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Full text of "Animal painters of England from the year 1650 : a brief history of their lives and works: illustrated with--specimens of their painting"

JOHN A. SEAVERNS 



TUFTS UNIVERSITY l-IBRAHIES_^ 

3 9090 6'l4 534 073 



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Webster Family Librany of Veterinary/ Medicine 
Cummings School of Veterinary Medicine at 
Tuits University 

200 Westboro Road ^^ 

Nortli Grafton, MA 01536 



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ANIMAL PAINTERS 




C. Hancock. Piu.xt. 



r.n^raied on Wood by F. Bablm^e. 



DEER-STALKING 



ANIMAL PAINTERS 

OF ENGLAND 

From the Year 1650. 

A brief history of their lives and works 



Illustratid with thirty -one specimens of their paintings^ and portraits ; 
chiefly from wood engravings by F. Babbage 



COMPILED BV 

SIR WALTER GILBEY, BART. 

Vol. II. 

10116011 

VINTOX & CO. 
9, NEW BRIDGE STREET, LUDGATE CIRCUS, E.C. 

I goo 



Limiiei' 



CONTENTS. 








PAGE 

HANCOCK, CHARLES i 


HENDERSON, COOPER 






•• 15 


HERRING, JOHN F 






22 


HOWITT, SAMUEL 






.. 36 


LANDSEER, SIR EDWIN, R.A. 






•• 47 


MARSHALL, BENJAMIN 






.. 85 


MARSHALL, LAMBERT 






•• 97 


POLLARD, JAMES 






99 


REINAGLE, PHILIP, R.A. ... 






.. no 


THE SARTORIUS FAMILY ... 






.. 124 


SARTORIUS, JOHN 






.. 125 


SARTORIUS, FRANCIS 






.. 126 


SARTORIUS, JOHN N. 






.. 131 


SARTORIUS, JOHN F 






.. 141 


SCOTT, JOHN 






.. 148 


SEYMOUR, JAMES 






.. 164 


SPENCER, THOMAS 






.. i7« 


STOTHARD, THOMAS, R.A.... 






.. 181 


STUBBS, GEORGE, R.A. 






.. 192 


TILLEMAN, PETER 






.. 207 


TURNER, F. C 






.. 212 


TURNER, G. A 






.. 224 


WARD, JAMES, R.A 






• • 225 


WOLSTENHOLME, DEAN ... 






.. 244 


WOLSTENHOLME, DEAN, Jnr. 






• • 251 


WOOTTON, JOHN 






.. 261 



ILLUSTRATIONS. 



HANCOCK, CHARLES. 

Deer-Stalking ... ... ... ... ... lo 

HENDERSON, CHARLES COOPER. 

Portrait of the Artist ... ... ... i8 

HERRING, J. F. 

Elis ... 26 

Portrait of the Artist ... ... ... 32 

HOWITT, SAMUEL. 

The Chase ... ... ... ... ... 38 

Taking Wild Horses on the Plains of 

Moldavia ... ... ... ... ... 42 

LANDSEER, SIR EDWIN, R.A. 

"Toho! " 54 

Brutus 70 

MARSHALL, BENJAMIN. 

Portrait of the Artist 



POLLARD, JAMES. 
Fly Fishing 



SARTORIUS, JOHN. 

Looby at full Stretch 



94 



REINAGLE, PHILIP, R.A. 

Portrait of Colonel Thornton ... ... ii6 

Breaking Cover 120 



124 



SARTORIUS, FRANCIS. 

Mr. Bishop's Celebrated Trotting Mare ... 128 



V i i i. Illustrations 

PACE 

SARTORIUS, JOHN F. 

Coursing at Hatfield Park ... 144 

SCOTT, JOHN. 

Portrait of the Artist ... ... ... 152 

Death of the Dove ... ... ... ... 160 

SEYMOUR, JAMES. 

Brushing into Cover ... 168 

Sketch for Hunting Picture ... ... 176 

STOTHARD, THOMAS, R.A. 

Portrait of the Artist 190 

STUBBS, GEORGE, R.A. 

Portrait of the Duke of Portland, 

Welbeck Abbey 200 

TILLEMAN, PETER. 

View of a Horse Match over the Long 

Course, Newmarket ... ... ... 208 

TURNER, F. C. 

The Find — "Hark to Rallywood " 218 

WARD, JAMES. 

Monitor 234 

Portrait of the Artist ... .. ... 240 

WOLSTENHOLME, DEAN, Senr. 

Lord's Wood, Leaden Roding ... ... 248 

Portrait of the Artist ... ... ... 250 

WOLSTENHOLME, DEAN, Junr. 

Burial of Tom Moody 256 

Portrait of the Artist ... ... ... 258 

WOOTTON, JOHN. 

Waiting for the Master ... ... 266 

The Chase is Over 270 



ANIMAL PAINTERS, 



CHARLES HANCOCK. 

(Born circa 1795. Died circa 1855.) 

CHARLES HANCOCK was born about the 
year 1795; the exact date cannot now be 
ascertained, nor are there available any particulars 
concerning his antecedents, belongings and place of 
birth. 

The exhibition of a picture at the Royal 
Academy in 18 19 gives us our first clue ; that 
year discovers Hancock, then a young man of 
about 24 years, residing at 55, St. James's Street. 
He won this first success with a portrait of " Mr. 
J. Hancock," a near relation, no doubt, of his own. 
His name does not occur in the Royal Academy 
catalogue of the following year ; but at the exhibi- 
tion of 1 82 1 we find him represented by "The 
Broken Teapot," a title which suggests that his 
artistic tastes took first a direction domestic rather 

I VOL. U. 



V 



2 ANIMAL PAINTERS 

than sporting. At this latter date he was residing 
at Marlborough, in Wiltshire, and thenceforward 
until the year 1830 he would seem to have had no 
fixed abode : he dwelt sometimes at Marlborough, 
sometimes at Reading, and sometimes at High 
Wycombe, his London address being given as 
" Messrs. Tattersall's, Grosvenor Place," through 
which firm his dwelling-place was always to be 
discovered. 

Nine or ten years' residence in country localities 
where sport, fox-hunting particularly, might be 
enjoyed, naturally imbued Hancock with sporting 
tastes ; and he has left evidence of his proclivities 
in numerous pictures. Between the years 18 19 and 
1847 he exhibited at the Royal Academy twenty- 
three works ; and though these no doubt include 
many of his best efforts, it is noteworthy that the 
portraits of racehorses (a class of work which 
formed one of his specialities) are not represented 
among them. He did not confine his exhibits to 
the Royal Academy ; fifty-five paintings from his 
easel were shown at the British Institution, and 
forty-seven at the Suffolk Street exhibitions ; he 
also contributed occasionally to other London 
galleries. 

Though we find Hancock residing at Marl- 
borough in 1 82 1, it was not until 1825 that he 
turned his attention to animal subjects and sporting 



CHARLES HANCOCK 3 

scenes. The first of such to call for notice was his 
portrait of the celebrated racehorse Sir Hercules, 
bred by, and the property of, Lord Longford, for 
whom the picture was painted. This horse, bred in 
Ireland in 1826, was sold in 1833 to go to 
America. For Lord Berners, Hancock executed 
a portrait of his racehorse Recovery, foaled in 
1827. Both of these works were engraved by 
Richard Parr. 

At one period of his career, indeed, it would 
seem that Charles Hancock shared with J. H. 
Herring the distinction of being the fashionable 
painter of winning horses on the turf; between the 
years 1835 and 1843 he painted portraits of the 
following : — 

Mundig, winner of the Derby, 1835, for John 
Bowes, Esq. Scott is the jockey in the saddle. 
This portrait was engraved in large size, printed in 
colours, and published by Rudolph Ackermann, of 
Regent Street, in September, 1835. Richard Parr 
also engraved a small plate from this portrait. 

Queen of Trumps, winner of the Oaks and St. 
Leger, 1835, and one of the celebrated winning 
mares. This picture was engraved and published 
in colours by Rudolph Ackermann : the plate is 
a large size, the same as that from the portrait of 
Mundig. 

Glencoe, bred by the Earl of Jersey in 1831 : 



4 ANIMAL PAINTERS 

winner of the Royal Cup at Ascot in 1835. 
Painted in 1836, and engraved by E. Duncan; size 
of plate, 16^ inches by 12 inches; published in 
colours by Rudolph Ackermann in 1836. 

Bay Middleton, winner of the Two Thousand 
and Derby, 1836. Engraved by E. Duncan; size 
of plate, 16. J inches by 12 inches; published in 
colours by Rudolph Ackermann in 1836. 

Don John, bred in 1835 by Lord Chesterfield ; 
winner of the St. Leger, 1838. This portrait was 
engraved by E. Duncan; size of plate, 162^ by 12 
inches, and published in colours by Rudolph Acker- 
mann in 1838. 

Coronation, bred by Mr. Rawlinson ; winner of 
the Derby, 1841. This picture was engraved in 
small size by E. Paterson. 

Satirist, bred by Lord Westminster ; winner of 
the St. Leger, 1841. 

Attila, bred by Colonel Hancox ; winner of the 
Derby, 1842. 

Our Nell, bred by Mr. Dawson ; winner of the 
Oaks, 1842. 

Blue Bonnet, winner of the St. Leger, 1842. 

Cotherstone, bred by John Bowes, Esq. ; winner 
of the Two Thousand and Derby, 1843, 

Nutwith, bred by Captain Wrather ; winner of 
the St. Leger, 1843. 

Faugh-a-Ballagh, bred in Ireland, and purchased 



CHARLES HANCOCK 5 

in 1842 by E. J. Irwin, Esq. ; winner of the St. 
Leger and Cesarewitch, 1844. 

The portraits of Satirist, Attila, Our Nell, Blue 
Bonnet, Cotherstone, Nutwith, and Faugh-a-Ballagh 
were all engraved in small size by E. Hacker. 

In addition to the works mentioned as having 
been engraved, several other prints from his pictures 
are in existence. 

Hancock's abilities were recognised by the editor 
of the New Sporting Magazine before he painted 
any of the equine portraits mentioned above. The 
first plate from a picture by his brush appears in the 
volume for 1833, and among the more noteworthy 
paintings reproduced in the Magazine may be 
mentioned the following : — In vol. 5, " The Fox," 
painted in 1833 and engraved by Richard Parr. In 
vol. 20, Marmion, an Old English bloodhound 
belonging to Lord William Beresford ; the plate 
engraved by E. Paterson. In vol. 22, " New 
Year's Morn," gamekeepers of the olden time going 
out on their rounds ; engraved by E. Paterson. In 
vol. 29, " How Happy could I be with Either," a 
fox watching a couple of rabbits in the distance ; 
engraved by J. R. Scott. 

Examination of the Sporting Magazine of the 
time reveals five engravings from the artist's 
paintings. In vol. 87 of December, 1835, for 
example, we find the picture " Scotch Terrier 



6 ANIMAL PAINTERS 

Chasing a Rabbit," which was exhibited at the 
Royal Academy in 1832 ; it was very beautifully 
engraved by H. Beckwith as "The Warrener's 
Enemy." The rabbit, it may be remarked, is a 
white one ; the keenness characteristic of the 
terrier in close pursuit is admirably portrayed. 
Three of the five plates represented foxes under 
varying conditions. Hancock never showed to 
better advantage than when painting a fox, and 
he was evidently fond of drawing wild animals whose 
beauty and character afford such infinite possibilities 
to the clever artist. 

The following are a few of his numerous pictures 
which appeal to lovers of horse and hound and of 
the gun : — 

" Dos-a-dos," sleeping hounds huddled together; 
painted in 1833 and exhibited at the Gallery of the 
Society of British Artists, Suffolk Street, Pall Mall. 
Also a "White Horse chased by Black Spaniels." 
These pictures are described by a contemporary 
critic as " very clever." 

"A Series of Heads of Sporting Dogs," the joint 
work of Abraham Cooper, R.A., and Charles 
Hancock, were engraved, bound, and published 
together in book form (royal folio) by Harding and 
King, London, in 1833. 

" The Widow " represents a young widow seated 
in her late husband's arm-chair with a large hound 



CHARLES HANCOCK 7 

by her side. This picture was engraved, and 
published by Harding and King in 1833. 

In 1832 Charles Hancock exhibited two pictures 
at the British Institution : one, "The Keeper going 
his Rounds," was described as "a very spirited and 
talented production ; the eagerness of the terriers 
as they watch their master's movements is admir- 
ably depicted." Of the other, "A Fox on the 
Watch," the critic says, "It has been purchased by 
Sir M. W. Ridley, and an old master of hounds 
told us he thought it was the best likeness of a fox 
he had ever seen," Sir M. White Ridley was 
himself Master of the Morpeth Hounds at this time. 
The opinion of the old M.F.H. was therefore borne 
out in the most practical form possible by Sir M. 
W. Ridley's purchase of the picture. 

Lord Middleton has in his collection at Birdsall 
the following works by Charles Hancock : — 

(i) A brown shooting pony in a landscape. 
Size 2i|- inches by 33|- inches. 

(2) A picture of Henry, sixth Lord Middleton, 
with his brother-in-law, Bielby Lawley {afterwards 
Lord Wenlock), and Sir Francis Lawley. Lord 
Middleton sits on his grey pony " Don " : the 
others stand near, evidently discussing which of 
them killed the woodcock, held in the hand of one 
of the brothers. Two other ponies, a bay and 
a grey (the latter afterwards presented to Mrs. 



8 ANIMAL PAINTERS 

Grimston- Keswick) stand feeding on the other side 
of the picture; and a black retriever "Tip" is 
near his lordship. Many Clumber spaniels and a 
keeper are in the wood beyond. The picture has 
suffered much cracking from the use of asphaltum. 
Signed, "Charles Hancock, 1833." Size, 64 inches 
by 79 inches. 

(3) Another smaller picture, said to be the work 
of Hancock, but without signature, is a lesser and 
different edition of Henry sixth Lord Middleton 
and his spaniels. The old lord (painted full figure, 
unlike the picture at Escrick, described below), 
sits under a tree near a stream in a wooded land- 
scape ; a keeper comes towards him through trees 
in the distance. A cream-coloured pony and eight 
Clumber spaniels are in the foreground ; beside 
Lord Middleton lie a dead woodcock, and a black 
greyhound. 

The picture is a clever one, and is evidently 
Hancock's work. Size 36I inches by 46I inches. 

In 1834 he painted " Lord Middleton, his 
Spaniels and Pony," — the picture referred to in the 
description of the work numbered (3) at Birdsall. 
Lord Middleton and his brother-in-law. Sir Francis 
Lawley, are seated on the spectator's right ; on the 
left stands a pony, and a small pack of spaniels 
occupy the centre of the canvas, which measures 
2 ft. lO^- inches by i ft. 10 inches. This picture 



CHARLES HANCOCK 9 

is now in the collection of Lord Wenlock at 
The Villa, Escrick, York. It was engraved by 
W. Giller, and "sold by C. Hancock, at Messrs. 
Tattersall's, Grosvenor Place ; Hodgson, Boys and 
Graves, Pall Mall ; and Rudolph Ackermann, 
Regent Street." 

The New Sporting Magazine for June, 1835 
(vol. 9), contains the following remarks on the 
above work, which was engraved for reproduction 
in the pages of that serial : 



" It is with feelings of regret that we prefix the word 
' late ' to the name of the principal subject in this picture, 
who is admirably represented in the bloom of health, seated 
beneath an ancient tree in his park, surrounded by his 
beautiful red and white spaniels (allowed to be the finest 
breed in England) to the number of seven couple, with his 
gun, keeper, and shooting pony in the background. Lord 
Middleton, as our readers have been informed by the daily 
prints, expired at his seat, Wollaton House, Notts, on the 
19th ult., in the 75th year of his age. He was one of the 
oldest, keenest, and best sportsmen this country ever saw, 
following with unabated ardour to the last whatever sport the 
revolving year brought round. The painting from which 
this engraving is taken was done last year, and we spoke of 
it at the time we saw it in Mr. Hancock's studio in terms of 
high panegyric. The likeness of his lordship is admirable, 
and in looking upon it we cannot but regret that so many 
noble spirits depart from us without leaving any such 
memento. The picture is highly creditable to the talents of 
the very rising artist by whom it was painted ; nor must we 
withhold our meed of praise from Mr. Giller for the able 
manner in which the plate is executed." 



lO ANIMAL PAINTERS 

The expression " very rising artist " was never 
more happily used, as that year saw the beginning 
of Hancock's vogue as a painter of the best race- 
horses of the time. 

In 1835 the artist painted "Tally-ho!" the 
picture of a fox breaking covert. This was 
engraved by Beckwith and Duncan, the plate 
measuring io| inches by 5 J inches, and was pub- 
lished by Rudolph Ackermann. 

In 1836 he painted a portrait of "George Baker, 
Esq., on his Favourite old Mare." This was 
engraved by W. Giller, size of plate 2 1 inches by 
18^ inches. It was published by Ackermann. 
" Mr. Baker, of Elenore Hall, in the County of 
Durham " — vide the New Sporting Magazine — " has 
been a gentleman jockey, an owner of racehorses, 
a master of foxhounds, a member of Parliament, an 
amateur in the fine arts — in short, he is a thorough- 
bred British sportsman." 

Hancock's services were also in request as an 
illustrator of books. The Sportsmans Annual 
(royal folio), published in 1836 by A. H. Baily and 
Co., of Cornhill, and R. B. King, of Monument 
Yard, London, contains plates from pictures by Sir 
Edwin Landseer, Abraham Cooper, R.A., and 
Charles Hancock. If a man's work may be known, 
as we are told the man himself may be known, " by 
the company he keeps," nothing is wanting to prove 



CHARLES HANCOCK II 

the merit of this artist, whose paintings we thus find 
with those of the first masters of the day. Hancock 
is represented in this boolv by his pictures of a 
Foxhound and a Bloodhound, drawn on stone 
and engraved by Thomas Fairland. 

Sporting, illustrative of British field sports, 
edited by Nimrod, also a royal folio, and published 
by A. H. Baily and Co., contains plates from 
pictures by T. Gainsborough, R.A., Sir Edwin 
Landseer, R.A., Abraham Cooper, R.A., J. F. 
Lewis and William Barraud. Hancock's five 
pictures in this work are " The Warrener," en- 
graved by R. Parr; "The Gamekeeper," engraved 
by W. A. Scott ; " Rat Hunting," engraved by 
T. S. Engleheart ; Thorngrove and Sir Hercules, 
two racehorses, engraved by H. Beckwith ; and 
" Deer-stalking," engraved by W. Greatbach. The 
literary contributors, in criticising the plates in 
this book, speak highly of Hancock's skill in 
delineating animal life and of his general ability in 
grouping his subject pictures. 

In 1838 he painted "The Young Falconers," an 
engraving from which picture, executed by H. 
Beckwith, was reproduced in vol. 9 of The Sports- 
man. 

The plate from "Deer-stalking" which accom- 
panies the present brief account of the artist's work, 
shows Hancock's talent for judicious and artistic 



12 ANIMAL PAINTERS 

grouping. As a painter of animals he possessed 
rare abilities : the examples of his work to which 
reference has been made indicate the breadth of his 
scope, but his greatest successes were undoubtedly 
achieved in portraying animals which are connected 
with or provide sport. 

No record exists to show the exact date of 
Charles Hancock's death. His active career as 
a painter can be traced from 1819 to 1847, the 
period during which he contributed to the Royal 
Academy, but there is reason to believe that he 
attained the age of sixty, in which case it would 
seem that his brush lay idle in his later years. 



WORKS OF CHARLES HANCOCK. 

PICTURES EXHIBITED IN THE ROYAL ACADEMY 

(23 in number). 

YEAR 

1S19— ilM. /. HANCOCK. 

ji.7i—THE BROKEN TEAPOT. 

■ii:^^— LANDSCAPE AND CATTLE. 

1828— (2) HORSE AND DOGS, the property of the Marquis of A.y\ts,huri— HORSES, 

the property of the Marquis of Aylesbury. 
1830— HORSES IN A THUNDERSTOR.tr, the property of D. Duncombe, Esq. 
1B31-SCOTCH TERRIER CHASING A RABBIT. 
1833— CAS H.MERE, the property of P. Dauncey, Esq. 
1834— <2) A FOX'S HEAD—CHLOE, the property of Miss Webster. 
iZ3i—THE LAST STRUGGLE. 

1836— rJFO GENTLEMEN DEER-STALKING IN FALAH FOREST. 
1838— (2)/.^ C A' CATON AND BARRA, the property of the Earl of Hillsborough— 

BLENHEIM SPANIELS, the property of Captain Watson. 
iS^o— ROBERT BURNS. 

"And stood with his hand on the plough and his heart with the Muse. 

yidg Allan Cunningham's " Life of Burns," vol. i., p. ig. 



WORKS OF CHARLES HANCOCK I 3 

YEAR 

1841— (3) SETTER AND SPANIELS, the property of Captain •^i.ts.oa— THREE 
HORSES, the property of Viscount Casl\etes.sii — EQUESTRIAN POR- 
TRAITS OF MISS BEVAN AND RICHARD LEE SEVAN, ESQ., by 
R. W. Buss and Charles Hancock. 

iS^2— THE HOUNDS ARE LATE THIS MORNING. 

1843 — ANIMALS, the property of Thomas Hancock, Esq. 

1846— (2) THE GREY DAM— COMMON AND SUNDAY AT THEIR EVERY- 
DA Y IVORK. 

iS^y— SCENE IN THE FORESTER'S HOME. 

PLATES IN THE SPORTING MAGAZINE (5 in number). 

THE WARRENEWS ENEMY, vol. 87 ; engraved by H. Beckwith. 

FOX AND CUBS, vol. 88 ; engraved by H. Beckwith. 

COMPLIMENTS OF THE SEASON, a brace of grouse, vol. io3 ; engraved by E. 

Hacker. 
TM LOOKING A T YOU, vol. io3 ; engraved by John Scott. 
THE STALKER'S HOME, vol. 109 ; engraved by E. Hacker. 

PLATES IN THE NEW SPORTING MAGAZINE 
(17 in number). 

THE FOX, vol. 5, 1833 ; engraved by R. Parr. 

MUNDIG, a chestnut colt, winner of the Derby r835, vol. 9, r835 ; engraved by R. Parr. 

SIR HERCULES, a celebrated stallion, vol. 10, 1835 ; engraved by Parr. 

LORD MIDDLETON, with his spaniels and pony ; engraved by Giller. 

GLENCOE, a celebrated stallion, vol. 11, 1836 ; engraved by R. Parr. 

RECOVERY, a chestnut horse, vol. 12, 1837 ; engraved by R. Parr. 

LION AND LIONESS, vol. 19, 1840 ; engraved by Beckwith. 

MARMION, an Old English bloodhound, vol. 20, i84r ; engraved by G. Paterson. 

CORONA TION, a winner of the Derby, vol. 21, 1841 ; engraved by G. Paterson— 
SA TIRIST, winner of the St. Leger Stakes, 1841, vol. 21 ; engraved by E. 
Hacker. 

NEiV YEAR'S MORN, gamekeepers of the olden time going out, vol 22, 1842; en- 
graved by G. Paterson. 

ATTILA, winner of the Derby at Epsom 1842, vol. 23, 1842; engraved by E. Hacker— 
OUR NELL, winner of the Oaks 1842, vol. 23'; engraved by Hacker — BLUE 
BONNET, winner of the St. Leger 1842, vol. 23 ; engraved by E. Hacker. 

COTHERSTONE, winner of the Derby 1843, vol. 25, 1843 ; engraved by E. Hacker — 
NUTWITH, winner of the St. Leger 1843, vol. 25, 1843 ; engraved by E. Hacker. 

HOW HAPPY COULD I BE WITH EITHER ! a fox, vol. 29, 1845 ; engraved by 
J. R. Scott. 

PLATES IN THE SPORTING REVIEW {j in number). 

REYNARD'S LAST SHIFT, vol. i, 1839 ; engraved by R. Parr. 

(3) BLOOMSBURY, winner of the Derby 1839, vol. 2, 1839; engraved by J. W. Cook— 
DECEPTION, winner of the Oaks t339, vol. 2, 1839 ; engraved by T. A. Prior— 
CHARLES THE TWELFTH, winner of the St. Leger 1839, vol. 2, 1839; 
engraved by J. H. Engleheart. 



14 ANIMAL PAINTERS 

THE LAST LEAP, vol. 3, 1840 ; engraved by Geo. Paterson. 

j) LITTLE WONDER, winner of the Derby, 1840, vol. 4, r840 ; engraved by T. A. 

Prior— Z^ UiXCELOT AND MAROON, first and second for the St. Lcger 1S40, 

vol. 4, 1840 ; engraved by T. A Prior. 

PLATE IN THE SPORTSMAN. 

THE YOUNG FALCONER, vol. 9, 1838 ; engraved by H. Beckwith. 



15 



CHARLES COOPER HENDERSON. 

(Born 1803. Died 1877.) 

CHARLES COOPER HENDERSON was 
born on 14th June, 1803, at the Abbey 
House, Chertsey, in Surrey. He was the younger 
son of John Henderson by Georgiana Jane, only 
child of George Keate, F.R.S., the well-known 
man of letters and correspondent of Voltaire. Mr. 
John Henderson was himself an amateur artist of 
more than ordinary merit, and he engaged the 
celebrated painter Samuel Prout to give Charles 
and his brothers and sisters instruction in drawing. 

From the first Charles Cooper Henderson dis- 
played considerable artistic talent ; when still at 
school at Brighton, he made, among numerous 
drawings, a sketch of a famous character of the 
Brighton streets, "The Mouse-trap Man," which 
possessed such merit that it was published. From 
Brighton Henderson went to Winchester ; and on 
leaving, read for the Bar with Basevi the special 
pleader, who at the time had another pupil who was 
destined to make a name for himself in Connop 
Thirlwall, afterwards Bishop of St. David's. Basevi, 



1 6 ANIMAL PAINTERS 

it may be mentioned, was a brother of George 
Basevi, the architect. 

Henderson did not practise as a barrister. 
Having " eaten his dinners " he set out with his 
father on a prolonged tour through France and 
Spain. We recognise the fruit of his continental 
travels in some of his pictures ; it was thus that he 
obtained the knowledge of French horses, their 
harness, trappings and accessories of coaching, 
which he turned to such good account at a later 
date. 

In 1829, being then twenty-six years of age, he 
married Charlotte, daughter of Charles William By, 
cousin of Lieut.-Col. John By, of the Royal En- 
gineers. Colonel By is remembered as the con- 
structor of the Rideau Canal and the founder of 
Ottawa, which city was known after him as Bytown 
until 1858, when it was made the capital of the 
Dominion. A considerable portion of the land on 
which Ottawa stands was Colonel By's property, 
and on the death of Mrs. By it went to their 
children. 

Charles Cooper Henderson's marriage with Miss 
By was contracted against the wishes of his 
father, who forthwith disinherited him. Being thus 
thrown upon his own resources, he ignored the 
profession for which he had qualified, preferring 
to depend for a livelihood on his brush. For 



CHARLES COOPER HENDERSON I 7 

some few years he lived at Bracknell in Berkshire, 
afterwards taking up his quarters in London at 
Lamb's Conduit Street. From the date of his 
marriage until 1850 he was chiefly dependent for 
his income on the pictures he sold. In the year 
mentioned his mother died, and from her he 
inherited a fortune which relieved him of the 
necessity of earning his own living. 

The poverty courted by Charles Cooper Hen- 
derson was the gain of later generations. He made 
coaching scenes and incidents of the road his 
speciality, and to him we owe many truthful pictures 
of coaches and road travel in England and France 
in the earlier part of the century. Many of his 
works were engraved. Among these may be men- 
tioned " English Post-boys," " French Postillions," 
and "The Turnpike Gate," which were published 
by Rudolph Ackermann in 1834. " Road Scrapings " 
was the humorous title of a series of twelve plates 
which Henderson himself etched for publication by 
Calvert in 1840. These pictures consist of scenes 
of coach travelling in England and diligence travel 
in France ; they are full of national character and 
have all the value of contributions to social histor)\ 

On only two occasions was Henderson represented 
in the Royal Academy exhibitions ; in 1840 he sent 
in "The Edinburgh and Glasgow Mails parting 
Company," and in 1848 a French road scene, "The 

2 VOL. II. 



l8 ANIMAL PAINTERS 

Diligence of 1830." Several engravings from his 
pictures are to be found in the old sporting publica- 
tions, and the majority of these are coaching or 
kindred subjects. Vol. 151, 1868, of the Sporting 
Alagazine contains a plate engraved by E. Hacker, 
from "Over the Downs," a pair of post-horses in 
a storm. It is a clever drawing and full of the life 
and spirit which distinguished Henderson's work ; 
the post-boy's horse is fairly frightened, and the 
grey off-horse, dragging as a hand-horse will, at his 
bridle. The N'etv Sporting Magazine for 1841, 
vol. 20, contains an engraving by G. Paterson from 
" A Smash in Piccadilly," an incident which fur- 
nished Henderson with the subject of a spirited 
picture. The horses of the Bristol mail having 
started without driver or guard, ran into a coach 
standing at the park side, working havoc with their 
own vehicle and that with which they collided. 
Bailys Magazine for May, 1S92, contains an 
engraving by Mr. F. Babbage from Henderson's 
" Coaching in the Olden Days." 

The artist did not confine his brush entirely to 
the portrayal of road incidents. The Sporting 
Review, vol. i, for 1839, contains a plate by 
Richard Parr from his painting " The Berkeley 
Hunt ; " and vol. 2 for the same year, a plate 
engraved by T. A. Prior, from " The Earth 
Stopper." 




CHARLES COOPER HENDERSON 



CHARLES COOPER HENDERSON I9 

" The Temple of Fancy " was engraved and 
published by Fullers ; other pictures particularly 
deserving of notice are, " Going to the Fight," 
"Travelling in France," "The Old Six-horse 
Diligence." 

Mr. George Henderson, of 3, Bloomsbury Place, 
possesses three interesting specimens of his father's 
later works. One, described in the artist's hand- 
writing on the back as " A London Particular," i8 
inches by ii^- inches, painted about the year 1873, 
is a difficult subject very cleverly treated. It repre- 
sents market-gardeners, men and women, making 
their way through a dense fog on the road near 
Brentford. Two of the figures, carrying large 
baskets over their heads and wearing men's coats 
and gaiters, might be mistaken for men. This was, 
however, the working dress of the women of the 
period. Mr. Henderson says, " I often remember 
meeting gangs of these people when driving with 
my father years ago." A water-colour of " Horses 
in a Stable," 8|- inches by 12 inches, shows the 
painter's mastery of equine anatomy ; and " Pair of 
Horses in a Mail Phaeton," 12 inches by 17 inches 
wide, is full of spirit ; a man on horseback rides 
by the carriage, but only the pair in harness are 
finished, the phaeton, its occupant and the rider 
with his horse being sketched in. 

It would seem that necessity alone kept Hender- 



20 ANIMAL I'AIXTF.KS 

son at work in London, for in 1850, on inheriting 
his fortune, he went to reside at Lower Halliford on 
the Thames and gave up painting for several years. 
Many will remember the yellow mail-phaeton in 
which he used to drive a well-matched, old-fashioned 
pair of roans in the Park during the London season. 
In his later years he again took up the palette and 
brush, but only as means of amusement and occu- 
pation. 

Charles Cooper Henderson died on 21st August, 
1877 ■ he was buried in the catacombs of Kensal 
Green, and a brass tablet to his memory was placed 
in the church at Shepperton. By his wife, who 
died in 1858, he had seven sons and two daughters ; 
his eldest surviving son is Major-General Kennett 
Greg Henderson, C. B., who recently commanded 
the garrison at Alexandria. 

Bailys Magazine for September, 1877, contains 
the following appreciative tribute to Henderson's 
works : — 

" We saw reported in the Times, lately, the death of Charles 
Cooper Henderson, the well-known painter of coaching and 
road scenes, whose pictures at the late exhibition in Bond 
Street were the gems of the collection. His loss is to be 
much regretted. It is not too much to say that what Mr. 
Apperley's (' Nimrod's ') pen did for the road was equally 
well done by Mr. Henderson's brush. For spirit and truth of 
detail he was unrivalled, and his pictures now will liave a 
double value, and be counted as treasures in every sportsman's 
house." 



WORKS 01- CHARLES COOPER HENDERSON 2 1 

John Henderson, elder brother of the artist, was 
the great collector of works of art who bequeathed 
the most valuable part of his treasures to the 
nation. None of his brother's works found their 
way into the national collections ; Mr. John Hen- 
derson doubtless, felt that his relatives had the 
prior claim. 



WORKS OF .CHARLES COOPER HENDERSON. 

PICTURES EXHIBITED IN THE ROYAL ACADEMY 
(2 in number). 

YEAR 

1840— r//A EDINBURGH AND CLASGOIV MAILS PARrjNC COMPANY. 
!S4S—7'//£ DILIGENCE OF 1830. 

PLATE IN THE SPORTING MAGAZINE. 

Ol'ER THE DOWNS, i368, vol. 151 ; engraved by E. Hacker. 

PLATES IN THE NEIV SPORTING MAGAZINE (s in number). 

A SMASH IN PICCADILLY, 1841, vol. 20; engraved by G. Paterson. 

A SCENE ON THE ROADSIDE, 1841, vol. 2: ; engraved by H. Guesl. 

U)— FRENCH HORSES, 1842, vol. 23 ; engraved by W. B. Scott— .'I SCENE ON THE 

GREAT NORTH ROAD, 1842, vol. 23 ; engraved by Perren. 
THE ROAD TO COVER, 1843, vol. 23 J engraved by McCabe. 

PLATES IN THE SPORTING REVIEW (3 in number). 

THE BERKELEY HUNT, 1S39, vol. : ; engraved by R. Parr. 

THE EARTH STOPPER, 1839, vol. 2 ; engraved by T. A. Prior. 

THE If'AV IVE SHOULD CO, 1840, vol. 4 ; engraved by J. H. Engleheatt. 



22 



JOHN F. HERRING. 

(Born 1795. Died 1865.) 

JOHN F. HERRING was born in Surrey in 
^ 1795- He was the son of a London merchant 
or tradesman who was born in America and came 
of a Dutch family. The artist, therefore, though 
British born and essentially British in his tastes, 
can hardly be considered a pure Englishman. 

Herring's earlier career was somewhat chequered. 
At school he was usually to be found with either a 
whip or pencil in hand, both of them tools which 
indicated his proclivities. His fondness of drawing- 
seems to have manifested itself at an early age, but 
his genius — for genius it deserves to be called — did 
not develope until later. Until about eighteen 
years of age he remained at home, where he must 
have enjoyed opportunity to acquire proficiency in 
handling a four-in-hand, and also have studied 
painting. Herring at this age appears to have been 
inspired with ambition to "seek his fortune," for 
happening one day in the summer of 18 14 to see 
"Doncaster" on the door of the Royal Leeds 
Union coach which ran between London and 

Leeds, he determined to go to Doncaster. 



JOHN F. HERRING 23 

His movements when he reached the famous 
northern racincj centre seem to show that he had 
no very definite idea as to the manner in which 
he proposed to earn a HveHhood. He saw the 
Duke of Hamilton's WilHam win the St. Leger, 
and, impressed with the winner of the first race he 
had ever seen in his Hfe, endeavoured to paint a 
picture of the horse. In this he failed : it can be 
imagined the work was a feeble attempt, as he 
had yet to learn the anatomy of the horse and to 
master subjects necessary for a picture. 

His next essay in art was of more modest descrip- 
tion. Wandering through the town one day, he 
saw in a coach-builder's shop a young man en- 
deavouring to paint upon the door of a new coach 
an equestrian portrait of the Duke of Wellington, 
emblematical of the name of the vehicle — " Com- 
mander-in-Chief." The young coach-painter was 
trying to follow one of Aiken's sketches, but his 
talents were unequal to the task of correctly 
drawing a horse, and Herring observing it prof- 
fered his services. His aid was accepted, and 
he executed the commission so much to the satis- 
faction of the young coach-painter that he was 
employed to paint its insignia, a white lion and 
a reindeer respectively, on the doors of the 
" Royal Forester," another coach. 

Herring at this juncture would appear to 



24 ANIMAL I'AINTERS 

have abandoned any intention he may have 
cherished of earning his bread by means of his 
brush, for he used the introduction to Mr. Wood, 
a coach proprietor, which his coach-door painting- 
procured him, to apply for the vacant seat on the 
box of the Wakefield coach, on the strength of 
his amateur experience gained when living at 
home with his parents. Mr. Wood, not unnatu- 
rally, had his doubts concerning the ability of an 
artist to act as coachman, but Herring evidently 
possessed the valuable gift of making people believe 
in him, for it was arranged that he should be 
Lriven a trial. He was allowed to drive the 
"Highflyer" a day's journey on the London and 
York road, and his employment was made con- 
tingent on the good opinion of the up and down 
coachmen of the day. The fact that the report 
of these judges of the road was favourable points 
to Herring's previous experience on the box, and 
their verdict secured for him the desired seat 
on the Wakefield and Lincoln coach " Nelson." 
It is evident that whilst in his teens at home he 
had been well tutored by some good coachman 
who drove the road from his father's country house 
into London. 

For nearly two years he continued to drive this 
coach, afterwards taking his seat on the box of the 
Doncaster and Halifax mail, which he drove for a 



JOHN V. HERRING 25 

short time:. According to the " Druid " {Scoii & 
Stbn'gkt), he " had thrown aside the reins in Jack 
Spigot's year, and fairly cast in his lot with the 
mahl-stick." As Jack Spigot won the St. Leger 
in 1 82 1, we may conclude that Herring spent at 
least five or six years as coachman. He did not 
neglect the brush during this period ; all along the 
road he could point to inn sign-boards and coach 
panels he had painted, and also to portraits of 
horses in inn parlours, the work of his spare hours. 
These works of art brought him into notice, and 
he became known as the "artist coachman." He 
made considerable progress during this time, for 
we find that in the year 1818, two years before he 
is said to have finally abandoned the box, he ex- 
hibited the " Portrait of a Dog " at the Royal 
Academy. In the same year he began to con- 
tribute to the Loudon Gentleman. 

While driving" the Doncaster and Halifax coach 
Herring married, and when he gave up " the 
ribbons " settled for a time at Doncaster. He 
spent eleven years here altogether, and afterwards 
betook himself to Fulbourn, near Newmarket, 
where he remained for three years. After leaving 
Fulbourn he took up his abode in Camberwell to 
study under Abraham Cooper, R.A., a circumstance 
worth mention as reflecting the character of the 
man. Bv this lime he had achieved success as a 



26 ANIMAL PAINTERS 

painter of horse portraits, but, conscious that he 
had something to learn which he could not teach 
himself, sought out one of the most able animal 
painters of the day, from whom to gain instruc- 
tion. He had to some extent studied equine 
anatomy in his coaching days, as witness his 
drawing of Spartan's fractured leg, which was 
reproduced in the volume of the Sporting Maga- 
zine for 1 8 19. Spartan was a bay horse belonging 
to Lord Derby ; one of the small bones near the 
pastern was " completely pulverised," says the 
" Druid," by his break-down. 

We can trace Herring's career as an artist from 
the year 18 18, the date of his first contribution to 
the Royal Academy exhibition and the beginning 
of his connection with the London Gcntlonan. The 
first of his horse portraits to be engraved for 
publication in the Sporting Magazine was that of 
Sultan, a hunter belonging to the Hon. E. Petre, 
which appears in the volume for 1820. His success 
was immediate, for examination of the list of his 
pictures shows that he became the painter of win- 
nine race-horses at Doncaster from that date. He 
executed portraits of the following winners of the 
St. Leger : — Jack Spigot, 1821; Theodore, 1822; 
Barefoot, 1823 ; Jerry, 1824, and Memnon, 1825, 
all of which were engraved for reproduction. 

These five pictures prove that Herring found 



JOHN F. HERRING 27 

his artistic abilities in request as soon as he 
renounced his seat on the coach- box. He painted 
portraits of nearly all the celebrated horses running 
on the turf for thirty-three years. A complete 
collection of his race horses would form prac- 
tically a pictorial history of the English turf during 
that period. 

We cannot attempt to give a list of Herring's 
race-horse portraits, but a few of those represent- 
ing the more famous animals may be mentioned : 
Touchstone, who started twenty-one times, won 
nine races, including the St. Leger, 1834; walked 
over for seven and lost five ; Queen of Trumps, 
winner of the Oaks and St. Leger, 1835 ; Elis, 
winner of numerous races, ending with the St. 
Leger, 1836 ; Bay Middleton, winner of the Two 
Thousand and Derby, 1836 ; Cyprian, winner 
of the Oaks, 1836 ; Phosphorus, winner of the 
Derby, 1837 ; Miss Letty, winner of the Oaks, 
1837; Don John, winner of the St. Leger, 1838; 
Crucifix, winner of the One Thousand, Two 
Thousand, and Oaks, 1840 ; Coronation, winner 
of the Derby, 1841 ; Ghuznee, winner of the 
Oaks, 1841 ; Nutwith, winner of the St. Leger 
1843 ; Orlando, winner of the Derby, 1844 ; 
Faugh-a-Ballagh, winner of the Two Thousand 
and Cesarewitch, 1844; Merry Monarch, winner 
of the Derby, 1845 ; The Baron, winner of the St. 



28 ANIMAL I'AINTERS 

Leger and Cesarewitch, 1845 ; Pyrrhus ist, winner 
of the Derby, 1846 ; Mendicant, winner of the 
One Thousand and Oaks, 1846 ; Sir Tatton 
Sykes, winner of the St. Leger and Cesarewitch, 
1846. Camarine, whose portrait Herring painted, 
was a remarkable mare. Foaled in 1828 she 
ran in neither the Derby nor the Oaks of her 
year but had a highly successful turf career, 
beating among others in 1831, Spaniel, winner 
of that year's Derby ; Oxygen, winner of the Oaks 
of that year; and in 1832 she beat Rowton, 
winner of the St. Leger of 1829. 

Smolensko, winner of the Two Thousand and 
Derby of 1813, and Comus are said by " Druid" 
to have been the first race horses on whose portraits 
Herring tried his 'prentice hand. The same writer, 
who visited the artist at Meopham Park, near 
Tunbridge Wells, in the early sixties, says : "His 
great racing pictures were generally got by the aid 
of a sketch-book, with ideal horses and jockeys, 
which a few strokes from life at the post con- 
verted into portraits." The "Druid" was able at 
Meopham Park to trace " in a pictured line the 
Cotherstone pedigree on both sides till the Whale- 
bone and Whisker strains united." 

Among his many portraits of hunters those of 
Everton, a bay belonging to Mr. J. Maunsell 
Richardson ; Sultan, a favourite of the Hon. E. 



JOHN F. HERRING 29 

Petre, and Pantomime, by Grimaldi, may be men- 
tioned as particularly good examples of Herring's 
art. 

Herring was fond of the Arab, and the horse that 
figures most frequently in his pictures (other than 
portraits) is the white stallion Imaum, one of the 
four first horses sent by the Imaum of Muscat to 
Her Majesty. He was presented to the Clerk of 
the Royal stables, who sold him at Tattersall's. 
Imaum was an invaluable " property horse." When 
Herring required a model for the dead horses to be 
portrayed in a picture of the Battle of Waterloo, 
he sent for a black trainer, named Pedro, from 
Batty's Circus, who taught the Arab to lie down. 
A few lessons made him so complete a trick horse 
that Pedro declared he wanted only youth to beat 
out of the field all the accepted favourites of the 
circus ring. He was a stout one, too, as we are 
told that Herring drove him, with an English horse, 
about seventy-five miles in one day from Camber- 
well to Stevenage and back, when he was paint- 
ing his picture " Steeplechase Cracks " for Lord 
Strathmore. 

It is worth drawing attention to the fact that, as 
in the case of Thomas Gooch, few horse portraits — 
and of these only one of a classic winner, namely, 
Rockingham shown in 1838 — occur in Herring's 
list of twenty-two works sent to the Royal 



30 ANIMAL PAINTERS 

Academy. Mindful perhaps of the tastes of the 
wider public for whom that exhibition caters, he 
most frequently sent scenes of country life in 
which horses figure as more or less conspicuous 
accessories. The Sporting Magazine s Academy 
critic remarks of the portrait of Slane, winner 
of the Waterloo Shield at Goodwood, shown in 
1838, that it "seems to add point to a remark 
that has been made, and that not unfrequently, 
that Herring's portraits are always in a quiet 
position, with the head either one way or the 
other; it may be incorrect, but it is certainly borne 
out by the two in the exhibition and of many 
within memory ; nevertheless it is in the painter's 
best style and must be prized as a finished 
portrait." 

Herring's rural scenes are remarkable for the 
wonderful delicacy and finish of the minor details ; 
the poultry and other fowls introduced in his 
numerous farmyard pictures are always wonder- 
fully painted. So much of his attention was 
bestowed upon pictures of this class in his later 
years that we find a critic complaining that 
" Herrinof grows more and more of an as^ri- 
culturist," " The Timber Carriage," " Going to 
the Fair," " The Frugal Meal," " Members of the 
Temperance Society," and "The Ferry " are good 
examples of Herring's achievements in this school 
of painting. 



JOHN F. HERRING 3 I 

Rarely has an animal painter been more suc- 
cessful than this artist coachman, who first made 
a name by painting coach panels and signs for inns. 
He received commissions from King George IV., 
William IV. and Her Majesty. The Queen indeed 
paid Herring more than ordinary attention ; in his 
later years he suffered much from asthma, and 
Her Majesty, learning that the malady confined 
him to the house, sent down three of her horses 
for him to paint. It may have been mere accident, 
but it is quite likely that the Sovereign knew the 
artist's love of the Arab, and therefore sent three 
Easterns to stand for their portraits ; these were 
Bagdad, a charger of the late Prince Consort's, 
Korsaid, and Said the horse on which the Royal 
children had been taught to ride. The portrait 
of the last named, painted in an Eastern landscape, 
is in the Royal collection at Osborne. For the 
Due d'Orleans Herring went over to Paris to paint 
portraits of five racehorses. 

Portraits of greyhounds, hunting and shooting 
pieces, occur among Herring's pictures but, some- 
what curiously, works inspired by his early ac- 
quaintance with practical coachmanship are few. 
We find works of this character wholly wanting 
in the long lists of pictures which were reproduced 
in the sporting publications of the time. It is by 
his portraits of horses, and more especially portraits 



32 ANIMAL PAINTERS 

of great racehorses, that Herring's name will be held 
in remembrance. 

Herring passed his later years at Meopham Park 
near Tunbridge Wells ; and there he died on 23rd 
September, 1865, at the age of seventy years. 

The works of this artist fetch high prices when 
they come into the market, as witness the following- 
instances of sales : — 

At Christie's, in 1884, "An English Homestead," 
with a grey horse, painted in 1852, realised 350 
guineas. In 1887, a joint work by J. F. Herring 
and H. Bright, entitled "The Return from Deer- 
Stalking," painted in 1852, realised 530 guineas; 
and in 1892, " Market Day at St. Albans," painted 
in 1858, realised 265 guineas 

WORKS OF J. F. HERRING. 

EXHIBITED IN THE ROYAL ACADEMY (22 in number). 

YEAR 

i^ii— PORTRAIT OF A DOG. 

liid—THVRSIS, a favourite hunter, the propertj- of Sir George Sitwell, Bart. 

iSio-ia) /.VT£R /OR OF A STABLE — VELOCIPEDE, the property of W. 

Armitage, Esq. 
\ii,i—(i) ROCKINGHAM, the property of John Theob.-iltl, ^^.—SLANE, the 

property of Colonel Peel, and winner of the Waterloo Shield at Goodwood, in 1837. 
1840— (2) THE FARM-YARD— GOING TO PLOUGH. 
iZk—FA VOURITES. 

i%^b— GENERAL SHUBRWS T\VO-Y EAR-OLD COLT BROCARDO. 
i863-<2) THE FARM, AUTU.MN— WATERING THE TEAM. 
1864— (3) FARM-YARD— HORSES AND POULTRY— HORSES, PIGS &'c. 
1865— (2) THE OLD LODGE— HORSES FEEDING. 
ii66— WATERING THE TEAM. 

i867-(2) THE FARMER'S FRIEND-HORSES FEEDING. 
i368— (2) HORSES AND POULTRY— DANGEROUS PLAY 



^f 




^ :^ 




J F. HERRING 



WORKS OF JOHN F. HERRING 33 

IN THE NATIONAL GALLERY OF BRITISH ART. 
Vernon Collection. 

A SCANTY MEAL, the heads of three horses, two white and one dark brown ; they 
are eating hay on which two pigeons rest. 



PLATES IN THE SPORTING MAGAZINE (49 in number). 

THE FRACTURED LEG OF SPARTAN, a bay horse, the property of Lord Derby. 

1819, vol. 53. 
SULTAN, a celebrated hunter, the property of the Hon. E. Petre, 1820, vol. 57; 

engraved by J. Scott, 
MULATTO, a bay horse, foaled in 1823, bred by, and the property of, the Rt. Hon. 

Earl FitzwilUam, 1S2S, vol. 72 ; engraved by J. Webb. 
MATILDA, a bay mare, foaled in 1824, bred by the Hon. E. Petre, 1829, vol. 73; 

engraved by R. Woodman. 
FAIR HELEN^z. grey mare, foaled in 1817, bred by, and the property of, the Marquis 

of Queensbury, 1831, vol. 77 ", engraved by J. R. Scott. 
A FAVOURITE COB, the property of Lieut.-Gen. Sir John Heron Maxwell, Bart., 1831, 

vol. 78 ; engraved by H. R. Cook. 
QUEEN OF TRUMPS, 1835, vol. 87 ; engraved by J. R. Scott. 
(3) DOVER, son of Patron, a bright bay, foaled 1832, and for his extraordinary beauty 

and symmetry, bone and substance, was selected for exportation as a stallion to 

New South Wales, for the purpose of improving the breed of horses there, 1836, vol. 

88; engraved by"^ J. R. Szoit— BAY MIDDLETON, property of the Earl 

of Jersey in 1836. 1836, vol. 88; engraved by J. R. ^coW — CYPRIAN, 1836, 

vol. 88 ; engraved by J. Engleheart. 
(5) ELIS, property of The Earl of Lichfield, 1836, vol. 89 ; engraved by J. R. Scott — 

PANTOMIME, a favourite hunter, 1836, vol. 89; engraved by J. R. Scott— 

OCTOBER SHOOTING, 1836, vol. 89; engraved by T. S. Engleheart — 

CAMARINE, bred by Lord Berners, 1836, vol. 89; engraved by H. Beckwith 

— LUCETTA, foaled in 1826. 1837, vol. 89 ; engraved by J. R. Scott. 
is) PHOSPHOR US, bred by Lord Berners, 1837, vol. 90; engraved by J. H. Engleheart 

—MISS LETTY, winner of the Oaks, 1837, vol. 90 ; engraved by T. S. ¥.Ti^^- 

h^ait— TOUCHSTONE, bred by the Marquis of Westminster, 1837, vol. 90; 

engraved by T. S. Engleheart — A MOOR SCENE, 1837, vol. 90; engraved by J. 

H. Engleheart — HORNSEA, a celebrated racehorse, 1837, vol. 90; engraved 

by J. H. EnglehearL 
GAZELLE, an Arabian, brought to England by — Sawj'er, Esq., for breeding pur- 
poses, 1842, vol. 100 ; engraved by J. H. Engleheart. 
(5) PYRRHUS THE FIRST, bred by Mr. John Day in 1843, property of John Gully, 

Esq., 1846,, vol. 108: engraved by E. 'ilsiQ\i.&r— MENDICANT, 1846, vol. 108; 

engraved by E. Hacker— r/j^^ HIGH-METTLED RACER, 1846, vol. io8 ; 

engraved by E. Hacker— 5/j? TATTON SYKES, 1846, vol. 108; engraved by 

E. Hacker— r//^ HIGH-METTLED RACER, 1S46, vol. 108, engraved by E. 

Hacker. 
(4) THE HIGH-METTLED RACER, plate 8, 1S47 vol. log ; engraved by E. Hacker 

— THE HIGH-METTLED RACER, plate 9, 1847, vol. 109; engraved by E. 

Hacker — THE SWITCHER, property of the Earl of Strathmore, 1847, vol. 

109; engraved by E. Hacker— /■//£ HIGH-METTLED RACER, plate lo 

1847, vol* 109 ; engraved by E. Hacker. 

a VOL. II. 



34 ANIMAL PAINTERS 

(2) THE HIGH-METTLED RACER, plate 11, 1847, vol. no; engraved by E. Hacker 

— THE HIGH-METTLED RACER, plate 12, 1847, vol. no; engraved by 
E. Hacker. 

(3) THE STEEPLECHASE, plate i, 1848, vol. in; engraved by E. Hacker— 

ALARM, 1848, vol. Ill ; engraved by E. Hacker — THE STEEPLE- 
CHASE, plate 2, 1848, vol. 3 ; engraved by E. Hacker. 

(2) THE STEEPLE-CHASE, plate 3, 1848, vol. 112 ; engraved by E. H^keY—THE 
STEEPLE-CHASE, plate 4, 1848, vol. 112 ; engraved by E. Hacker. 

(2) THE STEEPLECHASE, plate s, 1849, vol. 113; engraved by E. Hacker— r/Zj? 
STEEPLE-CHASE, plate 6, 1849, vol. 113; engraved by E. Hacker. 

THE PASSIONS OF THE HORSE, plate i, 1853, voL 121 ; engraved by E. Hacker. 

THE PASSIONS OF THE HORSE, plate 2, 1853, vol. 122 ; engraved by E. Hacker. 

THE PASSIONS OF THE HORSE, plate 3, 1854, vol. 123 ; engraved by E. Hacker. 

THE PASSIONS OF THE HORSE, plate 4, 1854, vol. 124 ; engraved by E. Hacker. 

(2) NOT EXACTLY, 1855, vol. 125; engraved by E. Hacker— r//£ PASSIONS OF 
THE HORSE, plate 5, 1855, vol. 125, engraved by E. Hacker. 

THE PASSIONS OF THE HORSE, plate 6, 1855, vol. 126 ; engraved by E. Hacker. 

" DONE HANDSOME," 1856, vol. 127 ; engraved by E. Hacker. 

"HAS BEEN RIDDEN WITH HOUNDS" (after a fashion), 1857, vol. 129; 
engraved by E. Hacker. 

THE WARREN HILL, 1859, vol. 133; engraved by E. Hacker. 

PLATES IN THE NEW SPORTING MAGAZINE (14 in 

number). 

(2) ORLANDO, vol. 27 ; engraved by HxkeT—FA L/GH-A-BALLAGH, 1844, vol. 27; 
engraved by E. Hacker. 

(4) LEVITV. the property of J. C. Cockerill, Esq., and her foal, QUEEN ELIZA- 

BETH, the latter being one of the last of the stock of Mr. Theobald's celebrated 
camel, purchased by Lord Dorchester, vol. 28 ; engraved by E. Hacker — 
HETMAN PLATOFF, a bay horse, bred by John Bowes, Esq., in 1836. 
1845, vol. zS ; engraved by J. Scott — EMMA, a chestnut mare, property of 
John Bowes, Esq., 1845, vol. 28; engraved by E. Hacker— .-I.ff/.S7'/Z)£'i', a bay 
horse, bred and owned by the Earl of Eglinton, 1845, vol. 28 ; engraved by E. 
Hacker. 

(2) THE MERRY MONARCH, winner of the Derby, 1845. 1845, vol. 29, engraved 
by E. Hacker — THE BARON, a dark chestnut horse, 1845, vol. 29 ; engraved by 
E. Hacker. 

(6) THE HIGH-METTLED RACER, plate i, THE FOAL, 1846, vol. 30; engraved by 
E. B.^ket—SlVEET.'ilEAT, property of Arthur W. Hill, Esq., 1846, vol. 30; 
engraved by E. Hacker— r//j5: HIGH-METTLED RACER, plate 11, BREAK- 
ING, 1846, vol. 30 ; engraved byE. Hacker— 7'//£' HIGH-METTLED RACER, 
plate 3, THE SIVEA T, 1846, vol. 30 ; engraved by E. Hacker— 7"//£ HIGH- 
METTLED RACER, plate 4, THE START, 1846, vol. 30; engraved byE. 
Hacker — THE HIGH-METTLED RACER, plate 5, THE RACE, 1846, 
vol. 30 ; engraved by E. Hacker. 

PLATES IN THE SPORTING REVIEW {ii in number). 

DON JOHN, 1839, vol. I ; engraved by J. R. Scott. 

CRUCIFIX, a mare bred by Lord Chesterfield in 1837. 1840, vol. 4; engraved by T. 
R. Prior. 



WORKS OF JOHN F. HERRING 35 

(a) CORONA TION, bred and owned by Mr. Rawlinson, 1841, vol. 6 ; engraved by E. 

Hacker— CNl/ZN£-E, a filly, bred by the Marquis of Westminster, r84i, vol. 

6 ; engraved by E. Hacker. 
(3) THE FIND, 1842, vol. 7 ; engraved by H. B. MM— THE FINISH, 1842, vol. 7 ; 

engraved by H. B. HM-THE WATERING PLACE, 1842, vol. 7; engraved 

by H. B. Hall. 
NUTU'ITH, 1843, vol. 10 ; engraved by E. Hacker. 
(3) TOUCHSTONE, property of the Marquis of Westminster, 1844, vol. 11 ; engraved 

by E. Kackcr—GIBSIDE F'AIRi', property of John Bowes, Esq., r844, vol. 

II ; engraved by E. UacVtr—FILHO DA PUTA, winner of the St. Leger. 

1815. 1844, vol. II ; engraved by E. Hacker. 



PLATES IN THE ANNALS OF SPORTING (19 in number). 

(2) JACK SPIGOT, 1822, vol. i: engraved by Sutherland— /YX/ZO DA PUTA, 1S22, 

vol. 1 ; engraved by Sutherland. 
THEODORE, 1822, vol. 2 ; engraved by J. Webb. 

MAGISTRA TE, bred by Major Bower, 1S23, vol. 3 ; engraved by Sutherland. 
BLACKLOCK, a celebrated racehorse, 1823, vol. 4 ; engraved by Sutherland. 
BAREFOOT, 1824, vol. 5 ; engraved by H. R. Cook. 
JERRY, property of, and bred by, R. G. Gascoigne, Esq., 1S24, vol. 6; engraved by W. 

R. Smith. 

(2) WANTON, THEODORE, AND MA V-DA V, running for the Gold Tureen at Leeds, 

June 24th, 1824. 1825, vol. 7 ; engraved by Smith — FLY,z. celebrated geryhound, 
1824, vol. 7 ; engraved by Scott. 
{■2) FIGARO, property of A. Farquharson, Esq., 1825, vol. 8; engraved by Scott — 
MEMNON, 1825, vol. 8 ; engraved by Scott. 

(3) WHISKER, a bay horse, bred by the Duke of Grafton, 1826, vol. 9 ; engraved by 

Scoit—FIGHTING HORSES, 1826, vol. g; engraved by ?>co\.t— LOTTERY 
(first called Tinker), bred by R. Watt, Esq. 1826, vol. g ; engraved by Scott. 

MANDANE, a good brood mare, 1826, vol. 10 ; engraved by P. Roberts. 

BEDLAMITE, bred by Lord Kennedy, 1827, vol. 11 ; engraved by Scott. 

(2) FLEUR-DE-LIS, a bay filly, bred by Sir M. W. Ridley, 1827, vol. 12 ; engraved by 
Westley — SAM, a celebrated pointer, 1S27, vol. 12, engraved by T. Landseer. 

MAMELUKE, winner of the Derby, 1827. 1828, vol. 13 ; engraved by J. Westley. 



36 



SAMUEL HOWITT. 

(Born 1750. Died 1824.) 

OAMUEL HOWITT, bom in the year 1750, 
^ was the scion of a Nottinghamshire Quaker 
family of independent means and good social posi- 
tion. The artist was one of the multitudinous 
grandchildren of Thomas Howitt and his wife 
Elizabeth Gosforth. Mary Strong, the mother 
of the latter, was a lady who was held in great 
respect in her circle. 

Samuel Howitt took up his residence at Chigwell, 
near Epping Forest, where, if we may judge by his 
subsequent work, the study of natural history and 
pursuit of field sports chiefly occupied him. At this 
time, it would seem, he enjoyed a competence that 
rendered it unnecessary for him to work for his live- 
lihood, and dabbled in art only as an amusement. 
Before long, however, he lost his fortune and found 
himself obliged to turn his talents to practical 
account ; he was either in immediate need, or being 
entirely self-taught, lacked confidence in his own 
ability, for instead of attempting independent work 
as an artist, he came to London and took a situation 



SAMUEL HOWITT 37 

as drawing-master in Dr. Goodenough's Academy 
at Ealing. 

We have no means of ascertaining how long he 
continued to hold this position. The next discover- 
able point in his career is the exhibition of three 
coloured drawings entitled " Hunting Subjects," at 
the gallery of the Society of British Artists in the 
year 1783, when he was thirty -three years of age. 
The Royal Academy catalogue of the following 
year, when he sent his first picture — a " Hunting 
Piece" — to that exhibition, gives his address there 
as 8, Coventry Street, Haymarket. We may fairly 
conclude, therefore, that in 1784, if not in the pre- 
vious year, Howitt had "found his feet" as an 
artist, and had severed his connection with the 
school at Ealing. 

In 1785, Howitt, then resident at Richmond in 
Yorkshire, sent two landscape pictures to the Royal 
Academy Exhibition, and eight years later, in 1793, 
we find him again in London at 4, Old Compton 
Street, Soho, and once more an exhibitor. His 
pictures in that year's exhibition were " Jacques and 
the Deer," and "A Fox Hunt." From the Old 
Compton Street address, in 1794, he sent in his 
picture of " Smugglers Alarmed." 

Howitt painted much in water colour, and some 
of his best work was done in this medium. Four 
water-colour drawings of " Fox Hunting," dated 



38 ANIMAL PAINTERS 

1 798, deserve mention both as works of art and as 
accurate presentments of the sport of the period : 
these are entitled respectively " Putting Hounds in 
Cover," "Away," "Full Cry," and "The Death." 
The collection at South Kensington includes six 
representative examples of Howitt's water-colour 
drawings : " In Full Cry," and " River with 
Anglers," we have him as the sportsman ; in "A 
Council of Animals " and " Lion and Lioness," the 
naturalist ; in " Netley Abbey," the landscape 
painter ; and in the " Country Horse Fair," the 
painter of rural scenes. It will be observed from 
the list of eno-ravinos which follows that Howitt 
excelled also as an engraver and etcher, executing 
the plates from many of his own pictures. 

Amonsf the best-known books for which the 
artist did plates must be mentioned the famous 
Thotights on Hunting, by Peter Beckford, an 
illustrated edition of which was published in 1 798, 
by D. Bremner, London. This contained six 
engravings illustrative of Hare Hunting, five of 
Fox Hunting, and others. 

" British Sportsmen " was the title of a work by 
the artist ; it contained seventy-two plates and was 
published by S. Gosnell in 1800. A second edition 
of this work containing seventy plates was published 
in 181 2 by Edward Orme. 

In the year 1800, after an interval of six years, 



SAMUEL HOWITT 39 

Howitt again exhibited at tlie Royal Academy, 
sending in two pictures, each described as " Deer." 
He was now living at 40, Charing Cross. His con- 
tributions were altogether few and fitful ; after the 
year 1800, his name is missing from the catalogues 
for thirteen years ; in 18 14, his address being then 
given as Bullock's Museum, Piccadilly, he sent in a 
painting of "Dead Game"; and in the following 
year was exhibited his last Royal Academy picture, 
a work entitled " Bella, Horrida Bella." 

It may have been that Howitt's knowledge of 
sport, and acquaintance with the habits of animals 
wild and domestic brought him so much work as an 
illustrator and engraver that he could spare little 
time for the execution of pictures for exhibition. 
From the beginning of his artistic career until he 
died he was a most diligent workman ; the number 
of pictures, almost exclusively sporting scenes and 
natural history subjects, which he left behind him, 
sufficiently prove his industry ; the number of his 
engravings and etchings, too, must be remembered 
in estimating his output. A free and animated style 
characterises his drawings and engravings ; many 
of his works show distinct similarity of touch to 
those of his brother-in-law Thomas Rowlandson, the 
famous caricaturist and designer. It may well be 
that Rowlandson's style influenced that of the man 
who married his sister, and with whom in con- 
sequence, he was for long closely associated. 



40 ANIMAL PAINTERS 

Sporting Anecdotes, published in 1804, contains 
some plates by Samuel Howitt. Captain Thomas 
Williamson's Oi'iental Field Sports in two volumes, 
for long the standard work on the subject, was 
illustrated with sixty plates by Howitt. This book 
was published in 1808, and contains "a complete 
description of the wild sports of the East, exhibiting 
the natural history of the elephant, tiger, &c." 
Hewitt's drawings were made from Captain 
Williamson's own designs, made during his twenty 
years' residence in Bengal. 

A New Work of Animals, which was issued in 
parts, commencing January, 1 809, by Edward Orme, 
contained one hundred etchings from drawings 
taken from life. The plan of the book is set out in 
the following advertisement, which occurs between 
title page and frontispiece : — 

The publisher respectfully informs the admirers of Mr. 
Hewitt's performances, the lovers of natural history and the 
public at large, that this work is intended to form a most 
unique collection of animals which, strange as it may appear, 
has never before been done by any British artist. Mr. Howitt 
has preferred representing most of the animals in fables, as 
allowing more scope for delineating the expression, the 
character and the passions ; it also affords an opportunity 
to give a portraiture of many different species of quadrupeds 
and birds. The artist, studious to attain correctness, hopes 
he may deserve the approbation of the natural historian, and 
assist the pencil of the designer who has not had an oppor- 
tunity to pay the same attention to this branch of the art. 



SAMUEL HOWITT 4 1 

Copies of A New Work of Animals with the 
plates coloured by hand were also published. 

Foreign Field Sports, by T. Heaviside Clark, 
which was published in 1814, contained 1 10 
coloured plates, including a supplement representing 
the sports of New South Wales, many of which 
were executed by Howitt. 

British Preserves, published in 1823, by Sher- 
wood, Gilbert and Piper, of London, contained 
forty-three plates from Howitt's drawings of wild 
animals and birds. 

Many of his pictures were engraved after his 
death. In the Aimals of Sporting for the years 
1826, 1827, and 1828, we find three plates, "Phea- 
sants Basking," " Partridges " and " Bloodhounds," 
engraved from Howitt's works. 

The volumes of the New Sporting Magazine for 
1832, 1837, and 1840, contain plates "from his 
pictures, "Owls," "Leopard seizing an Antelope," 
and " Elk pursued by Wolves." The Sporting 
Review of 1843 contains "Deer in Windsor 
Forest." 

There are many examples of his works in the 
Print Room of the British Museum. The National 
Dictionary of Biography states that Mrs. Samuel 
Hastings, great granddaughter of the artist, pos- 
sesses a large number of his works. 

As examples of Samuel Howitt's skill in animal 



42 ANIMAL PAINTERS 

drawing and of his sporting works we reproduce 
two pictures. " Taking Wild Horses on the Plains 
of Moldavia " appeared in the Sportmg Magazine of 
1 80 1, in illustration of an article on the subject of 
catching the horse, which run, or then ran wild on 
the plains of Moldavia, Wallachia and new Servia. 
This work was etched for reproduction by Howitt 
himself. " The Chase " (p. 38) was suggested by a 
passage from William Somerville's famous poem : 

Then to the copse, 

Thick with entangling grass, or prickly furze, 

With silence led thy many-colour'd hounds, 

In all their beauty's pride. See ! how they range 

Dispersed ; how busily, this way and that, 

They cross, examining, with curious nose, 

Each likely haunt. Hark ! on the drag I hear 

Their doubtful notes, preluding to a cry 

More nobly full, and swell'd with every mouth. 

As straggling armies, at the trumpet's voice, 

Press to their standard ; hither all repair, 

And hurry through the woods with hasty step, 

Rustling and full of hope ; now, driven in heaps. 

They push, they strive, while from his kennel sneaks 

The conscious villain. See ! he skulks along, 

Sleek, at the shepherd's cost, and plump, with meals 

Purloin'd : so thrive the wicked here below. 

Though high his brush he bear, though, tipped with white, 

It gaily shine, yet ere the sun, declined. 

Recall the shades of night, the pamper'd rogue 

Shall rue his fate, reversed ; and at his heels, 

Behold the just avenger, swift to seize 

His forfeit head, and thirsting for his blood. 

Howitt's connection with the Sporting Magazine 
began in the year 1793, and continued, with the 




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SAMUEL IIOWITT 43 

intermission of a period of the five years between 
1804 and 1 8 10, until his death. The 157 plates 
engraved from his pictures for the Magazine dealt 
with a wide variety of subjects ; some possess the 
peculiar interest attaching to extinct sports, as that 
of " Coursing the Bustard," which appeared in 1799. 
"Cherubim Shooting," which appears in vol. 17 
for 1 80 1, illustrated a popular anecdote of two 
cockneys who, having made a " sporting trip " into 
the country, shot an owl in the dusk of the evening. 
The large bright eyes, round face and snowy wings 
were new to the successful sportsman, who fainted 
on the spot, while his companion fled to the inn, 
calling on heaven to forgive the unfortunate man 
who had unintentionally shot one of the band of 
Cherubim. 

His knowledge of wild animals, obtained from 
imported captive specimens, is shown by the number 
of species whose names occur in this list. 

Samuel Hovvitt died in 1823, and was buried in 
St. Pancras Church-yard on 21st February. 

WORKS OF SAMUEL HOWITT. 

EXHIBITED IN THE ROY.-\L ACADEMY (lo in number). 

YEAR 

1784—^ HUNTING PIECE. 

178s— (2) VIEIV OF THE RUINS OF AN ABBEY, dedicated to St. Agatha, at 
Ayesby, near Richmond, Yorkshire — FAIRLOP OAK, on Hamault Forest, Essex. 
J793— (2) JACQUES AND THE DEER, a sketch from Shakspeare— ^ FOX HUNT. 
ijg^i—S.'UUCGLEKS ALAR.UED. 
1809-K2) DEER— DEER. 
lin—DEAD GA.ME. 
liii— BELLA, HORRIDA BELLA. 



44 ANIMAL PAINTERS 

IN THE SOUTH KENSINGTON MUSEUM. 

AV FULL C^K— water colour (No. 665). 

A COUNCIL OF AN/.1fALS—K^Mco\oax(No. ii)- 

L/OJV AND L/ONFSS—ws.tercohmi.'So. 3019). Signed. 

A^ETi^K W^fi^F— water colour (No. 11). Signed. 

RIVER WITH ANGLERS— iiaxer colour (No. 162). Signed. 

COUNTRY HORSE FAIR—viztei colour (No. 509). Signed 1793. 



PLATES IN THE SPORTING MAGAZINE (157 in number). 

(TV avoid repetition t/wse plates which luere etched by the artist himself are distinguished^ 

by aste risks\ 

WOODCOCK SHOOTING, 1753, vol. 3 ; engraved by Cook. 

(4) THE SPORTSMANS RETURN, 1796, vol. 8; engraved by J. 5cott— BULL 

BAITING, J796, vol. i— TOILING THE BUCK, 1796, vol. Z— HORSE AND 
LION, 1796, vol. 8. 

(5) FOXES, 1796, vol. g—DEER AND OUNCE, 1796, vol. g—COCK PIT ROVAL 

1796, vol. g— SNIPE SHOOTING, 1797, vol. g— ANGLING FOR SALMON 

1797, vol. 9. 

(4) DEER FIGHTING, ijgj, vol. 10; an etching— WOLF HUNTING, 1797, vol. 10; 

an etching- .5.E,i;f HUNTING, 1797, vol. 10; an etching ; HARRIERS, 1797, 
vol. 10 ; an etching. 

(5) A FOX-HUNTING BREAKFAST, 1797, vol. n; engraved by J. Scott— THE 

STAG HOUND, 1797, vol. 11 ; an etching-THE FOX HOUND, 1797, vol. 11 
—HORNPIPE LEAFING Ol-'ER PEPPERPOT, HIS RIDER AND THE 
FARMER'S SON, AT LINCOLN RACES ON FRIDAY, Sth SEPTEM- 
BER, 1797, vol. 11; engraved by J. Scott— CART-HORSES, 1797, vol. 11— 
THE CHARGER, 1798, vol. ji— THE PONY, 1798, vol. 11— RACE HORSES, 
1797, vol. II. 

(6) SPORTSMENS EMULATION, 1798, vol. 12; engraved by J. Scott— CO^IM/O- 

DORE TRUNNION, 1798, vol. 12— THE BULL-DOG,* 179S, vol. ii— PUG- 
DOG,'' 179S, vol. 1:2— ELEPHANT HUNTING,* 1798, vol. ii-PANTHER 
AND ANTELOPE,* 1798, vol. u. 

(6) ANTELOPE HUNTING, 1798, vol. 13— LIONESS, 1798, vol. 13— RHINOCEROS 
HUNTING, 1798, vol. 13— THE HIPPOPOTAMUS, 1799, vol. 13— BUFFALO 
HUNTING, 1799, vol. 13— KAINSI, OR ROCK-LEAPING ANTELOPE, 
1799, vol. 13. 

(9) SQUIRREL-HUNTING, 1799, vol. 14— HUNTERS, 1799, vol. 14— SWORD 
EXERCISE, Cut I, 1799, vol. 14; engraved by J. Scott— BATTLE OF THE 
BULL-DOG AND MONKEY, 1799, vol. 14— SWORD EXERCISE, Cut 2, 
1799, vol. 14; engraved by J. Scolt— COURSING THE BUSTARD, 1799, vol. 
14— Sll ORD EXERCISE, Cut 3, 1799, vol. 14; engraved by J. Scott— RURAL 
SPOR TS, MEN R UNNING IN SACKS,* 1799, vol. -^4— SWORD EXERCISE, 
Cut 4, 1799, vol. 14 ; engraved by J. Scott. 

((,) SWORD EXERCISE, Cut 5, 1799, vol. 15; engraved by J. Scott— CUDGEL 
PLA YING,* 1799, vol. IS— SWORD EXERCISE, Cut 6, 1799, vol. is— THE 

ASS RACE, 1799, vol. IS— BADGER HUNTING, 1800, vol. 15 CRUEL 

PUNISHMENT, 1800, vol. 15. 



WORKS OF SAMUEL HOWITT 45 

(5) PIKE FISHING," 1800, vol. i6—FATE OF A SHEEP-KILLING POINTER,- 

1800, vol. IS— GREYHOUNDS IN PURSUIT* 1800, vol. 16—REVNARD 

IN THE PIGSTY,' iSoo, vol. ib— FEMALE RUNNING MATCH,' 1800, 
vol. 15. 

(6) FOX AND HIS PREY," 1800, vol. ly— BATTLE BETWEEN THE HERONS 

AND ROOKS,' 1800, vol. XI— WILD CAT AND SPANIELS," iSoo, vol. 17— 
THE HARE IN ITS FORM, 1801, vol. ij— CHERUBIM SHOOTING,' 
j8oi, vol. ij-HOG WINNING A RACE AGAINST A MAN' (trained by 
being fed at the winning post) 1801, vol. 17. 
(6) THE PROLIFIC HARE,* 1801, vol. A— TWO HOGS,* one weighing 75 the other 
76 stone, 1801, vol. jS— SKITTLES,* 1801, vol. iS— TAKING WILD HORSES 
IN THE PLAINS OF MOLDAVIA,' 1801, vol. li—LION AND BUF- 
FALO,' 1801, vol. tZ—THE CA T AND THE RA T,* 1601, vol. i3. 

(5) RETURNING FROM THE INTENDED FIGHT, OCTOBER x-zth,* 1801, 

vol. 19— "jSV4G," A POINTER,* 1801, vol. ig— COURSING ADVENTURE," 
1802, vol. i^)— EXTRAORDINARY ESCAPE,* iSoj, vol. ig—DEAD GAME, 
plate I,* 1S02, vol. 19. 

(6) DEAD GAME, plate 11, 1802, vol. zo—DEAD GAME, plate 3,» 1802, vol. za—DEAD 

CAME, plate 4,* 1802, vol. -zo—FISH,* 1802, vol. 10— RABBITS AND 
TERRIER,* 1S02, vol. la-POINTER AND PARTRIDGE,* 1802, vol. 20— 
DEER, 1804, vol. 23. 

(3) SPANIEL FLUSHING A WOODCOCK,* 1810, vol. 2,6— SPANIEL STARTING 

A HARE,* 1810, vol. 3&-F0.\' UNKENNELED,* 1810, vol. 36. 

(4) HARRIERS RUNNING IN VIEW,* i8io, vol. yj— HOUND, BITCH AND 

PUPPIES,* 1810, vol. 37— /I BUCK FRAYING,* 1810, vol. yj— SETTER 
HOWLING' (Left at Home), 1811, vol. 37. 
(s) TERRIER AND RABBIT,* iSn, vol. ^i— GREYHOUND KILLING A HARE, 
1811, vol. 38— POINTER AND SETTER,* 1811, vol. ^t— GREYHOUNDS 
AND DEAD HARE,* 1811, vol. 38— HOUNDS STARTING A HARE, 
1811, vol. 38. 

(3) FOX AND WILD DUCK,* iBii, vol. 39-DEA TH OF THE FOX,* 1812, vol. 39 

—WATER DOG AND MALLARD,* 1812, vol. 39. 

(5) HARE KILLED BY A WEASEL,* 1812, vol. 1,0— GREYHOUND AND 

HARE,* 1812, vol. io— GREYHOUND TURNING A HARE,' 1812, vol. 40 

—HOUNDS MAKING A CAST,* 1812, vol. ^a— BRINGING UP TAIL 

HOUNDS,* 1812, vol. 40. 
(j) FLYING LEAP,* 1812, vol. 41—^ DROP LEAP,* 1812, vol. ^i— RISING AT 

A LEAP,* 1813, vol. 41. 
(s) STOPPING HOUNDS, RUNNING RIOT, OR CHANGING,* 1813, vol. 42— 

DEATH OF THE FOX,' 1813, vol. ^1l—F0X AND PHEASANTS,* 1813, 

vol. a,^—THE FOX, THE HERON, AND THE EEL,* 1813, vol. 42— 

DEATH OF THE HARE,* 1813, vol. 42. 
THE SAGACIOUS HARE, 1814, vol. 43; an etching. 
OUT-LYING DEER GOING THROUGH A SWING PALE IN A PARK FENCE,* 

1814, vol. 44. 

(4) BITTERN AND SPANIEL, 1814. vol. 43— TAME DEER PURSUING 

CATTLE, :Bi5, vol. 4S-DEAD RUN HARE AND BEAGLES IN A 

DITCH,* 1815, vol. is-DEATHOF THE OTTER,* 1815, vol. 45. 
(3) DOG AND BADGER,* 1813, vol. 46— FOREST KEEPER SHOOTING A 

BUCK,* 181S, vol. 46—DEA TH OF THE FOX, 1815, vol. 46. 
(2) MR. CORSELLTS GREYHOUND GOING DOWN DOVER CLIFF, 1815, vol. 

4j— TERRIER KILLING A FOX, 1816, vol. 47. 



46 



ANIMAL PAINTERS 



EAGLE AND DEER,- 1816, vol. 4S. 

(3) THE HUMOROUS REVENGE* 1816, vol. ^^—ANGL/NC; plate i,* 1817, 

vol. ^g— ANGLING ; plate 2,* 1817, vol. 49. 
ANGLING: plate 3,* 1817. vol. 50. 
ANGLING; plate 4,* 1817, vol. 51. 

(2) FOX AND PARTRIDGES* 1818, vol. si-THE BUCK'S DEATH WOUND 

1818, vol. 52. 

(4) ELEPHANT AND TIGER* iBiB, vol. ^^— NEWFOUNDLAND DOGS 

SAGACITY* 1818, vol. Si— POND NETTERS, 1819, vol. 53— THE WILD 
CAT* 1816, vol. 53. 

(6) FALLOW DEER, BITING THEIR WAY THROUGH A QUICK FENCE IN 

THE SNOW,* 1819, vol. It,— THE CANINE LANDING NET, 1819, vol. 54— 
WILD CAT AND MOOR CAME, 1819, vol. 54; an etching— r//£ PEACE- 
FUL ANGLER, iSiq, vol. 54 ; engraved by J. Scott-SO^ CONSTRICTOR 
AND ANTELOPE,' 1S19, vol. n— SHOOTING PECCARIES,* 1819, vol. 54. 

(7) BENGAL PITFALL, 1819, vol. 55 ; an etching— K'/Z/r^ GROUSE, 1819, vol. 55 ; 

engraved by Scott— MASTIFF AND LAMB, 1819, vol. 55 ; an etching— i^ 
MANCHE BRIDGE, 1819, vol. ss— TROUT ANGLERS, 1820, vol.55; en- 
graved by Scon— MODE OF DESTROYING THE WOLF IN BENGAL,* 
1820, vol. SI— PEREGRINE FALCON AND PHEASANT,* 1820, vol. 55. 

(i) SHOOTING A RHINOCEROS, 1820, vol. 56; an etching— .S.'lZ'Gi.ff AND 
TERRIERS, 1820, vol. 56 ; an etching. 

(4) WOOD GROUSE, 1820, vol. 57; engraved by J. Scott— AMERICAN BEAR AT 
BAY,* 1820, vol. SI— PERCH FISHING, 1821, vol. 57; engraved by Scott— 
HUNTING CHEETA AND AXIS DEER, 1821, vol. 57; an etching— 
AMERICAN WOLVES, 1821, vol. 58 ; an etching. 

(3) FATAL ACCIDENT IN HOG HUNTING, 1821, vol. 59; an etching— ANGLING, 

PREPARING FOR SPORT, 1822, vol. 59; engraved by J. Scott— MARTIN 

AND RABBIT, 1822, vol. 59 ; an etching. 
(,2) SHOOTING ANTELOPES IN INDIA, 1822, vol. 60; an etching— /"^y?- 

TRIDGES,* 1822, vol. 60. 
(2) RED-LEGGED PARTRIDGE,* 1822, vol. 6t— BLACK COCK, 1822, vol. 61; an 

etching. 
RED GROUSE,* :825, vol. 66. 



PLATES IN THE NEU^ SPORThXC MAGAZINE (3 in 

number). 

OWLS, 1832, vol. 3; engraved by J. Webb. 

LEOPARD SEIZING AN ANTELOPE, 1837, vol. 12; engraved by E. Hacker. 

ELK PURSUED B)' WOLVES, 1840, vol. ig : engraved by W. B. Scott. 

PLATE IN THE SPORTING REVIEW. 

DEER IN WINDSOR FOREST, 1843, vol. ro ; engraved by Westley. 

PLATES IN THE ANNALS OF SPORTING (3 in number). 

PHEASANTS BASKING, 1826, vol. 10; engraved by J. Westley. 
PARTRIDGES, 1827, vol. 11 ; engraved by J. Westley. 
BLOOD HOUNDS, 1828, vol. 13 ; engraved by Westley. 



47 



SIR EDWIN LANDSEER, R.A. 

(Born 1802. Died 1873.) 

PDWIN HENRY, third and youngest son of 
-'-' John Landseer, was born at ^^, Foley Street, 
then known as 71, Queen Anne Street East, on 
7th March, 1802. The gifts which made him the 
most popular animal painter of his own or any 
other time were to some extent hereditary, and 
were shared by some of his brothers and sisters. 
His father attained to eminence in his department 
of art, and was engraver to William IV. Thomas 
Landseer, A. R.A., the eldest brother, born in 1795, 
made a great reputation for himself as an engraver, 
and contributed in no small measure to the fame 
of Edwin. Charles, the second son, born 1799, 
devoted himself to landscape painting, and became 
a Royal Academician ; and Jessica, " born accord- 
ing to her own statement on 29th January, 18 10" 
{Dictionary of National Biography), inherited such 
share of artistic talent as enabled her to exhibit 
at the Royal Academy (10 pictures), the British 
Institution (7), and at Suffolk Street (6). She 
also etched two plates from works by her brother 



48 ANIMAL PAINTERS 

Edwin, — a portrait of Vixen, a Scotch terrier, 
and a picture of Lady Louisa Russell feeding a 
donkey. With reference to the date of this lady's 
birth, it must be observed that acceptance of "her 
own statement " involves the assumption that her 
first exhibit in the Royal Academy was painted 
when she was six years of age. The catalogue 
of the exhibition of 1816 contains mention of a 
picture, by Jessica Landseer, "The Frugal Meal," 
a number of dogs feeding. She died at Folkestone 
in 1880. 

The life and works of Sir Edwin Landseer have 
received such ample justice at other hands that it 
is not proposed to consider them in this series at 
the length their importance deserves. The excel- 
lent article in vol. xxii. of the Dictionary of 
National Biography leaves little to be said, but it 
may be of interest to supplement that record with 
a few hitherto unpublished details which have come 
within the knowledge of the writer and his friends. 
Landseer's artistic genius, as is well known, de- 
clared itself at a very early age : before he was six 
years old he made pencil drawings whose extra- 
ordinary precocity were clearly indicative of the 
future. A few of these early efforts, forming part of 
the Sheepshanks Gift, are preserved in the South 
Kensington Museum. In a frame on one of the 
screens are nine drawings, eight in pencil and one 



SIR EDWIN LANDSEER, R.A. 49 

in water-colour, all of which were done before the 
young artist was ten years of age. 

One drawing" of a foxhound was made when he 
was five : that of a bull calf lying on straw bears a 
note stating that this was done " when he was 
first breeched." The water-colour drawing of a 
liver and white pointer — head and shoulders — 
bears no inscription unless "lo" in pencil indi- 
cates the youthful artist's age. The head of a 
horse eating- from a nosebag was drawn when he 
was six or seven years old : a bull's head, a donkey's 
head, and a sow drowsing- with her well-grown 
litter grouped about her, when he was eight. Mar- 
vellously clean and firm in line is the parrot on 
its perch drawn at the age of nine. A cat's head 
drawn at the age of ten completes a collection, 
small, but of rare interest. It is difficult to realise 
that such sketches as the foxhound, the bull calf 
parrot and donkey's head were drawn by a child. 

John Landseer held the opinion that an ordinary 
course of education, if not harmful to an artist, was 
at least unnecessary ; and as Edwin's profession 
was plainly indicated at the age of five years, he 
suffered little from the books for which he had no 
taste. He was encouraged to follow his own bent, 
and his early school-rooms were the fields which 
then lay between London and Hampstead, and 
Exeter 'Change where the famous menagerie pro- 
4 VOL. 11. 



50 ANIMAL PAINTERS 

vided subjects for his pencil. His first known 
essay in the art of etching was made upon a draw- 
ing of his own, executed in 1809, the " Heads of 
a Lion and Tiger." The plate was the joint work 
of himself and his brother Thomas ; Edwin under- 
taking the lion's head and Thomas that of the 
tiger. 

Among the more noteworthy of his early works 
mention must be made of " The Brown Mastiff," 
painted at the age of ten and sold for 70 guineas 
at Sir John Swinburne's sale in 1861 ; another 
drawing, that of the head and tail of a very 
large and handsome male Persian cat belonging to 
Miss Finch of Maiden, in Essex, must have been 
made about the same time, as a beautiful engraving 
from it appears in the second edition of Daniel's 
Rural Sports, which was published in 181 2. 

This latter was drawn by the boy when staying 
at Beleigh Grange, the residence of Mr. W. H. 
Simpson, near Maiden. Edwin Landseer's pleasant 
disposition made him numerous friends, and in Mr. 
Simpson's house he found a second home : it will 
be remarked that the first three pictures exhibited 
at the Royal Academy by Edwin Landseer were 
portraits of animals belonging to this kind friend 
of his boyhood. In 18 15, when thirteen years of 
age, he showed the " Portrait of a Mule, the pro- 
perty of W. H. Simpson, Esq., of Beleigh Grange, 



SIR EDWIN LANDSEER, R.A. 5I 

Essex," and " Heads of a pointer bitch and puppy, 
the property of W. H. Simpson, Esq., of Beleigh 
Grange, Essex": and in 1817 the "Portrait of 
Brutus," a rough-haired white bull terrier belong- 
ing to the same gentleman. 

The first of these three works was described in 
the catalogue as the " Portrait of a Mute" and the 
critic of the Sporting Magazine remarks that he 
sought out the work so entitled with great curiosity 
to see how the artist had conveyed the idea of 
inability to speak ! He found the picture of a mule 
" neatly drawn, well foreshortened and staring us 
in the face." No reference is made to the youth 
of the painter of the work ; indeed the absence of 
remark in contemporary literature invites the sup- 
position that until Edwin Landseer reached the age 
of twenty-two or twenty-three the singularly early 
development of his genius remained unrealised save 
by his own friends and in artistic circles. 

It was impossible that artists could long continue 
unenlightened concerning Edwin Landseer's gifts. 
In 1 8 13, when eleven years of age, he won the 
Silver Palette of the Society of Arts with drawings 
of animals ; and in 18 14, 1815 and 18 16 he took the 
I sis medals given by the same body. In 18 16 he 
became a student at the Royal Academy Schools : 
C. R. Leslie describes him at this time as " a 
curly-headed youngster dividing his time between 



52 ANIMAL PAINTERS 

Polito's wild beasts at Exeter Change and the 
Royal Academy Schools." In this connection we 
note that the Academy Exhibition of 1815 included 
his portrait as " A Cricketer," painted by Master 
George Hayter, who ultimately became a celebrated 
portrait painter and was knighted in 1842. 

Until he joined the schools of the Royal Academy 
his studies had been made from nature and, as a 
child, from other pictures under his father's guid- 
ance. In 1 81 7 he was introduced to Benjamin 
Haydon, an artist who stood high in his profession 
and who, had he not quarrelled with the Royal 
Academy, would have received the highest distinc- 
tion that body is able to bestow. Haydon super- 
intended Edwin Landseer's work, though the youth 
did not become his pupil. It was upon Haydon's 
advice that he turned his attention to dissection and 
anatomy : in pursuance of his mentor's suggestions 
he procured the carcase of a lion which had died 
in one of the menageries, and made studies of the 
bones and muscular tissues. The care with which 
he pursued his investigations becomes evident in 
his subsequent drawings of lions. In 1817 his 
picture of " A Sleeping Dog," at the exhibition of the 
Society of Painters in Oil and Water Colours (now 
the Royal Society of Painters in Water Colours), 
attracted notice. Between the years 18 16 and 
1820 inclusive he sent nine pictures in oils, all 
canine studies, to the exhibitions of this Society. 



SIR EDWIN LANDSEER, R.A. 53 

His first contributions to the galleries of the 
British Institution were sent to the exhibition of 
18 1 8, in which he was represented by two paintings, 
the " Alpine Mastiffs," 5 feet 3 inches by 4 feet 3 
inches, upright, and the " Study of a Dog," 1 1 feet 
3 inches by i foot 2 inches. The former work, 
which showed St. Bernards, as the breed is 
alternatively called, reanimating a traveller who 
has fallen exhausted in the snow, was engraved 
by his father and brother In 182 1 a quarto 
entitled " Ttventy Engravings of Lions, Tigers, 
Panthers and Leopards," was published. The 
plates were executed by Thomas Landseer " from 
originals by Rubens, Rembrandt, Reydinger, 
Stubbs, Spilsbury, and Edwin Landseer." 

It is strange to us to see Edwin Landseer's 
name modestly following that of the forgotten 
Spilsbury in this brief list: but in 1821, although 
he had made his mark in artistic circles, his name 
was not yet one with which a publisher might 
conjure. 

In 1822 the artist, now twenty years of age, 
won a prize of ^150 offered by the directors 
of the British Institution, with his picture, "The 
Larder Invaded," in which figured the portrait of 
his own dog Brutus, a son of Mr. Simpson's Brutus 
whose picture had been exhibited five years before 
in the Royal Academy. In the following year we 



54 ANIMAL PAINTERS 

find in A^inals of Sporting engravings by Thomas 
Landseer from three shooting subjects, " Toho ! " a 
brace of setters, " Down Charge," and " Pheasant 
Shooting with Springers." The first of these is 
here reproduced as an example of his early sporting 
pictures. 

Landseer's contributions to the sporting publica- 
tions of the time were comparatively few ; the 
Annals of Sporting contains thirteen plates from 
his pictures and the Netv Sporfiyig Magazine only 
four ; while the volumes of the Sporting Magazine 
do not contain a single engraving from a work 
by him. Volume v. of the Annals of Sporting 
(1824) contains the engraving by Thomas Land- 
seer, from a portrait of Brutus, which is repro- 
duced facing page 70 : it may be remarked that 
the letter-press which accompanies the plate dwells 
entirely upon the merits of the dog, and makes no 
reference whatever to the status of his master as 
an artist, at a period when he was rapidly making 
a name for himself. It was in this year that he 
exhibited at the British Institution his picture, 
" The Catspaw " (a cat struggling in the clutches 
of an ape who uses her paw to pull chestnuts from 
the stove), which fairly established the reputation 
for humour maintained by so many subsequent 
pictures. This work, like others by Landseer, has 
been made the basis of political caricature. 




o 

I 
o 

I- 



SIR EDWIN LANDSEER, R.A. 55 

The appreciation of the artist for Scottish 
scenery, sports, and distinctively Scottish animals, 
dates from the year 1824, when Landseer accom- 
panied Leslie on a journey to the North. We have 
memorials of a visit paid to Sir Walter Scott at 
Abbotsford in the portraits of the great novelist- 
poet and his deer hound, Maida, which figured a 
few years later in the pictures "A Scene at Abbots- 
ford " and " Sir Walter Scott in Rhymer's Glen." 
From this time Scotland cast her spell over him, 
as the number of pictures he painted of Highland 
scenery and characters, of deer and deer-stalking 
incidents, of deer-hounds and Scotch terriers, bear 
witness. 

In 1826, Landseer, having attained the prescribed 
age of twenty-four years, was elected an Associate 
of the Royal Academy. "The Hunting of Chevy 
Chase " was his sole contribution to the Academy 
Exhibition of 1826: this picture is now in the 
possession of the Duke of Bedford. His first 
important Highland work, " Highlanders returning 
from Deer Stalking," was shown in the Exhibition 
1827. 

It was In the autumn of the year 1829 that 
Landseer became acquainted with the Earl of 
Tankerville, and laid the foundations of an intimacy 
which only terminated with the artist's death. 
Lord Tankerville, in an interesting pamphlet, Remi- 



56 ANIMAL PAINTERS 

m'scences of Life in the Hio^h lands, thus records 
the incident of their meeting in Glenfishie Forest : — 

We soon ensconced ourselves behind a heathery knoll 
within a few yards of our poacher, to watch his proceedings 
before we finally pounced upon him. He was a little, 
strongly-built man, very like a pocket Hercules, or " Puck " 
in the " Midsummer Night's Dream." He was busily em- 
ployed gralloching his deer. This he did with great quickness 
and dexterity, not omitting to wash the tallow and other 
treasures carefully in the burn and deposit them on the stone 
beside the deer. He next let the head hang over so as to 
display the horns, and then squatting down on a stone 
opposite took out of his pocket what I thought would be 
his pipe or whisky flask : but it was a sketch book ! 

Seeing that we had mistaken our man, I came out into 
the open and then found myself face to face with my friend 
of many years to come — Landseer. 

From this time forward Landseer was a con- 
stant visitor to Chillingham Castle, where he found 
congenial subjects for his brush in the famous wild 
white cattle. As soon as he arrived there on his 
first visit he devoted himself to the study of the 
cattle as keenly as he had done a few weeks before 
to that of the deer, " observing them with his 
glass for days from some hiding place and noting 
minutely their ways and characteristics." 

It was decided to kill a bull for his closer in- 
spection, and the means adopted to "cutout" the 
selected beast from the herd resulted in a serious 
mishap. A keeper was posted in ambush to shut 
the bull into the lower park when the herd returned 



SIR EDWIN LANDSEER, R.A. 57 

from feeding there at dawn. The beast charged the 
man and tossed him, but fortunately the attack was 
witnessed by the park-keeper ; and the deerhound 
Bran, under the direction of Lord Tankerville — 
then Lord Ossulston — speedily diverted the bull's 
attention from the prostrate keeper. 

The beast was shot, and with Lord Tankerville 
and others (including Bran) concerned formed the 
group for the " Dead Bull " which hangs at 
Chillingham with two other works, a " Portrait 
Group of Wild Cattle " and " Red Deer." It 
may be added that the keeper though he sustained 
fracture of four ribs and had his chest penetrated 
by the bull's horn recovered from his injuries and 
lived to the age of eighty years. 

A glance at the list of Landseer's Royal 
Academy pictures shows that he did not by any 
means confine himself to animal painting : portraits 
of ladies and gentlemen occur frequently, some- 
times with favourite dogs and sometimes in an 
atmosphere of sport. 

The speed with which the artist worked was 
remarkable. " The Sleeping Bloodhound " (3 feet 
3 inches by 4 feet i inch, oblong), exhibited at the 
British Institution in 1835, was painted, as the 
anecdote in the Catalogue of Pictures 271 the National 
Gallery tells us, between Monday morning and 2 
o'clock on the next Thursday afternoon. The late 



58 ANIMAL PAINTERS 

Mr. Wells* furnishes the writer with a far more 
striking example of skilful speed : Landseer was 
paying one of his frequent visits to Holme Wood 
in August, 1 83 1, and on Sunday, while the family 
was absent at church, he remained at home to 
paint a portrait of Trim, a favourite spaniel belong- 
ing to Mr. Wells. When the church party returned 
they were shown the picture of a dog holding a 
rabbit in his mouth : it had been begun and finished 
in two hours and a half ! This portrait, measuring 
28 inches by 34 inches, Landseer presented to his 
host ; it was placed in a panel over the fireplace 
in Mr. Wells' smoking room at Holme Wood, 
where it remained until the great sale at Christie's 
in 1890, when it was sold for 750 guineas. An 
engraving from this picture by I. Webb appears in 
Vol. 2 of the Nciv Sporting Magazine for 1831, 
and the accompanying letterpress — for the most 
part a dialogue between two gamekeepers— refers 
to "the talented artist," which cannot be considered 
extravagant praise ! 

It was in 183 1 that Landseer was elected a Royal 
Academician. He presented as his Diploma work 
"The Faithful Hound " ; a deerhound with uplifted 
muzzle, howling over the corpse of his master, who, 



* Mr. Wells, of Holme Wood, near Peterborough, and 
Redleaf, whose famous collection of pictures was sold at 
Christie's in 1890; vide Sales of Sir Edwin Landseer's Works, 
p. 78, seq. 



SIR EDWIN LANDSEER, R.A. 59 

in full armour, but bareheaded, lies with his head 
pillowed upon the body of his grey horse. 

The Earl of Tankerville, one of his most 
intimate friends, writes* of Landseer's mode of 
painting : 

It was most interesting to watch his unerring hand and 
eye guiding the brush with faultless precision, from the 
broadest to the minutest touches ; for though dashed in with 
marvellous rapidity they were never retouched. I frequently 
had opportunities afterwards of watching his endless resources 
in painting. In subsequent years we always took our autumn 
tour in the Highlands together, and the many charms of our 
life at Ardverikie, on Loch Laggan, made it one of our most 
favourite resorts. It was here that I enjoyed perhaps the 
greatest treat of all in seeing his masterly mode of handling 
his great paintings, and watching the beginning of those 
inimitable frescoes with which he decorated the walls of the 
lodge in black and red chalk. The dash and decision with 
which his touches were put in was really astonishing ; they 
seemed quite at haphazard, but it was the faultless hand of 
the master. Those frescoes were merely intended to cover 
the naked plaster walls, but they became the still greater 
originals of some of his most famous pictures. Two of those 
lately sold, viz., " The Stag at Bay," and " None but the 
Brave deserve the Fair," have fetched fabulous prices. 

Landseer would test his work by asking the opinion of 
the uninitiated. He would ask a servant as to the likeness 
of a portrait of his master in preference to the wife or sister. 
As he was sketching in the fresco of " The Stag at Bay," I 
was watching him : he first sketched in with a few strokes 
the head and antlers, and turning to me said, " Ossulston, 
what is this stag doing ? " " Why standing at bay, of 
course." " That will do." So he went on. 



Reminiscences of Life in the Highlands. 



6o ANIMAL PAINTERS 

Lord Tankerville was greatly impressed with 
the artist's ingenuity in utilising flaws on the wall 
and working them into his picture : — 

Every irregularity in the rough surface was given its 
significance, and in places where the plaster had holes where 
nails had been driven in, he transformed the holes into the 
eyes of his deer : the dark shadow of the cavity gave such 
transparent depth to the eye, and a mere touch of white upon 
some prominent edge of it, brought out such brilliancy as no 
pigment could have equalled. 

" These priceless frescoes " as Lord Tanker- 
ville truly calls them, were unfortunately destroyed 
in a fire which occurred at Ardverikie some time 
afterwards. 

Until well on in the present century artists 
always mixed their own colours, the convenient 
system of preparing pigments in tubes ready for 
use not having been discovered. It is said of 
Landseer that he was singularly careless about the 
colours he used. When a vendor of pigments 
brouoht his wares for trial with the view of sale, 
he would straightway try the paint on whatever 
picture he had on his easel at the moment, irre- 
spective of the fact that he knew absolutely 
nothing of the visitor and the quality of his goods. 
These reckless experiments sometimes produced 
bad ultimate results in the shape of unsightly 
cracks and fading tints on his canvasses. 

Sporting, by " Nimrod," published in 1S38 by 



SIR EDWIN LANDSEER, R.A. 6 1 

A. H. Baily & Co., Cornhill, contains four en- 
gravings from pictures by Landseer, viz., " Glen 
Fishie," painted in 1824 and engraved by 
Thomas Landseer ; "The Pug," "The Mourner" 
(a bull-dog), both engraved by J. T. Hixon ; 
and "Browsing" (the head of a goat), engraved 
by C. G. Lewis. 

The Royal Academy Exhibition of 1838 included 
a picture of " Her Majesty's Favourite Dogs and 
Parrot." This work may be said to mark the 
beginning of the friendship Landseer was privileged 
to enjoy with the Queen. In 1839 he exhibited, 
among" other works, a portrait of Princess Mary 
of Cambridge with a favourite Newfoundland ; the 
dog sits by the Princess holding a bit of biscuit 
on his nose and awaits the command to snap it 
up. The portrait of Van Amburgh, the famous 
lion-tamer, was painted under royal command. 
Another portrait of Van Amburgh and his animals, 
"as he appeared at the London theatres," was ex- 
hibited in 1847, having been painted for the Duke 
of Wellington ; this work is in the Apsley House 
collection. Other exhibited pictures, painted for 
the Queen or by special permission, are " Macaw, 
Love Birds, Terrier and Spaniel Puppies," belong- 
ing to Her Majesty (1840); "A Pair of Brazilian 
Monkeys," the property of Her Majesty, and 
"Eos, a Favourite Greyhound of H.R.H. the 



62 ANIMAL PAINTERS 

Prince Consort" (1842); "Royal Sports on Hill 
and Loch " — the Queen, Prince Consort and the 
Prince of Wales ; and " Dandie Dinmont, the 
Favourite Old Skye Terrier of Her Majesty" 
{1854); "Her Majesty at Osborne in 1866" 
(1867); and "Queen Victoria meeting the Prince 
Consort on his return from Deerstalking," in 1850 
(1870). As if to emphasise the intimacy to which 
he was admitted at Court, the last picture exhibited 
by him at the Royal Academy was an unfinished 
sketch of the Queen shown in 1873. the year of 
his death. 

Among Landseer's most valuable friends were 
Mr. Jacob Bell and Mr. Thomas Hyde Hills; so 
large a part did these two gentlemen play in the 
artist's affairs that their names should in justice 
have received earlier mention, Mr. Jacob Bell was 
the son of Mr. John Bell, founder of the well-known 
firm of chemists in Oxford Street, J. Bell and Co., 
a man of considerable artistic talent, peculiarly 
genial disposition and great hospitality. His house, 
at the corner of Langham Place and Cavendish 
Place, was the haunt of artists, men of letters and 
others with whom their host had tastes in common. 

When or how Landseer became acquainted with 
Mr. Bell cannot now be ascertained, but probably 
he was introduced to the house by some brother 
artist. However that may be, the acquaintance 



SIR EDWIN LANDSEER, R.A. 63 

soon ripened into intimacy, and Landseer gradually 
acquired the habit of consulting Mr. Bell on matters 
of business. "He was always very delicate and 
shy," Lord Tankerville writes me, "as to the ques- 
tion of money for his pictures, and got very, very 
insufificient prices for his earlier works. His friend 
Bell took it in hand and got him better prices — 
thousands instead of fifties and hundreds." Mr. 
Frederick Stephens in his Sir Edivin Landseer 
(Great Artists Series, 1880) says that ten guineas 
was the sum he was accustomed to receive for a- 
picture in 18 18. Mr. Stephens also tells us that 
" John Landseer managed his son's affairs, settled 
the prices of his pictures, received the money, and 
treated Edwin in his twenty-second year as he had 
done when he was twelve years old." 

Pictures, now the property of the nation, represent 
Landseer's gratitude to Mr. Jacob Bell for his ser- 
vices. It was this gentleman who took him for 
a tour on the Continent in 1840 when his health 
failed under distressing circumstances, and it be- 
came necessary for him to seek change of scene 
for a few months. When, in the year 1859, Mr. 
Bell died at the early age of 49, his mantle as 
business adviser to Landseer fell upon his friend 
and partner Mr. Thomas Hyde Hills. Mr. Hills, 
when a boy just out of his apprenticeship, came 
as a junior assistant to Mr. John Bell ; his 



64 ANIMAL PAINTERS 

employer's son, who was about the same age, 
took a great liking to him, and when the founder 
of the firm died, Mr. Jacob Bell took Mr. Hills 
into partnership. 

Mr. Walter Hills, nephew and successor of the 
latter gentleman, possesses numerous letters written 
by Sir Edwin Landseer to his uncle, and many 
of these are of interest as showing how com- 
pletely the great painter depended on Mr. Hills 
to take every difficulty, small or great, as it arose, 
off his hands. Thus he writes begging " My 

dear Hills" to come and explain to Mr. , 

the art publisher, what he, Landseer, wishes and 
does not wish done in respect of a certain plate 
which is about to be engraved ; again, to put a 
stop to the doings of a firm of photographers who 
have taken negatives of a picture and, Landseer 
suspects, intend to sell prints contrary to the under- 
standing ; again, to implore Mr. Hills' good offices 
to " smooth the feathers " of a friend Landseer 
thinks he has offended, "so that he may fly back 
again ; " and yet again, inviting Mr. Hills to lunch 
to talk over " those bank and investment matters." 

Some of the letters, written in the 'sixties, betray 
depression of spirits, concern about health, and 
betray the nervousness which commonly charac- 
terises the artistic temperament. More buoyant 
and cheery are those penned from some Highland 



SIR EDWIN LANDSEER, R.A. 65 

shooting lodge or from Chillingham, for Landseer 
was a keen sportsman and was happiest on the 
heather, though he often paid heavily for his day's 
stalkingf. He writes to Mr. Hills from Kinrara 
House, Aviemore, on October 7th, 1866 : — 

" I returned here last Wednesday, October 3rd, and have 
been out every day since in the Forest. Some very good 
stags have fallen to my rifle— as yet have only missed one 
shot when it was nearly dark ! I have unintentionally 
taken too much out of my already weak condition. I can't 
keep my hand steady. This is Sunday, and perhaps to-day's 
rest may restore me." 

He proceeds to describe the wreck of the Duke 
of Sutherland's yacht, in which, with other guests, 
he had left Dunrobin. Fortunately the weather 
remained calm after the vessel ran on the rocks, 
and all were taken off in safety ; but Landseer's 
nervous system was, he says, somewhat shaken. 
In regard to this we must remember that the years 
1862-3 had seen a return of the acute mental de- 
pression which clouded his reason and unfitted him 
for work or society for a long period. It is evident 
that in his later years he habitually overtaxed his 
strength during the stalking season. He writes to 
Mr. Hills on October i6th, 1866— 

" Yesterday I was at it (after riding nine miles to the 
ground) from 6 o'clock — the hour I was called — till 7 in the 
evening, having the same distance to ride home. The whole 
day passed in rocky ground, long heather and unceasing rain. 
I killed my stag at 150 yards towards the gloaming and have 
5 VOL. a. 



66 ANIMAL PAINTERS 

the bill to pay to-day — tired and very shaky. I have not got 
over the great shock sustained by the awful shoot out of the 
dogcart downhill — this style of accident." ("Here follows a 
rough sketch of a bolting horse, a smashed vehicle and a 
figure heels in air labelled, E. L.] 

Landseer at this date was sixty-four years of age ; 

the fatigue which followed such exertion seems to 

have made him realise that he attempted more than 

his age warranted. He concludes this letter: — 

" Reaction [after exhaustion] may give me boldness. My 
Hart is in my art. I long for meditation in my painting-room 
and for the quiet and repose necessary to an old gentleman's 
revival. Some things make age older, as in youth some 
things make youth younger." 

Another letter to Mr. Hills shows Landseer as a 

taxidermist : 

" With regard to the stags' heads, you ought to have 
received four harts and two roebucks. I don't want anything 
done to either of them till I come, simply to have them pre- 
served to prevent the hair coming off. No one can stuff them 
but myself. The shilh are left in, bones of neck taken out. 
If you can employ your art to keep them in stuffing order till 
my return I shall be most grateful." 

To say that Landseer owed his financial success 
to Messrs. Jacob Bell and Thomas Hyde Hills is to 
state the truth in the barest fashion. The demand 
for engravings from his works gave an exceptionally 
high value to their copyright, and sales of copyright 
to art publishers were always arranged first by the 
one and afterwards by the other of these invaluable 
advisers. 



SIR EDWIN LANDSEER, R.A. 67 

It is impossible to mention the engravings 
of his pictures without referring to his brother 
Thomas,* who executed so large a number of them. 
Never had artist more skilful and sympathetic 
interpreter than Sir Edwin Landseer possessed in 
his elder brother ; there is no doubt but that he was 
indebted for much of his wide popularity to the 
admirable handiwork of Thomas. He seems to 
have been in the habit of doing- something- to the 
plates himself, for in a letter to Mr. Hills he remarks 
of the plate of " Man Proposes God Disposes " (the 
picture of polar bears, illustrative of the loss of the 
Franklin Expedition), " I think it will be a good 
picture when I have touched it up." 

Among the artists' early friends was J. F. Lewis, 
A.R.A., of whom Mr. J. L. Roget says, in his 
History of the Old Water Coloicr Society :\ 

" More than one point of connection may be found in the 
early life of Lewis with that of his great contemporary. 
They are said to have been born in the same house in Queen 
Anne Street, Landseer being two or three years the senior. 
However that may be, an intimacy existed between the 
families of the engravers, John Landseer and Frederick C. 
Lewis, the respective fathers of the two young men who could 
not fail to find a bond of sympathy in their common taste for 
drawing animals." 



* It is hoped that a future volume will include some notice 
of Thomas Landseer's works. 

t Afterwards " The Oil and Water Colour Society." 



68 ANIMAL PAINTERS 

Mr. Arthur N. Gilbey, of Cookham, possesses 
a painting by J. F. Lewes, executed in 1833. '^ 
is a portrait in profile of Landseer playing a salmon 
under the direction of an old gillie ; pine-clad hill 
and glen forming the near background. This 
picture is the more interesting as the dog sitting 
a pace or two behind the angler is said to have 
been added by Landseer himself. 

The portraits he painted showed the breadth of 
his acquaintance among the upper classes of society. 
The Russells were among his most intimate friends; 
Georgina Duchess of Bedford was his pupil when 
he was twenty-four years of age, and some of his 
works were etched by her. In subsequent years, he 
painted portraits of the Duchess and her children. 

Among the pictures of Landseer's mature and 
later years the following are considered to show 
his art at its best: — -"Suspense," a bloodhound 
waiting at a door, exhibited in 1834 and now in 
the South Kensington Museum. "The Shepherd's 
Chief Mourner," exhibited in 1837, also in the 
South Kensington Museum, is perhaps as well 
known as any picture ever painted by any artist, 
and deservedly so for its simplicity and genuine 
pathos. " A Distinguished Member of the Royal 
Humane Society," exhibited in 1838, is not less 
widely known. This portrait of the dog, a New- 
foundland, was painted for the late Mr. Newman 



SIR EDWIN LANDSEER, R.A. 69 

Smith, of Croydon Lodge, a near connection of the 
Gilbey family. Mr. Newman Smith by his will 
left the work to the Nation : it now hangs in the 
National Gallery. " Roebuck and Rough Hounds," 
exhibited in 1840 at the British Institution, appeals 
more directly to sportsmen than to the general 
public. The art critic of the New Sporting Maga- 
zine thus eulogises the painting : 

" O ! what skins ! the picture would charm a furrier ! The 
hounds licking the wound in the neck — the wound itself — the 
quiet shaggy dogs in front — the death ful roebuck — and the 
solemn terrier forming the black and back ground — are some- 
thing more like an oil improvement upon the art of trans- 
ferring Nature to canvas, as it had been done through light 
to paper, than the common working of the imagination, the 
hand and the brush ! " 

This picture also is at South Kensington. 

Inept or hostile criticism, Landseer could not 
tolerate in his later years, when indifferent health 
rendered him more than normally sensitive. 
Writing in 1866 to Mr. Hills, he refers, doubtless 
with some individual critic in his mind, to men 
" who through fearful ignorance perpetrate most 
disgraceful cruelty to deserving and patient origi- 
nality of mind." From this we may fairly infer 
that depreciation of his work was a source of real 
mental suffering to him. 

"The Sanctuary," a grand stag emerging from 
the water on a reedy shore, exhibited in 1S42, 



70 ANIMAL PAINTERS 

belongs to Her Majesty. " War," in the National 
Gallery, exhibited in 1846, and "The Monarch of 
the Glen," exhibited in 1851, are familiar to all 
through the art of the engraver. " The Flood in 
the Highlands," exhibited in i860, is described by 
Mr. Stephens as " probably the strongest of all his 
paintings " in its powerful expression of the emo- 
tions of both man and beast. 

In 1850 the artist had received the honour of 
knighthood from the Queen. 

The only race horse of note whose portrait 
Landseer painted was Lord Zetland's Voltigeur, 
winner of the Derby and St. Leger in 1850. " The 
Druid " {Scott and Sebright^ says that this picture 
owed its creation to the artist's delight at the 
friendship that existed between Voltigeur and a 
tortoise-shell cat. He wished to paint the horse 
with the cat sitting on his bare back, but was 
dissuaded by the groom, who showed him that she 
would not stay there unless the horse had his 
sheets on. Accordingly Landseer painted Vol- 
tigeur " with his head down, whispering soft things 
to his furry friend." This picture, which is life 
size, was exhibited in 1870 at the Royal Academy. 

During the early sixties, as already said, Land- 
seer became again the prey of the extreme depres- 
sion which had attacked him in 1840. It will be 
observed that the Royal Academy exhibitions of 



SIR EDWIN LANDSEER, R.A. 7 1 

1862 and 1863 included no works from his easel. 
Happily he recovered — as letters quoted on pre- 
vious pages indicate — and in 1865, on Sir Charles 
Eastlake's death, he was offered the president's 
chair of the Royal Academy. This well deserved 
distinction, however, Landseer declined, feeling 
doubtless that his health was unequal to the duties 
of the office. In 1868, a railway accident, in which 
he sustained some slight physical injury, shook his 
delicately organised nervous system, and though 
he recovered and gave the world a few more pic- 
tures worthy of his reputation, a relapse followed, 
and during the closing years of his life he practically 
withdrew from society. He died on ist October, 
1873, and was buried with public honours in St. 
Paul's ten days later. 

Lord Tankerville has been kind enough to give 
me the following personal sketch of Sir Edwin 
Landseer : 

" Some of the happiest days of my deer-stalking times 
were spent with him in Glenfishie and the Blackmount, and 
we knew pretty nearly every bunch of heather in Perthshire 
and Argyllshire. He was a delightful companion ; so full of 
enthusiasm for scenery and sport, and with his natural 
humour and power of description we enjoyed over again all 
the events of the day. As an actor, with his powers of 
mimicry of voice and even of face, he was unsurpassed ; even 
Charles Mathews, who was one of our party at Glenfishie, 
was sometimes in the background. In his description of his 
day's stalking, or at another time of some debate in Parlia- 



72 ANIMAL PAINTERS 

ment, you would see the wild Highlander or the Duke of 
Wellington before you in face and language. He usually 
returned with me to Chillingham after our trip to the High- 
lands, where, with his love for all wild animals, he devoted 
himself to the wild cattle and studied their habits and 
peculiarities all day in the park. The result was those fine 
pictures of them now at the Castle." 

The sale of Landseer's works \vhit:h took place 
after his death made up a catalogue of 141 1 lots: 
the sale occupied seven days, beginning Friday, 8th 
May, 1874, and realised ^^69,709 9s. It may be 
added that this was the last great sale, if not the 
very last sale, conducted by Mr. Christie, of the 
famous firm. The appended list of pictures 
sold at various periods shows the high and 
increasing value attached to the works of this great 
artist. 



WORKS OF SIR EDWIN LANDSEER, R.A. 

IN THE NATIONAL GALLERY. 
(From the Vernon Collection.) 

SPANIELS OF KING CHARLES'S BREED: on canvas, 2 feet 3} inches high by : 

feet iii inches wide ; engraved by J. Watts, and again by J. Outrim. 
LOiy LIFE — HIGH LIFE, hull-dog and staghound with accessories characteristic of 

their classes: on wood, each picture 18 inches high by 13J inches wide ; engraved 

by R. Lane, A.R.A., and again by H. S. Beckwitb. 
HIGHLAND MUSIC, an old piper disturbs with a sudden blast on his pipes five hungry 

dogs at their food : on wood, i foot 61 inches high by i foot iii inches wide ; engraved 

by H. S. Beckwitb. 
THE HUNTED STAG, a stag held by two hounds, falling with them down a torrent : 

on wood, 2 feet 3^ inches high by 2 feet 11 J inches wide; engraved by Thomas 

Landseer and again by J . Cousen. 
PEACE, a coast scene — Dover Harbour in distance, goat and sheep browsing in the sun- 
shine on the cliflfs, a lamb lying with its head in the muzzle of a dismounted gun ; 

three bare-headed children : on canvas, 2 feet 10 inches high by 4 feet 4 inches wide ; 

engraved by J. Atkinson and again by L. Stocks, A. R.A. 



WORKS OF SIR KDWIN LANDSEER, R.A. T^ 

WAR., two horses— one dead and one dying ; the fallen riders lie amid the burning ruins of 
a cotuge ; companion work to PEACE and also engraved by Atkinson and Stocks. 

Bequeathed by Mr. Jacob Bell in 1859. 

THE SLEEPING BLOODHOUND^ portrait of ** Countess," who, while sleeping on 
a balustrade, fell over and died from injuries sustained ; on canvas, 3 feet 3 inches 
high by 4 feet i inch wide ; engraved by T. Landseer. 

DIGNITY AND IMPUDENCE; "Grafton," an old bloodhound of the Duke of 
Grafton's breed, and a small Scotch terrier, looking out of the same kennel ; on 
canvas, 2 feet i\\ inches high by 2 feet 3I inches wide ; engraved by T. Landseer. 

THE DEFEAT OF COMUS, scene from Milton's Comus \ painted for Her Majesty 
in 1843 for the summer house in Buckingham Palace grounds : on canvas, 2 feet 10 
inches high by 5 feet 6 inches wide. 

SHOEING, farrier fitting a shoe on near hind foot of " Old Betty," a bay mare belonging 
to Mr. Bell; the farrier, the donkey and bloodhound "Laura" are portraits; on 
canvas, 4 feet 8 inches high by 3 feet 8 inches wide ; engraved by C. Lewis. 

HIGHLAND DOGS, a group of five— sughound, terrier and others ; on copper, i6i inches 
high by 21 inches wide. 

Bequeathed by Mr. Newman Smith. 

A DISTINGUISHED MEMBER OF THE HUMANE SOCIETY, life-si/e por- 
trait of large white-and-black Newfoundland dog, *' Paul Pry," l>^ng at the end of 
a stone jetty, with forepaws overhanging the water; on canvas, 3 feet 6\ inches 
high by 4 feet 7 inches wide ; engraved by T Landseer, also on small scale by C. G. 
Lewis, etched by F. P. Becker, head engraved by H. T. Ryall as a separate plate, 
" My Dog. " 

Bequeathed by Mr. Thomas Hills in 1892. 

STUDY OF A LION, life size, seen to middle of the legs, facing spectator, body slightly 

foreshortened, background of grey clouds. 
STUDY OF A LION, life size, seen to middle of the legs and nearly full length of body, 

head in profile, background of grey clouds. 
These pictures were painted as studies for the lions at the base of the Nelson Column in 

Trafalgar Square, on canvas, each 2 feet ii* inches high by 4 feet 5J inches wide. 

IN THE SOUTH KENSINGTON MUSEUM. 
Sheepshanks Gift. 

A HIGHLAND BREAKFAST, cottage interior— mother feeding child just taken from 
cradle ; in the foreground, sheep dogs and terriers eating from a bowl ; one of 
them, lank and thin, suckles three puppies ; panel 2 feet 2 inches by i foot 8 inches 
oblong. 

THE DROVER'S DEPARTURE, a scene in the Grampians; in foreground a large 
family group, of which an old man and old woman form the centre ; sheep, bulls and 
goats are assembled on the path ; an old dog suckling puppies ; double canvas, 6 feet 
3! inches long by 4 feet i\ inches wide, oblong. 

THE DOG AND HIS SHADOIY, a dog carrying a piece of meat across a brook bridged 
by a fallen tree, stops to gaze at him^elf and his prize reflected in the stream ; panel, 
1 foot 6 inches high by i foot 10 inches wide, oblong, signed " E. L., 1822." 



74 ANIMAL PAINTERS 

A FIRESIDE PARTY', several terriers in couples in various attitudes before the bothy 

fire; these are portraits of Mr. Malcolm Clarke's dogs, said to be the original 

Peppers and Mustards of *' Guy Mannering " : panel i foot 6 inches by i foot la 

inches, oblong. 
THERE'S NO PLACE LIKE HOME, a Scotch terrier sitting outside his barrel : on 

canvas, 2 feet 55 inches by 2 feet i inch, oblong. 
THE " TIVA DOGS," the do^s of Burns' poem ; " Caesar," a Newfoundland, and 

" Luath," the tyke : on canvas, 1 foot 9 inches by i foot 4I inches, oblong, signed and 

dated *' E. L., 1S22." 
THE SHEPHERD'S CHIEF MOURNER, cottage interior— the coffin partly covered 

by plaid and blanket rests near the floor ; the shepherd's dog sitting upright rests 

his head upon the cofEn ; panel 2 feet by 2 foot 6 inches, oblong. 
A JACK IN OFFICE, a surly-looking, over-fed cur mounting guard over a dog's-meat 

barrow ; on the left a thin, hungry dog sniflfs at a skewer of meat ; an old retriever 

sits upright tr>nng to propitiate the guardian cur ; In front, a puppy gnawing a 

skewer, in the background a well-fed and disdainful terrier ; panel 2 feet 2 inches 

by ig3 inches, oblong. 
TETHERED RAMS, two rams tethered to a fallen tree, watched by two dogs; in the 

middle distance the flock, with shepherd conversing with a woman ; loch and 

mountain background ; panel, 2 feet by i3 inches, oblong. 
SANCHO PANZA AND DAPPLE, Sancho leaning on a rock watches his donkey eat a 

crust : panel 7J inches by 61 inches, upright, signed and dated, " E. L., 1S24." 
THE ANGLER'S GUARD, brown Newfoundland and white lulian greyhound watching 

the basket and property of an angler ; panel 54 inches by 5 inches, oblong. 
A NAUGHTY CHILD, a little boy " in the sulks" squeezing up against a door post; 

millboard, 15 inches by 11 inches, upright. 
SUSPENSE, a bloodhound watching at a closed door ; gauntlets, a torn plume and blood 

tracks suggest that a wounded knight has been carried within : panel, 2 feet iij inches 

by 2 feet 3} inches, oblong. 
COMICAL DOGS, two wire-haired terriers, life size, seated side by side; one wears a 

Scotch bonnet and the other, wearing a woman's cap, has a short pipe in his mouth : 

panel, 2 feet 6 inches by 2 feet 3! inches, oblong. 
YOUNG ROEBUCK AND ROUGH HOUNDS, four hounds gathered at a carcass of a 

roebuck, which has fallen over some rocks : panel, i foot 9 inches by 17 inches, oblong. 
THE EAGLES' NEST, female eagle perched on ashelf of rock over her eaglets screams 

to her returning mate ; on millboard, 14 inches by 10 inches, oblong. 



Jones Bequest. 

THE STONEBREAKER AND HIS DA UGHTER ; the man sits under the shelter of 
a bank ; he has paused in his work to speak to the little girl, at whobe basket a 
rough white terrier is sniffing ; panel, 18 inches by r foot 11 inches, oblong. 

LADY BLESSINGTONS DOG; the dog lies at the foot of red carpeted stairs ; before 
him sunds a black-and-white cat arching her back in anger ; on the stairs is the 
kitten she cannot reach without passing the dog. 



FoRSTER Bequest. 

SKETCH IN THE HIGHLANDS, a shepherd with his flock; panel, 9] inches by 
i3i inches, oblong. 



WORKS OF SIR EDWIN LANDSEER, R.A. 75 

IN THE NATIONAL GALLERY OF BRITISH ART. 
Bequeathed by Mr. Jacob Bell. 

ALEXANDER AND DIOGENES, z.^oyx'p of eight dogs; on canvas, 3 feet 7* inches 
high by 4 feet 3 inches wide. Exhibited in the Royal Academy, 1848. 

THE MAID AND 1 HE MAGPIE, a milkmaid milking a cow in a shed; on canvas, 
5 feet 8J inches by 4 feet 11 inches wide. Exhibited in the Royal Academy, 1858. 

Tate Gift. 

A SCENE AT ABBOTSFORD, two deerhounds (Sir Walter Scott's black-and-white 
" Maida" and another) resting on the hide of a stag ; hawks perching on a chair ; 
hog spears, antlers and other accessories ; engraved and published in " The Keep- 
sake" for 1829; panel, i foot 5! inches high by i foot ii^ inches wide. 

UNCLE TOM AND HIS WIFE FOR SALE, two pugs coupled sitting on a doorstep 
against a brick wall ; 2 feet 3I inches high by 2 feet ii\ inches wide. Exhibited at 
the Royal Academy in 1857 ; engraved by Thomas Landseer and by Charles 
Mottram. 

Anonymous Donor. 

EQUESTRIAN PORTRAIT, a young lady in dress of Charles IL's time on grey Arab 
pony ; on canvas, 10 feet sh inches high by 7 feet 7 inches wide. (The pony by 
Landseer, the lady by Sir J. E. Millais.) 

EXHIBITED AT THE ROYAL ACADEMY (179 in number). 

YKAR 

1815— <2) PORTRAIT OF A MULE, the property of W. H. Simpson. Esq., of Belcigh 

Grange, 'Essex.— HEAD OF A POIXTER BITCH AND /'L'/'/'l', the property 

of W. H. Simpson, Esq., of Beleigh Grange, Esse.v. 
1B17— BRUTUS, the property of W. H. Simpson, Esq. 

1818— f2) PORTRAIT OF AA'OLD HORSE— PORTRAIT OF A DOXKEV. 
1819— (2 MERINO SHEEP AND DOG— A DOG OF THE MARLBOROUGH 

BREED, the property of Mr. Plumer, of Gilston Park, Herts. 
i820-(=) THE THISTLE AND THE ASS, laden with provisions. From /Esop's Fables. 

—POINTERS. 
iSii— in) RATCATCHERS — IMPERTINENT PUPPIES DISMISSED BV A 

MONKEY. 
■ 822— (4) A PROWLING LION— RAT-CATCHERS— A HIGHLAND TERRIER— 

DEVONSHIRE COiVS. 
1S23— (,2) PORTRAITS OF HUNTERS — PORTRAIT OF A FAVOURITE 

SPANIEL, the property of S. Streatfield, Esq. 
1825— (3) PORTRAIT OF LORD COSMO RUSSELL, son of His Grace the Duke of 

Bedford— r^AVA'G/) BUCK— THE HTDOIV. 
1S26— THE HUNTING OF CHEW CHASE. 
1827— (4) HIGHLANDERS RETURNING FROM DEER STALKING, with dead 

deer, &c — THE MONKEY IVHO HAD SEEN THE IVORLD — 

HONOURABLE JA.IfES .MURRAY, second son to Lord Glenlyon ; with a 

gamekeeper, and favourite fawn — DEAD GA.^IE, swan and peacock, &c. 



76 



ANIMAL PAINTERS 



VEAK 

i8i8— {2) SCEA'E /.V THE HIGHLANDS, with portraits of the Duchess of Bedford, the 
Dukeot Gordon, and Lord Alexander RusscU— /'O A' r^-^/rO^ ^ TERRIER, 
the property of Owen Williams, Esq., M.P. 
1829— (4) ^ A' ILLICIT WHISKEY STILL IN THE HIGHLANDS — HON. 
RICHARD CAVENDISH, with a favourite greyhound, &c., the property of His 
Grace the Duke of Devonshire— Z)£/IZ3 ROE DEER—BASHA IV, the properly of 
the Right Honourable the Earl of Dudley. 
i83o-<2) THE DUKE OF A THOL AND MR. GEORGE MURRA Y, attended by hU 

head forester, John Cierar, keepers, &c. — A TTACHMENT, 
ziii—ii) INTERIOR OF A HIGHLANDER'S HOUSE — POACHERS DEER- 
STALKING— LITTLE RED RIDING HOOD— THE POACHERS' BOTHY 
—POACHER AND RED DEER. 
1832— (3) PETS— THE DUKE OF DEVONSHIRE, K.G., &>€.— HAWKING. 
i833-<4) A JACK-IN-OFFICE-DEER AND DEER HOUNDS IN A MOUNTAIN 
TORRENT— HUNTERS, the property of VV. Wigram, Esq.— 5/^ WALTER 
SCOTT SEATED AT THE BOTTOM OF THE RHYMER'S GLEN, so 
called, having been the scene of meetings between Thomas of Erceldoune, the Rhymer, 
and the Faiiy Queen. Maida, the stag-hound, was the gift of the late Glengarrj' ; 
the yellow terrier, Ginger, and the black Spice, were of Dandie Dinmont's family of 
Pepper and Mustard. 
^^3A-<.^) SCENE OF THE OLDEN TIMES AT BOLTON ABBEY— A HIGH- 
LAND BREAKFAST— COLLIE DOG RESCUING A SHEEP FROM A 
SNOW-DRIFT— MARK HALL, the property of W. Wigram, Esq. 
^i3i—{.i) FAIRY, the property of Mrs. E. Lytton Bulwer— .4 SCENE IN THE 
GRA.::PIANS, the drovers' departure— y^^ VOURITES, the property of H.R.H. 
Prince George of Cambridge. 
1836— <4) SCENE IN CHILLINGHAM PARK, portrait of Lord Ossulston, &c.— 
TWELFTH NIGHT, OR WHAT YOU WILL— LADIES HARRIET 
AND BEA TRICE HAMIL TON, children of the Marquess and Marchioness of 
.Khercoin— MUSTARD, the son of Pepper ; given by the late Sir Walter Scott to 
Sir Francis Chantry, R.A., &c. 
■ 837— (8) FALCON — HOODED FALCON — THE SHEPHERD'S CHIEF 
MOURNER— THE HIGHLANDS — RETURN FROM HAWKING — 
SPANIELS ; the property of the Earl of h\hemax\e— FRIENDS— SPANIELS, 
the property of Lady Scott Douglas. 
1838— (6) "THE LIFE'S IN THE OLD DOG YET "— PORTRAITS OF THE 
MARQUESS OF STAFFORD AND THE LADY EVELYN GOWER, 
Dunrobin Castle in the &st^nce-HER MAJESTYS FAVOUITE DOGS AND 
PARROT — LADY FITZH ARRIS —" NONE BUT THE BRAVE 
DESERVE THE FAIR "— DISTINGUISHED MEMBER OF THE 
HUMANE SOCIETY. 
,839— <7) PRINCESS MARY OF CAMBRIDGE, and a favourite Newfoundland 
dog, the property of Prince George of Cambridge — TETHERED RAMS, 
scene in ^zo\.\mi-CORSICAN, RUSSIAN AND FALLOW DEER-MISS 
ELIZA PEEL, with Fiiio— FA VOURITE PONY AND DOGS, the property 
of Charles William Packe, Esq., M.P., &c., kc.—VAN AMBURGH AND HIS 
ANIMALS — THE CHILDREN OF THE HON. COL. SEYMOUR 
BA THURST. 
1840— (5) HORSES TAKEN IN TO BAIT, the properly of J. Marshall, 'Eiq,.— MACAW, 
LOVE-BIRDS, TERRIER AAD SPANIEL PUPPIES BELONGING TO 
HER .M.-iJESTY—LION DOG FROM MALTA (the last of the tribe), the 
property of H.R.H. the Duchess of Kent— /,/CA' .AND DASH, the property of 
His Grace the Duke of Beaufort— X/1 l-'/iV'G DOWN THE LAW. 



WORKS OF SIR EDWIN LANDSEER, R.A. 7/ 

VEAR 

1842— (7) OTTERS AND SALMON— THE HIGHLAND SHEPHERD'S HOME— 
ZIVAt a badger dog belonging to the hereditary Prince Saxe Coburg-Gotha — A 
PAIR OF BRAZILIAN MONKEYS, tbe property of Her Unisay—BREEZE, 
a favourite retriever, the property of tbe Accountant-General — EOS, a favourite 
greyhound, the property of H.R.H. Prince A\hert— THE SANCTUARY. 

1843— (2) HON. ASHLEY PONSONBY— HORSES, the property of William Wigram, 

Esq. 
1844— (4) THE OTTER SPEARED, portraits of the Earl of Aberdeen's otter hounds— 

DISAPPOINT.MENT-COMING EVENTS CAST THEIR SHADOll'S 

BEFORE THEM— SHOEING. 
1845— ?■//£■ SHEPHERDS PRAYER. 

1846— (4) TI.ME OF PE.iCE-TIME OF WAR-STAG AT BAY— REFRESH- 
MENT. 
1847 — (2) THE DRIVE, shooting deer on the pass ; scene in the Black Mount, Glen- 

Urchy Forest — MR. VAN AMBURGH, as he appeared with his animals at the 

London Theatres, painted for F.M. the Duke of Wellington. 
1848— (5) PINCHER, the property of Montague Gore, Esq. —SKETCH OF MY 

FATHER— ALEXANDER AND DIOGENES— AN OLD COVER HACK, 

the property of R. Heathcote, Esq.— /I RANDOM SHOT. 
i849-(5) THE DESERT— THE FORESTER'S FAMILY— THE FREE CHURCH 

—COLLIE DOGS— EVENING SCENE IN THE HIGHLANDS. 
1850— (3) A DIALOGUE AT lV.4TERL00—"'Whal man of you, h.iving an hundred 

sheep, if he lose one of them, doth not leave the ninety and nine in the wilderness, 

and go after that which is lost until he find it?" (St. Luke xv., ^)—G0OD 

DOGGIE, the property of Lady Murchison. 

r85t-(6) 

" When first the day-star's clear cool light. 
Chasing night's shadows grey. 
With silver touched each^rocky height 
That girded wild Glen-strae, 
Uprose the monarch of the glen, 
Majestic from his lair, 
Surveyed the scene with piercing ken. 
And snuffed the fragrant air." 

(Lc^efuis o/Glenoychay, a Poem). 

-GROUP, GENEVA— SCENE FRO.M THE MIDSUM.VIER NIGHTS 
DREAM, Titania and Bottom ; Fairies attending Peas Blossom, Cob-web, Mustard- 
seed, Moth, &Q.— HIGHLANDER— LASSIE— THE LAST RUN OF THE 
SEASON. 

1853— (4) NIGHT— MORNING— CHILDREN OF THE MIST— TWINS. 

1854— (3) ROYAL SPORTS ON HILL AND LOCH, the Queen, the Prince Consort, 
and the Prince of Wales, the Viscountess Jocelyn— Z^.^j^^i^/ii DINMONT, the 
favourite old Skye terrier of Her Majesty the Queen. 

1856— <2) SA VED ! Dedicated to the Humane Society — HIGHLAND NURSES, 
dedicated to Miss Nightingale. 

1857— (3) SCENE IN BRAE MAR, Highland deer, &c.— ROUGH AND READY- 
UNCLE TOM AND HIS WIFE FOR SALE. 

i85S-(2) THE MAID AND MAGPIE— DEERSTALKING. 

1859— (4) DOUBTFUL CR U.WBS -" BRAN viM never put another stag to bay; and 
OSCAR will no make out by himself. The deer will do fine yel\"—THE 
PRIZE CALF— A KIND STAR. 

itia— FLOOD IN THE HIGHLANDS. 



78 



ANIMAL PAINTERS 



i86i-{4) THE SHREW TAMED-FA TAL DUEL-SCENES IN THE MARQUIS 
OF BREADALBANE'S HIGHLAND DEER FOREST. 

1864— (4) PIPER AND PAIR OF NUTCRACKERS— WINDSOR PARK— MAN 
PROPOSES, COD DISPOSES— PENSIONERS. 

j86s-(4) DEJEUNER A LA FOURCHETTE-PROSPERITV-ADVERSITY- 
THE CONNOISSEURS. 

lidd-ii) MARE AND FOAL, Indian tent, (ic.- LADY CODIYA'S PRAYER- 
ODDS AND ENDS, trophy for a \xM—THE CHASE— STAG AT BA Y. 

i86;-(3) HER MAJESTY A T OSBORNE IN 1Z6&-DEER OF CHILLINCHAM 
PARK, NORTHUMBF.RLAND—WILD CATTLE OF CHILLINGHAM, 
the property of the Earl of Tankcrville. 

1S68— <2) RENT DA Y IN THE WILDERNESS—" VVeel, sir, if the deer got the ball, 
sure's death CHEYYv;\\\ no leave him." 

1869— (4) STUDY OF A LION— STUDY OF A LION—SWANNERY INVADED 
BY SEA-EAGLES— THE PTARMIGAN HILL. 

1870 — (5) VOL TIGEUR : winner of the Derby and St. Leger, 1850, the property of the 
Earl of ZeU^nd— QUEEN I -IC TOR I A MEETING THE PRINCE CONSORT 
ON THE RETURN FROM DEER STALKING IN THE YEAR 1850— 
DOCTOR'S VISIT TO POOR RELATIONS AT THE ZOOLOGICAL 
GARDENS-DEER— LASSIE, a sketch. 

1872— <3) THE LADY EMILY PEEL, with her favourite dogs— 7"iY£ BAPTISMAL 
FONT— THE LION A ND 7 HE LA MB. 

1873— (0 TRACKER — SKETCH OF HER MAJESTY THE QUEEN ianfmUhe A) 
(Her Majesty has not sat for the likeness). 



SALES OF SIR EDWIN LANDSEER'S PICTURES. 



Sold 


Picture 


Collection 


Guineas 


1849 .. 


FALLOW DEER 


\Vm. Wells, of Red- 
leaf, Kent 


700 




RED DEER 


„ .. 


650 


June 9th, 


PORTRAIT OF SIR W. SCOTT IN 




3i050 


1877 


THE RHYMER'S GLEN, painted for 
Mr. Wells 








PORTRAIT OF SIR WALTER SCOTT, 


Baron Grant's Gallery 


Sio 




32i in. by 19J in., purchased by Mr. Grant 








for 160 guineas at the artist's sale in 1874 






April 25th, 


THE PRIZE CALF, 26 in. by 20 in. 


Bicknell sale . . 


1,800 


1863 








April 25th, 


TWO DOGS LOOKING FOR CRU.WBS, 


>t II 


8,300 


1863 


25 in. by 30 in. 






April 25th, 


HIGHLAND SHEPHERD, 57 in. by 31 in. 


» •• 


2|230 


May, 1870 


THE HIGHLAND SHEPHERD'S 

HOME 
LANDSCAPE, WITH CATTLE.. 


The Bullock sale . . 


1,000 


May 8th, 


Sir Edwin Laiidseer's 


315 


1874 




sale 




May 8th, 


PORTRAITS OF DUKE OF DEVON- 




1,050 


1874 


SHIRE, LORD AND LADY CAVEN- 
DISH, deer and dogs in park, unfinished.. 






May 8th, 


LADY GODIVA'S PRAYER, exhibited 


It II 


3,200 


1874 


r868 






May 8th, 


HORSES AND DOGS 




1,000 


1874 







WORKS OF SIR EDWIN LANDSEER, R.A. 
Sales of Sir Edwin Landseer's Pictures. —C(7«/rf. 



79 



Sold 



Picture 



Collection Guineas 



May 8lh, 

1874 
May 8th, 

1874 



May 8th, 

1S74 
May 8th, 

.874 

May 8th, 
1874 



July 3rd, 
1875 

May, 1886 

April 21st, 
1877 



April 27th 
& 23th, 
1S77 

April 27th 
& 28th, 
1877 



April 27th 
& 28th, 
1877 



May 19th, 
1877 

Mar.,1880 

May 4th, 
1878 



.879 



DIGCmG OUT THE OTTER .. 

PORTRAITS OF THE EARL AND 
COUNTESS OF SEFTON AND 
DA UGHTER 

PORTRAITS OF TIVO YOUNG LADIES 

PORTRAIT OF SIR WALTER SCOTT, 
with a book 

PORTRAIT OF HER MAJESTY THE 
QUEEN ON A WHITE HORSE, un- 
finished 

PORTRAITS OF THE DUKE OF 
BEAUFORT AND SISTERS when 
young, with dogs 

"OLD BRUTUS," rough white-haired dog 

NEWFOUNDLAND DOG AND TER- 
RIER AT A STREAM 

ST. BERNARD DOGS, 96 in. by 72 in. . . 



ST. BERNARD DOGS, from the Gillott 

sale, 1872 
LADY CATHERINE DOUGLAS, 

HA WKING 



A HIGHLAND LASSIE, 35 in. by 27 in. 



THE OTTER HUNT, engraved by C. G. 
Lewis, 76 in. by 60 in. (Mr. Grant is said to 
have given ;£ ro,ooo for this celebrated master- 
piece, which was painted for Lord Aberdeen) 

THE LADYS HORSE (Prosperit>-), 
27 in. by 35 in. 

AND 

\THE CABMANS horse (Adversity) 

ARREST OF THE FALSE HERALD, 
the engraved vignette to Quentin Durward, 
3 in. by 7 in. 

HINDS ALARMED (painted at Novar) . . 

HIGHLAND NURSES (deer and ptar- 
migan), 27 in. by 35 in., engraved by T. 
Landseer 

SPORT IN THE HIGHLANDS .. 

THE KING OF THE FOREST, 24 in. 
by 24 in. 



Sir Edwin Landseer's 
sale. 



CANINE FRIENDS 



Jesse Watts Russell, 
of Ham Hall, Staf- 
fordshire 



Mr. Robert Vernon's 
collection from Har- 
ley Park, Cam- 
bridgeshire 

Baron Albert Grant,of 
Kensington House 
Gallery 

Baron Albert Grant, of 
Kensington House 
Gallery 



Mr. John Knowles, of 

Manchester 

The Munro Collection 

F. T. Turner, of The 
Cedars, Clapham 
Common 

J. Nield, of Dunster 
House, Rochdale 



W. Fenton, of Button 
Manor, Rochester 



610 
570 



610 
800 



600 

r,050 

2,150 

440 
355 



5,650 



1,430 
190 

250 
1,600 

1,450 
1,000 



8o ANIMAL PAINTERS 

Sales of Sir Edwin Landseer's Pictures.— Ci»»/(/. 



Sold 



Picture 



Collection Glineas 



1879 .. 

Feb. 26th- 

2Sth, 
18S0 
May 28 tb, 
1881 



May 28ih, 



May 28th, 



May 28th, 



May t3th, 
1882 



May 13th, 

1882 



Mar. 28 th' 
2gth,i884 



May 24tb, 
1884 



Mar. 2 7th, 

1886 

Mar.27tb, 

1886 

June 25th, 

1892 



April 3oth| 
1887 



GIPSY ENCAMPMENT, witb donkej-s .. 

LION PREYING ON A FAWN, 16 in. 
by 12 in. 

" WELL-BRED SITTERS WHO NEVER 
SAY THEY ARE BORED," upright, 
36 in. by 28 in. 

*'MAN PROPOSES, GOD DISPOSES." 
Polar bears and the Franklin relics, 96 in. 
by 36 in. ; from the Albert Grant sale 

DIGGING OUT THE OTTER in the Valley 
of the Tay ; figures finished by Sir J. E. 
M illais, 60 in. by 98 in. This picture 
realised in its unfinished state 630 guineas, 
and at the artist's sale in 1874, 2,950 guineas 

STAG PURSUED BY GREYHOUND, 
chalk cartoon, life size in colours, 72 in. by 
96 in 

POACHERS DEER STALKING, 20 in. 
by 26 in. 



"OLD BRUTUS," a white, wire-haired, bull- 
terrier dog, 43 in. by 55 in. from the artist's 
sale 

MONARCH OF THE GLEN, 65 in. by 
66 in., purchased by Lord Londesborough of 
the artist for 350 guineas, and now secured 
by Mr. Eaton, M.P. 

PENSIONERS, two fine old hunters, a dark 
bay and a grey, 15 in. by 23 in., from the 
Hargreave's sale of 1873(1,600 guineas) 

HAWKING IN THE OLDEN TIME, 
72 in. by 60 in., engraved by Lewis 

FREE TRADE AND PROTECTION .. 

^' A DEER FAMILY," painted forW. Wells, 
of Redleaf, and subsequently in the collec- 
tion of Mr. Bashall, of Bristol, whence it 
passed privately into the Manley Hall gal- 
lery of a. Mendel 

THE SHEPHERD'S BIBLE, the engraved 
picture exhibited at the Royal Academy, 
1849, sold for 1,020 guineas, at the Farn- 
worth sale, in 1874 

INTRUDING PUPPIES, 28 in. by 35 in., 
engraved by Thomas Landseer, 1821 

BRAEMAR, 107 in. by 99 in., Royal Aca- 
demy, 1857 ; at the E. L. Belts sale in 1868 
this work realised 4,000 guineas 



W. Fenton of Button 
Manor, Rochester 

James Fenton, Norton 
Hall, Gloucester- 
shire 

Mr. E. J. Coleman .. 



Edward Hermon, 

M.P. for Preston, 
and of WyfoldCourt, 
Henley-on-Thames 



Mrs. Morrison, of 
Mountblairy House, 
Mr. Edward Sibeth 
and other properties 

Charles Skipper, of 
Russell Square 



Henry M'Connel, of 
Cressbrook, Derby- 
shire 



Lord Dudley's collec- 
tion 



John Graham, of Skel- 
raorlie Castle, Ayr- 
shire 



The Bolckow sale 



290 
"75 



6,300 



2,950 



800 



6,200 



200 

3.050 



1,000 
4.950 



WORKS OF SIR EDWIN LANDSEER, R.A. 8l 

Sales of Sir Edwin Landseer's Pictures. — Contd. 



Sold 



June 



April 



i8go 



2nd, 
8 



Picture 



TAKING A BUCK, from the Manley Hall 
collection 

THE HUNTED STAG, 1859, 42 '"■ ^y 
112 in. 

ALPINE MASTIFFS, 1820, from the Jesse 
Watts Russel Collection 

UNCLE TOM AND HIS WIFE FOR 
SALE 

DEAD PHEASANT, 19 in. by 26 in., 
painted in 1S23 

DEATH OF THE WOODCOCK, 19 in. 
by 26 in. 

HEADS OF SHEEP AND CATTLE, 
19 in. by 23 in. 

FOE'S HEAD AND PTARMIGAN, 9 in. 
by 12 in., exhibited at the British Institu- 
tion, 1830, as " Ptarmigan and Roebuck" 

TRIM: "The old dog looks like a picture," 
18 in. by 24 in., engraved by J. Webb for 
the New Sportiyig Magazine 

A HIGHLAND INTERIOR, 28 in. by 
34 in., Royal Academy, 1831 ; engraved by 
Finden and Ryall 

GROUSE, 19 in. by 26 in., exhibited at the 
Royal Institution, 1833 

POINTER, 17 in. by 24 in., 1833 ; engraved 
by T. Landseer 

BLACK COCK AND GREY HEN, 19 in. 
by 26 in., exhibited at British Institution, 
1833- 

SNIPE AND WOODCOCK, 19 in. by 26 in., 
1803 

PARTRIDGES, 19 in. by 26 in. (1833) 

DEAD WILD DUCK, 2oin. by 26 in., 1833 

BLACK HIGHLAND OK (" Sketch 
painted in one morning at Dunrobin Castle, 
byE. L., 1834") 

THE REAPER, 24 in. by 18 in., exhibited 
at British Institution, 1836, as the *' High- 
land Harvest Girl"; engraved by H. T. 
Ryall in 1834, and again by him on a large 
scale, 1846 

THE SHEPHERD'S GRAFE, 12 in. by 
14 in., 1837 ; engraved by B. P. Gibbon 



Collection , Guineas 



The Bolckow Sale 



Thos. Walker, of 
Berkswell Hall, 
Warwick 

Felix Vigne, of Pern- 
bridge Place, Hyde 
Park 


2,850 
1,850 


Wm. Wells, of Red- 
leaf, Kent 


350 


•' 


640 


n 1) • • 


570 



Wm. Wells, of Red- 
leaf, Kent 


I) 130 


„ .. 


1,400 




550 


M >> 


330 



850 



VOL. II. 



82 ANIMAL PAINTERS 

Sales of Sir Edwin Landsf.f.r's Picturks.— C^?;///. 



Sold 



1890 



Picture 



THE WOODCUTTER, 1837, 19 in. by 24 in, 

THE HAWK and THE PEREGRINE 
FALCON^ 24 ID. by 16 in., exhibited at 
Royal Academy, 1837, together 

THE HONEYMOON, 24 in. by 30 in., ex- 
hibited at British Institution, 1838, as " Roe- 
bucks " 

DEERHOUND AND MASTIFF, 45 in. 
by 48 in., exhibited at British Institution, 
1838, as "The Two Dogs" 

'* NONE BUT THE BRA VE DESERVE 
THE FAIR," 27 in. by 35 in., Royal Aca- 
demy, 1838 ; engraved by T. Landseer 

HARE AND STOAT, 21 in. by 27 in., 
British Institution, 1838, exhibited at the 
Manchester Art Treasures Exhibition, 1857, 
as " A Hare and Weasel" 

DAIRYMAID AND ALDERNEY COW, 
24 in. by 18 in., British Institution, 1839; 
engraved by Ryall 

OTTER AND SALMON, 22 in. by 34 in., 
Royal Academy, 1842 ; engraved by Jackson 

NOT CAUGHT YET, 22 in. by 34 in., ex- 
hibited at the British Institution, 1843, as 
" Not so Easily Caught " ; engraved by T. 
Landseer 

TERRIER AND DEAD WILD DUCKS, 
18 in. by 32 in., painted about 1845 

SPANIEL AND PHEASANT, 26 in. by 
18 in., exhibited at British Institution, 1845 

RETRIEVER AND WOODCOCK, 26 in. 
by 18 in., exhibited at British Institution, 
1845 

BROWSING: stag and hinds feeding: with 
portraits of Sir E. Landseer and W. Wells, 
Esq., M.P. ; a crayon drawing executed in 
1857, 91 in. by 108 in. 

RETURN FROM DEERSTALKING, 
1827, 24 in. by 30 in., engraved by Finden 
and Ryall, and the fine picture catalogued 
as '* Breeze" 

THE DRIVE, GLEN ORCHA Y, crayon. . 

THREE DOGS 

STAG BELLOWING 



Collection 



Guineas 



Wm. Wells, of Red- 
leaf, Kent 



The Bolckow sale 



2, zoo 
1,000 

3,850 



63a 



135 
215 

130 



WORKS OF SIR EDWIN LANDSEER, R.A. 
Sales of Sir Edwin Landseer's Pictures.— C(7«^^. 



Sold 



JuneiSth, 
i8q2 



Mar.22nd, 
1892 



1892 



May 7th, 

1892 

May 7th, 

1892 

May 7th, 

1892 



May 7th, 



May 7th, 
iSq2 



May 7th, 

1892 



1892 



1892 



1893 



Picture 



TAKING A BUCK, 67 in. by 84 in.; en- 
graved by T. Landseer ; from the Manley 
Hall collection 

ALPINE MASTIFFS, 74 in. by 93 in., ex- 
hibited at British Institution, 1820, and 
Manchester, 1857 ; engraved by J. Landseer 

THE FIRST LEAP, 18 in. by 23 in., 1829, 
from the collection of Lord J. Butler, 1870 ; 
engraved by Lewis 

WAITING FOR THE FERRY, 71 in. by 
112 in. 

LADY GODIVA'S PRAYER, 55 in. by 
44 in., Royal Academy, 1866 

THE HIGHLAND CABIN, 17 in. by 23 in., 
from the Duchess of Bedford's collection, 
^Ss3 (150 guineas) 

THE LION AND THE LAMB, yi in. by 
J07 in., Royal Academy, 1872, bought from 
the artist and engraved by T. Landseer 

ON TRUST, portrait of H.R.H. Princess 
Mary of Cambridge, with Nelson, a favourite 
Newfoundland dog, 55 in. by 44 in., Royal 
Academy, 1839, engraved by Simmons, 1875 

NO MORE HUNTING TILL THE 
IVEA THER BREAKS, 27 in. by 36 in., 
bought from the artist, 1863 

THE SIN OFFERING, Leviticus x. 16. 
48 in. by 53 in., exhibited at British Institu- 
tion, 1S61 

STUDY OF A DEAD GROUSE, oval, 
16 in. by 22 in. 

HER MAJESTY THE QUEEN, un- 
finished, begun 1841, bought from the artist, 
1S72, Royal Academy, 1873 ; engraved by T. 
Landseer 

ALL THAT REMAINS OF THE 
GLORY OF WILLIAM SMITH, 1827, 
ir in. by 9 in. ; engraved by John Pye 

TAMING THE SHREW, 32 in. by 50 in., 
Royal Academy, i85i; engraved by James 
Stephenson 

FLOOD IN THE HIGHLANDS, a scene 
on the Spey, 78 in. by 122 in.. Royal Aca- 
demy, i860 ; engraved by Atkinson 

OTTER HOUNDS IN WA TER, exhibited 
at Burlington House, 1874 



Collection 



The Bolckow sale 



Arthur C. Burnand, of 
Hyde Park Gate 

The David Price 



Lord Cheylesmore's 



Guineas 



850 



84 ANIMAL PAINTERS 

Sales of Sir Edwin Landsef.r's Pictures.— rn«/rf. 



Sold 



Collection 



Guineas 



May 6tb 



July 22nd, 
X893 

1894 



1896 



TOO HOT, a Breakfast Party, 13 in. by 17 in., 
exhibited at British Institution, 1831 

THE CATS PAiV, 29 in. by 27 in., 1824; 
engraved by C. G. Lewis 



CHEW, a deerhound 

CHEVY, Royal Academy, i863; engraved 
by T. Land seer 

THE SENTINEL, portraits of Lion and 
Dash, the Duke of Beaufort's dogs 

THE PENSIONERS, 1864; engraved by 
Stackpoole 



Viscount Clifton 



Rt. Hon. George, 5th 
Ear] of Essex 

Richard Hemming, of 
Grosvenor Place 



The- Hargreaves 



880 
890 

3i75o 

5.700 

1,850 
760 



PL.A.TES IN THE NEW SPORTING MAGAZINE (4 in 
number). 

DEAD RED DEER, vol. i, 1831 ; engraved by Scott. 
TRIM, a celebrated spaniel, vol. 2, 1831 ; engraved by J. Webb. 
DEER-STALKING, a portrait of Captain Ross deer-stalking, accompanied by 

keeper, vol. 7, 1834; engraved by Duncan. 
DEER-STALKING, vol. 20, 1841 ; engraved by Finden. 



PLATES IN ANNALS OF SPORTING (13 in number). 

TOHO ! Two setters with sportsman in the background, vol. 4, 1823. 

DOWN CHARGE, vol. 4, 1833. 

PHEASANT SHOOTING WITH SPRINGERS, vol. 4, 1823. 

BRUTUS, a bull terrier, vol. s, 1824 ; engraved by T. Landseer. 

FOXES, vol. 5, 1824. 

NEPTUNE, a Newfoundland dog, property of W. E. Gosling, Esq., vol. 5, 1824. 

FOXHOUNDS OF THE HATFIELD HUNT, portraits of Eleanor, Cottager, Stridrr, 

Adamant, and Rachel, \ol. 5, 1824: engraved by T. Landseer. 
PORTRAIT OF A CROSS OF THE DOG AND FOX, vol. 6, 1824. 
VIXEN, a thorough-bred Scottish terrier, vol. 6, 1824. 
ALPINE MASTIFF, vol. 7, 1825. 
PROCTER, study of a bloodhound's head, vol. 7, 1825. 
THE POACHER, a fo.\, vol. 7, 1825. 
BOB, a favourite terrier, tlie prt.perty of W. E. Gosling, Esq., vol. 8, 1825. 



85 



BENJAMIN MARSHALL. 

(Born 1767. Died 1835.) 

O ENJAMIN MARSHALL was born in Leices- 
*^ tershire in the year 1 767. Like many other 
artists who made their names as painters of animals, 
he began as a portrait painter, and until twenty-six 
years of age confined himself to this department 
of art under the tuition of F, L. Abbott. As might 
be expected of a Leicestershire man, he had a taste 
for sport, but does not appear to have weighed the 
propriety of lending his brush to animal portraiture 
until in 1793 he saw at the Royal Academy exhibi- 
tion Saurey Gilpin's exquisite painting " The Death 
of the Fox." This picture made a great impression 
upon him, and though he did not renounce portrai- 
ture altogether, he thenceforward devoted by far 
the greater portion of his time to the study of animal 
life, and more especially to horses and dogs in their 
relation to sport. 

Marshall was at this time residing in Beaumont 
Street, Marylebone ; and in turning his attention 
to the school of Art, in which he had so many 
brilliant contemporaries, he was no doubt influenced 



86 ANIMAL PAINTERS 

by the fashion of the time. Patrons of the turf 
and other wealthy sportsmen were eager purchasers 
of pictures which appealed to their sporting tastes, 
and there was a rage for possession of portraits of 
celebrated race-horses and hunters. As an indica- 
tion of the demand for good horse pictures, it is 
worth noticing that when George Stubbs was re- 
ceiving a hundred guineas for the portrait of a 
famous horse. Sir Joshua Reynolds could only 
obtain fifty guineas for a lady's portrait painted on 
a canvas of equal size. 

In spite of his undoubted ability Benjamin 
Marshall seems to have made little progress 
towards recognition until the year 1795, when he 
met John Scott, the famous engraver, then a young 
man of twenty-one, but already rising into notice, 
and at the beginning of his long connection with 
the Sporting Magazine. Common love of sport 
and art formed a bond between the two, and ac- 
quaintance soon ripened into intimacy. It is more 
than probable that Scott was instrumental in bring- 
ing the talents of his friend under the notice of 
Mr. Wheble, for in volume vii. of the Sporting 
Magazine for 1796 we find the first engraving from 
a painting by Marshall. This plate is engraved 
by John Scott from a portrait of Mr. Taplin, author 
of a work on Farriery. With the exception of 
three etchings from portrait sketches, Scott's name 



BENJAMIN MARSHALL 87 

appears on every plate from Marshall's pictures 
which appeared in the Magazine until 1822, in 
which year Scott's health broke down, and he laid 
aside his graver. Of Scott's rare abilities nothing 
need be said here, as his life will appear in this 
series of Animal Painters ; he was an artist as well 
as an eminent engraver. Marshall had great good 
fortune in making a friend so sympathetic in taste 
and so exceptionally competent to interpret his 
paintings for a wider public. 

Benjamin Marshall was neither constant nor 
liberal in his contributions to the exhibitions of the 
Royal Academy. Between 1801 and 18 19 he 
showed only eleven works. His first picture was 
a " Portrait of J. G. Shaddick, Esq.," and after an 
interval of five years he was again represented by 
a likeness of the same gentleman described as " The 
Celebrated Sportsman." His exhibits in the year 
1 81 2 were two pictures entitled "A Game Cock" 
and " A Trimmed Cock." 

Marshall in after years made several paintings 
of game cocks ; two which, companion pictures, 
were engraved by C. Turner; one entitled "The 
Cock in Feather," the other " The Streaky-breasted 
Red Dunn," and they were printed in colour. He 
also painted two other companion pictures en- 
titled " Black-breasted Dark Red " and " Streaky- 
breasted Red Dunn," which were printed in colours, 
each plate measuring 1 7 inches by 1 3f inches. 



88 ANIMAL PAINTERS 

During his residence in London he painted the 
portraits of two celebrated pugiHsts, viz., " Mr. 
John Jackson," for Sir Henry Smith, Bart., which 
was engraved by C. Turner, size of plate, 2 2f inches 
by i7|- inches — and portrait of Thomas Belcher, 
which was also engraved by C. Turner, plate 21^ 
inches by 18 inches, from the original picture in 
possession of John Harrison, Esq. 

After twenty years' residence in London Mar- 
shall moved to Newmarket ; not, it would appear, 
without qualms as to the wisdom of the step, and 
not without an eye to the vogue in art to which 
reference was made on a previous page. He is 
said to have remarked to Abraham Cooper, who as 
a young man was constantly in his studio, that it 
was folly to leave London, where he was esteemed 
as portrait painter, to " bury himself at New- 
market" and paint horse pictures, adding, "Stop, 
stop, though ! I have a good reason for so doing. 
I discover many a man who will give me fifty 
guineas for painting his horse who thinks ten 
guineas too much to pay for painting his wife." 

That his decision to make a new home at the 
headquarters of the turf was fully justified is proved 
by his subsequent success. Ere long he counted 
among his patrons George HL and George IV., 
Earl St. Vincent, Lords Darlington, Scarborough 
and Sondes, Messrs. Hy. Villebois, Thornhill and 
Fulmar Craven. 



BENJAMIN MARSHALL 89 

For Lord Darlington, afterwards Duke of Cleve- 
land and Baron Raby, famous both on the turf and 
in the hunting field, Marshall painted portraits of 
Hap-hazard and Muley Moloch, paying a visit to 
Raby Castle, near Durham, to execute the commis- 
sion. Hap-hazard is depicted ready for the 
match for 500 guineas against Lord Strathmore's 
Walnut at York. Samuel Wheatley, his training 
groom, holds the horse while Wm. Price, the 
jockey, is in the act of stripping off his coat 
to mount. Muley Moloch is represented under- 
going the operation of scraping and wiping down 
after winning a 20-guinea sweepstakes, to which 
there were ten subscribers. Tod, a stable lad, is 
at his head, and behind the horse stand Hardy, 
his training groom. Trotter, a farmer, and Thomp- 
son, the head gardener at Raby Castle ; the back- 
ground being filled with stands, booths, carriages 
&c. These pictures were engraved in 1805 by 
Cook, the plates measuring 24 inches by 18 inches. 

Middleton, Zinganee and Priam, among other 
famous race-horses, stood to Marshall for portraits, 
which were engraved and reproduced in the Sport- 
ing Magazine. A portrait of Lop was engraved by 
Whessell, size of plate 19 inches by 14, and was 
published on ist January, 1815, by J. Harris, of 
Sweetings Alley, east end of the Royal Exchange, 
and 8, Old Broad Street. Marshall painted 



go ANIMAL PAINTERS 

portraits of Filho da Puta and Sir Joshua on the 
same canvas ; this work was engraved by Wm. 
Ward, size of plate 23 inches by 18^, and pubHshed 
by S. Knight, of 3, Sweetings Alley, Cornhill, on 
1st January, 181 8. 

Other works more particularly deserving of 
notice are : a portrait of Spangles, a hunter owned 
by the Prince of Wales, which was engraved by 
John Scott ; " Water Dogs," two dogs contending 
for a stick just retrieved from a lake, engraved 
by W. Ward ; Francis Dukinfield Astley, Esq., 
and his Harriers, a hunting piece of which 
R. Woodman made an exquisitely fine engraving 
of large size, plate 24 inches by 19 inches, a few 
impressions of which were published in colour ; 
The Earl of Darlington and his Foxhounds, an 
engraving of which by J. Dean was published 
1st March, 1810, by W. D. Jones, of Cambridge, 
and Hunters at Grass, the property of Mr. John 
Micklethwaite, engraved by W. Ward. 

The Sportsman s Repository, published in 1820, 
by Sherwood, Neely and Jones, comprising a series 
of highly finished engravings, representing the horse 
and the dog in all their varieties, contains eight 
plates engraved by Scott from pictures by 
Marshall, namely. The Wellesley Arabian, owned 
by the Hon. Henry Wellesley ; Sir Charles 
Bunbury's race- horse Eleanor ; Mr. George 



BENJAMIN MARSHALL 9 1 

Treacher's hunter Duncombe ; Roan Billy, a 
hackney, the property of a gentleman ; The 
Charger, a horse belonging to General Warde ; 
Mr. Henry Villebois' coach-horse David, and a 
cart-horse Dumpling, owned by Messrs. Home and 
Devey. 

The volumes of the SportingMagazine from 1 796 
to 1826 contain no fewer than sixty engravings 
from pictures by Benjamin Marshall. Those oc- 
curring in the volumes prior to the year 1822 were, 
as we have already seen, almost without exception 
the work of John Scott. Subsequently J. Webb, 
R. Woodman, J. Romney, and other capable 
engravers executed the plates. The reservation 
applies to three etchings from sketches of the 
Newmarket turf officials, namely, Mr. John Hilton, 
Judge of the Course ; Mr. Samuel Betts, 
Starter of the Horses, and Mr. John Fuller 
(on horseback), the official known then, as now, 
as Clerk of the Course. The name of the etcher 
is not given on these plates. 

Two of Benjamin Marshall's portraits claim 

attention not less by reason of the fame of the 

setters than their artistic merits. One of these is 

The Sportsman, standing gun in hand by a stile 

with a pointer and setter beside him. A tablet 

attached informs us that 

" The portrait is that of Thomas Gosden, the celebrated 
sporting bookbinder of St. Martin's Lane, and afterwards of 



92 ANIMAL PAINTERS 

1 8, Bedford Street, Co vent Garden. Benjamin Marshall, 
1 814. The Landbcape in the picture is by Luke Clennell." 

This picture has been twice engraved ; in small 
size by Maile, and on a larger scale by Giller. 
Gosden, who was an intimate friend of Marshall 
and of John Scott, published Maile's engraving, a 
very beautiful piece of work, in 1824 : a few of the 
engravings from this plate were printed in colour. 
The other picture is A First Rate Shot, a com- 
panion work to The Sportsman. The tablet 
attached o-ives the followincj information : — 

" The portrait is that of George Osbaldeston, Esq. No 
man is better known on the turf, and few better calculated 
to shine in his bit of scarlet by the dark woodside, nor in the 
tented field with bat in hand. At the ' board of green cloth ' 
too, where the billiard balls fly true and swiftly, he rarely or 
ever meets his match, and at the round table will he take his 
seat occasionally, and cry, ' seven's the main.' Our hero 
gives similar reasons for being drawn in trousers to the hero 
Wellington against the Reform Bill, ' they work well, at 
least for me.' Nell, the pointer, is one of the handsomest 
ever seen, her bringing up perfect, as is her symmetry, and 
in finding her game is truly astonishing. Peg, the retriever, 
has her excellences also. If a bird is brought to the ground 
by depriving it of the power of flying it must come to bag. 
The picture is signed Benjamin Marshall, and bears the date 
1831." 

The Sporting Magazine for October, 1831, con- 
tains an engraving of this work, with a descriptive 
note compiled from the tablet. 

After the first few years of his artistic career, 



BENJAMIN MARSHALL 93 

when likenesses of men occupied Marshall's brush, 
portraits of race-horses, hunters and sporting dogs 
were the works to which he devoted his talents for 
the most part ; and though hunting and shooting 
subjects also came from his studio, he is best known 
by the equine portraits, which display sound know- 
ledge of anatomy and close study of the horse 
under all conditions. 

After thirteen years' residence at Newmarket 
Marshall returned in 1825 to London, where he 
purchased a house in London Terrace, Hackney 
Road. His choice of locality was influenced by the 
fact that his eldest son had received an appoint- 
ment in the Customs, and also by the desire that 
the younger, Lambert, should be able to profit by 
attendance at the Schools of Art in the Metropolis. 
Here the artist passed the last ten years of his 
life, dying on 24th July, 1835, in his sixty-seventh 
year. He was buried at Bethnal Green. A writer 
in the Sporting Magazine pays tribute to his 
memory with the mourning lines so much in vogue 
in past days : — 

" The remains of this eminent artist were followed to the 
grave by his sorrowing relations and a few attached friends, 
and his body was deposited in a vault at Bethnal Green by 
the side of his wife and daughter. 

" The hero falls and roars the funeral fire. 
The prelate dies and peals the cloister'd choir, 
To each appropriate ; yet the lowly name 
Shall not in vain prefer its humble claim. 



94 ANIMAL PAINTERS 

Marshall ! To thee the tribute that we give 
Is here, where proudly tliy memorials live, 
That such as hang in sorrow o'er thy bier 
Maj' turn and find thee still surviving here." 



WORKS OF BENJAMIN MARSHALL. 

PICTURES EXHIBITED IN THE ROYAL ACADEMY (ii in 

number). 

YEAR 

1801— /. G. SHADD/CK, £SQ. 

1806—/. G. SHADDICK, ESQ., the celebrated sportsman. 

1807— jW/e. D. LAMBERT. 

zZcA— PORTRAITS OF A FOREIGN NOBLEMAN AND HIS HORSES. 

iSio— <2) .1 FAVOURITE HORSE, the property of Lord Viscount Deerhurst— .-J WELL- 
KNOWN HORSE, the property of T. C. Hunter, Esq. 

1812— (2) THE TRIMMED COCK— A GAME COCK. 

,Sii— CATTLE OF THE IMPROVED SHORT-HORNED BREED, propertr of J. 
Wilkinson, Esq., of Lenton, near Nottingham. 

i3i9-(2) PORTRAITS OF A FAMILY AT LITTLE THURLOIV, SUFFOLK- 
FANNY, by Poulton, property of R. Jones, Esq., with the portrait of Chiffney. 

PLATES IN THE SPORTING MAGAZINE (60 in number). 

lifR. T.-iPLIN, author of The Gentleman s .^tabte Directory, 1796, vol. 7 ; engraved by 

Scott. 
-■I SON OF ER.4SMUS, property of E. Boehm, Esq., 1796, vol. 8; engraved by J. Scott, 
(2) AN ARABIAN, ijge, vol. 9; engraved by Scott— SPANIEL AND HARE, r797, 

vol. 9 ; engraved by J. Scott. 
(2) MR. ROBERT JONES, practical .farrier, 1797, vol. 10; engraved by J. Scott— 

D.4B.'iTER, a celebrated fo.xhound belonging to the Berkeley Hunt, 1797, vol. 

10 ; engraved by J. Scott. 
(2) COPPERBOTTO.M, an extraordinary mare, 12J hands high, winner of many races, 

1798, vol. II ; engraved by J. Scolt—PHOSPHORUS, by Eclipse, 1798, vol. 11 ; 

engraved by J. Scott. 
(2) RICHARD KNIGHT, huntsman to Earl Spencer, 1802, vol. 21 ; engraved by W. Bond 

—R0.-iNH.4CK', 1802, vol. 21 ; engraved by J. Scott. 
J.4SPER, a hound, bred by the Earl of Egremont, 1803, vol. 22 ; engraved by Scott. 
PRECIPITATE, bred by the E.irl of Egremont, and foaled in 1787. 1804, vol. 23; en- 
graved by Scott. 
(2) MR. JOHN HILTON, judge of the course, \ewmarket, 1804, vol. 24; an etching— 

MR. SAMUEL BETTS, starter of the horses at Newmarket, 1804, vol. 24 ; an 

etching. 
MR. JOHN FULLER, clerk of the course at Newmarket, 1805, vol. 15; an etching. 




-7 o-^tl-Sfllp^icMi^ 



-^. ,>oi,//tli 



M. 



''(i'n^.^2/^?7^/?Z/ 



WORKS OF BENJAMIN MARSHALL 95 

BADGER, property of Lord Jersey, 1805, vol. 27 ; engraved by Scott. 

SPANIELS, property of John Carr, Esq., 1807, vol. 30; engraved by Scott. 

(2) HORSE, property of J. B. Trevanion, Esq., 1809, vol. 35; engraved by S. Mitan— 

MISCHIEF, a terrier, property of Mr. T. Farley, 1810, vol. 35; engraved by 
Scott. 
{2) NOBLE, a hunter, 1810, vol. 36; engraved by Scoa—SP A NIELS-SPRINGERS, 

property of General Leigh, i8io, vol. 36 ; engraved by Scott. 
HUNTERS, property of the Earl of Scarborough, 1810, vol. 37 ; engraved by Scott. 
BLACKLEG, property of Lord C. Bentinck, iBii, vol. 39; engraved by Scott. 
DUSTMAN, a celebrated dog, property of Wm. Disney, Esq., 1812, vol. 40 ; engraved by 

Scott. 
SATAN, Newfoundland dog, and CIIESNUT PONY, 1S14, vol. 44 ; engraved by Scott. 
JUNIPER AND JANETTE, greyhounds, property of Captain Wyatt, M.P., 1815, vol. 

45 ; engraved by ScOtt. 
{■2) BROOD MARES AND FOALS, i8ig, vol. 55; engraved by Scott—ANTICIPA. 

TION, a chesnut horse, foaled i8i8. 1819, vol. 55; engraved by Mitan. 
(2) COLONEL MELLISH, 1S20, vol. 56 ; engraved by Scott. 
HOUNDS, contending for the lead, 1820, vol. 56 ; etched by Scott. 
(2) CANNON BALL, a bay horse, property of the Earl of Jersey, 1821, vol. 59 ; engraved 

by J. Scott. 
CANNON BALL, by Sancho, 1S21, vol. 59; engraved by J. Scott. 
THOMAS HILTON, ESQ., the father of fox-hunters in Kent, 1822, vol. 60; engraved by 

Wm. Smith. 
I AGO, a greyhound, 1822, vol. 61 ; engraved by J. Scott. 
(2) BANKER, a celebrated racer, 1823, vol. 62— TOT INCH LEV, 1823, vol. 62 ; engraved 

by W. T. Fry. 
EMILIUS, a bay colt, bred by, and the property of, Col. Udny, 1824, vol. 64; engraved 

by J. Webb. 
MIRANDOLA, a chesnut mare, bred by, and the property of, Lord Clarendon, 1824, vol. 

65 ; engraved by J. Webb. 
(2) LONGJi'AIST, a bay horse, property of Fulmar Craven, Esq., 1825, vol. 66 ; engraved 

by J. Wehh— DOG'S HEAD AND PARTRIDGE, 1825, vol. 66; engraved by J. 

Webb. 
(2) MIDDLETON, a chesnut colt, bred by, and property of, the Earl of Jersey, 1825, vol. 

67 ; engraved by J. 'Wehh— BRA FUR A, a dark grey mare, property of Sir Robert 

Keith Dick, Bart., 1S26, vol. 67 ; engraved by J. Webb. 
(2) PHANTOM, a bay horse, bred by, and the property of, Sir John Shelley, Bart., 1826, 

vol. 68; engraved by J. 'Wehh—RALLy, a hound in the Earl of Derby's pack, 

1826, vol. 68 ; engraved by J. Webb. 
(2) TIGER, a. hack, 1827, vol. 20; engraved by Wainwr'ight— BABEL, late Lilias. a bay 

mare, 1827, vol. 20. 

(2) SAMUEL CHIFNEY, 1828, vol. 71 ; engraved by R. Woodman— /v4i1/£'5' 

ROBINSON, 1828, vol. 71 ; engraved by R. Woodman. 

(3) ZINGANEE, a bay horse, foaled in 1S25, bred by the Marquis of Exeter, 1830, 

vol. 77 ; engraved by R. "^Qodrnzxi— LAMPLIGHTER, a bay horse, bred by 
and the property of Colonel Wilson, 1831, vol. 77; engraved by Romney — 
SKIFF, a bay horse, bred by the Duke of Grafton, 1831, vol. 77 ; engraved by 
R. Woodman. 
(3) SOUVENIR, a bay mare, 1831, vol. 78; engraved by J. R. Scott— ERVMUS^ a 
racehorse, 1831, vol.78; engraved by H. R. Cook— ^ FIRST-RATE SHOT 
1831, vol. 78 ; engraved by J. R. Scott. 



96 ANIMAL PAINTERS 

(2) PRIAMf the property of the Ear! of Chesterfield, a bay colt bred by Sir J. Shelley, 

Bart., 1831, vol. 79 ; engraved by Romney— Ci^iJ^/CZ-f", a brown horse, bred by 

the Duke of Richmond, 1831, vol. 29 ; engraved by Romney. 
GALATEA, a brown mare, bred by the Earl of Fitzwilliam, 1832, vol. 80; engraved by R. 

Woodman. 
{2) PARTRIDGE SHOOTING, 1832, vol. 81; engraved by Woodman—MEETING 

THE STAG-HOUNDS, portrait of Peter Pope Frith, Esq., on his mare, 1833, vol. 

81 ; engraved by T. Romney. 



PLATES IN THE SPORTING REVIEW {2 in number). 

STUDIES OFCELEBRATED JOCKIES, by Chifney, Wbeatley and Robinson, 1S43, 

vol. 7 ; engraved by J. W. Cook. 
STUDIES OF CELEBRATED JOCKIES, by Aniull and Goodison, 1842, vol. 8; 

engraved by J. W. Cook. 



97 



LAMBERT MARSHALL, 

(Born 1810.) 

LAMBERT, son of Benjamin Marshall, was 
born at Newmarket in 18 10. At an early- 
age he betrayed possession of artistic talents of 
high order, and when only sixteen years of age 
executed a portrait of his father, which was 
engraved by Fry, and reproduced in the Sporting 
Magazine for September, 1826. This Hkeness, 
given on p. 94, is the only one by the younger 
Marshall it has been possible to trace. The 
Editor, in referring to it, remarks of the painter 
that " some of his animals are really surprising 
for the pencil of so young an artist." In the 
Sporting Magazine, between 1826 and 1836, we 
find twenty-nine engravings from his pictures, and 
all of these are either portraits of race horses or 
sporting subjects. A good example of his work 
engraved by J. Greig, and published in vol. Ixxxv. 
for 1835, is "Coursing," which is here reproduced. 
Lambert Marshall's contributions to public exhibi- 
tions were but two ; one picture shown at the 
Suffolk Street Gallery and the other at the British 
7 VOL. 11. 



98 ANIMAL PAINTERS 

Institution in 1828 and 1829, After 1836, the last 
year in which a plate from a work by his brush 
appears in the Sporting Magazine, we lose all trace 
of him. 



WORKS OF LAMBERT MARSHALL. 

PLATES IN THE SPORTING MAGAZINE (29 in number). 

MR. BENJAMIN MARSHALL, the artist's father ; engraved by Fry, vol. 68, 1826. 

PRANKS AND LAZARUS, brood mare and foal; engraved by J. Webb, vol. 71, 1828 
—BADGER HUNTING: engraved by R. Woodman, vol. 71, 1S28. 

THE TURF PONY, property of Christopher Nelson, Esq. ; engraved by W. Hixon, vol. 
72, ^iii—SYLl'IA, a lady's pony; engraved by T. C. Zeitter, vol. 72, 1828— 
C05 ;('££, a mare ; engraved by J. Webb, vol. 75, 1829— .1//.S'5' CRAVEN, race- 
horse, A. Pavis in the s.iddle, also boy and fast-trotting pony ; engraved by R. 
Woodman, vol. 76, 1830. 

BRITISH GAME FOWLS: engraved by J. Romney, vol. 77, i%-io— ALBERT, with 
Connolly the jockey in racing colours; engraved by H. R. Cook, vol. 78, 1831. 

GAME COCKS : engraved by J. Romney, vol. 7g,'iB3i—SMARAGDINE, a bay mare : 
engraved by J. Romney, vol. 79, 1831 — MUSCAT, an Arab ; engraved by J. 
Romney, vol. 79, 1S31—VOUNG FOA'HUNTERS : engraved by J. Romney, vol. 
79. 1831. 

A CELEBRATED CABHORSE : engraved by J. Romney, vol. 80, xiyz—MAZEPPA, 
a race horse; engraved by J. Romney, vol. 80, 1832 — CRUTCH, a race horse; 
engraved by J. Romney, vol. So, liyi— SULTAN, a racehorse; engraved by J. 
Romney, vol. 82, i%2>'^— DRIVER, a trotter; engraved by J. Romney, vol. 80, 1832. 

COURSING : engraved by J. Romney, vol. 81, 1S32— ARCHIBALD, a race-horse ; en- 
graved by J. Romney, vol. 81, 1S31— HECTOR, a hen-cock; engraved by J. 
Romney, vol. 81, 1832. 

BROOD MARES : engraved by J. Romney, vol. 82, 1^33— GROUSE SHOOTING: en- 
graved by J. Romney, vol. 82, 1^33— TURNED OUT FOR LIFE (old horses); 
engraved by J. Romney, vol. 82, i833~PRIAM, a setter ; engraved by R. Golding, 
vol. 82, 1833. 

DRAIVING COVERT : engraved by J . Romney, vol. 83, 1834. 

DOG BREAKING: engraved by J. Engleheart, vol. 84, 1834. 

COURSING : engraved by J. C.reig, vol. 85, 1835. 

REAL YORKSHIRE (half-bred sire and dam, bred byDuke of Portland) ; engraved by 
J. Romney, vol. 86, 1835. 



99 



JAMES POLLARD. 

(Born 1797.) 

JAMES POLLARD was born at Braynes Row, 
Spa Fields, now known as Exmouth Street. 
His father, Robert Pollard, was a Newcastle man, 
who at the age of twenty-seven, in 1782, came 
south to establish himself in London as an 
engraver, and achieved a considerable reputation 
both for his designs, some of which were of a 
sporting character, and for his works as an engraver. 
John Scott, the first engraver of animal and 
sporting subjects of the time, owed his first start 
in the metropolis to Robert Pollard, who took him 
as a pupil. 

James Pollard's artistic talents were perhaps not 
equal to those of many of his contemporaries, but 
his skill in portraying sporting incidents lends his 
works a value to which those by artists of higher 
reputation can lay no claim. His pictures excite 
eager competition when they come into the market 
nowadays, and engravings therefrom are sought 
with even greater avidity. For example, a lot 
comprising six coloured impressions of the coaching 



TOO ANIMAL PAINTERS 

scenes which were a speciality of Pollard's were, in 
1897, knocked down to a bid of 49 gs. at Messrs. 
Christie, Manson and Woods, while two coloured 
engravings, Ascot Heath Races and Epsom Races, 
brought 32 gs. 

Two engraved plates, executed by M. Dobourg 
and published January ist, 1820, by Edward Orme, 
London, furnish the first clue to Pollard's name in 
connection with art. Plate i is entitled " Royal 
Hunt in Windsor Park ; " it shows the hounds in 
full cry. His Majesty, George HI., with huntsman 
and attendants following, while Windsor Castle 
forms the remote background. Plate 2 is H.M. 
King George Returning from Hunting, and forms 
a companion to the former, each plate measuring 
18 by 125^ inches. A few of the above engravings 
were published in colour. 

The following year provides evidence of James 
Pollard's whereabouts, for it was in 1821 that a 
picture from his easel was exhibited at the Royal 
Academy; he was then living at 11, Holloway 
Place, Holloway, and had not gone far from his 
own door to find his subject, which was North 
Country Mails at the Peacock, Islington. In the 
same year he painted A Steeple-chase ; this 
depicts a field of seven horsemen, six correctly 
attired in racing jackets, breeches and boots, the 
seventh duly sporting colours but clad as to his 



JAMES POLLARD lOI 

nether man in white nankeen trousers strapped 
under the boots in accord with the fashion of the 
day for ordinary walking dress. The size of this 
canvas is i6|- by 1 1|- inches. 

In 1824 we find Pollard represented at the Royal 
Academy by two works entitled Incidents in Mail 
Coach Travelling. One of these shows a coach 
crossing a stream. Pollard did not confine himself 
to exhibiting at the Academy ; his name appears in 
the records as painter of three pictures shown at the 
British Institute, and four sent to the Suffolk Street 
Gallery. 

In 1830 he painted Smithfield Market, a busy 
scene, full of life and animation, with its throngs of 
buyers and sellers of horses, cattle and pens of 
sheep ; in the background old St. Bartholomew's 
Hospital and the houses and streets surrounding 
the market (size of canvas 26 inches by 17 inches). 

Pollard was an artist of considerable versatility. 
The next pictures which claim notice in chrono- 
losfical order are of a different character. His 
Fly-fishing and Trolling for Pike are scenes on 
the river Lea (size of each canvas 17 by i2i'k 
inches), and were painted in 1831. His signature 
is affixed to each of these works, which were 
engraved by P. Himely. In 1836 he painted 
another picture of interest to fishermen : this was 
The Pike and Anchor, Ponders End, in which he 



I02 ANIMAL PAINTERS 

shows US the Inn — no doubt a famous resort of 
Waltonians of that day — with a group of anglers in 
the foreground. This canvas measures i7|- by ii^- 
inches. 

An interesting work, and one which arrests 
the eye by its somewhat unusual shape, is George 
IV. going to Ascot Races. This is a long, narrow 
canvas, measuring 39 by 10 inches. The King 
occupies a carriage drawn by four post-horses ; 
twelve out-riders in the livery of the Royal Hunt 
precede His Majesty ; and three open carriages, 
each drawn by four horses with post-boys, bring up 
the rear ; behind these again we see the ordinary 
traffic of the high road on a race-day. On the 
heath numerous figures stand to salute the 
Sovereign, and the landscape rolls away into the 
background. 

H.R. H. the Prince of Wales has in his collection 
at Sandringham two hunting pictures by James 
Pollard, each canvas measuring" 35 inches by 24 
inches. 

Pollard is better known by the engravings from 
his works than by the pictures themselves. This is 
natural enough in view of the great popularity of 
the subjects upon which his brush was employed. 
Several of these engravings were published in 
connection with his father and brother, who carried 
on their business in Hollo way, the style of the firm 
being " R. Pollard & Son." 



JAMES POLLARD IO3 

Besides the engravings already referred to the 
following deserve mention : — 

Pike Fishing and The Mill Ford. The latter 
shows anglers at the tail of a mill-race, one in 
the act of landing a fish. These engravings were 
executed by H. Beckwith, and impressions appear 
in the Sporting Magazine for 1849 and 1859 
respectively. 

Four engravings printed in colours: (i) Fly- 
fishing, (2) Bottom Fishing, (3) Trolling for Pike, 
and (4) Anglers Packing up. These engravings 
were published by T. Helme, " at his picture-frame 
manufactory, 15, Tabernacle Square, Old Street 
Road, London," and bear date November 17th, 
1831. 

A View on the Highgate Road, the Birmingham 
mail-coach, with passengers, passing a road-side 
inn called The Woodman. Engraved by George 
Hunt and published in colours by J. Moore, i. 
West Street, St. Martin's Lane. Size of plate, 19 
inches by 15 inches. 

Highgate Tunnel, a coach, with passengers, 
coming under the tunnel, the horses and coach well 
foreshortened. A companion picture to that last 
mentioned, similar in size and printed in colours. 

West Country Mail-Coach at the Gloucester- 
shire Coffee House, Piccadilly. This engraving is 
by Rosenberg ; plate, 32 inches by 25 inches. 



I04 ANIMAL PAINTERS 

The Royal Mail, a coach passing a sportsman 
who carries a gun and is accompanied by a setter 
and a pointer. E. Roviskere engraved this plate, 
which was published March 30th, 1829, by J. 
Wilson, of 7, Vere Street, Cavendish Square. 

Stage Coach Passengers Seated at Breakfast, 
and The Coach in the Snow, cottagers showing 
the delayed passengers hospitality. (Interiors.) 
Both these engravings were published by R. 
Pollard & Son. 

Easter Monday ; Turning Out the Stag at 
Buckitt's Hill, Epping Forest. This plate is 
printed in colours, and its dimensions are 24^ inches 
by 12 inches. 

Easter Monday, a View of Fairmead Bottom, 
Epping Forest. Also printed in colours, a com- 
panion to that last mentioned and similar in size. 

Stage Coach, with Opposition Coach in Sight, 
published in colours, plate ly^ inches by 12 inches. 

The Cambridge Telegraph starting from the 
White Horse, Fetter Lane. This plate was en- 
graved by G. Hunt, and was published by J. 
Moore, of London. Printed in colours ; size, 2of 
inches by 15I inches. 

The Oxford and Opposition Coaches. Printed 
in colours ; size of plate, 13I inches by S^- inches. 

The Cheshire Pile, a celebrated gamecock, bred 
by the Earl of Derby ; size of plate, 8j inches 
by 6^ inches. 



JAMES POLLARD 105 

Coursing at Hatfield Park ; size of plate, 18 
inches by lo inches ; published February 6th, 1824, 
by R. Pollard & Son. 

Evening, First September. 

The St. Alban's Tally-ho Stakes. Two com- 
panion pictures of a great hurdle race run at St. 
Albans on May 22nd, 1834. A sweepstakes of 
five sovereigns each with twenty added from the 
fund ; each horse to carry eleven stone ; gentlemen 
riders only. Run in two heats, each heat once 
round the course and a distance ; two leaps to be 
taken in each heat over hurdles. Won by Mr. 
Coleman's Latitat. Plate No. i shows the first 
leap of first heat. Mr. R. Oldaker with extended 
crop is galloping forward to cheer on Latitat, ridden 
by Mr. John Palmer, who is well into his stride 
again after taking a hurdle. Norman (Mr. F. P. 
Delme Ratcliffe up), Pompey (Mr. Mason), 
Splinter Bar (Mr. Richard Bevan), and Deceiver 
(Mr. T. Nestley) are taking the hurdle in a cluster. 
Thesis (Mr. Simmons) and Figurante (Captain 
Beecher) are coming up. Plate 2 shows the second 
leap in the second heat, which was a very close 
race. Mr. Bevan was thrown, and Splinter Bar 
running up came in third without his rider. Latitat 
is again leading, Norman and Splinter Bar are over 
the hurdle, Deceiver and Figurante are clearing it 
and Pompey and Thesis are coming up. These 



I06 ANIMAL PAINTERS 

plates were engraved by G. and C. Hunt ; size of 
plates, 17 inches by 12 inches ; published by J. 
Moore, "at the Corner of West Street, Upper St 
Martin's Lane." 

Scenes on the Road, or A Trip to Epsom 
and Back, is the title of a set of four plates, each 
19! inches by i2-g inches; engraved by J. Harris, 
printed in colours, and published May 30th, 1836, 
by R. Ackermann. 

Plate I is Hyde Park Corner ; No. 2, The 
Lord Nelson Inn, Cheam ; No. 3, The Cock at 
Sutton ; and No. 4, Kennington Gate. Each 
picture bears a verse from a song in the musical 
farce, " Hit or Miss." The lines from plate 3 will 
serve as an example : — 

" Where Belles as well as Beaux to get the whip hand strive, 
And Mrs. Snip the tailor's wife can teach her spouse to drive, 
So Jacky Snip, his wife and all, to Dobbin's back are strapped 

on 
In one-horse chay to spend the day with neighbour Stitch at 

Clapton." 

The Grand Stand at Doncaster Races con- 
tains portraits of the winning horses ; size of plate, 
24j inches by 21 inches. 

Doncaster, Ascot, Goodwood, and Epsom 
Races. This is a set of four plates engraved by 
Pyall, each 245- inches by 14 inches. 

The Aylesbury Steeplechase. A series of four 



JAMES POLLARD IO7 

coloured plates showing incidents of the great 
steeplechase which came off in the Vale of 
Aylesbury on February nth, 1836. This was a 
sweepstakes of fifteen sovereigns each, and 100 
sovereigns added ; eleven stone each ; fifteen 
started. These contain portraits of the horses and 
riders, and, according to the publisher's advertise- 
ment, were engraved from paintings made on the 
spot by the artist ; strict accuracy would doubtless 
read " from paintings, the sketches for which were 
made on the spot." Plate i shows The Start. 
No. 2, The Brook, Mr. Galloway's The Amazon 
clearing it, and Jerry fairly in, Yellow Dwarf down 
on the landing side, and Cannon Ball scrambling 
out. No. 3, the horses coming over a big bank 
through underwood : Yellow Dwarf and Sailor are 
down and The Pony leads. No. 4 shows The 
Finish : Captain Lamb's Vivian ridden by Captain 
Becker wins : Mr. Elmore's Grimaldi ridden by Mr. 
Sefifert comes in second under the whip, and Mr. D. 
Baring's The Pony, Mr. Cooper up, is a good third. 
These plates measure each 24 inches by i2|- inches. 
They were engraved by J. Harris and published in 
1836 by Ackermann and Co., 96, Strand. 

The Royal Mail Leaving the G.P.O., St. 
Martin's-le-Grand, was engraved by R. G. Reeve, 
printed in colours and published in 1836 by W. 
Soffe, 288, Strand ; size of plate, 24^ inches by i6f 
inches. 



Io8 ANIMAL PAINTERS 

The London Fire Engines : the Noble Pro- 
tectors of Life and Property, is a good example 
of Pollard's most spirited work. This picture was 
engraved, size of plate 29! inches by 20J inches, 
and printed in colours. The engraving is "dedi- 
cated to the Insurance Offices by their obedient 
servant, Thomas McLean, 26, Haymarket " (the 
publisher). 

A Prospective View of Epsom Races is the 
title of a series of six plates, printed in colours and 
published by R. Ackermann. 

These represent: (i) Saddling in the Warren: 
Jem Bland occupies a prominent place in the fore- 
ground of this picture ; (2) The Betting Post ; 
(3) Preparing to Start ; (4) The Grand Stand, the 
Race ; (5) The Race Over ; and (6) Settling at 
Tattersall's. The last plate is admirable ; not only 
is it highly characteristic but it has all the interest 
of a page of Turf history, containing many sketches 
of well-known racing men taken from life. 

Wings is the portrait of a race horse, bred in 
1822 by .Lord Grosvenor; Sam Chifney in yellow 
jacket and black cap is in the saddle. On the right 
of the picture is the weighing room with jockeys 
going to scale. Engraved and published by R. 
Pollard and Son, in June, 1825, printed in colours ; 
size, i8f inches by 13 inches. 

Fox Hunt, a print engraved by R. Pollard. 



JAMES POLLARD 1 09 

His Majesty George IV. Travelling, coloured 
print by R. Pollard, engraved by W. Dubourg. 

Fox Chase: View Halloa, engraved by R. Pollard 

The Merry Monarch, painted by J. Pollard : 
published and lithographed by Dean and Co. 

The Mail Coach in a Snow Storm, painted by 
J. Pollard, engraved by F. Rosenbourg. 

A White Horse standing against a large rock, 
man in scarlet leaning against him, group of hounds 
and dead fox. Coloured, size 12 inches by 10 
inches : published by R. Pollard. 

Though subjects pertaining to the road pre- 
dominate in this tale of Pollard's works, coaching 
by no means exhausted his sporting interests. As 
may have been conjectured from the frequent 
occurrence of fishing pictures, he was a keen angler 
and well-known habitud of all angling haunts round 
London until he was well advanced in years. The 
date of his death is not known, but in the year 
1859, then being about sixty-five years of age, he 
was still able to enjoy a day with his rod. 

WORKS OF JAMES POLLARD. 

PICTURES EXHIBITED IN THE ROYAL ACADEMY 
(5 in number). 

YEAR 

i%^\— NORTH-COUNTRY MAILS AT THE PEACOCK, ISLINGTON. 
i824-<2) INCIDENT IN MAIL-COACH TRAVELLING— INCIDENT IN MAIL- 
COACH TRAVELLING. 
1839— (2) MOTHERLY PROTECTION— MATERNAL ANXIETY. 

PLATES IN THE SPORTING MAGAZINE (2 in number). 

PIKE FISHING, 1849, vol. in ; engraved by H. Beckwilh. 
THE MILL FORD, 1859, voL 134 ; engraved by James \Vestley. 



no 



PHILIP REINAGLE, R.A. 

(Born 1749. Died 1833.) 

pHILIP REINAGLE was born in 1749. From 
■*■ the fact that Allan Ramsay, the famous Court 
painter, accepted him as one of his pupils we may 
infer that he gave promise at an early age; and that 
such promise was fulfilled is proved by Ramsay's 
subsequent appointment of this pupil to be his 
assistant. The portraits of George III. and Queen 
Charlotte are especially mentioned in connection 
with this appointment. It would appear that the 
Court portrait painter's official work was sufficiently 
onerous to oblige the employment of able assistance ; 
for it is recorded that Ramsay, having occasion to 
leave England for some months, deputed Reinagle to 
execute portraits o{ fifty pairs of Kings and Queens 
during his absence. Reinagle duly painted the 
pictures, receiving payment for them at ten guineas 
apiece. 

It might well be supposed that the gift for 
portraiture on which Ramsay was able to place so 
much reliance indicated the true bent of Reinagle's 
artistic talent ; and after leaving the Court painter's 



PHILIP REINAGLE, R.A, III 

Studio he was engaged for some years in painting 
portraits exclusively. When about thirty-four years 
of age, however, an innate love of sport and nature 
tempted his brush in a new direction, and from that 
time forward, though he continued to paint portraits, 
he devoted far more of his time to general sporting 
subjects, pictures of animals and birds and to 
landscape painting, in all of which he attained to a 
high degree of excellence. 

Accuracy of drawing is a very prominent feature 
of his animal pictures and one which betrays close 
and sympathetic study. The expression in the eye, 
the life-like attitude, anatomical truth of form, and 
nice attention to minute detail give his work a stamp 
of their own. Nowhere are these cardinal merits 
more apparent than in his pictures of dogs ; 
admirable examples appear in the twenty-four plates 
engraved by John Scott for The Spoi'tman s 
Repository, published in 1820, by Sherwood, Neely 
and Jones ; but good as these are, the twenty-four 
plates which adorned The Sportsman s Cabinet, pub- 
lished in 1803, by J. Cunder, are probably those which 
show Reinagle at his best. The minutely descrip- 
tive title-page so much in vogue at the time shows 
the scope of this work : " The Sportsman's Cabinet ; 
or Correct Delineations of the Various Dogs Used 
in the Sports of the Field, including the Canine 
Race in general ; consisting of a Series of rich and 



I 1 2 ANIMAL PAINTERS 

masterly Engravings of Every Distinct Breed, from 
Original Paintings taken from life, purposely for the 
work ; engra-ved in the Line Manner by Mr. John 
Scott, by whom the plates to Mr. Daniels' Rural 
Sports were executed ; and interspersed with 
beautiful Vignettes, Engraved on Wood. Forming 
a Collection of Superb Sporting Subjects, worthy 
the attention of Amateurs of Field Sports and 
Admirers of the Arts in general." 

It will be noted that while stress is laid upon the 
well deserved fame of the engraver, the name of the 
artist from whose paintings the plates were taken 
is not even mentioned ! The painter is dependent 
upon the engraver for just interpretation of his 
works, but a measure of credit for the results 
produced by the latter was apparently not con- 
sidered the due of the former by Mr. John Cunder. 

Reinagle made a special study of the spaniels 
now known as clumbers, but in his day as " cock- 
.springers " or " springing spaniels." The circum- 
stances that these dogs were introduced into Eng- 
land about the time he was beginning to exhibit and 
were doubtless exciting the interest of sportsmen as 
canine novelties may account for the attention 
accorded them by the artist. About the year 1775, 
Henry Clinton, Duke of Newcastle, during a visit to 
France, received from the Duke of Noailles several 
couples of " cock-springers " as a gift. These his 



PHILIP REINAGLE, R.A. II 3 

Grace brought home to Clumber and placed under 
the management of his keeper, William Mansel. 
He evidently prized these dogs highly, for Francis 
Wheatley, R.A., F.S.A., painted a picture showing 
the Duke on a pony with Mansel standing by his 
side and several clumbers in various attitudes 
grouped about him ; this picture, it may be added, 
was afterwards engraved. 

Reinagle's hunting and hawking scenes, bird 
pictures and studies of dead game were among 
the best of his day ; and though it is with such 
works that his name is particularly associated, his 
purely landscape pieces were of great merit. 
English, Italian and Spanish scenery furnished the 
subject of many of his Royal Academy pictures. 
Thomas Barker sought his aid in painting his 
panoramic views of Rome, the Bay of Naples, 
Florence, Gibraltar, Algeciras Bay, and Paris. 
The old Dutch Masters furnished the models upon 
which he formed his style ; during his earlier 
years of study he made numerous copies, and so 
faithful were these that unscrupulous dealers were 
able to sell them as original works by Paul Potter, 
A. Van de Velde, Berchem, Karel du Jardin and 
others. 

Reinagle's first contributions to the Royal 
Academy were two portraits of gentlemen, shown 
in the Exhibition of 1774. For nine years he was 

8 VOL. II. 



114 ANIMAL PAINTERS 

represented at the Royal Academy exhibitions by 
portraits, with the single exception of the study of 
" Dead Game" which was his sole contribution in 
1783. This year marks the turning point in his 
art ; for though portraits occur occasionally against 
his name in the catalogues of subsequent years, 
pictures of this class were far exceeded in number 
by works of the character which give him claim 
to consideration here ; indeed, from 1799 until 1827 
his contributions included but one portrait — that of 
Dr. Thornton, the botanist, for whom he had done 
much work — to betray his earlier bent. 

In this connection we must note that Reinaole was 
elected an Associate in 1787 ; and inasmuch as his 
exhibits until 1 784 were, with the exception above 
specified, portraits (he showed nothing in 1785) we 
can hardly doubt but that he owed the distinction 
then conferred to the talents he had manifested as a 
portrait painter. He was elected an Academician 
in 1S12, presenting as his diploma picture "An 
Eagle and Vulture disputing with a Hyena." 
Altogether Reinagle exhibited iio works at the 
Royal Academy, contributing with fair regularity 
until his seventy-eighth year. At the British 
Institution he showed 138 pictures between the 
years 1773- 1832, his last contribution thus being 
sent in the year before he died. 

Among Reinagle's works we may notice " Part- 



PHILIP REINAGLE, R.A. II 5 

ridges," painted in 1806. This was engraved by 
F. C. Lewis, the print being dedicated to T. W. 
Coke, Esq., of Holkham, afterwards Earl of 
Leicester. " Springing Spaniels," painted in the 
same year and also engraved by Lewis ; the print 
was dedicated to Sir John Shelley. These engrav- 
ings, which measure 2o|- by 15 inches, formed part 
of a series of twenty subjects from pictures by 
Reinagle ; they were published at 15s. for plain 
impressions and 21s. for coloured prints, to sub- 
scribers. There is an excellent example of Reinagle's 
work in the collection formed by the late Anthony 
Hamond, Esq., of Westacre, Norfolk. This is " A 
Dead Fox with Lurcher ; " the dog stands over the 
fox — a cub which he has coursed and killed. 

The volumes of The Sporting Magazine contain 
five plates from pictures by Reinagle : four of 
these, engraved by W. Nicholls, are : — " Fisher- 
men Displaying the Results of the Day's Sport," 
in vol. 47, for 1815 ; "Partridge Shooting with 
Pointers," in vol. 48 for 18 16 ; " Puffin Shooting at 
the Back of the Isle of Wight," and " Spearing the 
Otter" in vol. 50 for 18 17, and "Grouse Shooting" 
in vol. 51 for 181 7. 

Volume 1 1 of the New Sporting Magazine for 
1836, three years after the artist's death, contained 
an engraving by R. Parr, from Reinagle's " Fox 
and Partridge." This picture, which shows a fox 



Il6 ANIMAL PAINTERS 

in the act of running away with a partridge while 
the rest of the covey are escaping over the hill, was 
also engraved by T. W. Giles and published in 
1836 by Ackermann & Co., of the Strand. 

The Anna/s of Sport contains two plates, "Grouse 
Shooting" and "Terriers and Polecat," the former 
engraved by Thomas Landseer, brother of the great 
artist, and the latter by John Scott. 

A work by General George Hanger, dedicated to 
"all sportsmen and farmers," published in 1814, 
by Stockdale, contains a plate from a picture by 
Reinagle. This shows the General mounted on a 
mule, returning from shooting, his servant behind 
followed by a setter and pointer. 

A portrait of Colonel Thornton, the famous 
sportsman of Thornville Royal, the joint work of 
Sawrey Gilpin and Reinagle, bears date 1796. This 
picture shows the Colonel " Roebuck shooting in 
the Forest of Glenmore, with the only twelve- 
barrelled rifle ever made." The Colonel holds this 
curious weapon at the ready : a keeper with a 
dog crouches in the near background. This picture 
was engraved by M. W. Bate and published by H. 
Mutlow, of Russell Court, London, in 18 10. 

Colonel Thornton provided Reinagle with many 
commissions. The artist's Royal Academy picture 
in 1803 was a " Portrait of the Great Tench " taken 
by this patron, with a view of Thornville Royal ; 



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"iho-^ne/y^'^u^rn^on/ 



PHIUP REINAGLE, R.A. II7 

one of his contributions to the exhibition of 18 17 
was a woodland view on the same estate. The first 
volume of Colonel Thornton's Travels in France, in 
1804, has for frontispiece a portrait of the author as 
a falconer carrying a hawk hooded on his wrist. 

The portrait, an oval, is surrounded with a design 
emblematic of field sports, and, like the portrait of 
the Colonel in the Sporting Magazine, has for 
pendant a small picture of the race between Mrs. 
Thornton and Mr. Flint. This plate was engraved 
by Mackenzie. The race was the outcome of a 
ride in Thornville Park, on an occasion when Colonel 
and Mrs. Thornton were joined by the lady's 
brother-in-law, Mr. Flint. The latter was some- 
what chagrined by the prowess of the lady and 
her horse in a racing spurt or two in which they 
indulged : and the sporting instinct running high 
on both sides, a match for ^500 a side was 
made between Mrs. Thornton and the gentleman, 
the race to be run on the last day of the York 
August Meeting, 1804. The match duly came 
off, and resulted in the defeat of Mrs. Thornton, 
who, however, maintained that Mr. Flint's success 
was a matter of accident and due to no inferiority 
of her horse or her jockeyship. A writer in the 
Sporting Magazine for September adds to his 
description of the event the following postscript ; — 
" I forgot to add that Mr. Reinagle, the celebrated 



itS animal painters 

sporting painter, is in our neighbourhood, employ- 
ing his talents in finishing a fine picture of the late 
race, from which an elegant engraving will speedily 
appear. Indeed, much may be expected from the 
display of this gentleman's abilities, whose taste 
and correctness are so eminently manifest in the 
finished paintings lately executed for The Sports- 
mans Cabinet y 

" The Fox Breaking Cover " was painted by 
Reinagle for Colonel Thornton as a companion 
picture to "The Death of the Fox," painted by 
Sawrey Gilpin. The plate from this work was 
engraved by John Scott. As it appears desirable to 
give an example of Reinagle's skill in portraiture as 
well as his talent for the portrayal of sporting scenes, 
the engraving from the likeness of Colonel Thorn- 
ton from Travels in France, and that from the 
picture last mentioned, have been selected to 
represent his works. 

An admirable example of Reinagle's work hangs 
at The Villa, Escrick, Yorkshire, the seat of Lord 
Wenlock ; this is a portrait of the sixth Lord 
Middleton, gun in hand, on the moors. He is 
represented coming up a bank to his three pointers 
which are standingr to grrouse. In the riarht back- 
ground are two ponies from one of which Lord 
Middleton has evidently just dismounted ; it is held 
by a groom who rides the other pony. The canvas 



PHILIP REINAOLE, R.A. I I9 

measures 4 ft. by 5 ft. 8 inches. This picture was 
painted in the year 1792. The artist was then 
doubtless at the zenith of his fame, as it is recorded 
that he received no less than 500 guineas for it ; 
a very large fee in those days. 

Lord Middleton has seven pictures by this artist 
in the collection at Birdsall House, Yorkshire, 
viz. : — 

(i) " Chesterton Windmill," Henry 6th.— Lord Middleton 
with his hounds (The Warwickshire, of which he was Master 
from 1812 to 1822). The body of the pack, in full cry, are 
streaming up a slope on the landing side of a wide stream ; 
one couple are in the stream and another couple are just 
coming up to it. Lord Middleton is driving his white horse 
at it, and among the field are Mr. B. Lawley (afterwards 
Lord Wenlock), Sir Francis Lawley, Mr. Garforth, Mr. 
Willoughby (grandfather of the present Lord Middleton), Lord 
Clonmel, in black, who has just cleared the brook. Lord 
Aylesford, Sir Charles Mordaunt, dragging his horse out of 
the water, and Sir C. Biddulph. Chesterton Windmill is in 
the distance. 

(2) " Gone to Ground in the Clump near Birdsall." The 
famous hound Vanguard and his sister Vanity, with a few 
more, are racing with hackles up to an earth among great 
boulders. Will Carter the huntsman and Tom Carter the 
first whipper-in also figure in this picture ; size 4 feet 3 inches 
by 3 feet i inch high. 

These two pictures have been reproduced in The 
Annals of the Waiivickshire Hunt (the late Sir 
Charles Mordaunt and the Hon. W. R. Verney, 
London, 1896) : the latter has been engraved for 
separate publication. 



I20 ANIMAL PAINTERS 

{3) " Woodcock Shooting " : a woodland scene. In the 
foreground are a large black-and-white retriever and four 
spaniels, evidently portraits. A dead woodcock lies by a 
small pool close by, and another is falling in the near middle 
distance to the gun of a sportsman in the background. 

This picture and " Gone to Ground in the Clump 
near Birdsall " form a pair ; " Woodcock Shooting " 
also has been engraved. 

(4, 5, and 6) Three portraits of hunters : two browns and a 
bay. Each of these pictures, which are well painted, measures 
about 2 feet li inches by i foot 8 inches, oblong. 

(7) "General Bandbox," the portrait of a sturdy thorough- 
bred, saddled and bridled ; he is held by his groom upon 
whom a hound is fawning ; two more hounds are moving 
away to the right. A Yorkshire landscape, Birdsall and 
Settrington form the background, size 5 feet 6 inches by 3 
feet II inches oblong. Signed "P. Reinagle," and dated 
1792. 

It is fortunate that a few of Reinagle's paintings 
should have been made accessible to those in- 
terested in art by engravings in old magazines. 
These truthfully display all the character and in- 
dividuality of the works of this gifted painter. Not 
the least charm of his sporting pictures is due to 
the landscape setting and scenic accessories which 
are invariably composed with true artistic feeling. 

Reinagle died at Chelsea, in 1833, at the ripe age 
of eighty-four. His son, Richard Ramsay, born 
1775, inherited his father's artistic talent. He 
probably owed his second name to the fact that 
Philip Reinagle had been a pupil of Allan Ramsay 







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WORKS OF PHILIP REINAGLE, R.A. 121 

as Stated on a former page. Richard Ramsay 
Reinagle achieved success as a landscape painter 
and became a Royal Academician. He was, how- 
ever, obliged to resign, having committed the 
unique misdemeanour of sending in for exhibition 
as his own a picture which was partly the work 
of another artist. 



THE WORKS OF PHILIP REINAGLE, R.A. 

IN THE SOUTH KENSINGTON MUSEUM. 

FOX-HUNTING : THE Z'i'W 7"// (water-colour) (William Smith Gift). 

PICTURES EXHIBITED IN THE ROYAL ACADEMY (no 

in number). 

YEAR 

,773_(2) PORTRAIT OF A GENTLEMAN— PORTRAIT OF A GENTLEMAN. 

1774— (3) PORTRAITS OF TWO YOUNG GENTLEMEN AND THEIR SISTER 
FISHING— PORTRAIT OF A LADY— AN OLD HEAD. 

Tllff-PORTRAIT OF A LADY. 

i7jg—A GENTLEMAN. 

j-lio— PORTRAIT OF AN OFFICER. 

i782-<2) PORTRAIT OF A GENTLEMAN— PORTRAIT OF A GENTLEMAN. 

ijSi— DEAD GAME, a study from Nature. 

■t7%t,— PORTRAIT OF A GENTLEMAN. 

1786— (3) FARMYARD, with !ow/U—H U.M.MING BIRDS, from Sir Ashton Lever's 
collection— .)/.-lC--!/F5' AND PARROTS. 

i787-{4) VIEIV FROM BRACKENDALE HILL, NORFOLK— SCENE FROM 
NATURE— PORTRAIT OF A YOUNG GENTLEMAN— REPRESENTA- 
TION OF .MAJOR MONEYS SITU A TION WHEN HE FELL INTO 
THE SEA WITH A BALLOON- 

1788— (5) YIEW FROM THE WEST EXTREMITY OF ANGLESEA, WITH 
HOLYHEAD MOUNTAIN— PORTRAITS OF THREE CHILDREN- 
COUNT BORULAWSKI—A LANDSCAPE— ENCAMPMENT OF THE 
WEST NORFOLK MILITIA at Readham in 1787. 

1790— (3) PORTRAIT OF A LADY— PORTRAIT OF A GENTLEMAN— 
WILLI.AM WARD, the celebrated pugilist, and Wood, with Johnson and Joseph 
Ward. 

1794.— (2) ESSEX COUNTY HALL, with a view of part of Chelmsford— CO frr/^O.ff/' 
OA K, near Harrogate, Yorkshire. 



122 ANIMAL TAINTERS 

i79*-(5) ^•'V' ICELAND HAWK UPON A BITTERN— A HAWK UPON A 
BUZZARD—STUDY OF CATTI.r.—JOHN MITCALF, celebrated for 
making roads, who has been blind ever since a hoy— PORTRAIT OF A LAD}'. 

'191-ii) VIEW NEAR SHREWSBURY— VIEW FROM NATURE— WATER- 
FALL IN COAT LAND, near \y\Mhy,\oxVs\ar^— PEREGRINE FALCON 
UPON A WOODCOCK— VIEW OF IIAMMERTON HILLS,YORKSHIRE. 
—VIEW OF HAMMERTON HILLS, YORKSHIRE— A SENSITIVE 
PLANT. 

1798— (6) ENTRANCE INTO A WOOD, from Nature—^ SEA PORT— MR. 
/ENKI.VS—TOURNEFORTS SYSTEM, for Dr. Thorntons "Botany"— 
MRS. ROWCROFT AND CHILDREN— MRS. REEVES. 

■799— (7) VIEW IN WALES— CUPID INSPIRING PLANTS WITH LOVE, for 
Dr. Thornton's Botanical work— THE AMERICAN ALOE, for Dr. Thornton's 
Botanical work— /J DISTANT VIEW OF THE TOWN OF SUBIACO, and 
the Cervara mountains, including the convents of Santa Scolasta and San Francesco 
from the mountain road to Tivoli ; mormng—VIElV NEAR THE LAKE OF 
B0LZ.4NA, on the road to Rome ; evening — THE BEGONIA, a plant producing 
male and female flowers, for Dr. Thornton's Botanical work — VIEW OF THE 
NEW PASSAGE ON THE SEVERN, with the Bristol Hills. 

1800— (6) VIEW IN THE BAY OF SARZA, near Genoa, mamm%— VIEW OF THE 
GRAND CONVENT OF SCOLASTA, near Subiaco, territor>- of the Pope, 
and the river Agno, which falls at Tivoli in the celebrated cascade in the Appenines 
—VIEW NEAR RICH.VrOND: TWILIGHT— HAMPSTEAD HEATH— 
THE BLUE PASSION FLOWER and NIGHT BLOOMING CEREA, for 
Dr. Thornton's new Illustration of the Sexual System by Linnaeus. 

1801— (2) A LANDSCAPE— VULTURE DISPUTING WITH A HYMNA. 

iZo-^—THE GREAT TENCH tskm by Col. Thornton, in the year 1802, with a view of 
the house and park of Thornville Royal. 

i8o4-<5) THE SETTER— THE SPRINGER— TERRIERS— THE STAG-HOUND 
(four of the series for the Sfortsman's Catintey— LANDSCAPE AND CA TTLE : 
morning. 

180S— (6) PORTRAIT OF A POINTER, standing to game— r//.C FOX BREAKING 
COVER— MAJOR, a celebrated greyhound— //M7-^.ff SPANIEL- SPANISH 
POINTER— PORTRAIT OF AN EXTRAORDINARY MUSIC AL DOG. 

i8o6-<2) LANDSCAPE WITH FIGURES, AND CATTLE FORDING— VIEW IN 
THE MOUNTAINS OF SUBIACCO, fifty miles from Rome. 

iio^-i^i SUNSET, landscape with figaxe.^- TWILIGHT — A POTTERY— 
SNOWDON. 

iSog— SPRINGER, bred at Syeton Park, by W. Thorold, Esq. 

,8io-(5) LANDSCAPE WITH FIGURES-LANDSCAPE— LANDSCAPE WITH 
SPORTING FIGURES— GROUP OF CATTLE— COTTAGE SCENE, from 
Nature. 

iZix— {2) STUDY OF DEAD GA.1IE—VIEW OF WINDERMERE LAKE, from 
Low-wood Inn. 

i8i2— (4) VIEW OF LLANGOLLEN, in North Wales— ^ STAG HUNT— VIEW OF 
LANGDALE, in Westmoreland— £>£/lZ> GAME. 

1813— (5) GROUP OF STAGS— LANDSCAPE WITH PIGS— LANDSCAPE WITH 
SHEEP— LANDSCAPE WITH ASSES— DR. HOOPER. 

1814— (2) A WANDERING STAG— MONKEY TRICKS. 

iSjS— SCENE FROM THE ISLEWORTH MEADOWS, looking towards Mr. Gosling's 
bouse. 

xixb—GEDRO, IN THE PROVINCE OF BEIRA, in Portugal, a few leagues from 
Almeida. In the background, the mountains that divide Spain and I'ortugal. 



WORKS OF PHILIP RKINAGLK, R.A. 1 23 

VEAR 

1817— (2) FARMYARD WITH CATTLE, Sm^a— ENTRANCE INTO A WOOD, 

Thorn\-ille Royal, Yorkshire. 
lizg— RICHMOND HILL, near Twickenham : Morning. 
1823— (3) riEir NEAR SHIPTON, Yorkshire— P'lEW NEAR LONESOME, Dorking 

—LANDSCAPE WITH FIGURES : Morning. 
iS2i— WOODLAND SCENE WITH CATTLE : Mid-day. 
iSnS—RirER SCENE WITH COTTAGE AND BARGE. 
i32j— LANDSCAPE WITH CA TTLE, a view near Durham. 

PLATES IN THE SPORTING MAGAZINE (6 in number). 

FISHERMAN, 1815, vol. 47; engraved by W. Nicholls. 

PARTRIDGE SHOOTING, 1816, vol. 48; engraved by W. Nicholls. 

PUFFIN SHOOTING AT THE BACK OF THE ISLE OF WIGHT, 18:7, vol. 

50; engraved by W. li\c\\o[\i.—S P E A K I NG THE OTTER, rZij, vol. 50. 
GROUSE SHOOTING, 1817, vol. 51. 

PLATES IN THE ANNALS OF SPORTING {2 in number). 

HUNTING FOR MOOR GAME, 1823, vol. 4 ; engraved by Thos. Landseer. 
TERRIERS AND POLECA T, 1824, vol. 5 ; engraved by J, Scott. 



124 



THE SARTORIUS FAMILY. 

John Sartorius. (Born «Vf a 1700. Died 1780.) 
FRANCIS SARTORIUS. (Born 1734. Died 1804.) 
John N. SARTORIUS. (Bom «Vca 1755. Bled circa 1828). 
John F. sartorius. (Born circa 1775. Died circa 1831). 

' I 'HIS family furnishes a stril^ing instance of 
-■■ hereditary talent. The artistic gifts which 
have made the name of Sartorius famous were 
possessed in greater or less degree by five con- 
secutive generations of the family ; for John's father, 
Jacob Christopher Sartorius, was an engraver of 
Nuremberg, whose plates bear dates from the 
year 1694 to 1737 inclusive. Jacob Christopher, 
so far as we have been able to discover, did 
not devote himself to pictures of animal life or 
of sporting interest, and he therefore demands 
at our hands none of the attention which is the 
meed of his descendants. 

The published records of the lives of John, 
Francis, John N. and John F. Sartorious, are 
very meagre ; they seem to have been compiled 
from such information as the biographer chanced 




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JOHN SARTORIUS 1 25 

to possess, and afford no evidence of attempt to 
secure completeness. The particulars now given 
have been collected from all the sources ordinarily 
available, and also represent the fruit of much 
research over a wide field. Close personal examina- 
tion of paintings and engravings has been necessary 
to render justice to each member of this family 
of artists — a task of no small difficulty, as many 
pictures are signed by, or described as the handi- 
work of Sartorius Senior or Sartorius Junior, the 
initials being omitted. 

John Sartorius was born in Nuremberg, 
about the year 1700. It has not been possible 
to trace the date which saw his departure from 
Bavaria and settlement in England. The earliest 
evidence of his residence in this country occurs 
in connection with a picture which he painted for 
Mr. Panton about 1722. This is a portrait of a 
celebrated mare, named Molly, who had won 
upwards of twenty matches, and never sustained 
defeat until she started in the race which proved 
fatal to her. She had been matched to run at 
Newmarket on 2nd November, 1723, against the 
Duke of Bolton's famous horse Terror and two 
hours afterwards against Badger. While running 
the first match she was suddenly taken ill, with what 
malady we are not told, and died almost on the 
course, between the stand and the rubbing house. 



1 26 ANIMAL PAINTERS 

^" 1735 John Sartorius painted for the Duke of 
Bolton a portrait of the celebrated racer Looby ; 
the horse is represented being ridden at full gallop. 

In 1741 he painted for William Osbaldeston, 
Esq., the portrait of a racehorse, named Old 
Traveller, with the jockey Stephen Jefferson in 
the saddle; and in 175S, for the Duke of 
Kingston he did a portrait of the racehorse 
Careless ; he also painted portraits of other horses 
famous on the Turf in their day, some few of which 
have been engraved. 

He contributed one picture to the gallery of the 
Society of Artists, a body which was estab- 
lished in 1760; to the exhibitions of the Free 
Society of Artists, which came into being in 1761 
and was broken up in 1783, he sent no fewer 
than si.xty-two works. His name occurs only once 
in the catalogues of the Royal Academy ; in the 
e.xhibition of the year 1780 he was represented 
by the " Portrait of a Horse." He was then living 
in London at 108, Oxford Street ; and there he 
probably died in 1780, having then attained to 
about his eightieth year. 

Francis Sartorius, born in 1734, was the 

son of John, from whom he learned the art of 
painting. His portraits of horses and pictures of 
sporting subjects gained him great celebrity ; he 



FRANCIS SARTORIUS I 27 

appears to have been the fashionable horse-painter 
of his day, for it is recorded that he produced 
more portraits of winners on the Turf during the 
latter half of the eighteenth century than any artist 
of the time. It is stated that he painted more 
pictures of Eclipse during the zenith of that great 
horse's fame than did all his contemporaries put 
together. Eclipse was foaled 1764 and died 1789. 

For the Duke of Grafton he painted the por- 
trait of Antinous, foaled in 1758; also that 
of Herod, bred in the same year by the Duke 
of Cumberland. For Mr. Latham he painted the 
portrait of the famous mare Snap, foaled in 1759; 
for Mr. Shafto that of Cardinal Ruff, foaled 
in 1760, and afterwards the property of Lord 
Grosvenor ; and for the Marquis of Rockingham 
the portrait of Bay Malton, foaled in 1768. 
Some of these pictures of race horses were after- 
wards engraved by John June and published 
between the years 1760 and 1770. Other works 
of his were also engraved or mezzo-tinted. 

At Aynhoe Park, Banbury, the residence of 
Mr. W. C. Cartwright, late M.P. for Oxfordshire, 
Banbury Division, there is a hunting group painted 
in 1764. This work, which was formerly in Jus- 
more House, Oxfordshire, represents W. and H. 
Fermore, with a friend, hunting in Aynhoe Park. 
The three gentlemen wear black coats and are 



128 ANIMAL PAINTERS 

attended by three hunt servants in green Hveries. 
A pack of harriers are in full cry after a hare in 
the distance ; a view of Aynhoe House with church 
and grounds forms the background. The canvas 
measures 4 feet 1 1 inches by 2 feet 1 1 inches. 

Another picture which deserves mention was 
his portrait of a famous trotting mare which 
belonged to Mr. Bishop. She stood for her por- 
trait after her great performance on the Epsom 
Road, when she covered sixteen miles in one hour, 
carrying 1 2 stone ; she was afterwards matched to 
trot 1 7 miles in the hour under the truly crushing 
weight of 16 stone 4 lbs. ; the match was to have 
come off on the Hertford Road, but for some 
reason was not run, and Mr. Bishop received 150 
guineas forfeit. This picture was included in the 
catalogue of those belonging to the late Duke of 
Hamilton, sold at Christie's in November, 1898: 
by an obvious error it was attributed to John F. 
Sartorius, the grandson of Francis. 

In 1767 the artist painted "A Celebrated Race," 
which was run over the Beacon Course, Newmarket, 
on the 20th April, 1767. There were four entries 
at 500 guineas each, horses carrying 8 stone 7 lbs. 
— featherweights in those days when 10 and 12 
stone were the usual penalties. The picture shows 
the result, which was as follows: Lord Rockingham's 
Malton, I ; Sir J. Moore's King Herod, 2 ; Lord 




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FRANCIS SARTORIUS I 29 

Bolingbroke's Ting, 3 ; Mr. Shafto's Askam, 4. 
The size of this canvas is 6 feet 3 inches by 4 feet 
I inch. The picture was for many years in the 
possession of the late Mr. Richard Tattersall, and in 
1884 it was purchased for the Elsenham Collection. 

Francis Sartorius was an occasional contributor 
to the Sporting Magazine ; the volumes 2, 4, and 6, 
for the years 1793, 1794, and 1795, respectively, 
contain four excellent engravings from his works ; 
one plate by Thomas Cook of the celebrated race- 
horse Waxey by Pot-8-os, the property of Sir 
F. Poole, Bart., shows the horse standing with 
the groom at his head ; and another in the same 
volume engraved by J. Walker from the por- 
trait of Dragon, a horse bred by the Duke of 
Bedford. The other enorravinofs are from the 
artist's " Staa Chase throusfh the Thames" and 
the portrait of Mr. Bishop's trotting mare, to 
which reference has been made. 

To the various London Galleries he contributed 
some thirty-eight works altogether : twelve to the 
Royal Academy exhibitions between 1775 and 
1 790 ; seven to the Society of Artists and twenty 
to the Free Society of Artists between 1773 and 
1 79 1. His addresses in London during the years 
he was exhibiting are given as : 10, Meads Court, 
Dean Street, Soho ; i, Macclesfield Street; and 

17, Gerrard Street, Soho. 

Q VOL. n. 



130 ANIMAL PAINTERS 

Francis Sartorius died on 5th March, 1804, in his 
seventieth year. All that is known of his private 
life is contained in the following rather quaint 
passage taken from the memoir which was pub- 
lished in the Sporting Magazine for April of that 
year. Having referred in terms of praise to his 
artistic abilities, to the universal respect in which 
he was held, and to his conscientious discharge of 
all private duties, the writer proceeds : — 

" By those who had his acquaintance he was known as an 
affectionate father and hospitable friend, and if matrimony 
be considered one of the predominant blessings of this life, 
he enjoyed much more than most married men would have 
considered enough, having been married to and cohabited 
successively with five wives, the fourth of whom he lost 
about the time of his fiftieth year ; the fifth and last lived 
with him in the utmost extent of domestic happiness for 
twenty-seven years relinquishing this life for a better only 
in January last. The loss so powerfully preyed upon his 
spirits that he gradually declined and survived her no more 
than six weeks." 

The writer obviously errs in stating that the 
artist enjoyed the society of his fifth wife for 
twenty-seven years ; his fourth wife died when 
he was about fifty years of age, and he himself 
died twenty years afterwards. 

Though hunting scenes do not figure largely 
among the paintings of Francis Sartorius, it may 
be conjectured that he was fond of the sport, 
from the lines, which occur in the same Magazine 
three months after his decease (June, 1804) : 




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JOHN N. SARTORIUS I31 

" No more the bright dewdrops that sparkle in morn 
Are swept by his swiftness away, 
No more the loved halloo or shrill sounding horn 
Awake to the sports of young day." 



WORKS OF FRANCIS SARTORIUS. 

EXHIBITED IN THE ROYAL ACADEMY (12 in number). 

YEAR 

1775— W FAVOURITE HORSE. 

1782— (2) PORTRAIT OF A HACK— PORTRAIT OF A SPANISH DOG. 

\^^^— PORTRAIT of a cart horse. 

1785— /4 SPANIEL. 

iyi&-PORTRAIT OF A HORSE. 

1787— (2) PORTRAIT OF A COACH HORSE— PORTRAIT OF A HUNTER. 

ijSS— PORTRAIT OF TIVO HORSES. 

178^3) AN OLD DOG AND HORSES — A PAIR OF HIS MA/ESTi^S 

COACH-HORSES. 
t-jgo—AN OLD DOG AND HORSES. 

PLATES IN THE SPORTING MAGAZINE (4 in number). 

STAG CHASE THROUGH THE THAMES; engraved by Thomas Cook, 1793, vol. 1. 
PORTRAIT OF .MR. BISHOP'S TROTTING MARE: engraved by Thomas Cook, 

1794, vol. 4. 
WAXEY, the property of Sir F. Poole, Bart. ; engraved by Thomas Cook, vol. 6. 
DRAGON^ the property of the Duke of Bedford, got by Woodricker out of June, engraved 

by I. Walker, 1795, vol. 6. 



John N. SaRTORIUS, born about the year 
1755, was the only son of Francis. He began his 
artistic career at a period in history which gave 
him an advantage over his father and grandfather ; 
nothing had been done in their day towards 
encouraging study of the Fine Arts in England ; 
schools of painting were unknown and individual 
ability developed undirected. 



132 ANIMAL PAINTERS 

In 1769, the Royal Academy was established 
to foster promising talent ; such eminent pioneers 
as Sir Joshua Reynolds, Sir Henry Raeburn 
and John Constable, among others, were creating 
and elevating British schools of art at this 
period. Animal painters in particular now enjoyed 
exceptional opportunities for perfecting themselves 
in those branches of knowledge mastery of which 
is essential to success. A celebrated anatomist 
named Joshua Brookes had established a Museum 
and Anatomical School in Blenheim Street, where 
he gave lectures to young students on the structure 
of quadrupeds, birds and fishes. Painters of horses, 
too, could profit by the wonderful results of George 
Stubbs' industry, his great work on The Anatomy of 
the Horse with its twenty-four engraved plates, 
having been published in the year 1766. 

John N. Sartorius with his natural artistic 
ability, doubtless took advantage of these schools 
of painting ; he must also have gained a know- 
ledge of sport, as the turf, the hunting field, the 
gun, the kennel and the leash furnished subjects 
for his prolific brush ; and whether he dealt with 
equine portraiture pure and simple, with hunting, 
shooting or coursing scenes, he betrayed intimate 
knowledge of each sport and invested his pictures 
with remarkable spirit and animation. 

He counted his patrons among the leading 



JOHN N. SARTORIUS 1 33 

Sportsmen of his time ; among them, the Prince of 
Wales, the Earl of Derby, Lord Foley, Sir Charles 
Bunbury, the Right Hon. C. J. Fox and Mr. 
Christopher Wilson. 

In the year 1780 he painted a pair of pictures, 
the portraits of Two Hacks, one with the cropped 
ears in vogue at the time. These were among 
the collection belonging to the late Duke of 
Hamilton, sold at Christie's in November, 1898. 

John N. Sartorius first appears as an exhibitor in 
the year 1778, and from that time onwards till a few 
years before his death he was constantly represented 
in the various London galleries. To the Royal 
Academy exhibitions he was a frequent contributor : 
during the forty-one years, 1 781 to 182 1 inclusive, 
only three catalogues do not contain mention of 
works from his brush ; he exhibited at the Royal 
Academy altogether some 74 pictures, either animal 
portraits or sporting subjects. 

At Tendring Hall, Suffolk, the seat of Sir Joshua 
Rowley, Bart., there is an interesting hunting piece 
dated 1797 ; it is a portrait of Sir William Rowley, 
Bart., on horseback, with hunt servants and two- 
and-a-half couple of his favourite hounds. Sir 
William was master of a pack which hunted a 
country in Essex and Suffolk from about 1787 to 
1797. This canvas measures 2 feet 11 inches by 2 
feet I inch. 



134 ANIMAL PAINTERS 

He was a liberal contributor to the Sporting 
Magazine, and the volumes between 1795 and 
1827 contain numerous engravings from his works. 

In vol. vii. for December, 1 795, are two inte- 
resting plates engraved by J. Walker. One is a 
portrait of the race horse Escape, with his trainer 
and jockey standing at his head. This famous 
son of Highflyer, foaled in 1785, was bred by Mr. 
Franco and sold by him for 1,500 gs. to the Prince 
of Wales, for whom he won many important races 
during the three years 1788-91. The second 
plate is a portrait of Grey Diomed, with his 
trainer, jockey and a stable lad. Grey Diomed, 
by Diomed, foaled in 1785, was bred by Sir Charles 
Bunbury, who sold him to the Hon. Charles James 
Fox in 1787. In October, 1789, however. Sir 
Charles bought back the horse, who won numerous 
races in 1788 and years following to 1792. The 
pictures from which these plates were taken were 
also engraved in full size, viz. : 205- by 15I- inches, 
by Daniel Dodd, and published by R. Pollard in 
1792. 

In Vol. 20, for May, 1802, an engraving from his 
picture of Phenomena, a famous trotting Hackney 
mare which belonged to Mr. Joseph Robson, of 
Little Britain ; this plate accompanies an account 
of the mare's wonderful performances on the road 
between Cambridge and Huntingdon, and after- 



JOHN N. SARTORIUS 1 35 

wards near Woodford, in Essex. The picture of 
Phenomena was also engraved on large scale by 
Whessel for separate publication. 

In Vol. 66, for June, 1825, an engraving by 
J. Webb, from a portrait of Eclipse, with Jack 
Oakley up, galloping on the Beacon Course, 
Newmarket. Oakley was well known as a jockey, 
both in England and France, at this period. The 
inscription on this engraving states that the plate 
is " from a painting of Sartorius the Elder," and 
the name engraved thereon is "J. N. Sartorius:" 
but as Eclipse was running on the turf, and in his 
zenith about 1770, it must be concluded that the 
painting by John N. Sartorius was done from a 
sketch taken from life by his father Francis. 

Among the many horse-portraits painted by John 
N. Sartorius, mention may be made of Sir Thomas, 
engraved by J. W. Edye, the plate measuring i6| 
by 12 inches ; Champion, the plate from which 
measures 1^^ by gj inches ; the copy of the former 
engraving before the writer bears no publisher's 
inscription, and from the latter, names of both 
engraver and publisher are wanting. Rockingham, 
engraved by J. W. Edye, size of plate 16J by 12 
inches, and published on 25th April, 1789, by J. 
Harris, of Sweeting's Alley, New Broad Street, 
London. Cormorant was engraved and published 
on 1st March, 1795, by J. Aitkin, of Castle Street, 
Leicester Square ; size of plate 19} by i6| inches. 



I ^6 ANIMAL PAINTERS 



Mr. H. \V. Estridge, of Minety House, Minety, 
Malmesbury, has in his possession and kindly sends 
particulars of a hunting picture which was painted 
by John N. Sartorius for his uncle who formerly 
lived at Carshalton Park. Surrey. This work is 
about 3 feet long by 2 feet 6 inches high ; in the 
foreground two couple of hounds are killing their 
fox, while another leaps a five-barred gate on the 
right to join them ; in the immediate background 
the huntsman is giving a " who-oop ! " as he leads 
his horse down a steep bank. 

The Sportsman s Repository of the Horse and 
Dog, by John Scott, published by Bohn, of York 
Street, Covent Garden, in 1845, seventeen years 
after the death of J. N. Sartorius, contains two 
admirable plates by the famous engraver John 
Scott, from pictures by this artist, viz., plate i, the 
portraits of Eclipse and Shakespear ; plate 2, Flying 
Childers and King Herod. On plate i is inscribed 
under the portraits of Eclipse and Shakespear the 
following : " Painted by J. N. Sartorius, after 
drawing from the life of his father, published by 
Sherwood, Neely and Jones, Paternoster Row, 
January, 1820." Plate 2 has inscribed under the 
portraits of King Herod and Flying Childers, 
" Painted by J. N. Sartorius, the portrait of Herod 
after a drawing from the life by his father and 
Flying Childers, from the original picture by 



JOHN N. SARTORIUS 1 37 

Seymour." And in an article in the publication of 
1845 describing the plates and giving particulars of 
the achievements of the four horses this passage 
occurs : " The name of Sartorius as a horse 
painter of distinguished merit has been long 
known in this country, and the son has diligently 
and ably followed his father's steps. The por- 
traits are both copies : that of Eclipse by the 
younger (John N. Sartorius), from a painting by 
his father (Francis Sartorius), for the truth, both in 
form and character, of which we can vouch ; that of 
Shakespear by the same, from the original, we 
believe, by James Seymour." 

In a work (imperial 8vo), entitled " The Chase, 
to which is added Field Sports by William 
Somerville, Esq.," by Edward Topham, Esq., pub- 
lished in 18 1 7, by Sherwood, Neely and Jones, 
Paternoster Row, there are six e.xquisitely executed 
engravings by John Scott, from paintings by John 
N. Sartorius, viz.: "Unkenneling," "The View," 
"Stag at Bay," " Otter Hunting," " Hare," " Otter 
in a Tree." 

Many of his works were engraved for separate 
publication, viz., " Amatch " between Sir Harry 
Tempest Vane's Hambletonian and Mr. Joseph 
Cookson's Diamond. This race was run in 1799 
over the Beacon Course at Newmarket, 4 miles 
2 furlongs, the stake being 3,000 gs. a side. 



'o 



8 AKIMAL J-AINTERS 



Hambletonian, ridden by Frank Buckle, 8 stone 
3 lbs., beat Diamond, who was ridden by Dennis 
Fitzpatrick, 8 stone. The time of the race is 
recorded as 8|- minutes only. The engraving from 
this picture, executed by A. Lessell, was published 
in i8oo by John Harrison, London ; size of plate 2i|^ 
inches by 14 inches. 

A set of four foxhunting pieces published in 
1790 and 1795 by John Harris, and dedicated 
by him to Charles Boldero, Esq., of Aspenden, 
Herts. These plates, which measure 24 inches 
by 1 7 inches each, are the joint work of Peltro, 
who was responsible for the landscapes, and J. 
Neagle, to whom the figures were entrusted. 
Lines from Somerville's "Chase" appear beneath 
the pictures. 

Another very able piece of work is a mezzotint 
engraving executed by William Ward from the 
artist's picture of " Pointers," a brace of dogs 
standing to game ; this plate measures 1 6^ inches 
by 13I- inches. 

Lord Rothschild has at Tring Park two hunting 
pieces which give an excellent idea of the style of 
dress and character of the sport at this period. 

John N. Sartorius married very early in life. 
It is recorded that he lived at an inn at Carshalton 
and painted most of his pictures there ; little or 
nothing is known of his domestic life. Numerous 



WORKS OF JOHN N. SARTORIUS 1 39 

sporting pictures remain to prove the assiduity 
with which he worked at the easel during his long 
and industrious career. Many of the works are 
of large size. He died about 1828, when he would 
have been about ']2, years of age. He left two 
sons, John F., who painted sporting subjects, and 
Francis, a painter of marine subjects. 



WORKS OF JOHN N. SARTORIUS. 

EXHIBITED IN THE ROYAL ACADEMY (74 in number). 

1781— (2) PORTRAITS OF TWO HORSES— PORTRAIT OF AN OFFICER ON 

HORSEBACK. 
1782— (3) PORTRAIT OF A COW— AN OLD FAMOUS HUNTER— PORTRAIT 

OF TWO HUNTERS. 
\lii— PORTRAIT OF A SHOOTING PONY AND DOG. 
1784— (2) PORTRAIT OF A HUNTER— A HUNTER. 
17SS— HORSES. 

17S6— PORTRAITS OF TWO HUNTERS. 
1787— GOING OUT IN THE MORNING— THE CHACE. 

1788— (2) PORTRAIT OF A HUNTER— LANDSCAPE IN WHICH IS INTRO- 
DUCED A NEW INVENTED CARRIAGE. 
1791— A HUNTER. 

1792— (2) INSIDE OF A STABLE— A STRAW i'ARD. 
^793— (.2) PORTRAIT OF A HUNTER — PORTRAITS OF A GENTLEMAN 

AND DOGS. 
1794— (2) ^ GENTLEMAN SHOOTING— TRUE BLUE, lale the property of the 

Prince of Wales. 
i795-<2) THE DEATH OF A HARE-GENTLEMAN SHOOTING. 
i7<}6— {2) PORTRAIT OF A FAST-TROTTING MARE — PORTRAITS OF A 

SHOOTING PONY AND DOGS. 
i797-<7) ^4 GENTLEMAN AND DOGS — A FAST-TROTTING HORSE — 

GOING A-COURSING— A RABBIT FERRETER — PORTRAIT OF 

HORSES— .4 FATTENED FRENCH COW— PORTRAITS OF DOCS. 
1798— (6) Portraits of:— /I CHAISE HORSE— A HACKNEY— AN OLD HUNTI.VG 

MARE—FASTTROTTING HORSE— .MR. WESTCAR'S FAT HEIFER 

—A VERY OLD HORSE. 
1799— (2) .MR. WESTCAR'S GREAT OX— PORTRAIT OF COACH HORSES. 
■Aa^— PORTRAIT OF A HUNTER. 
iSoi—DIA.MOND. 



140 ANIMAL PAINTERS 

i8o2-(2) Portraits of :—.•! HORSE— A CART HORSE. 

■8o3-(3) Portraits of:-/} LADVS HUNTER— A FAST-TROTTING HOBBY— AN 
ARABIAN. 

lio^-POR TRAITS OF TWO HACKNEYS. 

1805— (3) PARTRIDGE SHOOTING— AN IRISH HACKNEY— A HACKNEY. 

i8o5-(2) A HUNTER— PORTRAIT OF A HORSE. 

1S07— (2) HORSES AT A COVER SIDE— A YOUNG LADY ON HORSEBACK. 

iS<a-(i) FLYING LEAP: FOX DYING — PORTRAIT OF A STALLION- 
PORTRAIT OF A PUG DOG. 

jiog— (3) SPANIELS FLUSHING A IVOODCOCK — MR. BUTLER'S MISS 
COINER— LORD FOLEY'S COMRADE BEATING MR GOODISONS 
FOXBURY, AND MR. BUTLER'S EPSOM FOR THE PLATE OVER 
EPSOM, 1808. 

1810— {2) PORTRAIT OF A SPANIEL— PORTRAIT OF A CART HORSE. 

\ii-i— PORTRAIT OF FAST-TROTTING HORSE. 

1S13— PORTRAIT OF AN ARABIAN. 

1814— (2) SMOLENSKO— SHOOTING PONY, AND ROLLA. 

liiS—A F.4ST-TR0TTING CART HORSE. 

i%\b— REMARKABLE THREE-YEAR-OLD DEER, property of the Karl of Derby. 

1817 — TINY, favourite spaniel, 

iSiS— SHOOTING PONY AND SETTER. 

iSig— BROOD MARE AND FOAL. 

1S20— BLOOD HORSE. 

1 82 i—GREYHO UNDS. 

1824— (2) BROOD MARE AND FOAL-PONY AND DOC. 

PLATES IN THE SPORTING MAGAZINE (45 in number). 

1795 — ESCAPE, the property of Prince of Wales, purchased of Mr. Franco for 1,500 

guineas ; engraved by Walker. 
lygS-GREY DIOMED, bred by Sir Charles Bunbury ; engraved by Walker. 
1796 — ELIZA, property of Christopher Wilson, Esq. ; engraved by J. Scott. 
tTJb—BENNINGBROUGH, property of Christopher Wilson, Esq. ; engraved by J. Scott 
1796 — BUZZARD, got by Woodpecker, the properly of Christopher Wilson, Esq. ; engraved 

by J. Scott. 
i79i— PA TRIOT; engraved by J. Scott. 

1798 — WHISKEY, got by Saltram, bred by Prince of Wales ; engraved by J. Scott. 
\1<n— DIAMOND, got by Highflyer. 
^199—HAMBLETONIAN; engraved by J. Scott. 
1799 — SALTRAM, Si son of Eclipse, late the property of Prince of Wales; engraved by 

J. Scott. 
iigg—BELISSIMA BEATING ll'ARTER AND DIAMOND AT OXFORD 

RACES, 1799; engraved by J. Scott. 
zygg—DON QUIXOTTE, a son of Eclipse, purcha.sed for Soo gs. by the Prince of Wales, 

was a very successful racer ; engraved by J. Scott. 
lica—PLAY OR PAY; engraved by J. Scott. 
1800— i'/i'}' SCRAPER ; engraved by J. Scott. 
ilaa— TRAVELLER ; engraved by J. Scott. 



JOHN F. SARTORIUS I4I 

1800 — JOHNyV, by King Fergus, property of Mr. Durrant ; engraved by J. Scott. 
lioa— DUNG ANNO N BEATING ROCKINGHAM AT NEWMARKET; engraved 

by J. Scott. 
iSoo— FAR R/ER'S SHOP; engraved by J. Scott. 
z2cxf—BRyA.YS O'LYNN, the properly of Mr. Graham. 
lioi—TEABOV BEATING HEPHESTION AND GREY FALCON OVER 

EPSOM, 2ist May, 1801 ; engraved by J. Scott. 
1801 — BLUECAP, a celebrated foxhound, the property of Smith Barry, Esq., of Cheshire ; 

engraved by J. Scott. 
xZai— FLYING LEAP. 
\1ai— PHENOMENA, the property of Mr. Joseph Robson— .47V^ EXTRAOR BINARY 

TROTTING MARE. 
1S02—STANDING LEAP, hunter about to leap over a five-barred gate. 
i8o2— <5) THE IFARRENER ; engraved by J. Chapmm-HORSE FALLING FROM 

A PRECIPICE- UNKENNELLING THE HOUNDS ; engraved by John Pye 

—THE HYDE PARK DISASTER— THE CURRICLE AND HORSES; 

engraved by Englehart. 
1803 — ROTTEN ROIV, principal figure supposed to be the Prince; engraved by John Pye. 
iZo-i-DRAU'ING COYER ; engraved by J. Scott 
1B03— THE CHASE; engraved by J. Scott. 
1803— yl T FAULT; engraved by J. Scott. 
1803— DIGGING THE FOX; engraved by J. Scott. 
zSai— THE DEATH; engraved by J. Scott. 
iScn— MOLL TOMSON AND HAREFOOT, with a view of the Well-Gap, Newmarket ; 

engraved by J. Scott. 
lia^-PHEASANT SHOOTING ; engraved by J. Scott. 
lio^— GROUSE SHOOTING; engraved by J. Scott. 
iSo^— PARTRIDGE SHOOTING; engraved by J. Scott. 
iBos—SN/PE SHOOTING; engraved by J. Scott. 
lios-lYOODCOCK SHOOTING; engraved by J. Scott. 
iSos— HEAD OF OLD ECLIPSE. 

iSio— MISS COINER, got by Don Quixote ; engraved by J. Scott. 
i%\i— WHISKER AND RAPH.AEL, the Duke of Grafton's Whisker heating General 

Gower's Raphael over Epsom, 25th May, 1815. 
■Alb— SEAGULL AND ESCAPE, the Right Hon. C. J. Fox's Seagull beating Prince 

of Wales' Escape for Oatlands Stakes. 
1817 — X V Z, by Haphazard, bred by R. Riddell, Esq., winner of nine gold cups between 

1811 and i8t4. 
\ZA— TROTTING CART HORSE, the property o( T. Greaves, Esq.; engraved by J. 

Scott. 
^iit,—ECLIPSE, WITH J. iCK OAKLEY, UPOVER BEACON COURSE; engraved 

by J. Webb. 
i827-^/.£'Z'C'.ff.-f. 

John F. SarTORIUS, the elder son of John 
N., was born about the year 1775. He displays 
no inconsiderable share of talent in painting 



142 ANIMAL PAINTERS 

pictures of the school made their own by his 
ancestors, but his abilities as an artist are not 
equal to those of his father. His hunting pieces 
are spirited, indicating, moreover, knowledge of 
country life and pursuits ; some of his works were 
done on a large scale ; but his output was small 
compared with that of his parent ; in regard to 
this it must be borne in mind that he had not 
only his famous father to compete against during 
the greater part of his life (he seems to have 
survived John N. only some three years), but 
numerous clever rivals whose talents, while inferior 
to those of his father, were superior to his own. 

His first works in the Royal Academy were 
shown in the exhibition of 1802, when his address 
was 17, King Street, Holborn ; these were two 
portraits, one of a mare named Isabella, the other 
of a colt named Edmund. John N, Sartorius 
had a couple of horse portraits in the exhibition 
of that year, and the ddbiit of a son following in 
his footsteps must have been remarked ; no doubt, 
too, the young man's works attracted some notice 
on their own merits ; at all events, we have evi- 
dence in an autograph letter, possessed by the 
author, that John F. Sartorius was at this time 
beginning to find patrons. The letter is worth 
quoting, as it affords an idea of the prices a young 



JOHN F. SARTORIUS I43 

painter set upon his pictures at the beginning of 
the century. There is nothing showing to whom 
this missive was addressed. It is the answer to 
an enquiry made, as it would appear, on behalf 
of a publisher or dealer in works of art. 

No. 18, Warwick Street, 

Golden Square, 

December i^^tk, 1802. 
Sir, 

I can furnish you with the Race of Hamhletonian and 
Diamond at 3 guineas. A design of the King's Stnghound 
at the same price. (The size of the pictures, 16 inches by 
13 inches). The Portrait of a Racer will be 2 guineas (the 
size 12 inches by 14 inches), provided the pictures are 
returned when done with [after being engraved] . But if 
the publisher wishes to possess them entirely he may have 
them on the addition of 2 guineas each. The pictures 
shall be finished in the best manner and expeditiously as 
possible. 

I'll take the opportunity of calling on you in a day or two 
for an answer. 

I am, 

Yours, &c., 

John Sartorius, Junior. 

The artist seems to have painted several pictures 
of this race and portraits of the horses. Among 
the engravings in the late Duke of Hamilton's 
collection, sold at Christie's in November, 1898, 
was a pair entitled " Hamhletonian and Diamond 
over the Beacon Course ; " one shows the horses 
going out, the other the struggle at the winning 
post. These plates were engraved by Whessel and 



144 ANIMAL PAINTERS 

printed in colours. A picture of " Bay Malton 
beating King Herod at Newmarket, 1767," in this 
collection is attributed to John F. Sartorius ; if 
correctly, the work was no doubt a copy of that 
painted by Francis Sartorius and referred to on a 
previous page as having been long in the posses- 
sion of Mr. Richard Tattersall. 

There are many engravings in the volumes of 
the Sporting Magazine from 1805 to 1827. During 
this period, however, John N. Sartorius was also a 
constant contributor, and it is not always possible 
to distinguish with absolute certainty between 
the works of father and son. The similarity of 
subjects chosen, the fact that many plates are 
signed "Sartorius" without initials, the fact that 
John Scott was the engraver of the works of 
both father and son, and the extreme probability 
that the senior lent frequent aid to the junior 
in " touching up " and improving his pictures, 
thereby investing them with something of his 
own individuality, in some cases combine to render 
the task of discriminating between the two prac- 
tically hopeless. 

John F. was only an occasional exhibitor at 
the Royal Academy ; between the years 1 802 
and 1829 his contributions numbered sixteen. If 
his offerings were not always accepted by the 
Hanging Committee he only shared the fate of 




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JOHN F. SARTORIUS 1 45 

Other artists of equal or greater competence. A 
letter, dated "Queen's Elm, April, 1828," which 
lies before the author, reads : — 

Sir, 

I have sent two pictures: (t) Portrait of a Favourite 
Terrier, the property of Mrs. Hill, Spring Gardens Terrace ; 
(2) Dead Game and a Jack Snipe. 

I am, 

Your obedient servant, 

J. F. Sartorius. 

This refers to the artist's offerings to the 
Royal Academy for that year's exhibition. " Dead 
Game and a Jack Snipe " was duly shown, but 
that portrait of Mrs. Hill's favourite terrier was 
less fortunate, the catalogue making no mention 
of the work. 

An engraving from the picture exhibited in 1806 
is here given to illustrate the style of John F. 
Sartorius. It is entitled " Coursino- in Hatfield 
Park," and the central figure represents one of 
the artist's best patrons, the Marchioness of 
Salisbury. 

This lady was one of the most remarkable 
sportswomen of her own or any other day. She 
established the Hatfield Hunt, whose affairs she 
directed for many years, seldom being absent 
from the covert side on hunting days. She is 
described as having been an elegant and accom- 
plished horsewoman, who rode with equal intre- 

10 VOL. II. 



146 ANIMAL PAINTERS 

pidity and judgment. No day was too long for 
her, and she was ever anxious to show the field 
which was generally a large one, the best of sport. 
She continued to preside over the Hunt until in 
her seventieth year. 

Even at the great age of eighty-six she was 
still fairly hale and vigorous, and up to her last 
season in London seldom omitted her daily ride 
in the Park, or, when the weather was unfavour- 
able, in the King's Riding School at Pimlico, 
where she spent an hour in the saddle. Her 
painful death in November, 1835, created a great 
sensation at the time. The day after her arrival 
from London she was alone in her boudoir, 
in the west wing of Hatfield House, writing a 
letter ; her cap came in contact with the candles 
on the table, her clothes took fire and before aid 
came she was burned to death. 

She was a great patron of both art and sport. 
The first volume of the Sporting Magazine for 
the year 1792 contains a series of articles descrip- 
tive of " Archery, its Origin and Progress in the 
Kingdom," from her pen. An engraving by Cook 
after Corbould, entitled " Archery at Hatfield," 
accompanies a chapter of the series. 

John F. Sartorius died about the year 1831. 



WORKS OF JOHN F. SARTORIUS 1 47 



WORKS OP JOHN F. SARTORIUS. 

EXHIBITED AT THE ROYAL ACADEMY (16 in number). 

YEAR 

1802(2) A Mare ISABELLA AND FOAL— EDMUND, a colt. 

xioi—SPANlELS. 

1S06—COURS/NG IN HATFIELD PARK, the Marchioness of Salisbury and others 

on horsebacii. 
1809(2) A PARTRIDGE— A SNIPE. 
i8ii— -4 GROUSE SKETCH FROM NATURE. 
1817 (2) A COUPLE OF SNIPES— A BR.4CE OF PTARMIGANS. 
1818(2) WOODCOCK-GOLDEN PLOVER AND SNIPES. 
\iia-GROUSING, WITH PORTRAITS OF FAVOURITE DOGS. 
i%ii-PARTRIDGES AND SNIPES. 

iZ2-i— GROUSE SHOOTING, WITH PORTRAITS OF DOGS IN CUMBERLAND. 
1S2S—DEAD CAME AND A JACK SNIPE. 
ji2g— DEAD GAME. 

PLATES IN THE SPORTING MAGAZINE (6 in number). 

iSos— COURSING AT HA T FIELD ; engraved by John Scott. 

liai-SANCHO BEATING HANNIBAL AT BRIGHTON; engraved by H. R. Cook. 

1S06-SHOIVING A HORSE. 

iSog— HUNTER'S STABLE. 

iSo6—F0UR-INHAND CARRI.4GE; engraved by John Scott, from a design by 

Messrs. Savage and Walter, Lincohi's Inn Fields. 
jSiS-SMOLENSKO BEATING CATERPILLAR AND THE HAPHAZARD 

COLT FOR THE DERBY, 1813. 



148 



JOHN SCOTT. 

(Born 1774. Died 1827.) 

JOHN SCOTT was born at Newcastle-on- 
^ Tyne, in the year 1774. His parents were 
evidently in humble circumstances, for the boy 
began life as apprentice to a tallow chandler. A 
considerable number of the artists whose works 
have been noticed began life under conditions 
which might well have stifled the artistic instinct ; 
but surely never did parent of future artist make 
less happy choice than did Scott, senior, when he 
bound his son apprentice to Mr. Greenwell, who 
carried on the business named in the old Flesh 
Market of Newcastle. It is true there is nothing 
to show that the young Scott had evinced any 
marked aptitude for the career in which he was 
destined to excel ; but the difference between the 
vocation into which he was inducted by his parents, 
and that for which Nature had so liberally endowed 
him, is so wide as to be almost grotesque. 

He was probably handicapped with little educa- 
tion when he entered Mr. Greenwell's service ; but 
the inborn artistic spirit quickly developed, for 



JOHN SCOTT 149 

during his apprenticeship we find him haunting the 
premises of a local engraver from whom he 
acquired a knowledge of both line and mezzotint 
engraving. Of the man who was thus instrumental 
in helping the future artist to learn the rudiments of 
his real profession little is known. From the fact 
that he was on his way home from Newcastle races 
when he was waylaid and cruelly murdered we 
may infer that he was a man of sporting tastes ; 
and perhaps his proclivities may have influenced 
the direction of his pupil's talents. 

Though the tallow-chandlery business must have 
been at least uncongenial to a youth of artistic 
temperament, Scott remained with Mr. Greenwell 
until his indentures expired, when he left the shop 
and took up the graver's tool in earnest. Suc- 
cess was waiting for him, as his first task was to 
engrave a series of profile portraits for Angus' 
French Revolution. Among his Newcastle friends 
Scott numbered a Mr. Fisher, parish clerk of St. 
Nicholas Church ; Mr. Fisher was also proprietor 
of a circulating library, and thereby came in con- 
tact with the educated classes. To a gentleman 
who frequented his library Mr. Fisher showed 
examples of Scott's work, including his maiden 
effort, a plate entitled " Duck Shooting," taken from 
a schoolboy's copy book. The gentleman was so 
favourably impressed by these engravings that Mr. 



150 ANIMAL PAINTERS 

Fisher allowed Scott to make use of his name in 
addressing to Robert Pollard a request for em- 
ployment in London. Pollard, also a native of 
Newcastle-upon-Tyne, was then plying his craft 
in Spa Fields ; his opinion of the specimens of 
engraving submitted by Scott is sufficiendy evi- 
denced by his reply to the application. He pro- 
mised his young fellow-townsman work, and on 
Scott's arrival in London, took him not only 
without premium, but at a weekly wage, which he 
increased in ratio with the young man's progress. 

It was in 1795, when Scott was in his twenty- 
first year, that his work attracted the notice of Mr. 
John Wheble. Mr. Wheble was the founder of 
The Middlesex Joui'tial and The County Chronicle-, 
and he achieved no little notoriety by identifying 
himself with the movements promoted by Wilkes, 
Home Tooke, and other fiery politicians ot the 
same class. For aiding Wilkes to avoid the law, 
Mr. Wheble was summoned to the Bar of the 
House of Commons ; he was acquitted, and as 
showing the popular feeling of the time, it is worth 
noting that the Constitutional Society voted him 
an award of 100 guineas in recognition of his 
courage in assisting Wilkes to hide. It is not, 
however, with Mr. Wheble the politician that we 
are concerned, but with Mr. Wheble the book- 
seller and journalist. One of the ventures was The 



JOHN SCOTT 151 

Sporting Magazine, which he started in 1792, and 
it was for The Spoiling Magazine that he sought 
the services of John Scott. 

The first enpraving- bearing- Scott's name 
appeared in the issue of that publication for July, 
1795; it was entitled "Sir William Rowley's 
Dog-Kennels at Tendring Hall, Suffolk," and 
from this time onward till 1822 his connection 
with the magazine was continuous. The 56 
volumes (286 monthly issues) published between 
the dates mentioned contain numerous plates 
by Scott, several from designs of his own, 
others from paintings by various artists. 

During the latter part of this period his contri- 
butions are less frequent, owing to failure of health 
due to overwork ; and were no other evidence 
forthcoming to prove the man's wonderful industry, 
the number of plates in different publications, and 
the detached pieces, many of them of large size, 
show that Scott must have worked both physically 
and mentally against time. The extent of his 
output should at least have brought in returns 
considerable enough to tide him over a period of 
rest ; but from the following letter, which appeared 
in The Sporting Magazine for November, 1822, it 
seems that he had not been able to make, or at all 
events had not made, any provision against illness, 
and that the breakdown in health, which com- 



152 ANIMAL PAINTERS 

pelled cessation of work, found him practically 
penniless : — 

" I cannot refrain from expressing to you the pleasure I 
felt on viewing the charming embellishment you gave us in 
your last number, in the portrait of the celebrated horse 
Moses. I must be permitted to say it is one of the best that 
has adorned your interesting Miscellany for some time past, 
and that is saying not a little. 

" But this admiration, Mr. Editor, was mingled with regret 
and sympathy when I heard that the unfortunate artist, who 
has produced this and numerous other fine specimens of 
animal engraving, should be compelled by affliction to make 
a public appeal to the charity of his fellow men. It must be 
distressing to all, but particularly some, admirers of art to 
behold one of its greatest ornaments thus overtaken by the 
storms of adversity in the decline of a brilliant career of fame. 
I am happy, however, to find on enquiry that Mr. Scott's 
bodily health is so far restored as to enable him to resume 
his labours partially ; and that his mind lacks none of its 
original vigour, the above work, with various others executed 
by his own hand, abundantly prove. 

" The generosity and charitable feelings of a British public 
have again been displayed by commencing a subscription to 
shield this unfortunate gentleman from pecuniary difficulties, 
and enable him to pursue his profession unmolested. As an 
admirer of art, and a lover of philanthropy, I have added my 
humble aid, and sincerely hope this laudable attempt to do 
good may be fully accomplished. 

" I am yours, &c. 

" Philanthropos." 

It is the more curious that Scott should have 
failed to make pecuniary provision against com- 
pulsory idleness, for he was evidently impressed 
with a sense of the uncertainty of the artist's means 
of livelihood, dependent as it is entirely upon his 




J.Jackson^ K,A., Pittxt. 



JOHN SCOTT 



From Kngravin^ l'}' If. R. Fry. 



JOHN SCOTT 153 

enjoyment of health. That he realised this and 
the disastrous results of improvidence would seem 
clear from the fact that he was one of the eight 
painters who, in 1809-10, established the Artists' 
Benevolent Fund for the benefit of decayed artists, 
their widows and children ; and there is something 
pathetic in the circumstance that (like Robert 
Pollard, his first London master), after a protracted 
illness of six years' duration, he himself became a 
pensioner of the institution in founding which he 
had borne a share. 

As an engraver, of course, Scott had eminent 
predecessors ; among them may be named G. B. 
Cipriani (born 1727), who came from Florence to 
England in 1755 ; and Francis Bartolozzi (born 
1725), also a Florentine who came to this country 
in 1764. Cipriani and Bartolozzi were the first 
engravers of real eminence ; to them is due credit 
for having created a taste for line engraving. 
The first English-born engravers were: James Mac- 
Ardell (born 17 10), William Wynne Ryland (born 
1732), William Mallet (born 1735), Valentine 
Green (born 1739), Richard Earlom (born 1743), 
and John Raphael Smith (born 1752). Each one 
of these established a high reputation as a line 
and mezzotint engraver, and each has reproduced 
portraits and subject pictures of our greatest artists, 
Sir Joshua Reynolds and others. 



154 ANIMAL PAINTERS 

In one important respect, however, John Scott 
is entitled to a place abov^e his predecessors ; it 
was reserved to him to found a school of en- 
gravers, whose speciality was the reproduction of 
pictures of animal life and incidents of sport. A 
place may perhaps be claimed for him above all 
save the two Florentines whose genius first opened 
the eyes of the world to the artistic quality and 
beauties of engraving. His conspicuous success 
as an engraver must not allow us to forget that 
John Scott was also a clever draughtsman and 
designer ; he designed, among other plates, many 
exquisite pieces which stand as frontispieces to 
volumes of The Sporting Magazine and other 
publications. He particularly excelled in impart- 
ing a life-like expression to his beasts and birds ; 
as an instance of his talents in this direction 
maybe cited his plate of "The Lurcher," which 
appears in The Sportsman s Cabinet, published by 
J. Cundee, London, in 1804. This picture, by the 
way, was one of the class which Scott considered 
by far the most difficult to reproduce by reason of 
the delicate handling required to preserve the moon- 
light effect. 

In every case attention is arrested by the 
marvellous skill with which his burin conveys 
the sense of texture in the coats of his animals, 
and the animation in the eyes of his dogs. The 



JOHN SCOTT 155 

same publication contains examples of this in his 
"Shepherd's Dog" and "The Water Dog"; the 
eyes in each case are liquid with light. In the 
possession of Charles Dean, Esq., of Lincoln's 
Inn Fields, is a copy of The Sportsman s Cabi- 
net, published in folio size by Cundee, in 1803. 
This is enriched with proofs and etchings, and is 
elegantly bound. It contains the brief but im- 
portant inscription, " The only copy taken off, 
signed John Scott, " and to this particular book 
is prefixed a portrait of Scott published by his 
widow. This portrait appears at page 152 ; the 
original engraving was done gratuitously by Fry 
for Mrs. Scott, investing the picture with addi- 
tional interest. 

Artists sometimes complain, and sometimes with 
reason, that the engravers' interpretation of their 
work does them injustice. Happy the painter 
whose picture was entrusted to Scott ; such was his 
artistic talent and so intimate his knowledge of 
animal life that he could improve when copying the 
picture on his plate. Thomas Landseer, it is worth 
reminding the reader, laid his famous brother under 
a similar obligation ; his reproductions of Sir 
Edwin's great pictures were made with such ability 
and artistic feeling that in some respects the merit 
of the original was enhanced in the engraving. 

It may be justly claimed for Scott that he pos- 



156 ANIMAL PAINTERS 

sessed not talent but genius ; the clearness with 
which his plates are always cut, whether the subject 
be animal, bird or figure, betrays the bold, firm hand 
of self-confidence. Close and discriminating study 
of Nature, nice appreciation of form, and excep- 
tional talent in presenting life-like character, blend 
to give Scott's work the accuracy of a photograph. 
Its excellence was fully recognised in the most 
acceptable form — namely, the great demand for his 
engravings ; but we must reproduce from The 
Sporting Magazine of April, 1832, a eulogistic 
notice which, though published after the death of 
Scott, was without question inspired by contempla- 
tion of his numerous plates : — 

" To remark that the art of engraving has now reached a 
degree of perfection which leaves other countries far behind 
us is almost superfluous, since every picture-shop in London 
proves the fact ; but in no department, we may venture to 
say, has its genius been so widely exercised. We may also 
add, so liberally appreciated as in, and by, the sporting 
world." 

It is not too much to say that John Scott's com- 
bined talents as a draughtsman and engraver 
equipped him for the production of works that 
have never been surpassed. Among these atten- 
tion may be called to the following: — 

The plates in Britton's Cathedral Antiqtdties and 
in Westall's Illustrations of the Book of Common 
Prayer, published by Tresham and Ottley. 



JOHN SCOTT 157 

"The Cottagers," after one of a series of paintings 
by Thomas Gainsborough. Scott's signal success 
as an engraver of landscape, as well as of animal 
subjects, is proved by the fact that the proprietors 
of the publication in which the plate appeared were 
compelled by the demand to republish separately 
the part containing it. 

" The Benevolent Cottager," from a picture in the 
collection of Lord de Tabley ; and " Daughter of 
Lord Charles Bentinck," from a miniature by Alfred 
Edward Chalon, representing the child seated with 
a doll in one hand, the other resting on a Scotch 
terrier. Scott engraved and published both these 
plates on his own account. 

His first great works were the plates from 
Sawrey Gilpin's " The Death of the Fo.x" (exhibited 
at the Royal Academy of 1793), and Philip Rein- 
agle's " The Fox Breaking Cover " (exhibited at 
the Royal Academy of 1805). Scott's large en- 
gravings from these pictures were not executed 
until 181 1, eighteen years after the former was 
painted. He had the plates in hand for six years. 
They display in marked degree his great abilities ; 
and on the day the engravings were published, 
28th May, 181 1, the Society of Arts presented 
John Scott with their large Gold Medal " for having 
completed two such works which do so much honour 
to his country and himself." 



158 ANIMAL PAINTERS 

None of Scott's plates are better known to sports- 
men of the present day than those exquisitely fine 
pieces which he contributed to Daniel's RhtuI 
Sports. These pictures include portraits of re- 
nowned fox-hounds, harriers, beagles, pointers, and 
greyhounds ; of a terrier worrying a fox, greyhounds 
coursing a hare, and other beautiful examples of 
engraving. In 1827 a copy of Rural Sports, con- 
taining numerous rare specimens of engraving, 
many from private plates by Scott, and bound by 
Thomas Gosden, the renowned London bookbinder, 
publisher, and sporting character, was sold to Mr. 
Tayleure, printseller, of Waterloo Place, for 90 gs. 

In the early numbers of The Sporting Magazine 
we find some fine specimens of Scott's work in 
plates from portraits of famous race-horses painted 
by George Stubbs, R.A. Among these may 
be noted those of Ambrosio, Marske the sire 
of Eclipse, Mambrino, Shark, Gimcrack, and 
Eclipse. In the same publication at later dates 
we find numerous plates from the works of our 
greatest animal painters; Henry Aiken, J. F. 
Herring, Abraham Cooper, R.A., and Ben Mar- 
shall. The last named was a close friend of Scott's, 
and by long practice the engraver so thoroughly 
caught the spirit of the artist that the engraved 
print was really a facsimile of the original painting. 
In the Sportsman's Repository, published in 1820 



JOHN SCOTT 159 

by Sherwood, Neely and Jones, is "a series of 
highly finished engravings by Scott, representing 
the horse and the dog in all their varieties," from 
the works of Benjamin Marshall : — The Wellesley 
Arabian, the property of the Hon. Henry Welles- 
ley ; the race-horse Eleanor, the property of Sir 
Charles Bunbury, Bart. ; the hunter Duncombe, 
the property of Mr. George Treacher ; Roan 
Billy, the property of a gentleman ; The 
Charger, the property of General Ward ; the 
coach-horse David, the property of Mr. Henry 
Villebois ; the cart-horse Dumbling, the property 
of Messrs. Horn and Davey. 

The Songs of the Chase, the first and second 
editions of which were published by Sherwood, 
Neely and Jones, London, in 181 1, owed not a 
litde of its attractiveness to the illustrations fur- 
nished by Scott. The frontispiece is appropriate : 
it is a portrait, by Benjamin Marshall, of Thomas 
Gosden, and the title-page bears an emblematical 
design suggestive of sports and games. Mr. 
Gosden carried on his business at 18, Bedford 
Street, Covent Garden. He was an enthusiastic 
sportsman, well known in the hunting field and 
also as a shot. He was the intimate friend of 
Benjamin Marshall, John Scott, and other leading 
men in the world of art. In a sense, Thomas 
Gosden was himself an artist. His style of 



l6o ANIMAI, PAINTERS 

binding was unique, and his best work was 
reserved for books on sport. The covers and 
edges of some such works are embossed in gold, 
with figures of birds and animals and incidents of 
the chase, designed by the most able artists of the 
day. A few of his bindings are real works of art, 
to which high value attaches. The preface, dated 
from Much Hadham, near Bishop Stortford, Herts, 
in 1811, is by Thomas Gosden, who bound many 
of the editions of this work, which is a collection 
of verses on field sports, and includes nearly one 
hundred songs on fox hunting, fifty on hare hunting, 
and nearly as many in praise of stag-hunting ; 
upwards of ninety on hunting generally, on racing 
twenty, on shooting twenty-four, and several on 
angling, hawking, archery, &c. 

A Hack, the property of Charles Bell, Esq., 
painted by Abraham Cooper, R.A., was engraved 
by Scott. 

The Social Day, by Peter Coxe, Esq., con- 
tains five designs : two by James Ward, R.A., 
Swans on the Thames and A Spaniel at a 
Tomb ; one by Abraham Cooper, R.A., A Child 
found in a Lane by a Traveller ; one by William 
Henry Pyne, A.R.A., A Barouche and Four, and 
one by George Garrard, A.R.A., A Park Scene, 
all of which were engraved by Scott. 

A copy of Waltoiis Angler, which Mr. Sotheby 




^=^^fe*iiv; 



S),^a//._yr/€^^. Q). 



'-cwe^ 



JOHN SCOTT l6l 

sold by auction, about the year 1825, to J. Dent, 
Esq., for 120 guineas, contained upwards of 800 
drawings, etchings, engravings, &c., many of which 
were by Scott. 

Another edition of Walton and Cotton's Compleat 
Angiei' (Samuel Bagsters, London, 1803, on the 
largest paper), is very copiously and beautifully 
illustrated, containing 254 plates and drawings. 
Several of the plates "proof" are by Scott. The 
binding, by Thomas Gosden, is probably the finest 
example of his art existing, and a MS. note by 
his hand on the fly leaf states that " the bands of 
the book are made out of the wood which belonged 
to Cotton's Fishing House." This book is now in 
the Elsenham Hall Library. 

Silver Buttons, published by J. H. Burn, London, 
1 82 1, display unique application of the art of the 
engraver. Thomas Gosden commissioned Abraham 
Cooper, R.A., to draw a series of fourteen designs 
illustrative of British field sports ; these were en- 
graved by Scott on a silver plate, from which the 
buttons were then cut. These Silver Buttons were 
sold for shooting coats, and there is in the Elsen- 
ham collection a case containing the set of fourteen. 

J. H. Burn published the designs on India paper 
with a quotation under each small plate from 
Bewick or Daniel. 

The Chase, by William Somerville, published by 

II VOL. II. 



1 62 ANIMAL PAINTERS 

William Tegg, London, contained nine engravings 
by Scott after paintings by J. N. Sartorius. 
Another edition of the same famous work, pub- 
lished by Sherwood, Neely and Jones, London, 
1817, with preface by Edward Topham, Esq., 
contained eight engravings by Scott, after paintings 
by J. N. Sartorius. 

Essay on Hunting, the third edition, published 
by Edward Jeffery and Son, London, 1820, has 
for frontispiece a beautiful design of dead game, 
fish, &c., drawn and engraved by Scott. 

Book-Plates : Scott designed and engraved 
two book-plates for his friend Thomas Gosden, 
one representing a stag's head, with various 
sporting trophies ; the other a rock with fish- 
gun, game-bag, fishing-rod, pannier, &c. 

Jupiter, a thoroughbred stallion in a field, 
challenging a mare in the next pasture, over a 
rustic fence. This picture was painted by Sawrey 
Gilpin, R.A., for Colonel Thornton ; it was en- 
graved in a masterly manner by Scott, and was 
published in 1820. He also engraved four other 
works for Colonel Thornton — "A White Terrier," 
"Harriers,'" "Spaniels," " Mopsy and Molly," and 
" A Pointer " in some sedges standing to a snipe ; 
the two former also by Gilpin, the latter two by 
Philip Reinagle. 

TJie Sport svian's Repository, by John Scott, pub- 



TOHN SCOTT 1 6 



O 



lished by Henry G. Bohn, London, in 1845, 
eighteen years after Scott's death, contains forty- 
two engraved plates representing the Horse and 
the Dog in all their varieties from paintings by 
different artists. 

After a long and painful illness John Scott died 
on December 24, 1827, in the fifty-third year of 
his age, leaving a widow, one son, and several 
daughters. His remains were deposited at Chelsea. 
James Barenger, the animal painter, and his fellow- 
townsman, Thomas Frazer Ranson, also an en- 
graver, were the only two mourners, except the 
members of his own family, who attended his 
funeral. An obituary notice in The Sporting 
Magazine of the following February alludes in 
feeling terms to the circumstances of his death ; 
the illness which terminated fatally was induced 
by intense application and study. As the letter 
from " Philanthropos," already quoted, shows us, 
disease found the unfortunate man unprepared in 
a pecuniary sense, and despite the aid of the 
charitable, and the pension accorded by the Artists' 
Benevolent Fund, it is to be feared that the closing 
years of his life were passed in penury. 



164 



JAMES SEYMOUR. 
(Born 1702. Died 1752.) 

TAMES SEYMOUR was born in London in the 
^ year 1702. His father was a London banker, 
himself an amateur artist and a man who took 
pleasure in the society of artists. Sir Peter Lely 
was an intimate friend of the elder Seymour, and 
several foreign painters then resident in England 
were among his acquaintance. James Seymour 
inherited his father's artistic tastes, and as no Eng- 
lish school of art existed at this period, his educa- 
tion in art was no more than the information he 
acquired in a desultory fashion from his father's 
artist friends. It is unlikely that he ever received 
any regular training in his youth ; painting was at 
first only his amusement ; his father when he died 
left him an ample fortune, which would have re- 
lieved him of any necessity to earn his own liveli- 
hood ; but James Seymour was fond of the turf, 
and having dissipated his patrimony over horse- 
racing, was obliged to make art his profession. 

By many of the patrons of art Seymour was con- 
sidered inferior to his contemporary, John Wootton. 



JAMES SEYMOUR 1 65 

In reoard to this it must be remembered that 
Wootton was an artist from the first, while Sey- 
mour only adopted the profession when necessity 
compelled him to find means of supporting him- 
self He accepted commissions to paint pictures 
only after his money was gone. One of his earliest 
commissions was given him by Mr. Charles Pel- 
ham, of Brocklesby Park, Lincolnshire, in 1724, 
when he was only twenty-two years of age. For 
this gentleman he executed a portrait of Old 
Partner, a race-horse, foaled in 1 7 1 8, which picture, 
one hundred and one years later, was etched by 
John Scott for the Sporting Magazine of 1825. 

Seymour had few rivals to contend with in 
painting portaits of race-horses at the commence- 
ment of his career. Thomas Spencer certainly was 
in the field, and John Wootton, being 17 years 
his senior, had in early life made the portraits of 
horses a speciality. When Seymour took up his 
residence at Newmarket as a professional painter 
of equine portraits he had the knowledge gained 
during his own brief and unfortunate turf career 
to supplement his natural ability. Whether he 
owed anything of his success to the readiness of 
his former racing friends to help one in adversity, 
or whether the superiority of his work to the 
accepted standards of merit alone brought him to 
the front, we need not enquire. It is certain that 



1 66 ANIMAL PAINTERS 

he had not long adopted art as his profession ere 
he was the recipient of commissions from some of 
the most prominent turfites of the day, among 
them the Dukes of Devonshire, Somerset and 
Kingston, and Sir WilHam JolHffe. 

The gentleman last named was Seymour's prin- 
cipal patron, and to his appreciation of the artist's 
work is due the existence of a representative col- 
lection of his paintings, consisting of fifteen pictures 
now in the possession of Lord Hylton, of Ammer- 
down, Bath. Sir William Jolliffe, Kt., was the 
eldest son of John Jolliffe, Alderman of the City 
of London in 1658, Member of Parliament for 
Heytesbury in 1661, and for Petersfield in 1734, 
and also a director of the Bank of England. Sir 
William was a prominent figure on the English 
turf of his time, and having also a taste for art, 
gave Seymour numerous commissions. He died 
unmarried, leaving his pictures to a nephew, John 
Jolliffe, from whom Lord Hylton is descended. 

Among the pictures by Seymour thus preserved 
are a few of great interest, not from an artistic 
point of view, for it cannot be said that Seymour's 
works have ever ranked highly in the esteem of 
critics, but as pictorial contributions to turf and 
social history. The quaint conventionality of the 
drawing cannot conceal the shape and character of 
the horses portrayed ; and the dress of hunting men, 



JAMES SEYMOUR 1 67 

jockeys, attendants, and others, is, of course, faith- 
fully reproduced. 

There are in this collection two portraits of the 
famous Flying Childers which were painted for 
Sir William Jolliffe, each measuring about 4 feet 
by 3 feet. One shows the horse on Newmarket 
Heath ridden by a groom in yellow coat with blue 
cuffs, and wearing blue stockings and a black cap ; 
many horses at exercise in the background. The 
second shows Flying Childers stripped and held 
by a boy ; near on a crop-eared white horse is a 
man holding a racing saddle across his mount's 
withers. Seymour painted in 1739 a third portrait 
of Flying Childers for his owner the Duke of 
Devonshire. This picture was subsequently en- 
graved by John Scott for the Sporting Magazine 
of 1813. 

Among other pictures in the Ammerdown col- 
lection we may note the portrait of the Bloody- 
shouldered Arabian ; a portrait of a Chestnut 
Barb Stallion, held by an attendant in a flowing 
pink robe and white turban, and a portrait of 
Sterlin, a plater. Two hunting pieces must also 
be mentioned ; one, over 5 feet in length, is a 
portrait of Sir William Jolliffe standing beside a 
favourite dun hunter, which is held by a groom ; 
to the rear a countryman holds the groom's horse, 
a chestnut, in the shade of some trees ; the back- 



1 68 ANIMAL PAINTERS 

ground is a wooded landscape with a church tower. 
The other hunting piece is over 4 feet in length ; 
it represents " Hounds in Full Cry," and contains 
portraits of Sir William Jolliffe on a grey hunter, 
and those of four other sportsmen. The whipper- 
in and the huntsman, who is blowing a curly horn, 
wear scarlet with blue collars and cuffs. Seymour's 
picture of Sir Robert Fagge, Bart, has social 
rather than sporting interest. Sir Robert was a 
well-known Newmarket character, renowned for 
his eccentricity and miserly spirit. He is repre- 
sented in shabby clothes, mounted on an old grey 
stallion with broken knees. The rider has dropped 
the reins on his horse's neck, and from a canvas 
bag in his right hand is offering a coin to a woman 
who stands on the horse's near side with a basket 
of cherries. Newmarket Heath, with many figures 
and horses, forms the distant background. 

"Race at Newmarket," 4th April, 1731 ; on 
canvas, 3 feet by 2 feet. A sweepstakes of 100 
guineas each for subscribers. It was won by the 
Duke of Bridgwater's bay horse. Hazard, the Duke 
of Ancaster's grey Crab being second ; each horse 
carrying 9 stone. In the background are several 
figures on horseback against the stand and the 
ditch. This picture of Seymour's is in the Elsenham 
collection. 

"The old Weighing-house at Newmarket," with 



L 



.Mkt 




JAMES SEYMOUR I 69 

crowds of spectators on horseback and in car- 
riages. This is a small work by Seymour in the 
same collection. 

He painted a picture of the famous Carriage 
Match, made by the Earls of March and 
Eglinton with Messrs. Theobald Taafe and 
Andrew Sproule for 1,000 guineas, which came 
off on Newmarket Heath on 29th August, 
1750. The articles provided that a carriage 
with four running wheels carrying one person 
in or upon it should be drawn by four horses 
a distance of nineteen miles in one hour. 
Lords March and Eglinton were to give two 
months' notice of the week in which the race 
was to be run, and had libi;rty to choose any one 
day in the week appointed. From the Sportsman s 
Magazine of 1825 we take an account of this 
curious race against time : 

The horses were all bred and trained for running ; the 
two leaders, including riders, saddles, and harness, carried 
about 8 stone each ; the carriage, with a boy on it, weighed 
about 24 stone. 

Tawney, the near leader, was rode by Mr. William Errat, 
who had the conducting the rate to go at ; the off leader, 
Roderick Random ; the near wheel-horse, Chance ; the off 
wheel-horse, Little Dan. 

They all had lobsters to preserve their shoulders ; the traces 
(by an ingenious contrivance) run into boxes with springs, 
when any of them hung back, to prevent the traces getting 
under their legs. A rope went from the further end of the 
carriage to the pole, and brought back under it, to keep the 



170 ANIMAL PAINTERS 

pole steady. By the side of each wheel there were tin cases 
with oil dropping on the axle-tree to prevent its firing. The 
boy placed on it is only to fulfil the articles. It started about 
seven in the morning, near the six-mile house, and run 
between the Warren and rubbing houses, came through the 
ditch called the Running Gap, then turned to the right, and 
run three times round a corded piece of ground of four miles, 
and then back to the place it started from. 

The match was performed before a great number of spec- 
tators, without any person attempting to ride with it, except 
Mr. George Tuting, and Lord March's groom, who waited 
on them to assist in case of accident. 

The time, taken by Dr. Monsey, Mr. Deard, and Mr. 
Rowley, was 53 minutes 27 seconds, according to the three 
umpires' stop watches, which tallied to a second. 

James Seymour was commissioned by the Duke 
of Oueensberry to paint a picture representing this 
celebrated Carriage Match. The picture, which 
bears the names of the horses and riders, remained 
in the Queensberry collection till it was sold at 
Christies', July, 1897. 

An interesting advertisement in the Racing 
Calendar for 1788 on page 366 gives an account 
by the engraver of the picture : — 

" On or before the ist March will be published A Print (in 
colours, from nature), executed in Bartolozzi's style of 
engraving. Honoured with the patronage of His Royal 
Highness the Prince of Wales, Noblemen and Gentlemen, 
members of the Jockey Club, &c., /. Bodger (land surveyor, 
Stilton, Hunts, and at 53, High Holborn) presents his dutiful 
respects to the nobility and gentry, and acquaints them that, 
at the request of many of his friends, he promises to publish 
by subscription a Print, as a companion to that of Twenty-four 



JAMES SEYMOUR 171 

Courses, &c., on Newmarket Heath, representing His Grace 
the Duke of Queensberry's Carriage Match, with which will be 
given a particular account of the match, and the names of 
the horses and riders. 

" The circumstance of the horses running away with their 
riders and carriages will be expressed in the Print, in passing 
by the King's Gap, from which place a new and picturesque 
landscape of the Heath, Beacon Hills, Upper and Lower 
Hare Parks, Four-mile Stables, and Choke Jade will be given ; 
and a perspective view of horsemen and carriages coming over 
the B.C. Embellished with a section of the carriage ; and, by 
particular desire, a representation of two horses going to run 
a trial. Also a Morning scene and an Auction Sale of Horses 
at the Coffee-house Gates, Newmarket. 

" Conditions. 

" (i) The size of the Plate will be 27 inches by 18 inches. 

" (2) Price to subscribers for Prints of the horses, &c., in 
colours from Nature, one guinea ; in black, los. 6d. Sub- 
scribers to have the first impressions. 

[The print was also sold printed on silk, £1 5s.] 

" The size of the horses, riders, and carriages is taken from 
the original painting by Mr. Seymour, now in the possession 
of the Duke of Queensberry, to whom the Print, by His 
Grace's permission, will be dedicated. 

" An impression showing the present state of the Plate may 
be seen at Mr. Weatherby's, No. 7, Oxendon Street ; also, by 
Mr. Bray, at Messrs. Tattersall's, London ; at the Coffee- 
house, Newmarket ; Mr. Monk, Chester; Mr. Harrop, Man- 
chester ; Mr. S. Hodgson, Newmarket ; Mr. Tesseyman, 
York, and Mr. Smith, Oxford, of whom may be had prints, 
in colours, of twenty-four Courses, &c., and an emblem of 
a Sweepstakes coming in on Newmarket Heath, on which are 
given chronological memorandums of many extraordinary 
riding performances, as well as an Historical Account of the 
Races and the Devil's Ditch. 

'=^'- " Elegant Drawings of Estates, &c., on the usual terms." 



172 ANIMAL PAINTERS 

" Map of Newmarket Heath." James Seymour 
executed a picture which was engraved by John 
Bodger, and published in 1791, plate measuring 
27 inches by 19 inches. He gives a plan of all the 
different courses and exercising grounds on the 
Heath, with references of their respective lengths, 
and the situation of the starting and winning posts, 
and the stands. Upon the plate is printed his- 
torical accounts of the chief matches which have 
been run on the Heath ; and of the annual meetings 
and the Royal plates. Also on the bottom of the 
plate an oval medallion, 6 inches by 2^, giving a 
view of the finish of a race, with numerous horse- 
men, &c., &c. The print was pulled upon paper 
and upon silk, and sold at the same prices as the 
"Carriage Match." 

" View of the Noblemen's and Gentlemen's Trains 
of running Horses, with the Grooms and Horses in 
their full Liveries, taking their Exercise up the 
Warren Hill, East of the Town of Newmarket," is 
another picture of Seymour's, also engraved by 
John Bodger, and published in 1791, the plate 
27 inches by 19 inches. It is dedicated to the 
Prince of Wales, whose arms are on the plate with 
the letterpress. It was pulled upon paper and upon 
silk. The picture is full of character. From the 
heath there is a distant view of Newmarket, the 
country round, and in the extreme distance Ely 



JAMES SEYMOUR I 73 

Cathedral. In the foreground are royal visitors, 
noblemen, ladies, and owners, on horseback and 
in carriages. The most conspicuous equipage is a 
high four-wheel gig, drawn by six grey horses, 
the four first horses being driven from the box-seat, 
and the leaders ridden by a post-boy. In a carriage 
to the left is the Prince, talking to a gentleman on 
horse-back, and by his side the Princess, wearing a 
high hat, trimmed with the Prince's Feathers. The 
rest of the picture is taken up by horses and jockeys 
at exercise, which may be counted by hundreds. 

On the subjects of the three pictures last men- 
tioned it is important to note that James Seymour 
only painted between 1724 and 1751, having died 
in 1 752. In looking upon these three engravings, the 
"Carriage Match," the "Map of Newmarket," and 
the "View of Running Horses," it must be remem- 
bered they refer to a period some fifty years prior 
to the date when John Bodger published them. It 
seems to point to the fact that fashion changed then 
as now, and there must have been a demand for 
turf events of an earlier period. 

Many of the artist's pictures were engraved 
during his lifetime. "The Greyhound coursing a 
Hare " was engraved by Josephus Sympson, the 
plate being 12 inches deep by 17 inches wide. 
More of his pictures, however, found their way 
into the engraver's hands after his death. He 



174 ANIMAL PAINTERS 

painted on a small scale on canvas, parchment, 
or on stout paper, numerous portraits of race- 
horses, which, from the peculiar style followed, 
possess exceptional value as items of early turf 
history. Each portrait bore the name of the horse, 
his pedigree and performances, and particulars 
concerning the owner. EnCTravincfs from these 
were published by Thomas Butler, in his Por- 
traitures of Horses, which appeared in 1754, two 
years after Seymour's death. 

He painted a portrait of Sudbury, which was 
engraved, and published by T. Bradford, of 132, 
Fleet Street, size of plate, 17I by 14^ inches. The 
engraving bears the following inscription : — " Sud- 
bury was for the justness of his shape the most 
beautiful and without doubt the best Horse of his 
size at that time in the Kingdom." 

Another horse-portrait, that of Torrismond, bred 
by Mr. John Crofts, was also engraved, and 
was published by T. Bradford, size of plate, 18} 
by 14 inches. Neither of these works bears the 
name of the engraver. 

Seymour painted, among other hunting pieces, 
a set of four pictures entitled " Fox-hunting." 
These were engraved by J. Roberts, the plates 
measuring each \o\ inches deep by 14 inches wide. 
They are entitled respectively: (i) Going out in 
the Morning ; (2) Brushing into Cover ; (3) In 



JAMES SEYMOUR I 75 

full Chase, and (4) The Death of the Fox. The 
second of the series, " Brushing into Cover," re- 
produced from an old engraving, faces page 168. 

The original painting is in the possession of 
Herbert Penning, Esq., of Bedford. Mr. Penning 
has personal interest in this old picture, as it is 
stated that the huntsman on the grey is a portrait 
of his great grandfather, who was a clergyman. 
The whips carried by these old-time sportsmen 
will be noticed, resembling as they do short-stocked 
coach-whips. 

The original pen-and-ink sketch by the artist, 
which is reproduced overleaf, betrays knowledge 
of equine anatomy ; it also shows Seymour's gift 
of touching in horses and men with a few lines. 
From the memoranda it appears that this was the 
drawing from which a painting was to be made. 

A work entitled Race and Saddle Horses Past 
and Present, which was published by Thomas 
Hookham, London, in 1836, contains among its 
eighteen plates three from pictures by Seymour : 
one of Mr. Charles Pelham's Old Partner, with 
his jockey, at exercise ; a portrait of Sudbury, 
foaled 1734, also with his jockey at e.\ercise ; and 
"A Racehorse being Dressed." Mr. P. H. Taun- 
ton's Portraits of Celebrated Race-horses from 
1705 contains several reproductions from Sey- 
mour's works. Several of his cattle pieces and 



176 ANIMAL PAINTERS 

horse pictures were engraved by Thomas Burford 
and other engravers. "Wood-cock Shooting " and 
" Trailing for a Hare " were engraved as companion 
plates, 13! inches by g} inches, and published 
by Carington Bowie on ist May, 1786. 

Seymour was a man of independent spirit, as we 
gather from the story told of his intercourse with the 
Duke of Somerset, a man of overweening pride. 
The artist, while on a visit to the Duke in Sussex 
for the purpose of painting portraits of his stud, 
dined with his host, who drank to him as " Cousin 
Seymour." The artist, a gentleman by birth and 
education, ventured the remark that he believed 
himself to be distantly related to the ducal family, 
a suggestion which gave such deep offence that 
the Duke left the table, and directed his steward 
to pay and dismiss his " quondam cousin " then 
and there. Seymour took his departure forthwith, 
leaving the work he had been engaged to do 
unfinished. The Duke, finding it impossible to 
discover anyone capable ot completing the task, 
sent again for Seymour, who promptly returned the 
reply : " My lord, I will now prove that I am of 
your Grace's family, for I won't come." Anthony 
Pasquin (John Williams) gives a somewhat different 
account of the circumstances under which Seymour 
offended the Duke and refused his advances, but 
shows both peer and painter in the same light. 




SKETCH FOR HUNTING PICTURE. 

By J. SEYMOUR. 



WORKS OF JAMES SEYMOUR 1 77 

James Seymour died in 1752, in the fiftieth year 
of his age. 



WORKS OF JAMES SEYMOUR. 

PLATES IN THE SPORTING MAGAZINE (3 in number). 

CHAISE MATCH AT NEIVMARKET, Ang. 29th, 1750, 1801, vol. 18; engraved by 

Scott. 
FLYING CHILDERS, painted for the Duke of Devonshire, owner of the horse, in 1739. 

1813, vol. 43 ; engraved by Scott. 
OLD PARTNER, a race-horse, 1825, vol. 65 ; etched by Scott. 



12 VOL. II. 



178 



THOMAS SPENCER. 

(Born circa 1700. Died 1763.) 

T^HOMAS SPENCER, born about the year 
-'• 1700, must not be confounded with Gervaise 
or Jarvis Spencer who lived about the same time 
and became a successful portrait-painter. Thomas 
Spencer first made for himself a reputation as a 
painter of portraits, miniatures, and on enamel, 
which possessed a share of artistic merit. Later, 
finding perhaps that this branch of the profession 
was not lucrative, he devoted his attention to 
painting the likenesses of race-horses ; and as a 
horse painter he achieved considerable measure of 
success. 

Like his contemporary, James Seymour, he often 
embellished such pictures with the pedigree and 
performances of the horse and the name of the 
owner. Many of his paintings were engraved, and 
the plates reproduce the particulars given on the 
original. A set of thirty-three plates of famous 
racers, each plate surrounded by engraved text, 
executed by H. Roberts, was published by John 
Cheney, London, between the years 1 740 and 1 746. 



THOMAS SPENCER I 79 

Another set, with decorative borders, beautifully 
engraved by R. Houston, was published in 1755; 
and several similar works were published between 
1751 and 1755 by Thomas Butler "at his shop 
in Pall Mall, London." Among these, for example, 
was a portrait of the horse Sportley, owned by 
Lord Massereene. This plate, which was engraved 
by H. Roberts, depicts the horse with his jockey 
in the saddle ; below appears Lord Massereene's 
arms, the names of Sportley's sire and dam and a 
list of the important races the horse had won. 

The Earl of Rosebery possesses a fine example of 
Spencer's work in the portrait of Mr. Churchman's 
racing mare Bonatee, painted in 1730. The canvas, 
which measures 10 feet by 7 feet, shows a blue 
roan mare with brown muzzle, life size ; the owner 
stands at her head holding the bridle. The picture 
shows admirably the dress characteristic of the 
time. 

With the view, doubtless, of showing the horse 
in the most spirited attitude, Spencer painted the 
portraits of some of the great sires of the day 
in the company of a mare. Among such were the 
following, which were beautifully engraved in mezzo- 
tint by R. Houston : — 

Dormouse and Mare, one groom holding the 
stallion, another the mare. Dormouse was the 
property of Lord Clidworth. Published in 1755. 



l8o ANIMAL PAINTERS 

The Callen Arabian and Mare, with two 
grooms ; the horse was the property of Lord 
Callen, and stood at Rushton, near Kettering. 
Published in 1756. 

White Nose and Mare, with two grooms. 
White Nose was owned by the Earl of Portmore. 
Published in 1756. 

Babraham and Mare, with grooms ; at the 
Stud, Micklesham, Surrey. Published in 1756. 

Other horse portraits by Seymour, which R. 
Houston engraved in mezzotint, were those of 
the Earl of Portman's Crab held by his groom, 
published in 1755 by Thomas Spencer and Robert 
Clee in Panton Street near Leicester Fields ; and 
The Chestnut Arabian, owned by Mr. Charles 
Wilson, of Oran, Richmond, Yorkshire, published 
in 1756. 

All the foregoing six plates are very beautiful 
specimens of mezzotint engraving ; an ornamental 
border surrounds each portrait ; the owner's coat 
of arms appears above and a description of the 
animal is given below. 

Thomas Spencer died on 30th October, 1763. 



i8i 



THOMAS STOTHARD, R.A. 

(Born 1755. Died 1834.) 

T^HOMAS STOTHARD was born in London 
-*■ on 17th August, 1755. His father was a 
Yorkshireman by birth, and Mrs. Bray, in her 
Life oi the artist, tells us that he was a member 
of an old and g-ood family. It would appear, there- 
fore, that the branch to which the artist belonged 
had sustained reverses, for at the time of his birth 
his father kept the " Black Horse" in Long Acre. 

A somewhat delicate child, Thomas was sent, 
when five years old, to be brought up in the 
country by his father's relations ; and three years 
later was sent by them to a school at Stutton, near 
Tadcaster, his father's birthplace. Here the boy 
remained until he was thirteen years of age, when 
his father paid a visit to Yorkshire, and on his 
return south took his son with him. Stothard 
senior had evidently thriven in his business as an 
inn-keeper, for he was now able to send his boy 
to a boarding school at Ilford, in Essex. Thomas 
spent only a year at this establishment, however ; 
his father's death, in 1770, obliged his removal, 



I 82 ANIMAL PAINTERS 

and he went with his mother to Hve at Stepney 
Green. 

He had ere then displayed such marked fondness 
for drawing that his mother wisely determined to 
seek for him some calling in which his talent should 
be of service ; and accordingly he was apprenticed 
to a designer of patterns for the richly brocaded 
silks which were then worn by ladies. His master 
died before Stothard's indentures expired, and 
though he continued to work for the widow, it is 
evident that he had no faith in the pattern-design- 
ing industry as a means of livelihood. He worked 
hard at other branches of art, and having minutely 
studied Nature, his clever drawings of animals, birds 
and flowers, earned him the patronage of publishers 
for whom he executed vast numbers of illustrations 
for various books. His first illustrations of im- 
portance were those executed for the Town and 
Country Magazine, Bell's British Poets and the 
Novelists Mao^azine. Among; other famous men 
who noted his early talent was John Flaxman, the 
sculptor ; and their meeting laid the foundation of 
a close and lasting friendship which proved of ad- 
vantage to both. 

Stothard in the year 1778 became a student at 
the Royal Academy ; ceasing to live with his 
mother, he shared lodgings in the Strand with 
a friend, and contrived to live on the interest of 



THOMAS STOTHARD, R.A. 1 83 

a sum of ;^i,200 which his father had bequeathed 
to him. Always of active habit, physically no 
less than mentally, his love of Nature led him 
to seek the country every year as soon as the 
Academy closed ; his sketch-book and pencil were 
ever at hand, and whatever struck his alert fancy 
was inevitably committed to paper. To this habit 
of continually making sketches from nature, 
Stothard's pictures owe not a little of their rich 
variety of landscape and background. Mrs. Bray, 
referring to his habit of drawing any natural object 
with which he desired to make himself acquainted, 
says that if his children asked him a question 
relating to bird or animal, he took his pencil and 
sketched the creature concerning which information 
was sought by way of illustrating whatever verbal 
description he might give. His appreciation of 
the value of anatomical study is shown by his 
frequent practice of drawing even the skeleton 
of any animal he might have occasion to introduce 
into a picture. One such sketch, in the possession 
of his son Alfred, is described by Mrs. Bray ; it 
is the skeleton of an elephant drawn with pen 
and ink, and every bone is most carefully dis- 
tinguished. 

His sketches of animals are as remarkable for 
their grace of form and action as are his studies 
of the human figure. One of his animal pictures 



184 ANIMAL PAINTERS 

which serves to exhibit his masterly handling in 
drawing and grouping is that of Orpheus charming 
the beasts with his lyre. Another painting which 
is entitled to special notice is his " Canterbury Pil- 
grims ; " this picture was painted at the suggestion 
of Mr. Cromek, an engraver who lived near the 
artist in Newman Street. The Knight and his 
young Squire are prominent characters in this 
piece ; it is remarkable for the skill with which 
the artist has grouped the numerous figures, and 
varied the attitudes of the horses in a long pro- 
cession, an array whose very essence would seem 
to compel monotony of treatment. Stothard ex- 
celled as a painter of horses ; the following brief 
quotation from Mrs. Bray indicates the opinion 
the first horse-painter of that or any later day 
formed of his talent in this particular : 



While it was in progress, Stubbs, the animal-painter, 
called on Stothard, and requested to view his " Canterbury 
Pilgrims," saying he felt great curiosity to see a picture in 
which nearly twenty horses were introduced. On looking 
at it, Stubbs exclaimed, " Mr. Stothard, it has been said 
that I understand horses pretty well, but I am astonished 
at yours. You have well studied those creatures and trans- 
ferred them to canvas with a life and animation which, until 
this moment, I thought impossible. And you have also such 
a variety of them ; pray do tell me, where did you get your 
horses ? " " From everyday observation," replied Stothard ; 
and Stubbs departed, acknowledging that he could do nothing 
in comparison with such a work. 



THOMAS STOTHARD, R.A. 1 85 

George Stubbs was not addicted to flattery : 
was perhaps more remarkable for plain speaking 
than for courtly phrase ; but without the hall-mark 
of his approval we can see for ourselves, from 
the facsimile of the first sketch for the Canterbury 
Pilgrims, given in the above work, with what 
singular aptitude Stothard in a few pencil strokes 
caught the characteristic attitudes and movements 
of the horse. The sketch is the more remarkable, 
for in no case is an outline horse furnished with 
ears : an omission which, as every horseman knows, 
means the denial of a wealth of equine expression 
and character. This omission perhaps can be ex- 
plained. It was the common custom to crop the 
ears of horses in Stothard's time, and the artist 
depicted what he saw. This work, which is now 
in the National Gallery, was engraved by the 
brothers Schiavonetti and also by James Heath. 

Stothard's first Royal Academy picture ("A 
Holy Family ") was shown at the exhibition of 
1778, when the artist was in his 23rd year. He 
was elected an Associate in 1785, and Academician 
in 1 794, depositing as his diploma work a picture 
entitled " Charity." His connection with the 
Academy, however, was destined to become closer, 
for in 18 10 he was appointed Deputy Librarian, 
and two years later, Librarian. He exhibited 
largely ; between 1778 and 1834, he sent upwards 



1 86 ANIMAL PAINTERS 

of 92 works to the Royal Academy, and also con- 
tributed many paintings to other exhibitions and 
galleries. For goldsmiths, he designed subjects 
for engraving and embossment on gold and silver 
decorative pieces, race cups, trophies and bowls. 

His most noteworthy achievement in this depart- 
ment of art was his success in the competition for 
the Silver Shield presented to the Duke of Welling- 
ton by the Merchants and Bankers of London. 
The drawings he sent in for this were scarcely 
more remarkable for artistic merit than for the 
miraculous speed with which they were prepared : 
exactly three weeks was the time at his command, 
and in three weeks he studied the history of the 
Peninsular War, selected the incidents which com- 
mended themselves as most proper for representa- 
tion, and executed his designs ! Many of our best 
known pieces of sculpture (Chantrey's " Sleeping 
Children " occurs as a prominent example), eques- 
trian groups and others, were chiselled from designs 
by Stothard. He was a most industrious and 
prolific workman ; it is recorded that he made over 
five thousand designs for various objects ; of these 
more than 3,000 have been engraved for various 
publications. 

Of sporting matters Stothard had little know- 
edge, or none ; his interest in beast, bird, and. 
flower was that of the naturalist, or rather that of 



THOMAS STOTHARD, R.A. 1 87 

the lover of nature ; nevertheless, many of his 
works display rare power in delineating incidents 
nearly pertaining to sport. His greatest talent lay 
in the historical designs by which his most con- 
spicuous successes were won. Drawings of an 
historical character were among the first to occupy 
his brush when he was yet a lad, and we recognise 
his affection for this school of art in his maturer 
years. Many of the pictures exhibited by him at 
the Royal Academy were historical subjects ; his 
gift for handling such topics was undoubtedly far 
above that possessed by the majority of painters. 

Of his landscape paintings Mrs. Bray remarks 
"the backgrounds are generally distinguished by 
richness of colour and warm glowing sunsets : they 
display execution in pencilling, but are seldom 
highly finished. Indeed, very few of his pictures 
are so ; yet that he could finish highly and elabo- 
rately when leisure or inclination led him on to the 
task, witness his beautiful little picture of ' The 
Cock and the Fox,' from Chaucer." 

Among the more important books illustrated 
from designs by Stothard may be mentioned Boy- 
dell's Shakespeare, Bunyan's Pilgrims Progress and 
Rogers' Poems. His "Canterbury Pilgrims" and 
" The Wellington Shield," are works to which refer- 
ence has already been made ; and "The Ceremony 
of the Dunmow Flitch " must not be forgotten. 



I 88 ANIMAL PAINTERS 

We find Stothard's few purely sporting pictures 
reproduced in a book entitled Cynegetics, or 
Essays on Sp07-ting, to which is added The Chase, 
by Somerville, published in 1788 by John Stock- 
dale, London. This contains two spirited plates, 
(i) Tiger Hunting on Elephants, and (2) Hare 
Hunting : the Death. The latter represents four 
sportsmen on horseback and one on the ground 
holding up the dead hare, the hounds surrounding 
him. These two plates were engraved by James 
Heath. 

The first volume of the Sporting Magazine — that 
for October, 1792 — contains a frontispiece by Sto- 
thard ; this is a picture of His Majesty George 
HI. on horseback with huntsmen and hounds on 
their way out stag-hunting in Windsor Forest ; the 
plate was engraved by Thomas Cook. In many 
of the earlier issues we find exquisite plates engraved 
from Stothard's historical works ; the figures, 
whether human or animal, are always grandly con- 
ceived and boldly executed. 

Of Stothard's Royal Academy pictures which 
display his talent as a painter of animals we may 
note the following : — Keppel, Earl of Albemarle, 
at the Siege of Lisle, where his horse was shot 
under him {vide the Peerage of Great Britain^, 
shown at the exhibition of 1794. A Lion 
Hunt, exhibited in 1798. His Landscape with 



THOMAS STOTHARD, R.A. 1 89 

Cattle at a Ford, 1811 ; and "Tarn O'Shanter," 
shown at the exhibition of 18 16, and now in the 
South Kensington Museum. The picture of A 
Lion Hunt was among the large collection of oil 
paintings which remained in the artist's possession, 
and which were sold at Christie's in June, 1834, 
after his death. The sale occupied three days, 
but " from inexperience and other untoward cir- 
cumstances," says Mrs. Bray, " was not well 
managed by the family." The justice of the remark 
finds its proof in the prices realised, many of which 
were absurdly small. A Lion Hunt brought 
;C9 19s. 6d. only ; the whole sale appears to have 
been a glorious opportunity for bargain hunters. 

Volume 13 of the JVew Sporting Magazine (for 
July, 1837) contains a plate engraved by J. T. 
Wilmore from Stothard's picture of "The Cock and 
the Fox," to which reference has been made as 
proving the artist's ability to bestow a high degree 
of finish on his work when it was his pleasure to 
do so. 

Stothard's activity of mind and body continued 
unimpaired until he was advanced in life. In 1825, 
being then seventy years of age, he undertook the 
execution of many beautiful designs required to 
illustrate the works of his friend Rogers ; and also 
a large series of illustrations for an edition of 
Shakespeare which Mr. Tegg, a bookseller, was 



'90 ANIMAL PAINTERS 

bringing out. Of more interest to sportsmen, 
however, was another commission which the artist 
executed in the same year : this was a series of 
landscape drawings for a new edition of JValtons 
Angler, or, more accurately, of the joint work by 
"Good old Izaak" and his friend Charles Cotton, 
which originally appeared in 1676. In order to 
carry out his task, Stothard repaired to Dovedale, 
in Derbyshire, with a few friends ; and while he 
was busy with his pencil they employed themselves 
with their rods. His life-long habit of sketching 
everything that came under his eye appears to 
have asserted itself, for on one occasion when the 
anglers had made a good basket, Stothard makes 
the brief entry in his journal, " Drew the roach 
and graylings." The journal kept by the artist 
during his Derbyshire trip shows him hale and 
energetic, taking long walks daily in search of 
views to fill his sketch-book. 

His original works are well represented in 
the National Collections. There are nine on the 
walls of the National Gallery, inclusive of the 
"Canterbury Pilgrims." Of these a mythological 
subject, entitled " A Battle," showing men and 
horses in fierce strife (on canvas, 23 inches by 26 
inches wide), calls for special mention as a picture 
of animals. In the South Kensington Museum 
are ten paintings in oil, six pictures and designs 




From an Original Draxvinghy J. Jackson . \ftcr the Engraving by //. Meya 

THOMAS STOTHARD, R.A. 



THOMAS STOTHARD, R.A. I9I 

in water colour or sepia, five pencil drawings 
made for Tristram Shandy and The Sentimental 
Journey, and six sketches. Of these works only 
three fall within our purview, viz., " Tarn O'Shan- 
ter" at full gallop on his mare, i2\ inches by 
14^ inches, on canvas ; " John Gilpin " riding his 
involuntary race with four men spurring after 
him, on canvas; a companion picture to " Tam 
O'Shanter" ; and " Sir Roger de Coverley and the 
Gipsies." Sir Roger, leading his horse, is accosted 
by the Fortune teller : panel 6| inches by 8 inches, 
upright. These three works form items of the 
Sheepshanks Gift. A fine collection of engravings 
from his pictures, numbering nearly four thousand, 
may be seen in the Print Room at the British 
Museum. Numerous engravers of high standing 
are responsible for plates from Stothard's designs. 
Perhaps James Heath and Luke Clennell have 
done the best justice to his works. 

Stothard married in 1 784 Rebecca, the daughter 
of a Mr. Watkins, by whom he had several 
children : his second son, Charles, inherited a 
measure of his father's artistic talent and is known 
as author of The Monumental Effigies of Gj^eat 
Britain. A few years after his marriage Thomas 
Stothard took up his residence in Newman Street ; 
and there he died on the 27th of April, 1834, in 
the seventy-ninth year of his age. He was buried 
in Bunhill Fields. 



192 



GEORGE STUBBS, R.A. 
(Born 1724. Died 1806.) 

GEORGE STUBBS was born at Liverpool on 
August 24, 1724. His father, John Stubbs, 
was a currier, whose business of dressing leather 
in various colours perhaps afforded the future artist 
his first lesson in the manipulation of pigments. 
When scarcely eight years old the boy began 
the study of anatomy and made drawings from 
bones and other subjects lent him for the purpose ; 
and as he evinced no special liking for either the 
mechanical or clerical sides of his father's business, 
and was of somewhat delicate constitution, he was 
allowed to follow the natural bent of his tastes, 
which were entirely artistic. Before he reached 
the age of fifteen he had produced pictures which 
arrested the attention of competent judges, and 
roused his father to the desirability of giving him 
an education in art. John Stubbs died before he 
could take any steps in this direction, and the boy 
was left to find a master for himself Hamlet 
Winstanley, an artist of some standing, was at the 
time making copies of the pictures at Knowsley 



GEORGE STUBBS, R.A. 1 93 

Hall, and to Winstanley George Stubbs applied. 
A copy of one of the artist's own pictures furnished 
the necessary recommendation, and the young man 
was forthwith accepted in the double capacity of 
assistant and pupil. 

The engagement did not last long. Winstanley 
refused to let Stubbs copy certain Old Masters in 
the Knowsley collection, averring that he wished 
to make the replicas himself Whereupon Stubbs' 
independent and rather fiery temper was provoked, 
and he summarily ended the connection, declaring 
his intention to "look into Nature for himself and 
copy her only," a resolution to which he adhered. 
He appears to have practised modelling in these 
early days, for it is recorded that the members of 
the Liverpool Society for the Encouragement of 
Arts awarded him a gold medal and compli- 
mentary letter in acknowledgment of the model 
of a horse which he executed and presented to 
the Society. This model is the first evidence of 
George Stubbs' wonderful talent for realising the 
form of the horse. 

About 1744, when nearly twenty years of age, 
Stubbs left his mother with whom he had hitherto 
dwelt, and after a few months' stay at Wigan went 
to Leeds. Here he applied himself to portrait- 
painting for a time, and then, having received 
some commissions for pictures, betook himself to 

13 VOL. II. 



194 ANIMAL PAINTERS 

York, where he studied anatomy with success, 
practised fencing, and learned French while still 
working at his easel. At York he made his first 
serious essay as an engraver. Dr. John Burton 
asked him to furnish illustrations for An Essay 
towards a Complete Neiv System of Midivifety. 
The illustrations required special technical study, 
but Stubbs executed them so much to Dr. Burton's 
satisfaction that he was asked to engrave them. 
Engraving was an art to which he was an absolute 
stranger ; but among his Leeds acquaintance was 
a house-painter who practised engraving in a small 
way. From this instructor he soon acquired the 
little it was possible to learn, and eventually 
engraved the series of eighteen drawings on 
copper. 

In 1754 Stubbs left York, and, after paying his 
mother a visit, embarked for Italy. His object 
was mainly, according to his own account, to 
decide if Nature were superior to art, Greek or 
Roman, ancient or modern. He spent some little 
time in Rome, and having made up his mind on 
the point, lost no time in sailing for home. On 
his journey back he made the acquaintance of a 
fellow-traveller who invited him to visit Ceuta ; 
and while there he witnessed the attack of a lion 
on a horse, an incident which furnished him with 
subjects for three of his most striking pictures. 



GEORGE STUBBS, R.A. 1 95 

The first shows the horse with the Hon in the 
distance ; the second the horse's terror at the 
appearance of the beast from behind a rock ; and 
third, the Hon seizing his prey. Returning to 
England, Stubbs went to reside with his mother 
in Liverpool, to fulfil the commissions which now 
poured in upon him and to pursue his anatomical 
studies. A picture he painted about this time of 
a grey mare, his own property, attracted the notice 
of a London picture dealer named Parsons, who 
urged him to seek his fortune in the metropolis ; 
but Stubbs, when he left Liverpool, which he did 
in 1750 soon after his mother's death, went to 
Lincolnshire to paint a series of horse portraits 
for Lady Nelthorpe. 

In 1758 Stubbs took up his quarters at a farm- 
house near Horkstow, in Lincolnshire, to carry 
out the long and disagreeable series of dissections 
whose results are preserved to us in his famous 
Anatomy of the Hoj-se. His only companion was 
his orphan niece, Miss Mary Spencer, who from 
the first had taken keen interest in his work. 

It is strange to us now to read that when the 
Anatomy of the Horse, with its invaluable drawings 
was completed, the artist could not find in London 
an engraver willing to undertake the execution 
of the necessary plates therefrom. His failure to 
secure the services of a suitable man threw him 



196 ANIMAL PAINTERS 

upon his own resources, and he engraved the 
plates himself — -a task which occupied all his spare 
time for six or seven years. The book eventually 
was published by subscription in 1766. It may 
fairly be said that this remarkable piece of work 
opened a new era in horse painting. We might 
almost divide our British painters of horse pictures 
into two periods — those who lived before Stubbs, 
and those who followed him and profited by his 
monumental labours at the Horkstow farmhouse. 

Stubbs had been receiving as much as 100 
guineas for the likeness of a horse, while in a 
letter to him Sir Joshua Reynolds says : " My 
price for a head is 35 guineas ; as far as the knees 
70 guineas ; and for a whole length 1 50 guineas. 

In 1760 he went to Eaton Hall to paint 
several pictures for the then Lord Grosvenor — 
"The Grosvenor Hunt" being, perhaps, the most 
important work executed. In 1762 he went to 
Goodwood House to paint a number of pictures 
for the Duke of Richmond — among them a 
portrait of the Earl of Albemarle and " Race- 
horses Training," which included portraits of the 
Duke and Duchess of Richmond and Lady Louisa 
Lennox, all on horseback. He went next to 
Wentworth House, where, for the Marquis of 
Rockingham, he painted several pictures of horses, 
including one of the famous Whistlejacket. At 



GEORGE STUBBS, R.A. 1 97 

this time Stubbs had established his head-quarters 
in London, his address being 24, Somerset Street, 
Portman Square. He had evidently been resident 
in London for some time, as 1760 seems to have 
been about the date of his appointment to the 
Treasurership of the first (Incorporated) Society 
of Artists, which was founded in 1859. He became 
President of this Society the year before its 
collapse, an event which occurred in 1774, and 
which seems to have been due to the change in 
its methods which followed the granting of a 
Royal charter of incorporation. Stubbs sent fifty 
pictures altogether to the Society's annual exhibi- 
tions ; some of his finest lion and tiger pictures 
were first publicly shown in the Somerset Street 
Rooms, where the exhibitions were held in 1764 
and afterwards. 

In 1 77 1, Cosway, the miniature painter, urged 
Stubbs to make some experiments in enamel paint- 
ing. Great difficulties had to be surmounted. Two 
years were spent in chemical study and experiment 
before colours which would retain their brilliance 
throughout the process of firing were discovered, 
and when the secret of making the colours had 
been solved, three years more elapsed before suitable 
earthenware plates were produced. These plates 
were eventually made by the famous firm of 
Wedgewood in 1778; the business of preparing 



igS ANIMAL PAINTERS 

them seems to have laid the foundation of the 
artist's friendship with the Wedgewood family, of 
whom he painted one of his most successful portrait 
groups and other individu il portraits. 

In the year 1780 George Stubbs was elected an 
Associate of the Royal Academy, and in 1781 an 
Academician. The difficulty which arose between 
the artist and the Royal Academy has been 
examined at length in the Life of George 
Stubbs, R.A.* and the several accounts of the 
circumstances under which the artist's election 
remained unratified are therein detailed. It will 
suffice here to state that George Stubbs was 
invited to be of the Forty ; that the trouble arose 
over a regulation subsequently made concerning 
the presentation of a Diploma picture, and that 
the dispute reflected no discredit upon George 
Stubbs as a man or as an artist. For a few 
years he ceased to send pictures to the Academy 
exhibitions; but in that of 1786 he was repre- 
sented by two works, and thereafter continued to 
do so with regularity till 1791, when he again 
ceased to exhibit until 1799. 

In 1790 Stubbs undertook to paint for The Turf 
Review a series of portraits of horses which had 



='' Tlu Life of George Stubbs, R.A., by Sir Walter Gilbey, 
Bart. Published in 1S98 by Vinton & Co., Ltd. 



GEORGE STUBBS, R.A. 199 

been famous on the English turf from the time 
of the Godolphin Arabian. These pictures were 
to be exhibited first, then engraved, and finally 
published in numbers with descriptive letterpress. 
A sum of ^9,000 was offered for the undertaking, 
and Stubbs had made considerable progress when 
the outbreak of war with France alarmed the pro- 
jectors, and caused the somewhat abrupt abandon- 
ment of the scheme after sixteen pictures had 
been painted. These were portraits of (i) The 
Godolphin Arabian ; (2) Marske, the sire of 
Eclipse; (3) Eclipse; (4) Dungannon ; (5) Volun- 
teer ; (6) Gimcrack ; (7) Mambrino ; (8) Sweetbriar ; 
(9) Sweet William; (10) Protector; (11) Shark; 
(12) Baronet; (13) Pumpkin; (14) Bandy; (15) 
Gnawpost ; and (16) Anvil. The portrait of the 
Godolphin Arabian had been intended to form the 
frontispiece of the work. These sixteen pictures, 
in 1794, were exhibited at the Turf Gallery in 
Conduit Street ; they were afterwards engraved 
by George Townley Stubbs, the plates being of 
practically uniform size, viz., 20 inches by i sc- 
inches, and published in accord with the original 
design. 

Stubbs was a man of simple tastes and habits. 
He outgrew the delicacy of his early youth and 
developed into a man of sound constitution and of 
remarkable physical strength. He possessed extra- 



200 ANIMAL PAINTERS 

ordinary capacity for work and his energy was 
untiring. To the last he was an early riser, and of 
abstemious habit ; for the last forty years of his life 
he drank only water. When seventy-nine years 
of age he was so active that on two or three 
occasions in one month he walked from his house 
in Somerset Street to the Earl of Clarendon's place, 
The Grove, between Watford and Tring, a distance 
of sixteen miles, carrying a small portmanteau ; and 
this before ten o'clock in the morning. On July 
9th, 1806, he walked eight or nine miles, a feat 
that shows he retained his bodily vigour to the 
very last ; for in the morning of the following day 
he was found dead in his chair. The Sporting 
Magazine, in an appreciative obituary notice, states 
that Stubbs was " so fully persuaded of the possi- 
bility to prolong his own existence to the patriarchal 
age of one hundred and fifty, that he most cheer- 
fully began his Comparative Anatomy, after the 
plan of Professor Blumenbach, at the period of 
eighty, promising a complete classification of the 
Animal World as an additaynentjim to an under- 
taking so laborious — a work that would require at 
least thirty years of good health and perfect 
memory to accomplish." He was in his eighty- 
second year when he died on July loth, 1806, at 
his house in Somerset Street. He was buried 
at St. Marylebone. 




I 






I 

I 



GEORGE STUBBS, R.A. 20I 

That George Stubbs was superior to all the 
painters of animals, and more especially of the 
horse, who preceded him is a statement on which 
it is needless to insist ; and if he has been equalled 
since, he has never been excelled, by painters who 
have had the enormous advantage of his anatomical 
and artistic labours to aid their studies. John 
Landseer, the engraver, in his Carnivorous Quad- 
rupeds, gives Stubbs the place of honour in a com- 
parison of his work with the animal paintings of 
Rubens, Rembrandt, Reydinger, Spilsbury and 
Edwin Landseer. Mr. Joseph Mayer, F.S.A., 
sums up his merits so ably that we cannot do better 
than quote from his careful and discriminating 
pages :— 

He who knows what manner of beast was given EngHsh- 
men to admire before Stubbs' day best recognises what we 
owe him. His obstinacy in rejecting the models of other men 
saved him from falhng into the exaggerations of any school. 
. . . Stubbs was the first to paint animals as they are. 
No temptation led him to invent a muscle, nor did he put his 
creatures into an attitude. They are always as nature made, 
with their own shapes, gestures and expressions, often ugly, 
but always true. 

" Anthony Pasquin " who, in his Memoirs of the 
Royal Acadejiticians (London, 1796), disparaged 
when he could and praised only when he must, 
gave cordial approval to the work of Stubbs. 
" He has become," says this exacting critic, 
"by his genius and his researches the example 



202 ANIMAL PAINTERS 

of Europe in his particular department." And 
in making- this statement WilHams did not 
overstep the limits of truth. 

The reader is referi'ed to my recently published 
Life of George Shibbs for particulars of a large 
number of the artist's pictures. Therein also a list 
is given of his works in the following collections, 
viz. : — 

At Windsor Castle— H.M. the Queen. 

At Marlborough House — H.!\I. the Queen. 

At Cumberland Lodge, Windsor — H.M. the Queen. 

At the National Gallery, London. 

At the South Kensington Museum. 

At Eaton Hall — Duke of Westminster. 

At Heatherton Hall— Col. Adair. 

At Queen's House, Lyndhurst — Hon. G. Lascelles. 

At the Jockey Club, Newmarket. 

At the Durdans, Epsom — Earl of Rosebery. 

At Berkeley Square — Earl of Rosebery. 

At Brocklesby Park — Earl of Yarborough. 

At Wellbeck Abbey— Duke of Portland. 

At Althorp — Earl Spencer. 

At Elsenham Hall— Sir Walter Gilbey, Bart. 

At 143, Piccadilly — Baron F. De Rothschild. 

At Scorby Hall— R. N. Sutton-Nelthorpe, Esq. 

At Wentworth House— Earl Fitzwilliam. 

At Sherborn Castle — Earl of Macclesfield. 

At Goodwood House — Duke of Richmond. 

At Wynyard Park — Marquis of Londonderry. 

At Petworth Hall — Lord Leconsfield. 

At Schleissheim, Munich — King of Bavaria. 

At Osberton Hall— Right Hon. J. F. S. Foljambe. 

At Pessingworth — Louis Huth, Esq. 

At Belvoir Castle — Duke of Rutland. 

At Sunningdale, Ascot — Sir George Pigot, Bart. 



GEORGE STUBBS, R.A. 203 

Since that work left the publishers' hands particu- 
lars of the following additional pictures by George 
Stubbs have been kindly sent me, viz, : — 

In the possession of the Marquis of Tweedmouth. 

Portrait of Josiah Wedgwood, on a white horse, in a 
dress of the period, wearing a three-cornered hat, yellow 
frock-coat and top boots. 

In the possession of Earl Cowper, Panshanger, Hertford. 

A picture entitled " The Waldegrave Family," con- 
taining portraits of Lord and Lady Milbanke, Sir Ralph 
Milbanke and Mr. John Milbanke — a subject group with 
members of the family seated in a pony-carriage, others 
on horseback — size of the canvas 5 feet by 3 feet 6 inches. 

At Grimsthorpe, in Lincolnshire, the property of the Earl 
of Ancaster. 

(These pictures hang in the Lower East Gallery.) 

No. 141. Portrait of a dark bay horse near an arch, a 
groom in Turkish dress holding him by the bridle. 35I 
inches by 44 inches. 

No. 142. Portrait of a bay horse with white spots on 
its back, held with a bridle by a groom in a brown 
Turkish dress. 35 J inches by 44 inches. 

No. 143. Portrait of a chestnut horse, held by a man 
in red flowing robe, with white dog in the landscape. 
35t inches by 44 inches. 

No. 148. Portrait of the Duke of Ancaster's " Blank," 
a bay horse in a landscape, held by a man in a blue coat. 
40 inches by 50 inches. 

No. 150. Portrait of the Duke of Ancaster's Spec- 
tator, a bay mare, with groom in drab coat and vest and 
jockey cap. 40 inches by 50 inches. 

No. 159. Portrait of the Duke of Ancaster's Blank, 
a bay stallion, held back by a groom ; in distance two 
tigures with horse near a stable. 30 inches by 44 inches. 



204 ANIMAL PAINTERS 

In the possession of Lord Cobham, Hagley Hall, Stour- 
bridge. 

Portrait of bay race horse, Trentham, ridden by jockey 
in harlequin jacket and cap: signed and dated 1771. 

In the possession of F. G. Pawson, Esq., East House, 
Titchfield, Hants. 

"The Rest." Landscape with figures: 23 inches by 
25 inches. One sportsman in a drab coat sitting at the 
root of a tree ; beside him stands a companion in a red 
coat loading his gun ; near the latter sits a liver-and- 
white pointer and a lemon-and-white setter. This pic- 
ture, which bears neither date nor signature, was pur- 
chased in Yorkshire about 1848 by an artist named 
Chinn, who sold it to the uncle of the present owner. 

In the possession of H. Gooseman, Esq., Great Grimsby, 
Yorks. 

A Portrait of the Artist painted by himself. This 
interesting picture is painted on white enamelled porcelain 
and measures 30 inches by 24 inches ; the oval mount 
reducing it to 27 inches by 20 inches, and revealing the 
half-length figure. Stubbs has portrayed himself looking 
o\er his right shoulder and in the act of painting : his 
white hair curls at the ends, the crown of his head being 
bald ; he wears a loose coat, greyish-brown in colour, 
and a white neck-cloth. He holds his palette, on which 
his signature is boldly painted, " Geo : Stubbs, Pinxt : 
1781." This portrait, therefore, shows him at the age of 
57 years. Stubbs had made progress with an engraving 
of this picture on copper ; the plate measures 13J by 
10^ inches, and the oval portrait 12 inches by 9 inches ; 
it is, however, unfinished. 

In the possession of J. R. F. Burnett, Esq. 

A Portrait of Eclipse, oblong, 4 feet 2 inches by 3 feet 
4 inches. Eclipse, saddled and bridled, stands facing 
the right : a surcingle passes over the saddle. At the 
foot of an immense ancient oak, which throws a bough 



WORKS OF GEORGE STUBBS, R.A. 205 

across the picture, is seated Mr. Wildman, the owner of 
the famous horse : he wears a blue suit, tcnee breeches, 
white stockings, buckle shoes and three-cornered hat. 
Mr. Wildman's two sons stand at the horse's head, one 
of them holding the bridle. They are dressed like their 
father, in blue, with knee breeches, white stockings, 
buckle shoes, and three-cornered hats. This picture was 
formerly the property of Mr. Burnett's mother, who was 
a direct descendant of Mr. Wildman. Mrs. Burnett died 
about the year 1868, at the age of 80. 

The pastel portrait of George Stubbs, by Ozias 
Humphrey, R.A., is now in the permanent collec- 
tion of the Walker Art Gallery in Liverpool. It 
measures four feet by two feet, and Mr. Charles 
Dyall, the Curator, states that the painting appears 
to be almost as fresh as when first e.xecutecl over 
a century ago. 



WORKS OF GEORGE STUBBS, R.A. 

PICTURES EXHIBITED AT THE ROYAL ACADEMY 

(52 in number). 

V5AR 

'775— (4) PORTRAIT OF EUSTO.V, A HORSE, belonging to Mr. WiIdman-/'0/f - 
TRAIT OF A POMERANIAN DOG, belonging to Earl Spitncn—SPANISH 
DOG, belonging to Mr. Cosw.iy— PORTRAIT OF A MONKEY. 

1776— (4) TIGERS AT PLAY— MARES AND FOALS— PORTRAIT OF A DOG- 
PORTRAIT OF A DOG. 

1778— <6) PORTRAIT OF A HORSE— DOG— TWO DOGS— PORTRAIT OF A 
GENTLEMAN PREPARING TO SHOOT— PORTRAIT OF A BOY- 
PORTRAIT OF A BOY. 

'ng—ii,) PORTRAIT OF A MARE AND DOG— A DOG— GENTLEMAN ON 
H0RSEB.4CK— LABOURERS. 

1780— (6) PORTRAITS OF HORSES— PORTRAITS OF TPYO HEIFERS— POR- 
TRAITS OF HUNTERS— PORTRAIT OF A DOG— FIGURES AND 
ANIMALS— PORTRAIT OF A HORSE. 

ijSi—TIVO HORSES (in enamel). 



206 ANIMAL PAINTERS 

Tjii-ii) PORTRA/T OF A DOG—PORTRAIT OF A YOUNG LADY, in the 
character of Una, from Spenser's Faerie Queen — PORTRAIT OF A YOUNG 
GENTLEMAN SHOOTING (tn;aatXy~ FARMER'S WIFE AND RAVEN 
(Gay's ¥a.\>\t:s)— PORTRAIT OF AN ARTIST (n:ime\)— PORTRAITS OF A 
VERY OLD HORSE AND DOG— PORTRAIT PF A DOG (enamel). 

1786— (2) REAPERS— HAYMAKERS. 

'787— (3) BULLS FIGHTING— BULLS FIGHTING— PORTRAITOF A HUNTER. 

i-liq— CARTING OF CORN. 

iTjo—PORTRAIT OF THE LINCOLNSHIRE OX, now at the Lyceum, Strand. 

1791 -(4) A POMERANIAN DOG-PORTRAIT OF HIS ROYAL HIGHNESS 
THE PRINCE OF WALES— SHEPHERD'S DOG, FROM THE SOUTH 
OF FRANCE— A BUFFALO. 

1799— (2) A TROTTING HORSE— A MONKEY. 

i8co— (2) HAMBLETONIAN BEATING DIAMOND AT NEWMARKET— HAM. 
BLETONIAN, rubbing down. 

1801— (2) PORTRAIT OF A M.4RE, the property of the Earl of Clarendon— /"/} A' A" 
SCENE A T THE GROVE, near Watford, Herts, the seat of the Earl of Clarendon. 

iio2—(i) PORTRAITS OF TWO HORSES, AND DOGS, in the possession of G. 
Towney SluhU—POR TRAIT OF AN INDIAN BULL, in the possession of the 
Earl of Clarendon. 

iio2— PORTRAIT OF A NEWFOUNDLAND DOG, the property of His R.H. the 
Duke of York. 

PLATES IN THE SPORTING MAGAZINE (13 in number). 

1796 — OTHO, a famous horse, the property of the Earl of Upper Ossorj"; by Moses out of 

a clam by Old Cade, foaled in 1760 ; vol. 9. 
iZo^— COLT BRED BY LORD BOLINGBROKE\ the horse was painted by Stubbs, 

the landscape by Vernet ; and the two figures, the dog and the sheep, by Boucher ; 

vol. 21 ; engraved by J. Scott. 
1B08—AMBROSIO, a stallion in the stud of Thomas Haworth, Esq., at Barham Lodge, 

near Edgware, Middlesex, was got by Sir Peter Teazle, his dam Tulip by Damper, 

vol. 31 ; engraved by Scott. 
i%oZ— HORSE AND LION, vol. 32 ; engraved by Mr. William Nicholls. 
xZoZ—THE LION AND HORSE, vol. 32; engraved by Mr. William Nicholls. 
iZoZ— THE GODOLPHIN ARABIAN, vol. 33 ; engraved by Mr. Nicholls. 
1808 — DUNGANNON, the sire of many famous horses, got by Eclipse, foaled in 1780, and 

bred by Colonel O'Kelly, vol. 33 ; engraved by W. Nicholls. 
t8ii — BARONET, a bay horse, foaled 1715* property of H.R.H. the Prince of Wales ; 

Baronet was a trial horse at Newmarket and afterwards sold into America, vol. 37 ; 

engraved by William Nicholls. 
\%iQ—MARSKE, was a son of Squirt by Eartlet's Childers, full brother to Flying Childers, 

vol. 56 ; engraved by Scott. 
1 821 — MAMBRINOy a grey horse, got by Engineer son of Sampson by Blaze, property of 

Earl GrLSvenor, vol. 57 ; engraved by Scott. 
1^12— SHARK, got by Marsk, his dam by Old Snap, both sire and dam great grandsons of 

the D^rby Arabian, property of Robert Pigott, Esq., vol. 60; engraved by Scott. 
1S22— ECLIPSE, foaled 1764, bred by the Duke of Cumberland, vol. 61; engraved by 

Scott. 
J823 — GIMCR AC K, folded 1760, was got by Cripple son of the Godolpbin Arabian out of 

Blossom, a grey maie by Old Crab, vol. 62 ; engraved by Scott. 



207 



PETER TILLEMAN. 
(Born 1684. Died 1734). 

pETER TILLEMAN was born at Antwerp in 
■'■ 1684, and came over to England with Peter or 
Pieter Casteels in the year 1704. It would appear 
that at first he failed to obtain recognition, for he 
was employed by a picture dealer, named Turner, 
to make copies of the works of Borgognone and 
other great masters ; in this he achieved remarkable 
success, more particularly in imitating the style and 
execution of Teniers. At a later date he turned his 
attention to landscape, painting scenes with small 
figures, sea-ports, and other views. In course 
of time his pictures began to attract notice ; and 
in 1719 he was commissioned to illustrate Bridge's 
History of Noi'thainptonshire, for which he executed 
nearly 500 drawings. It was no doubt this work 
which served to bring his talents for depicting 
country scenes under the notice of the landed 
gentry ; but whether he owed it to the publication 
of this book or not, he now found patrons among 
the nobility, who commissioned him to execute views 
of their country seats, hunting and racing scenes, 
and portraits of their horses and dogs. 



208 ANIMAL PAINTERS 

His picture of Chatsworth, painted for the Duke 
of Devonshire, is considered one of his happiest 
efforts ; another successful work was a general view 
of Richmond from Twickenham Park, painted for 
the Earl of Radnor. This picture was afterwards 
engraved by P. Benazech, the plate measuring 19 
inches by 13 inches. Among the works of sport- 
ing interest may be mentioned The Warren Hill at 
New Market which was engraved by J. Sympson, 
size of plate 42^ by 17 inches. The View of a 
Horse Match over the Long Course at New Market, 
engraved by Claude de Bose, size of plate 44 by 
i6f inches. The inscription tells us that this picture 
was "painted for John Bowles at No. 13 in Corn- 
hill and Carrington Bowles, No. 69 in St. Paul's 
Churchyard." The Round Course or Plate Course 
New Market was engraved by J. Sympson, size 
of plate 43j by 16J inches. None of the copies of 
the plates examined bears a date ; their similarity in 
point of size and shape seems to indicate that the 
three pictures were executed to form a set. 

Tilleman was employed for a time by the fourth 
Lord Byron, both to give him instruction in drawing 
and to paint pictures. 

A private collection in Essex includes a good 
example of Tilleman's work as a landscapist and 
animal painter, in fairly good preservation. This 
is a large picture of the Duke of Kingston on 



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PETER TILLEMAN 209 

horseback, with keepers, and eleven young pointers 
all standing to game ; a view of Thoresby Hall, 
Lincolnshire, forming the remote background. The 
work bears date 1725. In the Elsenham collection 
there is an engraving by Pritchard from this 
picture ; the plate measures 1 7 inches by 1 1 inches, 
and it bears the quaint inscription, "His Grace, and 
attendants going a-setting." 

The excellent plates engraved by Js. Sympson 
and Jn. Lloyds, from a set of three pictures descrip- 
tive of " Newmarket Horse Races," enable us to 
measure Tilleman's talent as a horse painter. 
Equine anatomy had not yet been mastered — had 
been hardly approached seriously — by artists when 
these pictures were painted, but the "different 
actions and postures," to quote from the inscription 
on the first of the series, are rendered with a skill 
that shows no inconsiderable advance in the art of 
horse portraiture. The pictures are: (i) A View 
of the Round Course with divers Jockeys and 
Horses in Different Actions and Postures, going to 
the Start for the King's Plate at Newmarket ; (2) 
A View of a Horse Match over the Long Course 
from the Starting Post to the Stand at Newmarket. 
Each of these plates measures i6 inches by 11 
inches ; (3) A View of Noblemen's and Gentle- 
men's Several Strings or Trains of Running Horses 
taking their Exercise up the Watering Course on 
14 VOL. n. 



2[0 ANIMAL PAINTERS 

Warring Hill at Newmarket. This plate measures 
17 inches by 12 inches. A fourth falate, "The 
Fox Cha.se," is of the same dimensions as the last 
of the Newmarket set. The four were " printed for 
and sold by Elizabeth Foster at the White Horse 
on Ludgate Hill, and published in 1752." The 
engraving, by Mr. F. Babbage, here given is from 
the " Horse Match over the Long Course." 

A trade catalogue issued in 1 768 by Robert 
Wilkinson, successor to John Bowles, 58, Cornhill, 
London, advertises four large prints from the same 
paintings. Each plate is described as being i foot 
7 inches deep, and 3 feet 6 inches wide, " curiously 
engraved by Tilleman, Dubose and Sympson." 
The same catalogue contains an advertisement of 
ten prints, each 17 inches deep and 19 inches wide, 
curiously engraved by Pardieu, Baron, and others, 
from the original paintings of Tilleman, Parocell, 
and others, illustrative of prominent events in the 
history of King Charles the First. The names 
of the artists are not declared in connection with the 
several pictures ; but in view of the acquaintance 
with Northamptonshire possessed by Tilleman, it is 
permissible to suppose that he was responsible for 
No. 5, depicting the battle of Naseby. The ten 
prints, representative of "The History of King- 
Charles the First," are : (i) The King's Marriage ; 
(2) King Charles before Hull ; (3) The Revolt of 



PETKR TILLEMAN 211 

the Fleet ; (4) The King Setting up his Standard ; 
(5) The King Seized by Cornet Joyce at Holmby 
House ; (7) The King's Escape from Hampton 
Court ; (cS) The Trial of the King ; (9) The King 
taking leave of his Children ; and (10) The 
Apotheosis or Death of the King. 

Tilleman painted numerous portraits of race- 
horses for his patrons, among whom were the 
Dukes of Somerset, Rutland, and Bolton, and the 
Earl of Portmore. A set of twenty-five copper 
plates, 7 J- inches deep and 8|- inches wide, were 
engraved by R. Parr from portraits of race-horses 
by Tilleman and his contemporary, John Wootton. 

He suffered much from asthma, and for this 
reason selected Richmond as his place of resi- 
dence. The malady, however, was never shaken 
off and he died at Norton, in Suffolk, on 5th 
December, 1734, in the fiftieth year of his age. 

A portrait of the artist, engraved by T. Cham- 
bers, from a painting by Hissings, is given (opp. 
page 92) in Pilkington's Dictionary of Painters, 
published 1805. 



212 



F. C. TURNER. 

(Born circa 1795.) 

"C" C. TURNER was born about the year 1795. 
-•- • Where he first saw the light, who his parents 
were or what their worldly condition, we are unable 
to discover. It is certain that his artistic talents 
developed early in life, for his name occurs as an 
exhibitor in a London gallery in the year 18 10, 
when he could not have been more than fifteen, 
or at most sixteen years of age ; and he has left 
abundant evidence to prove how those talents 
matured. 

That he was a native either of the South or 
East of England seems probable from the scenes 
whence he obtained material for the hunting pic- 
tures which formed so large a proportion of his 
works. We find him portraying incidents which 
occurred in the field with the Royal Staghounds, 
The Berkeley, Old Berkeley, East Kent and East 
Essex ; while he has left nothinq: to indicate that 
he was familiar with the packs of the Shires and 
the North country. Mention of the last-named 
pack suggests reference to his portrait of Mr. 



F. C. TURNER 213 

Charles Newman, painted for presentation to that 
gentleman when he resigned the mastership in 
1842. The picture included portraits of several 
East Essex sportsmen, Messrs. Caswell Newman 
and Thomas White, " Parson Cox," and Meshech 
Cornell, whipper-in. Mr. Charles Newman is 
riding a white horse, and the hounds are repre- 
sented breaking covert. This work was engraved 
by Barraud. 

F. C. Turner's first picture in the Royal Academy 
— "The Portrait of a Lady" — exhibited in 1817, 
was painted in London, the artist's address being 
given as 17, Park Street, Upper Baker Street; 
and nearly twenty years later he sent a picture to 
the Royal Academy from 66, Great Queen Street, 
Lincoln's Inn Fields. He could not have passed 
any considerable portion of his time in the metro- 
polis, during the hunting season at all events, for 
it is said of him — and the bare statement is the 
only scrap of biographical detail to be found — that 
he rode more often to hounds and had been in at 
the death of more foxes than any artist in exist- 
ence. A note in the Sporting Magazine, descrip- 
tive of one of his hunting scenes, remarks, " We 
know he can both wield and follovo ' the brush ' 
with equal credit." The minute accuracy of tech- 
nical detail which distinguishes his work sufficiently 
proves the intimacy of his acquaintance with all 



214 ANIMAL PAINTERS 

matters pertaining to the hunting field ; and his 
pictures lose nothing of their interest to sportsmen 
from the fact that the artist was a straisfht man 
to hounds. The Old Berkeley was the pack with 
which he most frequently hunted, and F. C. Turner 
on a celebrated horse named Tommy was a figure 
well known to the members of that hunt. As 
will be seen from the titles of the pictures given 
hereafter, his sporting interests were by no means 
restricted to horse and hound ; on the contrary, 
he was an all-round sportsman, equally fond of 
racing, shooting, and coursing, and equally conver- 
sant with each. 

" Throwing the Lasso " was painted to comme- 
morate the take of a deer which had soiled in a 
pond in Durham Marshes after giving the Royal 
Buckhounds a run of 35 minutes. " Our artist," 
says the Sporting Magazine, in a note descriptive 
of an engraving which T. H. Engleheart made 
from the picture, "having been mounted by a 
friend was present at the capture ; and Lord 
Frederick Fitzclarence and the select few up having 
expressed a desire to see a sketch, it was accord- 
ingly made on the spot." It represents the hunts- 
man on the bank throwing a noose neatly over the 
head of the quarry as it plunges in the water. 

The possessor of sporting tastes which claimed 
gratification in winter and summer alike, it is 



F. C. TURNER 215 

extraordinary what a quantity of work he sent out 
from his easel. His brush must have been as sure 
and rapid as it was industrious, for he was a pro- 
lific contributor to sporting publications, and also 
exhibited largely during the thirty-five years over 
which his artistic career extended. 

His Royal Academy pictures were few, num- 
bering only eleven, inclusive of the portrait of 
which mention has been made as his first exhibit. 
His second Academy picture was indicative of his 
sporting tastes ; this contained portraits of Mr. W. 
F. Stephenson's " Favourite Horses Going to 
Covert." With the exception of the first, his 
Royal Academy pictures exhibited between 1817 
and 1844 were equine portraits and sporting 
subjects. In 1836 he exhibited a portrait of 
Master Becher on Ladybird, which was afterwards 
engraved and reproduced in the Sporting Magazine. 

From the descriptive note accompanying the 
plate we gather that Ladybird was a very remark- 
able pony ; her height is not mentioned, but it is 
stated that she was one of the fastest ponies in all 
her paces in England. She trotted one match, for 
;^50, fourteen miles within the hour, carrying four- 
teen stone ; and Captain Becher, her owner, states 
that he often drove the pony fifty, sixty, seventy, 
and even eighty miles a day, and never got to the 
bottom of her. 



2l6 ANIMAL PAINTERS 

Other exhibitions received more of F. C. Turner's 
attention than did the Royal Academy ; to the 
British Institution, the Suffolk Street Galleries 
and other galleries, he contributed no fewer than 
sixty-five works. 

Like other animal painters of his day, F. C. 
Turner was in course of time secured as a con- 
tributor to the Sporting Magazine, though he was 
an exhibitor at the various public London galleries 
for two-and-twenty years before that journal was 
adorned by a reproduction of any work from his 
easel. We find him first represented in the 
numbers for 1832, and the two years following by 
plates from hunting pictures. These are : — 

In February, 1832 (No. i) — 

" Who-whoop ! who-whoop ! tear him, he's fairly run down." 

An engraving by John Romney from a work illus- 
trative of the finish of a brilliant run with the 
Old Berkeley, at which, no doubt, the artist was 
present. 

In December, 1832 (No. 2) — 

" Tally-ho ! Tally-ho, there ! across the green plain." 

Engraved by John Romney from another picture 
of the Old Berkeley, portraying the fox stealing 
away, hounds in full cry on his line and the hunts- 
man landing over a stiff fence out of the coppice 
from which hounds have just broken. 



F. C. TURNER 217 

In May, 1833 (No. 3) — 

" ' Drag on him ! ah, wind him, my steady, good hounds.' 
' Drag on him ! ah, wind him,' the covert resounds." 

This plate was engraved by H. R. Cook. The 

scene is laid at Thornley Park, near Canterbury 

(no doubt an incident with the East Kent Hounds) ; 

the huntsman, on a grey, is capping his hounds 

on to the line as they stream out of covert. 

In January, 1834 (No. 4) — 

" Cast round the sheep stain ; cast round, cast round ! 
Try back the deep lane ; try baclv, try back ! " 

This plate is also the work of H. R. Cook. The 
picture represents the huntsman on a celebrated 
old crop-eared mare which was ridden for many 
years by Tom Arnold, huntsman of the East Kent. 

These four plates from F. C. Turner's paintings 
complete the series illustrating the old song — " A 
southerly wind and a cloudy sky " — 

" Hark ! I heard some hound challenge in yonder spring 

sedge. 
Comfort bitch hits it — there, in that old thick hedge. 
Hark forward ! hark forward ! have at him, my boys. 
Hark forward ! hark forward ! 'Zounds, don't make a 

noise ! " 

In February, 1835, R. Ackermann & Co. pub- 
lished plates engraved by C. Heath from these 
pictures; each plate measuring 19 in. by 14^ in., 
and printed in colours. The series was entitled 
" The Fox Chase." 



2l8 ANIMAL PAINTERS 

F. C. Turner, once secured for the Sporting 
Magazine, continued to be a regular contributor. 
Between tlie years 1832 to 1845 seventy-eight 
pictures from his brush were reproduced ; the plates 
of these were engraved by John Romney, H. R. 
Cook, J. Engleheart, T. S. Engleheart, J. H. 
Engleheart, John Roff, R. Parr, John Scott, G. 
Patterson, H. Beckwith, W. R. Smith, T. Good- 
man, G. A. Perrian, S. Allen, H. Lemon and 
H. Hacker. 

Nor did this industrious painter confine himself 
to the magazine mentioned ; we find him repre- 
sented in the Neiv Sporting Magazine for 1837 by 
a picture engraved by T. E. Nicholson. The 
Sporting Review for 1840 contains an engraving 
by T. A. Prior, from one of Turner's pictures, 
which, by the way. appears again in the Sporting 
Review ior 1843, engraved by J. Wesley. He was, 
from an early date in his career, in much request 
as an illustrator by the publishers of books of 
sporting character. 

The Essay on Hunting (third edition), published 
by Edward Jeffrey & Son, London, 1820, con- 
tains three plates engraved from his pictures by 
Beckwith: — (i) Broke Cover; (2) Treeing a Cub; 
and (3) The Stable. 

Billesdon Coploiv, a poem on Fox-hunting, by 
the Rev. Robert Lowth, published by T. Griffiths, 




J 






'^ 



F. C. TURNER 219 

London, 1830, contains six plates engraved from 
works by F. C. Turner. These are hunting scenes 
and other designs. 

Bachelor's Hall, a series of six plates measuring 
18^ inches by 13^ inches, engraved by T. Fairland, 
and printed in colours, was published by R. Acker- 
mann ; as also was the series entitled Moving 
Accidents by Flood and Field, plates engraved by 
N. Fielding, measuring 14.^ inches by lOj- inches 
and printed in colours. 

A book entided Tumer's Illustrations to " Nim- 
rod" on the Condition of Hunters, published at the 
Court Gazette Office, 343, Strand, contains twelve 
engravings from works by this artist. These, as the 
name of the book denotes, illustrate a book written 
by Mr. Charles James Apperley, which was pub- 
lished originally in 1831, by M. A. Pittman, of 
London, under the title Remarks on the Condition 
of Hunters. The plates are : (i) Huntsman Rating 
Tail Hounds ; {2) The Meet ; (3) Breaking Covert ; 
(4) Nearly Done Up ; (5) The Standstill ; (6) 
Hounds in Full Cry ; (7) A Cold Bath ; (8) The 
Rider Spilled; (9) Clearing the Brook; (lo) The 
Death of the Hunter; (11) The Awkward Predica- 
ment; and (12) The Death of the Fox. 

A set of twelve foxhunting scenes by Turner was 
published by Knights, of Sweeting Alley, Cornhill, 
in 1835 ; the plates were engraved on zinc by Day 
& Haghe. 



2 20 ANIMAL PAINTERS 

The Dying Fox Hunter, engraved and printed 
in colours, was published in September, 1837. 

The Cracks of the Day, edited by "Wildrake" 
(George Tattersall), and published by Rudolph 
Ackerman, London, 1841, contains a plate engraved 
by T. E. Nicholson from Turner's portrait of " Miss 
Letty," winner of the Oaks of 1837. The later 
editions of this book were published under the tide 
of The Pictorial Gallery of English Racehorses. 

Shooting. This is a set of six engravings by 
C. Hunt from pictures by F. C. Turner, illustrative 
of the shooting months, August, September, 
October, November, December and January. 
These were published by J. W. Laird, in 1841. 

The Noble Tips. A set of four plates 24!- 
inches by 17 inches; published by J. W. Moore, 
in 1853, from pictures by F. C. Turner. 

Portraits of Celebrated Racehorses of the past 
and present centuries, by Thomas Henry Taunton, 
M.A., published in four volumes by Sampson Low 
& Co., 1887. Several of the plates in this well- 
known book are from F. C. Turner's pictures. 

These are but a few of the engravings of works 
from the artist's prolific brush. The number of 
pictures which appeared in the Sporting Magazine 
alone would prove his industry ; but when we 
remember that the appended list of these constituted 
only a portion of his output, we recognise how busy 
a life F. C. Turner led. 



WORKS OF F. C. TURNER 22 1 

The date and circumstances of his death are 
equally uncertain with those of his birth ; no record 
exists to show where and when he was born, and 
nothing has been published, so far as our researches 
have revealed, to tell where and when he died. 
The last trace of his work occurs in the shape of 
an engraving from one of his pictures which appears 
in the Sporting Magazine for 1846, and assuming 
that his life terminated with his labours, we must 
conclude that he died when in about the fifty-first 
year of his age. 



WORKS OF F. C, TURNER. 

PICTURES EXHIBITED IN THE ROYAL ACADEMY 
(i I in number.) 

YEAR 

x%i-j— PORTRAIT OF A LADY. 

■i%\<j— FAVOURITE HORSES GOING TO COVERT, the property of W. F. 

Stephenson, Esq. 
ii70— PORTRAIT OF A HORSE. 

1821— /I FA VOURITE MARE, the property of J. Russell, Esq. 
i823-(2) FA UN, the property of J. Archbutt, Esq.— C. COLMAN, ESQ., painted to 

embellish Part II. of the *' Percy Anecdotes." 
•i%T,6— .MASTER BECHER ON LADYBIRD. 
1840— .4 SUBJECT FROM jESOP'S F.4BLES. 
iiii~BI/OU AND BEA UTY, the property of Lord Tenterden. 
1844 —(2) FO.KHOUNDS GOING OUT—FO.XHOUNDS RETURNING. 

PLATES IN THE SPORTING MAGAZINE FROM PAINT- 
INGS BY F. C. TURNER (78 in number.) 

" WHO-WHOOP !" 1831, vol. 79 ; engraved by J. Romney. 

(s) " TALLY-HO ! "1832, vol. 81 ; engraved by J. Komnty— SHAVER, a celebrated 

deerhound, pinning a buck in Waldershare Park, Kent. 1832, vol. 81 ; engraved by 

H. R. Cook. 
(2) THE FIND, 1833, vol. 82, engraved by H. R. CooV— FLORA, a spaniel. 1833, vol. 

82; engraved by H. R. Cook. 



222 ANIMAL PAINTERS 

(2) "TKy BACK!" Tom Arnold, on a mare well known with the East Kent, 1S34, 

vol. 83; engraved by H. R. Cook.— THE EARTH STOPPER, Old Will 
Norris, of Pelham, earth-stopper of the East Kent foxhounds, 1834, vol. 83 ; 
engraved by H. R. Cook. 

FALCONER DISGORGING A HERON, 1834, vol. 84 ; engraved by H. R. Cook. 

(5) VIGNETTE, 1834, voL 85; engraved by J. T£.as\thtail-EXTRAORDINARY 
PRESERVATION OF FOXES, zZ^, vol. 85; engraved by H. R. Cook- 
THE EAST ESSEX FOXHOUNDS, 1834; vol.85; engraved by J. Engleheart 
— C. NEWMAN, ESQ., 1834, vol. 85; engraved by R. RoSe-HA IVKING 
PARTY. 1834, vol. 85 ; engraved by R. Parr. 

(3) UNCARTING THE ROYAL BUCK, 1835, vol. 86; engraved by Parr— 

HAWKING: THE FATAL STOOP, 1835, vol. 86; engraved \tyVm—THE 
RENDEZVOUS, 1835, vol. 86 ; engraved by R. Parr. 

MASTER BECHER ON LADYBIRD, 1836, vol. 87 ; engraved by J. Engleheart. 

(2) FAN, a celebrated bitch, 1836, vol. 88; engraved by John Scott— Z/.'IZ.-l/i'Z), a 

celebrated hackney purchased by the Marquis of Abercom for 330 guineas, 1836, 

vol. 88 ; engraved by Engleheart. 
VULCAN, BACHELOR AND BEVERLEY, three celebrated stallion greyhounds, 

r837, vol. 8g ; engraved by Engleheart. 
(2) THROWING THE LASSO, 1837, vol. 90; engraved by '&n%\Ai2:cl.— TANTALISA- 

TION, a white terrier bitch, 1837, vol. 90; engraved by Engleheart. 

(2) "OLD PLUCK," EARTH-STOPPER TO MAJOR-GENERAL WYNDHAM, 

OF SADILAND, SUSSE.X, 1S37, vol. 91 ; engraved by G. Paterson— ZOI'^Z. 
FOXHUNTERS, 1837, vol. 91 ; engraved by Engleheart. 

(3) VIGNETTE, 1838, vol. 92; engraved by Engleheart- TA^.S HIPPODROME, 1838, 

vol. 92 ; engraved by Engleheart — AMATO, a brown bay colt, bred by Sir Gilbert 
Heatbcote, 1838, vol. 92; engraved by John Scott— /A'Z»6'i'7Vf K, a brown filly, 
bred by the Earl of Chesterfield, 1838, vol. 92 ; engraved by Engleheart — 
THE CAPERCAILZIE, 1838, vol. 92; engraved by Engl<:hiait— PARTRIDGE 
SHOOTING, 1838, vol. 92 ; engraved by Engleheart— 7W£ GOODWOOD 
PLATE, 1838, vol. 92; engraved by Engleheart— //.>l/iA'.j;F/)K, a chestnut colt, 
bred by Mr. Ferguson, 1838, vol. 92 ; engraved by Engleheart. 

(5) DON JOHN, a bay colt, property of the Earl of Chesterfield, 1838, vol. 93 ; engraved by 

¥-.n'^^\^2.n— FORESTER, a bloodhound, 1838, vol. 93; engraved by Engleheart — 
WOODCOCK SHOOTING, 1838, vol. 93; engraved by G. Paterson— ;r/Z/) 
DUCK SHOOTING, 1839 ; vol. 93; engraved by G. Paterson— r/Z^ BADGER 
HUNT, 1839, vol. 93 ; engraved by H. Beckwitb. 

(2) VALIANT, property of Lord Adolphus Fitzclarence, 1839, vol. 94; engraved by 

%n^A\it3.n— PHEASANT SHOOTING, 1839, vol. 94 ; engraved by G. Paterson. 

(6) HUNTING : No. i, THE FIND, 1839, vol. 95 ; engraved by G. Paterson— No. 2, 

CHEERING IN COVER, 1S39, vol. 95 ; engraved by G. Paterson— No. 3, THE 
VIEW, 1840, vol. 95 ; engraved by G. Paterson— No. 4, THE DEATH, 1840, 
vol. 95; engraved by G. Paterson —7"i/£ SPICEY SCREW, 1840, vol. 95; 
engraved by Engleheart— //J/JV^r/iTG THE OSTRICH, 1840, vol. 93 ; engraved 
by G. Paterson. 

(3) POACHED EGGS, 1S40, vol. 96; engraved by Engleheart— /?£■/) DEER FIGHT- 

ING, 1840, vol. 96; engraved by W. R. Srmih— INSTINCTIVE PRESERVA- 
TION OF A FOX, 1840, vol. 96 ; engraved by H. Beckwith. 

(4) CALLACH, a celebrated Highland deerbound, 1840, vol. 97 ; engraved by G. Paterson 

— THE SNARE DISCOVERED, 1840, vol. 97; engraved by T. Goodman- 
SETTING THE SMEUSE, 1841, vol. 97; engraved by Kagiehti^Lxl— SNIPE 
SHOOTING IN JANUARY, 1841, vol. 97; engraved by John ScotL 



WORKS OF F. C. TURNER 223 

U) BLACK" A-VD RED GROUSE FIGHTING, 1841, vol. gS : eiigravea by H. Pecltwiih 
— B/JOU, a bitch, property of Lord Tenterden, 1841, vol. 98 ; engraved by H. Beck- 
with— THE STRICKEN MALLARD, 1841, vol. 98 ; engraved by H. Beckwith— 
A DAV WITH THE PHEASANTS, 1S41, vol. 98 ; engraved by T. Goodman. 

(i) HUNTING EXTRAORDINARY, 1841, vol. 99; engraved by Engleheart— T/^^ 
LOST SHOE, 1842, vol. 99 : engraved by E. A. Vtns.m— THE MILLER, a 
celebrated 4-year-old buck, 1842, vol. 99; engraved by Engleheart. 

MODISH, a favourite bitch in the Earl of Fitzhardmge's kennel, r84z, vol. 100; engraved 
by H. Beckwith. 

(3) GOING TO SCALE, 1843, vol. loi ; engraved by S. Allen— " iVO GO," 1843, vol, loi; 
engraved by Engleheart — RIDING TO COVERT, 1843, vol. loi ; engraved by 
Engleheart. 

"BY YOUR LEAVE, GENTLEMEN," 1843 ; vol. 102, engraved by Engleheart. 

(3) RUNNING REIN, bred by Charles Cobb, Esq., 1844, vol. 103 ; engraved by Engleheart 
—FIRST DAY OF THE SEASON, 1844, vol. 103; engraved by H. Lemon— 
CHANCELLOR RUNNING AMUCK, 1844, vol. 103 ; engraved by Hacker. 

(fi) /E3I HASTINGS, THE RUNNING TAILOR OF THE BERKELEY HUNT, 
1844, vol. 104; engraved by H. Beckwith — DESPERATE, a celebrated stallion 
hound in the kennel of the Earl of Fitzhardinge, 1844, vol. 104 ; engraved by 
Engleheart. 

(3) A TICKLISH SUBJECT, 1845, vol. 105; engraved by H. Beckwith- ir.-iff TAVC 
FOR THE DERBY, 1845, vol. 105 ; engraved by J. Engleheart — THE 
STEWARDS' STAND AFTER THE DERBY, 1845, vol. 105; engraved by 
Engleheart. 

(6) THE BELVIDERE ROUNDING THE FLAG BUOY, 1846, vol. 106; engraved 
by H. Beckwith— yl/^'yi'.ff I' MONARCH, a bright bay by Slane out of The Mar. 
giavine, 1846, vol. 106; engraved by Engleheart— r.ff'^ EMPEROR'S CUP, run 
for at Ascot, 1845 ; 1846, vol. 106; engraved by H. Lemon — THE TRIAL, young 
horses on the heath at Newmarket, 1846, vol. 106; engraved by Hacker — THE 
CANTER BEFORE THE RACE, 1846, vol. 106; engraved by Engleheart— 
CLIPPING, 1846, vol. 806 ; engraved by Engleheart. 

PLATE IN THE NEW SPORTING MAGAZINE. 

MISS LETTVy a bay mare, bred and owned by the Hon. Thomas OrJe Powlett, 1837 ; vol. 
13 ; engraved by T. E. Nicholson. 

PLATES IN THE SPORTING REVIEW (2 in number). 

MAJOR-GENERAL IVYNDHAMS FOXHOUNDS BREAKING COVER, 1840, 
vol. 3; engraved by T. A. Vnox— FAVOURITE HOUNDS IN THE CHEL- 
TENHAM PACK, 1843, vol. 10 ; engraved by J. Wesley. 



224 



G. A. TURNER. 



GA. TURNER was the son of F. C. Turner. 
• A brief note in the Sporting Magazine for 
March, 1838, in connection with a clever picture of 
a deerhound named BeHman, speaks of it as "the 
first appearance in our Magazine of a talented 
young artist, the son of F. C. Turner, who bids fair 
to turn out a genuine chip of the old block." G. A. 
Turner's works, so far as they can be traced, were 
very few ; he exhibited three pictures in the Royal 
Academy in the years 1836, 1838 and 1841 re- 
spectively ; and in the volumes of the Sportnig 
Magazine for 1837 and 1839 we find four plates, 
including that from the portrait of " Bellman," 
engraved from his paintings. 

No record can be found of the dates of his birth 
and death. 



WORKS OF G. A. TURNER. 

EXHIBITED IN THE ROYAL AC.\DEMY (3 in number). 

YEAR 

1836— Z .4 iV^C£ AND HIS DOG CRAB— TWO GENTLEMEN OF VERONA. 
rii%—BEVIS CONVEYS TOMKINS'S GLOVE TO WOODSTOCK, AND 

HOWLING, GAINS ADMITTANCE, vide Sir W. Scott's " Woodstock." 
^•,-i—THE CLIPPER. 

PLATES IN THE SPORTING MAGAZINE (4 in number). 

BELLMAN, a Highland deerhound, the property of the Duchess of Gordon, 1838, vol. 91 

engraved by Engleheart, 
2) THERON, Her Majesty's Charger, 1838, vol. 92; engraved by Engleheart— r/Zi' 

SPORTSMAN S PRESENT, 1S38, vol. 9s; engraved by J. H. Engleheart. 
RABBIT SHOOTING, 1S3S, vol. 93; engraved by T. S. Engleheart. 



JAMES WARD, R. A. 

(Born 1769. Died 1859.) 

JAMES WARD was born in Thames Street, 
London, on October 23, 1769. He owed his 
first introduction to the arts to the industry and ability 
of his elder brother William, who, at an early age, 
had been apprenticed to Raphael Smith, an engraver 
of some note. William, who afterwards became an 
Associate of the Royal Academy, stood so high 
in Smith's esteem that, when James reached his 
eleventh or twelfth year, the engraver offered to 
take him also as an apprentice. Smith's methods, 
however, did not commend themselves to the boy, 
whose taste for drawing was already developing. 
Instead of receiving instruction in the elements of 
the engraver's art, he was required to perform only 
such tasks as window-cleaning and running errands; 
his attempts at draughtsmanship were discouraged, 
and he was not even allowed the use of chalks and 
paper. Referring in after years to his apprentice- 
ship, he says that the only paper he could get was 
waste or unfinished proofs of engravings, and these 
latter were rendered so rotten by the process to 

15 VOL. II. 



226 ANIMAI, PAINTERS 

which they were subjected to print mezztintos that 
they would not take the chalk when he tried to 
draw on the backs. 

A chance sketch of an arm, inspired by the 
sight of a picture by Fuseli, which Smith and 
William Ward were engraving, one day revealed 
the budding gifts of James to his brother ; and 
William, having reason to be dissatisfied with their 
employer, kept the discovery to himself Soon 
after William quarrelled with Smith and left, taking 
James with him, and set up business on his own 
account. He achieved success as a mezzotint 
engraver, and trained his younger brother in the 
art ; but James, though he proved a most apt 
pupil, does not seem to have put his heart into the 
business. He continued to work at it, at the same 
time painting under the supervision of George 
Morland, and made such a name for himself that, 
in 1794, he was appointed mezzotint engraver and 
painter to the Prince of Wales. His progress with 
the brush must have been rapid after leaving 
Raphael Smith's employ ; for despite the delay his 
apprenticeship caused, he painted four pictures 
which were exhibited at the Royal Academy in 
1792, and continued to exhibit regularly from that 
time forward. 

His appointment as Engraver and Painter to the 
Prince of Wales, when only twenty-five years of 



JAMES WARD, R.A. 227 

age, must have confirmed the young man's know- 
ledge of his own abilities ; and thus he found open 
to him two paths in life, either of which gave 
promise of leading to eminence. He wavered long 
before he finally resolved to adopt the career of a 
painter, and not until 1797 did he practically 
abandon the art in which he had been trained. 
It was hardly wonderful that he should have 
remained in a state of indecision. While his own 
tastes and inclinations pointed directly to the easel, 
the first painters of the time, whose pictures he 
engraved, were unanimous in urging him to devote 
himself to engraving, and give up painting. Sir 
Joshua Reynolds, Hoppner and Northcote were 
among the artists from whose pictures he had made 
plates ; and the following frank letter written by 
Hoppner to Mrs. Ward shows that the artists were 
not wholly disinterested in their endeavours to 
dissuade the young man from indulging his aspira- 
tions : 

Taking it [painting] up at his time of life, he can never 
expect to overtake or even to make a stand with the painters. 
We shall therefore all oppose him in the one as we shall en- 
courage him in the other. I shall oppose him, for what shall 
I do ? I shall lose the first engraver I want and be encourag- 
ing a poor painter that we do not want. 

Ward's intimacy with George Morland no doubt 
did much to lead his thoughts away from engraving. 



228 ANIMAL PAINTERS 

William Ward had married a sister of Morland's ; 
and Morland had married a sister of the Wards. 
James was therefore brought much in contact with 
him and came under his direct influence in the 
studio ; in his early days he copied some of his 
paintings and learned the secret of his touch ; and 
he also engraved three of his best pictures, namely, 
The Fruits of Early Industry and Economy, 
Smugglers, and Fishwomen. And as he gave 
an increasing portion of his time to painting and 
less to engraving, he was more in Morland's society, 
and was more greatly influenced by his style. 

That Morland's influence appeared in James 
Ward's earlier works was apparent to critics at 
the time. He was regarded as a pupil of Morland, 
and it was not to his advantage to be so regarded, 
for that artist's popularity and fame, won by his 
extraordinary talent for delineating scenes of a 
domestic character — conversation pieces, landscapes 
with horses, cattle and other domestic animals — 
was on the wane ; and where the master had 
ceased to gain acceptance it was hardly likely his 
supposed pupil should succeed. 

One of James Ward's exhibits at the Royal 
Academy was a picture entitled Selling Rabbits. 
This work and another of somewhat similar cha- 
racter, " The Citizen's Retreat," both suggesting 
the influence of Morland, were engraved by his 



JAMES WARD, R.A. 229 

elder brother, W. Ward, printed in colours and 
published by him January i, 1796; the plates are 
of uniform size and measuring 23f inches by 
i7f inches. 

The decline of George Morland's vogue, though 
serious in its effects upon Ward's prospects for the 
time, was in reality an advantage in disguise. In 
1797 he exhibited at the Royal Academy a picture 
called The Bull Bait, which appears to have 
attracted much attention, even as it received high 
praise from the critics. It was described as "a 
work of great ability, full of figures cleverly grouped, 
fine in colour, and full of animation and character, 
which, though the talk of the day, was purchased 
by a dealer for j^^o." The artist, however, heard 
it described as the work of " a pupil of Morland," 
and realised the necessity of looking out for a 
style of his own. He found, to use his own words, 
that he "had a fresh foundation to lay and had 
to begin at the bottom of the hill." Thus only at 
the comparatively mature age of eight-and-twenty, 
when artists of real ability have generally esta- 
blished themselves, James Ward made the real 
beginning of the career he had chosen for himself. 

He entered as a student John Brook's School of 
Anatomy in Blenheim Street, and appears to have 
studied for a short time in the Royal Academy 
School of Art. Concurrently with his studies he 



230 ANIMAL PAINTERS 

painted diligently and with a degree of success 
which suggests that any shortcomings tuition might 
correct were more apparent to the artist himself 
than to his patrons. In 1798 he exhibited six 
pictures at the Royal Academy. Among these were 
two, Cattle in a Storm, and Lion and Tiger 
Fighting, which won much praise. Another 
picture was the Alderney Cow, no doubt the 
work commissioned by Sir John Sinclair, Presi- 
dent of the New (now the Royal) Agricultural 
Society. This picture marks the beginning of 
Ward's application of his energy and talents to 
animal painting, and was the first of an important 
series of similar works which did much to enhance 
a rapidly growing reputation. He speedily threw 
off the peculiarities of style or mannerisms of other 
artists, and, bent though he was " looking out 
for a style of his own," he could hardly have felt 
aggrieved when his 1798 exhibits earned for him 
the name, "The English Paul Potter." 

The success of the " Alderney Cow " resulted in 
his selection by the Agricultural Society to paint a 
series of pictures representing all breeds of farm 
stock ; and this commission, involving as it did con- 
tinuous travel about the country for some years in 
search of models, necessarily brought the artist in 
contact with a very large number of leading agri- 
culturists and others. The original scheme of the 



JAMES WARD, R.A. 23 1 

Society seems to have fallen through for lack of 
funds in 1805 ; but Ward, though he is said to have 
actually lost money over the collapse, had no reason 
to regret the time he had spent over its partial 
execution ; it gave him the opportunity to establish 
his name as an animal painter and to secure a large 
number of patrons whose orders meant financial 
success. Among his patrons may be mentioned 
the Dukes of Wellington, Bedford, Newcastle and 
Northumberland, the Marquises of Exeter and 
Huntly, the Earl of Powis, Lords de Tabley, 
Brooke, Ribblesdale, Dewhurst and Southampton, 
Lady Frances Vane Tempest, the Hon. C. Arbuth- 
nott, Hon. C. Phipps, Sir Matthew White Ridley, 
Sir W. W. Wynn, Sir J. Shelley, Sir Thomas 
Mostyn and Sir A. Hume, Messrs. Beckford, 
Vernon, J. Allnutt, John Wells, T. F. Heathcote, 
T. Croak, E. Mundy and Ralph Lambton. 

In the early years of the century James Ward, it 
is said, was earning as much as .1^50 a day ; and it 
will be observed, from the list of his contributions 
to the Royal Academy, that he sent in fewer 
pictures during the years 1802-5 than at any sub- 
sequent period of the same length. He was a 
large and constant exhibitor ; during the sixty-three 
years of his artistic career, only five exhibitions 
lacked works from his easel ; he very frequently 
sent in eight pictures, and in 181 6 he had nine on 
the walls. 



232 ANIMAL PAINTERS 

In 1807, he was elected an Associate of the 
Royal Academy, and in 181 1 an Academican. His 
diploma picture, A Bacchanalian, was presented 
in 181 2. 

The great canvas representing an " Allegory of 
the Battle of Waterloo," was finished by Ward 
after five years' work in 1823. The Directors of 
the British Institution, in 181 7, had offered a prize 
of ^1,000 for the sketch which should best express 
in an allegorical spirit the triumph of the Duke of 
Wellinofton. Ward's sketch was selected ; he had 
always had a leaning towards the allegorical, but it 
may be doubted whether his achievements in this 
particular department of art were of a character to 
bring him the fame he won as a painter of animal 
life. The picture was ordered, and after some vicissi- 
tudes due to its vast size (35 feet by 21 feet) was 
hung in Chelsea Hospital. 

Portraits of hunters, chargers and racehorses, 
figure largely among the artist's Royal Academy 
picures, as also do portraits of cattle and dogs. 
His two 1 8 18 contributions, an Arab belonging 
to the Earl of Powis, and a Favourite Hunter 
of Theophilus Levett, Esq., receive favourable 
notice from a critic of the time who refers to the 
excellence of the anatomical drawing and colour, 
and to the happy rendering of the silky texture of 
the horses' coats. One of his contributions to the 



JAMES WARD, R.A. 233 

Royal Academy Exhibition of 1820 was a portrait 
of Ralph Lambton, Esq., on his horse Under- 
taker, surrounded by his hounds, which the hunts- 
man is calling out of covert. This picture was 
engraved and printed in colours by C. Turner, 
who also published it in 1821. 

The picture of Primrose and Her Foal, which 
was reproduced in Vol. 36 of the Sporting Maga- 
zine, 1 8 10, was also engraved on a larger scale, the 
plate measuring 17I inches by 13I-. His portrait of 
the racehorse Walton, also reproduced in the 
Sporting Magazine, Vol. 45 of 1 8 1 4, was engraved 
for separate publication, the plate being the same size 
as that of Primrose and Her Foal. This engrav- 
ing was published April 2, 1882, by R. Ackermann, 
Rodwell and Martin, and Colnaghi and Co. 

A portrait of Mr. R. Riddel's thoroughbred 
Dr. Syntax, appears among the artist's exhibits 
at the Royal Academy of 1820; on April i, 1803, 
an engraving from a picture of the same horse, 
t8 inches by 13I inches, was published by R. 
Ackermann, Strand. The portrait of Mr. J. G. 
Lambton's Leopold, which was exhibited in 
the same year, was no doubt the canvas from 
which was made the engraving, 18 inches by 13 
inches, which R. Ackermann published in April, 
1823. The portrait of King George IV. 's Sooth- 
sayer was exhibited at the Royal Academy of 



234 ANIMAL PAINTERS 

1824 : this must have been a different picture from 
the one which was engraved (plate 18 inches by 13^) 
and published in 1823 by R. Ackermann and Rod- 
well and Martin. The portrait of Phantom was 
engraved, plate 18 inches by 13 inches, and pub- 
lished in London in April, 1823. That of the 
Duke of York's Moses was shown at the Royal 
Academy exhibition of 1825, and was engraved and 
published in October of the same year by R. Acker- 
mann ; size of plate, 18 inches by 13 inches. 

Ward's best known work is undoubtedly the 
large " Bull, Cow and Calf," which hangs in the 
National Gallery. This picture, 10 feet 8 inches by 
15 feet 10 inches, shows an Alderney bull, cow and 
calf, standing, in the centre ; a black cow lying 
down in the right foreground, with sheep and a 
goat in the middle foreground ; and in the distance, 
meadows with cattle grazing. The animals por- 
trayed belonged to Mr. Allnutt, of Clapham. This 
work, painted in 1820-22, was undertaken at the 
suggestion of Benjamin West, P.R.A., who thought 
Paul Potter's famous " Bull " an over-rated per- 
formance and considered Ward capable of better 
work. The picture was exhibited in 1823 at the 
British Institution, and afterwards sent over to 
America and exhibited in New York, where it was 
so greatly admired that Ward said, " They declared 
I had reached the rt(:we of perfection." In 1848, it 




O 

H 
Z 
O 



JAMES WARD, R.A. 235 

was brought back to England and purchased by 
George Ward, the artist's son, who exhibited it at 
Smithfield Cattle Show. The picture created a 
sensation, and was criticised at length in all the 
papers, much to the interest of the artist. Thus he 
writes to his son on December 22, 1848 : — 

I have anxiously expected to hear how the exhibition 
goes on, or if any more papers. I trust you carefully keep 
all the criticisms. So many on one work is a curiosity, and 
tends to prove how impossible it is for a painter to attempt 
to suit the critics, as you will find that those I have seen 
directly oppose each other as to the faults and beauties. I 
could give a reply to each and a reason for everything I have 
introduced, but then I must be writer as well as painter. 

In 1862, it was purchased for ^1,500 by the 
Trustees of the National Gallery from Mr. G. R. 
Ward. 

In 1825, Ward exhibited the portrait of 
Monitor, a very fast hackney belonging to King 
George IV., an engraving from which is reproduced 
as an example of his work ; and in the following 
year was shown his picture of the Norfolk 
Phenomenon, the great hackney sire whose impor- 
tation into Yorkshire by Mr. Robert Ramsdale did 
so much to improve the breed of roadsters in that 
county and in the North. Another picture, stated 
in an article in the English Ilhtstrated Magazine 
for August, 1884, by Mr. F. T. Piggott, to be even 
a finer piece of work than the " Bull, Cow and 



236 ANIMAL PAINTERS 

Calf," is a portrait of a flea-bitten grey Arab which 
was painted in 1828. This painting was shown 
for the first time at the Winter Exhibition of Old 
Masters in 1879. 

Portraits of ladies and gentlemen, sporting and 
domestic scenes, and landscapes came from Ward's 
prolific brush. During his later years his work, 
attained its widest variety, and at this period too, 
we find in his Royal Academy contributions evidence 
of the taste for allegorical art which he now per- 
mitted himself to indulge. Religious subjects, 
significant perhaps of the bent of the artist's thoughts 
in his advancing age, figure conspicuously in 1850. 
During the last few years of his life, however, he 
returned to more accustomed grooves, if his con- 
tributions to the Burlingrton House Exhibitions 
fairly represent his work. 

From the year 1792 to 1855 inclusive, James 
Ward sent no fewer than 287 pictures to the Royal 
Academy ; he was also a frequent contributor to 
the Exhibitions at the Royal Institution, the 
Suffolk Street Gallery and the Society of Artists. 
Engravings from some sixteen of his pictures 
appeared in the Sporting Magazine between the 
years 1807-18 18 ; and one in the Neii) Sporiing 
Magazine ; the majority of these possess sporting 
interest, but in no case is there a strictly sporting 
scene. Many of his works are widely known 



JAMES WARD, R.A. 237 

through engrravino's, and mention must be made of 
a series of twelve lithographic drawings of celebrated 
horses which was published in 1823 by Ackermann 
and Rodwell. 

Lord Middleton has a good example of his work 
at Birdsall, Yorkshire. 

James Ward resided in London during the better 
part of his life from 1798 to 1830 ; and in the latter 
year, being then sixty years of age, he retired to 
Cheshunt in Hertfordshire. He continued painting 
and exhibiting until he was eighty-seven years old ; 
the exhibition of 1855 contained his last contribu- 
tion, fitly enough a picture of cattle. He died at 
Kensington, whither he had gone to pay a visit on 
November 23, 1859, in the ninety-first year of his 
age. 

A portrait of the artist taken from the picture 
painted by himself and exhibited at the Royal 
Academy in 1831 is given on page 240. It shows 
him at about 60 years of age. 

James Ward married a lady of his own name, 
referred to by Mr. Piggott as " his first wife," 
though he says nothing of her death or a second 
marriage. He had two sons, William James, born 
1800, and George Raphael who inherited a share 
of his father's artistic ability and made his name as 
an engraver. 



238 



ANIMAL PAINTERS 



WORKS OF JAMES WARD, R.A, 

IN THE NATIONAL GALLERY (4 in number). 

LANDSCAPE WITH CATTLE, AldemeybuII, cow and calf. Canvas 10 ft. 8 in, high 
by 15 ft. 10 in. wide. 

A LANDSCAPE, COR DALE SCAR, yORICSH/RE.—A dark ravine between lofty 
cliffs, over the summit of which storm-clouds roll. Cattle and deer in the foreground 
and middle distance ; waterfall in the background. On canvas, lo ft. ii in. high by 
13 ft. 10 in. wide. Purchased from Lord Ribblesdale in 1878. 

HARLECH CASTLE AND SURROUNDING LANDSCAPE.— On the brow of a hill 
in the foreground lies a large tree recently felled, to the left of which stands a wood- 
man lopping off its branches. Behind are two peasant women binding faggots. To 
the right a cart laden with timber and drawn by four grey horses is turning the corner 
of a road ; some trees and half-hidden cottages separate this portion of the scene from 
the middle distance, in the centre of which rises Harlech Castle, surrounded by a 
large tract of meadow land with hills in the background. Stormy sky, with the sun 
setting in the extreme left of the picture. Painted on panel, 4 ft. 3 in. high by 7 ft. 
wide. Purchased out of a pecuniary bequest made by the late Mr. Richard C. 
Wheeler. 

REGENTS PARK IN 1S07 : A CATTLE PIECE.— In the foreground a white bull and 
several cows stand near a stream or pool of water. To the left a cottage with 
labourers at work; behind it a group of trees. Cattle in the middle distance. The 
sky is luminous near the horizon, but is overcast with dark clouds above. On canvas, 
2 ft. 4I in. high by 3 ft. 10 in. wide. Signed in the right-hand corner with cypher 
and dated 1S07. 



IN THE SOUTH KENSINGTON MUSEUM (7 in number). 

BULLS FIGHTING; IN A LANDSCAPE, WITH VIEW OF ST. DONATES 
CASTLE, GLAMORGANSHIRE. Panel, jif by Sgi oblong. Signed. Given 
by Mr. C. T. Maud. 

DONKEY AND PIGS. — A donkey feeding from a wheelbarrow ; two pigs are stretched on 
a heap of straw on the right. Canvas, 9 in. by 6^ in. oblong. Signed "J. Ward.'' 
Sheepshanks Gift. 

PIGS. — .\ large sow stretched at full length on the foreground ; two other pigs seen in the 
background. Canvas, 15^ in. by 9J in. oblong. Signed "J. Ward, 1813." Sheep- 
shanks Gift. 

A CHINESE SOir.—\ large sow is rooting in the straw outside the sty. Panel, ii in. 
by 83 in. oblong. Sheepshanks Gift. 

PEGWELL BAY, NEAR RAMSGATE.—'PiLnd, 13} in. by :6' in. oblong. Signed 
with initials. Jones Bequest. 



Water Colours. 



THE WATERCRESS GIRL 
SKETCH OF A DOG 



WORKS OF JAMES WARD, R.A. 239 

PICTURES EXHIBITED AT THE ROYAL ACADEMY 
(287 in number). 

YEAR 

i792-<4) CHRISTMAS CAROL-GATHERING COWSLIPS— ROCKING HORSE 
-HAYMAKERS AT REST. 

1793— (6) .'' DRAKE, study from nature—^ GUINEA PIG, study from nature— 
FEEDING PIGS— INSIDE OF A COWHOUSE— A DOG STEALING- 
TIGER SNARLING OVER HIS PREY. 

1794—^ LAND STORM. 

i79S-<3) A FANCY PIGEON— SELLING RABBITS— HARROWING. 

179S— (5) CONDEMNED CALF— THUNDERSTORM— IDLE BOYS— COURSING 
—FARRIER'S SHOP. 

'797— (4) A STAFFORDSHIRE COW— A STAFFORDSHIRE BULL— A LADY 
AND CHILDREN— BULL BAIT. 

1798— (6) CATTLE IN A STORM— PORTRAIT OF MISS WALKIN— BATTLE 
—AN ALDERNEY COW— WOODMAN AND GYPSIES— LION AND 
TIGER FIGHTING. 

1799— (2) SUNSET— PORTRAIT OF A CHILD. 

iSoo-(3) A COW, the property of K. Dyott, 'Es^.-yiEW OF CHUDLEIGH—A LION 
IN THE TOWER. 

iZoi— (.5) GLEANERS— CONVERSATION— A DEVONSHIRE OX— A COW OF 
THE LONG-HORNED BREED— THE BIRD-KEEPERS' REPAST. 

iao2— THE MOTHER. 

1803— (2) .4 NORMAN BULL— CATTLE. 

1 805— (4) GROUSING ON THE ROUABON HILLS, with Portraits of Dogs the 
property of Sir W. VV. Wynne, Bart.— /J CHARGER, the property of Sir W. W. 
Wj-nne, Bart.—/! CHARGER, property of the s^me— SHEEP SHEARING, a 
scene in Wales. 

1807— (8) WAGGON HORSES FRIGHTENED AT LIGHTNING— AN OLD SHEP- 
HERD—PIGS—LANDSCAPE AND FIGURES— .MELROSE ABBEY ON 
THE TWEED, the seat of Lord Somer\-ille, in the distance the Selkirkshire Hills 
—LITTLEDEN TOWER ON THE TWEED, the seat of Hugh Scott, Esq.— 
THE INFANT CHRIST EMBRACING THE CROSS— A TERRIER, the 
property of St. Aubyn, Esq. 

1808— (8) THE DAIRY MAID— FALL OF PHAETON, a finished sketch-HAR- 
LECH CASTLE— CATTLE— FIGHTING HORSES— A COWLAYER, 
EVENING AFTER RAIN— TIGERS— RABBITS. 

1809— (8) GRANADILLO, a brood mare, and SKYSCRAPER, colt, property of T. 
Crook, Esq. — W GENTLE.MAN AND HIS KEEPER WITH HIS 
FAVOURITE HORSE AND DOGS— PIGS— SUFFOLK MARE— POR- 
TRAIT OF S. /. PRATT, ESQ.— SHETLAND PONY— ASSES WAIT- 
ING THE RETURN OF FISHING-BOATS— A STRAW-YARD. 
iSio— (7) CATTLE IN A STORM— A HEATH EWE AND LAMBS— POR- 
TRAIT OF HON. C. B. PHIPPS AND HIS FAVOURITE PONY- 
LANDSCAPE AND FIGURES— CATTLE— EAGLE, a race horse, a cele. 
brated stallion— /5 SWINEHERD. 

iSii— (8) AN ARABIAN, Viscount Clive's— .4 TERRIER, Sir A. 'Havae's-THE 
MOUSE'S PETITION— A FAT STAFFORDSHIRE OX, property of E. 
Dyott, Esq.— THE SAND PIT— PORTRAIT OF LITCHFIELD, the pro- 
perty of Viscount howiher— THE OBSTINATE ASS— THE REV. T. 
LOVETT AND FAVOURITE DOGS-COCK-SHOOTING. 



240 ANIMAL PAINTERS 

i8i2-(7) ^ FAVOURITE HACKNEY OF LORD BROOKS - BANKER, a 
hunter, 25 years old, and a FOXHOUND, property of T. Lovctt, Esq.— SZ/ICA'- 
THORN, a brood mare, and a FAVOURITE PONY, property of E. Mundy, 
E.sti.— PORTRAITS OF CHILDREN— A FAVOURITE HORSE, Marquis 
of Huntly's— ^ GENTLEMAN, HIS KEEPER, SHOOTING PONY AND 
DOGS— J. NIC HO L, ESQ. 

1813— (8) A HUNTER, Lord Maynard's— /i/^Z)G.1/^J\^r, Viscount Deerhurst's— Z>0<;5, 
property of S. T. Parker, Esq.— W HUNTER, Hon. J. Coventry's— /4 CHARGER, 
Gen. Sir C. Stewart's, Vi.E.—OSIVALD, Lady R. Deerhurst's— »'y4Z,r(?JV, Sir J. 
Shelly's— />///! A'rOiT/, Sir f. Shelly's. 

1814— (4) LUKE KENNY, aged 96, HIS WIFE, aged 88, who have lived in the Woods 
upwards of 50 years, and brought up 8 children in a hut, following the empIo>inent 
of charcoal burning— /I OR Ei'HO UND, proptrty of T. F. Heathcote, Esq.— /I 
SHETLAND PONY, Hon. J. Coventry's— T/i^.e STRAIV-YARD, a sketch— 
A BITTERN— A HERON. 

iSis— <4) PRINCE PLATOFFS CHARGER, AND FOUR OF HIS COSSACKS— 
A CHARGER AND PONY, property of Lord Steward—^ VIEIV OF GOR- 
DALE, E.4ST MALHA.M, YORKSHIRE, Lord Ribblesdale's— r/FO EX- 
TRAORDINARY OXEN, Earl of Powis's. 

1S16— <9) r/£!F OF BRADBY CEDAR— BOAR HUNTING IN INDIA — 
TWILIGHT— MORNING— HUNTING IN INDIA— PORTRAITS OF TWO 
LADIES OF QUALITY— MISS .MANN— A NOBLE.MAN AND SHET- 
LAND PONY-MISS BEAN. 

1817— (7) THE DESCENT OF THE SWAN SEEKING HIS OWN ELEMENT, 
an allegory, to illustrate a poem, "The Social Hay"— SPANIEL WATCHING 
THE TOMB OF HER DECEASED MISTRESS, to illustrate a poem, "The 
Social Day "—L UKE KENNY, aged 96, and HIS WIFE, remarkable characters 
of Alderwaslie, Derbyshire— JF/Ji'/', R. Ludgate's— ^ BLOOD HOUND- 
WALTON, Su- J. Shelly's, Bart.— /I NEWFOUNDLAND DOG. 

iSiS— (2) T. LEVIT, ESQ., AND A FAVOURITE HUNTER— AN ARABIAN 
Earl of Powis's. 

t8i9— (3) REV. J. A. BUSFIELD, D.D.—DASH, a spaniel, Lady Francis Vane 
■Xempiii's-.MASTER BEAN. 

rS2o — (8) LEOPOLD, a celebrated race horse, property of J. G. Lambton, Esq. — DR. 
SYNTAX, a race horse, property of R. Riddel, Esq.— ^ COSSACK HORSE, 
Duke of Northumberland's— /! PERSIAN HORSE, Duke of Northumberland's— 
W. LYNN, ESQ.— TAFF, a dog, property of Arthur Stanhope, Esq.— /-WA'- 
HUNTING, CALLING THE HOUNDS OUT OF COVER— RALPH 
LAMBTON, ESQ., HI^ HORSE UNDERTAKER, AND HOUNDS— 
PORTR.IIT OF A DOG, taken with the French b.-iggage after the Battle of 
Vittoria. 

1821— (3) .4 HUNTER, property of Edm. Yates, Esq.— ROVER, a spaniel. Earl of Powis' 
-.ANOTHER OF ROVER, Earl of Powis's. 

1822— (5) FAVOURITE MARE, property of J. Harrison, Esq.— ^ HORSE, Earl of 
■P0'x\^i— HAPHAZARD— THE BOA SERPENT SEIZING A HORSE- 
ADONIS, the Favourite Charger of George IIL 

1S23— (4) HORSES, property of J. Allnutt, Esq.— THE DEER STEALER— BOB, A 
FAVOURITE OLD HORSE, property of J. P. Baxter, Esq.— A HORSE 
AND DOG, the property of Hon. C. Arbuthnot, M.P. 



WORKS OF JAMES WARD, R.A. 24 1 

YEAR 

1824— (6) A HUNTER, property of Unwin Heathcote, %v\.—SOOTHSAVER, a race 
horse, property of George W.—FERRETT IiV A RABBIT IVARREX—SIR 
JOHN LEICESTER, BART., EXERCrSING CHESHIRE YEOMANRY 
ON THE SANDS AT LIVERPOOL— PRINCESS ROYAL, a racing mare, 
property of Sir Thomas Mostyn, ^z.xt.—COPENH AGEN, ridden by the Duke 
of Wellington at Waterloo, whose dam was ridden by General Grosvenor at the 
Siege of Copenhagen when in foal of the former, and which carried the Duke that 
day 15 hours. 

1825— (5) NONPAREIL, the Charger of George IV.— MONITOR, very fast hackney of 
George IV. — BROOD .UARES, Queen of Diamonds, sister of Rozan and Lupin, 
property of Sir Thomas Mostyn, Bart., M.P. — DONALD, belonging to Philip 
Cell, Esq.—MOSES, property of the Duke of York. 

ii2&-<i) BATTLE NEAR BOSTON, LINCOLNSHIRE— HORSE AND PONY, 
Duke of Newcastle's — MARENGO, barbed charger, ridden by Napoleon 
Bonaparte at the Battle of Waterloo— .4 FAVOURITE HUNTER. 

1827— (7) THE NORFOLK PHENOMENON— SIDES ALL— ITALIAN GREY- 
HOUND, property of Lady Agnes Buller— r//£' DATS SPORT— A 
SHOOTING PONY— RETRIEVER AND A SPANIEL, Lord Southampton's 
—S.MOLENSKO, a race boTSe—PERSIAN SHEEP. 

j82B-<8) ALDERNEY bull— a HACKNEY, property of John Wells, Esq.— THE 
WOOD.MAN'S COMPANIONS— SPANISH ASS— THE RETRIEVER— 
ALDERNEY COIV—A HUNTER, property of Peter Hesketh, Esq.— 
V AMOUR DU CHEVAL. 

ii2^— AUGUSTA, the property of Marquis of Exeter. 

i830-(6) THE FALL OF PHAETON— .MALTESE ASS AND FOAL— SPANISH 
ASS AND FOAL— VENUS RISING FROM HER COUCH— THE 
ARTISTS MOTHER IN HER EIGHTY-FIRST YEAR— DIANA AT 
HER BATH DISTURBED BY ACTMON. 

^Zl\— PORTRAIT OF THE ARTIST (JAMES IVARD, R.A.) 

Hi^—THE STRONG AND THE WEAK TWIN. 

i853-<7) CONTENTION— BEAU.MONT, NEAR CHESHUNT, HERTS, the 
residence of Matthew Munt, Eiq.—THE M0.1IENT— PORTRAIT OF .4 
LADY—AVAIELLA OLIVERIA CR0.1IIVELL R USSELL, Ihe on]y child 
of the late Archimidorus Cromwell Russell, the last lineal descendant of the 
Protector Cromwell — MAMELUKE, a race horse, property of John Theobald, 
En-— THE EFFECTS OF DISOBEDIENCE (i Kings xiii. 26). 

iZn-ii) DUNCANS HORSES (M^chiilh, -Act ii. Sc. ih-AN ARABIAN— THE 
YELDHA.M OAK AT GREAT YELDHAM, mentioned in the Esse.i Court 
Rolls of the Manor, nearly 600 years ago. 

iZiS— THE HIGH AND LOW CONDITIONED EWE. 

1836— (3) BULL DOGS, REFORMER, BLUCHER, TROY AND CRIB, property of 
Rowland Alston, Esq., U.V.—NUMPS RETURNING FROM MARKET, 
vide lines upon the subject by the kn\s\.—THE STRUCK EAGLE, as 
described in tributary verses upon the death of Henry Kirke White, by Lord 
Byron. 

1837— (8) A SHEPHERD AND HIS DOG, AND TWO RA.MS, of Rowland Alston, 
Esq., M.P.— VIEW OF OXFORD, taken from 'RosehWl— CHANGE OF 
PASTURE— PLENTY— THE REPAST— DASH, the property of the Artist 
—SY.MPATHY— INTERCESSION. 

16 VOL. II. 



242 ANIMAL PAINTERS 



1838— (8) THE IVF.IRD SISTERS— THE TRIUMPH OVER SIN, DEATH AND 
HELL— THE LAST STRUGGLE OF SIN, DEATH AND HELL— 
ROUNDCROFT COTTAGE, the Artist's residence— r//£ FAIR CROP— 
THE FAIR SHOW— IGNORANCE, ENVY AND JEALOUSY FILLING 
THE THROAT AND WIDENING THE MOUTH OF CALUMNY, 
ENDEAVOURING TO BEAR DOWN TRUTH AS AN UNSHAKEN 
PYRAMID FOUNDED ON A ROCK— TICKLING THE EAR. 

1840— {3) DRYING THE LEGS— LOVE FLYING FROM SENSUALITY AND 
DISSIPA TION—THE J Y'S NEST. 

1842— (2) NONPAREIL, charger of George W.— ADONIS, favourite charger of 
George IV. 

1843— (8) VIRGIVS BULLS— OUT OF HEARING— MEETING THE SUN- 
BEAUTY AND SPRITE, the property of Miss iMhmi— ENJOYING THE 
BREEZE— THE CONTRAST— THE EVENING BLUSH— A GLEAM IN 
THE STORM. 

i&^S-<S) SAND ASSES— PEACE— DUCK WEEDS— WHAT IS IT '-WHAT A 
BE A UTY! (The background is the residence of Mr. Westcar, the celebrated 
feeder of Herefordshire Oxen)— THE BARROW PICr—COAL WORKS, of 
Ralph Lambton, Esq.— THE TORN LAMB. 

1846— (8) UNION— THE DEVIL'S BRIDGE— QUIETUDE DISTURBED— 
N.4TURE'S SWEET RESTORER, BALMY SLEEP— A FRIEND IN 
NEED— THE JUVENILE SCRIBE— WAITING THE WEATHER- 
PORTRAIT OF THE ARTIST. 

1047— (7) THE DISCOMFITURE OF CHARLES II. AT THE BATTLE OF 
WORCESTER— THE SNARLERS—THE VISION OF MYRZA— CON- 
WAY CASTLE AND TOWN BEFORE THE BRIDGE WAS MADE— 
A MILL IN WALES— THE GRANDMOTHER— GOING OUT. 

iS^S—THE COUNCIL OF HORSES. 

1849— (6) SY.VPATHY— SHOWERY WEATHER NEAR MIDSUMMER— THE 
CORNSTACK—RENTON IN SCOTLAND, looking to Ben Lomond, the birth- 
place of Smollett, with pillar erected to his memory—^ DEWY MORNING, Sir 
Robert Howard's Duel of the Stags, 2nd battle, written 1J2S— GIVEN GLEN- 
DOWER'S PARLIA.UENT HOUSE, North Wales, as in the year 1802. 

iSio— (6) GETHSEMANE— BETHANY, THE NE.YT DAY AFTER RAISING 
LAZARUS— THE BAPTISM— AGE AND INFANCY— THE STAR OF 
BETHLEHEM— THE LOOK TO PETER— PURITY CHERISHING 
LOVE. 

iZii-(&) DESTROYING THE HORNETS NEST— SEPARATION— HOPE IN 
THE TROUBLED OCEAN OF LIFE— TREES : THE PURPLE 
BEECH, ILEX, SPRUCE, FIR, AND THE WILLOW— THE HOUSE 
IN WHICH SMOLLETT WAS BORN ON THE RIVER SEVERN— 
THE DOUBLE TRIUMPH, SIN, DEATH, AND HELL— UNDER- 
MINING THE ROCK OF AGES— MEASURE FOR .MEASURE, THE 
BITER BIT— AGE AND INFANCY, THE SPANISH GRANDFATHER 
AND ENGLISH OFFSPRING. 

1852— (6) LAMBS OF THE FIRST YEAR— OLD CAREFUL— DANIEL IN THE 
DEN OF LIONS— THE HUNTED STAG, caught in the Rapids above the 
Fall of the C\yie— LISTENING TO ADVICE— THE FALL OF THE 
CLYDE AFTER A FLOOD. 

i853-<7) THE OLD DUTCH COW— CARTING SEA-WEED— HEARTS EASE— 
THE BAD DAY— TEETOTAL BEER AND BEEF— THE SHEPHERD 
AND BIRDKEEPER— PEEBLES CASTLE, SCOTLAND. 

itH—MR. RUDALL. 

■lZH-THE .MORNING GREY, with cattle of different breeds. 



WORKS OF JAMES WARD, R.A. 243 

PLATES IN THE SPORTING MAGAZINE (16 in number). 

LION AND TIGER, 1807, vol. 29; engraved by H. R. Cook— PORTRAIT OF A 
DOG, Fubbs, belonging to J. Ward, R.A., 1S07, vol. 30; engraved by H. R. Cook — 
PERSIAN GREYHOUND, 1S07, vol. 31 ; engraved by H. R. Cook. 

THE AL.MOND TUMBLER, a species of pigeon, 1808, vol. 31 ; engraved by H. R. 
Cook— THE SHEPHERD DOG, i8o3, vol. 32; engraved by H. R. Cook— POR- 
TRAIT OF A DOC, Viper, 1808, vol. 32; engraved by H. R. Cook. 

THE LIBOV SEIZING A TIGER, 1809, vol. 33 ; engiaved by H. R. Cook— HORSES 
FIGHTING, 1809, vol. 34; engraved by H. R. Cook— C.-IAT HORSES, 1809, 
vol. 34 ; engraved by H. R. Cook. 

PRIMROSE, a brood mare with foal, iSio, vol. 36— GAME COCK', 1810, vol. 36 ; engraved 
by H. R. Cook. 

BLOODHOUND, i8i4,vol. 43 ; engraved by H. R. Cook— jr.^irO-V, a celebrated racer, 
1814, vol. 45 ; engraved by J. Scott. 

VIXEN, a terrier, the property of Jas. Aubyn, Esq., 1S18, vol. 51 ; engraved by J. Scott. 

TERRIER, the property of C. Sturt, Esq., 1821, vol. 58 ; engraved by Cooke. 

ALMOND TUMBLER, a species of pigeon, 1825, vol. 65 ; engraved by W, Raddon. 

PLATE IN THE NEW SPORTING MAGAZINE. 

THE EVENING OF LIFE, picture of an old horse and ass, 1838, vol. 15 ; engraved by 
J. W. Cook. 



244 



DEAN WOLSTEN HOLME, Senr. 

(Born 1757. Died 1837.) 

pwEAN WOLSTENHOLME, Senr., was born 
*^ in Yorkshire in the year 1757. He was 
descended from Sir John Wolstenholme, Knt., 
who was one of the Farmers of the Customs in 
the reign of Charles I. Sir John Wolstenholme, 
who belonged to Stanmore in Middlesex, pur- 
chased Nostel Abbey, in Yorkshire, and when he 
died, in 1639, left very large property, which was 
inherited by his son John. The latter sustained great 
losses during the Civil War ; but after the Restora- 
tion he received some compensation in the shape of 
a Baronetcy (1664) and an appointment as Farmer, 
or lessee, of Customs. It may be added that the 
first Sir John was buried in the church of Stanmore, 
which he had rebuilt at his own cost ; and that the 
consecration of that church, on July 17th, 1632, 
was made to serve as one of the accusations pre- 
ferred against Archbishop Laud at his trial. 

Dean Wolstenholme's early life was passed in 
Essex and Hertfordshire ; Cheshunt, Turnford and 
Waltham Abbey being in turn chosen by him as 



DEAN WOLSTENHOLME, SENR. 245 

places of residence. The possessor of considerable 
means, he was able to indulge to the full the passion 
for sport which is betrayed in his pictures. He was 
an ardent lover of animals, more particularly dogs 
and horses, and found his chiefest pleasure in fox- 
hunting- and coursing. At this time he dabbled in 
art merely for amusement, painting occasionally for 
friends portraits of horses and hounds and also 
scenes of sport. His talent as an artist was remarked 
by Sir Joshua Reynolds, who predicted that Dean 
Wolstenholme would become a painter in earnest 
before he died. Sir Joshua's remark was prophetic, 
but Wolstenholme's adoption of the brush as a 
means of livelihood was due not to talent, but 
necessity. By some misfortune (1793) he became 
involved in legal proceedings in connection with the 
title of a property he had purchased at Waltham. 
He was compelled to fight three suits in Chancery, 
and finally losing the day found himself reduced to 
very slender resources ; he had then no alternative 
but to make a profession of the art he had thereto- 
fore followed as a pleasure. 

About the year 1800, therefore. Dean Wolsten- 
holme turned his back on country life and sports and 
came to London. He settled in East Street, Red 
Lion Square, and set to work to gain a livelihood ; 
no slight change for a man past forty years of age, 
who had been able to make sport the great business 



246 ANIMAL PAINTERS 

of life. His pictures naturally reflected the tastes 
he could no longer indulge, and his first contribu- 
tion to the Royal Academy, exhibited in 1803, 
when he was forty-six years of age, is entitled 
" Coursing." The large majority of the pictures he 
sent to the Royal Academy were sporting scenes or 
animal portraits, but his publicly exhibited works 
represent only an insignificant proportion of the 
pictures he painted during the quarter of a century 
which constituted his working life as a professional 
artist. 

In the interesting series of interleaved catalogues 
of the Academy exhibitions which Mr. Anderden 
bequeathed to the British Museum we find notes 
bearing on Wolstenholme's pictures. Of the " Por- 
trait of Mr. J. Goldham," shown in 1806, Mr. 
Anderden writes : " I have seen this man cutting 
away right and left, his horse at full gallop all the 
time. He was a trooper in the London Volunteer 
Yeomanry, of which my father was Colonel Com- 
mandant." The artist has portrayed this accom- 
plished swordsman "performing the Austrian broad- 
sword exercise with two swords at speed." John 
Goldham was Field Adjutant of the corps men- 
tioned, and the picture commemorates his success 
in winning a bet of 200 gs., that he would go 
through the exercise while riding at the rate of 
thirty miles an hour. Having won the wager he 



DEAN WOLSTENHOLME, SENR. 247 

afterwards went through one of the divisions of the 
exercise while riding over a five-barred gate. 
J. W. Reynolds executed a fine engraving from this 
picture, and a small plate engraved by Edwards 
was published in the Sporting Magazine of 1806. 

" A Correct View of the Golden Lane Genuine 
Brewery," with a dray and heavy massive horses, 
painted and exhibited in 1807, a canvas about 
47 inches long by 2oi- inches high, hangs in 
the Council Room of the Shire Horse Society in 
Hanover Square. 

Dean Wolstenholme painted several sets or series 
of hunting, coursing, and shooting scenes, many of 
which were engraved by Sutherland and Bromley. 
One such set represents " Foxhunting," in four 
scenes ; these were engraved by Sutherland ; size 
of plates 27 inches by 8|- inches, printed in colours, 
and published by Ackermann. "Shooting" was the 
title of another series of four clever pictures, which 
represented respectively (i) Going out ; (2) Game 
Found ; (3) Dogs Bringing the Same, and (4) Re- 
freshing. These were engraved by Himeley. Many 
of his pictures were inspired by the hunting songs 
which he was fond of singing with a few com- 
panions of his active sporting days. Others worthy 
of special mention are " The High-mettled Racer 
Sold to the Hounds " ; " The Joys of Coursing." 
The " Death of Tom Moody " and " Reynard seek- 



248 ANIMAL PAINTERS 

ing Refuge in the Church " were companion works. 

These two pictures were engraved by his son, Dean 

Wolstenholme, Junr., the plates measuring 17 inches 

by 13 inches, and were pubhshed by R. Ackermann. 

A representative example of his work is the 

picture entitled " Lord's Wood, Leading Roding, 

Essex," which was painted in 1820. The portraits 

are those of Mr. G. M. Box on Grey Pilot, and 

Mr. W. H. Box on Sally, the hounds belonging to 

the Essex Hunt, so many years hunted by the then 

well known master, Mr. John Conyers, of Copt Hall, 

Essex. Underneath the picture are the lines from 

Somerville's Chase : — 

" Hark ! on the drag I hear 
Their doubtful notes, preluding to a cry 
More nobly full, and swelled with every mouth. 
As struggling armies, at the trumpet's voice, 
Press to their standard, hither all repair, 
And hurry through the woods with hasty step. 
Rustling and full of hope." 

Wolstenholme did but little work after the 

year 1826; nearly all the pictures after this date 

signed " Dean Wolstenholme " are the work of 

his son, whose touch so closely resembled his that 

it is difficult to distinguish the work of each. 

Mr. Dean Wolstenholme, grandson of the artist 

with whose labours we are presently concerned, 

has indicated two points of dissimilarity which 

may in some cases help to determine the painter 

of a picture bearing the name. The elder Wol- 






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DEAN WOLSTEN HOLME, SENR. 249 

stenholme was fond of representing a dark and 
gloomy sky, whereas the younger, father of my 
informant, seldom painted any but a bright and 
sunny sky ; again, the senior Wolstenholme was not 
over particular in bestowing care upon his landscape 
backgrounds, while the younger man invariably 
painted these with scrupulous care and always from 
nature. While dealing with the distinguishing 
features of the work of the two, it may be added 
that Dean Wolstenholme, Junior, was extremely 
fond of painting leafless oaks in his landscape ; 
the sketch books in the possession of his son 
contain innumerable sketches of boughs, limbs, and 
trees taken from nature and destined for use at 
some future time. Errors in determining the 
authorship of the later works of the father and the 
earlier pictures of the son are particularly likely to 
arise as the professional career of the former over- 
lapped that of the latter by some eight or nine 
years, if not more. 

Dean Wolstenholm, Senior, died in 1837 at the 
age of 80, and was buried in the Old St. Pancras 
Churchyard. He was a man of remarkable physical 
strength ; it is said that on one occasion he made 
a bet that he would carry two sacks of flour up a 
ladder, and won it. As an artist, if he be not 
entitled to rank high in the profession, we may at 
least write him as one who painted, with skill and 
perfect understanding, scenes with which he was 



250 ANIMAL PAINTERS 

in intimate sympathy, and animals whose character 
he knew as well as their forms. His works possess 
a simplicity and truth which arrest attention and 
afford pleasure. The portrait which faces this page 
was taken from a rough sketch made by Dean 
Wolstenholme, Junior, when a young man and 
afterwards finished. 

WORKS OF DEAN WOLSTENHOLME, Sen. 

EXHIBITED AT THE ROYAL ACADEMY (28 in number). 

VEAR 

1S03— corn s/xG. 

lioi—FOX-HUNTING. 

lio-,— THE EPPING FOREST HUNT. 

zitii—(^y HOUNDS RUNNING GALLANTLY INTO A FOX IN VIEIF— POR- 
TRAIT OF MR. J. COLDHAM fXTforming the Austrian Broadsword Exercise 
with two swords, at speed— HOUNDS DRAIFING COVER AND JUST 
FINDING— VIEW OF THE INTERIOR OF MR. HARRISON'S 
VETERINAR Y SHOP. Horses Shoeing, &c. 

iZoj—VIEIY OF THE GOLDEN LANE GENUINE BEER BREWERY. 

1808— (2) PORTRAIT OF PILOT, formerly the property of Mr. Lade— rV^^fF OF THE 
INTERIOR OF THE SIX-STALL STABLE AT THE FINSBURV 
REPOSITORY. 

1809— (4) THE CHASE— DIGGING THE FOX FROM EARTH— PORTRAIT OF 
A CHARGER belonging to an Officer in the City of London Light Horse— THE 
LEAP OF THE STAG. 

l8io-{4) RETURN FROM FOX-HUNTING BY MOONLIGHT— PORTRAITS OF 
HORSES belonging to a Stage Coach changing horses on the Edmonton Road — 
RETURN FROM HUNTING BY MOONLIGHT — PORTRAITS OF 
TWO HORSES, a Dray Horse, the property of H. Meux, Esq., and Hunters and 
Hounds stopping to refresh at a public-house returning from Hunting. 

1813— (5) PORTRAIT OF AN OLD HORSE, the property of the late C. S. Chauncey, 
Esq., Cheshunt, Hertfordshire— /'CyeT'^.^/T' OF HORSE AND DOG, the 
property of Mr. Fuller, Tooting, Surrey— PORTRAITS OF POINTERS, 
belonging to C. Chauncey, Esq., Little Munden, Hertfordshire— j^O/eTi^.^/T' OF 
MR. JOLLIFFE'S HOUNDS AND HORSES wailing an Appointment at 
Merstham Church, now in possession of Lord Hylton ; also another of his pictures, 
COL. JOLLIFFE AND HOUNDS. 

iZ-H-PORTRAIT OF A HERTFORDSHIRE SHEEP, the property- of Mr. 
J. Clarke, of Littley Park, allowed by judges to be the largest ever seen. 

1819— (2) PORTRAIT OF BELFONT, a fast trotter, the property of a Gentleman— 
PORTRAIT OF A GENTLEMAN AND HIS SON waiting in Cover, 
Hounds finding. 

1S20-VIEWOF A GENTLE.VAN'S RESIDENCE IN SURREY, with Portraits 
of favourite Cattle. 

1S24— VIEW OF THE INTERIOR OF THE RIDING SCHOOL belonging to the 
Light Horse Volunteers, with portraits of horses, &c. 




/•'rout a roH^h Sketch Portrait by D. li'., /fir., iv/te/i a youn^^ man. 



Engrai'cd on Wood by F. Habba^c. 



DEAN WOLSTENHOLME, SENR. 



251 



DEAN WOLSTENHOLME, Junior. 

(Born 1798. Died 1882.) 

"DORN near Waltham Abbey in Essex, on April 
-*-' 21, 1798, this artist was the first-born of 
his father. He inherited both the love of sport 
and artistic gifts of his parent ; and he contrived 
to indulge the former by following hounds in 
Essex and Hertfordshire, while his talents were 
directed and fostered by his father, who had 
long made his own mark. From childhood the 
younger Wolstenholme evinced the keenness for 
sport, fox-hunting particularly, and the love of 
animals which distinguished his sire. He was 
always among horses and dogs ; and his affec- 
tion for the former once led to a nasty mishap. 
When about fourteen years of age, at Chelms- 
ford, he had a piece bitten clean out of his cheek 
by a vicious coach-horse. The piece was sewn in 
by a surgeon, but he carried a conspicious scar all 
his life. 

Very early in life he showed the love of 
drawing which induced his father to teach him the 
elements of his art ; and tuition in his father's 



252 ANIMAL PAINTERS 

Studio was followed by a course of study at the 
Royal Academy. 

At this period he began the practice of making 
long journeys on foot, which he never abandoned ; 
his sketch book was his constant companion on 
frequent walking tours, and to this he committed any 
picturesque scraps of scenery, sketches of animals, 
trees and other objects which struck his fancy. Of 
active habit from his youth up, he extended his 
pedestrian travels all over the country, and thus 
made acquaintance with the greater part of the 
country, travelling widely both in Scotland and 
Ireland. His affection for, or perhaps his more 
intimate knowledge of, the counties of Herts and 
Essex is betrayed in many of his hunting and 
coursing scenes which are laid in the districts where 
he passed his youth. At the age of seventeen he 
began to study engraving, and having in a few 
years mastered the mysteries of the art, was able 
to engrave both his own and his father's pictures. 
In after life his attention was about equally divided 
between painting and engraving ; and in regard to 
this his son states that he was frequently heard, in 
his later years, to regret that he had not devoted 
himself exclusively to the brush ; believing that 
the time and labour he had bestowed on the 
engraver's art had retarded his progress and quali- 
fied the success he might otherwise have won as 
a painter. 



DEAN WOLSTENHOLME, JUNR. 253 

The younger Wolstenholme must have been a 
man of considerable force of character. Born after 
misfortune had overtaken his parents, he did not 
allow the love of sport which his earnings would 
have enabled him to indulge more fully to blind 
him to what he considered his duty, and his younger 
brothers owed much to the assistance he rendered 
in giving them an education. 

His first Royal Academy picture was exhibited 
in the year 181 8, when he was twenty years of age. 
This work was a portrait of " Beach," a favourite 
bull bitch bred at Abergavenny, an engraving of 
which by H. R. Cook appeared in the Annals of 
Sporting for November. 1828. The artist was fond 
of the bull dog, and during his life owned many 
good examples of the breed. The " View of the 
Golden Lane Brewery," painted by his father, was 
the means of suggesting to the young man that in 
the magnificent teams of dray horses owned by 
the great private brewing firms there was a com- 
paratively unworked mine of art possibilities. The 
brewers of an earlier time took great pride in 
their horses, and if we may be guided by existing 
pictures, some of the larger firms made a point of 
using animals of one particular colour. The first 
of the younger Wolstenholme's " Brewery pictures," 
which were simply horse pictures, was Messrs. 
Truman, Hanbury and Buxton's " Black Eagle 



254 ANIMAL PAINTERS 

Brewery ; " this was exhibited in the Royal 
Academy of 1822. A "View of the Hour Glass 
Brewery," in Thames Street, belonging to Messrs. 
Calvert & Co., was one of his contributions to the 
gallery of the British Institution in the following 
year. The last of the series was "Messrs. Barclay, 
Perkins & Co.'s Brewery in Park Street, South- 
wark," painted in 1840. All of these pictures he 
subsequently engraved. 

Commissions for portraits of horses and hounds 
soon began to come in freely. Among his patrons 
were the Earl of Egremont, Lord Glamis, Lord 
Dacre, Colonel Joliffe, and Philip Booth, Esq. 
About 1830, he painted a full-length portrait of 
Lord Glamis in highland dress, with a favourite 
bloodhound at his side, mountain scenery forming 
the background. This picture is now in the posses- 
sion of the Earl of Strathmore, and hangs in the 
dining room at Glamis Castle ; the original sketch 
for this work is owned by the artist's son. Another 
portrait of Lord Glamis with his staghounds was 
painted by Wolstenholme about the same time ; 
the Hon. Francis Bowes Lyon, of Ridley Hall, 
Bardon Mill, Carlisle, possesses this work, which has 
been twice engraved, once by Bromley and again 
by Reynolds. He painted numerous portraits of 
horses and cattle, which possessed interest for 
breeders ; one of these, a likeness of a famous cart- 



DEAN WOLSTENHOLME, JUNR. 255 

horse named Warwick, was engraved. A print of 
it hangs in the rooms of the Shire Horse 
Society. " Friends of the Agricultural Society," 
three heads of bullocks, was exhibited in Suffolk 
Street in 1849. 

Among Wolstenholme's most popular and success- 
ful pictures were " The Burial of Tom Moody," and 
"The Shade of Tom Moody," the former of which 
is here reproduced. Tom Moody, it will be re- 
membered, made a dying request that at his grave 
side six earth stoppers should "give three rattling 
view halloas " in farewell ; which request was duly 
carried out. Both of these works were engraved by 
the artist himself; the copper plates are still in 
existence. A series of four pictures of the Essex 
Hunt afforded him an excellent opportunity of dis- 
playing his skill in grouping numerous figures in 
appropriate landscape. These pictures are entitled 
(i) The Meet at Matching Green ; (2) Drawing the 
Covert of Man Wood ; (3) Fox Crossing from 
Leading Roothing ; and (4) The Death. The 
figures in these pictures — men, horses and hounds 
— are all portraits ; they were painted in the time of 
Mr. Henry J. Conyers, who succeeded his father in 
the Mastership in 18 18. "The Essex Hunt " series 
is now in the possession of Mr. Salvin Bowlby, 
joint master of the Essex Hounds at the present 
time. The artist was likewise the engraver. 



256 ANIMAL PAINTERS 

Four verses of Coursing in the Last Century, 
a descriptive effusion of the old-fashioned kind, 
suppHed him with subjects for a series of four 
coursing jDictures which he engraved and which 
were printed in colours. 

Hunting scenes and coaching pictures were 
numerous among his pictures, but he did not con- 
fine himself exclusively to sport. " Love in a 
Tub" and "The Widow Bewitched" are known 
through the engravings made therefrom. In 1846, 
he exhibited two works which are noteworthy for 
the minute accuracy of the dresses and their 
historical interest. One was a picture of Queen 
Elizabeth, illustrative of a hunting expedition : — 

In April 1556, Princess Elizabeth was escorted from 
Hatfield House to Enfield Chase, that Her Grace might 
hunt the hart, by a retinue of twelve ladies in white satin, all 
on ambling palfreys, and twenty yeomen in green on horse- 
back. At the conclusion of the day's chase, Her Highness 
was honoured by cutting the throat of the hart. 

This work, which measures 6 feet high by 7 feet 
wide, was shown at the Royal Academy ; it is 
now in the possession of Mr. S. Lithgow, of 29, 
Wimpole Street. The Queen rides a cream- 
coloured horse and is surrounded by her atten- 
dants, the majority of whom are mounted, and by 
the hounds. " Queen Elizabeth going to Kenil- 
worth Castle by Torchlight " was shown in the 
same year at the Suffolk Street Exhibition. The 




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DEAN WOLSTENHOLME, JUNR. 257 

pains bestowed by the artist on these works is 
proved by the numberless sketches of costume, 
horse-furniture, appointments, &c., contained in the 
books now in possession of his son. He spent a 
vast amount of time at museums and elsewhere, 
searching out details of dress, &c., for these 
pictures. So full of the undertaking was his mind 
that on one occasion he rose from his bed, dressed 
himself in his sleep and went upstairs to his studio ; 
he did not awake until he actually had palette and 
brushes in hand. Similar cases of somnambulism 
have been recorded. 

Dean Wolstenholme exhibited for the last time 
in the year 1859, when he sent a picture to the 
British Institution, but he continued to paint until 
within a very short time of his death. "Shetland 
Ponies and Sheep " was painted when he was 
eighty years of age, and other works, hunting and 
coaching scenes, came from his easel during the 
remaining years of his life. 

He was a great pigeon-fancier, his speciality 
being the variety known as the "Almond Tumbler," 
which he brought to a high state of perfection. 
The illustrations for Eaton's Book on Pigeons were 
drawn and engraved on steel by him. He also 
executed portraits of numerous prize birds, many 
of which he engraved in life size. A set of these, 
printed in colours, fourteen in number may be seen 
17 VOL 11. 



258 ANIMAL PAINTERS 

in the Print Room at the British Museum. In 
several of these plates (which are " dedicated to the 
Gentlemen of the Feather Club") the metallic sheen 
of the plumage is very beautifully suggested. On 
February 23, 1869, the Pigeon Fanciers of England, 
Scotland and Ireland presented him with a testi- 
monial to mark their esteem for his private 
character and their admiration for the skill with 
which he portrayed those birds which it is the aim 
of the " Fancy " to produce. 

Dean Wolstenholme, it may be added, was the 
inventor of a process of colour printing which was 
afterwards patented by Leighton Brothers. 

From 1820 till about 1862 the artist lived in 
Chads Row, Gray's Inn Road ; he then mov^ed 
to Highgate, where he passed the remainder of 
his days. Many of his later pictures are landscapes 
showing the scenery of Hendon, Hampstead and 
Finchley. The metropolis saw comparatively little 
of him however. Until the last he was a great 
traveller, and in course of his long life visited 
nearly every corner of the United Kingdom. 
Like George Stubbs and others of the craft, he 
continued hale and active till a few weeks before 
his death, and thought nothing of a twelve- 
mile walk. He died in 1882, at the advanced 
age of eighty-four An old friend of his, now 
living, has described his character. " A man at 




From a i^ortrait painted by himself. 

DEAN WOLSTENHOLME, JUNR. 



WORKS OF DEAN WOLSTENHOLME, JUNR. 259 

once upright and true, honest and gentle minded, 
a kind friend and one that I most sincerely and very 
highly respected." 

The portrait here given is from a picture painted 
by himself and was considered an admirable like- 
ness. 



WORKS OF DEAN WOLSTENHOLME, Junior. 

PICTURES EXHIBITED AT THE ROYAL ACADEMY 
(14 in number). 

YEAR 

i8i3 — BEACH, a favourite bull bitch, bred at Abergavenny, the property of a Gentleman. 

iSig—PORTXA/TS OF THREE HORSES, the property of — Wyatt, Esq., Sun 
Brewhouse, Portpool Lane. 

1821— (2) THREE DOE RABBITS OF FANCY BREED, the property of a Gentle- 
man— /^Oi/./? BUCK RABBITS, the property of a Gentleman. 

iS2i—y/ElF OF THE BLACK EAGLE BREIVERV, belonging to Messrs. Truman, 
Hanbury, Buxton & Co., with portraits of Horses, Men, &c. 

liiy— HARLOT, A STAG HOUND, WITH PUPPIES, belonging to Lord Glamis. 

1824— /I FAVOURITE HACKNEY AND DOG, the property of a Gentleman. 

1825— <2) TERRIERS FERRETING RABBITS— PORTRAIT OF PHILIP BOOTH, 
ESQ.— VIEW FROM HATCH WOOD, LOOKING TOWARDS LORD 
D ACRE'S. 

■ii^d—BACKERTRUMPS, a trotter, the property of George Wyatt, Esq. 

iSaS— FAVOURITE HUNTER, the property of Philip Booth, Esq. 

1S46— QUEEN ELIZABETH ESCORTED FROM HATFIELD HOUSE TO 
ENFIELD CHASE TO HUNT THE HART. 

li^9—A MORNING SHOOTING. 



PICTURES EXHIBITED AT THE BRITISH 
INSTITUTION (8 in number). 

1823— (2) VIEW IN SURREY FROM THE OLD BRIGHTON ROAD, LOOKING 
TOWARDS GATTON, 2 ft. 4 in. by 2ft. 8 m.—A VIEW OF THE HOUR- 
CLASS BREWERY, THAMES STREET, belonging to Messrs. Calvert & 
Co., 4 ft. 4 in. by 5 ft. 2 in. 

1824— /I VIEW OF R UINS IN HER TFORDSHIRE, 3 ft. 4 in. by 3 ft. 10 in. 

1825— .4 FAVOURITE FOXHOUND, 2 ft. 4 in. by 2 ft. 8 in. 

ii2i— LANDSCAPE, WITH HOUNDS RUNNING ACROSS THE COUNTRY, a 
view in Hertfordshire, i ft. 4 in. by i ft. 8 in. 



26o ANIMAL PAINTERS 

\at^-PR/JVCESS ELIZABETH ESCORTED FROM HATFIELD HOUSE TO 

ENFIELD CHASE, 6 ft. 4 in. by 7 ft. 3 in. 
1833— /4 PROCESSION OF QUEEN ELIZABETH TO KENILWORTH CASTLE, 

3 ft. by 3 ft. 6 in. 
xZiCj-BEAGLES WAITING FOR THE MEET. 

PICTURES EXHIBITED AT THE SOCIETY OF BRITISH 
ARTISTS, SUFFOLK STREET GALLERIES (13 in number). 

^^2^— INTERIOR OF A BARN, ESSEX. 

ji26— PORTRAIT OF A GIRL, WITH A FAVOURITE PUPPV. 

^Z2(,— PORTRAIT OF A BOY, WITH A FAVOURITE HOUND. 

1827— (2) A LANDSCAPE VIEW (hom Nature)— HOUNDS FORDING A RIVER 

(from Nature). 
1828— (2) AN OLD HUNTER, the property of J. Lyons, Ksq.—PORTRAIT OF A 

TERRIER, WITH PUPPIES. 
1829—/. BOOTH, JUN., ESQ., WITH TWO FAVOURITE HORSES. 
^Szo— FAVOURITE SPANIELS. 

iZy^—THE TRIAL OF REBECCA, vide Sir Walter Scott's " Ivanhoe." 
1846— (2) QUEEN ELIZABETH ESCORTED BY THE EARL OF LEICESTER 

TO KENILWORTH CASTLE— INTERIOR OF A GA.MEKEEPER'S 

COTTAGE AFTER A MORNING'S SHOOTING. 
litg-FRIENDS OF THE AGRICULTURAL SOCIETY. 



26l 



JOHN WOOTTON. 

(Born circa 1685. Died 1765.) 

JOHN WOOTTON was born about the year 
1685. Matthew Pilkington, Horace Walpole, 
and other authorities state that he was at one time 
a pupil of John Wyck, the celebrated Dutch painter, 
whose battle scenes, equestrian pictures, and hunt- 
ing and hawking pieces are well known. If 
Wootton did enjoy the advantages of John Wyck's 
tuition, he must have done so when he was very 
young, the Dutch master having died at Mortlake 
in 1702, when Wootton would have been about 
seventeen years of age, if we are correct in be- 
lieving 1685 to have been the year of his birth. 

After studying in London, Wootton took up his 
residence at Newmarket for the purpose of painting 
the likenesses of horses ; and during his stay here 
he executed his principal works connected with the 
turf. Seymour and Spencer were at this time 
hardly out of the nursery, and Peter Tilleman 
devoted no attention to this department of art ; 
John Wootton, therefore, stood practically alone 
as a painter of equine portraits, and found many 



262 ANIMAL PAINTERS 

patrons. Among his more influential friends he 
counted Henry, third Duke of Beaufort. The 
Duke was something more than a patron to him ; 
when he recognised the young artist's abihty he 
generously sent him at his own expense to study 
at Rome. Horace Walpole, in his Anecdotes of 
Painting, published in 1782, says that Wootton 
painted "with consummate skill, animation and 
truth," and describes him as "a capital master in 
the branch of his profession to which he chiefly 
devoted himself" Walpole's opinion has been 
endorsed by Sir Edwin Landseer. Among the 
many works by Wootton in the Badminton collec- 
tion is a small one of a covey of partridges with 
pointers drawing up followed by men with nets. 

The present Duke, in a communication to the 
writer, says that Sir Edwin declared this to be "not 
only a far better picture than he himself had ever 
painted, but the best animal picture he had ever 
seen ; that you could see the dog crawling along to 
the birds." Wootton obtained high fees for his 
pictures according to the standard ruling during his 
day. Pilkington states that " for painting a single 
horse he has been paid forty guineas, and twenty 
when smaller than life." Forty guineas for the life- 
size portrait of a race-horse would hardly content 
an artist of very moderate pretensions in these 
days. 



JOHN WOOTTON 263 

The Duke of Portland has in the collection at 
Welbeck Abbey fourteen examples of Wootton's 
works : — 

(i) Landscape with View of a Plain : three horsemen water- 
ing their horses at a stream : in the foreground a pack mule 
covered with a red cloth, followed by a white horse with a 
blue cloth, a man and a dog. 

(2) A Brown Wolf: life-size. Landscape with hill to the 
right : 50 inches by 40^ inches. 

(3) Brown-and-White Antelope, life-size: landscape with 
fir trees in background : 40-i inches by 40 inches. 

(4) The Countess of Oxford : wearing a scarlet-and-silver 
habit and black hat. She rides a dun mare with red trap- 
pings. By her side a running footman in blue-and-white 
livery, knee breeches, black jockey cap laced with silver 
cord, bearing a cane ; behind, a groom in blue livery on a 
dark-brown horse : 30 inches by 25 inches. 

(5) The Starting Post, Newmarket, 37 inches by 58 inches. 

(6) The Countess of O.xford, on a dun mare attended by 
a groom in blue livery. Landscape with trees in back- 
ground ; 8 feet 10 inches by 11 feet. 

(7) White Arab Horse, with black attendant in red leaning 
on a wall : a greyhound in foreground : landscape back- 
ground. 

(8) Dun Mare, with attendant, to left a dun Arab horse 
held by a black groom dressed in blue with red cap. In 
foreground lie a crimson saddle and stirrups, a blue bow, 
quiver of arrows and scimitar : 7 feet by 5 feet 8 inches. 

(9) Dun Mare, held by groom ; sheet of water in middle 
distance : 50 inches by 40^ inches. 

(10) Hare Hunting on Orwell Hill. The Countess of 
O.xford in green-and-silver habit on a dun mare ; on left a 
gentleman in scarlet on a brown horse ; horseman behind. 
In foreground, a boy in blue with hare slung over his 
shoulder. In distance a rider who has lost control of his 
horse; two running footmen; hounds in full cry: 6 feet 11 
inches by 9 feet 8 inches. 



264 ANIMAL PAINTERS 

(11) Hare Hunting, a dead hare with two dogs on right 
and left, on the branch of a tree perches a jay. 

(12) Hawking in Wimpole Park; the Countess of Oxford 
in scarlet-and-gold liabit attended by running footmen in 
blue-and-white liveries. A central group of a clergyman, 
gentleman and falconer, all on horseback. Below a hill other 
falconers on horseback and several spaniels : 7 feet i inch by 
10 feet. 

(13) Landscape: in foreground a lady in an open carriage 
drawn by six horses, with an outrider and mounted groom 
with led horse. To the left a party of gentlemen and 
horse led by groom : 45 inches by 50 inches. 

(14) Casey, the Countess of Oxford's black-and-white 
spaniel, on a crimson velvet cushion : 50 inches by 40 inches. 

The present Duke of Beaufort possesses many 
of Wootton's works. In the front hall at Badminton 
are five large pictures: "A Stag Hunt," painted 
before the artist's visit to Rome ; " Hunting on 
Salisbury Plain," with a view of Stonehenge in the 
distance ; " Hunting on Salisbury Plain," with a 
view of Netheravon House ; " Newmarket from 
the Cambridge side of the Ditch," and the race 
horse Gripe, being rubbed down after winning 
a race. The last-named work, which is dated 1 734, 
contains portraits of the third Duke, his brother, 
and Sir Watkin Williams Wynn, who stands by 
looking on. 

Two important pictures by Wootton may be seen 
in the long corridor at Windsor Castle ; these are 
large canvases representing the Royal Buckhounds 
hunting in Windsor Forest with many horsemen. 



JOHN WOOTTON 265 

There are two pictures by this artist in St. 
James's Palace, and a third labelled as by "Wootton 
and Pyne." The latter is a life-size equestrian 
portrait of King George II., on a dark chestnut 
horse with white hind feet ; its mane is plaited with 
blue ribbons. It hangs over the mantel piece in 
the first reception room and measures 7 feet 1 1|- 
inches by 9 feet 7 inches. This picture was 
formerly at Carlton House. The other two are 
examples of Wootton's battle scenes, depicting the 
siege of Lisle and the Siege of Tournay respec- 
tively ; each measures 10 feet by 16 feet. They 
were formerly in the great drawing-room at 
Kensington Palace. At Goodwood House, the 
Duke of Richmond has seven pictures by John 
Wootton; one, dated 1733, is a portrait of Lady 
Georgina Lennox with a pony and attendant ; the 
other six are portraits of hunters, including the 
famous Bay Bolton. The Marquis of Bath has six 
hunting pieces by Wootton in his collection at 
Longleat. 

At Osberton Hall, Worksop, Mr. F. I. S. 
Foljambe has a portrait of Flying Childers ; it 
is on canvas and measures 4 feet 10 inches by 
3 feet 1 1 inches. 

Lord Rothschild, in his collection at Tring Park, 
has an equestrian portrait of Sarah Jennings, 
wife of the first Duke of Marlborough ; she wears 



266 ANIMAL PAINTERS 

a plain but elegant riding habit and a wide brimmed 
Leghorn hat. 

The Elsenham collection contains several exam- 
ples of Wootton's work, among which may be 
mentioned : a large upright painting of Sir 
Robert Walpole standing by his hunter, with 
hounds in the foreground ; " Waiting for the 
Master," a groom holding a crop-eared grey, an 
engraving from which is here reproduced. These 
two pictures were formerly at Houghton Hall. 
Other pictures are : a portrait of The Bloody 
Shouldered Arabian, with his Persian groom and 
a greyhound, signed and dated 1726; and a life- 
size portrait of an Irish Water Spaniel. The 
latter is an excellent specimen of Wootton's skill 
as an animal painter ; it is in a quaint wooden 
frame of the period, with an emblematical female 
head in a large shell carved on the top. This 
picture was in the Hamilton Castle collection, 
sold at Christie's. 

For the Hunting Hall at Houghton, Norfolk, 
Wootton painted a hunting piece 8 feet 5 inches 
long and 6 feet 10 inches wide, into which he in- 
troduced equestrian portraits of Sir Robert Walpole, 
Colonel Charles Churchill, and Mr. Thomas Turner. 
An engraving, plate 24 inches by 17 inches, from 
this picture by D. Lerpinsir was published in 1778 
by John Boydell. 



JOHN WOOTTON 267 

Earl Spencer has now in his collection a very 
clever group painting of Wootton, entitled, " The 
Chase is Over," an enairavinor from which faces 
p. 270. This work was painted for the gallery at 
Althorp in Northamptonshire ; the figures in the 
foreground represent the Hon. John Spencer, 
Charles, Duke of Marlborough, and Lord Vane. 
From the Atina/s of Sporting for October, 1827, 
we take the following quotation from an article 
referring to the picture, an engraving from which, 
by Percy Roberts, is there reproduced : 

Charles, the second Duke of Marlborough, the grandfather 
of the present Duke, was at the period of which we are 
speaking the possessor of Althorp, and his spirit and 
liberality led him to decorate the broad sides of the superb 
entrance hall with paintings by the pencil of the once famed 
and still highly esteemed John Wootton, descriptive of the 
matchless pleasures of the jovial chase. 

To the left, covering the whole side, there is a glowing 
representation of that moment of " maddening joy," " A 
Burst " ; whilst opposite, and of equal dimensions, is its 
companion (the original of our engraving), "The Chase is 
over." 

The main incidents of the picture are so famihar to every 
good sportsman that we need not illustrate by words ; 
Reynard is beaten — slain ; the huntsman holds him aloft, 
and the brush being won, the hungered hounds are leaping 
around in eager rivalry for their share of the spoil. 

To the left of the picture, in the foreground, is a group 
drawn and executed with great spirit and truth. The lower 
figure, to the left, is the Hon. John Spencer, grandfather to the 
present Earl ; the central figure is that of Charles Duke of 
Marlborough ; and the third figure, to the right, is that of 



268 ANIMAL PAINTERS 

Lord Vane, who used constantly to hunt with the Duke 
and, judging from his appearance, we should set him down 
as equally good in the field and jovial at the table. He was 
a jolly dog, depend upon it. 

There are other parts of the painting which will also bear 
a scrutiny, and which well depictures the moment when, with 
the modern poet of Scotland, we may exclaim : 

Huntsman, rest, the chase is done ; 
Think not yet of rising sun. 

Now, we are quite aware that our modern, fast-going fox- 
hunters, with whom pace is everything, will smile at the 
hunting caps, high boots, ample coats, and all the etceteras 
of costume which make up a sportsman of a century ago ; 
but still there are those who look back with fond reminiscence 
to the jovialities of the olden time, and who assert that, 
although we might have gained in speed, shape, breed, and 
show, we have lost in tone, stoutness, in hunting-caps (really 
a loss in our opinion), and in pluck over the bowl. Noit 
nostrum tantas componere lites. It is not for us to reconcile 
these differences. It is our province to please both parties, 
and both, in this instance, may be assured that we have 
shown them a true sporting field of the time of George the 
First. 

One of Wootton's best known portraits is that 
of Tregonwell Frampton, Esq., " The Father of 
the Turf," who died on March 12, 1727, at the 
age of 86, when King George II. was on the 
throne. Mr. Frampton was the owner of the 
famous race-horse. Dragon, concerning which an 
utterly incredible story is told, and was Keeper of 
the Running Horses at Newmarket to William III., 
Queen Anne, George I., and George II. The 
portrait shows the old man seated in his easy chair 



JOHN WOOTTON 269 

with a trimmed fighting cock on a table at his side, 
and a greyhound resting- its head upon his knee, 
and a portrait of " Dragon " hanging on the right 
on the wall of the room in which the old man is 
seated. 

It was engraved by " John Jones, Engraver extra- 
ordinary to the Prince of Wales and published 1791 
by J. Bodger, Land Surveyor, Stilton, Hunts, and 
at 53, High Holborn." Frampton was a great 
character, and twelve closely-printed lines describe 
the remarkable event of his life in connection with 
the race-horse Dragon. The size of plate, which 
includes the small printed matter following the 
portrait, is 21 inches by 14 inches. In the Racing 
Calendar for 1 790 will be found on the last page 
(413) an advertisement for the sale of the engraving : 
" The price to subscribers for prints on paper in 
colours ^i IS., in blank los. 6d., may be seen at 
Mr. Weatherby's, the Racing Calendar office, 7, 
Oxenden Street, London ; and in order to save 
trouble to the subscribers, the money may be paid 
into his hands, and there remain until the delivery 
of the print." Mr. Bodger also supplied this print 
and all his other published works, printed on silk, 
price £\ I IS. 6d. 

At a much earlier date than the above, a plate 
was engraved, evidently from the original painting, 
by J. Faber — size of plate 15 inches by 10 



270 ANIMAL PAINTERS 

inches. It differs from the larger and more 
recent engraving in that it bears under the likeness 
and above the letterpress a portrait of Dragon 
in a circular medallion. A third plate, similar to 
this, giving the portrait, was engraved by John 
Scott for the Sporting Magazine, vol. 18, for April, 
1801. 

Several of Wootton's pictures of race-horses were 
engraved ; a set of seven paintings entitled " Fox 
Hunting," were engraved by Carnot ; and for 
Gay's Fables, published in 1727, he executed a 
series of illustrations which display both ability 
and humour. A portrait of William Duke of 
Cumberland, with the routed army of the Pretender 
in the back-ground, was engraved by Baron. 

According to Mathew Pilkington, whose Dic- 
tionary of Painters was first published in 1770, 
Wootton "was first distinguished by frequenting 
Newmarket, and drawing race-horses," and "after- 
wards applied himself to landscape, approaching 
towards Caspar Poussin, and sometimes imitating 
happily the glow of Claude Lorraine." 

Wootton possessed a collection of his own works 
which were sold when he gave up painting, which 
he did a few years before his death. His drawincrs 
and prints were sold on January 21, 1761, and his 
pictures on March 12 and 13 following. He 
evidently prospered as an artist ; he built for 




From a Painting by John U'ootton. 

THE CHASE IS OVER 



WORKS OF JOHN WOOTTON 27 I 

himself a house in Cavendish Square, and displayed 
much taste and judgment in adornino- the interior 
with his own brush. He died at Cavendish Square 
in 1765, when he would have been about eighty 
years of age. 



INDEX TO PAINTINGS, ENGRAVINGS, SCULPTURES, &c. 



Abbotsford, Scene at 

" Adonis," King George IV. 's charger, 1S22, 

1842 

Adversity (the Cabman's Horse) 

iEsop's Fables, Subject from 

Age and Infancy 

Age and Infancy, Spanish Grandfalher and 

English Offspring 

"Alarm" 

Albemarle, Portrait of Earl of 
"Albert," with Connolly, the Jockey 

Alderney Bull 

Alderney Cow, An, 1798, 1828 

Alexander and Diogenes 

Allegory of Battle of Waterloo 

" All that remains of the Glory of William 

Smith" 

Almond Tumbler, The (2) ... 
" A London Particular " 

Alpine Mastiff 

Alpine Mastiffs 

" Amato," a colt 

" Ambrosio," after G. Slubbs, K.A. 

" Ambrosio," a stallion 

American Aloe, The 

American Bear at bay... 
American Wolves 
Amour du Cheval, L'... 

Angler's Guard, The 

Anglers packing up ... 

Angling (4 plates) 

Angling for Salmon 

Angling, preparing for Sport... 

Animals 

Antelope Hunting 

" Anticipation " 

" Antinous," a racehorse 

"Anvil" 

Arab belonging to Lord Powers, An 

Arahian, An ... 

Arabian, An, 181 1, 1818, 1834 
Arabian, Portrait of an, 1808, 1S13.. 

"Archibald," a racehorse 

Atistides" 



Sir Edwin Landseer, R.A. 

James Ward, R.A. 

Sir Edwin Landseer, R.A 

K C. Turner 

James Ward, R.A. 

J. Ward, R.A 

John F. Herring 

George Stubbs, R.A, 
Lambert Marshall 
James Ward, R.A. 
James Ward, R.A. : 

Sir Edwin Landseer, R.A 
James Ward, R.A. 



Sir Edwin Landseer, R.A 
James Ward, R.A. 

C. C. Henderson 

Sir Edwin Landseer, R.A, 
Sir Edwin Landseer, R.A 
F. C. Turner 
John Scolt 
George Stubbs, R.A. 
Philip Reinagle, R.A. 
Samuel Howitt ... 
Samuel Howitt ... 
James Ward, R.A. 
Sir Edwin Landseer, R 
James Pollard 
Samuel Howitt ... 
Samuel Howitt ... 
Samuel Howitt ... 
Charles Hancock... 
Samuel Howitt ... 
Benjamin Marshall 
Francis Sartorius... 
George Stubbs, R.A. 
James Waid, R.A. 
Benjamin Marshall 
James Ward, R.A. 
John N. Sartorius... 
Lambert Marshall 
John F. Herring ... 



53 



PAOE 

... 55 

240, 242 
... 79 
... 221 
... 242 

... 242 

••• 34 
... 196 
... 98 
... 241 
30, 239, 241 

75. 77 
... 232 



83 

243 

19 

84 

1,83 
222 
158 
206 
122 

46 

46 
241 

74 
103 

46 

44 
46 

«3 

44 

95 

127 

199 

232 

94 

241 

140 

98 

34 



39. 249, 



INDEX 



Arrest of the False Herald 

Artist, Portrait of an 

Artist, Portrait of the 

Artist, Portrait of the, 1831, 1846 

Artist's Mother, aged 80, The 

Ascot ... 

Asses waiting return of fishing boats 

Ass Race, The 

Astley, and his Harriers, Francis Dukinfield 

At Fault 

Athol, and Mr. George Murray, Duke of ... 

Attachment 

" Attila," a Derby Winner 

"Augusta" 

Away ... 

Awkward Predicament, The... 

Aylesbury Steeplechase, The. (i) The Start. 
(2) The Brook. (3) The Bank. (4) The 
Finish. 



Sir Edwin Landseer, R.A. 
George Stubbs, R.A. 
George Stubbs, R.A. 
James Ward, R.A. 
James Ward, R.A. 
James Pollard 
James Ward, R.A. 
Samuel Howitt ... 

B. Marshall 

John N. Sartorius 

Sir E. Landseer, R.A. ... 

Sir Edwin Landseer, R.A. 

Chas. Hancock, 

James Ward, R.A. 

Samuel Howitt 

F. C. Turner 



James Pollard 



273 

PAGE 
.,. 79 
... 206 
. . . 204 
... 241 
... 241 
100, 106 
•■■ 239 
... 44 
... 90 
... 141 
... 76 
... 76 

4, S. 1.3 
... 241 
... 38 

... 219 



106, 107 



"Babel" 

" Babraham " and mare 

Bacchanalian, A 

Bachelor's Hall, Series 

" B,ackertrumps " a trotter 

Bad Day, The 

"Badger" 

Badger and Terriers ... 
Badger Hunting 

Badger Hunting 

Badger Hunt, The 

" Bagdad," an Arab charger 

Baker, George, Esq., on his Favourite old 

Mare 

"Bandy" 

" Banks " and a Foxhound ... 
" Banker," a racer 

Baptismal Font, The 

Baptiser, The ... 

Barclay, Perkins & Co.'s Brewery 

" Barefoot," a racehorse 
Barn, Essex, Interior of a 

"Baron," The 

"Baronet" 

Barouche and Four, afler M. H. Pyite, 

A.R.A 

Barrow Pig, The 

"Bashaw" 

Battle 

Battle, A 

Battle between Herons and Rooks 

18 



Benjamin Marshall 95 

Thomas Spencer ... ... ... iSo 

James Ward, R.A. ... ... 232 

F. C. Turner 219 

Dean Wolstenholme, Jun. ... 259 

James Ward, R.A. 240 

Benjamin Marshall ... ... 95 

Samuel Howitt ... ... ... 46 

Samuel Howitt ... ... ... 44 

Lambert Marshall 98 

F.C.Turner 222 

John F. Herring 31 

Charles Hancock 10 

George Stubbs, R.A 199 

James Ward, R.A. 240 

Benjamin Marshall ... ... 95 

Sir Edwin Landseer, R.A. ... 78 

James Ward, R.A. 242 

Dean Wolstenholme, Jun. ... 254 

John F. Herring 26,35 

Dean Wolstenholme, Jun. ... 260 

John F. Herring ...27, 34 

George Stubbs, R.A. ... 199, 206 

John Scott 160 

James Ward, R.A. 242 

Sir Edwin Landseer, R.A. ... 76 

James Ward, R.A. 239 

Thomas Stothard, R.A 190 

Samuel Howitt 45 

VOL. II. 



274 



INDEX 



Battle near Boston, Lincolnshire 

Battle of the Bull-dog and Monkey 

" Bay Bolton," a Hunter ... 

Bay Horse, Portrait of a 

" Bay Malton," a racehorse 

" Bay Malton" beating " King Herod " ... 

" Bay Middleton," a racehorse 

" Bay Middleton " 

Bay of Sarza, View in the 

" Beach," a Bull Bitch 

Beagles waiting for the Meet... 

Bean, Master 

Bean, Miss 

Bear-Hunting 

Beaufort and Sisters, Duke of 

Beaumont, Herts 

" Beauty " and "Sprite" 

Becher on Ladybird, Master... 

"Bedlamite" 

Begonia, The ... 

Belcher, Thomas, Portrait of... 

" Belfont," a fast trotter 

"Bella, Horrida Bella" 

"Bellissima" beating "Warter" and 
" Diamond " at O-xford 

" Bellman," a deerhound 

Belvidere rounding the Flag Buoy, The 

Benevolent Cottager, The 

Bengal Pitfall 

" Benningbrough " 

Bentinck, Daughter of Lord Charles, after 
Chalon 

Berkeley Hunt, The 

Bethany, the day after rai.sing Lazarus 

Betts, Mr. Samuel, Sketch of 

Bevan, Miss, and Richard Lee, Esq., Eques- 
trian portraits of ... 

Bevis conveying Tomkins' glove to Wood- 
stock 

" Bijou," a Bitch 

"Bijou" and "Beauty" 

Billesdon Coplow, ////«/>'a//i'K.r /c ... 

Bird-Keeper's Repast, The 

Bittern, A 

Bittern and Spaniel ... 

Black and Red Grouse fighting 

Black-breasted Dark Red, The 

Blackcock 

Blackcock and Grey hen 

Black Eagle Brewery ... 

Black Highland Ox 

"Blackleg" 

" Blacklock," a racehorse 

" Blackthorn" and a favourite pony 



PAGE 

James Ward, R.A. 241 

Samuel Howitt ... ... ... 44 

John Wootton 265 

George Stubbs, R.A 203 

Francis Sartorius 127 

John F. Sartorius ... ... 144 

Charles Hancock... ... ... 4 

John Y. Herring 27, 33 

Philip Reinagle, R.A 122 

Dean Wolstenholme, Jun. 253, 259 
Dean Wolstenholme, Jun. . . . 260 

James Ward, R.A. .. .. 240 

James Ward, R.A. ... ... 240 

Samuel Howitt ... ... ... 44 

Sir Edwin Landseer, R.A. ... 79 

James Ward, R.A. ... ... 241 

James Ward, R.A. 242 

F. C. Turner ... 215, 221, 222 

John F. Herring 35 

Philip Reinagle, R.A. ... .. 122 

Benjamin Marshall ... ... 88 

Dean Wolstenholme, .Sen. ... 250 

Samuel Howitt ... ... 39, 43 

John N. Sartorius 140 

G. A. Turner 224 

F. C. Turner 223 

John Scott 157 

Samuel Howitt ... ... ... 46 

John N. Sartorius ... ... 140 

John Scott 157 

C. C. Hender.son. ... 18, 21 

J. Ward, R.A 242 

Benjamin Marshall ... 91, 94 



R. W. Buss and Chas. Hancock 



13 



G. A. Turner ... ... ... 224 

F. C. Turner 223 

F.C.Turner ... ... ... 221 

F.C.Turner ... ... 218,219 

James Ward, R.A. ... ... 239 

James Ward, R.A. ... ... 240 

.Samuel Howitt ... ... ... 45 

F. C. Turner ... ... ... 223 

Benjamin Marshall ... ... 87 

Samuel Howitt ... ... ... 46 

Sir Edwin Landseer, R.A. ... Si 

Dean Wolstenholme, Jun. 253, 259 

Sir Edwin Landseer, R.A. ... Si 

Benjamin Marshall ... ... 95 

John F. Herring 35 

James Ward, R.A. 240 



INDEX 



" Blank," Portrait of Duke of Ancaster's ... 
Blenheim Spaniels 

Blcssington's Dog, Lady 

Blood horse 
Bloodhound 

Bloodhound, A 

Bloodhounds ... 

Bloody-shouldered Arabian, The 

Bloody-shouldered Arabian, The 
" Bloomsbury," a Derby Winner 

" Blue Bonnet," a racehorse 

" Blue Cap," a foxhound 

Blue Passion-flower and Night-blooming 

Cerea 

Boa Constrictor and Antelope 
Boa seizing a Horse ... 

Boar Hunting in India 

" Bob," a favourite old horse 

" Bob," a terrier 

"Bonatic," a racehorse .. 

Book of Common Prayer, Westall's, plates 

in ... 

Bookplates 

Booth, Esq., Portrait of Philip 

Booth, junr., Esq., with favourite horses, J. 

Bottom-fishing 

Boy and favourite Hound, Portrait of a 

Boy, Portrait of a (2) 

Brackendale Hill, Norfolk, View from 

Bradby Cedar ... 

Braemar 

Bran and Oscar 

"Bravura" 

Brazilian Monkeys, Pair of 

Breaking Covert 

" Breeze," a retriever ... 

Bringing up tail Hounds 

British Field Sports, Engravings for silver 

buttons 

British Game Fowls 

^x\\x^Vat\.s,, Illustrations in 

British Sportsmen 

Brocado, General Shubrick's colt 

Broke Cover 

Broken Teapot, The 

Brood Mare and Foal, 1819, 1824 

Brood Mare and Foals 

Brood Mares 

Brood Mares 

Brown and White Antelope 

Brown Mastiff, The 

Brown Shooting Pony in Landscape 

Brown Wolf, A 

Browsing 



George Stubbs, R.A. 
Charles Hancock... 
.Sir Edwin Landseer, R.A. 
John N. Sartorius 
James Ward, R.A. 
Charles Hancock... 
Samuel Howitt ... 
James Seymour ... 

John Wootton 

Chas. Hancock ... 
Charles Hancock... 
John N. Sartorius 

Philip Reinagle, R.A. ... 
Samuel Howitt ... 
James Ward, R.A. 
James Ward, R.A. 
James Ward, R.A. 
Sir Edwin Landseer, R.A. 
Thomas Spencer 

John Scott 

John Scott 

Dean Wolstenholme, Jun. 

Dean Wolstenholme, Jun. 

James Pollard 

Dean Wolstenholme, Jun. 

George Stubbs, R.A. 

P. Reinagle, R.A. 

James Ward, R.A. 

Sir Edwin Landseer, R.A. 

Sir Edwin Landseer, R.A. 

Benjamin Marshall 

Sir Edwin Landseer, R.A. 

F. C. Turner 

Sir Edwin Landseer, R.A. 
Samuel Howitt 

John Scott 

Lambert Marshall 
Thomas Stothard, R.A. ... 
Samuel Howitt ... 

John F. Herring 

F.C.Turner 

Charles Hancock 

John N. Sartorius 
Benjamin Marshall 
Lambert Marshall 
James Ward, R.A. 

John Wootton 

Sir Edwin Landseer, R.A. 

Charles Hancock 

John Wootton 

Sir Edwin Landseer, R.A. 



275 

PAGE 

... 203 

12 

... 74 

... 140 

240, 243 

II 

...41,46 
... 167 
... 266 
... 13 

4> 5. 13 
... 141 

... 122 

... 46 

... 240 

... 240 

... 240 

... 84 

... 179 

... 156 

... 162 

... 259 

. . . 260 

... 103 

... 260 

. . . 205 

... 121 

... 240 

... 80 

... 77 

... 95 

... 77 

... 219 

... 77 

... 45 

... 161 

... 98 

... 182 

... 38 

... 32 

... 218 

... I, 12 

... 140 

... 95 
... 9S 
... 241 
... 263 
... 50 
7 
. . . 263 
61, 82 



276 



INDEX 



" Brutus," a bull terrier 

Brj'an's O'Lynn 

Buck's Death Wound, The 

Buck grazing, A 

Buffalo, A 

Buffalo Hunting 

Bull-Baiting 

Bull Bait, The 

Bull, Cow and Calf ( " Landscape 

Cattle") 

Bull Dogs 

Bull Dog, The 

Bulls Fighting (2) 

Bulls Fighting 

Burial of Tom Moody... 

Burns, Robert 

Busfield, D.D., Rev. J. A 

Butler's " Miss Coiner," Mr., 1809 ... 

"Buzzard" 

" By your leave, Gentlemen " 





PAGE 


... Sir Edwin Landseer, 


R.A. 51, 54, 75 


... John N. Sartorius... 


141 


... Samuel Howitt ... 


46 


... Samuel Howitt 


45 


... George Stubbs, R.A. 


206 


... Samuel Howitt ... 


44 


... Samuel Howitt ... 


44 


... James Ward, R.A. 
itli 


229, 239 


... James Ward, R.A. 


234, 235, 238 


... James Ward, R.A. 


241 


... Samuel Howitt ... 


44 


... George Stubbs, R.A. 


206 


... James Ward, R.A. 


238 


... Dean Wolstenholme, 


Jun. ... 25s 


... Charles Hancock... 


12 


... James Ward, R.A. 


240 


. . . John N. Sartorius 


140 


... John N. Sartorius 


149 


... F. C. Turner 


223 



Cabman's Horse, The (Adversity) .. 

" Callach," a Deerhound 

Callen Arabian and Mare, The 

"Camarine" ... 

Cambridge Telegraph Starting, The 

Canine Friends 

Canine Landing Net, The 

"Cannon Ball" 

Canter before the Race, The 

Canterbury Pilgrims ... 
Canterburj' Pilgrims, yf?-.r/ sketch for 
Capercailzie, The 
" Cardinal Ruff," a racehorse 
" Careless," a racehorse 
Carriage Match, The ... 
Cart-horse, Portrait of a 
Carthorse, Portrait of a, 1802, 1810 

Cart Horses ... 

Cart Horses 

Carting of Corn 

Carting Sea-weed 

" Casey," a Spaniel 

"Cashmere" 

Cat and the Rat, The 

Cathedral Antiquities, //ato in 

Caton, Jack and Barra 

Cattle, 1803, 1808, 1810 

Cattle, Group of 

Cattle, Improved Shorthorns 
Cattle in a Storm, 1798, 1810 



Sir Edwin Landseer, R.A. 




79 


F.C.Turner 




222 


Thomas Spencer 




180 


John F. Herring 


"28, 33 


James Pollard 




104 


Sir Edwin Landseer, R.A. 




79 


Samuel Howitt 




46 


Benjamin Marshall 




95 


F. C. Turner 




223 


Thomas Stothard, R.A. 1S4, 


1 87, 


190 


Thomas Stothard, R.A.... 




185 


F.C.Turner 




222 


Francis Sartorius 




127 


John Sartorius 




126 


James Seymour ... 169, 


170, 


173 


Francis Sartorius 




131 


John N. Sartorius 




140 


Samuel Howitt 




44 


James Ward, R.A. 




243 


George Stubbs, R.A. 




206 


James Ward, R.A. 




242 


John Wootton 




264 


Charles Hancock 




12 


Samuel Howitt 




45 


John Scott 




156 


Charles Hancock 




12 


James Ward, R.A. 




239 


Philip Reinagle, R.A. ... 




122 


Benjamin Marshall 




94 


James Ward, R.A. 


230, 


1 239 



INDEX 



Cattle, Study of 

Cat's Paw, The 

Cavendish, The Hon. Richard 
Celebrated Cab-horse, A 
Celebrated Race, A. ... 
Celebrated Sportsman, The ... 
Ceremony of the Dunmovv Flitch, The 
Chace, The 
Chaise Horse, A 
" Champion" ... 
Chancellor running amuck 

Change of Pasture 

Charger, A, 1805, 181 3 

Charger, The 

Charger, The ... 

Charger, The, after B. Marshall 

Charger and four Cossacks, Prince PlatofP: 

Charger and Pony, A... 

Charger, Portrait of a... 

Charity ... 

Charles I., History of King ... 

" Charles the Twelfth," a racehorse 

Chase, The 

Chase, The 

Chase, The 

Chase, The 

Chase, The, plaks for Somerville's, after J. 

N. Sartorius 

Chase is over, The 

Chatsworth 

Cherubim Shooting 

Cheshire Pile, The 
Chesterton Windmill ... 
Chestnut Arabian, The 
Chestnut Barb Stallion, A ... 
Chestnut Horse, Portrait of a 
" Chevy," a deerhound 
" Chevy will no leave him "... 

Chifney, Samuel 

Child found by a Traveller, after A. Cooper, 

R.A 

Child, Portrait of a 

Children of the Hon. Col. Seymour Bathurst 

Children of the Mist 

Children, Portraits of 

Children, Portraits of three ... 

Chinese Sow, A 

"Chloe" 

Christmas Carol 

Chudleigh, View of 

Citizen's Retreat, The 
Clearing the Brook ... 

Clipper, The 

Clipping 



Philip Reinagle, R.A. 
Sir Edwin Landseer, R.A, 
Sir Edwin Landseer, R.A, 
Lambert Marshall 
Francis Sartorius... 
Benjamin Marshall 
Thomas Stothard, R.A 
John N. Sartorius 
John N. Sartorius 
John N. Sartorius 
F. C. Turner 
James Ward, R.A. 
James Ward, R.A. 
Samuel Howitt ... 
Benjamin Marshall 
John Scott 
James Ward, R.A. 
James Ward, Iv.A. 
Dean Wolstenholme, Senr, 
Thomas Stothard, R.A. . 
Peter Tilleman ... 
Chas. Hancock ... 
Samuel Howitt ... 
Sir Edwin Landseer, R.A 
John N. Sartorius 
Dean Wolstenholme, Senr, 



JohnScott... 
John Wootton 
Peter Tilleman ... 
Samuel Howitt ... 
James Pollard 
P. Reinagle, R.A. 
Thomas Spencer ... 
James Seymour ... 
George Stubbs, R.A. 
Sir Edwin Landseer, R.A 
Sir Edwin Landseer, R.A 
Benjamin Marshall 

JohnScotl... 
James Ward, R.A. 
Sir E. Landseer, R.A. 
Sir Edwin Landseer, R, 
James Ward, R.A. 
Philip Reinagle, R.A. 
James Ward 
Charles Hancock.. 
James Ward, R.A. 
James Ward, R.A. 
James Ward, R.A. 
F.C.Turner 
G. A. Turner 
F. C. Turner 



277 

PAGE 
... 122 

54. 84 
... 76 
. . 98 
128, 129 
... 87 
... 187 
- 139 

•■ 139 
• ■• I3S 
... 223 
... 241 
239, 240 
... 44 
... 91 

- 159 
... 240 
. . . 240 
... 250 
... iSs 
210-21 1 
... 13 
... 42 
... 78 
... 141 
. . . 250 

161, 162 
267 
208 

43. 45 

104 

119 

180 

167 

203 

84 

78 

95 

160 

239 

76 

77 

240 

121 

238 

12 

239 

239 

228 

219 

224 

223 



278 



INDEX 



Coach Horse, Portrait of a 

Coach Horses, Portrait of 

Coaching in the Olden Days 

Coal Works 

" Cobweb," a mare 

Cock and the Fox, The ... 

Cock in Feather, The... 

Cock Pit Royal 

Cock-Shooting... 

Cold Bath, A 

Collie dog rescuing sheep from Snowdrift ... 

Collie Dogs 

Colman, G. , Esq. 

Colt bred by Lord Bolingbroke 

Comical Dogs ... 

Coming Events cast their shadows before 

them ... 

Commodore Trunnion 

Common and Sunday at their every-day work 
Compleat Angler, flates in IValton and 

Cotton's 

"Compliments of the Season" 

" Comrade " beating " Fo.xbury " and 

" Epsom" 

" Comus," a racehorse 

Condemned Calf ... 

Connoisseurs, The 

" Contention " 

Contrast, The 

Conversation ... 

Conway Castle and Town 

" Copenhagen," Wellington's charger at 

Waterloo ... 

" Copperbottom " 

"Cormorant" 

Cornstack, The 

" Coronation," a racehorse ... 
" Coronation," a racehorse ... 
Corselli's Greyhound going down Dover Cliff, 

Mr 

Corsican, Russian and Fallow Deer 

Cossack Horse, A 

Cottagers, The, after Gainsborough 

Cottage Scene ... 

"Cotherstone," a Derby Winner 

Council of Animals, A 

Council of Horses, The 

Count Borulawski 

Country Horse Fair, The 

Coursing 

Coursing 

Coursing 

Coursing Adventure 

Coursing at Hatfield Park ... 



Francis Sartorius 


.. 131 


John N. Sartorius 


■ 139 


C. C. Henderson 




James Ward, R.A. 


.. 242 


Lambert Marshall 


.. 98 


Thomas Stothard, R.A... 1 


87, 189 


Benjamin Marshall 


.. 87 


Samuel Howitt 


•• 44 


James Ward, R.A. 


•• 239 


F.C.Turner 


.. 219 


Sir E. Landseer, R.A. ... 


.. 76 


Sir Edwin Landseer, R.A. 


77 


F.C.Turner 


.. 221 


George Slubbs, R.A. 


.. 206 


Sir Edwin Landseer, R.A. 


74 


Sir E. Landseer, R.A. ... 


77 


Samuel Howitt 


44 


Chas. Hancock 


"3 


John Scott 


.. 161 


Charles Hancock 


13 


John N. Sartorius 


140 


John F. Herring 


28 


James Ward, R.A. 


•• 239 


Sir Edwin Landseer, R.A. 


.. 78 


James Ward, R.A. 


.. 241 


James Ward, R.A. 


.. 242 


James Ward, R.A. 


■ 239 


James Ward, R.A. 


242 


James Ward, R.A. 


.. 241 


Benjamin Marshall 


... 94 


John N. Sartorius 


■■ 135 


James Ward, R.A. 


... 242 


Chas. Hancock 


• 4. 13 


John F. Herring 


27. 34 


S. Howitt 


• 45 


Sir Edward Landseer, R.A. 


.. 76 


James Ward, R.A. 


240 


John Scott 


.. 157 


Philip Reinagle, R.A. ... 


122 


Charles Hancock 


4. S. 13 


Samuel Howitt 


.38,44 


James Ward, R.A. 


.. 242 


Philip Reinagle, R.A. ... 


.. 121 


Samuel Howitt ... 


38, 44 


Lambert Marshall, 1S32, 1835 


■97.98 


John Ward, R.A. 


■• 239 


Dean Wolstenholme, Senr. s 


46, 250 


Samuel Howitt 


■• 4S 


James Pollard 


.. los 



INDEX 



Coursing in Hatfield Park 

Coursing in the Last Century 
Coursing the Bustard ... 

Cow, A 

Cowlayer, A ... 

Cow of the Long-horned Breed 

Cow, Portrait of a 

Cowthorp Oali 

"Crab" 

Cricketer, A 

Cross of the Dog and Fox, Portrait of a ... 

" Crucifix," a racehorse 

Cruel Punishment 

" Crutch," a racehorse 

Cudgel Playing 

Cumberland, William Duke of 
Cupid inspiring plants with love 

"Curricle" 

Curricle and Horses ... 

Cynegetus, or Essays on Sporting, Iliusira 

lions ill 
" Cyprian," a racehorse 



John F. Sartorius... 
Dean Wolstenholme, Jun 
Samuel Howitt ... 
James Ward, R.A. 
James Ward, R.A. 
James Ward, R.A. 
John N. Sartorius 
Philip Reinagle, R.A. 
Thomas Spencer ... 
George Hayter ... 
Sir Edwin Landseer, R 
John F. Herring ... 
Samuel Howitt ... 
Lambert Marshall 
Samuel Howitt ... 
John Wootton 
Philip Reinagle, R.A. 
Benjamin Marshall 
John N. Sartorius 

Thomas Stothard, R.A. 
John F. Herring ... 



279 

PAGE 

145. 147 
256 

■43. 44 
239 
239 
239 
139 
121 
180 
52 
84 
■27, 34 
44 
98 

44 
270 
122 

95 

141 

18S 

■ 27, 33 



" Dabster," a foxhound 

Dairymaid and Alderney Cow 

Dairy Maid, The 

"Dandie Dinmont," H.M.'s. Skye terrier 

Dangerous Play 

Daniel in the Lion's Den 

Dark Bay Horse, Portrait of a 

Darlington, Earl of, and his Foxhounds 

"Dash" 

" Dash" a spaniel 

" David," a coachhorse 

" David," after B. Marshall 

Day's Sport, The 

Day with the Pheasants, i 

Dead Bull, The 

Dead Fox with Lurchers 

Dead Game 

Dead Game 

Dead Game, 1783, 1S12 

Dead Game 

Dead Game and a Jack Snipe 

Dead Game, Fish, cSc, PlaU in " Essay on 

Hunting " 
Dead Game, Study of 
Dead Pheasant 
Dead Red Deer 
Dead Roe Deer 

Dead run Hare and Beagles in a Ditch 
Dead Wild Duck 



Benjamin Marshall 

Sir Edwin Landseer, R.A 

James Ward, R.A. 

Sir E. Landseer, R.A. .. 

John F. Herring ... 

James Ward, R.A. 

George Stubbs, R.A. 

B. Marshall 

James Ward, R.A. 
James Ward, R.A. 
Benjamin Marshall 
John Scott 
James Ward, R.A. 

F. C. Turner 

Sir Edwin Landseer, R.A, 
Philip Reinagle, R.A. .. 
Samuel Howitt ... 
Sir Edwin Landseer, R.A 
Philip Rein.agle, R.A. 
John F. Sartorius 
John F. Sartorius 

John Scott 

Philip Reinagle, R.A. .. 
Sir Edwin Landseer, R.A 
Sir Edwin Landseer, R.A 
Sir Edwin Landseer, R.A, 

S. Howitt 

Sir Edwin Landseer, R.A 



J9. 
114,1 



145 



94 
82 

239 
62, 77 

32 
242 
203 

90 
241 
240 

91 
IS9 
241 
223 

57 
115 
43.45 

75 
I, 122 

147 
147 



162 
122 

81 
84 
76 

45 
81 



28o 



INDEX 



Death of a Hare, The 

Death of the Fox, 1812, 1815 

Death of the Fox, The 

Death of the Fox, The 

Death of the Fox, afler Sawrey Gilpin 

Death of the Hare 

Death of the Hunter, The 

Death of the Otter 

Death of the Woodcock 

Death of Tom Moody, The 

Death, The 

Death, The 

" Deception," a racehorse 

De Coverley and the Gipsies, Sir Roger 

Deer 

Deer 



John N. Sartorius 

Samuel Howilt 

Sawrey Gilpin 

F. C. Turner 

John Scott 

Samuel Howitt 

F. C. Turner 

Samuel Howitt ... 

Sir Edwin Landseer, R.A. 

Dean Wolstenholme, Senr. 

Samuel Howitt ... 

John N. Sartorius 

Charles Hancock... 

Thomas Stothard, R.A. ... 

Samuel Howitt ... 

Sir Edwin Landseer, R.A. 



Deer and Deerhounds in a Mountain Torrent Sir E. Landseer, R.A. 



Deer and Owner 

Deer Family, A 

Deer Fighting... 

Deerhound and Mastiff 

Deer in Windsor Forest 

Deer of Chillingham Park ... 

Deer, Remarkable three-year-old 

Deer-stalking ... 

Deerstalking ... 

Deer-stalking in Falah Forest, Two 

Gentlemen 

Deer Stealer, The 

Defeat of Comus, The 

Dejeuner a la Fourchetle 

Descent of the Swan ... ... 

Desert, The 

" Desperate," a Stallion Hound 

Destroying the Hornets' Nest 

Devil's Bridge, The ... 

Devonshire, Duke of, and Lord and Lady 

Cavendish (unfinished) 

Devonshire Cows 
Devonshire, K. G., Duke of 
Devonshire Ox, A 
Dewy Morning, A 

Dialogue at Waterloo, A ... 

"Diamond" ... 

Diana disturbed by Actaeon 

Digging out the Otter 

Digging the Fox 

Digging the Fox from Earth 

Dignity and Impudence 

Diligence of 1830, The 

Disappointment 

Discomfiture of Charles II. at Battle of 

Worcester... 
Distinguished Member of the Royal Humane 



Samuel Howitt 

Sir Edwin Landseer, R.A. 

Samuel Howitt ... 

Sir Edwin Landseer, R.A. 

Samuel Howitt 

Sir Edwin Landseer, R.A. 
John N. Sartorius 
Charles Hancock 
Sir Edwin Landseer, R.A. 

Charles Hancock 

James Ward, R.A. 

Sir Edwin Landseer, R.A. 

Sir Edwin Landseer, R.A. 

James Ward, R.A. 

Sir Edwin Landseer, R.A. 

F. C. Turner 

James Ward, R.A. 

James Ward, R.A. 

Sir Edwin Landseer, R.A. 

Sir Edwin Landseer, R.A. 

Sir Edwin Landseer, R.A. 

James Ward, R.A. 

James Ward, R.A. 

Sir Edwin Landseer, R.A. 

John N. Sartorius 

James Ward, R.A. 

Sir Edwin Landseer, R.A. 

John N. Sartorius 

Dean Wolstenholme, Senr. 

Sir Edwin Landseer, R.A. 

C. C. Henderson... 

Sir Edwin Landseer, R.A. 



Society, A 



J. Ward, R.A. ... 
Sir E. Landseer, R.A. 



PAGB 
•■■ 139 

... 45 
85, 118 
... 219 
... 157 
... 45 
... 219 

■ ■ 45 

... 81 

... 247 

... 3S 

... 141 

... 13 

... 191 

39. 43. 45 
... 78 
... 76 
... 44 
... So 
... 44 
... 82 
...41,46 
... 78 
... 140 
II 
...77,84 

12 

... 240 
■■. 73 
... 78 
... 240 

... 77 

... 223 

... 242 

... 242 

... 78 

... 75 

... 76 

-. 239 

... 242 

... 77 
139, 140 
... 241 
...79.80 
... 141 
... 250 
•.. 73 

...l8,2I 

... 77 

... 242 

68, 73. 76 



INDEX 



281 



"Dr. Syntax" 

" Dr. Syntax," a thoroughbred 

Doctor's visit to poor relations at the Zoo ... 

Dog 

Dog, A 

Dog and Badger 

Dog and his Shadow, The ... 

Dog at Vittoria, Portrait of a 
Dog Breaking ... 

Dog of the Marlborough Breed, A 

Dog, Portrait of a 

Dog, Portrait of a (2), 1776, 1780, 17S2, 1782 

Dog, Portrait of a (2) 

Dogs 

Dog's Head and Partridge 

Dog, Sketch of a 

Dogs, Portraits of 

Dog Stealing, A 

Dogs, Three ... 

Dogs, Two 

Dogs looking for Crumbs, Two 

"Donald" 

Doncaster 

" Done Handsome" ... 

"Don John" 

" Don John," a colt 

" Don John," a racehorse 

" Don John," a racehorse 

Donkey and Pigs 

Donkey, Portrait of a 

" Don Quixote," a son of " Eclipse " 

" Dormouse," a mare 

" Dos-a-dos " ... 

Double Triumph, Sin, Death and Hell, The 

Douglas, Lady Catherine, hawking 

Doubtful crumbs 

"Dover" 

Down Charge ! 

" Dragon," a racehorse 

Drake, A 

Drawing Cover 

Drawing Covert 

Drive, Glen Orchay, The 

" Driver," a trotter 

Drive, The 
Drop Leap, A ... 

Drover's Departure, The 

Drying the legs 

Duck Shooting 

Duckweeds 

" Durabling," a carthorse 

' ' Dumbling, " after B. Marshall 

Duncan's Horses 

^''DMncomhe" afler B. Marshall ... 

" Duncombe," a hunter ... 



R.A 



James Ward, R.A. 
James Ward, R.A. 
Sir E. Landseer, R.A. 
George Stubbs, R.A. 
George Stubbs, R.A. 
Samuel Howitt ... 
Sir Edwin Landseer, R 
James Ward, R.A. 
Lambert Marshall 
Sir Edwin Landseer, 
John F. Herring ... 
George Stubbs, R.A. 
James Ward, R.A. 
James Ward, R.A. 
Benjamin Marshall 
James Ward, R.A. 
John N. .Sartorius 
James Ward, R.A. 
Sir Edwin Landseer, 
George Stubbs, R.A. 
Sir Edwin Landseer, 
James Ward, R.A. 
James Pollard 
John F. Herring ... 
John F. Herring ... 
F.C.Turner 
Charles Hancock... 
John F. Herring . . . 
James Ward, R.A. 
Sir Edwin Landseer, R.. 
John N. Sartorius 
Thomas .Spencer ... 
Charles Hancock... 
James Ward, R.A. 
Sir Edwin Landseer, 
Sir Edwin Landseer, 
John F. Herring .. 
Sir Edwin Landseer, R.A, 
Francis Sartorius... 
James Ward, R.A. 
John N. Sartorius 
Lambert Marshall 
Sir Edwin Landseer, 
Lambert Marshall 
Sir Edwin Landseer 
Samuel Plowitt ... 
Sir Edwin Landseer, R.A, 
James Ward, R.A. 
John Scott 
James Ward, R.A. 
Benjamin Marshall 
John Scott 
James Ward, R.A. 
John Scott... 
Benjamin Marshall 



R.A 



R.A 



PAGE 
240 
233 
78 
20s 
20s 

45 

73 

240 

08 

75 

25.32 

205, 206 

243 
240 

95 
238 

139 
239 

82 
205 

78 

246 

106 

34 

34 

222 

4 

27 

238 

75 
140 
179 
6 
242 
79 
77 
33 
54,84 
129, 131 
239 
141 

98 

82 

98 

77 

45 

73 

242 

149 

242 

91 

159 

241 

159 
91 



282 



INDEX 



"Dungannon" ... 

"Dungannon" beating " Rockingham " at 
Newmarket 

Dun Mare, A (2) 

"Dustman" 

Dying Fox Hunter, The 



George Stubbs, R.A. 

John N. Sartorius 
John Wootton 
Benjamin Marshall 
F. C. Turner 



PAGE 
199, 206 

... I4t 
... 263 

... 95 
... 220 



E 



Eagle and Deer ... .. 

Eagle and Vulture disputing with a Hyena 

" Eagle," a racehorse 

Eagle's Nest, The 

Early Drawings 

Earth-Stopper, The ... 

Earth-Stopper, The ... 

Easter Monday, Turning out the Stag 

Easter Monday : View of Fairmead Bottom, 

Epping Forest 
East Essex Foxhounds, The ... 

"Eclipse," after G. Sltibbs, R.A 

" Eclipse and Shakespear " 

"Eclipse," Portrait of 

" Eclipse," with Jack Oakley up 

Edinburgh and Glasgow Mails parting Com- 
pany, The... ... ... 

"Edmund," a colt ... 
Effects of Disobedience, The ... 
'^lL\c3.nor," afle?- B. Marshall 
" Eleanor," a racehorse 

Elephant and Tiger ... 

Elephant Hunting 

"Elis" 

"Eliza" 

Elk pursued by Wolves 

"Emilius" 

"Emma" 

Emperor's Cup, The ... 

Encampment of the West Norfolk Militia ... 

English Homestead, An 

English Post-boys 

Enjoying the Breeze ... 
Entrance into a Wood 

" Eos," a greyhound ... 

Epping Forest Hunt 

Epsom Races ... 

Epsom Races, A Prospective View of 
(i) Saddling in the Warren. 

(2) The Betting Post. 

(3) Preparing to Start. 

(4) The Grand Stand, the Race. 

(5) The Race over. 

(6) Settling at Tattersalls. 



Samuel Howitt 


... 46 


P. Reinagle, R.A. 


... 114 


James Ward, R.A. 


• • 239 


Sir Edwin Landseer, R.A 


... 74 


Sir Edwin Landseer, R.A 


... 49 


C. C. Henderson 


iS, 21 


F. C. Turner 


... 222 


James Pollard 


... 104 


James Pollard 


... 104 


F.C.Turner 


... 222 


John Scott 


... 158 


John N. Satorius ... 


.. 136 


George Stubbs, R.A. 199 


, 204, 205, 




206 


John N. Sartorius 


13s. J41 


C. C. Henderson 


17, 21 


John F. Sartorius... 


142, 147 


James Ward, R.A. 


... 241 


John Scott 


... 159 


Benjamin M.irshall 


... 90 


Samuel Howitt 


... 46 


Samuel Howitt 


... 44 


John F. Herring 


••• 33 


John N. Sartorius 


... 140 


Samuel Howitt ... 


41, 46 


Benjamin Marshall 


... 95 


John F. Herring 


• •• 34 


F. C.Turner 


... 223 


P. Reinagle, R.A. 


... 121 


John F. Herring 


... 32 


C. C. Henderson 


... 17 


James Ward, R.A. 


... 242 


Philip Reinagle, R.A. .. 


122, 123 


Sir Edwin Landseer, R.A 


...61,77 


Dean Wolslenholme, Sen 


... 250 


James Pollard 


100, 106 


James Pollard 


... 108 



INDEX 



28- 



Equestrian Portrait 



J- 



PAGE 



" Erymu?," a racehorse 

"Escape" 

Essex County Hall 

Essex Hunt Series, The 

(i) Meet at Matching Green. 

(2) Drawing the Covert at Man Wood. 

(3) Fox crossing the Leading Roothing, 

(4) The Death. 

" Euston," Portrait of 

Evening after Rain 

Evening Bhish, The 

Evening: First September 

Evening of Life, The 

Evening Scene in the Highlands 

" Everton," a hunter 

Extraordinary Escape... 

Extraordinary Preservation of Foxes 
Extraordinary Trotting Mare, An ' ... 



Sir E. Landseer, R.A., and Sir 

E. Millais, R.A 75 

Benjamin Marshall ... ... 95 

John N. Sartorius ... 134, 140 

Philip Reinagle, R.A 121 

Dean Wolstenholme, Junr. ... 255 



George Stubbs, R.A 


205 


. James Ward, R.A 


239 


. James Ward, R.A 


242 


. James Pollard 


los 


James Ward, R.A. 


243 


Sir E. Landseer, R.A. ... 


77 


John F. Herring 


28 


Samuel Howitt 


45 


. F. C. Turner 


222 


John N. Sartorius 


141 



F 



Fables, Illustrations to Gay's 

" Fag," a pointer ... ... 

Fagge, Bart., Portrait of Sir Robert 
Fair Crop, The 

"Fair Helen" 

Fairlop Oak 

Fair Show, The 

"Fairy" 

Faithful Hound, The 

FaUh Forest, Two Gentlemen Stalking in... 
Falcon ... 

Falcon disgorging a Heron 

Fall of Phaeton, The 

Fall of the Clyde after a Flood 

Fallow Deer ... 

Fallow Deer, biting thro' quick fence in 

snow 
Family at Little Thurlow, Suffolk, Portraits 

of 

" Fan," a celebrated Bitch 

Fancy Pigeon, A 

"Farm" 

Farm Autumn, The 

Farmer's Friend, The... 

Farmer's Wife and Raven 

Farmyard 

Farmyard with Cattle ; sunset 

Farmyard, with Fowls 

Farrier's Shop 

Farrier's Shop 



John Wootton 




... 270 


Samuel Howitt ... 




... 45 


James Seymour ... 




... 168 


James Ward, R.A. 




... 242 


John F. Herring ... 




• ■ 33 


Samuel Howitt ... 




■ 43 


James Ward, R.A. 




. . . 242 


Sir Edwin Landseer, 


R.A. 


... 76 


Sir Edwin Landseer, 


R.A. 


... 57 


Chas. Hancock ... 




12 


Sir Edwin Landseer, 


r.a'. 


... 76 


F. C. Turner 




... 222 


James Ward, R.A. 




239, 241 


James Ward, R.A. 




... 242 


Sir Edwin Landseer, 


R.A. 


... 78 


S. Howitt 




... 46 


Benjamin Marshall 




... 94 


F. C. Turner 




... 222 


James Ward, R.A. 




• ■• 239 


Benjamin Marshall 




... 94 


'oha F. Herring ... 




... 32 


ohn F. Herring ... 




... 32 


George Stubbs, R.A. 




... 206 


John F. Herring ... 




... 32 


Philip Reinagle, R.A 




... 123 


Philip Reinagle, R.A 


. 


... 121 


John M. Sartorius 




... 141 


James W'ard, R.A. 




• •• 239 



284 



INDEX 



Fast-trotting Cart-house, A 

Fast-trotting Hobby, A 

Fast-trotting Horse, A, 179S, 1S12 ... 
Fast-trotting Mare, Portrait of a 
Fatal Accident in Hog Hunting 

Fatal Duel 

Fate of a Sheep-killing Pointer 

Fat Heifer, Mr. Westcar's 

Fat Staffordshire Ox, A 

Fattened French Cow, A 

" Faugh-a-Ballagh," a racehorse 

" Faugh-a-Ballagh " 

"Faun" 

Favourite Cob, A 
Favourite Foxhound, A 
Favourite Hackney and Dog, A 
Favourite Hackney, Lord Brook's ... 

Favourite Horse, A. ... 

Favourite Horse, A 

Favourite Horse, A ... 
Favourite Horses going to Covert ... 
Favourite Horses going to Covert ... 
Favourite Hounds in the Cheltenham Pack. 

Favourite Hunter, A (1826) 

Favourite Hunter, A ... 
Favourite Mare, A 

Favourite Mare, A 

Favourite Pony and Dogs 

Favourites 

Favourites 

Favourite Spaniel, Portrait of a 

Favourite Spaniels 

Favourite Terrier, Portrait of a 

Feeding Pigs ... 

Female Running Match 
Fermore, Hunting, W. and H. 
Ferret in a Rabbit Warren ... 

Ferry, The ... 

"Figaro" 

Fighting Horses 
Fighting Horses 

Figures and Animals 

" Filho da Puta and Sir Joshua" ... 
" Filho da Puta," a racehorse 

Find, The 

Find, The 

Finish, The ... ... 

Fireside Party, A 

First Day of the Season 

First Leap, The 

First-rate Shot, Portrait of George 
Osbaldeston, Esq., A 

Fish 

Fisherman 



.. John N. Sartorius 




. 140 


.. John N. Sartorius 




140 


. . John N. Sartorius 




139 


.. John N. Sartorius 




139 


.. Samuel Howitt ... 




. 46 


.. Sir Edwin Landseer, 


R.A. 


■ 78 


.. Samuel Howitt ... 




45 


. . John N. Sartorius 




139 


.. James Ward, R.A. 




239 


.. John N. Sartorius 




139 


.. Charles Hancock... 




■ 45 


.. John F. Herring ... 




27,34 


.. F. C. Turner 




221 


.. John F. Herring ... 




33 


.. Dean Wolstenhohne, 


Junr. 


259 


. . Dean Wolstenholme, 


Junr. 


• 259 


.. James Ward, R.A. 




240 


.. Benjamin Marshall 




94 


.. Francis Sartorius ... 




• 131 


. James Ward, R.A. 




240 


.. F. C. Turner 




221 


.. F. C. Turner 




• 215 


.. F. C. Turner 




223 


.. James Ward, R.A. 




32, 241 


.. Dean Wolstenholme, 


Junr. 


■ 259 


.. F. C. Turner 




221 


.. James Ward, R.A. 




. 240 


.. Sir Edwin Landseer, 


r.a'. '. 


. 76 


.. John F. Herring ... 




32 


. Sir Edwin Landseer, 


R.A. 


■ 76 


.. Sir E. Landseer, R.A 


75 


.. Dean Wolstenholme 


Junr. 


. 260 


.. John F. Sartorius 




• 145 


.. James Ward, R.A. 




• 239 


.. Samuel Howitt .. 




45 


.. Francis Sartorius... 




. 127 


.. James Ward, R.A. 




. 241 


.. J. F. Herring 




• 30 


.. John F. Herring ... 




35 


.. John F. Herring ... 




• 35 


.. James Ward, R.A. 




• 239 


.. George Stubbs, R.A 




. 205 


.. Benjamin Marshall 




• 90 


.. John F. Herring, 1822, 1844 


■ 35 


.. John F. Herring ... 




• 35 


.. F. C. Turner 




221 


. John F. Herring ... 




• 35 


.. Sir Edwin Landseer, 


R.A. '. 


74 


.. F. C. Turner 




• 223 


.. Sir Edwin Landseer, 


R.A. 


• S3 


.. Benjamin Marshall 




92.95 


., Samuel Howitt ... 




• 45 


.. Philip Reinagle, R.A 


'23 



INDEX 



285 



Fishermen displaying Results of Day's Sport 
Fishing, Portraits of two young gentlemen 

and their sister 

F'ishwomeo, a/ier Morlanii ... 

FitzHarris, Lady 

"Fleur-de-Lys" 

Flood in the Highlands 
" Flora," a spaniel 

" Fly," a greyhound 

Fly-fishing 

" Flying Childers " 

" Flying Childers and King Herod " 

" Flying Childers," a racehorse 

Flying Leap 
Fl)'ing Leap 

Flying Leap ; Fox dying 

Foreign Nobleman and Horses, Portraits of 

" Forester," a Blood-hound 

Forester's Family, The 

Forest Keeper Shooting a Buck 

Four Buck Rabbits 

Four-in-Hand Carriage 

Fox and Cubs ... 

Fox and his Prey 

Fox and Partridge 

Fox and Partridges 

Fox and Pheasants 

Fox and Wild Duck 

Fox breaking Cover, The 

Fox breaking Cover, after P. Reinagle 

Fox Chase, The 

Fox Chase : View Halloa 

Foxes 

Foxes ... 

Fox, Heron, and the Eel, The 

Foxhound, A 

Foxhound, The 

Fox-hounds breaking Cover, Gen. Wynd- 

ham's 

Foxhounds Going Out 

Foxhounds of the Hatfield Hunt 

Foxhounds Returning 

Fox Hunt, A 

Fox Hunt, A 

Fox-hunting 

Fox-hunting; four pictures 

Fox-hunting 

(i) Going out in the Morning. 

(2) Brushing into cover. 

(3) In Full Chase. 

(4) The Death of the Fox. 
Fox-hunting Breakfast, A 

Fox-hunting : calling hounds out of cover . , . 
Fox-hunting Scenes (4) 





PAGE 


P. Reinagle, R.A. 


i'5. 123 


P. Reinagle, R.A. 


... 121 


James Ward, R.A. 


... 228 


Sir Edwin Landseer, R.A. 


... 76 


John F. Herring 


•■• 35 


Sir Edwin Landseer, R.A. 


70. 77- S3 


F. C. Turner 


... 221 


John F. Herring 


•■■ 35 


James Pollard 


loi, 103 


John Wootton 


... 26S 


John N. Sartorius 


.. 136 


James Seymour ... 


167, 177 


Samuel Howitt ... 


... 45 


John N. Sartorius 


... 141 


John N. Sartorius 


. . 140 


Benjamin Marshall 


... 94 


F. C. Turner 


... 222 


Sir Edwin Landseer, R.A. 


... 77 


Samuel Howitt 


45 


Dean Wolstenholme, Junr. 


... 259 


John F. Sartorius. . : 


... 147 


Charles Hancock 


... 13 


Samuel Howitt 


... 45 


Philip Reinagle, R.A. ... 


... 115 


Samuel Howitt 


... 46 


Samuel Howitt 


... 45 


Samuel Howitt 


... 45 


Philip Reinagle, R.A. ... 


118, 122 


John Scott 


... 157 


Peter Tilleman 


... 210 


James Pollard 


... 109 


Samuel Howitt 


... 44 


Sir Edwin Landseer, R.A. 


... 84 


Samuel Howitt 


■ • 45 


Charles Hancock 


II 


Samuel Howitt 


... 44 


F. C. Turner 


... 223 


F. C. Turner 


.. 221 


Sir Edwin Landseer, R..A. 


... 84 


F.C.Turner 


... 221 


Samuel Howitt 


37.43 


James Pollard 


... 108 


Samuel Howitt 


37,3s 


John N. Sartorius 


... 138 


James Seymour 


■74. 175 



Samuel Howitt 44 

James Ward, R.A. 240 

Dean Wolstenholme, Sen. 247, 250 



286 



INDEX 



Fox-hunting Series (7) 

Fox-hunting : the Death 

Fox on the Watch, A 

Fox's Head, A 

Fox, The 

Fox Unkennelled 

Fractured Leg of Spartan, The 

Frampton, Esq., the Father of the Turf, 

Portrait of Tregonwell , 

Free Church, The 

Free Trade and Protection ... 

French Horses 

French Postillions 

Friend in Need, A 

Friends of the Agricultural Society 

Friends 

Frugal Meal, The 

Frugal Meal, The 

Fruits of Early Industry, after Morland . . . 

Full Cry 

Fuller, Mr. John, Sketch of 



John Wootton 
Philip Reinagle, R.A. 
Charles Hancock... 
Charles Hancock... 
Charles Hancock... 
Samuel Howitt ... 
John F. Herring ... 



rAr.E 
270 
121 

7 
12 

5. 13 
45 
33 



John Wootton ... 268,269,270 

Sir Edwin Landseer, R.A. ... 77 
Sir Edwin Landseer, R.A. ... 80 

C. C. Henderson 21 

C. C. Henderson 17 

James Ward, R.A 242 

Dean Wolstenholme, Jun. 255, 260 
Sir Edwin Landseer, R.A. ... 76 

John F. Herring 30 

Jessica Landseer ... ... ... 4S 

James Ward, R.A 228 

Samuel Howitt 38 

Benjamin Marshall ... 9I) 94 



G 



"Galatea" 

Galton, from the Old Brighton Road, Surrey 

Game Cock, A... 

Game Cock 

Game Cocks 

Gamekeeper, The 

Gamekeeper's Cottage, Interior of a 

Gathering Cowslips ... 

" Gazelle," An Arab ... 
Gedro, in the Province of Beira 
" General Bandbox ".. . 

Gentleman, A ... 

Gentleman and Dogs, Portraits of, 1793, 1797 
Gentleman and his Son, Portraits of a 
Gentleman and Keeper with favourite horse 

and dogs ... 
Gentleman, Keeper, Sporting Pony and Dogs 
Gentleman on Horseback 
Gentleman, Portrait of a, 1 782, 1784, 1790 
Gentleman preparing to Shoot, Portrait of a 
Gentleman's Residence in Surrey, View of... 
Gentleman Shooting, A, 1794, 1795 

George II., Equestrian Portrait of 

George IV. Going to Ascot 

George III., Portrait of 

George HI. Staghunting 

George IV. Travelling 

Gethsemane ... 

"Ghuznee" 



Benjamin Marshall 96 

Dean Wolstenholme, Jun. . . . 259 

Benjamin Marshall 87,94 

James Ward, R.A. 243 

Lambert Marshall 98 

Charles Hancock ... ... 11 

Dean Wolstenholme, Jun. . . 260 

James Ward, R.A 239 

John F. Herring 33 

Philip Reinagle, R.A 122 

Philip Reinagle, R.A. ... ... 120 

Philip Reinagle, R.A., 1779 .. 121 

John N. Sartorius 139 

"Dean Wolstenholme, Sen. . . . 250 

James Ward, R.A 239 

James Ward, R.A. ... ... 240 

George Stubbs, R.A 205 

Philip Reinagle, R.A 121 

G. Stubbs, R.A 205 

Dean Wolstenholme, Sen. ... 250 

John N. Sartorius ... ... 139 

Wootton and Pyne 265 

James Pollard, I02 

Philip Reinagle, R.A- no 

Thomas Stothard, R.A 188 

James Pollard 109 

James Ward, R.A 242 

John F. Herring 27,35 



INDEX 



287 



" Gibside Fairy " 

"Gimcrack" 

" Gimcrack " after G. Sliibbs, R.A, 

Gipsy Encampment ... 

Girl and favourite Puppy, Portrait of a 

Glamis, Portrait of Lord 

Glamis and Staghounds, Portrait of Lord ... 

Gleam in the Storm, A 

Gleaners 

Glen Fishie ... 

" Glencoe," a racehorse 

" Glencoe," a stallion 

Glenorchay, Scene to illustrate " Legend 

of" 

" Gnawpost " ... 

Godolphin Arabian, The ... 

Going a- Coursing 

Going Out 

Going Out in the Morning ... 

Going to Plough 

Going to Scale... 

Going to the Fair 

Going to the Fight ... 

Golden Lane Genuine Brewery 

Golden Plover and Snipe 

Goldham, Portrait of Mr. J. . . . 

Gone to Ground in Clump near Birdsall 

" Good Doggie " 

Goodwood 

Goodwood Plate, The 

Gordale, East Malham, Yorkshire ... 

Gordale Scar, Yorkshire 

" Granadillo " and " Skyscraper " ... 

Grand Convent of Scholastica, View of the... 

Grandmother, The 

Grand Stand at Doncaster ... 

Great Ox, Mr. Westcar's 

Great Tench, The 

Grey Arab, A ... 

Grey Dam, The 

"GreyDiomed" 

Greyhound, A 

Greyhound and Hare ... 
Greyhound coursing a Hare ... 

Greyhound killing a Hare 

Greyhounds 

Greyhounds and Dead Hare 

Greyhounds in Pursuit 
Greyhound turning a Hare ... 
" Gripe," a racehorse 

Grosvenor Hunt, The 

Group, Geneva 



John F. Herring ... 




■•• 3S 


George Stubbs, R.A, 




199, 206 


John Scott 




... is8 


Sir Edwin Landseer, 


r.a'. 


... 80 


Dean Wolstenholme, 


Jun. 


. . . 260 


Dean Wolstenholme, 


Jun. 


• 255 


Dean Wolstenholme, 


Jun. 


■ 2SS 


James Ward, R.A. 




242 


James Ward, R.A. 




• 239 


Sir Edwin Landseer, 


R.x; 


... 6l 


Charles Hancock.., 




3 


Chas. Hancock ... 




.. 13 


Sir Edwin Landseer, 


R.A. 


... 77 


George Stubbs, R.A. 




... 199 


George Stubbs, R.A. 




199, 206 


John N. Sartorius 




•■ 139 


James Ward, R.A. 




... 242 


John N. Sartorius 




■ 139 


John F. Herring ... 




.,, 32 


F. C. Turner 




... 223 


John F. Herring ... 




... 30 


C. C. Henderson... 




19 


Dean Wolstenholme, 


Sen. 


247, 250, 


John N. Sartorius 




253 
... 147 


Dean Wolstenholme, 


Sen. 


... 246, 
247, 250 


P. Reinagle, R.A. 




... 119 


Sir Edwin Landseer, 


R.a! 


... 77 


James Pollard 




... 106 


F. C. Turner 




.., 222 


James Ward, R.A. 




. . . 240 


James Ward, R.A. 




... 238 


James Ward, R.A. 




■ 239 


Philip Reinagle, R.A. ... 


... 122 


James Ward, R.A. 




... 242 


James Pollard 




... 106 


John N. Sartorius 




• ■• 139 


Philip Reinagle, R.A. ,,, 


116,122 


James Ward, R.A. 




... 236 


Charles Hancock... 




13 


John N. Sartorius 




134, 140 


James Ward, R.A. 




. . . 240 


Samuel Howitt ... 




... 45 


James Seymour ... 




• J73 


Samuel Howitt ... 




... 45 


John N. Sartorius 




... 140 


Samuel Howitt ... 




... 45 


Samuel Howitt ... 




45 


Samuel Howitt ... 




... 45 


John Wootton 




... 264 


George Stubbs, R.A, 




... 196 


Sir Edwin Lnadseer, 


R.a! 


... 77 



288 



INDEX 



PAGE 

Grouse ... Sir Edwin Landseer, R.A. ... 8t 

Grousing, with Portraits of Favourite Dogs John F. Sarlorius .. 147 

Grouse Shooting Lambert Marshall ... ... 98 

Grouse Shooting Philip Reinagle, R.A. 115,116,123 

Grouse Shooting John N. Sartorius 141 

Grouse Shooting in Cumberland ... ... John F. Sarlorius 147 

Grouse Sketch from Nature John F. Sartorius 147 

Grousing on the Rouabon Hills James Ward, R.A. 239 

Guinea Pig, A James Ward, R.A. 239 



Hack, A, after A. Cooper, R.A. 
Hack, Portrait of a 

Hackney, A 

Hackney, A (1828) ,., 
Hacks, Portraits of Two 
" Hambletonian " 
Hambletonian and Diamond, Race of 
Hambletonian beating Diamond at New- 
market 

Hambletonian, rubbing down 

Hamilton, Ladies Harriet and Beatrice 
Hampstead Heath 

Hancock, Mr. J., Portrait of 

Hanger, General George 

Hanmerton Hills, Yorkshire, View of, 2 ... 
" Hap-hazard," a racehorse ... 

"Haphazard"... 

Hare 

Hare and Stoat 

Hare Hunting 

Hare Hunting : a dead hare 

Hare Hunting on Orwell Hill 

Hare Hunting; the Death 

Hare in its Form, The 

Hare killed by a Weasel 

" Harkaway," a colt 

Harlech Castle 

" Harlot," a Staghound with Puppies 

Harriers 

Haxneis, after Sawrey Gilpin 

Harriers running in view ... 

Harrison's Veterinary Shop, Interior of 
Harrowing 

" Has been ridden with Hounds " 

Hatch Wood, View from 

Hawk and Peregrine Falcon 

Hawking ... 

Hawking in the Olden Time 

Hawking: the fatal stoop 

Hawking in Wimpole Park 

Hawking Party 



John Scott 




.. 206 


Francis Sartorius... 




131 


John N. Sartorius 


1 


37, 140 


James V.'ard, R.A. 




.. 241 


John N. Sartorius 




•• 133 


John N. Sartorius 




.. 140 


John F. Sartorius 




■ 143 


George Stubbs, R.A. 




.. 206 


George Stubbs, R.A. 




206 


Sir Edwin Landseer, 


R.A. 


•■ 76 


Philip Reinagle, R.A 




.. 122 


Charles Hancock... 




I, 12 


Philip Reinagle, R.A 


. 


.. 116 


Philip Reinagle, R.A 




122 


Benjamin Marshall 




.. 89 


James Ward, R.A. 




240 


John N. Sartorius... 




■■ 137 


Sir Edwin Landseer, 


r.a! 


82 


Samuel Howitt ... 




.. 38 


John Wootton 




264 


John Wootton 




263 


Thomas Stothard, R.A. ... 


.. 188 


Samuel Howitt ... 




• 4S 


Samuel Howitt ... 




• 4S 


F. C. Turner 




222 


James Ward, R.A. 




3S, 239 


Dean Wolstenholme, 


Jun. 


• 259 


Samuel Howitt ... 




44 


John Scott 




.. 162 


Samuel Howitt ... 




.. 45 


Dean Wolstenholme, 


Sen. 


250 


James Ward, R.A. 




• 239 


John F. Herring ... 




• 34 


Dean Wolstenholme, 


Jun. 


■ 259 


Sir Edwin Landseer, 


R.A. 


.. 82 


Sir Edwin Landseer, 


R.A. 


76 


Sir Edwin Landseer, 


R.A. 


So 


F.C.Turner 




222 


John Wotton 




.. 264 


F. C. Turner 




222 



INDEX 



289 



Hawk upon a Buzzard 

Haymakers 
Haymakers at Rest 

" Hazard," a hackney 

Head of Old Eclipse 

Heads of a Lion and Tiger ... 

Heads of Pointer Bitch and Puppy 

Heart's Ease ... 
Heath Ewe and Lambs 
" Hector," a hen-cock 

Heifers, Portraits of two 

Her Majesty's Favourite Dogs and Parrot ... 

Her .Majesty at Osborne 

Her Majesty at Osborne, l856 

Her Majesty's favourite Dogs and Parrot ... 

Her Majesty the Queen 

" Herod," a racehorse 

Heron, A 

Hertfordshire Sheep, Portrait of a ... 

" Hetman Platoff" 

High and Low conditioned Ewe, The 
Highgate Tunnel 

Highland Breakfast, A ... 

Highland Cabin, The 
Highland Dogs 

Highland Shepherd's House, The 

Highlander 

Highlanders returning from Deer-stalking ... 

Highland Interior, A... 

Highland Lassie, A ... 

Highland Music 

Highland Nurses 

Highland Shepherd ... 

Highland Shepherd's Home, The 

Highland Terrier, A ... 

Highlands, The 

High Life 

High-Mettled Racer, The 

(1) The Foal. 

(2) Breaking. 

(3) The Sweat. 

(4) The Start. 

(5) The Race. 

High-Mettled Racer sold to the Hounds, The 

Hilton, Sketch of, Mr. John 

Hilton, Esq., Thomas 
Hinds alarmed... 
Hippodrome, The 
Hippopotamus, The ... 
Hog winning a race against a man ... 
Hogs, Two 
Holy Family, A 

Holyhead Mountain from West Extremity of 
Anglesea ... 

19 







PAGE 


Philip Reinagle, R.A 




122 


George Stubbs, R.A. 




.. 206 


James Ward, R.A. 




■ 239 


F. C. Turner 




222 


John N. Sartorius 




141 


Sir Edwin Landseer, 


R.A. 


■ 50 


Sir Edwin Landseer, 


R.A. 


•51. 75 


James Ward, R.A. 




.. 242 


James Ward, R.A. 




•• 239 


Lambert Marshall 




.. 98 


George Stubbs, R.A. 




.. 205 


Sir Edwin Landseer, 


R.A.' 


.. 76 


Sir Edwin I^andseer, 


R.A. 


•■ 78 


Sir Edwin Landseer, 


R.A. 


62 


Sir Edwin Landseer, 


R.A. 


61 


Sir Edwin Landseer, 


R.A. 


.. 83 


Francis Sartorius ... 




.. 127 


James Ward, R.A. 




240 


Dean Wolstenholme, 


Sen. 


250 


John F. Herring ... 




■■ 34 


James Ward, R.A. 




.. 241 


James Pollard 




.. 103 


Sir Edwin Landseer, 


R.A.' 


■■73.76 


Sir Edwin Landseer, 


R.A. 


■ ■ 83 


Sir Edwin Landseer, 


R.A. 


73 


Sir Edwin Landseer, 


R.A. 


77 


Sir Edwin Landseer, 


R.A. 


77 


Sir Edwin Landseer, 


R.A. 


•55.75 


Sir Edwin Landseer, 


R.A. 


81 


Sir Edwin Landseer, 


R.A. 


79 


Sir Edwin Landseer, 


R.A. 


72 


Sir Edwin Landseer 


R.A. 


■77.79 


Sir Edwin Landseer, 


R.A. 


70 


Sir Edwin Landseer, 


R.A. 


... 78 


Sir Edwin Landseer, 


R.A. 


... 75 


Sir Edwin Landseer 


R.A. 


■ 76 


Sir Edwin Landseer, 


R.A. 


... 72 


John F. Herring ... 




•33.34 



Dean Wolstenholme, Sen 


... 247 


Benjamin Marshall 


...91.94 


Benjamin Marshall 


... 95 


Sir Edwin Landseer, R.A 


... 79 


F. C. Turner 


... 222 


Samuel Howitt ... 


44 


Samuel Howitt 


... 45 


Samuel Howitt 


... 45 


Thomas Stothard, R.A... 


... 185 



Philip Reinagle, R.A. 



VOL. II. 



290 



INDEX 



Honeymoon, The 

Hooded Falcon 

Hooper, Dr 

Hope in the Troubled Ocean of our Life ... 
Hornpipe leaping over Pepperpot, his rider, 

&c 

" Hornsea," a racehorse 

Horse ... 

Horse, Portrait of a ... 

Horse, Portrait of a ... 

Horse, Portrait of a, 1778, 1780 

Horse, Portrait of a ... 
Horse, Lord Powis' ... 

Horse and Dog 

Horse and Dog, Portrait of a... 
Horse and Lion 
Horse and Lion 

Horse and Pony ... 

Horse Match over Long Course, Newmarket 

Horse, Portrait of a, 1802, 1806 

Horses ... 

Horses ... ... 

Horses 

Horses 

Horses and Dogs 

Horses and Dogs 
Horses and Poultry 
Horses at a Cover Side 
Horse falling from a Precipice 
Horses Feeding 
Horses Fighting 
Horses Fighting 

Horses in a Mail Phaeton, Pair of 

Horses in a Stable 

Hor.ses in a Thunderstorm 

Horses, Pigs, &c. ... ... 

Horses, Portrait of 

Horses, Portraits of Stage 

Horses, Portraits of three 
Horses, Portraits of two 

Horses, Portraits of two 

Horses, Portraits of two ... 

Horses, Three 

Horses taken in to bait 
Horses, Two ... 

Horses and Dogs, Portraits of two ... 
Hound, Bitch and Puppies ... 
Hounds contending for the lead 
Hounds drawing cover and just finding 
Hounds fording a River 
Hounds in Full Cry ... 

Hounds in Full Cry ... 

Hounds making a Cast 

Hounds running into a Fox in View 







PAGE 


Sir Edwin Landseer, 


R.A. 


... 82 


Sir Edwin Landseer, 


R.A. 


... 76 


Philip Reinagle, R.A 




... 122 


James Ward, R.A. 




... 242 


Samuel Howitt ... 




44 


John F. Herring ... 




••• 33 


Benjamin Marshall 




... 95 


Francis Sartorius... 




... 131 


John Sartorius 




... 126 


George Stubbs, R.A. 




... 205 


F. C. Turner 




... 221 


James Ward, R.A. 




... 240 


James W'ard, R.A. 




... 240 


Dean Wolstenholme, 


Sen. 


... 250 


Samuel Howitt ... 




44 


George Stubbs, R.A. 




195, 206 


James Ward, R.A. 




... 241 


Peter Tilleman ... 




208, 209 


John N. Sartorius 




... 140 


Chailes Hancock... 




12 


Sir Edwin Landseer, 


R.A. 


... 77 


John N. Sartorius 




- 139 


James Ward, R.A. 




... 240 


Charles Hancock... 




12 


Sir Edwin Landseer, 


R.A. 


... 78 


John F. Herring, 1864, 1868 


... 32 


John N. Sartorius 




... 140 


John N. Sartorius 




... 141 


John F. Herring, 1865, 1867 


... 32 


John F. Herring ... 




■■■ 35 


James Ward, R.A. 




... 243 


C. C. Henderson... 




19 


C. C. Henderson... 




19 


Charles Hancock... 




12 


John F. Herring ... 




... 32 


John N. Sartorius 




•■■ «39 


Dean Wolstenholme, 


Sen.' 


... 250 


Dean Wolstenholme, 


Jun. 


... 259 


John N. Sartorius 




■■• '39 


Dean Wolstenholme, 


Sen. 


... 250 


. Francis Sartorius... 




... 131 


Charles Hancock... 




13 


Sir Edwin Landseer, 


R.A. 


... 76 


George Stubbs, R.A. 




... 205 


George Stubbs, R.A. 




. . . 206 


Samuel Howitt ... 




... 45 


Benjamin Marshall 




... 95 


Dean Wolstenholme, 


Sen. 


... 250 


Dean Wolstenholme, 


Jurj. 


. . . 260 


James Seymour ... 




... 168 


F. C. Turner 




... 219 


Samuel Howitt ... 




... 45 


Dean Wolstenholme, 


Sen. 


... 250 



INDEX 



291 



Hounds starting a Hare 

Hour Glass Brewery ... 

House in which Smollett was born 

" How happy could I be with either ! " 

Humming Birds 

Humorous Revenge ... 

Hunted Stag, The 

Hunted Stag, The 

Hunter, A, 1784, 1791 

Hunter, A, 1813, 1821, 1824, 182S 

Hunter, Lord Maynard's 

Hunter, Portrait of a 

Hunter, Portrait of a, 1784, 178S, 1793 

Hunter, Portrait of a ... 

Hunters 

Hunters 

Hunters 

Hunters at Grass 

Hunter, Portraits of ... 

Hunters, Portraits of ... 

Hunters, Portraits of two ... 

Hunters, Portraits of ... 

Hunters' Stable 

Hunting Cheeta and Axis Deer 
Hunting Extraordinary 

Hunting for Moor Game 

Hunting in India 

Hunting of Chevy Chase, The 

Hunting on Salisbury Plain ... 

Hunting Picture (Mr. H. W. Estridge's) ... 

Hunting Piece, A ... 

Hunting Pieces 

Hunting Pieces with equestrian portraits ... 

Hunting Scene, with portrait of Sir William 

Jolliffe 

Hunting Scenes 

(1) The Find. 

(2) Cheering in Cover. 

(3) The View. 

(4) The Death. 

Hunting Subjects 

Hunting the Ostrich 

Huntsman Rating Tail Hounds 

Hyde Park Disaster, The 



Samuel Howitt 


... 45 


Dean Wolstenholme, Jun. 


... 254 


J.ames Ward, R.A. 


... 242 


Charles Hancock 


■■• 5. 13 


Philip Reinagle, R.A. ... 


... 121 


Samuel Howitt 


... 46 


Sir Edwin Landseer, R.A 


72, 81 


James Ward, R.A. 


... 242 


John N. Sartorius 


139, 140 


James Ward, R.A. 


240, 241 


James Ward, R.A. 


... 240 


Francis Sartorius 


... 131 


John N. Sartorius 


... 139 


George Stubbs, R.A. 


. . . 206 


Samuel Howitt 


... 44 


Sir Edwin Landseer, R.A. 


...76,78 


Benjamin Marshall 


... 95 


Benjamin .Marshall 


... 90 


Sir Edwin Landseer, R.A. 


... 75 


Philip Reinagle, R.A. ... 


... 120 


John N. Sartorius 


• •• 139 


George Stubbs, R.A. 


... 20s 


John F. Sartorius 


... 147 


Samuel Howitt 


... 46 


F. C. Turner 


... 223 


Philip Reinagle, R.A. ... 


... 123 


James Ward, R.A. 


. . . 240 


Sir Edwin Landseer, R.A. 


..-55. 7S 


John Wootton 


. . . 264 


John N. Sartorius 


... 136 


Samuel Howitt 


37,43 


John Wootton 


... 26s 


John Wootton 


... 266 


James Seymour 


... 167 


F. C. Turner 


... 222 



Samuel Howitt .. 
F.C.Turner 
F. C. Turner 
John N. Sartorius 



37 
222 
219 
141 



" lago " a greyhound Benjamin Marshall 

Iceland Hawk upou a Bittern Philip Reinagle, R.A. 

Idle Boys James Ward, R.A. 

Ignorance, Envy and Jealousy seeking to 

overcome Truth J. Ward, R.A. ... 

Illicit Whiskey Still in the Highlands, An... Sir E. Landseer 



R.A. 



95 

122 

239 

242 
76 



292 



INDEX 



" I'm looking at you " ... 

Imperlinent Puppies dismissed by a Monkey 
Incidents in Mail Coach Travelling... 
Indian Bull, Portrait of an ... 

" Industry," a nily 

Infant Christ embracing the Cross, The 

In Full Cry 

Inside of a Cowhouse... 

Inside of a Stable 

Insiinclive Preservation of a Fox 

Intercession 

Interior of a Highlander's House 

Interior of a Stable 

Intruding Puppies 

Irish Hackney, An 

Irish Water Spaniel, An 

" Isabella," a mare ... 

Isleworth Meadows, Scene from the... 

Italian Greyhound 



Tack in Office, A 

■"Jack Spigot " 

Jackson, Mr. John, Portrait of 

Jacques and the Deer ... 

J y's Nest, The 

" Jasper," a hound 

Jem Hastings, the Running Tailor of the 

Berkeley Hunt ... ... 

Jenkins, Mr 

Jennings, Sarah, Duchess of Marlborough ... 

"Jerry" 

Jockeys, Studies of celebrated 

John Gilpin ... 

"Johnny" 

Jones, Mrs. Robert 

JoUiffe and Hounds, Colonel 

Jolliffe's Hounds and Horses, Mr. ... 

Joys of Coursing, The... 

"Judgment" ... 

" Jupiter," a Stallion, after Smvrey Gilpin.. 

"juniper and Janette," greyhounds 

Juvenile Scribe, The 



K 



Kainsi, or Rock-leaping Antelope ... 
Kenny, and his wife, charcoal burners, Luke, 

1814, 1817 

Keeper going his rounds. The 

Keppel, Earl of Albemarle at Siege of Lisle 

Kind Star, A 

King George returning from Hunting 





PAGE 


Charles Hancock 


... 13 


Sir E. Landseer, R.A. ... 


... 75 


James Pollard 


loi, 109 


George Stubbs, R.A. 


... 206 


F. C. Turner 


... 222 


James Ward, R.A. 


■ •■ 239 


Samuel Howitt 


38.44 


James Ward, R.A. 


•■■ 239 


John N. Sartorius 


■•• 139 


F. C. Turner 


... 222 


James Ward, R.A. 


... 241 


Sir E. Landseer, R.A. ... 


... 76 


John F. Herring 


... 32 


Sir Edwin I.andseer, R.A. 


... 80 


John N. Sartorius 


... MO 


John Wootton 


... 266 


John F. Sartorius 


142, 147 


P. Reinagle, R.A. 


... 122 


James Ward, R.A. 


... 241 


Sir Edwin Landseer, R.A. 


74, 76 


John F. Herring ... 


26. 35 


Benjamin Marshall 


... 88 


Samuel Howitt 


37.43 


James Ward, R.A. 


... 242 


Benjamin Marshall 


... 94 


F. C. Turner 


... 223 


Philip Reinagle, R.A. ... 


... 122 


John Wootton 


... 26s 


John F. Herring 


26,35 


Benjamin Marshall 


... 96 


Thomas Stothard, R.A. ... 


... 191 


John N. Sartorius 


... 141 


Benjamin Marshall 


... 94 


Dean Wolstenholme, Sen. 


... 250 


Dean Wolstenholme, Sen. 


... 250 


Dean Wolstenholme, Sen. 


... 247 


James W'ard, R.A. 


... 240 


John Scott 


... 162 


Benjamin Marshall 


... 95 


James Ward, R.A. 


... 242 


Samuel Howitt 


... 44 


James Ward, R.A. 


... 240 


Charles Hancock 


7 


T. Stothard, R.A. 


... 188 


Sir Edwin Landseer, R.A. 


... 77 


James Pollard 


... 100 



INDEX 



293 



King of the Forest, The 

King's Stnghound, The 
Kingston, on Horseback, Duke of ( " His 
Grace and Attendants a Setting ") 

Knight, Richard 

" Korsaid," An Arab 



Labourers 

Ladies of Quality, Portraits of two 

Lady and Children 

Lady Godiva's Prayer 

Lady Scoit Douglas' Spaniels 

Lady, Portrait of a, 1774, 1776, 1790, 1796 

Lady, Portrait of a 

Lady, Portrait of a ... 

Lady's Horse, The (Prosperity) 

Lady's Hunter, Portrait of a... 

Lake of Bolzana, View near ... 

La I\Lanche Bridge 

Lambert, Mr. D 

Lambs of the first year 

Lambton, Esq., on his horse Undertaker, 

Ralph 

" Lamplighter " 

Lance and his Dog Crab 

Landscape, A, 178S, 1801, 1810 

Landscape, A ... 

Landscape and Cattle... 

Landscape and Cattle... 

Landscape and Figures 

Landscape View, A ... 

Landscape with Asses 

Landscape with Cattle 

Landscape with Cattle at a Ford 

Landscape with Cattle : Bull, Cow and Calf 

Landscape with Cattle, View near Durham 

Landscape with Figures 

Landscape with Figures and Cattle fording... 

Landscape with Figures : Morning ... 

Landscape, with Hounds running across 

country 
Landscape with new invented Carriage 
Landscape with Pigs ... 
Landscape with Sheep 
Landscape with sporting Figures 
Landscape with View of a Plain 

Landseer, Portrait of Sir Edwin 

Land Storm, A 

Langdale, View of 

Larder Invaded, The 

Lassie 





PAGE 


Sir Edwin Landseer, R.A. 


... 79 


John F. Sartorius 


•■ 143 


Peter Tilleman 208,209 


Benjamin Marshall 


94 


John F. Herring 


•• 31 


George Stubbs, R.A. ... 


.. 205 


James Ward, R.A. 


240 


James Ward, R.A. 


.. 239 


Sir Edwin Landseer, R.A. 


..78,83 


Sir Edwin Landseer, R.A. 


.. 76 


Philip Reinagle, R.A. ... 


.. 121 


F. C. Turner 213, 221 


James Ward, R..\. 


.. 241 


Sir Edwin Landseer, R.A. 


79 


John N. Sartorius 


140 


Philip Reinagle, R.A. ... 


122 


Samuel Howitt ... 


.. 46 


Benjamin Marshall 


• • 94 


James Ward, R. A. 


.. 242 


James Ward, R.A. 


■"-ih 240 


Benjamin Marshall 


9S 


G. A. Turner 


.. 224 


Philip Reinagle, R.A. ... 


121, 122 


John Wootton 


.. 264 


Charles Hancock 


12 


Philip Reinagle, R.A. 


122 


James Ward, R.A. 


• • 239 


Dean Wolstenholme, Jun. 


260 


Philip Reinagle, R..-\. ... 


122 


Sir Edwin Landseer, R.A. 


.. 78 


Thomas Stolhard, R.A. ... 


.. 188 


J.ames Ward, R.A. 234, 2 


35. 238 


P. Reinagle, R.A. 


.. 123 


Philip Reinagle, R.A. ... 


.. 122 


P. Remagle, R.A. 


122 


Philip Reinagle, R.A. ... 


.. 123 


Dean Wolstenholme, Jun. 


.. 259 


John N. S<artorius 


■ ■ 139 


Philip Reinagle, R.A. ... 


122 


Philip Reinagle, R.A. ... 


.. 122 


P. Reinagle, R.A. 


122 


John Woutton 


.. 263 


J. F. Lewes 


.. 68 


James Ward, R.A. 


•■ 239 


Philip Reinagle, R.A. ... 


122 


Sir Edwin Landseer, R.A. 


S3 


Sir Edwin Landseer, R.A. 


-77.78 



J94 



INDEX 



Last Run of the Season 

Last Leap, The 

Last Struggle, The 

Last Struggle of Sin, Death and Hell 

" Launcelot" and " Maroon," racehorses ... 

Laying down the Law 

Leap of the Stag, The 

Leicester, Bart., and Yeomanry, Sir John ... 

" Legends of Glenorchay," Scene to illustrate 

Levit, Esq., and favourite Hunter, T. 

Lennox, Lady Georgina 

Leopard seizing an Antelope... 

"Leopold" 

Levity and her foal Queen Elizabeth 
Liboya seizing a Tiger, The ... 
Life's in the Old Dog yet 

Lincolnshire Ox, Portrait of the 

Lion and Buffalo 

" Lion " and " Dash " ^ 

Lion and Horse 
Lion and Lioness 
Lion and Lioness 
Lion and the Lamb, The 
Lion and Tiger 

Lion and Tiger fighting 

Lion Dog from Malta 

Lioness 

Lion Hunt, A ... 

Lion in the Tower, A... 

Lion preying on a Fawn 

Lions, &c., twenty engravings of 

Listening to Advice ... 

"Litchfield" 

Littleden Tower 

Little Red Riding Hood 

" Little Wonder," a Derby Winner 

Llangollen, View of ... 

London Fire Engines, The 

Lonesome, View near... 
" Longwaist" ... 

" Looby," a racehorse 

Look to Peter, The ... ... 

" Lop," a racehorse ... 

Lord's Wood, Leading Roding, Essex 

Lost Shoe, The 

" Lottery" 

Love flying from Sensuality and Dissipation 

Love in a Tub ... 

Lovett and favourite Dogs, The Rev. T. ... 

Low Life 

Loyal Foxhunters 

" Lucetta" 

Luke Kenny and his Wife, charcoal burners, 
1S14, 1817 





PAGE 


Sir Edwin I^ndseer, R.A. 


... 77 


Charles Hancock 


... 14 


Charles Hancock... 


12 


James Ward, R.A. 


... 242 


Chas. Hancock ... 


... 14 


Sir Edwin Landseer, R.A. 


... 76 


Dean Wolstenholme, Sen. 


... 250 


Tames Ward, R.A. 


... 241 


Sir E. Landseer, R.A. ... 


,. 77 


James Ward, R.A. 


. . . 240 


John Wootton 


... 26s 


Samuel Howitt 


41, 46 


James Ward, R.A. 


233. 240 


John F. Herring ... 


• • 34 


James Ward, R.A. 


• •• 243 


Sir Edwin Landseer, R.A. 


... 76 


George Stubhs, R.A. 


... 206 


Sameul Howitt 


... 4S 


Sir Edwin Landseer, R.A. 


... 76 


George Stubbs, R.A. 


ig5, 206 


Charles Hancock... 


... 13 


Samuel Howitt ... 


■ .■38.44 


Sir Edwin Landseer, R.A. 


•..78.83 


James Ward, R.A. 


- 243 


James Ward, R..A. 


230, 239 


Sir Edwin Landseer, R.A. 


... 76 


Samuel Howitt ... 


... 44 


Thomas Stothard, R.A.... 


188, 189 


James Ward, R.A. 


... 239 


Sir Edwin Landseer, R.A. 


... 80 


Thos. Landseer, R.A. ... 


■■ S3 


James Ward, R. .\. 


... 242 


James Ward, R.A. 


..• 239 


James Ward, R.A. 


... 239 


Sir E. Landseer, R.A. ... 


... 76 


Chas. Hancock ... 


14 


Philip Reinagle, R.A. ... 


... 122 


James Pollard 


... 108 


Philip Reinagle, R.A. ... 


... 123 


Benjamin Marshall 


... 95 


John Sartorius 


... 126 


James Ward, R.A. 


... 242 


Benjamin Marshall 


... 89 


Dean Wolstenholme, Sen. 


... 248 


F. C. Turner 


... 223 


John F. Herring 


■■• 35 


J. Ward, R.A 


... 242 


Dean Wolstenholme, Jun. 


... 256 


James Ward, R.A. 


■ ■• 239 


Sir Edwin Landseer, R.A. 


... 72 


F. C. Turner 


... 222 


John F. Herring 


■•■ 33 



James Ward, R.A. 



240 



INDEX 



Lurcher, The .. 
Lynn, Esq., W. 



John Scott 
James Ward, K.A. 



PAGE 

'54 
240 



u 



Macaws and Parrots ... 

Macaw, Lovebirds, Terrier and Sianiel 

puppies 

" Magistrate" 

Maid and the Magpie, The ... 

Mail Coach in a Snow-storm, The ... 

" Major," a greyhound 

Major Money falling into the sea with a 

balloon 

Mai I ese Ass and Foal 

" Mambrino " 

" Mambrino," afler G. Stuhbs, R.A. 

" Mameluke," a Derby Winner 

" Mameluke," a racehorse ... 

"Mandane" 

Mann, Miss ... 

Man proposes, God disposes... 

" Marengo," Napoleon's charger at Waterloo 

Mare, Portrait of a 

Mare and Foal 

Mare and Dog, Portrait of a... 

Mares and Foals 

Market day at St. Albans 

Mark Hall 

" Marmion," a bloodhound ... 

Marshall, the Artist's father, Mr. Benjamin 

" '^is.tike," after G. Slubbs, K.A 

" Mar.ske," sire of Eclipse 

Marten and Rabbit ... 
Mastiff and Lamb 

"Matilda" 

Match, A 

Maternal Anxiety 

" Mazeppa," a racehorse 

Measure for Measure, the Biter bit 

" Medora" 

Meet, The 

Meeting the Stag Hounds 

Meeting the Sun 

Mellish, Colonel 

Melrose Abbey 

Members of the Temperance Society 
" Memnon" ... 
"Mendicant"... 

Merino Sheep and Dog .. 

" Merry Monarch " ... 

" Merry Monarch," a Derby Winner 

" Merry Monarch," a racehorse 



Philip Reinagle, R.A. 



Sir E. Landseer, R.A. ... 


61, 76 


John F. Herring 


•■• 35 


Sir Edwin Landseer, R.A. 


■■75.77 


James Pollard 


... 109 


Philip Reinagle, R.A. ... 


... 122 


P. Reinagle, R.A. 


... 121 


James Ward, R.A. 


... 241 


George Siubbs, R.A. 


199, 206 


John Scott 


... .58 


John F. Herring 


- 35 


James Ward, R.A. 


... 241 


John F. Herring 


• ■■ 35 


James Ward, R.A. 


... 240 


Sir Edwin Landseer, R.A. 


67, 78, 80 


J.Wood, R.A 


... 241 


George Stubbs, R.A. ... 


... 206 


Sir Edwin Landseer, R..'\. 


... 78 


George Stubbs, R.A. 


... 205 


George Stubbs, R.A. 


... 205 


John F. Herring 


... 32 


Sir Edwin Landseer, R.A. 


... 76 


Charles Hancock... 


• ■■ 513 


Lambert Marshall 


97, 98 


John Scott 


- 158 


George Stubbs, R.A. 


199, 206 


Samuel Howilt 


... 46 


Samuel Howitt 


... 46 


John F. Herring 


•■• 33 


John N. Sartorius 


■ ■■ 137 


James Pollard 


... 109 


Lambert Marshall 


... 98 


James Ward, R.A. 


... 242 


John N. Sartorius 


... 141 


F. C. Turner 


... 219 


Benjamin Marshall 


... 96 


James Ward, R.A. 


... 242 


Benjamin Marshall 


... 95 


James Ward, R.A, 


■■• 239 


John F. Herring 


... 30 


John F. Herring 


26, 35 


John F. Herring 


28.33 


Sir Edwin Landseer, R.A. 


... 75 


F. C. Turner 


... 223 


John F. Herring 


■ 34 


John F. Herring 


27 



296 



INDEX 



" Merry Monarch " 

" Middlelon " 

Middlelon, Portrait of the 6th Lord 

Middleton, Bielby Lawley and Sir Francis 
Lawley, Portrait group of Henry, sixth 
Lord 

Middleton, and Spaniels, Henry, 6th Lord 

Middleton, his Spaniels and Pony, Lord ... 

Mill in Wales, A 

Miller, The 

Mill Ford, The 

" Mirandola " 

" Mischief," a terrier 

"Miss Coiner" 

" Miss Craven," a racehorse 

" Miss Letty " 

" Miss Letty," a bay mare ... 

" Miss Letty," a racehorse 

Mitcalf, blind roadmaker, John 

Mode of destroying the Wolf in Bengal 

" Modish," a bitch 

Moll Tomson and Harefoot ... 

" Molly," a racehorse... 

Moment, The 

Monarch of the Glen ... 

" Monitor," a hackney 

Monkey, A 

Monkey, Portrait of a... 

Monkey Tricks 

Monkeys, Pair of Brazilian ... 

Monkey who had seen the world. The 

" Mopsy and Molly," after Philip ReinagU 

Morning 

Morning 

Morning Grey, The ... 

Morning Shooting, A... 

" Moses " 

" Moses," Duke of York's 

Mother, The 

Motherly Protection 

Mountains of Subiaco, View in the 

Mourner, a Bulldog, The 

Mouse-trap Man, The 

Mou.se's Petition, The 

Moving Accidents by Flood and Field, series 

"Mulatto" 

" Muley Moloch," a racehorse 

" Muiidig," a racehorse 

Murray, The Honourable James 

" Muscat," an Arab ... 

Musical Dog, Portrait of an extraordinary ... 

"Mustaid" 







PAGE 


James Pollard 




... 109 


Benjamin Marshall 




89.95 


P. Reinagle, R.A. 




... 118 


Charles Hancock, 1833 ... 


7 


Charles Hancock... 




8 


Charles Hancock... 




9. 10. '3 


James Ward, R.A. 




... 242 


F. C. Turner 




... 223 


James Pollard 




103, 109 


Benjamin Marshall 




- 95 


Benjamin Marshall 




... 95 


John N. Sartorius 




... 141 


^l^ambert Marshall 




... 98 


F. C. Turner 




... 220 


F. C. Turner 




... 223 


John F. Herring ... 




27,33 


Philip Reinagle, R.A 




... 122 


S. Howitt 




... 46 


F. C. Turner 




... 223 


John N. Sartorius 




... 141 


John Sartorius 




... I2S 


James Ward, R.A. 




... 241 


Sir Edwin Landseer, 


R.A. 


70, 80 


James Ward, R.A. 




235> 241 


George Stubbs, R.A. 




... 206 


George Stubbs, R.A 




... 20s 


Philip Reinagle, R.A 




... 122 


Sir Edwin Landseer, 


'r.a. 


... 77 


.Sir E. Landseer, R.A. ... 


... 75 


John Scott 




... 162 


Sir Edwin Landseer, 


R.A. 


... 77 


James Ward, R.A. 




. . . 240 


James Ward, R.A. 




. . . 242 


Dean Wolstenholme, 


Jun. 


... 259 


James Ward, R.A. 




... 241 


James Ward, R.A. 




... 234 


James Ward, R.A. 




•■• 239 


James Pollard 




... 109 


P. Reinagle, R.A. 




... 122 


Sir Edwin Landseer, 


R.A. 


... 61 


C. C. Henderson... 




... 15 


James Ward, R.A. 




■ 239 


F. C. Turner 




... 219 


John F. Herring ... 




- 33 


Benjamin Marshall 




... 89 


Charles Hancock... 




••• 3. 13 


Sir Edwin Landseer, 


R.a! 


... 75 


Lambert Marshall 




... 98 


P. Reinagle, R.A. 




... 122 


Sir Edwin Landseer, 


R.A. 


... 76 



INDEX 



297 



N 



Nature's Sweet Restorer, Balmy Sleep 

Naughty Child, A 

Nearly Done Up 

" Neptune," a Newfoundland 

Netley Abbey 

Newcastle, and Cock-Springers, Duke of ... 

Newfoundland, A 

Newfoundland Dog, Portrait of a ... 

Newfoundland Dog and Terrier at a Stream 

Newfoundland Dog's Sagacity 

Newman, Esq., C. 

Newman, M. F.H., Portrait of Chas. 

Newmarket Heath, Map of 

Newmarket from the Duch ... 

New Passage of the Severn, View of the ... 

New Years Morn 

Nichol, Esq., J., 

Night 

" Noble," a hunter 

Nobleman and Shetland Pony 

Noble Tips, The 

"NoGo" 

No more Hunting till the Weather Breaks... 
"None but the Brave deserve the Fair" ... 
" Nonpareil," George IV. 's charger 
Norfolk Phenomenon, The ... 

Norman Bull, A 

North Country Mails at the Peacock, Isling- 
ton 

" Not caught yet " 

" Not e.\actly" 

Novelists' Magazine, Illnstrations in 

Numps returning from Market 

" Nutvvith," a racehorse 

"Nutwith" 



J. Ward, R.A. .. 

Sir Edwin Landseer, R. 

F. C. Turner 

Sir Edwin Landseer, K.t 

Samuel Iliivvitt .. 

Francis Wheatley, R.A., 

James Ward, R.A. 

George Stubbs, R.A. 

Sir Edwin Landseer, R.. 

Samuel Howitt ... 

F.C.Turner 

F. C. Turner 

James Seymour ... 

John Wuotton 

Pliilip Reinagle, R.A. 

Charles Hancock 

James Ward, R.A. 

Sir Edwin Landseer, R.^ 

Benjamin Marshall 

James Ward, R.A. 

F. C. Turner 

F. C. Turner 

Sir Edwin Landseer, R.. 

Sir Edwin Landseer, R.. 

James Ward, R.A. 

James Ward, R.A. 

James Ward, R.A. 

J. Pollard 

Sir Edwin Landseer, RA, 
John F. Herring ... 
Thomas Stothard, R.A. 
James Ward, R.A. 
Charles Hancock 
John F. Herring... 





PAGB 




... 242 


A. 


... 74 




... 219 


A. 


... 87 




38.44 


,'f.S.A. 113 




... 240 




206 


A. 


... 79 




... 46 




... 222 




212, 213 




172, 173 




. . . 264 




... 122 




• ■• 5. 13 




. . . 240 


a! 


... 77 




... 95 




... 240 




.„ 220 




... 223 


A. 


... 83 


A. 


59. 76. 82 




241, 242 




235. 241 




• ■ 239 




100, 109 


A. 


... 82 




... 34 




... 182 




... 241 




4. 5. 13 




■ 27, 35 



Obstinate Ass, The 

October Shooting 

Odds and Ends 

Officer, Portrait of an... 

Officer on Horseback, Portrait of an 

"Old Brutus" 

Old Careful 

Old Cover Hack, An ... 

Old Dog and Horses, 1789, 1790 .. 

Old Dutch Cow, The 

Olden Times at Bolton Abbey 

Old Famous Hunter, An 

Old Head, An 



James Ward, R.A. 

John F. Herring ... 

Sir Edwin Landseer, R.. 

Philip Reinagle, R.A. 

John N. Sartorius 

Sir Edwin Landseer, R. 

James Ward, R.A. 

Sir Edwin Landseer, R.. 

Francis Sartorius 

James Ward, R.A. 

Sir Edwin Landseer, R.. 

John N. Sartorius 

Philip Reinagle, R.A. 





■ 239 




• 38 


.A^ ; 


. 78 




121 




■ '39 


.A. 


.79. 80 




. 242 


.A. 


77 




• 131 




■ 24 


.A. '. 


• 76 




• 139 




121 



298 



INDEX 



Old Horse, Portrait of an ... 

Old Horse, Portrait of an 

Old Horse, A Very 

Old Horse and Dog, Portrait of a Very 

Old Hunter, An 

Old Hunting Mare, An 

Old Lodge, The 

" Old Partner," a Racehorse 

" Old Pluck," earthstopper to General 

Wyndham... 
Old Shepherd, An 
Old Six- Horse Diligence, The 
" Old Traveller " and Stephen Jefferson 
Old Weighing-House at Newmarket, The ... 

On Trust 

"Orlando" 

Orpheus and his Lyre 

"Oswald" 

" Otho," a famous Horse 

Otter and Salmon ... 

Otter Hound.s in Water 

Otter Hunt, The 

Otter-hunting ... 

Otter in a Tree 

Otter Speared, The ... 

" Our Nell," a racehorse 

Outlying Deer going thro' a swing-pale 

Out of Hearing 

Over the Downs 

Owen Glendower's Parliament House 

Owls 

0.x(ord and Opposition Coaches 

Oxford, Countess of, (2) 

Oxford, View of, 



Sir Edwin Landseer, R.A. 
Dean Wolstenholme, Senr. 
John N. Sartorius 
George Stubbs, R.A. 
Dean Wolstenholme, Junr. 
John N, Sartorius 
John F. Herring ... 
James Seymour ... 165 

F. C. Turner 
James Ward, R.A. 
C. C. Henderson... 
John Sartorius 
James Seymour ... 
Sir Edwin Landseer, R. 
John F. Herring ... 
Thomas Stothard, R.A. 
James Ward, R.A. 
George Stubbs, R.A. 
Sir Edwin Landseer, R.A. 
Sir Edwin Landseer, R.A. 
Sir Edwin Landseer, R.A. 
John N. Sartorius 
John N. Sartorius 
Sir Edwin Landseer, R. A. 
Chas. Hancock ... 

S. Howitt 

James Ward, R..^. 
C. C. Henderson 
J. Ward, R.A. ... 
Samuel Howitt ... 
James Pollard 
John Wootton 
James Ward, R.A. 



PAGE 

75 
250 

206 
260 

32 

I7S. 177 



222 

239 

19 

126 
168 
83 
27.34 
184 
240 
2o5 

77,82 

S3 

79 

137 

137 

77 

5. '3 

45 

242 

iS, 21 

242 

41,46 

104 

263 

241 



Pair of Brazilian Monkeys 

Pair of His Majesty's Coach-horses ... 

Panther and Antelope... 

" Pantomime," a hunter 

Park Scene, aj/er G. Garrard, A. R.A. 

Park Scene at the Grove 

Partridge, A 

Partridges 

Partridges ... 

Partridges 

Partridges and Snipe ... 

Partridge Shooting 

Partiidge Shooting 

Partridge-Shooting 

Partridge Shooting with Pointers 

Partridges with pointers drawing up 



Sir Edwin Landseer, R.A. 




61 


Francis Sartorius 




i3< 


Samuel Howitt 




44 


John F. Herring 


2S 


.33 


John Scott 




160 


George Stubbs, R.A. 




206 


John F. .Sartorius 




147 


Sir Edwin Landseer, R.A. 




81 


Samuel Howitt ... 


41 


.46 


Philip Rcinagle, R.A. ... 




"5 


John F. Sartorius 




147 


Benjamin Marshall 




96 


John N. Sartorius 


140, 


141 


F. C. Turner 




222 


P. Reinagle, R.A. 


115. 


'23 


John Wootton 




262 



INDEX 



Passions of the Horse, The 

" Patriot" 

Peace ... 

Peace 

Peaceful Angler, The ... 

Peebles Castle, Scotland 

Peel, .Miss Eliza 

Peel, The L.idy Emily 

Pegwell Bay 

Pensioners, The 

Perch Fishing ... 

Peregrine Falcon and Pheasant 

Peregrine Falcon upon a Woodcock 

Persian Horse, A 

Persian Greyhound 

Persian Sheep ... 

Persian Tom Cat 

Pets 

"Phantom" 

"Phantom" 

Pheasant Shooting 

Pheasant Shooting 

Pheasants Basking 

Pheasant Shooting with Springers 

" Phenomena," a Hackney Mare 

Phipp and his favourite pony, Hon. 

"Phosphorus" 

"Phosphorus"... 

Pigeons, Illustrations to Eaton's Book 

Pigs 

Pike and Anchor, Ponders End, The 
Pike Fishing ... 

Pike Fishing 

Pilgrim's Progress, 7 illustrations to 

"Pilot," Portrait of 

"Pincher" 

Piper and Pair of Nutcrackers 

"Play or Pay" 

Plenty 

Poached Eggs ... 
Poacher and Red Deer 
Poacher, The ... 
Poacher's Bothy, The ... 
Poachers Deer Stalking 

Pointer, Portrait of a 

Pointer ... 

Pointer, A, after Philip Reinagle 

Pointer and Partridge... 

Pointer and Setter 

Pointers... 

Pointers 

Pointers, Portraits of ... 
Pomeranian Dog, A ... 
Pond NLtlers 



John F. Herring, 1853, 1S54, 

John N. Sartorius 

Sir Edwin Landseer, K. 

James Ward, R.A. 

Samuel Howitt ... 

James Ward, R.A. 

Sir Edwin Landseer, R.A 

Sir Edwin Landseer, R.A 

James Ward, R.A. 

Sir Edwin Landseer, R.A. 

Samuel Howitt ... 

S. Howilt 

Philip Reinagle, R.A. 
James Ward, R.A. 
James Ward, R.A. 
James Ward, R.A. 
Sir Edwin Landseer, R.A 
Sir Edwin Landseer, R.A 
Benjamin Marshall 
James Ward, R.A. 
John N. Sartorius 
F. C. Turner 
Samuel Howitt ... 
Sir E. Landseer, R.A. .. 
John N. Sartorius 
James Ward, R.A. 
John F. Herring ... 
Benjamin Marshall 
Dean Wolstenholme, Jun 
James Ward, R..\. 
James Pollard 
Samuel Howitt ... 
James Pollard ... ■.. 

Thomas Stothard, R.A. .. 
Dean Wolstenholme, Sen, 
Sir Edwin Landseer, R.A, 
Sir Edwin Landseer, R.A. 
John N. Sartorius 
James Ward, R.A. 
F. C. Turner 
Sir Edwin Landseer, R.A 
Sir Edwin Landseer, R.A. 
Sir Edwin Landseer, R.A. 
Sir Edwin Landseer, R.A, 
Philip Reinagle, R.A. 
Sir Edwin Landseer, R.A, 
John Scott... 
Samuel Howitt ... 
Samuel Howitt ... 
John N. Sartorius 
Sir Edwin Landseer, R.A 
Dean Wolstenholme, Sen. 
George Stubbs, R.A. 
Samuel Howitt ... 



1855 



299 

PAGE 

34 

... 140 

... 72 

... 242 

... 46 

... 242 

... 76 

... 78 

... 238 
78, 80, 84 

... 46 

... 46 

... 122 

. . . 240 

... 243 

... 241 

... 50 

.. 76 

... 95 

234, 240 

... 141 

... 222 

41,46 

54, 84 

134. «4I 

... 239 

27, 33 

... 94 

... 257 

238, 239 

... loi 

... 45 
103, 109 

... 187 

... 250 

... 77 

... 78 

... 140 

... 241 

... 222 

... 76 

... 84 

... 76 
76, 80 

... 122 

... 8l 

... 162 

... 45 

... 45 

... 138 

... 75 

... 250 
205, 206 

... 46 



300 



INDEX 



Ponsonby, Hon. Ashley 

Pony, The 

Pony and Dog ... ... 

Portrait of a Gentleman 

Portrait of a Mule 

Pottery, A 

" Pranks and Lazarus" ... 

Pratt, Esq., S. J 

" Precipitate " 

"Priam" 

" Priam," a setter ... 

" Primrose," a Foal 

Princess Mary of Cambridge 

Princess Mary of Cambridge and Newfound- 
land 

" Princess Royal," a racing Mare 

Prize Calf, The 

Prize Pigeons, Portraits of .. 

"Proctor" 

Prolific Hare. The 

Prospective View of Epsom Races ... 

Prosperity (The Lady's House) 

"Protector" ... 

Prowling Lion, A 
Ptarmigan, A brace of 

Ptarmigan Hill, The 

" Pyrrhus," a racehorse 

" Pyrrhus the First " 

Puffin Shooting at Back of Isle of Wight ... 

Pug, The 

PugDog 

Pug Dog, Portrait of a 

"Pumpkin" 

Purity Cherishing Love 

Putting Hounds in Cover ... 



Sir Edwin Landseer, 


R.A. 




77 


Samuel Howitt ... 






44 


John N. Sartorius 






140 


Philip Reinagle, R.A 




"3. 


121 


Sir Edwin Landseer, 


'r.a. 


5= 


', 75 


Philip Keinagle, R.A 






122 


Lambert Marshall 






98 


James Ward, R.A. 






239 


Benjamin Marshall 






94 


Benjamin Marshall 


... 


"'89, 96 


Lambert Marshall 






98 


James Ward, R.A. 




233. 


243 


Sir Edwin Landseer, 


R.A.' 




76 


Sir Edwin landseer, 


R.A. 




61 


James Ward, R.A. 






241 


Sir Edwin Landseer, 


R.A.' 


!!.77.78 


Dean Wolstenholme, 


Jun. 


257. 


258 


Sir Edwin Landseer, 


R.A. 




84 


Samuel Howitt ... 






45 


James Pollard 






ic8 


Sir Edwin Landseer, 


R.A. 




79 


George Stubbs, R.A. 






199 


Sir Edwin Landseer, 


R.a! 




75 


John F. Sartorius... 






147 


Sir Edwin Landseer, 


r.a'. 




78 


John F. Herring ... 






28 


John F. Herring ... 






33 


P. Reinagle, R.A. 




"S. 


123 


Sir Edwin Landseer, 


R.A. 




61 


Samuel Howitt ... 






44 


John N. Sartorius 






140 


George Stubbs, R.A. 






199 


James Ward, R.A. 






242 


Samuel Howitt ... 






38 



Q 



Queen, on a White Horse The, 

Queen Victoria meeting the Prince Consort 

after deerstalking... ... 

Queen, Unfinished .Sketch of H.M. the 

Queen Charlotte, Portrait of ... 

Queen Elizabeth going to Kenilworth by 

Torchlight 

Queen Elizabeth's Hunting Expedition to 

Enfield Chase 

" Queen of Trumps," a racehorse ... 

" Queen of Trumps " 

Quietude Disturbed 



Sir E. Landseer, R.A 79 

Sir Edwin Landseer, R.A. ...62, 78 

Sir E. Landseer, R.A 62, 78 

Philip Reinagle, R.A no 

Dean Wolstenholme, Jun. 256, 260 

Dean Wolstenholme, Jun., 256, 259, 260 

Charles Hancock 3 

John F. Herring ... ... 27, 33 

James Ward, R.A 242 



INDEX 



301 



R 



Rabbits 

Rabbits and Terrier ... 

Rabbit Ferreter, A 

Rabbit Shooting 

Rabbits of Fancy Breed, Tliree Doe 

Race at Newmarket 

Race between Mrs. Thornton and Mr. Flint 

Racehorse being Viewed, A 

Racehorse 

Racehorses, Portraits of 

Racehorses, Porliaits of 

Racehorses, Portraits of 

Racehorses, Portraits of 

Racehorses, Training... 

Race of Hambletonian and Diamond 

Racer, Portrait of a ... 

" Rally," a hound 

Random Shot, A 
Rat-catchers ... 
Rat Hunting ... 
Real Yorkshire 
Reaper, The ... 

Reapers 

"Recovery" ... 

Red Deer 

Red Deer Fighting 
Red Grouse 
Red-legged Partridge .. 

Reedall, Mr 

Reeves, .Mrs 

Refreshment ... 

Regent's Park in 1807 

Remarkable three-year-old Deer 
Rendezvous, The 
Rent Day in the Wilderness ... 
Renton in Scotland ... 
Repast, The 

Rest, The 

Retriever, The... 
Retriever and Woodcock 
Retriever and Spaniel... 
Return from Deer-Stalking, The 

Return from Deerstalking 

Return from Foxhunting by Moonlight 

Return from Hawking 

Returning from the intended Fight ... 

Reynard in the Pigstye 

Reynard seeking Refuge in the Church 

Reynard's last Shift 

Rhinoceros Hunting ... 

Richmond Hill : Morning 

Richmond : Twilight, View near ... 







P.IGE 


James Ward, R.A. 




• 239 


Samuel Howitt ... 




... 45 


John N. Sartorius... 




■ 139 


A. Turner 




... 224 


Dean Wolstenholme, 


Junr. 


... 259 


Tames Seymour ... 




... 168 


P. Keinaijle, R.A. 




... 117 


James Seymour ... 




... 175 


Samuel Howitt ... 




... 44 


James Seymour ... 




... 174 


Thomas Spencer ... 




I7«. 179 


Peter Tilleman ... 




... 211 


F. C. Turner 




... 220 


George S'ubbs, R.A. 




... 195 


John F. Sartorius... 




••■ 143 


John F. Sartorius... 




... 143 


Benjamin Marshall 




•■■ 95 


Sir Edwin Landseer, 


R.A. 


... 77 


Sir Edwin Landseer, 


1S21, 


1822 75 


Charles Hancock... 




II 


Lambert Marshall 




... 98 


Sir Edwin Landseer, 


R.A. 


... 81 


George Stubbs, R.A. 




. . . 206 


Charles Hancock... 




••• 3. 13 


Sir Edwin Landseer, 


R.A. 


57,78 


F. C.Turner 




... 222 


Samuel Howitt ... 




... 46 


Samuel Howitt ... 




... 46 


James Ward, R.A. 




... 242 


Philip Reinagle, R.A 


• 


... 122 


Sir Edwin Landseer, 


r.a! 


... 77 


James Ward, R.A. 




... 238 


John N. Sartorius 




... 140 


F. C. Turner 




... 222 


Sir Edwin Landseer, 


R.A. 


... 78 


James Ward, R.A. 




... 242 


James Ward, R.A. 




... 241 


. George Stubbs, R.A. 




. . . 204 


. James Ward, R.A. 




... 241 


. Sir Edwin Landseer, 


r.'a. 


... 82 


. James Ward, R.A. 




... 241 


. John F. Herring ... 




32 


. Sir Edwin Landseer, 


r.a! 


82 


. Dean Wolstenholme, 


Sen. 


... 250 


. Sir Edwin Landseer, 


R.A. 


... 76 


. Samuel Howitt ... 




... 45 


. Samuel Howitt ... 




... 45 


. Dean Wolstenholme, 


Sen. 


247, 248 


. Charles Hancock... 




... 13 


Samuel Howitt ... 




44 


. Philip Reinagle, R.A. .. 


... 123 


. Philip Reinagle, R.A. ... 


... 122 



?02 



INDEX 



Richmond, View of ... ... 

Rider Spilled, The 

Riding to Covert 

Riding School, V'iew of Interior of 

Rising at a Leap 

River Scene with Cottage and Barge 
River with Anglers 

Road-scrapings 

Road to Cover, The ... 

" Roan Billy," a hackney 

" Ko?in MMy," a/Ur B. Maiskall 

Roan Hack, A. 

Robert Burns 

Robinson, James 
Roebuck and Rough Hounds 
Roebuck Shooting in the Forest of Glenmore, 
v/ith a l2-barrelled rifle, Col. Thornton 

Roe's Head and Ptarmigan ... 
Rocking Horse 
"Rockingham" 
"Rockingham" 

Roger's Poems, Itliistrations to 

Rotten Row ... ... 

Rough and Ready ... 

Roundcroft Cottage 

Round, or Plate Course, Newmarket 

" Rover," a spaniel (2) 

Rowley's Dog-kennels at Tendring Hall, 

SirW 

Rowcroft and Children, Mrs. 

Rowley, Sir William, Bart., on horseback ... 

Royal Buckhounds in Windsor Forest, The 

(2) , 

Royal Hunt in Windsor Park 

Royal Mail, The 

Royal Mail leaving the G.P.O., The 

Royal Sports on Hill and Loch 

Ruins in Hertfordshire 

Running Horses exercising on Warren Hill, 

Newmarket, View of ... 

" Running Rein " 

Rural Sports, Daniel's, /'/ato «K 

Rural Sports: Men Running in Sacks 
Russell, Avarella Oliveria Cromwell 
Russell, Lord Cosmo 







PAGE 


Peter Tilleman .. 




... 208 


F. C. Turner 




... 219 


F. C.Turner 




... 223 


Dean Wolstenholme 


Sen 


... 250 


Samuel Howitt ... 




... 45 


Philip Reinagle, R.A. .. 


... 123 


Samuel Howitt ... 




38, 44 


C. C. Henderson... 




17 


C. C. Henderson... 




21 


Benjamin Marshall 




... 91 


John Scott 




... IS9 


Benjamin Marshall 




... 94 


Charles Hancock 




12 


Benjamin Marshall 




... 9S 


Sir Edwin Landseer, 


R.A 


69, 74 


P. Reinagle, R.A., 


and 


Sawrey 


Gilpin 




... 116 


Sir Edwin Landseer, 


R.A 


... 81 


James Ward, R.A. 




■ ■ 239 


John F. Herring ... 




291. 32 


John N. Sartorius 




... 13s 


Thomas Stothard, R.A... 


. ... .87 


John N. Sartorius 




... 141 


Sir Edwin Landseer, 


R.A 


... 77 


James Ward, R.A. 




... 242 


Peter Tilleman ... 




20S, 209 


James Ward, R.A. 




... 240 


John Scott 




... 151 


Philip Reinagle, R.A 


. .. 


... 122 


John N. Sartorius 




••■ 133 


John Wootton 




... 264 


James Pollard 




... 100 


James Pollard 




... 104 


James Pollard 




... 107 


Sir Edwin Landseer, 


R.A 


...62,77 


Dean Wolstenholme, 


Jun. 


... 259 


Tames Seymour ... 




172, 173 


^. C. Turner 




... 223 


John Scott 




... 158 


Samuel Howitt ... 




... 44 


J. Ward, R.A. ... 




... 241 


Sir Edwin Landseer, 


R.A 


... 75 



Sagacious Hare, The ... ' ... 
" Said," an Arab 
" Saltram," a son of " Eclipse ' 
" Sam," a pointer 



Samuel Howitt .. 
John F. Herring .. 
John N. Sartorius 
John F. Herring .. 



4S 

31 

140 

35 



INDEX 



303 



"Sancho" beating "Hannibal" at Brigh- 
ton... 

Sancho Panza and Dapple ... 

Sanctuary, The 

Sand Asses 

Sand-Pit, The 

"Satan," a Newfoundland, and Chestnut 
Pony 

" Satirist," a racehorse 

"Saved!" 

Scene at Abbotsford, A 

Scene from Midsummer Night's Dream 

Scene from Nature 

Scene in Braemar 

Scene in Chillingham Park ... 

Scenes in Lord Breadalbane's Deer Forest... 

Scene ill the Grampians, A ... 

Scene in the Forester's House 

Scene in the Highlands 

Scene on the Great North Road, A 

Scanty Meal, A 

Scenes on the Road, A Trip to Epsom and 
Back 

(1) Hyde Park Corner. 

(2) The Lord Nelson Inn, Cheam. 

(3) The Cock at Sutton. 

(4) Kennington Gate. 

Scene on the Roadside, A ... 

Scholastica, View of the Grand Convent of.. 
Scotch Terrier chasing a Rabbit 
Scott, Sir Walter, at the Rhymer's Glen ... 
Scott, Sir Walter, with a Book 

Scott, Sir Waller, Portrait of 

Seagull and " Escape " 

Sea Port, A 

Sefton, Earl and Countess of, and daughter 

Selling Rabbits 

Sensitive Plant, A 

Sentimental Journeys, Draumigi for the 

Sentinel, The ... 

Separation 

Series of Heads of Sporting Dogs, A 

Setter, The 

Setter and Spaniels 

Setter Howling 

Setting the Smeuse 

Shaddick, J. G., Esq., Portrait of 

Shade of Tom Moody, The ... 

Shakespeare, Illustralions for BoydeU's 

"Shark" 

"Shz.iV," after G. Stuks, R.A. ... 

" Shaver," a deerhound 

Sheep and Cattle, heads of ... 

Sheep-shearing 



John F. Sartorius 
Sir Edwin Landseer, R.A 
Sir Edwin Landseer, R.A 
James Ward, R.A. 
James Ward, R.A. 



Benjamin Marshall 
Cha.s. Hancock ... 
Sir Edwin Landseer, 
.Sir Edwin Landseer, \ 
Sir E. Landseer, R.A 
Philip Reinagle, R.A. 
Sir Edwin Landseer, 
Sir Edwin Landseer, ' 
Sir Edwin Landseer, 
Sir Edwin Landseer, 
Charles Hancock... 
Sir Edwin Landseer, 
C. C. Henderson... 
John F. Herring ... 





... 147 


R.A. 


... 74 


R.A. 


■■ 69,77 




... 242 




■•• 239 




... 95 




4, 5. '3 


r.a! 


... 97 


R.A. 


•• 75 




... 77 




... 121 


R.A. 


... 77 


R.A. 


... 76 


R.A. 


... 78 


R.A. 


... 76 




... 13 


R.A. 


... 76 




21 
•■■ 33 



James Pollard 



106 



C. C. Henderson 


21 


Philip Reinagle, R. A. ... 


... 122 


Charles Hancock ... 


...5. 12 


Sir Edwin Landseer, R.A. 


55. 76 


Sir Edwin Landseer, R-.A. 


79 


Sir Edwin Landseer, R.A. 


... 7S 


John N. Sartorius 


... 141 


Philip Reinagle, R.A. ... 


... 122 


Sir Edwin Landseer, R.A. 


... 79 


James Ward, R.A. 


228, 239 


Philip Reinagle, R.A. ... 


... 122 


Thomas Stothard, R.A. ... 


... 191 


Sir Edwin Landseer, R.A. 


... 84 


James Ward, R.A. 


... 242 


A. Cooper, R.A. & Chas. Hancock 6 


Philip Reinagle, R.A. ... 


... 122 


Charles Hancock 


13 


Samuel Howitt 


... 45 


F. C. Turner 


... 222 


Benjamin Marshall, 1801, 


806. ..87, 94 


Dean Wolstenholme, Jun. 


... 255 


Thomas Stothard, R.A. ... 


... 187 


George Stubbs, R.A. 


199, 206 


John Scott 


... 158 


F. C. Turner 


... 221 


Sir Edain Landseer, R.A. 


... 81 


James Ward, R.A. 


••• 239 



304 



INDEX 



Shepherd and Bird Keeper, The 
Shepherd's Bible, The 
Shepherd's Chief Mourner, The 

Shepherd's Dog ... 

Shepherd Dog, The ... 

Shepherd, Dog and Two Rams, A ... 

Shepherd's Dog from South of France 

Shepherd's Grave, The 

Shepherd's Praj'er, The 

Shetland Ponies and Sheep .. 

Shetland Pony, A ... 

Shipton, Yorkshire, View near 
Shoeing... 

Shooting Antelopes in India 

Shooting a Rhinoceros 

Shooting Peccaries 

Shooting Pony, A 

Shooting Pony and Dog, portraits of 
Shooting Pony and Dogs, Portraits of 

Shooting Pony and Rolla 

Shooting Pony and Setter 

Shooting Pony in a Landscape, Brown 

Shooting Scenes 

(ij Going out. 

(2) Game found. 

(3) Dogs bringing the Game. 

(4) Refreshing. 

Shooting: The Monihs (6) 

Showery Weather near Midsummer... 

Showin ga Horse 

Shrew Tamed, The ... 

Shrewsbury, View near 

Shubricli's Colt Brocai do. General ... 

Sides All 

Siege of Lisle ... 
Siege of Tournay 

Silver Buttons 

Sin Offering, The 

"Sir Hercules" 

"Sir Tatton Sykes" 

"Sir Thomas" 

Six-stall Stable at Finsbury Repository 

Sketch in the Highlands 

Sketch of my Father ... 

"Skiff" 

Skittles 

"Sky Scraper" 

" Slane," a racehorse ... 

Sleeping Bloodhound, The ... 

Sleeping Children, Design for Ckaiitre/s 

Sleeping Dog, A 

" Sniaragdine," a mare 

Smash in Piccadilly, A 

Smithfield Market 



James Ward, R.A. 




... 242 


Sir Edwin Landseer, 


R.A. 


... 80 


Sir Edwin Landseer, 


R.A. 


68, 74, 76 


John Scott 




... 156 


James Ward, R.A. 




•■• 243 


James Ward, R.A. 




... 241 


GeoVge Stubbs, R.A. 




... 206 


Sir Edwin Landseer, 


R.A. 


81 


Sir Edwin Landseer, 


R.A. 


... 77 


Dean Wolstenholme, 


Jun. 


... 257 


James Ward, R.A. 




239, 240 


Philip Reinagle, R.A. ... 


... 123 


Sir Edwin Landseer, 


R.A. 


73. 77 


Samuel Howitt ... 




... 46 


Samuel Howitt 




... 46 


Samuel Howitt ... 




4 


James Ward, R.A. 




... 241 


John N. Sartorius 




•■■ 139 


John N. Sartorius 




•■• 139 


John N. Sartorius 




... 140 


John N. Sartorius 




... 140 


Chas. Hancock ... 




7 


Dean Wolstenholme, 


Sen.' 


... 247 



F. C. Turner 




... 220 


James Ward, R..\. 




... 242 


John F. Sartorius... 




... 147 


Sir Edwin Landseer, 


R.A. 


... 78 


Philip Reinagle, R.A 




... 122 


John F. Herring ... 




... 32 


James Ward, R.A. 




... 241 


John Wuotton 




... 26S 


John Woutton 




... 26S 


John Scott 




... 161 


Sir Edwin Landseer, 


R.A. 


... 83 


Charles Hancock... 




■■■ 3. 13 


John F. Herring ... 




28,33 


John N. Sartorius 




■• «3S 


Dean Wolstenholme, 


Sen. 


250 


Sir Edwin Landseer, 


R.A. 


... 74 


Sir Edwin Landseer, 


R.A. 


... 77 


Benjamin Marshall 




... 95 


Samuel Howitt ... 




... 45 


John N. Sartorius 




... 140 


John F. Herring ... 




30, 32 


Sir Edwin Landseer, 


R.A. 


57. 73 


Thomas Stothard, R.A. ... 


... 186 


Sir Edwin Landseer, 


R.A. 


... 52 


Lambert Marshall 




... 98 


C. C. Henderson... 




18,21 


James Pollard 




... lOI 



INDEX 



"Smolensko" 

"Smolensko" 

"Smolensko" 

Smolensko beating Caterpillar and the 

Haphazard Colt 

Smugglers, after Mor/and 

Smugglers Alarmed 

" Snap," a Mare 

Snare Discovered, The 

Snarlers, The 

Snipe, A 

Snipes, A couple of 

Snipe and Woodcock 

Snipe-Shooting 

Snipe-Shooting 
Snipe-Shooting in January ... 

Snowdon 

Snow Scene, A 

Songs of the Chase, flaies in... 

Son of " Eramus," A 

" Soothsayer," George IV. 's ... 
" Soothsayer," a racehorse ... 
" Southerly Wind and Cloudy Sky, A 

(4, 1832-4) 

"Souvenir" 
Spangles, a hunter 
Spaniel, A 

Spaniel and Hare 

Spaniel and Pheasant ... 

Spaniel at a Tomb, after J. Ward, R.A. 

Spaniel watching Tomb 

Spaniel flushing a Woodcock... 

Spaniels of King Charles' breed 

Spaniel, Portrait of a ... 

Spaniel Starting a Hare 

Spaniels 

Spaniels... 

Spaniels 

Spaniels, after Sawrey Gilpin 
Spaniels flushing a Woodcock 

Spanish Ass 

Spanish Ass and Foal... 

Spanish Dog 

Spanish Dog, Portrait of a ... 

Spanish Pointer 

Spearing the Otter 

"Spectator," Portrait of Duke of Ancaster 

Spicey Screw, The 

Sport in the Highlands 

" Sportley," a racehorse 

Sportsman's Cabinet, The Pictures of Sport 

ing Dogs ... 
Sportsman's Repository, plates in, after 

various artists 

20 



John F. Herring ... 
John N. Sartorius 
James Ward, R.A. 

John F. Sartorius 
James Ward, R.A. 
Samuel Howitt ... 
Francis Sartorius... 
F. C. Turner 
James Ward, R.A. 
John F. Sartorius 
John F. Sartorius 
Sir Edwin Landseer, R. 
Samuel Howitt ... 
John N. Sartorius 
F. C. Turner 
Philip Reinagle, R.A. 
John F. Herring ... 
John Scott 
Benjamin Marshall 
James Ward, R.A. 
James Ward, R.A. 

F. C. Turner 
Benjamin Marshall 
Benjamin Marshall 
Francis Sartorius... 
Benjamin Marshall 
Sir Edwin Landseer, R. 
John Scott 
James Ward, R.A. 
Samuel Howitt ... 
Sir Edwin Landseer, R. 
John N. Sartorius 
Samuel Howitt... 
Benjamin Marshall 
Sir Edwin Landseer, R. 
John F. Sartorius 
John Scott 
John N. Sartorius 
James Ward, R.A. 
James Ward, R.A. 
George Stubbs, R.A. 
Francis Sartorius... 
Philip Reinagle, R.A. 
Philip Reinagle, R.A. 
George Stubbs, R.A. 
F. C. Turner 
Sir Edwin Landseer, R. 
Thomas Spencer ... 

Philip Reinagle, R.A. 

John Scott 



305 

PAGE 

28 

140 

.. 241 

.. 147 

.. 228 

37. 43 

.. 127 

.. 222 

.. 242 

•• 147 

.. 147 

81 

44 

.. 141 

222 

122 

•• 33 

• • 159 

94 

•■ 233 

.. 241 

216, 217 

••■ 95 

... 90 

... 131 

... 94 

... 82 

... 160 

... 240 

... 45 

... 72 

... 140 

... 45 
95 

... 76 

... 147 

... 162 

... 140 

... 241 

... 241 

... 205 

... 131 

... 122 

115, 123 
... 203 
... 222 
... 79 
... 179 

... Ill 

... 162 



VOL. II. 



3o6 



INDEX 



Sportsman's Return ... Samuel Howitt .. 

Sportsman's Present, The ... G. A. Turner 

Sportsman, The, Portrait of Thomas Gosden B. Marshall and Luke Clennell 
Sportsman's Emulation ... ... ... Samuel llowitt ... 

Springer, The Philip Reinagle, R.A 

Springing Spaniels .. Philip Reinagle, R.A 

Squirrel-hunting ... ... ... ... Samuel Howitt ... 

Stable, The F.C.Turner 

St. Bernard Dogs Sir Edwin Landseer, R.A. 

StatTordand Lady Evelyn Gower, Marquess of Sir Edwin Landseer, R.A. 



Staffordshire Bull, A 
Staffordshire Cow, A ... 
Stag at Bay, The 

Stag at Bay 

Stag Bellowing 

Stag-chase thro' the Thames . 

Staghound, The 

Stag Hunt, A 

Staghound, The 

Stage Coach Passengers at breakfast 



Stage Coach, with opposition coach in sight James Pollard 



James Ward, R.A. 

James Ward, R.A. 

Sir Edwin Landseer, R.A. 59 

John N. Sartorius 

Sir Edwin Landseer, R.A. 

Francis Sartorius 

.Samuel Howitt ... 

John Wootton 

Philip Reinagle, R.A 

James Pollard 



Stag Hunt, A 

Stag pursued by Greyhound ... 

Stags, Group of 

St. Albans Tally-ho Stakes 

Stalker's Home, The 

Stallion, Portrait of a 

Standing Leap, A 

Standstill, The 

Star of Bethlehem, The 

.Starting for the Derby 

Starting Post, Newmarket 

Steeple-chase, A 

Steeple-chase Cracks 

Steeple-chase, The ... 

"Sterlin," a plater 

Stewards' Stand after the Derby, The 
Stonebreaker and his Daughter, The 
Stopping Hounds running riot or changing 

Straw Yard, A 

Straw Yard, Sketch, The 

Streaky-breasted Red Dunn, The ... 

Stricken Mallard, The 

Strong and Weak Twin, The 

Struck Eagle, The 

Study of a Dead Grouse 

Study of a Dog 

Study of a Lion (2) 

Subiaco, distant view of 

" Sudbury," a racehorse 

Suffolk Mere 

" Sultan," a racehorse 

" Sultan," a hunter 

Sunset ... 



Philip I\einagle, R.A. ... 
.. Sir Edwin Landseer, R.A. 
.. Philip Reinagle, R.A. ... 
. . James Pollard 
.. Charles Hancock... 
.. John N. Sartorius 
.. John N. Sartorius 

.. F. C. Turner 

.. James Ward, R.A. 

.. F. C. Turner 

.. John Wootton 

.. James Pollard 

.. John F. Herring ... 

.. John F. Hening, 1S4S, 1849 

. . James Seymour ... 

.. F. C. Turner 

.. Sir E. Landseer, R.A. ... 

S. Howitt 

.. John N. Sartorius 

.. James Ward, R.A. 

. . Benjamin Marshall 

. . F. C. Turner 

.. James Ward, R.A. 

,. James Ward, R.A. 

.. Sir Edwin Landseer, R.A. 

,. Sir Edwin Landseer, R.A. 

, . Sir Edwin Landseer, R.A. 

. Philip Rein.agle, R.A. ... 

. James Seymour ... 

. James Ward, R.A. 

. Lambert Marshall 

. John F. Herring ... 

. P. Reinagle, R.A. 



26, 



PAGE 
44 

224 
91 
44 

122 

• US 

44 
. 218 

• 79 

• 76 

■ 239 

■ 239 
77,78 

• ■• 1.17 
... 82 

129, 131 

... 44 

. . . 264 

... 122 

... 104 

... 104 
122 

... 80 

... 122 

... los 

... 13 

... 140 

... 141 

... 219 

... 242 

... 223 

... 263 

... ic» 

... 29 

■■■ 34 

... 167 

... 223 

... 74 

... 45 

«39 

240 

S? 

223 

241 

241 

83 

53 

■ 78 

122 

«7S 

■ 239 

. 98 

28,33 
122 



239 



•74 



INDEX 



307 



Sunset 

Suspense 

Swannery invaded by Sea-eagles 
Swans on the Thames, after J. Ward, 
" Sweetbriar "... 
"Sweetmeat"... 

" Sweet William " 

Swineherd, A ... 

Sword Exercise 

" Sylvia," a pony 

Sympathy 

Sympathy 



... James Ward, R.A. 
... Sir Edwin Landseer, 
... Sir Edwin Landseer, 
H.A. John Scott 

... George Stubbs, R.A. 
... John F. Herring ... 
... George Stubbs, R.A. 
... James Ward, R.A. 
... Samuel Ilowitt ... 
... Lambert Marshall 
... James Ward, R.A. 
... James Ward, R.A. 





PAGE 




••• 239 


R.A.' 


6S, 74 


R.A. 


... 78 




... 160 




... 199 




■■• 34 




... 199 




•■• 239 




... 44 




... 98 




... 242 




... 241 



"Taff" 

"Tallyho!" 

"Tally-ho!" 

Taking a Buck 

Taking Wild Horses on 

Moldavia ... 
Tame Deer pursuing Cattle ... 
Taming the Shrew 

"Tarn O'Shanter" 

"Tantalisation," a terrier bitch 

Taplin, Mr., Portrait of 

"Teaboy" beating " Hephestion 

" Grey Falcon" over Epsom .. 

Teetotal Beer and Beef 

Temple of Fancy, The 

Terrier, A 

Terrier and Dead Wild Ducks 

Terrier and Rabbit 

Terrier I'Cilling a Fox ... 

Terriers... 

Terriers and Polecat ... 

Terriers ferreting Rabbits 

Teirier, Portrait of a ... 

Terrier with puppies. Portrait of a .. 

Tethered Rams 

" The Baron "... 

" The Hounds are late this morning' 

"Theodore" 

" The Switcher " 

"There's no place like Home " 
"Theron," Her Majesty's Charger .. 

Thistle and the Ass, The 

Three Children, Portraits of ... 
Three Doe Rabbits of Fancy Breed.. 
Three Dogs 
Three Horses ... 

Three Horses, Portraits of 

Thornton, Portrait of Colonel 



the Plains of 



and 



James Ward, R.A. 
Charles Hancock 

F. C. Turner 
Sir Edwin Landseer, R.A. 

Samuel Howitt 

Samuel Howitt ... 

Sir Edwin Landseer, R.A. 

Thomas Stothard, R.A.... 

F. C. Turner 

Benjamin Marshall 

John N. Sartorius 
James Ward, R.A. 
C. C. Henderson... 
, James Ward, R.A. 
Sir Edwin Landseer, R.A. 
Samuel Howitt ... 
Samuel Howitt ... 
Philip Reinagle, R.A. 
Philip Reinagle, R.A. ... 
Dean Wolstenholme, Jun. 
Sir Edwin Landseer, R.A. 
Dean Wolstenholme, Jun. 
Sir Edwin Landseer, R.A. 
John F. Herring ... 
Charles Hancock... 
John F. Herring... 
John F. Herring ... 
Sir E. Landseer, R.A. ... 

G. A. Turner 

Sir Edwin Landseer, R.A. 
Philip Reinagle, R.A. ... 
Dean Wolstenholme, Jun. 
Sir Edwin Landseer, R.A. 
Charles Hancock... 
Dean Wolstenholme, Jun. 
P. Reinagle, R.A. 



. . . 240 

10 

... 221 

75. 81, S3 

42, 45 
... 4S 
... 83 
1S9, 191 
... 222 
...86,94 

... 141 

... 242 
19 
243 
82 

4S 

45 

122 

123 

.■ 259 

.. 76 

.. 260 

74. 76 

271, 34 

13 
• ■26,35 

•• 33 
■■ 74 
.. 224 

•• 75 

121 

■• 259 

.. !)2 

>3 

■■ 250 
.. 123 



239. 



[16, 



3o8 



INDEX 



Thornton, as a Falconer, Portrait of Colonel 
Thornton shooting in Forest of Glenmore 

with l2-barrelled rifle. Colonel 

Thornton, Portrait of Dr 

Throwing the Lasso 

Thunderstorm 

" Thyrsis," a hunter ... 

Tickling the Ear 

Ticklish Subject, A 

" Tiger," a hack 

Tiger blunting on Elephants 

Tigers ... 

Tigers at Play ... 

Tiger snarling over his Prey... 

Timber Carriage, The 

Time of Peace... 
Time of War ... 

" Tiny," a spaniel 

"Toho!" 

Toiling the Buck 

Too hot 

" Torrismond," a racehorse 

Torn Lamb, The 

"Totlnchly" 

"Touchstone" 

Tournefoit's System 

Town and Country Magazine, Illustrations in 

Tracker 

Trailing for a Hare ... 

"Traveller" 

Travelling in France 

Trains of Running Horses exercising 

Treeing a Cub... 

Trees — purple beech, ilex, spruce, fir, and 

willow 

" Trentham," Portrait of bay horse 

Trial, The 

Trial of Rebecca, The 

" Trim," a spaniel 

Trimmed Cock, A 

Tristram Shandy, Dra-vins;s for 

Triumph over Sin, Death and Hell 

Trolling for Pike 

Trotting Cart Horse 

Trotting Horse, A 

Trotting Mare, Mr. Bishop's 

Trout Anglers 

"True Blue" 

"Try Back!" 

Turf Pony, The 

" Turned out for Life " 

Turnpike Gate, The 

" Two Dogs," The 

Twelfth Night 







PAGE 


P. Reinagle, R.A. 




117,118 


P. Reinagle and .Sawrey Gilpin... ii6 


Philip Reinagle, R.A 




... 114 


F. C. Turner 




214,222 


James Ward, R.A. 




■•• 239 


John F. Herring ... 




... 32 


James Ward, R.A. 




... 242 


F. C. Turner 




... 223 


Benjamin Marshall 




... 95 


Thomas Stothard, R.A. ... 


... 188 


James Ward, R.A. 




••• 239 


George Stubbs. R.A. 




... 205 


James Ward, R.A. 




■ ■• 239 


John F. Herring... 




... .30 


Sir Edwin Landseer, 


R.A. 


... 77 


Sir Edwin Landseer, 


R.A. 


... 77 


John N. Sartorius 




... 140 


Sir Edwin Landseer, 


R.A. 


... 54 


Samuel flowett ... 




... 44 


Sir Edwin Landseer, 


r.a'. 


... 84 


James Seymour ... 




... 174 


James Ward, R.A. 




... 242 


Benjamin Marshall 




... 95 


John F. Herring ... 




27, 33. 35 


Philip Reinagle, R.A 


t 


122 


Thomas Stothard, R.A. ... 


... 182 


Sir Edwin Landseer, 


R.A. 


... 78 


James Seymour ... 




... 176 


John N. Sartorius 




... 140 


C. C. Henderson... 




... 19 


Peter Tilleman ... 




. . . 209 


F.C.Turner 




... 218 


J. Ward, R.A. ... 




... 242 


George Stubbs, R.A. 


... 


... 204 


F. C. Turner 




... 223 


Dean Wolstenholme, 


Jun. 


... 260 


Sir Edwin Landseer, 


R.A. 


58, 81, 84 


Benjamin Marshall 




...87,94 


Thomas Stothard, R, 


.A.!!! 


... 191 


James Ward, R.A. 




... 242 


James Pollard 




loi, 103 


John N. Sartorius 




... 141 


George Stubbs, R.A, 




... 206 


Francis Sartorius... 


...1 


[28,129, 131 


Samuel Howitt ... 




... 46 


John N. Sartorius 




••• 139 


F. C. Turner 




... 221 


Lambert Marshall 




... 98 


Lambert Marshall 




... 98 


C. C. Henderson.. 




... 17 


Sir Edwin Landseer, 


R.A. 


... 74 


.Sir Edwin Landseer, 


R.A. 


... 76 



INDEX 



309 



Twilight 

Twilight 

Twins ... 

Two Dogs 

Two Dogs looking for Crumbs 

Two Extraordinary O.ten ... 

Two Gentlemen Deer-stalking in Falah 
Forest 

Two Gentlemen of Verona 

Two Hacks, Portraits of 

Two Heifers, Portraits of 

Two Hogs 

Two Horses 

Two Horses, Portraits of 

Two Horses, Portraits of 

Two Horses, Portrait of 

Two Horses and Dogs, Portraits of 

Two Hunters, Portrait ol 

Two Ladies of Quality, Portraits of 

Two Young Ladies, Portraits of 

Two Racehorses' 

Two young Gentlemen and their Sister fish- 
ing, Portraits of 







PAGE 


Philip Reinagle, R.A 





... 122 


James Ward, R.A. 




... 240 


Sir Edwin Landseer, 


R.A. 


... 77 


George Stubbs, R.A. 




... 205 


Sir Edwin Landseer, 


R.A. 


... 78 


James Ward, R.A. 




... 240 


Chas. Hancock ... 




12 


G. A. Turner 




... 224 


John N. Sartorius 




- 133 


George Stubbs, R.A. 


... 


... 20s 


Samuel Howitt ... 




... 45 


George Stubbs, R.A. 




... 205 


John N. Sartorius 




... 139 


bean Wolstenholme, 


Sen." 


... 250 


Francis Sartorius... 




... 131 


George Stubbs, R.A. 




... 206 


John N. Sartorius 




.. 139 


James Ward, R.A. 




. . . 240 


Sir Edwin Landseer, 


r.a'. 


.. 79 


Charles Hancock 




II 



Philip Reinagle, R.A. 



Uncarting the Royal Buck ... 
Uncle Tom and his Wife for sale 
Undermining the Rock of Ages 
Union ... 
Unkennelling the Hounds ... 



F. C. Turner 222 

Sir Edwin Landseer, R.A. 75, 77, 81 

James Ward, R.A. 242 

tames Ward, R.A. 242 

John N. Sartorius ... 137, 141 



"Valiant" 

Van Amburgh and his Animals 

Van Amburgh, Mr 

Van Amburgh, Portrait of ... 

"Velocipede" 

Venus rising from her Couch 
Veterinary Shop, Interior of Mr, 
View, The 

View from Nature 

View of the Ruins of an Abbey 
View on the Highgate Road... 

Vignette, A 

Vignette (1838), Sporting Magazine 

Virgil's Bulls 

Vision of Myrza, The 

" Vixen," a Scotch terrier ... 

" Vixen," a terrier 

" Voltigeur," a racehorse 
"Volunteer" 



F. C. Turner 222 

Sir Edwin Landseer, R.A. ...61,76 

Sir Edwin Landseer, R.A. ... 77 

Sir Edwin Landseer, R.A. ... 61 

John F. Herring 32 

James Ward, R.A. 241 

Harrison's Dean Wolstenholme, Sen. ... 250 

John N. Sartorius 137 

Philip Reinagle, R.A 122 

Samuel Howitt 43 

James Pollard 103 

F. C. Turner 222 

... F. C. Turner 222 

... James Ward, R.A. 242 

... James Ward, R.A. 242 

... Sir Edwin Landseer, R.A. ... 84 

... James Ward, R.A 243 

... Sir Edwin Landseer, R.A. ...70,78 

... George Stubbs, R.A 199 



3IO 



INDEX 



"Vulcan, Bachelor, and Beverley," grey- 
hounds 
Vulture disputing with a Hyana 



F. C. Turner 

Philip Reinagle, R.A. 



222 
122 



W 

Waggon Horses frightened at Lightning ... 

Waiting fur the Ferry... 

Waiting for the Master 

Waiting the Weather ... 

Waldegrave Family, The 

Wales, View in 

Wales, Portrait of the Prince of 

Walpole, Sir Robert, and Hunter ... 

" Walton," a racer 

Walton's Angler, Drawings in 

Wandering Slag, A 

"Wanton, Theodore, and M.ay Day " 

War 

Ward the Pugilist, William 

Warrener, The 

Warrener, The 

Warrener's Enemy, The 

Warren Hill, The 

Warren Hill at Newmarket, The 

" Warwick," a catt-horse 

"Wasp" 

Watercress Girl, The 

Water Dog, The 

Water Dog and Mallard 

Water Dogs 

Waterfall in Goat Land 

Watering Place, The 

Watering the Team 

Water Spaniel 

Watkin, Portrait of Miss 

"Waxey," a racehorse 

Way we should go. The 

Wedgwood, Portrait of Josiah 

Weird Sisters, The 

" Well-bred Sitters who never say they are 
bored" ... 

Wellesley Arabian, The 

Wellesley Arabian, The, after B. Marshall 

Wellington Shield, /)£j;[§«y()7- //jtf 

Well-known Horse, A ... 

West Country Mail Coach at the Gloucester- 
shire Coffee House, Piccadilly ... 

" What a beauty I " ... 

"What is it?" 

"Whisker" 

" Whisker and Raphael " 

"Whiskey" 



James Ward, R.A. 


• • 239 


Sir Edwin Landseer, R.A. 


.. 83 


John Wootton 


.. 266 


James Ward, R.A. 


.. 242 


George Stubbs, R.A. ... 


203 


Philip Reinagle, R.A. ... 


.. 122 


George Stubbs, R.A. 


206 


John Wuotton 


269 


James Ward, R.A. 233, 2 


40. 243 


Thomas Stothard, R.A. ... 


.. 190 


Philip Reinagle, R.A. ... 


.. 122 


John F. Herring 


•• 35 


Sir Edwin Landseer, R.A. 


■ 70,73 


Philip Rein.igle, R.A. ... 


121 


John N. Saitorius 


.. 141 


Charles Hancock 


II 


Charles Hancock 


■ • 6, 13 


John F. Herring 


■• 34 


Peter Tilleman 


.. 208 


Dean Wolstenholme, Jun. 


■• 25s 


James Ward, R.A. 


.. 240 


James Ward, R.A. 


.. 238 


John Scott 


• iSS 


Samuel Howitt 


■ 45 


Benjamin Marshall 


90 


Philip Reinagle, R.A. ... 


122 


John F. Herring ... 


35 


John F. Herring, 1863, 1866 


•• 32 


Philip Reinagle, R.A. ... 


122 


James Ward, R.A. 


■ 239 


Francis Sartorius 1 


29. 131 


C. C. Henderson 


21 


George Stubbs, R.A. ... 


.. 203 


James Ward, K.A. 


.. 242 


Sir Edwin Landseer, R.A. 


.. 80 


Benjamin Marshall 


90 


John Scott 


.. 159 


Thomas Stothard, R.A. ... 1 


86, 1 87 


Benjamin Marshall 


94 


James Pollard 


• • 103 


James Ward, R.A. 


.. 242 


James Ward, R.A. 


.. 242 


John F. Herring 


•• 35 


John N. Sartorius 


.. 141 


John N. Sartorius 


140 



INDEX 



311 



" Whistlejacket," a racehorse 

White Arab Horse, A 

White Grouse 

White Horse, A 

" White Nose," a mare 

White Horse chased by Black Spaniels 
White Terrier, A, after Savjrey Gilpin 

"Who- Whoop 1" 

Widow, The 

Widow, The 

Widow Bewitched, The 

Wildcat, The 

Wild Cat and Moor Game 

Wild Cat and Spaniels 

Wild Cattle of Chillingham 

Wild Cattle, Portrait Group of 

Wild Duck Shooting 

Windermere Lake, View of 

Windsor Park ... 

" Wings," a race-horse 

Wolf-hunting ... 

Woodcock 

Woodcock Shooting ... 

Woodcock Shooting 

Woodcock Shooting ... 

Woodcock Shooting 

Woodcock Shooting ... 

Woodcutter, The 

Woodland Scene with Cattle... 

Wood Grouse 

Woodman and Gypsies 
Woodman's Companion, The 
Wyndham's Foxhounds Breaking Cover 





PAGE 


... George Stubbs, R.A. .. 


... 196 


... John Wootton 


... 263 


... Samuel Howitt 


... 46 


... James Pollard 


... 109 


... Thomas Spencer 


... 180 


... Charles Hancock 


6 


... John Scott 


... 162 


... F. C. Turner 


... 221 


... Charles Hancock 


6 


... Sir Edwin Landseer, R.A. 


... 75 


... Dean Wolstenholme, Jun. 


... 256 


... Samuel Howitt 


... 46 


... Samuel Howitt 


... 46 


... Samuel Howitt 


.- 45 


... Sir Edwin Landseer, R.A. 


... 78 


... Sir Edwin Landseer, R.A. 


... 57 


... F. C. Turner 


... 222 


... Philip Reinagle, R.A. ... 


... 122 


... Sir Edwin Landseer, R.A. 


... 7S 


... James Pollard 


... 108 


... Samuel Howitt 


... 44 


... John F. Sartorius 


... 147 


... John N. Sartorius 


... 141 


... Samuel Howitt 


• ■■ 44 


...P. Reinagle, R.A. 


... 120 


... James Seymour 


... 176 


... F. C. Turner 


... 222 


... Sir Edwin Landseer, R.A. 


... 82 


... Philip Reinagle, R.A. ... 


... 123 


... Samuel Howitt 


... 46 


... James Ward, R.A. 


... 239 


... James Ward, R.A. 


... 241 


... General F. C. Turner ... 


... 223 



X. Y. Z." 



John N. Sartorius 



141 



Yeldham Oak, 600 years old, The ... 

Young Falconer, The 

Young Falconer, The .. . 

Young Foxhunters 

Young Gentleman, Portrait of a 
Young Gentleman Shooting, Portrait of a . 
Young Lady as Una, Portrait of a ... 
Young Lady on Horseback ... 



" Zinganee," a race-horse 
" Ziva," a badger dog 



James Ward, R.A. 


... 241 


Chas. Hancock 


... 14 


Charles Hancock... 


II 


Lambert Marshall 


... 98 


Philip Reinagle, R.A. ... 


... 121 


G. Stubbs, R.A 


... 206 


George Stubbs, R.A. ... 


... 206 


John N. Sartorius 


... 140 


Benjamin Marshall 


89,95 


Sir Edwin Landseer, R.A. 


... 77 



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