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Full text of "A New Portuguese Grammar in Four Parts ..."

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ANEW 



PORTUGUESE 



GRAMMAR. 



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GRAMMAR. 



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PORTUGUESE 

GRAMMAR 

IN FOUR PARTS; 

CONTAINING 

J. Rules for the combination and ufe of the different Parts 
of Speech. 

IL The Syntax^ in which aref explained, after a mdre 
copious maimer than hitherto attempted, the peculiar ufet 
of the Portuguese Particles. 

III. A Vocabulary, more particularly containing the Terms 
of Commerce, War, and Navigation, wuh a variety 
of Phrafes and familiar Dialogueaj taken from common 
converfatipn and the heft authors. 

IV. Various Paifaffes extracted from the moft approved, 
ancient and modern writers, in profe ^and verfe, with a 
view to facilitate the reading of the moft valuable Por- 
tnguefe books. 

By ANTHONY VIEYRA, Tranftagano. 



THE EIGHTH EDITION, 

CAREFULLY REVISED AND CREATLT IMfROVBDf 
WITH THE PORTUGUESB WOEDS PROPBELT ACCENTED, 
ACCORDING TO THE LATEST AND BEST AUTHOEITlBSp 

By Mr. I. P. AILLAUD. 

f 

JNecefse eft enim inter quos mercaturm £<? contraQuumfint^ 
inter eos quoque jermonis ejse commercia. Ubertus 

FOUETA. 

,1 " ^ . r ' ' ' 1 

LONDON; 
Printed epr F. WINGRAVE, inj thb Stbak p. 



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PREFACE. 






jf^^^ HM^^f of ipePortugu/^i language 
is fo well known to all Englifti mercbants 
wbQ4wry on a general trc^ie<witb the t^frent 
tB^U^ the kmxffjij^ V)orid, if xmllj}^. needles 4o 
^e wiy arguments here 40 Jf rove ii ;. ^n^ JJhall 
i^r what Jb^e^iq fay ofi the mpiovftp^s and 
0^r^ "cf "this lojiguc^e ^ to the Preface to n^y 
£x^Ufli and^ Porti^guefe X>idlijonary. 



.\ 



- ■ - / 

The itdder willjind in tht Firfi PaKLjfftiis 

^rsimmar, what is material as ^ Jb^ndationrpf 

the tufbole. ^ 

^ At the end of tbe Second Part is a full ex^ 

planation of tbe Particles, on wbicb I bave 6e- 

jlowed more time and labour^ becaufe this fub» 

jeSl bas been bitberto much negledled, although 

tbe princ^al ornament and elegance not only of 

tbe 



Cviiil 

Ufe Portuguefe, hut of every other language, 
chiefly conjijl in the proper arrangement and 
judicious interjperjion of thefe words. 

■■ 1 ■ . '■■ ■• '. •■■ 

In the Third Part is a larger colleen than 
hitherto ^uhli/bed of the terms cf Trade, War, 
Navigation, &c. 'which the prefent intercourfe 
'hitween the natioThs renders particularly uj 




■ ' ..... . ., . ^ ■ . - • T . 

Having found a great difficulty in pfoturing 

Portuguefe hooks in this Coitrttry, I have beSfi 

commonly obliged to furnifk with part i^^^ 

priifatS cblledlion thofe Gentlemen whom LhTtoe 

^badthe honour of affijiing in the Jiudy of this 

language', during my refidence here ; tbertfirre, 

in the Fourth Part I have given fome paffdges 

feUSledfrom the heft Portuguefe Authors, and 

\wbicb will, at the fame tme,facilitdte the reikiing 

cf their mojl eminent writers. "* ^^-' 



- > * \ ' » • ^ 









■ I . 



I 






9 



Advertisement to this Sfew Edition. 



4 



npHIS new Edition of Mr. Vieyra's Orani'-^ 
I mar^.has been not only accurately marked ^ 
with the proper accents to facilitate the Rro* 
nunciation and the Intelligence of the tiaft^ 
guajge^ but even materially altered in ^e 
bpidy of t\i^ Work. The accentiiation is a 
matter of fo much confequence in the Pprtu- 
guefe Language, that one accent u fed ih the 
room of another^ often changes entirely the 
lignification of tjie wOrd, as for in^ahce ill 
the words Av6 and Avo ; the former, when 
marked with an acute, meaning ^rawrf-mt^A^, 
the latter with a circumflex, meaning ^a«^ 
Jatber^ This interefting part, in which all 
the former Editions have been fo deficient, 
(ufing only the acute) has been fcrupulously 
corredled' in the prefent one. In that part 
which treats of the Pronunciation, fome very 
neceffary corrections have been introduced. 
The pronunciation of the cb, wrongly ex-^ 
plained in the other Editions, is here intbiS^t 
brought to its real found. 



I • 



New paflages from the beft Modern Wri- 
ters, have been fubftituted for fome of the 
Ancient ones, to enable the learners to form 
a proper idea^ <if the variations and j^ogrefs 
of the Language, down to the prefent time. 
A new Vocabulary of the Military Words of 
Coihihaftd'and ifr^IhlVariflationof the Com- 
meircial Letters have alfo be^n inferted in this 
Cisifion. 



»' ^ — ' 



• »*'■■* 



S.u6Ti are th6 principal alterations ma& in 
this VjTork, which, it is hoped, will meet witK 
the approbation of the public. 



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London, i8th July, i8u» 



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CONTENTS. 



FAK'T L 



I 



/IF the Portuguese Alphabet, and the manner of pr^* 
^^ nouncing each separate Letter . - - . I^agc t 
Of the manner of pronotLncing 4he P^tuguese Letters 
as combined in Syllables -•»--••- 
Of the AHicles - • - - - • . ... * , .- 
Of the Nouns ' -^ ^ ^ - . • - ..».». ^i 

fOf the Pronouns -.- -.'-- . - . . -,« 
Verbs .-..-... ^ ...... 44 
the Participles •--..-.....113 
thk Adverbs 114 

Of the Prepofitions - - - - -/. - -. - - 117 

df the Conjunctions ' ..........iiS 

Jnitrjective Particles -.-----.--120 

Some Abbreviations used in the Portuguese Language ist 



P A R T JI. 

Of the Ditfifion of Syntax ..--.--.. nt 

Of the Syntax of Articles - - -.- - . - - .isfi 
Of the Syntax of Nouns\ and firfi^ of the Subftan^ 

tives - --- 131 

Of the Syntax of Adjectives - - . - - • - -13s 
^t/ie Syntax of the Comparatives and Superlatives • 135 
df the Syntax of Pronouns ........136 

Of the Syntax oj Verbs • -..-.•,.-'- 13(9 
Of the Syntax of Particles and Gerunds - - - - 4 152 

Of Prepofitions -.-.-.----- * 154 

Vf the Portuguese Orthography -.-•--- 191 
6f the Quantity of Syllabus^ and their Sound . • • 209 
fttymology of the Portuguese Tongue from the Latin -915 

PART 



Contents. 

-. ^ A RsT III, . . 

The most elegant Phrases of the Portuguese Lan^- 
guage .-....-.. ti8 

A vocabulary oj Words mhst'used inDiscourse - - i 
0/ the Portuguese Coin ..-.-....^8 
jI Condition 0/ Portuguese Proverbs ' ..-..- 59 
^ Fdmiltar Dialogues -----./••... 69 
Letters on Mercantile Affairs^ &c» .-•.-. 84 

■ *. ■ . • ^ \ 

PART IV. 

---...'•■. 

Several useful and entertaining Passages^ collected 
Jrom the be/l Portuguese Writers - . - - - - - 1 a^x 

. , ... . _ - ^>. - • . • ' 

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PORTUGUESE 



GRAMMAR. 



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PART I. 



CHAP. I. 
Of THE PORTUGUESE Alphabet. 

And the manner of pronouncing eackfeparate Letter. 

npHE Portuguefe alphabet contains twenty-four 
letters^ viz. 

A, B,C,D,E, F, G,H,I, J, L, M, N,0, P, Q, 
R,!S,T,U,V,X,Y,Z. 

The A is exprelTed by a found like that of a in 
the Englifh words j/, rat, fat, &c. 

B is exprefled by a found like that of the be, in tfa6 
firft fyllable of the Englifli word Betty. 

C is' exprefled by a found like that of the firft 
iyllable of the Englifh word celebrated. 

' D is exprefled by a found like that of the firft 
fyllable of the.Eogliih word declare. 

. '£ is exprefled by a (bund like that which we give 
to the Englifli a when we pronounce the word care. 

B Fis 



2 PORTUGUESE 

F is expxdEkd \jy the fame fi)UDd aaia^EDglxili. 

G IS expreffed bv a found like that of the firft 
, fyllable of the Engh'ih word yneratkm. 

H is expreffed by a found like that of the Eng- 
li(h word aghast if you cut off the two laft letters st, 
and ke^p tpe accent oa thq fecond 9. 

. I is exprefled by the found of our ee. 

J is called^ cotifidntej it is expreffed by the found 
oiee; and bwh^ faqie p^er ^ ihi^g hefofe c or i. 

L> as in Englifh. 

M^ a^ in £i)g4iih. 

N» as in Englifh. 

O has nearly thi faiqe found ais in the Engliih 
word slore. 

P is expreffed by a fotind like that of pe in the 
Englifli word penny. 

Q is expreffed by a found like that of the Eng" 
lifhit. / 

R is ^oreffed by a fbund like that of the Eoglilh 
particYpre Vr^i if you cart cut off the laft fetter A 

S, aji lii En^iffi. 

T is e;(preffc4 by a found like that of iha in the 
Ebglifli Wofd TPhams. 

y i^ expi;^ffedl>y a found like that of ^f in. fBe 
Engtilh word poi^. 

Vis eitpieffed ^y a fiwind Jtke tha^t oj[. qo'i t^y 
call it alfo i> canJmUs^* i. e, tjjt^ y.^mtomj^ 

X is e3i|)mffed by a found like thfit.pf puj; pro- 
noun perfonaljft?! i|!^^y^^4^ri^^tq it,qr ^$>&^ 

T 1^ expreifedby a hmsA like lh|M: f^.mi i|i Ifie 
Englifh word vi/Usk^v^ m e»Sttd 

Z is expmfled by this finuidt o£ 4>uil IBoffUSkk^^ 
iefffing out ^he i4 w aMi 

0/ 



Q RAM M AR. . ^ 

I . y ■ 

m 

Of tie manner of pronouncing the Portuguefe Letters as 

combmed in SyU^Us I and first 

Of the Vowels. 

A. 

A in Portuguefc is commonly pronounced like a 
in the following Englifli words adapted^ castle^ &c. 
It is fometitnes pronounced with lefs ilrength« and 
clofelyj a$ in dmboSy where the a is pronounced fike 
a in tlie Englifh word anibition. , 

• E. 

The letter e has two different founds ; the one 
open like ay in daily y the other clofe, like that in the 
Englifli word mellow. Examples of the former,/^, 
faith, piy foot> &c. Examples of the latter, ridty « 
-Mt^fmide^ a wall^ &c. In this confifts a great part 
of the beauty of the Portoguefe pronunciation, which 
however, cannot be learnt but by a long ufe, not* 
withftaniding all the rules that can be given. 

I. 

t% proBOUdced like ee in the Engliih word steely 
4^ 3 or like i in the Englifli words stilly ainda*; w^ 
jJiW#,visM. 

O. 

This vowel has two founds \ one open, as in the 
"word ^, pity, where tbe'^ is pronounced like our 
in the word store \ the other clofe, as in the Por- 
tuguefe article do^ of^ and th^ word r^J^i/f^/t^, round, 
where the o is pronounced like our u in turret' or 
stumble. It is likewife in the different pronuncia- 
tion^ of this vpwel that confifts the grenteft part of 
^c beauty of Ac Portuguefe pronuncf^on; but 
it can be learned only by a long.ufe. 

B SI U- The 



Contents. 

-. aP a R/T III, 

T%€ most elegant Phrases of the Portuguise Lan- 

guage ti8 

A vocabulary of Words most used irrDiscourse - - i 
OJ the Portuguese Coin ........ .58 

A Condition of Portuguese Proverbs " ...... 59 

^ Familiar Dialogues .---../•.... 69 

Letters on Mercantile Affairs^ &c» ...... 84 

P A R T IV. 

Several useful and entertaining Passages^ collected 
Jrom the befl Portuguese Writers • - - - - - is,i 



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PORTUGUESE 



GRAMMAR. 



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P A R T I. 



CHAP. I. 
Of THE PORTUGUESE Alphabet. 

Ai^ the manner of pronouncing each fepar ate Letter. 

TTHE Portuguefe alphabet contains twenty-four 
letters^ viz. 

A, B,C,D,E, F, G,H,I, J, L, M, N,0, P, Q, 
R, S, T, U, V, X, Y, Z. 

The A is exprelTed by a found like that of a in 
the Englifh words j/, rat, fat, &c. 

B is exprefled by a found like that of the be, in iht 
firft fyllable of the Englilh word Betty: ^ 

C IS exprefled by a found like that of the firft 
fyllable of the Etiglifh word celebrated. 

D is exprefled by a found like • that of the firft 
fyllable of the Eogliih word declare. 

< '£ is exprefled by a found like that which we give 
to the Englifli a when we pronounce the word care. 

B Fis 



2 PORTUGUESE 

F k cxpxdEkd fay the fame fiiuod aaia^EngliilL 

G IS expreffed by a found like that of the firft 
. fyllable of the Engliih word yneratkm. 

H is expreffed by a found like that of the Eng- 
li(h word aghast if you cut off the two laft letters st, 
and ke0p tpe accent oa thq fecond ^. 

. I is exprefled by the found of our ee. 

J is called^ cot^fidnte^ it is expreffed by the found 
of ^/ and h^the faqie p^er jig tb^^ hefofe e or i. 

L> as in Englifh. 

M^ aj^ in £i)g4iih. 

N, as in Englifh. 

O has nearly thi faiqe found ais in the Engliib 
word store. 

P is expreffed by a fptind like that of pe in the 
Englifli word penny. 

Q is expreffed by a found like that of the Eng" 

R is^preffed by ^ fpV?^ ^^^^ ^^^^ of theEoglilh 
partictpfcVr^i if you cart cut off the laft fetter A 

S, zi In En^iffi. 

T i$ e^tpreffed by a found like that of iha in the 
Etoglifli wofd TiJtfwrx, 

y i^ expii^ffed l>]r a found like that of o(i in. fBe 
Engtifli word /to6|^. 

V is exp;»effed J^|r. a fiwind iac;e that; ojf QQ.i t^y 
call it alfo i? cai^mUi^ u e, ijjfcp Y<:p»f^ajRtt / 

X 13 e:t|)i^i&d by a found: like ^hfU ^f PH)>r pro- 
noun perfonal j&?^ h! yw .^d^iR, ^ t« it> qr a^yJcrju; 

T 1^ expreifed by. a CmumI IHce lh|M: pf.w. <' Ui Ifie 
Engli {h word v^fi^nfeyd « alalM^^^^; 

2 is exprcfied by tfaisfiMiiidt of 'CUIL Eo^ltfiLi^lM/, 
leafing out ^he i4 o)^ aMi 

0/ 



Q R A M M A R. ^ 

Of tie manner o/pronauuing tie fffrtupufe Letters as 
camimed in SjiitUts I aadfirst 

Of the Vowbls. 

A. 

A in Portuguefe is commonly pronounced like a 
in the following £ngli(h words adapted^ castle, &c. 
It is fometimes pronounced with lefs ftrength, and 
clofely, a$ in dmbosy where the a is pronounced like 
a in the Englifh word ambition. 

• E. 

The letter e has two different founds ; the one 
open like ay in daify; the other clofe, like that in the 
l^gliiSi word mellow. Examples of the former, y!% 
faith, fi^ foot, &c. Examples of the latter, ride, « 
uteUfofide^ a wall, &c. In this confifts a great part 
of the beauty of the Portuguefe pronunciation, which 
howetver, cannot be learnt but by a long ufe, not* 
withftaniding all the rules that can be given, 

I. 

ts pronounced like ee in the Engliih word steely 
i^o 3 or like i in the Englifh words stilly ainda*; vt*^ 
JfiMi, visivd. 

O. 

This vowel has two founds ; one open, as in the 
"word d6j pity, where the* is pronounced like our 
In the vf or A storey the other clofe, as in the Por» 
tuguefe article do, of, and th^ word reddndo, round, 
where the o is pronounced like our u in turret or 
stumile. It is likewife in the different pronuncia- 
tion^ of this vpwel that confifts the grenteft part of 
the beauty of Ae Portuguefe pronunciation s but 
it can be learned only 1)y a long ufe. 

B« y.The 



P O R TUG UE S E 

U. 
The vowel u is pronounced like 00 in Englifh. 

I 

Y. 

Y has the fame found as the Portuguefe vowel/* 



Of Consonants. 

B 

Keeps always the. fame found as in Englith. 

C 

Before a^ o, », and the confonants /, r, is properly 
pronounced asi&; but before e and / it takes the 
hilling found of s : it takes alfo the found ofs before 
a^ Of u, when there is a dafli under it thus f. 

f^ I could wijh the learned in Portugal would follow the 

, resolution of the Royal Academy of Madrid^ hy expunging 

such Jajht and placing the s in its steady Jinee they have 

in both languages the same hijjing sound which frequent^ 

ly occqfions great confujion in the proper use of them. 

« ■ 

C before h is pronounced like sh in > the Englifli 
worAsfitneifiape^ &c. 

Double c is founded only before e and /> the firft 
with the found of k, and the other with the hiffing 
found of si as in accidinte, accidents pronounce 
aksidfyile. 

D 

Is pronounced ,in Portuguefe as in Englifli. ^ 

Is pronounced always as in Englllh. 

G 

'*■ ' Before the vowels a, o, ir» and before confonants^ 
h pronounced as in Engliih : example^ gdsto, tafte ; 
^aiola, cage 5 ^ilCj a cry. 

G before 



. Q R A M M A R. f 

G before e and i denotes the found of ^ confo- . 
nant. 

Gna fqunds almoft like our wa : example, guirdM, 
jpronounce gwarda. 

. Gue^ gui,2,K pronounced as gwe in the word F«fi/, 
and^* in the word g^ ; but in the verbs argw- and 
redarguir, it is to be pronounced as if it were written 
4rgu€er, &c. 

H. 

The letter h is never aspirated nor pronounced at 
the beginning of words^ as Adra, an nour ; Aomem, 
a man : but, according to the modern orthography^ 
aU thofe words are written without an A. 

H when preceded by a c^ makes a found with it 
like our jA. See the letter C^ and alfo the letters 
L and N. 

J 

Is pronounced like our^ confonant. 

K. : 

The Portuguefe have no fuch letter as k. 

L. . 

Is pronounced in Portuguefe as in Engliflu 
US is pronounced like g before an / in the Italian 
words/iglio^/og/io, &c. 

M 

Is pronounced as in Kngli(h^ when placed before 
a vowel with which it forms a fyllable s but, when 
it is at the end of words, and preceded by the letter 
e, it forms in Portuguefe a nafal found like that of 
the French words vin, wine ^ pain, bread ; except 
/dem, t6em, from the verbs foiir, to&r, and fome 
othei^s. 

M at the end of words, preceded by an a, o, or 
I9 has fuch a liafal obtufe found that can only be 
learned from a matter's mouth. 

B 3 N being 



8 PORTUGUESE 

Ey^ as in r/y, king. 

£/, as in amei, I loved. 

Eu,'B.seu, L 

Jo, as via, he faw* 

Oc, as in poemy they put ; compoim, they compofe ^ 
meioes, melons, &c. 

Qy, as in i(^, an ox ; f/fy, he was. 

Ou, as ^(}», I give ; /ou, I am, 

Ue, as ^2»^J, blue : 

JT The two vowels in the following words must 
be plainly and distinctly pronounced ; 

^i, as in paiz, a country, pronounce pa^iz. 

Ea, as in lampria, a lamprey, pronounce^ lampri^a^ 

la, as- c/emfyicia, clemency, pronounce^ clemind'a. . 

lo, as in navio, a (hip, pronounce, navi-o. 

luy as i/i^^^tf^ a widoWj pronounce, vi-uva. 

Od, as Lhbda, Lisbon, prda, a prow, pronounce, 
Lisbd-a, &c. 

O^, as z^^;?/, /^i^;;;, from the verbs, to&r, and /o4r, 
pronounce /^ ^t;;, &c. . > 

V. Oiy sts ro/;9i, bad, pronounce, ro-im. 

Oo, as ,coop^raf4m, co-operation, pronounce co- 
eperafSo. 

Ui, as ruina, ruin, pronounce, ru-ina. 



CHAP. 11. 

Of the Articles. 

'T'HOSE particles called Articles, are properly 
prepofitions, commonly put before nouns, to 
fliew their gender, number, and cafe. . . 
Thefe articles are definite or indefinite. 

0/ the Definite Article. 
•I. The definite article marks the gender, i^umber, 
and cafe, of the nouns which k precedes. \ . 

. . *!• The 



1 ■* 
i" 



GRAM MA R. 9 

The Englifli tongue has but one definite article, 
namely the, which lerves for both numberi 

The Portuguefe has two, vii. o for the mafculinc 
and a for the leminihe. 

The definite article has five cafes, the nominative, 
genitive, dative, accufative, and ablative ; becaufe 
the vocative in the nouns is defigned and preceded 
merely by the particle o. 

The Declenfion of the Mafculine Article o. 

Singular. . Plural. 

Nominative, 9, the^ - Nominative, os^ the. 

Genitive, do^ of the. Genitive,, ^^j, of the. 

Dative, ao^ or o^ to the. pative, aos^ or os^ to the. 

Accufative, ao^ or o^ the. ' Accvifative, aos^ or oi the. 

Ablative, do^ from or hy the. Ablative, dos, from or by the. 

The Dec/efifion of the Femimne Article a. 

Singular. * Plural. 

Nominative, a, the. Nominative, as^ the. 

Genitive, da^ of the'. Genitive, das^ of the. 

Dative^ <i, to the. Dative, as, to the. 

Accufative, ^, the. Accufative, jj, the. 

Ablative, da^ from the. Ablative, das^ from or by the. 

■ pr Obferve, that the Portuguefe have an article 
for each gender, both in the fingular and the plural. 

Of the Indefinite Article. 

[[ The indefinite article may be put before the maf- 
xul}ne as well as the feminine gender, before the 
plural as well as the fingular number. 

The indefinite article has but four cafes, the ge- 
iiitlve, dative, accufative, and ablative. 

One may. put de before a noun mafculine as well 

as a. feminine, as huma cordade riy, a king's crown 3 

tbip word r/y \% ihafculine; hutfi chapio de pilha, 9k 

, hat of straw , . the word p&lha is of the femitiine 

gender. 

TJie indefinite article de is alfo put before the plu- 
pal as well as the lingular number \ example, huma 

corda 



10 PORTUGUESE 

<wri4 ti§ Jttres^ a ciimtk of fiowers^ ^bM prkto dt 
4mr6zy a ptete of rice. 

Detlenjion ofiht IndefifAie Article. 

GenitiTe, de of. AccuAtive, a. 

TinAvt, d, lo* Ablacive, 4(^, fixMti. 

ijpr The accufatire of this article is not ^cpin^fed 
iti Engliifal example, Eu conked a sSu pAy^ I loiew 
his fattier, in conked a sua may^ I knew his mother. 

The indeiioitc article may aifo be put before infi- 
nitives, and then it fimifies to ; as he Umpo defalldr^ 
dc dormir^ de Hr, &c. it is time to speak^ to sleep, to 
read, &C« iu v6u a vir^ n fallhr^ I am going, to iee^ 
to fpeak. 

:N. B. Whenever we meet with ^dnd io in Ejifij- 
lifli, followed by /^tf, remember they are the indefi- 
nite artkies, and theh ^e muft make tife of the 
indefinite article de^ or a^ in Portuguefe* 

When the verb is in the infinitive mood, and- 
ferves as nominative to the followmg verb, they put 
the article o before it ; as o cbmtr e o dortfiirfdo as 
<6ujas mats neceffarias n^a vida^ eating and ileeping 
are the greateft neceffaries of life. 

When the prepofition in is followed by the article 
Mr or by a pronoun pofieffive^ as initio m my^ in 
tky^ in iis, we muft render «it in Portuguefe by em - 
^ or no, em os or nos, for the mafciiline ; and hy ema 
or na, em as or nas, for the feminine : example, inthe 
l^den, em o jar dim, or nojardim-, in the ftreet, em a 
ria or naria; in thy book, em o tiu. Or no tin ihro; 
In his bed, em a pa, or nafHa coma, &c. 

When after the prepofition wM, which in Portu- 
gtiefe is expreffed by com, we find the articles the, or 
a pronoun poflefiGlve, as whh the, with my, &c. we 
tnky hy^ctmi o, or eo, cma or coa, etm os, or cos, am 
m, or toMS : example, with the prince, com 6 or co 
prhuipe-y with the iword, com a or coa ejpida^ with 
the eyes, c^m os or cos olh0s -, with ray oooks, am os 
M COS mim livre$,8tc. 

WJien 



GRAMMAR. li 

When the prtf)0&ian wiik is-fellowed by a pro- 
tiotin poflefiive, and this by a noun of quality or 
kindred, as wit A your majefyy wit A your highnefs^ t$kk 
your excellency^ wHA Ids brother^ &c: wkA muft then 
be rendered by the Portuguefe word com^ as com 
*u^uli^^A4e, corn vdffa A4r/M, tcmjiu trmao^ wi^ut 
ufing the article. 

Obferve, that fotnetioies th^ dative and acculatife 
of the indefinite article are not exprefled in Englifliy 
piarticularly before pronouns perfonal and proper 
names ; example, ctmv^ a n6s, it behoves us ; Ai^ 
torn mat^ M P^dro, Anthony kUled Peter. 



,ji' i ' iii i T'^^iifn 



C H A P. IIL 

Of ths Novns. 

•ITHE Porluguefe nouns hav« various lermiiria* 
tlons, as will appear hereafter. 

They have but two genders, the inafculine and 
feminine. 

The Portuguefe nouns have no variation of cafes, 
like the Latin> and the article only diftinguifhes 
the cafe. 

a r 

f 

Of muns ending ih i ; and of their dectenfion. 

Sibgular. Floral. 

Norn, a rainha^ the queen. Norn, as rainhas^ the queeai. 
Geo. da rainha^ol^t. queen. Gen.^jrAiiiiaj,ofthequeeni. 
Dat. a rainidf to the queen. Dat.^^i ratnhas^ to the queenf • 
Act. a rainlia^ the quetn. Ace. as rainhas^ the queens. 
Voc. 6 ratnha^ O qu^en. Voc. i rain^^aSt O qaedhs. . 
AM. da ou pitla ramAa^ ftom Abl. da oapeiius ramhas from 
or by the queen. or by the quems. 

We have alreadv obferved that the Portuguefe 
Nouns have no variation of cafes y ther^ore there k 

no 



12 PORTUGUESE 

no occaiiori to difplay more examples of tlieir de- 
clenfipnSt becauJfe you need but change the article 
according to their gender. 

Of the Gender of Nouns ending in a. . 

Nouns ending in a are generally of the feminine 
gender; as rofa^ a rofe; janilla^ a window, &c. 
You muft except dia^ a day, planSta^ a planet ; and 
other nouns ending in a^ belonging to a man ; as 
mamla^ a porter; jtfuita, a jefuitt thofe derived 
from the Greek are likewife mafculine ; as dogmoj 
epigrdmma, clima ; except fcientific names as mathe* 
mdiica, theologia^ &c. 

Except alfo from this general rule fome nouns 
that have the accent upon the laft fyllable ; as alva^ 
ri^ a charter, or a prince's letters patent ; Pari, one 
of the captainfhips of the Portuguefe America, &c. 

Obferve, that the plural of nouns ending in /i is ' 
formed by adding the letter s to the lingular ; as 
likewife the plural of all nouns that terminate in 
vowels. 

Obferve alfo, that nouns ending in aa are of 
the feminine gender, and form their plural as thofe 
ending in a. 

Of the Gender of Nouns ending in t. 

Nouns ending in e are generally of the mafculine 

Sender ; as dente, a tooth ; v&lle, a valley ; vintre, 
e womb, &c. 

The exceptions are /e, faith; fonte, a fountain; 
chive, a key ; tdrre, a tower ; Ave, a fowl ; cdrne, 
flelh or meat ; gSnte, people ; nicfte, death ; neiJe, 
snow ;. ndite, night ; pdnte, a bridge ; p^Jle, plague ; 
parte, part ; ferpbtte, a ferpent ; /Sr^, a hare. 

Except alfo all names of virtues, vices, faculties, 
and thofe expreffive of the pafSons of the mind ; as 
vktitde, Viiiue ; fantidhde, holinefs ; bandide, good* 
ntU ; vaidade, vanity ; ociofidide, idlenefs^ &c. 

Thirdly, 



GRAMMAR. is 

Thirdly, idide^ age ; velhice^ old age ; ruJKcidade^ 
Tuftidty; capacid&de^ capacity; feitciddde^ happl- 
neisj forte, fortune; arte^ art;* irvore, a tree; 
fertUidade^ fertility ; ftde^ third ; febe^ a hedge ; cduve, 
cabbage; herdade^ a farm or manor/ chaminiy a ' 
chimney ; pnide^ a wall ; fa&de^ health ; ride^ a net ; 
mare, the tide ; fibre, fever ; gale, a gallery. Sec, 

Of the Gender of the No$tns ending in i. 

Nouns ending < in i are mafculine ; as i^adfi, a 
rapture ; nibri, a hawk, &c. 

Of Nouns ending in o. 

Nouns ending in o are of the mafculine gender ; 
as Uwo, a book ; ftlho^ a fon ; brigo, an arm ; vejiido, 
a garment ; efpelho, a, looking giafs, &c. Except 
mdo, a fliip; fUho, a fritter or pancake; nr6,zxi 
cej. 

Of Nouns ending in u. 

Alt nouns ending in u are mafculine; as peri, a 
turkey j grdu, a crane. 

'Of Nouns ending in y. 

Nouns ending in j^ are of the mafculine gender ; 
as r/y, king; p&y, father; b6y,o%, &€. except liy, 
a law ; may, a mother. 

« ■ 

Of the other Terminations of Nouns, or of thofe termi^ 

nating in confonants. 

1. AH Nound ending in' at, are mafculine; as 
^niU, a fign or token ; fal, fait. You muft except 
cal, lime, which is feminine, and has no plural. 

The plural of thefe nouns is formed by changing 
^ the letter /of the (ingular into^i; ^9, ftndesftomfi^ 
nU\ anim&es from anhnil. 

2. Nouns ending in at are of the mafciiline gei^ 
der; asiir,air. 

Tbe-pluriil of thefe nouns k formed by adding es 
to the ungular> as ares frbm ar. 



H FOR T y G*U E-S E 

SwM nouns endiDg in as ia the plaral are femi- 
otoe^ and Imve no lingular; as migas, exeqmas^ 

3. Nouns ending in 42: are of the iQafculine gen* 
der J as rapazy a boy ; except pifz^ peace. jThe 
plural is formed by the addition or ez to the finguhur. 

4. Nouns ending in </ are mafculines as annil} 
a ring 5 papely paper, &C; 

.TTie plttf al oi thefe nouns is formed by ehanging 
Ae i of the fingular into is ; as amiijy from amel ; 
j^tf^/Zr, from papel. 

5. Nouns ending in ^/^ are of the mafcuh'ne 
gender; as homeniy a man; btniy benefit, &c. 
Except briemy order; viAgsm. a voyage; virgem, 
a virgin, &e. but /ahigim, a K>rl of beafi, is com- 
mon. 

The plural of thefe -nouns is formed by changing 
the m of the fingular into ns ; as homens from kontemj 

tf. Nouns ending in er are of the mafculine 
[ender; as pod^r^ powder; prazfyr, pleafure, &c. 
Iircept colhety a fpoon ; mulher, a woman. 

The plural of tbefe nouns is Yor med by adding es 
to the ungular^ as collUreSy from colhir^ 

1. . Nouns ending in ^z are of the mafculine 
gender ; as fregukz^ a parifhioner or a cuftomer ; 
mezy month; arnezy UviZy revezy &c. Except 
Jurdhiy deafitiefs ; Mrpdzy vSZy Sec. 

The plural of thete nmms is formed by adding es 
to th^ fingular, as/irjt^^^y, from fregtUz ; but liz 
t^as-oo pJural. 

8. Nouns ending in // are of the mafculine gen- 
der; UB/mii, a funnel ; iarrii, a barcdL 

Xbe plural of theie npuns is formed by changing 
the / of the fingular into Sy ^funk% homjmiiyi^c. 
JB^ept oftisify ficUy pensile &c. which change the 
i^iiito eis m the plural, ^sficeisy frotQ/icU. 

j^ Nf>uii8 endiQ|; jniw are of the mafeulioe gen- 
det, as is fa Jim, a little fword. 

9 , The 



GRAMMAR, if 

. The piural of thefe flouns is formed by changing 
\he^ m of the fiogQiar into hs, a^ efpadins froai «»• 
paJsm. 

10. NoBBS ending in ir or yr are of the ntaC 
caline gender ; but mdrtir or martyr^ a piartyr, 13 

coAwnw^ 

Tbe plural of t^fe nouns 19 formed by adding es 
tp the angular. 

U* AU Nouns, ending in iz are of the mafcu* 
hne gender ; as apprenaix an apprentice ; . nwriz^ 
Q0& \ vwiity varoiih ; m4ti%^ a ihadowing in paint- 
ing ; chafarizy chamariz^ &c. Ei&cept aboiZi perdiz^ 
riuz, cod0miz, tnatriz^ &c. 

The plural of thefe nouns is formed by adding cs 
to the ungular, as perdizes from p^djz^ 

12. N^Mios ending 10 &/ are or the mafcnline gen*- 
der ; m anzplf a hook ; fil^ the fun, &c. 

The pluri^ of thefe nouns i% formed by changing 
tbe / or the fingular into es^ as anzoes from anzoiy^ 

13. Nouns ending in om are of the maCculine gen^ 
der ; d&f&mi fouckl ; ii6m^ gift, 8^:^ 

'tht plural of thefe nouns is formed by changii^ 
the 4l^of the finguladr into «5, as>MJ (rom/om^ &c. 

. 14« Nouns ending in or are of the ma&uline gen- 
der; as amAr, love, /rwdr, fear, &c. Except d^^ 
pain ; cifr, Qolour, &c. 

The plural of thefe nouns is formed by adding #> 
to the fingular, as iiw^r^i fromamdr. 
- Nounis ending ia os are oi the mafeuline gendfiir f 
aaZ>^0j,Qod. 

' The plural of thefe nouo$ is formed by chaogtng 
the s into zcs, as DicMs from I^s. 

li. N<>un3 eliding in ^2 are of the mafeuUne gpn-> 
dw ; as aiiernSz, a Moorifli coaf ; arrdz, rice 1 ^^^ 
hangman, &c. Except tr^z, a walnut ; voz^ vivc^ii 
/{«, the mouth of a river. 

The pLuraL oCthefe aouns i» formed by adding «tf^^ 
to the Angular. 



Ii6 PORTUGUESE 

t 

16. Nouns ending in ul or um are of the mafcu- 
line gender ; asy«/,,the fouth ; Sail, Saul, a pfoper 
name of a man ; atum, tunny-fifh. 

The plural of thofe ending in ir/, according to the 
learned B/uteau, is formed by changing the /of the 
fingular into €s, as /ties from /ul, az&es from azU 
blue, &c. Except cSn/ules from cSn/ul, a conful. 

The plural of thofe ending in «w, is formed by 
changing the m of the fingular into ns, as atins 
from atum. . 

17. Nouns ending in uz are of the mafculine 
gender ; as arcatiz, an afquebufs. 

The plural of thefe nouns is formed by adding es 
to the fingular. 

18. Nouns ending in^ are of the mafculine gan- 
der; as maS, hand^ campqfifao, compofitiou, ora- 
faS, oration, &c. Except paS, bread; anaS, a 
dwarf; cmfaS, a hand-worm ; fravaS, thunder ; es- 
quadrao', a fquadron; piao, a child's top; borraSy 
2l blot with ink ; papelaoy pafte-board ; chao, the 
ground, quinkaiy a (hare. . 

There is no certain rule for the formation of the 
plural of the nouns ending in uS ; becaufe fome 
change the at of the fingular into aes, as Alemaes, 
from AiemaS, a German ; capitaes, from capitaSi a 
captain; cais, from cds, a dog, pais, from pao, a 
loaf ; &c. S6me change the a8 of the fingular in- 
to Tos ; as cidadaosy from cidadad^ a citizen ; chris- 
fins, from chriftai, a chriftian ; cortexa&s from cor^ 
ttzaS, a courtier ; viltaos, from villao^ a villain, &c. 
Some change the ao of the fingular into Ses ; as ts- 
quadrfies, from e/quadraS, a fquadron. ; trovSes, from 
travai, thunder ; - ctmclufiies, from conclu/ai, a • con- 
clufion ; aragSes, (torn ' orafaS, an oration; and 

Enerally all the Portuguefe nouns that may 
■ cafily made Englifh, by changing their ter- 
mination faS into the Englifli termination/^^* as de- 
cRnofdi, declenfion or declination, re^^/^^f^S, con- 
fidcration^ &c. and thefe are of the feminine gender. 

. 19. All 



GRAMMAR. 17 

19« AH noups fignifying a mak, muft be of the 
mafculine gender^ as ihiqucy duke ; tnarquJz^ a mar- 
quis s cSnde^ count, and thofe denoting a female are 
always femirtine. 

You may form two general rules from what has 
been faid concerning the formation of the plural of 
nouns, viz. 

I. That all nouns ending in any of the vowels 
have their plural formed by adding the letter/ to 
the fingular. 

IL That the plural of nouns ending maz^ ez, i9, 
0Z^ MZ, is formed by adding es to the ungular. 

0/ Augmeniativis. 

The Portuguefe have their augmentatives formed 
by the increaie of one or two iyllables, which 
they; add to the end of their nouns, and ferve 
either to augment the fignificatioh of nduns, or to 
declare a thmg contemptible ; and fo, from homem^ 
a mao» they forn^* AomemzarraSy a great ftrong 
man; fS/o, a fool, toleiraOy a great fool, &g. 
and fonr>e others that may be learnt by ufe. They 
have alfo their augmentatives for the feminine i af, 
moHurina^ a great ftout woman s tQleir^m^ &c. 

There are a great many nouns that appear^ by 
their termination, to be augmentatives, though tbejT 
are not ; as, forao^ a ferret ; ai^ffma^ an ait or a 
borfe^mill, 8fc. 

Of Dimmniivis. 

^ 

The dimiuutives leflen the fignification- of their 
primitives. . 

The diminutives in the Portuguefe language are 
always formed by changing the laft vowel of the 
. primitives into inio ; but they denote either fmall* 
ncfs of things, or kindnefs and flattery ; as bichinho, 
a little worm, from^i^ii^, a worm ; cgsUu^nho, frorn 
soitiJp, a poor Jittle man s btmitinhp a little pretty 

C perfon 






• t 



Ig' PORTUGtJESE^ 

pMon or thing, from hnko, pretty. Sometimes 
thejr are formed by adding zinho to the primitives ; 
as caSzifthOf a little dog, from cao^ a dog, irmagzinAo, 
dear little'brother, from irmaS, &c. 

The diminutives that ferve for the feminine have 
their termination in inAa^ or. zinka; as maozinhay 
a little hand, from mcoy a hand ; tabednha, a little 
head, from cabeca, a head. You may fee in the laft 
example, that the diminutivals ferving for the femi- 
nine and ending in hka, are formed by changing 
the laft fyllable a of the primitive mto inha. 

Oblerve" that many nouns appear to be diminu- 
tives without being io ; as moinho, a mill ; tfpinha, 
a fi(h-bone. 

Note, the diminutives in Portuguefe convey fome- 

times a bad meaning, and denote contempt. 

. * • 

Of Noum AdjeBive. 

All adjectives ending in o make their feminine by 
changing o into a\ as ddutay from dtnHo^ learned ; 
but mhoy bad, makes ma in the feminine. 

Thofe that end in ao have their feminine in aa ; 
. z&yj&a^ from fao^ healthy ; lougaay from loiigaoy brifk, 
^y, beautiful; meaa^ from i^/^Jo^ middling, ordi« 
" nary. * 

Thofe ending in e are common to both genders ; 
as, firtey ftrong, &c. 

Thofe that end in m ihake their feminine by add- 
ing an a to the mafculiney z$. huma^ from Aum, 
one; aiguma, from algum, fome, &c. and fometimes 
by changing the m into a; as, commuay from com- 
mum^ common ; boa, from bpmy good. 

Thofe that end in i^ make their feminine by add- 
ing a to the mafculine, as nudy from ««, naked ; 
• nua^ from n», raw. 

Thofe that end in ez are common to both gen- 
ders ; as cortizy civil, kind ; capdz^ capable, &c. ex- 
cept fome which make the feminine^ by adding a 
, ♦ to 



GRAMMAR. 19 

to the mafculine; as, Franctza^ from Franciz^ 
French ; Partuguiza, from Portuguiz^ PoVtuguefe. 

F^pankoij Spanifti^ makes Efpanhbla in the ferhi- 
nine ; but generally thofe that end in /are common 
to both genders ; ds, affdvel^ affable ; cmil^ cruel, 
, &c. 

Of the Cpmparifin of jidjeHwes. 

The comparifon of. adjeftives is the way of in- 
creafing their fignification by certain degrees, whicK , 
are three, viz. the politive, comparative and fuper- 
lative. 

The pofitive lays down the natural iignrfication 
of the adjeftive ; as, nohrcy noble*; ^Snde, great. 

The comparative raifes it'to a higher degree, by 
comparing it to thp pofitive, which in Portuguete 
is performed by the adverbs /w4^, more ; mSnos, lefs ; 
as, m^ nobre^ more noble ^ minos hiila^ Idfs hand- 
fome. 

There arefome adjectives which do not admit ot 
mhh or im^oj before them ; as celeftt^ nasctdo, compri^ 
. do^ dejmado^ &c. 

There are four Porluguefe comparatives wlych 
txA in nr : they may alfo be exprefled by mats, 
more, before their pofitive 5 as. 
Mayor y greater, mais gr&nde. 
Menor, lefs, maispequino, , 

PeoTj worfe, fnais roim. 
MelUr, better, mats b6m. 

To which may be added fuperidr, fuperior j ««- 
fer^y inferior; deteridr-, and feme others. 

Obferve, that there ^can be no comparifon made 
without the word than*, and that. this woird is ex-^ 
pre0edi in Portuguefe bv ([ue. Ex. Mais clbro que 
fit, clearer than the um '; nUiis brdnco ^ue a neve, 
more white than the fnow. The particle que is 
fometimes preceded. by the word do. E:^. ifio he 
m&is doqueiu Ike dije^ this U more than I told him ; 

. C « he 



20 ? O R T U G U E« E 

hi mats prudbue do que pcsrece^ he is mofe wife than 
it appears. ' . 

N. B. The comparatives fnpetibr^ inferijk^ and 
fome others, do not require que before the fecond 
term but,»tlJ'? dative or the articles, viz. 4, ^9 ao, 
aos: Examp. O 6urro he fuperidr a eje, the other 19 
fuperior to this. 

When the Portuguefe have a mind te heighten 
their comparifons, thty make ufe of, mw/o mqfSf a 
great deal or much more { as alfo of muito minos^ a 
great deal, or much less. Ex. Cajar he inuiio mats ' 
efiimhdo que Pompio, Caefar is much more efteemed, 
than Pompey ; Pompeo foi muiiG niinos feliz que C^- 
far^ Pompey was much less happy than Caefar, 

0/ the Superlative. 

The Portuguefe fuperlative is formed from the . 
noun adje£tive, by changing the^laft letter into 
iffimo for the mafcuHne, and into ijjima for the femi* 
pine: thus, from hello is formed hel/iffimo ^nd belts- 
Jima^ moft handfome* But fometimes the fu{ier}a^ 
tive is formed' by adding muito ^ very, to the po^ 
tive ; a$, mutto iUo^ very tall. 

Obferve that fome fupcrlatives are differenitly 
formed ; zsyfrigidijfmo, from frio^ cold ; amicij^m&% 
from amigOy friend ; aiUiqwJfimo^ from antigcl^ an- 
cient ; capaajfimo, from capaz, capable ; noSUissimOy 
from nobrey noble ; acerrimo, from ofre, (harp, or 
acerb J riquksimo, froo) ricQ^ rich; fertilksimOy from 
fertily fruitful 5 bonissimo^ from bdmy good; fidetis- 
simoy from fiily tiithful ; Jacraiissiigio^ from fagr^^ 
iacred, &c. 

The mofi is expreffed alfo in Portuguefe by miis 
^l}4 a mats ; a^ the mod fair, dr faireft, mats beU 
ig, a mats billa. But you muQ: phfer?^, that ther^ 
are fome adje^ives which do not admit of msi^Uo^ 
ver^,, maisy or 4 nutis ; as mdrtOy dijlerradoy &c. 

Qbfcrve, that by changing the laft kU«f of tljie 
foperlatives into amente, iuperlative ^verbs are 

compofed ; 



GRAMMAR. 



21 



cotnpofed ,• ^s, from doutijjimoy learned ; doutijjima^ 
minte^ moft learnedly, &c. But the pofitive adverbs 
are formed by adding m^nte to the feminine of the 
pofitive ; as, doutaminte^ learnedly, from dbuta^ the 
femmine of 'dijtox) ; prudenteminte^ prudently, from 
prudente^ prudent. ' 

Of Numeral Nouns 3 and firjl^ of CardhUiL 
The cardinal nouns are fuch as exprefs the num- 
ber qf thitigs^as, 

Vinte e dius^ twenty tTVo 
Vinte e tris^ &c.' cwehty- 

three, G?r. 



Htimy 

Huitro, 

Ctnco, 

Sets^ 

Site, 

Ouio or oiia^ 

Nave, 

Dit, 

Onzi, 

Doze, 

Treu, 
iiatorzc^ 
,uin%e, ' 
^ezq/asj 

Dexajetc, 

Dezouto, 

t>ezanive, 

Vinie, 

Vinte € him. 



one 
', two 
three 
four 
five 
fix 
feven 
eigbt 
nine 
■ ten 
eleven 
twelve 
thirteen 
fourteen 
fifteen 
fixteen 
feventecn 
eighteen 
i^ineteen 
twenty 
twenty -one 



Trinia, 
\utirinta, 
lincoenta, 
Sejfenta, 
Setenia, 
Oitenia, 
Noventa, 
Cem, 

Duzentos, 
Trezintos, 

Hous'.mil, 



thirty 
fprty 

fifty 

sixty 

feventy 

eijghty 

ninety 

a bttndrea 

two hundred 

three hundred 

a tbdufaod 



two'thoufand 
Milhao^ or conto, a millic^ 
Hima dezina, half a^ fco^ 
Hiima duzia, a dozen 

Hima vintina, a fcoi« 

Diias vintinas, two Icore 
Tris vintenas^ three fcore 



Observe, that all the cardinslls that are adjective 
Iipunr8,are no^ declined, being of the common gen- 
der, except A«;», A»«^tf, one ; dous^ diias^ two; and 
ftofe compofed of chitOy a hundred ; as, duzinioTy 
iuzhtas, two hundred ; qudtro cintos, qu&fto dntaiy 
four hutl'dred, &C. and when the reminihe kuma is 
preceded by a, and followed by a o&ira, then hhna 

\ \ ngnifies^r^, «nd & dutfa^ Jecondly. 

'' The ][)lural, hins^ h^mas, is taken fometitnes in- 
AtBd of algiinSj algimas, fignifying forae ; as iuns 

1. rg^/f fome kings ; Mmas rainAas, fome queens. 

C S ^,\i 



\ 



22 P O R T U G U.ES E 

N. B. Cinto lofes to before a noun, either mafcu- 
line or feminine, and the n is changed into /»; there- 
fore you muft fay, tern fold&dos^ not cento foldados. 
^It only retains to and n when it is followed by ano- 
ther number, as cinio e ki^f&cc. a hundred and one, 
&c. and when it is fubftantive. 

N. B. Sometimes c^to is made a fubftantive; as 
ium cfyitpde cafl&nhas^ one hundred of chefnuts ; and 
fo all the cardinal numbers, when preceded by an 
article, or by another noun of number, as o cinco 
de paos, the five of clubs ; humfite^ a feven^ 

The* cardinal number is renderedioto Engliih 
by the ordinal, when it eXpreffes the day of the 
month, or the date of any act ; as, cheg6u a qu&tro 
de Mayo, he Arrived the fourth day of May. 

« 

Ofdinal Nouns. / 

s. 

Ordinal nouns are fuch as exprefs the order of 
things s as. 



Primeiro, 
SegHnda^ 
TtrceirOf 
ludrto^ 
^uinto^ 
\£xt0^ 
Setimo, 
Oitdva^ 
Nono^ 
Dicime^ 



firft 

fecdnd 

third 

fourth 

fifth 

fixth 

fevcuth 

eighth 

ninth 

tenth 



C/it^(frm^,or^»2e/i^,e1event^ 
Duodecimo^ twelfth 

DtcimO'tercio^ thirteenth 
Dtcimo-qudrto^ fourteenth 
Dicimo-qiunto, fifteenth 
'DicimO'Sexio, fi xteenth 

DicimO'SeptimOy feventeenth 



Dccimo* oitdvOf eighteenth 
Decimo-nonOf nineteenth 
Vigefimo^ or vtntifvmo^ twcn- 

[tieth 
Vigifimo-primeirot one and 

twentieth 
Trigejimo, thirtieth 

Quadragifimo^ or quarentc- 
Jmo, fortieth 

Quinquagefima^ fiftieth 

SexagefimOy fixtieth 

Septuagifimq^ feventteth 
Octagtfimo^ 
lionagefimOt 
Ceritefimo^ the hundredth 
Milufimo^ the thoufandth 
U'Jtimo, . the faft 



eightieth 
ninetieth 



' The propoftionable ,n umbers are, simp/iz^ dup/f- 
iado or dobr&do^ triplichdo or triplice or trefdobrado, 
fuadruplicado or quadruple, dntutlo ; a fingle, double, 
threefold, fourfold^ a hundredfold. ^ 

The 



' GRAMMA R. : " «$' 

The diftributive nouns are^ hfmhlmm^ one by 
one y dims h dous^ two by two. 

Id EngUfh a]) ordinal numbers may be formed 
into adverbs ; but in Portuguefe they have only 
frvmwramiMUy and JecutidariamerUCy or fepmianamb^ 
Uy firft, secondly ; and to exprefe thirdly, fourthly, 
&c. they (ay, em tercihrdlugar^ em quarto lugar^ in the 
third place, in the fourth place. 

A mihod (for thoje who underjiand French) to learn m 
great many rortnguefe words in ajhort time. 

We muft obferve, that the French fyUable cha is 
generally exprefled in Portuguefe by ca^ rejeding 
the k. ]^xamp. CharboHy charite, chajleti^ chqpbn^ 
• chapHle^ chafitre^ &c. the Portuguefe fay, carvaS^ 
caridade, cq/fidade, capag, capel/a, capltuloy &c. Ob- 
ferve alfo the following rules. 

French words ending in ance^ or eHCi\ as, con- 
fiance^' vigilance^ clemence^ prudence^ &c. in Portu- 
guefe end in dncia or inctd\ as conjidncia^ vigildncia^ 
^lem^ncia^prudSncid, &c. 

Jigfu makes dnha-y montagne, montanha-^ cam- 
pagne, campdnha. 

It makes ia ; con^iedie, comidia. Here you lean 
the accent upon the e, and not upon the /, as in . 
French'; poefie,^o«/i. 

QiW makes (9m; g\o\XQy gloria i yi&oire, viSioria. 

Ure makes ura-, impollure, impojlura-y figure, 
jigUra.^ 

Ifon makes %ao ; raifon, razaH^ ; prifon, prized. 

0« makes tfS; charbon, r^iri^^S ; hzron, bara?< 
; Ulier makes uldr : regulier, regular^, particulicr,, 
particul&r. 

. V tench Terminations ending in J^muguefe in e. 

jlntjdnte; Y\gihnt» vigilante *, ^mzutj amante. 
Ent, adjeSiive, ^«/^; prudent, prud^nte\ diligent, 
diliginte. - m^ 



V- 



e 



f# P It T UO U ES^ 

iiralidide. 

f tench TermttMtioHs ending in Poriuguefe in vel. 

Freneh Terminations ending in Portugueji in tz. 

Oisj names of nation^ ez -, Francois, F^^andt % 
Anglois, Ingliz. 

French Terminations ending ht Portuguefe in o. 

' Ain^ and />», names of nations, dno% Romain, 
jLomdno : \t7X\^r\^ ItaUdno \ Napolitain, Napolituno. 
Aire^&rio: falairc,yii/4rw ; temeraire, /m^rir/b. 
EaUy eoi chapeau ; chapeo. 
Mntf fubftantive, into; facrement, facramento. 
' EuXy 6fo ; g€tiert\xxl gefierd/o ; gracieux, graciofoi 
' Jfji^o; z&lfy aSivo, p^ifify paffivo. 
C, CO; pore, pdrco ; Turc, Turco. 

French Terminations ending in Portuguefe^ in or. 

Eur, or 5 terreur, terror ; humeur, humdr ; chaleur^ 
cal6r. 

Change of Terminations^of the Verbs' and Participles. 

£r, in the infinitive mood of the firft conjugation, 
makes &r j aimer, amar; chanter, cantdr^ 

Ir makes /r, in the infinitive mood: as, part ir, 
partir; (cniiTyfentrr. 

Oir makes^ ir in the infinitive mood ^ as, concevoir^ 
conceb6r. 

The participles in ^ make ado; aime, amhdo ^ 
pzrMjfaUido. 

The participles in / make ido; dorm:, dormido} 
menti, mentido. 

The participles in u make do^ zs,jConfMy concebido, 
entendu, eniendido^ %cc. 

There are a great manjr Portuguefe words that 
htvene manner of analogy with the French, which 
pre ve4|~ thefe rules from being general. 



GRAMMAR. 25 



CHAP. III. 

Of Pronouns, 

17HE pronouns are perfonal, conjunftive, mixed^ 
- poutive, demonftrative, interrogative, relative^ 
or improper. , 

Of perfonat Pronouns » . 

The pronouns perfonal are iu and «wfor the firft 
perfon ; they (erve for the mafculine and the' femi- 
nine. 

Tu and "dos for the fecond \ thefe ferve alfo for 
the mafculine and feminine. 
• Blle^ for the third perfon of the mafbuline gender) 
and ^//?j in the pluraL . ' > 

Ella^ for the third perfon of the feminine gender^ 
makes in the plural Silas. 

Thj? pronouns perfohal are declined with the arti' 
cle indefinite^ ^5 €1, ^,V<(r. 

The Decltnjion of perJhnaiPrmouns. 

Firft Perfon, 

t 

Sii^lar Number.. Plural Number^ 

Nora. •£», I. Noni. Jtat, we. 

Geo. de mim^ of me. Gen. de nos, of us. ' 

Ddt* * & fniin, to me. Dat. a n$s^ or ncSi. us. 

Ace. a mm, me. 'Ace. a nos^ us. 

Abl. de mim^ or p§r mim, Abl. de. nis^ or por nos, 
from cr by me. from or by us. 

fFiii me is rendered by comigo ; and fometimes 

. they add the pronoun piefmo to it ; me is exprefTed 

by me in the Portuguefe ; as fpeak to tucy^falldi'me^y 

tcU me, diziUme : lend me, mandaume ; write to me, 

irfopevii^mei eUe diJje^mej\\Q told me, &c. 

fF/lfA ifj is rendered in Portuguefe by €om nofco. 

r Vs 



26 ..PORTUGUESE 



V 



Vs is rendered by nos. Examp. tclf us, dizei-nos ; 
give us, ddi-nos j (how us, mojirai-nos ; ^i/^ dlffe-nos^ 
he told us, &c. In'thefe examples us is not a pro- 
noun perfonal, but coojunftive, as you will fee 
hereafter. 

Second Perfon. 
Singular. ^ Plural. - 

r{om, /tt, thou, Nona, vis^yc ^r you. 

Gen. de ti^ of thee. Gen. de vos^ or vos^ yo«. 

Dat. a ti^ or te, to thee. Dat. a Vos^ pr x/^j, you. 

Ace. a Hf or U^ thcc. Ace. a vos^ or voSy you. 

Abl. 4/e /t, or ^(?r //, from Abl. devis^or per vSs^ horn 
' orhy thee. ^r by you. 

fVifh thee \s rtti^txt^^y corhtigoy and fometimes 
they add to it the pronoun mifmo. You, or yourjelfy 
after imperatives are rendered by vos^ aiid not vos ; 
as, be you contented, conierUai-vos i (howyourfelf, 
mofir&Uws\ hide yourfelf, efcondei-vos. 

Thee or thyfelf^ are expreffed after vpperatives by 
te ; as mbfiraie^ (how thyfelf. 

Wkh yw is rendered in Portuguefe by com v6fco. 

Third Perfon. For the Mafculine. 

Stngolar. * Plural. 

Nom. elU^ he, or it. * Nom. elUs^ they. 

Gen. <////^, of him,<?r of it. Gen/ deiUst ot them. 

Dat. ^ ///<f, to bim, or to it. Dat. a tlUs^ to them. 

A£C. a ilU^ hira, ^r it. Ace. a iiles^ thero» 

Abl. ^dillc Of por clle^ icQOi Abl. delics or porcU^s^ from 
^rbyhim^rit. % ^r by them. 

Th^ Portuguefe have no partlculai; pronoun,- as 
our. it, for thingii that are inanimate. 

Ren[)ember that the pronoun him^ or to him, when 
joined to a verb, id always rendered in Portuguefe, 
by /he, and fhem, or to them, by Ihes. . 

fVith him is rendered in Portuguese fometinaes by 
com Hie, and fometimes by comjigo, to which they add 
the pronoun mtjmo. 

Third 
8 



GRAMMAR. 37 



Third PeribiK FeminiDe. 



Singular. PlOral. 

Nom. iUa^ file or it. Nom. illas^ they. 

GcB. JtUa^ of her or of it. Greo. dillas^ ot thenu 
Dat. a illa^ to her or to it. Dau a, eltas^ to thdm« 
Ace. a ///a« her ^r it. Ace. a cllas^ thecn. 

AbL dilla. Of poreila^irom ^hh dillas or ^^r f/ik5, 
<ir by her or it. from ^r by them. 

Remember that . the pronoun her or to her^ when 
joined to a verb, is always renderd in Portuguefe 
by Ihe; and themy or to them, by Ihes ; as you will fee 
in the pronouns conjunctive. 

fVith her is rendered in Portuguefe by com ilia or 
comfigo. 

Of the Pronoun if, himfelf, or oneV felf. 

There is another pronoun perfonal that-ferves 
indifferently for the mafculine and feminine : this is 
^, one's felt. It has no nominative. 

Gen. deji^ of one's felf, himfelf, or herfelf. 

Dat. aji^ tobne*s felf, 0c. 

Ace. ajiy one's felf, 0c. 

Abl. dcji^ porji^ from or by one's felf. 

It is joined with the pronoun mSfmo or mif- 
i»^ ; as de oV por Ji mefmo^ by himfelf ; porji mifina^ 
or defi tnifma'i by herfelf ; o hbmem ntfi Ayin femfi 4 
^ m(fmo^ man loves himfelf only ; quem nao hi b6m 
fent0 para Ji, nao he bem que viva, who minds no 
body but hiihfclf only-, don't defervc to live ; q vicio 
he abominavel de Ji mijmo, vice is hateful of itfelf ; 
a terra defi^ or deji mejma^ he fertile the earth is fruit- 
ful of itfelf. 

^ Ohferve that they join alfo the pronoun mSfmo to 
pronouns pcrfonaj, as the French do with their pro- 
nounmeme,y]z. 



^ 



i 



/ • 



as P OR T U G U E S E 

Ed. mismo^ myfelf, nis mismos^ ourfelves. . ^ 

Tu mesmo^ thyielf« zfis me^mos^ yourfelvcs. ^ 

Elle mesmo^ himfelf. ilUs miimos \ ^i I % 

Ella misma, herfelf. tllas^ mismasf thcmlelve^. 

kimtm mesmo^ man himfelf ;^a mesma virtide^ \ixfM€ itfelf. 

. ift. Obfefve, that mSfmo with the article is alfa 
an adjeftive, fignifying the fame \ thus o m/fmo, ar 
mifmay os mS^mos^ as ^S/mas, the fame, relating £6 
fbme nouns exprefled or underffood. 

2dly. Note, That they alfo join the adje£live 6u^ 
t¥o. Other, to the plural of the pronouns perfonal, 
/and fkou ^ fo they fay, nos diftros, we ; vos dusros, 
yott. 

3dly. Comsip may be rendered in Englifli (as* we 
harvfc laid above) by with him and with her •^ biit you 
muft obferve, that it may be rendered nlfo by w$k 
thm in the plural; and fomerimes by about him, 
about her or about them. Exam. Elh or eila, nUnca 
tf&z iinheii'o comsigo, he, or Ihe, never, haa mdhey 
ai)out him, or about her. 

Of conjunctive Pronouns. 

The pronouns conjunctive are fo called, becaufe 
they always come immediately befor-e or aftcir the 
verb that governs them. 

' The pronouns conjunctive bear a great refem- 
blftiice to the pronouns perfonal ^ the pronouns per- 
fonifl arc, . 

£ 4^ I; /tt^hou; «7/tf, he; nis^ytt; vos, ye; elUs, they. 

There are ieven pronouns conjunctive, viz. me^ 
tp me, or me : /«, tcr thee, or thee; fe^ to himfelf, 
or himfelf, to herfelf, or herfelf; Ihe to him, or him, 
to her, or her ; nos^ to tis, ^r us ; voSf to you, or you , 
Ihesy to them, or them. 

Example. 

,LSo me agrada, this pleafes me ; hi-me mcejfario^ I wanu 
7}eos tevij God fees thee. 
Ella se louva, ihe praife3 herfelf. 
^ Eu 



GRAMMAR. 99 

. Eu Ikedireit I will tell him, or I will tell her. . 

Eu Ikes promeHiy I promifed them : as well for the niaC. 
culine as the feminine. 

■ 

The pronouo conjunctive, Ihe^ is always put after * 
the verb, when it is in the imperative mood ; as 
dizSi'lke, tell him j cort&i4he as SzaSy cut his wings ; 
but when the verb is in fotne other mood, it majr 
be put either before or after it^ ^s i/le the cQrtdu, or 
: ille cort6u4ke acabiga^ h^ has cut off his head. The 
fame obfervation takes place in the other pronouns 
conianfiiye. 

The pronoun conjunftive, /<?, is fometinies fol- 
lowed by me^ Ihe^ &;c. as offeyec^fe mty it is offered 
to me i reprefentou^fi Ihe^ it was reprefented to \(\m^ 
&c. 

iff. Note, that the pronouns conjunctive are 
very often joined to a verb, preceded or followed 
by the verb Aifv^. Examp. Darlhe hSitdnta^ptm- 
chda^ or h the hit de dor tdnta panc&da, que^ &c. ' I 
will cudgel him fo much, that^^ &c. 

2dly. Lhe is fometimes rendered in Englifh hy 
you. Examp. Que lhe pare ce aquil/o ? What do you . 
think of that ? ajhia no que the digo, be perfuaded, 
or believe what 1 tell you. 

0/ Pr^noims mixed. 

There are fome pronouns^ in Portuguefe which 
are compofed of the pronouns perfonal aiid con- 
jun6live, and which therefore are dallcd mixed. 

To clear up this matter, you muft expr^fs them 
as underneath, changing the letter e of the pronoun 
' conjunflive into c> for the mafculine, and a for the 
feminine ; as to fay, to me of tt^ ioftead of me o, or 
me a, you muft fay, mc or ma- in the like ngianner, 
inftead of lhe q or lhe a you^ muft fay, Iho or Iha^ &c. 
as yjQu may pbferve in the following pronopni mix- 
ed, or rat her contracted. 

' ' . mo^ 



y 




so P b RTU G U E S E 

me of it, ftheeofit 

mo, m. < ^ td < or . 

or him to m<i. Xj^o^ him to thee* 

me of it. fthee of it 

or ta < pr 

or her to me. \jx. or her. to- thee, 

me of then)» ' * ^ , f thee of them • 

them to cie ^^.'* (^them to thee. 

s^lo, m,Vit to bimfelf, to herfelf, rr to themfelves. 
sila^ f. /it to herfelf, to himfelf, gr to themfelves. 
j^foj,m-1 them to himfelf, to herfelf, or to themfelves. 
^lai, f- J them to herfelf, to himfelf, or to themfelves. 

{to him, or to her of it 
or 
it to him, or to her. 
{to him, qr to her of it 
or 
it to him, or to her. 
Ikos^m. 1 to them of it, to ^im of them, or to her of them. 
lias, U^ J to them of it, to him of them, or to her of them. 
nolo, m. 1 us of it, or it to us. 
nola,L /us of it, (>r it to us. ^ 

nolos, ro. p. \them to us. 
nolas, f. p. /them to us. 

jyW-^ you havefome examples. 

Pdra ddr-lho, to giv^ it to him or to her. 
Ddf-mo, give it me. 

£u to dareiyVW give it you." »' 

Entrego-to, I deliver it to you. 
Dize-iho, vou tell it him, or her. , 

. EniriM'fhos, deliver them to him, or to her. 
Ld seto haja, leave that to himfelf. 
File nolo aisse, he told us of it. 
Eu volos mandarii. Til fend to you. 

If the verbs are in the infinitive, the pronouns 
mixed may be put either before or after the verbs ; 
as, pAta dizirmOf or para mo dizSr, to tell me it; 
but if the verbs are in the gerund, the pronouns 

mi^ed 



GRAMMAR. 31 

mixed muft be tranfpofed ; as» dizindomo^ and 
not mo dizindo, in telling me it.' 

Yjoix muft make ufe of thefe pronouns, both mas- 
culine and feminine, according to the gender of the 
thing named, fent^ or delivered, and not of the per- 
fon to whom the thing is faid, fent, given, &c. 

Of poffeffive Pronouns. 

Pronouns poffeffive, fo called, becaufe they denote 
that the thing fpoken of belongs to the perfon or 
thing they are connected with, are of two forts, ab« 
iblute and relative. See the remarks hereafter. 

Th^ Englilh have no article rn the nominative 
Before the pronouns poffeffive ; but the Portuguefe 
have, as, my, o miu, a minha, fern.' Plur. os mius^ as 
m/nAas, fern. 

The pronouns poffeffive in Portuguefe a>e the 
following: • * 

Sing. meUf m. minha^ U \^^ 

Plur. mf f^i, m. mtnhas^ f- J ^' 

Sing, teu^ m. tHa, f. \ , 

Plur. 4eys, m. tHas, f. / ^^^^ 

Sing. j^K, m. \ f . 

•Dt ^ - > his ^r us« 

Siog. nossOy m. nossoi, f, 

Plur. nissos^ in. nissas^ (. 

Sing, vosto^ m. vossa^ f. 

Plur. vissos^ m. vossas^ f. J X^"^' 

The pronouns poffeffive are declined with the 
definite article o for the mafculin^, and a for the fe- 
minine. 

Example, 

Singular. 

T^om. o meu Ihfro^ my book. . 

Gen. do mtu livro^ of my book. 

pfti« aa fneu livro^ to my book. 
'Acc« meu tivrOt my book. 

AbL d0 ou feUfi meu tivrP. from <?r by my book. 

Plural 



our. 



n PORTUGUESE 

Plural, 

Noin» OS mti^s Hvtos^ my books* ^ 
. Gjcm. dos mius livros, of my books* 
■ Dat. aos mens livros, to my bool^i. 
Abl. dosoMpellos meus Uvros^lrom <7r by my books/ 

Decline all the other mafculincs after the fame 
inanner, and their feminines by the article^; as' 
my houfe ; a mSnha cafii ; of my houfe, du minha 

, Note, you rauft not life the definite article when 
the pronouns poffeffive precede nouns of quality, as 
well a^ thofe of kindred, but the indefinite artick 
de, a, &c. 

Example. 

Vo^a magejlade^ your majefly. 

Dt vojfa magejtade^ of your, majelly, &c. 

Af/w ;&tfy, my father. 

De miu pay^ of my father, &c. ' 

From the above examples it appears that nouns 
declined by the indefinite article have pp article in 
the nominativ^. 

Though the definite article is fometimcs ufed be- 
fpre nouns of kindred, yet we ought not to ufe it, 
according to the old proYcrb: /» vivenda bonos^Jcru 
bendo fequare peritQS. 

Seu is fonjetinies made ufe of in rooni ofvSffo and ' 
vojffa, in the polite way of fpeaking : fo they fay, 
tSnAo feu livro^ I have your book: fallei ao fiu 
criado, 1 fpoke to your f^rvant ; osfius olhos fai for-^ 
mSJos^ your eyes are handfonie. ' 

Remarks upon the PoJ^eJ^ves. 

The pronouns pofleflivc abfolute ahvayscome be- 
fore the noun they belopf to. We have expr^ffed 
them above. 

' Pronouns 



GRAMMAR. SS 

Tronouns pofleffive relative are fo called becaufe 
they not being joined to their fubftantive, fuppofe 
it either expreffed before^ or underftood^ and are 
related to it. They are the following : 



Mafc. 
Sing. Mim^ nanha^ 
Plor. Mtus^ minkas^ 



mint. 



} 

Sing. 5fii, fua^ hers* 
Plur. iS/nj, ftHas^ theirs. 

Sing. Niifo, niffa, \ 



ours. 



Plur. Nbfos, nSfa 

Sing. V0^o, vS/a. \ 

To exprefs in Portuguefe // is. mine, ii is thine^ 
&c. we muil fay he men, he teu, &c. 

The pronouns pofleflive abfolute do not agree, in 
Portuguefe, in gender with the noun of the poflef- 
for, as in Englim, but with that of the thing pof- 
feiTed s as, ^ mai ama a Jeu filhoy the mother loves 
her fon ; o p6i dma a fHa filha^ the father loves his 
daughter. So you fee that the pronoun mafculine 
feuy in. Portuguefe is fometimes rendered by her in 
£ngli(h, and the feminine^ by his. 

The ^ fame obfervation is to be made upon the 
poffeffives relative/ according to the gender of the ' 
noun that is underftood ; therefore thev fay of a 
hat, (for inftance) belonging to a lady, \he o flu^ it 
i^ hersj becaufe the noun underftood, viz. chapio^ 
hat, is of the m&fculine gender. 

We have already faid, that fh$y znd/Aa^ are fome- 
times rendered into £ngli(h by your^ when they are 
abfolute : but you muft alfo obferve, that they are 
fometimes rendered into Englifh by yours, when 
^y are pronouns relative, and that in the polite 
way of fpeaking ; and fo they fay, fpeaking of any 
thing belonging to a gentleman or lady, he o/iu, or 



V 



34 PORtUGUESE 

he a J&a, it is ycur3 ; but if the gentleman or kdy 
are not prefent^ or if. they do not fpeak direfllyto 
then)} though prefent^ thfen the pronouns Jhi and 
jtia muft be rendered into Englifti oy his or hers. 

Note, That the pronovins pofleffive abfolute, in 
Portuguefe, agree alfo in number with the riovin of 
the thing poSeflfed ; hence it is that ^hey fay aj&a 
hijloridy its hiftorf, fpeaking of a kingdom, province, 
&c. or, his hiftory, fpeaking of any hiftory corar 
pofed by a man ; or, her hiftory, {|)enking of that 
written by a woman ; or, their hiftory, fpeaking of 
W^^t written by feveral hands, or of fev^ral people. 
And from this example you may learn, that the Por- 
""tugucfe have no particular pronoui;i pofleffive for 
things that are inanimate, as vfre have the pronoun 
iis, Htnce at laft it followsj that when the Portu- 
guefe pofleffives fin and ^a are relative, they are 
rendered into Englifti by his, GT ierSy at i heirs , ac- 
cording to the gender arul numl)er of the noun of 
the poflfeffor that i^ underftood. 

You muft alfo obferve> that they fometimes add 
the third pronoun personal, d^iUy of hitn, dii/es, of 
them) d^i/a^ of her, dei/as^ of them ; to denote morb 
plainly whofe thing it is they fpeak of 5 as /6n /i* 
vro dalles y their book 5 as, mf&as pslMjrtn Jffla^ hdr 
W6rds> &c* 

Note, that the pofleffives abfolute are left oift 
when they are preceded by a verb> or by a j>ronoun 
conjunftive, which fufficiewly denote whofe thing 
it « they fpeak of; the Portuguefe being then con- 
tented with the article : as d6v(hlhe a vida, I owe 
my life to hlrtif or to it -, dSe^me a barrigay my belly 
/ Bches% 

When the pronouns pofleffive abfolute are before 
*pouns of differeflt gertders in the fame fentence, and 
ai^ith which they are grammaticaUy tonftrued, they 
<iught to be repeated j as, Jiu pile Jia mSi, his fa- 
ther and mother: not fhf pUe mat. 

Moreover, 



GRAMMAR, '35 

Mowpv^r* the Portqgqese usf the pr<>nQqn pos- 
sessive absolute in the following case, when we 14^5 
the possessive relative; a friend of mine, hum dos 
miusamigos. ' 

The possessives minha^ tua^ sua^ nossay yossa^ may 
be alfo relative, but with 9 different meaning. Ex- 
amples; Levarii a minka avdntc^ I will insist upon 
it, f rvJlJ obtain it 5 ^//<? levara a sia av^^, h« mU 
insist upon it, he will do it; /^v4i (f vassa dvanie^ 
goon with your rcfolutipn ; fazSr das fias^ to play 
tricks,, to dodge. 

Or miuSj os sius^ Sec, signify my -relations, or 
my &lec)ds, thynelations, or thy friends; *s, os s^us 
nan -0 au^remy his parents or rdations dp not like , 
Jlill)} dfixa-Q hir com os s^us, l^t him go with his 
people, his couofrymen, &c. 

Tak$ notice, that when the pfotioun possessive is 
' accompanied hy a pronoun demonstrative, they 
do fjqt, put t^ie article in the nominative ; tb^y 
do nat fiay fsff mh livro, but ^ste mh //Vro, this 
.book of mind. But in all other case^ they make 
use of th^ iodefi^ite article ; as ZT hie or deste vbsso 

Of the Pronouns demonstrative^ 

They are called pronouns derponstr^tive, because 
tliey' serve to point out oi' demonstrate any thing or 
•person^ as, this book, iste Ihro; that imn, aqueUi 
iofifetf^. 

TPiere w^ tbrjee principal demonstratives in Por- 
tuguej^^ viz. isU, this j 6^<?, that ; aquilhy that ; but 
X>Wcf»rje thgt iSf/i^ shews the thing pr.perspn that is • 
just near gr by us ; e^j^shevvs the thing that is a little 
fartljier, or near the perfon; and aqu^Ue %htyjs vf\\?Lt 
i? wry distant from the perfon who speaks, or is 
spoken of, and is eKpres$ed in £ngli3h by that ther^y 
or yonder. You must also observe, that isse, essa^ is 
Uft^ in writing to any person to express the place or 
town whereia he dwells ; as tMofallado nessa cidade 

D 2 cQm 



i 



S6 



PORT U G U E S E 



commuiios tfw/jf^j, I have fpoken in your city with 
many friends. , 



These Pronouns are declined thus: 



Mafc. Fem. 

rNotn. 5^^ eft a, 

I G^n. deftc^ iijia^ 

Singular* <. Dat. aifit^ ^i^^> 

I Ace. iftt^ iftai 

lAbl. diftc, dijta, 

rNom. iftes^ 
J Gen. defteSi 
PluraU < Dat. a ijles^ 
I Ace. eftes^ 
» LAbl. defies^ 

Mafc. 

J Gen. aeffe^ 
Singalar., < Dat. a $Jft^ 
I Ace. iji 

Law. %ir, 

, j Gen. .dijfts^ dijfas^ . 

' PluraU < Dat. ae/fes^ aijfas^ 

j Ace. iffts^ i^s^ 

LAbl. di/fcs^ deJfaSf 

Mafc. 



Neut. 

ifto. 
dtfto. 

a ifto^ 

iftOr 

difto. 
No Neut. 





this, 
of this. 
to this. 
thi«. 
irom'thif. 

thefe* 
of thefc. 
to thefe. 
thefe. 
from thefe 

that or \U 
of that &C. 
to that, 
that. . 
from that* 

thofe. ^ 
ol thofe« 
to thofe, 
thofe. 
from thofe 



Neut. 



Fern. 

{Norn, aquille^ aquilla^ aquillo^ that. 
Gen. daquilU^ daquilla^ daquillo^ of that. ^ 
Dat. daquillt^ a aquilla^ a aquillo^ to that. 
Ace. aquilU^ aquilla^ aquilb^ that. 
Abl. daqueile^ daquclla^ daquillOf from that. 

^ No Neut. 

r^om. aquelles, aquetlas, thofe. 

j Gen. daquSlUSf daquilUs, i»f thofe. 

< Dat. aaquelles^aaquillas^ , to thofe. 
I Ace. aquelleSf aquellas^ thofe. 

(.Abl. daquclleSt daqueilas, from thofe 



Plttrak 



\ - 



Y<m 



GRAMMAR. S7 

YoQ miift ohSerre, that there is an difion of the 
vowel of the indefinite article in the genitive and 
abhtiTe of the pronouns ^e and (ffi^ both in the 
fiogular and. plural ; and that the^ write and pro« 
noonce difie^ defias^ &c. inftead ox^de ifit^ dc efims ; 
and fo in the neuter they write diffo^ difio^ inftead of 
de iffk^ de jfi0. Tiie fame obfervation jou muft make 
upon the pronoun oijpitlte^ wherein you will fee 
>another elifion befides, . in the dative cafe. , 

Note, Hiat both the Portuguefe and Spaniards 
have demonftratives of the neuter geiider ; though 
tbey do not sigi'cc with the fuhftantives as in Latuit 
becaufe they do not fay ifio homem^ but ^e homem^ 
this man. But the word cfmfa^ thing, is aJways un- 
derftood,, though the neuter denonftrative does not 
agree with it ; fo that \t is the fame thing to lay 
ifto^ or ^a cfnufa^ this thing ; ijjo^ or i£a c^a^ that 
thing, &c. Example, Iffb he ot ejfa he a cCufa de 
«# mbs eftdmos falldndo^ that is the thing we are 
ipeaking, of; aquillo he or aquilla he a cdmfa que vos 
dev&sfazfyr^ that is the thing you muft do, &c. 

When the prepofition em^ in, comes before the 
pTonounis demonftrative, they make an elifion of the 
vowel of it, add change the confonant m into n ; 
and fo, inftead of writing and pronouncing m ^Jle, 
em efta, em ijlo, em /Jo, em aqwi/o, they write and 
' pronounce nifte, nefta, nrjio, niJsOf&LC. in this, in that, 
&c. 

The words dutro^ Aulra, are often joined to the 
pronouns demonftrative, taking off tne laft ^•. as 
^6iUro, efs6titro^ aqueJl6utrq. Example ; EftSutro hS- 
iffii»», this other man; eftiutra molhir, this other 
woman ; efs&utro hbmem^ that other man. 

They alio join very often the pronoun mifmo^ the 
' fime, to the demoiiftrative ^ as ^Jle mifmo homem, 
this very same .man ; aqui//o mi/ma, ^tbat very fame 
thing. 

Aqtti, idi, and /i, are ibmetimes added to the de* 
monftrative, sor on the noun that comes after it^ in 



H P d R t U G U E S E 

order to fpecify and pirtieularize it ftlll more i as 
^5/1? hofkim aqu/, lhi§ rtiari ; aquelia ntdket la^ that 
woman : aqui^ denoting a tteafj or prefefil objeEl \ 
and /ii, a diftant and abfent 6h6. 

The prbinouns, aqu^Iley aqueila. A^tilis^ aquiUax^ 
when they relate to perfons, atid aiie tt>lloWe<i by the 
Relative que, are f^ndered into finglirti by iit ww^ or 
hi tMt, sh, wh or ihat^ they who ot thdl ; as aqu&ltt 

Jue drnaa virtude he ftliz^ he who lovcS virttife i^ ' 
t&ppy ; aqu&les que desprezao a t^itncia H^o tdnhhem 
t) vdlSr delta, thby Who defpife leatfiittg know ttCt 
the Value ^ of it/ Yoa mud obfet^, thai whin 
#^/A?, aquelld, &c;/ ate preceded by hte^ hta^ &ti. 
thfeA ^j/)? fignifies the laft tM^g 6r perfon fpokert of, 
iLXX'draqueUey fee. the firft; as CMos fU ^&nde^ />-i?A- 
Hro ambietSsOy isle i/alentCy aquHlle poderdfo^ Charles 
wais great, Frederic ambitious, the fil-ft poWeif\3il, 
the hft coiitageou«. 

The pronoun poffeffive ibr^latte A/I5 i^r, /*^, 
tbnfttutd in Englini With a tiblin follow^ by thte 
pronoun nelaiiint who 6\ that bbforfe a v^irb> is Aia4e 
hito PoVtugUfeffe by the genitive nf th^ pr^tt^uns 
'Oqu^Ue, aquilla, afStei^ followed by pe, ^attd the 
pbffeflive is Jeft out j aS> all men blatfte his matttieTs 
who often fays that, which hittfeff do^s fiot think, 
tddo mindo cens^a procedimento da^ft^e ^e i^efm f9r 
^Mtne dizdr que nao tern no pensakSmO % Pro vMewce 
does not profper their labours that flight their . bftft 
frf e-rtds, n Provideficia nod ai^nc66 d trMAlkd ddquMes 
ijue desprSzcA'os fSus methSres onAgds. 

The Englilh pirmoun such followed ^ astif timt 
(biHt not governed of the verb fuftafitivfe h be}i is 
alfo rendered irtto Porlugufefe by ^qnti/ks que^ or 
tqudfks tifs que^ bx aqnelie que 1 asv fuch as do not 
love virtue do not khOW iX^'aquillei ottitfui/Zts tdes 
que nai dma^ a %/iffiidf, frag a coHh^ifm. 

The pronouns issOy isto^ aquillo^ before jw, are 
Engliihed by tJohetts as etle ^ik iiqfuU/d ^e.Jaitt, he 
fe/is what ht ktioVrft. i 

Aquille 



GRAMMAR. Sf 

Aqu^Ue vs a]fo ufed to (hew contempt ; as que quir 



xqutiU 



Of the Prmiouns hacrrogiUive. 



The pronouns interrogative ferve to alk queftions, 

and are ^Sl follows; wha> what, which, quern, 
^^gual. 

■ 

Example. 

• • 

\uem he? who is it ? 

|irrt» vas dyTt ijfo ? . who told yon fo ? 

\ue qurreisr wbat wiH you have f 

Com qutje/uftinta ? what does he Baffstrai him« 

^ felf with ? 

Qjue ejldisfa%indaf what are yov doing ? 

De queftfazjjlo ? from what is this done ? 

^jBLt livro ht tft€ ? what book is this P 

tujgScufj tendes ? what affairs have you ? 

\Me fiua he? what houfe is it ? 






)e qualf allots vis f which do you fpeak of ? 

^ualdelUsf which of them ? 

\vemor quatios iSus9 which or whether of the 

two ? 

Thefe pronouns are thus declined. 

SinrfeUr imd Fhirai Siofular and Plusal. 

Maf^ine and Fcininiae. l^afculiAe and Femjnine* 

NflHD. quicm^ who. Nora, que^ what. 

Gen. dt quem^ of whom. Gen. i/e qut^ of what. 

I3at. a quem^ to whom. Dat. a que. to what. 

Ace. , plenty whom. Ace. que<^ what. ^ 

AW- tk quern, from whom. AbU de que^ from what. 

Qudl is ufed in fpeaking both of perfon^ and 
things^ and is declined thus: "" 

Singular. Mafcflfline and feminine. 
Nom. qual. which or what. 
Gen. de qumL, «af which sr what* 
Dat; u f«^4 to which cr what. ^ 

Ace. quaL. which or what. 
AfaL de quaii from which ^r ^h91^ \ 
. , D 4 Plural. 



40 P O R T U G UE S E 



PluraU MafcuUne and Eeminine. 

Norn* fudes^ which or what. 

G^n. de quSes^ of which or what* 

Dat. a qudes^ to which ^r what. 

Ace. quaes ^ which ^rwhat. 

Abl. de qudes^ from which (?r what. 

Obferve, that when the word quer is added to 
quemy or qual, it quite alters the meaning.; quemquer 
fignifying whoever, or any pcrfon, and qualquer 
any one, whether man, woman, or thing ; and 
fometimes they add the participle que to them, as 
ifuemquir que^ &c. 

Of the Pronoum relative. 

Pronouns relative are thofe which (hew the rela- 
* tion, or reference, which a noun has to what follows 
it. They are the following ; qualy which ; que^ that 
or which 3 cujoy whofe^-.^^^^w, who. 

Qualy iii'a fenfe of comparifon, is followed by tal, 
and then qual is Engliffaed by as^ an4 tal by of. 

N- B.^ When qual is only a relative, it is declined 
with the deffnitiel articles $ or a. 

The pronoun que may be relative both "to. per fons 
and things, and is common to all numbers, gen- 
ders, and cafes; as o livro quey the book which ^ 
OS Ihros que, the books which ; a carta que, the let* 
ter which ; as cirtas que, the letters which ; o mefirc 
que enftna, the' n^after who teacheth ; a tnolhSr pte 
iinio, the wife that I have ; o honiem que iu mo^ the 
man whom I love ; and it is declined thus : 



Singular and Plural. 

Nom. quCf. • which or who; 

Gen. de que^ of which or of whom. 

Dat. a que, to which or to whom. 

Ace. que, which ^rwhonu 

AbK de que, from which or from wboflu 



r 



Que 



G R A M M A R. ^M 

Que 18 (btnetimes a conjun£lion ; as cfiyo que Ur&^ 
I believe that I fhall ga. See the Syntax. 

The relative queniy who, is only relative 16 per- 
fons ; but in the nominative cafe of the fingolar is 
rendered into Englifh by he whoj or whp-^ zsy ptem 
fUla'divi confider&Tj &c. he who fpa^KS ought to 
confidcr^ &c. iu na$ sH quemy I know not who. ' 

Obferve, that quern is common to all numbers, 
genders^ and cafes s but it has no nombative in the 
plural. 

Qir^/0 is declined thus : 

, Singular and Plural. 
Kom. quem^ he who, or (he who, or whoever. 
Gep. de quem^ of whom. 
Dat. a quem^ to whom. 
Ace. quem^ whom. 
Abl. de quern, from whom. 

Quern is fometimes a particle disjunctive^ and then 
it (ignifiesy^f;?^; as^ quern cdnia. e quern ri, fome fing, 
and fome laugh ; and fometimes it ferves to excla- 
mation ; as quem me dira eji&r em eafa ! How fain 
wou^ld I be at home ! 

Cujoy cujay is declined thus: 

Mafc. Fern. 

rNom. cujo, cija^ whofe.^ 

I XJenr de cujo^ "de ciija, of whofe« 

Sing.< Dat. a cujo, a cuja, to whofe. 

J Ace, ^cujo^ cuja^ whofe. ^ 

Labi, de cujo^ de cija, from whofe* 

The plural is formed by adding # to the fingular ; 
as, cujoSy cwaSy whofe, &c. 

Note, tnat cijo muft be followed by tihe noun or 
' term which it refers to; and with which it agrees ia 
gender, number and cafe ; as, a peffSa cuja ^epuia^ 
^dmvbs admirbhy the perfon whole reputation you 
wonder at ; o dh cujo/occorro n&nca fhltay heaven, 
whofe afliftance'iiever fails ; citja bella ram, whofe 
fair vifage: ei^as teUizas, vifhok beauties s a cujo 



44 PORTUGUESE 



4 



C H A p. IV. 



Of Verbs. 



TTHE Terb is a part of. fpeech which ferves to, 

exprefs that which is attributed to the fubject 
in denoting the being or coHdition of the things and 
perfons fpoken of^ the actions which they do, or the 
imprefsi^ns they receive. 

The firft and the moft, general divifion of Verbs" 
is into perfonal and imperfonal. 

A verb perfonal is conjugated by three perfons. - 



Example. 

I love. 

thou loveft. 

he loves. 
Cnos amdfnfis^ we love. 

V\^t*\vos amdisy ye love. 

\iiki dmaS^ tbey love. 



feu dmot 
Sing.^ tudmaSf 
\elie dma. 



A verb imperfonal is conjugated by the third per* 
fbn of the finguj^r number only ; zs, ckove, it rains, 
com^em, it behoves. 

A verb, confidered in regard to the fyntax, is of 
four forts, viz. a^ve, paffive, neuter, and' recipro- 
cal. 

Some of the verbs are regular, and others irre- 
gular. '" 

Some are alfo called atixiliary verbs. We (hall 
giye their definitions in th^ir proper places. 

Before you begin to learn the conjugations, it 
will be proper to obferve, that all the verbs may be 

conju- 



CRAM MA-R. 45 

conjugated with the prohcmns perfonal^ en, iu^ elle, 
&c. or%^ithout them. , 

Of the auxiliary Kerbs. 

The auxiliary verbs are fo called, becaufe they 
help to the conjuration of other verbs. They arc 
four in Portuguele, \\t. hawr, tir^ to have ; /^r, 
^Jidr^ to be. The auxiliary verb/A^, to be, is alfo 
called the verb fubftantive, becaufe it affirms what 
the fubject is, and is always followed by a noun 
, that particularizes what that fubje£l is ; z.%jtr tico^ 
prudimt^ Mttfo, &c. to be rich, wife, learned, &c. 



Tie Conjugation of the auxiliary Ferb t6r, or hav6r, 

to have. 

I 

The Indicative Mood. 

Prefcnt. 

*€u itnko^ ou hey^ I have. 

Sing.*^ tu tins, ou A^, thou haft. 

^eUc tern, ou kd, , he has ^rhath. . 

{nos temos, ou havimos, ou kemoi, we have. 

vos tindes, ou haveis, ou hits, you have. - 

ellcs tim^ ou ha^, they have. 

PreterimperfeCh 

fetf Anha, ou havta^ ou hia, I had. 

Sing*% tu tinhas, ou havias, ou hias, thou hadft* 

\,elletinha,ouhavta,ovihta, he had. 

{nis iinkamos^oii haviamosy ou kiamos, w^ had. 

v6s tinhleis, ou havieis^oM kieir, you had^ 

e/tes tinnaS, ou haviao^ ou hiao^ they had. 

Preterpcrfect definite. 

C eu tive, oxkhouve, ^ I had. 

Sing,^ tu tiviste, ou houviste, thou hadft. 

\ellc teve, ou hSuve, . - he had. 

{nos Hvimos, ou Jiouvcmos, we had. 

vis iivistes, ou houvistes, you had. 

tiles tivfraS oixhoviraS^ they had. 

Prettf- 



46 P Q R T U G y E $ E 



I have had. 
thou b^{l had. 
he has had. 

% fnos ttmes tido^ Vfo have bad. 

Plur.< vis tenses tido^ yovi have had. 

X^ilfes Um ^fdo, they ba^c had. 



{eu tinho tida, 
tu'tens tido^ 
ille tern tido^ ' 



C 1104 t/nhama^ tidi 
Plur.^ vis thikieis tido^ 
/ (^ ilUs tznhao tido^ 



.\ 



Preterpiuperfefi. 

{(u iinka tido, ' 1 had had. 

tu tinhas tldp. • thou l»d hid. ^ 
eUe tinka ttd^, ' be bad bad. ^ ; . 

7104 tinhama^ ttio^' we had h^d* 

you had had. 
they had had. 

This tenfe may alfo be conjugated tlwis; thuiraj 
tiveras, iivera, iiveramos^ tivereis^ tiverao. 

Firft Future. ^ ' 

{iu terii, ou haver ei^ I (hall /^r will have. 

tu Uras^ ou havtras^ thou (halt or wilt have. 

ille terd, ou haver d^ he ftaH 9r. will have. 

{nos teremos, ou hav^rcmos^ we (hall or will have. 
vos tereis, gu havereis, ye (hall (7r will have, 
///^j terity o\x haver dS^ they (ball or will have. 

Second Future. 
Sing, eu hci de ter^ ou kavir^ &,c. I muft have, &c: 

Third Future. 

* Sing, iu haver ei de tir, ou haver, &c. I fhall jbeoWIgcd to 

have, &c. 

Fourth Future. 
Sing. €u havia dttir^ <m kavir^ &c. I was tofaave, &c. 

Imperative. 

«• ' ftem tUy ou hdjds tu, have thou. 

■^ "»• ^ f^nha elle^ ou hdja etle^ let him have^ 

Ctenhdmos, ou kqjdmos nis^ let us havew 
PlWt'x tende, ou Aflr;/i, i;^j>, bave ye. 

l^tiphaa, ou A4;'a3 ///^ j, lei them have^ 

9 The 



\ 



GRAMMAR., 4T 

• * 

The imperative has no firft perfon, becaufe it is 
knpoflible to command one's felf. r ^. 

Optative and SubjQnctive. 
I join them together, becaufe their tenies are fimtlar. 

Prefent, 

ft 

, Cfue eu tcnha^ ou hdja, that I have, or that IjnaAr hav6* 
Sing.< que 'til ienhas, ou k4jaSf tboQ haft, or tndyek have. 
i^que elk tenka, ou hdja, he has, 4fr may have. 

Cifue ni^UnhdmoSi ou huJamoSf we have, ormdj hkve^ 
Plur.< (juevos tenhais^ oukajaiss ye have, ^r m^y faavfe4 
^ l^que elUs tenhao, ou hajai^ they have, or may haVe* 

Firft Preterimpcrfeft. ^ ■ • . 

^qut eu tivira or tiveffe^ 

Sing.< ^"^ '? ''^"/"^ *"■ r^^^' > fliould. would, 
^ g^ houver as or houveff-es, r ^,. j^a Qr. 

kouvera or houvijfe^ J 

que nis tivtramos or tiyejfemos^ "^ . 

houvcrarnos or houvejfcmos | that we liad, i?r ' 

p, r f lu t/^j tivertis or tivejfeis^ I we (hould, 

"'^ j hour^reis or houvejfeis, [ would^ fi?c. 

j ^tt^ <^i tiverao or tivijfem^^ \ bav^ £?r. 

t^ . houvirao or houvejfcm^ J 

Second Preteriaiper£e£}., 

Sing.-! ^« urias ou A«i;.r/^J, V ^^"^^3 ?^^'' 

{msieriamos ouhaveridmos.'\ » /t ij n 

r/^j UrUis ou A<2z/«r/«j. . I ^'^ ^^'jft '"P"''^' 

Pre^rperfca. - 

Cque eu tinka tido ou kavido^ that I have had^ 
Sing.-^ que tu tenhas tide ou kavido^ thou hall had. 

^futf ille tenia tido ou havido^ he has had. 

r^w^ noj tenhdmos tido ou. havido, we have had. 
Plur. < f «^ I'^J tenhdis tido om kuvido^ you have had. 

\que illes tenhai luUf x^xxhi^do, they have had. 

Preter- 



crcis ou tivijjeis j 
iveraS ou tivijftm J 



48 PORTUGUESE 

I 

Pretefpluperfefi* 

It is comppunded of the firft preterimperfeft fub- 
junftive and the participle. 

{7^V« tivira ou tivtfft « "^ f 

ft tu Hveras ou tvotjjts v I 

Ve e//<ff tivira ou tivijfe I ^ i / if I had had, 

Plur. ^ ^ t/« J liver eis r ' " ' 

^ e/fej tiveraS 

Second Preterpluperfefl. 

It is compounded of the fecond preterimperfed 
fubjud£tive and the participle. 

{eu Uria "" '' 

tu terias 
{illettria Ktido^i IfliouW have had, 0f. 

nos tertamos f ^ ' 

vis terias 
itUs teriao 

Firft Future. 

{'fe iu tivir^ if I ftall have. 

tu tivera^ jhou (halt have. 

llle tiver, he fliaH have. 

rji nos tivSrmosi^ if we fliall have. 

Plur. < vSs tiverdes, you (hall have. 

I, ilUs tiverem^ they (hail have. 

This tenfe may be conjugated alfo thus : houvSr^ . 
houvires^ houver*y hotwermos^ Jiouverdes, houvirem. 
See the fynt. of the auxiliary Verbs. 

Second Future. 

|t isk compofed of the Firft Future aud the Parti- 
ciple. 

tje iu tiver '^ f 

.Sing. ^ iivires 

liS^rmos 't'''^'*\ iflftallhavehad.&c 
Plur. ^ fiver Jes 

tiverem 

Infinitive Mood. 

Prefent. 

tifg to have. 

Prctcr- 



GRAMMAR. 



iir tidd^ CO bare hid. 
Fntidples. 



Ficcciit. Siag. /i^. iida. Piur. iidts. iiJss. bad. 

Future. 
c^: . ftu kddtier^ihilutohKvc. 



'. itjub, haring •r in faiviiig. iautm^ 64^^ \BKmg blKl. 

Supine. 

'It is fapplied in PoitiJ^niefe by the prepofitioos « 

or para, and the verb in the infinitive ; as, 

. ■ • ■■ 

para tir^ to have. 

• In like manner are conjugated its compounds 
continboy Jetenko, mantinko, &c. 



. . Rtmark upon the aaxiHary verb, tdr, to have. 

The verb //r, to have, is an auxiliaiy or helping 
verb, which ferves to conjugate other verbs: ex* 
anapIe,7^V lidp^ to have read ; nos timosfeitOy we have 
done ; ilks iem vifto^ they have feen, &c. 

When the verb tir is followed by the participle 
ipi^, before an infinitive mood, it denotes the duty, 
inclination, &c. of doing any thing ; as, que tinaes 
quefazSrf what have you to do ? tSnko que/az& huma 
visita, I muft pay a vifit ; i//e tern muitd que diztrvos, 

he has a gi^at many things to tell you. 

<•-'•.■ I • _ 

h Of the auxiliary verb h av6r. 

This is one of the moft ufeful verbs in Portuguefe, 
fince it jsvnot only auxiliary to itfelf, as iu nil de 
iav6r, I muft have ; eu iavia de iavSr, I was to have, 
&c. but alfo to all forts. of verbs; as £u kiL de can^ 
tal^y I. will fing, or I muft fing, or I am to fing; 
iu ta deJiir^ \ muft go; ^ havia defallir^ I was 
to f{^ak ; (m hii de efcrevhri I muft write, &c. In 
which examples you n^ay fee that the verb ha^r, 
when auxiliary, has generally the particle de and 
the verb of the infinitive mood after it; and 

.. .i; Ti/l i. ::■.;... ,E ■ "- - that 



f - 



iQ P O B TUXJU;E.S E 

that then it denotes a firm refolution, poffibiKty,^r 
^eceffity of dokig any thiiVg> therefore it is not to 
be rendered into Engliih by the verb to have ; as 
you tfiiy fee by the fec6nd> third, and fourth fMbre 
of the indicative mood.. 

The verb kaviti with the particle de^ and the verb 
Jcr^ to be, after it, is an^up^Uiary both to the paflive 
verbs,^ and Xometirofes to the yfcrb jfiSr itfelf ; us^hei 
de ftrfelizy I (hall be happy^: O prindpe ha de fir 
f^fp^itA4o^i^^^,^^ViQ^ o\ight to be> «r muii; be, re- 
ipected. ^' ,, . : y-.. . . ./-. ^ .,-^ -,:•. 

The lame verb haver is alio auxiliary witKoijt the 
particle de \ but then it is put after the verb to 
tvhtfch it IS auxiliary ; &iid fo they {sLy,.JarvoS'Ae$\ } 
will give you; dar/he-^hei, J'^iW give td him, &e. 
In which exat6pIeA^yotl may obferve, that th^uxi- 
liary verb havir is put after the verb and ^hfiipi'^ 
bouDs conjunctive, i/^,ii^, &c^and (bmet^mfs jt; i^ 
put; after the yerb^ and t^ pronoun mi^ed^ a9» 
^ mand&rvoio'Ui^ Siy fend it to you.- Talpe notice^ 
however, that in the foregoing examples the verb 
havir Bjiiy be put before the other verb ^ bu^ then it 
4re(}uires the partiple de^ and has a different fueankig $ 
as, in th6 firft e;(i: ample, you may; faoTji .4f i' de, d^rvoi^ 
1 m^& ^ive to you. You muft alfo ^bferve^ tb^ 
when the indicative prefent of the^iiuxiliary veij^ 
haver is auxiliary to ether verbs, as in the foregoing 
examples, you muft cut off the laft letters ei from 
tbr future ^(^ the verb^ : and fo you may fay 'dhclhe- 
kih OT:hSi dS-^r-ihei but not darH ike^kHy nor Sfi 
^dt dor&ikei. ' Morcovefi. when the prbterirtipcrfcit 
JkavfA\9^A> \k, auxiU^ry.'tb ady V^rb, and k h to Mt 
;^ced .after It, you; mufi make wfk of bid; kia^ Ma^ 
ziiarrios^rMihi^'si/ao ; and fo •you 'may ' fay« dar-iik'Aim, 
,ikhs,i^. hutnotdar'/ie'hiiuUiJ^t^ lihbM 

•give to him^ ctthtrtil (houldrfti' 800. : u ' . 

r We fliail iBot ht at k loss how to tfx^re& the in* 
terrogalion ih.jP6rtQgue{ei)Kft<ilve do bi^iit the ptro- 
imins perfonal after the verbsj as in Englifh^ and 

we 



G R AM M AR< 51 

we (hall never miftaj^e in) faying tet^iSu? (hall I 
have ? timos nos f have we ? tens iu ? haft thou ? 
fwmilkf has b^F but ibonetimes they do.oot irrtn- 
tjim the pronouniat all $ asy jikf /i^rib^iLf what Oialk 
we do ; cantor imos f (hall we fing ? ^ 

Obferve, that havjtr i^ foimetimes Engliflied by to 
if ; as^ que ha de0'de mfmr what is to becocne of 

When we fp^'Jsjrrnelrtttioni we jmilft ufe the 
word iwo before the verb ; as, nao fenho^ I hav^ not ; 
wj nai cot^$cets^ you do ijot know, &c. 

The conjugatbn of the. auxiliary venhfir, or i^ar, 

to bew 

; Indicative. . 

t ■ - 

.1 ■ . ■ ' . 

, Prcfenu 

' • ■ » * ' . . 

{iufSa or estSu^ I am. 

tu is or ^5/a>» i thou art. 

e7/f ^/ or ista^ ' he is. 
ntf ^ f$ihoi or ^siimps, vtt art^« 

Plur. ^ vos fSis or riMi^i you are. 

, Hits fat fx estd8i khey am ^ . 



. :PwterpIupprfect; ^ > 

«tf /m or eslata^ I was. 

^roj or €StdvA)h: ; fhou waft. 

era or estdva^ he was. 

'»^i frames or e^avamos^ we-^fei ' 

Plur. ^ /r«V or est dims ^ you ^wft.^^ " 

trao CT kstdvoSi - tfiifcjr\«ii6 

Pf<ct«rpcrfccl ilefliA^ >- 



\ 



f; 



. \' 



^ _ WW W-- -— -- ■^-J 

'. .fiSmos Of 6siw(m^s^ we wtffft. 

nor. <{ ' :/^^i or tstkfistes^ yau ^w€r^ . 

E2 - PttltXm 



1«. I 



52 PORTUGUESE 

...... ^ ^ . . 

Preterperfect. 

It is compofed of the prefent indicative of ^tb#. 
aiixiliary^ verb tir^ to have^ and its own participlciif 

fido^ ox i^ido. ' r jv/ 

Prctcrpluperfcct, '"•^^^. 



• f :j : v 



^ It is compounded of the preterimperfect fnd(c}|n 
tive^ and the participle <f/(tAp«^or (/9i^^ 



/•t) . . 



{'cu tinhif, ft do or eftddq^ X had been* 

tinkas sido or estidb\ thou hadft been. , ' 

tifiha sido or e^tddo^ he had been. 

{tinhamos side or e^ddo^ v^e haid -been* " '^ ' ( 

tinheis stdo or est&ia^ : you had been. 

tinhao sido or estado, they had been. 

This teiife n^iy allb be coujngated thus; /Sra, or 
fftwira-y fbrasy or ^ftiveroi ; ^firay or eftivera ; fdnh 
fkosy or eftiveramos 'y fbreisy or ejlivereisi fdroQ, ox 



Future. 



^ 



feujerei or esiarei^ v^yLfbM or will ^^ 
Sing. < Jetas oxMUivas, ^hou {halt be. . , ^. 

L Jerd or esMd^ ^ be A^U jbe. 

r jiremoSt or estarimos^ we fliall be. 
. Piur.< feriis ox estariis^ . you '(hall be. 
(, Tir^S or estardo^ they Qiall hc^ 

^^''' Imperative; ^ 

6* ^ f// /« or «j/^, , he thou. 

^'""^'Xfija or ziii^eUc.^ X^imht. 

{'/qdmas,orre^lgdMos nos\ let \jshc. i ' " 

fide or € sin vis ^ ' be you. 

fijao or tsti^Qi^ilUsy .Jp^,tl|i«nbe. - 

Qptatiyfe ^nd Subjunctive, ^ /r 

[ Prefent. .. j 

f qu€ tu f^a or ^siija^ that I nw be, ^ r that I be. 
Sii'S* 1 y?^*^ ^' tstija^y r tbou mavft be ^r bf . 
t ji^^resUja^ hemayfae^&CA J 



Plur, 



«"'•{ 



G R AM MAR* 6^ 



fejdmos or eflejdmos^ we may be. 
Jijdis^ or e/tejais^ you may bei 

y{/fl3 of ejiijao^ they may be. 



Ki-ft PfctcrimpcrfcfiL 

tjiivira or eftivejfe^ f bc4 

° ' e/itveras or tjhvtjes^ \ 

foraatjqffe, \. _^^^ 

ejttvtreis or 



eftivejfeis^ J 
efiivejfm, J 



you were. 



- f6ra6 ox foftm, \ , 

Seeond Preteriroperfefl, 

{€u seria^ eUaria^ . I (bould ^r would be« 

;f^mi or estarfdSf thou ibouldeft be. 

i^rw or tftarta^ he (hould be. 

{, striamosox tstatiamos^ we (hould be. 

seriiis or estarieis^ you ihould be. 

jerlaS or ^fj^riao, they fliould be> 

Prctcrpcrfe^. 

It is compounded of the prefent conjunfiive of 
the auxiliary verb ifyr^ and its oWn participle sido^ 
or est&doy ' ' \ 

que eu ieuka sido or estddo^ that t have beefi«» 
! iihhas sido^ or estado^ thou baft been« 

//sAa i/^^» Itc* he has been. 

ienhdmas sido, &c. that we have been. 
Flur.^ ienhdis sido^ &c« you have been. 

\ » ienhaS sidif, &c. they have been« 

Preterpluper{e£^. 

It is compounded of the firft preteriniperfefl fub* 
jun^ive of the verb Ur^ and its own participle* 

•. E 3 Sing. 




y 



' \ 



/ 



S4 PORTUGUESE 

^fi €U tivira ot ttvifft 1 -r t t. j l » 
.. . / sidooxestiS ^»fH»dbeen.^ - 

^*°8* ^ tiviras, &c. thou hadft ht9h. 

tivira^ &c. . hc Had been. 

tiviramos^ &c. we had been. 

Plur> ^ tiyirds^ 8cc. you h^d ^een^ 

tiver^S, .&c* i)i^y had been. , 

Secpnd Pretcrplupepf^ 

It is compounded of the fc^eond preterimperfeft 
fubjun£tive of thd verb t/rf and its own participle 
si Jo or e/tido. 

Ceu ttria sido or €stddi> I piould or would hatfc been. 
Sifig/< ttrias^ &c.^ tHou fi^ouldfi have boen. 

L teria^ &c. lie (hould h#ve been.' 

r Uriamos^ &c, weihould have been* 

Flttr.Y terieis^ &c. you fliould have been. 

|[ icriaSj HjLCm ihey (I^iiild have been. 

Firft toimtS^t^ 

qudndoiu^or or efiivir^ ythth I QpII be. 

Sing.^ /!7r^j ox ejfHvires^ ' thM ihalt be* 

^(?r or ej^vivy he (ball be. 

JSrmos ereflivirmos^ we ftdl be. 

Plur.H^ Jordts or eftivirdes^ you (hall be, 

ybVtfftt or efttvcrem^ they (hall be* 

Second Future* 

It is conapptinded of the fiitnre fobjtinQ^Ve of the 
verb //r, and its own participle. 

qudndo iu /tWrji^^ or ^^^(?,when I (hall have been* 
Sing. ^ iiyetes sido, '&c. thou (halt lave been* 

/ti;/r i/i9» &c* he (hall have bfecB, , 
tivirmos sid^. See. we il^all have been* 
Plur.^ fiver dcs sido, ict. youfllall have been. 

tivercm sido, &o* diey (kail have^^MBtti 

Infinitive. ' 

I^«ft{ftt* 

fit^^i^rf^ tpbt* 

Preterperfeft* 

ier sido or €/l4(lo. ^ tohavebeest 

• Ptoi. 



. HR A MM AIL S BS 

Furticijde^. 
;. . Proi. 

r 

1 

^J0 or isijd^, been. 

f oftore. 
puH dt //r, or esfdr^ that is fo be« 

Grerunds* 

stndo or esidmio^ being. 
tindc sid§ or estido^ hiving bc^iv 

Sophie, 
^ara iir or ril^r, tp be; 

Rcfo^ks open the rerb/^ and tjl&r. 

There is a confiderable di^ence })etweea t^efe 
verbis j^ and eft^i Wh in Pprtii^Me^ and $pani0). 
In Engliih there is no word tO <liftingui()i theQiy fin<;r 
they are both repdered into Eng]ifl]i by to be. Sir. 
fignHtes tKe proper and infeparable eflence of a thing, 
its quality or quantity; fir komem, to be a man ; 
fer Mnty to be good ; fir aUo^ to be tall s fer lirp^ 
to be 'wide ; fer brdnfo^ to be white, &c. But.g^or 
denotes a place, or any adventitious quality; as» 
e^ m LdnJres^ to b^ in London > eJlAr de^faide^ Ko 
be in health \ efikrfrio^ lo be cold ; est&r quente^ to 
be warm ; eubir dointe^ to be ficfe > ^^tor infadhdo^ to 
,bc angry ; eUl^r alU^re, tQ bq ro^rrv, S^e^ 
. Take liotice, that you may ule estar before £he 
gerunds, but not/^; therefiore you may fay, estSu 
fmlldndoy lendo^ &c. I am i^aking, reading, &c, 
tlMt ifiQiJ^/i^lIandQ^ &c, 

- T}lr three Conjugations of regular 4eth)C Fer 6s. 

A Tegular vf^rb is fuch u l& confined to geneml 
iiito> m jti cPii}«f^tion. 

E4 A verb 



I 



56 PORT-UG.UESE 

A verb/aftive denotes. the aftion or impreffionof 
thc'fubject, and governs a noun which is the objeft 
of that action or impreffion ; as, amar a virtide, to 
love virtue ; recebir c&rtas; to receive letters. ' 

The regular Portuguefe verbs have three difFeT 
rent terminations in the infinitive ; to wit„ in ar^ ex^ 
ir ; as, am&r ^io love ; tem^r, to fear ; admit tir, to ad- 
mit. 

An eafy Mtthod of learning to conjugate the Portuguefe 

Verbs. 

I .have reduced all the tenfes of the Portuguefe 
verbs to eight; four of which are general, and 
have thp fame terminations in all the verbs ; and 
the otl)er four may be Jikewife ma^e general by 
changing fome letters, and all the conjugations re- 
/ duced to one. 

The general tenfes are, the ftiture indicative; 

the firftandfecond preteVimperfeft fubjunftive,and 
the firft future fubjunftive. ' 

The future indicative is terminated in all the 

verbs, in 



V» .- / - .L • — ' > • 



reiyTas^ra-, remosj rets, rao. -> 

The imperfe£l fubjun£iive, in ; 

ra or sse^ ras or sses, ra or sse-y ramos or ssemos, reis; 

; or sseiSy rao or ssem. .,■..;, -^ 



' ^ 



The fecond imperfe£l, in 
\ ria'.rias. ria ; riainos.rieis.riao. 

Theiirft future fubjunfitive, in . 

eSy moSf deSy em. '' " \ 

■ 

Note, that I have only put the termination of the 
fecond perfon lingular of the future fubjun£tive, 
becaufe the firft and third of the fame number are 
like their respeftive infinitives of the three conjuga- 
tions^ which however keep both their laft cohfonant 

and 



y* 



.: G R;A M ;M A It i 5,7 

and vowel before the termioations I havfe marked 
for the fecond perfoa fihgular, and for the iwholc 
plucal. As to the rfuture indicative, you have no- 
thing to do but add /i tothe refpe£tive pi'efentinfi- 
tiitive* of the three conjugations, in order to form 
the firft p^rfon Angular ; and if you add to the &tne 
infinitive prefent as^ you will form the (iecond peribo 
fingular of it, and fo of all the reft, by adding fo 
the infinitive prefent, tf, tfwoj, w, ^. 

The imperfeS fubjun£Hve has two termination; 
Tor every perfon, both in the. 'fingular and phiral; 
"liut if you cut off thip laft cotifohiEmt V of theinfint- 
tive, and then ^dd to it the tcbrmihations above- 
mentioned, yoii (hall* form the itoperfeft fubjunc- 
tive, acco^rding to its two different terminations. 
Laflly, *if you cut off the laft . confortan t of the infi- . 
nitive, and add to it the terminations above men- 
tioned^ you will form the fecond imperfe£l fubjunfc- 
tive. 

The prefent indicative of the three conjugations 
is formed by changing the lafi letters of the infini- 
tive, yiz. ar^ er, /r, into o ; as, dmo^ entihdo^ a^mittOy 
itom af^&Ty entendiry admit tir. , ,,/ 

The preterimperfeft indicative is formed in the 
firft conjugation, by changing the laft confonant of 
the infinitive, viz. r, into ^tf, vas^ va^ vamosy veis^ vat ; 
but in the (econd conjugation it is .formed by 
changing the termination nr of the infinitive into ia^ 
. iaSi ia^ iamos^ ieiSy iaS j and in the third by changing 
the laft confonant r of the infinitive into, a, as, a ; 
amos, eisy ao. 

The jierfeft definite in the firft conjugation is 
formed by changing the termination ^r of the infini- 
tive into //, aflty h, imos, ajiesy araS; and in the 
fecbnd conjugation, it is formed by changing the 
termination er of the infinitive into t, ejle^ co, imos, 
eftes, eraS. In the third conjugation, tl^ fame tenfe 

is 




I 



58 PORTUGUESE 

is formed by changing the termination it of the m* 
$nrif ive into /, ifte^ /«, /i»«r, ijles^ trap. 

The prirfent fubjunOive in the firft conjugation 
18 formed by changing the termitiatidn or of the 
infinitive into r, ^^ e, emoSy iisj tm-y and in the 
iecond conjugation, it is formed by chaoging the 
termination /r of the infinitive into a, as> a^ imas, 
SiSf agi, In the third conjugation, the fame tenfe s 
formed by changing the termination ir of the infi>. 
nitive into the fame terminations, a^ as, a, &c. 
*• A» to the [mperatiye mood, you may only oh- 
fcnre, that the £econf] perfon fingular j^s always the 
iamc as the third p^^fon fingi^ar of the prefeqt indi- 
g^tiye, in all the conjugations. ' 

Tlje participles ot tne preterperfeft tenfe iq.the 
firft conjugation are forq^^d by chwgihg the laft 
/confonant r of the infi.nitive ioip ^0 for the m^^ii- 
lpe»and da for the femiriin^; and into dosid^^ 
tor the plural • but when you come to verbs of ti^e 
fecond conjugation, you change the termination r 
of the infinitive into idoy ida^ &c. * ' 

In the third conjugation, you muft change the laft 
confonant r of the infinitive into do for the mafcu- 
line^ da for the feminine, &:c. 

Thtfifft Conjugation of the verbs /« ar. 

The Iei4icative Mood. 

I ihall put the pronouns pergonal, ia^tu^ ille^ 4cc. 
nomorci 

Prefem* 

, .mao^ '■ {love. 

4ma^^ thou. JoVdL 

4maj helovp^. 

lamdmesp we love. 

aptdis, ' ye lave. 

Jimai, tfaeylave. 

Fcpter« 



G R A M M A<R. 

Preterimpcrfed. 



« 



amava^ 

dmavas^ 

amdva, 

amdvamoSf 

umdveis^ 



amet^ 
kmafte^ 
amou^ 
amimes^ 

amdrao^ 



I did love^ ^ 
thou didfl love, 
he did love* 
we did love, 
you did lovc."^ 
' they did tore. 

Preterperfed definite. 

I loved, 
thou lovedft. 
he loved, 
we loved, 
you loved, 
they loved. 

'^' Prcterperfea.: 

This tqpfe ' IS compofed of the jiarticiple amido^ 
and the present indicative auxiliary verb; ter. 

tinho amado^ I have loved. 

tens imddo^ thoa haft loved* ^ r . ^ . . . 

Um MmSdo^ he has loved. '. 

tetnas amdd^^ we have loved^, -^'^ 

iinde4 amadou ^ yofi have lov^^ . 

t€i^ amddo^ th#y have loved* 

I Prcterpluperfea. 

This tenfe is compofed of the participfe dtfido^ 
and the iftipKsrfeft of the auxiliary verb W.r \y 

N. B. This tenfe njay be conjugated thus, Mmkrs, 
Mthrasy amdra, am&ramos, amareiSy aminrAS^ or, 

I.ha4 loved* 
thou haft loved* 
he had loved. 
,we had loved, 
you^had loved, 
they had lovpd. ^ 

Future. 

I-fliall or i^ill love, 
thou (halt love. 
/ he (hall love^ 



% 

iinhAamid^^ 
tinhaj amado^ 
tinkd amddo^ 
iinhamtfs amaddt 
tinheis amado^ 
tinhai amidc^ 



amarH^ 
amards, 
amard^ • 



ama* 



«D 



P Q R T V G U E S E 



^maremos, 

amareis^ 

amardor^ 



we (hall love, 
you (hall love- 
they (hall lore. 



Imperative. 



dma tu^ 
dme, Slltj 
amemos nis^ 
amdi vos^ 
dmem elUs^ 



love thou, 
let him love, 
let us love, 
love you. 
let them love. 



Optative and Subjunftive. 



que eu ame^ 

* dme^ 

amemos^ 



that I may lov^. ' 
thou tnayeft love, 
he may love, 
vre may love, 
you may love, 
they itiay love. 



Firft Preterimperfea. 



que eu amara or amasse^ 
amdras^ or amdsses, 
amdiraf or afndsse^ 
amirambSf or amdssemos^ 
amiteis or amdsseis^ 
amiraS ox amdssem^ 



that I might ^r could love, 
they mighteft love. > 
he miffht love* 
we misht love, 
you might love, 
they might love.^ 

' yWhen we find the conjunction if before the in- 
dicative imperfefil, we muft ufe the imperfeft of the 
,fubjun£liye or optative, when we fpeak. by way of 
wifti or defire \ as. If I did love, fe eu amajfuy or 
amhra^ and not Je h amdva^ if I had loved ; if I 
had, fe hi, thera, tivej/e, and not fe iu tlnha-^ and 
fo in all the verbs. 

Second Pretcrimperfefl:. 

^mariaf \ I (hould lovct 

amarfaSf ' thou (houldft love. 

amarial he (hould love. 

amariamoSi we (hould lov^. 

amarieis^ you (hould love. 

emariaS, they (hould love. 

. V Preter- 



G R A M M AiR. «) 

Preterper{ie8> 

J It is-c6chp6feit of the participle 4^4!0^m4 the 
prefent fubjun3ave, of the auxrlia^ vecb /fJTKl :. : i 

^t« it^icnha dmddo^ that I have Ipved«^ :> 

tSnhas amddo^ thou haft loved. 

tinka amado^ he ba$ loved. ^ 

ttnhawkosi amado^ we have loved. 

tenkais amido^ you have loved. 

. tenhsAamddo^ they have loved. 

Pre^erpluperfefi. 

It is compofed of the participle^ amido and the 
firft preterimperfeft fubjunaivc of the auxiliary 
verb tir. 

ft iu tivira or tivifst amddo^ , if I had loved. 

iiveras or tivifses amado^ thou hadft loved. 

tivira or t^vijst amddo^ - * ' > he Had loved. 
tiveramosortivifsempse^m^o^ we had loved. 
tivirtis or tive/scis amddo^ you bad loved. 

HveraB or tivefsem amddd'^'^"' *'lhey had loved. 

Second. Preterplupeffcfi. 

It is compofed of the participle iiwirfo and the 
fecond pretje^drnperfisS fubjim^ive of the auxiliary 
verb tir. ' 



. ■» » r ■ tf 



Uria anUido^ I fiiould have loved. 

ttrias amida^ . ' ' ^ ^ ' thou Ihouldit have loved. 

teria amdio^^ ?';,:. /f; -^ fliouid have loved. 
teriamcs amido^ we (hould have loved. 

terteis amddo^ ''-" ^' y^flioiild have loved. 

teriaS amddOf .t> v ' thfiy fliould have loved. 

' '• ■■'••■■■■:• 'Future.^ -^ . . ■ .. .-.;■.' 



^itdndf iu amir, wlien I (ban love. 

• amdres^ ' ^p (halt love. 



Nl- 



.'J 



dmdri he (hall love. 

dmirmos^ we (hall love. *■ . 

amirdes, ". you (hall love. 

fimmrtm^ . they (hall love.. 

V ' Second 



CS P O R T,!; G:U'^S E 

Sccmtd- Fnearo. 

ft 

tt b«offi{)<&fed 5f^ the pdt-tfdpl&kifmto, aixl llie 
future faljlmQiVd df the taxiliar/ verb /^; ^ .. j'lvi^r 

qudndo fu tiver dfrnido^ when L(^»U have l^v«d;> '} 
iivfreS affiidif^ •thouA^U hsMe loved. 

tivir djimdd, be {h«li havaloved. 

tivirihbs amado^ W€ ftaii hav^ loved. 

tivirdes di^do, ■ ydo feaH ha Vfc laved. 

- H'^tmamido, , tWfUiiHlia^e loved. 

PrcfeiUw 



»>-!'-• r- 



.J 'vrir: 



• / • • 



^ PretcrperfeQ. 

icr mH^db, to tkaivc klV«^^ 



' • . . / 



9 ' • *^ < ■ • 






' » » 



.•.•; •• •}.: : 



Participle* --\ . v - •« 
Prefciit. 
f n^ dma^ or amtinkt Chat Ip\^6|i. , 

Pret. 
amddOf male, dmida, felt). loved. 

• ^ '•-*. 'Future. ..) :..i.,qf-..--:. . ;1 

.. .J. 
... Ge;'unds. 

.1/ i,u..amdn,dQt loving. ,.' 

, - - Undo amdot,^ having lovc^./ 

,,v>y ^i:. Supine. 

,1. :>. . . ij^ard amdr^ to love. 

Note, the verbs teiupinating in^ the infinitive in 
« ^ir take ^u ii^ Ab^fe tenJfes, where th^s, c would other- 
wife mwt:w:it^i^^, vowel /; andtbiWe terrtriiiating 
in the infiditp m\.gar take an »,^ thofe tenfes, 
whereMhe g woiiki otherwife m^t with the fame • 
vowel rj that* i^to fay, in the firft perfon fingular 
of tlie ^rtietp€t(i& definite, in the third perfon 

fingular. 






6 R A M M A. R. 04 

fingular, in the firft and third plural of the impera- 
tive, and in the whole prefent fubjunftive, whicb 
afe the tepfes 1 (hall give you by y9aj <^ exainple 
in the .verbs pcaar and p0g^n 

P«'cv^;t6fin. 

PMfterperftft' dditike. ' 

iu pequii^ I finned — in^tdAm pettH* 

Imperative. , 

pcjjui ille^ let him iiii: pequemos nis^ let us fin; piquem 
ilUs^ let them fi^r^iui taoi-jpecce clU^ &c. 






Ptefett fubjunftivc 

que in piquf, iu piques^ that I ^ay fin-— 
an^xiotfuf eu pecce,ficca^ ccc. 

iVfelerpfeifea definite. 
pdg^uH^ I pA(f. 

• i'- c'-i 'v ' lir^ratiJttiLV : " ■ fi'.-J -• ' '^ 
pigue^ elle^^paguSmos nis^ pagifcm -eilss^ let him^pay, &e. 

' ' '- Prefent fubiunflive. 

f uf ^21 P^g^^t, P^g^^^9 pdgueypaguemoSf pagucis, paguem^ 
that 1 may pay, £?c.^and not page^pa^e:^^ &c. 

The other tenfet^ arc conjugated liKe amdrm 
Regulai''' verbs in ar. 

Abafdf^ to choke, or to ^di- Agarrar;\K> lay hoW of. 

. ther^ \i4/<flij€rr, to overflow. 

Abalar^ to fhake. AmaUifoar^ to curfe. 

^ian^zr, to fan. * Annular^ to annul, ^r to 

Abaftdr^ to fadate. . make void. 
Abaxar^ to bring ^tkt dowii. Aprefsar^ to pr^fs, ^ hafien* 

Aben f oar t to hlth. Aquenldr^iovfgtiti^ 

Abocankar^ to carp. Argumentar^ to aft'gtie« 

Abomxndr^ to dominate, ^ Ajsoprar^ to blow. 

>i^0/tfar,\to button* jJ^ir^nStie. 

Aiabdr^ to finifh. Avaffal&r^ to fabdoe, t9 con- 

Admoeftdr^ to adni|iKU#i» quer. ^r 

Affrontit^ to abufe.*. A%cdar^ to fooTt 



&4ri 



PORT UGUE5E 



I'Ofjhe Kerbs passiye. 

Before we proceed- to the fecond conjugation, it 
is neceffary to Icnow that' the Verbs paffiVe, whith 
cxprefs the fufferingpf Jip ^aion, are nothing more 
than the participtesof verbs a£liYe> conjugated with 
the verb y2r, to oel 



ii< — . 



< > ' . i 



•I 






E X A M P L £• ^ 



f< * 



*--.T 



> > 



Prefent tenfe. 



y 



' vindes^ \ , 
vihdt^ 
vendemos^ 
vendiisy 
• vind^m^ 

veiaidia^ 
' vendias^ 
; txendia^ ^ 
vendiamqs^ 
.vtndieis^ 
rfendiaSt 






I • » 



/Ky<?tt amid(fi . . I am kiVcd/ 

/ii h amddot ; , ^ , thou art loved. 

elU hi amSdoy ' he is loved ' 

nSsfomds afiidibs^ we are ld<red. 

vosfS'tsimdfl^^,\ . you arel<>ved. 

tlUsJai arndda^s^ , they are loved. 

and fo throughout . the other , moods and tenfes. 

The second conjugation of the verbs in 6r. 

* • .. 
Indicative Mood*. 

' i*fcfcnt, 
.::iiell. 

*' "thou felleft'. 
he fells. -^ ^"' 
we fell, 
you fell, 
they fell. 

Pi^ctcrimperfefi. 

; I did fell. 

thou didft fell. 
he did fell. 
wc did fell, 
you did fell, 
they did telU 

Preicrperfefi definite* 

*^ vtndU, I fold. 

vendefitM thoo foiifei^ 

vcndiii^ ' he fold. 

' venm 



\ . : 



' -^ 



o 






,« 



GRAMMAR. «» 

pendemos, we fold. 

vendeftcs. you fold. 

vindcrdSj tby fold. 

Preterperftfi* 




venJiJt, < I have foM, 9c. 



FMerpluperfed. 

itnka '\ 
iinkas I 

Sw >-""«''•• ^bw. feline. 

This tenfe may alfo be conjugated thus; vcndcrat vendirasg 
vehdei^i venderam^Sf vcndireis^ vendM^ 

Future* 

VtHdtf&t 

venderdSf 

venderiis^ 
vtnderaS^ 

Imperative Mood. 

vtnde tu^ fell thois* 

VEnda ille, kt him fi&lL 

venddmos nos^ let m felL 

vendei vos^ fell ve. 

vendaS ilks^ let them fell. 

Optative and SubjunQive. 

vindas^ J 

*2^W. r^' ^ '"^ ^^' ^'^^ 

vinddiSf 1 ' 

ifcndaS, J 

5 Prctcf* 



66 



P O R T U G U E S E 



t PrecerimperfeQ. 

f Iff eu vendira or vendesse^ that I might or could fdll, 

vender as or vendisses^ &c. . 

vendira or vendesse, 
vendiramos or vendessemos^ 
vendereis or vendesscis^ . 
vehderaS or vendissem^ 

Second Pfetcrimperfcct. 

vtnderia, I (hould fell, 0f. 

venderias^ 

venderia^ 

venderiamos^ 

venderUiSf 

venderiaSt 



Prctcrperfcfl. 



que eu tenhd 
tenhas 
tenha 



tenhamos f 
tenhdis I 
tinhoB J 



vendido, < 



that I nave foM»&f . 



Preterpluperfeft, 



/e eu tivera or tiveffe^ 
tiviras or tiveffes^ 
iivira or tiveffe 
tiveramos cr tivifiemos^ 
tivereis or iivijfas^ 
- tiveraS or tiviffem 



yvendido^ < if I 



had fold, &c. 



Second Preterpluperfe£l. 



eu teria 
terias 
teria 
teriamos 
terieis 
teriaS 



vendid^, < I fliould have fold^ &c. 



Future. 



GRAMMAR. 



fmmMd0 em vemder. vlnIfaHlcll.9 




vtmdirdts. 

Second Fuduc 

qmmmi0 em tivir 
iiveres 
tivir I ^^jf, } when I OmII bm tM. 

Infinitive Mood. 

Prefcnt. 
vender, to TdL 

PrctcrpcrfcQ. 
tcr vendido^ to have fold. 

Participle. 

Prefent. 

qmt vindCf that fell» that fells. 

Preterit. 

a 

vemdid^^m^tc. vendida, feni. Plur. vendidos^ vendidas^ fold* 

Future. 
fui ha de vender, that is to fell. ' 

Gerund. 

vendendo^ felling. 
tindo venliido^ having fold. 

Supine. 
para vender^ to fell. 

After the fame manner as the verb vendir^ are 

conjugated all the other regular verbs of the fecond 

conjugation ending in er s as the following -, 

18 Mfimetir. 



v-t8 PORTUGUESE 

Acometir^ to attack. Efcondir^ to hide. 

Bebir^ to drink. Emprendir^ to undertake. 

Comif^iO€k^ jW^/tfr> to put in. 
Comprekisnaer fto^erceive, or Offender ^ io oStnA. 

apprehend, jFr^^^/Zr, to promife, 

Comttir^ to commit. Refpondir^ to anfwer. 

Concedir^ to grant. Reprthcndert to reprove. 

^ Corrir^ to run. Tenter^ to fear. 

• /)«vdr, to owe. ^^arr^ri to fweep, €?c. 

.• . . . 

The third conjugation of the; verbs endingJnJrr. 

t - 

y-" " '*' IrtdkaUye Mood. 

Prefent. 

admitto. I admit, &c. admUtimcs. 

admUteSf • -'^ • admittis, 

admitte^ admitUm. 

PreterimpAtftft. 

admlttia^ I did adttiit».^€« admitttamos. 
admittias, admiiticisi 

admittia, ' adiAittiao. ^ 

Preterpcrfcfl definite. 

admiUi^ I admitted. admittimos. 

admittijie^ aimit^s. 

admittio^ admttirdo* 

Prcterperfeft* . 

This tcnfe is composed of the participle admittido, 
and the prefent indicative of the auxiliary verb tir.^ 

tinho admitiido^ I have admitted. 

tins admittido^ &c. thou haft, tec. 

P»etcrplupcr£ea. 

This tenfe is compofed of the participle admUiido^ 
and the imperfect of the auxiliary verb t6r. 

iinha admittidp^ I had.a'dmitted; ^ i 

tinhas admit tido, &c. thoU ha(itt,&c. 

This tenfe may alfo be conjugated thus ; admiHtra^ ai^ . 
mittir^s^ admttira^ admutiramos^ ^tdmittlreisp admiii^S. j 

Futare. 



GKAMM^It. 69 



Future. 

admUHrii, t flidi ^r wiU admit. 



admitirms. 
admittird^ 

admitfirfmpt» 

admidifiis^ 

admittifdOf 

admtieii^ admit thoy. 

admitta itk^ ^ let him admit. 
.admittdmcsnift, let us admit. 

udmitti V0S9 admit ye. 

admUtao ell^s^ let them adom* 

Optative and Subjunctive. 

Prerent. 

fue iu admitia^ that I may admit, &c» 
admittaSf 
adfAitta^ 
admtttdmos, 
admiitais, 
admittaS. 

Firft Preterimpc rff6l. 

que eu admiiirm or adtkittijfe^ that I might admit, &c. 

admittiras or admittijfes^ ^ 
admit tir a or admit tiff e^ 
admittiramos or admittijfemos^ 
^ admittireis or admitiifseis^, 
admitttraS or admiiifjfemt 

— Second Preterimperfefi. 
admttiiria^ . I ibould «r ^Mrould admit, &c. 
admittirias^ 
. admittiria^ 
' admittiriamoSf 
admittirUis^ 
admktiridSp 

Preterporfiefi* 

This tenfe is eotnpdfed of the ptrticle^ admittido, 
and the prefent fubjunctive of the verb /ifr. 

f 11^ /tf ienha admittidc^ that I have admitted. 

' '"^^fftcc. . «Imu haft admitted, &c. 
f 3 'Pretcr- 



70 P O R t U G U E j5 E 

PreterpI^pe^fe3. 

It is compofed of the firft preterimperfcQ? fub- 
junClive of the verb Ur and the participle admitti^o, 

ft eu tivira admittido^ If I had admitted, 

ttverasi &c. thou hadft admitted, ice. 

Second PreterpluperfeQ. , 

It is composed of the fecond preterimperfect fub- 

junctive of the verb iir and the participle admittido. 

eu teria admitlido^ u I ihould have admitted. 
terias^ &c. thou fhouldft, &c. 

Firft Future. 

■ 

fe eu admiitir^ If I (hall admit, &c. 

admittircSf 
admittir^ 
^ admitttr^ n^ . 

admitttrdeSf 
admittirem^ 

Second Future* 

It is composed of the firft future fubjunctivc of 
the verb tir and the participle admittido. 

fe eu tivir admittido. If I (hall have admitted. 
; tivires.tcCt thou (halt* &c. 

Infinitive Mood. 

. Prefent. 
admit ttr, to admit. 

Prcterpcrfeft. 
tlr admittido^ to have admitted. 

• Participle. > 

Prefent. 
admittido, for the mafc. admittida, for the fem. admitted. 

Future. 
' que ha de admittir, that is to admit. 

Gerunds. 

;' admittindo, admitting. 
tindo admittido, ^ving a&iitted. 

Supines. ' 
para admittir^ • to admit* 

Conjugate 



GRAMMAR. 71 

Conjugate after the £ime manner the following 
verbs: 

Abrir, to opeii« Nutrir\ to nourifli* 

Conduvir^ to conduA. . ReduMir^ to reduce, to 
Intro Ju%2r^ to introduce. to. 

Induzir^ to 'induce. Traduzfr^ to traoflaie. 

Produzir^ to produce. Deduzir^ to dedufi, &e. 

Luzir^ to (hioe. 



, Q/* tie irrepilar Verbs in ar. 

There are in each conjugation fome verbs which 
jdo not conform to the common rule, and on that 
account are called irregulars. 

There are but ttvo of the firft conjugation, which 
in fome of. their tenfes depart from the rule of the 
verb ^^4r^ viz. ejlar and dir. We have already 
conjugated the firft, and the fecbnd is conjugate4 
in the following manner. 

Indicative. 

Prcfent. 
dou^ I give. dimos^ we give. 

- dds^ thou givefi. ddts^ you give. 

di^ he gives. dai^ they give*. 

. PretcrimperfcS. 

dava^ I did give, &e. (as in regular verbs of the firft 

divas^ Sec. conjugation.) 

Prcterperfeft definite. 

dei^ I gave. demos, we gave. 

defte, thou gavefi. defies^ you gave. 

deu^ he gave. diraS, they gave. 

* Preterperfefl. 

This tenfe is compofed of the participle d&do and 
the prefent indicative of the auxiliary verb //r; as 
iessko dadoy I have given, &c. 

PreterpluperfeS. 

This tenfe is compofed of the participle dado and 

the imperfect of the auxiliary verb tir\ as iu tinha 

iUo^ &c. I had given, &c. 

F 4 Future. 



n PORTUGUESE, 

^ • - 

Fatnre. 

d^rh, I (hall or wHI give, &c. (as in the verb amir) 
dards. &c.. 

Imperative. 

dSmos nSSf let us gi^^. 
di /B» give tfaoQ. ' ddi vos^ cive thou. 

di ilk Jet him give, ^ dcm Ules^ let them, gi^tt 

Optative and Subjunctive. , 

Prefent. 
fue eu de. that I may give, &c» 
deSt 

dl - 
dimos^ 
' diis, 

Preterimperfefi* 

qui iu iira or disscj that I might give, &c« 

deras or desscs^ 
dera ox desse^ 
deramos or dissewufs^ 
direis or desseis^ 
deraS or dissent. 

Second Imperfe£L . 
darUt I (hould ^vCt Ax. dariamos* 

darUkS^ darieis. 

daria^ dariaS. 

The preterperfect> preterpluperfect, and the fis 

cond preterpluperfect, are oompofed of the participle 

dido, and the auxiliary verb Ur, as in the regular 

verbs. 

Future. 

^ fudndo cu der^ wbtt I (hall give, &c. 

dirts, 
dir. 
dermos, 
dirdesp 
direm^ ^ . 

Second Fntore.' 

It is compofed of the p^u-ticiple dido, &c. as the 
regular verbs. 

Infinitive. 



GBAMMAK. 7S 

Infinitive. 

4mr^ to^ve, &cim ia tbe K{ular verbi» • 
Of the irregular F^bs in er. 

I begin with fazir^ poder^ ^nd/Mbir^ bccaufe they 
; occur afieneft in difcourfe. 

■ 

Faz^, to do tr make. . 

-Indicative. 
PreTcAt. 

fofo^ I do, Jmximos^ we do. 

Jdzts^ thou doft. fazeis^ you do. 
fdz^ he docs. fiztm^ they do. 

Imperfect. 

Jaxiaf I did ^r did make; &u faiLiamos. 
Jazias^ Jazteis. 

faziOf ' faziaS. \ 

Preterperfcft- definite. * 

fiz^ I made» &c. Ji^fiws. , * 

fizijie^ Jiztjits^ 

fi%9 Jiz€Ta%, 

Preterperfcft. 

iink^ftiU^ I have done, &u 

iensJcitOi &c. 

PreterplupeiitfiS. 

iinha faito^ I had dooe« Qcm 
tinhasfeito^ &c. 

Future* 

Jarei^ I £baU do, &c. (according to the regular verb.) 
JardSf &c. 

^ffi^ratire. 

' fcfimos niSf let us do. 

fizeiu^, dothoQ. fuzeivSt. dbyou. 

fifa eikf let him do. fifao illes^ let iboi 

Optative. 



■\ 



74 PORTUGUESE 

« 

Optative. 

Prefcnt, , 

fue eujidfa^ that I may do, &c. (according to the regu- 
jdfas, lar verbs. 

Pretcrimpcrfcft. 

^ue eujizera or^z^, that I night do, &c. 
Jiziras OTjizeJfts^ 
fizera oxjixejfe^ 
Jiztramos or fizejptmos^ 
fizSreis or fizejffis^ * 

Jizerai oxjizfffem. 

Second Imperfeft. 

faria^ I (hould do, &c. fariamos. 
Jarias^ farUis. 

Jaria^ foriao. 

Future. •♦ 

qudndo eujizir^ when I (ball dp, &c. 
Ji%eres^ 
Jizer^ 
Jizirmps^ 
jizirdes^ 
Jizirtm^ 

Second Future. 

qudnio iu tivirfeUo^ when I Oiall have done. 

ttveresfeito^ &c. 

. Infinitive. 

fazer^ to do. 

Gerunds. 
Jazinio^ doing or in doing. 

Participle. 
JeitOf inadf,^r done. 

After thCjfiame manner are conju|[atcd iesfazir^ 
to undo.; conirafazir, to counterfeit; refazir^ to 
make ajg;8in. 



/ 



GRAMMAR. 75 

Podlr, to be able. 
Indicative. 

- * ^ Prcfent. 

piffo^ I can or am able. podimoj^ we can. 
pnleSi thou canft. podeis^ you can. 

p6de^ ht can. pidem^ they can. 

Imperfed. 

fodia^ I could or washable, &c. 
podias^ &c. 

Preterperfeft definite. 

pide^ I could. pudimos^ we could. 

fudeftcy thou couldft. pudiftes^ you could. 

pSd€y he could. pudiraS^ they could. 

* • Pretcrperfeft. 

ieiiho podidoy &c. I have been able, &c. 

Future. ? 

podereu I Ihall be able, &c. 

poderds^'8cc» 

1 - . 

There is no Imperative. 
Optative and Subjun£live. 

• Prefent. 

que iu piffa^ that I may be able. 

P^Jf^^^ ^l^ou mayeft be able, &f;. 

^ poffamos^ 
poffau, 
phJfaK 

ImperfeQ. 

^ut iu puderui or pudijfe^ that I might be able. 

puderas or pudiffts^ thou mightft be able, &c. 
pudira or pud^t^ 
pudcramos ox pudejfemos^ 
pudireis or pud^ets^ 
pudirai Of pudeffitm^ 

Second 



I » 1 • ■ t 



1 . 



- ' 



76 FORTUQVRSE 

Second Impcrfeft. 

poderia^ I iliDuId be able, &c. 

poderias^ &c. 

Future. 

ijudndo eu puder^ when I fltall be able, &c. 

pudires^ 
pudir, 

pudirtnoi^ " 

puderdes^ 
pudircm^ 

Infinitive. 

Prefent, 
l^^^r^tobeable. . 

Gerunds. 
podiudo^ hemg tble. 

Participle.' 
pudido^ been able. 



Sabify to know. 
Indicative. 

Preient. 

jA', I know. sabimos^ we know. 

shbes^ fhou knoweS. sahiis^ you know. 
skbt^ hekxiows. sdiem, iheyknow. 

ImperfeR. 

sabia^ I did know. 

saitas^ thou didft know, &e. 

saiia» &c. 

Preterpcr^eft definite. 

souhf Iknev, &t. soubimos. 
snbififi souUJlfs. 

souhf scuberttSf 

Preterperfe&i^ 

, tinho sahido^ I havvifcpowii, ic«» 

Future^ 



G S ▲ M M A J^. 



1 1 



0aksras, &c. regalar verbs.) 

jmbamos no^^ let us know. 
saht tu^ kacm tlunu iMMt «r«j, know you. 
<£tf£&a £Ue; kt bim know^ JuiiaB ilks^ let tbem know. 

Opittiipe and Sabjini^f& 

Prefem, 

f 8£ fv saUfA^ I may know. 

saibas^ tkmm nutyE know, ^^:. 



saaidis^ 



InperfieS* 

f JET e» spuifrm or spuiife, diat I m^glit know. Jkc* 
soubtTMs or smUfti^ 
soubtTA or S9mi^fk^ 
scmUrmm§s or S Bmi4 pm§t ^ 
souherns or somhigas^ 
souHrao or s^uttjfem^ 

Second Imperfeft. 
sMierta^ I (hoaWkaow, &c. S4^riamcs. 

sakcria^ ssitrtMS. 

FQlure« 
f%4^io iu ~j»»Mr, when I (hail know> &c. 

fouHfJeSf 
soubcrem^ 

Infinitive. 

Prcfcnt. 

ja^cr» to know. 

Gerand. 

Participle 



78 PORTUGUESE 

Pai'ticiple. 
fahtio (for the m^{c.)/abida (for the feminine,) known. 

Ill „i •. 

0/the irregular Ferb trazer, to bring. 

Indicative*. 

Prefent. 

^^^gOf I bring. trazemos^ we bring, &c. 

trdzes^ thou bringeft. trazeis* 

traZf he brings. trdzem. 

Imperfefl. 

trazia^ I did bring. 

trazidSi &C. thou didfi bring, &c. (according to theregulari*) 

Preterperfe£l definite* 

Hrouxe^ I brought. trouximos. 

irouxijltt thou broughtefi, &c. trou^ifits. 
irSuxe^ irouxeraS. 

PrcterperfeS. 

tenho trazido^ I have brought, &c. 
tens trazidOf &c. 

Future. 

trareif I (hall or will bring, &c. trarimos. 
trarist tratHs^ 

trard^ trardS. 

f 

Iniperative. 

tragdmes it jx, let ui bring. 
trdze fUf brin^thou. trazH vis^ bring you. 

triga elle, let hun bring. trigaS elles^ let them bring. 

Optative and Subjundlive. 
Prefent. 

• 

fue eu triga^ that I may bring, &c. 
tragas^ 
traga. 
tragdmcSf 
trag&is^ 
trigaS, 
1 Jisper|M. 

. / 



GRAMMAR. 7f 

ImperfeA. 

fue eu trouxira or trouxiffe^ that I might bring .C^c. 
trouxiras or trouxeffes^ 
trouxira or trouxejfe^ 
trouxiramos or iroiixMtmos^ 
trouxereis or iroux^eis^ 
^ trouxerai or trouxejff'em^ 

Second Jniperfe6l. 

eu traria^ I (hould bring, &c. trariamcs. 
trarias^ trarieis. 

traria^ trariao. 

Future. 

qudndo iu trouxir^ 5vhen Oi^ll I bring, &C/ 
trouxeres^ 
trouxer^ 
trouxSrmoSt 
trouxprdts^ 
trguxirevif 

Infinitive. 

Prcfcnt. 
trazer^ to bring. 

Gerund. 
trazendo^ bringing. 

Participle. 
if^azidoy mafc* trazida^ fern, brought. 



The conjugation of the Irregular Verb v^r, to fee. 

Indicative. 

Prcfent. . 

vijo^ I fee, vemos. 

vis^ thou feeft, vides^ 

ve, he fees, &c* vim. 

Imperfefl* 

via^ I did fee, &ۥ 

vias^ 

via^ &c. 



10" PORTUGUESE 

' Prcterj)|crfcfl definite. 

vif« Iikw» &c, vimps. 

' vijfe^ • vifies. 

WfOf vtraS. 

Prettrperfea. 

tinh^vifto^ I have {eett» &c. 

//n^ ^ijto^ &c. 

Future, 
fifr/z, I (ball fee» &c. 

Imperative. 

t;/ /», fee thou. 

vcja ille^ kt him fee* 

vcjdmos niSf 



let us fee* 
fee you. 
let :bem fee. 



vejai elleSf 

Optative. 
fue iu veja^ thai I may fee, &c. vejamos. 



veja. 



vcjats^ 
vejad. 



Dnaperfeft, 



qut iu vita or vi^t^ that I might fee, &c. 
vircLs or vijfes^ 
vira or vi 

viramos or viffim^s^ 
vtrcis or vij^s^ 
tiraS or viffim. 



vtrfast 
vtrta^ 



Second Imperfefi;. 
I ftvobld fce^ &c. 



virkis. 
veriao* 



fudndo iu 9tV, 

vires^ . 

virmpSt 

virdeSf 

vircm. 



Fbtnre. 

when I fliall fee, &c. 



Iniini« 



G JL A,MM A R. 


Si 


lufinuive. 


/ 


»/r; to fee. 


^ 


Gerund. 




vendo, feeing. 


' 


Particip]|e. 




Vififi^ vtfia^ feen. 





In like manner are conjugated the compounds 
fintevbr^ ^w^r,and revir. . 

The verl> prover^ when it fignifies to provide far ^ 
Off to take care ofy\% conjugated in the prefent indi- 
cative thus ; 

eu provinho^ I take care of, (3c. . provimos.^ 
provenSf propindes. 

provim^ privem. 

But when it fignifies to make provifiony it is conja- 
gated thus: ' 

iu provejot I make prbvifion, &c. provimo$. 
proves^ proviis. 

prove f privtm. 

The conjugation of the auxiliary verb ^ziry to fay. 

Indicative. 

Prefent. 

iigo^ I fay. @c. dizimos. 

df%^St dizHsu 

Ji9^ dizem: 

Pretcrimperfe^. 

dizia^ I did fay, (3c. 
dittos^ i&c. 

Preterperfeft definite. 

dffe, Ifadd,®<r. dijimos. 

dtfjftt, Mifies. 

<Me, dtfiraS. 

G Pret(nr< 



12 FOR tM 6 U ES £ . 

. itnko ditto ^ t have fai^, 8€. 
tins dittOt &c. 

Fulure. 

Jirei^ I (hall or will fay, &c. 
dirdSf &c. 

Imperative. 

' dize iu. fay thou, 

iiga (lUf let him tvf, 

digdmos nis^ let tii fay. 

ill»/< t/j^, fiiy you. 

iigiA Hies, let them lay* 

Optativc^^ 

fue eu diga, that I may fay, &e. 

dtgaSf &c. 

Imperfect. 

f tt^ eu dtjjera or diffiffe^ that I might fay, &c* 

dijfiras.ox oi0l[^^% 
dtjfiruix diffigh; ^ 
differamosxitai^effemos, 
mfereis or dijftjjcis, 
Jijferad ox dtjejfem. , ;- 

Second Imperfect. 

diria, Iflilmld fay, ^f. 

diriaSf &c. 

Future. 

qudndo eu dtjsir^ when Ihall I fay^ ^i^. 

dij^irit^ 
difsir^SLC. 

, Infinitive. 
dizir^ to f^. 

Gerund. . 

dixendo, faying. 

Participles. 

Obferv^ 



G R A MM AH. iw 

Obferve, that the compounds dejdiztxy to unfay, 
and cantradizir^ to contradi£t^ are in all points con- 
jugated like dizAr. , 



rttrm^^^ » ■» <> it 



The Conjugation of the irregular Verb querir, to be 

"toifling. , 

Indi^Uve Mood. 
Brofem. 

fuerOf I will, ^r am willing. ^ ' 

quires^ tbou art williog. 

^ti/r, he is willixig» Sc. 

querimosi 

queriis^ 

qnerem^ 

Imperfecta 

queria^ 1 was willing, &c. 

querias^ &c. 

. Prcter'perfect definitCL 

quix^ I have beea.wtUtng, &c. 

quizejlii 

quiz^ 

quizimas^ 

qmxiJleSf 

qviz^faSi ^ . . 

Future. • 
qucr4rH^ X fliill he willing, €?^. 

gnerctdiss IkC' 

Jbipetative* 

quArasiUt . be thou willing* 

queirailk^ let him be vrilfing. 

queirdmos 4$/, let us be willing. 

queirmstnisi be you willia^. 

queiraS illes, let them be wiUing. 

OptAthre and Sutrjunftirc. . 

que eu qu£ira, that I inay be wilUni^ &c. 

queiraSf ice. 

C ft Iiaper* 



84 P O R t U G U E« E 

imperfect. - 

fue eu (juizira or quizefse^ that I were w^lllnj^. 

(/uizeras or quxzifsts^ thou w^ert willing. 

guizira or-f«tW/A/,- he were willing, 

tfuizeratnos, ox jfiuizifsemoSy we were willing. » 
ifutzerels or ifuize/seis, ' you were willing. 
quizcmo or quize/sem, they were willing. 

SeciMid Imperfect. 

<(/ qusferia^ I (boulder would be willing, &c. 

quererias, &c. 

Future. .;^' 

qudndo eu quiter^ when I (hall be wiiiing^ tfr. 

quizeres^ &c. 

Infiqitive. 
.• • • ■ 

quercr, to.be willing. 

Gerunds. 

. quertndo^ being willing. 

. ./.Participle. 

querido^ been willing. 

Note, that qucr is fometimes a conjuft£Mon,.whca 
repeated in a fentence, and that it is rendered into 
EngHfli by whether and or^ as, quSr vos o-tenhais 
feito, quer nao, whether you have done that or.no. 
But when it is not repeated, and is joined to the 
particle y^, it is foinetimes rendered into Englifh 
Dy at leajly as, humfe quivy one at leaft ; and fome* 
tinf)es by hoiveveVy when joined in the particle que\ 
as c6mQ quer quefeja^ however it be. In all which 
cafes, it is not to be confounded wjth the,third pcr- 
fon Angular of the indicative of the verb querSrl 

Take notice that the verb querir is fometimesx 
ufed with the particle/^ inltead of the verb deviri 
as, as cdufas nadfe queremfeitas d ^r^, things muft 
not be done in a hurry. 

Of 



\, 



/ 



• G R A MM' A K. 85 

Of the imgular Fcr^val^r, to be worth. ^ 

I (hall put no other tenfes of this verb than the 
prefent indicative, the imperative^ and the prefent 
of tbe-fubjuixdive, none but thefe being irregular. 

Indicative Mood. 



vilAog 

vote or vai, 
valimos^ 
valets^ 
vdtem^ 



vale tUf 
valha illt^ 
valhamos nos^ 
valii vis^ 
vdlhao ilUs^ 



que eu v&lka^ 
vafhas^ 
vdlha^ 
. valhamos^ 
valhais^ ^ 
valhao^ 



Pre/ent. 

I am worth, &c. 



Imperative. 

be thou worth, 
let him be worth, 
let us be worth, 
be you worth. 
Jet them be worth. 

Subjunftive. 

that 1 may be worth, ^c. 



Of the irregular Verb perddr^ to lofe. 

This Verb changes the c before o of the prefent 
indicative into d in the other perfons of the fame 
tenfe, as well as in the other tenfes, if you except 
the imperative and prefent fubjun£tive ; in which it 
is conjugated in the following manner : 

Indicative. 

Prefent. 

' phcoy 1 lofcj &c. ferdemos. 

ptrdes^ ferdeis. 

pirde^ pirdtm. 

G 3 ' Impcra- 



\ 



/ 



86 P O R TU G U E S E 

'" Imperative. ' 

^ ptrittXL^ lofethou. 

^Tca ilUr let Him l<^c. / 

percdmos noYy let us Ipfe. 

perdii vos, iofe you. 

fercaS illes,, let them Iofe. 

Subjunctive.' 

« I 

que eu pircd, that I may Iofe, fff^. 

percas, ' 

pirca, &c. ' 

The compounds of the verb /er, as, continho^ I 
contain ; detinho^ I detain, £f?r. are conjugated like 

it; 

Some verbs* pf this conjugation are only irregu- 
lar in the participle paflive; as, efctito^ from cfcre* , 
ver ; abfdItOy from ahfoh^. . . 

Thofe, that have they before o in the prefent in- 
dicative change the j into g in all tenfes and per- 
fons, in which the^ would otherwife meet with the 
vowels / or ^ ; as, tlegfr^ to elect 5 eu^ elijo^ iu elSges^ 
&c. I cleft, &c. 

Imperfect. Preter-def. 

^elegia, &c. ^Ugi, elegejle, &c. I eleSed, &c. 

The verbs ending in eyo in the prefent indica* 
tive, change that termination into ia in the imper- 
fe£t, and into/ in the preter-definite, and are fo con- 
jugated* 

Indicative. ' 



. 


Prefent. 


• 


eu leyOf 
les. 


I readi &c. 


tem&s. 

ledes^ 

Urn. 


• 


Imperfefi. 




eu lia, 
lias, &c. 


I did read, &c. 





Prctcr- 



GRAMMAR. 87 

Pjreter deEnite. 
€M /i, I read, fffr. 

isfl^. ate. 

Imperative. 

Udmos nis^ let us read. 
// /», read cboD. Udi vts, read you. 
Ua /ili, let him Tead. ieao elUs^ lec tbtm read. 

Subjtta£li¥e. 

fue €u leaf that I may read, &c. 

You may obferve that they lofe the jf through all 
the other moods and tenfes. The verb crity to be- 
lieve> is conjugated in the;, fame manner. 



Of the frregu/ar Kerbs in Ir. 

/r, to go. 

Indicatire Mood. 

Prefent tenfe. 

vSu^ I go. vdn^oif we go. 

vdSf thougoefi. ides^ you go* 

vdi^ he goes. vaS^ they go. 

Preterimperfcct 

ita^ I did gO| &c» hiamos^ 

hiaSf hieis. 

hia^ hiaS, 

Prctcrperfect definite. 

ySf, I went, /dmoSf we went. 

JVfte^ thou weAteft* Joftes^ you went, 
y^i, he went* j6rM^ they went. 

Fretcrpcrftct. 

64 Prettr 



Preterpluperfect. 

^ ^ Future. 

irii^ I (hall or will -gOt &c« 

IiDperativei.* 

vdfkos nSst let ui go. 
vdi tu^ so thoUy ide vis^ go ye. 

va clle^ let him go, vao elUs^ let them go. 

bptative and Subjunftive. 



vd, 
vds^ 


that I may gp» &c 


vdmos^ 
vddis^ 


X 


vaOf 


% 



Firft Preterimpcrfect. 

fui iujora or Jo/sty that I might go, &c. 

Joras oxjofses^ 
f3ra ox JSjse,^ 
fSramos ox fS/semos, 
Jorcis or fS/seis^ 
J6rd6 oxfojstm^ 

Second Preterimperfcct. 
/r/a, I (hould gOj &Cf 

Preterperfect, 

It is compofed of the participle ido and the pre« 
fcnt fubjunctive of the auxiliary verb Ur. 

Prcterpltiperfect. 

It is compofed of the participle ido and the firft 
preterimperfea fubjunflive of the auxrjiary vtfrb tbr^ 

Second 



y 



G R AM M A.R. ^ 89 

^ecoMd Preterpltiperfefi. 

It is compoied of the participle iii$ and the fecond 
preterimperfect fubjunctive of the auiuliary verb 

Futuit. 

fiidndo eufor^ wheo 1 (bill go» &c* 

fSres, ' 

Jor^ 

fordeSf 

Jortm, J 

Second Future* 
qu&ndo eu tivir^ S ^j \ when I (hall have sone, 

Hvirts, Sec. V '''*' / &c- 

Infinitive. 

Prefent. 
ir, to go. 
^ Gerunds. 

indOf going. 

Part. 
idOi done. 



Vify to come. 
Indicative^ 

^ Prcfent. 

vtnhOf I coQe>&c. vim&s^ 
viiis^ vindeSf 

vfm^ Vem, • 

Imperfed. 

vinka, I did come, &ۥ vinhamos. 
vinkas^ vinheis. 

. ' ' Preter defitlit^. 
vim, I camei &c. viemos. 

9aff9 tnerdi. 



\ 



Jrrecer% 



m> PORTUGUESE 

Prcterimpcrf€&» 

iM0 vindo^ 1 have come, &c. 
* tins vindo^ &c« 

Future. 

virH^ I fliall come, &c. 

virdSf &c. 

Impersltive. 

venhdmos nSs, let us come. 
vfm tUt comer thou. vinde vis^ c«me you. 

ffinha elU^ let him come. tfenhao clUs^ let them come.. 

Optative. 

• ^ Prcfem. 

fue iu vinha. 

I 

ImperfeS. 
que tu vtcra, or viefst. 

Second Imperfe£l. 
viria^ viriaSfScc. 

Infinitive. 

Prefeot. 
viti to come. 

Gerund. 
vindOf coming. 

Part, 
^indo^ eome» 

The compounds of vir ; as convify to be conve<» 
nienc; fobrevir, to come unlooked for^ are con- 
jugated in the fame manner. 

Of the kregulir Ferksy mentir, to lie, sentir, to feelt 
servir^ tofirve \ feiir^ to wound. 

Thefe verbs change the / of the firft perfon fin- 

gular of the prefent tenie> indicative^ into c in the 

q I other 



4 



GRAMMA B. .. n 

6ther perfons of the fame teoftt as well as in the 
other tenfes and aioods> esfcept in the imperatiire 
and the prefent conjun^ive, in which they are con- 
jugated thus ; 

Indicative. 
. ^ PrefenU , ^ 

iujtnto. tufentes^ dU /inte^ 8lc. 
eu Jirvo^ tu Jtrves^ elUjirvt, Bcc. 

Imperative* 

menteiu, mtnta ille^ mintdmosnSs, mcntivis^ mtntdS ilUs. 
Jinit tUt ftnia ille^ Jintdmos nSs^ fmti ifos^ JfntaS elles. 
Jcrv^ tu,ftrvm iUe^ Jirvdmos nos^ ftrvi vis^ JirvaZ ilUs^ 

Subjjonftive. 

finta^ Jintas^ iccm 

The compounds^ itfimntiry afsefatr^ cMfiMtr^ difi 
Jitiiir^ prefentir, are conjugated like mentir and feti- 
fir I and alfo the verbs affcrir, referh:, conferir, de- 
ferir^ differir^ inferir. 

Of the irregular Verbs affligir, to qffliS 5 conrig^, i# 
corrcS^ nngir, to feign i ungir, to Mofnt-^ com- 
punptr, frigir, dirigir^ tingir, cingir, &c- 

Thefe verbs change the g of the infinitive mood 
ioto^ in thofe tenfes where the g would />therwife 
meet with the vowels 0, as in the firft perfon fingu- 
lar of the prefent indicative afflijoy or a, as in the 
third perfon of the imperative in both numbers, in 
the firft plural of the iame Cenfe» and in the prdent 
fiibjiiii£bve. 



■•■■•MMii«l««MBH^M«WBHaiiMta 



0/ tie irregular Ferk feguiTt tofolkw. 

This verb changes the e of the infinitive mood 
into iin the firft perfon fiogular of the preibnt indi- 

cativCf 



M PORTUGUESE 

eatire, lufigo^ I follow: in the prcfent fubjondive^ 
fw^ ^pg^9 tb^t I max follows and in the imperative^ 
wbcre it is conjugated thus: figue tu^figa ilU^fig^ 
mos ndSjJegui vosjigao ^les. 

Take notice that the u is loft in thofe tenfes where 
it would otherwife meet with the vowels o and a, as 
you fee in the examples; and this obfervation alfo 
takes place in the verbs ^^Ar^n/r^ to dillinguiflii^ 
ex/inguir^ to extinguiih^ &c. 

The compound are perfegulr^ to perfecute y con- 
feguir^ to obtain -, profeguir^ to purfue. 

Of ihe irrefftlar Verb ouvir^ to hear. . 

This verb changes the v of the infinitive mood 
'into f in the firft perfon fingular of the prefjsnt in- 
dicative, tu Sugo^ I hear, iif. duves, &c. in the pre- 
(ent fubjundive, and in the imperative mood, where 
it is conjugated thus : 6uve tu, duga Hle^ mgamos nos, 
l^uvi v6s, dufaS iJ^es, hear thou, &c. 

0/ tie irregular, Ferb dormir, tojleep. " 

This verb changes the o of the infinitive mood 
into M in the firfl perfon fingular of the prefent 
indicative, thus, /ir dlcrmo^ tu dSrmes, Hie dbrrhi^ 
&c. I fleep, iSc. In the prefent fubjunftive, que 
tu iitTtnay &c. that I may fleep ; and in the impe- 
Ititive moody where it is conjugated thus; dormetu^ 
dkrma Hie, dumdmos nSs^ dormi vos^ dirmao itUes, fleep 
'thoui &r. 

0/ the irregular Verb fugir, to fly away. 

This verb is irregular in the prefent indicative, 
' and is thus conjugated : fijoy fogeSy fogey fugimoSy 
fu^s^ fozenty I run away, Qc. It is alfo irregular 
in the imperative mood, where it is conjugated 
thus : fqge tUy fija ilUy fiydmos n6$y fu^t visy fuJaS 
Hies. Finally, it is irregular in the prelent fubjonc- 
tivcj wetufigayfijaSyiK. 

It 



GRAMMAR. 99 

It keeps the u in all other teofes and moods^ as 
alfo thej-. * 

The verb furgir, to arrive, or to come to an an- 
" chpr, has the (^oie irregularity, and m^kef^JSrto, in 
the participle paffive. 

The verbs Jubirj cuhrhrj encuirir, de/cuir/r, mcu^ 
dir^ bul/ir, fumtr^ confumir^ cujpir^ conftmir^ tossir^ ' 
&c. have the fame irregularity in regard to the tetr 
ter »• 

Of the irregular Verk pedir, to aji. 

* ' T*his verb it irregular in the firft perfon fingular 
of the prefent indicative and fubjunaive, as well as 
' in the imperative, in which it changes the ^ into f . 

Indicative. 

•■• ■ . • • 

iu pffo. I aik, &c. nis ptdimos. 

tupides^ vos peMs. 

ilUpide^ ilia pidem^ 

Imperative. 

. / pefdmos nos^ let ua aft. 

pide tu^ aflc thou. p^di vis^ alk you. 

pifdSlU^ let him alk. pi fat ilUst let ihem aft. 

Subjunftive. 

^ue iu pifa^ that I may aflc, &c. pefdmoi. . 

P^fds^ pecdis. 

pefa, pigo9^ 

In like manner is conjugated the verb meiir^ t# 
laeafure: eumi^o^tumidesyim:. , 

Of the irregular FerS veftir, to drefs. 

Indicative. 

Prefent. 

iu tifid^ - I drefs, 5kc. 9eflimos. 

vijles^ vefiis. 

vefte^ vcftem. . . ^ 

fchperative. 



m PORTUGUESE 

Prcterimpcrf€&» 

tinh0 vindo^ 1 have come, &c« 
* tins vindo^ &c. 

Future. 

virH^ I fliall come, &c. 

virdsp &c. » 

Impersltive. 

vchhdmos nis^ let us come. 
vim iUf comer thou. vinde vis^ cume you. 

' vittha ell$t let him come. tfenhao cUes^ let them come.. 

Optative. 

' • " . Prefent. 

fue iu venha. 

ImperfeS. 
que tu viera, or viefst. 

Second Imperfe£l. 
viria^ tdrias^Scc. 

Infinitive. 

Prefeot. 
vSu to come. 

Gerund. 
vindOf coming. 

Part. 
^SndOf comer 

The compounds of vir; as cofivlr, to be conve* 
niencs fdrevir, to come unlooked for^ are con- 
jugated in the fame manner. 

Of tie irrfguldr Ferh, mentir, to lie, sentir, to fetl^ 
servir^ toptvi \ feiir^ to wound. 

Thefe verbs change the / of the firft perfon fin- 
|uktf of the prefent tenie> indicative^ into c in the 



6RAMMAB. .. n 

dther perfons of the fame teolt,. as well as in the 
other tenies and inoods» except in the imperative 
and the prefent con)un£tive, in which thejr are con* 
jugated thus ; 

Indicative. 

Prefent. 

iu miniOt iu mniu^ $IU mimie, &c 
hifinto. tufcntes^ eUeJenU^SLC. 
iujirvo^ tujtrves^ dUJirve^tcz. 

Imperative* 

mentefu, minta ille^ mintamcsnis^ mentivis, minidSilUs. 
Jinte iUt fmia elle^ fintdmos nSs, find 90s^ JsntaS iUes. 
fifvt tu/fifvm ilU. firodmos nos^ firvi vis^ jirvtiS ilUs* 

Sal]9im£Hve. 

mintdf Msnias^ &c. 
' finta^ /intas^ iLC 
Jirva^ Jirvms^ &.C. . 

I 

The compounds^ difitanfir, afief^fr, r$$tf!mtSr, Jifi 
jMir^ prefentir^ are conjugated like mentir and /«i. 
//V; and alfo the verbs affcriry refcrir, cfmferir^ de^ 
ferity differify inferir. 

Of the irregular Verbs affligir, to affliS ^ corrij^, H 
correBy fingir, to feign i ungir, (o anoint ^ com- 
punptr, frigifs dirigir^ tingir, cingir, &c- 

Thefe verbs change the g of the infinitive mood 
mto^' in thofe tenfes where the g would />therwife 
meet with the vowels 0, as in the firft perfon fingu«. 
lar of the ptefent indicative afflijo-y or a, as in the 
third perfon of the imperative in both numbers, in 
the firft plural of the fame tenfe» and in the preient 
fiibJQii£bve. 

Of the irregular Verb feguiTt tofolhw. 

This verb changes the e of the infinitive niood 
into iin the firft perfon fiogulw: of the prefent indi- 

catitrCf 



W P O R T U G O ES E / 

eative, lufigo^ I follow: in the prcfent fubjun£liv4v 
fw^ ^fig^j tbkt I max follows and in the imperative^ 
where it is Conjugated thus: figue tu^figa Ule^figit-^ 
mos HoSy/egui vosyjigao illes. 

Take notice that the u is loft (n thofe tenfes where 
it would otherwife meet with the vowels o and a^ as 
you fee in the examples; and this obfervation alfo 
takes place in the verbs ^^i^fn/r, to diftiinguiflu 
ex/inguir^ to extinguilh, &c. 

The compounds are perfeguir^ to perfecute ; con- 
feguir^ to obtain; profeguir^ to purfue. 

Of ihe irregular Vnb ouvir, to hear. . . 

This verb changes the v of the infinitive mood 
into f in the firft perfon fingular of the prefpnt in« 
dicatfve, tu Sufo, I heary /i^ duves, &c. in the pre- 
(ent fubjundive, and in the imperative mood, where 
it is conjugated thus : 6uve tu, duga Hle^ ougamos nos, 
iuvi ^6s, dufao Hies, hear thou, &c. 

Of the irregular, Ferbi^oxmix, to Jleep. , ' 

This verb changes the o of the infinitive mood 
into M in the firft perfon fingular of the prefenC 
indicative, thus, iu dkrmoy tu dbrmeSy Hie dbrtke^ 
&c. I fleep, iSc. In the prefent fubjunftive, que 
tu iUrtMy &c. that I may fleep ; and in the impe- 
Ititive mood, where it is conjugated thus; dormetu, 
dkrma ille, durmdmos nSs, dormi vos, dUrnu^ Hies, fleep 
'thoui &r. 

Of the irregular Ferb fugir, to fly away. 

This verb is irregular in the prefent indicative, 
and is thus conjugated : fijo, fbges, fbge, fugimos, 
Ju^s^ figem, I ran away, W<. It is alfo irregular 
in the imperative mood, where it is conjugated 
thus : fqge tu, fija ille, fiydmos n6Sy fun vis, fujaS 
Hies. /Fmally, it is irregular in the prelent fubj one- 
live^ me ^/^'4,/4/iii,&c. 

It 



. . < -" 



It keeps the u in all other teofes and moods^ as . 
alfo the J-. * 

The verb furgir, to arrive, or to come to an an- 
chor, has the (^oie irregularity, and XMkeffJSrto, in 
the fiarticiple paffive. 

The verbs Jubir, cuirify encnirir, de/cuir/r, mcu^ 
Sr^ iul/ir, fumtTj confumirj cujpir, confimir^ tosslr^ ' 
&ۥ have the fame irregularity in regard to the tetr 
ter »• 

Of the irregular Verb ipeAir, to mji. 

' 'This verb it irregular in the firft perfon fingular 
of the prefent indicative and fubjunaive, as well as 
in the imperative, in which it changes the ^inxbg. 

Indicative. 

iu pfgo. I zfkt &c. nis pedimos. 

tupides^ ws pedis. 

ilUpede. ilia pidemi 

Imperative. 

pefdmosnos^ let ua aft. 
pide tu^ aflc thou. pedt vis^ alk you. 

ptfdillt^ let him alk. pifat illu. let ihcm «ft. 

' • ■ 

Subjunftive. 
^ut Su pica, that I may aflc, &c. pefdmoi. . ' 

pcfa^ pega9' 

In like manner is conjugated the verb medlr, t# 
laeafure: tumigo^tMfnfdesyia:. 

Of the irregular FerS veftir, to drefs. 

Indicative. 

Prefent. 

€u tAfo^ I dreft, Sec. wefitmos. 

vefies^ ^ vejits. 

Iihperativc. / 



94 P O R T U Q U E S E 

Imperative. 

vijleiu^ cirertthou. ve/litiSs, dfefs you. * 

' xHjfla ttU^ let him drefs. viftdS itits, let them drefs* 

Subjundive. 

Prefipnt* » 

queeuiAJa, Uiat I may dfeff , Ice. viftdmos. 

ylftaSt \ vt/idis. 

vifta^ . viftai. 

In all other tcnfes and moods it keeps* the letter 
Vtxe\ and in like manner is conjugated the ifterb 

OftU irrfgniar Verk forlir, iofurmfi^ or ftock. 

Feyjo fays, that the o of this verb is to be changed 
into «, in thofe tenfes where the / is followed by e 
or tf, and that it is to be kept, when the / is followed 
by/; but in the F&kula dos planHas we read, furtk 
^iytOy it took effeft : and \x\Andrade 2 part. Apohget. 
we r^zd, nao fortirao fffeyti^^ where the ytxhforthai 
is in the fame tenfe^ viz. in the preterperfeft defi- 
nite ; therefore nothing can be determined about 
the irregularity of this verb. 

0/ the irregular Verb carpir, to weep, , 

This verb is^ defeftive, and is only ufed in thofe 
tenfes and perfbns where the^ is followed by / ; as 
carpimos^ carpk^ we weep, you weep* Preterimper- 
fc£if ^arpiOf car^ss^ &ccJ 1 did weep» i^c. 

Of the irregular Verb parir, ft Mngforih young as 4mf 

female d$th. 

Indicative Mood. 

iu petiro^ I bring foni^ iftc* parim^s. 

p&res^ par IS. 

ftbrc^ pdrenu 

Imperfefi* 

Imperative* 



/ 



GRAMMAS. !l!5 



• • .y 



n . 



Imporative MoocL 

faitmnosm 
pin iUt bring thou forth^ &c. far/, 
pairaillat piiraS. 

Subjun£live. 

Prcfcnu * 

que iu paira, that I may fay, &c* pairamos. 
pairas^ ' pairais. 

paira^ • pairaSm 

• • * 

' . fadicativrf. 

' Prefcnt. 

repilOy I repeat, &c« repetimos. 

repetts^ * v repetis. 

Ttpitt\ repHtm. 

Imperfe£l. 

teptAa^ rtpetias^ Bcjc'^ 

Pretcrperfcft defiote. 

repeti^ repctiste^icc. 

Imperative. 

teplUtUy repeat thou, &c. , repitdmos^^. 
repita elU, 

Subjun£tlve. 

Prefent. 

que iu repita^ that I may n^peat^ ^c. 
•repftns.&c. 

Imperfe£l. * 

repetira\ (x repetifse^ that I might repeat. 

Of the inefftlar Verhi sahir^ to go ot$t, and cahir^ to 

fall. 

^ Indicative. 

. Pfefent. 

Jh^% Igoout, &c» fahimoSi, 

Jakes. fahis. 

jHfuf: ;: Jdhem. 

^ Pretenmperfea, ;, , ,; 

Jahta^ fahiqst &c. 

Pretcr- 



\ 
1 



S6 PjQ R T U G U ES E 



f, Fretoperfm definite. 
fahi,JakisU, &c. 

Ifpperative. 

fahdmos nos. 
Jake /»• J^f ^^•^• 

Jay a clle\ j4/^ Hies. 

Subjun£live. 

^ue eu fdya^fayas^Scc. 

This is the common way of writing the irregular 
tenfes of the vtthfahir as well as thole of the verb 
Cflhir^ viz. ou cayOi in cihesy &c. I fall, i^c. according 
to Ftyjo. . ' 

Of the irregular Verb, ordir, to warp in a horn. 

Feyjo fays that this verb changes the o into «, in 
thofe perions where it would otherwife meet wifh 
the fyllables da^ de^ do. 

Of the irregular Verb advertir, to warn. 

Advertir is irregular in the following tenfes j. only 
by changing vir into vfyr^ 

Indicative. 

Prefent. 

advirto^ I warn, &c. advertimos. 

advirtes^ advertis. 

adverte^ advertem. 

Imperative. 

advirtimos nvs. 
adpirte ?», warn thou, &c. adverti vos. 

adviria elte^ advirtdS elles. 

Subjun£tive. . 

Prefent. v 

*qtu iu advfridi that I may warn, &c. adviriimos. 
advirtaSf Mdtnrtiis. 

adviria, advirtai. 

The 



-\ 



6 R A M M A R. 97 

Tie CiM^gatwM ^tit hregubr Feri pdr> to pUce. 

Indicative. 
Prefeou 

pSnho^ I put, Sec. pomos. 

pSens^ ' . ' \ ' pondes. 

Preterimperfefi. ' 

pinhd\ I did put. pUnhamos. ^ 

pinkaSf * piinheism 

piinha^ punkaS. 

• Preterperfe^ definite* 

/,^p^%^ Iput, &c. pttzemos. ' * 

putefte^ puzejies. 

pSz^ pu^ra5, 

,.; Preterperfect. 

It is compofed of the prefent indicative of the 
auxiliary verb /^^ and tht participle pdfto. 

Preterpluperfeft, 

It is compofed of the participle pd/lo, and the 
imperfe£t of the auxiliary verb tir. 

Future. 

pord^ I fliall or will put, &c. poremos. 
poras^ poteis. 

pora^ porao. 

Imperative. 

ponhdmos nis* 
^o^m, put thou, &c. ponde vos. 
ponh^iUe, ponhaiilUs. 

Optative and Subjun£);ive* 

Prefent. 

que iu ponha^ that I may put, &c. 
ponhos^ &c. 

Firft Prctcrimperfeft. 

que iu, puzerm or pu^iffe^ that I might put, &c. ' 
puziras or puM'tSi &c. 

H Second 



4 



9», PDRTU^GUESE 

eu porta, I Offfi^ {|ut, &c. 

poriss^ Sec. ' - 

Prcterpcrfcft, 

. It is compofed of tl;^^ participle pSJIo, fj^uj. the 
prefent fubjvinftive of ^auxiliary verb //;;* 

Pr^^pJiMf,^Kfei^ 
It is compofed 9j(thje p;^rticiple)^safid^^l^ firft i 
preteriniperfe£); fubJ^^xl^^e of the aaxiliarjcy^m^f^* 

Second Pr^t^rpluperfed. 

It is compofed. o& tioe ^axtkiph pdfio, and the 
fecond preterimper^^^ 6lbjun6):iye of tho aiudtjarjr 
verb /^r. 

Future. 
quando eu pufir\ - wfaen I (hall put, &ۥ 

r 

It is compofed of tl;i^' ^^iciple pdjo, and the fv* ' 

tn^it^Vjei. 

Gerund. 
p4,ndOf putting* 

. txA<{K put- 
After the fame 9»aimei^ are cosju^atedc the lAprbs 

derived from p(m\ as C99vp6r^ to compoife j ^^pAr, 

to difpofe ; prpp^.^if^ propqfe, %. 

Some verbs are irregular only m the participle . 

paffive ; as aterto, from ahir ; efcrito, from e/a-e- 

vir, &c. 

Of Virb^^ H^tm^ 

Verbs ^uter. a;cfrt|iQfe whiQ^gDfcfil((^at<jQTO^^ 
fente of themfelves> and da ^o& ^m^em anji^ c^ie af-- 

.1* ter . 






as A u M A%. «y 

tQt tkMi^ like tfie trei^s »B!i ve ; di iAr^r^ t • fliee^; 
tfickijir,. f o go I tnsmir, to ttemble, &c. But yoit 
mull take notice that we meiet with fome- verbs^ieu^ 
tef which may govern, an accqfetive ^ as dormir hum 
fdno pqfiiHils^. tp flectp foundly j ^»/«/ anddndo mS% 
canitnh^ t iu6 d^ bumo: paiavra^ I went my wa5r; 
and fflid not a Wdrd. We may alfo fay, that the^ 
T#ri)». «Mt!e[f are l^boTi)' whtcl^i in their compoundi 
t«olSr%.af^feIdi^m orf Qj9v<9r conjugaited with the vesbi 
^^fc^i to^bd 5 m% I iteepk, I tijcJmbJe^ I f^aJc, &c. We 
mtgf? mfioed ^y. ^n (inhc d^rmdQ^ I have flept ; iu 
ifnhirtmijdoy. V have trembted ;. but Bot» I am flept^ 
&c« 1 f^JfiU^m^ beeatufe fometim;e& the verb$> 
iMMter ili«j( b^ conjugated with the verb yir; as^ 
7^ 60mfaiiUid(^^ to h^ve a^ good oame. 

Iti IS oQCfflary lo^ be aoqUajht^d witib tl^e nature 
o£ « ifferb; Devter^ £o i^void nMftal^et jn tjbo partioii- 
ple^ at Buijr hn* inw m tbe %QtaK of Participles. 

Of SLedpocat Ferbs. 

The^ ttatnp of Reciprocal Verbs fe glvM to fiich 
as retUfii tl^e aOioji upon, tbe agent, a:nd affe conju-. 
^ted tlhroogb alt their tenfes with t!h<e^ pronouns 

Example. 

ftidicatif e. Preftttt. 

eVfme arrepcnd'o, ' I repent, &c« 

tU tiarrtpindcs, / 

IRi'fejarupindi, &c. ; 

ImperfeEl. 
^i >^,^ c^rrtptndiiki t did repent, &c. 

aii(i£^^the i«ftw 

Yet Wi3^ sfre ta t^^kOrfto^ij^ that the pronouns con* 
junftive mCy te, &c. may be placed either before 
W aft^ t^. yerb«. iiei. th^ indicative, and confequent- 

ifW^Vf^^^x^f'^^^i^^^ Of ^ Umbff^me, Ire* 

H 2 member ; 



V 



100 P O.'R T U G U E S E • 

member y m^ /emirei, or lembrei-mey Irememheredy 
8ic. But in the imperative they ought to be placed 
after the verb, as in the following 

, Example. 

Umbremo^nos nos. 
Umbra-te tu, remember thou, &c. lembrduvos v6s. . > 
Umbre-Je ille^ limbremjt ilUs, , ; 

' In which example you muft obferve alfo, that the • 
^ firft perfon plural, which in the other verbs is like J 
^ the firft perfoii plural oftheprefentfubjunftive, has 
the laft confonaht, i, cat off ; arid fo from lembr6mos 
we cut off the X to make lembrimo-nos ; and from 
arrdpenddmos we make antpendamo^noi^ &c. In re- ' 
gard to. the infinitive, we ni^y fay, hi necefs&rio ar^i 
rependdr-fe dos pe^cAdbs, it isneceffary to repeht fihs; 
htnecefsario lembrdr-^fe fit is neceffary to remembfer ; 
zmd not/e arrependir, ot fe lembrar. In like man** • 
ner we may fay, lembrdndO'tney remembering, and ntA. 
me lembrdndo. Yet vou muft take notice that the 
prefent infinitive rriay be preceded by the particle 
p^a^ (whicli forms the Portuguefe fupine)^.and 
then the prftobun conj unfilive may be placed pither 
before pv after it ; and fo we fay, par(i lembrir- 
Je^ or para felembr&r, to remember, or in. order to 
remember. 

As for thefubjunftive mood, you muft put the 
pronoun conjundlive before the prefent j but you 
muft carefully qbferve, that the pronouns conjunc- 
tive muft be placed before it when prepeded by the 
particles fSy if, que^ that; ,and fo you may fay, que 
in me lembrafse^ fe eu me lembrdfsey that I might re- 
member, &c. but not que eu lembrafid me, &c. But 
when the firft preterimperfefit is hot preceded by any 
particle, then you muft place the pronoun conjuhc- 
tive after it ; as, arrepe^tdiram^e iu difso^ I wifti I re- 
pented it. 

■- In the fecond preterimperfeft we may pkce the 

pronouns conjunftive either before or ^fter it, therCr 

^ -fore 



^ GRAMMAR." lOi 

fore 700 may fay arrependeria^me fa^ &c. or in me or* 
rtpenderia fe^ &c. I fhould repent if, &c. 

In the future you muft.always place the pronouiis . 
conjundive before it ; and fo we noay fay, qudndo iu 
me Umbriar^ when I fhall remember ; but not- qudndo 
6u leTnhr&r-me. 

Note, all the verb's a£live may become recipro- 
cals. 

Example. , 

£u nu dmOf I love royfelf. 

iu te dmas, tbou loveft thyfelf. 

cUeJe dnuiy he loves biinf<elf. 

tips, fios amdmos^ we love ourfelves, &c. 

The Conjugation of the reciprocal Verb ir-fe, iogo away. 

Indicative. 

Prefent. 
iu me vSu^ I go away. 

tu te vdsy &c. thou goeft away, &c« 

♦ - 

Preterimperfed. 

eume hia^. I did go away. 

tu te bias, &c. thou didft go away, &c. 

' ' . Preterperfca definite. 

eu mcfdi; I went away. 
tu ttjojlty &c. thou wenteft away, &c. 

Prcterperfect. * • 

iu me tinho ido^ I am gone away, or I have gone away. 
tu te tins ido, &c. thou baft gone away, &c. 

' Preterpluperf ect. 

eu me tinha ido. I was gone away, or I had gone away* 
tu te tinhas idoj &c. thou hadft goile away, &c. 

Future. . 

^u me ireii &c. I fliall or will go away. 
iu te irdsj &c. thou fhalt go away. 

Imperative. 

vdute^ ' go thou aws^. 

vd-fe^ let him go away. 

vdmo^noSf let us go away. 

ide-vost go away, get away, or get you gone. 

vdorjk^ : Tetthem;ffo away. 

. . "^ H3 Suk. 



102 FOfiTTS GXSnSE 

Scrbjun€Uve. 

Pnefcnt* 

, jue eu me vd, ttat I ijiay py aWay* 

fue tu te vms,^ &c* that thoa' mayeft go awaf « Ulc. 

Firft Preteiioiperfipa. 

/tf me/ora^ or mefqfse, I went away. 
te/dras, or ttjojsts^ ftc^ tljP* wenteft away, &c. 

Second Pret^rimi^Qrfed . 

ru »^ fria» i would, ft€« |g>^^ay. 

;i^ ^ 2>i«5; thou wottWlAi llt€« 

Pretcrpcrfcd. 
^titf iu me tinha ido^ th^t I have gon^ away, &c; 

Prcterph^frfefl. 
^ti^^tt m^ tivira^ or x»^ tivifse idg^ that I had gone awiqr* 

SecMd Fretefphiperfeft. 
eu me teria ido, | (hoiild bsiv(p ^ne away, &ۥ 

f otttre; 

qudndo eu meJSr^ when I fliall go away, &c. 

SecoMi FttHirt. 
qudndo eu fiietivir ido^ when t (hall have gone away, ^c. 

In!iniliire. 

^^-A » go away. 

PreteryerfcfU 

ier-fe ido^ Ic^ b^vt ^one away. 

PreM. 

^uejcfd^ thtt s gone a«Ni]^ 

' Pieiem* 



C R A M M A IL IM 

Gerunds. 

Supoie;. 
para irje^ to go* or in order to go away. 

You muft obferve, that m tte coilif>oUnd tenfes 
ihe pronouns ¥Hei ^tfSec. are pltt<^d before the aux- 
iliary^verb. 

2dly. This verb is alfb faid of veBBli to fignify 
thv^ir beibg leaky ; as f^ai^/e a cuht^ the tab Mi1cs« 
it is ^Ifo afed before the genimls; it, # dnfimt 
vii'fe tKbidikhf the wibter is drawing toUrardk an 
end ; ilksbad^Jeprpm^nJhi ifiey ire {>reparitig theiti^ 
felves : in which examples and in the like, the verb 
is to E)« retidered into BngliSt by tfie yferb io ie it- 
ibtf^ and willhaiii addition of the adverb awtiy ; and 
fefnetim^s it is jilaqed before fhe.prefent ihfiaitWoi 
as^ ir-fc dettaty to go to bed. 

This verb is to b« conjugated like ^ne verb vir ; 
but you muft place the pronount conjunctive^ me^ 
tiy &c. according to the bbfervatiohs vf^ bkve made 
above. 



\ m 



Oftherecip^mmtf^iic-%hS^ie. 

This is a compoui^d verb, vJ^KWh Is fd be conju« 
gated by/ put ting; thg particle a befotfe &ih verb vir 
in all its tenfes and moods ; * $ut you muft alwavs 

mate 



« ' 



J 



I 



104 P O R T ITG U E S E 

make ufe of the obfervations alread]^ made about 
the pronouns conjunftive ; and the fam6 care muft 
be had with the reciprocal verb havtr-fe^ to behave j 
in^ the conjugation of which, you have nothing to 
do but to add the pronouns conjun£tive to the verb 
kavir. 

Imperfonal Verbs. 

There are three forts of verbs, imperfonal, which 
have, only the third perfon fingular. 

The firft are properly imperfonak of themfelves ; 
as, • . 

. : • , fuccede^ it happens. 

/ 1 . a bafta^ it is enough, or it fuffices. 

chive^ it rains. 

iroveja^ it thunders. 

. The fecond are derived from verbs aftive, fol- 
lowed by the particle fe^ which renders them im- 
perfonal ; as, dma-fey they love ; diz-fSy they fay ; 
nota-fe^ it is noted. They are alfo called paffivc 
imperfonals. 

» ^ The third, which have a great affinity with re- 
ciprocal verbs, are conjugated' with the pronouns 
conjundive, me^ te, He, nos, vos, Ihes ; as, dae me, 
die^tey doe-Met &,c. 

r 

" The imperfonal verbs of themfelves are, 

cofpoem^ it is convenient. 
fuccede^ it happens, or it falls out. 
ejid-me iem, it becomes me. 
idfia, it is enough* 

hd^fe^ it is neceuary. ' 

ehovifca^ it mifles. 
chive^ or cihe pedra, it hails. 
gea^ it freezes. 
neva^ it fnows. 

fuTila^ or rdampagufa^ it lightens* 
em^^r/a, it matters/ it concerns* 
parcce^ it feems. 

and 



GRAM M A>R. 105 

aQd#4he like, which are conjognteid with the third 
perioDS, fiogular of each tenfe ; as, ' . 



X V 



Indicative. 
Prefent. 
chove^ It rams. 

Imperfefi. 
chovia^ it did raiiu 

Preterperfe£l definite. 
ckoveo^ it rained. 

PrcterpcrfeS. 
Um ckovidoj it has rained. 

PreterpluperfeS. 
iinha chovido^ it had rained. 

Future. 
chovera. it fhali or will rain/ 

Imperative. 

chSva\ let it rain. 

Optattive and Subjunfitive. 

Prefent. 
que chSva^ that it .may rain. 

Imperfe6l. 

que chivera^ or chovejfe^ that it might rain. 

Second Imperfe6l. 
choverta^ it Ihould rain. 

Future. 
qudndo chovir^ when it ihall rain. 

Second Future. 
qudndo tlvir cha^do^ when it fliall have rained. 

Infinitive. 

choviTf to rain. 

The 



i 



lOS P OR T U G UES E 



The particle ir^ wbkth compofes the {bc^)nd -ibrt 
of imperfonal verbs, mliy be placed either before or 
after them ; ais, dizfCy they fay; shbe-se^ it is known ; 
sabia se^ it was known; tog^ s^ s6ube^ it was imme* 
diately known; sediz^ it iB faid,£5?r.T)ut fometiraes 
tb^y make no ufe of the particle se^ and only put 
' the verb in the third perfoo plural; as, dizem, in- 
ftead of se dlz^ they fay. 

In like manner all the verb9 a£tive may become 
imperfonal. 

In regard to thefe verbs, take notice, that when 
the*noun that follows them is in the Angular num- 
ber, you muft. put the verb in the Angular ; if the 
noun be in th6 pltli^l, you pilt thfi^ferb in the plu- 
» ral. 

iExampte. 

Louva-ft o capitao^ they praife the captain. 
Louvat-ft OS c&pitais^ thtey praifbthe daptains* 
Vi-ft hum homtm^ they fee a man, 
Vim-ft homens, they ft6 taetl. 

When Ihe is ufed aftfef the wdl^dj^, then Ike is to be 
^ " rendered into Englifh by his or her : as, Iduva-se-lhe 
valfyr^ they praile his or her courage. 
' The third fort of injperfonal verbs are fuch as arc 
conjugated with the pfottouns pfiffoll^, me, te^ lie, 
&c. with the third perftMi fingular. 

Ex^rrtpie. 
Indicative. 

Prefent. 

defagrdda me^ I tih Aitpleafed, or it difpleafes me. 

(U/agruda.tt^ tbou art lAfpltafeili 

dtfagrada4hcy he ^r (he is difpleafcd. 

dejagrdda-nos^ t^'eaiiS dffWeafed. 

^figriia^t^ifi ]^U are drnkM^d* 

dejagrada-lhts^ they are dilplea fed. 

I&iperfe^, 

^defagraddt^iKtt^ 1 1»^ clifpleafed. 

Prcter- 



V 



G R A M M A K. «n 

dvfagfjatiou'mt. I was di^Jealcd. 

Optative*. 

. Imperfefl. 
fMU mc dosagraiatm •r mi desagradijfi^ that I werc4i4>tiafi94. 

CoDJugatfe after tire fame tbanidtr. 

iieMe, \\ g^ie^s t^^ li paths «*. 

i^rsda-MbCi tt plftafcf knc4 
iembr4)'me^ I reniember. ^ 

perfon iingular and plural ; as, 

die me a pirna^ my leg pains me. 
dicm^m «> ^f^s, I \xk^ Ibr^ %>1si. 
o vojfo x>€]iidofarUc' me novo^ your coat appears new to me* 
§s vbjfo^ sapm^ me parhenk wdiio (mmfpridos^ yoor (hoes 
feem to me too long. 

Of the t^erb ^x, io be. 

The verb ser is alfo uf^d as an imperfonal^ as it 
appears in #be foHewiAgp etMiptett: m Hr^4e U- 
vanthr-sty it is time td gSet trp j ha timpo de hir^ it 
was time to go, &ff. ^i^ pftrticularly when it is con- 
jugated with the adi(e6lives^^<i^ori2r^ji//n(9 ; as^ he 
frecijo or necefshrio fazerifio^ ih\s muft be done; era 
precl/o or necefsim ^^i^NH/6^, It W»l>»eceffary to write j 

i»iria,/i^pr§^^lm4^}Mto, if it ftould bene^ 

ceflary^ 



V' ^ 



108 P .O R T U G U E S E 

ceffary ; hi precifo que iu vi, I muft go ; he prtcifo 
que tu leya^ I muft read \ he precifo que tile cdmay he 
muft eat ; sefia pr^^o que iu fSfse^ I fhould go. 
You fee by the laft examples, that when the verb 
fer and th? adjeftive are before the, coDJun£live 
mood, with the participle que^ the conjun£live is ren- 
dered in Englifh by the infinitive 5 but if the verb 
fer is followed by the relative or particle que^ it 
muft then be rendered in Englifh in the following 
manner ; as iu he que tenho fe'to aquillo^ 'tis I who 
have done that; tu he que tens, fefr. 'ti^ thou who 
haft, &c. iUe hi que tem^ ^c. 'tis he who, &c. nos 
hi que timoSj&LQ. 'tis we who have, &c. vos he que 
• ihides^ tffc. 'tis you who have, &c. tl/es hi que tern, 
. &fr, 'tis they have^ &c. a Ify he que mdnda^ 'tis 
the law that prefcribes it ; ilia hi que cri^ 'tis (he 
who believes it; Hies hi que fizirao ? \%\\ they 
have done it ? iu hi que ofiz^ 'twas I who did it; en- 
tio hi que iu tokio as minhas medidas^ 'tis then I take 
my meafures ; entai he que tu viy 'twas then I faw, 
or only then I faw. i ou may obferve that que is 
not relative in the laft exan^ples, and that it is left 
out in Englifl). 

• Of the Verb haver, when it is imperfonal. 

* 

It is to be fo conjugated. 
Indicative. 

Prefent. 

»* 

hd, or naS hd^ there is, or there is not, or there are, or 

there are not. ^ 

• • • * 

Imperfefi. ^ 

h^via^ there was, ^r there w^re. 

.Preterperfe£l definite. ./, '. . ' v , 

hSuve^. there ymr<^ there wcfe^- -^ 

; .^ . l^reter- 



GRAMMAR. 100 

* PretcrperfcQ. 

tern havidoy there has been ^r there have beeou 

Preterpluperfeft, 

tinh4^k'avid0^ tl^c^ had bechl 

■ ■ ' ■ . ^ ■ ■ . 

Futui^r ^ 
haver a ^ there (hall be. .-' ". ^ 



*»•• 



( -• 



•9 

« 

■ r 
4.' . ^ 



Imperative. 

hdja^ let there be.. 

■ ' ' ' 

Optative and Subjunftive. ' 

que hqja^ ) that there may be. 

Im'perfeft. ■■ ^■ 

que' houvera or houve/Te^ that there were. 

* . Second ImpeifeS. 

kaveria, there would be., 

PreterperfeQ. 
' f «< te'nha hdvidcKy if there had b^en. .. 

Preterpluperfeft. 
fe tivejfe kavido. if there had been. ' :' 

Puture. •• :'i 

^ qudndo houver, whenthere willWfliall be. ■'.'; 



• ■ •. ' ■ 



I ■ I 



\ 



Second Future. 



.^1. * 



quando tiver'havido, when there iliall have been. r 

Infinitive. 

. ■ i A. I.' 

haver ^ :»there to be* i 
. . • ^ Pret. 

ter havidoy there to have b'een. 

Gerunds. 

« . • .' _ 

;, havendoy there being. 

tendo havidoy in there having bceh. 

Thofe who learn Portuguefe are greatly at a lofs 
bow to render the following expreffions,/W^w «^/; 

U 

8 



114 PORTUGUESE 

There are three forts of participles ; hamely» ac- 
tive, paffive, and abfolute. 

The aftive participles are corapofed of the verb 
tif i as, tenio am&do^ tinha amadoy &c. ^ 

The paffive participles are preceded by the verb. 
Jir, to be ; ikSy/6u amhdo^findo louvado^ &c. ^ 

The paffive participles are of the fame Mature 
as thbfe called abfolute ia Latin ; and you mull ob- 
ferve, that having; and bewg are often left out in P6r«- 
*tuguc<fe, , 

E X A M P- L E. 

4 

• I ^^ 

Feito iftoy having done this., 

Ditd tfto, having faid fo. 

Acab&da a cta^ after he or they have fupped. 

The auxiliary and participle are not always im* 
mediately joined together in compound tenfes; as, 
Uos tSmoSy com a gydga de Dios^ vencido os nofsos ini- 
mi^oSy we have, by the grace of God,. overcome bur 
enemies. 



SSS3S5 S!r » S 



s=^ . 



CHAP. VI. • .' 

Of the Adverbs. 

-^ ^ * ■ ■ 

'T'HE adverb is that which gives more or Icfs force ' 
to the verb. 

The adverb has the fame effeft with the verb as 
tlie adjeftive with the fubftantive : it explains the 
accidents and circumftances of the a6tion of the 
verb. * ^ 

There are a great man^ forts j as, adverbs oF 
time, place, quantity, &c. ^ 

Adverbs of time; as, at prefent, prifefUemente i 
noyv, agora ; - yefterday, onrem s to day, Aoje 3 neve^, 

niinca; 



GRAMMAR. 115 

n&nca ; always^ /impre-, in the mean time ; enire- 
idnio. 

Adverbs of place ; as, where, inde-j here, aqui'^ 
from whence, dSnde-, there, aH\ from hence, da-> 
qui; above, cm ctma ; below, em baxo ; far, ISnge ; 

, Adverbs of* quantity i as, how much, quanta ; 
how many, qudntos \ or fudntas ; fo much, tinto ; 
mixch^ m^iio I XiXXlty pSuco. 

A great miany adverbs are formed^ from adjec- 
tives, changing o into aminte ; J&taOjfantamitae^ holi- 
ly-; rico, ricamfytte, ncMy I douto^ doutamhtCyW^xnc^- 

ly. \ . ; 

From adjeftives in ^ or/ we likewife form adverbs, , 
by adding m^nte to them ; as, 

Conjidntey conjlantemintej conftantly. 

JDUiginte^ diligent eminte^ diligently- 

Prudintey prudefitpnentey prudently. 

FiHyjUlmhtey^i2L\xM\i\\y. 

in order to affift the memory of thofe who are 
learning the Portuguefe language, I have here col- 
lected a large number of adverbs, which, by fre- 
quent, repetition, may be eafily retained, efpecially 
tnofe terminated in minte. 

A ColleSiion of Adverbs. 

AbundantemenUy abundantly AdeoSy farewell. 

Cwn razaZ^uJiamenUyjuilly Admiravelminte, "^ , . 

Abfolutamtntty abfolutely. Maravilhofaminte^ > ^ /?^* 

A EfcackapemaSy op a caval- As mil maravUhas,j ^^ ^* 

. leirOy a-firadille. AJlutamintt^ cunningly. 

Afora^ or por hora^ now at Atreifoadamentey Treacher* 
this time. oufly. . 

^a^tfr<i;^,now»imKiediate]y Dt maravilhay vtty feldom. 

CofkcondifiZ^\vfQncolii^ilon A miudo^ often. 

Depdriff afide. ^ ^^^' ^^* 

De travizy aflcew, afquint; TaS/io. 

», clhdr de travez^ to look A'prtjfa^ in hailei 

aikew, or afquint. FacUmenU, eafily. 

ASualniente^ adually. Ao aviffo^ or as apeffas^ the 

DepropqfiiOf^UT^oiely, wrong fide outward. 

I s Dt 



H9 



P Q R T V Q V E ? E 



D<! u/ifirovifot or imfrovj/ar 

z«/;2/tf, at' unawares. ♦ 
ATUigaminte^ anciently. 
Quafi^ p ret ly near, alirioft. 
Entdo^ then. 

IXifdt tniAo^ fmcethat time. 
Dtfde iiwdn4o ? fince when ? 
D^ qudii^o OiCd?, from what 

tirxie ? bow long ? 
. De quando &m qudndo^ now 

end then, ever and anon. 
^udnjio btm^oxain da qudntOy 
-aibrit, although it Ibould 
bcw . * 
Quando muito^ at the moft. 
. Qucrn^p miuGS^ at leall. 
X'c, here, or hither. 
L&^ there. 
Ali^ there, in that place. 

^there, exprefles the 
place where ftands the 
Ahi^ < perfon fpoken to; as, 
\ aju onae eft as ^ diere 
(^whereyou are. 
. Acola, there. 
TVflz, or detrdz, behind. 
Para traz,^ backward. 
I'Jio he, to wit. 
Em viz, inftead. 
Tamhim, al fo. 

Logo/{ut, J 

J}<? penfddq^ wilfully. 

Acafo, by chance. 

FixamenU, ftedfaftly. 

Final/nente, finally. 

Livreminte^ freely. 

Mtiito, muQh. 

Deprejfa, quickly. 

Aouiy here. 

Ate aqui^ as far as here, or 
till now, or hitherto. 

D*aqui em didnte, hencefor- 
ward, or hereafter. 

Bim, well. : . ' - 



A'manhd^, to-Qidrrow. 

A*manhaa pela mahkdH^ to- 
morrow jnorning. 

BtfpSis d^ d mdnkSa^ after 
to-morrow.. 

Uitimaminte^ \^9i^J^ • . ;, 

Como^ as. 

C6m,o^ bowt 

Cido^ foon, . 

Tdrde^ late. 

Primeiro gue^ before tkat. " 

Primeiro ^ 2^^/iik/^,be(preaU. 
or in the firft place. ^ . : 

Foray abroad^ avtf . 

ydy already. 

Defdlto, at on^ jump. 

De quando em qndndo^ from 
time to time. 

Antes, before. 

hefpSis^ afterwards, 

Jfuntamintt, togeth^rk 

EnteiramentCy entirely., 

A'o redor^ or em torn.o^ahcifaLl 

De balde, in vain. 

Loucamente, madly, 

Muito, very. • 

Atrevidamente^ bdidly. 

Felicemtnte, happily^ . '" 

Vergonho/amente^ fhamefullj 

Nunc a, never. 

Nui%ca mais^ never fince. 

Logo^ immediately. 

Ainda, yet; as, ainda nS^ 
ve'iOf he is not cpme yet, 

Ainda, even; ^A^feriu ve** 
gonha ainda ofalldr n^o^ 
it were a (hame ^ven tq. 
fpestk of it. 

Nemje quer, eveiu 

Vilminte, bafely. , 

Mai, ill. 

Mais, more. ■ • ^ 

Menos, left. 

Ati, until ^r'evcn. 

Sim, yes. . 



GRAMMAR. 117 

Kdo^no^ not. fitinrfp, trhpn. 

Cniie, where. NiJa^ nothing. 

De cir^ by heart. yerocdtirayfunU^ trtiiy. 

A*s vezes, fiunetimcs, from Dintro, within. 
ume to time. Dcvsg^r^ fofti y. 



^fc faahafc^MMJi 



CHAP. VIL 

O/th Prepofitwns. 

PREPOSITIONS are a part of fpeech indedih- 
able, nioft commonly fet before a noun> a pro- 
noun, or verb. 

Every prepofition requires Tome cafe after it, us 
you will fee in the follQwing colleftion : 

Gfenitive. 

^ntts do </f«, before day.break. 

Didnte de DeoSy before God. 

Dentro da igreja, within the church. . 

De traz do paldcio^ behind the palace. 

Debdxo da mefa^ under iht ttiible. 

Em cima da mefa^ upon the table. 

Alem^ befidfes. 

JUim dos mdres^ on that fide of the fcas. 

AUm diJfo^'htfiAtt that, moreover. 

iAlim de qm, idem. 

Aquem, or ddquem dos mares ^ on this fide of the feas. 

Ao redor^ or em contorno da cid4de^ round about the city. 

Per to de- Londras, near London. 

Acirca da quilk-negocio^ concerning that affair. 

Pora da cafa^ out of the houfe. 

Ford ile pet {go, out of danger. 

Fira itfii out of one's wits. 

This prepofition governs alfo a nominative ; as^ f6ra fAu 
\xm&S^'exQept his brother^ or his brother excepted* 
De fronte de minha cd/a, over-againft my houfc. 
Dejronte da igreja^ facing the church. 
jbe/piis de cfa^ after fupper. 

Dative. 

(ludnto aquiltb, with refpeQ to that. 
Femddo a murdlha^ ciofe to tbe wall. 



118 PORTUGUESE 

Difdt, bico dope ate a cabiga^ from top to toe. 

Accufative. 

Perdnte ojuiz, before the judg^. 
E'nire, between, among, or amongft. 
E'ntre os homens^ among men, 
Sobre a meja^ upon the ubie. 
Confornu^ oxftgdndo a leys according to the law* 
Por amor de Deos^ for God's fake. 
Pelo rndndo, thrpugh the world. 
Pela rHa, through the ftreets. 
^Pelas terras^ through the lands. 
Por grdtide quej'eja, let it never be fo great. 
Contra elies, agamft them. 
Trdz do tempco, behind the temple. 
Durante^ during; as, durante o tnz^/m^, during the winter. 

We fhall be more particular about prep(^tions 
when we examine their conftruclion. 



CHAP. VIII. 

0/ the ConjunSions. 

A. CONJUGATION is an indeclinable part of 
•^; fpeech which ferves to join the niembers and 
parts of fpeech together, in (hewing the dependency 
of relation add coherency between the words ana 
fentences. 

Some conjugations are copulative, which jpio, 
andf as it were, couple two terms together ; as, ^, 
and : Portugucfes e IngUJei^ Portuguefe and Engli/li. 

Some are disjunftive, which (hew feparation or 
dividon ; as, nem^ nor, neither; o«, either, or. 
Example ; fiefn ejicy nem aquelle^ neither this, nor 
that; on ifit^ ou aquillcy either this or that; ncm 
maiSf nem minos^ neither more nor'lefs; quer o fSfa, 
quer naS, tudo {ara rnim he o the/mo, it is all one to 
me whether he does it, or no ; querfeja verd&de^quer 
ffioi whether it be true, or not ; nem/e quer hum^ not 
even one. 

* The 



f^ 



G R A M xM A R. 119 

The advtcrfatif e denote reftridion, or contrarietjr > 
^s^ mas^ or parem^ but; comtido, yet, however; mas- 
dfifeSy or p^ contrurio, nay. 

The conjundions conditional fuppofe a condi* 
tion» and ferve to jreftrain and limit what has juft 
been faid ; as; fe^ if; C9m condifdm quCyCom ifio que^ 
Jkdo cifa quCy provided that^ or upon condition that> * 
or in cafe that, &c. 

The conceffive, which (hew the aflent we give to 
a thing ; as, emtdra, or feja embora^ well and good ; 
tfthfeito^ done, agreed. 

The caufal (hew the reafon of fomething ; as, 
forcMe, for, or becaufe, or why. 

The concluding denote a confequence drawn 
from what is before ; as, logo or por confequcnciuy 
therefore, then, or confeouently. 
- The tranfitive, which (erve to pafs from one fen- 
tence to another ; as, alem dijfo, moreover, or befides 
that ; fobre tudo, or em fumma^ after all, upon the 
whole, in the main ; a propSfito^ now 1 think On't, or 
now we are fpeaking of that. 

There are others of a di(Ferent fort ; as,yfc quor^ 
or ao mgnoSy at leaft ; amdaque, although ; dejorte 
fue, fa that ; antes qtfiro pedir quefuridry I'll rather 
a(k than ftcal; antes morrerei que dizer-v^lOyVWrz--^ ' 
ther die than tell you ; jd que, (ince, &c. 

To the above-mentionid parts of fpeech gramma- 
rians *hate added InterjeSIionsy which are particles 
ferving to denote fome paflion or emotion of the 
mind ; but there is another fort, which may be called 
demonftrative ; as, jjiv/ and /a ; Ex. ejle homem aquiy 
thi9 roan ; aquella molher /i, that woman, &c. and 
fome others continuative, becaufe they denote con- 
tinuation in the fpeech ; as, com effeltOy in effeft ; 
'Hem di/soy hefidcs ; oravejamos, now let us fee ; ^naU 
metue fSmonos emb6ra, and fo, fir, we went away. 
To which we may add thofe invented to imitate the 
founds of dumb creatures, and the noife which is 
occa(ioned by the cla(hing of bodies againft on6 
another; as, a«z> traZy th wick-thwack, &?c, 

1 4 / Inttr* 



•» -» 



120 PORTUGUESE 

« 

htetjeeiivt Particles^ 
Of Joy, 

Ha, ha, ha I Ha, ha, ha I . 
Oh que gosto ! Oh joy ! 

Of Grief. 

Ay ! Alas ! ah ! 

Jy He mitn ! Woe is me ! lack ! 

Miu Diosl My .God! 

Of Pain. 

Ay / Ay ! 
^ O/; / Oh i . 

To encourgige. 

«/wp 1 Come, come on ! 

Ota vqmos i y 

To rail/ 

0,.o/i, Ho, hey, hip ! 

. Of admiratioiii or- farprife. 

0^0 Id^ahi! Lack- a- day. 
Apre ! Heyday ! 

• ^ \ Of aversion. 

I'rra - ^ * * 

N^da ! > Away, away with, fye ! 
For a ! J 

For making people go out of the way, or ftand away^ 
Guardem-fey or arreaem-fe ! Have a care, clear the 
way, or ftand away ! 

' For fhouting. 
Viva I Huzza ! » ' 

Of silence. 
Calaivos ! Hufli ! Peace ! . 

Of cursing and threatening. f 

At, gudi I Woe ! 
. - , For derision. 

i<^/ Ah: oh! oh! oh! y 

Of wifhing. - 
Of provera a Dios ! Would to God ! 

Oxali! 



-1 



GRAMMAR. ISI 

OUfi«tt/ ^imii Othat! 
Oje! Would! 

The intcijeQion O ferves for BiflFerent emotions 
of the mind, as admiration, grief, wi(h, &c. and 
ibmetimes is ufed ironically, but differently uttered, 
according to the emotion which it expresses. 



Same 



Antenio 
Sebajiidif^ 
Beatiffimo Padre 

Companhia 
Carriio 
Dom or Dona 
Doutor 
Deos 
Ditto, ditta. 



Anthony 

Sebaflian 

The mod bleffed Father 

Captain 

Company 

Poft 

Don or Dona 

Do9or 

God 

Said 



ExceiUntiJjimo, ma Mod excellent. 

VoJI'a ixcellencia . Your Excellence 

Voffajenkoria Your Lordfliip. 

y^lfa altifa Your Higbnefs 

Vojfa merci Voa 

VQfa paterniddde Your Paternity 

yp/fa mageftidt Your Majefty 



Sdrito 

Francifco 

Gudrae 

MuitDs dnnos 
Mijtrt 
Scnhor, or a, 
Btutrtndtjfimo 
Para 

\ue , 

\udndo 
Quern 
Qudnto 
Supplic&nte 
General 
Teninte 

VSrbi gratia 



Saint 

Francii 

Save 

Jefus 

Many Years 

Mafier 

Sir, Lady 

Mbft Reverend 

For 

That 

When 

Who 

How much 
Petitioner 
General 
Lieutenant 
For Examplei 



And many others, that muft be learned by ufc 



1 M 



\ ■• 



A NEW 



PORTUGUESE 



GRAMMAR. 



' * ■ j ' ' I I < 



PART II. 



CHAP. I. 

Of the Divijion of Syntax. ^ 

SYNTAX is a Greek word, by the Latins called 
conJlruSlion : and it fignifies the right placing and 
conne£ting of wordis in a (entence. It is divided 
into three forts; the firft, of Order or Arrangement ; 
the fecond, of Concordance; the third of Govern- 
ment. The Syntax of Order or Arrangement, is the 
,fit difpofition of words in a fentehce. The Syntax 
of Concordance, is when the parts of fpeech agree 
with one anpther, as the fubllantive with the adjec* 
tive, or the nominative with the verb. The Syntax 
of Government, is when one part of fpeech governs 
another. 

• ' ' For 






G R A MM A R. iss 

For the lakepf thole who> perhaps, have not a 
grammatical knowledge of their own language, I / 
ft all lay down fome general rules of Poiftuguefe 
conftru6lion. 

\. Of tie Order of Words. 

1. The nominative is that to which we* attribute 
the a£Hon of the verb, and is generally ranged in 
the firft place ; it may be either a noun or pronoun, 
.as, Francifco ejcreve^ Francis writes ; ^fiUlo^ I fpeak. . 

2. When the aftion of the verb is attributed to 
many perfons or things, thefe all belong to the no- 
minative, and are ranged in the firft place, together 
with their conjun^ion ; as, 'Ptdro e Piuh lenty Peter 
and Paul read. 

3f. The adjefiives belonging to the nominative 
fubftantive, to which the action of the verb is attri- 
buted, are put after the fubftantive, and before the 
verb ; ^as, os eftuddtftes marlgerado^ e dilighies eftUddiy ^' 
the obedient and diligent Icholars do ftudy. 

4. If the nominative has an article, this article 
always takes the firft place. 

5. Sometimes an infinitive is put for a noun, and 
ftands for a nominative; as o dormir fiz iem, 
fleeping does one good: and fometimes a verb with 
its cafe ; as, ie &£lo de humanid&di ter compaix&p dos of- 

fiiRos^ toh^ve comp&flion on the afQicted is an act 
of hun^anity. ' 

6.. The nominative is fometimes underftood ; as, 
i^/ff<7, where you^underftand . A^ 5 and fo of the other 
perfons of the verb. 

' 7. After the nominative you'put the verb ; and if 
there is an adverb, it is to be placed immediately 
after the verb, whofe accident and circumftances 
it explains ; as, ftdro ama por extrhno a gloria, peter 
is extrenpely, fond of glory. 

8. The cafes governed by the verb are put after" 
it ; they may be one, or niany, according to the na- 
turfe of the action s as, iuamo aPMro, \\o\e Perer. 



m. PORTUGUESE , 

. F&fv pr^fhUi de hum ihm it P^uh, I tfiftke fe pnfcfent 
. of a book to Paul. ' 

9. The prepofition h always- put befor? thfe tAfe 
it governs ; ^s,perto de cafa^ near the hoiife* 

10. The relative is always |)laced after the ante- 
cedent ; is, Thdro o qual eftiday Peter who ftudies. 

IL Of Ccnc^d^nce. 

!• The adjeSives agree with thert- fubftatitivefc In , 
/ gender, number, atid cafe; ag^ ^6rnem vtrtAdfo^ a 
- virtuous ipan; bells molher^ a handf6nfi^ ^Vorinan ; 
JumptuofospdUicioSi &c. fumptuous palace^, ^c. ' , 

2. When two or tnpre fubftantives fingular ctfttie - 
toijeiheV, the adjeftive belonging to thetti tnuft be 

. put in the plural; as, tdnto el rty t6fho a ramia 
mont&dos a cavilh paricem l^m^ both the king and 
the queen look well when they ride. 

3. If the fubftantives happen to be one in the 
• fin^nlar and the other in the plural, or to be of 

different genders, the adjefilive common to both, 
ajgffees in number and gender with the laft; as, Ule 
itnha os blhos^e a bdca abirta, or ille tinka a bdta € os 
6lhos abertoSy his eyes and mouth were opened. As 
lugSas e rios eftdvah congeladoSy the ponds and rivers 
were frozen. 

'4. But when there is one or many words between 
the iaft noun and the adjeftive, that adjeftive (coA- 
mon to all) agrees with the noun mafculinc, thougfi 
the laft nbun be feminine; and if the nouns are in 
the Angular, thep the adjeftive common fliall be' put 
V in the plural number and mafculine gender; as, ^ 
^$0 € a lagCa ejiavai congelhdos ; the pond and river 
were frozen. O trabalho^ a indiftria^ t a ftfrtina 
nnidosy pains, induftry, and fortune joined together. 
, 6, Every verb perfonal agrees with its nomina- 
tive, expreffed or underftood, both in number and 
perfoft. 

6, The relative?, qnai with the article agrees en- 
U/eJf with the antecedent; but without the article - 

8 and 



GRAMMAR. m 

and denoting an abfolutequality, it agrees with what 
follows; as, aque//e coragad o qual^ &c. that heart 
which, Ssff. ConfidereindB- qfta^ feriao as^ condicSens, 
&c. confidering which would be the conditions, 

7, The quefiien and anfwer always agree in every 
thing ; as, a que fenhdra pertence v«r« ? ille refpondto^ 
pertiHfo a rdinha: To what lady do you belong, fixj 
and he anfwered^ I belong to the queen* 

A- 

IfL Of the Dependence of the Parts if Speech in, 

one another^ 

. ■ . * 

1. ITfie nominative being the bafis of the fenJtence, 
the ve.rb depends on it, as the other cafes depend oii 
the verb. The adjc6Jive depends on the fubftantivc 
that fupports it ; and the adverb on the verb whofe 
acci^ent^ it explains. 

2. The genitive depends on a fubftantive, ex- 
prefled or underftpod, by which it is governed^ 

3. Tbe accufative depends either on a verb ac- 
tive, or on a prepofition. 

. ^. The abJative depends on a preppfition by 
wbich it is governed j as, parto de Rdma, \ go from 

5. The dative 'and vocative have, ftriflly fpeak- 
ing, UP dependence on the other parts: the dative 
is common, as it were, to all hpuns and verbs > 
the voc&tive only points out the perfon to whom 
you fpeak* 

I now come tq the Conftrufilion of the feveral 
pijXts. of (pcQclx. 



'N 



■ > ■ 



lae P oil T U G U E S E 



CHAP. II. 



• »» 



Of the Syntax of Articles. 

• r 

r 

BEFORE we come to the fyntax of tlie articles, 
remember, that 0, tf, os^ as^ ^re articles only 
when they precede the nouns or pronouns, but not 
when joined to the verbs. 

Thofe who understand Latin will quickly per- 
ceive the difference, if they take notice that every 
time they render a, a^ by illum^ illam^ illud^y or by 
emfij eam^ id ; and os^ as, by i//os illaSy ilia y or by 
eos^eas,ea; they are relative pronouns. 

1. The article is ufed before the names of the foe- 
cies or things which can be fpoken of; .therefor-e^ 
nouns of (ubftances^ arts^ feiences^ plays, metals, 
virtues, and vices, having no article before them in 
Englifh, require the article in Portuguefe ; as, 

O duro e a prat a nao podem jaztr feliz ao hSmem, 
gold and iilver cannot make the happinefs of man. 

J virtude. nao hi compativel com o v/clo, virtue 
cannot agree veith vice. 

j1 pbUofophia he h&ma fciincia miito nobre^ philo^ 
fophy is a very noble fcience. 

JoguSmes as cartas, let us play at cards. ' 

2. The article is not placed before a fubstantive 
whiph is followed by the adjeftive of number that 
stands for a furname, or meet with a proper or 
Christian name; as, Jofeph Primeiro, Jofeph the 
First. 

S. When a book or fome'part of it, as chapter, 
page, &c. is quoted, the adjedlive of number may 
come either before or after the fubstantive ; but if 
it comes after, the two words are construed, without 
article ; . as, livro primeiro, capitulo fegindo, &c. 
hook h chapter ii. If the adjedive of number 
* comes 



(GRAMMAR. 127 

comes beFore the fubstantive, it takes the article s 
zs, oftimtiro livrOy the first book. 

4. O placed before que ^gni&es wiat, or wiici^ 
• ^Sffafa que qw'fer, let him do what he likes ; o que 
iufiZy which 1 did. 

- 5. The article is never made ufe of before proper 
names of men, women, gods, goddelTes, faints. 

6. The article is not ufed in Portuguefe before 
the pronouns pofTeflive relative ; as, de quern he efim 
cdfai heminha^hi tia^i^c. whofe^houle is this? 
it is mine, it is thine, &c. 

7. When a mount's, mountain's or hill's name« 
is preceded by the word montey it takes nehher ar- 
ticle or prepofition ; as,, o Mdnte AtUntey Mount 
A tias i - OS Mdntes Pirenios, the Pirenean Moun* 
tains; but after the word T^rr^,. a ridge of hills, it 

. takes the article ; as(, a S^a daEftrilla^ Mount- 
Strella; Serra Jo Pofqfi, Mount Potofi ; however, 
they fay, alfo, Serra Lida. 9 . 

8. The noun of the meafure, weight, and the 
number of the things that have been bought, re- 
quires thd articles ; as, o irigo vendeje a tdnto o ah- 
qudre, what is fold fo much a peck, three quarts 
and one pint. 

A manteiga vehdf-Je a tdnio o arratel, butter cost fo 
much a pound. 

Os bvos vindem-fe a idnto a duzia^ eggs are fold fo 
much a dozen* 

9. No article is ufed with proper names of per* 
fons and planets, except a terra^ the earth ; ojol^ 
the fun; a Uia^ the moon. 

10. When proper names are ufed in a. determi- 
nate fenfe, that is, when they are applied to parti-^ 
cular dbjects, then they take the article \ o Dhs 
dos ''CAriJidSs, the God of Christians ; o Archimedes 

■ de Inglaferra, the Archimedes of England. The. 
proper n^mes,of renowned poets and painters keep 
alfo the article ^ as, o Camtitis, o PopCf o Tajfoy # 

\\. TKc 



I 

\ 



128 PORTUGUESE 

11. The indefinite article de is ufed helbre nomns 
following one of this, fortty efpick^ generoy'^nd aay 
other noun of which thejr expre& the kind, chawac^ 
M% qualk^^ and nature i which fort of noans arc 
ufally Englifhed by an adje6live, or even bjr tiMf 
febstantive itfeif placed adjeftively.^ and making to-* 
gether, as'it wex^e, but a word compound ; as, Dt^ 
ii cadig^y the head ach ; hfimn fine de fruto, a fort- 
©f fruit ; falliir de t&hy a foolifli fpeech. 

Sometimes the Englilh adle£tive may be Vnade hsf 
an adjeftive too in Portugueie,as in the last examphi " 
hlmfallof tohy a fooli(h Ipeech ; but fometimes too 
the Portuguefe exprefs the Englilh adjefiUve bjr a 
(ubBtantive of the fame fignification with de before 
the other noun, though ihey have an adjeftivc' of 
the fimeiiature as the Engliih adje£^ive ; a^ o didko 
disf minha molhir^ my deviliili wife.^ and fametimes 
the adjeftive is ufed by them fubstantively, or the 
substantive is understood ; as, q velkaca de meuftUm^ . 
my rafcafly £bn ; a vdhaca de fua may, hia or her ■ 
rafcally mother. Finally they alfo. make ufe of the 
definite article; as, o di&io da homem^ or damolhSr, 
l^e deviiifll man or woman > a pihre da m^lher^ the 
poor woman, &c. 

12. Nouns are ufed without article in the foltaw*^ 
ipg cafes: 

1st. At the title of a per£ormaace, and in the ' 
middle of ientences, where they characterife in. a 
particular manner the perfoh or thing fpoken of, in 
which cafe the Engliih ufe. efpecially the particle a% 
as. , 

Dhetirso libre as abrigac^ens da retigiai nafurai, a 
difcoorie concerning the obligations of natural vtf* 
tigion. f ' 

^ Primeka p&rte, the fijst part. 

O Conde de CUrmont, ftiicipe (h &dngue^ m^rt^o^ &c. 
t^ CQimt of ClenQOflt> a prince of the bloody died» * 
«c - ' ' . • . '• 



.GRAMMAR. 129 

O ^M Mimh, n£U> de turolma p(fas, the St. An- 
^Minyi a aiaety gun (hip. 

2dly. In fei^tences of exclamation ; as, 

jU miif biUm fiires fho as qu€ m^nos durao ; qualauir 
f Ova as defmaia^ o vSnto as miircha^ o fol as queitnd, 
€ ac&ba de Jechr ; fern fallar numa infinid&df de infec" 
tH ^as peffiguem e deiiaS a perdir ; natural e verda-- 
diira migem da bellhui dasfeuhSras! the handfomeft 
jRow€Fs l^ft but a very (bort time ^ the lead rain 
tvniflies them» the wind withers them, the fun 
(corches them, and completes the drying of them ; 
vithout mentioning an infinite number of infers 
that fpoil and hiirt themi : a natural and true image 
9f the l^dietf beauty ! 

3dJy. WJicn they meet with a noun of number in 
an indefinite fenfe ; as, milfoldkdos de cavdllo cdntra 
<0m u^intesy a thoufand horie a^ainft an hundred 
foot, 

Thh^ ii4o dAus foetas, I have read two poets, that 
is, any pair out or all that ever exifted. 

But before a noutt of number, in a definite fenfe, 
it wocdd take the article j as, 

TVir^ lido OS Mus poetas^, I have read both poQts ^ 
beiWife this plainly indicates a definite pair, of^ 
whom- fome mention has been made already* - 

Os €em wf antes que comhatcTG^ contra os ml de ca* 
md/hj fN#, tstc, tt^e hundred foot that fought wijth the 
tbouland hor(e, that, &c. 

4thly/ After the verb/^r, when it fignifics to is- 
^ iother snd after fir tom&do for, to be accounted; 

Sajfir por^ to pa(s for ; a3> 6lle ferh doutdr com ot^mpo^ 
e will become a do£lor in time; ille pajja por ma- . 
rinhehro^ he pafses for a failor* 

Whe9 the adjedive is uied fubftantively, then it 

muft have tbe neuter Portuguefe article o before it ; 

O virdt fffindi tninos a vijia que o vermelhoy greea 

burts the eye lefs than red. 

ICbMC are alia fome adverbs preceded by the neu- 

K tral 



ISO PORTUGUESE 

tral article o ; as the following, o tnelhSr que Su puiSr, 
the beft I will be able; o menos quefdrpojfivel^ the 
lefs it will be poffible. 

* Articles are repeated in Portuguefe before as 
many nouns (requiring the article) as there are in 
the fentence ; as, 

duro, a prat a ^ afaude^ as Mnras^^e os deleiies nM 

podem fazir feliz ao- hbmem que ftaS temfcihnda nem 

virtUde, gold, filver, health, honours, and pleafui-es; 

cannot make a man happy without wifdom and 

, virtoe. ' 

The article o is put* before the word y^»irfr, fir, or 
my lord ; as, 

O /enhdr duque, my Jord duke ; ojenhbr prejidknie^ 
my lord the prefident ; osfenhdreSy the gentlemen j . 
•idos fenkdres ^ of the gentlemen. - ^ 

You muft obferve the fame rule for the feminine 
articled, which is to be prefixed tofenhora^ my lady, 
or madam ; as, ajenhdra duquSza, or condejfa de, €ffr^ 
my lady duchefs, or countew of, &c.. 

The article is never ufed in Portuguefe as it is in 
Englifli, before mais more, or m^nos lefs,- in the fot 
lowing fentences, qu&nto m&is vivimoj, tdnto m&is 
aprendimosj the longer we live, the more we learn,; 
y qudnto mats hum kydrbpico bibe^ mais fide tem^ the 
' ^more an hydropicfe drinks, the more thirfty he is; 
qudnfo m&iS hum hbmem he pbbre^ qudnto minos amUh 
dos temy the poorer people are,, the lefs care thef 
have, &c. 

Sometimes the Englifh particle 40^ before infini- 
tives, is rendered in Portuguefe by the article o ; 
as, hefdcilo dixir^ o vSr^ i^c. it is ealy to fey, to fee,. 
jScc. 

In a word, the natural ajfociatqrs with artielis are 
thofe cwnmon appellatives y which denote the feveral 
genera and ipecie^ of beings, or thofe words which, 
though indefinite, are yet capable, through .the ar- 
ticle, cf becoming definite. Therefore ApollMius 

makes 



V 



G R A M M A k- 131 

makes it part of the pronoun's definition, to fefufe 
coalefcence with the article ; and it would be ab- 
furd to fay o w, the I ; or ^ /», the thou ; becaufe 
nothing can make thofe pronouns more diefinite 
than they are. 

N. B. .When the adjefilive Aum, Mma, is ufed as 
an article in Portuguefe, it" fefpects our primary 
perception, and denotes individuals as unknown ; 
tut the articles Oy a, refpeft our fecondary percep- 
tion, and denote individuals as known. To explain 
by an example : I fee an obje£t pafs by which 
I never faw till theit ; what do I fay ? AH vat hum 
pobre com huma barba compriddy there goes a beggar 
with a long beard. The man departs and returns 
a week after ; What do I fay then ? AH vat o pobre 
da bhrba comprida, there goes the • beggar with the 
loDg beard. 



CHAP. III. 

Of the Syntax of Nouns y and firfty of the Subjianthes. 

WHEN two or more fubftantives come together 
ivithout a comma between them, they all 
govern each the next in the genitive, the firft 
roveming the fecond, the fecond the third in the 
lame cafe, and fo on ; (that is, the firft is always 
followed by the prepofition dey or by the article be- 
fore the next noun) but that genitive can never 
come in Pprtuguefe before the nouns that governs 
it, ds in Englim : 

A phUofophia de Newton, Newton's philofophy. 

As guar das doprincipey the prince's guards. * 

A p6rta da ci/a, the houfe-gate. 

K 2 Eis 



182 PORTUGUESE 

Eis aqui a chfa do compankeiro do irmii de minha 
molker^here is my wife's brother's partner's hoafe. 

When two fubftantivcs Angular are the nomina- 
tive of a verb, this muft be put in the phiral^ a% 
«/» irmdo e miu pat ejl&o no cdmpo^ my brother and 
my father are in the country. 

If the nominative is a colleftive name, the verb 
is always put in the fingular ; as, idda s cidade affif- 
fio, all the city was prefent. 

0/ ike Syntax of AdjeSives. 

Of adje£live8, some are put before the noun, and 
iome after; and others may be put indifferently^ 
either before or after. 

The pronouns adjefilive pofleflive, mAu, tiu^ lit^ 
fefr, and adjedlives of number, come before the lub- 
ftantive as in EnglKh. Ex. M6u pai, my father ; s 
fia cifay his houfe ; d&as pefdas, two people ; a jN> 
metro hSmem^ the firft man. 

But when the adjeftive of number (lands for a 
furname, or meets with a proper or Chriftian name, 
it comes after the fubftantive, without the article ; 
as, Jt^oY. John the fifth. 

I 

Thefe following Adje^ives come after the Subflan6ui. 

ifl. Verbal adje£lives and participles; as, Jmht 
hbmem divert ido^ a comical or merry man ; hUm^moi^ 
her efiimada^ a woman efteemed.' 

2dly. Adjeftives of names of nations ; a8> kum 
mathcmatico Inglizy an Englifh mathematician ; kum 
alfaihte Franciz^ a French taylor;, mufica Italiana^ 
Italian mufic. 

Sdly. Adjeftives of colour ; as, kum veJUeh nigro, 
a black fuit of plothes ; h$m capote vermelko, a red 
cloak, &c. 

4thljr. 



GRAMMAR. ISS 

4tlil]r> Adjedifet o/* figure ; as, iima mi/a reddh- 
da^ a round table ; ium cdmpo triangulir^ a triangular 
field)^ &c. 

5tb]y. Adje£lives expreffing fome phyfical or na- 
tural quality ; fuch are quinte^ hot ; /r/>, cold ; /W- 
mid$^ wet ; corcavddoy hunch-backed, &c. 

Moft other adjectives are placed before or after 
the Cobftantive ; 2i^/dHtVy holy ; verJadeira, true, &c. 

If the fubfiantive has three or more adjectives be- 
longing to it, they mbft abfolutelf be put after it 
with the enclitic c before the laft, which mull like- 
wife be obferved, even when there be but two ad- 
je£iives I for the Portuguefe don't fay, kima defrn^ 
. grad&vel fi^addnia obru^ &c. but h&mu bbrn defagn- 
divel e tnfanddnha^ &c. a difagreeable, tedious work. 
^ Of adje£liires» fome alwavs require after thetn 
either a noun or verb^ which they gorem ; as, 
dGjpw de louvSr, praife-worthy ; digno de Jhr mMk^ 
v^urthy to be loved ; cap&% de enfinhr^ capable to 
teach i aftd tbefe have always the particle dt after 
them* 

Some will be ufed abfolutely without being ever 
ctlendcd by any noun or verb s as, pvdinte; wife ; 
imm&vcli incurable, &c. 

Others may be conftrued both with and without 

a noun, which they govern ; eila ke hima m&lifr 

^mfe^hit^ flie is a woman without any feniihility ; 

iHla he ivfurfivel ao sfmSty flie is itifenfible and aftrafir 

ger to the pailion of love, 

^ftie A>IIowing adjeftives, which require the pre- 
pbfitioa ^ de before the next infinitive, govern the 
jrenitive cafe* Obferve, that fome of tl:^m require 
m £ngli(h the prepofitipn at or wit A before the tsekt 
norni. 

DignOf worthy: as, Me he digw de lowutr^ he is^ 
worthy of praite. This adjective is fometimes fol- 
lowed by que ; as, digna jne JHu nSme /4^, iiit. her 
name defervtd to be, &c. 

K3 Indlpm^ 



.1 



134 PORTUGUESE 

Indignoy unworthy ; as^ indigno da efUma^ao que/agB 
dille^ unworthy of the efteem which 1 have for him. 
' CapaZy capable ; incapdzy incapable ^ as, cap&z^ 
ou incapaz defervir a propria patria^ capable or inca- 
pable to ferve one's country. 

Notado^ charged ; as, not&do de avariza, charged 
with avarice. 

Coftiihtey glad; as. ejou contfytte do fuccefjb que tilt 
tivty I am glad or overjoyed at his fuccefs. 

Can f ado f tired i as, ,canfado de eftudar^ tired of ftu- 
dying. 

Dezejdfoy greedy ; as, dezejSfo de gloria^ greedy of 
glory, &c. as like wife adjeftives fignifying fuUnefs, 
^cjoaptinefs, plenty, want,defire, knowledge, remcm- 
.brance, ignorance, or forgetting. 

All adjeftives fignifying inclination, advantage 
and difed vantage^ profit or difprofit, pleafure or 
difpleafure, due, fubmifSon, refiftance, likenefs, 
govern the dative cafe; as, inftnpvel as affrAnias^ 
infenfible of affronts ; Jer inclimdo a alg&ma coufa^Xo 
be inclined to fomething ; nocivo afaudey hurtful' to 
health. ' ' - 

.' Thefe adjeftives fignifying dimenfions, ^Sy alto^ 
high, tall ; largOy wide, broad'; and compridc, long, 
come after the words of the meafure of magnitude, 
both in Englifli and Portuguefe ; but they are pre- 
; ceded by de in Portuguefe ; as, dh pes de l&rgo^ ten 
feet broad ; feis pis de comprido^ fix feet long,'&c. 
they alfo turn the adjeftive of the dimenfion into 
its fubftantive, with the word^of the meafure before : 
but the word of the dimenfion is always preceded 
.by de*^, My feis pes de altdra^ fix feet high ; dez pis de 
largitai ten feet broad. 

The adjeftives fignifying experience, knowledge, 
^.or fcience, require emyor noy nay noSynas, after them; 
as, ver/Ado nos livroSy verfed in books ; ixperto na mC' 
:didnay expert in medicine. 

The cardinal nouns require the genitive cafe after 
. them 3 as, kum dos ddus, one of the two. 

The 



G R A M M A R 135 

The ordinal nouns^ as well as the collective and 
proportional likewife require the genitive after 
them ; as, o primehro dos riys, the firll of the kings, 
hima duzia de &vos, a dozen of eggs, &c. 



Of tie ' Syntax of the Comparatives and Supers 

latives. 

■ • 

The comparative is not made of the pofitive in ^ 
Fortuguefe, as in L«atin and Englifli, but by adding 
mJns morcy or m/nos lefs, which govern que^ fignify- 
log than ; as, iddo he mayor que a parte, the whole 
xh greater than the part ; o ftu amdnte he/ndis bello^ 
ft&is mdfOy e mats rico que ilia, her lover is handfomer, 
younger, and richer than (he \% ^ iu acho-o agora 
m£nos bello do que qudndo o comprii, I now find it lefs 
handfome than when I brought it. 

The fimple comparatives mAis, and minos, meet- 
ing with a noun of number, are attended by de^ as, 
eunda que Hie tpuejje mats de cem homens, though he 
has abpve an hundred men ; elle tern mats d$ vinte 
dnnas, he is above twenty. 

When the comparifon is made \>yfo as, as much 
as, they muft be rendered by cdmo. 

£xample. 

O miu livro he taS hello c6mo o vo/so, my book is 
as handfome as yours ; hum prhicipe naS he tao pode- 
rSfo edmo hum riy, a prince is not fo powerful as a 
king. 

They put fometimes multo zn6 pduco before the 
£mple comparatives mats and m6nos ; as, ^lle hi 
muito mats grinde, he is taller by much s Hie he ptuco 
moisgrdnde, he is taller by little, &c. 



« • 



K 4 



/ 



136 P O R t U G U E S fe 

CHAP. IV. 

Of the Syntax of ProHMti. 

TfTE have fufficiently explained 'tlwf prMtoufur 
in the iirft part ; and to avoid any further 
repetition, I shall only obferve, that, 

1ft. The Etiglifli make ufe of the verb to ie^ put 
imperfonally through all ^ts tenfes in the thh'd ptt^ 
fon, before the pronouns perfonal, /, tA$Uj ht^Jki^H^ 
you, they ; it is I j it is he, &c. In Portugoefe the 
verb to be^ On this occafion, is not imperfonal i And 
they expreff, it is I -, by /oU ^u ; it is thou, is n i 
it is he, Ae ilh j it is we, fimos nbs ; it iis ye, j^ Wf^ 
it is (he, ht ilia ; it is they, mafc.^'3 6ile$ ; it fe they^ 
fern. faS illas ; and in like manner through all tM ^ 
tenfes ; as, it was I, er^ ^ ; it was we, frames nos^ ' 
8tc. - 

2dly. The Portuguefe feldom make ufe of the 
fecond perfoh lingular or plural^ but when throifgh 
a great familiarity among friends, or fpeakin^ td 
G6d, or a father and mother to their children. Of to 
fervants ; thus, yOu Are in the right of it, is e»* 
preffed by vm^^ rem raziS, inftead of tifides razSi ; 
como ejli vm^^ ? how do you do ? In the plural they 
fay vm^^ . 

Obfervc here, that when an adjeetite comes after 
vtH^ V. S. K E. &c. it does not agree in gendet 
with vm^ F. S. &c. but with the perfon we fpeidl 
to or we fpeak of, therefore they fpeak to a ladyxif 
woman thus 5 vm<^ he muito belU^ you are very 
beautiful ; and tr> a m^n they fay, vm^ he miit^bt^^ 
you are very good, 

Sdly. Nus is generally ufcd by the king, a goi^« 
nor, or a biihop, inHheir writings, and then it fig- 
nifies in Englifh we ; as, nos manddmos, oxmandimoSf 
we command s but nos before or after a verb in For* 

tuguefe 



GRAMMAR. IS7 

tagnese fignifies m in English ; »» iJ/e ms iiffe, he 
told us ; diinos timpo^ give us time. 

4rbly. Fos n also apoiied to a fingle person, but 
only speaking to inferiors, or between familiar 
friends, to avoid the word thou^ /tf, whtwh would 
be too grofs and unmannerly. 

Stbly. The pronouns conjunftive arc joined to 
~ verbs, ahd (land for the datire and accusative cases, 
a^ dhmty he gave me ; ima we, love me ; but the 
pronouns perfonal are ufed iitflead of them when 
they afe preceded by a preposTtJon. and not imme- 
diateN foHov^ed '• by a tcrb ; (JhfalUm ciditra mim^ 
ht fpoke a<(a'mft me. 

i6thly. When e?, a, oSy tiSy are joined to t^e pre- 
ftnt ff.finirive mood, tbev change thelaft r of it into 
/o, /a, i^c. thus ; para dma lo^ to love him ; fara vita, 
or, vi'las^ to fee her, or them, &c. and when they 
are joined to the preterpertect indicatire of the 
terb/tf asfr, and some others that have that tense end- 
ing in ft^ they change the last z of them into lo^ la, 
fefr. ^fi-loy 1 did it ; ilk fi-lOy he did, or made it, 
&c. hot Tvhen they are joined to the future indica- 
tive of any verb with the auxiliary verb haver ^ then 
tbey change the terminations rei, r4j,.&c. of the 
fbtures into &, la, i5fc, t$ fi-lo-iei, Vll do it ; ams- 
Hf-kei, 111 love him him, &c. 

Remarks on the Pronouns. 

iR. fltw, or //, which follow the verb in Engliffi, 
muft be expre&ed m Portuguefe, as in the following 
examples : 

When him or // in English follow the verb in the 
firft perfon of the Angular ixumber. It must be ex* 
prefsed in Portuguefe by b before or after the verb. 
£xam. I call him ot it, iu o ch&moy or in chdmo^o. 

When khn or it in Englifti follow the verb in the 
firft perfon of the fingular number, it may be cx- 
preffed in Portuguefe cither by o before the verb, or 
h after it, making an elifion of the laft confonant 

of 



IS8. PORTUGUESE 

» 

of the verb. Exam. Thou calleft him or it, iu o 
chdmaSy or tu chama lo.. 

When him or it is joined wiih the third person 
fingular of ayerb, it may be expreffed by o before 
or after the verb. Ex. He calls him (?r it^ clle «• 
chdmay or ilk chdma-o. - .. -v 

When Mm or //is with a verb in the firft perfon 
plural, it may be expreffed in Portuguefe either by 
before the verb^ or lo after it, making an'elifion 
as in the fecond cafe. Ex. We call him or it, nos 
^c ciamdmosy or nos chamemo-lo. 

When him or it is aftera verb in the fecond person 

Elural, It is expreffed in Portuguefe either by o 
efore the verb, or lo after it, making an elifion, 
&c^ Ex. You call him or it, vos o chamhis^ or vos 
chamai'lo. 

When him or it follows the verb in the third per- 
son plural, it may be expreffed in Portuguefe either 
by before the verb, or no after it. Examp.. They 
call him or it, ilks o chamao^ or iUes chdmaino. 

2dly. Her ox it after a verb in Englifti is express- 
ed in Portuguefe by a, according to the rules jiift 
now pfopofed. , 

Sdly. Them after ^ verb is expreffipd in Portu- 
guefe by c^xfor the mafculine, ana by as ior the^ fe- 
minine, according to the gender and the rules pro- 
pofed. • ^ 

4thly. The words o, a, os, as, mull always he 
put after the gerunds, but not .before the infinitives. 
Examp. Seeing him, we muft not fay, ovendo, but 
vendo'Oj becaufe vindo is a gerund. To fee him, in 
ftead of faying ^r^ vir-Oy you muft fay para o^ver^ 
is in the infinitive. 

Sthly.. The words /(?, la^ /w, /jj, muft always be 
.put after the verbs. Examp^ To fee him, you muft 
uiy, para vi-lo^ or para o vcr, and not para lo vir. 
.The fame, words muft follow alfo the adverb eiy 
and fo you muft fay, ei4o aqui, here he is ; ei-lo ali^ 
there he is ^ ei^los aqui, here they are j ei-la a/i, there 

flie 



GRAMMAR. • 189 

(he is ; ei-hs alf, there they are. They follow like- 
wife the perfons of the verbs ; cu fi-lo ; tu fizif^ 
ti-h \ ellefc'lo ; ms fi%mo h^ &c. I made it^Scc. 

Note, that I have been fpeaking of the words 
Oy a, 0Sy asy loy lay los^ las, and not of the articles 
0, OyOs, as ; becaufe when thofe words precede, and 
fometimes when they follow the verbis, they are not 
articles, but pronouns relative. They are articles 
only when they precede the nouns or pronouns. 



ftm 



CHAP. V. 



Of ike Syntax of Verbs. 

npHE verbs through every tenfe and mood * 

(except the infinitive) ought to be preceded 
by a nominative cafe, either expreffed or under- 
fiood, with which they muft agree in number and 
perfon. The nominative is expreffed when we say, 
iu dmoy tu cdtUa$ ; underftood when we fay, ciniOy 
digo, &c. * 

The Portuguefe, as well as Englifli, use the fe- 
cond perfon plural, though they addrefs themfelves 
"but to a fingle perfon. 

Example. 

Men amigOy vbs ndo tindes razdoy my friend, you 
are in* the wrong. 

And if we would fpeak in the third perfon, we 
muft fay, vem^^ tern razaS, fir, you are in the right. 

The* verb active governs the accufative ; as, ^mo 

a virt&dey I love virtue. 

The 



,» 



, 140 PORTUGUESE 

The verb pailive requires an ablative after it ; as 
§s MtU0s JiA mvtjkdos pillow igmrantes^ the learned 
are envied by the ignorant.. 

You rauft obferve, that there js in, Portuguefc 
another way of making the paffive, by adding the 
relatiTeyif to the third perfon fingular or plural i as 
ima/e Dt^Sy God is loved. 

When there are two nominatives fingular before 
a verb, itmufl be put in. the plural number. 

When a noun is collective, the verb requires the 
fingular, not the pural ; as, a genu cjii olhdndo^ the 
people are looking. 

Syntapc of the auxiliary ' Verbs. - 

The verb ter is made ufe of to conjugate all the 
compound tenfes of verbs ; as, tinhQ amadoytinha 
amado, I 'have loved, I had loved, 

Ter fignifies alfo to poflefs, to obtain ; as ienho 
dinhtiro^ I have money ; tern nuUia ^apacidhde^ lie 
Jm^ a great deal of capacity . 

Havir^ in account books und trade, exprefles 
^^rcdit ordifcharge. 

Haver is alfo taken imperfonally in Fortuguefe, 
and it fignifies in Englifli there he; m ha muit$ bwr^ 
no Mexico, there is a great quantity of gold in 
Mexico. 

Ha^^r-fe, made reciprocal, is the fame as to h^ 
havei to aS ; as hffuve-fe $ govirnadir com taifrth 
dencia que, &c. the governor behaved Virith uich 
wifdom, that, &fr. 

We have already obfervcd the difference betwixt 
far and ejiar. 

The verb eftir b alfo nfed to conjugnte the other 
verbs, chiefly exprefiing action ^ as ejldu Undo, ejUlt 
tprevindo, I am reading, I am writing! 

£flir, with the prepofition em, in, or with no, nd, 
ms, nas, fignifies to be prefent in a piact; is, e/Uu no 
idmfo, I am in the country. 



GRAMMAR. 141 

^ifj widi the prepofition parm dcnot o the m- 
clinttioa of doing what the following Terb expRfles^ 
but without a full determination ; as, eftdm fmrm ir 
mefmrm LMres^ I have a mind to go and life in 
{iOndoo. 

Efiir, with the prepofition ptTy and the infinitiTe 
of the verb following, means, diat the thing expieff- 
ed by the verb is Dot yet done ; as, (/tf^ e/lafm 
^ireviry this is not yet written ; ijio ^ipor mSaipit^ 
Vtm is not yet cleaned ; tftar par Ugaem fignifies to 
agree with one, or to be of his opinion. 

N. B. See in the Third Part the different fignifi* 
cations of the verbs iftir and havir. 

When fir fignifies the poffefiive of one thmg, it 
ffovems the genitive ; as, a rua hi d^ eUrey^ the 
meet belongs to the king; ifia cafa he demcupay^ 
this houle l^ongs to my lather. 

Emfer is taken for a thing to be whole or entire; 
without any alteration or mutilati(yi ^ as, asfazcu* 
das^ao emjer, the goods are not fo&L 

' Of4ke Syntax of Verbs active, pafsive, &c. 

When two verbs come together, with or without 
any nominative cafe, then the latter muft be in the 
innnitive mood ; as, quer vm^ aprcudir a foliar In- 
gliz f will you learn to fpeak Englifh ? 

AH Verbs active govern the accufative ; but if 
they are followed by a proper name of God, man, 
or woroan^ of any noun expreiiing their qualities or 
title, then it governs the dative cafe ; as, conkico a 
fta pdy, I know his father ; JchdraS a Joao no ca- 
tninhs, they found John in the road. 

All verbs of gefture, moving, going, ruling, or 
doing, as alfo the verbs that have the word that 
goes Ijefore, and the vc^ord that comes after, both be- 
longing to one thing, require the nominative alter 
them 9 as, Pidra vh trrado^ Peter goes on wrong ; 



I 



142 PORTUGUESE 

- opSbre dSrme defcangidoy the poor fleeps without care* 
Alfo the verb of the infinitive mood has the fame 
cafe, when verbs of wiflbingand'the like come after 
them ; as, tddos dezejaofer ricos^ every body wifhes 
tabe rich ; dnfes quisera fer dduto que pareeilo, I had 
rather be learned than be accounted lo. 

After verbs the Portuguefe exprefs j^w and no by 
que Jim and que «45, Example, criyo que firyiy I be* 
lieve yes ; crijo que nho^ I believe not s digo qnefimy 
I fay yes ; cutdo que naoy I think not ; apiflo quefim^ 
I lay yes y quereis apqftarque nao ? have you a mind 
to lay not ? ' - ^ 

Verbs fignifying grief, compafsien,' want, remem-^ 
trance, forgetting, &c. will have the genitive ; as, 
pifame muito da mbrte de feu irmdo^ I am very forry 
for the death.of your brother 5 Hie morre defome^ he 
perifhes by hunger ; Umbrefe do que me dijje, remem- 
ber what you faid to me -, compadegi-me dasfuas dif 
p&^aSy I pitied him for his misfortunes 5 efquect-me 
detudoifto, all this I forgot. 

The reciprocals of jeering, boafting, and diftruft-^ 
ing, govern atfo the genitive ; ^Sy jaSIarfey gloriar' 
fe^picirfe, enverg^nharfe) &c. 

AH the verbs active govern the dative only when 
the fubftantive reprefents a perfon ; as, cu conhego a 
vm^^^&cc. I know you, &c. 

' The following verbs belong to this rule of the ' 
dative: 

Jogdr, to play ;:^s,jogdr c&rtas, to play at cards^; 
jogar COS centos, to play at picquet ; jogar ao xadrez, 
to play at chefs, &c. 

Obedecer, defobedecir^ agrad&r, comprazer; as, iu 
obedego^ a Dios^e el-tey, I obey God and the king 5 
€omprazio em tudo aos foldhdos, in all he pleafed the . 
foldiers. 

Mandir, when it fignifies to command an army, 
company, &.. requires the accufative, but, when ' 
other things, the dative.; as ille mandava a cavalU'^ 
ria, he commanded the hprfe s governaddr ma$$* 

dou 



GRAM MA R. 14$ 

dAu a tSJos OS fwraddres que ft retirafjem p^ra Juas €&• 
/ks\ the governor ordered all the inhabitants to re- 
tire into their hdufes. 

/r, to go ; as, v6u a Paris ^ I go to Paris. 

jtfsifiir, djuddr, focorrcr, to help 5 as, afsifiir ao of^ 
Jim divinoy to affift at divine fervice. 

SaudoTy to falute or greet s as> tile fauda a tddos^ 
he (alutes every body. 

FalliTy to fpeak ; fatizjazir^ to fati^fy ; fervify to 
ferve ; favorecir^ to favour ; amea^hry to threaten. 

The verbs of pleafing, difpleafing, granting, de- 
nying, pardoningi^ will have the person in the da- 
tive cafe. 

The imperfonals acontecir^fuccedery import&ry per-^ 
tenctry and the like to thefe, will have often two 
datives, of perfon ; as, a mim mefuccedeoy it happen- 
ed to me 5 a Hie Ihe con^im^ it fuits him, or\\. is con- 
venient for him ; a ille nao Ihe importay it does not 
concern him, &c. - ^ 

All the active verbs require an accufative 5 and* . 
the Latin verbs which govern the accufative of the 
things, and the dative of the perfon, ^f overn gene- 
rally the fame in Portuguefe ; as, efcrevei que digd 
a voffo irmaoy write to your brother what 1 do fay* 

Verbs of afking, teaching, arraying, will have an 
accuiative of the doer or fufferer, and fometimcs 
verbs neuter will have an accufative^of the thing ; 
as, gozarfaltde^ to enjoy health ; pego ejlefav6ry I aflc 
this favour -yille idea muiio bemflauta^. he plays very 
well on the jflute ; curat huma doingay to cure a sick- 
'Jiefs. 

Verbs paffive, and the greateft part of the reci- 
procals require the ablative, with <sfe, doy day dos, 
daSy pOTy or pilloy pclldy pillosy pillas ; as, /ui cha^ - 
niado por el r/y, I was called by the king ; retiriu-me 
da cididey \ retired from the city ; illefdi amhdo do 
fSvOy he was loved by the people. But you muft 
except acoft&r fe^ which requires a dative preceded 
by a; encollar'JiyW\\\Q\x fometimes will have'a da- 



U4 PORTUGUESE 

tiye» and (bmetimcs 911 ablative pi^ded hf ern^M^ 
m. mSy or nas ; n^th^Je, which requires^ atriativte \ 
fetttar fe, introduz-rfe, &c. which muft have theidbt 
Jative with the prepdfition i^» m^ na^ noSy nss. 

The ttths joinea wkh a roud which they govern, 
muft have the infinitive withi^i^; as tenh^v^madc 
4t rify I am near laughirig. 

The price of any thing bought or fold, or bar* 
tared, will have thir ^^ctii^ive with^. 

The vtrhpCrfiy when it fignifies ^ iftgit^ muft 
have the infinitive, with the particle a ^ as,p4r-fca 
chri»\ to begin to cry. 

Verbs of plenty, filling, emptying, loading, UBf- 
loading, win have the ablative ; as,' i0a terra abun- 
de d9 tfigo ; this country abounds with corn s «^ 
^# (orregido de miferWy he is loaded with calami^ 

Verbs denoting cuftom^help, beginning, exhortar 
tion, invitation, require th^ infinitive with the pwr- 
ticle a ; as, ^udir afemear^ to help fowing s conviddu 
mf a cekf^ he invited me to fupper. 

Verbs that fignify diftance, receivifigj • or taking 
away» will have the ablative ; as, a madeira difia 
de MfrrU%5 ^20 miihaSy Madera lies ,320 miJes bom 
Morocco. 

Note, that the verbs fignifying receiving, or takiag 
away, generally require the ablative of the perfoa ; 
but they fometimes requii^ an accuCative : particift* 
larly the verb retetir^ when it fignifies t9 welcdme^ or 
/• tmertain : as, ilk re^ebe tddss com muite agrado^ he 
gives his company a hearty reception, he n^akes 
limsi very welcome. 

Verbs denoting obligation, govern thefoilowiag 
lA&iitive with the prepofition a ; as, iu obr^drUa 
^ a* ifi^y I will oblige him to do it. 

Verbs of arguing, qwarjelling, fighting, fee. will 
%VW the ablative with C9m ; as, feiejbu fMts de hunm 
hAraemfiu irm^^ he qui»flcelied more than one hoiar 
witli lMa.baoAbef. 

After 



GRAMMA R. 1*5 

"After the verb fubftantiveyJrV, to he, para is made 

uC? of as well as a ; the firft is employed to denote 

the uie or deftination of any thing; as^ ifta penpa 

he psra efcreviry this pen is to write with. But the 

' particle a is ufed to denote only the a£tipn; as, ellt 

Jdi (hprimtiro afugtr^ he was the firft to run away. 

The verbs of motion to a place always govern 
the dative ; as, vbu & comedia, I go to the play. 
Though the verb voltir^ to return, may alfo have 
an accufative, with the prepofition para. But the 
verbs .of motion from a place govern the ablative 
with diy do, da, dos,*dasi ^^j venho do cdmpo^ I come 
from the country. If the motion is through a place, 
tqen .the verbs govern the accufative, with ^<jr;. 
as, pajjarii por Ldndres, I vvill come by the way of 
London* 

Of the Ufe and ConJiruSlion of the Tenfes. 

Though we have fpoken at large upon the tenfes 
in the Firft Part, you muft, however, take notice. 

r. That they make ufe of the infinitive and the - 
auxiliary verb havir, together with the pronouns lo^ 
la, Iqs, las; inftead of the future indicative ; as, 
fmvir40'heu I will hear him; and th?n the r of the 
infinitive is changed into lo, la, los, las-, and fome- 
times they make ufe of the infinitive mood and the 
auxiliary verb haver, with the pronouns conjunfHve 
me^ te,fe, &c. inftead of the fame future; as^ 
dar-lHe-hei, I will give him; agajldrfe-h&, he will 
be angry* 

2, That when we find the particle if, which in 
Portuguefe is expreffed by fe, before the imperfeft. 
indicative, we muft generally ufe the imperfefl: fub- 
juo£iive in Portuguefe; example, fe iu iivefse, if I 
nad ; fe eupudcfse, if I could. But fometimes they 
ufe the imperfeft indicative ; as, difse-lhe que ft 
rnuria^ &C.5 he told him that if he was willing* £sfr. 

. L . .3. That 



. i 



146 P O R T U G U E »E 

3. That the firft imperfefl: fubjun6tiye in Portu- 
giiefe isalfo ufedin alenfe that denotes the prefent, 
^ecially in fentences of wiQiing; as, qtiizera que 
Domingo' fizifse bom timpOy I wilh it would be fine 
weather on Sunday. But if the fame tenfe is pre-^ 
ceded by ainda que, although, then it muft be ren- ' 
dered into Englifli by the fecond imperfeftfubjunc- 
tive, or by the imperfeft indicative ; as, Su ftaS a 
qufzeray ainda que tivifse milhdens de jh^ though flie 
was worth feveral millions, I would not have h^r; 
aind0 que ille confentifse ni/so, ttaS Je podia fazcr^ al- 
though he would confent to it, that could not be 
done. Laftly, when the firft imperfeft fubjunSive , 
is preceded by fe^ it is fometimes rendered into' 
Englilh by the fecond imperfeft fubjun6tive y as^/r 
elle viefiCy if he fliould come. 

The Rnglifh are apt to put the firft imperfeft of' 
the fubjun£tive where the Portuguefe make, ufe of 
the fecond ; as, I had been in the wrong, nao /eria 
tido razao ; apd though they may fay nad tivcra tido 
razaoy they may not fay naS tivefse ttdo razaS^ Xq . 
exprefs the Englifti of, I Jfwuld have been in the 
wrong, or / had been in the wrong. 

Note, that to exprefs in Portuguefe, //J6?»g-A /^^. 
Jkould be^ we muft fay, qudndoifsofd/se^ and not feria. 

The Portuguefe ufe the future tenfe fubjunftivc 
after the conjundtion-j^, when they fpeak of a future 
a£tion, but the Englifh, the prefent indicative : ejj- 
ample, to-morrow, if I have time, amanhaa fe tivir 
timpo^ and not fe tenho ; if he comes, we ihall fee 
\\va\yn6s veremoSyfe Hie vier. 

A conjunction between two verbs obliges thelaff 
to be of the fame number, perfon, and tenfe as the. 
firft: example, the king wills and commands, elrii 
quer e ordena ; I fee and I know, iu vSjo e conhego. , 

Sometimes the prefent is m^de ufe of, inftead of 
the preter definite in narrations, as, no mefmo tempo 
que hia andando, o encdnira^ o defpe^ e o &ta a huma 

arvorc. 



i 



GRAMMAR. 147 

ia-vore^ as he was going, he meets him, ftrips hrm, 
and ties him to a tree. 

When the Portuguefe ufe the infinitive wirh a 
third perfon in the plural, thev add em to it, and it 
is generally preceded by por^ for, and para^ in order 
to, that, or to the end that; as illes fhrcR enforc^dos 
por fwrtarem^ they were hanged for robbing j parm 
Jhem enformados^ that, to the end that they may be 
infornK:d ; para pod^rem dizir^ that they may be 
able to fay. 

Obferve, that when the Portuguefe put par before 
the firft future fubjunflive, they fpeak of a time 
paft ; as, por falldrdeSy becaufe you have fpoken. 
But when they put para before it, then they fpeak 
of a time to come ; as para falldrmos^ that, or to 
the end that we may fpeak, in order to fpeak. 

Of Moods. 

All the tenfes of the indicative mood may be em- 
ployed without any conjunftion before them ; but 
they admit alfo of fome. Befides the conjun£iion 
que, thofe that may be made ufe of are/^, c6mOy and 
yudndqy with fome diftindtion in refped to /^f, be- 
caufe this conjunftion is feldom ufed before the fu- 




Jeije ha^ devW, I do not know if they 
eftdu em d&vidafe os inim/ps pa/sara5 o rlOy I doubt 
if the enemies will pals the river ; nao pergunto fc 
partirhy I do not alk if he will fet out. 

The optative or fubjunftive in Portuguefe has al- 
ways fome fign annexed ; aSj omla^ prouvira a D^ 
os.o/e! would to God, 1 pray God, God grant 5 
&c.; que.paray quCy &c. that,&c. 

The - particle que is not expreffed m the prelent 
of this mood, but it is H?derftood in fente^^^^ 
wilhing or praying ; as, Dcos fat^a bom, let ^^ 
amend him. ^ When 






14« - PORTUGUESE 

When ^ is between two verbs^ the laft is not 
always put m the fubjun£tive,becaufe, thoagh fame 
foy crfyo que vinha^ I believe he comes ; I think it b 
better to fay cri^o que vem ; but when there is a ne» 
g^tion, thfe verb following que muft be put in the 
fubjunftive; as, nao crey^ que vinhayl do not beKeve 
hii will come, nai cr^oque vSnha fa5 cido^ I do not 
believe he will come fo fooh. 

When the verbs crtr^ to believe, /J^A^, to know, 
are uftd interrogatively, and followed by the -par- . 
tide qwe^ the next verb is put in the indicative, 
when the perfon that afked the queftion makes no 
doubt of the thing which is the obje£t in queftion s 
as, if khdWing that peace is made, I want to know 
if ^he people whom I converfe with know, it too, \ . 
will exprefe rayfelf thus, Jabeh vis que efia fiita a ' 
faz ? do you know that peace is made ? But if I 
have it only by a report, and doubt of it, and want 
to be informed of it, I muft aik the queftion thus, 
Jahih vbs que a pax eJlSja fiita ? and by no means 
fabiis vos que eft&feiia^a paz ? . \ 

You muft obferve alio, that the prefent fubjunc- 
tive of fai^ IS elegantly ufed when it is attended by 
a negative, and the particle que in this phrafe, naS 
que tujaiba^ not, that 1 know of. 

All the verbs ufed imperfonally with the particle 
que require the fubjunftive ; as, he precifo que iUe 
venha, he muft come ; cotwim que ifia fe faga^ it is 
convenient that this be done. You muft only ex- 
cept fuch fentences as cxprefs any pofitive a^urance, 
or <:ertainty ; as, he cerio que vem^ it is certain thftt 
he comes; Jtique ejia em cafa, I know he is' at h^e. 
" From thefe obfervations it follows, that all the 
verbs not exprefGng a pofitive aflurance, or believ- 
ing, but only denoting ignorancey doubt ^ fear ^ aflo^ 
nyhmentj admiration^ ivij^ingy prayings pretenfion^ 
or dejire^ govern the fubjunftive mood after que-y 
as, duvido que pofsa^ I doubt it is in his power; 
/^o que mArra^ L ani afraid he will die ; admirome 

que 



GRAMMAR, 1*9 

que con/tnia, nlffo, I wonder he agrees to it,&G. ; to 
J all which they add oxala^ an Arabic word, iSgnJfy- 

^ mgGod ^tf«/, which is ufed in Portuguefe before 
all the tenfes of the optative or conjunftive, as well 
as praza a DSos^ may it pleafe God ; or, prouvera a 
DioSy might it pleafe God. 

When que is relative, and there is a verb in the 
imperatives or in the indicative, with a negative or 
interrogation before it, it governs likewife the fub- 

" jiitffiUve ; as nao ha^ coufa que mak me inquietey there is 
nothing that difturbs me more \ ha coufa no mitido 
que me pc^a dar tanto gofto ? is there any thing in the 
world ths^t may give me more pleafure? ' allegai-lhe 

. tdntas razdens que o pojfao perfuadir^ R^ve him fo 
many reafons that he tnay be perfuaded. 

The prcfent fubjunftive is fome times rendered in- 
to Englifli by the fecond preterimperfefl fubjunftive, 
when it is followed by a verb in the future tenfe i as, 
cittda que iu trabdlhe^ ndnca Mi de canfar, though I 
fliduld work, I never would be tired. 
, The Portuguefe ufe fpecially the fame prefent 
fubjunftive for the future ; as in thefe fentences,« 
and others like : 

Nao duvido que venhay \ do not doubt but he will 
conie. . 

Duvido que o fa^a^ I doubt that, or whether he 
-V^ill do it. 

Therefore avoid carefully thofe faults, which io^ 

reigners are fo apt to make, in confidering rather 

the tenfe which they want to turn into Portuguele, 

' than the mood which the genius of the language 

reouifes. 

Th^ prefent indicative is alfo ufed for the future, 
as well as in Eiiglifli : example,y(0»/a/i h^e em chfa ? 
do you dine at home to-day ? 



1.3 ' Of 



150 P O-R T U G U E S E 

. <y the particles governing the Optative or ^ub^ 

junSive. 

The conjunftion que^ that, generally requires the 
fubjun£live after it ; but antes que, primeiro que, be- 
fore that, always requires it. 

Take notice, that que n:)akes all the words to which 
it is joined become conjunftives, as, para que, to 
the end that ; bem que^ ainda que, &c, Pdjio que^ 
although ; ate que, till ; quando, cdmo querqu6y which 
commonly govern the fubftantive. But com que 
ajfim governs the indicative ; as, c}im que, or com que 
ajstm vira amanhaa, fo he will come to-morrow. 

In Portuguefe you muft take care how you exprefs 
though^ or although', if it is by ainda que, you may 
put either the fubjunftive or indicative after it: ex- 
ample ^ ainda que fija horriem honrado, though he is an 
honeft man ; ainda que elle faz aquillo, though he 
' iJoes that. But if you render although or though ^ 
hy nao oijldnte, then you muft ufe the infinitive: 
example, though he is an honeft man ; nao obftdnte 

fer elle horn em honrado \ though he does this, nao ob- 

jiantefazer ^lle ilio. ,• ■ 

The imperfonal. verbs generally govern the fub- 
junftive with ^ue-, but with this diftinftion, when 
the imperfonal is in the prefent tenfe or future, of 
the indicative mood, then it requires the prefent 
fubjunftive mood ; tut when the imperfonaj, or any 
other verb taken imperfonally, is in any of the pfe- 
terites indicative, then it governs the imperfect^ per- 
fect, or pluperfect of the fubjunctive, according to 
the meaning of fpeech ; as, importa muito qu^ eUtey 
veja tudo, it is of great moment that the king may 
fee all; fof cpnveniente que o principe fojfe com 6lle,^\i 
was convenient that the prince fhould go with him. 
The prefent fubjunctive is like wife conftrued, 
when the particle por is feparated from que, by an 
adjective; as, por grdnde, por adniiravel, por dduto 

fue/eja, though he be great, admirable, learned. 

• a An- 



GRAMMAR^. I5i 

An imperative often requires the future of the 
Tubjunctive ; as fucceda o que fucced^r^ or /eja o qne 
for^ happen what (hall, happen, at all events. 

The imperfect fubjunctive is repeated in this- 
phrafe^and others VikQ^fuccedifse^ q quefuccedtfseyXtt 
happen what would. 

The future of the fubjunctive mood follow gene- 
rally thefe, logo que, quando, fe, cdmo, &c. ; as, logo 
fue cheg&r irSrnos' a pafse&r^ as foon as he comes, w.e 
.will go and take a walk ; qmndo vier^ eftarSmos 
prdmptoSj when he comes we will be ready. 

.Obferve, that qu&ndo and logo que may alfo be 

conftrued with th^ indicative mood ; as, quando el 

■ riy vi t^do^ ndS o engdmo^^v/hen the king fees every 

'thing, he is not deceived ; Jogo que chegou^ fallei com 

^ dlliy as foon as he came, 1 fpoke with him. 

Of the Ittfinitvue Mood. 

In Portuguefe there is not a general (ign before 
tbe .infinitive, as in Englifh the particle /o; but 
there are feveral particles ufed before the infinitive, 
denoting the fame as to does in Englifh, and they 

* are governed by the preceding verbs or noun^. 
Thefe particles are the following : tf, para^ de, cam, 
em, pory ati, defp6is dc ; and the article (?, when the 
infinitive ferves as a nominative to another verb ; as, 
di^tr e o fazSr fa^ dias cdufas, faying and doing 
are two different things. . ' 

A coming between two verbs, notes the fecond 
as the object of the firfl ; as, a tarddnga das' nofsds 
efperdn^as nos enftna a mortificar os nofsos dez^jos, the 
delay of our hopes teaches us to mortify our de- 
fire$ ; Slle come fa a difcorrSry he begins to reafon. 

Para notes the intention or ufefulnefs ; as, a ad- 
verfiddde ferve para experimentar a paciSncia, adver- 

. fity ferves to try one's patience. Fara after an ad- 
jective denotes its object; as, efti primptopara oh* 
ifer^, he i« ready to obey. 
. : L4 , Dt 



153 PORTUGUESE 

De is put between two verbs, if the first go- 
verns the genitive or ablative ; and whenvthe fub- 
stantive or adjective governs either of thefe two 
cafes, de muft go before the following verbs, or in- 
finitive ; as, vinho de vir a miu pay^ I have juft feen 
my father ; he t^mpo de hirje^ it is time to go away ; 
el-riy foifervido de mandar, the king has been pleaf- 
cd to order. 

The infinitive is on feveral occafions governed by 
prepofitions or conjuncti6ns ; as, /em dizer palavra, 
without fpeaking a word, where you mayobferve 
it is expreffed in Englifti by the, participle prefcnt ; 
as ninca se cdnga de jugar^ he is never weary of 
playing ; diverte-se em cagdr^ht delights in hunting; 
tile esti dointe pot trabalhar demajiadamintey by work- 
, ing too much he is fick ; perde ofiu tempo empaffeiar^ 
he lofes his time in walking ; heideir-me Jem me deS' 
ped/r f (hall I go away without taking my leave ? 

The infinitive is alfo ufed paflively ; as, naS ha 
fue dizer y que very &c. ; there is nothing to be fatd, 
feen, &c. 

The gerund of any-verb active may be conjugated 
with the verb eftdrj to be, after the fame manner as 
in Englifh ; as, estdu escrevindoy ' I am writing \ tile 
istava dormindo, he was afleep, iSc. 



C H A P, YI- 

Of the' Syntax of Participles and Gerunds. 

THE participle in . the Portuguefe language 
generally ends in do^ or to ; as, amad^y- visto, 
ditOy%tc. 

The active participles that follow the verb ter^ 
to have, m\xfi end in o ; as> 

Tinho vistt> el riy^ I have feen the king. 

1 ^ Tinho 



GRAMMAR. 153 

TMio vifio a rarnha^ I have feen the queen. 

E% tinha am&do os iitfroSyl bad loved books. 

Eu tinha lev&do as c&rtasy I had carried the letters. 

We meet with authors who fometimes make the 
participle^ s^gree with the" thing of which they are 
(peaking ; as, in Camoens, Canto 1, Stdnza xxix. 

E porque c6mo viftesj fern paflTddos, 

Na vi&gem tao ijferes pertgos, 
, TAUq^ .climasy e dot exprimentados, Csfr. 

And Canto 2, Stan. Lxxvi. 

Sio offereciminios verdadiiros^ 

E pal&urasJinciraSy nao dobrhdaSy 

As que o reymdnda a os nSbres cavaleiros^ 

Qi^^ tdnto mar e tirras tern pafladas. 

If it be a verb neuter, the participle ought artways 
to terminate in (? : example, 

El riy iemjanthdoy the king has dined ; a mMa 
iim ceadoy the queen has fupped ; Ps vqffos amigos itm 
fide^ your friends have laughed ; tninhas irmias tm 
dormido^ my fifters have flept. 

When the aSive participle happens to precede a|i 
infinitive, it muft be terminatedJn o; ^s.ojuiz Ikt 
Ifmha feiio cortar a caiSga, the judgp has caufed his . 
head to be cut pS. 

The paffive participles which are joined with the 
tenfes of the verby^, to be, agree with the fubftan- 
tive that precedes the verb fer ; o capitao f6i lou- 
-vAdfiii the captain was praiied ; a virtude^he eftmida^ 
virtue is efteemed; os preguigofosfao eenfuradoSyt^it 
lazy are blamed 5 as wjiasyoyasjdrai vendidas^ your 
jewels were fold. 

The Portuguefe generally: fuppneffr the gerunds 
jiJ^ww^ and b^tig before the |:»rtjap]es.^ as, dko ijo^ 
having faid fo ; acabado ofermao^ the fermon beings 
ended. ' T))is^ manner. of fpeAkingis called i^ gram- 
marians iftblativies^iabfehtte. 

Tilt particij^e of the prefeat teofc in ^ortuc nefe 
has fmgUfatr^^lPid pkurai»,but one termination ferves 
for both genders 3 ,as hum homem teminte a Deos^ a 



J 



154 PORTUGUESE 

man fearing God ; hAma mdhir tem^nte a Dioiy a 
^oman fearing God ; homens temtnies a DSos^ peo- 
^ pie fearing God. 

There are in Portuguefe a great many participles 
which are ufed fubftantively ; as, ignordihei amdnte^ 
ouvinte, ejluddnte, Ssc. ; an ignorant, a lover» an^ au-* 
ditor or hearer, a fcholar, fsrr. 

It is better to place the nominative after the ge- 
rund than before -, as ejldrido el r6y na comidia^ the 
king being at the play. 






CHAP. VII. 

Of Prepositions. 

A PREPOSITION is a part of fpeech, which is put 
before nouns, and fometimes before verbs, to 
explain fome particular circumllance. 

rrepofitions may be divided into feparable and 
infeparable. An mfeparable prepofition is never 
ioMvA but in compound words, and fignifies nothing 
of itfelf. A feparable prepofition is generally fepa- 
rated from other words, and fignifies fomething of 
itfelf. 

The infeparable propofitions are, 

^^ and abs ; as abrogar^ to abrogate ;' ^hjlfyr-fe^ to 
abftain. 

Arce^ or archi ; as, arceUfpo^ an archbi0iop 5 or- 
ihiduaue, an archduke. 

Aa-y as, advetuicioy adventitious. 

Am ; as, ambiguo, ambiguous ; ampAro, prdtedion, 
iheltcn ' 

Grcumy as circumfidnda, circumftance. 

Co, as, cohabit&r, to live together, to cohabit. 

JD«, feirves to exprefs the contrary of the word it 
is joined to ; a6> dejucirto^ miftal^e s derfas^^ to un- 

/ ' : -, do; 



G RAM MA R. 155 

do ; ikfenganhr^ to undeceive ; are the contrary of 
mctrto^fazir^ and enganhr. 

' Dis ; as, dijp6r\ to difpofe ; difiinguir, to diftin- 
guiQi 5 diftribuir^ to diftribute. 

Ex I as, extrahir^ to extra£t. 

/«, has commonly a negative or privative (enfe, 

denoting the contrary of the meaning of the word 

it precedes ; as, incapdz, unable; infeliz^ unhappy; 

iftacgcSy ina^ion, i^c. ; but fonOetimes it is affirma- 

•tive, as in Latin. 

Obferve, that in before r is changed into rr ; as,, 
hregulAry irregular ; irracionali irrational : before /, 
into /7; as illegitimo^ illegitimate; before m^inh 
changed into im; as immateri&l^ immaterial. 

Ob', zSyObviiry to obviate. 

Pos ; as, i>ofp6r^ to poftpofe, or to poftpone. 

Pre I as, prccedSr, to go before; predfceffdr, an an- 
ceftor; * 

Pro ; as, pfopdr, to propofe ; piromet^, to pro- 
mife. 

. Re, is a borrowed particle from the Latins, which 
generally denotes iteration, or backward a£tion j 
as, reedijicar, to rebuild ; repercutir, to repercute, or 
ftrike back. 

5^ ; as^focorrSr, to help, to fuccour. 

5c?r ; as, y&rr/r, to fmile. 

Sos; as, yi/?/r, to fupporfr; 

Soto ; as, fdtopdr, to put or lay under. 

Sub^ or fob', as, y»^^///r«(?, fubaltern; fubfcrevjir^ 
to fubfcribe,-y&^/)^»^,y&i&ffl/^r, iic. 

The Arabic article al^ which is common to all 
genders and both numbers, is found in the begin- 
ning of almoft all the words that remain in the Por- 
tugu^fe language from the Arabic, and it is the 
fureft way to diftinguifli them. But the Portu- 
guefe articles are added to the Arabic nouns, with- 
out taking off their ^article, 4/, as a almofida, the 
cufhion ; Alcorao, die Cdran, ^c. 

The 



i>6 PORTUGUESE 

. The Greek prepofition anti enters into the com- 
pofition of a great many Portuguefe words, which 
cannot be fet down here. It is enough to obferve, 
that it fignifies generally oppofite ; as in Antlpodas^ 
Antipodes s anu'pdpa, antipop^ ; and fometimes it 
ilgnifies before; as in dntiloquio, 3, preface* a^f peak- 
ing firft ; but in this laft fenfe it is derived from th^ 
Xiatin prepofition anie. 

Offeparable Prepqfitioris . 

It is abfolutely impoffible ever to attain to the 
knowledge of any language whatever, without tho- 
roughly underflanding the divers relations denoted 
by the prepofitions^ and. the feveral cafes of nouns 
which they govern ; both which relations and cafes 
being arbitrary, vary and differ much In all Ian* 
guages. This only infiance wiH evince it: the 
llnglifli fay, io think of a thing ; the French,^ to 
think to a things the Geftnans and Dutch, to think 
on, or upon a thing ; the Spaniards and Portuguefe, 
./« think in a thing, &c. Now it will avail an Englifh- 
,man but little to know that of\^ expreflfed in Portu- 
guefe by de, if he does not know which relations en^ 
and de denote in that language ; fince Hhe Portu- 
guefe fay, to think in a thing, and not of^ thing ; 
therefore we will treat here of each of them, and of 
Iheir cohftruftion feparately. 

Ifl. A^ or rather ao^ as, aos, (at, in, on, &c.) de- 
note the place whither one is going ; as, 

Eu v6u a LondreSj I go to London. 
, P'^oltar a Portugal, to return, or go back to Piwtu- 

A^ in this fense, is a prepofition, but in the next 
obfervations, it is a particle. 

2dly. yi denotes time ; as, chgar a tempo, ib^x- 
TivQ in time ; a tddo o tempo, at all times. 

;3dly;. A denotes the way of being, or of doing of 
people; as alfo their poflure, geflure^ or a£tion| as 



GRAMMAR. 157 

' Efthrh f&a vontide, to be at one's eafe. 

' A direfta, on the right hand; a efquir'da, on the . 
left hand. 

Vivir Afua vontade, to live to one's mind, as one 
likps. • - ' 

AndaT a pi ou a cavdtio^ to go on foot, or onhorfe* 
back/ 

Mmtar a cav&llo, to ride on horfeback, 

Corr^r a rideafoltay to ride full fpeed. 

Trajhr & France/a, to drefs after the French way. 

Fiver a Inglixa^ to live after the Englifti fafhion. 

Andhr a grander p&Jfos^ to walk at a great rate. 

Andhr a pajjdi lintosy to walk very flo^wly. 
' 4thly. A denotes ilie price of things ; as, a oifo 
xtiinSj at eight fliillings. It denotes alio the weight : 
but as the nouns fignifying weight are generally ufcd 
in the plural number, hence it is that they add j to 
0j when it is placed before nouns of the feminine 
gender, and os when it precedes nouns of the mas* 
culine gender: fo they lay, ds ongas^ by the ounce ; 
aorarrdieis, by tbe pound, &?^.- A denotes alfo the 
meafure ; as, medir a pa/mos, to fpan or meafure by 
the hand extended. 

When a is preceded by daquf, and foUpwed by a 
•noun of time, it denotes the fpace of time after 
which fomething is to be done: as, el rey partira 
dcqui a ires dias^ the king will fet out three days 
hence, 

5thly. i^ denotes the tools ufed in working, as 

irkewife the games one plays at ; as, abrir ao mtil, 

"to gr^ve ; wherein you fee they add oio' a^ trabat-- 

h&r it candia^ to do any thing by candle-light; d 

ag&lha^viixSx the needle. 

Andar d.vila^ to fail, or to be under fail, 

• Jogdr a pela^ to play at tennis. 

• 7^S^^ ^-^ cirtaSy to play at cards ; wherein you fee 
they add j to ^ when the noun is of the feminine 
gender, and placed in the plural number. 

Jogdr 



158 . PORTUGUESE 

t 

Jorir aos cimos, to play at piquet ; wherein you 
• fee they add os to a when it precedes nouns fignify- 
ing games, when they are of the mafculine gender 
and put in the plural number. 

6thly. J fignifies fometimes as. Examp. E/fa 
iflo afiugSfto ? Is this as you like it? And feme- 
times it fignifies after ; as, a feu mbdo^ after his or 
her way. It fignifies alfo in \ as, ao principiOy in the 
beginning ; but then they add o to it. 

' 7thly. A is alfo put before the infinitives, pre- 
ceded by another verb ; as, enfin&r a canthvy to teach 
to fing. It is alfo placed between two equal num- 
bers, to denote order ; as^ d6us a ddus^ two by two ; 
^utrao a quitro, four by four: and fometimes it is 

E receded by a participle or adjeftive, and follo^ved ' 
y an infinitive mood. 

8thly. -^ is a particle of compofition, ferving to 
many nouns,, verbs, and adverbs, of which it often, 
increafes the meanings zs, ^din&eiraii), very rich, 
that has a great deal pf money ; but it generally ex* : 
. preffes in verbs the aftion of the nouns they are 
compofed of 5 as, ajoelh&r^ to kneel down, which 
is formed from a and joilho^ knee ; airanddr, to ap- 
peafe j alargir^* to enlarge ; from br&ndo^ foft ; Idrgo^ 
wide, &fr. 

9thly. -^, when it is preceded by the verby?r, and 
followed by the pronouns perfonal, fignifie? in the 
Jlead ofy zSyfe iuf6f$e a vosjfaria aqul/o, if I was you 
(in your place) I would <io that. 

lOthly. When a is placed before cd/a, and the fenfe 
implies^w^g- to, it is Englilhed by to^ but the word . 
ci/a is left out 5 as, i//e fti a chfa do governaddr, he 
went to the governor's. You muft obferve, that a 
in this fenfe is a propofition. 

1 1. Ao pi fignifies /if^r ; as, pdnde hum ao pe do 
tutro, place, put, or fet them near one another. 
Sometimes mi/mo comes before ao pi, to exprefs 
iiill more the neamefs of a thing, and mifmo ao pi 

i^ 



GRAMMAR. . 159 

is Engliflbed by hard iy, jufi iy, &c. ; as, afia cifs 
eit& mifmo aope da minha^ his houfe is juft by mine. 

12th, When the noun refpeito is preceded by a^ 
it is ufed in the fame tenfe as em c&mparagao^ but re- 
quires Qn.e of thefe particles, do^ da, dos, das, after 
it, and fignifies sn comparifon of, in regard to, in refpeS 
ofy zs,ifio he n&da a refpeito do que pqffo diz^r, this is 
nothing to other things that I can fay. 

13th. When a comes before a verb neuter, it 
marks a dative ; and after a verb a£iive, an accuia- 
tive cafe. 

A before the verb propqfito is ufed in familiar dif- 
COIirfes ;. as, a propqfiio, efquecime de dizer-vos o outro 
£a ; now I think on't, I forgot to tell you t'other 



14thj Ao reveZf or as ave/sas, are alfo nfed as 
prepofitions, attended by, de, do, da, &c. ; and it fig- 
nifies quite iherever/ej or, contrary; as i/Ie faz tiioo 
aoreviz, or as avefsas do que ouvera de fer, ou do que 
Ih dizem, he does every thing quite the reverfe of 
right, or contrary to what he is bid. 

15th. A before trSco fignifies provided that. It^ 
is alfo ufed before the word tiro, as, a tiro de piga, 
within cannon fhot. 

I6th. C&ra a cara, cSrpo a corpo,{ignify face toface, 
body to body. Tomdr h^ima cSufa a h6a ou a ma 
parte, fignifies to take a thing well or ill. 

Such are the chief relations denoted by the parti- 
. cle a. The others mull ' be learned in conftruing 
and reading good Portuguefe books. 

Xft. De, or rather do, da, dos, das, (of, from, 
l^c. ) denote, firft, the place one comes from ; as, 
fahir de LSndres, to go out of London ; vir de Frdn^ 
fa^ das Indias, 6?r. ; to come from France, from the 
Indies, &c. 

2d. D^between two nouns denotes the quality of 
the perfon expreflcd by the firft noun ; as, hum ho^ 
mem de honra,^, man of honour : or the matter which 
the thing of the firft noun is made of; as, 

Huma 



V 



\ 



160 PORTUGUESE 

HufM estdiua de marmort^ a ftatue of marble. ' 

H£ma ponte de madeira eh depidra^ a wood or ftotito 
bridge. ^ ^ 

Note, that two nouns fo joined with de are .com- 
monly Engliflied^ by two nouns likewife, but with** 
out a prepofition, or rather by a compound word,, 
wiiofe firft noun (whether fubflantive dr adje6liv)s) 
expreffes the matter and quality, nianner, form, and 
ufe of the other; as a ftone- bridge, hUma ponte de 
pSdra^'j a dancing-mafter, kum mesirede d&nga. 

5d.' Dcy doy da^ dos^ das^ are ufed in Portuguefe 
after the participles of the preterite, with Jer^^ as^ 
Jer amddo, ou bem visto do pSvo^ dos fakioSf i^c. ; to be 
beloved by the people, by the learned, &c. 

Note, that do ferves for the mafculine, da for tbe» 
feminine, and de for both. 

44h. De fometimes fignifies iy/ as, denote; hy 
night ; de dm, by day. 

5th. De before em^ and many nouns of time de- 
notes the regular interval of the time after v(Fh]d| 
fomething begins again ; as, ^u vSu vHo de dim ed 
dSus diaSy I go to fee him every other day ; and be- 
fore nouns of place and adverbs repeated with em or 
para between, de denotes the paffing from one plape 
or condition to another j as, corrirde rua em ria, to 
run from ftreet to ftreet ; de ma/ para peor^ worfQ and ' 
worfe. ^ 

6tn. De after fome verbs, figni6es afier or Ar; 
as, ilJe portSu-fe d^esta Jbrte^ he behaved in or after- 
this manner. 

. 7th. /)f isVifed before an infinitive, and is then 
governed by fome preceding noun or verb j as, ca* 
pim de et^nkr^ capable to teach ; digno de fer am&de^ 
worthy to be loved, &c. j procwrardefazfy^ to endea^ 
vour to dO; authoridade de pregdr^ the power or au- 
tbority of preaching, ^r. 

8th. De is fometimes Englifhed by on ; as, pSr-fe 
dejUthoij to kneel down on one's knees. 

S. De 



<3 A A Sr Ma r. TWi 

*!^. Dthtitwteh ti¥o Aoinid deidoteft the ulfe which 

m thing i$ defigned for ; as, ,^ziite de tandU^ lamp^ 

oil ;: mttk dtfm^ tt fire-Artn % mfHho' de *oSni6, n win^^ 

Ndt«» that this rektioii \A ^iltpttStA inEngliflih^ 
f Wo nootas, making a^ cidtti|^6iind wctd : the fti^ of 
yf9\i\t\i fign{fie» th^ thanner, form^ aind af«, d€ti6ttd 
yiffUkt Pcntugdefetnrepoikiofr i as, cadiira de hr&fo$i 
fkfi ani^chair. Or tsloow-chaii" ; ^Oila dccifa^ A WftX* 
candle, S^. * 

10. De denotes fometiriles the qualify of things; 
88* m^yas de irts fhs^ fiockings V^ith three thmds.. 
SomiKtiaies it denotes alio the price ; as, pdnM di 
dnAito^ xeltHS, eighteen fliilting cloth. 

11. jD^ is fometimes Englilhed by ff^M ; as;viv& 
^ff^fifitm&rje de pim^ to live upon fifli. Sonaetimes 
it IS EngHAed by witAi M^m^trir dejrfsytot flvrve 
with cold. 

12. JDe fonietiipnies fignifiesyor ox out ofy Mjfaliir 
'^M^egria^ to leap for joy ; de niodiflo^ out of mo-* 

. rs. De figpifies fondetiolifes at \ as, zmbir de ai^ 
'pihn^ laugh at one; 

14. De is foitietimes left out ill Englifh^ tfs,^ 
z&r de Aima cok/a^ to eiijoy a thinj^. 

15. D^ followed by two nouns of oili&Bef and the 
prepofition i?// between theiri, is Eriglifiied by ie* 
iween-^ as^ hum hfmem de quarfftta ate eincoihia Mnos^ . 
'a.maiibetweei) forty and iifty. 

' 16< '2)<, preceded by the prepofition dUnti^ ift left 
out 'in Engltih s ^s, didnte de rnhf, before xfie'^ M- 
dnte de DioSy, before God. 

17. jD^ when it is plated before cafa, znd the 
ienfe ittipliietiiffrih^fh^mi is Engliflied hfjfrvm j but 
the ' word V^jISr fometimes ii left out iii Englilh, and 
fometimes not; a^^ vinho de cafa (meaning rriy 
houfe) I come from home, from myhoufe: but 
lirtiep tbcy fay, vhixf dk c^ Ja Senhdta €, we muft . 

M render 



^162 P* Q «^T U G U E S E 

rehder it iVEnglifli thus, / am rentrtmgjrem Mrs. 

Finally, de \% itifed before feveral. words; as, M 
irifos, lying all along on the ground; de madrugi^ 
'da^ioon in the ^mqrning ; de veyaSy in- earneft, feri- 
oully ; de verdS, \r\ Aimmer ;. idmem de paUvra, 4 
man as good as his word ; de ro^Ar, backwards, or 
on one's back; \andir de pi, to be fickly withoujt 
being bed-rid : and many others wliich muft bf 
learnt bjrufe. , 

jfntes. 

HL Antes, before, ihews a relation of time, df ^ 
-which it denotes priority; and is always oppofite to 
depots, after ; as, antes da criagaS do miindo,De(oK Ihe 
creation of the world, ^ » 

Primiiro is alfo a prepofition ; as, ille cke^dupri- 
rnHro que Su, he arrived before me. 

Didnte. 

IV. Didnte, before, fliews a. relation of plac^, 
and it is always oppofite to detrdz, behind. If fig- 
nifies alfo fom^times em, or na prejinga ; as, ha Sr^ « 
vores diante de fia cafa, there are trees before Ijjs ■ 
houfe ; ponde aquillo didnte do fogo, fet or put trait \ 
before the fire ; prigar didnte deMi, to preach b^ 
fore the king. 

Didnte is alfo fpmetimes an adverb, and may be 
ufed inftead o( adidnte-, as, ir didnte or adidntt, to 
o before : but in the following phrafe you muft 
ay, n&5 vades tdnto adidnte, and not didnte, don^t gO 
fo far ; por didnte is to be Englifhed by a» in th€ fol* 
lowing phrafe, ide for didnte, go on. ^ ^^^ 

Depots. ^[\v\ 

V. Dep6is,^{tT, denotes pofteriorityoftim^and 
it is ufed in oppofition to dntes ; as, dep&is do diMviOj 
after the delude : depois do miio-dia, after noon* 

Depdis alfo is ufed with an infinitive ; as, f(dtp 
a^illo, or tendofeito aquillo, or depots defaztr a^Uh^ 

" after ^ 






. G R A M M A R. MS 

after having done that; and it is a)fo made a con- 
jun£)tion with que^ governing the indicative; as, de* 
p6is que tivtfeiio aqull/o.uf tcr he had done that, 

" .- Detriz. , 

5 VI. Ditr&z^ behind, denotes pofteriority both of 

place and order, and it is faid in oppoiition to didnte ; 

. as, s/6a cafa efia detraz da vbjfa^ bis houfe is behind 

^yodrs ; ille vittha detriz de mim ; ' he walked aft en 

me. * 

Em. \ 

VII. EtHy or noy na, ms, nas, (in^ into, withi»« 

&C.) denote a relation both of time and place. The 

many various iignifications in which thefe prepofi- 

tions are ufed, rouft be accurately obferved, and 

. much regard had to them -in the pra£Uce. 

No and na are fometimes rendered into Englifh by 
a ; ail, duas vizts tto dia, nafemdnay &c. twice a day, 
aweek|,&c. 

Noy fuiy &c^ are always ufed before nouns de- 
jioting the place wherein fome^thing is kept ; as, ^i 
7IO gabmitty it is in the clofet ; na papeleiray in the 
bureau ; nas gavStas^ in the drawers \ na, ria^ in the 
ftreet, &c. but fometimes . they are Englifbed by 
np(m ; as, cahir no cMo, to fall upon the ground. 

Emy noy My &c. fignifies commonly />/; as, en^ 
L&ndi'esy in London ; eM na graga del rey^ he is in 
^ favour with the king; but in. fome cafes it has a 
.very particular meaning j as, ejtiiT em c&rpOy which 
ilgnifies literally to be in body, but the tfue fenfeof 
it is to be wiihotti a cloak f- fo that the body is iriore 
expofed to view without an upper garment. Eflkr 
jem fernaiy literally, to be in legSy (ignrfies to be barer 
l^^^\ J^bat is, the legs expofed without ftockings. 
^&r em cami/a is faid of one that has only the fhirt 
on his back. • . 

When this prepoiition em is before an infinitive 

iQ Ppjrtuguefe, then it is an Englifli gerund; as, 

cw^fie em fallhr bem^ it cpnfifts in ipeaking well y 

si M2 bat 



• ■ I. 



^162 PORTUGUESE 

rehder it in'Englifh thus, / am retvrmigjrom Mrs 
Cs. 

Finally, de i$ lUed before feveral, words; as^ J^ 
irifos, lying all along on the ground ; de madrugi^^ 
da^ foon in: the mqrning ; dt veras^ in- earneft, ieri- 
oufly ; de verdS, in iummer ;. Admem de palivrja^ 4 
map as good as his word ; de t^/^at, backwards, or 
jon one's back ; \afidiar de pe, to be fickly without 
being bed-rid : and many others wliich muft, bf 
learnt by^ufe* .1 

Ante$. 

HI. Antes ^ before, fhews a relation of time, of 
' which it denotes priority ; and is always oppofite to 
depots^ after ; as, antes da crkifaS do m^ndo,hefoTe the 
creation of the world. - * 

Primiiro is alfo a prepofition ; as, ille cke^Supri- 
m&ro que Su, he arrived before me. 

Diante. 

IV. Duinie, before, (hews a relation of plac^, 
and it is always oppofite to detrdZy behjnd. lij^g* 
nifies alfo fom^tinies em^ or na preftnga ; as, ha or- - 
vores diante de fia chfa^ there are trees before bj* 
hpufe ; ponde aqutUo diante do fogo, fet or put tluft 
before the fire 5 pregar didnte del-tii, to preach b^ 
fore the king. 

Didnte is alfo fptnetimes an adverb, and may be 
ufed inllead of adidnte 3 as, ir didnte or adidntt, to 

JY> before : but in the following phrafe you muft 
ay, n&S vddes tdnto adidnte, and not didnte, don't gO 
U} far ; por didnte is to be Englifhed hyonin tb« fol- 
lowing phrafe, ide por didnte, go on. ^ ^^^ 

' Depdis. -imr 

V. Depdis, ^ftcT, denotes pofteriorityoftime»and 
it is ufed in oppoiition to dntes^ as, depAis dodkMviOy 
^hev the delude : depdis do miio^dia, after noom 

. Depdis alfo is ufed with an infinitive ; as, feitp 
sqmllo^ or tendo/eito aquiUo, or depots defoT^ir a^ptUk, 

after 



\. 



. G R A M M A R. 163^ 

after having done that; and it is alfc) made a co|i- 
jun£)tion with f»^ governing the indicative; as, de* 
p6is que tivtfeiio aqull/o, sftcr he had done that, 

Detriz/ / ' 

, VI. Deir&z^ behind, denotes pofteriority both of 
place and order, and it is faid in oppofition to dulfife ; 
as, s/6a cafa efia dttrazda vbjfa^ bis houfe is behind 
,yoUrs ; Hie vinha detraz de mim ; " he walked aften 
me. * 

Em. 
: VIL Em, Of noy na, fwsj nas, (in, into, withi»« 
&cO denote a relation both of time and place. The 
many various iignifications in which thefe prepofi- 
lions are ufed, rouft be accurately obferved, and 
much regard had to themJn the pra£Uce. 

No and na are fometimes rendered into Englifh by 
a ; 2ii^dua5 vizes tto dia^ nifemdnay &c. twice a day, 
aweek»&c. 

JNfe, »?, &c^ are always ufed before nouits de- 
noting the place wherein fome.thing is kep^; ^^yejii 
M gabintte^ it is in the clofet ; na papeleira^ in the 
bureau ; nas gtru^as, in the drawers i na, rita^ in the 
ftreet, &c. but fometimes . they are Englifbed by 
np&i ; as, cahW no c/iaS, to fall upon the ground. 

Em, nOi fia, &c. fignifies commonly />/ ; as, <79f 
Ldndi'esy in London ; efla na gr&ga del rSy, he is in 
favour with the king; but in. Tome cafes it has a 
.very particular meaning j as, eftar em cSrpOj which 
iignifies literally to be in bedy^ but the tfup fenfe<»f 
ft is to be wiihotti a cloak i- fo that the body isiriore 
expofed to view without an upper garment. Eflir 
,em -pirnasy literally, to be in legSy (igiufies to be barer 
legged \ Jthat is, the legs expofed without ilockin^s. 
Epar em catnifa is faid of one that has only the fhirt 
on his back. 

When this prcpofition em is before an infinitive 
Jo Pojrtuguefe, then it is an Englifli gerund; as, 
crni/ifie em fallhr bem^ it cpnfifts jn ipeaking well ^ 
y : " M2 - bat 



16* : P O R T U G U ES E 

■ 

but when it is found before a gerund, it (ignifie$ itf 
fimt 0s ; as, mn acabdndo irJi^ as foon as I have done, 
I will geJ. 

Nos nojfos tempos is Engliftied by now a^iays. 

Em i^ ufed \tk fentences that imply a general ienfe \ 
t9, Ette tfik em mifjsr&vel eflhdo^ he is in a wretched 
conditioii; and not nomijer&vel: but if the fent^nce? 
imply ft particular fenfe^ you ntuft make ufe of n$^ 
nas, &c. as, no miferave/ eftado em que Hie ejli, in th'e 
wretched condition wherein he is ; and not em mje- 
rkvel YoD muft obferve in this laft example and 
the like» that you ought to make ufe of ^Mr before 
jw^, and not of w^ m> &:c. which are to be placed 
on^ before m^; therefore you muft not lay^ m 
mjer&vei eJi&M m ^e Hie efih\ but you may faj» w 
imjer&vil efiido no quai tile eftd. 

Note, that em cenftnied with pronouns without 
an article, makes a fort of adverb, rendered itita 
Ehglilb by a prepofition and a noun ; thus in thin 
fbttence, wbs iiimos em cSehe^ we fliall go in d CMcb^ 
pm ckhev^Wi adverb of manner, whicl^ (hews bow 
weihall go : but no coche denotes fometbing befides^ 
as if a company were cbnfidering how they (hall ride 
to a place^ fomebody would (ay, v6s itHs na cadei- 
ninhay e nos no cSche, you (hall go in the chair, and 
we in the coach ; no c6che would be (aid in oppofi- 
tiQn to na cudekinha^ and both rejjpedivelv to iome 
fMCtfied chair and eoacb ; or elie they (iiould fo|r> 
w ififs em cadeirmha^ e nSs em c6cie* But in thki 
:jC^tber fentence^ en dUxSi o meuehapio no cockey I left 
"^my b^t in the coach, it would be improper tq.&y 
tm cdciey becaufe fome particular coach is roeant| 
io wit^ that which has drove nie here or tbsn^ or 
which has been fpoken of. 

We fay de veraS, no veraS or emo veraS^ ^invSr'^ 
Ir6, no invirnoy &c. in fummer, in winter, &c. ' 

Em is alfo rendered into Englifli by or^ MB, tm 
tddoo ttmpo^ ftt an times. 

&n 



GR A M M A R< i«5 

Em h sfed, and never no^ m^ &c. before proper 
Mtmes of cities and authors ; as, ille efth em IJndres^ 
he is in London ; nbs limos em Cicero^ we read in 
Cicera* But they fay no P6ri§^ in Oporto. 

Em^ and no^ na^ &c. are conftrued with the name; 
of kiugdotns i us^em or na, Ing/aiirra^ in Eagl^id : 
hutwifia, is mod commonly conftrued with nanies 
of ptovinces; as, m> AJentejo^ na Beira^ &c» in Aien*, 
tejo, in Beira, &c. 

Em is fometimes rendered into Engliilh by inio ^ 
M Nardjo foi tranrforrnido em Jl6r, Narciflus ww 
metamorphofed into a flower : and fometimes by 
ioi as de rua em rua, from ftreet to ftreet. 

No, ncy are fotnetiraes r^dered into EagliA bv 
Mgatnfii ^dar co^ a caiifs m pMrHdc^ to dau one a 
wad agaioft the wall. 

. No^ na, &c. ave aHb rendered into £ngli& bjr ih 
and fometimes by into ; as, Ur htm menim mi Ar^c^s, 
to hold a ch^d in one's arms ; Mirejrir aJgima emf/k 
j$as maos, de algn/m^ to deliver a ^ing into font- 
body's hands. 

Em is ufed before the word traveZf as In this 
^ipbrafe, /0r/^ de mar em traiviz ^em AlgaHn^ to fallout 
togethen 

^Em before a noun of time^ deoofes the fpgce of 
tame that Aides away in dobg (bmething j as, el-rijf 
foi a HanSver, em ires dlas, the king went to Hanov^ 
in three days ; that is, he was no longer than three 
days in going. 

.:; Em is fometimes ufed after the verb ikp to go ; as, 
vUtm fuatre m0es qae iu Ofat eheguiiij it is now going 
-on four months fince I came hiiher. 

Em before qujnto, and fometimes without it, is 
rendered into Englifh by wii/e or whilfii as, em 
qudnto vosfazSis aquiUo, iu JarSi yioy while you do 
that» I fliall do this: but if they are followed by a 
noon of time with an interrogation, then they muft 
be rendered into Englifii by in how much^ or many ; 
v^im fudnte tempo P in bow much time? You muft 

M 3 Oe&txH^ 



\ 



iae P'O fe T u G u E s L 

bbferve, that em qiidntb a mim, a tt\ a tV//, Sec. ar« 
rendered into £ngli(fa by for what cmcerns me;, tkte^ 

'ki^l\ &c. 

You muft obferve that na ferves for the mafculfne, 
ua for the feminfnc, and em for both. 

Em iignifies as ; as, em final da /Ua amiz&de, as a 

- token of his friend (hip ; em primio^ as a reward. 

•^ The prepoiitions em^ no^ na^ &c. and dentro^ have 

very often the fame (ignification, thereforethcy may 

Tometimes be ufed one inftead of the othei*; as ef- 

'ta na^avitay or Mntro da gav^ia, it is in the 

drawer ; efia na cidhde^ or dhitro da cidade^ be is in 

tQwrt. 

EfH before the words /^w/^r, utilidade^ cmfidera^ 

"yam^ razaSfZnd the like, CgHtfics ift behalf offsr 

the fake of, on account of, &c. as, em razao das btUas 

acfdens ^ue ille tern feito^n confideration of the great 

'things he has performed., 

OpferVe, that they very often make an elifion of 
rite laft vowelis, 0, a, of the prepofitioft noy w^ 
when there is a vowel in the beginning of the next 
word^ -V iS^otf, inftead of na igoa^y they alfo cut 
'off the e of the prepofition em^ and change the m' 
into ny as you may fee in Camoens, Canto 2. Stan2t 
XXXI 1. V alg&mp6rtOy inftead of em algumporto, where- 
in you muft 'obferve that »' is to be Englifhed by 

^Oy or hito. 

■■ <• ■ 

Com* 

* . VII. This prepofition fignificsw/V^, and itdenotcs 

-i:onjun£tion, union, mixing, aflembling, keeping 
f:onTpan}r ; / as, cafir huma donzella com hum homem 
honrado^ to marry a maid with ain honeft man; *>(/> 
com hlguimy to go with one ; com a ajtida de D4oSy 

'by God's help, &c. . 

' Obferve that moft of the adverbs formed of the 

adjeftives are turned in Portuguefe by the pre- 

^ pofition com and the fubftantive ; as, atrevidamifite, 

voWyy^com atrevimintOy with boldrtefej elegante- 
' I • mbttey 



G » A MM A R. i^r- 

Meir/^; elegantly ; com eUgdncia^ with elegance > iw-- 
tfzmifnie, politely^ com cortezia^ with politenefs, &c. 
You muft obierve, that the laft confonaiit m is 
very often cut o£F, even before the noun of number 
ium^ one ; and fo they fay arm, iriftead of com Aumf 
as you may fee in CamocnStCzM. 2. Stanza xxxvii: • 

* Kote, . that zevVA me ^ with thee^ wiih himfelf^ &C4 
are rendered into Portuguefe by commlgo^ comiigo,* 
or comvofco, comjigo, comnS/cOy comvofco, com/fgo. 

When cam is preceded by para, it iignifies Z^- 
ife^tfr^, and fometimes over, in Englifh ; zs^/eJJmos 
pieJofos para com os pobres, let us be merciful towards 
the poor. Ter grdnde podir para com Alguim, to ^ 
llave a great influence over fdmebody's mind. 
'Com before tbe word capa is ufed fnetaphorically,^ 
and then it fignifies under colour, or pretext. > 

Para. 

* VlU.'Pjr^ is rendered into Engli{hbyjf&r.;^but it 
fignifies alfo /<?, when it is found before theinfinitiyet' 
and denotes the irrtention, or purpofe in doing' 
fbmethitig; as, Sfte livro he para mtu irmcA, this 
book' is for my brother -, efta p6mia he para efcrev^r^- 
this pen ils to write ; Deos nos ftz para amdl'o, God ' 
itoade us for to love him ; comtr he neceJJ&rto para 
ionferv&r'a vida, eating is heceflary for preferviDg- 
VSt. . ' . 

" Bdrd cfue \% rendered into Englilh hy f^r whaty 
M, para que he ijld ? for what is this ? andfometime^'^ 
by that, or in order that ; as, para que vinha virme, 
tnat he may come and fee me. But porfue fignifies 
ndfy, for what, upon what account, zs, porquf nSS*" 
^indes f why don't you come ? but when it is not-^ 
fbliowed by an interrogation^ it fignifies hecaufi^ 

; Parakxwts likewife before the verbs, to denote' 
what one is able to do in confequenceofbis.prefent 
difpofition ; as, ille hi baftantemHte fbrte para andar^ 
'a cavSUo'y he is firoog enough to ride \ elle tem haj^ 

M 4 tdnte 



1^9 PORTUGUESE 

to Hiamtf^ia ;hinp{clf ; ocf4^ap ,ie muit^ fawrji^ 
pfra no5 niio jftrvir-nm d^Ha^ XkP pppjifiQii iff tpo /a^ 
iffi^rable to let it fji^p. 

i^«r<i :e;cf)jre0i^ alfo ^ c^papity pr incapacity of 
d.QiRg i^y :$^|ig ; a^y ^/c h Jibm^m p^^ j^> be it 
tbft projs^^r OQan wante4 tor thi«; hekimmparflptu- 
€9^ lie IS good lax littlie 3 ^ iM^^ para nAdf, l^e W 
good fornQtbing. ' . 

. Thi^ prepoiition is alfo ufed to depots (h^ cod or 
iQf>tiv9 ^ dqi^g any thing ; aa» traMM> para i^im 
fl^lk^^ \ work for the public goad ; hum hfykii 
p0rd Mf^inres^ gn faofpital for the poor. 

Para is a prepofitipn of time ; as iftome h&pa pmm 
io4fi 4nHp y ih\^ is fufficieat tp noe for all the y^ar ; 

ejlai unidos, pgra fSmpr^, they are united for ever » 
j^ora dous mSfes ira muito pouco^ for two months it 
was too little. 

, Para i« foai^times pi:eceded by the adverb /^^ and 
fpUowed by a noijin of time, and then it is ElogliAi'** 
ed by againfi or tgwards ^ as. Id para ofim da femd^ 
Mf againft the e^d of tbp week, w towards tfaie en4 

of the w^e^' 

iV^. i$ fometiines Engliifaed by confiierm^y pr- 
tf^^ r/y^^ /^ ; as, efit menm Sfii^ muitQ adianiida 
para a idide qmc tm^ pr para 6 pouco t^rnpo q^g^ 
apriftdey this child is very forward for his age, or 
copfideriog the little time hehas learned ; par^ IngUz 
fgm dcmafiadamint$^ he talks too much cpA^ring 
that he is an Engliihmant 

]^ara iignifies fo^netimes juji pr ready to ^ siS, ^Uf 
e04 para pafiir, he is juft gping away^ he i^ ready^ 



Par^ H 



alfo ufed before the word grdfas ; as, 0a 
n4^J^J>afa^rafaSy he takes no jeft; SUt ni^ «?i 
/^^.ir^f^f h^ ^^ out ^ humour, er he is in an )1L 
Kuou^ur. . - 

Farajnd^ f %Qifies Vf hither i tv^^^hflt plac9 ^ % 

Para 



' • t' # • * • 



. . ""J 



ORAM MAIL 169 

p4ita mf 'PT ptr^ fuifim ? %ii]fiQS it wiai md ' 

fyr0 k -^ £Qglift«<i by twmds^ and k faid of 
p1ape« I a«, JMr^ # ^r^nr^, ^towards, ^ to the eaft. 
/Wa ^M$ qmr fH$^ ^SHJfies whitMr^ ox to wA^ 

Pwa imttri^ pArf^i figoUiefi tfWAtM amhr fkc4^ 

Para comigOy towards me. 
, f4ira. duit)Uf» fignifies/dir iie tint /# emu. 

D0 nrim, para mm^ £gnifie$ f9r snAai coucerm mi, 

Para i« ufed by CamoffHs. Cant. 2, Stanza xxiv. 
bcibre the pr^epofitfon iarJ^Zy atid fignifieg i^rib- 
wards, » 

JRtfr^ betwi^o ^w<^ nouns of Dumber is Etigli&ed 
bjr IT, and fometimes by «i^.; as^ ^«i» i<?»^#i de 
fuarikia para cincohrti dmos^ a nan b^woen forty ^^ 
«ad Afty; ^a ff^/n? ^r^ i:incB Ugooiy it is about 
f<Hur or five leagues diftvit. > ^ 

'. IX- PiNr,peUo,piliaypil/os^ or peUaSy{igmfy far; as . 
^ 4m»^r de V(fs^ tor your iake ; p$r feis femdnasy for 
fix weeks ^ paldvrapor palMfra^ word for word: 

A»49 and p0la iniiead of /t^//<^ and pella^ are out of 
ufc. 

Par fometiines denotes that the thing is not yet 
done ; as, ifia obra ejl& por acabdr^ this work is not 
yet finiflied. 

i'^r, byv for, over, or through ; as^ alcancSi^o p^K 
0mpink$y I obtained it by prote£tion; m v6u por 
dmhtrpy I am goiqg for money \ pafsh piUos ,<dmpoSy 
I walk, through the fielda s P^ ^^^^ ^ rgitio, all over 
the kingdom. 

. When for is before aft infiajtire, and folia wed by 
a negative, in the latter pv't of the fentence, it ii 
Gogliflied by aUhwgb or thpugh\ ?Sf por fcr dcwia^ 
or p9r drvota que/eja^ na^ deim 4fi Jifr malkir, though 

(he 



» 



170 P 6 R t^U G U e: S E 

jbe is a religious woman, yc^ (hfe is. a woman \pir s(r> 
poire, or 'par poUnaue sija, n&9 dcixa de ser sok/rimi 
though (he has no fortune, (he is neverthelefs, or for 
all that, proud. Wherein you fee, that the negative' 
with the verb dtix&r, are rendei^ into Englifh by 
thjB verb /o be, and the paiticles «wrr/4«toJ, j^€/, &c* , 
You muft obferve that tney fometimes put the words 
nem per isso before the verb W(^/^ir, but the fenfe ii 
the fame, and yoii may las Well fay, par sir p6bre, 
nem per isso delxa, 8ic. 

For followed by an d[dje6live and the palticle qui 
with a verb in the fubjun£tive Inood, is rendered 
into Englifh by never so ^ as, par grJnde que iltt s4ja, 
let hi m be iievir fo great; por pimco que sija,nt* 
ver fo little. - - • 

Par, before menos, fignifies far less thati, or under g 
as vm^^ fMo terh por minos de vitUe libras, you flii(It 
Hot have it under twenty pounds. • 

\ Par befote quanta, with an interrogation, fignifiet 
Jar how muck, at what rate ? But if there is no io* 
terrogatipn, as in the folio wing^ and the like fen- 
tences, then it is to be EjngliHied by /?r ii^v^ i^^ , 
much ; as, nhS a faria por qudnto me dessem,! woufld 
not do it for never fo much» 

Par before c/ma fignifies upwards, and before iixa 
is Englifhed by downwards-, as, a remedio obra paf 
cima e par bdxa, the medicine operates, ^r works, up- 
wards and downwards. • ' '> 

P(ar before pSuco, muito, hem, &c. and followed by. 
que, makes a iort of conjunflion governing the fub- 
fundive, and is Engliflied by if, followed by ever 
or never fo little, much, well, &c. as, por p6ucq ^ 
trr/tSf if ypu do amifs never fo little -, par hem que 

^/li^^ i(^ I do never fo well, &c. • 

^ jPim' before mim&gniSics fometimes as for, or* /or 
itUf\ w,por mim ejiu pr6mpta^ as for me, or, for my 
part i am ready y par nnm pdiii darmirfe quiz/rJes^ 
yo« may ilcep for 4ll me. 

^ Par 



V 



. ; G R A M M A R. ni 

Por^ ftllo^ pHUy &c. denote the efficient caufe of a 
thing, as alfo the motive and means, or ways of do- 
ing ; in all ^hicfa (ignifications they^ are Engh'ihed 
by kf^ thrpugh^ out of^ at, &c. as, 

A Afi0 foi conquistada par,Aicx4^JrCyARzvrzs con- 
quered by Alexander. 

Fos/ai/dis nijjojo for ettveja, it is out of envy only 
you fpeak of it. 

E'Ue tfUrou pil/a pSmtj mas Jahio p61la janilla, he 
got in at the door, but he got out at the window^ 
6cc. » 

. Ar denotes place,^ after the verbs it and passhr j 
as, for 6nde iriis vos ? vfrhich way (hall you go ? 

Eu passarii por Frdnqa^ Til go through France ; • 
por 6nde passouelle f which way did he go ? 

P^r conftrued with nouns without an article, de« 
notes moft times distribution of people, time, znd place ; 
and it is £nglifi2ed by a, or every, before the noun i 
as;- 

r Bile dSu tdntopor cabiga, he gave fo much a head. 
- Tdnio por fotd&do, por drmo, por mis, porfemdna, &c^ 
(b much a foldier, a year, a month, a week ; a raz&i 
de vintepor cinto^ at the rate of twenty per cent. 
• lEllepide tdnto por li^oa, he a(ks fo much a league^ 
or every league. 

' Por, between two nouns without an article, or 
between two infinitives without a prepofition, de^ 
notes the choice which one makes between two 
things, alike in their nature, but different in' their 
circudfiftances ; as, 

C&Jd por c&fa; dntes quiro esta que dquella,(itict I 
muft have one of thefe two houfes, I like this bettel^ 
than that ; morr6r por mohair, melhor, he morrir comba- 
tbtdo quefugindo, when a man muft die, it is better 
to die in fighting than in running away* 
V ^.PeUomiyo is rendered into Englifh by through^, 
z^^peiio miyo dos cdmpas, through the fields. ^ 
'Par iniyo is rendered into Englifii by by i .as,.elle 
MltaHfAko/iu iutinto.por miyot de ai$Jifias^\xQbii^ con> 
pafled Kis endsli/ devices. ^oir 



17S POttTUGUESE 

* Per iimd fignifies n one's turn. 

For before the iiafinitives is uied inftead of para 
by the beft Portuguefe writers ; and perqn^ iiafteiid 
of para que '9 as you may iiee particularly to C^mta^wIi 
Canto Q. Ststeza vii. aod viix. and m the follawing 
example, f^r naS, or para nao repeik c que ja temos 
difo^ not to repeat wbat we have already laid, 

^ Por is ' fomelimes Engliflied by for, upon the ac* 
count if, far fah^ %cc. as» ^llefMri ifio porjtm$r de vos, 
he will do this upon your account, or for yooriake ; 
-deixardS'O por mvrtOy he was left for dead 5 effttnho-a 
por miu smigo, I take him to be my friend; iSdos os 
hSmens de berufdi, oi* ejia6 por i1/e^ zU honeft pepple 
^ are for hiois or are on his fide ; por "quern me tdmiis' 
vos ? who do you take me for? 

We have already obfenred, that porqui without an 
interrogation fignifies becaufe ; but it has the fame 
fignificat^on in the following fentence, and the like; 
porqut Hie hi mentirbjo Jegue-fe que tambbn Su feja e 
becaufe he is a liar, does it follow the^pefeie that I 
Wnone? 

Por iftoy or por-ifia razalo^ fignifies therefore'. 

O porque fignifies the reafon, the caufe, orthe 
fubje£i ; as, fiiefe porque ? is it known upon what 
account ? 

Por modo de dizir fignifies as oue nutj fay^ if /y or 
we^may /ayyScc. 

Por didHte fignifies Jbefore^ and por detrdz fignifies 
behind. 
' Por Ventura figm^e^ perhaps. * 

: Piiio petff&do fignifies formerly^ in time pefi^ hereto- 

V Pet ftenhim cifo, by no means. 

• Por mar e por thra, by (ea and kimL 

Rum por hum fignifies oiu by oue. 
; /V is fbmetimes Engliflied by /a ; as» 60iS /oH 
viniej por 'tddos, they are twenty in all. 
' When ihe terb paffibr is followed bypor^ then the 
word Sta, %iii^ to forget % as, p0^tit$ eupMo foir 



(3 R A M M A R. 17». 

itlidy he forgot that; but fpeahing of goods it fignU 
fies Xofmuggk. 

Por joined wiA the verb cr fignifies to fytch, and 
feek after ; as, vU par vinAo, go fetch fome wine ; vdi 
pSlh midm^ go fee for the phyfician. 

PfiT is commonly ufed before the fubftaotives ; as, 
ftfr MAnpkfjioT example; for commodiddde^ for' con- 
veniency 3 por tost/mey for cuftom. fake ; and many 
others, that may be learned by ufe. 

You muft pbferve, that pello ferves for the mafcu- 
line, pella for the feminine, and^^r for both. 

Cpntra. 

X. Contra, (agaii^, contrary to,) denotes oppofi- 
tion; zs, que Jiz vm^^ contra isto ? what do you fay 
againft this ? It iignifies alfo over against, oppofite to. 

ffi e eSntta iiguifies in Rnglilh j^o and con. 

Defde. 

XL JO^fJt, denotes both time and place, and enu- 
meration of things, and is commonly followed in 
the fentence by the prepofition atf {to) ; then defde 
denotes the tertn/rom^wAenceyand ati that of hitler'^ 

to; 38, 

DSfde oprincipio ate fim^ fro^^ the beginning to 
the end. 

' Elk foi a pi defde fVindfor ate Lindres, he walked 
from Windfor to London. 

En tinho visto todos d^fde pimeiro ate iitimo, I 
have feen them all from the firft to the laft ; foraS 
todos mortos difde primeiro ate iltimoy they were 
all (lain to a man. 

DSfde a criaf&i do mUndi^i from or finc^e the crea- 
tion. ' . 

De/de bergo^ ou infancia, from the cradle, from a 

child, 

D^/de 



174 PORTUGUESE , 

Difdt ja^ even apw ; as, difde ja prev^jo^ I even 
nowforefee/ 
; Defde agbra^ from thisr time forward. 

D^fdt ^&6; from that time ever fince. 

.Dtfde qkty as (bon as, when. ^ 

D^dt qudndo7 how long (ince,&r ago ? 

Rio navegAvel difde ojeu nafciminio \ a river n^iga-^ 
ble at its very rife. 



. \ 



^ Ate. 

I 

XII.. jite fignifies ///A even, to, &c/ as you may fee 
in -the following examples. 

Ate 6nde I \iov9 i^Lx'i 

Ate Rdtna, as far as Rome. ;./ 

Ate qudndo ? till when, <;r how long ? 

Ate que eu viva, as long as I live. . 

He hum Homem de tout a bondade, que ate os/iusjni* 
tnigos fao obrigados a iflimalo, he is fo . good a man 
that even his en€;mies Jiave a value for him. 

Ate OS mail vis hofhens iom&vao a liberdade de, &c. 
the ve>y worft of men toolc fuchi a liberty as to, 

Ate que, until, till. 
Ate as ortlhas, up to the ears. 
Elle veftdio ati a camifa^ he has fold the very fliirt 
olF his back. 

Ate ag6ta, or ate aqul, till now, or hitherto. 

Ati aqui, (fpeaking of a place) to this placie, hither, 

^^ Ate Iq, to that place, fo far. v 

^ AjteqiieiftofeJaqa,\}A\\x\^^OTi^. 

Ate entaS, till then, till that time. 

.Ate is alfo ufed before an infinitive ; z%gritar ate 
enrouquecir, to bawl one's felf hoarfe. 

Rir ati arribent&rpellas ilh&rgas, to fplit one's fides 
with laughing. 

D&r de fomer a alguim ate arrebentar, to fill, dr 
cram one with visuals till he burfts. 

Ate 



' G R A;M M A R. ' ns 

. Aii iprt^ihrayXXl^^ cqr next meeting, till we meet 
again. - * 

XtiL Por citnd (above, over), denotes fuperiority 
of place ; as, 

Morar par cima da atguim^ to live or lodge above 
fomebody. 

A HUa the paJfAu por cima da cab^ga, the ball w«nt 
over his head. . ^ 

Por cima de tudo^ upon the whole. 

Pata cima. 

. X y. Para cima (above) denotes fuperjprity of age, 
and is fonretim^s put at the end of the (entence ; as^ 
' -Ellcs alijctri^. todos queiinhai de diz dnms para 
cima^ they enlifted every body above ten* 

A cima. 

XV. A cima^ (abov6) denotes rank^ and (bme 
moral fubje£ts ; as, ^ \ 

A cima dilUy above him, ar fuperior to him. 
Eftbr a cima de tido^to be above the vvorld. 
Huma tnolher que efii a cima de t&do^ nai Je Ikedi 
^ do que o mundo diz deila, a woman who is aopve th<^ 
public cenfure, don't care what people fay of her. 

Em cima. 

t 

XVI. Ei[n cima (upon) ; as em cima da mifa^ upon 
the table. , 

^ 'Eni dma de ikdo ifiOf or only m cima^ fignifies and 
hefidez afl that^ over and above all that. 

De cima. 

. XVII. De cima^ when it is ai> advcfb, fignifiei 
fmn above ; but when a prepolition, it is Englilhcd 
hi/rom/offtorfromoffjiz^. 

Tiri 



t ■ K 



176 PORTUGUESE 

Tirilaquilh de timm dd mefi, take thst frottt o# the 
table. 

Elle nuncd throu osfeus 6lhos de cima della^ he never 
turned his eyes from her. 

Cdhhr de chM das drvores, to fall off the treefe 

XVin. The prepofitioB dehdxo, ( under ^ MdW^ or 

frwn under) denafes th^ time and place ; I fajT the 

time of a denomination of a reign, or fi[DVemfn'6fi^ ; 

as, debaxo do impirio de Augifio^ under the empire of 

Auguftus. ' f ^ 

Deb&xoj as a prepeficion of place, marks out in- 
feriority of pofition ; asy 

Tudo ^e h& ddi&xo dos cios^ aU there is under 
fieaven. 

Ter hima dmofada dehhxo dos pilhos,^ to havf^ a 

cufhion under the knees. 

Eftar debaxo da chhvt^ to be under lock and key, 
JD^^oAT^ is fome times rendered into Eng^lifh by uf^ 

w%Ji^% affirmkr kkma eAufa deiiico di jufom^d^ to 

fwear a thing, to declare upon oath* 

Jiix0: 

: XIX* Thia prepofiticm ii rendered into Englifli 
by under, inferior^ w next; Mi affemdu-Ji abixo MUs, 
be fat inferior^ or under thenrj ^s^ ajjentim-fe dbdx0 de 
mm ; he fat next, inferior to me^ or he was next 
man to me : abaxo deUrH elle hi o primSiro^ he is the 
next man. to the kinir. 

This prepontion is fometimes put at the end of 
the n/^xt prafes, detSlhas abixo^h^xt below> in this 
lower world, dt.eabiqa ^itoA^o^ headlong^ - -\ 

XX. Fora^ (outy without , except, i«/, J! , denotes jex- 
clUGon; and exception. It requires generally a ge- 
nitive^ before a nodn of time; or place ;,. but It goi- 

Yerns alfb the nominative r a^,^ 

F6ra 



GRAMMAR. I7t 

do tJfMo^ Clot of the kiogdQm. 

Fora da cidhdey out of ^oWt}. 

FIta dc tempoy out of feajfonp 

frocmkMfirtL d% cdfa^ kx>k ibr bitn without 'dtK>rs. 
t; SIksJahiraS t^doSy for a ddus ou trhj they all went 
out (except, or but two or three. 

ElU the fermite t£da, fira o ir is a§embl6aSy he 
mdulgM h^r in every thing, but in going to affirm** . 
bliesi 

BiHt Um s6dis a/ podirnyfora o de ccHf/uir^ he has 
full powers, except of concluding. 

F6r0 is fbcnetimcs preceded by xiS, and then it is 
to be rendered into Englifh by fo far', as, Slletfik 
tAS fora de Jbcorr^ n ftm allUdoiy qu€ ft declara tdn- 
»a Ules^ be is fo far from affifting ni» allies, that h^ 
declares hinUelf againft them. 

Fora js fometimes rendered into Eogliih by hi^ 

fidts\ as, fira daqu^Ots que^ &c. befides thofe tliat, 

i^c. and fometimes by beyond y as, fora de medtda, 

Iscyond tneafujre. 

' Fora de koras (ignifies beyond tie Aour, or very hie. 

P6r alguSm fora da portay or mandar klgHim pSlIa 
pbffta foray to turn one out of doors. 

De firintet oxfrSnte. 

This prepofition governs the genitive, and fignl* 
Ife^ truer againfi. It is foHowed by de, do, da, &c. 

t>eft6Hte da fna cafa eft& hum outetro, over againft 
his houfeis a hill. 

Em efi&va defrtnte dSlle, I was over againft him., 

' Sem, 

Sem fiffnifies without-, as, 
Sem dtnheiro, without money. 
Sem duvida, without doubt. 
Semfm, without end. 

Sem^ dor u entend/r, ottfem fmir ernhHtryllM^ 
out eiviiiE to undcrftuid. 
. ^ ' N Sem 



178 PORTUGUESE 

Sem mats, nem i»/ir^j, without any reafon or- pro- . 
vocation. 

Eftarfem amOy to be out of place. 

Sem que alg&fn i£lo precedSnte po/Ja derrogar o pre* 
finte^ any former afl to .the contrary of the pretest 
notwithftanding. 

^ Sem governs alfo the inHnitive, which is render* 
ed into Engliih with the participle; ^yfallar Jem 
fabity to fpeak without knowing. 

It is alfo a conjundion with j^^^ govemtog' the 
fubjun£Hve ; as, 

Enfida-Je fern que Ihe digaS nada, he is angry with* 
out any body faying any thing to him. 

Nio era iu ja baftrntdmente infeliz^ femque p'ocuraf- 
feis de acrefcentar a minha infelicidade ? .was I not 
miferable enough before, but you muft ftill labour 
to make me more fo ? 

Lembrome fern que mo digais^ I remember with* 
out your telling* 

Elle vira Jem que mdndem pr Hie, he will cooie 
without fending ror. 

Conforme, or fegfindo. 

XXIII. ConfSrme or fegindo (according to, co»- 
formable to), govern the nominative^ and never 
the dative fis in Engh'(h : a$, 

Ellefoi tratado confbrme o feu mereciminto^ he waf 
treated according to his deferts. 

Coftforme o miu farecSvy in my jtidgnient, in my 
opinion. 

In common converfatipn confbrme is ufed ad^r- 
1>ially, and Engliihed as follows : 

t£o he confbrme, or only jponfbrme^ it is as it hap- 
pens ; may be yes; may be not; th^t is according. 

Confbrme a occafiao o pedir, according as ther^ fliall 
\fe need. 

Sdbre. 

XXIV. Sdbre^gai&esupon; bb^ fibre a mi/fa, upon 
the table ; f^e o rio, upon the river. 

I , $4ke 



• • 



GRAMMAR. 17^ 

Sohre tidoi or Joire tddas as coufas^ over all, above 
^li, above all thingS5 above any thing, efpecially; 
^SjJSiri i&do tinde cnidhdo na faide^ but howfoever 
tbe matter be, mind your health. 

PSr.alguhn fokre fi^ or dhr Ihe o primivro lugir^ to 
place one above himfelf. 

Ifjobre h&ma cid&de^ to march againft a town* 

IrJobrealguSmy to fall, or to ru(h upon one. 

Ir/Shr^fcgur^iyio go upon fure^ grounds. 
' . Sdire a notie^ about or towards the evening. 

Sobtc 9rverde^ fomewhat green. 

S6brt a minha palavra^ upon my word. 

SSbre paldvra, upon parole. 
' ' Mand&r chrtafobre carta^ to fend letter upon letter. 

Kile recebeo a chrtafobre ojantar^ he had juft dined 
when he received the letter. 

Elkdorme fobre ojant&ry he fleeps prefently after 
dinner^ 

Sobre ifio^ or fdbre iftas coufas, is fometimes Eag^ 
fiihed by more than thaty or befides that ; as^ , 

Elle rouboU'O^ e fibre {flo matdu-o, he robbed hkn, 
and more than that, he killed him. 
'Sdbre que, is rendered into £ng1i(h by though 
.. or although ; as, 

Efle negicio fSbre que he difficult 6 fo^ naS heimpoftivel, 
altbo' this is a hard affair, yet it is not impoffible. 

SSbre is Englifhed fometimes by befides ; as, 

SSbre as miserias dd guerra, elle tSve a difrra^a^ 8fc. 
befides* the miferies of the war, he had the misfor-^ 
tune of, 6? f . 

EfiiiT fibre Ji^ or anikr fobre /, fignifies to ftand 
upon one's guard. 

. Elf vos rfcrever/i fSbre ifia matira^ I will write 
to you about this matter. 

*. . Acirca. 

XXV. Jfc/rca SffdiSeu about 'y vs^hcirca dtfio Ihi 
iif^9 about this I told him ; hcfrca de l& ir the rrf- 
pwdij, about going there I anfwered hioi, 
" • . N2 Fht%^ 



178 PORTUGUESE 

Sem mats, nem w/»^j, without any reafon or pro- . 
vocation. 

Eftirfem dmo, to be out of place. 

Sem que algim i£lo precedcnte po/Ja derrogar o pre* 
feniet any former afl to .the contrary of the pretest 
notwithftanding. 

^ Sem governs alfo the infinitive, which is render* 
ed into Cngliih with the participle; BS,/ai/cir /em 
fabity to fpeak without knowing. 

It is alfo a conjundion with quey governing the 
fubj unfit ive ; as, 

Enfida-Jefem (jue Ike digai nada, he is angry with* 
out any body faying any thing to him. 

Nio era iu ja baftrntam^nte htfeliz, femque p'ocura/- 
feis de acrefcentar a minha infelUidade ? ,was I not 
miferable enough before, but you muft ftill labour 
to make me more fo ? 

Lembrome fern que mo digits, I remember with* 
out your telling* 

EUle vira fern que mdndem por ille, he will cooie 
without fending ror. 

Conforme, or fegfindo. 

XXIII. CtmfSrme or fegindo (according to, co»- 
formable to), govern the nominative^ and never 
the dative fis in Engh'(h : a$„ . 

Eliefoi tratado confbrme o feu merecimento^ he waf 
treated according to his deferts. 

Coftforme o meu farecer, in my judgment, in my 
opinion. 

In common converfation confbrme is ufed ad^er- 
1>ially, and Engliihed as follows : 

IJfo he confbrmey or ox^ sonforme, it is as it hap- 
pens ; may be yes; may be not; th^t is according. 

Confbrme a occafiao o pedir, according as ther^ ihsul 
^e need. 

Sdbre. 

XXIV. Sdbre Gg^iBes upon*, sts^ fibre a mi//a, upon 
the table ; f^e o rio, upon the river. 

I . $4he' 



• • 



GRAMMAR. 179 

Sohre tidOi or JSbre tSdas as coufas^ over all, above 
^li, above all things^ above any thing, efpecially; 
i^^JSiri i&do tende cuidado na /aide, but howfoever 
tbe matter be, mind your health. 

PSr, alguhn fokre fi^ or d&r Ihe o prim^iro lugir, to 
place one above himfelf. 

IrJ6bre h&ma cid&de^ to march againft a town* 

IrJohYtalguimy to fall, or to ru(h ujpon one. 

It Johre fegufyy to go upon fure^ grounds. 

S6hre a nSite, about or towards the evening. 

Soire ^v^rde, fomewhat green. 

S6bre a mlnha palavra^ upon my word. 

Sobre palavra, upon parole. 
' ' Mandhr chrtafobre carta^ to fend letter upon letter. 

Kile recebeo a chrtafobre ojantar^ he had juft dined 
when he received the letter. 

Elkdorme fobre ojant&ry he fleeps prefcntly after 
dinner^ 

Bibre ifio, or fdbre ifias coufas, is fometimes Eag^ 
liflied by more than that, or befides that ; as^ . 

Elle rouboU'O^ e fobre (fto matdu-o, he robbed him, 
and more than that, he killed him. 
^SSbre que, is rendered into £ngli(h by t/iougi 
; or although ; as, 

Efte negicio fibre que he difficult 6 foy naS heimpofiivel, 
altbo' this is a hard affair, yet it is not impoffible. 

SSbre is Englifhed fometimes by befides ; as, 

SSre as miserias dd pterra, elle tSve a difrra^a^ 8fc. 
befides* the miferies of the war, he had the misfor-^ 
tune of, 6f r. 

Eft&r f&brt Ji, or a$idkr fibre /, fignifies to ftand 
upon one's guard . 

. Elf vos rfcreverSi fibre efla matira, I will write 
to you about this matter. 

* . Acirca. 

XXV. ^r/rrtf fignifies 42^0«/ ; zs^&circa dlR^ Ihi 
iije, about this I told him ; icfrca dtl&ir Ike rrf^ 
pSndi, about going there I anfwered hiin, 

* . N2 P^krU^ 



I • 



180 PORTUGUESE 

' . PeriOgJirUOy a^pSfpegado. 

XXVI. Per/Oy (near by, ahoiit) denotes proximJty 
oF place and time, and governs the genitive cafe ; ^s 
aquillo ejla muilo perta do lume^ that is very near the, 
fire ; fhio das oiio ASraSy about eight o'clock. 

Perto do rh, near the river. 

Eftdmospirto do Natal^ we are near Chriftmia'j^ 

Ao p^ requires alfo the genitive cafe ; as„ 

AJJentMvos ao pi de mim, fit down by me, or near 
me; aopJ do m, near the river, &c. 

Note, that jfrf«/o (near or by) ^nd pegii^, (ha^d by) 
reouire the dative cafe ; as, 
^ jifUo a cidadcy near the town. 

P^ado ao palicio^ hard by the palace* 

Lottge. 

L6ngCy hvy a great way off, go^ifcrns the gt&ltive^ 
and the particle, de^ or doy da^Scc. as, 
Ufige- de cdfay far from home. 
Zr(^/ig^^4fii/, 6ir from hence. 

'- * De lofigOf or ao fSngo. 

: This prcDofitioQ requires the genitive cafe*; as, ' 

Ao /ongo aaprayaj along the ihore. 
'. 4^ Un^o^.da:4:Qfia^ do pfado% &c. along the coaA,the 
meadowa^&c. 

Of, further Pariidti. 

Ahtda, ah$dd qui; pcJoquJ ov qudndo icfn, dtnda qfUm 

or com tkdo. • . 

^ Jj^d0Sv^\^^:yei^\ 2i^e/Uaindiif$a0^v/yo9hcyt,n(A 

come yet. It fignifies alfo even -, as, JerU vergiiikek 

ahula ojailar ntfo, it .were a fliame even to fp^^ of 

it ; nem dinda per cem librasy no not for a huodied^ 

pounds. 

Ainda que fignifies, iiA^ttl-i^ or although*^ ^s^ainjM 
mf vis- fois mis vetko do que iUcy though you be 
Sdet than he i atnAa que ajsimfojj^^ though it Ttqmt 
fo; * 

' Mndi 



cfeAillMAR. ill 

Ainda que^ is very ofitAi followed by com tidoy i 
yet tor aU that : as, amda que SlU nifi tivhse necissijddi 

diiso, cofti ittdo, Kc. thoagh be h&d no nted of it, yet» 

&c. 

Arnih assim, or com iido^ is fometimes ^hglifhed 
by nevertlielesSj or for alt thai ; as, ainda assim stmpfe 
ilU Joi /ouvdvel, he was praife-worthy iPbr all that. 

Ja dcstlt^fA 'fne aad jA per que. 

Jb difdi M reiidered into Englifli by cvm from ; 
^ja dSfik « p^cipio, ev^n from the beginning. 

J/i fUf, flgnifiesj^^fr^; as, 

Ja que is so ossfm ke^ fmce it iafo. 

The patticl^e qut iometimes is not placed immt* 
Jliately after fa ; as, ja 1A dSus dnnos que warrhj be 
died two years fince o^ ago. 

Ja ha muito timfo que Jahifies de tAfa^ it is a long 
tifne fince you went trom home. 

Jipor^e^ \t repeated in the fame fentence^ end 
then the nrft is rendered into Englilh by fir^y U- 
caufe; and the fecond hyfecondlyy iecaufi; as, JM por 
que ira cego^ja por que era/:6xo, firft becaufe he was 
blind, andfecondly becaufe ht; was lame. 

Depois que. 

DepSis que is rendered into Englifb by rfter ; as^ 
Dep6is que hi iinha entrado^ after I was gobe in. ; 

Com que. 

Com que is only a note either of introduction, or 
connexion ; as, 

. . JCm que Imvia hum hSmem enfSrmo^ ^c. now k cer- 
tjJft man was fick i fometimes they add to it the 
particle afsim^ and then it is to rendered into £ng- 
VtSh by mii/o, 

Ou. 

\ Oh Signifies or, or either ; as, oubdtn^ oa maS, either 
good or bad ; miis ou menos, more or left ; M t8t 
^ira, ou nhi^ whether he will, or no. 



1$S PORTUGUESE 

Quer. 

Quer^ when a particle, muft be repeated^ and the 
firft is rendered into Englifli by either or wietker^ 
and the fecond by or > as, quer Hie qudra qner naS, 
whether he will or no ; quer vos o teniais jeito^ qu:r 
naS, whether you have done that, or no. • 

Se quer, or m mitm. 

Se quer or ao mSnos, &c. fignifies at leafly however ; 
as, Je vos naS query's fir par Hie naS fefAh fe quer 
cSntra Hie, if you don't chufe to be for him, at leaft 
don't oppofe him ; dai-lheje quer com que fi^fiinl&r-fey 
give him at leaft a fubiiftence ; o nojfo primiiro fim hi 
de livrimos de tddos os males , ao mJnos dof majbres, 
our chief end is to be freed from all, however the 
greateft evils. 

Uem fe quer hum, is rendered into Engliih by 
uiver a one, fo much, or in the following mamur ; as, 
fSraS tddos mortos^anemfe quer hum efcapou, they were 
all (lain to a man. 

Qudndo muito. 

Qudndo muito, (at moft, at fartheft, at long run), is 
generally ufed before the nouns of time and price; 
as> elle eftarh aqui dintro em hum mSz qudndo mu/to, he 
will be here in a month at farthest -, dez libras qudtuh 
midto, ten pounds at moft. 

■ • 

Tdnto. 

' ' Tdnto, fo much, is fometimes followed by eHm, 
and then it is rendered into Englilh by as well as, 
as much as, &c. 

AmO'te tdnto cSmo a mm mifmo, I love thee as well 
as myfelf. 

Elle time tdnto cdmoqualquer de v6s, que Ihe refulte 
airim ddno, be is afraid of a barm as much as any 
or you. • 

Cakkf 



6R A MM A R. its 

Cmd/l qMi a eftimdsse tdnto cSmo aji mismo^ I thougkt 
he made as high account of her^ as of himfelf. 

BfUes Vim tdnio de dia c&mo de nSite^ they can fee as 
wellby day as by night. 

Eu five tdnto como vSs^ I had as much as you. 

(Xutro tdfUo is rendered into £ngli(h by ihi dmble^ 
twice as muthy or as much ; as. 

En aktmcd outro tdnto mhis p& isso, I bad as much 
more for it ; eu posso fazir dntro tdnto, I can do at 
much. 

Tdnto followed by assim, is a particle merdy ex- 
Dletive; as, 

Tdnto assim que the posso iu fazir ? how can I help 
, it ; vaitCi' tdnto assim nao ha mda para ti, go away^ 
J^evQ is nothing for you« 

Tdnto assim followed by ijuc without an interro* 
gation, is fometimes rendered hyfo that^ in.fo much 
that\ as, tdfUo assim que elk nko quer ouvir mAUfallar 
mssoy fo that he will hear no more of it. 

Tdnto m&is is followed by qui, and Engliflied by 
and ike more so as, as, 

Eu eftou prompto para ir com vm^ hum dia dffies & 
vomidiaf se vm^ qutzevj tdnto m&is quefe deverepre* 
sentar h&ma nova peqa. I am ready to go with you 
fome day or other to the play, if you'll give me 
leave; and the more fo, as a new piece is to be acted. 

Tdnto que, or logo que^ is rendered into Englilh by 
as soon as ; as, tdnto que Su,o vi, as foon as I faw him. 

Tdnto melhSr is rendered into Englifh by so muck 
the better. 

' Tdnto is fometimes preceded by com^ and followed 
by que, aiid is EnglKhed by^^, provided that ; as com 
Sdt^o que o/af&iSj provided that you do itj com tdnto 
ifue me niofii^a mat, fo he do me no hurt. 

Tdnto qudnto is Engliihed by as much as^ as^' 

Tdnto qudnto possoy as much as I can. 

^ Tdn. 
T46, fO) is generally followed hy rchno ; as^ 

N4 m 



rM P O R T U CU S S E 

]^i Miieiii htm cSmo o S^it^^ ttiis is not fb gtiod 
as the other ; iu fft ifao tai hem como vos, I know it 
gjB well as yoa. 

Tag is fometimes followed hy^ue^ and Engliihed 



by fo J frchf ii> thai degree 5. as, 
Bfi/ihetii 



ftudAiU que nio tern igual^ he is fo wife 
that he has not his match ; nio fSu tai iducp fue # 
er^Mf I am not fo fimple^^r I am not fuch a fool as 
to beKeve it ) /Az tai p&nde vinio que, &c» tfae wind 
is £0 high that, &c. or the wind blows to that.4«* 
gree^ &:c* 

C6m0. 

C6mQ^ is EngliHied by ^^> iike^ ^oxvy 8cc. as joijl 
majr fee in the following ex{>refiions. 

€6mo? how? , 

DkJime e6m& Ihe hit defallar / t6U use how I tlMf 
fpeak to him. 

CSmc afsim ? how (b ? 

Como i what ! 

£^ fMT ^» whereas. 

C6fno mer juefejay howfoevftr^ in what Biaoner^ or 
faihion ioever. 
" &^a iomofor, be it as it will. 

X16mo i/h afsim he, iince it is £>• 

(Siwio^ as it were, or almoft. 

Cvmo fey as if, or ev^ as if s m, eitm Je ilki ti, 
%}^m jk veuefdOf aa if they had already over* 
come. 
^ CijSmn tamhetn^ as well aa* 

Rieocim&iiii he, as rich as hiis. 

Xj6mf6is tneu mnlgOy fuero,8sc. as (sr becaitie) y6s 
are iny friend, 111^ &c. 

DiMMmi%i6m9j tell me how. . 

Bu JH c6mfutArpAra mis iUe vM^ I koow.the^ 
way I (hall take to make him come. 

C6mo ilU Ih niS efleja, tu hrH^ provided he is not 
there^I will^lne. 

Afstm^ 



O R A M M A R. 391 

* * 

.-• : Affim. 

• <4^*, fO) thttt, is rendered into En'gliA as yiMi 
jAtfy ie^in the folio win fT e^cpreflionis, 

P6is he afsim de vhas ? de veras qui sfsim ke^ii it 
eTcn &> i it is even fb. 
Jt/slmfifd, oxfejn afsim^ fo be it, or be it fo. 

Afsm A:-, it is fo. 

JPara afftm dizer, as it were. 

Afsm J6u eu I(mco, ^^ &c. I am not fo fdolifh at 
to, &c. 

Msim Deos mefalvf, as I hope to be iaved. 

imto afsim^ fo that. 

Ajs'im he que ifis, &c. is this your way, &c. 

-4/}/;« cdmo afsim^ after all, neverthelefs. ^ for all 
that ; as,' tm vd^ dilatdis a voffa joniada^ afsim c&mo 
mfsim he prerfo que vhdes^ it is in vain for you to put, 
off your journey, you muft go thither neverthelefs, 
w for all that, you muft go after ail. 

Af)\wi c6mo^ as well as, or as foon as. 

hhftn afsim for agbra^ thus much for this time. 

AjAm na pdz^ cumo na gnerra, both in time of peace 
ttod war. * 

Afsim afsim^ fo fo, indifferent. 

Afsim queira Hie c6mo pode^ he can if he will. 

Afstm IS fometimes preceded by f ; as, ^ afshn que 
quer ijio dizer? how now ? what do you mean by 
this? And fometimes ^iim is followed by cdmo ; as, 
w/iim €6m0 o fwl tcliffa es onircs plaudtas, da mifma 
firte^ ^c. as the fun eclipfes the other •plaaets^ £)^ 
&c. 

■ Se, if; asy^ Slle vier^ if he eomea ; fe mi nmilJts^ 
flvcHikl you love me; fr 4Ue flffi hointm di hAnra, 
y^en he but an homeft m&n : fejotikefftm yum iufiu^ 
tSdos dkiat^ &c. were it told Who \ M^^ evety Mic 
wnuld fay> ^. Jtki xmdUk mt^ ftec«. tf io be that. 

The 



186 PORTUGUESE 

. The reciprocal verbs, as well as tbofe that are 
ufed imperfonal]y, may have two je 7!* joined toge- 
ther ; vs%fefef6r, if he goes away s fefi fkUa rijfo^ 
if they ijpeal^ of it. 

St is iotnetimes rendered intoEngh'fb by whether!^ 
and when it is repeated, the fecond is £ngli(hed by 
^; as, *" 

Quijfera faber Je a cilpa he nojfa^fe vSfsa^ 1 would 
know whether it is your fault, or ours. 

, Alias. 

Ali&Sf is fometimes rendered into Englilh by ei/e ; 
as, entr&i^ porque ali&s fecharei a pirta^ cofne in, or 
elfe I'll (hut the door ; par qui alias feriOS os vofsos 
fUhos immindos, elfe were your children unclean. 
And fometimes it is rendered into Engliifh by (tf jbf* 
wife, in other things, or refpeSls. 

Embora. 

Emhora is fometimes rendered into Englifh by 
pro/per oujly, aufpicioujly -, but fometimes it is a par- 
ticle merely expletive, and anfwers to the Italian 
pure ; as, dis&ii muito embora que quizerdes^ fay w&tf 
you pleafe : the Italian fays, dite.pur quel che vipi&ce. 

MHito embora feja a/sim, well, let it be fo. 

EmMra is ' fometimes Engliihed by awi^ ; as, 
^uiitetmbora, goaway. 

SenaS. 

SenaS fignifies if not, did not, were it n%t tiat, lut 
that I as, ' 

Sen&o thuefse medo de men pay, but that I fear my 
ifather. 

Se ilk n&6 twefse vergdnha de confefsar, but that he 
v(M afhamed to confeis. 

Note, that the following expreffions, in which 
they make ufe of this particle^ may be Engliihed by 
iit$,for, and fome other variations. 

Se iUfif6fse por elle, but for him, or had it aot been 
for hiro> or hs)d he not been. , 

Sen&i 



\ 



OR A M M A R. IS7 

• 

Smisjfdfsepor vosy had you not been^ or bad it 
not been for ydii, without you, without your help^ 
hindiBnce, iic. 

' Sen^fdfsepor mim^ tile morreria dtfomty were it not 
for roe;, he would ftarve. 

Senai is fometimes En'glifhed bv but : as, ntm Hies 
Sem ouiro ittf^nto^ fcniio^ &c. nor do they aim at any 
thing elfe but, iSc. 

NinguSm itrfse afsim feniS Cicero^ nobody iaid io 
but Cicero. 

Senifi may be alfo exprefled in Portuguefe by 

is que in the following fentence, and the like. 
" Elle nffi fa% fen&i jogar^ or Slle mS Jqz, mats que 
jogdr, he does nothing but play« 

Nii, n&o porqui. 

NaS, n$i. or no^ when followed by pcrqu^, is 
Englilhed by not that, not but that ; as, n&i porqui 
Ikefaltafse engtnho^ not but that he had wit ; naSpor^ 
fuS na6 ftjse jufto, mas porque, &c. not but that it 
was $,right, but becaufe, &c. ndo porque a cAufa/eja 
mpojsively masporqfiSy &c. not that thie thing is pof- 
fible, but becaufe, l£c. 

Tambem^ or dutroji. 

TanAim^ or Autrofi^ iigntfies alfo^ too, likemfe ; as. 
vos afsim o quereis e Su tambim^ yoii'il have it foj and 
I too. 

Parh que i par qui. 

See the prepofitions^^ira and por. 

P6is. 

This particle is very much ufed by the Portugucfe, 
aind it is rendered info Englifh feveral ways, as you 
may fee in the following examples : 

p£is ide, e vinde logo, go then and come back pre* ' 
fently. 

P6is nio f6u eu cap&z defdzHlo ? ^ wliai , am I not 

-capable to do it ? 

, Pdis, 



1*B P 6 R t U <>V 'E if E 

PtJw,' or pdis tttt&S qne ^uk dizh-lJU) ? Wfelf, ind 
^hatof ftll this. 

PdiSy or p6is entaS que hit defaxir ? Wh« ihall 
Idothtti? 

Pdis eu digo que Hie efii dhtfrff^ why, be^^is here 
within, I fay, 

\ PUs porqn^ me vigidis ! Why then tlo you watch 
me? 

EUe tern cabega ; pSis tambJm hum aljk^te a ttm^ he 
has got a head, and fo has a pin. 
/Pits before »4S, and precfcded by kti intdtroe^a- 
tion, denotes a ftrong aflertion, at\d is Engh'fti\td t>y 
tokkfmt dtmhty fes^Jurefyy to hefutt, fcc. as, wi iUe ? 
p6is ndo ! will he come? yes to be fure. 

Antesy or miis depfefsa. 




ilone than ht in your company. Sotnetimes^;i/rj 
i& Engliihed by before ; as, fde-vos dates que itte vSnka^ 
go away before he comes ; dtues que iu mdrra^ before 
Idle. 

Ma^ dntes, pelo conir&riOy mas pelo conirirw. 

Thefe particles are rendered into Edglifli by cm 
the contrary y on the other handy nay; as, mas dntes, 
mas pelo contrarioy or peh contririo ifto he muito dif- 
fer Snte^ nay it is quite another thing, ihas dnieSy pelo 
conirarioy &c. elle keavarhuo^ najc* or on the contrary, 
.he is fit covetous man. 

Parii mlkor dizir. 

, This phrafe is retidered into En^lilh by ftay^ as, 
/lie tern ja bajldftte, on para melhor db^y mils dp 
naefs&rioy he has ^already enough, nay too much ; 
A ifto he que 'n6s ehamdmos dHito das gintesy m$parti 
wnliSr diz/ry da rdz^, this is what we call the law of 

nations. 



GRAMMAR. .1S9 

iiationst which may be called more properly the law 
ofrjeafoo. 

. Wc h^ve already observed that yte is a particle 
which mo^ conjundions are compofed of; as, ^nda 
jWf, although ; dejorie i/uey fo that, &r. 
. The particle que fometimes is the figi> of the third 
perfoi;t$ of the iA)perative,.as let in Englijk \ as, qm 
fiUle:, let him fpeak ; que n/aS, let Uiem iaugh» 

Qtie is u&d betweeti two verbs, to determine and 




. Que is ul<td alio after kora in the beginning of a 
{entence, and followed by a verb in the fubjunSive^ 
tp denote by exclamation one's furprize, averfion, 
and relu^lance of fbmething ; in which cafe there is 
a verb grammatically underfiood b^ore fK^ ; as, 
Mra quefe efquec^fse elle deji mifmo ! I wonder, or is 
it poifible for him to have for|;ot himfelf ! 

If he e3$jQlaa»ation, or admmttbo, is fometimes 
^xprfffed without any verb ;. a», gne Fdfio^ e ao 
mifmo tSmpo, que pSna / how much pTeafure and 
trouble at once ! 

Que is fometimes repeated ; as, 
. (^. bilf^ livm que tetides ; what fine books jon 
baye got ! f^e killa tp^e he a vktiidc ! how beautiful 
isivifttte! 

Qfie is fometimes followed by de,i z$yque de iituos 
ia m uf^ffdo ! how many fools there are in the world ! 

a^ is ufed after nouns denoting time, and is 
fometimes Englifhed by laben or Jince^ 9iq. and 
fometimes left out ; as 

O dia que elle partio^ the day when he (et out. 
' Qudnto tempo hh que efthis em Ldndres ? how long 
have you lived in London ? How long is it fince 
you lived in London ? 

Ha dez dnnos quefa% a me/ma cdufa, he has done 
the fame thing thefe ten years. 



190 PORTUGUESE 

Hi dez dmos que morrSo^ be died ten years ago. 

(lue 38 fometimes rendered into Englilh by bicoufc, 
as you may fee in Cdnioens, canto 2» ftanza xvi. 
que levtniinte hum dnimOf and fometimes by tkai^ to the 
end that J in order to -, as you may fee ibid, ftanza xvi i. 
que c6mo vrfsem, que no rio, &c. 

Que before ySr in the beginning of a fentence, is a 
redundancy not eKpreifed in Englilh ; as quefe vSs 
diz^is que, if you fay that, &c. 

Que is u(ed after the coniun£tion a p^nar (fcarc^ 
or hardly); and is Engliflied by 6uf; as, a pSnas aca^ 
h6u de fallhr que logo morr(o\ he had hardly done 
fpeaking but he expired. 

Que tometimes is preceded by dejbrte^ de maiiiira^ 
deg^lto, -and then it is Engliflied by fotiat, infitek 
a manner y infomuch that', as hi ofarii de fbrte quefi^ 
quits contente^ I will do it fo that, or in that manner 
that, you fliall be contented. 

De veras. 

De veras fignifies in eamefi ; but fometimes it is 
Engliflied by nofure ; de veras ! naS o po/so crSr^ no 
furel 

Hbra. • 

Hifa, or ora, is an interje£tion that ferves \o en* 
courage, as wc have feen above ; but when it is re« 
peated, it is Engliflied bs fometimes, one whUe^ anotKet 
while ; as, ora efih hem^Sra ejl& mal, fometimes he is 
well, fometimes ill, ilk ora ejih de hum parecir, e arm' 
de dutro, he is now of one opinion, and nextmoment 
of another* For 6ra, (ignines now, for the prefent. 



GRAMMAR.. 191 

CHAP. vm. 

Of the Portugtufe Orthography ; aadfirjl of Carats 

and Stops. 

L npHE proper names, i^s well as the- famamesi 
X always begin with a capital. 
II. The names of nations, kingdoms, aad pro- 
vi;]ced, • alfo begin with a capital \ as, PrancSz^ 
Fretich; /wrf//z, Englifli, &c. 

. III. All names or d^ignities, and degrees, and ho- 
nours, require a capital ; as RSy^ Bifpo, &c« King, 
Bifhop, &c. 

IV. At the beginning of a period, as well as of 
a verfe, the firft letter is always a capital. 

V. The names of arts and fciences, as well as 
those of kindred, begin with a capitals 

€f Stops. 
The ufe of flops, or points^ is to diflinguiih words 
and fentences. . . ' 

The Portuguefe have fix flops, or'paufes, v\z. 

1. The pinto finily the famie as our period or full 
Hop (.), and is ufed at the end of a period, to fhew 
that the fentence is completely finifhed. 

2 . The dius pantos^ which is our colon (:), and 
is the paufe made between two members ot a pe- 
riod ; that is, when the fenfe is complete, but the 
fentence not ended. 

3. The ponto e virgu/a, our femicolon (;), and 
denotes that ihort paufe which is made in the fub- 
divifion of the members or parts of a fentence. 

4. The pdnto e interrogafdm, the point of interroga- 
tion thus (?). - 

5. Ponto e admirafam, the point of admiration 
thti6(!). 

6. TTje virguta, the fame with our comma (,) 
and 10 the fhorteft paufe or refting, in fpeech, be* 
itlg ufed chiefly to diftinsuifh nouns, verbs, and 
iMVftrbs^ as lilfo the parts of a ibortet fcDtence* . 

The 



19t P OR TTJ G U EiS E 

The conjundion e^ the relative qual, and the dif- 
junQions.^i^ ziiAnem^ require a cortima befpre jhem. 

The Portt^tiefe mate'ufe alfo of a parenthefis, 
thus ( ); but they do not mafce ufeof the diaerefis, 
cftlkdby their printers crehfa (**) ; they make'ufii 
alfo of the dngulOy thus a, called by the printers 

The ipoftrophe, or, as they call it, viratento^ Ii]ce< 
wife takes place in this as in other ]angf^ges« being 
deftgned only iix the more pieafant and eafy pro^ 
liunciatioa of words, by cutting off an antecedent 
vowel ; as, d* irr^as^ d' elvas, anci not darmas, detvasy 
Ibc. But this is fomewhat excufable in cafes where- 
in, by ufe, they ieem to be one wotd ; as ttiJUg; 
M^Ji, defia, dSfit^ nalgim, daquHU^ uSlIiy ntlla^ 
daqui, dali, attqui^ aiegora 3 and not em iih^ ik 
SUc, &c. 

Of the Accents. 

The accent, which is the very foul of articulst^ 
words, is a found of the voice by which wc pro- 
nounce fome fyllables iborter, others longer. 

I intend to fpeak here only of the accents the 
Portuguefe ought to make ufe of, according to Ma^ 
durtira^ in his Portuguefe Orlhography. 

The Portuguefe indeed are acquainted with three 
accents, but they ought to make ufe of two onlyi' 
namely, the acute, which defcends from the right 
to the left {'),and the circumflex, thus C). 

1, The acute ferves to prolong the pronuncia- 
tion, and ia put, according to Madureira^ on the 
third perfi)A togular of the future tenfe^ as amara^ 
Ura^ &c. 

fl. On the penultima of the preterpluperfeft tenfe 
of the indicative mood ; as, amara^ enftnaray &c. ^ 
. 3. Tbc'actite accent ought to be put alfo on 
tte {ifenaltima qf the third perfohs of the prefeirt 
tflnfe;,af ^e vtepb rfMifr^r, pmrnnciar, duvidar, &c, 
thus m m mi m, fmuumja, duvida^ia:. that they may 

be 



GRAMMAR. 19S 

be diftlnfufflied froM tkcj tidurH) ren&nciMy prwiMclay 
Mvidar&'Qi Tbef {atntt accent i^ alfa put oh efiA, 
noj to diftinguifh them frotto ^/9> thi&» afwi ^, in the. 
^ The vowel o btf^ two founds, according to the two 
abcents that may be pot on it ; one open, when it is 
marked with the acat-e accent, and is pronounced 
like in ^^^; the other clofe^ when if is mark^ ' 
wilb the circumSex acoent^ and then is pronounced 
lakt u in^ftumhle. 

There are many n^uns, both fubftaMive and ad-^ 
jefirte, wbkh ar€f a<:cet>ted in the fingular with the, 
circumflex, and in the plural with the acute ; and 
the adjectives that have two terminations, particu 
larly thofe endmg in ^, ^, muft be accented (in 
the fingular) with the circumflex in the mafculine, 
and wilh the acute in the feminine ; as, 

Fchrmi oven ; pXtxt^ufornoL 
^k9f eye I phiral, ilnos. 
^^f ^gg y plural, avos. 
disc, bone' j plural, 6ssos» 
P^fe^rWell; plural, ^fdj. 
PdrfOjhog; pluf^ly porcos^ 

R4go, prayer i plural, rogos. And fo fdjo, ttirno, 
. f^rmSfo^ fifuidfo, Juppdstay pdvo^ tdrio, tdrta, copi6fo^ 
<cc. 

The /bflowing. keep the circumflex accent in 
botli numbers ; *Afc, bdlos-y hdjo^ bdjosy b6tp^ bdtos ; c6co, 
coio5\ choTQ^ cfioros.'y c6te^c6tos'y forro^fSrrosi gordv^ 
gSrdos I ^osioy gSstos y gSzOy gSzos ; iSboy ISbos ; mSgo^ 
mogo^indjOj ndjos ; po/ro, polros; td/o, tolos ; /errd/Ao^ 
/err S lias ', raposo, raposos 'y arroz, arrdzcs; algeZfoU 
ffizes. &c. 

On the contrary, the following keep the acute ac- 
cent m both- numbers : capo, cbpos ; mbdo^ modos ; nossa, 
nossos', v6ss$fV6ssos,8cc. 

When the accent circumflex is put on the ,^, then 
ti&c ,e is pronounced like the French mafculine e; 
hut when e is accented with the acuX^ ^cctwX^^^w 

O ^^ 



194 FOR T U G U E S E 

the e 18 to be pronounced like the e open in Frencbi 
and it is exceeding fonorous and long. See the 
pronunciation of the vowel e. 

Nouns ending in a%^ izj oz, uz, muft have the 
acute accent on the vowel before the z ; as, rapiz^ 
a boy ; rioz, a walnut ; alcafiz^ licorice ;. but you 
muft except arrdz^ rice ; a/ghz^ a hang-man. 

Nouns ending in ez generallyhave the circumfliex . 
accent ; as m^z, a month 5 marqueZf a marquis ;- &a 
except the furnames ; as, Alvarez^ Aniunez, Lopez, 
Henriquezy Gongalvez, Rodriguez^ Pirez, Nufuzt 
TeUez, &c. 

Siwf ObfcrvatiouT upon the Portuguefe 

Orthography. 

Both the Portuguefe orthographers and beft au- 
thors vary fo much in their rules and ways of writ- 
ing, that it is a bard matter, and quite out of any 
grammarian's way, to clear up this part of the Per- 
guefe grammar: fince it requires no lefs authority 
than that of the Royal Portuguefe Academy. How- 
ever, not to omit fuch a material part of the Gram- 
mar, I (hall prefent the learners with the following 
obfervations. 

I. When the Latin words from which the Portu- 
guefe are derived, begin with a by the Portuguefe 
likewife muft begin with it; therefore you muft' 
write and pronounce the b, in the following words, 
bomy bonddde^ bem, bhto^ &c. becaufe they are derived 
from bonus ybonitasy &c. But you muft except bainha^ 
bsxiga, biirroy which begin with a b, though they arr 
derived from vagina, vefica, vicus. 

II. Likewife if the Latin words begin witTi a t^ 
the Portuguefe words derived from them muft alfo 
begin with it ; as vida^ vivkr, varrtr, vtr, vinho^ &ۥ 
from Vila, vivere, verrere, videre, vinum, &c. 

'Though b ought to be pronounced only by clo^g 

the lips, and v by touching the fuperior teeth with 

the inferior lips ; yct> by a certain affinity between 

thefe 



GRAMMAR. IW 

thefc two letters, in fpeaking theie is a great confu- 
fion in the pronunciation of them in the prorince 

. of Entre Dduro e Minho : and this confufion has not 
been pecuh'ar to the Portuguefe language, hecaufe 

" Vt^xA fays, in his Caftilian Orthography^ that in his 
time fome Spaniards could hardly make any diftinc- 
tion between thefe two letters. 
^ •III. The^ found in fome words originally Latin, 
is changed in Portuguefe into a ^ ; as, cdbra^ cabillo^ 
cabicaj Sec. from copra, capillus, caput y &c. 

IV, The Portuguefe generally make ufe of the ^ 
in the following words : ay, rey, frty^' /^y, w2y, pay^ 
wiyoy miyoy and fome others^ 

^Bhiteau fays, that we muft make ufe of the j^ in 
words having a Greek origin ; VLSyf/llabay Chryfopiia, 
pyramided poffgonoy kydrograph/a^ hydropicoy phyjica^ 
hyptrMcy hypbcrita, Apocrypho, &c. 

V. The ph are ufed by the Portuguefe in fome 
taken from the Greek; as, philojophiay phih* 

^ia^ PMladelpiia, epitipAio, &c, 
k VI. The r in Portuguefe has two pronunciations, 
I one foft, exprefled by a fingle r, as in arado, a 
plough ; and after the confonants, b, c, d,/,g, ^, / ; 
and another hard, in which two rr are ufed 3 as in 
Hno^c&rro, &c. But you muft obferve, 

'1. That ia the beginning of a word two rr ipuft 
never be ufed, becaufe then the r is always pro- 
nounced hard in Portuguefe 5 as in the words rimo^ 
rk^^ today &c. 

3. When the confonants /, «, J, are before the r, 
either in a (ingle word, or a compound one, this 
letter muft never be doubled, becaufe then its ifound 
is always ftrong ; as in abalroar, enriquec^r, hdnra^ 
d^egr&doy Henrique, Ifraelita, &c. 

3. The r after a b, is alfo pronounced hard in 

eotapounds with the prepofitions aby ob, fub, and 

yet is not doubled 3 as in abrog&r, obrepca^yjubrepga^ 

VII. The 5 is never doubled in the beginning 

of words, nor "after the confonants ; therefore you 

* 02 ^^^ 



\ 



1^ 



PORTUGUESE 



muft "mntfi jafkr^frnhh^falfamhue^falft^^ mififoy fee 

The J is pronounced like x between twcv vt>web^- 
In words derived from the Latin, as well as in f bofe 
tfiat €fnd in ^fa^ and 6fo\ as. m&faf cbfo^ rife, 0m&r6fof 
iwdoMfi^ c6f{i^ Sec. Yoa mu^ft aifo obferve, th^ 
C9fir fignifies to feWy but ewr (ignifies t$ bmt ot 
bake. 

VilL TA are generally ufed in words deriwdfirofn 
the Greek ; as, amfhitkeatroy atheifia, thtolop^ htkkf^ 
gOy methodo, See. 

TA is alfo ufed in th^ Portugaefe prepoStion^i/; 
though feme write it thus aie. 

IX. When pt is found in Latir^ words, it omft W 
kept in the Portugfuefe derived from them 5 M, ip- 
to, inSptOy optimOy &c. from aptus^ inepusj cprimus^ Jbr. 
You niuft make the fame obfervation alx>ut rf^^.- 

X. Cfi9 is founded like k^ in words derived firarfr 
the Greek ; as, orchdnjo^ arcAidiique, CkryfbJiwnOy chry^ 
foly chriJblogQ^ Chrifiovao^ monarcksay &c. Thefe w»oflllf 
muft be written with eky in orde;? to preferv« to thr 
cjre the etymology of words. 

Note, that ch m words that are hot derived from 
the Greek is pronounced like fi in the Engliih 
v^oris Jkawlyjhoot^ 8cc. but as fome confound the 
cA with the x, and begin with x thofe words- tte 
ihould begin with cA, I thought it neceflary to make 
a coUefiion of them. 



Words BEciNNtNo with 



CITA, 



Chi . 

Ch£ca 
Chacina 
Ch49o 
Chac6u^ 

Chaga. 
Cbalupa 
Cbimi 



Cbatnal6te 

Chamar 

Chamariz 

Chambao 

Chamej^r 

Chamica 

Chamine' 

Chamufcar 

Chan^a 

Chanc^Ia 

Chancelaria 

Chancelcr 



ChafifOB^Uis 

CbanmSta 

Chantagem 

Cbantriido 

Chamrc 

Cha 

Chips 

Chapado 

Cbapeido 

Chapeleta! 

Cbap6o 



Chapim 



GRAMMAR* 



197 



Chapim 
Chapinhir 

Chaptiz 

Charamela 

Cbarameleiro 

Cli£rco 

Charneca 

Charn6ira 

Char6Ia 

Cbdrpa 

CbSrro 

Cbarrua 

ChAfco 

Cbafona 

Cbatim 

Chato 

Cbavad 

Cbavafcal 

Chave 

Cbav&Iba ^ 

Cfaaveu 

Cb^^vinba. 



Chibarro 

Cbibo 

CbicbaroB 

Cbicbarro 

Cbiehelo^ 

Cbic6ria * 

Chic6te 

Cbtfra 

Cbifrdr 

Cbifre 

Cbilindrao 

Cbjlrir^^ 

Cbimbeo 

Cbinear 

Chincbeiro 

Chincbprro 

Cbin^la 

Cbiqueiro 

Cbifpa 

Cbifpar 

Cbiile , 

Cbita. 



CHO. 

Cb6§a 
Ch6ca 
Chocalbir 



Cbofr^do 

Cb6frc 

Cb6ldabolda 

Cb6que 

Cborar 

Cborrilbo , ' 

Cborro 

Cbovor 

Choupa 

Cboupana 

Cboupo, or Ch^po 

Cbourico 

Cboutir. 

CHU. 

Cbu^a 

Cbupamel 

Cbup4r 

CbucburriSr 

Cbiifo 

Cbufa^ 

Cbuma^o 

Cbumbar ; 

Cbtimbo 

Churriad 

Cburdme 

Cbiifma 

Cbiiva 

Chuveiro 



CHE. 

Cbea; or Cbcy^ 
^ Cb6fe 

Cheg&r - 
, Cberi^r^ and Us irCbocilhd 

rivatiws Cbocir 

Cherivia Cbocarreir, 

' Cberne* ' Cbocarrice ctlY. 

CHI* Choco and ditcot 

Cfaiir Cbocoldte Chy'pre. 

The, following words begin with ce and not/r. 



Cea 

Ceado 

Cear 

C£B. 

Cebola 
Ceboldl 
Cebolinbo. 

' Gedavf m 



Ced^ia 

Cedenbo 

Cedcr 

Cedilbo 

Ccdo 

C^dro 

Cedula. 



Cega 



C£G. 

t 

I 



Cegir 
Cego 
Cegonba 
Ogude 
Cegueira- ^ 

C£I« 

Ceifa 

Ccifao 

Ceirao 



Ceirinha 



198 



PORTUGUESE 



Ceirmha 
Ceiv&r. 

CEL. 

Celebra^ao 
Celebrar 

C61ebre 

Celefie 

Celefti^l 

Celeftrina 

Celeufma 

Celga 

Ceiha 

C61ho 

Celib&do 

Celibato 

Celicola 

CeHd6nia 

Cella 

Celleiro 

CeNeireiro 

C61tas. 

C£M. 

Cem 
Cemitei^io* 

CEN. 

Cenaculo 

Ceno 

Cen6bio 

Cenobitico 

Cenotdphia 

Cenoura 

Cenrada 

Cenrgira 

C£nfo 

Cenf6r 

Cenfura 

Cenfurado 

Cenfurdr 

Centiuro 

CentSna 



Centeal 

Centefinvo 

Centgyo 

C^nto 

Cent6cuIo 

Centop^a 

Centr&l 

Cfintro 

C^ntuplo 

Centuria 

Cenluriao 

Ceo 

CEP. 

Cgpa 
Cepilho 
C^po 
Ceptro. - 

C6ra 

Ceraferdrio 

Cerbcro 

Cfirca 

Cercado 

Cerc^r ' 

Cercador 

Cercadiira 

C^rce 

Cerce^do 

Ccrccif 

Cercilio 

C^rco 

Cerdofo 

Cerebtp 

Cergijas 

Cercij^I 

Cerem6nia 

CerehionidI 

CeriSiro 

Cerne 

Cernelha 

Cer6I 

Cerpulas 

CerquSiro 



Ccrrdr 

Cerralh^iro 

Cerr&lho 

Ccrrarfc 

C^rro 

Ceru 

Ccrto 

Certaa 

Certdza 

Certida 

Certificir 

C^rva 

Cervil 

Cerv6j« 

Cervilhas 

Ccrvii 

Ceriida 

Certlleo 

Ccrvo 

Ccrzir. 

CES. 

Ccfar^ 

Cefarea 

Ccfma 

Cefmaria 

Cefm^iro 

Cefsao > 

Cefla^a^ 

CeiTir 

C^fia 

CeAinha 

Ceftlnho 

Ceft^iro 

C^fio 

Cefiira 

CET. 

C£va 

Cevida 

Cevad&l 

Cevad^ira 

Cevad6uro 

CcvAr 



Ce^ 



% 



C S A M M A R. 



"1 



CtztS : Cezimbar. 

N. B. Cerrar, fignifies /oj^t, axjhut up ; hwxfm&r 
fignifiea /«y£rw, to cut timber or other matter with 
afaw. 

The following words muft have ci, and not /, Jn' 
their beginning. 



■ CIA, 


Cigino 


Cintiira ' 


Ciirfe 


Cigim 


, CinM ■ 


Ciitica. 


Cigiidc 


Cinzenio 


CIS. 


Cigui^lha. 


Cmzciro. 


Cfba 


CIL. 


CIO. 


Cibalbo 


CUida 


Clo 


Cib6ria. 


CIDiaa 


Ci6fo 




CiMr 


Ci6ra. 


cic. 


Cilida 




Cicatriz - 


CUicio 


cip. 


Cicero 


Cillidai. 


Cipo 


Cici6Ib. 




Cipi«lle 




CIM._ 


Ci^no. 


CID. 


Cima 




CUadao 


Cimilfaa 


CIR., 


Cid.daoi 


Ombalo 


CMiuIa 


Oidide 


Cimeyra 




Cidad&i 


CimCnto 


Cirandir ' 


Xiin 


Cimitarra ' - 


CIrco 


Cidiida 


Clmo.. 


Circtasao 


Cidiao 




Circular 


Cidriira. 


CIN. 


Circulo 




Cmca 


Circililo 


c«. 


Ciicir 


Circumcid£r 


CitiKia. 


Cincho 


Circumcffao 




Cinco 


Circurafergncia 


cir. 


CiDco^nu 


Circumfpeao 


Cittr 


Cmgidouro 


Circumfpec^ao 


CSb> 


Cbgi, 


Circumflancia 


CiMr. 


Cingulo 


CircumBantei 




Cinnamoiw 


Cirio 


CK. 


Ciou 


Cirargia 


C%ti» . 


Cintillir 


CiruigiaS 




04 


Ciizli 



20p 

Cirzir. 

Cifcfr 

Cifco 

Cifma 

Cifmitico 

Clfne 

Cifterci^nfe 

Ciilerna 



FOB T UG U ES E 



Cita9ad 

Cu&d9 
Citar 

Citeri6r 

Cithara 

Citharedo 

Citrlno 

Civel 

Civil 

Civilid&le* 



Ciu. 



Cltime 
Ci^met 



ciz. 



Cizania 



XL No Pprtuguefe word begins with go ; but ac- 
cording to Madweiray there an; fome that foeffin 
with guj ap4 f« ; as fapafo, fapifielroy fargifo, fija, 
fugidadcy gimoy f^rra^ gurrar^ and fome others. 

The f is ufed ?ifter p in thofe Portuguefe wpnfJi 
that have in their Latin root fi i as defcripfM^ 4^ 
. eepgaoj &c. from defcriptio, ace^tig^ &c. 



Of Double Litigrs. 

It is to bt generally obferved, that the confonant( 
are doubled in thofe Portuguefe words, whofe Latin 
roots have lil^ewi^ the fame do})ble confonants $ a« 
accelerar^ accinio^ occidintCy &c, from accelero, accefiiuSy 
occidenSy &g*. affi^gir^ qffluSndif^ (ifirmafdo, &c, frdflj 
affligOy affluentia^ affirmation _9fic, ^ you will fee ip |hf 
following colle£lions. 

B i$ to be doubled in ahiadey ahhacial, akbadi&y ab- 
badijja^ (^bheviaturay abbreviqry an4 fome others, 

C 18 to ^be doubled in the fpllewing words, uA 
fome of tjieir dprivatives. 



A. 


Accent© - 


Acceita 


Abftrac9ad 


Ac^entu&f 


Acceita9ld' 


Ac9ad 


Accepgad 


Acccitador . ; > 


'. 


1 


Acceitir 



G tt A M M A K. 



401 



itir 

flad 

fsiveif 

(To 

fliSrtp 

lentil 

iSnte 

lerada 

lerido 

lerir 

(ipa9^P 

nodado 

rpmodir 

mulaf^ao 

mul^r 

fa^ao 

aao 

'adof 

ar 

ativo 

gao 
:;ad. 



B- 



lO. 



9a 

dinhp 
do 
1. 

mfptc^ao 

ao 

* 
o. 

:jao 

ucfao 
ic^ad 

cfaa. 



Decoc9af 
Deduc^ao 

Desjecfifi 

Defoccupafs^ 

Defoe ciip&do 

Defoccupdr 

Detracfao 

Dic^ao 

DiccipDario 

Dj/tracfind. 

Eccentrico 

Eccleiiiftico 

Erecfao ' 

Evic9ao 

£xac9ad 

Excr^fUp. 

Fic9ao 
Fic9ao 
Frac9ad^ 

h 

s 

Itnpeceabilidide 
Impecciv«l 
Inaccefsivel 
Indic9ad 
Indiic9aG^ 
Inf6c;978 
Infra 0930 ■ 
Infpec9a6 
Inftruc9ad 
^Intellec9a5 
Interj6c9a5 
Interfec9ad^ 

Introduc9adL 

M. 
Manudtic9a)l 



o. 



Obj^cfao 



Obflruc9ao 

8ccafiid 
ccafionar 
Occafo 
Occidehtil 
Occid£nte 
Occiduo 
Occifao 
Occurter 
Occulum^nte 

OccuU4r 
Ocdilto * 
Occupa9ad 
Occupado 

Occupir 

Occurr^udia 

Occurr^hte. 

P. 

Peccddo 

Peccador 

Peccadora 

Peccante 

Peccar 

Predic9ao. 

Preoccupa^ 

Produc9ao 

Proj6c9af? 

Prof^ecao 

Putrefac9ad. 

R. 

Rarefac9a6 

Reconduc9ad 

Rcfec9a4^ 

Refriefi« 

Refecca9aQ 

Reftric9ad 

Satisfac9ad 
Seccir 

S^CGO 

Sec9ad 



Secura 



PORTUGUESE, 

T. 

TranriccaA 
Traduc9aS 
V. 
VAcca 
Vaccada - 
Vftccum. " 



Seccun 


Succefiivo 


S£cco 


■ SuMefsivd 


Soccorrgr 


, SucceffiSr 


Sbcc6rro 


SucciDUmteie 


SubirdcfiS 


SuGcinto 


Succed^r 


Succo 


Succeflao 


Succofo 


Succiflb 


Saccubo. 



This letter H doubled in the following wordcr 
atUt'gaS, i^dduMiido, addicton&r, additaminto, additdr. 

F, 



jF' is to be doubled in 




AfibiUdUe 


Affeninado 




AlBvd 


Affeminirfe 


ABrmadir 


Affxligido 


Aficmdam^te 


Affirm&r 




Afferrido 


Affiftiilicfc 


Aflcrrar " 


Affiair. 


ABigir 


A£FcrretoSdo 




Affiigos 


Afferretoiir 


AFFL. 


AAmido- 


Afferrolhado 


Afflaniirre 


Aaaoirfe 


Aiirrolhir 


Afiiccao 


ABiMJo 


Affervestado 


Affiiao 


ASilUr 


. Afferventar 


A«igir 


Aa^zuidido ' 


Afiervorado 


AfHulncia 


hSulxlt, 


Affetvorar. 


AFFO. 


AFfE. 


AFFI. 


Affocinhii 


AffdJo 


ABSido 


Affogado 


Affeir 


ASar 


Affogador 




ASdalgido 


AITogar 


Affeaadamtate 


Affidalgirfe 


■ Affogamint* 


AtTeaido 


AfEgUT&do 


Affcgucido 


ASeatl : 


ISC 


Affogueir 


Amao 


Afforfdo 


A<leaii6l<> 


, AlEladei 


Afforador 


A8<>(>S 


ABlir 


Afforir 


AIFei(0<da 


Affiaado 


AiForanlAnIo 


AIMoXr 


Affiair 


"AfFormemar 


Aleite 


Affincido 


A£Fbrmofeado 


Aleilir 


ABncii 


AlTaiiiioreir 

Afibui4« 



GRAMMAR. 



20S 



Afibuti^o v^. 
Affoutar 
Affouteza 
AfiSuto. 

Attn. 

Affirac&r 

Affirainengido 

Affreguefldo 

Affreguefirfe 

Affr^Dta 

ABmtido 

Aftontam^nto 

Affrontir 

AffirontofaiD^nte 

Affiront6fo 

Afiraxadamdnte 

Affroxiio 

Affroxar. 

AI7U. 

Affugentddo 
AfiugenUr. 



Affumado 

Affumar 

AfFundido 

Affundirfe 

AfFundfrfe 

Affuzill&r. 

DiSixnido 

Difiam&r 

Di£Ferinfa 

Difilertn^as 

DiffcrSnle 

Differentemente 

Difficfl 

Difficuldade 

Difficultir 

Oifficult6fain£me 

Diflkuhofo 

DifiFufad 

Diffufamcnte 

Difiufo 

G. 

This letter is to be doubled in 



\ 

\ 



Aggravante 
Aggravir 
Aggrav^do 
Aggrivo 



Aggreir6r 
Exaggeracad 
Exaggerador 
Exaggeri^o 



\ 



L is to be doubled in 



Aball^do 

Aballador 

Aballar . 

Abillo 

Aballifado 

Abilifador 

Aballif&r. 

AC 

Acafellad6r 



Acafelladura 

Acafeil^r 

Acallentido 

Acallentar 

Acapellido. 



£• 



EffeHivamintt 

Effeaivo 

Effeito 

Effeituir 

Efficazmente 

££Bcacia 

Efficiz 

Ei&ciente ' 

Effigie 

o. 

Offender 

Ofierec^r 

Offufc&r. 

J. 

SufiTocar 

Suffrigio, anifm€ 
^ others* 



Ezaggerir 
Suggerfr 
Suggefla5 
Suggerido. 



AF. • 



Affillado 

Affillador 

AffiUir. 



AL. 

Allega^ao 

Allegddo 

AUegSr^ 

Allegona 

AIIeg6rico 

Allegorifir 

AlieMia 

AUividr 

Alliicina9ad 

• Allucin^ 



PORTUGUESE 



Allotinir 


BA< 


CavallSiro 


Alludir 


Bacellida 


Cavillo. 


Allumiir 


Bacgllo 




Allufc*. 


Barbella 


ex. 




Bairelia. 


Ceb611a 


AM. 




Cebollil 


AmamclUilo 


Bit. 


Cebollinho 


Amar^llo 


B<lla . 


Cbancellir 


Amarellecerre 


Bellamentc 


ChanceJlwii 


AmerelllJio 


Bella' 


Cella 


Amollido 


Bellfza 


Celleiro. 


Anioll4r_ 


Belleirufin 


cu 


A~inollec£r 


Bcllico 




AdoIIecido 


BelUcdfo 


ClavellfM 


AmoHentif 


BeU!,.m 


€0. 


Ampdlla. 


BelluiDo. 


Codicillo 


AN. 


BO. 


•calls 


Annotlarao 


Bulla 


Cnllado 


AioolUr. 


Bullarip, 


Collar 
Collein 


AP. 


CA. 


CollScao 


Appellajao 

Appellante 

Appellii 

Appellidir 

Appellido. 


CaMfope 
Camillo 


Collaterfl 
ColI6cca5 


Cavilla^a* 


Colliaa . 


Cavillolamanle 
Caballioa 


ColleBivo 
Collea6l 


Cadella 


Coll%a 


AS, 


Cadellfnha 


Collegiada 


Aquclla 


Callo 


ColIegiSI 


Aqutlle 


Camanillo • 


Collegio 


Aquell6mro 


Cainbadala ' 


CoUigSr 


Aquillo. 


Cancel la 


Colligir 




Capilla 


Cll/rio , 


AR. 


. Capellau 


caio 


Armellas 


CapelKda 


Collocacao 


■Arrepellido 


Capellaai* 


CollocSr 


Arrepellao 


C.pello 


Colloquio 


ArrepellSr. 


Capillar 




AT. 


Callelli 


COM. 


AtropellUo 
Atropclltr. 


Caltcllo 
Cafallo 


Compellir 
Compoll£11a 


Cafiilla 


ConHellafaS 


AV, 


Caralla 


CorrolUUio 


AvillanUo, 


Cavallaiia 


CovSlla 

ComiU: 



CourcUa/ ' 

Delia 

Delias 

Deiie 

Delles . 

Degollido 

Degolia^ao 

JDegollar 

, DegoUadouro. 

VI, 

Difiillacio 
Diflillador 
•Dittilldr. 

DO. 
Donzella. • 

DU. • 
Duello .' . 

£bulli9ad -* 

ELI. 

E'ila 

E'llas 

£11e 

Elles 

Elleboro 

Elljpfe 

Elliptico. . 

Emolli^nte 
Emollir 

EN. 

Enallige 
EncapelUdo : 
Encapellir 
Kncaftellado 
Encaftellar 



G R A M AT A 

EncclleirAn 

EQ. 

'Equipollencia 
Equipollentc* 

ES. 

Efcabellada 
Bfcabello 
Efcudella 
Efcudeliau 
. Eflilla^ao 
Eftiilddo 
Ettillar 
Eftiliicidio 
Eftrella 
Eftrelladb. 

I EX. 

Excellencjia 

Excellcntc 

Expeliir. 

F41la 

Fall^cha 

Fallicia 

Fallador 

Fallir^ 

Fallccer 

Fallecfdp 

Falfencia 

Fallido. 

F£. 

FerdizSlIo 

FL. 

Flagellame - 
Flag611o. 

FO. 

F6lle 

Folliculo . 
- Jontollo, 



R. 

Gabella 
Gallido 
Galladura 
.Gailar 
Gailego 
Gdllia 
Gallicido 
Gallicir 
G^Ilico^ 
Gallinha 
Galiinha9d 
Gallinheira 
Gallinheiro 
Gallinhol-a 
Galli6poli 
Galliota 
Galliza 
GalJo 

Gain^lU 
Gaz^llrf. 



905 



• G611a. 



GO. 



US., 



a 



Hellefponto*. 
Hendecafj^llabo 
Hoimnda 
Hy pall age. 

anclla 
anelleira 
ancllinha 
armdllc^. 

I. 

111^930 

Illaquear 

Iliativo 

Illegftimo ' -• 

mfo 

Illi^ar 

,IlIiciad6r ^ . 

IllicitainSnte 



S06 

illiciumdite 

Illieito V 

Illoc&vel 

Itladido. 

Illudir 

Illuniina9a£ 

Illuniin&do 

Illaminir 

Illpminativo 

lUufao 

lUufo 

Illuftrafao 

Illuarir 

Illiiftre 

Illuftriffimo 

Ill/rio 

Imb^lla 

Impeliir 

Incapillato 

Infallivel 

Inintelligivel 

Interviilio. 

L. 

Lib6Uo 
Lordello ' 
Loufilla. 

M. 

Marc6Ua 
MarceUfm 



POkTXJGUESE 



MartelUda 

MartelUr 

Mart6Uo 

Maitellfnho 

Mallogrido 

MamilUur 

Meddlla 

Mellffluo 

M6U0 

MetUlic* 

Milleniri* 

MilMfino 



MirandelU 

Mifcellinia 

M61]e 

MoU^ira 

Moll«za 

Mollice 

Mollidao 

Mpllificante 

Molliiicir 

Mollini[r 

Monofy'llabo. 

N. . 

N^lla 

N6Uai 

N«lle 

Nelle* 

Nig^lla 

Novella 

Novelleiro 

Nulla 

Nutlid^de 

Nullo 

Nuzellos. 

O. 

Odivellas 
OUaria 
Oll^iro 
Ouguella. 

P. 

PalU 

Pallidio 

Pallante 

Pillas 

Palliido 

Palliar 

Pillido 

pailio 

Parad^lla 

Parallixe 

Purall61o 

ParaUel9graaio 



Pdle 

Pellefinha 

Pellica 

Pellicula 

Panella 

Pimpin^lla 

Phillis 

Pollegida ' 

Pollegir 

Pollez 

Polki9ao 

Polluto ' ' 

Polyfyllabo 

Portac6Ilo 

Portella 

Poflilla 

Poufaf611ea 

Prunille 

Pulm611a 

Pupilia 

Pupillo 

Pufiilauimidad* 

Pufillanime* 

Q- 

Quart611a 

R. 

Rabad6Ua 

Rebellido 

Rebellad 

RebeHarfe 

Rebelliao 

R^lla 

Rodof6ile 

Rodopello 

Rorilla 

Rueila 



S. 



Sella 

Sellido 

SeUaddr 

Sellagao 

Sell4r 



Selleiro 



G R A M M A R. 



20T 



SellSiro 

S6II0 

Sentln^lla 

Sibylla 

Sigitlo 

SigilJddo 

SoDrepelliz 

Sugillafao 

Sy'ilaba 

Syllabatico 

^llabico 

SyliogifSr . 

Syllogifmo. 



T. 



Tabella^ 
Tabelliao 
TabelliSa 
Titillacao 
TitUldr 



ToUa 
Tollice . 
T6II0 
Torcic6Uo 
' Ti;anquilUdade 
Tranquillo 
Tr^lla 
Trifyllabo 
Tunicella 
TuUio 

V. 

Vacilla^ao 
Vaciilante 
Vacillir 
Villa 
Vallado 
^ Vallir 
Vdllc 
Vaflalligeoi 



VaffiUIo 

VE, 

Velleidi^de 

Vellicacao 

Vellicir 

Velio 

Vcll6fo 

Velludo 

Verderella 

VI. 

Vflla ^ 

Villanla 

Villaam^Qte 

Vlllac? 

Villao 

VitcUa 

Vitellfno. 



N. B. JnnuUdr (ignifies to amml*^ but anrnHrl^txk 
adje£live» and (ignifies amtu/ar, or in the form of a 
ring. L is doubled by fome in the vrords pelo, pila, 
(for) thus; pillow pella. 



M. 



M is to be doubled in 



Acconpniodir 

Commemora^o 

Comm^nda 

Commenfurir 

Commentar 

Commerciir 

Commettir 

Comroina9ao 

Cemmiferafao 

Comipiflao 

Commiflirio 

Commo^ao 

Commodo 

Comai0v^r 



Commum 

Commun^ar 

Communicar 

Communidade 

Commuter 

Confumm&r 

Defaccommodir 

Defc6mniodo 

Dilemma 

£inmadeirar 

EmmadeixCr 

Emmagrec^r 

Emxnanquecte 

Emmaflar 



Emmudec^r 

Engomm£r 

Epigrjmma 

Flaroma 

Flammdnte 

FIdmmula 

G^mrna 

Gomma 

Grammitica 

Immaculdda 

Imman^nte 

ImmarcefTivel . 

Immaterial 

Immaturo 

Immediata. 



s 



308 PORTUGUESE 

Immediatam^C^ Immoitlficado Mamma 

Immemofavel Itnmovel , Maminir 

Imroenfo Immud^vel Recommendiir 

Immcnfufi^ef Immundo * Somma 

Immobilidf4d6 Immonidide Sommir 

Immoderadafll'^nte Immutavel Summa 

Immod^fto Incommodo Summ^rio 

imm6dico Incommutiicirel tSummidade 

Immolar Incommutdvel Sjmmetria, dnd 

Immortality Inflamm^r • some others 

N. B. A/, and not n, is 2^1 ways made ufe of before 

N is likeWife doubled in feveraf verbs compdfliYd- 
ed with a>f^ en, in, con, as ame/ar, annex0, MfUii^ 
annata, annet, Anna^ dnno^ annul&Ty connexaoyconnesi^j 
d^pennar, empennar^ ennafirar, ennegrecir, innafo, 
innaveg&vel, innoctncia, manna, Maridnna, pdnno, 
ftmkkt wken \l fi^ifies a peer, tyrdnftOy and Ibme 

P. 

This letter is to be doubled in words beginning 
with p compounded with the Latin prepofitions ad, 
ob^fub ; as appar&to, apparecer, oppdr, spprimiryfuppAry 
Philippey pdppa, &c. 

N: B. I^J^pa fignifies^jp^, or a fort of fpoon-tneit 
for childWtt'; bot papa hgnifies the Pope. 

The r f& doubled in,fuch wards as are ftrongly 
pronounced in f he middle ; as: guerra, arranciir, ^* 
redir, arrimtr^ mrruin&r, tarf^^itty carro, &c. 

The jf IS to be doubled in the Portuguefe fuperli- 
tives, bdeaufe tt is doubled m the Latin roots ^it ii 
alfo douUfd k» the following words : 

Abbad^fTa 



GKJLMMJkM. 



Coadefi Jb&m 

AfUnbSr ^Um 



£• 



Aflbl£r l-ffnryry 



An^flv 



Tis dowBiMrg jl ^k 
derivarires : 

Attcmpcrzr 



Attco 
Att6nuo 




Aura&iTo 
Attrahir 



Of tie 

OfWvric^Uat: 
N. B. Y^ ami -sr 

All wora^a:itiiT^ a 




s ^ 



, I I »«fl r^4 



tbe 




308 PORTUGUESE 

Immediatam^HC^ Imtnortlficado Mamma 

Imznemdrayel Itnmovel , Mammir 

Imroenfo Immuddvel Recommendiir 

ImmcnfufS^ef Immundo " Sonuna 

ImmobiIidf4d6 Immonidide Sommir 

ImmoderadafllSrJte Immutavel Summa 

immod^fto Incommodo Summ^rio' 

Imm6dico Incommuiiicirel tSummidade' 

Immolar Incommutdvel > Sjmmetria, dnd 

Immortality Inflamm^r • some others 

N. B. A/, and not «, is s^lways made ufe of before 

N is likewJfe doubled in feveraf verbs conipbflmf. 
ed with a>r, en, in, con, as anne/ar, annexe, a'fifUSi^ 
annata, annet, Anna^ dnno^ annul&Ty connexaoyConmiK^p 
depennar, empennar^ ennafirar, ennegrecir, innafo, 
innaveg&vel, innoctncia, manna, Maridnna, pdnno, 
fimkkf wken it fi^ifies a pe&, tyrdnmy and £bme 

P 

This letter is to be doubled in words begfnning 
with p compounded with the Latin prepofitions ad^ 
ob,fub ; as apparhio, apparecer, opp6r, Bpprimir^fupp6r, 
Philippe, pdppa, &c. 

N- B. I^i^pa signifies p^, or a fort of fpooii-toeit 
forchildWtt'; htxt papa CigniSit^ f he Pope. 

The r i& doubled in fuch words as are ftrongly 
pronounced in fhe middiej as: guerra, arraft€Sif,ar* 
redhr, arrimifry mrrmn&r, e^tigkr^ cdrro, &c. 

The $ IS to be doubled in the Portuguefe fuperli* 
tives, bdeaufe it is doubled m the Latin roots ;\it li 
alfo douUfd m ihe following words : 

Abbadaflk 



G R A MM A R. 



209 



Condafla 

Apr. 

Ailanhir 

Atiegtirir 

Affignit 

Affolir 

Acc£0b 

Aggre<5&r 

ApfN^ifir 

.^Unauar 

Arrcnteflar 



ASsAukr 

Afleyo 

Affeflor 

Afsibn 

Affiftil- 

Aflbmbv^ 

AIToprir 

AGTobbir 

Afluftdr 

Atraveflar 

Neceffitar 

Niffo 



N6flb 
N6fla 
E'lTa 
I/ffe 
I'ffo 

Cffo / 
Paffcir 
Paffir 
Remefla 

Ingr^flb, tfn«f mm^ 
others. 



Ti3 doubled in the following words and their 
derivatives : 



Attemperdr 

Atten^ao 

Attend^r 

Attent^r 

Attenuap4o 

Attenuar 

Att6nito 

Attr&C9d5 

Attra£livo 

Attrahir 



Attribuir 
Attribiito 
Attr]94o 
Attrito 

Commettir 

Demittir 

Enfittir 

Rtu 

Intrommett^r 

Omittir 



Permiitir 

Promettir 

Remettdr 

Remettir 

S^tta 

S^ttftnta 

Settec^tos 

Tranfmittir 



Of the Quantity of Syllables and their Sounds 

Of Words that make their Penultima in a. 

N. B. You muft remember what we have faid 
above about the accents. 

All words ending in abo^ hba^ heoy &ca, hcho^ hcha^ 
dfO'i iga^ &dOi ada^ dfo, &fa, Ago, i^a, Agem, agre, Alio, 
HAa, &lo, Ala, have the penultimas long; as diibo, 
ntang&ba, tnacdco, tnacaca, cavaca, mingicho, garn&cha, 
V^ir&go, Imhdfa, am&do, punhdda, (except reldmpago, 
waropofagp, levado, and cagada, which are ihort in 
the penijitima), ab&foy abafa^ faramAgo,adaga, (except 
std^go^ or fitdmagOydmago, imAraco,yrhich are Ihort,) 
• ' P trab&lkOi 



21© P.O R T U GJU E S E 

trabdlkOi iocdia^ badalo, (except ^nbmal% bu/ah, eJcdHf^ 
dalo, which are (hort), tanchdgem^ vindgre. ^ 

' Words ending in dmo^ dmai dnjio^ dnha^ dtiOy dn^y 
have their penultimas lon^j.as, efcdmo^ courdtnd^ 
cqftanhoy ardnha^ ^ngdno, fejldna: except pdmpano, 
t^mpanoy bigamo. 

Words ending in dpo^ hpa^ hqut^ aro, cim^\i^e 
thfeir penultimas long ; as, guardanhpOy Jol&pay baj^ 
bdque, emp&roy feara ; except cdntaro^ pucarOy Ifparo, 
hdfaroy liiparOy p/faroy picarOy cdmray tdmaray pafjim^ 
LazarOy b&rbarOy cbcaraSy &c. 

Words ending in arroy array atOy at ay hvOy hva^ 
axoy axasy make the. penultima long ; as, biz&rro^ 
bizarray blfcatOy pataratay ejcravo^ ffcrava, (except 
concava, and bifavo), cartdxo^ tarrdxa. 

Of Words that make their Penultima in e. 

All words ending \n eboy ebay edoy eday efa^ ha\l^ 
their pequltiraa long ; as, manceboy mancebay* oziA, 
azeday fane/a. 

Words ending in e/e are Jong ; as, magarefe :• as 
well as thofe ending* in icoy^ca, ego, ega; as bmicf^ 
bonecay cabegOy cabSga» 

Words ending in ^gOy egdy are long; as, moreigOf 
fodgOy religOy entregay allega ; except conegOy trAfegh 
cgrrego^ fofregOy pecegOyfdlegOy bUtegay cbcegas. 

Words endifTg in tjoy ejay elo, klay are long ; ^ 
iarangukJQy bocejo, igrija^ AlentejOy enveja, m^rtih^ 
querela. 

-Words ending in emoy ^maycnOyenay are longj aS| 
mpremoy pojlemay acenoy agucena ; except apozema^ 

N. B. The penultima is fliort in the Word ingrtmf. 

A^ords ending in epOy eparCpey eque^ eroy kra^^^ 
long ; as, decepOy caripayjulepeytnole^uey severOySf^ita% 
temperQy,(when a noun) : and /m^/r^, (when ^ yfirb) 
except isperpy prospero. , 

^^ Words eniXng in. eso^ hdySzOy eza^ eioy^itayiiet 
^ffp iva, eve^ arc long) as, aceso^ acisaydesprihy 



% 



GRAMMAR. L«Il 

hand^za and defprifoy (when a Ytxhytntremifq^^^aJ'' 
Wa, ramalMtCy boftte, atr&jOy atrhja^ atreve. 

Of Words ihat make their Penultima in i. 

Words ending in iboy iia, ibe^ icho^ icha^ icie, ico^ 
ica^ ico^ ifa^ ice, idoy fda, ifo, if a, ife, have the pe- 
nultima long ; as, ejiribo, arriba, arribe^ efguichoy 
efguicha^ azeviclie, panlco, (a fort of fluff) boticai 
except mecdnicOy ecumenicoy criticx>y politicOy pdfiicoj 
(panicle), and fome others borrowed from the Gfeek 
and Latin. In /'fo, iqa, &c. z^jToligOypreguigay veU 
hice, maridoy medida ; except humidoy pallido, horrido^ 
and fome others derived from the Latin. In ifo^ 
if a J &c. as borrifoy alcatifaypatife. 
i Words ending in igo and iga, are long ; as, amigo,^ 
cmig^y except, pridigo^ prodiga. ^ 

Words ending in ijo, and ija, are long ; as, qfiijoj^ 
jtrtemija. 

Words ending in i/iOf ilia, are long ; as, afi/Ho, 
beaiilha. Others ending in tlo, ila, as, gorgomiloy 
ferfila^desfda. - ' 

. ' Words ending in hnoy ima, have the* penultima 
Idng; a&' hptimoy cadmo, ejgrima, iafiima, (when a 
▼erb) ; except laftima (wnen a noun), Jeronimo, pef^ 
Jfev^j-^uid all the fuperlatives, an6nimOy and fome 
others. 

Words ending in inhoy inhay ino^ inay Ipo, ipay ipe^ 
bi^ve the penultima long ; as, conjiipo, conjiipay Euripo, 
in^^ife, I Others in iquoy iquay ique, hoy ira^ ire ; as^ 
piiipft^il^quay Iambi que, retiro, menttrayfufpire. 

Wprds ending in ifoy ifa, izp, iza, itOy iiayho^ iva^ 

Ik&^'ii^y'^rQ long in the penultima ; as, avifo^ camifa^ 

'j^o^ ajui^Hi altivoy altivay pro/ixo, proltxay atito^ 

• foirito-i^ except pilpiiOy vomiiOy decripltOy eJpritQ^ 

f//^/r(?, and fome others. 

\lQfleT^rJluch words as make their penulfima in o. 

'fords'" ending in obpyoba^ 6be^ 6bray obrq, Sbn^ 
' jj^te ' ihVir M^ jongj as, Idbo^ loba^ arrSba^ 



\ 



r 
\ 



fil2 P b R t U G U E S E 

aurSie^ gJSSo, a/c6va, oiro, Sira, cobre, c6brOy id- 
bro. 

Words ending in ocho, ockd^ dcoy oca^ 6go^ oga, odo^ 
SJa, -ode, Sfoy ofay vfe^ have the penultima, long ; as, 
agarrdcio, garrdcha^ carochity kioco, except a/it/oep) 
mafsarSca, minhSca^ almafo^ m6ga, (a girl) rndga^ or 
mdfsa^ (a notch) almogo (when a verb,) carroga^ iS* 
do, boda, bode, pode, (the third perfon lingular of the 
prefent indicative of the verb poder\ pode. (the third 

Eerfon Angular of the p;reterperfect definite of the 
ime \txh)ygalh6fay bofd . . . 

Words ending in bfro^ ofra, ofre, are along ; as> 
alcMxSfray cofre, enx&fre. 

Words ending in ogOy oga, ogue, are long; as,^ 
fl>gOy ^ffogay affbguty defafbgOy when a verb, and.i^- 
qfvgo^ when a qoun. 

Words ending in ojo, bja, hav6 the penultima kmg; 
tSy defpojoy whtn a vevby no jo, defpojo when a hgud. 

, Words ending in olo, bhy ble, are long; as^tiV^ 
lay gallinhbla, bbluy engblCy miolo^ boloy reboh^ tHh 
ccbola ; except perolay frivoloy benevolo y malevolo^ , 

Words ending in pmoy Sfna, bme, have the penill- . 

tuna long; as, mordokoytedomayjimey except Thm^* 

Words ending in onho, onha, bnoy ^/i^, have. Ac 

penultima long ; as, bifonhoy rijonhay dono, aii^m% 

. dAna y except altifonoy and unifono. 

. Words ending in bpla, opOy bpay bpty Spro, 6fl»y 

bpre, Sque, have the penultima long ; ^s, manifki 

' topOy tbpay galbpey afsopVQy when a verb, afsopna^ 4' 

Jopfrty afsopro, when a noun, botbque. 

Words ending in Sroy or ay ore y are long .mihe ' 
penultima ; as, peftAoro^ penibra, penhbrdy chorq viie& 
a noun ; chbro. when a verb s except bacoroi rhmSf 
pblvoray&rvore. 
■ Words ending in ^rro, orra, are long; ap/^* 
edrro, mStro, tachorra ; and fome others endmg in 
Sfiy 6fey 6fa^ 6zoy oza^ as, pfimorSfo^ primorSJa^ %^ 
triofo^ mdufiriofa, ciSzo, cigza, de/co/e. 

Woi 



.GRAMMA R. 213 

Words ending in oUy gtOy 6tey have their penulti- 
ma lonjg^f ^& goto^ gota^ h6ta^ devoio^ frota^ capote^ 
garrote. 

' Words ending in ovoy ova^ ove^ are long in the 
p^ultima ; z^ 6vOiCorc6vay aprove. 

Words ending in 6x0^, oxa^ are long in the pe- 
nultima ; as, roxoy f"6xa^ jmtarrSxo. 

IMes/or/uei fF&rdsas make their Penultima 

Words ending in ubo^ uia, 0ro, ibra^ ^h^ icAa^ 
ieo^ iudy itq^y uga^ make the penultima long; as/^ 
ad&bOy ddiini'^ except//irr«^o,/«r»^^,an^d fbme. other j 
incubroy inciihtUy machUthoy embdchai cadico^ caduca^ r^- 

Wo]xl$ landing in ddo^ udi^ ude^ ufo^ Hf^yjfff^J^gOf^^ 
^£fh jf^y 4^r ]bave the penultima long^;as,y^^^a^^ 
fe^iJa, a/ffide, paniu/Oy adu/a, aduj^e, \[dngiufkgaj^^ 
cwtM^ji^ a^ambiqa. *.*...,. .,; 

Words ending in ilho^ May ilhey itlbyila) ^le^ £mo^ 
jteOy uiff€^ iuhOy inhay Me; as, bagilha^ borbiilhay 
tntilke^ engiloy engila^ bulebule\ ,ex,cept vocabulOy.vef* 
tibulo, dugulo^ reg^loy ap&fculOy, iremuh, patibiUOy ihiri^ 
iulos and .£3me others; con/limp^ confuma^ cardume^ 
ttjiemiifthoy tefiemunhay empunhe. ^ - -i I 

, Words endmg in unOy iinay iiney upOy ipay upey ique, 
iror^^i ^^> ^^^ ]<>ng in the penultima; as^ defiina, 
fcrtinay defitney apipOy api^pa^ apipe, eft^ue^ tnaduroy 
madirayafiiire. 

Words ending m ifoy ifuy ^/e^ uzoy i^a^ ize^ ito^ 
itay itey ixoy uxa, ^xe, have tlie penaltiipa |ong ^ a^^ 
farafiifOy parafifay paraf&fey redizo, reduza, redize, coH' 
ikUOy labitay enxitOy lab&te ; except cSmpuio when a 
n^un ; repAxOy empixay empixe ; and fome others end-*^ 
ing in iivOy uva^ ive ; as, viM^Oy viuvay envi&ve, 

N* B. When the penultima is immediately fol- 
lowed by another vowel, you muft make the follow- 
ing obfervations : 

P S A before 



S06 

Illicittrntnte 

Illieito V 

Illoc&vel 

Illadido. 

Illudir 

inuinina9afi 

lUuminido 

Illaminir 

Illfiminativo 

lUufao 

Illdfo 

Illuftra^ao 

Illufir&r 

Illuftre 

Illafirifliino 

Illy'rio 

Imb^Ua 

Impellir 

Incapillato 

Infallivel 

Inintelligivel 

lotervilio. 

L. 

Lib6Uo 
Lordello ' 
Loufilla. 

M. 

Marc6Ua 
MarcellCna 

Maitdlida 

MartelUr 

Mart61Io 

Mattellfnho 

Matfaliftnte 

Mallogrido 

Matnillir 

Mediilla 

Mellffluo 

M6U0 

MetUlic* 

MiUeoiri* 

MilMfino 



PORTUGUESE 



Mirandella 

Mifceilania 

M611e 

Mol]4ira 

MolKza 

Mollice 

Mollidao 

MpUificante 

Mollificir 

Mollin&r 

Monofy'llabo. 

N. - 

N^IIa 

N^Hai 

Ntlle 

Mellet 

Nigella 

Novella 

Novelleiro 

Niilla 

Nullid^de 

NuUo 

^uzellos. 

o. 

Odivellas 
OUkria 
OllSiro 
Ouguella. 

P. 

Palla 

Pallidio 

Pallante 

Pillas 

Palliido 

Palliar 

Pallidfez 

Pillido 

Pallio 

Parad6lla 

Parallive 

Purallelo 

Parallelagraino 



P61h! 

Pellefinba 

Pellica 

Pellicula 

Panella 

Piinpinelia 

fhillis 

Polleglda 

Pollegir 

Pollez 

Polki9ao 

Polluto ' ' 

Polyfyllabo 

Portacdllo 

PorteHa 

Pofljlla 

Poufaf611es 

Prunelle 

Palni611a 

Pupilla 

Pupillo '^ 

Pufiilanimid&dt 

Pufillanime. 

Q- 

Quart611a 

R. 

Rabad^lla 
Rebellido 
Rebel lad 
RcbcHarfe 
Rebelliao 

Rdia 

Rodof611e 

Rodopello 

RoftUa 

Ruella 

S. 

Sella 

Sellido 

SeUad6r 

Sellagao 

Seller 



Selleiro 



^ 



. i t$ Jl A ^ M A R. 215 

- CHAP. it. ' 



[ !E^jimd}o£y of the Poriufuefe Tonruefrdm the 
^ " Lattn, 

'^Tf^HE Partuguefe rdtains fo great an affinity to 
X. 'the Latin, that feveral words of the latter are 
preferyed in the former, by only allowing a fmall 
alteration ; as may eafily be feen in the following 
x>bferyations. 

1. The V> of the Latito Words is preferved in fome 
Portugtiefe ones; nay, fome Latin words are entire- 
ly preferved in the Portugnefe ; . as, hd/pediy ^orda, 
^rta\ &c. 
/IL Tihe;» is changed into o\ ^Sy forca^.golSfo^ 
efi6pa^\m&ftay amdmos, ^cchomfurca^guloJuSyJiupa, 
tfiufcaiWfiixmusi &c. . - v o ^ 

III. The diphthong, au^ is fi-equently chsi^d inta. 
MT; My Jouv&veli Buroy couve, mouro, &c^ft6m iaudch 
J^^aumn^taidiSyfttauruSyZic:.' -! ., - » 

IV. The e is prcfferved in feveral PcMftu^ttefe 
words J {aus, certOy fervo, erva^ terra, /erro, See., from 
cirtMSiJmHtiy.herba, ttrrayferrumy &c. • i , 

V. The^-^'takes the place of i; as, enfertnayfeca^, 
&c. from infirmus^Jicus, &c, 5 and the / is -fotnettmes 
preier^d^^ as in - indignp^ bmgno, &c. from indignus^ 

VJ;.\ The b is alfo changed into v ; as, arucfre, dih . 
vid&rydcve/ir^ava^ atn/eua,%LC. from arbor ydubitart^ 
debei[tiyabat^amabaty&cc. . •, . 

VII,: The r is yerf often changed into g ; as, digo^ 
M^^do, amigQ, migdlAa, &c. from dica, acaius, arnicas, 
lamica, 8cc. v 

Vill* CI is changed into chy as, cham&r^ chaise, 
from cUmarCy clavis^ &c. 

IX. When the c in Latin is followed by /, this 
lelteT.is changed into f ; as, bcqao, dicfoo, &c. from 
affio^ diSio, Etc. i and . ibmetimes the e before: / lA 

P 4 . changed 



f - 



308 PORTUGUESE 

Immediatam^C^ Imtnortlficado Mamma 

Imznemorayel Itnmovel , Mamroar 

Imroenfo Immuddvel RecommeiKliir 

ImmcnfufS^ef Immundo ' Somma 

Immobilidfddd lmmanid4de Sommir 

(mmoderadafll^rjte Immutavel Summa 

Immod^fto Incommodo Summario' 

Imm6dico Incommutiicirel tSummidade 

Immolar Incommutdvel ^ Sjmmetria, dnd 

Immortality Inflamm^r > some others 

N. B. A/, and not «, is s^lways made ufe of before 

iV is likewJfe doubled in fevefaf verbs comp6fli¥d- 
ed with atu en, in, con, as ame/ar, annexe^ MfUli^ 
annata, annet, Anna^ dnno^ annul&Ty connexaoyconnen^i 
depennar, empennar^ ennaftrar^ ennegrecir^ inniMi 
innaveghvel, inmctncia, manna, Maridnna, pdnno, 
fimkkf wken '^ (i^ifies a peer, tyrdnmy and ibme 

P 

This letter is to be doubled in words begfnning 
with p compounded with the Latin prepofitions ad^ 
ob^fub ; as apparhio, apparecir, opp6r, Bpprimiryfuppdr^ 
Philippe, pdppa, &c. 

N. B. ri^pa fignifies^»dj^, or a fort of fpooti-tocit 
forchildWtt'; hxit papa hgniSit^ f he Pope. 

R. 

The r }& doubled in/uch wards as are ftrongly 
pronounced in fhe middle; as guerra, arratfciif, or* 
rtdkr, arrimifry mrruin&r, edrf^g^, cdrro, &c. 

The $ IS to be doubled in the Portuguefe fuperli- 
tives, bdCttttfe it is doubled hi the Latin roots ;\it li 
alfo douUfd m the following words : 

Abbadaffa 



G R A MM A R. 



209 



Cond^fla 
.Auanb^r 

ASoMt 
Aodeflb 
AggtfffBr 
Apwffiur 

Arrcnteflar 



Attnitkr 
Afleyo 
Affcflor 
Afsirn 

Affiftfr 

AfTombnj^ 

AiTopiir 

Aflbbiiir 

Afltift^ 

Atraveffir 

Neceffitar 

Niflb 



N6flb . ^ 
N6fla 
FiTa 
I/ffe 
rflb 

Cffo / 
Paffeir 
PiiCKr 
Renaefla 

Ingr^flb, tf;i4/ many 
others. 



. ) 



7 43 doubled in the following words and their 
derivatives : 



Attemper&r 

Atten^ao 

Attend^r 

Attentir 

Aitenuapio 

Attenuar 

Att6nito 

Attric945 

Attra£livo 

Attrahir 



Attribuir 

Attribute 

Attri9do 

Attrito 

Commettik' 

Demittir 

Enfittdr 

Rtta 

Intrommettftr 

Omittir 



Permittir 

Premettir 

Remett^r 

Reinettfr 

Setta 

S^tt^nta 

Settec^tos 

Tranfmittfr 



Of the Quantity of Syllables and their Sounds 

Of Words that make their Pemdtima in a. 

'N. B. You muft remertiber what we have faid 
above about the accents. 

All words ending in abo^ &ba^ ieo, hcay hcho^ hcha^ 
i^\iga\ &doy aday &fo, ifa^ ligo, i^a, igem^ agre^ hlhoy 
'ilhay Uoy hhy have the penultimas long ; as dihbo^ 
nian^&bay macdcoy tnacacay cavaca^ mingichoy garn&chay 
TfmSr&^Oy linhdfay amado, punhdday (except reldmpago, 
maropbfagOy levadoy and cagadoy which are fhort in 
the j)enultima), abhfoy abafa^ faram&gOyadagay (except 
sidfiia^Oy or fit6mago^dmagOyam^raco,vfhich are (hort,) 
^ ' . P traiilAo, 



•^ ' 



21© P.ORTUG^UESE 

trabalhoy to&liay badaloy (except ^nbmal% bkfuhy eje^ 
dalo, which' are (hort), tancMge^y vindgre. ^ 

' Words ending in dmo^ dma^' dr\ho^ dnha^ dno^ dn,^^ 
have their penultimas lon^j.a^, efcdmo^ [courdma^ 
cqftdnhoy ardnhaj engdno, pjldna: except ^dwpano, 
tympanoy bigamo. , 

Words ending in dpOy apa^ ique, aro^ dm^h^ve 
thfeir penultimas long ; as, guardandpOy Joldpa^ baj* 
bdquey emphroy fear a ; except cdntaroy pucarOy l^paro^ 
bdfaroy lifparOy pifaroy picaro, camera, tdmara, paffaro, 
LazarOy bhrbaroy cbcaraSy &c. 

Words ending in drroy array atOy ata, hvo^ iva^ 
dxoy axasy make the, penultima long ; as, biz&rro^ 
bizarray bifcaiOy patardtay efcrdvOy efcrdv^y (except 
concava, and bifav6)y cartdxoy tarrdxa. 



Of Words that make their Penultima in e. 

All words ending in eboy ebay edo, eda, efa^ haVe 
their pequltiraa long ; as, manceboy mancebay- az£Jo, 
azeday fane/a. 

Words ending in c/e are long ; as, magareft .•• as 
well as thofe ending* in icOy4cay egOy ega, as bonicff^ 
boiiecay cabegOy cabSga. 

Words ending in tgOy egdy are long; as, moreSgo^ 
focigOy religOy entregay allega y except tonegOy trkfegHf 
cgrrego^fofregOy pecegOyfdlegOy biitegay cbcegas. 

V Words endifTg in tjoy ejay elo, ehy are long ; as^ 
tarangukJQy bocejoy igrijay Alentejoy envejay ma^ttik^ 
querela, 

-Words ending in emOy emaySnOyenay are longj as^ 
supremo y pojlemay acenoy agucena ; except apozema^ 
N. B. The penultima is fliort in the Vvprd ingremf^ 
Words ending in epOy epayipe,- eque, eroykra^zte 
long ; as, decepo^ carepayjulepeyfnoleguey severOySffuita^ 
iemperp y\when a noun) : and temperoyivrhen 9,yerh) 
except dfperpy prosper 0. 

. Words enAing in. eso^ esdye'zo, eza^ eio,Jta^c(el 
^^p iva, evCy arc long) as, aceso, aci'say despreioy 



^ RAM MA R. lJ?1i 

ftandi^a and dejprkfo^ (when a verb)>»/r^w^/^,'^«/. 
fi^ta^ ramalhiie^ boftte^ atrivo^ atrhja, atreve, 

OfWot'ds that makejheir Penultima in i. 

Words ending in iboy iia, tte, ichoj icha^ iche, ico^ 
ica^ ico^ if ay icCy idoy fda, i/o, i/ay r/e, hayt the pe- 
nultima long ; as, eftriboy amba, arribe^ efguichoy 
ifguicha, azevichCy panlco, (a fort of ftuflT) uoticai 
except mecdnicOy ecumenicoy criticOy pliticOy pdfiicoy 
'^anick), and feme others borrowed from the Gfeek 
atid Latin. In TqOy ifay &c. ^Sy ro/rgOy pr^guffa, veU 
hicCy maridoy medida ; except humidoy pallida y hbrrido^ 
and fome others derived from the Latin. In ifo^ 
ifay &c. as borrifoy alcatifay palife, 
y . Words ending in igo and igay are long ; as, amigo,^ 
itmlg^y except, pr^digOy prodiga. 

Words ending in ijoy and ijay are long ; as, afflijoj^ 

Words ending in ilkoy ilkay are long; as, afitho^ 
beaiilha* Others ending in ilo, ila, as, gorgomilo, 
perjila.'desjila. - ' 

'. Words ending in hno, ima, have the penultima 
Idng; a& t>ptimoy cadimo^ efgrimay taftimay (when a 
verb) ; except laftima (when a noun), Jeronimo, pej^ 
jfimor-^^A all the fuperlatives, anSnimOy and fom6 

Others- 

Words ending in inhoy inhay inoy inay tpo, fpa, ipe^ 
hiave the penultima long ; as, conJlipOy conjiipay Euripo, 
0^f^p€. . Others in iquOy iqua, iquCy hOy ira,y ire-^ zs^ 
jniJpt^iiilquay Iambi guey retire y mentirayfufpite. 

W9rds ending in ijOy ifay izOy izay itOy itqyivo,^ iva^ 

/i^oV ifji^, 'are long in the penultima ; as, avifo^ camifay. 

'j0xo^ ajuiMi altivoy altiva, prolixo, prolixay apito^ 

^akrito-ietcept pulpit a, vomit o, decripitOy (fprito^ 

fUiito, and fome others. 

■\l&les ^Fjuck words as make their penultima in o. 

■'^prds'encling in obpy^oba^ Sbe^ ohray obroy gbre^ 
%it ' iheir pcnyltim^ Jong } as, Idbo, loba, arrSba, 



U2Q 



PORTUGUESE 



IKg^r^gj a p^ftid(f^ or langa r. 

send partido ae alguem, 
Ddr p/aUvra.^ 
i)ar hiima satva^ 



Dar fiador^ 
I^ar principio^otjim^ 
Dar conta^ , 
Dar-sc ao estudo^ 
Dar em qucfalldr^ 

I 

Dar cntrdda^. . . 

Dar cdusa, 

Dar em fue entendir^ 

Dar de beHr, 

Dar couceSf 

Dar hum ccscorrdo^, 

Dar pancadas^ 

^Dar murrast 

Dar murra^aSf , 

Dar o/dro a^alguim deatgu- 

)na cousa^ 
Darhuma estocdda^ 
Dar OS bins dias^ 

Dar aguardar^ 
,Dar d cista^ 
Dar com dlguem^ 

Dar em alguim^ 

Dar cafiAif 

Dar sobre o inimigo^ 

Dar OS parabfm^ 

Dar OS pdrabins a alguem 

itsiteck^gada^ 
Dot a wldS ajuddnda, 
Dar d tStdSiir, 
Dar enfddo a^dlguim^ 
Dar no alvo^ 
Dar /OS castas^ 

Bar parte dit l^in ne^Scic^, 



To fide with one, to be for 

him.' 
To promifc. ^ 

To give a volley of fliot, or 

to make a difcharge of 

guns in honour of fbme 

perfons of quality^ 
To bail. 

To begin, or end. 
To give an account. 
To apply orte's fetf to fludy. 
To make one fpeak, to give 

an occaflon to be talked b£ 
To give acceTs to. 
TogivecaUfe. 
To vex one fadly, to troubb 

one. 
To give drink. 
To kick. 

To give a box on the car. 
To beat with a cudgel. 
To cuff 

To butt, as rams do. 
To fmell out a matter. 

To give a thru ft. 

To bid one goqd-tnori'ow. 

To give in Kecjring. 

To run a-groifno: 

To meet with one by chance, 

to light upon a perfon. 
To ftrike one, al/o to accufe 

one. 
To deal, or give^the cards. 
To fall upon the enemy. 
To congratulate. 
To bid one welcome. 

To give a helping hand. ' 

To let »ne take his choice. 

To moleft one. ' 

To hit the mark. 

To run away, to betake on€*s 

felf to flight. 
To impart a hufincfs. 

Dar 



4G It A M 11 A ft. 



«tfl 



Dar peBo amor it Dios^ 
Dar ytwutJUirra^ 
Dor kkma^Situ em redSudn^ 
JUar hiima^ifia de Mox^ 
Darulcdnct uo queje desgrja^ 

Darfuipiros, 
Dor amides^ 
Dor em rSfio^ 



Did, 

Biu^me bima dor, 
Dar quefaa^tr a ulguam, or 
Dccupar alguim^ 

Dar kiraSy 

relogio d£ hircs^ 

Dar a Mma a Dios, 

Dar comsigo em aigumapartty 

Dur kit^, 
Dar garrdte^ 
Dar vizes^ 
Ofol da nos ilkos, 

Dar ra%oenSf 

Daf comsigc ^o ckaS^ 

Dar/nttc, 

Dar as mdSs, 

Dar com a pirta na car a dt 

alguem^ 
Dar com a pirta nos olhos a 

algima couja^ (metaph.) 
Dar priffdy 

Dar tregoas^ (metaph.) 
Efta travejfa vai dar a ria 

larga, 
Dei no penjaminio dt^ &c. 
Ouem me air a cjtdr em caja ! 
lia$fabt aonde hade dar com 

a caiica^ 
IJlo vos na dt dar na cattfa^ 

Dar com a calrifapillas pa» 
redest 



To ^ for G0ift fiite. 

To beat one hunify. 

To walk a tom. 

To caft an eye on. 

To obtain, or coofpafe dM's 

wi(b. 
Teii^b. 
To give hearing* 
To upbraid, to Oift in ilia 

teeth. 
Give hither. 
I was uken with a Mpn^ 
To employ one, to m him ^ 

work, to fet him upon fome 

hafincfs. 
To ftrike. 
The 'Clock ftr?ke». 
To give up the ghoft, to die. 
To caft one*is felt into a place, 

or to go to a place. 
To fuckle. 
To Ibangle, 
To cry out, to hawl. 
The fun (hfties in one^s 

eyes. 
To debate, or contet^d. 
To fall upon the ground. 
To hear rruit. 
To (hake hands- 
To (hut the door upon one. 

To flight, to d'cfpifc a th^g. 

To prcfs, or haflen. 

To refpite,togivc fome refpjte 

This lane ftrikes, of goes into 

the broad ftreet. 
It came into my head to^&c. 
How fain would 1 bfc at home I 
He docs not kuQW.which way 

to turn hirafelf. 
The mifchiaf will light upon 

your own head. . , " 
To beat one'i iie«a ligaina 

the wall. 



U2Q 



PORTUGUESE 



Dfl^r^se^ a p^ftidif^ or lang^r. 

se fid partido aeaiguem, 
Ddrfialdvra^ 
i)ar hfima satva^ 



Dar fiador^ 
U^ar priruipio^ Of Jim^ 
Dar cSnta^ , 
Dar-sc ao estudo^ 
Dar em que/aildr^ 

Dar cn^rdda^. 

Dar cdusdy 

Dar em (jue entendir^ 

Dar de behir, 

Dar couceSy 

Dar hum coscorrdo^, 

Dar pancadas^ 

^Dar murrast 

Dar murra^a^^ ' 

i)0r ofdro a^alguim dedlgu- 

)na cousa^ 
Darhuma estocAda^ 
Dar OS bins dias^ 
Dar a.guardar^ 
,Dard cSsia, 
Dar com diguem^ 

Dar em algucm^ 

Dar catia^, 

Dar sobre o inimigo^ 

Dar OS parabfm^ 

Dar OS pdrabins a alguem 

iiAsia chf^gada^ 
Dot 'a WU& aiuddndfy^ 
Dar dtstolhit^ 
Dar enfddo a'dlguem^ 
jPar no alvo^ 
Dar fos costas^^ 

Dar pirte ii i%m ne*gSti&^ 



To fide with one, to be for 

him.' 
To promifc. ^ 

To give a volley of fliot, or 

to make a difcharge of 

guns in honour of fbme 

perfons of quality^ 
To bail. 

To begin, or end. 
To give an account. 
To apply orte's fetf to fludy. 
To make one fpeak, to' give 

an occaflon to be talked 6t 
To give "ai'cers to^ 
To give caiife. 

To vex one fadly, to trouble 
' one* 

To give drink. 
To kick. 

To give a box on the ear. 
To beat with a cudgel. 
To cuE 

To butt, as rams do. 
To fmell out a matter. 

To give a thru ft. 

To bid one gopd-tttorrow. 

To give in Keej|[ing. 

To run a-groUnd: 

To meet with one by chance, 

to light upon a perfon. 
To ftrike one, aljo to accufe 

one. 
To deal, or give the cards. 
To fall upon the eneniy. 
To congratulate. 
To bid one welcome. 

To give a helping hand. " 

To let »ne take his choice. 

To moleftone. ' 

To hit the mark. 

To run away, to betake on€*s 

felf to flight. 
To impart a hufincfs. 

Dar 



G R A M M A R. 



2(21 



• 

Dar peU$ amor dc Deos^ 
Dar hduajirra^ 
Dar hima^Slta em redoi^do^ 
Dar kHrna vijla de, olhos^ 
Daralcdnce ad quejt dtxija^ 

Dar fuspiroSj 

Dar duvidoSy \ 

DaremrSflOy 

Ddciy I ' 

Diu^me kitma doty 
Dar qiitfaxir a alguim-y or 
occupar algaem^ 

Dar koraSy 

relogio dd horas^ 

Dar a alma a Deos, 

Dar comsigo em algumaparte, 

Dar leitfy 
Dar garrote^ 
' Dar ^izes, 
OJ'ol da nos olhos, 

Dar razoenSy 
Daf comsigo tio chao, 
- Darfrito, 
Dar as maSsi 
Dar com a porta na cdra de 

alguemy 
Dar com a porta nos olhos a 

algima cSufa^ (metaph.) 
Darprijfd, 

Dar tregoas^ (metaph.) 
Effia travejfa vai dar a rHa 

larga, 
Dei no penjamento de^ &c 
Quejn me air a tjidr em caja ! 
liaBfahe aondeha de dar com, 

a cabica^ 
Ifio vos na de dar na cabega^ 

Dar com a calrecapellas pa* 
rtdesy 



To giTC for God^ Cike. 

To beat one foundly. - - 

To walk a tarn. 

To caft an eye on. 

To obtain, or coin|)afs one's 

wifti. 
Tofigh. 

*ro give hearing* 
To upbraid, to caft in tht 

teeth. 
Give hither. 
I was taken with a psgnw 
To employ one, to fet him iit 

work, tQ fet him upon foipe 

bufinefs. / 

To ffrike. 
The clock, ftrikes. 
To give up the choft, to die. 
To caft one'is felt into a place, 

^r^o goto a place. 
To fuckle. 
To ftrangle. 
To cry out, to bawl. 
The fun Ihrhes in one^s 

eyes. 
To debate, or contend. 
To fall upon the ground. 
To bear fruit. 
To (hake hand«- 
To fliut the door upon onj?. 

To flight, to defpife a thing. 

To prefs, ^r haften. 

To refpite,togive fome refpjte 

This lane ftrikes, c^f goes into 

the broad fireet. 
It came into my head^o,S?r. 
How fain would \ be at home ! 
He does not koQ^.wbic}^ way 
, tQ turn hirafelf. 
The.mifchief will ^iffht upon 

your own head. ' " 
To l>t»t one's lieiS' a^inft 

the wall. 

Dar 



224 



P Q R T U G U E S E 



A iifficuldide ejld em, &c. 
Efiar par alguem, 

E/ldr por^ or cm lugdr dt^ (ffc. 
E!IU ejldva na altura do Ca- 

to de Boa Efperdnfa^ 
Eu naiquero ejldr asrazoens 

comvSfco^ 
Efld qudnto quizercs^ 
Aonat eftdis de caja ? 
EJiarii pillo que dijferapef^ 

Joa que for de vojfo mayor 

itgrddo\ 
Nao podemos efidr por ijfo^ 
Nab quero efidr pella vojfa 

fentincay 
Cimo ejta vm"f How do you do, fir. 

Esiar, joined with the infinitive of a verb and the 
particle para, fignifi^s to be ready, or about doing a 
thing, which has always reference to the fignification 
of the verb; as. 



The difficulty c6o(ifittfi,^<r« 
To ftand for one^to be of hit 
. fide. 

To ftand for, or fignify. 
He flood off the Cape Df 

Good Hope. 
I won't ftand, ^r difpute, with 

you. 
Stay as long as you pleafe. 
Where do you live ? 
ril refer it to whom jrou 

pleafe. 

We can't ftand to that. 

I won't uke yotir judgment. 



Esiou para ir^ 

Estoupara comprdr hum ca- 

vdllo^ ' 
EsTSu para fazarme^ 
E'sta aya estd para cahir, 
Esiou para dizer^ 
Nao estd no miu podir^ 
Estdr co^ a hoc a aberta (mc* 

taph.) 
Estir de regiminto^ 
Estarjiado em dlguitH^ 

Estdr noJUndo^ 
Esiir dejronte^ 
Estdr em compttincia^ 
Estdr ao limcp . 

Estdr de ISnge^ 
Estar ao ar^ 
JEstdr dlto^ 

Estit a mftS direifa 4^ dl* 



I am going, I am ready to op. 
I am about buying a Horfe 

I am going to be married. 

This houfe is ready to fall. 

I dare fay. 

It is not in my power. 

To fiare, to look, to hearken 

attentively. 
To keep to a diet. 
To truft to, to rely ^r depciui 

upon one. 
To lie at the bottom. 
To lie over-againft. 
To ftand in competition* 
To ftand by the fire. 
To ftand at a di^ance. / 

To ftand in the air. 
Tq ftand high, or in a high 

place. 
To be at one's jjght hand» to 

have the firil pbccev 

. * ElU 



G R A MM A R. i»5 

Elle iftiu^ em pertgo Je ufo" He vas like to be clrownedL 

JNi6 efidr no cdfo Je^ &c. Not to be aUe, or in the cafii 

of, &c. 
Efiit.a irian dt alguim^ , To beat one's dirpofal. 
M^ na6 eftdnos tirmot^ That is not right, it won't do. 

/roS tjliu no cif9, I don't underftand the cafe. 

EJlar as razoens^ To contend, to ftrive, or 

quarrel. ^ . 

Eftdrtem com ilgutm^ To be in favour irkh one, t^ 

live in friendAip with faiffi. 
Efidr Bern, . To be well, to beat one's eafc. 

Bern aviido tflariaiu^ft^ &c. Ic would be very bad fcH* fne^ 

indeed, if, £?r. 
EJldr em Qonciito dt himtm To be looked upoB as an 

honrdd^^ honeft man. 

Eftdr nafi^ To believe, to &ink, or fiip- 

pofc. 
Eftdr depiffi^ Topofleft^tohavethepofleT- 

nonpf a thing. . 
JDeixdi eftdr iffo^ Let that alone. 

EJidr tmfi^ To be in one's riAt wItt. 

Eftdr Jir^ de Ji^ To be outt)f one s vrits. 

Deixaivos eftdr ( a fort of 1*11 be revenged on you, jgu 
threatening.) IhaU pay for it. 

We have already obfervcd the difierence between 
ffyr and ejar. See page 55. 

Of the different Signification of hzer and ftazfyr ic. 

Fa:i^ir fignifies to do, to make^to create y alio tofm$ 
ef materials ; alfo tofeign^ to feem^ to make as if. 

Eilefiz. sue nac o Mfia, He made as if he did not Ssr H* 

I Ea%er humafaude. To drink, 0r to toaft a health. 

E'lle the fez cort&r a cabiga^ He caufed his head to be out 

oflF. 
Tajier pi atrdz (metaph.) To fall, or draw back, to give 

ground ; alfo jrield, to lub- 
mit. ^ ^. 

Que tindes Hfis quefa^ com Whgx have you to do with it? 
ifto. or what is that to you ? 

Q Fa«itT 



326 PORTUGUESE 

Fa%er brio it algCtrfia coufa^ 



Faxirjim ao dtzijo^ ■ 
Fazir por alguma coufa^ 



F&^o por ijfo^ X 

FcL%ir ao negocio^ kx ao cdfo^ 

Fazir efmolas^ 

Fa%ir gojio^ 

Fazir gojio^ 

Fazir o gofio^ or a vontade 

a dlguenit 
Fazir pdrallilo^ 
Fazir de comir^ 
Fazir fumot 
fazir auzintt a diguim^ 
Fqzfrio^ 
Fazir ginte^ 
Fazir em pedagos^ 
Fazir zombaria de dlgutmt 

Naofafdis cdfo dijfo^ 

Fazir agodda^ 

FJio mefaz vir a dgoa d bo' 

ca. 
Fazir dlio^ 
Fazir cdfa (in playing at 

back|^mtnon.} 
Fazir a cia^ 
Fazir cdras^ 
"Fazir enridos^ 

, • Fazir carrdncds^ 
Jtazir c&Jo^ 

Fazir de tripas coragaOf 
Fazir mHito cdfo de alguma 

coufa^ 
Naifdfo cdfo dille, 
fazirfejia^ 
f^xir A6ma Jijia^ 



To make a pride of a thih^ 

totako gtoryin it. 
To faiisfy one's defire, or 

longing. 
To take pains, to endeavour, 

to labour to a certain pur- 

pofe, to work for a certain 

end. 
I endeavour after it. 
To come to the purpofe. 
To give alms. 
To fpend. 

To like, to be pleafed with. . 
To pleafe one, to comply 

with one's deGre. ' 
To parallel, to compare^ 
To cook. 
To fmoak. - 
To believe one abfenc. 
It is cold. 

To raife men, foldiers. 
To pull into pieces. 
To mock, or to laugh ait a 

pcrfon. * 
Do not mind that. - 
To ta£e in frefh water. 
This makes my teeth^ or 

mouth, water. 
To halt in a march. 
To put two men on the fame 

point. 
To get fupper ready. 
To make mouths. 
To form a fecret defigM 

againft another. V 

To pout. 
To make account of, or 

efteeni. 
To make one's utmoft efiForts. 
To make great account of a 

thing, to make much of it. 
I don't niind him. 
To endear, to fondle. 
To give an entertainment, to 

feaft. 

Faxir 



GRAMMAR. 

Fazir as vezes dt dlguim^ 
. Fazir irapdfas^ . 



227 



Fazir lugdr.^ 
Fazer merce^ 



To make any bufincfs for' 

another. 
To chicane^ to civil, to ufc 

tricks. 
To make room. 
To grant a favour. 



Faxir oupidos demtncadof^ To make as if one. were deaf. 



To bebufy. 
To ufe excrcife. 



Tir cue fazir ^ 

Faxtr excrctclOy 

Fa%ir exCfcicio (a military To exercife. 

word.) 
Os foldddos tjlab Ja%^ndo The foldiers exercife. 

txtrxUxo^ 
Qucfazeis hqui? 
Fa%ir hum ve/iido, 
Fazir kuma liy^ hum difcur- To make a law, a^peech. 

' Fazir ffutrra^ 



What make you here ? 
To make a fuit of clothei • 



To make war. 



Fa%irfabir algdma coufa a To makeoiie acquainted with 



dlguim^ 
Fazir tnraivtcir dlguim^ 
Fazir hdma conta, 
Fa^er conta^ 



a thing. 
To make one mad. 
To call up an account. 
To intend, or to propofe. 



EHU fazia hUtma conta^ efa» He was much diiappointed. 
AiO'lhe Sutra ^ 



Fazir conias com dlguim^ ^ 
. 1^0 ndo mefaz ndda^ 



To fettle the accounts with 

one. 
It makes nothing to me, that 

does not concern me. 
To make a iland* v 
To make a fool of one. * 



Favxr pdufa^ 

Fazir dc dlguefh tolo^ 

Fi^xif dinkiiro dt alg'dma To make money of a thing, 

cSufa^ to fell it. 

Tornar a fazir ^ To make again. 

fazir a ra%ao. To pledge one. 

TJrr qut fazir com alguim^ To deal with one, or to have 

to do with one. 

' Fazir a dlguipi hum gilvdz To mark one in the face. 

' F/i%ir hSnra^ 
laz^fi.: 



Faz^rfiric^ 



To honour. • 

To make known, to teftKy, 

to witnefs. 
To fortify, or ftrengthen* 

Faxh 



tt« 



it26 



PORTUGUESE 



Fazir mtttfaS, 

'Fazen mal^ 

Fazir de alguem o fue hUma 

pessSa qucr^ • 
Tazir hima apista^ 
Fax vinto^ 
Fat'hojt outo dias, 

Tazer vida com dlguim^ 
Fazer a sua vontdde^ 
Fazir o passively 

Naojariis ndda com tsso, 
Nctojafdis fhdis assifh^ 
Se torndrdes a fazir assin^ 
Dezijo qu cjd^d a 54iajortkna^ 
Cusiou-'me muito afazilloviry 

Fazir a dutremopiefuizird'' 

mos que dutrem Tipsjitisse 

a niSf 
Naotinho qu$ fazir doin isso^ 
Fazir o que mguim mdnday 
Paz de mm o que vos pa- 

recircy 
Fatlr humgrdnde estrondo, 
E'llefdi que fez tudonaquelle 

negi€i&9 
Qfufariis hdje f 



'FMir siuciUrs^^ 

Fa%ir hdrnd hSa cosa^ 
Fazir a bdria^ ' 
^Fazir a cdma^ 
FiaS sii que Iheftiniry 
Fazir grdnde mjgkio^ 
Fazir seu officio^ 
Fazcr profissd6j 
Tddps pfatiaS fUSrh^ 

FmSr W-, 



To ibtentioii* 

To huru 

To difpofe of one. 

To lay a wager. 
The wind blowt^ 
This day fe^nnigfat, «r a week 

ago. 
To cohabit, ^rdwelltogethet. 
To do as one pliafai. 
To dp one's beft, or endea- 

vour« to do one's utmoft. 
You will do no good in it. 
Do fo no more. 
If ever you do lb agdiin. 
I wiib he may do well. 
I had much to do to get him 

to come. . 
To do by others as yoli would 

be done by. 

I have nothing to do with h* 

To do as one is bid. 

Do with me at you (hall thiift 

fit. 
To mike a great lioife. 
He was , the do-all in that 

bufinefs. 
What will you do to-day ? or 

how do you employ yout- 

felf to-day. 
To finifli its courfe at a ibr 

does. 
To raife, to fetup one's fotuly 
To (have. 
To make the bed^ 
I can't help it. 
To drive a grwt trade. 
To exercife, or ditfclMr^. 
Toprofefs.. 
They fgave out thiit lie 'wlis 

dead. 
To call, or fend 'fbr. 

Faz€r 



GRAMMAR. 



92t 



Fsi%ir entrdtt ou ^Mr ah 

guSm^ • 
I'sto naSfaz ndda, 
NaS sHauefazerdisso^ 
Ja naS ienheau^Joitr com ilU ' 
Fazir hum livro^ 
Fazir anUzitle com al^ucm, 

Faxcr cximplo em dlguem^ or 
CAStigdlla para dar exem^ 

Faster hUma cousa muito ao 
destntendido^ 



' Fazer das silas^ 

Ulte semprc cstdfatindo das 

sHas, 
Fazer jfoscaSf 



Fazer depessoa^ 
Fazir jurdr alguSm, 

•' Fazer' saliar, or vodr pellos 
ares, 
Fazir tSa vezinhdnfa, 



Fazer lenha, 
.F$izir a rSnda^ 
Fastlr dividas^ 

Fdz lua, 
Fazer violencia, 
F^zir^e ao trahdlho^ 

Fazer -se ttlo, 
Fazir-se vilho^ 

Fazer 'Sejiioy 
FoMr^se soberho, 
Fa^^se idrdiy 



' To call in, or ^nu to bid one 
come in, or ouu 

It is no matter. 

I have no need of it. 

I have done with him. 

To write a book. 

Tq mal^q friendlbiR» |o get 
into friendfliip with bne. 

To ipake one a public exam- 
ple. 

To do a thing very covertly, 
fo tliat people can't appre- 
hend that it is done on fet 
purpofe, and with adefign. 

To play the fool, to dodge, 
to play tricks. 

He is always playing his fool- 
ish tricks. ^ 

To bully, to provoke, to ex- 
cite by wordSi or actions 6i 
contempt ; alio to elude, or 
deceive by falfe (how. 

To behave ccoirageoofly. 

To ten46r the oaths to one, 
to put one to his oaths. 

To blow up. 



To keep fair with one*$ 

neighbours. 
To fell wood. 
To walk the rounds* 
' To rnn in debt, Uf contract 

debt|». 
The moon ftines. 
To offer violence. 
To inure one's felf to hard- 

(hips. 
To play the ninny. 
To grow old, or to grow is 

years. 
To grow ugly. 
To grow proud. 
It grows late. 
Q 8 Fazir 



«30 



P O R T U G U E S E 



Fazh'/e fignifies 'alfo tofeign^ to preten^y tofeeniy U 
make as If. 



FaZ'fe mSuco^ 



He won't bear. 



The different Signijicalions of th and ter-se. 



Ter.quefazer^ , 
Ter odiot 
Ter por cO flume ^ 
' Ter algu^m per ignordntt^ 
Tercuidado dty 
Tetjcuidados^ 

Ter fajiio, 

' Ter dnimo^ 
Ter boafdma^ 
Ter ccura d*ago^ 
Ter necejfidade^ 
Terprejfa^ 
TermuitosfiinKK^ 
Tergrdnde prefumpgao^ 

Ter razao, 
Nad ter razao^ 
Ter algiima coufa debdxo da 
lingua^ 



To be bufy. 

To ha(e. 

To be wont. 

To believe one ignorant. 

To be careful of. 

To be full of care, or ibouglit- 

ful. 
To loath, to fee food wish 

diaike. 
To have courage. 
To be well fpoken of. 
To have a brazen face. 
To be in want. 
To be in hafle. 
To be very proud. 
To prefunie much on one'i 

felf. 
To be in the right. 
To be in the wrong. * 

.To have a thing at one's 

tongue's end. ^ 



Ter alguma c6ufa na p6nta da lingua^ >ye fay, to 
have a thing at one's fingers entls, to have it perfect. 
Theyalfo {zTj^fabtr alguma cdufa nas pdulas dos didps-, 
which exactly anfwers to our' Englifli phrafe. 



Terfeifoensjeiiiceiras, 

Ter mdfdma^ 

Ter ciumeSt 

Ter m^yos, 

Ter no penfamento^ 

Ter obrigafdor 

Ter medo^ 

Tcrra%aQ^ e m&is que razao , 



To have a taking look. 

To be ill fpoken of. 

To be jealous of. 

To be able, or have means. ^ 

To bear in mind. 

To be obliged. 

To be fearful. 

To have reafon, to fpare. 

Hue 



G R A M M A R. 



231 



Hue tiwdes pis comi^o f 
Ter carruagem ( criados^ 
Ter a ilgu^mfuft^nfo^ 
Himen que tem boafeifao^ 

Ter m&fa franca. 



Terfridt 

T^r as ciflas quintes com alf 

guem, ^ 
• Ter for iim, 
TennO'O por doudo, 
Ter maS najud refolucdo, 
Ter com que, 
Nao tendes' de que vos quci 

Jcdr, 
Nao tSndes que, &c. 

• 
lyto nao tem ndda quefaz^r^ 

com que eu dtgo$ 
Ter enire maos, 

.'Tenho ijjo por cirto, " 
Ir ttr comdiguim,^ 
Venho ter comvm^* para fab er 
comopdffa afenhorajultd' 

Jr ter a algim lugdr, 
" EJia rua vii ter ao mercado^ 

Ter ilgu^mporjiy 

T^mos por nos a autkoridadt 
dos maisprud^ntes, 
' Ter patafi, 

Ter em mdito, 
Terempouco, 
Ser tido em boa cSntqi 



Ter mao, 

Ter.maS falguma c6uja. 



What is that to you ? • 
To keep a coadi and fcrvanii* 
To hold one' in fuTpence. 
A man of good addrefs, a^po«; 

lite man. 
To keep- open table, to keep 

a table where a man may 

come without bidding. 
To be cold. 
To be backed, or fupported, 

by one. 
To approve of, or confent* 
I take htm to be mad. 
To be ftill in one mind. 
To have wherewith. 
You have no reafdn of com- 

plaint. 
It i^ ufelefs, ^rit will be to no 

purpofe for you to, 0r. 
That is nothing to the pur- 

pofe. 
To have in hand, or in one's 

pofleffion. 
I hold that for a certainty; v 
To addrefs. one's felf to one. 
I addrefs, or apply myfelf to 

you to know how mifs such 

a one does. 
To go to a place. 
This ftreet Jlrikes, or goes 

into the market. 
To befupponed, or prote6led 

by one. 
We have the wifeft men of 

our fide, or of our opinion. 
To think, or imagine, to 

reckon. 
To fet much by. 
To value but little. 
To be efieemed, regarded, or 

valued, to be. in great 

efteem. 
To hold ^r keep in; to reftrain. 
To bear up, to fupport, to 

prop, to keep up, to holdup. 
Q4 AiO' 



\ 



fiftf 



P O R T U G U £ S ?: ' 

Atoms Ibife fticl^ tc^gidier* 



Atomos\qu€ i/tm mai hunsnas 
4utrQs^ 
eidia nuAf or Um wuiit 






* f 
'Seempe^ - 

, Ttr*s€,bcm a ^mtdlU^ 
Tcr^sc com diguem. 



Nao me p&ff'o tercom rlso^ 
Naisep^deUff que naojille,' 



Hold, ftop« 

To coDiaku .- . 

To fiand, to fiaad up. 

To fit faft, or wcU, on borfa* 

back. 
To keep at home. 
To hold out, to refifti iH^ ftaod 

agakift one, to cope w^ 

one, to oppofe, or refift 

him. 
I can't forbear laughing. 
He can't' forbear fp^ing* 



Tie different Significations of quer^r. 

Querh fignifies to willy to be willing, and to if- 
lieve; as. 



l^uirem alguns, 

^jucrer,bem^ . 

^uerer mal^ 
Antes guerer, 
Qjueira Deos^ . 

Mas quero que assim seja, 
Qjueqiter dizeraqucllehomem? 
Que quer dizir tsto f 

■ I'sto quer ditir que^ G?c. 
Eu quero absolutamente {jue^ 
Eu assim o quiro^ 
Elle quer que vis obedefais^ 
Nad quero, 
Elle ofard qudndo quiver, 

Elle quer partir amankaa, 

malque eu Ae quero me, 
venia a mim^ 



Some believe. 

To love. 

To hate. 

To have ratber. 

God grant it, God fend i 

may be To. 
I grant it, fuppofe it were fo. 
What does that man mean ? 
What means this ? what*«tbe 

meaning of that? 
The meanmg is that, &c. 
I pofuively rcfolve that, &c. 
I'll have it fo. 
He will have you obey. 
1 will not, I won't. 
He will do it when he pleafei^ 

or when be has a mind to it. 
He intends, or has a mind, to 

fet out to-morrow. 
I wifli hina no n^ore barm 

than I do myfelf. 



Havir; to have. 

Tukasdekir^ Youmuftgo. 

XV/<f h€ 4e wirk^y He is to come to day. 



Se 



GRAMMAR. 



m 



Se iu howvir de kir. 
Mndrnqme ijfo mt kowvijt de 

cuftar a vida^ 
M'Ueefid todo ni^ tkadt tit 

Jbufiis vis di ejldr em cdja^ 
JSu h£i de Uekdrme Id^ 
if lie k4i de sir enforcido^ 
£m kit de receier dinkeir^f 
Vis ke que haviisffe jugur^ 
^^dbf^i/lo ke^uevis kawUde 

^ Haver porbem^ 
Be»et for mdl, 
Que ka defer ^ 
jtifuillo nunca ka-defer^ 
tJuhei defer a cdu/a dafua 

morte^ ou ruink^ 
Para kaver defalldr^ ouvify 

&c. 
Due kd defer de tnim f 
Ravirfilhos^ 

9 

Uvros do dive^ ekade kavtr^ 

Bavir miftir. 

lid miftir apreffdrfe^ 



If I (ball be obliged t<ii go. 
Though I were . to loife my 

lifeTor't. 
He is all naked, he muft 

needs be. ytr^ coldt 
Sbslli you be at home ? 
I muft be there. 
He is to be hanged* 
I am to receive money. 
You are to play. 
You (boul,d do that. 

To take in ^ood part. 

To take.in ill part. 

That is to be hereafter. 

That will never be. 

I ihall be the death, or ruin 

of him. 
In order to fpeak, hear, &c« 

What is to become of me. 

To beget, to become the fa- 
ther of children. 

Books of debtor and creditor. 

To want. 

It IS neceflary to hafle, $r to 
make hafte. 



HovStj when itnpcrfonal, is rendered into Englifh 
by the verb lo ie, preceded by ikere 5 as. 



Hi kimems iaS mmlvddos^ 

Hanfiu kjUnMi molkir^ 

Hi aigins b^ns e outrosmaes 

* 

Hd muitas cdfai^ 

Hi ai^dvM, coufa de nSvo f 

Hi mdis ke k6ma kka^ 

Hd mdito tempo^ 

If d per to. dekdma kdrm que, 

elle fakio^ 
Ha kum dnn^t 



There is, <>r there are. 
.. There arc men fo wickeS. 
There was a woaum. 
There are fome good, and 

fpme bad. 
There are feveral houfes. 
Is tiaere any new« ? 
It is above an hour fince. 
Long iince^ 
It is almoft an bour fiooe be 

west out. 
Ayc?T«fo. , 

Ha 



234 



PORTUGUfeSE 



Ha htio di'aSt 

Hd per to de so legoas daqui 

Idj 
Hai kd^ 
JUIU cuida que naS hd mats 

que purgdr^ 



Haver fe^s. r. 

E'lU fdhr romo ff hd- df ha- 
ve f , <>' e'ujdbt cpmo ha de 
haver.Je^ 

Ellt h&uvt'fe de maniira que, 
fee. 



Eight days ago« ' 

It is near upon . to leagues 
thither. 

There is not. 

He believes that purginris 
all in all, 0r that purgiM 
is the only remedy, in fnco 
a cafe. ^ 

To carry, to behave one's 
self. 

He k nows ^ bow to bebave 
himfelf. 

4 

He behaved himfelf in fuch 
a manner that. &c. 

N. B. . When this verb is ufed iniperrohally^-it is 
always followed by the particle de ; as, 

Ha-Je de mi//er dinheiro. Money is wanted. 

Ha-Je dtfazer^ ou d^%er iflo^ This muft be done, or faid, • 

Ha-fe dejazer que elle qui- People muft do what he 

zer, I pleafes. 

. Hiry a neuter and irregular verb, to go^ to walk, t9 
march ; alfo, to grow, to reach any ejiate gradualfyf 
to ^e going. 

Hir por mar epor terra, 
CSmo vao os vojfos negocivs ?, 
Tudojudi bent, 
Asfuas coufas vaSmuifo mat. 



Hir a mdo, 

Hir pajfdndo, 
' Hir anddndo. 



Hir anddndo, or fajfdndo. 



Que vii de novo f 
Que v6i nifto ? . or onde vdi 
(Jloa dar comfigOsf 



To travel by fea and land. 
How go 3'our concerns ? 
All is well, all goes well. 
Things go very ill (cm: very 

hard) with him. 
To hinder, to obftruct, to 

obviate. 
To grow out of faihion or ufe. 
To go on or forward, to keep 

or hold on his way ; .ayo 

to proceed, to continue 

on, to profecute. 
To fliift, to pafs life n^ 

quite well, to live thou^ 

with diflficulty. 
Is there any thing ncw_? 
What of all this ? 

. ^ • . 

Hir 



GRAMMAR. 



S35 



Hir debdxa^ 

Mir fartf^ 

Quant0 mats vim^s para a 

primavirai mais comprU 

dos /fl6 OS dias, 
Hir dt mal para peor^ 
Sir di&nte^ 
Bir por didnU, 
Hir ao.encSntro, 

Hir e vir, 

Nai fafo mais d^ que hir ^ 
• voltdr^ 
Iffo ja la vdif 
Ezlo Id vdi^ 
Eilo vdi^ . 
Que vos parice daquilla moL 

hir f etlo vaijlla nao hefia^ 

« -I 

Ltio vdi^filga queajfimjeja^ 
Co mo as coufas agora vao^ 

Por que parte ides^ 
Digs vd comvofco^ 

' Hirdrodadomundo^ 
' Hir com dlguem, 

E'fia irave^a vdi ter i rua 
Idrga,^ 
' Eu irei ver de caminho^ 



# 

To come by the VrorlL 

To approach, to go near. • 

The nearer the .fpring, the 

longer the days. 

To grow worfe and worfe. 

To go before. 

To go on, or forward. 

To go to meet. 

To fink, or fall to the hot- ' 

torn. 
To go to and fro, to go and 

come. 
I will not ftay, Khali be back 

prefently.N 
'Tis a thing pad and done. 
There he goes. 
So fo, pretty well. 
How do you like that wo* 
' man ? She is fo fo, flie 

may pafs. 
Well, well, I am glad oa't 
As things go now, as the 

world goes. 
Which way d'ye go ? 
The Lord of heaven go with 

you. : 
To go about the world. 
To go along with one. 
This lane goes into the broad 

ftreet. 
I will call upon liim as I go 

alcng. 
Hir continudndo ofeucaminko To go along. 
Hirfora do feu caminho^ To go out of one's way. 



Hir hum de huma bdnda^ e 

Sutro da Sutra^ 
Hir para traz, 
Hir detrazy 
Hir atrdz de digue m^ 
Hir em alcdnce de digue nt^ 

Hir bufcdr^ 
Hir para dentnt^ 
Hir para Jo ra^ 



To go af under. 

To go backward. 

To go behind. 

To purfue, to go after one. 

To go after one, in order to 

overtake him. 
To go far, or fetch. 
To go in. 
To go out. • 

Hir 



236 



PORTUGUESE 



■ \ 



Hir pere^rindndo^ 
Hirfazirhuma embaixida^ 
Hir ver^ cantar^ &c. 
VdmoSf 

Hirjaxir hum negocia, 
Hir com a marf^ 
Hir par d par com dlguim^ 
Vdipara qudtro mifes que 
eu aqut cheguei, 

rdeempaz^ 

timpo vat ahanddndo, 

Hir (at cards), 

Hir-fe^ v. r. , 

I 

Hir-Je a olha^ ou a panillai 

Hir^i enfirmo^ 

A ^uarifma vai'Jt acaidndo^ 

Hir^fe, 

Ndda Je vdi mats dtfrijfa 

que tempo^ 
AquiUes monies v&i'fe eftcn^ 

dendo^ 
Hir-fe embSra^ 
Efper&i at^ que a cdlma/e va 

embira, 
Vdi'te embdra ; que ndijabes 

engoddr agenie^ 
Hirrje de kima carta[zicdsi%) 
Vai'Jefazendo tirde^ 
Va-Je ckegdndo a noite, 
Vdi'Je chegdndo o timpo da 



Vai^fe 



-fe acabdndo o meu conju^ 
lado^ 
'Hir-fe efcapulindo^ 
Hir-Jc d maS, 



To go a pilgrimage. " 

To go on an cmbafljr. 

To go^to fee,. to fing, &c. 

Corae» come on* 

To go upoii a bufinefs. 

To go with the Ude* 

To go cheek byjole with one. 

It *i8 now goinff on four 

months Gnce I came hi* 

thcr. 
Depart in peace. 
The wekhcr grows mild. 
To go, to lay. to fiake. to feu 
To go, to go away, to go 

one's way, to depa|t, aifo 

to run, or leak. 
Is for the pot to boil over. 
Is for a iick man to die. 
Lent draws to an end. 
To flip, or pafs away (as 

time.) 
Nothing goes fader thaQ 

time. 
Thofe mountains extend; or 

ilretch tb^mfelves^ 
To go away, alfo to be over. 
Stay till the heat be over. 

Away, or go, you know not 

how to wheedle people. 
To throw away a card. 
It grows late. 
The night draws on. 
It grows iiear harvefi. 

My confulfbip is almpft at 

an end. 
To fneak away. 
To refrain, to fprbear, to ab* 

ftain. 



Hir-fe imperfonal; as, vai-fe, they goj ^i'/f» 
they are gone ; Mr-Je U, they fhall go. 



ScnMr^ cSm$ amg^^ fifamc 

£u v0t pig0^ or pfctfoos^ 
Pifolke tm cortesia^ 
PtfoltU encartcidaminUi 

Ptfdtke^brJavSr fo^, &c, 
F.dcamt ajini%a^ 
Pc^oihe perdao^ 



GRAMMAR. s«7 

Tq praj; -^ 

Dear fir, do me the favour. 



I praj you. 

I befe^chyou. 

I intreat, or conjure, you to 

doit. 
I beg of V6utfaat, &t. 
Do me the kindnefs. 



1 beg your pardon. 

Expreflions of Kindnefs. 



-Minha vidd^ 

JAinha alma^ 

Meu amor^. ' 

Meu querido^ minha ^uerida, 

Meu cordfao^ 

Hike do meu coragdot 

Filha da minha dlma^ 



My life. 

My dear foul. 

My love. 

My little darlingk 

My d^ar love, my l0ve« 

My dear child. 

My little honey. 



To ifliew Civilityj 



Hgradifo a vfi^^ 
DSu a vm^ as agradecimintos^ 
Beijo 0s maZs de vm^t 
Falo-fieicom tSdo o gofta^ 
Oom todo meu corafdo^ 
De miito boa vontade^ 
Veja vm"Jeop6Jfo/ervir'naU 

g&ma cSusa^ 
Dtfponha vm'* como Ihepare^ 

cir dejle Jeu ciiado^ 
EftSu esperdndo pellas or- 

-dens de t/m*, 
Ja que vm** afsim ordina. 
As or dens de vm"^ 
JFico muito obrigddo a xmf^ 
Qjuer vm" que eu/£fa algima 

<oufa, 
Semceremima, 
Jfiaotemvm^ mdisquefaHar^ 
Fdfame a honra demepir 
i aospSsdafnr\ 



I thank yoii.) 

I ffive.yoQ thanks. 

I kift your hand. 

I will do it chcarfolly. 

With stfl my heart. 

Heartily, willingly. 

See if it is in my power t# 

fcrve you. 
Do what you pleafe with 

your fervant. 
I wait Tor your commands. 
Sjnce^you will have it fo. 
At your ferrice. 
I am very much obliged to 
.' you. 
Have you any thing to com- 

maiidme. 
Without ceremony. 
You nci^ but to fpeak. 
Prefent my reipects, crJtaty^ 

to my lady. 

NaS 



338 



PORTUGUESE 



Nt^ Jei como dgradedr a 
vjif' tdtitos favSres, 

Nao foa de comprim^ntos^ 
Detxemos eji^s comprim^fitos, 

Iffo he mtlhor^ 



I know not how to make a 
proper return for fo many 
favours. 

I am not for ceremonies. 

Away with thefe ceremonies 
^r compliments. * 

That It the beft way. 



To give tokens of AfBrmation, Confent, Belbfy 

arid Refufal. 



He verddde^ 

He ijfo verdade f 

He muito verdade^ 

Para dizervos a vetddde^ 

Com efieito he ajfim^ 

Quern duvida dijfo ? 

Nao ha dUvida nijfo^ 

Pareume quejim^ que nao^ 
. Apoflo quejim^ 

Apoflo que naS, 

Cr^ame vm"? 

Ella vm" zombdndo ? 

fdlla vfn^ de veras ? 

Fallo de veras^ 
. PSis^ ejtd feUo^ 

Pouco a poucx)^ 

Ijfo nao he verdddc^ 

NaS ha tal coufa^ 

He menttra, 
' Efidva zombdndo, 

Seja muto embira^ 
\^'ao quira^ 



It is true. , 

Is it true ? 

It is but too true. > 

To tell you the truth. 

Really it is fo. ' 

liy ho doubts it ? , 

There is no doubt of it. 

I think {o^ not. 

I lay it is. 

I lay it is not. 

Do believe me ? 

Don't you jeft ? 

Are you in carnell ? 

I am in earnefl ? 

Well, let it be fo. 

Softly, fair and foftly. 

It is not true. 

There is no fuch thing. 

It is a lie. 

I did but jeft. 

Let it be fo. 

I woa',t, I will not. 



To confult. 



Que fe ha defazir ? ' 

'^ue faremos ? 

^ue Ihe parece a vrr£* que cu 
fdfa?: 
fittir remedio tern iJfo f 
Fafdmos ajfim^ 
Fafdmos huma ccufa^ 
Sera melkSr que^ 
"Seria mdhir qme^ 



What is to be done ? 

What ft all w« do ? 

What do^ you advife mc to 

do? 
What remedy is tKere for it I 
Let us do fo,«and fo. 
Let us do one thing. 
It will be better thaj. 
It would be better that. 

^ Efperai 



GRAMMAR. 



239 



Esperai bum pouco, 
Deixdinu comijfo^ 
Antes gutzera^, 
Se ifo/ije comtgo, 
Tudo ne b mifmoi - 



Stay a little. 

Let me alone. 

I had rather. 

Were I in your place. ' 

It is all one. 



Of Eating arid Drinking. 



TtnkojoMe,' ' 

Morro defame^ 

CSma xrm" alguma cousa^ 

Que quer vm'' comir f. 

Quer vm'* comir mdis ? 

TenhoJUe, 

Ja matH afbme^ 

Tinho muita stde^ 

Morro defede, 

beme 4e beb^r^ 

Viva VTif' miitos dnnos^ 

EH beberia hum copo de vinho 

Pdis biba vm'\ 

Tenho bebido bajidnte^ 

Nao phjfo beber mdis^ 

Ja matH ajede^ 



I am hungry. 
I am almoft ilarved.. 
Eat fomething. - " 

What will you eat ? • 
Will you eat any more ? 
1 am dry, or thirfty. 
I have no more flomach. ' . 
I am very dry. 
I am almofl dead with thirft.' 
Give me feme drink. 
I thank you. 

I coul.d drink a glafs of wine* 
Drink then. 
I have drank enough. 
I can drink no more. 
I am no mpre thirfty, or my 
thirft is quenched. 



Of Going, Coming, Stirring, &c. 



Donde vem vm^' ? 
Para onde. vdi vm'^ f 
Vinho de; vou para^ or <2, 
Quer vm 'Jubir^ ou defcer f 

E'ntre vm'\fa^a vm^, 
Nao febula ifaqui, 
Chigue-fe para mimy 
Va-Je tm'\ 
Vem ca^ 

Efpire por mim^ 
Nao vU ta5 deprejfa^ 
Tire-Je df didntc dc mim^ 
Na&^metbque^ 
Ddxe eftdr ijjo, 
EHou bem aqui^ 
Jtbra vm" a porUit 



From whence do you come ? 
Where do you go ? 
I come from ; I am going to. 
Will you come up, or comt 

down ? 
Come in in, go out. 
Do not ftir from hence, 
Come near to me. 
Go your way, )3e gone. 
Come hither. 
Stay for me. 
Do not go fo faft. « 
Get you out of my way. 
Do not touch me. 
Let that alone, 
I am well here. 
Open the d«or. ' 

Fichi 



240 



PORTUGUESE 



FSche a porta, • 

J^ira, o\xJiche afanclhy 

Vinha vm^ por sfutj 
Pdjfe pot Id, 
Qutprocuravtn!* f 
Que perdio vm" ? 



Shut the door. 

Open the wtiMloyr, ^r fliUt 

the .window. 
Come this w^, 
Pafs that way. 
^ What do you look for ? 
What have you loft ? 



To wifli well to a Perfon. 



Ceo vosgudrde. 
Dios vos di boa fort^na^ 
Dezija-vcs tod9 o kem^ 

Diosvos ajide^ 
D^os vos per doe J 
tdt com Vios^ 
Ate ver^nos, 

^6m pToveitoJa^a a ^m**, 



Heaven prefcrrc yon. 
God fend yoa good luck, 
I wi(h yoo ev«ry tbicg thj^ 

is good. 
Godallift you. 
God forgive you, 
God be with you. 
Till I fee you agai«» 
Much good floay. do you. 



To wifii ill. 

didbo tt live. The devil take thee. 

Maldfto sejas tu, A curfe on thee. 

Vtti para os fuintos infirnos, Away, go to hell. 

Faite enforcdr. Go a(nd be hanged. 

Enforcddo sejas tu^ Would thou wert hanged. 

To fwear. 

Assim Dios me sdlve^ 



Arrebentadi seja iu^ 
Em conciencia. 



As God fhall help me, ftfl 

faveme. 
May I bur ft. 
In ray confcience. 

To threate n and infult. 



O'lha (jue te hei de dar, 
Diixa-te eftar, or cala^te 

que me has defagdr, 
yiiroqut ti farei arrependir 

disso. 
Seme imfaddres^ 
Coitddo deti, 
J^6ucas razoew-Sf or c6la issa 

boca^ 
I^fbafta. 



Take carc,i wiH l^eatibeeii. 
Thou wilt pay it me. 

I fwear thou ihalt repent <f 
it. - 

If you put me into a pcflib^. 

Woe be to thee. 

Hold your tongue, donH 
fpeak to me. •• 

It is enough, k if fufficient, 

.To 



Ct R A M M A R. 



041 



^ 



To mock» to blame, and to caff one names. 



[tf^ bilofocinko ! 
Ittt caradcmono! 

Trapacnro^ 

EmkufitirOf 

Aiexeriqueiro^ 

Que belo/offiito. 

FM6co, 
I MarSto^ 
' Ma cajla^ 

TontOf 

A/heirdo, 



O the fine fnout ! 
What an apcV face ] . 
A chicaner. . 
\A cheat, an impofior. 
A tale bearer, a tell-ule. 
O the dull thing. 
A knave. 
A rogue, a rafc^. 
Curled race. 

Giddy-brains, bkLDderbuft. 
A great beaft, a Uiick-lkull. 



To admire. 



Me pofsivil! 



OGodI 

Is it poflible I 



QutmiertaimagtnddOfCnJOf Who would have thought. 



believed, faid ! 
What a bead I 



I don't wonder. 



diioJ 
\ut animal ! 

\ue maravilka ! or que laii- O flrange ! 
Idgre! 
Nao me maravilho ! 

Coma pidefer ifiv ! or Cmo Ho,w can that be ! 
.. hepo/sivel! 
Eis aautromo fdo as coufis So goes the wdrld 1 
dine mindo I 

To (hevsr Joy and Difpleafure. 



\ue gSfta ! 
[utgfir%a!\ 
ategfia ! 
>ue contentaminto heo meu ! 

Sinto tjfo na dlma^ 

Slnio ^0 no corafaS, 

(y que defgraga he a minha I 



What plearure i 

Wbiatglofyl 

What joy ! 

How pleafed I am i 

What happinefs I 

I am forry for it. 

That touthes my very (but 

It pierces me to the heart. 

O now unhappy am 1 1 

R To 



\' 



242 



FOR T U G U E S E 



frontdume diflafirit ! 
im he quejetrata f 
Olha maroto ! 
Que bella cortesia ! 
riao deveria tratdr comigo 

dejlajorte^ 
Parece-te hem f 
^ Aprinde^ peddfp d^dfno^ 
(yiha como me trata eji'e anu 

Olhdi que velhaco he efte^ 
Que diabo tern ellefeito ? 
rois^ axnda teimdis? 



To affront me thus ! 
Do you deal thus ? 
You rogue ! 
O what fine manners \ 
Thou oughtest not to treat 
, me thus. 

Doft thou think that it will ? 
Learn, beaft as thou art. 
See the brute, how he ufes 

me. ' 
Do you behold that rafcah 
What the devil has he done? 
What, are you obftinate flill? 



To call. 



Ouve •! 

O'nde efiSs ? 

HUma patavra, 

Diias palavras Jomtnte^ 



Hark ! 

Where art thou ? 
A word. ' 

ril fpeak- but two words t» ^ 
ypu. 



To (hew Uneafinefs, Trouble, an|3 Sorrow. ' 



Sinto or pefame^ 
Deixame^ ' 

PefO'te que me deixes, 
Nao fne qnibres a cabif^^ 
Or a vdmos, deixdme^ 
Deixame^ vdi com Deos^ 
Vdite daqui, or vdite embora^ 
Vdi tratdr da tua vida, 
Faite nd md hora^ OT vdite 

cd' diabo ^ ' 

Nao mejdfas a cabica tdnta, 
Jfd me tensdito ijfo hum cen- 

to de vizes^ 



I am forry. 
Let me be quiet. 
Prithee get thee gone. 
Do not break my bead. 
Away, away. 

Go, go, God be with yoo. 
Get thee gone fromhencc^ 
,Go mind your own bufineff* 
Go to the devil. 

Do not make me giddy. -' 
You have told it me a hoD- 
dred times already. 



To afk. 



Que novas hdf 
Que he i/io ? que hd ? 



\ - 



What news? 

What is this, what is tbf 
matter? 



\ 



GRAMMAR. 



24S 



Cndt ides f 
DSnde vindesf 
Que quer dizer ? 

De qutjirvt ? 

^uevos paricef 

^uem live tal atreviminto f 

j^U€ dizem f (jueje diz ? 

fOmo diz vra^ ? 
Par que na8 me- rr/ponde ? 



Where are you a-going ? 
Whence come you ? 
What do you mean ? 
To what purpofe ? 
What do you think ? 
Who Is that has heen To bold ? 
What do they fay ? 
How do you fay ? 
Why dori't you anfwcr ? 



To forbid. 



Ddxdi efldr ijfo^^ 
Nao toqueis, 
Nao digdis nida^ 
Guardaivos, 



Let that alone. 
Do not touch. 
Say not a word. 
Have a care. 



Of fpeaking, faying, doings &c. 
Fdlfe vmf alto. 



Fdlle vrnf* mdnfo^ 

Com quern Jd/fa vni^f 

Fdlle »w" comigo ? 

FalleJhe, 

Fdlla vm" Portuguez f 

O'ue diz vm" f 

riad digo ndda^ 

Ella naS quer caldr-Je^ 

Ouvi dizer que 

Afsim mo dt/serao^ 
Afsim. dfzem^ 
jsfsfm dizem iSdos^ 

Suem Iho dijfe a vwf ? 
^iffemo Sr, A, 
Pais elle he que Iho diJfe f 
Pois ilia he que o dijje? 
Quando o ouvio vm. dizer f 
Di/fertti-mn hSje, 
Uao pojfo cri'lo^ 
^ue aiz elle f 
iue pes diJfe Hie f • 
E'lle nao me dijse ndda^ 
Nai Iho diga vm. 
E'u Iho ditei^ 
Nao diga nada^ 
Difse VM. aquillof 



Speak loud. 
Speak low. 

Who do vou fpeak to ? 
Do you (peak to me ? 
Speak to him, ^r to her. 
Do you fpeak. Portuguefe ? 
What do you fay ? 
I fay nothinff. 

She will not hold her tongue. 
1 was told that-*—- 
I was told fo. 
They fay fo. 
Every one favs fo. 
Who told it you? 
Mr. A. told it nie. 
Did he tell you fo ? 
Did (he tell it? 
When did you hear it ? 
I heard it to day, 
I can't believe \U 
What does he fay ? 
What did he fay to you ? 
He faid nothing to me. 
Do not tell him that, 
ril tell him, or her of it. 
Say not a word. 
Did you fay that ? 
R s Nai 



844 



PORTUGUESE 



NtA disse, 

Nao dtsst vm» assim t 

\ue ejld vm.fdtindo f 
2u£ tern vm.jiito ? 
Naofd<^o nada^ 
Nai tinhojtito ndda^ 
Tern vm. acabddof 
Que efid elkfazindo t 

\uejaz elU ? 

^ue quer, or gue ordina 
Que Ihejdlta ? 



vm.f 



I did not fay it. 
Did you not fay fo ? 
What are you doing? 
What have you done ! 
I do nothing. 
I have done aotbing. 
Have you doiic ? 
What is he doing? 
What does (be do ? . 
What IS your pleafurc ? 
What do you, want*? 



Of underftanding or apprehending. 



Entende^o^ or percibe-o vm* 

hem? 
Perceie vm^ o que elle dif^e ? 

Percebe vm. o que ilk diz ? 

Entind^me^itrpfrcibenu vm;? 
Entindo a vm* muilo bem^ 
Nao entenxlo a vm. 
Sabe vm. a lingua Poriu- 

gueza ? 
Nao ajet\ 

Tem^mt vm. fiercebido ? 
ji^ora percebo^ 
Naofe percebe o que Hie dh^ 



Do you underftand-faim weU? 

Did you ijinderfiand what he 

faid? 
Do. you underfiand what lie 

fays ? 
Do you underflshd me ? 
I underfiand you very well* 
I do not underfiand you. 
Do you underfiand Portu- 

guefe ? . 
I do not underftand it. '' 
Did you underftand me ? 
Now I underftand you. 
One cannot uoderuand what 

he utters. 
He fpeaks.like a ftammerec^ 



/ 



Par ice gdgo^ 

Of knowing, or having Knowledge of. 

Sabe vm. if so ? ' Do you know that ? 

NaS ofti, I dQ not tpow it. 

Naojii nada dUso^ I knew nothing of it ? 

Ella bem o fabia. She knew well of Jr. 

Porvehtira napjabia Hie if so} Did he not know of it ? 
Dimos que iu ofoubi/se^ Suppofe I knew it. 

Bile naofaberi nada difso^ He (ball know nothing of it. 
Elle nuncafSube ndda difio^ He never knew any thii|g 

about this. 
E'ufSube-o primiiro^ or antes I knew it before you. 
que vm. ofoublfst^ 

Hi 



GRAMMAR. 



2H 



Is it fo, or not ? 
Not that I know of. 



He ifto ussim ou naS f 
Nad que iu saiba^ 

Of knowing or being acquainted with« forgetting* 

and remembering. 

Do you know hiio ? 

Do you Icnow her ? 

Do you know them ?. 

I know him very welL 

I do ju>t know them. 

We do not know one another. 

I know hi(p by iighu 

I have heard of her* 

He knew me very well. 

Do you know me ? 



Conhece'O ^m. ? 
'Conkcce^a vm. ? 
Conhicf^as vm. ? 
ConkefO'O muUo iepif 
JfaS OS conhego^ " - 
Nis nap nos conhecimos^ 
Canheco-o de vifia^ 
Conhefo^a de nome^ 
E lie conheceo^me muxto iem^ 
Conhece-me vm. ? 



Tenho'tneesquecido do stu nome I have forgot your name* 
Tem-se vm. esquecido de'mim? Did you forget me ? 

Docs flie know'.yoQ ? 

Does the gentleman Juiow 
you ? 

It appears he doei not kivHr 

me. 
The gentleman knows me 

well. 
>He knows me np more. 
I have the honour to be 

kfiowp to him. 
Do you remember that ? 
I do not remember it. 
I do remember it very well. 



ntws eila? 
Conkece Sr.. a vm, ? 

Par ice que naS me conhece, 

Sr. bem me conkece, 

. ^ 

iElleja me naS conkece, 
Tenno a k6nra deferjeu^con* 

hecido, 
Lembra'Se vm. disso ? 
. Nao me lembro dUso, 
JJmbrO'-me miito bem dUso, 



Of Age, Life, Death, &c. 



\ue idddt'tem vm. ? 

\ue idade tern seu irmao ? 

^enko vinte e cinco dnnos, 
Tim vinte e dous dnnos, 
Vm. tern mats dnnos do que.iup 
(h$e idade terd vm. 7 
ne vm. casado 7 
Qudntas vezes tern vm. sido 

casado 7 
Qudnias molhhes tern ' vm* 
iidoJt 



How old are you ? 

How old.isyour brother ? 

I am five, and twenty. 

He is twenty-two years old. 

You are older than I. 

How old mafyou.be ? 

Are you married 7 

How often have you been 

married 7 . 
How many wivet have yeu 

had? 

Tern 



tie P 6 RTUGUESE 

Tern vm. ainda piy^ e may ? 



Miu pay m^rria^ 

Mtnka miy morrio^ 

Ha JSus annos que msu pay 

Minha May casou outra ve%^ 
QudntosjilhQS tern ym. ? 
Tenho quitro^ 
FilAos, oujilhas ? 



Have you father and motlier 

flill alive ? 
My father is dead. 
, My mother is dead* 
My father has been dead thefe 

two years. 
My tno[her is married again.' 
Howmany children have you? 
I have fi^ur. 
Sons or daughters? 



Tenho humfilho^e ires filhas'i I have one fon and three 

daughters. 



Qudntos irmabs iem vm, ? 

Nao tenho nenhim vivo^ 

Todos motreraSy 

Todos havemos demorrert 



How many brothers have 

you ? 
I have none alive. ' 
They are all dead. 
We muft all die. 



Que horas sdS ? 
Sao sit 



Of the word hora> as a Noun as well as an Interjecfiofu 

Hira^ An hour, also a particular* 

time. 
Euejlareili^dfntrodehiima I will be there within an 
' hora^ hour. 

What's o'clock. 

It is feven o'clock. 

At what hour\^r time will 

you be there ? 
In due or good time, at the 

time appointed. 
Leifure hours. 
The lad hour, or the dying 

hour. 
Every hour. ^ 

Hourly, every hour. 
Half an hour. 
A quarter of an hour. 
An hour and a half. 
About nine o'^clock. 
An hour ago, or anhour (ince. 
Beyond the hour, or very late. 
In time. 

To keep good hours. 
To keep bad hours. 
Dinner, or fupper time. 
About dinner tim^. 



site horas f 
A q,ue hSras eftariis vis id f 

As horas que for preciso, 

Horas desoccupddas^ 

A tiltima hbra ou a hira da 

morte^ 
Cada hora, 
De hora em hora, 
Meya Aora, 
Hum quarto de hora^ 
Hima horae meya^ 
Phto das nive kSras, 
Hd huma hSra^ 
For a de horas, 
AhSras^ 

Reeolher-se a boas hiraSf 
Recolher-sefSra de horas, 
Hiras dejantdr ou de cehr, 
Pirth das hiras dejantdr, 



f 



s 



J 



GRAMMAR. 



247 



AindAiJIiAs nd cima a ijias 

hSras f 
retorio da horas^ 
yd diraS Snze koras^ 
Ileiigio dt hira^ 
Muito a boas hiras^ 
A boas horas^ 

Na md hira^ 

Vdi tc na ma-hora^ 

Tdda a hora que^ 

A tSda a hora que.quizerdes^ 

Hbra^ 

Mother que an da para cida 

hira^ 
Hiras defaxir orag^S, 
Horas dt hir a igreja, 
fforas de hir para a cdma^ 
\ H.ras dt comer ^ 
Jd nao /do horas^ 
Chegar a hora^ 
E/idr efperdndo 'pelta fHa 

hora^ 
Nad ver a hora. 



Si6 horas de^ &c. 
"^ Horas caninicas^ 



Hiras, 



As quarenta hiras, 



CiSnta das horas, 
^r$e de dividir o idmpo em 
Mras, 



Are you a-bed at this time of 

the day ? 

The clock firikes. 

It (Iruck eleven o'clock. 

Hoiir-glafs. 

Elarly, betimes. 

In ^ood time, in time, at the 
time appointed. 

In an ill hour, unluckily, un- 
fortunately. 

Go to the devil, go and be 
hanged. 

Whenfoever, at what- time 
• foever. 

At what time you will. 

Time or hour of child-birth. 

A woman near her time. 

Prayer-time. 

Cburch-time. 

Bed-time. 

Times of eating. 

The time is p^fl, it is too late. 

Is for a perion to die. 

To wait for God's time. 

To long, to defire earneftly, 
to wiCi^ with eagernefs 
continueid, with em, or de 
before the thing defired. 

It is time to, £?f . 

The fet time for the clergy to 
fay their oflBce ; alfo thofe 
parts of the ofSce itfelf, 
called Priw^, Tterce,Sixth, 
None, &c. 

Any little prayer book, but 
particularly that in which 
is the office of the Ble/sed 
Virgin, 

3o they call the fpace of three 
days, in which the confe. 
crated Hoft is expofed and 
laid to public view. 

Horography .account of hours 

Uororaetry. 



PORTUGUESE 



As nHvens, 
veniOt 
A ckixfti.* 
irovao^ 
rel&mpago^ 
Sardiva^ 
rayo^ 
A nev€^ 
Agedda^ 
carqmctc^ 
ervalha^ 

Nevoiiro^ 
tcrrimSie, 
dHivic^ 
tatSr. 






The clouds. 

The wind* 

The ram. 

Thunder. 

The lightning. 

Hail. 

The thunderbolt. 

The fnowl 

The froC, : 

The ice. 

The dew. 

A fo^, orraiR, 

A thick fog. 

The earthquake* 

The deluge^ or floo^ 

The hes^t. 

The cold. 



..♦ 



Do Timpo. 

Odh. 

A niiU^ 

Miyo dia^ 

Meya nSite^ * 

A maniaa, 

Defpiis do fkiyo dsd^ 

Huma hira^ 

Hum qudrtb de hira^ 

HUma meya hora^ 

Tres quartos de hora^ 

Hoje^ 

O'niem^ 

AmanhSa^ 

Antes d* entente 

BepSis de amanhda^ 

Depots dejantir^ 

DepSis- de cia^ 

Himafemdna^ 

Hum mis^ 

Hum dnnOt 

Diajdnto^ 

Dia de tnthalho, 

nacer do fit^ 

Qper dojil. 



^ » 



Of the Time* 

Jhe day 

The night. 

Noon. 

Midnight. 

The morning. 

The afternoon. 

An hour.. 

A quarter of an hour. 

Half an hour. 

Three-quarters of an hour. ' 

To-day. .;'; 

Yefterday. 

To-morrow. 

The day before yefterday; ' 

After to>morrow. 

After dinner. -, i 

After fupper. ^ \ 

A week. 

A month. 

A year. 

A holy-day. ' 

A working day. 

The futt-nfing. 

The fun>fet« 

Tempi 



G R A M M A It 



Taihir, 

Affkcureirot 

JoAyxiUa oujirvip de praia^ 

Praio^ guarJandtp^ fica^ 
gitfo^ colkir {tudo junto) 

Jarro^ 

Huma bdcia^ 

Hum cipo^ 

Himagarrafa^ 

Hum0 ticu^ 

Caftifdl, 

Vela, 

Tt/ouras de e/pevildr, 

ifunui sdiva, 

Huma escudilia^ 
^ Cefto para por a paS. 
, DpnzSlla^ 

Faqueiro, 

Louga de Bdrro, 

Loufa de ejiinko^ 



Acruei*fiamL 

Suffar-bafin. 

A tei of filver plate* 

A coMrfe. 

A cover. 

The ewer. 

A bafin* 

A glafs. • . 

Aboule- 

A cup.- 

A candleftkk. 

A candle. 

Snuffers* 

A falver, 

A p<Mrringer« 
A bread-balket.. . 
A duinb.waiter« 
A cafe for knives. 
Earcbjen ware. 
Pewter* 






Do Comer, e Beber. 

Vdca, 
Carniiro^ 
Vititia, 
Cordeiro^ 
^ Gailinha, 
Gdllo, 
Peru^ 

AlmSndegas, 
jantdr^ 
AlmSgOf 
Via, ^ 
Merinda, 
Confodda, 

BanqueU, 
Fime, 
Side, 
Fdftio, 

Pa, 



Of Eating and Drinking^ 

Beef. ^ ^ 

Mutfon. 

Veah 

Lamb. 

Hen, a fowl. 

Cock. ^ 

A turkey. 

Force mestt balls. 

The dinner. 

Breakfaft. 

Supper. 

The afternoon's luncheon. 

A liffht fupper, as upon a 

fali-day. 
An entertainment, a banfi[uet« 
Hunger. "• 

ThiiS. 
A loathing. 
Bread. 
* A 4 P^5 



PORTUGUESE 



Pufificagdo^ 

Enirddo, 

Quaria fcira da Cinzas^ 

A Quarijina^ 

Annunctafddf 

As Qudtro ^emporas^ 

A Scmdnajantdy 

Domngcjit Rdmos^ 

Qudrtajeira de Trevaf^ 

Quinlajeira de EndficnfaSf 

Slflajiira da Paixdb^ 

Pdfcaa da Rf/urreyfda^ 

Ajfumpgdo dt N, o". 

As Rdffafoens^oT LadainkaSf 

Afctnjao^ 

Pentecifte^ 

Dta do Corpo de Dio$^ 
Dia de S, yoao, 
Dta de S. Ptidro, 
Dia de tSdos os Santos^ 
Dia dos Fxn&dos^ 
Dia de Sn Martinho, 
Dia de Natal, 
Vigilia^ or vifpera^ 

Da Igreja e Dignid^det £c* 
clefi^fticas. 

A ridve^ 

Zimborio^ 

Pindculo^ 

CorOf 

Cape/ia, 

EJIante^ 

Sacrijlia^ 

Campandrio^ oixturre dos si- 
no s^ 
Si/iOf 
Baddlo, 

ffy/op^f _ . 

^^nfeffionin&y 

. \ 



The Purification. 

The Carnival, or Shrovetide. 

Afli Wednefday. 

The Lent. 

Lady Day in March* 

The Ember Weeks- 

The Holy Week. 

Palm Sunday*. 

Wednefday before Eaften 

Maunday Thurfday, the laft 

Thurfday in Lent. 
Good Friday. 
Eafter Day. 
Lady Day in harvefl. 
Rogation Week. 
The Afcenfion. 
The Pentecoft, or Whitfwh 

tide. 
-Corpus Chrifti Day. 
Midfummer Day. 
Lammas Day. 
All Saints Day. 
All Souls. 
Martinmas. 
Chriftmas Day. 
The eve. 



Of the Church and Ecclefiaf^ 
tical Dignities, 

The aifle of the churchy 

The dome. 

Pinnacle. 

The choir. 

The chapel. "• 

A reading defk, or chorifi'er'i 

defk. 
The veftry. 
The belfry, or steeple. 

The bell. 

The clapper of the belK 

The font. . 

A fprihkler. 

A confefiion feat.. 

TrttuM, 



G A A At M A ft 



Tribind, 
Cemitiridf 

Carneiro, . 

Altar. 

Frcniml., 

JPdllio^ 

Todlha do alUr. 

Sobrepdliz^ 

pdpa^ 
Hum cardcdl^ 
Hum patriarch. 
Hum arctbifpQ^ 
Hum bifpo^ 
Hum legddo^ 
Vice Itgado^ 
^ Hum fiinciOf 
' Hum prelddo^ 
. Hum commendadSr^ 
Hum abbddc^ 
Hdma abbadfffdt 
Hum priir. 
Hum reitor^ 
Beneficiddo. 

Frdde. or religiofo^ 

HumguMrdiidy 
Hum definidor^ 
Hum provincial^ 
H%m gcril^ 
Hum vigdrio^ 
Hum vigdrio gerdl. 
Hum dedS^ 
Hufkarcediigo^ 
DidconOt 
Subdidcono^ 
Hum cSncgOf 
Arciprejle^ 
HMm clirigo. 
CupdM. 



A tribune, or gallery. 

A church*yara, a boiying- 

place. 
A cfaarneL 
An altar. 

An andpetidiaim ' . 

A c,anopy. 
The altar cloth. 
A tniflal, a mafs^hook, 
Aciflbck. 
A furplice» 
A fliort furplice, a bifhop't 

furplice. 
The pope. 
A cardinal. 
A patriarch. 
An archbilhop. 
A bilhop. 
A IcH^ate. 
A vice-legatt. 
A nuncio. 
A prelate. 
A commandier. 
An abbot. 
An abbefs. 
A pnor. 
A re£lor. 
Beneficed clergyman^ or4st^ 

cumbent. 
A friar. 

A fliaven. crown. 
A guardian. 
A definitor. 
A provincial. 
A general. * 

A vicar. 
A vicar-general. 
A dean. 
Archdeacon. 
Deacon. 
A fub-deacom 
A canon. 
Arch-prieft. 
A prieft. 
Acbaplaiiu 
• A 8 IJum 



PORT U G U E S E 



Hum tJmMlir^ • 
Hum pdrroco^ 
Beneficio simples^ . 
Fretra^ 

HumprigadSr^ 
Sacrtfiad^ ox fdnctifiao^ -^ 
Mentne ds coro^ 



An almoner. 

A curate. 

Sineeiire» 

A. iiufi. 

A preacher, cr le&urer* 

A lextoDy a veftry-keeper*. 

A finging boy. 



Nomes das couras que geral 
m^nte fe comem. 

Agoa, 

Vinho^ 

CarnCf 

Peixe^ 

Came coziJ-i^ 

Came afdda^ 

Hum bocido de pao. 

Hum paftel^ 

HumajSpa^ 

Hum cildo^ 

Mmajalada^ 

Hum molkot 

Fruia^ 
(hteijo^ 
manteiga^ 



Names of things mqft ufuully 
eaietu 

Bread. 

Water. ' 

Wine. 

Meat, or flefli. 

FiOi. 

Boiled meat. 

Roall meat. 

A mouthful of bread. . 

A pye. 

Soup. 

Broth. 

A failad. • < 

Any kind of fauce to dip: in, 

provoking appetite. 
Fruit. 
Cheefe. 
Butter. 



Do Servi9o de huma Mefa. 0/the Covering of the Table, 



A me/ky 
Huma cadetra^ 
A todlha da mifa^ 
Todlha de maos^ 
Hum guardandpo, 
Hitmafica^ 
Hum gdrfo, 
Hima colhir^ 
Hum prdto^ 
Humjaleiro^ 
€alheta do vinagre^ 
Galkita do taeitei ^ 



The table. 

A chair. 

The table cloth. 

A towel. , 

A napkin. 

A knife. 

A fork. 

A fpoon. 

A plate. 

A faltfeller. 

A vinegar bottle, or cruet. 

A cruet, or vial for oil. • 

TaiAer^ 



AffkcuTiiro^ 
. JaAyxeUa oujirvip de praia^ 
Hima cnifrU^ 
Praio^ guarJandfi09 Jaca^ 
gmrfot cMir {tudo junto) 
Jarro, 
Hima bdcia^ 
Hum cip0^ 
Bimagarrafa^ 
Huma ticu^ 
CaJHfdl, 

Tefouras de e/pevitdr, 

iluma sdiva, 

Huma escuddlia^ 
^ Ceftc Par a por a paS, 
. DoinUlla, 

Faqueiro, 

Ldufa de Bdrro^ 

Liu fa de ^iinho^ 



CRAM MAR. 

A croet'ftaiid. 






Suffar-bafin* 

A tei of filver. plate* 

A coMrfe« 

A cover. 

The ewer. 

A bafin. 

A glafs. • . 

AboiUe- 
A cup.- 
A candleftick. 
A candle. 
Snuffers. 
A falver, 

A pcMrringer- 
A bread-balket.. , 
A dumb-waiter. 
A cafe for knives. 
Earcbien ware. 
Pewcen 



Do Comer, e Beber. 

Vdca^ 
Carniiro^ . 

rttitia, 

CordeirOt 

GaUinha^ 

Gdlioy 

Peru^ 

Almondegas^ 

O jantdr^ 

AimSgOf 

Via, ^ 

Merinda^ 

Confodda^ 

Banqucttt 

Fime, 

Side, 

Fdftio, 

Put, 



Of Eating and Drinking. 

Beef. * 

Mutton. 

Veal. 

Lamb. 

Hen, a fowl. 

Cock. 

A turkey. 

Force mestt balls. 

The dinner, 

fireakfaft. 

Supper. 

The afternoon's luncheon. 

A liffht fupper, as upon a 

fali-day. 
An entertainment, a banquet, 
Hunger. 
ThiiS. 
A loathing. 



•A4 



?&? 



P O RTUG U ESE 



- \ 



Pdd/rc/io, or ]M milU^ 

PaSquinte^ 

PaS dc tSdAfatinha^ 

Pad branco^ or pd9 ah^, 

Pai dt rdla^ 

PaS de cevdda^ 

Pdo dc centeo^ 

Pan dt avia^ 

Pao dt mxlho miudo^ 

Pat dt milho grdnde, ^ de 

maiZf 
pao itvtdo, 
Pao a/mo^ 
BifciutOy 
Jdigdlha depaoy 
Fatta dt pad^ 
Cidta dtfiao, 
Majfa^ 
ToTta^ 
Rofca^ 
Ejtofddo^ 
riambre^ 

Cdrnt affadafobft grilhas, 
Cdrtit frila^ 

Picddof or carnt picdda^ . 
y avail J or porco n^antiv^^^ 
PrtfuntOf 
Porco^ 
CabritOi, 
Toucinho^ 
Hum ISmbe^ 
MaSs dt carntiro^ 
Frtjfura^ or forgura^ 
Cachola dt porco ^ 
Linguigaj or lingoifa^ 
Chourigo dtjangut dtpSrco, 

Fricajfe^ 

FigadOf 

jJttt^ '. 

Ndia^ 

Soro^' 

Jttqutijii, 

ppalhadi^^ 



New bread. 

A hot loaf. 

Cbminon br^iid; . ,« 

White bread* 

Rice. 

Brown bread. 

Barley bread. ' 

Rye bread* 

Oaten bread. 

Millet bread. 

Indian corn bread* 

Leavened breads 

Unlevr^nfcd bread. 

Bifcuit. 

A crumb of br^ad. 

A (lice of bread. 

A cruft of bread* 

Dough. 

A urt. 

Bread made like a rolL 

Stewed meat. 

Cold meat. 

Broiled meat. 

Fried meat* 

Saufagemeat. 

A wild boar. 

Ham, gammon of bacoa. 

Pork. 

Kid. 

Bacon. 

A loin» 

Sbeep^s trotters. 

A pluck. 

A pig's head. 

A faufage. . 

Black-pudding. 

A thick and ihort raufagt* \ 

A fricaffee. 

Liver. 

Milk. 

Cream, 

Whey. 

A kind of new cfaeefe* 

Curdted milk. 



\. 



R AMM A R. 



ivo^ 



Gemma do &vo^ 
• Cidra do ovo^ 

Sf^oJreftOi 
- ovo motley 

&U0 dUro^ 

ivo ajfddo^ 

ovo gall ado ^ 

ivos redes^ 

ivos ejcalfidosy 
ovosfrttoSy 
ivos mexidos^ ejrfios^ 
BoiinholOy 
ivas de peixe^ 
Do^es^ 
Conjeitos^ 
' Marmeliddi 



OqucfeA'ffa. 

Hum capad^ 
Hitmajrdnga^ 
Hum frdngo^ 
PSmboSy 
Pimbo trocdx, 

Qallinhilay 

iluma tfpicie degallinkilape' 
quena a qual os Cafielkdnos 
chamdo gallinita ciega^ 

Perdiz, 

Tordo, 
. Faifdo^ 

Faisaosinho^ 

Hum leitaS^ 

Veddo, 

Hum Coilho^ * 

Ldparo^ 

Leore^ 

idem^ 

Gi^fot or mdcho da 

Pdta.. 



An egg. 

The yolk of an egg. . > 

The white of an egg. 

AnewUidegg. 

A foft egg. 

A hard eg^» 

A roafted egg. 

An egg with a chicken in it. 

Sweet eggs fpun out like 

hairs. 
Poached eggs.- 
Fried eggs. 
An amiet. 
A fritter. 
The rocs of fifli. 
Sweetmeats. 
Comfits. 
Marmalade. 



M ill i l, ■ „ . 



What is roaftid. 

A capon. 

A pullet. 

A ghicken. 

Pigeons. . . 

A wood culver, or ^,#oti-. 

pigeon. 
A woodcock.. 
A fnipe. 



A partridge. 
A thrufli. 
A phcafant. 
A pheafant-powt. , 
A roafiing.pig. 
A flag. 
A rabbit. 
A young coney. 
A hare, 
A duck. 
A drake. 
Goofe. 

Gander, the mile ottbe gteTe 

Calkandr^,^ 



le 

CulhindtMi 
Codorntz^ 



FOR TUG U ES E 

A iky-lark. 
A quail. 



i*M 



De 6atro8 PiiTaro^. 

iguiaf 

3fuia nivd^ 
Hire. , 
Jlbtfir&s^ 

M/merithaat 
MScho^ 

Falcdd que ainda naS via, 

Gerifalte^ 

Sdcre^ . 

Garfdy 

Melharica^ 

Garfota^ 

Milhdno^ or milhifre^ 

Corv09 

Grilha, 

Grilho, 

AhelSa^ox raiiiUt 

Omirio^ ' 

Piniacilgo^ 

Mith, 

Teniilhda^ 

Rouxinilt 

VerdelhdS, 

fapagiyo^ - 

E/ferninko, or zor%H, 

FrancSlhCy 

M6ck§^ 

Corija^ 

MoTcigo^ 

Arc n^Birna^ cime milrc^ 

que mama as cdbrss, 
Ofraneolim, 

Cerctta, ^ 

Cdrvo mar^h0, 



0/ ether Mirds. 

m 

An eagle. 

An eaglet» 

A vulture. 

An oftricb. 

A merlin. 

A fparcow hawk. 

The horned owK 

A falcon. 

A iafs-bawk. 

Ager^faicon. 

A laker, a faker*hawk. 

A heron* 

Tomtit, 

A little heron. 

A kite. 

A crow, or raven» 

A rook. 

A jack-daw. 

A wag-tail. 

A canary-bird. 

A gold- finch. 

A black-bird. 

A chaffinch. 

A ni^tin^le. 

A green-burd. 

A parrot. 

A magpie. 

A ftaniog. 

A hobby, a mufket^ 

Owl. 

A fcreech owl. 

A bat« 

A goat milker. 



A godwit, a moor-cock* 
A nigl^t crow, 0r ravens 
A tcaL 
A cormorant.. 

GaivSUt 



• r 



<\ 



GRAM MAR. 



II 



Gtnvita, 

Gaivie, 

AnJorfnha. 
Merfulhai, 
Marrica^ . 
Picinco^ 

PazfiS, 

Pavoa, 

Ardra^ 

Pardil. 

Jto/a, 

Atcyon^ 

CeEonha^ 

Cifne^ 

FiniarrSx^i 

Grou^ , 

PavoncinOf 

PelicdnOt 

TaramiSia, 

Pifco, 



A moor-ben, or goU« . k 
A martlet* or martin* a kiihl 

of fwallow. 
A fwallow. 
Adive* ^rdtdapper.* 
A wild-duck. 
A wren, a little bird. 
A kind of ortolan. 
A peacock. 
A pea-hen. 
A macaw. 
A fparrow* 
A turtIe-dove« 
A king's fiflier. 
A ftork. 
A cuckow. 
A fwan. 
A red robin» 
A crjine. 
A lapwing. 
A pelican. 
A plover. 
A DuUfincb, or red-tail. 



Para os Dias de Ptixe, ou de 
JcjtSm. 

Sopa dc ervas^ &c. 

Piixe, 

Peixe do mdr^ 

Peixc do rio^ ou da igoa dSce^ 

Sdvel^ 

Anchova^ 

Anguia^ or Enguia, 

Barbo^ 

LuciOf 

Vdrpe, 

Siba^ 

Ulal 

Cmirat 

CordZf 

CongrOt 

Dourdddp 



For Fijk Days^ 9r Faft Days. 

Soup meagre, or leoten pot* 

tase. 
Fiflif 
Sea-fiDi. 

Pre(b-water fiffa. 
A (had. 
An anchovy. 
An eel. 
A barbel. 
A pike, or jack. 
A carp. 
A cuttle. 
A calamary. 
The miller's thumb. 
A rochet, or roach. 
A conger. [the gilt head. 
Dorado, St. Peter'a 6S\t or 

ijjptff- 



Lingfiiii 

Ugtfis, 

Bordilo^ 



P O R T UO U E^S E 



RodavUhe^ 

Sdrda^ 

Cavalla^ 

Sardinha^ 

Bacalhao^ 

Arinque^ 

Voad&r^ 

Arrinquedefit9U\ 

Arrinque con ixkis^ ' 

Pe/caaa^ 

Cadoz^ 

q/lra, 

Lampria^ 

Lamprea pequetut^ • # 

PSrco marinho^ • 

Polvo^ 

Pirca^ 

Tincai 

Trita, 

Aiim^ 

SalmaS, 

Camario, 

Caran^uijo^ 

AmiijdA^ 

ErvilhaSf 

Favast 

t^finndfreSf 

Alcachifras\ \- 

Effdtgo, 

RepolhOf 

Nabos^ 

Grilos de cSuf^^ 

CSuve irtfpa^ \ 

Coiive Flor^ 

Bddroigas^ 

Ceniuras^ 

Cilgas^ or acit^ds; 



A/ole. 

A lobfler. 

A fturgeoo ; fomd call il 

{had-fifii. 
A mullet. 
A byrt er turbot. 
A fort of little mackaffd. 
A mackarel. 

A pilchard. 

Dry cqd. - 

A herring, 

A flyins-fifli. 

A red herring. 

A hard-rowed herri^. 

A kind of cod-fiiK> 

A gudgeon. /^ 

An oyfter. ^^ 

A lamprey. 

A lampern. 

A porpoife. 

Pourcontrell or many-feet. 

Perch, 

A tench. 

A trout. 

A tunhy.&fli. 

A falmon* 

A flirimp,, or prawn. 

A crab. 

A cockle. 

Peafe. 

Beans. 

Spinage. 

Artichokes. 

Afparagus. 

Caobage, colewort. 

Summer cabbage. 

Turnips. 

Sprouts. 

Curled colewort. 

Cauliflower. 

Purflane. 

Carrots. 

Beets. 

Apples of love. 

• Piifj 



1 -u 



GJIAUMA tL 



1% 



P&ri Moperir o Cein£n 

Pimtnia, 
PimentdSi 

Vindgre^ 
Moftarda^ . 
Crdvo da Indid^ 
Canild, 
Ldureiro^ 
' Alcap^rras^ 
CcgumeloSf 
Tabara da terra, 
CebSlas, 
OuregaSf 
Fiinch0, 
Cebolinhas, 

Lardnjas,' 
lintoenSy 
jPinhSens^ 
PerrexU^ 
Sdlja,^ 
Ortdddf 
' Aipo, 
A'lhopirro, 
Cointro^ 
Afafrdm^ 
Cominhos, 



T^fimf0nmeaimM. 

Salt. 

Pepper. 

Cayan pepper. 

Oil. 

Vinegar. 

Muflard. 

Clove». 

Cinnamon, ' 

Laurel. 

Capers. 

Mufhrooms. 

Truffles^ 

Onions. 

Organy. 

Fennel. 

Young onions. 

Garlick. 

Oranges. ' . • 

Lemons. 

The kernels of a pine apple. 

Wild parfley: '^ 

Garden parfley. , 

Mint. 

Cellery. 

Leek. 

Coriander. 

Saffron. 

Cummins. 



T ' 



Para Salada* 



For a Sallad. 



Almeirao, 

Almeirao horUnfe^ovtndivia, 

Aljdce^ 

Chicoria^ 

AgriSens^ 

Mafiriifcs^ or maft^rfps, 

(krefilio, 

Ribag, 



Wild fuccory. 
Endive. 
Lettuce. 
Succory. 
Water crefles. 
Creffes. 
Chervil. 
Raddilh root. 



P&ri 



.t 



14 



P or: T U G U E S E 



Para Somfaremefiu 

Mafais, 

Ptras, 

Pita btrgamita^ 

Pii^cgos^ 

Camoezg^ 

AlhUoque^ 

Cerejas dtjaco^ 

GtnjaSf 

Ginja garrafal^ 



Laranja da China^ 

Uvas^ 

Pdff'as de Hva^ 

Uva efpim^ 

Figos^ 

Figos limpos, 

Amiixas^ 

Piffas de amiixas^ , 
Amirasde gdrfa^ or defylva^ 
AmSras que n&cem de hUfna 

forte defyha tenra^ 
AmSras que nicem da amo^ 

riira^ 
Marmilos^ 
Romaas^ 
Lima^ 
Axeitinast 
Amindoas, 
Ncfperas, 
Mem, , 

Melancia, or bulancia, 
Cafldnhas^ 
Nozes, 
AveldnSt 
Morifsgos, 
MedritthOf 



-:• 



For tie Dejfert. 

Apples. 

Peart. 

A bergamot pear. 

Peaches. 

A pippiiK 

Apricot. 

Cherries. 

Hard cherries. • 

Sour cherries. 

A very large fort of chcriy, 

the fruit of the , dwarf 

cherry-tree. 
China-orange. 
Grapes. 
Raiuns. 
Goofeberries. 
Figs. 
The. firft figs that come k 

May. 
Plums, 
prunes. 
Blackberries. 
Rafpberries. 

Mulberries. 

Quinces. 
Pomegranates. 
A lime. 

Olives* 

Almonds. 

Medlars. 

A melon. 

Water-melon. 

Chefnuts. 

Walnuts. 

Hazelnuts. 

Strawberries. 

A fort of fruit they have in 
Portugal like a flrawberry, 
eating whereof, they fay; 
makes people drunk. 

Timara^ 



GRAM MA R. 



Tdmaraf 

Fiffico, 

Aifarroia, 

Acoftija^ ox mafia de naftga^ 
Dices ^ 



A date. 

A piftachernut* 

A carob. 

A fweet acorn. 

Service. 

Ajubub. 

Swoet-meats. 



15 , 



Das A'rvores e Arbaftof. 



Pdmafquctro^ 

AnundoHra^ ' 

Cerejiira^ 

(AfjtanhHro^ 
- Ctdreira^ 
. Sorviira^ 

Pa/meirar . 

Figuiira^ 

hhrmeleiro^ 

Mdceira, 

Mmciira da ndfega^ 

Romeira, 

Linioeiro^ 

dmoriira^ 

OHviira^ 

NefptTeiray 
. LaranjHra^ 

M^rta^ 

Negueira^ 

Zamhujiira^ 

Era^ 

PeceguiirOt 

Rofiira, 

jimeixiHra, 
. Periira^ 

RofmianinhQ, 
. PinhHro, 



p* 1 1 > ■ ■ 






Dot Reptis, e Anim&^ am- 
phibios. 

Minhica^ 
S^plnte^ 



Of Trees and Struts. 

An apricot-tree. 
An aljnond-treq. 
A cherry-tree, 
A chefnut-tree. 
A citron-tree. 
A fervice-tree. 
A palm-tree. 
A fig-tree. 
A quince-tree. 
An apple-tree. 
A jubub-tree. 
A pomegranate-tree. 
A lemon-tree. 
A mulberry-tree. 
An olive-tree. 
^ A meellar-tree. 
An oraage-tree. 
Myrtle. 
A walnut-tree. 
A wild olive-tree. 
Ivy; 

A peach-tree. 
Arofe-bulh. 
A plum-tree. 
A pear-tree. 
Rofemiry. 
A pine-tree* 
Broom. 

■ I ■■ I . ' ■ I ■■< I. 

Of Reptiles and Amphili^us^ 
Creatures. 

An earth-worm. 
A ferpent. 

Serpifjdi 



16 



PORT UG;U£S E 



Serpinte com 6zas, 

AJbide, 

Ciha, 

Cibra de caftaxH, 

Vibord, 

Lagirto, 



jjagarto, 
Alacrao, 



Crocodth^ 

Jacfri^ or croofdUo 4a Ame- 

rtca» 
Cafltr, 
CdgaJOf 
Lontra^ 



A flying ferpent. 

An afD, 

A foake. 

A ratde-fnake. 

A viper. 

A iifuurd. 

An evet, eft, or newt. 

A fcorpion. 

A crocodile. 

An alljgitor. 

A beaver. 

A land tortoifc. 

An otter. 



. Dos Inftctoi. 

Ardnha, . 

FormiMa^ 

Caracii^ 

Ma, 

Sipo, 

Oucid, 

EJcaravilko, 

CarHncko, 

PtUhc, or lagiria da korta ttgfl. 

Cigirra, 

BorbolUd, 

Grilto, 

Piilho, 

Piilholidro, 

Undea, 

Pilfa. 

Mifca, 

Perfa%ft}0, 

Carraphto, 

GafankiU^ 

P.0iUA0. or trdfM, 

f^/pa* or ahijporaf 

ZingCf CfT Banf49f 

Tavad, 

Biy^Dhs. 



Of InftSs. 

A fpider. 

A pifmire or ant. 

A fnail. ' 

A frog. 

A toad. 

Hand-worm. 

A beetle. 

Wood-worm. 

Caterpillar. 

Grafshopper. 

A butterfly* 

A criclcet.. 

A lottfe. 

Crab4oufe. 

A nit. 

A flea. 

Afly. 

A' bug. 

A tick. 

A locufl. 

M$Hh. 

A wafp. 

A bee. 

A drorte. 

Aoi ox fly. 

A lady-bird. 

A gnat. 



' Gil A M M A R. 



17 



ios de Parent£fdo. 



genito^ 

7 mais mofo, 

/ 



com irmidf 
con it mad y 

doy 

day 

irmdo, « 



iffa, 
to, 



0, 

a, 

'tCy mafc. aad fern. 

(o, 

r, 

gemeOy 

•; or irmao dc liite, 

doy 

dre^ 



Degrees of Kindred* 

Father. 
Mother. 
Grandfather. 
Grandnlother. ! 

Great grandfather. 
Great grandmother. 
Son. 

Daughter* 
Broftier. 
Sifter. 

The eldeft fon. 
The youngeft fon. 
Uncle. 
Aunt. . 
Nephew. 
Niece. 

Coufio. X 

A female coufhi. . ' ' 

The male firft coafin. 
The female firft coi|fin; » 
Brother-in-law. 
I Sifter* in-law. 
Half-brother. ^ 
Father-in-law. 
Mother-in-law. 
A. fiep- father. 
A ftep-mother. 
A ftep-fon. 
A ftep-daught^r. 
A fon-in-Iaw. 
A daughter-in-law.. 
A grand-daughter. 
A grand-fon. 
A great grand-fon. 
A great grand-daughter. 
A confort. 
Huft>and. 

Wife. ^ . 

A twin-brother. 
A fofter-brother. 
A baftard. 
A male goiSp. 
* B ComddtCy 



A 

% 



18 



P O R T U G U E S E 



Comidrf^ 
AAlhddo^ 
Afilhdda^ 
Padrinhoy 
Madrinha^ 
O.parente^ 
A parente^ 

Parinte por affinidddc^ or 
confanguinidadc. 



Dos differcntes Generos de 
Efiado de hum Homem, 
ou de biima Molher, e das 
fiias qualidadeSy 

H^m homem^ 
Huma molher^ 
Hum homem de iddde^ 
Huma molher de iddde^ 
Hum velho,^ 
Huma velha^ 
Hum mq^o^ ou mancebg^ 
HUrna rapdriga^ 
Hum amanUy 
mma ami^a, 
Hiimafrianfa, ou menino, 
Hum rapdz^ 
; Hum rapazinhOf 
Ha ma menina^ 
Ha ma danzella^ 
Huma virgem^ 
A!mo^ 
'A ma J 
Criddo^ 
Cr'idda^ 
Cidaddo, 

Hum ejtrangeifo^ 
Hum vi&vOf 
Huma viiiva. 
Hum herdeira^, 
Huma herdeira^ 

4/iddif dejoltiif. 



,/ ■ 



A female goffip. 
A god-fon. * 
A god-daughter. 
A god- father. 
A god -mother. 
A male relation. 
A female relation. 
A kin, a relation either of 
affinity or confanguinity.r 

Of the conditions of Man' 
and JVoman^ as well as of 
their qualities. 



A man. 

A woman. 

An a^ed man. 

An aged woman. 

An oTd man. 

An old woman. 

A young' man. 

A girl. 

A lover. 

A miftrefs. 

A child, a little child* 

A boy. 

A little boy. 

A little girl. 

A maiden. 

A virgin. 

A mafter. 

A miftrefs. 

A malc-fervant. 

A female-fervant*. 

A citizen. 

A countryman. 

A ftranger, or foreigner. . 

A widower. 

A widow. 

An heir. ' 

An heirefs. , * 

A bachefor. 

fiachelorfliip. 

HinleB 



■\ 



GRAMMAR. 



23 



As bdfbaSt 
BigodeSf 
O ptjcogo^ 
A nuca, 
A/fargdnta^ 

Teta^ 

PettOt " 

Bico de petto i 

Eftomago^ 

Coftelas^ 

Embigo^ 

Barrtga^ 

brago^ 

O cotovilo^ 

Sobaco^ oifovaco^ 

A mao, 

Pul/o, 

A palma da maS, 

Os dedos^ 

dido poUffar^ 

O dido mojtrador^ 

Dido do miyOj 

Dido annular^ 

Dido meninkOf or minimo^ 

Pontas dos didos^ 

Juntas^ e nos dos didos^ 

Dido do pe^ 

A unhoy 

As eojlast 

Os ombros^ 

Jihargas, '* • 

As nddegas^ 

Coxa, 

Joelho, 

Ba rriga, da perna^ 

Efpinndco^ 

Tornozelo^ 

pi, 

S6la do pi, 
coracoQ, 
Osbifcs, 



The beard. 
Whiflceri. - 
The neck. 

The nape of the head. ' 
The throat. 
The bofotn. 
The pap. 
The breaft. 
The nipple. 
The flomach. 
The ribs. 

The naval. - ^ 

The belly. 
The groin. 
The arm. 
The/ el bow. 
The arm-pit. 
The hand. 
The wrift. 

The palm of the hand. 
The fingers. 
The thumb. 
The fore- finger. 
The middle-nnger. 
The rinj» -finger. 
The little-finger. 
The tips, or tops of the fin- 
gers. 
.. The joints, and knuckles of 
, the fingers. 
A toe. 
The nail. 
The back. 
The (houlders. 
The fides. 
The "buttocks. 
The thighi 
The knee. 
The calf of the leg. 
The ridge-bone of the back. 
The ancle. 
* The foot. 
The fole of the foot. 
The heart, 
.The lungs. 
•B4 Ojij^ai 



3d 

Que tern ciimes^ 

AdilUro^ 

SalteadSr^ . ^ 

MatadSfi 

Murmurddor^ 

Calumniator^ 

Feiticeiro^ 

Trahidor^ 

MalvddOf 

Rebelde^ 

Phfido, 

BopOf 

McniirSfo^ 

Altivo^ , 

Coxo^ 

Eftropiddo das maos^ 

Cego, 

mouco^ or furdoj 

CanhotOf or tjquirdd^ 

undo. 



P O R T U G U E S E 



Jealous. 

Adulterer. 

A htghwajntnan. 

A murderer. 

A cenfuret. 

A calumniator. 

A forcercr. 

A traitor. 

Wicked. 

A rebel. 

Perfidious. 

A buffoon. 

A lyar. 

Haughty. 

Lame of the legs^ 

Lame of the hands* 

Blind. 

Deaf. 

Left-handed. 

Dumb. 



Dos Moradores de huma 
Cidade. 

Fidalgo^ 
' Nhbrt, 
Mecdnico^ 
Tendeiro, 
Mercadir or himem de nego-^ 

cio, 
vulgo^ or a plike^ 
Candlha^ or a mais vil gente 
' daplibe. 
Official, 

Jornaliiro^ . ^ 

OuriveSf y 
Ourives do ourff^ 
Livreiro^ 
tmpreffor, 
Barbciro^ 
Mercador defida,, 
' Mercaiir depdnno^ 



Of the Inhabitants oj B 
City. 

* 

A nobleman. 
A gentleman. 
A mechanic. 
-A fhop-keeper. 
Merchant, or tradefm^n. 

The mob. 
The rabble. 

A work-man, a man tbi 

labours with bis hands. 
A journeyman. 
A filver-fmith, 
A gold-fmith. 
A book-(eller. 
A printer. 
A barber. 
A mercer. 
A woollen-draper. 

AlercaM 



/'■ 



Mjctcador depdnno^ it Itnho^ 
€ roupas da India^oxjan- 

Ai/aydU, 

Alfaydtt rcmtnddo^ 

Cq/lureira^ 

Chapdeiro^ or Somirtir^irCf 
. SapatiirOy 
/ Remendda^[sapateiroy^ 

Atiiitdr, ' 
CerralheirOy 

Tartetrat 
' Mldico^ 
Charlaiad 

Cirurgiam^ oifurgiiot 
Tira denies^ 

CarpenUirOy [army.) 

PioneirOy or gaftador^ (in an 

PadeirOy 

Carnicdroy 

FrutdrOy 

Mother que vendc Viirduras 
' ou ortalifas, 

Pajieleiro, 

Taverndro, or venddro\ 

CervejeirOyOt o quejaz cervtja 
■ EJiatajadetro^, 

Mqfarinhdro^ 

Relojoeiroy 

Prcgoeiro, 

yoyeircy or jcyalhdrif. 

ccticdrio^ 
. Vidraceiro^ 
* CarvodrOy , 

Jardineiro^ 

Letrddo^ 

ProcuradoTy 
.Advogddo^ 

Carrd/cOy 
MarUhf 



GI^ A M M A R. 

A linen-draper. 



21 



A taylor. 
Botcher. 
A fempfirefi. 
A hatter. 
Shoemaker. 
A cobler.' 
A blackfmith. 
Farrier. 
A lockfmith. . 
A midwife. 
A phyfician. 
A quack. 
A furgeon. 
A tooth drawer* 
A fadler. 
A carpenter. 
A pioneer. 
A baker. 
A butcher. 
A fruiterer. 
A- herb woman. 



t / 



Apaftry-cook. 
A vintner. 
A brewer. 
An inn-keeper. 
A pedlai. 
A watch-maker. 
A crier. 
A jeweller. 
An apothecary. 
A glazier. 
A coal man* 
A gardener. 
A lawyer. • 

A folicitor. , 

An advocate, cr a pleadef« 
A judge. 
' A coaler. 
A&mgman. 
A porter. 



N. 



26 



PORTUGUESE 



Agilha dc toucdr^ 

Fichu fsorte de linfo para o 

pescofo^ 
Tenazinkas, 
Pcndentes^ 
Palatina^ 
Giidrdd infdnU^ox Guard in^ 

Jantc^ X 
Vio, 
Rindai 
'Bilros, 

Bilrosfeitos de SJfo, 
Agoa da rainka de Ungria^ 
Agoa de chiifo^ 
Jupiho, . 



Bodkin. * 
Ribbons. 
A necklace. 

Nippers. 

Bob» or pendant«» 

Tippet. 

Farthing^de, or hoop. 

Veil. 

Lace. 

Bobbins. 

Bones. 

Hungafy water. 

Scented watisr. 

Bodice. 



Os doze Signos Celeftes. The twelve Celejlial Signs. 



Aries^ 
•Touro^ 

' Gemini or Geminis^ 
Cancer^ 
Leao, 
Virgem^ 
Libra^ 
Escorpido\ 
Sagit^riOj 
Capricornioy 
Aqudrio^ 
Peixes^ 



'- / 



Aries, or the ram. 
The bull. 
The twins. 
The crab. 
The lion. 
The virgin. 
The balance. 
The fcorpion. 
The archer. 
The goaf. 
The water-bearer. 
The fiOies. 



De huma Cafa e do que Ihe 
pert^nce. 



.aja, 
A/icer/e, 
Paredc^ 
TaitquCf 
Pdteo, or Pdiio, 
Anddr, or fobrado^ 
Fachdda^ 
Janilla^ 



Of a Housey and all that bt' 
longs to it. 

A houfe. 

Foundatipn. ^ 

A wall. 

A light brick-wall. 
A court, or yard. 
•A floor. 

The front. ' / 
A window. 

AtihaiA 



V 



GRAMMAR. 



23 



- Ai h&Tb'as, 

BigadtSf 

O pefcogo, 

A nuca, 

Arargdnta, 
' Seyt, 

Tela, 

PeiUf, ■ 

Bico de petto, 

Eflomago, 

Coftiias, 

Emifgo, 

Barriga, 

VfTtlha, 

irafo, 

cotevelo, 

Sobaco, ot/ov£c», 

A ma5, 

Pulfo, 

A p6lma da maS, 

Os didos, 

dido poUrhr, '' 

dedo moJlTador, 

Dido do miyo, 

Dido annular. 

Dido meninho,'ot minima, 

Ponias dos dedes,- 

y&nlas, e not dos diios. 

Dido do pi, 
A Unha, 
As ejjios. 
Os ombros, 
IlkSrgas, 
As nadegas. 
Coxa, 

Barriga da pirna, 

Efpit^d^o, 

Tornozeio, 

pi, 

SSla do p(, 

O coracdS, 

0s ii/ts. 



The heard. 
Whilkeri. . 
The neck. 

The nape of the head. ' 
The throat. 
The bofom. 
The pap. 
The bread. 
The nipple. 
The flomach. 
The ribs. 

The naval. - ^ ■ 

The belly. 
The groin. 
The arm. 
The- elbow. 
The arm -1)11. 
The hand. 
The wrift. 

Thepalm of the hand. 
The fingers. 
The thumb. 
The fore-finoer. 
The mlddle-fiijger. 
The nnj-fin>.er 
Thelitik-hngcr. 
The tips, or tops of the fin- 
gers. 
.. The joints, and knuclilet of 
, the fingers. 
A toe. 
The nail. 
The back. ■ 
The Ihouiders. 
The fides. 
Thetuttocks. 
The thigh. 
The knee. 
The calf of the leg. 
The ridge-bone of the back. 
The ancle. 
- The foot. 
The fole of the fool. 
The heart, 
The lungs. 
• B 4 Oftg^'l 



24 



PORTUCJUflSE 



CfiMdo, 

b&fo, 

Os rinSf 

A boca da^eflSmago^ 

As iripdSy 

A mddre^ 

Sdngu€y 

Cufpo, 

Ourina, 

Excremento^ 

Monco or rdnho^ 
Lagrima^ 
Carepa^ or cafpa^ 



Dos Veflidos^ 

Hum vefiido^ ' ' 

CabelUira^ 

Cravdta; 

ChapeOt 

Abas do ^hapeo^ . [p^'o, 

Cord^t mjita^ para o cka^ 

Bafr(t€,^ 

Capote^ 
' Qtbadf 

ViJUa^ or oolite^ 

Camifa; 

Cafdca^ 

Cafacdo^ 

Calfoens^ 

Ceroulas^ 

Meas^ or miyas^ 
, Mias dt cdbrejiilho, 

Ligas, 

Saphtos^ 

ChinHaSf 

B.otas^ 

Fivelas^ 

Efpiras^ 

PunhoSf 

Ta/im, or taly, * 



The liver. ^ 

The'fplcen. 

The kidneys. , 

The pit of the ftomach 

The guts. 

The gall. 

The womb. 

The bladder. 

The blood. 

Spittle. 

Urine. 

Dupg, 

Sweat or perfpiratioD. 

Mucus. 

Tear. 

Scurf. 



I » " ■ 



OfCloatAs. .. ' 

A fuit of cloaths. 

A wig. 

A cravat or neckcloth. 

A hat. 

The brims. 

A batbjuid. 

A cap. 

A cloak. 

A doublet. 

A waificoat. 

A fliirt. 

A coat. 

A great coat. 

Breeches. 

Drawers. 

Stockings. 

Stirrup ftockings. 

Garters. 

Shoes. 

Slippers. 

Boots. 

Buckles. 

Spurs. 

Ruffles. 

A flioulder-belt. 

. SoldrU, 



GRAMMAR. 



Boldrii, 
Espdda, 
LuvaSf 

Lenfo, ^ 

Lenfp para o pcfcSfo^ 
Samarra, or peudu d§ cdmp^^ 



25 



m I I— —»***« 



Para Molheres, 

Camisa de molheres^ 

Toucado^ 

Siya, 

Mantilha, 

MdntOy 



Avental, 

BraceleUs, 

Anil 

Brincos^ 

LequCy 

Pentcador^ 

Toucador^ 

Sindes^ 

EspelkOj 

Rcgdlo, 

Espartilho^ . 

PenUi 

Alfinetes, 

icsottra, 

Ikdil 

Agulha^ 

Fio de pirolas^ 
PolvilhoSy 

CSr^ 

P^lito^ 

Roca, 

Fiiso^ 

Atmofadinha para alfiniUSy 



A sword-belt. 

A fword. 

Gloves. 

A girdle. 

Handkerchief. 

A neck handkercliief. , 

A fliepherd's jacket. 

- ' ■ *■ » <»*".. ■■■ I mf^^i^m^^ 

Fhr Women. 

A fliift, or fmock. 

A head drefs. 

A petticoat. 

A little cloak women wear on 
their heads. 

A mantle, a kind of cloak 
women wear in Portugal, 
covering their head and the 
upper part of their body. 

An apron.. 

Bracelets. > 

Ring. 

Ear-rings. 

A fan. 

A combing cloth. 

A toilet, a dreffing table. 

Patches to wear on onfc*s facA. 

A looking-glass. 

A muff. , 

Stays. 

A comb. 

Pins. 

A pair of fciflars. 

A thimble. 

A needle. 

Thread. 

A necklace of pearls. 

Powder. 

Jewels. 

Paint. 

A tooth-pick. , 

A diftaff. 

The fpindle. 

Small pincufhion. 

Agilkm 



\ 

\ ■ 



26 



FOR TV G U E S E 



Agilha dc toucdrg 

FUas, 

Fichu (sorte dc Urifo para o 

pescofOj 
Tenazinhas, 
Pendenies^ 
Palatina^ 
Giidrdd infdnie,oi Guard in* 

Jantc^ , 
Vio, 
Renda^^ 
'Bilros, • 
Bilrosfeitos dc ojfo^ 
Agoa da rainku de Ungria^ 
A'goa de chiifo^ 



Bodkin. • 
Ribbons. 
A necklace. 

Nippers. 

Bob, or pendants 

Tippet. 

Farthings^le, or hoop. 

' Veil. 
Lace. 
Bobbins. , 
Bones. 

Hungafy water. 
Scented water. 
Bodice. 



Os doze Signet Celeftes^ The twelve Celejlial Signs. 



Aries^ 
Touro^ 

'Gemini or Geminis^ 
Cdncef^ 
Leao, 
Virgem, 
Libta^ 
Escorpidd\ 
Sagitariot 
Capricirnto, 
Aqudrio^ 
Peixes^ 



/ 



Aries, or the ram. 
The bull. 
The twins. 
The crab. 
The lion.' . 
The virgin. 
The balance. 
The fcorpion. 
The archer. 
Thie goaf, 
■f he water-bearer. 
The fiihes. 



De huma Cafa e do que Ihe 
pert^nce. 

Chfa, 
Alicirje^ 

Paredty 
Tabique^ 
Pdteo, or Patio ^ 
Anddr^ orfobrado^ 
Fachdda^ 
Jfanilla^ 



Of a Housey and all that be- 
longs to it, 

A houfe. 

Foundation. ^ 

A wall. 

A light brick-wall. 

A court, or yard. 

•A floor. 

The front. ' / 

A window. 

Atobaic 



V 



GTl A M M A R. 



iJt 



Abih'ada,, 
As escddasj - 
DegrdoSf 
- Telhido,. 
Telhas, 

J^adrUkos, or tijolos, 
Sala or quarto^ 
Antecdmura\ 
Sala^ 
Tecto^ 
Alcova^ 
Balcab^ 
Gabinite^ 
Almdrio^ 
Gudrda-roupa^ 
Adi^a, 
Cozinka^ 
Befpinfa, 
Cheminet 
Cavallarifa, 
Gallin/ieero, or cd/a das gal' 

linhas, 
Poleiro, 
Jar dim ^ 

Neccjfarias, ^ 

Cd/a dejantar, 
Qudrto de cdma^ 
Andar rente da Rua, 
Porta, ^ 
Po/ligo, 

Limindr, or lumidr, . 
Clara boia, 
AlgeroZt 

£eiras, or dbas do tclhado^ 
A couceira da porta, 
Fechad(Lra, 
Cadeado, 
Ferrolho,^ 
Trdnca da p6rta, 
Cdno da ckdve, 
Chave meflra, 
Gudrdas dajtchadura^ 
Palhetao da chdvc. 



A vault. 

The ftairs. 

Steps. 

A tiled roof.' 

Tiles. 

Bricks. 

A room. 

Aotichaniber. 

A halK 

A roof. 

An alcove. 

A balcony. 

Clofet. 

A cupboard. 

Wardrobe. 

A cellar. 

A kitchen. 

A pantry. ' 

A chimney. 

The liable. 

A hen-houfe. 

A hen-rooft. 

A garden. 

Water cidfet. 

A dining-room. 

Bed-chamber. 

A parlour. 

The door. 

A wicket. 

The thrclhold. 

Sky-lights. 

The gutter tile. - 

The eaves. 

The hinges. 

A lock. 

A padlock. ^ 

The bolt. 

The bar ot a door* 

The pipe of a key. 

A mailer- key. 

The wards of a lock. 

Key bit. 



Vidrdga^ 



'i8 



PORT U G U E S E 



I « 



EsciidajtUa a carracily 
Escdda secrita^ 

Viga, 

Parede meftra^ 
Paredes miyas, 
A'rca^ 
Cdjna^ 

Sobreceo da cdma^ 
I lOortinas da cdma^ 

Cabectira da cdma^ 

Pi% da cdma^ 

Colcha^ 

ColckdOf 

Cobertor^ 

Cobertor de felpa. 

Cama de Armagao. 

Travesseiro^ • 

Tapcte^ 

Tapefarta^ 

PcderncUaj 

tsca^ , 

Micha^ 

EnxergaOf 

E/ieira^ 

Caens da cheminiy , 

Folks ^ . 

TendzeT^ 

Ferra, 

Abdno or abanador^ 

Panella, 

Tejio, 

Aza da panilla^ 

Ferro para atifdr p lume^ 

Escumadeira^ 

Colher grdnde^ 

Caldeira^ • 

Scrtda^ ox fngidtiTa^ 

CoadSr^ 

Grelha^, 

Ralo. 



The glass of a window. 
A winding ftair-case. ' 
Back-flairs, a private flatr- 

case. 
A beam. 
The main wall. 
The party walli. 
Cheft. 
Bed. 

The bed's tefter. 
Bed curtains. 
Sheets. 

The bed's head. 
Bed's feet. 

Counterpane, a* quilt. > 
A matrafs. 
A blanket. 
A rug. 
Bedftead. 
A pillow. 
A carpet. . 
Tapeftry. 
A flint. 
Tinder. 
Match. 
A ftraw-bed. 
A mat. 
Hand-irons. 
Bellows. 
Tongs. 
A fliove). 
Fire-fan. 
A pipkin. . 
The pot-lid. 

The ear of a pot, or pipkio. 
A poker. 
A Ikimmer* 
. A ladle. 
A kettle. 
A frying pain. 
A cullender, or ll;rainer. 
Gridiron. 
A grater. 

Espiti 



GRAMMAR. 



29 



Amojariz^ 



Mao do almofariz, 

Rtdoma^ 

Bilde, - 

&abao^ 

Rodilha^ 

Esfregdo, 

Forno^ 

Pa dofSrno^ 
, Vascmho pa ra alimpdr ojor- 

no, 
^Farinka, 

Trinckdnte, 
' MordomOf 

Escudciro^ 

Camareiro mir. 

Esc ova, 

Vassoura,, 
' Dfspenseiro, 

Pdgm, 

Ldcdyo, 

CockeirOf 

Co c heir a, 

AfSfo des cavillos^ ou da es- 
trebaria, 

Copeire, 

Escudctro de h&majiddlga^ 

A mo, ou senhor da cdsa, 

A ma, ou senhor a na cdsa^ 

Grimpa^ 



Cores. 
Branca^ 

Azul celeste, 
Azuljerrite, 
Azil cldro. 
Cor de camur^a^ 
Amarilo^ 
Cor de risa, 
Cordcpdlha^ 



A fpit. 

A mortar wherein things arc 

pounded. 
A peftle. 
A vial, 

A bucket, or pail^ 
Soap. 

A kitchen towel*. 
A difh-clout. 
Oven. 

The peel of the oven. 
A maukin, a coaf^rake t4 

make clean an oven. 
Meal-flour. 
A carver. 
A lie ward. 
A valet-de-chambrc. 
A chamberlain* 
A brufli. 

A broom. ' ^ 

A fleward. 
A page. » 

A footman. 
A coathman. 
A coach-houfe. 
A groom. ^ 

A butler. 

A lady's gentleman ulber. 
The mafter of the houfe. 
The miftrefs of the.houfe. 
Weather- cock. 



Colours. 



White. . 
Blue. 

Sky-colour* 
• Dark bli^. 
Light blue. 
Lig^it yellow. 
Yellow. 
Rofy colour. 
Straw colotir. 



Virde, 



30 



PORTUGUESE 



Virdt, 

Cor de virde niar^ or virdt 

• cldi 0^ 

CSrvermilhay or Incarnada^ 

Cor vermilha muih viva, or 

carmin. 
Cor dt tame. 
Cor carmesin. 
Cor negra, or prSia, 
Cor dt mil, 
Furta cores. 
Cor viva. 
Cor trifle. 
Cor escura. 
Cor carregdda. 
Cor defogo, 
Pdrdo^ 
Cor de ctnza^ 
Escarldtoy 
Leonddo, 
Cor de lardnja. 
Cor de azeitona, 
RSxo, 
Roxo, or cSr de aurora. 



Green. 
Sea-green. 

Red colour. 

Carmine, a bright red colour. 

Flefh colour. 

Ciimfon red. 

Black colour. 

A dark yellow. 

A deep changeable colour. 

A lively and gay colour. 

A dull colour. , 

A dark colour. 

A deep colour. 

Fire colour. 

Gjey. i 

Afli colour. 

Scarlet. 

Tawney, 

Orange f:olour. 

Olive colour. 

Purple, violet. 

Aurora colour. ' 



Roxo fometimes fignifies redox rosy fo/cfttr; particularly 
in poetry, as m Camoens, Czvao 1. Stanza 82. 

"' Para que ao Portuguez se Ike iorndsse, 
Em roxo sdngue a dgoa, que bebesse. 



Anim^es. 

Bejla domejlica, 

Befia brava, 

Befta de cdrva, 

Bejia de sella. 

Gado, 

Gddo grojfo, ^ 

Gddo miSido, 

Rebdnho, 

Mandda de gado groff'o, 

Touro, 

Bezcrrfi, 



Beajis. 

Tame beaffij 

A wild bead. 

A beafl of burthen. 

A beaft for the faddle. 

Cattle. 

Great cattle. 

Small cattle. 

A flock. 

A herd of big cattle. 

Ahull. 

Heifer, 

Bezernr, 



GRAMMAR. 



31 



Bevterro^ 



Boy, 

Burro, . - 
, Burra, 
Porco, 
PircGy 
Fdcay 
Egoa, 
Cria, 
Potra, 

Cavdllo, . , 

Cavdllo anao, 
Cavallo de pojta, 
Garranhao, or cavallo it 

langamento, 
Ca*Oallo de alueuel, 
' Cavdllo dt cochc, ' 
Cavdllo que dnda de ch6ut0, 
Cavallo peaueno que serve 

para stnhoras, 
Cavdllo quetoma ofreio entre 

denies, 
Cavdllo rijo da b^ca, 
Cavdllo doce dejreio, 

Cavdllo que tern boa boca, 
Cavdllo que tropica, 
■' Cavdllo esfiantadifo, 
Cavdllo ardente, oxfogozo, 
Cavdllo que rkirde e da couces, 
Cavdllo rebelldd, 
Cavdllo que nao siffre ancas, 

Cavdllo mal mandddo, 

Cavdllo de albdrda, 

Cayallo de carro, 
* Cavdllo de sella, 

Cavdllo de correr, 

Cavdllo deguerra, 
' Cavdllo djaezddo, 

Cavdllo ae Barbaria, 

Cavdllo capado, 

Cuydllo sem ser capddo^ 

CavAlo que da aos folks. 



A calf, a fleer, a young b\il- 

lock. 
An ox. 
Anafs. 
A (he-afs. 
A hog, or pig. 
A fow. • 

A young mare, alfo a nag. 
A mare. 
A foal, a filly. 
A colt, or young horfc. 
A horfe. 
A nag. 
A poft horfe. 
A (lallion. 

A hackney-horfe. 
A coach- horfe. 
A johing-horfc. 
A palfrey; 

A horfe that champs th^it. 

A hard-mouthed horfe. 

A tender- moufhed horfe, one 

that eafily fubmits to the curb. 

A horfe that will eat any thing. 

A ftumbling-horie. 

A (lartling-horfe. 

A fiery horfe. 

A biting and kickiiig horfe. 

A untamed horfe. 

A horfe that will not carry 

double. 
A reftive horfe. 
A pack-hbrfe. 
A cart- horfe. 
A faddle-horfe. 
A race-horfe. 
A war-horfe. 

A horfe with all his furniture. 
A Moorifli horfe, a barb. 
A gelding. 
A flone-horfe. 
A broken winded horfe. 

Cavdllo^ 



32 P O R T U 

Cavdllo quiitrdlvo^ 

Cavdllo alazdo^ 
C(^vallo bdio. 
Cava II castdnko^ 
Cavdllo bdlo e cajtdrihp^ 
Cavdllo rocim^ 
Cavdllo remendddoy 
Cavallo rudo or rujfo porceU 

Idno^ 
Cavdllo que /off ft ancas, 
Cavdllo trotab^ 
Cavallo que fcrve para anddr 

dcdfa^ 
Cavallo que dnda de furta 

Caoy 

Cdo dt quinta. 

Odd 4c cdga^ * " 

Cdo de agoa^ 

Cad de gddo^ 

Cdd de mojira^ podingo^ or 

perdigueiro, . 
Cdo dejila, 
CdofacadSr^ 
Cdo de bifca^ 
Aldo, 
. (^algo, 
Cdo para cafdr rapozas e 

lontras^ 
Cachorrinho^ 
Cachorrinho defrdlda^ 
Cachorro^ 
Mdcho^ or mulo^ 
Mula^ 
Corfa, 

Corf a de tres dnnos^ 
^orfo de dSus dnno5\ 
Cdrfo^ 

Corfo on cira d^hUm anno, 
Gdmo, 
FeadOf 

Cdbra montez, 
Veddo grdnde de cinco dnnos, 
fioninha^ 
Tnxigo^ or texUgo^ 



G U E S E 

'A horfe' that has four white 
' feet. 

A forrel horfe. 
A bay ]^oi'k, 

A cbefnut- coloured horfc. 
A chefnut bay. 
A wortblefs nag, a poor jade. 
A dapple horfe. 
A dapple-grey horfe. 

A double horfe. 
A trotting.hoife, 
^ hunter. 

A pad, an easy-paced hotit, 

A dog. 

A houfe dog. 

A hound. 

A water fpanieL 

A fhepherd's dog. 

A fettmg dog. 

A great cor« a maftiff iog, 

A dog tumbler. 

A finder. 

A bull-dog. 

A greyhound. 

A terrier. 

A little puppy, a whelp*. 

A lap'dog. 

A little dog. 

A lie-mule. 

A ihe-mule. 

A (he-deer, a doe. 

A fpade. 

A pricket. 

A wild buck. 

A fawn. 

A fallow deer. 

A flag. 

A wild fhe goat. 

A hart. 

A weafel, 

A badger. 

Gate, 



QRAMHAH. 



S6 



toesptnhaieir^ ^ 

Ptaigo dt thd&Jim drvMts^ A glade in a wood* 

dentro d$ hMmtfipfU€t 
Pomdr^ or verged • 



A precipice. 

A wood.' 

A grove, 6r thickets 



• • 



Pr&do, 

Ftnte, 

Trigo, • . 
Trigo candial^ 
Trigo bretdnhai^ 

m 

Tremiz^ 

muta, 

Efpiga^ 

Cabcfa dn iff^(K 



An orchasd. 

A mf adow. 

A bower. 

A founcaifl. 

•Wheat. 

The beft Vheat. 

Jle4wlieau 

Rye. : 

JylefliQ^ sii)iedcoini» at vbnt 

TW ^mK of chmt MMihi 

Spelt. 

Earofcom. 

The grain at the top Qi cIkd 
ear of com. 



Bainka, 4MiJdhd ^gft The hu& in' which tbectf^ilf 



dtpois defa 
Legumes^ 
Graos de bico^ 
LentUha^ 

Tramifo^ or tftmAf^^ 
Feijoens^ 

Fajaofradmka^y 

E'ixo, 

Kayo da roda^ 

Currdl de biys^ 

Currdl'de ovilhaf^ 

Curral de cdtrqst: 

Chiqueiro depdt^^^, 

Srv0^ 



corn is lodff A 
Pulfe. 

Spahifli peafe. 
A lentil. r 

A lupine. 

Frencb^himiC 
Kidney-beans. 
A fort of fmall French bcuu 

with a black fpot. 
Chicklingi, a fort of pesti. 
A waggqiu 
A cart* 
A wheel. 

The j^oen of the wheat 
The 9xlt^up(SB of a wheel* 
^be jrpo]L|& cijt a wbeel« 
An ox-flail. 
ik (bcra-fbldb 
A houie for gooUk * 
A hog'fl-fiju 
Graft. 
Green cofnv 



♦Ca^ 



Stttre. 



\ 



^^ 



J4 PQRTU 

Lavrador^ 

V 

Piftos, 

Arddo^ 

Ferro do arddo^ 

Rdbo do arddo^ 

Abegad^ or ojiciai qH$f^ 

arados^ 
JIguilhaddf 
insmho^ 
Grade, 
Stmeador^ 
RofadoTf 
Fouce rogadoura^ 
Fouce, 
Poddo, 
Segador, 

Mangoal, 
Forcddo, 

CafadSr, 

Pefcador^ 

J%o, 

Terra mfic(^.l<vmiAi^cn^ 

tre dous regoSp 
Outeiro, 
MonU^ or m,oniinJk^y 

Ritetrq^ 



Idno, or pl(H(kK^ 
Penha, or rfcha,. 
Penkdfcq^ 
De/irio, 



(J y E S E 

A rarmer, oRtli^ C^l^inlll 

. tfraaoihif'i* 

Feeding ground»^ fAO^UM^ 

iheep-wa(^« 
, A plough. 
The plough-fliife. 
The plough-handle^ 
A plough^wright* 

A goad. 

A rak«. 

A harrow. 

A fower. 

A wecdcn 

A weeding-hook; 

A fcythc or fickle. 

A pruning-knife* 

A reaper, or mowcr« iwA 
man. 

A flail. 

A prong to ca{| up Oinv^ff 
com with. 

A huntfmati. 

A fifliermay. 

A furrow. 

A Mk^tff fidjn ^ bai be- 
tween two nirrows. ' 

Amountaiii^ . 

A valley. 

A mo6r, fen, or Wiifl^l 

ftanding^ water, but foflM^ 

timet dry. 

A lake or ftandingxpooli^lM 
always full of water^ 

A brook, a ftream of ^nM 
with a gentle or fiMit 
current. 

A rivulet, a ftreamlQ(^ 

A plain. 

A rock. 

A great rock. 

A defert or wildern^^ 



Q R A Mid 4 H. 



86 



Desbenhadeir^ ^ 

Pedifo de thd&fem drv^ts^ A glade in a wood« 
dcniro d$ ktm ^fifu^^ 



A precipice. 

A wood.' 

A grove, «r thicket. ' 



Pomdr^ or vtrgil^ 
Prido, . 

Ftnte, 
Trigo, • 
Trigo candial^ 
Trigo bretinha^ 

m 

TremiZf 

Effilta, 

E/piga^ 

Cabefa da. ^fjfii^(K 



An orchatd. 
A mf adow. 
A bower. 
A fountain^ 
•Wheat. 
The heft Vheat. 

&e4 wheat. 
Rve. : 

AacIKq^ sii)iedconi» at vbcit 

aB^ ryre, &c. 
TW ^WK of thmt siMdM 

growth. 
Spelt. 

Ear of corn. 
The grain at the top Qi chr 

ear of com. 



Bainha, Mmdijdhaa ^g^ The hu& in' wUchtbectf^ilf 



dedois defa 
' Legumes^ 

Graos de bico^ 

Lentilka^ 

, TramSfO, cm tffmAp0^ 
. Feijoens^ 

Fetjdifradmkc^s 

XXfckarOf 

Carrot 
Rida, 
CaimiaSt 
E'ixo, 

Rdyo da rida^ 
Currdl de biys^ 
Currdl'de obilhas^ 
Qurrdt de cdbri^ 
• Ckiqueiro depdt^^^ 



corn is lodge A 
Pulfe: 
Spahifli peafe. 
A lentil. 
A lupine. 
Frencb^hisMC 
Kidney-beans. 
A fort of fmall French bcuu 

with a black fpot. 
Chicklingi, a fort of peav. 
A waggon^ 
A cart% 
A wheel. 

The I^QQi of the wheal 
The i»le*to:# of a whed* 
^be jrpo]L|& ol a wbeel« 
An ox-flail. 
A (bcra-foldib 
A liouie for goaUU * 
A hog'fl-fiju 
Graft. 
Green cofn; 



♦Ca^ 



Stttra. 



S8 



FOR T U GrU ES E 



Tarro^ - 
CinehOf 


Standing corn. 

A milk-pail. 

A cbeefe-vat, to make eheeli 

a«^ ft 


Enxada^ 

Enxadio^ or alviao^ 
Cdnga, 
Cangdlhos^ 

Sibe, 

gucfaz sebeSf 


A mattot^k, a hoe. 
A mattock. 
A yoke for oxen. 
The arms of the yoke- ufed 
for oxen. 
. A hedge or fenoe. 
Hedgcr. 



tdrajazir s'tkts^ 
Tempo de tofquia e ajifta que The (heep-lhearing, the Ume 

nelU/azem os riifiicos^ of (hearing (heep. 

Caniigadosjigadire^defpiis^ Harveft home. ' ' 

de acabddo o tempo da 



Sarfa^ 

Mata^ 

Mato, ^ 

Leira^ or iaboleiro^ 

Ckirro de dgoa^ 

Vereda^ 

Bafto, 

CabdZf 

Cabdndt or choupdna^ 

CabUfo^ 



f , 



Coufas pertencSntes a 
Guerra. 



A bramble. 
A thicket, a foreft. 
A heath. 

A bed in a garden. - . ' 
A water-fpout. 
A path. 
The track. 
A baftet. 

A fiail, a pannier. * 
A cottage* a hut. 
A dry holJow gourd ufed tt 
keep feeds id. 



Things relating to War. ' 



Servifo ou vida miliidr^ War^re. . 

Military ou fervir na gutrrd^ To ferve in the army. 

.Artilharxa^ artelharia^ ou Artillery. 
artiiheria^ 

Canhd^tOupecddeartilharia^ A cannon. 

Cdnhdo dejtrro^ Iron cannon. 

Canhai de bronze^ Brafs cannon. 

Alma do cankdS^ The mouth of a cancon. ' 

Fogdd do canAaOf V ^^^ touch-hole of a '€a|iiKm« 

CmJdira do cankii. The breech of a cannon. 



Boidi^ ou -extrtmddde da 

culdira, , 
Bdids €ncadiddtfs^ 
Bila dt €ankdo^ 

Carrita d^ canhic^ 

Pilvora^ 

Miyo canhdoy 

Canhdb dobrddo^ 

Canh&o para batir hdma 

profay 
Canhao dt vtnte e qudiro^ . 
Calibre, 
Carregar^ 
Efcorvdr^ 
Fazir pdntarid, 
Petrichos^ or munifoins dt 

guerra^ 
Encravar hima pega^ 
Descavalgdr h£ima pi^a, 
Despardr, 
Tiro dt pi fa. 
Trim dt arHlharia^ 
Celubrina^ 
Falconiity 
Pttardo, 
Ptdrtiro^ 
\. 

Botnba, 
Bembdrda^ 
'Morttiroy 

Grandda, .^ 

Espingdrda^ 
Pijiila, 
Carabifia, 
Mo/gu€tt'y 
Machadinha^ 
Ldnca^ 
Aldoirdaf 
Pdrtasdna^ 
Pique. 
Caldr , OS piques pdra refijfir 

dcavalaria^ 
Al/in^e. 
Espdaa^ 



GRAMMAR. 

Tbeputnmd. 



17 



Chain-OioU. 

A catinon bullet, caimoa. 

bally or caDiion*fliot. 
The cajrru^ of a Cjaunum* 
Gun -powder. 
A demi-cannon. . . 

A dou^e cannon. 
A battering cann0n# 

A twenty* four pounded* 

Caliber. 

To load. 

To prime. 

To level. 

Military ftores. . 

To nail up a gun. 

To difmount s^ gun* 

To fire. 

A cannon (hot. 

The train of artillery. 

A culverin^ 

A falconet. ' . 

A petard. 

A fwivel gupi pedeitro* iff 

paterero. 
A boqib. 

A groat gun, a bombard. 
A mortar-piece. 
A granade. 
A firelbck. 
A pifiol. 
A carabine.. 
Amuiket« ' 

Abattte*ax. 

A lance. 

An halberti 

A partizan. 

A pike. 

To prefent the pikts ^g^dnft 

tbe cavalry, 
Scymeter* 
A fword. 



•C8 



Desembainkar 



•8 



PORTUOUESE 



Difembainhar m efpddM, 
Finho da e/pdda^ 
Mafaa da ejpdda^ 
emdrmcaU 4a tfpiim^ 
Filhada^da, 
Metir md9 a e/fiidm^ 

Matdr^ 
Ferir^ 
. DesbaraiSri 
Saquear^ 
PunUU, 
Bayoneia, 
Calar a bayeniia^ 
Capacete^ 
morriao, 
VisHray 

Gorjal, or gola^ 
Petto dt irwms^ 
Ceurdqa^ 
Efpalddr^ 
Cvffolite^ 
Brogult, 
EJcldo, 
Adiga^ 

Saya dt mdlha^ 
Hey d(t iffl^as^ • 



Ariuta. 

G^nerah 

Tenintc gew^rM, 

Sargento mor dt batMtka, 
Sarginto^ 
Sargento mor^ 
Marifcdl^ or Tnaritkil^ . 
Me/ire de cimpo gmitil^ 
Coronet^ 

Mefire de campo^ 
Coronel de injimtart^f 
Official de guifrM^ 
Brigadeiro^ 
Teninit eorMii^ 
Ajudante defapgilft^ fkor^ 
Ajudinte de tenenU 4h m^f 
dfcdmpo. 



Tt 



Xo ^lalntih i)ie foorf * 
The han4le of a fwwL 
The pommei of a AmonL 
The hilt of^a iimci. 
The blade of a fword. 
To dap M€'ft kami M miSi 

fword. 
To kill. 
To wound. 
Y»ro«t. 
To fack. - 
A iMniftrd w 
A bayonet. 
To fix the bayoneU» 
A helmet* 
A morrion* 

The ^i^or ^f m \aMm^ 
The gorget. 
A breal^^laic* 
A cmrafi. 
The back-plate« 
A corflet. 
A buckler* 
Afiiield. 

Dagger, a Oiort f Wwd* 
A coat of mail. 
The king at arms^vr iMf ^ 

heralds^ 
A herald, 
A general. 
A lieutenant geniftl. 
A major general. 
Aferjeant; 
Major. 

Marfhal. 

Mailer de camp jgtmw^^ 
^Colonel. 
Matter de camp. 
Colonel of foot. 
An officer. 
Brigadier. 

Uetiten^RtJcolwpK 

Adjutant. 
Aid de camp, 

■ 

Capita, 



GRAMMAR 



S9 



Captain. 

Gapllkicf #• ttfpHaiAif . 

Lieutenant 

Contet. * 

Enfigm 

Colours. ' 

Standard. 



Tofto de ca/Mh 

Cornita^ 

Aljirts^ 

BanJeiraSf 

Mfianddrte^ 

Atfires decavalaria f •! Infe Standard-bearer. 

o eftanddrtCi 
« Pagado/^ ^' Fay>illiiej 

Pravedor^ 4os mantimcntos Purveyor. 

de hitna armidm^ 
Commjfdrio^ 
Commffirio gerdl^ 
Engennei/o^ 

guatUt nujlri^ 
ib9 tk €sfUidrM, 
Tmmtir, #pi rstmli 
- Tamior ou o que t oca iamior^ 
iafuifi^ 



Ccrdeis de iami6r^ 
y Toques de tambor^ 
Tocdr 9 imMtt 
Alvprdda^ ou gennrdii ' 

Mojira^ 
Pyfar mojlra^ 
Trombita^ 
^ TrombeteirOf ou trombitti 
PifanOf 

S«ld9, 

Soldddo^ 



Commiflary. 

Commiflary-generat. 

EnginMf. 

§[uarter-mafier«. 

Dntm. 

A dnMMNt. 

Drum-ilicks. 
Drum-ftrings. 
Thebeaiitrfa Anigt 
To beat a At^m, 
The general, one «i( fltA Wik 
of the drum. ^ 

Miifter; 

To mufter, torevitlrigliiis. 

A trumpet. 

A trm6pem\ 

A fifer 9f ift» 

Wagci, 9r pay f«r f<»f (llM« 

A foldier. 



Soldado queejla A s$9ti9liiite. Soldier on-duty* 



Entrdr de gudfda^ 



To mount, or g9 upon ike 

guard. 
Dutyv centtfiii. 



Y- 



Senttne'lla^ 



Blocdtf or bloquedfi. 

Jnfdnit, or ivMiti nk pt^ 

GranadiirPt 

Bigtdi,, 

Dragao, 

Sotdadp di cm;m, 

Montdr a eavdllot 



To block up. 
A foot folditri 
Grenadier. 
Whilkcrs. 
Dragoon* 

Trooper, or horfe fol4itf. 
^ To get on horfebaftll. 



40 



PORTUGUESE 



Guirda dapeffSa reih or 

archeiro^ 
Cowraceirot 

FuxiUiro^ 

Alabardeiro^ 

Gcnisero^ 

Soldado armddo com linfa^ 

Soldado que leva pique^ or 
piquiiro^ 

Befteiro^ ou soldado qutpcli^ 
ja com bifta^ 

PtoneirOf 

Mineiro^ ou minddSr^ 

Bombardciro^ 

O tiro da artilhariat ou a 
espdfo que a bala despa^ 
rada corre ; Alcance^ 

Artilkeiro, 

A irte da artilharia^ 

Generil dc ariilharia^ 

Voluntirio^ 

RecrHtaSt 

Explorador^ ou corredSr dc 

txirciio^ 
Espia^ 
que leva vweres io exir" 

cito^ ou vivandeiro, 
Soldado que/ax correrias^ 

Timbdle or atab&U^ 
Infanteria^ 
Cavalaria^ 
Cavalaria ligeira^ 
Vangiiarda^ 
Cfrpo de batdlhaf 
Rctagudrda^ 
Cirpo de resirva^ 
Corpo deguirda^ 
Pique te^ 



■ • / 



To alight. 
Lafe-guard-maa. 

Cuifalfier. 

Muflceteer. 

Fufelier. 

Halberdier. 

Janiflary. 

A fpearman: 

.A piketnan. 

Crofa4K>w«inan. 



A pioneer •• 
Miner. 

A bombardier. 
Gunfliot, or the fpace (• 
whichafliot can be tfarovm. 

* ■ ■ • . 

Matrofs, alfo a gunner, ^r 

cannoneer. 
Gunnery. 

General of (he artiller}'. 
A Volunteer. , 
Recruits. 
Scout. 

Sutler. 

A marauder, a foldic^ that 

goes a marauding. 
Ki^lerdrum. 
The infantry. 
Cavalrv. 
Light-horfe. 
The vanguard. , 
The main body of an army. 
The rear. . , 

The corps de referve. 
The corps de guard. 
The piquets of an army, or 

piquet guard. 
The wing of an army. 
Battalion* ^ 

Deftacaminto. 



G RAM M A R. 



/ 



4S 



JFila da Rcciaguards^ ^ 

Dereita^ 

E^uerda^ 

Tempos^ 

Exercicio, 

Fechos^ 

Cao ou Perro da Armm^ 

Cronha^ 

A bicfiL da Arma^ 

cdno^ 

Varita^ 

PellotaS, 

Batalkao^ 

Ala, 

l)evisaSf 

Linha ou Fiteira, 

Cafadora^^ 

Flanco^ 

Mstado Mayor y 

Frente^ 

Jnfantaria Ligtita^ . 

m^ulamentcM^ 



B,ear rank*^ 

Right. 

lift. 

Motions. 

Exercife. 

Lock. 

Cock. 

Butt. 

Muzzle. ^ 

The barrel. 

Ramrod. 

Trigg^. 

Piatoon. 

Battalion. 

Wing. 

Divifion. 

Line. 

Riflemen. 

Flank. 

Staff. 

Front. 

Light infantry. 

Rc|;ulationf» 



\ - 



*m$ i i i» 



\ 



tm .1 



Palavras ^e Can»x»do. Military wordioJQommand. 



Sentido^ 

Armas ao Homiro^ 

DesCanfar sabre as ArmitSf 

M$t€T as Baypnttas^ 

Apreseniar as Armas^ 

Calar as Bayoneias, 

Descanfar as Armas\ 

Tirar as Bayonetaji^ 

Cruzar as Armas, 

Prtparar^ 

Carregar, 

Ttrar o Cartucho^ 

E4corvar^ 

Tiraf as VareUp^ 

Atuchar o Cartuch$^ 

ArmasdCata^ , 



Attention. 
3houlder arms. 
Order arms. 
Fix bayonets. 
Prefent arms. 
ChsCrge bayonets. 
Support arms. 
Unfix bayonets. 
\ Pile arms. 
Make reajy. 
Load; 

Handle cartridge. ' 
Prim'e. ^ 
Draw ramrods. 
Ram down cartridge^ 
Fire*. 

Prefent. 



Meii 



er 



44 PORT 

Miter e carticho^ ' 

logo por pellotS£St 

Fogo de Filas, 

Alto^ 

Format em linhe^ 

Fogo obliquo^ 

Formar^ 

Marcha, . 

Ordem cerrada, 

DesfiUr, ' 

Columna cerrada^ 

Man volta d esquerda^ 

Foliar, 

Avanfar^ 

Cerrar as FiUiras^ 



U G UE5 E 

• 

Caft about. 

furing by platoons* 

File firing. 

Halt. 

To form in line. 

Oblique firing. 

Fonn. 

March. 

Clofe order. 

To file. 

Clofe column. 

On your left backward wheel. 

Wheel. 

Advance. 

Clofe the ranks* 



Navegagao. 

Navio, ' 

Ndo, 

Ndo de guerra, 
Navio ae carga^ on mer- 
cantile 
Navio veleirOf 

Navio ronceiroj 

Gale\ 

Galedfa, 

Galeao, 

Galeita, 

Comitre, 

Fragdta, 

Carraca^ 

Fiijla, 

Ptndfat 

B&rca de pajfagem, 

Barco^ 

Bdrca, 

Canoa, 

Gond$la, 

E/quife, 

Chaliipa, ou baldndnif 

Chalipa pequina^ 



f ■ " 



Navigation. 

A (hip. ^ 

A laige (hip. 

A line of battle (hip. 

A merchant-Aip» a mer- 
chantman. 

A very good failcr, or a ftip , 
that fails well. 

A bad failer. 

A galley. 

A galleafs. 

A galleon. 

A galliot, a fmall galley. 

The boatfwain o( a gaHey. 

A frigate. 

A carrack. 

AfoifJ. 

A pinnace. 

A ferry-boat. 

A boat. 

A bark, great boat. 

A canoe. 

Gondola, a fmall boat, much 
ufcd in Venice, 

A(kiff. 

A (loop. 

A (hallop. 

Bergantim, 



G RAM MA R. 



4$ 



Bergantim, 

Balfa^ *' 

Capitdnia^ 

Almirdnta^ 

Armada^ 

Frota^ 

Efquadra^ 

A bordOf - 

Proa, 

Pcfas de proa para dar cafa 

do inimigo^ 
Tart ana ^ 
BruiSu, 
PatdxOf 
Falua, 

Batel, or bateira^ 
Ca rave la, 
Sirte dt pataxo pdrajervigo 

de hUrna ndo deguirra^ 
Nad de linha^ 
iSrudrda cojta^ 
Gale Ota da qualje I an f am as 

bSmbas^ 
Navio que Jirve para andar 

a corji^ 
Cor/ano^ 
' Hyaae, 

Navio de tranfpirte^ 
Ndo da India Oriental^ 
Nao da India Occidental 
Sirte de ernbarcafid pequena 
Hallandeza dekum so mafiro^ 
Navio para levdr carvdo^ 
EnUfdritafiens pequinas^ • 
, Embdrcafao^ ou barcogrdnde 
' f^ Jirve pdra levar fa» 

%endas a bbrdo^ 
EmbarcagdB grdnde, ou ca- 
• ravcta^ que serve pdra 

commercedr pella cifia^ 
Embarcagad de avizo^ 
Paquete\ 
BArco de pescar, 
^ Ldncha^ 



A brigantine, or brig, 

A float. 

The admirars (hip. 

The vice-admiral's (hip. 

A fleet, a navy. 

A fleet of merchant (hips. 

A fquadron, partof a fleet.^ 

On board. 

The poop, flern, or fteeragt. 

The prow, ^r head. 

Chafe guns. 

A tartan. - ; 

A fire-(hip. 

A patache. 

A felucca. . 

A fmall bark, a wherry. 

A caravel. 

A tender. 

A line of battleo(hip. 
A guard -(hip. 
Bomb-ketch. 

Acruifer. " 

A privateer. 

Yacht. 

A tranifport. 

£aft India»mah. 

Weft India.(hip. 

A Dutch dogger. ' 

• ^ : ' 

A collier. 

Small craft. 

A barge, a lighter. 



A coafting vefleU 



Advice-boat. 
Padcet-boat. 
A fi(hing-boac. 
Boat. 



\.. 



Ktmft^^ 



44 PORT 

Miter o carticho^ 

Fogo por pellotoe'Sf 

Fogo it FtlaSf 

jiito, 

Formar em linhc^ 

Fogo obliquo, 

Formar, 

Marchdt . 

Ordem cerrada^ 

DesfiUr, 

Columna cerrada^ 

Meia volta a e'squerda, 

Vcltar, 

Avanfar, 

Cerrar as FiUiras, 



U G U E5 E 

Caft about. 

Firing by platoons* 

File firing. 

Halt. 

To form in line. 

Oblique firing. 

Fonn. 

March. 

Clofe order. 

To file. 

Clofe column. 

On your left backward wbeol. 

Wheel. 

Advance. 

Clofe the ranks. 



Navcgagao. 

NavtOf 

Ndoy 

Ndo de guerra, 

Navio de carga, ou mer^ 

cantil^ 
Navio veleirOf 

Navio ronceiro, 
Gale\ 
Galedfa, 
Galeio^ 
Galeota, 
Comftre, 
Fragdia, 
Carraca, 
FUJla, 
Ptndfa, 
. Birca de pajfagem^ 
Barco^ 
Bdrca^ 
CanSa, 
Gond$la, 

Efquife, 

Chalipa, ou baldndrq^ 

Chalipa pequina, 



Navigaden. 

A (hip. ^ 

A large (hip. 

A line of battle (hip. 

A merchant-Aip, a mer- 

chantman. 
A very good failcr, or a (hip 

that fails well* 
A bad failer. 
A galley, 
A galleafs. 
A galleon. 

A galliot, a fmall galley. 
The boatfwainof'a gaHey. 
A frigate. 
A carrack* 
Afoift. 
A pinnace. 
A ferry-boat. 
A boat. 

A bark, great boat. 
A canoe. 
Gondola, a fmall boat, mttch 

ufed in Venice. 
A(kiff. 
A (loop. 
A (haliop* 

Berganiim, 



G RAM MA R 



4$ 



Berganitm, 

Bai/dy ' 

Capitdnia^ 

Almirdnta^ 

Armada^ 

Frota, 

Efquadra^ 

A bordo, • 

f'Spti, 

Proa, 

Fcfas de pr 6a para dar cafa 

do inimigo^ 
Tart ana ^ 
BruloU^ 
Patdxo^ 
Falua, 

Batel, or bateira^ 
Ca rave la, 
Sirte de pataxo pdra/ervigo 

de hima ndo deguirra^ 
Nad de linha^ 
Gudrda cojta^ 
Galeota da qual/e Idnfamas 

bSmbas^ 
Navio que Jirve p&ra andar 

a corfo^ 
Corjarxo^ 
Hva^e, 

Navio de tranfpirte, 
Ndo da India Orientdl^ 
Nao da India Occidental 
Sirte de embarcafio pequena 
Hoilandiza dekum so majiro^ 
Navio par a levdr carvao^ 
EnUfdrtafiens pequenas^ . 
EmidrcafaS^ ou barcogrdnde 
'' f^ Jirve pdra lev&r fa^ 

%endas a bordo^ 
Embarcagdd grdndtj ou ca- 
• ravcla^ que serve pdra 

commercedr pella cifia^ 
Embarcagad de avizo^ 
Paquete\ 
Bdrco de pescar^ 
LdncAOf 



A brigantine, or brig. 

A float. 

The admirars (hip. 

The vice-admiral's ihip. 

A fleet, a navy. 

A fleet of merchant fiiipi • 

A fquadron, part of a fleet,- 

On board. 

The poop, fiern, or fteeragt. 

The prow, or head. 

Chafe guns. 

A tartan. - ; 

A fire-fliip. 

A patache. 

A felucca. . 

A fmall bark, a wherry. 

A caravel. 

A tender. 

A line of battle* fliip. 
A guard-fliip. 
Bomb-ketch. 

Acruifer. * . 

A privateer. 

Yacht. 

A transport. 

£aft India»man. - 

Weft India.fliip. 

A Dutch dogger. ' 

A collier. 

Small craft. 

A barge, a lighter. 



A coafting veflel. 



Advice-boat. 

Padcet.boat. 

A fi(hing-boat. ,. 

Boat. 



Remax^ 



♦ % 



PORTUGUESE 



49 

Simos. 

Pa do fim0^ 

Sentina^ 

Laftr^. 9u Z^ffiK 

Laftdr, ou Umfar'la/lp0m To balM a (hip. 



Oars. 

The blade of the oar. 
The well. 
Ballaft. 



A triaft. ^ • 

The main maft. 

The mizen mafi. 

The fore maft. 

Tha iMwrpcift, #r bok(pci». 

The roinid-top^ naMMOfw or 

fcuttle of a maft. 
The keel. 
A yard. 
The vard-arms. 



MofhpM^ or inw^rtp, 
Majlrogrdnde^ 

Maftrodo HtۤiHkf 

Gurupes^ 

Givea^ 

Ouilha, 

rerga^ ou tntind^ 

LaiZf ou extremid0dt4 dm 

Prdnchas^ que cih r um ok Side-planks, orfideof afli^ 

costddos do navia it^pirH 

defira* 
Vela* 
Vila mijtra,^ or m vfU (k The main fiieet, 

mqftro grdnd^ ' 
Vila da Gdvea^ 
Vila do joanete 4^ wdfipQ 

grander 
Papaj^igos^ 
Mezena, 

Gala, ou vela d$ eimm dk Mizen-taji-*l«iL 
mezena^ 



A fail. 



The main-top-fail. 
Iftuft-lOfNgaUaAt.iaik 

The mizon and foreJGiSi 
Mizen-failJ 



Traquite^ 

Velicho, ^ 

yoanete do traqiiite^ 

Cevadiira^ 

Vilalattnai 

Fa%erforf(^ dk ^Ha^ 

Mqftareos, The lo|HPaft«^ 9^ l0irpUftnt< 

mafis. 
Majlario i# IIMUM^ Wr m$r Mi^W-topHmiU 



Tbd fim4aik 

Tbei^Bt.{a«l. 

A (hwM^ of QHitio% fiA» 



Jlareo da gita^ 
PoTtinhbla^ ^ 
Bandeiras^ 
Flimmuias ou g/ttkfpJ^Hs^ 



ApoiihMey 
The colousfl^ 

Streamers, pendant^. 



By wda is Qt^a»69^c$ ineant the Aip itself. 



JgilkM 



Q%,XU MAR. 



4¥ 



Bttacola^ 

Cu^ftck fdrriia^ 

EfcotilkdB^ 

Cqflillo de popa, 
Caftillo de j^rQ4k. 
Garrar a W^Q^v * 

« 

dncora, 

Mttir a dncora n^ Id^iOt 

. ou boUdepois de Uvwtih* 

dncora de e/Pir^n^A% 
Unkas da dncora^ 
Argila da dncora^ 
Enir a dncQra a piqw^x 
jimdrr0^ 

Picar^ ou coridr as s^mAi^^A^ 
Sonda^ ou prumo, 
Cutelos^ 

Bqfina^ - 

Prepdrdr hum naviQi 4^ pfr 

fas^ cdrdaSf &c. 
Piloio, 
ETcrivad^ 
Pilotdgem^ 
Carta de maredr^ 
Capitis. . 
GfpitdS (Anif^^, 
Ct(ntramejlre. 
AfarinheirOf 
Camarite. 
Marinhetr^^Uth,Uima^4dw 

Jormenta. 
Borrdfca. 
fi^nanfa. 
talmaria, 



The mariner'toMpftbi 

Bitude. 

Thft (wnt oC » iypw 

Helm, or rudder. 

The whip, (»r whip-iftft 

Deck. 

F4ufli fore and aft. 

The batches ; fimtlba. 

A room by the hatches^ t« 

keep the prq^iftdlM*, 
The hmd caftle. ^ 

The iov9 ctAk^ 
To dnne ; or Miktm % fkkp 

drags her anclwif « 
The anchor* 
To boat the anchoiCk 

A kfi4gf V. 

Sh«et wi^ou 

The flooju 0t£ v% mcIwL. 

The ring of a^ anchou 

Is for the apchortghtai ymt 

A cable* 

TocutthjC cables. 

The founding Iead# 

Studding fails* 

The tide. 

A fpeaking tmmpet. 

To rig a (hip. 

J?iIo4.'«f ^mmm^ 

A purfer* 

Seab'Cmrt. 
A captain* 

A ho^ibmim^ 
Afiiilai. 

A C^MIb^ ' 

A meflmater 

A tempeft* 
A ilorm. 
fair weather. 
Cain. 

r4nto 



48 PORTIPGUESE 

Viniotm pipa^ 



Nawo arraf&io em popdy 

. DerrSlay 
Alar a bolina^ 

It pda bolina^ 

No da holina^ 
BarlavintOy 
Ganhdr a barlavento^ 
Barlaventidr^ ou dtitar a 

barlaventOy 
' Sotavento^ 
^Jcovens^ 
EfcStaSt 
t^eldme, cordas^ e o mdis qut 

he necejfario para pre- 

par at hum navio^ 
Qirda, 
Enxdrcias, 
Arribar^ 
Bombordo^ • 
Efttbirdc, 

Li. 

Meter de 16, 

Bomba. 

Bar a bSmba, 

B&lde p&ra deitir igva na 

bomha^ 
Efcdma que sake da bomba 

depots de ter tirddo a 

dgoa, 
Navioj cUja igoaje nao pide 

tirdr com a bomba. 
Manga de couro por onde 

fine a igoa da bdw^a, 
Brifo da bSmba, ' 
FarSi, 
Vinto, 



The wind full a-ftern, a fore- 

wjnd. 
A (hip that fails before the 

wind. 
The coutfe, or way of a (hip. 
To (harp the main bowling, 

to ]baul up the bowling. 
To tack upon a wind, fail 

upon a bowling. 
The bowling knot. 
Windard. 
Togct the wind. 
To ply to windward. 

Leeward. 
Hawfers. 
Tacks. 

Tackle, or tackling, the rig- 
ging of a (hip. 

A rope. 

Shrouds. 

To put into a harbour. 

Larboard. 

Starboard. 

Loof. . 

To loo& or keep the (hip 

nearer the wind. 
A pump. . 
To pump. 
Pump-can. 

Pumpfuck. 



A (hip that is ftoaked. 

Pump-dale. 

The 'pdmp handle. 

Lieht, lantern, or Uehthottfe. 

wind. 



R66 



<<j:r a mm aa. 



410 



■m \ mm *J •-■ 



R6sa da Agiilha^ ^ 4e^ 
VcntQi. 

Norte^ 

jNorte j^a nordifle^ 

Nor nordejtf^ 

'^lf$rdefie4^ a nMt^ 

fJordme,} 

HordefU /^a lefie, . 

JUsndrdejie^ 

JJfU. 4^ a'nbrdffitf" 

Susuefte^ •'^*' 

. Sul /^a suejle^ 

Suit ••'• 

Sul 4* a sudoifte^ ■^'■ 

Sufudoefte^ -•••' 

Sudoe/teif^Ml^ -^-:'^:''\^ 
. Sudoifte^ 

Sudoijtc 4' a oifU^ • ' 

Ces sudoejte^ - - 

Oefte 4' a sudoSftcr 

0(fu, 

OifU 4* a noToifte^ 

Ois noroS/te^ 

Noroefte 4' a oifie^ 

Noroifte, ^ ' ' :^ 

Noroefu ^ a nortCt 

'Nor noroefte^ 

N6rie 4* a naroefU^ 

Vento travifSt PR fraveffi^^ 
Dar a emiarcagao (i travifs^, 
Pairdr^ . 

Esf0r4^, 
Colher hum cibo^ 
Largdr mats cibo^ 
Ahrtr dgoa^ - 
Faxir ag&ida^ 
Arpdo, 



' ■ t 



* \ 



.\ 



\ 



■> .. . 



» ' • ■ •! » . • 









7%e Fiy of the Mati»^^ 

^; by E. 
N. N. E. 
N. E. by N. 
N..E.. . 

•N. E:i)y :£. 

•E. N;«/ . 
E. by N. 
Eaft. 
E. by S. 
£• S. £• 
S. E. by E. 
S. E: 
S. E. by S. 

■fi: «:£.■■•■■ ' 

S.byS; 

South. ' 

S.byW. 

S. S.W. , . 

S. W. by S. 

S.W. 

S. W.byW. . 

W. S.W. 

W.byS. 

Weft. 

W. by N. 

W.N. W. 

N. W.byW. , 

N.W. 

N.W.byN. 

N. N. W. 

N. by W. 

Contrary wind. 

To hull. ' 

To ply to and again *a ami'* 

ftation. 
Beak. 

To toil a cable. 
To pay more cable. 
To leak, or fpring a leak. 
To take in frefli water. 
A grapple. 



■A 



P O R T U G tJ ES E 



50 

Arpdr hum navio^ 

Pedfo de lona breada que se 
poem ao redSr do mdftp e 
das bombas para que a 
dgoa nio penctre^ ; * 

PaffadSr^ 

Cor da com quesepren4^oioU^ 
ou Idncha dpopa do navio, 
Afito, ; 

jtbadernas^ ' 
Abita^ \\ 

Emprodr^ 



Guinir o naviOf 

Parte superior^ ou mats dlta 

da pita de hum navio, 
ApagafanieSt 
Arreigidas^ 
Brioes^ 
BarredSuras^ 
BartidSurOy 
Bajtdrdot^ 
Bigota^ 
Botalos^ 
BraceSr^ 
' Brdgos^ 
Bragueiro^ or verguiiro. 
Bran does t 
Bugdrdas^ 
Cacholas^ 
Cadafte^ 
Caderndl^ 

Cavirnas^ 

Colhedores, 

Compafdr hum navii, 

Coffouros^ 

Crdca^ 

EJidr hum naviolanfddo d 

banda^ 
'Cabrefiante^ 
Darcdfa^ 



To ficrapple a (hip. 

Tarpaulin. - ' 



A fidd, or pin of ironio opea 

the ftrands of rope^ , 
Boat rope, or gift-rope# 

^ - "■ 

A boatfwain'ft call. ; 

Nippers. 

Bits. 

To fteer right farif^rd, to 
turn the prow ft^ght. for- 
ward. ^ 

To yaw or maka jaws. .^, 

The tiaffinrel. 

Leech-lines. 

_ • # 

Puttocks. 

Buntljnes. 

Bow-ftudding-faiii. 

Boat's ikit. 

Parrels. ^ 

A dead-eye. 

Studding-fail-boioms. 

To brace. , » 

Braces. > 

The rudder's rope^ 

Back-ftays. . ^ 

Breaft.hooks. 

Cheeks. 

Stand-poft. 

A large block with more ifa|9 

one (hive. 
The floor-timb^n's. 
Lines of the (hrouds. 
To triiT^ a fliip. 
Trucks. 
The . foulnefs of the {hq>*i 

bottom. 
Is for a (hip td heel. 



The capilan. 
.To chafe. 



Curtlci^ 



i n H A MJM' A. R. 



'/ 



Ml 



*•» ■>■ 



\s da guamifdif 
fmdes, 

iroie Jo cirurgidS^ 



« > • < 



» 
•^ 



The kneet • 
Chain* wales. 
Boat's (kit. 
ScupperJioies. 
The bold of a 0up. 
Hammock. ^ 
Detk i^r quarter-deck. 
Cockpitvi / 

Freignt* 



• < • f 



m fue o captido tttiht Sailing orders. 
radar dvi&t • ' '^ 
fdm de imbarcirft^ 

Iha navdif 



• V>| I 



^^ *•■«< , ^ M J 



« 'j • • • « 



Embarkation. 
Landmg. 
Embargo. 
Aiichdnige^ " 
Naval battle. 
c;//a mexertfueirHt^M 'de- A Ihip for efpiali or lodk out. 

To veer. 
Toftrikefail. 
Tb^ ftrike tlie flag^ 






ar, ou arreir, 

ir as vclas^ 

ir baniiirai • - 

ntSr firro^ leva^ dncp" To weigh Aachoir. 

r, levar firto^ Uvar^Ji^ 



levari 



i -n 



- • a '. • t A • 



•• i 



rr a pffa, 
de Uva^' <' 



'» ri 



The afiion of ilreiffbing ar 

taking up tb« jinenc^f. 
To move a gun tolMMs ftar*^ 

.board or brixMritv^^ 
Tbefignalgun. 



rar, ou levdr di reHfUi, To tow. 

To fplice. 

f«, * Voyage.* 

S cdjo capUiaoie^ cdrids Letters of marque 

represalias^ 



r cofiiraSf 

\gem, 

igeiro 






enar hUm navfo, 
r as coftiroi do navio^ 
a eijia^ 
:dr a nSB^ 

fragar^ 

frigior « • ' 

i9, on wifHre de ndi, ^ 



To careen a (hip. 
To pay the (earns of 9 0iip. - 
To run a.ground^r on ftore. 
Is form ihip to roll, ^r to float 

in rough v^ien "^ 
Tc fufier a wrieck^ to be 

wrbckeid. 
Shipwreck* . : 
Shipma&er% v v ^ 



PORTUGUESE 



52 

Carpenieiro dc naws% 
EHaUtro^ 
£mbaf cdr^ 
Embdrcdr, 

Grumete, 

Rapdx que ferve copto mof9 

do navio, 
R(iduz que Jerve ao cfi^ido^ 
Calajdte^ 

Calajetdr hum navto^ 
Cala/eiOt 
Arftn&U ou ribeira das ndos, 

Emmaftedr hum nofviQt 

Remdr^\ 

Remador^ 

Forgddo^ , 

lenjeira^ 
(arinheiroit f i^da a ^uifA 
genu quepertinudo navipf 

Chu/ma^ 

Guarnifdo da ndo^ 

"• . - . - - . . . . 

JokritKirga-do navU, 

J9alepih4tir 

QuadrdjkU^ 

Outdnte^ '-' ' » 

I^^rer^ 

Paravdnte^ 

Situa^dd de hima eifla^ ilha, 

&c. a re/petto dfi quatquir 

outro tugdr^ 
Qjuarente^ar 
£aliza, 
Ldrga^ 
Amardri 
Cafdr a vi/Mf 

Cacear hum navU^ 



Zanfdf hum nwU 4^ nAr^ 



I J 



Shipwright. 

Stocks. 

To {hip. 

To ^ aboard, to i^ ili^ 

pmg. 
The meaneft fort of railoiBl; 
» or ferrant to the failoi»« 
Ship-1^. 

A cabin-boy. 
A calker* 

Tocalkafcif- 

Oakham.' , 

An arfenal; a ftore-houfti 

dock-yard. 
To fit a fliip, or .y^elt Willi 

mafts. ; , 

Tx>ffow:.. 

Rower. 

Galley-flave«i . ^ 

Steward. . , 

The crew of % ft^p, ,;. . . ; 

• . ■■ -••>■. 

Crew of gallfty flavor 

M^nnes, foldier$ w^ fov* 

on board of (hips. /' 
Supercargo. 
Croft.ftaff. - . . 

Siiadrant. 
alley's quadr^iil^ 
Aft. 
Fore. 
The bearing. \* 



\ ■ 






; Quarantine. 

Sea mark. 

Larffe. 

To hear qC 

To turn the fail to Htm vini 
fide. i, ^ 

It is faid of a fliip that is hur« 
ried away from hcrtomfi 
by flrong winds 9 tideSi £?^ 

To launch a ihip* 

ToWrtwair; * \ i 

^ hUrif 



: 6 R^ MM A R^ I 

Entrdr com vtnU fresco V To bear in tfae litHiour*' 

bom no potto ^ 



5S 



Birdo^ 

Birdo^ ou bdnda^ 

Navio dt alto bordo\ 

Cifa^ 

Pre/a, ou tomadia^ 

Efldr dt vtrgaddlto^ 



Tact. 

'Broadfide* 

Fifft rate mait of wai, 

Chace. 

Prize, or captQre. v 

To ftand for the6ffing. 



Vint OS dt monctm^ ou girotit Tr^d^ winds* 

Anddr dt conferva^ To keep company together. 



jDar, oxxfazir humtirdo. 



to fail under a convoy. 
To tack tde {hip, #r tack 
about, or to bring her head 
about. 
Efidr a capa^ ou porfe £" To lie by at fea, to back the 
cdpa 



fails. 



t-*^ 



«a 



Do Coniiii6Tcio,.e do que Iht Of Tradt^ and of Things re^ 



pert£nce 

CSnta, 

Conta dtvindaf 

Fazcr h4ma cSnta^ 

Ptdir contaSf 

Daraconta^ 

CSnta corrinttf 

Dinhtiro dt contddo, 

Fundes Publicos^ 

qut ntgocia tm comprit t Jobber 

vtndtr acfdnSf 
BalldnfOf 
Fdrdo^ 
Mdnco^ 
BanqutirOf 
(hiiora^ 

ralido, ou fuebrddo^ 
^^ff^f ou concerto^ 
irica^ 
Portador^ 

LanfadSr^ 

que Idnfa mais^ 

Letra dt cdmbio^ 



lating to it^ 

Account. 
Account of falet. 
To caft up an account. 
To call to an account. 
To pay on account. 
Account current. 
Ready money. 
Stocks. 



Balance* 
B^Ie. 
Bank. 
Banker. 
Bankruptcy. 
*^ Bankrupt. 
Bargain., 
Barter. 
Bearer. 
Bidder. 

Out bidder. ' 

Bill of exchange, a draught. 



Ntgocidr h4ma Utra diiim^ To negotiate a bill of ex. 



Ho. 
CSnta, 
Partida, 
Conhidmlnto^ 



change. 
Bill. 
Parcel. 

Bill of lading. 
•Dj 



EJmttiTV 



54 P 0,RTV GVESE 

Efcrit&r4ii4^ abrigagao^ Boadi engagement; 

GudrJaiivroSt ou o que em Boo^-keepe^• 

kima cdsa de negocto iem 

a feu cargo os Itvros^ 
Occupafio^tx negicio. 
Comprador^ 
Dinheiro^ 
Pirte^OMcarreto^ 



Bufinefs. 
Buyer. 
Cafli. 
Carriage! 



Caxeiro, ou o que gudrda a A caOuer, or cafli-keeper 

caixa^ , • ' 

CentOf 



Certiddfff 
^ Vdnibio^ - 
Fre^uex. 
Gaftos^ 
BardtOt 



^ 



Recibo da aljandega^ 

CQmmiffiL9^ 

Mercancta^ 

CompromijfQ:^ 

Con/i^nafdo, 

Confumo^ 

Conteidot 

Contrdto^ 

Correfbondintia^ 

Gorrejpondente^ 

Preco^ 

Alfandega^ 

Guardas d' alfdndega^ 



Cenh 

CerrificMe. 

Change, exchange* 

Chap, chapman, or cuftomer. 

Charges. 

Cheap. " 

Dear. 

Clearance, or cocktt. 

Commilfion, 

« 

Commodity. 

Compromife. 

Conugnment. 

Confumption. , . 

Contents. 

Contraa, 

Correfppndcnce* 

Correlpondent. 

Price, rate,. 

Cufiom-hpufe. 

Cuftom-houfe officors. '^ 



Guardas que ejldo vtgidnda Tidefmen, or tide waikH* 
aie que os navios^fftejao 
de/carregddos, 



Feitoria^ 

EfcritorU^ 

CreditOf 

AcredSr^ 

Correnie, 

Co/turn^ 

Data^ 

ContratadSTf 

Xrdffgo, oMjnegkiQ. 

Dividat 

DevedSr^ 

Dinheiro defemb^tcdd^t 

, ^ • * *■» 



; ^ i < 



L^^ 



/-•"• *» 



Fa£lory, fettlement, 

Countmg.faoufe. 

Credit. 

Creditor. 

Current. 

Cuftom. 

Date. 

Dealer». 

XX^^Hog, traffiek* 

Debt. 

Debtor. , ^ 

Disbttrfement. 

Dtfcount* 

BxtriSo, 



X 



- -tJ R A M MAR. 

• » • 

Jbinkeiro que ft pagd ads Primage. 

marinheiros pof tSrem 

carregddo o navio, 
Capital^ 

Fir das c ddnos, 
Impottdncia^ 
Importancialiquida^ 
Promejfa^ 
Bens, 

Pontualiddde^ ' 
CSmpra^ 
Rectio, 
Re&dmbiOf 

Arbitro^^OM louvddo^ 
Louvamento^ ou arbitrto^ 
RegatdOf 
Quitafdd^ 
Remijsa^ 
Venda das coufaspor miida^ 

comajdzem as mercadires 

de retalho^ 
Mercador de retdlho^ 
Riquezas, 
Venda^ 

Padrdo^ \ 

AmSftray 
Sinfie^ 
Ldcre^ 
. AjuJlaminU^ de cinias^ 

Mercador ^e tern toja^ 

Livro em que o mercador de Shop-booK. 

loja temfuas cSntas^ 
ContrabandiJ{a\ 
Fazinda de conirahindo^ 



SV 



Principal, or capital. 

Lodes and damages. 

Proceed. 

Neat proceed. 

Promife. 

Property. 

Punctuality; 

Pui'chafe. 

Receipt. 

Re-exch^nge. 

Referee or umpire. 

Reference. 

Regrater. 

Releafe. 

Remittance. 

Retail. 



lletaiter. 

Riches, wealth. 

Sale. 

A pattern. 

Sample. 

Seal. 

Sealing-wax. 

Settlement of tccoiintl^ 

Shop. 

Shop-keeper. 



\ 



Fazer cohttabdndo\ 



Smuggler. 

Contraband, or probibitedf 

goods, goods imugglc4» of 

rtin. 



To run, to fmuggle 
good^. 
Modelo^ eu Jiil dos pizos e Standard meafure. 

t^ J L^ Lt' 




medietas piblicas^ 
Armazem or Almazifih 
Sobrefcreverite^ 
Sobjcrip/do^ 
Tara, 
Fazindd rom. 



Warehoafc. 

Subfcriber.. 

Subfcription. 

Tare. 

Trafh of goods< 






Risc$s 



P OR t VGU E H R 



6« 

InveniariOt 

In/u^cienda, oufdlta it 

meyospara pagart 
Factira^ 
Arras^ 
Efcritura dc arrendaminto^ 

Arrendador./ 

Livro de razidi^ 

Empre/limOt 

Dinheiro cmpreftddo^ 

Cdrta^ 

Sobrefcrito da cdrta^ 

Fechdr hutna cdrta^ 

FechdrhUma carta comjinite^ 

Mala em que o correii trda as 

cartas^ 
Hypoihecat 
Acredor hypOtJucirioi 
que hypothlca\ 
Fiador^ 
Pagamento^ 
Falta de pagamenta^ 
EfcrUo ie Mvida^ 
Dono^ ' 
Pacote^ 
Serapilhcirat 
Brahinte, 
Mdgo ae cartas^ 
Compankeire de alguem np 

negocio, onjocio, 
Sociedade, ou companhia n$ 

negido^ 
PenhSr, 
Contrdto do fegiro dc mer-^ 

cancids^' 
Seg^ro, • "^ 

Segurar^ 

Protejiar Mma leira^ 
Ateitdr huma letra/ 
ProtefiOf 
Smear Aimaittra^ 



*•» 



Inventory* 
Infolvencjr. 



JokilurOrf 

L«ffee. * ' 

Ledger-bodk. 

Loan. 

Money letiki 

Letter. 

The direction of a letter. 

To taakc or tlo^Sip H kttef • 

To make and fetl tip alettttf* 

Mail, 

• ■ 

Mortgage* 

Mortgaged. ' 

Mortnerer. 

Bail. ^, 

Payment. 

Non-payment. s 

Note, or ptoinlffatf iKftr. 

Owner. 

Pack< a trdk. 

Packcloth, wrapper. 

Packthread. 

Packet of letteirfr. 

Partner. 

Partnerfhip. 

Fawn, <7r ple^lfB.* 
Policy of murantt; 



Inrurance. 

To infure. 

To proteft a tulh^ 

To accept a bill* 

Proteft. 

To draw a bill. 



, A » V» 



/ 



Correoaonde/elanfSoasedrtas Poft-office. 

Correo que leva. cirta9^ . Poft-man, or letltt' tslftfJMr. 

Porte de cartas, Poftagc. 

Premio ou dinheiro ^wtjh Premium. 

BiniSir0 






» • r 



=t>R A M M A R. 

toinheiro que ft pagd ads Primage. 

marinheiros pof terem 

carregddo o navio^ 
Capital^ 

Pirdas e danos^ 
Impottdncia^ 
Importancialiquida^ 
Promejfa^ 
Bens, 

Pontualidide^ 
Compra, 
Recibo, . . 
Re&dmbio^ 

jirbitro,' ou louvdao^ 
Louvamento, ou arbitrio^ 
Regatdo, 
Quitafdd^ 
Remijsa^ 
Venda das coufas par miida^ 

comajdzem os mercadires 

de retalho^ 
Merc a dor de retdlho^ 
Ri^uezas^ , 
Venda, 

Padrdo, ' \ 

AmSftroy 
Sinfie^ 
Ldcre, 
.Ajujiaminto^ de cinias, 

MercadSr ^e tern toja^ 

Livro em que o mercador de Shop-booki 

loja temfuas tpntas^ 
Contrabandtfta\ 
taxenda de conir&l&ndo^ 



%i 



Principal, or capital. 

Lodes and damages. 

Proceed. 

Neat proceed. 

Promife. 

Property. 

Punctuality; 

Pui'chafe. 

Receipt. 

Re-exchknge. 

Referee or umpire. 

Reference. 

Regrater. 

Reieafe. 

Remittance. 

Retail. 



lletaifer. 

Riches, wealth. 

Sale. 

A pattern. 

Siample. 

Seal. 

Sealing-wax. 
Settlement of tccounts^ 
Shop. 

Shop-keeper. 



••. ^ ♦. 



Fazer contfnbdndo. 



Smuggler. 

Contraband, ^r probibitedf 

goods, goods imuggic4» 0f 

rtm. 
To run, to fmuggle pi 

good^. 



Modelo, eu Jiil dos pizos e Standard meafure. 

medidas publicas, 
Armazem or Aimazemt 



Sobrefcrevente^ 
Sobjcrip/do^ 
Tara, 
Faz^dd rotm, 



Warehoafc. 

Subfcriber.. 

Subfcription. 

Tare. 

Trafh of goods< 



■•■':A t'l 

S - T 






£8 



PORTUGUESE 



R(fco. 

Ufufdrio^ 
mra, 

MercancidSf 

Avaria^ 

Diratos^ 

TribHto, on contributfdo^ 

Tdxas^ 

Stfa. 

Siftiro, 

Cdes^ 

Dircito quefe pdga^por de/i 

embarcirfazindas nocaes^ 
Collector do mi/mo direiio^ 

ou tribHiOf 
DizimoSf , < 

Dizimador, ou dizimciro^ 
Lou fa tndrida^Jtm J^r da 

China^ 
Mercador deatacddo^' 
Venda qucfefazpor partidas^ 

Da Mo^cla, ^s Dinheiro Por- 
.tugijfiz. • 

Thii mark * is prefixed 

* Real, 

Des reis, '- , 

Vintem, 

Tofido^ Qu 5 vintems, 

iiofidtns, ou hum crufado^ 
rutado novo^ ou Hj^mntems, 
8 Tvjoens, - 

Huin quarto de Suro, ou 12 
ioflms, 

* mitreis, ou 10 to/leens, 
16 TofioenSf 

Mtya, moida de ouro, 
S^aoo, ou 32 tqftoens, 
moida de ouro de 4,800^ 
Pifa de 6,400. 

ou 12,900.'. 

4 



Rifle. 

Intersil. 

Ufance. 

Ufurcr. • 

Ufury. 

Wafer. ' 

Wares. " 

Worth, or value. 

Average. 

Duties or cuffiom. 

Cefs, tribute^ 

Taxes. 

Excife. 

Exciletnan. 

Wharf. 

Wharfage. 
Wharfinger. 

Tithes. 

Tithe-gatlierer. 
Dutch ware. ^ 

• 

Wholefale dealer. 
Wbolefale. 



Of the Portuguefc Coin* 

to the imaginary money. 

A ree, equal to 7^^/. 
10 rees, l^irf. 
A vintin, i^^^. 
A t^ftoon, 6\d. 
A crufade, si. 3^. 
A new crufade, 2j. 87^. 
8 tefioons, 4J. 6d* 
12 teftoons, 6j. ^d. 



A milree, ^$. y^d. 
16 tefioon8y^9^. ^, 

Half moidore, i^i. 6^. 
32 tefioons, 18 J. ' 
A moidore, i/. /x. 
Joanefe, 1/. tSs. ' 
128 tefioons, 3/.. 19/^. 



v\ 



? • ' • » ♦. 



G R A MM A It. 



S9 



■•— 1- 



C O L L E C 



D£. 



/ 0* 



5A0 



Adigios Portugueses. 
jf A'goa dd^ a dgoa leva, 



Na dgoa tnvSIta pifta pef- 



ca 



dSr, 



Eftd c6mo petxe if &goa^ 
Trazir a dgoapdra moinho^ ' 
Levdr igoa do mdr^ 
As igoas tfidd biixas, 
^ gue nao podt aljit^ dives 

foffrer^ 
Come cSmo hum aldrve^ 
Meter a pdlha na albdrda^ 
AiataS iofiddo antes morio 
- auecanfido^ 
ffuma difgfdqa alcdnga a 

outra^ 
Efidr na aldea^ e nao ver as 

cdfas^ 



Quern traidlka, tern alfiya^ 
rallO'lheem dlkos^ rejponde^ 

me em bugdlhos^ 
Em tempo jnevddo dlho vale 

kumcavdllo^ 



.i.. 



fl' 



r V . 



COLLECTION 



OF 

Portuguefe Provcrbi. 

TTTHAT It ffot over the 

^^ devil's bck will be 
fpent under his belly; alfo 
lightly come^ liffhtfy go. 

To fi(h in troub&d waters, 
(to make a benefit of pub« 
lie troubles.) 

He lives in cloVer. 

To bring grift to the null. - 

To carry coals to Newcafile. 

{le or yx^ is at a low ebb. 

What can't be cured muft bft 
endured. 

He eats likA a ihrefhicr. 

To cheat, to impbfe ^upon. 

A dark forrel horfe will die 
befoire he'll jade. 

One mifchief draws on ano- 
ther. 

We fay ; you can't fee wood 

for trees: ^r to be like the 

butcher that looked fof hit 

kn^fe when he had it in his 

^ mo^lh• 

He that wbrks has farniture. 

I talk of chalk and yoo' of 

ipheefe. .. .' 

Garlic k in ithe foggy winillier 
is as good as a horfe ;^ it 
i^eans that ^Kck if a^ 
good defencefor ^travellers 
^\v^nft dampaeft and cold 
weather. " . . ! 

Tt%9 



•^ » 



6d 



P O R TUG UBS E 



Tito coma hum alho^ 



Sia clma, sia pdlma^ 



As ftiff as garlick ; t^at is a 
Wattfey, ftroBg, rebtift^r- 
fon; 

As you brew, even fo bake. 



Na almoida Um a barha At a fale keep your beard on 



quida 



Pagir OS altos de vasio. 



your 4iiiii> fill I if tbat is, 1ft 
not your beard wag too 
fad in bidding, left you 
overbid and repent. 
To have but little or no fenfe 
at air. 



Qucm dmaa.beltrdo^ ^^^^ Love me, love my dog. 
CAda qual lima sin senuU Like will to like, or l!k^ 



hdniCt 



loves to liker- 



TambimosatneafidoscSmem Threatened folks eat bread; 
piB^ we fay, threatened folks 

^ ^ live long. 

^Snias de pirto^ t amigos de Even reckonings make long 



Unge, 



fricDds, 



NHo se dtviperder a amizdJe An inch breaks t^ fquarcs. 
, par dd cd aquelld pdlkq^ 

'2^tt bom he fedro como seu Like raafter, like man. 

imOf 

Furidr carnefro, edaros We fay, to (leal a goefe and 

pis felloamSr de Diosi give tke giblets in almi. 

Kern hum dedofa% mdi^ nem One fwaflow does not wtkdkt 



fummer. Unahifuhdomon 
fac'U ver^ fays Horace, 
To fweep {lakes. 
Naareaabirtaojiftoplcca^ That is, it is opportunity 

that makes the thief* 
JDehum arguelrOfJazer hum We fay to make moomains 



kima andonnha verad^ 
tevdr pdlhasy e ardlhos^ 



' cavajtleiro^ 



of mole-hills. 



i^om drtt^ a com eng&no se That is, all a man's life is a 

vive meyo anno; com en- cheat. 

.; gdid^ e com arte si vive a ■ 

%tirafdrte, 

jQfiem a boa drvore se cAiga^ That is, he that relies on good 

tifd sSmbra o cibre worthy people, reaps a bt- 

• ' nefit. 

A'sfioiitSrtOf cevidaio rdbo^ A day after the fair, or after 

meat, mullard. 

Asho iqui tern Jimt^ cArdos ^ We fay, hunfr}* dogs will eat 

^mc, ' dirty pudcung. 

ssp^ 



\ 



GRAM ATrAlR. 



«1 



Sip^ 4i^ w/ »#? Hjit fir a 

Mats quero dsno que^e live; 
> qtUcatfdUif^Henuderrukii 

Miis val mdavinfa que i^ 

sentenfa^ 
Quern nap 4€ ^veniura^ nao 
AndMca^uilo^ netn enkm&la 
Nao deitis aectiie nofoga^ 
USca nao admiiU JiadoT^ 
JDa mdo a ioca M fifde a 

JEm boca cerrddm nao intra 

mSsca^ I 

Qjuem tern boca vdi a Rima^ 



Pilla bSca mirre o^pefx^^ 

Cdda bofariiiheSro loum ^^^ 

alfinetes^ .m- ..$ 
Huem teiH^auHr^9 egdftacin- 

co^ nao na miftirboU^ nem 

, ^ibolsinho^ , .^ 

jC^bdrvdipella vinhaforonde 

:;..V^/ « fn^y, vii.ajilha^ ' 

Matdr dStks c^lkosde Mma 

cajadada^' i,/ 
Quern cdnta^ sens mdUs ef- 

pdnias 



fieiidr a cdpa &0 i6uto^ 



yUta tlriy^ cM cda cdpa^ 



Good things are not fit for 

fools. 
Better be an old man's dar- 

ling» thaJR 9:]^4>iilig VlailVf 

warling. 
It is better td agree att«0f 

rate, than go to law. 
Nothing venture, nothing 

b^ve. 
Ho not t)}F0w oil into the fire. 
The >elly haa tf0 cars. 
Much falls between the cup 

and the lip. 
A clofe mouth catches no 

flies. 
That is, a man may go ainy 

where, if be has language 

to {peak for himfidf and 

aft: bis way. 
Much talking brings- much 

^lyoe. 
£vi^ Blan thinks tus ^mth 

geefe fwans. 
H^.^hat haih four andipisnds 

five bath no need of a 

purfe. 
Like father like fon* 

We fay, to kill two birds 
with one ftone. 

The perfon who fings maekes 
eafy his misfoTtuiies ; Uiat 
is, finging cattfes him not 
to reflefi on it fo much as 
he otherwife would. 

To throw one's cloak at the 
bull; that is, to ventjure 
all a man has to^ bve hip 
life. 

Let the king live, anddve 
roe the cloak ; that is fpo- 
ken of perfons who, under 
a pretence of authority, 
fob and phmder other peo- 
ple, ana at the fapse 43mc 



b't 



P O RTU GU ES E 



\ " . • 



JtkMr it cdpa eahiJa^ 

'^d& com raivu dt seu done 

Q^uem com c&ens st tdfffa^ €om 

pHtgaj 9t Uv&nta; ^< * 
J cirnt de^ lSb0 dinU dt cdi\ 



-.1 • • 



f^itmjat cdsa na- prdca, 
kuns diteni gut hi aUa, 
Sutros que At baixa^- ■ 



Aeavdllo dddo nao ilhts 

dintt, 
Qutm^jfutr caySllosem tdcha^ 

stnitUt St %cha^ 
Na tSrra dos ci^osy o tor to 

htriy^ 
Cobra boafdma^ t dtita^tt a 

-dormir^ 
Faxtr as conths stm a kos^ 

ptda^ 
Dd contddo comt libo^ 



i 1 



Em eisa dt ladrad naofdlles " 
tm corda^ 



Do tinr^ Ikt sd/um as tor^ 
rtas, , r : 



tice to the pbwer tefoM 

• m their handls. 

To be behind-hand in the 
world. 

A tx^d 4<3!g bites his own ttef- 
ter ; there is no t rafting to 

' madmen, ^rpeople inn ragcv 

We fay; lie with beggars and 
yoQ wiU get fleis* 

That is, to return raiUng for 
railing; or^ as our modern 
proverb fays, give hiin a 
Rowland for his Oliver^ 
the Latins fay, par pari 
rtferrti '^ \ •• • ■ ^ ^) 

That is, a man in public bu- 
finess can't pleafe every 
body; or as Solon fayMi 
'tis rare thai A^efmen can 

, all parties pleafe. 

Never look in tbe mouth •#( 
a gift horfe. . 

Tis a good lioffe that lievei' 
itunibles. 

In a country oWind men/he* 
that has one eye is the kidg^. 

When your' name is up, ^ou 
may lie a-bed till noon. ^ ' 

To reckon without the hof. 
tefs I ^r ^sx^efay, the hoft. 

The wolf eats of wbit. is 
counted ; that is, thieves 
will Aeal, though they 
know it will be mi flea, 
much mote if they thiid^ 
it will not. 

You (hould not mention a 
halter to any whofe rela« 
tjons or friends have fiif- 
fered by it ; that is, no man 
(hould be hit in the teeth 
of his dijgrace. 

The thongs come out of Us 

^ (kin^ t&t is, he pays for it. 

Cortdr 






x> 



GU&^M^^. 



9S 



Coridr o veftido confSrme » To cut one's coat according 



pAnno^ 



tot^ccfoth; 



Cridi c'Srvo^ Hrttif^S'/ld o It is faid of a perfon that, b^. 

jS/Ao^ ~ ing jreceived in difireia, 

' ' defrsliidi or grows too great 

f6r him that entertained 

' ' him. . ! 

Tinia cilpa tcni ^ fadrdS The receiver! ii as bid as the 
•' cdmd cofisentidSr, 



thief. 



Dddivas quetrdntio fhkqs. Gifts break rocks; that u, 

' . « kindrifefs overcomes tic 

. hardeil hearts; and bribes 

! .. ^^ prefents corrupt the 

' moft refolv>5d. 

Melhorhifaxirde.baldeque It is better to work for oo- 

tjlar ieb&lde^ | -v. :....t.__ ... , 

Dtitdr a%tite nojogff^ 



thing than be lazy and do 

nothing at all. , 

To inike bad worfe. Hotact 

fays, Oleum addtrt c amino. 

NaoheodemotamfeioScimo We fay, the Hon is not fo 



b pintao^ 



fierce as his picture. 



Primeiro sao denies^ que pa- We fay, near is my coat, but 
yintes^ ' tiearer is my fkin, 6?r. 7>- 

rente hyji, netis proxifnus 
Jum egomet mi At, 
La vdi a lihgoa, dnde o dinte To fcratch where it Uches.. 

grtta^ 
f^uafidO' c&idas meter o dente Harm watch, harm catch, 
cm segUTo\ iopariz o du ro^ Horace fays, 

> — etfragili quarens illi^ 

dere dent em ^ ^ 

— OJfehdet folido 

Ddr com alingoanos denies^ To contradift one's felf, to 

belie. v 

Qtiem nao Jhlla^ na0 o ouve A man may hold his tongue 
Deos^ in an ill time ; aljjc> fpare to 

fpeak and fpare to fpeed. 
Veniira te di Deos^filho ; God^ give you good luck, 
que saUr pSuco te vdfta^ child, for a little learning 

will ferve your turn ; be- 
caufe it is fortune that raif* 
' \ ' es men more than merit. 

CSdaqual porsi^e Deos por Every one for him felf, and 



todos^ 
Em tons dias, Has tbr&Sp 



God foe all. 
The better days the better 



H 



PORT v^ Of y BS E 



We fay, ' when two, Sufi4%t 
com^ together,, tliiif j^>t- 
ven 

. ^ „ Money ^governs the worl^. 

P h6mcfn> pfofStm% e Dios Man propofes. and God dif- 



Para diM it sai c$rij0i 
tuJo pide dinMrp^ ' * 



dispSem^ 
DirmecSmo hum argandx^ 



poles. 
He .»leepyike ^.dQjmpuff^ 



A torn enUndedor poucus pa- A worQib.dve wi^ is eoQqgib. 
G4to escaldddo ia igoafria We fay/al^urnt child dreads 



ka mtdot 



the fire. 



No escudclldr veras .q^m te That is, people's affeSions 
quir h'em^ ou maL ! are difcovered by their Ii« 

bcFality. ». 
EsmoUu s63 MatikiuSt ts^ Charity begins at bonwe. 
molou p&ra os seus^ t • 

Nap ha mtlhor cspilho que o There is no better lopking 
amigo velhOf glafs than an old frlenaj 

that is, fuch a opc will not 

flatter a man, but t^U Ipim 

the truth. 

Jfemeftopa com iifoens^ nem That is, converfatioa of wo- 

fnolhir com varScns^ men is dangerous J it is not 

good jefling with edged 
tools. 
falldr stm cuiddr^ he atirar To let one's tongue run, with- . 



sem afrontar. 



out reflecting oh whsit qiI(B 
fays, is Ijlke ./hpotiq^ 'at 
random. 



Fdlla pouco e hem^ tirte hdo Talk little and well, and 



por algucm^ 



I 



ou'll be counted fome- 



)ody \ that ii, you'll l(e 
efteemed. 
Ouim a Jama tem perdida^ He who has loft his reputs- 



motto an da nefta vida^ 



tion is as good as devl 

whilft living. 



jf, quem mi fama tem^ nem Do not keep (rompajny with* 
accomp&nhes^ nem digas nor be foi^d, oi one that 
hem^ has an ill name. 



. — » — — 

Aproveitador de farilos^ ThSit is, one that faves at the 

esperdifador de Jarinha^ fp'gRO' ^"d lets it run out 

at 4he bung ; alfo, peniqr 

wife and pound foolifli. 

Th^y cap't fet tbe^r borfo 

duem 



Naojaum boBfarinha^ 



GRAM MA R. 



«t 



aperta^^ 
No afougue^ quern maljdlla^ 
mat oMVC^ 



Qjuem em mSis alto nida^ 
m&s presto se afoga^ 

Hospede com sol^ha honoris 
Hospeda formosa^ Stdno fa% 

a bSlsa, ^ • . 

O hospede e o peixe aos ires 

Mas Jide^ 

Horta sem dgoa, c^sa sem 
telhddoy mother sem amor ^ 
marido sem cuiddde^ de 
grdfa he cdro^ 



HSnra ao bom para que te 
honre^ e ao moo para que 
ie nao deshonre^ 

SSnfa hi dos amosy a que se 

Jaz aos eriddoSf 
Officio de conselho^ honrm 
sem pfoviito^ 



I 

JHomeniapercehido^ meyo com* 
iatido^ 



outward appearance. 

AH grafp, aH lofe ; at corvet 
all, and lofe all. 

He that fpcaks knavifhlyfliali 
hear knaviOily. Terence 
fays, Qui per git ea^ quce 
vuit, dicere^ <?j, qua ngn 
vuU^ audiet. 

That is, the higheft charges 
are the more liable and 
nearer tp the downfall. 

Firfl come, firft ferved. 

A beautiful hoftefs, or land- 
lady, is bad for the purfe. 

Frefli fiOi, and new come 
guefts, fmell when they 

' are three days otd. 

That is, a garden without 
water, a faoufe untiled, a 
wife without love, and a 
carelefs hulbatld, ate all 
. alike, being all ftark 
nojMght. 

Honour a good man, that he 
Ai^y honour you ; and an 
ill man, that, he roiay iKtt 
diflionour you. ^ 

The honour done to fervants 
redounds to their mafiert^ 

Ah office in the counci) ii 
honour without profit ; 
that is, to be of the coun- 
cil of a town, by which 
nothing is £0t in rortugal. 

A maa thait is prepared, ttas 
half the battle oy^r. 



♦ Ea 



«« 



P O R T U G y E S E 



pays aofumtiro^ * 
Phto vat ojimo da chdma^ 

Quern huma viz Jdrta^fiil 
ninca^ 

Matvai ao fuso qudndo a 
barba nao dnda cm cima, 



Cdda tirra com seu iiso^ cddd 

roca com scufuso^ 
Quduias cabcfas^ tdntas ca- 

rdLpugas^ 
Qjnem Iht doer a cabiga que 

a aperte^ 

Se qnires saber quern he o 
xnlldo^ metelhc a vara na 
maOf 

$iio ha rosa stm espinhos^ 



^nddr^ anddr^ 'vjr morrer a 
, beira^ » 



\uem nao deve, nao teme^ 
[uem qudndo pode, nao que'r, 
audndo.quir^ nag poae^ 
Homcm honrddo nao ha mis- 
ter gabddo^. 
tiamemgrdnde, besia depdo. 



^ebdixo de md cdpdjdz btm 
k^bedir^ 



We fay there is no.fmoke 

without .Xbme fire. 
He who, once ileals is never 

trufty; or^ once a thief, 

9lway8 a thief. 
Alas for the fpindle whenth«( 
. beard is not over it ! By 

the fpindle is meant the 

woman, and. by the beard . 

is meant the man. 
So many countries, ^ m^xif 

cuftoms. 
Several men, feveral minds. 

We fay, if any fool finds the 
cap fit him, let him put it 
on. 

Set a beggar on horfeback, 
and he will ride to the 
devil. 

There is no rofe without 
thorns, there is no fweet 
without fome fweat«/. . 

To eat an whole ox and 
faint at the tail. This^pro- 
verb is fpoken wheq^^ny 
body falls fliort of a thing 
aher having ufed all his 
endeavours. 

Out of debt out of danger. 

It \i good to maNb hay while 
the fun (bines; 

We fay^ a good Bice needf 
no band. 

This proverb intimates, that 
things are not to be valued 
by their bulk, hut accord- 
ing to their intrinfic WGurtK 
and vahie ; and fo we ^y, 
a lark is better than a 
kite. 

A tattered cloak may cover a 
good drinker ; that is^ men., 
are not to be judg/^ by 

putW(ir4 



GRAM MA R. 



«7 



^perta^' 
No afougue^ quern maljdlla^ 
mat auve^ 



Quern em mSis alto nida^ 
mdis presto se afoga^ 

Hospede com sol^ha honoris 
Hospeda formisa, ddno fa% 

& bSlsa, 
O hospede e o peixt aos ires 

.dias fede^ 

Horta sem dgoa, c^a sem 
telhddd^ mother sem amor^ 
marido sem cuidddo^ dc 
grdfa he cdro. 



Hinra ao bom para que te 
honte^ e ao moo para que 
te nao deshonre, 

SSnta he dos £mos, a que se 

faz aos eriddos^ 
Offtcid de conselho^ honrm 

sem proviito. 



SomemapercetidOi miyo com* 
batido^ 



outward appearance. 

AH gmfp, an lofe ; w corvet 
all, and lofe all. 

He that fpcaks knavifhlyfliali 
hear knaviOiIy. Terence 
fays, Qui pergit ea^ qua 
vutt^ dicere, ea, qum non 
vult^ audiet. 

That is, the higheft charges 
are the more liable and 
nearer tp the downfall. 

Firfl come, firft ferved. 

A beautiful hoftefs, or land- 
lady, is bad for the purfe. 

Frefli fiOi, and new come 
guefts, fmell when they 

• are three days otd. 

That is» a garden without 
water, a faoufe untiled, a 
wife without love, and a 
carelefs hu(batld» are all 
. alike, being all ftark 
nought. 

Honour a good man, that he 
Ai^y honour you ; and an 
ill man, thati be may iKtt 
diflionour you. ^ * 

The honour done to fervants 
redounds to their mafieri. 

Ah office in the council i$ 
honour without profit ; 
that is, to be of the cOua* 
cil of a town, by which 
nothing is got in rortugal. 

A maa that is prepared, ttas 
half the battle oyer. 



£& 



«« 



P O R T U G y E S E 



pays aofumdrot * 
Phto vai ojimo da chdma^ 

Quern huma vez Jdrta^Jiil 
ninca^ 

Mat vai ao fuso qudndo a 
barba nao dnda cm cimat 



Cdda terra com seu iiso^ cddd 

rica com scuf&so^ 
Quduias cabcfas^ tdntas ca- 

rapucas^ 
Qiicm ikt doer a cabiga que 

a aperie^ 

St quires saber quern hi o 
xnlldo^ metelhc a vara na 
maOf 

Nia ha risa stm espinhos^ 



JLnddr^ anddr^ vir morrer a 
, beira^ \ • ■ 



Vuem nio dive, mo teme^ 
^uem qudndo pode, nao que'r, 

andndo.quir^ mo poae, 
Homem. honrddo nao ha mis» 

ter gabddo^ . 
iiamemgrdnde, besia depdo. 



^ebdixo de mdcdpajdz b$M 
hbeddr^ 



We fay there is no. fmoke 

without .Xbme fire. 
He who^ once deals is never 

trufty; or^ onc^ a thief, 

9lways a. thief. 
Alas for the fpindle when tlM( 
. beard is not over it ! By 

the fpindle is meant the 

woman, and by the beard , 

is meant the man. 
So many countries, fy manf 

cuftoms. 
Several men, feveral minds. 

We fay, if any fool finds the 
cap fit him, let him put it 
on. 

Set a beggar on horfeback, 
and he will .ride to the 
devil. 

There is no rofe without 
thorns^ there is no fweet 
withoiit fome fweat« ^ 

To eat an whole ox and 
faint at the tail. This^pio- 
verb is fpoken wheq'iiny 
body falls fliort of a thiiq( 
aher having ufed aU his 
endeavours. 

Out of debt out of danger. 

It \i good to maNb hay while 
the fun (bines; 

We fay^ a good Bice needi 
no band. 

This proverb intimates^ that 
things are not to be valued 
by their bulk, hut accord- 
ing to their intrinfic wort^ 
and val^ue ; and fo we tay, 
a lark is better than a 
kite. 

A tattered cloak may cover a 
good drinker ; that is^ men., 
i^e npt to be judged by 

putWiird 



GRAM MA R. 



«t 



Huem mdii^ airdfa, p6ue0 

4iperta^^ 
No afSugue^ quern maljdlla^ 

mat auvCf 



Quern em mSis alto nida^ 
m&s presto se afoga^ 
% 

Hispede com sol^ha honSr^s 

Hospeda formosa, &dno fa% 
& bolsa, 

O hospede e o peixe aos ires 
.dias Jide^ 

Horta sem dgoa, ca^a sem 
ielhddo^ mother sem amor^ 
marido sem cuiddde, dc 
grdfa he cdro^ 



HSnra ao bom para que te 
honre^ e ao mao para que 
te nao deshonre, 

% , 

SSnra he dos amosy a que se 

faz aos eriddos^ 
Officio de conselho^ honrm 
semproviito^ 



HomeniaperceHdo^ nieyo com* 
iatido^ 



outward appearance. 

AH grafp, an lofe ; w corvet 
all, and lofe all. 

Hethatfpcaks knavifhlyfliali 
hear knaviOily. Terence 
fays, Qui pergit ea^ quce 
vult^ dicere, <?j, iqum ngn 
vult^ audiet» 

That is, the higheft charges 
are the more liable and 
nearer tp the downfall. 

Firfl come, firft ferved. 

A beautiful hoftefs, or land* 
lady, is bad for the purfe. 

Frefli fiih, and new come 
guefls, fmell when they 

■ are three days old. 

That is» a garden without 
water, a faoufe untiled, a 
wife without love, and a 
carelefs hulbatld, ate, all 
. alike, being all ftark 
nojMght. 

Honour a good man, that he 
tn^y honour you ; and an 
ill man, that he may not 
diflionour you. ^ 

The honour done to fervants 
redounds to their mafiert. 

Ah office in the council is 
honour without profit ; 
that is, to be of the cOun* 
cil of a town, by which 
nothing is £0t in rbrtugal. 

A maa thait is prepared, lias 
half the battle oyer. 



♦ Ea 



68 



PORTUGUESE 



^ D I A L O G O S 

YAMILIARES. 



FAMILIAR 

DIALOGUES. 



D I A L O G O. I. 

rENHA vm* muUo tons 
dias, • 
Como cstdvm, ? ou cSmo pas^ 

sa vm, f 
Bern, nab muito bSm^ voji pas* 

sdndo^ 
Mutto bempara serviravm. 
• As or dens ue vm. 

SkoJhe muito obrigido^ 

Agradecido^ 

Como estd, ou pdssa o senkSr 

siu irmdb ? 
Muito bim^ nao muito bem^ 

ElU terdgosto de ver a vm. 
Nad terei tempo para hir a 

velo hoje^ 
Fica favor de assentdr-se^ 
Da hima cadeira ao scnhor^ 

Nad hi necess&rio^ 
Tenho que hir afa%ir huma 
visita aquinesta visinhdnfa 
Vm. tem prissa^ 
Eu logo voltarii, 

Adios meu senhor^ 

Fblgo de ver a vm, com boa 

SMude^ 
Beijo as mads de vm» 
Sou criddo de vm. 
Sou muito seu cridd0^ 



DIALOGUE I. 
r^ OOD morrow, fir. 

How do you dd, fir ? 

« 
Well ; not very well ; fo, fow 

Very well to ferve you. 

At your fervice-. 

I am obliged to yoiu 

I thank you. 

How does your brother do J 

He is very well ; not very 
well. 

He will ha glad to fee you. ' 

I (hsjl have no time to fet 
. him to day. . 

Be pleafed to fit down. 

Give a crfaair to the gentle- 
man. 

There's no occafion* 

I must go to make a vtfit in 
the neighbourhood. 

You are in hafte. 

ril be back, ^r return pre- 
fently. 

Farewell, fir. 

I am glad to fee you in good 
heaiih. 

I kife your hand. 

I am your fervant. 

Your mod humble fervant. 



<\ 



CRyAMM A R. 



n 



i) I A LOGO IV. DIALOGUE IV. 



O Senhor e o Alfaiite. 



'rRAZEiS miu vefiido f 

Sim,Jimior,eilottqMi. , 
lid fnHito tempo que efiou 

e^triniolpor iiU, 
Nao pude vir ate agora^ 
Nao ejtava acabdda^ 
Ainda nao ejiavaforrddo^ 
Quer t/m, vejiir a casdcapara 

virfi Ihe eftd bim f 
y^dmosje tfld btmfeita^ 

Tenho para mim que Ihe hdja 

df agraddr^' 
Pdrtce^me m^ito cafkprida^ 

He coflume agira de trazS" 
las comprtdas^ 

He muito apertdda^ 

Aff'tm dive fir para que the 

ejteja hem ao corpo^ 
Ka&jao as mdngas demafid- 

damente Idrgas f 
Naojtnkor^ estaS-lhe admu 

ravelmittU^ 
Os calf Sens JaS midto aper- 

tados? 
EJta he a mdd^ de agira^ 
lyie veJHdo eftd'lhe bizar^ 

ramente^ 
Be miito cirto^ m^Uo com* 

pridOf miitogrdndiymdite 

fequeno^ 
T^ndesfeito a vbffa contaf 
Nao^Jenhor^ nao live tempo ^ 
Jlrazeua amanhad'^ epagdr* 

V0S hii^ 



K. 



The Gaitlemdn and the ' 

Taylor. 

T^O you bring ray fuitof 

•*^ clothes ? 

,Yc«, fir, here 'ti«. ^^ 

You make fn« wait a great 

white. 
I could not cootie fooner* 
It was not finiflied. 
The lining was not fewed* 
Will you pleafe to try the 

clofe coat on ? 
Let us fee whether it be well 

made. » 
t believe it will pleafe you. 

It fecmi to me to be very 

long. 
They wear them long now. 

Button it. 

It is too clofe. 

To fit properly^ it ought t# 

be clofe. 
Are no^the fleeves too wide ? 

No, fir, they fit very' well. 

The breechca are very nar- 
row. 

That is the faffaion.' 

This fuitbecoroea you migli<< 
ty well. 

Tis too (hort, too lopg, tod 

. big, too little. 

Have you made your bill P 
No, fir, I had no time. 
Bring it to-morrow, Til pay 

you. 
E4/ D I A^ 



, -1 



70 



PORTUGUESE 



D I A L O G O III. 



Q. 



Para vcftir-fe. 

UEMestuahi? 
Que quir vm, ? 



Dcspaxa-Uf acinde o lume^ e 

veste-me^ 
Ha mHito torn lume, 
Dd'tne a minka camisa^ 
• Eila aqui esia^ scnhor, 
Naoestaqiienie.esta muxtojria^ 
Eua,aqufntArii^sevm.qu%zir 
'NaOf nao; traze-me as min^ 

has miyas de seda , 
Huma deltas esid rota, 
Da-lkchumpSntOyConcirta'a^ 
Dei-a ao que as concerta, 

FizhU-bem, 

O'ndeestaoasminhas chinelas 
O'nde estd a minha roupa de 
. chdmbre^ 
Pentea-^e, 
Procura Sutro pinte^ 
Di-me miu lenfo, 
Eis aqui hum lavado^ 
Dd-me o que estd na minha 

atgibeira^ 
Dd'O dlavandiira^ ille estd» 

va fujo, 
Trouxe ellajaaminha rSapa? 
^im, senhor^enaS/ditanada^ 
Trdze-me os meus calfdeAs^ 
Que veftido quer vm. para 

hSjef ■ 
mesmo de intern, 
O al/ai£te ha de trazer ligo 
■\ seuveftidOi 
Bdtem[d porta, vela quern he, 

' Quern he? 
Hi al/aidtf^ 
Deixa-o entrdr^ 



DIALOGUE III. 
To dress one's /e//l 

WHOistberc? 
What will you pleafc 
to have ? 
Be quick, make a fire» dref» 

me. 
There is a fine firew 
Give me my ihiit. 
liere it is, Sir, 
'Tis not warm, 'tis quite cold. 
If you pleafe I'll warm it* 
No, no ; bring me my silk 

{lockings. • I 

One of them is torn. 
Stitch it a liule, mend it. 
1 have given it to the flock* 

ing mender. 
You have done right. 
Where are my flippers ? 
Where is my night gown. 

■• 
Comb my head. 
Look for another comb. 
Give me my handkerchief. 
Here is a clean one. 
Give me that which is in my 

pocket. 
I gave it to the wather«wo* 

man, k was fouk 
Has (he brotight my linen ? 
Yes, there Vants nothing* 
Bring me'my breeches. 
What clothes will y«u wcir 

tO'day? 
Thofe I wore yefterilay. 
The taylor will bring your 

ctmh fuit prefently. 
Somebody knocks, fee wbt 

it isr 

Whp ift it ? 

It is the taylor^ - v 

Ikiei hioi come in. 



• ■* 



GR^AMU AJi. 



ri 



1) I A LOGO IV. DIALOGUE IV* 



O Senhdr e Alfai£te. The GcntUmdn and the ' 

Taylor. 

nrRAZEiS miu wfiidof T\0 you brbg my fait of 
•^ 1^ clothes? 

Sim^fsmkor^ eilo aqni. . ,Yc«, fir, here 'tis. ^ 

Hd M^ito tempo que efiou You make fn« wait a gteat 

white. 
I could not comie fooner* 
It was not finiflied. 
The lining was not fewed* 
Will you pleafe to try the 

cloie coat on ? 
Let us fee whether it be well 
made. * 
TenhoparaT^mquelhehdJA I believe it will pleafe you. 



esperando.por ille^ 
Nao pude vir ate agora^ 
Hao ejiava acabdda^ 
Ainda nao ejiava Jorrdio^ 
Quer trm. vejiir a casdcapara 

vet ft the eftdbemf 
. V^dmosfe ijld bemfeita^ 



df agraddrj 
Pdrece^me m^ito coniprida^ 

He cojtunu agira de traze- 
las comprtdas, 

He muito apertdda^ 



It fccms to me to be very 

long. 
They wear them long now. 

Button it. 
It is too clofe. 



Affim dive fir para que Ike To fit properly^ it ought tf 

e/leja hem ao corpo^ 
Naojao as mdngas demafid- 

damente Idrgasf 
Naojtnhor^ estaS-lhe admi- 

ravelmeaUt 
Os calf Sens faS m&iio aper- 

tadosf 
EJta he a moda de agora, 
EJie veftido efid'lhe bizar^ 

ramente. 
He miiio curto, miiito com* 

prido, miiito grdnde^miiito 

pequino^ 
Tondesfeito a viffa conta f 
Nao^Jenhor, nao tive tempo ^ 
Jjrazeua amaniad'^ epagdr- 

vos hii^ 



be clofe. 
Are no^the fleeves too wide ? 

No, fir, they fit very' well. 

The breeches are very nar- 
row. 
That is the faffaion.' 
This fuit becomes yoirmigli<< 

ty well. 
Tis too Ihort, too lopg, too 
, big, too little. 

Have you made your bill P 
No, fir, I had no time. 
Bring it to-morrow, Til pay 

you, 
4, D I A- 



>7 



72 



P O Jl T U€ U E SE 



D I A L Q G V. 

Pari.alniogin 

n^RAZE^nos alg^ma coufa 
•^ para almofdr^ 
Sim^Jenhir^ ha iinguifas e 

faftelinkos^ 
Gijla VM, de pre/into f 

/Sim^ trdze-o ; comer emos 
hiima tdlhada diilt^ 

EJiende hum guar dandpofo- 
bre aquella, mifa^ 

Da-nos pratos^fdcas^ e gdt- 

Lava OS cipos^ 

Da kutna cadeira ao fenhSr^ 

Ajfintt'fe vm. ajfintt-jt ao 

pi do lume^ 
Nad tinho frio^ aqui jicarii 

miiito bem^ 
Vejdmosfe o vinho he bim. 



Da cd aquilla garrdfa com 

aquelle copo^ 
Fafafavor de prcvdraquelle - Taile that wine, pray. 

vinho. 



DIALOGUE V. 

To break/aft^ 

BRING us fomething for 
breakfaft. 
Yet, fir, there are fome (au- 

fages^and petty-patees. 
Do vou choofe the gaipmoa 

of bacon ? 
Yes, brin^ it; we will eat a 

dice of It. - y 

Lay a napkfn on that table. 

Give us plates, knives, and 

forks. 
Rinfe the glafles. 
Reach the gentleman a^chair.- 
Sit down, fir; fit by the fire. 

I am not cold, I (ball be veiy . 

well here. 
Let us fee whether the wine 

be good. 
Give me that bottle and a 

glafs. 



Come (he agrdda ; que dix 
^ vm. deile? 

Nao he mdo, he muito bom^ 

Eis aqui as iinguifas^ lira 
aquelle prdto. 

Coma vm. Iinguifas, 
" Ja comi algumas^ ellasjai 
fwuito boas. 

Dd»mt de beber^ 

A Jadde devm. 

Bom proveito fa^a a vm. 
' Da- de beber ao fenhor^ 

E'u bebi ainda agora, 
Ospafielinhos erdo btm bofis, 

Eflivao hum pSuco mqts co- 
zidos que deviag ejlir^ 



How do you like it ? wbat 

fay you to it ? 
It is hot bad, it is very gopd.^ 
Here are the faufages, take 

away this plate. 
Eat foine faulages, fir. 
I have eat fome, they are very 
. good. 

Give me fome drink* 
Your heahh, fir. 
Much good may it ^ you. 
Give the gentleman fouMk. 

drink. 
I drank but juft now. 
The petty-patees were very 

good. 
They were baked a lltUe to» 

mi|ch. 



V- 



• ' 



G R A:M M A R. 



71 



Tinho comida tdnto^ que nao 
poderiijaniir^ 

Vm. eftd zpmidndot tr^r naS 

^tem c§mido ndda^ 

Tinho comido com mdito 
gofio^ tdnto das linguifas 
como do presunto^ . 
"■ ■ - ■ ■ ■ - . 

D lA L Q G O VI. 

Para falldr Portuguee. ^ 

' /^MO vdi vm. com o sen 
^ Portuguez ? 
Efia vm,ja muito adiantddo 

nilUf 
Ainda mefdlta muita; nao 
iiiquajtndda^ 
H . Dizcm.porim que vm, of alia 
' miiito bem^ 
ProuverOi a Dios que qffim 

'Mi! . . 

Os que dizem ijfo^eft&c muito 

enganadoSf 
> IJteja vm, na certeza que 

^inimo dijfirao^ 
Pojfo fallar algdmas paldv- 

ras que dprendi de c6r^ 
£ unicamente o que hi neces^ 

Arioparafomefdrajaliar^ 
comefar ftao he bastdnte^ 

he precis o que vm. acdbe^ 
Palle vnh sempre ou bem^ du • 

mal^ . ' 
f Tinho mcdo de dar irros^ ' 

Naotenhd. x^m* medo / a tin- 

gea Portugucza nao ^ ht 

diffidl, ^ 

Conhcfo ijfo^ e tambem que 

ilia he miito engrafdda^ 
duefelicidade serta a. minha 

se eu a soubisse bem ! 



You do not eat. 

I have eat too much, I {hall 

not be able to eat any din- 

ner,. , 

You only jeft, you have eat 

nothing at all. 
I have eat very heartily both 

of faufages and gammon 

of bacon. 

D I A L.O G UE VI. 

To spea^ Portuguese. 

TTOW goei on your Por- 

**• ^ tuguefe ? 

Are you much improved in 

it now ? 
Far from it ; I know nothing 

almoft. 
It is faid» however, you fpeak 

it very well. 
Would to God it were true ! 

Thofe that fay fo are much 

.miftak^n* 
I aiTure you I was told fo* 

I can fay a few words^ which 

I have learnt by heart. 
And To much as is neceflary 

to begin to fpeak. 
The beginning is not all, you ^ 

muft make an end. 
Be always fpeaking. Whether 

well, or ill. 
I am afraid to commit blun* 

ders. 
Never fear ; the Portugueft 

language is not hard* ; 

I know it; and that it has 
abundance of graces. ^ 

How happy fl^ould I be, if I. 
were mailer ot \v\ 

A ap* 



"V 



74 



PORTUGUESE 



A applicag'aShto ^nico mlyo 

para aprtndiUa^ 
Qudnth timpo ha que vm. a- 

pre tide f 
Aftenas hd hum mez, 
Co mo sf chdmd o sen mestre? 

Ckdma-se 

Hd'muito tempo que o con* 

he^o^ 
Elle tern enfinado a miiitos 
. dos tnfus amigos^ 
Naolke dizelUserpreciso que 

fdlle simpre Mprtuguez ? 

Sim^ senkir^ affim me diz 

muitas vezes, 
Pois^ porqMe naofdlla vm, ? 
Com quern quit vm, que iu 

falie, • . 

Com OS quejallarem com vm. 

Eu qui%crafalldr^ mas nao 

me utrivo. 
He preciso que vm. nao tenha 

mcdo^ nem se peje dos que 

ouviremjallar. 



Application is the only way - 

of learning it. 
How long nave you been 

learning ? • 
Scarce a month yet. 
What is your mart's name ? 
Hit name is 
I have known him a great 

while. 
He has taught feveral friends 

of mine. 
Does not he'tell you that you 

mud confiantly ulk Por- 

tugucfc? 
Yes, sijr, he often Cells me so. 

Why do not you talk then ? 
Who would' you have me 

talk^vitb? 
With thofe who (hall talk to 

yoti. 
I would fain ulk, but dare 

not. 
You muft not be afraid, you 

muft be bold. 



DIALOGO VII. DIALOG tJE VII. 



Q 



Do T^rapo. 
UE tempo fat ? 



tempo estd admirdvel^ 

temps estd roim^ 

Fazjrio ? fa% edlma f 

NaSJizJriif, nao/az cdima^ 

Chove f nao chive ? 

NaS criyo^ 

venib estd mudiio^ 

Teremos chtiva^ 

HSje nati hide chovir^ 

Cheve^ Chivea cAntikrcs^ 

Estk nevdndo^ 

Trovijd^^ 



Of the Wta^ihir. 

WHAT (bit of weather 
is it? 
It is fine weather. 
It is bad %ir<eather. 
1% it cold ? is it hot ? 
It is not cold, it is not hot. 
Does it rain ? does it not raii^ ?' 
I do not believe it. 
The wind is changed. ' 
We fhall have rain. 
It, will not rain to<4ay« 
It rains, it pours. 
It snows. 
It thunders. 

Caht 



/ 



G R AM MAR. 



7S 



Relampaguea^ 
Faz miita cdlma^ 
Geou a noite pajfdda f 
NaS, senhSr, mas agora estd 

gidndOy 
Parece'tfie que hd nevoiero^ 

Vm. naS st engdna^ qffim hi^ 

Vm. tem hum grdnde catarro^ 

, ou dtfidxo^ 

Hd f^inxe dias (jut o ttnho^ 

Que horas sad^ 

He cedfft naS he idrde^ 

He timpd de al^ogdr f 

foucofdltapara serem hints 

dejantflr^ 
Qjuefaremos depois de jan- 

tdrf 
• Daremoshumpajeyo^orx ire^ 

mos paffedr^ 
Vdmos dar huma vilta^ 
Nao vdmos fir^ com iste 

tempo^ 

diAlogq viil 

Para^ p^rgunlar que n6vas hi. 

r)UE vdi de novo? ou que 
- ,\^ novas ha? 
Sabevm. alguma cousa de no- 
vo? 

Nad ienho ouvido n&da de 

« 

novo^ 
De que tefilla petla cidade ? 
* Nd& sefalla dg ndda^ 
NdS tendes ouvidof altar d^ 

guerra, 
Nat oUfofall&r ndda dijfo^ 
Potemfi^Ua''Se de hum cerco. 



It hails. 

It lightens. 

It is very hot. 4 

Has it freezed laft nigh^ ? 

No, fir, but it freezes now. 

It appears to me tolie a great 

fog. 
You are not miftaken, it is 

v?ry true. 
You haye caught a violent 

cold. 
I have had it this fortnight. 
What's o'clock ? 
^Tis early, 'tis not late. 
Is it breakfaft-time ? 
'Twill be dinner .time inttne- 

diately. 
What (hall we do after din. 

ncr ? » 

We'll take a walk. 

Let us take ^ turn now. 
We muft not go abroad thii 
weather. 



Falliu'se niffo^ mas smS he 
vfrdddit . 



DIALOGUE VIIL 

To enquire after news, 
TT7HAT news is flirring ? 

Do you know any newt t 

p 

/ 

I have heard none. ^ 

'What's the talk oF the town ? 
There's no ulkof any thing. 
Have you heard no talk of 

war? 
I have heard nothing of it. 
There's a talk however of'k 

fiege. 
There was fuch a ^lifcourie^ 

but it iwas not tnie» ^ 

• Mties 



7« 



PORTUGJUESE 



A'ntes pith contririo JilU- 
Jede^pdz, 
Anim crtyo^ 
Qut ft di% na corte ? 
Falla-Je (te hdma vi&gem^ 
Qii&ndo vos par if e que el rey 

partira f 
Naofejdbe. Naofedizqudn^ 

do^ 
(yndc^ ou para Snde Ji diz 

que elle ird? 
Huns dizem que ird para 

FLdndres^ e Sutros para 

Alem&nha. 
E qtte dix a Gazeta ? 
E'u nao a lt\ 
' . He verdade o que Je diz do 

Sr.^ — ? 
Pdts quefe diz dilte ? 
Dizem qu€ ejidjerido mor- 

talmenle^ 
* Miiito me pejaria dijfo ; elle 
* he hum homem de bem^ 
Ojiem oferio f 
ISous marStos que o inveftU 

rdOf 
Sabe-Je o porquef 

A noticia que corre he^ que 
deu num dilles hum bo- 
JetaS, 

E'u naS creyo i/so; nem eu 
iaS poucot 

Eil9 vdi^ cedo saberemos a 
verdade^ 



On the contary thereat i 

talk of peace. 
I believe so^ 
What fay they at court ? 
They talkof avG^ragc^ . 
When do you thukthe king 

will fet but ? 
'Tis not known, they do not 

say^en. 
Where do they fay he'll go ? 

Some say into Flanders, 
others into Germatiy. 

And what says the Gazette? 

I have not read it. 

Ift it true what's I'eported of 

Mr. ? 

\yhat of him ? 

They fay he is mortally 
. wounded. 
i (hould be sorry for that, 

he's an honest man. 
Who wounded him ?' 
Two rogues that set upos 

him. 
Is it known upon what ac- 
count ? 
The report is that he gave 

one of them a box on the 

ear. 
I don't believe it. Nor I 

neither; 
However, we Ihall soon know 

the truth. 



•DJALOGO IX. 

Para escrever. 

jyAUME himafolha de 
•^-^ papil^hUmd pinna, e hi- 

ma pouca de tinta^ 
tde ao m^u quart o^eachareis 

em cima da me/a t&do o que, 

vcsfSr prccijo^ 



D I A L O 6 U E IX. 

To write. 

/^IVE me a flieet of pa- 
^^ per, a pen, and a little 

ink. 
Step to my eloseti you'll find 
on the table whatever vou 
vf«nt% . Aa* 



GRAMMAR. 



•J7 



JVdS hd pennaSf 
mgrdn<Uquantidddcdillas 

na cscrtvamnna^ 
Nad prtfiao para nada^ » 
La hi Sutras^ 
Nd6 efiao aparddas^s 
Ondt eftd o vijfa camviitf 
Sabiis vos apafdrfinnas? 
E'u apiro-as a mtu modai 
EJla naS efia mi, 
Em ijlkdnto acibo ijla cdrta, 
faviiimt o favor de fechdr 

as, iutras, e fa%€r~ hum 

miqo deltas, 
Qucfilloquir vm. que in the 

ponhd? 
S/lla'O com o miu siniU, bu 

com as minhas armasy 
Com que Here quer vm, que 

as fecke, 
Fechiuas com o vermilho ou 

corno preto:Jejaqudlf6r, 

nao impirta, » 
Tim vm. pofip a dataf^ 
Tarice-meouejim, mas ainda 

nao a affinei, 
A qudntos ejidmos koje do 

mezf . 
A outoi a deZj a quinze^^a 

vinte, 
PSnde sobrescrito ? 
(fride eftd a area ? 
Vis nUnca tendes area, 

Ahi hd algHma no areeiro, 

' Ahi ejia o feu criado ; quer 
vm, que etle live as cartas 

• ao correo. 

Leva as minhas cartas no 
correo, e nao te esquefas de 
pagdr parte, 

Nao tenhodinheirp, 

Ahi ejid huma moedade duro, 

Vai depreffa^ e vcm lig6. 



Th^re are no peiii# 

There are a great mai^y in 
the ftandifh. 

They are good for nothing. 

There are some othertf. 

They are not made. . 

Where is your penknife. 

Can you make pens ? 

I make them my own way. 

This is .not bad. 

While I make an end of this 
letter, do me the^favour to 
make, a packet of the rest. 

What seal will you have me ' 

put to it ? 
Seal it with my cypher, or 

coatx>f arms. 
What wax fhall I put to it ? 

■ \ 

Put either red, or black, no 
matter which. 

Have you put the date ? 

I believe I have, but I hare 
not signed it. 

What day of the month is 
this ? 

The eighth, the tenth, fif- 
teenth, twentieth. 

Put the stddrefs. 

Where is the powder ? i 

You never have powder or- 
sand. 

There's some in the sand 
box. 

There's your' servant, will 
you let him carry the let- 
ters to the poll- office ? 

Carry my letters ^o the poft> 
office, and don't forget to 
pay poftage. 

I have ho money. 

There's a moidore^ . 

Go- quickly, and return as 

soon ^^ ^o%^iXA^% 

^ /a \ few- 



7» 



PORTUGUESE 



diAloco X. 

Para coroprir. 



fi 



U E quir vm. 



Qjuero hum bom pdnno Jino 

para hum veJHdo^ 
Tenha vm. a bqndddt de en- 

irdr^ e vera 9 miis belo 

pdnno que hd em Londres, 
Diixc^me vir melhor que 

vm, tem, 
Aqui iemvm,* hum excellinU^ 
" que agorafe coftHmatra^r^ 
He hum bom pdnno^ mas a 

cor nao me agrdda, 
Ahi tern vm. Sutra pS fa que 

tern a cor mais glara^ 
Agrddame a cSr^ mas panno 

nao hi Jorte^ nao tern cor* 

Veja ifla piga; vm. naoac- 
. hard em nenhuma parte 

iutra tao boa como elUt . 
Qudnto pidt tm. pot cada 

ana ? 
OJea jujh prifo A^— ~ 

Sr. naohemiu coJlumepSr^me 
a re^ate&r ; Jaca-mejavor 
de atzer me ultimo prego^ 

Ja dtff'e a vm. queaquiilehe 
seujufto prifo^ 

H^'m^ito caro, aarlhe hii a 

vm* — 
Nad pijf6 abater hum ceitU, 
Vm. nao hd de vender por f j- 

seprefo^, 
Vm. quiz saber ultiMo pre* 

fo^ e in difc'lho^ ■ 



DIALOGUE X. : 

To buy. 

TXTHAT do you want, fir? 
^ ^ Whatj would you pleasi 

to have ? 
I want a good fine cloth to 

make me a suit of clothes*. ' 
Be pleased to vralk in, fir, 

you'll see the finest in 

London.. 
Shew me the heal you have. 

There's a very fine one, and 
what's worn at present. 

'Tis a good c)oth».Dut'I don't 
like the colour, «. • 

There's another lighter piece. 

I like that colour well, but 

the cloth ift not ftrong, 'tis 

too thin. 
Look upon th|s piece here, 

sir, you'll not find the, like 

any where else. 
What do you afk for it an 
♦ ell ? 
Without exacting, it is 

worth ■ ■ 
Sir, I aha not used to (land 

haggling ; pray tell me 

jour loweft price. 
I have, told you, sir, 'tis 

worth that. 
'Tis too dear. Til' give you — 

I can^t bate a brthing^ 
You (hall not have whiit you 

alk. 
You a(ked me the loweft 

price, and I havje told 

yoik ^ 

H^ra 



. k 



GRAMMA R. 



7^. 



• 

•Hira vimcs^ corte vm. Id 
duas anas dille^ 

AffigUTO'lhe a vm. como hi- 
mem dt hem qui Jou, que 
nao gdnho hdda com vm. 

Ahi tern vm. cincQ moidas de 
ourot di-me a demasia^ - 

Tinka a iandade de dar-mc 
Sutra em lugdr dejla^ por- 
quenaS he depizo^ 
• Ahi ^sia ouira^ 

A DeQs^ criddo de vm. 



Come^ come, cut off two 

clU of it. . 
I protest, on the word of an 

honed man, I don't get 

any thing by you« 
There's five moidore;, give 

me the change, 
fie pleased, sir, to let me have 

another for this, it wants 

weight. 
There s another. 
Farewell ; -sir,, your strvant. 



DIALOG O XI. 

Para huma Jornada., 

eUANTAS Ugoas ha dn^ 
qui a NJ • 
ffa duto Ugoas, 
Nos nao poderimos chegdr Id 

hoje^ hi muito tdrde^ 
Nao hi fends meyo dia^ vm'" 
ainda tern bastdnte^ tempo ^ 



Hi d estrada tod? 

Nao he muito boa^ pojf^ofc 

bSfques e rios^ 
Ha aigiim perigo nella ? 

N^aS hi HOtici^s diffoi hi 

estrdd^ Viii ^^ y^^ se^en- 

contra ginte a cdda pdlfo^ 
' JPois nao dizem que ha laUrO" 

ens nos bisques?. 
' /laS ha de que tir mido^ nan 

de dia^ nem de noite^ 
i^or ondefe vdi ? . . . 
Qudndo vm"' chegarem ao 
^ fi do ouiiiro^ he pret^ 

que iomem a maS direita^ 
fats nao hi ntceffdrio fukh 

^umautiirof , 



DIALOGUE XL' 
for a J$urney\ 

TJ O W many leagues is it 
'*^. -from this place to N. ? 
It is eightxUagues. 
We (hall not be able to get 

thither to day, it is too late. 
It is not more than twelve 

o'clock, you have time 

enough yet. 
Is the road good? 
So, so ; there are woods and 

rivers to pass. 
Is there any danger upon tfatt 

road? 
Tbere*s no talk of it, it is a 
: highway, where yoa meet 

people every moment. 
Do not they say there are 

robbers in the woods ? 
There's nothing to be fe^urci 

either by day or night. 
Which way muft one tak« ? 
When you come near the 

hill, you muft take to tht 
. right hand. 

Ift it not neces«Bry to asctii4 
^billtben? 



80 



P O R T U G U E SE . 



Na8, Sr. naShdSutro outti^ 

ro fena& huma pequina 

ladeira^ (ou descida) no 

bisque^ 
Oifta a atindr com o eaminho 

pillo miyo dos basques? 
Fm"" wflS podem errdJo^ 
Logo que vm"^ Jahirem do 

bifquejembrem-fe de tomar 

a mao e/querda, 
Vm"' muitos dnnos, fico^lhe 

tnuito obrigddo^ 
Vdmos^ vdmos^fcnhSreSt to- 

memos hum cavillo, 
Onde estd o mar quiz f 
EUe foi adidnte^ 
E'lle ha de estar efperdndopor 

vis logo all fora da cidade^ 
Pot que esta vrri* agora ejfe- 

rdndof hora^ vdmo-nos 

daqut^ acabemoSf 
Fiquem-fe embira, fenhores^ 

a Deos^ 
Fagao vff^ miiio boa jor* 

ndda^ 

DIAlOGO XII. 
X)a Cea e da Pousada. 

CO'MQUE ajfim estdmos 
chegddos aestaligem^ 
ApeemO' nos^fenhotts^ 
Pega nos cav alios disies sen^ 

nireSy e trdta delles, 
Vejdmos agora o que vm. nos 

hade dar para cedr^ 
Hum capao, meya duzia de 

pombos, huma /alada.Jeis 

codornizes^ e huma duxia 

de calhAndraSt 
Qjuirem vm*^ mats algima 

coufa f 
Isiotu bastAnte^ ddi^nosaU 

iUM vinho quefija bom^ e 
ima soifremisa^ 



No, 0r, there is no other 
hill but a little declivity in 
the wood. ' 

Is it a difGcult way through 

the woods ? 
You can't lofe your way. 
As soon as you are out of -the 

wood, remember to keep 

to the left hand. 
J[ thank you, fir, and am veiy 

much obliged to you. 
.Come, Gcniie, gentlemen, let's 

take a horfe. 
Where is the marquis? 
He is gone before. 
He'll wait for you juft out 

of town. 
What do you day for now? 

come, come, let's be gone, 

let's have done* 
Farewel, gentlemen, fare. 

wel. ^ 

I wifli you a very good jour- 
ney. 



D I A L O G U E XILv^ 
0/iAe Supper and Lodginj^^ 

Cp, we are 'arrivisd at 
•^ inn. 

Let's alight, gentlemen. 
Take tbefe gentlemen's Boir<< 

fes, and tSkit care of i 
Now let's fee what youl 

give us for (upper. 
A eapon, half a dbzen of wy^. 

geons, a fallad, fix quaik|9>4 

and a dozen of larks. J 

Will you have nothing elfe -^'l 

That's enough, give as ibod^ 
good wine, ami a deflert* 



G R AM MA R. 



81 



Heixem vm'^ isso por minha 
. Conta^ eu Ihes prometo que 

fiquem bemfervidos^ 
Alumia aosfenkSres, ^ " 
Dai-nos dt cedr o mdis dc- 

pressa quefSr possively 
Antes que vm^" tenhao def- 
calf ado as^ bkas, cstard a 
' £ed na mefa^ 
Tende cuidddo que tragdo 
para cima as nossas mdlas 
' e prs tolas ^ 

'Oescalfdi-me as botas^ e de^ 
Jpois ireis vir fe tern \dddo 
• algumjino aos,cavdllos^. 

Levdi'OS ao rio, e tende cuu 

- dado que Ihes dim alguma 
avea^ 

E'u terei cuidddo de tudo^ 
estejao vm^" descan^ados^ 

Senhores^ a ceaestdprSmpta^ 
estd na mesa^ 

Nos vdmosjd, 

Vdmos cedr^ senhores, para 
nos hirmos dcitdr cedo^ 

Dai" nos dgoa para lavar as 

- tnaSSfi • 

Sentemo-nos^ senhores, sentc- 

mono s a mesa^ 
Ddi-nos de beber, 
AsaMe de vm"* mens senhores, 
He bomo.zjinho? 
Nao he mao^ 
^ capao, na5 esta bem ajfado^ 
Dai-nos humas poucas de 
lardnjas^ e huma pouca de 
pimenta, 
P.o'rque nao come vm^ destes 
k pombos? 

^£i^ tenho comido hum pombo^ 
H e tres calhdndras^ 
BD;%^ ao estalajadeiro que the 
H fuerem osjalldr^ 



Let me alone, Til pleafe you, 
I warranbyou. 

Light the gentlemen. 

Let's have our fupper as 

foon as poflible. . 
Before you have pulled your 

boots off, fupper (hall be 

upon the table. 
Let our portmanteaus and 

piftols be carried up fiairs. 

Pull off my boots^, and then 
you (ball go to fee whether 
they have given the horfes 
any hay. 

You (hall carry them to the 
river, and take cate they ^ 
give them fome oats. 

ni take care of every thing, 
don't trouble yourielf. 

Gentlemen,. fupper is ready, 
it is upon the table. 

We'll come prefently. 

Let's go to fupper, gentle- 
men, that we may go to 
bed in good time. 

Give us water to walh our 
hands. 

Let us fit down, gentlemen, \ 
lei's fit down at table. 

Give us fome drink. » . 

To your health, gentlemen. 

Is the wine good ? 

It is not bad. 

The capon is not done enough 

Give us fome oranges with, a ' 
little pepper. 

Why don't you eat of thcfe 

pigeons ? 
t have eaten ocfe pigeon and 

three larks. 
Tell the landlord we want t6 

fpcak with, him, * 
F DIA- 



>■ 



83 



PORTUGUESE 



\ 



DIALOG O XIII. DIALOGUE XItt 



Do faltaf e 60 corr^r. 



Of jumping and rMmWg. 



■ I 



Zl/ O R Jl vamos^ quer vm. 
^" falidr, 
Nio hi b6mfaUdr logo def^ 

poif.de comir^ 
De que modo dt /altar gofia 

VM. mdisf 
mSis comm^m keapesjun^ 

ioSf 
Quer 9m> ^ueJaMmos sS com 

hum pi 9 
Como tym* qm%er^ 
Eflehe-humfiUo muitogrdnde 
Qjudntos pisfaltSu vm. ? 

Mdh de qudtroj 

Apofto que/alio p9r cima da-- 

qmeite harrdnco^ 
Vm.fdlta com humpio com* 

prido. 
Demos huma carrdra^ 
Quer vm. qaeeotrimos a pe ' 

cu a cavdUo^ 
Dt hdma e owtrafirte^ 
Digd vm. dondt Jt hd de 

comefdr^ e Snde/e ha de 

a<alfdY^ 
Comegimos a-corfir da qui, 

CorrerhHos Aii chegdr a tfia 

arvQre, 
Tfnho carrido tte^ vAj^jt 

defde o lugir affinalddo 

aii a dfuoYel- 



/^ O ^ E, will yon go to 

^ jumping?, ; 

It is not good' to jump imme-. 

diately after dinner. ^ 
What leaping do you like 

beft? 
The moft ufud is with one 

foot clofe to the other. 
Shall ¥re hop with one leg ? 

Ai y6u pleaie. 

This is a very ^^nedt leap^ 

How manf teet hshre y^ 

leapM? 
More dian ibtir« 
I lay I leap clearly over that 

ditch. 
You jump with a long Qick. 

Let us rim races. 

Shall we run on foot or on 

borfeback? 
Both ways. 
Appoint the rac^. 



This fliall be the Ibutiog 
' place. 
This tree fliail be the goal. - 

/ 
I bave run three times from 
the flartiiigrplace to tb« 
tree. 



€{ ft A Kt tt A R. 



8S 



Vm. nddefperSupeUoftndipO' You did not flay for the fig. 

nptwdfUiT a carter ^ * naltoftart. 

AguelU cavdlU corrio muito That horfe has run his race 



bem^ 



very well. 



Qudntas carreirUs tern Sik £[ow miny heats has he run ? 
d&dof 



Tris ou quairo, 
Vm. tern ganhido^ 



Three or four. 

You have won the plate. 



' f 



• Ft 



CARTAS 



'»» 



83 



P O RT UG U E SE 



\ 



D I A' L O GO Xill. D I At O G U E Xltt 



Do faltaf e io corr^r. 



Of jumping and rniimnig. 



ZJ O R A vamos^ quer vm, 
^" fdHdr, 
Nid hi bdm/altdr logo def^ 

poU.de comir^ 
De que modo de/aUdr gofia 

vm. mdisf 
m&is comm^m heapisjun- 

tos^ 
Quer 9m> fueJaMmos sS com 

hum pi 9 

EfteheJiumf^o mtUtogrdnde 
(ludniospisJaltSuvm.? 

Mdh de fudiroj 

Apijlo que^/ttltc p0r cimm da^^ 

qneite tairfdn0o^ 
Vm.Jdlta com humfio com* 

prido. 
Demies huma earreita^ 
Quer vm. qtilf CdtrSmiS a pi ' 

0A a caffdUo^ 
De huma e ouiraforte^ 
Diga vm. donae Je hd de 

comefdr^ e Snde/e ha de 

a<aMry 
Ccmegemos a-e^tfir da qui. 

Carter ^os Aii chegdr a efiii 

arvQre^ 
Tfnh^ carridd tte^ vAses 

difde o lugir ajjfnalddo 

ait a dfvoye'i' • 



/^ O ^ E, will ^ou go to 

^ jumping?, ; 

It is not good- to jump imme-. 

diately after dinner. ^ 
What leaping do you like 

beft? 
The moft ufuai k with one 

foot clofe to the other. 
Shall we hop with one leg ? 

Ai y6u pleafe. 

This is a very j^^t leap. 

How manf mt ks^ve y^ 

leaped? 
Moredianibtin 
I lay I leap clearly over that 

ditch. 
You jump with a long flick. 

Let us rim races. 

Shall we run on foot or on 

borfeback? 
Both ways. 
Appoint the rac^. 



This fliall be the flartiiig 

place. 
This tree fliail be the goal^ - 

I bave run three times froib 
the flartiiig.place to the 
tree. 






GRAMMA R. 



85 



LETTERS 



OK 



Business, or Mercantile Affairs. 



Mr, F. F. London. The 30th of January, 1811. 

YOURS of the 3d and 15th of last Month, came 
to Hand on the 5th Current by the Ship F. F. 
Captain B. B. ; and therein I take iNotrce, that yoji 
intend to put on board the next'^^ood 5hip bouncf 
< hither, the Goods I recommended to your Care in 
my last.* Herewith L send you more Patterns, but 
I would desire you to be solicitous with your Dyer, 
that the Colours may be lively and durable. By the ^ 
last Ship I remitted you Account of Sales, of the 
Parcel of Silk Stockings, and the three Boxes of 
Hats, by the Ship A ; and if you meet with 
a Parcel of either, or both, to your Mind, please to 
send them, such Articles beingnow in Demand, but 

freat Care noust be taken of the Fashion and Make, 
have taken care to*' secure your twenty Pipes of 
Oil for the first Ships in the Season, and put on 
. board the Ship N* Capt. F. your twenty Pipes of 
^Red, and twelve Pipes and three Hogsheads ©f 
White Wine, of which the Invoice .goes here- 
with, and the Bills of Lading shall be sent by 
the post, and I hope' will come safe to hand; . 
which being all that is necessary at present, I 
remain, . . 

, " SIR, . . 

Your humWe-Servant. 

\ *.F 3 Senhdr 



\ ■ 



84 P O R T U G.U E S E 



CARTAS 

P E ' 

Commercio. 



Scnhor F. F. Londres. 30 de Janeiro de 1811. 

RECEBr as suas de 3 e 5 do passado^ no dia 5 
do corrente, vindas pelo Navio F. F. capitao 
B. B. pelas quies vejo, Vm^. pretende carregar as 
fazendas que recomendei ao seu cuidado pela minha 
ultima, no primeiro Navio para esta. 

Inclusas remeto a Vm^®. mais algumas amostras, 
porem dezejo queira recomendar .ao Tintureiro, que 
^s cores sejao vivas e firmes. 

Pelo ultimo Navio que daqui partio Ihe remeti a 
conta de venda, da sua partida de meias de seda» 
e das tres Caxas de Chapeos, pelo Navio A ; c 
achando Vm^e. algumas partidas de qualquer 
destes dous generos, que Ihe agradem, as pode 
mandar, pois sao agora mui procurados ; deve 
comtudo ter muito cuidado em que s^jao da ultima 
moda. Tenho verificado o ajuste das 20 Pipas de 
Azeite da safra prpxima, parem partirem pelos 
prin^eiros Navios : igualmente tenho carregado no 
Navio N. Capitao F. as suas 20 Pipas de Vinho 
tinto ; assim como tambem as doze e tres quartos 
de bronco, cuja Factura remeto inclusa : Os conhe* 
cfmentos, Ihos remeter^i pelo correio. Heide es- 
timar chegue tiido a salvamento. r 

He quanto por bora se me ofFerece a di^z^rlhcj 
no cntretanto sou 

De Vmc«. muito Veneraddr e Criadg. 



GRAMMAR. 85 






LETTERS 

OK 

Business, or Mercantile Affairs. 



Mr, F. F. London. The 30th of January, 1811. 

YOURS of the 3d and 15th of last Month, came 
to Hand on the 5th Current by the Ship F. F: 
Captain B. B. ; and therein I take Notice, that yoji 
intend to put on board the next'^^ood 5hip bouncf 
' hither, the Goods I recommended to your Care in 
my last,* Herewith I send you more Patterns, but 
I would desire you to be solicitous with your Dyer, 
that the Colours may be lively and durable. By the 
last Ship I remitted you Account of Sales, of the 
Parcel of Silk Stockings, and the three Boxes of 
Hats, by the Ship A; and if you meet with 
a Parcel of either, or both, to your Mind, please to 
send them, such Articles beingnow in Demand, but 

freat Care noust be taken of the Fashion and Make, 
have taken care to*" secure your twenty Pipes of 
Oil for the first Ships in the Season, and put on 
.board the Ship N* Capt. F. your twenty Pipes of 
^ Red, and twelve Pipes and three Hogsheads ©f 
White Wine, of which the Invoice .goes here- 
with, and "the Bills of Lading shall be sent by 
the post, and I hope^ will come safe to hand ; 
which being all that is necessary at present, I 
xemain, . 

> SIR, 

Your humWe-Servant. 



> I 



*,JF 3 Senhdr 



\ 



86 P O R T U P U e S E 






Senhdr Didgo Jones. 

VOU por esta avis&r a Vm<*. que p^lp Navio 

Derby, Ine remeti duas saquinhas de diam^tes, 

. import^ndo em, Pagodas 4396. 25 Fan. }0 Casks, 

em retdmo dos seas fondos em me« poddr ; os 

qu&es fiz registrar nos livros da Companhia em con* 

formidade com as suas ordems. 

Inclusos achara o Conhecimento* Factura e a sua 

* Conta coirrente fechada, que desejo cfaeguem a 

salvapiento e me alegjrarei de que fajga gr^p^^f ior 

ter6ce^. ' . 

Cdmo eu estou p^ra volt^r para a £ur<$pa^ ^ 

- mmha cbegada a Ldndres, terei ^ hdnrfi de o vMj^ % 

Ihe darSi entao^ huma relasao exacta do qqqiin^FciQ ' 
^ da India. 

Teiihp o gdsto de ^6r, 
Forte de S. Jorge. De V m^© . Rjev^rdnte Crd^ 
1 2 de Jano. 1811. f Yeqeraddr. 



* 

m ill ^ I ■i 



Snr. Joao Ferrier, Lisboa 4 de Marfo de 181 1. 

Londres: * 

ACHO-ME favorecido c6m a sua de 8 dopassado, 
e vejo, que em execu9ao as minhas 6rdems, Vm^. 
t^m comprado os quinhdntos Barris de Afdnques de 

fumo. 



O R A ¥M 4 ft. 87 



t 
I 
I 



JAr. J^mes Jones. 

THESE will advise you, that by this Ship the 
Perby, I bjavemade the returp of vbur.Stock m my 
Hands |p two 3ulses of piamonas, amounting to 
F^godas 439^6, 25 f*an. 10 Casks, having registered 
tbeo} according to your Order in the Conrpanv's 
Bpoks ', inclosed is a Bfll of Lading, together wiA 
Invoice, aini your Account current dosed, wtfich I 
IWigJi .rosy come safe t6 you, and turn to a good 
Account. A? I am Veiurning to Europe, at my 
Arnval in London, I shall have the honour to see 
you, q^nd give you an exact Account of the Trade 
windCa. I am entirely, 

' Sir, 

i 

Fort St. George, Your humble Servant. 

J«n. 12, 1811. 



^ ^ ■ ij !■ I ■ I p^^tmrnmrn i i ■ i ■ ■ ■■ i wmtf^ifamt wi ■ ■ i i^^wP^^i^— ^h^ 



Mr. John Ferrier, Lisbon, 4 March, 1811. 

» 

London. 
Sir, . 

I AM iaroimd wkb fwn ^f tb^ 94 pi iatt 
moatb, smd &ul, in Compj^ance tq my Order, you 
have bought the five hundred Bwri^s of red HerW 

-* F 4 , - rings. 



88 PORtUGlTESE 

» 

fdmo, a ^11 por Last. Estou certo que esse he o 
menor prdco por que Vmce . os p6de obter, e nao 
tenho a menor duvida que hao de corresponder na 
sua qualidade. 

O meu Navjo se esta a aparelhar para os ir buscar, 
e visto elle nao demandar mais de nove pes d' agua, 
podera mesmo carregar no seu Caes (como Vrti^e. i 
t6ve a bondade deme dizer) o' que poupara quatro 
pehnys por barril, de desp6sas. Julgo que elle^ 
podera carregar sette centos fiarris, pu niafs. O 
Capitao visto nao ter despezas a' fazer, nao nedessi- 
tara de dinheiro. 

Agrade90-llie muito^a sua informa9ao' relativa- 
mente ao c^mbio 6ntre Ldndres e esta Pra9a, mas 
* c6mo julgo as remessas sobfeo Exchequer hum 
. pduco arriscadas, Vm^e. se servira sacar sobre mim , 
ao cambio mais vantajoso possivel, fic^ndb na cer- 
teza, que as suas Lettras serao pagas coin a ponqtu- 
alidade do costume. 

Tenho o gosto de ser, 
De Vm^e. m^o. Attento Venor/ 



Snr. J. Morrice. 

Cadiz. . Londres 18 de Mar50 de 1811. 

TENHO reccbido em s6u devido tempo as suas 
differdntes cdrtas^ assim como tamb^m a minha cdnta 
corrente, a qudl tenho lap9ddo nos mSus Livros em ^ 
conformiddde' cdm Vm<^«. % ' 

Asda. 



G R A MM A R. 89 

rings, at 11/. per Last. I make no doubt, but that 
was the 4owest Price you could get them for, and 
the goodness of them does answer it. . My Ship is^ 
getting ready with all speed to go down to fetch 
them, and she may be laden at your Quay, as she 
draws no more than nine Feet of Water, (as you are 
pleased to niention,) which will save the Charge 
of four Pence per, BarreU I j^^^g^ she will carry 
seven hundred Barrels, or more. The Captain will 
not have Occasion for any Money, so will want no 
Supply. I thank you for the Information you gavq 
me in relation to the Exqhange' between London . 
and this Place, but as I look upon the Remittance 
of the Money hence, as hazardous in Exchequer 
. . Bills, you will be pleased to draw on me at the 
most commodious Exchange possible, und your 
Bills at the usual Course, which sh^U meet with all 
due Honour from, - , . 



Sir, 



Your huniible Servant 



■ / 
^* ■ ' 



Mr. J. Morricc. London, March 18, 1811 

Cadiz. 

Sir, 



^ 



»' * 



YOUR several Letters came to hand Indue 
Time, as did my Account Current, which X have 
noted in conformity with, you j your last to nje was 

. ' "of 



so PORTUGUESE 

A sda ulUcna he de 29 do paasido, 6 nejl^ ine 
Inioda recibo ds^ U^ L^tras, bmport&odo em 
s^is mil Pe^as de Oito,c|ue sndulrmao Joze Ihe re.« 
Baei^ por niinha C6nta e ordem : espero fazejr trisl0 
Neg6cio cotti ellas depdis de hvm deseinbdl90 de 
t&nto tjBmpo, e de hum c^bio tao desfavoriveL 
Acho que os limites que idllc IKe d£u» forao nuiilio 
^b4xo do c^bio, e pr^^o da prdt^ : porfim visto 
cu ter esper^do todo ^ste t^po> e nao bav4^r prcU 
babilid&de de hum ou dutro baixir^ Vm^. se servin 
temeiir-me o meu dinh^iro, ao c^cabia CQifc^al«, 
para egta Prd^a^'ou Anisterdam^ icomo Ihe psaecdr 
m4is conveni^e aos mSus inter6sse$« 

Se # pr^o da cophenilha, ou da Prdta descdsse 
tinto, que Vmct. julg4sse ^r m^is pen venifinte para 
mim, empregar o meu 41066^-0 em qualquir HAsus 
do^is g^neros, do que remet6r->me Ldltras, ntese cdzo 
o poaera fazer, deicbSndo eu isso inteiramSnte 4 sua 
disposi9ao9 na certeza de que tratard dos m6us in- 
ter^sses, com o mesmo disycto como se fdssem seus 
proprios. 

^^iil^sM4a s?tb^ da ^hegada do cambpy, porque 
poderia s6r prodiizisse alguma mud&n9a favoravel 
po Commercio, e que c^a hum podesse fazer uso 
dos s6us capitdes 5 pois ao pres^nte as clrcumstan- 
cias nao coavidao a ndda* ,He qu^nto por agora 
«e me ofFerece. a dizdr-lhe. No entretanto tenho a 
gosto de ser . 

©e Vm<^-^- .n>.*^. Attento Ve,n<>^ e Crpi^o. 






^n^. Mills & C«. 

P^o. Londres 3 de Abril de 1811. 

SSTA serve de informar a Vm». qUe de Se:^ta 
^^a a ioto dhs, se haS de abrir os Livros do Banco de 

Inglatena, 



, GRA MM A R. , fti 

of 39 of last MoPJbi wherein you give me Recftipt, 
49f the three B^Us^ ,^|i)aut>ti9g tp six thousand Piecea* 
pf EigWf which my Brother Joseph sept to you 
Iqt my AccQUOt an4 by ;qiy Order; I shall mak.e 
h^t^spxry B^rgdin of them, after sip longf a Dis- 
bursement ; besides they cost me a dear Exchtoge $^ 
i £ad his Limits to you .were much under the 
Price of Plate «nd Exchange: Now since *I 
have wilted ajl this Tinje, and there being 
liqr Probability of their falling, be pleased to send 
my Money, a^ the Exchange comes, either for> this 
Place or Amsterdam, which you judge will turn 
most to Account. If the Plate or Cochineal should 
fiall to a Price, which you may conceive will answer 
better than by Remittance at a due Exchange, in 
•udi case invest my Money ip either of them, whicji 
I do en^rely ^ea^ to }^du,, being perfuaded, you 
will act in my Afbks equ^ 1 to your own. I should 
be glad to hear of the Fleets Arrival ^ for perhaps, 
it might give some favourable turn to business, so 
that one could make some use of one's money, , for 
at preseut, it does not invite one to any thing; 
which is all from. 



Sir» 



■ t 



Your bunible Servant. 



i«» Miimi "* II *■ 



IJ^I^ieufa Mills SiQo: 

Pporto. 

London ^he Sd of April, 1911. 

THIS may serve to inform you that the jBooks ' 
will be opened at the Saok of England on Friday 

se^hnight. 



92^ P O R T U G U E S E 

Inglaterra, para pagar os devidendos vencidos art 
iquelle dia, em que eu nao deicharei de receber o 
que Ihes pertence dos juros respectivos at6 a esse 
tempo, em virtude dos poderes que me conferirao 
para esse fim» e depois de os ter recebido^ Ihos 
remetrei. 

Dcos guarde a Vmc«». m'^. annos. 

De Vmce. mto. Veno^ e Crdo. 



Hum Escrito, ou BUnete aberto, a bum Amiga ou 
Vezinbo, em qualquer ocasiao. 

_ / 

AO Senr, G. S. que seu creado T. M, Ihe roga o 
favor, de iKe enviar pelo Portador 

de que agora precisa, e por que Ihe 
ficarif muito obrigado* 



Carta, ou Instrumento de Procuragao.^ 

SAIBAM todqs quantos este instrumento, ou 
Carta de procurs^ao virem, que eu A.J8. de Londres, 
horaem de negocio, tenho nomeido e constituido e 
poresta presente nomeo, ordeno, constituo e fa90 o 
Senhor B. C. de Negociante, meo Verdad^iro 

e legitimo procurador, ppr mim e em meu Ndmc e 

'/ ao 



V 



: G R A M M A R. 95 

se*ftnight, to pay the dividends due up to this time 
to the parties concerned, wnen I shall be ready to 
receive whatever belongs to you both, with the 
respective interests thereon, by virtue of your powers 
:given to me fgr that purpose, ^nd on receipt thereof, 
shall remit the same to you, whom God preserve 
;many year3. 

* ■ • -^ • 

Your most humble Servant." 



A short open Escrito, or Message ^ to a Friend 
or Neighbour^ for any Thing upon Occasion^ 

TO Mr. G. S. that T, M. his^most humblrf* 
Servant, desires the favour of him, to send by the 
Bearer , n 

having at present immediate occasion for it, and he 
shall always remain obliged to him as his 

Humble Servant. 



4 Letter of Attorney. 



\ 



KNOW all Men by these Presents, That I 
A. B. of London, Merchatif, have named and con- 
stituted, and by these presents do name, ordain, 
•appoint, and make rtiy trusty friend, i^ Ci^of 
.Merchant, my true and lawful Attorney, for me, 
and in my nai)()e» and to my Use, to Demand, sue 

for. 



• #■ 



9* \ P OR TU G U ESE 

no itieu use; pMt defrhiY)^/ mtii^ t' rii^iiJtt'At 
T. B. Negt>ciante a 86ma de ' a mira dfeVidk ^16 
diftaT. B. dimdo 6 pOT em 6bnc<^ndd ao ifi^tt 
dittb Prbcuraddr 6 itata pdS^ fitaSktio t mtdrididt 
d« «x«rciraf, de tksar d^ tod^ fi^s 2Kf^dSi.i dtitr^ 
tousas tm direitb Mteidsfo)^, ^ra a c6l^dia9a d& 
ditta divida^ e em meu nome, de dar, e fa^er quitsi^oS^ 
6u 6utras descirgas^e geraltnente de fazer € executar 
na roatertflt sobr^ditta tao piendriam^tite como'se 
eu m^smo fizesse ou pudesse fazer, estaniio pessoal* 
m^nte presenter ratific^do, confirm&ndo, e outdr« 
gaitdo toda e qualquer cousa que o ditto meu prcK 
caraddr legttimami^nte fiz6r on causar de se fazet 
nSlla per esta presente. Em testemunha do que 
Assinei e sellei esta em aos 20 dias do m6z de 
Mar96 de 1808. .^^ Jxif A. R 

A^siihiido e Sbllado atfilnt^ 

M R f T^stemunhas. 



^ ■■' ' ■■' » ■ ■ ■ , -. 1 -1 I - - 



Carta ou 6 Jhstrumento de Fretamento. 

ESTA carta ou Instirumfento de Fretamfento 
contratado, feito aos dias do mtz de 

do Anno de do naciro6nto de n66^ 

so Senhor Jes6^ Chtirtb, he. txiXr€ T. B. Mestre; 
debaixo de Deos, do navio nomeado, 
d^ doz^tas e cxmco^xtVA torieladas q(Q6 ^ pre- 
^dtite eista Sfirto e zncotisih no Rity de 
de huma pkte, e E. T; M. B. JL. ice. lu^nlekis 
de'^negdcio da 6atra p&fte: Ga-tifioiS qu^ 6 ditto 
M6strd tem dido etn aliigue) e fretado 6 ditto 
Navb jSbi dittos h^tt^n^ dtf iie]gdei6 e qu^ dies 

OS 



GRAMMAR. »$ 

fot, recovferj and nfeceiVe of T. B. of 
Merchant^ the Sum of to m6 du^ tod ow«> 

ing bj and from the said T. B. ^iving^ aad hereby 
gra^tid^ unicJ tj^y said Attorney, fifty fuJl PoiHner 
and Authorify to usb and exercise a^l suth A&s, 
Thin^9 and Device^ in the Law» as' shall be Ac- 
cessary fqfr the recbverihg of the fiud ^b^^^and give 
Acquittance, or bther Discharges-, in my Name ; to 
make and give^ and^nerally t6 do and e^ecate on 
th^Premm^, ^s" Ailly as myself might or could do, 
were I personally pi^sent ; ratify ingyConfirriAif^ and 
allowing all and whatsoever my s^id Attorney shall 
lawfully db« or cause fd be done therein, by these 
Presents. In witness whereof t have hereunto sfct 
my Hand arid Sedl, in th6 2Dth of March, 1807. 
Sealed and delivered 

In the Presence of A. B* 

T. A. 

M.Bi 



->'>■ ..^ «V.^t.v.. r., t.«^ .>..^i»^. V'^,.l, . 



The Copy of a Cbdrtdr-Party of AffriightrAm. 

THIS Charter Party of Affreightment^ iri- 
dent^, made the of ^ 

Mi6rith of Anno Dorbini^ 

between T. A% Master, under God, of the good 
Ship or Vessel^ cailled the of the Burthen 

of ' Ttibs), or thereabouts^ now riding at An- 

chor, in the ]ft.iver of of the one rartj arid 

Ej, T, M, B, L, &c. Merchantdj of the other Part, 
witriessethi that the said Master has granted and 
let the said Ship to fiteight qnto the said Mer* 
chants^ aAd thdt they the raid Merchants have ac* 

Gordingly 



96 PORTUGUESE. 

OS dittos Homens de neg6cio tern tornado em alu- 
gucl p^lla viagem aos concertos e as condi9oes9 a- 
saber; o ditto Mestre faz concerto, promete c ' 
ot6rga, por elle'm^smo, seus -Testament 6iros, c 
Administraddres, e com os dittos homens de ne» 
gocio, e qUalquer ddlles, ou. sens; e a qualquer dos 
seusTest&menteiros, Admrnistraddres, e Constituin- 
tcs, por estes presentes ; que o ditto Navio forte* e 
sao oe quilha, e bem provido de mahtimentos, 
cfnxarcias e g^nte, le aparelhado de tddas as cousas 
convenientes e necessarias para faze r a viagerti 
adiante declarada ; com o prim^iro. vento favo- 
ravel e bom tempo que Deos premittira desp6i^ 
da data da presente, partira do porto de 
com tfidas as taes faz^ndas e Mercadorias que os 
dittos homens de negocio ouos Seus Constituintes, 
entrem^ntes carregarao ou meterao abordo delle, 
e com elle em direitura dara a ve)a e aplicara ao. 

com, o vento e o tempo mais favo- 
recerem ao ditto Navio na sua viagem , e em 
chegando ta5 perto do ditto lugar de cUe 

o ditto Mestre ou os Seus Constituintes dentro de 

Dias de trabalho para se contarem logo, 
despols de tal sua chegada, nao somente descaregti« 
rao, entregarao as dittas fazendas e mercadorias 
metidas abordo do ditto Navio ao s6bfe ditto, 

aos dittos homens de .negocio, aos seus Feitores ou 
Constituintes, ou a alguns ou algum dalles a Sal- 
vamento e b6m acondicionadas, salvo o risco dos 
mafes, e o tolhimento de principes e Govcrnadores, 
tnas tambem receberao, tornarao a caregar, e toma- 
rao abordo do ditto Navio, de e dos dittos homens 
de negocio, dos seus Feitores ou Constituintes, ou 
de alguns ou algum dalles, tddas as taes fazendas e 
mercadorias que ^Iles ou qualquer delles ali carega- 
rao, ou meterao abordo d^Ue ale o comprimSnto 
inteiro da carga do ditto Navio; asaber: tSnto 
quanto bem se poder arrumar debaixo da cuberta 

no . 



G R A x\f M A R. 97 

cordiflgly hired her for the Voyage, Md- upon the 
Teton and Conditions following : That is to say, 
the said Master does covenant, promise, and gi'ant 
fb? hiWKdf, his Executors, and Administrators, to 
and- with the said Merchants,and either of them^ 
their and either of their Executors, Administrators, 
and Assigns, by these Presents ; That the said Ship, 
strong ami! sound, and Well and sufficiently victu- 
alled,- tackled, manned, and apparelled, v^ifh all 
Things fit, needful arid necessary for the Per- 
fomidnce of the Voyagte hereafter mentioned, shall, 
with thl3 first fair Wind and Weather, which God 
^all stfnd'v aft^r the Datd of these Presents, depart 
from thef Port of with all such Goods 

and Meikshamdlae as th^ said Merchants,- or theit 
^JigsigMf shall in the mean- time lade and pat on 
board of her, and therewith directly sail, and apply 
W\to , ds Wind-and Weat^r shall test 

arwfbt tAe snid Ship to' sail, and being ah*ived as 
tkfm^ to the said ^lace ef be thie said Mas- 

tfeti-or Assigns? shall and will, within 
nmrkmg Days next from and after sudh her Arri- 
ve* to be accounted,' not only unlade and deliver 
th6'S£irtd Good's and Kfetx:handize put on board the 
said Ship at* aforesaid, unto the said Mer- 

chants, their Factors, or A'ssigns, or sdme or onfe 
of them, in Safety, and v^ell conditioned, the Dan- 
gers of the Seasi, and Resttaint of Prindels^irid R\i- 
fers^i£ceptigd;.but also shall andwill'ritfoeiVe,reladtf, 
smd takeo^n boatd the said Ship, of and from'thb 
€tAd' Merchants, their F^retbrs, or Assigns,^ or some 
ct-6ne of them, pW such -Goods and Merchandi^te, 
^* they or any df' them shall there please to lade 
and put on board her,- to the said Ship's full and 
compleat Lading ; that' is to say, as much ast Can 
conveniently be stowed in the whole Hold, and 
between Decks, afore' the main mast. Room only 
TOfeWVed-for' the said Ship's 'Provisions^ Tackle, arid - 

* G Apparel, 



n PORTUGUESE 

no conv^s, e adiante do tnastro grinde» Salvo o lugar 
para os mantimSntoS} enx^rcias e apar^Ihps do ditto 
Navio, e os dittos dias de trabalho 

;^Mdo acabados, ou o ditto navio sendo ali mais de- 
pr^ssa despachado^ o que primdiro suceedSr, elle o 
ditto Mestre ou os seus constituintes com a pritn^ica 
boa occasiao de t^mpo c vento fa^oravel em derci- 
tura navegarao e tornarao a vir cdm o ditto Navi6 
e a Sua Carga, do ditto porto de descaregar^ e reca- 
regar de aqui d^ntro de 

dias de trabalho logo despdis da entrada 
do ditto Navio dada na alflindega desta ditta 

elle o ditto Mestre ou os s6us Constituiates . 
descarcgarao e entregarao as dittas fazendas e met- 
cadorias carregadas abordo do ditto Navio ao stti 
descarregar e recarregar sobre ditto, aoi 

dittos hom.ens de neg6cio, e os seusTestainent^fros, 
Administradores, ou Constituintes^ a salvamSnto, 
salvo o risco dos mares e o tolhimento de Principeff 
e Governadpres, e assim se acabara a ditta destir 
nada Viageni E os dittos homens de negd- 

cio concertam» prometem, e otorgam por 611es m^ 
mos e qualquer dalles, ou s6us, e qualquer de s6ui 
Testamenteiros^ Administraddres^ e Constitiuntes 
por esta presente : que os s6us Testamentei- 

ros, Administraddres, Feitores ou Constituintes nao 
somen te descaregarao e recaregarao o ditto na^ 
ao seu pdrto, de descaregar, e recaregar de 
sobre ditto, e despachardo e descaregardo o mdsmo 
neste na man^ira e forn^a acima decl&p 

rdda : e dSntro dos certos dias ^e tempos sdbre no- 
meddos ; Mas tamb^m por int^iro de tddo 6 frete • 
que se vencdr, para se pagar e pedir por e dur&nte 
esta presente destindda viagem ; bem e verdadeirA- 
m^nte pagardo ou causardo que se pdgue ao ditto 
Mestre, aos s£us Testamenteiros, Administrad6res ' 
ou Constituintes a somma de 

de dinheiro corr^nte de na msm^ira c 

fbvmt 



GRAM MAR. 99 

AppareU and the said working Days 

being expired, or the said Ship there sooner dis* 
patched, which first shall happen, he the said Mas- 
ter, or his Assigns, shall and will, with the then 
ncit Opportunity of Wind and Weather from her 
said unlading add relading Port of afpresaid, , 

directly sail, return, and come back with the said 
Ship and Lading unto the Port of * and here . 

within working Days next after the said 

Ship shall be entered in the Custom-House of this 
•aid he the said Master, or his Assigns, 

shall and will unlade, and deliver the said Goods and 
Merchandizes, laden on board the said Ship at her 
lading^ and rcladinrg ' aforesaid, unto the said 

MerchaflVS, their Executors, Administrators, or 
Assigns,, ifa safety, and well conditioned, the Dan- 

Ers of jthe'Seas; aijd Restraint of Princes and Ru- 
js, excepted, and so end the said intended Voyage ; 
and the said Merchants do covenant, promise, and 
grSint, for themselves, and either of them, their, 
and either of their Executors and Administrators, . 
to and with the s^id Master, his Executors and Ad- 
ministrators, and Assigns, by these Presents, that 
! their Executors^ Administrators, Factors, 

or Assigns, shall and will not only unlade and re-: 
lade the sarid Ship, at her unlading and reladingPort^ 
of aforesaid, and dispatch, and discharge the . 

sanpe at this in the Manner and Form as 

^boye expressed, and within the respective Days 
aind Times above mentioned, but also shall and 
^li, in full of all Freight to be dQe, payable, or 
dcmandable, for or during this present intended 
Voyage, well and duly pay, or cause to be paid, 
unto tne said Master, his Executors, Administrators, 
or Assigns, . * the Sum of 

of lawful money of in the 

Manner and Form following: That is to say. 

Part thereof within 

* G 2 Days 



100 PORTUGUESE 

forma seguinte; AsabSr p&rfce d61I& 

d^ntro em dias despois da eatrdds^ 

do ditto navio d4da na alf j^ndega de 

Item nri4is dSntrp. em dias proxi- 

mos seguintes, e o rest4nte do ditto frete int6iro 
dcntro em dias logo despdis da descdr^ 

do ditto Navio aquiem. sobre ditto» b 

ac6rdase reciprocamSnte por e^ntre d:mba6 a^ par- 
tes por dlles m^smos, os seus particulires Testamen- 
teiros, e Administraddres que tpdos os g^tos dos 
portos que se vencerem para pagarse ou pedirse^ dur 
rinte esta pres^nte destjndda. vidgem ; serdp p&gos 
e satisfeitos na mantra e forma seguinte ; A^^bj^ 
delles, pellos dittos homens de neg6cio ou 
scus Testamenltdiros ou Constituihtes : Alem disspi 
por esta se concerta que podera s^r e si^}^ i|cij;o a(Wf^ 
e pellos dittos homens de negocio, ossi^^s.&itdrc^ 
ou Const] tuintes de ret^r o ditto navio em detenj^. 
ao seu pdrto, descarga. e. r^carga sobr/edit^a, e tafjOr 
bcm em ... . sobredittp^ tgpto tempo etantos cjia^qiifi 
se requ^iraoi aldm dos dia$, cerjtos acim^ apoiptddo% 
salvo que nao passem. dias,pQr int^jko.;. 

Elles OS dittos homens de negqcio, os seus FeitdreSi. 
Constituintes por c^da hum.e cada t^l djfi pagindo 
ao ditto Mestre ou aos seus Constituintes de di^^eqi. 
dia, como mesmo se veneer para se pagar> qualque]:; 
c6usa ^obreditta emcontr^riq nap obstante ; e p^lk 
comprimento de tddas, e de cada, huma das oduw 
acima decjaradas, as quaes por parte e p^llo que,t6- 
ca ao ditto Mestre; aos seus TestamentSiros^- A^ 
ministraddres ou Constituintes. e c^da hum dalles, 
sao e devem de ser avidas^ tida$^ observadas .0 
compridas, o ditto Mestre se obrig^^a.si m6s.aH)».<9 
seus Tcstannenteiros, e Administrad6res> juntam^te. 
com- o ditto Navio, o seu frete, enxai cias e .apar^lhos. 
aos dittos homens de negocio, aos seus Testamen- 
teiros, Admipistradores e CJpnstituintes^.e cida.huB 
delles na sdraa ou pena de dinheiro corrSnte de 

part 



fek A M M A ft. 101 

pkys d^et* the said ship shall be entered into the 
'Custottl Hotise of Item^ 

tactrt thereof within Days then next fol- 

ilbwing, and the remaining part of the said whole 
FHaight within I>ays next after the 

s&id Ship shaH be delivered after lading here at 
aiorea&id ; and it is mutually agreed by and 
between the said Parties to these Presents, for therti- 
Ifelves, their several Executors and Administrators, 
"That all Port Chalrges which shall grow due, pay- 
)A)te, or demandable, during this present intended 
ybya|;e, sh^U be paid and satisfied in the manner 
jUdd R)rm follovfring ; That is to say, thereof by 
iiie slEiid Merchants, their Executors, Factors, or 
A&sig^ns, and the other thereof by the said 

Master, hils Executor or Assigns : Further, it is 
beteby agreed, that it shall and may be lawful unto 
and for the said Merchants, their Factors, or As- 
signs, to keep the said Ship in Demurrage at her 
liTiIading and relading Port above mentioned, and 
also at aforesaid, over and above the re- • 

spected Days aforementioned, such other Time and 
Number of Days as will be requisite, so as the same 
exceed not Days in the whole, they the 

said Merchants, their Factors, for each and every 
such Day, paying ^unto the said Master, or his 
Assigns Day by Day, where the same shall 

grow due and payaole, any thing aforesaid to the 
c6ntrary notwithstanding; and for the Perform- 
ance of all and singular the Premises, which on 
the Part and Behalf of the said Master, his Execu* 
tors. Administrators, and Assigns, and every of 
th^m, are and ought to lie well and truly holden, 
observed, and performed, the said Master doth bind 
and oblige himself, his Executors, and Administra* 
t6rs, tbgethet with the said Ship and her Freight, 
Tackle and Apparel unto the said Merchants, their . 
Executors, Administrators, and Assigns, and every 

of 



\. 



102 PORTUGUESE 

I 

para se pagar bem e verdareirimente por ^sta prc- 
sente, e tambem pello comprimentode tddas e.de 
cajda huma das cousas sdbre dittas^os qudes por pdrte 
e pello que toCa aos dittos homens de negocioj abs 
seus Testamenteiros, Administradores, Constituin- 
tes ou qualquer delles, sao e devem de s^r gufix* 
dadas> pagas, e Compridas; os dittos h6mens de 
negocio se obrigao a si mesmos, os seus Testamen* 
teiros, e Administradores^. junta e separadamSnte 
cdm a su^s fazendas que se caregarao abordo do dit- 
to Navio n^sta presente destindda viagem, ao ditto 
Mestre aos seus Testamenteiros, Administraddfes e 
Constituintes, e a c^da hum di^lles, na semelhaote 
Soma da pena de de Semelhante dinheiro 

corrente de para ser pago bem e verdadei- 

mente por esta presente; Em Te^temunha! do que 
as pdrtes Sobredittas assinarao e Selarap reciproca* 
mente estas pres6ntes Cdrtas de fretamento contra- 
tddas^ ao dia e anno prim^iro acima declarddo* 

XB. 
Sellido e entregue 
diante de 
A. B, C. D. 



Apolice de Segura, 

» • 

Em o N6me de Deos, Jmen. 

Tanto no seu proprio ndme, €6mo» por, 
ou em o. nome, ou nomes de todos e cada pessda 
ou pessoas a quem o m6smo pertencer» p6ssa ou po- 
dera pertencer, em parte ou em t6do, faz .o Seg^ro, 
causa asi mesmo e a elles, e a cada hum d611es» de 
assegurdrse, perdidos ou nao perdidos 

sabre qualqujcr g^nero de fazendas e M^r- 
cadoriasquaesqu^r^carregddas6u para se carregdrem 
ab6rdo do bom Navio por ndpae. . . do portc 

de 



GRAMMAR. 101 

mt tbein> in the Sbm or Penalty of *' . Pounds 
of kwful Money of well and truly to be 

paid by these Presents, and likewise for the Per* 
tbrmance of all and singular the Premises, which 
on the Part and Behalf of the said Merchants their 
Executors^ Administrators, and Assigns, or any 
of them, are and ought. to be kept, paid, and per* 
formed, the said Merchants do bind and oblige 
themselves, ,their Executors, and Administrators, 
jointly and severally, together with their Goods* to 
be laden on board the said Ship, this present intend- 
ed Voyage, unto the said Master, his Executors, 
Admin is tiators, and Assigns, and every of them, 
in the like Sum and Penalty of of like 

lawful Money of also well and truly to 

-be paid by these Presents. In Witness whereof, the. 
Parties aforesaid to these present Charter-parties in- 
dented, have interchangeably put their Hands and 
Seals the Day and Year first above written. 

T. B. 
Sealed and delivered in i 

the Presence of 
A.B.aD. 



A Policy of Assurance. 

In the Name of God, Ameny 
as well in his own Name, as for and in the Name 
mod Names of all and every other Person and 
.Persons to whom the same doth, may or shall ap- 
pertain, in Part, or in all, does make Assurance, 
, and causes himself and them, and every of them, 
■' to be insured, lost, or not lost upon 

any kind of Goods and Merchandize whatsoever, 
' laden or to be laden aboard the good Ship called 
the Burthen Tons^ 

Of 



104? PORTUGUESE 

de / ^one]4das, de <|ue b^ M^tre 

debdixo de D^os P. M. o\i quem ^er que 4dr 
por Mestre do ditto iN«Vio, ou o MestFe^ddJleM' 
Dom^e ou nomeara ; principi^ndo a ffvent\lFa -sdbre 
as dittas faz^nd^s ^ Mercadorias de> e logo despdis 
de carregallas abordo do ditto Nam e assrai 

se continuarde Gcaxk at6 que o dittfi Navlo c6m as 
dittas faz^ndas 9 Mercadbtlas qu4esqii6r^iiegaf 

e' as mesRias abi descarregad&s aem Salva- 
m^nto ; e serA licito parao ditto navio^ nesta viA- 
geni, de pardr e detme em quaesqu6r poito^sfkL^u- 
gdres s&m prejuizo a dste Seguro. ' As 

dittas /faz^adas e Mercadorias por conc^rto^ s^ e 
serao avaliadas em S6m que se dt di^tra 

conta d^ll ^smesSfnas, tocante as Aventuras e liscos 
com que fl6s os Seguradores nos contentamosegue 
tqm^mos sobre nos ni^sta vidgem; £llas S££ dos 
"Mkres, das Ddos de gu^rra, de fi&go, inimigos^ 
Cprsarios, LadroeS) Roubad6res^.A]{janu^tos oufa- 
zdndas perdidas e deitddas no mdr, lettras de Marea, 
e contra Marca, sobresaltos^ tomadks no Mdr^ cita- 
9oes, tolhimentos e deten9as de t6dos os R^ys, 
Principes e p6vos de na9ao, condi9a5 ou qualidade 
qualqu6r, barratria e contrdstes engan6sos do mestre 
e dos Marinh^iros, e de tddos os 6utros perigos ; p6r- 
das e desdstres que ja vi^rao ou que virao, ou pre- 
juizo^ desaproveitam^nto ou d&no das dittas taz^n- 
das e mercadorias, ou de algua parte d^llas. £ se 
acdso succeder alguma p^rda ou desventfira, sera li* 

^ cito aos Asseguraddres, Feitdres, Servos e Constitu- 
intes de manddr faz6r dilig^ncias e trabalh&r per, 

^ 6m, e &c£rca da defeza, Salvam^nto, e reeobramdnto 
das dittas fazendas e mercadorias, oude alguma pdrte 

-di^Uas s^m prejuizo d^ste Seguro, aos gistoe do 
que nos os Asseguraddres contrtbuir^mos cada hum 
cpnforme a Sua quantia n£lle assegurdda ^ e n6s-QS 
AssegurQddres eataraios de acdrdo e conc^nb qu€ 
^staescritura e seguro terd tinta for9a e valor cdmo 

a mais 



C R A M M A R. 105 

or thereabouts ^ whereof P. M. is Master, u&der 
God, for this preseht Voyage or ii^fao* 

soever "else •shall go fof Matster in the said. Ship, or 
by whatsoever Name or N^Etmes the said Ship, or 
the Master thereof, is or shall be named or cdJed ; 
beginning the Adventure upon the said Goods Bod 
Merchaiidise from and immediately following the 
Lading thereof aboard the said Ship 
and so shall continue and endure until the said Ship, 
with the said Goods and Merchandise whatsoever 
shall be arrived and the same there saroly 

landed ; and it shall be lawful for the said Ship in 
this Voyage to stop and stay at any Port or Places 

without prejudice to this Assurance. 
The said Goods and Merchandise by Agreement, 
are and shall be valued at without fur- 

ther Account to be given for the same, touching 
the Adventures and Perils which we the Assurer© 
are contented to bear, and do take upon us in this 
Voyage ; they are of the Seas, Men of War, Fire, 
Enemies, Pirates, Rovers, Thieves, Jetsons^ Let- 
ters of Marque and Counter-marque, Surprisals, 
Takings of !Sea, Arrests, Restraints, and Detain* 
ments of all Kings, Princes, and People of what 
Nation, Conditions, or Quality soever, Baratryof 
the Master and Mariners, and of all other Perils, 
Losses and Misfortunes, that have or shall come 
to the Hurt, Detriment, or Damage of the said 
Goods and Merchandise, or any part thereof ;' and 
in Cslse of any Loss or Misfortune, it shall be law- 
ful to the assured Factors, Servants, and Assigns, 
to sue, labour, and travel, for, in, and about the 
Defence, Safeguard, and Recovery of the said 
Goods and Merchandise or any part thereof, with* 
out Prejudice to this Assurance, to the Charges 
whereof, we the Assurers will contribute each one 
according to the Rate and Quantity of his^Sum 
herein assured : And it is agreed by us the Insurer?, 

that 



106 PORTUG.UESE . 

a miis authentica Apolice ou Escritura de Segiir^ 
^ dantes feita em qualquer parte de £ asstm nos os 
Asseguradores somos coDtentes e por efta prometS* 
mos e nos obrig^mos cadahuoi por sua propria parte, 
OS Dossos Herdeiros, TestamentSiros, Admrnistra-* 
ddres e Constituintes pello verdadeiro comprimento 
das cousas acima declaradas, coiifessando que esta- 
mos pagos e satisfeitos do que se nos deve aconta 
d^ste Seguro. 

Em testimunha do que nos os Seguradores^ aiS- 
namos ao pe d^ste, com as quantias assegu^as^ 

Eu A. B. Sdu Contente com este Seguro?^ -^ 
por cem livras Esterl. L. em de)^' 



ConJiecimento. 

DIGOeuT. B. de Mestreou 

Capitao qi^ sou do Navio que Deos salve por 
N6me que ao preseute e&k surto e . 

/ancor^do no porto de para cojn o favdr 

de Deos seguir a sua viagem .ao pdrto de: 
a6nde be miuha direita descarga, que he verdade, 
qqe recebi, e t^nho carregado dentro do ditto 
Navio debaixo de cuberta enxuta e bSm acondido* 
sado de Marcado comamarca de fora, o 

qual me obrigo e prometbi levandome Deos a bdm 
salvam^nto e ditto Navio ao ditto Porto, de entrc- 
gar em n6me do sobreditto a T. M . 
auzente a qu6m seus poderes tiv6r pag^ndo- 

me de frete para assim comprir c guardar, 

obrigo minha pessoa, e bems e ditto iNavio ; cm cer- 
t^sa^ qual dei trcs conhecimentos de hum thedr, 
assioadospor mim ou por meu Escrivao ; hum com- 

* prido 



GRAMMAR. t07 

^ ■ • - 

that this Writing and Assurance shall be of as much 
Force and EflFect, as the surest Policy or Writing:of 
Assurance heretofore made in . or 

elsewhere in and so we the Assurers 

are contented, and do hereby promise and bind 
ourselves, each one for hi§ own Part, our Heirs, 
Executors, and Assigns, to the Assured, their Exe^- 
cutors, Administrators, and Assigns, for the true 
Performance of the Premises, confessing ourselves 
paid the Consideration due unto us for thi$ Assu* 
ranee, by - In Witness whereof, wc 

the Assurers have subscribed our Names and Sums 
assured in 

1 J. B. am contented with this Assurance for 
One hundred Pounds. Witness my Hand> - 

The 15th of March, 1811. S^"^^^ 



• \ 



A Bill of Lading. 

SHIPPED, by the Grace of God, in good Or- 
der, and well-conditioned, by in and 
upon the good Ship called the where- 
of is Master under God, for this present Voyage 

and now riding at Anchor in 
arid, by God's Grace, bound for 
to say being marked and numbered as in 

the Margin^ and are to be delivered in like good 
Order, and well-conditioned, at the aforesaid 
Port . of the Danger of the Seas only 

excepted, unto Mr. or bis Assigns, he 

or they paying for the said Goods 
with Primage and Average, as is accustomed. In 
Witness whereof, the Master and Purser of the 
said Ship has^ affirmed to three Bills of Ladinc^, * 
all of this Tenor and Date; the one of which, 
three Bills being accomplished^ the other two to 

<- ' iUnd 



Wft PORTUGUESE' 

]>rido OS dutros ndo vdlliam ; feit5 em , ' . 

14 de Mar90 de 181 1 Annot 

Ign6ro o contfetido. 

Instrumenfo ou Escritura ^ Compromhso. 

A TODOS quantos ^ste presetitc Instrutn^ntd 
DU. Escritura de Compromisso virem, de n65 Acre* 
ddres de G. M. Negociante de StedAe ; 

C6mo o ditto- G- M. ao pTes6ntfe fica deTendo e 
cm dereito d6ve a' nos os Acredores delle ditto Gi 
M. varias c diversas sdmmas de Dinb^iro, fee. As 

^ quaes em rasao de muitas divrdas e algdmas d61Ia^ 
mui gr^tides, que tambi&m em derfeito se Ihe d^vem 
a elle^ nao se podem arrecadar sem alguma dila^ao 
de t^po, e por s^em algtimas dellas irrecuperliVfeis 

« sem demanda, elle efta por ora muito desabilitado 
de fazer pagamento a n6s os seus Acreddres da 
nossa intSira e justa divida conforme a sua vontade 
c des^joj a respeito de qae,elle nos pede cbto todo 
o encarecimento que n6sos dittos. Acred6res> e cada 
hum de nos fossemos servidos &t dar e tonced^t a 
illc o Ditto G. M. aos seus Tes^mentdiros, Admi- 
nistradores, ou Constituintes, t^dta largu^sa ou di- 
la9dode tdmpop^llo pagiam^nto e satisfa^do de nossas 
dividas particulares, que Ihe parecer jtisto, e rasdo 
p611o atclince e cobrStnca das dittas dividas ; AsabiSr^ 
que nos e cSida hum de n6s ficassemos contdntes a 
tom^T e receber de nossas dividas intdiras eiti 
para se r^partirem em p&rtes^ plira se pa- 

garem em pagam^ntos diversos na man^ira 

e forma Seguinte : Asab6r, o primeiro pagam^nto 
della ha de set e 6 resto pagar-se-ha em 

proximo p^lia intigira paga e Satisfa9io 

das dittas dividas especeficddas ; E'p^llo mai$ pie- 
:oirio eomprim6nto dos v4rios pagam^ntos sobfe- 

dittos 



G,R A M.M A;R.. H)» 

stsmd void. Aod so God. send, the good. SlhJ^ito- 
her d^ired Port in Safety. Amen. Dated in . 
the 14 of March 1811. 

tnside and Contents unknowa. 



W ■»' 



A Leittar of Licence, 

TO all People^ to whom, this present. Wiidbg, 
shsdl conie> We the Creditors, of G. Ml of 

Merchant, send greeting..^ Whereas- the 
sc^id G* M, at this present Time, does stand in- 
debted*, and dojes justly owe unto us. the said Credi- 
tiors of him tbei, said 6. M. diyers and sundry Sums 
of Money,, &<:• which». by reason of many Debts^; 
and. some of them very greats that are likewise 
justly owing luito. him^ and cannot be had or re« 
cpv^red without some Respite of Time^.and some 
of them, not without Suit, he is very much, disabled 
at present to mal^e Payment unto us the said Cre- 
ditors,, our. whole and just Debt, as he seems, will- 
ing and desirous ; in consideration whereof^r he 
instantly desires us. That we the: said Cr^editors, and 
every 'one. of i^s^, would be pleased.to give and.gr^nl; 
untO'the said G. M. his. Executors, Administrators^ 
or Assigns j, such Liberty or Respite of Time, for the 
Payment. and.Satisfactioa. of our several Od^ts^.as 
he thinks reasonable for the obtaining, .^tti^g, 31^4 
TACpyering^of the said Debts : viz. That we. and 
every, one of us would be content to. take, andacr 
cept of our whole Debts in. to^,be diyided 

in I * Parts, to-be paid at several 

Payments, in Manner, and Form following r\viz« 
The fifsti Payment thereof to be anithc 

Residue to, b^piiid at next in 

fuU Payment and Satisfaction of the said several 
Dcihts : And for the more full Perfprniance.of'tbe 
said several Paymeats aforesaid, in such Manner, and 

Form 



110 PORTUGUESE 

dittos em tal man^ira.e forma cdmo acima fe Iiinita 
c declara; ao verdad^lro intteto deltas presenteselle 
o ditto G. M. ao ou 4ntes do sera obri^ado 

a nos OS dittos acreddres na me^ma conformidsidey 
por hdma obriga^ao que se fara na melhor forma 
de derSUo com todos e cada hun) dos pagamentos, 
na maneira acima limitada, eih hum certo ]ugar ou 
lugares convenientes de nos os dittos Acredores no-' 
me&dos, e a pSna de cada htima das obrigacoes ha de 
ser dohrada daSomma inteira, inclusa nella roesma, 
para sfir aaios entregue e a cada hum de nos, os nos- 
sos Testament^iros, ou Constituintes, ao ou antes do 
proximo Seguinte da data desta ; poresta 
c&usa Saiba se ; que nos os dittos Acredores aqui 
a baixo assinados> e cada htim de nos para si em 
particul&r, c por seus Testamenteiros, Administra* 
ddres e Constituintes ao resp^ito do enicica especi- 
ficado e declarado, por estes presentes, de vont&dc 
pr6pria consentimos, contratamos, prometemos e 
concord&mos ao e com o ditto G. M. ou seus Testa- 
ment^iros, Administradores e Constituintes por es- 
tes pres^nteisqiie nos os dittos Acredores, ecada hum 
de nos, os, nossos Testamenteitos, Administradores 
e Constituintes, aceitaremos do ditto G. M. dos s6us 
Teftament£iros, AdministradiSres e Constituintes, to- 
das e cada'huma de tdes dividas e quantias de din- 
h£iro do ditto G. M. a nos e cada bum de nos, de- 
vidas evencidas em virtude de taes obriga- 
fdens, Segur&n9a ou Seguran9as sobredittas, 
para se pagdrem em tal modo e maneira, c 
ao8 tdes dias e tempos que acima se limitao e 
requerem. ' E al6m disso, que nos os dittos Acre- 
dores e cada hum de n6s, ou nossos e cada htim de 
n6ssos Testamfenteiros, Administradores e Consti- 
tuintes, em conformiddde d entrega da ditta Obri- 
ga^do a n6s e a cada htim de nossos Testamenteiros, 
Administraddres, e Constituintes ao ctisto do ditto 
G. M. OS seus Testamenteiros, Administradores, e ' 

Constituintes, 



GRAMMAR. ill 

Form, as is^ above limited. and declared, according 
fo the true meaning of these Presents, he th« said 
G. M. shall ahd will, at, or before the • be^ 

. come bound uoto us the said Creditors respectively, 
by One Obligation in due Form of Law to be made, 
including all and every oneof the Payments in such 
Sort as is above liniited at some convenient Place 
or Places * . by each of us the said Creditors 

to be nominated and appointed, and the Penalty of 
every Obligation to be doubled the whole Sum in- 
cluded in the Condition of the same to be delivered 
unto us, and every one of us, our Executors or As^ 
signs, at or before the next ensuing the Date 

hereof: Know ye therefore, that we the said Cre- 
ditors, • whose Names are here under- written, and 
every one of us for his own Part, and for his Execu- 
tors, Administrators and Assigns, for the Conside- 
ration above specified and expressed, do by these 
Presents willingly consent, covenant, promise an4 
agree to and with the said G. M. his Executor^,* 
Administrators, and Assigns, to accept of the said 
G. M. his Executors and Assigns, all and every of 
the said Debts and Sums Of Money by the said G. 
M. unto us, and twery one of4is^ owing) and paying 
upon such Obligations, Assurance and Assurances, 
as aforesaid, to be paid in such Planner and Sort^^ 
and at such Days and Times^ as is above limited 
ahd required. And further, that yye the said Cre- 
ditors, and every of us, our, and every of our Exe- ' 
cutors, Administrators, and Assigns respectively, 
upbn the Delivery of the said Obligation to us, and 
ta every of us, and every of our Executors,, Admi- 
nistrators, and Assigns, shall and will, at the 
Charge of the said G. M. his Executors, Adminis- . 
trators, and Assigns, seaU subscribe, and, in due 
Form of Law, deliver to the said G. M. our suffici- 
ent general release, for him,. his Executors, Admi- 
nistrators, or Assigns, to bear Date and Limitation, 

before 



112 PORTUGUESE 

Gonstituintes, Sellar^mos, assinar^mos e na-melbdr 
£Snna e dereito entregar^mos bo ditta €k ]Vfc. a>n6ssa 
geral e sufHcidqte descarga^ para s6r rendidia' pac 
£I]e o ditto G* M. ou sdus Test amen tt^ivosy Admi- 
oistradores, e ConstituiDtes, k data' e a Vimitsti^io, 
antes do dia e data defsta abriga^ao n6ira ;. em tes- 
timiinha do que temos assinado e sellddb;esta^ 

Daladk'aos 15 de Maiode 1811*. 

r 

■ * ■ > i — ^ ■ - , -| ■ - - . ^ ■ . - ^^^ 

Letra de Cambio. 

Landra, S de Junho 1811. por 300 Milreii. 

A VISTA desta minha pricaeira Eetra de 
Cambigr, pagard- Vm. ao Senhor T. M. ou OVdem a 
soitima de tresi&ntos Milreis em' dinh^iro corr^nte 
dfe^ Porfugdl, Va!6r recebidodo SeiiHor T. D. como 
p^r aviso de . Seu Venerador e CrtSA'Of^ 

Axx Senhor T. Ml .... T. M>: 

Neerociante em Lisboa. 



. .1' ; •>il-- 




V 


■ 1 • 

t ■ .1 




y 


' 


■ f . •;;• . .. 


lMoa>7 dfe Junho leit.' • - 




\ 


2^£.8tmM. 



A, QUARENTA Dias Vista desta minha Se- 
£unda Letra de Cambio^ (a. primeira n&6 sendo 
Ipaga^pagard Vm. ao Senhor F. G. & Companhia^ 
6a Ordfim a Somma de* dozSnta& e Cinquenta- livras 
EaterHnas em moeda corrente de Inglaterra, valdr 
^reoebida do Senhor J;II>. corao por aviso de: 

Ao, Senhor T. K Negpciante. 

em Londrcs, Seu Venerador e Creado. 

H.S. 



G-R A M>M A ft. Ill 

before the Day of the Date of this new Obligation 
to be made for the Debt In Wi theM hereof, we 
have hereunto set our Haod$ 4^ Seals; - Dated 
tU X*rt)>f May 1811, &c. 



I ■ 



r • ■ V 

■ • • ... , 

..f,^ | *li i^iili M iiii . Jj'i ' ' * "! M ' " '* ■ ! >»!■ . '% C>i> li> rf ii -.'i 



!• . . 



/.);- . Bitii Iff SJctiM$ge. .::!> 

( : I . • ; J . . . . 

i ,1 ... .V-*"«'.'l 

AT Sight of this my first Bill of fiiechmgei 
^ctoe.tb pay to.Mn T. M.or Orders tbe 8mn lof 
^Thscc Hundred Mlbeais in current Mom^^of Por* 
ftttgHU Value received of Mr. T« U.'fiiang it tB 

Asc^aunt, as per Advlc^^iriom^ . SIR, < : . 

*tb Mf . t. M. Merchant Youri, H. & 



» . I 



I • 



. '. .J 






.r''>4i(' = t * "..*: : ^ . . 



Lisbon 7th of Jooe Idlt* ' for S50& Sterliag 

AT Forty days Sight, of tiiis m^ second Bill of 
,£aa:hange, ngrfissHindtliArdaiot being pdkl,{>leate 
4d pay to Mii<it.cG/ and Oompany, or Od^' tile 
Sum of two Hundred ^and fifty jPbundt Ste]Oifig> in 







Tours, H. S» 



\ 



114 PORTUGUESE 

I. 






Protesto de hnma Letra de Cambh. r 



.. »» 



SAIBAM todos a quern 6sta ^resente es(;rit\^ 
ra tocar que aos do mtz de, do knr 

no de a requerim^nto de P. C. Nego- 

ciante de eu M. N. Tab^Uao de 

n6tas jiirado e admitido'pMia-antoridade del Rei, 
&c. fui a casa da morada do Senhor T. B* sobre 

3u6m a Letra de Cambio acima referida be saca- 
a, e mostrei a original ao ditto T. B. requerendo 
a sua aoeita^ao.della : o qual me respondeo que nao 
acdttria* a ditta Letra por huma^ ras6ens*q\)i^ e^re* 
veria ao Senhor T. P. sacador ; pella ^ual rasa6 
eu o ditto Tabaliao protestei^' por ^^$te'' prfesente 
prot£ftoyt4nto cdntra o ditto F; P. 6 sac^ddrxdmo 
tamb^m cdntra o ditto T. B. s6ln^ quern he'sacada, 
deroiis cdAtra todas as outraspessdas; Endos saddce^ 
ou outras nella interessadas^jpor^'todos os C^ktnbiaSf 
Rec^mbois, danos e inter^sses q.uaesquer^ VHm- pre- 
'sfen9a de H, J. S. T. chamados por T^sternunliijas a 
€ste presente acto, f(§ito no meu flscritorio em 6 dia 
e inno acima declarado. 

M. N, Notario Publico. 



aha 



Vartas For mas de Rccibou . 

* - > 

Dinheiro recebjdo tor inteiro. ^ ■ ^ . . 

^4). .: RECl^I, .do , Sbotoih ThoAapi Crcwv Seis 
tluv/^ /Setc $bi]lns iSdsi , .pernios .inbstsci :de : tod^s^ ds 

. to b'f^:miiayorAem'^^^ .' 

RECEBI do St. Jonas Lee,5ltlifttro Livns t 
iCippo Sbilips por Conta de meu amp Moises.Tnist 



. ^ 



G R A M^MrATIC "1 

» ,«. , . •» . \^ 

A Protest of a Bill of Exchange. ^ ^ . ^ , 

K^JOW all Persons whom this present, Wi;it^ji 
ipg may concern, that the or ^ iji^lwr 

Year at the Request of Mr. P. C. of 

Merchant, T. M. N. Public Notary, sworn and ad- 
mitted by Authority of his most sacred Majesty, 
did go to the^ Dwelling-housfe of Habitation ot Mr. 
T, B. upon whom the above named Bill of Ex- 
change is drawn, an* shewed the Original unto 
the said Mr. T. B, demanding his Acceptance of the 
same, who answered me he 'should not acce'pt the 
6ame Bill, for someReasons he should write Mr. F. P. 
the Drawer, Wherefore I the ss>id Notary ^(Jid pro- 
test, and by these Presents protest, as well against 
t^tf.^9Mi F. P. the Drawer, as ljike\vise agaiiist t,he 
'-^ said T. B. upon whom it is drawn ; , as also again^ltl; 
all other Persons, Indorsers, or others therein con- 
cerned,' for all Changes, Rechanges- :Damajgf€i» and 
Interest whatsoever, in Presence of H- L and S. T. 
c^led for Witnesses to this present Act, Hone in 
iny'Office in the Day and Year above men- 

tioned* . . ^. M. N. Notary Public* 

Various Forms of Receipts. 

V Money received in Full. 

RECEIV ED 1 St Januarv 1 8 11 , of Mr. Thomas; 
Cr0WySix Pounds Seven SBillin^s and Sixpence, in 
' . full of all. Demands per . 

1 - 

For another's Use. 

RECEIVED 22d February, 1 8 1 1 , of Mr. Jona« 
Lee, Four Pounds Five Shillings, for the Use of my 
- Master Moses Trust, per 

:..■.'■- • w.«. 

% - • H 2 






lltt pOjRItU'G.U.ESE 

Dinheko t^cibtdo & c6nta. 

RECEBI a SO dis Marco, 18U, do Sr. Jacinto 
Cbok; Cinco Livras Cinco Shilins, 4 cdnta de doze 
JlivVasc dez Shilins, per Conta de men par Antonio 

Tfuclove, 

SO de Mar50 1811. 



^ ■ • 



pkhiin recibidB k cSnia de Cent as fue naS istaB 

MJHsiadas. 

RECEBIt da Scnhora Martha Rich, por mao$ 
db Pedro Cornet* onze Livra& a Conta, 

,fl4deAbril J8ll. 

Quando hum Rol ou Coniafepaga por inteiro. 

RECEBI. & 15 de Mayo, 1811, o etttpbrte 
d*«sta Conta, por ' 

V Quandofepaga dmhiira a Cents de hum rSt. 

RECEBI, Sete livras a conta deste Rol 

6 de Junho de IftlK 



•w«^<i^— ^AMPM 



liotas tm Ohrtga^ens que faz hum Homrn quando tarns 

dinheiro emprejtado. 

Londres, 4 de Junho, 1811. 
EU a1;)aixo firmado prom^to pagar aoSr. E. D. 
Banqueiro do Thesouro de sua Majestade, do Excise^ 
on d sua 6rdem quar^nta dias despdis da ddta desta 
obriga9ao qu4tro c^nfas c trinta livras por valdr re^ 
cebido 

• * 

;^.430 p Christovao Wade. 

EU abaixo firmado prometo pagar ao Sr. PaiHo 
Barker ou 4 sua ordem em sendo requerido> ire- 
^enta^, e noventa, e quatro livras dous Shilins e 

^ . Scis 



ti^ R A KM A 1L '. tn 

• \ 

y RECEIVm. SOth of March, lall, of Mr, 
James Cook^ Five Pounds Ten Shillings, in Part of 
Twelve Pouirfs Ten Shillmgs^foir mjr father Antho- 
ny Tniek)v4, per 

• • ' . ,. It. 

I . ... • ■ -. 

/ » 

Mon^ receivfd on 4ccounts wfettjtd. 

\ RECEIVED a+th April 1811, of Mrs. Mtr- 
thftiRich, by t;hc Hands of Peter Cornet, Eleven: 
Pounds on Account, per 

When a Bill is paQ in Full. 

* 

RECEIVED 1 5th May, 1 8 U, the full Contents 
hereof, per 

When a BUI is paid in Part. 

RECEIVED 26th June, 1811, Seven Pounds 
in Part hereof, per 



Promijfory Noles/or a Man^s Self. 

\ 

s 

London, Jun^ 4th 181 L 

I PROMISE to pay to Mr. Edward Draper, 
Cashier of his Majesty's Revenueof Excise, orOrder, 
forty Days aft^r Date, Four Hundred and Thirty 
Pounds. Value received ^ 

jf .430 per Christopher Wade, 

I PROMISE to pay to Paul Barker, Esq. or 
Order, on demand. Three hundred and, ninety- 
four Pounds^ Tveo Shillings,' and Six-pence, 

Value 



lis 



P aR'TxUlCU E» E 



Seis pcnnys ppr r, ya^dr reqebido . "hoje 17 de 
Julbo, 1811. 



*.f. 



£U abaizo firmado ptom^to pa^arao'^lr. J; T. 
au d sua ordem, quar^nta e nove livras, e tre$ 
Sfhilins 6 mezes despois da ddta desta dbVigafao, por 
valor recebido em verdide ^6 que asignei esta 24 
4e Aeosto 1811. 

£A9 3 

N. B^ '■ 'Obs^Hr^sb que em ii6tai ou' bbrigacoem 
ttlmprici ^decldra a sdma redebic^d, setki a^quai niio 
sao de nenhuma for9a nem tern Autfaoridade. 



- <r . ^ 



» » 






\ / 



■«. * 



^ . • . 



1' 



.1 « 



• » 



t r 



I. . 



G R A-M M A.R. 119 

Value received this 17th of July, 1811. 

/.S94 2 6 per Philip V^nhatn. 

I PROMISE to pay to Mr. J. T. or Order, 

Forty nine Pounds Three Shillings, six Months after 
Date, Value receiyed. Witness my Hand this 24th 
of August, 1811. per William Jones,. 

£A9 3 

N. B. Observe in Promissory Notes that the 
words " Value received** are mentioned, or they are 
of no Force. 






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G R A M M A ll. 121 



^HT i T't^ r m^T n ^TTil^TT m Y^ r ^^i^r^ ' frr^!^^^'^^ 



A N£W 



PORT^JGUESE 



GRAMMAR. 



I 



■ ii n iMHfii iiy»iiiiii<nilri 11,1 II luml " II i" iiinl, i'fi hJML- 



^ 



PILRT IV. 



C0NTAINIK6 

^iwrU m^l m£ wtmaifmg Phages ^ xMtiUifrm 

the ^ ^ortvigtiese Wrim^. ^ 

Jp" NTB£ OS boQs ditQs i4e Seuzdm^ po^tit Ptftr 
Mq, se cdotOs que ^b^odk) com outfo :p<^tB\ 
^u amigqj caerto licorj^Quoisdva* de ^^ ^a imi- 
jto ^aioAe & dizjfeniolhe, aa^gOj pobf^ de ti que 
dmm a JI0UCO8 dias. te^^ heller no infi^reo a^pons 
sullureaiS, $c ar44^Qtes, ^^ue |e abnusarao at esteftn- 
faas^ oao ioapdrta, f eplfcdtt Sousi^ ; bttstardque 
ine lginbre-a)gum4dos tens verao9# ^ue tSksse Smo 
mais 1^19^ ^ue neve* 

K]xittmmi Part%duiy sdbrinfha da e£1ebre Jfma 
'Pnrthenuy, dftu esta b<3ia resp6sta a Kinripte IV. 
safiavos^a inag^ que iu s6u muito fobre para ser sua 
tons6rtei eque no memo tempo desctndo de mmaJamHia 
muito illistre, para ser sua dama. 

* I Huma 



122 PORTUGUESE 

Huma Princ6za Catholica, e de rara virtude ven 
do reduzido o Marichal de Saxonia as agonias da 
fri6rte, disse, qyc era pafk sentir o nao se podfir rc- 
zar hum De profundis pella alma de hum que tinha 
feito can tar tantos 2> Dcum, 

A Dom Christovao de Moura^ Marquez de Cas- 
tello Rodrigo, e Vice Rey de Portugal por Dom 
Philipe Terceiror indo per huma sala do Pa90 de 
Lisbda, hum soldido honradp, que tinha bem ser- 
vido na India, Ihe dava hum memorial, e pedia, que 
se lembrasse dos seus papeis, pofque hayia, largo 
terppo, que andava pretend^ndo. Respondfeo-lhe 
o Marquez, que havia muita Gente para despachar, 
' e ttko se podiao despachar todos com brevidade ; o 
soldado adiant&ndoiO passase atravessdti dtsnte sem 
dcscomposi9ao, e fazdndo parar o Vice Rey Ihe dissc 
com grande confi^nfa v senhorDom CAristovao desph' 
eke Vs. gs komensy e deixe a Gente^ O Marquez aceitou 
o memorial, e o despachdu no mesma dia. 

Mandando hum Fidalgo em Lisboa abrir em hu- 
ma rua OS Alicerces para w faz^rem humas casas, 
sem licen^^dac^meraypasslLndoporallio procdraddr 
da cidade, poz p^na aos ofjiiciaes, que nao.trabal- 
htssem na/obra sem lic^n^a dos Vereaddres ; eos 
officiaes dizdndo*b ao Fidalgo mand6u-Ihes elle que 
nao deixassem de trabalb&r, e que nao fiz6ssem' ca^ 
so do que dizia ^quelle villao ruim ;, tornado o 
procuraddr da cidade por alii e ach^ndo os officiaes 
trabalb&ndoy fnanddu que dessem com dies no trbn- 
co 5 e nao faltindo quem ihe contasse o que o Fi- 
dalgo diss^ra^ t6ve-o em diho ; e no tempo que ri- 
le hia atravessando pello Rocio para sua casa, sahio- 
Ihe ao camipho a cavalloy e com huma lan^a que 
kvava/dando na sua sdmbra^ Vo^ disse i .poique o 
que dissesles, foi em minha aus^ncia, ddu cn^ v6s- 
1^ sombra ; se mo ti vessels dito no rosto> dera na 
Yossa pessba. * ' 

Abcfd' 



GRAM MAR. . U23 

Ahu tiahifahi o mais ci&lebre douldf dos Mus- 
su)manes, t^ndo recebido huma bpfetada, dissQ ito 
que o tinha iiisultado: eu poderia vingarme, pa* 
gindovos na mestna moeda ; mas nao o quero fazdr. 
Poderia atcusarvos ao calife : mas nao quero ser ac- 
• cusador. Poderia nas minhas ora9den9 queixarme a 
Ddos desta affrdnta ; mas nem isso quero fazi^r. Por 
fim poderia pedir a Deos, que se quer no dia do jutzo 
vo$ castigasse ; porem o mesmo senhor me livre de 
semelh^nte pensami&nto ; mas antes, se succed^s^ 
que neste inst&nte chegasse aquelle formidavel dia ; 
Jt se a minha intercessao tivesse alguma efficacia para 
com D^oSf nao quisi:6ra por companheiro s6 nao a 
Tos para entrar no Paraiso. Que admhraveV ex6m- 
plo para os Christaos aprenddrem a perdoar as injd- 
riasJ . * ' 

Jba Peregriuagam. 

Pass^das quese daoperegrinando,sao degr^os pai^a 
a cdsa do desengano. Das suas fdntes sahem os rips 
muito pequenos, e crescem corrdndo^c levao mares 
ao mar. Hotnens, que da sua terra nao sahem, sao 
fiavios, que acabao no estaldirp. A sabedoria c6mo 
vinda^ do ceo, anda neste globo terrestre perigrina i 
nao be facil achala senao peregrinlLndo ; err^ndo por 
este mundo, se appr^nde a nao cometter erros. Va» 
pores, que na terra eram lodo, apartados della se 
fazam estrellas. Aos h6mcns que querem luzir, 
digve a p&tria servir, como ios planetas o horizdnte^ 
Ide ber90, para ensayo do seu luzin)ento, longe do 
poQtoortivo, e remontados a mais alta regiao, apurao 
as influ^ncias, e duplicao as luzes. Quenome teriao 
hoje no mundo Socrates^ Pith&goraSy e Plata^^ e ou- 
tros sibios da aptiguidade, se a modo de cdpos, ou 
francos, que adnde nascdrao fazem raiz e no seu 
primdirocbaoapodrecemynao buscarao foradaPatria 
as noticias, que Ihes falt^vao. , Nao se orndra //if; - 
luUs com 08 despojos dos Monstroij que domdU| se 

1 2 os 



M4 PORTUGUESE 

OS iiao fdra buscar pdo mundo; a sua dilat&davttgenx 
devem 06 Argonautas a conquista do tii&ello de ouro; 
Se nao canr6ra l/iCjriJ^i rein6tos dimas, font a Ald^ 
de lihdca de toda a sua gloria x) thedtco. H6fnens 
perpetviamente ca8^ir68, sao gallos, que;s6^bem 
do aeu poleiro. Sabioa peregiinosr imitao ^no sou 
.curso as ^ntes^^ue paasando por vdaadeprata, ouroj 
esmeraldas^ e saffiras, tomao.e comaigp levao a flor 
4e suas preciosas quididides. Zooibe .embera Pirn- 
iarc$ dos que Iduvao a peregrina9iio, e dj^ 4|ue 
se parecem com os que jdlgao as .estrdllas striates 
aiais nobtes^ e felices, que as fixas. Nao ha esoob 
mais util para a vida, que as muitas vidas ou iDodos 
de viv6r, que na variedade ,das Na9QeDS se obsenra. 
Vem-se muitas cousas nunca vistas; aprSndemtae 
muitas, que se nao sabiao, faz* se o homem capaz .de 
toda a casta de negocios, e folga de ver este mundo^ 
antes de sahir delle. Ate para os piincipes, que das 
anas cortes fazemna terra o seu.ppraiso, bomheque 
^peregrinem, para conhec^rem o mundo, que dlfis 
governao. Os commodos, ^ delicias, os obsi^qui- 
os dos subditos,p6dem dara conhec6r a hum hoaaena, 
. que nasc6o soberano, mas com este conhecim^oto, 
n&o o fazem digno da soberania : ^ oao sabirn JU- 
-txandre da sua MMcedmm^ nao passara dos limitos 
de regulo e naS ch^pra a avassaUar o mundo. 

Do Tempo fmiro. 

Trate o homem do presente, e nao qud^ira pcttt- 
trar no futuro; quern de tao longe p6em a.ttioi, 
iiao pode dar no alvo. Muitas vezes bom hk ifjjmy 
rar o que ha de succed^r ; porque se f6r JMm, a AU 
lafao he torm^ato; e sefor.maoj.o trabattio hej«em 
prov^ito. Para futuros, nao ha «egurftafa. Ao 
Embaixaddr, que na guerramovida porLuixKI. 
Rey de Fr4n9a, a Carlos Duque de B^gdofaa^ pro- 
curava attrahir ao Etnperaddr Frederico, xua {Ma- 
in eas^ de se repartirem com elie'os jdeap^^^je^os 

estadosy 



\ 



O^ ft A M M A^R. US 

est6dosi respbttd^o a dito ' Emperaddl' com este 
ap6l6go : tres ca^addres com a esperkfi^^ de apan« 
li^rem huirt* urso^ se compromctt^rao na reparti9ao 
delle. Cbegadosa boca dk caverna; sahio'afgra'oom' 
taS grande iropetc, que btim dos' ca^addresr botdtta^ 
fogif, outro subib a'lifumaarvore e ooutrose^estenddo 
no ch^ flhgihdo-se m6rto; cbegduse o urso a elie; 
pt)2^1be o focinlw) no narizi e nos ouvidbs, e naS Ihe- 
conhcc^hrib folego, nemsihal dt vida, o defxdu^por 
inorta. O qut estiva ma • arvone, disse^ ao compan^' 
Mtro ; b6mem^ que te disse d urso^ quando te falldtt< 
a- purid&de, com o foeinho nbs^ ouvidos? Disseme 
<]tie era^ mai feito; dispdr dapelle, e carne do urso^ ' 
antes de o v6rem morto; Com isto o Emperaddir 
ddu a CDtend6r ao- Embaitoddr, que era precisa 
apanfiaf primeir& aoDuquede Bdrgdnha,que depdis* 
seHratam da reparfi^aodos seu&estados. Dos suc^ 
cessos da tempo futuro, so Eteostem cert^za* 

D^s Ricos. 

Em lug^es estereis, sem her:vas> nem plantas 
produz a natureza o ouro, para mostfar que os 
amaddres^das rtqu^2Sa9 nao tern f^^ nem honra. Os 
ribos' faotnordsbsv que ainda- que celebrados nar 
bf^oriae) sao' b^ppr6bf id d^* sua posteridade^ pode- 
ri^ter-bda fMtta', se Ihes naofacilitara este metal<a> 
execu^fiS^' de seus danados int^ntos. Em todas as 
iditd^s fbta&- as- riqu^isas antagomstas da virtude^ 
cutis' inventaraSr' os- mais-endrmes delitos; dlas' en« 
siha^^o OS filhos a tirar a seus pdis a^ vida; 
eWilharaS^ os*^ poderosos^ a» opprimir os itanoc6htes». 
arruihar as famitiiiss sequear' os templos/&^ despir os; 
aKBrresf; ellasitidui^raS'os amigos a qi!^e faltassem a> 
Wi incit&raS' os vdssaltos> a- negar aos principes a 
obedt^ci^j a OS libkilnosos'del'aS'.mbyos para violac 
a' pudictbia^das doiis^eUas, e estragar a honra dos- 
roaridbs: fihalmtote ellas ainda^ que bdas para a 
vfda civile sao causa de tddosos^ miles,; e fSdstoque 
09* 6ibios se souberao aproveitar dellas^ a cobi9a9 



12« P 6 R^T U O U E S E 

e o mao uso das mesmas, encherao o tnundo t6de 
de crimin6sos. Hbmens ricos ordinariam^nte se 
p6rdem, por terem muito» e saWrem pooco y des- 
prezao o sabdr, porque Ihes parcce, que para todo 
o genero de vida, Ibes ba8ta o t6r. A Aristippo 
perguntdu Dionysio, porque raz^to os filosofos fre- 
quentavaoas cazas dos rieos, e nao os ricos as dqs 
filosofos. Responddo Aristippo, que os Blosofos 
conh6cetn o que Ihes falta> e os ricos ignorao o de 
que necessitao. Senhdres ricos, e filosofos pobres^ 
nao p6dem fazer cousas grandes, pdrque aestes Ibes 
falta dinheiro, e aquelles espirito. Dizia Diogenes, 
que muitos ricos sao como as plan tas, que nascem 
em desertos, e despenhadeiros, porque dos frutos, 
que ellas dao, nao comem os horr.ens, mas corvosi 
milhafres, e feras ; tambem as riqudzas de muitos 
^nao sao para sug6itos benem6ritos, mas para cho* 
carreiros, espadachins, rufioes, e meretrizes. 

Estado da Lusitania 4ti ao tempo em que foi reduzida 
em Provincia Romanay Por A, C. do Amoral. 
Extrahido das Memorias da Academia de Lisboa, 

« 

Huma historia sincera envergonba^se da gloria 
v^^ que $e busca em antiguidades mentirozas : 
Desgosta^^se desses sonhos agradaveis, pasto de 
huma esteril recrea^ao; e se sabor^a s6 com a ^r-, 
, dade pura. Tal h6 a sorte deste escrito, derigido a 
fazer prezentes aos Portugueses os verdadeiros cos* 
tumes> e Leis de seus Maiores : rejeita tiido quanto^ 
a iDflpostura, ou a credulidade moderna Ibe conta 
dos 3eculos, que a Providencia 'quiziesconder-Ihe;, 
e se contenta com as escassas memorias, que ppde 
colhdr dos raros monumentos antigos que Ihe restao. 
Nao tenta eritrar pelas esp^ssas trevas dosprimeirosi 
S6 Seculos do mundo, em que nao acha quern o 
encaminhe. Pois que os Hebreos untcos guias, 
iSeguros, que introduzem em muitos outros paizes, 
nem hum s6 pass6. dao para este que habitamos; c 

V apenas. 



GRAMMAR. 127 

kpenas dao motivo a conjecturar, que das Colonics 
sahidas do Oriente para povoar a terra algumas Se 
estend^rao ate a esta extremidade ; n)as netn donde, 
nem quando viessem o pode colher a historia. 

Nao aclia dejpois dos Hebreos outros, de quem se 
fie, senad os Komanos : e ainda estes pouco Ihe 
sabem dhzSr de hiim Paiz tao apartado, em quanto 
a ambi^ao de o senhorear os nd5 avizinba a elle t 
mal conservao huma obscura tradic&o de que a estas 
partes -vierao Ccltas, Iberos, rersas, Lusos, e 
Gregos: de huns apenas ficara resto na derivagfto 
do ndme; de outros na beran^a de alguns costumes. 
A navega9p5 com que alguns Povos do fundo do 
Mediterraneo com^jao a enriquccer, a# traz ate 
estas ultimas Costas, e vai logo espalhar pello 
Mundo, a fama das f icas minas, e do fertil torrao 
deste Paiz desconbecido ainda antes que da qiftli- 
dade de seus babitantes: nao tarda com tudo a . 
niostrar-se esta ; continda a vir em busca dos tho* 
sourps descobertos a ambi9So/estrangeira; e v^ ' 
erguer daqui, quaes feras acossadas nos seus covis, 
homens bravos para defender os bens que ^ Provi- 
dencia Ihes destinara« E esta he a primeira Scena 
que se nos representa no Terreno Lusitaqo 5 hum 
Canipo de Bataiha, continuada ja com os Fenicios, 
ja com OS Carthaginezes s que depois de disputarem 
por largo tempo com estes Barbaros a sorte das 
armas, os deixao ainda por domar aos Romanos 
quandd Ihes cedem a conquista de Mundo. Mas 
ao justo motivo da defeza propria succedem depots 
outros, que facilmente poem as armas jia jnao Va 
huns homens, a quem a falta do commercio, e de 
artes quasi nao deixa outro melo de ^jiriquecer, que 
a pilhagem ; ndme com que muitas das suas guerras 
sao infamadas pelos P6vos mais polidos que elles. 
E o mesnio habito de peleijar Ihes vai alimentando 
hum natural feroz^ que ja os n4o deixa accommodar 

clb 



128 PORTUGUESE 

com o soc^go da pzz, e que os faz buscar inimi^os. 
dentro emcaza, quando Ihes faltao osde fora. 

Estcs vicios, e virtudes dc guerra» he o que de 
princififo nelles distioguem os Romanos» nao os 
vendo senao armados no campo ; e de que nao po- 
dem deixar de dar testemunho estes mesmos.vai^ 
d6sos desprezadores de tudo o que nao he Romano. 
Mas em fim a medida que se Ihes choesS- mais. 
perto, e se envolvem com elles^ la v&6 divjsando 
por entre alguns claros^ que as armas deixaS^^ Sorv^ 
do seu governo interidr. 

V^m que este Tcrreno, que deaignao; pelo Qome, 
de Lusitania^.he habitado de Povos dtffbrentes in^s 
dependentes buns dos outros» e goveraadoa cadft 
hum por suas Leis^ costumes particulates; leis. 
raras, e costumes sin^elos^. ainda com a marca. da 
Natureza nao contrafeita^ 

Como a 8eguran9a propria he quem. s6t forma 
estes c6rpos3 nao largao da Iiberdade q;ue receb^ao. 
da natureza^ mais que o puramente preciso, para 
conservar essa mesma seguran^a. Aguerra a qiiie 
sao dados he que os obriga a criar hum. Superior, 
a que jurao fidelidade ; mas conseguida a pa^ 
expira o govemo do Generalj^ e a obediencia. dos 
Soklados. 

Se ha que estabelec^r de npvo paramo bem comr 
mum da Sociedade* servem-se do meio u^o das. 
puras Democraciasj Assembldas geraes^. em quiS 
cada pessoa tem o arbitrio de approvar,. ou rejeitar 
o que se propoem : e ainda nesta ac9^; respira o ar 
militar> em que sao criados y hum bater da espads^ 
no broquel he o signal de approva93os hum.susurra 
inquieto o de desapprovar. 

A' simplicidade da Legj[sla9lLo segue a; <las 
penas; sao os reos do crime capital apecirejado^.e 
^ara que o honor do crime se extenda alein ainda 
do castigo^ todo o que passa depois da execu9aQf 
h€ obrigado a Ian9ar alguma pedra sobre o cadaver 
do justi9ado. 

1 N^ 



C R A MM A R. • , 12ft 

N^ desmenta fla parte Le^jslativav, a. do Com- 
niercio interior aiada: pouco sujeito a: fraudes; nao 
OS move a.contratar. a sede insaciavel do ouro,. que 
ixiaL conhecem : as mutuas necessidades, a que so 
procurao soccorr^r, os ensina a trocar entre si as 
cousas precisas a vidj^ Estas Ihes dictao tambem, 
o que devem conceder ao corpo ; comeres, c bebi- 
das simples, quaes a Natureza as produsia : vesti- 
^ossem mais estudoqaeodo fim para que os iisaa; 
cama sem regaJo, nem^ despeza ; emfim a tudd o 
preciso para a conserv^ao se accode com o.meQos^ 
apparato que pode sen 

A esta sobriedade bem propria de si para dar a^ 
saude, e. vigor do.corp(^ ^untao.o trabalho aturado;^ 
OS hom^DS o daguerra quasi continua, e nos intef-^ 
vallos della o de exerdcios semelhantes a guerra ; 
as mulheres o da cultura dos campos, e de todo o 
trato domesticos que com discretareconomia Jibes he 
cedido peloshomens occupados com as armas. £ 
se faz memona dos seus^ bailes* e cantares^. nao sao 
taDto fructo do ocio^oomo do innocente prazer da 
vida social 

Deste modo) sobrio,. e trabalbado de. vida era 
consequencia araridade de dpen9as: para ^Iguma, 
que accaso haja, nao he venal a.cura,. nem o reme- 
dio, nao se tendo alguem. por desabrigado. de con«^- 
correr. para Inimi officior- de rigorosa, hnmanidade : 
he. o enfermo exposto em publicQt^ e 09 que tarn 
sido feridos do mesmo mal; ensinao os. remadiocr 
com qpe conseguirao a saiide^ 

Nos q]iie habitavao a& vizinhan^asr do Minho^ 
cpmo eraa osGronios^ ou-Gravios, os»AmphiloGiDS». 
e outros, se vem assazretratados^os^ costumesrdas. 
Gregos, de quem^ oe& Aiitigps. querem^ que elle$i 
descenda5> Jogos^ e certames- p\d3diaos> cazasneA**. 
tos„ai;l>e de augurar tudQ>h4de Gregos. IdolaUat) 
como seals Maiofea» nada-coa^e^vao di^Religiiao pursk 
q.uea Razao Ihes.mostrarai, mai$ qiie o recoiaheair- 
mento de que ha hum^ Epte maldi^ cg^ elk6)c«a» 

que 



ISO PORT U G U E S E ' 

qoe dcvcm dar culto : porem estragado este na- 
tural scntimento pela corrup9ao do coragao, imagi- 
nao Divindades indignas, a que bonrao com bum 
culto' igualmente indigno. Sc querem dar-lbes gra- 
mas pello feliz successo de buma batalba, as maos 
direitas dos prizionejros sd5 o tristc trofeo que Ibes 
lev&ntao. Se antes de qualquer ac9ao procurao saber 
o seu bom ou mao exito, dentro as entranbas de 
bum inimigo be que vao buscar este fatal segredo :' 
se querem fazer religioso hum juramento, he pre-* 
ciso que as entranbas quentes de bum homem, e de 
bum cavallo Ibesy^ sirvao de banbo» em que depois 
de mettidas as maos, as poem sobre o altar, junto 
ao qua! se deve fazer estaridiculaceremonia. Em- 
fim be'sempre sanguo o que applaca buns Deoses, 
que estes Idolatras guerreiros formavao a sua seme- 
]han9a. 

Estes sao os poucos vestigios, e quasi apagados, 
que se encontrao dos costumes domesticos dosLusi- 
tanos, que de ordinario so se viao no campo de ba* 
talba, detendo, ou fazendo retroceder os passos aos 
Conquistadores do mundo. Mai o podera crer quem 
mede a for9a de bum Estado pelo fausto de seus 
babitadores, pela magnificencia de suas obras, e por 
todo o explend6r que encanta os sentidos; quem 
nao avalia quanto pode bum Povo, em que todos os 
individuos sao aptos para adcfesa da Patria,em que 
ba tantos Soldados como bomens endurecidos todbs 
no trabalho, e todos animados do amdr da liberdade. 

Hum Povo, como este, foi o que sem arte, e sem' 
disclplina, em tendo na frente hum homem que o 
soubesse mandar, escarnece por muitas vezes das 
tropas mais bem reguladds, e deu muitos dias de 
mdgoa, e de deslustre aos soberbos Romanos. Viri- 
ato, Sertorio, i ainda outros de menos n6me forao 
instrumentos da gloria Lusitana, que sobrepujando 
4 emu]a9^ ficou eternizada nos escritos de seus 
mesmos iniraigos, e nos marmores que o tempo con- 
sumid6r nao acalmu de gastar. 

Por 



GRAMMAR. 131 

For mais de Seculo e meio andarao os Romano^ 
na porfiada lida de subjugar este ultimo peda9o da 
Hespanha que ja contao toda por huma por9ao certa • 
dps seu9 dominios : todos os annos Ihe nomeao Go*, 
vernaddr: mas por mais que tentem mandar Pretor 
como para Provincia pacifica, a cada passo se vem 
obrigados a Ihe mandar Consul armado ^ depois ^e 
terem separado o* seu Governo do de quasi todo o 
resto da Hespanha. Esedequandoem quandoalgum 
destes Generaes consegue a gloria de^a pacificar,* e 
sujeitar 4s Leis Romanas, pouco tempo Ihe dura 
verde o.louro 5 na sua mesma cabeca Ihe murcha, 
ou ao mais tarde na de seq successor : 4te que a 
longa experiencia os desengana, que he preciso mu- 
dar de systema; e que so costumando primeiro os. 
Lusitanos a se sujeitar como amigos, he que os po* 
derdo ipsensivelmente ir passando a obedecer como 
Vassalos. 

So^u a Poesia Bucoltca dos Poetas Portugu^zes Por 
Joaquim de Foyos. ExtrakidQ das Memorias de 
Litter atura da Academia de Ltsboa, 

Assim como entre as dilas especies de ora9ao,por 
que o homem tanto excede aos outros animaes, se- 
cultivou primeiro o Verso, assim de todas as sortes 
de Poesias pafece ter sido primeira a Bucolica. 
Ainda que o genero humano nao nasc6o da terra, e 
dos duros tronco3 das- Arvores, como imagindrao 
muitos Poetas, e parece que chegdralo a cr^r alguns' 
Filosofos; comtudo depois do diluvio, espalhados. 
os homens por toda a face da terra, e perdidos pouco 
apoucoosconhecimentosque herdarao de seqs ma* 
iores, e s6 conserv4vao naSociedade,he summamente 
provavel,que huma grande parte delles viesse succes* 
sivamente a passar por astes^tres generos de vida r Sel- 
vagem. Pastoral, Agricola. Os muitos Povos, que 
ainda hoje babitao, e se achao na primeira^ ou se- 
gunda destas vtdas, confirmao a verda^e desta con- 

jecHira. 



isa. POR'TU^GUESE 

jectura. Mas x> homem^ vivendo hmnatvidaailveMie 
no8 tiosqueSy separado de toda aSooiedadei 6 sost^- 
tando-fie UDicamente de ca^a^ e dos fhictoa espon. 
taneos da terra, nem se acha em circuimt&dcias d^ 
adiantar OS seu8 conbecimeDtos, nem^tem tetnpopara- 
cultivallos, occupadO) e at^ento todo em busoar o 
necessario fysico, que n^ pode acfaar semmuit8' 
difficuldade, e trabalho. E ainda queaconte^a^'que* 
por vezes Ihe sobre algum espa^o livre desta9 ooq^ 
tinuas fadigas^ satisfeitos todos os seusnatunfes de^ 
stjoSf e appetites, can^ado o cdrpo, e eotoispecidt>fr 
OS membros» Ihe entorpecerao juntamente* as faeul^ 
dades da alma, desacostumadas a^ discoti^r, e a 
exeroitar-se em outros objector, e se entregard^ooe* 
mente a o somno. N45 succederi assim- ao& P^ 
tores, que tenda gado^ que com seu leitelbes' sub-* 
ministre o sustt^nto, e com suss pelles a vestidc^^ 
passarao huma boa parte da sua vrdaquietos, e>d^« 
caQ9ados, sem mais outro cuidado que o de condu« 
zir, e defender os seus rebanbos^emanadas. Obri- 
gados de necessidades mutuas, e attrahidos do natu- 
ral deleite, que causa a companhia dbs que tern as 
mesmaS' preci^s que nos, e nellas nos* podem dar 
algum auxilio, e recebelio^ se chegarao, quando o 
permittir a abundancia dos pastos^ buns para os^ 
outros, communicarao entre si os seus pensamentos^ 
e descjos^ praticarao ^obre as cousasque mai& amiaoy. 
e celebrarao a suafelicidade. 

Huma vez juntos os homens^.e em ocio; contentes^ 
t^ sem: can9a90y impossivel he, que n^ inventem^ 
diversos jogos, e toda a sorte de-desenfado^ e reerea^ 
9^5 para evitar? o tedio de huma vid^ sdcegada, e* 
satisfeita* Entre estes divartimentos^n4o'devia tor* 
ultimo lugar &' Foesia. As faouldades do bomemf 
tern. huma natural disposi^o para ella-; ouaPoestai 
consista na imita^ao, como querem Piat^y ehn^ 
toteles, aindar queclara e distinctamente nunca xiosi 
diseessem o que esta imitai^ SjS^a ^ ou enr huma) 

ora94o 



G R A M M A R. nss 

orsLqiS levantada sbbre as expressoes vulgaris, in- 
vertida coin -figiuraG, e faarmoniosamente moduladiia, 
e >cocnpas6acki xx)fl[i o metro, e com orbythmo. Em 
qjualqiter destas cousas^que fa9amos coasistir a Poe- 
\UA, ou em. todas elias^ paca todas recebeo o homem 
da Natureza huma>admiravel propens^o. 

A^ nossas aensa^es sdo tido «6meiite a orfgen;i» e 
fimdaroento. de;tedas as nossas id6as, mas ^mnsiPoF- 
sundo^se de div^rsos :modos, ^sdo todos os nossips. 
juizos; « raciciciaios, as: nossas* artes, a9 nossas Soieh- 
cios, e, ^em^hunaa palaYra, >tudo:quanto sabemos^e 
^onfaecemos. Mas a imita^io be huma 8ensa9ao 
^il, ^e p^na que :estk xiUposia .« confbrma^ dos 
nossoa orgaSs; e das nossas potenicias, e por come- 
quencia huma .8ensa94o, que n6s ach&mos por ex- 
daremo ^gnita, e deleitavel. Deste mesmo prmcipio 
iae«egue oatro,:o fqual aqui igualoiente pertence, e 
•vema ser, que ^he -natural ao homem n6o 66 a otbn. 
^do^e^a'barmom'a^mas tambem essamesma ore^dB 
vaviaxia jcom differentes ^tropos, e figuras ; isto h^^ 
com diveiE806 modes de egcprimir as cousa^/e os 
peasamentos, jk com a iinpsma burmonia ; isto he, 
com o rhythmo, e ja com o metro. 

Conbeoei^se-ha claramente a dependeacia que 
estes dous principles tem eutre^i, se considerar-<ino8, 
^ue^imitagioyi^qual eu ja mostrei serhvm exerct- 
caOiSummameDte gostoso ao hoenem, e htrni modo 
fadllimo jas^itn de elle apprender, como de cQmm!^' 
jiiear aos ou^oe os *seiis sentimentos) huma wez 
-fieika, .e prakicada com a ora9io, traz necoMarkb- 
mente cpmsigo toiias aquellas vartedades da niesma 
, i>Ta94D, qjie taponteiadma. Daqui vem affirmarem 
Jig4ulamente, e com Faz4o jus^ima os mais ceiebrag 
{"ilosofos, x{ue qufzerao descer ja, discassoes deste 
^nef)o,x{ue a Poesia eta tdo ant^a, como o genero 
liumano. Ceitamehte parece ter nascidb logo com 
MB primeiras Sociedades, que eUes formiraSy e qbanfdle 
clles comeimiisaS amda ^llDHiito, aisim da rusticidade^ 

como 



134 PORTUGUESE 

c6ino da singeleza, e ionocenqia natural. Do que 
parece, ou claratnente provado, ou dedu^ido com 
•assaz probabilidade, qua a Poesia nasceo, e se in- 
ventou entre Pastores. Mas em que genero de 
Poesia se exercitariao estes prtmeiros hon[ien&? N4o 
sera difiicil conhecello, se reflectirmos, qual seria a 
materia que, segundo as circumstancias em que se 
achavao, se Ihes offerecia para os seus cantos. Aris- 
toteles foi de parecer, que dos primeiros inventores 
OS que tinhao genio elevado imitavao accoes illiis- 
ti'es, e feitas per personagens grandes^e pelo con- 
trario os que tinhao engenho mais rasteiro, cantavao 
as accoes dbs bom^ns vis, em cujo vituperio com* 
punhao obras vridiculas, assim como os outros sc. 
exercitavao em hymnos e encomios. 

Porem este erudito, e intelligeote Fiiosofo ndo 
fala naquelle/lugar da primeira origem da Poesia 
rigorosamente/mas sim do modo com que ella, de* 
pois de inventada^ se foi dividindo em diversas es- 
pecies ; porque suppoe tempos em que he ja grainde 
a disigualdade dos homens ; o que nao tern lugar 
nas primeiras e simplicissimas sociedades de Pas- 
tores. 

He pois summamente verosimil, que estes homens 
quizessem imitar aquellas cousas, que com mais 
frequencia se ofTereciao aosseus sentidos.que satis- 
fazido as suas necessidades, e que constituiao a bem- 
^venturan^a da sua socegada vida^ e felice estado, 
por que nellas empregavao toda a sua atten9d5, e 
cuidado. Canfariao pois os seus rebanhos> os mon- 
tes e os valles, em que os apascentavao, os rios, e 
fontes, a que os levavao a beb^r y a alva, e serdna 
madrugada, que os cbamava ao trabalho ^ a sesta, 
que OS convidava ao descanfb ; e os rafeirosp, que 
Ihes guardavao o g^o. Cantariao^ como era natu- 
ral, a^ paixoes e affectos da sua alma \ porem n^ 
affectos violentos, e d^sesperados, que ndo erao pro- 
prios daquella vidai mas ddces e suaves, e que so 

Ihes 



GRAMMAR, 135 



\ 



Ihes caus^vao aquella inquieta9ao, e desasocego^ ai 
que se nao pudesse seguir fim alguta funesto, 

Como estes argumentos sao todos prpprios da 
Poesia Bucolica, segue-se ligitamamente, que ellafoi 
a primeira, que no Mundo inyentafao os homens. 
Sendo pois a Poesia Pastoral a primeira origem de 
toda a erudi9do hun^ana^ e os primeiros esfor^os, 
que fis^rao as faculdades do homem para se puli- 
rem, e cultiyarem, justamente me persuadi, que a 
Academia, instituida toda para utiiidade publica, e 
que alem de outros mais gloriosos» e louyaveis ejna- 
penhos, tomou a si o de dar a conhecer os princi- 
pios^ e progressos da nossa Litteratura, havia de 
levar em gosto que hum Socio seu tratasse dos mere- 
cimentos dos nossos Poetas Bucolicos. Deste tra- 
balho> Senhores, posto que maiorque minhas for9as9 
me quiz encarregar, por ser dos mais leves e faceis, 
que tao illustre corpo podia commetter a algum de 
seus membros. . 

Vos tratareis verdades sublimes, por extrerao re- 
motas» e escondidas a commum comprehensdo dos 
homens i medireis o e9pa90 immenso dos C^os ; 
poreis Leis aos corpos mais vastos, mais distantes, 
e ate mais rebeldes do Univeho j com vossas por- 
fiadas investiga^oes, e rara sagacidade obrigareis a 
Natureza a que yos dcscubra, e patentee aquillo 
mesmo, em que ella punha maior estudo em occul- 
;tar. Assim para feticidade dos outros homens aug- 
mentareis, e aperfei9oarei$ os seus conhecimentos ; 
mas sereis muito particularmente Felices v6s, e feliz 
a Patria, em cuja utiiidade haveis de empregar os 
vossos talentos^, e todos estes trabalhos, e fadigas : 
e ella vo-lo sabera agradecer com o prcmio, que sov 
desejao as almas grandes, do louvdr^e da gloria. Eu, 
gozando-nqie, e comprazendo-me do vosso alto mere- 
cimento^ de que vos quizestes me coubesse tambem 
giguma parte, me contentarei com examinar a pro- 
priedade, e elegahcia de buma palavr^;' a verdade, 

novidade. 



136 PO R T tr G U ES E 

novidade, e 'belleza de 'hum pensamento ; a fnoo- 
cencia, e sS singeleza de Inim Pegureiro ; e isto 
propter aquie rivim, ouquando muito, s$ii tamis arboris 

Mas tornando ao meu assumpto, de que tne fize* 
rao desviar os vossos justos louvdres, nao sao poaco 
r^levantes, nem concorrem medianamenite para a 
insVruc^aoy e cultura dos homens os trabalhos dos 
Poeftas. Negallo seria nlio conhecer o mode, par 
que se dilatao, e apef feicoao as nossas faculdades, e 
ignorar inteiramente a riistoria dos varios progres* 
'SOS do entendimento humano. A restaura9ao das 
lethiSy com que se desterrou a ignorancia, e bar- 
baridade, a que nos tinhao reduzido as Na^oes 
do Norte, e as continuas irrup9oes dos Sarracenos, 
tetn as suas semetltes nos Trovadores 'Proveofaes, 
e Lombardos, que fructificando felizmente che- 
garaS a produzir os dous abalisados engenhos de 
Dante, e Petrarca- Cultivada per estes dous-^an- 
des homens, e por algunsmaisseuscontefnporaneos 
a Lingua Toscana, preparou a Italia, e a sua imi- 
taj(ao a toda a Europa para hum conhecimento pro* 
fundo da Lingua Latina, e da Grega. Com taes 
disposicoes, e auxilios se instruirao as Na9oes Euro- 
peas nas Artes, e Sciencias, e em toda a sorte de 
erudi9ao daquelles sabios P6vos; e inflammadas 
cada vez mais nodesejo de saber, tern levadomuitas 
das Artes, ^ Sciencias dos antrgos a hum ponto in- 
crivel de perfei9a5, &c. 

dnalyit ^ amhmafves Jilosojum s^ire a ehcugao e estylo 
de Sa de Miranda , Ferrtka^ Bermrdes, Cammia 
e CamSes. Pr Francisco Dias. 

Quando eiltrei nesta composicao, julguei que 
devia tomar bum ponto fixo, donde viesse deduzin- 
do a sua analyse, e que o Sa de Miranda devia 
indispensavelmente formar a 6poca, donde, seguodo. 
a ordem do tempo, bavia de dimanartodo o seu 

progresso> 



! OKA MM AH. 137 

progresfio,^ como.de huia ^scritor^ que lan^oa os 
fundamentos da Pdesia Portugue^a.. ^ Mas antes que 
entraase nesta diltgencia, vi que me. era de^ precka 
oecessidade fazer hucna descrip^ap. ex^cta do est?* 
do^ em que se achava a Lingua, qu^do o Poeta 
Miranda appareceo e sondar as qualidades prinql- 
paes da C0mposi9ao e estylo daquelle Padre da Po€i»a 
^Portugoezb, donde paasou? para Ferreira^ para Ber- 
nardes^para Cammhftj e ultimamente para Canioes, 
o maior Poeta da Na^ao, e o que mais enriqueceo, e 
apufou o nosso Idioma; discorrendo por aquelles 
pontci^^ que mals me pareceraq dignos de compara- 
9ao :no genero Sublkne^ como mais nobre, e conao 
aquelleque mais esfbr^a pede.da fantasia humana ; 
fazendo juizo de cada hum dos Poetasda Analyse, 
e finalmente indicando as origenjis donde nasceraoas' 
. expressoes^e £Srmulas.combinadas ; no que julgo ter 
.satisfeifto ao Assumpto, que he certampnte mais 
difficultoso do que parece. 

Na execufao de^te tao trabalhoso argumento me 
conduzi, segundo as luzes, que pude adquirir na 
lif^o de.Ari^toteleSftCicerps Longjtno, Quintiliano, 
e mutto niais na de I^ocke, CondilJac, Du Marsais, 
e em especial na dor sobre todos sabio Commentario, 
que*o grande Voltaire fez ds Obras^de Pedro Cor-> 
neille/dnde se Yem as regras do gosto pa sua maior 
^va^ao. 

Todasestas. mater ias sao novas em Portugal, e por 
consequencia nao tive a quem seguir : e apezar dos 
ddfeitos, posso dizer 

/ que aqui vereis presence 

CousaSy quejuntas^se achat raramerUe, Camoes Lus. 

InlroJucfao. 

Hio talentoda palavra a mais nobre faculdade 
do ence racional, como instrumento, com que nao 
BO e^)oe as suas ideas, mas ate pinta ots mais occultos 
8entimeritx>8 do espmto com rasgos tao vivos, e 

^ K sublimes 



158 PORTUGUESE 

sublimes, que os faz passar aos cora^oes roais izen- 
tos de interesse. At]uella Filosofia inata ao cora^ao 
do homeni, que preside a todas as ac9oes, que mais 
o elevao, foi queen formou os sindes representativos 
das suas ideas simplices, e compostas ; e quem, d 
for9a de infinitas combiDa9oes, Ihe . fez conceber o 
' grande pensamento do transumpto mental consign 
nado nas palavras por huma successao de ideas nao 
interrompidas, cujo nexo constitue a pintura eteraa 
nao so do fysico> mas, o que be mais prodigidso, do 
moral bumano. 

Aquella mesma filosofia, que dirigindo e elerando 
o espirito bumano desde as ideas simplices ate &s 
implexas, Ibe d^o as primeiras nocoes da expressao 
simples e primitiva, como mais addptada as necessi- 
dades do bomem ; d propor9ao que Ibe foi aid- 
pliando a esfera dos sens conbecimentos, Ibe fbi 
ministrando expressao complexa, isto be, figurada 
com a qual pinta aos olhos, e.dd corpo, e vida &$ 
mais sublimes abstrac9oes, que pode conceber o en- 
tendimento bumano. 

Deste immenso aggregado de id6as simpleces, e 
compostas, como consequencia natural, procedeo a 
vivacidade da expressao, e va riqueza das Linguas, 
que seelevdrao ao mais distincto grao de perfei9ao, 
segundo o numero de acontecimentos, e revoIu9oe5 
notaveis ; e muito mais segundo o trato frequentc 
com as na9oes estranbaSj e communica9ao social dos 
povos entre si ; por isso mesmo que das graindes 
crizes procede a effervescencia das patxoes, que 
pondo em movimento,eactividadea massa das ideas, 
gera novos pensamentos, e nova elocu9ao. 

. Daqui se infere, que os melbores de todos os 
idiomas devem for90samente ser os daquelles povos j 
que mais revolu9oes experimcntdrao, e que melhor I 
conhecerao as leis da Sociedade. V^-^e pois pello 

3ue nos ensina a bistoria, que as Na9oes nfiais puli- 
as e sdbias, tanto na linguagem, como nos cos- 

tumesi 



r G RA^M M-A R. - 139 

tumes, forao -quasi sempre.ast que situadias junto. ao 
mar conbecerao mais cedb a necessidade da com- 
municafao Hos povos estranhos, por meia do Com- 
mercio ; ou aquellas, . cujos acontecimentos Ihes 
derao lugar distincto nos apndes do genero hu- 

mano. 

Por isso vemos, que as Linguas geraes do Malabar, 
Coromandel, e da China, regioes.,mafittmas,.. assimi 
como.tambemaArabe, sapasmais bellas^ e.aritigas 
detodasas Linguas da Asia. Os F6vos da Grecia, 
que gozando do mais formoso espectaCulo d^ Na-. 
tureza^ experimentarao tantas; e tao notaveis revo« 
lu9oe^, inventarao a mais significativo, e b^rmbnico 
de todos OS Idiomas, onde se achao consignados os 
ibais insignes monumeatos do genio^ e donde pro- 
ceddo a magestade da Lingua dos Romanos, nao 
mais famosos pelas suas conquistas» que pelos es- 
criptos immortaes, com que illustrar^o os Seculps. 
O mesmo se deve considerar dos Italianos, Fraa- 
cezes^ Hespaohbes, e Inglezes, cujos Idiomas tendo 
origem na Lingua Latina, se tem elevado ao mais 
alto ponto de perfei9ao possivel;e nos quaes exis- 
tem monumcntos para.quem todo 6 loavdr he dimi- 
ntito. 

Mas este concurso de circunstancias parece, que 
ainda nao foiacausa sufEciente da perfei9ao jdas 
Linguasj ainda ali se diviza hum vacuo, que.pre-* 
ciza ser occupado; Aqui vem a Poesia com toda 
a sua pompa e magestade, desatando or vdos, pulin* 
do e aperfei9oando os Idiomas, diaado a tudo alma, 
ie vida, ja elevando-se aos maiores assumptos nos 
louvdres do Ente Supremo, e no Panegyrico dos 
grandes bomens, persuadindo a imita9ao das ac9oes 
nobres, e dignas dos mais distinctos applausos. Ella 
Ibe abreos'seus tbesouros; elIaosenriquece;ella]hes 
da for9a, elegancia, e harmonia, sem o que seriao buns 
cadaveres seccos, e inanimados. Sem a Poesia, nada 
seriao talvez os Gregos,. e os Romanos, que tanto 

* K 9 encbirai 



140 PORT U .b U E S E 

ench^rao o mutido com a fbma das^uas vfctorias, 
com a grandeza das suas ^9005, e muito ntais com 
a perfei9aS, com que cultivarao todas as Artcs de 
genio, de que tantos, e tao admiraveis teslemunbos 
nos deixarao principal men te nos seus escrkos. A 
Poesia pois, que tendo entre os antigos hum carac- 
ter de harmonia muito diverso da roesia moderna, 
veto pella ijgnomncia dos Seculos a tal decadencia^ 
que pouco raltou paf ficar inteiramente ignorada. 

Das reHqiiias da Lingua Latina, c Gr^gd se 
formarad as Idiomas modernos, com diversa Syn- 
taxe ; e com elles resuscitarao, ou por melhor dizer, 
formarao os Proven9aes huma Poesia toda nova na 
disposj^ao das cesuras, e combina9des harnidnicas. 

Os Italianos restaaraddre^ de quasi todas as 
Artes, fSrao os primeiros, que tratarao a Poesia com 
dignidade,aperfei9dando os metros, e harmOnia^que 
os mesmos rroven9aes, eSiciiianostrnhaoinventado; 
e tanto se applicarao a ella, que ja no decimo quarto 
Seculo era famoso Poeta o celebre Dante, quern 
JBxou todas as accentua9oes harmonicas do hende 
casyllabo, que ficou sendo 6 mais necessario metro 
da Poesia italiana, Castelhana, e Portugueza* 

Entrdrao os Mouros em Hespanha, e com elles a 
Poesia : porem o desassoc^go da guerra niS dfeo 
lugar aos antigos possuidores desta Regido, tdo 
.inrestada de Na9oes estranhas, a cultivar a Poesia 
seriamente^ nem a pulir os seus Idiomas tdo cede 
como OS Italianos. Da longa domina9^09 que os 
Romanes tiverao em Hespanha se havia neila intro- 
duzidb o uzo da Lingua Latina, que veio & ser vul- 
gar : della, e de varios dialectos barbaros, se formd- 
rdo OS dous mais bellos, e sonoros Idiomas de Hes- 
panha, e talvez da Europa, o Castelhano, e o Por- 
tuguez. 

B)stas duas Linguas se forao igualmente aper- 
fei9oaiido, de sorte que a burn mesmo temjpo che- 
gdtaoao seu auge. Com tudo, sendo a Na9do Por- 

tugueza 



iiWAM MAR.: 1*1 

tugucza fnais moderna, e occupaDdo muito : mbnos 
espa9o de terreno, que a Castelhana, veio roaisceda 
a produzir nionumentos, que assaz distinguirao, q 
acreditarao o seu Ididma. As historias de Jo45 do 
Barros dadaa k luz no meio do Seculo decimo sextQ^ 
if traduzidas em todas as Linguas cultas da Europa, 
fizerao mostrar ao Mundo litterdrio, quc^ aJUingu^ 
Portilgueza era .a mais filha da Latina. Hum 
fiuga^ro ■ sufficiente de Escricores, que logo depois 
vierao^ acab^rao de determinar o genio da Lingua^ 
cujo.caracter he elegancia, e perspicuidade. Sen- 
do pais a Lingua Portugueza desde a sua origem 
mui doce, e sonora, resultado natural aaquantidada 
proporcionada das suas vogdes, e c6nsoantes> das 
qu%es as pjrimeiras, nao sao tao frequentes, e con* 
JAinctas, que enfraqud^ao a harmonia, e a fa9ao lan^ 
guidaepouconotada,como se ve na Lingua Italiana^ 
netii as segundas com nimia frequencia se atro^ 
pellao> e produzem sona nides e asperos, como nas 
Linguas do Norte. Todas estas felices disposicoes, 
al^m do genio, conviddvao a Na94Q a cultura da 
Poe^ia pata que sempre teve natural inglina^ao. 
Deixemoa a miiida investiga^ao destas causas, a 
(|ual sera mai$ propria de quern tentar esprevdr a 
}ii$toria da Lingqa. Oeix^mos taoibem as Poesias 
anterl^r^s ao Deculo de quinhentos, muitas das 
quaes exi^tem em algumas Bibliothecas antigas, 
como as d' El Rei p. P.ini? na do Cohvento da 
'Qrdeip d^ Christo em Thomar^ e outras andaS em«> 
pregadas no c^lebre Canciopeiro de Kescnde^ col- 
lecf ap preciosa, donde se podem extrahir as maiores 
liiz^ a r^p^itp da Natureza, e origerQ da nossa 
f oesii; e come^^ndo a tratar do auge a que esia 
f levQu a Lingua Portugueza ; as graf as, e numero, 
qu^ Ihe communipoa ; principlaremos a discorr^r 
d0 huma^p&i^a (tiais vizinba a nos, e esta seja deter* 
0uoada peip iftq»^0 $4 de Miranda. 

4 Veja 



142 PORTUGUESE 

Ve)&-tno8 pois os s^ssumptos, que este Poeta tra* 
tou, a qualidade de sua imita^ao em geral, o uzo 
que fez do hendecasyllabo, ate ao seu tempo pouco 
ou nada conhecido em Portugal, e etn toda a Hes- 
panha ; como tratou, como aperfei9odQ o Son^to, 
do qual se deve reputar inventor entre nos, novas -^ 
grafas que accrescent ou a nossa l^ingua, e coma 
finalmente preparou aos Poetas, que Ihe succed^rao, 
' hum novo caminho para se ejevarem ate a immortal 
Lusiada. 

Mas antes que entremos neste exaine, veikmos 

{irimeiro estado em que o Sa de Miranda, acoou o 
dioma. 

A Na9ao Portugueza, que ate ao fim do reinado 
de D. Fernando jazia na ignorancia, oceupada uni- 
camente da cultura das suas terras, quanto Jhe era 
preciso para o .consomo interior do H^ino, e para 
entreter huma ligeira sombra de commercio ex- 
terior, continuamente vexado pella tyrannia Ara- 
bica, que infestando os mares, era eterno obstaculo a 
navega9ao ; vivendo como desterrada na solidao dos 
campos, sem communica9aO; nem policia, fallava 
huma linguagem informe, e grosseira, ch^a desons 
rudes, que as Linguas barbaras Ihe tinhao commu- 
Aicado 3 e a pezar de^ Cer huma origem tao pura, 
comQ a Lingua Latina,*donde proced|a^ so conser-. 
vava alguma energia natural nascida das significa-^ 
9oes primitivas das suas v6zes, ique, alem de serem 
maculadas de infinitas anomalias, e dissonancias, 
erao privadas de transla^oes, que dao for9a e eleva- 
9ao ^08 Idiomas. Chea pois de construccoes erro- 
. neas, de dithongos asperos, e desinencias rudes, 
pobre de termos, sem idea de nexo, que subsiste 
nas particulas, sem ^yntaxe, jsem harmonia o seu 
periodo incerto, e desunido vacillara sem caracter. 

A grande reyolu9ao de Dv Joao I. fazendo a mais 
viva commo9ao kio genio dos Portuguezes^ cotn ella 

fixe 



Q R A M M A R. 143 

ihe vierao novos estimulos de gloriai que eleva o 
espirito ; novAs emprezas, novos pensamentos, nova 
for9a, nova energia as suas. enuncia9oes; novos 
objectos do discurso, e ' nova linguageid. Hum 
Latim barbaro at6. alii organb das Leis, • e mstru* 
mentos publicos^ cessou de ser a linguagem do 
Fdro, . 

Da conquista de Ceuta pasceo a idea> a grande 
idea dos descubrimentos, que mostrando a nccessi* 
dade de cultivar as Mathematicas, e a Astronomia, 
taes, quaes existiao naquelles tempos obscuros» 
alargou a esf6ra da Mechanica^ que fazendo novas 
investiga^oes sobre a ac^ao dos yentos> e resistencia 
das agoas» extrahindo a somma da combina9ao dos 
movimentos resultantes da ac9ao, e reac9ao destes 
dous Elementos^ alcan90u mais perfeito conheci- 
mento das leis dos liquidos, e do equilibrio, e aper- 
fei90du finalmente a Arte.de navegar. Novos 
Astros, novos mares e costas^ novas ilhas, novos 
mundos enchem de adniira9a5 tddo o universo. 



From the %d Canto of the Luciad of CamSes. 

Estavas linda Inez posta em sossego, 
De tens annos colhendo o ddce fruto, 
Naqu£ll« engino da alma, ]£do, e cegOj 
Que a fortdna naa deixa durar muit6: 
Nos saudosos cam pos do mond^go, 
De teus formosos olhos nunca enxutb, 
Aos montes ensinindo, e as ervinhas. 
O nome, que no peito efcrito tinhas. ^ 

Do teu principe alii te respondiao 
As lembr^n9as, que na alma Ihe moravao. 
Que sempre ante sens olhos te traziao : 
Quando dos teus formosos se apartavao : 
De noite em doces sonbos^ que mentiaSj^ 

De 



144 P 6 R T U G U E S.E 

De dia em pensamfent >s, que voavaS: 
E quanto^m ficn cuidava, e quanto vk, 
E'rao' tudo mcm6rias da ategria. 

* * * « 

D'outras bellae senbdras, e princ^zas, 
Os dezejados talamos eng^ka^ 
Que tudo em fim, tu puro amor desprezas, 
Quando hdm g6sto, suave te sogeita : 
V6ndo estas namoradas ^Btmnhtzds, 
'O velho pay cesudo, que respeita, 
O murmm&r do povo e a fantasia^ 
Do (ilho, que casarse nao queria* 

Tirar Inez ao mundo determina, , . ' 
For Ihe tirar o -filho, que tetn p/eso, 
Crendo co*sangue ^ da morte indina» 
Matar do firme amor o fogo aceso : 
Que furor consendo^ que a espada finai 
Que pdde susteutar o grande peso 
Do furor Mauro* fdsse kvantada^ 
Contra huma fraca dkma delicada ? 

Traziao-na os horriferos aligdzes 
Ante o Rejr, ja movido a ptedade, 
Mas o p6vo com falsas, e terozes 
Razdens, a morte crua o persuade. 
Ella com tristes^^ e piedosas vozes^ 
Sahidas86de magoae saudade 
Do s^u Principe e filhos que deixava, . . 
Que mais que a propria morte a magoava. 

Para o ceo cristalino levantiindo. 
Com lagrimas OS alhos piedosos, 
Os olhos, porque as roaos Jhe estava atando 
Hum dos duros ministros rigurosos: 
E depois nos mentnos atentindo. 
Que taS queridos tinba> e t&o mimosos^ 
Cuja orfandide como tnai temia, ' 
JPara o ard cttiel affi diaa. 

Se 



GR A MM A R. 1*5 

Se ja ioas brutas feres; cuji mente 
Natdra fez cruel de ctascim^nto ; 
E nas avies agr^tesyqu^ 66niente 
Nas rapinas aerias tern o ipt^oto. 
Com pequenas cri§Ln9as vip a gente, 
Terem tao pieddso sentim^nto, 
Como coa may de Nino ja mostrarao, . 
E cos Irmaos, que Roma edificarao : 

O'tu que tens de hum&no o gesto^e o peito, 
Se de hum4no he matdr huma donzella 
Fraca, e sem for9a so por t6r sug6ito 
O cora9ao, a quern sdube venc^Ila 
A estas criancinhas tern resp^ito ^ 

Pols o nao tens d morte escura della, 
Mdvate a pied4de sua, e minha, 
Pois te nao move a culpa, que nao tinha, 

E se venci^ndo a Maura resistdncia, 
A morte sabes dar com fogo, e ferro, 
Sabe tambem dar vida com clemdncia, 
A quem para perd^Ua nao-fSz erro, 
Msrs se te assi merece esta innocdncia^ 
Poe-meem perpetuo e misero destSrro, 
Na Scythia fria, ou la na Libia ardSnte, 
Onde em lagrimas viva eternamdnte. 

Pde-n)e onde se nsc toda' a feriddde, 
Entre ledens, e tigres ; e ver6i 
Se nelles achar posso a pied^de, 
Que entre peitos hum&nos nao achei ; - • 

Alii CO* amor intrinseco, e vontade^ 
Naquelle por quem mdrrp, criarei 
Estas reliquias suas, que a qui vistc^ 
Que refrigerio sejao damai ^riste. 

Queria perdoar-lfee o rev benino, 
Movido das f^aiavras; que o magdao, 

^ Mas o pertinii^ pdvo, e s^u destine, 
(Que destn sort^ oquiz) Ibe tiiS perddao : 

Arrancdo 



146 PORT UG U fi S E 

* Arrancao das espidas dc a^a fino, 
Os que por boib tal feito allt pregdao. 
Contra buma dama, o peitos caijrniceiros^ 
Ferozes vos tnostrdes, e cavaUeiros ? 

Qual contra a linda mo9a t^olicena, 
Consola9ao extr^mst da may velha, 
Porque a idmbra de Acbiles a cond^na, 
C* o ferro o duro Pirrd se apar^Iha : '' 
Mas.ella os^ olhos/ com que o ar serena 
(Bern cdmo'paciSnte, e mansa,ov6Iha) 
Na misera may postos, que endoudece^ 
Ao duro sacrificio se offerece : 

Taes contra Inez os brutos mataddres^ 
No coIo de alabastro, que sostinha 
As obras, co que amdr matdu de am6res 
A'quelle, que depois a fSz rainha : 
As espddas bailbando, e as brancas fldres. 
Que ella dos olhos seus regddas tinba^ 
Se incarni94vao f6rvidos, e irosos^ 
No futuro castigo nao cuidosos. 

Bern puderas, 6 sol^ da vista d^stes, 
Teus rdyos apartdr ^qu61lc dia, 
Cdmo da seva mesa de Thyestes 
Quando os'filhos pormao de Atreu comia; 
Vos 6 concaves valles que pudestes, 
A voz extrema ouvir da boca fria, 
O nome do seu Pedro, que Ihe ouvistes, 
Por muito grande espa90 repetisites. 

Assi como a bonina, que cbrtdda 
Antes de tempo foi, Candida, e bella, 
Sendo das maos lascivas mal tratdda. 
Da menina, que a! trduxe na capelta^ 
O cheiro traz perdido, e a cdr murcl)id9y 
Tal esta morta a pdllida donzella^ 
S^cas do rosto a& rosas, e perdicj^ 
A brdnca, e viva cor, co' a doce vidg*,:. 



\, 



As 



'■ G R A MM A R. 1*7 

As filhas do Mond^go a morte ^scdra, 
Longo tempo chor^ndo memor^rao, ' ' 
]$ per ipemoria etdrna em fotite pura. 
As lagrimaschorddas transformdrao: \ ' 
O nome Ihe puzerao» que inda dura, 
Dos amdres de Inez, que <i,lii passarao ; 
V^de, que fresca fonte rcga as Acres, 
Que lagrimas sao agoa, e o ndme amdres. 

From the 5th Canto cf the same. 

Porem ]k cincos soes erao passddos. 
Que dalli nos partiramos, cortAndo 
Osmares nunca de dutrem navegddos, 
Prosperamente os ventos assoprando : 
Quando huma noite /cstando desctiidados^ 
Na cortaddra proa vigiindo, 
Huma nuvem que ds ares escurcce^ 
Sobre nossas cab^^as apparece. 

Tarn temerosa vinha, e carregida^ 

Que poz nos cora9dens hum grande medd^ 
Bramindo o negro mar de Idnge bra^a, 
Como se desse em vao n'algum roch^do: 
O' potestade, disse, sublimada. 
Que amea90 divino, ou que segredo, 
Este clima, e este mar nos apresenta. 
Que mor cousa parece, que torm^nta? 

Nao acabava, quando huma figura, 
Se nos mostra no ar, robusta, e valida^ 
De dUforme, e grandissima estatdra, 
O rosto carregado, a barba esquallida : 
Os olhos encovados, e a postura 
Medonha, e ma, e a cdr tetr^na, e pillida» 
O boca negra, os. dentes amarellos. , • ; 

Tarn grande era de m^mbros, que bem p6sso 
Certificdrte, que este era o segimdo^ 

Dc 



148 P Q RTU G U ES E 

De Rhodes e$Ltranhi8$>EDO Col6$60, 

Que hum dos set^ mil&gres foi do muodo : 

Co' hum torn de v6z dos falla borri^ndo, e grdsso. 

Que parecdo sahir do mar profiwido, 

Arrepiaose as ci^rnes, c o cabeUo» 

A mi, e a todo3, so d^ ouvilo, e velo. 

E disse, o* gente ousdda mais C{ue quintas 
No mundo comeltdraS gr&ndes cousas ; 
Tu, que por guerras cruas, taes, e tantas, 
E por trabalhos vSos nunca reppusa^y 
Pois vedados terminos quebrantas, 
E navegar meus longos mares ousas, 
Que eu tanto tempo hi que guardo^ e tepho 
Nunca arados de estranho ou propriolenho; 

Pois vens vdr os segr6dos escondidos 
Da natur^za, e ao humido elemento, 
A nenhutn grande hum&no concedidos 
De nobre ou de immprtal merecimento : 
Ouve OS damnos de mi, que apercebidos 
Estao a teu sobejo atrqvimentOj 
Por t6do a largo mar, e pela terra. 
Que inda bas-de subjugar com dura gu^rra. 

Sabe que quantas nios esta Viagemi 
Que tu fazes, fizcrem de atrevidas, 
Inimiga teraS esla paragem 
Com ventos, e tormdntas dcsmedidas. 
£ da primeira armada, ((ue passagemi 
Fizer por estas ondas inspffridas^ 
£u farei de improviso tal ca$tigo^ 
Que s6ja mpro damno que o perigp, 

Aqui espero toi&ar, se nao me e^g&no, 
De quern me descubrb aha ving^n^a^ 
E nao Bt acabara s6 nisto o damno 
De vossa pertinace '€onfiah9a j ' 
Antes em yos^a^ ndos verei^ c^da anno 
(Se he verdaik f> qu^ m^u jujzo alcaQCi?) 
; Naufragics, 



f 



Q ti A MM A 11;^ - 149 

Nkufragios, peTdi9oes de toda &orte, 
Que o menor mal de tMot seja a moftct. 

E do priraeirb iUustre que a xentiira f 
. Com fatna alta fizer tocar 6s Ceos^ 

Serei et^rna e nova sepultura, . 

Porjuizos incognitos de E)6os! 
' Aqui pord da Tufca tffmada dura 

Os sobdrbos e prosperos tropb6os : 

Comigo de seu$ damnos o amea9a 

A destrukja Quilda^ com Momba9a. 

Outro tambem vira de bonrdda fama. 
Liberal, Cavalleiro, ehamorado, . 
E comsigo trafa a form6sa Dama, • 
Que Amor por gram ftierce Ihe terd dado : ^ 
Triste veqtura c negror fado os chama 
Neste terr^rio meu,que duro, e irado, 
Os deixara.de hum crunaufragio vivos, ... 
Para verem trabalhos excessivos. • > 

Verao morr^r com fome os filhos charos, 
Em tan to am6r gerados, e nascidos : 
Verao os Cafres asperos, e avaros, , * ' 
Tirar a linda Dama oS seus vestidos : 
. Os crystallinos membros^ e preclaros^ 
A' calma, ao frio, ao ar verdo despidos^ 
Despois de ter pi2;ado longamdnte 
Co' OS delicados pes a area ardente. 

E verao mais os 61hos que e^capifem 
De tan to mal, de tanta desventura, 
Os dous am&ntes misefros ficarem " ' 

Na ftrvida e implacabil espessura. 
AlJi, despois que as pedras abrand^eofi 
Com lagrimas de ddr, de magoa piira, 
Abra9ados> as almas soltarao 
Da fprmosa e misefrima prisaS. 

Mais hia por diante o motistro borrindo 
Dizehdo n6ssg6 fadoii, quando alf&da 

- Lhc 



MO PORTUGUESE 

Lhe dice eu: quern ^s tu que esse estupenda 
Cdrpo, certo me t^m maravilhado ? 
A bdca, e os 61hos n^gros retorc^ndo, 
E d&ndo hum e^nrdso e gr^ade brddo", 
» Me responddo com \6z pesada e amdra^ 
Como quern da pergunta llie pezdra :* 

Eu sou aquelle occulto e grande Cdbo 
A quern chamdis vos outros Tormentorio ; 
Que nunca a Ptolem^o, Pomponio, Estrdbo, . 
Plinio, e quantos passdrao fui not6rio. 
Aqui toda a Afric^oa costa acabo 
Neste meu nunca visto ftomontorio. 
Que para 6 Polo Antarctico se estende^ 
A quern vossa ousadia Unto offlSnde. 

Fui dos filhos asperrimps da Terra, 
Qual Encelado, Eg^o, e o Centim^no ; 
Chameime Adamastdr^ e fui na guerra 
Contra o que vibra os rdios de v ulcSno ; 
Nao que puzesse serra sdbre serra^ 
Mas conquistaodo as dndas do Occi^no 
Fui Capitis do mdr, por onde andava 
A armada de Neptuno, que eu buscava. 

Amdres da alta Espdsa de Pel to 

Me fiz6ram tomar tam&nha empr^za, 

Todas as Deosas desprez^i do Ceo> 

S6 por amdr das aguas a Princ6za : 

Hum dia a vi, co'as fiihas de NerSo, 

Sahir nua na praia ; e logo prSza 

A vontade senti> de tai manSira 

Que inda nao sinto cousa que mais queira. 

Cdmo fdsse impossivel alcan^alla 
Pela grandiza fda ide meu gesto. 
Determine! por armas de tomalla, 
E a D6ris este caso manifesto : 
De mSdo a D£osa entao por mi lhe falla ; 
Mas ella co' hum formd^o riso honesto 

* Respondeo 



:: -GiR A M-M A R. ( i5i 

* 

Resp'ond^o ^ Qu^ai sera o aihor bast^ot^ 

De Nympha que sustente o dc hum^ Gigante ? 

Com tudo,^ "pot liVrarAioft Occe&no 
De tanial ^fuerfa, eu l^uscstfei ttianeira. 
Com que com mihha hddfa escuse o dimno : 
Tal resposta me torna a 'mdnlsageira^ • 
Eu que cahir uao p^e n^te engano 
(Que h6 grande do3 am&ntes a cegu^ira) 
£nch6ram*me cpm: gr&nde^ abond^n^as 
O peito de dezejosi e esperan9a8. 

Ja nescio, ja da guerra de&istindo,. 
Huma noite de Doris promettida. 
Me apparece de- longe b geato lindo. 
Da br^nca Thetis, unica despida : 
Cdmo doudo corri, de longe abrindo 
Os brd96s, para aquella que era vida 
Deste cdrpo , e 00111690 os olhos bellos 
A Ihe beijar, as fades, e os cabdilos. 

Oh que ndo sei de n6jb como o cdnte ! 
Que cr^ndo ter nos bra9os quern amava, 
Abra9ado me achei co' bum duro mdnle 
De aspero mato, e de espessura brava : 
Est&ndt) CO* hum penddb frdnte afrdnte. 
Que eu pSlo rosto ang^licQ apertava, 
Nao fiquei homem nao, mas mudo, e quedo, 
E junto de hum pen6do outro pen^do. 

Xy Nympha a tnais Formosa do Occeano : 
ja que minha presen9a n^ te agr^da. 
Que te custava ter-me nesfe engano, • 
Ou fdsse mdnte, nuvem, s6nho, ou nada ? 
De aqui me parto ir^do, e quasi ins^no. 
Da m^oa, e da deshdnra alii pass^da, . 
A busc^r dtitro mundo, dnde n^ visse 
Quem de meu pronto, e de meu mdl se risse. 

Erao ]k ndste t^mpo mens irmaos 

Vencidos, e em miseria extrdma postos ^ 

E, 



152 . P OK T U G U ES E 

E, por mats segurar-se os IMos^s vacis^ 
Agunsa v^rios m6ntes6otop6stos:r: : 

E como contra o Ceo Tiio valem maqs^ 
Eu que chor^n6o andiva roeus desg^tos 
Comecei a sentir dofado imi^o^, , .. - . 
Por meus atrevim^otqs, o castigo. 

Converte-se-rae a carric em t6rra ddfa; 
Em penddbs os 6ssos se fiz6ram : 
Estes m^mbrbs que \&s, e esta figiira^^ 
Por estas longas aguas se estenderam : 
Emfim minha grandissima estatdra . 
Neste remoto c&bo convertdram 
Os D6oses ; e por mais dobrddas mdgoas^ 
Me anda Thetis cercando destas dgoas. 

Assim contava^ e co' hum meddoho chdro^ 
Subito dante os dlhos se apartdu ; 
Desf^z se a nuvem negra, e co' bum soD6ro 
Bramido muito longe o mar sodu. 
Eu, levantaildo as m aos ao sancto coro 
Dos Adjos, que tao longe uos guidu, 
A D6os pedi, que removesse os duros 
Casos que Adamastdr, contou futuros. 

From the 2d Canto of the same. 

Ouvio-lhe estas palavras^piedosas 
A formosa Dione, e commovida, 
De entre as Nymphas se vai, que saudosas 
Ficdrao desta subita partida. 
Jd penetra as estrdllas luminosas; 
Janatercdira Esf6ra recebida 
Avinte pdssa ; e Id no sexto Ceo 
Para 6nd€ estdva o Padre se mov6o. 

Ecdmo hia afFrontada do caminho^ 
Tao formosa no gesto se mostrava. 
Que as estrellas, o Ceo, e o ar vizinbo 
£ tudo qu&nto a via namorava. 



^ 



Dos 



~ Dos- 61ho8 dttde £i9^'^.filho q: oiahA 

Huns espiritos vivos in^irava, , . 

Com queosP6lb^g<llWcli'iidtt<fflati',- ' .^ 

Etomavadefdgba'^fisfiShifM^'r ! ' - 

E por m4is namordr o Sober^no . . , 

P4dre, de quetA'fdisMpti'Mkdia^, e'cHiM,' * 
Se Ihe apresSh'ta'a^si cdmddtftibiitii}' ; 
Na selva Idea j4^ $^ apresdift4itf. 
Se a vira o ca9addr»que'd vulto'htun&ob' ^ v 
Perd^o, v6nudba Diaiik na agua cl&ra, n .* 
Nunca os £ammtos galgof o mat&ram't •.. W ^ 
Que primeiro desdjos o acabaram. - / 

Os ctSspos fios de diiroiie e$pifa(2iaixf ^ w . ' : 

P6Io colo, querarneye .escur^tiatf . (f : 

AndSndo, as lacteas tetas Ibe tremiam 
Com quern Amor brinca^, e nao se via: * , 
Da alva pretinach^fna^ Ih^'satili^irL' " 
dnde o menmo as aTma^ accendia : 
Pdlas lisas colikMinai Ihe txtphrnrnk ! /. i :; f.: ll 
Des^jos, que cdmo hem s^r!enrdl3^a3n;> . ' 

Co' hum delgidS'cehd&l aS p4'ttes'fc6tii*e/ - '^ ^ ' 
Dequ6m vergdoha h6^.natii^'k-eparo:. ;,ij . .' , 
Por^m nem'tiido escdnde, ]6^inidesd6bf^ j..r 
O veo dos rdxbs Hrios pduco arart) i 6::»-i' ; * 
Mas para que o desejo acc^nda^ e dobre^ . 
Lhe pod' diatite aquelle ob|ecto rato. *'' '* . 
Ja se «6ntem no Ce6, pof tdda a parte, ' *^ '^ • 1; 
Ciumes em Vulcfttfd, artidr^eitf mrte; * * ' '' 

E mostr^ndo no angelifco s^fhfcl^tit^ ' 
Co' o riso hdnda trist£za m'lsturada ; 
Como Akmk qde fdi do in^alifo amlnte' . 
Em brincos am6r6sos mal tratada; ^ . :- 

Que se queixa, e se ri n' hum m^smo inst&nte/' 
£ se m6stra 6ntre alegre magoada ; v. 

Desta arte a Ddosa^ a quern nenhuma iguala, 
Mais mim6sa que ttiste a o Padre f&la. 

* L From 



t: 



1S4 PORTUGUESE, 8cc. 

Fr$m ihi Ui Idyl of Boccage. 

K f6z do Tejou em brdnca peoedia, 
Minada p^Ias 6ndas salitrosasi 
IVision£iro de Amdr, Tritao gemia. 

LuziaQ-lhe as espadoas escam6sas, 
Sustentava o marltimo instrum^oto, 

O buzio atroaddr nas maos callosas : 

• 

Conchas da c6r do liquido Elemdnto 
Parte do.cdrpo enprme Jhe vestiao, 
Igudl nd Jigeirdza ao ptdprio v6ntb: 

Da barba salsas gdtas ihe cahiao, 
£ nos 61hos, que Amdr affogueava, 
Em borbotoes: as l^rimas ferviao. 

Lilia que hum B6sque proximo habitavaj 
lilia a Napia, desdenhosa, e b^lla, 
Amordsos damdres Ihe arrancava : 

Hum dia a vio na praia, e s6 de vSIfa 
Seu cora9ao feroz enfeiti9ado, 
Vodu, gemendo, para os olhos d6lla« 

Das< entr&nhas do Peiago salgado, 
Ldvco .de Amdres, Iduco de suadades. 
O queixdsa Amaddr tinha saltado^ 

Do Pai, que abafa as nSgras tempest&des, 
Ja» seu voraz tormento era sabido> 
E das dutras Equoreas Divipdades. 

De aereas espcran9as illudido, 
Grao tempo seu espirito sauddso, 
Rastej^do a criiel, vagdu perdido s 

Grao t^mpq glorias vis^isonhdu teimdso» 
Antes que desse fructuosa entc4da 
A o acre desex>g&QO^ o pdito ancidso. '&c« 

FlM. 



^ 






PORTUGUESE AND SPANISH LANGIJACfii. 



.... , Lately pub (ipud. . * 

1. A Dictionary of the Portuguefe and Englimjtl^#. 

guages, in Two Parts; Portturuefc and Englifh, «n4 Elnglilh 

arid ft)rtuffaere : wherein, Plwl — ^The Words are" explained, 

in their different niekni^gs, by Examples from the beft I^or^ 

tuguefe and Englilh Writers: Secbfidly^The EtymolGjJjr^ 

of the Portugueie generally indicated froitilbe Latin, Arabid' 

and other Languages. ^Thudii^hout tbc' whole are intdr- 

fperfed, a great number of Phrafes and Pn&yetbs* ' By An*-- 

THONY ViEYRA. In Two large Voliimes, 8vb. a new Edl.*^ 

tion, carefully revifed, and greatly improved wilh ujnoards 

oF 6,000 new words, and Cpnjmercial Phrafes, by Mr. J^ 

P, AiLLAUD, and the Portuguefe words properly .ag^eq^^dt 

to facilitate the Pronunciation to Learners. 
• • " .'■■''■' * 

2. An Abridgement of the fame in a pocket^VoIuine. 

3. fi. New Grammar of the Port uguefer and EngfUb Liui* 
guagesr By Mr* Vieyra, 8vo. A New Edition, grtftljr 
improved by Mr AillauD, with the PortQguefe Wotm. 
properly accented. , ., 

4. Exercises upon the different Parts of. fpcecb oCtht. 
Portuguefe Language, referring to Mr. Vxsyra'9 Gram* 
roar. 12010. 1 ., ' 

5. Nova Grammatica Ingleza, a qual ferve para Inflruif 
raos Portuguezes na Lingua Ingleza, 8vo. Nova Edifao re« 
vifta, e confideravelmente augmentiada. 

6. ^isTORj A de Portiigal, por Antonio de Moraes Sz^va, 
natural do Rio de Janeiro, e continuada at£os nossos tempos, 
por Hippolyto Joi£ da Costa, 3 torn. ismo. 

' 7. Hiftoria de Gil Braz de Santilhana traduzida em 
Portuguez, 4 tom. if mo. 

8. Selections in Portuguefe and Englifli, with the Por« 
tuguefe Words properly accented, for tbc Ufc of Pcrfons 
learoiof tiiofe Lianguages, 8vo. ^ . . . . 



Booh PfinUifQT /*• Wingrwe. 

g. A New DiCTiONART of tbe Spanifli and Englifli Lan« 
guagesJnTwo P^rtt— 1. SpaniOi and Eoglifli ; 2. EngHfli 
and Spanifli. A New Edition, 8vo. coirecicd and improved. ' 
By JPHM Barkttu s volt. 

10. The (ame abridged in a fmall fize. 

11. A New Spanifli Grammar; or, the Elements of the 
Spanifli Language. By Mr. ITelpino. A new Edition, 
improved by DeTpueyo. 8vo. 

la. Fernandez's New PrdcUcal Grammar of the Spani(h 
Lanffu^ ; a New Edition, confiderably enlarged by the 
Atenofp oVO. 

t'0V ExERdi^ES opon the Rules of CoriflruCtion of the 
^aoifli Languages ; with refcfrences to. the above Gram- 
mar. By Mr. Fernandez^ A New Edition, greatly im« 
p^ed by the Author. 

ti|« Laa AvENTURAS'de Giiir Blas deSantiliana'; Rew 
ftifttudas al CaiMl^MN), por el Sapitatifimo' Padre Ifla, y ea> 
eSR'NiMiva Edtcion^ revifadas pof el Rev. Don.FfiLfPB' 

FRR||ANDElty4Vol. laillOb 

Sj.'Thtlame vols a, 3, and 4 to complete fefs.* 

ift Don -Quixote de la Mancha, compuefto por Miguel 
de Cervantes Saavie(]ra. Nueva Exlicion pc^r M. F£Ri4AVf- 
OEZ, 4tom. iflirao; 

17'. NovELAS NuEVAS.'porMr. DeFlorian, trad^cidas 
liliirewente, 6 illuftradas con algunas notas curiofas 6 in- 
llMftlvas; por Don-Gafpar Zavala y Zamora, i2mo. 

18. GoNZALVO de Cordova, por Mr. DeFlorian, trad. 
ptPt'D* Jofan Lop^z de Penaivon, s torn. lamo. 

19: HJrsToRiAde la ConqUista de Mexico, pof Doh' 
Antonio de Solis^ 3 torn. 8vo. 



^ 



London s 



far F. WiKO&AVi, StnM, by T. C. HsriMi; 

Peterborough Court, Fleet'itreeL 



THE NEW 

This book ■■ 
Ok 


YORK PUBLIC LIBRARY 


en Irom the BuUdinl 




























































































'"'■"- 







THE NEW YORK PUBLIC LIBRARY 

RBPERBNCE DEPARTMENT 


taken from the BaUdint 




























































































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