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Full text of "Animal painters of England from the year 1650 : a brief history of their lives and works: illustrated with--specimens of their paintngs"

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ANIMAL PAINTERS 




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PORTRAIT OF HENRY ALKEN AS "BEN TALLY O' 



ANIMAL PAINTERS 

OF ENGLAND 

From the Year 1650 

A brief history of their lives and works 



Illustrated with tiventy-eight sfecimeiis of their paintings, chiefly from 
wood engro'iiings by F. Babbagc 



COMPILED BY 

SIR WALTER GILBEY, BART. 
Vol. I. 

Xon&on 

VINTON & CO. 
9, NEW BRIDGE STREET, LUDGATE CIRCUS, E.G. 

1900 



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INTRODUCTION. 

Pictorial records possess a value which in some depart- 
ments of history is even greater than that of the written 
word. The most minutely detailed description of the 
writer conveys less to us than the brush of the artist, and 
there are matters which only the painter can save from 
oblivion. Social history would be incomplete without 
its artistic exponents ; and the history of British field- 
sports perhaps owes more than that of other institutions 
to the painter. More especially is this the case in relation 
to the Turf, the Hunting-field and the Road. The details 
which by reason of their absolute familiarity or con- 
temporary insignificance escape the chronicler are per- 
petuated by the artist. 

We learn more concerning the dress and equipment 
of our forefathers on the race-course, in the hunting- 
field, on the coach-box, in covert and by the river-side 
from a glance at an old painting than we can glean 
from perusal of many volumes. More than this, old 
portraits of thoroughbreds, hunters, hacks, coach-horses, 
heavy draught-horses, and domestic cattle, serve a use- 
ful purpose which is apt to be overlooked. These 
pictures viewed in chronological order show us the various 
stages through which the four-footed servants of man 
have passed ere they attained their present states of 
development ; and they may be of service in indicating 
how breeders should proceed in order to eliminate defects 



vi. Introduction 

and secure more perfect adaptability to our present 
requirements. 

The Horse as it was a century or more ago was not as 
it is to-day. If we are not wedded to our own opinions 
concerning equine characteristics of a hundred and fifty 
years back, we can learn much from pictorial records. 
There are some who look upon George Stubbs' portraits 
of race-horses and exclaim "Impossible!" These in- 
credulous ones who disdain what they can know nothing 
of, may be reminded that great changes have been 
brought about in the thoroughbred horse since Stubbs 
lived and painted. Are they aware, for example, that 
the average height of the race-horse in the middle of the 
eighteenth century was one hand and a half less than 
the average height of the race-horse at the end of the 
nineteenth century ? 

Admiral the Hon. Henry John Rous, the greatest 
authority on race-horses and racing, in Baiiys Magazine 
of Sports and Pastimes, i860, writes: "A century ago 
race-horses were about the average of 14 hands 2 inches. 
. . . . I attribute the great growth and size of the 
present thoroughbred horses to the care which is bestowed 
upon them in early life." 

The thoroughbred ever since the middle of the last 
century has been increasing in stature, on an average one 
inch in twenty-five years, till we now seldom proclaim 
him a race-horse of the first class unless he stands 15.3 to 
16 hands. 

A worthy painter therefore deserves that we should 
invest him with something of the character of the 
historian. The statements of tongue or pen, unhappily, 
are often capable of differing interpretations ; but the 
painted record allows of little or no dispute. 

It is somewhat strange that no work has yet appeared 
which chronicles the names and performances of those 



Introduction vii. 

artists who have devoted their talents to the portrayal 
of animal life and scenes of sport ; and it is with the 
view of supplying this blank that the following chapters 
have been compiled. 

The English school of animal painters is one of com- 
paratively recent date ; it is perhaps not generally known 
that prior to the year 1700, there were but two artists 
who made the delineation of animals a speciality ; these 
were Francis Barlow, born in 1640, and Luke Cradock, 
born in 1657. Charles Collins, born in 1680, has left 
proof of remarkable ability in paintings of bird life, but 
by far the better part of his work was done during the 
earlier decades of the eighteenth century. Peter Tilleman, 
a German by birth, but an Englishman by adoption, 
painted many racing pictures ; but inasmuch as he was 
born in 1684, his artistic career began with the opening 
years of the eighteenth century. The same remark applies 
to John Wootton, born 1685, who must be regarded as 
the first great English animal painter. 

Prior to 1700, the only important painters resident in 
this country were natives of Germany, Holland, Spain, 
France and Belgium. We owe much to these artists 
for most of them established art schools and instructed 
our countrymen in art ; the works of our earlier animal 
painters have therefore the additional interest which 
accrues to evidence of this foreign influence. The 
amount of information now obtainable concerning the 
lives of these earlier painters is small and what has been 
procured is the result of some considerable enquiry and 
research. 

Art in seventeenth-century England received little 
encouragement and but meagre support ; the demand 
for artistic productions was limited and such men as 
Cradock, Collins and Casteels found their abilities most 
often in request for decorative work, the adornment of 



viii. Introduction 

ceilings, over-mantels, monumental tablets and the like. 
Under these circumstances it is not wonderful that con- 
temporary records should be silent concerning their lives 
and works, and that we can in many cases only follow 
the career of an old painter by his pictures : more often 
by the engravings therefrom, for original works now 
existing are few and are rarely heard of. 

Many dictionaries of Art have been published since 
the first edition of Mathew Pilkington's Gentleman s and 
Connoisseur's Dictionary of Painters appeared in 1770. 
These are rich in information concerning foreign artists 
whether they passed their lives in their own countries 
or sought a home in England ; but only too often — and 
the fact is eloquent of the little esteem in which English 
Art was held a century and a half ago — they are silent 
concerning even the names of British painters who are 
not less worthy of notice. 

A definite line may be drawn between English Art 
before the year 1750 and English Art subsequent to that 
date. During the former period the arts were at as low 
an ebb as they well could be ; and from about the middle 
of the eighteenth century the progress was sudden and 
remarkable. 

In little more than half a century were born several 
of the greatest painters England has known. We had 
Sir Joshua Reynolds born in 1723, George Stubbs born 
1724, Thomas Gainsborough born 1729, George Barrett 
born 1732, George Romney born 1734, Joseph Wright, 
of Derby, born 1734, Sir Harry Raeburn born 1756, 
George Morland born 1764, John Crome (founder of 
the Norwich school) born 1769, J. M. W. Turner born 
1775, John Constable born 1776, and many others. The 
foundation of the Royal Academy in the year 176S 
marks an era in the history of British Art ; yet Horace 
Walpole writing fourteen years later says, " Painting 



Introduction ix. 

has hitherto made but faint efforts in England. At this 
epoch of common sense one may reasonably expect to 
see Art flourish to as proud a height as it attained in 
Athens, Rome and Florence." Horace Walpole's five 
volumes contain much concerning the early painters 
with an interesting history of painting. In all subse- 
quent Dictionaries of Art the main facts are taken from 
his work. 

Of no department of art is the observation by Walpole 
above quoted more true than of the essentially British 
school which delineates subjects of sport and portrays 
animal life. Among animals the horse stands almost 
alone in point of importance, and pictures of the horse, 
or in which the horse occupies a conspicuous place, 
will necessarily claim much of our attention. Nothing 
in what may be called the pictorial history of the 
horse is more remarkable than the influence wrought 
upon it by the genius and industry of one man — 
George Stubbs, the first of our animal painters to seek 
inspiration direct from Nature. Stubbs was also the 
first to recognise that accuracy could be attained only 
through intimate and exhaustive knowledge ; and years 
of arduous study and labour produced fruits which are 
contained in that monumental work. The Anatomy of 
the Horse ; and from 1766, the date when that book 
was published, we discover the advance of equine 
portraiture. 

Previously to Stubbs few artists had displayed even an 
elementary knowledge of the frame and muscular system 
of the horse : nearly all painted from the eye and from 
the eye only. There were notable exceptions it is true — 
James Seymour, for example (1702 — 1752) shows distinct 
feeling for anatomical correctness ; but he gropes almost 
in the dark, for in his day practically nothing was known 
of the subject to the mastery of which Stubbs devoted 



X. Introdtution 

some eight years of work. The pictures of the large 
majority of painters who enjoyed no small measure of 
success in their day make it clear to us that anatomy 
was a study beyond their pur%"iew. 

If it appear that the praise bestowed on these early 
pictures is higher than they deserve, let it be borne in 
mind that their merits must be considered not by the 
artistic standards of the present day, but in comparison 
with the work of contemporary or previous painters. 
We may justly compare the horses of John Sartorius 
(1710-1780) w-ith those of Thomas Spencer (1700-1763); 
but to institute comparisons between the pictures of 
either of these artists and those of J. F. Herring 
(1795- 1 865), save for the purpose of marking the pro- 
gress made in a centurj', would be absurd. 

Completeness is not claimed for the lists of pictures 
and engravings which are appended to the biographies • 
but it is hoped that these are at least fully representative 
of the artists' work. We owe much to the art of the 
engraver ; and it curiously reflects the comparative merits 
of artist and engraver that impressions from some of 
these old paintings possess a higher market value than 
the originals. Apart from this, engravings and etchings, 
considered as accurate representations of paintings, are 
no less valuable historically. William Roscoe aptly 
says : — 

"As the genuine paintings of ancient masters are becoming extremely 
scarce, we are indebted to prints for the truth of our ideas respecting 
the merits of such masters ; and this is no bad criterion, especially 
when the painter, as is frequently the case, has left engravings or 
etchings of his own. . . The principal excellence of an original 
print is equally estimable with that of a painting. We have every 
condition of design, composition, and drawing ; and the outline of 
an engranng or etching is frequently marked with a precision which 
excels that of the painting." 

The art of engraving, it must be remembered further, 
has not always been the art of copying ; it has been 



Introdtution xi. 

employed as the original medium of expression. Many 
German, Italian, and French masters published prints, 
the subjects of which were never painted, but were, so 
to speak, created on the plate. Among such works are 
some by Albert Diirer (who was born in 1471 and 
founded the German school): "The Great Horse," "A 
Knight on Horseback," and "Death's Horse" were 
original engravings in the full sense of the word. 
Rembrandt, John Fyt, Francis Snyders, and others 
worked out some of their conceptions with the graver's 
tool and not with the brush. 

If this book does anything to show lovers of field 
sports and of animals, the horse in particular, how 
greatly we are indebted to painters of byegone days 
for our knowledge of our ancestors' sports, the object 
with which it has been written is fulfilled. 

The old sporting publications to which such frequent 
reference is made in the following pages are of the greatest 
value and interest to the student of the historj' of sport. 
Some little account of the " Sporting Magazine and its 
Illustrated Contemporaries" will be found on pp. 254-5. 
In all there were about 234 volumes of these, the original 
being the Sporting Magazine, which commenced in 1792 
and ceased in 1S70. The lives of the publications which 
at various times sprang up in what proved a hopeless 
endeavour to rival or eclipse it were comparatively brief. 
The New Sporting Magazine, founded in 1S31, and the 
Sportsiiuzn, founded in 1833, were merged in the Sporting 
Review, founded in 1839, which in its turn was absorbed 
by the Sporting Magazine in 1848. 



ElsenJiam, June, 1900. 




CONTEXTS. 



Introduction- 

ALKEX, HENRY 

ALKEX, HENRY GORDON. 

ALKEN, SAMUEL 

BARENGER, JAMES ... 

BARLOW, FRANCIS ... 

BARRAUD, \VILLL\M 

BARRAUD. HENRY ... 

BEST, J 

BLAKE, BENJAMIN ... 

BOULTBEE, JOHN ... 

BRISTOWE, EDMUND 

CHALON, HENRY BERNARD 

CLENNELL, LUKE ... 

COLLINS, CHARLES... 

COOPER, ABRAHAM, R.A. 

COOPER, A. D 

CRADOCK, LUKE 

DALBY, DAVID 

DAVIS, RICHARD BARRETT 

ELMER. STEPHEN, A.R.A. . 

FERNELEY, JOHN E. 

FERNELEY, JOHN ... 

GARRARD, GEO., A.R.A. . 

GILPIN, SAWREY, R.A. 

GOOCH, THOMAS 

APPENDIX : 

The Foxhound Troj.a^n 
BioGR-A.PHic.4j. Sketch of Colonel 

INDEX TO PAINTINGS, ENGR.WINGS 

-THE SPORTING MAG.AZINE - AND 
ILLUSTRATED CONTEMPORARIES 



Thornton 

1-c. 



ITS 
25+. 



3 
29 

30 

34 
40 
45 

55 

60 

63 

6S 

75 
Si 
92 
102 
104 
127 
129 
131 

137 
152 

159 
174 
176 
100 
204 

210 

211 
215 

^55 



ILLUSTRATIONS. 



ALKEN, HENRY. 

Portrait of the Artist as " Ben Tally O" 

Frontispiece. 
The Leicestershire Steeplechase, No. V. — 

A Rich Scene ..- ... ... ... i 

The Chase and the Road ... ... ... 20 



BARENGER, JAMES. 

Doll, a pointer ... 

BARLOW, FRANCIS. 

Turkeys 

BARRAUD, WILLIAM. 

Portrait of John Warde, Esq., on 
Ruin" 

BARRAUD, HENRY. 

Portrait of the Artist 

BEST, J. 

Gamecocks 

BLAKE, BENJAMIN. 
Dead Game 

BOULTBEE, JOHN. 

The Death 

BRISTOWE, EDMUND. 

The Shoeing Forge 



Blue 



37 
40 

48 
56 
62 

65 
72 

80 



xvi. Illustrations 

PAGK 

CHALON, HENRY BERNARD. 

Pointers and Gamekeeper 87 

CLENNELL, LUKE 

Riding in a Storm 97 

Badger and Dogs ... ... ... ... 100 

COLLINS, CHARLES. 

British Birds ... ... ... ... ... 102 

COOPER, ABRAHAM, R.A. 

The Studio ... ... ... ... ... log 

Portrait OF Thos. Waring, Esq., on "Peter" 112 

Portrait of the Artist ... ... .. 115 

DALBY, DAVID. 

Lord Harewood's Hunt, No. hi — the 

Death 134 

DAVIS, RICHARD BARRETT. 

Portrait of Tom Grant 141 

"Luxury" ... 144 

ELMER, STEPHEN, A. R.A. 

Woodcock... ... ... ... ... ... 153 

Trojan 155 

FERNELEY, JOHN E. 

Captain Ross on "Clinker" 172 

GARRARD, GEORGE, A. R.A. 

The Ninth Duke of Hamilton and Bran- 
don 181 

GILPIN, SAWREY, R.A. 

Portrait of John Parkhurst, Esq ig6 

Portrait of the Artist 202 

GOOCH, THOMAS. 

Goldfinder ... ... ... ... ... 204 



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ANIMAL PAINTERS. 



THE ALKEN FAMILY. 

Henry ALKEN. (Born 1784. Died 1851.) 

HENRY Gordon Alken. (Born 1810. Died 1892.) 

Samuel Alken. (Born circa 1750. Died circa 1825.) 

' I 'HE family to which one of our best known 
-*■ sporting artists belonged was of Danish 
origin. Its living representatives believe that 
their name was formerly Seffrien, and that their 
ancestors were attached in some capacity to the 
Court at Copenhagen ; but that having become 
involved in the political disturbances during 
Christian VI I. 's reign, they were compelled, in or 
about the year 1772, to fly the country, changing 
their name to that of " Alken," which is the name 
uf a little village consisting of a few farmhouses 
about fifteen English miles south-west of Aarhus in 
North Jutland. 

The refugees on their arrival in England settled 
in Suffolk, and at a later date the family moved 



2 ANIMAL PAINTERS 

to London, taking a house in Francis Street, 
Tottenham Court Road. 

The elder Aiken painted in water colours, but 
does not appear to have done anything that brings 
him within our purview ; his artistic gifts were 
inherited by three of his four sons : — (i) George, 
who was an artist of considerable ability, and 
(2) John Seffrien, who possessed moderate talent ; 
these two shared a studio at 15, Southampton 
Row, Holborn, John Seffrien living for many 
years in New Road, Ed^ware Road, and for a 
few years at Great Marlow. Henry (3), upon 
whom our chief interest centres, worked occa- 
sionally at his brothers' studio in Southampton 
Row. The fourth son, Martin, emigrated to 
America and engaged in business, ultimately 
becoming a mill owner in one of the Eastern 
States. The elder Aiken, beside his four sons, 
had one daughter, Lydia, who was blind. She 
lived for many years at Childrey, near Wantage, 
and died in 1880 at the age of eighty-seven. 
Samuel Aiken, who achieved considerable success 
as an animal painter, and whose works will here- 
after receive notice, is stated to have been a 
brother of the immigrant Aiken and to have 
accompanied him to England in 1772. Samuel 
Aiken would then have been about 22 years of 



HENRY ALKEN 3 

For these particulars of the family history of 
the Alkens, and some other personal details g;iven 
in the following pages, the writer is indebted to 
Mr. Charles Aiken, of 13, Hilldrop Road, Camden 
Road, NAV., a grandson, and to Miss Eliza 
Lanham, of i, Flora Villas, Carlton Colville, near 
Lowestoft, a granddaughter of Henry Aiken. 

Some confusion exists concerning the works 
attributable to each member of the family ; 
seldom as between the paintings of Samuel 
Aiken and his nephew Henry, for each usually 
affixed his signature to his work ; in Henry's case, 
for a time, the uom dc pliniic " Ben Tally O " 
was equally distinctive. The confusion arises 
between the original works of Henry and the 
pictures turned out by his son, Henry Gordon 
Aiken. Many errors of long standing are 
accepted as truth owing largely to the imposi- 
tions practised by Henry Gordon Aiken, which 
will be noticed in due course. 



Henry AlKEN was born in 1784 in Suffolk, 
but the better part of his youth was passed in 
London, whither his father, as already stated, 
moved from his east country home. 

The Dictionary of National Biography, Vol. I., 
states that Henry Aiken was originally huntsman. 



T^ 



4 ANIMAL PAINTERS 

Stud groom or trainer to the then Duke of Beaufort. 
This account of his earher career, however, must not 
be accepted, as the present Duke has taken consider- 
able trouble in searchinor the Badminton records 
for mention of the name, and failing to find any 
reference to it, doubts the authenticity of the state- 
ment quoted. The artist's mastery of hunting tech- 
nique in every minutest detail possibly gave rise to 
the conjecture that he owed his knowledge to 
stable work. The only discoverable reference to 
the pursuits of his early manhood is contained in 
the Introduction to the Beauties and Defects in 
the Figure of the Horse Comparatively Delineated, 
which was published when the artist was thirty-twu 
years of age. Here we read 

" The author flatters himself that his work will be found 
useful ; and as his remarks are the result of the most atten- 
tive observation during the many years entirely devoted to 
the pleasures of the field, he trusts that the general principles 
which he has laid down, as well with respect to power, 
strength, and the various points of action, as to the physiog- 
nomical character and figure of the horse will be found clearly 
elucidated in the following series." 

This seems to controvert pointedly the assertion 
that the artist had ever been employed as stud 
groom or trainer. It is at least improbable that 
a man whose knowledge of horseflesh had been 
acquired in a menial capacity would thus refer to 
years devoted to " the pleasures of the field." 



HENRY ALKEN 5 

Henry Aiken's name first occurs in the catalogue 
of the Royal Academy exhibition for 1801, when 
he was only sev^enteen years of age ; the work sent 
was a miniature " Portrait of Miss Gubbins," and it 
may be added that his first Royal Academy picture 
was also his last, for in no subsequent catalogue 
does his name appear. Miss Lanham states that 
he had the strongest objection to criticism of his 
works, and for this reason refused to exhibit his 
pictures, much to the sorrow of his relatives. He 
owed his early education in art to his father, 
and, it is thought probable, to his uncle Samuel. 
Although it is not definitely known that Henry 
received instruction from Samuel Aiken, careful 
comparison between the works of the two, more 
especially of the younger man's earlier pictures 
with contemporary pictures by his uncle, leaves 
practically no doubt on the point. The influence 
of the senior is apparent nowhere more plainly 
than in the pencil drawings ; delicacy of touch 
is apparent in Samuel Aiken's pencil work, and 
the extreme delicacy of Henry's pencil drawings 
indicates that he profited by his uncle's example, 
and in time surpassed him in execution. 

It must be added, however, that at the time 
of his first and only appearance on the walls of 
the Academy his address is given as at " J. T. 
Barber's, miniature painter to the Duke of Kent, 



6 ANIMAL PAINTERS 

26, Southampton Street, Strand." In view of his 
age, this may indicate that he was with the said 
J. T. Barber in the capacity of a pupil. 

He seems to have made a false start as a 
portrait painter. We next find him painting, not 
miniatures, but sporting subjects ; his productions 
in this direction were for many years published 
under the assumed name, " Ben Tally O." One 
picture thus signed represented " Easter Monday. 
A view near Windsor. Gentlemen sportsmen en- 
deavouring to lead the field," a title which suf- 
ficiently suggests the spirit in which the artist dealt 
with his subject. The deer-cart stands in the back- 
ground in a dip of the hill, and the deer at full 
speed is leading hounds down the slope in the 
middle distance ; down the highroad which winds 
across the foreground gallops a crowd of riders dis- 
playing every eccentricity of incompetent horseman- 
ship. This picture was engraved, and printed in 
colours by S. & J. Fuller, who published it on ist 
April, 1817 ; the plate, which measures 18 inches 
by 1 2 inches, also bears the following lines. 

" Away the London sportsmen ride 
And risk their necks at every stride ; 
In torrents rush so swift and strong. 
The yeomen prickers are borne along 
Against their right good will." 

A portrait of the artist as " Ben Tally O," 
engraved by M. Gauci, a well-known lithographic 



HENRY ALKEN 7 

artist of the time, and published by G. S. Tregear, 
is here reproduced ; the print bears no date. Not 
until 1816, when he was thirty-two years old, do we 
discover works signed with his own name ; in that 
year he executed and signed the series of eighteen 
plates entitled The Beauties and Defects of the 
Figure of the Horse Comparatively Delineated, to 
which passing reference has been made. These 
were engraved and printed in colours, a detailed 
explanatory description accompanying each plate. 
This work, with an illustrated title page, was 
published in quarto by S. & J. Fuller, 34, Rath- 
bone Place, London. 

He did not, however, cease signing himself 
" Ben Tally O." Hoio to Qualify for a Mcltonian, 
published in 1819, was issued under the name 
which was by that time closely identified with 
clever hunting pictures. There is a good deal of 
slightly cynical humour in the letterpress which 
accompanies the six plates of the series. Thus 
the artist words his " Address to Would-be 
Meltonians. " : — 

" The next best thing to being a man of high consideration is 
to be takm for one ; to be thought in any way like a Meltonian 
is honour quant, suff. for ninety-nine in a hundred. You have 
here six conspicuous points of Meltonianship, accompanied 
with some sHght remarks ; and should anyone have the good 
fortune to accomplish but thvee out of the six he will stand a 
fair chance of being taken for another — at any rate that he is 
not himself." 



8 ANIMAL PAINTERS 

The six plates are entitled (i) How to Go to 
Cover; (2) How to Appear at Cover; (3) How 
to Ride down Hill ; (4) How to take a Leap ; 
(5) How to go through an Overflow ; and (6) How 
to take the Lead. 

The would-be Meltonian in the letterpress to 
Plate I is gravely enjoined to " never ride at a 
less rate than sixteen miles an hour " ; in respect 
of Plate 3, "Be sure to ride down hill at top 
speed." The instructions about jumping are rather 
more elaborate, and recall the amusing " Hints to 
Young Shooters," offered a few years ago by Mr. 
Punch : — 

" Let your attitude be extremely careless, but at the same 
lime determinedly singular. Pick your leaps high and strong. 
However extraordinary the leap may be never appear to 
think it of consequence. If you should fail in the attempt, 
carelessly curse your horse and compare the fence, however 
large, to anything extravagant that may suit your fancy, 
such as a row of peas or cabbages. Endeavour to do all 
this and perhaps you may be taken for a real Meltonian." 

From the time the art dealers of London 
recognised his genius his progress was rajiid, and 
his works were in great demand by the leading 
firms, among them Thomas Maclean, S. & J. 
Fuller and Rudolph Ackermann. 

He had few private patrons : perhaps the most 
important among those who gave him commissions 
was the late Mr. Charles Hollingworth Magniac, 



& 



HENRY ALKEN 9 

M.P., whose unique collection of pictures and 
articles of virtu at Colworth included many 
fine examples of Henry Aiken's works. The 
series of eight pictures in oils, entitled " The 
Leicestershire Steeplechase," was painted to Mr. 
Magniac's order. The scenes represented are : — 
(No. i) The Start ; (2) Going the Pace ; (3) Symp- 
toms of Distress with the Cocktail floored ; (4) The 
Field becomes select ; (5) A Rich Scene, and such 
as no other country can exhibit ; (6) Dick Chris- 
tian's last fall, commonly called a Header ; (7) The 
Climax of Disaster ; and (8) The Winning Post 
at Billesdon Coplow. This race was run on [2th 
March, 1829, and the pictures possess all the 
interest of sporting history, containing as they do 
portraits of men and horses famous in Leicestershire 
in those davs. Among the likenesses are Dick 
Christian on Mr. Maxse's grey. King of the 
Valley, Captain Ross on his own mare. Polecat, 
Mr. Beecher on Bantam, Mr. Haycock on Clinker, 
Bill Wright on Mr. Patrick's bay mare Lazy 
Bet, Mr. Field Nicholson on Sir Harry Good- 
ricke's bay gelding, Magic, Mr. Guilford on Sir 
Francis Mackenzie's bay gelding, Spartacus, and 
" Nimrod " (Mr. C. J. Apperley) reading the 
articles of the race. 

Nimrod's graphic account of this steeplechase 
may be found in the Spor/ing- Alagazine for April, 



lO ANIMAL PAINTERS 

i<S29, vol. l.xxiii. It was won by Mr. Field Nichol- 
son on Magic : King of the Valley second, Lazy 
Bet third, and Clinker fourth. 

Henry Aiken paid several visits to Colworth, and 
in the latter years of his life, when consumptive and 
very weak, was asked by Mr. Magniac to come 
and remain as long as he liked. The artist accepted 
the invitation in the spirit in which it had been 
given, and spent two years with his hospitable 
patron. During his stay he painted numerous 
pictures, among them the largest canvas that ever 
left his easel; this was "The Oakley Hunt," of 
which Mr. Magniac was master from 1841 to 1847. 

In 1833 Henry Aiken painted "The Ouorn 
Hunt," a series of eight pictures which were en- 
graved by Lewis and printed in colour. They were 
used to illustrate Fox-hunting, published by Rudolph 
Ackermann. The incidents portrayed were taken 
from an article describing a day's sport over the 
cream of Leicestershire with Mr. Osbaldestone's 
hounds, which appeared in the Qtiarter/y Reviezv in 
1832, over the familiar signature of Nimrod. A 
writer in the New Sporting Magazine for 1833, 
thus describes the incidents illustrated : — 



Plate i. — The Meet at Ashby Pasture, where tandems, car- 
riages and four, barouches and horsemen without end are 
seen drawing to the rendezvous, where Mr. Osbaldeston and 
Jack Stevens are waiting with the hounds. 



HENRY ALKEN 11 

Plate 2. — The Find, where Snob appears on the good bay 
horse, and Mr. Coke on Advance comes up at the rate of 
thirty miles an hour, with the label on his back, " he kicks." 

Plate 3. — Tally-ho and Aivay ! There is a desperate rush; 
the Squire is flourishing his whip and " blowing up " like a 
good one, while Lord Alvanley, jack-boots and all, is pounding 
away in the front. 

Plate 4. — A Fall over a Flight of Rails, with Lord 
Brudenell and Jack Stevens looking back. 

Jack's answer to Lord Brudenell's inquiry who the fallen 
gentleman is, is capital, and very characteristic of the man : 
" Can't tell, my Lord ; but I thought it was a queerish place 
when I came o'er it before him." We heard him give just 
such an answer last season. We found a fo.x at some cover 
of Lord Spencer's, not far from Althorp, which, after thread- 
ing the woods on the line of hills in Northamptonshire, took 
into the vale below, pointing for Floor or Flower at a merry 
pace, but after running two or three miles, the hounds came 
to check all on a sudden, when, close by where they threw 
up, a gentleman in scarlet (Mr. Poyntz, M.P. for Ashburton, 
on a visit at Althorp) was seen lying on his back in the 
middle of a small field of hard corn, his horse having put his 
foot into a drain, and rolled over him. Some of the party of 
course went to his assistance immediately, and Jack, in reply 
to the question as to who he was, said, " Can't tell, I'm sure; 
I fear the gentleman's badly hurt ; here again ! — hounds ! — 
here again ! — " and, with a blast of his horn, trotted forward 
to make his cast ; " the pace was too good " to afford help, in 
fact. 

Plate 5. — Snob's Figure, with His " Strait-cut Coat," and the 
good bay horse " done up " at the gate, is capital. He is just 
putting his whip under the latch to open it instead of riding 
over. The horse is regularly gruelled. 

Plate 6. — The Elite of the Field on Their Second Horses, going 
at a devil of a pace. The Squire close to the tail hounds, 
followed by Mr. Holyoake, Mr. Maher, Captain Berkeley, 
Dick Christian, Sir F. Burdett, Sir H. Goodricke, Lord 
Alvanley and Lord Gardiner. 



12 ANIMAL PAINTERS 

Plate 7. — The Whissendine Scene, some in and some over. 

Plate 8. — The Death. The Squire flourishing the brush 
and Jack Stevens vnXh the scratched face, and the fox equally 
well drawn. 

" Sporting Anecdotes " was the title of a series 
of fourteen or more pictures. No. 12 of the series 
was " The Sporting Bishop. The Clerical View- 
halloo, or the Hounds at Fault," illustrating the well 
known anecdote which occurs in one of Nimrod's 
Htmting Tours. It will be remembered that a 
certain high dignitary of the Church had kept a 
pack of foxhounds, which, on his elevation to the 
Bench he made over to his brother. The hounds 
were out one day, and the Bishop who had taken 
a route which he thought the hounds might cross, 
viewed a fox and the hounds at fault. " Putting 
his finger under his wig his lordship gave one of 
his beautiful view-halloos. ' Hark halloo ! ' cried 
the field. The huntsman listened and the halloo 
was repeated. ' That will do,' exclaimed he, 
knowing his old master's voice. 'That's Gospel, 
by G— ! ' " 

" The Hunting Sweep," perhaps one of Aiken's 
best known drawings, forms the subject of the 
fourteenth picture of this series. This man was a 
well known character and a great favourite with the 
Duke of Beaufort's Hunt. He is shown on horse- 
back on the lawn at Badminton. This picture was 



HENRV ALKEX I 3 

engraved by the artist himself and published by 

Ackermann in 1837. 

"Fox Hunting" was a series of four pictures 

painted in 1844, engraved by Harris and published 

by Rudolph Ackermann in the same year. The 

scenes illustrate well-known verses from Somer- 

ville's poem, and the artist has added a description 

of the incident represented in each picture. 

(i) The Meet. 

Delightful scene 
WTien ail around is gay — men, horses, hounds, 
And in each smiling countenance appears 
Fresh blooming health, and universal joy. 

The meet is at the Cross Roads, where the finger-post, 
pointing to " Mehon Mowbray," teUs the whereabouts. 
There, surrounded by the hounds, stand the huntsman and 
his two whips. The rough rider of the county lays down the 
law for the benefit of the rural Boniface. The country squire — 
my lord in chariot and four — and the sporting parson are 
coming down the hill, the chawbacons are tucking up their 
skirts for a run, and all is expectation and exciting hope. 

(2) A Change, and We're A way ! 

Hark I what loud shouts 
Re-echo through the groves 1 — he breaks away : 
Shrill horns proclaim his flight. — Each straggling houod 
Strains o"er the lawn to reach the distant pack ; 
'Tis triumph all — and joy. 

The hounds have gone away, somewhat stragghng perhaps, 
but the huntsman on his grey is well up with them. The 
parson has got a capital lead, and is taking the rails in style. 
The thistle-whipper in green too, is well handicapped — the 
squire is going at the rails in a quiet and workmanlike 
manner, and the crowd are emerging from the cover here, 
there, and everywhere. The game's alive. 



14 ANIMAL PAINTERS 

(3) A Shift of the Scene. 

The brook stares us in the face. The huntsman's grey is 
landed — not very well— but on the right side. The squire is 
pulling himself out as he best may, having been left, like 
Moses, in the bulrushes. The parson goes like a man, clear 
over his head, the thistle-whipper has lost start, and the rest 
of the field, in various positions, but only thirteen in sight, 
look very determined to make the best of a bad thing. 

(4) Whohoop! 

In bolder notes 
Each sounUing horn proclaims the felon dead. 

The hounds are clamouring for their due, the parson is 
evidently entitled to the brush, and we may add, that the 
thistle-whipper is nowhere to be seen. 

The following works were published by R. Acker- 
man n : — Foxhunters, four plates, i2| inches by 8| 
inches ; Hunting Qualifications, six plates printed in 
colours, I of inches by 85 inches ; Thoughts ivhile 
Fox Hunting, six plates, ii\ inches by 83 inches, 
printed in colours. 

In an advertisement of " Standard Sporting 
Prints," published by Ackermann, occurs a series 
of eight coloured plates, 20^ inches by 12^ inches, 
drawn by W. L. Hodges, and engraved by H. 
Aiken. The artist sometimes engraved his own 
pictures, but with the exception of two etchings 
made from sketches by " Wildrake " ("Catching a 
Tartar," or "The Death of the Stag" and "The 
Meet of the Owl Hounds," reproduced in the 
New Sporting Magazine of 1842) these appear 



HENRY ALKEN I 5 

to have been the only works not his own that 
Aiken engraved, and therefore claim special 
notice. 

A set of four shooting pictures by H. Aiken was 
engraved by T. Sutherland, and printed in colours 
each plate i6|- inches by 13 inches. These are 
(i) Pheasant Shooting; (2) Cock Shooting; (3) 
Refreshing ; and (4) Going Home. 

" Epsom Races : the Derby Stakes," May 28, 
1 8 18, consists of two plates, 26 inches by 16 inches. 
The first depicting Mr. Thornhill's chestnut colt, 
Sam, beating Lord Darlington's Grey, Sir John 
Shelley's Prince Paul, and other horses, was en- 
graved by T. Sutherland. The second plate shows 
the Two Mile Course with horses preparing to start. 
These were published in February, 18 19, by S. and 
J. Fuller. 

The National Spojis of Great Britain, a magni- 
ficent royal folio published by McLean in 182 1, 
contains some of the artist's finest work, and also 
shows the breadth of his acquaintance with sport. 
This work contains fifty large plates engraved by I. 
Clarke, and printed in colours ; the pictures cover 
the whole range of field-sports and are described 
in English and French. 

" Real Life in London, or the Further Rambles 
and Adventures of Bob Tally-ho, Esq., and the 
Hon. Tom Dashall, through the Metropolis, by 



l6 ANIMAL PAINTERS 

an Amateur," published in two vols, royal 8vo, in 
182 1-2, contains numerous coloured plates from his 
pictures. 

TJie Analysis of the Hunting Field, published 
1846, contains seven coloured plates and forty-three 
woodcuts. Aiken's British Proverbs published by 
INIcLean in 1824, contains six plates engraved by 
the artist himself The Melange of Himiour, pub- 
lished by McLean in 1824, was the joint work of 
Aiken and Mr. Egerton, who are responsible for 
the thirty coloured plates it contains. 

Though many of Henrj^ Aiken's hunting scenes 
derive enhanced interest and value from the fact 
that they contain portraits of well-known sportsmen 
and horses, he did not often make portraiture of an 
individual the sole aim of a picture ; and therefore 
mention must be made of his equestrian likeness of 
the Marquis of Anglesea, which was engraved by 
H. Meyer, the size of the plate being 22 inches by 
26 inches. 

A series of fourteen pictures illustrative of post- 
chaise travelling and fox hunting, several of them 
reflecting the artist's lively sense of humour, were 
printed in colours and published by S. & J. Fuller 
in 1822. 

These are entitled : — 

(i) It thaws— we must be off to Melton. (2) Go! I fancy 
he can ! " Upon my soul a lie ! " (Shakespeare.) (3) Doing 



HENRY ALKEN I 7 

a bit of City. (4) "All the world's a Stage" (BuU and 
Mouth Inn). (5) " At his head a grass turf and at his heels 
a stone." (6) These came hopping. (7) Non-effectives. 

(8) Frogs and Cranes. Showing a friend the way to covert. 

(9) "My soul's on fire and eager for the field." (:o) A 
Struggle for a Start. (11) Candidates for Brooks. (12) A 
check. (13) Death and the Doctors. (14) Home ! 

Much of Henry Aiken's best and cleverest work 
was done to illustrate books by the leading sporting 
writers of his day. The Life of John Myiioti, 
Esq., by Nimrod, which was published by Rudolph 
Ackermann in 1835, contains numerous plates from 
Henry Aiken's pictures. The Life and Death of 
John Mytt07i, published in 1837, is illustrated with 
nineteen plates, and Jorrock's Jaunts and Jollities, 
published in the same year, contains sixteen engrav- 
ings from his pictures. The Life of a Sportsman, by 
Nimrod, contains thirty-six coloured plates from his 
drawings ; these plates were published in collected 
form by Rudolph Ackermann in 1842. The N'ew 
Sporting Magazine (vol. xxiii.) in reviewing the book, 
says, "The description of sporting and domestic 
scenes are in Nimrod's usual style of excellence. 
Aiken's illustrations, however, form, to us, the 
principal attraction of this very elegant volume." 
Aiken, it must be added, etched several of these 
plates himself. 

The mag-azines contain numerous engravings 



& 



from his pictures. His name occurs in vol. Ixx. of 

2 



1 8 ANIMAL PAINTERS 

the Sporting Magazine for 1827 under the " Portrait 
of a Fox Hunter and his Hounds," engraved by 
J. R. Scott ; but from that date onward to the year 
1847, this publication does not contain a single plate 
from his works. It is possible that the artist had 
some misunderstanding with the editor or publisher, 
for during the intervening one and twenty years he 
was frequently represented in the Sporting Review, 
Sportsman, and New Sporting Magazine, which 
last was started to rival the Sporting Magazine. 

The eleven volumes of the Sporting Review 
published between 1839 and 1844 contain many 
pictures of fox hunting, stag hunting, coursing, 
deer stalking and road subjects, engraved by E. 
Hacker, John Scott, and J. H. Engleheart, from 
Henry Aiken's paintings. In the Nciv Sporting 
Magazine, vols. ix. to xxix., between the years 1835 
and 1845, we find fifteen plates from his works; 
one of these is an engraving by E. Radclyffe in 
vol. xxii. from a very clever picture of " Horse 
Racing in Florence," executed to illustrate an 
article. The Sportsman, volumes xvii. to xix., for 
the years 1842 and 1843, contained nine engrav- 
ings from his pictures ; six of these from a series 
whose titles suggest their character. 

Plate i.— Going to covert to meet the Difficulty. (2) Get- 
ting into a Difficulty. (3) Got into a Difficulty. (4) Getting 
out of a Difficulty. (5) Got out of a Difficulty ; and (6) Get- 
ting home ; doing their best with Difficulty. 



HENRY ALKEN IQ 

These plates were engraved by J. H. Engle- 
heart. The remaining three pictures : — The Fox 
He breaks away : Greyhounds, The Last Act : 
Foxhounds in Full Cry ; were engraved by 
W. T. Davey. 

In 1847 Henry Aiken began to contribute again 
to the Sporting Magazine. Volumes ex. and cxi. 
for that year contain two plates engraved by John 
Scott from his pictures, and " A Sure Find " (uncart- 
ing a stag), engraved by E. Hacker. Volumes cxix. 
and cxx. for the year 1852, contain plates en- 
graved by J. H. Engleheart from his paintings 
" The Start for the St. Leger in 185 1," and " The 
Race for the St. Leger in 1851 " — Newminster's 
year. 

The style of this artist was at once elegant and 
refined ; the delicacy of his work is displayed in 
his small pencil drawings, which are done with a 
minuteness and lightness of touch which has rarely 
been equalled, and certainly never excelled by any 
animal painter. The anatomical studies, whose 
direct fruit was The Beauties and Defects of the 
Figure of the Horse, stood him in excellent stead 
in painting the hunting and coaching scenes by 
which he is so widely known. Proof of his genius 
is found in the lasting popularity of engravings from 
his works, which are probably more generally 
distributed than those of any other sporting artist 



20 ANIMAL PAINTERS 

before or since. Aiken's original pictures or prints 
therefrom are to be seen on the walls of dwellings 
of every class throughout England, from the ducal 
castle to the humblest country inn ; sure testimony, 
not only to the skill, but to the close technical 
accuracy of his drawings. He was essentially 
an artist of the country, for there are few of his 
creations that do not deal with those field sports 
or phases of rural life which appeal to all classes of 
Englishmen. 

Lord Middleton has in his collection of pictures 
at Birdsall, four tinted drawings by Henry Aiken. 

A contemporary publication gives "A brief sketch 
of our worthy friend, old Aiken, with his broad- 
brimmed low-crowned hat, his frock of Kendal 
green spotted with broad gold buttons, his rustic 
waistcoat with its low cut and old fashioned pockets, 
his brown cloth kickseys and his ditto gaiters, his 
thick-soled shoes and sturdy walking-staff ; in gait 
and altogether in appearance, the perfect inhabitant 
of those country scenes which he so skilfully 
depicts." 

Henry Aiken married in 1809, Maria Gordon, 
the ceremony taking place at St. Clement's Church, 
Ipswich. He left three sons : Henry Gordon 
Aiken, who requires passing notice ; George, who 
was born in 181 2 and was found drowned in the 
Thames at Woolwich in 1862 ; and Seffrien, who 




^Jc '• f 'V. 



HENRV ALKEN 21 

died in 1873, a.ged fifty- four : and three daughters, 
namely, Alice, Ellen, and Lydia Ann. The last- 
named married John Christian Zeitter, an animal 
painter of considerable merit. George Aiken is said 
to have painted pictures similar to those by which 
his father made his reputation. The writer 
po.ssesses a hunting picture in water colours which 
is believed to be the work of George Aiken. It 
is unsigned and is quite in the style of Henry 
Aiken. 

Henry Aiken died on 8th April, 1851, in the 
sixty-eighth year of his age, and was buried in 
Highgate Cemetery. For many years he had been 
resident at Kentish Town ; at a later period he 
occupied a small house near St. Anne's Church, 
Highgate, and here he passed his last days. 

Miss Lanham, the artist's a-randdaughter, states 
that Henry Aiken was an extremely eccentric man, 
and led a very secluded life. He is said to have 
been very stern in the family circle, and his bearing 
towards strangers who might call upon him on 
business connected with his pictures was somewhat 
abrupt. He would present himself before them 
with the curt self-introduction, " I am Henry 
Aiken." He was very neglectful of his appear- 
ance, and his attire — indoors, at all events — was 
usually shabby and disorderly. The sturdy inde- 



2 2 ANIMAL PAINTERS 

pendence of character which underlay his brusque 
manner is shown in the following verbatim copy of 
a letter to his aunt, Mrs. Woodley. The original 
is in Miss Lanham's possession : — 

April 2nd, 1839. 

Dear and Respected Aunt, 

As I find there is to be a general letter writing to you, 
I present what cannot well be called a letter but a bit of 
mark'd paper, for I have nothing to write about. I go on the 
principle of Sir Abel Handy. (If you have anything pleasant 
to say I will thank you for it. If not hold your tongue and 
make yourself pleasant that way.) 

In the first place I must thank you for your kindness to 
Ellen when at Childr'y. She was quite delighted with her 
visit : it has been food for conversation ever since, and I have 
no doubt but that it will last much longer. 

All I can say about myself is that I keep grinding on in 
this world with but little change except that I grow older 
every day (work) and none the forwarder— but I thank God 
and my own exertions I go on without having to ask favour 
of any person or accepting it when offered, for I do not choose 
to be a slave to any one however high in rank. 

I often propose to myself to spend a few days in Childr'y, 
but I am always disappointed not being able to spare either 
the time or money ; it has been put off from year to year ; 
perhaps if I lived at Kensington instead of Kentish Town I 
might have made a start. 

I must not trouble you with more nonsense. Maria has 
been very poorly for some time, but as I never have a doctor 
in the house she is now much better and joins with me in love 
to dear Lyd and duty to yourself. 

I remain, my dear Aunt, 
To Mrs Woodley, with all duty and respect, 

Childr'y, Your neppew, 

Berks. H. Alken. 



WORKS OF HENRY ALKEN 23 

The sale of his pictures and copyrights brought 
him considerable sums of money, and during the 
greater part of his career he enjoyed a certain 
affluence ; but in later years his circumstances 
became greatly reduced, and he received much 
assistance from his daughter, Lydia Ann Zeitter, 
at whose expense he was buried. 

In 1889 an excellent and representative loan 
collection of Henry Aiken's pictures and engrav- 
ings therefrom was exhibited in Messrs. Dickinson 
and Foster's Galleries, 114, New Bond Street. 
Over 160 examples of his works were catalogued, 
including many designs and sketches which have 
never been published. Among these will be re- 
marked several pictures and sketches of oriental 
cavalry, for drawing which the artist seems to have 
had a predilection. 

WORKS OF HENRY ALKEN. 

IN THE BRITISH MUSEUM. 

(2) Two on one mount, viz., (<i) A GROOM AND HORSES. A pair of harnessed 
horses, very lightly sketched, with a groom standing before them. Pencil, on 
greyish paper, heightened with body colour; size, 7} X q\ inches. — (/■) A POST 
BOV. A post b^y riding a lean nag. Pencil, on greyish paper, heightened with 
body colour ; size, 7J X g\ inches. 

(j) A WOMEN'S RACE AT A VILLAGE FAIR. Four women running a race at 
full speed. Two more have fallen, one of whom is being helped up by two men. 
Behind, a cheering crowd of on-Iookers, a marionette show (left), and the village inn 
(right). Three men on horseback in the foreground. Water. colour over pencil ; 
size, gi X 13J inches. 

IN THE SOUTH KENSINGTON MUSEUM. 

FOX-HUNTING (walercolour) William Smith Bequest. 
SPORTSMEN IN A WOOD (water-colour). 



24 AXIVAL PATS^TEilS 

PLATZ5 IX THE SPCRTIX^ MAZ-AZISE [ir is =sber). 









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LOAN COLLECT! DK 0? PICTURES EXHIBITED 
MESSRS. DICKINSON AND FOSTER'S GAEIZ? 
IN iSSo. 



T.=iS cs^ix-prcy cf ±:yoi-<xi'\sff:!^ zSyJ; ,4 cz^^ss f'sts-— 

— li.T.'TE TO CCrSJl. 



26 ANIMAL PAINTERS 

Lent by Leicester Hibbert, Esq. 

a burning scf.nl — the first ivhip—gone away— tally ho. 

Lent by Sir Walter Gilbey, Bart. 

a roadster— pheasant shooting— the real thing— on the 
moors— arab cavalry— " laugh at him if you will"— a 
mameluke— clever at hounds— a preliminary canter 

— Three Studies of Persian Soldiers — Three studies in frame :— (a) MAN IN 
ARMOUR— (i and c) ARAB SOLDIERS — WATERLOO (two sketches) — 
GOING TO THE MEET— TIGER SHOOTING— AFTER A GOOD RUN 
— POINTERS — STUDY OF HORSES' HE ADS— CRITICAL SITU A- 
TIONS—A FRIGHTENED HORSE— JACK' FISHING— A STALLION— 
SETTERS— HORSES' BEADS— A FRESH NEAR LEADER — GOING 
TO THE STARTING POST— IN HIS BOX — RUNNING— V\ve hunting 
subjects in pencil : (a) NEARLY READY TO START— (b) A RARE GOOD 
ONE AT TIMBER— U) USED TO IT ^nd NOT USED TO IT-(d) TAKING 
THE LEAD IN SPITE OF ALL—^e) THE WINNER OF THE BRUSH 
—Four illustrations of the Pleasures of the Old Coaching Days : — (a) 3*45 a.m., 
"TIME TO GET UP, ZUR !"—{b) THE LITTLE BILL—^c) ITS AN 
ILL WIND THAT BLOWS NOBODY GOOD— (d) THE CHAMBERMAID 
—.Analysis of the Hunting Field ; Original pencil designs ;— (a) WITH BRIGHT 
FACES AND MERRY HEARTS — (b) "THAT WILL SHUT OUT 
MANY AND MAKE THE 1 HING SELECT"— if) "LETS TAKE THE 
LEAD"— (tl)" LET'S KEEP THE LEAD" -(e) " WHAT THE DEVIL !" 
&c.— {/) "A CHOSEN FEW ALONE THE SCENE SURrEY"—ToaT 
vignette drawings of Deer StzWmg— PIGEON SHOOTING— WELL UP WITH 

the hounds in a wall country. 

Lent by Theo. Lumley, Esq. 

six original designs for the celebr.ited " Panorama of Hunting." — ORIGINAL DESIGNS 
FOR IDEAS : — (a) *' By George, Harry, I have an idea that the thing is not 
quite so easy as I anticipated": {b) "My good fellow, I have an idea that I 
shall be right on top of you"; (t) "My good fellow, I should be extremely 
sorry to speak of any country with disrespect, but 1 have an idea that the water 
hereabouts is not exceedingly fragrant"; (</)"You have no idea what a magni- 
ficent day I have had — at least a dozen falls and twice in the brook ! Oh ! it was a 
most magnificent day. Be kind enough to lend me a hat"; (,e) "I have an ft/^d 
that this is a situation of considerable difficulty, and by no means an everyday 
occurrence "; {/) " I have an idea that this is a most important and effective fall." — 
CONE AWAY— AN AWKWARD PLACE— Tvo Letters on Fox Hunting^ 
by Peter Beckford, Esq. (illustrated by Aiken).— " ArOiO HARD, GENTLE- 
MEN <"— A CRICKET .MATCH: One-Arm Players v. One-Leg Players- 
Four highly-finished Hunting Subjects (in pencil) — TAKING IT CLEVERLY — 
THE CHASE— A FIVE. BARRED GATE— THE DEATH (Whatcombe 
\lo\ii<-)-PARK PALINGS— HARE HUNTING (i)—THE MEET (Yellow, 
ham Wood-)— HARE HUNTING (2)-0N THE ROAD TO GRETNA 
GREEN (2) — Frontispiece to "Life of Jack Mytton"(in pencil) — Six pencil 
drawings in frame, viz., "IS THAT REALLY A 'ARE?" and five other 
original designs for the well .known IDEAS— GOING TO THE DERBY: 
(a and *) ON THE ROAD: (c) GOING TO THE POST: (d) THE R.4CE 
—Two highly finished studies of MEN IN ARMOUR (in frame). 



WORKS OF HENKY ALKEN 



27 



Lent by J. Granville, Esq. 

POACHERS AND POACHED <2 sketches in noXom)— PHEASANT SHOOTING- 
hare shooting. —setters— woodcock shooting. — noon- 
tide rest— an arab chief— partridge shooting— group 
of arab cavalry—the hounds will meet— tally ho ! 

Lent by Lord Henry Bentinck. 
the unkennelers—full cry !— breaking cover— the death! 

(four drawings, tinted, attributed to H. Allien). 

Lent by R. Clarke, Esq. 
breaking cover— the death! 

Lent by Arthur W. Gilbev, Esq. 

A DAY IN LEICESTERSHIRE (four suhjegts in frame). 



The more noteworthy piihlished worl-s of Henry Allien. 



Title of Work 


No. of 
Plates 


Publisher 


Date 


The Beauties and Defects of the Figure 








of the Horse 


IS 


S. and J. Fuller ... 


1816 


Sporting Discoveries : — 








'The Miseries of .Shooting 


7 


>» >5 


1817 


'The Miseries of Hunting 


7 


»l »» 


1817 


*The Miseries of Driving 


7 


)» »J 


1817 


An hour with Unqualified Riders 








Sketches of Cattle, six monthly numbers, 








each containing .. 


6 


S. and J. Fuller ... 




Cockney Shooting Season in Suffolk ... 


6 






Country and Town Sports : — 








Steeplechasing ... 


6 






A Steeplechase 


6 






Sporting Notions ... ... 


36 






*How to Qualify for a Meltonian 


6 


S. and J. Fuller ... 


1S19 


'Military Discoveries, or the Miseries of 








Campaigning ... 


7 


)j >} 


1819 


Humorous Specimens of Riding 






1821 


Qualified Horses and Unqualified Riders 


7 


S. and J. Fuller ... 


1821 


Landscape Scenery 


26 


J) »> 


1821 


Sporting Sketches, in eight numbers, 








each containing 


6 


1} If 


1821 


Scraps from the Sketch Book 


42 


Thos. M'Lean 


1822 


Moments of Fancy 


13 


)i »» 


1822 


Sketches; Horses and Dogs 


23 


Rowney and F'oster 


1S22 


Symptoms of Being Amazed 






1S22 



• Signed " Ben Tally O. ' 



28 



ANIMAL PAIKTER? 



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Thos. M^I^iT 



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Ideas 

Sc/'./ring 7 ------ Htiniing, Driving, 

'Coach E^r.-Eaiting, &c 

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StaJie? o:" 0.6 ciutyt 

The >'?3':t piH^r? of Nactoii 

XT': ' ' -.gSort 

in. -lax Soogs 



r-hiie Steeplechase 

Sj/ ..lates) .. 

Sy. _ "... .. 

ttOt'^ Xj^r, ; 1 Tig v.. ,*■ ... .. 

CocV Fighaag „ 

The Life of a Sportsman 

Ffyi Hanticg (large plates) 

Tht ----- -•'•-^ Htmttng Field 

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43 

49 

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20 

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7 

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42 

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Thcs. M'Lean 



Rodolph Ackennann 



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8 



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Rndolph Ackermann 
Fores 



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1846 
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1854 
1859 






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30 ANIMAL PAINTERS 

been remunerative, for Henry Gordon Aiken was 
in needy circumstances for many years before his 
deatii, being indebted to friends for support. He 
was in receipt of parochial relief when he died in 
London at the age of 82 in the year 1892. 



Samuel Alken was born about the year 
1750 ; we first find him resident in London, and re- 
ceiving mention not as a painter, but as an engraver 
in aquatint in connection with C. M. Metz, James 
Daniel, Daniel and Robert Havell, John Black- 
more, F. C. Lewis and John Hill, all of whom are 
known as engravers. The art, at this period, had 
made great strides ; engravers had discovered the 
artistic value of "tone," the effect produced by 
keeping flesh and coloured parts of a lower tint 
than pure white details or accessories such as linen ; 
they had also learned discrimination in the handling 
of lights and shadow, and knew what could be done 
by " biting over again " as the technical phrase has 
it. This method of engraving was first practised 
about 1750 by William Walker, who communicated 
his discovery to William Woollett. 

In 1780, Samuel Aiken's name appears as that 
of a draughtsman ; at the Royal Academy Exhibi- 
tion of this year he showed a " Design for a monu- 
ment." A pair of female figure subjects, which 



SAMUEL ALKEN 3 I 

were engraved and published in London in October, 
17S6, show that at this time he was living at 3, 
Dufour Place, Broad Street, Soho. His forte lay 
In directions different from these, however, and 
subsequently he appears to have devoted himself 
entirely to sporting subjects and with considerable 
success. He worked in both oil and water colours, 
sometimes on a large scale in the former ; other 
drawings are mere pencil sketches only partly 
coloured. Many of his pictures in either medium 
display great merit, particularly as character studies 
of the sport of his time. 

His influence upon his nephew when the young 
man was at the be2:InnInor of his career has been 
remarked. It is at least likely that he imbued 
Henry Aiken with the taste for delineating those 
studies of Hunting character in which he so 
peculiarly excelled. 

His range was a very wide one ; but It is through 
his innumerable hunting scenes that he is most 
generally known. One of these entitled " Hunters 
at Covertslde," portraits of horses belonging to the 
celebrated Colonel Thornton, was engraved by J, 
Pollard, and published by S. Knights in 1820. 
Four companion works by this artist, " Fox Hunt- 
ing," "Hare Hunting," "Stag Hunting" and 
"Coursing," engraved by T. Sutherland, plates 
measuring 26 inches by 9 inches, were published 



32 ANIMAL PAINTERS 

by James W. Laird, of i, Leadenhall Street, in 
1 84 1, several years after the painter's death. 
Another series of pictures, " Partridge Shooting," 
" Pheasant Shooting," " Woodcock Shooting," and 
" Grouse Shooting," were engraved by J. Pollard, 
the plates measuring 1 1 inches by 7^ inches, and 
were published at the same time. The early num- 
bers of the Amials of Sporting, published in and 
after 1822, contain twenty-six plates from his 
pictures engraved by T. Sutherland, J. Gleadale, 
Roberts and others. These plates were printed 
in colours for separate sale by the publishers of the 
magazine, Sherwood Jones & Co., of Paternoster 
Row, London. 

The second volume of Remarks on Forest Scenery 
and Other Woodland Views, by the Rev. William 
Gilpin, Prebendary of Salisbury Cathedral and 
Vicar of Boldre, near Lymington, contains a series 
of scenes in the New Forest, "The animals by Mr. 
Aiken." The author in a note at the end of the 
book pays a tribute to the " masterly and excellent 
work " of the artist. This book was published in 
London in the year 1791. Sawrey Gilpin, the 
author's brother, also contributed several pictures 
to Forest Scenery. 

Samuel Aiken's hunting pieces are cleverly 
drawn and afford an excellent idea of the stamp 
of horse hunted at the time, as well as of the style 



WORKS OF SAMUEL ALKEN 33 

of dress in vogue ; his hawking and coursing scenes 
are equally characteristic, and his dogs — grey- 
hounds, setters, pointers, and other breeds— are 
always good. 

At one period Samuel Aiken acted as tutor to 
the Earl of Clarendon. He is said to have been 
a dandy in his manner of dress. He died about 
1825, when he would have been about 75 years of 
age. 



WORKS OF SAMUEL ALKEN. 

EXHIBITED IN THE ROYAL ACADEMY. 

YEAR 

ij&o- DSS/G.V FOR A MONUMENT. 

PLATES IN THE ANNALS OF SPORTING (26 in number). 

(9) GROUSE SHOOTING, 1822, vol. i.— .-J MEMBER OF THE SURREY HUNT, 
ON HIS HACKNEY, RIDING TO COINER, 1822, vol. 1.— RACE-HORSES 
EXERCISING, 1822, vol. J.— BREAKING COINER, 1822, vol. 1.— RATTLE 
AND CLI NKER, a bull-terrier and terrier, property of William Harris, Esq., 
1822, vol. I ; engraved by P. Roberts. — PIPER, a celebrated greyhound, property 
of L. J. Pouch^e, Esq., 1822, vol. ^.— RACE-HORSES (fUla. ^\— MOUNTING, 
1822, vol. I.— RACE-HORSES— IVINNING, 1832, vol. 1.— COCK-FIGHTING 
—SETTING-TO, 1822, vol. i. 

{•i) DUCK SHOOTING, 1822, vol. 2: engraved by Snlhei\^ni. — PARTRIDGE 
SHOOTING, 1822, vol. 2 ; engraved by Sutherland.— /'/C^OA' SHOOTING, 
1822, vol. 2; engraved by Suthiidind.— SPORTSMEN REFRESHING, 1822, 
vol. 2.—PHE.4SANT SHOOTING, 1822, vol. 2 ; engraved by Sutherland. 

(5) THE HATFIELD HUNT, 1823, vol. i.— UNKENNEL t.I.\G, 1823, vol. 3 ; en- 
graved by SM'aerUni.— FERRETING RABBITS, 1823, vol. 3; engraved by 
Sutherland.— Sr.^C AT BAV, 1823, vol. 3 : engraved by S. Aiken.— DRAINING 
A BADGER, 1823, vol. 3 ; engraved by .S. Aiken. 

(7) RACE-HORSES— SADDLING, 1823, vol. 4 ; engraved by Sutherland.— OTT^'^ 
HUNTING, 1823, vol. 3 ; engraved by SMher\?iTii—R.-iCE-HORSES— PRE- 
PARING FOR SECOND HEAT, 1823, vol. 3; engraved by Sutherland.- 
DUCK HUNTING, 1823, vol.3; engraved hy P. Rohens.—H.-IRE HUNT- 
ING, 1823, vol. 3; engraved by P. RobsHi.— COURSING, 1823, vol. 3 ; engraved 
by Sutherland.— ^.-i 7" HUNTING, 1823, vol. 3 ; engraved by Roberts. 



34 



JAMES BARENGER. 
(Born 1780. Died 1831.) 

TAMES BARENGER born 1780. was, there 

^ is little room to doubt, the son of an artist 

of the same name who, in the last decade of the 

eighteenth century, exhibited a few pictures of 

entomological interest, butterfly and insect studies, 

at the Royal Academy. We do not anywhere 

find it definitely stated that James Barenger, the 

painter of insect life, was the father of James 

Barenger, the painter of sporting subjects ; but 

inasmuch as the Royal Academy catalogues give 

the address of each as Kentish Town, the 

similarity of name and sequence of dates justifies 

the assumption that the two were father and son. 

In Graves' valuable Dictionary they appear as : — 

James Barenger, London. Exhibited 1793- 1799. Insects. 
James Barenger, Junr., London. Ditto, 1807-1831. Sporting. 

The elder Barenger and his brother, S. Barenger 
who achieved some measure of success as an 
engraver, were nephews of the famous engraver 
William Woollett. 

Landscapes, more especially park scenes which 



JAMES BARENGER 35 

afforded opportunity of introducing deer, figure 
largely among the earlier works of the younger 
Barenger ; and only after he devoted his attention 
more strictly to animal portraiture was he repre- 
sented in the exhibitions of the Royal Academy ; 
his first exhibit being "Sheep, from Nature," and 
" A Famous Setter," which were shown in the year 
1807, when the artist was in his twenty-eighth year. 
He was at this time living in Kentish Town, with 
his father we may conjecture ; but at a later date 
he moved to Camden Town. In common with 
many other sporting artists his best known address 
was Tattersall's, Hyde Park Corner. 

He had numerous private patrons, for whom 
he painted portraits of horses and dogs, and 
sporting scenes; after 18 10 his works were in 
considerable demand by the publishers of sporting 
literature, and the first engravers of the time were 
employed to execute plates therefrom. Between 
the years 1807 and 1S31 he exhibited thirty-seven 
pictures at the Royal Academy. Most of these 
portraits of horses and dogs ; but the breadth of 
his range is apparent in the variety of subjects 
with which his brush dealt for the illustration 
of books. British Field Sports, vol. viii., by 
William Henry Scott, published in 1S18, contains 
the following plates from works by Barenger ; 
twelve of these were engraved by John Scott and 



36 ANIMAL PAINTERS 

the remaining five by J. Webb: — (i) Pointers 
going out with Sportsmen ; (2) Woodcock Shoot- 
ing ; (3) Sportsmen with Spaniels ; (4) Grey- 
hounds with Dead Hare; (5) Greyhounds with 
Sportsmen finding a Hare ; (6) Duck Shooting ; 
(7) Sportsmen with Spaniels ; (8) Earth Stopping ; 
(9) Pony and Dogs; (10) Hunting: going into 
Cover; (ii) Hunting: the Chase ; (12) Hunting: 
the Death; (13) Racing: the Finish; (14) Sligo, 
a racehorse; (15) Cock-fighting; (16) Game 
Fowls; and (17) Fly Fishing. The Sporting 
Repository, vol. viii.. published in 1822 by Thomas 
McLean, has five plates engraved by T. Hunt 
from Barenger's pictures. These are : — ( i ) Claret, 
a Hunter ; (2) A Hawk ; (3) A Herefordshire 
Ox ; (4) Rubens, a Hunter ; and (5) Merino 
Sheep. The portrait of Rubens was engraved 
for separate publication by C. Turner, the plate 
measuring 2'^\ inches by ic,^ inches. The Annals 
of Sporting for the year 1824 contains two plates 
to which special interest attaches, these being the 
only examples of the artist's work which, so far 
as our researches have shown, were engraved by 
his uncle, S. Barenger. " Topthorn " is depicted 
in the act of taking a leap of twenty-one feet 
over the Whissendine brook. 

One of the best of the twenty-six pictures re- 
produced in the Sporting Magazine between 18 10 



i 



JAMES BAREXGER ^y 

and 1832 was perhaps that of "Doll" a pointer 
bred by the artist from a bitch belonging to W. 
Whitbread, Esq., of Much Hadham, Hertfordshire, 
who was well known for his famous strain of 
pointers. This picture was beautifully engraved 
by John Scott. Many of Barenger's works were 
engraved in large size ; among these we may 
notice: — "Pheasants" and "British Feathered 
Game," companion plates measuring 17^ inches by 
14 inches, engraved by Charles Turner and pub- 
lished by Ackermann in 1810 ; and "The Earl 
of Derby's Staghounds," the plate from which, 
measuring 24 inches by 19 inches, was engraved 
by R. Woodman. This work contains equestrian 
portraits of Lord Stanley and the Hon. E. Stanley. 
Jonathan Griffin, the huntsman, on "Spanker" is 
the central figure; the first whipper-in on "Noodle" 
also has place in the picture. This print was pub- 
lished on 15th May, 1823, by I. Griffin, Carshalton, 
Surrey. 

Barenger's interest in field sports would seem, 
from his having bred pointers, to have been more 
than that of the artist : the sporting technique of 
his pictures is always accurate, and his animals 
are drawn with the knowledge that comes only 
from personal observation and study. In a collec- 
tion in Essex there are two companion coursing 
pictures, each measuring 35 inches by 27 inches : 



38 ANIMAL PAINTERS 

these are "Loo Loo," and "The Death;" the 
greyhounds and hare are most true to nature. 

Mr. George Henderson possesses a picture by 
James Barenger. This canvas, which measures 21 
inches by 1 7 inches, shows a horse in the stable ; 
the horse, a bay of the coaching stamp with a 
closely docked tail, stands in the subdued light of 
his stall, and is admirably painted. Mr. Charles 
Cooper Henderson saw this work in a picture 
dealer's window, and was so struck with its merits 
that he possessed himself of it on the spot, giving 
one of his own pictures in exchange. Mr. George 
Henderson is a son of Mr. Charles Cooper Hender- 
son, the celebrated artist. 

James Barenger died in 1831, and was buried 
in Old St. Pancras churchyard. 



WORKS OF JAMES BARENGER. 

EXHIBITED IN THE ROYAL ACADEMY {2,7 in Number). 

YEAR 

J807— (2) SHEEP FROM NATURE— A FAMOUS SETTER. 

1809— (3) PORTRAIT OF A MARE— PORTRAIT OF A PUG DOG— SPARROW 

FROM NATURE. 
iSio— (3) BROOD MARES AND FOALS— A FAMOUS H.ACK OF MR. WESTS 

—A DALMATIAN DOG. 
tii2—(3) MARE AND FOAL— PORTRAIT OF A HORSE— PORTRAIT OF 

CURRICLE HORSES. 
,B,3_(3) A BROOD COCK AND HEN-PORTRAIT OF A HORSE— PORTRAIT 

OF PHENOMENA, a Racehorse, the property of Mr. Sadler. 
i3i4-(2) HORSE— PHEASANTS. 
jSii-CRATEN HOUNDS. 

jSi6— WARRIOR, the property of Mr. Tattersall. 

,8,7_(2) SPRING TAIL, a Hunter, the property of Mr. Tzneri.,\\— POINTERS. 
1818— <3) D.4RLINC, .1 Staghound, the property of the Earl of licihy— FOXHOUNDS 

—SHORTHORN BULL. 



WORKS OF JAMES BARENGER 39 

VEAR 

1S20— (5) GREVHOUXD, property of Earl Talbot— //.-I C/T-Vj? K MARE—POI!fTER 
—GIG MARE SASE.VAGH, property of V. Corbett, Esq.- A FAMOUS 
HACK. 

i8j2— (2) DOG FROM NATURE— ALADDIN. 

1824— (2) rONY— PHEASANT AND BRACE OF PARTRIDGES. 

xi^a.— POINTER. 

iZig-il) GOSHAWK, property of Duke of Grafton— /?£//=•£ '5, property of Duke of 
GTsSton—MARE AND FOAL, property of Marquess of Londonderry. 

itZi—TAM O'SHANTER, property of Captain Copland. 

PLATES IN THE SPORTING MAGAZINE (26 in number). 

THE ll'ELLESLEV ARABIAN, vol. 36, 1810 ; engraved by J. Scott. 

(3) TIVO TAME LEVERETS, vol. 39, 1812; engraved by J. Scotl—n'OODCOCKS, 

voL 40; engraved by J. ScoV. — FOXES PURSUING .4 HARE, vol. 40; 

engraved by J. Scott. 
MAT O' THE MINT, a Celebrated Racehorse, vol. 41, 1813 ; engraved by J. Scott. 
BLUCHER, a Celebrated Racehorse, vol.49, 1816; engraved by J. Scott. 
DOLL, a Celebrated Pointer, vol. 52, 1S18; engraved by J. Scott. 
FIGHTING DOGS, vol. 54, iSio; engraved by J. Scott. 

SASENAGH, late Impostor, a Celebrated Racehorse, vol. 55, 1820; engraved by J. Scott. 
LAVENDER, a Greyhound, belonging to Earl Talbot, \o\. 57, 1821; engraved by J. 

Scott. 
PHEASANTS, vol. 63, 1823 ; engraved by J. Scott. 
PROSPER, a Celebrated Hunter, belonging to the Earl of Derby, vol. 64, 1824; 

engraved by J. Webb. 
RUBENS, a Celebrated Racehorse, vol. 66, 1825; engraved by J. Webb. 
PARASOL, a Celebrated Racehorse, vol. 69, 1826; engraved by J. Webb. 
GULNARE, a Celebrated Racehorse, \o\. 71, 1827 ; engraved by J. Webb. 

(3) MULEY, a Dark Brown Horse, vol. 72, 1828: engraved by J. Webb— W GAME- 

COCK ; engraved by Raddon — PR UDENCE, a Brown Mare, the propeity of the 
Duke of Grafton ; engraved by R. Woodman. 

(4) MAR/A, a Celebrated Racehorse, belonging to George IV,, vol. 74, 1829 ; engraved by 

J. Wehh—BUCKFOOT, an .-Vrabian Racehorse ; engraved by J. Webb— 
FREDERICK, a Celebrated Racehorse ; engraved by J. Wehb— PANDORA, 
a fine Hunter, vol. 75 ; engraved by J. Webb. 

(3) GODOLPfllN, a Celebrated Racehorse, vol. 76, 1830; engraved by J. Scott — 
SIGNAL, a High-bred Arabian; engraved by J. Scoa- NOSEGAY, a Brood 
Bitch, belonging to the Earl of Kintore, vol. 77; engraved by J. Scotf. 

TURK, a Retriever, belonging to the Marquess of Carmarthen, vol. 80, 1832 ; engraved by 
H. R. Cook. 

PLATES IN THE N£IV SPORTING MAGAZINE (3 in 

number). 

THE COLONEL, a Racehorse, 1831 ; engraved by J. Webb. 

(■i) PARTRIDGES, 1834; engraved by R. Vm-THE PHEASANT; engraved by 
J. R. Scott. 

PLATES IN THE ANNALS OF SPORTING (2 in number). 

TOPTHORN, a Celebrated Hunter, 1824 ; enraved by S. Karenger 

MARENGO, a White Charger supposed to have belonged to Buonaparte, 1825 ; engraved 
by S. Karenger. 



40 



FRANCIS BARLOW. 

(Born circa 1626. Died 1702.) 

pRANCIS BARLOW was bom in Lincoln- 
•*■ shire about the year 1626, and is therefore 
one of the earliest among animal painters of 
English birth whose works are known to us. He 
appears to have come up to London, no doubt in 
search of the art education which in his day, as for 
long after, could be obtained only in the studio of 
some painter of established reputation : and to have 
taken up his residence in Drury Lane while receiv- 
ing instruction from William Shepard, a man about 
ten years his senior, who practised as a portrait 
painter during the reign of Charles II. William 
Shepard, it must be added, has left proof of his 
ability to portray animals as happily as he painted 
portraits of men, in at least one picture, a mezzotint 
engraving from which by Fairthorn is in the British 
Museum. This is a portrait of Thomas Killigrew 
the jester and his dog, with a medallion portrait of 
King Charles I. in the right corner. An engraving 
from this work, which belonged to Lord Godolphin, 
was sold at the Strawberry Hill sale. At the same 



FRANXIS BARLOW 4 1 

sale a plate from another picture by Shepard was 
sold ; this was a portrait of Mr. Henry Terne 
which, according to Walpole's account, was after- 
wards altered to represent the Duke of Monmouth ! 
Shepard eventually retired to Yorkshire, where he 
died. 

Pictures of birds and animals were Barlow's 
speciality. Horace Walpole, in his Anecdotes of 
Painters in England, says that altogether there 
were published six books containing plates of birds 
and beasts from drawings by this artist : one of 
these was a series of folio plates entitled Nature 
displayed in the Ani^iial and Feathered Species, 
"being a collection of the capital studies of that 
great Master Francis Barlow, in which are ex- 
hibited a vast variety." Barlow's Birds and 
Beasts was a collection of sixty-seven plates from 
his chief works ; these represented various species 
of wild and domestic birds and animals in character- 
istic attitudes or situations ; several of these plates 
were engraved by W. Hollar, and bear date 1664, 
though the pictures in many instances had been 
painted several years previously. Such is the case 
in Barlow's "Turkeys," painted in 1654, an engrav- 
ing from which by Hollar is here reproduced. The 
work entitled Miiltce ct Diversce Avium Species, 
published in the year 1658, contained eighteen 
plates engraved by Hollar from his pictures. 



42 ANIMAL PAINTERS 

Another work entitled Various Birds and Beasts 
contains eiglit plates drawn from life by this artist. 
Walpole also makes mention of "a set of Cuts 
for yEsop's Fables." He doubtless refers to the 
folio edition, which was published in 1668, entitled 
yEsop's Fables, "with his life in English, French, 
Latin, &c., 112 sculptures, likewise added 31 figures 
in his life by Francis Barlow." The large majority 
of these elaborate studies of animal life are 
preserved in the British Museum. A work on 
sport entitled Several Ways of Hawking, Hunting, 
and Fishing, published in 1671, contained fourteen 
plates engraved by Hollar from designs by Barlow. 
Barlow's name receives mention as that of an 
etcher in Walpole's Catalogue of Engravers, pub- 
lished by Dodsley in 1783, and we find plenty of 
evidence to establish his right to the name. He 
designed and engraved two plates for Benlowe's 
poem Theophila, which appeared in 1652, and he 
etched several desiorns of his own drawingf for 
Ogleby's Virgil. For the edition of yEsop's Fables 
(Behn's translation), published by Mrs. Afra in 
1666, he designed and engraved upwards of one 
hundred illustrations. This edition of the Fables is 
very rare ; the greater part of the impression having 
been burned in the Great Fire of London. One of 
his most noteworthy etchings represented an eagle 
soaring with a cat in its talons, an incident which 



FRANCIS BARLOW 43 

came under his notice when drawing landscapes in 
Scotland. The struggles of the cat brought its 
captor to the ground, and Barlow secured the two. 
It is stated that the golden eagle is particularly 
partial to the flesh of the cat, and that the bird will 
eat this readily in captivity when, through indis- 
position, it refuses other meat. 

Barlow achieved considerable renown by his 
success in decorating the ceilings in country 
mansions with pictures of birds ; his brush was 
much in demand for this work, and it became one 
of his specialities. Natural history objects did not 
claim his exclusive attention ; he designed some 
monuments for Westminster Abbey among other 
works ; and a curious long roll engraved by Robert 
White, representative of the procession and cere- 
monies with which the obsequies of General Monck, 
first Duke of Albemarle, were solemnised in 1670, 
has for frontispiece a design by Francis Barlow. 
He painted and etched a half-length portrait of 
Monck. Mention may also be made of two plates 
engraved by Hollar from Barlow's drawings for 
Stapylton's Translation of Juvenal published in 
1660. 

His talents as a draughtsman were more remark- 
able than his skill as a colourist, hence his work 
appears in a more pleasing aspect through engrav- 
ings and etchings, especially those by such gifted 



44 ANIMAL PAINTERS 

men as Hollar, Fairthorn and John Griffiere, than 
in the original paintings themselves. The engravers 
indeed have placed him under an obligation in that 
they have so largely contributed to rescue his name 
as an artist from the obscurity which has overtaken 
his followers. 

Francis Barlow died in 1702. 



WORKS OF FRANCIS BARLOW. 

IN THE BRITISH MUSEUM. 



(i) ILLUSTKATIONS TO ^SOP'S FABLE OF THE YOUNG MAN AND HIS 
CA T. — A youth of effeminate appearance, fondling his cat, kneels on a balcony 
supplicating Venus to transform it into a woman. She, with Cupid by her, newly 
arrived from her dove-drawn car, appears in the sky (left) and grants his prayer. In 
a recess (right) a bed, from which the woman springs on seeing a mouse run along 
the floor. This design was probably done for Barlow's edition of the Fables, but 
another was substituted in the book. Indian ink; size, 4^ io. by 6^ in. 

(z) Two on one mount, viz. :— («) GOATS AND SHE£F.~-On a mound in the centre 
hegoat ; two goats (left) and a ram with two sheep (right) under a tree with a magpie 
and two tits ; in the foreground a mole. Indian ink ; size, 5^ in. by 8 in. (d) SIS 'INE 
AND DONKEYS.— A yard with a mound in the middle, on which is a boar ; a 
sow lying (left) and three pigs behind, one coming from a sty ; (right) two donkeys, 
and a man with a pitchfork looking over the palings into the yard. Indian ink ; size, 
5J in. by 8 in. 

(3) Two on one mount, viz. \—{a) BEAKS. — Two bears confronting each other, with two 

others behind, one of which (right) is climbing a palm tree. Indian ink ; size, 5I in. 
by Sii in. iS) LEOPARDS AND LYNXES.— Two leopards, one seen in front, 
the other turned towards a couple of lynxes ; in the background, a leopard leaping 
on a stag. Indian ink ; size, i\ in. by Z\ in. 

(4) STUDY OF A DEER. — A buck anda roe, side by side, moving towards the left, where 

another buck is feeding, and a hare sits in a listening attitude ; (right) two rabbits 
and tree with squirrels in the branches; five wild ducks flying (left). Indian ink; 
size, 5I in. by 8i in. 

(5) STUDY OF HORSES.— A horse turned towards the left; behind him another horse 

reajing up on its hind legs, and a number of others in varied attitudes in an undu- 
lating meadow beyond, bordered with distant trees. Indian ink; size, 5? in. by S in. 



WORKS OF FRANCIS BARLOW 45 

(6) STUDY OF CATTLE.— \ cow grazing, turned to the right ; two oxen half seen behind 

her ; two more further off in the field (right), one lying down, the other feeding near 
a tree ; in the distance a hill, crowned with a church spire. Indian ink ; size, gg in. 
by 8 in. 

(7) HOUNDS. — Five hounds, four of them coupled in pairs ; a man with lifted stick halloa* 

ing (right) and a hare running away over a little hill in the landscape behind. Indian 
ink ; size jf in. by 8 in. 

(8) STUDY OF DOGS AND A C^T.— (Left) A mastiff, chained by the collar to his 

kennel and showing his teeth ; in the centre a greyhound surveying a cat (ri-hl) 
which stands with arched back and furious expression, on a low stone wall, while a 
spaniel barks at it, with forepaws on the wall. Signed, " F. Barlow." Indian ink; 
size 5^ in. by 8 in. 

(9) ILLUSTRATION TO EDWARD BENLOIVE'S '' THEOPHILA, OR LOl'ES 

SACRIFICE," 1652. — Theophila, besieged by deadly sins, in the shape of wild 
beasts, kneels and prays to a fountain with a cross above it, emblematic of Christ's 
sacrifice ; behind, the Garden of Eden, with Adam and Eve being tempted and 
driven out. Indian ink; size, 7J in. by 5^ in. 

(10) THE FOX AND THE EAGLE'S NEST.— An eagle's nest, apparently in flames, 

on the top of a high rock ; a fox tumbles from it on the approach of the parent birds. 
In the foreground the mother fox and cubs in a hole under trees (right), beyond the 
trees a smoking altar. Pen and sepia, with Indian ink wash ; size, 3J in. by 3J in. 

(i:) PARTRIDGE STALA'IA'G.~A field, with partridges in the foreground, and (right) 
a man concealing himself behind a horse, which advances from under a tree ; a dof^ 
(right); beyond, trees and a hill. Indian ink ; size, -jl in. by ii| in. 

(12) AN EAGLE CARRYING OFF A DUCKLING.— li soars in the air, grasping a 
duckling in its talons, while it bites at the head with its beak. (Right) A hill with 
a cottage among trees. Pen and sepia, with Indian ink wash ; size, 5 in. by 6^ in. 
(An etching by Barlow of a similar subject, an eagle carrying off a cat, said to have been 
sketched from life in Scotland, is in the department at the Museum.) 



IN THE SOUTH KENSINGTON MUSEUM. 

PARTRIDGES AND SNIPE (water-colour). 

MARES AND FOALS (drawn with a reed pen in sepia and Indian ink). 

FARAtrARD WITH FIGURES (Landscape background (Indian ink). 



46 



THE BARRAUDS. 

William Barraud. (Born 1810. Died 1850.) 
Henry Barraud. (Born 181 1. Died 1874.) 

ABOUT the year 1650, half a century after the 
Revocation of the Edict of Nantes, Gabriel 
Barraud and Madeleine his wife came from 
Normandy to London. What Gabriel Barraud'.s 
calling was does not appear, nor does it greatly 
concern us, it being with his descendants that we 
have to do. One of these, Paul Philip Barraud, 
about the middle of the eighteenth century, 
established himself in Wine Office Court, Fleet 
Street, as a watch and chronometer maker; and 
afterwards moving to 41, Cornhill, achieved fame 
in his own particular line. Paul Philip's son, 
William Francis, who held an appointment in the 
Long Room at the Custom House, married and 
had twelve children, five sons and seven daughters. 
The two elder sons, William and Henry, became 
the artists whose works now claim our attention. 

William Barraud, the elder of these two, 
was born in iSio. From school he was sent direct 
to an office in the Customs, where his father's 



WILLIAM RARRAUD 47 

interest had procured him an appointment — the 
parent of large family feeling doubtless that it 
was more important to secure for the boy a start 
in life rather than allow him to depend for a 
livelihood on the chance of succeeding as an 
artist. That William Barraud's tastes were artistic 
from the beginning is obvious, for he occupied 
his stool in the Custom House only a short time, 
and left it to study under Abraham Cooper, then 
an Academician and enjoying the earlier years of 
his fame as a painter of animals. Under such 
guidance William Barraud's talents developed 
very rapidly ; in his nineteenth year we find him 
exhibiting for the first time in the Royal Academy, 
and perhaps as a direct consequence receiving a 
commission for the portrait of a dog. This was 
given him in 1829 by Mr. John Turner, of 
Clapham Common, a well-known coursing man 
of the time, who commissioned him to paint 
the likeness of a favourite greyhound named 
Triumph. An engraving from this painting, 
by J. Webb, appeared in vol. Ixxiii. of the 
Sporting Magazine. Triumph is described as a 
" red greyhound bitch " ; she won the Goblet at 
Epsom in 1828, and divided the Hedley Stakes 
with Mr. North's Lancer at Epsom in 1829. 

In the following year William Barraud's work 
attracted the attention of the famous Master of 



48 ANIMAL TAIXTERS 

Hounds, Mr. John Warde, known after fifty-seven 
years of mastership as the " Father of Foxhunters." 
The approbation of so acute a judge of horse and 
hound indicates the skill with which the young 
artist reproduced the character of an animal on 
his canvas. His first picture for Mr. Warde was 
a portrait of Betsy, a favourite fo.xhound bitch, 
and the next, painted in the following year, a 
portrait group comprising Mr. Warde on Blue 
Ruin, with Betsy looking up to her master. The 
picture of Betsy was engraved by J. Webb and 
reproduced in the Sporting Magazine ; a plate by 
Webb from the second work was published in the 
New Sporting Magazine. 

This portrait group proved a fortunate commis- 
sion to William Barraud ; the likenesses of master, 
horse, and hound were considered admirable, and 
the artistic ability exhibited in the handling gained 
the painter no little reputation. It must be added 
that he was lucky in his equine subject, for Blue 
Ruin was known as an extraordinary hunter. 
Foaled in 18 10, Blue Ruin derived his name 
from the fact that he was bred by a gin distiller 
at Maidstone ; he was three parts bred, being by 
Mr. Mellish's thoroughbred Didler, by Pegasus, 
a horse nearly related to the famous Wellesley 
Arabian, out of a half-bred mare. He stood 
sixteen hands, and was long a favourite of Mr. 







Ul 

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O- 
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Lij" 
Q 

a: 
< 

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I 
o 



WILLIAM EARRAUD 49 

Warde, who, as his picture shows, was no ordinary 
welter weight. On one occasion Blue Ruin was 
lent to Mr. Assheton Smith, who rode him through 
an extraordinary run which lasted nearly an hour ; 
not a man of the field could catch them, and the 
horse still had plenty left in him when hounds 
pulled down their fo.x. Mr. Assheton Smith offered 
Mr. Warde a large sum for Blue Ruin, but the 
veteran refused to part with him at any price. He 
was a marvellous stayer, and is said to have done 
sixt}-two miles in a curricle without having the 
bit removed from his mouth. This horse reached 
his thirtieth year in Mr. Warde's possession, and 
at that age was still able to do occasional journeys 
in harness to London. "The Father of Fo.x- 
hunting." a portrait of Mr. Warde. painted by 
W. Barraud, engraved in large size and printed 
in colours, was published in 1835 by Rudolph 
Ackermann. 

These works added yet further to the artist's 
reputation, and his services were sought by many 
of the leading sportsmen of the day, for whom, 
often in collaboration with his brother, he painted 
numerous pictures. Henr)- Barraud had achieved 
success as a landscape and portrait painter, and 
the brothers did so much work tosrether that it is 
impossible to treat the career of each entirely by 
itself One of their more noteworthy joint works 

4 



50 ANIMAL PAINTERS 

was " The Wiltshire Coursing Prize Picture," a 
large canvas containing forty-six portraits of the 
leading lights in the turf and coursino- worlds. 
Among the gentlemen who appear in this picture 
are Lord Stradbroke, Sir Hesketh Fleetwood, 
Mr. Bowes, Mr. Harry Briggs, Mr. Bagge, Mr. 
Etwell, Captain Daintree, Mr. Graham, Squire 
Goodlake, Mr. Inskipp, Mr. Parkinson, Mr. Bowyer 
Smith, Mr. Wyndham, and Mr. Nicholson the 
flag steward. The group is painted against a 
landscape background with a view of Stonehenge 
in the distance. This picture was afterwards en- 
graved and published by the artists themselves. 

Other pictures produced by the two brothers 
were : " Portrait of Thomas Brand, Esq., and his 
Huntsman;" "Portrait of Mr. Davis, Huntsman 
to Her Majesty, on his favourite mare, with 
hounds;" "A Royalist Family taken Prisoners by 
the Puritans ; " " Waiting for the Laird ; " " The 
Meet at Crick ; " " The Death of the Hare at 
Stonehenge ; " " The Last Resource ; " " Androcles 
and the Lion ; " " The Last Stake; " and " Border 
Law." The last a Sporting Magazine critic, 
writing on the Royal Academy pictures of 1838, 
considered " the best the Barrauds have in the 
e.xhibition," being noteworthy for its boldness of 
conception. The work represented the return of 
some marauding chieftain with a maiden on his 



WILLIAM BARRAUD 5 I 

saddle bow ; his followers drive before them the 
"lifted" cattle. "The Fathers of the Pack," 
also a joint work, was a group comprising portraits 
of Mr. Richard Hill, his huntsman and the 
"fathers" of the Pytchley pack of the day, three 
hounds named Fairplay, Helicon, and Watchman. 
This work was engraved by Davey and published 
in 1850. Davey also engraved a plate from 
another picture painted by the brothers, " A 
Portrait of Mr. Hill," w'ho was a Master of 
Hounds in Yorkshire for forty years, and four 
couples of his hounds. Several of the works 
enumerated above were exhibited at the Royal 
Academy, to which, between the years 1829 and 
1850, William Barraud sent fifty -seven pictures, 
inclusive of some in whose production his brother 
had a part. In 1S33 he painted a small portrait 
subject representing his uncle, Martin Barraud, a 
well-known sportsman, standing with a greyhound 
by his side, and a small retriever in the near 
foreground. 

In the volumes of the Sporting Magazine, 
between the years 1829 and 1861, we find seven- 
teen plates from his pictures, several of which 
were the work of J. Webb, John Scott, and E. 
Hacker. Portraits of greyhounds are frequent 
among these : the picture of Mr. John Turner's 
Triumph has already been mentioned as the 



52 ANIMAL PAINTERS 

artist's first commission. Tiney, another grey- 
hound, whose portrait was engraved for the 
magazine, won the Puppy Cup at Epsom in 
1827. Twilight, a blue bitch, and Wyandotte, 
a red do^, met in the deciding course for the 
Wiltshire Coursino- Prize Picture. Sarah Bate 
and Sedlitz were noted greyhounds ; the former, 
in 1844, won a Puppy Stake, and in 1845 she 
beat Captain Daintree's famous Killena in a 
match for 100 guineas at Newmarket. Sedlitz, 
in October, 1845 (then named Fan), ran up 
to Pilgrim for the Great Champion Puppy Stake 
at Amesbury ; in the following December she 
won the Champion Puppy Cup at Newmarket ; 
in 1847 she divided the Deptford All-aged Stakes 
with Mr. Etwall's Waterfall ; and at Amesbury 
won the first sixteen-dog stake for the Great 
Wiltshire Coursing- Picture. Midsummer and 
Snowball belonged to Mr. Henry Miller, of 
Frome ; the former, a red bitch, won a ;^50 stake 
at the Deptford Open Meeting in December, 1847. 
A good example of William Barraud's skilful 
handling of animals in motion is his picture of 
Winchelsea, a deer belonging to the Surrey Stag- 
hounds. Mr. Robinson, the master, bought him 
with twenty others from Sir Edward Dering, 
of Surrenden in Kent with whose hounds he had 
given long runs. Winchelsea once went down a 



WILLIAM BARRAUD 53 

deep cutting on the Brighton Railway, near 
Merstham, and led hounds in full cry through 
the tunnel. The train from London to Brighton, 
the deer, and the pack were all in the tunnel 
together, but quarry and hounds emerged in 
safety. 

In the volumes of the New Sporting Magazine, 
between 1831 and 1836, are five engravings 
from William Barraud's pictures, three of them the 
coursing subjects for which he seems to have had 
a special liking. 

If this artist attained to no conspicuous eminence 
he was at least a clever draughtsman who has 
left us good work in his pictures of sport, por- 
traits of sportsmen and famous horses and dogs. 
He did not confine his brush to sport and kindred 
subjects ; a few of his Royal Academy works 
betray his taste for classic and historical scenes, 
while the pictures by which he is probably most 
widely known are two of a sentimental or pathetic 
character. The plates which were engraved from 
these had an enormous sale 

William Barraud died after a short illness in 
1850 at the comparatively early age of 40 years. 
He left one son, a member of the Catholic priest- 
hood, believed to be living in 1898 at George- 
town in the United States. 



54 ANIMAL PAINTERS 

WORKS OF WILLIAM BARRAUD. 

IN THE SOUTH KENSINGTON MUSEUM. 

MARES AND FOALS (water-colour), signed. (IViUiam Smith Bequest.') 

EXHIBITED IN THE ROYAL ACADEMY. 

YEAR 

iSif-STUDy OF AN ASS. 

1S30-/OHN TURNER, ESQ., ON " JIfAKQU/S" IVITH A BRACE OF GREY 

HOUNDS. 
i83i-(3) POINTERS— THE COUNCIL OF HORSES— AN OLD HUNTER. 
i832-(3) AN OLD HACKNEV-A FAVOURITE COB— GULLIVER MEETING 

THE HOUYHNHNMS. 
iZii— (2) SHAKESPEARE, a Hanl^r — JULIAN PEVERIL COMPELS CHIP- 

FINCH TO RESTORE THE STOLEN PAPERS (vide " Peveril of the 

Peak.") 
\%-<,l,—LORD MARMIONS CHARGER. 

iS35-(3) THE SENTINEL- A TERRIER— A FAVOURITE HORSE. 
i836-(2) RUFUS—PONY AND BOY. 
\Zyi—FA VOURITES. 
1^38— (3) A FAVOURITE SPANIEL — SCENE IN OTTERSHAW PARK, 

SURREY, with portraits— r/jVl'. 
1839— (3) PLATO, property of the Marquess of Hastings— 7"^j?7'/J^, property of Her 

Majesty— 57/0 y. 
ri^a-CAPTAIN DALGETTY AND HIS HORSE GUSTAVUS. 
1841— (3) CATSUP— THE POPE'S .MULES AT THE FOUNTAIN OF TREVI— 

PORTRAITS. 
,843— (2) DEAD FALLOW DEER— HORSES, the property of Sir Geo. Farrant. 
1844— (3) CONRACH-iVAlTING FOR THE FERRY— PORTRAITS. 
1845— (2) FAVOURITE HORSES— FAVOURITE HORSES. 
1S46— (2) CONRAD, a two-year-old shorthorn bull, bred by Sir Charles Knightley, Bart.— 

TWO FAVOURITE SPANIELS OF LORD METHUEN. 
,i^S—{2) FAI'OURITE HORSES OF THE MARQUIS OF WORCESTER- 
SCOTCH TERRIERS. 
iS^q— THE GRAYLING, a celebrated Huiiler. 
,85o_(2) FAVOURITE PONY AND DOGS.—SKYE TERRIERS. 

(For pictures painted by William Barraud in collaboration with Henry, see 
page 59-) 

PLATES IN THE SPORTING MAGAZINE (17 in number). 

TRIUI\IPH, greyhound, i82g, vol. 73; engraved by J. Webb — TINEY, greyhound, 
BETSY, foxhound, 1829, vol. 75 ; both engraved by J. Webb. 

THE MOORS, 1840, vol. 96 ; engraved by John Scott. 

THE TRYSTING PLACE, 1841, vol. 99 ; engraved by G. Patersoii. 

WINCH ELSE A, a famous deer, vol 104. 

ROBERT BARTLETT, ist whipper-in to H.M. Buckhounds, 1845, vol. 106; engraved 
by 0. Paterson. 



HENRY BARRAUD 55 

Oi^CE MORE UPON THE MOONS, 1848, vol. 112 ; engraved by H. Beckwith. 

TIV{LIGHT AND WYANDOT TE, 1S4S, vol. 112; engraved by J. Scott— Z'Vf/l/'T'J 
FROM THE BAD.UINTON, 1848, vol. 112; engraved by J. Scott. 

SARAH BATE AND SEDLITZ, 1849, vol. 114: engraved by E. Uxka.—THE 
NEASDON HARRIERS, 184Q, vol. 114 ; engraved by E. Hacker. 

(3) BRITISH YEOMAN, a bay hor«, winner of the Great Metropolitan Steeplechase, 
1849. 1S50, vol. 115; engraved by E. HucVer — HERE COME THE 
HOUNDS, jSso, vol. 115; engraved by E. Hacker — r//£ COURIER'S 
COMPANION. Jack, a favourite servant of Henry Miller, with Midsummer 
and Snowball, 1850, vol. 1T5 ; engraved by E. Hacker. 

BEAUTY AND THE BEAST, 1853, vol. 121 ; engraved by E. Hacker. 

A ROUGH LOT, i36i, vol. 138 ; engraved by E. Hacker. 

PLATES IN THE NEW SPORTING MAGAZINE 
(5 in number). 

JOHN IVARDE, ESQ., ON HIS FAVOURITE HORSE BLUE RUIN, 1831; 

engraved by Webb. 
COURSING, 1832 ; engraved by Scott. 
COURSING, 1833 ; engraved by Englehart. 

GREYHOUND AND WHELPS, .834 ; engraved by Duncan. 
THE JOCKEY AND HIS HACK, 1836 ; engraved by Cooke. 



Henry BaRRAUD, born in 1811, like his 
elder brother began life as a clerk in the Custom 
House after leaving school, and for a short time 
worked there under his father. Him also Art 
claimed before he had long occupied his stool, and 
he left the Customs to study under J. J. jMiddleton, 
a draughtsman and landscape painter. His bent 
was more in the direction of landscape and por- 
traiture than towards sport and animal life. It 
will be remarked that among the pictures which 
he (from his own easel and not conjointly with 
William) contributed to the Royal Academy 
between the years 1833 and 1845, o"ly ^^e first 
was an animal picture. This was sent in when 



56 ANIMAL PAINTERS 

he was living with his brother at Champion Hill, 
Camberwell, and is thus described in the catalogue 
of the 1833 exhibition: — 

" FiTzjAMES Lamenting over his Steed." 

" Woe worth the chase, woe worth the day 
That cost thy life, my gallant grey." 

Lady of the Lake, Canto I. 

The two brothers shared a studio, and as already 
said, painted numerous important pictures together : 
among these, one which attracted great attention 
and gained for the artists considerable repute was 
" The Annual Benediction of the Animals of Rome 
on the Feast of St. Anthony, by the Pope." This 
work was exhibited in the year 1842. It seems 
right to notice this picture among Henry's Royal 
Academy exhibits rather than those of William, 
as the works of the former betray a knowledge of 
Italy which we do not discover in those of the 
latter ; and while it is quite probable that William 
contributed as much brush-work to the canvas as 
his brother, the idea of the picture and the general 
scheme must, for the reason given, be considered 
Henry's. 

The volumes of the Sporting Magazine between 
1854 and 1 86 1 contain seven plates from pictures 
of a sporting character by Henry Barraud — por- 
traits of horses, hounds and greyhounds. -Wanton, 
whose picture, engraved by Hacker, was published 



\ ^^ 



^■^ \ 



^ 



.. / 



HENRY BARRAUD 






HENRY BARRAUD 57 

in vol. 123, was a famous red bitch greyhound 
bred by Mr. Webb in 1849 ; of the one and thirty 
courses in which she was sHpped in pubHc she 
won no fewer than twenty-si.x. Hotspur and 
Languish were a couple of harriers from Sir 
Humphrey de Trafford's pack. 

Among his subject pictures may be mentioned 
"The Lobby of the House of Commons in 1S72," 
"The London Season" and, more within our 
scope, " Lord's Cricket Ground." His portrait of 
Uxbridge, one of Her Majesty's saddle horses, 
is in the possession of Mr. F. P. Barraud. 

By far the best known of his works was the 
picture of three choristers entitled, " We praise 
Thee, O God ! " engravings from which have been 
sold, it is no exaggeration to say, in hundreds of 
thousands. Few pictures of the devotional class 
to which this belongs have ever achieved the 
immense popularity of this unpretentious work by 
Henry Barraud. It may be added that the 
legend concerning the fate of the youths whose 
portraits appear in the picture was floated in a 
spirit of cynical jest and has no foundation in fact 
whatever. One of the boys was not hanged, nor 
were the other two sentenced to penal servitude 
for life ; the three were Henry Barraud's eldest 
son, his nephew, a son of William, and a friend of 
theirs ; all became respectable members of society. 



58 



ANIMAL PAINTERS 



Henry Barraud died in the year 1874, leaving 
nine children, five boys and four girls. 



WORKS OF HENRY BARRAUD. 

EXHIBITED IN THE ROYAL ACADEMY. 

YEAR 

i%yi—FlTZ}AMES LAMENTING OVER HIS STEED. 

1834— y« PORTRAIT. 

1835— /4 .MOTHER AND CHILD. 

itid— PORTRAIT OF A LADY IN THE With YEAR OF HER AGE. 

jS37— SCENE FROM THE OPERA OF LA GAZZA LADRA. 

i%if,— MINSTRELS OF THE FIFTEENTH CENTURY. 

lit,!.— DOORWAY IN THE CHURCH OF THE SPIRITO SANTO, FLORENCE. 

JS42— ROBERT BRUCE AND THE SPIDER. 

1844 (i)— /J BARD— THE THEORY OF GRAVITATION, suggested to Sir Isaac 

Newton by the fall of an apple. 
jiS-2— MASTER BERESFORD LOWNDES, WITH FAVOURITE PONY AND 

DOGS. 
liii-THE TEN VIRGINS. 

i8s5-(2) BIRDS OF A FEA THER—THE HO.^IE A T NAZARETH. 
iSsy—FETE DIEU. 
\%iZ— PORTRAITS OF HORSES. 
tis^-THE EARL OF ARUNDEL AND SURREY, WITH FAVOURITE 

PONY AND DOGS. 



PL.ATES IN THE SPORTING MAGAZINE (7 In number). 

WANTON, a Greyhound, 1854, vol. 123 ; engraved by E. Hacker. 

THE KEEP A T ARUNDEL, Three horses, the property of the Duke of Norfolk, 1836. 

vol. 131 ; engraved by J. H. Engleheart. 
HOTSPUR AND LANGUISH, 185S, vol. 132; engraved by W. Backshell. 
A ROUGH CUSTO.tlER, a thoroughbred Skye Terrier, 1855, vol. 133; engraved by J. 

H. Engleheart. 
POLYDORA, WITH SISTER TO PANDORA AT FOOT, bred by the Duke of 

Portland in 1S37. i860, vol. 135 ; engraved by E. Hacker. 
ANNETTE AND POLYXENA, Brood Mares, the property of Earl Spencer, i860, vol. 

136 ; engraved by E. Hacker. 
KEEPER'S COME, SIR, 1861, vol. 137 ; engraved by E. Hacker. 



WORKS OF HENRY BARRAUD 59 

PICTURES PAINTED IN COLLABORATION BY WILLIAM 

AND HENRY BARRAUD, EXHIBITED AT 

THE ROYAL ACADEMY. 

YEAR 

1836— {2) THE LAST RESOURCE— THE CHILDREN OF THOS. KEEX 

ESQ., WITH THEIR FAVOURITE PONY. 
i%n—THE LAST STAKE. 
■Al%-i-2) BORDER LAIV—ANDROCLES TAKING THE THORN FROM THE 

LIONS FOOT. 
■Ay^-THE MISSES ROBARTS ON THEIR FAVOURITE HORSES. 
A^i—THE AN.VUAL BENEDICTION OF THE ANIMALS AT ROME ON 

THE FEAST OF ST. ANTHONY. 
1843— 7"jV£ claims OF ST. FRANCIS. 
it\i,—HER .MAJESTYS BEAGLES. 
\iiS—A. (K ROBERTS, ESQ. 

1846-/4 ROYALIST FAMILY TAKEN PRISONERS BY THE PURITANS. 
1847— (3) THOMAS BRAND, ESQ., WITH HIS HUNTSMAN— THE EARL 

OF COVENTRY AND HIS SISTER— WAITING FOR THE LAIRD. 

1S4B— THE STABLE YARD. 

iS^g— MR. DAVIS, HUNTS.VAN TO HER MAJESTY, WITH HIS 
FAVOURITE MARE AND SO.UE FAVOURITE HOUNDS. 



6o 



J. BEST. 

(Born circa 1750.) 

J BEST, though not one of the most notable 
• artists of his time, is entitled to mention as 
the painter of several pictures of animal life and 
sporting subjects which secured the attention 
of contemporary judges. He was born about the 
year 1750, but we can ascertain nothing concerning 
his parentage and circumstances. It is known that 
he employed much of his time in copying the 
works of other artists, and we find our starting 
point in his artistic career while he was yet a 
copyist. There is in the Elsenham collection a 
large painting — 60 inches by 39 inches — which 
was sold at Christie's twenty years ago under the 
belief that it was by George Stubbs, R.A. ; it is 
entitled " The Waldegrave Family," and contains 
portraits of Lord and Lady Melbourne, Sir Ralph 
Milbanke, and Mr. John Milbanke. The lady is 
seated in a low park j^ony-carriage drawn by a 
white pony, and Lord Melbourne stands by its 
side. The execution of the work quite justified 
the belief that Stubbs was the artist ; but during 
the process of re-varnishing, "J. Best, 1770," was 
discovered lurking modestly in the right-hand 
corner. It is an excellent copy of the original 



J. BEST 6l 

picture by George Stubbs which is in possession 
of Earl Cowper at Panshanger, Hertford. 

The first mention of Best's original work occurs 
in 1772 ; in that year he was for the first time 
represented at the Exhibition of the Society of 
Artists ; he contributed to this Exhibition in sub- 
sequent years, but with no regularity ; on only 
six occasions does his name appear in the cata- 
logues of the Society from 1772 to 1787 — exclusive 
of his maiden exhibit. Only two pictures from his 
easel appear to have found their way into the 
Royal Academy. In 1782, then residing at 10, 
Titchfield Street, Oxford Street, he exhibited a 
painting of "A Large Ox," and five years later 
he was again represented at the Royal Academy 
by his " Portrait of a Warwickshire Ox," his 
address in that year being 108, Bunhill Row. 

The former work, by the way, was executed for 
Mr. Robert Bakewell of Dishley, the celebrated 
grazier and farmer, who will ever be remembered 
as the man who produced and established as a 
distinct variety the Leicestershire breed of sheep. 
The Leicester sheep, to quote Youatt, " within 
little more than half a century spread themselves 
over every part of the United Kingdom and to 
Europe and America." More germane to the 
matter in hand, however, though less potent in 
contributing to Bakewell's fame, were his sue- 



62 ANIMAL PAINTERS 

cessful endeavours to produce a new variety of 
cattle called the " Dishley cattle," or the "new 
Leicestershire Longhorn." The breed has now 
died out, but it was probably a typical specimen 
which Best was commissioned to paint. 

The first volume of the Sporting Magazine, 
published in 1792, contains two plates from pic- 
tures by Best, viz., "Gamecocks" engraved by 
Cook. These are portraits of two birds which 
achieved great fame in the cockpit ; one is of a 
Birchin Yellow in full plumage : this cock fought 
eleven battles, and was then withdrawn from 
active service to be used as a brood cock. His 
produce proved worthy of him, for we read that 
thirty-six of them fought in one main in the 
Royal Pit, Westminster, and that thirty-two of 
them won their battles. The other picture shows 
a Ginger Red Cock cut or trimmed in readiness 
for the pit : this bird also fought at Westminster, 
and won a battle in which he was backed at 20 
to I : this bird was also a winner at Guildford 
in the following year. 

No record of Best's later career — if indeed the 
above outline does not reflect the whole — nor of 
the date of his death, can be traced. 




O 
O 
O 

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S 
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63 



BENJAMIN BLAKE. 

(Boru circii 1780.) 

IDENJAMIN BLAKE was born about the year 
-*-^ 1780; concerning his parentage, birthplace, 
and early life nothing can be ascertained. Though 
not an animal painter in the e.xclusive sense of the 
expression, his frequent choice of subjects pertain- 
ing to field sports justifies notice of his works; 
and to his works indeed our remarks must be 
confined in the absence of any record of the 
painter's life. 

Blake dealt with various subjects, showing a 
preference for landscape ; but as he had few 
private patrons and did most of his work for 
dealers we may conjecture that in selecting sub- 
jects for his brush he was influenced less by per- 
sonal inclination than by the wishes of those who 
commissioned pictures or purchased them. His 
works display great ability and most careful execu- 
tion ; the latter quality being one which is found 
at its highest in the pictures of artists who paint 
on a small scale. Blake was one of these ; his 
paintings were most usually done on boards of 



64 ANIMAL PAINTERS 

small (cabinet) size. He was a skilful copyist, and 
devoted a good deal of his time to making copies 
of the Dutch masters. He did many of these, 
and with such nice appreciation of style and 
character as to deceive even connoisseurs in art. 

He lived a very retired life, and there is nothing 
extant to show where he dwelt; in 1807 we find 
him in Winchester Row, Paddington, from which 
address he sent his first picture to the Royal 
Academy ; but it is not likely that a painter whose 
works include so many landscapes passed any con- 
siderable portion of his time in the metropolis. 
Between the years 1807 and 1825 inclusive, he 
was represented at the Royal Academy by thirteen 
pictures shown at eight exhibitions. His first 
exhibit was the " Portrait of an Artist " ; on sub- 
sequent occasions his name occurs in the catalogue 
as painter of a "View near Amesbury " (1808); 
"View at Great Durnford, Wiltshire" (1811); 
while two landscapes, painted respectively near 
Amesbury and Great Durnford, shown at the 
exhibition of 181 2, suggest that if he did not for 
a time at least reside in that locality it had special 
attractions for him. In 18 16 he was represented 
at the Royal Academy by a " Sketch from Nature " 
and a "Landscape with Figures;" while in 181 7 
he reached his maximum in a single year with 
three pictures on the Royal Academy walls. In 



,4 




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o 

a 
< 

LLl 

Q 



BENJAMIN BLAKE 65 

1 82 1 he exhibited one study of "Dead Game" 
and in 1825 two similar works. 

At other galleries he exhibited more largely. In 
1824 his name is mentioned as that of a Founda- 
tion member of the Society of British Artists : to 
the annual exhibitions of that body he contributed 
seventeen works ; and at the Suffolk Street gallery 
he showed nineteen pictures. Many of his paintings 
are to be seen in private collections, and occa- 
sionally they come into the market. A few 
examples of pictures which fall within our scope 
may be described : — 

" Dead Game," painted in 1823; a heron hanging 
up by the feet with loosely extended wings ; a 
pheasant and a partridge also hanging ; a hare, 
wild duck, and other game on a table beneath. 
On board: size igi inches by 133 inches. This 
admirable specimen of Blake's work is here re- 
produced. "Dead Game," painted 1S2S ; par- 
tridges and wild duck hanging from ceiling ; an 
earthen vessel and basket of eoro-s on a table. On 
board : size 10 inches by 8 inches. " Dead Game 
and Codfish," painted 1S30; the game, a pheasant, 
hare, and wild duck are hanging ; the cod, sur- 
rounded by oysters and vegetables, lies on a table. 
On board, size 12 inches by 9^ inches. Another 
picture of this class, which Blake was fond of 
painting, shows a heron lying on a large barrel 
5 



66 ANIMAL PAINTERS 

with an earthen vessel ; a partridge and a hare 
with a long string of onions hang on the right ; 
shelf with bottle and baskets in the near back- 
ground. On board : size gi inches by 1 1 inches. 
Yet another shows a hare, with wild duck and other 
smaller birds on a table, a rush game bag hanging 
against the wall. On board: size ii^ inches by 
9 inches. He painted also a picture of " Dead 
Game " for Lord Francis Egerton for the Bridge- 
water Gallery. 

Several of Blake's pictures were engraved ; in 
the Sporting Review for 1843 we find a plate en- 
graved by Westley from one of his beautiful 
studies of Dead Game. 

Nothing- can be discovered to show even the 
approximate date of Edmund Blake's death ; the 
last trace of his artistic career occurs in the year 
1833, when a picture from his easel was exhibited 
in one of the London galleries. His age would 
then be about 53 years. There is nothing in the 
Sporting Review of 1843, which contains the plate 
above mentioned, to show whether the artist was 
alive in that year. 



WORKS OF BENJAMIN BLAKE 67 

WORKS OF BENJAMIN BLAKE. 

EXHIBITED IN THE ROYAL ACADEMY (13 in number). 

VEAR 

iZoj— PORTRAIT OF AN ART/ST. 

iSoS—F/£ty AT DURFORD, NEAR AMESBURY. 

iSii—y/Eir AT GREAT DURNFORD, WILTSHIRE. 

1812— (2) VIEW NEAR AMESBURY, with dguTes—WOODHOi'SE, AT GREAT 

DURNFORD, NEAR SALISBURY. 
1816— (:) SKETCH FROM NATURE— LANDSCAPE AND FIGURES. 
i&ij~{^) COTTAGE— A LUNCHEON— A LANDSCAPE 
1S21— DEAD GAME. 
1825— (j) DEAD GAME— DEAD GA.ME. 



68 



JOHN BOULTBEE. 

(Born 1747. Died 1812.) 

JOHN BOULTBEE was one of twin sons 
born to Mr. Thomas Boultbee of Stordon 
Grange, Leicestershire, in 1 747. The name was 
originally spelt " Bolteby " ; but the owner of the 
name, having got into trouble through his support 
of the Stuarts was obliged to leave his native 
county of Yorkshire and go into hiding ; after- 
wards settling in Leicestershire as Mr. "Boultbee," 
the change being adopted for the sake of security. 
Both the boys evinced marked artistic talent at 
an early age, and In course of time became 
pupils of Sir Joshua Reynolds. Thomas having 
devoted himself principally to portrait and land- 
scape painting, claims but little attention at our 
hands ; but it may be of interest to mention 
that among his pictures he painted a portrait of 
his great-uncle, Thomas Boultbee, for sixty-three 
years Rector of Brailsford, In Derbyshire. This 
Mr. Boultbee was able to perform his duty till 
the time of his death, which occurred when he 
was ninety-two years of age. He was evidently a 



JOHN BOULTBEE 69 

sportsman as he is described in family papers as 
being "great in the Scriptures as well as mighty 
in the saddle." The picture referred to is now in 
the possession of his descendants. 

In 1776, John Boultbee, then resident at 338, 
Oxford Street, e.xhibited his maiden picture in the 
Royal Academy ; this did not reflect the true bent 
of his talent, being described in the catalogue as 
" A Landscape." After this we lose sight of him 
for seven years ; recovering the thread of his 
career through his second contribution to the 
Royal Academy in 17S3. This work, sent up 
from Derby, where, as the catalogue shows, he 
then lived, was the portrait of a stallion named 
Pensoroso which he painted for T. W. Coke, Esq. 
Mr. Coke, it may be added, was a member of 
the family of Cokes, a scion of which was 
William, a famous follower of the Ouorn hounds, 
who gained a modest meed of immortality by in- 
venting the low-crowned hat which was named 
after him the "billy-cock." In 1785, for Mr. 
Richard Tattersall, Boultbee painted the portrait 
of Highflyer, one of the most celebrated horses 
on the turf, and at the stud known to equine 
history. 

Highflyer was bred by Sir Charles Bunbury 
by King Herod, dam by Blank ; and was pur- 
chased as a yearling at a very moderate price by 



JO ANIMAL PAINTERS 

Mr. Compton. He was a bay, standing about 
15-3 hands, and up to weight; he had a tremen- 
dous stride and was further a thoroughly honest 
horse. Highflyer's height was quite beyond the 
usual standard, as the average of race-horses (stal- 
lions) at that period was between 15 hands and 
I5'i hands. He never ran on any course but 
the Beacon at Newmarket, was never beaten, 
and never paid forfeit. It is true that his turf 
career was as brief as successful ; before being 
sent to the stud, he ran in only seven races, and 
received forfeit in one, in 1778-79, but in each 
event he started at odds on and won with ease. 
In 1785 two-and-twenty of Highflyer's get started, 
and all were winners, many of very considerable 
sums. Among his progeny may be mentioned 
Sir Peter Teazle, Rockingham, Marplot, Balloon, 
Delpini, and Lady Teazle. 

Mr. John Lawrence remarks, "the late Mr. 
Tattersall informed me, as a curious circumstance, 
that Highflyer got stock of all colours, even to 
the pyebald." Boultbee's portrait of this horse 
was shown in the Royal Academy Exhibition of 

1785- 
A year or two later the artist seems to have 

turned his attention to the hunting field for 

subjects; not unnaturally, inasmuch as in 1787 

he was living at Loughborough, in Leicestershire. 



JOHN BOULTBEE J I 

While residing here he sent a picture entitled 
" Horse and Terrier " to the Royal Academy. 

In the ensuing year we find him executing a 
commission for Mr. Robert Bakewell, of Dishley, 
who secured his services to paint the portrait of 
a favourite hunter. Though the famous founder 
of the Leicestershire sheep achieved his perma- 
nent fame through the success which attended 
his efforts in that direction, and less lasting dis- 
tinction by his evolution of the Dishley cattle, 
he was by no means neglectful of the nobler 
animal. For some months in 1785 he exhibited 
in London a famous black horse which previously 
by Royal command had been paraded before 
King George III. in the courtyard of St. James's 
Palace. Particulars concerning this horse are 
wanting ; it would be interesting to know if it 
were the animal which stood for its portrait to 
Boultbee three years later. 

The King furnished very practical proof of his 
admiration for John Boultbee's work; not only 
was the artist commissioned to paint portraits of 
some of George III.'s favourite animals but he was 
assigned a residence in Windsor Park that his 
services might be the more readily available. We 
are not told if Boultbee ever took up his quarters 
within the royal demesne, but if he did so his 
stay was not a long one, for failing health com- 



72 ANIMAL PAINTERS 

pelled resignation of the appointment. He exe- 
cuted some pictures to the Royal command, 
nevertheless ; the originals may be seen at 
Cumberland Lodge ; engravings therefrom are in 
Her Majesty's collection at Windsor Castle. Lord 
Mount Edgcumbe was one of the more prominent 
men of the day whom Boultbee counted among 
his patrons. 

In 1802 the artist painted a set of four hunting 
scenes, uniform in size, viz., 2 feet by i foot 6 
inches; these are (i) The Start, (2) At Fault, 
(3) Full Cry, and (4) The Death. In these 
pictures both horses and hounds are carefully 
and cleverly portrayed, and are very realistic. 
The huntsman and whipper-in are the only human 
subjects represented, and their dress displays the 
style of the period. These four works are in the 
Elsenham collection and a photograph of the last 
is here reproduced. The old-fashioned curly horn 
carried by the huntsman will be noticed. 

One of the artist's pictures, the portrait of a 
favourite horse belonging to his brother Thomas, 
is now in the possession of the Rev. James 
Boultbee, Vicar of Wrangthorn, near Leeds ; 
another " Gulliver among the Houyhnhnms," is 
owned by the Rev. George Herbert, Rector of 
Gannerew, near Monmouth. Both of these works 
display the painter's ability, but unfortunately 




I 

H 
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Q 

UJ 

I 



JOHN BOULTBEE 73 

were left unfinished. A work called " Richard 
III. at Bosworth " is reputed to be one of 
Boultbee's most strikins^ efforts, but in whose 
possession the picture now rests is not known. 

"Nimrod," writing in 1835, refers to the splendid 
horsemanship of a Mr. Charles Boultbee, a follower 
of the Ouorn. The Rev. James Boultbee informs 
me that the artist had a son named Charles, born 
in 1795, and who died in 1854; but he thinks 
the gentleman referred to is more likely to be a 
distant relative, the Rev. C. Boultbee, of Temple 
Balsall who was Rector of Baxterly. 

For some interesting: details relative to the 
career and works of John Boultbee, the writer 
has to express his thanks to Mr. James T. Pownall, 
of 14, City Walls, Chester. 

The twin brothers seem to have been much 
attached to each other for they lived together ; 
Thomas sent his maiden pictures — two " Land- 
scapes "—to the Royal Academy E.xhibition of 
1776, from 338, Oxford Street, whence John in 
the same year sent his first picture. In 1783 
when John sent the portrait of Pensoroso from 
Derby, Thomas from the same town sent up to 
the Academy the only animal pictures we can 
trace from his easel ; these were three in number: 
— (i) Hunter and a Shooting Horse the property 
of T. \V. Coke, Esq., (2) The Portrait of an 



74 ANIMAL PAINTERS 

Old Charger ; and (3) The Portrait of an Old 
Hunter. The first it will be remarked was 
painted for his brother's patron, Mr. T. W. 
Coke. It is probably only a coincidence that each 
of the brothers exhibited the same number of 
works : each sent three pictures to the Exhibi- 
tions of the Society of Artists, each sent three 
pictures to that of the Free Society of British 
Artists, and each sent six to the Royal Academy. 
John Boultbee died in the year 1812, at the age 
of sixty-five. 



WORKS OF JOHN BOULTBEE. 

EXHIBITED AT THE ROYAL ACADEMY (6 in number). 

VEAR 

1776— A LANDSCAPE. 
i-jiy-PEXSOROSO, A STALLlOy. 

1787— (2) TWO HORSES.— HORSE AXD TARRIER (j;Vr.) 

i-!&&-i:i) PORTRAITS OF HORSES.— A FAVOURITE HORSE, the property of 
Sir. BakewelU 

PLATE IX THE SPORTJNG MAGAZINE. 

HIGHFLYER, in Volume s3 of i32i. 



75 



EDMUND BRISTOWE. 

(Born 1787. Died 1S76.) 

pDMUND BRISTOWE, known as " Bristowe 
'^ of Windsor," was born at Windsor on the 
1st of April, 1787. The son of an heraldic painter, 
he was thus brought up in an atmosphere not 
devoid of art : whether he continued to live with 
his parents when he reached man's estate we are 
not told, but it seems certain that he passed his 
whole long- life in the neighbourhood of his birth- 
place. His disinclination to go afield may no doubt 
be attributed in some degree to the Royal patronage 
which was bestowed upon him while he was yet a 
youth. At an early age he had the good fortune to 
attract the notice of the Princess Elizabeth and the 
Duke of Clarence, afterwards William IV. Evi- 
dence of their patronage is found in three pictures 
in the Royal collection at Windsor Castle. These 
are : Coast Guard, a Newfoundland Dog, hang- 
ing in the Winchester Tower ; Beauty, a favourite 
hound belonging to George III., in the Round 
Tower, and " The Pensioners," in the Lobby, 
Prince of Wales's Tower. 



76 ANIMAL PAINTERS 

Bristowe did not confine himself to the portrayal 
of animals, though in this department of art he 
perhaps attained his highest excellence, displaying 
great artistic ability, imaginative power, and intimate 
technical knowledge. He painted also sporting 
subjects, pictures of rural life, interiors and studies 
of still life ; while his talent for portraiture is 
sufficiently proved in his numerous sketches of 
well-known characters in Windsor and Eton. His 
pictures are usually painted on a small scale, cabinet 
size finding special favour with him, and these often 
display all the finish and delicacy of miniature work. 
Among the best of his horse pictures special mention 
may be accorded his " Cart Horses," " Barge 
Horses," and " Horse Summering," which are 
life-like in their pose and treatment and admirable 
in composition. 

His success as an animal painter was greatly 
due to his intuitive sympathy with beasts ; his 
remarkable gift for rendering their characteristic 
movements and expressions was partly innate, but 
it plainly owed much to close and careful observa- 
tion. Admirable as are his pictures of horses, his 
delineations of monkey, cat, and dog life and 
character display equal merit. There is no higher 
test of an artist's ability than the opinion his con- 
temporaries entertain of it ; and of Bristowe it is 
recorded that he was on terms of intimacy with 



EDMUND BRISTOWE ']'] 

Sir Edwin Landseer, who freely accepted sugges- 
tions from him. 

Bristowe could not have been ambitious of public 
recognition : the catalogues show that he sent 
only seven pictures to the Royal Academy, and 
these at irregular intervals. The probability is he 
was satisfied with the distinction that the patronage 
of Royalty conferred upon him : but apart from this 
it would seem that he had some of the eccentricity 
of genius. He would not work to order, but only 
when the spirit moved him ; in this he resembled 
many other painters whose works have attained 
to wider fame, though, in some cases at least, not 
more deservedly. His indifference to money, and 
affection for some of his own creations are shown 
by the circumstance that he sometimes refused to 
sell his finished pictures. 

His works were appreciated and sought for by 
those residing in the immediate locality of his 
studio, and private collections in Windsor and Eton 
contain many excellent examples from his brush. 

He was an occasional contributor to the exhibi- 
tions of the British Institution and to the Society of 
British Artists ; the latter had the honour of in- 
cluding in its exhibition of 1838 the last picture 
ever sent by Bristowe to a public gallery. This 
was his painting of a " Donkey Race." Although 
he lived for thirty-four years after the date named 



8o ANIMAL PAINTERS 

here reproduced ; and " Summer," also on board, of 
similar size and painted in the same year. " Sum- 
mer " represents two horses with pigs and poultry 
in the foreoround. 

The date on these two works mark the period 
to which Edmund Bristowe's artistic career can 
be traced, though he lived to the ripe age of 
eighty -nine years, dying at Eton on the 12th 
February, 1876. 

Reference has already been made to the distinc- 
tive qualities of Bristowe's work : the handling is 
always masterly and the finish exquisite, resembling 
in many respects the paintings of the old Dutch 
masters. His works will doubtless create increased 
demand, as few artists painted subjects which 
appeal to those who appreciate historical records 
of sport, and subjects appertaining to animal life 
in the early part of this century. 

It is surprising that so little should have been 
recorded of this painter's life and works ; his dis- 
inclination to court public notice by exhibiting his 
pictures may in some measure account for it. 



WORKS OF EDMUND BRISTOWE. 

EXHIBITED AT THE ROYAL ACADEMY. 
Year 

iSog—S.lf/TH SHOEIXG HORSE. 

1820 — (3) JEFFERIES, for many years earth stopper to the Berkeley Hounds— POi?- 
TRAIT OF A HUNTER— MR. NOR.MAN AS DON QUIXOTE IN 
THE PANTOMI.ME AT COVENT GARDEN THEATRE. 

i823-<3) PORTRAITS OF MEN E.MPLOYED IN THE NURSERY GARDENS 
AT SLOUGH— THE PARISH CLERK, SATURDAY EVENING. 

li:iq—SH.i.VROCK, the property of C. T. Gaskell, Esq. 



wrir\ 




8i 



HENRY BERNARD CHALON. 

(Born 1770. Died 1849.) 

HENRY BERNARD CHALON was born 
in London in the year 1770. His father, 
a native of Amsterdam, had in early life left his 
own country and had settled in London. The 
name was uncommon in England before the 
middle of the eighteenth century, and it is there- 
fore likely that the two brothers, John James 
Chalon and Alfred Edward Chalon, born re- 
spectively in 1778 and 17S1, were relatives of 
the subject of the present sketch. These brothers 
came from Geneva, being members of an old 
French family who had taken refuge in that town 
after the revocation of the Edict of Nantes. John 
James was a landscape and genre painter ; Alfred 
Edward devoted himself to portrait and subject 
painting; and both attained to considerable 
eminence in their respective departments of art 
after taking up their residence in England, which 
they did in the latter portion of the century. 

H. B. Chalon studied at the Royal Academy 
and speedily made his mark as a painter of 
6 



82 AMMAL PAINTERS 

animals. His first pictures were shown at the 
Royal Academy Exhibition of 1792, when he was 
twenty-two years of age ; these were a " Landscape 
with Cattle " and a " Landscape with Horses." 
He did not exhibit again until 1796; but he 
worked to good purpose in the interval, for in 
1795 he was appointed animal painter to H.R.H. 
the Duchess of York. Late in life he had the 
further honour of being appointed animal painter 
to William IV. 

Henry Bernard Chalon devoted his talents chiefly 
to animal portraiture. His 193 contributions to the 
Royal Academy, in whose exhibitions he was 
represented for a period of forty-five years, consist 
largely of such works and of portrait groups which 
included likenesses of race-horses, hunters, and 
dogs of various breeds. Sporting scenes, studies 
of wild animals, of game birds and cattle pieces, 
are also numerous among the pictures left by this 
industrious painter, who counted the most dis- 
tinguished people of the day among his patrons. 

One of his best dog pictures is the portrait of 
an Irish Water Spaniel, painted in the year 
181 2, a canvas measuring 56 inches by 48 inches. 
This compares favourably with the "White 
Poodle," by George Stubbs, R.A., which is in 
the collection of Lord Yarborough, at Brocklesby, 
in Lincolnshire. Chalons portrait of The Colonel, 



HENRY BERNARD CHALON 83 

the famous race-horse and stallion, stands high 
among his most successful horse pictures. This 
work was executed in 1837 for the late Mr. 
Richard Tattersall, into whose possession The 
Colonel ultimately came. Bred by Mr. Wyvill, 
of Burton Constable, in 1825, and sold when a 
yearling to the Hon. Edward Petre, he won the 
St. Lecrer for that gentleman, who afterwards 
disposed of him for ^4,000 to George IV. Mr, 
Richard Tattersall bought The Colonel at auction 
for his breeding stud at Dawley, near London. 
Chalons picture of this horse is now in the posses- 
sion of Mr. Herbert Mavor. It was awarded 
a special prize at the Loan Exhibition of pictures 
held at the Agricultural Hall in 1896. The artist 
had also painted the portrait of The Colonel, 
with Wm. Scott, the jockey, in the saddle, after he 
won the St. Leger of 1828. The work was in 
the Royal Academy Exhibition of 1829. 

Chalon's mastery of equine anatomy is well 
shown in a series of seven large pictures repre- 
senting " The Passions of the Horse,' which 
were engraved and published by Jackson. Three 
of this series were exhibited in the Royal 
Academy, viz., an old hunter, Betty, in a 
paddock roused by the huntsman's view halloo, 
representing " Joy," and another representing 
"Rage with Agony," shown in 1837: and 



84 ANIMAL PAINTERS 

"Terror," shown in the exhibition of 1843. 
Direct evidence of the artist's careful study o. 
the Horse may be found in a book entitled 
" Studies from Nature," which was dedicated with 
permission to his patroness the Duchess of York, 
and published ist May, 1804, by H. B. Chalon and 
J, C. Nattes. This contains twenty plates, each 
14 inches by 11 inches; seventeen represent dogs 
and birds, and the remainino- three are Anatomical 
Tables, viz. : (i) The Horse's Skeleton on a New 
System ; (2) Explanation of the Anatomical Table 
of the Horse's Muscles ; and (3) The Proportions 
of an Arabian on quite a new System. 

Of the very numerous engravings which have 
been made from Chalon's works, mention may be 
made of the following : — 

Eight engravings in mezzotint, by W. Ward, 
A.R.A. : — (i) Pavilion, a race-horse with Chiffney 
in the saddle, plate 2 if inches by 155- inches: 
published by Boydell & Co., 90, Cheapside, 
London, ist March, 1803 ; (2) Coursing, a por- 
trait of the greyhound Snowball : published by 
Random & Sneath, 1807 ; (3) Violante, a race- 
horse with Buckle in the saddle, plate 21^ 
inches by 15 inches: published by Boydell & 
Co., ist March, 1808 ; (4) Quiz, a race-horse ; 
jockey, saddle on arm, entering the weighing- 
room ; plate 21^ inches by 16 inches: pub- 



HENRY BERNARD CHALOX 85 

lished by R. Ackermann & Co., ist September, 
1808 ; {5) Costive, one of the best foxhounds in 
Lord Darlington's Raby pack. An etching from 
this work by H. R. Cook, was also published in 
the Sporting Magazine of iSio; (6) A Setter, 
belonging to the Marquis of Ely; each plate \(j\ 
inches by 14 inches ; (7) The Raby Pack, por- 
traits of the hounds on the flags with huntsman 
and feeder ; and (8) Bull Dogs, namely Wasp, 
Child and Billy, three famous dogs belonging to 
Mr. Henry Baynton ; the two latter plates measur- 
ing 24 inches by 18 inches : published by Random 
& Sneath, 1809. This picture was also engraved 
by Duncan for the Nciv Sporting Alagazine in 1S35. 
Billy was originally purchased by Lord Camel- 
ford and from his possession passed into that of 
Mr. Boynton, member of a Yorkshire family. 

Chalon's portrait of Brainworm, a race-horse, 
was engraved by J C. Easling ; plate 22^ inches 
by i6|- inches : the print was published by R. 
Ackermann. His portraits of the race-horses 
Morelli and Vandyke, were engraved by William 
Say as companion pictures, each plate being 
2 2|^ inches by 18^ inches. The portraits of the 
Prince of Wales' horses, Orville and Sir David, 
exhibited in the Royal Academy of 1808, were 
engraved by William Ward, plates 2 if inches by 
16 inches, and published by Colnaghi & Co., of 



S6 ANIMAL PAINTERS 

23, Cockspur Street, the former on 25th March, 
1809, the latter on the 12 th August in the same 
year. The portrait of Barbarossa, also shown at 
the Royal Academy of 1S08, was engraved by 
William Ward, plate 2i|- inches by 15! inches, 
was published by C. Random, at The Sporting 
Gallery, 5, Hart Street, Bloomsbury Square, on 
2nd December, 1809. His portrait of Selim was 
also engraved by W. Ward, plate 2 if inches by 
16 inches, and published by Random & Sneath, 
The Sporting Gallery, 5, Hart Street, Bloomsbury 
Square, on 25th March, 1809. 

Among the many interesting pictures by this 
artist from which plates were engraved for the 
Sportivg Magazine, may be noticed the portrait 
of a famous Fighting Dog, owned by Lord 
Camelford ; this dog is said to have killed three 
celebrated dogs in his time and was never beaten. 
Dog-fighting, it is hardly necessary to observe, 
was one of the barbarous, but fashionable, "sports " 
of the age. Flora was a famous hunter, belong- 
ing to Lord Darlington ; her great achievement was 
a leap of 23 feet 3 inches. Streamer was a red 
greyhound bred by Mr. George Lane Fox, of 
Bramham Park, and owned by the Rev. F. Best ; 
he won the Cup at the Malton Coursing meeting 
in 1 82 1. Vanity, a blue and white greyhound 
bitch, also the property of Mr. Best, won the Cup 



HENRY BERNARD CHAI.OX 87 

at Malton in the followinsf year. The Dwarf 
Beagles whose portraits appeared in the Magazine 
in 1 83 1, were from the pack of Colonel Thornton, 
who bred them ; these beagles were of the smallest 
breed and were noted for their beauty. Bracer, 
whose picture appeared in the Nevj Sporting 
Magazine in 1836, w^as a famous hound in the 
Linlithgow and Stirlingshire pack : this plate was 
taken from a part of a large picture of Mr. W. R. 
Ramsay, of Barnton, the Master, and his hounds. 

Daniel's Rural Sports, published in four volumes 
by Longman, Hurst, Rees & Orme in 1807, con- 
tains four plates from paintings by Chalon, namely, 
" The Old English Setter," " The Pointer," 
" Spaniels " and " Four Pointers standing to 
Game ; " the first three were engraved by John 
Scott and the last by Laney. Chalons Drawing 
Book of Animals and Birds of every description, 
contained a series of plates from his pictures 
engraved on soft ground. 

The engraving given is from this artist's picture 
of a gamekeeper schooling pointers ; probably the 
work which he exhibited, among others, at the 
Royal Academy in 1805, under the title "Game- 
keepers and Dogs belonging to the Duke of 
York." 

In 1S46 Chalon met with a severe accident, and 
though the Royal Academy catalogue shows that 



S8 AXDIAL PAIXTERS 

he exliibited a picture in the subsequent year, it 
does not neces^irily follow that the work was 
executed after the accident, from the effects of which 
he died in i S49. 



WORKS OF HENRY BERNARD CHALON. 
EXHIBITED IN THZ ROYAL ACADE\n" (193 in nnmber). 

1:^2— {2) i^-VZJJ'C.iPt, WITH CASTZE—LASDSCAPR, JTITH HOSSES. 

T7gj—I5i HORSES, beboi^ a Iteis c£Y:Ek—/T.-iL/AS^ GREYBOVSl^— SKULL 
OF A LlOy— SKULL OF A BEAS—AX OLD EXCLISH SETTER— 

179S— (o).-* P0MESAS7AX DOG— A HUXTE^—AX ASA3IAX, bsijcii^g to 

Lore Uss:±xii—Sl!ETZAXD F-OXi', Iterbas of I>:Essi—A HOESE— 

A HUXZER, y"t-r5^g ni Lrxd Hszi2a=iL 
ijgg— (S) jJ FAJKOZ'S POXY, ieixiiis to Mr. FjeSi— TTFi? OF H.H. STATE 

SCBSES—SORSE AXD lyOG—GEEYHOUXlO—A HORSE— A HUXTEK. 
iStu— (i) HEXZr EA^LL—TTFO CHARGERS, "odDDgJiig to Ihie of Tori— Jf.-JXI' 

OWEX. 
x-ch—I^jC) EEAUin; coe of Hk M^^sn-'s Sisie Hdcss— 3TFi7 CHARGERS— TWO 

HUXTERS—SFAX7ELS FLUSHIXG A WOODCOCK. 
xxx>—MAX AXD DRAY-HORSE. 
1B15— {5) DAXCELiWAY, Vr-.Tp- , ;b2 p.-ijg:lj of Gsossi Grorresar— 5'J'.-!.T7£i, 

tjbjjai> CE Ma^or-G^osrsI Ur7r^'T?-t — M.-^LTESE ASS — A.X ARj^B/.-iV— 

HUXTER—THE BI3URY WELTER STAKES. 
iSoe— (i) DOGS—H.iXXI3AL AXD PRIXCESS, property cf Ihie of Tort 
ikis— (4) GAMEKEEPER AXD DOGS, b=3ccsi=g to Deis at Y3rk.—.VARE— 

GILES, propsrtj of W. Tftr. Esq.— ^P--lir/£X. 
x3a6 — (5) HUXTER .4.XD HACK MARE, vrzrxny of SHr F- Eoyrtoo, Ean. — 

HUXTERS, propi=rry of Coked Taociitoc — HUXTER, ptooerry of A. Robert 

—HUXTERS, j rj j tT LLi of Sr F. Eoj^iioi— 51"Zi DOGS. ; :_ •' H. 

IM7— {3) FAMOUS RACER— FA.MOUS R.iCER— SETTERS. 

i3o£— (4) J/.? DAVID, bj Ti-spesr, wirb Sasoi: CngKv, prOTeTty of Prixe o! 
Wais— (7.?;"7i:i£, J-J jt -Li of Prizio= of W2>5 sns 5=:El=an, to- grooEi— 
BAR3.4R0SS.~, prooerty of Pnucs of Waiss — CARLO, a ^s^ocs sjardd, 

{E^pSkT CB i£rS. &2ZOSCT. 

tScc— (2) DRAYHORSES, jjja^,. of C Ca-V-rt, Esq-, sod WRYXOXE JOE. THE 
DRAYiiAX— HUXTERS. 

lijo— p) HUXTER, prosKTT of Earl of IterSiigtcD— PC'CI^ii ^TZ) SCOTCH 
TEZZIER—SRIGHTOX. irnr^sr, prxiertj of Ear] cf DararifTCD — C^^- 
TOUCHE, £ pKwai, J.>je.o cf Itaci^ of Y^A— TERRIER .AXD TAME 



WORKS OF HENRY BERNARD CHALON 89 

BADGER— EATON, a race-horse, property of Earl of Gros^enor— /".■«/i?K, 
Scotch terrier, property of Duchess of York — COSTIVE., hound, property of 
Earl of Darlington. 

i3ti-(3) FIDGET, a famous blood horse, propert>- of Major J. Moiiat— 7'»'0 PHAETON 
PONIES, property of H.R.H. Princess Charlotte of 'W^l^s^SCORPIOX. a 
famous blood horse, property of H.R.H. Princess Charlotte of "Wales — TWO 
PONIES, property of H.R.H. Princess Charlotte of Wales— ^A' ARABIAN 
BROKE LOOSE. 

iSr2-(3) A HUNTER, property of Viscount Hawarden— ^4 CHARGER, property of 
Earl of Portarlington, and Corpora] of zsrd Light Dragoons, who was at Castle 
of Talavera— ^^00 rAVG PONi', GAMEKEEPER, AND DOGS, propertj- 
of J. Larking, ^sn-— HUNTER AND FOXHOUND, propertj- of the Earl of 
PortarUngton— T-JFO FAVOURITE PHAETON PONIES, propertj" of Princess 
Charlotte of Vfalis— RACE-HORSE— OFFICER'S CHARGER, 7th Hussar^- 
TIVO DOGS, properu- of the Duke of Devonshire. 

i3i3— (3) SALLV, a spaniel— r/T^ EARL OF DARLINGTONS KENNEL, WITH 
HIS HUNTSMAN, DOG-FEEDER, AND MOST CELEBRATED 
HOUNDS OF RABY PACK-^IR MAL.4GIZI, famous race-horse, property 
of Sir M. M. Sykes, Bart., iLP. — C.4MILLUS, famous race-horse, property of 
Sir SL M. Sj-kes, Bart., ^^.V.—PHCEBE, spaniel, property of G. V'ere, Esq. 

1814 — (5) ROSE, a terrier, property- of Lady Graham — FANCY, a spaniel, property of 
E. Poore, Y.^.— GROOM AND HUNTER, belonging to Lady .\ngnsta Vane— 
TWO F.-IMOUS HUNTERS AND HARRIERS, property of Sir B. Graham, 
B^rt-STEDMORE, blood horse, propertj- of Sir B. Graham. 

1815— (5) NOBLE.MAN AND SERVANT ON TWO F.-iST TR0TTING-H.4CKS— 
TWO SPANIELS— MAJOR, a cbzrsei— MAMMOTH, property of Colonel G. 
Thornton — FIDELE, Italian greyhound, property of W". Rogers, Esq. 

i3i6— {3)Z^F/AY.4, a ^vis— OSTRICHES, property of H.R.H. Duchess of York— 
NELSON, Newfoundland dog, property of H.R-H. Duke of York. 

i3t7— (6) FL USH, spaniel (King Charles' breed)— THE ROYAL HUNT, MR. SHARP, 
PRINCE REGENTS HUNTS.MAN, O.V FLA.MINGO, WHIPPERS-IN 
ON FAVOURITE HUNTERS, AND GROUP OF PICKED HOUNDS- 
HORSE, property of Princess Charlotte of Wales, and grooni — BERLIN, a 
favourite Pomeranian, property of Duchess of York — PRINCE LEOPOLD, a 
race-horse, property of the Duke of York, and Whealey the jockey — HORSE 
propert>- of Prince Charlotte of Wales, 
1S18— (to) CROUr -~ r 'S— SPANIEL— TERRIER— MELLOW, managed horse 
propertj- : - Esq. — PIC-EON, an .\i3.Di^ — H.4CK — FAMOUS 

HUNTE.K-^ ...:.:_ :.:4Y SHETLAND PONl'— CHESTNUT HUNTER- 
SPANIEL. 

iSiq— (8) SPANIEL— LADYS HORSE, PONIES, SPANIEL— HEAD OF FICKLE, 
a terrier — G/G HORSE AND NEWFOUNDLAND BITCH — VICARE, 
hunter, property- of Earl of Darlington — HUNTER, belonging to Countess of 
Darlington— Cci«'5', belonging to Countess of Darlington— 7"A'^£'£ HORSES, 
Tlt-0~FOA-HOUNDS, property of Hon. X. FeUowcs. 

iS»-{6) PERSI.4N .M.4RE, presented to His Majesty Emperor of Pei^z-ESSE.Y, a 
hunter, and his groom, with distant View of Thorpe Hall, Yorkshire — HUNTER 
AND NEWFOUNDLAND DOG— AN ARABIA.V, propertj- of His Majestj- 
TWO GREYHOUNDS— HUNTER A.VD NEWFOUNDLAND DOG. 

l32i— (3) FOXHOUND, propertj- of Sir M. M. Sykes — HORSE, property of Miss 
Beaumont, of Britton Hall, Yorkshire, with Groom — G.4MEKEEPER .4ND 
PONY, WITH POINTERS. 



90 ANIMAL PAINTERS 



lEii— {4) HUSTER'S HEAD AXD FOXHOVSD—HUSTER a:'Z ---- •-?— 

OLD HCXTER, with Distant View oe lirl of Csrfisks Seat, - - -— 

SPAyiEL. 
iSie— (3) TtFO HUSTERS— TERRIER. 
I&3— (3) LITTLE MARE AXD KITTY, fcvo=ii-.5 hzunezs—Hl/XTER property of 

Coduess rflteriiEStoo— PO-Vl-- AXD SPORTIXG DOCS. 
1826— rWO SPAXIELS. 
iSzT— {4) VIXEX, a icrAei—PIXCHER, te^er— BLOOD HORSE, v^agczty of 

CcOooel Sir Jains Moozt, Bart.— 7"^0J/.45 DAXCER, ESQ., iVITH 

FRIEXDS, HORSE AXD DOGS. 
iSiS— {2) GIG HORSE— WOODCOCK. 
1B29— (2) COZ^A'Xi, properTT CB Hca. E- Petre and Wn. ScxKt ma j^Kke- - ~ ~£, 

XORn-EGIAX Ra'sBIT, cat, AXD TiVO TERRIERS, : irjy 

EIEs-jn, Esq., cf Birericy, Yorishiie. 
1S30 {5) SP.iXIEL—SO.V AXD PIGS— NEWFOUXDLAXD— THE illSCHIEV- 

OUS BOY— PA TCH, a pony. 
1831— (4) HL'XTER—THE BOY. a Peisian aX—HACK, property rf John Fieid, Esq.— 

DEATH OF THE FOX, with Portrait cf Slarqnes of Ce-.V = -- a— -■< 

Lo^xiafcip's Foihocnds. 
i.l-S2r-{3) HVXTER .AXD SPAXIEL— SPOT, Ix^Sz^S^'haa^T.-, . . . ^ 

DeTctlihire — Tii-'O CATS, a white Petsan and a Siberian — F.-iXG, a hunter, 

pcotKTty of Manrcis rfSEgo, Mr. Connelly in Vidrile— TERRIER. 
zZj3—HEAD OF POXY, property of Ed. T. Q^Iey, Esq., Halnaiy Hail, Yatishire. 
iSj4— (2) TOBIAS, pooy, froptity of Dndsess of Qweland— .i?.^ 7T-? TCHER, WITH 

FA you RITE TERRIERS, jsxiperty of Rev. E. I :. Darlington. 

i53j-<2) BESS, an old English masC3, pr-iperty o.' Dnke cf —XEWFOVXD- 

LAXD DOGS, f^ojerty of Lady Frances W.ngh: V,;.^:-. 
1S36— (2) BR.iCER, cflfhrated fDihonnd m Linlithgow and Sdrlingshire Vzdic— MASTER 

HOPE JOHXSTOX, SOX OF JOHX J. HOPE JOHXSTOX, ESQ., MJ"., 

OX PO:rY, tM L^mu of Dowager Lady Tarj-iien. 
1237 — (3) BETTY, cob, O^ird 0: series of seven Passions cf the Horse : JOY, old hunter 

in paddcci ronsed by Tiew-haI!oo of hont^ma r— J L'RH.A M L.-iXDSC.-iPE 

R.i S i - C.4S TLE IX DIS TA XCE-Tusl of SEiis of seven Pasaons of the Horse, 

RAGE H'VTH AGO.TY, Arabian Scenery. 

r:3=— (4) SPAXIEL—SPAXISH BAr:.T—^COTC.fI TERRIERS, Scenery near Edin- 

' bcrgh— /'OJl"J". 
ily)—{S) SP.-iXIEI^TURPIX. . ind dog, bred by llr. Charles Cater in t335, 

won head prizE at Pirblic Sp^i. SLis- in iSyj-BROOD MARE, li'lTH FOAL. 

iZvo—ls)/IM CROJf, spamel— TWO OF HER MAJESTY S ST.iTE HORSES IX 
CHARACTER OF COURAGE (Passions rf the fioT^)— CELEBRATED 
RACER, DALPIXE—DAHLI.-i, %xejhoai^— PARTRIDGE SHOOT I XG, 
^eiV==il> of Thomas Henry Htypt, Esq. 

J243— (3) THOROUGH-BRED SP.iXIEL OF KIXG CHARLES BREED— SYKE 
TERRIER— TERROR, Pasaons of the Horse. 

ili^—iS) FOREST MARE .4XD FOAL— TERRIERS ATA RABBIT HOLE— 
W.iXDERIXG BOY, lauale!, -,: 'T '; "I- '.-_ 

il^i-SP.-iXIEL OF KIXG CHARLL 

j;45— (2) TERRIER— GOATS, FROM rUXJAB, WiJH THEIR SIKH SHEP- 
HERD. 
I'.iT—TOYY, propenj- cf Mrs. Elandfoid. 



WORKS OF HENRY BERNARD CilALON 9 1 



PLATES IN THE SPORTING MAGAZINE (19 in number). 

GREYHOUND, 1799, belonging to the Rev. H. B. Dudley, Bradwell Lodge, Esse.'c ; 
engraved by J. Scott. 

FIGHTING DOG, 1806, belonging to Lord Camelford ; engraved by H. R. Cook. 

(4) AN OLD ENGLISH SPRINGER, 1807, bred at Thorney, Nottinghamshire, belonging 
to N. G. Nevill, Esq.; etched by H. R. Cook— BOAR HOUNDS, the property of 
the Duchess of York; engraved by H. R. Cook- AD/ UTANTS, the property of 
the Duchess of York; etched by H. R. Cook— JIIAI.TESE ASS, 13 hands high ; 
etched by H. R. Cook. 

(3) CREAM-COLOURED CHARGER, 1808, an Hanoverian horse, belonging to His 
Majesty ; engraved by H. R. Cook— ,-1 WILD CA T ; engraved by H. R. Cook— 
DICK THE HUNTSMAN, well-known at Ne\vin.arket as a runner with hounds ; 
engraved by H. R. Cook. 

(2) WAG, 1809, a dog of King Charles' breed ; engraved by H. R. Cook— INDIAN RED 
DEER, painted for the Duchess of York ; engraved by H. R. Cook. 

(2) COSTIVE, 1810; etched by H. R. Cook— BONNY LASS, a hound of the Earl of 

Darlington's pack ; engraved by H. R. Cook. 
FLORA, 1811, property of the Earl of Darlington ; engraved by H. R, Cook. 
OTTER-HOUND, i8i2, belonging to the Hon. Mr. Leslie ; engraved by H. R. Cook. 
THE D.4RLEY AR.4BI.4N, 1824, from a copy of the original drawing, belonging to 

Henry Darley, Esq., of Aldby Park, near York ; engraved by Webb. 
STREAMER, 1826 ; engraved by W. Raddon. 
V.4NITY, 1827 ; engraved by Raddon. 
DiVARF BEAGLES, iSsr ; engraved by H. R. Cook. 

PLATES LM THE NEW SPORTING MAGAZINE (4 in 
number). 

PINCHER AND SHIVERS, terriers, 1S34, Shivers w.ts the property of Mr. Surtees, of 
Hamsterley Hall, in the county of Durham ; engraved by Duncan. 

TOMMY SINKS, 1835, born in village of Stapleton, gained a living by killing vermin ; 
engraved by Duncan. 

WASP, CHILD AND BILLY, bull-dogs, 1833; engraved by Duncan. 

BRACER, Mr. Ramsay, the Master Linlithgow and Stirlingshire, and his Hounds, 1836; 
engraved by Duncan. 



92 



LUKE CLENNELL. 

(Born 1781. Died 1840.) 

T UKE CLENNELL was born at Ulgham, 
-*— ' near Morpeth in Northumberland, on 8th 
April, 1 78 1. His father, a farmer, apprenticed 
the boy to an uncle who was a grocer ; but the 
shop was so little to his taste that he was 
removed, and allowed for a lime to follow his 
own bent, which declared itself at an early period. 
His love of drawing soon became marked, and 
he employed himself in making pictures of his 
rural surroundings. Unfortunately or perhaps for- 
tunately, as the event proved, the innate mischief 
of boyhood found vent in the artistic direction of 
caricature, and, having on one occasion outstepped 
the limits of a neighbour's toleration by this mis- 
directed exercise of talent, it was considered 
desirable to put an end to the comparative idle 
life he was leading, 

Luke Clennell was lucky enough to possess an 
uncle, Mr. Thomas Clennell, of Morpeth, who 
recognised the genuineness of his gift for drawing, 
and through this gentleman's instrumentality he 



LUKE CLENNELL 93 

was apprenticed, in April, 1797, when sixteen years 
of age, to Thomas Bewick, of Newcastle, one 
of the most distinguished wood engravers that 
this country has ever produced, and also one of 
our most able and observant ornithologists. Under 
Bewick's able direction the youth's natural abilities 
were turned into right channels and speedily 
developed. Such was his progress that Bewick 
entrusted him with the execution of some of 
Robert Johnson's designs for the second volume 
of the Birds. This book was published in 1804, 
the first volume having appeared in 1797. Clen- 
nell would, therefore, have been twenty-one or 
twenty-two years of age when he undertook a 
task which indicates his competence as much by 
reason of the high standard of excellence required 
by the man who gave it as by its intrinsic difficulty. 

He did not confine himself to engraving ; he 
designed many of the illustrations for the third 
edition of Solomon Hodgson's The Hive of Ancient 
and Modern Literahtre, published in 1806; several 
of the illustrations in this work bear his initials. 
Wallis and Scholey's History of England contains 
much work by Clennell's hand, done by the young 
artist during his apprenticeship to Bewick ; he also 
engraved the plates which his employer had under- 
taken to furnish. 

His contributions to the latter work were the 



94 ANIMAL PAINTERS 

means of bringing him to London. I\Ir. Scholey 
did not fail to mark the merit of Clennell's designs 
and plates, and in 1804, on the expiration of the 
seven years, for which he had been apprenticed 
to Bewick, sent for him to execute commissions for 
his firm. After settling in London the artist mar- 
ried a daughter of Charles Warren, the copper- 
plate engraver. His marriage was the means of 
introducing him to the society of Raimbach, Finden, 
and other talented men, who vied with each other 
in producing the delicate embellishments for books 
published by Sharpe, Du Rovory, and others at 
the beginning of the century ; and doubtless 
this alliance with Miss Warren had the effect 
of making him many useful friends. 

He soon succeeded as an engraver; in 1806 he 
was awarded the Gold Palette of the Society of 
Arts for an engraving on wood of a battle 
subject. About the same time he executed six- 
teen wood engravings from designs by Thurston 
to illustrate James Beattie's Minsti-e!, which was 
published by Davison, of Alnwick, in Northumber- 
land, in 1807 : from which it appears that he left 
a reputation behind him when he left the north 
country, and that his success in London was not 
lost upon his friends near home. He also did 
some of the pictures in W. M. Craig's Scriptnre 
Illustrated, which was published at this time. In 



LUKE CLENNELL 95 

180S he engraved the plates for Falconer's Ship- 
wreck, published by Cadell and Davies ; these 
illustrations are made the subject of high and un- 
qualified praise by Jackson in his History of Wood 
Engraving. For Ackermann's Religious Eviblenis, 
published in 1809, he engraved some of Thurston's 
designs, notably those entitled the " Call to Vigil- 
ance " and " The Soul Encaged." He worked in 
good company for this book, as Nesbit, Branston, 
and Hole were also engaged upon the task of 
enoravino- the blocks. Indeed, Clennell's career at 
this period was one of steady advancement, for in 
1809 he was presented by the Duke of Norfolk 
at the Annual Meeting of the Society of Arts 
with the Gold Medal for his enoravino' on wood 
of the design by Sir Benjamin West, P.R.A. for 
the Highland Society's Diploma. 

In 1 8 10 we find proof that success with the 
graving tool had done nothing to divert Luke 
Clennell's ambition to make a name as a painter, 
for in that year he appears for the first time as an 
exhibitor in the gallery of the British Institution, 
to which during the next eight years he con- 
tributed fifteen pictures. In a year or two he 
worked with both the graver and the brush, 
but, having found his footing as an artist, the 
former was laid aside. His last notable work 
as an engraver was done in the years 1810-1812, 



96 ANIMAL PAINTERS 

when he executed the plates for Rogers' Poems 
from the drawinsfs of Thomas Stothard, R.A. 
These are the most esteemed pieces of work accom- 
pHshed by Clennell as an engraver, 

After this he practically renounced engraving for 
painting in oil and water-colours, and attained in 
this field the success his abilities entitled him to 
expect. We learn from the History of the Old 
Water Colour Society that in 1810, 181 1, and 181 2, 
Clennell was a member of the Associated Artists ; 
these were the last years of the existence of that 
body. On 8th June, 181 2, he was elected an 
Associate of the Water-Colour Society, and in the 
same year he exhibited for the first time at the 
Royal Academy. His maiden picture at this exhi- 
bition was entitled " Fox-hunters Regaling after the 
Chase " (which was twice engraved), and the cata- 
logue gives his address as 9, Constitution Row, 
Gray's Inn Road. He was apparently of somewhat 
restless disposition, for in 18 13 he had changed his 
residence to 34, Tonbridge Place, New Road, 
London; and in 1815 and 1816, the last years of 
his working life, his address in the Royal Academy 
catalogues is given as -^i, Penton Place, Penton- 
ville. The exhibitions of the Old Water-Colour 
Society received altogether eighteen of his pictures, 
while fifteen were exhibited in the galleries of the 
British Institution, and thirty-one were shown at 
various other galleries. 



LUKE CLENNKLL 97 

The drawings shown at the exhibitions of the Old 
Water Colour Society were chiefly figure groups of 
contemporary life in picturesque aspects, soldiers, 
smugglers, fishermen, country folk, &c., the works 
of the landscape and figure artist rather than the 
animal painter. 




•^ '■ "- T.^ 



Riding in a Storm. 



Fairly large sums have been paid for good 
examples of Clennell's water-colour work in recent 
years. In 1S80, at Mr. C. J. Pooley's sale, "The 
Ferry Boat," a painting 32 inches by 17^ inches, 
realised 64 guineas. 

Among Clennell's earlier paintings not pertaining 
to sport were "The Arrival of the Mackerel Boat" 
7 



98 ANIMAL PAINTERS 

and " The Day after the Fair." These were 
remarked for the skill with which the rustic 
characters were portrayed, and for the mastery 
of colour displayed. In 18 14 he painted, in col- 
laboration with Benjamin Marshall, a portrait of 
Thomas Gosden, the famous sporting bookbinder, 
whose name recurs more than once in these pages. 
Gosden is represented, gun in hand, with dogs 
beside him. This picture was beautifully engraved 
in mezzotint. A work published in 18 15, entitled 
Recreations in Naticral History or Popular Sketches 
of British Quadrupeds, large paper, quarto, con- 
tains twenty-four plates engraved from pictures by 
Luke Clennell. In 18 16 he won the premium of 
150 guineas, offered by the British Institution, for 
the best sketch of " The Decisive Charge of the 
Life Guards at Waterloo," with a picture that did 
much to increase public interest in his work and 
enhance his reputation. This canvas and another 
of exceptional excellence, " The Overthrow of 
the French Army at the Battle of Waterloo," 
were shown at the exhibition of the British 
Institution in 18 16. 

It cannot be doubted but that these pictures, 
more especially the former, were the means of 
brino-inof the artist the commission which contri- 
buted much to induce the terrible affliction which 
terminated his working life in 181 7. The Earl 



LUKE CLENNELL 99 

of Bridgewater requested Clennell to paint a large 
picture to commemorate the meeting of " The 
Allied Sovereigns at the Guildhall Banquet ' 
after Waterloo, a work which may fairly be 
termed one of international interest. Clennell 
experienced infinite difficulty in obtaining the 
necessary sketches of the great personages who 
attended that memorable banquet and who were 
therefore to figure on his canvas, and the artistic 
temperament suffered under the stress of worry 
thus caused. With increasing fame, too, had 
come increasing work. Clennell was literally the 
victim of his own success, and a career which 
gave every promise of leading to the greatest 
heights of artistic fame came to a most painful 
close. The Guildhall Banquet picture was never 
painted, for Clennell's mind gave way under the 
strain of overwork, and in his thirty-sixth year he 
became hopelessly insane. To make matters worse 
his wife was soon afterwards overtaken by the 
same disorder, and their children were thus 
deprived of both parents and left unprovided for. 
For their benefit " The Decisive Charge of the 
Life Guards at Waterloo " was engraved by 
Bromley and published by subscription, the sum 
so realised being invested for Clennell's family. 

Thus sadly ended the artistic career of a painter 
and engraver who had done much, and must, under 



lOO ANIMAL PAINTERS 

happier circumstances, have achieved far more. 
The remainder of Luke Clennell's life was passed 
under control until on 9th February, 1840, he died 
a harmless lunatic in a Newcastle Asylum. Four 
years after his decease a tablet to his memory by 
R. Davis, a local sculptor, was placed in St. 
Andrew's Church in that city. 

A certain melancholy interest thus attaches to 
the six plates in British Field Sports, published 
in 18 18 by W. H. Scott. These are from Clen- 
nell's " Fox-hunters Regaling," " Fox-hunting," 
"Dog Pointing," "Squirrels," "The Fox," and 
" Badger and Dogs," an engraving from the last 
of which is here reproduced ; an example of his 
engraving in the shape of a small woodcut entided 
" Riding in a Storm," appears on page 97. 

In some of Luke Clennell's works we find much 
that recalls the style and touch of George Morland. 
It is very unlikely that he went to the paintings 
of that artist for inspiration however. Morland 
died in the autumn of the year 1804 which saw 
Clennell's arrival in London, and his pictures had 
long ceased to find the acceptance they well 
deserved and fully obtained at an earlier period. 
The surroundings amid which Luke Clennell 
passed his youth fully explain the love of rural 
scenery and sport which found scope in the 
exercise of his art. He was one of the very few 



WORKS OF LUKE CLENNELL lOI 

contemporary animal painters whose works were 
never engraved for the Sporting Magazine. 



WORKS OF LUKE CLENNELL. 

IN THE BRITISH MUSEUM. 

(i) PORTRAIT OF SIR IF. DOMl'ILLE, BarL—HnaA and shoulders in profile, 
turned to left, with fur collar and broad chain over the shoulders. Probably done in 
1814, when Sir W. Domville (b. 1742, d. 1833) was Lord Mayor of London. Water- 
colours and pencil ; size, 7I in. by 6\ in. 

(2) A COUNTRY MARKET PLACE.— kn open space, facing a long building with 

five gables, over a colonnade, around which are groups of people and a horse with a 
barrel on a dray; in the foreground a cart and two horses, and men near some 
barrels (right). Sepia; size, loj in. by 13J in. 

(3) NEWCASTLE FERRV.—FassengiiTS, landing from the ferry boat under the quay 

(right) by which is moored a brig and a sloop further to the left ; a little beyond 
them a stone bridge. Water colours ; size, 5J in. by Sg in. 

(4) Two on one mount, viz. :— (a) TILBURY POKT.—V'xvi from the river of the low 

buildings and ramparts of the fort ; sailing and rowing boats in a strong wind 
tossing on the rough water. Sepia; size, 4^ in. by 7^ in. — (^) THE LOGAN 
STONE— A rocky cliff projecting into the sea, seen from the land side ; on its 
nearest summit is balanced the Logan stone, with a man sitting on its top and 
others below. Sepia; size, 5 in. by 7I in. 

(5) LA UNCHING THE LIFE BOA T.—h sea beach in a storm ; (right) a jetty dimly 

seen, and in the foreground a boat-house and sailors launching the life-boat into the 
breakers ; a man in command directing from the shore, and two women and a boy 
at the extreme right. Indian ink with pen outlines ; size, ii\ in. by zo^ in. 

IN THE SOUTH KENSINGTON MUSEUM. 

THE PRESS GANG (sketch in sepia). 

THE SAIV PIT (water colour), signed and dated iSio, given by Mr. H. Vaughan. 

A RIVER SCENE (water colour). 

EXHIBITED IN THE ROYAL ACADEMY. 
(6 in number). 

YEAR 

iii2— FOX-HUNTERS REGALING AFTER THE PLEASURES OF THE 

CHASE. 
1S13— THE OLD FISHERMAN. 
tSn—THE GAMEKEEPER. 
xZiS—THE CAROUSAL. 
1S16— (2) BAGGAGE IVAGGONS I.V A THUNDERSTORM— THE PEDLARS. 



I02 



CHARLES COLLINS. 

(Born 1680. Died 1744.) 

/^HARLES COLLINS, born in 1680, was 
^-^ essentially a painter of English bird-life. 
His works are very beautiful, being executed with 
rare delicacy and sense of colour. He possessed 
a marvellous eye for the distinctive pose and 
character of a bird and his work betrays close and 
accurate study of birds in their haunts. His 
pictures of game are particularly true to nature. 
He painted his own portrait with a hare and birds. 

A picture of " Poultry," painted in 1733, from 
the collection of Sir G. Osborne Page Turner, 
Bittlesden Park, Woburn, was sold at Christie's in 
1824. 

Another sale, in 1825, included " A Landscape," 
with woodman and a woman with a basket ; this 
picture belonged to Mr. James Milstead, the 
Terrace, Edgware Road. 

He executed three oil paintings of British Birds 
in the year 1736 ; each picture measures 18 inches 
by 12 inches. These paintings, executed 162 years 
ago, are in e.xcellent preservation and are in their 




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CHARLES COLLINS IO3 

original frames. They were sold at Christie's in 
May, 1896, from the collection of Mr. C. H. T. 
Hawkins, of Pulborough, Sussex. 

He painted twelve pictures, representing upwards 
of 100 birds, which were engraved, plates 15 inches 
by i8|- inches. 

In the British Museum are two books, Scone's 
AvUim, and Plates of Birds, the illustrations in 
which are by Collins; these were published by John 
Lee in 1736; twelve plates are coloured. In the 
second book eight are line engravings, 18 inches by 
14 inches. 

Charles Collins died in 1 744. 



I04 



ABRAHAM COOPER, R.A. 

(Born 17S7. Died 1S68.) 

A BRAHAM COOPER was born on the 8th 
-^^ September, 17S7, in Red Lion Street, 
Holborn, where his father carried on business as 
a tobacconist. The elder Cooper was afterwards 
an innkeeper at Holloway, and at one period 
followed the same calling at Edmonton. While 
still at school the youth's talent displayed itself 
in the sketches of horses, dogs and ships with 
which he embellished his copy-books and margins ; 
these differed much from the usual scribblings of 
idle boyhood armed with a pencil. His artistic 
gift was not observed, or if observed was not en- 
couraged, and CoojDcr began life in Astley's Theatre, 
of which his uncle, Mr. Davis, was at that time 
manager. The precise nature of his duties is not 
stated, but we may take it for granted that the 
stables received much of his attention ; for when 
he severed his connection with the theatre and 
devoted himself to art, the first picture of which 
we have record is that of an old horse named 
Frolic, the property of Mr. Henry Meux, of 



ABRAHAM COOPER I 05 

Ealing-. The portrait must have been an excellent 
one for Mr. Meux declared nothinsf should induce 
him to part with it, and from that time forward 
he was Cooper's constant friend and patron. 

It was in 1809, when Cooper was in his twenty- 
second year that he discovered his true vocation ; 
and he applied himself diligently to study of the 
rudiments of his art, perusing also the writings of 
contemporary authorities on painting. The works 
of Benjamin Marshall, R.A., his senior by twenty 
years, particularly attracted him, and through his 
uncle, Mr. Davis, he obtained an introduction to 
the famous horse-painter. Marshall received him 
with all the traditional courtesy extended by the 
old artist to the young, giving him admission to 
his studio at all times and doing whatever lay in 
his power to promote his interests. 

Guided and encouraged by Marshall, Cooper 
pursued his studies assiduously ; each fresh attempt 
displayed qualities which strengthened his friends 
in their conviction that he possessed exceptional 
talent, and thanks to his abilities and his own charm 
of manner, he continued to extend his acquaintance 
among the leading artists of the day. Cooper was 
fortunate in making friends thus early in his career, 
for however great his own gifts he could not fail to 
profit by all he saw and heard in the studios of 
older men who had made their mark as animal 



I06 ANIMAL PAINTERS 

painters. In the year 1812, he exhibited his first 
pictures at the Royal Academy, "The Farrier's 
Shop " and " A Terrier's Head ; " and from this 
time onward till 1869, when his last and posthumous 
work was shown, he sent in upwards of 332 pictures. 
It is worth noting that during this long period of 
fifty-eight years, no single exhibition lacked 
examples of his work, a record that perhaps stands 
alone in the annals of the Royal Academy. 

In 1812 Cooper became a subscriber to the 
Artists' Benevolent Fund, and from being a 
member was afterwards nominated one of its 
guardians, a circumstance which points to his being 
a man of sound good sense and business capacity. 
Industriously as he worked at his profession he 
found time to discharge his duties with such success 
that he was subsequently appointed Chairman of 
the Institution, a position he held for five years. 

He was for five years a constant exhibitor at the 
ralleries of the Oil and Water Colour Societv, his 
thirteen contributions to these bein^ for the most 
part sporting subjects. He only ceased to send 
works to the exhibitions of this Society when 
elected an Associate of the Royal Academy, which 
distinction was conferred upon him in the year 
181 7. To the e.xhibitions of the British Institution 
he contributed altogether seventy-four pictures. 

For a few vears he seems to have devoted his 



ABRAHAM COOPER IO7 

brush almost exclusively to portraits of animals, 
if his contributions to the Royal Academy exhibi- 
tions fairly represent the scope of his work. In 18 16 
he made a sketch entitled, " The Battle of Ligny," 
which does not appear in the Exhibition catalogues 
but for which he was awarded 1 50 guineas. 

This was the first of many battle pieces from 
his easel ; such scenes naturally appealed to one 
who delighted to portray horses and men in strong 
action, and it will be observed that the majority 
of his battle pictures were designed to this end. 
Such were " The Battle of Marston Moor," exhibited 
in 1819 ; "The Combat between Sergeant Bothwell 
and Balfour of Burley " (Burleigh), a scene from 
Sir Walter Scott's Old Mortality, exhibited in 
1820 ; " Cromwell at Marston Moor," depicting 
the incident which turned the day in favour of the 
Parliament forces ; the Protector, though wounded 
in the right arm called up a reserve and placing 
himself at its head, with the aid of Lord Manchester 
and others, won the victory. This picture was 
exhibited in 1821. " Rupert's Standard at Marston 
Moor " and " The Battle of Strigonium," were 
among the pictures he sent to the exhibition of 
the following year. Marston Moor found special 
favour with Cooper; the exhibitions of 1823, 1852 
and 1863 also containing pictures inspired by the 
history of the fight. Other scenes of the civil 



I08 ANIMAL PAINTERS 

war were, " Arthur, Lord Capel, defending 
Colchester for the King," a work containing por- 
traits of Lord Capel and Fairfax, Sir George Lisle 
and Sir Charles Lucas, shown in 1823; "The 
Retreat from Naseby" shown in 1833 ; " The Fight 
at Cropredy Bridge, where Sir William Waller 
on 29th June, 1644, met King Charles L," shown in 
1841 ; "Prince Rupert routing the Besiegers at 
Newark," 22nd March, 1644, shown in 1844. The 
Crusades, the Scottish Rebellion, the Peninsular 
War, Indian wars, and, last, the Crimean War, also 
provided Cooper with opportunities of displaying 
his marvellous skill in portraying the Horse. 
" Hors de Combat," one of three battle pieces 
shown in 1853, was thus described by a critic of 
the time : " an old standard-bearer is leaning on 
his white charger which extends its weary limbs 
on the ground : the man is worn and sjient by a 
hard day's fight which has left pretty evident 
marks on his person ; the white horse is wonder- 
fully painted, texture preserved, and the tired, 
relaxed expression shows at once this master's 
knowledcfe of horse life." 

This white horse figured frequently in Cooper's 
pictures. The Sporting Magazine critic in his review 
of the Royal Academy pictures of 1836, remarks of 
the " Death of Harold at the Battle of Hastings," 
that its readers "will be gratified at least with an 







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ABRAHAM COOrER IO9 

old acquaintance a zohite charger who ' makes him- 
self so generally useful,' in Cooper's studio and who 
would throw no discredit upon any of the most 
celebrated of Ducrow's unrivalled stud." We need 
not doubt but that this is the animal which figures 
in " The Studio," here reproduced. 

In 1820 Cooper was elected to full honours as an 
Academician, presenting as his diploma picture, 
" Sir Trevisan flying from Despair," a scene from 
Spenser's Faerie Queene. The Knight is depicted 
helmetless, but otherwise in full armour ; he rides 
a black horse which is galloping along a rocky 
track towards the spectator's right ; the background 
is dark with storm clouds. 

It may here be added that in 1S62, six years 
before his death, he resigned the honour of Royal 
Academicianship. 

Among Cooper's countless works of sporting 
interest we may notice a few. A portrait of Elis, 
winner of the St. Leger of 1836, was exhibited at 
the Academy in 1S38: the jockey John Day is in 
the saddle, Doe, Lord Lichfield's trainer, standing 
on the risfht. In the backq-round is a travellinsf 
horse-box or van from which The Drummer is 
descending. A portrait of Mango, winner of 
the St. Leger in 1837, was exhibited in the same 
year ; Sam Day is the jockey in the saddle, and in 
the right background we have again the travelling 



no ANIMAL PAINTERS 

horse-box with The Drummer emergrinof there- 
from. The Drummer was a kicky travelHng 
companion, his van-mates winning the St. Leger 
in two successive years. This picture was painted 
for Mango's owner, C. C. Greville, Esq. 

The van, or travelHng horse-box for conveying 
race-horses from one course to another, was first 
used by Mr. A. W. Terrett in 1816, when that 
gentleman had his horse, Sovereign, thus con- 
veyed from Red Marley, in Worcestershire, to 
Newmarket to fulfil his engagement in the Two 
Thousand guineas. Mr. Terrett first made use of 
a caravan to convey fat bullocks to Smithfield 
Fat Stock Show, and so well satisfied was he 
with the result that it occurred to him to try 
how the system would answer in carrying race- 
horses long distances by road. After his ex- 
perience had proved the advantages of the horse 
caravan, many prominent turfites adopted it, 
among them the Earl of Lichfield, the Marquis 
of Exeter, the Earl of Chesterfield, Lord Suffield, 
Mr. Greville and John Day. 

Cooper also exhibited in 1838 portraits of Airy, 
winner of the Brighton Stakes of 1837, with litde 
Will Day up, and Hassan, a grey Arab painted 
for Henry Thomas Hope, Esq. He painted in- 
numerable portraits of the famous race-horses of 
his time and also of hunters. 



ABRAHAM COOPER 1 1 T 

Few Royal Academy Exhibitions during his 
working Hfe did not contain a horse portrait of 
interest to turfites or fox-hunters. In 1838, he 
painted a hunt group of Sir James Flower with 
his hounds, huntsman and whipper-in ; the men 
wear the hunt uniform, green with blue collar. 
A groom holds Lady Flower's horse ready for 
his mistress to mount. " The Day Family," 
also exhibited in 1838, shows Cooper as a por- 
trait painter ; the picture, which measures 4 feet 
2 inches by 3 feet 2 inches, contains the follow- 
ing likenesses : Mrs. Anne Day and Mrs. John 
Day, the jockey's mother and wife, in a mule 
carriage, John Day, whip in hand, standing on the 
left, John Day, junior, leaning on the shaft of the 
carriage, Samuel Day on Venison and William 
Day on Chateau d'Espagne. The painting of 
the horses shows infinite care and skill, and the 
fore-shortening of the mule is very cleverly managed. 

An excellent example of Cooper's work is his 
portrait of "Thomas Waring Esq.," of Chelsfield, 
Kent, shown in 1836, and engraved by W. B. 
Scott in the following year; Mr. Waring is painted 
on a favourite hunter named Peter, with five 
couples of his harriers grouped round his horse. 
" Nimrod," in a descriptive article written when the 
engraving was published, gives the following 
account of Mr. Waring's hounds : — 



112 ANIMAL PAINTERS 

" Mr. W'armg, as Master of Harriers, hunts the country 
between Farningham and Sevenoaks, in Kent. The horse 
upon which he is mounted may be called a pattern-card for 
the purpose for which he is wanted. From the great obHquity 
of shoulder he must be a good and safe fencer, and from the 
setting-on of his head and his apparently placid disposition, 
it is no wonder he is a favourite. His hounds, as Mr. 
Cooper has represented them, are thoroughbred harriers, 
without a cross of foxhound, not rounded in the ear and 
conveying to us the idea of being well calculated to hunt." 

The reproduction from W. B. Scott's engraving 
preserves the prominent features of the artist's 
wonderful draughtsmanship ; the drawing of horse 
and hounds aHke betray his talent for catching the 
character and subtle peculiarities of individual 
animals. 

Cooper had practical and intimate knowledge of 
field sports, and this knowledge is made very 
evident in his pictures. He v/as an all-round 
sportsman, who rode well to hounds ; was a good 
shot and an exceptionally clever fly-fisher. He 
was a keen angler to the last. It is recorded of 
him that from a lake in Capheaton Park, North- 
umberland, the seat of Sir John Swinburne, Bart., 
which he frequently fished during his later years, 
he killed pike, perch, and other coarse fish with 
the fiy. In the Sporting Magazine of 1859 we 
find reference to the artist's love of the rod ; then 
seventy-two years old, he was "as fond as ever 
of the art, a very expert fisherman, and well 



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ABRAHAM COOPER II3 

acquainted with many of the streams in England 
and north of Tweed." 

Mr. Wheble, the proprietor of the Sporting 
Magazine, "discovered" Cooper in iSii, the 
year before pictures from the artist's easel were 
exhibited in the Royal Academy, and from that 
date until 1S69 eighty-nine engravings from his 
pictures were published in the Magazine, many 
of these being works which had been hung on 
the Academy walls. John Scott and J. Webb 
engraved a large proportion of these plates, but 
the names of other engravers of the first rank, 
J. H. Engleheart and E. Hacker particularly, occur 
with frequency on more recent prints. 

Among the pictures engraved for separate jaub- 
lication we may note the portrait of a famous 
pointer named "Shot," size of plate 24^ inches 
by iQi inches (with this picture was published a 
companion by Agasse of " Dash," a famous setter) ; 
" Fallow Deer," " Stag," and " Roebuck," three 
engravings on stone by Fairland, the plates 
measuring each 12 inches by 10 inches; "Ring- 
wood," "Carlo and Shandy," "Fidele," and "Juno," 
four companion pictures, also engraved on stone 
by Fairland, plates 14 inches by 11 inches; and 
"A Fo.x Hunt," size of plate 8^ inches by 7 inches. 
These prints were published by R. Ackermann. 

Cooper numbered among his friends and patrons 
8 



114 ANIMAL PAINTERS 

the first sportsmen in England. Of these, as 
collectors of his works, may be named, H.M. 
George IV. ; the Dukes of Grafton, Bedford, and 
Marlborough ; the Marquis of Stafford ; the Earls 
of Essex, Carlisle, Egremont, Upper Ossory, and 
Brownlow ; Lords Ribblesdale, Arundel, Towns- 
end, Ducie, Kerr, Bentinck, and Holland ; the 
Hon. Grantley Berkeley ; Sirs M. White Ridley, 
R. C. Hoare, G. T. Hampson, J. Swinburne, and 
Grey Egerton ; Colonel Udney ; Messrs. Henry 
Meux, G. W. Taylor, H. Combe, E. Marjoribanks, 
George Morant, J. G. Lambton, F. Freeling, J. 
Archer-Houblon, R. Alston, T. Miles, R. Frank- 
land, John Turner, T. Nash, N. W. Ridley Col- 
borne, and D. Marjoribanks. 

A writer in the Sporting Magazine (vol. cxxxiv.) 
of 1859 so aptly sums up the merits of this artist's 
works that we cannot do better than quote a few 
lines from him : — 

" Whether racing, hunting, shooting, or fishing, you have 
only to look at them to see that they are done by a thorough 
sportsman, and are sure to bring back some pleasant recol- 
lection of the past — either when you were at Newmarket and 
had a pony on something of Lord George's — you re- 
member John Day sitting with his hands on both thighs, 
the horse with his nostrils extended, and remarked the 
dilated eye on his going back to weigh just as Mr. Cooper 
had depicted him ; how Todd, when Mr. Coombe hunted 
the Berkeley country, capped on the hounds in the Wood- 
lands when the meet was at Halton, and the fox broke away 



zssa! 






CD 



ABRAHAM COOPER I I 5 

in a line for Mendover. You had a glorious five-and-thirty 
minutes — only t-so up and yourself, the others on the wrong 
side of the wood. You felt half inclined to write to the 
editor for the addresses of the owners of the hunters and 
hacks, and have them at any price. Then his shooting 
scenes. You say : ' I recollect finding a cock in such a place. 
I have seen many a bird fall like that. What a likely place 
for a pheasant ! Ah, what sport I had with Old Turk, the 
ferret, and the nets many, many years ago ! The attitudes 
of the men, how natural ! They all look like sportsmen, too.' 
Then his hounds, setters, pointers, retrievers, spaniels, and 
terriers — how life-like ! " 

•' The very dead creation from hU toach 
Assume? a mimic life." 

Abraham Cooper died in the eighty-first year of 
his acre, at his residence, Woodbine Cottasre, Wood- 
lands, Greenwich, on 24th December, 1S6S. He 
was buried in Highgate Cemetery. The portrait 
of the artist is taken from a painting by John 
Jackson, R.A., an engraving from which was 
pubUshed in the Sporting Magazine of December, 
1 82 7. It therefore shows Abraham Cooper at 
about the age of forty, when he was enjoying the 
zenith of his fame. 

For some of the information concerning the 
artist's Hfe and work, the writer is indebted to the 
Dictionary 0/ National Biography, \o\. xii. 



no ANIMAL PAINTERS 

WORKS OF ABRAHAM COOPER. 
IN THE BRITISH MUSEUM. 

(i) PORTRAIT OF A JOCKEY.— YitsA only, wearing a cap, three-quarter face, turned 
to the left. Red and black chalk ; size, 4J in. by 3J in. 

(2) Two on one mount, %-iz. :— (a) STUDY OF A DEAD KING-FISHER— IMnz, on its 
belly. WaterK:olours; size, 4} in. by 6 in.— (*) STUDY OF A DEAD /AY— 
Lying on its back. Water colours ; size, 4I in. by 6 in. 

IN THE SOUTH KENSINGTON MUSEUM. 

A DONKEY AND SPANIEL : an ass tied in a stable ; in the foreground a spaniel lying 
on a yellow stable jacket, panel 12 inches by 9 inches upright ; signed and dated 
iSi3 {Skeepshanks gi/i). 

GREy HORSE AT A STABLE DOOR : a horse with cart harness about to enter the 
stable, panel 12 inches by 9 inches, upright ; signed and dated 1818 {Sheepshanks 

eifO- 
EXHIBITED IN THE ROYAL ACADEMY (332 in number). 

YEAR 

i8i»-<j) THE FARRIER'S SHOP— TERRIER'S HEAD. 

,813— (5) THE FIRST OF SEPTEMBER—ELEPHANT, a stallion— G/C, a favourite 
greyhound, property of Lord C. Bentinck- .^.V/J/z^Z.S', property of T. Milles 
Esq., with servant— .4 GREYHOUND. 

i3i4— (6) ZEBU BULL AND COW— MR. KEW AND HORSE— FANNY, a charger 
and .MUFF, a poodle — LEOPARD, a dray-horse belonging to Messrs. Barclay 
Perkins & Co., and Will Craddock, a servant— j?6)i'£' AND CRIB, two celebrated 
bulldogs — A HUNTER, property of Viscount Deerhurst. 

1815 — (7) SCRUB, a shooting pony, aged thirty years, belonging to Sir R. C. Hoare, Bart., 
with two favourite c\amhers—H.4CKNEY—DELPINI, a charger, property of 
Major T. P. Milles, 14th Light Dragoons— TWO SPANIELS— FAVOURITE 
CAT—CUTHULLIN, from Oss\a.n — HUNTING MARE AND FOAL, 
property of the Duke of Grafton. 

1816— (8) THE DESERTED CHILD FOUND— PONY, belonging to Mr. Edmund— 
PADDY, an old xn<:T— GOLDFINCH, a celebrated hunter— .4 FAVOURITE 
GALLOWAY, property of Lady Charles lovm-i'nitnA— PARTIS AN, by Walton 
—HUNTER AND SPANIEL, the property of F. Wilson, Esq.— WHISKER 
AND MINUET, winners of the Derby and Oaks Stakes, 1B13. 

,8,7— (7) THE ADVENTURE OF MAMBRINO'S HELMET— HUNTSMEN AND 

HOUNDS — FISHERMEN— PILGRIM, a 'a\xn\.a-TOM —A MORNING 

RIDE— CURL, a pug dog. 
i8l3— (6) THE WAPITI— ALDERNEY BULL AND COWS-HUNTING MARE— 

THE HAPPY FOX-HUNTER -SPANIELS— THE FOX-HUNTER'S 

RETURN. 

,li9-(i) STUDY FROM NATURE— THE BATTLE OF MARSTON MOOR— 
THE TURNPIKE GATE— A CELEBRATED FLY-FISHER— STUDY 
FROM NATURE— JACK, a celebrated \inM.a — LORILDA, a favourite 
hackney— //ICA', .-a cclebrat'--'J hunter. 



WORKS OF ABRAHAM COOPER II7 

1820— (6) SKIRMISH— THE COMBAT BETU'EEX SERCEAXT BOTHWELL 
AXD BALFOUR OF BURLEV, Vide Old Mortality, Tales of Mv Lindlord— 
PORTRAITS— PORTRAITS— A FAVOURITE HUXTER—A HORSE, 
property of — Wilson, Esq. 

iSsi— (2) CROMWELL AT MARSTOX MOOR— MR. T. ROUXDIXG OX 
SPAXKAIVAV, with portraits of Gladsome, Governess, and Svreia, stagbouiids 
in the Epping Forest hunt. 

1822— (5) THE BATTLE OF STRIGOXIUM, now Gran in Hnnffarr. fonght in 159;— 
A XATIVE DOG IX XEtV SOUTH IVALES— RUPERTS STAXDARD 
AT MARSTOX MOOR— FAVOURITE HORSE, property of Afar. W. 
Robans, Esq., yi.P.—RHODA, by Asparagus, a raxs-horse, tied by the Dnke of 
Rutland. 

1823— (6) A FAVOURITE DOG — DRAUGHT ■ HORSES — DEATH OF A 
CAVALIER AT MARSTOX MOOR— ARTHUR, LORD CAPEL, DE- 
FEXDIXG COLCHESTER for the Kmg (Charles the First) in the year 1048, 
with portraits of Thomas Lord Fairfax, Sir George lisle, and Sir Charles Lncas — 
IVOUVERMAXS, a chestnut bons^lVAMBA. 

i824-(6) THE TOtVIXG HORSE, a study — G.ff£r /EM, a hunter— ^AVG 
tVILLIAM III., LORD COXI.VGSB}', and the FIRST EARL OF 
P0RTL.4XD—AX .4R.4BI.-iX, of the purest blood, bred by the MomeSck 
Arabs— 5.4 r/Xi: OF SHRE!rSBU'Ry—.4L.4CRITy, a favourite mare. 

1825— (4) BOSIVORTH FIELD— SOHO, .VY MAX !—THE POOR M.4X jiXD HIS 
DISTRESSED HORSE, assisted by the Rev. G. Htilxit-THE ADIEU. 

1B26— {5) B.4TTLE OF ZUTPHEX, 15S6— riTO HORSES, property of Lord 
Charles V. Townshend, ^\.V.—PAIXTER, s. r^ais\-ei— THE LIBERATOR, 
a hunter — S.MOJCER, a celebrated dog, propertj- of the Hon. Grantley F. 
Berkeley. 

1E27— (S) THE DEATH OF SIR FRAXCIS RUSSELL, treacherously slain at a 
Border meeting, i6th July, i~Si—TROU.yCER, a foihovmd— ^ FAVOURITE 
HORSE, property of Thomas Harrington, Esq. — FLEUR-DE-LIS by 
Bourbon, property of Sir M. W. Ridlej-, Bart., yi.P.— ir.4MBA—THE HOX. 
GRAXTLEV F. BERKELEY taking a slag— //.-!A'.Vt'3T, a foxhound bitch— 
HORSES IX A STOR.U. 

jS25-(4) RICHARD I. UXHORSIXG SALADIXI, at the Ba:tle of .ksczlon—THE 
SHOOTIXG P0XY—DR.4UGHT.H0RSES, property of Mr. Crampem, of 
Jermyn Street- THE STALLIOX. RICHARD. 

iS::9— (3) SHOOTIXG POXY, dogs, game, Sic-SAXD DIGGERS— SPAXIEL. 

1830— (6) J'H'.-JP, a hunter— /.JiVi', a lady's donkey— C.-! rrZi:, portraits— fF/£i> 
FOIVL SHOOTIXG— .VISS TURXER, the celebrated trotting mare, property 
of J. Gordon, Ksq.-THREE HORSES. 

1831— (2) MARY OUEEX OF SCOTS MEETIXG THE EARL OF BOTHTVELL 
between Stirling and Edinburgh— rJi"C SP.4XIELS. 

i832-(5) THE BAGGAGE IVAGGOX-.VISS EDIVARDS, an old hackney— r//£ 
RETREAT— irOODCOCK SHOOTI.VG—BRIAX DE BOIS—GUIBERTS 
ESCAPE FRO.U TORQUILSTOXE C.4STLE. 

1S33— (7) THE SHOOTIXG POXY— THE RETREAT FROM XASEBY— T.HE 
HORSE FERRY— PORTRAIT OF .-} GE.VTLE.V.4X on a favourite hunter— 
FIDELIA— THO.MAS BLOOD, ESQ.—J.4CK1X THE BOX. 

1S34— (7)^ HAU-AV.VG PARTY— AYRSHIRE COirS— GREEKS JiVTH ARAB 
HORSES— I.VTERIOR OF .4 STABLE, with horses, goats, ic— .-1 SHOOT- 
IXG PARTY— A TERRIER— SHAKSPEARE,by Six-olen-sko property of 
Richard Wilson. Esq. 



Il8 ANIMAL PAINTERS 

YEAR 

1835— (6) /C/iVO property of W. Pinney, Ebq., M.P.—^.-IiV.V!', property of —Peacock, 
Esq.-COCOA, property of Sir John St. Aubyn, •&szi.— TOM JONES— PLENI- 
POTENTIARY, winner of the Derby in 1834, &c., with'portraits of Conolly, the 
jockey, and Ha>-ne, the trainer— Z>.ff .4 ] '-HORSES. 

1836— <7) THE SPORTSMAN'S BOTHY— THE DEATH OF HAROLD at the 
Battle of Hastings— /?^.W/'/OiV, a hunter, property of Earl Grosvenor— r/rO 
HORSES AND A DOG—THOM--IS WARING, ESQ., on Peter, with five 
couples of harriers— r/i'.E DOCTOR, a V^xtAzt — SPORTSMEN IN THE 
HIGHLANDS. 

l837-{8) GREEKS— JACK, property of Charles Brown, Esq. — MASTER FITZ- 
GIBBON on his pony. Lion, with Mustard, Pepper and Spice, Skye terriers — 
POP, property of .Sir John Shelley, Bart.— i'^J/, a setter— 5/'/C£, a Skye 
<.errier—GREEKS—THE TRL'.VPETER. 

tS3S—(y) HASSAN, an ArMa.n—IVELLINCTON AT WATERLOO— SIR JAMES 
FLOWER, BART., and his hounds— £Z /J', ridden by John Day, and Lord 
Lichfield's trainer Doe, at Doncaster, in 1S36— THE DAY FA.VILY— .MANGO, 
property of the Hon. C. C. Greville—--^ //?!', winner of the Brighton stakes, 1837, 
ridden by Will Day. 

•839— (7) CO.MUS, one of Her M.ijesty's favourite riding horses— A'OATOiV, a hunter, 
property of Earl Grosvenor— 5.-1 TTLE OF LEWES— AN ITALIAN SHEEP- 
DOG— CRAB .4ND PICKLE, Scotch terriers, belonging to Lady Flower— 
CHARLES BRETT, ESQ., with his horse Tohy— BAY MIDDLETON, pro- 
perty of Lord George Bentinck, M.P. 

i84o-(7) A DAYS SPORT IN THE HIGHLANDS, with portraits of Captain George 
Rooke and the ailht— RICHARD CCEUR DE LION REVIEWING THE 
CRUSADERS IN PALESTINE — STAVELY — ARABY and a PONY, 
favourites of Sir John Swinburne, Bart., and Miss Swinburne's grey horse, 
RAPID— BRUNO — MY FATHER'S FAYOURITE MARE, property of 
J. Stamford Caldwell, Esq. — GREY MO.UUS, property of Lord George 
Bentinck, M.P. 

1841— (6) LA UNCELOT, winner of the St. Leger, iZ^o-THE FIGHT A T CROPREDY 
BRIDGE— EQUESTRIAN PORTRAIT OF MISS HOARE-TWO DOGS, 
painted for Sir John Swinburne, Bart. — .4, L. PFEIL, ESQ., on a favourite hack, 
with Columbine and Nelson, greyhounds — G.-\RRY OWEN, property of the Right 
Hon. George Byng, ^LP., ridden by E. Flatman. 

T.ii,-2—{i) SCYROS AND TIT— THE CAVALIER— TWO MARES AND TWO 
SKYE TERRIERS, property of Sir Henry Meux, B:iTt.—THE HIGHLAND 
GILLIE— A BROOD MARE AND HER FOAL, property of Sir J. E. Swin- 
burne, 'Bz.n.-FLORA, a thoroughbred maie—TOM THUMB AND JACKY, 
property of Harvey Combe, Esq. 

1843— <4) SAILOR, a retriever— Z£'X TALIONIS, the raid on the Reivers, or the 
laird getting his ain &z^\n— PORTRAITS OF ALL THE HORSES AND 
JOCKEYS ENGAGED IN THE DERBY STAKES, r34o; won by Little 
Wonder, property of David Robertson, Esq.— THE GILLIES DEPARTURE 
FOR THE MOORS. 

1844— <4) PRINCE RUPERT ROUTING THE BESIEGERS AT NEWARK, on 
the morning of the 22nd March, 164.^— RETURNING FROM DEER-ST.4LK- 
ING— BRUSH, a retriever, property of Sir James Flower, Bart., M.P.— THE 
FORD, a scene in Inverness-shire. 

,S^i-{i) HIGHLAND COURTSHIP— THE igth JUNE, 1S15—A FAVOURITE 
OLD HUNTER— MR. ROBERTSONS LITTLE WONDER, winning the 
Derby, 1840. 



WORKS BY ABRAHAM COOPER II9 

1845— <3) THE LIFE GUARDS, in the costume of liii—SIR ROULAND, a favourite 
horse— ^^'Z* DEER, ridden by Kitchener, property of the Duke of Richmond — 
AN ARABIAN,-pioftny o{ Sn George Philip Lee— .-J FAVOURITE MARE 
liiiy- it) CUPID AND NYMPHS — THE SLAVE DEALER — LA PUCELLE, 
Old Talbot, and his Son at the Battle of Patay— /t'K, a favourite spaniel— 
REFRACTION, property of the Duke of Richmond ; ridden by Henrj- Bell— 
VINGT-UN AND MAJOR, property of Sir Henrj- Meux, Bart. 
1S4S— (6) ARIADNE AFTER HER DESERTION BY THESEUS— MR. IVORLEY, 
stud groom to Queen XA<:\Mde—HARVEST IN THE HIGHLANDS— THE 
DEAD KID— THE FORAY— A STUDY. 
i849-(6) THE WOUNDED CREEK— THE OASIS— ALIIVAL, an Arab charger, 
property of Sir Harry G. W. Smith, Bart., G.C.B.— INTERIOR OF A HIGH- 
LAND INN— RETURNING FROM DEER-STALKING — SURPLICE, 
winner of the Derby and St. Leger, 1S48. 
tB^o— (7) BLACKBERRY GATHERERS — SHOOTERS ON THE MOORS- 
ARABS — jVEETING OF THE KEEPERS OF SIR JOHN EDWARD 
SWINBURNE, BART., on his Moor in Northumberland - .4 iJC.-IZ)/.4i\'3'— 
A HUNTER— THE PEAT CART. 
i85i-(8) VIVE LE ROI'. — THE DEAD TROOPER— " HE WAS A MIGHTY 
HUNTER BEFORE THE LORD"— " WITH WHAT SUM WILL YOU 
OPEN THE BIDDINGS FOR HER >"—THE FORD— EDWARD COUTTS 
son of Edward Marjoribanks, Jun., Esq.. with pony and greyhound (the portrait 
by Thomas Webster, R.A.) — MOCKING-BIRD, a greyhound— Z)C'C5. 
185a— (8) THE ROUT A T MARSTON MOOR— A GREY HORSE, property of Lady 
Charles P. P. Clinton— .4 CHARGER, property of Lord Charles P. P. Clinton— 
STARTLING INTELLIGENCE— THE ARABS SURROUNDED AND 
FIERCELY ASSAULTED THE CARAVAN AND KILLED THE AT- 
TENDANTS, NOT SPARING ONE OF THEM— ONE OF THESE— 
SHOOTERS ON THE MOORS— THE BUTCHER BOY. 
,853— (7) WELLINGTON'S FIRST GREAT VICTORY— THE BATTLE OF 
ASSAYE—THE GILLIE'S COURTSHIP — LA VIVANDIERE—HORS 
DE CO.MBAT— HENRY MORTON RESCUING LORD EV AND ALE 
FROM THE FURY OF BURLEY MDrxxmAo?.— THE SHOOTING PONY 
—PILOT AND MIDGE, property of Viscountess Maiden. 
,85^_^6) DEERSTALKERS— HIGHLAND GAME— THE BEDAWEEN'S HOME 
—COLLECTING THE WOUNDED AFTER A SKIRMISH — POR- 
TRAITS—THE FALCONER. 
1S55— (.7) SPANIEL AND WOODCOCK — GOING OUT — THE GILLIE— THE 
VIDETTE— REPULSE OF THE COSSACKS BY THE NINETY-THIRD 
— THE TIRED HUNTER— TAM O' SHANTER. 
jii6—(,S) ENNUI, property of Lord Londesborough — JF.fii'y AUSTRALIAN, pro- 
perty of Lord Londesborough— .-lyVjr/j^ri— .-! SCENE IN THE CRIMEA- 
TWO OLD CA.MPAIGNERS, MARENGO AND COPENHAGEN— THE 
FISHER.MAN'S BOY AND HIS DOG — MAMBRINO'S HELMET- 
HIGHLAND LASSIE GETTING UP THE KYE. 
,857— <7) THE FIRST OF OCTOBER, containing portraits of the painter and his son; 
the former painted by Mr. J. -Hzi^aai— SMUGGLERS ON THE NORTH- 
UMBERLAND COAST— RETURNED FROM THE CRIMEA— ARABS- 
MASTER LEWIS, son of the Right Hon. the Chancellor of the Exchequer— 
JOHN COMYN, the veteran Highlander of Glen Urquhart preparing a salmon 
Ry—THE SHOOTER'S RETURN. 
ziii—(.i) AN UNLICENSED HA WKER— ARABS— BLACKCOCK SHOOTING— 
A HIGHLAND DAIRY— A CONFERENCE— PHEASANT SHOOTING- 
GROUSE SHOOTIaVG— POST-HASTE. 



I20 ANIMAL PAINTERS 

YEAR 

1859— (8) TAJ?, a retrievei — r//£ FUSEE— A CUP <^' WHISKEY— THE HIGH- 
LAND VULPECIDE—MY ARAB STEED— ROBIN HOOD AND ZOE— 
WOODCOCK SHOOTING— MERRY, the property of Mrs. Palmer. 

i36o-(7) THE GUARD— MAJOR-GENERAL SKIPPON'S TROOP OF HORSE 
CAPTURING THE KING'S GUNS, BAGGAGE, &'c., AT NASEBY— 
LIEUT.-GEN. THE HON. SIR EDWARD OUST, Culonel of the 
i6lh (Queen's) Lancers— CO 6/iVrAVC THE DA ^^S SPOR T— SNIPE SHOOT- 
ING—GROUSE SHOOTING— THE ARAB AND HIS STEED. 

1861— (7) 07V THE BANK OF LOCH NESS — MONTROSE ROUTED AT 
PHILIPHAUGH BY SIR DAVID LESLIE, wso—DUCK SHOOTING: 
SECOND BARREL — SHOOTERS GOING OUT — SCOTLAND— THE 
STIRRUP CUP— THE FIGHT AT GLADSMOOR, near Edinburgh, 1650— 
HUNTERS. 

t362— (6) THE CONTRAST, OR THE OFF SHOE— THE BATTLE OF NASEBY, 
June 14th, i(,ii—THE GILLIE— SHEARERS AND SPORTSMAN, scene 
near Mealfourvanie, Inverness-shire— ^i?^fi5', &.C.— HORSES IN A STORM. 

1863— (6) THE PRIDE OF THE DESERT— MY OWN GREY— THE GIAOUR— 
WOMANS .MISSION— CROMWELL A T MARSTON MOOR— HUNTERS, 
property of Sir Tatton Sykts, Bart. 

1864— <5) THE DESPATCH — SHOOTERS ON THE HILLS — A LESSON IN 
MENDICITY— SHOOTING PONY, &.C.— SILENT SORROW. 

1865— <4) GONE AWAY— THE BATTLE OF EDGE HILL— THE SUTTLEKS 
BOOTH— ARABS. 

1866— {4) ARAB CHIEF AND HORSE— THE TIRED CAMEL — CAVALIERS 
AND ROUNDHEADS, A STRUGGLE FOR THE STANDARD— AN 
AWKWARD PASS. 

1867— (3) THE PAINTER AND HIS MODELS— ARABS— DR ESSING A FLY, 
a scene in Glen Urquhart, Loch Ness. 

iSoS— THE ADVENTURE OF THE CAPTURE OF M.^MBRINO'S HELMET. 

iZt<)—THE BARON HE LOVES HIS OWN GOOD STEED, bj- the late A. 
Cooper, R.A. 



PLATES IN THE ANNALS OF SPORTING. 

STAG AND HIND, 1824, vol. 5; engraved by J. Scott. 

FOX OF SPITZBERGEN, 1824, vol. 6 ; engraved by VV. R. Smith. 



PLATES IN THE SPORTING MAGAZINE (189 in number). 

(i) BASTO, a doc, i3ii, vol. 38; engraved by Scott— ;i«. DAVIS AS THE 
GEORGIAN CHIEF IN TIMOUR THE TARTAR, iBii, yo\. 38; engraved 
by Scott. 

(2) PINCHER, a dog, 1811, vol. 39 ; engraved by %co\.\.—M.-iDCAP, a celebrated hunter, 

1811, vol. 39 ; engraved by Scott. 
141 HIPPOLYTUS, 1813, vol. 41 ; engraved by Scott— i'T'.'lG'^' HE.iD, 1812, vol. 41 ; 
engraved by Scon— HORSES IN A STORM, 1S12, vol. 41 ; engraved by Scott— 
THE STAG-HUNT AT EPPING, 1812, vol. 41. 

(3) THE CHARIOT RACE, 1813, vol. 42; engraved by Scon— DOGS FIGHTING, 

j8r3, vol. 42; engraved by Scott — FLY, a brindled greyhound bitch, unbeaten 
during six seasons, 1013, vol. 42: engraved by Suolt. 



WORKS BV ABRAHAM COOPER 121 

(2) GIG^ a greyhound bitch, property of Lord Charles Hentinck, 1813, vol. 43 ; engraved by 

Scon— THE RA T TRAP, 1814, vol. 43 ; engraved by Scott. 

(3) INTERIOR OF A COSTER-MONGER'S STABLE, with .\ss and Goat, 1S14, 

vol. 44; engraved by Scott— i'/Z^'-GC'^ T^, FOX AND KID, 1S14, vol. 44; en- 
graved by Sco\\.~ DRAKE, a water spaniel, property of Lord Charles Kerr, 1814, 
vol. 44 ; engraved by Scott. 

(4) SQUIB, properly of Lord C. Kerr, 1814, vol. 45; engraved by Hcolt— FIRST OF 

SEPTEMBER, 1814, vol. 45; engraved by Scott— FRANCIS BUCKLE, 1814, 
vol. 45; etched— X)i/A'.£ OF GRAFTON S H'OFUL, by Waxy, 1815, vol. 45; 
engraved by Scott. 

(5) PENELOPE, a bay mare foaled 1798, bred by the Duke of Grafton, 1815, vol. 46; 

engraved by Scott—/. COODISSON, 1S15, vol. 46; an etching - r//.E HIGH- 
METTLED RACER, 1S15, vol. 46 ; engraved by Scott— FRIEND, a greyhound, 
1815, vol. 46 ; engraved by Scott— JSIORNING OF FIRST OF SEPTEMBER, 
1815, vol. 46 ; engraved by Scott. 

(2) DON, a pointer, properly of Jasper Bates, Esq., Sussex, 1815, vol. 47; engraved by 
Scott— MINUET, property of the Duke of Grafton, 1S16, vol. 47 ; engraved by 
Scott. 

(2) EVENING OF tsi OCTOBER, 1S16, vol. 48; engraved by Scott— PA R TIS A N, a 
bay horse foaled 1811, bred by the Duke of Grafton, 1S16, vol. 48; engraved by 
Scott. 

(5) PADDY, a setter, 1S16, vol. 49; engraved by Scotl—THOMAS OLDAKER, hunts- 

man of the Berkeley Hounds, j8i6, vol. 49 ; etched by Scott — IVHISKER, a hay 
horse, foaled 1812, bred by the Duke of G.afton, 1816, vol. 49 ; engraved by Scott — 
THE EAGLE AND NEWFOUNDLAND DOG, 1816, vol. 49; an etching— 
STATELY, a hound belonging to the Berkeley Pack, iSi6,vo1.4q; engraved by 
Scott. 
(4) FOX'S HEAD, 1817, vol. 50; engraved hyScott— THE ASTONISHED YILLAGE, 
1817, vol. 50; an etching — DULCINEA, a hunter mare famed with the Craven 
and Essex hounds under Colonel Cook, 1817, vol. 50; engraved by Scott — 
HARES FIGHTING, 1817, vol. 50 ; engraved by Scott. 

(6) STILL LIFE, 1817, vol. 51; engraved by Scott— IVAPITI DEER, 1817, vol. 51; 

engraved by Scott— GREYHOUND AND FOX, 1817, vol. 51; engraved by 
Scott— /'0.4C//yrA'5', i8i8, vol. 51 ; engraved by Scott— HORSE'S HEAD 
FROM THE ELGIN MARBLES, 1S17, vol. 51 ; etched by J. Scott— EQUES- 
TRIAN FIGURES FROM THE ELGIN MARBLES, 1817, vol. 51; etched 
by J. Scott. 

(2) TRUFFLE, a bay horse foaled 1S08 (bred by Colonel Udny), 1818, vol. 52; engraved 
by Scott— THE FOX-HUNTER'S RETURN, 1818, vol. 52; engraved by 
Scott. 

ARCTIC DOG AND FOX, 1819, vol. 53 ; engraved by Scolt. 

(2) SPANIELS, iSi9, vol. 54 ; engraved by Scott— THE FL YING LEAP, 1819, vol. 54 ; 
engraved by Scott. 

(2) DRAY-HORSES, 1S20, vol. 56; engraved by Scott— ^ CART COB, 1820, vol. 56; 

engraved by W. Smith. 
GLADSOME, a staghound bitch, 1821, vol. 57 ; engraved by \Vm. Smith. 
{2) RHODA, ahay filly, bred by the Duke of Rutland, 1821, vol. 58; engraved by Wm. 

Sm\th— THE HON. THE KING'S CHAMPION, HENRY DYMOKE, 

ESQ., 1821, vol. 58; etched by W. Sm'itti-STUDY FROM NATURE, 1821, 

vol. 58 ; etched by A. Cooper, R.A. 

(3) SLEEPY TRAVELLERS, 1821, vol. 59; etched by W. Smith— LAPLANDERS 

AND REINDEER. 1S22, vol. 59; etched by T. fry— ADVANTAGES OF 
THE MARTINGAL, 1822, vol. 59; etched by W. Smith. 



122 ANIMAL PAINTERS 

NA TIVE DOG OF NEW SOUTH WALES, 1822, vol. 60 ; etched by W. Smith. 

(2) BOXER, a black water spaniel, 1823, vol. 62 ; engraved by Cooke— WO UVER MANS, 

a chestnut horse, 182?, vol. 62 ; engraved by W. Smith. 
(2) GREY JEM, aged 21, well-known with the Hatfield Hunt, 1823, vol. 63 ; engraved by 

Vfiihh— FLEMISH FISHERMEN, 1824, vol. 63 ; engraved by J. Phelps. 

(4) POACHER DETECTED, 1824, vol. 64; an etching— ^'iW/'.ff SHOOTING, 1824, 

vol. 64 ; engraved by J. Scott— THE ARABIAN, BORACK, brought from 
Madras, 1824, vol. 64; engraved by J. Webb— /(-"(J't'Z'COCA' SHOOTING. 1824, 
vol. 64 ; engraved by J. Webb. 

VIGNETTE, 1824, vol. 65; engraved by J. Scott. 

VIGNETTE, 1823, vol. 66 ; engraved by J. Webb. 

(5) VIGNETTE, 1825, vol. 67 ; engraved by J. Webb— PHEASANT SHOOTING, 1S25, 

vol. 67; engraved by J. Wehh— GREEN SANDPIPER, 1825, vol. 67; engraved 
by Mr. R^ddon— BLUNDER, a staghound in the pack of the Hon. Grantly 
Berkeley, 1826, vol. 67; engraved by J. Wehb—PERDRIX BOREALIS, or 
Maryland Quail, 1S26, vol. 67. 

(4) VIGNETTE, 1826, vol. 68; engraved by J. Webb— Z)OG AND CAT, 1826, vol.68; 

engraved by J. R. Scott— SUSSEX CARP, 1826, vol. 68; engraved by W. 
Ks^iAon— STORMY PETEREL, 1826, vol. 68; engraved by W. Raddon. 

(2) VIGNETTE, 1826, vol. 69; engraved by J. Webb— HARMONY, a foxhound bitch, 

1827, vol. 69 ; engraved by J. Webb. 

(5) VIGNETTE, 1827, vol. 70 ; engraved by J. Webb— TROUNCER, a foxhound, 1827, 

vol. 70; engraved by J. Webb— ARBUTUS, by Walton, 1827, vol. 70; engraved 
by J. Webb— GREENS HANK, 1827, vol. 70; engraved by W. Raddon— 
VICTORY, a pointer, 1S27, vol. 70 ; engraved by J. R. Scott. 

(3) VIGNETTE, 1827, vol. 71; engraved by J. Webb— RICHARD, a d.irk brown horse, 

1828, vol. 71 ; engraved by J. Webb— GEORGE NELSON, 1828, vol. 71 ; engraved 
by J. R. Scott. 

(4) VIGNETTE, 1828, vol. 72; engraved by J. R. Scott— HORSES IN A STORM, 

1828, vol. 72 ; engraved by J. Webb— CADLAND, a brown colt, bred by the Duke 

of Rutland in 1825, 1828, vol. 72; engraved by J. Webb— SOLITARY SNIPE, 

1S28, vol. 72. 
COCA' ROBIN, a bay colt, 1828, vol. 73 ; engraved by J. Webb. 
FLEUR-DE-LIS, a bay mare, property of His Majesty, 1S29, vol. 74 ; engraved by 

J. Webb. 

(2) VIGNETTE, 1829, vol. r^-DUCN SHOOTING, 1829, vol. 73; engraved by 

J. Webb. 

(3) VIGNETTE, 1S30, vol. -jf^THE WHIPPER-IN, 1830, vol. 76; engraved by J. R. 

Scott — ARCHER, a foxhound in the Old Berkeley Pack, 1830, vol. 76; engraved 
by J. Webb. 

(2) VIGNETTE, WATER-HEN, 1830, vol. t,—MISS TURNER, a trotting mare, 
bred in Wales, 1S30, vol. 77 ; engraved by J. Webb. 

OCTOBER'S OWN, 1S46, vol. 108; engraved by J. Scott. 

ALIWAL, an Arab, property of Sir Harry Smith, Bart. 

WITHIN RANGE, 1849, vol. 113; engr.ived by E. Hacker. 

MOCKING-BIRD, a black bitch greyhound, winner of the Wiltshire Champion Stakes, 
March 1851. 1851, vol. 117; engraved by E. Hacker. 

(2) THE COMPLETE ANGLER, 1851, vol. iiS ; engraved by J. Scott— THE SPORTS- 
MANS PICNIC, 1851, vol. 118 ; engraved by E. Hacker. 

(2) THE STAG MUST DIE! 1852, vol. 119; engraved by E. Hickei— HOLIDAY 
TIME, 1S32, vol. 119; engraved by E. Hacker. 



WORKS BY ABRAHAM COOPER I 23 

THE COUNT OUT, 1852, vol. 120; engraved by J. H. Engleheart. 

THE BURN, 1S53, vol. 121 ; engraved by W. Backshell. 

(3) WHICH IVAY NOIV? 1S53, vol. 122-, engraved by VV. Backshell— ^ frt'.^A' 

GLEANINGS, 1S53, vol. 122; engraved by S. Sqo\i—TO AN OLD TUNE, 

1853, vol. 122 ; engraved by W. Backshell. 
RED-HEADED WIDGEON, 1854, vol. 123; engraved by J. Outrim. 
(3) THE OPENING DAY, 1854, vol. 124; engraved by J. H. Engleheart— /■//£ 

SPORTSMANS SIESTA, 1854, vol. 124; engraved by J. H. Engleheart— 

MARK! COCK t 1S54, vol. 124; engraved by E. Hacker. 
HERE HE IS ! 185s, vol. 125; engraved by W. Backshell. 
THE BLACK COCK, 1855, vol. 126; engraved by E. Hacker. 
(3) IN THE RIGHT PLACE, 1856, vol. 127; engraved by J. H. Engleheart— ?■//.£ 

VEDETTE, 1856, vol. 127; engraved by E. Hacker— 7"//£ QUARRV, 1856, vol. 

127 ; engraved by J. H. Engleheart. 
(3) UNDER WEIGH, 1856, vol. 128; engraved by W. Giller— AV THE MORNING 

EARLY, 1856, vol. 128; engraved by J. H. Engleheart— r//£ FORESTER'S 

FREIGHT, 1856, vol. 12S ; engraved by W. Backshell. 
THE COMING MAN, 1857, vol. 129-, engraved by E. Hacker. 
A STRONG POINT, 1857, vol. 130 ; engraved by J. H. Engleheart. 
(2) THE DOG IN THE MANGER, 1S5S, vol. 131; engraved by J. H. Engleheart- 

WHAT SPORT! 1858, vol. 131; engraved by J. H. Engleheart. 
(5) THE FIRST BARREL, 1858, vol. 132; engraved by J. OMnm—HOME FROM 

THE HILL, 1858, vol. 132; engraved by W. Backshell—^ CROSS SHOT, 1858, 

vol. 132; engraved by E. Hacker— 7"//£ SHEALINC, 1858, vol. 132; engraved 

by J. H. Engleheart— .4 " NE EXEA T," 1858, vol. 132 ; engraved by E. Hacker. 
(2) UP THE PASS, 1859, vol. 134 ; engraved by J. H. Engleheart— i'O FAR, SO GOOD, 

1S59, vol. 134 ; engraved by E. Hacker. 
U) BOCK AGEN, i860, vol. 135; engraved by J. H. Engleheart— /I QUIET PIPE, 

i860, vol. 135 ; engraved by J. H. Engleheart — A KILLING FLY, i860, vol. 135; 

engraved by E. Hacker— THE DEAD HART, i860, vol. 135; engraved by W. 

Backshell. 
THE TOD-HUNTER, 1S60, vol. 136 ; engraved by J. H. Engleheart. 

(2) TAR, a retriever, 1S61, vol. 137; engraved by J. H. Engleheart — THE WILD 

HUNTSMAN, 1861, vol. 137 ; engraved by E. Hacker. 

(3) THE FIRST FLIGHT, i86i, vol. 138; engraved by T. S. Engleheart— r//jE 

BOUNDS OF THE BEA T, 1861, vol. 138 ; engraved by T. S. Engleheart— rZ/j? 
MOUNTAIN PASS, 1S61, vol. 138 ; engraved by J. H. Engleheart. 
(5) DECLINING DAY, 1862, vol. 139; engraved by E. Hx^ex— RIGHT AND LEFT, 

1862, vol. 139; engraved by T. S. Engleheart— 7"//.£ PYRA.^IID, 1862, vol. 139; 
engraved by E. Hacker — SAFT AN SLYLY, 1S62, vol. 139; engraved by E. 
Hacker— r//^ FISHERMAN'S FAMILY, 1862, vol. 139; engraved by E. 
Hacker. 

(2) VIGNETTE, LANGUISH, properly of Her Majesty, 1S62, vol. 140 ; engraved by E. 

HsLcVet— AN AUTUMN EVENING, 1862, vol. 140; engraved by E. Hacker. 

(3) THE LOST SHOE, 1S63, vol. 141 ; engraved by E. Hacker— .l/.ff. JOHN GULLY, 

1863, vol. 141 ; engraved by J. B. Hml—THE MORNING MEAL, 1863, vol. 
141 ; engraved by E. Hacker. 

(2) THE MOUNTAIN DEW, 1S63, vol. 14;; engraved by J. H. Engleheart— 

EXCELSIOR, 1863, vol. 142 ; engraved by \V. Backshell. 
NEWBJGGIN, a greyhound, property of Captain L. W. Atkinson, King's Dragoon 

Guards, 1864, vol. 143 ; engraved by E. Hacker. 



124 AXIMAL PAINTERS 

{3) THE THREE GRACES, iSat, toL 144: eagiaved by E. H^cier— rj/£ CaJ/AVG 
STORM, 1S64, tdL 144 ; eagi2TCd by E. H?rVer— r.y-gJg^'J' /J Ri\C A T 
THE BEEL, 1364, \T3L 144 : engiav-^ by tl. Hacker. 

(2) iTAJlKET DAI', 1=0;, 143; engisred by E. Hacker— .-3 WAYSIDE WELCOME, 

IC65, vt^ 145 ; engrav-sd by E. Hacker. 
(S) rffE HOUSE-KEEPER, 1=65, voL 146: eagraved by E. n^daiT—THE REST, 
A.VD BE THAXKFUL, 1065, Tot 146; engra^d byE. n^s^ei—MAXORIAL 
RIGHTS, iSoj, voL 146; englared by E. Hacker— T.'i^.E FIRST BRACE, iSos, 
\xA- 146: eEgrared by £- HprVer — HIT HIM AGAIX! 1565, vti 146; engraved 
by E- Hacker. 

(3) HARD TIMES, 1S66, voL 1.17; engraved by E. Haiier— O-V THE REiy, 1S66, 

toL 147; engraved by E. Hzid-^—THE HUXTSMAS'S HOLLOA, 1866, voL 
147 ; engraved by E. Hacker. 

(4) By HABEAS COREL'S, 1H06, vbL 14= ; engraved by E. Kzi:ke!—THE FOOT OF 

THE HILL, 1S66, vdL 143 ; engraved by E. Hacker — A WIXGED BIRD, 1S06, 
voL 145; engiaved by E. Hacker — HA.BET, iS^, voL 148; engraved by 
E. Hacker. 

{4) HAKE READ}', 1167, vo'_ 145 ; engraved by E. Hacker — 0-V THE RIPPLE, liS?, 
VT>L 149; engraved cy E. Hacker — Mi' LADi'S HOBBY, 1S67, voL 149; en- 
graved by E. Hacker — FASHIOXIXG A FLY, 1S67, voL 149; engraved byE. 
Hacker. 

STEADY, 1HC7. voL 15a ; engraved by E. Hacker. 

AFTER, 1B6S, voL 151 ; engraved by E. Hacker. 

(3) AX L'XDER CL'RREXT, i=63, voL ijr: ; engraved by E. Hacker— rif^ PRI^'A TE 
BOX, 1-65, voL 132, engraved by E. Hacker— rA'£' CREEK, io63, voL 133 ; 
engraved by E. Hacker. 

iS)OX THE BRIGHTOX LIXE, i369, voL 153; engra^-ed by E. Usd^ei—THE 
ARAB/AX KXIGHTS, 1S69, voL 153; engrav^ by E. Uzdca—THE 
STUDIO, a ponrak of himself, 1S69, vdL 133 ; engraved by E. Hacker. 
THE DEATH STRUGGLE, 1S69, voL rjt; engraved by E. Hacker. 



PLATES IN THE NEW SPORTING MAGAZINE 
(71 in number). 

(5) PARTRIDGE SHOOTIXG, rSsi, voL 1; engraved by J. VlAh—FLY-FISHIXG, 

iS3r. voL r ; engraved by J. Scott — BLACK GAME, iSsr, vol. i; engraved by 
W. Raddoc: — CAMEL, a brown bcrse, bred by tbe Earl of EgrenionC in iBza, 
1331, voL ■; engraved by J. Webb— j?/5 C/.VC, THE STARTIXG POST, i83r, 
voL I ; engraved by J. Scocr. 

(6) VIGXETTE, ri3r, voL 2; engraved by V{Ah— RABBIT SHOOTIXG, iBsr, voL 2; 

engraved by Webb— T'i'^Z., rSsi, voL 2; engraved by J. SzoK—HUXTIXG: 
No. T—Go'lXG TO COVER, rBsr, V0L2; engraviad by Webb— JF/ZiJ FOWL 
SHOOTIXG, 1Z3Z, voL 2; engraved by R. Golding- i'J/OA'£^, a dog, property 
of the Hon- G. Berkeley, rSsr, voL 2 ; engraved by Webb. 
(3) FLY FISHIXG, Xo. 2, r3j2, voL 3; engraved by Smith— MULE PHEASAXT, 
1832, voL 3: engraved by W. Radd-an — RACIXG, Xo. 2, 1832, vol. 3: engraved 
by Scoct — TROUT, 1332, vol. 3 : engraved by Raddon — GALA TA, a brown filly, 
bred in 1829 by Lord Exeter, 1H52, voL 3 ; engraved by Scoa — SETTERS, 1S32, 
voL 3; engraved by R. T^JZ— PHEASAXT SHOOTIXG, 1S32, voL 3; engraved 
by W. R. Sunrh—n'OCXDED MALLARD, 1232, voL 3; engraved by W. 
Raddoo. 



WORKS BV ABRAHAM COOPER 1 25 

(S) THE TERRIER, 1232, voL 4; e-srsved by R. Go-Iding— A"'.Vr/_VG^, iSja, -toL 4 ; 
esigTaved by J- R- SccrjL—PTARJ'TIGAX OR IVHITE GROZ'SE, 1=^2, voL 4: 
engraved by J. Engieheart — C-yi-'G^.V, 2, brom inare, bi^ by tbe Duke of 
Grafton in iSaS, 1E32, voL 4; engrsred by Sc&Ji—THE DVIXG WOODCOCK, 
1332, voL 4; eugraved by R. Goldiog— iT/ii iA^^: THE PEA-HEX, THE 
PIXTADO, AXD THE JAV, 1S23, voL 4: engraved by W. Radd-c^r^^ 
HOBBY HAil'JC, i523. tcL 4; engrav^ by R. Goldliig—THE PIKE, iS^, 
vdL 4 ; «3graTec by A, W. Warren. 

(2) PERCH, i?33, ToL 5 ; engraved by Warren— T.Y^ TVOUXDED S.WPE, 1333, vuL 5 ; 

engraved by R. Golding. 

(3) RABBIT SHOOTIXG, 1133, voL 6; engraved by rhmca:>--C.^.?/', 1333, v^L 6 ; e=- 

gra-red by Warren — GOXE A WA >', 1S33, vcL 6 ; engraved by Scoc 
(2) SHAKESPEARE, a celebrated stallion, 1=33, voL 5; engra^sd by J. R- Scxi— .=:^i? 
GROUSE, 1S33, voL 6 ; engraved by J. EngSebeart. 

(2) THE SHOVELLER, 1S34, voL 5; engraved by W. Raddoo— Pr5i'i; a ^^^ Ero^m 

mare, bred fay Mr. Leciuasre Cbarltoa, 1S34, voL H ; engraved by R- Parr. 
THE BLACKCOCK, 1E55, voL 10 ; engraved by Parr. 

(3) A MEALFOURVOXIE TROUT, i-jS, vr>L 11 : engrav^ by l>^c3Zir-THE SKYE 

TERRIER AXD WHELP, 1136, voL 11 ; engraved fay R. Vzn— GROUSE 

SHOOT I XG, 1:365 vol. II ; engraved by Duncan. 
(4)^r FAULT. i337, voL 12; engraved by Duocan— JtC^^C'CA" S.^fTOr/.VG; 1337, 

roL 12; engraved by Duncan — THE 5IOORHEX, 1537. voL r^ : engrav^ by 

Dnncan — RACIXG, Xo. 3, 1337. vcL 12: engraved hj R. Parr. 
(a) PHOSPHORUS, property of Lord Bemers, 1537^ voL 13; engraved by J. R. Sccc— 

^lAXGO, a three-y^earnald colt, bred by ilr. Tbocnhil!, 1S37, voL 13 ; engraved by 

T. E. XidioIscHi. 

(3) FOX-HUXTIXG, portrait of Wlffiam Pimiey, Esq., M.P., 1335, toL 14; aigraved by 
T. E. Nicholson — POP, a favocrite pointer, property ^ Sir John SheHey, Bart, 
1S33, voL 14 ; engraved by J. W. Arcber — THE COMMOX AXD THE 
BRAXDLIXG TROUT, zZsS. voL 14 ; er:graved by J. W. Arcber. 

(3) AMATO, a tbree-year-old colt, bred by Sir Gilbert Heaibcote, Bart., 1331, voL 15: 
engraved by W. B. Scott — ROE DEER on the banks ct Loch Xess, 1:33, voL 15 ; 
engraved by E. Harker — IXDUSTKY, a brosTJ filly, ZE^Dperty cf, and bred by the 
Earl of GiestexBdd, iSsS, voL 13 ; engraved by W. B. Scott. 

(a) DELIA AXD LUCV, hoonds bred by T. Groves, Esq., 1330, vtsL i5; engrav^ by J. 
W. Aicber — RETRIEVER, a deer-hocnd of the old F-^g ^^^Ln cEeed, pro p e rty cf 
the Hon. Mr. Grantley Berkeley, 1E39, voL 16 ; engraved fay W. RaddcHi. 

(2) BLOOMSBUR >', winner of the Derby Stakes at Eps^n, 1539. ^yz, vol. 17 ; engraved 

by J. W Aich^—DECEPTIOX, bred by Mj. Isaac Saddler, 1-39, v^ 17 : en- 
graved by W. B. Scott. 

(3) HEADS UP, STERXS DOii'X, dcgs, 1S43, voL i3; sigiav^ by J. W. Amh^— 

GREy MOMl'S, a hcrse sold to Co=j:nt Hahn and taken over to C-emany, 13.40, 
voL i3; engraved by J. W. Azf^i-zi—BULL TROUT, iSic, voL i3 ; engra^-ed by 
J. Octrim. 

(5) LITTLE JVOXDER, winner of the Derby Shakes at Epscm. 134a. i34o. vcA i2ci, 
engra\-ed by W. B. Scott — CRUCIF/-\~, winner of the Oaks Stakes at Epson:, 
iSao. 1240, vob 19; engraved by J. W. Arche- — PARTRIDGES, 1340, vcL 19 : 
engraved by J. Ontiim — LAUXCELOT, bred by the Manjnis cf Westminster, 
1S40, voL 19; engraved by W. B, Scott — XELSOX, a blai greybwnnd, ;£40. 
vol. 19 ; engraved by J. Outrim. 

PIGGIXG OUT. i34t. voL so; engraved by E. Radclyne. 



126 ANIMAL PAINTERS 

AUGUST, 1843, vol. 25; engraved by J. Godden. 

(2) BRUSH, a spaniel, property of Sir James Flower, Bart., 1845, vol. 28; engraved by 
E. B.&c\i&x~DEAD BEAT, 1845, vol. 28; engraved by E. Hacker. 

(2) SHOOTING ON THE MOORS, 1845, vol. 29; engraved by J. R. ^coiv— REFRAC- 
TION, a brown filly, bred by the Duke of Richmond, 1845, vol. 29; engraved by 
E, Hacker. 

READY, a spaniel, property of Sir James Flower, Bart., 1846, vol. 30; engraved by 
Scott. 



127 



ALEXANDER DAVIS COOPER. 

A LEXANDER DAVIS COOPER, son of 
•^*- Abraham Cooper, followed, but at a distance, 
in the footsteps of his father, whose tastes for art 
and sport he inherited. He is described in Graves' 
Dictionary as a Landscape artist ; but some of the 
works exhibited by him at the Royal Academy, 
and those engraved for the Sporting and New 
Sporting Magazines show that he could paint 
animals and sporting scenes with sufficient skill 
to render his comparative neglect of such subjects 
matter for regret. Volume xiv. of the latter (1838) 
contains an engraving by E. Hacker from a picture 
entitled "Spaniel and Dead Game," which is made 
the subject of editorial remark: — "The painter of 
this subject is the son of A. Cooper, R.A., and 
this, we believe, is the young artist's maiden 
plate. . . The picture which was exhibited at 
the Royal Academy last year is very cleverly 
composed, and the head of the spaniel is, in par- 
ticular, well painted." In 1841 he painted the 
portrait of Byron, a famous black and tan spaniel, 
for which the owner. Baron Lenton, had paid 



128 ANIMAL PAINTERS 

lOO guineas. Like his father he was an angler, 
and left evidence of his affection for the rod in 
his pictures. In the New Sporting Magazine for 
1843 ^^^ ^^^ ^''' engraving by J. Godden from 
"The Burn Side," a clever fishing piece; and 
again the Sporting Magazine for 1859 contains a 
plate entitled "Arcades Ambo," in which are 
represented two large trout with a fisherman whip- 
ping a rapid stream in a beautiful landscape. " No 
doubt," says the descriptive article, "Mr. Davis 
Cooper sat down and sketched them on the spot." 
A. D. Cooper contributed altogether sixty-seven 
pictures to the Royal Academy exhibitions between 
the years 1837 and 1888. The very large majority 
of these were landscapes and subject pictures. To 
the British Institution he contributed twenty-seven, 
and to various other galleries twenty pictures. 



WORKS OF A. D. COOPER. 

SPORTING AND AXIMAL PICTURES IN THE ROYAL 

ACADExMY (II in number.) 

iiyjSPANIEL AND GAME. 

iSyf-CAVALIERS. 

li^l— PORTRAIT OF A. COOPER, ESQ., R.A. 

iZ^^— MILKING TIME, the cows the property of Chas. Brett, Esq. 

T.%tf>—QUARRELSO.ME CO.MPANIPNS, the properly of Mrs. H. C. Hoare. 

lisi—HOR.'iES, the property of the Hon. G. W. C. Byng. 

1869— rO/'i'K, IVASP, SAILOR, AND MASTER TURl'V, protigis of James Farrer, 

Esq., of Ingleborough. 
iZTi—AT BAV. 
itig— AFTER THE FAIR. 

iSSo—BLACA'COCR- AND MOUNTAIN HARE. 
T%1.%—A MUTUAL SURPRISE. 



129 



LUKE CRADOCK. 

(Born circa 1657. Died 1717.) 

T UKE CRADOCK was born at Somerton, in 
-*— ' Somertsetshire, about the year 1657. In his 
youth, his parents, actuated perhaps by the desire 
to encourage what they supposed to be his natural 
bent, apprenticed him to a London house-painter ; 
and in this very elementary school, without instruc- 
tion and with few opportunities of study, Cradock's 
innate talent developed. 

Birds and animals were the subjects to which 
he devoted his brush and his success in the 
portrayal of these was the more remarkable, inas- 
much as he was entirely self-taught. His birds, 
particularly, show strength and truth of colouring, 
but spirit and fidelity to nature distinguish all his 
works. His paintings were in much request for 
decorative purposes to be placed over chimney- 
pieces and doors ; their value rose greatly after 
his death for Horace Walpole quoting Vertue. 
the great authority on painting in the various 
English collections, states that Cradock's pictures 
9 



130 ANIMAL PAINTERS 

frequently brought from three to four times the 
price the artist received for them. 

The British Museum contains four examples 
of this artist's work, engraved by Josephus 
Sympson, 1740- 1743: — (i) A Heron and Geese 
near a mill wheel ; (2) Hawk swooping down 
on Fowls ; (3) Hawk carrying off a Chicken ; 
(4) Various birds — pigeons, plover, and a parrot 
perched on a bough. 

The birds in the above four engravings are very 
spirited in drawing. Size of each plate 18 inches 
by 14 inches. 

A painting by Cradock is described in a catalogue 
of the sale of pictures belonging to Sir G. Osborne 
Page Turner, Battlesden Park, Woburn, 7th June, 
1824 : " Poultry, a Stork, a Passage-boat on a Canal, 
and Figures crossing a Bridge." The catalogue of 
a sale at Christie's in May, 1847, includes one of 
his works, " Poultry attacked by a Hawk," the 
property of Edward Harman. 

Luke Cradock died in London 1717, and was 
buried at St. Mary's, Whitechapel. 



131 



DAVID DAL BY. 

(Born cin-a lygo.) 

FN AVID DALBY was born about the year 1790, 
'-^ and was probably a Yorkshireman ; but 
where he first saw the Hght, who were his parents, 
how or where he received his education, under 
what circumstances he adopted the brush as a 
means of Hvehhood, and where and when he died, 
cannot be discovered. It is certain that for some 
years he resided at York, and that he left that 
city to seek a home in Leeds ; and the fact that 
this migration took place very shortly after the 
publication of a sketch he made, caricaturing the 
Sheriff, appears at once to furnish a motive for 
his change of residence, and also to indicate that 
Dalby occasionally employed his talents with more 
ability than discretion. 

He appears to have had a struggle for his bread 
after he settled in Leeds, as we are informed that 
he painted pictures for a dealer there, work which 
for a time kept him from starvation. However that 
may be, his gifts in course of time won the recog- 
nition which is their due, and he found patrons 



132 ANIMAL PAINTERS 

among the most prominent North-country sports- 
men of the second decade of the century. 

Dalby's style of painting is chaste and much 
resembles that of J. F. Herring; and if he could 
not impart to the coats of his race-horses the 
wonderful sense of texture for which Herring's 
pictures are remarkable, his horses are at all events 
anatomically correct in drawing while his hunting 
pieces are superior in their grouping and also in 
sporting technique. We see by the manner in 
which he puts his men in their saddles that Dalby 
himself was a good horseman ; he also understood 
fox-hunting and could prove his knowledge on his 
canvas ; Herring knew more of coaching than of 
fox-hunting, and thus Dalby had the advantage 
over him in the latter department of art. 

It is by his hunting scenes, and by the portraits 
of race-horses which North-country sportsmen com- 
missioned him to paint, that Dalby is known. One 
of his earliest patrons was Richard Watt, Esq., 
of Bishop Burton, at that time one of the most 
celebrated men on the turf. It was for Mr. Watt 
that he painted that remarkable portrait of a 
wonderful horse, the famous Blacklock, to whom we 
trace the best blood on the English turf to-day. 
This portrait, which is life-size, is a most life-like 
presentation of the great sire. The picture, which 
was painted in the year 1823, was sold at Christie's 



DAVID DALBY 133 

on 9th May, 1892, when it fell to the bid of Mr. E. 
R. B. Hall Watt, and is now at Bishop Burton. 
Blacklock was foaled in 181 5, ran until the York 
August Meeting of 1819, and died in 1831. 

Two years before he painted the portrait of 
Blacklock, in 182 1, Dalby executed for Mr. T. O. 
Powlett a picture of Jack Spigot, winner of the 
Doncaster St. Leger of that year, with his 
jockey up. This picture was engraved in small 
size by T. Sutherland, and published in colours by 
T. Sotheran, of York, whose business as a book- 
seller, by the way, did not prevent his holding the 
office of Clerk of the Course. 

In 1823, Dalby painted a small hunting picture 
called " Down Hill," which serves to display the 
artist's knowledge of both the horse and horse- 
manship. It represents a man in the fashionable 
hunting dress of the period — scarlet double-breasted 
tail coat, closely buttoned, tall beaver hat, and blue 
choker tie with white spots — on a black hunter 
which he is handing down a high and steep bank. 
The rider's pose, as he sits well back to relieve his 
mount's forehand, is cleverly treated. Size of 
canvas, 1 1|- inches by 9 inches. 

In 1826, for INIr. Consett Dryden, he did 
the portrait of White Legs, a celebrated hunter. 
This painting which has considerable merit, is now 
in the possession of Thomas Parrington, Esq., of 



134 ANIMAL PAINTERS 

Whitby, Yorkshire ; as also is another excellent 
sketch in oil by Dalby, namely a portrait of Done 
Up, a chestnut hunter, ridden by a sportsman in 
pink with the blue and white spotted choker tie 
which appears to have been the "correct thing" 
for wear in the hunting field at that date. 

In 1834, he painted a picture of Bran, by 
Humphrey Clinker. Bran was bred by Lord 
Sligo, and was foaled in 1831. He won his share 
of honours on the turf ; he ran second to Touch- 
stone in the St. Leger of 1834, in which year 
he was purchased by Sir Edward Baker for 1,300 
guineas. This work was engraved by Richard 
Parr and the plate therefrom forms the frontis- 
piece to vol. Ixx.xv., the Sporting Magazine of 
1835. In 1837 Dalby painted the portrait of 
Mango, by Emilius. Mango was bred in 1834, 
by C. C. Greville, Esq., for whom, in Sam Day's 
hands, he won the St. Leger of 1837 ; he also won 
many other races. The picture of Mango was 
engraved by J. H. Engleheart ; the plate forms 
the frontispiece to vol. xci., 1838, of the Sporting 
Magazine. These two plates it may here be added, 
are the only examples the Magazine contains of 
the works of this artist, who is described as "Dalby, 
of York." 

The artist did not confine himself exclusively to 
horse portraits; he painted in 1834, for Edward 




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DAVID DALBV I 35 

Howard, Esq., a picture of Lear, a celebrated 
retriever, which was bred by the Marquess of 
Carmarthen. An engraving from this picture 
appeared in the New Sporting Revieisj, vol. viii. 

For Mr. William Scott, Dalby painted the por- 
trait of Blacklock's well-known son Velocipede, 
winner of the York St. Legrer in 1828. The size 
of this canvas is 29 inches by 24 inches. 

Let us revert to the artist's fox-hunting pictures. 
Li 1824, he painted three hunting pieces, "Lord 
Harewood's Hunt" (as the Bramham Moor was 
called during the twenty years of Lord Harewood's 
mastership) at Knaresborough. No. i shows 
The Meet, a group of eight horsemen waiting 
in easy attitudes for the hounds ; a clump of trees 
forms an effective back-ground ; in the right dis- 
tance the pack with huntsman and whipper-in are 
approaching, through a stream. The eight figures 
are evidently portraits, but whose it is not possible 
now to discover. No. 2, Full Cry, shows the 
pack with huntsman in attendance, driving through 
a wide stretch of water ; and in No. 3, The 
Death, hounds are in the near foreground breaking 
up their fox. These pictures, which are in the 
writer's possession, are of uniform size, showing 
that they form a series. They are very cleverly 
drawn ; again we recognise Dalby's close and 
careful study of horse and hound in action, and the 



[36 ANIMAL PAINTERS 

workmanlike style in which he puts his men in 
their saddles. The third of the set faces page 

134- 

Dalby, for all his talent, does not appear to 
have succeeded in a pecuniary sense, for we find 
that at one time Mr. Dryden, Mr. John Booth,* 
and others clubbed together to guarantee him 
twenty hunters to paint at three guineas each. 
That such an arrangement should have been 
suoforested at all, indicates that the artist was in 
want when he had many admirers ; and the fact 
that he gladly accepted the commission, modest 
though the remuneration was, confirms the im- 
pression that this guarantee was in the nature of 
a charity. 

With the number of patrons and friends upon 
whose support Dalby could reckon, he should at 
least have been able to realise a competence ; but 
had he reaped only a share of the success to which 
his talents entitled him, it would surely be possible 
to trace his later career. As it is, we lose sight 
of him in middle age, when he passes into the 
unknown. The only conclusion is that the man 
was his own enemy, and that the kindly exertion 
of friends failed to save him from himself. 



* Mr. Booth, of Killerby, Yorkshire, was a yeoman farmer 
and famous breeder of Shorthorns, also one of the best 
known hunting men in the north of England ; he had great 
reputation as a wit. 



137 



RICHARD BARRETT DAVIS. 

(Born 1782. Died 1854.) 

p ICHARD BARRETT DAVIS, bom 1782 
-'■^ at Watford, in Hertfordshire, was, it may be 
said, reared in the atmosphere of sport. His 
father, Richard Davis, was huntsman of George 
HI.'s harriers, and one of his eight younger 
brothers, Charles, who began by turning hounds 
to his parent, became in 1822 huntsman to the 
Royal Buckhounds a post he held under George 
IV., William IV. and Her Majesty Queen 
Victoria. With such connections it was only to 
be expected that Richard's artistic tastes would 
take the direction they did. 

He studied under William Evans, better known 
as Evans of Eton ; and also under Sir William 
Beechey who, as drawing master to the Princess, 
resided much at Windsor. It may be conjectured 
that he owed the advantage of tuition by Sir 
William to the positions held by his father and 
brother ; Charles Davis, as Lord Ribblesdale tells 
us in his published work, Tlie Queens Hounds, 
was indebted to George HI. for his later educa- 



'^ 



8 ANIMAL PAINTERS 



tion, and it is probable that the Royal favour 
extended to the elder brother. When nineteen 
years of age Richard Barrett Davis became a 
student at the Royal Academy, and while there 
painted the first of his pictures of which there is 
record. One of these was a portrait of the Duke of 
Beaufort's huntsman, Philip Payne, on his favourite 
grey horse Charington with eight and a half couples 
of hounds, three of the hounds leading the way 
into covert over a wall. This painting was beauti- 
fully engraved in mezzotint by C. Turner, the plate 
being 27 inches by 18 inches; the print bears a 
dedication to the Duke of Beaufort. The second 
picture was entitled " Mares and Foals at the Royal 
Stud." 

In 1802 R. B. Davis, then in his twentieth 
year, contributed his first picture, " A Landscape," 
to the Royal Academy exhibition. Two landscapes 
with cattle represented him in the following year, 
and in the exhibition of 1805 he had a picture of 
" His Majesty in his Travelling Chariot returning 
to town from Windsor, accompanied by his usual 
escort of Guards, Riders and Attendants." This 
work, which is happy in composition and spirited 
in drawing, was engraved by Charles Turner and 
published on 20th February, 1806, by Mr. R. B. 
Davis, 41, Great Portland Street (for the proprietor) 
and C. Turner, 50, Warren Street, Fitzroy Square. 



RICHARD BARRETT DAVIS I 39 

The artist being himself proprietor of the work, 
it would seem that this was his first venture in 
publication and that the engraver shared the 
speculation. This very fine example of mezzotint 
engraving is " by permission humbly dedicated to 
H.R. H. the Duke of Cumberland by his devoted 
and very humble servant, R. B. Davis." The plate 
measures 28 inches by 21 inches. 

Having proved his artistic ability it was only to 
be expected that his family connections should have 
brought him renown in the country hunted by the 
Royal hounds ; and he soon numbered among 
his patrons many of the best known sportsmen 
of the day, including King George III., the Duke 
of York, the Duke of Cumberland, the Dukes of 
Beaufort, Grafton and Richmond, the Earl of 
Egremont, and Sir F. Bourgeois. Time brought 
him distinctions both significant of his talent and 
remunerative; in 1831 he was appointed animal 
painter to King William IV., and in 1842 he 
received the patronage of Her Majesty and the 
Prince Consort. 

In 1813 he executed a picture of "The King's 
Harriers," with portraits of the huntsman and 
whipper-in on horseback and thirteen couples of 
hounds grouped about them ; this work was, no 
doubt, commissioned in view of the abolition of 
the Royal harrier pack, as it was given up in April 



140 ANIMAL PAINTERS 

of the same year. The picture was engraved, and 
the print bears dedication to General Manners. 
It may be added that in 1824 King George IV. 
re - estabHshed the Royal Harriers, purchasing 
drafts from Mr. Loraine Smith, of Enderby 
Hall, Leicestershire, and thirteen couples of the 
pack sent up to Tattersall's by Lord Maynard's 
executors. Charles Davis, who had succeeded 
George Sharpe as huntsman of the Royal Buck- 
hounds in 1822, undertook to hunt the harriers on 
non-staghunting days. George IV. was a keen 
sportsman and appreciated the joys of pace ; when 
Prince of Wales he accepted a Mastership of Fox- 
hounds during his residence at Critchill, in Dorset- 
shire. His father was fond of the chase, and in 
1780 established a pack of foxhounds with Sharpe 
as huntsman ; but His Majesty's weight was against 
him in the field, and, according to Lord Ribblesdale, 
he was not in the habit of tempting Providence 
by trying big places or of riding too hard. 

In 1822 Davis painted for the Duke of York 
a portrait of his horse, Moses, which in Tom 
Goodisson's hands had won the Derby of that year. 
His Royal Highness is said to have been a good 
judge of a horse, and Moses he bred himself out of 
Sister to Castensa by Whalebone. This picture 
was shown at the Academy of 1823 ; an engraving 
of the work by J. Scott was published in vol. Ixi. 




I'.ilntcd h Rithard B.untI l\ivh. I' )ii;r,ir,.l on Wood by K l:,Ma!; 

TOM GRANT, Huntsman at Goodwood 



RICHARD BARRETT DAVIS I4I 

of the Sporting Magazine. The Royal Academy 
Exhibition of 1824 should have included a large 
picture of " His Majesty's Hunt," to which Davis 
had put the finishing touches in April of that 
year ; but unfortunately the carrier to whom he 
entrusted the work for conveyance from Windsor 
to London, omitted to deliver the picture within the 
time prescribed by the Academy, and in consequence 
it was never shown. In the same year he painted 
the portrait of Tom Grant, for many years huntsman 
to the Dukes of Richmond ; this picture was 
engraved by W. T. Fry and the reigning Duke 
was so much pleased with it that he accepted 
dedication of the engraving. 

Portraits of horses, more especially race-horses 
and hunters, formed a considerable proportion of 
Davis's works, but likenesses of men and subject 
pictures also frequently occupied his easel. In 1827 
he painted the portrait of George Sharpe, who after 
many years service as huntsman to George III., 
had retired on a pension in 1822. This work was 
also engraved by W. T. Fry. In 1831 he painted 
his brother's portrait, " Air. Charles Davis, His 
Majesty's Huntsman on his favourite Alare Colum- 
bine ; " Charles Davis, cap in hand and at full 
gallop, is waving hounds on to the line beside a 
coppice. This picture was engraved by W. Giller, 
the plate measuring 19 inches by 15 inches, and 



142 ANIMAL PAINTERS 

was published in July, 1831, by Moon, Boys and 
Graves, London. The engraving was dedicated 
by the artist to the then Master of the Buckhounds, 
Viscount Anson. 

Shooting subjects do not figure largely among 
the works of this artist, but when he turned his 
attention to sport with the gun he was highly suc- 
cessful, as witness the set of six pictures painted in 
1836 and engraved by R. G. Reeve; this com- 
prised : — 

" Grouse Shooting," August ; " Partridge Shoot- 
ing," September; "Pheasant Shooting," October; 
"Snipe Shooting," November; "Woodcock Shoot- 
ing," December ; and " Water-fowl Shooting," 
January. 

These were printed in colours, the plates being 
18 inches by 14 inches, and were published on 
2nd November, 1836, by Thomas Maclean, 
London. 

He was a keen sportsman and jDOssessed wide 
knowledge of sporting matters, particularly of hunt- 
ing ; he does not appear to have been a great 
horseman, as we are told that it was his custom 
to follow the Royal pack on foot and make rough 
and hasty sketches of incidents which he turned to 
account after in his hunting pictures. He was a 
o-ood judge of both horse and hound nevertheless. 

In 1837, by command of the Queen Davis 



RICHARD BARRETT DAVIS T43 

painted a " Scene in Windsor Great Park," con- 
taining some twenty equestrian portraits. The 
scene is the Long Walk, Windsor Castle appearing 
in the distance, and the picture shows Her Majesty 
attended by her suite and accompanied by the King 
and Queen of the Belgians, and other distinguished 
persons. The horses, all portraits of favourites of 
the Queen, are admirably painted. This picture, 
which was engraved in 1838 by F. Bromley and 
published by Hodgson & Graves, was exhibited at 
the Royal Academy in 1841. 

In 1837, Davis appears again as the publisher 
of his own work. At Wilton Street, Grosvenor 
Place, he issued the first number of The Huntej's 
Annual, a series of four drawings on stone by 
J. W. Giles from the artist's paintings, all "on 
elephant size," viz., 28 inches by 23 inches. The 
publication is dedicated to the King, and the pic- 
tures are (i) a portrait of Charles Davies on Hermit, 
just emerging from the kennels surrounded by the 
Buckhounds — "all remarkable likenesses," says the 
writer of an appreciative critique in the Sporting 
Magazine ; (2) a portrait of T. Goosey, huntsman 
of the Belvoir, the scene being Croxton Park ; 
(3) Geo. Montford and Will Derry, huntsman and 
whipper-in to the Melton (Quorn), scene John o' 
Groat's Gorse ; and (4) John Shirley, huntsman to 
the Bramshill hounds, scene Bramshill House. In 



144 ANIMAL PATNTERS 

each case the hunt servants are accompanied by 
hounds. An additional plate gives portraits of the 
most prominent hounds in the four packs with 
their names. The Hunter s Annual does not seem 
to have enjoyed a very prosperous career for we 
can trace reference to only three issues of the publi- 
cation in the Sporting Magazine, the third and 
evidently last number having appeared in the 
autumn of 1839. 

One of Davis's most successful hound portraits 
was that he painted in 1841 of a bitch in the 
Royal pack named Luxury, bred by his brother. 
Luxury was considered a model hound ; she came 
of the best Goodwood and Belvoir blood, and stood 
23 inches high ; she was six years old when she 
stood for her portrait. The sixth volume of the 
Sporting Review contained a well-executed engrav- 
ing by A. Warren from this picture ; a reproduction 
of this plate faces this page. 

Davis's picture of Hermit deserves mention as 
one of his best equine portraits. Hermit was a grey, 
bred by Mr. Gates, of Brookwood Stumps, near 
Woking, by Grey Skin out of a white Arab mare, 
and was considered by Charles Davis the stoutest 
and best hunter he ever had. His speed and bottom 
were proved one day when Harry King, who was 
riding" him, received the order to stop hounds when 
they "were rtying like pigeons" over the grass 




to 






>- 
D 

X 



RICHARD lURRETT DAVIS I45 

more than a mile away. He stopped them 
ultimately ; from that time Charles Davis rode 
Hermit, and continued to do so till he was lamed, 
which happened after he had been worked for 
nine seasons. This picture was shown at the 
Royal Academy E.xhibition of 1S40, and was 
engraved for the Sporting Review. A portrait of 
Charles Davis on Hermit was exhibited in the 
Academy two years later. 

In 1845 Davis painted "The Royal Hunt," in 
which is portrayed Charles Davis galloping away 
from the spectator, up a broad, winding ride in 
Windsor Forest with about twelve couple of 
hounds some of which are racing on the line ahead 
of the huntsman, while the remainder are streaming 
out of the woodland ; the field and whippers-in are 
grouped on the right of the canvas. The hounds 
are full of movement and spirit, and the artist has 
painted his brother in a position which shows to 
perfection the graceful seat in the saddle for which 
Charles Davis was famous. The landscape, with 
Windsor Castle in the distance, is only fairly good ; 
the canvas measures 44 inches by 48 inches. 

Another picture of the Royal Hunt was that 
painted in 1847, as a presentation work to Earl 
Granville, Master of the Buckhounds. The scene 
is a meet on Ascot Heath ; Charles Davis is on a 
favourite grey Lincoln — an entire ; Robert Bartlett, 
10 



146 ANIMAL PAINTERS 

first whipper-in rides Corn Law ; Harry King is on 
Postmaster-General ; J. Freeman on Traverser, and 
George Bartlett, the feeder, stands on the left 
looking at the hounds. This picture, which 
measures 72 inches by 48 inches, was shown at the 
Royal Academy Exhibition of 1847. 

Davis's pictures of the Royal Hunt and Mr. 
Garth's hounds, and of incidents connected there- 
with, were numerous : many of them are to be 
seen in the houses of hunting residents and in 
the hotels of the district, where they possess an 
interest apart from their artistic merit which would 
not attach to them elsewhere. 

Among other works may be mentioned, " Fox- 
hounds and Whelps," which was engraved on stone 
by S. W. Giles, size of plate 12 J inches by 10 inches : 
" Foxhounds Running in Covert," size of canvas 2 
feet 6 inches by 2 feet 2 inches. The hounds, 
about five couple, are in full cry on the outside of 
a thick forest ; a glimpse of light is shining- 
through the distant foliage. A beautiful mezzotint 
engraving of the work, 15! inches by 11^ inches, 
was executed by W. Giller, published in 1S29 by 
Mr. Davis, at 10, Wilton Street, Grosvenor Square, 
and sold by Boys and Graves, 6, Pall Mall ; the 
original picture is now in the collection of H. J. 
King, Esq., 138, Piccadilly, London. "Foxhounds 
in their Kennel," and "The King's Harriers," 



RICHARD I5ARRETT DAVIS I47 

companion pictures, were engraved by Giles, plates 
16 inches by io| inches. 

Davis resided at Windsor during a considerable 
period of his life ; among his friends he counted 
James Ward, R.A., Edmund Bristowe and James 
Stark, the last named a landscape painter who took 
up his abode at Windsor in 1840. 

Hounds excepted, the artist painted few pictures 
of dogs ; so far as our researches have shown, he 
has not even left a portrait of one of the black 
and tan wire-haired fox-terriers, a breed celebrated 
for their keenness at fox, badger, and other vermin, 
and which at the time were much prized by hunts- 
men. Davis shared possession of this breed with 
an old friend of his, Mr. P. L. Rumbull, of Sey- 
mour Place, London. 

Thouijh the artist must have been much with 
his brother Charles, to whom it is no doubt truly 
stated he owed a great deal as sporting mentor, the 
two were not very deeply attached to one another ; 
they were too utterly unlike to have much in com- 
mon. Charles Davis's staid character, the "even 
and deserved prosperity of his career, his converse 
— almost identity — with great personages, and the 
responsible authority of his position may easily have 
induced a certain semi-royal aloofness," to quote 
from Lord Ribblesdale's excellent account of him. 
Richard Davis on the other hand was careless and 



148 



ANIMAL PAINTERS 



Bohemian in his mode of life. Charles Davis when 
he died, at the age of seventy-nine, in 1867, left a 
large fortune which he bequeathed to Her Majesty ; 
whereas Richard, when he died, at the age of sixty- 
two, in the year 1854, was in poverty. 



WORKS OF RICHARD BARRETT DAYIS. 

IN THE SOUTH KENSINGTON MUSEUM. 

NEAR I'IRGINIA WA TER, Two tall trees oversh.iilow cottage, backed by a part of the 
forest ; in the front is a pool of water covered with water-lilies, a boy fishing on the 
margin ; canvas 17 inches by isi inches upright (^S'lcc/'sjianks Cijt). 

EXHIBITED AT THE ROY.'\L ACADEMY (69 in numbert. 

YEAR 

i3o2— ^ LANDSCAPE. 

1803— {2) LANDSCAPE AND CATTLE— LANDSCAPE AND CATTLE. 

1805— ///5 MAJESTY IN ins TRAVELLING CHARIOT, RETURNING TO 

TOWN FROM WINDSOR. 
iS.o6— {2) JII A RES AND FOALS IN HIS MA//:sTrS STUD AT UTNDSOR— 

AN OLD HUNTER, the properly of H.R.H. the Duke of Cumberland. 
iioy—[i) DUNCANS HORSES— PORTRAIT OF A HUNTER— A UIEIV OF 

WINDSOR CASTLE. 
ii.oZ— LANDSCAPE, horse and figures. 
iZog— {-2) HACK, the property of Capt. H. Vyse-THE WILD HUNT.'i.UAN, z/dir 

"Scots' Ballads and .Songs." 
i3io— .4 VLOOD MARE, the property of Sir F. Boingeois. 
iZi^—A BOAR HUNT. 

1S14— (2) GOING TO MARKET— THE STABLE. 
J817— (2) HORSES— PORTRAIT OF A RACEHORSE 
iii&—(2) CLAFILENO, property of the Earl of C\v,rmicin— PORTRAIT OF VAN 

DYKE, property of the Earl of Clarendon. 
iSig — (3) HACK, property of — I^ombard, Esq. — HACK, property of H. R. Hoare, Esq. — 

I/UNTFR, property of — Lombard, Esq. 
1820— (3) OLD CARRIAGE HORSES IN HIS LATE MAJESTY'S STUD AT 

WINDSOR— MAZEPPA, property of an officer in the GaziAs— FAVOURITE 

OLD HORSE, property of a gentleman at Windsor. 
■,Z2i—l2.) LANDSCAPF—A HORSE FAIR— AN OLD GIG HORSE— EATON, by 

SnPeM— PORTRAIT OF A CHARGER-PORTRAIT OF A RACER— 

AN OLD HUNTER—PORTRAITS OF HUNTERS. 
1S22— {5) PONY, property of the Earl of C\&renion— BROOD MARE, property of the 

Earl of Clarendon— i^i^/,L, property of the Earl of Clarendon— ..^A" OLl) 

HUNTER— PORTRAIT OF A HUNTER, 



WORKS OF RICHARD BARRETT DAVIS 1 49 

VEAK 

iSr3-<4) MOSES, property of the Duke of \ork— THE HAIVKI.VG PARTY; vule 
Bracebridge Hall— /).V OLD COACH HORSE, aged thirty-five years— 
AX OLD HORSE. 

1825— (3) EMILY, the dam of Km\\\ns—EMILlUS—PORTRAIT Of A CEXTLE- 
MAX, WITH HIS MA/ESTiS HUNT. 

iZ^i—.M/DDLETOX, property of the Earl of Jersey. 

1S27 — MARE, property of— Davison, Esq., 2nd Life Guards. 

1S29— /4 FAVOURITE OLD POXY. 

\Zy>—AX OLD CARRI.4CE HORSE, property of His .Majesty. 

1S31— TRAVELLERS ATTACKED BY IVOLVES, a Sketch. 

1S32—LORD FREDERIC FITZCLAREXCE; A Study for a Picture of the Coronation 
Procession. 

1S33— .4 SKETCH. 

iSsi—lVAITIXG FOR A TURX. 

iS3<)— PORTRAIT OF A FAVOURITE. 

1S40— (2) THE HERMIT, celebrated in the Royal Hunt, property of Her Majesty— 
XEAR THE BANKS OF LOCH LAGGAN, INVERNESS-SHIRE, deer- 
stalkers in the distance. 

tc^i—A SCENE IX IVIXDSOR GREAT P.4RK, containing portraits of Her Majesty 
Queen Victoria, the King and Queen of the Belgians, the Hon. Colonel Cavendish, the 
Earl of Bclf.LSt, Lord Lilford, Colonel Buckley, Lord Tonington, Sir George 
Quintin, Miss Quintin, Sir Frederick Stovin, the Earl of U.\bridge, Colonel 
Wymes, Lord .\lfred Paget, — Fozard, Esq., &c. Painted 1837. 

1842— .V.ff. DAVIS, HER .MAJESTY'S HUNTS.VAN, ON HER.VIT. 

■il.\i—SIR ROGER DE COVERLEV AND THE SPECTATOR GO HUNTING. 

1844— y//£ HAIVKING PARTY, vide Bracebridge Hall. 

I S46— TA KING THE S TA G. 

l^^^~THE ROYAL HUNT, AT THEIR MEET ON ASCOT HEATH. 

1048 — " Hark 1 What loud Shouts 

Re-echo through the Groves ! He Ijreaks away. 
Shrill Horns proclaim hii Flight." — Somekville. 

i&^g— OLD FRIENDS. 

iSsi— FA VOU RITES. 

iS32— THE CAVERLEY HUNT. 

1853— (2) TRESPASSERS— THE WILD HUNTSMAN, from the German. 

PLATES IN THE SPORTING MAGAZINE (30 in number). 

(2) THE LADY AT EGHA.1I RACES, 1812 ; an <tiCbmg— GO H ANNA, a bay horse, 
foaled in 1790, bred by the Earl of Egremont, 1013; erigraved by Scott. 

MOSES, a celebrated race-horse, the property of His Royal Highness the Duke of York, 
1822 ; engraved by J. Scott. 

MINOS, a favourite hound in His Majesty's Pack, 1824 ; ergra\ed by J. Webb. 

TOM GR.4NT, huntsman to His Grace the late Duke of Richmond, at Goodwood, 1S27 ; 
engraved by Mr. Fiy. 

(2) .1/^. G. SHARPE, many years huntsman to His Majestj-, 1027; engia^ed by Mr. 
Yxy— MAMELUKE, 1827; engraved by J. R. Scott. 

SOUTH AMERICAN MULE, sent to His Majesty from Valparaiso, by Mr. Nugent, 
appears from its make, as well as the beauty of its colour, to be a mixture of 
the Spanish horse and the ^ebra or the ijuagga, 1827 ; ciigra\ed by J. R. Scott. 



150 ANIMAL PAINTERS 

LOPy a celebrated hunter, 1828 ; engraved l;y J. R. Scott. 

SWIXLEV, a Hanoverian Sta^, presented to His Majesty by the DuVce of Cambridge 
1829; engraved by J. R. Scott. 

TURQUOISE, a brown mare, foaled in 1S35, bred by, and the property of, the Duke of 
Grafton, 1829 ; engraved by J. R. Scott. 

CRITIC^ a red dog, property of Mr. F. Clarke, three times winner of the Cup at Nether- 
haven, 1835 ; engraved by H. Setchel. 

FORWARD ALL! FORWARD! 1837; engraved by H. Setchel. 

ALP AND GLORY, a dog and bitch of the true Mont St. Bernard breed, the pro- 
perty of Her Majesty and Prince .\lbert, 184-; ; engraved by H. Beckwith. 

THE NEWMARKET TOUT, 1844; engraved by J. H. Kernot. 

(i) A DILEMMA, 1845, vol. 105; engraved by J. H. Engleheart— r.-J A'AVc; THE 
STAG, 1845, engraved by G. Paterson— /iVC/Z)£:.Vr OF THE CHASE, 1845; 
engraved by G. Paterson. 

VIGNETTE, 1S46 ; engraved by J. H. Engleheart. 

PORTRAITS OF HER MAJESTY S STAGHOUNDS, 1846 ; engraved by J. 
Scott. 

(2) WHO'S UP FOR THE RESCUE? 1S47, vol. 109; engraved by E. Hacker— 
HAVE A CARE FOR THE VIXEN! 1847; engraved by J. Scott. 

PORTRAITS OF HER MAJESTYS STAGHOUNDS, 1849; engraved by E. 
Hacker. 

FUTURE HOPES 1848 ; engraved by J. Scott. 

A CASE OF REAL DISTRESS, 1850; engraved by J. Scott. 

VIGNETTE, 1852; engraved by W. Backshell. 

VIGNETTE, A Fresh Fox, 1852 ; engraved by E. Hacker. 

OVER THE OPEN, 1854; engraved by E. Hacker. 

THE DEER PADDOCK, 1855; engraved by W. Backshell. 

THE GLOOMY WOODS, 1869; engraved by J. Scott. 



PLATES IN THE NEW SPORTING MAGAZINE 
(7 in number). 

GADFLY, a fo.\hound, the property of His Majesty, 1831 ; engraved by Webb. 

THE ILLUSTRIOUS SPORTSMAN, a portrait of His Grace the Duke of Welling- 
ton, with the Vine Hounds, 1841 ; engraved by E. Radclyffe. 

ORNAMENTS OF THE BENCH, Foxhounds, 184J ; engraved by J. Bull. 

THE EARTHSTOPPER ON HORSEBACK (in a wood, on a stormy night), 1843; 
engraved by J. Godden. 

YOICKS! GONE AU'AY, horseman and hounds, 1843; engraved by J. H. Engleheart. 

THE DEER PADDOCKS, ASCOT, 1S43 ; engraved by J. Godden. 

RIGGING HIM OUT or MAKE YOUR GAME, 1S45 ; engraved by J. R. Scott. 

PLATES IN THE SPORTING REVIEW {12 in number). 

THE BADMINTON SWEEP, Wot Hunts with the Duke, 1840; etched by 
Landells. 

THE HERMIT, a hunter belonging to the Royal Hunt. 1S40; engraved by H. B. 
Hall, 



WORKS OF RICHARD BARRETT DxUTS 151 

MEET OF HER MAJESTY S STAGHOUKDS, 1S40; engraved by T. A. Prior. 
FOX-HUNTJNG: pi. i, THE DNAIf: pi. 2, COiVE AH'-AV; pi. 3, FULL 

CRY; pi. 4, THE DEATH; 1841; engraved by T. A. Prior. 
COirES HARBOUR, rS4i; etched by E. Landells. 

LUXURY, one of the Royal Stag Hounds, 1S41 ; engraved by A. W. Warren. 
ILLUSTRATIONS OF THE EQUESTRIAN ORDER, 1841 ; etched by Landells. 
PHEASANT SHOOTING IN SIVINLEY PARK, His Royal Highness Prince 

Albert shooting, 1841; engraved by A. W. Warren. 
ILLUSTRATIONS OF THE EQUESTRIAN ORDER, No. 2, A Patrician, 1841, 

etched by Landells. 



152 



STEPHEN ELMER, A.R.A. 

(Born 1717. Died 1796.) 

STEPHEN ELMER was born at Farnham, 
Surrey, in 1717. The son of a maltster, 
he was brought up to his father's business ; 
but while following that occupation he found 
ample time to devote to artistic pursuits and won 
success as a painter of animals and birds, rural 
scenes and still life. In the last department of 
art, in the portrayal of dead game, fish, flowers, 
and fruit he particularly excelled ; but his pictures 
of birds, more especially of game birds, combine 
with high artistic merit, great accuracy of draw- 
ing and fidelity to life ; he possessed in a degree 
that has been rarely exceeded the gift of seizing 
the characteristic pose or attitude of birds, and 
betrays a knowledge of their ways of life and 
habits that only a careful student of nature can 
acquire. Notwithstanding the nicety of touch re- 
quired for the accurate presentation of the plumage 
of birds, Elmer was master of a bold and free style 
of draughtsmanship which lends individuality to his 
pictures. Character studies occur occasionally in 



STEPHEN ELMER. A.R.A. I 53 

the list of his contributions to the Royal Academy ; 
thus, in 1777 he exhibited "The Politician" (after- 
wards engraved by T. Ryder), and in 1785 
"Avarice." "The Miser," engraved by B. Granger, 
was another of the same class ; but studies of birds, 
noticeably pheasants, partridges and woodcock, of 
trout and of fruit seem to have possessed most 
attraction for him. 

In the vestry of Farnham Church is a picture of 
"The Last Supper," which formerly hung over the 
altar. This, so far as can be ascertained, is the 
only work ot sacred character painted by Elmer : 
and we may suppose that it was executed for 
the express purpose of presentation to the church 
of his native place. 

Elmer, in 1763, was a member of the Free 
Society of Artists, at whose annual exhibitions he 
showed numerous works. The fifth exhibition of 
the Royal Academy, held in 1772, included nine 
pictures by Elmer, then in his fifty-fifth year ; and 
for the ensuing twenty-three years, until 1795, with 
the e.xception of the 1792 exhibition, he was 
unfailingly represented upon its walls. The nine 
works contributed by him to the exhibition of 1772 
were very fairly representative of his range of art, 
including as they did pictures of a fox, hare, 
pheasant, small birds and trout, flower and fruit 
pieces, all of which were marked " For Sale." In 



154 ANIMAL PAINTERS 

regard to this it is worth noting that as time passed 
by Elmer appears to have made no attempt to sell 
his pictures ; at all events he possessed a large 
collection of his own paintings at the time of his 
death. His reputation had been well established 
long ere this date, and the Royal Academy evidently 
only waited until he should send pictures to their 
exhibition to elect him an Associate ; for this honour 
was conferred upon him in 1772, the first year in 
which he exhibited. Between that year and 1795 
he sent altogether 1 1 7 works to the Royal Academy 
exhibitions. 

Elmer's addresses in the catalogues are given as 
Farnham, Surrey, and 44, Watling Street, London ; 
the latter perhaps being an occasionally visited place 
of business, for he seems to have made the pretty 
little Surrey town where he was born his place of 
residence. 

Foxhounds and other sporting dogs furnished 
subjects for some of Elmer's best pictures. Two of 
his pictures were engraved by W. Smith for repro- 
duction in the Sporting Magazine. One occurs in 
the issue for April, 1805, entitled "Mallard and 
French Spaniel ; " it shows a dog whose closely 
shaven legs, shaven tail, with tip-tuft and fierce 
moustaches suggest the poodle rather than spaniel. 
The letterpress describing the original as the work 
of "the ingenious Mr. Elmer, of Farnham," says 




< 

o 
cc 

H 



STETHFS ELMER, A.B.>_ Iff 

" The rough French spaniel has been tVa-Ki the 
best companion on these occasions .^duck shoodn^^ : 
he watches the conduct of the sportSinan. and with 
a velocity- uneqaalled. darts on the wo'onded bird, 
and ha\Tng fastened on his prey, presents it wiih all 
possible speed at the feet of his master."' The 
second plate is from Elmers portrait of Trojan, a 
famous foxhound belonging: u3 Mr. Corbet, when he 
hunted the Warwickshire ODuntr\-. " Ximrod's ~ 
a : : . _ - : : f this hound, whose portrait faces this oage, 
: i; :':.:nd in the Apcendix. page 210- 

Traitor. TyranL Tormentor, Turpin and Tarquin. 

all as fine hounds as ever went into a field, were 

among' Trojan's get. When the pack was sold in 

1790, Mr. Corbet reserved the cid hc-und for 

himself 

Daniel's Rural Srcrzs contains ten engravings bv 
by John Scott, from ELmer's paintings, namely. 
"Terrier and Fox". •■Hare Sitting." ""Snared 
Hare, " " Groups of Fish. " "• Pheasants." " Wotmied 
Pheasantj" "Black Grouse."^ " Red Gnxisc," " Covev- 
01 Partridges "" and " Woodcocks." The last named 
is here reproduced. The A^^^ils of Spcrfiis^ i-os 
iS:;5 contains a plate engraved by Joim Scoa frcsn 
*• Partridges Basking in the Sun."" a picture which 
had been exhibited by Eimer at the Rcyal .Aca- 
demy : it depicts a covey alarmed while d-.3ting 
by the sudden liight overhead of a couple of duck. 
and is beaudfullv executed. 



156 ANIMAL PAINTERS 

Among many important engravings from his 
pictures mention may be made of three fine plates 
on a large scale engraved by Charles Turner and 
published by W. D. Jones, of Oxford, in 1807 ; these 
are "Dead Game," "Black Game" and "Red 
Game." 

Elmer died at the age of seventy-nine, in 1796, 
having exhibited for the last time three years pre- 
viously ; he was buried at Farnham. Dying as he 
had lived, unmarried, he bequeathed his property 
(which included, as already remarked, a large number 
of his own works), to his nephew. These were ex- 
hibited at the Large Room in the Haymarket in the 
spring of 1799, under the title of " Elmer's Sports- 
man's Exhibition." Many of them were disposed 
of at good prices, and the remainder were removed 
to Gerrard Street, Soho, where they were acciden- 
tally destroyed by fire on 6th February, 1801. The 
catalogue of these pictures consisted of 148 lots, 
and the Introduction describes it as a collection of 
pictures of dead pheasants, partridges, hares, "and 
the numerous etceterae of what painters call still 
life." It proceeds : — "To blazon the merit of Mr. 
Elmer is quite unnecessary, as for more than half-a- 
century his talents have been universally admitted 
and universally admired. 1 le took Nature, English 
Nature, for his model, and in his works she herself 
appears as in a mirror. ' I'he story of the ancient 



WORKS OF STEPHEN ELMEK, A.K.A. 1 57 

painter whose grapes were so natural that the birds 
flew and pecked at them is quoted, and it is added 
that Elmer's painting went further, for on one 
occasion, a lady of rank, calling at his studio at 
Farnham, found him painting a brace of partridges 
hangingf before him, and exclaimed, 

" No wonder, Mr. Elmer, you succeed so well, 
for I see you paint from Nature." 

" Not now, madam, not now ; for I am copying 
a picture I painted last year," replied the artist ; 
and he lifted from his easel the picture which his 
visitor had mistaken fir two real birds. 



WORKS OF STEPHEN ELMER, A.R.A. 

IX THE SOUTH KEXSIXGTON MUSEUM. 

GROUP OF FISH LVIXG O.V THE GROUND, on canvas, 24! inches by 29! im-he., 
oblong. Signed. 

PICTURES EXHIBITED IX THE ROYAL ACADEMY 
(117 in number). 

YEAR 

i772-<9) A FOX, &'c. A HARE— A PHEASANT— Ttuc FLOWER PIECES— 

Two FRUIT PIECES— Three DEAD BIRD PIECES— A BRACE OF 
PHEASA NTS— BRACE OF TROUT— Two pieces of SMALL BIRDS. 

i-,-,^— (10) FOIVLS — LURCHER AND DEAD FOX — SPORTSMEN, with dead 
game, &c.— CANARY IN A CAGE— FRUIT PIECE— Two small FRUIT 
PIECES— BRACE OF PARTRIDGES — WOODPECKER, JAY, &'c.— 
BASKET OF STRA WBERRIES—GAME. 

,7-^— (9) HERON AND SPANIEL — POINTER— PHEASANTS— PARTRIDGES 
— TROUT— FRUITS— FRUITS— GAME— HARE AND PHEASANTS. 

177s— (4) A BRACE OF TROUT— WOODCOCK.'i-PARTRIDGES-A BASKET 
OF STRA WBERRIF.S. 

r„(r~{^) DEAD CAME — DEATH OF A FOX— FISH AND CAT— FRUIT- 
FRUIT. 



158 



ANIMAL PAINTERS 



YEAR 

^m~(l) FOX AND PHEASANT — FOWLS, &-c. — BASKET OF STRAIV- 
BEKKIES — PARTRIDGES — FK UIT ~ A POLITICIAN— r/Eir OF 
FARNHAM CASTLE. 

l^^Z-^6) A BRACE OF TROUT— BASKET OF S TRAIl'BERRIES—FR UIT— 
FR UIT— FLOWERS— FLOWERS. 

1779— (6) A BRACE OF PHEASANTS— CARP— WOODCOCKS— WILD DUCKS, 
TEAL, &'c.— TROUT, CARP, b'c.—HEN AND CHICKENS. 

i7So-(6) FRUIT — WOODCOCKS — HARE AND PARTRIDGES — PERCH- 
BRACE OF PARTRIDGES— PHEASANT AND WOODCOCKS. 

1781— <6) WOODCOCKS— BR. ACE OF PARTRIDGES— BRACE OF PHEASANTS 
—FRUIT— FRUIT— COVEV OF PARTRIDGES. 

1782— <s) WOODCOCKS— DEAD G.iME—FISH AND CAT— FRUIT— FRUIT. 

^■jS3-(7) FISH— NEWFOUNDLAND DOG — SPANIELS AND WOODCOCKS- 
BLACK GAME— PAR TRIDGES— WOODCOCKS— FR UIT. 

17S4— (5) PHEASANTS— FRUIT— WOODCOCKS— AN ALAR.MED PO.ICHER— 
PARTRIDGES. 

1785— (5) GOLD PHE.4S ANTS — FRUIT— .MANDARIN DR.! KE— AVARICE- 
PHEASANTS. 

tji6—(.$) BRACE OF PIIE.4SANTS—HAWK AND PAR TRIDGF— FIGHTING 

COCKS— WOODCOCK.';— GR A PES, &=€. 
7S7— (4) Cr);'£ J- OF PARTRIDGE.';— BR.-ICE OF PHE.4SANTS—HARE AND 
WOODCOCKS— FOX .AND PHEASANT. 

\nZi-(S) BR.-iCE OF PARTRIDGES— COUPLE OF WOODCOCKS— A HARE 
SITTING. 

1 7S9— ( 5) PEA COCK— FISH— FR UI T—PA R TR IDGF.S—PHEA SA NTS. 

1790— (3) FISH— PHEASANTS— FRUIT, &=€. 

^ni— COVEV OF PARTRIDGES. 

1793— (2) COUPLE OF WOODCOCKS— FRUIT. 

,jg4_(2) TEAL— PARTRIDGES. 

tn'^—BR.'ICE OF TROUT. 

PLATES IN THE SPORTING MAGAZINE (2 in number.) 

MALLARD AND FRENCH SPANIEL, 1805, vol. 26. 
TROJAN, 1825, vol. 65; engraved by W. .Sniich. 

PLATE IN THE ANNALS OF SPORTING. 

COVEY OF P.l R TRIDGES, 1823, vol. 7 ; engra\'ed by J. Scott. 



159 



JOHN E. FERNELEY. 

(Born 1782. Died i85o.) 

JOHN E. FERNELEY was born on i8th 
^ May, 1782, at Thrussington, in Leicester- 
shire, a place well known to followers of the 
Quorn. The son of the village wheelwright, he 
followed his father's craft and worked in his 
yard until he attained the age of twenty-one. 
A wheelwright's business is not one that at first 
sight appears to offer scope for the exercise of 
artistic talents. But the born artist makes oppor- 
tunities for himself, and in his teens young 
Ferneley betrayed his real bent by adorning the 
foreboards of waggons sent for repair with devices 
in colours which he prepared for himself Further 
proof of his proclivities was forthcoming in his 
method of employing his leisure hours, which he 
spent copying pictures borrowed for the purpose. 

His success in these early efforts evidently 
impressed Ferneley senior, who must have been 
a man of less narrow views than some of the 
parents who have claimed incidental notice in 
these biographical sketches, for in 1803, John E. 



l6o ANIMAL PAINTERS 

Ferneley, being then of age, migrated with his 
father's consent to London in order to study under 
Benjamin Marshall. He spent a year in Marshall's 
studio in Beaumont Street, Marylebone, varying 
his work there with occasional visits to Dover, 
where he painted pictures of horses for the officers 
of the Leicestershire Militia then stationed at 
Dover Castle. That gentlemen from his native 
county should have requisitioned his services so soon 
after he had embraced the artist's career, seems 
to indicate that the work which engaged his spare 
time while in his father's yard had attracted atten- 
tion beyond the limits of his own village. 

He appears to have been of rather restless disposi- 
tion. When he had spent about twelve months 
with Marshall, he started to seek his fortune in 
Ireland, thinking no doubt that a country in which 
sport ranked so highly in the esteem of all classes 
offered a promising field to one of his profession. 
His residence on the other side of St. George's 

o 

Channel was not continuous, as he found time to 
pay occasional visits to Thrussington. Travel in 
those days was neither cheap nor expeditious, so it 
may be fairly concluded that Ferneley was doing 
well in a pecuniary sense. At all events, he found 
patrons among the most prominent Irish sportsmen 
of the time; between the years i8og and 1813 he 
executed commissions for the Earl of Belmore, 
Lord Lismore, Lord Rossmore, and many others. 



JOHN E. FERNELEY l6l 

As was most natural in view of the place of 
his birth and upbringing, fox-hunting pictures were 
Ferneley's speciality. Mr. Thomas Assheton Smith 
was one of his first patrons. That gentleman left 
Northamptonshire to succeed Lord Foley as Master 
of the Ouorn in 1806, collecting a first-rate pack 
from various kennels, his best draft being purchased 
for 1,000 guineas from Mr. Musters, of Colwick 
Hall. For Mr. Assheton Smith, in the first year 
of his mastership of the Quorn, Ferneley painted 
some large hunting pictures. Afterwards he under- 
took commissions for Lord Tamworth, at Stanton 
Harold, near Ashby-de-la-Zouch. Having these 
successes to remind him that there was no better 
field for a painter of fox-hunting scenes than his 
own county, it is not surprising that Ferneley, when 
weary of vacillating between Ireland and England, 
should have selected as his home the metropolis of 
the sporting world, Melton Mowbray, not half a 
dozen miles from Thrussington. Here he married 
and settled down. 

Once established at Melton work flowed in upon 
him ; his reputation grew apace, and soon was 
almost unrivalled by that of any man in his own 
line. His talent as a portrait-painter, combined 
with his remarkable ability in catching the likeness 
of horse and hound, rendered his position excep- 
tionally strong ; and he numbered among his 
II 



l62 ANIMAL PAINTERS 

patrons such men as the Duke of Rutland, the 
Marquis of Westminster, the Earls of Cadogan 
and Kintore, Lords Jersey, Middleton, Forester, 
Gardner, and Tyrone, the Hon. Augustus Craven, 
Sir Bellingham Graham, Sir Harry Goodricke, Sir 
J. Crewe, Mr. F. H. Standish, and many of the 
other celebrated hard riders of the time. 

Among Ferneley's best known pictures may be 
noted one painted in the year 1815 for the Earl 
of Plymouth, " The Quorn Hunt, Mr. Thomas 
Assheton Smith and his hounds"; a group of fifteen 
sportsmen. Mr. Assheton Smith stands by his 
horse Gift, a light chestnut, whose rein is held by 
Dick Burton. He is talking to Mr. Mills, who is 
mounted on an iron-grey. Lord Plymouth stands 
near, leaning over his horse Fancy ; Tom Edge is 
on Cayman ; and Jack Shirley from the back of 
Young Jack o'Lantern looks down on his favourite 
hounds. Young Will Burton lingers on the out- 
skirts of the group waiting to see hounds thrown 
into covert before he takes home his master's hack. 
(Young Burton was only fourteen years old at the 
time this picture was painted, and he died a few 
months afterwards). The meet is at Barkby Holt, 
and the eye, passing the church tower of Hunger- 
ton and Quenby Hall, rests on the fir-clad eminence 
of Billesdon Coplow. 

For Sir Bellingham Graham, who was Master 



TOHN E. FERNELEY 1 6 



J> 



of the Ouorn from 1821 to 1823, Ferneley painted a 
picture which Sir Reginald Graham has now in his 
possession ; he says " it is perhaps the largest and 
probably the best work of that excellent artist." 
This was "The Ouorn at Ouenby in 1823"; it 
contains more than forty portraits of men well 
known in Leicestershire ; among them are Lord 
Darlington (Master of the Raby), Lord Cardigan, 
Mr. Maxse, on Cognac, Mr. Valentine Maher, 
Captain the Hon. F. Berkeley, R.N. (afterwards 
Lord Fitzhardinge), Colonel Coke, on Advance, 
Lord Rancliffe (of Bunney Park), Sir Bellingham 
Graham, Lord Sefton, Sir Francis Burdett, M.P., 
Colonel George Anson, Lord Elcho, Sir James 
Musgrave, Captain Whyte Melville, Sir Roderick 
Murchison, Mr. Greene (of Rolleston), Mr. Frank 
Forester, Sir George Wombwell, Mr. John Bushe, 
Mr. " Jack " White (afterwards Master of the 
Cheshire, 1841-1855), Will Staples, first whipper-in, 
and Jack Wrigglesworth, second whipper-in. 

" The Meet at Kirby Gate " was also painted for 
Sir Bellingham Graham. 

Mr. Osbaldeston's first commission to F"erneley 
was for a portrait of Assheton, a hunter for which 
Lord Plymouth gave 400 guineas. It shows Mr. 
Osbaldeston on this horse topping a flight of 
rails ; he is in the act of checking the hounds. 
Mr. Holyoake on Crossbar is at his side, and 



164 ANIMAL PAINTERS 

some of the other leading Meltonians are equally 
well up. 

" Scurry," painted for Mr. Crawfurd, of Langton 
Hall, is a large canvas which has special interest 
as containing the portraits of three famous sports- 
men, .Sir Harry Goodricke, Squire Osbaldeston 
and Mr. Francis Holyoake (afterwards Sir F. 
Holyoake Goodricke). In reference to the last- 
named, a quotation from Sir John Eardley Wilmot's 
Reminiscences of Thomas Assheton Smith, Esq., 
published by John Murray, is not out of place 
here : 

" He was first man at one time for a twenty minutes' thing, 
was Mr. Holyoake. To see him ride Brilliant, shoving the 
fox along 1 This horse was a rich dark chestnut ; such a 
countenance, such an eye ; he had him from Newmarket. Sir 
Harry Goodricke, Sir St. Vincent Cotton, and Mr. Holyoake 
lived together at Quorn, and were called ' The Sporting 
Triumvirate.' Mr. Holyoake succeeded by will to the entire 
property of his brother-sportsman. Sir H. Goodricke, whose 
name he took, and was afterwards created a baronet. He 
himself rode Young Sheriff for several seasons. Clinker 
originally belonged to him, but was subsequently bought by 
Captain Ross. Sir Francis Goodricke has long since left the 
hunting-field under the influence of deep and very sincere 
religious impressions ; the zeal which unilormly displayed 
itself with such ardour in his case in the pursuit of a 
favourite diversion, is now directed with even greater 
strength and intensity into a far higher and nobler channel." 

Among J. E. Ferneley's other pictures may 
be mentioned a smaller work, termed " Modern 



JOHN E. FERNELEY 1 65 

Scarlets," which was won by the Earl oi Milton 
in a raffle, by whom organised and under what cir- 
cumstances does not appear. 

"A Favourite Hunter," the property of H. De 
Burgh, Esq., of Drayton Hall, near U.vbridge, 
dated 1823 ; size, 41 inches by 33 inches. This 
picture is in the Elsenham collection. 

An equestrian portrait of Sir Harry Goodricke, 
with that of Mountford, the huntsman, who holds 
aloft the fox ; Will Derry and Beers, the whippers- 
in, appear in the background. This picture was 
left unfinished. 

For Mr. Foljambe, of Osberton Hall, near East 
Retford, he painted a portrait of a famous mare 
named Lark, the property of Sir Vincent Cotton. 
So admirably did the artist catch her likeness that 
" Nimrod " said when he saw the mare herself he 
recognised her from her portrait at the first glance. 

" Silver Firs " : a shooting picture painted for 
Mr. Foljambe. 

" The Quorn Hunt " : a caricature sketch in oils. 
The scene is the district of Stapleford, in Leicester- 
shire, and the figures are portraits of well known 
followers of the Hunt. Sir F. Holyoake Goodricke 
leads the first flight on Brilliant, and the other 
riders are the Marquis of Worcester, Lord Belgrave, 
Lord Milton, Lord Forester, Lord Alvanley, Lord 
Brudenell, .Sir Belling-ham Graham, .Sir Francis 



1 66 ANIMAL PAINTERS 

Burdett, Sir Edward Mostyn, Sir Francis Mackenzie, 
Col. the Hon. Arden, the Hon. Robert Grosvenor, 
Captain Frederick Berkeley, Captain C. Berkeley, 
Captain Garth, Captain Ross, Count Sandois, 
Messrs. George Anson, Blount, "Billy" Coke,* 
Maxse, Maher, White, Kent, Patrick, T. Heycock. 
Gilmore, Nicholson, Lyne Stephens, Wharton, John 
Wormald, Henry Wormald, and Dick Christian. 
The riders are represented in very various attitudes : 
Sir F. Holyoake Goodricke, who was said to 
try and catch the fox himself, is leading, while 
others are riding: hard, fallino- off — in short, in everv' 
position in which the fortune of the chase may find 
a keen rider. On the left of the picture we see a 
group, eager and angry, having been stopped at a 
gate in a lane by a brood mare and her foal, which 
block their way. This canvas is in the Elsenham 
collection; it is dated 1S28; size, 83 inches by 25 
inches. 

" Sir Francis Burdett, Bart." : an equestrian por- 
trait. Ferneley received from Miss Burdett Coutts 
(now the Baroness Burdett Coutts) the commission 
to paint this picture of her father, who then resided 
at Foremark, Derbyshire. Sir Francis Burdett 
died in 1844. 

* This gentleman, nephew of Mr. Coke, who was afterwards created Earl 
of Leicester, is portrayed in the foreground on his famous chestnut Advance. 
Mr. William Coke introduced the low-crowned hat in which Ferneley has 
represented him ; this style of head gear was afterwards known by his name 
in the slightly corrupted form of " Billycock. " 



JOHN E. FERNELEY 1 67 

" The Lambton Hounds at Feedino- Time," was 
painted in 1832 and exhibited at the gallery of the 
Society of British Artists. The figure by the 
kennel door is Fenwick Hunnum, the feeder. This 
picture was engraved in 1833. 

"Breaking Cover" was painted in 1833. This 
work contained portraits of members of the Sedge- 
field Hunt ; it was presented to Mr. Ralph Lamb- 
ton at a dinner given in March, 1S33, by Mr. 
Fawcett, on behalf of the subscribers. 

Filagree and Cobweb : two race-horses with 
foals ; painted for Lord Jersey. 

Velocipede and The Cur : two race-horses ; 
painted for Mr. Crawford. 

" Waiting for a Shot at Roedeer " : a portrait of 
John Henry Bouclitch, for forty-five years head 
keeper to the Earl of Kintore. 

"The Horse Fair" and "The Cattle Market." 
These were two of Ferneley's latest works ; their 
interest is largely due to the artist's introduction 
therein of equine portraits, and of " horsey " char- 
acters of note at the time. 

He painted the portrait of Samuel Dumbleton, 
for twenty-three years whipper-in to the Earl of 
Spencer's hounds under the two Richard Knights. 
This picture was drawn on stone by Miss 
Ferneley, the artist's daughter, and published by 
Ferneley himself at Melton Mowbray in 1834. 



1 68 ANIMAL PAINTERS 

The Nevj Sporting Magazine, vol. viii., for 
Januar)-, 1835, gives a description of the work. 

" Here is the f>ortrait of a veteran sportsman — a man in his 
eighty-fifth year, who is yet able to get to hounds ! beautifully 
drawn on stone by the hand of a fair lady. Why, it is 
enough to rejuvenate the old fellow ! This picture of one of 
the men of olden times — who flourished in the palmy days 
of the Pytchley and " Dick Knight " — is published for the 
benefit of the venerable subject of it, both Mr. Femeley and 
his daughter ha^-ing, with a Hberality of feeling that reflects 
the highest credit on their character, given their time and 
talents to its execution. The likeness is admirable, and we 
feel assured that Mr. and Miss Ferneley's charitable exer- 
tions only require to be known to receive the generous 
suppon of the hunting world, particularly of the gentlemen 
who are acquainted with the original. We have elsewhere 
in this number said a few words on behalf of the ser\-ants of 
hunting establishments, and have often regretted the non- 
existence of a benevolent fund among them, from which aged 
and infirm members might draw a little relief in sickness and 
the decline of life ; for as things now stand we hold it to be no 
discredit to them not to have saved a competency during 
their ser\-itude, and such, we fear, is the case with honest 
Samuel Dumbleton." 

Ferneley's contributions to the Royal Academy 
were less numerous than his large output might 
justify us in expecting ; the probability is that in 
his day the practice, now so usual among painters, 
of stipulating for permission to exhibit a work before 
delivery to the person who had commissioned it, 
was not in vogue. During the period 1806- 1853 
he sent only nineteen pictures. In the issues of 
the Sporting Magazine, between the years 18 12 and 



JOHN E. FERNELEY 1 69 

1859. we find seven engravings from his works, 
and the New Sporting Magazine, for the years 
I S3 2, 1S34, and 1S38, contains three plates, en- 
graved from pictures by Ferneley. 

During the artist's lonsf residence at J^Ielton 
Mowbray, extending over fifty-four years, he 
necessarily witnessed many changes ; his experience 
is eloquently reflected in his works, which give us 
portraits of three generations of the hard-riding 
sportsmen of Leicestershire. It is impossible to 
leave this phase of the subject without more specific 
reference to the man who was so prominent a 
figure with the Ouorn hounds in Ferneley "s day ; 
and again, we cannot do better than quote from 
the book already mentioned — Sir John Eardley 
W'^ilmot's Reminiscences of Thomas Assheton Srnith. 
It is peculiarly apposite, as the writer's remarks are 
inspired by a picture painted by Ferneley : — 

" Speaking on the subject of hounds, we are naturally drawn 
to contemplate the splendid picture of the hunt at Tedworth, 
painted at Penton in 1829 by Mr. Ferneley, who came ex- 
pressly from Leicestershire into Hants, and was the Squire's 
guest for a fortnight for this purpose. Mr. Smith, as has been 
elsewhere already mentioned, is on Ayrton, with Dick Burton, 
his huntsman, standing at the side of the Big Grey ; Tom 
Day, the first whip, on Reformer ; and Bob Edwards, the 
second whip, holding Anderson, Mr. Smith's second horse. 
The numerous hounds in the picture are all portraits. Amcng 
those most famous are Rifleman, standing close to Dick 
Burton, who has a pair of couples in his hand, Watchman, 



170 ANIMAL PAINTERS 

Dimity, Chorister, Dabchick, Trimbush, Tomboy, Traffic, 
Reginald, Rubicon, Roundley, Rosy, Commodore, and 
Clinlver. Trimbush is looking up at Mr. Smith, while 
Chorister stands under his horse's head, and Rifleman with 
the huntsman is at his side. In front of the picture are 
Commodore and Watchman, while Rarity is gambolling 
towards her master. Under the tree, in the background, sits 
Remus, a well-known hound. On the left is Tedworth House. 
The sportsman in the green coat just about to mount his horse 
in the distance is Mr. Northeast, the agent of the Tedworth 
estates, famous for his judgment and experience in the breed- 
ing of Southdown sheep." Speaking of this picture and of 
the principal figure in it, Mr. Ferneley says in a letter written 
on the 23rd of October last : " It gives me much pleasure to 
hear of the publication of a memoir of so excellent a sports- 
man and so good a man. It is now fifty-three years since I 
first saw him ; he was riding his horse Jack-o'-Lantern. I 
saw him near Frisby Gorse, trying to get his horse over a 
flight of rails six or seven times, but he refused, and Mr. 
Smith had to take him to another place before he could suc- 
ceed." Mr. Ferneley adds : " He was the first red-coat I 
painted, and on Jack-o'-Lantern. The picture was bought by 
Mr. Valentine Maher, and at his death it was sold, and I do 
not know what became of it. This was in 1S06, the year Mr. 
Smith first took the Quorn hounds. I also painted his portrait 
with his hounds for the Earl of Plymouth. In the same 
picture were portraits of Lords Plymouth, Aylesford and 
Dartmouth, Messrs. P. Mills, J. Bradshaw, Paris, J. W. 
Edge, Hinton, &c. This was in 1819 ; and I fear never again 
will Leicestershire boast the assembling together of such 
thorough sportsmen, as well as kind, noble-hearted men." 

Ferneley's unwearying energy and industry and 
dauntless perseverance continued until the last, 
though during the two closing years of his life 
he was a great invalid. To the end he was an 



JOHN E. FERNELEY 171 

early riser; no matter how sleepless or full of pain 
the night, he was in his studio with the morning 
light. He was a man whose interests were not 
confined to his own department of art ; to the end 
of his life it was his custom to come up to London 
every year to keep himself abreast of the artistic 
life of the time by visiting the exhibitions. 

Many of the equine portraits and hunting pieces 
which came from his prolific brush adorn the walls 
of English country houses ; these, as we have said, 
were his specialities, but he occasionally painted 
scenes of Turf and Coaching life and other sporting 
subjects. Many of Ferneley's works will live to 
perpetuate his name in the world of sport ; for if 
his achievements were not of an order which would 
entitle him to rank with the first animal painters 
of his time, it must be admitted that he possessed 
gifts, the exercise of which assured him the patron- 
age of the best sportsmen of his day, and also won 
him, despite his humble origin, the personal friend- 
ship of all with whom he came in contact. 

He married, first Miss Sally Kettle, by whom 
he had seven children, and who died in 1836. 
His second wife. Miss Ann Allan, by whom he 
had one son, died in 1853. Two of his sons 
followed in his footsteps, John, of whom some 
notice follows, and Claude Lorraine, landscape and 
animal painter. 



172 ANIMAL PAINTERS 

An engraving of the picture of Captain Ross 
on Clinker, which appeared in the Sporting Maga- 
zine oi 1827, faces this page. 

John E. Ferneley died in the seventy-ninth year 
of his age, on the 3rd June, i860, and was buried in 
the churchyard of his native village, Thrussington. 



WORKS OF JOHN E. FERNELEY. 

PICTURES EXHIBITED IN THE ROYAL ACADEMY 

(20 in number). 

YEAR 

1806— (2) MR. FREER— L. SMITH, /UN., ESQ. 

iSo7-i^) P0RrR.4ir OF A HUNTER AND CROO.M— PORTRAIT OF .4 

GENTLEMAN AND HIS HORSE— SETTERS, the properly of Mr. Lambert 

—A F.4.M0US SETTER. 
1819— /. MILLS, ESQ., on horseback. 
1821 — A GROUP, containing portraits of horses, grooms, and barriers, belonging to 

J. Morant, Esq. 
1^2:1— PORTRAIT OF A HORSE. 
1828 — (2) GLENARTNEY, and his jockey, George Edwards, painted for the Earl of 

Jersey— /J GROUP OF CHILDREN, PONY AND ASS. 
1S31— SIR RICH.4RD SUTTON, BART., his hounds, and portraits of gentlemen of 

the Lincoln Hunt. 
iSsg— PORTRAITS OF THREE HUNTERS. 
liii-PORTRAIT OF MELTONIAN. 
li^-j-M'ILLIAM RUSSELL, ESQ., with his horses, dogs, &c. Presented to him by 

the members of the Brancepeth Hunt Club. 
1849— (2) PORTRAIT OF A HUNTER— THE CUR, winner of the Caesarewitch Stakes 

at Newmarket, 1848. 
i85c^2) HUNTERS, Sambo and Pilot, property of Lord Gardner— i^. GRANT, ESQ., 

A.R.A., on a favourite hunter. 
iSs}— GROUP OF DOGS. 

PLATES IN THE SPORTING MAGAZINE {y in number). 

JUPITER, bred by Col. Thornton, 1812, vol. 40 ; engraved by Scott. 

COGNAC, a celebrated hunter, property of James Maxse, Esq., 1S26, vol. 67 ; engraved by 

H. R. Cook. 
CAPTAIN ROSS ON CLINKER, 1S27, vol. 70; engraved by J. Webb. 
LORD KINTORE'S KEEPER SHOOTING ROEDEER, 1831, vol. 78; engraved by 

H. Woodman. 




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WORKS OF JOHN E. FERNELEY I 73 

LEATHERHEAD, property of Mr. Callinan ; this horse was reputed the best hunter in 

Ireland, 1831, vol. 79 ; engraved by H. R. Cook. 
ORELIO, a celebrated Arabian, 1833, vol. 83 ; engraved by J. Greig. 
RALLVIVOOD, a celebrated foxhound, the property of the Duke of Rutland, 1859, vol. 

134 ; engraved by E. Hacker. 

PLATES IN THE NEW SPORTING MAGAZINE 
(3 in number). 

JOHN U'lXTER, huntsman to Ralph John Lambton, Esq., 1832, vol. 4; engraved by 

J. R. Scott. 
THE LAMBTON HOUNDS AT FEEDING TIME, 1834, vol. 7; engraved by 

R. Parr. 
EXTRAORDINARY LEAP TAKEN BVCOL. STANDEN, 1838, vol. 14 ; engraved 

by T. E. Nicholson. 



174 



JOHN FERNELEY. 

(Born 1815.) 

JOHN FERNELEY, eldest son of John E. 
^ Ferneley, was born in 1S15. His pictures 
have merit, whether we consider them from the 
artistic or sporting stand-point ; but they cannot be 
compared with those of his father's. John Ferneley's 
work is first mentioned in the Sporting Magazine : 
vol. ci. of 1843, contains a plate engraved by J. H. 
Engleheart, from the artist's portrait of Theon, 
a dark brown horse by Emilius out of Maria, by 
Whisker. The picture was painted for Mr. R. 
Blacker, of Ripon, 1843. 

Two plates also appear in the Neiv Sporiitig 
Magazine, in vol. v., 1833, viz.: — a portrait of 
Robert Hunnum, Mr. Ralph John Lambton's first 
whipper-in. This was painted by John Ferneley 
from a large work by his father ; it was engraved 
by W. Raddon. In vol. vii., 1834, we find a 
portrait of Eglinton, a celebrated hunter belonging 
to Mr. Ralph John Lambton, of Durham ; this 
plate was engraved by Engleheart. 

Vol. ii. of the Sporting Review, 1839, also contains 



JOHN FERNELEY 1 75 

an engraving from a picture by John E. Ferneley, 
"The First Step," engraved by J. W. Coolc. 

The Htmting Exploits of Count Sandois, pub- 
lished by Rudolph Ackermann, London, 1841, con- 
tains ten coloured plates, 13^ inches by \oh inches, 
engraved by E. Duncan from paintings by J. 
Ferneley. Deer Stalking also published by 
Rudolph Ackermann, 1841, contains two coloured 
plates, namely "The Stag Soiling" and "The 
Death," after J. Ferneley, engraved by E. Duncan, 
24 inches by 18;^ inches. 

For Mr. R. Goddard he painted an equestrian 
group representing Messrs. Robert Darling and 
John Browne, two well-known characters in the East 
Riding of Yorkshire. This work was engraved and 
was published by Maclean, of the Haymarket, in 
1840. 

Little is known concerning John Ferneley's 
career beyond the fact that he resided chiefly in 
Yorkshire ; as an artist we know him chiefly from 
the engravings of his paintings, which may be found 
in the sporting publications of his time. 



176 



GEORGE GARRARD, A.R.A. 

(Born 1760. Died 1S26.) 

r^ EORGE GARRARD was born on 31st May, 
^-^ 1 760. He came of a family of artists, tracing 
his descent to Marcus Garrard who came from 
Bruges to England in 1580, and became painter 
to Queen Elizabeth. Among other important 
works executed by him was a picture of the pro- 
cession on the occasion of the Queen's visit to 
Hunsdon House, near Ware, Hertfordshire, in 1584. 
Marcus Garrard died in 1635. The name in con- 
nection with art next occurs in the Stafford Papers, 
among which we find two letters dated respectively 
9th November and 13th December, 1637, from "Mr. 
Garrard," who writes of Charles I. as a great patron 
of the Arts : " In evidence of the King's affection for 
his pictures," he says, "a great room is being erected 
in the first court at Whitehall, betwixt the guard- 
chamber and the banqueting-house, which will cost 
the King ^2,500, because he will not have his 
pictures in the banqueting-house hurt." The new 
room was only a temporary structure, built of 
weather-boarding; and it was intended to house the 



GEORGE GARRARD, A.R.A. 177 

King's pictures while the banqueting-hall was given 
up to rehearsals of two masks, one of which was to 
be held at Twelfth-tide and the other at Shrove-tide. 

Of George Garrard's early life very little is known. 
He studied under Joseph Simpson, a famous draw- 
ing-master and was afterwards a pupil of Sawrey 
Gilpin; in 1778 he studied at the Royal Academy. 
His first contribution to the Royal Academy exhibi- 
tion was a picture entitled " Two Horses," which 
was shown in 17S1, when his address is given as 
"At IVIr. Gilpin's, Knightsbridge." It was not 
long before he received a convincing proof of the 
opinion entertained of his work by the first artists of 
the day. This was a commission from Sir Joshua 
Reynolds, who was so pleased with his " View of a 
Brewhouse Yard," exhibited in 1784, that he gave 
the young artist an order for a picture of similar 
character. Though portraits of horses and dogs 
occupied much of Garrard's attention at this period, 
as they did for the best part of his career, he also 
enjoyed some reputation as a landscape painter. 

Hence when Colonel Thornton,* in preparing for 
his famous sporting tour in Scotland about 1786, 
addressed "the ingenious Mr. Gilpin, in whose 
taste as an artist, and good sense as a man I could 
confide ; particularly lamenting the want of a proper 



* See Appendix, p. 211. 
12 



178 ANIMAL PAINTERS 

person with me last year to do justice to the views 
I had been so enchanted with," Gilpin promised 
" to exert himself to find some young man of good 
family whose abilities were equal to the task," and 
suggested among others, George Garrard. For 
excellent reasons Colonel Thornton chose Gilpin's 
old pupil — " The scenes which I wished to have 
painted were to illustrate not only the views as mere 
views, but as scenes adapted to sport ; and his forte 
in animals was very manifest ; his age, constitution 
and acknowledged rising genius would admit of no 
comparison ; added to which he was an excellent 
walker." 

During his patron's six months' tour about the 
northern counties of England and the Highlands of 
Scotland, Garrard's brush was steadily employed ; 
and when the Sporting Tour was published in 1804, 
the work was illustrated with engravings from these 
pictures. 

Garrard, after his tour in the wilds of Scotland 
with his patron, appears to have settled down in 
London to work at his profession. The Royal 
Academy exhibition of 1786, contained evidence of 
his travels in a " View of Hamilton Palace," and 
a "View of Inverary, in Argyllshire," another view 
of the same mansion being shown in the following 
year. Portraits of horses and dogs and landscapes 
make up the majority of his contributions during 



GEORGE GARRARD, A.R.A. 1 79 

the next few years. In 1796, he exhibited a picture 
entitled "A Wharf near London Bridge." "Anthony 
Pasquin " (John Williams), in his Critical Guide 
to the Exhibition, " notices this performance with 
satisfaction as it affords us an opportunity of ad- 
ministering praise in consonance with our duty. 

. . . In the material parts of the outline the 
artist has soared above his competitors and has 
given us something very near the truth of cha- 
racter." The critic, however, is weighed down 
with a sense of his self-set task to "Ascertain the 
Truth and Improve the Taste of the Realm," as 
declared on the title-page of his guide ; and he 
complains that " the objects are too much crowded 
for any choice of nature unconnected with a mob." 

In 1795, we find the first indication of his taste 
for modelling in the " Model of a Cow," exhibited 
at the Royal Academy of that year. From this 
date he devoted an increasing proportion of his 
time to modelling and sculpture, if we may judge 
by the preponderance of models, busts and kindred 
works which represented his art in the Royal 
Academy exhibitions. 

The idea that models of cattle might be of utility 
to landscape painters seems to have inspired his 
efforts in this direction, but he found himself con- 
fronted at the outset with the difficulty that there 
was no copyright in works of plastic art. To secure 



l8o ANIMAL painters' 

therefore the fruits of their work to sculptors and 
modellers he obtained the support of the Council 
of the Royal Academy and some of the leading 
sculptors of the day, and petitioned Parliament for 
the legal protection of such works. In 179S, his 
exertions were rewarded by seeing 38 Geo. III., 
c. 71, placed on the Statute Book. This is an 
Act " for encouraging the art of models and casts 
of beasts, and other things therein mentioned." 

In 1792 were published engravings from two 
good examples of his work, " A View from the 
East End of the Brewery, Chiswell Street," the plate, 
measuring 21 inches by i6| inches, being engraved 
in mezzotint by W. Ward, and "A Brewhouse 
Yard," plate 22 inches by 17 inches, engraved also 
in mezzotint, by R. Earlom. The artist's choice of 
scene was doubtless due to the fact that on a 
brewer's premises he found the massive old English 
horse which at an earlier date was known as the 
War horse. The animals in these pictures are 
typical specimens of the heavy Shire horse of the 
present time ; the gelding in the Chiswell Street 
brewery picture is a model which breeders of Shire 
horses will find instructive. Garrard's knowledge of 
anatomy is made apparent in the drawing of these 
horses. One of his best subject pieces is to be 
seen in the Duke of Bedford's collection at Woburn 
Abbey. This is "An Agricultural Show," which is 




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GEORGE GARRARI1. A.R.A. l8l 

described by a modern authority as luminous and 
powerful in colour ; the canvas possesses additional 
interest in that the figures are portraits of men 
prominent in the agricultural world of the day. 

The portrait of a horse named Soldier was 
engraved by S. Aiken— size of plate i8f inches by 
1 4-J- inches — and published in January, 1793, "by 
G. Garrard and Mr. Gilpin Knightsbridge, No. 43, 
Little Britain." 

Archibald, ninth Duke of Hamilton and Bran- 
don, was one of the patrons for whom Garrard 
executed many pictures, among them a portrait of 
"The Duke on a Cover Hack" with a foxhound 
in front. This canvas shows admirably the dress 
of the period ; the action of the horse is exceedingly 
well presented ; the work was engraved in mezzo 
tint, the plate measuring 23 inches by 174 inches, 
the artist himself being the publisher in 1797. 

Two of his pictures, " Coach Horses " and 
" Chaise Horses " were engraved in mezzotint by 
J. Young, size of plates 23 inches by 16 inches; 
these, dedicated to Sir John Leicester, Bart., were 
published by John Jeffreys, London, 1798. Plate 
I shows a grand pair of horses, fully seventeen 
hands high, with cropped ears and short, nicked 
tails ; they are harnessed and two men quaintly 
attired in knee breeches, buckled shoes, wigs and 
turned up hats are preparing to attach them to a 



1 82 ANIMAL PAINTERS 

heav)- state carriage which stands in the back- 
ground. Plate 2 shows four grey post-horses with 
two postboys in attendance ; one boy stands by 
the near leader while the second is drawing out 
from the coach-house the travelling chaise ; the 
wheelers stand about sixteen hands, the leaders 
about two inches less. In both these pictures the 
excellent drawing of the horses arrests attention. 

" A Holderness Cow," or as we should now call it, 
a Shorthorn, is an admirably drawn picture, a plate 
from which, by W. Ward, dedicated by the artist 
to Lord Somerville, President of the Board of 
Agriculture, was published in 1798. This plate 
measures 22 inches by 17 inches. 

The year 1800 saw Garrard's election as an 
Associate of the Royal Academy ; it was in 1800, 
too, that he completed the designs for that most 
valuable and instructive work, Garrard's Prints of 
Improved British Cattle. The introduction to 
this work shows that the artist had obtained the 
support of the Board of Agriculture in making the 
drawings. The volume, a folio published by J. 
Smeeton, of St. Martin's Lane, Charing Cross, 
contains coloured plates representative of all breeds 
of cattle ; a table of the dimensions of the animals 
portrayed and a history of the breed accompany 
each plate. Not the least remarkable part of the 
undertaking was a set of models from Nature made 



GEORGE GARRARD, A.R.A. 183 

to show the exact proportions of every part of 
the animal. The Royal Academy recognised the 
importance of the work, and the skill with which 
it had been executed, by awarding Garrard a formal 
vote of thanks and congratulation. 

Daniels Rural Sports, published in four volumes 
in 1 80 1, contains two engravings from pictures by 
Garrard : '' Hounds in Full Chase " and "A Vixen 
and Cubs." A glance through the list of the 
painter's contributions to the Royal Academy 
exhibitions shows that he did not confine himself 
to the delineation of British animals. Indian cattle, 
nvlghai, camels, reindeer, lions, timers and other 
beasts formed the subject of many pictures and 
models. In 1802 one of his exhibits was "A 
Peasant attacked by Wolves in the Snow"; "A 
Norway Elk pursued by Wolves " having been 
one of his pictures in the exhibition of 1800. 

From 1802 until 1824 Garrard devoted himself 
almost entirely to the plastic art, an occasional 
portrait of man or horse and, more seldom, a 
landscape, varying the long record of modelled 
and sculptured works ; but during the last three 
years of his life he turned again to palette and 
brush, as if to show the world that in animal por- 
traiture and landscape his hand had lost none of 
its cunning. Between 1803 and 1S23, the most 
notable picture from his easel was, perhaps. 



I 84 ANIMAL PAINTERS 

" Woburn Sheep Shearing," painted in 1804; 
this work vies with " An Agricultural Show " in 
historical interest, containing no fewer than eighty- 
eight portraits of celebrated agriculturists. The 
work which is in the Woburn Abbey collection was 
engraved in aquatint by the artist himself. 

Garrard's pictures, though very frequently en- 
graved, rarely found their way into the serial 
publications which were the means of making so 
many paintings of sport and allied matters known 
to the world at large. One picture in the Sporting 
Magazine and one in the New Sporting Magazine 
complete the list of these. The former was a por- 
trait of " Betty Bloss," a mare, which at six years 
old went totally blind, but was ultimately cured. 
In her prime she was capable of trotting 17 miles 
in the hour carrying ten stone; of galloping 22 miles 
an hour, under eight stone ; and of travelling 120 
miles in twelve hours on the road. The artist 
sent altogether fourteen works to the exhibitions 
of the British Institution and nine to the Suffolk 
Street galleries. 

We must revert for a moment to Garrard's 
achievements in sculpture. In 18 19 in the 
Sculpture Room at the British Institution, Garrard 
exhibited models of equestrian statues of the Duke 
of Wellington and Sir John Moore, and at the 
Royal Academy in the same year he showed four 



GEORGE GARRARn, A.R.A. (85 

models, all of which received the warm approval 
of critics. At the Royal Academy in 1829 he 
showed a bronze equestrian statue of the Duke of 
York, which the Sporting Magazine eulogises in 
these terms : — " An inimitable performance. The 
attitude and spirited character of the horse are in 
accordance with the noble and commanding figure 
of the equestrian, whose likeness to the lamented 
original is as faithful as anything can be con- 
ceived." An excellent example of his work as a 
sculptor, is a bas relief in marble, 1 5 inches by 9 
inches, representing a group of four horses, which 
is in the Elsenham Collection. 

It is hardly necessary, after what has been said, 
to lay stress on the remarkable range of George 
Garrard's abilities. He was a painter in both oil 
and water colour, equally capable whether he 
elected to portray domestic animals or wild, por- 
traits of men, sporting subjects or landscapes. He 
executed busts, statues and groups in clay, marble 
and bronze, and was equally clever in handling so 
large a subject as a public monument, or one 
requiring such fineness of touch as a medallion ; 
and finally he engraved, with no mean skill, plates 
from his own pictures. 

George Garrard died in his sixty-sixth year on 
8th October. 1826, at Queen's Buildings, Brompton, 
London, 



1 86 ANIMAL PAINTERS 

WORKS OF GEORGE GARRARD. 

IN THE POSSESSION OF Mr. J. M. GARRARD, PINNER 
PLACE, PINNER (13 in number). 

I. PARK SCENE, WITH HUNTERS ; a bright bay and a golden bay Between the 
two stands a hunt servant with three more hunters. 

I. CREAM-COLOURED HORSE, having a snalce twined round his n^ar fore-leg. 

Colouring rich and harmonious. 

3. WINTER FARMYARD SCENE. In the foreground, sheep in the snow. Evening 

effect. 

4. MARES AND FOALS. To the left a white mare standing in repose ; to the right, a 

bay mare suckling her foal. This picture was engraved by Thos. Morris. 

5. A SUSSEX COW. 

6. AFRICAN CAMEL, and in middle distance a second camel reposiog. 

7. BLACK-AND-WHITE GREYHOUND. 

8. FOXHOUND. 

9. GROUP; THREE MAR.MOZET .MONKEYS. 

10. A RED DEER. 

II. HANOVERIAN HORSE. 

12. SKEWBALD MARE AND FOAL in field. 

13. BA Y HORSE grazing. 

EXHIBITED IN THE ROYAL ACADEMY (215 in number). 

YEAR 

17S1— r/CCl HORSES. 

J783— (3) PORTRAIT OF FRIEZLAND MARE and NEWFOUNDLAND DOG— 

PORTRAIT o^& Gentleman and his HoKe— PORTRAIT of ^ dog. 
1784— (4) VIEW OF A BREWHOUSE-YARD—PONY AND DOG— PORTRAIT 

of a Miie— SKETCH FOR HUNTING PICTURE. 
1786— (5) PORTRAIT of a nobleman on a trotting horse— VIEW OF HAMILTON 
PAL.4CE— HORSES AT A FARRIER'S SHOP— VIEW OF INVERARY 
IN ARGYLESHIRE— PORTRAIT of a race-horse, property of the Duke of 
Hamilton. 
iyiy-<,2) PORTRAITS of horse and dog— VIEW OF INVERARY CASTLE. 
,jW—(p) GOING OUT IN THE MORNING — PORTRAITS OF DOGS — POR. 
TRAITS OF HORSES— PORTRAIT of an old Suffolk hone— PORTRAIT 
OF .4 HORSE in miniature— /"Oj^r/e^/T" OF A HORSE in miniature. 
,^8g_(^) I'/EW IN A BREWHOUSE-YARD — HOUND RETURNING FROM 
CHASE— PORTRAIT oi a gentleman and pony— PORTRAITS OF HORSES, 
with view of Burley near Otley, Yorkshire, the seat of P. Mosley, Esq. 
,^qo_(4) PORTRAIT OF A HORSE— PORTRAIT of a gentleman and grey horse— 

COACH-HORSES— PORTRAITS OF HORSES. 
,^,3_(,,) y! .S'NOIV PIECE— VIEW OF A GENTLE.MANS SEAT IN HERT- 
FORDSHIRE — VIEIV IN TRING PARK, HERTS. — MARES AND 
FOALS FRO.M THE PRINCE OF WALES' STUD— VIEW OF A 
GENTLEMANS SEAT IN HERTFORDSHIRE — A YARMOUTH 
CART, WITH VIEW OF YARMOUTH— PORTRAIT OF A HORSE— 
"SALTRAM" — SHEEP-SHEARING AT ASTON CLINTON, IN 
BUCKINGHA.MSH/RE — PORTRAIT OF BULL DOG — SIM! A J AC. 
CHUS. 



WORKS OF GEORGE GARRARD, A.R.A. 1 87 

VBAR 

■ 79-(— (5) MARES AND FOALS— .If A RES AND FOALS— THE ZEBU— POR- 
TRAIT OF A PONY-MARE, property of Sir John Dashwood. 

J79S— (5) PORTRAITS OF HORSES— PARK SCENE at Witham, V-,iif:x— CAMELS 
—MODEL OF BULL— MODEL OF COir. 

ijgS-iio) THE LIME UVEA'S AT PURFLEET —" HAMBLETONIAN" — 
" CAVENDISH" — "BENNINGBROUGH" — A IVHARF NEAR LON- 
DON BRIDGE— MODELS : NIL GAIV iNVLGHAP) ANTELOPE— REIN- 
DEER — SHEEP — HEAVV DRAUGHT HORSE— TABLET FOR A 
CHIMNEY PIECE. 

•797— (ii) PORTRAITS OF HORSES— BULL-BITCH AND PUPPIES— STABLE 
YARD—YIEirOF IVOOL.MER PARK, HERTS.— VIEW IN BEDWELL 
PARK, HERTS.— MODEL OF COIV AND CALF— GROUP OF 
PUGILISTS — MODEL FOR EQUESTRIAN STATUE— GROUP OF 
LA.MBS— MODEL OF STAG— BUST OF INFANT. 

179S— (3) MODEL OF .4 POINTER, property of Sir Charles Hunter— 5,)^ RELIEF: 
DUNCANS HORSES (from a sketch by Mr. G[\fm)—BAS RELIEF: LION, 
LIONESS, AND WHELPS. 

^l^—(i) PORTRAIT OF A CO.iCH-HORSE — " IVHISKV," property of J. H. 
Durand, Esq. —STABLE YARD — MODEL OF BISON AND ZEBU — 
IRISH PIG, 4 ft. 2 in. high, and BERKSHIRE HOG, j ft. 10 in. high— 
NESS US AND DE/ANIR A— ALEXANDER AND BUCEPHALUS. 

iS^-(s) PORTRAITS OF TWO HORSES— PORTRAIT OF A HORSE— POR- 
TRAIT OF A HORSE— SCULPTURE, FIGHTING BULLS— NORWAY, 
ELK PURSUED BY WOLVES. 

1801— (3) BUST OF A YOUNG LADY— GROUP OF HOLDERNESS CATTLE, 
from the King's stock at Windsor— .5" 7"- -J TUE OF AN INFANT recumbent (sod 
of Sir J. Mildmay). 

1802— (3) VIEW IN THE HIGHLANDS OF SCOTLAND— TIGER, from nature— 
PEASANT ATTACKED BY WOLVES. 

>8o3-{5) BUSTS: A. YOUNG, ESQ.— P. COX, ESQ.—B. WEST, ESQ., P.R.A.— 
HOLLAND, ESQ.— THE EARL OF FA UCONBERG. 

1804— (10) SOUTH DEVON RAM, from the Duke of Bedford's flock at Woburn Abbey— 
TWO PRIZE HEREFORD OXON— DURHAM OX, AND MR. COATES' 
SHORT- HORNED COW— VIEW FRO.VI THE EAST END OF THE 
INNER COUR T OF BURGHLEY HOUSE, the seat of the Marquis of Exeter 
—BUSTS: W. STEVENSON, ESQ.— LORD SOMERVI LLE—S. WHIT- 
BREAD, ESQ.— J. HEAVISIDE, ESQ.— SIR J. BANKS, K.B. (in marble) 
— A. i'OUNG, ESQ., Secretary to Board of Agriculture. 

1805— (7) ALTO RELIEF— ALTO RELIEF— BUSTS : REV. MR. GILPIN, Vica 
of Boldre — J/A'. A. NEWLAND, chief cashier of the Bank of England — 
MR. FULLAR— MAJOR BATTEN— T. IV. COKE, ESQ. 

1806— (2) BUST: S. GILPIN, ESQ., R.A.—A LADY. 

iSoj— it) BUST: THE LATE RT. HON. W. PITX,—A YOUNG LADY— EARL 
ST. VINCENT— THE LATE RT. HON. C. J. FO.\'—THE RT. HON. 
J. FOSTER—/. C. CUR WEN, ESQ. 

1808— (6) MODEL for bust of a \:xdy— SKETCH IN CLAY: The death of Adonis— 
MODEL for bust of V. Green, A.E.— BUST IN MARBLE OF THE LATE 
RT. HON. WM. PITT— BUST IN MARBLE OF J. C. CURWKN, ESQ., 
M. P.— MODEL for bust of Mr. Pugett. 

1809— (6) MODEL for statue of the Rt. Hon. William P'M—BUST OF A L.-IDY— 
MODELS for bu.'its : the Rt. Hon. W. Pitt, in the robes of the Chancellor of 
the Exchequer^Capt. Thompson — H. Ashby, Esq.^The Rev. T. Fry, A.M. 

iBitt— (s) MODELS for busts: H. Repton, Esq.— Dr. S. Jackson— T. Tomkins, Esq.— W. 
Wilberforce, Esq., M.P. 



l88 ANIMAL PAINTERS 

VEAR 

1811— (8) MODELS for busts: W. Adam, E'iq.— A lady— The Rt. Hon. Sir J. Sinclair, 
Bart. — A youth — MODEL for equestrian statue of Sir John Moore — STUDY for 
equestrian study of His Majesty, proposed as design to commemorate the Jubilee 
—MODEL for a Xmn— MODEL for statue of His Majesty. 

1812— {7) MODEL for bust of a gznlX^Tn^n— MEDALLION of the Duke and Duchess 
of Bedford — Case containing THREE BRONZES to press letters : a favourite 
terrier, the property of Lady E. Whitbread ; bull-dog, the property of the Hon. R, 
P. D. Burrell ; and greyhound, the crest of the Duke of Newcastle— .1/0 i?^'^ t 
life size, of a true bred bull bitch, property of the Hon. R. P. D. Burrell — MODEL 
for bust of General T^\aan— BRONZE, Sir J. Uoar^— MEDALLION of Tom 
Cribb, the British champion. 

1B13— (6) COLONEL BEAUMONT, M.P.—REV. MR. HUTTON, with view of 
Houghton Hall, Durham — Glass case containing THREE MODELS : favourite 
dogs, properly of Mrs. Baker, of Elemore Hall, Diu-ham ; and of Miss Foljambe, 
of Osberton ; and of a horse— Z?0^ SERPENT CR USHING A TIGER : 
STUDY for has-rfAxi— MODELS for busts of a young lady, and R. B. Sheridan, 
Esq. 

iSh— (3) BUSTS: A YOUNG LADY— AN INFANT— BONERS : a late celebrated 
combat between the Champion and the Black. 

i8i5-<9) PERSIAN HORSES AND SPANISH SHEEP DOG, the property of Earl 
Percy— THE FALL OF PHAETON: model for a %A\>:x— MODELS for 
busts: LORD, LASCELLES— PRINCE HOARE, ESQ., Secretary for Foreign 
Correspondence to the Royal Academy— 5'/yf T. FRANKLAND, BART.— 
HON. .MISS LASCELLES— SIR J. GILPIN, M.D., Inspector General of the 
fortress of Gibraltar— T'/i'.fi' Z'i/A'.ff OF WELLINGTON \n Marshal's uniform, 
executed at the instance of subscribers to a proposed equestrian statue ; cast pre- 
pared for Her Majesty's apartments at Windsor — .-i GENTLEMAN. 

1816— (5) MODELS: for BUST OF A GENTLEMAN— DESIGN FOR A STATUE 
—for BUST OF IV. IVILSHIRE, ESQ.— for MONUMENTAL BUST OF S. 
WHITBREAD, ESQ.— BUST OF THE DUNE OF WELLINGTON. 

■ 817— (7) H. HOLLAND, ESQ., architect, with a view of Hans Place— SIR A. COR- 
BET. BART.— MEDALLION of a lady— .MODEL for bust of an artist— 
MODEL of "Comet," a celebrated improved short-horned bull, which sold for 
r,ooo gs. — STUDY for a monumental bust of young lady — MODEL of a bull calf 
of the improved short-horned breed. 

1818— (4) riEW OF ALNWICK' CASTLE, with Indian cow and group of half- 
bred Highland cattle — THE WAPITI, in possession of Lord James Murray — 
MODELS: for EQUESTRIAN STATUE OF THE DUKE OF WEL- 
LINGTON— ior BUST OF H.R.H. PRINCESS CHARLOTTE. 

1819— (5) MODEL (or BUST OF THE REV. W. CONE, M.A., F.R.S., F.S.A., Arch- 
deacon of Wills. — BAS RELIEF of a bull, from an antique gem — .MODEL in 
clay of design for public monnrrxeM- MODEL in clay : VICTOR Y AND FAME, 
design for public mox\amem— MODEL lor BUST OF MR. CLIFT. 

1820— (3) MODEL for EQUESTRIAN STATUE, to commemorate the downfall of 
usurpation— .Si/JT.? in bronze : DUKE OF WELLINGTON— SAM WHIT- 
BREAD, ESQ. 

1834— (7) HORSE AND DOGS, the property of R. Westenra, Esq., M.P.— ^ CELE- 
BRATED GREYHOUND, j>ropeny o! Edviaid Ellice, Esq., U.V.—VIEW IN 
THE PLEASURE GROUNDS OF CRAVEN LODGE— A FAVOURITE 
PONY, property of Lady Hannah Ellice— INTERIOR OF CRAVEN COT- 
TAGE— MODELS (in clay) for BUST OF JOSEPH BARRETT, ESQ.— 
MODEL for bust for General Mina. 



WORKS OF GEORGE GARRARD, A.R.A. 1 89 

YEAR 

1825— (S) STABLE YARD— SUNSET VIEW OF THE LIME WORKS AT PUR- 
FLEET — "ECLIPSE" p:iinled at Colonel O'Kelly's stables, Epsom, in 1787, and 
finished in 1824— iY£(r l.V OSTERLEV PARK— DESIGN (ar Gothic truss, 
busts of a lady and her seven daughters— .l/t'Z)£Zi' for busts : MASTER LANE 
FOX— MISS LANE FOX. 

1826— <8) SHEEP SHEARING— VIEir IN SANDWELL PARK, seat of the Earl of 
D^nmonih-POR TR AIT OF A HORSE— Yarn STUDIES of the Marquis of 
Exeter's mare, " A.i\g,\i%ta."— MODELS for busls : A LADY— MRS. LANE 
FOX— BRONZE BUSTS: A GENTLEMAN— A LADY. 



PLATE IN THE .'^PORTING MAGAZINE. 

BETTY BLOSS, a famous trotting mare, bred by a smuggler in K^nt, and ultimately 
belonging to Mr. LawTence, 1834, vol. 24 ; engraved by Scolt. 

PLATE IN THE NEW SPORTING MAGAZINE. 

ECLIPSE, a celebrated race horse, bred by the Duke of Cumberland, 1S43, vol. 24 ; en- 
graved by v.. Hacrke. 



IQO 



SAWREY GILPIN, R.A. 

(Born 1733. Died 1807.) 

OAWREY GILPIN, son of Captain John Ber- 
^ nard Gilpin by his wife Matilda, daughter of 
George Longstaffe, was born at Carlisle in 1733. 
The Gilpins come of a very old Cumberland family, 
the famous " Apostle of the North," Bernard 
Gilpin, a collateral ancestor, being recognised as a 
man of ancient lineage even in his day (15 17-1600). 
Captain Gilpin possessed some artistic talent him- 
self and was able to direct his son's first efforts 
with the pencil ; but the boy's exceptional ability 
soon became evident to his father, and at the 
age of fourteen Sawrey Gilpin was sent up to 
London to study under Samuel Scott, the emi- 
nent painter of river pieces and sea-scapes. 

From the circumstance that his father sent 
Sawrey Gilpin to study under Scott, we may hazard 
the conjecture that at this early period the special 
bent of his genius had not declared itself ; but if 
this were so it was not long before his peculiar skill 
in portraying animals was recognised. Scott lived 
in the near neighbourhood of Covent Garden, and 



SAWREY GILPIN, R.A. I9I 

in the great market his pupil is said to have found 
his first models among the horses and carts which 
thronged it daily. The Duke of Cumberland was 
shown some of his sketches, and so greatly did their 
merit impress him that he extended his patronage 
to the young man. and employed him to paint 
portraits of his favourite race horses at Newmarket 
and Windsor. One of the pictures he exhibited 
at the gallery of the Society of Artists in 1771, 
reflects this connection ; it shows " The Duke of 
Cumberland visiting the Stud at Windsor " ; this 
work was painted in collaboration with another 
pupil of Samuel Scott, namely W. Marlow who 
executed the background, a view of the Castle. 

After leaving Samuel Scott, Gilpin went, in 1758 
to Newmarket to study the horse ; and afterward 
returned to London and settled in Knightsbridge. 
He first appears as an exhibitor in the year 1762, 
when he was represented in the gallery of the 
Society of Artists ; for a period of twenty years 
he was a frequent contributor to this exhibition, 
sending altogether eighty-three works. Among these 
may be noticed a drawing " Darius gaining the 
Persian Empire," illustrative of the familiar legend : 
" Gulliver's Visit to the Houyhnynms," and 
"Gulliver taking leave ot the Houyhnynms," two 
large paintmgs of incidents selected from Dean 
Swift's classic ; the picture of " Gulliver's Visit 



192 ANIMAL PAINTERS 

was engraved in mezzotint by Valentine Green, 
the celebrated mezzotint engraver. The latter 
works are in the Cambridge House collection, 
and the former of the two, it may be added 
parenthetically, was selected for mutilation by 
burglars who broke into the house in 1892, the 
head of the dapple-grey horse having been cut out, 
" Pegasus at the Fountain of Hippocrene, being 
haltered by Perseus," is another of the pictures 
which displays Gilpin's talent for the presentment 
of scenes mythological and fanciful. This work is 
said to have been painted for a wager. At a party 
of artists, the possibility of painting a horse with 
wino^s and without obvious and flagrant violation 
of anatomical laws was discussed. Sawrey Gilpin 
declared his ability to do it, his brother artists 
defying him to perform a feat they deemed im- 
possible ; Colonel Mitford, Professor of Ancient 
History at the Royal Academy, who was of the 
party, laughingly offered to bet him a hundred 
guineas he failed to paint the winged horse of 
mythologists, and Gilpin took the wager. By a 
clever but simple artifice the artist won his bet : 
he drew Pegasus in the act of alighting, his wings 
being so disposed that the spectator does not see 
whence they spring, and anatomical laws are kept 
inviolate. This picture is now in the collection of 
Mr. A. B. Freeman- Mitford, C.B., at Batsford 



SAWREV GILPIN, R.A. 1 93 

Park ; the colours are as fresh and bright as on 
the day they were laid on. 

The Rev. William Gilpin, the artist's brother, is 
known by his book Forcsf Scenery, published in 
1 79 1, and other works for the illustration of which 
Sawrey Gilpin executed several cattle pieces. The 
Sporting ivlagazine for April, 1807, contains refer- 
ence to " the Rev. William Gilpin, the tourist " ; 
Mr. Giljiin no doubt travelled like other men of 
culture and taste, but his famous Forest Scenery 
owes its inception to the fact that he counted 
among his pupils at the school he kept near 
Cheam, the first Lord Redesdale and his brother, 
Colonel Mitford, the historian of Greece, of whom 
passing mention was made above. Colonel 
Mitford (who was the great-grandfather of Mr. 
Freeman-Mitford, of Batsford, lately M.P. for the 
Stratford-on-Avon division of Warwickshire) in 
later years presented his old master to the living 
of Boldre, in Hampshire ; here Mr. Gilpin wrote 
his books and passed the remainder of his life. 
It may be added that at the time of the artist's 
death, 1807, his only surviving brother, Joseph 
Dacre Gilpin, filled the mayoral chair of Carlisle. 

In 1773 Sawrey Gilpin was made a Director of 

the Society of Artists, and in the following year 

was elected President of that body. The earlier 

exhibitions of the Royal Academy included no 

13 



194 ANIMAL PAINTERS 

works from his easel ; he contributed his first 
pictures in 1786, sending then the "Portrait of a 
Horse belonging to His Majesty," and the portrait 
of "A Foxhound in the Possession of Colonel 
Thornton." His contributions to the Royal 
Academy were not numerous by comparison with 
the number of his works, nor did he exhibit with 
any great regularity ; between 1 786 and 1 807, when 
he died, he sent in thirty-six pictures. He was 
elected an Associate in 1795, and an Academician 
two years later : he deposited as his Diploma 
work " Horses in a Storm " ; horses in various 
attitudes of terror grouped round a leafless tree 
as if seeking shelter from the heavy storm and 
lightning approaching from the right distance. 

Colonel Thornton, whose name occurs in con- 
nection with one of the artist's first Royal Academy 
works, was his friend and patron, and it was for 
Colonel Thornton that Sawrey Gilpin painted one 
of his best sporting pictures, "The Death of the 
Fox," exhibited at the Academy in 1793. The 
incident portrayed occurred one day when Gilpin 
was hunting with the Colonel's pack ; and the 
picture received perhaps more general approbation 
than any from his brush. The art critic of the 
Sporting Magazine (vol. 11) writes as follows: — 
"The public has long been indebted to Mr. Gilpin 
for his valuable exertions which have greatly con- 



SAWREV GILriN. R.A. 1 95 

tributed towards the enrichment of our equestrian 
collections. In the particular scene before us — 
' The Death of the Fox ' — he has displayed much 
judgement and knowledge of his art : the hounds 
are equal to anything we have seen of the kind in 
our school." This picture is one of the three which 
we find reproduced in the Sporting Magazme, an 
engraving by T, Cook accompanying the notice 
quoted. Eighteen years afterwards, in 1811, John 
Scott completed a large plate from this work, and 
another to serve as a companion from Philip 
Reinagle's beautiful picture of " The Fox Breaking 
Cover " ; these engravings, which are among Scott's 
happiest efforts, will receive their meed of attention 
under the name of that famous artist and en- 
graver. 

"The Death of the Fox" was sold at Hick- 
man's gallery, St. James's Street, in June, 1819, 
with other sporting pictures belonging to Colonel 
Thornton, when recklessness and extravagance 
brought that celebrated sportsman's property into 
the market ; it passed into the possession of Baron 
de Tessier, and when his pictures were sold at 
Brighton in 1864, it was purchased by Mr. William 
Hine-Haycock, of Belmont, Sidmouth, in Devon- 
shire, in whose collection it may now be seen. 

In 1785 Gilpin painted the portrait of a boon 
companion of Colonel Thornton, namely, John 



196 ANIMAL PAINTERS 

Parkhurst, Esq., of Catesby Abbey, Northampton- 
shire. The canvas is a large one, measuring 6 feet 
square : Mr. Parkhurst is on a grey horse, and 
capping his hounds on to the Hne of a fox. An 
engraving by Mr. Babbage from this picture faces 
this page: the easy and workmanHke seat of the rider 
arrests attention in the reproduction ; indeed the 
whole pose is admirable, recalling the touch of 
Snyders, the Dutch artist. Mr. Parkhurst was a 
remarkably good-looking man, and appears at his 
best in pink with the powdered hair usual at that 
period ; he was known as " Handsome Jack," and 
after accession to his estates joined many of Colonel 
Thornton's wild and extravagant exploits, until he 
ran through his fortune, which did not take long to 
accomplish. About the year 1800 he married the 
widow of Sir Griffith Boynton, Bart., who had died 
leaving her with three sons ; Mr. Parkhurst brought 
up his stepsons, Francis, Griffith and Henry, in 
every sort of vice, and it is probable that the succes- 
sion of each in turn to the baronetcy was due to 
the ill-health caused by excesses. 

On 1st January, 1783, Geo. Garrard, from 
Sawrey Gilpin's address, published an engraving by 
Wm. Ward of Gilpin's portrait of Lord Derby's Sir 
Peter Teazle; size of plate, iS^- inches by 14 
inches. Sawrey Gilpin painted a portrait of the 
famous racehorse, PotSos, which was engraved by 







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SAWREY GILPIN, R.A. 19/ 

H. Hodges, plate i8f inches by 14^ inches, and 
published on 25th March, 1790, by Jas. J. Boydell, 
of Cheapside and the Shakespeare Gallery, Pall 
Mall. His portrait of Colonel Thornton's Jupiter, 
exhibited in 1792 at the Royal Academy, was 
engraved by Wm. Ward, plate igj inches by 14 
inches, and was published by George Garrard, "at 
Mr. Gilpin's, Knightsbridge." His portrait of 
Highflyer, which was etched by himself and also 
engraved by F. Jukes, plate 19 inches by 14;^ 
inches, was likewise published by Garrard "at Mr. 
Gilpin's, Knightsbridge." 

In the Royal Academy Exhibition of 1794, 
Sawrey Gilpin showed " A Gentleman on Horse- 
back bringing up lag Hounds," the portrait being 
by the hand of Philip Reinaglc. Of this work 
Anthony Pasquin (John Williams) says in his 
Liberal Critique on the Exhibition for that year : 
" This is the prime picture in the exhibition of 
its kind. Mr. Gilpin is inferior to Mr. Stubbs 
in anatomical knowledge, but is superior to him 
in grace and genius. The human portrait is 
not disreputably finished." The critic, it should 
be observed, is by no means lavish of his praise 
whatever the work under notice. Very many 
of Gilpin's pictures were painted in collaboration 
with other artists ; Reinagle and he together exe- 
cuted a portrait of Colonel Thornton shooting with 



198 ANIMAL TAIN'TERS 

a twelve-barrelled rifle (the only weapon ol the kind 
ever made) in Glenmore Forest : " A Litter ot 
Foxes," shown in the Royal Academy Exhibition 
of 1796, owed its background to P. Reinagle. 
Anthony Pasquin remarks of this picture that 
" these are as faithful portraits of foxes as any we 
have beheld from the graver of Ridinger, and the 
subtle character of this prowling savage is so well 
depicted that we think a hen and her brood might 
tremble at the terrific effigies." He complains, 
however, that " the force of the background over- 
powers those objects in colour and effect " in such 
degree that the picture were better described as 
"a background with a litter of foxes." 

George Barrett, R.A., the landscape painter, was 
frequently indebted to Gilpin for the animals which 
lent animation to his scenes, as also was William 
jNIarlow. Among the collection of Richard Hulse. 
Esq., of Blackheath, whose pictures were sold at 
Christie's on 21st and 22nd March, 1806, was "a 
chef-d'(£iivre that does infinite honour to the British 
School," to quote from the description in the 
catalogue. This was a view of Lake Windermere 
with a man driving sheep and cattle, the joint work 
of George Barrett, R.A., and Sawrey Gilpin, R.A. 
It brought the sum of eighty guineas. 

Perhaps some of the most noteworthy examples 
of joint work in art known are three large pictures 



SAWREV GILPIN, R.A. 1 99 

illustrative of incidents in Colonel Thornton's famous 
Sporting Tour through the Highlands of Scotland. 
These were painted conjointly by Sawrey Gilpin, 
who did the animals, Philip Reinagle, who drew the 
portraits, and George Barrett, who was responsible 
for the landscape and the work as a whole. As 
might fairly be expected of the combined efforts 
of three Royal Academicians, the pictures display 
peculiar merit as well as interest. " Czarina and 
Maria," a brace of greyhounds coursing a hare, was 
engraved by John Scott, and was used to illustrate 
Daniels' Rural Sports, published in iSoi. These 
dogs were no doubt two of Colonel Thornton's ; 
in the Sporting Magazine for INIay, 1805, we read 
that "The produce of [Colonel Thornton's] Major 
and Fawn-coloured Czarina, Lvdia and Czarina, are 
in London, and may be seen by applying to Mr. 
Tattersall. They are matched for 2,000 guineas to 
kill a box hare within 500 yards, and the hare to 
have 20 yards law." The three works mentioned 
above as having been painted for Thornton's tour 
in Scotland are in the Elsenham Hall collection. 

Mr. Freeman-Mitford, C.B., has at Batsford Park 
very fine samples of Sawrey Gilpin's work in the 
large painting of " Cattle going down to Water at 
Sunset " ; in the finished sketches from which the 
two pictures of Gulliver's Travels were made ; in 
a study in sepia entitled "The War Horse, " and in 



2CO ANIMAL PAINTERS 

" Horses," the landscape in which was painted by 
William ]\IarIow. 

In the Duke of Portland's collection at Welbeck 
Abbey there is a picture by Sawrey Gilpin of a 
" Hound in Chase"; the scene is an open landscape, 
with tall trees and a wood in the distance ; it bears 
date 1773, and the canvas is 61 inches high by 71^ 
inches long. 

The Right Hon. F. J. S. Foljambe has in his 
collection at Osberton Hall, Worksop, Notts., a 
painting of the celebrated racehorse and stallion, 
Jupiter, a son of Eclipse, which was executed by 
Gilpin for Colonel Thornton. This picture, which 
is 6 feet 8 inches wide by 5 feet 5 inches high, was 
engraved by Scott for the Spo]'ts)iians Repository, 
published in 1845 by Henry C. Bohn. 

The four volumes of Rural Sports, in addition 
to the picture of greyhounds already mentioned, 
contain ten e.xquisitely fine engravings by Scott 
from Gilpin's pictures of renowned pointers, fox- 
hounds, harriers, and beagles ; also a plate from 
a clever picture entitled " Terrier worrying a 
Fox." 

The Sporting Magazine for 1795, vol. vii., 
contained an engraving from Gilpin's portrait of 
Colonel Thornton's famous pointer Dash ; and the 
vol. 54, for 18 19, contains a plate from the portrait 
of the Earl of Derby's racehorse, Sir Peter Teazle, 



SAWREY GILPIN, R.A. 20I 

a turf giant of his day ; both of these plates were 
executed by John Scott. 

In the South Kensington Museum there are 
examples of Gilpin's work in oil and water colour, 
some sketches and a few spirited etchings. 

The Sporting Magazine of April, 1807, in course 
of an obituary notice of the artist, says of his paint- 
ings that they "are justly admired for the great 
truth and spirit of the composition and extreme 

chasteness of colouring- The Prince oi 

Wales' and the Duke of Hamilton's collections are 
both enriched with the productions of his pencil, 
but we believe his chef-cTceuvrc is in the possession 
of S. Whitbread, Esq., M.P. It consists of a group 
of tigers, and is a noble and spirited composition. 
He excelled much in giving an expression of 
terrible but majestic fierceness to that noblest of 
animals, the lion." Without in any way impugning 
Gilpin's skill in portraying wild animals, it is safe 
to assert that his reputation is most surely based 
upon the insight, knowledge and truth to life with 
which he painted the horse, the dog and the fox. 

Sawrey Gilpin was a man of culture and refine- 
ment, who in a licentious age was held in deserved 
respect by his contemporaries for his high moral 
character and extreme simplicity of manner. 

An industrious and prolific workman, he pro- 
duced a very large number of pictures during his 



202 ANIMAL PAINTERS 

life. His hand retained its cunning to the last ; 
the Royal Academy Exhibition of 1807 contained 
three pictures from his easel, the artist having died 
on the 8th of March in that year, at Brompton. 

He left one son, William Sawrey Gilpin, who for 
a time pursued the study of art and painted in 
water colours. William Gilpin, however, possessed 
little talent ; he became the first President of the 
Water Colour Society, and was a frequent con- 
tributor to its exhibitions ; but so indifferent were 
his performances, says Redgrave, that he injured 
his practice as a drawing master by showing his 
pictures. He eventually laid aside the palette and 
brush to adopt landscape gardening as a profession. 

The accompanying portrait of Sawrey Gilpin has 
been engraved from a picture kindly lent by 
Captain Norclifte Gilpin, of Brighton, a descendant 
of the painter. 



WORKS OF SAWREY GILPIN, R.A. 

IN THE SOUTH KENSINGTON MUSEUM. 

coil's IN A LANDSCAPE ; three red cows in the foreground of a suniij- landscape ; on 

canvas 24J inches by 18 inches, oblong. Water colours. 
SKETCH OF A LION AND LIONESSES. 
A MAAS/ON IN I'KOCESS OF CONSTKUCTION (Fonthill Abbey?), signed and 

dated, 1797. 
MOUATAIN LANDSCAPE WITH CATTLE AND FIGURES, signed and dated 

1787- 
TREES AND HORSES (painted with (ieorgc Bauelt, sen., R.A.) dated 17S2. 




SAWREY GILPIN, R.A. 

From a Fainliiig in the f-ossesiioii of Caplniii Norciiffc (-ji//>iii, 
y, Katon Gardens, Wesl Brii;hlon. 



"WORKS OF 5A\\*REV GILPIX. R.A. 203 

PICTUfiES E:XH:3;TED in the royal ACADE^rY 
36 in number . 

17M— ;3) A ffJSSE SEI^DSVISO TO h'fS 3rA/£S7~!'—A EJXrfCCXD IX THE 

POSSESSION OF COL. THCKi—JX. 
ijSS— (j) LA2rDSCA.PE AST) CATTLE — m'H'PCOS-- — DTSCAXXOX — 

Hocyns SEizfSu a rox—SA a-x ajtd ha-RE. 

1755 -(3) .4 DOG FROJf SA3LE CAPE— A STAG-SJ Z'-TJ — SSSC FETES. 

TELiZLE.' 
1792 — A R p-^p^-r sg. JTPITER. fcK uybs.-_. oc'Cci- Trcczcnc- 
i-m—THE DEATH OF THE FOX. 
:7H— (s) XAEE A.J>'D COLT—AJT OLD HTXTES—CEXTLE-VAX O.V HTESE- 

S.iCX BS/SUfXG UP LAG HOVyDS TO COyEKT. 
IT?;— (5) COCSSIXG—irAKES AXD FOALS— FORTSAIT OF A HOF.SE. 
i-r^-LITTES OF FO.TES Csa^graEsd bv Jlr. P. g--^- ''-) 
1797— Cs) HOSSES— POSTS ASTS OF HOSSES—.i .F.iS-V-iASjy. 
»79»— t) -4JfES/CAX SE.iSS—DEi'OXSH:SE CA TTLE, iz tix pcssesin: of 5r- 

Hacry \PV-'-";=t. Est:.— Hc'JJ'£S', prroerrv at is H;c. G==r5= Pici— ,^ ISX 

PL'CS. 
1790— (2) .^u^ASij IX -i THTXLES-STLS.V — LAXSEL iX THE LLOys 

DEX. 
I So; — TICESS. 

1*35 — HOSSESf u c t.\jtgt> oc the PiIjLja :t WsJ-s^ 
;3o7 — (s) HOSSE, property a Lccz. Gwrck — 3'OSSES — JJITAC^-i-VS ^JJC-F-S^ 



PLATES IN THE SPJRT/XG MAGAZIXE 3 in namber^. 

DE.A TH OF THE .^J-V, :tc;^ va^ 11 : Kgia-red "st X. Cock. 

D.-iSH, a pobmr, t»^;«lj of Coi. Tbg-.:3r. iTgc, t^ 7 ; c %^»-el or Scoci. 

SIS PETES TEAZLE, iSri toL j^ ; c j > gi br Scxt. 



204 



THOMAS GOOCH. 

(Born circa 1750.) 

nnHOMAS GOOCH, who was born about the 
•■■ year 1 750, is another of the artists whose frag- 
mentary history is written only in the catalogues 
of exhibitions. His pictures are occasionally seen 
in collections in the old country mansions of Eng- 
land, but it would appear that he had a tolerably 
extensive connection. His specialities were eques- 
trian portraits and portraits of horses and dogs, in 
the execution of which he displayed considerable 
artistic talent. He exhibited largely ; his name 
first appears in 1772, when he contributed a 
picture to the exhibition of the " Free Society of 
Artists;" between that date and 1781, when his 
name figures for the first time in the catalogue of 
the Royal Academy, he does not appear to have 
exhibited ; but we find a connecting link in his 
portrait of the racehorse Goldfinder^size of canvas 
2 feet 7 inches by 2 feet 2 inches — which he 
executed in 1777 for Mr. Cook. This picture is 
in the Elsenham collection, and an engraving from 
it is here given. 




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o 



THOMAS GOOCH 205 

In 1 78 1, the year of his first contribution to the 
Royal Academy, Gooch's address is given as " 7, 
facing the Chapel, Knightsbridge " : he was repre- 
sented by three works in that year's exhibition, 
and thenceforward until 1S02 was a tolerably 
regular and often large contributor, sending no 
fewer than seventy-six pictures in eighteen years. 
The large proportion of portraits in the list which 
follows indicates the extent of his connection, and 
testifies to the esteem in which his work was held 
by contemporary sportsmen and other patrons of 
art. His predilection for painting horses and dogs 
on the same canvas compels notice ; but no doubt 
this was usually done in compliance with the wish 
of his patron. His pictures from time to time 
received flattering notice in the pages of the 
Sporting Magazine. Thus in the issue for May, 
1 793, the critic remarks of Gooch's exhibits in the 
Royal Academy : " ' The portrait of a horse ' will 
be no disgrace to the Dormitory stud of the first 
sportsman in the kingdom.' Again — "'Breaking 
in the Young Coach-horse ' with its companion 
picture ' The Latter State of the Coach-horse ' 
does the artist credit ; they are a pretty pair of 
pictures, and worthy a place in any sportsman's 
collection." Modern art critics may perhaps con- 
sider these remarks lacking in discrimination and 
analytical spirit, but they at least go to prove that 



THOMAS GOOCH 205 

In 1 78 1, the year of his first contribution to the 
Royal Academy, Gooch's address is given as " 7, 
facing the Chapel, Knightsbridge " : he was repre- 
sented by three works in that year's exhibition, 
and thenceforward until 1802 was a tolerably 
regular and often large contributor, sending no 
fewer than seventy-six pictures in eighteen years. 
The large proportion of portraits in the list which 
follows indicates the extent of his connection, and 
testifies to the esteem in which his work was held 
by contemporary sportsmen and other patrons of 
art. His predilection for painting horses and dogs 
on the same canvas compels notice ; but no doubt 
this was usually done in compliance with the wish 
of his patron. His pictures from time to time 
received flattering notice in the pages of the 
Sporting Magazine. Thus in the issue for May, 
1793, the critic remarks of Gooch's exhibits in the 
Royal Academy : " ' The portrait of a horse ' will 
be no disgrace to the Dormitory stud of the first 
sportsman in the kingdom. " .A.gain — " ' Breaking 
in the Young Coach-horse ' with its companion 
picture ' The Latter State of the Coach-horse ' 
does the artist credit ; they are a pretty pair of 
pictures, and worthy a place in any sportsman's 
collection." Modern art critics may perhaps con- 
sider these remarks lacking in discrimination and 
analytical spirit, but they at least go to prove that 



206 ANIMAL PAINTERS 

Gooch's work attracted notice when the art critic's 
survey of the exhibitions was much less exhaustive 
than it is nowadays. 

In 1794, the year in which the artist had no 
fewer than thirteen paintings on the Royal Aca- 
demy walls, the critic is at greater pains to express 
his appreciation. "The smaller sized pictures of 
Mr. Gooch's are meant as different characters, 
and the set (of which he is now finishing the 
remainder) comprises twelve, with the like number 
of dogs to correspond ; these, together with six 
stages of the racehorse, are designed for the 
furnishing of any gentleman's room entirely with 
portraits of those useful and entertaining animals, 
and which from the specimens here given certainly 
will form a very pleasing assemblage." That the 
pictures were well worth buying was the highest 
praise the writer could bestow ; we have not gone 
much beyond that at the present day, but the idea 
is less frankly expressed. 

In the exhibition of 1800 he exhibited a portrait 
of an ox which had distinguished himself by the 
unbovine achievement of winning a race. The 
animal is said to have run this race, which was 
nearly two miles, in eight minutes. 

Gooch appears to have painted either one, two 
or three sets of pictures representing the career 
of a racehorse. The Royal Academy exhibition 



THOMAS r.OOCH 207 

of 1 783 included among other works from his 
brush "The Life of a Racehorse " in six scenes, 
viz., (i) The Foal with the Mare ; (2) The Colt 
Breaking ; (3) The Time of Running ; (4) As a 
Hunter; (5) As a Post- Horse and (6) His Death. 
This horse in his time played many parts ! In 1790 
a series of six engravings from the " Life of a 
Racehorse " was published ; but in the absence of 
particulars it is impossible to know whether these 
plates were executed from the pictures exhibited 
seven years earlier or from another set. In 1792, 
Edward Jeffery, of Pall Mall, published a book, 
in folio size, from whose title page the following 
quaint description is taken : — 

" The Life and Death of a Racehorse exemplified in his various 
stages of existence till his dissolution. The whole drawn and 
engraved in Aquatinta by Thomas Gooch, Esq., with an 
Essay tending to excite a benevolent conduct towards the 
Brute Creation by Dr. Hawksworth, to which is added ' The 
Song of a Racehorse,' " &c. 

The plates are six in number, and their titles at 
once challenore comparison with the set exhibited 
in 1783 :— 

(i) When a Foal with his Dam; (2) When a 
Colt Breaking ; (3) After running a Race and 
Winning ; (4) As a Hunter going out to the 
Chase ; (5) As a Postchaise- Horse, on the Road ; 
and (6) His Dissolution. 



208 ANIMAL PAINTERS 

It will be noted that this publication shows the 
artist in the role of engraver of his own works. 

Though Gooch did much and excellent work, 
few of his paintings seem to have been engraved, 
and the fact that his brush was so frequently em- 
ployed upon portraits of animals more interesting 
to their owners than to the general public, may in 
a measure account for this. One of his works, 
" Foxhounds," was engraved by Godby and Merke 
and published by Orme in 1808. 

We find no record of the date or circumstances 
of Thomas Gooch's death. His last contributions 
to the Royal Academy appeared in the exhibition 
1802, after which date we lose sight of him, the 
engraving of a painting at a later date being of 
course no proof that he was at the time alive. 



WORKS OF THOMAS GOOCH. 

EXHIBITED AT THE ROY.\L ACADEMY (76 in number). 

YEAR 

■781— (3) A GIG-MARE, the property of a ^enA^m^n— PORTRAIT OF A GENTLE- 
MA I'f WITH HIS HOR.'^E AND DOGS— A HORSE, for Colonel Gallatine. 

1782— (6) PORTRAIT OF A HUNTER— PORTRAIT OF AN OLD HORSE- 
HORSES AND DOGS belonging to the Hon. Mr. Vm— PORTRAIT OF A 
HORSE WITH DOGS— PORTRAIT OF A HORSE AND DOG— POR- 
TRAIT OF A NOBLEMAN ON A MANAGED HORSE. 

ijSj— (4) PORTRAIT OF A GENTLEMAN ON HORSEBACK— PORTRAITS 
OF A YOUNG NOBLEMAN AND HIS SISTER ON HORSEBACK- 
PORTRAITS OF Tiro HORSES— "The Life of a Raceh.rse," in a series of 
six different stages, viz. :— ist, THE FOAL IITTH THE MARE. 2nd, 
THE COLT BREAKING. 3rd, THE Tl.VE OF RUNNING. 4th, AS A 
HUNTER, sth, AS A POST HORSE. 6th, HIS DEATH. 

ijii—P0R7-RAIT OF A HORSE. 



WORKS OF THOMAS GOOCH. 2O9 



YEAR 

ij^—{j) PORTRAIT OF A HORSE AND DOG - PORTRAITS OF TWO 
HORSES— PORTRAIT OF A HORSE If/TH A GREYHOUND— POR- 
TRAIT OF A HORSE WITH FIGURE AND DOGS— A GENTLEMAN 
ON HORSEBACK, WITH HIS GAMEKEEPER AND POINTERS — 
TWO HORSES IN A CURRICLE— AN OLD HORSE. 

11%!— (it PORTRAIT OF A BROOD MARE— A POINTER— A GENTLEMAN 
WITH HIS SPANIELS 

■789-K3) Three studies of horses—^ SHOOTING HORSE, WITH POINTERS- 
HOUNDS KILLING A FOX. 

ijgo— {12) LA DVS LAP-DOGS— PORTRAIT OF A CAT— A STAGHOUND—A 
SETTING DOG — A GREYHOUND — SPANIELS — FOXHOUNDS — 
POMERANIAN DOG— COACH DOGS— A NEWFOUNDLAND DOG- 
PORTRAIT OF A HORSE— AN OLD POINTER. 

1792— (3) PORTRAIT OF A HORSE— PORTRAIT OF A DOG— PORTRAIT OF 
A HORSE. 

\ia-i—(i)) PORTRAIT with horse and dogs— THE LATTER STATE OF THE 
COACH-HORSE — PORTRAIT OF A LADY ON A REMARKABLE 
TROTTING MARE — A DOG FROM MILAN — PORTRAIT OF AN 
ITALIAN GREYHOUND— " STARING TOM" — " SATELLITE," by 
Eclipse, a favourite nM\on — BREAKING IN THE YOUNG COACH- 
HORSE— PORTRAIT OF A HORSE. 

■794— (13) PORTRAIT OF AN OLD PACK-HORSE— A CURRICLE HORSE, the 
property of a noUemRn— THE RACEHORSE— POR TRAIT OF A HORSE 
AND DOG— THE DEATH OF A MARE— Equine Characters: (i) THE 
CART-HORSE— (2) THE POST-HORSE— (,3) THE DR AY-HORSE —U) 
THE GALLOWAY— ii) THE C0ACH-H0RSE — (6) THE HUNTER 
(7) THE STALLION— PORTRAIT OF A GENTLEMAN ON HORSE- 
BACK. 

i795-<2) PORTRAIT OF A HUNTER— A FAVOURITE HACKNEY. 

i-jge-THE PROGRESS OF THE RIDING SCHOOL. 

1797— A GENTLEMAN ON A FAVOURITE TROTTING MARE. 

i7gS— (3) PORTRAIT OF A HUNTER— PORTRAIT OF A DOG— PORTRAIT 
OF A BLOOD MARE. 

lioo— THE OX THAT WON THE PLATE AT LYNDHURST RACES. 

iSoi— <2) PORTRAIT OF A HUNTER— PORTRAIT OF A HORSE. 

i8oii-(3) PORTRAIT OP A HUNTER— PORTRAIT OF A HUNTER. 



H 



APPENDIX. 



I. Trojan. 

From Nimrod's account in the Sporting Magazine of January, 
1825. 

"Whoever has hunted in Warwickshire has heard of 'the 
blood of the Trojans,' which was a standing toast in that 
country when Mr. Corbet hunted it, and was always drunk 
after ' the King ' in the club-room at Stratford-on-Avon. 
The hero from whom these modern sons of Ilion were 
descended was one of the best foxhounds that ever challenged 
on a fox, and whose blood has circulated through most of the 
first kennels in the United Kingdom. Various have been 
the reports respecting this celebrated hound, some of which 
gained credit enough to be believed. One was that he came 
astray to Mr. Corbet's kennel, and distinguished himself by 
carrying the scent for a considerable distance along the top 
of a park wall, thereby recovering his fox when lost to the 
rest of the pack. Whether he ever performed this exploit 
(as he was before my time) it is not in my power to determine ; 
but certain it is that old Trojan was bred by Mr. Corbet, and 
got by Lord Spencer's True-boy out of a bitch called Tidings 
(of unknown pedigree) purchased by Mr. Corbet at Tatter- 
sail's. 

" Trojan was entered in 1782 and hunted nine seasons. He 
would never look at a hare, and would speak only to a fox, 
a marten cat, or a pheasant. In his day, however, pheasants 
in Warwickshire were not much thicker than foxes, so that 
this propensity, if I may so call it, was of little consequence, 
for in chase he was as perfect as his nature could make him. 



APPENDIX 2 I I 

With the nose of a bloodhound, his pace was a killing one ; 
and as a proof of his powers in chase, Mr. Corbet has often 
been heard to say that he was the only hound he ever had 
who could leap Chillington Park wall after a fox. This 
circumstance, perhaps, may have given birth to the other 
story of the park wall exploit. It appears that Mr. Corbet's 
hounds found a very dark-coloured fox in Chillington Park, 
in Staffordshire, the seat of Mr. Gifford, which had beaten 
them twice. The third time they found him Trojan leaped 
the park wall after him, but, in consequence of the rest of the 
pack not being able to follow him, old Cjesar, as the gallant 
fox was called, beat them again. The following season Trojan 
found this fox again, nearly in the same place, and leaped the 
wall close at his brush, but from the cause before mentioned, 
although he afforded a good run after the other hounds got 
around to him, he beat them once more ! In short, in spite of old 
Trojan, ' Caesar's fortune ' attended him to the last, as he was 
never killed by hounds, neither was it ever known in what 
way he ended his life." 

II. Colonel Thornton. 

Colonel Thomas Thornton was so conspicuous a figure in 
the sporting world during the later decades of the eighteenth 
century and the earlier years of the nineteenth, and was also 
so liberal a patron of art in its sporting aspects, that more 
than passing notice of him seems desirable. He was born in 
the neighbourhood of St. James's about the year 1755, his 
father being Colonel Wm. Thornton, who raised a troop of 
yeomanry one hundred strong, and maintained it at his own 
cost while serving with distinction under the Duke of Cum- 
berland in the Scottish Rebellion. Young Thornton was sent 
to Charterhouse where he remained till he was fourteen ; 
when having made rapid progress, he was removed and sent 
to Glasgow University. When about sixteen years of age 
his father, then M.P. for York, died somewhat suddenly, and 
Thomas Thornton, at the age of two-and-twenty, came into 
possession of an immense fortune. Sport, and above all 



2 I 2 APPENDIX 

things hawking, was a passion with him ; in more than one of 
his portraits he is represented as a falconer or engaged in 
hawking ; hence on leaving Glasgow he soon took up his 
quarters at the family place in Yorkshire, Old Thornville, and 
busied himself about the congenial task of laying the founda- 
tions of the sporting establishment with which his name is 
associated. He joined the West York Militia of which he 
ultimately became Colonel and, in pursuance of his favourite 
scheme to bring hawking to perfection, formed a Falconers' 
Club. He kept a pack of foxhounds, hunting them himself, 
and was a familiar figure on the turf both as an owner and 
rider. His bodily activity was remarkable and he delighted 
in athletic feats ; he was an excellent shot with gun and 
rifle, and a good fisherman. About 1785 he appeared to 
have made a sporting tour in the Scottish Highlands ; and so 
pleased was he with the experience, that in the following 
year he organised the formidable expedition whose events are 
recorded with minuteness and detail in A Sporting Tour, a 
work which has recently been republished by Mr. Edward 
Arnold. It was on this expedition that George Garrard 
accompanied him as his " special artist." It is to be observed 
that the Colonel gave his voluminous diaries to an old school- 
fellow who was in distress, and whose necessities, it appears, 
the proceeds of the work went to relieve. In 1789 Colonel 
Thornton purchased from the Duke of York, Allerton Maul- 
evrer, which he afterwards renamed Thornville Royal, paying 
for the estate £"i 10,000 which it is said he had won from the 
Duke and others in gambling transactions. As the standing 
crops hindered hawking from Thornville Royal, he built a 
house on the Wolds near Baythorpe, about twelve miles 
from Scarborough, and when he was in residence here, the 
place became the scene of sport on a scale of mediaeval 
magnificence ; the revels, for the word is not misused, were 
sometimes continued for three or four weeks in succession, 
the guests being entertained with hunting, hawking, and 
coursing every day, and with the most sumptuous banquets 
at night. Early in 1803, for example, the programme for a 



APPENDIX 213 

week's sport was made public. It ran thus : " On Monday, 
stag-hunting, followed by coursing ; Tuesday, wolf, stag and 
fox-hunting and beagling ; Wednesday, stag-hunting and 
coursing ; Thursday, wolf, stag and fox-hunting, beagling 
and coursing ; to meet every day at Falconer's Hall where 
there will be a sportsman's breakfast provided for all the 
company." This particular entertainment may have been 
organised to celebrate the Colonel's return from France, 
whither he had gone on a sporting tour equipped on his 
customary lavish scale. 

In 1805, Thorn ville Royal was sold to Lord Stourton, 
and three years later Colonel Thornton left Yorkshire for 
Spye Park, Wiltshire, which he had taken on lease ; the 
increase of cultivation on the wolds which formed an obstacle 
to hawking is the reason assigned for his leaving. The order 
of his going was regal in its magnificence ; to give full details 
here of the procession which wound its way from Yorkshire 
southward, would be impossible. The king of sport was 
followed by a retinue of huntsmen, falconers, grooms, keepers, 
kennelmen, and other servants ; by his horses and hounds, 
and by a train of waggons containing a menagerie of beasts 
of chase. Among great variety of animals there were red- 
deer, roebuck, fallow-deer and Eastern species ; Russian wild 
boar and French, received from the First Napoleon in 
exchange for seventy couples of foxhounds, having the blood 
of the famous Old Conqueror to prove their breeding ; and 
cormorants, wearing silver rings about their necks, for fishing 
after the Chinese fashion. Dog-carts conveyed milk-white 
terriers and greyhounds whose sheets were embroidered with 
records of the various matches they had won. A feature of 
the cavalcade was a boat waggon which had once done 
yeoman service in conveying voters to the poll, filled for 
the occasion with the materiel of sport — guns, rifles, fishing 
rods and nets, otter spears and the like ; the conveyance 
being decorated with deer skins, and drawn by Arab mares 
from the King's stud. Waggon loads of wine brought up the 
rear. The cellars at Thornviile Royal v.ere famous, and the 



214 APPENDIX 

Duke of York pronounced some possessed by the Colonel to 
be the finest in the kingdom. It must be added that with 
all this parade and display, the business of transporting these 
many varied matters was so perfectly organised and carried 
out that everything reached Spye Park in safety. We can 
only regret that Colonel Thornton did not, on this occasion, 
include among his retinue George Garrard, to immortalise a 
scene of such curious ostentation ! 

About the year 1815, the Colonel gave up hawking and 
retired to France. In 1817, he bought the Chateau of Pon- 
le Roi, in the Dept. d'Aube, reselling it in 1821. He died in 
Paris in the spring of 1823, in his seventy-fifth year. 



INDEX TO PAINTINGS, ENGRAVINGS, SCULPTURES, .Vc. 







PAGE 


" A Change and we're Away " 


Henry Aiken 


... 13 


"A Chosen few alone the Scene Survey' ... 


Henry Aiken 


... 26 


Adieu, The 


A. Cooper, R.A. 


... 117 


Adjutants ... 


H. B. Chalon ... 


... 91 


Advantages of the Martingp.l 


A. Cooper, R.A 


... 121 


Adventure of the Capture of Mambrino's 






Helmet 


A. Cooper, R.A 


116, 120 


African Camel 


George Garraid, A. R.A. 


.. IS6 


"After" 


A. Cooper, R.A. ... 


... 124 


After a good Run ... 


Henry Aiken 


26 


After running a Race and winning ... 


Thomas Gooch ... 


207 


" After the Fair " 


A. D. Cooper 


,,. I2S 


Agricultural Show 


George Garrard, A. R.A. 


180, 1S4 


" Airy," winner of the Brighton Stakes 


A. Cooper, R.A 


no, iiS 


" Alacrity," a mare ... 


A. Cooper, R.A. ... 


117 


"Aladdin" 


James Barenger ... 


■ 39 


Alarmed Poacher, An... 


Stephen Elmer, A.R..\.. 


158 


Alderney Bull and Cows 


A. Cooper, R.A. ... 


. 116 


" Alexander and Bucephalus " 


Geo. Garrard, A.R..-\. 


.. 1S7 


" Aliwal," an Arab Charger ... 


A. Cooper, R.A 


119, 122 


" All the World's a Stage " 


Henry Aiken 


... 17 


"Alp and Glory" 


R.B.Davis 


... 150 


Alto Relief 


Geo. Ganard, A. R.A 


187 


" Amato," a Colt 


A. Cooper, R.A 


"S 


American Bears 


Sawrey Gilpin, R.A. 


.. 203 


" An under current " 


A. Cooper, R.A 


124 


Analysis of the Hunting Field 


Henry Aiken 


25 


" Androcles and the Lion " 


William and Henry Barr 


nud 5°>59 


Animals 


A. Cooper, R.A 


n6 


" Annette and Polyxena," brood mares 


Henry Barraud ... 


S8 


Annual Benediction of the Animals of Romt 






on the Feast of St. Anthony, by the Pope 


W. and H. Barraud 


56.59 


"Anxiety" 


A. Cooper, R.A 


.. 119 


Arab and his Steed 


A. Cooper, R.A 


120 


Arab Cavalry 


Henry Aiken 


26 


Arab Chief 


Henry Alkcn 


... 26 


Arab Chief and Horse 


A. Cooper, R.A. ... 


120 


Arab Soldiers 


Henry Alkcn 


... 26 



2l6 



INDEX 



Arabian, An 

Arabian, An 

Arabian, Borack, The... 
Arabian broke loose, An 

Arabian Knights 

Arabs ... A. Cooper, R.A., 1850, 1852, 
" Araby and a Ponv " 

"Arbutus" ... ' 

Arcades Ambo 

Arcadians 

" Archer," a foxhound ... 

Arctic Dog and Fo.\ 

" Ariadne after her desertion by Theseus" . 

Arrival of the Mackerel Boat 

Arthur, Lord Capel, defending Colchester.. 

" Assheton," portrait of 

Astonished Village, The ... ^^ 

At Bay 

At Bay 

At Exercise ... 

At Fault 

At Fault 

At High Pressure 

"At his head a grass turf and at his heels 

stone" 

August ... 

" Augusta," studies of 

Autumn Evening 
Autumn Gleanings 

"Avarice" 

Awkward Pass, An 

Awkward Place, An 

Ayrshire Cows 





r.\GE 


. H. B. Chalon, 1798, 1803, 1820 


...88,89 


. A. Cooper, R.A., 1824, 1846.. 


.117,119 


. A. Cooper, R.A 


. . 122 


. H. B. Chalon 


... 89 


. A. Cooper, R.A. 


... 124 


, 1857, 1858, 1862, 1865, 1867.. 


.119, 120 


. A. Cooper, R.A 


... 118 


. A. Cooper, R.A. ... 


... 122 


. A. D. Cooper 


... 128 


. A. Cooper, R..\ 


... 119 


. A Cooper, R.A. ... 


... 122 


.. A. Cooper, R.A 


... 121 


.. A. Cooper, R.A 


... 119 


. Luke Clennell 


... 97 


. A. Cooper, R.A 


108, 117 


. John E. Femeley 


... 163 


. A. Cooper, R.A 


... 121 


. H. Aiken 


... 2S 


. A. D. Cooper 


. . 128 


,. Henry Aiken 


... 25 


. John Boultbee 


... 72 


. A. Cooper, R.A. ... 


125 


. Henry Aiken 


24. 25 


a 

. . Henrj- Aiken 


17 


.. A. Cooper, R.A. 


... 126 


.. Geo. Garrard, A.R..\. . . 


... 189 


.A.. Cooper, R.A 


... 123 


. . A. Cooper, R.A. 


. . 123 


.. Stephen Elmer, A. R..-\.... 


153. 158 


.. A. Cooper, R.A 


... 120 


.. Henry Aiken 


... 26 


.. A.Cooper, R.A 


117 



B 



Badger and Dog hght 

Badger and Dogs 

Badminton Sweep 
Baggage Waggon 
Baggage Waggons in a Thunderstonn 

"Barbarossa" 

Barbary Sheep 

"Bard" 

Barge Horses ... 

Baron of Beef ... 

Barraud, Martin, portrait of ... 

Barrett, J., model for bust of. 

Bartlett, Robert 

Bas-relief of a Bull 

Basketof Strawberries... Stephen Elmer, 

" Basto,' a Dog 

Batten, Major, bual of 



... Henry Aiken 


... 25 


... Luke Clennell 


... 100 


... R. B. Davis 


... 150 


. . A. Cooper, R.A. 


117 


... Luke Clennell 


.. lOI 


... H. B. Chalon 


86,88 


... Sawrey Gilpin, R.A. 


. 203 


.. Henry Barraud 


... 58 


... Edmund Bristowc 


... 76 


... Henry Aiken 


... 25 


... \V. Barraud 


... 51 


.. Geo. Garrard, AR.A. ... 


... 18S 


... W. Barraud 


54 


... Geo. Garrard, A. R.A. ... 


188 


A.R.A., 1773, 1775. '777. '778.. 


157, IS8 


.. A. Cooper, R.A. ... 


... 120 


... Geo. Garrard, AR.A. ... 


... 187 



INDEX 



217 



Battle of Assaye 

Battle of Edge Hill 

Battle of Lewes 

Battle of Ligny 

Battle of Marston Moor 

Battle of Naseby 

Battle of Shrewsbury ... 

Battle of Strigoniuoi ... 

Battle of Zutphea 

Bay horse 

" Bay Middleton " 

Bears 

Beaumont, M.P., Colonel 

Beauties and Defects of the Figure of the 
I lorse comparatively del ineated 

"Beauty" 

" Beauty," a favourite hound belonging to 
George III. 

" Beauty and the Beast " 

Bedaween's Home, The 

" Ben Tally O," portrait of 

Benningburgh ... 

Berkeley, The Hon. Grantley F 

Berkshire Hog 

" Berlin,"' a favourite Pomeranian ... 

" Bess," Mastiff 

" Betsy," portrait of a foxhound bitch 

"Betty" 

" Betty Blois," a mare 

Bibury Welter Stakes, The 

"Bijou" 

Birds and Beasts 

" Birds of a feather " 

Bison and Zebu, model of 

Black and WTiite Greyhound 

Black Game 

Black Game 

Black Grouse ... 

Blackberry Gatherers ... 

Blackcock and Mountain Hare 

Blackcock Shooting ... 

Blackcock, The 

" Blacklock," portrait of 

Blood Horse ... 

Blood Mare, portrait of a 

Blood Mare, portrait of a 

Blood, Thomas 

Bloomsbury 

" Blowhard," the Hoghunter 

" Blucher," a racehorse 

" Blunder," a staghound 

Boa Serpent crushing a Tiger : Study for bas- 
relief 

Boat Hounds 





PAGB 


A. Cooper, R.A 


... 119 


A. Cooper, R.A 


... 120 


A. Cooper, R.A 


... IlS 


A. Cooper, R.A 


... 107 


A. Cooper, R. A 


107, 116 


A. Cooper, R.A 


. . 1 20 


A. Cooper, R.A 


117 


A. Cooper, R.A. 


107, 117 


A. Cooper, R.A 


.. 117 


Geo. Garrard, .VR.A. .. 


... 186 


A. Cooper, R.A 


.. IlS 


F. Barlow 


44 


Geo. Garrard, A. R.A. .. 


... iSS 


H. .Aiken 


... 7, 19 


H. B. Chalon 


... S8 


Edmund Bristowe 


75 


\V. Barraud 


55 


A. Cooper, R..\ 


... iig 


M. Gauci ... 


6 


Geo. Garrard, A.R.A. . 


... 1S7 


A. Cooper, R.A 


... 117 


Geo. Garrard, A.R.A. .. 


... 1S7 


H. B. Chalon 


... S9 


H. B. Chalon 


90 


William Barraud 


4S, 54 


H.B. Chalon 


83,90 


Geo. Garrard, A.R.A. .. 


184, 189 


H. B. Chalon 


... 88 


W. Barraud 


... 54 


Francis Barlow 


41 


H. Barraud 


... 58 


Geo. Garrard, .\.R..A. .. 


.. 187 


Geo. Garrard, A. R.A. .. 


.. 1S6 


A. Cooper, R..\. 


.. 124 


Stephen Elmer, A.R.A. 


J 56, 1 58 


Stephen Elmer, A.R.A. . 


... 15s 


A. Cooper, R.A. 


... 119 


A. D. Cooper 


... 12S 


A. Cooper, R.A 


119 


A. Cooper, R. A 


123. '25 


David Dalby 


... 132 


H. B. Chalon 


... 90 


R. B. Davis 


... 148 


T. Gooch 


... 209 


A. Cooper, R.A 


... 117 


A. Cooper, R.A... 


... 125 


Henry Aiken 


... 24 


J. Barenger 


- 39 


A. Cooper, R.A 


... 122 


Geo. Garrard, A.K..\. .. 


.. 18S 


H. B. Chalon 


... 91 



2l8 



INDEX 



Boar Hunt 

Bock Agen 

"Bolted!" 

"BonnvLass" 
"Border Law" 
Bosworth Field 
Bonnds of the Beat, The 
" Boxer," a water spaniel 
Boxers, bust of... 
" Boy, The," a cat ... 
Brace of Partridges ... 
Brace of Partridges 
Brace of Pheasants 
Brace of Pheasants 
Brace of Trout... 

Brace of Trout 

"Bracer" 

" Brainwonn," a racehorse 

"Bran" 

Brand, Thomas, and his huntsman ... 
Breaking Cover 

Breaking Cover ... 

Breaking Cover 

Breaking in the Young Coach-horse 

Brett, Charles 

Brewhouse Yard, A ... 

" Brian deBois" 

" Brighton," a hunter... 
British Feathered Game 
" British Yeoman," a bay horse 
Bronze busts of: — 

Gentleman 

Lady 

Moore, Sir J 

Wellington, Duke of 

Whitbread, S 

Bronzes, case containing 3 bronzes to press 

letters 

Brood Cock and Hen 

Brood Mare and her Foal, A 

Brood Mare, portrait of a 
Brood Mare, portrait of a 
Brood Mare with Foal 
Brood Mares and Foals 

Brook, The 

"Bruno" 

" Brush," a retriever 

" Brush," a Spaniel ... ... 

" Buckfoot," a racehorse 

Buffalo Shooting 

BuU 

Bull-bitch and Puppies 

Bull-dogs 

Bull Trout 



R. B. Davis 

A. Cooper, R.A 

Henry Aiken 

H. B. Chalon 

... W. and H. Barraud 
A. Cooper, R.A. 

... A. Cooper, R.A. .. 

A. Cooper, R.A 

Geo. Garrard, A.R.A. .. 

H. B. Chalon 

. . ... Stephen Elmer, A.R..\., 
Stephen Elmer, A.R.A., 17S0, 17S1, 

Stephen Elmer, A.R.A., 

Stephen Elmer, A. R.A. , 1780, 1781,1786, 

Stephen Elmer, A.R.A. , 1772, 

Stephen Elmer, A-R.A., 1778, 

H. B. Chalon 

H. B. Chalon 

David Dolby 

... W. and H. Barraud 

... H. Aiken 

... S. Aiken 

.. J. E. Femeley 

... Thomas Gooch ... 

... A. Cooper, R.A. . . 

... George Garrard, A.R.A. 

... A. Cooper, R.A. 

... H. B. Chalon 

... J. Barenger 

... \V. Barraud 



1773 

I -88 
1772 

1787. 

I-75. 

1795 



PAGE 
.. 148 
.. 123 

.. 25 

•• 9» 
SOi 59 
. 117 
. 123 
122 
. 188 
90 

• 157 
158 

■ 157 
158 
157 
158 



Geo. Garrard, A.R.A. 



Geo. Garrard, A. R.A. 

J. Barenger 

A. Cooper, R.A. ... 

R. B. Davis 

T. Gooch 

H. B. Chalon ... 

J. Barer.ger 

H. Aiken 

A. Cooper, R.A 

A. Cooper, R.A.... 

A. Cooper, R.A 

J. Barenger 

Henry Aiken 

R. B. Davis 

Geo. Garrard, A. R.A. 

H. B. Chalon 

A. Cooper, R.A. ... 



87, 90, 91 

... 85 

• • 134 

50. 59 

25, 27 

■• 33 

... 167 

205, 209 

... 118 

... 180 

... 117 

... 88 

-■ 37 

... 55 

... 189 

... 189 

... 188 

... 188 

... 188 

... 188 

... 38 

... 118 

... 148 

... 209 

... 90 

... 38 

... 24 

... 118 

... 118 

... 126 

• • 39 

... 25 

... 148 

... 187 
85, 88, 91 

... 125 



INDEX 



2IQ 



Bnrdett, Sir Frandi ., 
Burn, The 
Burning Scent, A 
Bumside, The 
Butcher Boy, The 
" By Habeas Corpus " 
" Byron," a. spaniel .. 





PAGE 


... T. E. Femeley 

... A. Cooper, R.A 

... Henry Aiken 

... A. D. Cooper 


. i66 

; '% 

. 12S 


... A. Cooper,' R.A 

... A. Cooper, R.A 

... A. D. Cooper 


■ "9 

124 

• 127 



"Cadland," a brown cok 

"Call for the Clippers" 

"Call to Vigilance" 

Camel, A 

" Camel," a brown horse 

" Camillus," famous race horse 

Canary in a Cage 

" Candidates for Brooks " 

Captain Dalgetty and his horse Gustavus . . . 

Captain Ross on Clinker ... 

"Carlo and Shandy"... 

" Carousal, The " 

Carp 

Carp 

Cart Cob, A 

Cart-horse 

Cart-horses 

"Cartouche" ... 

"Case of Real Distress, A" 

Cat, portrait of a, 

"Catching a Tartar" by " Wildrake " and 

etched by ... 

"Catsup" 

Cattle 

Cattle going down to Water at Sunset 

Cattle Market, The 

Cavalier, The ... 

CavaJiers 

Cavaliers and Roundheads, a Struggle for 

the Standard 

Cavendish 

Caverley Hunt, The 

Celebrated Fly-fisher, A 

Celebrated Greyhound, A 

Chaise Horses 

Chambermaid, The 

Champion of England, The ... 

Change, and We're Away, A... 

Charger, A 

Charger, A 

Charger, A 

Chariot Race, The 

Chase, The 



A. Cooper, R.A. 


122 


Henrv Alkea 


24 


Luke'ClenneU 


93 


Henry Aiken 


25 


A. Cooper, R.A. 


124 


H. B. Chalon 


■ S9 


S. Elmer, .\.R..\ 


• «57 


Henry .\lken 


17 


W. Barraad 


5+ 


J. E. Femeley 


- 172 


A. Cooper, R.A. 


■ "3 


Lake Clennell 


lOI 


A. Cooper, R..\ 


• 125 


Stephen Elmer, A.R..\ 


• 158 


A. Cooper, R.A. 


. 121 


T. Gooch 


. 209 


Edmund Bristowe 


. 76 


H.B. Chalon 


88 


R. B. Davis 


• 150 


T. Gooch 


. 209 


Henry AJken 


14. 24 


W. Barraud 


• 5+ 


A. Cooper, R..A 


. "7 


Sawrey Gilpin, R.A. 


■ 199 


]. E. Femeley 


. 107 


.\. Cooper, R_V 


. iiS 


A. D. Cooper 


. 12S 


A. Cooper, R.A 


120 


Geo. Garrard, A. R.A. 


■ 1S7 


R. B. Davis 


• 149 


A. Cooper, R.A 


. 116 


Geo. Garrard, A.R.A 


. iSS 


Geo. Garrard, .\.R..\ 


. iSi 


Henry Aiken 


. 26 


Henr)- .-Vlken 


• 25 


Henry .\lken 


13 


H. B. Chalon 


- 89 


.\. Cooper, R.A. 


119 


R. B. Davis 


.. 148 


.A. Cooper, R..\ 


. 120 


Henry .\lkea 


26 



220 



INDEX 



Chase and the Road, The 

Check, A 

Chestnut Hunter ... ... 

Children of Thomas Keen, Esq., with pony 
Claims of St. Francis, The ... 
" Claret," a Hunter ... 

"Clavileno" 

Clever at Plounds 
Climax of Disaster, The 

Close Finish, A ... 

Coach-dogs 

Coach-horse 

Coach-horses ... 

"Coast-guard," a Newfoundland Dog 

Cock-Fighting ... 

Cock-Fighting 

Cock Robin 

Cock Shooting ... 

"Cocoa" 

" Cognac," celebrated hunter 

Coke, T. W., bust of 

Collecting the Wounded after a Skirmish ... 

" Colonel, The," a racehorse... 

" Colonel, The," a racehorse 

Combat between Sergeant Bothwell and 

Balfour of Burley 
Combat between Smugglers and Revenue 

Officers 
Coming Man, The 
Coming Slorm, The ... 
Common and the Brandling Trout ... 
Complete Angler, The 
" Comus," one of Her Majesty's favourite 

horses 
Conference, A . . 
" Conrach" 

" Conrad," Shorthorn Bull ... 

Contrast, or the Off Shore ... 

Cooper, A., R.A., portrait of 

Cooper, A., R.A. , portrait of 

Corbet, Sir A. ... 

"Costive," a hound .. 

" Colherslone," winner of the Derby, 1S43 

Cottage, A 

Council of Horses, The 
Counting the Day's Sport 
Count out. The 
Country Market Place, A 

Couple of Woodcocks 

Coursers' Companion, The 

Coursing ... 

Coursing 
Coursing 
Coursing 



Henry Aiken 

Henry Aiken 

H. B. Chalon 

H. Barraud 

H. Barraud 
J. Barenger 

R. B. Davis 

Henry Aiken 
Henry Aiken 

Henry Aiken 

T. Gooch 

T. Gooch 

Geo. Garrard, A.I\.A. ... 
Edmund Bristowe 
Samuel Aiken 

J. Barenger 

A. Cooper, R.A 

Henry Aiken 

A. Cooper, R.A. ... 

J. E. Ferneley 

George Garrard, A. R.A. 

A. Cooper, R.A 

L. Barenger 

H. B. Chalon 

A. Cooper, R.A 

Henry Aiken 

A. Cooper, R.A. ... 

A. Cooper, R.A 

A. Cooper, R.A 

A. Cooper, R.A 

A. Cooper, R.A.... 

A. Cooper, R.A 

W. Barraud 

W. Barraud 

A. Cooper, R.A 

A. D. Cooper 

John Jackson, R.A. 
George Garrard, A.R.A. 

H. B. Chalon 

Henry Aiken 

B. Blake 

W. Barraud 

A. Cooper, R.A 

A. Cooper, R.A 

Luke Clennell 

S. Elmer, A.R.A. 

W. Barraud 

Samuel Aiken 

Barraud, W., 1832, 1833 

Edmund Bristowe 

H. B. Chalon 



PAGE 

... 24 

... 17 

... 89 

• • 59 
. . 59 
... 36 
... 148 
... 26 

9 

... 25 

. . . 209 

. . . 209 

181, 186 

... 75 

• 33 
... 36 
... 122 
... IS 
... 118 
... 172 
... 187 

119 

•■• 39 
...82, 90 

107,117 

... 25 

... 123 

... 124 

... I2S 

... 122 

... 118 

... 119 

• •• 54 
... 54 
... 120 
... 128 
... IIS 
... 188 

85, 89, 91 

... 25 

... 67 

... 54 

... 120 

... 123 

... lOI 

... 158 

. . 55 

• 3'. 33 
•■ 55 

... 79 

... 84 



INDEX 



221 



Coursing 

Coutts, Edward 

Co%'ey of Partridges ... 

Cowes Harbour 

Cows 

Cows in a Landscape . . 

Cox, P., bust of 

Coxe, Rev. W., M.A., bust of 

" Crab and Pickle," Scotch terriers... 

Craven Hounds 

Cream-coloured Charger 

Cream-coloured horse 

Creek, The 

Cricket, Extraordinary 

Cricket Match, A 

" Critic," a red dog ... 

Critical .Situations 

Cromwell at Marston Moor ... ... A. 

Cross Shot, A ... 
Crossing the Line 
"Crucifix" 

Cup of \Vhi.skey, A 

" Cupid and Nymphs " 

"Cur, The" 

" Curl," a pug dog 
Curricle horse, A 

Curwen, J. C, bust of 

Cu.st, Lieut. -Gen. the Hon. Sir Edward 

"Cuthullin" 

" Czarina and Maria" 



.. Sawrey Gilpin, R. A. 


... 203 


... A. Cooper, R..-\ 


.. 119 


... St. Elmer, A.R.A. 


'55.158 


... R. B. Davis 


... 151 


.. H. B. Chalon 


... 89 


.. Sawrey Gilpin, R. A. 


. 202 


. . George Garrard, A.R.A. 


,. 187 


... George Garrard, .\.R. A. 


... 188 


.. A. Cooper, R..\. 


... 118 


... ]. Barenger 


... 38 


.. H. B. Chalon 


ql 


... George Garrard, A.R.A. 


. 186 


... A. Cooper, R.A... 


... 124 


... Henry Aiken 


... 25 


... Henry Aiken 


... 26 


... R. B. Davis 


... 150 


... Henry Aiken 


... 26 


Cooper.'R.A., 1821, 1863. ..107, 117, 120 


. . A. Cooper, R.-\. 


• 123 


... Henry Aiken 


... 24 


... A. Cooper, R.A. ... 


... 125 


... A. Cooper, R..\ 


... 120 


... A. Cooper, R..\ 


... 119 


... J. E. Ferneley 


... 172 


. .. A. Cooper, R.A. 


... 116 


... Thomas Gooch 


. , . 209 


... George G.irrard, A.R.A. 


... 1S7 


... A. Cooper, R.A... 


... 120 


... A. Cooper, R.A 


... 116 


... Sawrey Gilpin, R.A. 


... 199 



" Dahlia," a greyhound 

Dalmatian dog, A. 

" Dalpine," celebrated Racer 

" Danceaway," a hunter 

Dancer, Thomas, with friends, horse and dogs 

Daniel in the Lion's Den 

Darius gaining the Persian Empire ... 

" Darley Arabian, The " 

" Darling," a Staghound 

" Dash," a Pointer 

" Dash," a Setter 

Davis, Charles, on " Hermit " 

Davis as the Georgian Chief in Timour 

the Tartar 

Day after the Fair, The 

Day Family, The 

Day in Leicestershire, A 

Day's .Sport in the Highlands 

Dead Beat 

Dead Fallow Deer 



H. B. Ch.ilon 




90 


T. Barenger 




3S 


H. B. Chalon 




90 


H. B. Chalun 




88 


H. B. Chalon 




90 


S.iwrey Gilpin, R.A. 




203 


Sawrey Gilpin, R.A. 




191 


H. B. Chalon 




91 


J. Barenger 




38 


Sawrey Gilpin, R.A. 


200, 


203 


A. Cooper, R.A. 




113 


R. B. Davis ... 141, 


143. '45. 


149 


A. Cooper, R.A 




120 


Luke Clennell 




98 


A. Cooper, R.A 


HI, 


, 118 


Henry Aiken 




27 


A. Cooper, R.A 




118 


A. Cooper, R.A 




126 


W. Barnard 




54 



222 



INDEX 



Dead Game 
Dead Game 
Dead Game and Codfish 

Dead Hart, The 

Dead Kid, The 

Dead Trooper, The 

Dealh, The 

Death, The 

Death, The 

Death, The 

Death, The 

" Dealh and the Doctors " 

Death of a Cavalier at Marston Moor 

Death of a Mare ... 

Death of Harold, The 

Death of Sir Francis Russel ... 

Death of the Fox 

Dealh of the Fox 

Death of the Fox 

Death of the Hare at Stoneheiige, The 

Death of the Slag 

Death Struggle, The 

" Deception" ... 

Decisive Charge of the Life Guards at 

Waterloo 
Declining Day ... 

Deer Paddock, The ... 

Deer Paddocks, Ascot, The ... 

Deerstalkers 

" Delia and Lucy" 

" Delpini," a charger 

Deserted Child found. The ... 

Design for a Monument 

Design for Gothic Truss, busts of a lady and 

her seven daughters 
Design for Hunting Appointment Card 
Despatch, The... 
Devonshire Cattle 
Dick Christian's last fall, commonly called 

a He.ader 

Dick the Huntsman ... 

" Dido," portrait of a Setter ... 

Digging out 

Dilemma, A ... 

Dilemmas 

" Doctor, The," a hunter 

Dog and Cat ... 

Dog from Botany Bay 

Dog from Milan, A ... 

Dog from Nature 

Dog from Sable Cape... 

Dog in the Manger, The 

Dog Painting ... 

Dog, portrait of a ... 



Benjamin Blake, 1821, 1828, 

Stephen Elmer, A.K.A., 1776, 17S2, 1807 
.. Benjamin Blake ... 

.. A. Cooper, R.A 

., A. Cooper, R.A 

,. A. Cooper, R.A. ... 

. H. Aiken 

. J. Barenger 

. John Boultbee 

. T- E. Ferneley 

. R. B. Davis 

, Henry Aiken 

. A. Cooper, R. A.... 
. Thomas Gooch ... 

. A. Co'iper, K.A 

. A. Coopc-r, R.A 

. Stephen Elmer, A. R.A. 

. H. B. Chalon 

. S. Gilpin, R.A. ... 
. W. and H. Barraud 

. "Wildrake" 

. A. Cooper, R.A. ... 

. A. Cooper, R.A 

. Luke Clennell 

. A. Cooper, R.A 

. R. B. Davis 

. R. B. Davis 

. A. Cooper, R.A 

. A. Cooper, R.A. ... 

. A. Cooper, R.A 

. A. Cooper, R.A 

. Samuel Aiken 

George Garrard, A. R.A. 

Henry Aiken 

A. Cooper, R.A.... 
Sawrey Gilpin, R.A. 

Henry .Mken 

H. B. Chalon 

E. Biistowe 

A. Cooper, R.A.... 

R. B. D.ivis 

Henry Aiken 
A. Cooper, R.A. 
A. Cooper, R.A. ... 

S. Gilpin, R.A 

T. Gooch 
J. Barenger 

S. Gilpin, R.A 

A. Cooper, R.A 

Luke Clennell 

T. Gooch 



i94i 



PAGE 
1S23...65, 67 
■157, 158, 156 

. ... 65 

... 123 
... 119 
... 119 

12, 26, 27 

. ... 38 

... 72 

... 175 

... 151 

... 17 

... 117 

... 209 

loS, 118 
... 117 
... 157 
... 90 

195. 203 
... 50 
... 14 
... 124 

... I2S 

98, 99 

• • 123 

... 150 

... 150 

... 119 

... 125 

... 116 
... 116 

30, 33 

... 189 

... 25 

... 120 

... 203 

9 

... 91 

... 79 

... 125 

... 150 

... 25 

... 118 

... 122 

... 203 

... 209 

••■ 39 

... 203 

... 123 

... 100 

... 209 



indSx 



Dogs 

Dogs 

Dogs and bitches v. Police and others 

Dogs and bitches z;. Pups 

Dogs fighting 

Doing a bit of City 
" Doll," a pointer 
Domville, Sir W., portrait of 
"Don," a pointer 
" Done up," a Chestnut hunter 
Donkey and Spaniel ... 
Donkey Race ... 

Doorway in the Church of the Spirito Santo, 
P'lorence ... 

Down HiU 

Drafts from the Badminton ... 
" Drake," a water spaniel 
Draught-horses 
Draw, The 

Drawing a Badger 

Dray-horse 

Dray-horses 

Dray-horse 

Dressing a fly ... 

Duck Hunting... 

Duck Shooting... 

Duck Shooting 

Duck Shooting... 

Duke of Cumberland visiting the Stud at 
Windsor ... 

" Duke of Grafton's Woful'' 

Duke of Wellington, Bust of 

Duke of Wellington, Statue of 

Duke of York, Eque.^trian Statue of... 

Duke on a Cover Hack, The... 

" Dulcinea," a hunter mare 

" Duncannon" 

" Duncan's Horses" ... 

" Duncan's Horses" 

" Duncan's Horses" 

Durham Landscape ... 

Durham Ox and Mr. Coates' Short-horned 
Cow 

Dutch Pups 

Dwarf Beagles, The 

Dying Woodcock, The 

Dymoke, The Hon. Henry 



223 







PAGE 


H. B. Chalon ... 




88 


A. Cooper, R.A. ... 




119 


H. Aiken 




25 


H. Aiken 




25 


A. Cooper, R.A. ... 




120 


H. Aiken 




17 


T. Barenger 




37, 39 


Luke Clennell ... 




lOI 


A. Cooper, R.A. ... 




121 


David Dalby 




131 


A. Cooper, R.A. ... 




116 


Edmund Bristowe 




77 


PL Barraud 




S8 


David Dalby 




133 


W. Barr.aud 




55 


A. Cooper, R.A.... 




I2t 


A. Cooper, R. A.... 




117 


R. B. Davis 




151 


S. Aiken 




33 


Th. Gooch 




209 


H. B. Chalon ... 




88 


A. Cooper, R.A.... 




iiS, 121 


A. Cooper, R.A. ... 




120 


S. Aiken 




33 


S. Aiken 




33 


J. Barenger 




36 


A. Cooper, R.A., 1 


S29. 


1S61 122, 120 


S. Gilpin, R.A. ... 




191 


A. Cooper, R.A.... 




121 


Geo. Garrard, A.R 


.A. 


188 


Geo. Garrard, A, R.A. 


184 


Geo. Garrard, A.R. 


A. 


185 


Geo. Garrard, A.R, 


.A. 


181 


A. Cooper, R.A. ... 




121 


S.Gilpin, R.A. ... 




20? 


R. B. Davis 




148 


Geo. Garrard, A.R 


.A. 


187 


S. Gilpin, R.A. ... 




203 


H. B. Chalon ... 




90 


i 

. Geo. Garrard, A.R 


.A. 


187 


S. Gilpin, R.A. ... 




203 


H. B. Chalon ... 




87,91 


A. Cooper, R.A.... 




i-^S 


. A. Cooper, R.A. ... 




121 



E 

Eagle and Newfoundland Dog A. Cooper, R.A. . 

Eagle carrying olT a Duckling F. Barlow... 

Earl of Arundel and Surrey, with favourite 

Pony .and Dogs H. Barraud 



121 

45 
58 



224 



INDEX 



Earl of Coventry and his Sister 

Earl of Darlington's Kennel, with his 

Huntsman, &c 

Earl of Derby's Staghounds 

Earl of Fauconberg, Bust of ... 

Earl St. Vincent, Bust of 

Earth Stopping 

Earthstopper on Horseback, The 

Easter iMonday, a View near Windsor 

" Eaton," a racehorse... 

" Eaton," a racehorse... 

" Eclipse," celebrated racehorse 

Edwards, Miss 

" Eglinton," celebrated hunter 

Elephant 

'; Elis," Winner of the St. Leger 

Elite of the Field on their Second Horses . . . 

"Emilius" ... 

" Emily," the Dam of Emilius 
Encounter, The 

" Ennui" ... 

Epsom Races : the Derby Stakes ... 
Equestrian Figures from the Elgin Marbles 
Equestrian Portrait of Miss Hoare ... 
Equestrian Statue to commemorate tlie 

Downfall of Usurpation 

" Essex," a hunter 

Evening of 1st October 

"Excelsior" ... 

Explanation of the Anatomical Table o( 

the Horse's Muscles 
Extraordinary Leap taken by Col. 

Standen ... 





PACE 


H. Barraud 


... 59 


H. B. Chalon 


.. 89 


J. Barenger 


-.- .37 


Geo. Garrard, A.R.A. .. 


.. 187 


Geo. Garrard, A.R.A. ... 


... 187 


]. Barenger 


... 36 


R. B. Davis 


... 150 


Henry Aiken 


6 


H. B. Chalon 


.. 89 


R. B. Davis 


... 148 


Geo. Garrard, A.R.A. ... 


... 189 


A. Cooper, R.A.... 


. . 117 


John Ferneley 


174 


A. Cooper, R.A.... 


... 116 


A. Cooper, R.A.... 


109, 118 


Henry Aiken 


II 


R. B. Davis 


... 149 


R. B. Davis 


... 149 


H. Aiken 


... 24 


A. Cooper, R.A 


... 119 


H. Aiken 


15 


A. Cooper, R.A 


... 121 


A. Cooper, R.A 


... iiS 


Geo. Garrard, A.R.A. ... 


,. iSS 


H.B. Chalon 


... 89 


A. Cooper, R.A. ... 


... 121 


A. Cooper, R.A 


... 123 


H. B. Chalon 


... S4 


J. E. Ferneley 


■ ■ 173 



" Fairy," a terrier 

Falconer, The ... 

" Fall of Phaeton," The 

Fall over a Flight of Rails ., 

Fallow Deer 

Famous Hack of Mr. West's. 
Famous Hunter 

Famous Pony 

Famous Racer 
Famous Setter 

Famous Setter... 

" Fancy," a spaniel ... 

" Fang," a hunter 

"Fanny" 

" Fanny and Muff" ... 

Farmyard, A ... 

Farmyard with Figures 



... H. B. Chalon 


... 89 


... A. Cooper, R.A 


... U9 


... Geo. Garrard, A.R.A. ... 


... 188 


... H. Aiken 


II 


... A. Cooper, R.A. ... 


... 113 


... T- Barenger 


... 38 


... H. B. Chalon 


... 89 


... H. B. Chalon 


... 88 


... H. B. Chalon 


... 88 


...J. Barenger 


35.38 


... J. E. Ferneley 


... 172 


... H. B. Chalon 


... 89 


... H. B. Chalon 


... 90 


... A. Cooper, R. A.... 


... 118 


... A. Cooper, f^.A 


... 116 


... S. Gilpin, R.A 


... 203 


... F. Barlow 


... 45 



INDEX 



225 







PAGE 


Farrier's Shop, The 


... A.Cooper, R.A. ... 


106, 116 


Fashioning a Fly ... 


... A. Cooper, R.A. ... 


124 


Father of Foxhunting, The ... 


... W. Barraud 


49 


Fathers of the Pack, The 


... W. & H. Barraud 


SI 


Favourite Cat ... ... 


... A. Cooper, R.A. ... 


il6 


Favoufile Cub 


... W. Barraud 


S4 


Favourite Dog... ... 


... A. Cooper, R.A. ... 


117 


Favourite Galloway, A 


... A. Cooper, R.A. ... 


n6 


Favourite Hackney, A 


... Thomas Gooch ... 


209 


Favourite Horse, A 


... W. Barraud 


S4 


Favourite Horse, A 


... John Boultbee 


74 


Favourite Horse, A ... 


... A. Cooper, R.A. ... 


117 


Favourite Horses ... 


... W. Barraud 


54 


Favourite Horses of the Marquis of Wor 


cester \V. Barraud 


54 


Favourite Hunter ... 


... A. Cooper, R.A. ... 


117 


Favourite Hunter 


... J. E. Ferneley 


I6S 


Favourite Mare 


... A. Cooper, R.A. ... 


119 


Favourite old Horse ... 


... R. B. Davis 


... 148 


Favourite old Hunter 


... A. Cooper, R.A. ... 


118 


Favourite old Pony ., 


... R. B. Davis 


149 


Favourite Pony ... 


... George Garrard, A. R.A 


.. 1S8 


Favourite Pony and Dogs 


... W. Barraud 


54 


Favourile, portrait of a 


... R. B. Davis 


149 


Favourite Spaniel 


... W. Barraud 


54 


Favourites 


... W. Barraud 


54 


Favourites ... 


... R. B. Davis 


149 


Ferreting Rabbits 


... S. Aiken 


33 


Ferry Boat, The 


... LukeClennell ... 


97 


Fete Dieu 


... H. Barraud 


S8 


"Fidele" 


... H. B. Chalon ... 


89 


"Fidele" 


... A. Cooper, R.A.... 


"3 


"Fidelia" 


... A. Cooper, R.A. ... 


117 


" Fidget," a blood horse 


... H. B. Chalon ... 


89 


Fight at Cropedy Bridge, The 


... A. Cooper, R.A. 


108,118 


Fight at Gladsnioor, The 


... A. Cooper, K.A — 


120 


Fighting Bulls, Sculpture 


... Geo. Garrard, A.R. A. 


187 


Fighting Cocks 


... Stephen Elmer, A. R.A. 


158 


Fighting Dogs ... 


... ]. Barenger 


.39 


Fighting Dogs ... 


... "H. B. Chalon 


9' 


" Filngree and Cobweb" 


... J. E. Ferneley 


167 


Find, The 


... H. Aiken 


II 


First Barrel, The 


... A. Cooper, R.A. ... 


123 


First Brace, The 


... A. Cooper, R.A. ... 


J24 


First Earl of Portland 


... A. Cooper, R.A.... 


117 


First Flight, The 


.. A. Cooper, R.A.... 


'23 


First of October 


.. A. Cooper, R.A. ... 


i>9 


First of September 


... A. Cooper, R.A. ... 


116, 121 


First Step, The 


... J. E. Ferneley 


175 


First Whip, The 


... Henry Aiken 


26 


Fish 


... Elmer, A.R.A. ... 


.. 158 


Fish and Cat ... 


.. S.Elmer, A.R. A., 1776,1 


782.. .157, 158 


Fisherman's boy and his dog... 


... A. Cooper, R.A. ... 


i"9 


Fisherman's Family, The 


... A. Cooper, R.A. ... 


123 


Fishermen 


... A. Cooper, R.A. ... 


116 



IS 



226 



INDEX 



Fitz-Gibbon, Master, on his pony ... 
" Fitzjames lamenting over his Steed " 
Five-barred Gate 
Flemish Fishermen 

"Fleur-de-lis" 

"Flora" 

"Flora" 

Flower, Sir James, and his Family ... 
Flowers of the Hunt ... 

"Flowers" 

" Flush," a spaniel ... ... 

" Fly," a greyhound ... 

Fly-fishing 

Fly-fishing 

Flying Leap, The 

Foot of the Hill 

Foray, The ... 

Ford, The 

Forest Mare and Foal 

Forester's Freight, The 

" Forward All ! Forward" ... 

Foster, The Rt. Hon. J., bust of 

Four Pointers standing to Game 

Fowls ... ... ... ... ... S 

Fox, The 

Fox, &c., A ... 

Fox and Pheasant ... ... 

Fox and the Engle's Nest, The 

Fox breaking Cover ... ... 

" Fox he breaks away. The " 

Foxhound in the possession of Colonel 

Thornton ... 

Fox Hunt, A 

Fox-hunters Regaling 

Fox-hunters' Return 

Fox Hunting ... ... ... 

Fox Hunting ... 
Fox Hunting ... 

Fox Hunting ... 

Fox Hunting ... ... 

Fox of Spitzbergen 

Fox, the late Rt. Hon. C. J., bust of 

Foxes pursuing a Hare ... 

Fo.xhound 

Foxhound 

Foxhounds 

Foxhounds 

Foxhounds and Whelps 

Foxhounds in Full Cry 

Foxhounds in their Kennel ... 

Foxhounds running in Covert 

Fox's Head 

Francis Buckle... 

Frankland, Sir T., Bust of 



A. Cooper, R.A 




118 


Henry Barraud 




58 


Henry Aiken 




26 


A. Cooper, R.A.... 




122 


A. Cooper, R.A. 1827, 1829.. 


.117. 


122 


H. B. Chalon 


86 


. 91 


A. Cooper, R.A. ... 




118 


A. Cooper, R.A 


III, 


iiS 


Henry Aiken 




25 


Stephen Elmer, A. R.A. ... 




158 


H. B. Chalon 




89 


A. Cooper, R.A.... 




120 


J. Barenger 




36 


A. Cooper, R.A... 




124 


A. Cooper, R.A 




121 


A. Cooper, R.A 




124 


A. Cooper, R.A. ... 




119 


A. Cooper, R.A. 1844, 1S51.. 


.iiS, 


119 


H. B. Chalon 




90 


A. Cooper, R.A. ... 




123 


R. B. Davis 




150 


Geo. Garrard, A. R.A. ... 




1S7 


H. B. Chalon 




87 


. Elmer, A.R.A., 1773, I777-- 


• 157. 


158 


Luke Clennell 




100 


Stephen Elmer, A. R.A. ... 




157 


Stephen Elmer, A. R.A. ... 




158 


F. Barton 




45 


Philip Reinagle ... 




195 


Henry Aiken 




19 


Sawrey Gilpin, R.A, 


194, 


203 


A. Cooper, R.A 




113 


Luke Clennell 96, 


, 100, 


lOI 


A. Cooper, R.A 


116, 


121 


Henry Aiken 


i; 


5.23 


S. Aiken 




31 


Luke Clennell ... 




100 


A. Cooper, R.A 




125 


R. B. Davis 




151 


A. Cooper, R.A. ... 




120 


Geo. Garrard, A. R.A. ... 




187 


J. Barenger 




39 


H. B. Chalon 




89 


Geo. Garrard, A. R.A. ... 




186 


J. Barenger 




38 


T. Gooch 


208, 


209 


R. B. Davis 




146 


Henry Aiken 




19 


R. B. Davis 




146 


R. B. Davis 




146 


A. Cooper, R.A.... 




121 


A. Cooper, R.A. ... 




121 


Geo. Garrard, A. R.A. ... 




1 88 



INDEX 



" Frederick," a racehorse 
Freer, Mr., Portrait of 
Fresh Near Leader, A 
Fresh Team,"' A 
" Friend," a greyhound 
Frightened Horse, A ... 
Frogs and Cranes 
" Frolic," a horse 
From Chester Races ... 
Fruits 

Full Cry 

Full Cry 

Full Cry 

Fuller, Mr., Bust of ... 

Fusee, The 

Future Hopes 



J. Barenger 
, J. E. Ferneley 

Henry Aiken 
, Henry Aiken 

A. Cooper, R.A. . 
, Henry Aiken 

Henry Aiken 

A. Cooper, R.A. 

Henry Aiken 



227 

PAGE 

39 
172 

26 

25 

121 

26 

17 
104 

25 

-57, 15S 
24, 25, 27 



... Henry Aiken 
S. Elmer, A.R.A., 1774, 1776, 1777, 177S, 
1780-1785, 1789, 1790, 1793 ... 15 
... Henry Aiken ... ... 24, 

... J. Boultbee ... ... ... 72 

... R. B. Davis ... ... ... 151 

Geo. Garrard, A.R.A 1S7 

A. Cooper, R.A.... 120 

R. B. Davis 150 



G 

" Gadfly," a fo.xhound 

" Galaia," a brown filly 

Galloway Shetland Pony 

Galloway, The... 

Game ... 

Game Cock, A... 

Gamecocks 

Game Fowls ... 

Gamekeeper, The 

Gamekeeper and Pony, with Pointers 

Gamekeepers and Dogs belonging to the 
Duke of York 

" Garry Owen," Portrait of ... 

General Mina, Model for Bust of 

Gentleman on a Trotting Mare 

Gentleman on Horseback bringing up lag 
Hounds ... 

Gentleman on Horseback, Portrait of a 

Gentleman on Horseback, with Game- 
keeper, &c. 

Gentleman with his Horse and Dog, 
Portrait of... 

Gentleman with his Spaniels, A 

George Montford and Will Derry 

George Nelson... 

George Sharpe, Portrait of 

Getting Home — doing their best with 
difficulty ... 

Getting into a Difficulty 

Getting out of a Difficulty 

The Giaour 

" Gig," a greyhound ... 

Gig Florse ... ... 



R. B. Davis 


.. 150 


A. Cooper, R.A 


... 124 


H. B. Chalon 


... 89 


T. Gooch 


... 209 


S. Elmer, A.R.A. 


... 157 


J. Barenger 


•■■ 39 


J. Best 


... 62 


I. Barenger 


... 36 


Luke Clennell 


... lOI 


H. B. Chalon 


... 89 


H. B. Chalon 


87, 88 


A. Cooper, R.A 


... 118 


Geo. Garrard, A.R.A. ... 


... 18S 


T. Gooch 


... 209 


S. Gilpin, R.A 


197, 203 


T. Gooch, 1783, 1794 ... 


208, 209 


T. Gooch 


... 209 


T. Gooch 


... 20S 


T. Gooch 


. . . 209 


R. B. Davis 


• ■■ 143 


A. Cooper, R.A.,.. 


... 122 


R. B. Davis 


... 141 


Henry Aiken 


... iS 


Henry Aiken 


18 


Henry Aiken 


18 


A. Cooper, R.A 


... 120 


A. Cooper, R.A 


116, 121 


H. B. Chalon 


... 90 



228 



INDEX 



Gig Horse and Newfoundland Bitch 

Gig Horse, Norwegian Rabbit, Cat and Two 

Terriers ... ... 

Gig-Mare 

Gig-Mare 

"Giles" 

Gillie, The 

Gillie's Courtship, The 

Gillie's Departure for the Moors, The 

Gilpin : — 

Rev., bust of 

Sawrey, R. A., bust of 

Sir J. M. D., bust of 

" Gladsome," a staghound bitch 
Glenartney and his Jockey ... 

Gloomy VVoods, The ... 

"Go! I fancy he can ! " ... 

Goats and Sheep 

Goats from Punjab, with their Sikh Shepherd 

" Godolphin," a racehorse 

"Gohanna" 

Going Home ... 

Going Out 

Going Out in the Morning ... 

Going the Pace 

Going to Cover 

Going to Cover 

Going to Covert to meet the Difficulty 

Going to Market 

Going to the Derby: on the road 

Going to the Meet 

Going to the Post: the Race 

Going to the Starting Post ... 

Gold Pheasants 

" Goldfinch," a hunter 

" Goldfinder," a racehorse 

Gone Away 

Gone Away 

Gone Away 

Goodisson, J., portrait of 

Goodricke, Sir Harry, portrait of ... 

Goosey, T., a huntsman 

Gosden, Thomas, portrait of ... 

" Goshawk " 

Got into a Difficulty 

Got out of a Difficulty 

Grant, F., portrait of ... ... 

Grapes ... 

" Grayling, The," a hunter 

Greeks ... 

Greeks with Arab horses 

Green Sandpiper ... 

" Greenshank" 

Grey Horse ... ... 



H. B. Chalon 


... 89 


H. B. Chalon 


... 90 


J. Barenger 


.■■ 39 


T. Gooch 


... 20S 


H. B. Chalon 


... 88 


A. Cooper, R.A.,i855, 1862.. 


.119,120 


A. Cooper, R. A. ... 


... 119 


A. Cooper, R.A 


... u8 


George Garrard, A. R. A. 


... 187 


George Garrard, A. R.A. 


... 187 


George Garrard, A. R.A. 


... 188 


A. Cooper, R.A 


... 121 


J. E. Ferneley 


... 172 


"R. B. Davis 


... 150 


Henry Aiken 


... 16 


F. Barlow 


... 44 


H. B. Chalon 


... 90 


J. Barenger 


39 


R. B. Davis 


.. 149 


Henry Aiken 


... 15 


A. Cooper, R.A 


... 119 


George Garrard, A. R.A. 


... 186 


Henry Aiken 


9 


H. Aiken 


25 


A. Cooper, R.A. 


124 


H. Aiken 


. . 18 


R. B. Davis 


... 148 


H. Aiken 


... 26 


H. Aiken 


... 26 


H. Aiken 


... 26 


H. Aiken 


... 26 


St. Elmer, A. R.A. 


... 158 


A. Cooper, R.A. ... 


... 116 


. T. Gooch 


. . . 204 


H. Aiken 


25, 26 


, A. Cooper, R.A. 


120, 125 


R. B. Davis 


... 151 


A. Cooper, R.A. 


.. 121 


, [. E. Ferneley ... 


... I6S 


R. B. Davis 


■■■ 143 


Luke Clennell 


... gH 


. J. Barenger 


... 39 


H. Aiken 


... 18 


H. Aiken 


... 18 


, J. E. Ferneley 


... 172 


S. Elmer, A. R.A. 


... 158 


W. Barraud 


51 


A. Cooper, R.A. ... 


... 118 


A. Cooper, R.A. ... 


... 117 


A. Cooper, R.A. .. 


... 122 


A. Cooper, R.A 


. . 122 


. A. Cooper, R.A. . 


... 119 



INDEX 

Grey Horse at a Stable door 

" Grey Jem '' ... 
"GreyMomus" 
Greyhound 
Greyhound 

Greyhound ... 

Greyhound 

Greyhound and Fox ... 
Greyhounds 

Greyhounds and Whelps , . 

Greyhounds, The Last Act ... 
Greyhounds with Dead Hare 
Greyhounds with Sportsmen finding a Hare... 
Groom and horses, A ... 
Groom and Hunter 

Group of Arab Cavalry 

Group of Children, pony and ass 

Group of Dogs... 

Group of Dogs... 

Group of Fish lying on the Ground ... 

Group of four Horses, a has relief in marble... 

Group of Holderness Cattle ... 

Group of Horses, grooms and harriers 

Group of Lambs 

Group of Pugilists 

Group representing Messrs. Robert Darling 

and John Browne... ... 

Groups of Fish... 
Grouse Shooting 

Grouse Shooting A. Cooper, 

Grouse Shooting 

"Guard, The" 

Gubbins, Miss, portrait of ... 

Guibert's escape from Totquilstone Castle ... 

Gulliver among the Honyhnhnms ... 

Gulliver meeting the Honyhnhnms 

Gulliver taking leave of the Honyhnhnms . . 

Gulliver's visit ... 

Gulliver's Visit to the Honyhnhnms 

Gully, John 

" Gulnare," a racehorse 



229 





PAGE 


A. Cooper, R.A 


116 


A. Cooper, R.A 


117, 122 


A. Cooper, R.A 


118, 125 


J. Barenger 


39 


"H. B. Chalon ... 


88,91 


A. Cooper, R.A 


116 


T. Gooch 


209 


A. Cooper, R.A — 


121 


Edmund Btistowe 


78 


W. Barraud 


55 


H. Aiken 


19 


J. Barenger 


36 


J. Barenger 


36 


H. Aiken 


23 


H. B. Chalon ... 


89 


H. Aiken 


27 


J. E. Ferneley 


172 


H. B. Chalon ... 


89 


T. E. Ferneley ... 


172 


S. Elmer, A. R.A. 


157 


Geo. Garrard, A. R.A. . 


185 


Geo. Garrard, A.R.A. . 


187 


J. E. Ferneley ... 


172 


Geo. Garrard, A. R.A. . 


-87 


Geo. Garrard, A.R.A. . 


187 


J. E. Ferneley ... 


175 


S. Elmer, A. R. A. 


15s 


S. Aiken 


32, 33 


, R.A., 1836, 1858, i860.. 


.125, 119, 120 


Davis, R.B 


142 


A. Cooper, R.A. .. 


120 


H. Aiken 


5. 24 


A. Cooper, R.A. ... 


117 


John Boultbee ... 


72 


W. Barraud 


54 


S. Gilpin, R.A 


191 


S. Gilpin, R.A. ... 


19' 


S. Gilpin, R. A. ... 


191 


A. Cooper, R.A. ... 


123 


J. Barenger 


39 



"Habet" 

Hack 

Hack 

Hackney 

Hackney Mare 

Hack Stable, The 

Hall, Henry 

" Hambletonian" 
Hannibal and Princess 



A. Cooper, R.A: 


... 124 


H. B. Chalon, 1818, 1831 


...89,90 


R. B. Davis 


... 148 


A. Cooper, R.A 


... 116 


J. Barenger 


... 39 


H. Aiken 


... 24 


H. B. Chalon 


... 88 


Geo. Garrard, A.R.A. . 


... 187 


H. B. Chalon 


88 



230 



INDEX 



Hanoverian Horse 

Happy Foxhunter, The 

Hard Hit 

Hard Time3 

Hare, A 

Hare and Partridges 

Hare and Pheasants ... ... 

Hare and Woodcocks 

Hare Hunting ... 
Hare Hunting ... 

Hare Shooting 

Hare Sitting 

Hares Fighting 

" Harmony," a foxhound bitch 

Harvest in the Highlands 

" Hassan," an Arabian 

Haifield Hunt, The 

" Have a Care for the Vixen " 

Hawk, A 

Hawk and Hare 

Hawk and Partridge ... 

Hawk carrying off a Chicken 

Hawk swooping down on Fowls 

Hawking Party 

Hawking Party 

" He was a mighty Hunter before the Lord " 

Head of " Fickle, " a terrier 

Head of Pony ... 

Heads up. Sterns Down 

Heaviside, J., bust of 

Heavy Draught Horses ... 

Hen and Chickens 

Henry Morton rescuing Lord Evandale, &c 

Her Majesty's Beagles 

Her Majesty's Staghounds, portrait of 

" Here come the Hounds " 

"Here he is!" 

Herefordshire Ox 

"Hermit" 

Heron and Geese near a Mill Wheel 

Heron and Spaniel 

Highflyer 

Highflyer ... 

Highland Courtship 

Highland Dairy, A 

Highland Game 

Highland Gillie, The 

Highland Lassie getting up the Kye 

Highland Vulpecide, The 

Highmettled Racer, The 
Hill, A., portrait of ... 

"Hippolytus" 

His ilajesty in his travelling Chariot re- 
turning to Town from Windsor, &.C.... 





PAGE 


Geo. Garrard, A.R.A. .. 


... 186 


A- Cooper, R.A 


... 116 


H. Aiken 


... 24 


A. Cooper, R.A 


... 124 


S. Elmer, A. R.A. 


... 157 


S. Elmer, A. R.A. 


... 158 


S. Elmer, A. R.A. 


... 157 


S. Elmer, A.R.A. 


... 158 


H. Aiken, 


... 26 


S. Aiken, 1833, 1S41 .. 


-33.31 


H. Aiken 


... 27 


S. Elmer, A.R.A., 1788 


iSS. 158 


A. Cooper, R.A 


... 121 


A. Cooper, R..\ 


117,122 


A. Cooper, R.A 


... 119 


A. Cooper, R.A 


no, 118 


Samuel Aiken 


- 33 


R. B. Davis 


... ISO 


J. Barenger 


... 36 


S. Gilpin, R.A 


... 203 


S. Elmer, A.R..A.. 


... 158 


Luke Cradock 


... 130 


Luke Cradock 


... 130 


A. Cooper, R.A 


... 117 


R. B. Davis 


... 149 


A. Cooper R.A 


... 119 


H. B. Chalon 


... 89 


H. B. Chalon 


... 90 


A. Cooper, R.A 


... 125 


Geo. Garrard, A.R.A. .. 


... 187 


Geo. Garrard, A.R.A. .. 


... 187 


S. Elmer, A. R.A. 


... 158 


A. Cooper, R.A. ... 


... 119 


H. Barraud 


... 59 


R. B. Davis 


... 150 


W. Barraud 


• ■■ 55 


A. Cooper, R.A 


... IZ3 


J. Barenger 


... 36 


R. B. Davis ... 144, 


145, 149, 150 


Luke Cradock 


... 130 


S. Elmer, .A R.A. 


... 157 


John Boultbee 


...69, 74 


S. Gilpin, R.A. 


... 197 


A. Cooper, R.A 


... 118 


A. Cooper, R.A 


... 119 


A. Cooper, KA 


... 119 


A. Cooper, R.A 


... 118 


A. Cooper, R.-i^. 


... 119 


A. Cooper, R.A 


... 120 


A. Cooper, R.A.... 


... 121 


W. and H. Barraud 


... 51 


A. Cooper, R.A — 


... izo 


R. B. Davis 


138. 148 



His Majesty's Hunt 

" Hit him again ! " ... 

Hobby Hawk, The 

"Hoik in, There!" 

" Hold hard, gentlemen! " ... 
" Hold hard, There 1 " 

Holderness Cow, A 

Holiday Time 

Holland, Mr., bust of 

Holland, Mr. H., portrait of... 

"Home!" 

Home at Nazareth, The 

Home from the Hill 

Hope, Johnstone, Master, on Pony . 

Hors de Combat 

Horse ... 
Horse ... 

Horse 

Horse 



Horse 

Horse and Dogs 
Horse and Dogs 
Horse and Dogs 

Horse and Terrier 

Horse Fair, A 

Horse Fair, The 

Horse Ferry 

Horse Racing in Florence 

Horse Summering 

Horse with a Greyhound, portrait of 

Horse with Figure and Dogs, portrait of 

Horses 

Horses 

Horses 

Horses ... 

Horses ... 

Horses at a Farriers Shop 

Horse's Head from the Elgin Marbles 

Horses' Heads, Study of 

Horses in a Storm ... A. Cooper, R.A. 

Horses in a Storm 

Horse's Skeleton on a New System, The 

" Hotspur and Languish " 

Hound in Chase 

Hound returning from Chase 

Hounds... 

Hounds in Full Chase 

Hounds Killing a Fox 

Hounds Seizing a Fox 

" Hounds will meet, The " 

Horse-keeper, The 

How to appear at Covet 

How to go to Cover 

How to go through an Overflow 



INDEX 

... R. B. Davis 

... A. Cooper, R.A.... 

... A. Cooper, R.A. 

... n. Aiken 

... H. Aiken 

... H. Aiken 

... George Garrard, A.R.A. 

... A. Cooper, R.A. 

... Geo. Garrard, A.R.A. ... 
... Geo. Garrard, A.R.A. ... 

... H. Aiken 

... H. Barraud 

... A. Cooper, R.A. ... 

... H. B. Chalon 

... A. Cooper, R.A 

... J. Barenger 
.H. B. Chalon, 1798, 1799, 1817, 1S21 

... A. Cooper, R.A 

... S. Gilpin, R.A 



T. Gooch, 17S1, 1784, 1790, 1792, 1801.. 

H. B. Chalon 

Geo. Garrard, A.R.A. ... 

T. Gooch, 1782, 1786, 1794... 

John Bouitbee 

K. B. Da\-i3 

... J. E. Femeley 

... A. Cooper, R.A. ... 
H. Aiken 

... Edmund Bristowe 

T. Gooch 

T. Gooch 

W. Barraud 

H. B. Chalon 

A. D. Cooper 

R. B. Davis 

S. Gilpin, R.A., 1797, 1798, 1805, 1807.. 

... Geo. Garrard, A. R. A. ... 

... A. Cooper, R.A... 

... H. Aiken 

1S12, 1S27, 1828, 1S62...120, 117, 

.. S. Gilpin, R.A., 1797, 1799- 

... H. B. Chalon 

... H. Barraud 

... S. Gilpin, R.A. ... 

... George Garrard, A.R.A. 

... F. Barlow 

.. George Garrard, A.R.A. 

.. T. Gooch 

... S. Gilpin, R.A. 

... H. Aiken 

... A. Cooper, R.A 

... H. Aiken 

,.. H. Aiken 

... H. Aiken 



231 

PAGE 
... 141 
... 124 
... 125 
24 
... 26 
... 24 
... 182 
... 122 
... 187 

... iSS 

... 17 

... sS 

... 123 
... 90 

loS, 119 

... 3S 

...SS, Sg 
.. 117 
... 203 

.208, 209 
... 88 
... 1S8 

20S, 209 
71.74 
... 14S 
... 167 
... 117 
... iS 
... 76 
... 209 
... 209 
... 54 
... 8S 
... 128 
... 148 

200, 203 
... 1S6 
... 121 
... 26 
122, 120 

194. 203 

... 84 

57,58 

... 200 

... 1S6 

... 45 

... 1S3 

... 209 

... 203 

... 27 

... 124 

8 

8 

8 



232 



INDEX 







PAGE 


How to ride down Hill 


H. Aiken 


8 


How to take a Leap ... 


H. Aiken 


8 


How to take the Lead 


H. Aiken 


8 


How to qualify for a Meltonian 


H. Aiken 


7 


Hunnum, Robert, portrait of... 


John Ferneley 


.. 174 


Hunt Dinner, The 


H. Aiken 


2<i 


Hunier...ChaIon, H. B., 1797, 1799,1803, 1806 


,1810,1819,1812,1825, iSji...S8,89, 90 


Hunter ... 


A. Cooper, K.A., 1814, 1850 i 


16, 119 


Hunter ... 


R. B. Davis 


.. 148 


Hunter and a Shooting Horse 


T. Boultbee 


74 


Hunter and Foxhound 


H. B. Chalon 


.. 89 


Hunter and Hack Mare 


H. B. Chalon 


•• 90 


Hunter and Newfoundland Dog 


H. B. Chaion 


.. 89 


Hunter and Spaniel ... ... 


H. B. Chalon 


.. 90 


Hunter and Spaniel ... 


A. Cooper, R.A. 


.. 116 


Hunter and Terrier ... 


H. B. Chalon 


90 


Hunter, portrait of ... T. Gooch, 17S2, 


1794. 1795. 1798. iSoi, 1S02...: 


08, 209 


Hunters... 


H. B. Chalon 


.. 88 


Hunters 


A. Cooper, R.A. 


120 


Hunters ... 


J. G. Ferneley 


.. 172 


Hunters at Covertside 


Samuel Aiken 


•■ 3> 


Hunter's Head and Foxhound 


H. B. Chalon 


90 


Hunters, portraits of 


R. B. D-ivis 


.. 148 


Hunting ... 


A. Cooper, R.A 


.. I2S 


Hunting: Going into Cover ... 


T. Barenger 


.. 36 


Hunting Incidents 


H. Aiken 


25 


Hunting Mare ... 


A. Cooper, R.A. ... 


.. 116 


Hunting Mare and Foal 


A. Cooper, R.A 


.. 116 


Hunting No. 1 


A. Cooper, R.A. ... 


.. 124 


Hunting Sweep, The ... 


H. Aiken 


12 


Hunting, the Chase ... 


J. Barenger 


.. 36 


Hunting, the Death 


J. Barenger 


.. 36 


Huntsman's Holloa, The 


A. Cooper, R.A. ... 


.. 124 


Huntsmen and Hounds 


A. Cooper, R.A 


.. 116 


Hutton, Rev. Mr., with View of Houghton 






Hall 


Geo. Garrard, A. R.A. 


.. 188 



" I shall begin to think," &c. 

Illustration to Edward Benlowe's "Theophila, 

or Love's Sacrifice " ... 

Illustrations of the Equestrian Order 
Illustrations to ^sop's Fable of -the Young 

Man and his Cat ... 

Illustrious Sportsmen, The ... 

In Cover 

In his box ... ... ... 

In the Belvoir Country 
" In the Morning Early " 
In the Right Place 
Incident of the Chase ... 
Indian Red Deer 



II. Aiken 


25 


F. Barlow... 


45 


R. B. Davis 


.. 151 


F. Barlow 


44 


R. B. Davis 


.. ISO 


H. Aiken 


24 


H. Aiken 


26 


H. Aiken 


25 


A. Cooper, R.A. 


.. 123 


A. Cooper, R.A.... 


.. 123 


R. B. Davis 


.. ISO 


H. B. Chalon 


91 



INDEX 



233 









PAGE 


" Industry," a brown filly 




. A. Cooper, R.A 


... 125 


Infant, bust of 


Geo. 


Garrard, A.R.A., 1797, iSl 


[4. ..187, iSS 


Interior of a Costermonger's Stable ... 




A. Cooper, R.A. ... 


... 121 


Interior of a Highland Inn ... 




A. Cooper, R.A. ... 


.. 119 


Interior of a Stable ... 




. A. Cooper, R.A. . 


... 117 


Interior of Craven Cottage ... 




Geo. Garrard, A.R.A. ... 


... 18S 


Irish Pig 




, Geo. Garrard, A. R.A. ... 


... 1S7 


" Is that really a 'are?'' 




, H. Aiken 


... 26 


" It thaws — we must be off to Melton ' 




H. Aiken 


... 16 


Italian Greyhound 




H. B. Chalon 


... 88 


Italian Greyhound 




T. Gooch 


... 209 


Italian Sheep Dog 




A. Cooper, R.A. ... 


... 118 


" It's an ill wind that blows nobody good "... 


H. Aiken 


... 62 



"Jack," a hunter 

Jack-fishing 

Jack-in-the-box 

"Jack Spigot," winner of the Doncaster ... 

"Jane," a lady's donkey 

Jefferies, Earth stopper to the Berkeley 

Hounds 
"Jim Crow," a spaniel 

Jockey and his Hack 

"JohnComyn" 

John Shirley, a huntsman 

John Winter, a huntsman 

" Joy " (Passions of the Horse) 

"Joy" 

Julian Peveril compels Chiffinch to restore 

the Stolen Papers 

"Juno" 

"Jupiter" 

"Jupiter" 



A. Cooper, R.A.,lSi9, 1837. 
H. Aiken 


..116, 118 
... 2O 


A. Cooper, R.A 

David Dalby 

A. Cooper, R.A 


... U7 

••. 133 
... 117 


E. Bristowe 


... So 


H. B. Chalon 


... 90 


W. B.irraud 


... 55 


A. Cooper, R.A. ... 

R. B. Davis 


... 119 
... 143 


J. E. Ferneley 

H. B. Chalon 


... 173 
83,90 


A. Cooper, R.A. 


... 119 


W. Barraud 


... 54 


A. Cooper, R.A., 1S35 ... 
J. E. Ferneley 


iiS, 113 

... 172 


S. Gilpin, R.A 


197, 200 



Keep at Arundel, The 
" Keeper's come. Sir " 
Kew, Mr., and his Horse 

Kjlligrew, Thumas 

Killing Fly, A ... 
King's Harriers, The ... 
King WiUi.am III., Lord Conini 
Knight in Armour, A... 



;sby 



II. Barraud 


58 


W. Barraud 


58 


A. Cooper, R.A. ... 


116 


VVilliana Shepard 


40 


A. Cooper, R.A. ... 


'^3 


R. B. Davis 


139, 146 


A. Cooper, R.A. ... 


"7 


H. Aiken 


25 



' LaPucelle" ... 
' La Vivandi^re ' 



A. Cooper, R.A. 
A. Cooptr, R.A. 



119 
119 



234 



INDEX 



Lady at Egham Races 

Lady, bust of ...George G 

Lady on a trotting Mare, portrait of... 

Lady's Horse, ponies, spaniel 

Lady's Lap-dog 

Lambton Hounds at Feeding Time, The 

Landscape, A ... 

Landscape, A ... 

Landscape, A ... 

Landscape, A ... 

Landscape with Cattle 

Landscape with Cattle 

Landscape wiih Cattle 

Landscape with Figures 

Landscape with Horses 

Landscapes ... ... 

Laplanders and Reindeer 

Large Ox ... 

" Lark," a famous mare 
Lascelles, Miss, bust of 
Last Resource, The ... 

" Last Scene of all ! " 

Last Stake, The 

Last State of the Coach Horse, The 

Last Supper, The 

" Laugh at him if you will " 

" Launcelot " ... 

Launching the Lifeboat 

" Lavender," a greyhound ... 

" Lavinia," a pug 

" Lear," a celebrated retriever 

Leatherhead 

Leicestershire Steeplechase, The 

" Leopard," a dray-horse 

Leopards and Lynxes 

Lesson in Mendicity, A 

" Let's keep the Lead " 

" Lets take the Lead " 

Lewis, Master ... 

" Lex Talionis " 

" Liberator, The," a hunter ... 

Life Guards, The 

" Life of a Racehorse " 

Life and Death of a Racehorse 

(i) When a Foal with his Dam 

(2) WTien a Colt Breaking 

(3) After Running a Race and Winning 

(4) As a Hunter going out to the Chase 

(5) As a Postchaise Horse, on the Road 

(6) His Dissolution 





PAGE 


... R. B. Da\-is 


... 149 


rrard, A.R.A., 1806, 1807. 1S26. 


.187, 1S9 


... T. Gooch 


... 209 


... H. B. Chalon 


... 89 


... T. Gooch 


... 209 


... John E. Femeley 


167, 173 


... B. Blake 


... 67 


... Tohn Boultbee 


69. 74 


... C. Collins 


... 102 


... R. B. Davis 


138, 148 


... H. B. Chalon 


82, 88 


... R. B. Davis 


... 148 


... S. Gilpin, R.A 


... 203 


... B.Blake 


64,67 


... H. B. Chalon 


82, 88 


... T. Boultbee 


••• 73 


... A. Cooper, R.A. 


... 121 


... J. Best 


... 61 


... John E. Femeley 


... 165 


... Geo. Garrard, R.A. 


... 188 


... W. and H. Barraud 


50. 59 


... H. Aiken 


24 


... W. and H. Barraud 


50, 59 


... T. Gooch 


205, 209 


... S. Elmer, A.R.A. 


••• 153 


... H. Aiken 


... 26 


A. Cooper, R.A., 1840, 1S41 . 


..125, 118 


... LukeCIennell 


... lOI 


...J. Barenger 


•• 39 


... H. B. Chalon 


.. 89 


... David Dalby 


- 13s 


... J. E. Femeley 


■•■ 173 


... H. Aiken 


9 


... A. Cooper, R.A. 


... 116 


... F. Barlow 


... 44 


... A. Cooper, R.A 


... 120 


... H. Aiken 


... 26 


... H. Aiken 


... 26 


... A. Cooper, R.A 


... 119 


... A. Cooper, R.A 


... 118 


... A. Cooper, R.A 


... 117 


... A. Cooper, R.A. 


... 119 


... T. Gooch 


207, 208 


. T. Gooch 


... 207 



Lime Works at Purfleet, The 

Lion, Lioness and Whelps, bas relief 

Litter of Foxes 

Little Bill 



Geo. Garrard, A. R.A. ... ... 187 

Geo. Garrard, A.R.A 187 

S. Gilpin, R..\, 198,203 

H. Aiken 26 



INDEX 



235 







PAGE 


Little Mare and Kitty 


... H. B. Chalon ... 


90 


"Little Wonder" 


... A. Cooper, R.A 


125 


Lobby of the House of Commons in 


1S72, 




The 


... H. Barraud 


57 


Logan Stone, The 


... Luke Clennell 


lOI 


London Season, The 


... H. Barraud 


57 


"Loo Loo" 


... T- Bareni;er 


38 


" Lop," a celebrated hunter 


... R. B. Davis 


150 


Lord Frederic Fitzclarence 


... R. B. Davis 


149 


Lord flarewood's Hunt, The Meet, 


Full 




Cry, The Death 


... David Dalby 


135 


Lord Kintore's Keeper Shooting Roedeer ... J. E. Ferneley 


172 


Lord Lascelles, bust of 


... Geo. Garrard, A.R.A. . 


18S 


Lord Marmion's Charger 


... \V. Barraud 


54 


Lord Somerville, bust of 


... Geo. Garrard, A.R.A, . 


187 


Lord's Cricket Ground 


... H. Barraud 


57 


" Lorilda," a hackney 


... A. Cooper, R.A 


116 


Lost Shoe, The 


... A. Cooper, R.A 


123 


Luncheon, A 


... B.Blake 


67 


Lurcher and Dead Fox 


... S. Elmer, A.R.A. 


157 


" Luxury," a hound 


... R. B. Davis 


144.15' 


" Madcap," a hunter ... 


H 

... A. Cooper, R.A 


120 


" Major," a charger ... 


... H. B. Chalon 


89 


Major-General Skipper's Troops of Horse 




capturing the King's Guns, &c. ... 


... A. Cooper, R.A 


I20 


"Make Ready!" 


... A. Cooper, R.A 


124 


Mallard and French Spame 


... Stephen Elmer, A.R.A.. 


154,15s 


Maltese Ass ... ... 


... H. B. Chalon ... 


88,91 


Mambrino's Helmet .. 


... A. Cooper, R.A 


"9 


Mameluke, A. ... 


... H. Aiken 


26 


Mameluke, A. ... 


... R. B. Davis 


149 


" Mammoth" 


... H. B. Chalon 


89 


Man and Dray-horse 


... H. B. Chalon ... 


88 


Man in Armour 


... H. Aiken 


26 


Mandarin Drake 


... Stephen Elmer, A.R.A.. 


«58 


" Mango," winner of the St. Leger ... 


.A.. Cooper, R.A., 1S37, 1S3S.. 


.109, nS, 115 


" Mango," winner of the St. Leger ... 


... D. Dalby 


134 


Manorial Rights 


... A. Cooper, R.A 


123 


Mansion in process of construction ... 


... S. Gilpin, R.A 


202 


Mare, A 


... H. B. Chalon ... 


88 


Mare, A 


... R. B. Davis 


'49 


Mare, A 


... Geo. Garrard, A.R.A. . 


187 


Mare and Colt 


... S. Gilpin, R..A 


203 


Mare and Dog 


... H. B. Chalon ... 


88 


Mare and Foal... 


... J. Barenger 


38. 39 


" Marengo," a white charger 


... J. Barenger 


39 


Mares and Foals 


... F. Barlow... 


45 


Mares and Foals 


... \V. Barraud 


54 


Mares and Foals 


... Geo. Garrard, A.R.A. . 


1S6, 187 


Mares and Foals 


... S. Gilpin, R.A. ... 


.. 203 


Mares and Foals at the Royal Stud ... 


... R. B. Davis 


13S, 148 



236 



INDEX 



Mares and Foals from the Prince of Wales' 

Stud 

" Maria," a racehorse... 

"Mark!" 

"Mark ! Cock !" 

Market Day 

Marmozel Alonkeys, Group of 

" Mary Owen" 

Mary Queen of Scots meeting the Earl of 

Eothwell 

Master Beresford Lowndes, with Pony 

and Dogs ... ... 

" Mat o' the Mint " 

" Mazeppa " 
Mealfourvoine Trout, A 

Medallion of a Lady 

Medallion of the Duke and Duchess of 

Bedford 

Medallion of Tom Cribb 
Meet at Ashby Pasture, The... 

Meet at Crick, The 

Meet of Her Majesty's Staghounds ... 
Meet at Kirby Gale, The 
Meet of the Owl Hounds, The 

Meet of the Owl Hounds, The 

Meet, The 

Meeting in a Stone Quarry ... 

Meeting of the Keepers of Sir Julian E. 

Swinburne 
" Mellow," a horse 
Member of the Surrey Hunt, on his Hackney, 

riding to Cover 

Men in Armour ... 

Merino Sheep ... 

"Merry" 

" Middleton " 

Milking Time 

Mills, J., portrait of .. 

" Minos," abound 

Minstrels of the Fifteenth Century 

"Minuet" ' 

Mischievous Boy, The 

Miser, The 

" Miss Turner," a mare 

Misses Robarts on their favourite Horses, 

The 

" Mocking-bird," a greyhound 

Model for a Lion 

Model for Equestrian Statue ... 

Model for Equestrian Statue of Sir John 

Moore 
Models for busts, by George Garrard, A.R.A.. 

W.Adam 

Artist 



Geo. Garrard, A.R.A. ... 


... i86 


J. Barenger 


••• 39 


H. Aiken 


24 


A. Cooper, R.A 


... 123 


A. Cooper, R.A 


... 124 


Geo. Garrard, A.R.A. ... 


... 186 


H. B. Chalon 


... 88 


A. Cooper, R.A. ... 


... 117 


H. Barraud 


... S8 


T. Barenger 


39 


R. B. Davis 


... 148 


A. Cooper, R.A. ... 


... 125 


Geo. Garrard, A.R.A. ... 


... 188 


Geo. Garrard, A.R.A. ... 


... 188 


Geo. Garrard, A.R.A. ... 


... 188 


H. Aiken 


10 


W. and H. Barraud 


... 50 


R. B. Davis 


... 151 


|. E. Ferneley 


.. 163 


"H. Aiken 


24 


"Wildrake" 


14 


H. Aiken 


13, 25, 26 


H. Aiken 


... 25 


A. Cooper, R.A 


... 119 


H. B. Chalon 


... 89 


S. Aiken 


■•■ 33 


H. Aiken 


... 26 


J. Barenger 


... 36 


A. Cooper. R.A. ... 


... 120 


R. B. Davis 


... 149 


A. D. Cooper 


... 128 


J. E. Ferneley 


... 172 


R. B. Davis 


... 149 


H. Barraud 


... 58 


A. Cooper, R.A 


... 121 


H. B. Chalon 


90 


S. Elmer, A.R.A. 


••• 153 


A. Cooper, R.A 


... 122 


H. Barraud 


59 


A. Cooper, R.A ' 


119, 122 


George Garrard, A.R.A. 


... 188 


George Garrard, A.R.A. 


... 187 


George Garrard, A.R.A. 


... 188 


.. of :- 






... 188 




... 188 



INDEX 

Models for busts, by George Garrard, A. R.A., of : — 

H. Ashby 

K. B. Banks 

Mr. Gift 

Rev. T. Fry, M.A 

Gentleman 

V. Green, A. E 

D. S. Jackson 

Lady, i8oS, 1809 

Lady, 1811 

Master Lane Fox 

Miss Lane Fox ... ... 

Mrs. Lane Fox 

Mr. Pugett 

H. Repton 

R. B. Sheridan 

Rt. Hon. Sir J. Sinclair... ... 

General Tarleton 

Capt. Thomson ... 

T. Tomkins 

W. Wilberforce, M.P 

Lady Young 
Models (or statues, by George Garrard, A.R.A., of: — 

His Majesty ... ... ... 

Rt. Hon. William Pitt 

Models by George Garrard, A. R.A. , of: — 

Bull 

Bull Bitch 

Bull Calf 

"Comet" 

Cow 

Cow and Calf 

Favourite Dogs, property of Mrs. Baker 

Pointer ... 

Stag 

" Modern Scarlets " J. E. Ferneley 

" Monck," portrait of ... ... Francis Barlow 

Montrose routed at Philiphaugh, &c. ... A. Cooper, R.A. 

" Moorhen, The " A. Cooper, R.A. 

Moore, Sir John, statue of Geo. Garrard, A. 

Moors, The ... \V. Barraud 

" Morelli," a race-horse H. B. Chalon 

Morning Meal, The A. Cooper, R.A. 

Morning of First of September A. Cooper, R.A. 

Morning Ride, A A. Cooper, R.A. 

" Moses," a race-horse ... ... ... R. B.Davis 

Mother and Child, A H. Barraud 

Mountain Dew, The A. Cooper, R.A. 

Mountain Landscape with Cattle and figures S. Gilpin, R.A. 

Mountain Pass, The A. Cooper, R.A. 

Mule Pheasant A. Cooper, R.A. 

" Muley," a horse J. Barenger 

Mutual Surprise, A A. D. Cooper 

My Arab Steed A. Cooper, R.A. 



R.A. 



FAGS 

187 

. 187 

. 188 

. 187 

. 188 

. 187 

. 1S7 

. 187 

. 1S8 

. 189 

. 189 

. 189 

. 187 

. 187 

. 188 

. 1S8 

. 188 

. 187 

. 187 

. 187 

. 188 

. 188 

. 187 

. 187 



... 1S8 

179. 1S7 

... 187 

... 188 

... 187 

... 187 

... 16S 

... 43 

... 1 20 

... 125 

... 184 

... 54 

... 85 

... 123 

... 121 

... 116 

140, 149 
58 

... 123 

... 202 

... 123 

... 124 

■• 39 

.. 12S 

... 120 



238 



INDEX 



" My dear Sir," &c. ... 

" My Father's favourite Mare " 
My Lady's Hobby 

"My own Grey" 

" My soul's on fire and eager for the field"... 

N 

Native Dog in New South Wales 

Nature displayed in the Animal and Feathered 
Species 

" Ne exeat " ... 

Near the Banks of Loch Laggan, Inverness- 
shire 

Near Virginia Water ... 

Nearly ready to Start 

Neasden Harriers, The 

" Nelson," a greyhound 

" Nelson," Newfoundland dog 

" Nessus and Dejanira " 

" Newbiggin," a greyhound 

Newcastle Ferry 

Newfoundland ... 

Newfoundland... 

Newfoundland ... 

Newfoundland ... 

Newland, A., bust of 

Newmarket Tout, The 

Nilgaw Antelope, model 

Nineteenth June, l8i 5, The 

Nobleman and Servant on two fast-trotting 
Hacks 

Nobleinan on a Managed Horse, portrait 
of a 

Non-effectives 

Noontide Rest ... 

Norman as Don Quixote in the Panto- 
mime, &c.... 

Norway Elk pursued by Wolves, A... 

" Nosegay," a brood bitch ... 

O 

Oakley Hunt, The 

Oasis, The 

October 

October's Own 

Officer's Charger, 7th Hussars 

Old Carriage Horse, An 

Old Carriage Horses in His Late Majesty's 

stud at Windsor 

Old Charger, portrait of 

Old Coach Horse, An 

Old English Setter 





PAGE 


H. Aiken 


25 


A. Cooper, R.A 


... 118 


A. Cooper, R.A. ... 


... 124 


A. Cooper, R.A 


... 120 


H. Aiken 


... 17 


A. Cooper, R.A 


117, 122 


Francis Barlow 


... 41 


A. Cooper, R.A — 


... 123 


R. B. Davis 


... 149 


R. B. Davis 


... 148 


H. Aiken 


... 26 


W. Barraud 


•■• 55 


A. Cooper, R.A. ... 


... I2S 


H. B. Chalon 


... 89 


Geo. Garrard, A.R.A. .. 


... 187 


A. Cooper, R.A 


... 123 


LukeClennell 


... lOI 


H.B. Chalon 


... 90 


St. Elmer, A.R.A. 


... 158 


Geo. Garrard, A.R.A. .. 


... 186 


T. Gooch 


. . . 209 


Geo. Garrard, A.R.A. .. 


.. 187 


R. B. Davis 


... 150 


Geo. Garrard, A.R.A. .. 


... IS7 


A. Cooper, R.A — 


.. 118 


H. B. Chalon 


... 89 


T. Gooch 


... 208 


H. Aiken 


... 17 


H. Aiken 


... 27 


Edmund Bristowe 


... 80 


Geo. Garrard, A.R.A. . 


183, 187 


J. Barenger 


■■ 39 


H. Aiken 


10 


A. Cooper, R.A 


... 119 


H. Aiken 


... 24 


A. Cooper. R.A 


... 122 


H. B. Chalon 


... 89 


R. B. Davis 


... 149 


R. B. Davis 


... 148 


T. Boultbee 


... 74 


R. B. Davis 


... 149 


H. B. Chalon 


87,88 



INDEX 

Old English Springer 

Old Fisherman, The 

Old Friends 

Old Gig Horse, An 

Old Hackney, An 

Old Horse, An 

Old Horse, portrait of, An 

Old Horse, portrait of. An ... 

Old Hunter, portrait of. An ... 

Old Hunter, portrait of, An 

Old Hunter 

Old Hunter 

Old Hunter 

Old Pack-horse, portrait of an 

On the Bank of Loch Ness 

On the Brighton Line... 

On the Moors 

On the Rein ... 

On the Ripple ... 

Once More Upon the Moors... 

"One of These" 

Opening Day, The ... 

Opposition Coaches with and without Bear- 
ing Reins ... 

" Orelio," a celebrated Arabian 

Oriental Horsemen 

Original Designs for Ideas ... 

Ornaments on the Bench 

" Orville," Prince of Wales' horse ... 

Ostriches 

Otter-hound 

Otler-hunling ... 

Olter-hunling ... 

Over the Open 

Overthrow of the French Army at the 
Battle of Waterloo, The 

O.t, portrait of an 

" Oxygen," a brown mare 



" Paddy," a setter 

" Painter," a retriever 

Painter and his Models 

" Pandora," a fine hunter 

" Parasol," a race horse 

Parish Clerk, The, Saturday Evening 

Park Palings ... 

Park Scene, at Wilham 

Park Scene with Hunters 

Parkhurst, John, Portrait of ... 

" Partisan," a bay horse 

Partridge Shooting, September 

Partridge Shooting 



239 





PAGE 


H. B. Chalon 


91 


Luke Clennell 


... lOI 


R. B. Davis 


... 149 


R. B. Davis 


... 148 


W. Barraud 


54 


R. B. Davis 


... 149 


Thomas Gooch, 1782 .. 


... 208 


Thomas Gooch, 1786 


... 209 


W. Barraud 


54 


R. B. Davis, 1S06, 1S21, 


1S22... 148 


T. Boullbee 


74 


H. B. Chalon 


90 


S. Gilpin, R.A 


203 


T. Gooch 


209 


A. Cooper, R.A 


120 


A. Cooper, R.A.... 


124 


H. Aiken 


26 


A. Cooper, R.A 


124 


A. Cooper, R.A 


124 


W. Barraud 


55 


A. Cooper, R.A. ... 


119 


A. Cooper, R.A 


123 


H. Aiken 


25 


J. E. Ferneley 


173 


H. Aiken 


25 


H. Alkcn 


26 


R. B. Davis 


150 


H. B. Chalon ... 


85, 88 


H. B. Chalon 


89 


H. B. Chalon ... 


91 


H. Aiken 


25 


S. Aiken 


33 


R. B. Davis 


150 


Luke Clennell ... 


9S 


T. Gooch 


206, 209 


A. Cooper, R.A 


'2S 


A. Cooper, R.A. ... 


n6, 120 


A. Cooper, R.A 


"7 


A. Cooper, R.A 


120 


J. Barenger 


39 


J. Barenger 


39 


E. Bristowe 


80 


H. Aiken 


26 


Geo. Garrard, A. R.A. 


187 


Geo. Garrard, A. R.A. 


186 


S. Gilpin, R.A. ... 


>96 


A. Cooper, R.A. ... 


... 1.6,121 


R. B. Davis 


142 


H. Aiken 


27 



240 

Partridge Shooting 
Partridge Shooting 
Partridge Shooting 
Partridge Stalking 
Partridges 
Partridges 



INDEX 



S. Aiken .,, 
H. B. Chalon 
A. Cooper, R. A. 
F. Barlow... 
J. Barenger 
A. Cooper, R.A.. 



Partridges Stephen Elmer, A.R.A., 1774, 1777, 17S3, 1784, 1789. I 
Partridges and Snipe ... ... ., ^ . 

Partridges basking in the Sun 
Passions of the Horse, The ... 
" Patch," a pony 
" Pavilion," a racehorse 

Payne, Philip, portrait of 

Peacock 

Peasant attacked by Wolves, A 

Peat Cart, The 

Pedlars, The 

Pegasus at the Fountain of Hippocrene, &c, 

" Penelope," a bay mare 

Pensioners, The ... 

" Penseroso," a stallion 

Perch 

Perch 

" Perdrix Borealis " ... 

Persian Horses and Spani.sh Sheep Dog 

Persian Mare ... 

Pfeil, A. L., portrait of 

Pheasant and Brace of Partridges ... 

Pheasant and Woodcocks 

Pheasant Shooting 

Pheasant Shooting 

Pheasant Shooting 

Pheasant Shooting 

Pheasant Shooting 



F. Barlow 

Stephen Elmer, A.R.A. 

H. B. Chalon ... 

H. B. Chalon 

H. B. Chalon 

R. B. Davis 

Stephen Elmer, A.R.A. 

Geo. Garrard, A.R.A. 

A. Cooper, R.A. 

Luke Clennell 

S. Gilpin, R.A. 

A. Cooper, R.A. 

E. Eristowe 

John Boultbee 

A. Cooper, R.A. 

Stephen Elmer, A.R.A. 

A. Cooper, R.A. 

Geo. Garrard, A.R.A. 

H. B. Chalon ... 

A. Cooper, R.A.... 

... J. Barenger 

Stephen Elmer, A.R.A. 

H. Aiken 

S. Aiken 

... E. Bristowe 
A. Cooper, R.A., 1825, 1832, 1858 
R. B. Davis 



Pheasant Shooting in Swinley Park R.B.Davis 

Pheasants J. Barenger 

Pheasants...Stephen Elmer, A.R.A., 1772, 1774, 1784^1785,1789,1790, 



" Phoebe," spaniel 
" Phosphorus" 

Pig Slicking ... ... 

" Pigeon," an Arabian 

Pigeon Shooting 

Pigeon Shooting 

Pigeons, Plover and Parrot on a bough 

"Pike, The" 

" Pilgrim," A hunter ... 

" Pilot and Midge " 

" Pincher," a terrier ... 

" Piiicher," a terrier ... 

" Pincher and Shivers," terriers 

" Piper," a celebrated greyhound ... 

Pitt, The late Rt. Hon. W., bust of 

" Pittites, but no Tories " 

Plato 



H. B. Chalon 

A. Cooper, R.A. ... 

H. Aiken 

PI. B. Chalon 

H. Aiken 

S. Aiken, 

Luke Cradock 

A. Cooper, R.A. .. 

A. Cooper, R.A 

A. Cooper, R.A.... 
H. B. Chalon ... 
A. Cooper, R.A. ... 
H. B. Chalon 
Samuel Aiken 
George Garrard, A.R.A, 

H. Aiken 

W. Barraud 



PAGE 

32,33 

... 90 

... 124 

... 45 

■■ 39 

... 125 

794. ..157, 158 

... 45 

■■ 155 

... 83 

... 90 

... 84 

... 138 

... 158 

1S3, 187 

119 

... lOI 

... 192 

.,. 121 

... 75 

69, 74 

125 

... 158 

122 

... 188 

... 89 

... 118 

■ 39 

... 15S 

5, 25, 26, 27 

32, 33 

... 78 

[22, 124, 119 
... 142 
... 151 

37, 38, 39 

155.157- 158 

... 89 

... 125 

... 25 

... 89 

... 26 

•■. 33 

... 130 

.. 125 

... 116 

.. 119 

... 90 
1 20 

... 91 

.. 33 

.,. 1S7 

... 24 

... 54 



INDEX 



"Plenipotentiary," Winner of tiie DeVby, 

1834 

Poacher, Tlie 

Poacher Detected 

Poachers 

Poachers and Poached 

Pointer 
Pointer 
Pointer 

Pointers 

Pointers (2) 

Pointers (i) 

Pointers going out with Sportsmen 

Poison ... 
Politician, A 



A. Cooper, R.A.... 

PI. Aiken 

A. Cooper, R.A. ... 
A. Cooper, R.A. ... 

H. Aiken 

li. B. Chalon ... 
S. Elmer, A.R.A. 
Thomas Gooch ... 

H. Aiken 

W. Barraud 
J. Barenger 
J. Barenger 

H. Aiken 

Stephen Elmer, A.R.A. 



' Polydora, with Sister to Pandora at Foot " H. Barraud 



Pomeranian Dog 
Pomeranian Dog 
Pony 
Pony 

Pony 

Pony 

Pony and Boy 

Pony and Dog ... 

Pony and Dog 

Pony and Sporting Dogs 

Poodle and Scotch Terrier 

Poor Man and his distressed Horse ... 

" Pop," a pointer 

Pope's Mules at the Fountain of Trevi, Tlie 

Portraits 

Portraits 

Portraits 

Portraits of all the horses and jockeys en 

gaged in the Derby Stakes 

Portraits of Artist 

Portrait of Bull-dog 

Portraits of Coach-horse 

Portraits of Curricle horses ... 

Portrait of Davis, Mr., Huntsman to Her 

Majesty, on his favourite horse, with 

hounds 



H. B. Chalon ... 

Thomas Gooch ... 

T. Barenger 

"H. B. Chalon ... 

A. Cooper, R.A.... 

R. B. Davis 

W. Barraud 

]. Barenger 

George Garrard, A.R.. 

H. B. Chalon ... 

H. B. Chalon 

A. Cooper, R.A. ... 

A. Cooper, R.A 

W. Barraud 
H. Barraud 
W. Barraud 
A. Cooper, R.A 

A. Cooper, R.A.... 

B. Blake 

George Garrard, -V.R.^ 
George Garrard, A. R.^ 
J. Barenger 



241 
TAGI! 

118 

24 
122 
121 

27 

87 

157 

209 

26 

54 

38.39 

36 

25 

158 
58 
88 

209 

39 

90 

116 

148 
54 
36 

186 
90 



... 117 
ti8, 125 



153 



117 



54 
58 
54 

119 



W. and H. Barraud 



Portraits of Dogs by 



Portraits of Famous Fighting Dog 
Portraits of Fox-hunter and his hounds 
Portrait of P'riezeland Mare ... 
Portrait of a Gentleman 
Portrait of Gentleman and Grey Horse 
Portrait of Gentleman and his Horse 
Portrait of Gentleman and his Horse 

Portrait of Gentleman and Pony 

Portrait of Gentleman with His Majesty's 

Hunt 

Portrait of a Horse 

i6 



George Garrard, A.R.A., 17S3, 1788 

A 



H. B. Chalon 

H. Aiken . 

George Garrard, A.K.I 

A. Cooper, R.A 

Geo. Garrard, A.R.A. 
J. E. Ferneley 
Geo. Garrard, A.R.A. 
Geo. Garrard, A.R.A. 

R. B. Davis 
J. Barenger 



,. iiS 
.64,67 
.. 186 
. 187 

. 38 



...50,59 
t86, 186 
... 86 
...18,24 
... 186 
... 117 
... 186 
... 172 
... 186 
... 186 



149 

83 



242 



INDEX 



.Geo. Garrard, A.R.A 



Portrait of a Horse 

Portrait of a Horse 

Portrait of a Horse 

Portrait of a Horse 

Portrait of Horse and Dog ... 

Portrait of Horse belonging to His Majesty... 

Portrait of Horse in Miniature 

Portrait of Horses 

Portrait of Horses 

Portrait of Horses 

Portrait of Horses 

Portrait of Hunter .. ... 

Portrait of Hunter 

Portrait of Hunter 

Portrait of Hunter and Groom 
Portrait of Irish Water Spaniel 

Portrait of Jockey, A 

Portrait of Lady in the 104th year of her age... 

Portrait of Mare, A 

Portrait of Mare, A 

Portrait of Meltonian ... 

Portraits of Men Employed in the Nursery 

Gardens .at Slough 
Portrait of Nobleman, &c. 

Portrait of Old Suffolk Horse 

Portrait of Phenomena 
Portrait of Pony, A ... 

Portrait of Pug Dog, A 

Portrait of Race-horse, A 
Portrait of Race-horse, A ... 

Portrait of Three Hunters 

Portrait of Warwick.shire O.K... 

Post Boy, A 

Post-Haste 

Post-horse, The 

Pot-8-os, a famous race-horse 

Poultry ... ... 

Poultry, a Stork, a Passage-boat on a 

Canal, &c. 
Poultry attacked by a Hawk 

Preliminary Canter, A 

Press Gang, The 

Pride of the Desert, The 

Prince Hoare, Esq., bust of ... 

" Prince Leopold," a race-horse 

Prince Rupert routing the Besiegers at 

Newark 

Princess Charlotte, Il.R.II., bust of 

Private Box 

Progress of the Riding School, The... 
Proportions of an Arabian, or quite a New 

System 

" Prosper," a hunter ... ... 







"AGE 


J. E. Ferneley 




172 


., 1790, 1793, 1800, 1S26. 


'186,187 


189 


S. Gilpin, R.A. ... 




203 


Thos. Gooch 


205 


209 


Geo. Garrard, A.R.A, . 




1S6 


S. Gilpin, R.A 


194 


203 


Geo. Garrard, A.R.A. . 




1 86 


PI. Barraud 




58 


John Boultbee 




74 


Geo. Garrard, A.R.A. 


,' 1788; 




1789, 1790, 1795, ! 797, I 


300...186 


1S7 


S.Gilpin, R.A 




203 


E. Bristowe 




80 


R. B. Davis 




148 


J. E. Ferneley ... 




172 


J. E. Ferneley ... 




172 


H. B. Chalon ... 




82 


A. Cooper, R.A. ... 




116 


II. Barraud 




58 


J. Barenger 




38 


Geo. Garrard, A.R.A. . 




186 


J. E. Ferneley ... 




172 


E. Bristowe 




80 


Geo. Garrard, A.R.A. . 




186 


Geo. Garrard, A.R.A. . 




186 


J. Barenger 




38 


Geo. Garrard, A.R.A. . 




187 


]. Barenger 




38 


"R. B. Davis 




148 


Geo. Garrard, A.R.A. . 




186 


J. E. Ferneley 




172 


J. Best 




61 


H. Aiken 




23 


A. Cooper, R.A. ... 




119 


Thomas Gooch ... 




209 


S. Gilpin, R.A 




197 


Charles Collins ... 




102 


Luke Cradock 




130 


Luke Cradock 




130 


H. Aiken 




29 


Luke Clcnnell ... 




lOI 


A. Cooper, R.A. ... 




120 


Geo. Garrard, A.R.A. . 




188 


H. B. Chalon 




89 


A. Cooper, R.A 


loS, 


118 


Geo. Garrard, A.R.A. . 




188 


A. Cooper, R.A. ... 




124 


T. Gooch 




209 


II. B. Chalon ... 




84 


J, Barenger 




39 



INDEX 



" Prudence," a brown mare 
Ptannigan, a white grouse 
" Pussy," a brown mare 
Pyramid, The 



J. Barenger 
A. Cooper, R.A.. 
A. Cooper, R.A. , 
A. Cooper, R.A. 



PACE 

39 
125 

125 

123 



Q 



Quarrelsome Companions 
Quarry, The 

Quiet Pipe, A 

" Quiz," a race horse ... 
Quorn at Quenby in 1823, The 
Quorn Hunt 
Quorn Hunt 



A. D. Cooper 
A. Cooper, R.A., 
A. Cooper, R.A.. 
II. B. Chalon 
J. E. Fcrneley 
II. Aiken ... 
J. E. Ferneley 



162, 



128 
123 
■23 

84 
163 

10 
165 



R 



Rabbit Shooting ... 

Raby Paclv, The 

Race for the .St. Leger in 1851 
Race-horse, The 
Race-horse, The 

Race-horses— exercising 

Race-horses — mounting 

Race-horses — preparing for second heat 

Race-horses — saddling 

Race-horses — winning 

Racer, portrait of a 

Racing 

Racing ... 

Racing at Florence 

Racing, the Starting Post 

Rage with Agony (Passions of the Horse) 
" Rallywood," a celebrated foxhound 
" Rampion," a hunter 

"Rapid" 

Rare Good One at Timber 

Rat-hunting 

Ratcatcher with Favourite Terriers ... 

Rat trap. The 

" Rather too much down " 

" Rather too much up " 

Rattle and Clinker 

" Ready," a spaniel 

Real Thing, The 

Red Deer 

Red Deer 

Red Game 

Red Grouse 

Red Grouse 

Red-headed Widgeon 

Refraction 



.. A. Cooper, R.A 


124, 125 


.. II. B. Chalon 


... 85 


.. II. Aiken 


19,24 


.. H. B. Ch.alon 


... 89 


.. T. Gooch 


... 209 


.. S. Aiken 


33 


.. S. Aiken ., 


- 33 


.. S. Aiken 


• 33 


.. S. Aiken 


- 33 


.. S. Aiken 


••■ 33 


.. R. B. Davis 


... 148 


.. J. Barenger 


... 36 


.. A. Cooper, R.A 


124, 125 


.. II. Aiken 


... 24 


.. A. Cooper, R.A 


... 124 


... H. E. Chalon 


S3- 90 


,. J. E. Ferneley 


••• 173 


.. A. Cooper, R.A 


... 118 


.. A. Cooper, R.A 


... 118 


.. H. Aiken 


... 26 


.. S. Aiken 


•■• 33 


,. II. B. Chalon 


... 90 


... A. Cooper, R.A 


... 121 


... H. Aiken 


... 25 


.. H. Aiken 


... 25 


,.. S. Aiken 


•■• 33 


.. A. Cooper, R.A 


... 126 


... II. Aiken 


... 26 


... A. Cooper, R.A 


... 119 


... Geo. Garrard, A.R.A. ... 


... 186 


... Stephen Elmer, A.R.A... . 


... 156 


... A. Cooper, R.A 


... 125 


... S. Elmer, A.R.A. 


... 155 


... A. Cooper, R.A 


... 123 


... A. Cooper, R.A 


119, 126 



244 



INDEX 



Refreshing 

Reindeer 

Repulse of the Cossacks by the 93ril 
Rest, and be Thankful, The 
" Retreat from Naseby, The " 
" Retriever," a deer-hound ... 
Return from the Derby 
Return Home, The ... 
Returned from the Crimea ... 
Returning from Deer-stalking 
Returning from Deer-stalking 

" Rhoda," a race-horse 

Rich Scene, and such as no other Country 

can Exhibit, A 

" Richard," a brown horse ... 

Richard Cceur de Lion, Reviewing the 

Crusaders in Palestine ... 
Richard I. unhorsing Saladin 
Richard III. at Bosworth 
Riding in a Storm 
Rigging Him Out 

Right and Left ... 

" Ringwood " ... 

River Scene, A 

Roadster, A ... 

Roadster's Album, The 
Robert Bruce and the Spider... 

Roberts, A. W. 

Robertson's Little Wonder, Mr. 
Robin Hood and Zoe... 

Roe Deer ... ... ... 

Roebuck 

Roebuck Shooting 
" Rose," a terrier 
" Rose and Crib " 
Rough Customer, A ... 

Rough Lot, A 

Rounding on Spankaway, Mr. T 

Rout at Marston Moor, The 

" Roxton," a hunter ... 
Royal Hunt, The 

Royal Hunt, The 

Royalist Family taken by the Puritans, A ... 
" Rubens," a hunter ... 

"Rufus" 

"Rufus" 

Runaway Coach, A 

Running 

Rupert's Standard at Marston Moor 
Russell, W., portr.iit of 



" Saft an' Shyly " 

" Sailor," a retriever .. 





PACE 


H. Aiken 


IS 


Geo. Garrard, A.R.A. .. 


. ... 187 


A. Cooper, R.A 


"9 


A. Cooper, R.A 


... 124 


A. Cooper, R.A 


108,117 


A, Cooper, R..'\ 


125 


H. Aiken 


25 


H. Aiken 


25 


A. Cooper, R.A. ... 


"9 


A. Cooper, R.A., 1S44 ., 


iiS 


A. Cooper, R.A., 1849 . 


"9 


A. Cooper, R.A. ... 


117, 121 


H. Aiken 


9 


A. Cooper, R.A 


122 


A. Cooper, R.A 


.. 118 


A. Cooper, R.A.... 


"7 


John Boultbee 


73 


Luke Clennell 


97. 100 


R. B. Davis 


ISO 


A. Cooper, R.A 


123 


A. Cooper, R.A. ... 


113 


Luke Clennell ... 


IQI 


H. Aiken 


26 


11. Aiken 


2S 


H. Barraud 


58 


II. Barraud 


59 


A. Cooper, R.A 


118 


A. Cooper, R.A — 


120 


A. Cooper, R.A 


I2S 


A. Cooper, R.A. ... 


113 


A. Cooper, R.A 


125 


II. B. Chalon ... 


89 


A. Cooper, R.A 


116 


II. Barraud 


58 


W. Barraud 


55 


A. Cooper, R.A 


117 


A. Cooper, R.A 


"9 


A. Cooper, R.A 


118 


H. B. Chalon ... 


89 


R.B.Davis 


145, 146, 149 


\V. & H. Barraud 


SO. S9 


J. Barenger 


36, 39 


J. Barenger 


39 


W. Barraud 


54 


H. Aiken 


25 


II. Aiken 


26 


A. Cooper, R.A 


107, 117 


J. E. Ferneley 


172 


A. Cooper, R.A 


123 


A. Cooper, R.A 


iiS 



INDEX 



-M5 



"Sally" a spaniel 


... H. i;. Chalon 


... 89 


"Salliam" 


... Geo. Garrard, A.K.A. .. 


... 186 


" Sam," a .seller 


... A. Cooper, K.A 


... 118 


Samuel Dumbletun, purlrait uf .. 


... J. E. Ferneley 


... 167 


Sand-Uiggers 


... A. Cooper, K..\ 


... 117 


"Saiali Bate and Seidlitz " 


... W. Barraud 


••• ss 

39 


" Sasenagh," a race horse 


... ]. Barenger 


"Satellite" 


... "T. G.ooch 


... 209 


Saw Pit, The 


... Luke Clennell 


... lOI 


Scene from ihe National Steeplechase 


at 




Liverpool 


... H. Aiken 


... 25 


Scene from the Opera of La Gazza LaJra 


... IL Barraud 


... sS 


Scene in Ottershaw Park, Surrey ... 


... \V. Barraud 


... 54 


Scene in the Crimea 


... A. Cooper, K.A ... 


... 119 


Scene in Windsor Great Park 


... R. B. Davis 


... 143 


" Scorpion," a blood horse 


... H. B. Chalon 


... 89 


Scotch Terriers 


... W. Barraud 


54 


Scotch Teniers 


... H. B. Chalon 


... 90 


Scotland 


... A. Cooper, R.A 


... 120 


" Scrub," a pony 


... A. Cooper, R.A 


... 116 


"Scurry" 


... J. E. Ferneley 


... 164 


" Scyrus and Til " 


... A. Cooper, R.A 


... 118 


.Second Barrel 


... A. Cooper, R.A 


... 120 


Second Horses 


... H. Aiken 


... 25 


"Selim" 


... IL B. Chalon 


... 86 


Sentinel, The 


... W. Barraud 


... 54 


Setters 


... IL Aiken 


. 25, 26, 27 


Setters 


... IL B. Chalon 


85, 88 


Setters 


... A. Cooper, R.A. ... 


... 124 


Setters 


... J. E. F'erneley 


... 172 


Setting Dog, A 


... T. Gooch 


... 209 


Setting to 


... Samuel Aiken 


■■• 33 


Shakespeare 


... A. Cooper, R.A 


... 117 


" Shakespeare," a lumter 


... W. Barraud 


•■• 54 


" Shakespeare," a stallion 


... A. Cooper, R.A 


... 125 


Shamrock 


... E. Bristowe 


... 80 


Sharpe, G. , portrait of 


... R. B. Davis 


... 149 


Shealing, The 


... A. Cooper, R.A 


... 123 


Shearers and Sportsman 


... A. Cooper, R.A 


... 120 


Sheep 


... Geo. Garrard, A.R.A. .. 


... 187 


Sheep, from Nature 


... J. Barenger 


35. 38 


Sheep Shearing 


.. Geo. Garrard, A.R.A. .. 


... 1S9 


Sheep Shearing at Aston Clinton 


... Geo. Garraid, A.R.A. .. 


... 186 


Shetland Pony 


... IL B. Chalon 


... 88 


She-Goat, Fvx and Ivid 


... A. Cooper, R.A. .. 


... 121 


Shift of the Scene 


... IL Aiken 


... 14 


Shoeing Forge 


... E. Bristowe 


79 


Shooters Going Out 


... A. Cooper, R.A 


... 120 


Shooters on the Hills 


... A. Cooper, R.A 


120 


Shooters on the Moors 


... A. Cooper, R.A 


119 


Shooter's Return, The 


... A. Cooper, K.A — 


119 


Shooting Horse, with Pointers, A ... 


... T. Gooch 


... 209 


Shooting on the Moors 


... A. Cooper, R.A 


... 126 


Shooting Party 


... A. Cooper, R.A 


... 117 



246 



INDEX 



Shooting Pony... A. Cooper, U.A., 182S, 

Shooting Pony, Gamekeeper and Dogs 
Shorthoin Bull... 
" Shot," a pointer 

" Shoveller," The 

" Signal," a high bred Arabian 

Silent Sorrow ... 

Silver Fir.s 

Simia Jacchus ... 

"Sir David" 

" Sir Malagizi," a racehorse ... 

" Sir Peter Teazle" ... 

Sir Roger de Coverley, &c. ... 

" Sir Rowland " ... ... 

Sir Trevisan flying from Despair 

Sketch, A 

Sketch from a Hunting Picture 

Sketch from Nature ... 

Sketch in Clay... 

Sketch of a Lion and Lionesses 

Skewbald Mare and Foal 

Skirmish 

Skull of a Bear... 

Skull of a Lion 

.Skye Terrier and Whelp 

Skye Terriers ... 

Slave Dealer, The ... 

Sleepy Travellers 

" SI igo," a racehorse ... 

Smith, L., portrait of... 

Smith shoeing horse ... 

" Smoker," a dog 

Smugglers on the Northumberland Coast ... 

Snared Hare ... 

Snipe Shooting 

Snipe Shooting 

Snipe Shooting 

Snob's Figure, with his " Short cut Coat " 
Snow Piece, A... 

" .Snowball," a greyhound 

" So far, so good " 

" Soho, my Man ! ' ... 
" Soldier," a horse 
•Solitary Snipe ... 
Soul Encaged, The 
South American Mule... 
South Devon Ram 
.Sow and Pigs ... 

Spaniel 

Spaniel 

Spaniel PL B. 

.Spaniel .. 

.Spaniel and dead game 

Spaniel and Woodcock 





PAGE 


1829, 1833, 'S53, I8G4...II7, 119, 120 


IL B. Chalon 


,. 89 


J. Barenger 


.. 38 


A. Cooper, R.A. ... 


.. 113 


A. Cooper, R.A. ... 


.. 125 


J. Barenger 


•• 39 


A. Cooper, R.A..., 


.. 120 


J. E. Ferneley 


.. 165 


Geo. Garrard, A. R.A. ... 


.. 186 


H. B. Chalon 


85,88 


H. B. Ch.alon 


.. 89 


S. Gilpin, R.A. ... 196, 3 


01, 203 


R. B. Davis 


• ■ 149 


A. Cooper, R.A. ... 


.. 119 


A. Cooper, R.A 


.. 109 


R. B. Davis 


.. 149 


G. Garrard, A. K.A. 


.. 186 


B. Blake 


64,67 


G. Garrard, A.R.A. 


.. 187 


S. Gilpin, R.A 


.. 202 


Geo. Garrard, A.R.A. ... 


.. 186 


A. Cooper, R.A 


.. 117 


PL B. Chalon 


88 


H. B. Chalon 


.. 88 


A. Cooper, R.A 


.. 125 


W. B.irraud 


■■ 54 


A. Cooper, R.A.... 


.. 119 


A. Cooper, R.A 


121 


J. Barenger 


.. 36 


J. E. Ferneley 


.. 172 


E. Bristowe 


.. 80 


A. Cooper, R.A. ... 


17, 124 


A. Cooper, R.A 


.. 119 


S. Elmer, A.R.A. 


• 15s 


H. Aiken 


■■ 25 


A. Cooper, R.A.... 


20, 122 


R.B.Davis 


.. 142 


PI. Aiken 


II 


Geo. Garrard, A.R.A. ... 


.. 186 


PL B. Chalon 


.. 88 


A. Cooper, R.A 


• 123 


A. Cooper, R.A. ... 


.. 117 


G. Garrard, A.R.A. 


.. 181 


A. Cooper, R.A. ... 


122 


Luke Clenntll 


95 


R. B. Davis 


•• 149 


Geo. Garrard, A.R.A. ... 


.. 187 


H. B. Chalon 


go 


H, B. Chalon, 1S03, 1805 


.. 88 


H. B. Chalon, 1818, 1819 


.. 89 


Chalon, 1822, 1830, 1838, 1839 


.. 90 


A. Cooper, R.A 


.. 117 


.\. D. Cooper 


27, 12S 


A. Cooper, R.A 


.. 119 



INDEX 



Spaniels and WoodcDcks 

Spaniel of King Charles' Breed 

Spaniels 

Spaniels 

Spaniels 

Spaniels 

Spaniels flushing a woodcock 

Spanish Bark ... 

Sparrow from Nature ... 

" Spice," a terrier 

Sporting Anecdotes ... 

Sporting Bishop, The Cleiical \' 

or the hounds at Fault ... 
Sporting Scraps and the M.iil Cha: 
Sportsman and Gamekeeper . . . 
Sportsman's Bothy, The 
Sportsman's Picnic, The 
Sportsman's .Siesta, The 
Sportsmen in a Wood... 
Sportsmen in the Highlands ... 
Sportsmen Refreshing 
Sportsmen Refreshing 
Sportsmen with dead game, &c. 
Sportsmen with Spaniels 
"Spot," Italian greyhound ... 
" Spring Tail," a hunter 
"Squib" 

Squirrels 

Stable-yard 

Stable-yard 

Stable-yard 

Stag 

Stag and Hind ... 

Stag at Bay ... 

Stag-hound 
Stag-hound 

Stag hunt at Epping 

Stag hunting 

Stag's head ... 

"Stag must die! The" 
Stag soiling 

Stallion, A 

Stallion, A 

" Staring Tom " 

Start, The 

Start, The 

Start for the St. Leger in 1S51 
Startling Intelligence ... 
" Stately," a hound ... 
Statue of an Infant 
" Stavely " 

Steady 

" Stedniore," a blood horse ... 
Stevenson, W., bust of 



S. Elmer, A.R.A. 

II. B. Chalon 

II. B. Chalon 

... A. Cooper, R..\., 1S18 ... 
... A. Cooper, R.A., 1S19 . . 
.. T. Gooch... 

II. B. Chalon 

II. B. Chalon 

... J. Barenger 

A. Cooper, K.A 

II. Aiken 

itwhalloo, 

H. Aiken 

ngc ... II. Aiken 

... E. Bristowe 

A. Cooper, K.A 

A. Cooper, R. A 

... A. Cooper, R..\ 

H. .\lken 

... .\. Cooper, K..\. ... 

.S. Aiken 

... E. Bristowe 

S. Elmer, A.R.A. 

... J. Barenger 

H. B. Chalon 

... J. Barenger 

... .\. Cooper, R. A. ... 

... Luke Clennell 

II. Barraud 

K. B. Davis 

George Garrard, A.R.A., 1797, 1IJ25, 

A. Cooper, R. A 

... A. Cooper, R.A — 
... Samuel Aiken 

S. Gilpin, R.A 

... Thomas Gooch ... 

... A. Cooper, R.A 

Samuel Aiken 

A. Cooper, R.A 

... A. Cooper, R.A 

... John Ferneley 

II. Aiken 

Thomas Gooch 

... Thomas Gooch ... 

II. Aiken 

... T. Boultbee 

"H. Aiken 

A. Cooper, R.A 

A. Cooper, R.A 

G. Garrard, A.R.A. 

... A. Cooper, R.A — 

... A. Cooper, R.A 

M. B. Chalon 

G. Garrard, A.R.A. 



247 

PAGE 

... 158 

... 90 

... 87 

... 116 

. 121 

... 209 

... 88 

... 90 

... 38 

... iiS 
12, 25 

12 

... 25 

... 78 

... 118 

... 122 

... 123 

... 23 

... 118 

••• 33 

.. 78 

... 157 

... 36 

... 90 

... 38 

... 121 

... 100 

... 59 

... 14S 
1S7, 189 

... 113 

... 120 

•• 33 

... 203 

... 209 

... 120 

... 31 

... 120 

... 122 

.-. I7S 

... 26 

... 209 

... 209 
9 

... 72 
...19.24 

... 119 

... 121 

... 187 

... 118 

... 124 

... 89 

... 187 



h8 



INDEX 



Still life 

Stirring Cup, The 

" Stormy Petrel " 

" Streamer," red greyhouml 

Strong Point, A 

Struggle for a Start, A 

Studio, The 

Study, A 

Study of Equestrian Study of I lis Majesty, 

&c 

Study from Nature 

Study of an Ass 

Study of Cattle 

Study of Dead Jay 

Study of Dead King-fisher 

Study of Deer 

Study of Dogs and Cat 

Study of Fo.\hound 

Study of Horses 

Summer 

Sunset View of the Limeworks at Purllect ... 

Sure Find, A ... 

" Surplice," winner of the Derby, 1S4S 

.Sussex Carp 

.Susse-\ Cow 

Suttler's Booth, The 

Sutton, Sir Richard 

" Swap," a hunter ... 

" Swinley," Hanoverian stag... 

Swine and Donkeys ... 

Syke Terrier ... 

Symptoms of Distress with the Cocktail 

Floored 





PAGE 


A. Cooper, R.A 

A. Cooper, R.A. ... 
A. Cooper, R.A.... 


121, 125 
... I20 
... 122 


II. B. Chalon 


...86,91 


A. Cooper, R.A 


... 123 


H. Aiken 


17 


A. Cooper, R.A 

A. Cooper, R.A.... 


109, 124 
... 119 


G. Garrard, A.R.A. 


... iSS 


A. Cooper, R.A., 1S19, lb 
W. Barraud 


21. ..116, 121 

••■ 54 


F. Barlow 


... 45 


A. Cooper, R.A 

A. Cooper, R.A. ... 
F. Barlow 


... u6 
... ii5 

44 


F. Batlow 


... 45 


II. Aiken 


... 25 


F. Barlow .. . 


... 44 


E. Bristowe 


... 80 


Geo. Garrard, A.R.A. ... 


... 189 


H. Aiken 


...19,24 


A. Cooper, R.A. ... 
A. Cooper, R.A.,.. 
Geo. Garrard, A.R.A. ... 


... 119 
... 122 
... 186 


A. Cooper, R.A 

J. E. Ferneley 

A. Cooper, R.A 

R. B. Davis 


... 120 
... 172 
... 117 
... 150 


F. Barlow 


44 


H. B. Chalon 


... 90 


II. Aiken 


9 



Tablet for a Chimney-piece ... 




... G. Garrard, A.R.A. 




... 1S7 


Taking it Cleverly 




... H. Aiken 




... 26 


Taking the lead in spite of all 




... H. Aiken 




... 26 


Taking the Stag 




... R. B. D.avis, 1845, 1S46.. 




150, 149 


"Tally IIo!" 




... H. Aiken 




26, 27 


" Tally Ho and Away ! " ... 




... H. Aiken 




II 


"Tam O'Shanter" 




... A. Cooper, R.A 




... 119 


"Tarn O'Shanter" 




... J. Barenger 




••• 39 


Tandem 




... H. Aiken 




... 25 


" Tar," a retriever 




... A. Cooper, R.A. ... 




120, 123 


"Tartar" 




... W. Barraud 




... 54 


Teal 




... A. Cooper, R.A 




... 124 


Teal 




... Stephen Elmer, A.R.A... 




... 158 


Ten Virgins, The 




... H. Barraud 




... 58 


Terne, Henry, portrait of 




... W. Shepard 




... 41 


Terrier, A 




... W. Barraud 




■•• 54 


Terrier, A 


"ii. 


B. Chalon, 1S18, 1824, 1832, 1 


846 


...89,90 



INDEX 



249 







I'AGE 


Terrier, A 


A. Cooper, R.A., 1S32, Ii>34... 


125, 117 


Terrier and Fox 


. Stephen Ehncr, A.R.A.... 


... 155 


Terrier and Tame BaJger 


. H. B. Chalon 


... Sg 


Terrier worrying a Fox 


S. Gilpin, R.A 


... 200 


Terriers at a Rabbit Hole 


. H. B. Chalon 


90 


Terrier's Head, A 


. A. Cooper, R.A 


06, 116 


" Terror" (Passions of the Horse) 


H.B. Chalon 


84, 90 


"That will shut out Atany and make tlit 






Thing select" 


H. Aiken 


.. 26 


"The Baron he loves his own good Steed' 


' A. Cooper, R.A 


.. 120 


The Field becomes Select 


H. Aiken 


9 


The Kill wins 


H. Aiken 


24 


"Theon" 


J. E. Ferneley 


•• "74 


Theory of Gravitation 


H. Barraud 


.. 58 


" There's a Ring at the Bell " 


A. Cooper, R.A 


.. 124 


"These came Hopping" 


H. Aiken 


17 


Thomas Oldaker, huntsman ... 


.\. Cooper, K.A 


121 


Thorough-bred Spaniel of King Charles 






Breed ' 


H. B. Chalon 


.. 90 


Three dead Bird Pieces ... 


Stephen Elmer, A. R.A... 


■ • 157 


Three Graces 


A. Cooper, K.A 


.. 124 


Three Horses 


A. Cooper, R.A 


.. 117 


Three Horses and Foxhounds 


PI. B. Chalon 


.. Sg 


Tiger, A 


Geo. Garrard, A. R.A. ... 


.. 187 


Tiger Shooting 


H. Aiken 


26 


Tigers 


S. Gilpin, A.R.A. 


.. 203 


Tilbury Fort 


LukeClennell 


101 


" Time to get up, Zur ! " 


H. .\lken 


.. 26 


" Tiney," a greyhound 


W. Barraud 


52. 54 


Tired Camel, The 


A. Cooper, R.A 


.. 120 


Tired Hunter, The 


A. Copper, R.A 


.. 119 


To an old tune 


A. Cooper, R.A 


.. 123 


" Tobias," pony ... 


li. B. Chalon 


.. 90 


Tod-hunter, The ... 


A. Cooper, R.A 


.. 123 


"Tom" 


A. Cooper, R.A 


.. 116 


Tom Grant, a huntsman 


R. B. Davis I 


41, 149 


Tom Jones 


A. Cooper, R..\ 


.. u8 


" Tom Thumb and Jackie" 


A. Cooper, R.A... 


,. 118 


" Tommy Binks" 


H. B. Chalon 


91 


" Topsy, Wasp, Sailor and Master Turvy".. 


.v. n. Cooper 


.. 128 


" Topthorn," a hunter 


J. Barenger 


■• 39 


"Tony" 


H. B. Chalon 


.. 90 


" Towing-horse " 


A. Cooper, R..\ 


.. 117 


Travellers attacked by Wolves 


K. B. Davis 


■• 149 


Trees and Horses 


S. Gilpin, R.A 


202 


Trespassers 


R. B. Davis 


■ 149 


" Triumph," portrait of a dog 


W. Barraud 47 


, 51. 54 


" Trojan," foxhound 


S. Elmer, A.R..\. ... I 


55. 158 


" Trouncer," foxhound 


A. Cooper, R.j\ I 


17, 122 


Trout 


A. Cooper, R.A 


.. 124 


Trout 


S.Elmer, A.R.A. ,1774, I779-' 


57, 158 


" Truffle," a bay horse 


A. Cooper, R..\. 


121 


" Trumpeter," The 


A. Cooper, R.A 


.. 118 


Trysting Place 


W. Barraud 


•■ S4 



250 



INDEX 



" Turk," a retriever ... 

Turkeys 

Turnpike Gate ... 

Turner, J., on " MMquis" ... 

Turner, Miss ... 

" Turpin," blind dog ... 
" Turquoise," a mare ... 

" Twiliglit and Wyandotte " 

Two Cats 
Two Chargers ... 
Two Dogs 
Two Dogs 

Two Famous Hunters and Harriers 

Two Favourite Phaeton Ponies 

Two Favourite Spaniels of Lord Methuen ... 

Two Flower Pieces 

Two Fruit Pieces 

Two Greyhounds 

Two Horses 

Two Horses 

Two Horses 

Two Horses in a Curricle 

Two Hunters ... 

Two Mares and Two Skye Terriers ... 

Two of Her Majesty's Stale Horses, &c. ... 

Two Old Campaigners, " Marengo and 

Copenhagen" 

Two Phaeton Ponies ... 

Two Pieces : Small Birds ... 

Two Ponies 

Two Prize Hereford Oxen 
Two Spaniels ... 
Two Spaniels ... 

Two Tame Leverets 

Two to One 





PAGE 


J. Barenger 




39 


F. Barlow 




41 


A. Cooper, R.A.... 




116 


W. Barraud 




54 


A. Cooper, R.A. ... 




117 


H. B. Chalon 




90 


R. B. Davis 




150 


W. Barraud 




55 


H. B. Chalon 




90 


H.B. Chalon 




88 


H. B. Chalon 




89 


A. Cooper, R.A 




118 


H. B. Chalon 




89 


H. B. Chalon 




89 


W. Barraud 




54 


S. Elmer, A. R.A. 




157 


S. Elmer, A. R.A. 




157 


H. B. Chalon 




89 


A. Cooper, R.A 


117, 


118 


Geo. Garrard, A. R.A. ... 


177. 


186 


T. Gooch, 17S3, 1786 .. 


208, 


209 


T. Gooch 




209 


H. B. Chalon, itioi, 1824 


'.'.'.Si 


1, 90 


A. Cooper, R.A 




118 


H. B. Chalon 


'si 


!, 90 


A. Cooper, R.A 




119 


H. B. Chalon 




89 


S. Elmer, A. R.A. 




157 


H. B. Chalon 




89 


Geo. Garrard, A.K.A. ... 




187 


H. B. Chalon, 1815, 1S26 


.■.■.'89,90 


A. Cooper, R.A., 1S15, 1830. 


..116, 


.117 


J. Barenger 




39 


H. Aiken 




25 



Under Weigh A. Cooper, R.A. 

Unkennelers, The H. Aiken ... 

Unkennelling S.amuel Aiken 

Unlicensed Hawker, An A. Cooper, R.A. 

Up the Pass A. Cooper, R.A. 

Used to it and not used to it H. Aiken ... 

" Uxbridge," Her Majesty's saddle horse ... H. Barraud 



123 
27 

33 

119 

123 

26 

57 



" Van Dyke," portrait of 
Vandyke, a racehorse ... 

"Vanity" 

Vedette, The 



R. B. Davis 


148 


H.B. Chalon 


85 


H. B. Chalon ... 


86,91 


A. Cooper, R.A.... 


119,123 



INDEX 



251 







PAGE 


"Velocipede" 


David Dalhy 


•■• 135 


" Velocipede and the Cur" ... 


J. E. Ferneley 


... 167 


" Vicare," a hunter 


H. B. Chalon 


... 89 


" VictL'ry," a pointer 


A. Cooper, R.A 


... 122 


Victory and Fame, model of ... 


George Garrard, .\. R.A. 


... 1S8 


View at Great Durnford, Wiltshire 


B. Blake 


...61,67 


View from the East End of the 


Brewery, 




Chiswell Street 


... George Garrard, A. R.A. 


... iSo 


View in Bedwell TarU, Herts 


G. Garrard, A.R. A. 


... 1S7 


View in Brewhouse Vard 


... G. Garrard, A.R.A., 1784, 17S9 .. 


. 177, 186 


View in Grounds in Craven Lodge 


G. Garr.ard, A.R.A. 


... 1S8 


View in Highlands of Scotland 


G. Garrard, A.R. .A. 


... 187 


View in Ostcrley Park 


G. (Garrard, A.R..\. 


... 189 


View in .Sandwell Parl< 


G. Garrard, A.R.A. 


... 189 


View in Tring Park 


G. Garrard, A.R.A. 


... 1S6 


View near Aniesliury ... 


B. Blake 


...64,67 


View of Alnwick Castle 


G. Garrard, A. R.A. 


... 18S 


View of Burghley House 


G. Garrard, A.R.A. 


... 187 


View of Farnham Castle 


Stephen Elmer, .A.R.A.... 


... 158 


View of Gentleman's Seat in Hettfjrdshire... G. Garrard, A.R. A. 


... 186 


View of Hamilton Place 


G. Garrard, A.R.A. 


178, 186 


View of Inverary, in Argyllshire 


G. Garrard, A.R.A. 


178, 186 


\'iew of Lake Windermere ... 


... G. Barrett, R.A., and S. Gil|nn, R 


A. 198 


View of Windsor Castle 


K. B. Davis 


... 148 


View of Woolmer Park, Herts 


G. Garrard, A.R.A. 


... 187 


Vignette 


...A. Cooper, K.A., 1824 1830, 1831 . 


. 122, 124 


Vignette 


R. B. Davis 


... ISO 


" Vignette, Languish" 


A. Cooper, R.A 


... 123 


" Vingt-un and Jlajor " 


A. Cooper, R.A 


... 119 


" Violante," a race-horse 


H. B. Chalon 


... 84 


"Vive-Ie-Roi !" 


A. Cooper, R.A 


... 119 


Vixen 


H. B. Chalon 


... 90 


Vi.xen and Cubs, A ... 


G, Garrard, A.R.A. ..^ 


... 183 



w 



" Wag," 1S09, a dog of King Charles 


Breed 


H. B. Chalon 


... 91 


Waiting for a shot at Roedcer 




J. E. Fernelev 


... 167 


Waiting for a turn 




R. B. Davis ' 


... £49 


Waiting for the Ferry ... 




W. Barraud 


... 54 


Waiting for the Laird 




W. and H. Barraud 


50.59 


Waldegrave Family, The 




]. Best 


... 60 


"W.aniba" 




A. Cooper, R.A 


... 117 


Wandering Boy 




H. B. thalon 


- , 90 


" Wanton," a greyhound 




H. H.arraud 


56,58 


Wapiti deer 




A. Cooper, R.A 


116, 121 


Wapiti deer ... 




Geo. Garrard, A.R.A. .. 


... 188 


War Horse, The ... 




S. Giljnn, R.A. ... 


... 200 


Warde, J., on his favourite horse " 


Blue" 






Ruin" 




W. Barraud 


48, 55 


" ' Ware' Horse ! " 




H. Aiken 


... 25 


Waring, Thomas 




A. Cooper, R.A 


III, 118 


"Warrior" 




J. Barenger 


... 38 



252 



INDEX 



Water-fowl Shooting ... 

Waterloo 

Wayside WclcoiiK", A... 

" We praise Thee, O God ! " Three Choristers 

Well up with hounds in a wall country 

Wellesley Arabian, The 

Wellington at Waterloo 

Wellington's First Great Victory 

West Australian 

West, B., portrait of 

Wharf near London Bridge, A 

What became of the Mail ? 

"What Sport?" 

" What the Devil !" &c 

Where they ran into him 

" Which way now?" ... 

Whipcord 

Whipper-in, The 

" Whisker," a bay -horse 

" Whisker and Minuet " 

"Whisky" 

Whissendine Scene, The 

Whitbread, .S. , bust of ... ... G. 

"White Legs," a celebrated liunter... 

White Poodle 

" Whohoop !" ... ... 

" Who's up for the Rescue ! " 

Wildcat 

Wild Ducks 

Wild Fowl Shooting ... 

Wild Huntsman, The... 
Wild Huntsman, The... 
Wiltshire Coursing Prize Pictuie, The 

Wiltshire, W., bust of 

"Winchelsea" ... 

Winged Bird, A 

Winner of the Brush, The 

Winning Post at Billesden Coplow, The ... 

Winter Farmyard Scene 

With bright faces and merry hearts ... 

'' With what sum will you open the Biddings 

for her?" ... 
" Within Range " 
Woburn Sheep Shearing 
Women's Mission 
Women's Race at a Village Fair 
Woodcock Shooting ... 
Woodcock .Shooting ... 
Woodcock Shooting ... 
Woodcock Shooting ... ... A. Cooper, 

Woodcock Shooting ... 

Woodcocks 

Woodcocks 

Woodcocks Stephen Ehiicr, A. 





PAGR 


R. B. Davis 


.. 142 


H. Alkeu 


.. 26 


A. Cooper 


.. 124 


n. Barraud 


57 


H. Aiken 


.. 26 


J. Barenger 


39 


A. Cooper, R.A 


.. iiS 


A. Cooper, R. A 


.. 119 


A. Cooper, R.A 


.. 119 


Geo. Garrard, A. R.A. ... 


.. 187 


Geo. Garrard, A. R.A. ... I 


79. 187 


H. Aiken 


.. 24 


A. Cooper, R.A 


•• 123 


H. Aiken 


.. 26 


H. Aiken 


24 


A. Cooper, R.A 


.. 123 


S. Gilpin, R.A 


.. 203 


A. Cooper, R.A 


.. 122 


A. Cooper, R.A 


.. 121 


A. Cooper, R.A. ... 


.. 116 


Geo. Garrard, A.R.A. ... 


.. 187 


H. Aiken 


12 


Gariard, A.RA., 1804, 1S16...1 


87, 188 


David Dalby 


■ 133 


George Stubbs, R.A. 


82 


H. .\lken 


14 


R. B.Davis 


•• 150 


H. B. Chalon 


•• 91 


S. Elmer, A.R.A. 


.. 158 


A. Cooper, R.A., 1S30, 1831... 


117,124 


A. Cooper, R.A 


.. 123 


R. B. Davis, 1809, 1S53... 1 


48, 149 


W. and H. Barraud 


50. 52 


G. Garrard, A.R.A. 


.. 18S 


W. Barraud 


52. 54 


A. Cooper, R.A 


.. 124 


H. Aiken 


.. 26 


H. Aiken 


9 


G. Garrard, A. R.A. 


.. 186 


H. Aiken 


.. 29 


A. Cooper, R.A 


.. 119 


A. Cooper, R.A. ... 


122 


G. Garrard, A.R.A. 


.. 184 


A. Cooper, R.A. ... 


120 


H. Aiken 


• 23 


H. Aiken 


■• 27 


S. Aiken 


• 32 


]. Barrenger 


.. 36 


,"R.A., 1824, 1832, 1859.. .122, 


17, 120 


R. B. Davis 


.. 142 


T. Barenger 


■ 39 


"H. B. Chalun 


90 


R.A., I77S. >779, I7i>-1. 17S6...1 


57. 158 



Woodhouse, at Great Duiiiford 

Sailslmry ... 
Woodperker, Jay, &c.... 
Worley, Mr. ..'. 
Wounded Greek, The... 
\Vounded Mallard 
Wounded Pheasant ... 
Wounded Snipe, The ... 
" Wouvermans," a horse 
Wrynone Joe, The Drayman 



INDEX 


253 




PAGE 


near 




... B. Blake 


... 67 


... Stephen Elmer, A. K. A.. 


... IS7 


... A. Cooper, R.A 


... 119 


... A. Cooper, R.A 


... 119 


... A. Cooper, R.A 


... 124 


... Stephen Elmer, A.R.A.. 


... 155 


... A. Cooper, R.A 


... 125 


... A. Cooper, R..\ 


117,122 


... H. B. Chalon 


... 88 



Yarmouth Cart, with views of Yarmouth 

"Yoicks!" 

" Yoicks 1 Gone Away " 

Young, A., bust of 

Young nobleman and his sister on horseback 
portr.nit of a 



G. Garrard, A. R.A. 

H. Aiken 

R. B. Davis 

G. Garrard, A.R..-\. 

Thomas Gooch ... 



186 

25 

150 
187 

208 



Zebu, The 

Zebu, Bull and Cow 



... G. Garrard, A.R.A. 
... A. Cooper, R.A. 



.87 
116 



"THE SPORTING MAGAZINE" AND ITS ILLUS- 
TRATED CONTEMPORARIES. 

The very frequent mention of old sporting publications in the 
preceding pages seems to render desirable some little account 
of these and their relation one to another. 

The history of the four principal magazines is slightly 
involved, and thanks are due to Mr. Frederick S. Banks, who 
stands alone in his knowledge of these old publications, for 
the following outline of their history. The Sporting Magazine, 
born in 1792, held its own till 1870, when it ceased ; having 
twenty-two years previously absorbed the Sporting Review 
which at different dates had absorbed the Sportsman and New 
Sporting Magazine. The word "absorbed" is not employed 
in its strictly literal sense ; when the Sportsman was absorbed 
by the Sporting RevicK' in 1845 (see diagram on opposite page), 
publication of the former continued, but its contents were 
word for word identical with the contents of the Sporting 
Review. When the New Sporting Magazine was also absorbed 
by the Sporting Revietv in 1846, publication of the former was 
continued, but its contents were thereafter word for word 
identical with the contents of the Sporting Review and the 
Sportsman. Finally, when the proprietors of the Sporting 
Magazine bought the Sporting Review in 1848, their purchase 
included the Netc Sportincj Magazine and the Sportsman, and 
thence forward four monthly magazines identical in contents, 
and differing only in title, ran abreast of one another till 
1870, when they came to a common end. The diagram 
shows in the simplest form the periods during which each 
magazine had an independent existence and the dates at 
which the contents of each became identical with those of a 
purchasing rival. 

The year i860 had seen the birth of Baily's Magazine of 
Sports and Pastimes : the Sporting Magazine group of publica- 
tions continued to compete with this new rival for ten years, 
when as already stated they came to an end. 

The Annals of Sporting, which was of small size, started in 
the year 1823 and "died" in the following year after three 
volumes had been completed. The Sportsman's Cabinet, printed 
on larger paper than any of its contemporaries, enjoyed an 
existence even shorter; started in 1832 it came 10 an end in 
1833, when only two volumes had been completed. These 
two serials may be thus briefly dismissed, their respective 
careers having been independent. 



The Sporting 
Magazine. 

Fonnded 1792. 



New Sporting 
Magazine. 

Founded 1S31. 



Sportsman. 

Founded 1833. 



Sporting 
Bevies. 

Fonnded 1839. 



In 1845 the Sportsman was 
immerged in the Sjmrt- 

ing Review 

In 1846 the New Sporting MagaHm was immevged 

in the Spmtinq Bfrim' 

Sim-ling Magamie absorbed the Sporting Semew in 1848. 



The Sporting 
Magazine. 

Ceased 1S7U. 



Webster F^.miiv Ubrary of Veterinary Kledicine 
r,, " ' f Veterinary iVledicine at 



hoad 

-.n i\/IA OIR'^R 



WORKS BY SIR WALTER GILBEY, BART. 



Animal Painters of England 

from the year 1650. Illustrated. Two vols., quarto, cloth 
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The Great Horse or War Horse 

From the Roman Invasion till its development into the 
Shire Horse. New and Revised Edition, 1899. Seven- 
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