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Full text of "Angling clubs and preservation societies of London and the provinces"

SH 

W56 

1883 

Fishes 



ISSUED BY AUTHRISJ'flAIIO''*^ KUSiOJi 




ANGLING CLUBS 

PRESERYATIOK SOCIETIES 




J. P. WHEELDON 

LATE ANGLING EDITOR OF " DKI-L'S UF« '^ 



London 




^m:. 



iNTEJUSt/Z^TIOIJ^L IjSHERIES EXHlBITIOil 
AND 15 &H/gRJNG CXQSS ' S^r 

ONB SHII<LINQ 




OFFICIAL PUBLICATIONS. 

The following Handbooks upon subjects cognate to the 
International Fisheries Exhibition are already published, 
or in active preparation :— 

NOW READY. 

Demy Zvo., in Illustrated Wrapper \s. each ; or bound in cloth 2s. each. 
THE FISHERY LAWS. By Frederick Pollock, Ba.rrister-at- 
l.avv, M.A, (Oxon.), lion. LL.D. Edin. ; Corpus Christi Professor of Juris- 
prudence in the University of Oxford. 

ZOOLOGY AND FOOD FISHES. By George B. Howes, 

Demonstrator of Biology, Normal School of Science, and Royal School of Mines, 
.South Kensington. 

BRITISH MARINE AND FRESHWATER FISHES. 

(Illustrated.) By W. Saville Kent, F.L.S., P'.Z.S., Author of Official Guide- 
books to the Brighton, Manchester, and Westminster Aquaria. 

APPARATUS FOR FISHING. By E. W. H. Holdsworth, 
F.L.S., F.Z.S., Special Commissioner . for Juries, International Fisheries 
Exhibition; Author of "Deep Sea F'isheries aiid Fishing Boats," "British 
Indu.stries — Sea Fisheries," &c. 

THE BRITISH FISH TRADE. By His Excellency Spencer 

Walpoi.e, Lieut. -GoTernor of the Die of Man. 

THE UNAPPRECIATED FISHER FOLK. By James G. 

Bertram, Author of " 'i'he Harvest of the Sea." 

THE SALMON FISHERIES. {Illustrated.) By C. E. Fryer. 

As^ist.int Inspector of S.dnMin I- isheries. Home Office. 

SEA MONSTERS UNMASKED. {lUustrateJ.) By Henry Lee, 
F.L.S. 

THE ANGLING CLUBS AND PRESERVATION SO- 
CIETIES OF LONDON AND THE PROVINCES. By J. T. Whkeldon, 

late Angling Edaor of " Bell's Life." 

IN THE PRESS. 
THE HISTORY OF FISHING FROM THE EARLIEST 

TLMES. By W. M. Adams, M.A. (Oxon.), late Fellow of New College. 
FISH CULTURE. {Illustrated.) By Francis Day, F.L.S., Com- 
missioner for India to International Fisheries Exhibition. 
FISH AS DIET. By W. Stephen Mitchell, M.A. (Cantab.) 
ANGLING IN GREAT BRITAIN. By William Senior (" Red 

EDIBLE CRUSTACEA. By W. Saville Kent, F.L.S., F.Z.S., 

Author of Official Guidebooks to the Brighton, Manchester, and Westminster 
Aquaria. 

INDIAN FISH AND FISHING. {Illustrated.) By Francis 

Day, F.L.S., Commissioner for Imiia to International Fisheries Exhibition. 

THE LITERATURE OF SEA AND RIVER FISHING. 

By John J. Manley, M.A. (Oxon.) 
SEA FABLES DISCLOSED. By Henry Lee, F.L.S. 
FOLK LORE OF FISHES: their Place in Fable, Fairy 

Tale, Myth, and Poetry. By Phil Robinson. 
THE OUTCOME OF THE EXHIBITION. By A. J. R. 

'i"RKNDELL, of the Inner Temple, Barrister-at-Law, Literary SuperintendeHt for 
the Fisheries Exhibition. 



LONDON : 
WILLIAM CLOWES AND SONS, Limited, 

INTERNATIONAL FISHERIES EXHIBITION, & 13, CHARING CROSS. 



^^ , Liter national Fisheries Exhibition 

'^ LONDON, 1883 



ANGLING CLUBS 



AND 



PRESERVATION SOCIETIES 



LONDON AND THE PROVINCES 



BY 



J. P. WHEELDON 

LATE ANGLING EDITOR OF " BELL's LIFE' 



LONDON 
WILLIAM CLOWES AND SONS, Limited 

INTERNATIONAL FISHERIES EXHIBITION 
AND 13 CHARING CROSS, S.W. 

1883 



THE 



ANGLING CLUBS AND PRESERVATION SOCIETIES 
OF LONDON AND THE PROVINCES. 



INTRODUCTION. 

In writing this handbook it was my original intention to 
give something like a short history of the formation and 
present position of some, at any rate, of the chief Angling 
Societies of the metropolis. Considering that there are 
certainly over 150 of these societies in London alone, I well 
knew that I had set myself no light task. Mapping the 
matter over in my own mind, I came to the conclusion that 
the only course for me to adopt was to seek the co-opera- 
tion of the societies themselves, asking through their various 
secretaries for information as to their origin, and also what, 
if any, good work they were doing in the present. With 
this view a letter was sent to the secretaries of the various 
metropolitan clubs, apprising them of my design and 
intention. I have to thank a small proportion of these 
gentlemen, and I regret to say a very small one, for the 
courtesy of a reply. The larger number evidently con- 
sidered the matter beneath their valuable notice, and so 
ignored it altogether. The situation hardly requires further 
comment. 

B 2 



4 THE ANGLING CLUBS AND PRESERVATION 

With regard to the provincial societies, the line adopted 
has been entirely different — not in so far as I personally 
was concerned, because the same letter was addressed to 
each and all, but in the matter of politeness and courteous 
consideration towards myself. The result leaves me little 
room for doubt that the gentlenesses of modern society are 
cultivated far more abroad than they are at home. Many 
gentlemen have taken considerable trouble in affording 
me especially valuable information ; to all such I tender 
my warmest and heartiest thanks — not so much perhaps 
for the knowledge conveyed in their letters, as for the 
kindly sentiments which accompanied it. 

Thus much by way of introduction. For the reason 
stated, I regret very much that my little book does not 
contain fuller and more concise information, I leave it, 
however, to the tender mercies of my readers. 



It would probably be very difficult for the angler of 
to-day to realise what the Thames and the Lea were like 
some fifty years ago. Those are the two great home rivers, 
centres of all the persevering efforts made day by day, week 
by week, and month after month, by the London angler, 
whose great aim it is to catch a big fish of some sort — it 
matters very little what — and have his name go down 
to posterity, decked with emblematic laurels as the 
" champion " in such and such a class of fishing. Such 
happy fate may be preserved for all time — until at any rate 
the record is beaten — upon the tablets of fame connected 
with some small local angling club. 

But fifty years ago — and what a paradise for sports- 
men the Thames must have been then ! — swans were kept 



SOCIETIES OF LONDON AND THE PROVINCES. 5 

within bounds, and at that time it was not necessary to 
employ bands of men, as it is in the present day, to drive 
these handsome but terribly destructive birds from the 
line of weed-fringed roots dependent from stubbly pollards 
lining the bank, and upon which spawning perch have 
deposited their riband-like strings of ova, nor from " the 
hills " in the weir streams, where the great and bonny 
mother trout has frequented during that time when she was 
simply obeying Nature's urgent laws. 

Steam launches, probably the greatest of all great curses 
to him who, following the example of a writer of other 
days, would fain — 

" Live harmlessly, and by the brink 
Of Thames or Avon have a dwelling place, 

Where I may see my quill or cork down sink 
With eager bite of perch or bleak or dace, 

And on the world and my Creator think, 

were then absolutely unknown. In any event, there were 
none of those thrice detestable " puffers," with silent engines 
and dull moaning whistle, which daily and hourly tear 
through the water at the rate of 12 to 20 miles an hour, 
doing direful and deadly injury every yard they go. It 
may be said that this language is excessive in its strength, 
and overstrained in its application. Not a whit, take my 
word for it. I have seen more damage done to the ova of 
spawning fish in one season, and particularly perch and 
pike, by the everlasting swash and wash of these deadly 
pests, more — aye, far more than an army of poachers and 
fishermen could do in five years, had they even combined 
their forces, without absolutely netting the river wholesale 
every day, and harried every fish to death that came 
within their ken. 
At the first glance this would seem to be an overwhelming 



6 THE ANGLING CLUBS AND PRESERVATION 

statement, hastily and rashly made. One moment's con- 
sideration will suffice to impress any thoughtful man's mind 
with an assurance of its truth. A pike wirer, it is true, 
may kill a female fish, ripe and full of ova, and hence many 
thousands of future pike are lost to the fair fisher. But 
where he kills one or two fish without detection, the steam 
launches are perpetually and everlastingly ploughing 
through the water, not only washing away the ova de- 
posited upon the weeds and sheltering roots, but destroying 
thousands upon thousands of tiny just-hatched fry, which 
would otherwise have probably grown up, and made in time 
mature fish, the source and foundation of good sport to the 
fair fishermen. 

In those far-off days of the past there were such delight- 
ful and fishful nooks as one misses nowadays. Com- 
paratively speaking the Thames was a great stretch of 
maiden water, where the unharried fish dwelt in a sense of 
the most perfect security. Their chief enemy was then, 
probably, the village poacher, with his rude, yet none the 
less dangerous, ash pole and bit of dangling copper wire. 
Lazy and idle — as indeed some few perhaps of the village 
loungers of to-day may be — this worthy would stroll 
down to the- river side, where mayhap, amongst bonny 
sweet-smelling hay-fields lined with meadow-sweet, and 
where glorious purple loosestrife bounds the river's marge, 
he met not a solitary living soul the whole summer's day. 
Here he would pry about, until he might haply descry, 
basking amongst the water weeds, a big pike, with the tip 
of his nose and tail clear of the water, or the dorsal fin of a 
great lumbering carp. Then the fatal noose would be 
brought into play, and towards night, when reeling home 
from " The Haymakers," the gloriously happy fellow might 
possibly reflect, and withal possessed of an infinite sense of 



SOCIETIES OF LONDON AND THE PROVINCES. 7 

satisfaction, that he was a very lucky dog indeed to be 
able to get such a skinful of good old ale with so little real 
trouble. 

But the injury done to the fisheries of a river in such a 
case — and examples of it are now happily almost extinct — 
is increased a millionfold every year by that wrought by 
the terrible rate at which traffic up and down the stream 
is permitted. I have seen, for instance, the wave raised 
by a fast launch or heavy steam-tug rushing along the 
bank nearly a yard high, sweep up some little inland bay 
where the water perhaps shallowed from a foot or so 
at its mouth to only a few inches in depth in its interior. 
That little bay, and all such like it, is full to this day, I 
hope, of tiny mites of baby fish. I have seen, as I have 
said, the wave sweep across it, and as it receded it left 
hundreds, possibly thousands, of little fish to die amongst 
the pebbles and rank grass growing along the shore. Talk 
about the destruction effected by a pair of otters, talk 
about the war waged by the idle village lout upon the 
finny inhabitants of a river — why, the argument falls fiat 
and becomes both baseless and ridiculous as opposed to 
the terrible havoc wreaked by these puffing pests, deter- 
mined enemies as they are to good sport, peace, and 
quietude. 

It may be in the recollection of some few of the readers 
of this little book that I have for years waged war, with 
both voice and pen, for the suppression of what I cannot 
help seeing is the chief enemy to the fisheries of the 
river. My work has borne at least some little fruit, inas- 
much as a Bill for the better regulation of steam traffic upon 
the river has gone through a select Committee of the Com- 
mons, and is now before the House of Lords ; and all good 
anglers will, I am convinced, say amen to my prayer for its 



8 THE ANGLING CLUBS AND PRESERVATION 

success. But suppose it passes and becomes law, as I 
earnestly hope it may do, it will still be an abortive and 
useless measure, unless the "Angling Clubs of London" — 
and here I strike the key-note of my book — help it by their 
united support and assistance. It is useless for Tom to 
wait while Jack or Harry strikes, in the event of any 
outrage upon propriety. Tom, being the spectator of an 
abuse of the existing law, should strike at once, and then 
perhaps others will follow his example, so that in the event 
of any breach of law in the future, the result, affecting, 
recollect, the angler's dearest and nearest interests in con- 
nection with his sport, rests with the angler himself As 
there are twenty " clubmen " fishing the Thames to one 
unassociated with any such body, this warning, and it is a 
very grave one, is addressed particularly to them. 

Practically, I think, or at any rate to any great extent, 
poaching on the fisheries of the Thames is very nearly 
extinct. Now and again there is a raid made, it is true, by 
some of those determined spirits always to be found in 
villages and large towns, and who would, every man-Jack 
of them, infinitely prefer one poached hare or pheasant, 
obtained at the price of a little adventure and devilry, to a 
brace got by fair means ; but I hardly fancy that the extent 
of the mischief done is very great. The reason lies in the 
fact that a very large proportion of the river is now pro- 
tected either by the keepers and officers of the Thames 
Angling Preservation Society or by the officials of some 
one or other of the local associations, all of whom are in 
reality offshoots from the parent-tree just named. There 
can be little doubt that the growth of the angling clubs of 
London has been largely fostered by the efforts made by 
the " Thames Angling Preservation Society " in the con- 
servation and preservation of its fisheries. In tracing, 



SOCIETIES OF LONDON AND THE PROVINCES. 9 

therefore, an imperfect history of the growth of the angling 
clubs, due credit should be given to the leading Preservation 
body, which exercises such an important control over the 
interests of the great home river. It may therefore, at 
this point, be a fair opportunity for a short description of 
establishment and progress up to the present time. 

The Thames Angling Preservation Society was, I believe, 
first established in the year 1838. Somewhere about that 
time, a report was certainly promulgated to the effect 
that "the Fisheries of the River Thames had of late 
afforded so little sport, owing to incessant poaching and 
the destruction of the young brood and spawn during the 
fence seasons, that it was almost useless to attempt angling 
in certain districts at all." Fortunately, that report found 
its way to a sympathetic quarter, and it occurred to those 
into whose hands it fell that if a proper representation of 
the facts were made to the Lord Mayor of London (then 
Sir John Cowan) he might probably be induced, in his 
official capacity as Conservator of the River Thames, to 
help those early pioneers of fish preservation in the course 
they were endeavouring to take for the good alike of anglers 
and the river itself Acting upon this view, a meeting was 
convened on the 17th of March, 1838, and was afterwards 
held at the " Bell Inn," Hampton. It was attended by the 
following good anglers, most of whom, I am afraid, have 
gone to that shadowy bourne, from which no angler, 
however good he may have been, ever returns — Mr. Henry 
Jephson, Mr. C. C. Clarke, Mr. Henry Perkins, Mr. W. H. 
Whitebread, Mr. Edward Jesse, Mr. Richard Kerry, and Mr. 
David Crole. These gentlemen having met, fully discussed 
the important issues brought before them, and that meeting 
was the groundwork upon which the present important work 
of the Thames Angling Preservation Society was founded. 



lo THE ANGLING CLUBS AND PRESERVATION 

They therefore resolved themselves into a Society for " the 
protection of fish from poachers ; " and one of the earliest 
steps taken was the appointment of a staff of river-keepers, 
selected principally from amongst the professional fishermen 
who gained a livelihood upon the Thames. The valuable 
action of this small preservative body was from the outset 
fully recognised by the Lord Mayor, and warrants were 
then granted to the river-keepers to act as water-bailiffs, 
while certain bye-laws were framed for the better protec- 
tion of the fisheries of the river. Under these by-laws 
the position and power of the river-keepers is thus defined : — 
They are empowered " to enter any boat, vessel, or craft of 
any fisherman or dredgerman, or other person or persons 
fishing or taking fish or endeavouring to take fish, and 
there to search for, take and seize all spawn, fish, brood of 
fish, and unsizable, unwholesome, or unseasonable fish, and 
also all unlawful nets, engines, and instruments for taking 
or destroying fish as shall then be in any such boat, vessel, 
or craft in and upon the river, and to take and seize on 
shore or shores adjoining to the said river all such spawn, 
fish, and also all unlawful nets, engines, and instruments 
for taking and destroying fish as shall there be found." 

The extent of water taken under control was from 
Richmond to the City Stone at Staines, and immediately 
efforts were made to preserve the various deeps in the 
course indicated, thus making them " harbours of refuge " 
for the fish. The position of such preserves may be shortly 
pointed out as follows. 

Richmond. — The preserve is westward of the bridge to 
the Duke of Buccleuch's, 700 yards. Twickenham. — The 
preserve is the west end of lawn. Pope's Villa, to the ait, 
400 yards. Kingston. — The preserve is from the Lower 
Malthouse at Hampton Wick to the east end of Mr. J. C. 



SOCIETIES OF LONDON AND THE PROVINCES, ir 

Park's lawn at Teddington, including the back-water 
known as the Crolock, 1060 yards. Thames Ditton and 
Long Ditton. — The preserve is from Lord Henry Fitz- 
gerald's, running eastwards, 512 yards. Hampton. — The 
preserve is from the west end of Garrick's Lawn, including 
the Tantling Bay, to the lower end pile below Moulsey 
Lock, 1 5 14 yards. Sunbury. — The preserve is from the 
weir westward to the east end pile of breakwater, 6'^'^ yards. 
Walton. — The preserve is at the east end of Tankerville 
and west of Horse Bridge, called Walton Sale, 250 yards. 
Shepperton. — The preserve is. Upper Deep, 200 yards ; 
Old Deep, east of the creek rails, 240 yards ; Lower Deep, 
east of the drain, 200 yards. Weybridge. — The preserve 
is from the weir to Shepperton Lock, 830 yards. Chertsey. 
— The preserve is the weir to 80 yards eastward of the 
bridge, 445 yards. Laleham and Penton Hook. — The 
preserve at Penton Hook is from the guard piles eastward 
round the Hook to the east end of the lock. Staines. — The 
preserve is the City boundary stone to 210 yards eastward 
of the bridge. 

From time to time these preserves have been rendered 
more efficient by the sinking of old punts, brick burrs, and 
by driving stakes into the river bed, as a protection against 
netting operations. The last of such established preserves 
was that at Kingston, which was made in the year 1857. 
Upon application being made to the Lord Mayor, the move- 
ment was opposed by some of the professional fishermen, 
but such opposition was overruled, and the following is a list 
of the obstacles sunk : — " Five old punts, two iron waggons, 
7 feet 3 inches in length by 4 inches, and 2 feet 6 inches in 
height, open at one end ; 450 stakes driven ; six 2-horse 
loads of large brick burrs ; twenty &%^ chests with tenter 
hooks ; fifty large flint stones ; ten tar-barrels, tenter- 



12 THE ANGLING CLUBS AND PRESERVATION 

hooked ; two large sugar casks, tenter-hooked ; two punt 
loads of old iron gas lamps and other useful things ; and 
three sacks of tin cuttings for the landing-places along the 
shore." 

In December 1857 the Board of Thames Conservancy- 
became invested with fuller powers in its' government, and 
an application made by the Thames Angling Preservation 
Society for a continuance of the powers vested in their 
bailiffs or water-keepers was at once granted. The next 
step taken for the further preservation of the fisheries of the 
Thames was in 1869, when an application was made for the 
whole abolition of netting between Richmond Bridge and 
the City Stone at Staines. This w^as supported by the 
entire body of Thames fishermen, and in consequence of 
the Conservancy Board acceding to the application the 
following notice was inserted in several of the London 
papers : — 

" Be it ordered and established that the i6th item of 
the rules, orders, and ordinances for the fisheries in the 
Thames and Medway, made on the 4th day of October, 
1785, be repealed, and that henceforth no person shall 
use any net for the purpose of catching fish in the River 
Thames between Richmond Bridge and the ' City Stone ' 
at Staines, except a small net for the purpose of taking 
bait only, of the following dimensions — namely, not ex- 
ceeding 13 feet in circumference, and an angler's landing 
net, under penalty to forfeit and pay £<) for every such 
offence. The seal of the Conservators of the River 
Thames was this 23rd day of January, i860, affixed by 
order." 

But the most important work, after all, effected by 
the Thames Angling Preservation Society was perhaps 
the abolition of snatching and laying night lines. It is 



SOCIETIES OF LONDON AND THE PROVINCES. 13 

absolutely impossible to overestimate the destruction 
effected amongst spawning fish, or to others flocking to 
certain places where a sewage discharge induced them to 
harbour, than was effected by the detestable and unsports- 
manlike practice of snatching. The sewer at the foot of 
Richmond Bridge was a noted place where the so-called 
angler was in the habit of exercising his unworthy craft. 
The modus operandi was very much as follows : an angler 
— heaven save the mark ! — perhaps pretended to be fishing 
for dace, and attached to his tackle he had a dozen stout 
hooks set at intervals on his line, some of them baited — 
others with not even that shallow pretence — with a fragmen- 
tary portion of worm. All day long these delightful gentry 
kept dropping a heavily shotted line into the swim, and 
instantly jerking it upwards again with a powerful stroke. 
Thus many a great carp has been impaled, many a lusty 
bream dragged nolens volens from his watery home. The 
same kind of thing was done openly and in broad daylight, 
along the parade at Kingston, and the operators pretended 
they were fishing — legitimately fishing ! Now and again a 
bold sportsman, rendered hardy and brave with impunity, 
disdained to use the shallow artifice of the bit of worm at 
all, and boldly lowered amongst the gathering shoals of 
bream or dace a cruel implement of sport, consisting of a 
bunch of bare triangles weighted with a sinker. It may 
well be in the recollection of a great many disgusted 
spectators, even as the memory is likely to abide with me 
for all time, of the shameful and detestable scenes that 
were wont to be enacted day after day at many of the 
accessible weirs, when the dace were heading up. I have 
seen them slaughtered in scores, and scores of hundreds ; 
and this little game went on day after day, for weeks. It 
was stopped at last, and high time too. The only wonder 



14 THE ANGLING CLUBS AND PRESERVATION 

I have, thinking back upon such scenes, is this : How was it 
that many a good angler, who must have shuddered with 
indignation at the cruel, shameful waste of life, the pain 
inflicted upon the hapless fish, escaped trial for man- 
slaughter at the Old Bailey, consequent upon trying to 
effect the death by drowning of one or other of the manly 
and noble crew ? I know not. 

As to the practice of laying night lines, its results were 
all too palpably apparent to him who reads by the wayside 
as he runs. Many and many a grand Thames trout, the 
l^ride and crown jewel of some deep reach, has met his 
death ignobly at the end of a night line, ostensibly laid 
for the capture of eels. Then it was that the lucky captor 
would knock his prize on the head, and straightway take 
it up to the village house of a well-to-do and worthy 
inhabitant, who had probably tried a round dozen of times 
to effect his capture legitimately. Some such scene and 
dialogue as this then followed : — 

A trim and natty servant-maid appearing at the door, 
honest old Bill Boozier, the hard and horny-handed, who 
never told an untruth in his life, or pretended to bait a 
barbel swim when he had not had a worm near his 
premises for a month, rush basket in hand, thus addresses 
her : — 

" Mornin', Mary, my dear. Why, Lard a mussy, what 
cheeks them is o' yourn, surelie. Redder 'n the best Ribson 
pippen as I ever seen. Lard, ef I'd only bin a younger 
man." 

" Go along with you ; a married man and all. You 
oughter bin ashamed o' yourself," is naturally red-cheeked 
Mary's retort. 

" Well, so 'tis, Mary. Mortal 'shamed of myself I is, and so 
I don't deceive you. Muster Fubsy in? But, theer, I needn't 



SOCIETIES OF LONDON AND THE PROVINCES. 15 

arst Aint them his brekfus' things agoin' in ? Course 
they is ; new laid heggs there is, which they're werry good 
at times, and a leetle bit o' bacon frezzled crisp. Tray 
bung, as the Frenchmen says, and now, Mary, my dear, 
will you be so good as to give Cluster Fubsy ole Bill 
Boozler's compliments, and say he's sorry to say as that 
theer trout has a-come to a huntimely hend at larst." 

The natty one, having delivered her message, is nearly 
upset by the anxious Fubsy, who rushes out, spec- 
tacles on nose, the Times in one hand, and loosely 
arrayed in his dressing-gown. He opens upon William at 
once. 

" William — William Boozier, you don't mean to say 
that you've er — er — caught that trout, after all the number 
of times I've been out with you, and the pounds and 
pounds I've spent ? " 

" Suttenly not," cries the worthy William, with an air of 
mingled grief and astonishment. " No, sir, suttenly not. But 
this blessid mornin' as ever was, I'se a goin' down to Bun- 
kin's Ait in the little skiff, to see about the eel barskits, and 
I hears a floppin' and prancin' about in my old punt — that 
one what the Westa, confound her ! stoved in — and so I 
sculls across softly, thinkin' it was rats. Soap me never, 
marster, I was that knocked-a-cock as I could ha' drunk 
arf-a-pint o' ole ale quick, just as I could at this heer minnit, 
fur theer lay that theer loverlly trout, a nine-pounder ef he 
weighs a bounce, wi' just a kick and no more left in him ; 
and I takes him in my two hands tenderly as ef I was a 
lefting ababby, and 'olds his 'ed up stream. But it worn't a 
mossel 'o use, he was stone gone ; and I says to myself, I 
does, ' Bill, this punt is yourn ' — which it is, cause why, my 
own brother's sister's husband built her, best pine deal and 
oak stretchers, which well it is beknown down at the bridge, 



1 6 THE ANGLING CLUBS AND PRESERVATION 

and at the ferry ; but, ' Bill,' says I, * this trout ain't yourn, 
and for why, cause Muster Fubsy bin a fishin' wi' you, Bill, 
off and on, a matter of a score o' times, ole days and arf 
uns ' — though I never was the man to arst for a ole day's 
pay for a arf un — ' and that theer trout, Bill,' says I, ' is 
Muster Fubsy's fish by rights ' ; and so I brings him 
straight up to you, sir, and theer he lays — a beauty as 
he is — wi' spots on him as big as a crown piece, werry 
nigh." 

" But, in the name of fate, William," cries Fubsy, carefully 
putting his spectacles on the bridge of his nose, " how 
did the trout get into your punt ? " 

" Chucked hisself in, sir — chucked hisself in, which it is 
well known they will do arter a bait, or else a leaping out 
o' the water arter a butterfly or what not, and so the pore 
Greater hadn't the sense to chuck hisself back again, and 
theer he is. Blessed if I ain't as dry as bones, a-talking so 
much." 

" William, you're a very worthy and honest fellow — a 
very worthy fellow indeed, William. There's a sovereign 
for you, and I'm much obliged to you, while Mary will 
draw you a jug of ale. Good morning, William. Good 
morning." 

The end draws nigh. William at any time during that 
day may be discovered at the bar of the " Angler's Rest," 
where for the hundredth time, at least, he tells the story of 
" that theer trout a-chucking hisself high and dry into the 
old punt." The trout goes to Cooper, and when it comes 
home, at the expiration say, of six to twelve months, it 
may perhaps bear an inscription to this effect : " Thames 
Trout caught by A. J. Fubsy, spinning. Weight, nine 
pounds." 

In my own opinion the abolition of night-lining is the 



SOCIETIES OF LONDON AND THE PROVINCES. 17 

sole and only reason for the immense increase in late years 
of the stock of trout in the river. 

The new by-laws as to snatching and night-lining were 
approved by Her Majesty at the Court of Balmoral on the 
28th of October, 1879. They are as follows : 

"Snatching of fish. — It shall not be lawful for any 
person to fish for, or to take, or attempt to take, any fish 
by using a wire, or snare, or hooks (baited or unbaited), or 
any other engine for the purpose of foul hooking, commonly 
called ' snatching or snaring.' 

" Night lines. — It shall not be lawful for any person to lay 
night hooks or night lines of any description whatever 
between the ' City Stone ' at Staines and Kew Bridge ; and 
any person laying fixed lines of hooks by night or day 
(commonly called night lines), or taking, or attempting to 
take, eels or fish of any description by such means, shall be 
deemed as committing a breach of this by-law." 

The Thames Angling Preservation Society continues its 
jurisdiction as far as Staines, and at that point the first of 
the local associations for the preservation of the river 
commences its work. This is the Windsor and Eton 
Society, which is supposed to look after something like 
about twelve miles of water extending from Staines Bridge 
to Monkey Island. Throughout that stretch, some of the 
finest water in the Thames is to be found, and if this 
society were more thoroughly supported by the public, it is 
probable that no similar length of water would be more 
splendidly productive. It is the fashion, however, to rail at 
the promoters and managers of any incorporated body 
whose objects may not appear to be carried out well and 
to the point. It escapes probably the notice of those who 
gibe and speak harshly about the work done by the 
Windsor and Eton, that it is simply impossible for the 

C 



1 8 THE ANGLING CLUBS AND PRESERVATION 

Society to keep going unless the angling public provides 
the sinews of war. This section of the public will know in 
an instant whether they have done so or not. 

It is at once an injustice and a wrong to brand a body of 
men with shortcomings in their work, when the very work 
itself is dependent upon the help which a local association 
like the Windsor and Eton receives from the public who 
fish its waters. I venture to think that few, if any, of the 
hundreds of men who yearly go to Windsor and its 
charming environs from London, sometimes taking good 
bags of fish home with them, ever subscribe, or ever did 
subscribe, one single penny to its funds. 

The Maidenhead, Cookham, and Bray Angling Society, 
whose headquarters are at Skindle's Hotel, and whose 
excellent secretary is Mr. W. G. Day, takes up the work of 
preservation at Monkey Island, continuing their operations 
over an important section of the Thames. There is pro- 
bably none other of the local associations which has done 
such wonderfully good work. But then the reason is not 
far to seek ; they are not only siipported fairly by the local 
gentry and inhabitants, many of whom are themselves keen 
lovers of angling, but also by a considerable number of 
London anglers, principally members of the leading clubs. 
That just makes all the difference, and although I do not 
pretend to say that the Windsor and Eton has not done all 
in its power with the funds which it had at command, the 
Maidenhead and Cookham sets such a brilliant example, by 
stocking their waters with splendid Wycombe trout, and 
that too in the most liberal manner, that their example 
possibly commanded the support they have unquestionably 
received to a certain extent from a small section of the 
angling public. 

I say a small section advisedly, because where a society, 



SOCIETIES OF LONDON AND THE PROVINCES. 19 

like that under notice, proves that it is doing a valuable 
and extensive work, it ought to be recognised, in no matter 
how small a degree, by every angler who fishes its waters. 

Now is this the case, or anything approaching to it ? I 
say no — emphatically no. I have seen scores and hundreds 
of men, during the many years which I have fished the 
Thames, pursuing their sport on the Maidenhead waters, 
and but very few of them ever contribute a single farthing. 

If this state of things were confined solely to the coarse 
fish of this or any other section of the river, it would not 
possibly matter so much — but then it is not. Trout fishers 
come and take fish — not confining themselves in some 
instances very strictly to size — and those very trout 
represent so much hard cash deducted from the Society's 
income. Still the Society goes on its way quietly, and 
year by year does good and worthy work. They are 
assisted by an excellent body of keepers, under the 
command of Harry Wilder, who is himself a rare good 
fisherman, and year after year show an admirable return 
for their labours. 

I In justice to Harry Wilder and Captain A Styan, one of 
the early founders of this Association, it should be added 
that they were really the first to start the Society. Wilder 
informs me that he originated the idea of stocking this 
part of the river with Wycombe trout, and that he and 
Captain Styan raised a subscription for that purpose. Such 
a subscription was raised, and in the year before the Associa- 
tion was really started over 50 brace of fine Wycombe trout 
were turned into the river opposite the Ray Mead Hotel. 

It may now be interesting to trace the absolute history 
of the Society itself. 

The Maidenhead, Cookham and Bray Thames Angling 
Association was started so recently as 1874. The objects 

C 2 



20 THE ANGLING CLUBS AND PRESERVATION 

in view were, generally speaking, to preserve and improve 
the fishing from the Shrubbery to Monkey Island, that 
is to say, the water between the Great Marlow and the 
Windsor and Eton Districts. 

Prior to their establishment poaching and illegal fishing 
were rampant in this district ; and I am informed, by those 
who speak from personal knowledge, that netting on the 
meadows adjacent to the river during flood time was carried 
on wholesale, and large quantities of all kinds of river 
fish, the greater part undersized, were captured and sold. 
Wiring fish in the ditches, where they had retreated for 
spawning operations, was also a very common practice. 

Ten years ago trout had become, comparatively speak- 
ing, a very rare fish in these parts, and a young trout of 
greater rarity' still. Angling was almost at a standstill, 
and anglers were seeking other waters which promised 
greater success. 

Several gentlemen belonging to London, and to the 
locality of Maidenhead, feeling that a great deal could be 
effected in the way of improvements at a comparatively 
small cost, if a good system were pursued, took the matter 
in hand. Support was solicited from the various classes of 
the community interested in the results, and it ended in this 
Association being formed. 

Their first step, after forming a good working committee, 
was to make arrangements with the several riparian owners 
in the districts, by which the Society obtained the rights 
to drag their ditches and prosecute poachers, and I am 
pleased to say that they found little difficulty in obtaining 
these powers. 

The Society then took into its service several of the 
fishermen of the district, and at their request the Thames 
Conservancy granted deputations for each, by which they 



SOCIETIES OF LONDON AND THE PROVINCES. 21 

were empowered to enter boats to search for fish unlawfully 
taken, and seize any unlawful net, &c. The Society also 
had an understanding with its water-bailiffs, that they were 
to net the ditches adjacent to the river immediately after 
floods, and that they were to be constantly on the watch 
for any infringement of the Thames Conservancy By-laws. 

During the nine years which have elapsed since their 
establishment, a number of prosecutions have resulted from 
the vigilance of their officers, and several convictions have 
been obtained. The Society has also, after floods, dragged 
the ditches in their district, from whence large quantities of 
fish have been returned to the river. The water-bailiffs 
have also taken a number of night-lines at different times, 
and I feel, I may say without fear of contradiction, that the 
Thames Conservancy By-laws are now far more respected 
in this district than they ever were before. 

With a view to improve the fishing, the Society turned in, 
by way of experiment, a large quantity of golden bream, 
which were kindly placed at their disposal by the Bedford 
Angling Association, but the fish appear to have left this 
locality altogether, probably because the water, except in 
certain places, was entirely unsuitable to their habits. 

From time to time a large quantity of good sized Wycombe 
trout have been turned in, running from half to five pounds 
in weight. I should mention that this Society wisely recog- 
nised from the first that it was worse than useless to turn 
in fish below half a pound in weight ; and if one may judge 
from the quantity of trout of that breed now taken, and the 
numbers of young fish seen in the Maidenhead waters, the 
Society has been successful in that branch of their under- 
taking, or at any rate so far as the limited means at their 
'disposal would permit. 

The difficulty experienced in purchasing trout of the 



22 THE ANGLING CLUBS AND PRESERVATION 

right sort and size induced the Society, some time since, to 
obtain competent advice as to the practicability of breeding 
and rearing them. With this view one of the vice-presidents, 
Mr. W. H. Grenfell, of Taplow Court, who has always shown 
a lively interest in the success of the Society's undertaking, 
expressed his willingness to place at their disposal a likely 
place for the purpose. In every respect but one it was 
pronounced suitable, but it was soon found that the con- 
stantly recurring floods would render attempts at breeding 
useless, and hence the scheme was not prosecuted farther. 

The Great Marlow Thames Angling Association does 
capital work, and is thoroughly well officered. The 
honorary secretary is Major Simpson Carson, who most 
efficiently helps the Society in their effiDrts for the general 
good of the river. Here again a large share of the Society's 
income is laudably spent in the purchase of trout of 
excellent size from the Wycombe waters, which are turned 
into the Thames at an age, and when they have attained 
such a size, as enables them to take care of themselves. 

The Reading and District Angling Society comes next, and 
in the hands of its worthy and efficient secretary, Mr. Arthur 
Butler, of Zinzan Street, Reading, prospers exceedingly. 
This Society has made the most strenuous efforts to re-stock 
that portion of the river more immediately under their 
own control, and I have little doubt that their effi^rts have 
met with the success they deserved. It was only a few 
years ago that the fisheries of the Reading district bore a 
most unenviable reputation from the extent of netting going 
on. To my certain knowledge now there is no section of 
the river which is better looked after and where I think less 
netting or poaching is prosecuted. Much of this happy state 
of things is due to Mr. Butler, who is not only a hard 
practical worker, but a man, moreover, who never walks 



SOCIETIES OF LONDON AND THE PROVINCES. 23 

about the world with his eyes shut. Such a man is bound 
to do good, and Mr. Butler does it without stint. 

This flourishing Thames Preservation Society — one of the 
most useful and influential on the river — was formed in 
December, 1877, at a meeting at the Queen's Hotel, Reading, 
at which upwards of 100 gentlemen of position were present. 
The intention at first was to protect and improve the fishing 
in the fine stretch of water between Mapledurham and 
Sonning — then so denuded of fish that even the poachers 
let it alone. Henry John Simonds, Esq., J. P., was appointed 
the first president ; Charles Stephens, Esq., J. P., treasurer ; 
and Mr. Arthur Butler — the originator of the movement 
— honorary secretary, an office he still holds. Mr. Stephens 
still acts] as treasurer. It was soon found desirable to ex- 
tend the operations of the association both up and down 
stream, and its district now reaches from Goring Lock to 
Shiplake Lock. The first president resigned in February 
1 88 1, and James Simonds, Esq., J. P., who still occupies the 
position, was chosen in his stead. 

The association has done a really great work for the 
public, and all its operations have been attended with 
success. Since its formation about 60,000 trout have been 
turned in, a large proportion having been reared in a stream 
belonging to the association ; and, as a result, trout fishing 
has vastly improved. Six years ago the trout were very 
"few and far between ;" this season at least 150, ranging 
from two to nine pounds in weight, have been landed in 
the immediate neighbourhood of Reading. Coarse fish 
have by no means been neglected. Tens of thousands of 
pike, perch, roach, dace, &c., have been recovered from the 
ditches after floods, &c., and restored to the river ; and 
several reservoirs and lakes have from time to time been 
netted, by the kind permission of the owners, and great 



24 THE ANGLING CLUBS AND PRESERVATION 

numbers of perch, carp, tench, rudd, &c., thus added to the 
stock. 

Coarse fish culture has this year been undertaken with 
surprising success. Two large " Lund " hatching-boxes — 
stocked with fine Kennet perch — have been filled with 
spawn, all of which hatched out ; and since the perch fry 
were liberated, a great quantity of carp spawn has been 
hatched. 

No less than eleven bailiffs are employed by the com- 
mittee, and their work has been so effectual that illegal 
practices have been, practically, entirely stamped out. It 
is gratifying to be able to state that every prosecution 
undertaken by the committee has resulted in a conviction. 

Extensive private rights of fishing have lately been 
acquired for the members (an annual extra charge of five 
shillings being made). From these waters, fish may not be 
taken under the following sizes : trout 2lbs., pike 3lbs., tench 
2lbs., perch ilb., barbel 3lbs., carp 3lbs. — a sportsmanlike 
standard, which the committee recommend for observance 
also in the public fisheries. 

The minimum subscription to the association is lOi". 6d. ; 
but subscribers of ^i i.y. and upwards have the privilege of 
cheap railway tickets to 28 fishing stations. There are at 
present 117 subscribers (elected by ballot) on the books. 
Last year's income was £\0() \<^s. yd., and the expenditure 

The Henley and District Thames Angling Association 
does no doubt excellent service, and certainly not before it 
was wanted in that much be-poached district. 

The honour of originating this Society belongs to the 
late honorary secretary, Charles H. Cook, Esq., whose 
bad health unfortunately compelled him to retire. They 
preserve the Thames between Temple and Hurley Locks, 



SOCIETIES OF LONDON AND THE PROVINCES. 25 

and have turned into the river considerable numbers of 
trout. Hardly is this a very satisfactory district, I am 
afraid, but certainly the improvement made in the fisheries 
of the neighbourhood redounds very much to the credit of 
the Association. The president of the Association is the 
Right Hon. W. H. Smith, M.P,, while the present secretary 
is Mr. J. W. Knight. 

The Wycombe Angling and Preservation Society is 
another body of, shall I say, private conservators, from 
whom the Thames itself derives a very large amount of 
good. All the splendid trout which have been turned into 
the river at Maidenhead, Marlow, and other places, come 
from the water under the control of this association, and 
the following short particulars embody nearly all that is 
necessary to say about a Society whose reputation as trout 
preservers is a veiy great one. It has been in existence 
for nearly four years. It originally commenced with 
about one hundred members, who paid a low annual fee, 
but it was found necessary to gradually reduce their 
number and raise the subscriptions. At present it consists 
of 30 members who each pay an annual fee of from 
three to five guineas. This number also includes six 
artisan members at a nominal subscription. The club 
preserves a mile and a half of the Wycombe stream, 
and possesses a magnificent stock of trout. The president 
is the Rt. Hon. Lord Carrington ; honorary secretary and 
treasurer, J. Thurlow, Esq. 

The last of the Preservation 'Societies of which I shall 
have occasion to speak in connection with the Home 
District is the Newbury and District Angling Association. 
The following short history of its position at the present 
time is full of interest to anglers frequenting the lovely 
Kennet Valley, over which this Association has jurisdiction. 



26 THE ANGLING CLUBS AND PRESERVATION 

This very young association was started on the i8th of 
June, 1878, with the object of protecting the rivers in and 
about Newbury — putting a stop to poaching which had 
been going on for years, and also the practice of taking 
fish out of season, which was very rife. 

After considerable trouble on the part of its chairman 
and committee it succeeded in obtaining leave to exercise 
its protective right over the whole of the waters under the 
control of the Mayor and Corporation of Newbury, also more 
than seven miles of the Kennet and Avon Canal ; and it also 
rents on a long lease about one mile of the river Lambourne, 
abounding with trout, and on which stream only the fly is 
allowed. 

The streams over which this association exercises con- 
trol are the Kennet and many of its back streams, the 
Lambourne, and the Kennet and Avon Canal. 

The fish found in these streams are all very fine, and 
comprise trout, pike, perch, chub, barbel, roach, dace, carp, 
tench, eels, gudgeon and — last, but by no means least — very 
famous crayfish. Indeed, not m,any miles up the stream 
there is an old saying concerning them, running as follows — 

" Hungerford crayfish, 
Catch me if ye can ; 
There's no such crawlers, 
In the o-ce-an." 

In a short sketch like this it is impossible to do more 
than glance at one or two of the notable fish for which this 
neighbourhood is celebrated. 

Its trout are beaten nowhere, having been taken up to 
20 lbs. While Pope pleasantly says of its eels — 

" The Kennet swift. 
For silver eels renowned." 

And travellers of a nearly bygone age in the old 



SOCIETIES OF LONDON AND THE PROVINCES. 27 

coaching days could tell of the great gastronomic attractions 
of the Kennet eel, 

" At the house below the hill." 
There it was that, in the days when the " Pelican " did 
flourish, seventy coaches in the day and night passed 
through the good old town. 

But I must pass to the present time and the working 
of the Association. Well, from small beginnings it has 
grown so much that at the meeting previous to the next 
angling season this question will have to come to the fore 
— either the Committee must raise the price of the tickets 
or place a restriction upon the number of the members. 

It may be as well to add that no profit whatever is 
made out of the Association, as it is only in existence to 
preserve the water and improve sport, and all its Committee 
of Management wish to see is enough to pay the outgoing 
expenses. They are of necessity large, when consideration 
is given to keeping up a stock of fish, by turning in hun- 
dreds at the proper season, the pay of the keepers all the 
year, and the constant supervision that is required. 

Many fine specimens of Kennet fish may be seen in the 
Western Quadrant of the Fisheries Exhibition now open 
at South Kensington. 

It only remains to add that all particulars may be 
obtained of the worthy chairman of the Association, Mr. 
John Packer, 87 Northbrook Street, Newbury, who will 
forward rules and all needed information upon application, 
and from whom alone tickets can be had. 

There is yet another Society doing good work upon the 
Thames, called the Oxford Angling Association, but I 
regret that I received no particulars as to its constitution 
until too late for insertion in this book. 

Finding it to be a matter of exceeding difficulty to 



28 THE ANGLING CLUBS AND PRESERVATION 

obtain reliable information as to the origin and growth 
of the various preservation societies scattered about the 
country, I was compelled to fall back, either upon the 
horns of a dilemma, or upon the charity of my very good 
friend, Mr. R. B. Marston, the editor of the Fishery Gazette 
who has very kindly placed at my disposal " The British 
Fisheries Directory," a valuable little book of reference, 
dedicated to Mr. Birkbeck, the Chairman of the Executive 
Committee of the International Exhibition. From that 
little volume I extract much of the following information 
with regard to the London and Provincial Preservation and 
Angling Societies of this country. 



METROPOLITAN AND DISTRICT ANGLING CLUBS AND 
FISPIERY ASSOCIATIONS. 

The Fisheries Preservation Association, 22 Lower Seymour Street, 
Portman Square, London. 

The National Fish Culture Association of Great Britain and 
Ireland, Royal Courts Chambers, 2 Chancery Lane. 

Thames Angling Preservation Assofciation. Thomas Spreckley, 
president; W. H. Brougham, secretary. Office, 7 Ironmonger 
Lane, E. C. 

Thames Rights Defence Association, Francis Francis, chairman j 
J. M. R. Francis, tion. sec. Office, 11 Old Jewry Chambers, E.C. 

United London Angling Associations Fisheries Society, Star and 
Garter, St. Martin's Lane, Charing Cross, W.C. 

West Central Association of London and Provincial Angling 
Societies, P. Geen, president; T. Hoole, hon. sec. Club-House — The 
Portman Arms, Great Quebec Street. 

LONDON CLUBS. 

Albert .... The Crown Coffee House, Coronet Street, 

Old Street. 
Alliance . . . Clerkenwell Tavern, FarringdonRd., E.C. 

Alexandra . . . Crown and Anchor, Cheshire St., Bethnal 

Green. 



SOCIETIES OF LONDON AND THE PROVINCES. 29 



Amicable Brothers . 
Amicable Waltonians 

Angler's Pride 
Acton Piscatorial Society 
Albert Edward 
Anchor and Hope . 

Act on the Square . 
Admiral Brothers 
Acorn . . . . 
Acme .... 

Bostonian 

Battersea Friendly . 
Bloomsbury Brothers 
Bermondsey Brothers 

Brothers Well Met . 

Beresford 

Burdett .... 

Bridgewater Brothers 

Brunswick 

Brentford 

Buckland 

Barbican 

Battersea Piscatorials 

Cadogan 

City of London 
Cavendish 

Clerkenwell Amateurs 
Convivial 

Carlisle .... 

Clapham Junction . 



Bald Faced Stag, Worship St., Finsbury. 
Horse and Groom, St. John's Street, 

Clerkenwell. 
Five Bells, Bermondsey Square, S.E. 
George and Dragon, High .St., Acton, W. 
Tile Kiln, TuUerie Street, Hackney Road. 
William the Fourth, Canal Bridge, Old 

Kent Road. 
The Ferry Boat, Tottenham. 
Admiral Hotel, Francis Street, Woolwich. 
Duke of York, Gloucester St., Clerkenwell. 
Weaver's Arms, Drysdale Street, Kings- 
land Road. 
Dalby Tavern, Prince of Wales Road, 

Kentish Town. 
Queen's Hotel, Queen's Road, Battersea. 
Rose and Crown, Broad St., Bloomsbury. 
Alscot Arms, Alscot Road, Grange Road, 

Bermondsey. 
Berkeley Castle, Rahere St., Goswell Rd. 
Grove House Tavern, Camberwell Grove. 
Joiners' Arms. 118 Hackney Road. 
Three Tuns, Bridgewater Gardens, Bar- 
bican. 
Brunswick Arms, Stamford St., Black- 
friars. 
Angel Inn, Brentford End, Brentford. 
Middlesex Arms, Clerkenwell Green. 
White Bear, St. John Street, Clerkenwell. 
Queen's Head, York Road, Battersea. 
Prince of Wales, Exeter Street, Sloane 

Street, S.W, 
Codger's Hall, Bride Lane, Fleet Street. 
Duke of York, Wenlock Street, Hoxton. 
George and Dragon, St. John Street Road. 
Bull and Bell, Ropemakers' Street, Moor- 
fields, E.G. 
Hall of Science Club and Institute, Old 

Street, E.G. 
Lord Ranelagh, Verona Street, Clapham 
Junction. 



30 THE ANGLING CLUBS AND PRESERVATION 



Canonbury 

Cambridge Friendly 

Cobden . , . . 

Clerkenwell Piscatorials . 
Crescent 

Critchfield 

Crown .... 

Crown Piscatorials . 
Dalston .... 
De Beauvoir . 
Duke of Cornwall . 

Duke of Norfolk 

Ealing Dean . 

Excelsior 

Excelsior 

Eustonian 

Edmonton and Tottenham 

Friendly Anglers 

Foxley .... 

Golden Tench . 

Golden Barbel 

Good Intent . 

Grafton .... 

Grange .... 

Great Northern Brothers 

Globe .... 

Gresham 

Hammersmith Club 
Hammersmith United 

Hearts of Oak 



Monmouth Arms, Haberdasher Street, 
Hoxton. 

Rent Day, Cambridge Street, Hyde Park 
Square. 

Cobden Club, Landseer Terrace, West- 
bourne Park. 

Horse Shoe, Clerkenwell Close. 

Giraffe Tavern, Newington Crescent, 
Kennington Park Road. 

Myddleton Arms, Queen's Rd., Dalston. 

Crown and Sceptre, Friendly St., Dept- 
ford. 

Crown Tavern, Clerkenwell Green. 

Hope, Holies Street, Dalston. 

Lord Raglan, Southgate Road, Islington. 

Duke of Cornwall, Lissmore Circus, 
Haverstock Hill. 

Ledbury Arms, Ledbury Road, Bayswater. 

Green Man, Ealing Dean, W. 

The Hope, Bird Street, Kennington. 

Palmerston, Well Street, Hackney. 

King's Head, Swinton St., Gray's Inn Rd. 

Three Horse Shoes, Silver St., Edmonton. 

Albion Tavern, Albion St., Hyde Park. 

Foxley Amis, Elliot Road, Brixton. 

Somers Arms, Ossulton St., Euston Rd. 

York Minster, Foley Street, Portland Rd. 

Crown Inn, Church Street, Shoreditch. 

King's Arms, Strutton Ground, Wesmins- 
ter. 

Grange Club and Institute, Bermondsey, 
S.E. 

Robin Hood, Southampton Street, Penton- 
ville. 

Bank of Friendship, Blackstock Road, 
Highbury Vale. 

Mason's Hall Tavern, Basinghall St., E.C. 

Grove House, Hammersmith Broadway. 

Builders' Arms, Bridge Road, Hammer- 
smith. 

Dolphin, Church Street, Shoreditch. 



SOCIETIES OF LONDON AND THE PROVINCES. 31 



Highbury 

Hoxton Brothers 
Hampstead 

Isledon Piscatorials 
Izaak Walton . 

Jovial . . . . 

Junior Piscatorial . 

Jolly Piscatorials 
Kentish Perseverance 
Kenningtonian 
Knights of Knightsbridge 

King's Cross United 

Kingfishers 

Kentish Brothers 
L. & S. W. Railway 
Larkhall 

Limehouse Brothers 
Little Independent 

Metropolitan . 
Marylebone 

Nautilus 
Norfolk . 

North London 

North Eastern 

North Western 

New Globe 
Never Frets . 



PlimsoU Arms, St. Thomas's Road, Fins- 
bury Park. 

Cherry Tree, Kingsland Road, Shoreditch. 

Cock and Crown, High Street, Hamp- 
stead. 

Crown and Anchor, Cross St., Islington. 

Old King John's H-ead, Mansfield Street, 
Kingsland Road. 

Jolly Anglers, Whitecross Row, Richmond, 
Surrey. 

Duke of Cornwall, South Island Place, 
Clapham Road. 

Sugar Loaf, Great Queen Street, W.C. 

Corner Pin, Cold Bath, Greenwich. 

The Clayton Arms, Kennington Oval. 

Grove Tavern, Grove Place, Brompton 
Road, S.W. 

Prince Albert, Wharfdale Road, King's 
Cross. 

Oliver Arms, Westbourne Terrace, Har- 
row Road. 

George and Dragon, Blackheath Hill. 

Brunswick House, Nine Elms. 

The Larkhall, Larkhall Lane, Clapham. 

Dunlop Lodge, 70 Samuel St., Limehouse. 

Russell Arms, Bedford Street, Ampthill 
Square. 

The Rose, Old Bailey. 

Prince Albert, Sherbourne Street, Bland- 
ford Square, W. 

British Lion, Central Street, St. Luke's. 

Norfolk Arms, Burwood Place, Edgware 
Road. 

Prince Albert, Hollingsworth St., Hollo- 
way. 

Shepherd and Flock, Little Bell Alley, 
Moorfields. 

Lord Southampton, Southampton Road, 
Haverstock Hill. 

Albion, Bridge Road, Stratford. 

Crown and Shuttle, High St., Shoreditch. 



THE ANGLING CLUBS AND PRESERVATION 



Nelson . 

Odds and Evens 
Original Clerkenvvell 
Original Alexandra . 

Peckham Perseverance 
Pictorial . 
Penge 
'Phoenix . 

Prince of Wales 

Portsmouth Waltonian 
Peckham Brothers . 

Princess of Wales . 

Perseverance . 

Pike and Anchor 
Queen's . 

Reform . 
Royal George . 



Richmond Piscatorial 
Royal Piscatorial 
Rodney . 
Second Surrey 
South Essex . 
Sportsman 
Suffolk . 
South Essex . 
St. John's 

Savoy Brothers 
Silver Trout . 

St. Alban's 



Nelson Working Men's Club, 90 Dean St., 
Soho. 

Albion, East Road, Hoxton, N. 

White Hart, Aylesbury St., Clerkenwell. 

Duke of Wellington, Three Colt Lane, 
Bethnal Green. 

Eagle, 118 Trafalgar Road, Camberwell. 

King's Arms, Tottenham Court Road. 

Lord Palmerston, Maple Road, Penge. 

Tavistock Arms, Wellington St., Oakley 
Square. 

Victoiy, Newnham Street, John Street, 
Edgware Road. 

Golden Fleece, High Street, Landport. 

Prince Albert, East Surrey Grove, Peck- 
ham. 

Prince of Wales, Gt. Barlow St., Man- 
chester Square, W. 

The Perseverance, Pritchard's Row, 
Hackney Road. 

Pike and Anchor, Ponder's End. 

Queen's Arms, Bomore Road, Netting 
Hill, W. 

Jolly Coopers, Clerkenwell Close. 

Hope Tavei^n, Tottenham St., Tottenham 
Court Road. 

Station Hotel, Richmond. 

Foxley Tavern, Elliott Road, Brixton. 

Albion, Rodney Road, Walworth, S.E. 

Queen's Head, Brandon St., Walworth. 

The Elms, Leytonstone, E. 

Lady Owen Arms, Goswell Road. 

Suffolk Arms, Boston St., Hackney Rd. 

Victoria Dock Tavern, Canning Town, E. 

Three Compasses, Cow Cross Street, 
Farringdon Street. 

Green Man, St. Martin's Lane. 

Star and Garter Hotel, St. Martin's Lane, 
W.C. 

Royal George, Great New St., Kenning- 
ton Park Road, 



SOCIETIES OF LONDON AND THE PROVINCES. 33 



Sir Hugh Myddleton 

South London. 
St. Pancras Club 
Stanley Anglers 

Star 

Stepney . 
South Belgravia 
Surrey Piscatorial 

South Eastern. 
Sussex . 
Sociable Brothers 
Social Brothers 
St. James's and Soho 
Stoke Newington 

St. John's Wood 



Society of Caxtonians 
The Piscatorial 

Trafalgar 

True Waltonians 
Three Pigeons 

United Brothers 

United Essex . 

United Society of Anglers 
United Marlboro' Brothers 
Woolwich Piscatorials 
West Ham Brothers 
Woolwich Invicta 
Waltonians 
Walton and Cotton . 

Walworth Waltonians 



Empress of Russia, St. John Street Road, 

Clerkenwell. 
George and Dragon, 235 Camberwell Rd, 
2 Crescent Place, Burton Crescent. 
The Lord Stanley, Camden Park Road 

Camden Town. 
King's Arms, Charles Street, City Road. 
Beehive, Rhodeswell Road, Stepney. 
Telegraph, Regency Street, S.W. 
St. Paul's Tavern, Westmoreland Road 

S.E. 
Prince Arthur, Stamford Street, S.E. 
Sussex Arms, Grove Road, Holloway. 
Princess, 237 Cambridge Rd., Mile-End. ' 
Prince Regent, Dulwich Rd., Heme Hill. 
39 Gerrard Street, Soho, W. 
Myddleton Arms, Mansfield St., Kings- 
land Road. 
Queen's Arms, Lower William Street, St. 

John's Wood. 
Falcon Tavern, Gough Square, E.C. 
Ashley's Hotel, Henrietta Street, Covent 

Garden. 
Star and Garter, Green Street, Leicester 

Square. 
White Horse, 80 Liverpool Rd., Islington. 
Three Pigeons, Lower Richmond Roadj 

S.W. 
Druid's Head Tavern, Broadway, Dept- 

ford. 
Dorset Arms, Leyton Rd., Stratford New 

Town. 
Duke of Wellington, Shoreditch. 
Hercules' Pillars, 7 Greek Street, Soho. 
Cricketer's Arms, Sand Street, Woolwich. 
Queen's Head, West Ham Lane, E. 
Golden Marine, Francis St., Woolwich. 
Jew's Harp, Redhill St., Regent's Park. 
Crown and Woolpack, St. John's Street, 

Clerkenwell. 
St. Paul's, Westmoreland Rd., Walworth. 



D 



34 1HE ANGLING CLUBS AND PRESERVATION 

West Central . . . Cross Keys, Theobald's Road, High 

Holborn. 
Woolwich Brothers . . Prince Regent, King Street, Woolwich. 

Westbourne Park . . Pelican, All Saints' Road, Westbourne 

Park, W. 
Walthamstow . . . Common Gate, Markhouse Road, Wal- 

thamstow. 
West London . . . Windsor Castle, King St., Hammersmith. 

Watford .... Leathersellers' Arms, Watford, Herts. 
Wellington . . . Prince Regent, Beresford St., Walworth. 

ENGLAND. 

Bedfordshire. 

Bedford Angling Society, Bedford. 

Blunham Angling Association — C. Forge, ii and 12 Addle Street, 
Wood Street, secretary. 

Berkshire. 

Maidenhead, Cookham, and Bray Thames Angling Association—- 
W. G. Day, secretary. Club-House — Skindle's Hotel. 

Newbury and District Angling Association — J. Smith, 62 North- 
brook Street, Newbury, secretary. 

Reading and District Angling Association — Arthur C. Butler, hon. 
sec. Club-House — Great Western Hotel, Reading. 

Windsor and Eton Angling Club. > Club-House — Royal Oak Hotel, 
Windsor. 

Windsor and Eton Angling Preservation Association — Rev. E. 
James, Eton, secretary. 

Buckinghamshire. 
Great Marlow Thames Angling Association — Major Simpson Car- 
son, Great Marlow, hon. secretary. 

High Wycombe Angling Association, High Wycombe. 

Marlow Angling Association — A. Maskell, Great Marlow, secretary. 

Cambridgeshire. 
Cambridge and Ely Angling Society — W. Purchas, secretary. Club- 
House — Lion Hotel, Cambridge. 

Cheshire. 
No. I Crewe Angling Society— John Dickens, secretary. Club- 
House — Dog and Partridge Inn, High Street, Crewe. 



SOCIETIES OF LONDON AND THE PROVINCES. 35 

Cumberland. 
Carlisle Angling Association — J. B. Slater, Carlisle, secretary. 

Derbyshire. 

Aquarium Angling Society — T. Winfield, secretary. Club-House — 
The Three Crowns, Bridge Street, Derby. 

Burton-on-Trent Angling Association — Sir M. A. Bass, Bart., M.P., 
president; John C. Perfect, hon. sec. Club-House — Midland Hotel, 
Burton -on-Trent. 

Castle Fields Angling Club, Messrs. Beden's Factory, London St., 
Derby — M. Bland, secretary. 

Chatsworth Angling Club, Chatsworth. 

Chesterfield Angling Association— G. R. Hornstock, 26 Durrant 
Road, Chesterfield, secretary. 

Excelsior Angling Club — J. Hibbert, secretary. Club-House — ■ 
Lamb Inn, Park Street, Derby. 

Mazeppa Angling Club, Traffic Street, Derby — F. Bond, secretary. 

Melancthon's Head Angling Club, Park Street, Derby — W. Peet, 
secretary. 

Pride of Derby Angling Club — W. Tunnicliff, secretary. Club- 
House, Old English Gentleman, Normanton Road, Derby. 

Red Lion AngHng Association, Bridge Street, Derby — Joseph Selvey , 
secretary. 

Devonshire, 

Avon and Ernie Fishery Association, Plymouth. 

Culm Fishery Association — C. J. Upcott, Shortlands, Cullompton, 
secretary. 

Exe Landowners' Salmon Fishing Association — Mr. Whippell, 
Rudway, Silverton, secretary. 

Exe Occupiers' Trouting Association — W. C. James, Thorverton, 
secretary. 

Lower Exe United Fishing Association, Exeter. 

Tiverton Angling Association, Tiverton. 

Upper Culm Fishery Association, Exeter, 

Upper Exe Angling Society, Exeter. 

Gloucestershire. 

Avon and Tributaries Angling Association — E. B. Villiers, 26 Bath 
Street, Bristol, hon. secretary. 

Bristol Golden Carp Angling Association — Lewis Wride, Digby 
House, Barton Hill, Bristol, secretary. 

D 2 



36 THE ANGLING CLUBS AND PRESERVATION 

Bristol United Anglers' Association — R. D. Frost, 48 Victoria St., 
Bristol, secretary. 

Cheltenham Angling Society— \V. H. Davis, 7 Priory Terrace, 
Cheltenham, secretary. 

City of Bristol Angling Association — H. Lewis, Morton House, 
Barton Hill, Bristol, secretary. 

Hampshire. 

Portsmouth Waltonian Society — F. Tranter, secretary. Club-House 
— Golden Fleece, Commercial Road, Portsea. 
Stockbridge Angling Club, Stockbridge. 
Titchfield Angling Club — E. Goble, solicitor, Titchfield, secretary. 

Herefordshire. 

Bodenham Angling Club, Bodenham. 

Leominster Angling Club — V. W. Holmes, National Provincial Bank, 
Leominster, secretary. 

Hertfordshire. 

Harefield Valley Fishery, Rickmansworth. 

Watfield Piscatorial Society — H. A. Vincent, lion. sec. Club- 
House — The Leathersellers'' Anns, Watford. 

Kent. 

Maidstone Angling and Medvvay I^reservation Society — David Pine, 
Maidstone, ho7i. secretary. 

Stour Fishery Association — Club Yiow'st—Fordtvich Arms. 

Tonbridge Angling Association — Edwin Hollomby, secretary. Club- 
House — Bull Hotel, High Street, Tonbridge. 

Lancashire. 

City of Liverpool Angling Association, 19 West Derby Road, 
Liverpool. 

Liverpool Angling Association — Richard Woolfall, lion. sec. Club- 
House — Strawberry Hotel, West Derby Road, Liverpool. 

Liverpool Central Angling Association, 181 Dale Street. 

Manchester Anglers' Association — Abel Heywood, jun., lion. sec. 

Manchester and District Anglers' Association — J. Vroci&r, preside/it ; 
Edwin Hicks, 6 Belmont Street, Eggington Street, Rochdale Road, 
secretary. The Association comprises sixty-six different Clubs. 

Stalybridge Anlging Society — J. B. Udale, secretary. Club-House 
— J he Q. Inn, Stalybridge. 



SOCIETIES OF LONDON AND THE PROVINCES, yj 

Stamford and Warrington Angling Club. Club House — Guide Post 
Tavern, Stalybridge. 

Wigan and District Amalgamated Anglers' Association — Levi Booth, 
president J John Stones, secretary. This Association consists of twenty- 
six different Clubs. 

Leicestershire. 

Leicester Jolly Anglers' Club. Club-House — The Earl of Leicester, 
Inn, Infirmary Square, Leicester. 

North Britons' Angling Association. Club-house — The York Castle, 
Northgate Street, Leicester. 

Lincolnshire. 

Boston Angling Association — Mr. ^Day, Boston, secretary. 

Great Grimsby Angling Association. Club-House — Masons'' Arms 
Hotel, Great Grimsby. 

Market Deeping Angling Association — S. B. Sharpe, Market 
Deeping, hon. secretary. 

Monmouthshire. 

Abergavenny Fishing Association — C. J. Daniel, Cross St., 
Abergavenny, treasurer. 

Usk Fishery Association — Charles R. Lyne, Tredegar Place, 
Newport, secretary. 

Norfolk. 

Bure Preservation Society — C. J. Greene, London St., Norwich, 
secretary. 

East Anglian Piscatorial Society — R. Palmer, Great Eastern Wine 
Vaults, Norwich, secretary. 

Great Yarmouth Piscatorial Society — James Lark, St. George's 
Tavern, 162 King St., Great Yarmouth, secretary. 

King's Lynn Angling Association — Frederick Ludby, president ; 
H. Bradfield, hon. secretary. 

Norwich Angling Club — R. Moll, hon. sec. Club-House — Walnut 
Tree Shades, Old Post-0 ffice Yard, Norwich. 

Norwich Central Fishing Club. Club-House — Old Oak Shades, 
Lower Goat Lane, Norwich. 

Norwich Champion Angling Club — G. Dsixntls, president. 

Norwich Piscatorial Society — Mr. Capon, secretary. Club-House — 
Walnut Tree Shades, Old Post-Office Yard, Norwich. 

Wensum Preservation Association — E. H, Horsley, Fakenham, 
hon. secretary. 



38 THE ANGLING CLUBS AND PRESERVATION 

Yare Preservation and Anglers' Society — C. J. Greene, London St., 
Norwich, secretary. 

Northamptonshire. 

Northampton Working Men's Angling Club. Club-House — Bridge 
Street, Northampton. 
Wellingborough and Higham Ferrers Angling Club — E. Brummitt, 

Wellingborough, secretary. 

Nottinghamshire. 

Lenton Anglers' Association — George Tilley, hon. sec. Club-House 
— Black's Head Inn, Lenton, Nottingham. 

Newark Piscatorial Society. Club-House — Horse and Gears Inn, 
Portland St., Newark. 

Nottingham and Notts Anglers' Preservation Association — Mr. 
Clarke, secretary. Club-House — The Minstrel Tavo'n, Market St., 
Nottingham. 

Wellington Angling Association — Club-house — Wellington Hotel, 
Station St., Nottingham. 

Oxfordshire. 

Henley and District Thames Angling Association — Mr. Cooke, 
Henley, secretary. 

Oxford Angling Society. Club-house — The Pheasant Inn, St. Giles, 
Oxford. 

Oxford Thames Angling Preservation Society — W. T. Mayo, 13 
Cornmarket Street, Oxford, hon. secretary. 

Rutlandshire. 
Oakham Angling Society, Oakham. 

Shropshire. 

Plowden Fishing Association (River Onny) — A. B. George, 
Dodington, Whitchurch, hoti. treasurer. 

Shrewsbury Severn Angling Society — F. H. Morgan, lion, sec^ 
Club-House — 57 Mardol, Shrewsbury. 

Somersetshire. 
Kingswood and District Angling Association, Kingswood. 



SOCIETIES OF LONDON AND THE PROVINCES. 39 

Staffordshire. 

Cobridge Angling Society. Club-House — Wedgcwood Hotel, 
Waterloo Rd., Burslem. 

Isaac Walton Angling Club — -William Qxtgoxy, secretary. Club- 
House — Coach and Horses, Stafford St., Lonf:;ton. 

Isaac Walton Angling Club — Frederick Higginson,.y^^r^/«r)/. Club- 
House — Dresden Inn, near Longton. 

Longton Excelsior Angling Club — Thomas Morris, secretary. 
Club-House — Crown and Anchor, Longton. 

Stoke-upon-Trent Angling Society — J. Hollins, hon. sec. Club- 
House — Pihe Hotel, Copeland Street. 

Suffolk. 

Gipping Angling Preservation Association — George Josselyn, 
president ; W. C. S. Edgecombe, National Provincial Bank, Ipswich, 
hon. secretary. 

Norfolk and Suffolk Fish Acclimatisation Society — Edward Birk- 
beck, M-.Y., president J W. Oldham Chambers, Lowestoft, hon. sec. 

Surrey. 

Godalming Angling Society — F. Dowse, High Street, hon. sec. 
Club-House — Sun Inn, Godalming. 

Richmond Piscatorial Society — F. Gaunt, secretary. Club-House — 
Station Hotel, Richmond. 

Sussex. 

Brighton Anglers' Association, Brighton. 

Chichester Angling Society — W. Cooke, secretary. Club-House — 
Globe Hotel, Chichester. 

Ouse Angling Preservation Society — Hector Essex, Hillside, Lewes, 
hon. secretary. 

Rother Fishery Association — D. N. Olney, Blenheim House, 
Robertsbridge, secretary. 

Warwickshire. 

Birmingham and Midland Piscatorial Association — James Gregory, 
39, Vyse St., hon. secretary. 

Westmoreland. 

Kent Angling Association — G. Fisher, Kendal, hon, secretary. 
Milnthorpe Angling Society — W. Tattersall, Milnthorpe, secretary. 



40 THE ANGLING CLUBS AND PRESERVATION 

Wiltshire. 

Bradford-on-Avon Angling Association. 

Sarum Angling Club— H. Selby Davison, 40 King St., London, E.G., 
secretary. 

"Worcestershire. 

Evesham Angling Club, Evesham. 

Isaac Walton Angling Society — Club-House, Plough Inn, Silver St., 
Worcester. 

Teme Angling Club — W. N orris, Worcester, secretary. 

Yorkshire. 

Aire Fishing Club— T. H. Dewhurst, Whin Field, Skipton, secretary. 

Burnsall, Appletrewick, and Barden Angling Club — T. J. Critchley, 
Brook St., Ilkley, secretary. 

Costa Anglers' Club — J. H. Phillips, 22 Albemarle Crescent, Scar- 
borough, secretary. 

Derwent Anglers' Club. Address — Mr. Patrick, gunmaker, Scar- 
borough. 

Hawes and High Abbotside Angling Association — B. Thompson- 
Hawes, secretary. 

Knaresborough Star Angling Club. Club-House — C. M'Nichols, 
Knaresborough. 

Marquis of Granby Angling Society — T. H. Settle, hon. sec. Club- 
House — The Marquis of Granby, Leeds. 

Middleham Angling Association — J. E. Miller, yVi^^^dcm., secretary . 

Otley Angling Club — Mr. Pratt, Otley, secretary. 

Rockingham Angling Society — E. F. Atkinson, president. Club- 
House — Tlie Fox, Leeds. 

Ryedale Angling Club, Hovingham. 

Sheffield Anglers' Association — Charles S>lyx\ng, presictent ; Messrs. 
Baker, Gill, Greaves, Guest, Jenkinson, Leonard, Sheldon, Stuart, 
Swinden, Thompson, Unwin, and White, co/nniittee; Thomas Walker, 
24 Blue Boy St., Sheffield, secretary. This Association comprises 232 
Clubs in Sheffield and district. 

Wilkinson Anghng Association, Hull. 



SOCIETIES OF LONDON AND THE PROVINCES. 41 

ANGLING CLUBS AND FISHING ASSOCIA- 
TIONS IN SCOTLAND. 



Aberdeenshire. 

Dee Salmon Fishing Improvement Association — William Milne, 
C.A., 147 Union St., secretary. 

Berwickshire. 

Berwick Anglers' Club — Robert Weddell, solicitor, Berwick, 
secretary. 

Coldstream Angling Club — John Tait, High St., Coldstream, 
secretary. 

Ellen Fishing Club, Duns — The Hon. Edward Marjoribanks, 
president ; G. Turnbull, 58 Frederick St., Edinburgh, secretary. 

Greenlaw Fishing Club — David Leitch, Greenlaw, secretary. 

Dumfriesshire. 

Esk and Liddle Fisheries Association — The Duke of Buccleuch, 
K.G., president J Robert M' George, writer, Langholm, secretary. 

Edinburgshire. 

Cockburn Angling Association — George E. Y. Muir, i West Cross- 
causeway, Edinburgh, secretary. 

Edinburgh Angling Club — William Menzies, 18 Picardy Place, 
secri:tary. 

Edinburgh Amateur Angling Club — J. Gordon Mason, S.S.C., 
secretary. 

Midlothian Angling Club — Joseph A. Cowan, 53 Rose St., secretary. 

Penicuik Angling Club — James Foulis, clothier, Penicuik, secretary. 

St. Andrew Angling Club — Professor Williams, president; J. Young 
Guthrie, S.S.C., 29 Hanover St., Edinburgh, secretary. 

Walton Angling Club — Professor Williams, /r^j-/c/^«/y James Grant 
S.S.C, 12 Howard Place, Edinburgh, secretary. 

Waverley Angling Club — John M'Dougal, 3 Rutland Place, 
Edinburgh, secretary. 



42 THE ANGLING CLUBS AND PRESERVATION 

FiFESHIRE. 

Dunfermline Angling Club — James Mathewson, Dunfermline, 
secretary. 

Kirkcaldy Angling Club — Patrick Don Swan of Springfield, 
president ; Thomas Johnston, solicitor, Kirkcaldy, secretary. 

Forfarshire. 

Alyth Angling Club — Major Japp, president ; James D. Murdoch, 
Alyth, secretary. 

Arbroath Angling Club — David A. Wilson, Kirk Wynd, Arbroath, 
secretary. 

Brechin Angling Club — James B. Hodge, 2 Swan St., Brechin, 
secretary. 

Canmore (Forfar) Angling Club — David Maxwell, i6 Watt St., 
Forfar, secretary. 

Dundee Angling Club- — David Ireland, Calcutta Buildings, Dundee, 
secretary. 

Dundee West End Angling Club — Alexander Mitchell, Roseangle, 
Dundee, secretary. 

Dundee Walton Club— W. Mudie, 3 Athole Terrace, Maryfield, 
Dundee, secretary. 

Forfar Angling Club— James Dall, joiner. Market Place, Forfar, sec. 

Strathmore (Forfar) Angling Club^James Paton, 10 Arbroath Road, 
Forfar, secretary. 

Haddingtonshire, 

East Linton Angling Club — The Rev. Thomas Stirling Marjoribanks, 
Yx^%\.<d'a}^\x\i, president J George Smellie, East UixvX.oxv, secretary. 

Haddington Fishing Club — Captain Houston of Clerkington, presi- 
dent; George Angus, 35 Court St., Haddington, secretary. 

KiNROSS-SHIRE. 

Kinross-shire Fishing Club- — Thomas Steedman, Clydesdale Bank, 
Kinross, secretary. 

Loch Leven Angling Association (Limited) — Sir J. R. Gibson-Mait- 
land, Bart, of Craigend, president; George Bogie, solicitor, Kinross, 
secretary. 

Lanarkshire. 

Abington Angling Club — David Oswald, teacher, Abington, sec. 
Buckland Angling Club — William Cross, 41 York St., Glasgow, 

secretary. 



SOCIETIES OF LONDON AND THE PROVINCES. 43 

Coatbridge Angling Club— David Girdwood, Langloan, Coatbridge, 
secretary. 

Echaig Angling Club — John Clark, 17 Royal Exchange Square, 
Glasgow, secretary. 

Glasgow Dodgers. 

Glasgow Junior Angling Club. 

Lanark Amateur Angling Association — David Gourlay, Bannatyne 
Street, Lanark, secretary. 

Lanarkshire United Anglers' Protective Association — Crawford 
Brown, 1 10 Garthland Drive, OXdJS.'gow, secretary. (Nine associated 
Clubs.) 

Loch Lomond Angling Improvement Association — Alfred Brown, 
163 West George Street, Glasgow, secretary. 

Motherwell Star Angling Club— James Brown, Braidhurst Colliery, 
Motherwell, secretary. 

Stonehouse Angling Club — A. Hamilton, Stonehouse, secretary. 

St. Mungo Angling Club — W. Craig Ramsay, writer, Glasgow, 
secretary. 

Trout Preservation Association — David B. Macgregor, 51 West 
Regent Street, Glasgow, secretary. 

West of Scotland AngHng Club — David B. Macgregor, 51 West 
Regent Street, Glasgow, secretary. 

Western Angling Club — John Wilson, 59 St. Vincent Street, Glasgow, 
secretary. . 

Linlithgowshire. 

Armadale Angling Club — Robert Kerr, South Street, Armadale, 
secretary. 

Avon Conservancy Association — -W. Horn Henderson, Linlithgow, 
secretary. 

Bathgate Angling Club — Robert Bryce, Bridgend, Bathgate, sec. 

Peebleshire. 

Peebles Vigilance Trout Protection Association — Charles Tennant, 
M.P., The Glen, president J- James Anderson, Peebles, secretary. 

Peebles Angling Association — James Wolfe Murray of Cringletie, 
president J Alexander Pairman, grocer, Peebles, secretary. 

St. Ronan's Angling Club — James Cossar, Innerleithen, secretary. 

Perthshire. 

Aberfeldy Club — James Forbes, Chapel Street, Aberfeldy, secretary. 
Aberfoyle Angling Club. 



44 THE ANGLING CLUBS AND PRESERVATION 

Blairgowrie Angling Club. 

Perth Anglers' Club— P. D. Malloch, 209 High Street, Perth, 
secretary. 

Perthshire Fishing Club— Robert Keay, City Chambers, Perth, sec. 

Roxburghshire. 

Kelso Angling Association — Sir G. H. S. Douglas, Bart., of Spring- 
wood Park, president ; Archibald Steel, Bridge Street, Kelso, secretary. 

Upper Teviotdale Fisheries Association — The Duke of Buccleuch, 
K.G., president ; Walter Haddon, Royal Bank of Scotland, Hawick, 
secretary. 

Selkirkshire. 

Caddonfoot Fishings — H. W, Cornillon, S.S.C, 139 George Street, 
Edinburgh, secretary. 

Gala Angling Association — Robert Hall, 131 High Street, Galashiels, 
secretary. 

Selkirk Angling Association — John Anderson, Elm Row, Selkirk, 
secretary. 

Stirlingshire. 

Bonnybridge Angling Club — Alexander Mitchell, Greenbank Cottage, 
Bonnybridge, secretary. 

Callander Angling Club — D. Melrose, Callander, secretary. 

Denny and Dudipace Angling Club — Robert Shearer, Well Strand, 
Denny, secretary. 

Dollar Angling Club. 

Dollar and Devondale Angling Club — Peter Cousins, Dollar, sec. 

Doune Angling Club — W. H. Hogg, Lanrick Castle, Doune, sec. 

East Stirlingshire Association of Anglers — John Hogg, writer, Lar- 
bert, secretary. 

Falkirk Angling Club — J. A. Miller, 144 High St., Falkirk, secretary. 

Forth Angling Club, Stirling. 

Haggs Angling Club — -George Mirk, Haggs, by Denny, secretary. 

Muiravonside and Polmont Angling Club — A. Campbell, Blackbraes, 
Falkirk, secretary. 

Sauchie and Whins of Milton Angling Club — Sir J. R. Gibson-Mait- 
land, Bart., of Craigend, president y Wm. Reid, Whins of Milton, by 
Stirling, secretary. 

Skinflatts Angling Club — William Russell, Skinflatts, by Falkirk, 
secretary. 



SOCIETIES OF LONDON AND THE PROVINCES. 45 

Stirling Forth and Teith Angling Association — Alexander Moffat, 
Clydesdale Bank, Stirling, secretary. 

Stirling Fishing Club— Sir J. R. Gibson-Maitland, Bart., of Craig- 
tx^di, president J Robert M'Luckie, Stirling, secretary. 



The following short descriptions of some of the most 
prominent Angling and Preservation Societies of the 
Provinces are compiled mainly from the information 
kindly supplied by the secretaries of each Association. 
They are placed as nearly as may be in alphabetical 
order, the particulars being summarised as much as pos- 
sible, so as to come within the scope of this little book. 

Aire Fishing Club. 

This club, which has been in existence some ^forty-five 
years, was founded and fostered by J. R. Tennant, Esq., 
of Kildwick Hall, Skipton. It consists of twenty 
members, paying an entrance fee of ten guineas, and an 
annual subscription of the like amount, who preserve the 
river from Cargrave to Eastburn Brook. It has also a 
number of subscribers, limited to thirty, paying an annual 
subscription of thirty shillings, who are allowed to fish the 
river from Carleton Stone Bridge to Eastburn Brook. The 
Hon, Secretary is T. H. Dewhurst, Esq., of Whinfield, 
Skipton, while the President is J, R. Tennant, Esq. 

Abergavenny Fishing Association. 

This Association was founded in i860, and has been 
carried on from that time with fairly good success. The 
number of salmon and trout season tickets is limited to 20, 
the holders of such tickets in the previous years having 



46 THE ANGLING CLUBS AND PRESERVATION 

the option of renewing them. Five of these tickets are 
reserved for persons Hving twenty miles from the town. 

Rule 6 provides : That the price of salmon and trout 
season tickets be 40/-, except to persons who, in the 
judgment of the committee, are professional fishermen, 
who will be charged £\o \ season tickets for trout, 
20/-, to admit the use of fly, w^orm, minnow, or gentle; 
season tickets for trout, if fly only be used, 10/-. Day 
tickets for salmon and trout, 5/-, to be restricted to 
persons residing 10 miles or more from the town ; day 
tickets for trout, fly only to be used, 2/6 ; or 5/- to 
admit the use of worm, minnow, or gentle. None of 
these tickets are transferable, except as provided for in 
Rule 8. Also that tickets for clodding for eels shall 
be issued at 5/- ; and that tickets for dace fishing during 
the trout closed season shall be 5/- ; or to include both 
eels and dace, 10/-, such fishermen to be subject to 
Rule 10, as to time of fishing. Ladies may be allowed to 
fish on the payment of half the price of any of these 
tickets. 

The Association has about two miles of water, most of 
which can be fished from both banks. The Marquis of 
Abergavenny gives the right of fishing from his property 
on the left bank, while the Association rents the right bank 
from a local landowner. 

The Birdsgrove Fly-fishing Club, Mayfield, 
Ashbourne. 

This club, which is limited to twenty members paying 
an annual subscription of five pounds each, was formed by 
J. H. Villiers, Esq., and fishes four miles of the river Dove 
situate about a mile from Ashbourne, and lying between 
the Okeover and Norbury Fishing Clubs. The river 



SOCIETIES OF LONDON AND THE PROVINCES. 47 

abounds in trout and grayling, and runs through some 
very fine scenery. 

The members at present consist of eighteen gentlemen, 
thus showing a vacancy for two more rods. 

Bradford-on-Avon Fishing Association. 

This Association was formed about ten years ago with 
the object of putting a stop to the poaching, netting and 
pollution which was then going on in the Avon. The 
principal supporters of it were W. Stevine, Esq., of 
Warleigh, the Rev. George Baker, of Manor House, 
Freshford, and Captain Sainsbury, of Bathford. It pre- 
serves the river from Holt to Stoke, which distance is 
divided into three sections. The charge for a yearly 
ticket for the whole of the water is ^i, and such ticket is 
transferable to any member of the owner's family. For 
half the water the cost of a ticket is ioj., and for one of 
the sections it is 2s. 6d. per month. In 1876 the water was 
handed over to an association formed at Bristol, of which 
Mr. E. W. B. Villiers, of 26 Bath Road, Bristol, is secretary. 

Boston Angling Association 

Was established in 1871, having for its object the pre- 
vention of the wholesale destruction, by netting, of fish in 
the river Witham and its tributary streams, so that good 
angling might be provided for the inhabitants of Boston, 
its visitors, and the neighbourhood. This object the Asso- 
ciation has undoubtedly attained, and is now one of the 
largest and best free fisheries for coarse fish in the kingdom, 
being bountifully supplied with pike, perch, roach, rudd, 
chub, ruffe, bleak, bream (two kinds), tench and eels. 
Burbot are occasionally taken. It is 148 miles in extent, 
comprising the river Witham, and the drains in the East, 



48 THE ANGLING CLUBS AND PRESERVATION 

West and Wildmore Fens, under the jurisdiction of the 
River Witham Drainage Commissioners, and under whose 
by-laws the B. A. A. have power and act. At the 
present time it is the principal resort of the Sheffield 
anglers, it being nothing uncommon to witness two 
thousand in a single day. It is computed by competent 
authorities that there were not less than 30,000 visitors 
last season. It is regulated by a code of rules twenty 
in number, and supported by voluntary contributions. The 
officers consist of patrons, a president, vice-presidents, 
treasurer, secretary, and a committee of management. 
The officers are appointed annually by ballot, on the first 
Monday in July. The committee meets monthly on the 
second Wednesday in every month, having power to call 
special meetings. The quarterly meetings are held the 
first Monday in October, January and April. 

Besides the above there is the North and South Forty- 
foot drains, about forty miles in extent, under the juris- 
diction and management of the Black Sluice Drainage 
Commissioners. The latter drain is large and deep, with 
excellent water, and though it has only been preserved 
three seasons it abounds with most kinds of the fish 
previously mentioned, but is particularly noted for its 
pike and perch. There is a small annual fee of 2s. 6d. 
charged by the Commissioners on these waters. 

Bristol Golden Carp Angling Association. 

This Association was founded in September 1879, and is 
limited to 200 members. The subscription for the first 
year is 5^., and 2s. 6d. per annum afterwards. General 
meetings are held the last Monday in each quarter, and 
committee meetings last Monday in each month. 



SOCIETIES OF LONDON AND THE PROVINCES. 49 

Secretary, Lewis C. Wride, Digby House, Barton Hill, 
Bristol. 

Carlisle Angling Association. 

This Association was formed in 1852 to preserve the 
River Eden and its tributaries. Up to that time a great 
amount of poaching had existed, there being no regular 
watchers on the river. In the first year of its existence the 
bailiffs seized thirty-two illegal nets, in most cases securing 
convictions. Up till 1870 they were the only preservers 
of the river, then, however, the Eden Board of Conservancy 
was formed, having a staff of ten men and an inspector, 
whose salaries were paid out of the funds arising from the 
sale of net and rod licences. The number of salmon and 
trout has steadily increased since the Association was 
formed. In 1878 the salmon disease broke out amongst 
the fish, and has continued more or less ever since, 
showing itself principally in the spring and autumn. The 
Eden is one of the finest trout and salmon rivers in Eng- 
land, abounding in fishy streams and runs with occasional 
rocky pools. There are netting-stations for fifteen miles 
from the outlet, but in spite of these salmon and grilse run 
up the river in large numbers. The Hon. Sec. is J. Bedwell 
Slater, Esq., of Chatsworth Square, Carlisle. 

The Chichester Angling Society. 

This Association was established in 1881. Its Patron is 
His Grace The Duke of Richmond and Gordon, while the 
President is W. W. Baker, Esq., and Vice-President, 
W. Kerwood, Esq. ; Treasurer, Mr. A, Purchase ; Hon. 
Sec, Mr. G. F. Salter. The head-quarters are at the 
" Globe Hotel," Chichester. 

This Society numbers over 100 members, and has a fine 

E 



50 THE ANGLING CLUBS AND PRESERVATION 

stretch of water within a short distance of the club-room, 
well stocked with carp, bream, perch, roach, and a few 
tench and eels. Pike are also fairly represented. The 
canal from the basin to the lower lock is over three miles, 
and since the weed clearance by the Society in 1882 is in 
fine angling condition. 

The Costa Anglers' Club. 

The River Costa at Keld Head runs in considerable 
volume at the foot of the oolitic limestone moorlands, 
lying north of Pickering, in the North Riding of the 
County of York. In many respects it is a remarkable 
stream. It is of high uniform temperature, rarely below 
37 degrees, consequently it never freezes, and in cold 
winters the condensation of vapour is a striking phe- 
nomenon, rising, as it frequently does, high into the air, 
and may be seen for many miles. 

This high temperature naturally promotes the rapid 
growth of weed, and is one of the annoyances which the 
managing committee have to contend with in being com- 
pelled to cut and keep it under so very frequently in the 
height of the fishing season. On the other hand, this weed 
forms a capital shelter for fish, and produces a vast amount 
of insect food, on which young fish rapidly increase in size 
and condition. 

The club is only a youthful institution ; nevertheless, 
the managers have already a breeding establishment in 
operation, and are able to turn out annually from 15,000 to 
20,000 fry, consequently the stream is becoming fairly 
stocked with both trout and grayling. Those killed last 
season, and so far as this one has progressed, have been 
of an average weight of i^ to 2 lbs., and a few 3 lbs. 

Each member is limited to ten brace a day, not less than 



SOCIETIES OF LONDON AND THE PROVINCES. 51 

10 inches in length, and to 20 days, angling during the 
season, for which he pays four guineas subscription and an 
entrance fee of five guineas. There are 40 subscribing 
members, under the presidency of the Rev. J. R. Hill, of 
Thornton Hall, near Pickering, a thorough sportsman and 
a county gentleman of the truest Yorkshire type. 

The Costa receives the Pickering Beck near Kirby 
Misterton, and two or three miles below the united waters 
are discharged into the Derwent J. H. Philips, Esq., of 
Scarborough, is the honorary secretary, and it was mainly 
through his exertions that the club was re-established some 
four years ago. 

Derwent Anglers' Club. 

This Club preserves a stretch of water extending from 
two miles below East and West Ayton, near Scarborough, 
through the celebrated Forge Valley, thence past the highly 
picturesque village of Hackness, the seat of Lord Derwent, 
to Hill's Green Bridge at the entrance of " Barnescliffe," a 
wild gorge of surpassing beauty, running up and forming 
the eastern side of the lofty " Langdale Rigg," from the 
summit of which there is a magnificent view of a large 
expanse of country. On the east the cliffs of the sea coast, 
with the baronial castle keep of Scarborough standing out 
like a sentinel to guard that ancient borough and queen of 
watering places — on the south are the Great Wolds, with 
the bold promontories of Filey Brigg and Flamborough 
Head forming striking objects, whilst on the west the eye 
stretches away to Malton and the Howardean Hills, with 
the Hambleton plateau in the far distance. On the north is 
large expanse of moorland lying in the direction of Robin 
Hood's Bay, and the Peak, flanked by the railway from 
Pickering to Whitby, emerging from Newton Dale on to 

E 2 



52 THE ANGLING CLUBS AND PRESERVATION 

the heights above. It is here on high ground, under the 
shadow of " Lilla's Cross," that the " Derwent " takes its 
rise ; and, descending in a meandering form, with many a 
pretty waterfall, it traverses the monotonous expanse of 
moor in a south-easterly course until it meets at the foot 
of the upper end of Langdale Pike the " Luggerhowe " 
stream coming from Harwood Dale, and unitedly they 
enter the Barnesclifife Valley. From this point to Hill's 
Green Bridge is a nice stretch of stream, full of small 
yet toothsome trout, of which Lord Derwent is the 
owner, and who liberally grants permission to honest 
anglers. That portion of the Derwent which is presei'ved 
by the club is a pleasant fishable stream, with abundance 
of trout and a few grayling, though neither of them 
are of large size, averaging about three to the pound. 
The stream may be briefly described as one of alternate 
pool, with here and there gravelly streams, fringed on 
both sides with trees and bushes where trout love to hide 
and dwell and to watch for their daily ephemeral food. 
Through the Forge Valley the stream runs deep and 
sluggishly, but many a lusty trout lies there in ambush, only 
to be interviewed when there is a wind blowing up or down 
the valley. A practical hand then may readily fill his 
pannier. 

Lord Derwent and Lord Londesborough are the chief 
proprietors, and are the liberal patrons of the Club, though 
there are other riparian owners, all of whom generously 
place their respective waters at the disposal of the members. 
The Derwent being at such a convenient distance from 
Scarborough and easily accessible by rail, are great facilities 
for the members reaching the stream. The Club was 
formed upwards of forty years ago, namely in 1839, and, 
from its many surroundings, has always been a popular 



SOCIETIES OF LONDON AND THE PROVINCES. 53 

one, especially with the gentry residing in Scarborough. 
The managers have a breeding establishment at the Forge 
Cottages, and for many years past have turned out from 
10,000 to 20,000 fry, so that the stream is kept constantly 
replenished with an abundant stock of fish, to supply diver- 
sion for its many members, who occasionally jostle each other 
— as for instance in the Mayfly season, when every one is 
anxious for the fray and to secure a basket. If, however, 
the angler should fall on an untoward day, when trout 
decline conclusions with his " gentle art," he has before him 
magnificent scenery which will well repay him for his outing, 
though he may have to return home with an empty creel. 
T. B. Etty, Esq., of Scarborough — a relative of the dis- 
tinguished painter — is the acting and obliging honorary 
secretary of the Club, which consists of 40 members, 
subscribing two guineas each annually and three guineas 
entrance. 

The Dart District Fishery Board 

Exercises certain powers of control over a defined district, 
the limits of which were settled by a certificate from the 
Secretary of State dated 26th of March, 1866, under the 
powers conferred by the Salmon Fishery Acts ; and under 
the same powers the members of the Board are appointed 
by the Magistrates at Quarter Sessions. The Board has 
the power to issue licences, without which no person (not 
excepting owners of property) can fish. The Chairman is 
Jeffrey Michelmore, Esq., of Totnes, while the Hon. 
Secretary is Anthony Pike, Esq., of the same place. 

Derwent Valley Angling Association. 

At a public meeting held at the Town Hall, Shotley 
Bridge, on Tuesday, March 9th, 1865, to consider the 



54 THE ANGLING CLUBS AND PRESERVATION 

propriety of forming an association for the protection of 
fish in the River Derwent, the late Thos. Wilson, Esq., 
of Shotley Hall, in the chair, it was resolved : 

I. That the above Association be formed for the above 
object. 

II That it be governed by a president and a committee 
of not less than six members, with secretary and 
treasurer. 

III. That Mr. Wilson, of Shotley Hall, be president, and 
that the provisional committee to carry out the resolutions 
of meeting should be composed of the following gentle- 
men, viz : Mr. John Armandale, Mr. Thos. Ramsay, Mr. 
Geo. Peile, Mr. Thos. Richardson, Mr. (now Dr.) Renton, 
the Rev. W. Cundill, Mr. Featherstonehaugh, and Mr. 
Thirlwell, Mr. A, Town (Hon. Treasurer), the Rev. F. B. 
Thompson, and Mr. Booth (Hon. Sec). 

IV. That such committee be authorised to communicate 
with the landed proprietors along the bank of the river, 
asking their co-operation, &c., and report to future meeting, 
together with proposed rules and regulations for working 
of the association. 

V. That a subscription list be now opened and sub- 
scriptions solicited towards funds of the Association. 

At a public meeting held on Monday, 30th October, 1865, 
the report was presented and rules adopted, while it was 
settled that fishing should commence on the i6th of March, 
1866, and close on the 1st of October. Tickets \os. each. 
The first subscription amounted to ^32. 

Since March 1879 the tickets to new members have been 
5^., to old members 2s. 6d. 

From report of annual meeting held in February last I 
find that the Society commenced earlier, viz., on March ist 
instead of i6th. Since its formation 6,000 fry {fario and 



SOCIETIES OF LONDON AND THE PROVINCES. 55 

levenejisis) have been introduced in the river and tributaries. 
(Fishing in the latter is strictly prohibited.) 

The subject of introducing grayling is postponed for the 
present. 

The East Anglian Piscatorial Society. 

This Society had its origin in the City of Norwich, and 
was founded by Mr. Alfred Palmer, the then proprietor of 
the Great Eastern Hotel. It was first started in the year 
1879, and up to the present time has had a most successful 
career. The society consists of, and is limited to thirty 
members, besides several honorary members. Prominent 
amongst the latter is the name of Edward Birkbeck, Esq., 
M.P., as also the names of W. H. Grenfel, Esq., M.P. 
for Salisbury, and Edward Fanshaw Holley, Esq., of 
Gunyah Lodge, Norwich. The above gentlemen have 
taken a keen interest in the welfare of the Society. 

The members meet once a month for the transaction of 
business, special meetings for readings, and " Social Board 
meetings are held at intervals. The society has done 
much in prohibiting netting and other unfair fishing both in 
the rivers Yare and Bure. 

The Eaton Fishing Club. 

The club preserves about three miles of the rivers Lugg 
and Arrow, commencing a mile below the town of 
Leominster, Herefordshire. The water which runs through 
land belonging principally to the Earl of Meath is well 
stocked with both trout and grayling. 

This society was originally formed some thirty-five years 
since, and is limited to fourteen members. Since then it 
has passed through various changes in rules and con- 



56 THE ANGLING CLUBS AND PRESERVATION 

stitution, and is now managed by a committee of local 
gentlemen. 

The Esk Fishery Association 

Was founded in the year 1866, and consists of the land- 
owners consenting to the preservation of their portion of 
the stream by the club, and persons who subscribe to the 
whole of the club waters. This Association has done good 
and important work in breeding salmon, having turned 
into the river not less than 100,000 fish. Last season more 
salmon were taken with the rod than sea-trout or bull- 
trout. 

The Grassington, Threshfield and Linton 
Angling Club 

Was commenced in 1855, for the purpose of preserving a 
length of about three miles of the river Wharfe near 
Grassington and between the Kilnsey and Burnsall angling 
waters. The fishing is almost entirely for trout and 
grayling. 

The present subscription is \os. for a season ticket, and 
2s. 6d. for a day ticket. The Club is managed by a 
committee consisting of a president, secretary, and three 
other members of the club. Tickets may be obtained 
from the secretary, Mr. William Harker, Grassington, near 
Skipton, Yorkshire. 

Great Grimsby Angling Association. 

This Association was formed a short time back by Mr. 
Hollingsworth, " Mason's Arms Hotel," Grimsby. It now 
numbers 100 members, and has secured by rental a great 
part of the " South Navigation Canal." The society rents 
several fishing streams. The river Ancholme is within 



SOCIETIES OF LONDON AND THE PROVINCES. 57 

easy reach of the vicinity of Grimsby, and contains numbers 
of bream, roach, perch, pike, &c. It is the property of the 
" Ancholme Commissioners," who issue a season ticket at 
the moderate charge of 5^-. ; it is strictly preserved, and 
affords excellent sport. From the docks a stream called 
the " Haven " runs for miles through several adjoining 
villages, and contains plenty of trout and roach ; it is 
preserved in some parts by the owners of the land through 
which it passes. The docks abound in roach, pike, &c., 
and the fishing is free. The Association is managed by a 
president, vice-president, secretary, treasurer, and a com- 
mittee of twelve members, and is in a very flourishing 
condition. Their head-quarters are the "Mason's Arms 
Hotel," Grimsby. 

King's Lynn Angling Association. 

This society was started in December 1880 — the origi- 
nator being H. Bradfield, Esq. It preserves the Gaywood 
river, and hires the Middle Level Main Drain, the Hundred 
Feet river, Roxham Drain, and the Drain — Downham or 
St. John's Eau — the Walks rivulet. Long Pond, and Lake, 
the latter being provided for the fishing of the inhabitants 
of the borough free of charge. 

The Association rears large numbers of trout fry, part of 
which are procured from parent fish in the neighbourhood. 
The greater portion of the ova is hatched in the Lynn 
Museum — entrance to which is free — and the operation is 
one of great attraction to the inhabitants. The young fry is 
afterwards transferred to a nursery pond. Last year 15,000 
fry were hatched, and this year 20,000. 

The annual subscription is 5^-., honorary members £\ \s. 
and \os. 6d, The Hon. Sec. is H. Bradfield, Esq., of Gay- 
wood Road, Lynn. 



58 THE ANGLING CLUBS AND PRESERVATION 

Liverpool Angling Association. — Head-quarters, 
"Strawberry Hotel," West Derby Road, Liverpool. 

Some four years ago a number of anglers who were in 
the habit of meeting at the above hotel conceived the idea 
of forming an angling association, and after some difficulty 
succeeded in their endeavour. The number of members at 
first was thirteen, but this has now increased to lOO, with 
about twelve hon. members. They had great difficulty 
in obtaining or renting fishing waters, but have now secured 
the right of fishing in the reservoir of the Ruabon Water 
Company, which is well stocked with trout averaging 
half a pound each. About 2000 Lough Neagh trout have 
been placed in the brook leading into the reservoir as a 
trial, with the intention of placing some 10,000 more there 
if this attempt is successful. They have also got permis- 
sion from the Parks Commissioners to fish in the Park 
lakes. The President is James Wilkinson, Esq., while the 
Hon, Sec. is Mr. R. Woolfall, of 27 Troughton Road. 

Lower Monnow Fishing Club. 

This Club is limited to twenty-five members, paying an 
annual subscription of £<, each, and has the fishing for 
about nine miles on the lower Monnow. The trout average 
three to the pound ; fish of three and four pounds are, 
however, frequently caught. There are vacancies for more 
members. The Hon. Secretary is R. Wrightson, Esq., 
Newport, Monmouth. 

Lower Teign Fishing Association. 

This Association was formed in February 1876, after a 
public meeting held at Newton Abbot on the 24th of that 
month. All the principal landowners on the Teign and its 



SOCIETIES OF LONDON AND THE PROVINCES. 59 

tributary the Bovey gave up their fishing rights to the 
Society. Since then part of the Bovey has been withdrawn, 
and the Association right now extends for about nine miles 
up the Teign, and about two miles up the Bovey. Tickets 
are issued to the public at lOi". 6d. for the season, 5^-. per 
month, 2s. 6d. per week, and is. per day ; a trout licence of 
2s. 6d., and a salmon licence of .^i is., is also imposed by 
the board of conservators. 

The Secretary is the Rev. J. Yarde, of Culver House, 
Chudleigh, while the Treasurer is Sidney Hacker, Esq., of 
Newton Abbot. 

The Market Deeping Angling Society. 

The right of fishery in the river Welland at Market 
Deeping extends from a point at the end of Mr. Thorpe's 
mill-stream to Kenulph's Stone, a distance of six miles, 
and formerly belonged to the Crown as Lord of the Manor 
of East and West Deeping. It was let until 1872 to a 
fisherman who netted it at all times and seasons, sparing 
nothing. Mr. S. B. Sharpe represented the matter to Mr. 
Gore, Commissioner of Her Majesty's Woods and Forests, 
who accordingly discharged the tenant and accepted Mr. 
Sharpe, in company with Mr. Holland and Mr. Molecey, of 
that place, as tenants. In 1875 the manor was sold, and in 
1877 the right of fishery was purchased by a few local 
noblemen and gentlemen, consisting of the following : — 
Lord Kesteven, Lord Burghley, William Holland, William 
Beadzler Deacon, George Linnell, John Thorpe, John Mole- 
cey, Twigge Molecey, Edmund Lawlett, and Samuel Bates 
Sharpe, Esqs., and an angling society formed which has been 
eminently successful. The Welland is a very good breeding 
river, running over a gravel bottom, the lower parts running 
through low-lying lands which in winter become flooded. 



6o THE ANGLING CLUBS AND PRESERVATION 

and form what is called Crowland Wash, a few miles below 
Deeping, and there the fish, especially pike, breed in great 
numbers. The dace in the higher waters about Deeping 
are very fine and rise freely to the fly ; large numbers have 
been caught from eight to fourteen ounces. Through the 
efforts of the proj^rietors, aided by the untiring exertions of 
the Hon. Sec, Mr. S. B. Sharpe (who is also on the Council 
of the National Fish Culture Association), the river Welland 
at this portion literally teems with fish. The object of the 
Society being "the preservation of fish for legitimate 
sport," and that alone, the rules are extremely liberal to 
anglers — the annual subscription of five shillings, for 
example, including the head of a family and his young 
children. 

The Middleham Angling Association. 

This Society was founded in 1880, and preserves the 
fishing on the river Cover (a tributary stream of the Yore). 
The water contains trout and grayling, and is rented from 
the lord of the manor, J. Wood, Esq. The members at 
present number about twenty, and pay an annual subscrip- 
tion of;^i \s. with an entrance fee of a like amount. 

The President is S. T. Scrope, Esq. of Danby Hall, 
Bedale ; Secretary and Treasurer, J. E. Miller, Esq., 
Middleham, Bedale. 

The Nene Angling Club. 

This Club was established in 1856, Dr. Webster being 
the first President and J. Hensman, Esq., Hon. Secretary. 
They preserve from twelve to fourteen miles of the river 
Nene. The water contains jack, bream, perch, carp, &c., 
and large bags are frequently made. A bream of 6 lbs. 
and a carp of 9^ lbs, were lately taken from the water. 



SOCIETIES OF LONDON AND THE PROVINCES. 6r 

The annual subscriptions are £}, '^s. for the whole fishery- 
extent ; from the Paper-mills to Castle Ashby, £l is.; and 
los. 6d. for the third fishery, from the Paper Mills to Billing; 
there being also an entrance fee of los. 6d. for the whole 
water, and 5^-. for the ^i is. preserve. 

President, the Rev. H. Smyth, Little Houghton ; Hon. 
Sec, H. P. Hensman, Esq. 

Norwich Piscatorial Society. 

This Society was originated by Mr. W. Capon, of Norwich. 
It numbers 50 fishing and a large number of honorary- 
members. The annual subscription is los., hon. members 
20J-. The Club gives a very fine Challenge Cup, to be won 
twice before becoming the property of any member. 

Hon. Secretary and Treasurer, Mr. W. G. Capon, Mar- 
ket Street, Norwich. 

The Northampton Working Men's Angling Club 

Was formed May 22nd, 1876, and now numbers 80 
members ; fishes about 8 miles of private water in the Nene. 
Annual subscription 8j". 6d., hon. members los. 6d. The 
Society has several prize competitions during the year. 
Its head-quarters are at the * Half Moon ' Inn, Bridge 
Street. Hon. Sec, Mr. J. James, 10 Pike Lane. 

Newark and Muskham Fishery Association. 

This Association was formed 1868, it has about 4^ miles of 
private water rented from Lord Middleton and H. Manners- 
Sutton, Esq. The number of members is about 70, paying 
a subscription of l^s. per annum for a single ticket, and 
£1 is. for a family ticket. The limits of the fishery are 
defined as follows, and include some of the very finest 



62 THE ANGLING CLUBS AND PRESERVATION 

lengths on the river Trent. The " Muskham Fishery " 
extends on the north bank of the river from the " Fir 
Trees " in Kelham Lane to the fence dividing the parishes 
of North and South Muskham, two fields below "Toder's 
Holt ; " and on the south bank, from the fence dividing the 
parishes of Kelham and South Muskham, nearly opposite 
the aforesaid " Fir Trees,'' to the fence dividing the same 
parishes opposite the Bottom Lock. The " Dead Water " 
and "Muskham Fleet " are also included in the Fishery. 

The Hon. Secretary of the Association is J. Neal, Esq., 
of Mount Schools, Newark-on-Trent. 

Otley Angling Club. 

The Otley Angling Club was formed in 1876, principally 
through the kindness of Ayscough Fawkes, Esq., of 
Farnley Hall, who gives to the Club about six miles of 
fishing on one side of the river Wharfe. The number 
of members is limited to 30, paying an annual subscription 
of ^^"3 and an entrance fee of £2, The society hatches 
about 26,000 trout fry annually and places them in the 
river. The President is Ayscough Fawkes, Esq., while the 
Hon. Sec. is R. M. Pratt, Esq., Otley. 

The Redditch Piscatorials. 

The Club was established a short time ago to meet the 
requirements of the working-men anglers (who are mostly 
engaged in the Redditch hook, &c., manufactories). So far 
it has been a decided success. The subscription is u., 
with \d. for a book of rules. The Club has been greatly 
assisted by several of the manufacturers giving prizes to 
be fished for. 



SOCIETIES OF LONDON AND THE PROVINCES. 63 

President, Mr, George Welch ; Secretary, John E. Wilkes, 
31 Edward Street, Redditch. 

Ryedale Angling Club. 

The Ryedale Angling Club was formed June ist, 1846, 
and consists of 20 members paying an annual subscription 
of £4. 4J-. and £2 is. entrance fee. They rent from Lord 
Feversham the length of water from Helmsley Bridge to 
Newton, a distance along the stream of about 4 miles ; 
the fishing is restricted to artificial fly and dead minnow. 
The river Rye is a good trout and grayling stream, and is 
strictly preserved both above and below the Club water. 
The Honorary Secretary is Bryan Ed. Cookson, Esq., of 
40 Holgate Road, York. 

Shrewsbury and Severn Angling Society. 

This Angling Society was started in March, 1882, having 
then 70 members, which have increased to no at the 
present time. The honour of originating it belongs chiefly 
to T. H. Morgan, Esq. The annual subscription is 2s. 6d., 
with IS. entrance fee ; hon. members lOi-. 6d. The 
Society has promoted an Act of Parliament to do away 
with netting in the part of the Severn within the limits of 
the borough. 

President, James Watson, Esq., of Berwick Hall ; Hon. 
Sec, T. H. Morgan, Esq., Shrewsbury. 

The Spalding Angling Club. 

This Club was formed in the year 1864. The fishing 
exists in the Drains belonging to the Deeping Fen Drainage 
Trustees and extends over some 2$ miles of water, the 
Society also has a reach of about four miles of the River Glen. 



64 THE ANGLING CLUBS AND PRESERVATION 

Tickets are issued to subscribers at the rate of £i \s. for 
double tickets and \os. 6d. for single. 

The Hon. Secretary is J. G. Calthrop, Esq., of Spalding. 

The Stour Fishing Association. 

This Association was formed in January 1866, in the 
place of an old private club which had almost become 
extinct. They preserve part of the River Stour, containing 
some of the finest trout in England, and also breed 
artificially with success. The number of members is limited 
to 100, paying an annual subscription of ;^3 '^s. to £$ 5^-. 
and an entrance fee of ^10 los. 

Hon. Sec, Captain Lambert, Stanmore, Canterbury; 
Assistant Sec, Mr. , F. G. Haines, 9 Watling Street, 
Canterbury. 

St. John's Amateur Anglers' Association. 

This Association was formed about five years ago by 
several anglers residing at St. John's, Worcester, with a 
view to securing for themselves good fishing waters and 
to encourage sportsmanlike angling. The number of 
members is limited to 30, paying an annual subscription 
of 2s. 6d. 

Hon. Sec, Arthur Hill, Fern Villa, St. John's, Worcester. 

Upper Exe Fishing Association. 

This Association was formed in February, 185 1, by the 
owners and occupiers of land on the river Exe, and was then 
called "The Occupier's Exe Fishing Association," but has 
since been altered to the above title. Cards for the season 
are issued at ;^i is.; monthly, lOi". ; weekly, 5^-. ; day, 2s. 6d. 
The extent of fishing is about five miles up the river Exe, 



SOCIETIES OF LONDON AND THE PROVINCES. 65 

from Thorverton Bridge to near Beckleigh Bridge, and 
comprises the best fishing in that river. 

The Hon. Secretary is W. C. James, Esq., Thorverton, 
Collumpton, Devon. 

Trent Fishery Board of Conservators. 

The chief honour of the establishment of this important 
Board belongs unquestionably to Thomas Worthington, 
Esq., solicitor, of Derby, who in 1863, by means of a series 
of letters addressed to the Derby Mercury, called public 
attention to the fact that no proper steps had been taken, 
under the Salmon Fisheries Act of 1861, for the preser- 
vation of the Trent. At a public meeting which followed, 
Mr. Worthington and another gentleman, on the motion of 
the late Sir Oswald Mosley, Bart., were appointed the first 
conservators under the act. The movement greatly inte- 
rested the then Lord Vernon and other fishery proprie- 
tors, amongst whom was Mr. Dennison, the then Speaker 
of the House of Commons. In June 1864 a meeting of 
fishery proprietors was held at Mr. Dennison's residence, 
when an association was formed, and called the " Trent 
Fishery Association." Mr. Thomas Worthington, and 
Major Scott, of Knaith Hall, near Gainsborough, were 
appointed joint honorary secretaries. 

In 1865, the Salmon Fisheries Amendment Act having 
been passed, the Trent Fishery Association was duly formed 
into the "Trent Fishery Board," in pursuance of the act. 
Major Scott resigned the honorary secretaryship, and 
Colonel G. M. Hutton, of Gate Burton, Gainsborough, was 
appointed in his place, and still remains hon. secretary. 

In December 1880 Mr. Worthington, in consequence of 
ill-health, was compelled to resign the hon. secretaryship, 

F 



66 THE ANGLING CLUBS AND PRESERVATION 

and Mr. C. K. Eddowes, solicitor, Derby, was appointed 
clerk and solicitor in his place. 

ToNBRiDGE Angling Club and Fish Preservation 

Society. 

This Society was established at Tonbridge about eight 
years ago to preserve the upper reaches of the Medway, and 
put a stop to the continuous poaching and netting which was 
then going on. The Society received great assistance from 
the riparian proprietors, and is now in a very flourishing 
condition. They have recently acquired " The Ballast Pit," 
a lake of about six acres, which it is the intention of the 
association to stock with trout. The annual subscription 
is los. 6d. for the whole fishery, and 5^-. for part ; day 
tickets, IS. 

President, A. T. Beeching, Esq. ; Hon. Sec, Mr. E. 
Hollomby, Quarry Hill, Tonbridge. 

Universal Angling Society. 

This Society was formed in 1872, and was principally 
composed of the former members of the " Yorkshire and 
Lincolnshire Angling Association," which had ceased to 
exist as a club in the preceding year. The association 
owes a great deal of its present success to the good 
services and management of Mr. Thomas Maplebeck, who 
was for several years their president. The number of mem- 
bers at present is eighty, paying an annual subscription of 
Si", with an entrance fee of 1.5-. 

Secretary, Mr. V/. H. Barker, High Street, Hull. 

The Watford Piscators. . 
This Society was established in March 1882, for the 
purpose of putting a stop to the poaching which was going 
on in the public waters of the neighbourhood, and to rent 



SOCIETIES OF LONDON AND THE PROVINCES. 67 

fishing for the exclusive use of its members. In May the 
club got under their control about half a mile of the river 
Colne from the railway arches to the Leathersellers' Arms, 
and some time afterwards secured a reach of the canal from 
Cassio Bridge to Beasley's Lock. The number of fishing 
members is limited to 50, with numerous hon. members. 
The annual subscription is ^s. 

Hon. Sec, Mr. H. A. Vincent, 4 Carey Place, Watford. 



LONDON ANGLING CLUBS. 

I now come to an entirely distinct consideration of the 
" Angling Clubs " of London pure and simple. It is very 
likely that a certain class of unreflecting people, or people 
who don't know any better, may imagine that the sole aim 
and ambition attendant upon the formation or weekly 
gathering together of the members of an angling club is 
centred in the consumption of a good deal of fourpenny 
ale, unlimited grogs, and the strongest sort of tobacco. 

Now and again it is possible, but they are very isolated 
instances, that this view of matters represents something 
like the facts of the case. More frequently such an un- 
generous reading is as far wide of the mark as the North 
Pole is to California. Then, again, it may be asked ' What 
good do angling clubs effect .'' what are they really doing 
that is worth doing .'' and what might they not do 1 Truly 
three such queries open up a terrible vista of argument, 
and although the first question may be, and is, easy enough 
to answer, the two following must inevitably place the ma- 
jority of the angling clubs, to speak simple truth, in a by 
no means complimentary or particularly enviable position. 

What good do angling clubs effect ? Well, by way of 

F 3 



68 THE ANGLING CLUBS AND PRESERVATION 

answering that question I will endeavour to show the 
difference between angling clubs past and present. 

At a date by no means very far antecedent there were, 
comparatively speaking, only a very few angling clubs in 
existence. Such as they were, they embraced all the best 
and longest-lived societies then in being, with some few of 
the now rapidly springing body of piscators, constantly 
resolving themselves into some new club, and which might, 
under proper skilled management, become in time a mighty 
host, powerful to do good. 

Such angling societies as existed then, or many of the 
members at any rate, were anglers only in name. They re- 
cognised, save with rare exceptions, no fence seasons at all, 
and as to size, bagged every living thing in the shape of a 
fish that they could entice with either worm or gentle. It 
was no disgrace then for an angler proudly to display in 
the club room, as the result of his day's sport, such a col- 
lection of fish as nowadays he dare not even bring home. 
It was literally shocking in those degenerate days to see 
what baby fish were slaughtered. It was sad to think 
that men were amongst us calling themselves sportsmen — 
Heaven save the mark ! — who were content to base their 
claim to the title upon the wretched laurels they might 
win by the production of such a tray of fish as would have 
almost disgraced the doughty deeds done in the days 
when the embryo angler sallied forth armed with a pea- 
stick, bent pin, some stolen cotton, and a borrowed pickle 
bottle. However, such were the facts, and I turn gladly to 
a contemplation of the picture in our own day. 

That resolves itself into a totally different one. Anglers 
nowadays are, in the first place, restricted by most 
wholesome rules, which bar them from showing anything 
but fairly good sample fish, and in the second, I fully 



SOCIETIES OF LONDON AND THE PROVINCES. 69 

believe that their latent sportsmanlike feeling has been so 
thoroughly developed by good example, that in many 
cases they would not exhibit poor specimens even if they 
had the chance. A very strong feeling, emanating it is only 
right to say with the " Gresham Angling Society," has 
sprung up of late years against the promulgation of " gross 
weight competitions," and in favour rather of specimen fish. 
The scale of weights has been fixed in all cases at a fair size, 
and in many instances some of the clubs — and notably 
those old Societies, " The Piscatorial Society " and " The 
Friendly Anglers " — fix their weight at a very high standard 
indeed. How different from the old days, when everything 
in the shape of a fish was bagged, and the waters north, 
south, east, and west of the compass, were slowly, it is true, 
but not the less surely, depleted and gradually fished out. 

I may ask now, What are the London Anglers doing 
for the common good of their brethren .'' and the answer, 
without giving offence, which I should be sorry enough to 
do, is one especially difficult to shape nicely. 

In the first place they have established by joint effort, 
spread over certain districts, three institutions by means of 
which cheap railway facilities have been obtained from all 
those companies whose permanent way leads to well-known 
angling resorts. These are the West Central Association 
of London and Provincial Angling Societies, The United 
London Anglers' Central Committee, and the Central 
Association. 

In the next place, they have founded what should be 
known as the best and most important work that the 
London anglers, as a body of sportsmen, have ever at- 
tempted to give root and birth to, in the shape of "The 
Anglers' Benevolent Association." This has for its main 
object the assistance of anglers who through declining 



70 THE ANGLING CLUBS AND PRESERVATION 

years, or the working of that strange unwritten law which 
would seem to hamper some unfortunates with the unvari- 
able and accursed sting of poverty, sink gradually into a 
pitiable state. Before its institution, and when a properly 
accredited member of an angling club fell into distress, 
there was nothing by way of relief save the "whip round" 
with its open declaration of distress, sometimes especially 
hurtful to a man's feelings, but which, to the credit of his 
comrades, they were never disposed to shirk. Now a dis- 
tressed angler simply makes his case known to the Com- 
mittee of that institution, and he is instantly relieved to 
the best of its ability. 

But is this institution, which should be one of the first 
and most important, properly supported } No, I answer — 
emphatically no ; yet the very men probably who hesitate 
in the time of prosperity to put their shilling into its funds 
are the very men who would think they were hardly dealt 
by if, in the hour of need, they were not offered pounds. 

My friend Mr. Geen, the hard-working practical "anglers' 
friend," if ever man deserved the title yet, has lately written 
a paper, which has been read before various Angling 
Societies, upon "The better Organisation of the London 
Anglers." I had not intended to trench upon the ground 
he, in that admirable and sensible essay, has taken up, but 
he speaks so much more powerfully than my feeble pen is 
capable of expressing, that I shall not hesitate, with many 
apologies for so doing, to quote here and there his opinions, 
mainly as a means of strengthening my own. 

Hear what he says, ye London Anglers, concerning this 
same " Anglers' Benevolent," and mark, learn, and inwardly 
digest the wisdom of his repeated warnings. 

" Another fault, and not a small one, is the difficulty of 
getting members to join. One of the chief reasons which 



SOCIETIES OF LONDON AND THE PROVINCES. 71 

caused me to work for the society was the hope that 
begging would be done away with, I feel certain that 
there have been more journeys undertaken, and more 
earnest pleading, and eloquent speeches made to get 
members to join the Anglers' Benevolent than was ever 
made for the needy angler under the old system. 

" And what does all this begging for members produce ? 
£Z7 8j. yd. — actually a smaller sum than they took out of 
it. No one could possibly take exception to a single item 
of the expenses, yet they amount to ^^31 Si". 4d., which is 
only ;^ 5 15^-. less than the members' subscriptions." 

The last good working of the London anglers, or at 
any rate its outcome, is the establishment of the " United 
London Fisheries Association," having for its object the 
renting and stocking of various waters for the use and 
pleasurable enjoyment of its members. 

Now the business working of these five associations 
means simply and totally, apart from their admirable 
objects, a sheer waste of both time, labour, and money. 
Mr. Geen's great idea, and in this I fully and entirely join 
issue, is that all might be comprised under one general 
head, and that in lieu of five sets of officers, embracing 
three presidents, two vice-presidents, five chairmen, five 
treasurers, fifteen trustees, five committees of twelve each, 
and five secretaries, all might be well and efficiently done 
by one set of officers alone, and that in opposition to the 
ridiculous issue of three sets of privilege tickets for rail- 
way purposes, all might be easily comprised in one, saving 
trouble, expense, and a lot of entirely unnecessary round- 
about business. 

What would be the result .■' There would be more 
money at command to help the various Preservation 
Societies, at present greatly neglected ; there would be still 



72 THE ANGLING CLUBS AND PRESERVATION 

more to help to stock the waters, at present absolutely in 
the London anglers' hands, and get them more efficiently 
protected and watched, and there would be still more 
left vested, and ready when needful, to help and assist the 
sacred cause of charity. 

I quote Mr. Geen again, because no language of my own 
could make the question of how is this desirable result to 
be obtained more clear than he does. 

He first of all tells us that there are 41 17 enrolled 
members of one or other of these split-up associations. 
Some belonging to one, some to another, but few to all 
three combined. Upon the question of ways and means 
he says : — 

" I have left the important matter of ways and means 
until the last, as I thought it best you should first be 
informed as to the nature and extent of my other sug- 
gestions. 

" At present we pay \s. to the association of whom we 
get a privilege ticket, and is. to the Fisheries Society; so 
that the yearage is now 2s. The^ the Benevolent steps in 
and asks us to voluntarily pay them is. Six hundred and 
ninety-one out of the 41 17 responded to that appeal, and 
paid over £^J 8^-. 7^. How much easier, how much fairer 
and more satisfactory that we should all pay 3^-. ! I hope 
no one will accuse me of being unmindful of my poorer 
brother anglers. I would not be a party to taking a single 
penny unnecessarily from their pockets, and before I could 
bring myself to consent to make this suggestion, I had 
ascertained that it is the poor angler that is paying 
the 3^-. now. I have also asked myself the question, 
'What do I offer in return .'' ' The answer is, your railway 
concessions shall be guarded, and, if possible, extended ; 
your free rivers shall be protected, and private waters shall 



SOCIETIES OF LONDON AND THE PROVINCES. 72> 

be rented for you ; the needy and distressed among you 
shall be relieved. 

" Three shillings per year means a trifle more than one 
halfpenny a week. Many of you must have been struck 
with the wonderful penny's-worth offered. Cheap tra- 
velling, good sport, pleasure and charity for one half-penny 
per week. Small as this sum is, it would produce £61^ lis. 
The donations and annual subscriptions to the Benevolent 
amount to £6^ ijs. 8c/., making our gross income ^^^683 ^s. 8d. 
Out of this sum we must pay our secretary and bailiff, vote 
a sum to the Benevolent committee, and provide for printing, 
stationery, stamps, and general expenses. 

" Much will depend on our getting a good 

practical secretary, whose salary I fix at 

^150 per annum, payable monthly, not 

yearly .. .. .. .. .. ;^I50 O o 

Head bailiff, t,os. per week . . . . 78 o o 

Benevolent vote (the amount expended 

last year) . . . . . . . . 50 o o 

Present amount paid for printing, station- 
ery and stamps, £13^ 15-r. S^- ) proposed 

amount, £t,t, i^s. ^d. (This sum 

would be found ample, if not more than 

sufficient, when augmented by the 

numerous advertisements which a fully 

paid secretary could get) . . . . 33 1 5 5 

Incidental expenses . . . . . . 20 o o 



Total .. £zzi 15 5 
Which leaves us an available balance of i^35i 13 3 

" What are we going to do with this handsome sum of 
money ? Why, give it to the Preservation Committee, 



74 THE ANGLING CLUBS AND PRESERVATION 

who, with the active assistance of our secretary and bailiff, 
and with our support and encouragement, will remove 
those cruel evils in our present system of preservation." 

The following short particulars give some idea of the 
formation and history of such few of the London Angling 
Societies as responded to my application for them. I 
regret personally that they are so few, in opposition to the 
lengthy list of provincial societies. The regret, however 
keenly felt, will not unfortunately supply the deficiency. 

The Piscatorial Society. 

In the year 1836 a few friends, who were in the habit of 
meeting at the " Granby Tavern," South Audley Street, 
Grosvenor Square, who were devoted to angling, and 
frequently made parties for competing in a friendly 
manner, resolved to form an association to take the name 
of " The Piscatorial Society." 

This was done in October of the same year, the object 
of the Society being to meet their friends and associates in 
social conversation and harmony (religion and politics 
being excluded), to encourage fair angling ; while a portion 
of the funds was to be appropriated to prizes, and forming 
a museum and collecting works on angling, &c. Rules 
were formed, and under their Secretary, the late Mr. 
Cotterill, the Society was launched and has sailed on 
progressively to the present time. 

In the course of the past 47 years they have had a great 
many good anglers, who have contributed largely to the 
museum and library. The late Frank Buckland, Esq., an 
old member, was especially devoted to their welfare, and 
frequently gave a lecture on the Natural History of Fishes. 
He presented, in conjunction with the late H. L. Rolfe, Esq., 
a cast of pike, which was painted in his usual excellent 



SOCIETIES OF LONDON AND THE PROVINCES. 75 

manner, forming a noble and valuable angling trophy. 
The late Mr. Chapman, who was Hon. Secretary for several 
years, contributed largely to the museum and library, and 
his celebrated composition of the " Fine Old Jolly Angler " 
was also presented to the Society. A valuable album of 
original sketches was presented by T. H. Parker, Esq., 
and another, containing comic sketches of the members of 
the Piscatorial Society, by B. Perclli Rocco, Esq. The 
library now consists of over 150 volumes, with many 
valuable paintings and portraits. 

In 1838 the Society exerted themselves in giving 
assistance to the formation of the Thames Angling 
Preservation Society, and one of the members, the late 
H. Dean, was for several years secretary. The Piscatorial 
Society have subscribed three guineas annually to that 
association, independently of the subscriptions of the 
individual members. 

The museum consists of a large number of cases, and 
have been exhibited at the Westminster Aquarium, for 
which a silver medal was awarded ; also at the Fisheries 
Exhibition, Norwich (silver medal and £\^ ; at the Fisheries 
Exhibition, Edinburgh (a gold medal) ; and now exhibiting 
at the International Fisheries Exhibition, Kensington. 

The Society now holds its meetings at " Ashley's Hotel," 
Henrietta Street, Covent Garden, on Monday evenings at 
8 o'clock. 

The members number 150. 

The True Waltonians 

Was established in 1830, and the number of its members 
is limited to 40. It seeks rather to avoid than to court 
publicity, and the feeling of the society is strongly opposed 
to prize fishing. 



76 THE ANGLING CLUBS AND PRESERVATION 

Quoting from its memoirs, I find that " This society was 
established in the year 1830 to encourage periodical 
meetings of its members whereat they might reason, 
converse or instruct with sober pleasantry and unlicentious 
hilarity ; to promote the principles of fair angling, to 
vigorously oppose every description of poaching, and to 
cultivate and advance brotherly and true Waltonian feeling 
among the members of the society and anglers generally. 

It also provides for the renting and preserving, for the 
purposes of angling, such water or waters as may be 
decided upon from time to time." 

The Waltonian Angling Society. 

After many removals from place to place in search of 
suitable head-quarters this Society settled down at last 
at the "Jew's Harp," Redhill Street, Regent's Park, where 
the)!- now number 58 members, and under the secretary- 
ship of Mr. J. Packman are in an extremely flourishing 
condition. 

The Sportsmen's Angling Club 

Is one numbering amongst its members many who devote 
themselves to other pursuits than a study of the gentle 
art. One of them is now lion-hunting in Africa, while 
several other members are fishing on far off continental 
waters. Its head-quarters are at the " Lady Owen's Arms," 
Goswell Road, and its Secretary Mr. Benjamin Denny. 

The Ealing Dean Convivial Angling Society 

Was started in October only of last year, yet already 
numbers 54 members. They fish for no prizes and have 
no subscriptions, are very rigorous as to the size of fish 
shown, and support the Thames Angling Preservation 



SOCIETIES OF LONDON AND THE PROVINCES. 77 

Society. I care not to say more, for if their rules are novel 
they are at least good. 

Westbourne Park Piscatorial Society. 

This Society, started in 1876, has gradually increased 
until it stands now with a list of nearly seventy names. 
Although in existence but seven years the walls of the 
club-room boast of twenty-three cases of preserved speci- 
men fish (thirteen of the cases are now being exhibited at 
the Fisheries Exhibition). Amongst this number may be 
mentioned the following : Jack weighing 26^ lbs., a Thames 
Trout 6 lbs., 2 Roach 4 lbs., i Dace 16^ ounces, and also a 
very pretty Jack of 16 lbs. taken from the Regent's Canal 
by the late Mr. Severn (in which water he recently lost his 
life), I Bream weighing 6Mbs., i pair Tench Qlbs., and also 
a pair of Carp weighing i61bs. 

I may mention that "gross weight " competitions have 
been entirely abolished in the Society, and none but speci- 
men fish of the following weights are now recognised : 
Jack 5 lbs., Bream 3 lbs.. Trout 2 lbs., Barbel 2 lbs.. Chub 
2 lbs.. Carp 2 lbs.. Tench i^ lbs., Roach i lb., Rudd i lb. 
Perch I lb., and Dace \ lb. 

West London Angling Club. 
This Society was formed March 31, 1880, at a meeting 
held at the " White Bear," King Street, Hammersmith. 
It holds its meetings now at the " Windsor Castle," and 
under the secretaryship of Mr. G. S. Benham the Society 
is in a thoroughly sound condition. 

The Hammersmith United Angling Society 
Is another excellent association of anglers possessing a 
splendid museum, upwards of sixty members, and under 



78 THE ANGLING CLUBS AND PRESERVATION 

the presidency of Mr. P. Geen and the secretaryship of 
Mr. J. Hook is as flourishing as need be. 

The Woolwich Brothers Angling Society, and 
Woolwich Piscatorials. 

These are two capital clubs, numbering a fair average 
number of members, established in the town of Woolwich. 

The Acton Piscatorial Society. 

This excellent Society, small in number yet high of 
purpose, at its start in 1881 had very few members, yet it 
now musters forty to fifty. Gross weight is barred, and 
specimen fish are entirely sought after. Its secretary is 
Mr. C. Simpson, and its head-quarters the " George and 
Dragon," High Street, Acton. 

Golden Barbel Angling Society. 

The above Society was established in the year 1872 at 
the " Bear and Runner," Wells Street, Mortimer Street, by 
Mr. FuUerton, then a fishing-tackle maker of Wells Street, 
W. Dixe, the late secretary, and six or seven other gentle- 
men. 

After some two years or so the Society was removed to 
the "York Minster," Foley Street, Portland Street, W., 
where it still remains. The Society is enrolled on the 
"West Central Association of London and Provincial 
Ano-ling Societies," at whose meetings the Society send 
two delegates to represent it. 

The objects of the Society are to promote the interests of 
its members, so far as regards angling, to assist its members 
to preserve specimen fish. The Society gives prizes for 
every species of fresh-water fish, and prizes for the three 
first gross weights, and one for the gross weight of pike. 



SOCIETIES OF LONDON AND THE PROVINCES. 79 

The Buckland Angling Society 

Was formed in September, 1881, and its title taken, as 
may be surmised, from the name of the late Mr. F. 
Buckland. Its head-quarters are at the "Middlesex 
Arms," Clerkenwell Green, and its secretary is Mr. L, V. 
Delean. 

The Alliance Angling Society 

Holds its meeting at the " Clerkenwell Tavern," Farring- 
don Road. It possesses a good museum of preserved 
trophies, and under the secretaryship of Mr. T. J. Cundeli 
flourishes exceedingly. 

Clerkenwell Piscatorial Society. 

The above Society was founded in August 1879 by the 
united efforts of Messrs. Stebbings, Trott and Cooper. Its 
head-quarters were fixed at the " White Hart," Aylesbury 
Street in Clerkenwell, and at the present time it has about 
forty members. The contribution is \2s. per annum, which 
sum clears all expenses. The members fish free waters 
only. 

The Grange Angling Society. 

This Society was formed in 1882, and although only In 
existence for little more than twelve months, is in a highly 
efficient state, being both well officered and well supported. 
Their head-quarters are at the " Earl of Derby," Grange 
Road, the Society having for president W. Hosken, Esq., 
while its hon. secretary is Mr. William Kayes. 

This ends the list of the "Angling Clubs of London." 
If it is " cribbed, cabined, and confined," it is not the 
fault of J. R W. 



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PRESERVATION OF FISH LIFE IN RIVERS, by 

THE EXCLUSION OF TOWN SEWAGE. By the Hon. W. F. B. Massey AIAI^•wARI^G. 
6d. Post-free jd. 

MOLLUSCS, MUSSELS, WHELKS, &c., used for Food or 

Bait. By Chas. Harding. 6d. Post-free yd. 

COARSE FISH CULTURE. By R. B. Marston. 6^/. Post- 

fiee yd. 

ON THE FOOD OF FISHES. By Dr. R Day. 6r/. Post-free jt/. 
THE HERRING FISHERIES OF SCOTLAND. By R. \V. 

Duff, M.P. 6d. Post-free yd. 

LINE FISHING. By C. M. Mundahl. 6./. Post-free 7//. . 
FISH TRANSPORT AND FISH MARKETS. By His 

ExtELLEN'CY Shencer Wali'Ole. 6d. Post-free 7//. 

FOREST PROTECTION AND SHELTER. By D. Howitz, 

Esq. 6d. Post-free yd. 

SEAL FISHERIES. By Captain Temple. 6t/. Post-free 7//. 
FISH AS FOOD. By Sir Henry Thompson. 6./. Post-free 7^/. 
STORM WARNINGS. By R. H. Scott. 6J. Po.st-free Ttf. 
ON THE DESTRUCTION OF FISH AND OTHER 

AQUATIC animals BY INTtRXAL PARASITES. Bv Professor Cobeold, F.K.S., 
F.1..S. 6../. Post-free 7^?. 

ARTIFICIAL CULTURE OF LOBSTERS. By W. Saville 

Ki:.\r. ed. Pust-free yd. 

[See next fn^e. 



OFFICIAL PUBLICATIONS 

OF THE 

INTERMTIOML FISHERIES EXHIBITION, 

PUBLISHED BY 

WM. CLOV/ES d SONS, Limited, 13, Charing Cross, S.W. 

{And Sold at their Stalls near each Entrance to the Exhibition.) 



PAPERS OF THE CONFERENCES -C^^^/^^^/^^'. 

I^ THE PKESS. 
Demy 8vo., in Illustrated Wrapper. 

SALMON AND SALMON FISHERIES. By David Milne 

Home, F.R.S.E. bd. Post-free nd. \ 

SCIENTIFIC RESULTS OF THE EXHIBITION. By 

Professor E. Ray Lankester. dd. Post-free yrf. 

THE FISHERIES OF OTHER COUNTRIES. By Com- 

miisioners for Sweden, Norway Spain, &c., who took part in the Conference. i>d. Jr'ost free -jd. 

PILCHARD AND MACKEREL FISHERIES. By T. 

Cornish, dd. Post-free ^d. 

FRESHWATER FISHING (other than Salmon). By J. P. 

WheeldON. (>d. Post-free 7^. 

BASIS FOR LEGISLATION ON FISHERY QUESTIONS. 

By LiEUT.-CoL. F. G. Sola. 6</. Post-free -jd. 

CRUSTACEA. By T. Cornish:, dd. Post-free 7^/. 

TRAWLING, By Alfred Ansell. dd. Post-free 7^/. 

A NATIONAL FISHERY SOCIETY FOR GREAT 

BRITAIN. ByC.E. Fryer, dd. Post-free 7^. 

ON FACILITIES FOR THE IMPROVED CAPTURE AND 

-ECONOMIC TRANSMISSION OF SEA FISHES, AND HOW THESE MATTERS 
AFFECT IRISH FISHERIES. By R. F. Walsh, of Kinsale. 6./. Post-free 7^. 

THE FISHERIES OF IRELAND. By J. C. Bloomfield. 

dd. Post-frci Td. 



London: WILLIAM CLOWES & SONS, Limited, 
INTERNATIONAL FISHERIES EXHIBITION, & 13 CHARING CROSS. 



OFFICIAL PUBLICATIONS 

OF THE 

INTERNATIONAL FISHERIES EXHIBITION, 

PUBLISHED BY 

)NM. CLOWES d SONS, Limited, 13, Charing Cross, S.W, 

(And Sold at their Stalls tiear each Entrance to the Exhibition.) 



OFFICIAL OUIDE BOOKS, &g. 

LARGE PLAN and TOUR of the BUILDINGS, Id. ; 
post-free l^d. 

GUIDE to the EXHIBITION, 3d.; post-free 4d. 

PROGRAMME of MUSIC, &c., 2d. ; post-free 3d. 

OFFICIAL CATALOGUE, Second Edition, Is. ; post- 
free Is. 4d. 

CHEAP RECIPES for FISH COOKERY. Prepared 
by Mrs. CHARLES CLARKE. 3d. ; post-free 4d. 



THE FISHERIES PORTFOLIO 



CONTAINING 



Ten Original Etcliings of Scenes on the British Coast. 

TITLE. ARTIST. 

I.— Bait Gatherers R. W. Macbktu, A.R.A. 

2. — Running Ashore Colin Hunter. 

3.— A Fisher Girl J- D. Watson. 

4. — Fishing Boats off Hastings . . David Law. 

5.— Going for Bait Otto Leyde, R.S.A. 

6. — Boat Building on the Yare . . C. J. Watts. 

7. — Preparing for Sea — Hastings . C. P. Slocombe. 

8. — Ramsgate Harbour J- f- Heseltink. 

9. — Fisherman's Haven . . , . . J. MacWhirter, A.R.A. 

10. — Stranded — Rye Wilfrid W, Ball. 

Price I Si', the complete set. 



London : WILLIAM CLOWES 6- SONS, Limited, 
INTERNATIONAL FISHERIES EXHIBITION, & 13 CHARING CROSS. 



OFFICIAL PUBLICATIONS 

OF THE 

INTERMTMAL FISHERIES EXHIBITION, 

rUBLlSHED UY 

WM. CLOWES & SONS, Limited, 13, Charing Cross, SAY. 

{A/iJ So'J ai their Stalls near each Entrance to the Exhibition.) 

OFFICIAL GUIDE BOOKS, &g. 

LARGE PLAN and TOUH of the BUILDINGS, Id. ; 
post-free lod. 

GUIDE to the EXHIBITION, 3d.; post-free 4d. 

PROGRAMME of MUSIC, &c., 2d. ; post-free 3d. 

OFFICIAL CATALOGUE, Second Edition, Is. ; post- 
free Is. 4d. 

CHEAP RECIPES for FISH COOKERY. Prepared 
by Mrs. CHARLES CLARKE. 3d. ; post-free 4d. 



CONTAINING 

Ten Original EtcWngs of Scenes on tlie British Coast. 

TITl E. ARTIST. 

I.— Bait Gatherers R. W. Macbeth, A.R.A; 

2.— Running Ashore Colin Hunter. 

3.— A Fisher Girl J. D. Watson. 

4. — Fishing Boats off Hastings . . David Law. 

5.— Going for Bait Otto Leyde, R.S..\. 

6.— Boat Building on the Yare . . C. J. Watts. 

7.— Preparing for Sea — Hastings . C. P. Slocombe. 

8. — Ramsgate Harbour J- P. Heseltine. 

9. — Fisherman's Haven J. MacWhirter, A.R .\. 

10.— Stranded— Rye. ...... Wilfrid W. Bail. 

Price i^s. the complete set. 



London ; WILLIAM CLOWES 6- SONS, Limited, 
INTERNATIONAL FISHERIES EXHIBITION, & 13 CHARING C.^OSS. 



PAPERS OF THE III 

HeU in connection with tt 3 9088 60717" 4428 
FISHERIES tAMiDiiiun. 

NOW READY. 

Demy 8vo., in Illustrated Wrapper. Price Sixpence each. 
rWAUaURAIi MEETING: ADDRESS. By Professor Huxley, P.R.S. 

H.R H. the Pkinck ok Walks (P.esident of the Commission) in the Chair. 

NOTES ON THE SEA FISHERIES AND FISHING POPULATION 

OF THK UNITED KINGDOM. By H.R.H the Dlke of Edinburgh, K.G. i^. 

THE FISHERY INDUSTRIES OF THE UNITED STATES. By Pro- 

fessor Bkown Ooode, M.A. 

OYSTER CULTURE AND OYSTER FISHERIES IN THE NETHER- 
LANDS. By tVofessor Hubkecht. 
PRINCIPLES OP FISHERY LEGISLATION. By Right Hon. G. Shaw- 

Lefkvre, M.P. 

ON THE CULTURE OF SALMONIDAE AND THE ACCLIMA- 
TISATION OF FISH. By Sir James Ramsay Gibson Maitland, Bait. 

FISH DISEASES, By Professor Huxley, P.R.S. 

THE ECONOMIC CONDITION OF FISHERMEN. By Professor I.eone 
Levi. 

THE FISHERIES OP CANADA. By L. Z. Juncas. 

PRESERVATION OF FISH LIFE IN RIVERS BY THE EXCLU- 
SION OK TOWN SK.WAGK. By ihe Hon. W. F. B. Massey Maiwiaki-.'.. 

MOLLUSCS, MUSSELS, WHELKS, &c , USED FOB FOOD OR BAIT 

By Charles Haruinc,. 

COARSE FISH CULTURE. By R. B. Marston, 

ON THE POOD OF FISHES. By Dr. F. Day. 

THE HERRING FISHERIES OF SCOTLAND. By R. W. Duff, M.P. 

LINE FISHING. By C. M. Mundahl. 

FISH TRANSPORT AND FISH MARKETS. By His Excellency Siencf.r 

Waliolk. 
FOREST PROTECTION AND TREE CULTURE ON WATER 

FRON PAGES. By D. Howitz, E-q. 

SEAL FISHERIES. By Captain Temple.^ 

FISH AS FOOD. By Sir Henry Thomp3u:». 

STORM WARNINGS. By R. H. Scott. 

ON THE DESTRUCTION OF FISH AND OTHER AQUATIC 

animals by internal parasites. Bv Professor Cobbolti, F.R.S., F.L S. 
SCIENTIFIC RESULTS OF THE EXHIBITION. By Professor K. RaY 
Lank ESTER. 

A NATIONAL FISHERY SOCIETY FOR GREAT BRITAIN. By 

C E. FkYES. 

IN THE PRESS. 
SALMON AND SALMON FISHERIES. By David Milne Home, F.R.S.E. 
PILCHARD AND MACKEREL FISHERIES. By T. Cokxjsh. 
FRESH- WATER FISHING (other than Salmon). By J. P. Whekldo:*. 
ARTIFICTAT. CULTURE OF LOBSTERS. By W. Saville Kent. 
THE BASTS FOR LEGISLATION ON FISHERY QUESTIONS. By 

Lieut.-Col. F. G. SoLi, 

CRUSTACEANS. By T. Cornish, 

TRAWLING. By Alfred Ansell. 

ON FACILITIES FOR THE IMPROVED CAPTURE AND ECO- 
NOMIC TRANSMISSION OF SEA FISHES, AND HOW THESE .MATTERS AFFECT 
IRISH FISHERIES. By R. F. Walsh, of Kinsale. 

THE FISHERIES OP IRELAND. By J. C. Bloomfield. 

THE FISHERIES OF OTHER COUNTRIES. By Commissioners for 
Sweden, Norv»ay, Spain, &c., who took part in the Couference. 



LONDON: WILLIAM CLOWES & SONS, Limited, 
INTERNATIONAL FISHERIES EXHIBITION, & 13, CHARING CROSS. 

fcOKBOK; PR!IITEP BY WILU\M CLOVBS ANP SON?, t'MITKD, 'TAMFORD STREET, .\ND CHARING CROSS.