ecco la tua livrea !" e, come fu la 

sera, 

^ntre tu studiavi il minuetto, 
I, gallonato e muto, 

aprivo o rinchiudevo una portiera... 

Ah, poscia un' altra sera io 1' ho vo- 
luto! 

Fu quella sera allor che dentro all' 
anima 

mi venne il gran disio di farti mia. 

Per te sognavo il genio !... Ma, ironip ! 

sovra altra fronts gia splendea : Ch~ 
nier! 



Ed il destin che trama le commedie 

de le diverse vite, quasi a prologo 

quella sera ci uniaL. Vidi il tuo 
amore ! 

Innamorato e odiando son fuggito !... 

e poscia no non m' ha Chenier ferito 

ma il grido tuo d'orrore, il tuo: Ge- 
rard !... 

Pure anche allora, e sempre, t' ho 
voluta ! 

La poesia in te cosi gentile, 

di me fa invece un pazzo grande e 
vile ! 

Ebben? Che importa? Sia! 

E, fosse un' ora sola, 

io voglio quell' ebbrezza 

de' tuoi occhi profondi! 

Io pur, io pur, io pur voglio affondare 

le mani mie nel mare 

de' tuoi capelli biondi !... 

Or dimmi che farai contro il mio 
amore ? 

MADDALENA. 
La... giii!... nella via corroL. II nome 

mio 
vi grido!... Ed e la morte che mi 

salva ! 

(Gerard va a frapporsi tra Madda- 
e le due uscite) 

GERARD. 
No, tu non lo farai ! No ! tuo mai- 

grado 
tu mia sarai! 

MADDALENO (gittando un grido di t er- 
ror e fugge; ma, presa da improvvisa 

idea, rnovendo risohita verso Gerard 

gJi dice:} 
Se de la vita sua 

tu fai prezzo il mio corpo... ebbene 
prendimi ! 

GERARD (da se). 
Come sa amare ! 

MADDALENA. 
La mamma morta 
m'hanno a la porta 
la de la stanza mia; 
moriva e mi salvava !... 
poscia a notte alta io con la 

Bersi errava, 
quando, ad un tratto, un livido bag- 

liore 
guizza e rischiara innanzi a' oassi 

miei 

la cupa via ! 
Guardo!... BrHava il loco di mia 

culla ! 



ANDRE CHfiNlER 



37 



MADELEINE (entering-.) 
Can I see Charles Gerard ? 

MATHIEU. 
Here, this way, please! 

MADELEINE. 

Maybe no longer you remember me? 
Who knows! I'm Madeleine de Coig- 

ny! 

Ah! drive me not away! 
Since, if you will not hear me, I am 

lost! 

GERARD. 

For you was I waiting; 
Tis I that brought you here; 
'Tis I that have beset your path 
With swarms of crafty spies! 
Watching in street and by-way, 
Mine eye at ev'ry moment 
Was always fixed upon you; 



Thus, to secure 
your lover! 



you, 1 have seized 



MADELEINE. 
Well, here am I ! Take your revenge J 

GERARD. 
Nay, not revenge! 

MADELEINE. 

Takee your revenge. I am the last 
survivor of my house. 

GERARD. 
Nay, not revenge ! 

MADELEINE. 

Then wherefore would you have me 
here? 



Thro' fragrant /ane in blossom, 

Adorn'd with wilding roses ! 

For you I long'd that day they told 

me: 

"Here! don thy liv'ry" 
And when at evening, 
As there you practis'd the measure 

of a minuet, 
I, rigid, mute, in liv'ry, 
Threw back or closed the curtains at 

the doorway. 

And now, once more do I desire you! 
It is the charm, the poetry of your 

presence 
That doth enrage me, goad me on to 

madness! 

What matter ? Be it so! 
Tho' 'twere but one short hour, 
I'll feast me on the beauty of those 

eyes enthralling! 

I, too, I hunger for your soft car- 
esses 
Would plunge my hand within the 

ocean 

Of those bright golden tresses! 
Say, who shall save you now from my 

great love? 

MADELEINE. 

I'll rush thro' all the streets, 
Denounce myself to the mob! 
From death, say, who shall save me, 
then? 

GERARD barring her passage . 
That you shall never do! 
A_h! tho' you hate me, you are mine! 

MADELEINE (shrieks and endeavors to 
escape; then, suddenly, with great 
calmnes, she aproaches him. ) 

If you will save his life 
At the price of my honor 
I am yours! Take me! 



GERARD. 

Why would I have your here? 

Because I desire you ! 

Because 'tis written thus i' the book 

of Fate; 
Because my will would have it so, my 

will supreme 
'Tis Fate's decree; and lo! 'tis come 

to pass! 
For you I long'd while yet a little 

maid. 

With me you wander' u 
A -down the daisied meadows 



Ah ! 



GERARD (aside) 
how she loves him! 



MADELEINE. 
Ere death had taken 
My darling mother 
Leaving me forsaken, 
In dying, she strove to save me ! 
In darkest midnight I fled with Bersi; 
The suddenly a lurid glare 
Lit up the path that lay before. 
The cruel flames my home devour'd, 



ANDRfi CHfiNIER 



Cosi fui sola!... E intorno il nulla! 

Fame e miseria!... 

II bisogno e il periglio !... 

Caddi malata!... 

E Bersi, buona e pura, 

(ed a narrarlo mancan le parole) 

ha del suo corpo fatto 

u n mercato, un contralto 

per me ! Porto sventura 

a chi bene mi vuole ! 

Fu in quel dolore 

che a me venne Tamore!... 

Voce gentile piena d'armonia 

che mi susurra : "Spera !" 

e dice : "Vivi ancora ! lo son la vita ! 

Ne' miei occhi e il tuo cielo ! 

Tu non sei sola! Le lagrime tue 

10 le raccolgoL. lo sto sul tuo cam- 

mino 

e ti cr >rreggo il fianco 
affaticato e stance!... 
Sorridi e spera ancora!... Son 

1'amore !... 
Intorno e sangue e fango?... lo son 

divino!... 

lo sonojl paradise!... lo son 1'oblioL. 
lo sono il dio 
che sovra il mondo scende da Tem- 

pireo, 

muta gli umani in angioli, 
fa della terra il ciel !... 
lo son 1'amore ! 
L'angiol tremante allor le labbra 

smorte 
della mia bocca bacia... E or vi bacia 

la morte!... 

Corpo di moribonda e il corpo mio ! 
Prendilo, dunque L. lo son gia morta 

cosa!... 

GERARD (guardando del fogli che gli 

z'engono consegnati). 
Perduto ! 
Ah, la mia vita per salvarlo ! 

MADDALENA. 

Voi lo potete !... Appena stamattina 
egli arrestato fu. 

GERARD. 
Ma per Chenier 

rn uomo che 1'odiava ha preparato 
per oggi il suo giudizio... la sua 

morte!... 

(A un tratto dalla strada viene un 
mormorio, un bisblglio di folia.) 

La folia gia!... La maledetta folia 
curiosa ed avida di sangue e lacrime. 
(Rumore del fucili e delle baionette} 
Sono i gendarmi !... 
E la sta gia Chenier! 



MADDALENA (disperatamente) 
Salvatelo! Salvatelo! Salvateloi 

GERARD. 

Ah, la Rivoluzione i figli suoi 
divora !... Non perdona !... Fin di 

sangue 
per tutti... 

(scrivendo un biglictto at Vice Pre- 
sident e Dumas.) 

10 1'ho perduto?... Lo difendero! 

11 tuo perdono e la mia forza! lo 

spero ! 

(// pubblico, si rovescia fumycltu&nte, 
nnnoroso, cccitato, ncll' auto.) 

CORO DI VECCHIE 

Mamma Cadet!... 

Presso alia sbarra, qui ! 

Di qui si vede e si ode 

a perfezione. 

Qui si gode 

la vista d'ogni cosa. 

Voi state bene? 

Si. 

E voi? 

Cosi... cosi... 

Dal mercato venite?... 

Vengo dalla barriera !... 

Notizie ce ne avete?... 

No ! E voi nulla sapete?.* 

Hanno cresciuto il pane!... 

Eh lo so... e un tiro... 

Dite! 

un tiro di quel cane 

d'inglese detto Pitt ! 



Venite ? 



Si! 



LTN'ALTRA. 



L' A MIC A. 



MATHIEU. 

Un po' di discrezione, 
cittidina !... 

CORO DI VECCHIE 

Piu in la ! 

Venite qua, 

cittadina !... 

Dite, oggidi 

grande infornata, pare! 

Si. 
Molti ex ! 

(Entrano giudici e giurati) 



ANDRfi CHfiNIER 



39 



And i was homeless, with nought be- 
fore me 

But hunger, misery, and peril dire ! 

Then I fell sick, and Bersi nurs'd me, 

On me spent all her savings, noble 
soul! 

To such as love me, see, I bring mis- 
fortune ! 

'Twas in such sorrow 

That first I heard the voice of Love ! 

In accents sweet, it murmur'd : 

"The Star of Love shall guide thee, 

"E'en tho' grief betide thee ! 

"Love, the immortal fire from heaven, 

"Boon to mourners given, 

"Love's self am I; oh, hear me call- 
ing: 

"I'll guard thee, guide thee, save thee 
from falling ! 

"Hope on, hope ever! 

"Love fails thee never! 

"Tho' dark the road, and foes assail 
thee, 

"I will not fail thee ; 

"I am Love whose magic pow'r, 

"My name is Love ! 

"Like golden sunlight falling from the 
skies, 

"All this world can change to Para- 
dise! 

"Love's very self am I !" 

And then the angel kiss'd me : 

In me that hour the light of life did 
die! 

Take me, then, take me ; but a corpse 
am I! 

(Papers are handed to Gerard.) 

GERARD (reading). 

He's lost. I'd give my life to save 
him! 

MADELEINE. 

5\h ! you can save him ! 

IThis morning only was he arrested ! 

GERARD. 

But one who hates him 

Has hurried on his case for trial ; 

[And he must die! 

(Sounds of the noisy crowd heard 
without.) 

The cruel mob comes back, 
Athirst for blood and .tears and car- 
nage ! 



(Clatter of soldiers' arms.) 

Do you hear their sabres clanking? 
They're the gendarmes ; they've got 
him, in there! 

MADELEINE (despairingly). 
All ! save him ! 

GERARD. 

Thus doth the Revolution 
Devour the sons that serve her ! 

(Writing a note for presentation to 
the President of the Court.) 
Your sweet forgiveness shall make me 

bold! 

Courage ! 'tis not too late ; 
I'll save him, if I can! 

(The mob now noisily enters the 

Court.) 

CHORUS. 

Well, how are you ? 

I'm just so-so ! 

Have you come back from market? 

No, from the barrier. 

You've heard the news ? No ! 

Not heard the news? 

They've raised the price of bread! 

Yes, yes ! I know ! 

They say 'tis all that scoundrel, 

That English villain, Pitt ! 

ONE OF THEM. 
Are you coming? 



A FRIEND. 



Here I am! 



MATHIEU. 

Now, then, what a noise you're mak- 
ing! 

CHORUS OF OLD WOMEN. 

Mother Cadet! sit by the barrier, 

here! 
Here's the best place for seeing and 

hearing ! 

Come over here, good Mother Babet! 
Here one sees things to perfection. 
There'll be lots of prisoners! 
There's Legray ! And a poet ! Come 

this way! 
Move up, do ! No, I sha'n't ! 

(Enter the fudges and Jury.) 



ANDR CHfiNIER 



MATHIEU. 
K c' e un poeta ! 
i'asso ai giurati, o popolo ! 

GERARD (a Maddalena). 
Eccoli, i giudici. 

LE MERCATINE (si kvano ritte sulle 
panche esaminando i giudici). 

Chi presiede e Dumas !... 

ALTRI (nominando i giudici.) 

Vilate... 

MERCATINE. 

... pittore ! 

Valtro e lo stampatore 

tribune Nicolas!... 

UNA VOCE. 
Ecco laggiu FouquierL. 

TUTTI. 
L'accusatore pubblico!... 

MADDALENA (a Gerard). 
E gli accusati?... 

GERARD (indicando la porta). 
Di la... presso ai giurati ! 
MADDALENA (vedendo schiudersi la 

porta, soffocando un grido). 
Ecco... 

GERARD. 
Tacete ! 

MADDALENA. 

Mi manca 1'anima! 

(Entrano i prigionieri) 

MADDALENA. 
Egli non guarda!... Non mi crede 

qui!... 

Ma pensa a me ! lo sono in quel pen- 
siero!... 

MATHIEU. 
Silenzio ! 

DUMAS (leggendo i nomi). 
Gravier de Vergennes. 

FOUOUIER TINVILLE (legendo una 

nota). 
Un ex referendario ! 

(fa un rapid o gesto e rip one la 
nota) 

PUBBLICO. 
Ii un traditore! 

(sue cede un silenzio profondo) 

DUMAS (legge un altro nome)... 
Laval Montmorerc-- .. 



FOUQUIER-TINVILLE (c. S.) . 

Convento di Montmartre! 

CALZETTAJE, MERCATINE, PESCIVEN- 

DOLE (urlano). 
Aristocratica ! 

IL PUBBLICO (le grida ironico). 
A che parlar?... Sei vecchia!... Taci 

DUMAS. 
Ti tolgo la parola! Abbiamo fretta! 

(La monaca lascia cadere uno 
sguardo di sprezzo poi siede digni- 
tosa. // pubblico la applaude deri- 
dendola.) 

DUMAS (c. s.) 
Legray ! 

(Si leva una donna giovane che 
vuol parlare ma e zittita dal pubblico e 
si lascia .cadere sulla panca plan* 
gendo. ) 

DUMAS. 
Andrea Chenier! 

GERARD (a Maddalena). 
Coraggio ! 

MADDALENA (guardandv Chenier). 
O amore ! o amore ! 

PUBBLICO. 
Ecco, e il poeta ! 

Fouquier Tinville attentamente legge I 
Lunga e Taccusa dunque ! 
un accusato 
pericoloso ? 
Si! 

MATHIEU. 
Scrittore... e basta ! 

FOUQUIER TINVILLE. 
Andrea Chenier, poeta giornalista. 
Costui violento scrisse contro 

uomini 

de la Rivoluzione. Fu soldato 
con Dumouriez e... 



PUBBLICO. 



Un traditor! 



CHENIER (a Fouquier Tinville). 
Tu menti! 

GERARD (fra se, terribile, con disperd* 

zione a Maddalena). 
Ah, Maddalena, io sono che cio fecif 

DUMAS (a Chenier). 
Siedit : e tac: ! 



ANDR CHENIER 



MATHIEU. 
Make way for the jury ! 

GERARD (to Madeleine). 
Those are the judges. 

CHORUS. 

Here they come, the judges! 
That's the President Dumas! 
There's Vilate, the painter ! 
The other one's a printer, Tribune 

Nicolas ! 

See ! there he goes ! That's Fouquier, 
The great Attorney-General! 

MADELEINE (to Gerard). 
Where are the accused? 

GERARD (pointing to door). 
In there, next to the jury ! 

MADELEINE (as the door opens). 
Heavens ! My courage fails me ! 

(The prisoners enter; Chenier 
walks last.) 

He does not heed us! 
Perchance he thinks of me ! 



MATHIEU. 



Silence ! 



DUMAS (reading out the names.) 
Gravier de Vergennes 

FOUQUIER-TINVILLE (consulting his 

notes.) 
An ex-Chancery officer! 

(Motions the accused to be seated.) 

CHORUS. 
Then he's a traitor! 

DUMAS (reading). 
Laval Montmorency 

FOUQUIER-TINVILLE. 

From the convent of Mont-Martre! 



CHORUS. 

A cursed aristocrat ! 

Best hold your tongue, you hug ! 

Silence ! Die ! Ha ! ha ! ha ! 

FOUQUlER-TlNVILLE. 

I can't let you speak ; we are in ? 
hurry. 

GERARD (to Madeleine.) 

DUMAS (reading). 
Legray 

(A woman rises, and would speak, 
but is silenced by the mob. She 
sinks back, sobbing piteously.) 

DUMAS (reading). 
Andre Chenier 



Courage ! 

MADELEINE (gazing at Chenier). 
Belov'd one! 

CHORUS. 

There's the poet ! 

Fouquier-Tinville reads the charge 

with interest; 
No doubt that he's a dang'roiis fellow. 

MATHIEU. 
A writer that's all! 

FOUQUlER-TlNVILLE. 

He has written against the Revolu- 
tion ; 
Was a soldier with Dumouriez 

CHORUS. 
He's a traitor! 

CHENIER (to Fouquier). 
You lie! 

GERARD (to Madeleine.) 
'Twas I who thus denounc'd himl 



DUMAS (to Chenier.) 



Silence ! 



4 2 



ANDRE CHNIER 



Parti f 



GERARD (fortissimo). 



ALCUNI. 



Parli! 



Parli! 



TUTTI (inter essan dosi) . 



DUMAS (violento). 
No, nego la parola! 



TUTTI. 



Parli! Parli! 



CHENIER. 

Si, fui soldato 

e gloriosa affrontata 

ho la morte che vil qui mi vien data. 

Fui letterato, 

ho fatto di mia penna arma feroce 

contro gli ipocriti ! 

Colla mia voce 

ho cantato la patria ! 

Pura la vita mia 

passa nella mia mente 

come una bianca vela ; 

essa inciela 

le antenne, ali allargate 

ad tin eterno volo, 

al sole che le indora, 

e affonda 

la spumante prora 

ne 1'azzurro dell'onda... 

Va la mia nave spinta dalla sorte 

a la scogliera bianca de la morte?... 

Son giunto?... E sia! 

Ma ancor io salgo a poppa e una ban- 
diera 

trionfal disciolgo ai venti ! 

De' mille e mille miei combattimenti 

e la bandiera e su vi e scritto : "Pa- 
tria !" 

(verso Fouquier Tinville) 

A lei non sale 

il tuo fango, o Fouquier! 

Essa ognora s' insola 

immacolata. 

Essa e immortale! 

Non sono un traditore. 

Uccidi? E sia! Ma lasciami 1'onore. 

FOUQUIER TINVILLE (subito). 
Udiamo i testimoni! 

GERARD (con voce fiossente), 
II passo datemU 
Carlo Gerard. 



DUMAS. 
Sta bene ; puoi parlare. 

GERARD. 
L'atto d'accusa e orribile menzogna, 

FOUQUIER TINVILLE (sorpreso). 
Setu Thai scritto?! 

GERARD. 

E ho denunciato il falso 
Or lo confesso. 

(un gran movimento) 

FOUQUIER TINVILLE. 
Io non ti credo ! 



GERARD. 



Giuro ! 



DUMAS. 
Dinne il perche. 

GERARD. 
L' odiavo! 

DUMAS. 
Non ti credo ! 

FOUQUIER TINVILLE (levandosi rittQ 
c picchiando febbrilmente sul foglio 
scritto da Gerard). 

Mie faccio queste accuse e le rinnovo ! 

DUMAS. 
Ti do il consiglio di tacerti ! 

GERARD. 
No! 
II tuo consiglio e una vilta ! 

FOUQUIER TINVILLE. 
Tu offendi 
la patria e la giustizia ! 

IL PUBBLICO. 
Basta ! Taci ! 
Imponigli silenzio tu, o Dumas! 

MERCATINE. 
In istato d'accusa dichiaratelo ! 

SANCULOTTI. 
Si ; fuori della legge ! 

TUTTI. 

Alia lanterna 
Esso e un sospetto! 
Fu comprato ! 
Taci! 



ANDRfi CHfiNIER 43 

GERARD, FOUQUIER-TINVILLE. 

Tis well ! Speak ! 

GERARD, 

The indictment is a monstrous lie! 

FOUQUIER-TINVILLE (astonished) . 
Twas you who wrote it ! 

GERARD. 
But the charge is a false one, I coi 



Let him speak! 

CHORUS. 
Speak, then ! Prove you're not guilty ! 

DUMAS. 
I will not allow it ! 

CHORUS, 
Let him speak! 



CHENIER. 

Aye, as a soldier 

Once I faced a glorious death, 

Not such a vile one as you offer! 

I was a writer ; a'nd I made my pen a 
scourge 

Wherewith to lash all lying hypocrites ! 

And, as a poet, ever sang my coun- 
try's praise. 

Life was for me a ship 

Set in a boundless ocean 

With snowy sail outspread 

To catch the morning glory ; 

It rode upon the crested waves, 

Forth to remote horizons. 

Now is my bark the sport of Fate, 

And driven upon the rocks, 

The ghostly rocks of Death. 

Will it founder? Maybe! 

But lo ! from the mast 

Floats a bright banner triumphant in 
the breeze ; 

Thereon is writ, "My Country!" 

(to Fouquier-Tinville.) 

Your filth shall never soil that banner ! 
In truth am I no traitor ! 
Kill me, 'tis well! But leave my ho- 
nour bright! 

FOUQUIER-TINVILLE. 

Now we'll hear the witnesses ! 

GERARD (forcing a passage through 
the crowd) . 

Let me pass ! I'm Gerard ! 



fess it! 



(Sensation). 



FOUQUIER-TINVILLE. 
I don't believe it. 

GERARD. 
I swear it is true. 

FOUQUIER-TINVILLE. 

Why did you do that, then? 

GERARD. 
I hated him. 

DUMAS. 
I don't believe it. 

FOUQUIER-TINVILLE. 

(Pounding the papers containing the. 
indictment. ) 

I, too, have made these charges, 
Now I repeat them ! 

DUMAS. 
I advise you to keep silent. 

GERARD. 
Then such an act is vile! 

FOUQUIER-TINVILLE. 

Tis an insult to country, to justice' 
Enough! 

THE AUDIENCE. 
Let Dumas silence him ! 

FISHWIVES. 
Indict him! 



Outlaw him ! 



SANCULOTS. 



ALL. 



Ha! most suspicious! They've brib'd 

him! 
Silence! 



ANDRfi CHfiNIER 



GERARD. 

La patria? La giustizia osi tu dire? 
La tua Giustizia ha nome Tirannia ! 
L'amore della patria?! Qui?L. No, 

e un' orgia 
d' odi e vendette !... II sangue della 

patria 
qui cola !... E siam noi stessi che 

feriamo 

il petto della Francia !... 
Basti il sangue ! 

Andrea Chenier della Rivoluzione 
e figlio! P. il figlio piu glorioso 

suo !... 

MERCATINE e CALZETTAJE. 
Con gli accusati tosto giudicatelo ! 
Alia lanterna! 
Morte ! 
Alia lanterna ! 

(lontano rullare i tamburi) 

GERARD. 

Laggiu, e ia patria! Odila, o popolo! 
la sua voce!... 
Eccola!... E la la patria; 
ove si muore colla spada in pugno! 
Non qui dove le uccidi i suoi poeti ! 
(Gerard corre a Chenier e lo abbrac- 
cia. ) 

CHENIER. 

O generoso ! O grande !.. Vedi ?... lo 
piango ! 

GERARD. 

Guarda laggiu !... Ouel bianco viso... 
lei! 

CHENIER. 
Lei? 

MaddalenaL. Ancor 1'ho riveduta! 
Or muojo lieto ! 

GERARD. 
lo spero ancora ! 

(i giurati rientrano.) 

DUMAS. 

(da una rapida occhiata al verdetto). 
Morte ! 

FOUOUIER TlNVILLE. 

Via i condannati ! 

MADDALENA. 
(went re Chenier esce) 
Andrea !. . 
Rivederlo i... 

CAT. A i A TFLA 



QUADRO QUARTO 

(// cortile delle prigioni di San Laz~ 
zaro a mezzanotte. Andrea Che 
nier scrive a tavoiino Roucher gli 
e vicino.) 

SCHMIDT (a Rouchert). 
Cittadino, men duol, ma e tardi assai. 

ROUGHER (dandogli del denaro). 
Pazienta ancora un attimo!.., 

CHENIER. (cessa di scrivere). 
Xon piu... 



Ah, leggiL. 



Pochi versi... 



ROUGHER. 



CHENIER. 



ROUGHER. 



Lesgi ! Leggi ! 

CHENIER. 

Come un bel di di maggio 

che con bacio di vento : e carezza di 

raggio 

si spegne in firmamentc, 
col bacio io d'una rima, 
carezza di poesia salgo 1'estrema ci- 

ma 

de Tesistenza mia. 
La sfera che cammina 
per ogni umana sorte ecco gia mi 

avvicina 

all'ora della morte, 
e forse pria che I'ultima 
mia strofe sia finita, in'amninciere 

il carnefiice 
la fine della vita. 

(con grande entusiasmc^ 

Sia! Strofe, tiltima Dea, 

da ancor al tuo poeta la sfolgorante 

idea, 

la fiamma consueta ; 
io, a te, mentre tu vivida 
a me sgorghi dal ctiore, claro pe^ ri-* 

ma il bacio 
r.ltimo di chi muore. 

(Roucher e Chenier st abbracciano e t>oi 
si separano. ) 



ANDR CHNIER 



45 



GERARD. 

Here, all your justice is but cruel 
tyranny ! 

An orgie vile of hate and vengeance ! 

Can such as you be counted patriots? 

Bloodthirsty villains, ye, who stab the 
heart of France ! 

Chenier's a son of the glorious Re- 
volution ; 

Crown him with laurel, never let him 
die! 

(A sound of drums heard without.) 

Hear ye it, citizens? 

There speaks the real Fatherland, 

Whose gallant sons all perish for her 

now! 
Not here, where they are murdering 

her poets! 

(Rushes to Chenier and embraces 
him.) 

CHENIER. 
Oh, noble heart and gen'rous ! See 



my tears! 



(Exeunt Jurats) 



GERARD. 

Look, over there, yon pallid face ! Tis 
she! 

CHENIER. 

She ? Madeleine ? 
I've seen her once again! 
Now I die happy! 
(The jury come back into court.) 

GERARD. 
I yet have hope ! 

DUMAS 

(glancing at the verdict handed to 

him by the foreman). 
Death I 

FoUQUIER-TlNVILLE. 

Lead them away. 

MADELEINE 

(as Chenier is lead away). 
Andre! Andre! Farewell! 

CURTAIN, 



ACT IV. 

(The Courtyard of the Prison of Si. 
Lazare at midnight. Andre Chenier 
seated at a table, writing. Roucher 
is beside him.) 

SCHMIDT (to Roucher). 
I'm sorry, but the hour is late! 

ROUGHER (giving him money). 
Nay, wait a moment longer! 

CHENIER (as he stops writing). 

Tis done! 
Verses ? 



CHENIER, 
Just a few lines. 



Read them! 



ROUGHER. 



CHENIER. 



"Like summer day that closes 
"While the breezes are sighing 
"All for love of the roses, 
"In dreamy twilight dying; 
"So now my life hath ending, 
"As yet one last kiss tender 
"The Muse doth now accord me 
"Ere I to Death surrender. 
"The joys of life are over; 
"Fond Hope doth now forsake me ; 
"Love is lost to the lover; 
"Lo! cruel Death must take me. 
"As in these lines the Heav'nly Muse 
"Farewell to me is calling, 
"The headsman grim shall summon me 
"To meet my doom appalling! 
( with gt ca t en th usiasm . ) 
"Hail! Poetry, glorious goddess! 
"Unto thy votary, oh! grant, I pra;' 

thee, 
"The living flame of fancy, the fir 

sublime, immortal ! 
"Behold this song I bring to thee, 
"Blent with my sighing, 
"Let one last strain of melody 
"Greet thee from poet, dying!" 
(Roucher and Chenier embrace and then 
Part.) 



ANDR CHfiNIER 



(Si picchia al portone della prigione. 

Entrano Gerard, e Maddalena.) 
SCHMIDT (gli s'inchina deferente.) 
Tu qui, Gerard? 

GERARD. 

Viene a costei concesso 
un ultimo colloquio... 

SCHMIDT (interrompendolo). 
II condannato ?... 
II nome? 

MADDALENA. 
Andrea Chenier! 

SCHMIDT. 
Sta ben ! 
Attendi ! 

MADDALENA (a Gerard, risohtta) 
II vostro giuramento vi sovvengo! 

(rivolgendosi a Schmidt). 
Odi ! Fra i condannati di dimani 
e una giovane donna. 

SCHMIDT. 
La legray! 

MADDALENA. 
Or ene... viver deve! 

SCHMIDT. 

Cancellare 

or come da la lista il nome suo? 

MADDALENA. 

Che importa il nome se in sua vece 
un' altra per lei rispondera? 

SCHMIDT. 
Sta ben!... Ma, e 1'altra? 

MADDALENA. 
Eccola ! 

.SCHMIDT. 
Come?!... Lei?... 
Tu, cittadina? 

MADDALENA. 

(a Schmidt porgendos.il pochi giojelli 
e una piccola borsa contenente al- 
cttin hiigi). 

A vox!... Giojelli son!... Questo e de- 
naro. 

SCHMIDT. 

Evento strano in tempo di assegnati ! 
lo non vorrei... 
Capite?... lo non so nulla!... 
(A Maddalena) 

Al nome di Legray... salite in fretta !... 

(esw) 



GERARP. 

O Maddalena, tu fai della morte 
la piu invidiata sorte ! 

MADDALENA. 
Benedico il destino ! 
Benedico la morte ! 

GERARD. 

SalvarliL. Ancor da Robespierre!.- 
Ancora ! 

(esce) 
(Schmidt ritorno con Chenier). 

CHENIER. 

Vicino a te s'aqueta 
1'irrequieta anima mia; 
tu sei la meta 
d'ogni desio e bisogno 
e d'ogni sognp 
e d'ogni poesia!... 
Entro al tuo sguardo 
Tiridescenza scerno 
de li spazi infiniti, lo son gia eterno! 
Ti guardo; 

e in questo fiotto verde 
di tua larga pupilla erro coiranima IU. 
Questa e la luce arcana 
delle plaghe serene!... 
Mi avvolge ! Si allontana 
lungi e si perde 

ogni ricordo di cose terrene!... 
Tu sei la poesia 

che alfin si dona tutta al suo poeta I 
Tu sei la meta 
dell'esistenza mia ! 
II nostro e amore d'anime! 

MADDALENA. 
II nostro e amore d'anime! 

CHENIER. 

Che tu viva se muojo, di', che vale? 
I'anima immortale; 
ovunque tu sarai, si, io la saro! 

MADDALENA. 
Per non lasciarti 
son qui; non e un addio! 
Vengo a morire, 
vengo a morire anch'io 
con te!... 
Fini il soffrire .... 
La morte neH'amarti!... 
Chi la parola estrema 
dalle labbra raccoglie 
e Lui... 1'Amor! Come gemine foglie 
da Talbero di vita 
cadiamo e il vento 

ne avvolge insieme dentro alia mfimita 
luce del firmamento !... 



ANDR CHNIER 



47 



(Knocking heard without. Enter Ge- 
rard #nd Madeleine}. 

SCHMIDT (lowing respectfully.} 
You here, Gerard? 

GERARD. 

This lady is permitted to have a final 
interyiew with 

SCHMIDT (interrupting). 

Which prisoner? 
Tell me his name. 



MADELEINE 
A^dre Chenier! 

SCHMIDT. 
11s well ! Wait ! 

MADELEINE (to Gerard). 

The oath that you have sworn to me 
remember ! 

(to Schmidt.) 

Listen! Among those who are to die 
to-morrow, there is a young wo- 
man! 



SCHMIDT. 



Yes, Legray! 



MADELEINE. 
Well, mark you, she must live ! 

SCHMIDT. 

fvit how from the death-roll can I 
now strike off her name? 

MADELEINE. 

Tru- name is nothing, if, when she's 
called, another should reply ! 

SCHMIDT. 
And who is that other? 



MADELEINE. 



Tis I ! 



SCHMIDT. 
You? Yot* \vouia replace her* 



MADELEINE (giving jewels and gold.) 

See, here! I'll give you these! Mo- 
ney and jewels! 

SCHMIDT. 

Tis an evil wind that blows no good 
to some one! 

(to Gerard). 

I hardly like to risk it! 

Well there ! I know nothing ! 

(to Madeleine.) 

But when I call for Legray, at once 
come forward! 

GERARD. 

Oh ! Madeleine thy love victorious 
Make shameful death most glorious ! 

MADELEINE. 

Blessed Fate that requites us! 
Blessed Death that unites us ! 

GERARD (aside). 

How to save them ? I'll go once more 
tc Robespierre! 

(Exit.} 

(Schmidt returns with Chenier.) 

CHENIER. 

From thee, belov'd, my restless soul 
New joy and peace doth borrow ; 
The goal art thou of my desire, 
The solace of my sorrow ; 
In thy blue eyes gazing, 
All Heav'n appears before me. 
Starry spaces, bright and boundless ; 
The gates are they, the shining portal 
Of a fair realm immortal. 
Where I with thee would dwell ! 



MADELEINE, 
Our love is of the soul, 



CHENIER. 
Tis thou that art the life of me 

MADELEINE. 

With thee I'll stay to tne lasv 

Nor say farewell ! 

With thee to die have I come! 



ANDR CHfiNIER 



In quell'ora suprema 
de 1'ultimo cammino 
ogni dolor finisce 
col tuo bacio; il divinoL. 
Ah, se anche e del carnefice 
la man che insiem ci unisce, 
quella sua mano e pia 
se la tua boca tocca 
la morta bocca mia. 
Salvo una madre! Maddalena all'alba 
ha nome per la morte Idia Legray ! 
Vedi ? La luce incerta del crepuscolo 
giu pe'squallidi androni gia lumeggia. 
Abbracciami, mio amante! Amante, 
baciami ! 

CHENIER. 

Orgoglio di bellezza! 
Trionfo tu de Tanima ! 
O mia fortnna il premio 
di questa tua carezza ! 
Tl tuo amore, sublime amante, e mare, 
e ciel, luce di sole e d'astri... il 
mondo ! 

CHENIER. 
La nostra morte e il trionfo d'amore ! 

MADDALENA. 
La nostra morte e il trionfo d'amore! 

CHENIER. 
Viva la morte! 

MADDALENA. 
Viva la morte! 



CHENIER. 



la morte! 



MADDALENA. 
la morte! 

CHENIER. 
Fllla viene col sole! 

MADDALENA. 
Ella vien col mattino! 

CHENIER. 
Benedico la sorte! 

MADDALENA 
Benedico il destine! 

CHENIER. 
Vien come 1'Aurora... 

* MADDALENA. 

Col sole che la inc^rr. \ 



CHENIER. 

Ne viene a noi dal cielo 
velata entro ad un velo... 

MADDALENA. 
fatto di rose e viole ! 

CHENIER. 
Viene la misteriosa! 

MADDALEKA. 
La eterna innammorata! 

CHENIER. 
Viene la Eterna Cosa... 

MADDALENA. 
La amante immacolata! 



La fronte essa mi sfiora 
come raggio d'aurora! 

MADDALENA. 
Ci bacia e ci accarezza 
lene si come brezza! 

CHENIER. 

Come una brezza lene 
la morte, eccola, viene ! 

CHENIER e MADDALENA. 
(abbracdati I'uno all'altro). 
Nell'ora che si muore 
eterni diveniamo!... 
Eternamente amiamoL. 
Morte e infinite, e amore!... 
SCHMIDT , GENDARMI, SECONDINI 

(ripetono forte il nome appellate da! 
I'Usciere). 

Andrea Chenier! 

CHENIER. 
Son io! 

SCHMIDT, GENDARMI, SECONDIN. 
Idia Legray! 

MADDALENA. 

(si fa arditamente innanzi). 
Son io! 

CHENIER. 
Inni alia morte! 

MADDALENA. 
Viva la morte! 

(si avviano al patibolo) 

CALA LA TELA. 



ANDR CHSNIER 



All suffering ended! By death to thee 

united ! 

Let the last word upon my lips be this : 
"I love thee!" 
When comes the morning, 
Madeleine goes to death as Idia Le- 

gray! 

CHENIER. 
Pride of beauty. 
Triumph of the soul ! 
Thee, my happy thought, 
The prize of my good luck! 
Thy love, my queen, is for me 
A sea, a heaven, a sun,... 
The very light of day,. . 'tis all ! 

CHENIER. 
(3ur death is love's triumph! 

MADELEINE. 
Our death is the crown of love! 

CHENIER. 
I welcome Death ! 

MADELEINE. 
Welcome, welcome! 

CHENIER. 
Jt is coming! 

MADELEINE. 
Death is coming! 

CHENIER. 
It is coming with the sur. beams! 

MADELEINE. 
Death comes in the wake of morn 

CHENIER. 
Happy is my lot! 

MADELEINE. 
Blessed is destimy ! 

CHENIER. 
Death comes on the wing of dawn! 

MADELEINE. 
With the morning golden light! 

CHENIER. 

From heaven to us it comes! 
Shr -tided in a wondrous veil..., 



MADELEINE. 
Of violets and roses fair. 

CHENIER. 
There it comes, the misterious 

MADELEINE. 
The ever restful Death! 

CHENIER. 
There comes the everlasting end. 

MADELEINE. 
The beloved maiden pure ! 

CHENIER. 

She, with her 1 ps my forehead smites 
Like the morning rays of dawn 1 

MADELEINE. 

Her loving fond embraces 
New joy and peace afford. 

CHENIER. 

New joys and peace affords us 
Kind Death, ... Here it comes! 

(Chenier and Madeleine embrac ; 

The passing of our lives 
Is the dawn of our eternal love ! 
Love be our everlasting bond ! 
And Death immortal love ! 

SCHMIDT, GENDARMES AND GUARDS 

{calling the prisoners, ) 
Andre Chenier. 

CHENIER. 

Tis I! 

SCHMIDT, GENDARMES AND GUARD? 
Idia Legray ! 

MADELEINE. 
(boldly coming forward.) 

Tis I! 

CHENIER. 

Let us to death, united 
Raise our song ! 

MADELEINE 
O, blissful Death i 

(They go out to the scaffold , 
CURTAIN 



Maria Jeritza 

Writes of the KNABE 

OFFICIAL PIANO of the METROPOLITAN 
OPERA COMPANY 

ff l love the Knabe Piano. 
Rehearsing in my apart- 
ment or on the concert 
platform it is my 
staunch support. I 
revel in its en- 
chanting tone.' 





Knabe Pianos 
range in Price 
from $875. Pay- 
ments may be ex- 
tended over a period 
of two years. Any make 
of piano taken in exchange. 



AMPICO HALL 
FIFTH AVENUE AT 47th STREET 





ML Giordano, Umberto 
50 c Andrea Ch^nier. 

G496A52 Libretto. English & Italian 
1921 Andr* Chewier Rev. ed. 

Muiic 



PLEASE DO NOT REMOVE 
CARDS OR SLIPS FROM THIS POCKET 

UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO LIBRARY