(navigation image)
Home American Libraries | Canadian Libraries | Universal Library | Community Texts | Project Gutenberg | Children's Library | Biodiversity Heritage Library | Additional Collections
Search: Advanced Search
Anonymous User (login or join us)
Upload
See other formats

Full text of "A New and Complete Italian Grammar ..."

This is a digital copy of a book that was preserved for generations on library shelves before it was carefully scanned by Google as part of a project 
to make the world's books discoverable online. 

It has survived long enough for the copyright to expire and the book to enter the public domain. A public domain book is one that was never subject 
to copyright or whose legal copyright term has expired. Whether a book is in the public domain may vary country to country. Public domain books 
are our gateways to the past, representing a wealth of history, culture and knowledge that's often difficult to discover. 

Marks, notations and other marginalia present in the original volume will appear in this file - a reminder of this book's long journey from the 
publisher to a library and finally to you. 

Usage guidelines 

Google is proud to partner with libraries to digitize public domain materials and make them widely accessible. Public domain books belong to the 
public and we are merely their custodians. Nevertheless, this work is expensive, so in order to keep providing this resource, we have taken steps to 
prevent abuse by commercial parties, including placing technical restrictions on automated querying. 

We also ask that you: 

+ Make non-commercial use of the files We designed Google Book Search for use by individuals, and we request that you use these files for 
personal, non-commercial purposes. 

+ Refrain from automated querying Do not send automated queries of any sort to Google's system: If you are conducting research on machine 
translation, optical character recognition or other areas where access to a large amount of text is helpful, please contact us. We encourage the 
use of public domain materials for these purposes and may be able to help. 

+ Maintain attribution The Google "watermark" you see on each file is essential for informing people about this project and helping them find 
additional materials through Google Book Search. Please do not remove it. 

+ Keep it legal Whatever your use, remember that you are responsible for ensuring that what you are doing is legal. Do not assume that just 
because we believe a book is in the public domain for users in the United States, that the work is also in the public domain for users in other 
countries. Whether a book is still in copyright varies from country to country, and we can't offer guidance on whether any specific use of 
any specific book is allowed. Please do not assume that a book's appearance in Google Book Search means it can be used in any manner 
anywhere in the world. Copyright infringement liability can be quite severe. 

About Google Book Search 

Google's mission is to organize the world's information and to make it universally accessible and useful. Google Book Search helps readers 
discover the world's books while helping authors and publishers reach new audiences. You can search through the full text of this book on the web 



at |http : //books . google . com/ 



'LleL-oi^e^'V ■)- \ q I v> 7-fr.?rro .< 







*^^ 




3 2044 102 788 098 



ti- 



▲ NEW AND COMPLETE 



ITiXIAN GBAimUJl 



CONTAINING 



A fbort Ihtkoductiov to the 
Italiaa ProiuinciAtioD | 

Plain aod concife Rules and 
Observationfl upon tbc nine 
Parts of speech, exemplifi- 
ed and sanctioned bj Pas* 
Mges taken from the best 
Italian Writers j to which 
are annexed instmcttve and 
entertaining Exercises: 

A short Appevinz on Italian 
Orthography f 

A VocABULAAT, English and 
Italian, and a Number oj 
Phrases which yrerj fre- 
qnentlj occur in Conver- 
iacion ; 

A select Collibctiov of smart 
Aepartees, Witticismsi etc. 
' in Italiaa ; 



A Collectioa of rfeisMit nA 
interesting Italia* LrrTEU 
upon varions Subjects. Spe- 
cimens of Italian Pobtkt ; 
with Ae Rules thereon ; 

A TaalL which presents m 
one PoLt of View, a deaf 
and succinct Method of 
declining every Noun and 
Pronoun Aaod of conjugat- 
ing cvery\regoUir Verb; 

An alphaonical LuT of thfl 
irregular Verbs. 

cV T«ANfeLATf9K, as literal, as 
possible, o( the Italian Pas- 
sages quoted in the course 
of the grammatical Rules 
and Observations. 



The whole laid down in a dear and methodical Man- 
ner, and interspersed with many u<>erul notes calr;n- 
lated for the Atuinmcnt of ilic ITALIAN TONGUK 
in iu greatest Pubitt and PeaFBcriov. 

By^'/VE R G a N I 



LEGHORW 

PftlNTSO BT GLiUCUS IfASI. 

Temssau Mreet opporite (h« Potfroffiee. 
1838. 



'7-i<\ V "S- . "i-^* V tTO 









'/lA f*' j'.^P" J- 






CONTENTS. 

Prefiee. — — ^-. Pag. 4 

A. Sbort IntrodoolioB to tiM ItaliaB PrMiaa* 

ciation, . — — — ^ 5i 

O0 the Artiele* *« ^ *— *— 8C 

Praxif apon ArticUf. — — — 5l 

Of the Nooa* — — ^ — S3 

Prakif upon Noasa. — — "" ^ 

Of the Pronooa. — — — ^1 

Praxif opon ProBoast, — — — 104 

Of the Verb. — — -» — ill 

Of th« P«rticip1e. — — — i4l 

Of Che Adrerb. — — — — f 43 

Of the Prepotitioo. — «-» -» i4S 

Of the Coojaootieo. — .. .. 146 

Of the loterjeetioo. — «- ** >49 

Prexif opoo the foregoiBf Perta of Speeell tri 
Of ExpletiTet. — •— — -» ife 

Of the luliea Sinus. -*- — — i6S 

Of the fuliao Ortho^aphjr. -«- — 167 

A yoeabolarjrf Enclith eod Itelteo. ~* '79 

Femilter Phrecet. £agli«h eod Itelieo* — 199 
A feleet' CoUeetton of jeatf, pleeaiftf 8to» 

riet eto« ^ — i. — asS 

A ColleetioD of keliaii Letteri* ^ *« 344 

Speoimeo* of lulien Poetry. — — a85 

A Teble» •hewio; the DeoleotioD o# Nonntf 
eod the Coojugetioo of the regolar 
Terbtf facing. .« — .. 509 

Aft 'etphebetfoal Lift of the Irregnler Verbf, 
eoojofated in thoae Tentea in whioh 
. they yry from the regnUr ooea. — iri 
(kn English TranaUtion, aa literal aa poa- 
aibloy of the lulian Paaaagea quoted in 
the Coorae of the gramaaetieal Rnlea 
end Obaef retiona. •« «« ^ 338 



PREF AZ I ONE. 



Kyhe la lingua Italiana sid una delle 
pill ielhy ■ e piu artnoniose fra le mo-^ 
derne lingua Europeey pochi 0i sono 
che^ hoi confessing'. Figlia delta Lati-- 
na ha conser{;ato- tutte Ux prerogatii^e 
e le bellezze delia madre, • ed ha ag^ 
giunio le site. Etta e, ' al par delta 
Ziatiuaj ricca ed abbondante di vociy e 
capace al ^ar d'essa de' ire differenti 
stiliy che cHiamansi da' Retorici urhile^ 
m^diocrey e suhlmi^, Ella ha egtfal^ 
mente che la Latina i suoi ^uperldtiiPt^ 
ha irsuoi "diminiltivi come la hdtfna^ 
ami nel numerpy nelta proprietoiy e 
scelta de* medesimi pub i^antarsi di^su^ 
perar la Latiria d*assai. ' Ella ha JitiaU 
mentis gli duniefitativi che mdncahp atr- 
ia Latinay e che_ danno al fai^ellare 
una speciale eleganza ed enereia: Nel* 
la dolcezza poi egli e Jiior di ,difbbioy 
che la lingua Latina deve: alla,.ifo^tra 
cedete ilvantoj 1/ H. che dd^ Latini 
aspiraifasi (i)j -e ch& canSeguefiterhente 

(i) Baommattei ,pnQ.¥a, die 1 L«tini aspikiavano 
V H da quell* apigrainiua di Catuilo- iaiitolato de 
Ario Aspirantey che comincia cosi: 

Ghoinmoda dtcebat si quando commoda yellet 
Dicere, et Htosidias Arias insidias. 



PREFACE 



X here are few who do not allow tbe 
Italian to be one of the most beautiful 
and harmonious of the modern Euro* 
pean languages! Derived from the La- 
tin^ it has preserved all its peculiari- 
ties and beauties, to which it has an* 
nexed its own. It is as rich and co- 
pious^ as the Latin, and equally suscep- 
tible of the three different styles, which 
the Rhetoncians term the low, the mid- 
dle, and sublime. It has its superlatives 
and diminutives, as well as the Latin^ 
and with respect to the number, pro- 
priety, and choice of its diminutives, it 
may claim superiority over the Latin. 
It has finally its augmentatives, which 
the Latin has not, and which give onr 
language a peculiar elegance and e«- 
nerpy* With regard to softness, tbe 
Latm language doubtless is inferior to 
ours. The letter H, which the Latins 
aspirated (i), and which had ne* 

(i) Boommatlei provea that tbe Latiss atpU 
reted the H, by that Epigram of Catailot d'Ario 
a$pinmte^ which bcsina taoa, 

Choicinoda dtcebat fi qoando oommoda vel|ef 
Pioers et Uiofidiat Arias iofidiaa. 

2 



6 

render dovea un suono dura e spiace- 
vole^ da noi Itnliani non si aspira 
giammai. Se le vocali son a pronun^' 
ziarsi piii dolcl che le consonantly la 
nostra lingua^ che assai piii della La^ 
tina abbonda di parole terminanti in 
vocate, debb'essere necessariamente an- 
che pill dolce e piii sonora. 

Sogliono alcuni critici tacciare, ap^ 
punto per questo^ la nostra lingua, d'una 
stucchevole monotonia 5 ma l^ggano es-^ 
siy se mai nol fecero per t avanti^ 
qualunque siasi scrittore Italiano^ e 
s^ edr anno che se noi non abbondiamo, 
come i Latini, di voci che Jiniscono in 
us, in um, e similiy la pronvnzia del- 
le guati doi^et^a riuscire dura ed aspra, 
ne abbiamo perb anche noi alcune^ 
che in consonanti Jiniscono^ efacciamo 
in oltre uso frequente delle elisioni (1) 
le quali opportunamente dislribuite da 
un orecchio delicato e giudizioso, ren* 
don la nostra lingua varia nel tempo 
stesso ed nrmoniosa. Tanto e cio vero, 
che la musica la qual sola pub dar 
legge d' un' armonia if aria e soave non 
trova lingua per se piii propria e piii 

(0 \\ segnente verso del Petrarca h compotto 
dt otto parole, e. vi 8ono sei elisioni. 

Fior froud' erb'omber^antr'o&d' aure aoavi^ 



7 
ccssarly a rough and disagreeable 
sound, is never aspirated by Italians* 
If vowels are niore agreeable to pro- 
nounce than consonants , oar lan*- 
guage, which abounds more than the 
Latin with words ending in vowels, 
must likewise be more soft and more 
sonorous. 

There are critics, who, on that ac- 
count, complain of a wearisome mo- 
notony in our language ; but let them 
read an Italian author , if they have 
never yet read one, and ihey will see 
that if we have not, as the Latin, that 
multiplicity of words ending in us and 
I//7Y, the pronunciation of which must 
have been rough and sharp, we ^have 
however, some terminating with a con- 
sonant, and besides, we make a fre- 
quent use of elisions (i), which pro- 
perly arranged by a delicate and judi* 
cious ear, render our language diyersi- 
fied, and, at the same time, harmonious. 
This is so true, that music, which can 
alone decide with respect to a various 
and sweet harmony , cannot have a 
more suitable language than the Italian. 

(i) The folIowiDg verse of Petrarch is com* 
posed of eight words^ and there are six elisions. 

Fior frond' erb'ombr' antr' ond' aure s oavi 



8 
confacente delV Ita liana. La Poesia 
anck' essa che suole andare in traccia 
non meno del maestoso e del sublime 
che deir armonioso e del dolcCy mira* 
bilmente compiacesi della nostra lin^ 
gua ; e gravissimi jiutori asseriscono 
esser piu grato ad Apollo^ ed alle nO" 
ve Muse il suono de'versi Italiani che 
guello de'Latini. Quindi non h meravi- 
glia, se la nostra lingua h tanta coltiva- 
ta, e in cost alto pregio tenuta da tuttel e 
nazioni straniere. In tutte le Corti di 
Ger mania ^ principalmente nelV Impe- 
rial Corte di Vienna la nostra lingua 
e quella che piii d' ogni altra si stu- 
diay s'impara e si parla. In Inghilter- 
ra ella forma da lungo tempo una 
parte indispensabile d' un' educazione 
civile ; e I' immortal Milton medesimo 
non isdegno di studiosamente coltivar- 
la scrwendo in essa alcune graziose e 
leggiadre poesie. 1 Francesi anch' essi 
amano la nostra lingua^ e la studiano : 
anzi vi h stato fra loro un celebre 
Menage d' Angers^ che con somma lo- 
de ha scritto sulle origini della favel- 
la Ita liana ^ ed ha composto varie pee- 
sie che lette sono con piacere ed am- 
mirate dagV Italiani medesimi^ dando 
con cio a divedere quanto la Poesia 
Italiana sia piu facile della Francese. 



. 9. 
Poetry also, xfhich delights no les^ in 
the majestic and sublime^ than tbe 
barmooious and agreeable^ is wonder* 
fully pleased with our language ; and 
judicious authors say^ that the sound 
of Italian verses is more agreeable to 
Apollo and the nine Muses^ than that 
of Latin verses. So that it is not to be 
wondered at being our language so 
much studied and admired by foreign 
nations. At all the Courts of German j^ , 
and particularly at the Imperial Court 
of Vienna^ our language is taught^ studi* 
ed^ and spoken more than any other. 
In England it has been considered for 
many years past an indispensable part 
of a polite education, and even the im- 
mortarMiUon did not disdain to cul- 
tivate it diligently, as he wrote in the 
Italian language very acceptable and 
agreeable poetry. The French also are 
pleased with our language, and study 
it 5 they had the famous Menage d' An- 
gers, who wrote with the greatest suc- 
cess upon the origin of the Italian lan- 
guage, and composed different pieces 
of poetry, which are read with pleas- 
ure, and admired by Italians them- 
selves } shewing, by this means, that Ita- 
lian is much easier thanFrench poetry. 
I must acknowledge, though with coa«. 



10 

Anzi^ bisogna pur ch' io lo dica^ quan^ 
tunque con mio grai^e rammaricOy ei 
pare che la lingua Ilaliana sia piii 
coltwata fuor deW Italia eh^e nelV Ita^ 
Ha medesima. In Italia la lingua La^ 
Una k quella che a preferenza della 
nativa s' insegna nelle scuole^ la Lati^ 
na h quella nella quale si pubblicano 
gli atti delle nostre Accademiey moU 
tissimi trattati di Filosqfiay di Medi- 
cinay di Matematichey e di quasi tutte 
le arti e le scienze^ come se alia no*^ 
stra lingua mancassero termini e ma^ 
niere per esprimer le cose grandi e 
le piccolcj le maestose e le umiliy le 
scientifiche e le familidri. Non ^ gia 
ch'io disapprovi lo studio della Jingua 
Latinoy anzi lo consiglioy e lo giudico 
ifantaggioso alia nostray la quaU aoen- 
do da essa derivato i suoi principali 
pregi ed ornamentiy pud sempre rica- 
parne de'nuovi : ma se (a/ dir del 
celebre Maggi) 

Gadon coa le Cittk Ic lingue ancora^ 

egli i giustOy che se dopo la caduta 
della lingua Greca la Latina visse e 
trionfoy V Italiana aspettando anch'essa 
il suo fato vi{;a presentemente fra not, 
• sopra ogni altra trionfi. Nh dal la^ 



II 
eern^ Ibal the Italian language is sliidi' 
ed more ont of Italy, than in it. In 
Italy the Latin language is taught in 
the schools ^ in preference of the 
tongue of the country . The la- 
tin language is that in which we 
publish the Acts of our Academies, 
many Treatises of Philosophy, of Physic, 
of the Mathematics, and of almost all 
the Arts and Sciences, as if our lan- 
guage wanfed. terms and words to 
express things great and little, majestic 
and low, scientific and familiar. Not 
that I disapprove the study of the Latin 
language ; on the contrary I recom- 
mend it, and think it useful to ours, 
which having derived from it its prin- 
cipal ornaments, may always extract 
new ones again ; but if (as the cele- 
brated Maggi says) 



With cities languages also fall, 



it is very just, that if after the decline 
of the Greek language, the Latin arose 
and triumphed, the Italian, expecting 
its fate, should now exist, and triumph 
among us over all others. Nor iroai 



12 

gnarmi ch* to faccio della manias che 
generalmente hanno i nostri dotti di 
scrwere Latinauieote, s* immagini al- 
cuno che ottimi scrittori Italian i man- 
chin fra noi. A tutti son noti i nomi 
d* un BoccacciOy d* nn Bembo^ d' un 
Caro^ d'un Gabrielli^ d' un Casa^ d'ua 
Castelvetro, d' una Speroniy d' un Sal^ 
viatiy d'un Varchiy d' un DolcCy d' un 
PolizianOy d' un Guicciardiniy che in 
purissima prosa Italiana hanno scrittOy 
senza ramtnentare il f^atisneri, il Re^ 
diy il Maffei^ il Muratori^ V Algarottiy 
to Spallanzaniy il Fontana^ il Beccaria, 
ed in/inid altri, che in questi ultimi 
tempi hanno ^ con universale applauso 
di tutta V^Europa scritto cose Mediche^ 
FisichCy o Matemadche nella nostra, 
Italiana favella. Che se in materia re- 
ligiose e politiche la nostra Italia non 
ha Jinora ahhondato di scrittori emi-^ 
nentij cib e dovuto ad alcune partico^ 
lari rngioni.Les Italiens^ diceva Vol-^ 
taire^ ces peuples ingenieux craigiient 
de penser, les Francois n' oseut pen- 
ser qu* ^ demi, les Auglais voleot 
jusqu' au ciel , parce qu' cJti ne leur 
coupe pas les ailes : Ma ora son can- 
giate le cose : i Francesi pensano piu 
liberantente , gV Italiani cominciano 
ancW essi a pensare, essendo passati 



i3 
the stroog iaclination of the learned to 
write in Latin, of which I complain, 
let it be supposed, that we want excel- 
lent writers in our own language. The- 
names of Boccaccio, Bembo, Caro, Ga- 
brielli^ Casa, Castelvetro, Speroni, Sal- 
viati, Varchi, Dolce, Poliziano, Guic- 
ciardini, who wrote excellently Italian 
prose, are every where known ; not to 
mention those of Vallisneri, Redi, Maf- 
fei, Muratori, Algarotti , Spallanzani , 
Fontana, Beccaria, and of an infinity 
of others, who ba?e latterly written 
with the universal approbation .of £u-. 
rope, on Medicine, on natural Philo- 
sophy, on Mathematics, in the Italian 
language. If on the subject of Aeligioti 
and Politics Italy has not hitherto 
abounded with eminent writers, it must 
be ascribed to particular causes. The 
Ilalians, said Voltaire, that ingenious 
people^ fear' to think, the French dare 
but half thinh^ the English fly even 
up to Heaven y because their wings are 
not dipt ; but now things are altered, 
the French think with more freedom, 
the Italians begin also to think : the 
anhappy day being for ever past, when 



'4 

per sempre que' tempi inieliciy ne* qutUi 
sifaceQan languire nelle carceri delV 
Inquisizione i Galilei^ non per altro 
delitto che per aver dimosirato et/i- 
dentemente il moto della terra, lo che 
render face a Boileau quel burlesco 
decretOy que la terre se repose, que le 
soleil tourne autour d^ elle sous 
peine d' excommunication. Se poi par- 
lisi de^ Poeti, e dov' h che non risuoni 
la fama d' un Petrarca non mai ab^ 
hastanza commendato per la purita 
dello stile^ la dolcezza de^ suoi Sonet^ 
ti, la gravita delle sue Canzoni, la 
moralita de'suoi Trionfiy in una pa-- 
rpla, per V eccellenza di tutti i suoi 
poetici componimenti ? Doi^' e che non 
sia noto L' Orlando Furioso deW Ario* 
stOy Poeta che per V incomparabil fa'- 
eiliti dello stile^ per V inenarrabil va- 

f'hezza e varieta degli argomentiy per 
a sublimita e novita delle immagini , 
e per cent'altre inimitabili doti h da 
noi Italiani comunemenf* intitolato il 
diQino T Doi/ h che non .da conosciuta 
la Gerusalemme lilerata del Tasso, 
Poema che per la sceltezza delle pa^ 
role, per la proprietd delle metaforey 
per V armonia del metro y e Jinalmente 
per la perfezione del tutto non h su^ 
perato nh daW Iliade d' Oinero neUa 



i5 

Galileo languished in the prisons of the 
Inquisition^ for no other crime than that 
of having clearly demonstrated the 
motion of the earth ; which occasioned 
this burlesque decree of Boileau^ Let 
the earth be at rest, let the sun move 
round it under the penalty of excom^ 
munication. But if we speak of Poets^ 
where is not the fame of Petrarch re- 
sounded, who can never be sufficiently 
commended for purity of style, for the 
beauty of his sonnets, for the gravity 
of his Odes, for the morality of his 
Trionfi ; in a word, for the excellence 
of all his poetical compositions ? Where 
is not the Orlando Furioso known of 
the poet Ariosto, who for incomparable 
ease of style, for great beauty and 
variety of arguments^ for sublimity and 
novelty of images, in general has the 
appellation of Divine ascribed to him ? 
Where is Tasso's Jerusalem Delivered 
unknown, a poem, which for choice of 
expression , propriety of metaphors , 
harmony of metre, and finally for the 
Perfection of the ^vhole, is exceeded 
neither by the Iliad of Homer in Greeks 



i6 
lingua Greca, nh dalV~Eneide di f^ir* 
gilio nella Latina ? Finalmente per 
tacere di tanti altri^ e dooe sono igno- 
ti i drammatici componimenti del nostra 
immortal MetastasiOy che per V ordi-' 
ne, per la tessitura, pe' caratteri, pel 
maraifigliosi accidenti ; pel maneggio 
degli affetti, pel niovimento delle pas^ 
sioniy e pel linguaggioy" infine, facilis^ 
simo a un tempo stessOy ed altamente 
poeticOy mai non ebbero e forse mai 
non avranno gli eguali ! V injinito 
piacere che ricavar si pud dalla lettu- 
ra de' sopracitati Poeti, e di tanti al- 
triy che per brevita tralasfiio, h piu che 
bastante a compensare qualunqne siasi 
penay che da' Fores tie ri si prenda per 
imparare la nostra lingua. E vera che 
i sopraccennati Poeti sono stati in 
quasi tutte le lingue tradotti, e in In^ 
ghilterra specialmente celebri penne^ 
come quelle d' un Hoole, d' un Har- 
ringtonj d'un Hug gins, un Hunt si sono im- 
piegate a tradurli nella lingua Inglese, 
lingua jorte, ricca, e libera al par 
della Nazione che la parla. Ma la piu 
perfetta traduzione, che il piu nobil 
genio possa produrre non sard mai un 
sostituto equivalente agli originali. Egli 
h lo stesso che traspiantare un albero 
prezioso fuor del suo clima caldo e 



»7 
nor the iEneid of Virgil in Latin ? To 

pass over in silence many others^ where 
are not known the dramatic pieces 
of our immortal Metastasio, which for 
order, for invention^' for charaters^ for 
wonderful incidents, for the manage- 
ment of the aSeclions, for command of 
the passions, and for language easy and 
poetical never have been, and perhaps^ 
never will be equalled ? The great pleas- 
ure which may be derived from read- 
ing the above mentioned Poets, and 
others, whose names are omitted for 
the sake of brevity, is more than an 
adequate compensation to foreigners 
who learn our language. It is true, that 
the above named Poets have been trans- 
lated into almost all languages,, and 
in England especially eminent wri- 
ters, such as Hoole, Harrington, Hug- 
^ns , Hunt have employed themselves 
m translating them into English, a 
language strong, rich, and free like 
the nation which speaks it. But the 
most perfect translation whii^h the most 
noble genius can produce, will never 
be a substitute equal to the originals. 
It may be compared to the transplanting 
a valuable tree from its own warm and 



i8 
fertile in un paese freddo e sterile. 
Per quanta un industre Giardiniere 
^ s' affatichi intorno aX medesimo non 
Jiorira mai cost hene^ come nel sua 
nativo terreno, e perdera sempre mol- 
tissimo del delicato suo gusto delizio^ 
sOf e delta sua naturale bellezza. Ma 
io non ho ancor detto nulla del piacere 
e delV istruzione^ che ricavar si pud 
dal visitar le nostre contrade tanto 
favorite dalla Natura^ e tanto abbel- 
lite dalV arte, Parli qui per me un 
Martina Sherlock, giacchh il mio dire 
patrebbe esser creduto esagerato e 
' parziale „ Italia, Italia! esclama egli 
io non ho mai conosciuta un essere 
che la vedesse senza rimanere in'- 
cantata, nh che potesse parlarne sen* 
za entusiasmo. Came Shakespear, ella 
e inesauribile nelle sue ricchezze, e 
came lui ella ha bellezze bastanti da 
cattivarsi tutta il genere umano, „ ed 
altrave cosl parla delle arii, che vi 
Jloriscono. „ La superiorita de'suoi dr^ 
tisti, e altrettanto indisputabile, quanta 
quella delle sue naturali bellezze, e i 
nomi di Raffaello, di Palladia, di Mi- 
ehel Angela, di Pergolesi impangon 
silenzio a tutte le nazioni del man'- 
do. ,j n Carriy vola a Napoli^ dice 
Gian Giacomo Rousseau a un giovine 



19 

fertile climate, into a cold and barren 
country. Whatever care an industrious 
gardaer may take,it will never flour- 
ish 8o well as in its native soil, and 
it will always lose mnch of its delicate 
smell, of its delicious taste, and of its 
natural beauty. But I have not yet 
spoken of the pleasure and of the in- 
struction that may be derived from vis- 
iting our country, so favoured by na- 
ture, and embellished by the arts, to 
which end a knowledge of our language 
is absolutely necessary. Let Alartm 
Sherlock speak for me here, as all that 
I may say would be thought extrava- 

fant and partial. „ Italy, Italy! says be, 
never knew a being who saw il 
without being enchanted , nor who 
could speak of it without enthusiasm. 
Like Sbakespear, it is inexhaustible in 
riches, and like him it has beauties to 
captivate the whole human race. „ And 
speaking of the arts, which flourish 
there, he expresses himself thus ; n 
The superiority of her artists is as in- 
disputable as that of her natural beau- 
ties, and the names of Raphael, Palla- 
d7o, Michael Angelo, and Pergolese im- 

Sose silence upon all nations ff Run, 
J to Naples. » says J. J. Rousseau to 



20 

musicoj per ascoltare i capi d' opera 
di Leoj di Durante^ di Jomelliy e di 
Pergolesi. „ „ Corri vola in Italiay o 
Pitiorey o Poeta^ o Scultore, o Archi- 
tettOy e voi uomini di genio di qua^ 
lunque classe vi siate, quello k H pae 
se eke sifiluppera i vostri talenti, I 
prodigj delTarte trasporteranno la vo- 
stra mentey e feconderanno la vostra 
immaginazione . La perennita delta 
Natura dopo avervi sdrpresi vi mem^ 
pira di coraggio, e d ardire. Divente- 
rete creatori sulV esempio di leiy ose- 
rete contrastare con tutd i vostri pre* 
decessoriy e perfino con ta Natura me- 
desbaa. Forse vi riescira di superarla^ 
come fece Vautore deW Apollo di Bel- 
vedere. „ La nazione Inglese h quella, 
che pill d'ogni altra visita r Italia, ed 
h quella altresi che la visita con mag- 
gior frutto d' ogni altra, tirando pro^ 
fitto da tutto quello che vede, e pene^ 
trando la sostanza delle cose: laddove 
alcune altre nazioni solamente delta 
superficie contentansi. Per questo mo-^, 
tivo in Inghilterra, e principalmente 
nella capitale abbondano precettori di 
lingua Italiana, nessuno volendo in^ 
iraprendere il viaggio d' Italia senzes-* 
ser prima istruito della lingua^ che 
ii^i si parla. Ma fra tanti che si 



at 
the young Musician, « to listen to ihe 
master-pieces of Leo, Durante^ Jomelli^ 
and Pergolese ; v » Run^ fly to Italy 
Painter^ Poet, Sculptor, and Architect, 
men of genius of every class, that is 
the country which will unfold your ta* 
lents. The prodigies of art will trans- 
port your soul , and fertilize your 
imagination. The inexhaustibleness of 
Nature, after having astonished you, 
will fill you with boldness j you will 
become a creator after her example, 
you will dare to contend with all your 
predecessors, and even with Nature 
herself. Perhaps you will surpass her, 
as did the author of the Apollo of 
Belvedere, v Englishmen visit Italy 
oftener than any other people, and 
likewise visit it to the greatest advan* 
^^0^9 profiting from all they see, and 
searching into the substance of things, 
whilst persons of other nations are 
satisfied with the superficies ^ hence in 
England, and particularly in the Cap- 
ital, Italian masters abound, fojr no one 
will undertake the journey of Italy, 
unless he is beforehand acquainted with 
the language of the country* But among 
the great number of those who set up 
for masters of our language, I know 
not if there be many capable of teach- 



22 

erigono in maestri delta nostra lin^ 
gua^ non so se tutti saranno bastan^ 
temente qualificati per insegnarla, Di" 
rd solamente per regola degli ama-^ 
tori della nostra favella^ che Roma, 
Fivemey e la Toscana tutta sono i 
soli luoghi ove si parla bene Italia^ 
nOy quantunque sembri ancora inde* 
ciso^ se it linguaggio Romano^ debba 
preferirsi at ToscanOj o il^ Toscano 
al Romano. Bembo pretende che la 
migtior lingua Ita liana sia quella 
che parlasi in Roma dalle persone 
distinte dal volgo. Altri vogliono , 
che Firente sia la sede della piii pu^ 
ra Italiana lingua^ essendovia Fi^ 
renze^ e non a Roma la famosa Ac* 
cademia della Crusca sempre intesa^ 
come ognun sa^ a cogliere il piii bel 
jftor delta lingua. To sarei di pare^ 
re che chiunque penfenir potesse ad 
unir la dotcezza della pronunzia Ro^ 
mana alia sceltezza delle parole, che 
in Firenze perfin dal volgo ado^ 
pransi, potrebbe con ragion vantarsi 
di parlar la lingua Italiana meglio 
d'ogni *altro. lo non son cosi vano 
di presumere d* essere a cib perve^ 
nvto X il vero si e che nato in una 
citta non motto distante da Firenze 
fill nella prima gioventu mandate a 



a3 
ing it well. I shall ooly say, to direct 
the lovers of our language, that Rome^ 
Florence, and all Tuscany are the only 
places where they speak Italian well^ 
although it be still a point undecided, 
if the Roman, language be preferable 
to the Tuscan, or the Tuscan to the 
Roman. Bembo is of opinion that the 
best Italian is that which is spoken at 
Rome by those who are distinguished 
from the vulgar. Others think^ that in 
Florence they speak with the greatest 
purity ; for at Florence, and not at 
Rome, is the famous Academy of La 
Crusca, always employed in studying 
the purity of the language. I am of 
opinion^ that whosoever should unite 
to the sweetness of the Roman pro* 
nunciation the purity of expression 
which is in use at Florence, even 
among the people, would be entitled 
to boast of speaking better Italian than 
any other. I am not vain enough to 
presume upon having arrived at this ; 
it is^ however^ true that I was bora 
in a town not £ir from Florence, and 



=*4 

Roma a cagion degli studio oife sog' 
giornai molti anniy ed ebbi tutte le 
fai^ore\;oli opportunitd di conversaT con ' 
persone colte e letterate^ oltre il fre" 
quentar sovente le celebri adunanzts 
degli Arcadia fra' quali ho V onore 
i£ esser annoverato^ e riconosciuto sot- 
to il nome di Florideno ItoneOy averts 
doy come ognuti sa, queW illustfe Ac- 
cademia il costume di dare a da- 
scun de suoi membri un nome pasto- 
rale. Da Roma passai a Fireme, ove 
dimorai parecchi anni, Jiachh lascian- 
do il bel paese^ 

Ch'Appennin parte, el'iiiar circonda, e 

I'Alpi. 

feci passaggio in Francia, la cui lin- 
gua ho sempre amata, e coltivata per 
tutto al pari della mia nativa. Con 
questi vantaggiy e con la scoria della 
Grammatica de\ Buommattei, che e 
sempre stata la mia guida^ e che sa- 
rd sempre in pregio, finchk durerd 
la lingua Italiana^ avventuro di da- 
re al pjibblico le presenti regole, ed 
osseri^azioni sulla nostra lingua esem- 
plificate^ ed autorizzate con passaggi 
scelti da' nostri piii approvati scrit^ 
tori, quali sono il Boccaccio^ il Pe- 



35 

was sent very young to Rome for edu- 
cation, where I resided many years, 
and had every favourable opportunity 
to converse with well educated and 
learned men y and to frequent the 
meetings of the Arcadi y of whose 
society I have the honour to be a mem- 
ber, and am acknowledged under the 
name of Florideno Itoneo ; for, I must 
remark, that this Academy is accustom - 
ed to confer on each of its members 
a pastoral name. From Rome I went 
to Florence, where I remained some 
years, till leaving the beautiful country 



Which the Apennines divide, and 
the Sea trith the Alps surround. 

I passed into France, whose language 
I have always loved, and studied as 
much as my mother tongue. With these 
advantages, and by the help of Buom- 
mattei' s Grammar, which has always 
been my guide, and which will be 
esteemed as long as the Italian tongue 
shall exist, I venfure to lay before the 
public these rules and observations 
upon our langua(;e exemplified and 
sanctioned by passages taken from our 
best writers^ such as Boccaccio, Pe- 



26 

trarcuj il Tassp^ e SJmiliy alie quali 
aggiungo alcuni tend instruttwi nel 
tempo stessOy e piaceifoliy ben per* 
suaso che omne tulit punctum qui 
miscuit utile dulci*. Conjugo i verbi 
in quattro colonne. La prima mostra 
il correttOy e deve. impararsi a me- 
morial la seconda V antiquatOj la ter^ 
za il poetico, la quarta il corrottOy 
e queste possono consuUarsiy quando 
V occasione il domanda . Aggiungo 
di quando in quando delle note utili 
e necessarie per quelli^ che hramano 
avere una perjetta idea delle bellez- 
ze della lingua. Giacchh e cosa sO" 
lita di dare un vocabolario delle pa- 
role piu usitate^ e alcune frasi fa- 
miliaria non ho mancato di farlo. Ho 
inoltre fatto una scelta raccolta di det- 
ti argutiy di risposte ingegnose^ etc.\ 
affinchk. gli scolari s' applichino con 
piacere a tradurre la nostra lingua* 
Siegue una piccola raccolta, di ele^ 
ganti letter e Italiane^ ed alcuni saggi 
della nostra Poesia con poche rego* 
le ad essa appartenenti. ^Indi trove-- 
rassi una Tat^ola che mostra in sun 
sol punto di vista le declinazioni de* 
Nomiy e le conjugazioni de' verbi rc- 
-* golari con una lista alfabetica de* ver^ 
bi irregolari conjugati in que' tempi 



%7 
trarca^ Tasso, etc. to which I auuex 
instructive aod entertaining exercises^ 
thoroughly persuaded that omne iulil 
puncium qui miscait utile dulci. I con- 
jugate the verbs in four columns. The 
first marks that which is correct^ and 
which should be committed to me- 
mory ; the second notices what is obso- 
. lete ; the third what is poetical^ and 
the fourth what is vulgar, which may 
bo consulted when occasion requires. I 
add, from time to time^ useful and 
necessary notes for those who wish to 
obtain a perfect idea of the beauty of 
the language. Since it is the usual 
method to give a vocabulary of words, 
and some familiar phrases, I have omit- 
ted neither. I have likewise made a 
choice collection of witticisms and smart 
lepartees, etc. that entertainment . may 
accompany the improvement of the 
scholars, in translating the language. 
Afterwards I have given a collection of 
elegant and interesting Italian letters^ 
and specimens of Italian poetry, with 
some new rules belonging to it. Then 
will be found a table^ where may be 
seen in one point of view, the declen- 
sion of nouns, and the conjugation of 
regular verbs, with an alphabetical list 
of the irregular verbs conjugated ii^ 



28 

ne' quail differiscono da^ regofarL Sic^ 
come questa Grammatica e principal" 
mente destinata per Vuso de' tniei sco- 
lariy a' quali spero che non manche- 
rd d* esser vantaggiosaj cost non ista^ 
rd qui a sollecitare il favor del pub^ 
blico ; solamente chiedo scusa per 
V ineleganza dello stile, e prego ognu- 
no a rifiettere, da una parte, che e 
un Forestiere che serine, e dall'al- 
tra, che la materia medesima non do^ 
manda ornamenti, bastandole d! istrui- 
re. Cib nonostante se qualche precet^ 
tor di lingua la trovasse vantaggio^ 
sa anche pe' suoi scolari, gli dirb 
candidamente con Orazio. 

— — Si quid novisti rectius istis. 
Candidus imperii , si non his utere 
mecuin. 



^9 

those tenses, in which they vary from 
the regular ones. As this Grammar is 
pnncipally designed for the use of my 
Pupils, to whom I hope it will not 
fail to be nseful, I shall not attempt 
to conciliate the favour of the public, 
by dwelling on the subject of it anjr 
longer. I shall only solicit an excuse 
for my style, and request that it may 
be considered on the one hand, that it 
is a foreigner who writes, and on the 
other hand, that the subject itself will 
admit of no ornaments. Should, how- 
ever, any teacher find this wDrk useful 
to his Pupils, I shall say with Horace, 

——— Si quid nooisti rectius istis 
Candidas imperii , si non is uter€ 
mecum. 



A SHORT 

INTRODUCTION 

,TO THS 

ITALIAN PRONUNCIATION. 



The Italian Alphabet has 22 
Letters viz. 

A pronounce Aw ) Rf pronounce Kmm* 

B Bee (1) \ N Enne 

C: Chcc \ O O 



1) Dee 5 P Pec 

E AJ Q Coo 

F Effe R Erre 

G Gee | S Esse 

H Acca I T Tee 

I Ee I U Oo 

J I coson. \ V Vce 

L EUe I Z^ Dseia 



OP THE PRONUNCIATION OP THE VOWELS. 

The Italian A is pronounced as in 

(i) The Toicanf pronoance Bee, Chee^ Dee^ 
etc. bat the other Italiant pronoonoe Bai, Chai^ 
Daif ete. Cor best writers seem to anthorize the 
Tuscan proounciation, as we read in Dante, Di 
quetti vi Mono idioli i quali noa tanno VAhhiccl^ 
and in Boecaecio, Foi non imparatte VAbbici,U 



32 

the English words , Father , Rather : 
It has, however, a sharper sound, when 
it is distinguished with an accent, as in 
the following words, Caritd ^ Bonta , 
Amista ; which is the case with the 
other vowels, when they are accented. 

E has two distinct sounds, one open, 
as in Erba'y the other close, as in Eser- 
cizio. 

I is pronounced as in the English 
words Idiom , Ignorance , 

O , as well as E , has two distinct 
sounds, one of which is open, as in 
Ozioy and the other close, as in Or^ 
dine. 

U is pronounced as Oo in Cool<. 

In the diphthongs all the vowels are 
distinctly pronounced, yet they form 
but one syllable , as mai , miei , iuoi , 
etc. But their pronunciation cannot be 
properly attairicd without hearing them 
sounded by aA. Italian. 

OF THE PRONUNCIATION OF T^E 
CONSONANTS. 

li is exactly pronounced as in the 
v^ords Bell , Blot. 

C before a^ o, if, /, r, has the same 
sound as in English ; before e or i is 
prououiiced like Ch io the following 



53 
Engiish words, ChceJcy Chicken : before 
H it has ihe sound of Ihe En^^Iish K, 
and we pronounce Cherubino ^ Chim^- 
ray as if Ihey were written Keruhino^ 
Kimera. When C is preceded by S ^ 
and followed by JB or /, as See, Sci, 
we pronounce it as the English do Sh, 
For instance, these words, Tralascio, 
Discerno , are pronounced as if they 
were written Tralashio , Dlsherno. 
But when Sc is followed by a, o, u, 
as ScampOj Scorretto^ OsrurOy then it is 
sounded as if the aforesaid words were 
written SkampOy Skorretio,Oskuro. 

D and F are pronounced as in the 
English words Deed, Flock. 

G before a, o, i/, has the same sound 
as in English ; before e or i is sounded 
as in Gin , Geometry : likewise before 
the consonants it has the English pro- 
nunciation, except Gli followed by a 
vowel , which has a sound that the 
English have not : it bears some affi- 
nity to the L mouillhe of the French ; 
for we pronounce Figlin , Trat^aglio , 
very much like Fille , Travail. When 
Gli stands alone as an article , and \ ^ 
when it ends the words, we pronounce \ 
it after the same manner ; ns Gli, De- ]/> 
glij Figliy etc. except Angli, Anglia. 
When Gli is followed by a consonant^ 



as Negligeaza , it is prononced as in 
Ihe English \yord Negligence. 

G before na, we, wi, nOy nUf as Ca/n- 
paghoy Vegnentej Guadagni, SostegnOj 
Ignudoy has a sound which the English 
are strangers to : and we pronounce it 
as the French do CampagnCy Borgne^ ec. 

Ghcy Ghiy are- pronounced as Gue, 
Guiy in the English word$ Guesty Guilt. 

When two gg\ meet together , as 
TraggOy Viaggioy the first follows the 
nature of the second, that is to say, it 
is hard or soft, as the second is. The 
same must be said of the two c&s. 

H in Italian is never aspirated. 

J consonant is pronounced like yi in 
yield. 

L, M, Ny Py Qy are pronounced as 
in English. 

S is sounded as in English 5 but when 
it is between two vowels, its sound is 
almost like Z : such it is in Caserma , 
CesqrCy etc. we must except from this 
rule the words to which we add the 
particle Siy as Trovasiy Odesiy etc. 

T and ^ are pronounced as in En- 
glish. 

Z has two sounds, one soft, the other 
hard; which sounds cannot be easily 
conveyed by writing , and therefore 
must be beard from the mouth of an 



35 

Italian. The English in pronouncing 
Italian must be mindful of what Milton 
says in his Treatise on Education : 
Their speech ( says he, meaning the 
children ) is to be fashioned to a dis^ 
tinct and clear pronunciation as near 
as may be to the Italian^ especially in 
the vowels : for we Englishmen, being 
far northly, do not open our mouths in 
the cold air wide enough to grace a 
southern tongue , but are observed by 
all other nations to speak exceedingly 
close and inward. 

Grammar is the art of speaking and 
writing a language according to the 
established custom of it. 

This is a general definition, and may 
be adapted both to the living and dead 
languages : therefore the Grammar of 
a particular language, as the Italian, 
may be defined the art of writing and 
speaking Italian according to the custom' 
established in Italy by polite conversa^ 
tion, and the best authors. 

There are in Italian, as well as in 
English, nine sorts of words , which 
are commonly called parts of speech 
viz. The Article, the Noun, the Pro* 
noun, the Verb, the Participle, the 
Adverb, the Preposition, the Con- 
juoction, the Intetjection. As these nine 



36 
parts of speech make up the whole 
subject of a Graramiir, I shall speak of 
each of them separately. 

ON THB ARTICLE. 

The Article, which takes its deriva* 
tion from the Lalia word Articulus y 
is a part of speech which joined to a 
nouQ shews its gender , number , and 
case (i). I said joined , because the 

(i) The gender is that which marks the sex, 
«nd is divided into jnasculine and feminine. If 
names^ instead of heing arbitrarily masculine or 
feminine, 'were to follow the nature of things, 
and be either masculine or feminine only, accord* 
ing to their sex, how much easier would our 
language be, especially for Englishmen I There 
ought to be a neuter gender for all inanimate 
things, and then we should be superior even to 
the Latins, who, although they had a neuter 
gender, did nut derive «ny advantage from it ; 
because amongst inanimate things, to some they 
applied the neuter, to some the mascaliue, and 
to others the feminine gender . For instance ; 
ponduSf niunu$^ aurum^ are neuter ; lahor^ orJof 
vruorf are masculine, ¥estis^ via^ domus^ are fe- 
minine. Therefore the Latin language is, in this 
Respect, still more intricate than ours. The num- 
ber is either singular or plural : the singular is 
used when we speak of one thing only, as The 
Kivar. ll Fiume, The plural, when we speak of 
more than one, as The Rivers, I Fiumi^Thtrt are 
fix cases ; the nominative, the genitive,, the da* 
tive I the accusative , the vocative , the ablative • 
They derire from the Latin words 9 nominare ^ 



57 
Article can never stand by iUelf : I 

said parlicularly I'af/ie^/ to a nourij be- 
cause we often find, some other parts 
of speech which are, like the Article, 
without being one ; and we may distin- 
guish them by their being joined to 
a noun or not; as Ai^visossi fermamen- 
te , che se il Re di cib s' avvedessCy 
senza dubbio il farebbe morire. CBocc. 
g. 3. n. io«) La giovane veggendo che 
V ora era tarda, ancora che le parole 
del vecchio la spaventassero, disse etc. 
(Bocc. g. a. n. 3.) The first il and the 
first la in the two preceding examples 
must be considered as Articles, because 
the one is prefixed to Ke^ the other 
to Giovaney both nouns : but the second 
il and the second la affixed to a verb 
are pronouns, and mean, farebbe mo* 
rire lui, spaventassero lui (i). I said 

geaeraftf dare^ accusare^ vocare, auferre. For, the 
Bomtoatire noarfct the sobject of a xlitcoarte ; lh« 
genitiva what belongs to a iub;ect ; the dative 
the sobject Co which sooiethiog it given \ the ac- 
cufative the subject acted upon by anothr^r ; the 
Tooatire the calling to a subject ; the ablative the 
taking from a subject. 

(i) We aometimes find the Article before a 
verb, as U paaeggiare , lo stare , il parlare , etc. 
but in that case a substantive is always under* 
stood between the Article and the verb, that is 
to taj, L'aiio, il modo^ and ihe like ; as V alio 
di paueggiarg , il modo di parlare , e(o« VTc 

* 3 



38 

lastly, shews its gender^ number^ and 
case .vfor the Article, as it will appear 
below, varies according to the gender, 
number, and case. 

There are in the Italian language 
two sorts of Article, the one definite, viz, 
that which indicates the gender, and 
the number of the nouns to which it 
is prefixed ; the other indefinite, which 
is called by the Italian grammarians 
Segnacaso (i), and it is made use of 
before the nouns taken in an indefinite 
and indeterminate sense. In the English 
language there is only one definite ar- 
ticle, which is prefixed to nouns, either 
masculine or feminine, and serves as 
well for the singular as for the plural : 
but in the Italian language there are 
three different definite Articles, viz. Ilj 
Loy La. 



likewise meet iometimes with the Article before 
aa adverb, at j^^ dove , e 7 quando tutto gU 
narrai ( Dittam. lib. i. cap. 7. ) Come , e perche 
venisti tu qui 7 ed egU mi rispose: del corhe-^non 
ti caglia, ma ii perche ti dird (Filo. lib. 6. num. 
145.) But in these cases the adverbs are looked 
Yipon as nouns , or rather they are adverbs con- 
verted into nouns ; and it is the same thing as 
to say, // luogOf e il tempo tutto gli narrai : Del 
modo non ti caglia, ma il motivo ti dird. 

(i) Segnacaso means the sign for the cates of 
the noons. 



First Article used hefoKe the masculine 
nouns beginning with a consonant. 

Sing. Nom. II maestro tlitf master • 
Geo. Del maestro of the master 

Dat. A I maestro to the roaster 

Ace. Jl maestro the master « 

Voc. O maestro (i) O master 
AbL Dal maestro from or by lh« 

master. 

rior. Nom. L maestri (a) the maslera 
Gea. DeiJ^Of maestri of the masters 
Dat. Ai4^jfniaestri to the mastera 
Ace, / maestri the master* 

Voc. O m aestri O masters 

Abl. Da i ^^r a^ maeUri from or by th« 

masters. 

Second Article used before the mascu* 
line nouns which begin with an S. 
followed by another consonant (3), 
or with Z. 

Siog. Norn. Lo sdegno (4) the anger. 

(i) O ia the roeative if rery often omitteii; 

Che dehh' to fur t che mi eonsigli, amore t 

(Petr.) 

Chefaif mlma^ che pensi ? at^rem mat pace ? 

(Petr.) 

(a) r«., delli, atti, dalli, instead of i, rfe/, «/, 
daif feem to be rather obsolete! 

(3) The Italians call the 4^ followed by another 
consonant 4^ impura, 

(4) The poets a^e not Tory exaet ia making 



4o 

Gen. Dello sdegno of the tsger 

Dat. Alio idegno to tbe anger 

Ace. Lo idegno the anger 

Voc. O sdegno O anger 

Abl, Dallo sdegno* from, or by the 

aoger. 
Plor. "Norn. Gli sdegni{l) the angers 

GAi. Degli sdegni of the angers 

Dat. Agii sdegni to jthe angers 

Ace. Gli sdegni the angers. 

Voc. O sdegni O angers. 

Abl. Dagli sdegni lnstwfkor hj 




the 



Siog. Nom. Lo lio (a) the uncle 

use of the Article Zo, dello^Mo^aUo^ before 
the 4$" imfiura^ Petrarch sajt, Essendo il spirto 
dal bel nodb tcioUo : and Ariotto, Che delW li» 
'^uid* ifnde at specchio siede. Yet our best prote- 
writerj are very tenacions of this rule. They 
eren go so far as to add an / to the word begia- 
aiiag with an S impura^ when they cannot 
change the preceding word ending in a consonant, 
•nd they sajr. lo soho siato in IspagnOf instead 
of Spagna : Se non isbagliOf instead of Se nom 
dfjMglio. ^ 

(i) Gigli thinks that the plural of £o scoglio 
should he excepted from this role, to aroid the 
hsrshness of GU scoglif etc. 

(2) Bnomroattei is of opinion , that we ooght 
fo saj ii Zio in the sin|;ular, and GU Zii in the 
plural. I do not see. any reason for this irre^n- 
larity. In Florence I always heard Lo Zio^ and 
never // Zio. It it true , that thii irregularity, 
takes place in the word Dio^ especially in prose: 
For we say // Dio in the lingular, and gli 
Dti in the plaral j as II Dio de' CrisUuni, GU 



Geo. Dello zio 
Dat. Alio zio 
Ace. Lo zio 
Voc. O zio 
Abl. Dalto tio 

Plar. Nom. Gli zii 
G«n. Degii zii 
Dat. ^^// z/i 
Ace. Gli zii 
Voc. O zii 
Abl. Pa^/i zi7 



of the iiDcl« 
to the uncio 
the ancle 
O uncle 
from, or by 

uncle, 
the iinclet 
of the unclet 
to the unclet 
the unclet 
O uncles 
from, or by 

uncles. 



4t 



the 



the 



We make use of the same Article 
before the masculine nouns beginning 
•with a vowel ; only we cut off the 
Towel in the singular , and add an 
apostrophe^ as follows : 



^og. Ifom. Vamieo 
Gen. DelVamico 
Dat. All^amico 
Ace. Uamico 
Voc. O amico 
Abl. DaU'amico 



the friend 
of the friend 
to the friend 
the friend 
O friend 

from, or by the 
friend. 



I>ei d§*GentiH ; hot, in my opinion, this irre- 
Sttlari^'if better rronnded than the former, 
haying for its groond the eoftom. Quern penes 
athitrium e$t^ et jue^ et norma loquendi\ I said 
especially in prose^ for in verte I find Lo Dio 
efteotr. uaed, perhapt, becaase Lo J>io ^ appears 
more foooroua, more solemn, and majestio. 



44 

live, and the ablative (i). and serves 
both for the masculine and feminine 

fender : Di before a consonant^ and 
)'wilh an apostrophe before a vov^el, 
is the sign of the genitive. ^ before a 
consonant^ and ad before a vowel, is 
the mark of the dative : Da is that of 
the ablative, which, in my opinion , 
should not be altered before a vov^el , 
in order to distinguish the ablative from 
the genitive (2). 

(1) The indefinite Article has onljr the three 
aforesaid cases, the others Veing easily understood 
without any sign. If I say Pietro patda, there is 
BO occasion for any Article : if Peter is the person 
who speaks, Peter is the first case, viz, the agent, 
that is to say, the nominative : if I say, Jo amor 
Pietro^ every one sees, that here Peter is the 
subject 0cted upon by another, that is to say^ 
Uie accusative. The vocative, likevise, is easily- 
known without any Articles ; for in the vocative 
we always speak to a thing which is either present 
.•r looked upon as present $ as 

Coriesi Donne, che benigna udienza 
Date a miei ^ersi. (Ariosto canto 38. ) 

Ingiustitsimo amor, perehi si raro 
Coriispondenti fai Ho%tri desiril (Id m.) 

(s) It is a general rule, that Di serves for 
the genitive. A. for the dative. Da for the abla- 
tive \ yet we sometimes use the one for the 
other ; as 

Si ienil dentro di dolcttta oppre$9o 

X di pieioso affeilo tovco U core* (Ariosto.) 



45 

Indefinite Article before a eonionant. 

Nom. LondrGf Loodoo. 

Geo« Di LondrUi of London. 

Dat. A Londra to Loodon* 

Ace. Londra London. 

Toe* Londra^ or Q Londra (i), Loodoa 

or O London. 
Abl. Da LondrOf from London. 

Indefinite Article before a FoweL 

Nom Alessandro^ Alexander 

Ceo. 2>' Aiessandro of Alexander. 

Dat. Ad Alesiandro to Alexander. 

Ace. Aiessandro Alexander. 

Voc. Aiessandro » or O AUssandrot 

O Alexander. 
Abl. Da Aiessandro , from or by A1e< 
xander. 

Il 18 a very difficult matter to deter- 
niiue wlieu we must make use of the 

Here Di is osed instead of Da, A is sonietimea 
nscd instead of Di^ as In ahUo di peregrini hen 
forniti a danari e gioft. (Bocc. 3 9) Somctiniea 
instead of Da, ^mtndue gli ftet pigUart a frt 
iuoi itn^itcri (Bocc. s. 6.) Da is likewise seme- 
times osed instead of A^ as f7 menerb da ieif 
t son certo ch' tUa vi conoicerh^ (Boco. s. lo. 

(1) Tbe particta O may be cither prefixed to 
the Tocatiye or left out* 

O tu che gli anni pmiod e tort 
~ Sfi' vani studi oomumando vai\ (Cotta) 



. 46 . . 

indefinite Article. Custom is the onlj 
rule in this pointy as in many others. 
Some lay it down as a general rule, 
that all proper names take the indeh« 
nite Article. Although this rule be subject 
to many exceptions, yet it may be of 
some use : For this reason. 
Dio, or Jddioy God, {Iddio is used 
only in the nominative) is declined 
with the indefinite Article, because he is 
only one, except when it is preceeded 
by an adjective, pronoun, or followed 
by some words which imply possession 
and dominion, (i) 

Papoy on the contrary, when it stands 
by itself, d;s a substantive, takes the 
definite Article : II Papa fece solen- 
nemente celebrate le sponsulizie. (Bocc. 
2. 3.) But when it is followed by a 
proper name, it is used with the inde- 
finite Article 5 as Papa Boni/azio^ Papa 
Benedetto eic.Di Papa Bonifazioy Di 

(1) The following exemples from MeUnMio 
•oufirm what I have asserted above. 

Ecco il fin de'malvagi^ Iddio ^U $€(ff'r§ 

Ftlici un tempo. ^'^ ■— . . 

Lode al gran Dio che oppresic 

Gli empj nemici suoi, 

Tutto son pieno 

Tutto del vostro />io.«— — — 

j^ltri non amo ; 

Non conosco altro Dio che it Dio d*jtbramo» 



47 
Papa Benedetto etc. likewise, Santo^ 
Santa^ FratCy Suora^ Monsignore, etc. 
admit of the definite Article, wbea 
they stand alone as II Santo , La San* 
ttty il Frate^ La Suora^ etc. but they 
take the indefinite Article, when they 
are joined to a substalive ; San Pietro, 
Santa Teresa , Fra Bernardo , Suor 
Serqfina , Monsignor Dalla Casa , 
elc. (i). 

^ (i) Observe that Santo, Frate^ Suora^ Monti' 
inorcy are abridged : We likewise abriilge Uno^ 
belloy buono^ ^rande, quello y and say Vn men , 
bel soggiornoy buon pbne^ gran teatro^ quel libra | 
bat wbeo the aforesaid words are ftiUowed bjr a 
noun beginning with an S impura, or a Z, ift 
that case they admit of no abridgment, and w* 
say, Santo Stefano^ Frate Zenobio^ Bello Studio^ 
and so oo. When they precede a word beginning 
with a vowel, they take an apostrophe thus, 
Sant*AntoniOy Quell* uomo^ Grand* jimivo , and 
to forth. This last is abridged both in the mat* 
coline and feminine gender both in the singu- 
lar and plural number ; for we $a^yy Gran pala%» 
zOf Gran casa, gran palazzi, gran case. In short 
we generally cut off the last vowel, when it if 
preceded by Z, J/, iV, il, /acil soggetto, fartm 
coiiy men caro^ cuor generoso \ instead of facilt 
soggetto, faremo cosi, meno caro, cuore generoso | 
though it would not be a fault to §iy faciie sog- 
gettOf etc. Hence it appears how false is the charge 
of monotony which some foreigners bring against 
the Italian language, imdgining that all the Ita« 
lian words end in a vowel. There is a rent in Pe- 
trarch containing dight different words, and there 
are but two ending in a vow«L The rtno is tb« 
following. 

Fior frond' erb* ombr^ ond' aure soa^i. 



48 

PietrOy 'Antonio^ F'ittoria, Elisahet^ 

ta, and other proper names, take the 
indefinite Article, ex^^ept when they 
denote an individual distinction, or a 
particular appellation , especially the 
author, or the subject of some com- 
position : For instance. La Fiammetta 
del Boccaccio^ La Merope del Maffeiy 
U Orlando' delV Ariosto , U Aminta 
del ' TassOy II Temistocle del Meta- 
stasia. We say also , I Dandy I Pe- 
trarchi, I Tassiy in the plural ; ob- 
serve, however, that when we put the 
ii^mes before the surnames, then we 
make use of the indefinite Article , 
even when we speak of an author, as 
Lodovico AriostOy Torquato TassOy Pie- 
tfo Metastasioy etc. (i). 

You must here take notice of a pe- 
culiarity of the Italian language with 

(i) what I have said concerning the name and 
tarnames, may be obseryed in the fonoi^in^ 
stanza of Ariosto. 

Lh Bernardo Capet, Ih veggo Pietro 
Bembo^ che I'l puro^ e dolce idioma nostra 
Levato fuor del volgar uso tetro, 
Qual e$ser dee, ci ha col suo esempio mostro* 
Gaspar Ohizi i quel che li vien dietro 
Ch*ammira,e ossen^a ilsi benspeso inchiostroi 
lo veggo it FracastorOf il Bevazzano^ 
Tr{fon GabrieUy e il Tasso pii^ toniano. 

Canto 4^. 



49 
respect to proper names, which is, 

thai tbejr are someliiiies put .in the 

genitive case wilh an adjective or a 

substantive before them : as // catti- 

i;eUo di Calandrino (Bocc.) Quel buon 

omaccino del Coltellini (Salvini). 

The proper names of towns are used 

with the indefinite article, as Londra^ 

Parigiy Roma, etc. Di Londra, di Pa- 

rigi, di Roma^ and so on* We must 

except some few which admit of tho 

definite Article , as // Cairo, La Mi- 

randola^ II Borgo San Sepolcro , and 

perhaps a few more that 1 do not now 

recollect* 

The proper names of the parts of 
the world , of kingdoms , countrie^.^, 
islands (i), rivers etc. may be used 
either with the definite or with the 
indefinite Article ; therefore , in this 
respect the most approved custom is to 
be followed. 

When we intend to mark the mater>- 
ials of any thin^ whatever, we make 
use of the indebnite genitive, and say^ 

(0 With respeet to isUDdi, lome of them Admff 
•f well of tho deBnite, af of tho indofinito Ar* 
tfole ^ at Corsica , or La Corsica , Sardegaa , or 
La Sardigna tie. Some admit only of tho definite 
Art ole, ai // Gigtio^ L'Etba^ La Gorgena > soiu* 
othors tako only the iiidefiottOt at C/prOf Cor/ilkt 
MuJQrca^ Minorca^ MaUa^ Liparif Negropontg^ 



So 
It mortajo di pletra , La ghirlanda 
d' alloroy le colonne di porfidoy etc. 
provided we take such materials ia a 
general and indeterminate sense. 

We likewise make use of the inde- 
finite genitive when we speak of aa 
employment, or office in an indetermi- 
nate manner ; as Gli uomini di corte^ 
I soldati di guardia, etc. 

The indefinite genitive is also used 
when we speak of a thing contained 
within another ; as Una cassa di zuc^ 
chero , Una botte di vino , etc, : or 
when we intend to denote the posses- 
sion, or the belonging of one thing to 
another; as II padron di casa^ II re 
di Francioy La sala di tVestminster. 

When in English some before a noun 
is either expressed or understood, wei 
make use of the definite genitive Dei^ 
Delloy Detlaj as Portatemi del pane, 
Datemi della Carne, etc* 



(t) Sometimet we omit the Artielei and tajr* 
lo mangio carne^ EgU bet^e vino^ or Jo non man^ 
gio carne ; egU non beve vino ; but then properly 
•peftking we mean. In non m' asiengo dal man-" 
giar carne^ BgU non s'asiiene dal ber vino^ or lo 
m'attengo^ ate. 



5 1 

PIUXM UPON ARTICLES. 

Without a (i) friend the world (is 

Stnza amieo m, mondo m» {non 

but) a wilderness. 

^ che deterto m, ~ 

Prosperity ( 2 ) gains friends ^ and 

Protperith f. proeura amici m, 

adversity (tries them.) 

{flweniih /. U prcva,') 

Honour, like life , when once lost 
Onore m, come vita f, una volta perduiQ 
never returns. 

mat ritoma, 

Man (is but) a composition of good 

Uomo {non i che) composto bene 

and evil ; diamonds have flaws , and 

male diamanti m» hanno maglie f. 

roses have prickles \ and the sun has 

ro$e f. hanno spine /. toU m» ha 

its shade ; and the moon her spots. 

tika omhra f. luna f. sue macchie f. 

To-day ought to be the disciple of 

dot^rehbe e$ter discepolo m* 

yesterday : it is a great advantage to 

E* gran t^antaggio m* 



(1) A UnCf for tbe msMiilitte, ami una for tha 
Itminioe ^ and they are doclised with tho iodefi* 
Aite Article. 

(3) In £ng1ifh, when noons are taken in their 
w'ideft seofe as Protperity^ Honour^ Man. Philo" 
tophy^ etc. they are declioed with the Indefinite 
Article ; hot in Italian they are alwajry deoUaed 
with the definite Article* 



52 

learirwhat is to be avoided by the 

imparare quel che i da ^uggirsi 

misfortunes of others. 

disgrazie f. altii m» 

Pride ( should be ) by youDg men 

Superbia f, (dovrehbe essere) giovini m . 

caretully avoided ; by old men utterly 

evitata vecchi m. 

dispised, and by^ all men suspected and 

sprezzata tutti uomini tospettata 

feared. 

temuia, 

y Some things (are wanting) to poverty, 

. cose f, {mancano) poverih f» 

but all things are vvanting to avarice. 

tutit cose avarizia f. 

Beauty without virtue is like poison 

Bellfzia f. senza virtik f, come vtUno nu 

concealed in a gold box. 

nascosto oro scalo/a f. 

To bei angry is to revenge the faults 

Andare in colitra vendicart , falii m, 

of Others upon ourselves. 

allri m, sopra not sUssL 

The satisfaction derived from revenge 

iodditfazione f, derivata vendttta f. 

is only momentary \ but that which 

momentanea ma qtulla che 

(is to be gained) from clemency lasts 
(sf a^quisia) eUmenza f. dura 

for ever. 

per umpre 

The first duly of a sovereign is to 

pnmo dovtre m. sorrano m* di 



53 
consider of everj thing, and to remember 

eonsiderare ogni cosa J. rieordarsi 

that he has himself two sovereijgns , 

ehe egU ha due sovrani 

God and the Law. 
Dio ^t$*A 

This is a law that should be observed 

Qiuita U$$€ /• che dovrtbht eaere omrvata 

betwixt the giver and the receiver.: 

fra donatore m. donatario m» 

the one should instantly forget the 

un(f dovrebbe dimenticare 

benefit he has conferred, and the other 

henefitio m, ehe ha confirito altro 

should always have it in remembrance. 

dovrebbe averlo in mtmoria, 

Onr passions are like the seas agitated 

19o»tre paisioni f, $ono come mari m. agitati 

by the winds ; and . as God has set 

venti fa, ha posto 

bounds to these^ so should we^ to tnose j^ 

Umiti m, ^uesii : eo$i noi dcvremmo^ ifuelie 
(so far they shall go and no farther.) 

{si ayanzeranno tanto e non ^ pi^*) 

Philosophy is then only valuable, 

Filoiofia f. 

when (it serves) for the law of life , 

{serve) ^ ^H^^\ ^^^^f* 

and not for the ostentation of science. 

oiteniazione fi soienta fi 

' ' ' •» 't • . i . 

OF THE NOUN. 

The noun « called by the ancient 
Latins, ihe name by which thing are 

4 



vi 



understood (i), is commonly divided 
into substantive and adjective. The sub« 
stantive is that which can stand by it* 
self in the sentence without the help 
of any other noun : for instance.. Casa^ . 
Chiesa are siibstantive nouns ; because 
they can subsist by themselves vvithout 
expressing whether the house is hand- 
some or ngly, whether the church is 
large or small ; and for this reason they 
are called substantives, bearing a re- 
semblance to the substance defined by 
philosophers , that which Subsists by 
Uself. The adjective is a word added 
to a substantive to express its quality, 
as Un uomo buono , un panno . nero» 
Sometimes the substantive is understood 
as when we say , I buoni amano la 
virtu } il nero di questo panno non mi 
place. In the i former example we 
understand uominiy in the latter, colo\ 
re ; they may therefore be called adjec- 
tives converted into substantives , or 
used like substantives. The substantive 
nouns are divided into ^onimon and 

f)roper 5 common, called likewise appel- 
atives, are those which may be appro- 
priated to many tfaiags; as l/omo, Citti^ 
Fiume, which may be applied to' all 

(i) FAUkulm»^ per quod res inHXU^untun 



55 
men^ cities, and rivers. Proper names 
are those i^btch are peculiar to one 
thing or person only, as Parigiy Pirert" 
ze^ Carloy Alessandro. Nor does it 
signify that there are several persons 
called bj the same name, since we may 
say/ that one person has the proper 
name of another, and hence the necessity 
of family names is derived. 

I said that the adjective nonns are 
those which express the quality of a 
substantive. Now as the quality may 
be expressed in three different degrees^ 
viz. simply, I mean without any aug- 
mentation or diminution, as BuonOf Cat" 
tipo, GrandCf Piccolo^ or with some 
augmentation or diminution, as Miglio^ 
re, Peggiorey Maggidre, Minor e ; and 
finally with all the excess of augment- 
ation or diminution, as Onimo, PessU 
mo, GrandissimOy Piecolissimo : m it 
follows, that the first are called positives^ 
the second comparatives , the third 
superlatives. As in the Italian language 
not every positive has its own compar- 
ative, (which is mostly the case in 
English) our language not admitting of 
Bello^ BelliorSf Sat^io, Saviore, 9a the 
English say , handsome , handsomer ^ 
wise^ wiser ^ we are fprced to b^vi^ 
recourse to piU to augmea| the positive 



56. 
as, JB cosa pericolosa il j^darsi a un^ 
piii forte di noi (Salv.) and to meuQ 
to diminish it, as^ 

Quanta ciascuna h men bella di leiy 

Tantocresce il desio cbe m'innamora, 

(Petr.) 

It must be observed here, that io 
our comparisons we chiefly use the 
article of the genitive case, where the 
English make use of than , and the 
French of gue (i) ; and in this wc 
imitate the Greek language. 

Vhen we mean to heighten or lesseo 
our comparisons, we say, via piu, via 
menOy assai piii, assai meno, molta piu^ 
molto meno ; as V Asia i via pi^y ov 
assai piiiy or molto piu popolata dell hu- 
ropa. U Africa h via meno or assai 
meno, or molto meno popolata dell Eu- 

ropa (2). , ,. t 

The superlatives in the Italian lan- 

(,\ We sometfines nse of che i« our eomparU 
.on.; but only before . verb .n.d,e^^^^^^^^ 
•n adverb; as. Le cone mal fatte, e dtjran lungB 
Zssaii S9no troppopO^ agB^'i ariprtndere, che ad 

'fio ; e meglio tardi, che mai. ^ItSnk 

U^ There 1. another fort of compariioo, which 
1. af lollowf: U mio arnica i si, or co«, or tanto. 
or aUrettanto fedete quanta U vostr^i ^.^JV^!Z 
Is as faithful as yours. We ^^^ ^'j^t }l "^^ 
out si, cosi, tanto, altrettanto, and »ay. H nuo 



gnage (some few excepted) (i) are 
formed from the positive^ changing the 
last vowel into issimoy if masculioe, into 
issima, if feminine, as Bella, Bellissi- 
moy Bella, Bellissima (2) ; and this 
might be called superlative absolute, 
because it expresses a quality in the 
highest degree without any relation to 
any other thing, and is turned into 
English, i^ery handsome. But when the 
English put before the adjective the 
particle most, and say, the most hand^ 
some, or the handsomest, then the Italian 
express this superlative thus, II piu bello. 
La piu bella; as, 

Discolorato hai Morte il piu bet volto 

Che mai si vide. (Petr.^ 

Deh eonservate 

ha piu belVopra nostra, eterni Dei ! 

(Metas.^ 

This superlative may be called relative, 
because it expresses the quality in the 
bigbest decree, but with relation to 
4^nother thing. 

We sometinies repeat the positive. 



<i) The f vperlatiTef, wfaicli Mtt not formed 
from the potitiref , ere Ottimo^ Ptaimo^ Maisimo^ 
Miinimo^ Supremo^ Infimo^ end perhaps e few 
others, which are taken from the Latin. 

(ft) CeUhre^ integro^ talubre, make ctUhenimo, 
uUegtrrimOf saluberrimo. 



58 
and then it is considered as a superla- 
tive : Elle si vorrebbon vive vwe met^ 
ter nel fuoco (Bocc. 5. lo.) Basi e di^ 
ventb piccin piccino (Buon.) We may 
also reckon amongst the superlatives 
the three follov^iog modes of expres* 
sion, viz. Dolente senza modo, Lieto 
fuor di misura, Avs^enturato senza fine. 

The superlative adverbs are compos- 
ed by changing the last vowel of the 
superlative noun into amente; as from 
Poverissimo , Poverissimamente , from 
Felicissimo , Felicissimamente , except 
benissimo, ottunamentet and perhaps a 
few more^ which I do not now re- 
member. 

The nouns both susbtantive and 
adjective admit of some augmentation 
or diminution in their own simple and 
positive signification by adding to tbem 
only some syllables at the end of the 
words ; and this is a beauty peculiar to 
the Italian language. 

They admit of an auj^mentation by 
changing the last vowel into one, ona, 
ottay occio, occia, accio, accia ; as^ from 
uomo we make uomone , or rather 
omone , and omaccione , a very bulky 
man ; uomotto , uomoccio , or rather 
omottOy omacciotto, omoccioy a tallish 
qf nnf fpHow : uomQCCio I or omaccf^ . 



^minaccioy a tail, clumsy, and worthtesa 
fellow : from donna we make Jo/i- 
nona f or rather donnone (i) a stout- 
manly woman y donnotta y donnoccia ^ 
a woman rather tall and stout ; don* 
naccia , an impudent and despicable 
woman. Observe that the two last ter* 
minations accioy accia^ are always used 
in a contemptible sense ; whereas the 
others are on\j augmentative , and 
convey no bad meaning. 
^ Our language abounds with diminu- 
tives. We make use of them to shew 
either contempt or kindness. The di- 
piinutiyes of contempt commonly end 
in uccio (t)^ upola, aglia^ ame, iciat" 
€0y icduoloy icciuola ; as uomuccioj or 
omuccio , a little insignificant fellow j 
casuppolaj a small contemptible house; 
gentaglia , geniame , the dregs of the 

(i) Althoagh W€ often hear io eommoa cow 
TertatioB, dcnnona^ campanona^ etc. yet the beat 
«othorf, and those who tpeak properly ^ ose to 
make them maaeoline | aa for ina taaee. 

Tu $ei un hel donnone 
Da non trovar nella tua beUhfondo. (Beroi) 
Suonate il campanone^ ecco il eomiglio 
I>elU vedoift ch'tmra. (Baoaarroti.) 

(9) Uccio it aometiinef a diminotive of kind- 
neat } aa , il mio caro vecchiuccio , my poor old 



6o 
people ; uomiciatto, or omiceiatto^ omU 
ciattolo, a poor silly fellow; libric* 
ciuoloy or libercolOf a small iosignificant 
book 'y donnicciuolay a contemptible little 
woman. The diminutives of kindness 
end in inoj ettOj elloy in the masculine 
and in ina^ etta^ ella^ in the feminine ; 
as PoverinOy poveretto^ poQerello ; Po- 
verinay poverettay poverellcy poor crea- 
ture, or poor little creature. 

There are a great many more dimin- 
utives in the Italian language y which 
it would be too tedious to mention. 
We have even diminutives of diminu- 
tives ; as Bambinelluccioy vecchiettinOy 
vecchierellinOy and the like ; but the^e 
things will be better learned by pract- 
ice, the master of all languages 5 usus 
te plura docebit. 

In the Italian language^ nouns, both' 
substantive and adjective, have a differ- 
ent termination in the plural. The rule 
is as follow : the nouns ending in A 
in the singular (is feminine > as they 
chiefly are) end in E in the plural : as 
Donnay Donne^ Principessa^ Principes" 
sCy etc. if they are masculine, their 
plural ends in / , as PoetCy Poetiy Pro^ 
fetoy Profetiy etc. All nouns ending in 
.E, or O in the singular, whether mas« 
culine or feminine, terminate in 1 in 



6i 
tli« plural ; ai Padre Padri , Madre 
Madri , Maestro Maestri (i), Mano 
Manif etc. We mast except from tbU 
rale a few nouns, which, ending in E 
in the singular, retain the same termi* 
nation in the plural j as Spezie^ mfigi^% 
Superficiey Requicy and perhaps a yerj 
few others, if any. 

The nouns which end in 1 in the 
singular , such as Diocesi , Ipotesi , 
Estasij Antitesiy Metamorfosi, etc. are 
not subject to any yariation in the 
plural, and the diflference of the number 
4S sufficiently pointed out by the article. 

None of the nouns which have aa 
accent upon their last vowel, and no 
monosyllables, vary in the plural : and 
•we say. La Citta, La Virtu, II Re, in 
the singular, and Le Cittdj Le Virt&^ 
1 Re, in the plural. These nouns are 
curtailed, originally being Cittade, or 
Cittatey Virtude, or Virtute, Rege^ etc. 
but now we leave tbem entirely to 
poets. Exam. 

Parebbe il sua dolor pietade a un sasso. 

(MeUs.) 

Hqu k ifera pietade. 



(i) Uomo «i«k«f uomini in th« plnraK «b4 
VQmi. 



6» 

Quella che mosira, nd, ma crudeltade. 

(Menage.) 

E Vesser da te tfinte, e in guerra dome 

Recansi a gloria le provincie, e i Regi^ 

(Tasso.) 

I now proceed to point out some 
irregularities to which several nouns 
are subject. 

Some masculine nouns admit of a 
double singular; as Cavaliere^ Cai^a^ 
lierOf Console, Consolo, Destriere, DS" 
strierOj Leggiere, Leggier Oy Pensiere, 
PensierOy Mestiere, Mestiero, etc. but 
their plural is always in Z, according 
to the rule above fixed for the nouns 
ending in £ or in O in their singular. 

There are some feminine nouns which 
have a double singular and a double 
plural J Frode, Froda, Fronde, Fronda, 
Ale, Ala^ Arme, Arma, Lode, Loda^ 
Canzone, Canzona (i) They make ia 
the plural , Frodi , Frode , Frondi , 
Fronde, AH, Ale^ Armi, Arme, Lodi, 
Lode, Canzoni, Canzone. These nouns 
are always feminine in both their sin- 
gulars and both their plurals. 

There are, however, others which 
have at the same time two singulars 

(x) I do not find Canzona rtry mach nted 
by the best authorf, yet it it Very common all 
oyer Tuicany. 



«iid two plurals^ one masculinef the 
other feminine j as II fonte^ La fonte^ 
li folgore^ La folgore^ 11 fine^ La 
Jiney il careers, La carcere; and in 
the plural, I fontl, Le fonti, etc. 

There are besides some nouns, which, 
though they have only one singular, 
have however a double plural , one 
masculine, the other feminine, as Ca^ 
Stella, Braccio, Labbro, Osso, Ciglio^ 
DitOy FilOf Ginocchio, Corno, Grido^ 
Lenzuolo, Membra^ Legno^ etc. which 
make in the plural^ I castelli^ and Le 
casiella, I bracci, Le braccia^ I lab* 
hri, Le labbra, and so on. 

Finally, you will find some nouns 
wanting the singular, and some others 
wanting the plural : for instance, Ese* 
ijuie , Nozze , Vanni , (i), Spezie , 
{when it means aromati) Reni, are 
without singular $ Niuno , Nessuno , 
Veruno , Ciascuno , Qualche, Qualcu' 
no , Ciascuno , Ognuno , Qualunque , 
Qualswoglia, Ogni^ are without plural, 
although they commonly say in Tu- 
scany Ognissanti^ Nessuni , etc. We 
likewise read in Boccaccio, I miei qf* 



(l) F'anni It only a poetioal wofd. 
Si chs 0l miia voio /* 4m addwpi i vanni» 

(Peer.) 



«4. 

fanni ogni altri trapassano ; and ia 
Petrarch. Addormentato in qualche i^er* 
di boschL But in this they are not to 
be followed. 

The nouas ending in Co or in Go, 
in the singular^ if you except Porcoy 
which makes Porci^ take an H in the 
plural, when either of these two ter- 
minations is preceded by a consonant: 
as SolcOy Solchi ; Arcuy Archly Alber* 
gOj Alberghi ; etc. but when Co and 
Go are preceded by a vowel, they are 
then turned sometimes into Ci and Giy 
.sometimes into Chi and Ghiy for which 
there is no fixed rule, it depending 
entirely on practice 5 for instance, Ca- 
nonico or Calonaco (as they say in 
Tuscany ), Nemicoy MedicOy Monacoy 
Istoricoy make in the plural Canonici 
or Caloniciy Nemiciy Medici^ Manaciy 
Istorici ; on< th^ contrary, -^/ifiVo, C/e- 
coy AbbacOy Fico, FuocOy make in the 
plural Antichiy Ciechi, Abbachiy Fichiy 
Fuochi ; Mago , Astrologo , Sparago , 
joiake in the plural Magiy AstroJ.ogiy 
Sparagi i and Drago j Spago y Ago, 
Piegj>^ JntrigOy make JDraghiy Spaghi, 
Agffii Intrighiy etc. 

As for feminine nouns ending in Ca 
or Gay they are subject to no irre-^ 
gularity, since they all end ia €^Ae and 



65 
in Chef in the plural j Iheretore Mtisi^ 
ca^ Parcay Verga^ Spranga^ etc. make 
in the plaral Musicne^ Parchej Verghe^ 
Spranghe^ etc. 

We aofDetimes make use of foreign 
names eodiog in a coosonant} as^/a/ie/y 
Natauy etc. these in tbeir own original 
termination without any change are 
indeclinable, and we should say, Molte 
Alatiely Mold Natan etc. but when 
we give them an Italian termination, 
as Alatielle , Natanno , etc. which is 
▼ery often the case, as for example, 
we say, Gerusalemme, Gabriello^ Aaf- 
faelloy etc. they then become declinable, 
and are governed by the same rule as 
other Italian names. 

With respect to the gender of sub- 
stantive nouns although there is no ge- 
neral rule how to form the feminine 
from the masculine, yet, when they 
end in A in the singular, we often 
make the feminine gender in essa ; as 
// poeta , La poetessa , 11 pto/eta , 
ha projetessay etc. Those ending in E 
sometimes are turned into Ibe feminine 
gender by changing E into essa ; as 11 
principe , La principessa ', sometimes 
only changing E into A 'y m II mar^ 
chese. La marchesa, 11 padrone, La 
padronay etc. 



66 

Finally^ when the mascdline noon 
ends in- oj^e, as Imperatore^ Elettorey 
etc. the feminine often ends in trice ^ 
as Imperatrice, Elettricey etc. 

With respect to the adjectives^ which 
in English are indeclinable and in Ita- 
lian declinable, there is a general rule 
how to form the feminine from the 
masculine. Those adjectives which in 
the masculine end in O must always 
end in A in the feminine, as Caro pa- 
drsj Cara madre. Those which end in 
£ in the masculine do not alter their 
termination in the feminine 5 and we 
say as well Verde prato ^ as Verde 
piantCj though one is masculine and 
the other feminine. 

There are some adverbs of quantity^ 
as TantOf Malta j Trappa^ which often 
become adjectives and agree with the 
substaDtive, not only in the number^ 
but also in the gender ; as Tanta gen^ 
tey molte persane^ trappi affari. On 
the contrary , there are adjectives , 
which sometimes become adverbs. Thus 
Guarini says in his Pastor Fido : 
Che se ben dritta mira 
Questi beni mortali 
Altra nan son che mali 
And Tasso. 

Came i ministri al dura afficia intend 



«7 
Ptde : ^reeipitoso urii le gemi. 

Dritte is for drittamenie^ precipUosQ 
ior precipitosamente. 

There are nouns which denote nam-^ 
ber, and are called numeral : they are 
divided into cardinal or absolute^ ordi- 
naly distribative^ and collective. 

Cardinal (i), or absolute, are those 
that imply number aljisolutely ; b$ Vno^ 
Unay DuCy (2) Tre, Quattroy Cinoue, 
Seij Settey Oteo, ^we, Dieciy Undiei, 
Dodiciy Trediciy Quaitordieiy Quindieiy 
Sediciy Diciassette, DicioUo, Dician* 
noi^e, Fenti, yenumo ^i), Feniidue, etc. 
Trenia, Quarantay Cinquantay Sessan^ 

(1) Thejr are called Cardinal from the^ LaiIb 
word CardOf beio|* the fooodattOB aad origin of 
other Dam here. 

(2) We ofien hear io Floreooe Dua isftead of 
l>iie, bnt we onlj bear it horn the nooth pf 
rolgar aod i^ooraot people, and there it no in- 
staoce of it id good aathora. la poetrj we often 
meet with Duo aod Dui^ af| 

Lo splendor ferl gli ocehi ai duoftaUlH, 

(Petr.) 
J>i lei degno egU^ e degno ella di lui \ 
Ni migUo #' aceoppiaro unqu' altri dui, 

(Ariofto.) 

(3) Oheerre, that when the nomber Fentuno^ 
TreniunOf etc. precedea e aobftantiye, theinbitan- 
tire if alwaja iiognlar $ at, Fentuno Scudo^ Tren* 
tun' anno ', bnt when the a amber followfithea the 
•obftaatire if plural } of, 

Tennemi Jmon anni i^eniuno ardtndo, (Petr.) 



ia, Settanla^ OttaHta, ffoQanta, C^ntOy 
DugentOy TrecentOy Milley Duemila, 
Milione y ' etc. These are commonly 
adjectives, for we say, Vn uomoy Una 
donna y DuefratelUy Tre sore lie, Ceu" 
to personcy etc. though they are some- 
times used substantively ; as U uno^ 
II duoy II trey etc. and at play we say^ 
Tre cinquiy Tre settiy Tre novi, etc* 

Ordinal numbers are those wiiich 
point out the order and the place of 
one thing with respect to another ; as 
Primoy Secondoy TerzOy QuartOy Quin^ 
tOy SestOy Settbnoy OttavOy Nona; Do" 
eimoy UndecimOy DuodecimOy DecimO' 
terzOy DecimoquartOy etc. P^entesimo, 
yentesimoprimOy etc. TrentesimOy Qua' 
rantesimoy Cinquantesimo y Sessantesi' 
mOy Settantesimoy OttantesimOy No^an^ 
lesimOy Centesimoy MillesimOy Penul- 
timo , Ultimo. These are commonly 
adjectives 3 for we say^ 11 primo tomOy 
La seconda edizione. La terza vol^ 
tay etc. 

It is true that we sometimes say, 
Un terzOy Un quartOy Un quinto^ etc. 
but there is then a substantive under- 
stood, viz. parte, and we mean, Una 
terza parte , una quarta parte , etc. 
These are called distributives. 

Lastly^ the collectives are those wbich 



69 
express a determinate qnantity $ as Una 

decina^ una ventina^ un centinajo^ un 

migliajoy etc. These are always sub* 

stantives. 

PRAXIS UPON NOUNS. 

Among the precepts and aphorisms 

Fra precetto m, aforismo m* 

admitted by general consent , and 

ommesso consenso m» 

inculcated by frequent repetition, (there 

inculcato fnqutntt riptiiuont f, inon ¥t 

is none) so famous amongst the masters 

n'i alcuno) co$l /amosa maestro m^ 

of ancient wisdom, than that compen* 

antico $apitnz%f, quanto quello succin' 

dious lesson : ( Be acquainted with 
to Uzione f. ( Conoici te Heao ) 

thyself (i) 
Superficial people are more agreable 

Superficiale ' gente f, i piaoevoU 

the lirst time ( you are ) in (2) their 

prima voltaf, (che voi siete) loro 

company, than ever afterward : men of 

compagnia/, dipoi uomo 

(i) No tee te iptum, 

(9) When there if an article after the prepo* 
•ilion i^f we do not fay in iL in lOf in /a, etc. 
but nelt nello^ nella^ etc. at 2ve/ prato^ nello sti&» 
dioy nell'amore^ nella campagna^ and in the plural, 
Ne\ or nei pratif negU studjf negU amori^ nelU 
campagne» 



, 70 

judgment improve every succeeding 

giudizio m, piaccieno pUi ogni successivo 

conversalion: beware therefore of judging 

convenazione /, guardatwi durnque giudicure 

by one intervieiv. 

dbboccamento m. 

People are very apt to compare their 

Alcuni seno incUmato paragonare loro 

present situation with the best that is 

preseiUe stato m. con (i) migUore che 

past, or with a better of other people's : 

passat^ aitri 

whereas quite the contrary would always 

iaddof^e contrario S4irehbe sempre 

be more politic , and generally more 

poiUico 

reasonable. 

ra^ionevolei 

Men and statues that are admired in 

Vonw statuaf. ch€ tono nmmirato 

an elevated situation have a very different 

tk^ato siiuazionef. hanno differenie 

eftect upon us when we approach them. 

^«aw. moi ci uecoitiamo 

Ihe first appear less than (we imarin- 

pnmo sembrano Coe U jUu- 

ed them,) the last bigger. ^ 

rammo) ^ ultimo grande. 

Learning is like mercury, one of the 

r, we iay CO/, and colV in the .iognlar, 9.% Col 
$enno, coll amove, and coi, or co', aod cozU. or 



7» 
most powerfbl and excellent things ia 

poUnte tecelieute eosa f.^ 

the world in skilful hands, in unskilful 

tnondom, perito mono/, imperiio 

most mischievous. 

perieoioio, 

A man writes very often much better 

icrwe ■ spesMo megiio 

(than he lives :) he proposes his schemes 

(phe non ¥ive) propone piano m. 

of life in a state of abstraction and 

vita f, staio m. a8tra%*onef» 

disengagement , exempt from the 

libeHhf. 

enticements of hope, the solicitations of 

lu$in%a f, iptranzaf. instigazione f,^ 

affections, the importunities of appetite, 

ajfetto m. impoHunith f. appetito nt. 

or the depressions of fear , and is in 

avifUimento m, timore* 

the same state (with him that) teaches 

medeumo staio m, {di ehi) insegna 

upon land the art of navigation , to 

terra fi arte f, navigaxione f, 

whom the sea is always smooth, and 

cui mart m, sempre tranquiUo 

the wind always prosperous. 

vento m, fa^'onvole. 

It is good for a man to wish the best 

i bene per uomo deeiderare 

to mediute upon (i) the worst , and 

meditate $u 

(I) When thit preposition $u U foUowed hy tho 
•rtiole i7, iottead of laying $u il in. the ftngdiar, 
and $u i in the plaral, w6 eay «»/, and #»', of 
#111 1 aa Sul pratOf su\ or $ui nr^*'' 



7« 
l^tiently to snfFer whatsoever (does 

iof/rirt gualunqut 'C9Sa {ao- 

happen*.) 

cadm) 

We should take a prudeat care for 

Dovremmo prtndere cum f. per 

the future, (but so as to enjoy) the 

(i) futuro m, {ma in maniera di ^odtrt) 

present ; ( it is no part of wisdom } 

preiente m. {non 3 da uomo $a\^io) 

to be miserable to dajr, because ( we 

^sfere (pos- 

may happen to be so ) to morrow. 

siamo esserlo) 

A man (should never be ashamed) 

(non dovrebhe mai vergognarsi) 

to own, he has been in the wrong, 

^ confessare che ku sbagliato 

(which is but saying) in other words, 

(/o che vuol $oUant9 dire) altro parola f* 

that he is wiser to day (than he was) 
c&e eg// savio ( cht non era, ) 

yesterday^ 
^ As men are sometimes in an admirable 

-alcuaa voUa f, 

frame and disposition of mind , it 

mente /• 

should be one of the greatest tasks of 

dovrehhe essere impresa /. 

wisdom (to keep ourselves so,) and 

sapitnzaf, ( il consetvargi cosi) 



<a} See the aext Bete« 



. 73 
oeTer to go oat of that wfaicb i» the 

aUontanarci da guelh chg 

agreeable part of our character. 

parte f. caraitere fit. 

What scQlpiore is to a block of oiarble 

•Quel che tcuUmra petto in, marmom, 

edacation (is) to a human aoul. The 

educatiome (to i) umano anima f» 

philosopher^ the aaiot, the hero^ the 

fiUfsofo fit. $anto m- eroe m. 

wise, the good, or the great man lies 

gof^io huono gmnde uomo itan* 

hid and concealed in a plebeian, which 

no naeeotto eelato vUheo m. che 

a proper education might nave disinterred 

proprio educazione f. avrehhe potato diiotierrare 

and brought to Ij^ht; 

produrre mcefi 

Anciently the Romans worshipped 

Romano m- adoravano 

virtue and honor for gods : (whence 

*^irtU /. onore m. dio m. ip^^ 

it was that) they built two temples, 

cib) fahhricarono ttmpio m. 

which were so seated, as none could 

i qaali eramo talmenU eitaati che neituno potevo 

enter the temple of honor without 

entrare ntl m. ^ nnta 

passing through the temple of virtue. 

paisare per {i) m. 



(i) When the prepoiiCion per h followed bjr 
the article i7, we Mr Peif pe' or pei j •• pei tern- 
piOi pe\ or pei tempi* 



74 

There is a mean in all things; evea 

Vi mezzo m. tutto cosa f. fino 

virtue itself has its stated limits, which 

¥irtitf. tte$$o ha stabilito limite m. i quali 

not being strictly observed, it ceases 
non essendo o$$eivato tUd cessa 

to be virtue. 
di essere. 

Some old men, by continually prais* 

Alcuno vecchio m. lodan^ 

ing the time of their youth, vrould 

do tempo m. loro poventit f. vorrebbero 

almost (persuade us,) that there viere no 

( persuaderci ) che non vi erano 

fools in their days; but unluckily (they 

sciocco m. loro giomo m. ma (e$si 

are left themselves) for examples. 

sono stati lasciati) esempio m. 

When we are very young, we have 

siamo giot^anem. abbiamo 

scarcely an idea of becoming old, we 

idea f- diventar vecchio m. 

have scarce a remembrance of having 

ricordanza es$ere 

been young. 

Btati 

(We are always complaining) that 

(a lamentiamo coniinuamente^ che 

our days are few ) and (acting as if 

noUro giomo sono poco (pperiamo 

there would be no end of them.) 

come se non dovessero aver mai fine) 

Man is the only creature endowed 
soio creaiuraf, dotato 



75 



with the power of laogbter, (is he not) 

pofenxa f. ri^p m. {mon 4 egii} 

also the only one that deserves to be 

SQio tks meriia d't 

laaghed at ? 

dewiio. 



OF THS PRONOUlf • 

I now enter upon a very intricate 
subject. Buommattei bismelf has not 
treated it with sufficient prespicuity. 
I shall endeavour to explain it in the 
clearest manner I can. 

A pronoun is a vrord used instead 
of a noun , as its substitute , or repre* 
sentative (i). 

(i) ProDoan if deriredl from the LaCin Pro In- 
ftead, iod Nomen noon. It MiDetiines bappent, 
that we pan oyer id filenee tome namef, either 
from motiref of regpeetf hatred or ele|;aDce, aod 
often throoj^h necetfitj. The name if not men- 
tiooed oat of rererenee and respeet in the two 
foUowiog examplef* 

ji rivtrenza di cotui^ a eui^ttUU h eo$e vWono^ 

(Boce.) 
Chi per tante 
Ignote iolitudini infteonde 
Ci guidd, ci nutri^ poiremo ades$o 
Temer che n* ahhdndoni 7 (Metaf t.) 

Id the foUoii^inr ' irerf ef of Tm$$6 the name h 
omitted tbroagli hatred : 

Or colui regge a tup ¥ole^ U itelU^ 
E noi .$iam giudicaie alme ruhelte* 
After ths fire t time the same if left oat Ibr 



76 

Pronoun are divided into foor. priiv* 
cipal classes tiz. personal, possessive^^ 
demonstrative, and relative. 

OF THE PERSONAL PRONOUNS. 

Personal pronouns are those wbich 
denote persons, and are used instead of 
them. There are three persons which 
may be the subject of any discourse j 
the person who speaks, and is express- 
ed by the pronoun, lo: - lo veggio il me^ 
glioj ed al peggior tvl appiglio. (Petr.) 
The person whom we speak to, and is 
expressed by the pronoun Tu : - Tu 
vearai Vltalia^ e Vonorata rha (Petr.) 

the sake of elegance in the following sentence of 
Bentiyoglio; Era cresciuto in eth il Conte MaU' 
rizio^ e con V eth if. concetto del $uo valore, onde 
a lui fu commessa la total cura delU armi^ Co' 
mincid egli a segnalarsi, etc. How inelegant would 
it hare been to have said, Era conosciuto in etit 
il Conte Maurizio^ e con I' eth il concetto del 
Conle Maurizio onde al Conte Maurizio fu com- 
messa Id total cura delle arnU, Comincib il Conie 
Maurizio a segnalarsi^ and so on. 

Lastlj, it is sometimes necessarj to make use 
of the pronoun to make oarselyes understood. 
Suppose I was speaking to a man, who is igno- 
rant of my name, and was to say Vergani hra* 
merehhe V onor di parlarlei be would not un- 
derstand me, and I should be obliged to make 
use of the proAoan, and to isyi lo hramcrei I'onor 
di paiiarU* 



The person we speak of, and is 
eicpressed by the pronoun Egli^ if of 
the uia2>cijline gender ; by Ihe pronoun 
Ella^ if of the feminins : -- f^enne int" 
maginandosr^ ch' ella fosse sua moglie^ 
Egli sua marito. ( Varchi. ) But as 
those who speak , lire persons spoken 
to, and the persons spoken of may 
be many, so each of Ihem has a plural 
number. lo has for its plural Noi ^ 
Tu has F'oi ; the plural of Egli and 
Ella is Eglino and Elleno^ as you "will 
see more distinctly by what follows. 

First Person of both Genders (i). 

Sing. Nom. Jo (2) I 

Gen. Di me of me 

Dat. A me to me. 

Ace. Me me 

Abl. Dame from me 

(1) rt It needlett to point oot the sex in the 
ftr^t and Second person, for they are supposed to 
be presenr, aud therefore their sex is couiinonljr 
knoMrn , bat as the third person may he absent^ 
and in many respects nnknowo, a distinction of 
gender seems to be necessary. 

(3) lo is often abridged hoth in Terse and in 
prose, but especially in verse. 

E l*arco^ e Utaette^ ond'Vfui punto, (Petr.) 
Qual donna canterh^ $' i* nan cant' io ? (Bocc.) 

Remark in this last verse lo twice repeated 
with a great deal of elegance and energy. 

5 



78 








Plur. 


Norn. 


Noi(i) 


we 




Geo. 


Di noi 


of us 




Dat, 


A noi 


to us 




Ace. 


tioi 


us 




Abl. 


Da noi 


from us 



"We make use of the particle Ml in 
the third and fourth case of the singular 
instead of a me and me^ as Voi pro- 
metteste di farmi parlare con la donna 
ifostra, e mi avete fatto parlare con 
una statua di marmo, (Bocc, 35.) that 
is to say, p^oi prometteste a me, etc. 
and me avete fatto parlare, etc. Cj 
serves in the third and fourth case 
of the plural instead of a noi and noi, 
as Correranno alle case ; e V avere ci 
ruberanno. (Bocc. i. 2) that is to say^ 
ruberanno a noi. Sicuramente se tu jeri 
ne afftiggestiy tu ci hai oggi tanto di-^ 
liticate^ (Bocc. i. 1.) that is to say^ 
hai diliticale noi. 

Take notice that ne is now and then 
made use of in the third and fourth 
case of the plural number. In the fourth 
case it is used in tlie foregoing example. 

(1) Too win sometiinet find in poetry Nui 
used iottead of Noi \ especially for the sake of 
rhyme 

Facciam per noi quel eke si pud far per nui» 

(Arlosto.) 



79 
Se tu jeri ne affligge$tiy Ihal is to say, 

afjliggesti noiy and in the third it is 

used in the following: 11 mandarlo fuori 

di casa nostra cost infertno ne sarebbe 

gran biasimo ; that is to say, sarebbe 

a noi gran biasimo. 

This particle ne, instead of a noi and 

noi is still more used in poetry than in 

prose. Exam. 

Che non ambiziosi atfari affetti 

Ne spronaro alVimpresa^ o ne fur 

(guida. (Tasso.) 

Perchh con luicadrd quella speranza^ 

Che ne fh vaneggiar si lunf;amente. 

(Pelr.) 

And Annibal Caro in his eiEcellent 

translation of the iEncid, where Virgil 

says : Trojus JEneas tPa nos ad liiniaa 

misity renders it thus : 

Quel Trojano Enea^ ch'a te ne manda. 

Second Person of both Genders* 

Sing. Nom : Tu (i) thou 

Gen. Di te of thee 

Dat. A te to thee 

Ace. Te thee 

Abh Da te from thee 

(i) The ancientf often aied tue for tu i Perehi 
ii rammarichi iut th' io mi porta da te ? (Boo. 3. 6.) 



8o 

Plur. Nom. I^oi (i) you, or ye 
Gen. Di voi of you 
Dat. A voi to you 

Arc. , t^oi you 

Abl. Da voi from you 
Ti serves for the third and fourth 
case in the singular, and vi for the third 
and fourth case in the plural, as Ora vie' 
ne quel tempo, nel qual ti potrd chia^ 
ramente mostrare se io ti amo^ (Bocc* 
3. 5.) that is to say, Potrb mostrare a 
te, se io amo te. Quando di venir vi 
pidccia, Ella vi attendera in casa sua^ 
{Bocc. 2. 5.) that is to say, Quando 
piaccia a voiy Ella attendera voiy etc. 

Third Person for the masculine 
Gender. 
Sing- Nom. EgU (2) or Esso (3) he 

(1) The poets sometimes use yui instead of 
f^oiy for the very same reason that thejr use Nui 
instead of Noi^ y 

In questo stato son donna per vui, (Petr.) 
It is very common in Tuscany to. say F'o' and 
iVo' instead of F'oi and Noi ; as f^o' paiiate bene 
Italiano. No* si amo stati a vedere la Gaiieriaf etc, 
(a) I sometimes find iitio^ Ei^ and E' instead 
of E^iiy or Esso and especially in poetry. Exam. 
E ralU%rasi tl Ctel, 09 Ello e gito. (Petr.) 
Eli vht modesto i si, <*om' Essa e beiia^ 
Brama assai^ poco spera^ e nulla chiede» 

(Tasso.) 
Ed E' si stava. in se tutto raccolto tPelr.) 
(3) Th« difference between E^U and Esso^ ElU^ 



8i 

Cen, Di luh ««* di Esso of him 

Bat. ^ iui, or a Etio to bim 

Ace. Lni or Es9o faim 

Abl. Da iui or da Etso froin bio 

Plor. Norn. Eglino (l)» or Eisi ihem 

Gen. P/ /oroy or di Essi of ibem 
Dat. ^ /(iro» or u Essi to them. 
Ace. Xoro, or Essi them 

Abh 2>a loro, or iia £*!#/ from them 
We make use of gli instead of a Iui 
as Costuiy guando tu gli sarai rincre- 
seiutay con gran vitupero di te medesi- 
ma ti caccera ifia, (Bocc. ) that is to 
say, guando sarai rincresciuta a Iui, 
Likewise instead of Iui the fourth case, 
>ve make use of i7, or lo ; but the last 

«Dd Esia ooDfistf in thig ; that Et$o and Etta 
serve both for reafonable beingg and for ipa- 
niiDate thiogf, and E$U and Ella ferve for ani- 
mate and reafonable bein|;s only ; it would then 
be a miftake, speaking of a battle, to fay, Faro- 
no in lei ucciti trentamila uomini, inf tead of Eu» 
rono in etta ucciti, Etto if fomctimef an exple- 
tive^ and inthat case it never ehaoges itf termina- 
tion, and we fay. Con etto Iui, con e$to lei^ 
con etto loro^ etc. cominciano a cantare, e U ¥atH 
con etto loro ritpondono, (Boec.) 

(i) We also sometimes find EUi^ E$li, E* instead 
of Eglino, or Etti Ex, E vef:gio hen quant' elli a 
schivo m'hanno. (Fetr.) Come egti hanno tre toU 
di^ vogliono le figUuole de' GeniHuomini (Boce. y. 
8.) Coioro tono eli nero vetliU, perciocchi e* natt 
Mono ancora quindici dl^ che un lor frutello fu 
uccito. (fioco, S J.) 



is more commonly used by the moderns, 
and especially in prose. Examples : Tut- 
ti vestiti co'camiciy e co'piviali^ con li^ 
hri in manOy con le croci innanzi can^ 
iando con grdndisshna festCj e soleu" 
nitdy il recarono alia chiesa, (Bocc, i. i.) 
that is to say, recarono lui alia chie- 
sa, viz, Ser Ciappelletto. Per lo co- 
mun bene della repubblica lo dichia- 
rarono Re e loro Signore\ ( Giov. 
Villani lib. i. ) that is to say, dichia^ 
rarono lui viz. Numa Pompilio. In 
the third case of the plural v^e say 
loro instead of a loro, as To dissi loroi 
lo mando lorOy etc. and serves as well 
for the masculine as for the feminine. 
In the fourth case of the plural we say 
gli and li, instead of loro or essi. Exam« 
^vea tre Jlgliuoli, e tutti e tre pari- 
mente ^li amava. (Bocc. i3.) 
Tutti aanque i miei di saran, Germana^ 
Neri cosi ? Non gli sperar sereni. 

(Metast.) 
Observe, thai gli is made use of before 
the vowels, and li before the consonants. 

Third Person for thefemihine. 

Sing. Worn. Ella^ op Efsa »be 

Gen. Di lei^ot di Essa of her 
Dat. A lei, or a essa to her 



83 

Ace. Lei^ oi* Eaa her 

Abh Da lei or da Eaa (torn her 

Plan Nom. Elleno^ Elle or Esse they 

Gen. I?i /orot or di Esse of them 
DaU.A lorOf or a £fie to them 
Ace. LorOf or JE'iie them 

AbL Da lorot or da Esse from them 

We make use of le in the dative 
singular instead of a lei ; as La don- 
na con la sua fante si consiglio, se 
ben fatto le paresse , ch' Ella usasse 
quel bene che innanzi le aveva la 
fortuna mandatOy (Bocc. 2- 2.) La (i) 
is used in (he accusative singular instead 
of leiy and le in the accusative plural 
instead of loroy or Esse. Exam. II ma- 
rito, credulo alle altrui falsita^ la fh 
uccidercy e mangiare a' lupi. (Bocc. 
3. 6.) La Ninetta ^ che il desiderio 
delle sorelle sapeva^ in tanta ifolonta 

(0 ^e often hear in Florence. Lu mi icusi, la 
mi faccia il fn^ore^ etc. instead of Etla mi scusi 
EUa mi faec\9 tlfavore^ etc. Father B^rtoli hae 
laid it down a« a rule, that we ought to aajr La 
and not EUa after the words ending in JS*; suoh 
M Se^ che, perchi , etc. Not finding this rule oh* 
eerved hy good authors, I do not know what to 
determine about it, 1 should rather think, that 
we mij;;ht make an elision in the preceding word, 
and §By , S' etla viene^.mi furhpiucere: desidero^ 
ch'eiia mi serif a, etc: For he who sajrs EUa, ia 
the first case, is sure not to be in an error: 



«4 

di questo fatto le accese. che, etc. 
(Bocc. 5. 3.) 

According to the above declensions, 
we plainly see, that in the nominative 
case we must make use of Jo, tu, egtij 
ella 'y it is therefore a manifest error to 
^ay, Ltd mi scrioe spessissimo, instead 
of egli mi scrii^e spessissimo ; Lei gode 
ottima salute^ instead of Ella gode ot^ 
tima salute^ though you hear it very 
often in Italy , and especially out of 
Tuscany. There are, however , some 
exceptions, which I think, it proper to 
mention. 1st, There is one in the verb 
essere, which, when it is placed be- 
tween two pronouns, and means the 
transformation of the one into the other, 
governs the fourth case instead of the 
first. Exam. Credendo ch' io fossi te^ 
mi ha con un bastone tutto rotto (Bocc. 
9. 7.) adly. After the adverb come^ or 
siccome : l£xam. Costoro y che dalV aU 
tra parte eranoy siccome luiy maliziosiy 
etc. (Bocc. 2. 40 3dly, In exclamations 
of ]oy or grief, in which the personal 
pronoun is put in the fourth case as 
in Latin : 

Oh Padre f oh caro Padre I oh me 
felice ! (Metast.) 

0/ the Pronoun Se^ irhich servt& 



85 
for either Gender and number^ it wants 
the first and fifth Case ^ and signifies 
the Return or Reflection of the Action 
on any third Person. 

Horn. Wanting, 

Gea. Di se of one' f telf, himtr/f or lierfcTf 

Bat, ji $t to one* s self, biinse/f or herself 

Ace. 4^^ one' f self, himself, or beiself 

Voc. Wanting 

Ah/. Da St Uwca one' s self, himself, or herself. 

The particle Si stands instead of this 
pronoun, in the third and fonrlh case 
of both genders and numbers : Exam. 
Come piuttosto poti si fece chiamare 
j4ntigono. ( Bocr« 3. 6. ) that is, fece 
chiamare a se. Chi a legger romanziy 
chi a giuocare a' scacrhij chi a tavole, 
memtre gli altri dormivanOj si diede^ 
(Bocc. 9. 9.) that is to say, se diede. 

All the personal pronouns may be 
joined with stesso^ or medesimOj stes-^ 
sa, or medesima ; as lo itesso, or lo 
medesimo y myself ;€?£ me stesso , or 
^i me medesimo , of myself , and so 
forth. Instead of medesinjo , some say 
medesmo and medemo\ as for medesmo, 
I should not scruple to make use of it 
10 poetry, since Petrarch says, Di me 
medesmo meco mi vergogno : but as 
for medemo, though it i« very common 

*5 



86 
at Rome^ I do not find it in good autborsk 
" Observe, that all the above-meDtioned 
particles, or conjuactive pronouos, as 
the generality of gramnkarians call them, 
viz. mif ciy ne, tij vi^ lo, gli, li^ Ze, 
luy Uy siy must always be joined to 
the verb, and for this reason they are 
commonly called conjunctive pronouos. 
"We may often place them either before 
the verb, or after ; as lo vedet^a, or 
vedevaloy vi prego^ or pregovi^ etc. 
but the last mode is never used in con- 
versation and seldom in familiar style. 

We must except the affirmative im- 
peratives, the infinitives (i) and parti- 
ciples, in which the aforesaid pronouns 
are always placed after the verb : for 
we always say, Datemi del pane -; vi 
prego di farlo ; scrwendogli, salutatelo 
da parte mia^ and the like. 

When the above pronouns are put 
after a verb of one syllable, or a verb 
ending in an accented vowel, as yir, 
narrerby etc. we take off the accent^ 
and double in both cases the con- 
sonant of the conjunctive pronouns^ 

(i) The final E of our infinitives if dettroy«d 
]»j the addition of the aforesaid particles; as we 
herer say jaremi^ mandarelo^ vederela^ ralUf^rareci^ 
diuertiresi, etc. but farmi^ wandaHo^ vedeHa^ ral" 
ifgrarcif divtrtini etc. 



«7 

and sajr, fammi^ narrerotti, etc* Exam. 

Fanuniy che puoi, delta tua grazia 
degno. (Petr.) 

Ma dond' io voglia inccmincia gV in^ 
canti 

E con quai modi or narrerotd avantL 

(Tasno.) 

Gli only is excepted, which cannot 
be altered and we 'write and say , 
Digli^ dirogli, etc. 

Observe besides, that these con- 
junctive pronouns mi, d, si, cij vi, 
when they are followed by some par- 
ticles beginning with one of these con« 
sonants L, ZV, as Lo, li, le, ne, etc. 
or by gliy are always changed into 
me, te, se, ce, ve ; as Egli promette 
di mandarmelo ; te ne parlerb doma" 
^i ; se ne andb a Roma ; ce ne pen^ 
tiremo ; ve gli spedirb^ etc. The others 
are nncbangealple^,. only gli admits of 
an £ ; as glielo scriverb, gliene par^ 
lerb etcl 

It must, moreover, be observed, that 
the Italians often use the , particle ne 
to express of him^ of her ^ of it, some 
of them, from them, by them^ witfi 
them ; in short, it answers to the r*rench 
particle en (i). When it is accented, it 

(i) Dan$ let biens^ ^ue Vhommi enta$ttt 



8S 
means neither, or nor ; as lo non pes^ 
$Q nh parlare, nh tacere. (Firenzuola.) 

or THE POSSESStlTE PROBTOUEfS. 

The possessive pronoons are called 
#0^ because the/ denote possession. 

Declension of a masculine Noun > 
irith the possessive Pronoun. 

Sb(. Norn. // mio^ il tuo^ it iuoy it noiiro^ 
Myf th}r, big cr lieri o«r, 
it vosirOf it ioro lihro* 
jour, thehr book. 

6ea. Det mio^ det iuo, det suo^ del 
Of my, of thy, of his. or her, o^ 
nostro^ del ifottrof det toro iibro. 
our of yoar^ of their boob. 

Dst. At mio^ at tuo^ at tuo% at no$tro% 
To my, to thy, to his or her, to oar, 
al 9osiroy at toro tibro* 
to your, to . their book^ 

l.bl. Dat miof dat tuo^ dot suoy 

l^tQta mff from thy, from his or Jur: 



^M* il sait peu te moderer ! 

// sembltf qu* il n' en amas$e^ 

Qu' h deiuin d' em desirrr. 
In tbo foregoing French rerses there is rn twi«e| 
and it rosy be rendered into Italian that. Quan» 
i^ poco sa I' uomo moderarsi nelle richezze ck§ 
mduna t Sembra che non ne accumuli^ cht per mog^ 
giormtnte dgtidtmrng. ^> 



dal no9irOf dal tfosirOf dal torn 
from oor, from yout^ from tlitir 
libro. 
book. 

lur. HoiB. / mieif i tuoU isuoh i noiirif i 
Mff thjf hif or her, our. 

posirif i luro libri. 
joori their bookt. 

Gc», De* miei de* tuoi^ de* moi, de* 

Of IDJ9 of thjr, of hia or ber, of 

noiirif de* vatiri de* loro libri » 

oar of yoor^ of their booka. 

Dftt. jf mieif a*iuoi% a*$uoh a'noitri^ 
To my^ to thjr, to bi« or her, io o«r, 
a* vosirif a* loro librL 
to your, to their bookf. 

Abl. Da* miei f da* tuoif da* tuoi, (1) 
From mj, from thjr, from hi« or her 
da* nottrh da' %fo$iri da* loro 
from onr| from /onr, from thtir 
libri. 
bookf. 

Declension of a feminine Noun with 

the possesiive Pronoun 

ding. Horn. La mia, la /ua, la suof la noitraf 

(1) The poetf, for the take of rhyme, often neo 
toi and %ui inetead of tuoi and $uoi, 
Deh ! non eipor I* oggeiio 
Dti dolci affetii tui 
AW odiOf al risOf ed agV insuUi altrui.' 

(Metaat.) 
Iftuuno i reOf 
St haita a*faUi iui 
P$r difiiu portar V tampio mUrmi, (Idem.) 



la voitra^ h hro casn, 
yonr, their house. 

C«n. Delia mia, della tua, delta sua^ 
Of my, of thy, of hit or her, 

delta nostra^ delta vostra^deUa 

of our, of your, of 

toro casa, 
their, house. 
Dat. Alta miat alia tua, alia sua^ alia 
To my, • to thy, to his or her, to 
nosirayalla vostrayul/a loro casa. 
onr, to your, to their house. 
Ah\. datla m/a^datta tuaydattasua^ 
From my^ from thy^ horn his or her, 
dalla nostia^ dalta uostra,datta 
from our from yoar, from 

loro <:asa» 
their house, 
Plttp. Nom. Le mie^ le tue, lesucy le nostre^ 
Mfi *^7» his or her, our 
le vostre, le loro case. 
your their houses. 

Gtn. Delte tnie^ delle tue, delle sue^ 

Of my, of thy, of his or her, 

delle nostrcy dette uosire^ delte 

of our, of your, of 
loro case* 
their ho n sea. 
Pit. jille mie^ atte tue, alle sue, aUe 
To my, t. thy, to his or her, to 
nosire, alle vostre^ alle loro 
o«r, to your, to their 

case. 

houses. ' 

-ibi. Dalle micy dalle tue ^ dalh 
' From my, from thy, from 



9* 
su€f (i) dalle nastrtf dalle 
hia or her, from 041 r, from 
voiire% dalle loro ca»e» 
yonr^ from their homes. 

The English and the French make 
nse of the indefinite article before the 
possessive pronouns. The Italians chiefljr 
use the definite. 

It must however be observed, that 
names of quality and dignity, as Slgno- 
ria^ Eccellenzay Santied^ Maestd, Al-^ 
tezzay Paternitdy etc, when the posses- 
sive pronoun is placed before them, 
require the indefinite article, and we 
say. Vostra Signoriay Vostra Eccel' 
lenza, Vostra Santiiay Vostra Mae- 
stay etc. di i^ostra Signoriay di vostra 
Eccellenzay etc. but when we place the 
pronoun after them, we then make use 
of the definite article ; as La Signoria 
vostra^ V €iltezza vonray La Santitd 
vostra , Delia etc. Signoria vostra , 
delV^ltezza vostroy etc. 

Names of kindred, when preceded 

(t) The oommoD people in Florence $mj mia 
iDitead of miei and mi>, tua instead of tuoi and 
f«a, sua instead of suoi and sue} as QuetU Ja^ 
nari tono mia^ queite coie sono tua, Vada pe'fat* 
ti suOf etc. This barbarism has even escaped th« 
pen of some rtry good anthore i snch as BoecacciOf 
Virenzuola, etc. bat in tjiis thejr urt hy no^means 
to be imitated. 



9^ 

by ibe possessive pront>nns, either take 

or reject the definite article 5 and we 
may say, La mia sorella^ il suo nrpotCy 
as well as mia sorelloj suo nipote^ etc. 
except Padre and Madre^ which re- 
quire the indefinite Article ; but when 
they are foMowed by the possessive pro- 
noun, or accompanied by an adjective, 
they always take the definite article $ 
as // padre vostro, la madre mia^ il 
fratello suOy il vostro caro padre^ la 
mia tenera madrey il suo diletto fra- 
iello, etc. 

In the plural we always make use 
of the definit-e article, and say, Le mie 
sorelle, Le loro madrij Le loro Ec* 
cellenze etc. 

When the possessive pronoun is ac- 
companied by a demonstrative dne, itre* 
quires the indefinite article ; as questo 
vostro ^ libro, quella ^mia casa, di que- 
sio postro liirOf di guella sua casa^ 
etc. I now proceed to speak. 

or DEMONSTRATIVE PRONOVKS. 

The demonstrative pronouns are those 
Hirhich particularise, or point at persons 
Qv things. Some of tbem denote a person 
Pt thing near to him who speaks ; some 
E person or thing near to him who is 



93 
ipoken to ; and others a tliird person 

or thing remote from him who speaks, 

and from him ivho is spokeo to. 

Pronouns demonstratwe of a Person 
or Thing nearer to him who speaks 
than to him who is spoken to^ 

■Sing. Ifom. Queni (i) 

or quetto thif tOMi, or thing 

Gen. Di quegto of chit man^ or thing 

Dat. A que§t0 to thi« man, or thing 

Ace. Quetto this man, or thing 

Abl. Da qu€$to. from thiaman* orthiogt 

S^lar. Nom. Que%ti (i), tbeie men, or things 

Gen* JDi quetto of these men, or thiogf 

Dat. jf qitesto to these men, or things 

Ace. Queito, these men, or* things 

Abl. i>a questo from these meni or things. 

Feminine Gender. 

Siog. Nom. Quetta this woman, or thing 

G«n. Di qutita of this woman, or thing 

Dat, A questa to this woman, or thing 

Ace, Que$ta this woman, or thing 

Abl. Da quetta from this woman, or thing. 

(i) Quiiti is always used snbstanttrnljr and in 
the nominatire only according to the Academioianf 
of La Crusca^ when we speak of a roan. For, il 
mfana this man^ Quest* uomo. Exam. 

Questi or Afacone adora^ e fu CriUiano, 

(Tasso.) 
Questi ; that is to say, Ismeno. In the other easoi 
we use questOf which may btoaed eitbaf by ittolf 
or wUb a •abttaatiro* 



94 

J^lar. Nom ,Queste these women, or things 

Gen. J)i queite of these women, or things 

Dat. ji queste to these women, or things 

Ace. Queste these women, or things 
Abl. I)a quegtt from these, ete. 

Cestui and Costei which are substan- 
tive pronouns, are only used to denote 
persons : the first signifies this man, 
the second this woman. They are de- 
clined like Questo and Questa^ and in 
the plural they both make Costoro (i). 
When they are used in familiar style, 
th«y generally imply a kind of dis- 
respect. The ^ame must be understood 
of Colui an^ Colei. 

Pronouns demonstratwe of a person 
or thing nearer to him who is spoken 
iOy than to him who speaks. 



i^i) Sometimes hy a poetical or rhetorical fiction 
inanimate things are eiihibited as persons. Thej 
then become either male or fi^male. In that case 
we may use Costui and Costei, Dante, speaking 
of Italy, personifies it thus: 

Co9tei ch* 4 fatta indomita^ seivaggia. 

Observe, that Costuiand Costei are sometimes 
tisedin the genitive witkoot an article; as Pargo* 
Utt0 pas* io nel costui regno^ it piede ^ (Petrar.) 
that is to say, nel regno di costui^ Salabaetto usci 
di casa costei^ (Bocc, 8« 10} that is to say iff ca* 
411 di ^aOei. 



95 
Masculine Gender* 

Sing. Nom. Cotesti (i) 

or Colesto tbtt man, or thing 
G«n. J>i coteiio of that man, or thi«g 
Dat. ^ coteito to that man, or thing 

Ace. Cotesto that man. or thing 

Abl. Da coieilo from that man, or thing. 

1^1 ur. Norn. CoUsii those men. or things 

Gen. Di eotetti of those men or things 

Dat. A cotesti to those men, or things 

Ace. Coteiti those men, or things 

Abl. Da cotesti from those men, or tbiogs« 

Feminine Gender. 

-Sing. Notn. Cotesta that woman, or thing 

Gev. Di cotesta of that woman, or thing 

Dat. A cotesta to that woman, or thing 

Ace. Cotesta that woman, or thing 

Abl. Da cote Ha from that woman, or thing. 

?ior. Nooa. Cotiste those women, or tbinga 

Gen, Di eoteste of those women, ortbingt 

(i) What I have said of ^uesti is to be nn- 
^rstood of Cotesti^ which is to be used in the 
Dominatire only to express Potest* uomo^ that 
man, Codesto and Codesta instead of Cotesto and 
Cotesta f are often used by modern aothora. There- 
fore I wonder that they are not taken notice 
of by onr best grammarians, sach »s Suommatteif 
Corticeilif and others* However, I should not 
scruple to ase them, since I find them mentioned 
and approved of in the remarka upon Buommat' 
teVs Grammar, which are made by eminent men, 
and chiefly by SaWini^ one of onr best pros* 
wriure. 



96 

Oat. A CotesU to thotewomeii, or thin gt 
Ace. Cottite tliose women, or tbin^t 

▲bl. Da cpt9*t4 from (bote, ftc; 

We sometioies find, though not very 
often, Cotestui and Cotestei , both 
substantives, and have the saixie sifjui- 
fication ; us Cotest' uomo^ Cotesta don^ 
nay that man, that woman* They are 
declined like Cotesto and Cotesta^ both 
making Cotestoro io/tbe pIuraL 

Pronouns demonstrative of a Person^ or 
Thing remote from him who speaks, 
and from Jiim who is. spoken to'. 

Masculine Gender* 

Sing, liom QuegH (f), or Quelle Plan QuelU (a) 

(i) Quegli^ and fometimef* ^uei in the nomina- 
tire case, sigoiiies quelV uomo^ -that man. Exam, 
QuegU abhiiogna di pocc^ che poco desidera (6oo. 

IVbi edffica quei^ che vuol gV imperi 
Su fondamtnti edijicar mondani (Tasf o.) 

(a) We always make ote of Que* Quel , or 
Quegli^ inacead of quelli ^ when followed by a 
c&ouo or pronoun, Exam. 

Que* duo pien di paura^ e di sospetto, (Petr.) 
JEcco quei che le carte empion at sogni, 

(Idem.) 
IE spero un giomo 
V* involar quegli allori alU tue chi^me. 



9! 

DaC. j4 quello A qutUi 

Aco. OiMr//o Out Hi 

Abl. Da i/ueiio J}a ^uiiU, 

FemininH Gender. 

Sittf. Nom. Quella Plor. QuelU 

Gen. i)i 9«e//a i)i quelt$ 

Ace. Qtt^//a Otti'/i^ 

Abh Da queUa Da qutUt, (i). 

Colh iuWare isteue^ 

Che il iimor dt* mortali offrt at tuo ncms, 

(Metaf.) 

Obterre, that we use quegli when the oeon 
begins with a rowel. In the«ioguIar, when quello 
if followed by a noon, we abridge it thus : Quel 
UhrOf queii' uomo, etc. See pa/ee 4c. note (s). 

(i) X would recommend all possible attention to 
the use of the demonstrative pronoaos. Quesio 
and ^ae/Za correspond to the Latin hic^ haee^ hoc t 
Cotisio^ Coiesta; to hu, ista^ istud ; Quelto^ and 

tueUa^ to ille^ illa^ itlud. Those who are neither 
ora in Tascany, nor have regalarly studied the 
Italian langnage, are liable to err in the use of 
the above- m'«ntioned pronouns. When at Florence. 
I received the following letter from a friend at 
liodena : Mi obbligherete infinitamente^ se mi protf» 
vedtrete un esemptare delle opere del MachiavtlU 
uUimamente stampote in questa citth \ ne ho fatt^ 
ricerca preao cotesti libruri^ e non ie ho potutg 
irovaref etc* It most here be observed, that he 
oaea questa Cttiil. instead of €ote$ta Citiii meaning 
Florence, where I ttien was, and cotesti librari 
instead of quasti librarij meaning the booksellera 
of Modena, where the writer was. This is a great 
fault, and may be attended with ditagreable con* 
•equenoes espeoiatly io trade, by one place being 
nistakto for another. 



Colui and Coleii which make in the 
pluiral Coloroj are substantives, and are 
used lo denote persons (i). They are 
declined like quello and queUn. Observe, 
however, that Colui and Coleiy as well 
as Cestui and Costeiy with their plurals, 
take no article in the genitive, whea 
they are placed before a noun, and 
preceded either by a preposition or an 
article. We have many instances of it 
in Boccaccio ; as In colui scambio^ al 
colei gridoy nella costui ebbrezza, per 
gli coloro beniy per lo costoro amorey 
instead of lu iscambio di colui , al 
grido di colei^ etc. 

Cib is a pronoun neuter, and indeclia- 
able, which serves indiscriminately for 
quesio, cotestOy quello ; as Fate cid, 
che vi piace, Cib che x^oi dite i ae- 
ro, Ecco cib che volete, etc. (Annib. 
Caro.) 

OF EULATIYE PRONOUNS. 

Relative pronouns are those which 

(i) What I have observed of Cestui and Costei 
maj be applied to Colui and Colei ; that is to 
lay, they are foinetiines ased to express inanimate 
things by a poetical fiction. Petrarch introdacet 
DeaUi speaking thus. 

r son coUi^ che si import unA^ e ftra 
Chiamata $Qn da koi. 



refer to a person, or thing, before men* 
tioned. They are quale ^ chcy chi^ cui. 

Quale irhichj wbeo it is used as a 
relative pronoua always takes the defi- 
nite article ; as II quale^ la quale, del 
quale^ della quale, etc* and relates 
either to a person or thing before na« 
med Exam. Con i/olontd, e mandato 
di CI entente Papa Quinto , il quale 
allora sedea, fu eletto in Re de* Ro" 
manL (Day.) Una montagna aspra^ ed 
ertUy presso alia quale un hellissimo 
piano y e dilettesfole h riposto (Bocc.) 

I said that quale takes the definite 
article (i) when used as a relatii^e 
pronoun because it sometimes signifies 
an absolute quality, and then it does 
not admit o| the definite article. Exam. 
Seco pensando quali infra piccol ter" 
mine dovean divenire (Bocc. 6« 5.) 

Also when quale is used in a doubt* 
ful or interrogative manner, it requires 

(i) ThoM who make ate of the indefinite artiolo 
with quaUy when it ie a relative pronoun, and 
does not imply an interrogation, &re in a very 
great error; yet there are a great many who igno« 
raotly write. La ietlera qiiaU iovi scristi^ instead 
of U quale io vi gcrissi. If they are not perfect 
atrangera in the latin language, they ought to 
eoniider that quale y wiih the definite article, an- 
swera to the Latin qui^ quae, quod^ and withoni 
the definite article to the Latin quaiiif quaUy 



loo 
the iiidefii)ite article^ as in the follow*- 
iog examples : 

Potete scegliere de* ducy qual pia vi 
place. (Bcmho.)^ 

lo non so quale 

Poter hai tu sopra gli affeili miei ; 

Qual utiley qual fede 

Sperar si pud daW oppressor di Roma ? 

(Matasl.) 

When it expresses resemblaiice or 
likeness, it is used without any article 
whatever y especially when it has a 
reference to tale. Exam. Dwehuto nel 
i^iso quale k la scolorita cenere (Fi- 
renzuola). 

Tal quale or me vedete giovinettay 

Quivi accoinpagno amore. 

(Am. Vis. Cant. i6) 

Finally, quale is used without the 
article when it means some^ as in the 
fallowing verse. 

E quai (i) morti da lui^ quaipresi vivi. 

(Pelr.) 

Che is referred to both genders and 
numbers, and serves to point out thinj^s 
as well as persons , and is declined 
with the indefinite article (2). 

(i) ^<iai Jnitead of quali 

(3) Che is not always a relative pronoun, but 
fOHieiiniM a conjuntioo, as in this example: 
Dille^ che si consoli j 



101 

When it ia ased in a neuter sense 
(but not iolerregativelj) it admits of 
the definite article j and meads la qual 
cosa y delta qual cosa j etc. Exam. 11 
che degV innamorad tsomininon avviene 
(Boc.) that is to say $ la qual cosa , etc. 

Chi serves to both genders and 
numbers 9 and signifies he whoj she 
vihoy or those who (i). Exam. 

Chi vuolveder quantunque pud Natura 

E'l del tra noi, venga a mirar costei» 

(Pelr.) 
It sometimes signifies alcuno che, any 
who. Ex. 

E non v' k chi muceida} (Metast.) 
Sometimes it means chiunque, ^whoever* 
Exam. 

f^inca chi vuole indifferente io sono. 

(Idem.) 
And at others, alcuni some. Ex. 
A chi la spemey a chi manca il timore^ 

(Idem.^ 
It IS always declined with the inden- 

nite article; 

Cuiy which aignifies quale ^ a pronoun 
relating to persons ^ and sometimes 

Dills t che m' ami^ t dille | 
Chs parti fido Achillt , 
Ch$fido tomtrh (MeUft.) 

(i) Someiimet he who , ihe who } the$e wAo- 1 
thou who , «tc. are rendered into lulian thus % 
QueUo ehij quella ehe, quellif or coioro che^ eto. 

6 



even to beasts or inaDiitidte things^ is 
of both genders and numbers. It is one 
of those which the grammarians call 
defective, because its nominative is 
niranting. It is declined with the indie* 
finite article , which may be suppress- 
ed when this pronoun* is placed before 
the noun y as it appears in the foUovr- 
ing examples : Qaestf uomo , i cui eostu^ 
mi sono degni d^ un Eroe. (Salvini.) 
Questa fanciulla ^ il cui name i [tsa-- 
bulla ^ le cui labbra pajono due ruhi-' 
netii , etc. (Bocc.) , 

Tucuiconeesse il cielo, e dielti {\)infato 
Voler il giustOy e poier cid , che uuoi. 

( Tasso.) 
Tott see, that in the above examples, 
f an costumi is instead of i costumi 
di cui y or del quale ; il cut nome , le 
cui labbra, instead of il name, It lab- 
bra di cui or delta quale^ TU em 
e&hcesse il cielo , instead of Tu, a cui 
concesse il cielo. It even ^eems, that 
in these cases the article ought to be 
suppressed , having invariably observed 
it in good authors (2). 

(1) A poetical Iieenee^ IjDitead of le U diede, 
(s) What I hare i^idof cia may be applic<l to 
0krui, otiiera. Exam. 

Che ^sucepl, che sm$H 



io5 
It must be obsenred^ that instead 
o£ del quale f delta qualcj di cui^ di 
che, dal quale , dalla quale y da cui ^ 
da chef con c^i , con eke , per cut, 
etc. we often use onde , and chiefly 
in poetry } aa in these examples: . 

^one speranze, oniPio vwer solea. 

(Petr.) 
DeirEmpia Babilonia, onff i tuggita 
Ogni i^ergognay ond^ogni bene hjoru 

(Idem*) 
————— II suono 
Di queUospiriy ond' ie nudrha il core 
Jn sul mio prime gioi^anile errore* 

(Idem.) 
Altro 9 which may be called jin im« 
proper pronoun 9 means other ; as vn 
altro giornoy urf altra settimana^ an- 
other day, another week: but when it is 
not followed by a noun^ and has no 

Nofi la ragiom^ ma la viUade altruL (UeUil) 
Non voUi far dtUa mia gUna altrui 
Ntftpur minima pawH (Tatto.) 

In the forajir esaiDfU ftUfmi^ n loitead of di 
akruif of othttB, In the latter, isftead of ad aUrai 
to otherf Sometimet attrui it deeliaed with the 
definite artiete, and oaed ae a inbatantiTe^ bat 
then it meane other people's proptHy ^ m in tlM 
Mlewing example. iVon hisogna desiderofe I'aU 
irui (Segneri.) We mutt not eovet sther people's 
pffopertj. 



io4 

reference to any^ it means another things 
Exam. Altro h parlar di morte , altro 
i morire. (Maffei.) 

When altri is used in the singular 

number, it signifies some. Exam« 

Sia destin cid ch'io voglio\altri disperse 

Sen vada errando:altri nmanga ucciso^ 

Altri in eure £amor lascii/e imntersoy 

Idol sifaccia un dolee sguardon un riso. 

(Tasso.) 
Ciaseuno, ciaschedunOy nessuno^ognu" 
no , qualcuno , qualcheduno , taluno , 
verunoy ogni , qualche^ are never used 
in the plural number ^^ as I (have al* 
ready observed in the treatise on notms^ 

PRAXIS UPON PRONOUNS. 

He who loves study , says Seneca , 

ama studio m» dice 

is neither a burden, tp himself^ nor to 

peso i». ad 

others. 

altri, 

Zeno hearing a young man speak 

Zenone sentendo ^iovane m. parlare 

too freely , told him : „ For this reason 

disse per que&to ragione f» 

we have two ears , and but one tongue, 

ahhiamo oreechia f, lingua f. 

that we should hear much, and speak 
accioechd asGolta^iimo parlaaimO' 

little. ,, 
pocot 



io5 
A talkative fellow willing to learn 

ciarlone m. hramoio d' imparare 

(of Isocrates J he asked him ( double ) 

{from liocrate chiese {U doppio del 

hb usual price J because, said he, » 

ioUto prezzo m. diste 

I must ( both teach ) you to speak , 

devo iimegnare) a parlarg 

aud to ( bold your tongue, n 

\tacefe ) 

When Socrates was asked, which 

a SocraU fu domandato 

of mortal men ( was to be accounted) 

mortale ( epa da stimarsi ) 

Dearest to the gods in happiness , he 

dio m. /elicith f» 

answered ; fp that man who is in want 

riipose uomo ha bisognQ m. 

of the fewest things, n 

.poc9 cota yi 

When the; same philosopher ( >vas 

itetio Jtlosofo {itava 

building) himself a house at Athens , 

fabbricando ca$a /, ^Une 

being asked bj one who observed the 

essenao 4nterrogtiio otsetvb 

littleness of the design, why be (would 

piccoUzza f. disegno m. (^on 

not have) an abode more suitable to 

poleva) dbitazione f, adattato 

kis dignity ? he replied, that he should 

dignithf, ritpose eredt" 

think himself sufficiently accomodated 

«M«* accomodaU 



io6 
if he could see that narrow habi- 

4€ poU$$e Ftdere angutto ahiUtuo\ 

tatioa filled (with) real friends. 

ne f, pienp i of ) reale amieo m. 

The same philosopher , one of the 

medesimo Jiloscfo 

poorest though greatest men ( in } . 

Xovero henehe grande uomo I of ^ 

thens , observing the pomp and luxury 

Atene ostervando pompa f. luiso nt* 

of his (fellow citizens, ) i^vHow many 

(jBoncittadino m. ) Quanlo 

wants , says he , have the rich and 

hisogno m. disse hanno ricco. p, 

great, from which I am entirely free. » 

eseme* 
Cato being asked , how it happened 

Catone interrogate come aceadevA 

that he ( had no ) statues erected t^ 

( non aveva ) itatua f, eretto 

him i whilst Rome was crowded with 

Jtoma f, era ripieno 

those of SO maoy others, » I would 

ianto altro m, tforrei 

rather , answered he , ( people ) should 

piuttoeto rispose ( che ta gente ) ricer* 

enquire, why J have them not, than 

casee ho 

complain that I have them, n 

lagnarei ho 

Demetrius Phalereus being inforttied, 

Demetrio Falereo infyrmai^ 

that the people of Athens had des- 

popoh m, Jlttno a^t^a di' 



I07 
Iroyed all the numerous statues thej 

ttruUo itiito numeroio ttmtua f, 

had formerly erected to his honour^ 

avevano tretto to onort m. 

u (It matters not^) says he , since thej 

( JVbn importa ) disse poiehi nek 

cannot obliterate the actions which 

potsono eancelimre a%ione /. 

acquired them. » 

ac(fuiitaron0. 

It was a fine answer of Diogenes, 

fu betlo risposUf, Diogene 

who being asked in mocirery, why 

essendo tichiesto 

philosophers were the followers of rich 

Jllosofo m. enno seguact rioco 

men, and not rich men of philosophers, 
replied, n Because the one knew what 

vispoit eonoseevana 

they had need of, and the other (did 

avevano hUogno aUro m> (f^on I0 

not. ) » 

^onusctuano) 

The Emperor Titus remembering 

Imperaiore Tito ricordandoii 

once at supper, that during that day 

cena /• giorno m, 

(he had done nol>ody) a kindness , n 

( non a^e¥a fiuto a nessuno } gratia /, 
My friends said he, I have lost this 
amico m, disio hoperduio 

day. n 

giorno m. 



io8 

It is mentioned (in) history to the 

i regUtrato (in the) (i) 'istoria f. 

honor of the Emperor Alexander Se- 

onore m, Alessandro Ser 

veras , that he ( would in no case 

vero (jton voieva in nessun caso 

permit ; offices to be sold ; for said 

ptrmeUere che) carica f. si vendessero dicewi 

he, » He who buyeth must selL v 

compra deve t^ndere y 

Anacharsis the Scythian , who was 

Anacarsi Scita m. era 

accounted one of the wisest men of 

riputato taggio uomo 

his age , being reproached by an im- 

secolo m. essendo rimpro^enUo 

pertinent Athenian ( with the) barbarity 

Ateniese (of the') barbaric fi 

of his country, told him, w My coua- 

patria f. . disse 

try may disgrace me, but thou art a 

pud disonorare ma sei 

disgrace to thy country n 

di'sonore m, 

Callicratidas , the Spartan general 

CalUcratida . Spartano generate 

being persuaded (at) a battle to save 

essendo convgliato ( in ) battaglia f. di 

himself (by retreating,) » No, answered 

salvare {col batter la ritirata) rispose 

he , the Spartans can equip another 

possono allesUre 
(i) See page 69, note (1). 



109 
fleet , ( should tHU be lost, , but I caa 

flottaf. (#« q^ita tftnisse a ptrdersi) poiso 

never recov^ my repuUtion , if I 

ricuperare riputazicne f. 

forfeit it ( by ) basely flying before 

perdo ( not expressed ) fu^endo 

the eoemy. x^ 

nemico m. 

Whea Diogenes received a visit ia 

Diogene ricevi visita f» 

his tub- from Alexander the great ; 

hoitefs AUttandro ^ ^ ^rande 

«iid' Mras asked , what petition he had 

supplica f, avet>a 

to offer : I have uothing , said he^ to 

da fare non ho nient* aUro di$u da 

ask, biit that you would remove to 

domandare se non che ^i scosUaU 

4he other side, that you ( may not, ) 

banda qffinchi {non passUte ) 

by intercepting the sun-shine, take 

eoW impedirmi splendor del sole to» 

from me what you cannot give 99 

gliere "<"* potete dare, 

Philip , King of Macedon , having 

Filippo Re Macedonia avendo 

heard that the great Alexander his 

seniito Aleisandro 

son, sang once at a feast , ( to the ) 

figUo m. ^ntb festaf. {with) 

wonder and envy of the best musicians 

sorprtsa /• invidia f. musico m» 

there j ( ,y Art not thou ashamed, ) said 

(JSon U yergogni) diss9 



\10 

he to him , to sing so well? ^, 

di cantor $\ heme 

Themistocles being asked how he 

TimistocU 

would roarrj his daughter, whether to 

vorrehbe maritare JigUuoia f. ee 

one of small fortune or to one that 

fortuna /. o 

was rich , but of an ill reputation , 

fosse ma cattfvo reputavone fi 

( made answer ) ,9 I had rather have 

{^ntpose) vorrei piuitosto 

a man without an estate , than to have 

unza ricchezsa fi avere 

an estate without a man. ,, 
We read of a philosopher} who declar- 

Leggiamo - dich ia • 

ed of himself, that the first year 
( he entered ) upon (the) study of 

'( ch* tgU entrb ) ( in the } studio m. 

philosophy he knew all things , the 

Jtlosofia f* sapeva ogni cosa Jr. 

second year he knew something, but 

sape^a 4fualche eosa 

the third year nothing. (The more) 

( more ) 

be studied, the more he declined in 

studiat^a scemava 

the opinion of his own knowledge « 

opinione f, dottrinaf* 

and saw more of the shortness of 

¥edeva fnccoUzza f» 

his understanding. 

intendimento m. 



Ill 
Aristotle precipitated himself into the 

AriactiU prtcipitb 

river Eunjpus, because be ( could not ) 

fiume m. Euripo {uottpoUva ) 

understand its ebb and flow. By the 

aapire /lusie e rijlusio m. per 

same logic he inight at his first entrance 

toxica f. voUva ingresso m. 

( on ) philosopb J have destroyed himself, 

( in ) at^ere 

and we may fairly doubt in which 

poisiamo duhUart 

of the elements he ( ought to have 

eUmentom. \avrtoh9 dwuto 

perished. ) 
pertre, ) 

OP THE VERB. 

A Verb is a word which signifies 
to be, to do, or to suffer. Veros are 
divided into personal and impersonal. 
The personal is that which admits 
of three persons, both in the singular 
and in the plural. The impersonal admits 
only of the third person singular j 
as Piove , Tuona , etc* // rains ^ it 
thunders , etc. 

The personal is either iransidue or 
intransitive : 

The transitive signifies an action 
which really or intentionally passes 
over to the object, and is commonly 



H2 

called^ aciwe'j as II padre ama ijfi* 
^liuoli , the father loves the sons. It 
IS easily made passhe by adding the 
auxiliary verb essere^ to be, with the 
participle , and changing the agent , 
that is. to say, the nominalive into the 
ablative ) and the accusative into the 
nominative ; as I figliuoli sono amati 
dal Padre , the sons are loved by 
the £ither. 

The intransitive signifies an action 
confined to the agent, and which does 
not pass over to any object 5 a^ lo 
dormOj lo passeggio, I sleep, I. walk* 
These verbs are commonly called neu^ 
ter. 

In personal verbs we must consi- 
der the moods, tenses^ numbers. and 
persons. 

The mood of a verb is the manner 
of representing the being, action or 
passion , and there are five of them 3 
the indicative , the imperative , the 
optative, the conjunctive and the infi- 
nitive. 

The indicative only shews the action 
or passion ; as lo amo, lo sono amato, 
lo amava ; lo era amato 5 etc. I love, 
I am loved, IJovcd, I was loved, etc». 

The imperative commands ^ intreats 
pr exhorts 5 as Da^ luogo^alla ragione. 



ii3 
raffrena it coneupiseibile appetko (Bocc* 
lo. 8.) 

The optative shews a certain desire 
or wish 5 as Piacesse a Dio che cid 
fosse vera \ oh\ se V avessi saputo , 
etc. woald to God it were true ^ had 
I known it, etc. 

The conjunctive J likewise called 
subjunctive , is that which is always 
joined with some other roood. 

The infinitive points out action or 
passion in general, without any dis- 
tinction either of personf or numbers ; 
as Amarey to love, vedere , to see , 
udircy to hear essere amato , QedutOy 
uditOy to be loved, seen, beard, etc* 

Tenses denote the periods of time, 
in which an action is , was , or shall 
be done , and these are but three in 
the physical order of nature, viz. the 
present , the past and the future ^ 
but they undergo various subdivisions, 
according to the nature of each mood, 
as will appear in the conjugations. 

The numbers are two , singular and 
plural. 

There are three persons in both 
numbers , viz. Jo, Tu^ Egliy or Etta , 
in the singular : iVbi, Voi , Egltno or 
Elleno , in the plural. 

The due distribution of verbs into 



ill » 

moods, tenses 9 nombers and persons, 
is called conjugation. There are three 
regalar^ coDJagations^ which are dis- 
tinguished by the termination of the 
inlhnitive. The first ends in are, as 
Parlare to speak ; the second in ere , 
as Temere , to fear ; the third in ire } 
as Capire^ to comprehend. 

Before I proceed to them, I think 
it necessary to conjugate the two yerbs 
Essere , to be, and Avere^ to have, 
which help in the formation of the 
compound tenses of all other verbs , 
and do not require the help of any 
to form their own. For this reason 
they are called auxiliaries \ viz. Helpers. 

Instead of multiplying notes and ob- 
servations, as Buommattei , Corticelli » 
and other Italian grammarians do ; I 
shall follow , in the display of the 
verbs , the method of Gigli , which is 
to shew by columns what is correct, 
obsolete, poetical and vulgar, but with 
many necessary corrections and im^ 
provements. 



n5 

Canjitgadon qf the jiuxiUary Verh 
Esiere to be. 

INDICATIVE MOOD. 



I. f Mtiinr TivM* 



Correct* 
I am io $ono (i) 

Thoo art iu sei or $e '(i) 
H« or the it igU ottUa i 
We are noi siamo 

Ton aro ih»* gieU 
Thojr sro ly/iiio or elUno 
sono . 



Obfol. 



#emo, 
ieiamo 

enno 



Po«. 



fffl» 



$0 

tian9 
$i€wm 

$iat€ 
90^ntm 



(i) An rerbt may fce eoafogated with tha 
pertooal proDona, or without, whoa thora Sa ■# 
doobt of any aquirooation; bat if, ioftead of aajiag 
la em, Jlu /o#f/, I waf to ta/, j^ra, fossi^ withottt 
a prooooa, the expreMioo might be aqniroeal, 
not beiog koown whether I mean Io era or BgU 
era, I waf| or he waf, Io foMsi , or Tu /ossi , I 
might be, or thon might'et be; therefore in thaaa 
caeet I tbonld thiok it neoeiaarjr always to make 
nia of the pronooo. 

(«} When we apeak to one person only we 
ought to make oae of 7\f, and aay for example* 
7tt s§i un oniit'uomoy thoa art an honeat man| 
bot it ia now naed ont j in poetry , and in the 
anbtima, or in apeaking with peraona of the loweat 
rank , aa familiarly aaed it implies diareapeet* We 
make nse of ¥oi when we speak to our ioferlora« 
or to onr eqoala when intimately acqaainted with 
them % but when we intend to shew aome reapeet 
we always make nse of F'ouignoria^ V. S, and 
to aroid the frequent repetition of it, we nae the 
feminine pronoun tlla , which ia alwaya referred 
to r, S. either expressed er andersiood. 



ti6 



1&. iMniticir. 



Correct. 
I was (i) em, or ero 
Thoa wftft eti 
He Wit era 
We were erawamo 
Too were erayaBt 
Thtj were enino 



Obfol. 



savamo 
savate 



Poet. 



erffiMo 
trate 



3. PSBTBBITS. 



Correct. 
1 wtt /la (a) 

Thott waft fosti 
He wee /tt 
We were fummo 

Yoo Yftf foite 

The J wereyureno 



Obsol. 
/©•to* 



./ttoro 



Poeticd. 



foroJ)irnOi 
fur^ furo, 



Vmlgtr, 



en 
erono 



Ta1|;ar^ 

fu$U 

fussimo 

fossimo 

foitijitsti 

fuste 

JUMtO 



{X) Some rigid grammarians think, that 6m 
firit person of the imperfect shoald end in a, ac 
io era , io aveva^ etc. and that it is a fault to sajr 
so era, io avevo^ etc. though custom begins to be 
in its favour, at least in common .conversation 
and familiar writings. For my part , I should 
think it necessary, for the sake of avoiding all 
doubt, that -the first person of the imperfect tense, 
when the pronoun is omitted , should always end 
in o: this is my custom, but 

(a) Siegttu ogniMo il $uo ^tile^ h sie^uo rl mio. 

(Metast.) 
(s) The English and Germans have not m 
their verbs this distinction of the imperfect and 
preterite , and they %»y in both tenses , J was^ 
Ich war. They are therefore apt to take one tense 
lor the other, which materially changes the mean* 
ing. They ought to ^observe', that the imperfect 



4. vorvM. 



117 



Correct. 


Obtol. 


Poet. 


Volger. 


I thall be Mi^ 


sarhe- 


mm. 


«rr^ 


Thou ehelt be sami 


— 


mm^ 


4€rai 


He ehell be sarit 


#or^ /e >o 1 


ifrh 


We ehell be $anmQ 


— . 


.^ 


Ufirno 


Ton ehell be sareie 


... 


— 


*eret€ 


Thef shall he somnno 


"^ 4 


iPe/io, 


$€ru4in9 




• fiano I 




5. iMflBATlTB MOOD. 


Correct. 


Obs 


Poet. 


Volg. 


H^aniing 








Be thoo tfii, or $ia 


ef> 


^ 


•«• 


Let him be $ia 


.» 


— 


«. 


Let Of be tiamo 


.-> 


mmm 


— • 


Be 70a #/aie 


— 


— 


— » 


Let them be sUno^ or Jia/io 


— 


— 


^ 



enpreteet an action which wet doing and-wfcick 
waf not jtt aecomptifhed daring the time of 
another paat action. The preterite exprcaiet aa 
action , which ie, or onght to be tni\tt\y peet« 
For instance , if I saf lo andaPa a easa di N» 
tjuando v' incontrai. I was going to N. 's when I 
met jron , Andava in this case is imperfect, becanso 
It if not known whether I realljr went to N. '• 
hoDSe or no; bot if I aajr andai jeri a caga dijf. 
In that caae it is preterite, because it if fbtljr 
onderstood that I weot there. The imperfect like- 
wise esprfsses an habitnal aetion , or one often 
repeated in time past ; as A Roma andavo quasi 
tutti i giomi alia F'illa Medici^ at Rome I weot 
almost ever/ day to Villa Medici , that is to sa/i 
I used to go. 



ti8 



6. o»TATiri An» BvinvifCTiyi mooik 



Correct, 
I maf be sia 

Then me/'et be #if , or sia 
He mej be sia 

l/Ve maj be jxonto 
Yott loaf be ^I'a'e 
Tbe/ najrbe aiOAO 



Oba. PocU 



Vulj. 



a. IHPIMICT, 



Correct. 
I 4bonld be sarei 

Thoo fhoald'st be saresti 
He aboold be tarv&fre 

We fhoald be $anmmo 

Toa ahoald be taresU 
Tbejr ahoald be sarebbero 



Oba. Poet. 



aarra, 
/ora, 
saria' 
mo 



[ sarU' 

P9, $a- 
Hano 
yrano 



sartbbi 

Barave 

tarth* 
bamo 
MiresU 
serieno 



8, ffBiTBxnaricT* 



* ^ Correct. 
I migbt be fiui 

Thoa niight'at Ufosii 

He might be fosse 

We night be fossimo 

Yen might be ^afe 

IPhe/ miglit be fotsero 



Obaoi. 

JUssi 

fussi 
fusst 
fussimo 

fusU 

fussero 
ftasono 



Poe fVulgtr. 

fosse^ 

fuSS€ 

fosse^ 
fusst 
fossil 
fussi 
fossamo 
fussemo 
fpsU^ 

.« Uossino^ 
[fussift^ 



»>9 

^ mrmiTiTB moos. 
To be Stsert | ^ | ^ | ' em* €$$mH 

10. rAlTICirU ACTITI. 

Being tffieii<lo,iwilV«- I mimIo, jtoiNfo I — * I «- 

ti» fAVriCirU ffAMlTB. 

iCorreot. I Obfolete. | Poe. iVaff 

lee* ete/Oy ta^ iL,*u euuio^ istut^ 



The compound tenses are formed 
lyy adding the passive participle to Uie 
simple tense ; as lo sono stato ^ or 
j0tata, I have been; Noi siamo static 
or state^ we have been; lo era stato, 
I had been, and so on (t). 

The negative is expressed in Italian 
by putting nan before the verb } as 
lo non sonOj non sono stato. etc* I aot ' 
not. I have not been, etc. 

In Uie imperative moodi^when there 
is a negation ,' we make use of the 
infinitive instead of the second per- 

(i) At the Eoglifh end Frenoh, to form tlie 
^omponnd tentaf of the Terb tiitrt to be i meke 
ttfe of the ebxiiUrf rerb atftrt^ to h«Te^ tnd Mjr, 
/ havt been^fai 4ti» Whioh U in Icelian, /o Hq 
state f to thejr tre litble to err in thtf retpeett 
We tgree in this with ihe ^Germent « who •^ff 
Ich bin fiweua. 



lao 
son singular, und say TVon essere in* 
stead of non sii^ non avere , non ama- 
re , non temere , Hon sentire , Instead 
of non abbi , non amay non temi , non 
senti, which is owing to the verb 
dem being iindlerslecd ; as Non^devi 
essere^ thou itiust not be. 

In interrogations we use the per- 
sonal pronoun after the verb : as Sono 
io }'ho 10 ? amo io? etc. am I ? have 
I? do I love ? etc. and in the com- 
pound tenses we put it after the auxi- 
liary verb ; as Sono io stato ? ho io 
avuto ? ho io amato ? etc. have I been ? 
have I had ? have I loved ? etc. It 
is true , that we often omit the pro- 
noun^ even in interrogations , and say 
Sono stato ? ho avuto ? etc. the in- 
terrogation being sufficiently expressed 
by a change in the tone or accent 5 
but as without the pronoun it is less 
expressive , I would therefore advise 
foreigners , who do not always know 
how to make use of the necessary 
inflection of that tone or stress, which 
is 4'equired , to add the pronoun in 
order to avoid any doubt whatever. 



Jt21 



Conjugation of the AuxiliaryVerh 
Av€re to have^ 



INDICATIVE MOODv 



X. MIMKT Tints* 



Corrtot. 
I have io ho 


Obtol. 

abbo^ 


Poet. 
agsio 


Valvar. 
ho€ 


Thoa hftf t tu hai 
He luM #9l> ha 


09 
abbi, 
abbe^ 


w 


— 


We hare nof a&frfflino 


mo 


atf€' abbiitno^ 
mo aniamo 


Yott hare vo«' av^^« 
Thejr hate e$Uno h^n^ 


— 


— 


aettt aio 



^ .jWjfia^ACf. 



Corvcel. 
1 bad avet^a; or ai^ei^o 

Thoa hadtt avevi 
Be bad a^^et^a 

We had mrevar^o 

I - 
Tos bad afv^^iil^ 

Tha^ had avevai^o • 



Obtol. 


Poet. 


a^'ai'a 


avea 


avid 


avto, 
avia 


auat^a- 


mm. 


mo 




U 


Oi^ea 


no. 


no 


^auieoQ 





Vulgar. 
Af^eo 
atvi 
ava 

avkmo 

antevi^ avi 

aoano • 



IM 



S. nwTMMttm. 



Obfot. 
apettu 



Poet. 



Correct. 
I M ei6> 

Thou hudit avesti 
He had €&fre 
We had avtmmm 



Ton had w^tM 
They had e»er» 



4. VUTUBl. 

Gerrecl. 
I ihall or will hare m^ 

Thon tkalt or wilt hare ovnit 

He aball or will hat« a»rk 

We ahtfl or will hare a»wemo 

Tea shall or will hare wmU 

They ahall or will hare avrtmm 

5. iHtaaaTin. 

Corrects tObfol. 

Hare thoa alhi 

Let him hare cM/a 

Let at hare ohhiAmo 

Hare ye atfria^ 

Let thejn hare a^fr»aMo| — - 



Tol^ar^ 



mo, Qvet^ 
simo 

see, a€$U 
tbbena 



avero 

ard, aa- 
rd 



Obfol. 


P. 


ai^roe 


. 


avarai 


— 


avarh 


*^ 


avart' 


.. 


mo 




avan* 
U 


^" 



flVO- ...I •» 



n 



iPoet. 



agfiaU 



Vi»lgar. 



ai'Mim^ 

llUfllO 



$. o»T4rivm AV» •OBiuxerivB mood* 



aaS 



Correct*: 

I may \uLre ahbia 

Tboa ma j'n hare aM/, or abhia 
He may Jure ahbia 

We may hare abbiamo 

Tos may heTo abbiats 

TJiey maylwTe dbhiano 

p iMtaattcr. 



Oba^lPoet. 
aggia 



VJiL 

avia^ 



' 1 '* 

I «• 



Correet* 


Obt 


Poet. 


T«]gar» 


I ihoold have a¥r$i 


— 


w^ri 


ll»^#fVl\ 








atni^ 
avpebbi 


Then ahoald'a i bare ai^m^i 


•^ 


— 


avrtb' 
bamo 


Ho fbovid hare a^nbbe 


«•» 


auria 


mm» 


We ahoald iuire cii'rrmmc 


— 


avria' 


avnb^ 






mo 


bemo' 


Tea thould bare avrtsie 


— 


^ 


\ avMti 


Tbey fhoald bare avnbbi» 


«• 


at^riu' 


ariano 


F», 


« 


no 


at^rebba 


g. taimmrtct. 


Correct. 


Obt 


Pee. 


VaJgac. 


I nigbt bave o^eui 


•" 


^^ 


avr#ie 


Thoo mfgbtett bare avesti 


— 


— 


avesU 


Re mifht bare aveue 


— 


— 


' avessi 


We m»gbt bare ateuima 


— 


— 


at^tstemQ- 


\ ■ 






mo 


Tea might bare a»€$i9 


■^ 


"^ 




Tbey might baTe ay$tS€ro 


— " 


— 


aeaino^ 








l« 


fessinm 



.24 



9« iirriinTiTa icoov. 
Correct. I Obtol. I Poetic. | Volgar. 

To hare at^ere j abbiare \ «-•- I aen 



lO. f AlTICirLS AGTIVa. 


avend^ 


ahkiendo 


— 


con a»trt 

CokV Q9tTt 


^ 


^^ 


in. avert 
ueifavert 


«» 


•-^ 



— tunda 



Haying 



II. MITMins tAMlTI. 

Correct. | Obsolete. [ P«e. | Vttlga». 

Had at^uto to, <i, fe [ abhiuto j — I 

lo form the compound tenses it is 
only necessary to add to the simple 
tense Ihe passive participle a^uto , 
which alvrays retains the same termi- 
nation , be the gender or number 
of the persons governing tbe verb 
whatever it may , contrary to the verb 
essere f in which a man says lo sono 
stato , and a woman To sono stata y 
and * in the plural noi siama stad 
and noi siamo state 'j all the verbs 
therefore whicb are conjugated with 
the auxiliary verb essere are governed 
by this same rule ; as II Padre k ri- 
spettatOj La Madre h amatay etc. the 
father is respected , the mother is 
beloved, etc. Those that are conjugated 
with the verb avere ^ to have> never 



1^5 
etiance Ihc pnrlir.iplc wilh rrsperi to 
Ihc per«»oii* of Ihe %«mIi-, iis /'/ M 
lodato, PMa ha b'nsimatn, Nn nb^ 
hianio srritloi olwervc lliat » «ai(l 
with r expert to ihe penon.^ of the 
verb, for w^lli icspect lo lli«nj;« Ihe 
cajic is dillViciil, as appears in iho 
lulluwifis ox iiiip!^ : ^ . • • , 
Signor, fJ^ran cose in ptcciol tempo 

hai fatte, 
Che lunga eta pnrre in ohfio nnn puote, 
Eserciliy e citfa, %^intiy e Jh/fjUe, 
Superati disagi^ e strode ifsifoe. 

'^ ( Ta^so. ) 

Wc 90fnctiiii<?s mc the voiU oi^ere in 
the third person iiisUmiI o\ the verb 
essere-, a* lo fi;li p^irfai, non ha t;ran 
tenrj}0 in Londra ; Hi »i i« to ^ny non 
i nran tempy: Una dclh pu he lie 
di quelit Cil/a, benrhe porhe ve n' nb* 
biann che pmsono cMfmtrsi helle^ 
that IS lo say, benchi puche i^e ne 
siano (i}« 

(l^ We i<ntt«ti> in thif tti* Fr«nrfi, wh« winlil 
ii«. in the fore/coiiiK "Xaiirpt'-f, J*' f»i fhtrfai h 
Londret, iln'ya pa$ lont-Umpi : Qtniqit il y ff^ 
mii peu gu'vn put%$e app^Ur johea^ w. tfi thu 
iifferenee, howevr, ihAt lH«f Kr^-iiiK iiHe iHi- vrrb 
«>'4>ir, to hire, only in tlie thinl p'-mon siiiKiilar« 
•nd we in-ke no «crMp'e to u*e it »l»« in ih« 
third porfon plural; ihoiijih it i« M»ore roHMiion 
lo huiIm ait oal/ ol the third peiion i.o|;iil«ir« 

7 



126 

The verb c^oere before the infinitives 
*with the particle a or du meaos do- 
,vere ; as Ho da scrhere tjuesta sera 
a Puri^i ; Questo k quanta io aua^a 
a dirOiy etc. aiean Debbo scrii/ere, io 
doi^ei/a din^i. ' 

First regular. Conjugation in Are. 

INDICATIVE MOOD 

I. PKBSSNT TBRfM. 



Oorrect. 
I ipcAk Io pUfia 

Thuu «peak'st tu parli 
He speaks egli parla 

Wtf speak noi parLiamo 

You speak voi parlatt 

The/ speak egllno parla- 
''■• » ' no 



Vulgar. 



parlianp^ 
parlamo 

— — parlono 



Obs. 


Poe. 


.— 


— - 


— 


parle 


— 


-— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


^ V 





a. iMttarscx, 



Correct. 
I 1 did speak . parlava^ or 

parla if o 
Thou didst speak parla^^i 
Ue did speak parlat^a 

W'^ did speak parlavamo 



I'oa did speak parla^^ate 
Thtj did speak parlayano 



Obs 



Vulgar, 



pttrlapO' 

parla^i. 
pariayonQ 



3; PitTS«ITB. 



-* ■ . Oorrelet* ' 
I tpoke pttrfiai 

Tbou spokett parluhti 
H« spoke parld 

W« spoke partummo 

.Yi>o spoke par/a tie 
Th«7 spuke parlarono 



Ob»olet 

parlatiu 
pa it be 



?0tt. 



Volgsr. 
parta$t€ 



parlar 



paHagsi' 

mo 
pa Haiti 
parlorono 
pArta-^purlorn0 

TO ^ 



4» FuTuii. 



Correct. 
I thai I speak parkr6 

Tbott shaU speak parlerai 

He shall fpeak parUrti 

Vit shall speak parleremo 

Too sliall speak purUrett 

XUey siial! Kpeak pafterunno 



Ol^sul. 

pat la- 
id 

parla* 
lai 

pario' 
ra 

pa fla- 
re mo 

paiia- 
I'tte 

parlw 

lannv 



Pce.Volj^ar. 
-^ I purlt' 



5 I 



MPttaTirs MOOD. 



Correct. 

Ranting . 

Speak thos purla 

Let him speak purli 

'Het OS spekk paHiamo 

Speak juaj . parlape^ 

"Litl them Ipeak purling 



Obsol. 



Poetie* 



Yolgers 



120 



S. OfTATirt AID SVBIVKCTITt MOOS- 



Correct. 
I may apeak parti 

Thuu inajeat apeak pur i 
He may tp^ak /iMr/i 

Wa may ap<««k p.iiumo 

You may apeak p„riiui€ 

Xkey may apeak pariiao 



Oba 



Boet 

par It: 

pit fie 



— t — parUam^ 



VoT^r. 



7. iMraarfiCT: 

Correct. 
I ahonid tpcak parhrei 

Tboo thoold'st itpeak parlt're.Ki 
He ahoold apeak parurtbbt 



We abould apeak 



par' f rem 



Oba fPooti. 



pa He 

I HI 

putL'»\parie 
rtuitiu 



Vuf^. 



Ton ahould uptsak patter* ste 
Tkey abould ape^k patten b 
btroy ur /iurttrc-^^i/nul 

8. pa£TCRPisracT 



parte 
riufiu 



rtbba* 
mo 

parte* 

nbba* 

^.e 



Cnrrecf. 
I might apenk parta^si 

Thou migfoteat speak puttu»si 

He might apeak pailasse 

Wt might tpeak purtassimi 

Tdo might apeak^ partastt 
Tbejr might speak paHiisser>» 



)biio 



Po#», 



V»!g. 
pur* 

pap* 

assi 

par* 

(«.«ae« 

mo 

iHtrla* 
sti 

IHtrfai 



t29 

tWr VlTtTB MOOO. 

Orr^ct. I Obtf4. I Poetical | VaTg. 

To tp««k purlan I -* I *— I p^J^fU^ 



lo. fAiTicirii ACTiri, 



Coffct- 



Iparinnao 
col pa Hare 
Hi'/ uarlurt 



Puriure 



Obtoletct Poetic 



|i 









Volj. 



11. rilTfCirLB PAtfJVB. 

C<»rr^ct. I Obioletc*. | Poet'cat. | Vo1|^tr« 
Spoktfu purlalo | .« | .— | .. 

The compound tenses nre formed 
by llie tielp of llie auxiliary atfere, 
ftildin*; lo il ihc pa*»sivn parluriple ; as 
Jo ho parlalOy lo /a^ei^a parLaiOy etc# 
1 Il'ivc icpoken, 1 b;id .npokeu, clc, The 
same is lo be uiider^^lood of olber 
verbs. 

We also somclimcs make use of Iho 
verb essere in the compound lenses, 
bul as Bnominallei observes, il must 
only be used in Ihe intransiihe veibs ; 
as lo sono andatOj tu sei venufo^ egli 
i sceso elc. i am {^one, Ihou arl come, 
he is come down, elc. This rule may 
be of Some use, Ihou^h suhjerl lo 
tiiany rxreplions, as pradice will shew* 

Whrn we wunl lo oxpre.HS a cerlaia 
couUuualiuu or ^uccessiou of limCy w« 



i5o 
use ihe active pnrliciple with Ihe 
verbs stare^ venire, andare^ and say 
lo sto scrwendoy tu vai leggendo^ 
egli mi vien racconlandoy etc. I am 
writing, etc. 

The verbs in care^ and garey as 
predicarCy spiegare^ etc. take an // ia 
those teases in which C and (? should 
precede E or I. Therefore in the 
present of the indicative they make 
tu predichiy tu spieghiy etc. in the 
future lo predicherOy io spiegherb etc. 
in the imperative predichi egli, spie^ 
ghi eglij and so on. 

In our language we have no simple 
tenses for the passive verbs, as the 
Latins } who say amor, amahary etc. 
but we make use of the verb ^ssere 
with the passive participle of the verb 
we intend to make use of; lo sono 
amatOy or amatay I am loved; lo eruy 
or fui amatOy I was loved, and so 
forth ; as I have elsewhere observed. 

Second regular conjugation in Ere 
INDICATIVE MOOD. 



I. rXKSXMT TKMSB. 






Correct. 


Obs. 


Poe. 


Va1|C«r.. 


1 fear lo iemo 


— 


— 


"^ i 


Thoa fear*tt iu terrii 


m^ 


-^ 




He fear« tgli ieme 


Ml.. 


-— 


• — 


We fear noi temiamo 


.^ 


^-. 


t€mian9 


You fe^r voi Umete 


•« 


— 


-p. 


thej fear t^Uno lemji>no 


— 


, — 


temoiiQ 



• . IMMSrsCT. 



i3i 



Correct, 
I did fear temefa^ or 

temevo 
Thoo did'«t fear Umevi 
He did fear temevm 

We did fear iemevamo 



Too did fear 
Tbej did fear 



temevate 
temevano 



Ob$. 


Poetic. 


— 


lemea 


«• 


«. 


— 


iemeu 


— 


tern fa- 




mo 


... 


-* 


— 


— 



Valgar. 



temevo* 
mo fie me -^ 
miff 

lemeyi • 
tvmnvon^' 



a. raiTsaiTK. 



Correct. 
I fear'd temei^ or 

temelti 
Thoo f' aredit temesti 



He fear'd 

We fear'd 
Yoo fearM 
Tbey fear'd 



l<'m^ , or 
temette 
ttmemmo 
temette 
temerono 



or temette ro 



Obaol 


Poel 


— " 


— 


temestu 


^ 


— 


"" 


.. 


— 


— . 


«. 


-~ 


temero 

1 



Vofjar. 



emeutmo 

ttmeiti 

'emuttano 



4* rvruiB. 



Correct. 
I thall fear temerb 

Tboa ihait fear temerai 
He thall fear iemtrli 
We shall fear ttmeremo 
iTon thall fear temerete 
Thej tbaU fear Umeranno 



Obfole. 


Poe 


temeroe 


— 


» 


.. 


Umerae 


— 


— 


T" 


f— 


— 


*■" 


— 



Voljar. 



— -^ /iff/ii r^no 



i3a 



5. iMrtBATfYS irH>D, 



Correct. jja* /^itc ( Vulgar. 

Fear thou ttmi 1 — — iemg 

Let hiui fear l.'w/i — — uiiti 

Let tt« fear trtnium 

Fear yoii temete 

Let thciu fear Uniuno — 1 -^ Unune 

6, OPTiTITB 4IIO SUBIUNCTITB MOOD. 

C'jire<.t. lb* '..,. Vulgar. 

I may fear /rm/i \— . tetne 

Thou mayeft fear Umi or fem* 
lie may frar Umn — — l«-»ij 

V\« m»y f- r ' temiutno 
Yfin may fear ttntiuie 

Tkey may fear iaiuano — .^| UminQ 



y. imhbfkct 
Correct. Jbt 

I tfiooM fear temrr*'i 

Thou aboiilirat fear teniensii 
He should fear temtfvLbt 
We ahoulii fe«ir Ununmmo 



Ton thofild fear ttmeresie 



They thou I J fear iemert hhtro — 

8. raKTsartBPBcr 
C*»rrec«. Ohj 

I might Cear icmessi 

Thou ini^htest fear l< mi>»< 
He mt](ht frar trmt^se 

W« might fear tem ssnn0' — 
Yju uiigM fear Uiurste 



They might fear Um€%Mtr0 . — 



Poetic. 


Vulg. 


— 


— 


^- 


-« 


tt-mi-n'ti 


_ 


t» nit rtw 


temem 


mo 


nr^si" 




mo^ ie- 




Hiereln 




bam Of 


— 


iefft-re* 


*7< 


Poe 


Vulgar. 


— 


ienu'Stid 


— 


mmm 


— 


iemi*s$£ 


— 


Umes%t^mm 


— teme*ti\ 


teme$»rv 


"^ k 


Urn 


t^faa^Jia 



t33 



^ mrtvtTiTt Hoos. 
Onrect. | Ob»ol. | Poeiic 



T# f«iir f*mrrf | — j 



jetic. I Vol^ar. 



Ftartsg 



10. »AlTICirLB ACTirt. 

ttmtndo I — I — ! "* 

4*0/ lemetif I •" I *~ I "^ 

«iW Uuur€ I — I -" I — 



It. rAlTICiri.t P4MITB. 

Third Conjugation in Ire. 
INDICATIVE MOUD. 



S. flBUVr. TBVtB. 

Correct 
1 e<>mpreTieii<l locnpisco {i) 

Thou cuiiipieliend'tt tu cui>i$ci 
H*? coiijpiehruU* ffiii euiHMce 
\\t euiKprehvMil nwi vuptumo 

Ton comprehend vof capite 
' TiM?/ coiuprchcod f^/ino vapheo- 



VoljB. 



— |i*if|>/Vi#io 
I tsapim^ 



(li Most Italimi grfimnariapii/tive for ihe third 
regular cuiijugatibu the verb fi/ilirr, or ioint 
•ther like it, which it cou|iif(»ted at fullowi Th« 
freient tease of the indieiilive iiioud iit lo itrntOf 
Itt ii'iftt, e^ii sente^ noi sentiumo^ voi sentite^ e$li* 
mo senionQ. Tne imperative mood, stuti in, ientm 
#^//, stntiamo noi, $enUU voi^ ientano e^itiuo. The 
•ubjanctive mood, eh* io ieniUf vhi m senta^ 



i34 



2. iHFsmrscv. 



Correct, 
I d\d eompreheod capiva^ or 

capivo 
Thoa did'tt compreheqcl eapi*i 
He did comprehend capita 

VVe did eoqiprehend capivamo 

Yoa did comprehend capivate < 
Thejr *did couiprebend capivano 



3. PXlTlBirB 

Correct. |Obs. 

I comprehended capii (i) capei 

Than comprehend'st capisU 

He compreheaded ca/^i 

"We comprehended capimmo 

Yoa comprehended capiste 

They comprehended capirono 



Poet. 



capia 



CO' 



Volg. 



capi' 
mio 
capital 

capi' 



piano yono 



Poet, Vufj 



capio 



capiro 



capi- 
ste 

capU" 

te 
capiS' 

simo 
capi- 

su,\ 
cup(q- 

no 



ehyj^tino sentano. The other tenses like capif^p, 
BuT «i I have observed ihat «mongist the Verbs 
Ending' in ire^ for one that i< donjugatod like sen- 
tire tbet'e ra one haodred tike copire^ I thought it 
proper to put down the verb capiro as fl^rcgplar 
conjugation, not being spbject to so many elccep- 
tiotof 'as^^rt//re. ' ' . * . 

(i) Some people v1io"'uie to write with V rt« 
irords that shoiitd end With two ii*s \i 'pi*ofhrJ 




ii'i muikjL ie diittioctly prouounced 



t3S 



4. rUTORK 



Correct. 



I fhall ^ eapird 


capiroe 


-^ 


.— 


Til on «haU J capinii 


— 


— 


— 


Ue shall 1 capita 


capirae. 


-^ 


— 


I cowpre* 


— 


— 


capi- 


/ hend 






re no 


W© shall 1 enpiremo 


— 


— 


— 


You *hal! 1 cupirete | — 


— 


— 


They shall / eapiranno 


1 — 


-" 


•-• 



Obsol 



Volg. 



6. IMPKBATIVS MOOD. 



Correct. 
Wanting, 
Comprehend thoa 
Let him comprehend 
Let OS comprehend 
Comprehend yon 





Ob. 


Poe. 


capisci 


... 


— 


^apisca 


— 


— • 


capiamo 


— 


— 


capite 


— 


— 


t;apiscano 


'" 





Volg. 



— -^ c apt SCI 



capi* 
$chsn0 



$• OPTaTITI and SU^UIItfTlVS afpoo.*^ 



Correct. 

1 .may comprehend cnpisca 

Thoo ma yesrc«m« capischi, 

• preheod or capitca 

He may comprohend captsca 

We may comprehend eopiatjtp 

You may comprehend capiaie 
Ttk^f m»y comprehend capticano 



o.\ 



'— citptgchi 



capischi 



- . Cttpt- 



136 



7* iMftBVSCV 



Correct: 
I thttald eompreheai capifti 



Thou tlioald'si coinpre« capirrsti — I — 
head '^ ' 

H» sha«ld comprehead capinb 



r,bU 



W« thoald eomprehead capirfm^ 



-^capt 






mo 



Too shoolcl comprehend capireste — 
Xhffjr chottld comprelieud cuinr.b- I— 



9, rairKirtirxcT* 



Correct. 
I ni^ht eomprelieiid capissi 

Xboa mi^htett comprehend capUu 

Be mi^ht eompreheod capisse 

We might cemprehead capissimo 

Yoa Ki^ht comprehend capiste 



fo 



capi* 

dipt* 

ra¥t 

capim 

rrbba^ 



:api» 

rtstd 



capt* 



— capt$m 
$e 

capim 

$ti 

capit. 



SI 



' '^ capitm 
I *r«# 

Xhejr might comprehead capisuro — '— -|r<i/F/e» 



9* IVriWlTIVB MOOO. 

Cnrrert. I Obf ol. | Poetic. I Tutie. 

Ta oomprebeud cup/ne | f I 



!•• »4ftTICirM ACTlrt. 



t^ 



Correct* 

CompreheadiBg 



capfHtitt 
vol capire 



Obsol 



Poalie. 



V«. 



If. rAiricipti rAtfiYt, 
Comprefccttdid ta/^fiv, f«i, U^ <^f I * I ^ I ««P»A» 

These <*ire the Ihrce models of regular 
conjugaliiiris ; bul as Uietc are a f;reat 
many verbs wliick in some tcnse# 
deviate from tJiem, and are ralJed Jt> 
regular^ ihey will be found alptia- 
belically arranged and coiijiigaled at 
the end of I his grammar* 

The folluwinf; observations, however^ 
may be of a very great use lo Ihe 
learner. 

Observe ist, That all Ibe verbs of 
the first conjugation are regular, except 
four, vi«. Andare^ Dare^ Fare^ Stare. 
The compounds of Dare^ and Siare, at 
Secondare^ Accostore^ etc.. are regular. 
The conipoujids of Pare^ as Disfare^ 
Liquefrtre, ect. follow the irregular 
conjugation of their original verb Fare. 

adly, There is a great variation in 
the preterites of the verbs belonging 
to 4ie second conjugation. When Ere 
ii loog^ and there iii C before it 



i5« 
as Tacere, Giacere^ Place fp^ we add 
^ Q \ti the first and third person 
singular, and in the Ihird person plura], 
and give it a particular terminatioa 
thus ; Tacquij Giacqui^ Piacqui^ Yac- 
que , Giacque , Piacque , Tacquero , 
Gidcquero, Piacquero. 

In the verbs that have the consonant 
t, before JEre, as Valere^^ Dolere^ and 
their compounds , the preterite is 
formed by takin<; away Rre^ and by 
addi-n^f si^ se in the singular, and 
^ero in the plural 5 as Falsiy VahCf 
Valsero^ Dolsiy Dolse^ Dolsero. 

The preterite of Avere^ Cadere^ 
TenerCy Sapere, F'olerey is formed by 
doubling their consonant, and by adding 
/, E to it in the singular, and ero in 
the pVur«rl y as Ebl/i\ (i), El/hey Ebbero]^ 
Caddiy CaddCy Caddero^ Tennij Tea- 
ne , Tenneroy Seppi , Seppe^ Seppero , 
J^olli, rdle, Vollero. 

The verbs that in the first person 
aingular of 4iic present of the indicative 
mood end in /»g^o, as legf;o fiom /gg^- 
^tfre, end in ssi in the preterite ; as 
f^88^ y ^^^^^ 'y ^l^Sfi^ y ^lessi , traggo » 
tra^siytrqfiggOy trvj^sAi, etc. (2). 

(1) Ob«»rve that jivere Bnd So ptre change (b^tr 
Towcl A into E; «• Ebbi\ Sef>pi^ and tli» ^ ©f 
Avtrt if changed into two hh*** 
" (2) Tliose irh^ 'ttaderUibd "Liitia iriU ^odm 



i39 
The verbs epding, in Dere short, an4 
preceded by joi vowel, as CJiiedere, Re^ 
cidere^ elc. termii>(^le their preterite ia 
#i, as Chiesiy Hetisif etc. 

The verbs which in the first persoa 
of the preseat have before the la^ 
vowel two dirrercat consonants » the 
first of which is one of the three li. 
quids L, 2V, /I, form their preterite by 
preserving the liquid, and adding si ; 
as ScelgOy SceUiy Dolgo^ Dolsi, Fran^ 
go^ Fransi^ PiangOy Piansif Ardo^ Ar^ 
hi^ AccorgOy Ac^prsiy elc. 

A verb oeutec^ as I have observed 
^before, is tbat, the anion of which 
does not pass from the agent to any 
object : as Jo corro^ To dormo^ lo so- 
gno, I run, I sleep, I dream, elc. where 
the. effect is coa(ipcd within the agenk 
The. action ^oiriOtinie* rejlect on the 
figenty and then . >ye always add the 
.conjunct VQ propo.uus mi, ii^ si^, ci, t^i; 
as , io, . n^ lusingo^f tu tl lusinghiy egli 
si lusingaf ,noi cilusinghiamoy i^ov 01 
j{(f5ingq4f?$ AgUn^ fil,UislugdiuOy Jo mllu" 

. , l\ ,' y 1 ' *l .1' J" I ', / ^ * *'' ' ' * 

a 5r<*at bf)p jn it ior, the;foic^fiAO. of, the yrf- 
Tter/tc. When fhe preicrite in Latin if >^itli an J^, 
'^Wlii, tth, i\i^ Jtia dhanget/ iu ilalian Tntp s$i, 
^mg-Visk, et»».if thm^' aMtiro consonant, • #• 

la^UM-, a#ui aay Sgri^si^.tlQ,^ • . . ' « ? 



i4o 

singtwn. nnd so forfh. I fl;iircr my^^el^ 
thi«ii fliiller''5l Ihyscli^ he flalters htm- 
ceir, etc 

Wc may likewise say, 7b lasingomi^ 
fgli /tisinga^i, c\c. See pafje j5 Thesd 
terlis are railed lefl^Tlive or re<:iprocal« 

or impersonal verbs, some are ab« 
Boliifely so ; as Piove^t ^'et^icay Lam* 
peggia^ Tuonfty rl<*. it rains, it snovi'S^ 
It li;;titens, it lhiinc)er<;, ele. Uihers 
are made impersonal by the addilioa 
ef the parlic'le si : hxi-im. Ctedesi 
che la marina da Rt^ggio a Gaeta 
sia la piu di/eUePote pnrte d' Jtalia^ 
(Boe. 2. 4-) This parlirle answers to 
the French en : for when the French 
•ay on croitj on ditj on Jaity we com* 
monly say si rrede^ si dire, si fa or 
€redMy as in the roro^oin«; example^ 
dicesiy fassij etc. Vf'e ni;»y likewise 
«ay, yien credufOy Vien detfo^ Vien 
fatiOy etc. whirh expresses the same 
meaning, vi%. Ihey Ihink, fhey say^ 
they do, or people Ihink, elc. 

Lastly, There are fsome verbs wnieh 
•re called dereclive, ijcfniise they have 
fiol all the moods, lenses and personV 
'Which are common to other verbs; 
.«ach are Calere y f^ire ^ ire ^ licere ^ 
^lirCj redirey solercy etc. bnt Iheso 
will be found ia the list of the irr<^* 
galar verbf. 



»4» 

-or THE PARTICIPLE. 

This part of uprcrh is rnllcd partU 
eiple, because il p.u'lakes tiiilh of ihe 
tioiiti and of llio veib (•)*. 

TUe parliciple is either at. live or pas- 
sive. 

Tlie active, wliirh may also be call- 
ed Ceruud with the Latins signifies 
action , as Amando , 3 emendo , Ca^ 
peudo. 

Observe Uiat in the verbs of Ihc 
fii-st con]ii;;attuii the aclive parlicipio 
ends in undo; as Aniando^ I'arlando^ 
Passegji^Jandoj etc. bom A mare ^ Par'* 
lure, Passegf^inre^ etc. 

In the second and tbird conjngation 
it term i nates in eudo; as Temendo, 
Capenda, etc. 

The passive participle is that which 
signifies pusMuu ; as Amaio^ Ttmuto^ 
Capita. 

In llie first eonjngalion it ends in to 
and ta ; as Amato , Amata. In tho 
second, when ere is long, it ends ia 
»//>, uta\ as TemutOj remuta \ etc« 
exctept ri/rifi/tere^ the pnnsive parlicipio 
•t which is rimastOj or rimaso. Wbea 

(i) Purt/c/pium itd dii^tum^ tfvfa partem eapit 



i4a 
ere is shorty the passive pnrliciple is 
subject to a great many variations. For 
instance, when the preterite ends in 
ssiy as Lessiy Elessi, Trassiy etc. the 
participle is in ttOy as Letto, Eletto, 
TrattOy elc, When the preterite ends 
in ji, preceded by a vowel, as Accesiy 
Difesiy etc. in the participle, si \s 
changed into jo, as AccesOy DifesOy 
etc. except Chiesi , Risposi , Misi , 
which make in the participle ChiestOy 
RispostOy Messo elc. 

Those verbs which have their pre- 
terite in hi as Scelsiy Sciolsiy etc. have 
Iheir passive participle in //o, as Scelto, 
sciolto, etc. except Calsi and yalsi, 
the participle of which is CaLuiOy Va^ 
luto. 

The verbs whose preterite terminates 
in nsiy as Piansiy Giunsiy Finsiy have 
their participle in ntOy PiantOy GiuntOy 
FintOy etc. 

When the preterite ends in rsiy as 
Arsiy Sparsiy Accorsiy Scorsiy etc. the 
participle ends sometimes in rsoy as 
ArsOy SparsOy sometimes in rtOy as Ac* 
cortOy Scorto. 

The verbs of the third conjugation 
generally have their passive partici pie 
in itOy itOy as Capita, CapitCy from 
Capire. 



i4S 

There are, however, »ome few excep- 
tions, vix- Comparlre^ Aprire^ Morirey 
Ojfrircy Projferire^ which make in the. . 
passive participle Comparso, j4perto, 
Mono, OJfcno, Projftrto. 

Observe that Ihe participle must agree 
with the thing spoken of, that is to say, 
it must be either masculine or feminni& 
according (o the gender of the thing 
which is mentioned. For example, wo 
ought to «ay, ha lettera^ che ho rice^ 
ifuiaj the letter which I have received, 
and not La leilera che ho ricei^uto ; 
he commtssioni che mi avete dale, the 
orders which jou have given me, and 
not Le cotnmlssioni che mi ai^ete da^ 
to ; except when the noun is placed 
after the participle, io that case we 
may say, Ilo riceifufo la lettera, etc* 
mi avete dato le commissioni^ etc. 

. OF THE ADVERB. 

An adverb is a part of speech which, 
added to verbs, expressels some circum- 
stance belonging to them, and is, witli 
respect to the verb, what the adjective 
is with respect to the subsantivc. (i) 

(i) Adt^ethium eft pan orationii indeelinahiUi^ 
eujui u^nificutio verbi$ adjitilur. Hoc enim per* 
ficU adtfitiium vetbis addituaiiquod udfuctipa nQ* 



i44 

Many ndvcrbs are firmed from flie 
adjeclives by ndilinj; mente^ ns from 
doita: djtiamenie, Iroiii prudente /»/*«• 
dentemenie^ cfc. 

Some advcibft hnve fhoir posilivei 
romparalivCy and siipcrlalive do^ice; as 
Bencj well ; mef'tio^ beller, ottifnamente^ 
very well ; mate^ ili^ pegf;ioj w<irse, 
pessimamentej very ill. Some cillicis 
form their compaijilivrs by adding pm : 
as tloitameate IviivnrdWy piu doittimente^ 
more le.iriiedly, and Iheir snperlalivcs 
by chan*{in;{ amente inlo issimameme ; 
as dottissiintmenie^ very learnedly. 

Some adverbs have likewise their 
diminutives; as Benino^ adaf^inOy po" 
ehino^ pocolino, pochetio^ faniino, tan* 
ttnettOi eti*. wliitth are diminutives, of 
BenCj adagio^ poco^ ianto^ etc. 

There arc adverbs of time ; as Ora^ 
adesso^ jert^ domaniy oggiy primly poif 
un pezzo fa^ subito^ talora, etc. 

Of place, as Dos^Cy or ot^e (i) qui^ 
quwif /V/y lay cola, cosii, cosid^ qua^ 
vi, ci. (2J 

minn a^pellatWis nominibut adjuncia. (Prite. lib* 
l5. p. luoS. 

^i) la poftry we soni^tini- » ose tt' with a« 
•p.>«tropb • itt»C *»4 of dot^e. or om*. For «*X4fDpf«* 

U* t*H» or U nvvh' %z^ ? «' son gli onon 7 {P tr} 
■ O) With fnperC lo lli«*ie two laiitt «dveib« t*£ 
•ad «?i| wb.«ii ti^aif/ likriv iu £af li^lii it mcuc Iw 



t45 

Of quality ; at Ihi^mente^ prudtnU' 
menie^ c*lc. 

Of qiiatitiiy ; aa //ssai, molio^ poco^ 
pill truppo^ meuo, eUu 

Of Affii'iiialioii, or tiej^Qlion ; n% Sh ^i 
bene^ no nortj non gia^ non mar, etc* 

Of order ; as y4 vic^ndu^ firadata^ 
mente^ succtssshamente^ I'un dopo I'aU 
trOf primieramenle^ JiuahuQnte. et^j. 

Of choice ; as Anzi^ me^lio, piaito* 
sio etc. 

Of exhortalion } as Or sii^ su via, 
di graziUf clc. 

OF TnE PREPCSITlOSr. 

A Prcposttion, so en lied from thd 
Lcitin word, Praep^nere^ is a part of 
speech devoid lUelf of si^iiificMlioii, but 
$o formed as lo unite two words lh;it 
are siguifioautj and llial refuse lo coal- 

•hfenred, thf t w« <«oelit to m.iko use of vi when 
ire tpeiik »f a pliif**'«li«Ufit fr«'iif ii« } a« Jn Ante* 
fica vi 9*}no m^fUi Ewntprt j ami of ci when we 
fpeak of ■ pUce which wr are in i »« In Ini^hii* 
terra ci iOfo mUti m rcanit ririhtt^imt. S^na^ 
•et>pte are n^t vety exarl in thi» p^rtiruteri 
llowever I think thif \* th- rul**, ami it «iighe 
,lo be ob^erwrnl Ci ••iin"t lu^a me <»« ttfn^ on it «te« 
AS in the fuilHwiiij^ exatiipic : 
Pf niacin t ptii tirl mo dfifin thcil!, (MeUft,) 
Xb»«k •! itf Attd Uiea dvetilc m/ f^u. 



«)46 
e.^re «r Unite of thcths^l^s. »^pFIarHs'« 
Ilrrines, p. 261. ) 

, Prepositions chitfly denotcf the being 
in a place ; as jiccantOy allato^ presso^ 
ptcino, sopra^ sotfo, in^ sUy eir. It must be 
observed, that when an arlicle follows 
the preposition in, we do not say In 
'l&y in la, but net, nello', nella etc. afs 
jSet prato\' nelto • shidia, nella iarhi^ 
ra lelc. and in' the pfnral nei, ot ne' pra- 
tif nttgUstudj, nellecamere, etc. Likewise 
when su is followed- by the arlicle, we 
say Suly sullo, sulla, etc. as sul iavoli- 
noy sullo scrif>nOy suUa panca ; and in 
thf» plural sui or su'taimlini^ sulli scri- 
gni, sulle panche. They likewise denote 

The moving from a place ; as Da^ 
indiy fuoriy etc, * 

The moving to a place ; a^ A, or ad, 
before the vowels, infino^ Oerso, eld. 
therefore we always put the preposition 
a or ad after the verbs andare and i^e- 
nire , . 

Observe^ that some prepositionsi govern 
one case, some another. For < instance, 
j4ppiii Jiioriy appresso, contra , difntrd,^ 
in^guisaj etc. govern the genitive casq. 

Aecanto, acca^to^ a fronte^ addossa^ 
dinanziy dirimpetio^ Jino^ etc, govern 
the dative. 

Circa, ecc€tto, giiisia, lungo^dopo^ etc. 
goveru the accusative. 



'i47 
Di lif. di gua^ etc.. gov/erft tbe abla« 

live. 

When the prcpOsiLioos co/r, with^ is 
followed by an arlicle^ some tnodera 
aulbors write colj collcy cotlo as cal 
sennOy colla manOy collo studioy ood in 
the i^lural coi or co' sennij coUe mani^ 
cogli studj. But I would ralber advise 
.the learner to write, corif con ia^ con 
loj and in tbe plural coi, or co' con 
le, con glL Exam* 

Molto egli oprb col senna e con la 
( mono. (Ta&so.) 

E fa con gli. aiti dolcjy e col bel if Up 

Piiicke con le arti lor CircSy o Medea. 

( Tasso. ) 

Instead of sayings con me, con le^ 
con se, we say meco, teco, seco. Poets 
sometimes say con meco, con ttcOy con 
seco. They likewise say nosco, vosco, 
instead of con noi, con voi. Exanu . 

hagiouando con meco, ed io con lui. 

(Pelr.) 

Gite sieuri omai, ch'amor vien i^csco. 

( Idem. ) 
But every one knows, that 
— — Pictoribus, atque Poetis 
Quidlibet audendi' semper fuit ae<^ua 
( potestas, ( Hor. J 



i48 

OP THE CONJUNCTlOTf. 

A Conjnnnion • is a pirt of speech 
Toid of si};iiifualion ilseU; but so t«»rm- 
cd as lo help sif;niHr4iliou by making 
5lwo or more .si;»niti«-aiil st-nleiires lo be 
one significdiil sentence, (i) »> (Ilaiiis's 
Hermes, p. 25B. ) 

The fiillovviiig arc Ihe most common, 

Of ranse, Perchh, tmperciocchdj ac* 
tiocchh, ai^nch>., elc ^ 

Of doubl, or siupension, Se^ purcfie, 
dato che^ se wii, t'l«'. ,^ , 

Of ne;:alion, No, no», non /r»f > n^> ^**^* 

Of exceplion, Fuori, fuorche^ se non^ 
ecceftuatOy cic. 

Of explanation , Clue , we Aen ^a- 
peie, clc. . 

Of copulalion, E, ancora, anchej «• 
milmentey altresi, elr. 

Of adtiilion, f/» oUre, oliniccio, an* 
cora^ di p u, etc. 

Of disjunclion, O, oc^wro, ni etc. 



(i) ConjuncfhnU n^h'oncm veteres pnulo I'tcoii. 
#iiflitti urodiderv ; «. ^m** 't/'ii 9«*»'' "/"*' P*"!^^* 
Mat con/aogii. {ipae enini pa-ies ^r *e c»ii;a«. 



»49 

OF THE INTERJECTION. 

The interjection expresses the affec- 
tion of the speaker. 

If we want to express joy, we avail 
ourselves of the following interjections : 
yii^a, benCy bravoy buonOj etc. 

If grief, we use the following : Ahy 
4ihiy aim^y oimiy etc. 

If anger^ Ohy puhy vioy viay etc. 

If fear, Oh DiOy oimiy ehy ohy sCy 
non piiiy etc. 

If contempt or disapprobation, Oibby 
ihy uhy etc. 

If approbation, Si benCy buonoy bene 
stay mi piacey etc. 

There are many more which will 
be easily learned by practice. 

PRAXIS UPON THE FOREGOING PARTS- 
OF SPEECH. 

A petty prince of Italy having known 

piccolo principe m. Italia /• sapere 

that a French gentleman, who resided 

risedere 

at his court, had (ridiculed) him, sent 

corU f. {mettere in ridicolo) mandare 

one to bid him depart his dominions withia 

dive partirt stato m, 

ihree days. >> He does me (too great) 

fiorna m, fort {troppo) 

8 



i5o 

a favour^, said the FrencbmaQy ia grant- 

grazia f. dire concC' 

ing me so much time : for J 4o not 

defe tanto tempo m, ^ a^er ' 

.want above three quarters of att hour 

hisogno 'di - quarto m» oraf* 

to obey him. » 

obbedire 

An Archbishop of Florence said to a 

Firenze 

Cardinal, v Men are very unfortunate 5 

Cardinale infelice 

all their happiness consists in the goods 

consUtere bene m. 

either of the soul, the body, or for- 

animafi corpora, for' 

tune, and yet they are always plagued 

tuna /. tormentare 

by crafty lawyers, ignorant physicians, 
or bad divines, v 

A certain man said 3 that wine has 
two bad qualities $ first, if you mix 

catUvo qualithf, ^ ^ mesco* 

water with it, you spoil it; secondly, 

tare acqua rovinare 

if you mix none with it, it will spoil 
you. 
A poor man finding one night some 

trovare 



i5i 
thieves id his hoiis<^: told them, whilhout 

liiciro /». casa f. senza 

puttiog himself ia a passion, v I cannot 

coll era f, 

imagine what you expect to find in mj 

immag;inar$i aspettare trovare 

house in the night time, since I can 

notie 

find nothing in it myself in the day 

giorno 

time. j» 

One day t poet presented himself to 

poeta m, presentare 

Henry IV , with a confidence which 

Enrico confidenza 

exceeded his poetical talents ; but the 

eccedert poetico ialento m, 

king not knowing either his person or 

J(e conoscere 

his writings, asked him what was the 

icritto m. domandare 

nature of his occupations ? 99 Sire, I 

natura f. Qccupazione f. ^ 

make anagrams, but I am very poor, n n 

fare anagramma m, pofero 

I believe so indeed, said Henry, for 

credere 

you have (made choice) of a very bad 

(jfcegUere) 
trade. 

meitiere m. 

A noble Athenian, out of his mind, 

Jit€nie$e $en$i p% 



l52 

fancied all the vessels that came into 

immaginare bastimento m. venire 

the port to be his own ; when removed 

porta TO. guarire 

from his indisposition he declared, that 

dichiarare 

he never had more pleasure than whilst 

piacere m, 

he was distempered, which he remem- 

rtcor- 

bered very well, adding that his friends 

darsi aggiungere amico to. 

would have obliged him very much to 

ohbligare 

have let him enjoy a happiness that 

lasciare godere felicitd /. 

put him in possession of all thin^ , 

mettere posse sso f, cosa f, 

without depriving any body of the least 

privore 

thing. 
Sudden joy may kill as well as sudden 

gioja 

grief. .— 

affanno m, 

' Diigoras Rhodius hearing that his 

sent ire 

three sons were vicCiorious at th« olimpic 

Jiglio vitto^io^so' 

games in one day, died suddenly in 

giuoco TO. morire 

that transport. 6f foy 5 and the story of 

trasporto f, '^ ^ storia f. 

Zeuxis, Uie famous painter, is yet more 

piUore 



i53 
strange, who having made the por- 

fare ri- 

traiture of an old woman very oddly, 

tratto m, i^ecchia 

died with laughing at the conceit. 

ridere 

Melancholy, saya the spectator, is a 
kind of demon that haunts our islnnd, 

specie/, demonic frequentare isolaf. 

and often conveys itself to us in an easterly 

trasmettere orifntaie 

wind. A celebrated French novelist, 

vento m. 

continues he, in opposition to those 

continuare 

who begin their romances with the 

cominciare romanzo m, 

flowery season of the year, enters on 

Stallone f' anno m, entrare 

his Story thus : v In the gloomy 

cosi 

month of November, when the people 

mese m, 

of England hang and drown themselves, 

Inghilterra appiccare annegare 

a disconsolate lover walked out in the 

amante passeggiare 

fields, 99 etc. 

campo m. 

In England they blame every one 

hiasimare 

who talks freely, let his conversation* 

pari are 

be ever so entertaining and improving. 



i54 
In France they look upon every man 

eonsiderare 

as a gloomy mortal^ whose tongue does 

Un^uaf, 

not make an uninterrupted noise: these 

rumort m. 

judgments are both unjust. 

giudiiio m. 

In former times , says Huet , there 

antico tempo m, 

were no books but what were manu- 

lihro m. mano' 

scripts ; their price consequently was 

$criU9 prezzo m, 

great , and their number small. At 

numero m, 

present we have so many grammars , 

grartimatica /I 

dictionaries, compendiums, that every 

dizionario m» compendio m. 

difficulty is nearly removed from the 

d((jficoUa f. togUen 

path of erudition. There is, therefore, 

sentiero m. 

the same difference between a learned 

differenzaf, dotto 

man of the ancient time ^ and that of 
the modern , as between Christopher 

moderno che Cristoforo 

Columbus, the discoverer of the new 

Colombo 

world, and the waterman who daily 

mondo m, barcaruolo m. 

passes from Dover to Calais. 

p assure 



100 

Adam, says aa author, beiog desirous; 

Adatno autore desideroio 

to know &od see his race , * whose 

conoicere • i'cdere razza f» 

number bad overspread X\\e earth, and. 

gpareerii $opra terra f, 

fame had reached the heavens, parti- 

famaf. arrivart cielo m, 

cularly the Europeans , as the most 

Europeo 

distinguished ^ determined to visit the 

dittinto determinare • visitdre 

celebrated nations of this part of the 

nazione f, 

globe. He descended in Italy. The Arts, 

globp m. icendere Italia arte f, 

agriculture and architecture bad so en - 
tirely changed the face of the earth and 

camhiare faccia f, 

the inhabitants , that he immediately 

abitants 

disclaimed them as his oflfspring. He 

rinunziare ditcendenti m. 

then turned his steps to France, Ger« 

volgere paiso i». Francia /. Ger^ 

many, Holland, and England, yet found 

mania f. Olandaf, Irtf^hilttrraf. trovare 

nothing to awaken his paternal affection ^ 

Si'egUan affttto m, 

but the moment he cast his eyes upon 

^ettare ovchio -m.; 

the Spanish realms, the great progen* 

Spagnolo name m. 



i56 
itar's heart was filled with rapture. 

cuore in» riempiere gioja f. 

Behold ! said he, these, these are my 
true children, ia whom time has made 

figliaolom, 

no change. They and their country are 

cantbiamenio fit. paesc m, *~ 

in the same state that I and Nature 

stato IB. 

left them. 

lasciare 

When two Englishmen meet, says 

Inglese incontrarsi 

Johnson, their first talk is of the weath- 

discorso m, tent" 

er , but this is a natural consequence, 

po m. conseguenza fi 

continues he , of this changeable sky 

continuare cielo m. 

and uncertain season. In this island 

stagione f, isola f. 

every man goos to sleep unable to guess 

4indare dormire indovinare 

whether he shall behold in the morning 

vedere mattina fl 

a bright or a cloudy atmosphere, whether 

atmosfera f, 

his rest shall be lulled by a shower, 

riposo m. conciliare 

or broken by a tempest. 

interrompere tempesta f. 

Mr. JMontesquieu said after his travels, 

vijag^io m. 



i57 
that Germany was made to travel in, 

fare t^iagfiiare ^ 

Italy to sojonrn in, England to think, in,^ 

soggiornare pemare 

France to live in. 

vivere 

The qualities requisite to conversation, 

qualith f, richiesto 

says Johnson, are exactly represented 

rappresentare 

by a bowl of punch* Funcb^ is a liquor 
compounded of spirit and acid juices, 

comporre ipirito acido sugo m. 

sugar , and water. The spirit volatile 

zucchero m, acqua/» 

and fiery is the proper emblem of vi- 

igneo emblema m, 

vacity and wit ^ the acidity of the lemon 
will very aptly figure pungency of 

rappre tenia re 

raillery, and acrimony of censure. Sugar 

burla j: censura f» 

is the natural representative of luscious 
adulation and gentle complaisance ; and 

iidulazione f, compiacenza f» 

water is the proper byerogliphic of 
easy prattle, innocent and tasteless. We 

ciaria /*. 

ought, therefore, to temper the acid of 

doyere temperare 

*6 



i58 
satire with tb« sugar of civility, the 

$atiraf. ci%filthf, 

heat of wit with the frigidity of chatter, 

cat ore m, cicaleccio m^ 

and that will make the true punch of 

formare 

conversation. 

conversazione /• 

Metaphysical writers, said Voltaire^ 

fctafisico icriUore 

like minuet-dancers , who being 

dressed to the greatest advantage, make 

accomodare vantaggio m. /are 

a couple of bows, move through the 

inchino m. 

room in the finest attitudes, display 

iaia y. atUtudine f, spiegare 

all their graces, are in continual motion 

gmzia f» movinunto 

without advancing a step, and finish at 

a^anzare « passo m. finire ^ 

the same identical point from which 

identico punto m. 

they set out. 

pariire* 

The Physicians, says the Spectator^ 

medico Spettatore 

are a most formidable body of men. 

corpo nt. 

This body in our own country may 
be df^scribed like the British army, in 

descrifere BrUannico armaiaf* 



i59 
Caesar's time. Some of them slay in 

Ce$art ammazzarg 

chia riots , and some on foot. If the 
infantry do less execution than the char* 

Janteria 

ioteers, it is because they cannot be 

pot ere 

carried so soon into all quarters of the 

poriare 

town, and dispatch so much business 

citth f, ipedire affare f, 

in %o short time. Besides this body of 

hre^e 

regular troops, there are stragglers | 

truppa f. ramingo m, 

who without being duly listed and 
enrolled^ do infinite mischief to thosa 

arrotare 

who are so unlucky as to fall into their 

ifortunatQ cadere 

hands. 

mano f. 

The following is one of the most 

itiiuente 

agreeable follies of Ariosto : 

piacevole foUia /. 

Orlando, nephew to Charlemagne^ 

nipote Cariomagno 

runs mad^ because the fair Angelica 

di^enire motto hello Jngelica 

prefers Medore to him. Astolfo, a knights 

prtferin Medoro eavalien 



i6o 
errant, finding himself one day in the 

errant€ trovare giorno m, 

terrestfi^ paradise, which was uppn the 

paradiso m. 

lop of a very high mountain , where 

cima f. alto montagna f, 

he was carried by his flying horse , 

portare alato cavallo m, 

meets St. John there, who tells him^ 

incontrare Giovanni dire 

that if he would have Orlando cured , 

volere guarire 

he must make a voyage with him into 

fare 

the moon. Astolfo y who had a great 

lunaf, 

mind to see new countries, (did not 

voglia f, nuovo paese m. ( non 

Stand much upon intreaty^ ) there im- 

farsi moUo pregare ) 

mediately came a fiery chariot, which 

venire carro m, 

carried the Apostle and the Knight up 

portare apostolo 

into the air. Astolfo being no great 

aria f, 

philosopher, was surprised to find the 

Jilosofo sorprendere 

moon so much bigger than it appeared 

grande apparire 

to him when he was upon the earth ; 

terra /• 

to see rivers, seas, mountains, cities, 

flume m. mare m, montagna f, cittd f* 

forests ; but that which appeared most 

foresta /. * parerc 



i6, 
remarkable^ was a valley ^ where you 

valle f. 

might find any thin^ that was lost in 

potere cosaj, perdere 

our world, crowns, riches, fame^ and 

mondo m, corona f, ricchezza f, 

ani infinity of hopes ; the time we spend 

iperanza f, ' consumare 

in play, the verses we present to great 

giuooo m, verso m. presentare 

men and princessand the sighs of lovers; 

principe sospiro m» amante m, 

yet though every thing is there, even 

Jino 

the donation of Constanline ( the Popes 

donazionef, Costantino Papa 

having pretended to be masters of Home 

pretend ere padrone Roma 

and Italy by virtue of a donation which 

virth /. 

the Emperor Constantine made Silvester, 

imperatore Silvestro 

and the truth of it is^ nobody knows 

verith. sapere 

what has become of it) what do you 

dit'enire 

think is not to be found in the moons 

credere trovare 

n Folly, ff all that ever was upon the 

pazziaf, 

^arth is kept there still (i). 

terra f, comervart 

(i) 4^0/ la Pazzia non v* i poca nh assai^ 
Che tta ^aggiitf ni te ne. parte mai. 



l62 

OF EXPLETIVES. 

Grammarians mean by Expletives 
some particles, yrhich, allhough they 
are not absolutely necessary for gram- 
matical construction, serve, hovsrever, 
to give a particular strength and energy 
to the discourse. The most common 
are the following: 

Bene^ Or bene. Si bene^ 

Exam. E bene, volete voifarlo ? well, 
will you do it ? Or bene^ qual partita 
prenderemo noi ? well , what course 
shall we take ? Gli domandai, se gli 
bastaua U animo di cacciarlo via : ed 
egli risposey si bene. (Salv.) I asked 
him, if he had courage to send him 
away, and he answered, yes. 
Pure. 

Exam. La cosa k tanto da ridere, 
cK io pur la dirb ; (Firenz.) the thing 
is so laughable that I must tell it. When 
pure is put before an adverb of time, 
it means just ; as J signori erano pur 
allora arrivati, the gentlemen were just 
then arrived. 

Poi. 

Exam. Non h poi vero quanta mi 
diceste, what you told me is not true. 
Gid. 

Exam. Non credo io gia, che i^e ne 



i63 
avrete a male (Annibal Caro.) I do 
not think you will take it ill. 
Mau 
This is likewise an expletive^ since 
we say sometimes Mai sempre, ntaisi^ 
mai nd, only meaning sempre, si, noy 
always, yes, no ; yet it gives a greater 
force to the expression. 
Bella. 
Exam. // vostro i^eslieo i belVe fatto, 
your suit of clothes is finished. Ho pa* 
gate cinquecento belle ghinee , I have 
paid five hundred guineas. 
Tutto. 
Exam. Son tutto stancOj I am quite 
tired. La donna udendo costui parlare^ il 
quale ella credeva mutolo tutta stordi ; 
(Bocc; 3. 1.) the woman hearing that 
man speaking whom she thought dumb 
was quite amazed. 

AltrimentL 
Exam. lo non so altrimenti , chi 
egli siaj I do not know who he is, 

ria. 

Exam. Se spacciar voile le cose sue, 
^liele conuenne gettar i^ia^ (Bocc. 2. 40 
if he wished to get rid of his goods^ 
ho was obliged to throw them away. 
EglL 

Exam. Che tempo fa egli ? how is 
Cbe weather ? Che era i egli f whaf s 



i64 
o'clock ? Egli i ora di desinare^ it is 
dioner time. 

Ella. 

Exam. Ella non andra sempre cosi^ 
it shall not always be so. 
E/so. 

See page Ro, note i. 
Non. 

Exam. Egli h piu dotto, ch' io non 
credeva , he is more learned than I 
thought. Temo che voi non mi ab^ 
bandoniate^ I am afraid you will for- 
sake me. This idiom cannot be literally 
translated^ since the word non would 
make no sense in English ; but in 
French it would admit of a literal trans- 
lation thus : // est plus savant que je 
ne croyois ; je crains que vous ne 
m*abandonniez • 

Mi, Ti, Ciy Vi, Si, Ne. 

Exam. Io mi credeva, che voifoste 
partitOy I thought you were gone. De- 
sid^ro , che tu eon noi ti rimanga 
. questa sera, I wish thou would'st stay 
with us to night. Noi ci sederemo qui, 
we will sit down here. Non so, se voi 
vi conosciate un certo Calandrino. I, 
do not know whether you are acquaint- 
ed with one^ Calandrino. Del palagio 
s^ usci, e fuggissi a casa sua, ^Boc,c.) 
he left the palace^ and ran to his owft 



i6o 
house. Chetamente n andb sino alia 
Jinestra^ he gently went as far as the 
window. • 

Observe^ that the aforesaid expletives 
JWi, Ti, 5/, etc. when they are follow- 
ed by a pronoun, are changed into Me^ 
Te^ Scj etc. Exam. Non me Vaspettavo 
da ifoi^ I did not expect it from you. 
Qaello eke noi vorrem fare a te, tu 
tel vedrai nel tempo awenirey (Bocc. 
10. 7.) thou shalt see in future, what 
we intend to do with thee. Comperati 
i capponiy insieme coi compagni suoi 
selimangidj (Firenzuola) having bought 
the capons, h^ eat them with his com- 
panions. 

OF THE ITALIAN SYNTAX. 

Syntax is a Greek word which means 
Constructiariy viz. the right placing and 
connecting of words in a sentence. The 
natural order of words is the following : 
the nominative substantive should always 
be placed first 5 Jhe adjectives belonging 
to it should have the second place; if 
the nominative has an article , the 
article must necessarily precede it , 
then the verb should follow 3 and if 
there be an adverb, it. ought to be put 
immediately after the verb ; then the 



i66 
accusative, and so forth. But as there is 
no language which has so much affinity 
to the Latin as the Italian^ so there is 
none which admits of so many trans- 
positions of words. Exam. In qvesti 
tempi aui^enne, che la citta di Faenza 
lungamente in guerra , ed in mala 
Ventura stata alguanto in miglior di- 
sposizione ritornb^ e fu a ciascuno , 
che ritornarvi volessCy liberamente con- 
ceduto il potervi ritomare (Bocc.) The 
natural arrangement of words in the 
foregoing example ought to be as fol- 
lows : jkvvenne in questi tempi y che 
la citta di Faenza stata lungamente 
in guerra, ed in mala ventura ritorno 
al<fuanto in miglior disposizioney e fu 
liberamente conceduto il potervi tornare 
a ciascuno che oolesse tomarvi. This 
construction is more conformable to our 
present style, than the former ; for such 
transpositions of words are now-a days 
but sparingly used by our prose writers, 
and he who would adopt the style of 
Boccaccio, Bembo, Delia Casa, and the 
like, would be ridiculed and considered 
as an affected and pedantic writer. We 
now leave such transpositions almost 
entirely to poets, who seem to have a 
better claim to tbem. 

As I have occasiooaliy spoken of the 



167 
Italian Syntax ; treating of the difierent 
parts of speech^ I shall not dwell upon 
it, being sensible that the reading of 
our best authors will more contribute 
to the improvement of learners than 
any rules upon this subject. Therefore 
I shall immediately proceed to speak 

OF THB ITALIAN ORTHOGRAPHY. 

' Orthography is the art of writing 
words correctly, that is to say, with 
such figures or letters as are authorized 
by custom. 

Our language has this advantage over 
many others, that we write all our 
words in the same manner as they are 
pronounced. I shall therefore only treat 
of the Accents, the Apostrophe, and 
the words which in our language are 
either augmented or abridged. 

The accent is a mark over some letters 
or syllables , to regulate their pro- 
nunciation. 

We have two accents, one acute ('), 
the other grave (*). 

The acute is but seldom used in our 
language. We only set it over some 
few words , such as Balia when it 
means /70(v^r, Gia when it means he or 
she ivent^ Stropiccio when it signifies 



i68 
friction^ In order to distinguish them 
from Baliuy Gia^ StropicciOy which, 
not being accented, mean nurse^ already y 
1 rub. 

The grave accent is much oftener 
used than the acute- 
First, We place it on the last vowel 
of nouns ending in /a, such as Libered, 
Caritdy Pietd^ etc. when they- derive 
from Latin nouns terminating in ta^^ 
viz, Libertas , Caritas , Pietas , etc. 
We also accent the substantives ending 
in », such as Virtiiy Ser\>itUy and the 
like. 

2dly, On the last vowel of the third 
person singular of the preterites of all 
the regular, and of many irregular conju- 
gations : as Parlby Tenths Capiy Sentt^ 
Mori, etc. Likewise on the last vowel 
of the first and third person singular of 
the future tenses in all verbs : as Par^ 
lerby Parlerdy Temerby Tenter dy Ca* 
pirby Capird , Farb , Fard , Tacerby 
Tacerdy Sentirby Sentird, etc, 

Sdly, On the final letter of mono- 
syllables, which' have a diphthong ; as 
Gidy Ciby Pub, etc. Other monosyllables, 
such as JRtf, Stay Suy etc. are not ac- 
cented, since they are pronounced in 
the same manner either with the ac- 
cent or without. We must except some 



j69 
few , which being susceptible of two 
different meanings, require an accent 
in order to prevent any ambiguity. For 
instance, we set an accent over ^, when 
it is a verb, to distinguish it from the 
conjunction. We also put an accent on 
diy when it means either day, or say, 
the imperative of the verb dire^ to say, 
to distinguish it from di^ the sign of 
the genitive case. The accent is likewise 
placed over da, the- third person sin- 
gular of the present tense of the verb 
dare, to give, that it may not be con- 
founded with the arlicle ^a^yro/n : the 
same must be said of Si, La, Li, Ni. 
We accent them when they mean je^. 
therey nor, and we write them without 
an accent, when they are articles or 
conjunctiva pronouns. 

4thly, We set the accent on the last 
vowel of some words, when they must 
be pronounced somewhat stronger, and 
with a greater pause: as Ohime, Cosi, 
Perd, etc. 

The apostrophe is a mark like a 
comma placed at the top of a letter 
to denote the elision. It is therefore ge- 
nerally, made use of in the articles, when 
they precede a noun beginning with a 
vowel, as L'amico^ L'isola, delVamico, 
deltisQla^ etc. as I have observed in 



the treatise on articles, which I refer to- 

We often make an elision of the / in 
the article, or conjunctive pronoun Ily 
when a vowel precedes it, and put an 
apostrophe in its stead : as one may see 
in the following examples. 

Ebbe Argante una spada e 'Ifabbro 
egregioy 

U else e 7 porno le fe* gemmato 
d* oro. (Tasso.) 

ha ragion delle genti, e Vuso antico 

S'offenda^ o nby no'l pensa egliy ne'l 
cura. (Idem.) 

We likewise cut off the vowels in the 
conjunctive pronouns miy tij siy ciy vi, 
loy lay gliy - Uy ICy fiCy wfacu thcy are 
followed by a vowel, and put an apo- 
strophe instead of them \ as Egli m^amay 
noi t' odiamoy etc# yet this is not a 
general rule with our writers, since I 
very often find Egli m^ama and Egli 
mi amay noi t'odiamOy and noi ti odia- 
moy and the like. What must be cerefully 
oliserved is, that ci must never be re- 
trenched before a, o, «• 

We also make use of the apostrophe 
in the following abbreviated words, vie. 

Co' instead of con u Exam. 

. Andremo omai 

Tu col Sol nuovOy io co* notturni rau 

(Tasso.) 



i7« 
E' instead of egli or eglino. Exam. 

Cortfesetnente domanddij chi e* fossero^ 

(Boccaccio.) 

Be' instead of helVu Exam. 

JB se il tempo h contrario aibe'desiri. 

(Petr.) 

Qua' for quali. Exam. 

Qua' sono stati gli anni^ e i giorni, e 
I' ore. (Idem-) 

To' for toglL Exam . 

Dir pocea, to''di me quel che tu puoL 

(Idem.) 

Me' for meglio. Exam. 

Cost me'si vedri^ sal tuo s'agguaglia. 

11 mio i^alore. (Tasso.) 

Fe' for fece. Exam. 

L' Idra si fe' muta al suono. (Idem. ) 

Fo' for Qoglio. Exam, lo i>o' condurtu 

Nella piu spai^entevdtelsai^erna. 

(Guarini.) 

f^e' for vedi Exam. 

J^e'y mobile fanciullo, a che son giunta. 

(Idem.) 

In our language we have several words 
which admit of being augmented^ as 
will appear by whal follow. 

First. We augment the words be- 
ginning with aa S impura, when the 
precedmg ends in a consonant^^ and say 
for instance, Egli mi prese in iscambio^ 
voi non istatebene in sua compagniuy etc. 



instead of in scamhiOy nan state^ etc* 
as I observed p. 34 iiota •54. 

The ancieDts used to soflea the S 
impura with an JE, as Egli mi pre^e in 
escambiOyVoj,npn estate bene in sua com- 
pagnia, etc. They say even at this day 
at Siena, Uho^incontrato per estrada^ 
egli nan estava bene, etc. but the first 
mode is more conformable to approved 
custom, and moderu writers. 

adly. The particles a, e^ o, ne^ before 
a word' beginning with a vowel admit 
of ad. Exam. 

lo sono disposto ad andarvi. (Salv.) 
Gli amicij ed i parenti ve ne scongiu^ 

rano. (Manfrodi.). 
Pomml' in Cielon ad in terra^ od in 

'^abisso. (Pelr.) 
Ned'ella scopre ardor^ ch' egli non 

senta. (Guarini.) ** 

Su admits of an R before una and 
unay according the custom established 
in Tuscany. Exam. 
ha sua villa era situata sur una collina. 

(Villani.) 
3dly, Ourr poets sometimes add an B, 
or an O, to the words ending in an 
accented vowel^ in order to. make the 
verse more haraioniqu§,* and often .for- ' 
the sake of rhyme. Exam^ 
^^— La donde riceve 



173 
Valt'a vostra Mesehita e Vaura^ e7 iie^ 

(Tasso.) 
Ualma mia che di la mat non partio. 

(Zappi.) 

In the first example die is for Ji, in 
the second partio is for partij the third 
person singular of the preterite of the 
verb pardrey to depart. 

But we oflener abridge our words^ 
than lengthen them. 

In the nrsjt place, we generally abridge 
those words, which end in^^ without an 
accent, as o//re> <fe, che^ etc. when they 
precede a vowel; but when the final E 
is preceded by C, or Gj we ^ever 
retrench- it before A^ O, U. 

We likewise retrench the final E 
before the consonants ( the S impura 
.excepted ) when it is preceded by one 
of these three letters L. N. R. Exam, 
Non mi cal di i^oi, (Bocc.) I do not care 
for you. Egli i^ien frettolos0 y (Idem.) 
he comes in great haste. Alfin eominf 
do ad invidiar cosiui, (Metast.) at last 
I begin to envy this man. In tfaeibregoing 
examples mi cal is instead of mi cale^ 
vien instead oi ideney invidiar instead of 
invidiare. 

We must except the plurals of the 
nouns ending in E, for we never say • 
Sal grandi i campagn^fertili^ peoor 

9 



«74 
grasse for Sale grandi, campagnefer* 
dliy pecore grasse^ great lialls^ fertile 
countries, fat sheep. 

2dly, Glij Ognij andllbe words ending 
in Ci and Gi lose their [ before words 
beginning with an i^ as GP mdustriosi 
art^ci debbono essere ricompensati'y 
tronehiamo ogn* indugio ; questi sono 
doWimeneii loderd sempre i suoi preg'iU 
lustriy etc. but the I should never be 
cut off before the other vowels, and it 
would be a fault to say^ GV amori^ 
Ogn' anno^ (i) dolc'amici, preg' ona^ 
ratiy etc. 

The plural of nouns ending in U^ 
or ni ; as AU^ Destinu etc. are never 
curtailed. 

Sdly, The words ending in O mvf be 
abridged before a vowel ; as Voi le 
portate tropp'amore ; egli h un buonis* 
^im'aomo; Quest' ^ un beU'argomeiUo,eic» 

Many words ending in Lo, Ma, No, 
Ro, as Duoloy Andiaino, Sogtiona, Pen^ 
sieroy etc. maj likewise be abridged 
before a consonant. Exam. 11 mio dual 
s'nccresce $ andiam via di qua j Essi 
soglion venire; questo pensier ni af^ 
fiigge, etc. 

(i) Boommtuei approves of O/rnsno* opMUr^^ 
instead of agni uno, o^ni altro^ when both words 
sre written ao as to lorm bat one word. 



175 
We must except the first person 
lingular of the indicalive mood ; as 
Amo^ temoj sento, etc. The first person 
.of the indicative mood of the verb 
essere is not excepted ^ for we . tnay 
say very properly* both in verse and 
in prose,, io sono^ and lo son before a 
consonant ; as 2o sono vostro amico^ 
or Jo son vosiro amieoj I am your 
friend. 

4thly, The words ending in O preced- 
ed by two 11% or two nn^s as Frw 
iello^ bello, quellOy hannoy fannOy sian^ 
no^ etc. lose their last vowel and one 
of their consonants before nous begin- 
ning with a consonant/ which is not 
an S impura Exam. Ilmiofratel mag' 
glare i ilvostro bel volto^ Quel parlar^ 
mi piece : Le vostre virtii m' han rapi" 
to^ etc. ( Annibal Caro. ) my eldest 
.brother ; your pretty face ; that speech 
pleases me ; your virtues have charmed 
me, etc. (i^ Bello and Qire/Zo-make 

(i) The. words wherein the rowel preceding the 
iwo //'« or the two nn'f if eitb«r i or O a« SpO^ 
lo^ Crollo^ etc. ere excepted from the above role. 

jiugello^ FraieliOf Capelio nalie atco cometimef 
in the pi ore I Capei^ Fratei^ Amgei^ and efpecialljr 
in poetry. Exam. 

PamU d*udir gli aOgei lagnani^ e Vac^ue 
Miormorando fu§glr per l'4fha virds* ^(Petr.) 



176 
in the plural Be or beiy Que\ quel; 
^hen joined to nouns beginning with 
a cdnsonant. Exam. 

/ dolci sguardi, fsd i bei detti adorni. 

( Tasso. ) 
— — lo i^o' ehe *n merto 

Del fiituro sen^ir que' rei mi done. 

(Idem.) 

Before a vowel we say Begli, Quegli, 
as Begli occhi che amorformb per suo 
nido, etc. (Metast.) Ho rossor di que- 
gli allori etc. (Idem.) 

The vowel O is likewise often suppress- 
ed in the pronoun lo : for we frequently 
say Noly mely tely sel^ etc. instead of 
fion lOf me loj te lo^ se lo^ etc. Exam. 

Ah^ chi mi toglie la mia pace antica I 

E' amore? lo n&n distingue : alcunmel 
dice. (Metast.) 

Instead of yerso y when it means 
towardsy we sometimes say i^er, but 
particularly in poetry. Exam. 
i II Or ce n' andremo omai 

lo per Gerusalem^ tu verso Egitto. 

(Tasso.) 

Lastly, iS^/i/o, Grande^ when they are 
used like adjectives^ lose their last sylla- 
ble before a consonant, except the Z 
and the S impura. See page fy/. nota 2. 

A nice ear, and a frequent perusal 
of our best authors^ will tell when the 



177 
aforesaid abbreviatioDS and contractions 
may be used with propriety and elegance, 
I shall only make a few general remarks^ 
which may be of use to the learner. 

Observe, first, that the last words of 
a sentence should never be abridged 
in prose, (i) 

Observe also, that the words which 
have an accent upon their last syllable, 
are never curtailed ^ except Che with 
its compounds^ vb. Perchi, benchi,. 
poichiy and the like. 

It is,nioreover to be observed, that 
the words ending in A are never 
retrenched before a consonant : for we 
always say Una donna , alcuna per- 
sona^ nessuna pena , etc. and never 
Un donna^ alcun persona^ nessun pe^ 
nay etc* The adverb ora with all its 
compounds, viz. Alloray talora, anco* 
ray etc, and the word Suora, wbea 
used as an adjective, are excepted from, 
this rule« 

(i) Poetfl frequently end ft tentenee with cnntil-, 
, ed wordf. af in the following example, which it 
not, in my opinion, witboat a particular heantjr 
nnd ener|:7« 

Chi mai d' iniqua $tella%Pasi9 di pene in penti 
Frovd tenor piii. rio ? J Quetta iuccede a quella % 
Chi vide mai del mio \Afa UuUima che viene 
Piii tornunttUQ cor 2 \E' sempre la peggior. 

\ (M^taft.^ 



178 

Lastly, We do not use to abridge 
those words which terminate in a 
diphthoogi such as Occhio, specchioy 
cambio, etc. The moderns commonly 
write their plural with a /, as Occhj, 
specchjy cambj^ etc. I should think , 
however, that when the I is long^ as 
it is in MormoriOy cicalioy natio, etc. 
we should write Ihe plural with two ii's, 
viz. Mormorii, cicaliij natii^ etc. at least 
the pronunciation seems to require it. 

This is enough with respect to the 
grammatical rules. I will venture to saj 
I have omitted none of those which 
are the most necessary and essential. 
I shall only exhort the learners to perfect 
themselves by a frequent perusal of our 
best Prose writers, and especially of our 
celebrated Poets, for I am yecy confident 
that no man can pretend lo a thorough 
knowledge of any language whatever^ 
without being acquainted with the Poets. 
Let then those who aim at perfecUon 
never be weary ( according to Horaces 
precept ) of perusing^ them night and 
day, nocturna i;ersare maauj persare 
diurnai and when they come to tasta 
and relish the beauties of Petrarca, 
Tasso, Ariosto, and particularly of our 
unparalleled Metastasio, they may then 
justly boast of having made a great 
pronciency in the Italian language. 



179 
VOCABULARY.' 



sMGLisn and itauan. 



GOD, 

The Trinity, 

— Father, 

— Son, 

— Holy Ghost, 
Jesas Christy 
The Virgin Mary, 

— Angels, 

-* Archangels, 

— Saints, 
A Prophet, 
An Evangelist, 
An AposUe, 
Heaven, 
Paradise, 
Hell, 

The Devil, 
.- World, 
-Sky, 

— Sun, 

— MooUj 
•• Stars, 

— Clouds, 

— Rain, 

— Rainbovir, 

— Lightning, 
The Thunder, 



Dio, IddiOf 
La Trinitd 
II Padre 
II Figliuolo 
Lo Spirito Santo 
Gem Crista 
La Madonna 
Gli /fngeli 
Gli Arcangeli 

I Santi 
Vn Profeta 

Un EifangelUta 
Vn jipostolo 

II Cielo 

II Paradise 

V Inferno 
II Diavolo 
II Mondo 

II Firmamenio 
II Sole 
La Luna 
Le SteUe 
Le Nui^ole 
La Pioggia 

V Arcobaleno 

II Lampoj il Baleno 
H TuofiQ 



The Thunderbolt, 
.. Hail, 

— Snow, 

— Frost, 

— Ice, 

— Fog, 

— Dew, 
..Wind, 
A Storm, 
The Deluge, 

— Earthquake, 

— Elements, 

— Earth, 

— Water, 

— Fire, 

— Air, 

— Heat, 
-Cold, 

— Sun rising, 

— Morning, 
Noon, 

The Sun set, 

— Evening, 
-Night, 
To-day, 
To-morrow, 
The Day ^fter To-) 

morrow, ) 

Yesterday, 
An Hour, 



. // Fulmine 

La Grandine 

La Neve 

II Gelo 

II Ghiaccte 

La Nebhia 

La Rugiada 

II f^ento 

Una Burrasca 

II Diluvio 

II Terremoto 

Gli Elementi 

La Terra 

L* Acqua 

II Fuoco 

U Aria 

II CaldQ 

n Freddo 

II Levar del Sole 

La Mattina 

Mezzo Giorno 
( II TramotUar del 
l Sole 

La Sera 

La NoUe 

Oggi ^ 

Domani 

Posdomani 

Jeri 
Un' Qra 



Half an Hour/ 
A quarter of an 
Hour, 

— Minute^ 

— Moment^ 
-Day, 

.. Week, 

— Months 
•- Tear, 
An Age, . 
The Beginnings 

— Middle^ 

— End, 
Monday^ 
Tuesday, 
Wedoesday, 
Thursday^ 
Friday, 
Saturday^ 
Sunday, 

A Holy Day, 

A "Working Day, 

January, 

February, 

March, 

April, 

May, 

June, 

July, 

August^ 

September, 



181 
Una Mezz' Ora 

Vn Quarto d' Ora 

Un Minuto 

Vn Momenta 

Vn Giorno . 

Vna Settmana 

Un Mese 

Vu Anno 

Un Secolo 

11 Principio 

II Meizo 

II Fincj or La Fine 

Lunedi 

Martedi 

Mercoledi 

Giovedi 

Venerdi 

Sabato 

Domenica 

Un giorno di Testa 

Un giorno di lavoro 

Gennajo 

Febbrajo 

Marzo > 

A p rile 

Maggio 

Giugno 

Luglio 

Agosto 

Settembre 

*9 



i8a . 
October, 
Novecnberi 
December, 
Tbe Seasons, 

— Spring, 

— Summer, 
-^ Antama, 

— Winter, 

Nevr Year's Day, 

Lent, 

Good Friday, 

Easter day, 

Whitsuntide, 

AU Saints Day 

Christmas, 

A Man, 

An old Man, 

A Woman, 

An old Woman^ 

A young Man, 

— young Woman, 

— Sweet heart, 

— Boj, 
.- Girl, 
.. Child, 

— Nurse, 

— Husband, 
.. Wife, 

A Widower, 
-. Widow, 



Ottobre 

jpfovembre 

Dicembre 

Le Stagioni 

La Primap^ra 

La State 

JJ ^Mitunno 

L* 'inverno 

II Capo if Anno 

La Quaresimd 

n F^enerdi Santo 

II giomo di Pasqua 

La Pentecoste 

( Ognissanti, or 

Tutti i Santi 
^l Giomo di NataU 
Vn Uomo 
Un Vecchio 
Una Donna 
Una Fecchia 
Vn Giovine 
Una Giooane 
Vn' Amante 
Un Ragazzo 
Vna Ragazta 
Vn Bambino 
Vna Balia - 
Vn Marito 
Vna MogUe 
Un Fedoi^o 
Una Fedoi^a 



i 



The Master, 

— Mistress, 

— Man servant, 

— Maid-servant, 
A Foreigner, 

— Blind Man, 

— Deaf Man, 

— Dumb Man, 

— Rofjue, 
.. Thief, 
The Head, 

— Hair, 

— Face, 

— Forehead, 
An Eye, 
The Eyes, 

— Eye brows, 
-Eye lids, 

— Terople3, 

— Nose, 

— Cheeks, 
-• Ears, 

— Mouth, 

— Lips, 

— Teeth, 

— Gums, 

— Tongue^ 

— Jaws, 

— Chin, 

— Throat, 

— Neck, 



i83 

II Padroney maestrd 
La Padrona 
11 Servo 
La Serva 
Vn Forestiero 
Vn Cieco 
Un Sordo 
Vn Mutolo 
Vn Furfanie 
Vn Ladro 
II Capo 

I Capelli 

II Volto 
La Fronte 
Vn Occhio 
Gli Occhi 
Le Ciglia 
Le Palpebre 
Le Tempia 
II Naso 

Le Guance 
Gli Orecchi 
La Bocca 
I Labbri 

I Demi 

Le Gengive 
La Lingua 
Le Mascelle 

II Mento 
La Gola 
II Collo 



t84 
The Shoulders, 

— Back» 

— Arms^ 

— Elbow, 

— Hands, 

— Right Hand, 

— Left Hand^ 

— Fingersj 

— Thumb, 

— Fore Finger, 

— Little Finger^ 

— Nails, 

— Fist, 

— Sides, 

— Breast, 

^ Stomach, 

— Heart, 
.- Liver, 

— Bowels, 
^ Lungs, 
^Ribs, 

w. Thighs, 

— Knees, 
^ Legs, 
«. Feet, 
^ Heels 
» Bones, 
.. Skin, 
^ Blood, 

— Veins, 
*- Flesh, 



Le Spaile 

La Schiena 

Le Braccia 

II ' Gomito 

Le Mani 

La mano Destra 

La Mano Sinistru 

I Diti, Le Diia 

II Pollice 
U indice 

II Dito Mignolo 
Le Unghie 
II Pugno 
t Fianchi 
II Petto 
Lo Stomaco, 
II Cuore 
II Fegato 
Le Budella 
I Polmoni 
Le Costole 
Le Coscie 
Le GinocchiM. 
Le Gambe 
I Pledi 

I Galea gni 
Le Ossa 
La Pelle 

II Sangue 
Le Vene 
La Carne 



The Fat, 
-^- Nerves, 
-. Skull, 

— Brains 

— Spleea. 
-Gall, 
^ Milk, 

— Senses, 

— Sight, 

— Hearing, 
-. Smell, 

— Taste, 

— Feeling, 

— Head-ach, 

— Tooth-achj 

— Fever, 

— Cough, 
A Cold, 

The Small-pox, 

— Measles, 

— Gout, 

— Palsy^ 
Life, 
Death, 
The Soul, 

— Mind. 
Reason, 
Bilemory, 
Wisdom, 
Folly, 
Loye, 



i85 
II Grasso 

I ^ervi 
Jl Cranio 
li CerQeUo 
La Milza 

II Fiele 
II Latte 

I Sensi 
La f^ista 

V Vdito 

V Odarato 

II Gusto 
II Tatto 

II Mai di Teski 
II Mai di Demi 
La Febbre 
La Tosse 
Vn* Infreddatura 
II Vajuolo 
La "Rosalia 
La Gotta 
La Paralisia 
La Fita 
La Morte 
U Anima 
Lo Spirito 
La Ragione 
La Memoria 
La Saviezza 
La Pazzia 
U A more 



i86 




Haired, 


V Odio 


Hope, 


La Speranza 


Fear, 


II Timore 


Pleasure, 


II Piacere 


Grief, 


II Dolore, Vaffanno 


Boldness, 


V Ardire 


Shame, 


ha Pergogna 


Eavy, 


U Invidia 


Anger, 


ha Collera 


Despair, 


ha Disperazione 


Peace, 


La Pace 


Sadness, 


ha Malinconia 


The Linen, 


ha Biancheria 


A Shirt, 


Una Camicia 


— Handkerchief, 


Ifn Fazzoletto 


•• Neck-qloth, 


Una Crat^atta 


The Stockings, 


he Calzette 


— Garters, 


he hegacce 


— Shoes, 


he Scarpe 


— Buckles, 


he Fibbie 


— Slippers, 


he Pianelle . 


- Hat, 


II Cappello 


- Coat, 


UAbitOy II restito 


— Waistcoat, 


ha Sottoveste 


-« Breeches, 


I Calzoni 


Drawers, 


he Mutande 


A Morniag Goviro> 


( Una Peste da 
( Camera 


- Gowo,^ 


r Una Peste, 
( Gonna 


- Petticoat, 


Una Gonnetla 



The Stays, 
An Apron, 
The Ruffles, 

— Gloves, 
A Muff, 

— Cloak, 

— Swordi 

— Wig, 
The Boots, 

— Spurs, 
A Whip, 

— Cane, 
-Watch, 

— Great-Coat, 
The Ear-rings, 
A Ribbon^ 
-Fan, 

The Bracelets, 

— Jewels, 

— Ring, 

A Nosegay, 

— Needle, 

— Pin, 

— Comb, 

— Lookiog*gidss, 
The Patches, 
The Thimble, 

I A Pair of Scissars, 
Some Thread, 
Some Silk, 



i8f 
// Busto 
Vn Gremhiule 
I Manichini 
I Guanti 
Un Manicotto 
Un Ferrajolo 
Una Spada 
Una rerrucca 
Gli StWali * 
Gli Sproni 
Vn Frustino 
Una Canna 
Vn Oriuolo 
Vn Pastrana 
Gli Orecchini 
Vn Nostra ' 
Vn Fentaglio 
he Smaniglie 
he Gioje 
U Anella 
Vn Mazza di Fiari 
Vn Aga 
Vna Spillo 
Vn Pettine 
Vna Specchia 

I Nei 

II Ditale 
he Forbid 
Del Fila 
Delia Seta 



^88 

A Distaff, 

— Spindle^ 
Breakfast, 
Dinner, 

Bearer, or After- 
nooning. 

Supper, 
A Meal, 
Some Bread, 
White Bread 
Brown Bread, 
New Bread, 
Stale Bread, 
Hot Bread, 
The Crum, 

— Crust, 
Some Broth, 
— — Soup, 

Meat, 



] 



( Una Conocchia 
( Una Rocca 

Vn Ftiso 

Colazione 

Pranzo 

Merenda 

Cena 
Vn Pasto 
Del Pane 
Pan Bianco 
Pan Nero 
Pan Fresco 
Pan Posato 
Pan Caldo 
Lq, Mollica 
La Crosta 
Del Brodo 
Delia Zuppa 
Delia Came 



Some Boiled Meat, Del Lesso 



— Roast Meat, 
Stewed Mc^at, 
Mutton, 
Lamb, ^. 
Veal, 
Beef, 

Bacon, 

A Sucking Pig. 

Ham, 



DeW Arrosto 
Dello Stufato 
Castralo 
Agnello 
Fitello 
Manzo 
Porco 
Lardo 

Vn PorcelUnditaUe 
Prosciutio 



A Ducl^ 

— Chicken, 
Some Greens, 
A Salad, 

— Rabbit, 

— Hare, 

— Goose, 

— Turkey, 

— PheasaiU, 
--- Partridge, 

— Woodcock, 

— Quail, 

— Lark, 

— Pigeon, 

— Pie, 

Some Sausages, 

E«g«i 

Butter, 

Cheese, 

Salt, 

Oil, 

' Vinegar^ 
— — Sauce, 

Moustard^ 

— — Lemon, 
-— — Oranges, 
The Desert, 
Some Water, 
— — Beer, 

Win4?, 

White Wiae, 



189 
Vh* Anatra 
Vn Polio 
Degli Erbaggi 
Un' Insalata 
Vn Coniglio 
Una Lepre 
Un' Oca 
Un Gallinaccio 
Vn Fagiano 
Una Pernice 
Una Beccaccia 
Una Quaglia 
Una Lodola 
Un Piccionc 
Un Pasticcio 
Delle Salsiccie 
Delle Uova 
Del Butirro 
Del Formaggio 
Del Sale 
DelV Olio 
DelV jiceto 
Delia Salsa 
Delia Mostarda 
Del Limone 
Degli Aranci 
Le Frutta 
DelU Acqua 
Delia Birra 
Del Vino 
Vino Blanco 



I go 
Red Wioe, 
Brandy, 
A Glass, 

— Napkin, 

The Table Cloth, 

— Spoon, 

— Fork, 

— Knifey 
A Dish, 

— Plate, 

— Bottle, 

— Salt-cellar, 
Coffee, 
Chocolate, 
Tea, 

A Town or ^ity, 

— House, 

— Street, 

— Church, 
^- Steeple, 

— College^ 

— School, 
An Hospital, 
An Inn, 

A Cofiee^house 
A Public-house, 

— Stable, 

— Shop, " 

— Warehonse 
The Play-house, 

— Post> office^ 



Vino Rosso 
Acquavita 
Va Bicchiere 
Una Sahietta 
La ToQagUa 
11 Cucchiajo 
La Forchetia 
n Coltello 
Un Piatio 
Vn Tondino 
Una boitiglia 
Una Saliera 
Caffh 
Cioccolata 
Ti 

Una Cittd 
Una Casa 
Una Strada 
Una Chiesa 
Un Campanile 
Un Collegio 
Una Scuola 
Uno Spedale 
UnAtbergo 
Un Caffh 
Un Osieria 
Una Sialla 
Una Bottega 
Un Magazzino 
11 Teatro 
La Fosia 



The Custom- house, 

— Exchange, ^ 

— Prisons, 
A Bridge, 
The Gates, 
A Wall, 
The Door, 

— Kej, 

— Bolt, 

— Lock, 

— Cellar, 
•• Well. 

— Garden, 

— Stair-case, 

— Chimney, 

— Windows, 

— First Floor, 

— Second Floor, 
A Garret, 

— Room, 

An Apartment 
A Closet, 

— Study, 

— Chair, 

kn Arm-chair, 

A Looking-glass, 

— Picture, 

— Clock, 

— Table, 
-Bed, 



191 
Ln Dogana 
La Bor4a > 
l^e Careeri 
Un Ponte . 
Le Porte _ 

Una Muraglia . 

U Uscio 
La Chiave 
II Chiai^istello 
La Serratura ^., 
La Cnntina 
11 Pozzo 
II Giardino 
La Scala 
II Canting -'^^m^ 
Le Finestre — * 
// Prima Piano 
II Secondo Piano 
Una Soffitta 
Una Camera 
Un jippartamenio 
Un Gabinetto 
Una Studio 
Una sedia, 
( Una Sedia ^ap^ 
( poggio 
Una Specchio 
Una Pittura 
Un Orologio 
Una Topola 
Un Letto 



192 

The Curtains^ 
A Blanket, 
Tbe Bolster^ 
A Pillow, 
The SheeU, 
A Warming pan, 

— Cradle, 

— Candlestick, 
Tbe Snuffers, 

— Fire-tongs, 
-» Fire shovel 

— Bellows, 
A Spit, 

— Kettle, 

— Broom, 
~ Pail, 

Tbe Library, 
A Book, 

— Pocket book^ 
The Paper, 

A Pen, 

— Pen-knife, 
An Ink-stand, 
The Ink, 

— Sand-box, 
A Rule, 

The Country, 
A Village. 

— Hamlet, 

— Mountain, 

— Hill, 



Le Conine 
Una Coperla 
II Capezzale 
Un Guanci^le 
he Lenzuola 
Una Scaldaleuo 
Una Culla 
Un Candelliere 
he Smoccolatoje 
he Mollette 
La Paletta 
Jl soffietto 
Uno Spiedo 
Una Caldaja 
Una Scopa 
Una Secchia 
La Libreria 
Un Libra 
Un Taccuino 
La Cavta 
Una Penna 
Un Temperino 
Un Calamajo 
U Inchiostro 
II Polverinajo 
Una Riga 
La Campagna 
Un Fillaggio 
Un Casale 
Una Montagna 
Una Collina 



A Forest, 

— Wood, 

— Country Seat, 
An Estate, 

A Pigeon house^ 

— Shepherd, 

— Shepherdess, 
• -Field, 

-* Meadomr, 
.. Ditch, 
** Hedge, 
The Grass, 

— Hay, 
A Mill, 
The Corn, 
A Spade, 

— Plough, 

— Scythe, 

An Almond tree, 
•- Apple-tree, 
A beech-tree, . 
An Elm, 
A Fig-tree, 
An Oak, 

— Pine-tree, 
A Fir-tree, 
An Olive- tree, 

— Orange tree, 
A Pear-tree, 

— Poplar-tree, 

— Plum*tree, 



195 
Una Foresia 
Un Boseo 
Una Villa 
Un Podere 
Una Colombaja 
Un- Pastore 
Una Pastorella 
Un Campo 
Un Prato 
Un fosso 
Una Siepe 
V Erba 
II Fieno 
Un Mulino 
Jl Grano 
Una Zappa 
Un Aratro 
Una Falce 
Un Mandorlo 
Un Melo 
Un Faggio 
Un Olmo 
Un Fico 
Una Querela 
Un Pino 
Un Abete 
Un Olii^o 
Un Araneio 
Un Pero 
Un Pioppo 
Un Susino 



A Peach-tree^ 

— WalnuUtree^ 

— Vine, 

An European, 

— American, 

— Asiatic, 
-" African, 

— Italian, 

A Sardinian, 

— Corsican, 

— Genoese, 

— Piedmoatese, 

— Tuscan, 

— Venitian, 

— Neapolitan, 

— Sicilian, 

— Roman, 

An Englishman, 
A Scotchman, 
An Irishman, 
A Frenchman 

— Spaniard, 

— Portuguese, 

— Swiss, 

— German, 

— Fleming, 

— Dutchman, 
An Austrian, 
A Bohemian, 

— Hungarian, 

— Polander, 



Un Pese6 
Un Noce 
Una Vite 
Un Europeo 
Un Americano 
Un jisiatico 
Un Affrieano 
Un Jtaliano 
Un Sardo 
Un Corso 
Un Genoi^ese 
Un Piemontese 
Un Toscano 
Un Veneziano 
Un Napolitano 
Un Siciliano 
Un Romany 
Un Inglese 
Uno Scozzese 
Un Irlahdese 
Un Franeese 
Uno Spagnolo 
Un Portoghese 
Uno Si^izzero 
Un Tedesco 
Un Flamingo 
Un Olandese 
Un Austriaco 
Un Boemo 
Un Ungaro 
Un Poldcco 



A Sazon^ 

— Prussian^ 

— Swede, 

— Dane^ 

— Russian, 

— Turk, 

-- Grecian, 

— Persian, 
The Emperor, 

— Empress, 

— King, 

— Queen, 

— Prince, 

— Princess, 
A Duke, 

— Dutchess, 

— Marquiss, 

-* Marchidness,^ 

— Count, 

— Countess, 

— Baron, 

— Baroness, 

— Knight, 

•- Nobleman, 

— Lady, 

An Ambassador, 
A Governor, 
An EnvoT, 
A Consul, 
The Pope, 
A Cardinalj 



Un Sasione 

Vn Pnissiano 

Una Svezzese 

Un Danese 

Un Russo 

Un Turco 

Un Greco 

Un Persiano 

V Imperatore 

L' Imperatrice 

II Re 

La Rjegina 

11 Principe 

La Principessa 

Un Duca 

Una Duchesza 

Un Marchese 

Una Marcheta 

Un Conte 

Una Contessa 

Un Barone 

Una Baronessa 

Un Cavaliere 

Un Nobile 

Una Dama 

Un Ambasciatore 

Un Governatore 

Un Inifiato 

Un Console 

n Papa 

Un Cardinale 



196 
A Bishop^ 
An Abbots 
A Canon^ 

— Chaplaia^. 

— Rector^ 

— Curate,. 

— Priest, 

— Monk, 

The Grandfather^ 
-* Grandmother, 

— Father, 

— Mother, 

— Son, 

— Dauehter^. 

— Bt'other^ 

— Sister, 

— Uncle, 

— Nephew 

— Aunt, 

— Niece, 

A Falher-in law, 

— Mother-in law, 

— Son-in law, 

— Daughter-in-law 

— Step-father, 

— Step- mother 5 

— Step-son, 

» Step-daughter, 
-« Brother-in-law, 

— Sister-in-law, 
.. God-father^ 



Un 


Vescovo 


Un Abate- 


Vn 


Canonico 


Vn 


Cappellano 


Un 


Retore 


Uh 


Curato 


Un 


Prete 


Vn Frate 


II 


Nonno 


La 


Nonna 


It 


Padre 


La Madre | 


a 


FigUo 5 


La 


Figlia 1 


II 


Fratello | 


La 


Sorella i 


Lo 


Zio. \ 


n 


Nipote ] 


La 


Zia 


La 


Nipote I 


11. 


Suocero \ 


La Suacera 1 


11 


Genero i 


La 


Nuora: \ 


11 


Padrignty- I 


La 


Madrigna \ 


II 


Figliastra I 


La 


FlgUastra \ 


11 


Cognato ! 


La 


Cognata \ 


II Pae^iua l 



The God-mothery 

— God-aoDy 

— God-daughter^. 

— Cousin, 

— Relation^,. 

— PareoU/ 

An Orphan, 

Alexander,. 

Anaelm, 

Anthony, 

Austin, 

Baptist, 

Bartholomew^^ 

Benedict, 

Charles, 

Dominick,. 

Francis, 

Gregory, 

Hierom, 

Hilarr^ 

John, 

James, 

Lewis, 

Peter, 

Stephen, 

William, 

Ann, 

Jane, 

Magdalen^ 



>97 
La Madrina 

II Figlioceio 

La Figlioccia 

iUn CuginOy m. 
Una Cu^ina^f. 
parenti 
T Genitori 
(JJn drfano^ m. 
{Un' Orfana, f. 
jilessandro 
Anselmo- 
Antonio 
Agostino 
Battista , 
Bartolommeo^ 
Benedetto ' 
Carlo 
DomenieO' 
Francesco 
Gregorio 
GirolamO' 
Hario 
Gioi^anni 
Giacomo' 
Luigi 
Fietro 
St^ano 
Guglielmo 
Anna 
GioQanna^ 
Maddaleua 

10 



198 
Margaret^ ' 

Mary, 

Agnea, 

Caroline, 

Charlotte, 

Elizabeth, 

Eve, 

Jnditb, 

^.ose, 

Brigid, 

Catharine^ 

Cicely, 

Clare, 

Dorothy, 

Eleanor, 

Francea, 

Lucy, 

Helen, 

Isabel, 

Constance^ 



Margherita 

Maria 

Agnese 

Carolina 

Carlotta 

Elisabeua 

Eva 

Giuditta 

Rosa 

Brigida 

Caterina 

Cecilia 

Chiara 

Dorotea 

Eleonora 

Francesca 

Lucia 

Elena 

Isabella 

Costanza 









>99 
FAMILUR PaXJSES FBA8I FAMILlAfil. 

How do you do^ Sir? Come sta Vossi' 

gnoria ? (i) 
I am very Mre11> and Sio benissimoy ed 
yoa, Sir, how do ella ? 
you do ? 
Always ready to Sempre disposto a 

serve you. servirla. 

I am very glad to Godo estremamen" 
see you in good te di vederla in 
health. buona salute, 

Tou look very well. Ella ha un'ottima 

ciera. 
Tou look ill* Ella ha cattwa 

ciera. 
I am not very well. Non istd troppo 

bene. 
I am sorry for it. Me ne displace. 
Did you sleep well Ha ella dormito 
last night ? bene la none 

passaVa ? 
I did not sleep a Non ho mai chiuso 
wink all the night. un occhio in tut- 
ta la none. 
,How does your Come sta il suo 
brother do ? signor fratello ? 

(t> The ityle of retpeet In Italian it to addreft 
another bjr the third person aingnlar, fometimet 
cxpretting, but more oommonl/ emplo/iog tht 
word Voiiiinoria. See pag. loi, not. 3. 



200 

How does your sister Come sta ta sua 

do ? signora sorella ? 

How does your lady Come sta la sua 

do ? signora sposa ? 

She is a litlle indis- Ella h alquanto m- 

posed. dispostd. 

What is the matter Che cosa ha ? 

with her ? 
What ails her ? Che male ha ? 

She has got . the Ua mal di testa 

head ach. 
She has got the Ha mal di den-^ 

tooth ach. ti. 

She has got a coId« Ella e infreddata. 
She does nothing but Non fa altro che 

cough. tossire. 

She must be let Bisogna^ cKellasi 

blood. faccia cai^ar san- 

gue. 
She IS to take physic Domani ella pren^ 

to morrow. dera un medica^ 

mento. 
She must spare her- Bisogna cK ella 

self. sabhia cura. 

She was well last Jeri sera ella stava 

night. bene. 

I will go and see Anderb a vederla 

. her to night. questa sera. 

My mother is also Anche mia madre 

indisposed. e indisposta. 

She has got a sore Ha mule alia gala. 

throat. 



201 

I am sorry to hear Mi displace disen* 

she is ill. tire ch^ella siia 

mnle. 
I hope that will be Spero che non sard 

nothing. niente. 

VLow old is she ? Qaanti anni ha 

ella ? 
She is seventy years Ella ha settant^an- 

old. ni. 

I did not think she Non la credevo 

was so old. cosi vecchia. 

What o' clock is if. ? Che ora h ? 
It is one o'clock. E un^ ora. 
It is half an hour E uriora^ e mezzo. 
' past one. 
It is three quarters E uvl ora^ e tre 

past one. quarti. 

It is near two. E vicino alle due. 
It has struck three. Son sonate le tre. 
It wants a quarter Sono le quattro 

of four. meno un quarto. 

It is past seven* Sono le settejjas- 

sate. 
It is almost twelve. Sono quasi le do- 

did. 
It is time to go £ tempo d'andare 

home. a casa. 

How is the weather? Che tempo fa ? 
It is fine weather. Fa bel tempo. 
It rains^ it does not Pioi^e, non pioi^e. 

rain. 



202 

It U but a shower. Non i cfuc ana 

scossa. 
It will be over pre- Cesserd ^ubito. 

gently. 
It 18 but a flying Non h che una nu^ 

cloud. i^ola passeggiera 

It rains as fast as it Diluvia. 

can pour. 
It is foggy weather«£ un tempo neb-- 

bioso. 
It is very unwhole- E' un tempo molto 

some weather. malsano. 

It is a very cold E' una mattinata 

morning. molto fredda. 

I am vastly cold. Houngranfreddo^ 
Is there a fire in the Fi k fuoco netla 

parlour f sala ? 

Let us warm our- ScaldiamocL 

selves. 
The wind blows Fa un i^ento fred-- 

cold. do. 

It is very hot* Fa molto caldo. 

The weather is quite II tempo h affatto 

changed. eamoiato. 

What season do you Quale delle stagio- 

like best ? ni le place piu ? 

Winter is too cold V in\>erno h una 

a season. stagione troppo 

fredda. 
It is too hot ia sum- Nella state fa trop^ 

mer. po caldo. 



203 

I love winter better U inperno mi place 

tbaa sumoier. piu delta state. 

Iloye summer better /f me la state via" 

than winter. ce piu delV in^ 

verno. 
Spring is the most La primavera k la 

pleasant of all the piii piaceifole di 

seasons. tutte le stagioni. 

It is neither too hot Non h nh troppo 

nor too cold. caldo nh troppo 

freddo. 
We have had no Questanno non ab" 

spring this year. biamo aifuto pri- 
maifera. 
We had no summer Uanno passato non. 

last year. avemmo estate. 

The seasons are ont.Uordine delle sta^ 

of order. gioni h rove- 

sciato. 
All the trees are fiiU Tutti gli alberi so* 

of fruit. nopienidifrutti. 

The country people I contadini non 

will have no rea- avranno motivo 

son to complain dilagnarsi guest' 

this year. anno. 

The days are very Igiorni sono molto 

much shortened accorciati, o aU 

or lengthened. ^ lungati. 
It is presently night; E presto notte. 
I fear we shall have Temo, ehe avremo 

9l ^ very severe un inverno mol- 

winter. to rigido. 



2a4 
Winter begios earlf. L'inuerno comin^ 

cia per tempo. 
Whence do you come Di dove i^enite? 

from ? 
I come from the Fengo dalla Borsa 

Royal Exchange. reale. 
Where are you Dooe andate ? 

going 1^ 
I am going home, yado a casa. 
You are in a great Avete una gran 

hurry fretta. 

Let us go into tkis Entriamo in questo 

Cloffee-house. Caffh 

I have no time. Non ho tempo. 

I cannot stay* Non posso traue- 

nermu 
Well then, I will Bene dunque^ sfac^ 

wait on you hojne. compagnerb fino 
a casak 
I cannot follow you. ^on posso segul- 

tar if L 
You walk too fast, f^oi camminnte 

troppo presto. 
Do you know that Conoscete quel si^ 

gentleman ? gnore ? 

I am very well ac- ho conosco molto 

quainted with him . bene. 
We are old acquaint- Siamo conoscenti 

ance. vecchL 

Where came you ac- Dove avete fatto 

.quainted together? conoscenza i&* 
sieme } 



205" 

At Paris. A Parigi. 

I know him by sight. Lo eonosco di vista. 

I know him by re- Lo eonosco per/a- 

putation^ ma. 

Do you remember Viricorcl ate di quel 

-what I have told che vi ho detto ? 

you ? 
I do not remember it Non me ne ricordo. 
I have quite forgot V ho affatto di^ 

it. menticato. 

That went out of M' h uscito di men* 

my head. te. 

Do you understand Mi capite ? 

xae ? 
Do you understand Capite V Italiano ? 

Italian 7 
Do you speak Ita- Parlate voi V Ita^ 

lian ? liano ? 

I do not understand Non lo capisco* 

it. 
Why dont'yon learn Perchi non V ifri' 

it ? parate ? 

I -will learn it by- V imparerd quanta 

and-by. prima. 

The Itahan language La lingua Italiana 

is very easy. ^ facilissima. 

When you begin to Quando comincere" 

take a liking to ie a prendervi 

it, you will im- gusto^ vi farete 

prove in it imper- progressi senza 

ceptibly. aceorgerpehe. 

* 10 



ao6 
Is there any news ? Vi sono nrnve ? 
They talk of peace. Si parla di pace. 
They talk of war. Si parla di guerra. 
There are great f^i sono^ gran cose 

things upon the sul iappeto. 

carpet. 
Is it true ? E' egli vera ? 

I can assure you of Posso assicurarve-^ 

it. ne. 

Be so kind as to Abbiale la bontd 

hear me. di ascoltarmi. 

You are absent 5 why F'oisiete distraito^ 

don't you hearken perchh non nt' 

when I speak ? ascoltate auando 

io parlo r 
There is a handsome Ecco una bella si'^ 

young lady ! griorina ! 

Her complexion is La sua carnagione 

like lilies and roses h simile ai gigli^ 
, ed alle rose. 
She is a fair beauty. E una bella bion^ 

dina. 
What sparkling eyes Che oeehi i^ivaci 

she has I ella ha f 

What fine hair ! Che bei capelli f 
How red her lips Che labbri i^ermi- 

are I glil 

Her neck is as white 11 sua collo e bian^ 

as alabaster. co come V ala^ 

basiro. 
What a fine shape ! Che bella vita / 



207 
What majesty ia ber Che maesta nel su6 

carriage I portamento ! 

Are you tired ? Let Siete voi stanco ? 

us rest a little. Riposiamoci un 
poco* 
Let us go and see Andiamo a vedere 

Mr. il signer A. 

Who is there? Chi h la? 

Is the gentleman at II signore h in 

home ? casa ? 

The gentleman is in // signore hnel sue 

his closet. gabinetto. 

He is writing. Sta scrii^endo ? 

May one speak to Si pub parlargli ? 

him ? 
Stay a moment, I V^ S. aspetti un 

am going to tell momento. l^ado 

him. m dirglielo^ 

Sir, Mr. A, asks for II signer A. la do^ 

you*. manda* 

Desire him to come Fatelo entrare. 

in* 
I am very glad to Ho malte piacere 

see you^ my dear di i^eden^i^ amico 

friend. care. 

I came to speak to Sonvenutoperpar* 

you about a little larvi d'un inte^ 

businm. ressuccio. 

I shall take care of Prendero a cuore 

your business. il vestro affare. 

Rely upon me» Riposatevisopradi 

me. 



^o8 
Will you hreAhst yhleie vox far co- 

with iii€ ? lazione meco ? 

As yoa please. Come pi place ^ 

I caaoot^at so early Nonpossomangiar 

ia the morniog. la mattina cosi 
a buon*ora. 
As for my part, I la quanto a me ho 

am very hungry. una grandissima 
fame. 
I wonder at it. Ne sono sorpreso. 
I eat no supper last Jeri sera rum ce« 

night. nau 

Did you eat aotfaiog Non mangiaste 

at all ? niente affaito ? 

Nothing but bread tiient'altro che pa^ 

and butter. ne e butirro. 

Do you call that E questo lo ckia- 

eatinff no supper mate non cenar 

at all ? del tutto ? 

I am used to eat a Sono solito a fare 

hearty supper. juia buona cena* 

Dinner is our best In IngkUterra il 

meal m England, pranzo h il no* 

stro migliorpasto. 

I regularly eat four lofo regolarmente 

meals a day, when quattro pasti al 
^ I am well. giorno , quando 

sto bene* 
Ask my brother if Domandate a mio 

be will have his fratello^ se vuol 

breakfast. far colazione. 



S09 
He is but just up. E' appunto Uifoto. 
Well, we shall break- Bene, faremo cola* 

fiist together. zione insieme. 

Let us make some Facciamo del thi, 

tea and coffee. e del caffh. 
I love chocolate bet- Mi place piii la 

ter* cioccolata. 

Well, you shall have E beae^ ne iwrete. 

some. 
The water is boiling. Vacqua hoile. 
Thej tea is very // thh h molto Je- 

weak. bole. 

Tour coffee is too II vostro caffh h 

strong. troppo forte* 

That caa be easily Vi si pud rimediar 

remedied. facilmente. 

This chocolate is Questa cioccoUUa 

good for nothing non val niente* 

at all. 
The tea is mighty II thh e eccellente. 

good. 
Do you sugar it ? Vi mettete zucche* 

ro ? 
To be sure. Certamente* 

And I always drink Ed io lo bevo sem* 

it without. pre senza. 

Every one to their Ognuno ha il sue 

taste. gusto* 

What a fine china I Che. beUa porceU 

lana ! 
Don't go yet. Non ve ne andate 

ancora^ 



am 
Yott shall dine with Doirtte pranzar 

me. meco. 

With all ray heart. F'olentierissimo. 
Let us go into the Entriamo nella sa-» 

dining-room. la» 

Let's sit at table* Mettiamoci a ta^ 

vola. 
This soup seems to Questa zuppa mi 

me very good. par molto buona. 

I know that you lore So che vi piace la 

soup. zuppa. 

As for my part I Pef me non amo 

don't love soup at punto la zuppa. 

all. 
Eat of this boiled Mangiate dl questo 

meat. lesso. 

There, help yourself. TTenete^ serQita^L 
Take the soup away Lewite la zuppa. 
Tou do not eat. P'oi non m>angiate. 

The fricassee of chic- La frhassea di 

kens is very nice. poUastri i quaU 
che cosa di de* 
licato. 
You don't seem to Non pare che vi 

like it much. piaccia molto, 

I save my stomach Mi riserbo pelPar^ 

for the roast meat. rosto. 
Be so good as to cut Abbiate la bonti 

that turkey. di trinciar quel 

gallinaccio. 
Who will dress the Chi puoI condir 
•alad ? r insalata ? 



ail 

Put a good deal of Mettetenmolifolio^ 

oil to it, and little e poco aceto. 

vinegar. 
Sir, to your health, Signore^ alia iio« 

stra salute^ 
I thank yon, Sir. Grazie^ Sienore. 
Why don' t you Perchh non %evete f 

drink ? 
Don't you like that Vion pi place quel 

wine ? , Pino ? 

It is mighty good, E ottimo, ma nam 

but I am no great sono gran bepi* 

drinker. tore. 

That's a very fine Quello i un beL, 

desert. lissimo dessert. 

What shall we do Chefaremo not do* 

this afternoon ? po pranzo ? 

Smillwego and take P^oghamo noifare 
/ a walk ? unapasseggiata) 

/ It is right walking // tempo non pu^ 

weather. esser migliore 

per passeggiare. 

Let's go a walking, Andiamo aunque 

tlien. o,fare un giro. 

It is too bad weather. 11 j tempo h troppo 

Jcattivo. 
We must . stay dX pisogna stare in 

home. casa. 

Well, let us play at Ebene^giuochiamo 

cards. alle carte, 

As you please. Come pi place. 



2« 

As you wilL Come volete. 

What game shafll^ve j4 eke giuoco giuo-- 
play at ? cheremo noi ? 

These two gentle- Questi due signori 
men will play at giuocherdnno a 
piquet ; they Kke picchetto, so che 
it, I know. Vamano. 

As for you two, I In quanta a voi «Z- 
know that you iri -due, so che 
don't like playing non vi place di 
at cards, therefore giuacare aUe 
you wiU play at cartey percib i^oi 
chess* giuocherete a 

scacchL 

What shall wc play Di quanta giuoche-^ 
for ? remo ? 

We won't play very Non giuocheremo 
high. di molto. 

I am the most unfor- Sono il piu sfoV" 
tunate in the world tunato del monda 
at gaming. al giuoco. 

Who is to deal? j4 chi tocca afar 

le carte ? 

The gentleman is to Tocca al signore. 
deal. 

Shuffle the cards Mescolate bene le 
well. carte* 

Please to cut Alzaie. 

I play in hearts, and Giuoco a* cuori, e 
call for die king chiamo il Re di 
of spades. jricche* 



ai3 
Clubs and the king Piori e il Re di 

ef diamonds. quadrL 

I hay« the wont Wo le peggiori ear^ 

cards in the pack. te del mazxo^ 
You must needa have f^ai doaete neces^ 

food cards, since *sariamente ai^r 
ha^e nothing. buone carte per- 

chb io -non ho 
niente. 
Are yea going so Foiete andar^ene 

soon ? cosi presto / 

Why won't you stay Perch i non voiete 
and sup with us ? restar a cena 
-con not ? 
I cannot, I must go iVon posso ; devo 
to the ball. andare alia fe^ 

sta di ballo. 
I wish you merry. Vi auguro del pia» 

cere. 
1 (haniL you for your F'i ringrazio delta 
good company. nostra buona 

eontpagnia. 
t^ood night* Buona sera, buona 

notte. 
Which is th« way <lual h la strada 
to — ? per andare a—? 

How far do you Quanto v^ h di ^id 
reckon it from a W-^} 
hence to W — ? 
Twenty-four miles, yenti quattro mi;^ 

glia» 



ai4 
How inaj I go from In gual ' maniera 

hence to it ? posso io andan^i? 

You may take post- Potete prender ca- 

horseft. oalli di posta. 

You may take a place Potete prendere un 

in the stage coach* posto nella dili" 
genza» 
Are you alone ? Siete voi solo ? 

I must have a horse Mi bisogna un ca* 

for my servant. vallo pel mio 

s^rvitore. 
How good the roads Che huone stradel 

arel 
The dust flies, and Lapolvere vola^ed 

it is very trouble- incomoda assaL 

some. 
T4is carriage is so Questa carrozza 

easy, one might i tanto comoda^ 

sleep in it. c&e vi si potreb^ 

be dormire* 
Now we are arrived. Eccoci arrivati. 
Why do you come Perchk venite cost 

so late? tardi ? 

You got up 4his Voi vi siete leaato 

merniog too late. troppo tardi que^ 
St a mattina. 
Nobody awaked Nessuno m^ha si^e- 

me, I was very gliato^ at^vo un 

sleepy. g'ran sonno. 

Why don't you de- Perchh non prega^ 

sire somebody to te qualcuno di 

call you up? ^^kiainari^i ? 



2l5 

Have you got yQur Ai^ete imparato la 

lessoa ? lezione ? 

It is too loog and EUa k troppo lunm 

too hard. g'a, e troppo dif* 

Jicile* 
Have you done your Avete Jatto il vo* 

' exercise ? stro tema ? 

Lei' 8 see, shew it Vediamo^ mostra^ 

me. temelo. 

It is full of fanlts. E* pieno d' erroru 
What a bad Italian ! Che cattwo Italia'^ 

no I 
Tou don't mind the F'oinonbadatealle 

rules. regole. 

Why don^t you con- Perchh non consul' 

suit the grammar? tate la gramma^ 
Uca ? 
t^ou take no pains. Vol n<^ vi date 

nessuna pena* 
Where did you leave Dove avete lasciato 

off last time } Vultima volta i 

Here. Qm. 

You read too fast. F'oi leggete troppo 

presto. 
Read more slowly. Leggete piu adagio 
You don^t under- yoi non capite quel 

stand what you che leggetfi» 

read. 
Have you looked for Avete cercato queU 

that word ? la parola ? 

You must look foe Bisogna che cer^ 

your words. chiate {e parole. 



^i6 
How do you say in Come dile in Ita^ 

Italian r- ? Uano^-''^? 

Tou are mistaken. Sbagliate. 
What a noise! Chefracasso! 

Hold your tongue. Tacete. 
Will you give me Vuol ella darmi il 

leave to go out, permesso d'uscU 

Sir r ref 

Go, and make haate AndatSy e tornate 

ba<5k again. sitbito. 

Shut the door. Chiudete I'uscio. 

I found it open. JL' ho trov^tto aper^ 

to. 
What does that Che importa ? 

signify ? 
Have you got all that Ai>ete guanto q'oc^ 

you want ? corre ? 

I have neither pen Non ho ni penna 

nor ink. nh incfuostru. 

The ink is good for U inchiostro non 

nothing. pal niente. 

The pen is very bad. La penna i catd' 

vissima. 
Cannot yon make a Non sapete tempe- 

pen ? rar una penna f 

Try this. Prolate questa. 

This is a good one. Questa e buona. 
What is the matter Che avete f 
vi^ith you ? 
Mr. A. hinders me // signer A. m* im- 



ti7 
from getting my ; pedisce d^ impa^ 
lessoo. rar la mia le- 

Mone* 

He laughs at me. Si burla di me. 

He pulls me by the Mi lira pe' captlli. 
hair. 

Come hither both Fenite qui tuHi e 
of you. due. 

Is it so you learn E' questa la ma* 
your lesson ? niera d' imparar 

la lezione ? 

Pray, Sir, forgive Di grazia^ ella mi 
me for this time, perdoni per que* 
sta poUa* 

I will never do it Non la farb jnai 
any more. pili* 

Every body com- Ognuno si lagna di 
plains of you. voi. 

I hope you will be Spero che sarete 
better for the fu- migliore in av* 
ture. penire. 

Yes, I will, I assure Lo sard certamen-' 
you. ie. 

So much the better : Tanto meglioy se 
if you are good sarete buonOy e 
and diligent I will diligente^ io ui 
love you. vorro bene. 

Sir, 1 am overjoyed Signore^ ho un 

to see you. grandissimo pia* 

cere di veden\i. 

Vherehaveyoubeen Dove siete state 



di8 

this long while ? tutto questo tem^ 
po ? 
We have been these Sono due mesiy che 

two months at a siamo in villa. 

country-house. 
Are you come to Siete ora venuto in 

town for good and cittd per restar^ 

all? W? 

No, Sir, I go back 2Vo, signore^ me ne 

to-morrow morn- ritorno domani 

ing. mattina. 

How do you enjoy Come >}i dither tite 

yourself in the in campagna ? 

country ? 
How do you pass Come passate it 

avfSLj the time ? tempo ? 
I bestow part of it Ne consacro una 

upon books. parte a' libri. 

I go sometimes a F'ado qualche i^olta 

hunting. a caccia. 

What do you hunt ? A qual caccia T 
Sometimes we hunt Alcune volte del 

a stag, and s6me- cervo^ ed alcune 

times we hunt a altredellalepre. 

hare. 
How do you like Come vi place la 

fishing ? pesca f 

Extremely, but I fish Estremamente, ma 

very seldom. pesco rarissimc 

volte. 
We are too great a: Siamo troppo lon^ 



^'9 
wajr from the tani dalfiume. 

' river. 

They say there is a JDieono, che i^i sia 

new play acted to una commedia 

night; shall nre go nuoi^a questa se^ 

and see it? ra, andereino 

^oi a vederla } 
With all my heart. Molto polentieru 
Let us go imme- Andiamo subito. 

diately. 
There is abundance C h moUUsima 

of people. gente. 

These ladies are ver^ Quelle signore sono 

finely drest. vestite molto be^ 

ne» 
That lady is as Quella signora i 

handsome as an bellacomeunan- 

angel. gelo. 

Do yon know her } La conoscete ? 
I have that honor. Ho quest! onore 
The play is over, ha commedia i /?<* 

nita. 
Let VLB go home. Andiamo a casa. 
Where are you Dove andate, si'- 

goin^, Sir^ gnore ? 

I am gomg to Dover, yado a Douvres* 
When do you set Quando partite* 

6nvf - 
Presently/' Immediatamente, , 

Do you go thithei^ Jndate in carrot- 

in a coach or on za^ o a cavallo ? 

horse back ? 



320 

Qq hofsebatk.: ^ A ca»allo. ■■ ■- 
How many miles is- Quante miglia- tn 

this place frotni- ? s^no di qui a*«- ? 
Forty miles. Quaranta miglia. 

Do you think we Cnedete voi ehe 

can go. so far to- pdtremoarrwar* 

day ? vi oggi ? 

Without doubt*- Senza dubbio* 

But we have woods. Ma abbiamo upas* 

to go through, and sar de' boschi^ e 

rivers to go over.- a- i^arcar de' fiu^ 
mL 
Farewell, gentlemen. Addioy signoru 
I wish you a good Vi auguro un buon 

journey. viaggio. 

I thank you with all ^£ ringrazia JU 

my heart. tutto euore. 

Where is the best Dov' h il miglior 

inn in town } alb^rgo della 

citta ? 
At the sign of the AlV insegna del 

White-Horse cavallo bianco. 

In what part of the In <jual parte ddUi 

town is it ? citta rimane t . 

Near the new Vicino alia chiesa 

church. nuova. 

]L.et us alighL Scendiam(K . . 

Where is the ostler ? Doi^' k il m$z;io di 

stalla} '; 
Take our hors^^Jnto Menate i n^iri ca-^ 

the stable. i^aUi nelU 9iaU 

la. 



22r 
Take care of them. Ahhiatene cura. 
What will you give Che ci darete da 

lis for Slipper ? cena ? 

Give us some pigeons. Dated de'piccioni^ 

some quails, and a delle tjuaglie, ed 

good salad. • una buoma insa^ 

lata* 
It would be better Sarebbe meglio per 

for me to go to me d* andare a 

bed. letto. 

What ails you ? Che avete ? 

I have no appetite, Non ho fame j sono 

I am weary and stance ed^affaii-^ 

tired. cato. 

Gentlemen, are you Sono le signorie 

satisfied with your loro soddisfatte 

supper ? delta cena ? 

Yes, but we must Si, ma ora bisogna 

satisfy you too. soddisfarvi. 

What have we to Quanto dobbiamo 

pay ? pagare ? 

Six shillings. Sei scelliniy dodici 

pai^oli. 
Tou ask too much. Vol domandate 

troppo. 
On the contrary, I ^nzi sono discre* 

am very reason- tissimo. 

able. 
We shall pay yon PI pagheremo do^* 

to morrow mom* mani mattina do* 

i\ 



222 

ing after breakfast, po la colazione. 
As yon please , Come place alle 

gentlemen. signorie loro. 

Let lis have clean Fated a^ere delle 

sheets. lenzuola bianchc. 

The sheets you shall he lenzuola che 

have are lyewash* ai^ranno saranno 

ed. di bucato. 

Good night, gentle- Buona notte , si^ 

men. gnori. 

Who knocks at the Chi picchia alia 

door ? porta ? 

Are you in*bed still ? Siete ancora in 

letto ? 
It is time to rise* E tempo d* alzarsi. 
Open the window, Aprite la finestra. 
How loath I am to Quanto mi rincrs" 

rise. see di levarmi. 

I was fast asleep. Dormioo profonda* 

mente» 
We went to bed very Jeri sera andammo 

late last night. a letto molto 

tardi. 
You ate lazy. Voi siete pigro. 

You see I am rising. Vedete cK io mi 

levo. 
Where is my morn- Doi^' ela mia oeste 

ing gown ? , ^^ camP.ra ? 

Somebody knocks E picchiato , ve- 

at the door , see dete chi h. 

who it is.' '. 



, - 223 

It 15 the hair-dresser. £ il perrucchiere. 
Let him come in. Fatelo entrare. 
Where are my gloves, Dove sono i miei 

my hat, and my guanti , il mig 

sword ? cappello e la mia 

spada ? 
Brush my cloaths Spazzolate bene il 

and my hat well. mio vestito^ e il 
mio cappello. 
Now I am almost Ora son quasi proU" 

ready. to. 

Who wants me ? Chi mi puole ? 
The taylor. II sarto. 

Do you bring my Avete portato il 

suit of clothes ? mio vestito ? 

Tes, Sir, here it is. Si signore^ eccolo 

I hope it will qui. Spero che le 

please you. , piacera. 

It is too long. E troppo lungo. 

That is the fashion. E la moda. 
You have not Non ai^ete portato 

brought my great il mio pastrano. 

coat. 
It is not made yet. Non h ancora Jini^ 

to. 
WJiy do you pro- Perchk promettetCy 

mise, if you can- se non potete 

not keep your mantener la pa^ 

word ? rola. 

I did not expect so Non mi aspettavo 

much work, and tanto lavoro , e 



a24 

other people will gli altri vogliono 

be served as well esser serviti 

as you. egualmente che 

y.s. 

My money is as good // mio danaro val 
as theirs. quanta il loro. 

Sir, you shall have y. S. I' avra do- 
i t to-morrow. mani. 

Shall I have it L' a\}rb senza faU 
without fail ? U ? 

I pass my word for Le do parola. 
it. 

Bring your bill to- Domani portate il 
morrow , aad I vostro conto , e 
shall pay you. i^i pagherb. 



22J 

A SELECT COLLECTION. 

OF 

Jests^ Pleasing Stories, Bon Mots, ec. 



I.U. 



Ecclesiastico essendo stato 
privato del suo uffizio sotto il regno di 
Giacomo 11.^ a motivo di non -confor- 
mity^ disse, che ci6 avrebbe costato la 
vita a molte eentinaja di persone. Mol- 
tissimi credettero ch' egli volesse farsi 
promotore d una sedizione : IVIa essendo 
stato interrogate trovarono^ che egli in- 
tendeva di dire, che avrebbe esercitalo 
la medicina. 

IL Essendo stato riferito ad Enri- 
co IV. re di Francia , che un famoso 
medico protestante, aveva abbandonalo 
la sua religione , ed^ abbracciata la ro- 
mana, si volt6 al duca di Sully, che tro- 
vavasi allora in sua conipagnia, e gli 
disse : E bene. Sully, che pensate voi 
della vostra religione; ora ch'ella h ab- 
bandonata da' medici. 

III. Un^ Pirata essendo interrogate da 
Alessandro il Grande, con qual diritto 
egli infestasse i mari, rispose ardifa- 
menle fp con quel dirilto nicdesinio, che 
tu infesti il mondu tutlo : con questa 



226 

sola differenza, che lo, perchfe lo fo con 
un picciol bastimento, sono chiamato 
ladro, tu, perche lo fai con una graa- 
de armata, sex chianrialo Imperatore. »> 

IV. Un belio Spirito Italiano, a cui 
era stata accordata una grazia, ma tar- 
di , e dopo molte preghiere, disse : v 
N on vi maraviglia.te^ se non mi diffondo 
in ringraziameatl, ho impiegato tutte 
le uiie forze a chiedere, non me oe re- 
stano piu per ringraziare. » 

V. Un contadino passando sul ponte 
nuovo di Parigi, ed osservando fra molte 
bottegbe piene di mercanzie^ quella d'ua 
cambista, nelia quale eravi soltanto ua 
uomo^ e Ma tavolino con carta, e cala- 
inajo, voile entrar dentro per-curiosita 
e domand& che cosa vendevasi (i). » 
Delle teste d'asino » rispose il carabi- 
sta ff Bisognn, soggiunse il contadino , 
che abbiano un grande spaccio, percb^ 
non vi h rimasta che la vostra. 99 

VI. Giacomo IL, quando era duca di 
York, voile fare una vi^^ita a Milton uui- 
camente per curiosila. Nel corso della 
loT (2) conversazione il Duca disse a 
Milton, ch'egli credeva, che la perdita 

(i) F'cndet^asi for vi si vende*'a Th'ji pBrtiele si 
answers to the French on, as I observed, p. 124 < 
and in this case a Frenchman would say onysfta- 
' doit^ was sold, 
(a) Lor for loro. 



327 

della sua irista fosse^ua castigo del Cie- 
lo per aver egli scritto^ contro Carlo 
Primo suo padre. U immortale poeta 
diede la seguente risposta ; » Se vostra' 
Altezza crede che le disgrazie lequali ac* 
cadono guagglii siano contrassegni della 
collera celeste, cbe dovrassi (i) pensare 
del fatal destino di vostro padre ? la 
qiiesto caso il dispiacer del Cielo debb' 
essere &tato maggiore contro di lui, che 
contro di me. lo bo solamente perduto 
gli occhi, egli perd^ la testa. 9f 

VII. Alentre un contadino andava se- 
xninando (2) il suo campo, un giovanot* 
lo pa^sando vicino , e voiendo far lo 
spiritoso, gli disse d^un aria piuttosto in- 
soiente : Biion nomo, a voi sta il semi« 
nare, a noi il raccogliere i frutti delle 
vostre fatiche ; a cui il contadino ri- 
spose j egli h mollo probabile, Signore^ 
poich& vo seminando canapa. 

VIII. Un medico vantandosi della sua 
gran perizia nella roedjcina, e dicendo 
<ihe niai non aveva sentito lagnanza al- 
cuna da suoi malati : non ne ho dubbio 
nessuno, rispose una persona presente, 
poich^ gli sbagli de'medici sono gene< 

(i) Dovraai for $i dovrh^ See p. ^5. and ^6. 

(2) AndavhteminandoyWierBWy^ went on sou fng^ 
nnd answers to the Englih expression, IVat 
sowing See p. ii3. 



2:^8 
ralujeate sepolti iDsieme co' loro malati. 

IX. Ua uomo di spirito iosultato da 
ua gentiluomo ignorante, che coDtinua- 
njenle vantavasi della sua nobilta, gli 
dis5e : Signore, io credo la vostra ge- 
uealogia assai piii antica che oon (i) 
CI edele voi stesso : Direi ch' elia fosse 
prima d'Adauio. Per qual lagione? ri- 
spoi^ il geuliluomo. La ragione si hy 
cbe voi discendete da uaa bestia^ e le 
bestie soiio stale create prima d'Adamo. * 

X. Un certo giudice iacontrando un 
ecciesiastico sopra un belli&simo cavallo 
txa Loadra e Haaipstead> disse ad al- 
cuai Sigaori che erano con Uii: Vedete 
voi che bel cavallo ha quel prete ? Vo- 
glio scberzare un poco. Dottore, diss^egli 
accostandosegli, voi non seguite Tesem^ 
pio del vostro gran maestro, che umil- 
nieute contenlavasi di andar sopra un 
asiuo. In verila, rispose il prete, questa 
era la mia intenzione, ma ultimamente 
tanti asini sono stati fatti giudici, che 
un povero prete, anche volendo, pu6 dif- 
ficilniente trovarne uno per cavalcarlo. 

XI. Sisto V. mentre era Cardinale 
fingeva d' essere estenuato dagli anni, 
e dalle infermita e andava eccessiva- 
menle curvo , credendo che questo 

\ 

O) Sec p. 145. 



229 

potess'essere an mezzo probabile al suo 
innalzameoto al Pontificato. Fu appena 
elctto Papa, che cominci6 a camminare 
assai piii diritto di quello che (i) non 
avea (2) fatlo per lo innanzi. Un tal 
cangianiento fu osservato da tutti^ ed 
alcuQo fu si ardito per domandargliene 
la cagione : v Cercavo ^ diss'egli, le 
cbiavi di San Pietro^ ora che le ho tro- 
vate noD ho piu bisogno d'abbassarmi. 

XII. Una Signora soslenendo in una 
conversazione , ch' ella avea solamente 
trent' anni, e parendo che alcuni ne du« 
bitassero, si voll6 a un Signore, che le 
sedeva vicino, e lb preg6 a dime il suo 
aentimento. Cngino, diss' ella , credete 
voi, che io abbia ragione^ o no, quando 
dico che ho solamente trent' anni ? 6i« 
aogna certamente, che ci6 sia vero^ ri- 
spose egli , perch6 sono piii di dieci 
anni, che costantemeote lo dite« 

XIII. Mentre il duca d'Orleaos mette- 
▼a tulto in opera per procacciarsi la 
Re^genza ad onta del testa men to di 
Luigi XIV. il duca di Maine a cui questo 
testamento era cotanto favorevole ^ si 
occupava a tradurre V Anti Lucrezio. La 
Duchessa sua moglie gli disse un 4;ior- 

(0 Di qurllo che^ than, 
(a) ^♦"•fl for nffva. 

11 * 



no : 99 Signore qualche mattlna nello 
svegliarvi troverete che voi siete deir 
Accadernia, € che il Signor D'Orleans 
ha la Reggenza. 

XIV. L^Abate di Vertot non si dava 
serapre la pena di consultar le memo- 
rie, che gli erano spedite. Dovendo una 
volta descrivere ua famoso assedio, e le 
niemorie ch^egli aspettava, avendo tar- 
da to^ scrisse la storia deirassedio parte 
da ci6 che ne (i) sapeva, parte da ci5 
che lie immaginava ^ fiaalmente le me* 
xnorie arrivarono ; me ne displace , 
di«s'egli, ma il mio assedio k fatto. 

XV. Ua Predicatore avea grandemen- 
te annojato tutta Tudienza (2) col pre- 
dicar le beatitudini. Una Signora gli 
disse dopo la predica : » Padre, voi ne 
avete dimeaiicato una. » Quale ? » ri- 
spose il Predicatore. » Questa, soggiun- 
se la dama : Beati coloro, che non era- 
no alia vostra predica. j> 

XVI. Menage celebre scrittor france- 
se teneva una mano di Madarna di S. 
fra le sue. Quando V ebbe lasciata, 
Mr. PelleUier gli disse : v Eoco la piu 
beir opera che mai sia uscita dalle vo-' 
sire mani. v 

(i) Ne 18 a relative particle, and stands here 
for the ptronoun of the genitive case, viz. of it. 
See p. y6. 



e p. y[ 
(2) C, 



(il contracted from coit i7« 



201 

iSVII. Ua Veneziano, che non era 
roai uscito di Venezia^ e consegueote- 
mente non doveva esser il miglior ea- 
valiere del mondo, avendo per la prima 
volla montato un cavallo restio, che, per 
quanto egPi adoprasse gli sproni , non 
poteva far andare avanti, cavb di tasca 
il fazzoletto ; Tespose al vento, e disse: « 
Ora non mi maraviglio piu, se il ca* 
vallo non va avanti : II veulo k conlra-* 
rio. 99 

XVIII. II Signor di Batru essendo sta* 
to spedito in Ispagna (i) and6 ail'Escu«> 
riale, dove vide la libreria, e parlando 
col bibliotecario s' accorse cb' era un 
uonio di pochiHsima dottrina. Dopo si 
porl6 dal (2) Re^ e lo compliment6 su 
le bellezze di quel reale palazzo, e su 
la scelta , che aveva fatta del suo bi- 
bliotecario. Gli disse aver osservato , 
cb' egli era un uomo assai rare , e che 
S. M. avrebbe dovuto farlo soprinlen- 
dente delle finanze* £ perch^ ? gli do- 
mand(!» il Re : Percbe, rispose Batru^ 
noQ avendo egli preso cosa alcuna 
da' vostri libri, m' immagino che non 
prenderebbe niente dalle vostre finanze. 
XIX. Michel Angelo nel quadro del 

(1) Ispagna iaitead of Spagna, See p. 34. oot. 3 
(9) Dai for al, to the. 



2^2 

Giudizio universale , che trovasi nella 
cappella del Papa, fra le altre figure 
rappreseDtate neirinferno vi avea messo 
un certo Cardinale, che non era de'suoi 
amici,^ e I'avea dipinto si al naturale 
che ogDuno agevolmente il riconosceva* 
II Cardin*^le se ne trov6 aSrontato e 
ando dal Papa a domandar giustizia 
deir affronto. Pretendeva che la sua fi- 
gura fosse immediatainente tolta via dal 
quadro. Ma il Papa, gli rispose. f> Vol 
sapete fin dove giunge il mio potere^ 
possa liberar dal purgatorio, ma non 
dair Inferno. » 

XX. Quelli che danno delle commis* 
sioni dovrebbero senkpre cominciar dal 
dare il danaro necessario per eseguirle. 
Un Curato italiano chiamato il Piovano 
Arlotto fece intender cio in una ma- 
niera bel)is$ima ad alcuni de^ suoi ami- 
ci, che caricato i' avevano (i) di com- 
missioni neirimbarcarsi ch'egli fece (2) 
per Napoli. <]iiascuno gli diede una pic- 
cola memoria in carta, ed uno sola- 
menle vi aggiunse il danaro richiesto 
per comprare quanto desid§rava. 11 Cu- 
aato impieg6 il danaro dell^ amico con- 

,(1) Caricat9V avevano for V avevano caricato, 
(a) Nell* imharcarsi ch* egli fece^ an Italianism 
,vrhich cannot be literally translated into English, 
and means when he embarked. 



233 
forme alia memoria* datagli, e per gli 
altri noa coinpr& coaa veruoa. Al suo 
ritorno tuiti andarono a trovarlo spe- 
rando ch' egli avesse recato quanto gli 
ayevano ordinato : Signori, disse loro il ^ 
Piovaoo, ioibarcato cbe (i) io fni, di« 
•tribuii le vostre memorie sol ponle 
delta nave, af&ne (2) di esaminarie, 
quandd improvvisamenle levossi (3) 
un vento, cbe le getto nel mare, e 
Don ho potuto ricordarmi di quelle 
ch' ease contenevano $ ma voi avete 
pur (4) portaio delle stoffe a uo tale, 
disse uno di loro ^ i^erissimo, sog* 
giunse il Piovano , ma egU aveva in- 
▼iluppato nella sua memoria dei ducati, 
il peso de' quali impedi al vento di 
portarla via insieme colle vostre ch'era- 
no leggiere, ed ecco perch^ me ne 
sono ricordato. 

XX i. Un giovine dopo esse re stato 
per qualche tempo alia scaola del filo" 
sofo Zenone ritorn^ alia casa pater* 
na : tf £ bene, gli disse suo padre, che 



^i) Che in thii place means %¥hen, 

(3) AfJiHt compounded of a and fint^ fe iht 
end 

(5) Levoisi for si levd ,* 

(4) Pure or pur if often osed withouc any par^ 
ticuUr s'^finidcauoa^ and it only adds strength to 
Che sentence. 



ai34 
hai lu imparato da quel filosofo ? » Vox 
lo saprete presto, ^ rispose il giovine , 
e tacque. » II padre sdegfiato, pel (i) 
suo sileuzio , e prendeadolo per una 
lacita coufessione del poco frutto, cJie 
aveva ricavato dalla filosofia ; v disgrazia- 
tOj gli disse, tu hai duoque perduto, 
il tempo ? Duaque ho fatto invaoo taa- 
te spese per la tua educazione ? Nel 
medesimo tempo comincio a batterlo 
fieraniente. 11 giovine sopporto con ras- 
segoazione un trattamento «osi crude- 
le, e quando la collera di suo padre 
tu calaiata : n Ecco, gli disse pacifica- 
njente, ecco quel che ho iofiparato 
alia scuola di Zenone : Ho imparato 
a soflTrir pazientemente la collera , e 
i cattivi trattamenti di mio padre. f> 

XXII. Una donna ricorse una volta 
per una sua lite a Filippo re di Ma- 
cedonia in tempo che era ubbriaco , 
e mezzo addormetitato dal vino. Es- 
6endo stata da lui ingiustamente con- 
daonata, disse che voleva assolutameute 
appellarsi ; ed a chi ? rispose il re griin- 
demente sdegnato. Da Filippo ebrio , 
e sonnolento , soggiunse la donna, a 
Filippo sobrio, e svegliato. 

XXIII. Fra tatte le nazioni gli Spa- 

(i) Pel cantracted frond per iL 



235 

gooli son qaelli, cbe hanno piu no- 
aii degH altri. Un povero Spaf^aolo, 
il quale aon aveva per rompagno che 
un pessiaio Rosinante arriv6 a un pic- 
col villaggio di Francia y dove eravi 
soUanto un albergo. Era gi& passala 
la mezza notte^ e piovcva si dirotla« 
mcnle , che il povero Spagnolo era 
bagnato tutto siuo alia pelle. Avendo 
picchiato alia porta , V oste &' alz5 e 
cloniand5 chi era. Lo Spagnolo rt- 
spose, Don Sanchez^ Alfonso^ Rami* 
rezj FranciscOy Domingo de Roxasj 
y de Fuentes. U oste, che aveva ua 
sol letto d' avanzoy gli disse in colle< 
ra , che non poteva alloggiar taota 
genie, e se ne (i) torn6 a letto. 

XXIV. Un tamburino inglese essen* 
do stato fatto prigioniero in tempo 
delle guerre di Marlborough , ed es- 
sendo uo uomo ben fatto, e di belVa- 
spetto si guadagn5 V attenzione del 
Comandante francese ; il quale y fra le 
allre cose , gli domand& se sapeva be* 
ne il suo dovere , a cui il tamburino 
rispose di si. Allora V uffiziale gli fe* 
ce recare un tamburo , e gli ordin& 
di battere diverse marcie francesl ed 



(j) Se ne tomb ; here se ne it en expletire, 
«od it only meaoi tornd^ ntumed. See p. i44* 



3i36 

iiiglesi , lo che (i) eaegui con gran- 
dissima destrezza ed ability. Finamiea- 
te r uffiziale gli comand6 di batler 
la ritirata. w La prego di scusarmi^ Si- 
gDore, disse il tamburino , percb^ que- 
sta noa mi e mai stata insegnata in 
loghilterra. n 

XXV. Un giovine di distinziode es- 
sendo appunto ritornato dal fare il gi- 
ro deir Europa e serveodosi del prU 
vilegio de' viaggiatori d^ abbellir le cose 
co' fiori deir iavenzione, raccontava ua 
giorno ad un uffiziale i magnifici re- 
gaii , cbe avea ricevuto da diversi 
principi sovrani ; menzion6 fra gli a1* 
tri una superbissima briglia regalatagli 
dal re di Francia. 9f Ella h si elegan- 
temente ornata di pietre preziose^ diss' 
egli, che non posso indurmi a metier- 
la nella bocca del mio cavallo ; che 
debbo dunque fame 7 v Metterla nella 
vostra , rispose Y uffiziale con cui il 
viaggiatore parlava. 

XXVI. Voltaire avendo composto una 
mordace satira contro un nobile fran- 
cese, questi (2) incontrandolq di notte 
in una strada remota , gli diede per 



(1) Aooording to graminatical rules it ought to 
be il cAe, bat our best aathors oftener use ?0 cht- 

(2) Qu9$ti the feme at <iu€tio. See p. 93. 



i37 
vendetta, de' fierissimi colpi di canaa, 
11 poeta corse immediatamente dal 
duca D' Orleaas, fili disse cbe era sta- 
te maltrattato dal nobile,. e che do- 
mandava giustizia. v Siguore , gli ri- 
spose il duca, coq un significante sor- 
riso 9f essa vi h gih stata fatta. v 

XXVII. Qiiando il rnaresciallo ' De 
la Ferl^ fece il suo ingresso in Metz^ 
gli Ebrei, che vi soao tollerati, anda- 
rono a complimeDtarlo egualaiente cbe 
gli allri abitanti della citta. Quando 
egli seppe ch' erano neir anticamera : v 
Non voglio ricevere , diss' egli , questi 
bricconi, son que' (i) medesiixii , che 
fecer (2) morir Gesu Crislo, nou li 
lasciate entrare. » Fu dunque detto 
loro , che non era permesso di par- 
lare al * maresciallo. Essi risposero^ » 
che n' erano estremameute rammarioa* 
ti^ e che gli avevano portato in dono 
4000 doppie. » II Signor De la Forte 
ne fu subilo informato. 9f E bene , 
diss egli, lasciateli entrare, i poveri dia* 
voli non sapcvano chi egli era quan- 
do lo crocifissero. n 

XXVIII. Enrico VIII, re d' Inghil- 



(1) Que* for quilU^ those, 
(3) Fecer ior Jecero, from the trregalar verb 
fore. 



238 
terra , e Francesco I , re di Francia , 
erano due principi d' ua temperamen 
lo molto coUerico. Enrico avendo de- 
terminato di mandare a Francesco una 
dispeltosa e pungente arabasciata , scel- 
se a tale eflfelto Tommaso Moro , suo 
cancelliere. Tommaso avendo ricevuto 
]e instruzioni , disse ad Earico^ ch'egh 
temeva mollo, che il recare una tal 
ambasciata ad un uomo cosi violento 
come Francesco gli avrebbe costato la 
testa. » Non temete , gli disse il re , 
86 Francesco vi fa tagliare la testa 
io la far& tagliare a tutti i Francesi 
che sono in mio potere. 99 Sono in- 
finitamente obbligato a V. M., repli- 
ed il faceto cancelliere, ma non so se 
alcune delle loro teste potr^ adattarsi 
a queste spalle cosi bene come la 
xnia. » 

XXIX. Un Signore cenando a un'oste- 
ria in una piccola ciltli , quando fu 
sparecchialo , Toste gli domando come 
gU era piaciuta la cena. Moitissimo, 
rispose quel Signore, posso dire d' aver 
cenato bene al par (1) di qualunque 
grau personaggio del regno, Eccettua- 
io il Signor Governatore^ disse Toste : 
lo non eccettuo nessuno, rispose egli ;' 

(i) ^/ par for al pari, a$ well, • 



ma voi dovete serapre ecceltuare ilSignor 
Governatore, replic6 V oste ; ma io non 
voglio , soggiunse il genliluomo. In 
breve , la loro disputa si accese tal- 
mente, che 1' oste, il quale era un ma*- 
gistrato subalterno^ ma non per6 simile, 
a Solone, o a Licurgo, fece chiamare il 
genliluomo davanti al governatore. Que- 
sto magislrato , la cui capacity (i) era 
in perfetlo equilibrio con quella delFo- 
8te, disse con aria grave al genliluomo, 
che Teccelluare il signor governatore in 
ogni cosa , era in quella citta un inve-' 
teratissimo costume, e che a tal costu- 
me era obbligato ciascuno d'uniformar^ 
si , e perci6 lo condannavii aU'emenda 
d'uno scellino per anrer ricusato di far- 
lo. Benissimo , rispose il genliluomo , - 
ecco uno scellino, ma possa io morire 
se v' h nel mondo un piii gran pazzo' 
deir oste eccettuato il signor goveV'- 
natore. 

XXX. Una moglie mallrattando un 
giorno il marlto per la sua disposition 
mercenaria, ed interessala, gli disse, fra 
le altre espressioni oltraggiose. » Se io 
morissi, credo che voi sposereste la figlia 
primogenita del diavolo, purch^ vi fosse 

(i) La cui capacith (at la di eui capacith^ ort 
la capacith di eui^ whote capacity. See p. los. 



da guadagoar qualche coaa da nn tal 
matrimonio. » n Forse lo £sirei, rispose 
il marito, ma voi sapete^.mia cara^ che 
Qon si possono sposar due sorelle. v 

XXXI. II senato romano avendo scel- 
to ire ambasciatori da mandare a Bill- 
nia^ uno de' quali era tormentato dalla 
gotta, r altro dal mal di testa^ e il ter- 
zo era d'un natural tlniidissimo, Gatone 
il vecchio disse ridendo^ v che avevano 
acelto un' ambasceria senza piedi^ senza 
testa e senza cuore. << 

XXXII. Quando il Papa Innocenzo 
IV, scomunic5 Timperator Federigo II, 
comand6 che la sentenza fosse'letta in 
tutte le chiese della cristianit^. Un cer* 
to curato di Parigi dovendo leggerla 
nella sua cbiesa parlo af suoi parroc- 
chiani nella seguente maniera : , Udite, 
miei cari ! mi vien (i) comandato di 
pronunziar la solemie sentenza di sco- 
munica contro Timperator Federico coa 
le caodele spente, e col soono delle 
campane. lo certamente non ne so il 
motivo ; so bensi ch'eravi un odio gran- 
dissimo tra '1 (2) papa, e lui ; so inoltre, 
che uno de' due ha ragione , ma quale 



(i) Mi vien comandato, F'iene standf ia this 
place for ^, it is. 
(a) Tra 'I (or tra il See p. lyi. 



>4» 

sia di loro nol so (t). Oade^ per quan- 
to (2) a'eslende il mio polere^ scomunico 
uno dei due, cio^ quello che ha torto^ 
ed asaolvo quello che haragione. L'im- 
peratore avendolo aaputo a)and6 al cu- 
rato un bellisaimo regalo, ma il papa 
lo puni severaitiente. 

XXXIII II medesiino papa parlando 
un giorno con San (3) Tommaso d'Aqui- 
no, e aveodo aul iavolino una gran som- 
ma di danaro, n vedete 9f gli disse con 
un sorriso ff ora h passato quel tempo, 
quando la chiesa poteva dire io non ho 
n^ argento, n^ oro. n Veriasimo, Santo 
Padre » replic& il Santo v ma non pu& ella 
neppur (4) dire airinfermo, e alio zop- 
po : n » sorgi , prendi il tuo letto , e 
cammina* n 

XXXIV. Un gentiluomo entr& in un 
caff(^, e domanoo un bicchier d' acqua- 
Tite adducendo per ragione, che aveva 
molto freddo. Poco dopo entr6 un al- 
tro, e diase, portatemi un bicchier d' ac- 
quavite, perch^ ho un grandissimo cal- 
do ; Maledette le vdatre sense, disse un 

terzo , che avera aacoltato ambedue, 

/ 

(1) Not t0 for n0n lo so^ 1 do not know /^ 
( j) Per quanio^ at far* 

(3) San for Santo Sed p. iy3, 

(4) Neppur oompoaodcd of ni tad pun^ not 
even* 



24a 
non potete voi soddisfare alle vostrc 
brame senza far insulto all' iDlendimen- 
to di chi (i) v'ascolta ? Presto, garzone, 
portatemi un bicchier d'acqaavite, per- 
ch^ essa mi place. 

XXXV. Due marinari, uno Irlandese, 
e Taltro Inglese, convennero di prender 
reciprocameiite cura Tuno deiraltro ia 
caso che uno di loro rimanesse ferito 
in un azione ^ ch' era appunto per co- 
minciare. Non pa$s6 oioUo tempo che 
una pdlla di cannone porl6 via una 
garaba air inglese ; egli chiam6 imme-. 
diatamente I'lrlandese e pregollo, secon- 
do i patti^ di portarlo dal cerusico, nel 
che egli prontamente compiacquclo: ma 
s' ebbe egli appena recato sulle spalle 
il ferito compagno^ che venne un' altra 
palla^ e gU port& via la testa. U Irian* 
dese^ che, a cagion del gran rumore^ e 
scompiglio che suol regnare in un com- 
battimento navale, non si era accortb 
deirultima disgrazia del suo amico, con- 
tinuava il suo cammino per portarlo al 
cerusico. Un uffiziale osaervando cestui 
recando suite spalle un uom senza testa 
gli domand6 dove andava, » Dal cerusi- 
co> V disse Tlrlandese ; p dal cerusico, sci- 
munito, disse Tuffiziale, non vedi ch^egli 

(I) Di chi^ of those trfto, 



243 
ha pcrdnto la lesta ? » Voi sbagliate, ri- 
spose r[rIandese,non ha perduto che una 
gaiuba. Ci6 detto, lo po86 in coverta: lo 
guard6 , e vedendo che era realmente 
senza testa. Per Bacco ! esclam& egli 
sdegnato, percbi non mi hai detto alia 
prima che avevi perso anche la testa? 



244 

A COLLECTION 

O F 

ITALIAN LETTERS. 



LETTERA r. 

Martinelli al Sig. Conte di Flimouth^ 
ringraziandolo del dono d' una bel- 
lissima spada. 

ECGELLENZA, 

Lia preziosa spada, onde V. E* (i) si 
k compiaciuta farmi an regalo mi ob- 
bliga a farlene i miei piu umili ringra- 
ziamenti>i Questo cospicuo dono , che 
tanto decora la superficie di mia per- 
sona^ inarca ogni giorno le ciglia de*miei 
conoscenti al primo incontro, vedendo- 
m\ y foor (2) del niio solito , si ricca- 
mente spadato. Ma io che sono pur 
troppo informato quanto i1 mondo sia 
pieno di sinistri calcolatori^ acciocch^ al- 
cuno DOQ pensasse che mi fosse caduta 

(1) Onde for della quale^ See p. io3 F. E. for 
^ Voitra Eccellenza, 
(a) Fuor fotfuorii 



245 
qualche eredita ^ o avessi trovato qiial- 
che tesoro ^ o finalmenle svaliglala la 
guardaroba di qualcbe general d' armata^ 
corro tosto alia vera apologia , e dico 
che V« E. ti'k stata per sua mera beni- 
gnity il donatore. In sotnraa clla mi 
ha coir onore di qnesto done istallato 
8U0 cavaliere, e mi dichiaro da era in- 
nanzi suo fedelissimo campione, prepa- 
rato a battermi per lei con chiunque , 
Tenendo Toccaaione^ che il Cielo non 
voglia , fino air ultimo sangue , e £Bir 
vedere. 

■ Che F antico valore 

NegV Italici cor non & ancor motto. 

(Petr.) 

Per questo, e per tanti altri favori che 
' la sua generositJl mi ha dispensati noa 
ho avuta per anco la sorte di contri- 
buire cosa alcana^ onde rendermene in 
qualche parte meritevole : Supplico dun- 
que V. E. di non lasciarmi lungamente 
con €|uesto rossore, somministrandomi 
occasioni di esercitar la mia obbedienza 
in di lei servizio, e farle v edere ch' io 
sono quale profondamente inchinando- 
mi mi do lonore di protestarmi, etc. 



la 



a46 

L E T T E R A 11. 

11 medcsimo al Signor Angela 
Malei^oUi. 

Cob mio sommo cordoglio seDlii la 
disgrazia accadutavi uell' ammaestrar 
quel (j) voslro cavallo danese ^ ed ora 
sofmnainenle mi rallegro nel sentire 
cbe siete affatto fiior di pericolo. E cer- 
to che la profession di cavallerizzo h una 
delle pill pericolose y ma quale h piu 
pericolosa di quella della guerra ? Ep- 
pure (a) tanti gran Signori, tanti Prin- 
ciple taati Re vi (3) si comraeHono al* 
legrameote malgrado gli esempj di tan- 
te migliaja di persone che contiauamen- 
te vi periscoQo. Ho sentito piii d' uno 
che iideudo il yostro infortunio vi ha 
dato gran biasimo d' esercitar un me- 
sliere tanto pericoloso qual h qiiello di 
joietter giudizio alle bestie i a qaesti 
tali ho risposto coU' apologo d' un mu-* 
ratore. » Uu muratore interrogate da 
un gentiluomo , che mestiere faceva il 
suo avo , e come morlf rispose che £ei« 
ceva il muratore ^ ed era morto caden* 

(0 Quel for quillo. 
(3) Eppure compoanded of e and pure. 
(3) Vi it a relative particle referred to Gutrru 
and in this place it means to »X 



247 
do da un tetto. Continue il gcntiluonio 
a domandargli di suo padre, e la riipo- 
sta fu presso a poco la stessa. E bene, 
repHc6 allora il gentiluomo, escmpj cosl 
fuoesti di casa vostra non bastano a 
£irvi cercare altri mezzi per gaadagnar- 
Ti il pane aenza eaporvi a an continuo 
pericolo di rompervi il coUo ? a ci& il 
muratore rispoae : Signore , come morl 
il vostro aye ? Nel auo letto, replied U 
gentiluomo : e vostro padre ? medeaima- 
mente nel soo letto » diase il Signore : 
e bene, disie il muratore, voi cbe pre- 
tendete esser tanto piil pnidente di me 
dopo questi eaempj a?ete V imprufdenza 
d'andare a letto ? i^ Orsii ho piaeere cbe 
•tiate bene , e deaidero ehe siate piii 
cauto in arvenire, prima perch^ Dio ci 
▼uol diligent! custodi di qnelta vita.. 
ch' egli CI ha data , e poi pereb* avcte 
-!«•»' Angiotino della »-^^f», bellissima 
moglia, cKw vt ama tanto, e quel vostro 
bambiqo che pare uii Cnptdo in fasce, 
i quali abbisognano, che voi viviate gli 
anni di Matnsalemme ; Finalmente per« 
ch& avete un numero tanto grande d'ami* 
ci, cbe riguardano la vostra vita come 
cosa per loro molto preziosa. Fra que* 
ati Vi prego di darmi principatissimo 
luogo^ e di credere cbe niuno prende 
piil intcresse di me a tulto quelle cbe 



248 
▼i appartiene. Resto intanto pieno di 
stima, e di cordiale amicizia. 

LETTERA HI. 

Alessandro Fabri a Gian Pietro (i) 
Zanoiii a Bologna. 

O Voi «ete morto, o per noi atmeno 
non siete piii vivo ; altrimeati voi avre- 
ate alia mia, che qua v' invitava, o cor- 
risposto, o risposto. Ma la nostra com- 
pagnia non vi dee (a) per avventura 
esser piacevole come qualche altra in 
Bologna. Paziensa I lo non voglio per 
questo rimanermi dal farvi ua secondo 
invito, seguane che pu6, Viene lo ster- 
zo a Bologna stasera (3) ; e lanedi o 
martedi sarli di ritorno a noi. Volete 
▼01 t^lervi dell' occasione o n& ? Risol- 
vete. Maara^si vi sollecita, Ghedini vi 
prega^ io vi acongiuro, v«a»; «' aspeitia- 
jno. Addio. Salutate i vostri^ e partico- 
larmente Franceschino. 



(i) Aft iHreviitMA of Giovanni Pietro 
. («) Dee third, perfon •inijaUr of the present 
tenae of the iodicative mood of the rerb Dovem^ 
We likewifc ny deve, dehbe, aoA io poetry de\ 

13) Sterzo, a kind of carnage. Stasera com- 
poonded of $ta a eoatractioft from queHa end sera. 



^9 
LETTER A IV. 

U Abate Metastasio al Cavaliere 
Adami. 

Non mi trattengo molto neir eccessi- 
ye espressioni di sUma delle quali Y. 
S. Ulma. (i) mi onora per risparmiare 
a me stesso la faticosa difesa da un 
Tiolento aaaalto di yaniU che potrebbe 
insidiosamente sedurmi aulorizzata da 
lei. Son coofiiso del sao yantaggioso 
giudizio^ ma non intraprendo di disin- 

Sannarla, temendo di scuotere il fon- 
amento deiramicizia, ch^ella m'ofire^ 
e ch'io vorrei meritare. 

Ho letto^ riletto, e sempre giusta- 
mente ammirato i sonetti^ che a V. S. 
Illma. h piaciuto comunicarmi. 

Ho trovato in tutti robuslezza, e no* 
bilU di stile, profonditi di dottrina, vi* 
TaciU di fantasia, e finalmente queiru* 
nitjk 9 propoTzione o corrispondenza di 
parti, che distingue in Parnaso gli al^i* 
tanti da' passeggieri* Comecchi di tutti 
io sia contento, i Sonettt della Provi- 
denza, ec. mi hanno pi£i efficacemente 
' scosso* Ove a lei piaccia di farmene 
parte^ mi saran sempre care le colte 

(t) f^o$sif;noria Iitustrif$ima» 



25o 
sue produzioni, se vorra accompagnar- 
le con alcuo suo comando^ secoadera 
VimpazleazsL, ch' elU m' ha inspirata di 
Gonvincerla della dovuta slima con la 
quale io sono^ etc. 

LETTERA V. 

Antonio Perrigo alia Signora 
Angiola Gozzi. 

Vol mi domaodate quel ch'io fo ia 
Ferrara. Ohimd, Angioletta, quanto mi 
spiace esser privo della dolce compaguia 
▼ostra I lutaato che voi siete forse af- 
faccendatissima nel porre a profitto gli 
uUimi giorni del Carnovale, notando le 
varie pazzie delle varie maschere che 
5^ aggirano senza un buon percb^ nella 
piazza di San Marco, io me ne sto (i) 
le ore e le ore a sedere vicino al fuo- 
co, e in una positura cosi maninconosa^ 
e meditativa^ che un pittore obbligato a 
fare il ritratto d' un povero cappuccino, 
che pensi alia morte, o a farsi eleggere 
provinciale dell' ordine, non Io dipinge* 
rebbc in altra attiludine. Uaff*are che 
m'ha condotto qui non sar^ spedito con 

(i) Mt ne ito. Ate ne in this place ii mereljr 
eropbatical, and starsene^ andarsene^ tornarsene^ 
etc. oaly mean stare^ andare^ tornare^ etc. 



25l 

quella prestezza ch'io mi prometteva, 
perchi questo Cardinal Legato Don ha 
per anco ricevute le risposte, che do- 
vevano venir di Roina 5 e non sa dirmi 
quando verranno. Se tardano ancor due 
setlimane^ io 5ono riaoluto di tornarme- 
ne a Venezia : vale a dire, di tornar- 
mene a voi ^ percb^ senza di yoi la vita 
lui riesce, non dir6 insipida^ ma grave. 
Qui non conosco persona ; qui non ho 
che fare. Al peggio de* peggi torner6 
poi qui fra due mesi^ e cosl fuggird 
il pericolo di morirmi della noja^che non 
pu& non abitare in ogni luogo dove non 
sia la uua soavc Angioletta. Scrivetemi, 
e stale Sana. 

LETT ERA VL 

Paolo Donzelli a Gianfrancesco 
Cigna. 

Duoimi sentire che voi non abbiate 
potato otlenere quel Segretario che 
tanto desideravate. Ma che volete far« 
ci (1) ? Disperarvi ? N6 : che alia fin 
fine il perdere una cosa che non si ha, 
non h poi (2) un gran colpo. Tirate in- 



(i> a hero it a reTatire particle. 

i'i) Poi if oDiy an expletive, 8ee p. l6«. 



?52 

nanzi alia meglio^ come faccio aach'io; 
anzi come faoDO tijitti gli uomini veouti 
al mondo seoza prati e seoza campi; 
nh vi scordate mai^ cbe non v' h gran 
differeoza dal bene al male di questo 
IQondo. Adoperiamoci quaiito possiamo 
per oUenere quelle, che crediamo abbia 
ad addolcir I'amaro di questa vifa : ma 
quando i nostri sforzi riescoa vani, e i 
Dostri desiderj soao delusi, ricordiamoci 
come talora Tuomo brama questa e 
queiraltra cosa, la quale otlenuta vieae 
poi a recargli un qualche daono ina- 
•petlato, e non previsto. La bella occa- 
sione che vol mi avete data di far qui 
pompa d' ottima morale ! Voglio per6 
astenermene sapeudo che voi aiete di 
animo forte , e atto a portarvi (i) in 
pace ogni rovescio, ed ogoi traversla. 
Addio. 

LETTERA Vn. 

yittore yettori a Giammaria GaleoUi. 

Non t' abbandonare air affanno, Ga- 
leotti mio. Tu hai perduto uq amico in 
quel Carlo Cantonii che il simile nou 



(i) n in this place is merel/ an expletWe, 
Sm p. 1S4. 



a53 
troverai piCi, quantunque tu noti sia cbe 
sil cominciare della vita. Di quella sor- 
*te d^ uomini il mondo ne ha sempre 
aTuti pochi, avyenendo assai di rado, 
cfae tanta bdnliL si congiunga con tanta 
sapere iq un solo individuo : e Tessere^ 
come tu eri, distinto sopra tutti gli altri 
neiraffetto d'un tant'uomo, rende giu- 
sto e ragionevolissimo il dolor tuo. Tu 
dei nondimeno addolorarti con misura, 
non tanto perchi le lagrime tue not 
ti (i) renderanno, quanto percbeil cor« 
po tuo non si scomponga di nuovo^ che 
g\h bastaoo le febbri avute. Credi tu 
cbe a queUanima benedetta possa esser 
mai grato il vederti cosi oppresso 
AaW ambascia^ s'ella ti sta inirando di 
lassii, com' io credo fermamente cbe 
faccia ? Se tu vuoi piacergli da lode al 
Signor Die del suo avcrlo tratto a se ; 
e locatolo sur una di quelle sante sedi 
promesse a cbi dabbeoamente vive 
com' egli Tisse. Povero Sigcior Carlo ! 
Anzi, poveri noil Anzi povero io^ che 
passai con esso cinque interi lustri nella 
piii stretta intimity non alterata^ non di- 
mtnuita, non guasfa mai' un moroento 
da veruna diversit^i d'opinioni^ da gelo* 
sia di sorte alcuna I Dio ce i'aveva da« 

(0 Nol U for If on ie lo. 



254 . 

to, e Dio ce V ha tollo I Disg'mnzione 
amara^ dolorosa^ e crudele, Don v' ha 
dubbio 1 (i) Pure di qui a uu quarto 
d' ora ci ricongiungereuio con esso in 
Gielo, che la piii lunga vita non dura 
56 non UQ quarto d' ora, tanto passa via 
veloce. Richiama dunque al cuore tutte 
le forze tue^ Gal^otti mio^ e confortati 
coUa bellissima speranza^ che presto lo 
rivedrai) per istarti poi con esso in uns^ 
beatitudine incessante, e sempiterna. 
Statti (2) bene, e non mancare di tor- 
nare a me, e agli altri amici quest' altra 
settimana alia piii lunga. Addio, 

LETT ERA VIH. 

Xranganelli alVAbata Papi. 

Ecco dunque^ Signor Abate^ che il 
dottissimo Cardinal Querini se n'^ an* 
dato ad unir 1$ sua scienza con quella 
di Dio^ ed a saziarsi in quel torrente di 
lucO; che noi quaggiu non rimiriamo se 
non che (3) a traversa di folte nubi. 
II mio cuore gl" innalz;a un, moaumento 

(i) "Noi^ ¥* ha dfdibio for non r' i dubbio. Set 
p. ii3. 'I 

(2) Statti bene^ it only itieans stai bene. How 
erer staiti is more energetio. See p. 164* 

(3) Se non che^ but. 



255 
dentro me stesso tanto durevole quanto 
la mia vita. Aveva egli della bont^ per 
me : ma e per chi mai non ne avea (i) ? 
La sua cattedrale^ la sua dioceai^ Tlta- 
lia tutta banno sperimentato le sue li- 
beralita. Se i poeti sono suscettibili d'ami- 
cizia sar^ compianto dal Signer di Vol* 
taire. Si scrivevauo amicbevolmente tra 
lore : il genio va in traccia del genio* 
Quanto a me, cbe bo quello soltanto 
d' ammirare fili uomini grandi^ e di 
compiargene la perdita, vo spargendo 
le mie lagrime sulla tomba delPillustre 
nostro cardinale. Quando im^eniemus 
parent ? bo V onore d'essere. 

LETTERA IX. 

II medesimo alP Abate Frugonu 

lo son (2) rimasto maravigliato, cbe 
m'abbiate scelto in preferenza per man* 
darmi le vostre ultimo poesie^ mentre 
io non conosco I'arte poetica cbe per 
parlarne in una maniera superficiale, 
vale a dire^ sul gusto di quelli cbe non 
ne banno fatto il loro studio. Quesio 
per& non m' imped isce dair ammira- 



(1) Avea for aveva if rather poeticaL 
(ft) Son for iona. See p. i^s. 



^56 
re quanto voi date al pubblico, e di 
sentire il mio spirtto acceso alia lellura 
d' una bella poesia come la vostra. 
Bisogaerebbe easere insensibile alle bel- 
lezze della natura per noa easer colpiti 
dalle immagiai che i gran poett espoa- 
goao alia nostra viata. Ve ne aono, a 
cagion d' eaempio , nel Metastasio , e 
nelle opere vostre , Signor Abate ^ che 
acuoterebbero ranima la piu instupidita. 
Mi aoQ provato talvolta a comporre al- 
alcune piccole poesie campestri^ ma ne 
rimaaevo cosi poco contento^ che mi 
facevo UQ dovere di bruciarle a misara 
che le componevo. Avvien della poesia 
come de' buooi atrumenti , i quali non 
Toglion esser trattati che da mani mae- 
atre. Se tutte le vostre poesie son come 
quelle che m'avete mandate, applaudi- 
8C0 al genio che vi ha reso poeta. A 
Dorma de'vostri desiderj le comuniche- 
t6 al nostro comune amico, e son per- 
auaso che ne sar^ contento al par di 
ixie (i). Biso^na confessare che il paese 
abitato da ?oi (il Parmigiano) contribni- 
^ce molto ad eccitare Testro. Son passato 
piu volte per cotesto territorio col mag- 
gior piacere del mondo, e sentivo bene 
che se fossi stato reaJmente poeta , 

(i) Jl par di me for al pari di me^ a$ will as L 



avrei celebrato coteste belle pianure, 
cotesti pingui armenti , cbe ne for- 
mano V ornamento. Eccovi , carissimo 
Abate , pe' vostri bellisaimi versi una 
prosa moHo meschina , ma siccome 
UQ poeta qual voi aiete ha il dono d'ab- 
bellire ogni coaa, apero che renderete 
a voi steaso questa lettera grata^ e pia- 
cevole avendo riguardo alia atima ed 
amicisia con la quale io sono. 

LETTERA X. 

Tradotta dalle Lettere Persiane. 

Si dice che Tuomo h un animal socie- 
vole. Se ci& 6 veroynembra che i Fran- 
cesi aiano uomini piii degli altri^ e che 
possano cbiamarsi gli uomini per ec^- 
cellenza. Anzi bo osservato fra loro delle 
persone che non solamente sono socio- 
voli) ma che sono una society universa* 
le. Si moltiplicano in ogni angolo^ po« 
poland in un istante i quattro quartieri 
della citUi : cento uomini di queata sor- 
te fauno maggior comparsa di due mila 
cittadini. Potrebbero essi riparare agli 
occbi dello straniero il guasto cagionato 
dalla peste, o dalla carestia. Si diaputa 
nelte scuole se il medesimo corpo possa 
trovarsi nel medesimo tstante in diversi 



luogbi. Quest! tali sono una prova di 
ci6 che i filosofi propongoao come uo 
dubbio. Siccome si fanno ua debito di 
domandare a tutti quelli che incontra- 
no^ Dove vannoy dove sono static etc 
cosi sono sempre id una graadissima 
fretta. Niano potrebbe cavar loro di ca- 
po, ch' egli h ua dovere delle persone 
ben educate yisitar tutti ogni giorno iu 
particolare, oltre le visite generali 
ne' luoghi ove tutti radunansi 3 perchi 
questa essendo una via troppo breve h 
riputata un nulla nelle regole del lor 
ceremoniale. Fanno costoro assai piu 
danno alle porte col picchiarvi si spes- 
sOj che i venti, e le tempeste. Se si 
esaminassero le liste delle visite che 
sono scarabocchiate da^portinaj Svizzeri 
si troverebbero ogni giorno in un mi- 
gUajo d' esse i loro nonii storpiati in 
mille difFerenti maniere. Passano la loro 
intera vita in assistere a Funerali^ in 
ufficii di condoglianza, o in congratula- 
zioni di Matrimonj. II re non conferi- 
sce giammai una grazia ad alcuno de^suoi 
sudditi, che ad essi non costi la spesa 
d' una carrozza per andare a rallegrar- 
sene. Alia fine se ne tornano a casa ec- 
cessivamente stanchi e si riposano per 
riassumere il giorno seguente il niede- 
simo nojoso impiego* Si faceva Taltro 



250 

giorno il calcolo che udo di questi tali, 
aveva assUlito a 53o fuaerali : Si era 
rallegrato della nascita di %69o bambi* 
ni^ che le peasioni per le quali si era 
coDgratuIato co' suoi amici seinpre in 
termini di£fereati ascendevano a 2600000; 
che le storielle le quali egli aveva pron* 
te per raccontare nolle conversazioni 
non erano mono di 665^ che possedeva 
fin dalla sua gioventu 180, apote^mi 
raccolti dagli antichi , de' quali egli si 
serviva in alcune straordinarie occasioni* 
Sarebbe un non finire giammai il rac- 
contar quanto disse , e qoanto vide. 
Addio, 

LETTERA XI. 

Tradotta parimente dalle Lettere 
Persiane* 

Vi roando la copia d'una lettera^ che 
un Francese scrisse dalla Spagna ad un 
suo amico di quesla citl^> e credo, che 
proverete piacere net leggerla. In sei 
mesi di tempo ho scorso la Spagna, e 
)X FortogallO) ed bo vivuto fra un po- 
polo che disprezzando tutli gli altri fa 
solamente a'Francesi Tonore di odiarli. 
La gravity h il carattere priocipale di 
queste due nazioni, e palesasi partico- 



d6o 
larmente in dae maniere cioi con gli 
occhiali, e con le basette. Gli occhiali 
mostrano ad evidenza che chi li porta 
h un aom conaumato nelle scienze, e 
sepolto in una profonda lettura a segno 
d' arer grandemente pregiudicato alia 
sua vista, ed ogni naso che n'i omato, 
o, per dir meglio^ carico, pu6 passar 
sen^ contradizione veruna pel naso d'ua 
nomo dotto. Quanto alle basette , son 
esse cosi rispettabili che un famoso ge. 
neral portoghese nell' Indie Orientali 
avendo bisogno di danaro ne tagli6 una^ 
e mandft a chiedere agli abitanti di Goa 
2000 doppie sopra un ial pegno. Essi 
r accettarono prontamente, ed egli dopo 
qualche tempo onoratamente le riscosse. 
E facile a congetturarsi, che popoli cosi 

fravi, e flemmatici debbon esser super- 
i, e realmente lo sono. Persone di 
tanta conseguenza non lavorebbero per 
tutti i tesori del mondo, nh vorrebbero 
a cento alcuno con una vile industria 
meccanica esporre il loro onore^ ed il 
loro decoro 3 imperocch^ do?ete sapere 
che un uomo in Ispagna, il quale k 
proprietario d' una lunga spada , o ha 
imparato da suo padre V arte di strim- 
pellare una mal accordata cbitarra non 
lavora piii , il suo onore h intcressato 
pePriposo delle sue membra. Ci6 non 



26 r 
ostaote qiianlunqae questi niortali ne- 
inici della fatica &cciano mostra d^ una 
filosofica tranquilliU, non sono perft 
mai traoquilli nel loro cuore j perchi 
sono sempre innatnorati. Sono i primi 
uomini del 'mondo per langoire sotto la 
finestra delle lor belle ; e uno Spagnolo 
che Don %' abbia acquiatato un buon raf- 
freddore non pa6 paaaar per galante. 
Gli Spa^noli sono in oltre eatrema- 
mente bigotti. Amano tanto rinqoisi* 
zione che il privarneli aarebbe far loro 
un torto manifesto. lo vorrci aolamente 
atabilirne un' altra non per gli Eretici^ 
ma per gli Ereaiarchi, i quali attribui- 
acono ad alcune fratesche invenzioni la 
alessa efficacia che a' Sacramenti ^ e 
adoran quelle cose che unicamente do* 
Trebbero rispettare^ e in una parola so- 
no si eccessivamente divoti che possono 
appena chiamarsi cristiani. Puo darsi^ 
che vi sia dello spirito , e del buon 
aenso fra gli Spagnoli, ma non ne cer- 
cate ne' loro libri. Date un' occhiata 
alle loro librerie, non vedrete che ro- 
manzi da una parte, e teologi scolastici 
dair altra ; direste che aiano stati espres- 
aamente composti e raccolti da qualche 
Qemico segreto^ deir umana ragione. II 
solo buon libro che abbiano e quellb 
appunto che fu composlo per moslrare 



=rF 




a63 
^^' -r I del lor fava- 

^^ ('oidarai della 

^p^ ^ .lissinia conse- 

^^^ a pcro, luflgi, 

::!-::-. . cou me, a k 

«^ -r .J, che le ave- 

amenle spe- 

"^'^ - I o life pii nk 

^^ . eslo h il fa- 

ult' ncnte obbli- 

Tner. .. ^. ssij le rendo 

c 1- :.j^'giori. Ho 

TiHf*-itf.— ~. oe la Clelia 

HL- ' ■ i m media ta- 

roprio della 

r 

to 1 

a-_ »')clc: non ha 

Jk -_ , del Deme- 

1 S3-' • quella di- 

Tr- ... '^oaosciuto 5 

. (Icf^'ao parlo 

I^ ^ ' plena d'in- 

T *- * ^ o" parole 

Z, ij^'i (0 «ea- 

-/ . 5 que' moti 



» 



» iUelia, per 
' tlcsima for- 



svi 



iluppati ia 



7, See p. a63. 
. /(>//<, befure ma- 
vowel, See p. 96. 



262 

la ridicolezsa di tutti gVi altri. Hanno 
falto immease scoperte nel nuovo mon- 
do^ e QOQ conoscoao ancora il lor coa- 
tiQeate^ non hanno per anco scoperto 
quel che hanno su' loro fiami, e nelle 
lor fnontagnei luoghi a loro interamente 
ignoti. Dicono che il sole nasce^ e tra- 
moota nel loro paese^ ma pu6dirsi an- 
iiovsLy che nel fare un tal corso non ve- 
de che rovinate campagne, e terre de* 
serte* Addio. 

LETTER A XII. 

Giuseppe Parini al Conte Durazzo 

Rendo infinite ^razie all'Eccellenza 
Vostra non gia del libro che in' ha man-* 
dato, ch^ (i) un lihro h cosa di poco 
valore , ^ dappoichi la stampa trov6 il 
niodo di moltiplicarne il numero, ma 
bensl d'essersi ricordato di mandarme-- 
l0| mostrando cosi ch' io non le sia del 
tulto indifferente, nialgrado Tumilta del 
mio ^tato. II costume degli uomini di 
gran prosapia, locati in posti luminosi^ 
cari. air Imperatori^ e alle Imperatrici, 
accerchiati di continuo da un rapido 
vortice di grandi affari, ed assediati 

(i) Che for perchi^ because. 



a63 
sempre da gente studiosa del lor fava- 
re^ noa fu quasi mai di ricordarai della 
geate piccina, e di pochissioia conse- 
guenza. Vostra Eccellenza pero^ luogi, 
dairusarequesto costucne con me, s k 
ricordata di me e del libro, che le ave- 
vo chiesto, e me I'ha prontamente spe- 
dito, come se io foissi stato nh piii nh 
meao che ua pari sue. Queslo h il fa- 
yore di cui le aooo infinitamente obbli- 
gatOi e di cui, come g\k dissi, le rendo 
quelle grazie che po5so maggiori. Ho 
dunque ricevuto il libro, cioe la Clelia 
del Metastasio, e Tho letta immeaiata- 
menle, percli6 mi morivo proprio della 
voglia di leggerla. Questa sua Clelia, per 
vero dire, noa ha quella medesima for- 
za del Tito, e del Temislocle: oon ha 
quella sfolgorante bellezza del Deme- 
trio, e deir Achille, noa ha quella di- 
vioa grazia del Giuseppe riconosciuto ; 
pure aach^ essa si mostra de^no par(o 
della sua graa mente sempre piena d^ in- 
venzione ; anch' essa esprime con parole 
facili) vive^ sceltissime aue' bei (i) sen- 
timenti , quegli (2) affetti , que moti 
d' animo che sono a fatica sviluppati in 

(i) Que* for quells^ Bei for belli, See p. 363. 

(a) We always use quegli for guelli^ before ma- 
sealine nouns beginning with a vowel. See p. 96. 
not. a. 



262 

la ridicolezsa di tuttt gti altri. Hanno 
falto immease scoperte nel nuovo mon- 
do^ e noQ coaoscoao aacora il lor coa- 
tiQeale^ Don hanno per anco scoperto 
quel che hanno su' loro fiomi, e nelle 
lor fnontagne, luoghi a loro interamente 
ignoti. Dicono che il sole nasce^ e tra- 
moota nel loro paese> ma pu^dirsi an- 
cora^ che nel fare un tal corso non ve- 
de che rovinate campagne^ e terre de- 
serte* Addio. ^ 

LETTER A XIL 

Giuseppe Parini al Conte Durazzo 

Rendo infinite ^razie alPEccellenza 
Vostra non gia del libro che m' ha man-* 
dato, ch^ (i) un libro h cosa di poco 
valore , dappoichi la stampa trov6 il 
niodo di moltiplicarne il numero, ma 
bensl d'essersi ricordato di mandarme- 
l0| mostrando cosi ch^ io non le sia del 
tulto indifferente, nialgrado Tumilta del 
mio ^tato. II costume degli uomini di 
gran prosapia, locati in posti luminosi^ 
cari. air Imperatori^ e alle Imperatrici, 
accerchiati di conlinuo da un rapido 
vortice di grandi affarii ed assediati 

(i) Chi for perchi^ because. 



a63 
sempre da gente studiosa del lor fava- 
re, Doa fu quasi mai di ricordarai della 
geate piccina, e di pocbissioia coase- 
gueoza. Vostra Eccelleaza pero, luflgiy 
dall'usarequesto costucne con me, a k 
ricordata di me e del libro, che le ave- 
vo chieato, e me Tha prontamente ape- 
dito, come ae io foissi stato nh piii nh 
meoo che ua pari sue. Quealo b il fa- 
Tore di cui le aooo infinitamente obbli- 
gatOi e di cui, come g\k dissi, le rendo 
quelle grazie che posao maggiori. Ho 
dunque ricevuto il libro, cioe la Clelia 
del Metastasio, e Tho letta immeaiata- 
menle, percli6 mi morivo proprio della 
voglia di leggerla. Questa sua Clelia, per 
vero dire, noa ha quella medesima for- 
za del Tito, e del Temislocle : oon ha 
quella sfolgorante bellezza del Deme- 
trio, e deir Acbille, noa ha quella di- 
vioa grazia del Giuseppe ricoaosciuto ; 
pure aach^ essa si mostra de^no par(o 
della sua gran mente sempre pieaa d^ in- 
venziooe ; anch^ essa esprime con parole 
facili) vive^ sceltissime aue'bei (i) seu- 
timenti , quegli (2) affetti , que' moti 
d' animo che sono a fatica sviluppati ia 

(i) Que* for quelli^ Bei for belli, See p. 363. 

(a) We always use gueuli for guelli^ before naa- 
fcaline nouns beginning yrith a vowel. See p. 96. 
not. a. 



262 

la ridicolezsa di tuttt gti altri. Hanno 
falto immense scoperte nel nuovo mon- 
do^ e QOQ coaoscotio aacora il lor con- 
tiQealC) non hanno per anco scoperto 
quel che hanno au' loro fiami, e nolle 
lor fnontagne, luoghi a loro interamente 
ignoti. Dicono che il sole nasce^ e tra- 
moota nel loro paese> ma pu6 dirsi an- 
gora, che nel fare un tal corso non ve- 
de che rovinate campagne, e terre de- 
serte. Addio. 

LETTER A XII. 

Giuseppe Parini al Conte Durazzo 

Rendo infinite ^razie airEccellenza 
Vostra non gik del libro che m' ha man-> 
da to, ch^ (i) un libro h cosa di poco 
valore , dappoichi la stampa troy6 il 
niodo di moltiplicarne il numero, ma 
bensi d'essersi ricordato di mandarme-- 
lo, mostrando cosi ch^ io non le sia del 
tutto indifferente, nialgrado Tumilta del 
mio ^tato. II costume degli uomini di 
gran prosapia, locati in posti luminosi^ 
cari . air Imperatori^ e alle Imperalrici, 
accerchiati di conlinuo da un rapido 
vortice di grandi affarii ed assediati 

(i) Chi for perchi^ because. 



a63 
sempre da gente studiosa del lor fava* 
re^ noa fu qaasi niai di ricordarsi della 
gente piccina, e di pocbUsima coase- 
guenza. Vostra Eccelleaza pero, luogi, 
dairusarequesto costume cou me^ s' 4 
ricordata di me e del libro^ che le ave* 
vo chiestOy e me I'ha prontamente ape* 
dito^ come se io fossi state nh piii nh 
meao che ua pari sue. Questo h il fa- 
Tore di cui le aooo infiDitamente obbli* 
gato, e di cui^ come gik dissi> le rendo 
quelle grazie che posso maggiori. Ho 
duaque ricevuto il libro, cioi la Clelia 
del Metastasio, e Tho letta immediata- 
mente, percli^ mi morivo proprio della 
voglia di leggerla. Questa sua Clelia^ per 
vero dire, non ha quelia medesima for* 
za del Tito, e del Temistocle : non ha 
quelia sfolgorante bellezza del Deme- 
trio, e deir Achille, noa ha quelia di« 
vina grazia del Giuseppe riconosciuto ; 
pure anch' essa si mostra degno parlo 
della sua gran mente sempre piena d^ in- 
venzione ^ anch' essa esprime con parole 
facili, vive^ sceltissime que' bei (i) sen- 
timenti , quegli (2) affetti ^ que' moti 
d' animo che sono a fatica sviluppati in 

(i) Que' for quelli^ Bei for betU, See p. 265. 

(a) We always use quegli for quelli^ before mt- 
fcaliae nouai beginaiag vrith a vowel. See p. 96. 
not. a. 



262 

la ridicoIezM di tutti gli altri. Hanno 
falto iiBmease scoperte nel nuovo moa* 
do, e noQ conoscoao aacora il lor coa- 
tioeute) non hanno per anco scoperto 
quel che hanno su' loro fiami, e nelle 
lor montagne, luoghi a lore interamente 
ignoti. Dicono die il sole nasce, e tra- 
moota nel loro paese> mapu6dir8i an- 
qora^ che nel fare un tal corso non ve- 
de che rovinate campagne, e terre de- 
serte. Addio. 

LETTER A XIL 

Giuseppe Parini al Conte Durazzo 

Rendo infinite ^razie alPEccellenza 
Vostra non gik del libro che in' ha man^* 
dato, chh (i) un libro h cosa di poco 
valore , ^ dappoich^ la atampa Xvoyh il 
niodo di moltiplicarne il numero, ma 
bensi d'essersi ricordato di mandarme- 
loy mostrando cosi ch' io non le sia del 
tulto iudifferente, nialgrado rumilta del 
mio ^tato. II costume degli uomini di 
gran prosapia, locati in posti luminosi, 
cari. air Impera tori, e alle Imperalrici, 
accerchiati di conlinuo da un rapido 
vortice di grandi affari, ed assediati 

(i) Chi for perchi^ because. 



a63 
sempre da gente studiosa del lot favo- 
ve, noa fu qaasi niai di ricordarsi della 
gente piccina, e di pocbissima conse- 
guenza. Vostra Eccelleaza pero^ luogi, 
dairusare questo costume cou me^ s' k 
ricordata di me e del libro^ che le ave- 
vo chiestOy e me I'ha prontamente spe- 
dito^ come se io fossi state nh piii nh 
meao che ua pari sue. Questo h il fa- 
Tore di cui le soao infinitamente obbli- 
gato, e di cui^ come gi& dissi> le rendo 
quelle grazie che posso maggiori. Ho 
duaque ricevuto il libro, cioi la Clelia 
del Metastasio, e Tho letta immeaiata- 
mente, percli^ mi morivo proprio della 
voglia di leggerla. Questa sua Clelia^ per 
vero dire, non ha quelia medesima for* 
za del Tito, e del Temistocle : non ha 
quelia sfolgorante bellezza del Deme* 
trio, e deir Achille, noa ha quelia di« 
vina grazia del Giuseppe riconosciuto ; 
pure anch" essa si mostra degno parlo 
della sua gran mente sempre piena d^ in- 
venzione ^ anch' essa esprime con parole 
facili, vive^ sceltissime que' bei (i) sen- 
timenti , quegli (2) affetti , que' moti 
d' animo che sono a fatica sviluppati in 

(i) Que' for quelii^ Bei for bellh See p. 265. 

(a) We Always use guegli for quelU^ before mt- 
fcaline nouai beginaiag with a vowel. See p. 96. 
not. a. 



!l64 . .. 

prosa da' piik sottili Filosofaoti sulla oa* 
tura umana. In somma la Clelia quan- 
tunqae non generata con quel fuoco di 
gioventili, che rese V altre sorelle Unto 
robaste^ ha pure la sua parte di vigore, 
di bellezea, di nobiltj^^ e di grazia. 
E chi non rimane sorpreso dell' in- 

Segno del nostro Metastasio nel consi- 
erare in quanto poca parte di lingua, 
e d' affetti la poesia sua sia per forza 
circoscritta dalla musica ? In quanto a 
me non so finire di maravigliarnii, per* 
chi anch' io ne'miei piii fervidi anni ho 
voluto tar prova, se potevo metastasia- 
re (i) , anch' io ho tentato di salire 
quelV erto monte, ma invano. M' avvidi 
dopo molti, -e molti tentativj, che ci 
volevano • altre gambe^ altra lena che 
non la mia per vincere queiraltissima 
vetta ; onde mi tornai indietro, e mi 
volsi a cercare un^ altra men disage* 
Tole^ e mono aspra salita. Perdoni yo* 
stra eccellenza questo mio vano ci« 
caleccioi e mi creda quale coHossequio 
pij^ verO| e pii!i profondo mi dico. 



(i) Metasta$iare^ k lodicroat word vrhich neaoi 
to wnte after the style of Meiastuiio, 



265 
LETTERA XHI. 

' Antommaria Salvini al Sig. Antonio 
Montauti. 

La materia deiramicizia h un mare^ 
cbe non si pu5 solcare (i) in an momen- 
to. Tanto n^ hanno parlato i savj antichi, 
e moderni che uno non sa trovar la via 
ixh a cominciare nh a finire. Ho indu- 
giato an giorno a acrivere per veder 
di trovar qualcbe cosa. Ma che posso 
10 dirvi^ se non quello cbe h state 
detto, e ridetto ? Cbe chi levasse V ami* 
cizia dal mondo sarebbe come toglie- 
re il sole, che c' illumina , ci nutri- 
sce , ci rallegra } che cbi trova un 
amico trova un tesoro, come disse il 
pill virtuoso nomo del mondo, Salo- 
mone. Ella h an bene senza di cui 
1' unmo nun pu6 starc y e mille beni 
a' hanno da quella. L'amico h an eom- 
pagno della vita. Se avete fortune > 
che cosa k il goderle seoza un ami- 
co, che se ne rallegri di caore, come 
se fossero sue proprie ; cbe col con- 
siglio vi regga percb^ le sap(>iate go- 
-dere , e clie sappiate reggervici den* 

( (>) ^olcare il mare h rather « poetical exfiraa^ 
•ion. It mky be iitterally tranf|ated. ^o ptouEh 
the iea. 



^66 
Iro, e la tropp.a fbrluna non vi pre- 
cipiti ? Al contrario se avele dis^razie 
egU ne piglia una parle^ e cosi quel 
peso ve lo fa piA leggieri 5 sente con pa- 
zien^sa i vostri rammarichi^ i vostri pianti 
rasciuga, e vi consola colla presenza 
sua grata , e col parlare vi conforta^ 
e v' invita a sperar bene; e coU'opera^ 
col coDsiglio in ogni traversia vi gui- 
da, vi drfige, vi rasserena, vi aromae- 
«tra. Nel suo seno potete con sicurez- 
za dep^sibre tutti i vostri segreti sen- 
za timore d'esser tradito ^ tutte le vo- 
stre passioni^ e siete certo d^essere o 
sanato o compatito ; in un bisogno avete 
a chi ricorrere*5 nelle difficolta avete 
chi ve le spiani ; nei dubbj chi ve U 
sciolga; negrincontri tutti della vita 
un lume, un porlo^ un'aura che v'in- 
dirizzi, v'accojga, vi favorisca. EgU vi 
procura ftltri amici, aderenze, ^ fa-70 
ri. L'amicizift 6 una Virtil, una co* 
jtante Vobhti di far bene kiramtco; e 
qiietramicizia h piA ferma e piu sta- 
bile cbe b fondata a») buono, sul ve^ 
ro, e sul gtus;to ; snlla bont^ e simi* 
litudine di maniere e di» costumi, e che 
non ha per uriico fine l* utile eTia-^ 
teresse ; percb^ mancando questo o 
mutandosi, 'ma\i6a ' ancor teSa, o vien 
meno. Si vede per esperienza che chi 



a67 
h dato air interesse non ha onore nh 
amicizia^ adora solainente il suo tdolo, 
cbe h V oro , dove ha il suo cuore. 
Le amicizie giovanili fatte da on genio 
subitaneo , e chc consistono nel pia- 
cere, presto saziano, e syaniscono. Gli 
ambiziosi, gV invidiosi, i malighi non 
son fatti per la buona e per la bella 
virlii deiramicizia , la quale non sa- 
rebbe virtil $e non partecipasse dell'o- 
norato , e del buono j e au tpiesta 
base fondata ella dura^ ed k una buo* 
na compagna per tutta la vita. V at- 
tendo in breve. Salutate tutti. Addio. 

LETTERA XIV. 

Del Signer Menage alia Signora 
Contessa della Faetta. 

Sono obbligatissimo a V. S. Illnia per 
la grazia sit^olare che s' h eompiacin*- 
ta di farmi colla sua cortesissima let- 
tera ; che veramente h fare una gra* 
zia singolare agU assenti averli in ine- 
moria in cosi ameno luogo , quar h 
la villa di Fresne , ed in compagnia 
di cosi amabili persone quali sono Ma- 
daoia Du Plessis ^ e Madaoiigella Le 
Gendre, tutle cose capacissime di oc* 
cupare interamente T animo suo per 



d6S 
grande che sia. Quant' a me, nan dir& 
&ik -z V. S. Uliua, cb' ogni di spesse 
bate anch' ella mi toroa a mente doq 
essendone mai partita. Le dir6 che 
aono a Vitri luogo altres) ameDO ; do- 
ve fra dotti pastori , e Taghe pasto- 
relle si &nno tutti i balli> e giuochi 
che si scrivono del paese di Celado* 
ne , e d' Astrea : ma che ogni luogo 
m' attrista dove non vedo V. S. Ilima^ 
e che in questo amenissimo luogo, 
fuggendo tuttt i piaceri, e passatempi ^ 
di cosi riguardevoli pastori^ e pastorelle^ 

Solo e pensoso i piu deserti campi 
Vo ndsurando a passi tardi, e lentil 

Quindi pu& ben conoscere V. S. Illma < 
ch' io non son meno adesso delle di 
lei virtjl e gentilezze invaghito ch'io 
n' era allora che dimorava ella in Angid 
nella deliziosiasima villa di Ciampiri. 
Torneri a Parigi subito ehe vi sari 
ella tornata. Fra tanto le mando il 
Madrigale italiano da me fatto per 
Madama di Sevigni ad imitaaione di 
quelle di Gaarini Oechi stelle morta'^ 
Ih etc. tanto lodato da V. S. lUma 
e per fine le prego ogni piu desiderata 
felicity. 



26g 
MADRIGALE. 

Fianto di bella donna. 

j4h del regno d' amor prodigio tristo I 

Sparger lagrime amare 

(^ue^dolci lumi ho pistoi 

La tra le Grazie assiso 

Solea scherzare il riso : 

Spargean di pianto que^ hegli occhi un 

mare , 
Ma pur CO* raggi ardenti 
Spargean fiamme cocenti : > 
E quelfatale ardore 
Tosto m' aecese il core* 
O misera mia i^ita I 
Occhij lumi immortally 
Deh , qual per i miei mali 
Posso sperar aita} 
Se nubilosi ardete, 
Sereni eke /arete ? 

LETTERA XV. 
Tradotta dallo Spettatore* Eglijln^ 
ge che sia stata scritta nel regno di 
Carlo II. dalV Amhastiator di Ban^ 
tarn poco tempo dopo il sua arrivo im 
IngJnlterra. 

SlCNORE, 

I popoU fra'qaali presentemente mi 

i3 



trovo. hannoja liogna pm lontana dal 
cuore, che non k BaDtam da Londra^ 
e tu aaiy cbe ^i abitanti d^ uno di 
quest! due luoghi non saouo quel che 
tccade peir a}tro. Essi chiamaqo te , e 
i tuoL sudditi bjsurbairi perch^ tra noi 
si dice quel ^he §i peqsa i e chiaonaa 
se stessi un popolo calto, perehe di- 
Gono una cosa^ e ne peosaoa un'altra: 
alia veriU daono il nome di barbarie, 
e alia falsita quello di pulitezza. Al 
mio sbarco ia questa terra uo uomo 
mapdato dal re per incontrarHii mi dis- 
se; cfie proQa\fa un estremo dispiacere 
per la tempesta accaduta appunta pri- 
ma del mio arrivo. Realai confuso 
fieirudirlo tanto raoimaricato ed afflit- 
to per cagion nailaj *na in meno d'un 
c^arto d' ora egli rideva , ed era eosr 
allegro come se niente fosse accadu- 
to. Un allro , che era vcnulo. eoa hii 
mi fece dir dal mio interprete y che 
^i chiatheretbefeiice , se pot^sse servir- 
mi in qualche cosa. Lo pregai duo- 
que a portarmi una delle mie valigie, 
x»a ia .vece di servirmi a tencn: della 
proniessa si mise a ridere, e la fece 
portare da un altro. Alloggiai la pri- 
ma settimana in casa d' uno , che ini 
preg6 di disporncy come se fossae mia 
propria. Ia confeguenza. di cio coqiin- 



ciai la mattiaa segnente a battar gi& 
una muraglia per fare entrar 1^ aria 
fresca , ed avevo ^ih messo in ^ un fa« 
acio alcuni mobili coll" idea di roan* 
darteli in dono^ ma V ingannatore leb- 
be appena saputo che mi fece dire di 
desistere immediatamente, e cbe in ca- 
aa sua noii voleva aimili cose. Un uo- 
mo a cui ho ottennto an favore dal 
principal servitore del re , da qaello 
cioi cbe qui cbiamano lord treasurer 
mi disse giorni sono cbe V avevo eter^ 
namente obbligato. Fui cosi sorpreso 
della sua gratitudine , che non potei 
fare a meno d'esclamare ,h e qual e mai 
quel servizio fatto da an uonio che 
possa obbligare un altro per tutta Teter- 
nit4! Cib nonostante io non gU cbiesi 
altro per ricompensa che d' accordar- 
mi la sua figliuola maggiore durante 
il mio soggtorno in quesio paese^ ma 
incontanente m'accorsi^he era on tra- 
ditore al par degli altri suoi compa- 
triotti. La prima Tolta cbe andai a 
eorte uno di que' gran personaggi mi 
fece rimaner sbalordito col domandar- 
mi diecimila perdoni solamente per 
avermi calpestato per mero accidente 
on piede. Questa soria di bogia chia- 
masi qui nn complimento, e quando 
essi yogliono mostrarsi ciyili a an graa 



%7^ 
personaggTO gK dicono Bugie taTi» per 
le quail iu faresti dare a uno de^iuoi 
uffiziali di stato cento colpl snlle pian- 
te. Nod so come far6 a negoziare cob 

?[ue8to popola , giacehi si pud prestar 
oro si poca fede. Quando vado a far 
irisila alio scrivano del re ni vien (i) 
comunemente detio , ch^ egli nen k in 
casa^ quantunque io Tabbia forse ve- 
duto eotparvi un momenlo prima. Tn 
ti daresti a credere (2), ebe qui tutli 
siao niedici , Hientre la prima domanda 
cbe fanno k sempre , How do you do ? 
come state voi ? Questa h uaa do- 
manda cbe mi vien fatta almeno eea- 
to volte al giorno. Anai bod solamen* 
te sooo curiosi di saper lo stato dellsr 
mia salute^ ma me la desiderano in 
una maniera piu solenoe eon un bic- 
cbier pieno nelle mani tutte le volte 
cbe seggo con essolore a tavola, quark- 
tunque nel medesimo tempo vorreb- 
bero indurmi a bere i lor liquori in 
tanta quantila^ quanta per esperieoza 
conosGo esser noeiva alia raia sa- 
lute. PretendoQO anche di pregar per 
la tua nello stesso modo^ ma io bo 

(i) nen detto for i detlo ; and it mcao* ia 
this pUce / am told, 

(2) Tu ti daresti a credere^ ta idiom wbich 
metni Thou would' st think, 

I 



273' 
pliji ragion d' a.speUarIa dalla bont^ del 
tuo temperameiitOy chc dalia .sinceritii 
de' lor desiderj. Poasa il tuo achiavo 
uscir aalvo di mezzo a qiiesta ingan* 
na trice razza d' uomini^ e vivere per 
proatrarsi una volta aiicora al tuo pie- 
de Delia real cilU di Baatam. 

LETTERA XVI. 

Del Signor Abate Frugani alia 
Signora N. 

Nea ho «cuse, non bo diacoipe, aono 
atato uegligenle , la pijjrezza h per me 
un' iocantatrice che mi seduce faciU 
mente ^ debbo tratto tratto abbando* 
narmi nelle sue braccia , e bere al* 
la tazza il doke obblio di tuUe le co- 
se : posso per& cea verita dirvi che 
tardi mi sono giunte le due vostre 
lettere 9 e di poco banno preceduto la 
terza che con quesla posta ricevo. Ab« 
biamo pessimi giorui, abbiamo una sta* 
gione contraria alle dlligenze non me* 
no de' corrieri, che alle premure degli 
amanti. Yoi mi vi fate vedere in tutta 
Taria del vostro sdegno, ed in tutte 
quelle armi che vi pu& fornir la vo* 
stra ancor viltoriosa bellezza; mi aie* 
te cosi pill che mai piaciuta. 



' a74 



Bella Nice, it vostro sdegnOy etc. 

Che mai non mi fate voi scrivere , 
e dire per piacervi ? II parnaso h pieno 
del vostro nome. La mia dolce passio- 
ne h la feconda materia del mio can* 
to. Gontentatevi di rasserenare il vostro 
volto , di sorridere su questi miei ver- 
si, e di comandar alle yostre gentili 
coHere di dar luogo ai teneri seati- 
menti. Prendetemi, come per natura 
e per consuetudine io mi sono. lo 
scrivOy 10 verseggio, quando mi sento 
inspirato. Getto la penna, non m'ap- 
presso al tavolino , qiiando vaghezza di 
riposare , taleato di non far nulla mi 
pigliano. Non sofire il mio spirito una 
aervitii aenza qualche intervallo di li- 
bertii \ ma se non vi scrivo, se non 
Ti canto , non per5 cesso d' amarvi , 
non per6 lascio d'esser vostro. 

Non ispero che in qiieste reliquie 
del cadente Garnevalc mi vogliate ono- 
rar di risposta. La star6 attendendo in 
Quaresima. II presente vostro tempo 
h tutto dovuto ai piaceri* Andate pure 
in fnaschera, fatevi la maraviglia dei 
passeggi, l-amor dei teatri, e la felici- 
ta di chi, dopo avervi accompagnata, 
dee poscia passar in lieta privata cena 
i piu dolci momenti della vita con voi. 
Addio. 



275 
L E T T E R A XVIL 

•Ganganelli al Signer Abate Ferghem 

Non pu^ far megtio^ Stgnor Abate ^ 
per distrar^i dagrnnpacci e dalle in- 
quietadini, che viaggiar F Italia. Ogni 
uomo ben istruito dee un omaggio a 
qiieato paese tan to rinomato, e tanto 
degno di esserlo ^ ed 10 ce la vedr6 
con indicibil piacere. 

A prima vista acorger^ que' baluardt 
dati daila natura negli Appcnnint , e 
quelle Alpi che ci dtvidono dai Fran* 
cesi , e ci meritarono il titolo d' 01- 
tramoutani. Questi son tanti monti mae* 
atoai £itti per servir d'ornamento al 
quadro; cb'essi contornano* I torren- 
ti^ le riviere, i fiumi , non contando i 
mari, aono altrettante prospettive cha 
preaentano i piii bei punti di vista , 
che interessar possano i viaggiatori, e 
i pittori. Nulla di piii ammirabile che 
un SU0I0 il pii!i fertile aotto il clima 
p\h bello, ovunque interaecato di vive 
acque , ovunque popoiato da Villaggi , 
e adorno di siiperbe citti ; tal'i T Italia. 

Se tanto in onore vi fosse Tagri* 
coUura quatito T arcbitettura ; se diviso 
non fosse il paese in tanti govern! di* 
versi| tutti di varia forma ^ e quasi 



tutti debolij e poco estesi lion si ve- 
drebbe la miseria al fianco della ma- 
gnificeaza, e Y industria senza attivitiL ; 
ma per somma disgrazia piii si & at- 
teso air abbellimeDto delle ctlUlk, che 
alia cuUura delle campagne, e dap- 
pertuUo gr iocolti terreni rimproveraao 
agli abitanti la loro infingardaggine* 

Se ella entrer^ da Venezia vedrJi 
una cilU unic^ al moodo per la sua 
situazione, la quale k appuoto come 
UQ vasto naviglio che si riposa tran- 
quillamente suiracque, ed a cui noa 
s'approda che per mezzo di navigli. 

Ma Qon sari questa V unica cosa 
che la. sorpreaderL Gli abitanti ma- 
scherati per quattro o cinque mesi 
dell' anno, le leggi di un governo te« 
inutOj che lascia ai divertimenti la mag- 
gior liberta, le prerogative d'unprin- 
cipe che non ha autorita veruna^ le 
costumanze d^ un popolo che ha sin 
paura dell" ombra propria , e si gode 
la maggior tranquillita son tutte cose 
tra loro disparate, ma che in modo 
parlicolare interessano un viaggiatore. 
Non vi h qua^i un Veneziano che non 
sia eloquente ^ sono state aozi falle 
delle raccolte dei concetti dei gondo** 
lieri ripieoi di sail argutissimi. 

Ferrara nel suo recinto le fari ve- 



*77. 
dere una bella e vasta solitudine tacita 

quasi altretUinto quanto la tooiba dell' 

Ariosto che ivi riposa. 

Bologna presenter^ ai suoi occhi ua 
altro l^l prospetto. Vi troverSl le acien-i 
ze familiari ancbe al bel sesso , che 
produces! con dignita nelle scuole , e 
nclle accademi€ nelle quali ogni di 
gU s' innalzano dei trofei. Mille diversi 
prospetti aoddisfaranno il suo spirito , 
e gli occhi suoi ^ e la conversazione 
poi degU abitanti la rallegrer^ mollis- 
flimo, 

Quindi per uno spazio di piu di tre-^' 
cento miglia attraverserli una moltitndi- 
ne di piccole citta^ciascuna delle quali 
ha il suo teatro, ed il casino (j^, e 
qualche lelterato ^ o poeta , che si ap- 
plica secondo il suo genio cd a nor- 
ma del suo piacere. 

Visiterli Loreto, pellegrinaggio famo« 
so pel coocorso dei forestieri , e pei 
superbi tesori de' quali ^ arricchito il 
atio tempio. 

Fioalmente vedrli Roma la quale per 
mille anni continui si rivedrebbe sem« 
pre con nuovo piacere, citt^ che assisa 
sopra sette colli chiamati dacli antichi 
i sette domioatori del mondo sembra 

(i) Casino U a place where the nohili^r neelS; 
l3 * 



a7« . 
di 1^ domioar I' tiDi^erso y e dir con 
orgoglio a tatti i popoli ch' essa n^ h 
la regina , e la capitate. 

Nel gettare nno sguardo su quel fa- 
mo90 Tevere le sovverr^ di quegli ati- 
tichi Romani che tanto banno parlato 
di lui , e come tante volte and6 goa- 
fio del sangue loro , e di quello dei 
loro nemici. 

Andri quasi in estasi nel rimirar 
la Basilica di S. Pietro, dai conoscitori 
chiamata maraviglia del mondo , perch^ 
infinitamente superiore a S.*^ Sofia di 
Costaatinopoli , a S. Paolo di Londra , 
ed al tempio stesso di Salomone. 

Essa h un vaso tale che si estende , 
quanto piii si scorre^ ed in cui tutto 
k colossale e tutto apparisce di una 
forma ordinaria. Le pitture rapiscono^ 
i mausolei son parlanti y e si crede- 
rebbe di rimirar quella nuova Geru* 
salemme dal Cielo discesa, di cui par- 
la S. Giovanni nella sua Apocalisse^ 

Nel complesso^ ed in ciascuna parte 
del Vaiicano eretto sulle rovine dei 
falsi oracoli, vi troverk del bello in 
ogni genere da stancare i snoi occbi^ 
e da rimanerne incantato. Qui k do- 
ve Rafiaello et Michel Angelo ora in 
una maniera terribile y ed or' amabile 
banno. spiegato, ne'piii bei capi d'opera^ 



^70 
n genio loro, esprimendo al vivo riti-' 

tera forza del loro spirilo, c qui 6 

dove h depositata la scienza e lo spi- 

rito di iuUi gli scrittori dell' universo^ 

fn ana moltitudiae d'opere che com- 

pongonb la piii vasta, e la piii ricca 

Ubreria del mondo. 

Le chiese, i palazzi, le piazze pnb- 
bliche J le piramidi , gli obelischi, le 
colonne, te gallerie, le facciate, i tea-* 
tri, le foDtane, le vedute, i giardinij 
tutto le dir^ th^ ella & in Roma , e 
tnlto le fark ad essa affeziooftre come 
ad una citta che fu mai sempre (i) 
con preferenza' universale ammirata, 

ScuoprirJ^ finalmente un nuovo mon- 
do in tutte le figure di pittura e scuU 
tura SI degU antichi che dei modemij 
e credera questo mondo animator 

La disgrazia si d che quest' ottica 
magnifica andr& poi a finire in torme 
di questuanti mantenutr da Roma mal 
a proposito con isparger certe limosU 
ne mal intese invece di farli appli-^ 
care a lavor^ utili } 'ed in tat modo 1& 
rosa scorg^si colla spina^ e il vizio si 
rede bene spesso al fianco della virtik* 

S6 i nudvi Romani hon te sembrano 

(i) Mai iempn it th« tamt as umpn olmijf$$ 



a8o 
puDto bellicosi, c\b addiyiene dal loro 
attuale governo, che non ne iospira loro 
il valore : del resto si trova in essi 
ogoi seme di virtu , e sono • si buoni 
militari come gli allri, alloAch^ mill* 
tano soUo qualche straniera poteDza. 

Passer^ di poi a Napoli per la fa- 
Mosa via Appia^ cbe per la sua anti- 
chiti si h resa in oggi per somma 
disgrazia scomodissima ^ ed arriver^ a 
quella Partenope ova riposano le ce* 
neri di Virgiiio , suite quali vedesi 
nascere un laaro cbe non pu6 esser me^ 
glio collocato. I 

Da UQ lato il Monte Vesuvio, dalKal- 
tro i Campi Elisi le presenteranno dei 
punti di vista siDgolarissimi ; e dopo di 
f3ssertte sazio si troveri circondato da 
una pioltitudine di Napolitani vivaci^ 
e. spiritosi., ma troppo inclinati al pia- 
cerev ed air iofiogardaggine per esser 
quel che potrebboa essere. Sarebbe Napoli 
un' iqapareggiabil cltt^, se non vi s'in- 
CQBtrasse una folia di plebei che ban- 
UK)' 'un^ aria, di ribaldi; ? di malan- 
(Irini v^en^' esse#: sovente a^ Tuno, n^ 
J'Mtco. t , 

f Le' chiese sono riccamente adorne > 
ma Tarchitettura h di un cattivo gusto 
che non corrisponde punto a quella 
di Roma. Un piacere singolare pro* 



verh Del passeggiare i contoroi di que** 
8la citla delizioaa pe' suoi frutti , per le 
sue prospettive , e per la sua situa- 
zione; e polf^ penetrare aino in quel 
faniosi aotterranei, ove resl6 uii tempo 
iogbiottita la cilUi d' Ercolaoo da una 
eruzione del Vesuvio. Se a caso egU 
fesse ia furore, vedrJi uscir dal suo 
seno dei torrenti di fuoco che maer 
atosamente ai apandono per le cam- 
pacne. Portici le £ir^ vedere' una col- 
lezione di quanto h atato acavato dallo 
royine d' Ercolano , ed i cootornt di 
Pozznolo , gi^ deeantati dal principe 
de' poeti , le insptreraouo del gusto per 
la poesia. Bisogna andarvi coU'Eneide 
alia mano , e confrontare coU'antro 
delta Sibilla di Guma, e colV Acheronte 
quel che ne ha detto Virgilio. 

Al ritorno paaserli per Gaserta, che 
per li snoi ornati, marmi, eateosione, 
ed acquedotti, degni deir antica Roma, 
pn6 dirsi la piii bella. villa d'Europa* 

Firenze, donde uscirono le belle 
arti , e dove eaistboc ccfme in depo* 
aito i loro mik magnifici capi dopera^ 
le preaentera nnovi og|;etti. Vi ammi« 
rera una citU^, che giusta V espreasio- 
Be d'un portogheae non doi^rebbe mo* 
strarsi che le domenickej tanto h gen* 
tile, e vagameote adorna. Dappertut* 



a8< 
to yi 8\ scorgon It; Iracce d^lla spleo- 
didettn- e del buon gusto dei Medici 
descritti negU annali d«l genio quai (i) 
restauratori delle arti. 
' Livbrdo porto di mare si popolato 
the vantaggtoso per la Toscana ; Pisa 
^empi^ in possesso' delle scuole, e d'aver 
d^li uomini in ogni genere eruditi 5 
Siena rinomata per la puribii deiraria 
e del lingnaggio IMnteresseranno a vi* 
eenda in modo particotare. Parma si* 
ftitita in mezzo ai pasooli piii fertili 
le mostrerk nn teatro che contiene 
quattordici mila persone, e nel quale 
ciascono inttode tntto quel che si di^ 
te anche ^a mezza voce. Piacenza poi 
le sembr^^ ben degnadel nome chessa 
porta, essendo un soggiorno cbe, per 
la sua sitnaziohe' ed amenitBi , piaoe sin* 
golarmeme a'viaggiatori. 
. Non si ^scdrdi di Modena come pa- 
tria deir illustti^ Muratori, e come una 
citU celebre^ pel home che ha dato 
a'sudi sovrani. 

b^Milano troveira la seeonda 'chiesa 

delV Italia per beltji e grandezz;a; piiSi 

V di. dteci mila statue dr imarmo ne ador- 

Bano' Testierno, e sarebbe un capo 

A' opera se avesse una £aicciata« -La so- 



cieta de'suoi abitaoti i sommamento 
piacevole. Vi si vive come a Parigi, 
e tutto spira ud' aria di splendidezza. 

L^IsoleBorromee rinviteraono a por* 
larsi a vederle rnerc^ il racconto che 
le ne szrk fatto. Situate in mezzo di 
un lago deliziosissimo presentano alia 
vista tutto ci6 che di piii ridente t 
magnifico trovasi nei giardini. 

Genova le provieri esser ella real* 
mente superba (i) nelle sue chiese 
e nei suoi palazzi. Vi si osserva ua 
porto famoso pel suo commercio e per 
r affluenza degli stranieri ; vi si vede 
nn doge che si cangia appress'a poco 
siccome i superior! delle comunit^ , e 
che oon ha nu' autoritil molto mag* 
giore. 

Torino finalmente residenea di una 
corte, ove da lungo tempo abitan le 
virti!i , r incanter^ colla regolaritJ^ degli 
edifizjy colla bellezza delle piazze, 
Colla dirittura delle sue strade, cello 
^pirito de'suoi abitanti; e qui in tal 
guisa terminer^ il piacevolissimo suo 
viaggio. 

Ho fatto com' ella ben vede prestis- 
simamente tutto il giro deir Italia e 

(i) Creno¥a it commoal/ called bjr the luHau 
La Mptffta 



i84 . . 
con pochissima spesa ^ col fine d' ia- 

yttarla in realt^ a veoirci. Noa le sta- 

xh a dir cosa alcana dei nostri costu- 

mi; queati, non son niente piu cor- 

rotti di quelli delle altre nazioni^ cbec- 

ch& (i) ne dicano i maligni; soltanto 

Tariano nel chiaroscuro secondo la di- 

versiU dei govern! , poichi il romano 

non somiglia il Genovese ^ n^ il Ve- 

neziano il Napoletano 3 si puo dir 

deir Italia come del mondo intiero, cbe 

salva qualche piccola difierenza , ci h 

qui, come altrove un po* di bene , e 

un po* di male. 

Non la prevengo sulla grazia degUIta* 

liani> n& tampoco suiramor loro per 

le scienze e per le belle arti, essen- 

do questa una cosa cbe conoscerk hen 

presto nel trattarli , ed el la special- 

mente sopra d' ogni altro ^ con cui tan- 

ta soddisfazione si prova nel conver- 

aare^ ed a cui sarJi sempre un piacere 

il potersi dire umilissimo obbligatissi* 

mo servitore. 



(i) Chtechi mtant whatei^ir^ and antrctt !• 
tht Latin •xprMtion quidquid. 



285 
SPECIMENS 

or 

ITALIAN POETRY. 

SoneUo del Petrarca. (a) 

Cbi Tuol veder qnantanqne pao oatara 
£ M ciel Ira not ; venga a niirar cotXti \ 
Ch' e nola ma tol, soa pure agli occhi mieiy 
Ma al roondo cieco che Tirtu rion cora; 

£ TCflga totto perche niorte (s) fura 
Prima i migUorii e lascia stare i rei } 
Qaesta aipettata al regno degli Dei 
Cota bella morUl pastai « Don dura* 

(i) The toonet It the faroarite compotition of 
the i tali ant. It eonaitu of two QuaUrnarii^ and 
two TeneiU. The Quatemarii are dif poaed io two 
different mannera. In the one caae, the firtt rerao 
rhymea with the fourth , fifth and eighth \ the 
aecond with the third, aixth and aeventh. In the 
other, the ^rat rhjrmea with the third, tii^ and 
eighth.; the aeoood with the foarth , fifth and 
teventh. Of theae the former ia the moat aaoal» 
The Terzetti may alao be ranged in two different 
iirayt. The one when the iirat rerte rhymea with 
the third and fifth, and the aecond with the 
fourth and aixth. The other, when the three renw 
of the tir$t TerzettQ are oompoaed of different 
rhymea, and the aecond Terzetto corretponda with 
the veraea of the firat, preeerving what order yon 
please. The modern poeta commonly make ate of 
the former, aa ia the caae in the oeit aonnet, 

(s) Fura from the Latin furari^ to ittal. It il 
only allowed in poetry. 



a86 _ ^ 

Vedri , ft" arriTtf a lem^^ ogni ^iftilte^ 
Ogoi beJIezza, ogDi real co^ume 
iGiantt in on corpo <;on mirabil tern pre* 

Alior dira eke mie rime son mate, 
L'ingegno offeso dal soVerchio lame, 
Ma •€ |M« tarda, avra da pianger sempre* 

SonHto del Medesimo. 

V wo (t) piangendo i miei passati tempt 
I qiiai (t) posi in amar cosa mortale, 
SeDKa lerarmi a volo, aT«iid'io Tale, 
Per dar forse dt me noa basst esempi. 

Tu che vedi i miei mali indegni ed empj. 
Re del Cielo invisibile ^ unmortale, 
Soccorri all' alma (3) disviata e frale, 
£ '1 suo diletto dt tua grazia adempi^ 

Si che a'io visst in gnerra ed in tempeata. 
Mora in pace ed in porto ; e ae la sunsa 
Fa vana, aUuen aia la partita ooetia^ 

A quel poco di viver ishe m'avanza 
Ed al morir degni esser tua man presta : 
Tu iai beoy che ia altrui aolt bo speranza 

Sonetto del CaQalier Mariao. 

Apre rnbmo tnfelice, atlor cbe oaice 
la quesla vita di tniierie piena 
Pria ehe al Sol gli occhi al ptanto, e aato appeaa 
Va prigionier fra le teaaci faKe. 

' CO '' ^^ '^' '<> ^tido* 
(s) Quai for quaU, 
(3) jdlmOf a poelieal word for tinimti^ souL 



287 

Fanciollo poi ch6 non pici latte pasce 
Sotto rigida sferza i giorni mena ; 
Indi in eta pih ferma, e piu terena 
Tra fortuoa ed amor, more a rinasce. 

Quante poscia sostien tristo e mendico 
Fatiche, a morti infiochi cnrvo , e lasso 
Appoggia a'debil legno il fianco antico! 

Ghiude alfin le sne spoglie angiuto sasfo 
Ratto cosi che sospirando 10 dico : 
Dalla cutla alia tomba k mn breve passo. 

Sonetto del Dottor Eustachio ManfredL 

II prirao albor non appariva ancora 9 
£d 10 staTO con Fille al pie d' un' orao, 
Ora ascoltando i dolci accent! , ed era 
Chiedendo al Ciel, per vagheggiarlay ii giorno; 

Yedrai, mia fille , in le dicea , V Aurora 
Come bella a not fa dal roar ritorno , 
£ come air apparir tarba, e scolora 
Le tante sielle ond' h V Oiimpo adorno : 

£ vedrai poscia il Sole incontro a cui 
Spariran da lai Tinte e questa e quelle , 
Tanta h la luce de'bei raggi sui. 

Ma non Tedrai quel ch' io Tedr6 , le belle 
Tae popille seoprirsi, e far di lai 
Qael ch^ei (l) fa dell' Aurora , e delleitelle* 

Sonetto pastorale del Signer 
Avf^ocato ZappL 

In qneU'etii ch'io miiurar solea 

(1) Ei for €gl£. 



s88 
Jle col mio <ca{Mro, e il capro era aaggkiTe 
Amava io Clori che iafin da qaell' ore 
Merayiglia e non Donna a me parea. 

Un di le diMi io t' «mo, e il disse il core 
Poichi Unto la lingua non tapea , 
£d ella an bacio diemmiy e mi dicea, 
Pargoletto ah I non sai che cosa e amore. 

Ella d' altri •' accese , altri di lei , 
to poi giunsi air eta cV aom s'fanamora, 
L' elk degl' iofdici affanm raiei. 

Clori or mi spTe;t£a , io Tamo infin d'«liora. 
Non fti ricorda del mio amor cosCei, 
Io mi ricerdo di quel bacio ancora. 

Sonetto del medesimo^ 

Tomami a mente qaella trista e fiera (t) 
{^otte; qnando partii dal snol natio, 
£ lasciai Clori, e pianger la vid'io 
Non niai piii bella e non mai meao altera. 

All ! quante volte addio, drcenimo ^ addio , 
E '1 pt^ senza partir resto doir' era, 
Quante volte partimmo , e alia primiera 
Orma toroaro (2) il pi^ di Clori , e '1 mio 1 

Era gia presso a discoprirne il Sole , 
Quando le dissi alfin — ma che le dissi ? 
St '1 pianto confondeva le parole , 

Partii, che cieca torte, e destin cieco 
Tolle cosl 9 ma come io mi partissi 
Dir non aaprei, so che non son piu seco* 

(i) This is an imitation of that elegy of OriJ 
«rhich begins. Cum subii ilUus tristibtima nociii 
ijnago^ cc. 

433 Tomaro tor iornaroao. 



Sonetto det medesimo. 

Sopra il ritratto di RafTaelle ch6 quest! 
£ece da se medeslmo.. 

Qnesti i il gr«n Raffaello; ecco Tidea 
Del Tago Tolto e mBe$io$o, in cni 
Tanto Natara de*»iioi don (i) pone» 
Quanta egli tolse a lei de' pregi aui. {2^ 

Un giorno ei qui che preso a schifo ave* 
Sempre far snHe tek eieroo artmif 
Pinse se atesfto, e pinger non pote* 
Frodigie the naggior foMe di lui. 

Quan^ poi> Morte il" doppib ToltD| e vago 
Tide, iotpeso i\f negro arao fatale, 
Qnal disse ^ ii finto o il vero, o quale inipiago ? 

Impiaga qnesio inutil nianto e frale^ 
U Alma Dispose^ e lateia star V immago. (3) 
« Ciaacuaa di dm dae nacqcus inraortaJe. a (4)* 

Sonett<^ di Fincenzo da Fiticaja^ 

Italia, ItaKa, o ta cni fee (5) la aorta 
Pono infellce di beHezza ond'bai 
Fuaeata dote d' infintti gaai , 
Che scritti in fronte per graci dogKa porta. (6) 

Bell I fossi tu men bella, o almen piii forte 
Oodc aasai piii t» pat eataste> o assai 

(i) Don for cfaiif, a poetical lieenee,. 
(s) Sui iQf §uoi. 

(3) lnnna$0-f a poetical word for immagioe* 

(4) Thif Ufk Yerae if taken from Fettaroa. 

(5) Feo for fece, ^ 

(6) ForCe for porrA 



«9o 

Tamaste nen chi del tao beDo a! rtfl (i) 
Par che si stragga e pur ti sfida a morte ; 

Che or gi& dall' Alpi noa iredrei torrent! 
Sceoder d^armati, oe di sangae tinta 
Berer V onda del Po galliGi armenti : 

Ifi te Tedrei del non tao ferro cinta 
Pugnar eol braeeto di straniere genti, 
Per fervir aempre o viBcitrice o Tinta. 

Sonetto del Metastasio da lui scriUo 
in tempo che componeva V Olim* 
piade* 

Sogni e fa vole io fingo ; e pure in carte, 
llentre favole, e sogoi orao e disegno. 
In lor, folle ch'io ton, prendo tal parte, 
Che del mal che ioTentai, piango e uii sdegno. 

Ma forse allor che non m'inganna Tarte, 
Piu taggio io iono? h 1' agitato ingegoo 
Forse allor piii tranqnilio? o forse parte 
Da pin salda cagion Tamor, Io sdegno ? 

Ah ! che non sol qnelle ch'io canto, o scriyo 
Favole son ^ ma quanto temo, o spero ^ 
Tntto e aienaogna, e delirando io tivo 1 

Sogno della mia vita e il corso intero. 
Deh tUf Siguor, quando a destarmi arrivo. 
Fa ch* io irovi rlposo in sen del vero.) 
Sonetto dell* Ahate Vipiam.. 

Paragone tra Coriolano, e Temistocle* 

Due gran citii ver (a) dne campioni invitti 

(i) Rai for raggi. 

(3} FtT tot 9ino» iowardst 



D^aUo livar d''ingratitaAo pttne 
Coriolapo e Teniittocle pFoscritti 
La»gi Aiicciar (l) dalle pateroe areat* 

L' ttD calpeitando ii natura t dritti 
Tentodi por la sua Roma ia cateoe, 
BUpote Taitro ^t ceaoi a lui prefcrittit 
« Mi difanda cht vuoI| nacqiit in Atene* (2)r 

E per noD Tiver scoooteeate a Serte, 
Vk la patria ohraggiar, bevve la morle^ 
£ attoDite f€itar (3) Fanioie Per«e« 

Di traditor la taccta in tua vil iorta 
Per fin che Tisie Corlolan •offerte, 
U ahr» morl da cittadio, d* forte. 

Ottave tratte dal cante sec^ndo dell^ 
Gerusalemme liberata del Tas* 
so (i) 

Colei Solrenia, Olindo egli f'^appelte^ 

(i) Caceiar for cBceiarono, 

(3) Thi» Terfo ii Uk«o from Metattoiio^t The* 
i»fitoclcf>, act. a, ieene 8, where Them Utoo lea 
refuiiog the comisaiKl of the Peril an ariiijr deatiii»- 
•d agaiaet Greece, addreuea Xerxta than : 

E vuoi ch*to di*'enga 

II distruttor deOe pattwne mum ? 

No I tanto non potrli la mia $tfentunf 

"itrxtB repltea. 

Non i p$& Atem^ i guetta nggia 

La patria tua : auella t* ifisidia^ e queit» 

T accoglie^ ti dijtnde^ e ti sostlene, 

Theo Thi mistoelea thus nobly answeri : 

Mi difetHfa chi t^uot nacqui ii» Atene* 

(3) lUstar for rtstarono 

(4) The Octaya ia a itanaa •£ eight iceriea. 



uga 

D* aoa cittadtf enframbi, e dT ona fedc ; 
£i, che modetto e il, com'essa k belFa, 
Brama attai| poco spera, e nalla cMede; 
IXh sa acopririi o non ardiice , ed ella 
O lo tprecza, o nol Tede, o non s* aTTede : 
Cosi fihora il misero ha ter^ito 
O BOO viito, o mal noCO| o mal gradito. 

S'ode raomiDzio intanto, e che s'appreiUi 
Miterabile strage al popol loro. 
A lei che generota k qoanto onesta 
Yiene in pensier come talvar costoro : 
Move fortesza il gran pensier, Tarresta 
Poi la vergogna, e il Terginal decoro, 
Yince fortezza , anzi s'accorda, e face (1} 
Sh Tergogoosa, e la ipergogna audaee. 

La Yergine tra '1 ^ulgo usci soletla^ 
"Non copri fue bellezze e non Tespose^ 
Baecolse gli occhi , ando nel vel (2) ristretta 
Con ischive maoierc e generose; 
Non tai ben dir, a^adorna, o se negletta^ 
Se cato, od arte il bei toUo compose, 
K natura, d' amor, de' cteK araici 
Le negligenze sne aono artifici. 

Mirata da ciaseun passa, e non mira 
L*^ altera donna, e innanzi al re sen viene ^ 

each couipoied of eleven sjllables, ihevefbre term- 
ed EndecauUabi. They are the same' at those 
osed in the Sonnet : only the first verse, as most 
be apparent to every observer , rhymes with the 
third and fifth, the second with the £oarth and 
aixth, and the seventh with tlie eighth. 

(1) Face ^ a poetical expression for jfa, the third 
person singular of the present tense of the indi- 
cative mood of the verh /ar«. 

(a) F€l tot velo^ 



THk perchc irato il v^ggia, il pii fitita, 
Ma il fiero aipetto intreptda soslieae. 
Vengo, Signor, gli ditse ( e intanto V Ira 
Prego^ toipenda, e il too popolo affrene y 
Vengo a scoprirti, e vengo a darti preso 
Quel reOf che cerchi, onde sei tan to offeso* 

All' oneita baldansa, all' imprOTviso 
Folgorar di bellezae altera, e sante, 
Qnasi confaso il re^ qnasi conqaiso 
Freno \o sdegno, e placo- il fier tembiante* 
S' egli era d'alma, o te costei di tiio 
Severa maoco, ci diTeniaoe amante • 
Ma ritrosa belta ritroso core 
P^OD prende, e sono i Teazi eteli d'amore; 

Fa itupor, fa taghezza, e fu dileitOi 
S^amor non fo, che motsa il cor ^illaao : 
Natra, ei le dice, i] totto: eaco io commetto 
Che non %' offenda il popol too crittiano* 
Ed ella : il reo si trova al tuo eoapetto; 
Opra ^ it forto, Signer, di qaetta manoi 
Io ]' immagine tolii ; io- son colei^ 
Che tu rioerohi, e me punir to dei. 

Cofi al pubblico fato il capo altero 
Offerae, a il voile in t^ sola raccorre. 
Magoanima menzogoai or qaando ^ il TCro 
Si belle, che si possa a te preporre ? 
Riman sospeso, e- non %\ tosto il hto 
Tiranno aU'ira, eome sool trascorre; 
Poi la richiede : Io Ta6, ehe ta mi scopra 
Chi di^ (i) ooBSiglio, e cbi fa insiema all'opra* 

Non Tolsi far della mia gloria alirui 
N^ par minima parte (ella gli dice) 
Sol di ma stasia io oonsapeirol ftti|. 

(I) DU for dUde or detu. 

»4 



294 . 
Sol consigliera, e tola esecntrice. 
Drinqne in te tola (ripiglk) eoiui) 
Cadera V ira mia ve ndicalrice. 
Disi*elia : ^ giusro; etser a me convieaei 
Se fui sola aironor, tola alle pene, 

Qui comiocia il Tiraooo a risdegnarst : 
Poi le dimanda ov' bai V iraroago aacosa ? 
Pfoa la oascosi (a lui rispoode) io V arai^ 
£ 1 'arderla stimai Iaudabi4 cosa : 
Cosi almea dod potra piu violarsi 
Per man de' miscredenti ingturiosa: 
Signore, o chiedi il furto, o il ladro chiedi. 
Que! Don Tedrai in elerno, e questo il vedi. 

fienche n^ /urto h il mio, ne ladra io soao^ 
Giuito h ritor cio ch' a gran torto k tolto. 
Or qneato ndendoi in minaccevol suono 
Freme il Tiranno, e '1 £ren dell* ira e fciolto. 
Non iperi piu di ritrovar perdono 
Cor pudicOy alia mente, o nobil volto: 
£ indarno amor contro Io fdegno crndo 
Di sua vaga bellezza a lei fa scado. 

Presa e la bella donna, « iocrudelito 
II re la danna enlro no inoendio a morle. 
Gia '( velo, e 1 caito manlo ^ a lei rapito : 
Siringon le molli braccia aspre ritorte. 
£|]a si tace, e in lei non sbigottito. 
Ma pnr oommosso alqoanto e il pelto forte: 
£ smarrisce il bel volto in un colorCi 
Che Don k pallidesEa, roa 4;andore* 
. . DiTulgossi il gran caso, e qnivi tratto 
Gia *1 popol s'era : Qlindo anco v'acoorse, 
Dubbia era la persona, e cerlo il faUo^ 
Venia (l), che fosse la sua donna in forse. 

(i) Vtnia for peni^a* 



Come la bella prigioniera in atto 
Non par di rea ma di dannota ei scorte. 
Come i mioistri al dnro uffi/io intenti 
Vide; preoipitoio urtb le genti. 

Al re grido: non e, non k gik rea 
Costei del furto, e per follta sen Taota; 
Non pemo, non ardi n^ far potea 
Donna sola, inetperta opra cotanta ; 
Come ingann6 i cuttodi, e della dea 
Con qnal arti involo V imraagin tanta ? 
Se *l fece, il narri ; lo V ho Signor, furata ; 
Ahl tanto amo la non amante amata. 

Soggiunte poscia : lo III, d'onde rice^e 
L'alta vostra meschita e I'aura, e il die^ 
Di nolle ascesi, e trapatsai per breve 
ForOy tentando inaoceisibii vie: 
A me Tonor, li^ morte a me si deve, 
!Non usurpi costei Ic pene roie :• 
Mie son quelle oatene, e per me questi' 
Fiaroma s^accende, e il rogo a me s'apprestai 

Aka Sofronia il yiso e umanamente 
Con occhi di pietade in lui rimira. 
A che ne vieni, o misero innoeente ? 
Qua! consiglio, o furor ti guide o tira ? 
Non son io dunqne senza te possente 
A soslener cio che d'un nom pa6 1' ira ? 
Ho petto anch' io, cb'ad una morte crede 
Di bastar solo» e compagnia non ehiede. 

Cosi parla airamante^ e no) dispone 
Si ch'egli si disdica, o pensier mute (i) 
Oh spettacolo grande, OTe a tenzone 
Sono amore, e magnanima Tirtotel 
Oye la morte ai Tincitor si pone 

(i) MuU for muti» 



296 

In preoiio, e 'I idaI del vinto e la salute. 
Ma piu *' irrila il rc qaant*ella, ed esao 
£* piu costante in incalpar ae atesso. 

Pargli che vUipeao egli ne rcsti, 
£ che 10 disprezzo aao aprezzin le pene. 
Credasi ( dice ) ad ambo, e quella, e qoesti 
Vinca, e la palma aia qiial si coaviene. 
Indi accenna ai aergeati, i quai ion presti 
A legar il garzon di lor catene. 
Sooo ambo siretti al palo atesio, e voito 
E il lergo al tergo» e '1 voUo ascoao al volio. 

Coroposlo ^ lor d* intorno il rogo omai, 
1^ gia le fiarome il roantice t* incita: 
Quandp il fa Dcittllo in doloroai lai 
Proruppe, e dtsse a let ch' ^ seco ooita : 
Questo dunqne e quel laccio, ond' io sperai 
Teco accQppiarmi in compagnia di vita ? 
Quest' ^ quel foeO^ cL' io credea, che i cori 
IVe doTesae infiammar d*eguali ardori ? 

. Allre fiamme, altri nodi Amor promise, 
Altri ce n'apparecchta iniqua sorte, 
Troppo ( ahi ben troppo ) elia gia noi divise^ 
Ma duramenfte or ne conginnge in morte* 
Piacemi almen, poicbe in si strane guise 
Morir pur dei, del rogo esser consorte, 
Se del letto non fui ; duolmi il tuo fato, 
II mio non gia^ poich* io ti moro a lato. 

£d .oh mia morte avYenlorosa appieno. 
Oh fortunati miei dolci roaniri, ' 

S* iropetrera^ che giunio seno a seno 
Uanima mi» nella tuft boeca io spiri. 
£ venendo lu meco a un tempo meno. 
In me fuor mandi gJi ulh'mi sospiri. 
Cosi dice piangendo, ella il ripiglia 
Soaveroente, e in tai detti il contiglit. 



^97 

Amico, altri peoiieri, altri lamenti 
Per piu alta cagione il tempo chtede. 
Che oOQ pensi a tue colpe, e non rammcnti 
Qual Dio promette ai baoni ampia mercede? 
Soffri in suo Dome, e sian doici i tormeuti, 
E lieto aspira alia ioperna sede. 
Mira il Ciel, com' i bello, e mira il sole 
Ch' a te par che n' inviti, e ne console. 

Qui il vulgo de'Pagani il pianto estolle, 
Piange il fedel, ma in voci assai piu basse. 
Un non so che d' inusitato, e moile 
Par che nel duro petto al re trapasse; 
£i presentiilo, e si sdegno, ne voile 
Piegarsii e gli occbi torse, e si ritrasse. 
Tu sola il diiol comun non accompagni, 
Sofronia, e pianta da ciascun non piagni. (l) 



(i) There Is aoother species of Stanzas of s'yx 
rerses : the first rhyming with the third, the se- 
eood with the fourth, and the two last together ; 
aa IB the following examp/e. 

D/Ve che 7 sacro ed onorato fontt 
Do^e gloria si beve in guordia avtte^ 
Dal t^ottro ombroso e solitario monie 

Un iempio meco a fahbriear scendtte^ 
Un tempio m*' immortal poscia s'adori 
Quegta donna de* GalU e Dea dt' cori» 

(Marino.) 

There is also aoother sort of Stanzas, called 
QuaHa Rima. It consists of foar rerses, the first of 
which rhymes with the fourth, the second with 
the third* 



29« 

Terzine del Metastasio. (i) 

^ U 0R1C1NE HELLS LeGGI. 

Quando ftDcor non ardiva il pino audace 
Grave di merci disptegare il toIo 
Sul mobi) dorso d'oceati faNace^ 

Era alle genii noto ud lido solo, 
'Ne certo segno i cam pi distingaea, 
Ne curvo aratro rivolgeva il suolo. 

Per gli antri e per le selve ogoaa traea 
Allor la vita, ne fra seta o lane 
Le sue ravide membra ravTolg«a« 

Che noQ teroeano ancor le membra nmane 
II dure ghiaccio degli alpestri monti, 
Hh i raggi che cadean dal sirio cane. 

La pioggia, e il sol sulle rugose fronti 
Battean sovente, tna il disagio istesso 
Oli rendcTa a soffrir stabili, e pronti. 

A ciascun senza tema era concesso 

(i^ The Terzine^ or -CapUoU^ are heroic Tersetf 
«r EndecasUiubiy disposed la soch a manner, that 
ihe first and third verses of the first stanza m«y 
rhyme together; the second with the first and 
third of the second stanza^ and the second of the 
second itanza with the first and third of the third 
Mtanza^ thus continoing: to the end of the compo- 
sition, which mast close with a stanza of four 
verses, that every verse may have another to 
rhyme with. We have likewise CapitoU di terza 
rima of slippery verses, or sdruccioU^ as the 
Arcadia of Sannazaro, 

O pura fede, e dolce usanza tfctera \ 

Or coaosco ben <o, ch' il mondo instahiie 

Tanlo peggiora pi it, quanta ptii inwtUnim 



^99 

Dal medesimo troneo il cibo corre, 
Ed estinguer la sete al fonte appreifo. 

Avveone poi che desiando porre 
Due sul frutto vicin TaduDca manO| 
Uuno all'ahro tentd la preda torre. 

£ quindi acceti di furore insano 
Con Tunghie pria ti iaceraro (i) il votto, 
Poi con Tarmi irrigar (3) di sangue il piano. 

Indi pill d'an ti Tide insierne accolto 
Solo per (ema del potera altrui, 
Cui (iero idegno il freno avea disciolto. 

Poi, per aprir ciascuno i tensi iui 
Con la lingua accennava il suo parere, 
Che fa il modo primiero offerto a Ini, 

Percbe tente ciascnno il suo potere. 
Come il piccol fanciullo appena k nalo 
Ne dimoitra col dito il luo volere. 

Scberza il torello alia lua naadre a lafo, 
Ed appena spunlarti il corno tente, 
Che. a cozzar dallo tdegno h gia portato, 

Ed adolto V augello immantinente 
Se ttetto affida ad inesperti vanni, 
Ove il poter natura a Ini contente. 

Poi Tolendo del Ciel fuggire i d^nm , 
Yarie pelli alle membra t'aidkittorno (3) ; 
Indi testean di lane i rozzi panni. 

E ciatcnn componendo il tuo toggiorno 
Per ticnrezza i lor tngurj uniti 
Cinter di fosse, e di muraglie intorno. 

Ma perche varie idee; varj appetiti 
Yolgon Tuonjo ; percid tempre fra loro 

(17 Lacefaro for laceraron^* 
(a) Irrigar for irrigarono, 
(3) Jdattorno for adaitarono» 



oao 
Era no semi di discordte e lili. 

Onde per ritrovar pace, e ristoro 
Fu dttopo esser soggetti a patti tali 
Che del cotnan voler tmroago foro (l). 

Cosi le varie menri de'mortali 
Dall'utile coinun preudeodo norma 
Resero tutti i lor desiri e^uali 

Che in var tenta ridursi a certa forma 
Corpo civil, se sol de' proprj affetti 
Ogai stolto pensier seguita Torma. 

Ami anche a* dolti, e nobiii intelletti 
Tant' e piu necessario ii giusto freuo 
Quant* hanno di variar raaggiori oggetli. 

II Saggio yive sol libero appieno, 
Perche del ben oprare 11 seme eterno 
Deir infinito trae dal Tasto seno. 

Egli discerne -col suo lume interno 
Che da una sola idea sorge.e dipende 
Delle create cose il gran governo. 

II dotto e quel ehe solo a gloria attende, 
Qaal k colui che di Febeo furore 
Tra 1' alme Muse la sua mente acceade. 

Ma il saggio e quel che mai non cangia il core^ 
E seropre gode una tranquilla pace 
Id questo breve Irapassar dell'orc. 

Egli e sol, ch' alle leggi non soggiace, 
Perche sol con le leggi egli conviene, 
£ di quelle e compagno, e non seguace. 

Ei le sue voglie a suo piacer trattiene, 
£ sciolto vola da mortale impero, 
A cui legad ambizion ci tiene. 

Egli e che conducendo il suo pensiero 
Per lo cammin delle passate coie 

(i) Foro lor furono» 



3oi 

Mira delte'fatnre il corso intiero. 

Egli in 86 stesso ha sue ricchezze ascose ^ 
Vi iiiai per Toglia di grandezza umana 
Di le la guida alia fortuna espose. 

Ed egli e che con mente accorta e aana 
Le leggi incontra, e con la propria vitl ^ 
Ogni ingiuria da quelle anche allonlana. 

Coiue Socrate ii saggio ognor n'audita, 
Che per non violar le leggi sante 
Sparger si conlento Tanima ardiia. 

£i fa ch^avcndo i cari amici avante 
Del sno giorno fatal nel pun to estremo 
Disse con voce debile, e tremante s 

Amici il mio morire io- gia non temo ; 
Peroccbi qnanlo accorcio il viver miof 
Tanto alio apirto (l) di prigione io icemo. 

£ questa mortal vita non desio, 
Acciocch^ Talma del sue fango pura 
Ritorni lieta alio splendor natio. 

Che in qaesta spoglia che ii goder ci fura, 
Colui la propria Tila ha piti disteso, 
Che non dai giorni il yiver sac misara. 
Ma da quel cha conobbe ed ha compreso. 

Fersi sciolti tratti dal Pastor 
Fido del Gutfrini. (a) 

Come il gelo alle piante^ ai fior TariorA 

(i) SpirU for spirito* 

(a) The Italians hare preserved in their own 
langBa|;e many peenliarities of the Latin toogne. 
The present species of verse was taken from the 
same : the Italians term it ScioUo^ the £nglish 
blank verse. It is frequently mixed with one of 
l^aWe syllablfa aallcd Sdruceigh or slippery. Qf 

* *4 



302 
La grandine alle spiche, ai teml tl vermei 
Le reti a' cervi, ed agli avgelli it tisco: 
Cosi nemico airaom fu sempre araore. 
£ chi faoco chiamollo, intese molto 
La saa natnra perfida, e maWagta. 
Che se *1 faoco ti mira oh come e Tago ! 
Ma se si tocca oh come e crudo I il mondo 
I^on lia di Ini piii spaventeTol mostro ; 
Come fera divorai e come ferro 
Punge, e trapassa, e come vento Tola : 
£ dove-il piede imperioso ferma 
Cede ogoi foraa, ogni poter da loco. 
Non altrametite Amor; che se ta '1 miri 
In dao begU occhi, in ana treccia bionda. 
Oh come alletta, e place ; oh come pare 
Che gtoja spiri, e pace altrui prometta 1 
Ma se troppo faccostl, e troppo il tenli^ 
Si che serper cominci, e forsa acquisti, 
Non ha tigre V Ircania, e non ha Libia 
Leon si fero, e si pestifero aogne 
Che la sua feritli vinca, o pareggi. 
Crudo piu che T Inferno^ e che la morte : 
Nemico dt pieth, ministro d' ira 
t* finalmeute Amor privo d'amore. 

this kind is the following passage of the fsmoas 
translBtioD of the AEneid by Annibal Caro. 
F'erranno i Teucri al regno di Lavinio \ 
Di cib t*aff,do. Ma hen iosto d'esgervi 
Si pentiranno. Guerre^ guerre orribili 
Sorger ne veggio^ e pien di sangae il Tet>ere, 
They are sometimes intermixed with verses 
of ten syllables, the last word of which have an 
accent upon the last vowel, and are called Tron* 
chi. Of this nature is Annibal Care's siranslation of 
the following line of Virgil, 

Exanimiique tremens jtrocmmbit humi fros. 
Si sposse^ barcoUbi morto cadi. 



3o3 
Canzone di Gioifanni Milton. 

Ridonsi donne e GioTani emorosi, 

M' accostandosi altorno. e perrh^ ^crivi, 

Perclii ta acrivi in lingaa ignota e slrana 

Versegglando d'amor, e come T osi ? 

Dinne se la tna ipeme sia mai. Tana, 

£ de* penfieri lo rotglior t'artivi ? 

Cosi mi van burlando: 

Altri rivi ftipettano, ed altre onde 

Nelle cut Tcrdi spoade 

Spantera ad or ad or aHa tna cbioma 

L' immortal gaiderdoo d'eiemc froodi. 

Percbe alle spalle Cae toTerchia aoma ? 

Canzon diroui, e tu per me ritpoDdi : 

Dice mia Donna, e '1 tuo dire h il mio cuore. 

Qaeita h lingua di cui si Tania amore. 

Epigramma di Monsieur ^Ife/iage. 
Chi credato I'aTrebbe? 
L*empia, la cruda Joie 
Del mio patir ai dnole : 
A quel finto dolore 
Non ti fidar, mio core ; 
T^on i Tera pietade 
Quella che mostra no, ma crudeUade. 
Dell'aspro mio martire 
La cruda vuoi gioire* 
Udir la cruda i miei aoipiri ardenti, 
£ mirar tqoIc i dnri miei tormenti, (l) 

(0 This if a tranalation of the following Epi- 
gram of fiucaoan : 

Jlla mihi temper praesenti dura Nedero 
Me quoties dbtutn semper abesie doleK 
Non desulerio nostri^ non maerei amore* 
Sed «e non nostro posse dolore frui. 



SceUa di alcuni passaggi del 
Metastasio. (i) 
> 
'^— — Non * pnidema 
Ma fallia de' mortali 
L'arte cradel di presagirsi i malL 
Sempre e maggior dd ipero 

L* idea d" ana trientura 

Ai credulo pensiero 

Dipiota del timor. 
Chi ftolto ii mat figure, ^ 

Affretta il proprto a£fannO| 

£d atsicura un danno 

Qaaodo h dubbioso aoeor. 

Auilio Regolo Auo L Scena XL 

• ■ ■ Mai non %i Tide ancora 

In pertglio si graade 

La Gloria mial ma qaetta Gloria, o Dei, 

Kon e deir alme oosrre 

Ua affelto tiranno? Al par d'ogni altro 

Domar non ai dovrebbe ? Ah nol De* yiH 

Qaesto ^ il linguaggio— -Inutilmeate neeqiM 

Chi sol Tive a se stetso : e sol da qaesto 

Nobile affetto ad obbliar t* impara 

Sh per altrni. Qoanto ha di ben la terra 

Alia Gloria si dee. Veodiea qaesta 

L' nmanita del Tergognoso stato 

In cui aaria aenza ii desio d*oaore: 

(0 Next to the yerse gf eleven tjITi^bles that 
of seyen i< the moit harmonious ^ and Metastasis 
l^aa liappU/ mixed it to that of eleven, without 
j^iying to it anjr determinate placej only contnlt* 
lag hit nice and jadicioas ear. 



3o5 

Tog1i« il senio al dolore, 

Lo spaTento at perigli. 

Alia morte il terror. Dilata i Regali 

1.6 citka cMtodisce: Alletta, aduna 

Segaaci alia Tirtii, caogia in toavi 

I feroci costami, 

£ reode Vuomo imitator de* Numi. 

Idem Alto IL Scena f^IL 

Se a ciascon V interno atfanno 

Si leggesse in fronte scrttto, 

Qaanti mai, che invidia UtMO^' 

Gi farebbero pieta ! 
Si Tedria (i) che i lor iwnict 

Hanno in seno : e si riduoe 

Nel parere a noi felici 

Ogni lor leliciti. 

Giuseppe Riconosciuto Parte L 

Deh coii pvetlo 

I^on condannarmi* Oh tomt 

Siam degli altri a STantaggio 

Facili a giodicari Blisero effetto 

Del troppo amar noi stessil Al iiottro fatto 

Luiinga k il biatmo (3) altrni. Par che s'acquuti 

Quanto agli altri li •cema. Ognan procura 

Di ritroyare altrore 

O compagii< all* errore, . . 

O r error ch' ei non ha* Cambian per qneato 

Spesso i nomi alle oote. In noi Tednto 

II timore i prudensa, 
Modettia la Tiltii: Teduta in altri 

(i) Si 9edna tot si vedrebhe, 

(a) Mioimo contracted from biasimQ, 



So6 

E' vilta la modestia, 

La pradeDza e timor. Qoindi poi siamo 

Si contenti dt noi; qaiodi snceede 

Che Urdi il beo, tabilo U ma! si crcde. 

Ibidem 
— — Qaando il coslame 
Si convene in natura 
L'alma, quel che non ba, togna, e figara. 
Sogna il goerraer le sebiere 

Le telve il caeciator; 

E ftogna il petcator 

Le retiy e ramo. 
Sopito in dolce oblio 

Sogno pnr io cosi 

Colei cbe tntto il di 

Sospiro e cbiamo. 

Artaserse. Atto L Scena V. 

— -^^ Ai grandi acqnbti 
Gran coraggio bisogna, e nop eonviene 
Temer periglio, o ricusar fiilica ; 
Cbe b fortuaa h degU aadaei arnica. 
Non fidi al mar cbe freme 
La temeraria prora 
Chi fti tcolora, e feme 
Sol qnando vede il mar* 
Non fti cimenti in campo 

Chi trema al snono, al Umpo 
D* una gnerriera troaib% 
D' ao bellicose acctar 

Denietrio Atto IL Scena X* 

Insana gioyentu! Qaalora esposta 
Ti Ycggo Unto agU impeti d* amore 



3o7 

Di mia vecchiezza io mi cooiolo^ e rido. 
Dolce ^ il mtrar dal lido 
Chi sta per naufragar; noo che ne alletti 
II danno altroi, mn %<A perch^ Taspetto " 
D'uD mal che doq si soffre k dolce oggetto. 
Ma che ? 1* elk canufa 

Nod ha le sue tempeste ? ah I che pur troppo 
Ha le sue proprie, e dal timor deiraltre 
S«;iolta non e. Son le follie diverse 
Ma foUe e ognono: e a sno piacer o'aggira 
L'odio o Tamor, ia cnpidigia o I'ira. 
Siam navi all'onde algenli 

Lasciate in abbandono ; 

ImpetuosK Teoti 

I nostri affetti sooo : 

Ogoi diletto ii scoglio : 

Tatta la vita ^ an mar. 
Ben qaal nocchiero in noi 

Veglia ragiooy ma poi 

Dal proceiloso orgoglio 

Si lascia trasportar* 

Ollmpiade. Atto II. Seena V. 

Perchi bramar la vita! £ qnale io lei 

Piacer si trova ? Ogni fortuna k pena, 

£' miseria ogni eti. Treroiam fanciolli 

D' an gnardo al minacciar. Siam gioco adoiti 

Di fortuna, e di amor. Gemiam canuti 

Sotto il peso degli anni. Or ne tormenta 

La brama d'ottenere : or ne trafigge 

Di perder il timore : eterna gaerra 

Hanno i rei coo se stessi ; i giusti 1' hanno 

Coir invidia e la frode. Ombre, deliri, 

Sogniy follie son nostre care : e quando 



3o8 

II Tergognoto errore 

▲ scoprir •' incominciay allor ai maore. 

Demofoonte Atto IIL Scena I. 

Sk loniinoso il fine 

Del Ti?er mio. Qaal monbonda face 

Sciotiilando s' estiogna. Alfin che mai 

Easer pn& qaesta morte ? Un ben ? s'affretti. 

Un mal? Foggasi presto 

Dal limore d*aspettario, 

Che h mal peggtore. E* della Yita Indegno 

Chi a lei pospon la gloria: a cio che nasce 

Qoella h coman: deiralme grand! e qaesU 

Proprio, e privato ben. Tema il sno fato 

Quel Til che aglt altri oscnro, 

Che ignoto a s^ mori nascendo, e porta 

Tatto s^ nella tomba: ardito spiri 

Chi pu6 tensa rossore 

Eammeatar come yiue allor che maore. 

Temistocle dtto IIL Scena L 



A TABLE, shewing the Dedei 



DEFINITE 
BIASGULINE CENDtR. 

Stag. ITinaestrOy (2) the masier. 

Del maettroy of the mn^ier. 

Al maestro^ to the mustei", 

Dal maestro^ Jtrtni the master, 

Plur. I maestriy tfie tuaaten. 

Dei, or de' maestri, of tfte nuisters. 
Ai, or a' maestri, to tfie m^Lsierx^ 
D«t, w dti* auiestxif J totn the tnaslcts^ 

Siag. Lo adegno, (3) jAe ari^cr. 

Delio sdegno, of the fin£*tr. 

Alio sdegno, to the finger. 

Dallo sdetfDO, frof/i dw luiger. 



PUr, Git adegniy 
Dedi adegai, 
A^i sdegai, 
Jiagli sdegniy. 



the a/igert. 
of tfie angers, 
to the angfrs. 
from the angers^ 



iNiflNITIFE MOOD. 



^. pO.Part.act. 



\\.V^\\,\\»iA. 



Pre 
i do 



cut J J 



cr- 



D«len AN ALPHABETICAL LIST. 



509 



IRREGULAR FERBS 

Snjagated in those lenses in which they vary 
from the BigulaR ones. 

fte Figures i, 3, 3 etc, mark the Tenses.^ as in the 
' preceding Table, 



BBOR-ire, to abhor, liTce 
I Capire, tbe third regular 
conjugation. It is often 
conjugated as follows , 
and especially in poetry. 
^9 o, h « CO* 'fl/wo* ite, 

OHO 

2 ^> '* ^ > ^^^ > ^^ ' ^'^ 
** ' 6 « , «, or a, a, iamo, 

iate, ano 
Ucadere u. Cadere. The 
former is an impersonal 
▼crb. 
Iccen-dere, v. Preodere 
3. Accensi ed accenae , 

with 
44. AccensOi are poetical 
expressions (2) 
Acchiudexe, u* Chiudere 
Accinsere, %*, Gingere 
Accogliere, v Cogliere 
Acconsentire, v. Abborrire 



seotj 



Accorgersij to perceive. 

3. si, g^^ti, se , gemmoy 
geste, sero 

41. to> The compound ten-* 
ses are formed with es- 
sere, and this is the 
case with all reflective 
veAs. 
Accorrere u. Correre 
Accrescere u. Crescere 
Addivenire^ ^». Venire; the 
first is an impersonal 
^cerb. 
Adducere {obsolete) u. Ad- 

durre 
Addu-rre , to iring, to al- 
ledge 

4. CO, ci, ce, oiamo, cete 
cono 

3. ssi, cesti, sse^ cemmo ^ 
4ieste, ssero 



0") Ei brama onore e *l suo contrario dbborre. 

^Petr.) 
.(2) E spesso I* un contrario all* altro accense. 
Per Hon trouaryi i duo bei Iwni accensi. 

(Idem.) 



3io 

4. rr6 , rrai, rrk, rremo, 
rretCt rramto 

5. ei , ca , ciamo , cete , 
cano 

6. ca, CO, ca, ciamo, da- 
te, cano 

7. rrei, etc, 

8. cessi, etc. 
40. cenao 
M. addoUo 

AiTiggere, »/. Affliggere 

44 ajfisso 
Affli^ere^ to ajJLict 
3. til, ggesU, sse, ggem- 
mo, ggeste, ssero 
AfTrangere, tf. Frangere 
Aggiacere, i/. Giaccre 
AggiuQgere, u. Giungere 
Adhere, a verb used chiefly 
ia poetrYy and only ia 
the tlilrd person singular 
of the present tense, viz. 
al^e and in the first and 
third person singular of 
the preterite of the indi- 
cative mood} vizy aUi, 
alse 



Ammetterey p. Mettere 
Ancidere, (4) t^. Uccidcrc 
Andare, (2; to go 

4. uado or po, uai, va, 
andiamo, aiidate, vaiuto 

4. andrb, etc. rather than 
anderd, etc. 

5. t^a , vada , andiamo , 
andate, i^adano 

6. uada, vadi, or vada, 
i/ada, andiamo, andia- 
te, uadojio 

7. andrei, etc. 
Angere, (3") a defective 

verb, ana used only in 

poetry 
Antenorre, t*. Porre 
Amid ire, t/. Dire 
Antivedere, t/. Vedere 
Appa-rire, to appear 

4. — rre in poetiy (4) 

3. rsi, or rt*i, risti, rse, 
or ri^, — ri^ero 

44. rso 
Appartenere, >/. Tenere 
Appendere, p, Sospendere 
AppUudire, u. Abborrire 



(4) Ancidere if nther a poetical expression. 

Exam. 
E se un tempo V ancide alfiae U sana, 

(Pastor Fido.) 

(2) This verb is often made reflective with the parti- 
cle ne : as andartene, which answers to the French s* en 
a/ler. In the second person singular of the imperative 
taood, we double the f, and say vattene, and sometimes 
ifanne, especially in poetry. Its compound tenses are form- 
ed witli essere. We also make use of the verb andare 
instead of do%^re; as Questo non ua detto, queilo non 
^ndaiHi Jatto, etc. meaning Questo non deve eursi, queilo 
non doueua farsi, etc. 

(3) Potria 7 fuoco allentar die 7 cor tristo ange 

(Petr.S 

(4) D*auro ha la chioma, ed or dal bianco i>elo 
Trainee -uwolta, or discoperta appare, (Tasso.) 



3ii 



Apporre, %f, Ponre 
Appreadere. (/. Prendcre 
Ap-rire, like Dormipe , 
•except 

3. ersi, or rii, risti, erse, 
or rl, rimmo, riste, er- 
sero, or rirono 
44. erto 
-Ar-dere^ to burn 

3* W, £2f«£/, te, demmo, 

date, sero 
44. #o 
.Ardire, to dare, like the 
regular verb oapirei only 
we never »ay ardiamo; 
•ftrdiate, ardendo, these 
inflections heingl ike those 
oC thet verb ardere, to 
bum. We make use in the 
-above tenses of the regu- 
lar verb otaref or else 
we saj ahbiamo ardire f 
abbiate ardire, at/endo ar- 
'dire; in order to pre- 
. Tent any ambiguity that 
might arise 
Arrendere, i/. Rendere 
Arridere, i/. Ridere 
Arrogere, to add, a defec- 
tive and poetical verb (4) 
Ascendere, k Scendere 
Asco-ndere, to conceal 
3. $i, ndesti, se, ndem*' 

mo, ndeste, sero 
44. so 
Ascrivere, u. Scrivere 
Asper-gere, to sprinkle. 
3. si, gesti, se, gemmo, 

0) £ duolnu ch'ogm gionto arroge at danno. 

(2) The compound tenses are formed wi/h essere. 

(3) We likewise make use of bei*ere, which is a rego- 
lar verb ; bnt instead of beuei, beu^., het^rono, ben^ro, be» 
^'erei, etc. we say, beuin, bet^we, bei^eiOj berb, betei, eta. 



44. so 
Assalire, t^, Salire 
Assentire, (/. Abborrire 
Assi-dersi, to sit down 
40. si, dest'i, se, demmo, 

deste, sero 
44. so (2) 
Assistere, to assist 

44. Assistito 
Assolvere, y. Risolvera 
Asstt-mere, to assume 
S. nsi, mesti, use, mem» 

mo, meste, tisero 
44. nto 
Astenere, t^, Tenere 
Astrarre, t^. Traire 
Astrinffercy u. Stringeve 
Attendere, v. Prendere 
Attenere, u. Tenere 
Attingere, u. Cingere 
Attor-cere to twist 
3. si, cesti, se, eemmo, 

eeste, seto 
44. to 
Attrarre, i/. Trarre 
Avveliere, »/. Svei/ere 
Avvenire. ) •» . 
Avvenirsi, ) *"' ^^""''^ 
Of these two verbs the 
former signifies to hap' 
pen^ and is impersonal ; 
the latter to meet wi^ 
and is reflective 
Benedicere^) obsolete 
Benedire, } i/. Dire 
Bc-re, (3) to drink 



3l3 

^ vo, i, e, iiamo. He, 

ono 
% evo, etn, etta, et*amo, 

etuae, etfwto 

3. %HH, esti, inft, emmo, 
este, vtfero 

4. moy rai, ra, remo, 
retCf ranno 

5. i, o,, iamo, ete, vano 

6. a, i, or a, a, iamo, 
iau, vano 

7. rei, resti, rebbe, rem- 
mo, reite, rebhero 

8. vessi, yessi, vesse, ves- 
simo, ueste, vessero 

40. vendo 

41. tfiOo 
Benvolere v. Volerc 
Cade-re, to fall 

i. do, or egio ia poetry 

(4) di, ae, diamo, dete, 

dono 
$. ddi, detti, dde, dem- 

mo, deste, ddero 
6, da, da, da or ggia ia 

poetry, (2) diamo, dia- 

te, dano 
4. drd. drai, dra,<dremo, 

drete, dranno 
7« drei, etc. 
40. dendo, or agendo in 

poetry ^3) 



Ca-lere, to core for. Imperii 
sonal verb 

3. l9e 

6. caglia 

Capere, a defective and ob- 
solete verb, instead of 
which we make use of 
the verb Capire. In the 
DictioDary of La Grusca, 
I find Capcy (4) Capeim, 
aad no othec tenses. 

Cedere, i^ Coucedere 
4 4 . cedulo , and never 
cesso 

Cherere, a defective verb 

4. - chere io poetry (5) 
Ghie-dere, to ask 

4. do, ggo, or ggio, di, 
de, or re (6) diamo, 
dete, dono, ggofio, or 
g^iono 

3. ti, or detti, desti, se, 
or dette, demmo, desu, 
sero, or dettero 

44. sto 
Chia-dere, to shut . 

3. si, desU, se, 
deste, sero 

44. so 
Go-^ere, or Cigaere^ ^ 

gird 



M Or mi iollet^, or eaggio. (Petr ) 

j(2) Qual uom cK aspetti che sid coUo ignudo 

Ad or ad or gli caggia it ferro crudo, (Tasso.) 
*Q) II Nil d'alto cag^endo 

Col gran suono i **icin d* -intorno assotda. 

(Petr.) 
(4) Questa prima voa^a 

Merto di lode, o at biasmo non cape. (I3ante.) 
{5) Soccorso a* suoi perigli altro non chere. 

(Ta>so.) 
[6) — « Roma ognora 

Ti chier merce da tutti seUe i colli. (P«tr.) 



^- go> gh ge, gtamo, 

gete, gono 
3. si, gesti, se, gemmo, 

gene, sero 
44. to 
Circoncidere, if. DWidere 
CirconciDgere, u. Cin^ere 
Circonscnvertf, w. Scnvcre 
Circonvenire, i/. Veairo 
Co-gliere , or Corre , to 
gather 

A, glio, otlgo,gli, glie, 
gliamo, gliete, gliono 
or Igono 

3. In, gliesti, Ite, glieni' 
mo, eliesie, Isero 

4. corro, etc. 

5. gli , glia , or Iga , 
gliamo, gliete, gliono, 
or laano 

U.lto. 
Colere, an obtolete and de- 

. iccti^e verb ^i) 
CoUidere, u, Dividere 
Commeitere, t/. Mettera 
Comroovere, t^. Movere 
Gomparire, t^. Apparire 
Compiacere, t*. riacere 
Gompiangere, p, Piangere 
GompoiTei t^. Porre 
Comprendere, i/. Prendere 
Compromettere; t^. Promet- 

tere 
CompuDgerey ^. TJngere 



3i3 

Conce-dere to gratU 

3. ssi, dei, or deiti, desti, 
gse, dh, or dette, dem- 
mo, dette, stero or 
dettero 

44. duto, or sto 
Goncepire , like Gapirt , 

R. (^) 
Gonchiadere, y, Ghtud«re 
Goncorrere, t^. Gorrere 
GoQcaocere, i/. Gaocere 
Gondescendere, t/. Scenderc 
Gondolere^ i/. Dolere 
Gondurre, (/. Addu^re 

4 1 . oonduUo , in poe* 
try (3) 
Gonfare, f/. Fare 
Gonfiggere, p. Affltggere 
Gonl'oadere, v. Fondere 
Gono-scere, to htow 

J. bbi, teetti, hbe, Mcem' 
mo, tceste, hb«ro 

41. sciuto 
Gonquidere, f/. Dividere 
Gonscrivere, u, Scrivere 
Gonsentire, i/. AbborriM 
Gonsistere, y. Assistere 
Gonstruire, like Gapire R. 

44. oonstruito, or coo* 
stnttto 
Gonsumere. y. AMomere 
Gontendere, i>. Prendere 
Gontenere, y. Tenere 
Gontorcere, y. Toreere 



J'{) This TCib is seldom used but in poetry^ wherein 
o an cole are sometimes introdaced. Exam. 

Al loco tonto 

Che per te coruacrato onoro, e coin. (P«tr.) 

(2) Tasso makes use of concepe for eoncepisce. 

Exam. 
Cupidamente ella conceme e figHa. 

(3) E gita al Cielo, ed hammi a tal condutto 
Che gli ocehi mm non latsan loco oiduito. 

(Petf.) 



3i4 

G>Dtraddire, v,. Dire 
Gootrafiare, u. Fare 
Gintrapporre, u. Porre 
G>Dtrarre, i/. Tiarre 
Contrascriirere, v. Scrivere 
Conveaire, y. Venire 
CouTerUre^ i/. Abborrire 
Convincere, i/. Yincere 
Coavivese, v. Viverc 
Gonvolgere, i/. Volgere 
Goprire, »/. Aprlre 
G>rre. a couiraction ot the 

-verb CogUere 
CoiTeggere. i/. Leggere 
Co-nere, to run 

3. r«i, rresti, rse, rrem^ 
mo, rreste, rsero 

*{. rso 
Corrispondere , t*» Rlspon- 

dere 
CorroderCy u, Eodere 
Corrompere, i/. Rompere 
Cospergere, i/. Aspergere 
Costringerei y, Stringere 
Cre-scere, to grow 

bhi, scesti, o6e, soemmo, 

sceste, bbero 

44. gciuto 
Crocifiggei*ey f/. AiBggere 
Cu-cire, to sew 

4. cip, ci, ce, damo oite, 
cioiio 

2. ciVo> etc. 

3. cii, etc. 

4. ciroy etc. 

5. ci^ ct^j ciamo cite, 
ciofio 

6. cf'a, etc. 



7. cirn, etc. 

8. cissi, etc. 

Cuocere, to c?o, «> Aoi7, 

4. cuoco, ci, ce, cuocta- 

mo, cete, cuooofto 
X cocci^, etc. 

3. oossi, cuocesti, or OO' 
cesti, cosse, cuocemmo, 
cuoceste , or cocesU, 
eossero 

4. cocer 6, or cuocero, etc. 

7. cocerei , ox cuoce" 
pei, etc. 

8. cocessi, or cuooes- 
si, etc. 

40. cocendo 

44. cotto 
Guoprire, |/. Coprire 
Dare, to giW (4) 

4. ^o, rfai, a«, diamo, 
date, danno 

3. ciicti/, or dettif de- 
sti, diede, date, or die', 
demmo, deste, diedero, 
dettero, diedono, diero- 
no, and io -poetry dier, 
diero, demio, (2) 

5. da dia ; and tormerly 
dea diamo, daU, die- 
no, diatto, deajio 

6. dia, dia; dia, diamo, 
diate, dieno, or diano. 

7. darei, etc. 

8. dessi, dessi , desse, 
dessimo, deste, dessero, 
or dessono 

Decadere, w, Cadere 



(4) The verbs compounded of dare, or stare, snch ai 
secondare, circondare, accostare, soi*rastare, are ^regular. 

(2) — ; Tal risposta diero. (Dante.) 

Oi^' e {/ bel cigUo, e Vwia e V altra Stella ' 

Ch* ai oorsQ Jil mio uiyer lume denno ? 

(Petr.) 



Deci'Jere, t*» DivIJcrc 
Decrescertf, p. Crescere 
Dedurre, ^. Addurre 
Deludere, i/. Chiudere 
Demergere, u. Asperger^ 
Deporre, t*. Porre 
Dereiinquere, tojbnake (4) 
Deridere, u. Dividere 
DescriverCi t*, Scrivcre 
Desiare, to wish for. This 
Terb is used only in poe- 
trj (2) In prose we com- 
monly use desiderare, or 
bramare, -which are regu- 
lar verbs. 
Detei-gere, w. Aspergere 
Deirarrc, t/, Trarre 
Diacere {pbioUte) ff, Gia* 

cere 
Dicadere, u. Cadere 
Dicere (obsolete) u. Dire 
Dicrescere, i/. Crescere 
Difendere, ^, Prenderc 
Diflbodere, (/. Fondere 
Dimettere, v, Mettere 
Dtpingere, (/. Cingere 
Diporre, if, Porre 
Di-re, to say 

A, CO, ci, ce, ciamo, te, 
cono 

2. cevo, ceid, ce^a, oeua" 
mo, oeuate, oeuano 

3. ssi, cesti, sse, cemmo, 
ceste, ssero 

4. ro, etc. 

5. di, ca, ciamo, te, cano, 

6. ca, Chi, or ca, ea, cia- 
mo, date, cano 

40. cendo 



3i5 

44. detto 
Divigere, u, Erieere 
Discendere, u. Scendere 
Dischiudere, «/. Chiudere 
Disciogliere, u. Gogliere 
Disciorre, a contraction of 

Disciogliere 
Disconvenire, y. Veniro 
Discoprire, y, Coprire 
Discorrere, k Correre 
Disdire, y. Dire 
Disfare, %». Fare 
Disgiungere, y. Giungere 
Dismettere, u, Mettere 
Disparire, u. Apparire 
Diifperdere^ %». Perdere 
Di»pergere, u. Aspergere 
Dispiacere, y. Piacere 
Disporre, u, Porre 
Dissolvere, y, Risolvere 
Distendere, y. Prendere 
Distin-guere, to distinguish 

3. si, guesti, se, guem- 
mo, gueste, sero 

44. to. 
Distogliere, y, G>gliere 
Distorcere> t*, Torcere 
Distorre, a contraction of 

Distogliere 
Distrarre, y, Trarre 
Distruggere, y. Siruggere 
Disveilere, y. Svellere 
Disvolgere, y. Volgere 
Diteoere, y. Tenere 
Dived ere, y. Vedere 
DivcUere, y. Svellere 
Diverlire. y. Abborrire 
Divestire, y, Dormire 



(4) Derelin^uere is entirely Latin» and seldom used; 
only the passive participle derelilio is now and then 
employed by good authors. 

(2) 1 find no teofei used by our poets» but desio, de^ 
sia, desiare. 



3i6 

Divi-dere, to ditnde 

3, si, desd, se, demmo, 
deste, tero 

41. MO 

Divolgere^ u. Volgere 
Dolere. an inrper^onarl 
▼erb, which 8ignifie& to 
aeh M Mi drtole la testa, 
my head achs, etc. 
Do-Iern, a reflective verb, 
to complidn^ 

4. Igo, slio, duoti, duo- 
ie, gliamo, Ute, Igono, 
or ^liono 

3. isi, or lei, Ibsti, Ise^ 
lemmo, teste, Isero^ 

4. rro, etc. 

5. duolti, Iga, or glia, 
gliamoci, litevi, Iga* 
no, or gliano 

6; glia, or Iba, Iga, Iga, 
gliamo, gliate, gliano^ 
or leano 
7. irtt, etc. (4) 
Dormi-re, to sleep 

\. o, i, e, iamo, ite, ono 
5. i, a, iamo, ite, ano, 
(i. a, a, a, iamo, iatt, 
ano 
DoYcre, to be obliged 



4, devo, debboM or deg-- 

fio, det^i, deobi, or ddj 
e>^, debbe, dee, or 
da* in poetry (2) -loib- 
biamo, dovete, aeSbonOf 
(ieggiono, or deono 

3. dovetli, dovesti, do- 
vette, doifemmo, dovt- 
ste, dovetiero 

4. dotard, doyrcd, dovra, 
etc. 

5. debba, debba, dMfi, 
deggia, or debbia, d^b' 
biamo, dobbiate, dA- 
baiio , desgiano , or 
debbiano (3) 

7. doi*rei, etc. (4) 
Dacere and Darre, to Uad^ 

both obsolete; instead of 

them we make use of 

Condurre 
Effoadere, »/, Fondere 
Eleggere, v. Leggere 
Eliccre, to draw (5) 
Eludere, p, Chiudere 
Emergere, u. Aspergere 
Emungere, v. Mungere 
Equivalere, %*. Valere 
Ef-i^ere , to erect-, v 

raise 



(i^ The compound tenses are formed with essere, 
(2; Si la sitso e, quant* esser de', gradiia. 

(Petr.) 
(3) Mentre sort questi alle beltopre intenti 

Perche debbiano tosto in uso porse* (Tasso.) 
(4) I find in Petrarch devro, det^ra, det^ria, for 
doifto, etc. 

(5) Tasso has Tcry elegantly made use of the third 
person sineukr of the present tense of the imdicrati^e 
mood, iq ihe following verse» 

Questo Jimo dolor da molti dice 
lAxcrime vere : 
Bat I do not find any other tense Or person used b^ 
«ttr poeta. 



\ 



3. eni igestt, eae, igem' 

mo, igeste, esuro 
44. fito 
Er-gere, to erect 
3. si, gesti, $e, genww, 

geste, sero 
a. to 
Erompere, if. Rompere 
Escire, |/. Uscire 
Escliidere, u. Chiodere 
Esigere 

U. esatto 
EsiBterey (/. Assistere 
Ef D-ellere ; to expel 
3. ulsi, ellesii, ulse, el- 

lemmo, ellestCg ulsero 
U. ulso 
Eiporre, >/. Pon*e 
Esjpr-imere, to express 
a. esst, imesli,esse,imenh' 
mo, imeste, esset'O 
ii. esso- 
Estendere^ v. Spendere 
Estlnguere, p. Distinguere 
EBtrarrCy tK Trarrc 
Facere, (obsolete) v. Fare 
Fare, to do 

i. fo, or faecio, fed, fa, 
%nd face in poetry (4) 



3i7 

faeciamo, fate, fatttto 

2. Face%fo, facei^a ox fa- 
€ea,faccwii faceva, fa- 
eea, snd fea In poetry 
(2) facet^amo, etc. 

3. feci, or fei, facesti, or 
jesti, Jece, fe* and feo, 

10 pwctry (3), facem- 
mOffacesie, fecero, and 
poetically fero (4) and 
finm (.-O -^ 

5. fa, faccia, faeciamo, 
j'aie,Jacciano 

^.faccia, faccia, faccia, 
faeciamo, facci€Ue,fac' 
ciario 

B facessi, facessi, faces' 
se, and poetically fes- 
se (6), facessimo, fa- 
ceste, facessero 

9. farei, fa/esti, farehhe, 
or faria, faremmo, fa- 
reste, farMero, fareb* 
bono, or fariauo 

40. fucendo 

M.faUo 
Ferire to strike, like Ca* 

rire 
,fero, feri, fere, are 



(4) Che pro se eon quegli oechi ella nejace 

Di note wi^hiaccio, un fuoco quando t^ema ? 

(Pctr.) 

(2) ' ■ Audace e baldo, 

n fea degli atmi e deW amore il caldo. 

(Ta«so.) 

(3) Italia, Italia i o tu em feo la sorts 

Dono infelice ai bellezza', etc; (Fillcaja.) 

^4^ Molti cadendo compagnia li fero, (Tasto.) 

(5) Ove son le bellezze aceolte in ella 

Che gran tempo di me gran voglia fenno 7 

mil maggtor don t^ Dio per sua largezia '' 
Fesse ereando, etc. (Dante.) 

l5 



3i8 

poetical expretsioni 
^4) I likewise finii feruio 
lor ferito in Dante, and 
in some other ancient poets 
but it is never nfted by 
any modern writer of 
note. 

Fiedere, to strike, a poetical 
expression (2) 

Fi|g;ere, i/. AHiggere 
a. fitto and Jisso 

Fingere, v. Cingere 

Fondere, to melt 

3. futi , foftdestiy fi^se, 
Jondemmo , Joii^este , 
fusero 
U.fuso 

Frammeitere, tf. Mettere 

Fran-gere to break 

3. si gesti , se , gemmo, 

geste, sero 
H. to 

Frapporre, u. Porre 

Friggere, i/. Aidi^gere 

Fulgere, a defective verb 

3. --fulst 
Fuggire, u. Dormire 
Gia-cere to lie down 

4. ccio, ci, ce, cciamo, 
cele. cciono 

3. oqui, cesti, ctpte, eem.' 
mo, oeste, cquero 

5. ei, cda, cciamo, cete, 
cciono 

6. ecia, eda, o&a, ecio' 
mo, cciaie, cciauo 

44. ciuto 
Gire 10 go, a defective 



▼erb, and used onhf in 

poetry 

4. gite, you go 

2. ^it^ , gnHi , or gia , 
gi^i, gil^a, or girt, gi- 
wamo, giifote, givwto, 
or giaito 

3. gi), gisli, gl. or gio, 
gimmo, gisie, girono 

5, gft^y, g« (you) 
8. gissi, etc. 

4 4. gito 
Giugnere, t*. Giungere 
Gioii-gere, to arrive, or 

join 

3. si, gesti, se, 'gemmo, 
geste, sero 

44. to 
nindere, %/. Elndere 
Inibercj y, Imbevere 
Imbevcre, t^. Bevcre or Ben 
Immergere, i/. Aspergere 
Inipellei-e, |/. Espeliere 
InipenJere, p. Sospender« 
Im porre, »/. Porre 
Imprenclere, v. Prender« 
Imprimere, t/. Esprimer* 
Inchiudere, u, Cliiudere 
Incidere, u. Uccidere 
loclodere, m. Cliiudere 
Incorrere, »/. Correre 
bicrescere (impersonal verb) 

p. Creticere 
Inducere (^obsolete) v. Inp 

durre 
Indurre, y, Addurre 
Iiifingere, y. Cingere 
Infondere, y. Fonder* 



(4) Chi sa come difeitde, e come fere 
focoorso a* suoi perigli aUro iion chere. 



(2) Ecco to chino le hracda, e fappresento 
Senza dijesa il ucUo, or che no I Jiedi 2 



(Tasao.) 



lafniiDmetterey p. filetter« 
lofraiigcre, i/. Frangera 
Inghiottire, u. Abborrir« 
Ingiunger«, «/. («innger« 
Intcrivera^ (/. Scrivere 
lofiftere^ »/. AMiit^re 
Imoffgerc, »/. Hifiirger« 
lottruire, to hutruot 

3. initruii or itutnusi, etc. 

44. initruito or ifuirutto 
lotendere, »/. Prendere 
latercederci t'. Coneedere 
loterdire, t^. Dire 
Intermettere, »/. Mettere 
iaterporre, u. Porra 
Interromperey i'. Romper* 
Intertenere, «/. Tenere 
Interveaire, «/. Venire 
Intingneia^ «/. Inlingera 
lotiiigere, u Cingere 
lotrametcert', »/. jMettere 
iDtrapreDdere. »/. Prendere 
Intridere, k Dividere 
lotKxlarre, ^. Acid trre 
Intromettere, i/. M«;ttcre 
lotradere, »/. Cin'udere 
Jfivadere, u PertUadere 
Involgere, •*. Vot^ere 
Involvere, • poetical espret* 

•ion (1) 

ii.i/it^fo 
he, to go. Tbi# if a defeclive 
■ Terb; and fel lr»iii used 

bat hj poeto. TIte inflec- 

tioDf in use Mretbe follow* 

fag: 



5i9 

2 fVtf, be VM goin^, ii^o* 

no, ihey were going 
4 iretno, we iliall ^f ire* 
te, }oii fhali go, irannOf 
thej shall go 
5. ife, go (you) (2) 
41. I/O. This paiticipale to 
more u»ed by the Ta«* 
cans than A/idatOp 
^ne. 
Istruire, »/. In/truire 
Languire, tf. Abborrire 
Lasjare, to leaue. A regular 
verb, which is frequent- 
ly used in poetry instead 
oi' Lasciare 
Le-dei'ey to offend 

3. »i, detti, se, demmo, 

deste, sero 
41. JO 
Lecere, a poetical esprewioii» 

(3) »/. Licere 
^^g^'ccy fo read 
J. Uisi, lef^f^esti, tette, 
lefigemmo, leggeste, let* 
tem 
41. Into. 
Licere, to he tawfd, permit" 
ted, etc. A dei<H;tive and 
impersonal \erb| which ia 
•ehioni used but in poetry 
(4) The only inflectionf 
of rhts verb, and of the 
▼erb Lecere, are Lice and 
Ijece lor ilie tliird f.erson 
singular of the preaeni 



(1) Eoeo il nemioo h gut, mira la polt^ 
Che §oUo otridu nuke il Cielo inyol^, 

(Tasao) 

f2) he ueloci ed opprimete i ret, (Idem.) 

(3; Ormai ti leee 
Per t€ itetao ptirlar ooa «Ai li piaoe, (P<tr.) 

(4)|Per quaiuo lice 
M desUti de* nwrUtU mer/etioe, (MetMt.) 



320 

tense of the indicative 
mood, and Lecito for the 
participle passive 
Lu-cere, to shine This verb 
if wiUiout a participle 
3. ssi, cesti, sse, oemmo, 
ceste, ssero 
Maledire, m. Dire 
Mai fare, t/. Fare 
Manomettere, m. Mettere 
Mantenere, i/. Teoere 
Meotire, u. Abhor rire 
M^rgere, i^. Aspergere 
Mettere, to put 

3. misi, mettesti, mise, 
mettemmo, r^elteste,mi' 
sero 

44. messo 
Mor-dere, to hite 
I 3. si, or detti, desti, se, 
or dette, eiemmo, deste, 
sero, or dettero 
44. so 
Morire, to die 

4. muojo, and poetically 
^moro (4), muori, or mo- 
re, muojaxxko, or moria' 
mo, morite, muojono, or 
morono 

3. morii, moristi, morr, 

and morio in poetry 
etc. (2)' 

4. morro and morira etc. 

5. muori, or mori,muoja, 

or mora, muojamo, 
or moiiamo, morite, 
muojano, or morano 

6. muoja, muoj, or muoja, 
muoja, muojamo, muo- 
jate, muojano 

7. morrei, or morirei,eic. 



44. morto, whieh is some- 
times used for ucc*- 
jo, A{//ed 
Mo V ere, i/. Maovere 
Mi:^nere, t'. Muneerc 
Mun-^ere, to milk ^ 

3. si, gesti, se, gemmo, 
geste, sero 

\\. to 
Muovere, to move 

4 . mtiowo or movo, ui, i^r, 
mowiamo, t^e, m.uovo- 
no 

3. mossi, movesti, mosse, 
mm^emmo, mot^este, mos- 

sero 

4. moifcr6,elc.. 

5. muowi, muoya, mowia- 
mo, mouete, muowano 

40. mot^erido 
4 4. mosso 
Na-scere, to he bom 

3. cqui, scesti, cque,soem>* 
mo, sceste, cquero 

44. to 
Nascondere^ m. Ascondere 
Negare, to deny 

4 . nego, and niego, neghi, 
ancl iiieghi, nega, and 
niega, neghiahto, and 
nieghiamo, negate, nc- 
gaiio, and idegcmo 

5. rae^d^ and niega, etc 

6. neghi, and nieghi, etc. 
Negl-igere, to neglect 

3. WW, ig'Mti, essCjigem- 
mo, igeste, essero 

\{. etto 
Nocere, »/. Nuocere 
ISudrire, u. Nulrire 
Naocere, to hurt 



{\) To di dolor mi more, 

E nan la posso dir. 
(X) E ^ol morio qual yis4e. 



(Metast.) 
(Dante,) 



1. TtUDCo, ci, ce, ciamo, ce- 
te, cono 

3. noccjuif nuocesti, or no- 
cesti, TUKcpie, nuocem' 
mo, ceste, nocquero 

5. nuoci, nuoca, nociamo, 
ftocete, nuocano 

6. nuoccia, or nuoca, etc« 
ii. nuociiUo, or iiociiUo 

Niitrire, u» Abborrire 
Occidere, u. Uccidere 
Occorrcre, if. Con-ere 
Odire, u. Udire 
Offendere, */. Prcndci'c 
Offerire, if. O fir ire 
OflVire, M. Abborrire 
Oli-re, a defective verb 

2. ya, ui, ua, — waiio 
Omeltcre, %*. Metterc 
Opporrc, u. Porre 
Opprimere, m. Esprimcrc 
Oliencrc, >/. Tenere 

Pa -re re, to appear 
<. Jo, ri, re, jamo, rete, 
jorio 

3. rvi, esti, r^^e, remmo, 
reste, n/ero 

4. rro, etc. 

5. ri, ja, jamo, rete, jano 

6. J a, ja,ja, jamo, hate, 
jarto 

7. rrei, etc. 

4 \ . riUo, or rso. The com- 
pound teases are formed 
ivith tlie auxiliary verb 
essere 
Partire, u. Dormire 
Pascere, to feed 
\\» paaciuto 



321 

Pavcre, to fear, a defectife 

and poclical verb 

\. pai*e, be or she fears (4) 

Fentirsi, a reflective verb. 

Its compound tenses arc 

formed with estere, and 

is conjugated Wke dormire 

Per-cuotere, to strike 

3. ossi, uotesti, osse, lio- 

temmo, uoteste, etseio 
44. osso 
Pcrdere, to lose 
3. dei, or ti, desti, dh, 
detle, or se, tiemmu, 
deste, derotio, tietiero, 
or sera 
Permetteie, »/. Metlere 
Perseguire, p*. Segiiire 
Persiiitert?, ^f. Assisiere 
Persua-dere, to persuade 
3. si, desti, se, demmo, 

deste, sero 
4<. so 
Pervenire, v. Venire 
Perverlire, u. Abborrire 
Piacere, %*. Giacere 
Piagnere, v. Plaiigcrc 
Piaiigere, if. Frangerc 
Pignerc, </. Pin;^cre 
Pingere, u. Ciiigcic 
Pi(»-vcre, to nun, an imper- 
sonal vcib 

3. %fue, and stTtuetlmcs bbe 
Pod ere, k Porre 
Porgere, ^. Scorgerc 
Porre, anciently Poiiere, to 

put 

4. ponga, poni, f>one, po- 
nianio, or pcu^f tin/no. 



(4) Tasffo nsed, witli great pTopriety, the tliird person 
aingular of the prc<>ent tense; 

Ne cosi di legger si turha, o pai>e. 
«nd I tbink that no other tense or person may be pro- 
perly used. 



3aa 

ponei9f pwigono 

2. poiteyo, etc. 

3. posi, potiesti, pose, po- 
ttemmo, poiiesie, poscro 

4. porro, etc. 

6. potii, ponga, pouiamo, 

or pongkianio, ponete, 

pongano 
6. poiiga, go, or ghi, ga, 

ghiatno, gtiiaU, poiiga- 

no, 
'• porret, etc. 
8. poiiew, etc. 
40. pofurtao 
ii. posto 
Posporre, i^. Poire 
PoMedere» i/. Seclere 
Po-tere, to be able 

4. sso, puoi, pud, RuS puo- 

fein poetry (l) ssiamo, 

tete, ssofto, ancl /</io in 

poetry (2) 

3. tei, tesu, th, and in 
poeirj- teo (3) 

4. ttd, etc. 

6. 15a, ssi, or «ia, ««a« 
ssiamo, ssiate, ssaiio 

7. tret, tresti, trehbe, tria, 
or ria in poetry (4), 
tremmo, treste, trAbero, 
triano 

Precidere, »/. Uccidere 
PrecoiTere, (/. Gorrere 
Prcdire; t^. Dire 
Prefiggei'e, ^. Affiggere 



Premetrere, ir. Metter« 
Pren-dere to take 

3. si, ndesii, se, fidem- 
mo, itdeste, sero 

<{, so 
PropoiTe, •/. Porre 
Prescii>ere, m. Scrivere 
Preseilei-e, m. Sedere 
Piesumere, t^. Assumero 
Prejiupnorre, »*. Porre 
Pretendere, u. Pieiidere 
Prc^alere, t^. Vaiere 
Prevcdwe, y. VeJcrc 
Prevenire, ^/, Venire 
Pi-odurre, »/. Addarre 
Profoodere, »/. Foudero 
Promettcre' t*. Meltere 
Pramovere, t/. Prouiuuvcre 
Prom uov ere, u. Muovcre 
Proporre, >/. Porre 
Prorompere, i^. Rompere 
Prosciogliere, m. Probciorre 
Prosciorre, i/. Corre, or Co- 

gliere 
Prose riv ere, u. Scrivere 
Proseguire, u. Seguire 
Prosuniere, u. Assumert 
Pi*oteggere, u. Leggere 
Protei^dere, t'. Tendeco 
Protrarre, i/. Trane 
Provvedere, u. Vedere 
Proven ire, t*. Venire 
Pugnere, u. Pungere 
Pungere, vf, Uiigere 
Putrei'are, »/. Fare 



(4) Questi or JH/acone adora, efu Cristiano, 
Ma I primi rili ancor lasciar non puote, 

(Tasso.) 

P) — .— — £e tue braccia 
Che scuoter forst, e soltevarla ponno. (Petr.) 

(3) Questefur Varti onde miWalme e mille 
Prender jurtivamenle ella poteo, (Tasso.) 

(4) Ida qual suot^ poria mai saiir UuiValto ? 

(Petr.) 



Racceii(fere, p. Acrenderc 
Macchiiiflere, v. (iliYuffcra 
Haccogliere, u. Raccorre 
Raccorre, «/. Cont, and G)- 

gli«*re 
Ka-tlere, to shave 

3. si, dcstif s€, demmo, 

desti, sa'O 
n. so 
Raggiugnere, f/. Raggiuoge- 

re 
Ragginngere, v. Giiingere 
Rartenere, w. Tencrc 
Ravvolgere, t'. Volgere 
Rccere, to vomit 

\\. reciuto 
Recfdere, u. Divi'lere 
RecJ-imere. to redeem 
3. ensi, imesti, ense, imem' 

mo, inesle, ensero 
H. redento 
Rcdire, to retnm, or eome 
hack. This i« a defec- 
tive verb, an 'I «»titir«»ly 
poetical. The inflections 
in use arethefoil(imo£(. 
I riedot 1 return, r/Vrf/, 
thou return'st, riede^ lifl 
returns (4) 
Reggpre, »/ Lej;gere 
Rent/ere, »/. Prcii lere 

3. /r.^/, or rciiflei^ etc, 
Reprinicre, «/ K'^prinere 
Rescrivi'fe, i*. .Scrlvere 
Re^istffii?, V AMifliere 
Ili;icceiiderey u. Acccndere 
Riaprire, v. Aprire 
Riardcrc, u, Anicre 
Riavercy v. Av«re 
Riheneilire. u Benedire 
RIbere, u. Bere 
RicaJere, »/. Cadere 



3a3 

Rictiiedere^ u. Chiedert 
Ri'cirlere, »/. Recidere 
Ricinfferey »/, Cingere 
Ric(»gifiere, »/, G>giiere 
Ricoiiinorre, if, cSmporre 
KiconJnrre, i>. Condurre 
Ricongiangere^ v. Coagiaji< 

gere 
Kiciin venire, «/. Venire 
Riconiertire, u. G>nverUr« 
Ricoprire, u. (joprire 
Rjcorrere, u. Oirrere 
Ricredere, »/. Credere 
Ricrescere, %t. Crcscere 
Ricuucere, u. Cuocere 
Ri lere, v, Dividere 
RiJire, u, liire 
Ri<larre, u. Addarrc 
Rifai e, »/. Fare 
Rilondcre, u. Fondere 
Ril'i-afigere, >/. Franget« 
Hjlrig-cre, u. Frigger« 
Riluggiie, i». Fnggire 
Rllul^ei'e, u. Futger« 
Rijeg-ere, »/. Leggere 
n.li.cere, »/. Luccre 
Hiiuajeie, |o dwell 

<. ii^o, Hi, ne, niamo, 

uete, ngo/to 
J. sif nesti, se, vemmo, 

tieste, sera 
4, nd, eic. 

6. iii, fiffa, niamo, nets, 
ngaito 

6, iit^a, nga^ nga, niamQp 
mate, ngatio 

7. nei, etc. 
iU so, or sto 

Riraetr<>re, u. Metier* 
Rim irdere, tf. Mordtiw 
Rrmovere, «/. Mover« 
Rimaovere, y, Muotal^ 



(i) Gia riede Primat/era 
Col suo fioriio aspcito,9U, (Meutt.) 



3a4 

Rin«sceie, f. Nascerc 
Kincliludei-e, v. Chiudere 
J^increscere, v, Increscere 
R in venire, v. Venire 
Binvestire^ v. Dormire 
Kinvolvere, t*. Volgere 
Ripartire, u. Abborrirc 
Ripentire, »/» Pentirc 
Ripercuotere, v. Percuoterc 
Riperdere, v. Perdere 
Ripiangere v. Piaogere 
Riporre, f. Pone 
Riprendcre, v Prendere 
Itisapci-e. »*, Sapeie 
Ri&ciiiudcre, v Chiudere 
Riscrivere, v. Scrivere 
RUciiolcre, v. Percuotere 
RisederCi t^. Sedere 
Risen tire, »/. Dormire 
Risul-vere, to resolve 

3. «, t^'esti, se, vemmo, e- 
ste, sero 

M. uto 
Risorsere to rise up again 

3. SI, gesti, se, genuno, ge- 
ste^ scro 

44. to 
Risospiucere, v. Cingere 
Risovveuirc, t^. Venire 
Risjingere, v. dingere 
Ri^pondere, to answer 

3. si, ndestiy se, ndtmmo, 
iideste, sero 

44. sto 
Ristringcre, v, Stringere 
Ritenei-e, v.. Tenere 
Ritinsere, u. Cingere 
Ritogliere, v. TogUerc 
Ritorcere, %». Torccrc 
Riton-e, V. Torre 
Rili-arre, v. Trarrc 
Kivedere, v. Vedere 
Ri\endere, v. Vcndcrc 
Rivenire, v. Venire 
Rivestire, v. Doitnire 
Riviverc, v. Vivere 



Ri volgere, v. Volgere 
Riuscire, v. Uscire 
Ro-dere, to gnaw 

3. si, desli, se, demmo, 

deste, sero 
44. so 
Rompere^ to break 

3. rt^pi, rompesti, rup- 
pe, rompemmo, ro/n- 
peste, ruppero • 

4 4. rotto 
Sal-ire, to ascend 

4. go, or saglio, i, e, 
ghianio, oi- sagliamo, 

ite, gono, or sagliono 

5. i, ga, or saglia, ghia- 
nio, ite, gojto, or sa- 
gliano 

6. ga, or saglia, ghi, or 
ga, ga, or saglia, ghia- 
nio, or sagliamo, ghia- 
te, or sagliate, g<uu), 
or sagliano 

Sapere, to know 

4. so, sai, sa, sappiamo, 
sapete, sanno. 

3. seppi, sapesti, seppe, 
sapemmo, sapeste, sep^ 
pero 

4. Sapmi etc, 

5. Sappi, sappia, sappia- 
nio, sappiate, sapJMono 

6. sappia, etc. 

7. saprei, etc. 
Scadere, v. Cadere 
Scegliere^ to clioose 

3. Isi, gliesti, Ise, gliem- 
' mo, glieste, Isero 
44. ho 
Scen-dere, to descend 

3. si, ndesti, se, ndem" 

mo, ndeste, sero^ 
44. so 
Scernere, to discern, a de- 
fective verhf the inflec« 
tiOQS of "\ivhich 9re, 



325 

4. scerno, toerm, Mme ^ 6. fe^ntf, or BJegua etc. 
Schiadcic, V, Cbiudew S«ntire, u. Dormire 

Sfeioglierc, V. Coglicrc Serv.rc, i^. Dorm.rc 

Scommetiere, i; Mette.^ Sileie, a dcfectne verb used 
Scomporre v. Compotre only iq f »ft^.(0 

SconfiWre, f^. Friggere Smentire, »^. Ablwnire 

Seontorccre, i^. Torccre Soiovere, v. Movere 

ScoDvenire, v. V-eniw Smungere, v. Maogcre 

Sconvolgere, i.. Volgere Sinuovei|e, v, Muoyere 

Scoprirc, u. Coprire Socchiudere, i^Cluudere 

Scof-gere, to M$cover Socconere, */. Conrere 
3. «, *e*tt', Jtf, ge/»/»o, ge- Sod(h»lare, ./. Fare 

«£e sero Sofinre, i/. Dormire 

Scorrere, »/. Correrc Soilriggere, v. Frlggcre 

Scri-tere, to write Socgiacere, v. Giacei» 

3. wi, »^rt/*, *#(f, i^emmo, So-lere, to *e «ccu#iow«i 
vesie, uero , * defective verb (2 ) 

44 /to i, gI40,£uolt,tuote,gl^a' 
&iaoiere, V. Pereaotere mo, lete, siiono 

Medeve, to nt down. , 2. fcj^, or foa, etc. 

4. 5e^/<o. or #«Wo, ««it, 6. gii», gUa, glia, glia- 
tfkSS, seduimo. tedete, mo, gRute, gliano 
MMono, or sieOono 40 /e/*4o 



6. aiedi, segga, or »«ia, <<• Uto 
sediamo, sedete, segga- Sommcrgerc, t^. Aspergere 
no, or tiedano oommettere, tf. Mettere 

«. «e£«a^ or sieda, etc. Sopprimere, */. tlftpriaiere 
Sedarre, %. Addurre Sopragglungere, >/. (liimgere 

JSegiiirey to follow Soprascrivere, m. Scrivere 

i, §eguo, or sie%m, segui, Sopraftsedere, ♦/. Sedere 
or tfiegfu; segue, or ««- Sopravveoire, «/. Venire 
gue, seguiamo , segmits, Sopravvivere, t*. Vivere 
seguoHO, or sieguoHo. . Sopriateudere, m. lotendera 
5. fe^of^ or «>^wi, *tfgr»w, Sorgere, f. Risorgere 
or eiegiMf seguiamo, te- \\. surto ior jorfo if 
guite, seguano, or tie- lometimes made use 

guofto oi 19 poetry (3) 

(4) Preso dal nuovo canto stupe, t site. (Petr. ) 
(2) The tenses wanted are formed with the auxiliary 
verb Essere, and the passive jtorticinle SolitOy viz, lo fui 
solitOf etc. which answers to the Latin Fui solitus. We 
may likewise say, lo sorio solito, lo era solito, and so oa 
through all the tenses. 
(4) Argante, Argante stesso ad un gratuturto 
DlRmaldo ahbattmo appma h surto. (Tassa) 

• 1% 



326 

Sorprenuorey c Prendcro 
Sorreggere, v. Reggere 
Sorridere, u. Ridere 
SoscriverCy v, Scriver© 
8<wpendere, ¥. Intendere 
Sospiogere, v. Cingere 
Sostenere, v. Tenere 
Sottiotendere, m. Intendere 
Sottomettere, 9' Mettere 
Sottoecriverey «/. Scrivere 
Sottrarre, u. Trairc 
Sovveaiire, v. Veoire 
tSoTYeriire, u. Convertire 
Spar-gere, to spread 

3. si, ^esti, se, gemmo, 
geste, sero 

\i. so 
Sparire. p. Apparire 
iSpengere^ to extingtUA 

3. nsi, gtiesti, se, 
gnemmo, gneste, nsero 
Spe-nderey io spend 

3. «r, ndesti, ese, 
ndemmo, ndeste, 9eto 

44. so 
Spiacere, p, Piacere 
Spingere, if, Ciugera 
Sporgere, v. Por^ere 
Sprovvederey v. t*rovv«dere 
Sure, «/. Dare 
Steodere, \f. Preadere 
Stingere, v. Tiogere 
Storcere^ v. Torcere 
Stravedere, »». Vedere 
Stravolgere, u. Volgere 
Stringere, to biiidjoMt 

ii. stretto 
Stru-ggere, to melt 

3- *"** S8'''^» ^^> ggemmo, 
ggeste, ssexo 
Stapere, to \vonder, a defec- 



tive verby and merely 
poetical 

1. stupe, he wonders (i) 
Succedere, it. Concedere 
Succingere, v. Cingere 
Sveilere, or Sverre 

3. svelsifSueUesti, svelse, 
si^lemmo , svellesU, 
svelseio 
i\. sp^elto 

Sveaive, i/. Venire 

Svestire, m. Dormiie 

Svolgere, v. Volgere 

8up]:oiTe, V. Poire 

Sussislercy v. Esistere 

Tacere, u, Giacere 

Taiigere, a detective and 

r»et'ical veib, of wluch 
only find 
i. -^taiige (2) 
Tendere, v. Prenaero 
Te-iiere, to hold 

2. ngo, tietii, tiene, ma- 
mo, ttele, ngoiio 

3. ttni, iiesti, nae, nem- 
moy 9iesle, finero 

4. erro, etc. 

5. tieiii, tenga, niamop 
riele, ngatto 

6. tiga, etc. 

7. terrei, etc. 
Tergete, f^. Asperger* 
Tiogere, t^. Cingere 
TogUere, t^, Cogliere 
Torcere, tf. Attorcera 
Tradurre, i/. Addurre 
Trafi^ere i/. Alfligger* 
Tralucere, u. Lucerc 
Traere, »/. Trarrc 
Tra-rre, to draw 



ys Preso dal nuoiH) canto stupe, e site. (Petr.) 
") le son futta da Dio, sua rnerce, tale 
Che la vostra miseria tion mi. tai^t* (DaoU.y 



^. g^o, ggi, gge, or e, 
ggiamo, ete, ggono 

2. et}o, etc. 

3. 8si, esti, sse, emrno, etle, 
iaero 

4. rro, etc. 

5. trai, tragga, iamo, trae- 
tc, tragga/to 

6. tragga, etc. 

7. tr arret f etc, 

8. traessi, etc. 
10. traendo 
\i. tratto 

Trascegliere, m. Scegliere 
Trascendei«| i*. Sceiidere 
Trascorrere, p. Correre 
Trascrivere, v. Scrivere 
Trabibnflere^ u. Fondcrc 
Trasmettere, t*. Metterc, 
Trasporre, u. Pon-e 
Trattciicr«, v. Tenere 
Travedcre, if. Vedere 
Travetttire, v. Dormire 
Travolgere, u. Volgere 
Va-lcre, to he worth 

4. gllo. It, le, ghiamo, lete, 
fUiofio 

3. hi, lesti, Ue, lemma, /e- 
ste, Isero 

4. rr6, etc. 

5. IL glia, gliamOf lete, 
gtiatto 

6. glia, etc. 

7. rrei, etc. 
\\. luto, Uo 

Uccidere, u. Oividere 
Udire, to hear 
4. odo, odi, ode, udiamo, 
udite, odono 



327 
-^. odt, oda, ftdiamo, udi" 
te, odano 
6. oda, oda, oda, udiamo, 
uiliate, odofio 
Vc-deie, to see 

\. do, ggo,g^lo, di,de, 
dtamo, ggia/no, dete, 
dofio, ggo/to 

3. Mi, or ueddi, tfedesti, 
vide, or i^edde, t^edem- 
mo, vedeste, tndero, or 
vcndero 

4. vedro, etc. 

5. iW/, veda, or uegga, 
yediamo, or t^eggiama, 
i^edete, t^edofto, or 
ueggaito 

6. veda, or uegga,eu, 

7. vedret, etc. 
U, veduio, or t/ijto 

Venire, (i; to come 

\ , ye^igo, t/i&ii, uiene, p4» 

nia/no, ueuite, t^e/tgofto 

-3. ^fcfmi, venisti, vetme, 

veniinmo, veiUtU, vert' 

nero 

4. verrd, etc. 

5. vieni, %*enga, veniamo, 
ve/iite, ifengatto 

6. peiiga, ga, ga, tfenia- 
mo, or uengniamo, yf 
niate, vetighiate, 
i^engano 

7. verrei, etc. 
{\. i/e/tuto 

Vestire, »/. Dormire 
Vigere, a deiective verb 

4. — vige 
Via-cerc, to conquer 



(1) We fometimef make a reflective verb oi Venire, vii» 
VenirBene, Exam. 

Mirata da ciascun passa e non mira. 

La Bella Donna e innanzi al Re sen yien (Tawo.) • 
Sometimef Viene is nted instead of E\ it is, at Fiem 
detto, $4en supposto, it is said, it is supposed. 



3a8 

3. si, eesti, u, cemmo, 

ceste, sero 
44. to: 

Vi-vere, to live 
3. tti, t^sti, tse, vemmo, 

yesU, ssero 

\\. taito, or tsuio 

Ugaerey v. Uogere 

Un-gere, to anoint. 

3. si, gesti, se, gemmo, 
geste, 9ero, 

44. to 
VoUre H) to Be willing 

4. vo^o, and vo* uum, 
vuoU, t^gliamo, tfoUte, 
vogliono 



3. uoUl tfoUiti; poiie, 
volemmo, lilesU, tnUUre 
4. vorro, etc. 

6. voglia,etc. 

7. vorrei, etc. 
Vol gere, to turn 

3. si, gesti, se, gemme, 
gesu, sero 

44. to 
Uscire, to go out 

4. e§co, esei,esee, 
usciamo, uscite, eacono 

&. esd, esca, usciamo 

uscite, escano 
6. esca, etc. 



(4) VoUre M loaietunas used for Dovere, as Si yuott 
osseryare, etc. it is to ie oUerved, etc. where ti 
ymde means Jt detfc. 



8>d 

A TRANSLATION 
AS UTERAL AS POSSIBLE 
OF TH£ 

ITALIAN PASSAGES 



^OTB» IV THS GOUMI OV THE CRAMMATICAfc 
AULBf AVD OMUVATIOVS. 

i^. B. The AVTBOR has thought proper to giue tht 
Translation of the Italian Passages in the end oj the 
work, that the aUentii^ learner mar Jirst attempt Id 
construe them by himself, which witl %*ery much contri' 
bute to his improt/ement , and then ccnsidt, if he choo' 
ses, this translation, which he can easily do , as tha 
Author has carefully marked the beginning of e^ftry^ 
Italian passage, and page wherein it is inserted. 

Page 31. Di questi etc. Amongit these there are eonit 

•o ignoraDt, that they do not know the alphabet. 
Voi non, etc. You did not learn the alphabet. 
Page 37. At^tnsossi, eto. He was firmly of opinion, tluH 

if the kioff should come to the knowledge of it, he 

would undoubtedly order him to be put to death. 
La Giouane, etc. The young woman seeing that the 

hour was late, although the words of tne old man 

frightened her, said, etc. 
Page 38. E 7 dot^, etc. I rebted every circomstanee 

to him, as to time and place. 
Come, e percKb, etc. How and why art thou come 

here ? and he answered , Low I came enquire not | 

but I will tell thee why. 
Page 59. Che debh* io far. etc. What ought I to do ? 

what do'st thou advise me, love? 
What art thou doing, my ^ul? what thinkest thou? 

shall we ever have peace ? 
Paffe 40. Essendo, etc. The soul being departed from 
' ner beautiful body. 
Che delle, etc. Who fits el the nirrat of die li^piiA 

stream. 



S3o 

Page 44. Cortes i donne^ etc. Te conrteooft damet, w^ o 
give kind hearing to my verse. 
Ingiustissime, etc. Most unjust love, why dost thoa_ 
so felHoin satisly our desires? 

Fage 45. In abito , etc. In the Jrefs of pilgrims, wcU 
provided with money and jewels. 
Amendut^ etc. He ordered them both to be taken by 

three of his servants. 
Vi menero, etc. I sliatL take yon to her; and I am 

ceruin that she will recollect you. 
O Hi che, etc. O thou who art spending thy precious 
years and hours in vain studies. 

Page 46, // papa f^ce, etc. The pope ordered, that the 
wedding shoufd be solemnly celebrated. 
Ecoo it Jin de'malwagi, etc. liehold the end of wicked 
people. God suflers them to be happy for a time — 
Praise to the great God, who oppressed bis impious 
enemies — . I am altogether full oi fyour (^od, I do 
not acknowledge any oUier God , Dut the God of 
Abraham. 

Page 49. La Bernardo Capel, etc. There I see Bernard 
Capello, thei*e I see Peter Bembo , who having re- 
stored our bnguage, Uien vulgar and obscure, to its 
native purity and soi'tness, has hliewn us with bis 
example what it ought to he ; Gaspar Ohizi is he who 
admires and observes his succestul attempts. I see 
Fracastoro, Bevazzano, Triton, Gabriele, and A little 
farther 1 see Tasso. 

Page 49. // caUiuelto di Calandriuo. That little rogue 
Calandrino — Quel buon pmaccino del ColieUini, ThM 
little sond man Coltellini. 

Pif^e 56. iv* cosa pericolosa, etc. It is a dangcrons thing 
to trust ourselves to those who are stronger than 
we. 
Quanta ciascuna, etc. The desire which inflames my 
breast, increases in proportion ^as every one is less 
haodsome tlian she. 
jLe cose med fuUe, etc. Tilings ill done , and done a 
long while ago, are much easier to be found fault 
with than to be amended. 
EkU hf etc. He is more jellow than white; it is 

better late tlian never. 
X' Atia, etc. Asia is much more populous than Europe* 
Africa is much less populous than tilnrope. 

Bb|« 17. DiicolQr0to hm^ e^:. Q Dcaih^ thou hast dis* 



33i 

colourecl tbe hiindionieit.coiioteiuiiice that eycr WM 



Dch oonMervate, etc. O eternal gods, presenre th* 
Imndaoniest work of your hands. 
Page 58. EUe ti vorreblion , etc. They would commit 
themwlvea quite alive to tbe flames. 
Bos}, eUB. He wai fnghtened, and became, at it we^e , 

quite inanimate. 
Dol&U€ tenza modo, etc. Sarrowful to excess, joyful 
beyond measure, happy without end. 
Page 59. Tu tei un bel, etc. Thou art a fine mascnliot 
woman ; the extent of thy beauty is not to be mea«« 
ured. 
SuonaU etc. Ring the great bell; behold the assemUj 
of the widows which enter* 
Page 64. FarMe^ etc. His grief would move a stone to 

JVojs e vera pietade, etc. That wluch she manifestt it 
not true pity, but cruelty. 
Page 62. E V ester da fe, eu. Provinces and kings think 
it a glory tu be conquered , and subdued by thee in 
war. 
Pag« e^. SI ohe 4d mio. etc. So that anger may gi?« 
double win^ for mv flight. 
/ jwiei affanm, etc My sorrows surpass all others. 
Page 64. AddormetOato, etc. Being a sleep in some gree* 

woods 
Page 66. CMe te hen dritto , etc. For if I judge rightly, 
these transitory goodt are nothing eUe but evils. 
Come I miwitn, etc. When he saw the officers intent 
on their cruel duty , he rushed precipitately through 
the crowd. 
Page 67. Lo splendoTf etc. The splendour struck the ejref 
of the two brothers. 
Di iei degnoe^Uf etc. He worthy of her, and slw 
worthy of him, nor ever were two people more 
happily joined together. 
Termemif etc. Love inflamed by breast for twenty 
one 3fears. 
Page 75. ji ritferenta di , etc. To the honour of him , 
by whom ail tliioiu liave their being. 
Chi per tatUe, eU. Can we now fear that he will 
abandon us, who has guided and conducted us 
through so many unknown and barren deseru? 
€)r colui regge, etc. Now be governs the staza at bat 
will, and we art accomitMl rcbeUioni sooJa. 



352 

Fi^e 76. Era art$eiuio, etc. The Goimi M»aiic« iocreas- 
ed in ^ years, and the repute of his vaJour increased 
Wifli his age. Therefore they commilted to him the 
entire care of the army. He began to signalise him- 
self, etc. 
lo t^ggio, etc. I see the best, vnd follow the worst. 
71i vedrai, etc. Then shah see Italy and its honour- 
ed coasts. 
Page 77. Vennt immtcginandosi, etc. He imagined ihst 

she was bis wife, and he her •husband. 
Page 78. p^oi mi prometteste , etc. You promised me to 
let me speak with your wile, nnd you hai've nude 
me speak with a statue of marble, 
j? V arco, etc. And the »bow «nd the Arrows, firam 

and with which I was wounded. 
Xfttdi donna f etc. What woman shftll susg, if I do 

not sing? 
Facciam noiy ete. Cet ns do all that it is in our 

power to do. 
fjorreranno dtle ease, «tc. They will run to onr- hoa- 

ses, and steal Irom us what we have. 
^ieuramenu *e tu jeri, etc. Certainly if .thon dldit 
'distress tts yesterday ; thou hast pleased us so much 
to day etc. 
IBsge 79. II tnandarlo fuori, e c. To send him omt of 
our house so infirm would be a conduct Tcry blame- 
able in us. 
•Che non amhiziosiy etc. For ambitions or ooTetooi 
desires did not move ns to this e^iterprise, nor were 
our guide, 
Perche con Iru, etc. For with him that hope diall 

ddl which made us frantic so long. 
Qud Trojano, etc. That Trojan Ene^ who sends as 

to thee. 
Perche li, etc. 'Why dost thou ffrieye that I leave 

thee? '' o 

In questo stato^ etc, In this situation 1 am on thy ac->- 

count, my fair ope. 

yo'parlate, etp. You speA the Italian language weU, 

iVoi siamo, etc. We have been to see the eallerj. 

Page 80. etc.. Now the time comes, in which I shall 

be able to shew th ee p lainly whether I love thee. 

Quando di venir, etc. When it may please yon to 

come, she will wait fur you at her house. 
E railegrasif etc. May heaven rejoice 9 where lit k 
gone. 



333 

Ei che modesto, etc. H« who ii at nocteft as she if 
handsome, desires much , ezpecu little, and aska 
nothing. 

£d e* si stauOf etc. And be was quite wrapt np in 
hiniDelf. 
Page K4 . Cominoiano a cantare, etc. Tliey begin to ainj^ 
and the vaUies echo their songs. 

E veggio ben, tie I plainly see how much they dia^ 
like me. 

Come egli ha/mo, etc When tliey l»ave « little money 
they wish to have the daughters of gentlemen. 

Coloro sono, etc. They are dressed in black, becausd 
it is not y«t a fortnight aince one of their bro- 
tl;ei-s was killed. 

Cestui ifuandof etc. This man when '^he is weary of 
thee, will aend thee away to thy great disgrace. 
Page 82. TuUi vestiU, etc. All clothed in albs and 
copes with books in their bands, and with cros- 
ses before them sinaiug, with great ceremony and 
solemnity , carried him to the church. 
Per io comwt berte, etc. For the common good of the 
republic, they declared him their king aod their 
lord. 

Jlt^et^a tre Jigliuoli , etc. He had three children, and 
loved them all equally. 

Tutti dtaufuCf etc. WiU then all my days , sister, be 
thus gloomy ? Do not hope to have them serene. 
Page S3. Jm tlonna, etc. The woman consulted her 
servant, whether slie thought it expedient that she ' 
should avail herself of tliat iavourable oppoitunity^ 
which fortune had thrown in her way. 

// marito^ etc. The husband believing the false re- 
presentations, causes her to be killed , and devoured 
D)' wolves. 

La Ntnetta. etc. Nancy who kuew the (inclination of 
her sisters , roused in them such a desire of it i 
that. etc. 
Page 84. Credendo thet etc. Mistaking me for thee, he 
has bruised me all over witli a stick. 

Costoro che , etc. These who on the other band were 
as malicious as he. 

Oh Padre I etc. Oh Father! oh dear Father! oh 
happy tluitl am! 
Page 85. Comr piuitcsto, etc. As soon as he could, he 
ordered Antigonus to be called to him. 

Chi a legger, etc. Some gave themselves up to read 



554 

romances , some to play at chess , and some at 

draoghu, whilst the others slept. 

Di me medesimo , etc. I am inwardly ashamed of 

myself, 
page 87. Famnu, etc. Render me worthy of thy bounty, 

for it is tliy power. 
Ma Hond* lo, etc. But now I will tell thee first of 

ally from whence 1 intend to b^in my enchantments^ 

and in wliat manner. 
Page 88. E&non fosso^ etc. I can neither speak, nor 

be silent. 
Page 89. Dtht non espor , etc. Pray do not espose the 

object of thy sweet affections to the hatred^ the con- 
tempt > and the insults of elhcri. 
Nesumo h reo, etc. No one is suilty , if it is eoongh 

to bring the example of oUiers lor a defence of 

one's crimes. 
Page 93. Questi or^ etc. This man now adores Mahomet 

and was a Christian. 
Page 94. Costei ch' hfatta^ etc. This country -which is 

become wild and savage. 
Pargoletto, etc. When a child I set my fool in hit 

kinedom. 
AaiaSaetio ujcI , etc. Salabaetto came out of her house. 
Page 96. Quet^li abbisogna, etc. He wanU little, who 

desires little. 
iVo/t edijiea, etc. He does not build empires, who 

would build them upon wordly foundation. 
Qu^ duo, etc. Those two full of fear and suspicion. 
£coo quei, etc. Behold, those who fill book with ima- 
ginary tales. 
E spero un giomo, etc. And 1 hope one day to snatch 

those laurels from thy bead, upon the very altaif 

which the fear of men erects to thy name. 
Page 98. /' son oolei, etc. I am the same whom you call 

so importunate aud cruel. 
Page 99 . Con volonta, etc. By the will and command of 

Pope Clement V, who then reigned, he was elected 

king of the Romans. 
Una mortlaena , etc. A nigged and steep mountain , 

near which is found a most beautiiul and deliglit' 

ful plain. 
Seco pensandoy etc. Thinking wiihin themselTCs, what 

they should become io a short time. 
Page 100. Polete, etc. You okay clioose of the two which 

^ou please. 



335 

lo non to quale, etc. Ton lui^e»^ I do not know what 

degree of power over the atTectiuns of people. 
Qual utile f etc. Wliat advantage, ^hat faith can b« 

expected irom the oppressor of Rome? 
Diuenulo, etc. Having become in his countenance like 

the colour of ashes. 
Tal qual or^ etc. Young aa yon tee me now> I here 

accompany Cupid. 
E quai mortif etc. And some killed bj him, lome 

taken alive. 
Page 401 . 11 che, etc. Which if not the coie with 

people in love. 
Di/le che, etc. Tell her to console herself, tell her to 

love nie^ and tell that Achilles departed iaithful, and 

that he will return failhfuU 
0u t/uol veder, etc. He who wishes to see allthat Na- 
ture and Heaven can produce amongst uSy let him 

come to contemplate this woman. 
E lum u e, etc. And is tlicre no one who will put me 

to death? 
P^inca, etc. Conquer who will, I am indifferent. 
A chi la tpemet etc. Some are without hope, and some 

without fear. 
Page 4o2. Quet^uomo, tic. This man, whose maimera 

are worthy of a hero. 
Quetta fanciulla^ etc. This girl, whose name is Isabel- 
la, whose lips appear like two rubies. 
Tu eui oonoestef etc. Thou to whom Heaven has grant- 
ed and allotted to will what is just, and to be able 

to perform what thou wilt. 
f^ane tperanze, etc. Vain hopes with which nsed to 

live. 
Deitempia, etc. Of the wicked Babylon, from which 

flU feiiame is fled, and all good is banished. 
It euoftOf etc. The sound of tJiose siglis witli which I 

fed mj heart in my iirst jontltful ctTors. 
Page 103. NoH vollifar, etc. 1 did not wish that otherf 

should have the least part in my glory. 
Page i04. Allro e il parlor, etc. To speak of death, and 

to die. are two tiling. 
E* un foglio,', etc. It is an infamous paper, which not 

reason but tlie baseness of others conceived and 

d elated. 
Sia destiiip etc. Let my will be like fate, let some 

of tlieni go dispersed and wandering, let some be 

killed, let others, pluuged in wanton tbonghu ot 



336 

love, place their happiaesB in « tweet «look] or a 

Miiile. 
I^e 442. Da luogo, etc. Give vmy to reason> bridle thj 

udUwIuI desires. 
Page Mq Siegua ognano, etc. Let every one ^follow his 

own vtra^y 1 follow mine. 
^ge 125. Signor gran cose, etc. My lord^ tbou hast 
done great things in a short lime, which cannot be 
forgotten in many centaries; armies conquered, ci- 
ties destroyed, hardships borne, and unknown ways 
passed throuf^i. 
Bige 440. Credesi che^ etc. It is thoasht that the sea 
coast Irom Re^gio to Gaeta , is tjie most pleasant 
part of Italy, 
ftlge 444. U' son or, etc. Where now are riches? where 

are honours? 
^ge 447. MoUo egli oprb, etc. He effected much by his 
ezploiu. 

E fa con gli attip etc. She does more with her sweet 
manners and beautiful countenance, Uian Circe or 
Medea with their arts. 
Hagionando, etc. Speaking with me, and I with him. 
Ite sicwi, etc. Go with confidence, for love accompa- 
nies yoa. 
Page 4 70. Ebhc ArganUt etc. Argante had a sword, and 
cfae eminent artist made its hilt and pommel of 
gold, set with jewels. 
Im ragione ddle eetui, etc. He neither cares non re- 
flects whether the rights of people and the ancient 
customs are injured or not. 
ji/idremOf etc. We shall set out, diou at the rising and 
I at the setting of the sun. 
i^e-4 74. Cortesetnente, etc. He kindly asked who they 
were. 
E se *l tempo, etc. tf opportunity does not favour our 

ardent wishes, etc. 
Qtui'wno slatiy etc. Which have been the years, the 

days, and the hours. 
Dir parea, etc Seemed to say, take of me what thoa 

canst. 
Cost me*, «tc. Thus will be seen, if my "valour is 

equal to thine. 
V idra , etc. The hydra was silenced by the sound. 
io tH> ooridurti, etc. I will uke thee into the most 
dreadful cavern. 



537 

Ve*mobile, etc. Stt, thon dumgeable jovaCti, to what I 
am reduced. 
Page 472. lo son dispotto, etc. I am ready to go there. 
GU ofnUsif etc. Both your Cneads aud reiatioo entreat 

you. 
Pommi, etc. Place me in heaven, on earth, or in 
. hell. 
Ntd ella tcopre, etc: Nor does she ditcover passion 

which he does not feci. 
La sua t^illa, etc. His country house was situated upoo 

a hill. 
La clonde, etc. There from whence your lofty mosque 
receives the air and the liaht. 
Page 473. L' alma mia, etc. My soul, which never de- 
parted thence, 
/ dolci sguardi, etc. The sweet looks, and the fine 

words. 
To i^'che, etc. I wish that thou would'st give me those 
guilty persons, a reward for my future services. 
Page 475. Parmi, etc. Meihinks 1 hear the birds com- 
plaining, and the waters running with murmur 
through the green fields. 
Page 4 76 ^ chi mi to^lie, etc. Who takes from me my 
former peace ? It a love ? I cannot distinguish. Let 
somebody tell me. 
Or ce n* andremo, etc. Now we shall go, I lowarda 
Jerusalem^ d»oa towardi Egypt. 



S38 

OP A FEW 

EMINENT ITALIAN WRITERS. 

Earnestly recommended to the attention of 
those who are desirous of becoming ac- 
quainted with the £legance and Beauty, of 
the Italian Language, many of whom havt 
been repeatedly quoted in this Work. 

ALiMANNI, La ColtiYaiione, Poema in verso 

aciolto con le Annotazioni del D. Giaseppa 

Bianchini da Prato. 
ALGAROTTI, Opere, 
ALFIERI, TrageUie, e Opere. 
ALLEGRI , Lcttere e Rime d' Alessandro At 

Icgri. 
ANGUILLARA, Metamorfosi d' Ovidio in ot- 

tava rima. 
ARIOSTO, Orlando Furioso e Satire. 
BANDIERA, Curnelio Nipote. 
BECCARIA, Dei delitti, e dcile pene. 
BELLINI, Discorsi di Notomia* 
BEMBO, Opere. 
BENTIVOGLIO, Opere. 
BOCCACCIO, Opere. 
BOCCALINI, R4(;guagli di Parnasso. 
BUQMMATTEI, Delia lingua Toscatia. 
BUONAROTI, La Fiera, La Tancia, Comme- 

dia in versi. 
CARO, Eoeide di Virgilio, e Lettere. 
CASA, Opere di Munsignor Giovanni delU 

Casa. 
CORTICELLI, Regole della lingua Toscana. 



339 

COTTA, Rime. 

CRESCIMBEXI, Ittoria della Volgar Poesia 

CRUSCA^ Vocabolario degU Accademici della 

Crujica. 
DANTE, La diviaa Coromedia di Dante Ali- 

gljieri. 
DAVANZ4TI, Volgarizzamento degli ADoali 

di Tacilo. 
DAVlLAy Istoria delle gaerre civili di Fraa^ 

cia. 
DOLCE, Orazioni di Cicerone. 
ELEMENTI di Conversazione, in tre liogae. 
FILANGIERI, Ja Scienza della legiilazione , 

col CoMEVTO di B. Constant. 
FIRENZUOLA , Opere di Agnolo Fireo* 

zuola« 
FRLSI Elogio del Galileo. 
FRUGONI, Opere. 
GANGANELLl, Lettere. 
GALILEI, Opere. 
GIAMBULLARL Sloria d' Eoropa. 
GLA.NNONE, Storia civile del Regno di Na- 

poli 
GOLDONT, Commedie. 
GUARINI, Pastor fido. 
GUICCIARDINI, Sioria d' Italia. 
MACHIAVELLl, Opere. 
MAGALOTTI, Opere. 
MAFFEI, Opere del Marchese Sctptone Maf* 

fei. 
MANFREDI, Opere. 
MANNI, Lezioni di lingna Totcana. 
MANZONI, I promessi s|)osi, e Tragedit. 
MARCHETTI, Tiaduzione di Lacrezio. 
METASTASlOi Opere. 



S4o 

MURATORI^.Operc. 

ORTIS, ultiiae letter^. 

PETRARCA., Rime di-Francetco P«trarca. 

PROSE, Florentine di diversi aotori, raccolu 

da Carlo t)ati, ed ahri. 
REDI, Esperieoze natncali, e Lettere faoirgHari 

di Francesco Redi. 
REMIGIO FIORENTINO, Episrolc d'OTidio, 
ROSA, Satire di Salvator Rosa. 
SALVUTIy Opere del Cavalier Leonardo Sal- 

Tiati. 
SALVIW, Prose Toscane;: e Biscorsi Accade- 

mici di Anton*niarra Salvioi. 
SANNAZZARO, Opere. 
SANSOVINO, Opere. 
SARPI, Opere di Fra Paolo Sarpi. 
SEGNERl, Opere di Paolo Segneri della Com- 

pagnia di Gcsu. 
SEGNI, StoriaFiorentina. 
TASSO, C'erusalename Liberata'i e rAminf*. 
TEORICA de'verbi italiani. 
-TIRABOSCHI, Storia delia Letteralora Ita- 

iiana. 
VALLISNERI, Opere. 
VARCHI, Opere di Benedetto Varchi. 
VILLANl, Croniche Florentine* 
ZANNOTTI ( Francesco j, RagiQnaxnenli eiii- 

que dell^Arte Poetica. 
ZAPPI, Poeste. 



THE END. 



\ . 



^ 



mi' 



1