(navigation image)
Home American Libraries | Canadian Libraries | Universal Library | Community Texts | Project Gutenberg | Children's Library | Biodiversity Heritage Library | Additional Collections
Search: Advanced Search
Anonymous User (login or join us)
Upload
See other formats

Full text of "Annals of the Free Foresters from 1856 to the present day"

THE LIBRARY 

OF 

THE UNIVERSITY 

OF CALIFORNIA 



PRESENTED BY 

PROF. CHARLES A. KOFOID AND 

MRS. PRUDENCE W. KOFOID 



// ' 



p 



/ic'c^CL^rC ^ 



CL^/rC /VL.a^^z>-^^-^ 




^^^A,0^' 



.e-.^ ^^ 



2^/rt. 



o/ ' 



A 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2007 with funding from 

IVIicrosoft Corporation 



http://www.archive.org/details/annalsoffreeforeOObedfrich 



FREE FORESTERS 




REV. W. K. R. BEDFORD. 



ANNALS 



OF THE 



FREE FORESTERS 



FROM i8s6 TO THE PRESENT DAY 



BY 

W. K. R. BEDFORD 
W. E. W. COLLINS 

AND 
OTHER CONTRIBUTORS 



WILLIAM BLACKWOOD AND SONS 

EDINBURGH AND LONDON 

MDCCCXCV 



All Rights reserved 



r^ D^ 



TO 

THE VICEROY OF INDIA, 

THE MOST DISTINGUISHED MEMBER OF OUR CLUB, 

HIS BROTHER FORESTERS 

WISH HEALTH AND WEALTH. . 



PREFACE, 



When the idea of a record of the doings of the old 
Club with which he had been originally so intimately 
connected was first suggested to the editor of the 
present volume, he was under the impression that 
the materials available were more complete than 
upon minute investigation proved to be the case. 
For ten or twelve years after its formation the first 
Secretary had kept a record of its matches, but this 
miscellaneous chronicle then came to an end ; and 
although in most years a list of fixtures was pub- 
lished at the commencement of each season, it 
proved impossible to trace the whole of the matches 
thus advertised, some of which were never played, 
while others, not on the advertised list, were substi- 
tuted for them. A careful search has, however, 
been made of the whole of the cricket-reporting 
press up to 1883, when the second part of the 
chronicle is resumed by a writer more competent 
to deal with modern cricket ; and it is to be hoped 



iwn09184 



VIU 



PREFACE. 



that the joint labours of the two annalists, combined 
with the Illustrative chapters and passages obtained 
from other sources, will give at least a readable and 
Intelligible summary of a series of campaigns on the 
mimic battle - field, creditable to an association, 
united in aim though untied by rule, whose boast 
it is that if their early success sent them up like a 
rocket, they have not yet come down like the stick. 
To many Free Foresters who have assisted with 
reminiscences, and to the members and friends of 
the Club, who have encouraged the book by their 
subscriptions, the editor says one word — 

G RATI AS. 




CONTENTS. 



CHAP. 




I. PERSONAL . 


II. founder's kin 


III. 1858 




IV. 1859 




V. i860 




VI. 1861 




VII. 1862 




VIII. 1863 




IX. 1864 




X. 1865 




XI. 1866 




XII. 1867 




XIII. 1868 




XIV. 1869 




XV. 1870 




XVI. 1 87 1 




XVII. 1872 




XVIII. 1873 




XIX. 1874 


- 


XX. 1875 




XXI. 1876 





IV. K. R. Bedford 



PAGE 
I 

9 
16 
26 
33 
39 
49 
65 

n 
82 
89 

94 

lOI 

106 
no 

115 

122 
130 
136 

145 
156 





CONTENTS. 




XXII. 


THE SCOTTISH TOURS 


{ D. Buchanan and 
\ W. K. R. Bedford ] 


165 


XXIII. 


FREE FORESTER MUSIC 


Edward Lyttelton 


185 


XXIV. 


THE FORESTER BALL 


Edward Rutter 


208 


XXV. 


1877 


W. K. R. Bedford 


213 


XXVI. 


1878 


It II 


222 


XXVII. 


1879 


M It 


228 


XXVIII. 


1880 


It II 


232 


XXIX. 


1881 


II It 


237 


XXX. 


1882 


It II 


242 


XXXI. 


1883 


II II 


247 


XXXII. 


R.E. MATCHES 


W. E. IV. Collins 


252 


XXXIII. 


OTHER MATCHES IN KEN 


T II ,1 


266 


XXXIV. 


MATCHES IN THE MIDLAl 


^DS II II 


289 


XXXV. 


CHANNEL ISLANDS 


II II ^ 


318 


XXXVI. 


YACHT RONA AND IRELA 


ND 11 II 


327 


XXXVII. 


WILLES'S TOURS . 


G. E. Willes 


347 


STATISTICS OF MATCHES, 1 884 TC 


> 1892 . 


365 



INDEX 



385 



ILLUSTRATIONS. 



FULL-PAGE ILLUSTRATIONS. 

PORTRAITS- 
REV. W. K. R. BEDFORD . . . . . 
S. R. HOLE, F. C. DE CRESPIGNY, F. P. ONSLOW, F. 

BRANDT ...... 

MATTHEW KEMPSON, HON. W. M. JERVIS, SCHOLES 

BIRCH, GEORGE HOMFRAY . . . . 

W. WINGFIELD, E. K. HORNBY, R. A. BENSON, C. T. 

ROYDS ....... 

HON. C. LYTTELTON, H. H. GILLETT, B. B. COOPER, 

F. R. EVANS ...... 

T. O. REAY, J. M. MORDAUNT, F. R. PRICE, E. WALLER 
H. E. BULL, F. W. WRIGHT, D. BUCHANAN, M. T. MARTIN 
J. M. YATES, A. HILLYARD, F. LEE, C. F. REID 
W. F. HIGGINS, F. G. WILLIAMSON, A. H. SMITH BARRY, 

A. E. SEYMOUR ..... 

W. M. COYNEY, G. H. ALLSOPP, W. W. BAGOT, A. L. 

VERNON ..... 

S. P. B. BUCKNILL, H. FOSTER, E. RAMSAY, T. RATLIFF 
H. G. S. HUGHES, G. H. GOLDNEY, C. W. L. BULPETT, 

A. W. DANIEL ..... 

H. M. MARSHALL ..... 

E. RUTTER ...... 

R. D. WALKER, I. D. WALKER, V. E. WALKER, C. E, 

GREEN ...... 

E. M. KENNY HERBERT, W. D. BOVILL, A. J. WEBBE, 

H. R. WEBBE ..... 



Frontispiece 
To face p. 6 

M 12 

'• 35 



47 
.. 68 

•' 95 



. 


It 


115 


F 


II 


126 


r, 






. 


11 


137 


. 


II 


i8s 


• 


II 


213 




II 


215 
224 



Xll 



ILLUSTRATIONS. 



GROUPS- 
ELEVEN OF THE FOUNDERS 

SUTTON, 1859 ..... 

OXFORD HARLEQUINS, 1862 

UPPINGHAM, 1868 ..... 
FREE FORESTERS V, I ZINGARI, AT WALTON, WARWICK 

SHIRE, 1876 ..... 
THE GARNETTS, 1 876 .... 

STIRLING, 1865 ..... 

DRUMPELLIER, 1 866 .... 

FREE FORESTERS V, OATLANDS PARK, 189O 
FREE FORESTERS V. ALDERSHOT, 1887 

FREE FORESTERS V. ROYAL ENGINEERS, CHATHAM, 1 887 
FREE FORESTERS V. LINTON PARK, 1 888 . 
FREE FORESTERS V. MOTE, 189I . 
FREE FORESTERS V. SCHOOL OF GUNNERY, SHOEBURY 

NESS, 1893 ..... 

FREE FORESTERS V. ALDERSHOT DIVISION, 1 892 . 
FREE FORESTERS V. H. E. CRAWLEY'S XI, AT AYOT ST 

LAWRENCE, 1 89 1 
FREE FORESTERS V. CHRISTCHURCH, OXFORD, 189O 
FREE FORESTERS V. NORTHAMPTONSHIRE, 1893 • 
FREE FORESTERS V, ETON RAMBLERS, AT NEWBOLD 

REVEL, 1894 ..... 
FREE FORESTERS V. SHROPSHIRE, AT NEWBOLD REVEL 

1893 

FREE FORESTERS V. GREEN -JACKETS, AT WINCHESTER, 
1889 

FREE FORESTERS IN CHANNEL ISLANDS, 189I 

FREE FORESTERS V. JERSEY, 189O . 

PASSENGERS ON BOARD THE RON A, 1 894 

FREE FORESTERS IN IRELAND, 1 894 

FREE FORESTERS V. MR BURRELL's XT, AT LITTLEBURY, 
1887 

FREE FORESTERS V. RUGBY SCHOOL, 1 888 

FREE FORESTERS V, SHROPSHIRE, 189O . 

FREE FORESTERS V. SANDHURST STAFF, 189I 



To face p. 31 

43 

57 

It 105 



. Drawing by H. M. Marshall 



ROCKINGHAM CASTLE . 

WORCESTER ... 11 11 . 

THORNBY ....... 

CANDELABRUM PRESENTED TO MR WOOD ON HIS MARRIAGE 
NEWBOLD REVEL — PAVILION, NEWBOLD 



190 
199 
301 
313 
317 



ILL USTRA TIONS. 



ILLUSTRATIONS IN TEXT. 



FREE FORESTER ARMS . 
SUTTON RECTORY CRICKET-GROUND 
WESTERN PAVILION, 1 857 
CENTREPIECE PRESENTED TO THE I 
DR morgan's ring 
**l ENJOY A GALLOP STILL" . 
BULLINGDON IN 1847 . 
GROUP AT SUTTON, 1 873 
BLACK-COUNTRY CRICKET 
TYPES MILITAIRES — OXFORD UNIVERSITY 
BEECHAM'S HIGHLAND PILLS . 
THE SWORD-DANCE 
NEWARK 

GROUP AT ROCKINGHAM, 1 873 
FORESTER BALL CARD, 1873 . 
II II II 1876 . 

SOUTHGATE CRICKET-GROUND . 
GROUP, 1882 
LINTON PARK . 
GROUP AT SHOEBURYNESS, 1 893 
UPTON HOUSE . 
GROUP AT BICESTER, 189O 
YACHT RONA 
GROUP AT LUDLOW, 1 885 
GROUP AT SANDHURST, 1 894 . 



W. K. R. BEDFORD . 

Drawing by Halifax Wyatt 
Drawing by G. R. Winter 



Drawing by H. Wyatt 

V VOLUNTEERS 

Drawing by F. Richardson 
Drawing by W. D. Scull 
Drawing by H. M. Marshall 



PAGE 

viii 
9 
15 
64 
81 
88 
93 

135 
144 

155 
165 
184 
185 
207 
208 
212 
221 
246 
266 
288 
289 
317 
327 
347 
401 



ERRATA. 



260, 

261, 
273. 



.. 274, 

" 27s, 

•I 304. 

" 307. 

•' 336, 



.1 340, 
" 35^. 



Page 259, line 18 (ist co].), for " H. U. Dumbleton " read " H. N. Dumbleton." 
10 from foot (2d col.),^ 

4 „ (ist col.), y/or "J. D. Walker " read " I. D. Walker." 

3(istcol.), J 

9 (ist col.), /or " Rev. V. Boyle " read " Rev. V. Royle." 
24 (2d coh), for " M 'Alpine " read " K. M 'Alpine." 
34 (ist coh), for " Hickmott " read " E. Hickmott." 

4 from foot (ist col.), /or " H. M 'Alpine " read " K. M'Alpine." 
13 (ist col.), /or " G. M. Styles " read " G. M. Style." 
23 (2d col.), a/ier " c Smith " insert " b Cobden." 
10 from foot (ist col.), /or " Rev. J. E. Willes " read " Rev. G. E. 

Willes." 

5 (ist col.), ^ 

17 It \for " Captain Macjier " read "Captain MacTier." 

20 II J 

2 from foot,/>r " fame " read "tame." 

10 (ist col.),/?r "Captain W. Roberts " read "Captain B. Roberts." 
8 (2d col.), /or "Willis " read " Willes." 



CHRONICLES 



OF 



THE FREE FORESTERS. 



CHAPTER I. 

PERSONAL. 

Horace in his * Art of Poetry ' blames the versifier who, 
having to write an epic on the Trojan War, began with 
the legend of Leda and the egg. But in spite of this warn- 
ing, now that the history of the rise and progress of my old 
club are to be recorded in print, I believe the reader will 
adopt the words of the Giant Moulineau in the French 
fairy-tale to his friend the story-telling ram, " Belier, mon 
ami, si tu voulois commencer par le commencement, tu 
me ferois grand plaisir," and wish for the narrative of the 
incubation of an idea which has turned out such a 
success. 

To the inspiration of my dear and honoured friend 
the Dean of Rochester the original conception of Free 
Foresters is due. Not only because my regard for him 
induced me to seek the curacy of Southwell, where the 
cricket aestrum bit more strongly than in any "central 

A 



2 PERSONAL. 

cricket mead " of those days, but because his own genuine 
and hearty love for all that is manly and becoming in- 
fected me with a desire for the promotion of that which 
may justly be termed the " noble science," the game of 
games. 

May I quote from my scrap-book one personal item ? — 

" A Charade elicited by the ' rimy ' state of the Weather. 
Nov. 28, 1849. Caimton Manor. 

" Within my first grow flow'rets gay, 
And oysters, so great Pym doth say ; 
There a chief part of life is past, 
Of each it sees the first and last. 
My second was when long ago 
Oxen by Isis used to low, 
Cross and recross where now is seen 
Fair Magdalen in reflected sheen. 
My whole's a town and title great, 
And, upon this I most dilate, 
A friend, for whom my love's a strong un, 
And will be while I am 

The Long Un. 

In Harry V., Act iv. scene i, line 3, 

Who cannot guess, may there the answer see." 

A finale which brings back my recollection to the days 
when the "Long Un's " nephew — now a distinguished divine, 
then a chubby jolly schoolboy of some seven summers — 
used, when asked for a Shakespeare recitation, to select 
Henry of Monmouth's speech before Agincourt, " because 
my friend Paul is in that." 

It is said that a great lady of fashion obtained an un- 
questioned supremacy in the beau monde of half a century 
ago, because she not only gave the best dinners, but sent 
the best written reports of them to the 'Morning Post' 
afterwards. By that criterion the N. C. C. — the Notting- 
hamshire County (gentlemen) Club — would have httn facile 



JV.C.C. 3 

princeps^ with the Vicar of Caunton as their historiographer. 
For instance — 

Field Day of the Nottingham Club at Southwell, 
Aug. 12, 185 1. Old v. Young. 

Though many a grouse and many a gunner lies among the 
moors to-day, want of time or tin keeps most men from wander- 
ing " with Scotia's sons 'mong heather hills," and hence a goodly 
muster of the N. C. C. for a battue of a less murderous description. 
A challenge having been sent from the nursery, and accepted by 
the potent, grave, and reverend seniors to test the truth of the 
Horatian adage — 

" Multa ferunt anni venientes commoda secum ; 
Multa recedentes adimunt ; " 

behold eleven gentlemen, " i' th' sere and yellow leaf of age," and 
in raiment of flannel, arrange themselves "with measured step 
and slow " in the field, while two beings in the hues of youth, 
" scarcely touching the ground, they're so proud and elate," ad- 
vance, bat in hand (sweet babes of the wood /), to the wicket. 
The faces of the aged men, just before " sicklied o'er with the 
pale cast of thought," now smile " as they were wont to smile " ; 
for they recall once more "the merry days when they were 
young " — days of tame rabbits and unripe gooseberries, departed 
never to return. The heart yearns for auld lang syne, as traces of 
recent jam-and-bread appear on the cricket-jackets of the boys, and 
as the eye of each centenarian chief descries the string of a peg- 
top hanging from the pocket of Master Tinley, " tears, idle tears " 
(no reflection on the French politician), course down their wrinkled 
cheeks. Sweet odours of buttered Scotch and peppermint per- 
vade the ambient air, the music of the Hebrew lyre is accom- 
panied by castanets of slate — the paper-covered comb is there. 
Time would fail to tell how the aged Warwick (for an account of 
his single wicket match with Widdicombe 600 B.C. vide Thucy- 
dides) bowled "cunningly and closely." May he live "longer 
than I have time to tell his years," and make during that in- 
definite period continual leg-hits for four. And thou, Goodrich ! 
Over the early grave of many a young cricketer shall it be written, 
" Frightened to death by the slow bowling of Goodrich." Praise, 
high praise, be awarded to the fine batting of old Mr Northcote, 
who still shoulders his bat, and shows how fields are done ; to 
the bowling of the grey-haired Woolley and the infantine Falkner ; 
to the really excellent wicket-keeping of Master R. Wilkins j to 



4 PERSONAL. 

the catch made " 'twixt heaven and earth " by a very High Church- 
man from the bat of Tinley {Fra?ik playing rather too free), &c. 
Suffice it to subjoin the score, with the hope (to quote from the 
poet of the N. C. C.) that— 

' ' Long, long in park of noble, 

And in the cottage field, 
This game of games to English hearts 

Its manly joys may yield ! 
And oft at eve, when stumps are drawn, 

The fragrant weed may glow ; 
As we tell how they fell 

Where Falkner's swift uns go, 
Or Goodrich, with his artful twist. 

Sends in the teasers slow." 

The actual score would be but " leather and prunella " in 
the present day, but it is worth noting that Frank Tinley, 
so humorously described as a boy, was the eldest of the 
trio of Nottinghamshire cricketers of that name, and nearly 
forty years of age ; while old Mr Northcote was just twenty- 
four. It is also worth noting that the last wicket of the 
" young " stands in the score as " J. Crow, Esq." ; by which 
was signified a long gipsy-looking, barefooted youth, who 
ran with the hounds in the winter in an old stained "pink," 
and in the summer haunted the cricket-ground, where he 
was always addressed as Jim Crow, and was ready to field 
or bowl to you for sixpence an hour. In a very few years 
I met my old acquaintance again, as the chief bowler of 
the England eleven, J. Jackson ! 

With most of the amateurs mentioned in the above 
lively narrative I was personally acquainted, and with one 
of them, Mr Goodrich, I formed a friendship which endured 
for many years, cemented not more by his admirable cricket 
than by his excellent qualities both of head and heart : he 
was a true friend and a pleasant companion. When he 
died in 1885, aged sixty-two, some of his old comrades in 
the cricket-field, mostly Free Foresters, erected a tablet to 
his memory in the church at Stamford, where for the latter 
part of his life he constantly went, with an inscription 



GOODRICH. 5 

devised by another of our best and oldest members, Rev. 
W. G. Armitstead :— 

5n Affectionate IHcmorg of 
THOMAS COOPER GOODRICH, 

A RARE CRICKETER AND A GOOD MAN, 

WHO DIED MARCH lOTH 1 885, AGED 62. 

THIS TABLET WAS ERECTED BY SOME LOVING FRIENDS. 

GIVING ALL DILIGENCE HE ADDED TO FAITH, VIRTUE ; 

AND TO VIRTUE, KNOWLEDGE ; 

AND TO KNOWLEDGE, PATIENCE ; 

AND TO PATIENCE, GODLINESS ; 

AND TO GODLINESS BROTHERLY KINDNESS. 

That very admirable old cricketer, lately lost to us, the 
Rev. Edward Elmhirst, wrote of Goodrich : — 

He was a most useful man in a county eleven, a difificult 
customer at the wicket, an admirable slow bowler with a twist in 
Clarke's style, and a first-rate field. He was also as true in his 
character and friendship as in his metal as a player. 

Mr Pycroft, too, in the * Cricket Field/ though he spells 
the name wrong, noticed how Mr Goodrich (Goodridge he 
calls him) coincided with the old school of slow bowlers 
in his delivery of the ball from the height of the hip ; and 
another peculiarity is noted by the Rev. F. Marshall in his 
excellent volume on Rugby football (1892), in a passage 
worth quoting verbatim : — 

J. A. Boyle, an old Malburian, was one of the surest of place- 
kicks, and also an admirable drop. Curiously enough, when 
about to drop he did not hold the ball in the usual way, but 
allowed it to rest on the extended palm of one hand in precisely 
the same manner as the late Mr T. C. Goodrich, the famous 
Free Foresters' slow underhand bowler, treated a cricket - ball 
before delivering it. 

In a cutting which Goodrich preserved among his scores 
I find the following : — 

Here we must needs record a curious accident which befell 
the well-known player Goodrich. He handled the ball : no, he 
did not, but a running substitute did it for him. How civil some 



6 PERSONAL. 

people are ! They say civility costs nothing. Here at all events 
it cost Mi: Cioodrich his innings. 

The match was at Stamford, v, N. Northants, Aug. 3 and 
4, 18 — . Goodrich got 15 and 23. 

The first object I had in view in the foundation of Free 
Foresters was the hope of keeping alive such intimacies as 
these, by means of the game which is the most sparkling 
channel of the stream of friendship ; but as the necessity- 
presented itself for considering our future plans, what 
matches we should play, where, and with whom, there 
arose the dim dawning of another purpose which, quixotic 
as it looked then, was ultimately fulfilled, of measuring 
ourselves against the acknowledged champions of the 
cricket-field, without that hired assistance which even the 
strongest cricket centres seemed to consider indispensable 
when they were about to meet Clarke's or Wisden's " Eng- 
land " elevens, and were hardly able to do without in their 
contests with rival counties or town clubs. I have delivered 
my soul elsewhere upon the subject of the hydra-headed 
E.'s, as the author of * Jerks in from Short -leg' called 
them, and indeed may recommend the chapter on that 
subject in the wise and witty volume thus named, as 
expressing my sentiments on this head; but the type of 
local celebrity who was prominent in fostering these con- 
tests was so amusingly sketched in a letter which my 
friend Hole wrote me one day about this time, that I 
obtained his permission to print it in a little Oxford mis- 
cellany of sport and rhyme which appeared in 1856, and 
it may be worth reproduction now. It is entitled " * Un- 
fulfilled Renown,'^ afifectingly exemplified in the History 
of Sam Hopkins," and I may add, in many of its details 
was founded on an episode very well known to Midland 
cricketers at that date : — 

1 " The inheritors of unfulfilled renown."— Browning. 





S. R. Hole. 



F. C. de Crespigny. 





F. P. Onslow. 



F. Brandt. 



SAM HOPKINS. 7 

I never could understand, and Sam could never explain to me, 
how it came to pass, one fine summer's afternoon, that he went 
to his wicket, at a country cricket match, and got a tremendous 
innings. I am aware, of course, that the players were amateurs ; 
that Sam achieved his greatness after so much champagne had 
been consumed at luncheon, that the bowler was transcendentally, 
and the field materially, intoxicated. I know, too, that the 
umpire was his particular friend, and was very severely criticised 
(and indeed challenged to fight by some vulgar people who had 
lost their money) for his devotion to Sam's interests ; but after 
all, I could never understand it; and he, as I have said, was 
equally astonished. 

But be this as it may, the next morning Sam "awoke and 
found himself famous." 

' Bell's Life ' pronounced him famous in an article supplied by 
the faithful umpire, and which Sam was never tired of reading. 
They said he took it to bed with him ; and they said also, which 
I decline to believe, that he was seen, on the first day of its 
appearance, to peep at it during the sermon. All I know for 
certain is this, that when he had read it, he bought six new 
cricket-bats and a box of weeds for the umpire. 

Well, the next time Sam played at cricket, the world and his 
wife they came to see. 

The world and his wife took no interest in the game whatever 
until Sam came forth in his glory (he was a fat man was Sam, 
and looked, when attired in flannel, so like a bed as to make one 
feel quite sleepy), and then the world put on his spectacles, and 
his wife laid aside her knitting. 

The reporters pointed their pencils, and took special note of 
the time of day. 

The gentleman in command of the opposition altered the field 
some fourteen times, and sent out the man who could catch about 
half a mile into the country. 

Sam went slowly forth, drawing on a pair of gloves which I 
feel convinced would have supplied with India-rubber all the 
ladies' schools in Brighton ; and as he went there passed a 
murmur through the multitude, " That's the celebrated Mr 
'Opkins ! " 

'^ Mr O " employed himself for some minutes, and with great 
dignity, in obtaining a satisfactory ^^ guard"; and then having 
superciliously surveyed the field (bestowing a look of especial 
scorn upon the man who was posted in the adjoining parish to 
catch him, as though that gentleman was not half far enough for 
the hits which Sam had designed), he went behind the wicket 
and superciliously surveyed the bowler. 



8 PERSONAL. 

A silence, which might be felt, was broken by the voice of the 
umpire — '''' Play^ 

Whizz went the ball, and " Oh Lor'' I'^ roared Sam Hopkins, 
nobbled in some unguarded part. 

The bowler was a professional this time, quite sober, and had 
a " ripping " pace. 

A spectator was heard to say, " Poor ole bloater " ; but the 
crowd still knew that he was famous. 

The bowler moistened his digits, as though preparing stamps 
for adhesion, and proceeded to deliver ball No. 2. Away it 
went, swift and straight from his hand ; and away went also (alas, 
alas !) the bat from the hand of Hopkins ! 

The multitude awoke, at once, as a man from dreams — awoke, 
and laughed at Sam ! 

Again the professional assails the wicket; the maddened 
Hopkins lashes out for four, and away (with his middle stump) 
go his fame and glory as "a first-rate Bat." 

So went he up, like the rocket, and so came he down, like the 
stick. 

It must be clear to every one who laughs at this smart 
and lifelike character sketch, that the Sam Hopkins ele- 
ment never could, with any amount of cultivation, have 
developed into the style of cricketer of which I was in 
search ; in fact, it was his material which I wished to 
exclude: but at that time public-school cricket-training 
was becoming more systematic, and a rising generation 
was springing up, not merely from Winchester, Eton, and 
Harrow, but from new schools like Cheltenham, and old 
ones like Westminster and Rugby. With all these three, 
and especially the last-named, our prosperity was in a 
measure to be identified, though from the three who in 
that day were the only contestants at Lords, and from 
Charterhouse and other school elevens, we drew some of 
our earliest and best recruits. The Kempsons, Matthew 
and George, of Cheltenham, and the Garnetts, mostly then 
at the same school, were neighbours of mine, and I set to 
work to prepare a ground at my own house where I hoped 
good cricket might be played. 




Sutton Rectory Cricket-Ground, 



CHAPTER II. 



FOUNDERS KIN. 



If chess its bishops — billiards canons claims, — 
Why should not cricket have some cleric names?" 

— Mortimer Collins. 



Yet my "castles in the air," like those of the Scottish 
ballad, would have been " swallowed up by night," had not 
I, in 1856, renewed my acquaintance with a trio of brothers 
well known in Oxford at that day, and well known since in 
Cheshire as orthodox efficient clerics and thorough sports- 
men, — a combination which at times has made them the 
target of much vulgar abuse from a certain class of would- 
be critics. Knowing the why and the wherefore of this 
scurrile mire-flinging, I feel inclined to add that I should 



lo FOUNDER'S KIN. 

have been proud of being similarly assailed ; but I re- 
member an incident of my Oxford days which points a 
moral, so I v/ill relate it instead. 

The cox of a certain college boat had a soul much too 
large for his eight-stone-six. He was, to use Dean Hole's 
name for a certain pugnacious politician of small stature, 
a " belligerent bantam " ; and one day he was observed 
pacing the quad with such evident discomposure that a 
friend felt constrained to inquire what was wrong. " My 
usual luck, old fellow," replied B. B., with tears in his 
eyes ; " here's Moore " (the stroke of the boat, as " strong 
and mighty" as his namesake who slew the dragon of 
Wantley) " been called a foul name by a bargee, and he's 
licked the cad ! No bargee ever calls me a foul name." 

The second of the brothers, W. G. Armitstead, who 
played in the Oxford eleven for four years at that time, 
was an admirable hard-hitting batsman, and a very fine 
field. He will be found hereafter in this chronicle as 
"middle Jack" ; for the eldest brother's name being John, 
he had transmitted the familiar appellation to the junior 
members of the family, with the difference, as heralds say, 
of "middle" and "little." John, who had been a boating 
man at Westminster, did not play very much with us, 
but William and Henry were of our most constant cham- 
pions. They promised to bring an eleven to inaugurate 
my new ground, and it was on this occasion, in 1856, that 
the title Free Foresters was invented, from the circum- 
stance that all my eleven were from the precincts of the 
Forest of Arden in Warwickshire, or Needwood in Stafford- 
shire. The score would hardly be worth giving in extenso^ 
save for the fact of its containing the names of those who 
have a right to style themselves the first Free Forester 
eleven. The small totals speak volumes as to the con- 
dition of ground which forty years ago was to be met with 



THE FIRST MATCH. 



II 



in country cricket. My friend Mr Reay reminds me : 
" Scores were generally smaller in those days, when there 
were no boundaries, no cane-handled bats, and the wicket 
was mown with a scythe at 3 A.M. on the morning of the 
match, and the rest of the ground only fed by sheep." 

Jitly 20, 1856. 
FREE FORESTERS. 



1ST INNINGS. 

J. W. Bott, b Randolph . 
W L. Gresley, run out 
M. Kempson, run out 
E. Thornewell, b Davies . 
C. H. Inge, c Hilton, b Gem . 
W. B. Harrison, c Gem, b Davies 
H. S. Chinn, 1 b w, b Davies 
A. P. Garnett, b Davies 
S. W. Williams, b Davies- 
R. J. Garnett, b Davies 
C. J. R. Bedford, not out 
byes 4, leg-byes 3 . 



Total 



SCORE. 

IS 
19 
19 
o 

5 
o 
o 
o 
o 
o 
o 
7 

65 



2D INNINGS. SCORE. 

b Gem , . . . o 

c Law, b Gem . . . o 

c Earle, b Davies . . 5 

b Gem .... 4 

c H. Armitstead, b Davies 3 

b Davies .... 2 

b Earle .... 6 

b Earle .... 16 

st Earle, b Davies . . o 

not out .... 8 

b Earle . . . . i 

byes 7, leg-byes 2, wides 3 12 



Total 



57 



PILGRIMS OF THE DEE. 



T. J. R. Hilton, b Kempson 

W. G. Armitstead, c Chinn, b Williams 

B. M. Randolph, 1 b w, b Williams . 
R. B. Earle, c A. Garnett, b Kempson 
W. H. Davies, b Kempson 

C. T. Royds, c Gresley, b Williams . 
E. C. Law, b Williams . 

H. S. Armitstead, c Chinn, b Williams 
J. R. Armitstead, b Williams . 

D. S. Perkins, st Kempson, b Williams 
C. H. Gem, not out .... 

byes 7, leg-byes i . 

Total 



9 


c A. Garnett, b 


Kempson 


4 





b Kempson 




4 


3 


b Kempson 




I 


4 


run out . 




18 





b Kempson 




2 


6 


b Williams 




7 





b Thornewell 







I 


c Kempson, b " 


rhornewell 


9 


3 


run out 


. 





3 


not out 




8 


I 


b Thornewell 


. 





8 


byes 


• 


13 


• 38 




Total . 


66 



1857. 



In 1857 the pleasant contest was renewed, and some 
new blood introduced which strengthened the combination 



12 



FOUNDER'S KIN. 



considerably; so that it was deemed expedient to unite 
for the purpose of seeking cricket elsewhere, and to incor- 
porate Staffordshire Rangers, Pilgrims of the Dee, and the 
Midland contingent of that club who played under the 
title of All Muggleton, into one general association, to be 
known henceforth as Free Foresters only. 



PILGRIMS OF THE DEE. 



1ST INNINGS, 

W. G. Armitstead, b Fen ton 
G. S. Homfray, b Thoinewell . 
H. S. Armitstead, b J'enton 
C. T. Royds, b Thornewell 
Capt. J. Broughton, run out 
G. Gilbanks, c Story, b C. A. Garnett 
R. Garnett, c Story, b C. A. Garnett 
C. H. Gem, run out .... 
G. D. Perkins, c and b Fenton . 
J. R. Armitstead, not out . 
Capt. J. Mytton, b C. A. Garnett 
byes 2, leg-bye i, wides 3 

Total 



SCORE. 2D INNINGS. SCORE. 

24 b Thornewell . . . i 

7 b Onslow .... 15 

1 st Ridding, b Thornewell 6 
3 c Inge, b Onslow . . 7 

8 run out . . . . i 
7 not out .... 16 

2 b Webb .... 3 

5 b Story . . . . o 

2 b Story . . . . i 

3 b Webb . . . . o 

4 bWebb .... 6 

6 byes 6, leg-byes 2, wides 7 15 

72 Total . 71 



FREE FORESTERS. 



J. B. Story, jun., b Broughton . 

W. Ridding, c Royds, b R. Garnett . 

E. Thornewell, hit wicket, b Broughton 
C. J. Webb, b Broughton . 

F. H. Garnett, c Homfray, b Gem . 
F. P. Onslow, b H. Armitstead . 

J. K. Fenton, c Royds, b Broughton 

C. A. Garnett, c Gilbanks, b W. G. Armit 

stead 

H. S. Chinn, not out . . . 
C. H. Inge, b H. Armitstead . 
C. J. R. Bedford, b H. Armitstead 

byes 5, leg-byes 3, wides 10 . 

Tota 



o not out .... I 

o 

o not out .... 22 

o 

2 

9 



27 c and b W. G. Armitstead 22 

o 

2 
18 byes 2, wides 6 . . 8 



9T 



Total 



53 



It will be noticed that the Garnetts were to the fore in 
both matches. Of these there were two families, Charles 
Garnett and his brother Robert both residing then in 
the neighbourhood of Tamworth, the house of the first- 





Matthew Kempson. 



Hon. W. M. Jervis. 





Scholes Birch. 



George Homfray. 



THE GARNETTS. 13 

named, Bonehill, being in Staffordshire, while Moor 
Hall, where Robert lived, was over the Warwickshire 
border. They were veterans by this time, but had large 
families of sons, all pretty good with bat and ball. (The 
eldest of the Bonehill family, C. A. Garnett, played for 
Oxford University in i860 and 1862.) A third brother of 
Charles and Robert Garnett resided at Wyreside in 
Lancashire, and a little later on played for us, as did 
several of his sons in after-years. Of those now mentioned,. 
A. P. was subsequently Colonel of the nth Hussars, while 
R. J. and F. H. also went into the army. And it was part 
of our plan that the three names of Armitstead, Bedford^ 
and Garnett should rank as founder's kin, and give a title 
to membership to those cricketers whom they furnished 
for us. 

The composition of the Club was intended to have 
a Midland county character — not to be a provincial 
I Zingari, because we did not propose to exact that 
unlimited fealty to our colours which the queen-mother of 
amateur wandering elevens so rigidly requires, but to 
imitate that unrivalled Club in dispensing altogether with 
the hired assistance without which some of the strongest 
local clubs of gentlemen then imagined themselves unable 
to play matches. This was the meaning of the motto we 
adopted, " United though untied," which I borrowed from 
an epigram I met with in some book of the period, the 
words of which I cannot now recall, and adapted it to a 
heraldic design called the Hastings knot, a cord loosely 
entwined connecting a sickle and a wheat-sheaf, for which 
we substituted two capital F's, as in the title-page. 
Neither this badge nor our colours were, however, at that 
time definitely adopted ; and indeed our success in our first 
out- matches was not such as to encourage us, for two 
defeats were at once experienced, viz. \— 



14 



FOUNDER'S KIN. 



July 24 and 25, Rugby. 
FREE FORESTERS. 



1ST INNINGS. 


SCORE. 


2D INNINGS. SCORE. 


W. G. Armitstead, b Fenton . 


I 


b Buchanan ... 5 


F. Garnett, 1 b w, b Fenton 


5 


not out . 


10 


F. P. Onslow, run out 


16 


b Fenton . 


6 


H. S. Armitstead, c Pilkington, b Fenton 





1 b w, b Buchanan . 


8 


C. T. Royds, c Rokeby, b Buchanan 


19 


c Campbell, b Buchanan 


TO 


G. Homfray, not out .... 


16 


c Rokeby, b Buchanan 


15 


H. S. Chinn, b Fenton 





b Kenney . 


23 


C. A. Garnett, h w, b Fenton . 





c Wood, b Buchanan 


12 


F. H. Garnett, c Campbell, b Buchanan 


8 


b W. Benn 





•C. J. R. Bedford, run out . 





c Rokeby, b W. Benn 





S. Smith, absent .... 





c W. Benn, b Fenton 





byes 9, leg- bye i, wide-ball i . 


II 


byes 5, leg-bye i, wide-balls 8 


Total 


76 


Total . 97 


RUGBY 


CLUB 


. 


G. Benn, b W. G. Armitstead . 


26 


not out . . . .28 


C Pilkington, b Onslow . 







F. Garnett, b Onslow . 3 


F. Wood, b Onslow . 




9 


b Onslow .... 3 


J. F. Eraser, b Onslow 




7 




D. Buchanan, b C. A. Garnett 




. 18 




Capt. Hogge, b C. A. Garnett 




7 




H. K. Rokeby, not out . 




20 


not out . . . .10 


W. Benn, b C. A. Garnett 




I 




A. Kenney, c Homfray, b C. A 


Garnett 


5 




J. Fenton, c Chinn, b Onslow 


, 







D. Campbell, c Chinn, b Onslow 


I 


c F. Garnett, b Oi^slow . 14 


byes 7, wide-balls 9 




. 16 


byes 3, leg-bye i, wide 


- 



and 



Total 



August if, at Leamington. 



Total 



Free Foresters 
Leamington Club 



ist Innings. 2d Innings. Total. 
41 57 98 

99 - 99 



64 



For F. F. E. Hill scored 2 (not out) and 21, F. H. Garnett 
10 and 4. 

Another match was totally stopped by bad weather ; but 
at length, at the then new ground of the Western Club, 
Manchester, Free Foresters were successful in their first 
contest of any note, on a wicket where in future years some 
of their most interesting matches were destined to take 



MANCHESTER. 



15 



place. Here, for the first time, they enjoyed the valuable 
aid of Mr Goodrich's bowling, which took 13 of their 
opponents' wickets. Mr T. L. Inge, a member of one of 
the best of our cricketing families, carried out his bat for 
39 runs. 

August 27 and 28, Eccles, Manchester. 





ist Innings. 


2d Innings. 


Tota 


Western Club 


66 


43 


109 


Free Foresters 


121 




121 



Later in the year we beat the Manchester Club (play- 
ing Hunt, their groundman), Goodrich taking 12 wickets. 

Septemler 30 and October i, Old Trafford. 



Manchester Club . 
Free Foresters 



ist Innings. 2d Innings. Total. 

33 40 73 

150 ... 150 



Joseph Makinson scored 56 and W. G. Armitstead 50 
for F. F. 




Western Pavilion, 1857. 



i6 



CHAPTER III. 

1858. 

The Rubicon then was crossed, but what next and next ? 
Were we to join the " swarm of butterflies, grasshoppers, 
chrysalis, wasps, drones, and other ephemeral bodies that 
quicken in the summer-time under the genial influence of 
cricket," ^ consider the lawn match our metier^ and a pretty- 
ribbon and a pleasant autumn the objects of our ambition ; 
or fling down the gauntlet to clubs of higher pretensions in 
the recognised centres of cricket ? In either event we 
required some kind of organisation ; so when we met at 
Oxford on the ist of June 1858, we at once proceeded to 
appoint a secretary and a committee, the first office falling 
to my share, and four cricketers being selected from our 
ranks as committee men representing the various interests 
bound up in our welfare. One of the most prominent of 
these was a man hardly less instrumental in raising our 
Club to the proud position which it eventually attained 
than were Armitstead or Goodrich — Arthur Faber, Fellow 
of New College, who a few years later became headmaster 
of the newly founded school at Malvern, — a preferment 
which caused us to lose the services of a player who ought 
to be remembered as having held the premier place in the 
batting averages of amateur cricket in the year immediately 

^ 'Jerks in from Short-leg.' 



A. H. FABER. 17 

preceding the rise of Mr W. G. Grace. Faber was not only 
a fine cricketer, but a fine scholar, a sayer of good things, 
and a singer of good songs. One not to be forgotten, 
"King Richard of England/' pronounced by men well 
versed in the lighter minstrelsy the best in that particular 
line of parody ever heard, obtained a great popularity ; but 
I preferred another spirited lilt, which recounted the 
adventures of certain Oxford oarsmen upon the Rhine, 
starting thus : — 

" 'Twas on a summer's evening, when July was close at hand, 
And half the men in London dined at Simpson's in the Strand ; 
But the ones who called the waiters there in far the loudest tones 
Were Messrs Brown and Robinson and John James Jones." 

The expedition is matured over their wine, and they 
proceed to put their design into execution, and after a 
humorous description of a Channel passage, are launched 
upon the stream. Of course there has to be a love story, 
which comes out thus : — 

" Innumerable conquests, too, they made among the ladies gay, 
Who flocked upon the towing-path to cheer them on their way ; 
And in spite of being rather plain, a truth one rarely owns. 
Brown backed his luck at six to four 'gainst John James Jones. 

Jones took the bet, as on ladies a bet one always takes ; 

The money was deposited, and Robin held the stakes. 

To a blue-eyed girl they told their tale in most affecting tones, 

While Robin clinked the cash of Brown and John James Jones." 

By-and-by comes the decision of the bet. 

" To her home on wings of love they flew, but found her also flown, 
And what was worse, bold Robin, taking both their bets as loafis, 
Had eloped with the girl of the heart of Brown and John James 
Jones ! " 

Perhaps this is a little caviare to a cricket chronicle, 
but the fact remains that the tone of good-fellowship 
generated by such enlivening pastime helped us materially 

B 



l8 THE RIBBON. 

in our enterprises in the more legitimate game. We had 
very httle formahty as a club. By way of proof, I may 
mention that our rules were never printed until 1867, and 
one of the most important in its ultimate results upon 
the prosperity of the Club never appears to have been 
printed at all, although acted upon as an understanding 
from the commencement — namely, that while we desired 
to restrict the numbers and the local qualification of our 
ordinary members, these limitations were not to apply to 
officers in her Majesty's service. The ribbon, as at present 
arranged, was adopted at this meeting, though not with 
unanimity — an arrangement of darker shades of red, green, 
and black being the competing design. I fancy that part 
of the objection to the " red and green and white " arose 
from some of our older members, who dubbed it a "Radical." 
ribbon, the Chartists of 1848 having sported a tricolour of 
the same tints ; and that it had a political significance, in 
Italy at least, was evidenced by the rather vexatious 
incident which occurred to a lady, whose brothers and 
husband are among our founder's kin, upon the occasion 
of a visit to Rome in Carnival time, while the temporal 
power' of the Pope still existed, and Garibaldi was still 
** hushed in grim repose." She has narrated it herself. 

What came of wearing a Forester Ribbon. 

The following morning we were at Civita Vecchia. I was now 
informed that upon landing we entered the States of the Church, 
and all our luggage would have to pass through the Custom- 
house. As we had no servant with us, our English friends kindly 
suggested that our boxes should go with theirs under the charge 
of their Italian servant, who would look after them at the Custom- 
house and meet us at the station. Poor Rozelli, he little knew 
what he was undertaking. You must remember it was just after 
the time when Garibaldi had been fighting so hard for Italy, and 
the Pope had found his temporal dominions considerably reduced. 
There was consequently a very bitter feeling throughout the States 
of the Church against all Italians who were not the subjects of his 



A POLITICAL OFFENCE. 19 

Holiness, and no sooner did any one set their foot in his domin- 
ions than they became Hable to the closest watching, and impris- 
onment for the slightest offence of a political nature. We were 
at the station, and had taken our tickets for Rome, when the elder 
of our two English friends came to me in a state of great agitation, 
and asked me almost fiercely what I was doing with the Italian 
tricolour in my box ? 

I was utterly at a loss to comprehend his meaning, and said I 
knew nothing about any Italian tricolour, and was quite sure I had 
no such thing. "Yes," he said, "you have some kind of a loose 
white dress in your box, such as is worn at the Carnival, and it 
has Garibaldi's ribbon all over it." 

I thought for a moment. " Can it be my dressing-gown ? " I 
said, a light beginning to dawn upon me ; " that is trimmed with 
a red, white, and green ribbon, but that has nothing to do with 
Garibaldi ; it is nothing in the world but the ribbon of the Free 
Foresters' Cricket Club : I had it made to wear at a cricket match, 
and thinking it a pity to throw it away had it transferred to my 
white dressing-gown. You surely cannot mean to say that this 
has given offence ? " 

" Given offence ! " he replied ; " we may think ourselves very 
lucky we are not now all under arrest : my man Rozelli has been 
nearly frantic, for he of course knew nothing about it, and the 
very first thing that came to view when your box was opened 
was this ' rebel ' ribbon. Of course the authorities inquired what 
was the meaning of it, and all poor Rozelli could do was to shake 
his head and say, 'I am innocent.' He has been .taken to the 
Consul about it now, and I have no idea how it will all end." 

At this moment Rozelli appeared, and looking reproachfully at 
me, began a long story in which he told us how we had narrowly 
escaped imprisonment, but that being English had saved us. The 
ribbon had been torn off the dressing-gown by the Custom-house 
officials and kept there ; and a little jacket which they could not 
strip, the ribbon being rather tightly sewn on, they had also kept. 

The man Rozelli, it seemed, was a Roman by birth, and had 
years ago been in the service of the celebrated Lola Montez. He 
was well known to the police, and was closely watched the whole 
time his master remained in Rome. For ourselves, as soon as we 
got over the annoyance, we thought it a great joke, but I do not 
think Rozelli ever understood it. I believe we were all more or 
less watched by the police during our stay in Rome. It was the 
Carnival week, and I had an opportunity of seeing the long white 
wrappers that were worn to keep off the confetti, and for one of 
which my poor innocent dressing-gown had been taken, it being 
supposed by the Custom-house officers that I was taking it to 



20 OXFORD. 

Rome to wear at the Carnival to create a demonstration in favour 
of Garibaldi. Little did the Free Foresters dream when they 
fixed upon their colours what a foolish adventure they would 
cause ! I was told I could have my ribbon given back to me 
at Civita Vecchia on leaving, but when after a week of sight- 
seeing and gaiety we retraced our steps, I said to James, " No, 
we will not ask for it : let us give them the trouble of taking care 
oi\X.for ever.^^ And so I suppose the Free Foresters' ribbon still 
remains in the Custom-house. 

The season of 1858 was decisive also of our pretensions 
to superiority, although at first no results of moment fol- 
lov^ed our contests. 

On June i Free Foresters beat Bullingdon at Oxford, 
making 185 to their hosts' 135 and 22 for 3 wickets. For 
BuUingdon J. Gundry scored 29 and 3, J. Carpenter 27 
and I, G. W. Barker 15 and 13 (not out), Burrin (pro.) 14. 
For F. F. H. Latham scored 58, G. S. Homfray 37, H. S. 
Chinn 22, W. M. Jervis 16. 

On June 2 and 3 Ch. Ch. beat them by 228 to 165. For 
Ch. Ch. C. G. Lane scored 28 and 41, J. G. Edwards 26 and 8^ 
A. Thesiger 13 and 18, W. Fellowes o (absent) and 26, T, 
Houghton o and 20, W. B. Beaumont o and 16 (run out). 
For F. F. H. S. Armitstead scored i and 47, J. Fenton o 
(not out) and 24 (not out), J. E. Codrington 5 and 19, W. 
M. Jervis 1 1 and o. 

On June 4 they beat B. N. C. by 99 to 51. For B. N. C, 
D. G. Thomas scored 15, J. Morley 12. For F. F. W. B. 
Beaumont scored 15 and 24 (not out), S. Birch 11, G. S. 
Homfray 17 and o. It was in this match that Homfray 
hit Brandt, bowling for his College, four times running out 
of the ground. One F. F. wicket was dow^n in the second 
innings for 36. 

On June 23 Maidenhead beat Free Foresters by 289 to 
138, Onslow and Thesiger being the F. F. bowlers ; and as 
Parsons, who played his qualifying match, well remembers, 
a hot afternoon's leather-hunting was particularly trying.. 



LORD STAMFORD. 21 

The Maidenhead score included 62 extras, and 75 runs 
from G. R. Dupuis, 54 from S. Leigh, 29 from C. Leigh, 
26 from A. Leigh. For F. F. O. F. Wakeman scored 55 
(not out), W. M. Jervis 21, J. Parsons 20, C. Everett 17. 

On the 29th and 30th Rugby Club beat Free Foresters 
at Sutton by 153 to 129. Buchanan for Rugby took 12 
wickets. 

On July 3 King Edward's School, Birmingham, lost to 
F. F. by 9 wickets; and on July 21 the Forest of Arden, 
at Meriden, scored 93 and 79 with 7 wickets to fall, against 
F. F.'s first innings of 124, — Homfray 42. Two days later 
Trentham, at Sandbach, made 64 and 51 with 5 wickets 
to fall, against Foresters' 255, including 86 from W. G. 
Armitstead. 

On the 26th and 27th July at Rugby the home Club 
were beaten by Foresters by 3 wickets, Goodrich disposing 
of fourteen Rugbeians ; and on the 31st Birmingham, 
though playing their professional, could only total 128 
in both innings, against F. F. 129 in the first. 

But now came the crisis of the fate of our brotherhood. 
We were honoured by an invitation to play against Lord 
Stamford's team on the famous ground of Enville, — a 
ground the like of which for perfection in a cricket point 
of view I never saw until I visited Newbold Revel a year 
or two ago. Lord Stamford himself was a fine batsman 
who often made runs for I Zingari. He had always some 
of the very best professional talent of the day engaged as 
groundmen, and the pick of the M. C. C. invariably ready 
to play for him, so that we were quite satisfied that we 
should have to accept a certain defeat as a price which we 
should have been wrong to grudge paying for a recognition 
of our status in so eminent a quarter. So we set ourselves 
to work to find what, next to a good cook, seems the 
hardest person in the world to lay hold of — a really depend- 
able bowler, who could do for us at one end what Goodrich 



22 • F. BRANDT. 

we knew was capable of doing at the other. Just then a 
Manchester cricketer of very high repute, who frequently 
played in England matches, George Cooke, wrote warmly 
recommending a Cheltenham College bowler recently 
entered at Oxford, Frank Brandt (" the devastating 
Brandt," as Faber, quoting from Campbell's poem, dubbed 
him), who was in his judgment just what we required, with 
the support of a good field like that which we could assure 
him of. So we enlisted him. We were certainly favoured 
by fortune at the outset, for our opponents, who won the 
toss, kindly put us in, some of our men having been 
delayed at the junction of a cross-country railway. Faber 
and Homfray started the batting, and although the bowlers 
to whom they were opposed were C. D. Marsham, A. Payne, 
and Drake, lOO runs appeared on the board before the 
first wicket fell. Homfray played cricket for so short a 
time, owing to his change of residence and premature 
failure of health, that few even of our own members ever 
saw him, or remember the cleanest and finest hitter almost 
ever seen (he hits harder than George Parr, said a famous 
judge of the game), as quick on his legs too as he was 
strong in punishment. His score of 83 virtually won us 
the match; and considering that the best gentlemen bowlers 
of the day were his assailants, it is worthy to rank even 
with some of the phenomenal innings of modern times. 
Faber supported him well with a hard hit 26. Scholes 
Birch, a cricketer of Manchester fame, and a slow bowler 
whom we used to alternate advantageously with Good- 
rich, made 29, and the Armitsteads both achieved double 
figures, our total being 203, then considered a long innings. 
Enville began with A. F. Payne and the Hon. G. Milles, 
now Earl Sondes (who had played against players the 
year before), and Brandt secured both wickets for no runs ; 
Capt. F. Marshall and Drake put a different complexion 
on the score, making 51 apiece, but when Goodrich had 



ENVILLE MATCH. 23 

disposed of them both, no great stand ensued, though all 
made runs down to the two servants, not professional 
cricketers, but active fellows in good practice, who com- 
pleted the house eleven. The total was 188, only 15 
behind ours ; and when we all got out for 63 it seemed a 
certain win for his Lordship, and had not our men been 
quicker and steadier in the field than most elevens were 
then, or indeed are nowadays, we could not have hoped 
to get them out, as we did, for 58 runs, their only double 
figures being obtained by Capt. Marshall, A. Payne, and 
Wingfield Fiennes, all three being caught at point by 
Faber, two off Brandt and one off Goodrich. Brandt 
accounted for two more, and Goodrich for five. I regret 
that I never obtained the analysis of bowling. It was 
certainly a great feat, and was handsomely acknowledged 
as such by our opponents. Goodrich, not much of a 
ladies' man, was put into a state of considerable embar- 
rassment by the desire of Lady Stamford that he should 
be presented to her, whereupon with a pretty speech she 
decorated him with a flower for his button-hole. But 
nobody could help seeing that this victory over a side of 
such high cricket celebrity placed us in a very different 
position to that which we had held before — in the premier 
rank at any rate of the Midland clubs. 



FREE FORESTERS. 



1ST INNINGS. SCORE. 


2D INNINGS. SCORE. 


A. H. Faber, c A. Payne, b Drake . 


26 


c A. F. Payne, b Marsham 2 


G. S. Homfray, b C. D. Marsham . 


. 83 


b C. D. Marsham 


13 


W. G. Armitstead, b Drake 


10 


c H. Payne, b Marsham 


7 


H. R. Armitstead, b Drake 


13 


b C. D. Marsham . 





S. Birch, b A. Payne 


29 


c Drake, b A. Payne 


I 


0. F. Wakeman, cC. D. Marsham, b Pay 


le 3 


1 b w, b A. Payne . 


10 


H. S. Chinn, b A. Payne . 


7 


bA. Payne 





F. P. Onslow, b A. Payne 





c Drake, b Marsham 


10 


T. C. Goodrich, b A. Payne . 


8 


b A. Payne 


I 


F. Brandt, b C. D. Marsham . 


I 


b A. Payne 


3 


J. K. Feriton, not out 





not out . 


6 


byes 16, leg-bye i, wides 5, no ball i 


23 


byes 5, leg-byes 3, wides 


2 10 


Total 


203 


Total 


6S 



24 A VICTORY. 

EARL OF STAMFORD'S ELEVEN. 



1ST INNINGS. SCORE. 


2D INNINGS. SCORE. 


A. F. Payne, b Brandt 


o 


b Brandt . 


5 


Hon. G. Milles, c and b Brandt 


o 


St H. Armitstead, b Goodrich 9 


B. Richards, b Brandt 


8 


b Goodrich 





Capt. F. Marshall, b Goodrich . 


51 


c Faber, b Goodrich 


15 


E. Drake, hit wicket, b Goodrich 


51 


c and b Brandt 





C. D. Marsham, c and b Goodrich . 


15 


c and b Goodrich 


I 


Earl of Stamford, hit wicket, b Brandt 


I 


b Goodrich 





A. Payne, c and b Goodrich 


15 


c Faber, b Brandt . 


14 


Hon. W. Fiennes, not out 


17 


c Faber, b Brandt . 


II 


G. Hancock, b Goodrich . 


9 


b Goodrich 





A. Gould, c Fenton, b Brandt . 


7 


not out . 


I 


byes 6, leg-byes 6, no-ball 2 . 


14 


leg-bye i, wide i . 


2 


Total 


188 


Total 


58 



We won another match at Trentham on the 12th and 
13th Aug. against an eleven of Capt. J. Broughton's, with 
4 wickets to fall, Goodrich again taking 13 wickets. And 
we then played a couple of matches in Manchester from 
the 1 8th to the 21st, one of which, with the Manchester 
Club, who played their "pro.," Hunt, we won by 3 wickets, 
though after the winning run had been obtained Henry 
Garnett tried a second, and paid the penalty. The other 
match on the Western ground terminated in a tie in rather 
a curious manner. 

The. Western were not in those days at all a strong club, 
but they had playing for them an officer from the cavalry 
barracks near, Kington by name, a fine hitter, and had 
also strengthened their side by two professionals, Wright 
and Nixon. Foresters made a poor show with the bat, 
only 6y and 85 — J. S. Dugdale and Goodrich being the 
double-figure men in both innings. Against this, with the 
assistance of 50 from Kington, the Western made 115, so 
that in their second innings they had only 38 to get to 
win, and thought that the state of the score quite 'justified 
them in letting Nixon go away to fulfil some other engage- 
ment. So it did ; for at the fall of the sixth wicket their 
score was 36, and their victory appeared a moral certainty. 



A TIE MATCH. 25 

Two more wickets fell, however, for but one run, and the 
last man went in with an infallible plan of campaign. He 
was a character. Even in those days he insisted on a mili- 
tary title, which he derived from a volunteer regiment ; and 
when I last saw him, twenty years ago, he informed me 
that he had cut commerce and was generalissimo to some 
sable potentate in Africa. He had noticed that our long- 
stop stood rather deep, and concluded that a stolen bye 
would finish the match. It was "over" and the bowling 
from his end. William Armitstead, long-stop, crept in four 
or five yards nearer the wicket unnoticed by the " Major," 
and the instant the ball had passed the batsman, away, as 
he expected, started the man at the other end ; the ball 
was thrown direct over to the bowler, H. S. Armitstead, 
who was also on the look-out, and the unlucky batsman 
was scarcely half across before his wicket was down. 

Not long agt) V. K. Armitage, a pretty good bat, men- 
tioned to Armitstead that he was the victim of the " Major," 
so had the latter only played the game the Western must 
have won. The ground, adds Armitstead, was soft, and 
difficult to get runs on. 

We had a very poor team for our last match this year, 
on Sept. 20 and 21, at Rugby, against the School, and only 
scored 39 and 31 to the boys' 164. It was here that T. 
Ratlifif (who had played against us more than once) first 
figured in our eleven ; and from this match too began that 
connection with Rugby School which produced us so 
many excellent recruits. 



26 



CHAPTER IV. 

1859. 

Out of fifteen matches played in 1858 we had won ten, 
lost four, and made a tie. This encouraged us to make 
a similar programme for 1859, and we were fortunate in 
being able to add to it a match against I Zingari, to be 
played on a ground now forgotten, " Parr and Wisden's," at 
Leamington. We began badly. 

June 3 and 4, Rtigby. 

^ ist Innings. 2d Innings. Total. 

Rugby Club 218 ... 218 

Free Foresters .... 45 55 100 

But Brandt and Ratliff (the first taking lo wickets, the 
latter 7) gave a better account of the School. 

June 13 and 14, Rugby. 

ist Innings. 2d Innings. Total. 
Free Foresters . . . . 100 149 249 

Rugby School .... 81 74 155 

H. S. Armitstead, 5 and 39; T. Ratliff, 22 and 19 ; G. A. 
E. Kempson, 2 and 29, were prominent for F. F. F. Lee, 
17 and 15 ; A. Rutter, 5 and 19; M. T. Martin, 18 and o, 
for the School. 

At Oxford two elevens of Foresters engaged in a week's 
cricket, the results being evenly divided. Bullingdon did 
but little against us (79 and 53 for 2 wickets), though 
J. A. Pepys made 26 and 23 (not out), J. Gundry 16 and 
14, &c. F. F. scored 203 — W. G. Armitstead making 6^^ 



OXFORD. 27 

H. S. Armitstead 26, F. P. Onslow 24, W. L. Gresley 16, 
Lord A. Paget 14, &c. 

Christ Church, on June 30, scored 215, including 66 from 
J. Llewelyn, 49 from E. G. Sandford, 24 from A. Waller, 

30 from Herbert G. Norman. Foresters only put up 120 
— W. G. Armitstead 28, F. Brandt and W. M. Jervis 16 
each, H. S. Armitstead 15, H. S. Chinn ii, T. Ratliff 10. 
And on the same day B. N. C. lost to F. F. by 169 to 197, 
our leading scores being E. Hill 44, F. P. Onslow and F. 
H. Gregory each 33, R. B. R. Bedford 23. 

On July I Harlequins made 179 — G. L. Hodgkinson 30, 
C. D. Marsham 27, R. Parker and B. Wand each 25, &c., 
against a poor score of 74 from. Foresters. T. Ratliff 25, 
being best ; E. G. Sandford, A. H. Faber, and H. S. Armit- 
stead the only other double figures ; while the other eleven 
beat Magdalen, who declined to give up Charles Ridding 
(F. F.), and offered A. B. Trollope as a substitute. The 
latter, playing for Foresters, got 95 (not out) in a total of 
173, against which the College scored 151, Ridding only 
making 13. 

In the last match. University College beat Foresters by 
17 runs, 105 to 88 — J. S. Dugdale 29, C. H. Gem 18 (not 
out), and H. S. Chinn 13, helped the modest score of F. F. 

A match at Trentham with the Staffordshire Rifles on 
July 13 was won by Foresters, though two men short of 
their complement. C. A. Garnett made 49, H. S. Chinn 

31 (not out), A. R. Kenney 14, J. S. Dugdale 12, the total 
being 151. Garnett and Kenney took the Staffordshire 
wickets for 98 — Capt. Broughton 16, the highest score. 

On the 1 6th July, at Coventry, the 4th Light Dragoons 
made 73 and 60 against 164 for Free Foresters. The 
gallant 4th, says the chronicler of the day, " exhibited 
in Lieut, de Capel Broke (29 and not out 24) a hero 
superior to misfortune. On the part of the Foresters 
Gregory took care not to forget that "swashing blow'* 



28 LEAMINGTON. 

immortalised by the Bard of Avon (" Romeo and Juliet," 
Act I.) ; while T. Ratliff, " his foot upon his native turf," 
contented himself with 64 runs and 14 wickets as his 
contribution to the game. 

At Sutton Coldfield, on Aug. 2, a local twenty-two of a 
very mixed composition could only realise 64 and '/6 to 
188 from Foresters — C. A. Garnett (not out) 36, being 
ledger-man ; and on Aug. 4 Birmingham, though assisted 
by two professional players, only scored 58 and 52 against 
the bowling of Brandt and Goodrich, Foresters exceed- 
ing their total by 2 runs in the first innings. W. G. 
Armitstead made 33, A. H. Faber 24, and T. C. Good- 
rich II. 

On the 8th of Aug. Free Foresters met I Zingari on the 
Leamington cricket-ground mentioned before. The wicket 
was good, but the weather left much to be desired. Six of 
our eleven, starting from Sutton Coldfield, found Birming- 
ham enveloped in mist and rain, and telegraphed to know 
if it were any use to come on. A reassuring reply being 
received, they joined the rest of the players, and no posi- 
tive hindrance from wet took place. But the light soon 
became darkness visible, and thence no doubt the small 
scoring of the first innings of our opponents. Foresters 
did not show in very formidable colours, but that such an 
eleven as I Z. put into the field should be all out for 
30 is only to be accounted for by atmospheric influence, 
though the F. F. fielding was quite faultless. Brandt and 
Goodrich bowled without change on both days. 

FREE FORESTERS. 

1ST INNINGS. SCORE. 2D INNINGS. SCORE. 

A. H. Faber, b Fellows . . . . 8 c Aylesford, b Fellows . 3 

H. S. Armitstead, st Ponsonby, b Fellows 33 c Fellows, b W, Fiennes . o 

G. S. Homfray, b Fellows ....5b Marsham ... 26 

W. G. Armitstead, st Ponsonby, b Fellows 14 st Ponsonby, b W. Fiennes 22 

T. Ratliff, b Fellows o st Ponsonby, b W. Fiennes 4 

F. Brandt, c Fitzgerald, b Fellows . . 17 b Marsham . . . o 



MANCHESTER. 



29 



1ST INNINGS. 


SCORE. 


2D INNINGS. SCORE. 


J, Parsons, b Fellows 


. 





not out . 


7 


C. A. Garnett, b Fellows . 


. 


5 


St Ponsonby, b W. Fiennes 


I 


H. S. Chinn, c Fitzgerald, b W 


Fiennes 


7 


b Marsham 


2 


R. B. R. Bedford, b W. Fiennes 





c Marshall, b Marsham . 


4 


T. C. Goodrich, not out . 


. 


3 


b W. Fiennes . 


I 


leg-byes 3, wide-balls 9 . 


• 


12 


byes 4, leg-bye i, wide- 
balls 3 


8 




Total 


. 104 


Total 


78 




I ZINGARL 






Hon. S. Ponsonby, run out 




10 


c Faber, b Brandt . 


7 


Captain Marshall, run out . 


. 





b Brandt .... 


I 


R. Marsham, b Brandt 




7 


c Homfray, b Goodrich . 


13 


Hon. E. C. Leigh, b Brandt 


. 





c H. Armitstead, b Brandt 


19 


Sir F. de Bracy, b Brandt . 


. 


2 


c Homfray, b Brandt 





H. W. Fellows, c and b Brandt 


. 





c Chinn, b Brandt . 


17 


Earl of Aylesford, c Ratliff, b G( 


Dodrich . 


2 


c Homfray, b Goodrich . 


I 


R. Fitzgerald, b Brandt . 


. 


2 


b Brandt .... 


40 


Hon. W. Fiennes, b Goodrich 




4 


1 b w, b Goodrich . 





Hon. C. Fiennes, b Brandt 




I 


not out .... 


5 


Lord Skelmersdale, not out 


. 


I 


c Faber, b Goodrich 





wide-ball .... 




I 


byes 2, leg-byes 3 . 


5 




Total 


30 


Total 


108 




ANAL^ 


fSIS. 






If 


JNINGS. 


B. 


R. W. M.O. WIDE. 




Brandt .... 


'ist 

1 2d 


56 


14 6 4 I 






176 


52 6 23 




Goodrich .... 


(ist 
I 2d 


56 


15 2 4 






176 


57 4 9 





The remainder of the week we utilised at Manchester 
(our diligence being much applauded by one of our late 
adversaries, who joined us forthwith) by winning two 
matches, — the first against the Western, assisted by R. C. 
Tinley, who with Brandt bowled and took all our wickets 
for 155. The Western made 72 and 123, and we won by 9 
wickets — Faber scoring 19 and 27 (not out). Birch 14 and 
20 (not out), Goodrich 25, and Homfray 21. Birch, in the 
second innings of the Western, took 8 wickets. The 
Manchester Club, with H. H. Stephenson, made 91 and 
146, on the two following days Mr Perera 44 and 59, 
F. F. again scoring 155 in their first innings, and securing 
their victory by 8 wickets. The first day was partially 



30 CHANGE OF SLOWS. 

wet, so the Foresters had to play against time as well as to 
win, and hard hitting was in the ascendant the second day; 
A. H. Faber made 6i and 14, H. S. Armitstead o and 41 
(not out), T. C. Goodrich 26 ; and he also took 10 wickets. 
We used to change slow bowlers a good deal in those 
days. Birch writes apropos of this : — 

Dear old Goodrich, of course, always started ; when he got in 
a tangle he used to chuck the ball to me and say, " Now, Birch, 
you have a try ; " and it was curious how invariably the change 
acted after an over : then I ^ used to throw the ball back to 
Goodrich. We often used to wonder how it was : he thought I 
might be a little slower ; my impression was I delivered higher 
from the hip, and the ball rose sharper. Another Goodrich as a 
■county man would, I feel pretty sure, reduce the big averages. 
There is only one good underhand bowler, Humphreys, who did 
•capitally last year. Lobs, as they call them, are often tried, but 
they are mere rubbish. It is generally thought easy to bowl 
them, whereas it takes a deal more to make a Clarke or Goodrich 
than a good Catherine-wheeler. I wish I could get a youngster 
and coach him, but he might lack the necessary brains. As a 
beginner, he should not practise against batmen unless they play 
a defensive game. It is easy to run out and hit when chances 
■don't count. I am convinced that the higher above the hip the 
ball can be delivered from the better ; but it is much more 
•difficult to preserve the pitch. 

On August 18 and 19 F. F. turned up two short for a 
match at Southwell against Nottinghamshire County Club, 
who were also short-handed, so nine a-side went in. A 
good game was won by the Shire, who scored in their two 
innings 164 to the Foresters' 162. R. B. Earle, 37 and 29, 
was the premier ^or N. C. C. Goodrich 9 and 43, Royds 
32 and ■ 2, C. A. Garnett 29 and 5 for F. F. One 
quaint circumstance distinguished this match. A certain 
Free Forester fielding long-leg, ran for a ball which lodged 
in a tuft of nettles. " Mayn't I call lost ball ? " he implored. 
•" Certainly not, Frank, throw it in," was the stern reply ; and 
regardless of stings he did retrieve it, but meanwhile two 
^xtra runs had been made, and this margin won the match. 




W 
Q 

o 

W 

H 
O 

> 

w 



SOA^G OF THE SEASON. 31 

We had almost as close a finish in a second match with 
Rugby School, who headed our score of 86 by 20 runs in 
the first innings; but as we made 161 in the second and 
got them out for 1 19, we rather more than turned the tables, 
and won by 22. For the School — C. Booth 29 and 22, 
Bowden Smith 15 and 28, A. Rutter 24 and 10, M. T. 
Martin, 6 and 16, were conspicuous. The brothers Ratliff 
and E. Waller made runs for Foresters ; whose bowlers 
were W. K. Mott, T. RatHff, Cecil Plennes, and E. G. 
Sandford. 

Faber's muse thus celebrated the heroes of the 
season : — 

Air — " When the Green Leaves come again,'' 

"When summer's sun adorns the sky, 

And April yields the place to May and June, 
The birds' sweet notes are heard on high, 

And half a hundred pulses beat in tune ; • 
Forth from out their cases bats and balls appear, 

Cricket-shoes are worn instead of spurs ; 

But of all the clubs in this our hemisphere. 

Which can vie with the Free Foresters ? 

Fifty colours may face the light of day, 

Si7igle^ double^ or in triple rows; 
But the red and gree?i and white ^ when did hues unite 
Half so free and fair and fresh as those? 

The central counties of this isle 

Can boast attractions plentiful as flowers ; 
But when were ladies found to smile 

On fairer claims for notice than on ours ? 
In our colours decked, in a jovial band. 

Seldom found to weary or to yield, 
With the agile foot, with the nimble hand. 

Full of fun and chaff we take the field. 
Fifty colours may, &=€. 

Not far from where just now we stand, 

This Club of free companions took its rise ; 

A master mind its being planned. 

And ladies' taste devised the triple dyes. 



32 FABER'S SONG. 

Long it were to name those its ranks that fill, 
But one, at least, shall echo in the strain, 

Noted far and wide — long may he preside ! 
Long the brethren live to entertain ! 
Fifty colours may, Qr^c. 

With what impatience do they arm, 

And at the Rector's kindly summons come, 
And some put up are at 'The Farm,' 

And at the firm ' Rectorial Mansion ' some. 
But where'er they go, or where'er they stay, 

Bodies in condition — spirits light — 
To the best of games they devote the day, 

And to fun and laughter half the night. 
Fifty colours may, &^c. 

And thence to all the country round. 

To find and win their matches they proceed. 
And whether on their native ground 

Or any other central cricket-mead, 
Still Frank the great, compelling clouds, is seen, 

Still Codrington aquatic muscle shows, 
Still Homfray with his bat mischief loves to mean. 

And Jack to win, or lose, the match with slows. 
Fifty colours may, &^c. 

Not less with skill and science fraught. 

Old Goodrich multiplies the mounting score. 
Adroitly gets the batsmen caught. 

Or bowls him clean, or plants him leg before. 
Lichfield Chinn is there to intercept the ball. 

And Edward Hill amusement to maintain : 
A free and jovial lot, take them for all in all. 

We shan't soon look upon their likes again. 
Fifty colours may, &^c. 



Cricketeering, laughter-loving elves, 
A health I'll give you, three times three, 

With all the honours drank, Our noble selves. 
Still when warm July bakes us like a nut. 

And half the turf is brown for want of rain, 
May we all our other engagements cut. 

And like the green leaves come again. 
Fifty colours may, dr'c" 



33 



CHAPTER V. 

i860. 

We had now arrived at the position of being able to 
essay the high emprises which my sanguine hopes had long 
foreshadowed, but it was perhaps as well that we deferred 
the realisation of our more ambitious programme until 
1 861 ; for the summer of i860 was a damp imposture, and 
our book for that year is one melancholy record of rain. It 
might be said of the clerk of the weather as of the tyrant 
of old— 

" As long as he could reign he reigned, 
And then — he mizzled ! " 

Rugby School on May 14 and 15, having got F. F. out 
for 157, secured a lead of 80 runs, and got 4 wickets down 
for 82, when wet stopped the game. A. E. Tennant 83, 
S. Linton 47, E. Rutter 29, F. R. Evans 14, M. T. Martin 
II, were the double figures for the School. For F. F. 
E. G. Sandford 4 (not out) and 52, and T. Ratlifif 33 and 
8, are worth a note. 

On June 4 and 5 University Coll. beat F. F. terribly 
at Oxford, making no and 133 to 48 and 93 for F. F., 
Hilton, Hinchliffe, H. S. Armitstead, T. Ratliff, and G. 
Phillips being the best scorers. Harlequins again made 
106 to 27 only from F. F., who in their second innings had 
scored 135 for 6 wickets when wet caused the game to be 

C 



34 SHROPSHIRE. 

drawn. F. G. Inge made o and 39 (not out), A. H. Faber 
5 and 40, H. S. Armitstead 8 and 28, &c. 

On June 6 and 7 (the Same days) another Forester 
eleven drew their match with B. N. C, who made 131 and 
129, to F. F. 113, Hinchliffe scoring 28, Mott 24, Codrington 
1 1 (not out). 

On June 9 Foresters did manage a win against Bul- 
lingdon, getting lOO to 68 and 78. BuUingdon had their 
professional, Slinn, to bowl for them. For Foresters Chinn 
took 9 wickets, C. A. Garnett 8 ; the latter scored 21 runs, 
G. H. Philips 18, T. Hilton 14, H. S. Armitstead and 
C. Horwood 13 each. A h'Ural colncidGnce occurs in the 
score of this match — viz., Slinn c and b Chinn ; Chinn c 
and b Slinn. 

A win over the nth Hussars at Sutton Coldfield on 
July 4 was almost snatched from our grasp by bad 
weather. The regiment scored 50, F. F. yy ; G. A. E. 
Kempson 23, H. S. Chinn 12, and T. O. Reay 10, the 
double figures. 

July 10 to 13 were devoted to a campaign in Shrop- 
shire, productive at the moment of signal discomfiture, 
but as its result bringing into our ranks more than one 
of our very best recruits. Shrewsbury, who won with 8 
wickets to fall, got 235, and made Free Foresters follow 
their innings. Shropshire had playing for them W. Wing- 
field, a pocket-Hercules, who had steered the Cambridge 
boat in the races against Oxford of 1855 ^.nd 1856, who 
in this match made 84 and 15, both times not out. Free 
Foresters, who made 95 and 178, were indebted to G. S. 
Homfray 25 and 55, G. Arkwright 23 and 11, E. K. 
Hornby 10 and 25, H. S. Armitstead 2 ^^^ 25, for most 
of their runs. Probably bowling was here our weak point ; 
one incident at any rate may be cited as a proof. When 
Wingfield had been in for a considerable space of time, 
and treated each change of bowling with increasing dis- 





W. Wingfleld. 



E. K. Hornby. 





R. A. Benson. 



C. T. Royds. 



BENSON'S LINES. 35 

respect, one of our team suggested that when he had 
been in the Rugby eleven he bowled slows, and accord- 
ingly he was tried for an over. The moment he began 
the field were in convulsions of suppressed laughter, 
for he simply chucked up a ball to hit, without length, 
twist, pace, or anything likely to take a wicket about 
it. The batsman, however (not Wingfield), evidently 
detected some deep design in this simplicity, and played 
all the four balls of that over with the utmost caution, 
and v/ithout a run ; our new bowler was cock-a-hoop, and 
insisted on another trial. Unluckily for him he had 
Wingfield to bowl at this time, who promptly deposited 
the first ball in the Severn, which flowed by the cricket- 
field. The ball was not lost, for a man with a punt was 
on the look-out for such contingencies, but we did not 
indulge Royds with a third over. At Ludlow again we 
were beaten by 52 runs — W. Wingfield not out twice 
more, with 66 and 42 ; and a Mr Taylor bowling most 
of our wickets for small scores, — H. S. Armitstead 28 
and I, and E. K. Hornby 17 and 18, the best. This 
eleven, however, had the honour of being handed down 
to immortality in the verses of a witty opponent, Benson, 
whose initials, R. A. B., are appended to some of the best 
society rhymes in the early numbers of 'Once a- Week,' 
and who was as good at a hustings speech as he was 
at a cricket rhyme. 

" How shall I sing these Foresters so free, 
Too bad for Salop, p'raps too good for we,^ 
Led by three Jacks, ' United though Untied,' 
Loose in their hitting, in their bowling wide. 
Spoilt child of fame, on conquest's glowing track, 
A middling player comes, the ' middle Jack.' 
Two loving brothers in his wake pursue, 
Their fielding famous, and their runs not few ; 



^ Ludlow. 



36 . LUDLOW. 

The * old ' to take the lead upon the score, 
The ' young ' to chatter when the game is o'er. 
Next to my vision Jerry comes 'on slow' 
(The tucked-up trouser now seems all the go) ; 
A ' quidnunc ' champion too before me steps, 
"With small ambition, but with large biceps ; 
A dread form now disturbs my fevered brain 
The mighty Homfray slogging o'er the plain, 
Performing feats that strike the foe with dread, 
And putting bowlers over their own head, 
A point — not Euclid's point — I next must sing, 
For parts and magnitude their point can bring ; 
His hitting brilliant, though his life not long, 
Like David, ruddy, and, like Samson, strong. 
A late Harrovian at short-leg I spy. 
His batting steady, his delivery high ; 
And Hill (I might go farther and fare worse) 
Winds up the tale of wickets and of verse. 

P.S. — Must I, to make my epic true, 
Too kind emergencies, descant on you. 
That Stone on which, to condescend to tropes. 
At long field-on they founded all their hopes. 
And Morris, by whose too tenacious grip, 
Poor Mr Taylor perished in the slip, 
Ah, yes ! their names upon my song I'd see — 
They let me off, and that's enough for me." 

The three Armitsteads are of course Jack. Francis 
Onslow's sobriquet was Jerry. The "quidnunc" is Royds, 
the " point " Codrington, and the " Harrovian " Hornby, 
an excellent bat, who played a great deal for Foresters in 
future, as did Wingfield also. 

July 19 and 20 saw two Free Forester engagements 
fulfilled : one in Notts, where the gentlemen of the county 
scored 181 and 149, R. B. Earle 72 and 37, against Fores- 
ters' 132, and 92 for 2 wickets ; F. G. Inge scoring 43 and 
24, T, Rathfif 13 and 44, G. S. Homfray 28 and 18 (not 
out), F. Brandt 19 and 2 (not out). The last-mentioned 
took 10 wickets. C. A. Garnett and Ratliff also bowled. 

The other match, in Cheshire, against the 84th Regi- 



IV. G. a:s slows. 37 

ment, was won by F. F., who made 159, E. K. Hornby 
claiming 66, H. S. Armitstead 18. The officers only scored 
50 and 15, W. G. Armitstead with lobs taking 12 wickets. 
His bowling must have been just at this time somewhat 
deadly, for in our next match at Leamington, July 28, he 
took all the wickets of Deddington, including W. and C 
Fiennes, for 49, and as we had made 144, and Deddington 
had to follow their innings, the not-out man fell to him 
also without another run being obtained. T. Ratliff was 
our best scorer, making 61. 

Against a twenty-two of Sutton Coldfield, including W. 
K. Mott and H. S. Chinn, Foresters only scored y6, of 
which W. G. Armitstead claimed 43 (not out); but as Good- 
rich and Brandt disposed of the twenty-two for 32 and 65 
runs. Foresters won by 10 wickets. Goodrich annexed no 
less than 24 wickets, of which 11 were ciphers. Brandt 
disposed of 1 1. 

The two next days, Aug. 6 and 7, we should have beaten 
Lord Lichfield's team at Shugborough Park, but for rain, 
having got 174 to the home side's 64, and 32 for 5 wickets. 
Goodrich took 6 wickets, and made 30 runs, H. S. Armit- 
stead 45. 

Our Manchester matches, Aug. 13 to 15, were not quite 
so interesting as usual,— the original programme having 
fallen through. The Western, with two professionals, 
Wright and Rowland, were beaten rather easily in one 
innings by 17 runs, Foresters making 123, and getting 
their antagonists out for 74 and 32 ; Brandt, Goodrich, 
and Arkwright bowling. Homfray scored 33, Hornby 
and Goodrich each 24, Arkwright 14. On the other side 
played a Rossal schoolboy, F. W. Wright, soon to be one 
of our best recruits ; he was run out twice for small scores. 
The 84th Regiment tfcen had another essay, but only 
made 53 and 41, Goodrich's slows taking 8 of their wickets 
and W. Armitstead's 6; while Foresters claimed 117 and 



38 AN ETON BOWLER. 

199— W. Wingfield 55 and 13, T. Ratliff i and 51, W. G. 
Armitstead 4 and 30, A. F. Payne o and 35, T. C. Good- 
rich 15 and 14. H. Arkwright obtained 13 Forester 
wickets. 

On Aug. 20 and 21, at Warrington, a match v. Gentle- 
men of Cheshire was momentous, as introducing to our 
ranks another young player of consummate value in our 
after - engagements. I had observed that in a match, 
" Twenty - two of Walsall against the United England 
Eleven," an Eton boy, the Hon. C. G. Lyttelton, had kept 
one end up during the whole game, bowling 8 wickets, in 
which were included those of Griffith, Caffyn, Lockyer, 
Wisden, and Carpenter, and getting runs as well. I was 
fortunate enough to induce him to go down and qualify 
for our Club, in which I need hardly say his family name 
has become " a household word." Otherwise the match was 
not interesting, the Cheshire side only making 74 and 
40, and Foresters 119; of which W. G. Armitstead and 
Hornby, playing for their club against their county, made 
25 and 52 respectively. Goodrich took 11 wickets. 

A ludicrously ea§y victory over a Birmingham eleven on 
Sept. 24 concluded the season, the opponents only scoring 
25 runs, which Kempson doubled off his own bat, the total 
of Free Foresters being 204. 



39 



CHAPTER VI. 
1861. 

We had not enlarged our programme very much during 
the last two seasons, but we had felt our way. I began to 
see the dawn of my ambitious schemes on the horizon of 
practicability, and for the season of 1 861 was able to obtain 
a fixture at Lord's v. M. C. C, and against the United Eng- 
land eleven with sixteen at Manchester. We also found 
that the best Midland bowler, David Buchanan, was pre- 
pared to enter into friendly relations with our confederacy 
with a view of joining it — a matter most important to our 
future prospects. 

For a wonder Free Foresters lost their first match, May 
28, to Bullingdon, who played two bowlers, Shaw and 
Hinckley, rather too good for the F. F. batsmen ; in the 
first innings W. K. Mott 12, being the only double figure, 
and the total 37. Against this, with the aid of a good 59 
from J. A. Pepys, Bullingdon got 147, and F. F., with 5 
wickets down, responded with 82, Reay scoring 26 and 
Faber 19. They won their other game against B. N. C, 
making 98 and 149 to 123 and 96 from the College. C. A. 
Garnett took 11 wickets, W. K. Mott 7. A. H. Faber 31 
and 14, G. H. Phillips o and 46, H. E. Hulton 10 and 20, 
R. Brodie 11 and 18, C. A. Garnett 17 and 12, were the 
principal contributors to the Foresters' score. 

At Rugby, on June 3 and 4, "a rainy influence gave a 



40 



M. c. a 



predominance each day to batting over fielding and bowl- 
ing." The School got 132 and 134, with 5 wickets down. 
Her champions were C. Booth 63 and 19, E. Rutter 20 
and 24, C. Marshall 6 and 54 (not out), F. R. Evans 7 and 
26 (not out) ; Reay, Mott, and T. Ratliff took the wickets. 
For F. F. the last-named scored 34 and 26, W. G. Armit- 
stead 8 and 57, W. Ratliff 20 (not out) and 21, C. Inge 
15 and 14 (retired), T. O. Reay 9 and 31, W. K. Mott 25 
and 5. The totals were 148 and 193, against the bowling 
of Rutter, Hood, Evans, and Robertson. 

The match at Lord's was played on Thursday in Ascot 
week, with a gallery of perhaps fifty spectators, but the 
cricket was good, and the ' Field ' was kind enough to say, 
"on the part of the Foresters especially so." In this 
match the original constitution of the Society as a Mid- 
land Club suffered its first innovation, for F. G. Inge 
having met with an accident on the eve of the match, 
E. Hume, a Sussex man, played for him, and was there- 
upon elected a member. 



M. C. C. AND GEOUND. 



1ST INNINGS. 

Hon. C. Carnegie, run out 
Brampton, c Brodie, b Goodrich 
Wells, c W. Armitstead, b Goodrich 
Hearne, b Goodrich .... 
E. H. Ellis, c Wingfield, b Goodrich 
S. Taylor, c W. Armitstead, b Goodrich 
R. Forster, c Armitstead, b Brandt . 
Capt, Meux Smith, b Goodrich 
R. Monypenny, not out 
Capt. Moore, h w, b Goodrich . 
Rogers, b Goodrich .... 
byes 2 



Total 



SCORE. 

5 
3 

26 

17 
6 
o 

3 
6 

5 
o 

5 
2 

78 



2D INNINGS. SCORE. 

b Brandt .... 8 
St H. Armitstead, b Goodrich 22 
b Garnett .... 31 
c Wingfield, b Goodrich . o 
not out .... 25 
St H. Armitstead, b Goodrich o 
b Garnett .... 3 
st H. Armitstead, b Goodrich 10 
b Goodrich . . . o 
run out .... 7 
c Brodie, b Goodrich . 8 
byes 3, wide i, no-ball 2 6 



Total 



120 



FREE P^ORESTERS. 



E. K. Hornby, b Brampton 


11 






A. H. Faber, b Rogers 


. 23 


b Rogers . 


. 23 


W. G. Armitstead, b Rogers 


7 


b Brampton 


8 


W. Wingfield, c Taylor, b Rogers . 


. 40 


not out . 


8 


T. Ratliif, b Brampton . 


• IS 







LORD'S. 



41 



1ST INNINGS. 

E. Hume, c Wells, b Hearne 
C. A. Garnett, c and b Rogers 
H. S. Armitstead, b Brampton 

F. Brandt, b Brampton 
R. Brodie, not out 

T. C. Goodrich, b Rogers 
byes 5, leg-byes 4, wide i 



Total 



SCORE. 

5 

23 

2 

O 

8 

o 

10 

144 



2D INNINGS. 



not out 



bye I, leg-bye i . 
Total 



SCORE. 



IS 



56 



ANALYSIS OF BOWLING 

M. C. C. 

First Innings. 

Goodrich . 
Brandt 



Goodrich 

Brandt 

Garnett 



Brampton 
Wells 
Rogers 
Hearne 



Brampton 
Rogers 



B. R. 


M. 


w. 




112 50 


6 


8 




112 26 


15 


I 




Second Innitigs. 








152 61 


10 


6 




78 24 


9 


I 


2 no-balls 


69 29 


7 


2 


I wide 


Free Foresters. 








First Innings. 








172 46 


23 


4 




32 23 


... 






141 60 


13 


5 


I wide 


. . 28 5 


2 


I 




Second Innitigs. 








56 32 


4 


I 




55 22 


3 


I 





From July \y to 20 Foresters visited Manchester and 
Liverpool. The Western, at the former city, scored 253 
and no, Mr Chinn's slows — which one of the critics 
asserted he fielded himself at cover-point — being the 
feature of the game. He also made 49 (not out) out of 
the 199 total of Free Foresters — Capt. Blane 33, H. E. 
Hulton 35, and W. K. Mott 22, assisting. At Liverpool 
Mr Horner led off with 75 (not out) out of an innings of 
144, to which Foresters responded with 186 — Hornby 52, 
Price 38, Mott 19. Against this Liverpool only put on 89, 
Brandt bowling 89 balls for 49 runs and 6 wickets, while 



42 A CHANCE. 

Mott bowled ^S balls for 36 runs and 3 wickets ; so 
Foresters won with the loss of only two batsmen, W. J. 
Lyon being, not out, 20. I was scoring, as I often found 
myself doing, during the match at Liverpool, when I 
observed my colleague making mysterious dots and 
scratches over some of his figures. " What does that 
mean ? " I asked at length, my curiosity being thoroughly 
awakened. " A chance, sir," was the polite reply. I held 
my peace until a flukey hit some twenty yards beyond 
long-off was " starred " as before. "How could that be a 
chance?" said I, "when there was no man there." "Ah, 
but there might have been," was the rejoinder. 

At Leamington, July 30, Deddington scored 95 to 103 
from Free Foresters, who had made 81 for 4 wickets in 
their second innings — W. K. Mott 23 and 16, H. C. Willes 
20 and 24 (not out), C. G. Lyttelton 21 and 17, and M. T. 
Martin 13 and 14 (not out), distinguishing themselves 
against the bowling of E. Ramsay and T. E. Cobb. 

Two days later, at Southwell, 

the F. F. Administration, said ' Bell's Life,' met with a fierce 
Opposition on the part of the country gentlemen of Notts. The 
struggle was a severe one, the debate lasting till the evening of 
the second day ; but in spite of the exertions of the Opposition 
whipper-in the country gentlemen were beaten by the Ministry 
by a majority of 77. The ability of Mr Goodrich and Mr Brandt 
was very conspicuous during the debate, and though Mr Boden 
spoke with much emphasis for the country party, his voice carried 
little or no weight with it. It is hoped that the motion will be 
an annual one, and the Secretary for the Home Department has 
promised to grant a day for the purpose in the ensuing session of 
18.62, when he hopes that Mr Faber will again catch the Speaker's 
eye and occupy the House for a couple of hours. 

Aug. z and 2, Southwell, 

ist Innings. 2d Innings. Total. 
Free Foresters .... 112 120 232 

N. C. C. . . . . . 60 95 15s 

Noticeable scores — Faber 9 and 64, Chinn 37 and 4, 




O 
o 

u 

m 

r 

m . 

. c 

fe 2 

to 



-Ho 

.o U 



4 ^ 



SALOPIAN STANZAS. 43 

Brandt 29 and 3, W. G. Armitstead 4 and 15, R. T. Whit- 
tington 4 and 13. Goodrich took 7 wickets, Brandt 8. 

At Sutton Coldfield, on Aug. 6, a local twenty, including 
a famous old University cricketer, Herbert Peel, were dis- 
posed of by Goodrich (12 wickets) and Brandt (5) for 38 
runs ; but Foresters, who had only eight men to go in, 
found Peel's bowling unexpectedly puzzling, and but for a 
good innings of 80 (not out) from C. A. Garnett, who gave 
a splendid object lesson on the art of leg-hitting, would 
scarcely have won. Fourteen Sutton wickets had fallen 
in the second innings for 64^9 to Goodrich and 4 to 
Brandt, G. D. Perkins 14, the only double figure. 

An easy victory was obtained on Aug. 10 at Leam- 
ington, F. F. scoring 217, of which T. Ratliff put on 62, 
R. Brodie 29, A. H. Faber and Reginald Garnett 26 each, 
against 6j from Leamington. 

On the 1 2th and 13th Aug., 

" With stern resolve, furled flag, and muffled drum, 
To Severn's shores the ' nomad Woodmen ' come, 
And by that stream where erst their colours dipped, 
Their quondam conquerors they soundly whipped." 

This was the Forester retort to a local poet who had cele- 
brated, their defeat at Shrewsbury the year before : — 

" Fling the green flag upon the breeze, and blazon far and wide 
The legend of the Foresters — ' United though Untied.' 
Ah me ! the banner's silken fold is drooping on the plain, 
In the glory of its coming it returneth not again." 

In fact, Free Foresters having made a good beginning 
with 181 — 45 from Faber, 24 apiece from C. G. Lyttelton 
and H. S. Armitstead, and 21 apiece from Brodie and 
Fiennes — by the aid of Brandt,- Fiennes, and Lyttelton, 
prevented the two essays of Salop from equalling their 
single total, getting them out for 96 and 64. 

At Ludlow, on the two days following, the game was 



44 HONORARY MEMBERS. 

drawn in favour of the local eleven, who had lost only 
4 wickets, and were 31 runs behind — H. S. Armitstead 
and W. Fiennes were playing for Ludlow, who scored 
224. Foresters 255. 

The interest in such contests as the last mentioned is 
ephemeral ; but the Club was now to test by experience 
the practicability of an attempt not at that time supposed 
to be within the powers of any amateur clubs except the 
Universities — to meet without paid bowlers one of the 
England elevens. By the kind offices of our old friends, 
the Western Club, Manchester, whose secretary, Mr 
Hampson, became one of our first honorary associates, 
we were enabled to make satisfactory arrangements for 
bringing our experiment to a decision at Eccles on the 
ground of the Club, of which for the nonce we were 
installed as honorary members, enabling us to order such 
refreshments as we required, and to use the pavilion ; but 
as such an arrangement was not possible with the players' 
eleven, a room was assigned to them, and their refresh- 
ments were franked. I could not help being diverted, 
when on the first morning Cafifyn came up to the bar for 
a glass of beer, and asked, " What's to pay ? " *' Nothing, 
sir," replied the barmaid. " Thank ye, miss," was the 
prompt reply ; " then I'll take another ! " The United 
played strong, as Hayward, the great A. E. E. batsman, 
was included in their eleven, as was an excellent Man- 
chester amateur, Mr Bousfield. 

Some members of the Free Forester team being com- 
pelled at the last moment to absent themselves, in the 
place of two of them we obtained the services of a brace 
of clever substitutes, Messrs E. Rowley and V. K. 
Armitage. Beginning rather late the first day, Good- 
rich obtained 3 wickets and Buchanan i for 23 runs, 
Hayward and Wisden took up the score to 85 for the 
fifth wicket, and the former player was in with Mortlock 



U. E. E. 45 

at the call of time — 123 runs being registered for 7 
wickets. The amusing incident of the day was that 
Bell, a Cambridge pro., invented what the Manchester 
cricket reporter called a " fancy stroke " to Goodrich, 
running out and trying to lift his ball over the wicket. 
He missed it, however, and it took his bails. On the 
second day, Goodrich caught and bowled Hayward for 
65, and the innings totalled 163. Atkinson, a Yorkshire 
bowler, was particularly deadly, and but for a timely 
stand of W. G. Armitstead, who got 30 by some hard 
drives and really fine cuts, Foresters would have figured 
badly; as it was, they just failed to score 100. It is 
worth a mention that Armitstead complained that he 
could not see Atkinson's hand against the body of the 
umpire ; and that functionary was in consequence in- 
vested with a white garment, — a thing which I at least 
for one had never seen before. In the second inningrs 
of the United, Buchanan's luck was crushing, as he did 
not get a single wicket, though bowling admirably. The 
eleven were not out until the third morning, and the 
question was whether time would allow them to win. 
In fact, at luncheon-time, with 4 Forester wickets down 
for 40 runs, it looked very like a draw ; but the United 
eleven thought that they might make a win of it, and 
when Atkinson changed ends more life was infused into 
the game. Faber and Inge, H. S. Armitstead and Colley, 
all scored freely, and finally, at little more than five 
minutes to time, Harry Willes and V. K. Armitage ran 
the winning run. 

UNITED. 

1ST INNINGS. SCORE. 2D INNINGS. SCORE. 

Caffyn, b Goodrich lo b Goodrich ... 12 

Griffith, c and b Goodrich . ..3c Wingfield, b Goodrich . o 

E. Stephenson, st Armitstead, b Buchanan 5 b Goodrich ... 13 

Hayward, c and b Goodrich . . . 65 c Wingfield, b Fiennes . 33 

Carpenter, b Goodrich . . . . i b Goodrich ... 18 

Wisden, c Griffith, b Goodrich . . . 23 c Brandt, b Fiennes . 13 



46 



MANCHESTER. 



1ST INNINGS. 



Bell, b Goodrich .... 
E. J. Bousfield, c Colley, b Buchanan 
Mortlock, c Fiennes, b Buchanan 
Lillywhite, not out . * . . 
Atkinson, hit wicket, b Goodrich 
byes 6, wides 3, leg-byes 2 

Total 



>RE. 2D INNINGS. S( 

3 St Armitstead, b Goodrich 

17 not out 

23 run out . 

2 c Rowley, b Goodrich 

o c and b Goodrich 
II leg- byes 

163 Total 



FORESTERS. 



J. R. Colley, b Atkinson . 

F. Price, c Bousfield, b Atkinson 

F. G. Inge, c Hayward, b Caffyn 

A. H. Faber, b Atkinson . 

W. G. Armitstead, c Atkinson, b Wisden 

W. Wingfield, c and b Atkinson 

H. S. Armitstead, c Carpenter, b Atkinson 

E. Rowley, c Bousfield, b Wisden 
D. Buchanan, b Atkinspn . 

Hon. W. Fiennes, c Wisden, b Atkinson 
H. C. Willes, b Wisden . 

F. Brandt, b Atkinson 

H. S. Chinn, c Wisden, b Atkinson . 
T. C. Goodrich, b Wisden 
A. H. Smith Barry, not out 
V. K. Armitage, c Stephenson, b Wisden 
leg-byes 



Total 



6 
4 

30 
9 
2 

II 
I 

4 
2 

4 
o 
o 
2 

7 
2 

99 



b Atkinson 

b Griffith . 

run out . 

c Stephenson, b Caffyn 

b Atkinson 

b Atkinson 

b Atkinson 

c Carpenter, b Wisden 

c Carpenter, b Wisden 
not out . 
b Atkinson 



b Atkinson 

not out .... 

byes 6, leg-byes 4, wides 4 



23 

o 

46 

39 
o 

14 

23 

3 

o 
4 



Total 



o 

9 

14 

177 



ANALYSIS OF BOWLING. 
United. 





First Innings. 
B. R. 


M. 


w. 


WIDES 


Buchanan . . 
Goodrich . 
Inge 
Brandt . 


240 59 

244 82 

. . 28 4 

32 7 

Second Innings. 


31 
24 

3 
4 


3 
7 


2 

I 


Buchanan 
Goodrich . 
Fiennes . 


. . 140 36 

172 62 

28 12 

Foresters. 
First Innings. 


16 

18 

4 


7 
2 




Atkinson . 
Caffyn . 
Wisden . 


168 49 

68 22 

100 26 


20 

8 

16 


9 

I 
4 


- 



X 





Hon. C. Lyttelton. 



H. H. Gillett. 



n 


If arf«S 




--q 


II 


4| 






feLL^- ^ : 


^^IhH 


r— 






■ 


^'*^|4 


m^ 


Pv\ 




w 


n 


^,,-_^^ 


1 




B. B. Cooper. 



F. R. Evans. 



BROUGHTON. 








Second Inm 


ngs. 








B. 


R. 


M. 


w. 


WIDES 


244 


5X 


36 


6 




28 


16 


I 


I 


... 


. 148 


45 


IS 


2 


... 


108 


22 


13 


I 


4 


40 


17 


3 






20 


II 


I 




... 



47 



Atkinson . 
Caffyn . 
Wisden . 
Griffiths . 
Hayward 
Carpenter 



Close and interesting as this match was, it was followed 
by a finish more sensational, and a match more fluctuating 
in its progress. We played on the 29th and 30th the 
Broughton Club, the only Manchester eleven we had not 
beaten, reputed to be the strongest of the three Man- 
chester teams. It was a bowler's wicket, and they got 
F. F. out for 89, leading by 20 runs when their turn came. 
Our second innings produced 127 (the fifth wicket having 
fallen for 103) ; thus Broughton went in for 107 to win. 
Buchanan began splendidly ; 5 wickets fell to him and i 
to Goodrich for 44 runs, and then E. Rowley (who scored 
48 and 60 not out) broke the bowling, and Brandt having 
been disabled the day before, we had no change to fall 
back upon but H. S. Armitstead, who did us yeoman's 
service, sending up 24 balls for 4 runs, and enabling the 
original bowlers to come on again. At 97 Goodrich took 
the seventh wicket, the next fell for the same score, and 
then the ninth man went in determined to do or die. I 
cannot recall his name, but I see him yet, a huge slogger, 
tucking up his sleeves as he went to the wicket. Goodrich 
gave him a ball to hit, up it went straight into Wing- 
field's hands — who dropped it. The thunder of suppressed 
enthusiasm burst forth from every quarter of the ground, 
and the few backers of the Foresters changed colour and 
drew a long breath. Goodrich never moved a muscle. He 
gave him the same ball, and it went to the same place, but 
with a different result, for Wingfield held it this time. The 
last man was a slow bowler, and had rather ill - treated 
Buchanan, who had his revenge by bowling him neck and 



48 SEVENTIETH MATCH. 

heels. So Foresters won by 6. A. H. Faber 34 and 28, 
F. G. Inge 7 and 30, W. Wingfield 17 and 10, T. C. Good- 
rich 4 and 18, made most runs. 

And in their last match with Rugby School they won 
again with small margin of time. It was played on Sept. 
9 and 10, F. F. getting 160 runs in the first innings, of 
which T. Ratliff contributed 70. The School got 86, and 
disposed of F. F. for 59 runs only, and then succumbed for 
6Z, — Goodrich (who took 9 wickets), Buchanan, and Mott 
being the F. F. bowlers. B. B. Cooper with 42 and 10 (not 
out) championed the School. I shall never forget the not- 
out innings, played for time with a patience and dexterity 
which would have been remarkable in a veteran. He went 
in second or third wicket down, and was in while Martin 
made 35 and Davenport ii. He soon became one of 
our most reliable batsmen. 

This was the seventieth match played by Free Fores- 
ters, who felt themselves not unworthy to be classed with 
the "wandering tribes represented by I Zingari, whose 
amateur performances in the evening are equal to their 
prowess in the morning ; the Perambulators, whose motto 
is * Floreant Vehicula ' ; the Ramblers, who are never with- 
out * Spectators ' ; the Toxophilites, who are as expert at 
the wicket as they are at the bull's-eye, and who quiver not 
before their opponents ; the Free Foresters, who, like Robin 
Hood and his merry men of old, bear off the palm for skill, 
pluck, and determination ; the Suffolk Borderers," &c.^ 

^ Recreations of a Sportsman, Lord Wm. Lennox, ii. 39. 



49 



CHAPTER VII. 
1862. 

Free Foresters began their season as usual at Oxford, 
on May 27, getting Bullingdon out for 52, — Mott, Reay^ 
and W. G. Armitstead bowling ; and the last-named with 37 
aiding H. Boden 39, and J. B. Story 27, in the compilation 
of a score of 132, with 6 wickets to fall. Brasenose on the 
two next days made a draw. F. F. scored 168 and 179 — 
W. G. Armitstead 62 and 42, C. A. Garnett 55 and 3, A. 
H. Faber i and 46, &c. — to 133 from the College. 

A third match at a village called Buckland, on a ground 
full of molehills, and in rain which, as Hood once said, 
" came from watering-pots with the rose off," was attempted 
on May 30, and part of an innings was got through, For- 
esters' score being 78, of which 39 were extras, 24 being 
wides from Colonel Goodlake, fast underhand. W. G. 
Armitstead scored 16. Four wickets of the Kingston 
eleven scored 27, Lord Turnour 12 (not out). 

There was yet more rain at Rugby, June 3 and 4, where 
the boys made a fine innings of 248 — Robertson 70, Case 
53, Cooper 35, Vandermeulen 27 ; and 6 Forester wickets 
were down for 88, T. Ratlifif 38. And although a month 
had elapsed before their next engagement, the vengeful 
clerk of the weather still dogged their steps. It was at 
Southgate — the first time F. F. had the pleasure of visiting 
a ground sacred to Middlesex cricket, where they have 

D 



50 APPRECIATION. 

played many a good match since ; and with Hearne IJ, E. 
Vyse 31, and C. Waller 28, the home team compiled 152 
against 35, which time and weather only allowed F. F. to 
score for the loss of 4 wickets. Mott's performance with 
the ball was unusually good — 114 balls for 30 runs and 5 
wickets ; Goodrich bowled '^'^ balls for 50 runs and 2 
wickets, and Buchanan 80 for 42 runs and i wicket, Brandt 
also securing one. Mott always was a valuable bowler, 
though in general we used to utilise his services as a 
change for a few overs only. He took a remarkably long 
run, and we used to think soon tired. He rather resented 
this estimate of his powers, and I well remember, when he 
went to a curacy in Devonshire, asking him how he was 
getting on. " Splendidly," was his reply ; " I am appreci- 
ated at last. They flock to hear me preach, and put me 
on first to bowl for the county." 

A weak team of Free Foresters had to succumb in one 
innings on July 8 to the School at Weybridge, to which 
Goodrich had transferred his services. The School got 
128 — W. C. Tabor 60; and Goodrich took 15 wickets of 
Foresters, who only made 59 and 43. 

The following days saw Free Foresters at the Oval to 
play a team of Gentlemen of Surrey, supplemented by two 
ground men, Humphrey and Heartfield. The feature of 
the match was W. G. Armitstead's admirably got score of 
116; but our new recruit, B. B. Cooper, took 6 wickets with 
his slows, and C. G. Lyttelton, though failing to add to the 
score, disposed of as many at wicket. 

FREE FORESTERS. 

1ST INNINGS. SCORE. 

A. H. Faber, c Little, b Humphrey 2 

W. G. Armitstead, b Waller 116 

C. G. Lyttelton, b Humphrey o 

B. B. Cooper, b Heartfield 64 

F. Watson, c Vyse, b Heartfield 48 

T. Ratliff, c Dawson, b Waller 14 



THE OVAL, 



51 



1ST INNINGS. 

T. O. Reay, c Burnett, b Heartfield . 
S. Linton, c Hemming, b Heartfield . 
H. H. Gillett, not out ... 

W. K. Mott, c Humphrey, b Heartfield 
D. Buchanan, run out 
byes 3, leg-byes 6, wides 5 



Total 



SCORE, 

9 

I 

12 

13 
2 

14 

295 



GENTLEMEN OF SURREY CLUB. 



1ST INNINGS. 

T. Humphrey, c Cooper, b Buchanan 
C. C. Dawson, c Mott, b Buchanan 
J. D. Burnett, c Buchanan, b Reay 
E. Vyse, st Lyttelton, b Reay 
W. Little, c Faber, b Reay 
C. Waller, b Buchanan 
G. M. Kennedy, b Buchanan 
E. Smith, c and b Buchanan 
P. Beaver, not out 
A. Hemming, c and b Cooper 
J. Heartfield, 1 b w, b Buchanan 
wides 

Total 



SCORE. 2D INNINGS, 

2 St Lyttelton, b Cooper 

c and b Cooper 

2 b Buchanan 
19 St Lyttelton, b Cooper 
15 b Buchanan 

1 not out 
7 c Lyttelton, b Reay 

II St Lyttelton, b Cooper 

22 b Buchanan 

5 c Lyttelton, b Cooper 

4 c Lyttelton, b Buchanan 

3 byes 2, leg-byes 2 . 

91 Total 



7 

5 
8 

I 
I 

55 

20 

8 

3 
8 

5 
4 

125 



ANALYSIS OF BOWLING. 





Free Foresters. 










First Inning. 


r. 










B. 


r. 


M. 


w. 


wides 


Humphrey 


. . . 84 


55 


4 


2 


... 


Heartfield 


240 


136 


12 


5 


I 


Little 


80 


29 


8 






Waller . 


72 


26 


3 


2 


3 


Kennedy . 


20 


18 


... 


... 


... 


Hemming 


32 

Surrey. 
First Inning. 


17 

r. 


2 




I 


Buchanan 


113 


SO 


10 


5 


I 


Reay 


. . . 84 


34 


4 


4 


2 


Cooper . 


16 


4 




I 


•" 




Second Innings. 








Buchanan 


92 


55 


6 


4 




Reay 


20 


12 




I 




Cooper . 


80 


40 


I 


5 




Mott 


28 


10 


3 




... 


Gillett . 


20 


4 


3 


... 


... 



52 A TIE. 

In the same week, July 12, the Club made their second 
tie match, Wimbledon being the locality. It was essen- 
tially a bowlers' day. B. B. Cooper took 16 Wimbledon 
wickets and won his hat, the home side only reaching the 
totals of 41 and 91. But Foresters did no better ; they 
got 54 in the first innings, and Walter Coyney was run 
out by a substitute when attempting the winning-notch. 
Oliver captured 12 Forester wickets, those who got into 
double figures being Faber, Wingfield, W. G. Armitstead, 
and Pocklington (twice). 

A fortnight later our most important engagement came 
off at Leamington, where we met the old All England 
eleven with sixteen ; the ground being the one owned 
by Parr and Wisden. Imagine the consternation of the 
writer when at his breakfast-table that morning he received 
a missive from Buchanan announcing that, in consequence 
of what was once called in the letter of a waiting-gentle- 
woman a dishion to his family, he could not come to play. 
Fortunately Wingfield Fiennes was accessible, and sup- 
plied the vacancy. The score will give a good idea of the 
game, which nevertheless abounded in incident from com- 
mencement to close. The eleven included Capt. F. Mar- 
shall, and was as formidable a batting team as could be 
found : 95 for 2 wickets was the score at dinner-time, and 
the England eleven were out for 227, and had got 2 
Forester wickets for 13 at the end of the day. Faber, 
however, was treated very leniently at wicket by H. H. 
Stephenson, and Wingfield played excellent cricket, carry- 
ing out his bat for 20, having W. Fiennes in with him for a 
rattling 31, while he simply defended his stumps. This 
innings produced 218, and the Free Foresters had got five 
of the A. E. E. out for 92 at the conclusion of the second 
day's play. On Saturday George Parr had to acknowledge 
that T. O. Reay was his master, as the second ball that 



A. E. E. 53 

bowler gave him took his wicket, as the first ball from the 
same quarter had done in the first innings. When the 
eleven were out, at 12.45, for 134, matters began to get 
interesting, and the A. E. E. looked like winning, as at 
luncheon-time 5 wickets had gone for 31 runs; nor did 7 
for 60 look much better. Hornby and Mordaunt, Evans 
and Reay, however, played steadily, and byes, the ground 
not being quite perfect, helped the score. It was just 
when Evans went in that a ball, hit to leg, was fielded by 
a large dog, who calmly lay down with the ball between 
his paws, and growled at George Parr, who was in pursuit 
of it. Parr halted and expostulated, but the dog growled 
ominously, and the owner had to be found to call him 
off before the hit could be fielded. When Reay was out, 
6 runs were required to win, and Mott went in. " I think 
we shall win now," observed Jackson, "for Mr Goodrich is 
tired out, and Mr Mott 'ad 'is 'it first innings." However, 
Mott sent a ball from Tarrant about two feet out of Capt. 
Marshall's reach, Evans made a single, Jackson bowled a 
wide, a tie, and Mott triumphantly finished the match 
with a stroke for 2. 

ALL ENGLAND. 

1ST INNINGS. SCORE. 2D INNINGS. SCORE. 

Tarrant, run out 17 1 b w, b Goodrich . 

Caesar, c W. Armitstead, b Goodrich . 10 c Evans, b Goodrich . 23 

Anderson, run out 51 c Wingfield, b Goodrich . 21 

Hayward, c H. Armitstead, b Goodrich . 26 b Goodrich ... 2 

Parr, b Reay 33 b Reay .... 12 

H. H. Stephenson, c W. Armitstead, b Inge 24 c and b Goodrich . . 18 

Clarke, c Mordaunt, b Goodrich . . o c Ratliff, b Goodrich . o 

Capt. Marshall, b Reay . . . . 23 c H. Armitstead, b Good 

rich 

Jackson, 1 b w, b Evans . . . . 22 c Reay, b Fiennes . 

R. C. Tinley, c Evans, b Goodrich . . i not out ... 

Wootton, not out 13 st H. Armitstead, b Reay 

byes 5, leg-bye i, wide i . . . 7 leg-bye i, wides 3 

Total . 227 Total 



9 
18 

I 
18 
4 

134 



54 



MOTT NOT OUT. 



FREE FORESTERS. 



1ST INNINGS. 

W. G. Armitstead, b Jackson . 
B. B. Cooper, b Jackson . 

E, K. Hornby, b Jackson . 

F. R. Price, b Jackson 
A. H. Faber, b Jackson 
F. G. Inge, b Jackson 
J. M. Mordaunt, b Wootton 
W. J. Lyon, b Tarrant 
H. S. Armitstead, st Stephenson, b Tinley 
W. Wingfield, not out 
T. Reay, c Stephenson, b Hay ward 
T. Rathff, b Hayward 
F. Evans, 1 b w, b Hayward 
W. K. Mott, b Hayward . 
Hon. W. Fiennes, b Wootton . . 
T. C. Goodrich, c Stephenson, b Wootton 

byes 19, leg-byes 6 . 

Total 



SCORE. 


2D INNINGS. SCORE. 


9 


c Wootton, b Jackson 


10 


2 


b Jackson 


I 





b Tinley . 


17 


2 


b Wootton 


5 


• 79 


c Wootton, b Jackson 


6 


3 


c Wootton, b Jackson 





10 


c and b Tinley . 


16 


2 


c Wootton, b Tinley 


16 


y 9 


b Tinley . 


3 


20 


b Wootton 


I 


5 


c Tarrant, b Jackson 


14 


12 


b Tinley . 





3 


not out . 


15 


6 


not out . 


5 


. 31 


c Marshall, b Wootton 


12 


• 25 


byes 19, leg-byes 4, wide 


I 24 


. 218 


Total 


. 145 



ANALYSIS OF BOWLING. 

All England. 

First Innings. 

B. R. 

Goodrich 240 99 

Mott . . . . . .68 35 

Evans ..... 100 36 

Inge 16 3 

Fiennes 44 25 

Reay 52 17 

Second Innings. 

Goodrich 193 51 

Mott 40 13 

Evans ..... 36 7 

Inge . . . . . . 4 

Fiennes ..... 12 9 

Reay ...... 104 49 

H. S. Armitstead ... 4 i 



M. 


w. 


IVIDI 


19 


4 




4 


I 


I 


7 






1 


I 




2 


... 




3 


2 




14 


7 




6 






6 




... 


I 


... 


... 



Free Foresters. 

First Innings. 

Wootton 116 

Jackson 220 

Tinley 72 

Tarrant 52 

Hayward 88 



31 


12 


3 


68 


25 


6 


26 


8 


I 


23 


4 


I 


45 


6 


4 



/ Z. 55 

Second Innings. 

B. R. M. W. WIDES. 

Wootton 208 34 35 3 

Jackson 141 48 15 5 

Tinley 88 33 7 5 i 

Tarrant 28 6 4 

On Monday, Aug. 4 — Sunday fortunately being a day of 
rest after the excitement of the great win of Saturday — 
the annual match with twenty-two of Sutton took place. 
The local men were supplemented by several good 
cricketers, as the names of Chinn, Mott, Inge, and 
Coyney prove; but Goodrich took 15 of their wickets, 
and they were all out for 70; against which F. F. made 
149 — F. G. Inge 50, B. B. Cooper 27 (not out), W. J. 
Lyon 23. In the second innings, Goodrich not bowling, 
the twenty-two made 104. 

The next day, by invitation of Lord Aylesford, Free 
Foresters met I Zingari again on his Lordship's ground 
at Packington. " Sore and hard I Z. struggled for victory, 
but fortune went for their opponents ; in their three- 
coloured robe of virtue they were fain to enwrap them- 
selves, to look pleasant, and to pay up," said * Bell's Life.* 
"Mr W. G. Armitstead's performance in the second 
innings was artistic, and displayed an accurate knowledge 
of the regulation height as at present insisted on at the 
Horse Guards : the fielding of the Forest brethren was 
superb ; and to their excellence in that department, com- 
bined with Goodrich's mathematical precision of delivery, 
must the large margin of their victory be ascribed." 

I ZINGARI. 

1ST INNINGS. SCORE. 2D INNINGS. SCORE. 

R. Marsham, c W. G. Armitstead, b 

Goodrich o 1 b w, b Reay . . . ii 

C. D. Marsham, c W. G. Armitstead, b 

Reay o c Price, b Reay . . 6 

G. R. Johnson, c Price, b Reay . . 3 c Ratliff, b Goodrich . 29 



56 



PACKINGTON. 



1ST INNINGS. 



SCORE. 



R, A. Mitchell, c Mott, b Reay 



R. Fitzgerald, b Reay .... 

E. Drake, c Cooper, b Reay 

Hon. S. Ponsonby, c Wingfield, b Goodrich 

Capt. F. Marshall, c Faber, b Goodrich . 
H. Fellows, c Inge, b Goodrich 
E. Tredcroft, not out .... 
Hon. W. Harbord, c Reay, b Goodrich . 
byes I, wides 2 



2D INNINGS. 






Total 



43 st H. S. Armitstead, b 

Goodrich 
12 c Inge, b Mott . 
II b Goodrich 

3 St H. S. Armitstead, 
Goodrich 

5 run out . 

3 run out . 

I c Ratliff, b Goodrich 

o not out 

3 leg-bye i 

84 Total 



83 



FREE FORESTERS. 

W. G. Armitstead, c Mitchell, b C. D. 

Marsham 18 not out 

F. R. Price, st Mitchell, b Drake . . o 
H. S. Armitstead, c Fellows, b C. D. 

Marsham 5 

A. H, Faber, b C. D. [Marsham . . 16 st Mitchell, b Drake 
F. G. Inge, b Drake 17 not out . 

W. Wingfield, c Mitchell, b C. D. Marsham 3 st Mitchell, b Drake 

B. B. Cooper, not out . . . . 9 b C. D. Marsham . 
T. O. Reay, c Tredcroft, b Drake . . 2 

T. Ratliff, st Fellows, b Drake . . . o 
W. K. Mott, b C. D. Marsham . . o 

T. C. Goodrich, c. Fellows, b C. D. 

Marsham o 

bye I, leg-bye i, wides 2 ... 4 byes 2, leg-bye i, wide 

Total . 74 Total 



50 



95 



ANALYSIS OF BOWLING. 

I ZiNGARI. 
First Innings. 

B. R. 

Goodrich 77 42 

Reay 76 39 

Second Innings. 

Goodrich 115 39 

Reay 68 38 

Mott 44 6 



W. WIDES. 
5 

5 2 



i ^ ^B^^BBHBp|H^^^^^^^^^^ 


IiJmI^Pk 






'^^^■Ijl^llf^.^ 


^g 




?i€M-^iJ 


^&' -^ 


2 




MJ '.1. cSJ 


i' Jl 


■i 


Li|^||IM[|^^ 


1 


^.s . ; ,r - 


^l^^^bL ^ 




^^*T,*. 


^Mkj^ 


I^^^H^^^i«rl^ 


1 




^ '^iaSjif ^^^^B^ '<S3B|1 / ^ i " " , '"IW^ 


b 


L_:^H 






1 


|iiiii,.,iiri^ 


M 


^^^iif^ 



H ,5 



FIVE WICKETS RUNNING. 57 





Free Foresters, 








First Innings. 








B. 


R. 


M. 


C. D. Marsham . 
E. Drake . 
H. Fellows 


. 88 
. 104 
. 16 

Second Innings. 


16 

47 
8 


12 
6 


C. D. Marsham . 
E. Drake . 
R. A. Mitchell . 
C. R. Johnson . 


. 108 

. 81 

12 

. 16 


47 

34 

5 

4 


8 

7 

2 
I 



W. WIDES. 



The " regulation height " mentioned above refers to the 
fact that Capt. Marshall just failed to reach a sharp cut 
of Armitstead's which got up surprisingly. Mott, who 
obtained one wicket in the second innings, wanted to claim 
another, — a hard hit of Fellows from him having stuck 
between two of the park pales, whence it was extracted by- 
Price, who smartly returned it, and the batsman was run 
out, Mott insisting that as it had not touched the ground it 
was a catch from his bowling. 

The match being over early the second day, a scratch 
game was got up, in which Goodrich, with five consecutive 
balls, took the wickets of Drake, Faber, Mitchell, Tred- 
croft, and Harbord. 

On August 7 Foresters got, at Sutton Coldfield, 174 
against a local team, hight " Warwickshire Knickerbockers," 
Faber improving his average by making 61 (not out). 
Although there were among the Knickers some pretty 
good players, Goodrich got 10 wickets for 83 runs. 

At Leamington on the 14th they met Deddington, 
against whom they scored 85 — T. O. Reay 29 — and then 
got them out for 48. In a second innings F. F. made 136 
— F. R. Evans 41, A. E. Seymour 27, &c.; and one Ded- 
dington wicket was down for 33, T. E. Cobb 24 (not out). 
Reay, Brandt, and Evans bowled for F. F. 



58 



CHELFORD. 



Foresters were not, however, to conclude this briUiant 
season without experiencing some of the rough as well as 
the smooth gales of fortune. At Chelford, in a return 
match with Surrey Club, they sustained a virtual defeat 
on Aug. 21 and 22, caused by bad fielding on their part, 
and a still greater mishap in an accident which crippled 
Mr Goodrich's right hand. 

FREE FORESTERS. 



1ST INNINGS. 

W. G. Armitstead, b Walker . 
F. R. Evans, c Vyse, b Miller . 

E. K. Hornby, st Howsin, b Walker 
H. S. Armitstead, c Walker, b Miller 
W. Wingfield, b Wilkinson 
T. Ratliff, b Wilkinson . 
T. O. Reay, c Belhouse, b Miller 
A. H. Smith Barry, c Walker, b Wilkinson 

F. Brandt, c Wilkinson, b Miller 
D. Buchanan, not out 
T. C. Goodrich, c Dowson, b Walker 

-byes 12, leg-byes 3 ... 



SCORE. 


2D INNINGS. SCORE. 


7 


c Howsin, b Walker 


6 


. 14 


c Tomkinson, b Miller 


3 





c Vyse, b Miller 


6 


• 33 


c and b Miller . 


15 


• 45 


c Whittaker, b Miller 


7 


20 


c Miller, b Walker . 


24 


3 


b Walker . 


II 


Dn I 


b Miller . 


I 


. 14 


Whittaker, b Walker 


8 


12 


b Walker . 


I 


4 


not out . 





• 15 


byes 3, leg-bye i . 


4 



Total 



168 



Total 



86 



GENTLEMEN OF SURREY CLUB. 



A. J. Wilkinson, st H. S. Armitstead, b 

Goodrich 

H. Howsin, c Goodrich, b Reay 
J. Tomkinson, b Evans 

E. Dowson, c Buchanan, b Reay 
A. Whittaker, c Goodrich, b Buchanan 
V. E. Walker, c and b Evans 

F. P. Miller, b Evans 
J. D. Burnett, run out 
E. Vyse, c Evans, b Reay 
E. S. Hartnell, b Buchanan 
T. T. Bellhouse, not out . 

byes 9, leg-byes 3 . 



14 

17 

9 

II 

31 
42 

o 
10 

2 

3 
6 



c H. S. Armitstead, b Reay 10 
st H. S. Armitstead, b Reay 33 



not out 
leg-byes 2 



Total 



T^Sl 



Total 



54 





DIAMONDS. 










ANALYSIS OF BOWLING. 








Surrey. 










First Innings. 










o. 


R. 


M, 


vv. 


Goodrich 
Buchanan 
Reay . 
Evans . 
Rathff . 


• • -39 

. 24 

20 

II 

2 

Second Innings. 


65 
32 
26 
17 

5 


I 
8 
7 
3 


I 
2 
3 
3 




0. 


R. 


M. 


w. 


Goodrich 
Buchanan 
Reay . 
Evans . 
RatHff . 


6 
3 
II 
8 
I 


8 

IT 

16 
13 

5 


I 
I 

5 
4 


2 



59 



In their match with the Western Club at Manchester 
they lost, though not discreditably, having only eight 
effectives. The Club went in first, and got 202, to which 
F. R, by the aid of three good and true emergencies, re- 
sponded with 207 — J. Mordaunt making 37, H. E. Hulton 
32, A. E. Seymour 34, W. Coyney 24, &c. The Western 
then made 103, and got F. F. out for 86^ nobody making a 
stand save Mr Turner, a substitute. 

And although they saved their next match on Sept. 9 and 
10 at Nottingham against the Diamonds, the latter, as the 
reporter put it, " sparkled at the expense of the Foresters 
pretty considerably." A word must be said in explanation 
of the position of this Club. It was the outcome of the 
dissatisfaction with which certain fathers of cricket in the 
counties of Nottingham, Leicester, and Derby viewed the 
assumption by residents in the western shires of the lead 
in Midland cricket. They sneered at the Foresters, until 
the matches at Lord's and Manchester in 1 861 rendered 
that course of action no longer possible, and then with 
some pomp announced the advent of a central county club 



6o WHATS IN A NAME? 

to be called the Midland Harlequins. This was a sad mis- 
nomer, for the Oxford Harlequins had no intention of 
allowing their well-known title to be wrested from them. 
A humorous letter appeared in ' Bell's Life,' sarcastically- 
informing the sponsors of the new organisation that their 
proposed name was pre-engaged, and suggesting that if 
they must resort to pantomime for their nomenclature, 
there were other male characters whose designation would 
suit them. The force of the remark was too obvious, and 
the unattached name of Diamonds was substituted. But 
as the letter was transparently the production of a well- 
known cricketer almost as much identified with Free 
Foresters as with Harlequins, it became an open secret 
that the great desire of the new club was to meet and van- 
quish those whom they chose to dub their rivals. This 
indeed they did ; for going in first, W. Bury played a fault- 
less innings of 121, well supported by H. S. Wright and 
A. W. Daniel who got 44 each, &c., &c. — total 315. A 
downpour of rain, which descended immediately after 
stumps were drawn, and continued all night, made the 
batsman's task next day a difficult one. Foresters had to 
follow on, and finally drew the match, being still 45 runs 
behind with 4 wickets down — H. S. Armitstead 46 and 54, 
A. H. Faber 38 and 41, and T. O. Reay 24, being the chief 
contributors. A square-leg hit of Armitstead's off Daniel 
was the sensation of the day. Mitchell, for the Diamonds, 
took 7 wickets. Although this match was a disappoint- 
ment at the moment, the upshot was most satisfactory. 
The after- doings of the Diamonds I am not able to 
report ; but Mitchell, Daniel, and others who then wore their 
colours, became shortly constant and vigorous supporters 
of Free Foresters. 

The last match of this eventful season was also drawn, 
but much in favour of Foresters, who had only 7 runs to 
get and 6 wickets to fall. It was at Rugby, against the 



FABEWS ALPHABET. 6i 

School, on Sept. 22 and 23. The best scores were — for the 
School, Case 41 and 27, Robertson 23 and 38, Hood 20 
and 21 ; for Foresters, O. Mordaunt 50 and 6, A. E. Sey- 
mour 17 and 26 (not out), M. T. Martin 35 and 7, T. O. 
Reay 18 and 14, J. M. Mordaunt 24 and 15, &c. 

September 22 and 23, Rugby. 

ist Innings. 2d Innings. Total. 

Rugby School . . . 127 141 268 

Free Foresters . . . 188 74 262 

At the end of this season we had a lyric from our 
Laureate, full of felicitous comment upon the doings of 
the brotherhood, first sung with great applause by the 
writer at our friend Mr Hole's hospitable mansion in 
Nottinghamshire : — 

To be Sung ad libitum. 

" Foresters and friends, it's a fact I wish to mention, 
One department of your studies hasn't had enough attention : 
In the letters of the Alphabet, if I rightly understand, 
There are symptoms and signs of our Midland counties band. 

Then judge from my rhymes what appear to be 
Traces of the Forest in my ABC. 

A% the Aspiration which we feel a match for winning, 
B the Bore we think it if we make a Bad Beginning ; 
C the Central Counties where, as every one agrees. 
The Forest banner braves the cricket-battle and the breeze. 
Then judge^ &^c. 

D is for the Diamonds, whom we're never slow to meet ; 
E the Ease with which we sometimes lay our rivals at our feet ; 
F is for the Forest, of which we're all the loyal sons ; 
G the Gay Good-humour of whoever gets the runs. 
Then judge y &^c. 

H is for the Hosts who put us all so kindly up. 
And mix a drink without one leaf of burrage in the cup ; 
Also for the fair Hostesses, each of whom deserves a poem, 
To show something of the gratitude we're well aware we owe 'em. 
Then judge ^ &^c. 



62 B.B. 

7's the lengthy Innings which is some days sure enough ; 
y our Joviahty the day we pull it off. 

K the mind's Kaleidoscope, through which the match looks right ; 
L the Ladies on the field, the beautiful and bright. 
Then judge^ &^c. 

ATs the jolly months that see us bat and ball in hand, 
Also the Merry Matches which we play through half the land; 
To the central breezes floating, it has travelled far and wide, 
In the Motto of the brotherhood, ' United though Untied ! ' 
The7i jtidge^ &^c. 

JV's the Nottinghamshire haunts, notoriously pleasant ; 
O the Opportunity of haunting them at present ! 
P the Proof of our enjoying them in spirit and in letter; 
Q the Query — Of all counties, could we haunt a better ? 
- Then judge ^ &^c. 

Rs the gentle Rule to which our brotherhood defers ; 
S the Song which speaks of ' Cricket-shoes instead of spurs ' ; 
T the Toast we love to drink in bumpers full and fast — 
' Success to our engagements, each improving on the last' 
Then judge, &^c. 

U\s the Unitedness of all the Forest clan, 

With Lilly white for umpire — ' or any other man ' ; 

V is for these Verses, and you'll show consideration 

By from time to time suggesting here and there a variation. 

Then judge, Qr'c. 

Ws our wonder at our great All-England Win ; 
X is the Xcitement we expressed that wonder in ; 

V the Youngest member playmg, the bold Benician hero ; ^ 
Z the depth our Zeal and faith had never got to — Zero. 

Then judge, &'e. 

Foresters and friends, I've performed my task but ill. 
And the song for its reception stands in need of your goodwill ; 
The Alphabet itself would fail to speak the hearty greeting 
With which, I trust, we'll all salute our next convivial meeting. 

Then judge from my rhyjnes what appear to be 
Traces of the Forest in my A B CJ^ 



1 "The bold Benician hero," B. B. Cooper, from a farce styled "B.B.," in 
which a harmless man, with the letters B.B. on his portmanteau, is taken for 
the "Benicia Boy," J. S. Heenan, who fought Sayers. 



RESIGNATION. 63 

With this season also my own connection with the Club 
as its first Secretary closed. There were domestic and 
personal reasons for this ; but, moreover, the Club had 
outgrown the sort of brotherhood only compatible with 
the consciousness of individual friendship and a community 
of tastes and feelings on other subjects than cricket, and 
though, in spite of their ever-widening circle, Foresters had 
in a great measure answered to the spirit of their motto, 
" United though Untied," yet it was evident that hence- 
forward they must be more under the control of a com- 
mittee than "personally conducted," and assimilate them- 
selves to the modes of other combinations of cricketers, 
instead of being, what Scholes Birch called them, the 
*' happy family." In their earlier contests there had been 
little of the mechanical precision of modern matches, as, 
for instance, when the Secretary would walk round the 
ground during a game, and suggest, through one of the 
outfielders, a change of bowling, — an irregular interference 
which would be very naturally resented by a captain of 
the present day, but which the half-dozen managers who 
lived in such intimate association were by no means sur- 
prised at, and often good-naturedly complied with. " One 
thing has often struck me," writes Birch ; " I have no recol- 
lection of a captain to the team, yet some one must have 
written out the ' order of going in ' and settled who should 
bowl." 

Our engagements likewise were becoming too numerous. 
This, in fact, brought me for some years into harness 
again occasionally, as I could not but try to assist my 
successors to carry out plans which I had formed ; but I 
would not take the prominent place I had held up to this 
date, and the " Rector's resignation " was the accomplished 
fact of 1863. "The brethren of the Free Forest, the most 
kindly, united, and undaunted of nomad tribes," presented 
me with a very tasteful and elegant token of their regard, — 



64 PRESENTATION, 

a life-long source of pleasure and of pride to one who did 
her best to make my roof a home for cricketers ; and I 
still had the gratification of seeing the success of my 
design, though the personal pronoun will not be so often 
used in connection with it. 




IN GRATEFUL MEMORY 

OF LONG SERVICES, 

THIS TOKEN OF ESTEEM WAS PRESENTED 

ro tbe 1Rcv. TOU. 1ft. 1R. 3Bcbtor5, 

RECTOR OF SUTTON COLDFIELD, 
AND SOMETIME SECRETARY 

Of tbe 3Frcc ^foresters, 

BY HIS MOST ATTACHED FRIENDS 

& AFFECTIONATE BRETHREN OF 

THE CLUB. 

MARCH 1863. 



65 



CHAPTER VIII. 
i86 



'3- 



It will be remembered that certain engagements of a 
high class in cricket had been made by the late secretary. 
Two of these were to come off in the season of 1863 — 
namely, contests with the two champion counties of 
Surrey and Nottingham, Foresters playing fourteen in 
each match. In these, of course, the promoter felt a 
personal interest ; and he gave what assistance he could 
to his successor, Mr Faber, in getting the teams together, 
and completing the other arrangements. Meanwhile the 
annual routine of matches was steadily gone through. 

F. F. beat the Rugby School eleven by 4 wickets on May 
18 and 19 in stormy weather. The School went in first 
and scored 151, getting F. F. out for 106. The second 
innings realised 201 (extras nil) — T. Case making 40 and 
45, R. Murray 10 and 53 (not out), H. V. Ellis 14 and 34, 
R. Cotton 29 and 24, A. Lee 33 and o. But F. R, with 
S. Linton 28 and 70, C. G. Lane 19 and 53, and some 
minor scores, ran up 247 for 6 wickets. Buchanan took 
8 wickets. 

At Oxford, on June i, Bullingdon made a drawn match 
of it, scoring 80 runs with a wicket to fall against F. F. 140 
— E. Waller 46, B. Fetherston 26, J. E. Codrington 20 (not 
out) ; and on the 2d and 3d F. F. beat B. N. C. in one 
innings of 140 — B. B. Cooper scoring 109 (not out), while 

E 



66 WEYBRIDGE SCHOOL. 

the College could only claim 39 and 94. The next day's 
match with Ch. Ch. they won as easily, the House only 
scoring 59 to Buchanan and Gillett's bowling, while F. F. 
made 187 for 6 wickets — Cooper 52, F. W. Wright 49, 
Gillett 44, and Caldecott 17 (not out). 

At Weybridge, on June 20, they beat Dr Spyers's School, 
despite Goodrich's bowling, in one innings. It may be 
noted, especially with reference to some remarks a little 
later on upon this point, that the " ould man " never 
showed to less advantage than on the school ground, which 
was a very confined one, so that a lofty hitter was able to 
lift him over the hedge with impunity. This F. R. Evans 
did in this very match, and scored 44 out of 128 made by 
F. F., Weybridge only scoring 71 and 53. 

Civil Service also succumbed in one innings on July 6, 
Buchanan and Osbert Mordaunt taking their wickets for 
105 and 49 (two absentees), F. F. having made 200, of 
which E. Hume claims 51, J. W. Inge 48 (not out), A. H. 
Faber 24, H. Finch 17, &c. 

But at Southgate, though, as the reporter said, strong 
on paper, they met with a sad reverse on July 7 and 8. 
Hearne and Humphrey played for Southgate. 



FREE FORESTERS. 



1ST INNINGS. SCORE. 2D INNINGS 

W. G. Armitstead, c Hearne, b V. Walker 6 c and b Humphrey 

A. H. Faber, c Benthall, b R. Walker 

B. B. Cooper, c Benthall, b Humphrey 
R. A. H. Mitchell, c and b V. Walker 
F. W. Wright, c Hearne, b V. E. Walker 
E. K. Hornby, c Harvey, b Humphrey 
S. Linton, c Perkins, b Benthall 
H. R. Finch, c Benthall, b Humphrey 
J. Round, not out .... 
M. T. Martin, c Dovvson, b Benthall 
D. Buchanan, b Benthall . 

leg-byes 3, wide i . 



5 

8 c J. Walker, b Perkins . o 

51 b Humphrey . . . i 

12 c Hearne, b Humphrey . 11 

4 V. Walker, b Humphrey 5 

3 
II 

I 

IS 
o 

5 



18 St Hearne, b Perkins 

2 not out 

5 St Hearne, b Perkins 

8 st Hearne, b Perkins 

4 b Perkins . 

o b Humphrey . 



4 byes 2, leg-byes 2, wide i 5 
Total . 122 Total . 62 



SURREY COUNTY. 67 

SOUTHGATE. 

SCORE. 

R. D, Walker, b Mitchell 19 

T. Hearne, run out 77 

H. Perkins, c Mitchell, b Buchanan 22 

W. H. Benthall, c round, b Buchanan . . . . i 

T. Humphrey, b Mitchell 38 

G. Dowson, b Buchanan .11 

V. E. Walker, c and b Mitchell o 

C. M. Harvey, st Round, b Buchanan .... 6 

J. Walker, not out 17 

C. Cator, b Mitchell i 

E. W. Vyse, st Round, b Mitchell 3 

byes 7, leg-bye i, wides 5 13 

Total . . 208 

On the three next days their important engagement at 
the Oval terminated in a sensational and unexpected suc- 
cess. Two of the fourteen did not put in an appearance, 
but a serviceable emergency was secured in Mr Beaver, 
there being a chance that Goodrich might play on the 
next day. Imagine the faces of the backers of Surrey 
when, after the Forester innings (12 wickets) had closed for 
116, they saw four of their crack batsmen out to Buchanan 
and Ratliff for 8 runs — seven for 16, and the whole 10 
wickets for 34. 

I did not see the match, but meeting Griffith a few days 
after, I asked him how such a startling result came about. 
" Well, sir," said he, " 'twas this way. Mr Ratliff he ran 
right up to Mortlock's crease and caught him, and the 
rest of us went in in a funk." Ratliff bowled lobs, and 
certainly fielded them splendidly. Buchanan says, " The 
ground was hard and true, and with fast bowling my 
analysis was as follows " : — 

First innings 
Second ,, 

Ratliff 's bowling in both innings was 239 balls, 131 runs, 
16 maidens, 9 wickets. 



Balls. 


Runs. 


Maidens. 


Wickets. 


80 


10 


12 


4 


296 


100 


33 


5 



68 



A GOOD WIN. 



FREE FORESTERS. 



W. G. Armitstead, b Cafifyn 
B. B. Cooper, b Griffith . 
H. E. Bull, c Street, b Caffyn 
E. K. Hornby, b Griffith . 

E. Hume, b Caffyn . 
A. H. Faber, run out 

F. W. Wright, c and b Griffith 
T. Ratliff, b Mortlock 

S. Linton, c Lockyer, b Caffyn 
M. T. Martin, b Sewell . 
E. Waller, b Sewell . 
D, Buchanan, b Sewell 
P. K. L. Beaver, not out . 
T. C. Goodrich, absent . 
byes 8, leg-byes 7 . 



I 


c Fowler, b Caffyn 




13 





b Stephenson . 




52 


24 


b Sewell . 




16 


I 


1 b w, b Sewell . 




33 


6 


b Caffyn . 




2 





c Lockyer, b Stephenson 





8 


not out 




30 


14 


b Stephenson . 




3 


22 


b Sewell . 




t 


13 
7 

5 


not out . 




IS 




15 


byes 5, leg-byes 5, 


wides 2 12 



Total 



116 



Total 



177 



SURREY. 



1ST INNINGS. 

W. Mortlock, c and b Ratliff . 
T. Humphrey, b Buchanan 
T. Sewell, b Ratliff . 
G. Griffith, c Cooper, b Buchanan 
W. Caffyn, b Buchanan . 
T. F. Fowler, c Armitstead, b Ratliff 
T. Lockyer, c and b Ratliff 
E. Dowson, c and b Ratliff 
H. H. Stephenson, not out 
H, Jupp, b Buchanan 
J. Street, st Martin, b Ratliff . 
bye I, leg-bye i . . . 

Total 



SCORE. 

2 

3 
2 
o 
3 
3 
o 
2 
14 
3 
o 
2 

34 



2D INNINGS. 

c Linton, b Buchanan 



SCORE. 

61 



1 b w, b Buchanan . . 14 
not out ... .13 

c and b Buchanan . . 38 

run out .... 21 

b Ratliff .... 28 

b Buchanan ... 22 

c Cooper, b Ratliff , . 10 

b Beaver .... 14 

c and b Ratliff ... 16 

b Buchanan ... 7 

byes 9, leg-byes 4, wide i 14 

Total . 258 



On July 24 and 25, at Sutton Coldfield, the Incogniti 
were saved from defeat by rain on the second day — 
Foresters making 141 and 176, Incogs, y^ and 30, with 4 
wickets down. Our champions were R. T. Whittington 65, 
C. J. Marshall 51, W. K. Mott 13 and 43. 

And at Leamington, on the 30th, Deddington had 
slightly the worse of a fine day's play, scoring 137 against 
Foresters' 192, of which W. K. Mott scored 56, F. Caldecott 
and W. Ratliff 31 each, C. A. Garnett 29; Mott and Vernon 
were the F. F. bowlers. 





T. O. Reay. 



J. M. Mordaunt. 





F. R. Price. 



E. Waller. 



ARMITSTEAUS NARRATIVE. 69 

At the Western Manchester, on Aug. 5 and 6, the home 
team went in first, and stayed all day against Mott and 
Goodrich and others for 279. The following morning 
Mott and a Harrow boy, Cecil Hornby, went to the wicket, 
and though the former only got the one run which Jack- 
son considered his due, Hornby and Tomkinson stayed 
in, one for 26, the other for 108 ; and at luncheon-time, 
when rain stopped the match, E. K. Hornby was 34 and 
R. T. Whittington 10, both not out. Three wickets for 

194- 
The next match was the fixture at Nottingham. 

The best and most closely contested match, "from find to 
finish," as fox-hunters say, that I ever had the happiness to take 
part in, " Cujus pars parva fui " ! 

It was held by the bigwigs of Notts to be a flight of no small 
ambition, not to say presumption, for fourteen members of a 
club of amateurs, of moderate if rising repute, to face the Premier 
County of England, at the time in the very zenith of its fame. 

Perhaps it was so; yet, at least, the result justified the 
attempt. 

Thirty long years have passed since then ; but never have I 
witnessed, still less borne a hand in, a contest of more sustained 
interest, or in which has been exhibited more attractive Cricket : 
every stroke, I had almost said every ball, in that long three 
days' battle, is still fresh and vividly painted on my memory ; and 
I am pleased and proud to have been invited to furnish my recol- 
lections of the match. 

The weather throughout was splendid, and the wicket good 
and very fast, and the interest shown by the grand old town and 
county of Notts keen and generous. 

One of those selected to play for the honour of F. F., M. T. 
Martin, was unwell, and his place was taken by a small Harrow 
boy, C. L. Hornby, who justified the choice by pluck with the bat 
and activity in the field. George Parr — that veteran of a thousand 
fights — when shall we look on his like again ? — was also prevented 
from playing by illness, and in his room Martin M'Intyre, an 
erratic but exceedingly fast and rather dangerous bowler, was 
brought out, and in the first innings bowled with great effect, as 
the score shows. I myself remember receiving from him a short- 
pitched ball on the off, which jumped high, and ought to have 
been left severely alone, but I could not resist the tempting 



70 ARMITSTEAUS NARRATIVE. 

length, and cut it so hard that C. Tinley, at deep long-sHp, one 
of the best fields of his time, could not hold it, and it went off 
his hands and over his head for two or three runs. 

F. F. in the first innings scored only 114. "Where are your 
great Free Foresters now ? " asked Capt. H., an enthusiastic and 
keen-witted Notts partisan. Indeed things did look a bit black 
for our Club, but what was the surprise of the wise ones who 
were assembled, like the grasshoppers of Homer,^ chirping, chatter- 
ing, and criticising the long day through on the benches and green 
sward, to find that, with the two exceptions of R. Daft and Bramp- 
ton, the men of Notts could not play Goodrich " a little bit." 

Let me here tell modern cricketers something of the character 
and method of that most excellent bowler. 

He was an underhand bowler, slow, but no mere pitcher of 
lobs. He owed his success, which was almost unfailing on all 
sorts of wickets, to his long head, his marvellous precision, and 
his invincible courage and temper. Of course he needed a good 
field, and that F. F. always supplied. When he had against 
him a foeman worthy of his arm, he was indeed a sight for gods 
and men : he had a slight but not a startling twist from the leg, 
given by the wrist and not the fingers. On great occasions, when 
he had to deal with a really dangerous bat, like C. G. Lane or 
R. A. Mitchell, he would always bowl from the off-side of the 
wicket, and pitch every ball on the middle or two leg stumps, 
varying only a little in length, pace, or height in the air. No 
one, be he ever so quick on his feet, could get to his ball and 
thrash it where he liked on the full pitch : if a batsman meant 
to hit him he must go right out to meet him on the half- 
volley, and take his risk of stumping and accidents ; but woe to 
him if he persisted in playing back ; inch by inch would the ball 
be pitched further up^ till the batsman, getting no sight at all, 
would be either driven on his wicket, or bowled neck and heels 
by one a shade faster and farther up, and would retire to his 
friends in the pavilion, gnashing his teeth, and open to the 
severest remarks of every one with a stick or umbrella in his 
hands instead of a bat, — and how well and bravely one does 
play — in the pavilion / 

Another thing I must mention : Goodrich bowled so triie^ in 
length and straightness, that point could safely stand within five 
yards of the bat, just behind the batting-crease, and the hardest 
hitter in the world could not hurt him, no, nor ruffle a feather of 
his wing. It will be easily seen how pleasant this was to a 
batsman. I have seen them — Jemmy Grundy, for instance, who 

^ T€rTiye(r<riv eoiKSres, olre KaO^ vKrjv 
Sevdpecp i({>e^6ix€yoi oira Anpidearaav UTa'i. 



ARMITSTEAUS NARRATIVE. yi 

had an undaunted heart, but rather a warm temper, hft up his 
bat and threaten point therewith, as if he would thoroughly 
enjoy knocking off his head on the spot ; and then to see them 
play out at the next ball perhaps, a bit shorter than they thought 
it, and gently poke it into the ready hands of point, who had 
crept even nearer to wait for it ! Oh, it was a thing to see ! 

All this, and much more, was over and over again exemplified 
in this very match. And this, I hope, will be held to be some 
excuse for my long digression. 

R. Daft, I may say, played Goodrich very well indeed, and 
with boundless patience^ but could scarcely get a run off him, and 
the others were mostly — noivhere I 

Well, there being only one run between the two rather small 
scores of the first innings, no bones were as yet broken, and in- 
terest was still alive for the second. But how different in char- 
acter was the batting in the second venture ! 

The two first men at once collared ^^Smacktntyrej'^ as his friends 
called him, in graceful allusion to the violence of his attack, and 
he was, besides, so bad to stop behind the wicket, that he had 
to be taken off as being too expensive. One cannot help wonder- 
ing what present-day wicket-keepers would do with such a bowler 
without a long-stop. I may say, without tedious particulars, that 
Bull and Mitchell much surprised the Notts spectators by the 
fineness and dash of their play ; and when F. W. Wright came in 
he electrified them with his hitting : he hit all the bowlers alike, 
clean and hard, along the ground; and when Tinley, the slow 
bowler, was put on, it was only to experience still more drastic 
treatment. Wright was so quick on his legs, and so determined, 
that he got to every ball, and made it visit each corner of the 
ground in turn. Finally, he hit Jackson — a rare feat with so fast 
and fine a bowler — over his head, far out of the ground, and over 
the road beyond into a garden. The ball was in truth a lost one, 
for it never was found. A new one was produced from the 
paviHon, and, strange to say, Jackson bowled him with a shooting 
Yorker the very next ball. When I mention that out of a total 
of 64, obtained in about half-an-hour, Wright hit ten fours, a 
five, and a six against the then best bowlers in England, I need 
not say that the spectators had a treat foreshadowing Mr Stoddart 
or Mr O'Brien at their best. 

In fine, F. F. put together 2 1 2 in the second innings — a score, 
in those days, more than respectable. 

Notts went in the third morning and played, most of them, 
with great determination ; but again none of them but R. Daft 
could do much with Goodrich, backed up by fourteen fieldsmen 
of more than average quickness. Daft played a fine game, but 



72 ARMITSTEAD'S NARRATIVE. 

I feel sure his memory would bear me out in saying that he 
could get no runs from Goodrich, — he could but stay there, with 
all his skill and impregnable defence. When 9 wickets of Notts 
were down, they still needed 67, runs to reach the F. F. total, 
and the case of the county seemed hopeless — but with the 
occasion (as sometimes happens) came the men, for here came 
in the great surprise of the match : Wootton and Biddulph 
became partners, one of whom was played entirely for his 
bowling, and the other as a wicket-keeper, neither having a 
very high reputation as a batsman ; yet, somehow, they seemed 
to stick, and each began, now and then, to get runs, chiefly 
at the fast bowler's end. Buchanan was then a fast and 
difficult left-handed bowler, and a bit dangerous to legs and 
fingers, not the slow dodger, with an off-break, like that of 
Briggs and Peel now, which he afterwards developed into : in 
fact, his only variation to his usual fast and kicking ball was 
a slow half-volley chucked up, as if for the very purpose of 
being hit for four. These balls, I am bound to say, Biddulph 
made free use of till, in fine, instead of being ^2) ^u'^s ^"^ arrear, 
the scorers had actually stood up for the tie, while the winning 
run should be made. Here, at last, from over eagerness, or 
a nervous wish to get home, the steadiness of Biddulph gave 
way, and he ran in to one of Goodrich straight on the middle 
stump, played in with his leg instead of his bat — and paid 
forfeit. 

Hurrah ! a tie after all ! Surprise upon surprise ! So, while 
Notts headed the score by one run in the first innings, F. F. did 
the very same thing in the second, making a sort of double tie, — 
thus altering for the nonce the well-known though enigmatic motto 
of F. F. — " United but not Untied." The scene, as reporters say, 
" beggared description." 

The Trent Bridge ground was then a far more free-and-easy 
sort of place than, I feel sure, it is in these more highly organ- 
ised days : the old paviHon combined a bar with its dressing- 
rooms, &c., and both sexes were admitted in it; and dressing 
seemed to go on in public, varied and enlivened by liquid 
refreshment. 

My last recollection of the match is of several smart young 
ladies patting or sttiacking the plump shoulders of Buchanan, 
while they, in this hearty fashion, congratulated him on his 
personal prowess. 

Now, ye Moderns ! if you can promise to show me a better 
and more exciting match than that which I have tried to describe, 
I, on my part, will go a good way to look at it. — Yours sincerely, 

W. G. A. 



A TIE AT LAST 



73 



FREE FORESTERS. 



1ST INNINGS. 

W. G. Armitstead, b Jackson . 

C. L. Hornby, c Bignall, b Wootton 
H. G. Bull, c Tinley, b M'Intyre 

E. K. Hornby, b Wootton 

R. A. H. Mitchell, b M'Intyre . 
T. Ratliff, b M'Intyre 

F. R. Evans, c Jackson, b Wootton 
F. W. Wright, b M'Intyre 

W.J. Lyon, b M'Intyre . 

H. S. Armitstead, b M'Intyre . 

T. O. Reay, b M'Intyre . 

W. K. Mott, c Clarke, b M'Intyre 

D. Buchanan, not out 

T. C. Goodrich, b M'Intyre 
byes 7, leg-byes 6, wide i 

Total 



SCORE. 

IS 
9 

17 
7 
o 
I 

IS 

lO 

4 
i8 
o 

3 

I 

o 

.14 

114 



2D INNINGS. SCORE, 

b Wootton ... 12 

St Biddulph, b Wootton . 7 

b Jackson ... 41 

b Wootton ... 7 

b Tinley .... 34 

b Jackson ... 8 

run out .... I 

b Jackson ... 64 

run out .... 2 

1 b w, b Tinley . . 5 

c Tinley, b Jackson . . 7 

b Jackson . . . o 

not out .... 3 

St Biddulph, b Tinley . i 

byes 14, leg-byes 6 . 20 

Total . 212 



NOTTS. 



b Evans . 



C. Daft, run out 
C. Brampton, b Goodrich . 
T. Bignall, c W. G. Armitstead, 
R. Daft, not out 
J. Grundy, b Evans . 
A. Clarke, st Mitchell, b Goodrich . 
J. Jackson, st Mitchell, b Goodrich . 
R. C. Tinley, c Ratliff, b Goodrich . 
M. M'Intyre, c E. K. Hornby, b Buchanan 
S. Biddulph, b Goodrich . 
G. Wootton, b Goodrich .... 
byes 8, wide i 



16 c H. Armitstead, b Reay 23 

26 b Buchanan ... 20 

3 st Mitchell, b Goodrich . 4 

26 c Bull, b Goodrich . . 56 

6 c W. Armitstead, b Goodrich o 
9 c W. Armitstead, b Goodrich o 
o st Mitchell, b Goodrich . i 

7 b Buchanan ... 25 
9 b Goodrich . . . o 
2 1 b w, b Goodrich . . 33 
2 not out .... 30 
9 " ' 



leg-byes 9, wides 3, byes 7 19 



Total . 115 
Umpires — G. Butler and V. Tinley. 



Total 



ANALYSIS OF BOWLING. 

Free Foresters. 

First Innings. 





B. 


R. 


M. 


w. wides 


Wootton . 


132 


59 


II 


3 


Jackson . 


48 


23 


3 


I 


M'Intyre. 


8i 


18 


7 


9 I 




Second Innings. 






Wootton . 


128 


48 


12 


3 


Jackson . 


72 


38 


4 


5 


M'Intyre . 


72 


33 


10 


... 


Grundy . 


60 


24 


7 





Tinley . 


74 


49 


4 


3 



74 KNOWING ONES DONE. 





First Inning 


s. 










B. 


R. 


M. 


w. 


WIDES 


Buchanan 


72 


41 


6 


I 




Goodrich 


160 


40 


16 


6 




Evans 


90 


25 


10 


2 


I 




Second Innings, 








Buchanan 


216 


69 


28 


2 


... 


Goodrich 


. . 238 


79 


24 


7 


... 


Evans 


. . 67 


15 


6 


... 


3 


Reay 


28 


14 


I 


I 


... 


Ratliff . 


12 


II 


... 


... 


... 


Mott 


8 


4 


... 


... 


... 



I must supplement this admirable and spirited narra- 
tive by one or two other recollections. One of the keenest 
of the critics not only volunteered a very disparaging 
comment upon Bull's play, but wound up by offering a 
bet that he did not make 17 runs again in the second 
innings. Armitstead promptly took him up, and handed 
him 17s., to receive in return is. a-run, to the noble 
captain's great contentment. By -and -by, however, his 
face began to lengthen, and he was barely perceptible 
far away in the distance, evidently dreading chaff. Noth- 
ing would satisfy Mitchell but to go and talk to him, 
but as Mitchell approached he edged away, and finally, 
having made the circuit of the ground, was run to earth 
just in his old position, in time to look pleasant and pay 
up a couple of sovereigns and a shilling to boot. 

But his. discomfiture was nothing to that of a deaf 
gentleman residing in Nottingham, no cricketer, but a 
great sportsman, and one who liked to have a little 
money on an event. He began by backing the County 
at odds, but when Foresters' second innings was in pro- 
gress he became alarmed and backed them, at odds also. 
When the tie was declared, his face, which had been a 
study for the last half-hour, cleared, and he cried, " Thank 
goodness, my bets are off! " When he found that the rule 





H. E. Bull. 



F. W. Wright. 





D. Buchanan. 



M. T. Martin. 



/ Z. 75 

in such a case was to put the money together and divide 
it, his disgust was pitiable, and he probably to this day 
considers cricket a swindle. 

Mr Reay recalls the scene on the third day. It was 
market-day in Nottingham, and when word went up to 
the farmers' ordinaries that the County were going to 
win after all, the taverns were deserted, and the gate 
during the last hour was the best in the match. The 
Nottingham lambs looked more than playful when the 
telegraph showed a tie, but when their own umpire had 
to give Biddulph out 1 b w, they cheered both sides. 

As the earlier match at Manchester had come to such 
an untimely end, the Western Club invited Foresters to 
pay them a second visit on Sept. lo and ii, when 
the latter won by 9 wickets — Mitchell 98 and Ratliff 53, 
helping a score of 200, and getting out the Westerners 
for 50 and 140 — Mitchell accounting for 7 wickets, Ratliff 
for 6, Lyon for 5. 

On the 17th and i8th of the same month F. F. met I Z. 
again at Packington. 

FREE FORESTERS. 

1ST INNINGS. SCORE. 2D INNINGS. SCORE. 

W. G. Armitstead, b Arkwright . . 4 c Fitzgerald, b Arkwriglit 2 

H. E, Bull, run out 43 run out .... 3 

E. K. Hornby, c Ponsonby, bC. D. Marsham 16 not out .... 68 

F. R. Evans, c Lyttelton, b Arkwright . 21 c Drake, b Arkwright . 36 
T. Ratliff, c Lane, b Marsham . 
M. T. Martin, c Drake, b Marsham 

C. Booth, c Mordaunt, b Arkwright 
W. J. Lyon, c Drake, b Arkwright 
T. O. Reay, c Drake, b Arkwright 

D. Buchanan, not out 
H. C. Willes, c Ponsonby, b Arkwright . 2 

bye I, leg-byes 6, wide-balls 4 . .11 leg-byes 4, wides 5 . 9 

Total . 147 Total . 185 



o 

4 b Marsham ... 40 

34 b Mitchell ... 7 

2 not out .... 12 
2 

8 b Drake .... 8 



76 



A SUCCESSFUL SEASON. 



I ZINGARI. 

C. D. Marsham, b Buchanan 
E. T. Drake, c Reay, b Buchanan 
R. Marsham, c Willes, b Evans 
C. G. Lane, b Ratlifif . 
Hon. C G. Lyttelton, b Evans 
R. A. H. Mitchell, b Evans 
R. A. Fitzgerald, c Bull, b Ratliff 
Hon. S. Ponsonby, not out 
O. Mordaunt, b Buchanan . 
H. Arkvvright, c and b Buchanan 
Lord Aylesford, b Buchanan 
byes 4, leg-byes 2, wides 3 



Total 



SCORE. 

4 
12 
10 
52 

o 
II 

35 
24 
10 
20 

S 
9 

192 



The laurels of the game thus went to Hornby, of whom 
an opponent, qualified to judge, wrote, " Were he as strong 
on the off-side as to leg, he would be fit to play in the first 
rank." 

At Rugby, on Sept. 21 and 22, Foresters got 189, and 
then the boys just saved the follow on by making no, 
Case 26 ; and in the second innings of Foresters only 
3 wickets were down for 131. Linton scored 31 and 70, 
Bull yj, Caldecott 6 and 42 (not out twice), Mordaunt 
22 and 13, &c. 

A new match with Uppingham School the two next 
days finished this successful season, the boys only getting 
55 and 53 to Buchanan and Ratlifif's bowling, and F. F. 
scoring 144 — Colley 38, Martin 22, Caldecott 16, &c. 



-Jl 



CHAPTER IX. 
1864. 

This year Mr Faber had arranged to hand over the 
secretaryship to Mr Mitchell, when the latter found him- 
self compelled to resign most of his cricket engagements, 
owing to circumstances over which he had no control ; 
consequently the programme was very imperfectly com- 
pleted, although new ground was taken up by the com- 
mencement of the tours in Scotland, which for some years 
were so prominent a feature of our season. 

Foresters, however, played strong in Oxford, where they 
commenced on May 10 (the 9th being wet) against Ch. Ch., 
by making 212 — Mitchell 53, Linton 35, Gillet 26, CoUey 
and Bull each 23, &c., Ch. Ch. losing 9 wickets, 6 to Buch- 
anan and 3 run out, for 102. Bullingdon, on the nth, had 
to field all day to ten F. F. Stanhope not going in, E. 
K. Hornby made 123, Mitchell 82 (not out), F. W. Wright 
and R. H. Colley 29 each, W. G. Armitstead 25. 

F. F. beat B. N. C. on the 12th and 13th by 7 wickets, 
the College scoring 127 and 100. F. F. got in and 119, 
of which E. K. Hornby claimed 17 and 38, C. L. Hornby 
12 and 23, Linton 8 and 22, Fetherston 2 and 22 (not out). 
Buchanan took 14 wickets. 

On the i6th and 17th they made another successful 
departure by encountering Cambridge University. 



78 CAMBRIDGE. 

FREE FORESTERS. 

SCORE. 

R. H. CoUey, b Pelham 8 

E. Davenport, c De Grey, b Pelham 30 

Hon. C. G. Lyttelton, b Pelham 65 

A. Walker, b Booth o 

H. E. Bull, c Tuck, b Pelham 14 

M. T. Martin, c De Grey, b Curteis 46 

O. Mordaunt, c Hyndman, b Pelham .... 8 

D. Buchanan, c Balfour, b De Grey i 

W. J. Lyon, st Balfour, b De Grey 31 

G. E. Willes, not out 27 

B. T. Fetherston, c Harvey, b De Grey .... 13 
byes 3, leg-byes 5, wide-balls 5 13 

Total . . 256 

CAMBRIDGE. 

Hon. T. D. Grey, c Colley, b Buchanan .... 27 

T. F. Fowler, c Davenport, b Buchanan . . . . o 

R. D. Balfour, b Lyttelton 23 

A. W. T. Daniel, c and b Mordaunt 126 

G. H. Tuck, c Walker, b Buchanan 31 

C. Booth, b Lyttelton 2 

W. R. CoUyer, b Mordaunt 11 

H. M. Hyndman, c Colley, b Mordaunt .... 35 

Hon. F. Pelham, b Mordaunt 3 

F. C. Harvey, not out 2 

T. Curteis, b Mordaunt 4 , 

byes 3, leg-byes 3, wide-balls 2 8 

Total , . 272 

The Rugby match was won on May 23 and 24, with 10 
wickets to fall. Bull distinguished himself by a hit for 
7 over the bowler's head. He scored 13 and 49 (not 
out), Robertson 5 and 20 (not out), Colley 73, Buchanan 
38. Totals 209 and 79. For the School, who made 95 and 
192, Ellis 4 and 57, Bowey 25 (not out) and 20, Kenney 7 
and 28, did best. Buchanan took 10 wickets. 

Weybridge School on June 18 only got 96, to 154 and 
73 for 6 wickets of F. F. — Stanhope 50 (not out), Cecil 
Reid 23 and 28 (not out), Finch 20 and 21, O. Mordaunt 
31, being chief scorers. Mr Reid writes : — 

As a member of the F. F. since the early or middle " sixties," 
and having always been very partial to cricket, though but an 
indiiferent performer at the noble game, I naturally came into 



SFVEJ^S'S. 79 

contact with many cricketers, and visited many pleasant places, 
during my somewhat lengthened F. F. career, which I always shall 
look back upon with great pleasure now that the " ground is too 
far off," and that the " chest has sunk."^ My first match — I think 
in 1864 — for the Club was v. Spyers's School at Weybridge, and 
one or two of the masters were playing. In the days I am speak- 
ing of, the masters, as a rule, were not so taken from the ranks 
of really good cricketers as they are now at Elstree school and 
other schools, and I always thought that I had got a " soft thing 
on " when they went on to bowl : a friend of mine, now the Rev. 
C. Spencer Stanhope, of Merton, was playing, and we were in 
together, and we smacked a master all over the ground. He was 
bowling underhand lobs. We each got a good score ; and it was 
not for some hours afterwards that I learnt that I had actually 
been "tonking" no less a personage than T. C. Goodrich — 
probably the best underhand bowler of this or any other day. 
Just fancy my impertinence / Why, if I had known beforehand 
who it was, I should of course have been bowled out first ball! 
Shakespeare's remark of "What's in a name?" was the worst 
thing the immortal William ever wrote. 

Another school eleven succumbed at Haileybury on the 
i8th, who got 140 to 172 from F. F. M. T. Martin scored 
39 and 20, C. H. Bill 31 and 10, A. Lee 30 and 3 (not out), 
S. Linton 31 and I. F. G. Inge arrived too late for his 
first innings, but took 4 wickets and got 41 runs. Mr Bill 
was credited in the report of the match with 85 ; and this 
error remaining undetected, figured as one of the scores of 
the season in those days, when centuries were less com- 
mon than they are now. 

Nothing was done by the Club till the autumn, when 
the old secretary essayed to get together a team for a 
northern tour beginning on Aug. 23 and 24 at Chelford, 
where the Armitsteads and Hornbys played for their 
county against their Club. Out of 335 runs made in the 
two innings of Cheshire, H. S. Armitstead made 64, 
W. G. A. 48, E. K. Hornby 40, C. L. H. 21. F. W. 
Wright 7 and 53, F. G. Inge 28 and 25 (not out), and S. 
Lyttelton 31 and 10, did best for Foresters, whose totals 
were 121 and 120. 



So A SERIOUS ACCIDENT, 

At the Western ground, Eccles, on the two next days they 
left a most interesting game unfinished. The Western 
Club, for whom F. W. Wright was now playing, with the 
assistance of 89 runs from him and 47 from Bousfield, made 
234. Free Foresters started well, and F. G. Inge seemed 
on the point of obtaining his century, when a ball got up 
sharply and struck him on the breast-bone. He rubbed 
the place with his hand for a second or two, and was just 
taking guard to receive the next ball, when he suddenly 
fell on his face, to all appearance lifeless. Fortunately 
the late Dr Morgan (whose book on University oarsmen 
is so well known) was playing on the side of the Western, 
and by his efficient aid consciousness was soon restored, 
and no subsequent evil effect experienced. 

With Inge's 98, Foresters achieved a total of 232, 
W. W. C. Lane 45, W. G. Armitstead 23, &c., and having 
got out the Club for 201, of which M'Donald made 95, had 
scored at the end of the day 71 for 2 wickets, W. G. 
Armitstead 25, and H. E. Bull 31. 

The Free Foresters naturally wished to show in some 
suitable way their feeling of gratitude for the services ren- 
dered to one of their eleven by Dr Morgan. The artistic 
taste of a member (Halifax Wyatt) settled that the pre- 
sentation should take the shape of a plain gold ring, bear- 
ing our motto, " United though Untied," and within, the 
legend in old English characters — 

"^a frmti gn neUe p a frmli 2« ftrte." 
Thus handsomely acknowledged by the recipient : — 

Eccles, Oct. 3, 

My dear Sir, — I trust you will convey to the Free Foresters 
who played against the Western Club, my deep sense of their 
great kindness in sending me so generous and beautiful a token 
of their regard for the slight assistance which it was my happy 
privilege to render to one of their members. 

I would desire likewise to thank them for the honour they 



THE RING. 8i 

have done me, in electing me a member of their Club, and to 
assure them of the gratification and pride I shall, feel in wearing 
their colours. 

To yourself, as their representative, for the kind manner in 
which you have given expression to their wishes, I shall ever feel 
that my gratitude is due. — Believe me, my dear Sir, yours very 
truly, John Ed. Morgan. 

The tour in Scotland will be found in its place in the 
chapter dealing with this portion of our history. We drew 
three matches in terrible weather. 

On the same days as our last match in Scotland, Sept. 
14 and 15, another F. F. team made 210 against Upping- 
ham — M. T. Martin 114 (not out), Boyle 47, &c., while the 
Boys made 132 and 35. Buchanan took 11 wickets. 




Dr Morgan's ring^ from a pen-and-ink drawing by Halifax Wyatt. 



82 



CHAPTER X. 



1865, 



The appearance of Osbert Mordaunt as Secretary in- 
fused new life into F. F., and a very good programme was 
arranged, which began on May 24 and 25 at Cambridge 
against the University. 



FREE FORESTERS. 



1ST INNINGS. SCORE. 

Hon. C. G. Lyttelton, b Green ... 17 

E. K. Hornby, c Foster, b Pelham . . 12 

F. R. Evans, 1 b w, b Green ... 6 
C. Booth, c A. H. Winter, b Green . . 15 

G. E. Willes, run out 2 

J. S. E. Hood, not out .... 71 

M. T. Martin, c Winter, b Pelham . . i 

W. J. Lyon, st Winter, b Pelham . . 15 

W. W. C. Lane, c Winter, b Pelham . 55 

Hon. A. V. Lyttelton, b Curteis . . o 

L. W. Dent, c Tuck, b Pelham . . o 

byes 2, leg-byes 4, wides 5, wide-byes 3 . 14 

Total . 208 



2D INNINGS. 



c Tuck, b Pelham 
b Curteis . 
b Curteis . 
b Green . 
St Winter, b Pelham 
1 b w, b Roupell 
c Pelham, b Curteis 
c Tuck, b Pelham 
c Winter, b Pelham 
not out 

c Roupell, b Curteis 
byes 7, leg-byes 2, wides 
5, wide-ball i 

Total 



SCORE. 

71 
4 
6 

14 
27 
36 

I 

15 
3 



3 

15 
213 



CAMBRIDGE. 



A. Walker, c Martin, b C. Lyttelton 

A. H. Winter, c C. Lyttelton, b Evans 

G. H. Tuck, c C. Lyttelton, b Evans 

E. P. Ash, c Booth, b C. Lyttelton 

E. W. M. Lloyd, run out . 

C. G. Green, not out 

H. Foster, b C. Lyttelton . 

J. W. Taylor, b C. Lyttelton . 



99 

14 

o 

5 

23 

28 

6 

o 



absent 

b Evans . 

c C. Lyttelton, b Lyon 

c Lyon, b Evans 

st Lyon, b C. Lyttelton 

c Lane, b Lyon 

1 b w, b Lyon . 

b Lyon 



UNIVERSITIES. Z-^ 

1ST INNINGS. SCORE. 2D INNINGS. SCORE. 

Hon. F. Pelhairi, st Hood, b C. Lyttelton o st Lyon, b C. Lyttelton . 2 

J. H. Roupell, b C. Lyttelton . . . o not out .... 9 

T. S. Curreis, st Hood, b C. Lyttelton . i b C. Lyttelton ... 9 

bye I, leg-bye i, vvides 11 . . -13 byes 2, leg-bye i, vvides 3 6 

Total . 189 Total . 81 



On June 5 F. F. played BuUingdon, and F. Inge making 
52, R. Whittington 44, and T. Gamier 40, their total 
was 169 against 118 made by BuUingdon, who then lost 
3 wickets for 48, their groundsman twice not out. 

A two days' match with Ch. Ch. only gave time for an 
innings each — F. F. making 293, Ch. Ch. 299. For F. F. 
F. G. Inge scored 84, Davenport, Lyon, and L. Garnett 
35 each, CoUey 30, Moseley 19, Reay 18. For Ch. Ch. 
Maitland made 80, O. Mordaunt 58, Boyle 40, &c. 

But on June 8, B. N. C. having got F. F. out for 97, 
Davenport 26 being the best scorer, made 136 themselves 
for 9 wickets. 

On June 23 Upper Tooting was the scene of some good 
cricket and mirthful minstrelsy. F. F. made 172 to 114 
from the home side — E. Rutter scoring 59, T. Ratlifif 35 
(not out), T. O. Reay 24 ; but on their second essay they 
only attained the figure of 52, and Tooting made 23 for 
2 wickets. 

Haileybury got out for 25 and Z6, so as F. F. had 
scored iii in the first innings, a wide in the second 
settled the matter. F. Lee 30, R. Brodie 26, E. Hume 24, 
were the chief performers. Ratliff's slows took 12 wickets, 
and Brodie 6. 

At Lord's, on July 4 and 5, F. F. met I Z. and a licking, 
for which they are indebted to a splendid innings on Mr 
Buller's part, and some bad management on their own. 



84 



LORD'S. 



I ZINGARI. 

1ST INNINGS. SCORE. 

R. Balfour, c Hornby, b Buchanan . . i 

C. D. Marsham, st Cooper, b Buchanan . i 

R. Marsham, c Daniel, b Buchanan . . 9 

C. F. Buller, not out 95 

R. A. H. Mitchell, st Cooper, b Buchanan i 

C. G. Boyle, b Buchanan .... 24 

R. A. Fitzgerald, c Tuck, b Buchanan . 9 

G. R. Johnson, b Buchanan ... 5 
W. F. Maitland, c and b Hood . .20 

W. F. Traill, c Cooper, b Buchanan . i 

Hon. F. G. Pelham, b Ramsay . . 17 

wide I I 



Total 



2D INNINGS. 

not out 



not out 



c Buchanan, b Ramsay 



SCORE. 

4 



bye I 



184 



Total 



17 



FREE FORESTERS. 



D. Buchanan, 1 b w, b Maitland 

E. K. Hornby, b R. Marsham . 
G. H. Tuck, b C. D. Marsham 

B. B. Cooper, c and b C. D. Marsham 
A. W. Daniel, c and b R. Marsham . 

F. W. Wright, b C. D. Marsham . 
J. S. E. Hood, b C. D. Marsham . 
E. Davenport, c Buller, b Traill 

T. Ratliff, c Boyle, b Traill 

E. Ramsay, b C. D. Marsham . 

A. L. Vernon, not out 

wide I 



Total 






not out . 


9 


17 


c Fitzgerald, b Pelham 


12 


8 


c R. Marsham, b Traill 


2 


27 


b Traill . 


12 


4 


c Traill, b Pelham . 


24 


2 


c Traill, b C. D. Marshan 


1 6 


S 


c Boyle, b Pelham . 


4 


I 


c Mitchell, b Pelham 


11 


4 


c and b Pelham 


21 





Maitland, b Trail . 


23 


I 


b C. D. Marsham . 





I 


byes 4, leg-bye i, wide 


I 6 



70 



Total 



130 



And on the 20th a team, described in the book as a 
"scratch lot," made 71 against the Civil Service — M. T. 
Martin getting 28. For the Opposition A. Rawlins made 
112, C. Rawlins 62, and C. Morgan 50 (out), of the respect- 
able total of 268. 

The star of the Foresters was certainly not at this period 
in the ascendant, for a match against Gentlemen of the 
South at the Oval produced another discomfiture, in spite 
of a patient innings by Buchanan, who went in first. Had 
they scored, as they easily might, another 25 runs the first 
day, the match would have been drawn. Buchanan, 
Taylor, and Ramsay, were the chief bowlers for F. F. 



THE OVAL. 



85 



GENTLEMEN OF THE SOUTH. 



1ST INNINGS. 

T. Case, c Balfour, b Ramsay . 
E. M. Grace, st Balfour, b Buchanan 
E. Rowley, c Ratliff, b Buchanan 
R. D. Walker, c Hume, b Buchanan 
G. M. Kelson, c Round, b Buchanan 
T. D. Walker, not out . . . 
C. Calvert, c Round, b Buchanan 
R. Bissett, c Tennent, b Taylor 
E. W. Burnett, st Balfour, b Buchanan 
C. Morgan, run out .... 
J. Smith, c and b Round . 
bye I, leg-bye i, wides 8 

Total 



CORE. 


2D INNINGS. 


SCORE. 


9 


not out . . . 


6 









. 32 






. 16 






. 16 






. 46 






. 16 






II 


run out 


• 13 


10 


not out 


I 


• IS 









b Ramsay 





10 












. 181 


Total 


20 



FREE FORESTERS. 



D. Buchanan, b I. D. Walker . 

E. Hume, b I. D. W^alker 

R. D. Balfour, run out .... 
J. Round, c Bissett, b I. D. Walker . 

F. F. Taylor, c Kelson, b Grace 
H. N. Tennent, b Morgan 

G. P. Robertson, c Grace, b R. D. Walker 
P. Norman, c and b I. D. Walker . 

A. W. Daniel, c R. D. Walker, b Morgan 

E. Ramsay, not out 

T. Ratliff, st Bissett, b I. D. Walker 
bye 1, leg-byes 2 

Total 



28 


b I. D. Walker 


12 


4 


not out . 


13 


3 


c Calvert, b Morgan 


9 


5 


c Morgan, b Grace . 





I 


c Grace, b I. D. Walker 


I 


23 


b Grace . 


13 


6 


c I. D. Walker, b Grace 


5 


12 


b Grace . 


9 


I 


c Rowley, b Morgan 


22 


4 


b Morgan 


14 





b Grace . 


9 


3 


bye I, leg-byes 2 . 


3 


QO 


Total 


no 







ANALYSIS OF 


F. 


F. ] 


BOWLING. 










First 


Innings. 


















B. 


R. 


M. 


w. 


WIDES 


D. 


Buchanan 


. 




180 


81 


II 


6 


... 


E. 


Ramsay 




, 


72 


25 


6 


I 


7 


F. 


Taylor 


. 


. 


1x6 


30 


10 


I 


I 


J. 


Round . 


. 




50 


25 


.,. 


I 


... 






Second 


Innings. 










D. 


Buchanan 


. 


. 


28 


4 


4 


... 


... 


E. 


Ramsay 


. 


. 


26 


16 


I 


I 


... 



At Manchester again, on July 27 and 28, they lost their 
match with the Western Club, being short of men. W. G. 
Armitstead 26 and 76 (not out) was the best performer 



86 



ABSENTEES. 



for F. F., who scored 93 and 178. The Western made 172 
and loi for 3 wickets, J. F. Leese being 54 (not out) at 
the close. 

In their Scottish tour they won three matches, lost one, 
and drew one. 

The inconvenience of the managers being both absent 
on tour was exemplified by the imminent collapse of 
their great contest against the County of Nottingham, 
when only ten Foresters out of fourteen appeared on the 
ground — one of these, Lyon, with his arm in a sling, and 
Colley also disabled. Mr Williams, however, represented 
him in the match, and D. Pocklington came to fill the 
place of one of the other absentees. Communications from 
Ashley Walker and Ratliff arrived, after delays in trans- 
mission, when the game was over. Fortunately the bowlers 
were there, and this was sufficient in the dull sticky weather 
which ensued to give the Club a victory. 

FREE FORESTERS. 



1ST INNINGS. 

F. G. Inge, run out .... 
H. S. Armitstead, c Tinley, b Grundy 
A. W. Daniel, c Tinley, b Shaw 

C. Booth, c Shaw, b Grundy . 
Hon. S. G. Lyttelton, c Jackson, b Grundy 
R. T. Whittington, b Grundy . 

D. Buchanan, not out 
W. W^illiams, c Biddulph, b Shaw 
T. C. Goodrich, c and b Shaw . 

E. Davenport, b Shaw 
D. Pocklington, absent 
Three absentees 

bye I, leg-byes 2 . 



SCORE. 

18 
20 
I 
6 
o 
o 

5 
6 
o 
o 
o 



Total 



2D INNINGS. 

b Wootton 

b Wootton 

c Brampton, b Tinley 

b Grundy . 

b Tinley . 

c Wootton, b Tinley 

c Tinley, b Wootton 

c Biddulph, b Tinley 

b Tinley . 

c Parr, b Wootton . 

not out 



3 bye I, wide-bye i . 



59 



Total 



SCORE. 

23 
13 

21 
2 

6 
2 

IS 
29 

4 
II 

13 



141 



NOTTS. 



W. Oscroft, c Davenport, b Buchanan 
C. Brampton, c and b Buchanan 
G. Wootton, c and b Buchanan 
J. Jackson, c Davenport, b Buchanan 
G. Parr, c Whittington, b Buchanan 



7 c Inge, b Buchanan . . i 

10 c Whittington, b Lyttelton 13 

23 c Davenport, b Buchanan 32 

o c Substitute, b Buchanan 3 

o c Inge, b Goodrich , . 12 



A BOWLERS' DAY. 



^7 



1ST INNINGS. 

J. Grundy, c Whittington, b Buchanan 

T. Bignall, run out . 

S. Biddulph, b Goodrich 

C. F. Daft, b Buchanan 

R. C. Tinley, run out 

J. C. Shaw, not out . 



Total 



iE. 2D INNINGS. SCORE. 

3 b Buchanan ... 4 
13 1 b w, b Buchanan . . o 
12 Goodrich, b Buchanan . i 

2 c Inge, b Buchanan . . i 

2 b Buchanan ... 9 

4 not out . . . . o 

bye .... I 



76 



Total 



77 



ANALYSIS OF BOWLING. 

Free Foresters. 

First Innings. 

B. R. 

Shaw ...... 114 22 

Tinley 40 10 

Grundy 72 24 

Second Innings. 

Shaw 124 23 

Tinley 176 43 

Grundy 116 23 

Jackson 56 19 

Wootton 176 31 

Notts. 
First Innings, 

Buchanan 104 37 

Goodrich . . . . . 103 39 

Second Innings. 

Buchanan 137 31 

Goodrich ..... 80 22 

Lyttelton 56 14 



M. 


w. 




17 


4 




4 






2 


4 




19 




I no-ball 


17 


5 




18 


I 




4 


... 




25 


4 





20 8 

6 I 

7 I 



The Foresters now went on to Southwell, and beat 
Notts Gentlemen by 55 runs — S. G. Lyttelton taking 10 
wickets and T. C. Goodrich 9 for 70 and 114. F. F. got 
93 and 146, Booth's 73 being their best score. 

The following match on i8th and 19th, against Rugby, 
they lost in rather curious fashion. The School fell to 
Ratliff and Buchanan for 65 runs — F. F. totalling 116, 
Martin (not out) 31, Fetherston 26, Boyle 23. The School 
then got 125, of which Pauncefote made 70. This left the 



88 A COLLAPSE. 

Foresters 75 to get to win, but 9 wickets fell for 33, and the 
eleventh man was non est, probably thinking he would not 
be wanted. 

The last match at Uppingham, Sept. 20 and 21, they 
won by 36 runs — M. T. Martin scoring 43 (not out) and 38, 
R. H. Colley 3 and 41, C. Marshall 6 and 29, &c. ; totals 
102 and 158, against which the School made 117 and 107 — 
J. Fitzgerald 22 and 21, C. E. Green 10 and 25, being their 
best scorers. Buchanan took 10 wickets, Ratliff 6. 




' ' / enjoy a gallop still, though I am an honorary Canon. 



89 



CHAPTER XI 



1866. 



The season began at Cambridge with good scoring. 



FREE FORESTERS. 



SCORE. 

Hon. C. G. Lyttelton, b S. G. 

Lyttelton 26 

W. G. Armitstead, 1 b w, b Pelham 28 

G. H. Tuck, b S. G. Lyttelton . o 

C. Booth, c Hood, b Pelham . . 43 

G. E. Willes, b Weighell . . 60 

H. S. Armitstead, c Lloyd, b Pelham 5 



W. W. C. Lane, b Weighell 
W. J. Lyon, b Weighell . 
J. M. Yates, b Hood . 
R. H. Colley, b S. G. Lyttelton 
D. Buchanan, c and b Pelham 
B. M. Fetherston, not out . 
byes 16, leg-byes 2, wides 5 

Total 



I 
10 
38 
13 

o 

33 
23 

280 



CAMBRIDGE UNIVERSITY. 



1ST INNINGS. 

Hon. F. Pelham, c Buchanan, b Lyon 
A. H. Winter, c Yates, b Buchanan 
C. Warren, c Lyon, b Buchanan 
J. S. Hood, c Booth, b Lyon . 
Hon. S. G. Lyttelton, b Lane . 
J, S. Roupell, b Buchanan 

E. W. M. Lloyd, c Armitstead, b Buchanan 

Lord Hyde, b Buchanan . 

J. M. Richardson, not out 

W. B. Weighell, c Yates, b Buchanan 

H. A. Richardson, c Tuck, b Yates . 

C. E. Green, c Willes, b Yates . 



byes 3, leg- byes 4, wides 6 



SCORE. 


2D INNINGS. 


SC( 


)RE. 


9 


c Booth, b Buchanan 


. 


I 


. 64 


b Lyon . 


. 


36 


I 


c Lane, b Buchanan 


, 





2 


b Buchanan 


. 


3 


• 13 


c Tuck, b Buchanan 


. 








St C. G. Lyttelton, 


b 






Buchanan 




II 


an 17 


c Willes, b Buchanan 


. 


7 


. 34 


c Booth, c Buchanan 




5 


• 23 


c W. Armitstead, b Lyon 


19 





run out . 


. 





• 34 


not out . 


. 


13 


3 


St C. G. Lyttelton, 


b 






Buchanan 




36 


• 13 


leg-bye i, wides 


3. 






bye I 




S 



Total 



213 



Total 



136 



90 UPS AND DOWNS. 

At Oxford also, on June 5, the Club got rather too 
many runs against B. N. C. — C. G. Lyttelton 56, C. W. S. 
Stanhope 55, J. S. Holden 35, &c., making 225. The 
College had 6 wickets down for 132. 

Bullingdon, the next day, after the third wicket had fallen 
for 36, collapsed for 51, Buchanan taking 5 wickets and 
Reay 4; then Foresters scored 136 for 6 wickets, Reay 
claiming 36, G. Willes 30. 

On the 7th and 8th Ch. Ch. scored 178 and 190, in 
which are included 55 and 5 from A. H. Smith Barry, 
and 10 and 37 from O. Mordaunt, against 144 from F. F., 
of which D. Pocklington made 5 1, G. H. Tuck 28, T. O. 
Reay 26. 

At Eton, on a bowler's wicket, the boys on the 9th of 
June won by 14 runs on the first innings, ^y to 73, Colley 
and Tuck being the only double figures against Ferguson's 
bowling; thus encouraged, Eton scored 124 for 3 wickets, 
Barrington making 79. Buchanan, Mordaunt, Hood, and 
Mitchell bowled for F. F. 

The Weybridge match on the i6th they won, Brodie 
scoring 30, Fetherston 33, Colley 35, T. Ratliff 19 (not out) ; 
total 158. The School made 82 and 68 for 4 wickets. 

The Civil Service match on the 28th was won also by 
139 to 6^, Osbert Mordaunt making 58. Civil Service got 
46 runs for i wicket in the second innings. 

Haileybury, too, on the 29th and 30th, proved a win 
— 140 and 133 to 100 and 74. E. Rutter 26 and 40, R. 
Brodie 20 and 36, were the ledger-men. 

Upper Tooting, however, inflicted a defeat upon July 
5, Raynes making 53 out of 149; while A. Hillyard 23 
(not out) and 17, T. O. Reay i and 36, were the best of a 
team who made but 6S and 84 for 6 wickets. 

On July 9 and 10 Rugby School made 262 (W. G. 
Goschen 75, B. Pauncefote 51) and 75 for 3 wickets, against 
F. F., whose single innings produced 221 — G. L. Marten 6^, 



PARODY. 91 

A. Hillyard 43, &c. E. Ramsay captured 7 wickets, but 
was absent when called upon to bat. 

On July 26 and 27 the Foresters were very nearly 
beaten by the Western Club at Manchester, making 214 to 
the home side's 251, and then losing 7 wickets for 99 runs. 
E. K. Hornby for F. F. made 49 and 13, C. L. Hornby 34 
and 28, A. H. Smith Barry 30 and 5, W. G. Armitstead 32 
and 12. Foresters seem to have been short of men. 

Their Scottish tour, July 31 to Aug. 9, produced four 
wins and a draw. 

On Aug. 22 and 23, the Incogniti beat a scratch team 
of F. F. at Cannock by 201 to 65 and 125 — A. A. Wilmot, 
who made 7 and 30, doing best for F. F. ; Bott, Coyney, 
and C. A. Garnett also making a few runs. 

If the second day at the Southwell ground had not 
been too wet to play, another victory would have been 
probably added to the Forester list, for they got 263 — 
Tennent 70, Boyle 48, Reay 47, Brodie 34, &c. ; and when 
the N. C. C. went in they lost 6 wickets, 5 to Goodrich and 
I run out, for 16 runs. 

At Thoresby, where an aristocratic patron of cricket, 
Earl Manvers, gave them a right noble reception, they 
just drew the match in a critical position. The wicket 
was all that could be desired. As a parodist observed — 

" Prince's and Lord's may flourish and may fade ; 
Yield to the plough, the level, and the spade : 
But English lawns and parks, their country's pride, 
Will for the noble game a home provide." 

Foresters went in first and scored 150, Pocklington and 
Whittington bowling for Thoresby, the first-named taking 
4 wickets, the latter 5. Brodie was best scorer with 51. 
" The noble host," it is noted, " got rid of Mordaunt by a 
capital catch off Whittington." Thoresby then took their 
turn, and only making 63, had to follow, when they mended 
their hands, and claimed 152. As there was only about 



92 RULES, 

an hour to play, F. F. tried the forcing game, but unsuc- 
cessfully, for they had 7 wickets down for 40 at the close ; 
Pocklington again claiming 3, and Whittington 4. 

In bad weather, at the end of September, they beat 
Uppingham in one innings, by 141 to 52 and 56, Buchanan 
taking 12 wickets, and S. G. Lyttelton 6; and the same 
bowlers the next day disposed of 5 Rugby wickets apiece 
for 51, while Free Foresters claimed 6Z with 6 wickets 
down, Ratliff (not out) 28. 

Rules of the Free Foresters, 1866. 

The design of the Free Foresters is to play matches with 
County, University, College, and Regimental Elevens, and with 
recognised clubs in desirable localities. No entrance or annual 
subscription shall be required. 

By-Laws. 

1. The affairs of the F. F. are to be regulated by a Committee. 

2. The Committee are to consist of the present and former 
Secretaries, and such F. F. as shall appear likely best to 
represent the different localities in w^hich the Society's members 
reside. Such members not to exceed six in number, and to be 
elected at the annual meeting. 

3. The duties of the Committee are to arrange matches (with 
the sanction of the Secretary), and generally to forward the 
interests of F. F. in their respective counties. 

4. The Secretary is empowered to call a meeting of the Com- 
mittee at his own discretion; and the presence of any three 
members of the Committee with the Secretary shall form a 
quorum. 

Elections, 

1. Elections shall take place twice in the year. Not more 
than six names shall be selected on each occasion from the 
names of the candidates proposed, which appear on the circular ; 
these shall then be submitted to the ballot in the order of their 
number of votes. One black ball in five shall exclude. 

2. The Secretary and the Committee shall arrange the place 
and time of election, giving not less than fourteen days' notice, 
and inserting in the circular the names of all candidates, with 
those of their proposers. 



RULES. 



93 



3. The Committee shall be empowered to elect as Honorary 
Associates, with the privileges of F. F., not more than six 
gentlemen in each year — to be chosen for past or prospective 
services to the Society. 

4. Ordinary candidates must be members by birth, or one 
year's bond-fide residence, of a central county — viz., Bedford, 
Bucks, Cambridgeshire, Cheshire, Derby, Hereford, Huntingdon, 
Leicester, Oxford, Northampton, Nottingham, Rutland, Shrop- 
shire, Stafford, Warwick, Worcester, Yorkshire, and Lancashire, 
south of a line drawn from Preston to the Humber. 

5. No F. F. (except Honorary Associates) shall wear the 
ribbon until he has played in a match. 




Bullingdon in 1847, by G. R. Winter. 



94 



CHAPTER XII. 
1867. 

The season of 1867 does not appear to have furnished 
very much whereof to boast. Free Foresters existed, and 
could take a beating. But they had to experience the 
truth of a stanza once quoted as a motto for the Club 
in more successful days : — 

" Your cricketing boy, full of teasers and twisters, 

Of backing well up, and of saving the run. 
May talk till his lingual appurtenance blisters 

Of the scores he has made and the matches he's won. 
We feel a bit bigger when scoring a figure. 

And wearing the willow as it should be worn ; 
But to play in the sun till you're black as a nigger, 

And get licked after all, is a bit of a thorn." 

It was a transition period ; the old generation were well- 
nigh on the shelf, and the new one had hardly arrived 
at maturity : all the more honour to those who sustained 
the old " United though Untied " through this critical 
time. 

They began on May 23 by getting beaten at Hampton 
Wick : Free Foresters (with four absentees) scoring 88 — 
Round 33, Goodrich 23, Entwisle (not out) 28 — and the 
home side contriving to annex 112 against the bowling 
of Goodrich and A. R. Kenney; Anderson 27, and Ubsdell 
23, being the prominent scorers. 





J. M. Yates. 



A. Hiilyard. 





F, Lee. 



C. F. Reid. 



SEATS OF LEARNING. 



95 



At Cambridge the next week the University won in one 
innings. 



FREE FORESTERS. 



1ST INNINGS. 



W. G. Armitstead, b Weighell . 

D. Buchanan, b Brune 

C. J. Marshall, c Winter, b Weighell 
W. F. Higgins, c and b Lyttelton . 
J. M. Yates, b Green 

B. Fetherston, c J. M. Richardson, 
Absolom 

W. J. Lyon, run out .... 
Hon. A. V. Lyttelton, b Green 

C. Horwood, c Weighell, b Absolom 
W. W. C. Lane, not out . 

E. Ramsay, c Absolom, b Weighell . 
wides 2 . 



Total 



SCORE. 2D INNINGS. 

2 c Brune, b Absolom . 
8 b Absolom 
I b Lyttelton 
5 c and b Absolom 

13 c and b Absolom 

25 1 b w, b Brune . 

not out 

3 c and b Absolom 

1 and b Absolom 
17 c Lyttelton, b Absolom 
28 c Hood, b Brune 

2 wides 3, byes 4 

105 Total 



SCORE. 
6 
6 

I 
7 



I 

3 
o 
6 
9 

4 
7 

52 



UNIVERSITY. 

J. M. Richardson, 1 b w, b Buchanan 
A. W. Winter, 1 b w, b Buchanan 
Hon. S. G. Lyttelton, b Horwood 
M. H. Stow, c Yates, b Ramsay 
C. A. Absolom, c Lyon, b Ramsay 
J. S. E. Hood, run out . 
G. Savile, st Lyon, b Buchanan 
C. E. Green, c Ramsay, b Buchanan 
W. B. Weighell, 1 b w, b Buchanan 
H. A. Richardson, b Buchanan 
C. J. Brune, not out 
wides 18, byes 22, leg -byes 2 



Total 



S3 

I 

27 

24 

2 

o 

o 

38 

18 

40 

9 
42 

254 



And at Eton, on the Saturday after, Foresters lost a good 
match by 5 runs, Eton scoring 113, F. F. 108. For the 
School, W. F. Tritton scored 36, W. Hay 28, A. W. Fitz- 
gerald 12, W. C. Higgins 10. For F. F., T. Ratliff scored 
30, J. A. Pepys 22, C. C. Cotes 12, O. Mordaunt 11. 
Mitchell and Rutter were the Forester bowlers. 

At Oxford three defeats were sustained to one victory. 
On the loth and nth June, Foresters played Ch. Ch., 
who beat them by 8 wickets. F. F. made 123 and 108, 
R. Brodie scoring 42 and 22, A. Hillyard 35 and 9, and 



96 



OXFORD. 



E. M. Kenney 12 and 47 ; while Ch. Ch. in their 145 
and Z7 had G. Smythe 16, C. C. Cotes 12, W. Kenyon 
Slaney 17 (not out) and o, E. M. Wakeman 43 and 35 
(not out), D. Moffat 20, and J. Frederick 5 and 45 (not 
out). Foresters, on June 12 and 13, beat Bullingdon, 
losing 4 wickets, three run out, in their second innings. 
Bullingdon made 94 and 160 — W. F. Maitland 51 and 
61, H. J. Tollemache 2 and 35, J. C. Robartes 19 and 
22. For Foresters, 159 and 96, E. M. Kenney scored 
61 and 16 (not out), W. Evetts 25 and 16, A. Hillyard 
22, G. E. Willes 13, &c. 

The University, on the 14th and 15th, beat F. F. by 
7 wickets. " The bowling of E. S. Carter was most effec- 
tive, no less than twelve of the Free Foresters being 
subdued by him." The premier score of the match was 
made by R. Brodie, who made fifteen singles, one 4, two 
3's, and the same number of 2's : — 

FREE FORESTERS. 



1ST INNINGS. 
A. H. Smith -Barry, b Carter . 

D. Buchanan, c Frederick, b Miles 
J. Round, run out 

G. Tuck, b Carter . 

O. Mordaunt, b Carter 

T. Ratliif, b Miles . 

W. W. C. Lane, c and b Kenney 

E. Rutter, b Kenney 
R. Brodie, not out 

R. J. Venables, b Carter . 
A. R. Kenney, c Kenney, b Carter 
bye I, leg-bye i, wides 4 

Total 



SCORE. 2D INNINGS. SCORE. 

2 b Carter .... 3 

o c Case, b Maitland . . 13 

10 c Reid, b Carter . . 7 
2 b Carter .... 9 

11 c Miles, b Carter . . o 
o c Miles, b Carter . . o 
4 b Carter .... 8 

15 St Reid, b Carter . . 4 

2 c Reid, b Fellowes . . 29 

6 not out .... 6 

o c and b Kenney . . 17 

6 bye i, leg-bye i, wides 3 5 

58 Total . loi 



OXFORD UNIVERSITY. 



T. Case, c Round, b Buchanan 

R. T. Reid, c Mordaunt, b Rutter 

C. E. Boyle, b Buchanan . 

R. Digby, b Rutter . 

A. C. Bartholomew, run out 

R. Miles, c Round, b Rutter . 



hit wicket, b Rutter . . 3 

St Round, b Buchanan . o 

not out .... 15 

not out . . . . 9 



SOUTHGATE. 



97 



1ST INNINGS. SCORE. 

J. Frederick, c and b Rutter . . .10 
E. M. Kenney, c Kenney, b Rutter . . 21 
W. F. Maitland, st Round, b Buchanan . 7 
E, L. Fellowes, st Round, b Buchanan . 5 

E. S. Carter, not out 2 

byes 2, leg-bye i, wides 2 ... 5 

Total . 121 



2D INNINGS. 



c Round, b Rutter 



SCORE. 



Total 



40 



And on the 17th and i8th, B. N. C. inflicted a one-innings 
defeat, scoring 273 — W. Evetts 81, Chute 47, Hall 38, 
H. F. Johnson 34, and J. H. Gibbon 21, being their prin- 
cipal performers. F. F. only made 66 and 133 — R. Brodie 
10 and 34, C. R. Moore 15 and 30, A. A. Wilmot 6 and 
21, W. F. Maitland 14 and 10, &c. 

Foresters won a match at the Node on the 20th by 
5 wickets. They made 173 and 19 — E. Hume scoring 
61, F. R Price 20, J. S. E. Hood 24, T. Ratliff 23 (not 
out), T. O. Reay i8. A. R. Kenney and Ratliff were 
their bowlers, against whom Warner got 23 (not out) and o, 
L. Burnand 10 and 21, R. D. Elphinstone o and 19, S. 
Reid o and 44, C. F. Reid 6 and 16, W. Bayliff 10 and 
10, &c. Totals 65 and 126. 

At Southgate, the absent T. seems to have interfered 
with the trowlers, as Foresters had no less than eight 
bowlers on, with poor result. 



SOUTHGATE. 










SCORE. 


E. Dowson, b Mellor 14 


V. E. Walker, c Price, b Yates 








138 


C. Cater, st Lyttelton, b Mellor 








75 


R. D. Walker, st Lyttelton, b Kenney 








16 


I. D. Walker, c Price, b Baker 








107 


G. Hearne, c Price, b Kenney 








73 


M. Thomson, c Lyttelton, b Mellor 








19 


H. G. Phipps, b Kenney 








3 


W. T. Phipps, c Lyttelton, b Mellor 








29 


F. W. Daniell, st Lyttelton, b Mellor 








3 


J. F. Horner, not out . . 








S 


byes 5, leg-byes 12, wides 9 . 








26 



Total 



S08 



98 



DEFEATS. 



FREE FORESTERS. 



1ST INNINGS. SCORE. 


2D INNINGS. SCORE. 


F. R. Price, c Hearne, b Horner 


26 


b R. D. Walker . . 6 


F. Baker, st Hearne, b R. D. Walker 


30 


not out .... 45 


W. W. C. Lane, b I. D. Walker . 


50 


1 b w, b R. D. Walker . 8 


R. Brodie, c V. E. Walker, b Horner 





run out . . . . 4 


T. Ratliif, 1 b w, b I. D. Walker . 


18 


c Hearne, b Horner . . 


J. M. Yates, st Hearne, b I. D. Walker 


36 


b R. D. Walker . .15 


J. G. Beevor, b R. D. Walker . 


I 


c and b R. D. Walker . 26 


A. R. Kenney, b I. D. Walker . 


4 


c Dowson, b R. D. Walker 8 


P. H. Mellor, not out . . . 


5 


run out .... 5 


Hon, C. G. Lyttelton, absent . 





b R. D. Walker . . 7 


A. N. Other, absent 





absent . . . . 


byes 9, leg-bye i . . . . 


10 


leg-bye . . . . i 


Total 


180 


Total . 125 



Their match at Weybridge on June 29 was drawn, not in 
their favour ; their first innings of 97 — R. Durnford 20, H. R. 
Finch 41 — being only followed up by 44 runs in the second. 
Goodrich and his boys got 62 and 48 for 4 wickets, with the 
aid of Mr Taylor, who made 37 runs and took 12 wickets. 

On July 4 the Civil Service inflicted a severe defeat, J. 
Kirkpatrick accounting for 9 wickets and C. Morgan for 
10 ; F. R. Price 14 and i, J. G. Beevor 14 and o (not out), 
C. C. Cotes 18 and 5, H. Bass o and 22, A. R. Kenney o 
(absent) and 15, being the chief contributors to the small 
totals of 69 and 62. The Service made 145 — S. C. Spencer 
Smith 24, J. Davies 18, E. L. Bateman 24, J. Kirkpatrick 
17, J. W. Martin 18 (not out), F. H. Short 14. 

At Haileybury, on July 6, the School — with the aid of 
65 from E. P. Ash, 49 from F. E. L. Schreiber, and 40 
from A. W. C. Young — made an innings, of 253, and got 
out F. F. for 157 ; the most prominent scorers being E. J. 
Harper 31, J. M. Yates 27, R. Brodie 27, and C. Bill 15. 

Rugby School also, on July 8 and 9, won by i wicket, 
though had J. H. Raven (43, retired, and o, absent) been 
able to stay, the result might have been otherwise. F. F. 
got 128 and 175 ; O. Mordaunt 6 and 53, W. F. Higgins 
21 and 50, Y. Paget 30 and 3, and G. Bennet o and 22 



. LORD'S. 99 

(not out), doing best. For the School, F. Tobin, ma., 75 
and 35, W. Yardley 16 and 53, F. Tobin, mi., 24 and 6, 
were the chief contributors to a score of 177 and 128. 

At Tooting, July 10 and 11, F. F. scored 159 and 172 to 
154 and 58 ; E. Rutter 33 and 30, W. F. Higgins 6 and 50, 
R. Brodie 18 (not out) and 27, doing best. For Tooting, 
Baggallay made 29 and 4, Wix 32 and 10, &c. 

Foresters had also the best of a match with M. C. C, 
which was made a drawn one by a wet second day. 

Foresters won the toss, and sent in Price and Baker. Scothern 
and Chatterton were the bowlers at starting. Both, however, 
got so freely hit that Mr Fellows was called on, and then Mr 
Pickering. When the score had advanced to 120 Mr Sutton 
relieved Mr Fellows, and at 146 Mr Duntze went to Mr Picker- 
ing's end. To be brief, all the Foresters hit and scored regard- 
less of bowlers, or how they changed about. The innings 
occupied five hours, and averaged nearly 50 runs per hour. At 
the close of the day Marylebone had lost 6 wickets for 90 runs. 

FORESTERS. 

SCORE. 

F, R. Price, b Pickering 40 

F. Baker, c Pickering, b Chatterton .... 18 

E. Rutter, b Fellows 27 

R. Brodie, c Sutton, b Duntze 19 

J. Round, run out . 26 

J. G. Beevor, b Sutton 5 

F. Lee, not out 39 

T. Ratliff, b Sutton 2 

A. R. Kenney, b Fellows 37 

J. H. Randolph, b Sutton 8 

A. Hillyard, c Sutton, b Pickering 3 

leg-byes 4, byes 9, wides 5 18 

Total . . 242 
M. C. C. 

E. G. Sutton, c Round, b Rutter 6 

Chatterton, c Price, b Lee 6 

G. A. Duntze, c Price, b Rutter 20 

J. A. Pepys, b Lee o 

H. J. Browne, c Round, b Rutter o 

H. W. Fellows, b Rutter 2 

W. Pickering, not out 31 

R. T. Key, not out 21 

byes 4 . . .4 

Total . . 90 



loo THORESBY. 

A tour in Nottinghamshire produced two draws and a 
defeat. Gentlemen of Notts at Beeston scored 194 and 
150 — J. G. Beevor making 79 in the first innings and 59 
(run out) in the second — against Foresters 237. A. W. T. 
Daniel 65, M. T. Martin 70, E. Rutter 31, G. N. Marten 27, 
T. Rathff 15. 

At Thoresby Lord Manvers' eleven defeated them by 4 
wickets, Foresters making 121 and 106; M. T. Martin 
again scoring 37 and ii, H. N. Tennent 33 and 11, A. W. 
Daniel 18 and 26. For the House, J. J. Sewell scored 20 
and 45, D. Pocklington 15 and 29 (not out), R. F. Miles o 
and 23 (not out); totals 109 and 119. Rutter, Daniel, 
Whittington, and Ratliff, took the Thoresby wickets ; 
Pocklington, Miles, and Beevor those of F. F. 

The third match was against Ratcliffe, who made 185 — 
G. B. Davy 44, C. Martin 30, and W. Clements 25, being 
the best. F. F. had obtained 148 for 7 wickets at the call 
of time— M. T. Martin with 6Z, A. W. Daniel 28, being their 
leaders. 

They won a match at the ground of their old friends the 
Western, Manchester, with 6 wickets to fall, making 216 
and 66 ; A. W. T. Daniel jj and (not out) 33, leading, 
followed hand passibus cequis by R. T. Whittington 38 and 
10 (both not out), and W. F. Higgins 34 and 3. The 
Western made 125 and 155 — V. K. Armitage 24 and 21, J. 
Galbraith o and 37, A. Proudfoot 3 and 24, A. N. Blair 23 
and 10, being their best. 

Foresters also played a match at Shrewsbury on Aug. 
26 against Christ Church Cardinals. Owing to the loss 
of the Shropshire score-books, I am unable to say more of 
this match than that it was drawn, and that W. Wingfield 
scored 30 for F. F. 



101 



CHAPTER XIII. 
1868. 

It was at the conclusion of the last or the commence- 
ment of the coming season that a complaint from some 
country cousin of the advantage which he supposed the 
metropolitan members to derive from the annual meeting 
being held in London, induced the acting secretaries to 
issue a circular asking for nominations in writing for the 
Committee — a measure which was attended with very satis- 
factory results, inasmuch as the majority of those who 
took the trouble to write supported the executive as then 
constituted. One eminent Forester, however, sent a list 
which indicated a very radical change. His communica- 
tion is worth preserving verbatim : — 

Caunton Manor, March 12. 

Dear Mr Secretary, — As I shall be unable to attend the 
meeting on Wednesday, I forward, as you request, six nominations 
for our future Committee : — 

Dr Livingstone, 

Marie Wilton, 

Beales, M.A., 

Fortnum & Mason, 

Sir Watkin Wynne, 
and the Christy Minstrels, so long as they abide 
by their present intention never to perform out of London. — 
Faithfully yours, S. Reynolds Hole. 



I02 SCHOOLS. 

Foresters won a good match with Rugby School on June 
I and 2 by 5 wickets. The School went in first and made 
124, which the F. F. topped by 5 runs only, and then got 
the School out for 106, Buchanan and Millington bowling. 
H. Verelst 22 and (not out) 37, G. N. Marten 36 and 7, 
W. Newport 34 and 5, and E. M. Wakeman 3 and 25, were 
the best scorers for F. F. ; S. K. Gwyer 12 and 33, W. 
Yardley 38 and o, and S. P. Bucknill 29 and 20, for the 
School. 

Westminster would have won had time permitted. F. F. 
got 187— C. G. Lane 57, G. N. Marten 23, R. Brodie 32, 
E. Rutter 27, W. F. Higgins 22. The boys made 174 for 

5 wickets— F. N. Saunders 71, and R. U. Eddis 48, being 
both not out. 

Cheltenham drew with a short team of F. F., getting 1 10 
and 257 to 147 and 93 for 4 wickets. C. B. Filgate 3 and 
y6, and J. J. Reid 25 and 32 for the School, S. G. Lyttelton 
15 and 42, and J. M. Yates 32 and (not out) 17, for F. F. 
were prominent. Buchanan took 14 wickets. 

Weybridge School won outright, absentees again being 
the complaint. F. R. Price and E. Rutter made 38 and 42 
out of the 98 scored by F. F. ; E. F. Taylor 34, A. Lips- 
comb 22, and H. A. Sealy 35, of the 132 credited to the 
School. 

On July 9, Civil Service inflicted another defeat, making 
183 ; J. Kirkpatrick (not out) 43, L. C. Abbot 29, James 
Davies 25, and E. P. Thesiger 21, being to the fore. F. F. 
only compiled 80; W. K. Mott 16, T. Rathfif 10, and F. 
Baker 28, being the only double figures. 

At Haileybury, on July 14, Foresters beat the School by 

6 wickets. F. R. Price 60, E. Rutter 29, C. F. Reid 21, A. 
Lee (not out) 20, and B. Pauncefote 19 were the chief con- 
tributors to their score of 189. The boys only got 122 and 
109 ; A. E. Burr 45 and o, J. Branton Day 24 and 23, T. 
Spens 19 and 20, W. P. Brooke o and 39, scored best. 



SOUTHGATE. 
Southgate beat Foresters as usual. 



103 



SOUTHGATE. 






1ST INNINGS. 


SCORE. 


2D INNINGS. SCORE. 


Captain Parnell, c Cooper, b Rutter . 


. 18 


c Cooper, b Rutter . 


II 


R. D. Walker, b Rutter . 


9 


c A. Lee, b Rutter . 


7 


C. C. Dawson, c Ratliff, b Rutter . 


4 


c and b Rutter . 





I. D. Walker, b Rutter . 


6 


b Rutter . 


2 


V. E. Walker, c Wilmot, b Rutter 


8 


hit wicket, b Rutter . 


32 


F. Burbridge, c Paget, b Rutter 


. 30 


c Cooper, b Rutter . 


42 


E. W. Vyse, c Lee, b Rutter . 


3 


St Cooper, b Ratliff . 


65 


J. Laurence, b Riddell 


4 


not out . 


II 


A. H. Walker, not out 


• 25 


c and b Rutter . 


9 


J. Walker, c Lee, b Rutter 


20 


c Marshall, b Rutter 


9 


G. Hearne, c Lee, b Rutter 





run out 


3 


byes 


3 


byes 6, wides 2 


8 


Tota 


1 . 130 


Total 


. 199 



FREE FORESTERS. 



E. M. Riddell, c L D., b R. D. Walker 

A. A. Wilmot, c J. Walker, b Parnell . 

B. B. Cooper, 1 b w, b L D. Walker . 
T. Martin, c Lawrence, b R. D. Walker 

E. Rutter, c L D., b R. D. Walker 

H. M. Marshall, c V. E., b R. D. Walker 

A. Lee, run out 

T. Ratliff, not out 

F. Paget, St A. H., b L D. Walker 
E. Lee, c Hearne, b R. D. Walker 
Cock Robin, c Dawson, b L D Walker . 

byes 4, leg-byes 2 . . . . 

Total 



2 


c and b L D, Walker . 





7 


St A. H., bR. D.Walker 


2 


32 


b Parnell . 


30 


14 


St A. H., b R. D. Walker 


13 


4 


c Burbridge, b Parnell 


35 


9 


b Parnell . 


32 


3 


St A. H., b R. D. Walker 


n 


4 


St A. H.,bL D.Walker 


2 





c L D., b R. D. Walker 


IS 


I 


not out ... 


3 





St A. H., b LD. Walker 


I 


6 


byes 10, wides 2 . 


12 


82 


Total 


156 



ANALYSIS OF BOWLING. 
Southgate. 
First Innings. 





0. 


M. 


R. 


w. 


WIDES 


Rutter 


32 


II 


60 


9 




Riddell . 


32.2 


ID 


67 


I 






Second 


Innings. 








Rutter 


38.2 


7 


lOI 


8 


I 


Riddell 


35 


15 


61 


... 


I 


Ratliff 


I 




3 


I 




Wilmot 


3 


... 


14 


... 





I04 A DRY SUMMER. 





FREE FORESTERS. 






First Innings, 








o. 


M. 


R. 


W. 


R. D. Walker 


22 


9 


30 


5 


I. D. Walker 


4-3 


... 


16 


3 


Captain Parnell 


27 
Second 


5 
Innings. 


30 


I 


R. D. Walker 


22 


6 


52 


4 


I. D. Walker 


24 


6 


50 


3 


A. H. Walker 


4 




31 




Captain Parnell 


13 


I 


14 


3 



On July 27 and 28 they beat the Western (Manchester) 
Club by 9 wickets, their first innings reaching 226 ; H. N. 
Tennent 75 (not out) being well supported by H. Verelst 
20, Lionel Garnett 17, H. Wyatt 20, J. Bennet 21, and W. 
H. Richards 23. The Western made 137 and 96; R. 
Clayton 57 and 4, Capt. Marshall 86 and 17, F. W. Wright 
4 and 18, being their leading batsmen. 

The Scottish tour was next undertaken, under very dif- 
ferent conditions to those usually experienced north of 
the Tweed, the prolonged drought of an exceptionally 
hot summer having affected the usually over- luxuriant 
verdure of Scottish parks. Five matches were played, of 
which Foresters won three, drew one, and lost the other. 

At Manchester again, on Aug. 14 and 15, a drawn match 
was played against the Garrison, who scored 103 and 171 ; 
C R. Brander 24 and 70, Dodson 15 and 49, and R. Clay- 
ton 34 and 3, distinguishing themselves. For Foresters, D. 
W. Macdonald 6y, Stewart Garnett 52, H. Wyatt 32, H. G. 
Barron 21, made up the major part of an innings of 210. 

On the 24th Aug. F. F. began a week's cricket in Notting- 
hamshire, drawing a match at Beeston with Gentlemen of 
Notts, who made 163 and 276 — D. Pocklington 6 and 90, 
G. B. Davy 26 and 57, R. F. Miles 32 and o, &c. Foresters 
scored 173 — A. W. T. Daniel 59 and C. Booth 51. 

Lord Manvers' match proved a draw also, the Thoresby 
eleven making 172 and 193 with 5 wickets down ; J. G. 




s w 






H-1 

.si ^ 

o 



T3 5! 



1^- 



NEW GROUND. 105 

Beevor 20 and 59, H. W. Hoare 47 and 12, J. F. Hutchin- 
son 55 and 4, C. Eppleton 16 and 42, and the two not- 
outs, D. Pocklington 5 and 27 and R. F. Miles 8 and 35, 
making it hot for the bowlers. F. F. made 264 — R. D. 
Walker 40, A. W. T. Daniel 66, R. Brodie 49, T. Ratliff 
(not out) 55. 

The remaining match at Ratcliffe (one day) was won by 
F. F. ; C. Booth 80, F. Lee 40, and R. T. Whittington 30, 
with a few other contributions, realising 205 against 147 of 
Ratcliffe, for whom W. Clements 62 did best. 

A fresh campaign was inaugurated at Althorp Park, 
Sept. 7 and 8, but Foresters met with discomfiture in their 
first essay, Messrs Kenney and Smith taking all their 
wickets for 37 and 1 1 1 — R. D. Walker o and 22, A. Lee o 
and 19, F. Lee 7 and 16, E. M. Riddell 2 and 16, E. 
Rutter 5 and 14, &c. Althorp made 130 — Plumb 27, 
W. F. Higgins 21, E. M. Kenney 21, R. L. Parker 20 — 
and won by 8 wickets. 

At Uppingham F. F. reversed the spell, and scored 356 — 

E. Hume 140, F. Lee 82, G. B. Davy 65, &c. — against the 
School, who only put on 72 and 124; J. Gibson o and 23, 
W. Kidd II and 15, P. Kidd 6 and 20, W. Alexander 6 
and 17, A. Weldon 13 and o, C. Helmsley 13 and 16, being 
the chief scores. 

At the unusually late period of Michaelmas an eleven 
went, as some one cynically observed, "gooseying" to 
Woburn, where they beat the Gentlemen of Bedfordshire — 

F. Lee accounting for 9 wickets, E. Rutter for 1 1, for the 
moderate scores of 39 and 81. Although F. Lee's 27 was 
the chief score for Free Foresters, and they. were all out 
for 107, they had no difficulty in winning by 10 wickets. 

September 28 and 29. Woburn. 

1st Innings. 2d Innings. Total. 
Gentlemen of Bedfordshire . 39 81 120 

Free Foresters . . . . 107 15 122 



io6 



CHAPTER XIV. 

1869. 

Some difficulty exists at this period of the history of 
the Club in obtaining a correct record of their matches. 
It was never compulsory upon the Secretary to preserve 
the scores, which in fact were not always forwarded to him 
by the managers, nor were they invariably sent to the press. 
The recognised channels of cricket reports were at that 
time also in a transitional state, so that the scores of 
matches appeared when transmitted, in the columns some- 
times of one paper, sometimes of another. Still the frag- 
mentary notices of the doings of Free Foresters will 
suffice to show that they were by no means moribund, even 
if their sphere might be somewhat restricted. 

A good match was played at Oxford on June 7 and 8: — 



UNIVERSITY OF OXFORD. 



1ST INNINGS. 



Score. 



A. J. Fortescue, c Buchanan, b Rutter . 
J. H. Gibbon, c and b Rutter 

R. Digby, c Watson, b Rutter 

E. F. S. Tylecote, c Wakeman, b Venables 

B. Pauncefote, b Rutter 

W. Evetts, b Rutter .... 
A. F. Walter, c Wakeman, b Rutter 

F. H. Hill, not out .... 
E. Mathews, st Watson, b Buchanan 
W. A. Stewart, c Watson, b Buchanan . 
H. Armstrong, c Buchanan, b Rutter . 

byes 8, leg-byes 5, no -ball i, wides 4 . 



E. 


2D INNINGS. Score. 


31 


b Walker . . 





8 


b Walker . 





10 


b Rutter 


6 


87 


b Buchanan 








not out ... 


41 


44 


c Buchanan, b Walker 


4 


9 


c Walker, b Buchanan 


15 


52 

8 

I 
18 


b Rutter 


31 


byes 3, leg-byes 2 


• 5 



Total 



268 



Total 



OXFORD. 



107 



FREE FORESTERS. 



1ST INNINGS, 



Capt. F. Watson, c Digby, b Armstrong . 
R. Brodie, c Armstrong, b Walter . 
R. D. Walker, c Tylecote, b Mathews 

E. M. Wakeman, b Armstrong 

F. R. Evans, c Gibbon, b Mathews . 

J. Frederick, run out .... 

S. G. Lyttelton, c Pauncefote, b Armstrong 
W. F. Higgins, 1 b w, b Mathews 
E. Rutter, c Tylecote, b Hill . 
D. Buchanan, not out .... 
R. G. Venables, b Hill . . . 
byes 5, leg-byes 2, wide i . . . 



Total 



40 

1 

9 

17 

31 

66 

o 

19 

40 
o 

5 
8 

236 



ANALYSIS 


OF BOWLING. 






University of Oxford. 








Fii'st Innings, 












B. 


M. 


R. 


W. WIE 


Buchanan . 


. 


100 


7 


64 


2 


F. R. Evans 




68 


4 


53 





E. Rutter . 


. 


164 


12 


73 


7 2 


S. G. Lyttelton 


. 


60 


4 


30 


2 


R. G. Venables . 




40 


2 


29 


I 




Second Innings 








Buchanan . 


. 


72 


4 


34 


2 


R. D. Walker . 


■ . 


51 


2 


37 


3 


E. Rutter . 




36 


4 


23 


2 


R. G. Venables . 




40 


2 


3 







Free 


Foresters. 








First Innings. 








Mathews . 




96 


6 


60 


3 


Walter . 




92 


7 


40 


I 


Hill . 




116 


12 


47 


2 I 


Armstrong 




72 


7 


35 


3 


Fortescue . 




8 





15 





Pauncefote 




32 


2 


22 






I no-ball. 



On June ii,at Vincent Square, having got the West- 
minsters out for 193, Free Foresters scored 179 for 4 
wickets. Northcote and Rawson, 41 and 40, and R. 
Curteis, 34, got runs for the School, 7 of whose wickets 
fell to Goodrich. Chamberlayne 73, Horner 13, Goodrich 
25, Smith Barry 23, and Riddell 25 (not out), with 20 
extras, made up the F. F. score. 



io8 ESSEX. 

On June 24 v. Civil Service, F. F., with S. G. Lyttelton 
77, M. T. Martin 37, J. S. E. Hood 25, reached a total of 
181. The C. S. made 105, of which W. J. Maitland 
claimed 30, W. Hamilton 21 ; Rutter took 7 wickets, 
R. D. Walker 3. 

On June 30 and July i, at Thorndon Hall, Essex, Free 
Foresters did well, scoring 167 and 190 against the county 
professionals Carpenter and Silcock, W. H. Richards scor- 
ing 40, J. S. E. Hood 24, R. Entwisle the same, and in the 
second innings 106, C. C. Cotes 54. They dismissed 
Thorndon for 136 and 112, of which the Hon. W. Maxwell 
made 39 and 18. Ramsay and Rutter were the Forester 
bowlers. 

On July 5 and 6 F. F. succumbed to Rugby School, only 
scoring 79 and 96, of which Hood made 24 and 8, Captain 
Watson 7 and 30, C. Marriott i and 34, T. Ratliff 1 1 and 
19 (not out), R. G. Venables 13 (not out) and i. Against 
this the boys' first innings came to 211, H. W. Gardner 
scoring 44, S. K. Gwyer 39, H. Tubb 29, T. S. Pearson 
27, &c. 

On July 13 and 14 F. F. scored 94 and 229 for 8 wickets 
at Haileybury, the School making 154. A. A. Wilmot 
was the principal scorer for F. F., making 36 and 59. 

At Tooting, on July 14 and 15, the home side in two 
innings made a total of 230, while the Foresters in one 
reached 271— A. W. Daniel 98, A. A. Wilmot 61, E. 
Rutter 34, &c. Rutter bowled 7 wickets, Daniel 5. 

A fine batting display took place at Southgate on July 
19 and 20 : — 

FREE FORESTERS. 

1ST INNINGS. Score. 2D innings. Score. 

B. B. Cooper, c and b Burnett . . lo st A. H., b. I. D. Walker . loi 

A. A. Wilmot, c J., b V. E. Walker . 14 st A. H., b I. D. Walker . 5 

A. W. T. Daniel, b R. D. Walker . 36 c Calvert, b A. Vyse . . 2 

J. E. Congreve, c Burnett, b R. D. Walker 51 st A. H., b I. D. Walker . 11 

T. W. Baggallay, b R. D. Walker . 9 c and b A. Vyse ... 15 

Capt. Watson, c Burnett, b I. D. Walker 78 c Mathews, b R. D. Walker 14 



SOUTHGATE, 



\QC^ 



1ST INNINGS. 
E. Rutter, 1 b w, b R. D. Walker . 
D. Moffat, St A. H., b R. D. Walker 
S. Harper, c J. , b R. D. Walker . 
M. T. Martin, not out . 
W. H. Richards, run out 

byes 6, wides 4 ... 

Total 



)RE. 21) INNINGS. SCORE. 

b I. D. Walker ... 45 

1 not out .... 3 
II b A. Vyse . . . . o 
41 St A. H., b I. D. Walker . i 

I c J. Walker, b A. Vyse . 4 

10 bye I, leg-bye i, wides 2 . 4 

262 Total . 205 



SOUTHGATE 

1ST INNINGS 

E. Mathews, c Congreve, b Rutter 
V. E. Walker, c Watson, b Rutter 
E. Dowson, c Moffat, b Rutter 
I. D. Walker, b Rutter . 
C. Calvert, b Daniel 
E. W. Burnett, c Cooper, b Harper 
R. D. Walker, c Martin, b Daniel 
A. Vyse, st Watson, b Rutter 
E. W. Vyse, b Daniel . 
A. H. Walker, not out . 
J. Walker, b Harper 
byes 9, wides 2 



Total 



15 
53 
I 
10 
38 
18 

17 
5 
4 
24 
46 
II 

242 



In the second innings of Southgate, 1. D. Walker scored (not out) 10, E. W. 
Vyse, c and b Harper, 16 ; byes 2, — total 28. Umpires, Mudie and G. Hearne. 

On Aug. 9 and 10, at Beeston, F. F. made 192 and 342, 
of which fianiel contributed 70 and 49, M. T. Martin o and 
73; while Gentlemen of Notts scored 119 and 121 for 6 
wickets — E. M. Riddell, 43 and 12, was best. 

The three following days were occupied at Thoresby, 
where the bat was again in the ascendant, Free Foresters 
scoring 147 and 178— S.-G. Lyttelton 35 and 65, B. T. 
Fetherston 4 (not out) and 63 (not out), Booth 39 and 9, 
&c. ; while Thoresby responded with innings of %}^ and 205 
— H. H. Gillett 45 and 5, J. G. Beevor 5 and 54, R. Miles 
o and 53. 

At Uppingham, on Sept. 8 and 9, F. F. scored 114 and 
156 — E. Rutter o and 27, B. Fetherston 7 and 22, T. Ratlifif 
15 and 17, A. Lee 17 and 23 (not out) — to the School's 
first innings of 149, in which the two Greens made 46 each. 



no 



CHAPTER XV. 

1870. 

A MATCH with their old hosts and rivals at Bullingdon, 
on May 28, started the season of 1870, Bullingdon scoring 
163, including 40 from C. Hoare and 21 each from T. 
Hartly and A. Jeffreys : against this F. F. had scored 117 
for 5 wickets at the call of time, R. Brodie making 48, A. 
H. Smith Barry 22, H. M. Lindsell 20. 

On June 13 and 14, at Rugby, the School made 156 and 
71 — H. Tubb 56 and 4 ; F. F. made 60 and 183 — E. Tyle- 
cote 18 and 32, W. Hadow 6 and 36. Francis took 11 
wickets. 

On the 29th June they encountered Civil Service, mak- 
ing 195 — Booth 62, W. G. Armitstead 22, Martin 22, C. C. 
Cotes 20 (not out) — to the 142 of C. S., 7 of whose wickets 
fell to O. Mordaunt. 

On the 1st of July Haileybury scored 130 and 139 for 7 
wickets, against 140 for F. F., of which D. Moffat con- 
tributed 52. 

On the 6th and 7th, F. F. played at Southgate. 

FREE FORESTERS. 

1ST INNINGS. SCORE. 2D INNINGS. SCORE. 

M. Turner, b Horner ....2b Horner .... 2 

C. B. Marriott, c Dowson, b R. Walker 18 b R. Walker ... 10 

S. C. Voules, c I. Walker, b Horner . 27 c R. Walker, b Homer . 12 

E. W. Burnett, c and b R. Walker . 2 b R. Walker . . . o 

E. Rutter, c Hearne, b Orme . . 29 c R. Walker, b Horner . 8 





W. F. Higgins. 



F. G. Williamson. 



i 



•> 

^ ^ ? 





A. H. Smith Barry. 



A. E. Seymour. 



SOUTHGATE. 


III 


1ST INNINGS. 


SCORE. 


2D INNINGS. SCORE. 


F. Crowder, 1 b w, b I. Walker . 


. 46 


b R. Walker 


27 


P. Lancashire, c Hearne, b I. Wal 


<er . 2 


c and b R. Walker 


4 


V. Ellis, not out . 


• 23 


b Horner 


3 


W. Maclaren, b Horner 


10 


b R. Walker 


15 


G. Hearne, jun. (em.), b Horner . 


2 


A. Daniel, not out 


II 


E. Hume, absent .... 





c I. Walker, b R. Walker 


3 


byes 


2 


leg-bye . 


I 


Total 


. 163 


Total 


96 


SOUTHGATE. 




W. Hadow, St Turner, b Rutter 


• 37 






S. H. Akroyd, c Burnett, b Ellis 


. 18 






R. D. Walker, not out . 


• 74 






I. D. Walker, b Marriott 


. 19 






C. L. Thornton, b Marriott . 


. 23 


not out 


• 31 


E. Dowson, c Marriott, b Rutter 


• 23 


not out 


8 


A. Vyse, c Marriott, b Rutter 





c Marriott, b Ellis 


5 


J. Horner, st Turner, b Rutter 





b Ellis. 


II 


J. Walker, b Rutter 


2 






W. Orme, c Voules, b Rutter 





st Turner, b Rutter 





G. Hearne, b Ellis . 


I 






leg-bye 2, wide i 


3 


byes, &c. . 


5 


Tota 


I . 200 


Total 


. 60 



On the 13th, at Tooting, Foresters scored 202 — E. Hume 
55 ; and Tooting were disposed of by R. D. Walker and T. 
Ratliff for m. 

On the 20th, Malvern College made 142 and Free For- 
esters 134 ; 32 byes and leg-byes swelled the score of the 
School, Ramsay taking 7 wickets. J. G. Nicholls made 36 
and A. W. Pim 20. For Foresters, H. Foster made 59, 
Herbert Garnett 30 (not out). The ground was on the old 
slope, and the byes all ran down-hill. 

At Eton, on July 25, the School scored 145 — G. Cammel 
32, G. Harris 27, &c. — while Foresters, with nine men only, 
contrived to score 132, M. Turner being best with 59. E. 
Rutter took 5 Eton wickets. 

On the same day Free Foresters played against Cheshire 
at Chelford. The County played two men short, and only 
made 88 and 82, Eccles taking 11 wickets. F. F., with the 
aid of 78 (not out) from Eccles, 46 from Verelst, 27 each 



112 



ECCLES. 



from D. M'Donald and F. R. Price, and 20 from R. Garnett, 
claimed 254. 

And on the 27th and 28th they achieved a phenomenal 
performance on the Western ground, Manchester. 



FREE FORESTERS. 

C. L. Hornby, b S. Garnett 

F. R. Price, b S. Garnett . 

C. V. Eccles, St Dunn, b Birley 

W. Townshend, c Latham, b Garnett 

H. W. Verelst, c Dunn, b Birley 

W. G. Armitstead, c sub., b S. Garnett 

H. G. Barron, run out 

R. Garnett, b S. Garnett . 

L. Garnett, c and b S. Garnett 

G. H. Allsopp, b Birley . 
S. Peel, not out 
T. Wakley, b Birley . 

byes 8, leg-bye i, wide i 



Total 



SCORE. 

14 
II 

85 
4 
4 
24 
40 
28 

9 
27 
II 

o 
10 

267 



WESTERN. 



1ST INNINGS. 

A. Bradshaw, b Eccles . 

V. K. Armitage, c Eccles, b Barron 

F. Higgins, c Hornby, b Eccles 

F. H. Birley, c Eccles, b Barron 

S. Garnett, c Hornby, b Eccles 

W. H. Cooke, b Eccles . 

J. Latham, run out 

J. P. Hamer, run out 

J. Edwards, b Eccles 

J. A. Richards, c and b Barron 

W. Dunn, not out . 

T. Garnett, c and b Eccles 

byes 4, leg-bye i, wide i, no-bal 

Total 



SCORE, 
o 
o 
o 

I 
o 
o 
o 

9 
o 

1 

5 
o 

7 
23 



2D INNINGS. SCORE. 

b Peel o 

run out .... 10 

run out .... 12 

St Hornby, b Peel . . 12 

c Eccles, b Barron . . loi 

St R. Garnett, b Eccles . o 

St R. Garnett, b Eccles . 4 

c Armitstead, b Barron . 27 

st Hornby, b Peel . . 7 

b Barron .... 3 

b Eccles .... 6 

not out .... 4 

byes 2, wides 10, no-balls 3 15 

Total . 201 



After a lengthened period of estrangement from the 
scenes which originally witnessed their formation, Free 
Foresters revisited Warwickshire, and commenced on Aug. 
6 with a match against a local twenty-two at Sutton 
Coldfield, whose first innings only reached the total of 74. 
F. F., playing twelve men, then scored 124, R. F. Miles 
contributing 28, Regd. Garnett 22, A. Hillyard 20. In a 



WARWICKSHIRE WEEK. 113 

second attempt the home side showed up better, having 
made 69 for 3 wickets, Herbert Garnett (not out) 42. 

During the next week the matches played were on three 
grounds where for a series of years the Club were very 
much at home, and enjoyed the best of cricket and 
hospitality. 

At Elmdon (Mr W. C. Alston's) Foresters won with 
129 and 187 to 75 and 98, Miles and Price, with Gibbon 
and Foster as a change, being much on the spot. H. 
Verelst 43 and 33, J. H. Gibbon 24 and 60, and Robert 
Garnett o and 35, were prominent for F. F. ; for Elmdon 
W. Smythe 8 and 25, A. Hillyard 21 and 13, and B. T. 
Fetherston 25 and 5, did best. 

Mr Bagot, thanks to Rylott's bowling, and a fine though 
fortunate innings of yC from Mr H. W. Gardner, drew the 
match in his favour, Pype Hayes counting 207 and 69 for 
3 wickets, to F. F. 150 and 171, S. P. Bucknill being the 
hero of the occasion with 37 and 27, H. Foster scored 8 
and 44, F. R. Price i and 37 ; Ramsay took 5 wickets. 

The third match was at the house of the Hon. E. Parker 
Jervis, where a Staffordshire eleven succumbed to Hillyard, 
Gibbon, and W. G. Armitstead for 61 and 132 — M. Graham 
25 and 12, E. W. Burnett 9 and 32 ; while Foresters made 
174, and won by 7 wickets — A. Hillyard 43 and 6, R. 
Brodie 41 and 3, and G. H. Allsopp 26, being their leading 
batsmen. 

During this period the Scottish tour was going on, Mr 
Buchanan being manager. The matches will be found in 
the chapter devoted to these events. 

A match not on the programme was played at Burton- 
on-Trent, Aug. 8 and 9, against an eleven of the Hon. and 
Rev. R. Moncrieff's, who scored 189 and 81 — G. M. Robin- 
son 41 and 24 (not out). Free Foresters responded with 
253 — J. G. Beevor 98 — and won by ten wickets. 

At Woburn on the 30th Aug. they beat Bedfordshire, 

H 



114 A GOOD FINISH. 

who made 77 and 140 — T. S. Pearson 19 and 27, W. Vyse 
25 and 21. Foresters claimed 130, G. Strachan making 
63 (not out) and Bull 13. The latter, who came upon the 
ground on horseback, was induced to put on pads, but not 
to change his shoes : a spur caught in his pad in turning 
for a second run, and he came a cropper. F. F. had little 
difficulty in winning by 6 wickets — G. Strachan 27 and 
R. D. Walker 22 being not out. 

An eleven, which may be presumed not to have been 
very strong in bowling, was kept out in the field all day at 
Hams Hall on the 14th Sept. by Crusaders, who made 376 
— C. J. Brune 121, A. Hillyard 92. 

At Newark on Sept. 19 F. F. finished their season by 
obtaining 91, of which E. A. Chester made 26 and T. 
Ratliff 28 (not out), against 84 for Newark, Rutter and 
Mitchell taking the wickets. The latter made 31 (not out) 
in a fragment of a second innings. 



J 





W. M. Coyney. 



G. H. Allsopp. 





W. W. Bagot. 



A. L. Vernon. 



"5 



CHAPTER XVI. 

1871. 

With 1871 begins a new era in the fortunes of the old 
club. A discontented veteran was indeed heard to observe 
that their first motto, '' United though Untied," had been 
changed into " The Singers go before " ; but this ebullition 
of spleen was in no degree justified by facts, cricket and 
good fellowship going hand in hand with music in a 
harmonious trio. 

The first match at Hastings, May 11, was unfinished 
owing to the long scores of F. F., who totalled 298, M. 
Turner contributing 46, E. Hume 31, H. M. Marshall 52, 
S. G. Lyttelton 39, J. Marsham 53, T. RatlifF44 (not out). 
Against this Hastings made 80 for 4 wickets — W. Pope 39 
(not out). 

On the 22'd and 23d May, at Cheltenham, they fared 
worse. The boys made 227, of which F. W. Francis 
claimed 65. F. F. then scored 169 — F. R. Price 30, G. N. 
Wyatt 25, J. H. Gibbon 29 (not out) — and got the School 
wickets down for 140; but when 5 wickets had made 81, 
time was called. 

On June 7, at Oxford, F. F. beat Bullingdon by 120, with 
4 wickets down, to 109. 

On June 20, at HiUingdon, F. F. made 125 — R. D. Walker 
39, D. Moffat 24 ; and the next day, at Vincent Square, 



Ii6 MUSIC, 

the club defeated Westminster School by 132 to 'j'^, the 
boys' second innings realising 58 for 4 wickets. 

On June 28, at Battersea, F. F. scored 125 to the 152 of 
Civil Service, 5 of whose wickets fell in the second innings 
for 47. J. H. Berger made 65 for C. S. ; F. Paget 36, 
G. Tuck 29, G. Wyatt 26 for F. F. 

July 7 and 8 were occupied in the match at Shoebury- 
ness, which was won by F. F., the Gunners m.aking 82 
and 153 — Bomb. Macpherson playing a good not -out 
innings of 56. Foresters made 98 in their first innings — 
H. M. Marshall 54, and E. P. Ash 21 — but in the second 
innings Turner scored 57 (not out), Marshall 7, Ash (re- 
tired) 47, E. Rutter 21, and Francis 5 (not out), with 
extras 138; and on July 10 and 11 met Rugby School, 
Foresters making 253 — H. M. Marshall 71, B. T. Fether- 
ston 50, J. Marsham 32, E. P. Ash 21, &c. Against this, 
on a wet second day, the boys made 86, and 53 for 3 
wickets — G. H. Nash 19 and 28, E. L. Curry 24 and 6 
(not out). 

A good match ensued on July 12 and 13 at Southgate. 

FREE FORESTERS. 

1ST INNINGS. SCORE. 2D INNINGS. SCORE, 

H, M. Marshall, c Smith, b R. D. Walker 6 c Thornton, b R. D. Walker 14 
M. Turner, b V. E. Walker 



E. P. Ash, b Thornton . 

F. Crowder, c V. E., b R. D. Walker 
W. Law, c V. E. Walker, b Thornton 
T. Ratliff, not out . 
E. Rutter, b Thornton 
M. T. Martin, st I. D., b R. D. 
A. Percy, b R. D. Walker 

G. Hearne, jun. (em.), absent 
byes 9, leg-byes 2 . 



Walker 



Total 



64 cl. D., b R. D. Walker . 7 

2 c I. D., b R. D. Walker . 8 

76 c Fryer, b R. D. Walker . 38 

12 c and b R. D. Walker . 14 

7 b Thornton . . .13 

2 c Marsham, b R. D. Walker i 

8 cl. D., b R. D. Walker . 15 

3 c V. E. Walker, b Barber 6 
o not out .... 7 

II byes 3, leg-bye i, wides 3 7 

[91 Total . 130 



SOUTHGATE. 

J. W. Dale, run out 24 c Rutter, b Ash . . 13 

C. L. Thornton, b Law .... 59 not out . . . . i 

L. S. Howell, c Ratliff, b Law ... 22 not out .... 7 



MATCHES. 




117 


1ST INNINGS. 


SCORE. 


2D INNINGS. 


SCORE. 


F. E. R. Fryer, c Martin, b Law 


• 17 


c Percy, b Ash . 


2 


C. J. Smith, c Marshall, b Rutter 




22 


St Marshall, b Law . 


6 


I. D. Walker, b Law 




8 


c Ash, b Law . 


I 


R. D. Walker, c Rutter, b Law 




2 






C. Marsham, c Martin, b Law . 




28 


bAsh 


5 


W. Fletcher, b Law . 











V. E. Walker, b Law 




7 






J. Barber, not out 




3 


b Percy . 


7 


leg-byes 3, wide-bye i, no-balls 2 




6 


bye I, leg-bye i . 


2 


Tota 




198 


Total 


• 44 


Drawn 


owing to wet. 





On July 15, a capital struggle gave Malvern College a 
majority of 4 runs — Y, F. 82, Malvern Z6 ; F. F., second 
innings, 93 for 7 wickets. 

At Eccles, July 17 and 18, the Western Club succumbed, 
making only 53 and Z6 — V. K. Armitage 2 and 30 (not out) 
— in response to 166 and 124 from F. F., W. Townshend 
scoring 52 and 66, H. G. Barron '^'j and 19, F. R. Price 23 
and 8. 

Liverpool, on the two days following, made a draw, 
obtaining 121 and 184 for 6 wickets, against F. F.'s 163. 
For Liverpool, D. Cunningham 30 and 42, and G. Wild 23 
and 41, were prominent ; for F. F., W. G. Armitstead 35, 
P. H. Mellor 34, F. R. Price 18, H. Garnett 17. 

At the Node on the 3d Aug. the home side made 144 ; 
but the Foresters, with 8 wickets down, 267. 

The Scottish tour this year involved six matches — four 
won, one lost, and one drawn. 

The Warwickshire week, which commenced August 7, 
embraced three matches, the first, at Elmdon, being a 
drawn one, a little in favour of F. F., who made 207 — G. N. 
Wyatt 90 and J. H. Gibbon 62 being foremost. Had 
Malcolm Graham not stumbled after getting a gallery 
catch right into his hands, and so dropped the ball, it 
would have been a one-innings affair ; as it was, the home 
side having made 125 in their first innings, totalled 2 more 
in the second for 8 wickets, T. Ratliff 47 and 7, A. Hillyard 



Ii8 



DOUBTFUL. 



31 in each innings, and B. T. Fetherston 20 and 34, being 
leaders. 

The two days following were occupied at Pype Hayes, 
where the house eleven comprised Silcock (the Essex 
bowler), by whose assistance they got F. F. out for 80 ; 
but were unable to better that total by more than 6 runs. 
In the second innings F. F. scored 239, their best per- 
formers being J. H. Gibbon 23 and 45, F. R. Price 20 and 
22, E. Rutter 5 and 33, A. Hillyard 7 and 57, S. P. Buck- 
nill 5 and 41. Rutter and Mordaunt then disposed of 7 
wickets for 56 — J. Marshall 22 and 25, and J. W. Gardner 
39 and 5, being noteworthy. 

The third match, on the Sutton Ground, they lost to 
Deddington by 10 wickets, F. F. getting 119 and 103 — 
J. H. Gibbon 35 and 4, F. R. Price 24 and 11, J. W. 
Gardner 10 and 26, H. W. Verelst 17 (not out) and 13, 
doing best. For Deddington, who made 200, T. H. 
Hudson 48 and J. G. Crowdy 69 deserve remark. 

Foresters beat Gentlemen of Notts at Beeston, August 
15 and 16, by 10 wickets. 



NOTTS. 

1ST INNINGS. SCORE. 

G. B. Davy, b Booth 12 

W. F. Story, b Booth .... 8 
J. G. Beevor, c Prior, b Booth . . .11 
E. M, H. Riddell, st Martin, b Walker . 5 
J. R. Truswell, c sub., b Walker . . 16 
G. Fillingham, c Martin, b Walker . . 6 
T. Barber, c and b Walker . . . o 
Capt. Parry, b Walker .... 2 
G. Fellows, not out ..... 26 
H. Enfield, run out ..... 11 
J. R. Forman, c Rutter, b Booth . . 9 
byes 5, leg-byes 4, wides 3 . . .12 

Total . 118 



2D INNINGS. SCORE. 

b Rutter .... 16 

c Martin, b Rutter . . 5 

c Walker, b Rutter . . 68 

b Rutter .... 5 

c and b Rutter ... 42 

not out .... 10 

c Freer, b Rutter . . 7 

St Martin, b Rutter . . i 

c Walker, b Rutter . . 4 

b Rutter .... 3 

c Burnett, b Rutter . . 28 

byes 2, leg-byes i, wides 5 8 

Total . 197 



1ST INNINGS. 

W. C. Higgins, b Story 
E. Rutter, c Davy, b Story 



FREE FORESTERS. 

SCORE. 1ST INNINGS. SCORE. 

36 M. T. Martin, b Riddell . . o 
20 R. D. Walker, c Enfield, b Barber 152 



DRA WN. 



119 



1ST INNINGS. 
C. Booth, c Story, b Riddell 

E. W. Burnett, b Riddell . 

F. Paget, b Enfield . 
F. H. Freer, c and b Barber 
H. W. Holden, not out 



SCORE. 

o 

35 

o 

26 

19 Total 

In the 2d innings Holden scored 3 and Earle i, both not out. 



1ST INNINGS. SCORE. 

G. Prior, run out . . . . i 

R. B. Earle, b Truswell . . i 

Extras 23 



313 



Gentlemen of Lincolnshire next day made 183 — J. Dale 
and F. Rhodes 55 and 58 — and F. F. replied with 177, M. 
Turner 56 and J. G. Beevor 44 doing best. Their antag- 
onists then scored 191. Dale and Rhodes again 43 and 59, 
and the match was drawn. 

They made a very fine draw at Hawkstone, August 
21 and 22, against the Hon. Geoffrey Hill, who had col- 
lected a strong team, including A. N. Hornby. 



HON. G. R. HILL'S ELEVEN. 

1ST INNINGS. 

T. W. Dale, b W. G. Armitstead . 

A. N. Hornby, c Pearson, b Armitstead 
R. D. Walker, 1 b w, b Armitstead . 
F. E. R. Fryer, c sub., b Armitstead 
J. D. Walker, b Hutchison 
F. C. Cobden, c and b Townshend . 
J. S. Phillips, b H. S. Armitstead . 
W. Wingfield, run out 

B. R. Hill, St Armitstead, b Twemlow 
T. H. Edwards, not out . 
Hon. G. R. Hill, st Armitstead, b Twemlow 

Extras 

Total . 326 



SCORE. 

22 

. 170 


2D INNINGS. SCORE. 

c Twemlow, b Steadman . 23 
b Wright. ... 3 


12 

7 
. 43 
6 
22 

8 


c Tippinge, b Steadman . 8 
c Pearson, b Wright . 6 
c Hutchison, b Steadman • 7 


not out .... I 
not out .... I 


low 6 
. 13 


Extras .... 3 



Total 



52 



FREE FORESTERS. 



W. G. Armitstead, c J. D., b R. D. Walker 

W. Townshend, st Hornby, b R. D. Walker 

T. Pearson, run out .... 

F. W. Wright, and b R. D. Walker 

H. Steadman, b R. D. Walker . 

J. R. Hutchison, b R. D. Walker 

H. S. Armitstead, c Cobden, b R. D. 

Walker . 
F. Twemlow, b Fryer 
H. Bidwell, not out . 
V. Tippinge, run out 
Substitute , 

Extras . 



Total 



4 


st Hornby, b Walker 


20 


62 


cR. D., bj. D. Walker . 


5 


18 


st Hornby, b Fryer . 


76 


7 


c and b Cobden 


34 





c Dale, b R. D. Walker . 


35 


4 


b Cobden 


4 


52 


c Edwards, b J. D. Walker 


17 





b Fryer .... 


10 





st Hornby, b Fryer . 


10 


4 


not out . 


13 





b Fryer .... 





8 


Extras .... 


14 



159 



Total 



238 



120 NOTTINGHAMSHIRE. 

Another draw took place at Drayton with Gentlemen of 
Northamptonshire on August 28 and 29. Foresters scored 
160 and 128, S. G. Lyttelton 88 and 15, E. H. Warner 17 
and 26, and V. Ellis 37 and o (not out), distinguishing 
themselves. For the Shire, who got 124 and 115 with 4 
wickets to fall, W. F. Higgins 42 and 13, J. Marsham 5 
and 36, FI. B. Upcher 21 and ii, and H. H. Gillett 4 and 
31, were scorers. 

The same week at Higham Ferrers F. F. won outright, 
making 168 and 122 to their antagonists' 133 and ']'^\ 
E. H. Warner 63 and 8, H. W. Gardner 22 and 19, and 
E. W. Burnett 2 and (not out) 27, were to the fore. 

The last match of this season was played at Newark, 
Notts, on September 6 and 8, an archery contest being 
sandwiched between the two days. F. F. got 74 and 103, 
J. Marsham 20 and 43 (retired) being the champion. The 
Langford Club, their opponents, got 120 and 22 for 3 
wickets. There was probably more good fellowship than 
strict cricket upon the occasion, as evidenced by the ludi- 
crous account which appeared in ' Forester Chronicle ' : — 

In an ancient manuscript recently discovered amid the ruins 
of the once famous castle of Novus Audi or " New-hark," it is 
recorded that at some remote period of the dark ages the city 
suffered from the inroads of a race of wandering barbarians, clad 
in uncouth apparel, and wielding clubs of peculiar construction. 
The chief of this race of banditti was known by the title of Old 
Tom, either by hereditary right, or from a corruption of the 
French H Automne^ at which season of the year these marauders 
were wont to make their annual appearance. Tradition, merging 
into fable, varies on the subject of his personal appearance, at 
one time asserting that the figure of an animal of the feline tribe, 
which still adorns the premises of licensed victuallers, was ori- 
ginally intended as a representation of this redoubtable chieftain ; 
while at another, with more probability, he is depicted as an in- 
dividual devoid of any such hirsute adornment, and only resem- 
bling the symbolical quadruped in the gladsome expression of his 
countenance. History, indeed, does not bear out the notion of 
ferocity as associated with these "Silvicolse liberi," or "Free 



''NOTORIOUSLY PLEASANT." 121 

Foresters." The tribute which they exacted from the natives was 
of a trifling character, consisting merely of lodging and moderate 
refreshment, enlivened by the society of the female part of the 
community. In return they endeavoured to instruct their enter- 
tainers in various amusing arts, such as music and dancing, but 
especially in a " mystery," now long forgotten, called cricket, the 
nature of which it is somewhat difficult, from the confused and 
contradictory descriptions preserved to us, to discover with accu- 
racy. One eminent Free Forester, whose name we decipher as 
Marsham, evidently practised it with some reference to the science 
of astronomy, for we read of his " star-gazing innings." That it 
was in some way connected with a ball is quite clear, or rather 
that balls of different sizes were in use, as the prefix wide which 
frequently accompanies the word involves the fact of a narrower 
species of ball being also employed. Whatever the nature of the 
pursuit, it appears to have been a most engrossing one, for a 
" score," or schedule, almost obliterated (probably by the tears of 
the losing side), is still preserved, in which the titles " Mrs " and 
" Miss " accompany the names of the most efficient bowleuscs and 
redoubtable batsmen, or perhaps batswomen. The date of this 
latter cricketalian celebration we have no difficulty in fixing as 
the 7th September 1871, though the date of the match of which 
the score is appended is open to doubt, inasmuch as the historian, 
" Regulus tenet totus," ^ from whom we have extracted much of 
the foregoing dissertation, records in medieval or canine Latin an 
oration made to the nomads by one " Rector," probably the pilot 
who steered them up the reaches of the Trent. In order that the 
reader may form his own opinion, we append the speech : " Quae 
cum ita sint, silvicote liberi, ad meam vocem aures arrigite. Sunt 
in hoc aevo duo monstra horrenda, quibus certamina cricketaha, 
nisi ipsa diruta sint, omnino destruentur. Hoc, malum infestum, 
accrescens, superjectio dictum; quum in loco hominum adcampum 
telegrammata accedunt ; res a viris conjunctissimis etsi solutis ab- 
horrenda. Illud, in .campo laxitas, omissiones, deprehendendi 
impotentia, ab lusoribus spectatoribusque deprecanda ! Necnon, 
fratres, ad exemplum majorum respectate. His ungulae corne- 
scentes, his paxilli celeres. Horum famam respicientes, ite qua 
gloria vos expectat, vociferantes — ' nunquam morior dicite.' " 

^ Wren holds whole (Reynolds Hole). 



:22 



CHAPTER XVII. 

1872. 

The stormy inifluence which pervaded the sky during 
this year interfered not a little with cricket throughout ; 
nevertheless it was a season full of interest in various 
ways. It was resolved to try the experiment of a dinner 
on the day of the annual meeting ; and this was carried 
out, though scarcely with as much success as had been 
anticipated — not more than a dozen members attending — 
at the St James's Hall Restaurant on March 22. 

F. F. took the field at Cheltenham, where the match was 
drawn owing to wet — " cold incessant showers on the first 
day, and heavy rain on the second." F. F. made 80 ; the 
College 120 for three wickets. 

At Hillingdon, on May 27, F. F. lost, scoring only 65, of 
which R. D. Walker compiled 27 ; Rutter took 6 Forester 
wickets. Hillingdon made 72 and 69 — A. Rutter con- 
tributing 16 and 4, E. Rutter 5 and 20; Walker took 9 
wickets, Novelli 5. 

At Canterbury on the 3d June they stayed in until a 
thunderstorm broke up the game ; nevertheless they made 
a total of 179— F. Crgwder 36, N. G. Lyttelton 27, H. M. 
Marshal], 23, &c. — against which on the second day the 
Cathedral city could only show 71 and 47. 

On the 5th and 6th, at the Mote, Maidstone, the home 
team, by the aid of 38 from John Marsham, scored 100, a 



A SOUTHGATE STRUGGLE. 



123 



number which F. F., despite 43 from K. M. Mackenzie, 
fell short of by I. In the second innings the Mote made 
114, and F. F. 64 for one wicket — Crowder (not out) 40. 

F. F. then won a match, of which the score has not been 
preserved, at Sevenoaks Vine. 

The Civil Service match on June 25 was interfered 
with by rain. C. S. scored 119 for 8 wickets. F. F. did 
not bat. 

At Deddington, on the 3d and 4th July, Foresters 
laboured under the absentee plague, and were beaten by 
3 wickets : it was quite a bowler's match, F. F. only 
making 120 in both innings — F. Crowder, 4 and 33, being 
best. Rutter took 7 wickets of Deddington, Law 8, 
Colmore 2. 

At Southgate, July 10 and 11, the match was drawn 
after a close and interesting finish. 

FREE FORESTERS. 



1ST INNINGS. SCORE. 


2D INNINGS. S 


CORE. 


W, Law, run out 


5 


b L D. Walker . 


17 


F. Crowder, c J., b V. E. Walker . 


18 


thrown out by V. E. Walker 


G. D. Baker, b Voules .... 


32 


c Hornby, b Voules . 


33 


C. B. Marriott, b Thornton . 


56 


c Vyse, b L D. Walker 


16 


H. M. Marshall, c I. D., b V. E. Walker 





b Thornton . 


T 


W. Evetts, c Hornby, b Thornton . 


24 


c Vyse, b Voules . 


5 


C. K. Francis, b Voules .... 


17 


c \. D. Walker, b Hornby 


90 


T. Ratliff, b Thornton .... 





not out 


48 


E. Rutter, b Voules . . . . 


4 


c I. D. Walker, b Voules 


15 


L. W. Novelli, not out . 


3 


St Vyse, b L D. Walker 


6 


R. G. Venables. b Voules 





c Hornby, b Voules . 


4 


byes 4, leg-byes 4 . . . . 


8 


byes 4, wides 3 


7 


Total 


167 


Total 


. 242 


SOUTHGATE. 




1ST INNINGS. SCORE. 


2D INNINGS. S 


CORE. 


C. I. Thornton, c Venables, b Francis . 


3 


absent. 




C. J. Ottaway, run out .... 


5 


run out 


. 30 


J. W. Dale, b Rutter .... 


3 


b Francis 


58 


S. C. Voules, b Rutter .... 


14 


b Francis 


. 55 


A. N. Hornby, b Francis 


39 


c Novelli, b Law 


3 


A. F. Smith, b Law .... 


13 


absent. 




L D. Walker, b Francis 


8 


not out 


9 


V. E. Walker, not out . 


15 


b Francis 


10 



124 EXIT ARMITSTEAD. 



1ST INNINGS. 


SCORE. 


2D INNINGS. 


SCORE. 


C. D. Marsham, b Francis 





c Rutter, b Law . 


7 


W. Vyse, c Evetts, b Francis . 


3 


b Francis . 





J. Walker, b Law .... 





not out ... 





byes 6, leg-byes 5 . . . 


II 


byes 6, leg-byes i . 


7 


Total 


. 114 


Total 


. 179 



At Rugby, July 15 and 16, the School made two innings 
of 81 runs each, L. Jeffery 28 and 2, and E. P. Barlow 
17 and 10, being best scorers. Buchanan took 11 wickets, 
Ellis 7. F. F. reckoned 97 for their first innings, nobody 
making 20 runs, and in the second only scored 34, Jeffery, 
Francis, and Ridley bowling them out. H. W. Gardner 
did best with 16 and 17. On the other hand, at Malvern 
they won easily, Ashley Walker 43, Malcolm Graham 45, 
and F. R. Price 30, being the leading figures in a score of 
205. The boys scored 60 and 120, A. H. Stratford 10 and 
39 ; Hull, Walker, and F. Garnett bowled. 

At the Old Trafford ground a very interesting match 
against Gentlemen of Lancashire was associated with a 
disaster to W. G. Armitstead, which, while it robbed the 
Club of his companionship and cricket in some measure, 
was the cause of the introduction of a most valued 
member to their ranks, as Appleby kindly volunteered 
to take Armitstead's place in the match the same week 
at Birkenhead. Armitstead's accident is thus described 
by an eye-witness : — 

He started to run, turned back, and then quickly started again, 
fell, got up, but immediately fell again. I was sitting with his 
brother Henry at the time, and W. G. came, with assistance 
hopping off the ground, and sat down by us for a few minutes ; 
but being strongly recommended to go and see what was the 
matter, after laughing and talking for some time, he went, and a 
surgeon on the ground pronounced the "Achilles Tendon" 
snapped in two, and that he would be on his bed or sofa for 
some weeks, and not have the full use of it again for probably 
two years. I only hope it may not prove so bad after further 
examination. On going away he said, " I have played my last inn- 
ings, Houson ! " 



ENTER APPLEBY. 



[25 



FREE FORESTERS. 



1ST INNINGS. 



SCORE, 



W. Townshend, c Bousfield, b Murchie 
W. G. Armitstead, b Appleby 
J. R. Hutchison, b Murchie . 

F. R. Price, c Bousfield, b Appleby 

C, G. O. Bridgeman, c and b Critchley 
H. S. Armitstead, b Critchley 

G. Kempson, b Critchley 

J. Pender, not out .... 
L. O. Garnett, c Bousfield, b Appleby 
C. A. Chester, c Critchley, b Murchie 
R. Entwistle, b Appleby 
Extras 



Total 



E. 


2D INNINGS. SCORE. 


34 


b Appleby . 


43 


II 


retired hurt . 


26 


27 


c Bousfield, b Schofield 


21 


4 


not out 


45 


16 


b Murchie . 


32 









4 






7 


c and b Murchie . 


10 


2 


not out .... 


14 


7 













4 


Extras 


10 



16 



Total 



GENTLEMEN OF LANCASHIRE. 



T. O. Potter, c H. Armitstead, b Bridgeman 
E. Bousfield, c Entwistle, b Garnett 
J. F. Leese, st H. Armitstead, b Bridgeman 
J. Schofield, b Garnett .... 
A. Ollivant, c Hutchison, b Garnett 
J. Murchie, b Pender .... 
S. Rowley, b Pender .... 
A. M. Watson, c Garnett, b Townshend 
A. Appleby, not out .... 
E. Leese, b Townshend 
J. Critchley, st H. Armitstead, b Bridgeman 
Extras 



Total 



SCORE. 

I 

73 
2 

o 

33 

o 

64 

14 

5 
7 
S 



223 



Armitstead wrote soon after to me : — 

I remember me of my Horace, and I must hang up my bat 
and pads on my study wall with the familiar stanza : 

" Vixi duellis nuper idoneus 
Et militavi non sine laiidibus ; 
Nunc arma defunctumque hello 
Mt bacuhim hie paries habitat. " 

I really was fit enough. You see I have softened the gloria — 
that is native modesty. 



During the remainder of the week F. F. beat the West- 
ern by 5 wickets, the Western scoring 70 and 143 — Capt. 
Jervis 36 and 8, H. A. H. Hulton 2 and 54, L. Garnett 5, 



126 DELUGES. 

and 31. The Foresters' first innings was j6 — J. R. Hutchi- 
son 22 ; in their second, W. Townshend was (not out) 61 
and A. M. Watson 30, C. G. O. Bridgeman 15 and 24 (not 
out). F. F. beat Birkenhead also by 52 runs, Appleby, 
Hutchison, and Bridgeman bowling. F. F. scored 175 and 
90 — L. Garnett (not out) 47 and 2, W. Townshend 36 and 8, 
F. R. Price 27 and 6, J. Garnett i and 27 (not out), &c. 
Birkenhead claimed 124 and 89, C. S. Gordon 44, the best 
score. 

The Scottish tour this year comprised six matches, four 
of which F. F. won outright and drew the other two. 

While these were in progress a week in Warwickshire 
proved a great success socially, but the cricket was almost 
ruined by stormy weather. At Pype Hayes, where F. F. 
began, they only got through in two days a couple of 
Forester innings for JJ and 62, no one making an indi- 
vidual score of 20, while the home side only managed one 
innings of 60. The next day, Aug. 7, at Elmdon, when 6 
wickets had fallen on the home side for 109 — T. Ratliff 
33, and B. Fetherston 29 — such a deluge descended that 
the match was abandoned. 

On Aug. 9 and 10, at Little Aston Hall, F. F. beat 
Staffordshire gentlemen by 9 wickets (twelve a-side), the 
County scoring 52 and 102 — M. Graham 20 and 2, W. W. 
Bagot 4 and 27, H. S. Chinn 2 and 17 (not out), being 
chief scorers; Hillyard, who took 9 wickets. Ash 8, and 
Chambers 2, being F. F. bowlers. The Club scored 85 and 
70 — E. P. Ash 35 and 6, J. Roughton 10 and 25 (not out), 
L. Garnett, 7 and 18 (not out). 

Thence to the adjoining county of Worcester, where 
F. F. lost to the County team by 6 wickets, scoring 108 
and 6"^ ; E. M. Kenney 13 and 21, and H. Verelst 24 and 
7, being noteworthy. Against the bowling of Kenney, 
Ratliff, and Chambers, the County made 142 — A. T. Lyt- 
telton 28 and H. Foster 29 being the best. 





S. p. B. Bucknill. 



H. Foster. 





E. Ramsay. 



T. Rati iff. 



DRAWS. 127 

The match with Notts Gentlemen was left drawn on a 
batsman's wicket, the County getting 203 and 233 ; S. H. 
Miles 68 (not out) and o, A. W. Cursham 40 and o, C. T. 
Ashwell II and 58 (not out), J. G. Beevor 19 and 43, E. 
M. H. Riddell, 5 and 37, helping the score. F. F. had an 
innings of 201, H. H. Gillett making y^^, H. Verelst 39, F. 
R. Price 23 ; and Ashley Walker and M. T. Martin went 
in and made 32 when time was called. 

At Thoresby the match was lost — under the circum- 
stances recorded in the appended score. Mr Reid contri- 
butes a reminiscence of this match of some interest : — 

At Lord Manvers's place at Thoresby, the F. F. always were 
warmly welcomed. The house was a very large one, and the 
cricket-ground was kept in excellent order, and the scoring as a 
rule was very big. Of course, in the days I am writing about, 
the " Closure " Act was not in force : if my memory serves me 
correctly, a wicket could have been pitched, and a good wicket 
too, on any portion of the ground ; so one expected, and not in 
vain, for the ball to come true to one in the field. I only 
played there on one occasion, and both sides were strong ; but 
the batting on such a perfect wicket was a trifle in the ascen- 
dant. Our best bowlers were being unceremoniously treated by 
^'Mit" Riddell, at that time a first-rate batsman, and we were 
rather in a hole. I, bashful at times, plucked up courage and 
said to the captain, " If you really want a wicket, I know the 
man who can get one." He said, "Who?" I took the ball up 
and said to the umpire, " Round the wicket, please." Before 
the situation was thoroughly realised, I heard the captain say, 
"Oh, let old Snowball have one over ! " The Rev. H. H. Gil- 
lett — one of Bob Thoms's " gentle tappers " — received the 
first ball from me, and I said to Crowder, " Jog, go out deeper." 
He said " I won't ; I am deep enough." I replied, " You shall ! 
— a bowler ought always to place his own fieldsmen." So 
" Jog " did what he was told to do, and wxnt out " in the coun- 
try," — almost out of sight, — and I proceeded to deliver the ball, 
about the sample of a ball I usually delivered. I had a choice of 
a long-hop to the off or a half-volley to the leg, and this time the 
half-volley turned up trumps ; the Rev. H. H. G. (" Slinger " — 
though I ought not to dare to call him so) opened his shoulders 
and hit the ball on the on-sid^ — the hit was honestly worth 
^'fifteen." Boundaries were then more or less unknown, but 



128 



A VOLUNTEER. 



" Jog " was equal to the occasion ; a wild rush, a frantic stoop, 
and he clutched the ball with his left hand an inch or two from 
the ground. I have seen many a good catch in my time, and 
hope to see many more ; but I always think that was the very 
best I ever saw. Gillett, after hitting the ball, came to my end, 
and was turning for the second run, when I gently touched him, 
and I said, " You're out," and he " smole," but he was out. I 
finished my over, and was confidently expecting to be kept on 
for at least half an hour, but I was told I had done what was re- 
quired, and had better go back to my old place — mid-off ; it was 
what I supposed would be the upshot — F. F. gratitude ! When 
I told the rest of the field that had it not been for me we should 
never have got Gillett out, they wore a curious expression on their 
faces and said, " Oh no ! perhaps not, but you had better have a 
rest ! " Next day Gillett and I were again opposed, at Higham 
Ferrers ; but this time, when he came to the wicket, I said, "/ 
am going on, whether any one likes it or not ; Jog, go to the 
old place — tve can work 'Slinger' between us." The old half- 
volley to leg, the old tremendous hit, the old fine catch, and 
of course the old F. F. gratitude ! I have never since bowled 
to Gillett ; but with Crowder at long-leg, and a sufficiently large 
ground, I feel convinced that even now I could defeat him. 

EARL MANVERS'S ELEVEN. 



1ST INNINGS, SCORE. 


2D INNINGS. SCORE. 


E. M. H. Riddell, b Lyttelton 


8 


c and b Lee 


72 


J. M. Dolphin, b Lyttelton . 


2 


b Ratliff 


I 


H. H. Gillett, run out . 


43 


c Crowder, b Reid 


II 


C. Appleton, b Ratliff . 


o 


b Ratliff . 


II 


W. Appleton, c Martin, b Lyttelton 


o 


c Turner, b Ratliff 


3 


A. Gresley, b Lyttelton . 


o 


not out ... 


4 


S. H. Miles, not out . . . 


13 


c and b Reid 


24 


J. G. Beevor, b Ratliff . 


I 


run out ... 





C. J. Armitage, run out, b Ratliff . 


4 


c Lee, b Ratliff . 


12 


W. H. Mason, c Lee, b Lyttelton . 


. 27 


b Ratliff . 


20 


Viscount Newark, c Lee, b Lyttelton 





b Lyttelton . 


I 


byes 2, leg-byes i, wides i . 


4 


byes 5, wides 5 


10 


Total 


102 


Total 


169 



FREE FORESTERS. 



1ST INNINGS. S( 

M. T. Martin, c C. Appleton, b Riddell 
M. Turner, c Beevor, b Riddell 
Hon. S. G. Lyttelton, b Riddell . 
H. Verelst, b W. Appleton . 
F. Crowder, c Mason, b Armitage . 



E. 


2D INNINGS. 


SCORE. 


12 


c and b Riddell . 





3 


b Armitage . 


I 


5 


absent. 




35 


b Riddell . 


8 


44 


absent. 





ABSENTEES. 129 



1ST INNINGS. SCORE. 2D INNINGS. SCORE. 

A. Walker, st C. Appleton, b W. Appleton 12 b W. Appleton ... 10 
Hon. J. Marsham, st C, b W. Appleton 5 b Gillett 

F. Lee, not out 53 c C. Appleton, b Gillett 

T. Ratliff, c Gillett, b Armitage . .4b Gillett . . . . o 

C.F. Reid.stC. Appleton, bW. Appleton 18 not out .... 4 

Hon. E. Pierrepont, b Riddell . .6b Riddell .... 2 

byes 7, leg-byes i, wides 3 . . . 11 leg-byes 3, wides i . . 4 



Total . 208 Total 



59 



A Northamptonshire week followed, comprising a drawn 
match at Drayton, and two wins at Higham and Rock- 
ingham. Higham only scored 90 and 91, S. G. Lyttelton 
taking ten wickets. F. F. totalled 197, Verelst adding 59, 
and Lyttelton 57 of them. Rockingham compiled 129 
and 146— Maul 27 and 48, J. Hill 9 and 45. The F. F. 
innings were 115 and 161, with 3 wickets to fall — C. 
Reid 42, S. G. Lyttelton o and 56 (not out), H. Foster 6 
and 40, &c. 

At Drayton Foresters were too greedy of runs, making 
334 — W. F. Higgins 117, H. Verelst 83, F. Lee 31. Dray- 
ton scored 77, and 121 for 5 wickets — Gillett i and 40 (not 
out), Maul 35 and o, Marshall i and 30. 



no 



CHAPTER XVIII. 

1873- 

This year began with a dinner on March 28, the opera- 
tions in the tented field being commenced two months 
later at BuUingdon, where, when the Oxford Club had 
completed an innings for 113, — A. V. Harcourt 38, the 
premier batsman, — 8 F. F. wickets were down for 126 — 
W. Evetts (not out), 58. 

Hillingdon, June 9, scored 179 to Foresters' 93 — M. T. 
Martin 39, being their best man. 

School of Gunnery, Shoeburyness, lost to Free Foresters 
on June 13. F. F. made 203 — H. W. Verelst 6j, F. R. 
Price 31, C. Booth and W. F. Higgins each 27, R. G. 
Venables 20 ; and then got the Gunners out for 91 and 
132, so that they easily won by 9 wickets. 

The Civil Service, on June 25, won by 16 runs, scoring 
144 to Free Foresters' 128; in the second innings F. F. 
made 50 for 3 wickets. S. Lyttelton 29, and E. M. 
Kenney 36, were their best scorers ; Marsham, E. M. 
Kenney, S. Chamberlayne, and S. Lyttelton their 
bowlers. 

The Royal Engineers played Free Foresters on July 
4 and 5 at Chatham. F. F. first innings 211, and second 
293 — E. M. Kenney 30 and 159, F. R. Price 59 and 16, 



LANCASHIRE. 131 

T. Ratliff 25 and 40; R. E. 279 and 77 for 4 wickets — 
H. W. Renny Tailyour (not out) 140 and b Marriott o, 
H. E. Rawson 36 (not out). Drawn. 

At Chichester, on July 7 and 8, Priory Park drew the 
match with a score of 190 and 219 for 7 wickets, against 
Foresters' 291 : S. G. Lyttelton made 95, H. H. Gillett 68, 
R. Lyttelton 43, &c. 

On the same day, F. F. proceeded to their usual week in 
Lancashire, where they beat the Western Club by 309 to 
92 runs in the first, and 93 in the second innings. For 
Foresters the mischief was done by E. F. S. Tylecote 104, 
T. S. Pearson 70, and W. F. Higgins 56. For the Western, 
Capt. Jervis o and 44, H. Crummack 14 and 21, and 
V. Royle 20 and 1 1, showed best. Higgins sent down 
222 balls for 71 runs and 6 wickets, Pearson 172 balls for 
81 runs and 12 wickets. Royle distinguished himself by 
throwing out Pearson and Townshend. 

At Liverpool they were defeated by 2 wickets, making 
115 and 164; H. W. Verelst 29 (not out) and 28, J. R. 
Hutchison 23 and 19, and E. F. S. Tylecote 7 and 25, 
being conspicuous. Liverpool scored 136 and 145, J. A. 
Richardson and A. J. Tod being not out with 58 and 
33 respectively. Pearson and Higgins took 7 wickets 
apiece. 

At Birkenhead the match was drawn, F. F. scoring 208 
and 188 for 5 wickets— C. A. Garnett 53, T. J. Rider 31 and 
14 (not out), E. F. S. Tylecote 23 and 56, T. S. Pearson 
22 and 17, J. R. Hutchison i and 62, &c. — to 202, including 
98 (not out) from R. J. Richardson for Birkenhead. 

Rugby School met F. F., June 11 and 12. F. F. 136 
and 142 — A. Chambers 17 and 52, H. W. Gardner 35 and 
17, T. S. Pearson 32 and 13; the School 136 and 55 — 
G. F. Vernon 46 and 6, C. H. Simpson 6 and 21. Buch- 
anan took 10 wickets, Tubb 6. 



132 



SOUTHGATE. 



Southgate, Jtily 14 and 15. 
SOUTHGATE. 



1ST INNINGS. SCORE. 

R. D. Walker, c Marriott, b Rutter 26 

S. C. Voules, b Francis . . 33 

F. E. R. Fryer, c Hadow, b Rutter 26 

E. F. S. Tylecote, c Rowley, b Rutter 19 

J . W. Dale, c and b Francis . 5 

E. S. Gamier, c Marriott, b Rutter 2 

W. F. Traill, c and b Rutter . 5 



1ST INNINGS. SCORE. 

C. J. Brune, c Ratcliff, b Rutter . 13 

A. E. Gamier, b Gillett . . 17 

V. E. Walker, st Turner, b Rutter 10 

John Walker, not out ... 6 

byes 4, leg-byes 3, no-ball i . 8 



Total 



170 



In the second innings the 2 runs required were easily got — J. W. Dale (not out) o, 
E. S. Gamier (not out) i ; wide i. 



FREE FORESTERS. 



1ST INNINGS, SCORE. 


2D INNINGS. SCORE. 


W. Yardley, c and b Bmne 


. 18 


c and b Bmne . 





C. Marriott, c Tylecote, b Brune 


7 


c A. Gamier, b Fryer 


13 


W. M. Hadow, c and b Bmne 


6 


b Brune . 


3 


M. Turner, c J., bR. D. Walker . 


I 


c V. E. Walker, b Fryer 





H. H. Gillett, run out . . . 


4 


St Tylecote, b Brune 


15 


T. Rathff, c E. Gamier, b R. D. Walker 





c Brune, b Fryer 


II 


C. K. Francis, b Bmne . 


6 


c J. Walker, b Fryer 


5 


E. Rutter, c V. E., b R. D. Walker . 


25 


St Tylecote, b Fryer . 


16 


E. Bray, c Tylecote, b Brune . 


6 


not out . 


3 


H. M. Marshall, c Tylecote, b R. D. Walke 


r 3 


St Tylecote, b Fryer . 


15 


M. T. Martin, not out . . . 


I 


b Brune . 


4 


bye I, leg-byes 4 


5 


byes 2, leg-byes 2 . 


4 


Total 


82 


Total 


89 



At Rockingham, on July 22 and 23, the match was 
drawn ; the home team making 81 and 228 (twelve a-side), 
against 213, and 49 for 5 wickets of F. F. S. Lyttelton 
55, H. M. Marshall 42 and 22 (not out), and K. Muir- 
Mackenzie 49 and 2, scored. 

At Tyringham, July 24 and 25, the home side scored 
147 and 124 — H. C. Maul 58 (not out) and 34; Free 
Foresters 79 and 112 — F. Crowder 19 and 16, C. W. 
Boyle 10 and 26. 

Malvern, July 28 and 29, proved a victory for the 
Foresters by 10 wickets. 

A match was played at Worcester, July 30 and 31, 
(twelve a-side). F. F. 160 and 90— H. Verelst 33 and 19, 



SUTTON. 133 

T. Ratliff 30 (not out) and 4 ; Worcestershire Gentlemen, 
118 and 136 for 6 wickets. 

The Warwickshire matches, which commenced at Mr 
Alston's on Aug. 2, were unusually successful. 

" There are few things within this happy reahn done 
So well as lunch, chaff, wickets, runs, at Elmdon." 

The Hall eleven, with 104 from W. H. Wright and 56 
from J. R. Walker, totalled 249, and time only allowed 
Frank Wright to lose his wicket to his namesake (whom 
he, be it noted, had before c and b) for 66, leaving Gibbon 
not out, and 106 runs up. 

Pype Hayes scored 64 and 140, J. W. Gardner, as 
beforetime in this match, being best with 22 and 39. 
W. H. Wright scored 8 and 48 (not out). E. W. Burnett 
13 and 23 (not out), H. Verelst 31, for F. F., whose first 
innings amounted to 125 ; so they won with 2 wickets 
down. 

At Sutton Coldfield, Aug. 6 and 7, F. F. made an innings 
of 223 against Deddington — W. H. Wright again to the 
fore with 50, E. W. Burnett 39, W. G. Armitstead (re- 
covered from his accident) 33, S. P. Bucknill (not out) the 
same number, &c. Except A. Bradshaw, who scored 14 
and 36, nobody did much for Deddington, RatlifF taking 
9 wickets in the first innings and 5 in the second. Scores 
6'j and yj. 

The County Gentlemen of Stafford were also beaten 
at Little Aston in an innings, making only 42 and 85 ; 
while F. F. scored 194 — G. M. Robinson 40, T. S. Pear- 
son 30, H. M. Marshall 28. T. Ratliff was out " handled 
ball." Pearson took 9 wickets, 3 of which were caught 
by Appleby, who claimed 5 more, from his own bowl- 
ing. 

On Aug. 1 1 F. F. encountered the formidable Hawkstone 
combination, and lost by 8 wickets. 



134 



SHROPSHIRE. 



FREE FORESTERS. 



1ST INNINGS. SCORE. 

W. G. Armitstead, run out ... 40 

F. Lee, c Dale, b R. D. Walker . . 9 

F. W. Wright, c Fryer, b Cobden . . 33 

Hon. S. Lyttelton, c I. D. Walker, b Fryer 11 

W. H. Wright, b Cobden ... 3 

F. Crowder, b Fryer 24 

H. W. Verelst, c I. D. Walker, b Fryer . 2 

Hon. R. Lyttelton, c I. D. Walker, b Dale 27 

L. Garnett, c Wingfield, b Hornby . . o 

T. Ratliff, not out 2 

M. T. Martin, absent . . . . o 

Extras 

Total . 159 



2D INNINGS. 

c Cobden, b Fryer . 
b Cobden . 

c Fryer, b L D. Walker 
b Cobden . 
b Cobden . 
not out 

c Dale, b Fryer 
St Marshall, b Fryer 
c L D. Walker, b Fryer 
c Hornby, b L D. Walker 
b Fryer 
Extras . 

Total 



2 

I 
SI 

5 

T 
10 
61 

2 

24 

9 

o 

12 

178 



HON. G. HILL'S ELEVEN. 



1ST INNINGS. 



A. N. Hornby, run out 

L D. Walker, c Garnett, b S 

Lyttelton .... 
F. Fryer, b Lee ... 
R. D. Walker, c Wright, b S 

Lyttelton .... 
J. Dale, c Wright, b Lee . 



SCORE. 

42 



1ST INNINGS. 



SCORE. 



5 
72 



47 
33 



J. Marshall, b Lee . . . o 

V. E. Walker, not out . . 22 

F. C. Cobden, c and b S. Lyttelton i 

H. Whitmore, b Rathff . . 4 

Hon. G. Hill, b S. Lyttelton . 9 

Extras 7 



Total 



261 



W. Wingfield, c Lee, b S. Lyttelton 19 

In the second innings I. D. Walker (c S. Lyttelton, b Armitstead) scored 37, 
J. Dale (not out) 29, J. Marshall (not out) 2, F. C. Cobden (c Armitstead, b S. 
Lyttelton) 6 ; extras 5, — total 79. 



On the 14th and 15th they drew with Alton Towers, 
who scored 82 and 178 — A. Cotterill 7 and 45, H. S. Reade 
26 and o, W. M. Coyney 18 and 19, F. Cotton 5 (not out) 
and 34. Rathff took 10 wickets, S. G. Lyttelton 8. F. F. 
made 187 and 56 for 4 wickets — Louis Garnett 58 and (not 
out) I, F. Lee 32 and o, W. H. Wright 27 and 20, J. G. 
Beevor 8 and 22, S. G. Lyttelton 26. 

At Beeston, on Aug. 18 and 19, F. F. won by 10 wickets. 
They went in first and scored 238— F. W. Wright con- 
tributed 90, F. Crowder 43. It was then discovered that 
the man who had marked out the ground had mistaken 
the bowling-crease at one end for the popping-crease, and 
so added the length of the crease to the distance between 



NOTTS. 



35 



wickets. This was rectified, and Notts went in, but were 
got out for 136, and the follow-on produced 118. Gillett 
took 8 Notts wickets, Rutter 7, Higgins 2. 

Wet prevented a victory over South Derbyshire on the 
20th. The County made 50, F. F. 243, with a wicket to 
fall— H. H. Gillett 7^, F. Crovvder (not out) 52, F. W. 
Wright 37. 

A similar fate attended a match at Uppingham on Sept. 
9 and 10, where, one day being wet, the boys scored 124 — 
D. Q, Steel and W. S. Patterson 34 each — and 7 wickets of 
Foresters were down for 130 — L. W. Novelli 43 (not out). 
Buchanan bowled 9 wickets. 




L. O. Garnett. J. W. Gardner. W. P. Jervis. W. Bedford. S. Bucknill. T. P. Jervis. 

H. Armitstead. H. M. Marshall. T. RatHff. W. G. Armitstead. 
W. H. Wright. T. S. Pearson. H. Verelst. J. H. Gibbon. E. W. Burnett. F. W. Wright. 



136 



CHAPTER XIX. 
1874. 

The season began with a match at Hillingdon, June 8. 
In each of their innings F. F. fell 10 runs short of a cen- 
tury. S. G. Lyttelton 21 and 8, and F. W. Wright 18 
and 36, were their best men. The villagers made 84 and 
23 for 4 wickets. S. Lyttelton took 7 wickets, V. E. 
Walker 4. 

On the 19th and 20th, at Sevenoaks Vine, Free Foresters 
made only ^j, but disposed of the Vine for 41 and 30. 
Chamberlayne took 13 wickets. Bray 9. 

On the 22d and 23d, at Marlborough, Free Foresters 
won. 

On the 26th and 27th, at Shoebury, R.A. scored 139 — 
Sergeant-Major Ledsham 57, Colonel Godby 36. Rutter 
took 5 wickets, Sherrard 4. F. F. then made 308 — T. 
Ratlifif 1 14, E. Rutter 65, R. Entwistle 20 (not out). The 
second innings of R.A. only amounted to 29 (no extras) — 
Captain Gyll 14 (not out). Pearson took 8 wickets. 

On July I they encountered Civil Service and made 
238, B. T. Fetherston claiming 60, T. S. Pearson 52 (not 
out), H. M. Marshall 23. Eight wickets of Civil Service 
had fallen for 46 when the game was drawn. 

And on the 8th and 9th played Southgate. 






H. G. S. Hughes. 



G. H. Goldney. 





C. W. L. Bulpett. 



A. W. Daniel. 



A SPARKLING CATCH. 



137 



SOUTHGATE. 



1ST INNINGS. 

C. L. Thornton, b Buchanan . 

R. D. Walker, c Turner, b Buchanan 

I. D. Walker, not out 

A. N. Hornby, c Lyttelton, b Francis 

F. S. R. Fryer, b Francis . 

G. Law, c Ratliff, b Buchanan . 
C. T. Hoare, c Pearson, b Buchanan 
V. E, Walker, b Francis . 
W. Vyse, b Francis . 
C. Absolom, c Buchanan, b Law 
A. Bain, absent .... 

byes 3, leg-byes 4, no-ball i . 

Total 



SCORE. 

o 

14 

92 

20 

6 

o 

4 
48 

o 
27 

o 



219 



2D INNINGS. 

b Buchanan 

b Buchanan 

not out 

b Buchanan 

c and b Buchanan . 

c Pearson, b Buchanan 

b Francis . 

b Buchanan 

b Francis . 

c Buchanan, b Francis 

b Francis . 

byes 4, leg-byes 2 . 

Total 



SCORE. 

10 

9 

9 

7 

18 

16 

3 
6 

15 
9 

I 
6 

109 



FREE FORESTERS. 



W. Law, b Absolom . 

C. Marriott, c R. D. Walker, b Bain 

T. S. Pearson, c Absolom, b R. D. Walker 

C. R. Francis, st Vyse, b R. D. Walker 
S. G. Lyttelton, b L D. Walker 
T. Ratliff, b Absolom 
F. W. Wright, b L D. Walker . 
H. H. Gillett, b Absolom . 
M. Turner, b Absolom 
E. Rutter, st Vyse, b Absolom . 

D. Buchanan, not out 
byes 4, leg-byes 7 . 



Total 



9 c Thornton, b R. D. Walker 18 



55 


not out . 


. 64 


5 


b R. D. Walker . 


. 16 


10 






31 


retired 


. 18 


5 






12 






18 






15 


not out . . • . 


. 26 


9 






2 






TI 


byes 4, leg-bye i . 


5 



182 



Total 



147 



,"Mr Buchanan, as the score will show, was as usual 
destructive with the ball, whilst a sparkling right-hand 
catch that he made fairly electrified his side, and — we had 
almost added — himself too. He was ably seconded by 
Mr Francis, whose bowling, coupled with pace, was well 
on the spot." 

On July 13 and 14, Liverpool beat F. F., for whom 
L. O. Garnett made 27 and 3, J. H. Gibbon 18 and 22 
(not out), helping the totals of no and 75. Liverpool 
scored 171 and won by 10 wickets — H. P. Stedman, 63 and 
13 (not out), being the best. 



138 



SCOTLAND AT RUGBY. 



July 15 and 16, at Birkenhead, F. F. reversed the spell, 
getting the Park out for 131 and 149 — Richardson 56 (not 
out) in the first innings, and Crowther 74 in the second — 
owing to the bowling of Barron (8 wickets) and Royle 
(10 wickets). Then Foresters, who had made 162 in their 
first essay, scored 119 for 4 wickets — Hutchison 32 and 
13, Royle 7 and 30 (not out), Gardner 47 and 43, Venables 
20 and 16 (not out), and Armitstead, 20 and 3. 

On July 17 and 18, at Eccles, Free Foresters lost to 
their old friends the Western Club, making 64 and 188 
from the bowling of three of the Garnett family (L., L. O., 
and S.) — J. R. Hutchison 7 and 56, H. W. Gardner o and 
40, R Mellor 14 and 22, J. Law 4 and 27, and W. G. 
Armitstead 17 and i, being recognisable scorers. For the 
Western, who won by 5 wickets, L. O. Garnett 9 and 6j 
(not out), and J. M. Yates 47 and o, were prominent. 

On July 14, at Chiselhur^t, Foresters were beaten by 
West Kent, who scored 132 to 102 and 96 from the 
visitors — E. Bray 38 and 14, G. Law 19 and 21, being 
the best F. F. 

The match with Rugby School did not take place ; but 
on July 17 and 18 a victory was obtained on the Rugby 
ground over an eleven from beyond the Border. 

FREE FORESTERS. 



1ST INNINGS. 

C. L. Hornby, c J. Sharp, b Laidlay 

C. J. Thornton, b Laidlay 

A. N. Hornby, b Wright . 

T. S. Pearson, c J. Sharp, b Laidlay 

C. Smith, c Wright, b Sharp . 

H. N. Tennent, c Speid, b Laidlay . 

C. J. Smith, run out .... 
Hon. A. Baillie Hamilton, b Cotterill 
A. A. Bourne 1 b w, b Cotterill . 

D. Buchanan, not out 

F. Paget, b Cotterill .... 
byes 



Total 



iE. 2D INNINGS. 

20 c Speid, b Laidlay . 

3 run out 

34 c Cotterill, b Laidlay 

50 run out 

19 b Laidlay . 

9 c J. Sharp, b Laidlay 

4 cj. Sharp, b. Laidlay 
o b Wright . 

8 b Wright . 

3 c J. Sharp, b Laidlay 
2 not out 

4 byes 9, leg-byes 2 . 



156 



Total 



SCORE. 

o 

63 

I 

71 

7 
34 
3 
I 
2 
o 
II 

207 



A NEW BOWLER. 139 



GENTLEMEN OF SCOTLAND. 



1ST INNINGS. SCORE. 2D INNINGS. SCORE. 

G. M. Bannerman, c C. Smith, b Buchanan 22 b Bourne .... 23 

F. L. Wright, c C. L. Hornby, b Bourne . 4 c A. N. Hornby, b Buchanan 17 
J. M. Cotterill, c C. Smith, b Buchanan 



T. Marshall, c and b Buchanan 
W. Dove, b C. L. Hornby 
R. Sharp, b Buchanan 
J. Speid, St Pearson, b Buchanan 
L. M. Balfour, b C. L. Hornby 
J. M'Neill, b Buchanan . 
W. J, Laidlay, b Buchanan 
J. H. Sharp, not out . 
byes 3, leg-byes 2 . 



Total 



9 c Pearson, b Buchanan 

3 c and b Bourne 

40 c Bourne, b Buchanan 

o c Tennent, b Bourne 

Ti st Pearson, b Buchanan 

o c Thornton, b Bourne 

4 c Paget, b Buchanan 
7 run out 

o not out 



5 byes 7, leg-bye i, wide i 9 
105 Total . 138 



July 20 and 21, at Brookwood Park, Foresters suc- 
cumbed to Gentlemen of Hants under the captaincy of 
Clement Booth. Hants made 198 and 228 — G. P. Green- 
field 54 and 26, W. J. Kendle o and 62>. Foresters, with 
a couple of absentees in the second innings, could only 
compile 169 and 104 — S. G. Lyttelton, 53 and o, being 
their best performer. 

On the two next days, again, they were beaten at 
Chichester, Priory Park playing Fillery, who took 13 F. F. 
wickets. F. R. Price 30 and 3, W. H. Hadow 23 and 4, 
S. G. Lyttelton 31 and 8, E. Bray 13 (not out) and 12 
helped the modest totals of 134 and 50. P'or Chichester, 
who made 86 and loi for i wicket, A. T. Fortescue 7 and 
44 (not out), and C. Howard 41 and 44 (not out), dis- 
tinguished themselves. 

The Malvern match, played on the College ground, July 
29 and 30, was productive of a surprise. Foresters went 
in first and made 221 — R. Garnett, 59, A. G. Lee 54, T. P. 
Jervis 30, H. Foster 27, J. H. Gibbon 23. When the 
School's turn came it occurred to a charitably disposed 
captain to give them a chance by putting on to bowl a 
young member of the team, whose chief recommendation 
was that he did not bowl for his coUeg-e. The novice 



I40 



THE LAST OF HAWKSTONE. 



duly delivered his first ball and — took a wicket. The 
next man went in, and ball number two dismissed him 
also ! In fine, the boys got out for 109 and 47, W. C. R. 
Bedford claiming 1 1 wickets, A. L. Vernon 6. Scott 34 
and 9, Newby 34 and o, Read 26 and 9, and Colt i and 19 
(not out), were the only double figures. 

The Newark match, played 30th and 31st July, was also 
a thoroughly sensational one. Going in first, Free Fores- 
ters were disposed of for 74 runs, of which H. W. Verelst 
made 27, G. Law 21. Newark then obtained a total of 
162— A. A. Wilmot 66, E. M. H. Riddell 37. When the 
F. F. began their second innings, T. S. Pearson and E. F. 
S. Tylecote stayed at the wickets until the first was out 
1 b w 186, and the second run out for 166, — the total 
innings being 393. Newark then made 49 for 4 wickets. 

The Scottish tour will be found in its place. It began 
Aug. 3. 

Aug. 4 to 7, a Forester team played at Chelford and 
Alton Towers. Rain spoiled the match v. Cheshire, as 
when the county (one man short) had made 131, F. F. 
scored 88 for 2 wickets, and it had to be abandoned. 

At Alton rain again robbed them of victory, as after 
the Alton eleven had scored 128 to Foresters' 126 — A. N. 
Hornby 34 and J. G. Beevor 19 — Mr Fryer disposed of 
the 10 Staffordshire wickets in the second innings for ij. 

At Hawkstone, Aug. 10 and 11. Weather wet and 
windy. 

FREE FORESTERS. 



1ST INNINGS. 

W, Law, c Cobden, b Fryer 

C. J. Ottaway, c Wingfield, b Fryer . 

F. Crowder, b Francis 

Hon. R. Lyttelton, c V. E. Walker, 

Francis 

J. R. Hutchison, c Francis, b Fryer . 
H. W. Verelst, not out 
H. Foster, b Francis .... 
Hon. J. Marsham, b Francis 



SCORE. 



2D INNINGS. 



18 c and b Fryer . 

10 b Francis . 

1 c Wingfield, b Cobden 

7 1 b w, b Francis 

11 c V. E. Walker, b Fryer 
28 c T. D. Walker, b Fryer 

2 c Hornby, b Cobden 
4 St Hornby, b Fryer . 



WASP-STINGS. 141 

1ST INNINGS. SCORE. 2D INNINGS. SCORE. 

R. O. Milne, c Hornby, b Fryer . . 8 not out .... 2 

W. G. Armitstead, b Francis . . .4c Francis, b Fryer . . 12 

Extras 9 Extras . , . . 13 

Total . 102 Total . 62 

HAWKSTONE. 

1ST INNINGS. SCORE. 1ST INNINGS. SCORE. 

J. W. Dale, b Marsham . . 29 W. Wingfield, b Hutchison . 10 

T. D. Walker, b Marsham . . 19 V. E. Walker, not out ... 7 

A. N. Hornby, 1 b w, b Marsham 3 F. C. Cobden, b Hutchison . . 3 

F. E. R. Fryer, c sub., b Marsham 31 Hon. G. R. C. Hill, b Hutchison 9 

C. K. Francis, b Marsham . . 2 Extras ..... 12 

R. D. Walker, b Marsham . . 2 

H. E. Whitmore, c sub., b Hutchi- Total . 155 



28 



In the second innings Hill (c sub. b Marsham) scored 3, Francis (not out) 6, 
Dale (not out) i, 

Havvkstone won by 9 wickets ; Foresters played only 
ten men. 

This was the last of the matches played at the invitation 
of that excellent sportsman the late Geoffrey Hill on the 
Hawkstone ground, where not cricket only but many 
other sporting achievements came off. In 1873, A. N. 
Hornby, R. D. Walker, and others of the home eleven 
amused themselves by catching the silver-grey rabbits of 
which the Park was full, and cramming them alive into 
their woollen jerseys. The fun came to its climax when a 
well-known cricketer altered the centre of gravity and fell 
on his face on the top of the live rabbits, his efforts to 
release himself from his struggling captives being highly 
ludicrous. When out with the otter-hounds in the same 
year, *' we came " (says a Free Forester) " to a footpath with 
deep water on both sides, and the fiercest and strongest 
wasps' nest in the middle of the path, so that it was a choice 
of going back into the water or over the nest. After some 
consultation it was decided to go over it, or rather through it : 
this we did, and no less than sixteen people were stung, some 
seriously. Hornby for two hours afterwards was wildly 



142 GOODRICH. 

pulling off coat, waistcoat, and other garments, always to 
find a wasp under his shirt stinging him. I was stung in 
the calf of the leg, which caused it to swell as big as my 
body, and the weight was awful. A doctor was called in, 
who said I should lose my leg if I played cricket or danced, 
and that I should have to nurse it for some months. I did 
dance, at first under great pain and difficulty; but the more 

1 danced the better my leg got, and next morning I was 
perfectly well." 

At Pype Hayes, where they began their Warwickshire 
<:ampaign, Free Foresters won a one-day match on Aug. 
8 by 133 to 113. J. W. Gardner 32, Lord Lewisham 20, 
•G. Walker 32, and R. Lant 20, were the best scores. 

On the loth, at Four Oaks Park, the home side only 
made 55 to a Forester innings of 222 — J, Garnett 52, L. 
•Garnett and T. P. Jervis 35 each. Then came a wet day, 
which caused a draw. 

The next match, on the Sutton Ground, was a renewal of 
the old local contest, which, in consideration of the amount 
of rising talent at the disposal of the home side, was arranged 
as eighteen of Sutton, J. H. Gibbon acting as captain, 
against a Forester twelve. The home team won the toss, 
and despite a good 23 from Gibbon, supplemented by 17 
from Ward and 13 from Manley, were all out for 90 runs, 
'Goodrich taking 9 wickets (3 c and b) and likewise making 

2 catches off Higgins, who took 6. Foresters, however, 
found Gibbon's bowling not very easy, and went down for 
.80 runs — Louis Garnett 21, and F. Lee 20, doing best. At 
time, Sutton had made 10 runs for the loss of 2 wickets, and 
the second day being again wet the game was drawn. 

This match had one feature of peculiar interest, being 
the last time that the veteran Goodrich played with his old 
club, and not improbably was his final appearance in a 
x:ricket eleven. 

The other match on the two following days against 



LEICESTERSHIRE. 143 

Gentlemen of Stafifordshire was drawn also from bad 
weather. It was played at Little Aston Hall, and F. F. 
made 160— F. W. Wright 32, T. Ratliff (not out) 28— to 
92, R. Moncriefif 21 and C. E. Lyon (not out) 18 being 
best. 

At Worcester, Aug. 17 and 18, the County beat the 
Club, making 102 and 150 — R. Lyttelton 17 and 50, A. B. 
Martin 36 and 18, F. R. Evans 19 and 22 — to Foresters' 
94 and 128 ; F. W. Wright 26 and 18, T. Ratliff 5 and 51 
(not out). While at Hanbury (Mr Foley Vernon's), on the 
2 1st and 22d, Foresters won a twelve-a-side match by 3 
wickets, in spite of a fine 112 (not out) from E. Lyttelton. 
Hanbury made 44 and 217, Foresters 6j and 199 — Louis 
Garnett (not out) 66. 

Deddington, Aug. 19 and 20, was the scene of a draw ; 
Fetherston making 89 in an innings of 209 for the home 
side, and Tubb, Ramsay, and Marsham disposing of Fores- 
ters for 141, W. F. Higgins 48. Deddington then lost a 
wicket for 17 runs. 

On Aug. 25 and 26, at Rockingham Park, another 
twelve-a-side contest was drawn, F. F. making 189 and 
147 to the home side's 166 and 135 for 5 wickets. W. F. 
Higgins 40 and 11, H. Verelst o and 43, E. Hume 31 and 
O, F. Crowder 14 and (not out) 26, scored for F. F. 

A match at Leicester v. Gentlemen of the county was 
likewise left drawn on Aug. 28. 

FREE FORESTERS. 

1ST INNINGS. SCORE. 2D INNINGS. SCORE. 

F. W. Wright, c Stainton, b C. Marriott . 27 c Burge, b C. Marriott . 43 

A. A. Wilmot, c and b Mitchell . . 8 b C. Marriott ... 2 

F. R. Price, c Dixie, b Byron . . . 116 c Dixie, b C. Marriott . 13 

W. F. Higgins, c Mitchell, b G. Marriott 19 b G. Marriott ... 9 

H. M. Marshall, b G. Marriott ... 64 absent 

H. Verelst, b Burge 2 b C. Marriott ... 22 

F. Crowder, b Burge . . . . 7 b G. Marriott . . . o 

T. Ratliff, c J. M. Marriott, b C. Marriott 10 not out . . . .23 

J. Marsham, b C. Marriott . . . 2 st Stainton, b C. Marriott 10 



144 



AN INCIDENT. 



1ST INNINGS. SCORE. 

S. P. Bucknill, 1 b w, b C. Marriott . . o 

Sir A. Palmer, b Byron . . . . i 

C. F. Reid, not out i 

Extras 13 



Total 



2D INNINGS. 

b Byron . 
b Burge . 
c Dixie, b Byron 
Extras . 



270 



Total 



SCORE 

I 
2 

s 

4 
134 



GENTLEMEN OF LEICESTERSHIRE. 



J. M. Marriott, b Marsham . 

F. Warner, b Higgins . 

G. Stainton, b Marsham 
R. A. H. Mitchell, b Marsham 
C. Marriott, c Wright, b Reid 
W. H. Hay, c Reid, b Price 
Sir A. B. Dixie, c Crowder, b Price 
Capt. Tryon, st Wright, b Price 



SCORE. 
2 
I 
12 
. 28 
• 41 


SCORE. 

G. Marriott, st Wright, b Price . 
A. W. Byron, b Marsham . . 11 

F. H. Paget, c Price, b Reid . 13 

G. R. Burge, not out . . . 3 
Extras 15 


• 57 

;e 9 




Total 


192 



© 




Black-Country Cricket. 

How's that? — Hout ! Hout be blowed ! I'm biggest man i' the ground, 
and here I boide." 



145 



CHAPTER XX. 

1875- 

The season commenced with a match at Chiselhurst on 
June 7, when West Kent beat Free Foresters by 48 runs. 
It was a twelve-a-side game, and F. F. reahsed lOi and 58 
for 4 wickets — R. Entwistle 25, and E. Rutter 10 and 23, 
getting most runs. Mr F. Penn made 81 out of the 
Kentish score of 149. 

At Winchester, playing the Garrison on June 14, 
Foresters won by 40 runs, making 164 — E. C. Hartopp 
34 — to the soldiers' total of 124. H. Tubb disposed of 4 
wickets, S. G. Lyttelton 3, E. Rutter 2. In their second 
innings Foresters scored 152 for 4 wickets, J. R. Hutchison 
being not out with 71 runs, and E. Rutter, who had made 
2J runs in his first innings, adding another 30. 

They proceeded to Hilsea, where on June 16 and 17 
they beat the Southern Division by 2 wickets, scoring 103 
and 107 to 113 and 96. F. Baker and E. Rutter made 20 
each in the first innings of Foresters, and in the second the 
latter added 19, H. Tubb 28, and T. S. Pearson 25. 
Rutter took 9 wickets, Tubb 6, Lyttelton 3. 

On June 21 and 22, the match with Rugby School was 
drawn. The local reporter said : — 

The reason of the absence of the Rugby School match from 
the list of last year's fixtures has not transpired, and it would do 

K 



146 RUGBY SCHOOL. 

no good to hazard conjectures about it now. Suffice it to say 
that F. F.'s made up for the omission by sending a good team to 
Rugby on the 21st and 22d of June 1875. That good cricketer 
and hard hitter H. H. Gillett, who at Bullingdon in 1859, in 
Exeter College sports, threw 116 yards 2 6 inches, failed to come 
off as expected ; but for F. F.'s Hay, Williamson, Evans, Milne, 
Warner, and others in the batting line, and for the School Cunliffe 
with the ball, gave a good account of themselves, as the score 
will show. 

Foresters went in first and scored 93 — F. R. Evans 44, 
and W. H. Hay 20, doing best. The School then, with 
a good innings of 54 from A. S. Bennet, totalled 173, and 
then F. F. compiled 315. R. O. Milne, who had been 
not out 8 in the first innings, contributed 117, and F. 
Williamson 45, E. H. Warner 34, W. H. Hay 32, and W. 
W. Bagot 24. The last named took 3 Rugby wickets, and 
Gillett and Marriott a like number. D. Buchanan was 
not playing for F. F. in this match. 

On the same days another eleven vanquished Marl- 
borough by five wickets (twelve - a - side), the College 
scoring 74 and 1 14 from the bowling of Voules, Miles, 
Venables, and F. Lee. S. G. Lyttelton and F. H. Lee 
made 35 and 27 respectively out of the 129 scored by 
F. F. in their first innings, and T. Ratliff was not out 19 
in the second. 

At Shoebury, on June 25, 26, a match was left drawn 
with the School of Gunnery, who scored 147 and 297 — 
Pattle 31 and 91 (not out). The one innings of Foresters 
totalled 191— J. R. Hutchison 42, T. Ratliff 41. "I like 
playing at Shoebury," said a certain F. F. who shall be 
nameless ; " start at one, hot lunch at two ! " 

July I found Foresters at Daylesford, where the home 
team made 127 and 82 for 5 wickets and won. Foresters 
getting out for 73 and 135 — W. Evetts 29, the only score 
worth mention. S. Butler for Daylesford disposed of ten 
Foresters. To meet Butler in those days was no joke, 



SAM BUTLER, 



147 



though Mr Reid appears to have once found a man who 
thought otherwise : — 

I remember one year S. E. Butler was playing at Shoeburyness, 
and he in his day, and if he chose, could put in a tremendously 
fast ball. I was fielding at mid-on, and he said to me — he had 
just got a wicket by the way — " Oh, look at this man coming in." 
He was the most splendid specimen of the genus homo I think I 
ever saw ; but he disdained pads and gloves, though the ground 
played like greased lightning. Sam said, " May I give him a fast 
one ? " I said it had nothing to do with me, but if he hit him on 
the leg there would certainly be an inquest, and I advised — in 
fact implored — him not to bowl too fast at him. He said, " Oh, 
just one^^^ and before I could say anything more he bowled him 
the " just oneP I can hear that ball hum now : it caught the 
" splendid specimen " full pitch on his shin, and to " Sam's " 
great astonishment, and also to mine, the man never rubbed the 
place, or even limped, but calmly proceeded to be in readiness 
for the next ball ! After the end of the innings I asked the man 
if he wasn't hurt, and he said he wasn't, and that he wouldn't 
have minded the same knock every ball of the over. And I 
really believe that he meant what he said. What his legs were 
composed of I don't know — ivory probably ! — C. F. R. 

On July 5 they met at Prince's the formidable Upping- 
ham Rovers. 

FREE FORESTERS. 



J. R. Hutchison, b Patterson 
T. S. Pearson, b Cape 

F. E. R. Fryer, b Kidd 

G. N. Wyatt, c and b Patterson 
F. Baker, b Kidd 

W. H. Hay, c and b Patterson 
E. Rutter, b Riddell . 



SCORE. 




SCORE. 


• 23 


R. Garnett, not out 


. lOI 





A. Lyttelton, b Cape . 


• 27 


21 


E. Bray, b Cape . 


2 


2 


F. Crowder, b Hough . 


. 37 





byes 14, leg-byes 8, wides 4 


26 


• 34 






22 


Total 


• 295 



UPPINGHAM ROVERS. 



1ST INNINGS. 

K. P. Lucas, b Wyatt 

P. Kidd, c Hutchison, b Rutter 

F. E. Street, c Garnett, b Rutter 

W. S. Patterson, st Pearson, b Rutter 

J. G. Beevor, b Wyatt 

E. M. Riddell, st Pearson, b Rutter . 



SCORE. 


2D INNINGS. SCORE. 


• 45 


c and b Bray . 


• 39 


. 18 


st Garnett, b Rutter 


66 


10 


b Rutter . 


27 


3 


c Pearson, b Rutter , 


2 


2 


c Hay, b Fryer 


38 


. 16 


1 b w, b Fryer . 


17 



148 THE ROVERS. 



1ST INNINGS. 

J. Perkins, run out . 
C. E. Ridley, not out 
A. P. Vansittart, c and b Wyatt 
T. G. Cape, st Pearson, b Rutter 
G. F. Hough, absent 
byes 4, leg-byes 2 . 



SCORE. 


2D INNINGS. 


SCORE. 





not out 


14 


7 


and b Bray . 


9 





not out . 


I 


7 


c and b Rutter 








absent 





6 


byes 4, leg-byes 4, wide i 9 


il . 114 


Total 


. 222 



Tota: 



This match was harmoniously commemorated in the 
Uppingham magazine by some excellent verses, entitled 

"MR JOHN THOMAS AT PRINCE'S. 

"This comes 'oping, Mr Hedditor, it may find U in good 'ealtli, 
Which, without it, there's no benefit in wittles nor in wealth. 
R ! I'd reether be a pawper, and be 'earty, 'ale, and strong. 
Than a Creesus with the toothake or the 'eadake all day long ; 
For tho' you gets no wenson in the workouse, nor no wine, 
You couldn't with the toothake enjoy them when you dine ; 
And tho' the Parrish gives no ale nor porter, why, it's clear 
A Creesus with the 'eadake E can't enjy his beer ; 
Which the chicest of malt lickers ain't of no good when you're ill, 
'Cos when you'd like to take a pint, you 'ave to take a pill. 

But talkink of good 'ealth, my I ! U should 'ave gone with me 

The valiant gents a-cricketing at Prince's for to see ! 

The mussels them young fellers 'ad, you wouldn't scarce believe, 

It swelled out on their shoulders like a fashinnable sleeve. 

Their harms were like a blacksmith's, only p'raps a trifle whiter. 

And their bax as broad as Bendigo's, the celebrated fiter ; 

And some wore 'niggerbockers to ease 'em as they played, 

And the calves they showed compleetly threw us footmen in the 

shade ; 
They swelled out like the letter P, without a bounce of fat, 
For their legs was sollid mussel, which ours 'aven't much of that. 

It was on Monday afternoon, a quarter after four. 
And the carridge was a-waiting for our ladies at the door ; 
Says my lady, reether languid, ' Where shall we drive to-day ? ' 
Says Miss Mary, ' O mammar, we'll go to see the Rovers play ; 
The match is with the Foresters — the best in all the year.' 
And my lady, smilink graciously, says, ' Very well, my dear.' 



JOHN THOMAS. 149 

So hoff we went to Prince's ground. And ho ! 'twere like a phair, 

Only neither shows nor happle-stalls nor gingerbread was there ; 

But 'eaps of gents and ladies in elligant array, 

Which some 'ad come to flirt, and some to crittysize the Play. 

And I 'eard them tell how 'Utchingson 'ad batted strong and well, 

And how to Patterson and Kidd the early wickets fell, 

And how the wicket-keeper 'ad fumbled many a ketch, 

Which the Humpire said 'twas Rotten^ and might 'ave lost the Match; 

How Fryer E playde beautiful, and Lyttelton and Hay 

'Ad given the bowlers toko — I suppose that means Tokay, 

Or some bother plessant beveridge the thust for to allay. 

The ladies wore the colors of the side they 'oped would beat, 
And they sat beneath the spreading trees to shade 'em from the 'eat, 
And some was eating hices, and some strorberries and cream. 
And some they was a-drinking tea, and a- watching of the geame ; 
And some was skating at the Rink on wheels of Injy-robber, 
Which skating in the summer-time I 'ardly think is propper. 
Miss Mary wore the ribbings of the Rovers in her 'air. 
Which, if I mite persoom to say, they most becoming were. 
And I says hunto our Coachman, which upon the bocks I sat, 
And we'd heach a Rover favor as Miss M. made for our 'at — 
Says I, ' Some Uppinam Rover 'ave been saying somethink sweet.' 
Says he, ' It's that young kovey as she met in 'Arley Street.' 
And being reether curious, says I, *Why, which is E?' 
Says he, ' Why, don't you see him there, a-handing her the T ? ' 
And there he was beside her chair, partickler in attention, 
A tall and 'ansome feller, which his name I mustn't mention. 

Has thus we were conversing, there went up such a cheer 

When some one 'it a 6-er, as the likes you seldom 'ear. 

And ho ! 'twas really wonderful to see the fielders run. 

As hagile as young grass'oppers, all in the burning sun ; 

Which men like Mr Beevor, as are bulky in their form. 

Must find it most puspiring work, leastways when it's so wann. 

The holers, as I 'eard 'em say, was dead upon the spot. 

But the slow ones hevery now and then they cawt it reether 'ot. 

And R ! to see that Mr Huff, the pace he slung 'em in. 

Without the least regard to 'ead or 'and or rib or shin ; 

Which not being made of hadamant, nor wishink a black heye, 

Let others try to stand afore them lightning balls, says I. 

But la ! that Mr Crowder, E didn't seem to care, 

And the galliant Mr Garnett was wisibly ' all there.' 

That Garnett is a cricket gem, as sure as Pm alive. 

And he 'elped to make the tottle two 'undred ninety-5. 



I50 MISS MARY'S VERDICT. 

And now the Upnam Rovers 'ave buckled on their pads, 
And Kid and Lucas take their place, a pair of hactive lads ; 
And though they tried for 'alf an 'our, they couldn't get 'em hout, 
But, bold as any Buffaloes, they stood and 'it about, 
And when at last the play was stopd, they were unconkered still, 

'em with a will. 



Next day, as soon as lunch were done, Miss Mary she evinces 

A most uncommon longing for to be again at Prince's ; 

But my lady 'ad some shopping first, a long and teejus round, 

And the clox was striking 6 afore we came upon the ground — 

When hup comes that young feller, and 'We've 'ad bad luck, 

says E, 
' And are follering of our hinnings ' — (wotever that may be ! ) 
And he said as Mr Pursy Kidd 'ad totted sixty-6, 
And Lucas got the boling in a very pooty fix ; 

And none 'ad showed in better style than Street, the County player, 
And turtle 'adn't spiled the site of the Wussipful Lord Mair,i 
Which I thinks the Mair, if he was there, a pore sort must 'ave been, 
For no crimson robes nor golden chain was nowheres to be seen. 



Now J. G. B. was taking T, they said, with Mr Fryer, 

And hall this time the tellygraff was mounting hire and hire ; 

And ho ! it were exciting as the game drew near a close, 

And the way my 'art was beating at that momink. Goodness nose ! 

But at last it hended in a Draw, which was a great relief. 

For such excitement's 'urtful, leastways in my belief. 



Hour ladies 'aving took their seats, away again we drove. 

And we brought with us to dinner that tall and 'ansome kove. 

And ho ! to see him take his food ! it reely were a site, 

For cricket is a game as much improves the happytite. 

And to see Miss M.'s heyes sparkle as they talked the matter hover ! 

It made me wish that I 'ad been a galliant Uppinam Rover. 

She said as 'ow in all her life she never saw such play, 

And the Rovers would 'ave won it — which they might 'ave, I dessay. 

And when they plays another Match, may I again be there, 

Which I am your 'umble servink, 

John Thomas, 

Grosvenor Square.' 



1 E. M. Riddel], Mayor of Newark. 



GLORIOUS UNCERTAINTY. 151 

On July 7 and 8 their match at Southgate was drawn. 

FREE FORESTERS. 



1ST INNINGS. 


SCORE. 


2D INNINGS. SCORE. 


G. N . Wyatt, c and b Absolom 


. 42 


run out 


9 


T. S. Pearson, b Absolom 


. 18 


not out 


2 


W. H. Hay, b Fryer. 


. 16 






S. G. Lyttelton, b Fryer . 


• 56 






V. K. Royle, c Walker, b Fryer 


. . S3 


c Hornby, b Absolom 


10 


F. Baker, st Akroyd, b Absolom 


10 


b Hornby 


I 


T. Ratlifif, c Le Bas, b Thornton 





b Absolom 


2 


E. Rutter, run out . 


2 


c Thornton, b Hornby 


5 


F. A. Crowder, 1 b w, b Fryer . 


7 


1 b \v, b Fryer . 


2 


E. Bray, b Fryer 


3 






D. Buchanan, not out 


4 


not out . 





byes 18, leg- byes 3, wide i 


22 


bye I, leg-bye 2, wide i 


4 


Total 

sot. 


. 233 
JTHGATE. 


Total 


35 


C. J. Thornton, b Lyttelton 


• 30 


1 b w, b Lyttelton . 


3 


S. H. Akroyd, b Buchanan 


4 


st Pearson, b Buchanan 


54 


W. Blacker, st Pearson, b Buchanan 


5 


b Buchanan 


45 


F. E. R. Fryer, b Lyttelton 


• 25 


b Buchanan 


8 


G. Strachan, b Buchanan 





st Pearson, b Royle . 


16 


I. D. Walker, c Wyatt, b Lyttelton 


• 46 


c Bray, b Buchanan . 


I 


A. N. Hornby, c Wyatt, b Lyttelton 


22 


st Pearson, b Buchanan 


2 


M. T. Martin, st Pearson, b Buchans 


in . 


1 b w, b Buchanan . 


18 


C. Henderson, not out . . . 


7 


b Buchanan 


10 


C. A. Absolom, b Buchanan 





c Royle, b Buchanan 


7 


R. N. Le Bas, b Buchanan 


2 


not out . 





byes 12 


12 


byes 8, leg-byes 6, wide 


2 16 


Total 


. 153 


Total 


180 



Southgate followed their innings. 

At Brookwood Park, on July 12 and 13, Foresters beat 
the Gentlemen of Hants by 7 wickets, Hants making 125 
and %6. F. F. 174 — H. Verelst 49 — and in their second 
innings 41 for 3 wickets — G. N. Wyatt 20 (not out). 

On July 14 and 15 Liverpool won by 107 runs — viz., 
103 and 134 — against the bowling of Barron and Stewart 
Garnett, while Foresters only made 83 — J. S. Phillips (not 
out) — and 47. Porter and Patterson were the bowlers. 

And on the i6th and 17th Birkenhead had the best of 
them by 7 wickets, Foresters claiming 147 and 134 — H. 



152 JULY FLOODS. 

W. Gardner 6'^, J. R. Hutchison 30, R. Garnett 20 — 
Birkenhead 114 and 169 for 3 wickets, C. J. Crovvther 92 
(not out). Stewart Garnett and N. Barron were the 
Forester bowlers. 

On the 20th a match at Deddington was stopped by 
rain, when the home side had got 188, Free Foresters 84. 
H. T. Allsopp 28, W. Evetts 52, and C. D. Marsham 35, 
surpassed the F. F. score, and T. E. Cobb and E. Ramsay 
took their wickets. 

" Broil sun ! Ice claret ! Let my lady be 
Upon the ground ! Cricket's the game for me ! " 

— Mortimer Collins. 

On the 27th Free Foresters enjoyed a most delightful 
reception at Fulbeck, where they defeated Col. Fane's 
twelve on that and the following day by 6 wickets. C. 
B. Tylecote made a splendid maiden essay with F. F., 
scoring 61 (not out), and bowling in the first innings 26 
overs for 27 runs and 6 wickets. 

Malvern College, July 28 and 29, only made 203 in both 
innings to 254 in Free Foresters' first — J. H. Gibbon made 
75 and E. Stanhope 56. And on the two next days 
Foresters drew with the Malvern Club, who made 182 
and 98 to their 246. 

On the 30th also a match at Southwell against Mr 
Riddell's team was drawn, the Newark twelve having made 
132, and Free Foresters 34 and 144 for 7 wickets. This 
match was played at the Southwell ground, in consequence 
of the Newark ground being flooded by the Trent ! 

The Scottish tour began this year on the 2d August. 
Of four matches played, two were won, one lost, and 
one drawn. 

At Worcester, on the 4th and 5th of Aug., F. F. beat 
Worcestershire Gentlemen by 8 wickets. Worcestershire, 
though strong on paper, succumbed 1 1 to Appleby and 
10 to Bray for 81 and loi runs, R. Lyttelton 13 and 24 



THE GARNETTS. 



153 



being ledger-man ; so that Foresters, who made in their 
first essay 161, — Crowder 41, Appleby and Ratliff 20 each, 
— hit off the balance with the loss of 2 wickets — Hay 9, 
and F. W. Wright 15. 

At Hanbury, on the two next days, Mr Vernon's eleven 
turned the tables, making 142, and getting Foresters out 
for 62 and yZ. By the kindness of the editor of the 
* Worcester Herald ' I am able to say that F. F. had six 
ciphers in the first innings, and that H. AUsopp and T. 
Ratliff both obtained spectacles ; R. Garnett, 26 and 10, 
showed best for them. The Tylecote brothers, C. B. L. 
and H. E., took 11 F. F. wickets ; and C. B. L. Tylecote 
25, Alfred Lyttelton 30, and E. Allsopp 43, assisted the 
Hanbury score. 

The programme at Sutton Coldfield commenced on 
Aug. 9 with a very interesting contest against eleven 
Garnetts, won by 7 runs. 

FREE FORESTERS. 



1ST INNINGS. SCORE. 


2D INNINGS. SCORE. 


H. G. Barron, c L. O., b S. Garnett 


6 


cF. H., bG. GameU 


• 3 


F. R. Price, c G., b S. Garnett . 


4 


retired 


10 


C. B. L. Tylecote, b S. Garnett 





b S. Garnett . 


10 


F. W. Wright, b S. Garnett . 


• 13 


cG.,bF. Garnett . 


iS 


J. H. Gibbon, b S. Garnett 


. 16 


St R. L., b S. Garnett 


14 


N. Barron, c and b G. Garnett . 


5 


c Reg., b G. Garnett 





A. Chambers, b G. Garnett 


9 


b S. Garnett . 





T. Ratliff, c and b S. Garnett . 


5 


1 b w, b S. Garnett . 


17 


W. C. R. Bedford, c Robt., b G. Garnet 


t 10 


b G. Garnett . 


4 


W. A. Lucy, b S. Garnett 


I 


c Lionel, b F. Garnett 


14 


W. Chance, not out . 





not out 





byes 2, leg-bye i, no-ball i . 


5 


wides 4 . 


4 


Total 


74 


Total 


94 


GARNI 


i:iTS. 






Lionel Garnett, b Tylecote 


8 


b Tylecote 


2 


F. H. Garnett, c H. Barron, b Tylecote 


12 


c Chance, b Tylecote 


I 


S, Garnett, c Ratcliff, b Tylecote 





c Lucy, b Tylecote . 


9 


L. 0. Garnett, b Tylecote . 





c H. Barron, b Ratliff . 


9 


Robt. Garnett, c Ratliff, b Tylecote . 





bRatlifi- .... 





G. Garnett, c Tylecote, b Ratliff 


18 


c Wright, b Ratliff . 


36 


Reg. Garnett, not out ... . 


17 


c Wright, b Ratliff . 


8 



154 DRA WS. 



1ST INNINGS. SCORE. 2D INNINGS. 



H, Garnett, b Tylecote 
C. H. Garnett, b Tylecote 
R. L. Garnett, c and b Ratliff 
F. N. Garnett, run out 
byes 2, leg-byes 2, wide i 



1 b Tylecote 
o not out 

4 run out 

2 c H. Barron, b Ratliff 

5 bye I, leg-bye i . 

Total . 67 Total 



4 
5 

16 
2 
2 

94 



On Aug. II and 12 Foresters were unable to make the 
Four Oaks Park eleven follow their innings. Foresters 
got 167 and 215 — H. G. Barron 50 and 75, F. W. Wright 
36 and 54, G. Smythe 7 and 45. Four Oaks Park only- 
scored 90 and 40 for 5 wickets, J. W. Bagnall and A. F. 
Manley making 27 each in the first innings, and the latter 
16 in the second. Rain stopped the play. 

The match with Staffordshire Gentlemen on the 13th and 
14th was also drawn ; the Lichfield side having made 184 
and 119 — A. E. Alcock 49 and 8, W. W. Bagot 37 and o, 
M. Graham 29 and 21 — against 105 and 44 for 3 wickets; 
H. G. Barron 28, and his brother, 21 and 19, doing best. 

At Rockingham Castle, on the 17th and i8th, the match 
was left drawn for want of time. The garrison made 189 
and 146, A. Lyttelton, 34 and 30, heading a string of 
six double figures in each innings. Against this total 
Foresters claimed 129 and 128 with 7 wickets to fall — R. 
Lyttelton 27 and 45, T. Ratliff 3 and 39 (not out), C. B. L. 
Tylecote 20, J. G. Beevor 30 and 9 (not out). 

At Uppingham, which came next. Foresters got 257, 
and won by 35 runs in a single innings. C. G. Lane 57, 
T. Ratliff 41, F. Crowder 37 (not out), swelled the total 
of the F. F. score. J. Hare 54 and 26, D. G. Steel 24 
and 26, and J. W. Woodgate 35 and o, were prominent 
for the School. 

On the 2 1st, at Market Harboro', in a one-day match, 
Foresters lost by 3 runs, making 100 to the locals' 103, Mr 
Buchanan assisting the latter team. 

And at Alton Towers, on the 24th and 25th, they were 



AS OTHERS SEE US. 



J55 



defeated by 3 wickets. Mr Twemlow made j6 (not out) 
and 8 for the Towers, whose total score in both innings 
was 250. For Foresters W. F. Higgins made 39 and 5, 
H. T. Allsopp 15 and 29, T. Ratlifif 4 and 30. 

The last match, at Ashbourne, Foresters won by 7 runs 
116 and 99 to 151 and 57. 




Types Militaires. — Oxford University Vomnteers. 



156 



CHAPTER XXI. 

1876. 

The first match of the season was played on May 23 
at Ealing, Free Foresters winning by 22 runs, 118 to 96. 
The villagers obtained 51 for 3 wickets in their second 
innings. 

At Tooting, on June 5, the match was drawn, Free 
Foresters having made 254 — Pearson 66, Tuck 53, Ratliff 
37. Tooting lost 4 wickets for 57. 

At Eton, on the lOth, the School made 133 — W. F. 
Forbes 38, Ivo Bligh 25. Foresters rejoined with 154 — 
T. S. Pearson 75, P. A. M. Pearson 32, and E. F. S. 
Tylecote 16. Pearson took 8 wickets. 

At Beddington Park, on the 9th, F. F. made 246 — T. 
S. Pearson 114, T. RatUff 47, V. E. Walker 31 ; and then 
Pearson, with some assistance from Walker and Ellis, got 
the Park out for 136— W. B. Cloete 36 (not out), F. H. 
Birley 32. 

On June 12 and 13 rain caused a draw with Rugby 
School. Free Foresters scored 141 and 182 for 5 wickets ; 
W. Hay 10 and 62, W. S. Patterson 2 and 60, G. S. Mar- 
riott 20 and 14 (not out), were to the fore. The School, 
who had the worst of the weather, made 102, of which 
W. J. M. Hughes and G. L. King claimed 25 and 24 
respectively. 

At Aldershot Foresters broke new ground with success. 



ROVERS AGAIN. 157 

winning by 9 wickets. The military only obtained 88 and 
Si. T. S. Pearson took 11 of their wickets. For Foresters, 
who scored 149, E. Lyttelton 59, G. Law 26, Lord Lewis- 
ham 17, and C. E. Ringrose 14, were the double figures. 

At Chiselhurst, on the 29th, West Kent made 175. 
Pearson, taking 6 wickets, got Foresters out for 115, and 
then disposed of 9 wickets for 49 runs — J. Beevor 20 and 
H. Verelst 21. 

At Shoeburyness the next day, however, the boot was 
on the other leg, for F. F., who made 254, won in an inn- 
ings by 6d> runs. 

At Prince's, on July 3 and 4, another fine run-getting 
game with Uppingham Rovers was left undecided. 

FREE FORESTERS. 

1ST INNINGS. SCORE. 1ST INNINGS. SCORE. 

R. Briggs, 1 b w, b Patterson . 11 1 C. J. Lucas, c Lucas, b Patterson 9 

C. G. O. Bridgeman, b Luddington 6 H. Verelst, 1 b w, b Luddington . o 
A. H. Heath, c and b Luddington 14 E, S, Stanhope, not out . . 19 
T. S. Pearson, c Wright, b Pat- C. Childe Pemberton, b Kidd . 13 

terson 128 M. P. Lucas, absent . . . o 

F. A. Twemlow, c Patterson, b byes 14, leg-byes 2 . . .16 

Luddington . . . . i 

D. Moffat, b Luddington . . 10 Total . 327 



UPPINGHAM ROVERS. 

A. P. Lucas, run out . . . 30 S. S, Schultz, c and b Pearson . 5 

W. S. Patterson, 1 b w, b Pearson 46 H. L. Wright, c Pemberton, b 

D. A. Steel, c Briggs, b Pearson . 10 Pearson ..... 9 
C, E. Green, c Briggs, b Pearson o H. T. Luddington, not out . . i 

E. M, Riddell, c Briggs, b Pearson 21 byes 15, leg-byes 2, wide i . 18 
P. Kidd, c Pearson, b Briggs . 2 



J. G. Beevor, c Stanhope, b Pearson 15 Total 

F. G. Street, st Pemberton, b 



157 



Pearson 



In the second innings Lucas (c Bridgman, b Moffat) scored jj, Steel (not out) 8, 
Street (not out) 64 ; byes 4, leg-bye i, wides 2,— total 156. 



On the 5th and 6th Southgate proved too hard a nut 
to crack. 



158 



THORNTON AND OTTO WAY. 



SOUTHGATE. 

1ST INNINGS. SCORE. 1ST INNINGS. SCORE. 

I. D. Walker, b Hutchison . . 53 A. F. Smith, c S. G. Lyttelton, b 

G. Bird, c Chamberlayne, b Buch- Buchanan 7 

anan . . . . . . 2 W. A. Soames, b Chamberlayne . 6 

C. I. Thornton, st Chamberlayne, C. A. Absolom, c Ratliff, b Buch- 

b S. G. Lyttelton . . .185 anan 17 

F. E. Fryer, c Turner, b Pearson 3 V. E. Walker, c Ratliff, b S. G. 

R. D. Walker, not out . . . 51 Lyttleton 14 

S. H. Ackroyd, c Ratliff, b Buch- byes, &c 18 

anan 6 

C. J. Lucas, b S. G. Lyttelton . 12 Total . 374 

In the second innings Fryer (st Ottoway, b Rutter) scored i, Lucas (not out) 10, 
Soames (not out) 7 ; bye i, — total 19. 



FREE FORESTERS. 



1ST INNINGS. SCORE. 


2D INNINGS. SCORE. 


C. J. Ottoway, c Thornton, b Absolom 





st Bird, b V. E. Walker 


. lOI 


T. Ratliff, c Lucas, b Fryer 


12 


absent 


— 


M. Turner, b Fryer .... 


38 


cV. E.,bR. D.Walker 


2 


S. G. Lyttelton, c Bird, b Fryer 


4 


c Fryer, b R. D. Walker 


. 16 


E. Hume, c and b Fryer . 


I 


c Soames, b Absolom 


7 


T. S. Pearson, b Smith . 


29 


b R. D. Walker 


15 


J. R. Hutchison, b Absolom 


5 


st Bird, b R. D. Walker 





R. Lyttelton, c Smith, b L D. Walker 


74 


c Bird, b Absolom . 


8 


E. Rutter, st Bird, b Absolom . 


7 


c Absolom, b Lucas . 


39 


D. Buchanan, run out . . . 


IS 


c Fryer, b V. E. Walker 


I 


S. Chamberlayne, not out ... 


I 


not out . 


8 


byes, &c. ...... 


4 


byes, &c. 


5 


Total 


190 


Total 


202 



On July 8, at Haileybury, Free Foresters having made 
213, got out the boys for 62, and the follow produced 
47 runs for 4 wickets. S. B. Chamberlayne 49, R. G. 
Venables 55, E. P. Ash 25, H. N. Tennent 24, were the 
principal scorers for F. F. 

On July 17 a very successful tour in Kent was inaugur- 
ated by a match at Warnham Court, where F. F. won by 
7 wickets — 173 and 39 to 87 and 124. A. P. Lucas made 
53 for Foresters, F. H. Lee 30, E. Rutter 28 and 14 (not 
out). Pearson took 9 wickets, Lee 6, R. Garnett 4. 

At the Mote (Maidstone), having disposed of the home 
side for 96, F. F. accumulated 316. H. Verelst was to the 



UPS AND DOWNS. 159 

fore with 79, R. Garnett 54, S. G. Lyttelton 45, but E. 
Hume took premier place with 81. 

And the next day, July 21, Free Foresters scoring 100 and 
^S^ were beaten at Preston Hall by 2 wickets. R. Garnett 
made 17 and 15, the best scores for F. F., J. Dale 16 and 
30 for Mr Brassey's side. Gilliat took 1 1 of the Hall wick- 
ets, Francis and Fellowes (Capt. J.) disposed of Foresters. 

Gentlemen of Bedfordshire beat Free Foresters at Turvey 
House, July 24 and 25, the Club collapsing in the second 
innings for 6^,, after having claimed 187 with a man short 
in the first. S. G. Lyttelton with 54 and 3, H. W. Verelst 
with 32 and 8, R. Garnett with 3 and 30 (not out), and J. 
Marsham with 37 and 14, were their best scorers. The 
County Gentlemen made 125 — T. S. Pearson 30 and F. 
Safiford the same number — and then wiped off the runs for 
4 wickets ; H. G. Tylecote 41, and W. Vyse 37, being not 
out. 

After a tolerably close first innings against Malvern 
College, Free Foresters beat them on July 26 by 213 
runs, scoring 154 and 263 to the M. C. C. C. 139 and 65. 
A. J. Cripps made 31 and H. Harrison 25 for the College ; 
H. Foster made 63 and 42, W. A. Lucy 47, for Foresters. 

On the 28th and 29th a match with Newark was drawn, 
Mr Riddell's twelve scoring 179 and 90 for 8 wickets, while 
F. F. made 220 in their one innings, of which E. F. S. Tyle- 
cote made 106, H. W. Verelst 36, F. E. Allsopp 32. For 
Newark J. G. Beevor 61 and o, A. P. Lucas 25 and 32, 
E. M. H. Riddell 21 and 26, H. F. Clinton 40 and 3, did 
best. The brothers Tylecote, E. and C, were instrumental 
in securing 12 wickets. 

On the 31st Free Foresters began a four days' engage- 
ment at the splendid and hospitable mansion of Sir Charles 
Mordaunt, Walton Hall, where they first encountered the 
Gentlemen of Warwickshire, whom they defeated by 5 
wickets. 



i6o 



WALTON. 



WARWICKSHIRE. 



1ST INNINGS. SCORE. 


2D INNINGS. SCORE. 


J. R. Walker, st Tylecote, b Pearson 


21 


b Pearson. 


5 


C. Smith, c Pearson, b Royle . 


25 


c Maul, b Voules 


6 


Rev. W. J. Batchelor, c Tylecote, b Pear 








son 


6 


run out . 


12 


Lord Willoughby de Broke, b Royle 


10 


c Marshall, b Pearson 


4 


T. Ratliff, c Tylecote, b Royle 


I 


b Voules . 


14 


Rev. O. Mordaunt, b Voules . 


24 


c Voules, b Pearson . 


6 


Rev. F. Evans, c Marshall, b Pearson 


12 


b Voules . 


3 


Rev. G. C. Willes, b Voules . 


9 


St Tylecote, b Pearson 


49 


Rev. F. C. Williamson, c Royle, b Voulej 


4 


b Voules . 


2 


J. Mordaunt, not out 


6 


c Longman, b Voules 


15 


S. C. Smith, b Voules 


3 


c Longman, b Voules 


9 


Hon. D. Finch, b Voules . 


7 


not out 


14 


Extras 


9 


Extras . 


II 


Total 


137 


Total 


150 



FREE FORESTERS. 



E. F. S. Tylecote, c R. Williamson, b 
Walker 

T. S. Pearson, run out 

G. H. Longman, b C. Smith . 

H. Maul, b Walker .... 

V. Royle, run out .... 

S. C. Voules, c Willoughby, b C. Smith 

W. Evetts, b Walker 

E. Rutter, c sub. , b Walker 

H. M. Marshall, b Walker 

G. C. Sinclair, not out 

Sir C. Mordaunt, c Finch, b Walker 

Rev. E. L. Fellowes, b O. Mordaunt 
Extras 

Total 



II 


c Walker, b C. Smith 


13 


7 


b Walker . 


21 


10 


c Ratliff, b Batchelor 


73 





c Ratliff, b Batchelor 


15 


5 


not out 


17 


14 


c Williamson, b C. Smith 


I 


16 


not out . 


2 


14 






6 






13 






2 






13 


retired hurt 


13 


12 


Extras . 


II 



123 



Total 



166 



The two following days were devoted to a match with 
I Zingari, of which the reporter said : — 

Two strong teams. Foresters won the toss, and made good 
use of their advantage, all scoring with the exception of their 
veteran bowler, whose mind being, unfortunately, more active 
than his body, was badly run out just as he was beginning to 
look dangerous. For I Zingari, Lyttelton, Rowley, Marriott, 
and Lord Willoughby came to the front, Lyttelton's square-leg 
hitting into the band-tent becoming almost monotonous (at a 
later period in the day the " big drum " was reported far from 
well ; a cure was speedily provided by Captain Middleton). 




• rt != 

^ w 
rt • 
m j3Q 

^ 2 
>^ t i 

bj -1-1 . rt 

' i o c i: 

i-J « 3 o 

d ^ ^ " 
: W W .!? . 






3 ^ ^ ^ 
= H -"S ^ 



D. O C rt O 

rt t: C/2 CJ § 

HI 



/ z. 



i6i 



Appleby and Buchanan with the ball, Tylecote and Lyttelton 
with the bat and at the wicket, with Royle, Maul, and Kenyon 
Slaney in the field, and no better cricket could be wished for. 
What would probably have been an exciting finish was put an 
end to by time. 



FREE FORESTERS. 



1ST INNINGS. 

G. H. Longman, b Mordaunt . 

E. F. S. Tylecote, c Rowley, b Fellowes 

T. S. Pearson, b Fellowes 

S. C, Voules, c Middleton, b Mordaunt 

H. C. Maul, c and b Fellowes . 

V. Royle, c and b Mordaunt . 

G. E. Willes, run out . . . 

H. M. Marshall, b Middleton . 

A. Appleby, retired, hurt . 

E. Rutter, 1 b w, b Middleton (?) 

D. Buchanan, run out 

T. Ratliff, not out . 

Extras 



Total 



SCORE. 2D INNINGS. 

3 c Drake, b Cobden . 

43 c Mordaunt, b Cobden 

24 b Mordaunt 
23 absent 
12 b -Fellowes 

3 c Drake, b Fellowes 
33 run out 
20 1 b w, b Fellowes 

4 absent 
II c and b Fellowes 

o not out 

6 st Lyttelton, b Mordaunt 

25 Extras . 

207 Total 



SCORE. 

15 

50 

41 

o 

o 

4 

3 

o 

o 

II 

o 

4 
12 

140 



I ZINGARL 

1ST INNINGS. SCORE. 1ST INNINGS. SCORE. 

Capt. Rowley, c Buchanan, b Ap- O. Mordaunt, c and b Appleby . 4 

pleby 33 W. Evetts, b Appleby ... 6 

Capt. Middleton, c Royle, b Buch- E. T. Drake, run out . . . i 

anan 6 Lord Willoughby de Broke, c 

Hon. A. Lyttelton, b Appleby . 39 Rutter, b Buchanan ... 20 

Capt. Kenyon Slaney, c Buch- F. C. Cobden, st Tylecote, b 

anan, b Appleby . . . i Buchanan o 

E. L. Fellowes, st Tylecote, b Extras 8 

Buchanan i 

C. Man-iott, not out ... 21 Total . 140 
E. W. Tritton, c Tylecote, b 

Buchanan o 

In the second innings Rowley (not out) scored 10, Lyttelton (b Appleby) 32, 
Kenyon Slaney (not out) i ; extras 2, — total 45. 

Appleby was struck by Capt. (Bay) Middleton, when 
batting, on the right elbow ; he had to leave off, and was 
unable to bat in the second innings, but bowling left- 
handed, he was not disabled in that capacity. 

On the same days, Aug. i and 2, another team of Fores- 
ters made a draw of a match at Alton Towers, which looked 

L 



i62 INTERNECINE STRIFE. 

like a victory, had the clerk of the weather been more pro- 
pitious. For F. R, who scored 158 and j6, C. B. L. Tyle- 
cote 28 and 27, R. Garnett 45 and i, W. J. Lyon 23 and 
2"], H. G. Tylecote 6 and 40, and F. Baker 23 (not out) 
and 13, were prominent; and the Tylecote family took 
the whole of the wickets. For Alton nobody exceeded 20 
but W. Moore, 21 (not out). Their score was 93 and 31 
for 3 wickets. 

On the 4th and 5th, at Hanbury, a side which was ipsis 
Hibernis Hibernior, more Forester than many a Forester 
eleven, drew a rather interesting contest. For F. F., who 
scored 197 and 198, in the first innings seven double figures 
were made, 25 (not out) from T. RatlifT, the highest. In 
the second innings, G. H. Longman 65, and T. RatlifT 39 
(not out), made more than half the runs. For Hanbury, 
again, there were seven double figures in the first innings, 
H. G. and C. B. Tylecote, 40 and 32, being chief In the 
second innings an excellent 45 from A. Lyttelton and a 
steady 29 from W. F. Higgins made, with extras, a score 
of 102 for I wicket. 

The Scottish matches this year (the last in which they 
were attempted) dwindled to two only : one was lost and 
the other won. 

On the same days as the last of these, Aug. 9 and 10, 
a renewal of the match with Gentlemen of Worcestershire, 
after a very even first innings, ended in favour of Free 
Foresters by 231 runs, several of the opposing team having 
taken their departure. H. C. Maul, 71 and 59, was un- 
doubtedly the F. F. champion, and was ably seconded by 
H. W. Verelst 23 and 69, the other figures of note being 
H. M. Marshall 14 and 36, G. H. Longman 36 and 7, J. 
Garnett o and 28. For the County, F. H. Lee 54 and J. 
R. Walker 35 are noteworthy. Stewart Garnett accounted 
for 10 Worcester wickets. Bray for 8. 

The next match, Aug. 11 and 12, played at Sutton 







1~. > r\. 






1ST INNINGS. SCORE. 


T. Ratlifif, not out 


. 


8 


G. E. Smythe, st 


Laurence, b S. 




Garnett . 


. 


i6 


W. C. R. Bedford, 


b S. Garnett . 


o 


Hon. J. Marsham, 


b S. Garnett . 


4 


W. Smythe, 1 b w. 


b Lionel Gar- 




nett . 


. 


o 


byes 3 . 


. 


3 



THE FAMILY UNDEFEATED. 163 

Coldfield against eleven Garnetts, though unfinished, ex- 
hibited some very pretty cricket, and if time had permitted 
might have had an interesting finale. 

FREE FORESTERS. 

1ST INNINGS. SCORE. 

G. H. Longman, c and b S. 

Garnett 28 

H. M. Marshall, c S., b F. H. 

Garnett 29 

F. R. Price, c and b S. Garnett . 8 
C. Tillard, c Lionel, b S. Garnett 3 
H. G. Barron, st Laurence, b G. 

Garnett 40 

A. F. Manley, c Robt., b F. H. 

Garnett 56 Total , . 195 

In the second innings Longman (not out) scored 53, Marshall (c Laurence, b G. 
Garnett) 36, Manley (not out) 3, Marsham (c Robt., b G. Garnett) 32, — total 124. 
The author of * Scores and Biographies ' adds, probably correctly, 11 for extras in 
the second innings. 

GARNETTS. 

SCORE. SCORE. 
Lionel Garnett, b Marsham . . 28 Laurence Garnett, c and b Long- 
Gerald Garnett, b Marsham . 36 man 14 

F. H. Garnett, b Ratliff . . 25 C. A. Garnett, b Marsham . . 9 

Stewart Garnett, b Tillard . . 9 Herbert Garnett, c Manley, b Ratliff 3 

Robt. Garnett, c Marshall, b Tillard 69 H. C. Garnett, not out . . 3 

John Garnett, b Tillard . . o byes 5, leg-byes 7, wides 2 . 14 

L. O. Garnett, c Marsham, b Til- 

lard 9 Total . 219 

The match which followed, against twelve gentlemen of 
Staffordshire at Lichfield, had likewise some interesting 
features, especially when F. R, going in the second time 
to get 100 runs to win, saw Longman and Tillard fall for 
a cipher, and Ratliff follow suit in another over, while 
their score was as blank (to quote from 'Pickwick') as their 
faces. Fortunately good play was in reserve : Allsopp 
and Baker made 21 each, the latter not out, and Wil- 
liamson carried his bat for 18, so they won by 4 wickets. 
F. F. 135 and 100, Staffordshire 64 and 170, Malcolm 
Graham scoring for his county 15 and Z6, Longman 



i64 A GOOD YEAR. 

made 45 in the first innings of Foresters, and Ratliff 27, 
besides accounting for 9 wickets ; Allsopp and Tillard 
took 5 apiece, Lyon for Staffordshire 10. 

Shropshire, on the 17th and i8th, were beaten by 9 
wickets, Wingfield's 31 being the only individual contri- 
bution of note, in their 96 and y^. F. F., by the aid of 
58 from S. G. Lyttelton and 30 from E. F. S. Stanhope, 
made 154 in their first innings. 

At Market Harboro' on the 21st F. F. encountered Mr 
Hay's team with a deficiency of force ill supplied by kind 
emergencies. S. Bucknill 34 (not out) and 4, T. Ratliff 
15 and 28, F. Baker 24 and 2, H. Verelst 13 and 16, were 
the chief contributors to their rather meagre totals of 129 
and 114. On the other side, John Marsham, 44, helped a 
first innings of 116, and the requisite 128 was made with 
the loss of 7 wickets, W. Hay 37 (not out), and Capt. 
Meares 33. 

The last match of this successful season was played on 
Aug. 24 and 25 at Deddington, the home side getting 34 
and 128, while F. F., who made 156, won without losing a 
wicket. Twelve a-side played. 




CHAPTER XXII, 



THE SCOTTISH TOURS. 



1864-65. 



When it first occurred to the present writer to try the 
experiment of the circuit in the Land of Cakes, the off- 
spring of his brain very nearly perished in infancy for want 
of encouragement. Selecting the idlest fellow and best 
batsman of his acquaintance, he tentatively put the 
question, " What should you say to an autumn cricket-tour 
in Scotland ? " A pale cast of thought sicklied for an 
instant the wholesome ruddiness of the hero's countenance, 
" Is Scotland an island ? " quoth he. When assured that 
you could reach that portion of Britain without a marine 
trip, he condescended to say he would "think of it"; 



i66 SOFT DA YS. 

" but," he added, " I went to Ireland with I Zingari once, 
and no more islands for me, thankye." His thought of it, 
as might be expected, ended in a polite excuse for not 
going, and somewhat similar replies were received from at 
least four-and-twenty other intimate friends of the pro- 
jector. E. K. Hornby, however, was staunch, and with 
Hood, Bass, and W. J. Lyon, we started, relying on a 
promise that other Foresters, who were temporary residents 
beyond the Border, would turn up to our aid. At Glasgow, 
where we began on Sept. 6, 1864, we literally had only 
seven men ; but as the first day was too wet to play, and 
on the second the West of Scotland, winning the toss, 
went in and made 178, H. Tennent 63 being ledger-man, 
only one F. F. wicket fell for 35. 

We journeyed next to Perth, where we went in first and 
ten batsmen made 227 — Lyon 43, Hornby 41, Tennent 39, 
Bass 34, Hood 23, R. J. Garnett 16. The Perth men then 
made 177, and got 8 F. F. wickets down for 167 — Lyon 
32 (not out) ; he also bowled six wickets. 

On the 14th at Stirling it rained all day; and on the 15th 
and 1 6th bad weather and bad cricket prevailed at Kelso, 
who made 184, their two professionals accounting for 69 
runs, and extras 20 ; while four Foresters went out for 26. 
This was not encouraging. However, the following year, as 
I was a temporary resident near Edinburgh, I was able to 
arrange a good programme, and Osbert Mordaunt brought 
a strong eleven, including Goodrich, Mott, Hood, Lionel 
Garnett, Bass, and Colley — the last named, though he ac- 
companied us, being unable to play from the result of an 
accident : we had no difficulty, however, in filling his place. 
We began with the Grange Club, Edinburgh, on Aug. i, 
who beat us rather unexpectedly, as they did not make 
many runs, and our batting was strong. They scored 98 
in their first innings, and F. F. 119 — Hood 31, Mott 27, 
&c. The Grange only reached 1 14 in their second hands, 




13 
O 

^ m . 

-^ a 

.t; o 

r-* E -^ 

I ^ rt 

^ •- > 

O 

. <« ,/ 



1) 4J 

i I 



*J o 

P5 _cj 

t> "o ^ 
> U 

CO 



THE SOUTH INCH. 167 

though Jack Mackenzie made a good 48 ; but with 94 to win 
we only made 57. On the 3d, in a one day's contest with 
Dalkeith, we showed up better. The home eleven made 
1 36, their full worth ; and then Foresters, with the two last 
wickets, Goodrich and C. Bedford, still in, made 250 — 
Mott's 63 being a fine hitting innings (one hit for eight in 
particular), well supported by Hood with 50, Mordaunt 36, 
Lyon 25, Downe 17. 

On the 4th and 5 th, at Glasgow, the West of Scotland 
succumbed (13 to Goodrich) for the small scores of 47 and 
79; while F. F., with nine double figures, gave a total of 
210 in one innings — Hood 56, Lyon 32, Garnett 23, &c. 

At Stirling, thanks to the toss, F. F. went in first and 
scored 215, of which Garnett was credited with 61, Mor- 
daunt 48, Lyon 35, Mott and James Smith Barry 20 each. 
Stirling only scored 70 and 99, their pro., Guild, making 
22 and 39 of them. 

On the second day at Perth, the weather, which had 
changed for the worse the day before, stopped the match 
outright, F. F. having scored 136 — Mott 43, Mordaunt 31, 
&c. — and Perth, whose last man saved the follow-on, 64. 
The Foresters' second innings in the dark and on a bad 
wicket only produced 65 for eight wickets, so there might 
be some speculation on the result. I forget whether it 
was in this match or the year before that I was scoring, 
with the Hon. Sec. of Perth for my companion, when a 
long stand was made on our side, and my colleague sent to 
speak to his brother, the captain in the field. " You must 
take Lochead [pro.] off," said he. " Well, he says that if 
he don't get a wicket presently, he'll try an over of lobs ! " 

Perth certainly was an old-world place to play cricket in, 
— an uninclosed ground, and a large contingent of unwashed 
urchins of tender years by way of gallery : they hissed, as 
Lyon reminds me, when we made a good hit or catch ; 
but the batsman, after a long innings, was conducted to 



i68 POLICE! 

the tent in triumph, one of the small boys marching in 
front with the bat. 

There were other perils at Perth besides those of the 
Inch. We very nearly left a couple of our eleven in 
durance vile there. All through the tour one or two 
obstreperous demonstrations had checkered the usual 
tranquillity of Forester cricket, and we had tried to give a 
hint to the principal offender by serving him in the field 
with a bogus summons for some act of mischief, through 
the connivance of a friendly "local authority." But at 
Perth he and another cricketer were actually run in for 
insisting on calling up a billiard-marker at 12.30 A.M. 
Luckily a masonic superintendent of police recognised a 
brother, and did not insist upon bail. The next morning 
the patriarch of the party thought it incumbent upon him 
to lecture the other roysterer, when to his great surprise he 
found that he was far too highly impressed with a burning 
sense of his own wrongs, especially of the injury he had 
been subjected to by the policeman. " Was it his duty," 
he exclaimed, " to call me " We may leave the appel- 
lative choked, as it was by his indignation, for it w^as that 
familiar to the British private beloved of Mr Rudyard 
Kipling, and equally so to the Scottish rough of that 
period. Fortunately words break no bones, or the finale 
might have stood " Retired hurt ! " 

But it certainly was annoying when an infuriated bag- 
man brought a policeman into the hotel at Glasgow, to 
give into custody somebody who had filled his Wellington 
boots with water. Of course he pitched upon the wrong 
men, and their calm demeanour and evident innocence so 
wrought upon the guardian of the peace that he recom- 
mended his client to apologise, lest the gentlemen should 
retort upon him. 

A more strictly cricket incident occurred at Stirling : 
after our innings the county men dallied a good deal 



BUCHANAN'S TOUR. 



169 



before going to the wicket, and some one asked for the 
ball. " We've sent up for it to the town," was the reply. 
" But why not go on using the one we have ? " " We want 
to sting your hands a bit with a new yin/' was the ex- 
planation. 

Goodrich's analysis is a curiosity : — 



ist innmgs 
2d innings 



Edinburgh \ 
Dalkeith 

Glasgow { ^^V™"-5 
I 2d innings 

Stirling \ ^^* ^"^^"S^ 
( 2d innings 

Perth, ist innings 



Tota 







Maiden 




3alls. 


Runs. 


Overs. 


Wickets 


181 


5T 


19 


7 


170 


41 


21 


6 


100 


43 


8 


3 


60 


23 


2 


6 


108 


42 


7 


8 


114 


32 


II 


6 


144 


46 


13 


9 


104 


35 


8 


5 



981 



313 



89 



so 



1866. 



By D. Buchanan. 

It was with pleasant anticipations that in the summer of 
the above year I accepted Osbert Mordaunt's invitation to 
make one of his eleven in the cricketing tour to Scot- 
land which he had arranged ; and I looked forward to 
this visit to the north with the more pleasure, not only 
because I should renew my acquaintance with the Grange 
Club, of which I was a member thirteen years before, 
but also because I hoped to revisit scenes of early days, 
and note the many changes which had taken place since 
the iron horse went snorting through the land. Fortunate 
it is that in bonny Scotland there are spots far from the 
beaten track where nature, in rugged beauty, revels in 
wealth of heath, and stream, and birken glen — tracts 
which man in his ruthless thirst for gold will ne'er de- 
face, because it will not pay ; whose solitudes are still 
the haunt of the red-deer ; from whose heath-clad hills 
" The gor-cock crousely craws the mom ; " 



1 70 AN ANTICIPA TION. 

and o'er whose loftiest heights, wheeling in majestic 

flight But I spare you, gentle reader, and will only 

add the earnest hope that as long as the world shall 
last there may be found in " Caledonia stern and wild " 
spots such as these, affording fitting themes for painter 
and poet alike, for where the iron streak runs all things 
are levelled down. I have seen the lordly stag with 
his companions — the "children of the mist" — in the 
brakes of Auchnashellach, quietly browsing within rifle- 
shot of the Strome Ferry train, and have knocked over 
the karken freuche (Gaelic, heather -hen or red -grouse) 
some twenty yards or so from the Highland Railway at 
Dalwhinnie ; and who can tell but that some day on some 
distant mountain - top we may find a scene somev/hat 
similar to that depicted at the head of this chapter, and 
be saluted with. Walk up, ladies and gentlemen ; only 
a penny. Walk up, walk up and see the Fat Lady, 
and the Golden Eagle a-sittin' on its nest ! ! ! Notwith- 
standing these animadversions, railways are indispensable 
in the present age,^ and by their means the Free For- 
esters were comfortably and rapidly conveyed to Edin- 



^ To illustrate the curious notions old people in Scotland held on matters 
connected with railways. An old lady whom I knew in Roxburghshire, who 
had never been in a train in her life, and whose ideas on modern discoveries 
were very primitive, inquired in all soberness, and in much the same words as 
follows : " If I were in one train and saw a freen [friend] passin' in anither, 
could I no' stop and hae a crack [talk] wi' her?" Almost a parallel case to 
that of the old Scotchwoman who, finding she was being carried beyond her 
destination, called out, " Gerd ! gerd ! let me oot, let me oot ! ! " While the 
ink with which this note was written thus far was wet, a friend who had driven 
up to the front told me the following story. His grandfather, in going from 
Berwickshire to visit his relatives in Northumberland, was in the habit of driv- 
ing across the old bridge which connects Berwick with Tweedmouth. On a 
similar journey with his wife, towards the end of the "Forties," when about 
to start from Berwick by train, seeing the lofty new bridge, with its many 
arches, across the Tweed, he said to his wife, " I've often gane ower the auld 
brig ; but am no gaun to risk my neck fleein' through the air here, sae I'll 
just walk across by the auld brig, and jine ye on the ither side o' the watter." 



AN ACCIDENT. 



171 



burgh, for their first match with the Grange Club — the 
Marylebone of the North. 

The match was played on the Academy Ground, Raeburn 
Place. The Grange Club, owing to expiration of lease, 
and the property being taken for building purposes, had 
lost their old ground on the west side of the Lothian Road, 
and had not then obtained a new site. The Foresters 
were fortunate enough to win by 36 runs, and had not Hill 
been put hors de combat the result might have been differ- 
ent. I have seen many batsmen badly hit, and once in 
practice on the old Grange ground Jackson, afterwards the 
fast Nottingham bowler, then engaged by the Club, and a 
wild tearing bowler, hit me on the face with a bumping 
ball ; but I have never seen any one struck harder than 
young Hill was. Macgill — over six feet high, and a hard 
hitter — and he were batting well, and beginning to make 
runs fast, when the former drove a ball straight back, hard 
and low. Hill, who was backing up well, could not get out 
of the way, and was hit full below the belt a terrific blow, 
which finished the innings and the match. I never met 
Hill again, and never could ascertain if any permanent in- 
jury was done. The following was the score : — 

FREE FORESTERS. 



1ST INNINGS. 


SCORE. 


2D INNINGS. 


SCORE. 


R. Brodie, c Brown, b Craig 


4 


b Adams .... 7 


D. Buchanan, b Hill 





b Adams . 






8 


J. S. Hood, c Hill, b Adams . 


5 


b Adams . 






12 


0. Mordaunt, b Adams . 


32 


b Adams . 






4 


W. J. Lyon, c Balfour, b Adams 


5 


b Hill . 






17 


H. N. Tennent, c Dunlop, b Hill . 


30 


b Adams . 









C. W. Stanhope, st Balfour, b Hill . 


7 


not out . 






9 


J. S. Holden, c Macgill, b Craig 


5 


b Adams . 






42 


R. Garnett, absent .... 





b Hill 









W. Birkett, not out . 


8 


b Craig . 






• 45 


G. Gillespie, c Mackenzie, b Craig . 


I 


b Adams . 






I 


bye I, wide i 


2 


byes 2, leg-by 


ei, w 


ides. 


3 6 



Total 



99 



Total 



151 



172 



WINS. 





THE 


GRANGE 






1ST INNINGS. 




SCORE. 


2D INNINGS. SCORE. 


R. D. Balfour, b Mordaunt 


. 


5 


c and b Buchanan , 


I 


J. Moncrieff, run out . 


. 




o 


st Lyon, b Mordaunt 





J. Mansfield, b Buchanan . 


. 




3 


c Hood, b Buchanan 





G. Dunlop, c Birkett, b Buchanan 




28 


run out 


16 


G. Craig, c Stanhope, b Mordaunt 




IS 


b Buchanan 


5 


J. Mackenzie, b Mordaunt . 






o 


c Hood, b Buchanan 


9 


K. Adams, b Hood . 






9 


st Lyon, b Buchanan 


12 


W. Dunlop, b Hood . 






8 


b Hood . 


4 


A. Brown, b Lyon 






41 


b Buchanan 


4 


A. Macgill, b Brodie . 






13 


not out . 


22 


J. Hill, not out . 






4 


hurt .... 





byes 5, leg-bye i, wides 6, 


no-balls 


2 


14 


leg-bye . 


I 




Total 


140 


Total 


74 



The next match was played, Thursday and Friday, the 
2d and 3d August, on the picturesque ground in front of 
Dalkeith Palace, one of the seats of the Duke of Buccleuch, 
and was won by Foresters in one innings with 6y runs to 
spare. There being no special feature in the match in a 
cricket point of view, the score will be a sufficient record : — 

FREE FORESTERS. 



1ST INNINGS. SCORE. 

D. Buchanan, b Stobbs . . 2 

R. Brodie, c Balgarnie, b Stobbs 5 

J. Hood, b Riddle ... 87 

H. N. Tennent, c Seton, b Stobbs 52 

O. Mordaunt, b Riddle . . 7 

W. J. Lyon, run out ... 8 



1ST INNINGS. SCORE. 

J. Holden, b Riddle ... 9 

C. W. Stanhope, b Riddle . . i 

Gibson-Craig, not out . . 2 

byes 10, leg-byes 4, wides 4 . 18 

Total . 191 



DALKEITH. 



1ST INNINGS. 

Douglas, b Mordaunt 
Riddle, st Lyon, b Mordaunt 
Heathcote, b Buchanan . 
Taylor, b Buchanan . 
Craig, b Hood . 
Dunlop, c Hood, b Buchanan 
Balgarnie, b Buchanan 
Almond, run out 
Dods, not out . 
Seton, 1 b w, b Buchanan . 
Stobbs, c Lyon, b Hood . 
byes 2, leg-byes 3 . 



Total 



SCORE. 2D INNINGS. 

1 St Lyon, b Buchanan 

2 b Buchanan 
2 not out 

35 c Lyon, b Buchanan 

19 St Lyon, b Buchanan 

b Mordaunt 

1 b Mordaunt 

1 b Mordaunt 

2 b Mordaunt 
o c Hood, b Buchanan 
2 b Mordaunt 
5 

70 Total 



SCORE. 

o 
6 

4 
o 

9 
2 

4 

I 

12 

16 

o 



54 



IVET. 



173 



On the morning of Saturday the 4th of August the 
Free Foresters proceeded to Stirling. The wicket was 
rather of a spongy nature, and the out-fielding not good. 
The match was won by Foresters in one innings with 16 
runs to spare. Score — 

STIRLING. 



1ST INNINGS. 

E. Morrison, b Mordaunt . 
J. Nicholson, b Mordaunt 

C. Mackenzie, c Brodie, b Buchanan 
J. M'Quade, b Buchanan . 

F. Murrie, c Hood, b Buchanan 
Lord Erskine, c Hood, b Buchanan 
R. Walton, c Birkett, b Buchanan 
J. Wilson, b Buchanan 

G. Dalgleish, c Birkett, b Mordaunt 
J. Morrison, not out . 

J, Henderson, st Lyon, b Mordaunt 
bye 



Total 



IE. 2D INNINGS. J 

8 run out 

3 not out 

5 b Brodie . 

2 b Mordaunt 

3 run out 

3 b Hood . 

1 c Birkett, b Mordaunt 
10 b Brodie . 

2 c Mordaunt, b Buchanan 
2 b Mordaunt 

hit wkt., b Brodie 

1 byes 



40 



Total 



I 

4 
10 
II 

o 

14 
4 
4 

12 

3 
I 

5 
69 



FREE FORESTERS. 



1ST INNINGS. SCORE. 

D. Buchanan, c J. Morrison, b 

E. Morrison . . . . i 

W. Birkett, run out ... 2 

R. Brodie, c Mackenzie, b Morrison 16 

W. J. Lyon, c Dalgleish, b Erskine 11 

H. N. Tennent, b Erskine . . 18 

J. S. Hood, 1 b w, b Erskine . 2 

O. Mordaunt, c Murrie, b Walton 28 



1ST INNINGS. SCORE. 

C. W. Stanhope, st Morrison, b 

Dalgleish i 

J. Holden, c Murrie, b Morrison . 24 

J. Balgarnie, not out ... 14 

P. Henderson, run out . . 5 

bye I, wides 2 . . . . 3 



Total 



125 



On Monday the 6th of August, by an early train, with 
Jupiter Pluvius in the ascendant, Foresters made their way 
to Glasgow, and on to Drumpellier, where they were 
heartily welcomed by Colonel and Mrs Buchanan of 
" that ilk." The kind reception and gracious hospitality 
enjoyed by the Foresters, not only on this occasion but 
in subsequent years, whenever the Scottish tour took 
place, will always be remembered with the greatest 
pleasure by all the F. F.'s who played in those matches. 
And particularly by me is this first match at Drumpellier 



174 A RETROSPECT. 

to be remembered, since it was the precursor of delightful 
visits at Drumpellier, and many more for many years 
to Colonel Buchanan's charming place, Carradale, in 
Argyllshire, where — on the " beautiful hills of Kintyre," 
with good sportsmen, good dogs, and with all arrange- 
ments carried out in true sportsmanlike manner ; or on 
the cricket - ground, in friendly riyalry with the Camp- 
beltown Club ; or, if hills were shrouded in mist and rain 
came down, by the river-side, beginning at my favourite 
pool at Auchenruaich, some four miles up the glen, and 
fishing down ; with evenings graced by the presence of 
a kind and thoughtful hostess, and a lady friend or two — 
time, alas ! too swiftly sped away. Owing to rain no play 
took place on the first day of the match, but on the second, 
one innings each was concluded. Watson, afterwards the 
noted slow bowler for Lancashire, then employed in some 
iron-works in Coatbridge, — a capital wicket-keeper, good 
fast bowler, and useful batsman, — played regularly for 
Drumpellier. Score : — 

DRUMPELLIER. 

1ST INNINGS. SCORE. 1ST INNINGS. SCORE. 

Shaw, c Balfour, b Hood . . lo Sands, not out .... 8 

Isaac, c Hood, b Buchanan . 13 Griffith, c Lyon, b Buchanan . 2 

Watson, b Buchanan ... 12 Courtnay, I b w, b Buchanan . o 

Tennent, c Hood, b Buchanan . 6 Stevenson, c Lyon, b Buchanan . o 

Col, Buchanan, Ibw, b Buchanan o bye i, leg-byes 5 ... 6 

Lewin, c Mordaunt, b Hood . o — 

Swale, c Brodie, b Buchanan . 4 Total . 61 



FREE FORESTERS. 



R. Brodie, c Buchanan, b Sands 

W. Lyon, c and b Sands 

J. Hood, St Watson, b Sands 

H. Tennent, c Isaacs, b Sands 

R. Balfour, b Griffiths . 

C. W. Stanhope, run out 

J. Holden, c and b Watson . 



15 O. Mordaunt, b Watson . . 7 

15 D. Buchanan, run out ... 4 

31 G. Craig, not out .... 7 

49 W. Birkett, c Lewin, b Sands . 14 

9 byes 2, leg-bye i , wides 2, no-balls 2 7 

o 

o Total . 158 



The last match of the tour was played at Partick, 
Glasgow, V. The West of Scotland Club, on the 8th and 



A GOOD FINALE. 



175 



9th of August. There was nothing special to note in this 
match except that the Foresters won by 53 runs. Score : — 



FREE FORESTERS. 



1ST INNINGS. 


SCORE. 


2D INNINGS. SCORE. 


J. Hood, c M'Alister, b F. Norley 





st Stenhouse, b F. Norley 


32 


R. Brodie, c J. Norley, b F. Norley 


2 


b F. Norley 


10 


0. Mordaunt, b F. Norley 


• 23 


b M'Ahster 


21 


J. Holden, c Norley, b M 'Mister 


4 


c Sharp, b F. Norley 


9 


W. Lyon, c Sharp, b F. Norley 


I 


b F. Norley 


6 


H. N. Tennent, b F. Norley . 


3 


c Norley, b M'Alister 


39 


R. Balfour, b F. Norley . 


12 


c Swale, b F. Norley 


29 


D. Buchanan, b F. Norley 


3 


c Rowan, b F. Norley 





G. Craig, bM 'Mister 


3 


c M'Alister, b F. Norley 


2 


C. W. Stanhope, not out . 


4 


c Swale, b M'Alister 


7 


J. Houldsworth, c Sharp, b F. Norle 


Y . 7 


not out 


12 


byes 3, wides 4 . . . 


7 


bye I, leg-bye i . 


2 


Tota 


I . 69 


Total 


169 


WEST OF SCOTLAND. 




W. Stenhouse, b Mordaunt 


7 


hit wkt., b Mordaunt 


14 


J. Pattison, st Lyon, b Buchanan 


• 23 


b Mordaunt 


I 


F. Norley, c Tennent, b Mordaunt 





c Mordaunt, b Buchanan 


2 


Swale, c and b Mordaunt . 





c Brodie, b Hood 


23 


Col. Buchanan, not out 


2 


bHood . 


4 


J. Norley, b Mordaunt 


I 


b Mordaunt 


4 


A. M'Alister, st Lyon, b Mordaunt 


10 


st Lyon, b Buchanan 


. 48 


J. Inglis, b Buchanan 





b Mordaunt 


7 


Sands, b Mordaunt . 





not out 


9 


J. Sharp, st Lyon, b Mordaunt . 


5 


bHood . 





T. Rowan, hit wkt., b Buchanan 


3 


st Lyon, b Buchanan 


9 


byes 2, leg-bye i . . . 


3 


byes 5, leg-byes 5 . 


10 


Tota 


1 . 54 


Total 


• 131 



No Scottish tour having taken place in 1867, the getting 
up a team and the arrangement of the fixtures was under- 
taken by me in the exceptionally dry season of 1868, and for 
several years afterwards. The match with Perth in 1868 
is specially worthy of mention, because it was the only one 
ever played by the Free Foresters at that '' fair city " which 
was brought to a definite conclusion, — the matches of 1864 
and 1865 having been prematurely closed by rain, — and 
the one of the tour which they least cared to lose. It was 
remarkable to see the interest taken by the " caddies " and 



176 ''FIRST PRINCIPLES^ 

barefooted lads in the streets. They staked their pennies 
and twopences on the result, and on taking a walk after 
our evening meal at the George, I overheard one of them 
remark to his companions, "That's yin o' the Free For- 
esters." It was a good match, and well won by F. F.'s. 
Many Scotch clubs were anxious to make matches with the 
Foresters, but as all the matches were to be played within 
the limits of a fortnight, only those which were considered 
convenient were selected . Amongst these was Kelso, which 
was thought a good place to begin the tour with, especially 
as the match there gave Foresters an opportunity of seeing 
the far-famed Tweed, and on their way to Edinburgh they 
had a glimpse of the Eildon Hills and Melrose Abbey. The 
country there was well known to me, and I had formerly 
been a member of the Club, A good story, not generally 
known, in connection with the visit to Kelso of the All 
England Eleven, — Old Clarke's eleven, — as far as I can 
recollect, in the year 1852, may be mentioned. The match 
was played on the ground — kindly lent to the Club by 
the Duke of Roxburgh e — on Kelso Race-course. An old 
grocer, who had been looking on at the match for some 
time, on an interval taking place, accosted "Old Clarke" in 
the following terms : " It's a verra fine game this cricketts, 
Mr Clerk ! I've a gude mind to tak' to it mysel'. Noo, Mr 
Clerk, wad ye jist instruct me in the first preenciples o' 
crickett } " Old Clarke looked the old grocer over, and 
seeing that his finger-nails were long, had been in constant 
contact with sugar, snuff, pepper, &c., &c., and were innocent 
of a nail-brush, said dryly, " The first preenciples of cricket 
are, to coot yer nayls." My experiences of the Scotch 
tours were very agreeable ones, and when the fortnight was 
up and the matches over, the team generally broke up with 
unanimous expressions of regret that their pleasant trip 
had come to an end. 



A SAD NOTE. 177 



1868. 

The season of 1868, as Mr Buchanan has incidentally 
mentioned, was unusually hot and dry, hence the diary 
of the Forester progress that year commences with a 
misquotation from Walter Scott — 

" Land of brown turf and scanty flood " — 

" descriptive of an August when there was not a particle 
of verdure upon the hillside nor a bucketful of water 
in the burn which gems the glen. However, before F. F. 
bent their backward steps towards the Border, refresh- 
ing showers had begun to gladden the country - side, 
putting a veto upon that implicit reliance on the clerk 
of the weather which is the sheet - anchor of cricket 
engagements." 

They began at Edinburgh on July 30 against the 
Grange, and with 9 wickets only, eight F. F. and a couple 
of substitutes, compiled 81, Verelst making 26 and Pender 
21. The Grange, going in to the bowling of Buchanan 
and Bass, completed a total of 138, including 40 from 
Sanderson and 22 from Jack Mackenzie. F. F., who had 
lost the services of Pender in their second innings, scored 
206 — Verelst 6^, Bennet 61 — and drew the match ; the 
Grange, with 5 wickets down, having made 112 at the 
call of time, Mackenzie again contributing 46 runs. Two 
days afterwards he injured his spine when taking a 
header while bathing, and, after lingering a few days, 
expired at the age of thirty ; and Scotland had to mourn 
the loss of one of the finest proficients in all manly games 
that ever entered a field, a man equally admirable in 
every other relation of life. 

On the 1st of August Stirling County only made 42 
and 48, to 97 scored by Foresters — Bennet 33, Verelst 14, 

M 



178 A TRIUMPHAL MARCH. 

and D. M'Donald (not out) 14, taking the palm. Buch- 
anan accounted for 11 Scottish wickets. 

On the 3d and 4th, Foresters did badly at Dalkeith, 
who with the assistance of 32 from Watson (professional) 
totalled 142. Foresters only scored 34 and 106, and were 
thus beaten in one innings. D. McDonald 18 and 20, H. 
Verelst 2 and 33, H. Bass o and 27, made a creditable fight. 

Aug. 5 and 6 were spent at Drumpellier, where F. F. 
won by 5 wickets. This was the match of which the 
chronicler said that the most remarkable feature was the 
temporary deposition of David (not, as might be sup- 
posed, by Absalom, but) by Bass from his domain of 
premier bowler to the F. F. The usurper achieved 17 
wickets and twice that number of runs. Verelst made 21 
and 34 (not out), Buchanan 14 and 10. 

At Perth, too, another victory was scored, the home 
eleven falling — 10 wickets to Buchanan and 11 to Bass — 
for 61 and 57 runs ; while F. F., though only scoring 37 
in the first innings, obtained the required number in the 
second with 3 wickets to fall — -M'Donald 13 and 28, Verelst 
o and 25, being the principal scorers. 

No matches in 1869. 

1870. 

1870 saw what the * Scottish Cricketers' Annual' desig- 
nated "the almost unimpeded triumphal march of the 
Free Foresters." 

On Aug. I and 2 they played at Dalkeith, where the home 
team lost, scoring 142 and 59 to the bowling of Buchanan 
and Francis, the first - named claiming 12 wickets, the 
latter 7. " For Foresters, Francis," says the local report, 
" played a magnificent innings, his only bad stroke being 
his last one ; his bowling in both innings was also first- 



THE REVERSE. 179 

rate. Buchanan, the veteran leader of his eleven, 
bowled with his usual judgment, proving himself to be 
one of the best gentlemen * head ' bowlers living." For- 
esters made 155 and 47 for i wicket — C. K. Francis 60, 
J. Smith 35 and 24 (not out), and J. Pennycuick 4 (not 
out) and 20, being conspicuous. 

On Aug. 3, at the Fettes College ground, the Grange 
scored 157 and 109, Free Foresters only making 113 in 
the first innings, but in the second wiping off the balance 
with 6 wickets to spare. C. K. Francis scored 72 for F. R, 
and J. Speid for the Grange 52. 

Aug. 5 found F. F. at Partick, where the West of Scot- 
land made 118 and got out F. F. for 59 runs. The second 
innings of the home eleven produced 147, and then 
Foresters, with 5 wickets to fall, scored 116. 

On the 8th, in a one-day's match at Kinning Park, 
Clydesdale got Foresters out for 75, but only made 39 
themselves. "Although the Club has been in existence 
twenty - three years, the score recorded was nearly the 
smallest one it has ever made. The bowling of Mr 
Buchanan was too much for the bulk of the eleven." In 
the second innings Foresters scored 142 for 6 wickets — 
A. Wilmot 75, J. Smith 26, H. Bass 22. Buchanan took 7 
Clydesdale wickets. 

On the 9th Foresters met with an unexpected reverse at 
Greenock. The first innings of Greenock was concluded 
by luncheon-time for 104, Morton and Grieve scoring 23 
each. But when the turn of F. F. came, nobody got 
into double figures save W. H. Richards 32, and H. Bass 
17, and they were all out for 88. 

On the loth and nth Drumpellier scored 81 and 122 
for 6 wickets to the Foresters' single innings of 274. C. 
K. Francis and J. Smith made 60 and 66 respectively, G. 
Simpson 32, and J. Pennycuick 31. Buchanan took 10 
Scottish wickets. 



i8o OUR BOWLER'S DAY. 



1871. 

Free Foresters this year commenced on the ist of Aug. 
at Kelso, the home team claiming a victory next day by 
8 wickets. Kelso made 182 in their first innings, of which 
the Marquess of Bowmont contributed 42, H. G. Wedder- 
burn 30, T. R. Marshall 28. Free Foresters only scored 
117 and 71 — J. H. Raven 24 and 5, L. W. Novelli 12 and 
27, doing best. 

In a one-day's match v. the Grange, on the 3d, Foresters 
put on 182 with 4 wickets to fall, against the Grange's 170. 
For the home side J. R. Marshall came first with 70, H. 
Wedderburn scored 32, and J. Mylne 22 ; L. W. Novelli 
for Foresters scored 65, J. H. Raven 31, G. F. Rayner 26, 
W. F. Higgins 24 (not out). 

At Dalkeith, on the 4th and 5th, they got out the natives 
for 109 and 79 — Rayner 53 (not out) and 8 the best — and 
made 134 in their first innings, winning by 8 wickets ; 
R. G. Venables scoring 71 and 31, both not out, E. H. 
Warner 24 and 26. 

On the 17th and i8th, on the Partick ground, Glasgow, 
Free Foresters drew with the West of Scotland, making 
153 and 223 to their opponents' loi and 54 for 3 wickets 
— R. G. Venables 4 and 38, W. F. Higgins 31 and 17, L. 
W. Novelli 33 and 35, A. Young 37 and 16, D. Buchanan 
12 and 34, twice not out.^ For the Westerners J. R. 
Hutchison 32 and 4 (not out) did best. 

^ This is Mr Buchanan's best batting performance for Free Foresters, but it 
must not be supposed because the great bowler often went in late and carried 
his bat for infinitesimal scores, that he could not get runs on occasion. Apple- 
by recalls the incident of his going in M'ith him first in an eleven of J. W. 
Dale's against Harrow Wanderers in 1873, ^^^ staying in for 102, Buchanan's 
contribution being 21. This puts one in mind of the lady at Lord's who told 
her friend that Mr Grace — she called him W. G., and blushed — "was the 
only man who had made a hundred ofif his own bat." "But I saw Mr Read 
make a hundred," was the reply. " Yes, dear, but not off his own bat." 



''HAMLET LEFT OUT:' i8i 

At Greenock, on the 9th Aug., the local club made 41 
and 53 to Foresters' 108, of which Venables contributed 44 
and Warner 20. And they finished their tour by another 
victory on the two next days at Drumpellier, where, says 
the reporter, " two or three surprisals came off — to wit, the 
jerk out by *our David,' the wide ball of * our David,' and 
the bowling of Bass in the first innings." The home 
eleven made 117 and %6. Foresters — with Higgins 42, 
Novelli 40, and Venables 36 — again to the fore, realised 
186, and won by 8 wickets. 

During this tour Buchanan took 47 wickets, Bass 15, 
Venables 17. 

1872. 

Free Foresters in 1872 had, according to the 'Scottish 
Cricketers' Annual,' " a very fair team, though the familiar 
face of Mr D. Buchanan was missed. At Glasgow really 
good batting was displayed by Novelli, Tubb, Tylecote, 
and Hutchison. Their fielding was very good, but the 
bowling inclined to the weak side." 

They began at Drumpellier on July 30, and getting out 
the home eleven for 64 and 97, they reached the total 
of 225, T. S. Pearson making 61, and H. Tubb 52 (not 
out), L. W. Novelli 32 and J. R. Hutchison 21. Tubb 
took 9 wickets, Novelli 5, of the Drumpellier side. 

On Aug. I, against the Grange at Edinburgh, their 
score was 297, E. F. S. Tylecote claiming 63, Hutchison 
and Warner 39 each, Pearson 35, Tubb (not out) 28, 
W. F. Higgins 25. The Grange were all out for 149, 
of which J. M. Cotterill made 70 — c and b Tubb. 

On Aug. 2d and 3d Dalkeith made two innings of 
107 each to Foresters' iii and 106, with 4 wickets to 
fall. E. F. S. Tylecote was here to the front with 31 
and 15, T. S. Pearson 30 and 12, L. W. Novelli 24 
and (not out) 5, while W. F. Higgins, whose score was 



i82 A WIN FOR DRUMPELLIER. 

blank in the first innings, carried out his bat for 49 in 
the second. 

On the 5th, however, West of Scotland at Partick 
claimed 258 to Free Foresters' 173 and 128 with 7 wickets 
down — H. Tubb 48 and 6 (not out), E. F. S. Tylecote 2 
and 42, L. W. Novelli 38 and 2. Chalmers for Glasgow 
made a not-out innings of Z6. 

On the 7th Greenock scored yj, and then Foresters 
amassed 281, nine of the eleven getting into double figures 
— T. S. Pearson 48, the best. Tubb and Novelli each 
took 5 Greenock wickets. 

On the 8th F. F. vanquished the Glasgow Caledonian 
in one innings by 178 to 92 and 52. Capt. Watson for 
F. F. made 43, T. S. Pearson 40. Of the 16 wickets 
bowled Tubb claimed 11. 

No tour in 1873. 

1874. 

Aug. 3 and 4, the Grange scored 180 and 273 against 
Free Foresters — E. M. Bannerman 93 and 14 and L. M. 
Balfour i and 86 being best on the score. F. F. made 213 
— E. F. S. Tylecote 52, T. S. Pearson 55, T. R. Fleming 

54. 

Foresters beat Dalkeith by 197 runs. 

Aug. 7 and 8, Drumpellier scored 70 and 103, to no 
and 45 made by Free Foresters, thus winning by 18 runs 
after a well-contested match. 

Aug. 10 and 11, West of Scotland scored 166 — Clarke 
53, Capt. Soames 46 — and F. F. 84 for four wickets — E. F. 
S. Tylecote 43, D. Buchanan (not out) 13, — the match being 
drawn owing to bad weather. 



SHOWERY WEATHER. 183 

1875. 

Aug. 2 and 3, Grange made 123 and 66) but Free 
Foresters having compiled 130 in the first innings, wiped 
out the runs with 8 wickets to fall. E. F. S. Tylecote 27 
and 43 (not out), T. W. Lang 22 and 12 (not out), and 
G. F. Rayner 47, did best. 

On the 4th and 5th, Free Foresters played against Dal- 
keith at Edinburgh, and in their first innings made 83 — 
T. S. Pearson, 28, J. W. Hutchison 15 — while Dalkeith, 
with the assistance of 24 from John Craig, equalled their 
score. Free Foresters next scored 108, Pearson making 
58 ; and then Dalkeith, with 52 (not out) from G. F. Ray- 
ner, won by 2 wickets. Lang and Pearson were the 
Forester bowlers. 

On the 6th and 7th, at Partick, Free Foresters got 166 
against the West of Scotland, Pearson making 33, and 
W. F. Story 32. West of Scotland replied with 202, — 
T. Chalmers yy, J. M'Neill 38. Then Free Foresters 
scored 210 for 6 wickets — Story 67, T. W. Lang (not out) 
52, Lord Elgin (not out) 24. 

The 9th and loth were devoted to a match with Drum- 
pellier, where E. F. S. Tylecote having made 83, and Lord 
Elgin 30 (not out), the total of Free Foresters' first innings 
amounted to 176. Butler and Pearson then disposed of 
their opponents for 94 and 97, Lieut. Story 22 and 40 
being the principal contributor. 

1876. 

Free Foresters were beaten by West of Scotland at Par- 
tick on the 7th and 8th of Aug. " The heavy rains which 
fell within the last few days rendered the ground slippery 
and marshy, and though it could not be said that there 



1 84 



FAREWELL TO THE NORTH. 



was rain during the course of the play, the state of the 
field was not improved by the almost unintermittent 
drizzle that fell, making everything bleak and uncomfort- 
able." The F. F. scores were 92 and 61 — E. F. S. Tylecote 
o and 20, T. W. Lang 29 and 6, G. Hughes 41 (not out) 
and 2, J. R. Hutchison i and 16. Clarke (pro.) and 
Russell bowled. For West of Scotland J. M'Neill 26, and 
P. B. Russell (not out) 24, headed a score of 127, and Capt. 
Soames was (not out) 14. 

At Drumpellier the home side were all out for 31 and 
52, D. Buchanan taking 10 wickets, Lang 8. In their turn 
Free Foresters scored 106, T. S. Pearson claiming 38, T. 
W. Lang 26. 





H. M. MARSHALL. 




14-lwH'v'-'^ 



CHAPTER XXIIL 



FREE FORESTER MUSIC. 



By Edward Lyttelton. 



There seems to be no necessary connection between 
Cricket and Music. It would be difficult to say that 
this is owing to the somewhat violent science of the 
former and the extreme and indescribable delicacy of 
the latter ; since in various quaint and uncouth ways we 
find that something of a partnership has existed between 
two such incongruous accomplishments as music and 
warfare. We are familiar with stories of armies being 
cheered on a long and dusty march by the brass band ; 



i86 FREE FORESTER MUSIC. 

and it is well known that many a charge in battle has 
owed its irresistible fury to the clarion-like shouts of the 
attacking party. But it may be said with some truth 
that the kind of music which these instances call to mind 
is of the less refined order, and hardly constitutes a serious 
exception to the rule. It is music indeed, but effective for 
its purpose because it requires little attention in the 
listener, and no great skill in the performer. 

The mention, however, of the brass band reminds us 
that a certain alliance between that order of music and 
cricket has existed for some years. Many of our readers 
will remember gay scenes of cricket-grounds decked with 
tents and banners, and with a galaxy of fair women and 
leisurely young men ; while in a suitable spot is drawn 
up the band, which plays a strange hotch-potch of tunes 
of the most various quality, such as Strauss' Waltzes, 
Sullivan's Lost Chord, and the overture to Tannhauser, 
during the fashionable hours of the afternoon. Here 
again, however, we must hesitate to call this a necessary 
connection between music and cricket. Some would even 
go so far as to say that the connection is not only un- 
necessary but unnatural. Batsmen have been known to 
attribute their failure in an innings — quite inexplicable 
otherwise — to the sudden and intrusive blare of the cornet- 
d-piston or to the thunder of the trombones ; and there 
is indeed some reason to suppose that a musical mid-off 
might find it uncommonly hard to fix his thoughts on 
the next ball just as a Vorspiel of Wagner's is reaching 
its climax. Cricketers, in short, in proportion to the zest 
with which they pursue their calling, hesitate to approve 
of the combination of the noble game and the brass band. 
It is a combination which is far less fitting than that 
between band music and skating as we remember it at 
Dresden, where the players set the time to rows of skaters 
whose linked hands and feet plied in graceful forward 



THE BRASS BAND. 187 

curves up and down the Teich, This partook of the char- 
acter of dancing, and no one supposes that music is out of 
place in a ball-room. But on a cricket-field it resembles 
the brilliant strains to be heard in the bull-baiting arena 
in Madrid, where the tunes are intended — like a piano 
solo at an evening party — to be a mere disguise to the 
serious business which has brought people together. 

Nevertheless, in spite of this broad general rule, the 
Free Foresters, during a few never-to-be-forgotten years 
of their history, established an alliance between these two 
superb but very different arts, which, so far from being 
unnatural or unfitting, served to bring out in fair relief 
what was best in both. It is the purpose of this chapter 
to give some account of this unique development, and 
the extraordinary success and delight which attended it. 

Before explaining the way in which this was done, we 
may pause to consider the kind of combination which is 
possible, if music is to be real music, and cricket to be 
in no way interfered with. Probably the reader will 
have guessed that the music was vocal and for the most 
part unaccompanied ; and further, that the singing was 
not in chorus but in quartette. It is hardly possible to 
imagine a whole cricket eleven capable of forming a 
chorus, but it would be quite possible to have four good 
singers frequently playing in a team together. Again, 
it is essentially necessary that they be independent of 
musical instruments. The captain of the side cannot 
provide a piano in a tent, or a harmonium close to 
long-leg, or a mandoline in the scorer's box. But he 
can perfectly well add a bag of books to his modest 
travelling equipment, and those books may contain the 
most priceless treasures of vocal part-music. And this 
was precisely what was done. Often and often during 
a long day's fielding a quick ear among the spectators 
might have detected something resonant in the tone of 



l88 FREE FORESTER MUSIC. 

mid-on's remonstrance when put on to bowl for the third 
time, or in the banter which passed from cover-point to 
third-man on the dropping of a high spinning catch. The 
truth was that singers were interlarded among cricketers : 
not that we mean to imply that they were soft and inert 
members of the team — they were themselves cricketers of 
undoubted prowess; but that stout and hilarious cover- 
point sings alto, that tall and black-bearded bowler is a 
sonorous bass, that unrivalled long-stop a second tenor, 
and that transparent-looking short-slip a first tenor, who 
not only can bowl puzzling "donkey-droppers," but can 
render Gounod's Rossignol with a singularly finished de- 
licacy of style. These, or others of a like calibre, form the 
Forester quartette, and when the proper time comes they 
will show how cricket and music may be combined. 

And before long the time arrives. There is no cricketer 
alive whose memory is not charged with the dismal in- 
cidents peculiar to a cricket-match stopped by rain. The 
fieldsmen come trooping in, and the padded batsmen 
behind them, running with less eagerness. The tent is 
charged with a disconsolate horde of onlookers and 
players, brooding over the fun they are losing: ladies 
doing their best to make things cheery, but secretly 
musing over a damp walk home, or, what is far worse, 
a drenching wet drive. Everybody feigns a cheerfulness 
that nobody feels or possibly can feel, as they listen to the 
patter of the remorseless drops, and gloomily view the 
pitch being ruined before their eyes. There is only one 
art known to man able to kill this "care and grief of 
heart," and that is sweet music. In the palmy times of the 
Foresters, on occasions like these, suddenly the cry would 
be heard, " Now, Tom, tune up : give us what you can ; never 
mind the bullion, sing by heart." The " bullion," it should 
be explained, had no connection with the vexed question 
of bimetallism, then hardly in existence, but was the 



THE QUARTETTE, 189 

familiar term for the copies of the Orpheus glees and 
other compositions. No second exhortation is required. 
The quartette are soon disposed, sitting back to back, 
round the tent-pole, and without more ado the lovely- 
strains of Integer Vitcs are heard welling forth to the 
pleasant accompaniment of the rain above, lifting our 
thoughts away from life's disappointments to a serener 
region where pleasures are independent of the humid 
south-west wind. It would be difficult to find a better 
fulfilment of the old poet's advice to men to bend circum- 
stances to their will, and not themselves to circumstances. 

Or again, supposing the weather had remained fair, 
there was perhaps the evening concert to be faced. 
Possibly, but not often, a few moments might be snatched 
from the early afternoon just after luncheon, and the 
four singers would be seen under a distant tree humming 
over a few "curly" bars in "Strike the Lyre," or, more 
puzzling still, " Come, let us join the roundelay." Perhaps 
the first bass was new to his work, or a little rusty in 
memory. But generally the morning practice after break- 
fast was sufficient ; and they were prepared to do battle 
as genuine cricketers for some six hours in the day, and 
sing "without mitigation or remorse of voice" far into the 
night. 

But it was not only in the summer that they were called 
upon to show their talent. Not unfrequently a winter 
concert was arranged somewhere in the Midland Counties. 
What do cricketers do in the winter? Various answers 
might be given to this question. Ill-natured critics might 
suppose that they pined in enforced idleness, waiting like 
plants and trees for the call of spring. Some work at the 
desk in England. Some, like one member of the quar- 
tette, fly abroad to avoid the fall of the leaf Some dance, 
some shoot ; and the late W. Mycroft, the Derbyshire pro- 
fessional, turned the dark months into still deeper dark- 



I90 FREE FORESTER MUSIC, 

ness " doon the mine," and then, after a few rounds in the 
prize-ring in April, was ready to bowl (or throw) for six 
months on end. But the vocal cricketers generally pre- 
ferred singing. It was a great treat in the depths of 
December to leave for a while the heavier duties of life, 
and gather to some kindly welcome like that twice given 
by Mr (now Dean) Hole at Newark, and there furbish up 
the familiar glees, and crack many a time-honoured August 
joke, too happy to miss "Apollo's summer look," in the 
glow of a really hospitable English home. Perhaps the 
concert was followed by a ball, or by a mount with the 
hounds, or some erratic shooting at driven partridges. 
But whatever were the other attractions of the visit, to 
the singers themselves the concert was invariably the best 
thing of all. 

It would be possible, now that we have gone so far, to 
descant long and fondly on days spent on the river, as, 
for instance, on a glorious summer evening at Taplow 
Court near Maidenhead, when the part-singing by moonlight 
caused many a passing boatful of cockneys and pleasure- 
seekers to wonder where in the world they were. But as 
this was an instance of music blended, not with cricket, 
but with rowing, we must reluctantly leave it, as not being 
strictly germane to our subject. One occasion, however, 
stands out too prominently in our recollection to be passed 
over. About the year 1877 the quartette assembled at 
Trinity College, Cambridge, for some informal evening 
singing. And on the following morning it occurred to 
one of the party that a far better place for part-singing 
than rooms in Neville's Court would be the lecture-room 
staircase in the Great Court. Thither they repaired, about 
1 1. 15 A.M., when all studious members of the College were 
busily engaged in wooing various Muses. Never before 
or since has part - singing been heard on that staircase, 
but nowhere from John o' Groat's to Land's End could a 







H 



11 



NEVILLE'S COURT. 191 

place be found more perfectly adapted to make the best 
of the human voice. At first quietly, as if in awe of the 
august and scholastic surroundings, " the coronach stole " 
" from stair to stair," the echoes blending the voices into 
full rich melody. But at last the triumphant ending of 
" Shall I, wasting in despair?" at the words "What care I 
how fair she be ? " broke down all reserve. There was a 
sudden spontaneous shout, of five times the usual volume 
of sound, which rang far across the quad, and drowned the 
voice of the junior proctor lecturing hard by on hydro- 
statics. It so happened that there was no wild swan to 
pause in the cloud, but gyps and bed-makers stood aston- 
ied on door-mats, and gazed at each other with a wild 
surmise : and it is credibly reported that an aged senior 
wrangler, passing below, stopped dead in the middle of 
a problem, and stood spellbound in a chaos of emotions, 
marvelling whence the melody came, and who was the 
gentle heroine of the song ; and not till ten good minutes 
had passed did he stiffly resume his walk to his rooms, 
still labouring with dim memories so rudely awakened of 
a timid and uncompleted romance at Tooting full fifty 
years before. 

But our readers may ask how it was that ordinary 
part-singing came to occupy so prominent a place in 
the memories of those who were concerned. As a general 
rule, it cannot be denied that quartette singing is far more 
rewarding to the singers than to the listeners. In an 
ordinary concert in England, there is one piece in the 
programme which is admittedly inserted merely as pad- 
ding, generally at the very beginning, to give the people 
time to get settled into their places — the ladies to arrange 
their skirts, the men to cross their legs. This is the 
pianoforte solo or duet. But next to this, a vocal quar- 
tette is for the most part regarded as a harmless, not 
unpleasing, little effort, which is not worth very much 



192 FREE FORESTER MUSIC. 

attention unless it be a roaring catch or the vehicle of 
some absurdly comic words. If, as has already been 
hinted, the Forester quartette became something better 
than this, it will be well that some idea be given of the 
requirements and shortcomings of ordinary part-singing, 
so that it may be made clear what prevalent faults the 
singers in question were able to avoid. 

In the first place, to catch and rivet the attention of an 
audience with music, it is above all things necessary that 
the performers shall have a clear idea what is the meaning 
of the composition. Next, that they should endeavour 
to express it. This is true of all music ; but in the case of 
vocal music the question becomes complicated, owing to 
the presence of words as well as melody. Now, singers 
have a choice before them. They can either confine their 
attention to the music and slur the words, or, vice versa, 
they can pronounce the words so ultra distinctly that the 
rhythm of the tune is interrupted. Thirdly, they can aim 
at both in due proportion ; fourthly, they can succeed 
in neither. But no good singer will adopt the same 
method for all songs and all audiences. Some songs are 
first-rate because of their music, though the words be 
paltry, — such as many of the old Italian schools. Others 
are charming owing to the beauty of the words, though 
the music be unvocal ; this is the case with some of Schu- 
mann's. In the old English ballads the combination is 
quite perfect. It would be impossible to conceive of the 
music of " Barbara Allen " expressing any other words, 
or those words being set to any other music. But it 
very seldom happens that the words are so perfectly 
adapted to the music that a careful rendering of the 
music necessarily involves an adequate expression of 
the words. It is nearly always the case that a singer 
can give his best to either one or the other, while very 
few are equally strong in both. But the problem is 



PART SONGS. 193 

not solved when these simple principles are grasped. 
The further question arises in connection with the audi- 
ence. If, as is highly improbable, a concert audience 
be so musically intelligent as to take delight in the 
harmonies of a part-song, or in the accompaniment of a 
solo, merely as music, then it is not necessary to be very 
careful about the choice or the articulation of the words, 
in order to produce an effect. But in a general way an 
audience will strive to catch the words, and is only thor- 
oughly pleased if it succeeds in doing so, and at the same 
time enjoys the simple refrain as a vehicle for the story. 
Therefore to succeed in a concert, the first essential is 
that the words be well delivered ; the second is, that the 
voice be pleasing ; the third is, that the tune be attractive. 
All this makes it obvious why part-singing is so seldom 
effective in a concert. It is more difficult to catch the 
words when four people are singing than when one is ; 
though even in the latter case it often demands prolonged 
attention to make out even what language is being rendered. 
Again, a vast number of part-songs consist of vapid words 
set to good music ; but even if the music be faithfully 
rendered, nothing will atone with a popular audience for 
the loss of good words, when every one is striving to "make 
out what it is all about," and can only catch here and there 
lifeless and obsolete allusions to Thyrsis and Daphne. 
Long before they have begun to pay attention to the 
music, the three verses are at an end, and the performance 
is a flat failure. And if such be the difficulties inherent in 
the quartette, what shall be said of the singers? The 
commonest fault of all is bad pronunciation of words. The 
next is shyness. When an Englishman is shy he is 
funereal ; and if he be singing jovial words in a funereal 
manner, it is better that he slur them over rather than let 
the audience see the painful incongruity. And without 
exaggeration it may be said that, considering the demands 

N 



194 FREE FORESTER MUSIC. 

of an ordinary audience, it is astonishing how few quartette 
singers manage to put life and expression into their words. 
Again, very often the voices do not blend. Nobody knows 
why some voices blend and some do not. It cannot be 
predicted, but an experiment sets the question at rest ; 
and if one voice out of four fails to blend, it draws the 
attention of the audience to itself, and many beauties and 
much of the meaning of the composition are lost. Then 
there are, of course, wrong notes, and also the peculiar 
dulness and monotony which comes of imperfect acquaint- 
ance with the piece, and from a certain dark misgiving in 
each singer's heart that at the next turn of the page there 
will be a catastrophe. 

From most, not quite from all, of these defects the 
Forester quartette was singularly free. The first pre- 
caution they took was, as a rule, to have the words printed 
in all the programmes, so that if the articulation of all the 
singers was short of perfection, as was certainly often the 
case, yet the audience should not be baulked of its first 
great demand, the sense of the piece. It is undoubtedly 
a lamentable fact that this is seldom done. A good 
English or German composer ponders first on the full 
meaning of his words before he thinks of his music ; but 
the English public are supposed to be able to get at his 
idea by their unassisted intellect, though they can't hear a 
single word from start to finish. It is a sheer impossibility, 
and the attempt to do without printed words at once 
ensures the failure of all the lovely part-songs the words 
of which are dull or out of date, such as ninety-nine per 
cent of all those of the best English composers. But put 
the words in plain print before the audience, and they will 
with a glance take in what Damon said to Phyllis, or, if it 
be a modern piece, why, there is sure to be something 
about angels and graveyards somewhere before the end. 
They then can give their attention to the music ; they will 



WORDS IN PRINT. 195 

anticipate a change of key to suit a change of words, and 
will be keenly interested in seeing how the composer has 
interpreted the sense of a particular distich. These secrets 
were known and acted on by the Foresters almost from 
the very first. Come what might, let the listeners anyhow 
know what the song is meant to say. 

In the next place, they were, as a rule, thoroughly 
familiar with the pieces to be performed. This was, of 
course, due to a good deal of practice, and very frequent 
singing together, and latterly, it must be confessed, to a 
somewhat restricted repertoire, owing to the imperfect 
powers of reading new music which characterised one or 
two of the singers. But the classical part-songs, such as 
" Strike, strike the Lyre," " When Evening's Twilight," 
"The Two Roses," and many others, can hardly be re- 
peated too often or be too well known. Hence their singing 
was free from monotony. Every composition requires 
variety of treatment in different places, and this was given 
without effort, and with a singular unanimity of tone and 
exactness of time. When the time changed, as it fre- 
quently did to bring out the expression, the audience were 
taken by surprise but the singers never, and very often it 
was like one individual varying his tones in a solo, so 
perfect was the rapport which existed between the voices. 

Thirdly, the four parts were well balanced. That is to 
say, as a general rule the two outside voices, alto and bass, 
were stronger than the tenor and first bass ; or if, as some- 
times happened, the bass was not as strong as the alto, the 
other voices were sufficiently subdued to maintain the re- 
lation unimpaired. This is not by any means easy to do. 

But the real secret of the success of the Forester quartette 
unquestionably lay in this fact. One of the singers, Tom 
Ratliff, the alto, without whom the quartette would never 
have come into existence, was possessed of a singular and 
almost unique dramatic gift. At the risk of being thought 



196 FREE FORESTER MUSIC. 

a little over-analytical, we must explain what we mean by 
the expression. 

Put quite briefly, a dramatic gift is the power of ex- 
pressing feelings so vividly as to carry the feelings of the 
audience along with the actor or speaker or singer. But 
how are they to know what those feelings are ? It is 
interesting to see how an accomplished public speaker, as 
a general rule, indulges in a few sonorous platitudes or 
timely jokes at the beginning of his speech, simply to 
ascertain the exact prevailing tone of feeling in the room. 
Every audience is in a certain key, as some people say 
every building is better suited to one key than another. 
Mr Gladstone was once heard to say that in his great 
Budget speeches — the greatest and by far the most in- 
teresting that have ever been delivered — he forebore to 
arrange beforehand the order in which the different topics 
should be taken, but waited till he felt the pulse of the 
House, and was able to see what they wanted and how he 
could best give it them. And of another supreme orator. 
Bishop Wilberforce of Oxford, it is recorded that on one 
occasion, on mounting a pulpit with a sermon ready pre- 
pared in his head, he discovered somehow that it would 
not be suitable to the particular audience at that particular 
time, and without a second's hesitation delivered another 
magnificent address on a totally different subject. 

Now, let us consider for a moment how this bears upon 
the question of part-song singing. To produce an effect, 
the opening songs of a concert ought to be such as suit 
the prevailing tone of the audience, and the great difficulty 
is to ascertain this tone. The speaker, as we have said, 
cracks a few jokes simply to hear the people laugh ; at 
any cost they must express themselves early and clearly, 
and show of what sort they are. How are singers to get 
them to do this ? 

In an ordinary concert a great deal can be done by a 



TOM RATLIFF. 197 

good chairman. Two or three felicitous remarks at the 
beginning sets every one in a good humour : a cheery- 
demeanour makes it evident that he at least expects a 
pleasant evening, and so the very common evil is avoided 
of having to wait for the audience to thaw from the con- 
dition of glacial depression in which English people fre- 
quently set themselves to listen to music. But if there 
is no chairman, the singers must manage this themselves. 
The only singer we have ever seen or heard who never 
failed in the attempt was Tom Ratlifif. It is true that 
he was acted upon by his audience sometimes unfavour- 
ably. When singing for the first time in a strange locality, 
he would be less confident about the beginning of a con- 
cert than when, as at Worcester or Newark, he was well 
known, and a single glance at some familiar faces was 
sufficient to show him that the listeners were really eager 
for the best that he could give them, and knew what style 
to expect. On these occasions he would choose some 
such piece as " The Tar's Song," by Hatton, and take up 
his stand, with the three others ranged in a slight curve 
alongside of him, waiting till the audience was absolutely 
quiet. Then with the fore-finger raised, preparatory to 
giving the first beat, he would often catch, or pretend to 
catch, the eye of some acquaintance in a far corner, and 
just as every one was looking at him, a smile of the most 
irresistible geniality would play over his mobile features 
and almost at the same moment the words would be 
heard of the opening alto solo, delivered with the most 
living intonation, " Our ship now goes with a pleasant gale," 
and in a few minutes his high C, at the words " So clear 
your pipes" rang out like a clarion, to be followed by 
" and join in our heave ho ! " when he would be seen giv- 
ing an indescribable nautical hitch at his breeches, not 
because it was proper to the part, but with the air of one 
who could not sing the words without an appropriate 



198 FREE FORESTER MUSIC. 

gesture. And so it went on till the unison burst, " Cheer- 
ily, my men," ended with a piano " Heave ho ! " the last 
note " lingering and wandering on as loath to die." At the 
end of such a piece of singing as this everybody was 
happy : the ticket-holders felt that they were getting ex- 
actly what they wanted ; they were ready to welcome the 
next solo with applause, and every performer was aware 
of a general cordiality diffused throughout the premises to 
the farthest recesses of the green-room. How astonishingly 
different from the usual beginning of a charity concert ! 

But to say that Tom Ratliff was possessed of a remark- 
able dramatic instinct by no means exhausts the subject. 
It is necessary for us to dwell on his qualifications at some 
length, since it is quite undeniable that the success of the 
quartette was as much due to him as the supremacy of 
Thebes was due to Epaminondas, or that of Gloucester- 
shire county cricket to W. G. Grace. With him the 
singing began, and with him, alas ! it decayed and ended. 
The other singers may have sung since, with pleasure 
to others and to themselves, but never again with the 
same exhilaration as in the days when Tom was the leader 
of the choir. In proof of this statement the following fact 
may be adduced. On a comparatively recent occasion, 
somewhere about the year 1885, some quartette singing 
was arranged for the benefit of the Eton Mission at 
Hackney Wick. Three of the quartette were Foresters, — 
that is to say, George Longman, tenor, Edward Lyttelton, 
first bass, and his brother Spencer, second bass ; but in 
place of Tom as alto was a thoroughly skilled and finished 
counter-tenor, who rendered the part-songs along with 
the others in as artistic a way as any one could wish for. 
Moreover, the songs that were sung were exactly those 
which produced the greatest effect when Ratliff had been 
among us. Not a single encore was asked for, not a single 
thrill of delight in the audience was perceptible. The 





mil hd 



T 



RECORDS. 199 

singers looked and waited at each well-known cadence, 
and did their utmost to reproduce the turns, the pauses, 
the phrasing of their leader. All was as good as it could 
be, except that Tom was not there ; and that is tanta- 
mount to saying that the quartette, in spite of its excel- 
lence, was to the audience an ordinary quartette, and 
shared the inevitable fate of all such. We read that, 
during the French Revolution, a citizen went out on to the 
Boulevards and met a friend, with a cheery salutation to 
the effect that it was a fine bright day. The answer was, 
" Oui, monsieur, mais Mirabeau est mort." In the same 
way the Foresters have occasionally gathered together 
in lonely couples, or three together, to try to recall some- 
thing of the spirit of old times — but it is in vain : a void 
has been made which nothing will ever fill up again. 

But it is time to say something of the coadjutors of this 
remarkable artist before we pass on to describe more 
exactly the method they adopted in part-singing. 

We must begin by saying that the records,^ on which we 
have to depend for any history of the Forester concerts, 
bear all the signs of having been collected some time after 
the singing had begun. They consist of two large volumes, 
containing numberless cricket scores and accounts of con- 
certs, programmes, &c., besides some charming illustrations 
in water-colour and ink, and some very valuable photo- 
graphs of groups. From these we can extract a certain num- 
ber of facts which tell us who the singers were, but not, un- 
fortunately, how the quartette originally came into being. 

The first concert recorded was at Worcester on Aug. 12, 
1872: the first part-song given was "The Summer Eve," 
by Hatton, at all times a favourite one to start with. The 
quartette were Tom Ratlifif, the Hon. Rev. John Marsham, 
Muir Mackenzie, and Herbert Marshall. We find, strangely 
enough, that Spencer Lyttelton — a most familiar figure later 
^ Now in the possession of Mr Herbert Marshall. 



200 FREE FORESTER MUSIC. 

on — was singing a solo at the concert, but not joining the 
quartette. It was seldom in later times that the singers 
were reinforced by the excellent musical accuracy of Muir 
Mackenzie, who combined a thoroughly good blending 
voice with sound knowledge. Herbert Marshall, after a 
year or two, was the regular first bass till, from 1876, 
Edward Lyttelton sometimes took his place, it being of 
course an advantage to have two brothers singing together, 
as their voices are pretty sure to blend. It is not necessary 
to say much of Spencer Lyttelton, as he was for many 
years well known as a first-rate amateur bass. He had 
all the native qualifications for part-singing, the quality 
of his voice being peculiarly soft and smooth, and telling 
with great effect in such a legato passage as that in "Come, 
gentle Zephyr." In John Marsham the Foresters possessed 
a comedian fit to rival Ratliff in social life, though not on 
the platform, unsurpassed as a raconteur and letter-writer. 
It was somewhat uncertain work bringing him and Tom 
together, as the foolery which resulted threatened to upset 
the orderliness of the evening's proceedings; but in a quar- 
tette the former was graver than usual, owing to a laudable 
desire, not always fully gratified, of hitting the right note 
in the very centre. His excellent solo singing was always 
a feature of the concerts in which he took part, and in 
" Old Thomas Day " we have seen him as good as could 
be. When a soprano quartette was required, there was no 
one who could take the top part better, or who was more 
deservedly popular on the platform or in the drawing-room, 
than Mrs John, and her solo singing, especially in "My 
Mother Bids Me," was a real treat, owing to the rich and 
sympathetic tone of her voice. 

The next concert we read of was at Rugby, where we 
find two Humes helping, and in July 1873, for the first 
time, E. Bray, a slow bowler of renown, and a peculiarly 
refined light tenor. An excellent reader and as true a 



A FRENCH SOLO. 201 

singer as could be found, he was invaluable in all the 
softer pieces, and the sound of his soft birdlike tones in 
" Celia's Arbour" will not be forgotten. In louder pieces 
he was hardly strong enough ; but for an evening's sing 
in the hall of a country house, with the four singers sitting 
close together and rendering all the old plaintive favourites, 
one after another, the best tenor possible was Teddy Bray. 
During 1873 there were numerous performances through 
the summer and winter, ending with one at Ashburn in 
November, when E. Wilson took the tenor part. In Jan. 
1874 an amazing fact is recorded: Tom Ratliff is credited 
with a French solo ! Certain it is that " no mortal wight 
had ere that night" heard a French sentence proceed from 
the door of his lips, and it would be difficult to imagine 
even him putting much meaning into the words — 

" Avec ivresse et sans effroi 
Je braverais la mort pour toi " — 

even if he ever understood their meaning, which is wholly 
out of the question. And as, not long after, we find Teddy 
Bray singing this very song, in an excellent French accent, 
it seems highly probable that Ratliff has been credited by 
the printer of the programme with linguistic powers to 
which he would have been the last to lay any claim. 

We have forgotten to mention that about 1875 G. H. 
Longman made his appearance in the quartette as a sound 
and trustworthy first tenor, adding one more to the list of 
first-rate cricketers of vocal talent. And this reminds us 
of a fact worthy of mention, that it was quite possible for 
the Foresters to put on a platform together a galaxy of 
vocalists all of whom had played in the University match. 
Suppose a glee such as " The Cloud-capped Towers " was 
being sung. We should have had Ratliff for the top part, 
as a cricketer once fully up to University standard. Bray 
and Longman second tenors, Marshall and Alfred Lyttelton 



202 FREE FORESTER MUSIC. 

first basses (the latter being a very rare visitant, but still 
able to help at a pinch), and Edward and Spencer Lyttelton 
as second basses. Add to these E. Hume, and possibly 
R. H. Lyttelton, and the combination of the two arts be- 
comes sufficiently remarkable. On one occasion, at Wor- 
cester, an octette was got together very similar to the one 
we have sketched. 

In trying to give our readers some idea of the method 
of the Forester quartette we find ourselves obliged to 
recur to Tom Ratliff, and perhaps, as he was always the 
most striking object on the platform, not only to the ear 
but to the eye, we had better describe briefly his appear- 
ance. A stout grey-haired man, with a large rubicund 
face, and a certain looseness of limb, generally perceptible 
among middle-aged cricketers, was apparently all that 
was to be noticed about the alto of the quartette. But 
when he began to sing, the extraordinary mobility of his 
ample jowl and capacious mouth, the indescribable con- 
tagiousness of his smile, and the roving glance of his 
liquid blue eye, soon arrested the attention of every one 
in the room, even if his grand falsetto had not done so. 
When engaged in a pleading and pathetic piece like 
" By Celia's Arbour," he would often lower his book and 
raise his eyes to the ceiling, displaying to view the ample 
volume of his throat, and depicting every passing mood 
of the music on his face as he poured out the sound.^ 
But, as will have been already inferred, his greatest powers 
were best seen in some light melodious piece like " Banish, 
oh Maiden," or " I know a Maiden fair to see." The 
first of these two soon became a great favourite. From 
the beginning to the end of it, every note was delivered 
by him with all the mock fervour of an impassioned 

^ This is the attitude caught in an admirably clever caricature by Mr A. C. 
James of Eton College, drawn after a concert given about 1886. It is now in 
the possession of Mr E. Lyttelton at Haileybury College. 



''BANISH, OH MAIDENP 203 

lover pleading with a mistress whose looks were coy 
and cold, exactly as if she stood visibly before him, and 
all the time the most roguish smile showed how com- 
pletely he entered into the farcical humour of the situation. 
His burly and most unromantic proportions gave a de- 
lightful comicality to the skittish sham pathos of the 
words — 

" Or if a frown must that smile chase away, 
Why, frown then to-morrow, but kiss me to-day " — 

the last two syllables being delivered with most telling 
effect after the other three voices, as a sort of echo, the 
pause of which could only be attributed to the profound 
sentiment simulated by the singer. As a rule, he would 
improve on all this by addressing his blandishments to 
the first tenor next him, generally some sinewy middle- 
aged and married cricketer, whose stolidity was an admir- 
able set-off to Ratliff's fooling. But his old associates 
knew too well what was coming, and enjoyed the fun too 
thoroughly to be able to feign unconsciousness. Once 
only was this seen in high perfection. The tenor had 
failed, and a minor canon of Worcester Cathedral kindly 
came to the rescue, and sang the part through the concert 
with the most praiseworthy fidelity. But when it came — as 
sooner or later was inevitable — to " Banish, oh Maiden," 
the effect was unconsciously ludicrous. The tenor plodded 
on as conscientiously and seriously through the unfamiliar 
phrases as if they had been part of a new Magnificat, 
while Ratliff was pouring into his wholly unconscious ear 
the tenderest solicitations and most irrelevant endear- 
ments, combining all the pleading power of voice and 
eye with a roguish merriment which no one will ever 
forget who once saw it, but which, alas ! no power of 
language or pencil will ever reproduce. 

The same comedian's power was singularly noticeable 
in such pieces as " I know a Maiden fair to see," where 



204 FREE FORESTER MUSIC. 

the "side glance" was irresistible, and in the ridiculous 
old catch " Old Thomas Day." Towards the close of 
this we have seen him with handkerchief in hand, and 
literally a big tear on his cheek, sobbing out nonsense, 
with the whole audience and the other singers incap- 
acitated with laughter. And in the last line, after a 
long dramatic pause, he would groan out the words 
"Poor soul" with the deepest intensity of feeling, and 
then, with a slight shade of annoyance at his questioner's 
stupidity, " No, no," followed by the tragic admission, " Ay, 
ay," delivered with the solemnity of an undertaker at a 
funeral. The remaining syllables were generally lost in sobs. 
There were times, however, when the infectious expres- 
siveness of Ratliff's face was a hindrance rather than a 
help. As every experienced concert-singer knows, there are 
times when a dismal collapse seems imminent : something 
has gone askew ; a wrong page has been turned, or a repeat 
forgotten by somebody, and nobody can conceive how the 
crisis is to be met. Now, the first requisite on these 
occasions is an impassive demeanour. No audience detects 
a trouble of this kind so soon as the singers themselves, and 
there is always hope that a little fertility of resource may 
gloze over the mistake before any one knows what is going 
on. But on such occasions, as on all others, Ratliff's face 
was a mirror on which the passing emotions of the singers 
were faithfully and instantaneously recorded. Up went the 
eyebrows, down went the corners of the mouth: a hasty 
prod with the left elbow into the tenor's ribs gave a sort of 
general signal of distress, and if, as was practically certain, 
the eyes of all present were fixed on him, it was inevitable 
that the embarrassment of the singers should be at once 
revealed. In fact, no cat ever leapt out of any bag with 
more decisive promptitude. This was something of a 
nuisance, as it is possible, as we have said, to recover a 
lost position in part-singing, as in chess or football. About 



AN IMPROVISATORE. 205 

the year 1876 the quartette gave a delightful concert at 
Eton, ending up with Bishop's rollicking glee, " Mynheer 
Van Dunck." They sang it unaccompanied, and to suit 
Ratliff's voice it was raised two whole tones. Some of 
our readers will remember that near the beginning there 
is a bass solo — 

" Singing, oh! that a Dutchman's draught could be 
As deep as the rolling Zuyder Zee;" 

and on this occasion the second bass, not being a very old 
hand, unconsciously set off in the original key, and forced 
the singers to continue the next bars as they were written 
— that is to say, just on the crack of Ratliff's falsetto. 
The effect was most disquieting. He was heard to emit 
a series of uncomfortable yappings, harsh chest - notes 
varied with involuntary falsetto, so that it was evident that 
the glee could not possibly be finished in that way without 
seriously tarnishing the reputation of the Forester quartette. 
The catastrophe bade fair to spoil a jolly concert just when 
it was finishing in thorough good style. And there was 
no concealing the fact : dismay and perplexity were seen 
chasing each other from brow to jowl, up and down the 
leading singer's countenance, and betraying themselves in 
every movement of his arms, and in something indescrib- 
able even in his back view. Every portion of his person 
revealed his feelings. But the bass, unlike Histiaeus, 
having made the shoe, put it on. When the next bit of 
solo came, " Water well mingled with spirit good store," 
he boldly left the notes, improvised an incipient cadenza, 
and brought himself back to within a semitone of the 
right pitch. So Apollo saved us ! It was doubly delightful 
to see the change in our alto. Instead of threatening and 
hurrying clouds coursing over the sky of his countenance, 
the broad ruddy sun shone out again, and off he went 
with " No Hollander dreams of scorning," easily subsiding 



2o6 FREE FORESTER MUSIC, 

into the genial and buxom serenity required by the words, 
and which he of all men was best fitted to express. 

Besides the specially comic part-songs there were some, 
like the delightful Orpheus glee " The Two Roses," which 
brought out a peculiar power of Ratliff's, that of phrasing. 
The piece can be easily sung so as to produce no effect 
whatever except that of a mechanical and monotonous 
composition. But here the real artist was at home. The 
opening lines describing the roses were given briskly, and 
without the least pause between the first and second, as 
if the picture were too vivid not to be eagerly described ; 
then a slackening at " As I pensive, full of care, gathered 
two sweet flowers," followed by a pause. This was 
suddenly and most effectively broken by the exhilarat- 
ing appeal, " Tell me, roses," running at a quickened pace 
in a crescendo up to the high B ; then again a pause, and 
the graceful concluding phrase pianissimo. Any one who 
carefully studies this charming melody will see how vastly 
it is improved by these and suchlike little liberties with 
the strict time, just sufficient to prevent all suspicion of 
dulness, while preserving the rhythm. 

In these ways Tom Ratliff was a prodigious favourite 
with many large audiences in the Midlands. On one oc- 
casion he was applauded so long and so loud on getting up 
to sing a solo that with all his aplomb he was embarrassed, 
and hardly knew which way to look. And the glamour 
that he threw over the old part-songs was so magical, that 
it was quite safe to draw up a programme consisting of 
very little else. We believe we are right in saying that 
two charity concerts given in consecutive years at Newark, 
consisting of from twelve to sixteen part-songs each, and 
a few unimportant solos, yielded £^y and ;^ioo profit re- 
spectively. Of course this means good local management. 
But what conceivable management would have yielded this 
result unless the quartette had been headed by Ratliff? 



A BORN ARTIST. 



207 



In short, he was a born artist of a most remarkable kind. 
His powers were very insufficiently trained. He was a bad 
reader, and in an echoing room a fine ear could occasion- 
ally detect him out of tune. But making all necessary 
subtractions from our encomium, it may safely be said 
that he was a truly great part-singer : lacking indeed some 
of the qualifications of an ordinary choir-singer of part- 
songs, but gifted with a power, unparalleled as far as we 
know in any professional or amateur, of fascinating a large 
audience by his masterly interpretation of ordinary four- 
part music, his delicate appreciation of the meaning of words 
and cadences, and, above all, by his irresistible and wholly 
indescribable fun. 




G. Watson. C. F. Reld. K. Muir Mackenzie. C. E. Boyle. F. K. Price. E. Rutter. 
S. G. Lyttelton. H. Verelst. F. Crowder. W. F. Higgins. T. Ratlifif. W. H. Hay. 
H. H. Gillett. H. M. Marshall. H. E. Maul. 



Rockingham^ 1873. 




By what wise men ' eternal fitness ' call, 
The morninsf bat demands the evening ball. 



■I. P. 



CHAPTER XXIV. 



THE FORESTER BALL. 



By Edward Rutter. 



No chronicles of the Free Foresters would be complete 
without some reference to the Balls which have periodi- 
cally been given. What has dancing to do with cricket ? 
many will say, and at the first glance the two do not 
seem to be connected ; but in a fraternity where social 
gatherings and good-fellowship are so closely allied to the 
principal pastime, cricket, dancing is constantly included 
in the programme. As visitors in country-houses the F. F. 



HOME DANCES. 209 

are often expected, after their arduous duties in the cricket- 
field, to devote themselves to the ladies, who have looked 
forward to the presence of a cricket eleven as an excuse 
for getting their neighbours together and having a dance 
after dinner. And very pleasant evenings they are, and 
though the concerts and part - songs of the inimitable 
quartette were at one time highly and justly popular, 
still upon the whole the dances were quite as welcome, 
and have survived the more refined and artistic music. 

One explanation of the constant popularity of Terpsi- 
chore unquestionably is, that the fairer sex, although they 
may be said to have challenged the supremacy of their 
male admirers and rivals in almost every department of 
sporting or artistic excellence, have achieved in none of 
them so decided a supremacy as in the ball-room. The 
ladies who from the outset condescended to wear Forester 
colours were well advised of this, and the earliest chroni- 
cles of the club record that they made the most of their 
advantage. 

It was with regard to the inaugural match of Free For- 
esters that, in a parody of Byron by one " Longfellow " 
(not the Transatlantic poet), the proceedings of the even- 
ing were thus summed up — 

" The men 
Wore hearts like sieves — all riddled through and through. 
And yet, poor donkeys, liked it : just as when 
Whizz ! — at the blazing lamp the scorched moth comes again." 

And this precedent has never been lost sight of during the 
intervening years. 

At Sutton Coldfield, the birthplace of the Club, at 
Pype Hayes, at Kingscote, at the Harfords' at Knowle 
in Gloucestershire, at the Greenwoods' in Hampshire, at 
Thornby and many other houses, the Club has tripped 
it merrily. At Worcester, Weybridge, and elsewhere, the 
local hall has been retained for a ball given in honour 



210 THE FORESTER BALL. 

of the visitors, and at Deddington a dance in the Pavilion 
was always an important feature of the occasion. As time 
went on the Club began to feel that some return should 
be made for all this kindness and hospitality, and early 
in 1876 it was decided to give a ball, at which our hosts 
and hostesses should be our guests. A circular was sent 
out, which was very favourably received by the members, 
and accordingly Willis' Rooms were engaged. On the 
second night of the 'Varsity match (1876) the first of these 
pleasant gatherings was inaugurated, and to the strains 
of the Royal Artillery band dancing was kept up till the 
morning sun shone brightly through the windows. It had 
proved an unqualified success. Many wished it to be 
repeated the following year, but wiser counsels prevailed, 
and triennial balls were instituted. 

The ticket of invitation, a felicitous piece of artistic 
design, will be found at the head of this chapter ; and the 
copy of the first circular is appended, to show how gener- 
ally the idea commended itself to Free Foresters of older 
as well as more modern standing : — 

FREE FORESTER CRICKET CLUB. 

At the suggestion of many members of the Club, it has been 
decided that a BALL should be given at Willis' Rooms on June 
27 th next. 

The following ladies have kindly consented to become 
Patronesses : — 

The Countess Manvers. I The Hon. Mrs J. Marsham. 

The Lady Georgina Vernon. | The Hon. Mrs Parker Jervns. 

Mrs Allsopp, Mrs Bedford, Mrs Beevor, Mrs Bill, Mrs Booth, Mrs Bray, Mrs 
de Capel Brooke, Mrs Chance, Mrs H. Garnett, Mrs C. Garnett, Mrs Green- 
wood, Mrs Hay, Mrs Hartopp, Mrs W. F. Higgins, Mrs Hole, Mrs Hume, 
Mrs Longman, Mrs Paget, Mrs Watson, Mrs Wilmot. 

And the undermentioned gentlemen will act as Stewards : — 

The Earl Manvers. I The Hon. E. Lyttelton. 

The Rev. the Hon. J. Marsham. | Sir C. Mordaunt. 
S. C. Allsopp, Rev. W. G. Armitstead, W. C. Alston, C. Bill, Rev. W. K. R. 



WILLIS' ROOMS. 211 

Bedford, J. G. Beevor, A. de Capel Brooke, C. Booth, D. Buchanan, S. P. 
Bucknill, C. M. Caldecott, F. Crowder, L. Garnett, H. Garnett, R. Garnett, 
E. C. Hartopp, W. H. Hadow, W. H. Hay, W. F. Higgins, E. Hume, J. 
R. Hutchison, F. Lee, C. Marriott, H. M. Marshall, M. T. Martin, L. W. 
Novelli, F. R. Price, T. S. Pearson, T. Ratliff, E. M. H. Riddell, E. Rutter, 
E. F. S. Tylecote, H. Verelst, Rev. A. A. Wilmot, G. Watson. 

Members of the Club only are entitled to subscribe to the Ball, 
Tickets (which are not transferable), One Guinea each. 

The Tickets issued will be strictly limited to 320, and if the 
applications exceed that number, a proportionate distribution will 
be made. 

The number and names of guests for whom Tickets are required 
must be sent in before the ist of June, when the Subscription List 
will be definitely closed. 

Ball Committee. 

S. P. B. Bucknill. I H. M. Marshall. I E. Rutter. 
E. Hume. | T. Ratliff. | 

Letters to be addressed to the F. F. Ball Committee, 22 Old 
Burlington Street, London, W. Cheques and P. O. Orders on 
Charing Cross Post-Office, S.W., to be made payable to S. P. B. 
Bucknill, 22 Old Burlington St., W. 

April 2i^, 1876. 

In 1876, 1879, 1882, 1885, Willis' Rooms were the scene 
of these festivities ; but in 1888 the popularity of this resort 
was on the wane, and it shortly after disappeared. The Club 
was in a dilemma, when Philip H. Coxe, an enthusiastic 
member of the Ball Committee, came forward and invited 
them to the " New Club," then at the height of its short 
but brilliant existence. The old "Evans," where supper 
and song had long prevailed, had been converted into 
a luxurious club-house, admirably adapted for balls and 
theatrical performances, and it was here that the Free 
Foresters held their most successful and memorable 
reunion. 

Ere the next three years had passed this pleasant resort 
had come to an untimely end, and the Club had to look 



212 



THE M^TROPOLE HOTEL. 



about for fresh quarters for their ball in 1891. The 
Whitehall Rooms attached to the Mdtropole Hotel sup- 
plied the existing want. In the magnificence and size 
of the rooms and in the completeness of the arrange- 
ments they are unequalled, and enabled the Free Fores- 
ters to entertain their friends right royally in 1891 
and 1894. 

The Club grows old in years, but a constant stream 
of youth flows into it. And though the fair daughters 
have taken the place of their fairer mothers, and brave 
sons the place of braver fathers, the same pleasant socia- 
bility and almost brotherly intercourse prevails ; and as 
every three years come round the Free Foresters meet 
together like a large family party to renew and keep alive 
old friendships, to form and strengthen new. E. R. 





E. RUTTER. 



213 



CHAPTER XXV. 
1877. 

The season of 1877 began with a match at Woolwich, 
drawn on even terms, F. F. scoring 114 and 164 to 94 
and 135 for 5 wickets. E. F. S. Tylecote 32 and 49, G. 
H. Longman 25 and 21, bore the bell. 

On May 28 the favourite old haunt of Upper Tooting 
was revisited, but unsuccessfully, for S. Harper 37 and E. 
Bray 34 helped a modest total of 114, which proved more 
than sufficient. H. Verelst 23 and R. G. Venables 18 
were the only double figures in the Forester score of 69, 
which Tooting equalled with 6 wickets. 

At Esher, on the 2d June, an uninteresting match ended 
in a draw. F. F. Sy and 55 — Esher 39 and 79, with 2 
wickets to fall. Venables for F. F. got 44 runs. 

At Oatlands, on June 5, F. F. made 134 to 172 from the 
Park. 

On June 6, however, F. F. obtained a score of 311 
against Crystal Palace — T. S. Pearson and A. A. Nepean 56 
each, H. M. Marshall 57, A. P. Lucas 50, G. Law (not out) 
44. Two wickets of the C. P. C. fell for 11, when " an awful 
storm of wind and rain put an end to the proceedings." 

At Eton, the Monday following, the School scored 129 — 
Ivo Bligh 42, from the bowling of Gilliatt, 6 wickets, Bray 
3, and Chamberlayne 2 — and then got F. F. out for 115 — 
G. H. Longman 61. 



214 SCHOOL MATCHES. 

On the appropriate date of June i8 Free Foresters 
engaged Wellington College in a bloodless Waterloo. S. 
G. Lyttelton made 37 runs and S. P. B. Chamberlayne 25 
out of 132 for F. F., and then the same Foresters took the 
Wellington wickets (the latter 6, the former 3) for 53 runs. 
In a fragmentary second innings the School did better, 
120 for 5 wickets, all claimed by Chamberlayne. 

The Rugby match was played on June 18 and 19, and 
was won, after some tall hitting, by 9 wickets, the School 
scoring 116 and 234, including 50 from Baily and 44 (not 
out) from Gaddum. In Foresters' first innings of 328, 
H. W. Gardner 116 was an easy first, well supported by 
A. S. Bennett 53, F. R. Evans 45, and I. D. Walker 37. 
Buchanan took 12 wickets. 

At Marlborough, on the 20th and 21st, the School 
claimed 203 and 191. F. F. began with 147 — E. Hume 
55, M. R Lucas 31 — and then made 132 for 6 wickets; 
Dunell and Longman not out for 30 and 26. 

At Shoeburyness, where two innings filled up the whole 
of June 29 and 30, Foresters began with 303 — W. H. Hay 
71, G. Law 78, F. Crowder 44, E. Rutter 34, J. R. Hutchi- 
son 27, &c. — but the Gunners, with 137 from E. C. Trollope, 
6Z (not out) from H. E. Walter, and sundry minor contri- 
butions, exceeded this amount by 62 runs. 

Beddington Park, on the 30th, was the scene of a two- 
to-one beating, for the Park made 204, F. F. 102, of which 
20 were A. P. Lucas's. 

On July 4 and 5, at Southgate, the usual fine display of 
batting came off. 

FREE FORESTERS. 

1ST INNINGS. SCORE. 2D INNINGS. SCORE. 

R. T. Richardson, c Absolom, b Daniell 70 b Ftyer .... 92 

T. S. Pearson, c Thornton, b Absolom . 88 b I. D. Walker ... 20 

F. Crowder, c V. E. Walker, b Fryer . i 

R. Lyttelton, c Childs, b I. D. Walker . 20 c and b V. E. Walker . . 3 

E. Lyttelton, c Martin, b Daniell . . 9 c Pemberton, b V. E. Walker 58 



"^^^^- 




.^ 




R. D. Walker. 



I. D. Walker. 




M 




V. E. Walker. 



C. E. Green. 



SOUTHGATE. 



215 



1ST INNINGS. 



2D INNINGS. 



E. Bray, b Fryer .... 
E. Rutter, c I. D. Walker, b Absolom 
J. R. Hutchison, c V. E., b I. D. Walker 
H. Gilliatt, run out 
W. N. Powys, b Fryer . 
D. Buchanan, not out . 
byes 5, leg-byes i, wides i . 

Total 



31 

10 

2 

I 

9 
o 

7 
248 



not out 



byes 7, 



leg-byes 2 

Total 



19 



SOUTHGATE. 



T. H. Akroyd, retired . 

C. B. C. Pemberton, b Buchanan 

R. D. Walker, b Powys 

I. D. Walker, b Powys 

F. E. R. Fryer, c and b Powys 

C. J. Thornton, b Gilliatt . 

C. A. Absolom, b Powys 



SCORE. 

• 41 
I 
20 
107 
27 
48 
29 



SCORE. 



C. J. Daniell, st Pearson, b Gilliatt 11 
M. T. Martin, c and b Gilliatt 
V. E. Walker, b Powys 
J. Childs, not out 
byes 5, leg-byes 5, wides 6 



Total 



14 
I 

5 
16 

320 



No report is procurable of matches at Haileybury, July 
7; Shorncliffe Camp, July 9 and 10; Aldershot, July 11 
and 12. 

On the 1 6th and 17th a match at Hartley Row, Hants, 
was left unfinished owing to the rain, F. F. having com- 
pleted an innings of 202 — F. R. Twemlow 81, R. Garnett 
'^6, G. H. Longman 25. The Row made 180 — Baldwin 
41, Maturin (not out) 30. 

At Hilsea, the two days after. Foresters drew again 
with the Southern Division, scoring 95 and 234 to 169 and 
44 for 3 wickets. F. R. Twemlow was again to the fore 
with 23 and ic6, R. Garnett 7 and (not out) 33. Capt. 
Heneage, R.E., with 46 and 20, was the leader of the 
opposition. 

On the 17th and i8th The Node made 243 and won by 
10 wickets, G. F. Vernon, 54 and 45, being the only F. F. 
scorer of importance. 

On the 20th and 21st F. F. beat Priory Park at Chiches- 
ter by 6 wickets. The Park, singular to say, just compiled 
a century in each innings, while F. F. got 152 in their first, 
G. E. Willes 46 and R. Garnett 27 doing best ; the latter 



2i6 RUNS AT THE MOTE. 

was (not out) 20 in the second innings, and W. H. Hadow 
(not out) 22. Hadow also took 12 Chichester wickets, 
Gilliatt 6. 

A match which had not appeared upon the card was 
played, July 23 and 24, at Sutton Coldfield, v. Gentlemen 
of Staffordshire, and was drawn, the County scoring 6^ 
and 17 for 3 wickets, Free Foresters 51 and 159. E. F. 
S. Tylecote made 7 and 59, H. E. P. Steadman o and 38 
(not out), E. Flint 18 (not out) and 6. 

On the same days, at Warnham Court, F. F. were defeated 
by 5 wickets. F. F. went in first, and, with 38 from Verelst 
and 35 from F. Lee, totalled 130, a number which the 
home team failed to reach by 6 runs — M. P. Lucas (not 
out), 50 ; but in the second innings F. F. only made 68, 
of which 23 went to the credit of J. R. Hutchison (1 b w), 
consequently, despite good bowling from Appleby (6 
wickets in the first and 2 in the second innings), and two 
or three run out, the necessary runs were obtained. 

July 26, 27, at Fulbeck. Col. Fane's eleven made 245 
— G. H. Longman yj', while F. F. made 94 and 44 — 
Gardner 35, Tylecote 18. 

On the 26th Foresters encountered the Mote, Maidstone. 
" Of the 300 runs scored by F. F., Mr J. R. Hutchison 
contributed 83 (a six, 7 fours, 3 threes, 8 twos), Mr M. T. 
Martin 50 (8 fours, 5 threes, and 3 twos), Mr F. Lee 38 
(a six, 8 fours, a three, and 4 twos), and Mr T. Ratliff 31 
(4 fours and 3 twos). Qn behalf of the Mote (134 for 8 
wickets), Mr D. Duncan scored 54, comprising 5 fours, 3 
threes, and 4 twos." 

And the two next days F. F. obtained a victory at 
Preston Hall. The home side went in first and made 
113, Lord Harris 28, heading the score ; then F. F. totalled 
291 — S. G. Lyttelton 89, A. C. Lucas 31, J. H. Hutchison 
34, J. G. Beevor 29, R. Garnett 28, H. Verelst 27, &c. 
The second innings of the Hall eleven produced . 220, 



WALTON. 217 

Duncan and Francis playing well for 60 and 67 ; but F. F. 
had no difficulty in getting the 43 runs required without 
the loss of a wicket. 

Aug. I found Free Foresters at Walton again, for a three 
days' match with I Zingari and a single day's contest with 
Warwickshire. How they fared the papers of the day and 
the appended scores will show. 

Wednesday morning found two strong teams in the field. I Z. 
won the toss, and went in, and began badly, Fortescue, Forbes, 
and H. R. Webbe all being disposed of for small scores, 4 
wickets down for 47, looking like a one -innings defeat; but 
Walter Hadow, who has so often done the old Club a good 
turn, did not fail them to-day, and played a magnificent innings 
of 92 not out, — worth, at least, 120 on Lord's, as the long grass 
here stopped most of the big hits. A. W. Ridley arrived from 
Canterbury in time for his innings, and I Z. finished their innings 
for 206, Capt. Stewart contributing a most useful 16, including 
two splendid square-leg hits for 4 each. Francis and Ridley were 
on the spot in the bowling department, and disposed of the strong 
batting team opposed to them for the small score of 114, Long- 
man playing well and steadily for 25 runs. Richardson was in 
one hour and three-quarters for 9 runs, a proof of the goodness 
of the bowling. The Foresters had to follow on, and I Z. had to 
delegate the bowling at the commencement of the second innings 
to Ridley and Middleton, as Francis's side began to be painful 
again. Pearson and Longman got well set, and put together 120 
before they were separated : both played excellent cricket, and 
neither gave a chance. The spectators had, as they say, " a rare 
batting treat," but whether I Z. looked upon it in that light may 
well be doubted. The innings closed for 206 at half-past three 
on Friday, leaving I Z. with 1 1 3 to get to win. Forbes and 
Webbe went in and scored 1 1 off the first 7 balls, and looked 
all over like winning the match without a separation being ef- 
fected ; but, alas ! at five o'clock down came the rain, and I Z. 
were obliged to put up with a draw in their favour, instead of the 
victory they so fondly hoped was theirs. 

I ZINGARI. 

1ST INNINGS. SCORE. 1ST INNINGS. SCORE. 

Rev. A. J. Fortescue, st Pearson, Capt. Middleton, b Buchanan . o 

b Buchanan .... 9 Lord Willoughby de Broke, st 
W. Fj Forbes, b Buchanan . . o Longman, b Buchanan . . 11 



2l8 



/ ZINGARL 



1ST INNINGS. S 

W. H. Hadow, not out 

H. R. Webbe, b Appleby . 

C. K. Francis, c Allsopp, b Ap 

pleby .... 

Rev. E. L. Fellowes, b Lucas 
W. C. Higgins, run out 



92 

I 

6 
II 



1ST INNINGS. SCORE. 

A. W. Ridley, b Buchanan , . 14 

Capt. Kenyon Slaney, b Willes . 8 

Capt. Stewart, b Appleby . . 16 

byes 21 

Total 



206 



In the second innings Forbes (not out) scored 21, Webbe (not out) 27 ; byes 6, 
-total 54. 

FREE FORESTERS. 



1ST INNINGS. 


SCORE. 


2D INNINGS. SCORE. 


T. S. Pearson, b Ridley . 


10 


c Francis, b Forbes . 


62 


R. J. Richardson, b Francis 


. 


9 


c Fortescue, b Francis 


28 


A. P. Lucas, b Francis 


. 


14 


b Forbes . 


3 


G. H. Longman, b Francis 


. 


25 


c Forbes, b Francis . 


63 


H. C. Maul, b Francis . 


. 





b Francis . 


10 


C. Smith, c Forbes, b Ridley 


. 


5 


b Francis . 


9 


F. E. Allsopp, b Ridley . 


. 


19 


c Francis, b Middleton 


9 


R. Garnett, c Webbe, b Francis 


12 


b Hadow . 





G. E. Willes, c Higgins, b Ridley . 


3 


b Forbes . 


14 


A. Appleby, c Webbe, b Francis 


8 


b Forbes . 


I 


T. Ratliff, not out . 


I 


b Francis . 


I 


D. Buchanan, b Ridley . 


4 


not out . 


I 


byes 


4 


byes 


9 




Total 


114 


Total 


210 



On Saturday the Free Foresters were opposed to the County, 
and easily headed them on their first innings. Longman was 
again in his best form, and got 52. Appleby was all there with 
the leather, and got 5 wickets, 3 of them with 3 consecutive 
balls. So ended the Walton week, and each cricketer, whether 
Zingaro, Free Forester, or County Warwick, left the ground with 
the deepest feelings of gratitude to Sir Charles Mordaunt for the 
week's pleasure he had afforded them. May the house of 
Mordaunt long flourish, and may we all meet there again in 
1878 and fight our friendly battles once more! 



WARWICKSHIRE. 

SCORE. SCORE. 

D. Buchanan, b Ratliff . . 4 F. R. Evans, c Garnett, b Appleby o 

C. Smith, c and b Appleby . . 4 Lord Willoughby de Broke, riot 

W. J. Batchelor, b Appleby . 29 out 36 

H. E. Rathff, c Garnett, b Allsopp i R. A. Hull, st Longman, b Allsopp 15 
R. O. Milne, c Mordaunt, b Hig- J. R. Walker, c Longman, b Mar- 
gins 18 riott 2 

G. E. Willes, c Mordaunt, b Ap- byes 4 

pleby I 

H. S. C. Everard, b Appleby , o Total , 114 



COUNTIES. 



2t9 



FREE FORESTERS. 



SCORE. 

C. Marriott, c Walker, b Buch- 
anan lO 

G. H. Longman, not out . . 52 
F. E. AUsopp, b Buchanan . . 6 
W. F. Higgins, c Hull, b Walker 



SCORE. 

R. F. Richardson, b Buchanan . 3 

H. C. Maul, not out ... 34 

byes 5 



34 Total 

T. Ratliff, A. Appleby, R. Garnett, J. Mordaunt, S. C. Smith, to bat. 



144 



On the 8th and 9th, at Worcester, the match with the 
County Gentlemen was declared drawn. 



FREE FORESTERS. 



1ST INNINGS. 



2D INNINGS. 



SCORE. 



H. M. Marshall, c A. Lyttelton, b Belcher 
G. H. Longman, b Caldicott . 
H. G. Tylecote, b Belcher 
H. C. Maul, c A. Lyttelton, b Moncrieff 
R. Garnett, b Caldicott . 
C. B. L. Tylecote, c Hudson, b Walker 
S. Garnett, c H. Allsopp, b Moncrieff 
H. Verelst, c and b H. Allsopp 
T. Ratliff, not out . 
E. M. Wakeman, b Caldicott . 
G. H. Goldney, b H. Allsopp . 
Extras 



Total 



6 

7 
6 

49 
o 

17 

34 

4 

16 

9 

o 

12 

160 



St R., b A. Lyttelton . 41 
c A. Lyttelton, b Caldicott o 
R. Lyttelton, b H. Allsopp 4 
c A. Lyttelton, b H. Allsopp 9 
c Moncrieff, b H. Allsopp 33 
R. Lyttelton, b H. Allsopp 3 



c Stanhope, b F. Allsopp 
c and b Walker 
b Belcher . 
not out 

b A. Lyttelton . 
Extras . 

Total 



35 

7 

27 

38 

I 
12 



WORCESTERSHIRE. 



Hon. A. Lyttelton, b C. Tylecote . . 3 

Hon. R. Moncrieff, b C. Tylecote . . i 

H. T. Allsopp, c S. Garnett, b H. Tylecote 35 

E. S. Stanhope, b C. Tylecote . . . i 

F. E. Allsopp, b S. Garnett ... 14 
Hon. R. Lyttelton, run out ... 10 
Earl of Coventry, c and b S. Garnett . 7 
J. R. Walker, b S. Garnett ... 7 
A. H. Hudson, not out .... 14 
W. Caldicott, c S. Garnett, b H. Tylecote 2 
T. Hayes Belcher, b H. Tylecote . . 6 

Extras 6 

Total . 106 



c Garnett, b Tylecote 
run out 

b S. Garnett . 
b S. Garnett . 
c Marshall, b S. Garnett 
c Ratliff, b S. Garnett 
c Longman, b S. Garnett 
not out 
b S. Garnett 
b C. Tylecote . 
not out 
Extras . 

Total 



58 
7 
o 
2 
2 
8 
o 

II 
I 
2 
7 
4 



The score of the two next days at Hanbury I have been 
unable to discover. 

At the annual general meeting of the Rugby Cricket 
Club in March of this year, the use of the ground was 



220 



THE ROVERS. 



granted for the match F. F. v. Uppingham Rovers, to be 
played in the following August. The match came in due 
course on the 13th and 14th, and the Foresters, not being 
so strongly represented as they should have been, and with 
the luck against them, were easily beaten. The record 
says : — 

This match was played at Rugby on Aug. 13 and 14, and 
commenced the northern tour of the Rovers, who won easily in 
one innings with 2 1 runs to spare. Messrs Street, Schultz, Steel 
(D. Q.), and Green (C. E. Green 20, and Rev. J. H. Green 30) 
were most successful with the bat; whilst for the Foresters, Messrs 
Longman and Marshall played splendid cricket in the second 
innings. D. Buchanan and S. S. Schultz both bowled well for 
their respective sides. George Longman, of the great publishing 
firm, a thorough cricketer, and Herbert Marshall were unfor- 
tunate in their first venture with the bat. Schultz bowled 
splendidly. 

UPPINGHAM ROVERS. 



SCORE. 



SCORE. 



A. P. Lucas, b Buchanan . 

T. B. Grunsdale, c Eaton, b Buch- 
anan 

D. Q. Steel, c Marsham, b Buch- 
anan 

F. E. Street, c Goldney, b Buch- 
anan 

C. E. Green, c Eaton, b Buchanan 

S. S. Schultz, b Buchanan . 



7 


Rev. J. H. Green, c Smith, b 






Goldney 


30 





J. Perkins, b Buchanan 


10 




J. B. Maul, b Bray 


13 


39 


H. Gibson, not out 

C. E. Ridley, c Marshall, b Buch- 


15 


52 


anan ...... 


3 


20 


byes 5, leg-bye i, wides 2 


8 


31 







Total 



228 



FREE FORESTERS. 



1ST INNINGS. SCORE 

D. Buchanan, b Schultz . . . . 4 

H. Ratliff, b Schultz 20 

G. H. Longman, 1 b w, b Schultz . . o 

H. M. Marshall, b Schultz . . . o 

G. H. Goldney, b Lucas . . . . o 

Hon, R. Lyttehon, c Street, b Schultz . 3 

T. Ratliff, b Schultz . . . . . 5 

Hon. J. Marsham, c C. E. Green, b Lucas 10 

E. Bray, b Schultz 10 

C. Eaton, not out 2 

A. Bowden Smith, b Schultz . . .0 

byes II, leg-byes 3, wides 2 . . 16 

Total . 70 



2D INNINGS. 

c Schultz, b Gibson 

c Grunsdale, b Steel 

b Gibson . 

run out 

c Lucas, b Gibson 

b Lucas . 

c Gibson, b Schultz 

St Steel, b Gibson 

c Perkins, b Lucas 

not out 

b Gibson . 

byes 9, leg-byes 3 

Total 



SCORE. 
2 

5 

48 

42 

3 

19 

o 

2 

2 

2 

o 

12 

137 



NEW GROUND. 



221 



On the 1 6th and 17th, at Deddington, F. F. reached the 
respectable score of 257, thanks to 74 from G. Law, 30 
from F. Lee, 27 from T. Ratliff, 29 from F. R. Price, and 
divers minor contributions ; then an eleven which looked 
more than respectable on paper crumbled before Buchanan 
(12 wickets) and Bray (7) for 33 and 48 runs. 

At Shrewsbury, Aug. 21 and 22, Shropshire scored 192 
against Free Foresters' 177, R. Lyttelton 83, and 84 for 4 
wickets — F. R. Twemlow 44, S. G. Lyttelton 28. Rutter 
took 5 v/ickets. 

On the 24th and 25th at Kingscote a match was drawn, 
which must have been a good deal interrupted by bad 
weather, for F. F. only got 165 — E. M. Wakeman 28, S. 
G. Lyttelton 21, E. Rutter 19, &c. — and the home side 100 
less, and no second innings seems to have been attempted. 




Soiithgate Cm kcl - \ji uunu . 



322 



CHAPTER XXVI. 

1878. 

The season of 1878 appears to have begun on May 27, 
when Upper Tooting scored 170 — Syd Harper 83 — to 
Free Foresters' 59 — Hon. N. Lyttelton 18. 

On the 3d of June a match v. R.E. was drawn at 
Chatham. F. F. totalled 130 and 227, of which F. E. 
Street made 21 and 72, D. Moffatt 14 and 82, C. V. 
Eccles 40 (not out) and 3, F. R. Price, 14 and 20. R.E. 
made 235 and 26 for no wicket, Renny Tailyour (retired 
hurt) 90. 

On the loth, at Colchester, Free Foresters encountered 
the nth Hussars, who only scored Zj and 90 runs, K. 
Borrowes contributing 32 and 35 of them. The club 
made 284 — J. R. Hutchison Z%, C. S. Ringrose 63, S. G. 
Butler 42. Price disposed of 10 Cherubic wickets, Cham- 
berlayne 6, Butler 3, Reid 2. 

The Aldershot Division on the 13th claimed 103 and '^i 
to 119 from Foresters, eight of whom were then got out 
for 17 runs, and the other three were absent. F. Twemlow, 
91 and 4, did best. Higgins and Law got 6 wickets each, 
and Taylor (for the Soldiers) 11. 

On the 15th they were beaten at Cooper's Hill by i run, 
F. F. 99, the College 100 ; but in the second innings had 
lost 4 wickets for 14. F. H. Lee took 5 wickets and got 
41 runs, J. M. Yates 22. 



PLENTY OF RUNS. 223 

Two days later they won at Woolwich, R.M.A. getting 
87 and 73, F. F. 137 and 29 for i wicket. E. F. S. Tyle- 
cote 39, F. E. Street 26, F. R. Price 20, and Hon. W. 
N. Hood 19, were the scorers for F. F. Chamberlayne 
claimed 8 wickets, AUsopp 7. 

On the 26th June, at Oatlands Park, the home side 
scored 89 and 60 for 2 wickets, F. F. 154 — Hon. E. Lyttel- 
ton 54, G. Longman 27, E. Bray 21 (not out). The last 
named took 6 wickets, Goldney 5. 

At Shoeburyness, June 28 and 29, the Gunners made 
244 and 178 for 3 wickets — S. G. Miles 36 and 6'^ (not 
out), F. E. Allsopp 72 and 43. Foresters made 246 — 
S. E. Butler 49, E. Hanbury 43, H. M. Marshall 31. 

Eton, on July 4, scored 6Z and 94 for 5 wickets, F. F. 
180. C. R. Moore 38, E. S. Stanhope 34, G. H. Longman 
25, were their best performers. D. Q. Steel and W. F. 
Forbes each disposed of 7 wickets. 

At the Node the F. F. had a good team but were easily 
beaten, says the manager of the match : the score, however, 
is not forthcoming. 

At Henley, on the 6th July, F. F. made 234 to the 
Henley's 94. S. G. Lyttelton contributed 102 to the 
winning side, and there were five other double figures. 
Bray took 6 wickets. 

Plenty of runs were got at Chiselhurst on the 8th, as 
after F. F. had scored 294, West Kent for 4 wickets 
claimed 211 — F. Penn 143 (not out). The Forester scorers 
were G. H. Tuck 84, R. Garnett 53, C. R. Dunell 67, E. 
Bray 45. 

The twelve-a-side match with Rugby School on the 8th 
and 9th of July, fortunately for F. F., ended in a draw, the 
boys being only 31 runs behind, with 6 wickets to fall. 
Totals, F. F. 166 and 129; the School 220 and 44, with 
4 wickets down. For the Foresters G. F. Vernon made 29 
and 12. G. S. Marriott 65 and 2, H. W. Gardner 40 and 



224 



/ ZINGARI. 



23, H. G. S. Hughes 3 and 29, W. J. Hughes 7 and (not 
out) 19. Buchanan took 7 wickets in the first innings, 
Marriott 3 ; in the second, Buchanan i and Marriott 3. 
For the School C. F. H. Leslie made 60 and 2, B. Fitz- 
gerald 34 and (not out) 17, F. L. Evelyn 48 and (not 
out) 4. 

At ShorncHffe, July 9 and 10, the Camp scored 212 and 
75 to 149 and 79 for 4 wickets from F. F. R. Garnett 
made 73 and 17 (not out). Rutter took 6 wickets, Reid 4, 
Price 7. 

At Rockingham, July 16, the Castle made 189 and 146 
—A. Lyttelton 38 and 30, H. H. Gillett 39 and i, H. C. 
Maul 28 and 26. F. F. 129 and 122 for 3 wickets — E. 
Lyttelton 27 and 45, J. G. Beevor 30 and (not out) 9, T. 
Ratliff 3 and (not out) 39.1 

At Walton, July 22 to 26, F. F. met I Z. and Gentlemen 
of Warwickshire. 



Julyzz, 22, 


a7id 2<^ 


f. 




I ZINGARI. 






1ST INNINGS. SCORE. 


2D INNINGS. SCORE. 


W. F. Forbes, c S. Garnett, b Buchanan 


45 


c Royle, b Appleby . 


47 


H. R. Webbe, 1 b w, b Buchanan . 


3 


b Buchanan 


2 


T. S. Pearson, st R. Garnett, b Buchanar 


1 14 


c Royle, b Appleby . 


12 


A. W. Ridley, b Appleby . 


4 


c T. Ratlifif, b Appleby 


O 


A. Fortescue, c Appleby, b Buchanan 


i6 


b -Appleby 


O 


G. H. Portal, not out . . , 


27 


b Appleby 


4 


C. Marriott, st R. Garnett, b Buchanan 


6 


c Marsham, b Buchanan 


3 


Capt. Middleton, b Appleby 


12 


c Hill, b Appleby , 


i8 


O. Mordaunt, b Appleby . 


o 


st R. Garnett, b Appleby 


9 


Lord Willoughby de Broke, c Royle, t 








Appleby. . . , . 


7 


not out . . . 


. i6 


W. Evetts, absent .... 


o 


c Dale, b Appleby . 


o 


Hon. W. Verney, b Buchanan . 


o 


b Buchanan 


o 


byes . . .... 


lO 


byes 5, leg-bye i . 


6 


Total 


. 144 


Total 


. 117 



1 No report is obtainable of a match at Market Harborough announced for 
July 19. 





E. M. Kenny Herbert. 



W. D. Bovill. 



For W. D. Bovill, read B. Pauncefote. 





A. J. Webbe. 



H. R. Webbe. 



THE COUNTY. 



225 



FREE FORESTERS. 



1ST INNINGS, 

F. H. Hill, b Forbes . 
V. Royle, b Forbes . 
J. W. Dale, hit w, b Mordaunt . 
H. S. Maul, retired hurt . 
R. Garnett, c Portal, b Middleton 

C. Smith, St Pearson, b Mordaunt 
S. Garnett, st Pearson, b Mordaunt 

G. S. Marriott, c sub., b Mordaunt 
J. Marsham, st Pearson, b Mordaunt 
A. Appleby, c and b Forbes 
T. Ratliff, not out . 

D. Buchanan, 1 b w, b Mordaunt 
byes 6, leg-bye i, wides 2 

Total 



SCORE. 


2D INNINGS. SCORE. 


7 


b Mordaunt 


13 




13 


c Ridley, b Mordaunt 


4 




I 


b Mordaunt 


14 




39 








13 


c Ridley, b Forbes . 


2 




3 


c Forbes, b Mordaunt 


2 







1 b w, b Forbes . 


5 




5 


c Pearson, b Forbes. 


13 


t 


8 


b Forbes . 







4 


c Portal, b Mordaunt 


6 







b Mordaunt 


I 







not out . 







9 


bye I, leg-byes 2, wide 


I 4 


ll 


102 


Total 


. 6^ 



July 25 and 26. 
WARWICKSHIRE. 



1ST INNINGS. 



SCORE. 



J. R. Walker, c R. Garnett, b Forbes 
A. Fortescue, b S. Garnett 

C. Smith, c G. S. Marriott, b Forbes 
Lord Willoughby de Broke, st R., b S, 

Garnett 

W. C. Alston, c Evans, b Forbes 

O. Mordaunt, b S. Garnett 

R. C. Milne, c Forbes, b Hill . 

D. Buchanan, c Ratliff, b Hill . 
A. H. M. Russell, c Ratliff, b Hill 
W. M. Smythe, c Evans, b Portal 
S. B. H. Chamberlayne, c Evans, b Hill 
W. Rashleigh, run out ... 

Hon. G. Leigh, c S. Garnett, b Portal 
J. Goodacre, not out .... 
byes 3, leg-byes 5 . 



Total 



E. 


2D INNINGS. SCORE. 





bHiU 


14 


9 


b S. Garnett . 


3 


4 


b Marriott 





10 


and b Marriott 


4 


I 


c S. Garnett, b Marriott 


7 


6 


c Ratliff, b S. Garnett 


6 


II 


c R. Garnett, b Hill . 


24 


3 


not out . 


5 


3 






7 


c Hill, b Marriott . 


12 





csub.,bS. Garnett . 


I 


3 


c R. Garnett, b G. S 






Marriott 





I 


1 b w, b G. S. Marriott 


7 





absent 





8 


byes 8, leg-byes 3, wide 


[ 12 



66 



Total 



95 



FREE FORESTERS. 



1ST INNINGS. SCORE. 

W. F. Forbes, c Walker, b Buch- 
anan 10 

C. Marriott, b Buchanan . . o 

G. H. Portal, b Mordaunt . . 4 



1ST INNINGS. SCORE, 

S. Garnett, 1 b w, b Buchanan . 18 
G. S. Marriott, b Buchanan . 6 

R. Garnett, c Buchanan, b Mor- 
daunt . . . . .16 



226 BATTING. 

1ST INNINGS. SCORE. 1ST INNINGS. SCORE. 

F. H. Hill, c Fortescue, b Buch- Hon. J. Marsham, st Walker, b 

anan 3 Buchanan 15 

W. Evetts, c Willoughby de Broke, T. Ratliff, not out ... 4 

b Buchanan .... 14 byes 7, wides 2 . . . . 9 

F. R. Evans, c do. , b Mordaunt . 5 

H. R. Webbe, c do., b Buchanan 23 Total . 127 

In the second innings W. F. Forbes (c Smith, b Buchanan) scored 17, C. 
Marriott (not out) 15, F. R. Evans (c Mordaunt, b Buchanan) o, G. S. Marriott 
(not out) 7, — total 39. 

On the 29th and 30th, at Winchfield, Mr Wood's Eleven 
made 220, while Foresters, who had commenced with 160, 
claimed a second score of 224. Most of them got runs — 

G. H. Tuck 31 and 9, G. H. Longman 17 and 22, R. 
Garnett 32 and 7, S. G. Lyttelton o and 60, H. M. Marshall 
5 and 19, F. H. Lee 36 (not out) and 2, G. H. Goldney 24 
and 32 (not out). Bray took 7 wickets. C. C. Clarke 
made 80 for Mr Wood. 

At Malvern, July 31 and Aug. i, the School won a 
close contest, scoring just 7 runs majority in each innings. 
M. C. C. C. 155 and 117— R. B. King 39— and F. F. 148 and 
no — W. A. Lucy 43, H. Foster 33. 

The Mote on the ist Aug. was the scene of a good 
match, the home side obtaining 205 runs, of which Foord 
Kelcey claimed 100 ; while F. F. had to be content with 
190 — Stw. Garnett making 60 and H. G. Tylecote 41. 
The latter took every Kentish wicket. 

A fine display of batting took place at Preston Hall, 
August 2 and 3. The home eleven went in first, and 
scored 130, to which F. F. responded with 158 — H. G 
Tylecote 38, S. G. Lyttelton 23, G. Garnett 21, E. Hume 
22 (not out). Then the Hon. Ivo Bligh 96 (not out) and 
Lord Harris 73 inaugurated a second innings for the Hall 
of 296. Tylecote took 10 wickets. 

On the 7th and 8th, Foresters met again the Gentlemen 
of Worcestershire, who beat them by 2 runs in one innings, 
scoring 302 to F. F. 189 and in — F. W. Wright 33 and 



BOWLING. 227 

28, J. G. Crowdy 3 and 22, H. M. Marshall 38 and 9, 
F. R. Tvvemlow 31 and o, F. H. Lee 17 and 20, S. Garnett 
32 and 7. The Worcester heroes were two Lytteltons — 
S. G. 127, R. H. 67. 

On the two following days at Hanbury Hall Mr Ver- 
non's eleven scored 113, and then F. F. made 183 — Hon. 
R. Lyttelton 41 — J. G. Crowdy yZ. The home side then 
succumbed for 28 runs, Crowdy taking 7 wickets, Stewart 
Garnett 3. 

Shrewsbury, on Aug. 16 and 17, was the scene of a 
match with Gentlemen of Shropshire, of which one innings 
each was played — F. F. 199, Shropshire 125. S. G. Lyttel- 
ton 79, G. P. Ash 33, C. F. Reid 20 (not out), were leading 
Foresters. 

On the 19th and 20th, at Sutton Coldfield, Gentlemen 
of Staffordshire made an innings of no to Foresters' 113 
and 169 — G. H. Goldney 45 and 28, G. Smythe 15 and 41, 
H. G. S. Hughes 19 and 45. The County, 5 of whose 
wickets fell to James Alston, would have cut a bad figure, 
but for a good not-out 41 from W. W. Bagot, who also 
took 7 F. F. wickets. 

On the 22d and 23d, at Deddington, F. F. made loi ; 
and after the Gentlemen of Oxfordshire had scored 62 for 
6 wickets, rain stopped the match. H. E. Rhodes 26 and 
R. H. Lyttelton 21 (not out) did best for F. F. 

A very enjoyable week in Gloucestershire was com- 
menced at Kingscote on the 26th, when F. F. got two 
totals of 64 to the like of 65 from the home team, with 2 
wickets in hand. Bruen, for Kingscote, captured 15 F. F. 
wickets ; S. G. Lyttelton 7, and J. G. Crowdy and E. 
Rutter 5 each, of the Kingscote side. 

On the 29th and 30th Mr Baker's twelve made 58 and 
no to Foresters' loi and 44. Crowdy again took 7 
wickets, Allsopp 8. 



22^ 



CHAPTER XXVII. 

1879. 

On June 2, v. R.A., at Woolwich, there is no report. 

West Kent, at Chiselhurst on the 4th, made 117 to 131 
from F. R, for whom J. Wise scored 32 (not out), G. Macan 
21. Goldney took 5 wickets, Cunlifife 3, Rutter 2. 

On June 4 and 5 F. F. played the Cavalry Brigade, 
Aldershot, who scored 104 and 95 to iii and 89 for 5 
wickets — Garnett 25 and 24, H. Verelst 18 and 16, Capt. 
Eccles 3 and 18 (not out), C. F. Reid 21 (not out), &c. 
Godfray took 8, Eccles 4 wickets. 

On the 6th, v, Winchester Garrison, no report appears. 

At Sevenoaks Vine, on the 9th, although F. F. only 
exceeded the century by a run, they won in one innings, 
to 48 and 46. H. M. Marshall made 24, F. E. Street and 
F. E. Mellor 15 each. C. M. Cunlifife took 9 and G. Law 8 
wickets. 

On June 10 and 11, v. R.M.A., at Woolwich, Foresters 
obtained 91 and 164 to the Academy's 117 and 94. E. F. S. 
Tylecote, the customary hero of this match, surpassed 
himself, claiming 14 and 122 runs (i six, i five, i four, 17 
threes, and 17 twos), Capt. Beresford Baker 44 and 18. 
The wickets of R.M.A. fell to Hon. W. N. Hood and 
S. B. Chamberlayne, who each took 8. 

The score of the match on the 14th, R. I. E. College, 



ROYAL ENGINEERS. 



229 



has not been preserved, the books of the college club con- 
taining none of the contests of this period. 

On the 19th, at Henley, the match could not be played, 
in consequence of the state of the ground through floods. 

The F. F. met R.E. at Chatham, June 20. Rain second 
day. 

ROYAL ENGINEERS. 



1ST INNINGS. SCORE. 

H. N. Dumbleton, b Bulpett . 3 
H. W. Gregson, b Bulpett . . 3 
H. F. Stafford, b Chamberlayne . 17 
H. W. Renny Tailyour, b Cham- 
berlayne ..... 4 
P. G. Von Donop, c Jeffreys, b 

Bulpett 4 

F. G. Bowles, b Bulpett . . 7 



1ST INNINGS, S 

F. W. Bennett, c Chamberlayne 

b Bulpett . 
E, Druitt, c sub,, b Bulpett 
M. Lindsay, not out . 
B. Russell, b Bulpett . 
S. R. Rice, b Bulpett . 

byes .... 



Total 



3 

I 
I 
o 
S 
13 

61 



In the second innings Gregson (not out) scored 16, Renny Tailyour (not out) 
49, — total 65. 



FREE FORESTERS. 



J. Wise, c Rice, b Dumbleton 

J, S. Russell, b Dumbleton . 

F. E. Street, c Lindsay, b Dum- 
bleton 

J. Garnett, 1 b w, b Von Donop . 

W. J. Jeffreys, b Druitt 

F. H. Mellor, c Dumbleton, b 
Druitt 

E. W. F. Bulpett, run out . 



I 
16 
63 

II 
35 



SCORE. 



W. D. Bovill, c Von Donop, b 

Gregson 32 

C. Browne, c Druitt, b Rice . 4 

F. R. Price, not out . . . 10 

S. B, H. Chamberlayne, b Rice . i 

byes 2, leg-byes 6, wides 3 . 11 

Total . 197 



On the 27th and 28th F. F. improved the practice of 
the School of Gunnery at Shoeburyness by getting 337 
runs to their hosts' loi and 155. M. P. Lucas claimed 
181 of the total, G. Law 46, E. Rutter 27, W. Bovill and 
S. Chamberlayne 20 each, the latter also taking 10 wickets, 
the former 6. 

On 7th and 8th July the match with Rugby School 
ended in the defeat of F. F. by 7 wickets, the totals being 
F. F. 98 and 127 ; the School 177 and 48, with 3 wickets 



230 



THE FAITHFUL CITY. 



down. For F. R, H. R. Webbe made 12 and 7, H. W. 
Gardner 2 and 45, R. W. Gillespie Stainton 33 and 17, 
A. J. Webbe 7 and 29. For the School Leslie made 84, 

F. W. Capron 15 and (not out) 36, E. H. Kempson 28, 
and H. J. Fowler (not out) 16. In the first innings 
Buchanan took 6 wickets, A. H. Heath i, and 3 were 
run out. In the second A. L. Vernon i, G. S. Marriott i, 
and I run out.^ 

At Preston Hall, July 28 and 29, Mr Brassey's eleven 
claimed 183 and 107 to Foresters' 117 and 78 for 5 wickets. 

G. H. Longman made 1 1 and 30, S. G. Lyttelton 36 and 
12 (not out), E. Hume 39, S. Garnett o and 28. Lyttelton 
took 8 wickets, Garnett 5. 

A match with Malvern on July 30th was undecided, the 
M. C. C. C. making 139— R. B. King 35, A. C. Bird 29 (not 
out) — to 95 for 6 wickets of F. F. — W. Lucy 49 (not out).^ 

And on the 7th and 8th Aug. they met Gentlemen of 
Worcestershire on the County ground at Worcester, with 
the following result : — 

FREE FORESTERS. 



1ST INNINGS. SCORE. 


2D INNINGS. 


SCORE. 


T. Wise, b S. G. Lyttelton 


7 


not out . 


7 


G. H. Goldney, b S. G. Lyttelton . 









G. H. Longman, b E. P. Jobson 


26 


retired 


• 19 


S. Garnett, b E. P. Jobson 


23 






F. Lee, c V^alker, b S. G. Lyttelton . 


16 


not out . 


9 


R. Garnett, b Buckle 


61 






F. H. Lee, c R. H. Lyttelton, b Stallard 


6 






W. D. Bovill, b E. P. Jobson . 


53 


c E. P. Jobson, b S. 


G. 






Lyttelton 


. 17 


E. Bray, b E. P. Jobson . 


3 


b S. G. Lyttelton . 


4 


T. Ratliff, b Buckle . . . . 


24 






H. P. Richardson, not out 


12 






byes, &c 


II 


byes, &c. 


3 


Total 


242 


Total 


• 59 



1 No report of the matches announced for Rockingham and Market Har- 
borough, July 15 and 18, and for Warnham Court and Deddington, Aug. I 
and 5, could be discovered. 



BAD TIMES. 



231 



WORCESTERSHIRE. 



1ST INNINGS. SCORE. 


2D INNINGS. SCORE. 


E. P. Jobson, b Bray 


48 


bBovill . 


21 


M. B. Buckle, b S. Garnett 


16 


run out 


II 


Hon. S. G. Lyttelton, b S. Garnett . 


12 


c S. Garnett, b Bray 


14 


Hon. R. H. Lyttelton, c Goldney, b Bovil 


1 18 


bBovill . 


40 


W. Pullman, b S. Garnett 


12 


c and b Bray . 


13 


R. C. Moncrieff, c Longman, b Bray 





c Wise, b Goldney . 


9 


R. Atthill, c and b Bray . 


8 


c S. Garnett, b Bray 


5 


J. R. Walker, c Ratliff,' b Goldney . 


II 


b S. Garnett . 


20 


G. Stallard, c F. Lee, b Bray . 


4 


c R. Garnett, b Bray 


II 


H. C. Jobson, not out 


2 


not out 





H. Caldicott, b S. Garnett 





b S. Garnett . 


I 


byes, &c 


9 


byes, &c. . 


. 14 


Total 


140 


Total 


. 159 



At Sutton Coldfield, on the nth and 12 Aug., F. F. 
beat the Gentlemen of Staffordshire in one innings, scoring 
128 — Goldney 23 — to Staffordshire's 84 and 38. Goldney 
took 10 wickets, Bovill 7. 

F. F. had the worst of the match with Shropshire 
Gentlemen on the 15th and i6th, at Shrewsbury, in wet 
weather, claiming only 125 to the County's 159 for 4 
wickets. 

The next match was at Alton Towers against an eleven 
of Mr Bill's. F. F. in bad weather compiled 81 and 49 
for 3 wickets to their adversaries' 6^. Bovill took 7 
wickets. 

On the 25th and 26th Aug. F. F. got 95 and 62 for 5 
wickets against 153 made by the Southern Division (Army 
and Navy). J. G. Crowdy, 20 and 16, was the best of the 
modest scorers for F. F. 



232 



CHAPTER XXVIII. 



1880. 



The season began on May 31 at Woolwich, when a wet 
first day spoiled the match with Royal Artillery, who 
on the 1st June scored 121 to the 188 of F. F. — J. S. 
Russel j6, E. F. S. Tylecote 33. Bovill took 4 and G. 
Law 3 wickets. 

On the 4th June the scene of action was Wellington, but 
no gazette appears to have been published. 

At Upper Tooting on the 7th F. F. got 154, Schultz, Z^ ; 
and then Schultz (8 wickets), Goldney (3), and Gilliatt (2), 
got Tooting down for 132. 

On the nth and 12th the match at Chatham, after a 
close first innings, proved an easy victory for R.E. 

ROYAL ENGINEERS. 



1ST INNINGS. : 

R. S. Maclagan, c Lucas, b W. D. Bovill 

R. S. Hedley, b Bulpett . 

H. W. Renny Tailyour, b Bulpett . 

Capt. P. S. G. Reid, not out . 

C. D. Learoyd, b Bulpett . . . , 

Major Fellowes, b W. D. Bovill 

C. W. S. Sherrard, st Kington, b Bovill 

E. Druitt, b W. D. Bovill . , . 

E. Creswell, b W. D. Bovill . 

B. B. Russell, c Lucas, b Bovill 

C. A. R. Browne, b Bulpett 
byes 9, leg-byes 3 . 



Total 



RE. 


2D INNINGS. SCORE. 





b W. D. Bovill 





22 


b Law 


49 


II 


b W. D. Bovill 


5 


35 


b W. D. Bovill 


2 





st Kington, b Moffat 


27 


I 


run out . 


18 


7 


b Bulpett . 


38 





st Kington, b Bovill 


19 


6 


not out . 


27 


9 


1 b w, b Bovill . 


6 


I 


run out . 


8 


12 


byes 21, leg-byes 3, wide 


I 25 



104 



Total 



224 



ROYAL ENGINEERS. 



233 



FREE FORESTERS. 



1ST INNINGS. 

Col. Kington, b Fellowes . 
G. Law, c Hedley, b Fellowes . 
W. D. Bovill, b Browne . 
C. J. Lucas, b Druitt 

C. W. Bulpett, c Browne, b Fellowes 
F. E. Street, st Hedley, b Fellowes 
E. P. Bovill, c Hedley, b Fellowes 

J. S. Russel, b Browne 

D. Moffatt, b Druitt . 
J. Cooke, not out 

W. A. Cairnes (emergency) absent 
byes 2, leg-bye i . 



Total 



RE. 


2D INNINGS. 


SCORE. 


6 


b Druitt . 


7 


5 


c Fellowes, b Browne 


. 19 


38 


b Browne . 


7 


7 


c Hedley, b Reid . 


. 24 


3 


b Browne . 





6 


c Renny Tailyour, b 


Reid 3 


9 


bReid . 


5 


20 


b Reid . 


. 28 


16 


st Hedley, b Reid . 


2 


3 


bReid . 


I 





not out 


9 


3 







;i6 



Total 



los 



At Rugby, on 17th and i8th June, the Foresters, who 
had not won since 1877, were defeated by 59 runs, F. F. 
making 80 and 114 against 125 and 128 by the School. 
H. G. S. Hughes made 18 and 4, G. S. Marriott 7 and 13, 
C. M. CunHffe 12 and 23, H. W. Gardner 12 and 40, Rev. 
O. Mordaunt o and 13, H. Rotherham (not out) 13 and I, 
Buchanan 10 and (not out) o. For the School W. P. Ward 
made 28 and 11, A. L. Melly 29 and i, C. E. Cobb 27 and 

4, E. H. Kempson 24 and 2, E. N. Fellowes o and (not out) 
39. In the match Buchanan took 8, Rotherham 7, Marriott 
4 wickets, and Mordaunt i. " It was thought that the bowl- 
ing talent of the Free Foresters would more than compen- 
sate for their deficiencies in batting, that department of the 
game never having been better represented ; the victory of 
the School was therefore a well-earned one." 

On the 19th June, at Henley, the natives obtained 159 — 
W. J. Hughes 46 — and F. F. only 107 — B. N. Acroyd 37, 
H. E. Speed 30. W. D. Bovill took 9 Forester wickets. 

On the 22d and 23d time and rain prevented the con- 
summation of a one-innings victory over R.M.A. at Wool- 
wich, F. F. scoring 351, A. F. Jeffreys loi (not out) and J. 

5. Russel 105 being the chief contributors, F. G. Street 
assisting with 34, W. F. Higgins 25, W. Byass 24, D. 



234 THE SHUTERS. 

Moffatt 27. The R.M.A. made 121 and loi for 8 
wickets, Rutter taking 7, Byass and Higgins each 5 of 
their wickets. 

At Shoeburyness, on the 25th and 26th, another un- 
finished match in favour of F. F. took place with the 
School of Gunnery, F. F. scoring 136 and 256, H. Gilliatt 
claiming 14 and 74, Colonel Kington 8 and 71, A. F. 
Jeffreys o and 44, T. Wise 27 and 17, Capt. B. Baker 25 
(not out) and 3. Of the Gunners, whose totals were 10 1 
and 40 for 4 wickets, E. Rutter accounted for 9. 

On the 30th, at Chiselhurst, West Kent scored 234 runs 
— the Shuter brothers making 56 and 75 of them — and 
then F. F. ha4 to retii*e for 127, G. F. Vernon claiming 39, 
C. M. Cunliffe 25, G. Law 21. Two wickets were down in 
the second innings for 27 — Vernon (not out) 19. 

On July I, F. F. scored 232 against Eton, who made 56 
and 5 3 for two wickets. H. W. Gardner 5 5, W. F. Forbes 54, 
J. G. Crowdy 51, E. Lyttelton 33, were the best performers 
for F. F. with the bat ; Goldney 9, and Bray 3 wickets, with 
the ball. 

On the 7th, at Oatlands Park, having got the home side 
out for y^, F. F. made 127, including 33 from D. Moffatt, 25 
from A. H. Trevor, 21 from M. G. Wilkinson, and 13 (not 
out) from C. Y. Bedford. S. Lyttelton, G. Law, and H. 
AUsopp were the bowlers. 

The 1 2th and 13th found F. F. opposed to Capt. Bridge's 
eleven, who scored 157 and 25 for 3 wickets, while F. F. 
had one innings for 100 — W. Lucy 26, their best man. S. 
Garnett took 8 wickets, Law 4. 

And on the two next days at Knole Park, playing thir- 
teen a-side, the Park made 250, F. F. 207 for 10 wickets — 
E. Hanbury 89, H. G. S. Hughes 38. Gilliatt took 5 and 
J. Marsham 4 wickets of the Park, for whom E. M. Grace 
made 89 runs. 

At Warnham Court the week was concluded by a one- 







o 



-: o 

W 5? 



BIRMINGHAM. 235 

innings defeat, F. F. making 138 and 102, the Courtiers 
372. E. Hanbury was best again for the F. F. with 28 
and 54 (not out), C. W. Bulpett 48 and 3, W. D. Bovill 20 
and o. For Warnham (whose wickets were equally divided 
between Godfray, Bulpett, and Bovill), three of the Lucas 
family did the mischief— A. P. 83, A. C. 72, E. M. 64. 

On July 19 and 20, at Aldershot, Free Foresters made 
two innings, T13 and 106 for 6 wickets, against one of 205 
for the Camp. H. J. B. Rollings 55 and 33, both not out, 
did best. 

But on the following days the Club mended their hand 
considerably, scoring 260 to 103 and 36 for 2 wickets from 
the Garrison at Winchester. Capt. Borrowes made 70, C. 
Booth 48, E. Hanbury 46, A. Jeffreys 35. Rutter took 9 
wickets. 

At Preston Hall, July 26 and 27, the match was drawn, 
Mr Brassey's eleven scoring 157 and 159 (Ivo Bligh 26 and 
63) to F. F.'s 153 and 52 for i wicket — V. Royle 17 and 20 
(not out), E. Bray 14 and 22 (twice not out), T. S. Pearson 
30, and H. G. Tyiecote 20, doing best. Appleby took 1 1 
and H. G. Tyiecote 6 wickets. 

Of the match against Malvern, July 28 and 29, no record 
appears in the M. C. C. C. book. 

Worcestershire beat F. F. at the Boughton ground on 
Aug. 5 and 6. The totals of F. F. were 90 and iii, while 
the County, who scored 177 in their first essay, rubbed off 
the balance without losing a wicket : no individual Forester 
reached 20 runs. 

At Edgbaston, Birmingham, on Aug. 9 and 10, the match 
was drawn. F. F. scored 141 and 131 — C. W. Rawlinson 
57 and 10, E. Hanbury 35 and 36. Edgbaston in their first 
innings made 138, and 49 for 4 wickets in the second. A. 
Smith, 45 and 15, was their best man. Bovill took 7 of 
their wickets. 

The match with Staffordshire at Sutton Coldfield on the 



236 LOSSES. 

nth and 1 2th was also drawn in an interesting position. 
One run was the lead obtained by the County, i6o to 159, 
in the first innings. E. Alcock, 58. best for the Shire, and 

E. Hanbury, 42, for the Club. Then Staffordshire fell for 
123 (Alcock again 41), and time prevented more play. 

At Wellesbourne, two days later, a couple of missed 
catches earned Mr Bachelor a long innings, and F. F. a 
defeat. Wellesbourne made 173 and F. F. only 84; so 
they had to follow, and got 107 — E. Hanbury 15 and 20, 

F. H. Lee 8 and 28, S. C. Voules 8 and 18, G. S. Hughes 
17 and 8, W. D. Bovill 19 and o. Then South Warwick- 
shire knocked off the runs with the loss of 2 wickets. 

On the 20th and 21st, at Shrewsbury, the F. F. brought 
to an appropriate close an anything but brilliant campaign ; 
for Shropshire, with the assistance of 164 from C. F. Leslie, 
81 from E. Wakeman, 70 from Payne, and 69 from Gillies, 
compiled (in spite of the attacks of Cobden, Lucas, Gibbon, 
and other noted bowlers) an innings of 483, and then got 
F. F. out for 85 and 82 for 3 wickets, A. H. Heath, 35, sav- 
ing the credit of his side. 

On the 23d and 24th a match at Deddington, of which 
the full score will be found in a later page, was won by the 
home side. 



237 



CHAPTER XXIX. 

1881. 

The programme began this year with a match at Esher, 
May 21, of which the score is not forthcoming. 

On the 30th May the R.M.A. at Woolwich opposed 118 
runs to Foresters' 192. Capt. Beresford Baker made 54, 
E. Rutter 39, A. F. Jeffreys 26, A. Chambers 12 (not out). 
Goldney took 6 wickets, Rutter 3. 

R.A., on June 6 and 7, after F. F. had scored 228, made 
166, and got 7 F. F. wickets for 124. In Free Foresters' 
first innings the principal scores were those of Capt. Pear- 
son 72 (not out), E. Hanbury 28, S. G. Wilson 52, and E. 
Rutter 18. Rutter also took 4 wickets. In the second 
innings A. Jeffreys 36 (not out) and F. H. Lee 26 did 
best. 

On the next day, at Chiselhurst, the spell was reversed, 
West Kent claiming 223 to Foresters' 106, of which Lord 
Carnegie made 33, C. Booth 28. 

On the 9th F. F. played nth Hussars at Hounslow. 

A match against Longwood ended in a draw in favour 
of the home side, who got 169 and 217 to 84 and 88 for 6 
wickets. J. G. Crowdy o and 44, G. H. Goldney 45 and 3, 
did best for F. F. 

At Chatham, on the loth and nth, only five Free 
Foresters put in an appearance, who with the assistance 
of emergencies contrived to score 35 and 139 — J. S. 



238 EMERGENCIES. 

Russel 19 and 16, A. F. Jeffreys o and 25, R. O. Milne 
48. R.E. therefore, having made 127 in their first hands, 
rubbed off the balance without losing a wicket. Capron 
accounted for 6 and R. E. Milne for 4 wickets. 

A twelve-a-side match with Eton, June 11, ended in a 
draw, Eton scoring 185, F. F. 151 for 9 wickets — T. S. 
Pearson 46, the best score. G. Law took 5 Eton wickets 
and made 19 runs. 

At Elstree, on the 15th and i6th, F. F. just managed to 
stave off a defeat in one innings, making 136 and 187 for 
9 wickets to 330 from Elstree, whose chief batsmen were 

E. F. S. Tylecote 100, Breedon 71 (not out). For Foresters 

F. R. E. Fryer made o and 75, Capt. B. Baker 27 and 27, 
F. W. Capron 18 and 2, C. F. Hoare 18 and o, E. Rutter 
17 and 6 (not out). Fryer got 5 wickets. 

The School of Gunnery at Shoeburyness, on June 24 
and 25, had two innings of 145 and 149 to one of For- 
esters, which totalled 161. E. Rutter scored 35, Capt. Baker 
29, T. O. Reay 22 for F. F. Goldney and Rutter got 8 
wickets apiece. 

F. F. encountered Clifton College on the 1st and 2d 
July, and seem to have been rather fortunate in their 
emergencies. They scored 334 in their first innings, of 
which H. F. Fox made 137, A. D. Greene 64, P. W. H. 
Miles 51. The College then made 228 and 182, and F. F. 
52 for 4 wickets. Gilliatt took 5 wickets. 

At Henley, on the 2d, the home side reached the total 
of 328, and then F. F. made 128 for 3 wickets — A. H. 
Trevor 58 (not out). 

On July 4 and 5, against Capt. Bridge's eleven, the Blaise 
Castle team made ZZ and 100 to Foresters' 35 and 91, 
A. H. Evans reckoning 7 and 24 and 10 wickets, Gilliatt 
6 wickets. 

And on the 6th, at Knole Park, 254 was the score against 
which F. F. had to go in, and they only succeeded in 



WEATHER BAD. 239 

rubbing off 151— E. Hanbury 51, A. F. Jeffreys 35, being 
the best performers. Evans claimed 4 wickets, Rutter 3. 

On the nth and 12th of July, at Rugby, "a strong team 
of F. F. made the star of the Wanderers rise with a bound, 
as the School team was beaten by 150 runs, F. F. making 
157 and 262 and the School 163 and 2>6, T. S. Pearson 
made 28 and 40, W. R Ward (of last year's School eleven) 

10 and 32, J. D. Walker 23 and 19, A. J. Webbe 10 and 
82, Capt. Beresford Baker 39 and 13, C. Smith (Clary) 
21 in the first, C. J. Inglis and H. G. S. Hughes 16 and 31 
respectively in the second, and Buchanan not out in both 
innings. The School wickets were disposed of as follows : 
Buchanan 6 and 3, Walker i and 5, Webbe 2, Inglis 2, 
and Ward i. The loss of the services of Arnall, the slow 
bowler, early in the match, from an injury to his foot, 
considerably lessened any chance of winning on the part 
of the School." 

The match with King Edward's School, Oxford, on the 
13th, was not played from stress of weather. 

On July 18 and 19, at Warnham Court, F. F. realised 
151 and 146, the Court 155 and 48 for 4 wickets — C. W. M. 
Bulpett 62 and 14, A. O. Burton 35 and o, F. H. Lee o 
and 33, R. M. Turnbull 7 and 27 : he also took 6 wickets. 

On the 22d and 23d, at St Cross, Winchester, the Rifle 
Depot, after F. F. had scored 238, made no and 328, F. F. 
in the second innings having lost i wicket for 10 runs. 
A. F. Jeffreys 89, and Beresford Baker 86 (not out), 
were the heroes of the Forester score. C. K. Wood took 

11 wickets. 

At Broughton, Worcester, on the ist and 2d Aug., F. F. 
encountered the Gentlemen of Worcestershire, and won by 
24 runs. 



240 



WORSE. 



FREE FORESTERS. 



1ST INNINGS. ! 

C. B. Tylecote, b Millward 

G. Law, b Millward .... 

C. W. Bulpett, c E. Jobson, b Millward 

H. G. Tylecote, c H. Jobson, b Millward 

J. G. Crowdy, b Millward . 

A. D. Burton, b Thring . 

W. D. Bovill, c Lyttelton, b Millward 

F. H. Lee, st Lyttelton, b Millward . 
J. Marsham, c H. Jobson, b Thring . 
P. R. Toynbee, c Lyttelton, b Millward 

G. H. Goldney, not out 

byes ...... 



Total 



iE. 


2D INNINGS. SCORE. 


I 


b Thring . 


4 


5 


St E. Jobson, b Millward 


3 


28 


bBuck . 


25 


24 


c E. Jobson, b Buck 


22 


8 


bBuck . 


43 


5 


b Millward 


6 


20 


b Millward . : 


44 


35 


b Millward 


I 


48 


c Roughton, b Buck 


2 


I 


not out . 


4 


8 


c E. Jobson, b Millward 





IS 


byes 


7 


toB 


Total 


. 161 



WORCESTERSHIRE. 



E. P. Jobson, b C. Tylecote . 

A. Millward, c Crowdy, b H. Tylecote 

R. Moncrieffe, c Lee, b H. Tylecote 

R. H. Lyttelton, c Crowdy, b H. Tylecote 

H. C. Jobson, c Lee, b H. Tylecote . 

R. Atthill, b H. Tylecote . 

H. T. Twynam, c Law, b Goldney . 

H. W. Buck, b C. Tylecote 

J. C. Thring, not out ... 

J. Hastings, c C. Tylecote, b H. Tylecote 

Rev. Roughton, b C. Tylecote . 

byes 14 



Total 



92 


c and b Bovill . 


60 


21 


b Goldney 


14 


21 


c Law, b Bulpett 


IS 





c C. Tylecote, b Bulpett 


7 


5 


b Bulpett . 


3 


6 


b H. Tylecote . 


3 


I 


c Crowdy, b Bovill . 


18 


2 


c and b Bovill . 


I 


14 


c Goldney, b Bovill . 


12 





not out . 


6 


12 


c Lee, b Bovill . 





14 


byes 8 . . . 


8 


[88 


Total 


. 147 



At Hams Hall, on the 6th Aug., nine of the F. F. made 
59, and got out Edgbaston for 257. 

On the 8th and 9th, in very rainy weather, they drew 
with Staffordshire Gentlemen at Lichfield ; the County 
making 162 — H. Bagot 30, C. H. Gardner 2i^ — ¥. F. 203 
(Bovill 94 not out — he scored 8 not out in second innings) 
and 65 for 4 wickets. And on the loth and nth Welles- 
bourne came over to play them at Sutton Coldfield, but 
as it rained both days from dawn to eve, not a single ball 
was bowled ! 

Rain again ruined the match at Middleton Towers 
against Mr Jervis's eleven on the same day, though one 



A CURIOUS UMPIRE. 241 

innings each was finished. The home side scored 120, 
and F. F. 148 — J. Marsham 30, the highest single score. 
Tillard secured 6 wickets, R. Lyttelton 4. 

At Melton Constable, Aug. 15 and i6(?), Free Foresters 
lost to Lord Hastings' eleven, making 64 and 170, to 198 
and 41 for no wickets — C. Tillard o and 65, R. H. Lyttel- 
ton 4 and 37. An amusing incident happened during the 
Melton Constable innings. Dale was fielding at long-leg. 
Thornton hit the ball straight to him. Dale never thought 
the batsman would try to get a second run, but Thornton 
did not like the idea of giving up the bowling, so started 
on the return journey. This roused Dale, who dashed 
at the ball with all his old Cambridge energy and sent 
it in like lightning, and ran Thornton out by about two 
yards. He, not liking to die without a struggle, said, 
** How's that, umpire ? " — the umpires were two local 
brethren. " Not out," said that worthy. The field were all 
not a little astonished, and Dale furious after his fine piece 
of fielding. The brother umpire, who saw the whole affair, 
went to talk to his brother after the fall of the next wicket, 
when he confided to him that he had often heard of the 
^* great hitter," but had never seen him before, and there- 
fore wanted to see what he could do. 

At Deddington, on the 15th and i6th, F. F. scored 214 
— G. H. Longman 65, H. W. Hoare 40, A. O. Burton 25. 
Deddington scored 87 and 177 for 5 wickets — H. Tubb 
I and (not out) 100, Clary Smith 26 and 20. 

The Aldershot Division on the 24th were to have met 
F. F., but there is no record of their having done so. 



242 



CHAPTER XXX. 

1882. 

The season commenced with a capital match at Esher on 
May 27, the last wicket of F. F. — G. H. Goldney — when 
only 6 runs were required to win, being finely caught by 
W. Bovill, fielding as a substitute for Esher. Scores — 
F. F. 164, Esher 169. 

On the 29th and 30th of the same month, F. F. at 
Woolwich scored 159 and 225 against the R.A., who 
made 123 and 153. This was a most extraordinary 
match. R.A. went in the second time for 262 to win, 
and lost 9 wickets for 33 runs; then Purvis (31) and 
Dorehill (85) got together and played out time. The 
chief display of batting for F. F. was made by F. E. 
Speed 15 and ill (not out), E. F. S. Tylecote 40 and 45, 
S. J. Wilson 24 and 38, C. Booth 30 and 7, W. D. Bovill 
23 and I. C. R. Wood took 8 Artillery wickets, G. H. 
Goldney 7. 

On June 2, v. the Moors, Crookham., who made 73 and 
92 for 5 wickets, F. F. completed an innings of 82 — A. H. 
Trevor 20. Goldney and Bray each annexed 5 wickets. 

Wet spoiled the match v. Elstree Masters on June 9, 
F. F. completing an innings of 106, Stokes making 20. 
Elstree had 9 runs for no wicket. 

The next day, at Sandhurst, F. F. scored 136, Ravenhill 
contributing '^6 (not out), and then the MiHtary Collegians, 



DEFICIENCIES. 243 

for 9 wickets, put up 166, of which 96 were added by the 
ninth batsman. C. R. Wood took 6 wickets. 

On June 10, at Woking, Sandholme, another F. F. eleven 
scored 290 against Mr Leese's team, who got 112. The 
best scores for F. F. were made by C. M. Tuke Z6 (not 
out), F. C. Coxhead 85, J. S. Udal 58. C. M. Tuke and 
T. W. Lang each took 4 wickets. 

Of a match on the i6th, v. R.E. at Chatham, no score 
has been preserved. 

On June 17, at Rugby, against the School, F. F. scored 
150 and 310 (twelve a-side) — G. F. Vernon 10 and 116, 
Beresford Baker, 55 and 7, H. W. Gardner, 16 and 46, 
C. E. Cobb 13 and 50, Clarence Smith 3 and 38, A. J. 
W^ebbe 25 and o, F. L. Evelyn 4 and 21. Buchanan took 
II wickets of the School, who made 80, and 109 for 10 
wickets, drawing the match. 

On the same day, at Eton, the Royal School made 225, 
Free Foresters 95— E. Lyttelton 53, Capt. Macan 20. E. 
Bray took 5 wickets. 

On the 23d and 24th, v. The School of Gunnery at 
Shoebury, a match was drawn, F. F. making 340 — M. 
Lucas 107, F. E. Street 59, G. H. Goldney 52, T. Carrick 40, 
&c. — to 316 from the Gunners, for whom Lieut. Hewson 
made 139. S. G. R.A. had 2 wickets to fall; only one 
F. F. was bowled, and only one S. of G. was caught. 

July I, at Hounslow, v. nth Hussars. No score ob- 
tainable. 

Long innings and a wet day brought the match at 
Clifton to a draw on July 3 and 4. One innings on each 
side was completed — F. F. 221, and the College 210. 

On the 5th, V. Capt. Bridge's eleven (Knole Park) at 
Blaise Castle, F. F. won easily in an innings by 24 runs, 
F. F. making 95 — R. C. Ramsay 47 — and then getting 
out the home eleven for 45 and 26. Ramsay 10 wickets, 
Peake 4, and Gilliatt 2. 



244 LIVERPOOL. 

On the 8th, at Henley, F. F. scored 86— S. G. Lyttelton 
23, W. D. Bovill 18 ; Henley 107. 

On the 8th July, at Vincent Square, F. F. lost to St 
Peter's College, F. F. making 100, R. S. W. 131 and 48 
for 4 wickets in second innings. P. Toynbee 40, and C. 
Y. Bedford 23, scored best for F. F. H. F. Chance took 
8 wickets. 

Of a match on July 17, v. Winchester Garrison, no score 
seems to have been preserved. 

On July 19, at Longwood, v. Lord Northesk's eleven, 
F. F. lost by 7 wickets, scoring 138 and 138 — A. H. 
Trevor 50 and 11, J. Eyre i and 65 — against 212 in the 
first innings of Longwood, of which A. H. Wood made 6Z 
and E. F. S. Tylecote i run less. 

On July 24, and the two next days, an interesting 
match was played with Liverpool, who went in first, and 
from the bowling of Appleby and Stewart Garnett made 
135 — Lyster 59, their best single score. Then F. F. replied 
with 162— Major Miles 57, A. Appleby 39, and C. W. 
Bulpett 25, doing best. The second innings of Liverpool 
produced 139, Appleby again taking 5 wickets; and as 
F. F. lost 8 wickets for ^9 runs, the match was drawn, 
presumably in favour of the city. 

On July 28 and 29, at St David's, Reigate, F. F. drew 
a match with W. H. Churchill's eleven. F. F. achieved 
126 and 88. Reigate, who were 16 runs behind on the 
first innings, just missed the balance for 5 wickets (no 
and 102). The Forester leaders were W. D. Bovill 58 
and 12, R. M. Turnbull 43 and 11, F. C. Coxhead o and 
39. Bray (5), Byass (4), Turnbull (3), took the wickets. 

On Aug. 7 and 8 F. F. beat Colchester Garrison by 5 
wickets. The soldiers' total was 57 and 204, F. F. 140 
and 122 — A. H. Trevor 41 and 6^ not out, F. H. Mellor 
25 and 35, W. D. Bovill 32 and 7. G. H. Goldney 
accounted for 10 wickets. 



RUNS GALORE. 



245 



At Melton Constable, on the 9th and loth Aug., F. F. 
scored 84 and 105 — A. H. Trevor 25 and 33, R. A. H. 
Mitchell 10 and 28, G. H. Longman 19 and 18 — while 
Lord Hastings' side, having made 132, got the necessary 
runs for 2 wickets. C. B. L. Tylecote disposed of 6 bats- 
men, C. Tillard 3, E. Rutter 2. 

On the nth F. F. met the Gentlemen of Norfolk, and 
a great batting display ensued. 

FREE FORESTERS. 



SCORE. 

V7. D. Bovill, c Wickham, b 

Rye 18 

H. G. S. Hughes, b Rye . . 58 

A. H. Trevor, c and b Tillard . 104 

G. H. Longman, run out . . 41 
R. A. H. Mitchell, c Kennaway, 

b Raikes 102 

C. W. Boyle, b Rye . . .33 



SCORE. 



C. B. L. Tylecote, c Gurney, b 

Raikes 
S. J. Wilson, b Rye . 
Major Gamett, b Rye . 
L. P. Marshall, not out 
E. N. Fellows, b Tillard 

Extras 

Total 



6 
o 
o 
6 

73 
25 

466 



NORFOLK. 



H. Birbeck, b Boyle . 
Sir K. Kemp, run out . 
Hon. J. W. Mansfield, b Boyle 
Capt. F. A. Currie, b Boyle . 
W. S. Gurney, b Boyle 
C. Tillard, b Bovill . 
Rev. C. L. Kennaway, c Tylecote, 
b Bovill .... 



147 



W. A. Thurgar, c Tylecote, b 

Mitchell 29 

Rev. A. P. Wickham, c Mitchell, 

b Bovill 77 

E. B. Raikes, 1 b w, b Bovill . o 

Rye, not ou .... 2 

Extras 38 



Total 



398 



At Middleton Towers, on the 14th, the home side scored 
146 — Capt. Currie 54 — to which Foresters replied with 
192 — R. A. H. Mitchell 81. The Towers, however, in 
their second innings made 299 — H. R. Webb 69 — and 
Foresters had only time to lose 2 wickets for 69 runs. 
Appleby took 6 wickets, Tillard 5, Bovill 6} 

On the 2 1st and 22d Deddington made 261, while the 
F. F. made twin innings of 119 each — F. M. Buckland 



^ See post for full score. 



246 



DOUBLE FIGURES. 



39 and 38, W. D. Bovill 24 and 5. Deddington had seven 
double-figure scores — Collins, Maul, and Evetts all over 40. 

And Banbury beat F. F. by 5 wickets. F. F. 104 and 
106 — J. G. Crowdy 37 and o, W. D. Bovill 25 and 5 ; 
Banbury 113 and 99 — W. E. Collins 7 and 44 (not out), 
F. C. Cobden, who was missed more than once, 3 and 27 
(not out). 

On the 29th F. F. scored 107 and 58 for 3 wickets, to 
y6 from Shepperton. C. C. Clarke made 40 runs and C. 
R. Wood took 7 wickets for F. F. 

At Aldershot, on the 30th and 31st Aug., the mihtary 
made 128, and F. F. 195 for 8 wickets. A. J. Webbe 
claimed 102 (not out), W. D. Bovill 23. The latter with 
Goldney shared 6 wickets of Aldershot. Rain stopped 
the game. 




W. H. Jenkins. G. W. Ricketts. T. T. Peyton. F. E. Speed. H. C. Maul. 

W. Toynbee. W. D. Bovill. W. E. W. Collins. G. Willes. D. Prothero. 

J. G. Walker. P. Toynbee. H. Tubb. R. Skipwith. 



247 



CHAPTER XXXI. 

1883. 

With this year the task of the compiler comes to an end, 
and a more facile and familiar pen will chronicle the re- 
maining years in up-to-date fashion. Thanks are tendered, 
as honestly due, to the many Foresters who have kindly 
contributed items q( information, and helped to make the 
narrative as perfect as the capacity of the writer would 
admit of. 

The season began with a match at Woolwich v. R.A. 
on the 14th and 15th May, which was lost, R.A. making 
113 and 155 to 54 and 123 from F. F. E. M. Bannerman 
26 and 12, F. H. Mellor 2 and 39, W. F. Capron o and 48, 
batted well for F. F., and C. R. Wood took 8 wickets, R. 
M. Turnbull 7. 

The match at Esher on May 26 was spoiled by rain. 

On June 6 F. F. lost to Elstree Masters, who got 138 to 
F. F. 117, though as Cattley and Kenrick were (not out) 
47 and 45 respectively in their second innings, the pros- 
pect had brightened considerably. E. F. S. Tylecote also 
claimed 23 runs and J. Robertson 5 wickets. 

On June 9, at Crookham, the Moors scored 90 to 
F. F. 123. Maul 31, Turnbull 25, Oswald 21, Brougham 
22, were the F. F. champions. Lang took 5 wickets, 
Goldney 4. 

At Eton, on the i6th June, the home side made 143 to 



248 DRA WS. 

F. F. 159. E. Lyttelton 57, J. W. Dale 56, were best with 
the bat for Foresters, and Goldney took 8 wickets for 84 
runs ; Richards for Eton took 7 for 40. 

The match at Oatlands Park, June 20 and 21, was 
drawn, F. F. scoring 125 and 296, the Park 168. The 
prominent figures were J. Spens 14 and 129, J. Kenrick 
33 and 81, J. H. Bridges 14 and 25, J. Eyre 2 and 22, G. 
Law 20 and 17. Goldney took 4 and Kenrick 3 wickets. 

The match at Shoeburyness, on June 23 and 24, against 
the School of Gunnery was also drawn, F. F. scoring 148 
and 227, the Gunners 89 and jy for 4 wickets. F. E. 
Street made 33 and 107, F. W. Capron 32 and 2, S. J. 
Wilson 8 and 35, T. Wise 12 and 23, F. E. Allsopp 13 
and 19 ; the last named claimed 8 wickets, E. Rutter 4. 

At Henley, on July 7, the natives scored 92 (and 71 for 
no wicket) against Foresters' 139, of which H. G. S. Hughes 
made 17, H. P. Marriott 28, and W. D. Bovill 27. The 
last-named also took 4 wickets and Goldney as many. 

At Rugby, on the 9th and loth, after getting the School 
out for 58 runs, F. F. made 172, and though the boys 
improved in the second essay, scoring 154, it only cost 
Foresters 3 wickets to win the match. A. J. Webbe 41 
and 19 (not out) was their premier batsman. Robertson 
and Buchanan took 12 and 4 wickets respectively. 

Against Westminster, at Vincent Square, on the 12th 
July, F. F. scored another win, 212 and Zy, to the School's 
156. P. R. Toynbee made 133 and 20, G. Macan 18 and 
21, W. R. Peyton 12 and 25. W. C. R. Bedford and C. 
Armstrong each took 4 wickets. 

The match at Longwood v. Lord Northesk's eleven, on 
July II and 12, was drawn. F. F. 120 — G. H. Goldney 
(not out) 46; Longwood 132 — A. F. Jeffreys 30, F. E. 
Lacey 36. 

The Liverpool Club, on July 16, 17, 18, defeated F. F. 
after a good fight. 



THE COUNTY-PALATINE. 



249 





LIVERPOOL. 






1ST INNINGS. 


SCORE. 


2D INNINGS. SCORE. 


G. Dunlop, b Goldney 




20 


c Goldney, b Henery 


7 


H, Eccles, b Appleby 




7 


b Garnett 


4 


G. Bird, c Tapling, b Henery 




. 48 


c Goldney, b Garnett 


2 


H. B. Steel, b Goldney . 




3 


c and b Appleby 


5 


E. H. Porter, b Appleby . 




5 


b Henery . 


27 


E. C. Hornby, b Appleby . 




8 


c Seymour, b Henery 


14 


H. B. Parr, b Appleby 







c Goldney, b Garnett 


. 59 


E. E. Steel, not out . 


. 


28 


1 b \v, b Goldney 


. 27 


G. F. Hornby, b Henery . 







not out 


2 


F. Williamson, c Henery, b Appleby 


IS 


b Appleby 


20 


0. H. Jones, run out . 


. 





c Seymour, b Appleby 


7 


Extras .... 


. 


5 


Extras . 


2 




Total 


139 


Total 


176 



FREE FORESTERS. 



C. R. Seymour, b E. E. Steel . 

R. Garnett, c and b E. C. Hornby . 

A. H. Heath, c E. C. Hornby, b E. E. Steel 

P. J. Henery, st H. B., b E. E. Steel 

Capt. Miles, c G. F. Hornby, b E. Hornby 

W. H. Heale, c Dunlop, b Hornby . 

G. H. Goldney, b'£. E. Steel . 

T. K. Tapling, b E. Hornby 

S. Garnett, c H. B. Steel, b E. Hornby . 

H. Verelst, b E. Hornby .... 

A. Appleby, not out 

Extras 



33 


c H. B. Steel, b E. Hornby 31 





Jones, b Hornby . 


• 13 


II 


c G. Hornby, b E. Steel, 


7 





c and b G. Hornby . 


43 


27 


b Hornby 


17 


24 


b Hornby 


4 





c H. Steel, b E. Hornby 


3 


3 


c and b E. Steel 


I 


3 


c H. B., b E. E. Steel 


2 





not out . 


3 


5 


c G. Hornby, b E. Steel 


I 


8 


Extras . 


6 



Total 



114 



Total 



131 



At Manchester, Western, on the 20th and 2ist, the 
match was drawn. After F. R, who went in first, had 
lost 4 wickets for 226 — C. R. Seymour 113, J. E. K. 
Studd 40, G. Bird (not out) 56 — rain prevented further 
play. 

On July 23 and 24 F. F. lost at Abbots Langley, the 
home team claiming 138 and 153 to F. F. 79 and 129. 
F. E. Allsopp made two innings of 18 and 21, Capt. Renny 
Tailyour 4 and 36. The latter, with Rutter, Baker, and 
Allsopp, dismissed four batsmen apiece. 

On July 25 and 26 F. F. lost to East Gloucestershire at 



250 



OXFORDSHIRE. 



Cheltenham. The Club made the paltry total of 29 runs, 
and though they mended their second essay to 173 — C. 
Smith 13 and 105, J. S. Russell 9 and 19 — yet the county 
gentlemen, who had got 112, just managed to secure the 
needful 91 with i wicket to fall. 

On Aug. 3 and 4, at Reigate, F. F. lost to Mr Churchill's 
team. 

On Aug. 7 and 8, at Hitchin, the Gentlemen of Herts 
just saved themselves from a defeat in one innings, getting 
143 and 47 for 7 wickets to 253 from F. F., H. G. S. 
Hughes making yj and F. W. Maude 33 of them, G. H. 
Goldney 27 and G. Macan 21. Beresford Baker took 10 
wickets. 

At Middleton Towers, on Aug. 15, 16, the match was 
drawn in favour of the Towers, who scored 358 — Capt. 
Frederick "jy, A. F. Kemp 58, A. B. Giles 56, &c.— to 164 
from F. F., who had made 132 for 5 wickets in the follow 
— H. G. S. Hughes 17 and 59 (not out), E. H. Buckland 
16 and 15. 

On the two following days Norfolk County won a most 
exciting match by i wicket. Buckland played splendidly 
for 104, and Maude bowled 7 wickets for 44. 

FREE FORESTERS. 



1ST INNINGS. SCORE. 


2D INNINGS. SCORE. 


H. G. S. Hughes, c Davies, b Wilson 


o 


c and b Rye 


6 


E. H. Buckland, c and b Rye . 


104 


run out . 





W. D. Bovill, b Wilson . 





c sub., b Rye . 


16 


F. W. Maude, c and b Rye. 


17 


b Wilson . 


12 


C. Gurdon, 1 b w, b Rye . 


50 


b Wilson . 





J. S. Udal, 1 b w, b Rye . 


I 


not out . 


13 


S. J. Wilson, c Hare, b Wilson 


10 


c and b Rye 


3 


G. H. Goldney, st Wickham, b Rye 


4 


c Rye, b Wilson 


7 


H. M. Marshall, b Wilson 


I 


b Wilson . 


6 


A. Appleby, not out . 


4 


1 b w, b Rye . 


5 


P. Bennet, b Wilson .... 


2 


b Wilson . 


4 


Extras 


7 


Extras . 


3 



Total 



Total 



75 




^•1 



Oh 



NORFOLK. 251 



NORFOLK. 

1ST INNINGS. SCORE. 2D INNINGS. SCORE. 



J. H. M. Hare, b Appleby . . . i run out . 

Rev. A. C. Davies, c Gurdon, b Maude . 7 c Gurdon, b Maude 

Sir K. Kemp, not out . . . . 35 1 b w, b Maude 

C. P. Wilson, b Maude . . . . o c Maude, b Appleby 

Rev. G. L. Kennaway, b Maude . . 21 b Maude . 

Rev. A. G. Blyth, b Maude ...5c and b Appleby 

G. P. El was, c Appleby, b Maude . . o c Buckland, b Goldney 

Rev. A. P. Wickham, c Wilson, b Buckland 23 b Goldney 

Morris, b Maude 17 b Buckland 

C. Scott-Chad, b Maude . . . . i not out 

Rye, b Appleby o not out ^^ 

Extras 21 Extras . 

Total . 131 Total 



2 

13 

10 

o 

o 

4 
28 

15 
39 
19 
2 
16 

148 



F. F. also lost two matches in Oxfordshire, one on Aug. 
20 and 21 at Lord Jersey's, Middleton Hall, Bicester, 
where the home side made 258 — J. G. Walker 65, F. W. 
Maude 57, H. Tubb 33 — to the Foresters' 73 ; and though 
the latter then made 202 — W. D. Bovill 5 and 41, A. H. 
Trevor 5 and 43, G. Willes 8 and 31, T. T. Peyton 21 and 
24, T. Wise 4 and 25 — Lord Jersey's eleven wiped off the 
runs without losing a wicket ; H. Tubb 15. 

At Deddington, on the 23d and 24th, F. F. fared but 
little better, as they only made 103 and 149 — A. H. Trevor 
58, T. T. Peyton 6 and 40. Deddington made 189 and 6^ 
for 4 wickets — H. C. Maul 36 and 3 (not out), and J. G. 
Walker 6 and 25 (not out).^ 

At Shepperton, Aug. 28, F. F. won, getting out their 
opponents for 79 — E. Money Wigram 35 — and themselves 
scoring 285 — F. Capron loi and F. Maude 60; the latter 
took 4 wickets, W. Bovill 3 ; Rutter took 5 F. F. wickets. 

And at Aldershot they concluded the season with a 
draw, 117 and 226 to 212 and Z'^ for 4 wickets. Their 
best contributors were C. R. Seymour 20 and 61, W. D. 
Bovill 1 1 and 60, F. W. Capron i and 44, A. H. Trevor 
24 and o. 

^ Full scores of these matches will be found further on. 



252 



CHAPTER XXXII. 

R.E. MATCHES. 

By W. E. W. Collins. 

In this attempt to carry out the work entrusted to me by 
my superior officers, the Rev. W. Bedford, the father, and 
Edward Rutter, whom I may call the pedagogue, of the 
Free Forester Club, I am fully conscious of the delicate 
nature of my task — the task, that is, of at once writing 
of and writing to living contemporaries. In a record of 
this sort it is almost impossible to avoid personalities. If 
any cricket friend or cricket foe is inclined to feel aggrieved 
by any word of mine, I would ask him to remember that 

" Many a shaft, at random sent, 
Finds mark the archer little meant ! " 

and to acquit me of any intention to offend. How far my 
memory of incidents and my opinions on the game may 
differ from those of others is perhaps a matter of little 
moment. If any other Forester would have undertaken 
these chapters in my stead, he would have earned my 
eternal gratitude. Let me, then, without further apology, 
try in some degree to merit his approval. 

In the first place, then, I do not think that I need 
apologise to Edward Rutter for the sobriquet I have 
bestowed on him. To him it has been a labour of love 
to guide almost from its earliest infancy the tottering 



CHATHAM, 253 

footsteps of this now middle-aged Club, to steer it clear 
of all the pitfalls and stumbling-blocks which must occa- 
sionally imperil the existence of the strictly amateur C.C. ; 
to keep it from taking false steps, to open out for it roads 
to new and happy hunting-grounds, and finally to win 
from every member with whom he has come into con- 
tact that sort of affectionate regard and respect which 
we may fancy a Roman boy felt towards his pedagogue, 
the companion of his daily walk, which we ourselves as 
boys have felt towards some cherished and valued family 
friend. How much of their successes in after-life Masters 
Caesar, Cato, or Scipio owed to the words of wisdom which 
fell from the lips of their childhood's instructor history does 
not record ; the Free Forester Club both knows and appre- 
ciates the debt it owes to Edward Rutter. 

And now it is difficult to know whence to start my nar- 
rative. But as at Chatham I played my first match for 
the Free Foresters, and whereas I have played more 
matches in my life against the R.E. than against any 
other one club, I will take Chatham as my starting-point. 
That our matches there have been most pleasant no one 
who has ever played against the Engineers on the Chatham 
lines can doubt. On that somewhat bleak and dreary- 
looking ground the wickets are excellent, the cricket keen, 
the crowd orderly and apparently impartial, the company 
undeniably good ; and if the wind sometimes blows cold 
there in the latter days of August, the welcome at all times 
is warm enough to satisfy the most hypercritical. Than 
those twin-sister corps, the R.E. and the R.A., the Free 
Forester Club has no dearer foes. But apart from the 
pleasantness of our visits to Chatham, we have had in these 
latter years, with but few exceptions, a series of most even 
and excellently contested matches. Once in 1885 the 
F. F. won somewhat easily, and again in 1889 and 1890 
Albert Thornton in a high wind, which fortunately does not 
materially affect his action, played havoc with the R.E. 



254 R'E. MATCHES. 

wickets. The matches have generally been drawn, and 
on those occasions I may say that we have always been, 
on paper, the stronger side, have usually got distinctly the 
worst of the match in the first innings, sometimes to the 
extent of having to follow on, and yet at the finish made 
our opponents bustle to save rather than to win the game. 
It is hard to account for those apparent inconsistencies. 
But be it remembered in the first place that the Chatham 
match has generally followed a stay at Linton Park, where 
it might be as truly said as of Brussels that — 

" There was a sound of revelry by night, . . . 

and bright 

The lamps shone o'er fair women and brave men : 
A thousand hearts beat happily ; and when 
Music arose with its voluptuous swell, 
Soft eyes looked love to eyes which spake again. 
And all went merry as a marriage-bell." 

Now we all love the Linton week dearly, and I shall 
have much to say in its praise later on ; but I fancy that 
Mr Cornwallis will agree with me that this sort of thing is 
extremely pleasant at the time, but not exactly calculated 
to improve the eye on the following day. More than 
once, too, when we have been in the field, it has seemed 
to me that the thoughts of the younger Forester have 
unconsciously wandered back to the bright faces he has 
left behind him in the Weald of Kent instead of being 
wholly concentrated on the game, and that the ball of the 
previous night has still possessed a greater fascination than 
that more prosaic article which I would fain have had him 
in the present pursue. 

And in the second place, a certain doughty R.E. colonel, 
who has worked destruction in the first innings of more 
than one of our recent matches at Chatham, has laboured 
so hard on the one day that on the second a natural 
attack of stiffness has reminded him that the old complaint, 
Anno Domini, must occasionally affect the powers of a 



TIVO WICKETS IN ONE BALL. 255 

man who was the greatest bowler in the British Army. 
To be bowled at or even bowled out by Jim Fellowes will, 
we hope, again be an occasional feature in our matches at 
Chatham. 

At Chatham, as must be the case at any place where 
a series of matches has been played, there have been some 
curious incidents. It does not often fall to the lot of any 
bowler to capture more than one wicket with a single ball, 
but in 1886, the only occasion on which I personally 
remember I. D. Walker playing in a F. F. match, he un- 
doubtedly did bowl a ball which was fatal to the batsman 
at either end. The R.E. wickets had been falling rather 
rapidly in the second innings, but Stafford, perhaps the 
soundest if not the most brilliant batsman on the side, and 
a very strong side it was then, was playing a patient and 
steady game, and had apparently got the measure of all our 
bowling. Unfortunately for him, his partner walked out 
to the last ball of an over of I. D.'s lobs, and drove it back 
so hard and straight that Stafford, who had backed up a 
yard or so, could not get out of the way. The ball struck 
him hard on the upper arm, and then dropped gently into 
mid-off's hands ; all the power was taken out of Stafford's 
arm, and he was easily caught off the first ball of the over 
from the other end. 

On another occasion, Timothy O'Brien having elected 
to take 137 in his own style, and Sellars, the most patient 
of batsmen, having blocked the other end for over two 
hours to the tune of some fourteen runs, time alone seemed 
necessary to ensure a victory. A council of war was held,, 
and we determined — it was before the days of the closure 
— to finish off our innings as quickly as possible. Two 
men not unnaturally objected to the prospect of fielding out 
twice without any compensation in the way of an innings, 
and were accordingly sent in next and allowed to do their 
best. As evil fate — their evil fate — would have it, they 
both got out unintentionally with quite as much rapiditj^ 



256 R.E. MATCHES. 

as could be desired by the rest of us. Then I went in, 
meaning to have a hit if possible, and get out — the 
latter in my case never a difficult feat to accomplish. 
Hedley was bowling and I ran out to the first ball, which 
happened to be a fast and straight long-hop, and I hit it 
almost perfectly straight up into the air. Harder hits I 
may have seen, a higher never. It went to mid-on where 
Von Donop was standing, and seldom was a fieldsman 
more completely flabbergasted. There was a high wind, 
and at the moment a bright sun was shining — quite a 
pleasant change to most of us, as it was one of the wettest 
and coldest of days. But I doubt whether Von Donop 
much appreciated the change, as the ball, after having paid 
its respects to the sun, began to fall in the most provok- 
ingly leisurely manner in the wind. The fieldsman tried 
to watch the ball : we all watched him. His face was well 
worth studying, the expression varying between concen- 
trated agony and hopeless bewilderment. For a moment 
he was stationary ; then he tried to follow the tortuous 
course of the ball, turning round and round much after the 
fashion of a puppy chasing its own tail ; and finally he sat 
down on a very muddy patch, exactly as the ball fell some 
ten yards away from him. He looked so ludicrously 
unhappy that the whole field, including Renny-Tailyour, 
generally the strictest of disciplinarians, simply collapsed 
with laughter. 

I will not mention the name of a Free Forester who 
played in one of our matches at Chatham, in his case by 
the way a qualifying match, but I will briefly give what 
might have been his diary of a two days' holiday. 

Friday, Aug. 29. — 

1. Bowled first ball by Pllcher. 

2. Missed the first ball which came to me In the field — a 
high catch — and split my finger, which ached consumedly the 
whole evening. 



CHATHAM. 257 

Saturday^ Aug. 30. — 

1. Finger still aching : every ball which I attempted to field 
seemed to come to that one finger, with the result that I mis- 
fielded everything. 

2. Bowled again first ball. 

3. Ground slippery: finger sore: spikes worn out — general 
result was that I invariably fumbled the ball, and ft-equently sat 
down in a most painful and involuntary manner; crowd good- 
naturedly roared with laughter or cheered vociferously. 

4. Fielded a hard drive so brilliantly and so unexpectedly 
that both batsmen were at the same wicket : to that wicket I 
threw very hard and very wide — result a 4 over-throw. " Thocht 
I heard swearin'." 

5. My very nice dressing-bag elected to roll off the top of the 
cab, and everything fell out into the mud at Chatham Station. 

6. Got to London by the L.C.D. just in time to miss my 
train at G.W.R. Had to wait till midnight and then walk home 
on a dark and wet night. 

And but for his innate modesty the victim might have 
added that — he kept his temper. Penitent, nervous, dis- 
gusted with himself, inclined to put up his cricket effects 
for auction — all of these he may have been, but he was 
so absolutely amiable under most depressing circumstances 
that he was unanimously elected a Free Forester in the 
following spring, and has on several occasions done yeo- 
man service to the Club. 

But the enjoyment of a match at Chatham is by no 
means limited to the cricket-ground. The sappers are 
as cheery hosts in the mess-room as they are formidable 
opponents on the lines. And it was in the mess-room 
some years ago that I witnessed a most ludicrous incident. 
We had had a gay evening. After a lively game of Rugby 
football in the ante-room, Walter Bovill on the one side, 
and Jim Fellowes, who played the part of M.C., on the 
other, had vied with each other in feats of derring-do : 
Jack Dale had fallen a most egregious cropper in a 
mounted tournament, and the gymnastics were only ter- 
minated at a late hour, when the gallant Colonel posi- 

R 



258 R.E, MATCHES. 

tively declined to follow Bovill in walking round the room 
on his hands. 

" No, no ! " he remarked, " I won't try that ; let's go 
and have some broiled bones," and we adjourned to the 
mess-room. 

It was then that Joe Hornsby conceived the charit- 
able idea of attempting to arrest an incipient inclination 
to baldness on the part of John Ricketts. The pair 
were sitting opposite to each other at the supper-table, 
and John, leaning over the table to reach some con- 
diment, speedily paid the penalty for the breach of 
etiquette. He was in those days the proud possessor 
of a mighty forelock, which has long since joined the 
majority. It may have been that to Joseph's classical 
mind recurred the old proverb, — 

" Prendite praecipitem — post est occasio calva." 

At any rate, he gently, but firmly, grasped the forelock, 
and then discovered that John was very much in the same 
plight as occasio. For on the back of the head was ex- 
posed to view a round bald patch some three inches in 
diameter. After a brief but searching inspection of the 
place, Joe's eye wandered round the table till he caught 
sight of a pat of butter. This he put with much care in 
the centre of the bald patch, and then proceeded to spread 
it with a knife much after the fashion of a nurse buttering 
a piece of bread for a child. Both parties — operator and 
patient — seemed to recognise the gravity and delicate 
nature of the operation. The extreme care which Hornsby 
took to spread his pat of butter exactly on the bald patch 
was only to be equalled by the patience displayed by 
John. There was no undue hurry on the one part, on the 
other no unseemly struggling. When the operation was 
quite completed, Joe released the forelock and both went 
on with their supper as unconcernedly as if nothing 



POMADE DU BEURRE. 



259 



unusual had occurred. After a few minutes the butter 
commenced to melt and finally to drip, and then, for the 
first time, John became aware of the exact nature of the 
application — up till that moment all he knew, as he subse- 
quently confessed, was that something cool had been put 
on his head, and the sensation had been rather pleasant 
than otherwise. However, he did not seem the least dis- 
concerted when he found what had really happened, but 
merely wiped the butter off and went on eating. It is to 
be regretted that from a medical point of view the opera- 
tion proved signally unsuccessful — possibly oleo-margarine 
might have produced more effect. 

1884. Played, June 13 and 14. 
ROYAL ENGINEERS. 



1ST INNINGS. 

C. V. W. Stratford, b Maude . 
H. Bonham Carter, c sub., b Goldney 
H. U. Dumbleton, b Maude 
W. H. Stafford, c Moon, b Goldney . 
H. E. Rawson, b Goldney 
Capt. C. L. Young, b Goldney . 
Capt. P. G. Von Donop, not out 
J. E. Hamilton, 1 b w, b Goldney 
A. H. Van Straubenzee, c Spens, b Payne 
W^. J. Bythell, b Goldney . 
E. W. Walton, b Payne . 
Extras 

Total 



SCORE. 2D INNINGS. 

20 c Spens, b Payne 

7 b Payne . 

32 c Payne, b Rawlinson 

28 c and b Payne . 

63 b Payne . 

63 b Goldney 

36 1 b w, b Goldney 

22 b Goldney 

1 b Goldney 
o b Payne . 

2 not out 
17 Extras . 

291 Total 



o 
2 

6 

19 

32 

10 

2 

o 



97 



FREE FORESTERS. 



1ST INNINGS. SCORE. 

A. E. Payne, b Young ... 29 

R. M. Turnbull, run out . . 25 

Capt. J. Spens, st Rawson, b Von 
Donop 115 

J. G. .Walker, c Young, b Strau- 
benzee . . . . .22 

S. C. Oswald, c Stafford, b Dum- 
bleton 30 

F. W. Maude, 1 b w, Dumbleton 6 Total . 301 

In the second innings R. M. Turnbull (c Stratford, b Dumbleton) scored 7, 

Capt. Spens (not out) 39, J. G. Walker (not out) 32, C. H. Goldney (b Young) 

12 ; extras i, — total 91. Result, F. F. won by 8 wickets. 



1ST INNINGS. SCORE. 

A. W. Moon, c Hamilton, b 

Young 37 

C. W. Rawlinson, b Dumbleton . o 

H. T. Griffiths, b Von Donop . 2 

T. F. B. Renny Tailyour, b Young 12 

C. H. Goldney, not out . . n 

Extras 12 



26o 



R.E. MATCHES. 



Played, August 28 and 29. 
FREE FORESTERS. 



1ST INNINGS. SCORE. 

C. J. E. Jarvis, b Hedley . . 166 

F. W. Maude, b Young . . 6 
W. D. Bovill, c Renny Tailyour, 

b Young ..... I 

Capt. J. Spens, b Hedley . . 3 
R. H. Fowler, c Hedley, b Strau- 

benzee ..... 14 
Capt. L. Spens, c Hedley, b Strau- 

benzee 57 



1ST INNINGS. SCORE. 

J. H. Hornsby, c Fowke, b Friend 14 

C. L. Hickley, not out ... 25 
E. J. Beaumont, c Renny Tailyour, 

b Friend 3 

Hon. W. North, b Young . . 6 
Capt. J. Frederick, c Renny Tail- 
your, b Young . . . .8 

Extras ..... o 



Total 



312 



There is no score to hand of second innings, but, as stated below, F. F. won by 
10 wickets. 



ROYAL ENGINEERS. 



1ST INNINGS. 



Capt. Stafford, b Beaumont 

Capt. Stratford, b Beaumont 

W. C. Hedley, b Hickley . 

Capt. Young, b Beaumont 

A. H. Van Straubenzee, b Beaumont 

Capt. Renny Tailyour, 1 b w, b Jarvis 



Capt. Friend, c Beaumont, b H 
H N. Dumbleton, b Maude 
J. A. S. Tulloch, b Beaumont 
G. H. Fowke, b Beaumont 
Col. Edwards, not out 
Extras .... 



ckley 



Total 
Result, F. F. won by 10 wickets. 



CORE. 


2D INNINGS. SCORE. 





b Maude . 


II 


2 


b Beaumont 


10 


3 


c Fowler, b Hornsby 


. 28 


. 65 


b Maude . 








b Maude . 





• 31 


c North, b Maude . 


4 


• 13 


c and b Maude 


4 


24 


b Maude . 


52 





not out . 


16 


2 


run out 


3 


. 16 


b Maude . 


10 


II 


Extras . 


10 


. 167 


Total 


148 



1886. Played, August 27 and 28. 
ROYAL ENGINEERS. 



1ST INNINGS. 



SCORE 



Capt. Abbott, b Hornsby . 

G. M. Blair, b Collins . 

Capt. Renny Tailyour, c Hornsby, b Collins 

Major Savage, b Hornsby . 

Capt. Stafford, b Hornsby 

W. C. Hedley, b Ricketts . 

Capt. Young, b Ricketts . 

T. A. H. Bigge, c Bovill, b Collins . 

P. J. J. Radcliffe, c Ricketts, b Hornsby 

Col. Fellowes, c J. D. Walker, b Hornsby 

A. J. Pilcher, not out 

Extras 



Total 



IE, 


2D INNINGS. SCORE. 


7 


c Allason, b Collins . . 16 


6 


b Collins .... 


21 


b Collins .... 7 


II 


cCollins.b J. D.Walker 5 


40 


c J. G. Walker, b Collins 24 


49 


c Allason, b Collins . . 22 





not out .... 5 


8 


not out .... 8 


7 


to bat. 


5 


to bat. 


3 


b Collins .... 


II 


Extras , . . . i 



168 



Total 



88 



R.E. MATCHES, 



261 



FREE FORESTERS. 



1ST INNINGS. SCORE. 

J. D. Walker, b Fellowes .... 3 

J. G. Walker, c Tailyour, b Hedley . . 17 

Hon. F. E. Allsopp, b Fellowes . . 8 

J. W. Dale, c Young, b Fellowes . . 19 

Capt. Allason, not out .... 22 

Major L. T. Spens, b Pilcher ... 7 

J. H. Hornsby, b Pilcher . . . . o 

W. D. Bovill, c Tailyour, b Fellowes . 3 

W. E. W. Collins, b Fellowes ... 2 

G. W. Ricketts, c Young, b Fellowes . 8 

O. M. Slaughter, b Pilcher ... 2 

Extras 6 

Total . 97 

Result, drawn. 



2D INNINGS. 

c Young, b Fellowes 
c Pilcher, b Hedley 
b Hedley . 
c and b Tailyour 
b Radcliffe 
b Fellowes 
b Fellowes 
not out 
b Richer . 
b Pilcher . 
b Pilcher . 
Extras . 

Total 



230 



1887. Played, August 26 and 27. 
ROYAL ENGINEERS. 



1ST INNINGS. SCORE. 


2D INNINGS. 


SCORE. 


W. C. Hedley, b Collins . 


18 


b Webbe . 


• IS 


Capt. Friend, b Collins . 


I 


c Vernon, b Collins 


. 27 


H. W. Dumbleton, b Collins . 





b O'Brien . 


• 32 


Capt. Renny Tailyour, c Vernon, b Rickett 


s 42 


c O'Brien, b Bovill 


. 18 


E. M. Blair, c Vernon, b Collins 


5 


c Walker, b Bovill 





Capt. Stafford, run out . . . 


3 


b Collins . 


3 


Capt. Young, c Walker, b Ricketts . 


3 


not out . 


II 


E. Druitt, b Collins .... 





1 b w, b Bovill . 





Capt. Von Donop, not out 


8 


c Bovill, b Collins 





Capt. Stratford, b Ricketts 


I 


not out 


8 


A. J. Pilcher, b CoUins . 


7 


to bat. 




Extras 


7 


Extras . 


. 15 


Total 


. 95 


Tota 


. 129 



FREE FORESTERS. 



1ST INNINGS. SCORE. 

A. J. Webb, c Pilcher, b Hedley . 6 

T. C. O'Brien, c Hedley, b Druitt 137 

W. D. Sellar, b Pilcher . . 14 

J. G. Walker, c Druitt, b Pilcher 46 
G, W. Ricketts, c Stratford, b 

Pilcher 25 

G. F. Vernon, not out ... 19 
W. E. W. Collins, c Stafford, b Druitt 11 



1ST INNINGS. SC 

Capt. Rice, run out 

W. D. Bovill, b Druitt 

Capt. J. Fredericks, c Tailyour, b 

Pilcher .... 
J. H. Twiss, Stratford, b Pilcher 

Extras 



lotal 



278 



Result, drawn. 



262 



R.E. MATCHES. 



1888. Played, August 31 and September i. 
FREE FORESTERS. 



1ST INNINGS. 



SCORE. 



H.R.H. Prince Christian Victor, b Fellowes 3 
G. W. Ricketts, 1 b w, Fellowes . .18 
P. J. T. Henery, b Fellowes . . .13 

A. T. B. Dunn, not out .... 32 

W. E. W. Collins, b Fellowes . . . o 

J. H. J. Hornsby, b Pilcher ... 3 

P. E. Ricketts, b Fellowes . . . o 

R. T. Atthill, b Fellowes . . . . o 

N. K. Stephen, b Pilcher . . . . i 

C. M. Woodbridge, b Pilcher . . . o 

S. W. Gore, b Pilcher . . . . o 

W. D. Bovill, c Friend, b Fellowes . 8 

Extras 11 



Total 



2D INNINGS. 

c Liddell, b Fellowes 
b Pilcher . 
b Stockley 
c Friend, b Stockley 
c Liddell, b Stockley 
c Dumbleton, b Pilcher 
b Pilcher . 
b Pilcher . 
not out 
b Pilcher . 
c Friend, b Pilcher 
c Pilcher, b Dumbleton 
Extras . 

Total 



SCORE. 

38 

3 

61 

22 

5 

2 

6 

18 

10 

o 

14 

15 

II 

205 



ROYAL ENGINEERS. 



Capt. L. B. Friend, b Collins . 
Lieut. E. Druitt, c Henery, b Collins 
Lieut. J. S. Liddell, b Collins . 
Capt. H. N. Dumbleton, c Henery, b G, 

W. Ricketts .... 
Lieut. C. Ainslie, b Collins 
Capt. C. L. Young, b Collins . 
Corp. Bayfield, b Bovill . 
Lieut. C. J. Burnaby, b Collins 
Lieut. H. R. Stockley, c and b Bovill 
Lieut. H. O. Lathbury, not out 
Lieut. A. J. Pilcher, b Collins . 
Col. Fellowes, c and b Collins . 

Extras 



7 1 b w, b Collins 
38 c G. Ricketts, b Collins 
o b Stephens 



SI 
14 
12 

3 
8 
o 

4 
18 

8 
16 



Total . 179 
Result, drawn. 



not out 

c Henery, b Collins 

b Collins . 

not out 



Extras 



Total (5 wickets) 



II 
62 



1889. Played, August 30 and 31. 
FREE FORESTERS. 



1ST INNINGS. 

Capt. W. D. Jones, run out 

A. J. Thornton, b Burnaby 

G. W. Ricketts, b Pilcher 

J. A. Turner, b Pilcher 

Major J. Spens, b Smyth 

A. M. Inglis, c Tower, b Rice 

W. D. Bovill, Tower, b Burnaby 



o 

72 
14 
13 
29 

3 

55 



1ST INNINGS. 



SCORE. 



Major L. Spens, c Talbot, b Burnaby 29 
W. E. W. Collins, c Guggisberg, 

b Bayfield 20 

S. W. Gore, not out . . . 12 
G. F. Corringe, run out . . 4 

Extras 15 



Total 



266 



R.E. MATCHES. 



263 



ROYAL ENGINEERS. 



1ST INNINGS. 

Corp. Bayfield, not out 

C. G. Burnaby, b Collins . 
Capt. Bowles, 1 b w, Thornton . 
J. S. Liddell, c Turner, b Collins 
Capt. Rice, c L. Spens, b Thornton . 
T. A. Bigge, c Ricketts, b CoUins 
Capt. Tower, b Collins 

Major Hon. M. G. Talbot, b Thornton 
A. J. Pilcher, b Thornton . 

D. C. Smyth, b Thornton . 

F. G. Guggisberg, c Gore, b Collins . 
Extras 



Total 



E. 


2D INNINGS. 


49 


b Collins . 





b Collins . 


6 


b Turner . 


4 


run out . 





c Bovill, b Collins 


14 


c Inglis, b Collins 


14 


b Collins . 


4 


not out 





b Ricketts 


5 


b Collins . 


23 


c Gore, b Turner 


22 


Extras . 



141 



Total 



SCORE. 

4 
4 
9 
2 
o 

50 

10 

o 

16 

6 

I 

15 

117 



Result, F. F. won by i innings and 8 runs. 

1890. Played, August 14 and 15. 
ROYAL ENGINEERS. 



1ST INNINGS. 




SCORE. 


2D INNINGS. SCORE. 


C. G. Burnaby, b Hornsby 


. 







c Ricketts, b Thornton 


44 


Corp. Bayfield, b Thornton 


. 




4 


c Turner, b Hornsby 





Capt. Bowles, b Thornton 


. 







b Thornton 


6 


W. C. Hedley, b Thornton 






2 


c and b Hornsby 


4 


T. A. H. Bigge, b Thornton 






6 


b Thornton 


2 


Capt. Rice, b Thornton 






3 


b Thornton 


4 


F. G. Guggisberg, c Robertson, 


b Hornsby 


4 


c Hornsby, b Thornton 


32 


R. M. Yeates, b Thornton 


. 


. 


2 


b Hornsby 


II 


P. Maud, b Thornton 


. 


. 


3 


c Spens, b Thornton 


9 


A. J. Craven, not out 


. 


. 


II 


run out . 





B. H. Rooke, c and b Thornton 




4 


not out 


2 


Extras .... 


• 




3 


Extras . 


4 




Total 


. 


42 


Total 


118 



FREE FORESTERS. 



1ST INNINGS. SCORE. 

G. W. Ricketts, c Bowles, b Hed- 
ley 100 

J. A. Turner, c and b Bayfield . 10 

J. H. Hornsby, c Craven, b Bigge 36 

J. Robertson, c and b Hedley . 8 

C. F. Vernon, c Maud, b Hedley 36 

Major J. Spens, b Hedley . . o 

A. J. Thornton, b Bayfield . . 18 

F. F. won by i innings and 77 runs 



1ST INNINGS. SCORE. 

K. M 'Alpine, c Burnaby, b Hed- 



ley 

Major L. Spens, b Hedley . 
Major Rice, not out 
W. E. W. Collins, b Bayfield 
Extras .... 



Total 



4 

12 

o 

o 

13 

237 



264 



R.E. MATCHES. 



1891. Played, August 14 and 15. 
ROYAL ENGINEERS. 



1ST INNINGS. 

E. M. Blair, b Thornton . 
G. O. Bigge, b Collins 
C. G. Burnaby, b Collins . 
P. Maud, b Collins .... 
C. W. Gwynn, st Philipson, b Thornton 
T. A. H. Bigge, b Curteis . 
A. H. Cunningham, b Turner . 
H. F. Freeland, b Thornton 
Capt. Rawson, c Hardy, b Collins . 
Corp. Bayfield, c Spens, b Collins 
H. H. Turner, not out . . . 
Extras 

Total 



SCORE. 
2 
102 

5 
6 
o 

16 
18 

34 
18 

I 

5 

17 

224 



2D INNINGS, 
b Collins . 
b Collins . 

c Metcalfe, b Thornton 
not out 

b Collins . 



Thornton, b Collins 



SCORE. 

4 
9 

. 35 
4 



Extras 



Total 



66 



FREE FORESTERS. 



W. E. W. Collins, b Bigge 

Major Hardy, c Cunningham, b Bigge 

H. Philipson, b Bayfield . 

Major J. Spens, run out 

Capt. Curteis, b Bayfield . 

J. A. Turner, c Cunningham, b Bigge 

A. J. Thornton, c Blair, b Freeland . 

T. W. Burbury, st Rawson, b Maud 

E. L. Metcalfe, c Cunningham, b Maud 

R. T. Atthill, c Bayfield, b Maud . 

Major L. Spens, not out . 

Extras 



6 

9 

7 

II 

42 

15 
26 
28 
49 
13 
o 



Total , 218 
Result, drawn. 



c Bigge, b Blair 

b Blair . 

c Bigge, b Maud 

c Gwynn, b Burnaby 

b Blair . 

not out 

not out 
b Bayfield 

b Bayfield 
Extras . 

Total 1 



o 

49 
o 
6 

35 
21 

4 
24 

I 
8 

148 



1892. Played, August 12 a7jd 13. 
FREE FORESTERS. 



1ST INNINGS. 



SCORE. 



Capt. E. G. Wynyard, c Wood- 

roffe, b Freeland ... 40 
G. W. Ricketts, b Guggisberg . 5 
Capt. Curteis, c Gwynn, b Gug- 
gisberg 95 

A. J. Thornton, b Freeland . . 5 

Major J. Spens, not out . . 178 
E. A. J. Maynard, c Bayfield, b 

Maud 25 



1ST INNINGS. SCORE. 

H. W. Brougham, b Blair . . 19 

Major L. Spens, b Guggisberg . 23 

W. E. W. Collins, b Bayfield . 6 

Major Rice, did not bat . . o 
E. Fisher, not out ... 21 

Extras . . . . .20 

Total . 437 



1 Innings declared closed. 



R.E. MATCHES. 



265 



ROYAL ENGINEERS. 



1ST INNINGS. SCORE. 


2D INNINGS. SCORE. 


C. W. Gvvynn, hit wicket, b A. J. Thornton 


I 






Corp. Bayfield, b A. J. Thornton 




3 






M. 0. C. Tandy, c and b Wynyard . 




31 


b Fisher . 





E. M. Blair, b Fisher 




38 


b Collins . 


19 


H. E. Freeland, b Fisher . 




I 


not out . 


10 


A. J. Woodroffe, b Collins 




20 


run out . 


19 


Capt. Abbott, b Thornton . 




17 


not out . 


26 


F. G. Guggisberg, 1 b w, b Thornton 




2 






J. A. S. Tulloch, not out . 




39 


run out . 


39 


P. Maud, b Collins .... 




9 






Capt. Homiblow, b Wynyard . 




4 






Extras 




19 


Extras . 


5 


Total 




184 


Total 


118 


Result, drawn. 







1893. Played, August 18 and 19. 
ROYAL ENGINEERS. 



1ST INNINGS. SCORE. 

Corp. Bayfield, b Homsby . . 5 

Capt. Rice, b Homsby . . 3 

Captain Hamilton, c Bovill, b 

Hornsby 14 

E, M. Blair, b Adair . . .19 

W. Robertson, b Thornton . . 33 

A. J. Woodroffe, b Hornsby . 39 

C. H. Versturme, b Asher . . 12 



1ST INNINGS. SCORE. 

Major Rawson, 1 b w, Homsby 
C. N. North, not out . 
G. C. M. Hall, b Adair 



C. H. Ley, b Adair . 
J. P. Moir, c Thornton, b Hornsby 
Extras 

Total 



I 

II 

7 

4 

12 

13 
173 



In the second innings Captain Hamilton (b Collins) scored i, E. M. Blair (not 
out) 19, A. J. Woodroffe (b Thornton) 17, C. N. North (b Collins) 2 ; extras i,— 
total 40. 

FREE FORESTERS. 



1ST INNINGS. 

Capt. H. R. Adair, b Bayfield . 
Major Rice, b Bayfield 
J. Hornsby, b Bayfield 
Major Curteis, b Bayfield . 
W. D. Bovill, c Rawson, b Woodroffe 
A. G. Asher, c Rawson, b Woodroffe 
A. E. Leatham, b Bayfield 
Major L. Spens, b Bayfield 
A. J. Thomton, b Bayfield 
Capt. Hamilton, b Hamilton 
R. B. Pearson, not out 
W. E. W. Collins, c Ley, b Hamilton 
Extras . • 



SCORE. 

10 

4 
18 

o 

o 
10 

o 

24 

8 
6 



2D INNINGS. 

b Ley 

not out 

c Rice, b Woodroffe 

not out 

b Ley 

c Hamilton, b Ley . 

c Hamilton, b Ley . 

c North, b Bayfield . 

c Rice, b Bayfield . 



8 b Moir 
12 
16 



SCORE. 
O 

3 

• 35 

2 

2 

• 131 

10 

. 16 

2 

. 40 



Extras 



Total . 116 
Result, drawn. 



Total I 



1 Innings declared closed. 




Linton Park. 



CHAPTER XXXIII. 



OTHER MATCHES IN KENT. 



Had Noah once landed from his Ark 

Upon the Mount at Linton Park, 

He might have pitched his cricket tent, 

And played a match, Noah's team v. Kent. 

A perfect pitch, a lovely ground, 

I'm sure the Patriarch would have found : 

A Paradise for an Eleven — 

The very ground is close to heaven." 



/. — Linton Park. 



If at the present moment I cannot recall the closing 
lines of our poet Spencer Gore's effusion, I can at least 
cordially endorse the sentiment they contained, which was 
to the effect that the Free Foresters were better off than 



LINTON PARK. 267 

the Patriarch's team might have been, inasmuch as we 
latter-day cricketers have found Mr and Mrs Cornwallis 
reigning at Linton Park, and making things extremely- 
pleasant for their visitors. Yes, we have had everything 
at Linton that can make the surroundings of a cricket- 
match pleasant ; and, most important fact of all, the cricket 
has been really good and keen : and if it has happened 
that we have on the whole had a little bit the best of our 
matches there, we have had to work hard for those we 
have won, and the drawn games might easily have gone 
either way. When I mention the names of W. H. Patter- 
son, Leslie Wilson, W. Rashleigh, Captain Hamilton, F. 
Marchant, E. C. Streatfeild, A. M. Streatfeild-Moore, S. 
Christopherson, T. Tonge, M. C. Kemp, Major Friend, 
and the Rev. R. T. Thornton, it will be seen that we have 
on various occasions had arrayed against us the pick of 
the Kentish amateurs, with a little bit of Surrey thrown 
in. Most of these celebrities have once and again taken 
runs, though Patterson and Streatfeild-Moore alone have 
exceeded the century ; while on our side John Ricketts 
and Jack Turner have also scored over 100, and other 
large scorers have been A. G. Asher, A. M. Inglis, and those 
m.odern Ajaxes the brothers Spens. We have invariably 
been captained by the elder Spens, to whom is due the 
credit of instituting that most cheery week in Kent ; but 
once — it must have been, I think, when he declined to 
go on bowling — he was temporarily superseded, and the 
affair was managed by a syndicate, of which he was kindly 
allowed to represent the Corporation, a post which he 
filled with becoming gravity. But in addition to the 
cricket talent, we have also had arrayed against us at 
Linton a goodly "Band of Sisters," to say nothing of 
wives, mothers, cousins, and ew^w fiancees of our opponents, 
all keenly anxious for our defeat, the triumph of the op- 
posite faction in general, and the success of favoured 



268 



OTHER MATCHES IN KENT. 



individuals in particular. I have at some time or other 
played cricket in almost every single county in England, 
and in a few Welsh and Scotch counties as well ; but 
nowhere else have I ever seen so — if I may use the word — 
intelligent and so keenly interested an audience of the fair 
sex as that which has year after year watched our match 
at Linton, and with all the strength of feminine pertinacity 
willed our discomfiture. Still, when we have been vic- 
torious, they have graciously condoned our error ; and 
if party spirit has run high in the cricket-field, we have 
buried the hatchet later on in the day, and have spent 
most cheery and sociable evenings. The member for 
Maidstone and his charming wife have indeed deserved 
well of the Free Forester Club ; and their reception of us 
has been so cordial that when the time comes for us to 
strike our colours to the Linton XI, we shall only be too 
ready to avow with De Grantmesnil that we have been 
"vanquished as much by the courtesy as by the address 
of our opponent." 



1888. Played, August 15 and 16. 



BAND OF BROTHERS. 



1ST INNINGS. _ SCORE. 

J. N. Tonge, b Collins 

S. Christopherson, c Inglis, b Robertson 

W. H. Patterson, b Collins 

Rev. R. T. Thornton, b Collins 

Capt. L. B. Friend, b Collins . 

A. M. Streatfeild, b Collins 

F. Marchant, c Thesiger, b Hickley 

E. C. Streatfeild, b Collins 

M. C. Kemp, c Ricketts, b Hadow 

A. W. Cornvvallis, not out 

E. H. Hardcastle, b Collins 

F. S. Cornwallis, c Thesiger, b Collins 
bye 1, leg-byes 2, wides 2 



2D INNINGS. 

1 b w, b Hadow 
b Collins . 
b Thornton 



35 b Robertson 



b Thornton 

c Bovill, b Hadow 

absent, hurt 

b Thornton 

b Hadow . 

b Collins . 

b Thornton 

not out 



38 

21 

46 

o 

50 

107 

o 

14 

2 
12 

O 
12 



byes 12, leg-byes 13, wides 5 30 



Total 



63 



Total 



332 



LINTON PARK. 



269^ 



FREE FORESTERS. 



1ST INNINGS. SCO 

G. W. Ricketts, run out 

A. J. Thornton, b Hardcastle 

E. M. Hadow, c and b Hardcastle 

Hon. F. Thesiger, c Kemp, b 

Thornton 

Major J. Spans, c F. S. Cornwallis, 
b Thornton .... 
G. F. Vernon, c and b Thorn- 
ton 

J. Robertson, b Christopherson . 

In the second innings Ricketts 
total 19. 



25 



1ST INNINGS. SC( 

Major L. Spens, c Thornton, b 

E. C. Streatfeild 
W. D. Bovill, c Friend, b E. C. 

Streatfeild .... 

A. M. Inglis, st Kemp, b Thornton 
W. E. W. Collins, c sub., b 

Thornton 

C. Hickley, not out 

bye I, leg-byes 2 . . . 

Total 



10 
24 

4 
3 
3 

176 



(not out) scored 8, Vernon (not out) 11, 



1889. Played, August 28 and 29. 
FREE FORESTERS. 



1ST INNINGS. 

A. J. Thornton, b E. Streatfeild 
W. D. Bovill, b Pilcher . 
J. A. Turner, b Pilcher 
G. W. Ricketts, run out . 
Major J. Spens, c F. Cornwallis, bE. Streatfeild 12 
A. M. Inglis, c A. W. Cornwallis, b Pilcher 
J. H. J. Hornsby, c Rashleigh, b Pilcher 
W. E. W. Collins, c and b E. Streatfeild 
Major Spens, c Friend, b Pilcher 
S. W. Gore, b E. Streatfeild . 
Capt, Jones, not out .... 
byes 4, leg-byes 5 . 



Total 



.E. 


2D INNINGS. SCORE. 





b E. Streatfeild 








b Pilcher . 


5 


4 


b Pilcher . 


56 


27 


b Pilcher . 


8 


12 


b Richards 


81 


64 


not out 


12 


8 


not out .... 


24 


34 













6 


b Pilcher .... 


7 


9 


byes 9, leg-byes 5 . 


14 



164 



Total 



207 



LINTON PARK. 



Major L. Friend, b Turner 

W. Rashleigh, b Turner . 

J. N. Tonge, c J. Spens, b Collins 

A. M. Streatfeild, retired hurt . 

E. C. Streatfeild, c Bovill, b Collins 

H. F. Kemp, b Collins . 

L. M. Richards, c Collins, b Turner 

A. W. Cornwallis, b Collins 

A. J. Pilcher, c Turner, b Collins 

E. F. Chaplin, not out 

F. S. W. Cornwallis, run out . 
byes 7, leg-byes 6 . 

Total 



3 


c and b Turner 


• 39 


3 


c and b Turner 


19 


II 


b Turner . 


40 


II 


c Jones, b Thornton 








c Bovill, b Turner . 


I 


35 


c Thornton, b Turner 





8 


b Collins . 








c Turner, b Collins . 


15 


II 


c and b Turner 


10 


I 


b Thornton 


I 





not out . 


5 


13 


byes 8, leg-byes 2, no ball 


S5 15 



96 



Total 



145 



270 



OTHER MATCHES IN KENT. 



1891. Played, August 12 and 13. 
FREE FORESTERS. 



1ST INNINGS. SCORE. 

J. A. Turner, c Streatfeild, b 

Friend 106 

A. J. Thornton, b Streatfeild . 13 
Major J. Spens, c Streatfeild, b 

Christopherson ... 29 
H. Philipson, c Streatfeild, b 

Friend 22 

Capt. Curteis, c and b Friend . 4 

Capt. Rawlinson, b Christopherson 37 



1ST INNINGS. SCORE. 

R. T. Atthill, b Hinde . . 8 

Major L. Spens, c Streatfeild, b 

Thornton 14 

E. L. Metcalfe, b Hinde . . 34 
Major Hardy, st Christopherson, 

b Hinde 4 

W. E. W. Collins, not out , .2 



Total 



273 



In the second innings Major J. Spens (not out) scored 29, E. L. Metcalfe (not 
out) 9, — total 38. 

LINTON PARK. 



1ST INNINGS. SCORE. 

Capt. Friend, c and b Turner . . . o 

Capt. Hamilton, st Philipson, b Turner . 53 

Rev. R. T. Thornton, b Turner . . 8 

E. C. Streatfeild, b Collins ... 18 

F. J. Richardson, c and b Turner . . 31 
S. Christopherson, b Turner , . . i 
R. H. Pemberton, b Turner . . . o 
Capt. Hinde, b Turner .... 13 
A. W. Cornwallis, c Philipson, b Thornton 17 
F. S. W. Cornwallis, b Turner ... 7 
L. M. Richards, not out .... 7 

byes 3, leg-byes 2, no ball i . . .6 

Total . 161 



2D INNINGS. 

c Rawlinson, b Curteis 

c and b Curteis 

c Turner, b Thornton 

b Collins . 

b Thornton 

c Curteis, b Thornton 

b Turner . 

c Metcalfe, b Turner 

b Turner . 

not out 

b Turner . 

byes 10, leg-byes 2 

Total 



12 

38 

25 

14 

7 

8 

I 

6 

21 

19 
18 

12 

181 



[892. Played, August 10 atid 11. 
FREE FORESTERS. 



1ST INNINGS. SCORE. 

G. W. Ricketts, st Kemp, b Richards . 147 

Major J. Spens, b Streatfeild ... 29 
■Capt. E. Wynyard, c Pemberton, b Streatfeild 4 

Capt. Curteis, b Streatfeild . . . i 

E. A. J. Maynard, b Streatfeild . . 2 

H. W. Brougham, c sub., b Champion . 9 

A. J. Thornton, not out .... 85 

Major Spens, c Kemp, b Richards . . 20 

W. E. W. Collins, c Wilson, b Richards . 7 

E. Fisher, c Kemp, b M 'Alpine . . 5 

F. G. Stenning, b Streatfeild ... 30 
byes 4, leg-byes 3 7 

Total . 346 



2D INNINGS. 



SCORE. 



c Streatfeild, b Marchant 5 

c Marchant, b Wilson . 7 

c Wilson, b Champion . i 

not out .... 28 

not out .... 12 

c Wilson, b Champion . 18 

c Marchant, b Richards . 28 

leg-byes ... 3 

Total . 102 



MOTE PARK. 



271 



LINTON PARK. 



1ST INNINGS. 



Spens, 



Fisher, b 



G. E. Champion, c 
Wynyard . 

F. Marchant, b Collins 

W. H. Patterson, c 

Collins 

L. Wilson, cStenning, b Wynyard 

E. C. Streatfeild, b Collins . 

D. W. Carr, c Ricketts, b Thorn- 
ton 



SCORE. 

b 



15 

I 

104 
78 
14 



1ST INNINGS. SCORE 

R. H. Pemberton, b Collins . i: 

K. M 'Alpine, c Ricketts, b 

Thornton .... 
M. C. Kemp, b Collins 
F. S. W. Cornwallis, not out 
L. M, Richards, b Ricketts . 

byes 4, leg-byes 3, no balls 3 



Total 



332 



1893. Played, August 16 and 17. 
FREE FORESTERS. 



1ST INNINGS. 

G. W. Ricketts, b Champion 
Capt. Adair, c Streatfeild, b Champion 
A. G. G. Asher, c Rawson, b Streatfeild 
Major Curteis, b Champion 
H. Philipson, b Christopherson 
Major Spens, c Rawson, b Christopherson 
A. J. Thornton, b Christopherson 
A. E. Leatham, run out . 
W. D. Bovill, c and b Friend . 
W. E. W. Collins, c Wilson, b Christopherson 
Capt. Hamilton, not out . 
byes II, leg-byes 5 . 

Total . 188 



SCORE. 


2D INNINGS. SCORE. 


. 16 


c Weigall, b Champion . 


19 


. 16 


b Champion . 


IS 


. 28 


c Richards, b Champion . 


72 





c Weigall, b Christopherson 


21 


• IS 


b Champion . , 


20 


n 7 


b Champion 





• 15 


not out .... 


17 


• 43 


b Christopherson 


5 


. 26 






rson 3 






3 


not out .... 


I 


. 16 


byes 7, no balls 2 . 


9 



Total 



179 



LINTON PARK. 



Major Friend, c H. Hamilton, b Collins . 

E. C. Streatfeild, c Grant Asher, b Bovill . 
G. E. Champion, b Collins 

L. Wilson, b Collins 

G. J. Weigall, c Ricketts, b Bovill . 

F. Marchant, c Leatham, b Colhns . 
S. Christopherson, b Bovill 
Major Rawson, b Thornton 

A. Kent, b Collins 

L. M. Richards, not out .... 
F. S. W, Cornwallis, c H. Hamilton, b CoUins 

leg-byes 

Total , 135 



8 


b Collins . 


5 


34 


c Curteis, b Collins . 


31 





c Ricketts, b Collins 





S 


Hamilton, b Collins 


86 


19 


b Ricketts 


35 


41 


b Ricketts 


5 


6 


c Leatham, b Ricketts 


14 


9 


b Collins . 





4 


c Bovill, b Collins . 


16 


I 


not out 


3 


I 


c Collins, b Adair . 


23 


7 


byes 6, leg-byes 5, no ball 


S2 13 



Total 



231 



272 OTHER MATCHES IN KENT 

II.— Mote Park. 

On the first two days of the Linton week we have played 
at the Mote, where we have had a series of pleasant matches, 
though we have occasionally found the opposition a little bit 
too good for us. If, on the one hand, I am ready to admit 
that the better side has usually won, which is all as it should 
be, there is no doubt that the Forester sides at the Mote 
have not been quite so strong as those we have put into 
the field at Linton, and that the former is a ground which 
requires a little education, as ability to act up-hill and down- 
hill is not always to be expected from men who have been 
accustomed to bat and field on the flat. The batting of 
F. M. Atkins and Walter Wright's bowling have been im- 
portant factors in our adversaries' success, and if Kent 
possesses eleven better all - round cricketers than the 
former, it must have a much stronger side than results 
would lead one to imagine. Whether Walter Wright's 
bowling would be quite as formidable on any ground 
except the Mote is an open question. It is recorded in 
the Forester scores that in 1889 A. M. Inglis and myself 
scored 88 runs off 11 consecutive overs in 20 minutes. 
And I ought to mention that in 1887, when a prodigious 
amount of runs were scored, Walter Wright made well 
over 200 for the Mote, and Lionel Spens played two 
magnificent not-out innings for 115 and Zy, and thereby 
not only covered himself with glory but saved the match. 
In 1 89 1 that- most excellent all-round cricketer, J. A. 
Turner, scored exactly one-half of the runs made by our 
side on a very tricky wicket, and when he was bowled in 
the second innings the telegraph-board registered 79 — 5 — 
6^. A catch at cover-point made by Atthill in the second 
innings of the Mote fairly brought down the house. It 
will be noticed that in this innings ten men on a really 
strong batting side only contributed 15 runs between them. 



MOTE PARK. 



273 



We thought that we had done badly enough when nine of 
us had totalled 24. 



1887. Played, August 8 and g, 
FREE FORESTERS. 



1ST INNINGS. sec 

F. E. Speed, c A. Hearne, b Wright 
L. W. Cattley, c F. M. Atkins, b Wright . 
Major J. Spens, c Hickmott, b Hearne 
Rev. V. Boyle, c F. M, Atkins, b Wright . 
Rev. H. E. Thursby, b Bligh . 
Major L. T. Spens, not out 
Capt. Von Donop, c Hickmott, b M 'Alpine 
A. T. B. Dunn, 1 b w, b M 'Alpine . 
H. J. Burrell, b Wright .... 
W. Loring, b Wright .... 
Extras 

Total 



RE. 


2D INNINGS 


o 


b Wright . 


IB 


b Hearne . 


46 


St Hickmott, b F 





b Wright . 


22 




112 


not out . 


24 


not out . 


I 


c and b Hearne 


I 
17 


b Hearne . 


II 


Extras . 



Hearne 



Total 



87 
17 
14 

I 
14 

180 



MOTE 

1ST INNINGS. SCORE. 

J. L. Hardy, b Burrell . . 10 

F. M. Atkins, c Thursby, b Burrell 76 

A. W. Fulcher, st Speed, b Burrell 34 

E. Hickmott, st Speed, b Burrell 20 

A. Hearne, c Royal, b Burrell . 11 

W. Wright, not out . . . 237 

Capt. W. B. Roberts, b Burrell . 5 

L. E. Bligh, b Spens ... 37 



PARK. 

1ST INNINGS, SCORE. 

Capt. Evans, c Loring, b Von 

Donop 8 

Rev. J. B. Burra, c Thursby, b 

Spens 47 

M 'Alpine, c Spens, b Thursby . 4 

Extras 42 

Total . 531 



1888. Played, August 13 and 14. 
MOTE PARK. 



1ST INNINGS. 

F. M. Atkins, b Robertson 
C. Lake, b Collins 
A. W. Fulcher, b Collins , 
Hickmott, b Thornton 
H. Mann, b Robertson 
Capt. Daniel], c J. Spens, b Thornton 
Hon. V. Parnell, c and b Robertson 
Wright, run out 
L. E. Bligh, b Hadow 
Rev. T. F. Burra, b Hadow 
J. S. Hardy, not out . 
byes 12, leg-byes 5 . 



SCORE. 


2D INNINGS. SCORE. 





b Hadow . 


14 


. 


15 


b Collins . 


I 


. 


4 


c and b Bovill . 


21 


. 


. 14 


b Thornton 


15 


. 


9 


c Vernon, b Bovill . 


2 


ornton 


3 


b Bovill . 





rtson . 


I 


b Bovill . 







6 


not out . . . 


48 




I 


c and b Bovill . 







8 


c Thornton, b Ricketts 







3 


c Vernon, b Bovill . 


I 




17 


byes 


16 


Total 


81 


Total 


118 



74 



OTHER MATCHES IN KENT 



FREE FORESTERS. 



1ST INNINGS. 


SCORE. 


1ST INNINGS. 


SCORE. 


Hon. F. Thesiger, c Hickmott 


b 




A. M. Inglis, b Wright 


8 


Atkins .... 


. 


8 


Major L. Spens, c Parnell, b Bligh 30 


G. W. Ricketts, b Wright . 




4 


W. E. W. Collins, b Wright 


7 


Major J. Spens, b Bligh 




76 


J. Robertson, not out . 


17 


E. M. Hadow, b Wright . 







W. D. Bovill, b Bligh . 





G. F. Vernon, c Hickmott, 


b 




byes 5, leg-byes 5 . 


10 


Bligh .... 


. 


45 






A. J. Thornton, run out 


. 


14 


Total 


. 219 



1889. Played, August 26 and 27. 
FREE FORESTERS. 



1ST INNINGS. SC 

A. J. Thornton, c Vaughton, b Le Fleming 
E. Matheson, 1 b w, b Lake 
J. A. Turner, c Hickmott, b Le Fleming 
Major J. Spens, b M 'Alpine 
J. H. Hornsby, c Hickmott, b M 'Alpine 
Major L. Spens, c Hickmott, b Le Fleming 
A. M. Inglis, c M 'Alpine, b Atkins . 
W. D. Bovill, c and b M 'Alpine 
W. E. W. Collins, c Vaughton, b Lake 
Capt. W. D. Jones, not out 
H. Beeching, b Atkins 
bye I , leg-byes 3 . . . . 



IE. 2D INNINGS. 

22 b Lake 

o not out 

24 st Hickmott, b Lake 

13 b Atkins . 

6 c Le Fleming, b Atkins 

10 b Lake 

62 c Evans, b Lake 

9 c Hickmott, b Knight 

49 St Hickmott, b Lake 

3 St Hickmott, b Lake 

2 b Knight . 

4 



SCORE. 

39 

56 

5 

4 

8 



Total 



204 



Total 



164 



MOTE PARK. 



C. Lake, c and b Turner . 

F. M. Atkins, c Turner, b Collins 

H. Vaughton, c Matheson, b Thornton 

J. Le Fleming, b'CoUins . 

E. Hickmott, b Hornsby . 

A. W. Fulcher, c and b Thornton 

R. Marchant, c Bovill,, b Hornsby 

Capt. C. W. Evans, not out 

G. Knight, c and b Thornton . 
H. M'Alpine, c Turner, b Collins 
Capt. O. Daniell, b Turner 

byes 7, leg-byes 2 . . . . 



Total 



3 c and b Collins 

IX c and b Collins 

49 b Collins . 

1 c and b Thornton 

30 c J. Spens, b Collins 

6 not out 

I b Turner . 

20 c Bovill, b Collins 

3 c Hornsby, b Turner 

29 c and b Turner 

o b Turner . 

9 byes 2, leg -byes 4, wide 
I, no ball I 

162 Total 



MOTE PARK. 



275 



1890. Played, August 11 and 12. 
MOTE PARK. 



1ST INNINGS. SCORE. 

Wright, c Prentis, b Homsby . 

F. Solbee, run out .... 

E. Hickmott, b Homsby . 

F. M. Atkins, b Homsby . 
A. H. Harrison, st J. Spens, b Thornton 
K. M 'Alpine, b Homsby . 
A. W. Fulcher, b Homsby 
A. M'Kinlay, b Hornsby . 
H. Foster, b Thornton 

G. M. Styles, c L. Spens, b Thornton 
W. Stratton, not out .... 

byes 4, leg-byes 2 . . . . 



E. 


2D INNINGS. SCORE. 


7 


not out . . . .84 


I 


c and b Thornton . 


4 


8 


c Ricketts, b Hornsby 


17 


18 


b Hornsby 


76 


I 


b Hornsby 


5 


5 


c Ricketts, b Braybrook 


27 


10 


c and b Hornsby 


24 


2 


did not bat. 


8 


did not bat. 


9 


c and b Hornsby . . 12 





b Hornsby . . . 


6 


byes 2, leg-byes 3, wides 




2, no balls 7 


. 14 



Total 



75 



Total 



263 



FREE FORESTERS. 



A. J. Thornton, run out . 

H. M. Braybrook, c and b Atkins 

J. A. Turner, b Wright 

G. W. Ricketts, b M 'Alpine 

Major J. Spens, b Wright . 

G. F. Vernon, run out 

J. H. J. Hornsby, b Wright 

W. E. W. Collins, c and b Wright 

Major L. T. Spens, not out 

A.J. Prentis, b M 'Alpine . 

G. F. Bennett, absent 





c Mackinlay, b Wright 




I not out 




6 Fulcher, b Foster . 




18 1 b w, b Wright 




c and b Wright 




6 M 'Alpine, b Wright 




4 c Style, b Wright . 




9 c M 'Alpine, b Wright 




18 St Hickmott, b Wright 




3 b Foster . 




c Atkins, b Foster . 




byes 5, leg-byes 4, wide 



Total 



65 



2 
9 

49 
I 

46 

29 
4 
4 
o 
2 
o 

10 



Total . 156 



1 89 1. Played, August 10 and 11. 
FREE FORESTERS. 



1ST INNINGS. 

J. A. Turner, st Hickmott, b Champion 

R. T. Atthill, run out ... 

Major J. Spells, not out 

Capt. F. Curteis, 1 b w, b Burra 

A. J. Thornton, b Champion 

W. E. W. Collins, c Page, b Champion 

Major Hardy, b Champion 

Major L. T. Spens, c Best, b Champion 

E. L. Metcalfe, 1 b w, b Page . 



SCORE. 2D INNINGS. SCORE. 

50 b Le Fleming ... 68 

t6 c and b Le Fleming . . 8 

34 c M 'Alpine, b Champion . o 

1 b Champion . . . x 
4 c Thornton, b Best . . 3 

2 b Best . . . . o 
6 b Le Fleming ... 5 
2 c M 'Alpine, b Best . . 28 
o b Best .... 7 



276 



OTHER MATCHES IN KENT 



1ST INNINGS. 

G. Campbell, b Champion 
S. Hardy, absent 
bye 



SCORE. 



Total 



117 



2D INNINGS. 


SCORE. 


not out 





b Best 





leg-bye . 


I 



Total 



MOTE PARK. 



F. G. Stenning, b Collins . 
C. Lake, c Turner, b Collins 
Rev. R. T. Thornton, b Turner 
W. W. Best, b Turner 

J. Le Fleming, b Thornton 
A. S. Page, b Collins 

G. Champion, c Campbell, b Turner 
E. Hickmott, b Thornton . 

H. Prentis, b Turner . 
Rev. T. Burra, c J. Spens, b Turner 
K. M 'Alpine, not out 
byes 4, leg-byes 9, vvides i 

Total 



7 c and b Collins . 

29 lb vv, b Collins 

o b CoUins . 

o c Atthill, b Turner 

29 b Collins . 

c Atthill, b Turner 
19 b Turner . 

4 b Turner . 

1 b Turner . 

1 not out 

2 c Thornton, b Turner 
14 byes 10, leg-byes 2 

106 Total 



I 
21 
3 
3 
o 
o 
2 
o 

4 
o 

2 
12 

48 



1892. Played, August 8 a7id 9. 
FREE FORESTERS. 



1ST INNINGS. SCO] 

G. W. Ricketts, c Solbee, b Prentis . 
Major J. Spens, c M'Alpine, b Prentis 
J. N. Tonge, b Wright .... 
Capt. E. G; Wynyard, c M'Alpine, b Wright 
E. A. Maynard, b Wright 
Capt. F. Curteis, not out .... 
Major L. Spens, b Prentis 
H. W. Brougham, 1 b \v, b Prentis . 
Colonel Fellowes, b Wright 
W. E, W. Collins, c Atkins, b Wright . 
E. A. Talbot, b Prentis .... 
Extras 

Total 



E. 


2D INNINGS. 


12 


run out 


24 


c Mann, b Prentis 


6 


c and b Wright 


II 


b Evans . 


4 


c Login, b Prentis 


II 


c and b Wright 





not out 





b Wright . 





b Wright . 


26 


b Evans . 





c sub., b Prentis 


5 


Extras . 



99 



Total 



21 

o 

1 8 

27 

6 

o 

7 

12 

8 

9 

20 

6 

134 



MOTE PARK. 



F. M. Atkins, c Curteis, b Ricketts . 

E. Hickmott, b Collins 

F. L. Solbee, c Brougham, b Wynyard 
W. Wright, c Brougham, b Fellowes 
F. G. Stenning, not out 

K. M'Alpine, c Wynyard, b Fellowes 



• 37 


1 b w, b Collins 


32 





b Tonge . 


5 


• 30 


b Tonge . 


42 


. 16 


c Collins, b Fellowes 


51 


21 


c Ricketts, b Wynyard 


15 





c Fellowes, b Tonge 






BOXLEY. 



277 



1ST INNINGS. 

H. Prentis, c Tonge, b Collins . 
Capt. Login, b Fellovves . 
Capt. JNIann, b Fellowes . 
G. M. Style, c Ricketts, b Fellowes 
E. G. Evans, b Fellowes . 
Extras 

Total 



?E. 2D INNINGS. 

5 c Tonge, b Wynyard 
o b Fellowes 

6 b Collins . 
3 b Collins . 
6 not out 

II Extras . 

[35 Total 



4 
14 

7 
12 

9 
13 

204 



1893. Played, August 14 arid 15. 
FREE FORESTERS. 



1ST INNINGS. SCORE. 


2D INNINGS. 


SCORE. 


G. W. Ricketts, not out . 


63 


b Whitby . 


. 18 


Capt. Adair, b Wright 


4 


b Champion 


• 59 


A. G. Asher, b Knight 


18 


b Wright . 


6 


Major Curteis, b Wright . 


7 


b Knight . 


. 24 


H. PhiUpson, b Wright . 


2 


c Stenning, b Chamj 


)ion . 18 


W. D. Bovill, st Atkins, b Wright . 





c M 'Alpine, b Whitt 


jy • 4 


Major L. Spens, b Knight 





not out 


. 28 


W. E. W. Collins, St Atkins, b Knight 


20 


c Atkins, b Whitby 


4 


A. E. Leatham, b Knight . 


18 


c Hickmott, b Cham 


pion . 


Capt. Butler, b Wright 


3 


b Whitby . 


6 


A. N. Other, st Atkins, b Wright . 


3 


st Atkins, b Whitby 





Extras 


6 


Extras . 


12 


Total 


144 


Tota 


1 . 179 


MOTE ] 


PARK. 






F. M. Atkins, c Philipson, b Collins . 


9 


c Asher, b Collins 


• 74 


Wright, c Philipson, b Collins . 


4 


c Philipson, b ColHn 


s . 42 


G. Champion, b Ricketts . 


39 


b Adair 


• 37 


Hickmott, b Bovill .... 


15 


c Adair, b Butler 


. 40 


Rev. E. L. Colebrooke, c Phihpson, b Ashe 


r 29 


1 b w, b Ricketts 


2 


F. Stenning, b Collins .... 





1 b w, b Ricketts 


• 41 


J. S. Hardy, c Philipson, b Collins . 


5 


not out 





K. M 'Alpine, c Philipson, b ColUns . 


5 


c Asher, b Collins 


2 


H. 0. Whitby, not out . 


12 


c Bovill, b Collins 





G. Knight, b Collins .... 


I 


c Spens, b Collins 


. 26 


E. Cruttenden, b Collins .... 


II 


c Butler, b Ricketts 


3 


Extras 


20 


Extras . 


• 30 


Total 


150 


Tota 


I . 297 



///. — Boxley. 

For two or three years past there have been Forester 
matches played at Boxley, where Mr Style has got to- 
gether a strong side to oppose us ; and if once at least we 



278 



OTHER MATCHES IN KENT. 



have lost our match there, we have had the pleasure of 
knowing that a good many of our opponents are entitled 
to wear Free Forester colours, so that we have only been 
hoisted on petards of our own production. In the one 
match I played for the Club v. Boxley, Herbert Thursby 
hit tremendously hard for lOO on our side, and Frank 
Gresson got lOO for Boxley, his innings being terminated 
by a most extraordinary catch made by L- Spens, who 
caught a sharp drive straight at his nose exactly as if he 
was brushing a fly off that appendage. 

As we grow callous with age we may forget our occa- 
sional defeats, even though at the moment they may 
rankle — as a beating at any game should, if the game is 
worth playing at all, rankle — in our minds ; but we shall 
not so lightly forget the many pleasant days spent in the 
hop-country, and the kindly welcome and warm hospitality 
we have received in many houses in the Maidstone district. 
Why there should be such an abominable service of trains 
to one of the most attractive parts of England will ever 
remain a mystery to my mind, unless the directors of the 
various lines have so thoroughly gauged the hospitable in- 
clinations of the men of Kent as to think it advisable 
to put some barrier in the way of too great an influx of 
visitors. 

1890. Played at Boxley House, July 15 and 16. 
G. M. STYLE'S XI. 



1ST INNINGS. SCORE. 

H. Tubb, b A. J. Thornton . . . i 

W. D. Llewelyn, b W. C. Hedley . . 28 

Hon. F. J. N. Thesiger, b W. C. Hedley . 2 

F. M. Atkins, b V^. C. Hedley ... 9 

Hon. M. ToUemache, b W. C. Hedley . o 

Hon. R. G. Verney, b A. J. Thornton . o 

F. E. Johnson, b W. C. Hedley . . o 
C. D. Llewelyn, run out .... 4 

G. M. Style, c Smith, b W. C. Hedley . 22 



2D INNINGS, 



SCORE. 



b W. C. Hedley 
run out 

b A. J. Thornton . 
1 b w, b A. J. Thornton 
not out . 
b W. C. Hedley 
b A. J. Thornton . 
b W. C. Hedley 
c G. F. Vernon, b A. J 
Thornton 





BOXLEY. 




279 


1ST INNINGS. 


SCORE. 


2D INNINGS. 


SCORE. 


H. Foster, c Vernon, b Hedley . 


lO 


run out 


4 


W. Hickmott, not out 


I 


run out 


. 23 


byes 


4 


bye . . 


I 



Total 



81 



Total 



^58 



FREE FORESTERS. 



1ST INNINGS. SC 

A. M. Streatfeild-Moore, c Tolle- 
mache, b Thesiger . 

A. W. Fulcher, c E. Hickmott, b 
W. Llewelyn .... 

Rev. R. T. Thornton, b F. E. 
Johnson ..... 

G. F. Vernon, c H. Forster, b 
Tollemache .... 

W. C. Hedley, b F. E. John- 
son ...... 

In the second innings the Rev. 
(c Hickmott, b Atkins) i, Rev. H. 



)RE. 1ST INNINGS. SCORE. 

A. J. Thornton, c G. M. Style, b 

6 Tubb 41 

Major L. T. Spens, b F. E. Johnson 28 

37 K. M 'Alpine, b F. M. Atkins , 6 

S. H. Walrond, not out . . 15 

o S. Smith, run out . . . o 

Rev. H. W. Trower, b Tubb . 4 

40 byes 15, leg-bye i . . .16 

25 Total . .218 

R. T. Thornton (not out) scored 11, S. Smith 
W. Trower (not out) 6 ; extras 8, — total 23. 



C891. Played, July 17 and 18. 
FREE FORESTERS. 



1ST INNINGS. SCORE. 

H, T. Hewitt, c Thesiger, bGres- 

son 86 

A. J. Thornton, c H. Tubb, b 

Gresson 64 

Rev. H. E. Thursby, c Llewelyn, 

b Gresson ..... 96 
N. E. G. Stainton, b Gresson . 8 
Major L. T. Spens, b Gibbs . 11 

S. H. Walrond, c Llewelyn, b 

Gresson 2 



1ST INNINGS. S( 

W. E. W. Collins, c G. M. Style, 
b Gibbs .... 

K. M 'Alpine, 1 b w, b Gresson 

L. M. Richards, c G. M. Style, 
Gresson .... 

C. E. S. Mason, not out 

H. S. F. Hole, c Thesiger, b Tubb 
byes 8, leg-byes 3, no-balls, 2 

Total 



I 
24 

3 
10 
10 
13 

328 



BOXLEY HOUSE. 



F. M. Atkins, c sub., b Collins . 11 
W. D. Llewelyn, c Spens, b 

Collins 20 

H. Tubb, run out ... 2 
Hon. F. J. N. Thesiger, c Rich- 
ards, b Hewett .... 69 
F. H. Gresson, c Spens, b Hewett 95 
C. E. Cobb, c Thursby, b Collins 16 
H. Philipson, b Collins . . 6 



Capt. Wyld, c M 'Alpine, b Collins 12 
E. L. Metcalfe, c Thornton, b 

M 'Alpine 17 

J. A. Gibbs, retired hurt . . 5 

Hon. H. Milles, absent . . o 

G. M. Style, not out . . . 4 

byes 14, leg-byes 4 . . .18 

Total . 275 



28o OTHER MATCHES IN KENT. 

IV.— R,A. Matches. 

Alas ! that my account of the matches against the R.A. 
at Woolwich must of necessity be meagre, and alas ! for the 
reason, which is, that on only two occasions I have been 
able to play there for the Foresters. Once we won hand- 
somely, when Freddy Thesiger, who had played the teeto- 
taller with signal want of cricket success on the four previ- 
ous days, was on the eve of the Woolwich match driven by 
desperation to mixing port wine and champagne, and was 
so much invigorated by the unwonted excess that he made 
lOO in fine style ; when Albert Thornton was so much 
conscience-stricken at the unconscionable time that it took 
him to scrape up 60 that he was only too ready to retire on 
being caught first-bound, much to the bewilderment of some 
of the fieldsmen and the manifest disconcertment of the 
umpire ; when most of us scored freely, and Alfred Inglis 
kindly did all the fielding for our side. Time may have 
tempered to some degree that ready enthusiasm ; but a few 
years ago, when Inglis was playing on my side, I found it 
expedient to yell out " Inglis " whenever a ball was hit at 
all high in the air, by way of saving from utter destruction 
any other rash or unwary fieldsman who might feel inclined 
or possibly entitled to go for the catch. He was the most 
zealous and untiring fieldsman I ever saw, the sort of man 
who, if standing or fretting at deep square-leg, might be re- 
lied upon to back up cover-point on an emergency. Who 
that has experienced it will ever forget the sound, as of a 
mighty rushing steam-engine behind him, as he went to 
fetch a fourer when Inglis was on the war-path ! His 
activity in very sooth covered not only much ground, but 
a multitude of other people's sins. 

In the other match I played at Woolwich things did not 
go quite so well. In the first place, we went down short, 
and had to hunt high and low for substitutes ; then again 
not a ball was bowled on the first day owing to persistent 



I 



R.A. MATCHES. 281 

rain, and on the second day the ground was very sloppy 
and the weather cold. Finally, ours was not a good side, 
and we got distinctly the worst of the inevitable draw. A 
rather curious incident occurred towards the close of the 
R.A. innings. Curteis was batting, and had made a lot of 
runs, but he knew all along that at 5.30 he would have to 
retire. A wicket happened to fall to the last ball but one 
of an over, and as his time was all but up, Curteis, had he 
been a wise man, would have retired then ; but, fortunately 
for the look of the score-sheet, and unfortunately for the 
new-comer, the greedy gunner elected to stay and receive 
that one ball. He hit out wildly, made a miss-hit, and 
dropped into the hands of one of our substitutes at mid-on 
such a dolly catch that he burst out laughing, and ran off 
towards the pavilion. But that substitute being, unhke 
Curteis, a man of ready wit, commenced to play a species 
of pat-ball with the catch, and finally fumbled it right on 
to the wicket of the other batsman, who was standing out 
of his ground watching the performance, feeling probably, 
as most of us did, that it was really beyond the power of 
mortal man to drop the catch. 

" Plauserunt omnes : batsmanius exit uterque." 

I was more sorry for that batsman, who, as it happened, 
had come from afar especially for that match, than I ever 
felt even for Mrs Leo Hunter's expiring frog. In 1893 
A. J. Thornton with his lobs captured four wickets in 
one over, performing the hat trick. But I gather that, 
taken as a whole, the matches at Woolwich have not been 
entirely satisfactory, and the fault has most certainly not 
been on the side of the Gunners, who play good cricket 
themselves, and in many seasons have been, on their own 
ground at any rate, a difficult side to beat. Perhaps the 
time of year at which the match has been played has had 
something to do with the comparative apathy shown about 
what ought to be one of our best matches. A Whitsuntide 



282 OTHER MATCHES IN KENT. 

which falls in the middle of May is apt to tempt men who 
are in business and get few holidays in the early summer, 
to find their pastime elsewhere than in the cricket-field, 
and they naturally choose a game which is not so com- 
pletely made or marred by weather. If May has the re- 
putation of being a sunny month, the forecast for that 
particular section of May in which our calendar ordains 
that Whitsuntide should fall would in most years run 
"cold and damp," and nothing so entirely spoils the 
pleasure of cricket as cold and damp weather. But as the 
British public demand that a certain amount of cricket 
should be played for their edification, such F. F. as are 
county players have a prior attachment ; and a good many 
sober-minded members of the Club, who might possibly 
play in the absence of any counter - attraction, prefer to 
watch the matches at Lord's and the Oval, and see other 
people shiver instead of shivering themselves. Finally, to 
men of my own profession, from whom the ranks of the 
Foresters are largely recruited in August, a Whitsuntide 
holiday is a myth or an anachronism. Hence it has come 
to pass that weak and at times short sides have gone to 
Woolwich, and that when weather has permitted the match 
to be finished at all, the Foresters have lost. 

1885. Played, May 25 and 26. 
ROYAL ARTILLERY. 

1ST INNINGS. SCORE. 1ST INNINGS. SCORE. 

Capt. Davidson, cThursby.bBovill o Capt. Hardy, b Robertson . . i 

Major Anstruther, b Bovill . . o G. V. Kemball, c Metcalfe, b 

C. D. King, b Tlaursby . . 59 Robertson .... 7 

Capt. Wheble, c Booth, b Robert- H. E. W. de Robeck, c Capron, b 

son 17 Robertson .... 48 

Major Duthy, c and b Coxhead . 17 Capt. Murchison, not out . . 10 

P. H. M. Dorehill, b Robertson . 59 Extras 18 

C. R. Buckle, c Macpherson, b 

Robertson . . . , o Total . 236 

In the second innings Capt. Davidson (not out) scored 20, Major Anstruther 
(not out) 32 ; extras 6, — total 58. 



R.A. MATCHES. 



283 



FREE FORESTERS. 



1ST INNINGS. 



1ST INNINGS. 



SCORE. 



C. Booth, c Dorehill, b Anstruther 
Capt. Metcalfe, c Dorehill, b 

Anstruther 
F. W. Capron, b Anstruther 
J. Robertson, run out . 
A. C. Macpherson, c Anstruther, 

b Kemball 
W. D. Bovill, b Wheble . 



35 

28 

2 

38 

14 
10 



F. C. Coxhead, b Wheble . . 5 

H. Thursby, b Wheble . . 9 

F. Vans-Agnew, b Anstruther . 11 
Capt. Boteler, c Murchison, b 

Wheble o 

Capt. Baker, not out . . . i 

Extras 11 

Total . 164 



[886. Played, June 14 and 15. 



FREE FORESTERS. 



1ST INNINGS. 



1ST INNINGS. 



E. F. S. Tylecote, 1 b w, b Dorehill 42 M. Wilde, c Usborne, b AUsopp , 



J. S. Russell, c Redfern, bAUsopp 11 
Major Spens, c King, b Redfern . 42 
J. Robertson, c Allsopp, b Dore- 
hill 13 

G. F. Vernon, c Dorehill, b King 58 
F. W. Capron, c Slee, b Cooper- 
Key 49 

R. H. Fowler, b King ... 18 



F. E. Speed, not out ... 21 

F. H. Mellor, c Allsopp, b Dorehill 23 
Major Ravenhill, b Dorehill . 3 

G. H. Goldney, c Dorehill, c 

Stockdale o 

Extras . . . . -23 

Total . 308 



ROYAL ARTILLERY. 



1ST INNINGS. 



2D INNINGS. 



SCORE. 



P. H. Slee, c Wilde, b Robertson . . 14 

P. H. M. Dorehill, c and b Vernon . . 3 

Hon. F. E. Allsopp, run out ... 18 

Capt. Bannatine-Allason, not out . . 63 

H. E. Stockdale, b Vernon . . . o 

A. M'N. C. Cooper-Key, c and b Robertson 9 

C. D. King, St Tylecote, b Robertson . 2 

G. D. Symonds, c Tylecote, b Robertson . 3 

Capt. Fegen, 1 b w, b Robertson . . 9 

Capt. Phipps-Homby, b Robertson . . 2 

T. M. Usborne, c Ravenhill, b Robertson o 

Sergt. Redfern, c Wilde, b Robertson . 5 

Extras 10 



c Robertson, b Vernon 
c Tylecote, b Spens 
c Tylecote, b Vernon 
c Tylecote, b Robertson 
c Ravenhill, b Spens 
c Wilde, b Spens 
b Robertson 
c Tylecote, b Capron 
c Tylecote, b Spens . 
not out 

c Tylecote, b Goldney 
c Vernon, b Robertson 
Extras . 



I 
33 

5 
15 

4 

o 

3 
13 

I 
18 

19 
16 



Total 



138 



Total 



138 



:84 



OTHER MATCHES IN KENT. 



1887. Played, May 30 a7id 31. 
FREE FORESTERS. 



1ST INNINGS. 

J. R. Hine-Haycock, b Pratt 
E. H. Buckland, b Dorehill 
J. E. N. Greatorex, b Pratt 
W. D. Bovill, c Dorehill, b King 

E. F. S. Tylecote, c Barton, b Curteis 
M. Wilde, b King . 
G. H. Goldney, c Dorehill, b King 
S. J. Wilson, not out 
C. A. S. Leggatt, 1 b w, b King 

F. S. Cornwallis, c Pratt, b King 
L. M. Richards, b Curteis 

Extras 

Total 



SCORE. 


2D INNINGS. SCORE. 





b Dorehill 







6 


b Curteis . 


21 




6 


c Gordon, b King . 


19 




20 


c Douglas, b Pratt . 


16 


is 


2 


1 b w, b Pratt . 


8 




8 


b Dorehill 


5 




8 


not out 


7 




13 


b Pratt . 


21 




4 


c Dorehill, b Pratt . 


I 




2 


c Gordon, b King . 


13 




I 


b Dorehill 


I 




4 


Extras . 


II 



74 



Total 



123 



ROYAL ARTILLERY. 



1ST INNINGS. 



1ST INNINGS. 



b Leg- 



J. Haggard, c Greatorex, 

gatt 

Bombr. Barton, c Goldney, b 

Leggatt 

P. H. M. Dorehill, st Tylecote, b 

Buckland 

A. P. Douglas, b Buckland . 
Major Stephenson, c Wilde, b 

Leggatt 



C. D. King, b Leggatt . . i 

Capt. Curteis, c Wilson, b Bovill 43 

Capt. Fegen, c and b Bovill . . 18 

Capt. Wheble, not out . . 14 

Capt. Pratt, c Goldney, b Bovill . 4 

Capt. Gordon, b Buckland . . 11 

Extras 5 

Total . 144 



In the second innings Haggard (b Goldney) scored 24, Barton (b Leggatt) 2, 
Dorehill (not out) 20, Douglas (not out) 2 ; extras 6, — total 54. 



1888. Played, August 17 and li 
FREE FORESTERS. 



1ST INNINGS. 

Hon. F. Thesiger, b King 

A. J. Thornton, c King, b Barton 

G. W. Ricketts, b Barton . 

Major J. Spens, b King 

G. F. Vernon, c Adair, b King 

W. E. W. Collins, b Adair . 

Major Spens, c King, b Adair 



SCORE. 


1ST INNINGS. SCORE. 


. 102 


A. M. Inglis, c King, b Barton 


25 


n 64 


W. D. Bovill, b Adair . 


I 


• 14 


C. Hickley, b Barton . 


4 


9 


Capt. Cockburn, not out 


s 


6 


Extras .... 


4 


40 






. 14 


Total 


288 



R.A. MATCHES. 



285 



ROYAL ARTILLERY. 



1ST INNINGS. SCORE. 

Major Anstruther, c Vernon, b Thornton 21 

H. R. Adair, c Ricketts, b Hickley . . 38 
Bombr. Barton, run out . . . .11 

Qr.-Mr. Sergt. Hunter, b Ricketts , . 11 

C. D. King, b Ricketts .... 5 

J. Haggard, c Vernon, b Ricketts . . i 

Capt. Wheble, b Bovill .... 28 

J. J. MacMahon, c and b Ricketts . . i 

Hon. W. D. Sclater-Booth, not out . . 16 

Capt. Pratt, b Thornton .... 3 

H. L. Powell, c Vernon, b Bovill . . 11 

Extras 11 

Total . 157 



2D INNINGS. SCORE. 

b Bovill .... 3 

c Vernon, b Hickley . 17 

b Ricketts . . . o 

not out .... 14 

b Collins .... 36 

b Collins . . . . o 

c Ricketts, b Collins . 36 

c Spens, b Thornton . 13 

c Bovill, b Hickley . . 6 

c J. Spens, b Thornton . o 

b Bovill .... 6 

Extras .... 5 

Total . 136 



1889. Played, June 10 and 11. 
FREE FORESTERS. 



1ST INNINGS. SCORE. 

F. E. Lacy, c Flower, b Adair . 14 

C. A. S. Leggatt, b Adair . . 12 
L. Sanderson, c Adair, b Curteis 27 

D. H. Barry, c Campbell, b Barton i 

E. A. J. Maynard, b Barton . o 
H. M. Stutfield, b Adair . . o 
L. M. Richards, b Barton . . 2 



1ST INNINGS. 



F. J. Richardson, c and b Barton 
A. Fulcher, b Adair 
P. J. T. Henery, not out 
H. T. Hewett, b Barton 
Extras .... 

Total 



SCORE. 

S6 

7 

22 

3 



152 



ROYAL ARTILLERY. 



J. Haggard, c Sanderson, b Henery 18 

H. R. Adair, c and b Lacey . 22 

Bombr. Barton, c Leggatt, b Henery 28 

Capt. Curteis, not out ... 68 

C. H. de Rougemont, run out . 7 

A. C. Currie, b Hewett . . 2 
Capt. Abdy, b Leggatt 



P. H. Flower, b Leggatt 
J. Bellhouse, b Henery 
H. M. Campbell, run out . 
H. E. Stanton, c and b Leggatt 
Extras .... 



Total 



[65 



No play possible on loth — raining all day. 



1890. Played, May 26 and 27. 
FREE FORESTERS. 



1ST INNINGS. 

J. S. Russell, b Dorehill . 

F. H. Mellor, b Barton 

W. D. Bovill, st Hutchinson, b Currie 

L. Sanderson, b Barton 



CORE. 


2D INNINGS. 


SCORE. 


. 46 


c Cochrane, b Dorehill 


. 26 


• 23 


run out . 


2 





b Cochrane 


2 


II 


b Dorehill 


6 



286 



OTHER MATCHES IN KENT. 



1ST INNINGS. SCORE. 

J. Robertson, c Curteis, b Benson . . 36 
F. H. Gates, retired hurt ... 

C. A. S. Leggatt, c Du Cane, b Benson . 16 

L. M. Richards, run out .... 6 

H. E. Stutfield, c Douglas, b Cochrane . 7 

C. E. Farmer, b Cochrane . . . i 
Major Rice, not out .... 

Extras 



Total 



2D INNINGS. SCORE. 

c Dorehill, b Cochrane . i 
(E. M. Lachlan, sub.) b 

Dorehill 
b Dorehill 
absent, hurt, 
not out 
run out 
c Douglas, b Cochrane 

Extras . 



163 



Total 



ROYAL ARTILLERY. 

1ST INNINGS. SCORE. 1ST INNINGS. SCORE. 

A. P. Douglas, c Farmer, b Rob- Capt. Dorehill, not out . . 79 

ertson 6 Sergt. Cochrane, b Rice . . o 

J. P. Du Cane, c Robertson, b Capt. Phipps-Hornby, c Robert- 

Bovill o son, b Sanderson ... 14 

Bombr. Barton, c Farmer, b Rob- H. D. White-Thomson, c Rice, b 

ertson 7 Robertson .... 25 

Capt. Curteis, c Stutfield, b Rob- R. P. Benson, c Leggatt, b Bovill 64 

ertson 29 Extras 25 

C. H. Hutchinson, b Rice . . 22 

A. C. Currie, b Robertson . . 4 Total . 275 

1891. Played, May 19. 
FREE FORESTERS. 



1ST INNINGS. SCORE. 

G. W. Hillyard, c De Rougemont, 

b Benson 3 

H. M. Stutfield, c De Rougemont, 

b Currie 49 

Capt. Cowper-Coles, c Hornby, b 

Barton 11 

H. W. Dickson, c Benson, b Currie 54 

J. S. Russell, c and b Barton . 32 

Capt. Vizard, c and b Currie . o 



1ST INNINGS. 

G. Ray, run out . 

Capt. Colvin, b Barton 

Capt. Hon. C. Lambton, c Bar 

ton, b Currie 
Capt. Heyman, c and b Currie 
W. E. W. Collins, not out . 

Extras .... 



Total 



163 



ROYAL ARTILLERY. 



J. P. Du Cane, b Collins . 
Corporal Barton, c Lambton, b 

Cowper-Coles . 
A. C. Currie, c Ray, b Hillyard 
C. H. De Rougemont, 1 b w, t 

Hillyard .... 
Major Davidson, c Ray, b Cowper 

Coles .... 
Capt. Dorehill, run out 
Capt. Curteis, retired . . • 



4 Capt. Phipps-Hornby, b Cowper- 



13 

o 

61 



Coles 



Sergt. Cochrane, c Dickson, b 

Cowper-Coles .... 30 
R. P. Benson, not out ... 15 
Bombr. Bailey, c Stutfield, b Hill- 
yard 9 

Extras 17 



Total 



192 



R.A. MATCHES. 



287 



1892. Played, June 6. 
FREE FORESTERS. 



1ST INNINGS. 



W. D. Bovill, b Butler 

J. S. Russell, c Cochrane, b Butler 

D. R. Napier, c Du Cane, b Osmond 
Capt. Rice, b Osmond 

Major Spens, run out 

L. Sanderson, 1 b w, b Osmond 

C. E. Murdoch, c Butler, b Osmond 

H. Bull, run out 

R. E. Latham, b Osmond . 

C. E. Farmer, c Osmond, b Butler 

Capt. Elliot, not out . 

E. Butler, st Campbell, b Butler 
Extras 

Total 



SCORE. 2D INNINGS. 

16 c Campbell, b Cochrane 

o b Findlay . 

22 c Findlay, b Cochrane 

o c Campbell, b Cochrane 

2 b Findlay . 

1 b w, b Osmond 

3 b Osmond 

1 not out 

3 c Elton, b Osmond 

4 c Osmond, b Butler 
o c Findlay, b Osmond 

2 St Campbell, b Osmond 
13 Extras . 

66 Total 



SCORE. 

36 

27 
24 

o 

2 

42 

o 

23 

o 

17 

8 
6 

19 
204 



ROYAL ARTILLERY. 



tST INNINGS. 



SCORE, 



J. P. Du Cane, c Russell, b Mur 
doch 

E. R. J. Peel, c Farmer, b Sander 
son 

Capt. F. A. Curteis, b Rice . 

Capt. Wynne, b Sanderson . 

A. E. J. Perkins, c Murdoch, 
Sanderson 

Bombr. Osmond, c and b Bovill 

Sergt. Cochrane, b Murdoch 



106 

45 
18 
16 

73 
5 
2 



1ST INNINGS. 



Capt. Dale, c Murdoch, b Sander- 
son 

Capt. Campbell, st Farmer, b 
Sanderson 

F. A. G. Y. Elton, b Butler 

Bombr. Butler, not out 

Trumpeter Findlay, absent 
Extras 

Total 



14 

3 

I 

o 

o 

16 

299 



1893. Played, June 7 and 8. 
FREE FORESTERS. 



1ST INNINGS. 

J. S. Russell, c Curteis, b Elton 
G. F. Vernon, b Dorehill . 
Major Friend, c and b Elton 
Major Hardy, b Elton 
J. A. Gibbs, c Crampton, b Elton 
A. J. Thornton, c and b Dorehill 
Capt. Banbury, b Dorehill 
Capt. Willes, st Usborne, b Elton 
H. E. Chapman, b Elton . 
Major North, not out 
Capt. Bunbury, b Elton 
Extras 



Total 



.E. 


2D INNINGS. SCORE. 


27 


b Dorehill 


4 


58 


b Crampton 


43 


7 


c Usborne, b Elton . 


27 


16 


b Elton . 


4 





c and b Dorehill 


2 


I 


not out 


18 





b Elton . 


7 


37 


1 b w, b Elton . 


I 


4 


b Crampton 





14 


b Crampton 


2 


7 


absent 





II 


Extras . . 


5 



182 



Total 



113 



288 



OTHER MATCHES IN KENT. 



ROYAL ARTILLERY. 



1ST INNINGS. SCORE. 

Capt. Du Cane, b Gibbs .... 68 

C. C. Van-Straubenzee, c Vernon, b Thornton i8 

Capt. Dorehill, 1 b w, b Thornton . . 9 

Major Curteis, 1 b w, b Thornton . . 7 

E. J. R. Peel, not out .... 17 
T. M. Usborne, b Thornton . . .19 
A. E. J. Perkins, b Thornton . . . o 
Capt. Abdy, b Thornton . . . . o 
Capt. Crampton, b Friend ... 19 

F. A. G. Y. Elton, b Gibbs ... 2 
E. G. Waymouth, b Thornton . . . i 

Extras 4 

Total . 164 



2D INNINGS. 

c North, b Friend 

not out 

hit wicket, b Gibbs 

b Thornton 

b Friend . 

not out 



Extras 



Total 



132 




Major Bannatine-AUason. M, F. Maclean. G. F. Vernon. Major Curteis. C. Booth. 

E. Rutter. H. E. Cobb. Major Hardy. Lieut. R. J. M. Locke. Lieut. Moorhouse. 

C. Leveson-Gower. Lieut.-Col. Bingham. 

Goodyear. Colonel Richardson. Lieut. Hine Haycock. Lieut. L. M. Wilson. 

Lieut. Tomkins. Lieut. Cayley. Lieut. Craig. Lieut. Waymouth. 

N. Morrice. H. M. Burge. Lieut. Van Straubenzee. 



Shoehwyness, 1893. 



g ^ 




B 5 



x 




ITl 


ii ^ 




H 


^ c 




iz; 


•? S o 




>^ 


Mad 
lards 






l^s 




o 


x§-3 






U 






o t;. 


^ 


>« 


iH-H i 


-^ 


e< 








.X 3 




?^, 


•^ fe^ 


a. 


^ 




o 


o 


H c 




pL, 


•" — 5 




o 














O 3 -C 




h-I 


^•►^ 


1^ 


o 


. ;^ 


,; 


o 


o P^ _: 


3 


ffi 


S d o Ij 


^ 


> 




ti 














K '^ 3 




m 


"OS 


1 


W 
H 


5«^ 


w 


3 






P< 


-3 u S 




o 


"j3a 


IXH 


,& 




H 



I m 



^ o 

w w 
WW 




Upton House. 



CHAPTER XXXIV. 



MATCHES IN THE MIDLANDS. 



A ROVING club in very truth is this of ours, and it is a 
matter of considerable difficulty to follow its peregrinations. 
A series of matches is inaugurated in one district, and then 
something happens to break the chain, and the Foresters 
for a time disappear, only to reappear on some future occa- 
sion under new auspices. 

For some i^^ years we had a merry one-day encounter 
with C. J. Hegan's XI on his pretty ground near Watford. 
I had the good fortune to play in this match in three con- 
secutive seasons, and on the last two occasions got up the 
F. F. XL Each of these matches had its own peculiar 
features, but in one respect all were very much alike, there 
having generally been almost as many Foresters playing 
against as for the Club. 

In the first year we were soundly thrashed, a result 
mainly, so far as I remember, due to the excessive good- 

T 



290 MATCHES IN THE MIDLANDS. 

nature of our captain, who, by way of what he, or it may 
have been Hegan, called " equalising the sides," gave over 
to the opposition sundry men who had been originally 
enlisted in our service. It was in this match that A. E. 
Leatham, then a great buyer of tups, signally distin- 
guished himself by fielding long-leg to his own bowling, 
and running out a man who was attempting a fifth or 
sixth run from a hit into a neighbouring plantation. 

" I don't want a long - leg," remarked Leatham with 
cheery confidence as he took the ball ; and when he com- 
menced with a wide on the off, it really looked as if he 
was in his rights. But in the second over came a gruesome 
half-volley to leg, which was hit fair and square in the 
middle of the bat. Mid-on made a merit of necessity, and 
began to move in the direction of the vanishing ball, but, 
much to his relief, off galloped Leatham capless and — he 
will forgive the remark — hairless, and shortly proved 
that he not only runs rather faster than he bowls, but is 
also a long and a straight thrower, for he ran one of the 
batsmen out from a prodigious distance. Nor was that 
wicket his only stroke of good luck, for presently Green- 
field hit him magnificently on the on-side into the top of 
a high tree a very long way off, without any run being 
scored for the hit. Every one except the umpire thought 
that the tree was a boundary, and the umpire kept his own 
counsel till the ball was returned. 

" How many was that 1 " inquired the batsman, as he 
prepared to receive the next ball, and he spoke with the 
air of a man who has just done a big thing. 

" Run it out," was the chilling response. 

In the next two years, when I got up the Forester side, 
I am afraid that Hegan did not find me so willing to part 
as my predecessor had been. We both had strong sides, 
and the Foresters just got home on each occasion. The 
first of these two matches was not productive of large 



ASH-SOWN WICKETS. 291 

scores, as after playing for about an hour we began to 
imagine that Hegan must have been holding high festivities 
and roasting oxen whole upon the pitch during the winter 
months. It was what a Scotsman would have called a 
" saft " day, and we did not commence play much before 
one o'clock. The wicket was very slow and easy at first, 
but as the ground cut up, cinders of all sorts and sizes 
cropped up in unexpected places, and things did not im- 
prove as the day went on. It turned out that some 
wiseacre had informed Hegan that ashes improved the 
turf, and the ashes had been put on with no niggard hand. 
As a means of ensuring that every player should have at 
least one innings in a short one-day match, I can con- 
fidently recommend the ash theory. Neither batsman nor 
bowler had the slightest conception what any given ball 
was going to do : it was quite an open question whether 
it would shoot dead, go over the wicket-keeper's head, or 
twist a yard either way. Albert Thornton distinguished 
himself by making a barefaced attempt to put an end to 
our host's existence. He began by scraping away with 
praiseworthy patience at the mud, ashes, and ball, until 
he had induced Hegan to stand in rather close at mid-off. 
He then suddenly ran out into the middle of the pitch, and 
made a real fine drive straight at Hegan's heart. Much to 
his credit, and perhaps a little to his surprise, Hegan, who 
received a nasty knock, clutched the ball as it rebounded 
from his body, and A. J. had to go. And then was to be 
seen the unusual spectacle of a batsman profusely apolo- 
gising to the man who had caught him in the act of trans- 
gressing every rule of the game of batting as commonly 
practised by A. J. Thornton. 

In my third year both sides were again well represented. 
Seldom, I think, has a stronger all-round XI played for 
the Foresters. Bowling was our weakest point, and in 
this department of the game Hegan's XI had the pull of 



292 MATCHES IN THE MIDLANDS. 

us, as he had got hold of six fairly useful trundlers in the 
persons of H. G. Tylecote, C. Pigg, W. N. Roe, D. H. 
Jephson, G. W. Hillyard, and T. Bigge, who in that par- 
ticular season did good service for the Engineers. In the 
end — a rather bitter end for Hegan — we won a really 
sporting match ; but owing to some carelessness in the 
scoring, our opponents had fair ground for not being 
entirely satisfied with their defeat. For us Arthur Heath 
played a fine innings, and both Hewitt and Charlie Cobb 
treated the spectators to some tall hitting : altogether we 
piled up about 280, — quite enough runs, as we thought, for 
a one-day match. 

It had been arranged that we should play till 6.30, and 
that, if there was any likelihood of finishing, the match 
should go on for an extra quarter of an hour. At 6.30 
there was just an off-chance of a definite conclusion, 
Hegan's side having three wickets to fall, and some 45 
runs to make ; and so we agreed to go on for that extra 
quarter of an hour, though it involved running our train 
desperately close. At 6.45 there were still three wickets to 
fall, and still 20 runs to get. Hegan thought that it would 
be a pity to allow so good a match to remain drawn, and 
on the principle that a moral is quite as unsatisfactory as 
an actual defeat, I quite agreed with him. But, on the 
other hand, the train had to be considered. Our host 
kindly offered dinner to any of us who would stay and 
play the match out, and some half-dozen of the side, who 
had only to get to London some time that night, readily 
acceded to his proposition. But the rest, including most 
of our bowling talent, had no option in the matter, and 
were obliged to go. So with six Foresters and five sub- 
stitutes we again took the field, and in ten minutes the 
runs were, as we thought, hit off. But by the time that 
we had reached the tent and congratulated Hegan, the 
scorers came to announce that there was an error of 10 



MATCH NEVER LOST TILL WON. 293 

runs in the score, and that consequently 10 more runs 
were still required. So again we went out, ostensibly for 
the purpose of giving them the chance of knocking off 
those 10 runs ; but, as it happened, we got the three 
wickets and won the match. A friendly discussion fol- 
lowed at dinner. W. N. Roe, who had made upwards of 
80, always religiously counts his runs as he scores them, 
and he had positively asserted that he had made 10 more 
than the scorers had accredited to him. '^wt, per contra^ 
we in the field had remarked on the astounding rapidity 
with which the telegraph-board had covered the distance 
between 150 and 170; and if the scoring had been of so 
casual a character as to rob any one batsman of 10 runs, 
it might just as easily have added those 10 to other men's 
scores. At any rate, no amount of argument or assertion 
could controvert the fact that according to the score-sheet 
we had made 9 more runs than our opponents — and so the 
victory lay with us. 

That Roe was absolutely correct as to the number of 
the runs that he had made I believe to this day ; but it is 
much more probable that some one else got the credit of 
those important 10 runs than that they were altogether 
omitted, and it was satisfactory to us to feel that our 
opponents had during their own innings kept the score. 
So it fell out that we six who had stayed behind had the 
double satisfaction of winning the match, and of eating 
the excellent dinner which our host kindly provided in 
spite of the bad turn we had done him. Verily and in 
truth, a cricket-match is never lost till it is won. And to 
point the moral further, I will take two other Forester 
matches quite out of their turn, each of which afforded a 
vivid illustration of the breadth of that gulf which lies 
between the possibilities and the probabilities of cricket. 
Once at Portsmouth, in 1888, a Forester XI was beaten 
by a few runs by the United Services, for whom P. J. 



294 MATCHES IN THE MIDLANDS. 

Henery, whom I presume to be a Volunteer, and L. Ham- 
ilton scored freely. Notwithstanding their exertions, we 
had a good deal the best of a long two days' cricket, and 
it looked as if nothing but time was wanting to ensure our 
easy victory. Walter Bovill was our commander, and he, 
like Hegan, felt that it was hard lines that a match should 
be left drawn in our favour when an extra half-hour would 
enable us to finish it ; and the captain of the U.S. team, a 
thorough sportsman, readily assented to Bovill's proposi- 
tion that play should continue till seven o'clock. Poor 
Hornby's ipagnanimity met with its due reward ; for on 
a wicket which was quite as good as at any period of the 
match, we failed to get the necessary lOO odd runs, though 
we had made nearly 300 in our first innings. We were 
so cock-sure of victory that one man, a very steady bat, 
had been allowed to go home, and several others had 
changed, and had to hurry in as they were. A slow 
bowler, with the setting sun behind his arm, did the 
execution ; but even if some slight excuse might be made 
on the ground of indifferent light, we really had only our- 
selves to blame for our miserable exhibition. Walter 
Bovill himself got nearly half the runs scored, but re- 
ceived little assistance. It may readily be conjectured 
that we fell foul of him for having arranged to go on 
beyond the stipulated time, and that he with much more 
reason retorted that he had not conceived it possible that 
nine men could make such fools of themselves. If we 
had recovered our tempers by the next day, we none of us 
cared to talk much about that match at Portsmouth. 

The other was a still more extraordinary case of the 
fallibility of human hopes. That the match could ever 
be finished at all seemed to be almost impossible ; that we 
could win, absolutely so. It was played three years ago 
(1892), in variable weather, and on a still more variable 
wicket, at Aldershot. We won the toss, and soon found 




c3 
B 

J Q 
5 6 



P3 
2 W 



■^< 



u- u H 



A BOWLING FEAT. 295 

that the wicket was very tricky; but it improved as the 
day went on, and with a distinctly weaker side, the 
Division almost equalled our score overnight for the loss 
of 3 wickets. A mistaken idea that a review — that ap- 
parently indispensable accompaniment of a cricket-match 
at Aldershot — would stop play till luncheon-time, caused 
three of our men to absent themselves on the second 
morning ; and though the opposite side insisted on send- 
ing out one substitute, and offered more, we felt that we 
were so entirely in the wrong that we preferred to go on 
with nine men in the field till luncheon-time, when the 
truants turned up. Under the circumstances, we did fairly 
well to get rid of our opponents for about 60 more runs 
than we had scored. It was almost a necessity for E. C. 
Streatfield and myself, who had some way to go on that 
Saturday night, to catch a train at 5.30 ; and most cer- 
tainly when we left the ground at 4.45 we were justified 
in thinking that a draw was a certainty. We had 7 good 
wickets to fall, not much bowling to contend against, the 
balance of runs had been knocked off, two men were ap- 
parently well set, and there was an hour and three-quarters 
more play, less the interval between the innings. But as 
soon as we had left the ground a collapse set in, one of 
our soundest batsmen was most unnecessarily absent, and 
eventually the Division were set to make about 40 runs in 
an hour. That looked an easy task enough, and when i 
wicket was down for 28 all seemed over but the shouting. 
It was then that C. Toppin came to the rescue, and, ably 
backed by Asher, disposed of the other 9 wickets in about 
six overs for as many runs. One of the most curious parts 
of the whole affair was that Toppin had hardly bowled for 
us at all during the week, as he was suffering from a 
sprained side — the bete noir of a fast bowler — and had 
begged to be excused bowling. But it did so happen that 
he had been one of the absentees in the morning, and 



296 MATCHES IN THE MIDLANDS. 

felt so conscience-stricken at his misdemeanour that he 
pluckily chose to ignore the sprained side, and to bowl for 
all that he was worth ; and on that wicket he was simply 
unplayable. As had been the case with us at Portsmouth, 
several of the opposition had changed, and had to go in to 
be demolished by Toppin in their workaday clothes. Toppin 
did the hat-trick once, and twice besides got 2 wickets in an 
over ; and I doubt whether such a bowling feat has ever 
been equalled in the annals of Free Forester cricket. 

It has been a matter of deep regret to a good many 
Free Foresters that a most enjoyable week at Upton 
House has of late years found no place on our card, and 
that, owing to the departure from the neighbourhood of 
our quondam host and hostess, the doors of a place we so 
dearly loved in the past are now practically closed to us. 
Nothing can ever quite fill the gap. We may find better 
grounds, it is true, than either Deddington, Banbury, or 
Middleton ; cheerier matches we shall never have ; and 
the long chatty drives and the gay evenings spent in the 
miniature drawing - room and the quaint old smoking- 
room at Upton can hardly be reproduced. Nodes Am- 
brosiance those were indeed, and Nodes Nedarince to boot ; 
and if grouse and champagne took the place of the more 
orthodox articles, what Sybarite could wish for better 
fare } Who that was privileged to witness the sight will 
ever forget the reproduction of the bombardment of Alex- 
andria by Harry Maul, when, having raised a mighty pile 
of cushions to represent the doomed city, he implored and 
entreated every member of the smoking-room party in 
turn to sit upon the top and play the part of Arabi ! — or 
who that took part in that great lawn-tennis tournament 
wherein six of the Upton House party made rings round 
the champions of a local club on one by-day, will not 
recall the utterances of the unintentionally and yet most 
irresistibly comic man, who, after convulsing the luncheon- 







i" < 



j3 h4 






C/3 

i ^S- ^ 
1^ . ^ 

ra (« t» 

S ^ s 

u 
O 

W 
W 
C^ 



UPTON HOUSE. 297 

party by suddenly entering the room with the startling 
announcement that he had " cub to play teddis with Mr 
Jedkids," later on in the day fairly capped his own best 
on record by inviting James Walker to " spid " ! " Ichabod " 
should indeed be written up over the gates of Upton ; for 
if the archaeological glories of the old Dower- House still 
remain, gone are our popular host and our sympathetic 
hostess ; gone is the dog Jack, the shrewdest judge of 
cricket ; gone is Harding, most charming of stud-grooms, 
and the deftest handler of spade and bucket who ever 
took a wasp's nest in broad daylight ; gone, alas ! they all 
are to lands where cricket is almost unknown, and their 
like we can hardly hope to see again. 

" The steed is vanished from the stall ; 
No serf is seen in Hassan's hall ; 
The lonely spider's thin grey pall 
Waves slowly widening o'er the wall." 

So far as Forester cricket is cortcerned, Upton must be 
accounted as a relic of the past : a future it is impossible 
to foresee. Those were days before I was a Forester ; but 
most of the Upton party, which formed the nucleus of the 
sides which the Foresters encountered on the three grounds 
I have mentioned, sooner or later became members of the 
old Club. Such were Frank Cobden, Harry Maul, James 
Walker, Charlie and poor Arthur Cobb, Clarence Smith, 
Harry Tubb, and Jinks himself, and all of us got runs on 
occasion, and we won more matches from the Free Foresters' 
XI than we lost to them. But though many of our side 
even in those days wore Forester colours, there was no 
shifting of players from one XI to the other by way of 
equalisation of strength ; nor did Walter Bovill, who got 
up the Club team, ever unduly trespass on the home 
preserves. 

As to the cricket, there is no need to go far afield to 



298 MATCHES IN THE MIDLANDS. 

search for incidents. A match at Middleton in those 
days was Hkely to afford enough incident to last a Hfe- 
time ; and the cheery cry of " got him/' as the ball 
sounded on the batsman's ribs, might have been heard 
pretty frequently. If we bowlers could not quite say 
with J. C. Shaw that we put the ball where we liked, I 
doubt if after it had once pitched on a real old Middleton 
plantain, even W. G. Grace at his best would have backed 
himself to grapple with its subsequent eccentricities. That 
we got a good many more runs than far stronger sides 
could get on Hegan's ash-sown wicket, was perhaps due 
to the fact that we have become a little ultra-civilised in 
the way of our requirements in these latter days. 

" Have a shot at them, old fellow," remarked Jack Dale, 
as he retired, with his bat behind his back, in the direction 
of short-leg just as I was on the point of delivering the 
ball ; and so I did, but I missed them. Perhaps George 
Willes on the Forester side and myself on the other got 
as many runs as most people at Middleton, nicety of cal- 
culation, not being quite such a strong point with either of 
us as it was with more scientific batsmen; and when it was 
odds on the ball hitting the body if it missed the bat or 
wicket, to shut the eyes and let go the painter was sound 
policy. However, we never did have an inquest on the 
ground, and we got plenty of amusement out of the game. 
I cannot conscientiously say that either Banbury or Ded- 
dington was exactly a bread-and-butter wicket, but both 
were so atrociously slow that there was a less exciting 
element of danger, and on the whole I vastly preferred 
Middleton. At Banbury one year, Teddy Rutter distin- 
guished himself by taking the ball when we had got about 
80 for no wickets, and getting rid of James Walker, a Pigg 
(whether it was H. or C. is still an open question), and 
Harry Maul, then a most dangerous bat, in six balls, and 
I was very nearly caught from a rebound off the opposite 



BICESTER. 299 

batsman's hind-quarters in the next over. I remember 
Harry Tubb playing a fine not-out innings of just 100 in 
the second innings on a very muddy wicket at Dedding- 
ton; and I also remember that gay deceiver, Walter Bovill, 
considerately borrowing my best bat for the express pur- 
pose apparently of hitting me out of the ground with it, as 
I bowled the first ball of the match. And to this day I 
can vividly recall the piteous expression of Holford Risley's 
face, when he had rashly asked Jenkins to lend him a 
dancing man for the night of the Deddington ball, and on 
coming up to the ground to be introduced to his guest, 
found that he was expected to entertain a man who was 
at the moment standing upon his head in the midst of the 
wreckage of furniture which he had created just outside 
what was to be the ballroom. 

" Oh, is that the young gentleman } " was all that he 
said, but his face spoke volumes. 

But if unkind fate has decreed that the Upton week is 
to come again no more, it is a matter of congratulation 
that for the past three years Forester cricket in the Ox- 
fordshire district has had a renaissance, and so long as 
those keen and hospitable supporters of the game, Harry 
Tubb and Charlie Hoare, reside in the neighbourhood of 
Bicester, we may hope that there are good days in store 
for us, and that good yarns may be reserved for a future 
chronicler. 

The matches played since the revival have been most 
hotly contested, and though Atthill and Walter Bovill 
managed to split a finger apiece at Bicester on one and 
the same day, the light, not the ground, was responsible 
for the twin mishaps. If results proved that Harry Tubb 
was slightly out of his reckoning when he informed me last 
year at Lord's that he fancied that both Bicester and 
Bignell would beat the Foresters, either match took a 
good deal of winning, and the only thing that marred the 



300 MATCHES IN THE MIDLANDS. 

enjoyment of the four days' cricket was the fact that the 
temporary disablement of Tubb himself deprived the home 
XI of a still more than serviceable cricketer. 

There must be something very rejuvenating about the 
climate of this part of Oxfordshire. For either at Banbury, 
Middleton, Deddington, or Bicester successive generations 
of Free Foresters have had the pleasure of encountering 
that genial old cricketer Edward, or, as he is more 
commonly called, "Wash" Ramsay of Croughton, who 
has belonged to the Club from its very earliest beginning, 
and playing on one side or the other, has taken part in more 
F. F. matches than any man in that or possibly any other 
district. Not only has " Wash " with ever ready hospitality 
opened the doors of his house at Croughton to many 
Foresters during their tours in Oxfordshire, but he has 
probably in his time bowled some hundreds of them out, 
and is quite likely to perform the same kind office for some 
of them in the future. There were few more dangerous 
bowlers in England than " Wash " some thirty years ago, 
and even now on his day he wants a good deal of watching, 
"^YvXq per contra \i^ is always game to back himself for a 
crown to make his ten runs against any bowling. Another 
familiar figure in the same district is that of the chatty and 
energetic Rector of Middleton. W. H. Draper had, I fancy, 
already taken his M.A. degree when as a very small boy 
at Radley I first admired his brilliant fielding ; and to this 
day he can still hold a hot catch, steal a short run, or take 
as well as talk more than his fair share in a long day's 
outing better than a good many cricketers belonging to a 
generation which was yet unborn when he was in his prime. 
To that despairing philosopher, who has already in his own 
mind settled upon the age of forty, or it may be even an 
earlier date, as the " fixed period " for giving up cricket and 
taking to golf or some other form of gentle exercise, I would 
prescribe a visit to the Bicester Country and a match 



CHRISTCHURCH, OXFORD. 301 

either with or against a Bicester XI, in the hope that a 
couple of overs from "Wash" Ramsay or half an hour's 
batting with Draper as a partner might induce him to 
postpone the evil day for yet another twenty years. 

I had almost forgotten to mention that a very pleasant 
match has been for the last eight years played during the 
summer term at Oxford against Christchurch. The 
Forester Elevens have been got up by H. Tubb, and he 
has often put a very strong side into the field ; but, strange 
to say, only one match of the whole series has been finished, 
and that resulted in the defeat of the Foresters. Drawn 
games are of frequent occurrence on the " House " ground, 
owing to the excellence of the wicket, and owing partly 
also to the unfortunate fact that the summer team may 
too often be entitled the Oxford "Monsoon." However, 
any match under the auspices of one of the most popular 
captains of the present or any era of Free Forester cricket 
is likely to retain its attractiveness in the face of far more 
untoward circumstances. I have not been specially retained 
to sing the praises of individual members of the Club, but 
the general effect of Harry Tubb's residence in the district 
upon the tone of the local cricket has been little short of 
remarkable, and can only be fully appreciated by those who 
have played in the Bicester country. 

In his picturesque house, Thornby Hall, lying on the 
borders of Warwickshire and Northants, the county of 
spires and squires, Mr Pender, a Forester of some years' 
standing, for several seasons hospitably entertained a Club 
XI which played two or three matches in the district. 
These matches were generally managed by C. Farmer, 
under whose auspices a fairly strong side encountered 
the Gentlemen of Leicestershire and either the Gentlemen 
of Northants or the County XL A good many drawn 
games were played, and now and again the F. F. got by 
no means the best of the deal. But in 1893, the last year 



302 MATCHES IN THE MIDLANDS. 

in which the matches figured on our programme, a 
decidedly strong Forester XI, the mustering whereof 
a chapter of accidents rendered anything but a sinecure, 
easily beat a weak amateur side at Lutterworth, and on 
the two following days won the match against Northants 
Club and ground in an innings with some runs to spare. 
Both matches were finished early on the second day, 
results partly attributable to the fact that in neither case 
was the wicket quite unexceptionable. 

At Lutterworth the turf was rather of the slow and 
sticky order ; at Northampton, on the other hand, it was 
rather a fast and a decidedly fiery wicket ; and at both 
places the ball wanted a good deal of watching. We had 
on our side a fast bowler of some repute, who — I trust 
the ' Lancet ' will not review our book — had been strictly 
forbidden by his doctor to bowl. He kept the spirit, if 
he somewhat transgressed the letter, of the law, as he only 
went on occasionally for a couple of overs when the bowl- 
ing was in a knot. And he invariably brought about a 
dissolution of partnership between the batsmen ; but, by 
way of keeping on good terms with the doctor, begged 
that his name might not appear on the score-sheet as a 
bowler. There was a good deal of competition for the 
credit of those wickets, and the claims put forward were 
in many cases ingenious. The bewilderment of the 
scorers when they were informed that one and the same 
man, when he was bowling, was sometimes Curteis and 
sometimes Bovill, but when he was batting was quite 
another person altogether, may be more easily imagined 
than described. I must apologise for thus giving away 
the two great bowlers I have mentioned ; but as it occasion- 
ally happened that one or other of them was nominally 
bowling at both ends, the analysis must have been rather 
a curiosity. At Northampton Curteis proved in more 
ways than one that his heart is always in the right place, 




V 3 

7. < 

o . 



6 w 



fa 



qh 






DEDDINGTON. 



303 



as after receiving a very severe blow in that region early 
in his innings, he stuck to his guns manfully, and helped 
Walkenshaw to put on a hundred before the first wicket 
fell. While the latter was batting, an old gentleman in- 
formed me that no one had ever hit into the pavilion from 
the middle of the ground, whereupon, by way of giving my 
informant the pleasure of a new sensation, Walkenshaw 
kindly performed the feat twice in the same over. 



1880. Played at Deddington, August 23 and 24. 



FREE FORESTERS. 



1ST INNINGS. SCORE. 


2D INNINGS. SCORE. 


W. D. Bovill, not out .... 


50 


c Tubb, b Ramsay . 


22 


T. Wise, hit wicket, b Maul 


5 


b Burra . 


I 


Hon. R. H. Lyttelton, c Ramsay, b Maul 


3 


b Ramsay 


I 


C. J. Hegan, st C. E. Cobb, b Maul 





c Burra, b C. E. Cobb 


7 


W. A. Lucy, c Cobden, b Ramsay . 





b C. E. Cobb . 


6 


E. Rutter, c and b Maul .... 


3 


run out . 


8 


T. Ratliff, c Willes, b Maul 


3 


c A. Cobb, b Ramsay 


2 


R. G. Venables, b Burra .... 


18 


c A. Cobb, b C. Cobb 


7 


E. W. Hemingway, c Willes, b Burra 





b C. Cobb 


3 


E. L. Fisher, absent. 




c Maul, b Burra 


I 


C. R. Draper, absent. 




not out . 


6 


Extras 


2 


Extras . 


9 


Total 


84 


Total 


73 



DEDDINGTON. 



1ST INNINGS. 



SCORE. 



A. R. Cobb, run out ... 3 

H. Tubb, c Hegan, b Bovill . 33 

H. C. Maul, St Wise, b Rutter . i 

W. Evetts, c Hegan, b Rutter . o 

F. C. Cobden, c Lucy, b Rutter . 2 

C. E. Cobb, c Wise, b Bovill . 18 

R. W. Byass, c Lucy, b Rutter . 15 

Rev. G. E. Willes, c Ratliff, b Rutter 19 



1ST INNINGS. 

E. Ramsay, not out 

Rev. J. F. Burra, hit wicket, 

Venables .... 
W. H. P. Jenkins, b Rutter. 

Extras .... 



Total 



12 
9 

131 



In the second innings A. B, Cobb (b Rutter) scored o, H. Tubb (c Rutter, b 
Bovill) I, W. Evetts (not out) 14, F. C. Cobden (run out) 2, C. E. Cobb (not out) 
10, — total 27. Deddington won with 7 wickets to fall. 



304 



MATCHES IN THE MIDLANDS, 



1881. Played Augiist 15 and 16. 
DEDDINGTON. 



1ST INNINGS. 

Rev. E. D. Prothero, b Burton . 
H. Tubb, 1 b w, b Bovill . 
W. E. W. Collins, st Hoare, b Rutter 
A. R. Cobb, b Bovill .... 
Rev. Clary Smith, c Ratliff, b Buckle 
F. C. Cobden, c Hoare, b Bovill 
Rev. C. D. B. Marsham, c Rutter, b Bovill 
H. C. Maul, c Lee, b Bovill 
E. V. Hemingway, b Buckle 
H. Bullock, c Byass, b Buckle . 
S. H. Byass, c Longman, b Bovill 
W. H. P. Jenkins, not out 
byes 4, wides 3 . . . . 

Total 



19 

I 

14 

5 

26 

5 
2 

3 

I 
I 

3 
o 

7 
87 



2D INNINGS. 

b Lee 

not out 

hit wicket, b Lee 

c Dewar, b Rutter 

b Buckle . 

c sub., b Rutter 

not out . . • 



SCORE. 

6 
100 

S 

13 
20 

13 



byes 8, wides 3, no-balls 2 13 



Total 



177 



FREE FORESTERS. 



1ST INNINGS. SC 

G. H. Longman, c Smith, b Collins 

G. H. Goldney, b Smith 

W. D. Bovill, b Collins 

M. B. Buckle, b Collins 

A. O. Burton, b Byass . 

H. W. Hoare, b Byass 

E. Matthews, c Maul, b Collins 

F. H. Lee, c Prothero, b CoUins 



RE. 1ST INNINGS. SCORE. 

65 R. W. Byass, c Maul, b Smith . 17 

2 E. Rutter, c Marsham, b Cobden 12 

3 E. J. Dewar, not out . . .18 
o T. Rathff, c Smith ... 6 

25 byes 8, leg-byes 2, wides 2, no- 

40 balls 3 15 

4 Total . 214 



1882. Played at Deddington, August 21 and 22. 



DEDDINGTON. 



1ST INNINGS. : 

Rev. W. H, Draper, b Buckland 

A. R. Cobb, c sub., b Rutter 

H. C. Maul, 1 b w, b Peyton 

W. Evetts, b Peyton . 

W. E. W. Collins, b Lee . 

F. C. Cobden, b Buckland . 

Rev. Clarence Smith, c and b Lee 34 



1ST INNINGS. 

Rev. T. F. Burra, not out . 
Rev. G. E. Willes, b Lee . 
E. Ramsay, c and b Buckland 
W. H. P. Jenkins, b Lee . 
Extras .... 



Total 



14 
o 
o 

I 
34 

261 



DEDDINGTON. 



305 



FREE FORESTERS. 



1ST INNINGS. 




SCORE. 


2D INNINGS. SCORE. 


Capt. H. C. WiUes, b Collins ... 2 


c Maul, b Collins . 





W. D. Bovill, c Collins, b Cobden 




24 


bMaul . 


5 


F. M. Buckland, b Ramsay 




• 39 


c Cobden, b Collins . 


38 


E. L. Fisher, c Burra, b Maul 






6 


b Cobden 


14 


Rev. T. T. Peyton, b Ramsay 






II 


c Burra, b Ramsay . 


17 


E. Rutter, b Ramsay . 









not out . 


9 


F. H. Lee, c Maul, b Ramsay 






3 


b Burra . 


8 


L. J. Fish, b Collins . 






6 


b Burra . 


7 


H. Hole, b Collins . 






19 


St Cobb, b Burra . 


6 


A. E. Bedford, b Burra . 









c Smith, b Collins . 


7 


C. H. Cobb, not out . 









b Cobden 


3 


byes, &c. 






9 


byes, &o. 


5 




Total 




no 


Total 


119 



1884. Played on B anbury ground, August 21 and 22. 
DEDDINGTON. 



1ST INNINGS. SCORE. 


2D INNINGS. SCORE. 


J. G. Walker, b Bovill 


6 


c Rawlinson, b Appleby 


7 


W. T. Toynbee, b Bovill . 


2 


b Maude . 


8 


Rev. E. D. Prothero, c Rawlinson, b Bovil 


1 13 


b Maude . 


8 


W. E. W. Collins, b Bovill 


5 


b Appleby 





S. H. Byass, b Appleby . 


9 


b Evans . 


6 


C. E. Cobb, b Appleby . 


4 


c Foster, b Maude . 


2 


W. Evetts, c Maude, b Bovill . 


13 


c Ricketts, b Appleby 


21 


A. C. Willy, c Rawlinson, b Appleby 


3 


b Appleby 


5 


H. Byass, not out ... . 


4 


b Maude . 


2 


E. Ramsay, c Appleby, b Bovill 





c Bovill, b Appleby . 


3 


W. H. P. Jenkins, c and b Bovill . 


2 


not out . 





Extras 


6 


Extras . 


6 


Total 


^7 


Total . 


68 



FREE FORESTERS. 



1ST INNINGS. SCORE. 


1ST INNINGS. 


SCORE. 


A. H. Evans, run out . 


65 


A. Appleby, b Willy . 


. 38 


F. W. Maude, c Cobb, b Collins 


7 


W. D. Bovill, b Willes 


5 


J. H. J. Hornsby, b Collins . 


13 


G. W. Ricketts, b Collins . 


• 14 


C. Rawlinson, b Willy . 


3 


F. J. Foster, not out . 





Rev. G. E. Willes, c Willy, b 




Extras .... 


• 25 


Collins 


16 







F. W. Capron, c Cobb, b Ramsay 20 
Capt. B. Baker, c Evetts, b Ramsay o 



Total 



Free Foresters won in one innings, with 70 runs plus. 
U 



206 



3o6 



MATCHES IN THE MIDLANDS. 



1885. Played at Banbury, August 19 aiid 20. 
DEDDINGTON. 



1ST INNINGS. SCORE, 


2D INNINGS. SCORE. 


H. C. Maul, b Ricketts . 


II 


b Rutter . 


30 


J. G. Walker, b Ricketts . 


14 


b Rutter . 


13 


C. Pigg, b Bovill .... 


6 


b Rutter . 


26 


C. H. Balderson, b Ricketts 


6 


c Ricketts, b Rutter . 


17 


E. L. Fisher, c Rutter, b Bovill 





b Bovill . 


I 


W. E. Collins, 1 b w, b Bovill . 


2 


c W. Toynbee, b Ricketts 


54 


C. Shillingford, run out . 


30 


b Bovill . 


7 


Hon. W. F. North, b Cattley . 


12 


run out . 


6 


H. Tucker, not out .... 


4 


c Speed, b Bovill 





A. B. Franey, b Cattley . 


2 


not out . 


3 


E. Ramsay, b Cattley 


I 


c and b Bovill . 


14 


W. H. P. Jenkins, b Cattley . 





run out . 





Extras 


4 


Extras . 


5 


Total 


92 


Total 


176 



1ST INNINGS. 



FREE FORESTERS. 



SCORE 



p. R. Toynbee, hit wicket, b Collins 
R. W. Skipwith, b Ramsay . 
A. C. Cattley, c Maul, b Shilling- 
ford 

Rev. G. E. Willes, b Collins 

F. E. Speed, run out . 
W. D. Bovill, b Ramsay 

G. W. Ricketts, run out 



E. 


1ST INNINGS. 


SCORE. 


27 


A. Hoare, b Collins 


7 


I 


W. A. Lucy, b Collins . 


3 




W. T. Toynbee, not out 


II 


3S 


R. Peel, b Collins 


I 


6 


E. Rutter, b Maul 


5 


9 


Extras 


• 32 



17 



Total 



In the second innings P. R. Toynbee (not out) scored i, A. C. Cattley (b Collins) 
21, F. E. Speed (not out) 27, W. T. Toynbee (c Shillingford, b Collins) 11 ; extras 
7, —total 6^, The Foresters won with 8 wickets to fall. 



Played at Middleton Park, Atigust 20 and 21. 
LORD JERSEY'S ELEVEN. 



1ST INNINGS. SCORE. 

J. G. Walker, c Wise, b W. D 

Bovill .... 
A. R. Cobb, b E. Rutter . 
H. C. Maul, c W. Peyton, b E, 

Rutter .... 
M. P. Lucas, b W. D. Bovill 
W. E. W. Collins, c Trevor; 

Rev. T. T. Peyton . 
F. W. Maude, c Wise, b W. D, 

Bovill .... 



57 



Total 



1ST INNINGS. SCORE, 

Rev. E. D. Prothero, c Bovill, b 

Rev. T. T. Peyton . 
H. Tubb, b E. Rutter . 
Rev. C. D. B. Marsham, not out , 
E. Ramsay, c Bovill, b Rev. G 

Willes . . . . , 
W. H. P. Jenkins, c Willes, b E. 

Rutter 2 

byes 6, leg-byes 2, no-balls i . 9 



258 



In the second innings H. Tubb (not out) scored 15, A. R. Cobb (not out) 4 
no-balls i, — total 20. 



MIDDLETON. 



307 



FREE FORESTERS. 



1ST INxNINGS. SCORE. 


2D INNINGS. SCORE. 


W. D. BoviU, c Jenkins, b Collins . 


5 


c Marsham, b Lucas 


41 


Capt. B. Baker, b Collins . 


I 


c Tubb, b Maude . 


7 


A. H. Trevor, b Collins . 


5 


b Ramsay 


43 


H. R. Webbe, b Collins . 





b Ramsay 


2 


Rev. G. E. Willes, b Collins . 


8 


c Walker, b Lucas . 


31 


J. W. Dale, c Maude, b Collins . 


7 


b Maude . 


5 


Rev. T. T. Peyton, c Maul, b Lucas . 


21 


c Cobb, b Collins . 


24 


T. Wise, c Lucas, b Collins 


4 


c Lucas, b Maude . 


25 


A. Hoare, b Collins .... 


4 


b Lucas . 


5 


W. R. B. Peyton, b Collins . 





not out . 





E. Rutter, not out ... . 


4 


b Collins . 





byes 10, leg-byes 2, wides 2 . 


14 


byes 14, leg-byes 3, wides 2 19 


Total 


73 


Total 


202 



Played at Middleton Park, August 18 and 19. 



LORD JERSEY'S TEAM. 



1ST INNINGS. SCORE. 

J. G. Walker, c and b James ... 32 

H. Tubb, c W. D. Bovill, b Capron . . 16 

H. C. Maul, c sub., b Maude ... 6 

Rev. T. T. Peyton, b Bovill ... 60 

W. E. W. Collins, c and b Bovill . , 26 

Rev. W. H. Draper, c Baker, b Bovill . 4 

C. E. Cobb, c James, b Bovill . . . i 

C. Shillingford, c Rev. Bedford, b Maude 4 

Rev. C. D. B. Marsham, c Capron, b Maude 4 

S. H. Byass, not out o 

Lord Jersey, b Bovill o 

W. H. P. Jenkins, c Capron, b Bovill . o 

byes 13 

Total . 166 



2D INNINGS. SCORE, 

c Dale, b Bovill . . 2 

c North, b Maude . . 12 

c Maude, b James . . 8 

b Maude .... 4 

st James, b Maude . . 24 

b Maude . . . . o 

c North, b James . . 31 

c Baker, b Maude . . • o 

not out .... 8 

c and b Maude . . 23 

c and b Maude . . o 

c Toynbee, b Maude . 14 

byes 9, leg-byes 7, wide i 17 

Total . 143 



FREE FORESTERS. 



Capt. B. Baker, b Collins . 
F. W. Maude, b Shillingford . 
F. W. Capron, b Collins . 
W. D. Bovill, c Cobb, b Collins 
Rev. J. E. Willes, b Collins 
J. W. Dale, b Shillingford 
C. James, c Rev. Draper, b Byass 
C. W. Rawlinson, b Collins 
W. T. Toynbee, c Cobb, b Collins . 
Hon. W. F. North, b Collins . 
Rev. W. C. R. Bedford, b Shillingford 
Hon. R. Villiers, not out . 
byes 5, leg-byes 2 . 

Total 



96 



c and b Shillingford . . 4 

c Rev. Draper, b Shillingford 21 

c H. Tubb, b Shillingford 12 

b Shillingford . . . o 

c Tubb, b Shillingford . 30 

not out .... 34 

c Tubb, b Collins . . 3 

c Lord Jersey, b Collins . 2 

b Shillingford . . . o 

b Collins .... 3 

b Shillingford . . . o 

c Peyton, b Collins . . 2 

byes 27, leg-byes 8 . 35 



Total 



146 



3o8 



MATCHES IN THE MIDLANDS. 



1886. Played at Bicester, July 19 and 20. 
FREE FORESTERS. 



1ST INNINGS. 



SCORE. 



A. W. Moon, c Paxton, b Lindsey . 

F. W. Bovill, b Hamilton .... 

E. J. Beaumont Nesbitt, c Tubb, b Ramsay 
Hon. W. F. North, b Lindsey . 

F. M. Lucas, b Lindsey .... 
J. H. J. Hornsby, c Tubb, b Lindsey 
C. A. S. Leggatt, not out .... 
A. H. Blackwell, b Shillingford . 
E. Dames-Longworth, c Heath, b Lindsey 
A. T. Thring, 1 b w, b Lindsey . 
C. J. Stratton, absent. 

byes 8, leg-byes 6, wide i . . . 

Total . 155 



E. 


2D INNINGS. 


SCORE. 


74 


c and b Lindsey 


6 


30 


c Glanville, b Shillingford 37 





b Shillingford . 


I 


6 


c and b Lindsey 




4 





b Shillingford . 




5 


2 


b Shillingford . 




10 


21 


c Prothero, b Lindsey 




6 


3 


b Ramsay 










c Hoare, b Paxton . 




9 


4 


not out . 


. 


16 




b Lindsey 




3 


15 


byes 2, leg-byes 2, w 


de 


I 5 



Total 



BICESTER. 



1ST INNINGS. SCORE. 


1ST INNINGS. SCORE. 


C. T. Hoare, b Stratton 


52 


Capt. Douglas Hamilton, b Nesbitt 5 


A. H. Heath, not out . 


146 


F. W. H. Lindsey, b Hornsby . 11 


E. W. Glanville, b Hornsby 


29 


E. H. Paxton, st Moon, b Thring 23 


Rev. H. A. Douglas Hamilton 




E. Ramsay, b Stratton . . .10 


b Hornsby 


9 


C. Shillingford, b Stratton . . i 


Rev. E. D, Prothero, st Moon 




byes 7, leg-byes 3 . . .10 


b Hornsby 







H. Tubb, b Hornsby . 


4 


Total . 300 



1888. Played at Bicester, July 23 and 24. 
BICESTER. 



TST INNINGS. 



SCORE 



C. T. Hoare, b Wilson 

Rev. E. D. Prothero, c Cowan, b Nesbitt 

Capt. Talbot, st Moon, b Wilson 

H. Bassett, c Hill, b Wilson 

F. W. H. Lindsey, b Nesbitt . 
W. D. Llewellyn, b Nesbitt 
C. D. Pennant, b Wilson . 
Rev. H. A. D. Hamilton, b Wilson 
C. J. Stratton, c Hill, b Wilson . 
C. Shillingford, c Fitz-Roy, b Wilson 

G. H. Page, not out . 
H. Tubb, b Wilson . 

bye. . , . , . 

Total 



E. 


2D INNINGS. SCORE. 


3 


c Cowan, b Nesbitt . . 


5 


b Wilson . 


4 


3 


c Pennant, b Wilson 





13 


c Moon, b Nesbitt . 


30 





c Cowan, b Wilson . 


10 


4 


c Moon, b Nesbitt . 


2 





b Nesbitt . 


I 


6 


b Wilson . 





4 


b Wilson . 


2 





not out 


9 


2 


b Nesbitt .... 





2 


c Fitz-Roy, b Wilson 


6 


I 


byes 3, leg-byes 2, wide 


I 6 



43 



Total 



70 



BICESTER. 



309 



FREE FORESTERS. 



1ST INNINGS. 



Capt. F. Cowan, c Hamilton, b 
Page 

J. Hill, b Page . 

Capt. W. R. B. Peyton, run out 

A. W. Moon, b Bassett 

C. Thursby, b Bassett . 

E. B. Nesbitt, c and b Lindsey 

Capt. B. Roberts, c Hamilton, b 
Bassett 



1ST INNINGS. 



SCORE. 



Rev. G. C. Willes, b Shillingford 3 
Lord A. Fitz-Roy, c Hoare, b 

Lindsey 4 

R. Skipwith, c Stratton, b Bassett 12 

R. A. Wilson, b Bassett . . 2 

F. D. Pennant, not out . . 3 

byes 8, leg-bye i . . . 9 

Total . 103 



In the second innings Cowan (not out) scored 5, Hill (b Bassett) o, Moon (not 
out) 5 ; bye i, — total 11. 



1890. Played at Bicester, Augtist 25 a7td 26. 
BICESTER. 



1ST INNINGS. SCORE. 

E. Jakeman, c Ricketts, b Collins o 

S. D. Maul, 1 b w, b Webbe 

A. Rogers, c sub., b Collins 

Capt. Wyld, b Ricketts 

C. T. Hoare, c and b Ricketts 

E. L. Metcalfe, b Ricketts . 

F. W. H. Lindsey, c and b Rick 

etts 

In the second innings Maul (c 



1ST INNINGS. SCORE. 

H. Tubb, hit wkt., b Webbe . 5 

C. J. Stratton, c Dewar, b Collins 6 

Policy, b Bovill .... 14 

F. Dickenson, not out . . . i 

E. Ramsay, c Gillman, b Ricketts o 

byes 3, leg-byes 2 ... 5 



2 Total . 134 

Dauglish, b Gillman) scored 34, Wyld (not out) 



4, Metcalfe (not out) 10, Tubb (b Gillman) 27 ; leg- bye i, — total 76. 
FREE FORESTERS. 



1ST INNINGS. 

G. L. Windier, b PoUey 
J. Hill, run out 
C. Dewar, c Maul, b Lindsey 
R. T. Atthill, b Rogers 
W. E. W. Collins, not out . 
byes 2, leg-byes 4 

Total 



1ST INNINGS. SCORE. 


A. J. Webbe, b Lindsey . . 19 


G. W. Ricketts, b Rogers . 


14 


D. F. Gillman, b Rogers . 





H. V. Page, b Lindsey 


I 


W. D. Bovill, b Maul . 


26 


Rev. J. H. Savory, c Dickenson 




bMaul .... 


20 


M. J. Dauglish, b Rogers . 


II 



SCORE. 

I 

I 

14 

13 

2 

6 
128 



1892. Played at Bicester, Jiily 13 and 14. 
BICESTER. 



1ST INNINGS. 



E. Jakeman, run out . 

J. G. P. Draper, b Lang . 

H. Bassett, run out 

A. E. Leatham, b Maclean . 

W. S. Case, c Lang, b Rutter 

Rev. J. H. Savory, c Walker, b 

Rutter 

C. T. Hoare, c Welman, b Lang 



SCORE. 

5 
o 

41 

7 

23 



1ST INNINGS. 



SCORE. 



C. J. Stratton, c Maclean, b 

Rutter o 

Policy, c Lord Dalkeith, b Lang . 66 

R. Renn, b Lang ... 21 

G. H. Page, not out . . . 3 

Extras 18 

Total . 255 



3IO 



MATCHES IN THE MIDLAADS. 



FREE FORESTERS. 



1ST INNINGS. 

O. R. Dunell, c Jakeman, b Bassett 
C. H. R. Gresson, b Bassett . 
G. G. Lang, c Bassett, b Page . 
H. E. Bull, c Savory, b Bassett 
J. G. Walker, c and b Page 
M. F, Maclean, c Jakeman, b Bassett 
Capt. Becher, c Savory, b Bassett 
Major Rice, st Renn, b Page . 
Earl of Dalkeith, c Savory, b Page 
F. T. Welman, not out . 
E. Rutter, absent 
Extras 

Total 





SCORE. 


2D INNINGS. SCORE. 


o 


c Hoare, b Bassett . 


14 




22 


c Bassett, b Page . 


28 




6 


b Policy . 


15 




6 


b Page . 


2 




4 


run out . 


i6 


tt 


28 


c Jakeman, b Leatham 


28 




5 


c Stratton, b Policy . 


14 




4 


b Policy . 


4 




o 


not out 


14 




7 


c Savory, b Bassett . 


o 




o 


absent 


o 




4 


Extras . 


i8 


1 


86 


Total 


153 



1893. Played at Bicester, July 19 and 20. 
BICESTER. 



1ST INNINGS. 






SCORE. 


2D INNINGS. SCORE. 


T. B. Case, c Hanbury, b Harding . 




12 


c and b Appleby 


4 


H. E. Bull, c Hardy, b Leatham 







c and b Appleby 


5 


W. S. Case, c Rice, b Harding 




21 


c Rutter, b Harding 





Rev. W. H. Draper, st Hanbury, b 1 


H[ard 








ing ...... 




10 


b Harding 


2 


H. Allen, b Harding . 







c Becher, b Harding 


18 


P. Colville Smith, b Appleby . 






16 


b Appleby 





Policy, c and b Leatham . 









c Hanbury, b Leatham 


35 


H. Tubb, b Harding 






29 


c Becher, b Leatham 


17 


C. T. Hoare, b Appleby . 






II 


c Rice, b Harding . 


II 


C. J. Stratton, not out 






I 


b Harding 


2 


A. B. Ramsay, b Appleby 






I 


b Appleby 





E. Ramsay, b Appleby 









not out 





Extras .... 






2 


Extras . 


I 


Total 




103 


Total 


95 


FREE 


FOE 


.ESTERS. 




E. Hanbury, c and b Tubb 




2 


b E. Ramsay . 


. 32 


Rev. J. H. Savory, b Policy 






6 


b Policy . 


7 


Major Hardy, run out 









not out . 


• 44 


C. H. Harding, b Policy . 






8 


c W. S. Case, b E. Ramsa 


V 4 


Major Rice, b Tubb . 









c Allen, b Tubb 


20 


Capt. Becher, run out 









not out . 


8 


A. E. Leatham, b Tubb . 






2 






A. Appleby, b Policy 






10 


c and b W. S. Case . 


9 


G. Style, c Draper, b Policy 






. 23 






Capt. A. H. Butler, c Allen, b Tubb 











F. Dickenson, st T. B. Case, b W. S 


Cas 


e 13 






E. Rutter, not out . 











Extras 




3 


Extras . 


8 


« 


Tota 


1 


. 67 


Total 


. 132 



NEW BOLD REVEL. 



311 



1894. Played at Bicester, July 23 and 24. 
BICESTER. 



1ST INNINGS. SCORE. 


2D INNINGS. SCORE. 


Capt. S. D. Maul, c Appleby, b Leatham 


88 


1 b w, b Hickley 


17 


H. Tubb, c Savory, b Leatham 


35 


b Appleby 


IS 


T. Emberlin, run out .... 


8 


c Leatham, b Hickley 


16 


P. C. Smith, b Hickley .... 





not out 


3 


C. T. Hoare, b Hickley . 


17 


c and b Leatham 





H. Allen, b Harding 


33 


c Leatham, b Hickley 


22 


J. Hill, c Rutter, b Appleby . 


I 


b Appleby 


18 


Polley, c Hanbury, b Hickley . 


9 






C. J. Stratton, c Hanbury, b Hickley 





c Marshall, b Appleby 


13 


F. Morgan, st Hanbury, b Harding . 


9 


c Marshall, b Appleby 





E. Ramsay, b Harding 


2 






G. H. Page, b Harding . 


4 


b Hickley 





C. L. H. Burton, not out . 


I 


c Hanbury, b Hickley 


2 


byes 4, leg-bye i, wide i 


6 


byes 


2 



Total 



213 



Total 



108 



FREE FORESTERS. 



1ST INNINGS. SC 

E. Hanbury, c and b Maul . 

H. G. S. Hughes, b Maul . 

H. E. Cobb, b Morgan 

C. H. Harding, b Maul 

A. E. Leatham, c Polley, b Page 

Rev. J. H. Savory, c Emberlin, b 

Page 

Lieut. -Col. Rice, c Emberlin, b 

Tubb 



^E. 1ST INNINGS. 

II Capt. Becher, c Hill, b Page 

9 C. L. Hickley, b Page . 

84 J. F. Marshall, not out 

8 F. Dickenson, b Maul . 

72 A. Appleby, c Ramsay, b Page 
E. Rutter, b Page 

40 byes 23, leg-byes 5, wides 3 

29 Total 



2 

2 

20 

II 

4 

7 

31 

330 



No account of Free Forester cricket in the past few 
years would be complete without something more than 
a passing reference to the matches played at Newbold 
Revel. Thanks to Arthur Wood's unfailing hospitality, 
the Newbold Revel cricket-ground has become a highly 
favoured resort of a goodly. throng of amateur cricketers, 
and the scene of many a keen encounter. There Butter- 
flies, Eton Ramblers, Free Foresters, and many other 
clubs have assembled to fight their friendly battles, and 
neither on the cricket-ground nor before or after the day's 



312 MATCHES IN THE MIDLANDS. 

play need any one find the time hang heavy on his hands. 
It is not given to many places to combine so many forms 
of outdoor amusement. A plunge in the ample swimming- 
bath, trout-fishing, rabbit-shooting, lawn-golf, squash rack- 
ets are all included in the programme ; and those unappre- 
ciated mortals, like Jeff Maynard, who have been pining to 
bowl all day and yet never put on, are allowed to try their 
hands at lawn-bowls in the evening, and, by the deadly 
accuracy of their aim, vindicate their reputation as straight 
if not dangerous bowlers. If it did so happen that Gunner 
Curteis was so unreasonably startled by the sudden appari- 
tion of a black rabbit between his feet as he was ferreting 
with the keeper at an early hour in the morning, and so 
much upset thereby that he not only dropped catches and 
made ducks for the rest of the day, but is even credited 
with having for the first time in his cricket career tempor- 
arily lost his temper and instituted comparisons between a 
brother Forester and an unclean animal ; and even though 
to this day it is darkly hinted that Rawlin shot a pheasant 
out of season, — the presence of a plurality of pursuits is a 
distinct and most attractive feature of the place, and neither 
host nor captain can be held responsible for the eccentrici- 
ties of individual cricketers. Very pleasant has a stay at 
Newbold Revel been in the days of Mr Wood's bachelor- 
hood, and there is good ground for hoping that the advent 
of a wife upon the scene of action, so far from diminishing 
the popularity of the Newbold weeks, will rather tend to 
add to those charming surroundings one attraction that 
has been missing in the past, a gallery of fair spectators. 
For even in this prosaic and matter-of-fact age the " love 
of ladies" and the knowledge that "fair eyes look upon 
their deeds" is an additional incentive for distinguishing 
themselves to many men whom nature obviously intended 
to play up to a gallery. Here and there I have heard a 




CANDELABRUM PRESENTED TO MR WOOD 
ON HIS MARRIAGE, 



ARTHUR WOOD, 313 

jealous or crusty bachelor, whose idea has been that Para- 
dise was not quite the same place after Eve was admitted, 
suggest that the master of Newbold was full young to 
marry ; but the suspicions of even the most confirmed 
woman-hater have been allayed by the hearty interest 
taken by Mrs Arthur Wood in the cricket programme for 
the season of 1894. 

To the young and active cricketer, as well as conservative 
old fossils of my own type, the cricket-ground with its 
" six " boundary, and the constant extra strain on the 
powers of endurance, may be said to realise an ideal else- 
where sought for in vain ; and if to a wearied bowler the 
perfect wicket may seem rather to favour the batsman, the 
former, when the scoring rules high, may at least console 
himself with the idea that he is not by any means mono- 
polising the real hard work, as is too frequently the case 
where the boundaries are smaller. There are plenty of 
runs to be got at Newbold Revel, but the spectacle of a 
comparatively fresh batsman hitting a succession of 4's, 
and landing the ball high in the air just over the ropes, is 
conspicuously and necessarily absent, and any one who 
can hit out of that ground honestly deserves his 6 and his 
brief rest. The finest hit I have ever seen at Newbold 
myself was made by Arthur Wood in a Forester match 
against a local team last July, when the ball pitched ten 
yards over the railings to square-leg ; and Asher created a 
record hard to beat when he made 27 off one over in the 
second innings of our match against Shropshire County. 
The runs were scored as follows : 6, 6, 6, 4, 5 ; and as the 
fourth ball was hit to the on -boundary, it was honestly 
worth 6, but had, unfortunately, in its course passed under 
a seat, one of the only two 4 boundaries on the ground, 
and 6 might easily, but for a misunderstanding, have been 
run for the last ball of this sensational over. The bowler 



314 MATCHES IN THE MIDLANDS. 

was not in the slightest degree put out by the rough usage 
that he had received, but informed me that he had been 
hit for 26 in an over a few weeks previously. In 1892 
A. J. Thornton took 36 wickets in a week, but last year 
(1893), when the ground was very hard, he was freely hit 
by the Oxford Authentics, who beat us in an innings. 

"Let me have one more over, Spens," he pleaded, on 
our Captain hinting that a change was imminent. " I'm 
sure that Punch is not at all at home with me." 

So he was allowed that one more over, and Punch 
Philipson, by way of proving that he really was " not at all 
at home" with A. J., scored 17 off the first four balls. 
But to this day A. J. thinks that he should have got him 
if he had gone on. However, we none of us got much 
change out of Punch that day, as, after being badly missed 
early in his innings, he knocked all our bowling about to 
the tune of 130. For us Hornsby played a good innings ; 
but taking it all round, our batting was feeble in the 
extreme. Hornsby has played several good innings on 
the Newbold ground, but has notably failed in the bowling 
line. Blair, Ricketts, and Walter Bovill have also been 
large scorers, and our host has hit hard on more than one 
occasion. As very much the same lot of cricketers have 
been playing at different times as Free Foresters, Butter- 
flies, or the Newbold Revel Club, which numbers upwards 
of 120 paying members, it is rather difficult in the absence 
of the scoring-book to recall in which particular colours 
any individual has been successful. That the Foresters 
may have many more pleasant matches at Newbold is the 
wish dear to the hearts of all of us that have played there. 

For a year or two the Foresters, under my guidance, 
strayed back to what was, if I am not mistaken, the orig- 
inal home of the club, the Forest of Arden. At Fillongley 
Hall, at Meriden, and elsewhere, we met with abundant 



ME RID EN. 315 

hospitality, and our best thanks are due to Arden Adderley, 
Cliarles Digby, and others, for the kindly welcome which 
they extended to us. Nor could any one wish to visit a 
more beautiful country than that district, which claims to 
be the very centre of England. If it was not destined that, 
to Ricketts' inquiring eye, the magic name Rosalind should 
be revealed, we were quite prepared to believe that Rosa- 
lind and Celia, as well as Orlando and Oliver, found in the 
Forest of Arden many a pretty spot obviously designed by 
nature for love-making. But if we were fain to admire the 
quaintly picturesque beauty of the old archery-ground at 
Meriden, a brief experience taught us that it by no means 
follows that a good ground for archery need be a good 
ground for cricket, or that the man who can drop an arrow 
into the clout is thereby constituted a formidable opponent 
in the cricket-field. The wicket was slower, I think, than 
any wicket I ever played on, the out- fielding in many 
places impossible, and the lights and shadows on the 
ground at certain times of the day most baffling. We 
won our matches each year, and on one occasion Gillman 
made 100 by some really brilliant hitting. But by far 
the most interesting match that we played in that district, 
from a cricket point of view, was against Hugh Rother- 
ham's XI at Coventry ; and though, after declaring our 
second innings over, we won rather easily at the finish, 
they had headed us by some 50 runs in the first innings. 
Hard hitting was the order of the day in the latter part of 
our second innings ; and as a hard hitter, under those cir- 
cumstances, I can confidently recommend Harry Bagot, to 
whom nothing in the way of pitch or pace seemed to come 
amiss. Much to be condoled with was the man Caldwell, 
who, having travelled some hundreds of miles to play that 
week for the Foresters, split his finger in a local match at 
Meriden on the day before the Forester cricket began, and 



3i6 MATCHES IN THE MIDLANDS. 

finding himself absolutely incapacitated, returned to Scot- 
land in disgust. We had a match against the Gentlemen 
of Staffordshire at Lichfield each year ; but the weather 
spoilt both games, and a more bleak place on a cold and 
rainy day than that Lichfield ground would be hard to 
find in the whole of England. Gillman and John Ricketts 
caused a little amusement while they were in together one 
second innings — the former, who had taken o at the first 
time of asking, not evincing the slightest anxiety to save 
his spectacles, and failing altogether to respond to the self- 
sacrificing efforts of his partner to run some rather short 
things. Eventually, after playing for some four overs with- 
out attempting to run, Gillman hit out finely, and made 50 
in very quick time. Here let me relate a rather curious 
coincidence which happened in a Forester match with 
the Green-jackets at Winchester. Against a rather weak 
bowling side, John Ricketts, going in first, had elected, in 
the most unfeeling manner, to knock up a century, and 
had rather taken the gilt off the gingerbread for the rest of 
us. However, we made a good many runs, and after they 
had had to follow on we were left with only 9 to get in 
order to win the match. Two champions, of whom Frank 
Gresson was one and, I fancy, either Pember or Bobby 
Skipwith the other, having failed to score in the first 
innings, w^ere naturally given the chance of bagging their 
brace. After prolonging the excitement for quite a quarter 
of an hour, and after each had had several hairbreadth 
escapes, they returned to the pavilion in triumph, each 
having scored o — each being " not out," but having secured 
9 extras. And I had almost forgotten to chronicle that 
when 4 runs were required in the second innings of our 
match against the Old Carthusians at Newbold Revel last 
year, we commenced operations by losing 3 wickets for 
no runs, with the result that one, if not two, distinguished 




s ^ 



^ 5 ^ 


'- 






2 i 


f^ 


■>:^. 


H 


. < 


c« 


H 


W 




ffi 


b-i 


u 


^ 


;^ 


<u 




-2 


^ 






fi^ 5 


H 


v 


< 


^ 1 


m 


ta 3 


H 


. Q 


W 


^ . 


N^ 


•n!^ 


u 




< 


TS 


►— , 


V 




-.£ 


;^ 


"- 


[tI 


o '""' 


w 


P? 


« 


P 


o 


^ S 


R. 




c/) 


. o 


P< 


•5 ^ 


Cjlj 


'^^ 


H 


^H 




P^^ 


e 




w 


jj 


w 


u 






NEWBOLD REVEL. 




PAVILION, NEWBOLD. 



OLD CARTHUSIANS. 317 

officers in her Majesty's service earned spectacles ; and 
John Ricketts, when, owing to a mistaken idea that the 
bowler who slipped and delivered an egregious long-hop 
was intentionally playing the fool, he declined to hit the 
silly ball to the boundary, was deservedly punished for the 
omission by being caught off the next ball. 




Rogers. G. W. Ricketts. H. V. Page. G. L. Windier. Goodyear. E. Ramsay. Hobley. 
C. Dewar. A. J. Webbe. D. F. Gillman. E. Jakeman. M. J. Dauglish. 

Capt. Wyld. T^. T. Atthill. F. Lindsey. E. L. Metcalfe. 

J. H. Savory. C. T. Hoare. W. E. W. Collins. S. D. Maul. H. Tubb. J. Hill. W. D. Bovill. 

Bicesiej-, 1S90. 



3i8 



CHAPTER XXXV. 



CHANNEL ISLANDS. 



It only remains for me to record how in 1890 the 
Channel Islands were formally re-occupied by the. Free 
Foresters. Rumours having reached the secretary of the 
disaffected state of these islands, he commissioned me to 
take charge of an expedition, and having effected a land- 
ing, we defeated the forces of Guernsey and Jersey in 
several encounters. In fact, the news of our victory in 
Guernsey must have preceded our arrival in the other 
island, as we found great preparations made to illuminate 
St Heliers on the day of our landing. To be sure, some- 
body did say something about unveiling a statue of her 
Gracious Majesty ; but by the time that we had drunk a 
couple of glasses of the South Lancashire regimental mix- 
ture, we were quite prepared to regard such rumours as 
a mere canaj-d (the recollection of the Channel Islands 
inspires the French). And is it not a recorded fact that 
on the occasion of our second visit, the customary tokens 
of submission — not bread and salt as in the East, but a 
local cheese and part of a gammon of bacon from a local 
pig — were duly presented to us by the Victoria Club 
waiter with the Governor's compliments. 

Without further preface I will give as briefly as possible 
the outlines of the campaign. From the very outset I found 



HECKLED. 319 

that I should have no difficulty in getting together an XI 
or a XXII if necessary, and the fact that we eventually 
started with only ten men was due to the unfortunate cir- 
cumstance of Atthill splitting a finger on the day before the 
voyage, and hoping against hope that his medical adviser 
would not put a veto on his going. The monotony of the 
long night-journey from London to Weymouth was suffi- 
ciently relieved by Ingram's cheery conversation. Ingram's 
merits as an all-round athlete are too well known to require 
any encomium ; as a conversationalist he is simply inde- 
fatigable, and as a cross-examiner equal to Sergeant Buz- 
fuz in his best day, while his stock of general information 
is inexhaustible. The following will serve as a specimen 
of his powers : — 

/. " What time do we reach Weymouth ? " 

C. " Somewhere about two." 

/. " Oh, then, you don't know exactly ? " 

C. " No, not exactly." 

/. "Well, it happens to be 1.50." 

C. " Well, I wasn't far out." 

/. "You were ten minutes out." Then, after a pause, 
"And how soon does the boat leave?" 

C. " Oh, at once, I suppose." 

/. " But you don't know for certain } " 

C. " No, I don't." 

/. " Couldn't you have wired to ask t " 

C. " Well, I'm afraid I did not think it worth while." 

/. "Don't you think that, as a rule, it is worth while 
to make certain } " &c., &c. 

I have quite made up my mind at some future date to 
offer myself for election in an outlying constituency, and 
to get Ingram to " heckle " my opponent. 

Our passage through the streets of Weymouth to the 
boat afforded " Bishop " Kemp unmitigated satisfaction, 
and he yelled directions out of the window to the engine- 



320 GUERNSEY. 

driver to draw up at the butcher's shop, or to have an 
easy at the confectioner's. 

A sort of vault with some beds or berths in it was put at 
the disposal of the team ; but the " Bishop," Jack Turner, 
and Kenneth M'Alpine were so uncommonly lively, and 
there was such a promising preparation for a stupendous 
bear-fight, that the more serious members of the party 
adjourned to the deck and slept there. Personally I 
slumbered peacefully till 8 A.M., when I was awakened 
by the " Bishop " shouting frantically for the steward. That 
functionary hurried to our vault with the paraphernalia 
generally in requisition on these occasions, but was 
promptly repulsed by the " Bishop." " What the dickens 
are you bringing that rubbish here for } Go and tell the 
captain that I want my sea-legs." 

This was received with a stifled scream of laughter from 
the ladies' cabin, and a grunt from the outraged steward. 
Shortly afterwards our whole party assembled on deck, 
looking none the worse for their night's voyage, but feel- 
ing uncommonly peckish. There was a cheerful unanimity 
in the response " Not out ! " given to a sudden inquiry, 
" How's that } " emanating from a stout party in brass 
buttons standing on the bridge. He looked angry, but 
there was really no apparent ground for the appeal. 

We landed on a Sunday morning, and on the afternoons 
of Monday and Tuesday played a match against a com- 
bined team of soldiers and civilians, whom we defeated 
in an innings, and on Wednesday proceeded to Jersey. In 
the evening we scaled the heights and watched the illumina- 
tions from the fort, where we were cordially welcomed by 
the South Lancashire Regiment, and it was then that we 
made our first acquaintance with the aforesaid " regimental 
mixture," a beverage fit for the gods. On the two follow- 
ing days we played a match with our gallant entertainers 
on a truly sporting ground. The wicket was of a some- 




a, 

a 

<u 
o . 



k^ 








u . 


CJ 


^i 


<n 


T- 


fe u 


„ 




>< 


^ 




TS [£1 


P^ 




M 


S^' 


•-> 






3 


?:> 


n u G 






c/) 


fe S Sb 


(4 


e:^^^^ 


H 


.;<^ 


S 


■S.'->fe 


Pi 


< 


^ 


S 






W 


^ 


P^ 




Pi 




(>< 


•a 
















-^ 




3 . 




«- 




«« 




o 








ss 





yERSEY. 321 

what fiery order : a tent was the only recognised boundary, 
but a hospital, a mess-room, a corn-field, a precipice, and 
a camp were tempting marks for a hard hitter. Teddy 
Buckland, who elected to bowl without a long-leg, was hit 
prodigiously hard in that direction. His elder brother 
was the unlucky short-leg, and, as he commenced to pur- 
sue the ball, which travelled merrily over a morass and 
along a hard and gritty road, with more perseverance than 
speed, had the presence of mind to ejaculate, " Back me 
up, some one ! " 

Fieldsman after fieldsman responded to the appeal, with 
the result that cover-point and two outfields v/ere left to 
watch the pleasing spectacle of seven men, with the 
" Bishop," gloves and all, bringing up the rear, toiling after 
the ball. How many were run for that hit I forget, but I 
have a distinct recollection of Jack Turner's last ball for 
the season of 1891 being hit by Easby for 9 in very 
much the same direction. We finished ofif match No. I. 
before luncheon on the second day, and the weather being 
too lovely to be wasted, at once started a return, in which, 
being set to make rather under 100 to win, we knocked 
them off in twenty-nine minutes by the clock. On the 
Saturday we played the Island on the Victoria College 
ground, where Ingram brought off a sensational catch close 
to the boundary. Here again the wicket was somewhat 
dangerous, one gentleman's life being only saved by the 
stoutness of his straw-hat ; and the captain of the opposi- 
tion had to be frequently encouraged by the Bishop " to 
stand up to his guns," as the balls whizzed past his ears. 
This match, like its predecessors, we won easily. We had 
a most festive dinner one night at the Fort, on which 
occasion Walter Bovill fairly frightened our entertainers 
by turning somersaults over chairs in the small hours of 
the night ; and it was on the morning after that dinner 
that I had the pleasure of personally conducting a nautical 

X 



322 THE COW, 

expedition, consisting of the Bishop, Mid Kemp, M'Alpine, 
and Walter Bovill. There was plenty of wind, which 
materially affected the comfort of the latter trio, who were 
all ill at intervals, but were kindly nursed by the " Bishop," 
who played the part of steward to perfection, and obligingly 
passed up the green slugs, intended for bait, to be inspected 
by any temporary convalescent. The mal de mer took 
Kenneth M'Alpine in a peculiar form, and he reminded 
me much of Mr Squeers, his groans and gasps tending to 
the " 'arrowing belief that he had received some injury in 
his inside." 

Eventually, after eating an abnormal quantity of figs 
and grapes, talking more bad French than could be 
imagined, and drinking much excellent champagne at 
somewhere about half the cost of an inferior brand in 
England, we returned to Weymouth, and notwithstanding 
the sea passage commenced a match immediately on our 
arrival, and finished it in our favour in the afternoon of 
the second day. I have omitted to record how Walter 
Bovill so wofully frightened a cow on the fort cricket- 
ground in Jersey that he nearly drove the unhappy animal 
to commit suicide. Peeler Buckland and myself com- 
manded an excellent view of the proceedings, and a very 
funny sight it was. The cow, tethered after the manner 
of Jersey cows, was sedulously grazing her way up one 
side of a big grass mound, and we presently saw Walter, 
for want of a better occupation, divest himself of his coat, 
and so deftly time a laborious walk on all-fours up the 
other side that his nose almost encountered the cow's at 
the apex of the mound. Walter burst out laughing, but 
the cow was so startled at the apparition that she smashed 
her tether-rope and bolted after the manner of the Gadarene 
swine down a steep place, with a settled resolution to drown 
herself, a calamity which only Ingram's activity averted. 
From our position we thought it was a " gone " cow, and 



A NOVEL MATCH. 323 

were much relieved when we saw it led back by our 
athletic cross-examiner. 

In 1 89 1 a good many of the original side again made 
the passage. Wet and cold weather rather marred the 
pleasure of the first part of the trip ; but the weather in 
Jersey was bright and warmer, I think, than any part of 
the summer. We started by playing Weymouth ; but, in 
the absence of " Bishop " Kemp, Jack Turner, and Walter 
Bovill, were soundly beaten twice over. The ground cut 
up badly, and we had all the worst of the wicket, but the 
amount of catches dropped was abnormal. In Guernsey 
we had a bit the best of a match played in a strong north- 
east wind, which chilled us all to the very bone, so that 
the game was stopped by mutual consent. Some half- 
dozen of our side had been conveyed from Weymouth 
in the yacht Roseneath — at that time owned by A. W. 
Fulcher — and we had a most cheery voyage, notwithstand- 
ing a little sea-sickness. If we had been unable to beat the 
Guernsey folk at cricket, Walter Bovill carried off for the 
time being, at all events, the honours of an encounter with 
the Major of the regiment quartered in the island. We 
had been most kindly welcomed by the Mess, who, in 
addition to showing us much hospitality, had pressed us 
to dine on the last night of our stay. But visions of an 
early start induced a change of programme, and we event- 
ually persuaded as many members of the Mess as we could 
get hold of to dine at our hotel instead. After dinner we 
all adjourned to the Club, and it was there that Walter 
Bovill had a most amusing contest with one of our guests. 

It was Joseph Hill who made the match, pitting his 
Free Forester unknown against the regimental fancy. 
Whether there had been any previous argument or dis- 
cussion, that I know not ; this only do I know, that some- 
where about midnight to the smoking-room of the Club 
there penetrated — even though uttered in those dulcet 



324 PRELIMINARIES. 

accents for which Joseph is so justly famed — this start- 
Hng announcement, " Well, I'll back a fellow on our side 
to stand on his head against any man on yours." Ye 
gods ! what a challenge, and that when most of us were 
rather inclined to doubt our capacity for standing on our 
feet, let alone our heads. For though the day had been 
cold enough, the night was not only warm, but what a 
Scotchman would call "unco drouthy." I myself at the 
moment was doing my best to make small-talk to the 
two senior ofhcers of the regiment, — my best was not, I 
fear, very successful, as both my guests looked sleepy, 
sleepier of the pair the Major. But at the cry he started 
up, and then might be seen, as Napier puts it, " with what 
strength and majesty the British soldier fights," and how 
"nothing can stop that astonishing infantry." For that 
dark drowsy man simply bounded from his seat as if pro- 
pelled from a catapult, and ran down-stairs at a breakneck 
pace, loudly vociferating, " I'll take up that challenge with 
any man living ! " 

" Well, then, Bovrill is my man," announced Joseph ; 
and in the hands of Bovrill, or Bovill — you can spell it 
which way you like — we felt that the honour of the side 
was safe. For had it not been recorded of Walter Bovill 
that on one occasion he had dived into the window of a 
train in motion like the harlequin in the pantomime of our 
childhood would vanish into a post-box } that on another 
occasion, when he went to make a call, his hostess, enter- 
ing the drawing-room with her company smile, discovered 
her genial visitor sitting cross-legged on the top of the 
door? Had we not in the previous year v/ith our own 
eyes seen him at i o'clock A.M. turn a somersault over four 
chairs, to the astonishment of our hosts the South Lanca- 
shire Regiment, and to the evident disappointment of his 
showman Freddy Capron, who had apparently calculated 
upon his breaking his neck in the execution of this per- 



I 



THE CONTEST. 325 

formance ? And had we not further seen him in ^Z^ pul- 
verise a well-known sporting colonel of the Royal Engineers 
at Chatham, who after fairly holding his own in cock-fight- 
ing, cavalry tournaments, and other gymnastic displays, 
simply declined attempting to walk round the anteroom 
on his hands at 2 A.M. 

What the Englishman is to other whites, what a Red 
Indian is to an Englishman, what an ape is to a Red 
Indian, what an orang-outang is to other apes, that — 
had Providence seen fit to make him an orang-outang — 
would Walter Bovill have been to the rest of his species. 

Preliminaries were soon settled. Two mats were brought 
out into the hall ; the men stripped to the buff, or rather 
took off their coats and waistcoats, stood face to face, and 
at a given signal up went — the Major. On his head, with 
his legs upreared straight as arrows, stood, motionless as 
a statue, that marvellous man for the space of fully five 
minutes — stood until (it was really quite interesting to 
watch) all the blood ran into his head, and his face grew 
purple. And where was our Walter all the time ? Kneeling 
on his mat with a quiet smile upon his face, and apparently 
trying to count the hairs on the back of the Major's 
head. For a moment there was a dead silence ; then as 
Foresters and guests alike entered into the spirit of the 
thing, uprose a mighty babel of voices, encouraging now 
the Simon Pure, now the impostor. " Bravo, Walter ! 
stick to it ; the Major is tottering." " Good old Major ! 
hold on one minute more, and you'll win yet ! " 

And right gallantly that Major held on — his face was 
almost black now. Six minutes passed — a tremulous 
movement in his legs indicated failing power, and sud- 
denly he came down with a run, an example which his 
adversary, who had calculated it to a nicety, and mounted 
just before the final catastrophe, followed half a minute 
later. 



326 THE FINALE. 

" Well," exclaimed the Major, as soon as he had re- 
covered his breath sufficiently to make himself heard 
amidst the tumultuous laughter and roars of applause 
which greeted both performances, " I really had no idea 
that any one else could stand on his head so long. Of 
course I could have gone on for another ten minutes, only 
I thought that you were sure to be down." 

" Well, so could I, if it comes to that," retorted the un- 
blushing Walter ; " but I heard you fall, so I didn't care to 
go on. Anyhow, you are much more pumped than I am." 

By our guests' advice we held our peace, for the Major, 
they warned us, was a bit of a fire-eater, and it was thought 
that the harmony of the evening would be better preserved 
if he were left in blissful ignorance of the deceit practised 
on him. So at the time we allowed him to return to his 
quarters, a somewhat crestfallen and victimised man. But 
here let me make the amende honorable. What in the 
matter of standing on the head Walter Bovill is to other 
Free Foresters, that, and something more than that, I 
firmly believe the Major to be to Walter Bovill. 

We left Guernsey very early the next morning, and 
were again most cordially welcomed by our old friends, 
the 40th or South Lancashire Regiment. We had lovely 
weather, amusing cricket, and two most cheery dinners, 
and it was with unfeigned regret that we found that that 
was to be their last season in Jersey. All of us were 
sorry to take leave of those pretty islands ; and if some 
of the party were abominably ill on the return voyage, 
a wise minority who took champagne as a preventive 
can look back upon the trip with a conscience void of 
offence. 




Yacht Rona, 



CHAPTER XXXVI. 



1894. 



I WILL own that I had fondly hoped that I had long 
since written my last chapter in the F. F. book. But alas 
for the fallaciousness of human expectations ! Another 
year has passed, and the records of another cricket season 
have been added to my labours. 

In this year of grace 1894 two distinctly new departures 
in the way of Free Forester cricket have taken place — i.e.^ 
the cruise of the yacht Rona and an Expedition to Ireland. 
If I cannot with a clear conscience say that the twelve 
brothers of our order who were privileged to sail in the 
Rona one and all proved themselves past masters in the 
art of navigation, it did not, on the other hand, seem as if 



328 - JERSEY AND GUERNSEY. 

temporary fits of bodily uneasiness much interfered with 
thorough enjoyment of the excursion, nor did the awful 
amount of catches that were dropped weigh deeply upon 
the offenders' conscience. For men, they argued, who 
were night after night tossed upon the ocean could not 
be expected to judge catches on land in the morning, 
and it was clearly the bowlers' business to hit the wicket. 
We commenced our tour with a match against a 
very weak Isle of Wight side, played on what is by 
courtesy called "The County Ground," near ShankHn. 
In our second innings H. G. Tylecote and Ginger Mor- 
daunt each took a hundred, though for several overs it 
was an open question whether the latter would not prefer 
the distinction of spectacles. Early in the afternoon of 
the second day rain effectually stopped further play, and 
the match was left drawn considerably in our favour. 
On that Saturday night we made tracks for Jersey, but 
wind and tide necessitated a change of route, and we 
found ourselves anchored on Sunday morning in Cher- 
bourg Harbour. Some of our party were not particularly 
clever at breakfast that day, and our umpire looked as 
if he would gladly have given himself " out " of the rest 
of that or any other voyage. A quiet morning restored 
the lost appetites, and after lunch we went on shore and 
visited the fair, where Harry Forster distinguished him- 
self by performing some surprising feats of strength with 
a beetle. His energy was not allowed to pass unre- 
warded. For the Amazon who ran the show pinned on 
his breast with her own fair hands a medallion bear- 
ing an appropriate inscription. Then, in order to prove 
that there was really no deception, the lady proceeded 
to reproduce the feats herself ; but albeit that this un- 
called-for exhibition rather discounted the merits of his 
performance, Forster retained possession of his medallion, 
which will doubtless remain an heirloom in the family. 







<i ^ « 



Phili 

Mrs 

n. 


o 


9 


(^ 


W "5:^ 




.S^ 




o o M 


H 






Hami 

E. W 

T. S 






O 


^^ 


M 


u 


iz; 


^: o >< 


o 


5J aj 3 


W3 


1^1 




^■^W 




^- W 


r« 


W 


tn 



|3 



WEYMOUTH. • 329 

We reached Jersey on the following morning, and on a soft 
wicket easily defeated Colonel Bruce's XL 

A wet day at Guernsey gave ample opportunity for 
inspecting the capital town of that island, and we found 
the Island side so unexpectedly weak that a single day 
proved ample time to play out what should have been 
a two-days' match. We declared our first innings over 
with one wicket down for 150, and disposed of our op- 
ponents twice for an aggregate of 120. The one re- 
markable incident of the match was illustrative of the 
steadiness of the British Infantry under fire. For when 
Cranston drove a ball into the middle of the regimental 
band, more than one member of which was for the moment 
in imminent bodily peril, they never faltered in their 
playing, but went on as gaily as if a knock from a 
cricket -ball was a matter of no importance. Some 
sporting paper laid much stress on the fact that Le 
Mesurier committed suicide by knocking down his own 
wicket in either innings, but when we inspected the place 
where he took guard we came to the conclusion that it 
would have been rather a matter of surprise if he had failed 
to accomplish his weird design. 

From Guernsey we went on to Weymouth, and then 
played a most enjoyable match on a wicket which was 
not only very true, but, considering the amount of rain 
that had fallen, remarkably fast. Though we eventually 
won somewhat easily by 8 wickets, the locals were by no 
means a bad side, and it was unfortunate for them that 
one of their soundest batsmen should have been run out 
in each innings when apparently well set. For them 
W. H. Mansfield played a spirited innings for 70, and 
their professional, Hughes, bowled well and steadily from 
start to finish. It would be a pity if a match at Wey- 
mouth were not occasionally to figure in the Forester 
programme : the ground is good, the cricket keen, and the 



330 IRELAND. 

place most attractive. With this match ended our most 
pleasant tour. 

If we could have wished that the cricket in the Channel 
Islands had been of a somewhat higher standard, all the 
arrangements on board the yacht were simply perfect, 
and when I say that Mr M'Arthur Wood made us feel as 
comfortable and as much at home as we have always 
been at Newbold Revel, men who have played there will 
readily understand that Paradise Row was no inappropriate 
name for that section of the yacht of which I was the self- 
appointed Commodore. Ours was a distinctly strong side, 
too strong of course for most of the teams we encountered ; 
but it had been confidently anticipated that the effects of 
the sea-passages would equalise matters to a far greater 
degree than was the case. Ginger Mordaunt and H. G. 
Tylecote came out with prodigious averages, while Boger, 
Leatham, and Harry Forster also made a good many 
runs. Forster and Theo. Wilson were the most success- 
ful bowlers, but most of us had on occasion a turn with 
the ball. Hanbury kept wicket so consistently well that 
Philipson's services were not called into requisition, and 
the latter was allowed to swell the ranks of the change- 
bowlers. In this capacity Punch met with some success, 
and I have it on the best authority — his own — that his 
fast ball is especially effective. It has not yet been 
officially decided whether the Champion Belt, to be worn by 
the fieldsman who misses most catches on a tour, which was 
long and worthily held by Joe Goldney, and in the season 
of 1893 passed into my possession, should be awarded to 
Boger, Gray Tylecote, or Harry Forster. That each of 
them has strong claims in his favour will be readily 
admitted by all the passengers of the steam-yacht Rona. 

The other new feature of the year was an Irish tour 
organised and personally conducted by Frank Sitwell and 



IRISH WEATHER. 331 

myself. One thing only was wanting to make it a com- 
plete success — i.e., fine weather. People had prophesied 
hard things to us about the weather to be expected in Ireland 
during August, and their predictions were amply fulfilled. 
Altogether we were in Ireland for twelve days, inclusive of 
Sundays. On three days it rained almost continuously ; 
on three we really had something like summer weather, 
with bright sunshine and blue sky — but, unfortunately 
for our cricket aspirations, two of these latter were Sun- 
days. Some of our party, who visited Killarney on a 
Sunday, seemed inclined to congratulate themselves on 
having secured a bright day for their expedition. Per- 
sonally I, who had gone to Ireland to play cricket rather 
than look at scenery, felt aggrieved that so fine a Sunday 
should have followed three impossible working days. The 
remaining six days may be briefly described as muddy 
and cloudy. If on the one hand there was no rain, on the 
other there was a total absence of sunshine, with the 
natural result that the wickets after the excessive rain 
were too slow and muddy for words. 

We spent a very fair proportion of our time on the 
railway, and twice had to start at 7 A.M., and pass on 
one occasion four, on the other six, hours in the train 
before playing cricket. We found the trains neither rapid 
nor punctual, and when every other expedient for spinning 
out the time prescribed by Bradshaw or by custom failed, 
petty officials used to come and mutilate our tickets or 
argue with Jeff Maynard. The stationmasters at Dublin, 
Cork, and Limerick were extremely courteous and ob- 
liging, but many of the understrappers at intermediate 
stations we found very much the reverse. As a final 
steadier of the nerves before going in to bat, I can con- 
fidently recommend a jaunt on an outside car through 
crowded streets laid with tramway lines and under the 
auspices of a slightly elevated Jehu. Not even the 



332 RESULTS IN IRELAND, 

abominable weather or the lengthiness of the journey 
could make our visit to Cork otherwise than pleasant. 
For there we once more forgathered with our old friends 
the South Lancashire Regiment, and were for three days 
most hospitably entertained by them and the York and 
Lancaster, who were quartered in the same barracks. 
Whether a supper off grilled bones and poached eggs, 
washed down by Spiltzner beer, at 2 A.M., is likely to be 
conducive to good cricket was a wholly immaterial ques- 
tion, as the only cricket played by the F. F. at Cork 
was an hour's mud-larking on the Saturday afternoon. 

And now for the composition of the team, which on 
the evening of the first day of our match with the Vice- 
regal was described as consisting of " has beens," " never 
was's," and fair-class contemporaries. I am not at all 
anxious to quarrel with this description, which, if uncompli- 
mentary, had the merit of being fairly accurate ; but 
whereas seven of the opposition were reported in the 
same paper to be about as strong as could be called up 
in the absence of F. H. Browning, and a good many 
people were at pains to inform us that all the best bowling 
in Ireland was arrayed against us, it must have been 
rather a blow to the prophets when we converted what 
looked like a lost match into a distinctly favourable 
draw. My whole idea in getting up the side had been 
to collect a team capable of making a fair show in the 
Dublin matches, and at the same time not overwhelmingly 
strong for the outlying garrisons. And now that it is 
all over I may fairly claim to have accomplished my 
object. We had a bit the better of the draws with the 
Viceregal and Limerick County teams, and we defeated 
the Curragh by 8 wickets and the Military of Ireland by 
3 wickets. In fact, we proved ourselves to be rather a 
better team in the field than we looked on paper, and 
the show we made contrasts very favourably with that 







o c** 



C (V 
o ^ 
m 

K-1 



HARD HITTING. 333 

of the far more classy I Zingari side which invaded 
Ireland earlier in the season. By far the most creditable 
performance of the tour was our second innings against 
the Viceregal XI. In the first innings our opponents 
made on a slow but very easy wicket 255. Their batting 
was described as being most pugnacious, and they cer- 
tainly seemed to be thoroughly at home with the ex- 
traordinary lights and shadows of a ground surrounded 
on all sides by trees. As no one on our side seemed 
to be able to judge a catch, the batsmen hit out freely 
with absolute impunity. When we went in to bat at 
5 P.M. the light was abominably bad, and Maynard was 
the only man on the side who seemed to have any notion 
of timing the ball or judging the pitch of two slow 
bowlers. Penny and Hamilton, the latter of whom came 
out with an extraordinary analysis. Our eight best 
wickets fell overnight for 68 runs, and on the following 
morning the other three went for one more run, so that 
we had to follow on in a minority of 166. We again 
started badly, losing two good wickets for 20 runs ; but 
then Hamilton's steady defence and Cuninghame's 
brilliant hitting altered the whole complexion of the 
match. Three off- drives made by Cuninghame from 
consecutive balls sent down by the Irish Hamilton were 
magnificent hits, and fairly brought down the house. As 
long as Cuninghame was in, the bowlers hardly seemed to 
know where to pitch the ball ; and even after he was dis- 
posed of for a grandly hit 118, there was little diminution in 
the pace of the scoring. Nearly every remaining member 
of the side got into respectable double figures, and the 
last over bowled by the overnight terror Penny produced 
19 runs. The local papers singled out Appleby for special 
commendation, and were pleased to liken him to one 
Phil Casey ; but whether the latter was the Clown or the 
Fenian of that ilk is still a disputed question. Doubtless 



334 -4 TIGHT FINIS//. 

Appleby, who accepted the position with characteristic 
modesty, would have shone in either capacity. Eventu- 
ally we put in our opponents to make 190 runs, and as 
at the call of time we had got their six best wickets down 
for 90, we may fairly claim to have had a bit the best of 
the deal. For the Viceregal side Hamilton and Meldon 
played sterling good cricket, and Penny was in a long 
time for his runs ; but Cuninghame's hitting for us put all 
other performances in the background. 

We owed our victory over the Military of Ireland to 
Crosfield's all-round cricket. In this particular match he 
batted, bowled, and fielded magnificently, and, fortunately 
for us, stayed the rot which had set in at the outset of our 
second innings, when, having to make 37 runs to win the 
rnatch, we started by losing 6 wickets for 11. For the 
soldiers. Finch and Morant bowled finely on a wicket 
which the uninvited application of the roller, while we 
were in the dressing-room, had made extremely difficult, 
and it did not take us long to discover that the victory 
which we had already begun to discount was no great 
certainty after all, and though we did eventually pull 
through by 3 wickets, we had not much to boast about. 
Oswald played two really fine innings for the soldiers, and 
Finch hit with some luck and much pluck. 

The other matches in Ireland were so much interfered 
with by the weather that it is not worth while to give 
any details. I would recommend any future manager 
of a F. F. team in Ireland to see that his XI is amply 
provided with mud-wicket bowlers and waterproof garments, 
and leave the batting to look after itself ; and, above all, 
I would warn him either to avoid the week of the Dublin 
Horse Show or to take a stout-hearted and, for choice, an 
impecunious side, abundantly insured in Accidental In- 
surance Companies. 



PHCENIX PARK. 



335 



1894. Played at Viceregal Lodge, Phcefiix Pa}'k, Dublin. Atigust 20 and 21. 
VICEREGAL. 

1ST INNINGS. S( 

A. D. Comyn, b Hamilton 

B. Hamilton, c Hamilton, b Appleby 
T. M, Meldon, b Collins .... 
Hon. and Rev. E. Lyttelton, c and b Collins 

F. F. Kilkelly, c Ryder- Richardson, b 
Crosfield 

G. F. Berkeley, c Lawson-Smith, b Ham 
ilton 

Major Lindsay, c Lawson-Smith, b Collins 

G. H. Thesiger, b Crosfield 

A. Penny, b Appleby 

Col. Hon. N. Lyttelton, b Cuninghame 

H. E. Lord Houghton, b Pilcher 

Capt. Dundas, not out 

Extras 

Total 



JE. 


2D INNINGS. SCORE. 


19 


c Cunninghame, b Pilcher 18 


44 


c Sitwell, b Collins . . 45 


40 


c Hamilton, b Collins . 14 


4 


b Collins .... 3 


6 


b Collins .... 


21 



20 


c Richardson, b Crosfield 3 




50 


not out .... 5 


10 




3 









18 


Extras . . . -4 



235 



Total (for 6 wickets) 92 



FREE FORESTERS. 



E. A. Maynard, b Hamilton 
R. J. Atthill, c Meldon, b Penny 
Capt. Hamilton, c Thesiger, b Penny 
S. Crosfield, b Hamilton . 

E. R. Lawson-Smith, b Hamilton 

B. A. Cuninghame, c sub., b Hamilton 
W. D. Bovill, b Penny 
W. E. Collins, b Penny 

F. H. Sitwell, b Hamilton 
A. Appleby, b Berkeley 
A. J. Pilcher, b Hamilton 
W. Ryder-Richardson, not out 

Extras .... 

Total 



32 c Houghton, b Hamilton 

8 1 b w, b Berkeley 

7 b Meldon . 

8 c Lindsay, b Penny . 
o run out 

9 c Comyn, b Berkeley 
o not out 

o c and b Comyn 

2 c Meldon, b Penny . 

c Lyttelton, b Hamilton 

1 st Thesiger, b Hamilton 
o c Hamilton, b Berkeley 

2 Extras . 

69 Total 



7 
o 
36 
14 
18 
117 
72 

31 
o 

29 
17 

3 
10 

354 



1894. Played at Phasnix Park, Dublin. August 2g and 20. 
MILITARY OF IRELAND. 



1ST INNINGS. 



Captain Baker, c Pilcher, b Collins . 

R. K. Price, b Pilcher 

Captain Oswald, b Pilcher 

Captain Oates, c Pilcher, b Collins . 



SCORE. 



2D INNINGS. 



SCORE. 



3 c Ryder - Richardson, b 

Crosfield . . .11 

I b Pilcher .... 2 
44 c Collins, b Crosfield . 71 

o c Ryder - Richardson, b 

Pilcher . , . . 2 



336 MILITARY 


OF IRELAND. 




1ST INNINGS. 


SCORE. 


2D INNINGS. SCORE. 


Captain Lindner, b Crosfield . 


5 


b Pilcher . 


6 


M. B. Ffinch, b Crosfield . 


o 


b Hamilton 


44 


A. Penny, b Crosfield 


o 


c and b Crosfield 


2 


Captain Macjier, c and b Crosfield . 


2 


not out . 


o 


H. H. Morant, b Crosfield 


• 15 


b Hamilton 


2 


W. P. Barter, not out . . . 


5 


c Cuninghame, b Cros 








field . 


o 


Private Garside, c Hamilton, b Pilcher 


4 


b Crosfield 


o 


Extras 


I 


Extras . 


II 


Total 


. 8o 


Total 


iSi 



FREE FORESTERS. 



F. H. Sitwell, b Morant . 
E. A. J. Maynard, b Morant 
Captain Hamilton, b Morant . 
B. A. Cuninghame, c Dates, b Ffinch 
S. M. Crosfield, c Macjier, b Ffinch 
W. D. Bovill, St Barter, b Penny 
R. J. Atthill, b Morant 
E. M. Lawson-Smith, 1 b w, b MacJ 
A. J. Pilcher, c sub., b Garside 
W. E. W. Collins, not out 
W. Ryder-Richardson, run out . 
Extras 

Total 



27 


b Ffinch . 


4 


8 


b Morant . 


2 


7 


b Morant . 





22 


c Gates, b Morant . 


2 


51 


b Morant . 


13 


12 


c and b Ffinch . 





41 


1 b w, b Ffinch 


I 


6 


not out . 


15 


II 
2 



not out . 


2 







Extras 



19s 



Total (for 7 wickets) 41 



School Matches. 



Hitherto I have treated of matches or series of matches 
in which I have from time to time myself taken an active 
part. But as it is impossible for an individual to be, like 
the Free Forester Club, ubiquitous, and as, moreover, it 
is only on rare occasions that the hard-worked school- 
master can snatch a day for cricket until the end of July, 
there have of necessity been any number of F. F. matches 
of which I know little beyond the facts that I see them 
down on the card, hear of them at the meeting, and oc- 
casionally find them reported in the * Field ' or the 
* Sportsman.' And here let me remark that, with all 
due respect to * Cricket ' and the ' Cricket-field,' I am 



SCHOOL MATCHES, 337 

inclined to believe that the ' Field ' and the ' Sportsman/ 
as having a wider circulation, are the most convenient 
papers in which to report matches. 

In the first places, then, come matches against the 
Public Schools, those treasured opportunities for revisit- 
ing haunts of the past, as well as favourable occasions for 
keeping in touch with the Foresters of the future. In- 
cluding Woolwich Academy — I must apologise to the 
gentlemen - cadets and sub - officers for thus classifying 
such veterans among schoolboys — there are no less than 
seven of these matches on the '94 programme, and the 
only thing to be regretted is that there are not more. It 
would be sound policy for a Club of this stamp, which 
naturally recruits its ranks almost entirely from men who 
hail from public schools, to make it a rule— subject, of 
course, to an invitation — to visit every public school once 
at least in three years. And if it is the case, as rumour 
says, that it is impossible to induce men to go far away 
from London to play matches in June and July, there 
must be plenty of local Foresters, belonging either to the 
Active Service Corps or the Reserve Battalion, in every 
county in England to form the nucleus of a side. At any 
rate, my own experience in getting up F. F. teams has been 
that, if time is taken by the forelock, it is far more easy to 
make oneself unpopular by refusing applications for places 
than it is difficult to muster a fairly strong side. 

Only once have I had the chance of playing against a 
school for the Foresters, and that was some few years ago 
at Eton, when on a hard wicket I was snicked to leg by 
those Eton boys in a way which was "quite frightful to 
see." The boys made plenty of runs, and we only got an 
innings late in the afternoon ; but even then, thanks to 
some marvellously fast scoring by Arthur Heath and H. 
J. Burrell, those runs would have been got in the time, but 
for the interference of an umpire, who came to the rescue 

Y 



338 ETON AND RUGBY. 

of his side with one of those decisions which only a school 
umpire or a village-green ignoramus has the hardihood 
to utter. When the partnership between two men who 
were flogging weak bowling and had grown accustomed 
to the light was dissolved, slower scoring followed, and 
we had to rest content with a moral victory. But the 
Forester sides at Eton, which have usually of late years 
been got up by Charlie Farmer, have by no means had 
matters entirely their own way, and several of the drawn 
games have been much in favour of the School. It has 
not been found altogether an easy task to please the 
powers that govern the cricket at Eton, and more than 
one side that has gone there has been pronounced to be 
either too strong or too weak or too local to be entirely 
satisfactory. 

Probably the most popular of all the matches against 
Public Schools is the annual two-day fixture at Rugby. 
In the first place, owing to the excellent service of trains, 
Rugby is very accessible from the metropolis ; in the 
second place, many Free Foresters are old Rugbeians ; 
and lastly, it is felt that the Free Forester match is one of 
the events of the Rugby cricket season really looked 
forward to by the boys, and likely to have a definite 
conclusion. Of late the Foresters have generally had the 
better of the deal, but appearances point to better things 
to come in the way of Rugby cricket, which has fallen 
far below the standard of the days in which Rutter, Willes, 
Venables, Francis, poor Bernard Pauncefote, Harry Tubb, 
and other celebrated Foresters first made their mark. 
Now and again some of these time-honoured names crop 
up in the Forester teams which oppose the School. And 
a few years back a cheeky young member of the School 
XI was heard to cast somewhat disparaging reflections on 
the personal appearance of the side which was representing 
the Club. " Well," remarked the youthful critic, " this is 



RUGBY WIT. 339 

the funniest side I ever saw. All of them have got grey 
hair except three, and they have got no hair at all." But 
if it was a funny side to look at, it proved fairly strong 
when it came to playing cricket, and the fielding of the 
grey-headed and bald-headed old gentlemen was about 
as good as anything that the boys saw that season. The 
Foresters administered a sound thrashing to the School, 
thereby proving that the old adage, "youth must be 
served," does not hold quite as good in cricket as in 
other forms of athletic exercises. It would be invidious 
to mention names, but I could count on my fingers at 
this minute an XI of bald-headed Foresters who would 
make rings round any Public School side at Lord's. To 
have played in the Rugby XI was in days gone by 
regarded as a sort of passport for entrance into the ranks 
of the Free Foresters, and good service has been often 
rendered to the Club by the old Rugbeian contingent. 

It is unfortunate that Malvern and Uppingham, which 
have lately turned out excellent sides, should be so very 
inaccessible from town, and that a good deal of difficulty 
has been experienced in getting a sufficiently strong For- 
ester team to undertake the journey. Several good crick- 
eters from either School have lately been elected For- 
esters, and it would seem to rest with them to emulate 
George Willes' example, and collect a side capable of 
better things than merely leather-hunting for the boys. 

Kent and South Coast Matches in 1894. 

My apology for having written at some length of events 
which occurred in the later days of the season before treat- 
ing of other matches must be that I preferred to record 
what was still fresh in my memory before attempting to 
grapple with the -results of a very lengthy programme of 
matches. 



340 R'A. AND R.E. 

In Kent the Foresters cannot be said to have shown 
to great advantage, as we were decisively beaten both 
at Woolwich and Chatham, and in both matches sides 
which on paper looked strong in batting failed to make 
a respectable show. In our first innings at Woolwich we 
actually lost 6 good wickets for 17 runs, and in the in- 
evitable follow-on, which, by the way, the courtesy of the 
Woolwich captain postponed to the good light of the 
second day, batsman after batsman stayed at the wicket 
long enough apparently to get set, and then retired clean 
bowled. There were some curious decisions given by the 
umpires, both of whom seemed to be affected with tem- 
porary blindness ; but, fortunately, their mistakes did not 
in any way affect the issue of the match, and our oppo- 
nents as thoroughly deserved to win as we did to lose 
what proved a very one-sided game. For the Gun- 
ners, De Rougemont, after feeling for the ball for his first 
few overs, played well and hit hard, while Orlebar gave 
for us what the * Sportsman ' would describe as a dashing 
display during the short time that he was in. Don 
Wauchope's catch, which brought the first innings of 
the Gunners to a close, was one of the finest I have ever 
seen in the long field. He had to run a very long way 
to the ball, and no one but an exceptionally fast mover 
could have got to the catch at all. In our Chatham match 
we secured a fair lead in the first innings, but in the 
second our batting collapsed in the most disappointing 
manner. We had rather the worst of the luck in the. 
way of the wicket, as the umpires elected to delay the 
match after a heavy downpour of rain on the second day 
of the match just long enough to give the bowlers every 
advantage. But it is graceless work attempting to explain 
away defeats, and the real secret of our discomfiture lay 
in the excellence of Bayfield's bowling against fame and 
feeble batting, and the smart out-fielding of the Sappers^ 



\ 



CHATHAM AND THE MOTE. 341 

which contrasted very favourably with our own display. 
For them all the catches in the country seemed to come 
to hand; but though in both innings Tandy and others 
hit hard and high, often the only catch which our out- 
fields brought off was one which Dorehill clasped to his 
body. It is a long lane that has no turning, and the Free 
Foresters could well afford to lose a match to their cheery 
hosts at Chatham. 

The Mote we beat handsomely by 10 wickets, and had 
only a moderate percentage of the chances they gave in 
their second innings been taken, we should have won in 
an innings. As it was, nearly every batsman on their 
side made double figures, and most of them gave two or 
more easy chances. For us Spurway and Tonge played 
fine cricket, and Hewett's rough handling of Walter 
Wright's bowling showed that Atkins is not the only 
left-handed batsman who can "cart" left-handed bowl- 
ing on the Mote ground. It was even-money betting 
that Hewett would hit Wright to the boundary twice at 
least in every over, and to the left-handed trundler who 
started the bowling at the other end he was even more 
unkind. 

It was a source of deep regret to the Foresters that there 
was no August cricket at Linton Park, and that conse- 
quently the very pleasant annual match there did not figure 
in the programme for '94. And the match which had been 
arranged with Boxley eventually fell through, owing, I fear, 
to the indisposition of one of the kindliest of our many 
kindly hosts in Kent. A pleasant substitute for the Linton 
match was the game played at Bedgebury Park, where 
Captain H. Campbell entertained us royally, and got 
together a fairly strong side to meet us. We were vilely 
treated by the weather, and the wicket is probably slow 
under any circumstances ; but we had, notwithstanding, a 
most sociable and fairly even match, and thoroughly enjoyed 



342 BEDGEBURY PARK. 

our two days' visit. When rain stopped play on the second 
day we were in the enviable position of being practically 
"dormy," as, while we had a chance of winning, by no 
possible combination of circumstances could we have 
absolutely lost the match. Hewett hit well in each innings, 
and Leatham was also on the knock ; but Spurway's was 
perhaps the soundest exhibition of batting. Sidney 
Crosfield made his runs well for the other side, and it was 
refreshing to see that Joe Hadow's absence from the 
cricket-field had not made him forget what a half-volley 
looked like. Stanley Christopherson did a little fancy 
bowling, and hereby hangs a tale. Chris had originally 
been expected to play throughout the week, but was 
detained in London by business. As we had not got him 
to bowl for us at the Mote, we consoled ourselves by talking 
about the great things he would have done for us ; and 
whenever our bowling was at all in a knot, our gallant 
leader, Lionel Spens, made the same apology, " If Stanley 
Christopherson had been here, we should have had them 
out in no time." 

In fact, so great was the value that was set on Chris's 
services, and such the enchantment that distance added to 
the view, that it was determined to play with ten men on 
the first day of the Bedgebury match rather than risk the 
loss of so potent an auxiliary on the second. And through- 
out the earlier part of the enemy's innings we still continued 
to conjure with the name of Stanley Christopherson. In 
fact, Crosfield, who was the overnight " not out," probably 
had a nightmare, in which Chris with cricket-ball in hand 
played a prominent part. And in the morning Chris in 
person came and saw, and — bowled the three most ghastly 
overs that ever were sent down. Of the fifteen balls, eleven 
were rather fast long-hops on the off, and the other four 
rather slow full pitches to leg. Seldom has a bowler 
displayed so much want of originality. Had he sent down 



DRAWN AGAIN. 343 

a full pitch to off or a long-hop to leg, or even an occasional 
straight ball, it would have been a welcome variety ; but 
nothing of the sort occurred, and by the end of the third 
over, point, the umpire, and short-leg had had plenty of 
perilous excitement. It was fortunate for us that a hit to 
the off-side boundary counted three, and that one of the 
batsmen was of the cautious type ; but whenever Crosfield 
got to that end, matters became extremely lively. Our 
only bowler's skill will require a considerable amount of 
booming before it ever again reaches the premium it 
commanded previous to being actually in the market, and 
the downfall of Pip's great expectations was a mere trifle 
compared to the bursting of the still greater Stanley 
Christopherson bubble. 

The Southampton, Portsmouth, and Aldershot tour re- 
sulted, as usual, in two drawn matches at the former places 
and a win at the last-named. It would seem desirable 
that two three-day matches should in that particular week 
take the place of three two-day fixtures. A cricket-match 
without a definite result is always unsatisfactory, and when 
two sides go into the field year after year with a sort of 
condition that, bar accident, a draw will be the result of 
two days* work, the game must lose a good deal of interest, 
and men are tempted to play, like the Gow Chrom, for their 
own hand. There is a certain monotony about having to 
make the same old stereotyped remarks : " We should 
have won if we had time," or, " We saved the match any- 
how," year after year ; and though in the days to come we 
may look back with some pardonable pride on our vic- 
tories, and occasionally brood over our reverses, the draws, 
whether in our favour or against us, will still be labelled 
unsatisfactory. I have heard a rumour to the effect that 
Peeler Buckland, who, as being less than ten years younger 
than myself, must be accounted quite a veteran, had a not 
altogether encouraging experience of this particular tour 



344 SOUTH COAST. 

in the seasons of '92 and '93. In the latter of these years 
he received two balls and scored o and o in the whole week, 
but as a set-off against this bad luck had the pleasure of 
fielding out for something like 1200 runs. In '92 he was 
rather more fortunate, as he made very nearly 20 runs 
himself, and only had to field out for about 1000. But he 
was intensely pleased at being spoken of by a young and 
zealous member of the side as " the old gentleman." The 
fact that a still older gentleman in the season just ended 
helped to put on 160 runs for the last wicket in a Forester 
match ought to be an encouragement to a good many of 
us, who have begun to feel that our room might be more 
valuable than our company in some of the August matches. 
H. J. Burrell scored largely in both innings at Southamp- 
ton, though a good deal of encouragement was required in 
the second innings to make him forget that he had dam- 
aged his hand. At Portsmouth, Hornsby, who elected to 
figure in the ranks of the opposition, found Streatfeild's 
bowling a bit too good for him, and possibly wished before 
the game was over that he had been playing on the 
Forester side. For once in a way no one got a century 
in the week, though Burrell went very near it. In '92 
Captain Quinton amused himself by making 120 for the 
Foresters at Southampton and somewhere about the same 
number against them at Portsmouth, and he made another 
century in one of the '93 matches. In short, to individual 
cricketers matches on these two very easy grounds have 
been pleasant opportunities for making large scores ; but as 
six matches in succession have been left drawn, it would 
seem advisable either to put the Aldershot match into 
another week, and have three-day fixtures at Southampton 
and Portsmouth, or to let it be an understood thing that 
each side shall do its level best to cap the score made by 
the Australians in 1893, ^i^^) like the Austrahans, make no 
attempt to finish the match. 



ECCE ITERUM. 345 

History repeats itself, and Teddy Rutter once more 
co.MES TO the Fore. 

It has been the unanimous feeling of Foresters who 
have been consulted in the matter that the subjoined score 
should have a page to itself. It would almost seem as 
if our worshipful and honoured Secretary had purposely 
delayed the production of these records, which had not 
been originally intended to include the year 1894, and 
had made up his mind that, before the book was finally 
published, he would yet do one more doughty deed which 
should stand forth as a conspicuous example for younger 
generations of Free Foresters. I believe it to be a fact 
that at the time when Rutter joined Savory a follow-on 
was still on the cards. By the time that memorable stand 
was over and Rutter left, possibly, like Fitz-James, "breath- 
less all," and certainly, like that hero, master of the situa- 
tion, the only hope for the opposing team lay in a draw, 
which just — only just — came off. I have seen Savory hit 
hard and well more than once, and rumour says that he 
hit harder than usual, and that some of his drives took a 
good deal of stopping. He gave, it is true, a chance to 
Draper, but an eye-witness remarked it was one of those 
chances which few men but the plucky old Rector would 
have gone for. 

1894. Played at Bignell, July 25 and 26. 
FREE FORESTERS. 

1ST INNINGS. SCORE. 1ST INNINGS. SCORE. 

E. Hanbury, b PoUey . . . i Capt. Becher, b Maul ... 9 

H. G. S. Hughes, b Policy . . 9 C. F. Hickley, b Maul . . 7 

H. E. Cobb, St Renn, b Policy . 35 A. Appleby, c and b Maul . . o 

C. Harding, b Policy . . . i Rev. J. H. Savory, st Renn, b 

A. E. Leatham, c Jakeman, b Draper 125 

PoUey 13 E. Rutter, not out . . . 41 

J. Hill, b Maul .... 10 Extras 26 

J. F. Marshall, c Renn, b Jakeman i 

Col. Rice, b Maul ... 2 Total . 280 



346 



VALE. 



MR HOARE'S TEAM. 



1ST INNINGS. I 

S. D. Maul, c Appleby, b Hickley 

E. Jakeman, c Leatham, b Hickley 
Rev. W. H. Draper, b Hickley 
W. S. Case, c Hanbury, b Hickley 
H. Tubb, b Appleby 

P. C. Smith, c Hanbury, b Harding 
H. Allen, b Appleby 

F. G. Morgan, c Hanbury, b Leatham 
F. Dickenson, h-\v, b Harding 

C. J. Stratton, b Harding 
Policy, c Hill, b Appleby 
R. Renn, b Harding 
C. T. Hoare, not out 
Extras 



E. 


2D INNINGS. SCORE. 


2 


c and b Marshall 


II 


lO 


not out 


6 


i8 


b Harding . 





5 


b Hickley . 


14 


o 


b Harding . 


3 


38 


1 b w, b Hickley . 


21 


8 


b Harding . 


12 


II 


St Hanbury, b Harding 


I 


32 


b Harding . 


2 


2 


c Savory, b Harding . 


2 


27 


1 b w, b Hickley . 


7 


21 


c Becher, b Hickley . 


4 





not out ... 


4 


6 


Extras 


17 



Total 



180 



Total 



104 



And now I have finished my appointed task, and have 
given what I fear is a very lame and a very imperfect 
sketch of Free Forester cricket during these latter years. 
It only remains for me to thank many secretaries of 
private and other cricket clubs for furnishing copies of 
scores, and to apologise to many men for not entirely 
respectful, if friendly, mention of their names. I think 
that it may be fairly claimed for our Club that in every 
part of the United Kingdom to which it has wandered, 
it has played the game of cricket in the spirit in which 
cricket should be played ; that we Foresters have worked 
for victory hard and accepted defeat not ungraciously; 
that we have shown our due appreciation of the merits 
of our opponents, and due gratitude to the many clubs 
and private houses which have opened their doors to us. 
And for myself I will just add that I account the days I 
have spent in playing for the Free Foresters as the 
brightest and happiest in my cricket career, and that 
I shall always regard the Club, to which for ten years 
past I have been " united though untied," as the beau 
ideal of what an Amateur Cricket Club ought to be. 







■ ' 1 ' 




vvLji^^ '''^%,j|NH| 


piiBUil 



F. Capron. 
J. H. Hornsby. F. C. Evelyn. 
H. Maul. 



C. Cobb. W. Bovill. 
G. E. Willes. H. Hamilton. E. D. Prothero. 

E. Peake. W. H. P. Jenkins. 



F. F. V. Liidloxu, 1885. 



CHAPTER XXXVII. 



WILLES'S TOURS. 



It was in 1883 that a suggestion was made by Captain 
Willes, the secretary of the newly formed East Glouces- 
tershire Cricket Club, that the Free Foresters should play 
an annual match on the picturesque ground at Charlton 
Park, Cheltenham. This match was undertaken by W. H. 
P. Jenkins and G. E. Willes, and was continued year by 
year until 1891. The first match was won by E. G. C. C 



348 ''ALMOST THE DELUGE?' 

by one wicket, and was the forerunner of many a stubborn 
fight. In 1884 the average ages of the Free Forester team 
was thirty-five, and one of their number, Clarence Smith, 
played an admirable innings of 105. In another match, 
at Cheltenham, A. W. Moon scored over 90 not out, while 
the total of the whole side only amounted to 122 ; the 
wicket was sodden, and no one except himself could do 
anything with the bowling. On another occasion W. D. 
Bovill did an excellent performance, getting a lot of runs, 
and taking all the wickets in one innings. The last match 
that was played v. E. G. C. C. was in 1891, and was remark- 
able for the fact that, both days being more or less wet, 
E. G. C. C. did not handle the willow, the Foresters keeping 
possession of the wickets during all the available time of 
play, and making 371 for the loss of 6 wickets. Nor must 
we omit an incident which created much amusement and 
not a little controversy at the time : a certain prominent 
member of the E. G. C. C. in the 1890 match played 
the ball twice, on the second occasion putting it in the 
direction of point. The ball was picked up, and hurled 
somewhat wide of the bowler's wicket in .the direction of 
the boundary. The batsman started to run, and the umpire 
adjudged him " Out," whereupon laughter, confusion, and 
almost "the Deluge." 

In 1885 operations were extended to Ludlow, and v. 
Radnorshire at Knighton, where F. C. Cobden of Cam- 
bridge fame (the Cobden, as he once was called by a 
youthful cricketer) had always a strong team against the 
Foresters, while Frank Sitwell also did, and still does, his 
best to beat the Club at Ludlow. It was on the Knighton 
ground in 1885 that F. W. Capron scored 105 in almost 
record time, and a year or two later C. E. Cobb knocked 
up 73 in thirty-five minutes. 

Pleasant, indeed, are the memories of these matches, and 
of the hospitable homes in which the Foresters have 



THE ROVER. 349 

always been entertained so regally. Nor shall we lightly 
forsfet the welcome we have received in the houses of R. 
Harley, C. Rogers, H. Crawshay, Lady Gierke, R. G. 
Venables, &c.; and last, but not least, at Ferney Hall, the 
home of that good sportsman, W. H. Sitwell, who is not 
only a Forester himself but the father of two of the best, 
Tim and Franky. 

But here a memory of Knighton cricket-ground intrudes 
itself. Frank Cobden was practising at a net before a 
match, — for a wonder he was playing steadily, — and so 
pleased was he with his performance that he ventured to 
compare himself with Fuller Pilch, whereupon a funny 
man behind the net, a native, gravely remarked, " Full o' 
whisky, you mean, whatever." 

And now perhaps may follow some lines by the Forester 
bard, which illustrate an event of some obscurity. The 
subject of them was not then a Forester ; we had picked 
him up en route, and right good service did he do us, 
scoring v, Ludlow 57 and 43 (not out), and taking 15 
wickets. 

" After the dinner was over, 

When no one could drink any more, 
We discovered our Uppingham Rover, 
Fast asleep, on the step of the door. 

When asked for a true explanation 

By the rest of the Forester team, 
He said, 'twas excessive potation 

Of his hostess's excellent cream. 

But all sportsmen who know Mrs Rowton, 

And have dined at her table before, 
This fact will have never a doubt on. 

That cream was the best of creme d'or. 

And now that our cricket is ended. 

Let us all of us Foresters Free 
Thank our hosts for their welcome extended, 

And toast them with thirty times three." 



350 AULD LANGS YNE. 

Owing in a great measure to Frank Cobden leaving the 
neighbourhood, the Knighton match was abandoned, and 
in its place Heath House became the venue^ where a 
welcome both by night and day was extended to the Club. 
How shall we describe the hospitality of Mr Seton and 
Mrs Sunderland ? Perfect wickets in the day, a perfect 
floor at night ; fair ladies equally ready to applaud our 
feats in the cricket-field and to dance us off our legs in 
the ball-room. Yes, the Heath House match was verily 
and indeed a match to be remembered, and many a 
Forester regrets that Mr Seton has given up his ground, 
and that we shall no more encounter that keenest to win, 
and at the same time most generous, of adversaries. 

But we must say a word or two of other matches. 
Worcester was visited, and a place was given in the 
County Club cricket-week to the Forester match. Some- 
how they always got the better of us, as they succeeded 
in putting into the field a side just a bit too strong for a 
"touring team." At Shrewsbury, however, we have met 
with better success, and in the many battles which have of 
later years taken place on the old ground by the river, 
sometimes the County and sometimes the Foresters have 
come off victorious. Here it has always been the custom 
for the Foresters to stay together at the George Hotel, 
and hearty has been the welcome we have received year 
by year from host Fox and his excellent staff, including 
that most amiable and all-important functionary, the cook. 

Nor must we forget three visits to Cirencester, one to 
Stoke {v. Staffordshire), two to Hereford, one to Leomin- 
ster, several to Wellesbourne ; and, above all, there is the 
memory of the last match at Sutton Coldfield in the good 
old Rector's time, where once more the Father of the 
Club gathered " his children " round him in the ancestral 
home. 

No one can rob us of the pleasures we have had, and 



DO OR DIE. 351 

there is many a Forester who will keep a kindly recollec- 
tion of the fun he has had with " the Skipper " and his 
crew. The friendships so many have made, the places 
visited, the matches lost or won, will linger in the minds 
of some of us long after the bat has been laid aside and 
the pads handed over to the next generation. 

In one never-to-be-forgotten match at Shrewsbury, "res 
venit ad triarios," or, in other words, a distinguished officer 
of the Royal Artillery, was sent in to face the attack when 
there were two wickets to fall and one run needed to give 
the Foresters a victory. The gallant Gunner's face wore 
a " do-or-die-in-the-attempt " expression. But it was re- 
marked that he was so much impressed with the gravity 
of the occasion that he entirely omitted the formality 
of taking guard, to the manifest disconcertment of the 
umpire. Perhaps under the circumstances it was fortunate 
that the ball, the last of the over, missed both bat and 
wicket. The winning hit was made from the other end, 
and the Gunner to this day doubtless cherishes a pleasing 
recollection of the way in which he kept up his end, and of 
the lusty manner in which he smote — the air. 

G. E. W. 

1885. Played at Cheltenham, July 28 and 29. 
EAST GLOUCESTERSHIRE. 

1ST INNINGS. SCORE. 1ST INNINGS. SCORE. 

Rev. J. H. Baxter, c Lucy, b T. W. Knight, c Hornsby, b 

Bovill 4 Bovill 4 

Captain W. Roberts, b Bovill . 8 E. A. Bennett, c Beevor, b Bovill 14 

Captain C. W. Knox, c Capron, Rev. V. Leatherdale, c Willis, b 

b Bovill 35 Bovill ..... 8 

A. E. Leatham, c Beevor, b Bovill 4 O. R. Sergeant, not out . . 33 

R. Gore, b Bovill .... 10 Extras 18 

C. Tillard, c Smith, b Bovill . 108 

T. W. Gould, b Bovill ... 8 Total . 254 

In the second innings Baxter (b Bovill) scored o, Knox (c and b Lucy) 20, 
Leatham (not out) 24, Leatherdale (c Hornsby, b Bovill) 5, Sergeant (not out) 
41 ; extras 5, — total 95. 



35- 



WESTERN SCORES. 



FREE FORESTERS. 



1ST INNINGS. 

E. D. Prothero, c Roberts, b Bennett 

F. W. Capron, run out 
H. C. Maul, c Sergeant, b Bennett 
J. C. Beevor, run out 
W. D. Bovill, not out 
J. H. Hornsby, c Gore, b Leatham 
Rev. G. E. Willes, c Gore, b Bennett 
C. E. Cobb, sub., b Bennett . 
Rev. C. Smith, c Knox, b Bennett 
W. A. Lucy, b Bennett 
W. H. P. Jenkins, c Leatherdale, b Bennett 

Extras 

Total 



RE. 2D INNINGS. i 

2 b Tillard . 

8 c and b Bennett 

7 b Tillard . 

1 b Tillard . 
28 b Roberts 
13 b Tillard . 

o c Bennett, b Tillard . 

o 1 b w^, b Leatham 

22 c Leatherdale, b Bennett 

o not out 

2 c Knox, b Sergeant . 
5 Extras . 

88 Total 



II 
o 

24 
2 

IIS 
20 
10 
II 

34 
18 

I 
8 

254 



1885. Played at Ludlow, July 29 and 30. 



LUDLOW. 



1ST INNINGS. 

C. J. Gierke, c Willes, b Bovill . 

Rev. E. G. Baker, c Hornsby, b Bovill 

E. H. Newill, c Hornsby, b Peake . 

F. P. Norbury, run out . 

W. H. H. Sitwell, c Cobb, b Bovill . 
W. H. Hopkins, b Peake . 
Sir W. Gierke, c Cobb, b Bovill 
R. G. Venables, b Peake . 

E. H. Giles, c Cobb, b Bovill . 
W. W. Tyrer, b Peake . 

F. Hale, not out ... . 
Extras 

Total 



LE. 2D INNINGS. 

23 c Bovill, b Peake 

3 c and b Bovill . 

4 1 b w, b Bovill . 
I b Peake . 

21 c and b Peake . 

5 run out 
o run out 

b Peake . 

1 c Prothero, b Hornsby 
10 b Peake . 

o not out 

6 Extras . 



SCORE. 



74 



Total 



T 

3 
12 

5 

I 

24 

9 
II 

3 
4 
o 
6 

79 



FREE FORESTERS. 



W. Bovill, c C. J. Gierke, b Sit- 
well 4 

J. H. J. Hornsby, run out . . 27 
F. L. Evelyn, c Norbury, b Hop- 
kins 63 

H. C. Maul, c Newill, b Hopkins 58 

H. A, D. Hamilton, b Hopkins . 3 

E. Peake, c Venables, b Gierke . 4 

F. W. Capron, 1 b w, b Gierke . 15 



SCORE. 

E. D. Prothero, c Sitwell, b Ven- 
ables . . . . -23 

C. E, Cobb, not out . . .11 

W. H. P. Jenkins, c Newill, b 
Venables ..... 5 

Rev. G. E. Willes, b Venables . o 
Extras 15 

Total . 228 



WESTERN SCORES. 



353 



1885. Played at Knighton, July 31 and August i. 
RADNORSHIRE. 



1ST INNINGS. 

C. J. Gierke, b Bovill . . ■ . 

A. Green- Price, b Bovill . , 
F. L. Evelyn, st Gobb, b Gapron 
W. H. H. Sitwell, b Peake 
W. Green-Price, c Hamilton, b Peake 
F. G. Gobden, c Hornsby, b Peake . 
Rev. G. Green-Price, c Maul, b Peake 
Rockley, b Bovill 
C. Salmon, b Bovill . 
E. Bright, b_ Peake . 
E. G. Gartwright, not out 
Extras . 



Total 



RE. 2D INNINGS. 

6 b Bovill . 

19 c Bovill, b Peake 

40 c Bovill, b Peake 

9 c Gobb, b Peake 

3 c Bovill, b Peake 

2 c Prothero, b Gapron 

6 not out 

II c Bovill, b Peake 

o c Prothero, b Bovill 

7 run out 

3 b Bovill . 
9 Extras . 

[IS Total 



FREE FORESTERS. 



1ST INNINGS. SCORE. 

J. H. Hornsby, c Sitwell, b 

Gierke 35 

J. S. Phillips, b Rockley . . 4 

H. G. Maul, c Salmon, b Gobden 97 

W. D. Bovill, b Bright . . 14 

E. Peake, c W. Green-Price, b 
Bright o 

Rev. G. E. Willes, b Gobden . 6 

F. W. Gapron, b Gobden . . 105 



1ST INNINGS. 



SCORE. 



E. D. Prothero, c A. Green- Price, 

b Bright 14 

H. D. Hamilton, c Gierke, b 

Bright 23 

G. E. Gobb, c Gierke, b Bright , 13 

W. H. P. Jenkins, not out . . o 

Extras 19 

Total . . 330 



1886. Played at Cheltenham, July 28 and 29. 
EAST GLOUGESTERSHIRE. 



SCORE. 

E. L. Griffiths, b Nesbitt . . 9 
R. Gore, b Hornsby . . . i 
Rev. P. Hattersley Smith, c Skip- 

with, b Nesbitt .... 65 

G. Tillard, b Hornsby ... 85 

W. H. Sevier, b Rawlinson , 20 

W. B. Piers, b Nesbitt . . 4 

F. H. Freer, c Lucy, b Hornsby . 3 



Major M'Neale, b Rawlinson 
A. J. Luckham, b Rawlinson 
E. A. Bennett, st Gobb, b Raw 

linson .... 
E. W. Richardson, not out . 

Extras .... 



Total 



9 
o 

3 
13 
23 

23s 



354 



WESTERN SCORES. 



FREE FORESTERS. 



1ST INNINGS. SCORE. 

E. D. Prothero, c Bennett, b Richardson . i 

M. B. Buckle, b Richardson ... 3 

J. S. Russell, c and b Richardson . . o 

J. H. J. Hornsby, c Sevier, b Tillard . 9 

E. J. B. Nesbitt, c Tillard, b Richardson . 4 

C. E. Cobb, c Richardson, b Bennett . 4 

R. Skipwith, c Freer, b Richardson . . 10 

W. Lucy, b Bennett ..... 10 

G. E. Willes, not out .... 2 
J. B. Rawlinson, run out . . . .2 

W. H. P. Jenkins, c Piers, b Bennett . o 

Extras 3 



2D INNINGS. 



SCORE. 



Total 



c Sevier, b Richardson 
b Tillard . 

c Freer, b Richardson 
c Sevier, b Tillard 
b Tillard . 
not out 
b Tillard . 
run out 
c Tillard, b Richardson 
c Griffiths, b Richardson 
c M'Neale, b Richardson 
Extras . 

Total 



6 

22 
24 

7 
29 
24 
6 
o 
2 

13 

I 
II 

145 



1886. Played at Ludlow, July 30 and 31. 
LUDLOW. 



1ST INNINGS. 

A. W. Moon, c Cobb, b Rawlinson . 
R. Newill, St Cobb, b Hornsby 
W. Green-Price, c Skipwith, b Hornsby 
C. E. Brown, c Crake, b Rawlinson . 
F. L. Evelyn, c Skipwith, b Hornsby 
F. C. Cobden, c Skipwith, b Hornsby 
F. H. Sitwell, c Skipwith, b Cobb 
W. H. H. Sitwell, not out 
C. J. Clerke, absent . 
F. Norbury, b Nesbitt 
H. V. Hewitt, St Cobb, b Royds 
Extras 

Total 



iRE. 2D INNINGS. 

33 c sub. , b Hornsby . 

4 b Nesbitt . 

I c Cobb, b Hornsby . 

9 absent — hurt . 

13 b Nesbitt . 

56 b Nesbitt . 

10 c sub., b Nesbitt 

26 c Phillips, b Hornsby 

o b Hornsby 

20 b Hornsby 

6 not out 

11 Extras . 

189 Total 



• FREE FORESTERS. 



1ST INNINGS. 



SCORE. 1ST INNINGS. SC 

J. B. Rawlinson, b Sitwell . 

F. T. Royds, b Cobden 

R. G. Venables, c Hewitt, b Cob- 
den 

W. H. P. Jenkins, not out . 
Extras 

Total 



E. D. Prothero, 1 b w, b Clerke . 43 

W. P. Crake, c Brown, b Clerke . 13 
J. H. J. Hornsby, c Green-Price, 

b Clerke 40 

J. P. Phillips, c Clerke, b Cobden i 

C. E. Cobb, c Newill, b Cobden . o 

E. B, Nesbitt, c Evelyn, b Cobden 26 

R. Skipwith, b Newill ... 25 

In the second innings Crake (not out) scored 18, Hornsby (b Cobden) i, Phillips 
(not out) 7 ; extras 2, — total 28. 



21 

I 

4 
o 
16 

190 



WESTERN SCORES. 



355 



1886. Played at Knighton, August 2 and 3. 
FREE FORESTERS. 



1ST INNINGS. S( 

J. H.J. Homsby, c Gierke, b C. J. Gierke 
W. P. Grake, hit wkt., b G. J. Gierke 
Gapt. Spens, b G. J. Gierke 

E. B. Nesbitt, c Moon, b Gobden 
R. Skipwith, b Gobden 

G. E. Gobb, c W. H. Sitwell, b Gobden 

Gapt. B. Roberts, b G. J. Gierke 

J. B. Rawlinson, run out . 

A. Appleby, c Green-Price, b Sitwell 

Major Gowan, c Sitwell, b G. J. Gierke 

F. T. Royds, b Gobden . 
W. H. P. Jenkins, not out 

Extras ....... 

Total 



2D INNINGS. 



SCORE. 



o c Evelyn, b Gobden . 

6 b Gobden . 

8 Gartwright, b Gobden 

9 b Gobden . 

o b G. J. Gierke . 

7 c Green-Price, b Gobden 
16 c Sitwell, b G. J. Gierke 

9 c Gobden, b G. J. Gierke 

18 c Sitwell, b Gobden . 

8 c Green- Price, b Gobden 

2 not out 

15 b Gierke . 

3 Extras . 

roi Total 



3 

o 

II 

o 

5 
10 

4 

I 

37 

22 

6 

3 
II 

"3 



RADNORSHIRE. 



W. Green- Price, c Gobb, b Nesbitt . 
A. W. Moon, b Nesbitt . 
F. L. Evelyn, c Jenkins, b Nesbitt . 
F. Sitwell, b Rawlinson 

F. G. Gobden, b Rawlinson 
Major Lewis, c Homsby, b Rawlinson 
A, Green-Price, b Homsby 
W. H. Sitwell, c Royds, b Homsby . 
H. G. Green- Price, b Appleby . 
Sir W. P. Gierke, c Rawlinson, b Appleby 

G. J. Gierke, b Appleby . 
E. Gartwright, not out 

Extras 

Total 



4 
2 
2 

28 
6 

1 
8 

19 
2 
6 

14 

I 

13 
106 



c Appleby, b Rawlinson 

b Rawlinson 

not out 

not out 

b Nesbitt . 

c Skipwith, 

b Nesbitt . 



b Rawlinson 



c Royds, b Appleby 



Extras 



Total 



15 



109 



1887. Played at Stoke, July 25 and 26. 
STAFFORDSHIRE. 



1ST INNINGS. SCORE. 2D INNINGS. SCORE. 


Glay, c Hill, b Appleby .... 


13 c Skipwith, b Rawlinson 


53 


H. Fishwick, b Appleby . 


5 b Rawlinson . 


21 


W. H. Gatkin, b Homsby 


48 c and b Gowan 


21 


A. H. Heath, b Appleby . 


31 b Appleby 


59 


P. S. Sheldon, b Appleby . 


6 b Goldney 


. 42 


G. E. Meakin, b Appleby . 


I c Spens, b Appleby . 


3 


G. R. Street, c North, b Appleby . 


c and b Goldney 





T. Robinson, not out ... 


46 absent 






356 



WESTERN SCORES. 



1ST INNINGS. 



2D INNINGS. 



R.-Stainer, run out . . . . 
P. Mainwaring, c Tilney, b Homsby 
J. Heath, c Tilney, b Rawlinson 
Extras 



Total 



1 b .Goldney 

2 not out 

7 b Appleby 
II 



171 



Extras 



Total 



2 

o 

o 

17 

218 



FREE FORESTERS. 



J. Hill, b Robinson 

Hon. W. H. North, c Stainer, b 

Catkin 

J. H. J. Homsby, c Street, b 

Catkin 

Major J. Spens, b Fishwick . 
R. H. Tilney, b Fishwick . 
Capt. Cowan, c and b Clay . 



I 


A. Appleby, b Robinson 


14 




G. H. Goldney, b Fishwick . 


26 


i6 


R. W. Skipwith, not out 


12 




G. E. Willes, Heath, b Clay 


I 


22 


J. B. Rawlinson, run out 


6 


12 


Extras .... 


I 


I 







39 



Total 



1887. Played at Cheltenham, July 27 and 28. 
FREE FORESTERS. 



1ST INNINGS. 

J. Hill, csub,, bTillard . 
Capt. B. Roberts, 1 b w, b Elliot 
T. M. Wilde, 1 b w, b Leatham 
Major J. Spens, c Leatham, b Elliott 
J. H. J. Homsby, st Desages, b Elliott 
J. A. Turner, c and b Elliott . 
Captain Cowan, st Desages, b Leatham 
G. H. Goldney, b Elliott . 
A. Appleby, c Jessop, b Elliott . 
R. W. Skipwith, mn out . 
J. B. Rawlinson, c Desages, b Tillard 
G. E. Willes, not out ... 
Extras 



Total 



iE. 


2D INNINGS. 


SCORE. 


I 


not out . 


• 25 


24 


c Elliott, b Tillard . 


I 


5 


b Elliott . 


3 


52 


b Elliott . 


8 


32 






3 


c Jessop, b Tillard . 





26 


c Tillard, b Leatham 


. 14 


II 


c Leatham, b Elliott 


5 


20 


not out 


8 


34 


c Desages, b Elliott . 


. 16 


15 






3 







Extras 



244 



Total 



85 



EAST GLOUCESTERSHIRE. 



J. H. C. Baxter, b Appleby . . o 
W. H. Sevier, c Cowan, b Appleby 17 
W. A. Lucy, b Turner . . 16 
A. E. Leatham, c Cowan, b Ap- 
pleby 144 

C. Tillard, c Appleby, b Wilde . 55 

O. Phillips, c Wilde, b Rawlinson 13 

E. A. Bennett, c sub., b Rawlinson o 



G. H. Cooper, b Turner 
C. E. Willes, c Spens, b Turner 
H. Jessop, not out 
Elliott, c Skipwith, b Wilde 
P. Desages, st Spens, b Cowan 
Extras .... 



Total 



7 
3 

22 
o 
9 

25 

311 



WESTERN SCORES. 



357 



1887. Played at Ludlow, July 29 a?id 30. 
LUDLOW. 



1ST INNINGS. 


SCORE. 


2D INNINGS. S 


COKE. 


W. F. Felton, b Turner . 


• 15 


c Hill, b Turner . 


13 


F. L, Evelyn, c Grosvenor, b Turner 


• 43 


c Lewes, b Turner . 


2 


E. C. Evelyn, b Turner . 


3 


c Cowan, b Turner . 


14 


A. W. H. Percy, b Turner 


. 18 


b Turner . 


33 


W. H. Sitwell, b Rawlinson . 


• 30 


b Rawlinson . 


II 


F. C. Cobden, c and b Turner . 


5 


c Grosvenor, b Rawlinson 


15 


J. T. Day, c Lewes, b Turner . 


3 


b Turner . 


40 


C. J. Gierke, b Goldney . 


3 


b Turner . 





P. Rogers, c Goldney, b Turner 


3 


c Crake, b Turner . 


2 


F. H. Sitwell, b Turner . 


2 


c Skipwith, b Rawlinson 


17 


T. H. Green, run out 





not out . 





G. F. Lloyd, not out . 


4 


run out 


I 


Extras 


. 14 


Extras . 


13 


Tota 


. 143 


Total 


161 



FREE FORESTERS. 



1ST INNINGS. 



SCORE. 



1ST INNINGS. 



SCORE. 



W. P. Crake, b Rogers . . 5 

H. Grosvenor, c and b Cobden . 7 

J. H. Goldney, b Cobden . . 5 

G. E. Willes, c P. Evelyn, b Cobden i 

J. B. Rawlinson, not out . . 4 

Extras 26 

Total . 179 

In the second innings Skipwith (b Day) scored 11, Turner (not out) 43, Cowan 
(not out) 9, Hill (b Cobden) 11 ; extras 10, — total 84. 



Capt. B. Roberts, b Day . 
R. Skipwith, b E. C. Evelyn 
J. A. Turner, c E. Evelyn, b Day 
Major Lewis, c Cobden, b Evelyn 
Capt. Cowan, c Felton, b Gierke . 
E. D. Prothero, b Cobden . 
J. Hill, c Cobden, b Rogers 



I 
24 

57 

o 

2 

22 

25 



1887. Played at Knighton, August i and 2. 
FREE FORESTERS. 



1ST INNINGS. 

Capt. B. Roberts, b C. Gierke . 

R. W. Skipwith, b C. Gierke . 

J. T. Day, b C. Gierke . 

Capt. Cowan, c Rogers, b C. Gierke 

G. G. Skipwith, c Gierke, b Sandwith 

C. E. Cobb, c Felton, b Cobden 

Major Lewis, b Gierke 

J. Hill, c W. Sitwell, b Cobden 

E. D. Prothero, b Cobden 

W. P. Crake, c Cobden, b C. Gierke 



SCORE. 


2D INNINGS. SCORE. 


21 


1 b w, b Sandwith . 


12 


. 


5 


c Sitwell, b E. Evelyn 


20 




II 


c E. Evelyn, b Gierke 


7 


. 


6 


b Cobden . 


16 


h 


8 


b Cobden . 


19 


. 


6 


b Rogers . 


72 


. 





b Cobden. 


10 


. 


4 


b W. H. Sitwell . 


16 


. 


12 


c Rogers, b Gierke . 


12 




8 


not out . 


31 



358 



WESTERN SCORES. 



1ST INNINGS. 

J. B. Rawlinson, b Cobden 
G. E. Willes, not out 
Extras .... 



E. 2D INNINGS. 


SCORE. 


II b Cobden 


2 


2 b Cobden 


7 


12 Extras . 


. 27 



Total 



106 



Total 



251 



RADNORSHIRE. 



1ST INNINGS. 



SCORE. 



F. L. Evelyn, c Cobb, b Day 

E. C. Evelyn, b Rawlinson . 

W, F. Sandwith, c Cowan, b Day 
C. J. Clerke, c Day, b Hill . 
W. H. Sitwell, c Lewes, b Hill . 
W. F. Felton, c Cobb, b Day . 

F. H. Sitwell, c Crake, b Rawlinson 



2 

54 
o 

30 
o 

26 
24 



1ST INNINGS. 

F. C. Cobden, not out 
C. Boyle Smith, b Day 
Sir W. Clerke, run out 
P. Rogers, b R. Skipwith . 
E. Cartwright, b R. Skipwith 
Extras .... 



Total 



SCORE. 

55 
II 
24 
I 
4 
17 

248 



In the second innings F. L. Evelyn (not out) scored 62, E. C. Evelyn (run out) 
II, W. F. Sandwith (b Rawlinson) o, W. F. Felton (not out) 6, P. Rogers (c andb 
Hill) 23 ; extras 4, — total 106. 



1887. Played at Shrewsbury, August 3 and 4. 
SHROPSHIRE. 



SCORE. 



E. Engleheart, c Cobb, b Rawlin- 
son 

R. Fowlis, c Cobb, b Voules 
J. S. Phillips, c Cobb, b Rawlinson 
W. H. Griffiths, c Cobb, b Raw- 
linson ..... 
Capt. H. France, b Cowan . 
W. Deedes, c Cobb, b Hill . 



3 
13 

47 

120 
48 
10 



A. F. Chance, c Cobb, b Hill 
R. SaviUe, b Hill . 
W. H. Davies, b Rawlinson 
W. H. Ray, b Hill 
Rev. T. Woodhouse, not out 
Extras .... 

Total 



34 

41 

6 

o 

15 

375 



FREE FORESTERS. 



1ST INNINGS. 



SCORE. 



R. W. Skipwith, c Davies, b 
France 

J. Hill, c Davies, b France . 

G. G. Skipwith, c Phillips, b 
Woodhouse .... 

C. E. Cobb, b Saville . 

S. C. Voules, b Saville 

Capt. Cowan, c Davies, b Griffiths 



17 

31 

22 

47 
27 



1ST INNINGS. SCORE. 

W. P. Crake, c Phillips, b Griffiths 7 
Capt. B. Roberts, c Davies, b 

France 43 

E. D. Prothero, c Ray, b France 17 

G. E. Willes, c Ray, b Chance . 31 

J. B. Rawlinson, not out . . 10 

Extras 27 



Total 



287 



In the second innings R. W. Skipwith (b Saville) scored 5, J. Hill (not out) 6, 
C. E. Cobb (c Chance, b Saville) 24, S. C. Voules (c and b Chance) 17, Capt. 
Cowan (not out) 18, J. B. Rawlinson (b Saville) 2 ; extras 4, — total 76. 



WESTERN SCORES. 



359 



1888. Played at Knighton, July 30 and 31. 
FREE FORESTERS. 



1ST INNINGS. 

A. W. Moon, b Jones 
H. E. Cholmely, c Gierke, b Jones 
C. E. Cobb, c Cobden, b Jones 
E. B. Nesbitt, b Cobden . 
Capt. B. Roberts, c Clerke, b Cobden 
R. A. Wilson, b Cobden . 
J. Hill, c Jones, b Cobden 
Capt. Cowan, b Cobden . 
Lord A. Fitzroy, c Cobden, b Jones 
R. Skipwith, not out . 
G. E, Willes, c Evelyn, b Sharpe 
J. M. Prinsep, b Cobden . 
Extras 

Total 



SCORE. 


2D INNINGS. SCORE. 


5 


c and b Jones . 


6 







c Evelyn, b Jones . 


14 




II 


run out 


17 




2 


b Jones . 


1* 




3 


b Jones . 







2 


not out . 


33 




II 


c Sandwith, b Cobden 


9 







b Evelyn . 


20 




I 


b Cobden. . • . 


6 




12 


c Boyle Smith, b Jones 


2 




12 


c and b Jones . 







2 


b Cobden . 


I 




7 


Extras . 


5 


ll 


. 68 


Total 


114 



RADNORSHIRE. 



F. L. Evelyn, c Nesbitt, b Wilson . 

E. C. Evelyn, b Prinsep . . . 

C. Boyle Smith, c Hill, b Wilson 

W. F. C. Sandwith, c Prinsep, b Nesbitt 

D. M. Jones, c Prinsep, b Wilson 
C. J. Clerke, c Hill, b Nesbitt . 
A. Green-Price, c and b Cowan 
Capt. H. France, st Moon, b Nesbitt 
Sharpe, b Nesbitt 

F. C. Cobden, not out 
W. Green-Price, b Nesbitt 
H. C. Green-Price, b Wilson 

Extras .... 




Total 



22 


b Nesbitt . 


8 


6 


c Cobb, b Prinsep . 


IS 





c Cobb, b Nesbitt . 


3 


II 


b Nesbitt . 





27 


c Prinsep, b Nesbitt 


5 





b Nesbitt . 


IS 


II 


not out . 


15 


14 


c Cobb, b Prinsep . 


9 


I 


not out . 


3 


II 


c Prinsep, b Nesbitt 


2 


4 













I 







108 



Total 



75 



1888. Played at Shrewsbury, August i and 2. 
FREE FORESTERS. 



1ST INNINGS. S 

E. D. Prothero, c H. France, b R. Davies 

R. W. Skipwith, b H. France . 

C. E. Cobb, c W. H. Davies, b R. Davies 

J. M. Prinsep, b H. France 

R. A. Wilson, c sub., b Griffiths 

A. W. Moon, b Griffiths . . . 

E. B. Nesbitt, b Rivett Carnac . 

Capt. Cowan, c France, b Rivett Carnac 



CORE. 


2D INNINGS. SCORE. 





b Rivett Carnac 


2 


• 13 


b Griffiths 


4 


3 43 


b H. France . 


IS 


I 


c sub., b Griffiths . 


36 


4 


c Chance, b Carnac . 


9 


. 19 


b Rivett Carnac 


20 


9 


1 b w, b Griffiths 


6 


9 


b Rivett Carnac 


9 



360 



WESTERN SCORES, 



1ST INNINGS. SCORE. 

Capt. Roberts, not out . . . . i 
Lord A. Fitzroy, st W. Davies, b Rivett 

Carnac o 

G. E. Willes, b Griffiths . . . . i 

Extras 8 

Total . 108 



2D INNINGS. 

c and b Rivett Carnac 
b Rivett Carnac 

not out 
Extras . 

Total 



SCORE. 

3 

I 



SHROPSHIRE. 



W. H. Griffiths, b Prinsep 

R. Fov^'les, c Skipwith, b Nesbitt 

W. Deedes, b Prinsep 

J. S. Phillips, b Nesbitt . 

Capt. H. France, c Nesbitt, b Prinsep 

Rev. G. Rivett Carnac, b Prinsep 

Captain Peyton, b Wilson . 

R. O. Davies, b Prinsep . 

A. Chance, b Prinsep 

Rev. H. G. Glennie, b Prinsep . 

J. E. Pickering, c Cobb, b Prinsep 

W. H. Davies, not out 

Extras 

Total 



2 


b Prinsep ... 





4 


run out . 


10 


5 


c Moon, b Prinsep . 


6 


I 


b Nesbitt . 


13 


3 


b Nesbitt . 


15 


2 


b Prinsep . 


9 


13 


c Cobb, b Nesbitt . 





5 


absent— hurt . 





2 


c Fitzroy, b Prinsep . 


5 





b Nesbitt . 


I 


7 


not out . 





2 


c and b Nesbitt 





8 


Extras . 


6 



54 



Total 



65 



1888. Played at Worcester, August 3 and 4. 
WORCESTERSHIRE. 



1ST INNINGS. 

Major Clarke, b Toppin , 
H. Wilkes, c Cowan, b Toppin . 
Rev. E. Fitzherbert, b Nesbitt . 
Millward, b Nesbitt .... 
J. Foord Kelsey, c Hill, b Nesbitt . 
Rev. M. B. Buckle, c Cobb, U Toppin 
Smith, c Toppin, b Nesbitt 
E. P. Jobson, b Nesbitt . 
R. T. Atthill, c Cowan, b Nesbitt . 
H. J. Ferkins, b Dixon 
P. H. Foley, not out . 
Extras 



Total 



RE. 


2D INNINGS. SCORE. 


3 


b Prinsep . 





20 


c and b Toppin 


8 


25 


not out 


25 


31 


b Toppin . 


8 





b Toppin . 


2 


24 


b Toppin . 





28 


not out 


31 
















S 






II 






14 


Extras .... 


3 



161 



Total 



77 



FREE FORESTERS. 



A. W. Moon, b Foord Kelsey . 
J. Hill, run out .... 
C. E. Cobb, c Atthill, b Millward 
C. Toppin, 1 b w, b Foord Kelsey 



2 b Millward 


9 


3 c Ferkins. b Millward 


. 14 


5 b Millward 


5 


4 b Smith . 


. 61 



WESTERN SCORES. 



361 



1ST INNINGS. SC( 

A. W. Dixon, c Foley, b Mill ward . 
J. M. Prinsep, c Foley, b Millward . 
E. B. Nesbitt, b Millward .... 
Capt. Cowan, b Millward .... 
G. E. Willes, c Atthill, b Millward . 
Capt. B. Roberts, c Atthill, b Foord Kelsey 
Lord A. Fitzroy, not out .... 
Extras 



E, 


2D INNINGS. SCORE. 


9 


b Millward 


9 





b Ferkins . 


13 


9 


not out . 


12 


7 


b Millward 


15 


5 


c Foley, b Millward . 


3 


II 


1 b w, b Millward . 





8 


b Jobson , 





11 


Extras . 


18 



Total 



74 



Total 



159 



1891. Played at Cirencester, July 27 and 28. 



CIRENCESTER. 



1ST INNINGS. 



SCORE. 



1ST INNINGS. 



SCORE. 



C. R. Gresson, st Wynyard, b 

Gresson 14 

E. B. Haygarth, b Gresson . 

E. M. Beecham, c Wynyard, b 

Maclean 

Rev. L. B. Butt, b Maclean 
A. E. Leatham, b Peachey . 
E. Henry, c and b Gresson . 

In the second innings Gresson (c Cowan, b Peachey) scored 94, Haygarth (not 
out) 132, Beecham (not out) 18, Butt (b Gresson) 14, Leatham (c Peachey, b 
Gresson) o; extras 18,— total 276. Innings declared closed. 





C. Wolferston, b Maclean . 


6 


14 


S. P. Ralli, c Rawlinson, b Gresson 


12 


21 


W. G. Legg, c and b Gresson 


7 




A. Prout, 1 b w, b Gresson . 


8 


6 


Attewell, not out .... 





3 


Extras 


II 


38 









Total . 


126 



FREE FORESTERS. 



1ST INNINGS. 



SCORE. 



2D INNINGS. 



Capt. H. France, st Haygarth, b Attewell 
Capt. Cowan, b Legg 

F. H. Gresson, 1 b w, b Legg 
Capt. Wynyard, b Legg 
C. E. Cobb, b Attewell 
Capt. Vizard, b Prout 
M. F. Maclean, b Legg 
J. Hill, c Leatham, b Prout 
J. B. Rawlinson, not out 
C. Peachey, c and b Legg 

G. E. Willes, b Legg 
Extras . 



30 b Leatham , . 

o st Haygarth, b Leatham 

13 st Haygarth, b Leatham 

5 c Wolferston, b Attewell 

32 st Haygarth, b Leatham 

67 1 b w, b Leatham 

* 3 not out 

31 c Haygarth, b Attewell 
19 not out . 

6 
o 
3 Exlras . 



Total 



209 



Total 



108 



I 



362 



WESTERN SCORES. 



1891. {Free Foresters v. East Gloucestershire.) Played at Cheltenham, 
July 29 and 30. 

FREE FORESTERS. 



A. E. Leatham, b Hay . . 31 
F. L. Evelyn, c Hay, b Young . 102 
F. H. Gresson, b Young . .118 
Capt. Vizard, 1 b w, b Tillard . 26 
Capt. Wynyard, c Rice, b Tillard 42 



C. E. Cobb, 1 b w, b Carketon 
Capt. Hayhurst, not out 
Capt. Cowan, not out . 
Extras .... 



Rain stopped further play. 



Total 



SCORE. 

. 17 

• 23 

. 13 

9 

. 381 



1891. Played at Heath House, July 31 and Augtist 1. 
FREE FORESTERS. 



1ST INNINGS. : 

A. E. Leatham, c F. L. Evelyn, b Jones 
C. R. Gresson, c Jones, b Toppin 
F. H. Gresson, c and b Toppin . 
Capt. Vizard, b Toppin 

F. H. Sitwell, c C. J. Gierke, b Jones 
C. E. Cobb, b Toppin 
Capt. Cowan, b Toppin 
J. Hill, c W. H. Sitwell, b Toppin 
M. F. Maclean, b E. C. Evelyn 
C. Peachey, c C. Gierke, b Jones 

G. E. Willes, c B. Seton, b Toppin 
R. S. Benson, not out 

Extras 

Total 



^E. 2D INNINGS. 

13 c Jones, b Leake 

I b Leake . 

b Toppin . 

15 b Toppin . 
6 run out 

30 c and b Jones . 

1 c W. Sitwell, b Toppin 

1 b C. H. Seton . 
o not out 

16 c W. Sitwell, b Jones 

6 c C. Seton, b Jones . 

7 not out 

2 Extras . 



98 



Total 



SCORE. 

31 

29 

45 
6 
2 

43 

4 

16 

6 

I 
I 
I 
8 

193 



HEATH HOUSE. 



F. L. Evelyn, c Hill, b Leatham 


37 


c Peachey, b Gresson 


13 


E. C. Evelyn, b Benson . 


6 


run out . 


3 


D. T. M. Jones, c Cobb, b Leatham 


24 


b Gresson 


16 


J. C. Mallam, b F. Gresson 


46 


c and b Gresson 





C. Toppin, b Maclean 





b Gresson 


4 


C. H. Seton, 1 b w, b Gresson . 


10 


b Maclean 


23 


C. J. Gierke, c Cobb, b Gresson 





b Benson . 


4 


W. H. Sitwell, b Gresson . . '. 


2 


c Hill, b Gresson 


4 


J. S. Leake, b Gresson 





b Gresson 





Sir W. F. Gierke, 1 b w, b Gresson . 





not out 





B. H. Seton, run out ... 


22 


c and b Benson 


4 


Sharpe, not out . . 


2 


b Benson . 





Extras 


13 


Extras . 


5 


Total 


162 


Total 


Ve 



WESTERN SCORES. 



363 



1892. Played at Cirencester ^ August i and 2. 
FREE FORESTERS. 



I 



1ST INNINGS. SCORE. 


1ST INNINGS. 


SCORE. 


H. K. Foster, b J. A. Gibbs 


8 


C. E. Cobb, b Gibson . 


. 72 


D. F. Gillman, b Legg 





M. F. Maclean, b Leatham . 


. 17 


W. L. Foster, c Haygarth, b Legg 


22 


J. Hill, b Prout . 


• 25 


F. H. Gresson, b Leatham . 


69 


Capt. Cowan, c Haygarth, b Prout 4 


C. Toppin, b Legg 


15 


G. E. Willes, not out . 





Capt. Bruce, b Legg . 


32 


Extras .... 


7 


Capt. Watson, c and b Leatham . 


7 







Total 



CIRENCESTER. 



S. Boulton, c H. Foster, b Gresson 4 

C. H. Gresson, b Gresson . . 41 

J. A. Gibbs, c Hill, b Gresson . i 

E. B. Haygarth, b Gresson . . o 
W. G. Tovey, c H. Foster, b 

Gresson 7 

A. E. Gibson, b Gresson . . 2 

A. E. Leatham, b Gresson . . 2 



F. M. Beecham, run out 

G. H. Gibbs, b Gresson 

Lord Truro, c Toppin, b Gresson 

A. Prout, not out 

W. G. Legg, b Gresson 

Extras 

Total 



278 



20 

12 

17 

7 

o 

17 
130 



In the second innings Boulton (run out) scored 29, Gresson (c Cowan, b Maclean) 
6, Gibbs (c Cobb, b Gresson) 41, Haygarth (b Cowan) i6, Gibson (not out) 5, 
Leatham (c Hill, b Gresson) 5 ; extras 8, — total no. 



1892. Played at Ludlow, August 3 and 4. 



FREE FORESTERS. 



I 



1ST INNINGS. SCORE. 2D INNINGS. SCORE. 


F. H. Gresson, c Wright, b Nash . 


20 not out . 


33 


Capt. Bruce, c and b Nash 


c Kent, b Jones 





D. F. Gillman, b Nash 


19 c and b Jones . 


5 


A. E. Gibson, 1 b w, b Jones . 


3 c F. Sitwell, b Nash 


7 


Capt. Watson, st Moon, b Nash 


4 c F. Sitwell, b Nash 


I 


C. Toppin, c Kent, b Jones 


3 bNash . 


I 


C. E. Cobb, b Nash .... 


12 b Nash . 





M. F. Maclean, b Jones . 


c Wright, b Nash 


6 


J. Hill, St Moon, b Nash . 


I c Boyle Smith, b Jones 


5 


G. E. Willes, c Moon, b Nash . 


b Jones . 





Capt. Cowan, not out 


b Jones . 


3 


Capt. Benson, c Kent, b Nash . 


bNash . 





Extras 


4 Extras . 


I 



Total 



66 



Total 



62 



364 



WESTERN SCORES. 



LUDLOW. 



1ST INNINGS. SCORE. 

F. L. Evelyn, st Cobb, b Gresson 4 

D. T. M. Jones, run out . . 13 
W. C. Bridgman, c Gillman, b 

Benson 39 

H. J. Carson, b Benson . . 2 

A. W. Moon, c Gillman, b Benson 51 

W. H. Sitwell, b Gibson . . 4 

C. Boyle Smith, c Toppin, b Gibson o 



1ST INNINGS. SCORE. 

A. R. Kent, c Maclean, b Benson 14 

F. H. Sitwell, c Hill, b Gresson . 28 

Wright, c Maclean, b Gresson . o 

Nash, not out .... 1 

A. C. Sim, c Gillman, b Benson , i 

Extras 14 

Total . 171 



1892. Played at Heath House, August 5 and 6. 
HEATH HOUSE. 



1ST INNINGS. 


SCORE. 


2D INNINGS. SCORE. 


F. L. Evelyn, b Gresson . 


I 


b Gresson 


5 


D. T. Jones, c Gillman, b Toppin 


• 13 


run out . 


25 


A. E. Gibson, b Toppin . 


4 


b M'Lean 


54 


A. W, Moon, c Watson, b Toppin 


• 17 


b Toppin . 


I 


C. J. Gierke, b Toppin 


4 


c Toppin, b Leatham 


4 


W. Radcliffe, b Gresson . 


. 36 


c Gillman, b Leatham 


10 


F. C. Cobden, c Gillman, b Gresson 


3 


b Maclean 


6 


Lord Truro, b Toppin 


10 


c and b Leatham 


16 


W. H. Sitwell, not out 


6 


c Leatham, b Maclean 





C. H. Seton, b Gresson . 


I 


run out . 


12 


B. H. Seton, b Gresson 





st Cobb, b Leatham 


5 


Sharpe, b Gresson 


3 


not out . 





Extras 


8 


Extras . 


9 


Tota 


I . 106 


Total 


147 



FREE FORESTERS. 



1ST INNINGS. SCORE. 

F. H. Gresson, c Radcliffe, b 

Sharpe 61 

27 
12 

77 
II 

3 
22 



A. E. Leatham, b Cobden . 
D. F. Gillman, c Jones, b Sharpe 
C. Toppin, c Gierke, b Jones 
F. H. Sitwell, 1 b w, b Jones 
C. E. Cobb, 1 b w, b Gibson 
Capt. Bruce, c Jones, b Radcliffe 



1ST INNINGS. 

Capt. Watson, b Gibson 
M. F. Maclean, b Gibson 
J. Hill, b Jones . 
Capt. Cowan, not out . 
G. E. Willes, b Gibson 
Extras 



Total 



12 

I 
o 

o 

I 

15 

242 



In the second innings Maclean (not out) scored 8, Hill (not out) o. Cowan 
(c C. Seton, b Jones) 4,— total 12. 




STATISTICS OF MATCHES 



PLAYED BY THE FREE FORESTERS FROM 1564 TO 1 502. 



1884. 

Matches played, 26. Won, 10; lost, 10; drawn, 6. 
Batting Averages. 









Innings. 


Times 
not out. 


Runs. 


Most in 
innings. 


Average 


Captain J. Spens . ■ . . 5 


I 


337 


131 


84.25 


M. P. Lucas . 






3 





166 


139 


55-33 


J.G.Walker . 






6 


I 


197 


130 


39-40 


A. Appleby 






5 


I 


152 


53 


38.50 


C. R. Seymour 






S 





160 


108 


32 


F. C. Coxhead 






6 


I 


158 


III 


31.60 


C. Gjirdon 






3 





92 


57 


30.66 


S. J. Wilson . 






8 


2 


158 


59 


26.33 


S. C. Oswald . 






6 





149 


57 


24.83 


J. Robertson . 






6 


I 


124 


93* 


24.80 


Major Wallace 






3 





73 


53 


24.33 


A. E. Payne . 






4 





95 


33 


23-75 


W. D. Bovill . 






20 


2 


408 


81 


22.66 


F. W. Maude . 






18 





361 


117 


20.55 


F. E. Speed . 






6 





123 


46 


20.50 


F. W. Capron 






9 





177 


51 


19.66 


P. R. Toynbee 






5 





94 


68 


18.80 


H. G. S. Hughes 






12 


I 


194 


54 


17.63 


C. W. Bulpett . 






5 


I 


83 


27 


16.60 


G. D. Rowe . 






10 


I 


148 


49 


16.44 


H. T. Griffiths 






14 


2 


196 


49* 


16.33 


G. Law . 






3 





42 


34 


14 


G. H. Goldney 






16 


4 


165 


50 


13-75 


G. Macan 






3 





41 


40 


13-66 


Captain Beresford Baker 


16 


I 


204 


112 


13.60 


R. M. TurnbuU 






4 





54 


25 


13-50 



* Signifies not out. 



366 



STATISTICS OF MATCHES. 





Innings. 


Times 
not out. 


Runs. 


Most in 
innings. 


Average 


E. Money- Wigiam . 


6 


o 


69 


53 


11.50 


E. Bray .... 


3 


I 


20 


14 


10 


E. Rutter 


5 


o 


46 


26 


9.20 


Rev. G. E. Willes . 


7 


o 


62 


30 


8.85 


Rev. W. C. R. Bedford . 


3 


I 


25 


25 


8.33 


T. Wise .... 


6 


I 


43 


33 


7.16 


C. W. Rawlinson . 


8 


o 


55 


23 


6.87 


W. T. Toynbee 


5 


o 


27 


14 


5.60 


H. Gilliat 


3 


I 


4 


3 


1.50 


W. H. Jenkins 


4 


o 


4 


3 


I 



The following played in less than three innings : A. Arkwright, 4, 8 ; E. M. 
Bannerman, o, 57* ; H. W. Brougham, 60* ; C. Y. Bedford, 27* ; A. E. Bedford, 
7 ; A. G. Bovill, 34 ; E. H. Buckland, 107, i ; G. Bird, 9, 25 ; C. C. Clark, 12 ; 
W. Chance, 14 ; Rev. J. G. Crowdy, 20, 28 ; Captain W. F. Cowan, o* 2 ; J. 
Dale, 2, 34* ; A. H. Evans, 65 ; S. Garnett, 24 ; H. Gibson, 6, 13* ; Rev. H. H. 
Gillett, 8 ; E. Phipps-Hornby, o ; W. F. Higgins, 2 ; F. S. Head, 5 ; C J. E. 
Jarvis, 17, 3 ; C. F. H. Leslie, o, 15 ; T. W. Lang, 12* 8 ; G. H. Longman, 22 ; 
Hon. E. Lyttelton, 16; Hon. R. H. Lyttelton, 18; Rev. W. Law, 12; C. J. 
Lucas, 76* i; W. A. Lucy, o*, o; A. W. Moon, 37; F. H. Mellor, 107, 53; 
H. Mellor, 74, 12 ; Captain Miles, 4 ; C. Marriott, i ; J. C. Page, 3, i ; T. S. 
Pearson, i, 10 ; E. Peake, 18, 5 ; H. Rhodes, o, 24 ; J. S. Russel, 15, 2 ; F. R. 
Twemlow, 60 ; Rev. C. Tillard, 42, 8 ; J. S. Udal, 12, o; A. J. Webbe, 2, 4. 



1885. 

Matches played, 24, Won, 10; lost, 6; drawn, 8. 

Results of Matches. 

May 25, 26.— Woolwich. Drawn. Royal Artillery, 236; F. F., 164. 

30. — Esher. Lost. Esher, 190 ; F. F. 65 and 130 for 4 wickets. 
June 6. — Wellington. Won by 3 runs. Wellington College, 129 ; F. F., 

132 for 8 wickets. 
12, 13. — Horsham. Drawn. Horsham, 434; F. F., 281. 

13. — Eton. Unfinished. Eton College, 219 ; F. F. , 42 for 4 wickets. 
18.— At the Bucknall's, Watford. Lost. C. T. Hegan's XI, 198 ; F. F., 
130. 
22, 23. — St Cross, Winchester. Won by one innings. Green Jackets, 70 

and 167 : F. F. , 263. 
24, 25. — Weybridge. Won by one innings. Oatlands Park, 72 and in ; 

F. F., 258. 
26, 27. — Shoeburyness, Won by one innings. School of Gunnery, 83 and 
131; F. F.,43S. 
July 4.— Henley. Drawn. Henley, 99 for 8 wickets ; F. F., 199. 

6, 7.— Rugby. Drawn. Rugby School, 134 and 450; F. F., 132 and 90 

for 8 wickets. 

7, 8.— Longwood, Drawn. Lord Northesk's XI, 172 ; F. F. 130 and 159 

for 4 wickets. 

■* Signifies not out. 



STATISTICS OF MATCHES. 



367 



July 15, 16. — Abbotts Langley. Lost by two wickets. Abbotts Langley, 130 and 
197 for 8 wickets ; F. F., 165 and 160. 
18. — Woolwich. Lost. Royal Military Academy, 292 ; F. F., 97. 
27, 28. — Cheltenham. Lost by 7 wickets. East Gloucestershire, 249 and 

95 for 3 wickets ; F. F., 88 and 254. 
29, 30. — Ludlow. Won by one innings. Ludlow, 74 and 79 ; F. F., 228. 
31, Aug. I. — Knighton. Won in one innings. Radnorshire, 115 and 

93; F. F., 330. 
II II — Reigate. Won in one innings. Rev. Churchill's XI, 57 

and 129 ; F. F., 275. 
Aug. 6, 7. — Hitchin. Drawn. Gents of Herts, 304; F. F., 231 and 61 for 4 
wickets. 
17, 18. — Bicester. Lost. Bicester, 149 and 223; F. F., 100 and 191. 
19, 20. — Banbury, Won by 8 wickets. Deddington, 92 and 176 ; F. F., 202 
and 67 for 2 wickets. 
25. — Shepperton. Won. Shepperton, 73 and 60 for 7 wickets ; F. F., 

139- 

26, 27. — Aldershot. Drawn, Aldershot Division, 100 and 160 for 6 wickets ; 

F. F., 336. 

27, 28. — Chatham. Won by 10 wickets. Royal Engineers, 167 and 148; 

F. F., 312 and 6 for 10 wickets. 



Bowling, 

No complete record of the analyses has been obtained, but the following were 
the principal bowlers : — 



W, D. Bovill 

E. J. Beaumont 

F. W. Maude 

J, H. J. Hornsby 
E. Peake *. 

G. H. Goldney 
C. L. Hickley 



Wkts. Inns. 
55 16 



G. W. Ricketts 
J. Robertson 
E, M. Hadow 
A. J. Webbe 

E. Rutter 

F, W. Capron 
C. W. Bulpett 



Wkts. Inns. 
14 5 



Battixg Averages. 



H. C, Maul 
E. M. Hadow . 
S. J. Wilson . 
W. T. Toynbee 
Captain B. Baker 
W, D. Bovill . 

E, J. Beaumont. 
R. H. Fowler . 
A. C. Cattley . 
C. W. Bulpett . 

F, W. Capron . 
J. H. J. Hornsby 

G, W. Ricketts . 
C. L. Hickley . 
R. W. Skipwith 
C. E. Cobb 



o 



Runs. 
186 

175 

194 

34 

59 

383 

267 

105 
88 
90 

195 

249 

81 

61 

74 
61 



Most in 
innings. 

97 
108 
124 

II 

30 
115 
120 

52 

35 

50 
105 

35 

26 

25 
34 
20 



Average. 
46.2 
43-3 
38.4 
34 
29.1 

27.5 

26.7 

26.1 

22 

18 

17.8 

16,9 

16. 1 

15. 1 
14,4 
12. 1 



368 



STATISTICS OF MATCHES. 





Innings. 


Times 
not out. 


Runs. 


Most in 
innings. 


Averag 


P. R. Toynbee . . . ' 


5 


I 


48 


27 


12 


F. E. Speed 


lO 


o 


119 


27 


11.9 


Rev. G. E. Willes . 


9 


o 


97 


27 


10.7 


F. C. Coxhead . 


6 


o 


67 


33 


10.7 


C. R. Seymour . 


4 


o 


43 


25 


10.3 


G. H. Goldney . 


8 


2 


61 


41 


10. 1 


F. W. Maude . 


4 


O 


35 


19 


8.3 


F. Rutter .... 


4 


O 


30 


14 


7.2 


S. P. Bucknill . . . . 


4 


O 


28 


17 


7 


W. H. P. Jenkins . 


4 


I 


8 


5 


2.2 



The following played in three innings : C. Booth, 56, 47, 35 ; Rev. J. G. 
Crowdy, 17, 64, 24 ; Captain J. Frederick, 10, 44, 8 ; A. Hoare, i, 3, 7 ; H. G. S. 
Hughes, 29, 51, 8 ; G. H. Longman, 21, o, 51 ; H. H. Longman, 22, 17, 19 ; W. 
A. Lucy, o, 18, 3 ; J. Robertson, o, 2, 38 ; Captain L. T. Spens, 22, 87, 57 ; W. 
W. Whitraore, 10, 17, 5 ; Rev. E. R. Yerburgh, 2, 5, 19. 

Played in two innings : A. Appleby, 43, 17 ; J. G. Beevor, 1,2; R. W. Byass, 9, 
o; F. Crowder, 31, 2; F. H. Lee, o, 10; H. M. Marshall, i, 2 ; F. H. Mellor, 
22, 15 ; E. Peake, 4, o ; Rev. T. T. Peyton, 13, o ; G. D. Rowe, 18, o ; Rev. 
Clarence Smith, 22, 54 ; Captain J. Spens, 23, 3 ; R. W. Gillespie-Stanton, 7, 10 ; 
C. B. L. Tylecote, 7, 6 ; J. G. Walker, 83, 9. 

Played in one innings : C. J. E. Jarvis, 162 ; P. H. Coxe, 93 ; F. L, Evelyn, 63 ; 
A. F. Jeffreys, 49 ; T. Wise, 47 ; H. T. Griffiths, 43 ; Rev. W. H. Heale, 33 ; P. 
Norman, 32 ; A. S. Francis, 31 ; J. C. Page, 30 ; E. Money- Wigram, 24 ; A. R. 
Cobb, 24 ; Rev. W. Law, Hon. R. H. Lyttelton, T. K. Tapling, E. Bray, Hon. 
C. Finch, A. B. Ridley, Lord Stanhope, Rev. T. O. Reay, A. G. Bovill, Hon. and 
Rev. J. Marsham, D. Buchanan, R. M. Turnbull, F. H. Birley, Rev. F. G. 
Williamson, H. W. Brougham, J. H. Bridges, J. Kenrick, J. S. Phillips, A. J. 
Webbe, Dr Bourns, H. Gilliat, D. Moffat. 



1886. 
Matches played, 27. Won, 13; lost, 4; drawn, 10. 



Results of Matches. 



May 26.— Woolwich Academy. Won in an innings. Academy, 43 and 42 ; 
F. F., 86. 
29.— Esher. Lost. Esher, 168 ; F. F., 104 and 43 for two wickets. 
31, June I. — Christ Church, Oxford. Drawn. Christ Church, 63; 
F. F., 175. 
June 9. — Elstree. Drawn. Elstree, 230 ; F. F. , 77. 

10, II. — Rugby School. Drawn. The School, 186; F. F., 33. 

12. — Crookham. Won. The Moors, 78; F. F., 196. 
14, 15. — Woolwich, Won in one innings. Royal Artillery, 138 and 138 ; 
F. F., 308. 
19.— Eton College. Won. The College, 181 ; F. F., 186 for 8 wickets. 
23, 24. — Weybridge. Won by 6 wickets. Oatlands Park, 139 and 49 ; 

F. F., 113 and 77 for 4 wickets. 
25, 26. — Shoeburyness. Drawn. School of Gunnery, 142 and 42 for 6 
wickets ; F. F. , 603. 



STATISTICS OF MATCHES. 



369 



July 


12, 13. 

IS- 
19, 20. 
22, 23. 




23. 24. 
26, 27. 




28, 29. 
30, 31- 


Aug. 


2, 3- 




4. 5- 



13. 14- - 

18, 19.- 

24.- 

25, 26.- 

27, 28.- 

Sept. 3, 4.- 



■St Cross, Winchester. Drawn. Green Jackets, 173 ; F. F., 329. 
-Hounslow. Won. 7th Hussars,. loi ; F. F., 344. 
-Bicester. Lost. Bicester, 300; F. F., 155 and 102. 
-Northampton. Drawn. Northamptonshire, 222 and 25 for 3 

wickets; F. F., 184. 
-Longwood. Drawn. Lord Northesk's XI, 224; F. F., 147. 
-Hackwood Park. Drawn. Hackwood Park, 109 and 86 for 3 

wickets ; F. F., 332. 
-Cheltenham. Lost. East Gloucestershire, 235 ; F. F., 48 and 145. 
-Ludlow. Won by 10 wickets. Ludlow, 189 and 26 ;F. F., 190 

and 28. 
-Knighton. Lost. Radnorshire, to6 and 109 for 6 wickets ; F. F., 

lot and 113. 
-Hereford. Won in one innings. Herefordshire 76 and 52 ; F. F. , 

136. 
-Hitchin. Drawn. Gentlemen of Herts, 238 and 248; F. F., 164 

and 209 for 7 wickets. 
-Bucknalls. Won by 6 wickets. George Longman's XL 146 and 

240 ; F. F. , 323 and 64 for 4 wickets. 
-Banbury. Won. Deddington, 36 and 55 ; F. F., 98 and 58. 
-Shepperton. Won. E. Rutter's XI, 69; F. F., 177. 
-Aldershot. Won in one innings. The Division, 161 and 193 ; 

F. F., 525. 
-Chatham. Drawn. Royal Engineers, 170 and 87 for 7 wickets ; 

F. F., 97 and 230. 
-Ayot St Lawrence. Won by 6 wickets. H. E. Crawley's XI, 53 

and 41 ; F. F., 83 and 17 for 4 wickets. 



Batting Averages, 





Innings. 


Times 
not out. 


Runs. 


Most in 
innings. 


Averag 


Captain B. Baker 


6 


2 


220 


126 


55 


F. W. Capron . . . . 








305 


164 


50.5 


C. R. Seymour . 


4 





179 


153 


44-3 


Major J. Spens . 


8 


2 


223 


49 


37-1 


I. D. Walker . 


4 





162 


60 


40.2 


J. W. Dale .... 


7 


2 


181 


84 


36.1 


G. W. Ricketts . 


8 


I 


237 


84 


33.6 


F. E. Speed 


10 


2 


264 


174 


33 


F. W. Pember . 


5 





116 


48 


23.1 


Major L. T. Spens 


4 





79 


36 


19.3 


A. W. Moon . 


6 





115 


74 


19. 1 


W. P. Crake 


5 


I 


71 


34 


17-3 


Rev. E. Prothero 


5 





87 


43 


17.2 


W. D. Bovill . 


12 


3 


154 


56 


17. 1 


J. Robertson 


4 





65 


29 


16. 1 


J. H. J. Homsby 


20 





262 


56 


13-2 


Captain W. T. Cowan 


5 





60 


28 


12 


E. J. Beaumont-Nesbitt 


13 





156 


36 


12 


A. Appleby 


7 





69 


37 


9.6 


C. F. Leslie 


5 





48 


21 


9-3 


R. W. Skipwith . 


6 





55 


25 


9.1 


C. E. Cobb 


6 


1 


54 


24 


9 


M. Wilde .... 


2 





43 


37 


8.3 



2 A 



370 



STATISTICS OF MATCHES. 



I 


""■"8^-n'^'ir 


Runs. 


Most in 
innings. 


Avera 


J. W. Rawlinson 


7 I 




55 


21 


7.6 


C. W. Bulpett .... 


5 o 




34 


21 


6.4 


W. P. Jenkins .... 


5 I 




20 


15 


5 


Captain W. B. Roberts 


7 o 




37 


16 


3.6 


Bowling Averages. 












Inning. 


. Wickets. 


Average. 


E. J. Beaumont-Nesbitt . 




13 




48 


3-9 


A. Appleby 




8 




3^ 


3-7 


J. H. J. Hornsby . 




16 




51 


3-3 


J. Robertson 




5 




18 


3-3 


W. W. Collins . 




4 




15 


3-3 


Captain C. K. Wood . 




4 




14 


3-2 


C. F. Leslie 




4 




12 


3 


J. B. Rawlinson . 




7 




19 


2.5 


W. D. Bovill 




4 




11 


2-3 


C. W. Bulpett . 




5 




II 


2.1 


G. H. Goldney . 




5 




13 


2-3 


F. W. Capron 




5 




9 


1.4 



The following played in three innings : Rev. G. E. Willes, Roger Walker, J. S. 
Russell, G. F. Vernon, G. H. Goldney, S. W. Cattley, Captain C. K. Wood, L. 
Owen, C. L. Hickley, W. E. W. Collins, J. G. Walker, Major Ravenhill, S. J. 
Wilson, F. H. Gates, 

The following played in two innings : E. M. Hadow, G. H. Longman, G. D. 
Rowe, E. F. S. Tylecote, E. Rutter, E. J. C. Studd, R. H. Fowler, Captain 
Frederick, D. H. Barry, J. E. A. Greatorex, Hon. W. F. North, F. M. Lucas, 
Rev. M. B. Buckle, F. E. Lacey, J. L. Phillips, O. R. Dunell, Captain Hon. F. 
E. Allsopp, Captain B. Allison, Captain Lyle, J. Kenrick. 

The following played in one innings : A. N. Hornby, H. B. Steel, M. C. Kemp, 
A. R. Cobb, H. T. Arnall-Thompson, H. Tubb, E. Ramsay, Rev. C. Smith, J. 
Pender, F. H. Mellor, J. C. Page, A. F. Jeffreys, Major Eccles, H. Gilliat, W. F. 
Higgins, Rev. W. Townshend, H. G. Tylecote, C. Marriott, R. W. G. Stainton, 
H. L. Butler, Rev. J. H. Savory, A. H. Evans, Rev. J. G. Crowdy, R. G. Ven- 
ables, F. E. Street, Major Bally, Surgeon-Major Bourns, Rev. F. C. Williamson, 
A. J. Webbe, Rev. W. Law, E. H. Buckland, Hon. R. H. Lyttelton, A. C. 
Cattley, F. M. Buckland, Rev. W. H. Heale, T. R. Hine-Haycock, E. Money- 
Wigram, F. W. Maude, W. J. Hughes, H. J. J. Hughes. 



1887. 

Matches played, 26. Won, 6; lost, 7; drawn, 13. 

Results of Matches. 

May 30, 31. — Woolwich. Lost. F. F., 74 and 123 ; Royal Artillery, 144 and 54 

for I wicket. 
June I, 2. — Oxford. Drawn. Christ Church, 180 and 162 for 8 wickets ; F. F., 
121. 
8, 9.— Rugby. Lost. Rugby School, 117 and 205 ; F. F., 77 and 159. 
16.— Eton. Lost. F. F., i8o; Eton College, 237. 
M — Harrow. Won. Harrow School, 137; F. F., 178. 



STATISTICS OF MATCHES. 



371 



July 


I, 


2.- 
6.- 




20, 


21.- 




22, 


23-- 




25. 
27. 


23-- 
26. 
28. 




29, 


30-- 


Aug 


I, 


2. 



June 21. — Esher. Won. Esher, 218 ; F. F., 301 for 3 wickets. 

22.— Weybridge. Won. F. F., 206; Oatlands Park, 131 and 54 for i 
wicket. 
24, 25.— Shoeburyness. Drawn. School of Gunnery, 239 and 387 for 4 
wickets; F. F., 165. 
Carshalton. Drawn. F. F. , 404 ; Carshalton Park, 460 for 8 wickets. 
Dulwich. Won. F. F., 200; Dulwich College, 87 and 135. 
Hackwood. Won. F. F., 162 and 90; Hackwood Park, 85 and no. 
Winchester. Drawn. Green Jackets, 154 and 332 for 7 wickets ; 

F. F., 379. 
Godalming. Won. Charterhouse, 98 and 46 for i wicket ; F. F. 162. 
Stoke-on-Trent. Drawn. Staffordshire, 171 and 218 ; F. F., 151. 
■Cheltenham. Drawn. F. F., 244 and 85 for 7 wickets; East 

Gloucestershire, 311. 
Ludlow. Drawn. Ludlow, 143 and 161; F. F., 179 and 84 for 2 

wickets. 
■Knighton. Lost. F. F., 100 and 251; Radnorshire, 248 and 106 
for 3 wickets, 
li II — Norwich. Lost. F. F., 121 and 149; Norfolk, 417. 
3, 4. — Shrewsbury. Drawn. Shropshire, 375; F. F., 287 and 76 for 4 

wickets. 
•I 11 — Ipswich. Drawn. F. F., 293 and 252 ; Ipswich and East Suifolk, 
297. 
5.— Littlebury, Saffron Walden. Lost. F. F., 120; Mr Burrell's XI, 
197 for 8 wickets. 
8, 9. — Maidstone. Drawn. F. F,,'256 and 172 for 6 wickets; Mote 

Park, 531. 
10, II. — Linton Park, Maidstone. Lost. F. F., 213 and 171 ; Band of 

Brothers, 330 and 55 for one wicket. 
12, 13. — Shorncliffe. Drawn. F. F., 184 and 272 for 5 wickets ; Shorncliffe 

Garrison, 223. 
24, 25. — Aldershot. Drawn. Aldershot Division, 273 ; F. F., 336 and 12 

for 2 wickets. 
26, 27. — Chatham. Drawn. Royal Engineers, 95 and 129 for 8 wickets ; 
F. F., 278. 





Batting Averages. 








I""i"S-nIro?c. 


Runs. 


Most in 
innings. 


Averag 


Major L. Spens .... 6 2 


262 


112* 


65.2 


C. E. Cobb 






4 


149 


72 


37.1 


G. F. Vernon 






4 I 


loS 


71 


35 


S. W. Cattley . 






6 I 


172 


n* 


34.2 


Hon. W. F. North 






5 2 


100 


57* 


33.1 


A. C. Macpherson 






5 


153 


116 


30.3 


Major J. Spens . 






lO I 


259 


114* 


28.7 


Rev. H. Thursby 






12 I 


305 


53 


27.8 


H. G. S. Hughes 






5 


132 


106 


26.2 


W. D. Bovill . 






6 


139 


88 


23.1 


T. Hine-Haycock 






4 


87 


49 


21.3 


Capt. Von Donop 






4 I 


63 


24 


21 


J. H. J. Hornsby 






9 


170 


48 


18.8 


Captain Cowan . 




*Sig 


9 2 

nifies not out. 


132 


39 


18.6 



372 



STATISTICS OF MATCHES. 









Inninofs. 


Times 


Runs. 


Most in 


Averas; 


° 


not out. 




innings. 




C. L. Hickley . . . . lo 


2 


146 


63 


18.2 


Captain B. Allason 






4 


I 


55 


28 


18.1 


R. W. Skipwith . 






9 


I 


144 


34 


18 


W. P. Crake 






4 


I 


51 


31* 


17 


F. E. Speed 






8 


o 


128 


30 


16 


Captain B. Roberts 






7 


o 


107 


■ 43 


15.2 


G. H. Goldney . 






15 


4 


166 


30 


I5-I 


Rev. V. Royle . 






6 


o 


84 


67 


14 


Rev. E. Protheroe 






5 


o 


67 


22 


13.2 


Rev. G. E. Willes 






8 


2 


78 


31 


^3 


C. B. L. Tylecote 






5 


o 


60 


28 


12 


E. F. S. Tylecote 






5 


I 


46 


23 


II. 2 


H. J. E. Burrell . 






8 


o 


84 


31 


10.4 


J.J.Frederick , 






II 


o 


no 


53 


10 


J. B. Rawlinson . 






7 


2 


50 


IS 


10 


C. A. S. Leggatt 






8 


I 


62 


27 


8.7 


R. M. Turnbull . 






5 


o 


39 


21 


7-4 


M. Wilde . 






5 


o 


32 


II 


6.2 



The following played in three innings: H. J. Mordaunt, F. C. Coxhead, E. 
Rutter, W. E. T. Bolitho, W. W. Whitmore, F. W. Capron, A. Appleby, Captain 
Stratford, N. E. Stainton, H. Tubb, F. C. Cobden. 

The following played in two innings : E. H. Buckland, J. E. A. Greatorex, 
A. S. Francis, F. S. Cornwallis, H. C. Maul, L. M. Richards, F. H. Sitwell, 
C. R. Thursby, J. H. Savory, G. C. G. Dewar, Rev. S. C. Voules, G. W. Ricketts, 
W. G. Hargreaves. 

The following played in one innings : Hon. and Rev. E. Lyttelton, E. Han- 
bury, F. Buckland, Rev. W. Law, Hon. R. Lyttelton, G. Ralli, W. Byass, H. F. 
Lee, G. N. Marten, D. S. Dury, F. W. Wright, H. F. de Paravicini, E. A. J. 
Maynard, T. Greatorex, Sir Guy Campbell, I. D. Walker, R. E. Inglis, H. Clough 
Taylor, J. Robertson, T. Kaye, Hon. A. Grosvenor, A. J. Webbe, J. G. Walker, 
W. E. W. Collins, Major Griffiths, Captain B. Baker, F. E. Lacey, C. R. Seymour, 
G. H. Longman, R. L. Knight, F. W. Pember, A. Rotherham, E. Ramsay, 
L. Owen. 



Matches played, 32. Won, 16; lost, 5 ; drawn, 10. 

Results of Matches. 

May 26. — Esher. Won. F. F., 141 ; Esher, 75 and 118 for 3 wickets. 
June 2, — Weybridge. Won. F. F., 181; Oatlands Park, 136. 

7. — Oxford. Drawn. F. F., 231 and 124 for 7 wickets ; Christ Church, 

244. 
9. — WeUington College. Drawn. F. F., 56 for 3 wickets; Wellington 

College, 139. 
12. — Winchester. Won. F. F., 163; The School, 31 and 25 for 3 
wickets. 
14, 15. — Rugby. Drawn. F. F., 133; The School, 159. 

16. — Woolwich. Won. F. F., 313 for 9 wickets ; Royal Military Aca- 
demy, 52. 

* Signifies not out. 



STATISTICS OF MATCHES. 



^7Z 



June 



29. 



July 



16.— Eton. Won. F. F., 151 ; The College, 133. 

23. — Shorncliffe. Won. F. F., 317; The Camp, 50 and 82. 

30.— Shoeburyness. Won. F. F., 321 ; School of Gunnery, 151 and 165. 

30. — Sandhurst. Won. F. F., 168; Staff College, 100 and 46 for 3 

wickets. 
7. — Godalming. Won. F. F., 96; The Charterhouse, 32 and 91 for 

7 wickets. 
12. — Colchester. Lost. 



23, 



Drawn. 



F. F., 105 and 100 ; The Garrison, 86 and 143. 
F. F. did not bat; The College, 20 for 6 



Aug. I, 



Dulwich. 

wickets. 
Bicester. Won. F. F., 103 and 11 for i wicket ; Bicester, 43 and 70. 
Cheltenham. Drawn. F. F., 43 and 114 for 7 wickets. East 

Gloucestershire, 164. 
Ludlow. Drawn. F. F. did not bat ; Ludlow, 97 for 8 wickets. 

F. F., 68 and 114 ; Radnorshire, 108 and 75 for 



Lost. 



17, 18. 



22, 


23- 


24. 


25 


27. 


28. 


29, 


30. 




31. 



— Knighton. 

8 wickets. 
— Shrewsbury. Won. 
— Worcester. Lost. 

for 5 wickets. 
— Audley End. Lost. 
— Ipswich. Won. F, 
— Norwich. Drawn. 
— Maidstone. Won. 
— Linton Park, Maidstone. 

63 and 320. 
—Woolwich. Won. F. F. 

157 and 136. 
— Hackwood Park. Won. 

wood Park, 85 and 87. 
—Portsmouth. Lost. F. F., 234 and 95 ; United Services, 172 and 

178. 
— Winchester. Won. F. F., 264 and 6 for no wicket ; Green Jackets, 

153 and 116. 
— Aldershot. Drawn. F. F., 279 ; The Division, 170 for 7 wickets. 
— Ayot St Lawrence, v. Mrs Pringle's XL No record. 
Sept. I. — Chatham. Drawn. F. F., 90 and 205 ; Royal Engineers, 

179 and 62 for 5 wickets. 



F. F., 107 and no ; Shropshire, 54 and 65. 
F. F., 78 and 159; Worcestershire, 161 and jj 

F. F., 105 and 52 ; Mr Burrell's XI, 73 and 171. 
F. , 104 and 197 ; East Suffolk, 109 and 150. 
F. F., 203 ; Norfolk, 205 and jj for 5 wickets. 
F. F., 225 ; The Mote, 99 and 118. 

Drawn. F. F., 176; Band of Brothers, 

288 and 6 for no wicket ; Royal Artillery, 

F. F., 103 and 69 for no wicket; Hack- 





Batting Averages. 








Innings. 


Times 
not out. 


Runs. 


Most in 
innings. 


Averag 


G. F. Vernon .... 5 





184 


118 


36.4 


N. E. Stainton . 






8 


I 


251 


53 


35.6 


Major J. Spens . 






4 





129 


76 


32.1 


J. A. Turner 






5 


I 


128 


47 


32 


W. E. W. Collins 






11 





258 


95 


23-5 


G. W. Ricketts . 






10 





231 


108 


23.1 


J. Robertson 






5 


I 


90 


30 


22.2 


Major L. T. Spens 






5 


I 


79 


30 


19. 1 


W. D. Bovill . 






12 


2 


180 


41 


18 


C. E. Cobb 






9 





158 


53. 


^7-5 


E. D.-Longworth 






9 





157 


46 


17.4 


A. W. Moon . 






17 


2 


242 


94* 


16.2 



* Signifies not out. 



374 



STATISTICS OF MATCHES. 





Innings. 


Times 
not out. 


Runs. 


Most in 
innings. 


Averag 


A. T. B. Dunn . 


7 


I 


113 


32* 


16. 1 


J. H. J. Homsby 


4 


o 


59 


46 


14-3 


E. A. J. Maynard 


9 


o 


119 


33 


•13.2 


E. J. Beaumont-Nesbitt . 


20 


2 


174 


39 


12.9 


E. Money-Wigram . 


8 


o 


I02 


34 


12.6 


M. Wilde .... 


4 


o 


44 


30 


II. 


W. E. Crake . 


5 


o 


48 


17 


9-3 


J. F. M. Prinsep 


7 


o 


57 


36 


8.1 


Captain Cowan . 


lO 


I 


70 


20 


1-1 


C. E. Farmer . 


5 


2 


23 


10 


7.2 


J. Hill .... 


9 


o 


54 


14 


6.0 


R. W. Skipwith . 


II 


I 


61 


13 


5.6 


Captain B. Roberts . 


9 


I 


45 


25 


5-5 


Captain Von Donop . 


5 


o 


25 


15 


5-0 


Lord A. Fitzroy . 


7 


2 


24 


10 


4.4 


Captain J. Frederick . 


6 


O 


25 


II 


4.1 


Rev. G. E. Willes 


12 


I 


40 


12 


3-7 


F. W. Pember . 


4 


I 


II 


5 


2.3 



The following played in three innings : E. M. Hadow, E. Rutter, Rev. E. D. 
Protheroe, A. E. Leatham, H. Tubb, T. R. Hine-Haycock, D. H. Barry, Rev. E. 
H. Hardcastle, C. L. Hickley, Capt. Dumbleton, and A. W. Cornwallis. 

The following played in two innings : Prince Christian Victor, Capt, Caunter, 
S. W. Cattley, F. E. Speed, L. Saunderson, G. H. Longman, A. C. Macpherson, 
R. W. Byass, M. J. DaugHsh, H. W. Hutson, C. Toppin, F. H. Gates, and 
Capt. B. Baker. 

The following played in one innings : R. W. Turnbull, C. J. Hargreaves, Captain 
C. K. Wood. E. H. Buckland, J. S. Udal, L D. Walker, J. Colman, E. Ramsay, 
A. S. Francis, J. G. Walker, C. E. Currie, S. T. Wilson, F. C. Cobden, R. O. 
Milne, J. W. Dale, F. M. Buckland, Rev. C. Smith, T. S. Dury, Roger Walker, 
Hon. R. H. Lyttelton, E. G. Wynyard, F. H. Lee, Capt. Holden. E. RaUi, Rev. 
J. H. Savory, P. J. T. Henery, Rev. H. E. Thursby, T. K. Tapling, G. H. 
Goldney, H. E. Crawley, C. A. S. Leggatt, C. R. Seymour, Rev. J. G. Crowdy, 
J. H, Bridges, Major Lewes, H. H. Castens, M. C. Kemp, Capt. Peyton, Rev. T. 
O. Wray, A. Rotherham, C. Thursby, H. F. de Paravicini, L. Owen, A. J. Webbe, 
F. Dames-Longworth. 



1889. 



Results of Matches. 



May 25. — Esher. Lost by 185 runs. Esher, 306; F. F., 121. 

June I.— Weybridge. Won by 156 runs. F. F., 236 ; Oatlands Park, 80. 

6.— Winchester. Drawn. F. F., 225; Winchester College, 71 for 2 
wickets. 
10, II.— Woolwich. Drawn. F. F., 152 ; Royal Artillery, 166. 
13, 14. — Rugby. Won by 10 wickets. Rugby School, 90 and 145; F. F., 
201 and 37 for no wickets. 
15. — Woolwich. Drawn. F. F., 205; Royal Military Academy, 59 for 
5 wickets. 

* Signifies not out. 




Hi 



-a 
o 
U 



STATISTICS OF MATCHES. 375 

June 15. — Wellington. Lost by 150 runs. Wellington College, 202 for 6 
wickets (innings declared finished) ; F. F., 52. 
19, 20. — Oxford. Lost. Christ Church, 221 and 131 for 3 wickets : F. F., 
219 and 132. 
24. — Eton. Drawn. Eton College, 262 ; F. F., 207 for 5 wickets. 

28, 29. — Shoeburyness. Won by 7 wickets. School of Gunnery, 65 and 202 ; 

F. F., 162 and 108 for 3 wickets. 
July 4. — Bucknalls, Watford. Lost by 179 runs on first innings. Bucknalls, 

271 ; F. F., 92 and 43 for 5 wickets. 
II. — Ayot St Lawrence. Won by 52 runs. F. F., 193; H. E. Craw- 
ley's XL 141. 
13. — Dulwich. Drawn. Dulwich College, 177; F. F., 47 for 2 wickets. ' 
17, 18. — Winchester. Won by 7 wickets. Green Jackets, 156 and 247; 

F. F., 294 and 113 for 3 wickets. 
19, 20. — Eccles V. Western. No score. 

20. — Godalming. Drawn. F. F., 167 for 5 wickets (innings declared 
finished) ; Charterhouse, 54 for 7 wickets. 

22, 23. — Liverpool. Drawn. F. F., 82 and 80 for 3 wickets ; Liverpool, 59. 
ti II — Horsham. Drawn. Horsham, 174 ; F. F. , 486 for 5 wickets. 

29, 30. — Bicester. Lost by an innings and 21 runs. F. F., 65 and 102; 

Bicester, 188. 
31, Aug. I. — Cheltenham. Lost by an innings and 53 runs. E. Glou- 
cestershire, 445; F. F., 203 and 189. 
It It — Kingswalden Bury, Hitchin. Lost by 6 wickets. Rev. 
H. C. Fellowes' XI, 184 and 59 for 4 wickets; F. F., 70 
and 177. 
Aug. 2, 3. — Ludlow. Lost by an innings and 75 runs. F. F., 71 and 53; 
Ludlow, 199. 
5, 6. — Knighton. Drawn, Radnorshire, 205; F. F., no and 119 for 5 

wickets. 
It It — Meriden. Won by an innings and 106 runs. Mr Digby's XI, 88 

and 73 ; F. F., 267. 
7, 8. — Shrewsbury. Drawn. F. F., 162 and 183 ; Shropshire, 242 and 70 

for 3 wickets. 
II II — Meriden. Won by an innings and 116 runs. F. F., 382 ; Warwick- 
shire Crusaders, 87 and 79. 
9. — Kenilworth. Lost by 45 runs. Kenilworth, 138 ; F. F., 83. 
9, 10. — Worcester. Drawn. Worcestershire, 179. 
19, 20. — Aldershot. Drawn. Aldershot Division, 287 ; F. F., 156 and 218 

for 8 wickets. 
21, 22.— Portsmouth. Drawn. United Services, 165 and 46 for 3 wickets; 
F. F., 187. 

23, 24. — Hackwood. Lost. F. F., 103 and 123 ; Hackwood Park, 186 and 

39 for 3 wickets. 
26, 27. — Maidstone. Won by 84 runs. F. F., 204 and 164 ; Mote, 162 and 

122. 
28, 29. — Linton Park. Won. F. F., 164 and 207 for 6 wickets ; B. B.'s, 98 

and 145. 

30, 31. — Chatham. Won by an innings and 8 runs. F. F., 266; Royal 

Engineers, 141 and 117. 

At the Mote, W. E. W. Collins and A. M. Inglis made 78 runs off 8 overs in 
fifteen minutes. 



376 



STATISTICS OF MATCHES. 



Batting Averages. 



A. M. Inglis 

G. Garnett . 

W. D. Marshall 

J. M. Jones 

R. W. Skipwith 

C. E. Farmer 

G. F. Vernon 

L. M. Richards 

A. J. Thornton 

A. T. B. Dunn 

Major J. Spens 

Major Spens 

H. J. E. Burrell 

C. W. Ricketts 

R. T. Atthill 

Captain Hayhurst- France 

J. A. Turner 

J. H. J. Hornsby 

Rev. J. H. Savory 

W. D. Bovill 

Captain W. D. Jones 

Captain Cowan . 

F. W. Maude . 

E. Rutter . 
A. E. Leatham . 
W. E. W. Collins 

F. C. Cobden . 

E. J. Beaumont-Nesbitt 
Rev. C. Smith 
Hon. H. A. Adderley 
S. Garnett . 

F. Dames-Longworth 
A. W. Cornwallis 
J. Hill 

G. H. Goldney . 
H. G. Tylecote . 
S. J. Wilson 
Rev. G. E. WiUes 
Captain Talbot . 
R. G. H. Hughes 
Captain B. Baker 
A. Appleby 
H. T. Hewett . 
H. G. S. Hughes 
A. E. Payne 
H. Tubb . 
Lord A. Fitzroy . 

The following played in two innings : H. 
Buckland, 76, i ; G. Bird, 3*, 13 ; H. E 

* Signifies not 



nings. 


Times 
not out. 


Runs. 


Most in 
innings. 


Average. 


5 


I 


149 


64 


37-1 


3 


I 


74 


48* 


37 


7 


2 


179 


61 


35-4 


8 





283 


97 


35-3 


3 


I 


63 


44 


31- 1 


3 


I 


59 


28* 


29.1 


5 





137 


44 


27.2 


4 





no 


55 


27.2 


5 





133 


72 


26.3 


3 





80 


57 


26.2 


6 





151 


81 


25.1 


8 





196 


68 


24.4 


3 





87 


72 


24 


7 





156 


71 


22.2 


3 


I 


44 


33 


22 


4 


I 


63 


36* 


21 


6 





123 


56 


20,3 


9 


I 


158 


45 


19.6 


10 


I 


150 


40 


16.6 


8 


I 


117 


55 


16.S 


II 


2 


145 


43 


16. 1 


9 





13s 


40 


15 


4 





60 


40 


15 


5 


4 


IS 


5* 


15 


10 


I 


131 


27 


14-5 


8 


I 


99 


49 


14. 1 


3 





42 


37 


14 


7 


I 


74 


38 


12.2 


4 





46 


26 


II. 2 


3 





31 


23 


10. 1 


3 


I 


21 


9* 


10. 1 


5 


I 


40 


18 


TO 


7 





57 


36 


8.1 


14 


I 


118 


33 


9.1 


8 


2 


49 


14 


8.1 


s 


I 


33 


20 


8.1 


10 





80 


15 


8 


9 


I 


63 


15 


7-7 


3 





23 


17 


7.2 


7 


2 


37 


18 


7.2 


7 


3 


27 


9 


6.3 


3 





19 


13 


6.1 


3 


I 


13 


8 


6.1 


3 





18 


15 


6 


3 


I 


12 


6 


6 


3 





18 


7 


6 


9 


3 


20 


10 


3.2 


: H. 


T. Arnall-Thompson, 0, 


31 ; E. H 


.. Bull, 5, 0* ; 


Captair 


I C. Boultbee, 6, i 



out. 



STATISTICS OF MATCHES. 2,77 

Hon. D, Carnegie, 7*, 9* ; M. J. Dauglish, 12, 2 ; Rev. E. Davenport, 4, 23* ; 
C. Dewar, 9, 4 ; S. W. Gore, 12*, o; R. Hine-Haycock, 6*, 20; W. J. Hughes, 
I, 21 ; F. R. Kindersley, 20*, 15 ; C. A. S. Leggatt, o, 12 ; M. P. Lucas, 34, 26 ; 
C. J. Lucas, 16, 15 ; W. Lucy, 8*, o ; A. W. Moon, 20, 6* ; G. N. Marten, o, 6 ; 
E. A. J. Maynard o, 21 ; A. C. Macpherson, 10, 37 ; F. H. Gates, 4, 23 ; C. D. 
Pennant, 3,0; G. D. Rowe, 43, 6 ; Captain C. Rawlinson, 2, 10* ; N. Stainton, 
6, o ; L. Sanderson, 85, 27 ; C. B. L. Tylecote, i, 8 ; R. M. Turnbull, o, 15 ; R. 
G. Venables, 8, o ; C. M. Woodbridge, 23, 33 ; R. A. Wilson, 33*, 24*; Roger 
Walker, 2, 12 ; A. J. Webbe, 2, 32*. 

The following played in one innings : D. H. Barry, i ; Dr Bourns, 7 ; C. C 
Burke, 4 ; H. L. Butler, o ; Rev. J. E. Crowdy, 46 ; C. E. Cobb, 23 ; S. W 
Cattley, 13 ; F, C. Coxhead, o ; J. Colman, 2 ; T. S. Dury, 14 ; Major Dorling 
76 ; E. C. Evelyn, 39 ; A. S. Francis, 21 ; A. Fulcher, 7 ; E. M. Hadow, 32 ; A 
H. Heath, 88; Lieut.-Col. Inge, 27; C. F. H. Leslie, 6 ; F. E. Lacey, 14; F. H 
Lee, 3; H. Mellor, 51; W. F. Moore, o; K. M'Alpine, 6; R. J. M'Niel, 17; J 
J. Richardson, 56; Rev. V. Royle, 11 ; Rev. T. O'Reay, o; Captain Ridley, 8 
J. Robertson, 4; F. E. Speed, 3 ; H. M. Stutfield, 24; C. R. Seymour, o; Cap 
tain Stratford, 4; C. Bogle-Smith, o ; J. S. Udal, 37; J. G. Walker, 4; C. T 
Weatherby, 18 ; Captain M. G. Wilkinson, 52. 



Results of Matches. 

May 24. — Esher. Won. Esher, 108 and 108 for 5 wickets ; F. F., 183. 

26, 27. — Woolwich. Lost. Royal Artillery, 278 ; F. F., 72 and 163. 
June II. — Eton. Won. Eton College, 128; F. F., 211 for 6 wickets. 

14. — Wellington. Won. Wellington College, 156; F. F., 161 for 8 
wickets. 
16, 17. — Rugby. Drawn. Rugby School, 303; F, F., 313. 

18. — Woolwich. Lost. Royal Military Academy, 149 ; F. F., 127. 
19, 20. — Oxford. Lost. Christ Church, 307 and 9 for 9 wickets ; F. F., 98 
and 215. 
21.— . Lost. C. Rose's XI, 182; F. F., 142. 

M — . Won. Lord Chesham's XI, 112; F. F, , 204. 

24. — Winchester. Won. Winchester College, 154; F. F., 157 for 2 

wickets. 
25. — Ayot St Lawrence. Won. H. E. Crawley's XI, 69 ; F. F., 116 and 
196 for 9 wickets. 

27, 28. — Shoeburyness. Drawn. School of Gunnery, 227 and 116 for 4 

wickets; F. F., 224. 
July 3.— Watford. Won. C. J. Hegan's XI, 90; F. F., 102. 

16. — . Won. Evelyns, 225 ; F. F. , 234 for 5 wickets. 

19. — . Won. Charterhouse, 50 and 43 for 5 wickets ; 

F. F., 176. 
23, 24. — Horsham. Lost. Horsham, 202 and 24 for 5 wickets ; F. F., 141 

and 83. 
25, 26. — Winchester. Drawn. Green Jackets, 211 and 127 for 6 wickets; 
F. F., 507. 

28, 29. — Wellesbourne. Won. Wellesbourne, 131 and 59; F. F., 123 and 

lis- 

* Signifies not out. 



378 



STATISTICS OF MATCHES. 



July 30, 31.— Cheltenham. Drawn. East Gloucestershire, 146 and 78 for 5 

wickets; F. F., 164 and 164. 
Aug. I, 2. — Ludlow. Drawn. Ludlow, 74 and 135 for 6 wickets ; F. F., 198 
for 5 wickets. 
2. — Oatlands Park. Drawn. Oatlands Park, 130; F. F., loi for 2 
wickets. 
4, 5.— Hopton Heath. Lost. Hopton Heath, 116 and 113 for 8 wickets ; 

F. F., 149 and -jj. 
6, 7. — Shrewsbury. Drawn. Shropshire, 107 and 151 ; F. F., 193. 
8, 9. — Worcester. Drawn. Worcestershire, 411 ; F. F., 199 and 140 for 
wickets, 
ir, 12. — . Lost. The Mote, 75 and 263 for 8 wickets ; F. F., 65 

and 156. 
15, 16. — Chatham. Won. Royal Engineers, 42 and 118 ; F. F., 237. 
18,19. — Aldershot. Drawn. Aldershot Division did not bat ; F. F., 396. 
20, 21. — Portsmouth. Won. United Services, 161 and 150; F. F., 153 and 

158 for 5 wickets. 
29. 30- — • Lost. Gentlemen of Leicestershire, 264 ; F. F. , 

103 and 48. 
Sept. I, 2. — . Won. Guernsey, 34 and 139 ; F. F., 209. 

4, 5. — Jersey. Won. South Lancashire Regiment, 87 and 82; F. F., 168. 
6. — Jersey. Drawn. Island of Jersey, 53 and 53 for 6 wickets ; F. F., 
212. 
8, 9.— Weymouth. Won. Weymouth, 51 and 149 ; F. F., 79 and 124 for 
3 wickets. 

A^.^.— No records of Staff College at Camberley, at Boxley, at Hams Hall, or 
Northampton. 



Batting Averages. 









Innings. 


Times 
not out. 


Runs. 


Most in 
innings. 


Averag 


Captain B. Baker ... 7 


5 


134 


54 


6j 


Major Rice 






8 


3 


241 


• III 


48.1 


E. H. Buckland . 






6 


I 


173 


119 


34-3 


A. T. Atthill 






7 





227 


74 


32.3 


Rev. J. H. Savory 






5 


I 


131 


85 


32.3 


Major J. Spens . 






S 





161 


106 


32.1 


F. M. Buckland . 






5 





153 


62 


30-3 


G. W. Ricketts . 






4 





123 


100 


30.3 


F. Gilman . 






10 


I 


263 


65 


29.2 


H. T. Hewitt . 






4 





114 


48 


28.2 


J. A. Turner 






8 





225 


61 


28.1 


G. F. Vernon . 






9 





232 


17 


25-7 


W. D. Bovill . 






6 


3 


59 


33 


19.2 


Captain Prinsep . 






10 


I 


171 


36 


19 


A. E. Leatham . 






7 


I 


109 


57 


18.1 


J. H. J. Hornsby 






12 





197 


62 


16.5 


H. Bull 






7 


2 


78 


26 


15-3 


C. E. Farmer . 






II 


3 


14s 


28 


15 


C. E. de Trafiford 






5 





95 


41 


15 


W. E. W. Collins 






■ 13 


3 


14s 


28 


14.5 


M. F. Maclean . 






II 


I 


140 


39 


14 


J. A. Gibbs 






5 


I 


56 


21 


14 


F. W. Maude . 






4 





55 


22 


13-3 







4^«K 



< 



STATISTICS OF MATCHES. 



379 









Innings. 


Times 
not out. 


Runs. 


Most in 
innings. 


Averag 


K. M 'Alpine .... 6 


o 


77 


30 


12.5 


H. E. M. Stutfield 




5 


I 


49 


32 


12. 1 


E. A. J. Maynard 




5 


o 


6o 


29 


12 


Rev. G. E. Willes 




8 


2 


6i 


15 


10. T 


C. M. Woodbridge 




4 


o 


41 


35 


10. 1 


J. Hill 




7 


I 


6o 


21 


10 


S. H. Walrond 






4 


o 


37 


16 


9-1 


A. J. Thornton 






4 


o 


36 


18 


9 


Captain Cowan 






8 


T 


57 


26 


8.1 


M. C. Kemp 






5 


o 


37 


26 


7.2 


R. A. Wilson 






4 


I 


20 


9 


6.2 


W. H. Sitwell 






5 


I 


26 


16 


6.2 


J. Robertson 






6 


o 


55 


36 


6.1 


F. Coxhead 






4 


o 


16 


16 


4' 


R. Skipwith 






8 


I 


24 


7 


3-3 



The following played in three innings : F. W. Bovill, Major L. T. Spens, H. W. 
Brougham, F. W. Capron, Captain C. E. Clowes, H. G. S. Hughes, H. E. Hoff- 
meister, Major Pearson, Captain Hornby (R. A. ), H. Tubb, E. Rutter, Ll Sander- 
son, J. Pender. 

The following played in two innings : E. M. Bannerman, R. W. Byass, A. C. 
Cattley, O. R. Dunell, Rev. H. J. E. Burrell, A. T. B. Dunn, Captain Young 
(R.E.), C. W. Parry, E. M. Hadow, A. E. Payne, E. S. Hanbury, Captain 
Talbot, Captain Wheble, H. J. Mordaunt, J. T. Sanderson, H. G. Tylecote, W. 
D. Marshall, J. S. Russell; F. H. Mellor, C. A. S. Leggatt, L. M. Richards, S. 
H. F. Hole, Rev. J. S. Marriott. 

The following played in one innings : Captain W. D. Jones, R, O. Milne, F. G. 
Barker, I. D. Walker, P. R. Toynbee, R. Turnbull, H. Rotherham, Captain Rice, 
(R.E.), Captain Lipscombe, E. Murdoch, Rev. V. Royle, A. S. Francis, Ca'ptain 
Elliott, F. E. Speed, C. Bridgeman, C. Booth, C. L. Hickley, Major Griffiths 
(R.A.), Colonel Nicholson (R.A.), Captain Curteis (R.A.), C. F. H. Leslie, Captain 
Wynyard, P. C. Smith, J. Colman, W. F. Higgins, A. C. Macpherson, L. G. A. 
Collins, F. L. Evelyn, F. T. Welman, M. J. Dauglish, E. T. Hodgson, A. Chinn, 
Captain Hayhurst-France, C. J. Stratton, F. H. Gates, W. N. Cobbold, Captain 
V. Tippinge, G. D. Rowe, F. Dames-Longworth, E. Bray, A. J. Webbe. 



1891. 

Results of Matches. 



May i8, 19.— Woolwich. Royal Artillery. No record, 

30.— . Won. Eton College, 34 and 116; F.F., 125. 

June I, 2.— . Won. Rugby, 83 and 109; F. F., 166 and 30 

for 3 wickets. 
3.— Woolwich. Won. Royal Military Academy, 71 and 69 for 4 

wickets; F. F., 92. 
6. — V. Esher. No record. 
10, II.— Oxford. Drawn. Christ Church, 271 and 59 for 3 wickets; F. F. , 231. 
.13. — Won. Westminster School, 117; F. F., 322. 

- II — V. Charterhouse. No record. 

II — . Lost. C. Rose's XI, 248 for 8 wickets ; F.F., 158, 

II — V. Staff College, Camberley. No record. 



38o STATISTICS OF MATCHES. 

June 17.— . Won. H. G. Tylecote's XL, 120; F. F., 238 for 

6 wickets. 
24. — . Won. Winchester College, 137; F. F., 184 for 

8 wickets. 
26, 27. — . Drawn. School of Gunnery, 161 and 225 for 4 

wickets ; F. F. , 342. 
July I. — Southgate. Drawn. Southgate, 205 for 6 wickets ; F. F., 132 for 

2 wickets. 
2. — V. C. J. Hegan's XI. No record. 
4. — . Lost. Lyric, 253; F. F., 117. 

8. — . Drawn. Evelyns, 199 for 6 wickets. 

II. — . Won. Wellington College, 156; F. F., 176 for 

9 wickets. 

13, 14. — V. Horsham. No record. 
15,16. — z/. Green Jackets. No record. 
17, 18. — V. Mr Style's XL No record. 

20. — Sandhurst. Drawn. Staff, 202; F. F., 148 for 6 wickets. 
27,28. — Cirencester. Drawn. Cirencester, 126 and 276 for 3 wickets ; F. F. , 

209 and 108 for 7 wickets. 
29, 30. — Cheltenham. Drawn. East Gloucestershire, ; F. F., 381 for 

6 wickets. 
31, Aug. I. — . Won. F. F., 98 and 103 ; Heath House, 

162 and yS. 
Aug. I. — . Won. Oatlands Park, 50 and 64 ; F. F., 174. 

3, 4. — Ludlow. Drawn. Ludlow, 93 and 60 for no wicket ; F. F., 156. 
5, 6. — . Won. Shropshire, 187 and 102; F. F. , 149 and 

141 for 9 wickets. 
7, 8. — Worcester. Lost. F. F., 90 and 149 ; Worcestershire, 116 and 124 

for I wicket. 
10,11. — . Won. The Mote, 106 and 48 ; F. F., 117 and 121. 

12, 13. — Linton Park. Won. Linton Park, 163 and 181 ; F. F., 305 and 38 
for no wicket. 

14, 15. — Chatham. Drawn. Royal Engineers, 224 and 66 for 5 wickets ; 

F. F., 218 and 149 for 7 wickets. 
17, 18. — Aldershot. Won. Division, 138 and 100 ; F. F., 183 and 164 for 

6 wickets. 
19, 20. — Portsmouth. Drawn. United Services, 278; F. F., 116 and iii 

for 2 wickets. 
„ M — Kearsiey Grange. Won. Kearsley, 186 and 85; F. F., 159 and 

294 for 8 wickets. 
21, 22. — . Drawn. Gents of Staffordshire, 34 and 51 for i 

wicket ; F. F., 105. 
24, 25. — . Drawn. Rockingham, 53; F. F., 107 and 27 for 

I wicket. 
26, 27.— . Drawn. Northants C. & G. , 88 ; F. F. , 270 for 6 wickets. 

28, 29.— . Won. Gents of Leicestershire, 102 and 48 ; F. F,, 

173 and yj for 6 wickets. 
28.— Weymouth. Lost. Weymouth, 161 ; F. F., 39 and 48. 
29. — Weymouth (return match). Drawn. Weymouth, 186; F. F., 60 

and 81 for 5 wickets. 
31, Sept. I. — Guernsey. Drawn. Guernsey, 54 and 108 for 3 wickets ; 
F. F., 141. 
Sept. 2, 3. — Jersey. Won. South Lancashire Regiment, 53 and 78 ; F. F., 194. 
4, 5. — Jersey. Won. Jersey, 115 and 80; F. F., 254. 



STATISTICS OF MATCHES. 



381 



Batting Averages. 






. 




Innings, 


Times 
not out. 


Runs. 


Most in 
innings. 


Average 


J. A. Turner 


7 


I 


276 


106 


46 


C. Toppin .... 


4 


I 


178 


78 


44.2 


F. Dames- Longworth . 


5 


I 


158 


58 


39-2 


W. D. Bovill .... 


8 


3 


192 


102 


38.2 


C. E. Farmer 


6 





163 


41 


37-1 


Captain Hayhurst-France . 


5 


2 


109 


30 


36.1 


F. L.. Evelyn 


5 





150 


102 


30 


C. Parry .... 


5 





147 


66 


29.2 


C. E. Cobb 


10 





287 


65 


28.7 


F. H. Gresson . 


10 





283 


118 


28.3 


H. E. Bull .... 


4 


I 


86 


61 


21.2 


Major J. Spens . 


5 


I 


80 


34 


20 


Captain B. Baker 


4 


I 


60 


51 


20 


A. E, Leatham . 


8 





^S7 


32 


19-5 


Captain Vizard . 


10 





188 


67 


18.8 


E. L. Metcalfe . 


9 





165 


49 


18.1 


F. H. Sitvvell . 


4 


I 


53 


29 


17.2 


H. M. Burge . 


4 


I 


50 


20 


16.2 


E. Rutter .... 


4 


2 


32 


13 


16 


Captain Curteis, R.A. 


16 





253 


61 


15-13 


M. F. Maclean . 


15 


4 


166 


40 


13.10 


Major Hardy, R.A. . 


5 





73 


49 


14-3 


Major L. T. Spens . 


5 


I 


55 


28 


13-3 


C, A. M. Kempe 


7 


I 


75 


25 


12.3 


Rev. H. E. Thursby . 


II 





132 


48 


12 


T. Hill .... 


14 





156 


52 


II. 2 


A. J. Thornton . 


4 





46 


26 


II. 2 


R. T. Atthill 


22 


I 


205 


40 


9.16 


W. E. W. Collins . 


16 


I 


125 


48 


8.5 


H. C. Currie, R.A. . 


4 





35 


23 


8.3 


H. Philipson 


4 





29 


22 


7-1 


Rev. G. E. Willes 


7 


2 


31 


6 


6.1 


Captain Cowan . 


10 


I 


52 


13 


5-7 


Lord Truro 


5 


I 


25 


9 


5 


A. W. Fulcher . 


4 


I 


14 


14 


4.2 


E. P. Benson, R.A. . 


7 


3 


17 


7 


4.1 



The following played in three innings : C. Bogle Smith, J. Robertson, E. C. 
Mordaunt, R. Turnbull, F. E. Speed, Captain E. Wynyard, C. Peachey, A. C. 
Richards, Rev. H. E. Burrell, A. J. Boger, C. J. E. Jarvis, Hon. A. Adderley, 
H. T. Arnall Thompson, K. M'Alpine, Captain Phipps Hornby, M. C. Kemp, 
Lieutenant P. Hornby, R.N., J. A. Gibbs. 

The following played in two innings : E. M. Hadow, C. E. Murdoch, R. A. 
Widson, T. O'Brien, Captain W. G. Wyld, H. E. HofFmeister, G. F. Vernon, 
J. G. Walker, C. E. Mason, G. Style, P. Toynbee, R. Skipwith, J. B. Rawlinson, 
G. Beaumont Nesbitt, J. Pender, C. Douglas Pennant, C. W. Digby, Captain 
Gatliff. 

The following played in one innings : E. A. Nepean, D. F. Gillman, C. P. 
Foley, Captain Cowper Coles, F. T. Welman, Captain Elliott, S. H. F. Hole, 
H. T. Hewitt, M. P. Lucas, G. G. Skipwith, R. Gibson, Rev. M. P. Buckle, 
Captain Rawlinson, VJ. S, Case, C. L. Hickley, A. Appleby, A. J. Webbe, Rev. 



382 STATISTICS OF MATCHES. 

W. Law, A. H. Heath, A. C. Collier, Hon. F. Thesiger, G. M. Jones, S. H. 
Walrond, G. D. Rowe, C. R. Seymour, H. W. Brougham, G. G. Moir, R. J. 
Pinney, A. C. Macpherson, S. J. Wilson, C. F. H. Leslie, J. R. Head, E. T. 
Hill, L. Y. ColHns, Captain Becher, W. F. Higgins, C. J. Stratton, H. Tubb. 



Matches played, 32. Won, 9 ; lost, 7 ; drawn, 16. 

Results of Matches. 

June I. — Woolwich. Lost. F. F., 161; Royal Military Academy, 163 for 8 

wickets (12 a-side). 
6, 7. — Woolwich. Lost. F. F. , 66 and 208 ; Royal Artillery, 299. 

Ti. — Eton. Won. F. F., 155 and 74 ; Eton College, 125 and 66 for 3 
wickets. 
13, 14. — Rugby. Won. F. F., 214 and 141 for 6 wickets (innings declared 

closed) ; The School, 137 and 92. 
15, 16. — Oxford. Drawn. F. F., 298; Christ Church College, 215. 
20, 21. — Newbold Revel. Won. Newbold Revel, 132 and 153; F. F., 274 
and 12 for i wicket. 
22. — Westminster. Won. F. F., 82 and 61 for 3 wickets; Westminster 
School, 96 and 50. 

23, 24. — Newbold Revel. Won. F. F., 124 and 97; Warwickshire Crus- 

aders, 123 and 87. 

24, 25. — Shoeburyness. Drawn. School of Gunnery, 138 and 200; F. F., 

146 and 139 for 7 wickets. 
July 8, 9. — Malvern. Drawn. F. F., 208 and 10 for no wicket ; The College, 
279. 
9.— Godalming. Drawn. F. F., 219 for 6 wickets (innings declared 
closed) ; Charterhouse, 174 for 3 wickets. 
13, 14. — Bridge Castle. Drawn. Lord Abergavenny's XI, 167 and 272 for 

7 wickets (innings closed) ; F. F., 146 and 70 for 2 wickets. 
It II — Bicester. Lost. Bicester, 262; F. F., 86 and 154. 
15, 16.— Colchester. Drawn. The Garrison, 196 and 194 for 6 wickets 
(innings closed) ; F. F., 229 and 17 for 3 wickets. 
18. — Sandhurst. Drawn. F. F., 132 ; The Staff, 30 for no wicket. 
22, 23. — Maidstone. Drawn. F. F., 123 and 192 ; Mrs Styles' XI, 323. 
Aug. I, 2. — Winchester. Won. F. F., 314 ; Green Jackets, 100 and 95. 

II II — Cirencester. Drawn. F. F., 278 ; Cirencester, 130 and no for 5 

wickets. 
3, 4. — Ludlow. Lost. F. F., 66 and 62 ; Ludlow, 171. 
5, 6. — Heath House. Won. Heath House, 106 and 147; F. F., 242 and 

12 for I wicket. 
8, 9. — Shrewsbury. Lost. F. F., 92 and 202 ; Shropshire, 266 and 33 for 

no wicket. 
,1 II — Maidstone. Lost. Mote Park, 135 and 204 ; F. F., 99 and 134. 
, 10, II. — Newbold Revel. Won. F. F., 121 and 74; Warwickshire Crus- 
aders, 60 and 82. 
II It — Linton Park. Drawn. F. F., 346 and 102 for 5 wickets ; Linton 

Park, 332. 
12, 13. — Wellesbourne. Drawn. Wellesbourne, 134; F. F., 129 for 6 
wickets. 



STATISTICS OF MATCHES. 



3^3 



Aug. 12, 13. — Chatham. Drawn. F. F,, 417 for 8 wickets (innings closed) ; Royal 

Engineers, 184 and 118 for 4 wickets. 
II II — Chelmsford. Drawn. F. F., 521 ; A. P. Lucas's XI, 562 for 5 

wickets. 
15, 16. — Southampton. Drawn. Hampshire Hogs, 310; F. F., 176 and 261 

for 7 wickets. 
17, 18. — Portsmouth. Drawn. F. F., 286 and 12 for no wicket; United 

Services, 322. 
19, 20. — Aldershot. Won. F. F., 141 and 63 ; The Division, 163 and 35. 
22, 23. — Northampton. Drawn. F. F., 153 and 323; Northamptonshire, 

357- 
24, 25. — Lutterworth. Lost. F. F., 162 and loi ; Leicestershire, 202 and 

68 for 4 wickets. 



Batting Averages. 










Innings. 


Times 
not out. 


Runs. 


Most in 
innings. 


Average 


Major J. Spens . 


5 


I 


236 


178* 


59 


G. W. Ricketts . 


4 





185 


147 


46.1 


A. J. Boger 


6 





254 


60 


42.2 


Captain Quinton 


5 





103 


106 


38.3 


F. H. Gresson . 


II 


I 


364 


80 


36.4 


A. C. Richards . 


5 


I 


144 


55 


36 


H. J. Mordaunt . 


4 





144 


118 


36 


C. A. R. Gresson 


5 





150 


66 


30 


0. R. Dunell 


5 





120 


48 


25-3 


E. F. Rutter 


5 


2 


77 


37* 


25.2 


Captain Beecher . 


3 





72 


53 


24 


Captain E. G. Wynyard . 


8 





176 


64 


22 


A. J. Thornton . 


7 


I 


130 


85* 


21.4 


C. E. Cobb 


4 





87 


72 


21.3 


E. C. Streatfeild 


6 





126 


44 


21 


C. Toppin .... 


13 


2 


224 


77 


20.4 


R. 0. Milne ... 


3 


I 


41 


36 


20.1 


F. L. Evelyn 


4 


I 


55 


36 


18.1 


Captain Bruce . 


9 





162 


44 


18 


Captain Curteis, R.A. 


. 17 





286 


95 


16.14 


A. E. Leatham . 


9 





146 


84 


16.2 


D. F. Gillman . 


13 





204 


59 


15-9 


C. E. Murdoch . 


6 





93 


51 


T5-3 


M. F. Maclean . 


15 


2 


194 


45 


14.12 


E. A. J. Maynard 


4 


I 


44 


25 


14.2 


G. G. Lang 


4 


I 


42 


15* 


14 


C. Heseltine 


4 





53 


30 


13- 1 


C. L. Hickley . 


3 





39 


20 


13 


C. E. Farmer . 


10 


I 


113 


33* 


12.5 


G. F. Vernon 


3 





38 


20 


12.2 


Major Rice 


14 


4 


121 


58 


12.1 


J. H. Hornsby . 


4 





49 


23 


12.1 


Major L. T. Spens . 


12 


3 


108 


21 


12 


H. E. Bull .... 


9 


I 


89 


23* 


II. I 


F. T. Welman . 


9 


2 


74 


26 


10.7 


Captain Elliot . 


3 


I 


21 


13 


10. 1 



* Signifies not out. 



384 



STATISTICS OF MATCHES. 





Innings. 


Times 
not out. 


Runs. 


Most in 
innings. 


Average 


H. M. Burge 


3 


I 


20 


17 


10 


H. W. Brougham 


12 


I 


III 


21* 


9-3 


F. M. Buckland . 


9 


2 


66 


33* 


9.3 


A. G. G. Asher . 


5 


I 


39 


25* 


9-3 


W. E. W. Collins 


9 


O 


So 


26 


8.8 


R. T. Atthill . 


9 


I 


69 


• 19 


8.5 


J.Hill .... 


9 


2 


54 


25 


7-5 


Captain Cowan . 


9 


2 


50 


26 


7-1 


E. Rutter .... 


8 


4 


33 


8 


8.1 


J. Pender .... 


4 


o 


20 


II 


5 ■ 


Captain Watson 


8 


o 


37 


12 


4-5 


Lord Truro 


5 


o 


24 


10 


4.4 


G. E. Willes 


8 


3 


23 


16* 


4-3 


Captain Benson . 


6 


o 


21 


10 


3-3 


A. H. E. Wood . 


4 


I 


9 


9 


3 



The following played in two innings only: W. D. Bovill, 16, 36; J. S. Russell, 
o, 27; D. R. Napier, 22, 24; Captain Rice, R.E., o, o; L. Sanderson, o, 42; 
Captain Knox, 0,0; L. M. Richards, 7, 6 ; Colonel Fellowes, o, 8 ; G. A. Talbot, 
o, 20 ; Major Gatliff, 3, o ; A. S. Macpherson, o, 3 ; K. M 'Alpine, 13, 22 ; J. A. 
Gibbs, 27, o; R. J. Shipworth, i, o ; J. R. Head, 54, 100; Hon. P. Thesiger, 
4, 9; C. H. Morton, 11*, 3* ; F. Harvey-Bathurst, 2, 3 ; A. C. Collier, 9, o ; C. 
Peachey, 3,0; J. Robertson, 13, i ; Rev. W. Law, 2, 9 ; Earl of Dalkeith, o, 14* ; 
G. A. Talbot, o, 20 ; J. G. Walker, 4, 16 ; A. L. Watson, 18, 15 ; F. Sitwell, 3, 
II ; Major Young, 68, 2*; E. A. Milne, 33, o; H. J. Mordaunt, 16, 12; H. E. 
Hoffmeister, 2, 10 ; Major Pratt, 4, 6* ; T. C. O'Brien, 24, 9 ; G. G. Skipwith, 
34*, 12* ; C. Booth, 9, 8 ; C. P. Foley, 3, 5 ; J. H. Weatherby, 9*, 6 ; E. L. Met- 
calfe, 15, 67* ; Captain B. Baker, o, o. 

The following batted in one innings only : G. H. Cotterill, 66* ; N. Thursby, i ; 
V. F. Leese, 19; C. J. Stratton, 2; N. E. Stainton, o; H. Tubb, 4*; Lieut. 
Blair, 141 ; C. A. S. Mason, o ; R. A. Wilson, o ; Colonel Nicolson, 3 ; Captain 
Prendergast, 30* ; A. H. J. Cochrane, 17 ; J. B. Rawlinson, 31 ; W. H. Sitwell, 
5 ; Rev. M. B. Buckle, i; A. W. Moon, 3; F. Dames-Longworth, o; Captain 
Wheble, o ; C. R. Seymour, 12 ; R. Christopherson, 8 ; J. A. Turner, 23 ; W. H. 
Brain, 73 ; Captain Abdy, 3 ; W. E. T. Bolitho, 34 ; Hon. F. Thesiger, i ; G. J. 
Mordaunt, 29 ; Sir C. Cuyler, 3 ; F. M. Ingram, 130 ; Captain H. Curteis, 
R.M.L.L, 2; M. J. Dauglish, 20; Captain Wyld, i ; J. B. Hughes, 4 ; E. M. 
Gibson, 38 ; H. Gibson, 115 ; W. S. Case, 21 ; W. D. Marshall, 34 ; E. Bray, o. 

* Signifies not out. 



INDEX. 



Abbots Langley, 249. 

Abbott, Capt., 260, 265. 

Abbott, L. C, 102. 

Abdy, Capt, 285, 288. 

Absolom, C. A., 95, 137, 151, 158, 215. 

Academy Ground, Raeburn Place, 171. 

Ackroyd, B. N., 233. 

Ackroyd, S. H., iii, 151, 158, 215. 

Adair, Capt., 265, 271, 277, 284, 285. 

Adams, K., 172. 

Adderley, A., 315. 

Agnew. See Vans Agnew. 

Ainslie, C, 262. 

Alcock, A, E., 154, 236. 

Aldershot, 156, 215, 222, 228, 235, 241, 

246, 251, 294, 295. 
Alexander, W., 105. 
Allason, Capt., 260, 261, 283, 288. 
Allen, H., 310, 311, 345. 
All England Eleven, 52, 53. 
All Muggleton, 12. 
AUsopp, Hon. F. E., 153, 159, 218, 219, 

223, 248, 249, 261, 283. 
Allsopp, Hon. G. H., 112, 113, 153. 
Allsopp, Hon. H. T., 152, 155, 219, 234. 
Alston, J., 227. 
Alston, W. C, T13, 133, 225. 
Althorp Park, 105. 
Alton Towers, 134, 14c, 154, 161, 231. 

Anderson, , 53. 

Anstruther, Major, 282, 283, 285. 
Appleby, A,, 124-126, 133, 152, 153, 

161, 180, 216, 218, 219, 225, 235, 244, 

24s, 249-251, 305, 310, 311, 333, 335, 

336, 345, 346, 355. 356- 
Appleton, C, 128. 
Appleton, W., 128. 
Arden, Forest of, 10, 21, 314. 
Arkwright, G., 34, 37. 
Arkwright, H., 38, 76. 
Armitage, C. J., 128. 
Armitage, V. K., 25, 44-46, 100, 112, 

117. 
Armitstead, Henry S., 10-12, 14, 20, 23, 

25-28, 30, 33-35, 37, 41, 43-47, 54, 56, 

58, 60, 73, 79, 89, 119, 125. 



Armitstead, John R., 10-12, 16. 

Armitstead, W. G., 5, 10-12, 14, 15, 21, 
23, 25-27, 28, 37, 38, 40, 43, 46, 49, 50, 
52, 54.56, 58, 66, 68, 73, 75, 77, 79, 80, 
85, 86, 89, 91, 95, no, 112, 113, 117, 
119, 124, 125, 133, 134, 138, 141. 

Armitstead's narrative, 69-72. 

Armstrong, C, 248. 

Armstrong, H., 106. 

Ash, E. P., 82, 98, 116, 126, 158, 227, 

Ashbourne, 155. 

Asher, A. G., 265, 267, 271, 277. 

Asher, J. G., 295, 313. 

Ashwell, C. T., 127. 

Aston, Little, 126, 133, 143. 

Atkins, , 341. 

Atkins, F. M., 272-278. 

Atkinson, G., 45-47. 

Atthill, R. T., 231, 240, 262, 264, 272, 

275. 299. 309> 317* 335> 336. 360. 
Aylesford, Earl of, 29, 55, 76. 

Baggallay, T., 99, 108. 

Bagot, H., 240, 315. 

Bagot, W. W., 113, 126, 146, 154, 227. 

Bailey, Bomb., 286. 

Baker, Capt. Beresford, 228, 234, 237- 

239, 243, 249, 250, 283, 305, 307, 335. 
Baker, E. G., 352. 
Baker, F., 98, 99, 102, 145, 147, 151, 

162-164. 
Baker, J. D., 123. 
Balderson, C. H., 306. 
Balfour, L. M., 139, 182. 
Balfour, R. D., 78, 84, 85, 172, 174, 

175- 
Balgarnie, J. , 173. 
Banbury, 246. 

Bannerman, E. M., 139, 182, 247. 
Barker, G. W., 20. 
Barker, J., 117. 
Barker, T., 118. 
Barlow, E. P., 124. 
Barron, H. G., 104, 112, 117, 138, 151- 

154, 163. 
Barron, N., 153. 



2 B 



386 



INDEX. 



Barry, D. H., 285. 

Barter, W. P., 336. 

Bartholomew, A. C, 96. 

Barton, Bomb., 285, 286. 

Bass, H., 98, 166, 177-179, 181. 

Bassett, H., 308. 

Batchelor, Rev. W. J., 160, 218, 236. 

Bateman, E. L., 98. 

Baxter, Rev. J. H., 351, 356. 

Bayfield, Corporal, 262-265, 340. 

Beacham, E. M., 361, 364. 

Beaumont, E. J., 260. 

Beaumont, W. B., 20. 

Beaver, P., 51, 68. 

Becher, Capt., 310, 345. 

Beddington Park, 156, 214. 

Bedford, A. E. R., 305. 

Bedford, C. J. R., 11, 12, 14, 167. 

Bedford, C. Y., 234, 244. 

Bedford, R. B. R., 27, 29. 

Bedford, W. K. R., 140, 153, 163, 248, 

252, 307 — presentation to, 64. 
Bedfordshire, Gentlemen of, 105, 113, 

159- 
Bedgebury Park, 341. 
Beeston, 100, 104, 109, 118, 134. 
Beevor, J. C, 351, 352. 
Beevor, J. G. , 98-100, 105, 109, 113, 

118, 119, 127, 128, 134, 140, 147, 154, 

157, 159, 216, 224. 
Belcher, T. H., 219. 

Bell, , 45, 46. 

Bell, C, 231. 

Bellhouse, J., 285. 

Bellhouse, T. T. , 58. 

Benn, G., 14. 

Benn, W., 14. 

Bennet, J., 104, 177. 

Bennet, P., 250. 

Bennett, A. S., 146, 214. 

Bennett, E. A., 351, 352, 353, 356. 

Bennett, F. W., 229. 

Bennett, G. F., 275. 

Benson, Capt., 362, 363. 

Benson, R. A. B., 35. 

Benson, R. P., 286. 

Benson's lines, 35, 36. 

Benthall, W. H., 67. 

Berger, J. H., 116. 

Berkeley, G. F., 335. 

Best, W. W., 275, 276. 

Bicester, 299. 

Biddulph, S., 72, 73, 75, 87. 

Bidwell, H., 119. 

Bigge, G. ©.,264. 

Bigge, T. A, H., 260, 263, 264. 

Bignall, T.,73, 87. 

Bignell, S. H., 299, 304, 305, 307, 345. 

Bill, C. H., 79, 98. 

Birbeck, H., 245. 

Birch, S., 20, 22, 23, 29, 30, 63. 

Bird, A. C, 230. 

Bird, G., 158, 249. 

Birkenhead, 126, 131, 138, 151. 

Birkett, W., 171, 173, 174. 

Birley, F. H., 112, 156. 



Birmingham, 21, 28, 38. 

Bissett, R., 85. 

Black Country Cricket, 144. 

Blacker, W., 151. 

Blackwell, A. H., 308. 

Blair, A. N., 100. 

Blair, E. M., 260, 264, 265, 313. 

Blaise Castle, 238, 243. 

Blane, Capt., 41. 

Bligh, Hon. Ivo, 156, 213, 226, 235. 

Bligh, L. E., 273, 274. 

Blyth, A. G., 251. 

Boden, H., 42, 49. 

Bonehill, 13. 

Booth, C, 31, 40, 75, 78, 82, 86, 87, 89, 
104, 105, 109, no, 119, 130, 139, 235, 
237, 242, 283. 

Borrowes, K., 222, 235. 

Boteler, Capt., 283. 

Bott, J. W., II, 91. 

Boulton, S., 363. 

Bourne, A. A., 138. 

Bousfield, E. J., 44, 46, 80, 125. 

Bovill, E. P., 233. 

Bovill, W., 229-233, 235, 236, 240, 242, 
244-246, 248, 250, 251, 257, 260-262, 
265, 268, 269, 271, 274, 277, 284-287, 
294, 297, 299, 302-308, 314, 321-323, 

335. 336, 348, 3S3j 367- 
Bowden, Smith, 31. 

Bowey, , 78. 

Bowles, Capt., 263. 

Bowles, F. G., 229. 

Bowmont, Marquis of, 180, 

Boxley, 277, 341. 

Boyle, C. E., 81, 84, 87, 91, 96. 

Boyle, C. W., 132, 245. 

Boyle, J. A., 5. 

Boyle, v., 273. 

Bracy, Sir F. de, 29, 

Eradshaw, A., 112, 133. 

Brampton, C, 40, 70, 73, 86. 

Brander, C. R., 104. 

Brandt, F., 20, 22, 23, 26-29, 3^, 37, 41- 

43. 45-47. 50- 57, 58. 
Brasenose, 20, 27, 34, 39, 49, 65, 77, 

83, 90, 97- 
Brassey, H. E., 159, 230, 235. 
Bray, E., 132, 136, 138, 139, 147, 151, 

152, 162, 200, 201, 213, 215, 220, 221, 

223, 230, 234, 235, 242-244. 
Braybrook, H. M., 275. 
Bridge, Capt., 234, 238, 243. 
Bridgeman, C. G. O., 125, 126, 157. 
Bridges, J. H., 248. 
Bridgman, W. C, 364. 
Briggs, R., 157. 
Bright, E., 353. 
Brodie, R., 39, 41, 43, 83, 90, 91, 95-99* 

102, 105, 107, no, 113, 171-175. 
Broke, Lieut, de Capel, 27. 
Brooke, W. P., 102. 
Brookwood Park, 151. 
Brougham, H., 247, 264, 270, 276. 
Broughton, Capt. J., 12, 24, 27. 
Broughton Club, 47. 



INDEX, 



Z^l 



Brown, A., 172. 

Brown, C. E., 354. 

Browne, C, 229, 232. 

Browne, H. J., 99. 

Browning, F. H., 332. 

Bruce, Capt, 363, 364. 

Brune, C. J., 95, 114, 132. 

Buchanan, Colonel, 173-175. 

Buchanan, David, 14, 21, 39, 44-48, 
50-52, 58, 65-68, 73, 75-78, 81, 84-90, 
92, 95, 96, 102, 107, 124, 131, 135, 
137, 138, 151, 154, 158, 161, 169, 171- 
175, 177-182, 184, 214, 215, 218, 220, 
221, 223, 225, 230, 233, 243, 248. 

Buck, H. W., 240. 

Buckland, 49. 

Buckland, E. H., 250, 264, 321, 343. 

Buckland, F. M., 245, 305, 321. 

Buckle, C. R., 282. 

Buckle, Rev. M. B., 231, 304, 354, 360. 

Bucknill, S. P., 102, 113, 118, 133, 144, 
164. 

Bull, H., 287. 

Bull, H. E., 68, 71, 73-78, 80, 310. 

Buller, C. F., 84. 

Bullingdon, 20, 26, 34, 39, 49, 65, 'j'j, 
83, 90, 96, 115, 130. 

Bullock, H., 304. 

Bulpett, C. W. F., 229, 233, 235, 239, 
240, 244. 

Bunbury, Capt., 287. 

Burbridge, F., 103. 

Burbury, T. W., 264. 

Burge, G. R., 144. 

Burnaby, C. J., 262-264. 

Burnand, L., 97. 

Burnett, E. W., 85, 109, no, 113, 119, 
120, 133. 

Burnett, J. D., 51, 58. 

Burr, A. S., 102. 

Burra, T. F., 273, 276, 303-305. 

Burrell, H. J., 273, 337, 343. 

Burton, A. O., 239-241, 304. 

Burton, C. L. H., 311. 

Burton-on-Trent, 113. 

Bury, W., 60. 

Butler, A. H., 310. 

Butler, Bomb., 287. 

Butler, E., 287. 

Butler, S. E., 146, 147, 222, 223. 

Butt, Rev. L. B., 361. 

Butter, Capt., 277. 

Byass, R. W., 233, 234, 244, 303-305. 

Byron, A. W., 144. 

Bythell, W. J., 259. 

Caesar, Julius, 53. 

Caffyn, VV., 38, 44-47, 68. 

Caldecott, F., 66, 68, 76. 

Caldicott, W., 219, 231. 

Caldwell, L., 315. 

Calvert, C, 85, 109. 

Cambridge University, 78, 82, 89, 95. 

Cammell, G., in. 

Campbell, Capt. H., 341. 

Campbell, D., 14. 



Campbell, G., 276. 

Campbell, H. M., 285, 287. 

Campbeltown Club, 174, 

Cannock, 91. 

Canterbury, 122. 

Cape, T. G., 148. 

Capron, F. W., 230, 238, 247, 248, 257, 

282, 283, 305, 307. 347, 348, 351-353. 
Carnac, Rev. G. Rivett, 360. 
Carnegie, Hon. C, 40. 
Carnegie, Lord, 237. 
Carpenter, J., 20, 38, 45-47. 
Carr, D. W., 271. 
Carrick, T., 243. 
Carsham, A. W., 127. 
Carson, H. J., 364. 
Carter, E. S., 96, 97. 
Carter, H. Bonham, 259. 
Cartwright, E. C, 353, 355, 358. 
Case, T., 49, 61, 65, 76, 85, 96, 310. 
Case, W. S., 309, 310, 346. 
Casey, P., 333. 
Catkin, W. H., 355. 
Cat or, C, 67, 97. 
Cattley, A. C, 306. 
Cattley, L. W., 247, 273. 
Caunton Manor, 2. 
Cayley, Lieut., 288. 
Chalmers, T., 183. 
Chamberlayne, S., 107, 130, 136, 158, 

213, 214, 222, 223, 225, 228, 229. 
Chambers, A., 131, 153, 237. 
Champion, G. E., 271, 275, 277. 
Chance, A. F., 358, 360. 
Chance, H. F., 244. 
Chance, W. , 153. 
Chapman, H. E., 287. 
Chatham, ze^'Z et seq. , 341. 
Chatham, R. E., 222, 229, 232, 237. 
Chatterton, 99. 
Chelford, 58, 79, in, 140. 
Cheltenham, 8, 102, 115, 124, 250. 
Cherbourg Harbour, 328. 
Cheshire, 9, 36 — Gentlemen of, 38, in. 
Chester, E. A., 114, 125. 
Chichester, Priory Park, 215. 
Childe-Pemberton, C, 157. 
Childs, J., 215. 
Chinn, H. S., n, 12, 14, 20, 23, 27, 29, 

32, 34, 37, 41, 42, 46, 55, 126. 
Chiselhurst, West Kent, 138, 145, 157, 

223, 228, 234, 237. 
Cholmely, H. A., 359. 
Christ Church Cardinals, 100. 
Christ Church, Oxford, 20, 27, 66, jj, 

83, 90. 95- 
Christian, Victor, H.R.H. Prince, 262. 
Christopherson, S., 267, 268, 270, 342, 

343. 
Churchill, W. H., 244, 250. 
Civil Service, 66, 84, 90, 102, 108, no, 

116, 123, 130, 136. 
Civita Vecchia, 18. 

Clarke, , 5, 6, 30, 53, 176, 

Clarke, A., 73. 
Clarke, C. C, 226, 246. 



388 



INDEX. 



Clarke, Major, 360. * 

Clay, , 355. 

Clayton, R., 104. 

Clements, W., 100, 105. 

Clerke, C. J., 352, 355, 357-359. 362, 

364- 
Clerke, Lady, 349, 
Clerke, Sir W., 352, 355, 362. 
Clifton College, 238. 
Clinton, H. F., 159. 
Cloete, W. B., 156. 
Cobb, A., 297, 303, 304, 306. 
Cobb, C. E., 233, 243, 279, 292, 297, 

303. 30S» 347, 352, 353-355» 357-364- 
Cobb, H. E., 288, 311, 345. 
Cobb, T. E., 42, 57, 152. 
Cobden, F. C., 119, 134, 141, 161, 236, 

246, 297, 303-305, 348-350, 353-355. 

357-359. 3^4' 
Cochrane, Sergt., 286, 287. 
Cock Robin, 103. 

Codrington, J. E., 20, 32, 34, 36, 65. 
Colchester, 222 — Garrison, 244. 
Colebrooke, E. L., 277. 
Colley, J. R., 45, 46, 76-78, 83, 88-90, 

166. 
Collins, W. E. W., 246, 252, 261-265, 

268-277, 279, 284-286, 295, 304-307, 

309, 317. 335, 336. 
Collyer, W. R. , 78. 

Colmore, , 123. 

Colvin, Capt., 286. 

Coniyn, A. D., 335. 

Congreve, J. E., 108. 

Cooke, G., 22. 

Cooke, J., 233. 

Cooke, W. H., 112. 

Cooper, B. B., 48-50, 52, 54-56, 65, 66, 

68, 84, 103, 108. 
Cooper, G. H., 356. 
Cooper-Key, A. M'N. C, 283. 
Cooper's Hill, 222. 
Cork, 331. 

Cornwallis, A. W., 267-270. 
Cornwallis, F. S,, 268-271, 284. 
Corringe, G. F., 262. 
Cotes, C. C, 95, 96, 98, 108, no. 
Cotterill, A., 134. 
Cotterill, J. M., 139, i8i. 
Cotton, F., 134. 
Cotton, R., 65. 
Coventry, 27, 315. 
Coventry, Earl of, 219. 
Cowan, Capt., 356-359, 361-364. 
Cowan, Major, 355. 
Cowper-Coles, Capt., 286. 
Coxe, P. H., 211. 
Coxhead, F. C, 243, 244, 283. 
Coyney, Walter, 52, 55, 59, 91, 134. 
Craig, G., 172, 174, 175. 
Craig, J., 183. 
Craig, Lieut., 288. 
Crake, W. P., 354, 355, 357 358. 
Crampton,' Capt. , 287, 288. 
Craven, A. J., 263. 
Crawshay, H., 349. 



Creswell, E., 232. 
Cripps, A. J., 159. 
Critchley, J., 125. 

Crookham, , 242, 247. 

Crosfield, S., 334-336. 342, 343. 

Croughton, 300. 

Crowder, F., no, 116, 122, 123, 128, 

132, 134, 135, 140, 143, 147, 151, 153, 
154, 214. 

Crowdy, J. G., 118, 227, 231, 234, 237, 

240, 246. 
Crowther, C. J., 152. 
Crummack, H., 131. 
Crusaders, 114. 
Cruttenden, E., 277. 
Crystal Palace, 213. 
Cuninghame, B. A., 333-335. 
Cunliffe, C. M., 228, 233, 234. 
Cunningham, A. H., 264. 
Cunningham, D., 117. 
Currie, A. C, 285, 286. 
Currie, Capt., 245. 

Curry, E, L., 116. 

Curteis, Capt., 264, 265, 270, 275-277, 

281, 284-288, 302, 312. 
Curteis, T. S., 78, 83. 

Daft, C, 73, 87. 
Daft, R., 70, 71, 73. 
Dale, Capt., 287. 

Dale, J, W., 116, 119, 123, 132, 134, 
141, 159, 180, 225, 241, 248, 257, 261, 

307-. 
Dalgleish, G., 173. 
Dalkeith, 167, 169, 172, 178, 180-182, 

183. 
Dalkeith, Earl of, 310. 
Dames-Longworth, E., 308. 
Daniel, A. W., 60, 78, 84-86, 100, 104, 

105, T08, 109. 
Daniell, C. J., 215. 
Daniell, Capt., 273, 274. 
Daniell, F. W., 97. 
Dauglish, M. J., 309, 317. 
Davenport, E., 48, 78, 83, 84, 86. 
Davidson, Capt, 282. 
Davies, A. C, 251. 
Davies, J., 98, 102. 
Davies, R. O., 360. 
Davies, W. H., 11, 358, 360. 
Davy, G. B., 100, 104, 105, 118. 
Dawson, C. C, 51, 103. 
Day, J. B., 102. 
Day, J. T., 357. 
Daylesford, 146. 
Deddington, 37, 42, 57, 68, 118, 123, 

133, 143, 152, 164, 2TO, 221, 227, 236, 

241, 245, 246, 251, 304. 
Deedes, W., 358, 360. 
Dent, L. W., 82. 
Derby, 59. 

Derbyshire, South, 135. 
Desages, P., 356. 
Devonshire, 50. 
Dewar, E. J., 304, 317. 
Diamonds, The, 59. 



INDEX. 



389 



Dickinson, F., 309, 311, 346. 

Dickson, H. W., 286. 

Digby, C, 315. 

Digby, R., 96, io6. 

Dixie, Sir A. B., 144. 

Dixon, A. W., 361. 

Dolphin, J. M., 128. 

Donop. See Von Donop. 

Dorehill, P. H. M., 242, 282-288, 341. 

Douglas, A. P., 284, 286. 

Dove, W., 139. 

Downe, Lord, 167. 

Dowson, E., 58, 67, 68, 97, 109, iii. 

Drake, E. T., 22, 24, 56, 57, 76, 161. 

Draper, J. G, P., 309. 

Draper, W. H., 300, 303, 304, 307, 310, 

345. 346. 
Drayton, 120, 129. 
Druitt, E., 229, 232, 261, 262. 
Drumpellier, 173, 174, 178, 179, 181- 

184. 
Dublin, 331. 

Du Cane, J. P., 286-288. 
Dugdale, J. S., 24, 27. 
Dumbleton, H. N., 229, 259-262. 
Duncan, D., 216, 217. 
Dundas, Capt., 335. 
Dunell, A. R. , 214, 223. 
Dunlop, G., 172, 249. 
Dunlop, W. , 172. 
Dunn, A. T. B., 262, 273. 
Dunn, W., 112. 
Duntze, G. A., 99. 
Dupuis, G. R., 21. 
Durnford, R., 98. 
Duthy, Major, 282. 

Ealing, 156. 

Earle, R. B., 11, 30, 36, 119. 

Easby, , 321. 

Eaton, C, 220. 

Eccles, C. v., Ill, 112, 222, 228. 

Eccles, H., 249. 

Eccles, Manchester, 15, 44, 117. 

Eddis, R. U., 102. 

Edgbaston, 235. 

Edinburgh, 169. 

Edwards, Col., 260. 

Edwards, J. G., 20, 112. 

Edwards, T. H., 119. 

Eighty-fourth Regiment, 36, 37. 

Eleventh Hussars, 34, 222. 

Elgin, Lord, 183. 

Elliot, Capt., 287, 356. 

Ellis, E. H. , 40. 

Ellis, H. v., 65, 78, III, 120, 124. 

Elmdon, 113, 117, 126. 

Elmhirst, Rev. E., 5. 

Elphinstone, R. D., 97. 

Elstree, 238, 242, 247. 

Elton, F., 287, 288. 

Elwes, G. P., 251. 

Emberlin, T., 311 

Enfield, H., 118. 

Engleheart, E., 358. 

Entwistle, R., 94, 108, 125, 136, 145. 



Enville, 21, 22. 

Eppleton, C., 105. 

Erskine, Lord, 173. 

Esher, 213, 237, 242, 247. 

Eton, 90, 95, III, 156, 213, 234, 238, 

243, 247, 248. 
Evans, A. H. , 238, 239, 305. 
Evans, Capt., 273, 274. 
Evans, E. G., 277. 
Evans, F. R., 33, 40, 53, 54, 57, 58, 66, 

73' 75> 82, 107, 143, 146, 160, 214, 

218, 226. 
Evelyn, E. C, 347, 357-359- 362. 
Evelyn, F. L., 224, 243, 353-355. 357- 

359. 362, 364. 
Everard, H. S. C, 218. 
Everett, C, 21. 
Evetts, W., 96, 97, 106, 123, 130, 146, 

152, 160, 161, 224, 226, 246, 303-305. 
Eyre, J., 244, 248. 

Faber, Arthur H., 16, 17, 22-24, 27-32, 

34. 39. 40, 42, 43. 45. 46. 48-50. 52. 

54> 56. 57, 60, 61, 62, 65, 66, 68, 77. 

Falkner, , 3. 

Fane, Colonel, 152, 216. 

Farmer, C. E., 286, 287, 301, 338. 

Fegan, Capt., 284. 

Fellowes, Col., 159, 232, 257, 260-262, 

276, 277. 
Fellowes, Rev. E. L., 97, 160, 161, 218. 
Fellowes, E. N., 233, 245. 
Fellows, G., 118. 
Fellows, H. W., 29, 56, 57, 99. 
Fellows, W., 20. 
Felton, W. F., 357, 358. 
Fenton, J. K., 12, 14, 20, 23. 
Ferkins, H. J., 360. 
Fetherston, B. T., 65, 'j-j, 78, 87, 89, 90, 

95, 109, 113, 116, 118, 126, 136, 143. 
Ffinch, M. B., 336. 
Fiennes, Hon. C., 29, 31, 37. 
Fiennes, Hon. Wingfield, 23, 24, 29, 37, 

43-46, 52, 54. 
Filgate, C. B., 102. 
Fillery, 139. 
Fillingham, G., 118. 
Fillongley Hall, 314. 
Finch, H., 66, 78, 98. 
Finch, Hon. D., 160. 
Findlay, Trumpeter, 287. 
Fish, L. J., 305. 
Fisher, E. L., 264, 270, 271, 303, 305, 

306. 
Fishwick, H., 355. 
Fitzgerald, A. W., 95. 
Fitzgerald, B. , 224. 
Fitzgerald, J., 88. 
Fitzgerald, R., 29, 56, 76, 84. 
Fitzherbert, Rev. E., 360. 
FitzRoy, Lord A., 309, 359-361. 
Fleming, T. R., 182. 
Fletcher, W., 117. 
Flint, E.. 216. 
Flower, P. H., 285. 
Foley, P. H., 360. 



390 



INDEX. 



Foord Kelcey, 226, 360, 361. 

Forbes, W. F., 156, 217, 223-225, 234. 

Forman, J. R., 118. 

Forster, H., 328, 330. 

Forster, R., 40. 

Fortescue, A. J., 106, 139, 217, 224, 225. 

Foster, F. J., 305. 

Foster, H,, 82, iii, 113, 126, 129, 139, 

140, 159, 226, 275, 279. 
Foster, H. K., 363. 
Foster, W. L., 363. 
Four Oaks Park, 142, 154. 
Fourth Light Dragoons, 27. 
Fowke, G. H., 260. 
Fowler, H. J., 230. 
Fowler, R. H., 260. 
Fowler, T. F., 68, 78. 
Fowhs, R., 358, 360. 
Fox, H. F., 238. 
France, Capt. H., 358-361. 
Francis, C. K., 116, 123, 132, 137, 141, 

159, 178, 179, 217, 218. 
Francis, F. W., 115. 
Frank (Bedford), 32. 
Fraser, J. F., 14. 
Frederick, Capt., 250, 260, 261. 
Frederick, J., 96, 97, 107. 
Free Forester Ball, 210. 
Freeland, H. F., 264, 265. 
Freer, F. H., 119, 353. 
Friend, Capt., 260-262, 267-271. 
Fryer, F. E. R., 117, 119, 132, 137, 141, 

147, 151, 158, 215, 238. 
Fulbeck, 152, 216. 
Fulcher, A. W., 273-275, 279, 285, 323. 

Galbraith, J., 100. 

Gardner, C. H., 240. 

Gardner, H. W., 108, 113, 120, 131, 138, 

152, 214, 216, 223, 230, 233, 234, 243. 
Gardner, J. W., 118, 133, 142. 
Garnett, A. P., 11, 13. 
Garnett, Charles, 12. 
Garnett, C. A., 12-14, 27-30, 34, 36, 39, 

41, 43, 49j 68, 91, 131, 154, 163. 
Garnett, F., 14. 
Garnett, F. H., 12-14, m? "3, iS3, 

163. 
Garnett, G., 153, 163, 226. 
Garnett, H. C, 163. 
Garnett, Henry, 24, 117, 154. 
Garnett, Herbert, 163. 
Garnett, J., 126, 142, 162, 163, 229. 
Garnett, L., 83, 104, 112, 134, 138, 142, 

143, 153, 163, 166, 
Garnett, L. O., 125, 126, 137, 138, 153, 

163. 
Garnett, Major, 245. 
Garnett, R,, 12, 43, 112, 113, 139, 147, 

152, 153, 158, 159, 162, 163, 171, 215, 

216, 218, 219, 223-226, 230, 249. 
Garnett, R. J., 11, 13, 112, 153, 166. 
Garnett, Stewart, 104, 112, 138, 151-153, 

162, 163, 219, 225-227, 230, 234, 244, 

249. 
Garnett, T., 112. 



Garnetts, 8, 12, 153, 163. 
Gamier, A. E., 132. 
Garnier, E. S., 132. 
Garnier, T., 82. 

Garside, , 336. 

Gem, C. H., 11, 12, 27. 

Gentlemen of the South, 85. 

Gibbon, J. H., 97, 106, 113, 115, 117, 

118, 133, 137, 139, 142, 152, 153. 
Gibbs, G. H., 363. 
Gibbs, J. A., 279, 287, 363. 
Gibson, A. E., 363, 364. 
Gibson, H., 220. 

Gibson-Craig, , 172. 

Gilbanks, G., 12. 

Giles, A. B., 250. 

Giles, E. H., 352. 

Gillespie, G., 171. 

Gillett, H. H., 51, 66, jj, 109, 120, 127- 

129, 131, 132, 136, 137, 146, 224, 232. 
Gilliat, H., 159, 213, 215, 216, 234, 238, 

243- 

Gillman, D. F., 309, 315, 317, 363, 364. 

Glasgow, 166-169. 

Glasgow Caledonian, 182. 

Glennie, Rev. H. G., 360. 

Gloucestershire, East, 249. 

Godby, Colonel, 136. 

Goldney, G. H., 219, 220, 223, 226, 228, 
230-232, 234, 237, 238, 240, 242-244, 
247-250, 259, 283, 284, 304, 330, 355- 

357. 
Goodacre, J., 225. 
Goodlake, Colonel, 49. 
Goodrich, T. C, 3-6, 15, 16, 21-24, 28- 

30, 32, 37, 38, 41-43, 45-48, 50, 53-58, 

66, 68-73, 79, 86, 87, 91, 94, 98, 107, 

142, 166, 167, 169. 

Goodyear, , 246, 288, 317. 

Gordon, Capt., 284. 

Gordon, C. S., 126. 

Gore, R., 351-353- 

Gore, S. W. , 262, 263, 266, 269. 

Goschen, W. E., 90. 

Gould, A., 24. 

Gould, T. W., 351. 

Grace, E. M., 85, 234. 

Grace, W. G., 17, 298. 

Graham, M., 113, 117, 124, 126, 154, 

163. 
Grange Club, Edinburgh, 166, 169, 171, 

177, 180-183. 
Greatorex, J. E. N., 284. 



82, 88, 89, 95, 109, 157, 

H., 220. 

357. 
238. 



Green, C. 

220. 
Green, Rev. J. 
Green, T. H., 
Greene, A. D. 
Greenfield, G. P., 139. 
Greenock, 179, 181, 182. 
Green- Price, A., 353, 355, 359. 
Green-Price, Rev. C, 353, 355, 359. 
Green-Price, W., 353-355, 359. 
Greenwoods, 209. 
Gregory, F. H., 27. 
Gregson, H. W., 229. 



INDEX. 



391 



Gresley, A., 128. 
Gresley, W. L., 11, 27. 
Gresson, C. H. S., 310. 
Gresson, C. R., 361-363. 
Gresson, F. H., 278, 279, 361-364. 
Grey, Hon. T. D., 78. 
Griffith, G., 38, 45-47, 67, 68. 
Griffiths, E. L., 353. 
Griffiths, W. H., 358, 360. 
Grosvenor, H., 357. 
Grundy, J., 70, 73, 87. 
Grunsdale, T. B., 220. 
Guernsey, 320, 329. 
Guggisberg, F. G., 263-265. 
Gundry, J., 20, 26. 
Gurdon, C, 250. 
Gurney, W. S., 245. 
Gwyer, S. K., 102, 108. 
Gwynn, C. W., 264, 265. 
Gyll, Capt., 136. 

Hadow, E. M., 268, 269. 

Hadow, J., 342. 

Hadow, W. H, , no, in, 132, 139, 216, 

217. 
Haggard, J., 284, 285. 
Haileybury, 79, 83, 90, 98, 102, 108, 

no, 158, 215. 
Hale, F., 352. 
Hall, G. C. M., 265. 
Hamer, J. P., 112. 
Hamilton, B. , 333-335. 
Hamilton, Rev. H. A. Douglas, 308, 

309, 347, 352, 353. 
Hamilton, Hon. A. Baillie, 138. 
Hamilton, Capt., 265, 267, 270, 271, 

335. 336. 
Hamilton, Capt. Douglas, 308. 
Hamilton, J. E., 259. 
Hamilton, L., 294. 
Hamilton, W., 108. 
Hampson, Mr, 44. 
Hampton Wick, 94. 
Hams Hall, 114, 240. 
Hanbury, 143, 153, 162, 219, 227. 
Hanbury, E., 223, 234-237, 239, 310, 

311, 345, 346. 
Hancock, G., 24. 
Hants, Gentlemen of, Brookwood Park, 

139, 151. 
Harbord, Hon. W., 56, 57. 
Harcourt, A. V., 130. 
Hardcastle, E. H., 268, 269. 
Harding, C, 297, 310, 311, 345, 346. 
Hardy, J., 273, 276, 277, 
Hardy, Major, 264, 270, 282, 288, 310. 
Hare, J. H. M., 154, 251. 
Harlequins, 27, 33. 
Harper, E. J., 98. 
Harper, S., 109, 213, 222. 
Harris, Lord, in, 216, 226. 
Harrison, A. H., 275. 
Harrison, H., 159. 
Harrison, W. B., 11. 
Harrow, 8. 
Harrow Wanderers, 180. 



Hartley Row, 215. 

Hartley, T., no. 

Hartnell, E. S., 58. 

Hartopp, E. C, 145. 

Harvey, C. M., 67. 

Harvey, F. C. , 78. 

Hastings, 115. 

Hastings, J., 240. 

Hastings, Lord, 241, 245. 

Hawkstone, 119, 133, 134, 140, 141. 

Hay, , 362. 

Hay, W. H., 95, 144, 146, 147, 151, 

153, 156, 164, 214. 
Hayes, Pype, 113, 118, 126, 133, 142. 
Haygarth, A. B., 361, 363. 
Hayhurst, Capt., 362. 
Hay ward, P., 44, 45, 47, 53. 
Heale, W. H., 249. 
Hearne, A., 273. 

Hearne, George, 97, 103, 109, in. 
Hearne, G. F., in, 116. 
Hearne, Tom, 40, 50, 66, 67. 

Heartfield , 50. 

Heath, A. H., 157, 230, 236, 249, 292, 

308, 337. 355. 
Heath, J., 356. 
Hedley, R. S., 232. 
Hedley, W. C, 256, 260, 261, 263, 

279. 
Hegan, C. J., 289-292, 303. 
Helmsley, C., 105. 
Hemingway, E. W., 303, 304. 
Hemming, A., 51. 
Henderson, C, 151. 
Henderson, J., 173. 
Henderson, P., 173. 
Heneage, Capt., 215. 
Henery, B. J., 294. 
Henery, P. J. T., 249, 262, 285. 
Henley, 223, 229, 233, 238, 244, 248. 
Henry, E., 361. 
Herts, Gentlemen of, 250. 
Hewitt, H. T., 279, 285. 
Hewitt, H. v., 354. 
Hewitt, J. R., 292, 341, 342. 
Hewson, Lieut., 243. 
Heyman, Capt., 286. 
Hickley, C. L., 260, 268, 269, 284, 311, 

345. 346. 
Hickmott, E., 273-277. 
Higgins, F., 112. 
Higgins, W. C, 95, 118, 218. 
Higgins, W. F., 95, 98-100, 102, 105, 

107, 120, 129-131, 135, 143, 155, 162, 

180, 181, 219, 222, 233, 234. 
Higham Ferrers, 120, 129. 
Hill, B. R., 119. 
Hill, E., 14, 32. 
Hill, F. H. , 106, 225, 226. 
Hill, Hon. Geoffrey, 119, 134, 141. 
Hill, fj., 129, 172, 309, 311, 317, 323, 

345. 346. 355. 364- 
Hillingdon, 115, 122, 130, 136, 
Hillyard, A., 90, 91, 95, 96, 99, 112-114, 

117, 118, 126. 
Hillyard, G. W., 286, 292. 



392 



INDEX. 



Hilsea, 145. 

Hilton, T. J. R., II, 33, 34. 

Hinchliffe, , 33, 34. 

Hinckley, , 39. 

Hinde, Capt., 270. 

Hine-Haycock, J. R., 284, 288. 

Hitchin, 250. 

Hoare, A., 306, 307. 

Hoare, C. no, 137, 238, 299, 308-311, 

317. 345. 346. 
Hoare, H. W., 105, 241, 304. 

Hobley, , 317. 

Hodgkinson, G. L., 27. 

Hogge, Capt., 14. 

Holden, Capt., 70. 

Holden, H. W., 119. 

Holden, J. S., 90, 171-175. 

Hole, H. S. F., 279, 305. 

Hole, S. R., 6, 10, 61, loi, 190. 

Hollings, H. J. B., 235, 

Homfray, G. S., 12, 14, 20-23, 28, 29, 

32, 34, 36, 37. 
Hood, J. S. E., 40, 61, 82, 84, 89, 90, 

95, 97, 108, 166, 167, 171-175. 
Hood, W. N. , 223, 228. 
Hopkins, W. H., 352. 

Hornby, , 294. 

Hornby, A. N., 119, 123, 134, 137, 138, 

140, 141, 151. 
Hornby, Cecil, 69, 73, 77, 79, 91, 112, 

138. 
Hornby, E. K., 34-38, 40, 41, 53, 54, 

58, 66, 68, 69, 73, 75-77, 79, 82, 84, 

91, 166. 
Hornby, G. F., 249. 
Horner, J. F., 97, 107, in. 
Horner, Mr, 41. 
Horniblow, Capt., 265. 
Hornsby, J. H. J., 258, 260-263, 265, 

269, 275, 305, 308. 314, 344, 347, 352, 

353, 356. 
Horwood, C, 34, 95. 
Houghton, Lord, 335, 336. 
Houghton, T., 20. 
Houldsworth, J., 175. 
Hounslow, 243. 
Howard, C, 139. 
Howell, L. S., 116. 
Howsin, H., 58. 
Hudson, A. H., 219. 
Hudson, F. H., 118. 
Hughes, H. G. S., 184, 224, 227, 233, 

234, 236, 239, 245, 248, 250, 311, 

345- 
Hughes, W. J. M., 156, 223, 224. 
Hull, R. A., 218. 
Hulton, H. E., 39, 41, 59, 125. 
Hume, E., 40, 41, 66, 68, 83, 85, 97, 

105, III, 114, 143, 158, 159, 200, 202, 

214, 226, 230. 
Humphrey, T., 50, 66-68. 

Humphreys, , 30. 

Hunt, , 15, 24, 27. 

Hunter, Q.-Mr. Sergt., 285. 
Hutchinson, C. H., 285, 286. 
Hutchison, J. R., 105, 119, 125, 126, 



131, 138, 140, i45-i47> 152, 158. 180, 

181, 183, 184, 214-216, 222. 
Hyde, Lord, 89. 
Hyndman, H. M., 78. 

Incogniti, The, 68, 91. 

Inge, C. H., II, 12, 40. 

Inge, F. G., 33, 36, 40, 45, 46, 48, 54- 

56, 79, 80, 83, 86. 
Inge, J. W., 66. 
Inge, T. H., 15. 
Inglis, A. M., 262, 263, 267, 269, 272, 

274, 280, 284. 
Inglis, C. J. , 239. 
Inglis, J., 175. 
Ingram, F. M., 319, 321. 
I Zingari, 13, 21, 26, 28, 29, 55, 75, 84, 

160, 161, 217, 224. 

Jackson, J., 4, 53, 69, 73, 86, 171. 

Jakeman, E., 309, 310, 317, 345. 

James, C, 307. 

Jarvis, C. J. E., 260. 

Jeffery, L., 124. 

Jeffreys, A. F., no, 229, 233-235, 237- 

239, 248. 
Jenkins, W. H. P., 297, 303-307, 347, 

352-355- 
Jephson, D. H., 294. 
Jersey, Lord, 257, 307. 
Jervis, Hon. E. Parker, 113. 
Jervis, Hon. W. M., 20, 21, 27, 125, 

131. 
Jervis, T. Parker, 142. 
Jessop, H., 356. 
Jobson, E. P., 231, 240, 360. 
Jobson, H. C, 231, 240. 
John Thomas at Prince's, 148-150. 
Johnson, G. R., 55, 84. 
Johnson, H. F., 97. 
Jones, Capt. W. D., 262, 269, 274. 
Jones, D. T. M., 359, 362, 364. 
Jones, O. H., 249. 
Jupp, H., 68. 

Kelsey. See Foord Kelcey. 

Kelso, 166, 176, 180, 

Kelson, G. M., 85. 

Kemball, E., 243, 248. 

Kemball, G. V., 282, 283. 

Kemp, A. F., 250, 259. 

Kemp, M. C, 267, 270, 271. 

Kemp, Sir K., 245, 251. 

Kempson, E. H., 230, 233. 

Kempson, George A. E., 8, 26, 34, 38, 

125. 
Kempson, Matthew, 8, n, 19. 
Kendle, W. J., 139. 
Kennaway, C. L., 245, 251. 
Kennedy, G. M., 51. 
Kenney, A. R., 14, 27, 95-99. 
Kenney, E. M., 78, 96, 97, 105, 126, 

130. 
Kenrick, J., 247, 248. 
Kent, 254. 
Kent, A., 271. 



INDEX. 



393 



Kent, A. R., 363, 364. 

Key, R. T., 99. 

Kidd, P., 105, 147, 157. 

Kidd, W., 105. 

Kilkelly, F. F., 335. 

King, C. D., 282-285. 

King Edward's School, Birmingham, 

21. 
King, G. L., 156. 
King, R. B., 226, 230. 
Kingscote, 209, 221, 227. 
Kingston, 49. 

Kington, , 24. 

Kington, Col., 233, 234. 
Kinning Park, 179. 
Kirkpatrick, J., 98, 102. 
Knight, G., 274, 277. 
Knight, T. W., 357. 
Knighton, 348. 
Knole Park, 234, 238, 243. 
Knowle, 209. 
Knox, C. W., 351. 

Lacey, F. E., 248. 

Laidlay, W. J., 139. 

Lake, C, 273, 274. 

Lambton, C., 286. 

Lancashire, Gentlemen of, 124, 125. 

Lancashire, P., iii. 

Lang, G. G., 310. 

Lang, T. W., 183, 184, 243, 247. 

Langford Club, 120. 

Lane, C. G., 20, 65, 70, 76, 80, 102, 

154- 
Lane, W. W. C, 82, 89, 95, 96, 98. 
Lant, R,, 142. 
Latham, H., 20, 112. 
Latham, R. E., 287. 
Lathbury, H. O., 262. 
Law, E. C, II. 
Law, G., 123, 137, 138, 140, 187, 213, 

214, 221, 222, 228, 229, 232-234, 238, 

240, 248. 
Law, J., 138. 

Law, W., 116, 123, 137, 140. 
Lawrence, J., 103. 
Lawson-Smith, E. R., 335, 336. 
Leake, J. S., 362. 
Leamington, 14, 28, 37, 42, 43, 52, 57, 

68. 
Learoyd, C. D., 232. 
Leatham, A. E., 265, 271, 277, 290, 309- 

311, 345, 351, 352, 356, 361-364- 
Leatherdale, Rev. V., 351, 352. 
Ledsham, Sergt. -Major, 136. 
Le Bas, R. N., 151. 
Le Fleming, J., 274-276. 
Lee, A. G., 139. 

Lee, Arthur, 65, 79, 102, 103, 105, 109. 
Lee, E., 103. 
Lee, F., 26, 83, 99, 105, 129, 134, 142, 

146, 216, 221, 230. 
Lee, F. H., 146, 158, 162, 222, 226, 227, 

230, 236, 237, 239, 240, 304, 305. 
Leese, E., 125. 
Leese, J. F,, 86, 125. 



Leese, Mr, 243. 

Legg, W. G., 363. 

Leggatt, C. A. S., 284, 286. 

Leicester, 59, 143. 

Leigh, A., 21. 

Leigh, C, 21. 

Leigh, Hon. E. C, 29. 

Leigh, Hon. G., 225. 

Leigh, S., 21. 

Lennox, Lord W., 48. 

Leslie, C. H. F., 224, 230, 236. 

Lewes, , 357. 

Lewis, Major, 355, 357. 

Lewisham, Lord, 142, 157. 

Ley, C. H., 265. 

Lichfield, 154, 163, 240, 316. 

Lichfield, Lord, 37. 

IJddel, J. S., 262, 263. 

Lillywhite, John, 46. 

Limerick, 331. 

Lincolnshire, Gentlemen of, 119. 

Lindner, Capt., 336. 

Lindsay, M., 229. 

Lindsay, Major, 335. 

Lindsell, H. M., no. 

Lindsey, F. W. H., 308, 309, 317. 

Linton Park, 254, 266-272. 

Linton, S., 33, 51, 65, 66, 68, 76, 77, 

79- 
Lipscomb, A., 102. 
Little, W., 51. 
Liverpool, 41, 42, 117, 131, 137, 151, 

244. 
Llewelyn, CD., 278. 
Llewelyn, J., 27. 
Llewelyn, W. D., 278, 279, 308. 
Lloyd, E. M. W., 82, 89. 
Lloyd, G. F., 357. 

Lochead, , 167. 

Locke, R. J. M., 288. 

Lockyer, T., 38, 68. 

Login, Capt,, 276, 277. 

Lords, 8, 39, 40, 59, 99. 

Loring, W., 273. 

Longman, G. H,, 160-163, 241, 245, 304. 

Longwood, 237, 244, 248. 

Longworth. See Dames-Longworth. 

Lucas, A. C, 216. 

Lucas, A. P., 147, 157-159, 213, 214, 

218, 220, 235. 
Lucas, C. J., 157, 158, 233. 
Lucas, F. M., 308. 
Lucas, M., 243. 

Lucas, M. P., 214, 216, 229, 306, 307. 
Luckham, A. J., 353. 
Lucy, W. A., 153, 159, 226, 230, 234, 

303, 351, 352, 354, 356. 
Luddington, H. T,, 157. 
Ludlow, 35, 43, 44. 
Lutterworth, 302. 
Lyon, C. E., 143. 
Lyon, W. J., 42, 54, 55, 73, 75, 78, 82, 

83. 89, 95. 162, 166, 167, 171-175- 

Lyster, , 244. 

Lyttelton, Hon. A., 147, 153, 154, 161, 

162, 201, 219, 224. 



394 



INDEX, 



Lyttelton, Hon. 
Lyttelton, Hon. 
Lyttelton, Hon. 

76, 78, 82, 89, 
Lyttelton, Hon. 

202, 214, 223, 
Lyttelton, Hon. 
Lyttelton, Hon. 

143, 152, 154, 

227, 231, 240, 
Lyttelton, Hon. 

102, 107-109, 

137. i39j i45> 
199, 200, 202, 
227, 230, 231, 



A. T., 126. 
A. v., 82, 95. 

C. G., 38, 42, 43, 50, 

90, 92, 98. 

E., 143, 157, 185, 200, 

224, 234, 335. 

N., 122, 222, 335. 

R. H., 131, 134, 140, 
158, 202, 214, 219, 221, 
241, 303. 

S. G., 79, 86, 87, 89, 95, 
120, 128-132, 134, 136, 
146, 151, 158, 159, 164, 
214, 216, 221, 223, 226, 
234, 244. 



Macan, Capt., 243, 248, 250. 

Macan, G., 228. 

M'Alister, A., 175. 

M 'Alpine, K., 263, 271, 273-276, 279, 

320, 322. 
Macdonald, D. W., 104, 112, 178. 
Macgill, A., 171, 172. 
M'Intyre, Martin, 69, 73. 
MacTier, Capt., 336. 
Mackenzie, C, 173. 
Mackenzie, J., 167, 172, 177. 
Mackenzie, K. M., 123, 132, 199. 
M'Kinley, A., 275. 
Maclagan, R. S., 232. 
Maclaren, W., no. 

Maclean, M. F., 288, 309, 310, 361-364. 
MacMahon, J. J., 285. 
M'Neale, Major, 353, 354. 
M'Neill, J., 139, 183, 184. 
Macpherson, A. C, 283. 
Macpherson, Bomb., 116. 
M'Quade, J., 173. 
Magdalen, 2, 27. 
Maidenhead, 20, 21. 
Maidstone, 268, 278. 
Mainwaring, P., 356. 
Maitland, W. F., 83, 84, 96, 97. 
Maitland, W. J., 108. 
Makinson, Joseph, 15. 
Mallam, J. C, 362. 
Malvern, 16, in, 117, 124, 132, 139, 

IS2, 159, 226, 230, 235. 
Manchester, 29, 39, 41, 47, 59, 75, 85, 

104, 112 — Club, 15, 24, 29 — Garrison, 

104 — Western, 249. 
Manley, A. F., 163. 
Mann, H., 273, 276, 277. 
Mansfield, J., 172. 
Mansfield, J. W., 245. 
Manvers, Earl, 91, 100, 104, 127. 
Marchant, F., 267, 268, 271. 
Marchant, R., 274. 
Mares, Capt., 164. 
Market Harborough, 154, 164. 
Marlborough, 136, 146, 214. 
Marriott, Charles B., 108, no, 123, 131, 

132. 137) i44> 161, 219, 224, 225. 
Marriott, G. S., 144, 156, 223, 225, 230, 

233. 
Marriott, H. P., 248. 



Marriott, J. M., 144. 

Marshall, Capt. F., 22-24, 29, 52, 53, 

57. 
Marshall, Rev. F., 5. 
Marshall, Charles J., 40, 68, 88, 95. 
Marshall, H. M., 103, 115, 116, 122, 

123, 129, 132, 133, 136, 143, 160-163, 
185, 199, 201, 213, 219, 220, 223, 226- 
228, 250, 

Marshall, J., 118, 134. 

Marshall, J. F., 311, 345. 

Marshall, J. R., 180. 

Marshall, L. P., 245. 

Marshall, T., 139. 

Marsham, C. D., 22, 24, 27, 55, 'jd, 84, 

124, 152, 304, 306, 307. 
Marsham, Charles, 117. 

Marsham, Hon, J., 115, 116, 120, 122, 
129, 130, 140, 143, 159, 163, 164, 199, 
200, 220, 225, 226, 234, 240, 241. 

Marsham, Hon. Mrs J., 200. 

Marsham, R., 29, 55, 76, 84. 

Marten, G. N., 90, 100, 102, 109. 

Martin, A. B., 143. 

Martin, C, 100. 

Martin, J. W., 98. 

Martin, M. T., 26, 31, 33, 42, 48, 61, 66, 
68, 69, 75, 76, 78, 79, 81, 82, 84, 87, 
88, 100, 103, 108-110, 116, 118, 127, 
128, 130, 132, 134, 151, 215, 216. 

Mason, W. H., 128. 

Matheson, E., 274. 

Mathews, E., 106, 109, 304. 

Maud, P., 263-265. 

Maude, F. W., 250, 251, 259, 260, 305- 

307- 
Maul, H. C, 129, 132, 160-162, 218, 
219, 224, 225, 246, 247, 251, 296-298, 

303-307. 317, 347. 352. 353- 
Maul, J. B., 220. 
Maul, S. D., 309, 311, 345, 346. 
Maxwell, Hon. W., 108. 
Maynard, E. A. J., 264, 270, 285, 312, 

335. 
M. C. C, 21, 39, 40, 99. 
Meakin, G. E,, 355. 
Meldon, T. M., 335. 
Mellor, F. H., 228, 229, 244, 247, 285. 
Mellor, P. H., 98, 117, 138. 
Melly, A. L., 233. 
Melton, Constable, 241, 245. 
Meriden, 21, 314, 315. 
Metcalfe, E. L., 264, 270, 275, 279, 283, 

309. 317- 
Middleton, Capt., 161, 217, 224. 
Middleton Hall, 251, 296-298. 
Middleton Towers, 240, 250. 
Miles, Capt., 249. 
Miles, P. W. H., 238. 
Miles, R. F., 96, 100, 104, 105, 109, 112, 

113, 146. 
Miles, S. H., 127, 128, 223. 
Miller, F. P., 58. 
Milles, Hon. G., 22, 24. 
Milles, Hon. H., 279. 
Millward, A. , 240, 360. 



INDEX. 



395 



Milne, R. O., 141, 146, 218, 225, 238. 
Mitchell, R. A. H., 56, 57, 60, 66, 70, 

71, 73. 75-77, 84, 90, 95, 114, 144, 

245. 
Moffat, D., 96, 109, no, 116, 157, 222, 

233, 234. 
Moir, J. P., 265. 
Moncrieff, J., 172. 
Moncrieff, Hon. R., 113, 143, 219, 231, 

240. 
Monypenny, R., 20. 
Moon, A. W. , 259, 308, 348, 354, 355, 

359, 363, 364. 
Moor Hall, 13. 
Moore, A. M. S., 267, 279. 
Moore, Capt., 40. 
Moore, C. R., 97, 223. 
Moore, W., 162. 
Moorhouse, Lieut., 288. 
Moors, the, 242, 247. 
Morant, H. H., 336. 
Mordaunt, J. M., 53, 54, 59, 61, 160, 

219. 
Mordaunt, Osbert, 66, 76, 78, 82, 83, 90, 

91, 95, 96, 98, no, 160, 161, 166, 167, 

169, 172-175, 224, 225, 233. 
Mordaunt, Sir C, 159, 160, 218. 
Morgan, C, 84, 85, 98. 
Morgan, Dr, 80, 81. 
Morgan, F. G., 346. 
Morley, J., 20. 
Morrice, N., 288. 
Morris, J., 251. 
Morrison, E., 173. 
Morrison, J., 173. 
Mortlock, W., 46, 67, 68. 

Moseley, , 83. 

Mote Park, 122, 158, 216, 226, 272, 273, 

342. 
Mott, W. K., 31, 34, 37, 40-42, 48-51, 

53-57. 68, 69, 73, 102, 166, 167. 
Murchie, J., 125. 
Murchison, Capt., 282. 
Murdoch, C. E., 287. 
Murray, Reginald, 65. 
Murrie, F., 173. 
Music, 185. 
Mylne, J., 180. 
Mytton, Capt. J., 12. 

Napier, D. R., 287. 

Nash, E. H., 116, 363. 

Needwood, 10. 

Nepean, A. A., 213. 

Nesbitt, E. J. Beaumont, 308, 309, 353, 

354. 
Nesbitt, E. B., 354, 355, 359, 361. 
Newark, 114, 120, 140, 159, 185, 190. 
Newark, Viscount, 128. 
Newbold Revel, 21, 311. 
New Club, 211. 
Newill, E. H., 352. 
Newill, R., 354. 
Newport, W., 102. 
Nicholls, J. G., III. 
Nicholson, J., 173. 



Nixon, , 24. 

Node, the, 97, 117, 215, 223. 

Norbury, F. P., 352, 354. 

Norfolk, Gentlemen of, 245, 250, 251. 

Norley, F., 175. 

Norley, J., 175. 

Norman, H. G., 27. 

Norman, P., 85. 

North, C. N., 265. 

North, Major, 287. 

North, W., 260. 

North, W. F., 306-308. 

North, Hon. W. H., 356. 

Northampton, 302. 

Northants, N., 6. 

Northcote, Mr, 3, 4. 

Northesk, Lord, 244, 248. 

Nottingham, 59, 69. 

Nottingham County, 69, 70-73, 86. 

Nottinghamshire (Gentlemen) County 

Club (N. C. C), 2, 3, 30, 87, 100, 104, 

109, III, 120, 127. 
Novelli, L. W., 122, 123, 135, 180-182. 

Gates, Capt., 335. 

Gates, F. H., 286. 

Oatlands Park, 213, 223. 234. 

O'Brien, T., 255, 261. 

Old Trafford, 15, 124. 

Oliver, F. W., 51. 

Ollivant, A., 125. 

Onslow, F. P., 12, 14, 20, 23, 27, 36. 

Orlebar, , 340. 

Orme, W., in. 
Oscroft, W., 86. 
Osmond, Bomb., 287. 
Oswald, Capt,, 335. 
Oswald, S. C, 247, 259. 
Ottaway, C. J., 123, 140, 158. 
Oval, the, 50, 67, 85. 
Oxford University, 96, 106. 
Oxfordshire, 251. 

Packington, 55, 56, 75. 

Page, G. H., 311, 317. 

Paget, F., 98, 103, 116, 119, 138, 144. 

Paget, Lord A., 27. 

Palmer, Sir A., 144. 

Parker, R., 27. 

Parker, R. L., 105. 

Parnell, Capt., 103. 

Parr, George, 22, 52, 53, 69, 86. 

Parr, H. B., 249. 

Parr and Wisden's Ground, 26, 52. 

Parry, Capt., 118. 

Parsons, J., 20, 21, 29. 

Partick, Glasgow, 174, 179, 180, 182, 

183. 
Patterson, W. S., 135, 147, 151, 157. 
Pattison, J., 175. 

Pauncefote, B., 87, 90, 102, 106, 338. 
Paxton, E. H., 308. 
Payne, A., 22-24. 
Payne, A. E., 236. 
Payne, A. F., 24, 38. 
Peachey, C, 361, 362. 



396 



INDEX. 



Peake, E., 347, 353. 

Pearson, Capt. P., 237. 

Pearson, P. A. M., 156. 

Pearson, T. S., 108, 114, 119, 131, 133, 
136-138, 140, 145, 147, 151, 156-161, 
181-184, 213, 214, 218, 224, 235, 238, 

239- 
Peel, Herbert, 43. 
Peel, R., 306. 
Peel, S., 112. 

Pelham, Hon. F., 78, 83, 84, 89. 
Pember, F. W., 316. 
Pemberton, C. B. C, 215. 
Pender, J., 125, 177, 301. 
Penn, F., 145, 223. 
Pennant, F. D., 308, 309. 
Penny, A., 333-335- 
Pennycuick, J., 179. 
Pepys, J. A., 26, 39, 95, 99. 
Percy, A., 116. 
Percy, A. W. H., 357. 
Perera, Mr, 29. 
Perkins, A. E. J., 287. 
Perkins, D. S., 11, 12. 
, Perkins, G. D., 43. 
Perkins, H., 67. 
Perkins, J., 148, 220. 
^ Perth, 166-169, 178. 

Peyton, T. T., 246, 251, 305-307. 
Peyton, Capt. W. R. B., 248, 306, 307, 

309, 360. 
Philipson, H., 270, 271, 314, 330. 
Phillips, G. H., 34, 39. 
Phillips, J. P., 354. 
Philhps, J. S., 119, 151, 353, 358, 360. 
Phillips, O., 356. 
Phipps-Hornby, Capt., 283. 
Phipps, H. G., 97. 
Phipps, W. T., 97. 
Pickering, J. E., 360. 
Pickering, W., 99. 
Pierrepont, Hon. E., 129. 
Piers, W. B., 353, 354. 
Pigg, C, 292, 298, 306. 
Pigg, H., 208. 

Pilcher, A. J., 256, 260-263, 335j 33^. 
Pilkington, C, 14. 
Pim, A. W., III. 

Plumb, , 105. 

Pocklington, D., 52, 86, 90-92, 100, 104, 

105. 

Policy, , 309-3T1, 345, 346. 

Ponsonby, Hon. S,, 29, 76. 

Portal, G. H., 224, 225. 

Porter, E. H., 249. 

Potter, T. O., 125. 

Powell, H. L., 285. 

Powys, W. N., 215. 

Pratt, Capt., 284, 285. 

Prentis, A. J., 275. 

Prentis, H., 276, 277. 

Preston Hall, 169, 216, 226, 230, 235. 

Price, F. R., 41, 46, 54, 56, 57, 97-99, 

I02, 112, 113, 115, 117, 118, 124-127, 

130* 1395 1435 i53j 163, 221-224, 229. 
Price, R. K., 335. 



Prince's Ground, 147, 157. 

Prinsep, J. M., 359, 361. 

Prior, G., 119. 

Priory Park, Chichester, 131, 139. 

Prothero, E. D., 305, 308, 347, 352-354, 

357-359- 
Proudfoot, A., 100. 
Prout, A., 361, 363. 
Pullman, W., 231. 
Purvis, Capt., 242. 
Pycroft, Mr, 5. 

Quinton, Captain, 344. 

Radcliffe, P. J. J., 260. 

Radcliffe, W., 364. 

Raikes, E. B., 245. 

Ralli, S. P., 361. 

Ramsay, A. B., 310. 

Ramsay, E., 42, 84, 85, 91, 95, 108, 113, 
143, 152, 300, 303-308, 310, 311, 317. 

Ramsay, R. C, 243. 

Randolph, B. M., 11. 

Randolph, J. H., 99. 

Rashleigh, W., 225, 267, 269. 

Ratcliffe, 100, 105. 

Ratliff, the Brothers, 31. 

Ratliff, H. E., 218, 220. 

Ratliff, T., 25-28, 31, 33, 36, 37, 40, 43, 
48-5o> 54, 56, 58, 67, 68, 75, 76, 83-85, 
87, 88, 90, 92, 95-100, 102, 103, 105, 
108, 109, III, 114, 116, 117, 123, 126, 
129, 131-134, 136, 137, 143, 146, 151, 
153-156, 158, 160-164, 195, 199, 216, 
218-221, 224-226, 230, 303, 304. 

Ratliff, W., 40, 68. 

Raven, J. H., 98, 180. 

Ravenhill, Major, 242, 283. 

Rawlin, , 312. 

Rawlins, A., 84. 

Rawlins, C, 84. 

Rawlinson, C. W., 235, 259, 270, 305, 

307- 
Rawhnson, J. B., 353, 354-358, 361. 
Rawson, H. E., 131, 259, 264, 265, 271. 
Ray, G., 286. 
Ray, W. H., 358. 
Rayner, G. F., 180, 183. 
Reade, H. S., 134. 
Reay, T. O., 11, 34, 39, 40, 49, 5i, 52, 

54, 56-58, 60, 61, 73, 75, 83, 90, 91, 

97, 238. 
Redfern, Sergt., 283. 
Reid, C. F., 78, 97, 102, 127-129, 144, 

147, 222, 224, 227, 228. 
Reid, Capt. P., 232. 
Reid, J. J., 102. 
Reid, R. T., 96. 
Reid, Saville, 97. 
Reigate, 244, 250. 
Renn, R., 309, 346. 
Renny-Tailyour, H. W., 131, 222, 229, 

232. 
Renny-Tailyour, T., 256, 259-261. 
Rhodes, F., 119. 
Rhodes, H. E., 227. 



INDEX. 



397 



Rice, Capt., 261-263, 265, 287. 

Rice, Major, 263-266, 310, 311, 345. 

Rice, S. R., 229. 

Richards, B., 24. 

Richards, J. A., 112. 

Richards, L. M., 248, 269-271, 279, 284- 

286. 
Richards, W. H., 104, 108, 109, 179. 
Richardson, Col., 288. 
Richardson, E. W., 353, 354. 
Richardson, F. J., 270. 
Richardson, H. A., 89, 95. 
Richardson, H. P., 230. 
Richardson, J. A,, 131. 
Richardson, J. M., 89, 95. 
Richardson, R, T., 214, 218, 219. 
Ricketts, G. W., 246, 258, 261-264, 267, 

269-271, 275-277, 284, 285, 305, 306, 

309, 314-317. 
Ricketts, P. E., 262. 
Riddell, E. M., 103, 105, 107, 109, 118, 

127, 128, 140, 147, 157, 159. 
Ridding, Charles, 27. 
Ridding, W., 12. 
Rider, T. J., 131. 
Ridley, A. W., 217, 218, 224. 
Ridley, C. E., 148, 220. 
Ringrose, C. E., 157, 222. 
Rislev, H., 299. 
Roba'rtes, J. C, 96. 
Robeck, H. E. W. de, 282. 
Roberts, Capt. B., 309, 351, 352, 355- 

361. 
Roberts, Capt. W., 273. 
Robertson, G. P., 40, 49, 61, 78, 85. 
Robertson, J., 247, 248, 269, 274, 282, 

286. 
Robertson, W., 265. 
Robinson, G. M., 113, 133. 
Robinson, T., 355. 
Rockingham Castle, 129, 132, 143, 154, 

207, 224. 

Rockley, , 353. 

Roe, W. N., 292, 293. 

Rogers, , 40. 

Rogers, A., 309, 317. 

Rogers, C, 349. 

Rogers, P., 357, 358. 

Rokeby, H. K., 14. 

Rona yacht, 327. 

Rooke, B. H., 263. 

Rotherham, H., 233, 315. 

Rougemont, C. H, de, 285, 286, 340. 

Roughton, J., 126, 

Round, J., 66, 85, 94, 96, 99. 

Roupell, J. H., 83, 89. 

Rowan, T., 175. 

Rowland, , 37. 

Rowley, Capt., 161. 

Rowley, E., 44, 46, 47, 85. 

Rowley, S., 125. 

Royal Engineers, Chatham, 130, 252- 

269. 
Royds, C. T., 11, 12, 14, 30, 35, 

36. 
Royds, F. T., 354, 355. 



Royle, Vernon, 131, 138, 151, 160, 161, 

225, 235. 
Rugby, 5, 8, 14, 26, 35, 39, 49, 60, 138, 

214, 223, 229, 233, 239. 
Rugby Club, 14, 21, 26. 
Rugby School, 25, 26, 31, 33, 48, 65, ^e, 

78, 87, 90, 92, 98, 102, 108, no, 116, 

124, 131, 145, 156. 
Rules of the Free Foresters, 92, 93. 
Russell, A. H. M., 225. 
Russell, B., 229, 232. 
Russell, J. S., 229, 232, 233, 238, 250, 

283, 285,-287, 354. 
Russell, P. B., 184. 
Rutter, A., 26, 31, 122. 
Rutter, E., 33, 49, 83, 90, 95, 96, 99, 100, 

102, 103, 105, 107, 109-111, 114, 116- 

118, T22, 123, 132, 134, 137, 145, 147, 
151, 158, 160, 161, 208, 214, 215, 221, 
224, 227-229, 234, 235, 237, 239, 245, 
248, 249, 251-253, 298, 303-307, 310^ 

3ii> 345- 
Ryder-Richardson, W., 335, 336. 
Rye, 245, 250, 251. 
Rylott, , 113. 

SafFord, F., 159. 
Salmon, C, 353. 
Sandbach, 21. 
Sanderson, L., 285, 287. 
Sandford, E. G., 27, 31, 33. 
Sandholme, 243. 
Sandhurst, 242. 

Sands, , 175. 

Sandwith, W. F. C, 357-359. 

Saunders, F. N., 102. 

Savage, Major, 260. 

Saville, G., 95. 

Saville, R., 358. 

Savory, Rev. J. H., 309-311, 317, 345. 

Schofield, J., 125. 

Schreiber, F. E. L., 98. 

Schultz, S. S., 157, 220, 232. 

Sclater-Booth, Hon. W. D., 285. 

Scotland, Gentlemen of, at Rugby, 138,^ 

139- 
Scott-Chad, C, 251. 
Scottish tours, 165-176. 
Sealy, H. A., 102. 
Sellars, W. D., 255, 261. 
Seton, B. H., 362, 364. 
Seton, C. H., 362, 364. 
Seton, Mr, 350. 
Sevenoaks Vine, 123, 136, 228. 
Severn, the, 35. 
Sevier, W. H., 353, 354, 356. 
Sewell, J. J., 100. 
Sewell, T., 68. 
Seymour, A. E., 57, 59, 61. 
Seymour, C. R., 249, 251. 
Shanklin, 328. 
Sharp, J,, 139, 175. 
Sharp, R., 139. 

Sharpe, , 359, 364. 

Shaw, , 39. 

Shaw, J. C, 87, 298. 



INDEX. 



Sheldon, P. S., 355. 
Shepperton, 246, 251. 
Sherrard, C. W., 136, 232. 
Shillingford, C, 306-308. 
Shoeburyness, 116, 130, 136, 146, 157, 

214, 223, 229, 234, 238, 243, 248. 
Shorncliffe, 215, 224. 
Short, F. H., 98. 
Shrewsbury, 34, 43, 100, 221, 227, 231, 

236, 350- 
Shropshire, 34, 164. 
Shugborough Park, 37. 
Silcock, F., 108, 118. 
Sim, A. C, 364. 
Simpson, C. H., 131. 
Simpson, G., 179. 
Sinclair, G. C., 160. 
Sitwell, F. H., 335, 336, 339, 354, 355, 

357? 358, 362, 364. 
Sitwell, W. H. H., 349, 352-35S? 357? 

358, 362, 364. 
Skelmersdale, Lord, 29. 
Skipwith, G. G., 357, 358. 
Skipwith, R., 246, 353-355? 357-359- 
Skipwith, R. W., 306, 356-359. 
Slaney, Capt. Kenyon, 96, 161, 218. 
Slaughter, O. M., 261. 
Slee, P. H., 283. 

SHnn, , 34. 

Smith, A. IBowden, 220. 

Smith, A. F., 123, 158. 

Smith-Barry, A. H., 46, 58, 90, 91, 96, 

107, no. 
Smith, C. Boyle, 359, 364. 
Smith, Capt. Meux, 40. 
Smith, C. J., 117, 138. 
Smith, Clarence, 138, 160, 218, 225, 239, 

243, 250, 297, 304, 348, 352. 
Smith, E., 51. 
Smith, J., 85, 179. 
Smith, P. Colville, 310, 311, 346. 
Smith, Rev. P. Hattersley, 353. 
Smith, S., 14, 279. 
Smith, S. C, 160, 219. 
Smith, S. C. Spencer, 98. 
Smyth, D. C, 263. 
Smythe, G. E., 96, 154, 163, 227. 
Smythe, W. M., 113, 163, 225. 
Soames, Capt., 182, 184. 
Soames, W. A., 158. 
Solbee, F., 275, 276. 
Sondes, Lord, 22. 
Southgate, 49, 66, 67, 97, 103, 108-110, 

116, 123, 132, 136, 137, 151, 157, 214, 

221. 
Southwell, I, 3, 30, 42, 87, 91, 152. 
Speed, F. E., 233, 242, 246, 273, 283. 
Speid, J., 139, 179. 
Spens, Capt., 355. 
Spens, J., 248, 259, 260, 262-264, 267, 

269, 270, 273-276, 284, 366. 
Spens, L. T., 102, 260-265, 267, 269-279, 

283, 284, 287, 314, 342. 

Spurway, , 341. 

Stafford, H. F., 229. 
Stafford, W. H., 255, 259-261. 



Staffordshire, 113, 126, 133, 143, 154 — 

Rangers, 12 — Rifles, 27. 
Stainer, R., 356. 
Stainton, N. E. G., 279. 
Stainton, R. G., 144, 230. 
Stallard, G., 231. 
Stamford, 4, 6. 
Stamford, Lord, 21, 24. 
Stamford, Lady, 23. 
Stanhope, C. S., 77-79, 90, 171-175. 
Stanhope, E., 152, 157, 164, 219, 223. 
Steadman, H. E. P., 119, 137, 216. 
Steel, D. Q., 220, 223. 
Steel, E. E., 249. 
Steel, H. B., 249. 
Steele, D. B., 135, 154, 157. 
Stenhouse, W., 175. 
Stenning, F. G., 270, 271, 276, 277. 
Stephen, N. K., 262. 
Stephenson, E., 45, 46. 
Stephenson, H. H., 29, 52, 53, 68. 
Stephenson, Major, 284. 
Stewart, Capt., 217, 218. 
Stewart, W. A., 106. 
St Heliers, 318. 
Stirling, 166-169, i73? ^71- 
Stockdale, H. E., 283. 
Stockley, H. R., 262. 

Stokes, , 242. 

Story, J. B., 12, 49. 

Story, W. F., 118, 183. 

Stow, M. H., 95. 

Strachan, G., 114, 151. 

Stratford, C. V., 259-261. 

Stratton, C. J., 308-311, 346. 

Stratton, W., 275. 

Straubenzee, A. H. Van, 259, 260, 288. 

Streatfield, E. C, 267-271, 295, 344. 

Streatfield, Moore A. M., 267, 268. 

Street, F. E., 147, 157, 220, 222, 223, 

228, 229, 233, 243. 
Street, G. R., 355, 356. 
Street, J., 68. 
Studd, J. E. K., 249. 
Stutfield, H. M., 285, 286. 
Style, G. M., 275, 277-279, 310. 
Suffolk Borderers, 48. 
Sunderland, Mrs, 350. 
Surrey County, 67, 68. 
Surrey, Gentlemen of, 50, 51, 58. 
Sutton Coldfield, 9-21, 28, 34, 37, 43, 55, 

57, 68, 112, 118, 133, 142, 153, 163 

209, 216, 227, 231, 235, 240. 
Sutton, E. G., 99. 

Swale, , 175. 

Symonds, G. D., 283. 

Tabor, W. C, 50. 

Tailyour. See Renny-Tailyour. 

Talbot, Capt., 308. 

Talbot, E. A., 276. 

Tamworth, 12. 

Tandy, M. O. C, 265, 341. 

Tapling, T. K., 249. 

Taplow Court, 190. 

Tarrant, 53. 



INDEX. 



399 



Taylor, E. F., 85, 98, 102. 

Taylor, J. W., 82. 

Taylor, Mr, 35. 

Taylor, S., 40. 

Tennant, A. E., 33. 

Tennent, H. N., 85, 91, 100, 104, 138, 

158, 166, 171-175- 
Thesiger, A., 20. 
Thesiger, E. P., 102. 
Thesiger, P., 269, 274, 279, 280, 284. 
Thesiger, G. H., 335. 
Thomas, D. G., 20. 
Thompson, M., 17, 97. 
Thoresby, 91, 100, 104, 109, 127. 
Thornby Hall, 209, 301. 
Thorndon Hall, 108. 
Thornewill, E., 11, 12. 
Thornton, A,, 253, 262-265, 268-270, 

273-275* 279-281, 284, 285, 287, 288, 

291, 314. 
Thornton, C. J., iii, 116, 123, 137, 138, 

151, 158, 215, 241. 
Thornton, R. T., 267, 268, 270, 276, 

279. 
Thring, A. T., 308. 
Thring, J. C, 240. 
Thurgar, W. A., 245. 
Thursby, C, 309. 

Thursby, H. E., 273, 279, 282, 283. 
Tillard, C, 163, 164, 241, 245, 353, 354, 

356, 362. 
Tilney, R. H., 356. 
Tinley, Frank, 4. 

Tinley, R. C, 29, 53, 70, 71, 73, 87. 
Tippinge, V., 119. 
Tobin, F.. 99. 
Tod, A. J'., 131. 
ToUemache, H. J., 96. 
Tomkins, Lieut., 288, 
Tomkinson, J., 58, 69. 
Tonge, J. N,, 341. 
Tonge, v., 267-269, 276, 283. 
Tooting, 213, 222, 232. 
Toppin, C, 295, 356, 357. 
Tovey, W. G., 363. 
Townshend, W., 112, 117, 119, 125, 126, 

131- 
Toynbee, P. R., 240, 244, 246, 248, 

306. 
Toynbee, W. T., 246, 305-307. 
Traill, W. F., 84, 132. 
Tredcroft, E., 56, 57. 
Trentham, 21, 24, 27. 
Trevor, A. H., 234, 238, 242, 244, 245, 

251, 307. 
Tritton, E. W., 161. 
Tritton, W. F., 95. 
Trollope, A. B., 27. 
Trollope, E. C, 214. 
Trower, H. W., 279. 
Truro, Lord, 363, 364. 
Truswell. J. R., 118. 
Tryon, Capt., 144. 
Tubb, H., 108, no, 131, 143, 145, 181, 

182, 241, 246, 251, 297, 299, 301, 304, 

306-3TI, 317, 346. 



Tuck, G. H., 82, 84, 89, 90, 96, 116, 

156, 223, 226. 
Tucker, H., 306. 
Tuke, C. M., 243. 
Tulloch, J. A. S., 260, 265. 
Turnbull, R. M., 239, 244, 247, 259. 
Turner, H. H., 264. 
Turner, J. A., 262-264, 267, 269, 270, 

272, 274, 275, 320, 321, 356, 357. 
Turner, Montagu, no, in, 115, 116, 

119, 128, 132, 137, 158. 
Turner, Mr, 59. 
Tumour, Lord, 49. 
Turvey House, 159. 
Twemlow, F. R., 119, 155, 157, 215, 221, 

222, 227. 
Twiss, J. H., 261. 
Twynam, H. T., 240. 

Tylecote, C. B., 152-154, 162, 219, 240, 

245. 
Tylecote, E. F. S., 106, no, 131, 132, 
140, 156, 159-161, 181-184, 213, 216, 

223, 228, 232, 238, 242, 244, 247, 283, 
284. 

Tylecote, H. G., 153, 159, 162, 219, 226, 

235, 240, 292, 330. 
Types Militaires, 155. 
Tyrer, F. W., 352. 
Tyringham, 132. 

Udal, J. S., 243, 250. 

" Unfulfilled Renown," 6. 

United England Eleven, 38, 39, 44-46. 

" United though Untied," 13, 35, 63, 

80, 94. 
University College, 27, 33. 
Upcher, H. B., 120. 
Upper Tooting, 83, 90, 99, 108, in, 

156. 
Uppingham Rovers, 147, 157, 220. 
Uppingham School, 76, 81, 88, 92, 105, 

109, 135, 154. 
Upton House, 289, 296. 
Usborne, T. M., 283, 288. 

Van Straubenzee. See Straubenzee. 

Vandermeulen, , 49. 

Vansittart, A. P., 148. 

Vaughton, H., 274. 

Venables, R. G., 180, 181, 213, 303, 349, 

352, 354- 
Venables, R. J., 96, 107, 108, 123, 130, 

138, 146, 158. 
Verelst, H., 102, 104, 111-113, ^^S, 126- 

132, 134, 140, 143, 151, 157-159, 162, 

164, 177, 178, 213, 216, 228, 249. 
Verney, Hon. W., 224. 
Vernon, A. L., 68, 84, 140, 230. 
Vernon, Foley, 143, 153. 
Vernon, G. F., 131, 215, 223, 234, 243, 

261, 263, 273-275, 279, 284, 285, 287. 
Versturme, C. H., 264. 
Victor. See Christian Victor. 
Villiers, R., 307. 
Vizard, Captain, 361, 362. 
Von Donop, P. G., 229, 256, 259. 



400 



INDEX. 



Voules, S. C, no, 123, 132, 146, 160, 

161, 236, 358, 
Vyse, A., 109, in, 114, 124, 137, 159. 
Vyse, E. W., 50, 51, 58, 67, 103, 109. 

Wakeman, E. M., 96, 102, 107, 219, 221, 

236. 
Wakeman, O. F., 21, 23. 
Wakley, F., 112. 

Walkenshaw, , 303. 

Walker, A. H., 103, 109. 

Walker, Ashley, 78, 82, 124, 127, 129. 

Walker, G., 142. 

Walker, I. D., 85, 97, 103, 109, in, 

117, 119, 123, 134, 137, 141, 151, 158, 

214, 239, 261. 
Walker, J. G., 246, 251, 259, 261, 297, 

298, 305-307, 310. 
Walker, John, 67, 103, 109,. in, 124, 

132. 
Walker, J. R., 133, 160, 162, 218, 219, 

225, 231. 
Walker, R. D., 67, 85, 97, 103, 105, 107- 

109, III, 114, 115, 117-119, 122, 132, 

134, 137, 14I5 ^58, 215. 
Walker, V. E., 58, 67, 97, 103, 109, 117, 

123, 132, 134, 136, 137, 141, 156, 158, 

215. 
Waller, A., 27. 
Waller, C, 50, 51. 
Waller, E., 31, 65, 68. 
Walrond, S. H., 279, 
Walsall, Twenty- two of, 38. 
Walter, A. F., 106. 
Walter, H. E., 214. 
Walton, E. W., 259. 
Walton Hall, 159, 217, 224. 
Walton, R., 173. 
Ward, W, P., 233, 239. 
Warner, F., 144. 

Warner, E. H., 180, 181, 120, 146. 
Warnham Court, 158, 216, 234, 239. 
Warren, C, 89. 
Warrington, 38. 
Warwick, 3. 
Warwickshire, 217, 225 — Gentlemen of, 

159, 160 — Knickerbockers, 57. 
Watson, A. M., 125, 126. 
Watson, Captain F., 50, 107, 108, 182, 

363, 364. 
Wauchope, Don, 340. 
Waud, B., 27. 
Waymouth, E. G., 288. 
Webb, C. J., 12. 
Webb, H. R., 245. 
Webbe, A. J., 230, 239, 243, 246, 248, 

261, 309, 317. 
Webbe, H. R., 217, 218, 224, 226, 230, 

307- 
Wedderburn, H. G., 180. 
Weighell, W. B., 89, 95. 
Weldon, A., 105- 
Wellesbourne, 236, 240. 
Wellington College, 214. 

Wells, , 40. 

Welman, F. F., 310. 



Western Club, Manchester, 14, 15, 24, 
29, 37, 41, 44, 59, 69, 75, 80, 85, 86, 
91, 100, 104, 112, 117, 125, 131, 138. 

Westminster School, 8, 10, 102, 107, 
116. 

Weybridge, 209. 

Weybridge School, 50, 66, 78, 90, 98, 
102. 

Weymouth, 319, 329. 

What came of wearing a Forester rib- 
bon, 18, 19. 

Wheble, Captain, 282, 284, 285. 

" When the Green Leaves come again," 

31- 
Whitby, H. O., 277. 
Whitehall Rooms, 212. 
White-Thompson, H. D., 286. ' 
Whitmore, H, E., 134, 141. 
Whittaker, A., 58. 
Whittington, R. T., 43, 68, 69, 83, 86, 

91, 92, 100, 105. 
Wickham, A. P., 245. 
Wigram, E. M., 281. 
Wild, G., 117. 
Wilde, M., 283, 284. 
Wilde, T. M., 356. 
Wilkes, H., 360. 
Wilkins, Master R., 3. 
Wilkinson, A. J., 58. 
Wilkinson, M. G., 234. 
Willes, C. E., 356. 
Willes, Rev. G. E., 78, 82, 89, 90, 96, 

160, 161, 215, 218, 246, 251, 298, 303- 

307, 3091 339j 347, 351. 352, 353, 354, 

356-364. 
Willes, Captain H. C, 42, 45, 46, 75, 

287, 305. 
Williams, S., n. 
Williams, W., 86. 
Williamson, Rev. F. C, 146, 160, 163, 

249. 
Willis' Rooms, 211. 
Willoughby de Broke, Lord, 160, 161, 

217, 224, 225. 
Willy, A. C, 305. 
Wilmot, A. A., 91, 97, 103, ic8, 140, 

143. 179- 
Wilson, C. P., 250, 251. 
Wilson, E., 200. 
Wilson, J., 173. 
Wilson, L., 267, 270, 271, 288. 
Wilson, R. A., 308, 309, 359. 
Wilson, S. G., 237, 242, 248, 250, 284. 
Wilson, T., 331. 
Wimbledon, 52. 
Winchester, 8, 317. 

Winchester Garrison, 145, 235, 239, 244. 
Winchfield, ;226. 
Windier, G. L., 309, 317. 
Wingfield, W., 34-36, 38, 40, 45-48, 51, 

52, 54. 56, 58, 100, 119, 134, 141, 

164. 
Winter, A. H., 82, 89, 95. 
Wisden, 38, 44-47. 
Wise, T., 228-230, 234, 248, 303, 306, 

307- 



INDEX. 



401 



Woburn, 105, 113. 
Woking, 243, 
Wolferston, C, 361. 
Wood, A., 311-313. 
Wood, A. H., 244. 
Wood, C. K., 239. 
Wood, C. R., 242, 243, 247, 
Wood, F., 14. 
Wood, Mrs, 313. 
Woodbridge, C. M., 262. 
Woodgate, J. W., 154. 
Woodhouse, Rev. T., 358. 
Woodroffe, A. J., 264, 265. 

Woolley, , 3. 

Woolwich, 213, 223, 228, 232, 233, 237. 
Woofton, G., 53, 72, 73, 86. 
Worcester, 126, 132, 143, 152, 162, 209, 
219, 226, 230, 231, 235, 239, 240. 

Wright, , 24, 37, 364. 

Wright, F. L., 139, 157. 



Wright, F. W., 37, 66, 68, 71, 73, -j^, 79, 
80, 84, 104, 119, 133-137, 143, 153, 
154, 226. 

Wright, H. S., 60. 

Wright, W., 272-277. 

Wright, W. H., 133, 134. 

Wyatt, G. N., 115-117, 147, 151. 

Wyatt, Halifax, 80, 104. 

Wyld, Capt., 279, 309, 317. 

Wynne, Capt., 287. 

Wynyard, Capt. E. G., 264, 265, 270, 
276, 277, 361, 362. 

Wyreside, 13. 

Yardley, W., 99, 102, 132. 

Yates, J. M., 89, 95, 98, 102, 138, 222. 

Yeats, R. M., 263. 

Young, A., 180. 

Young, A. W. C, 98. 

Young, C. L., 259-262. 



I^IHH^B^^^^H^^^^^^H 




BIKWWffl^^^^^ 


H^^^H 


^BKlWI^iJ^^ ' '9I^M\IHiV 


ff^^9 


PfHpH 


/^K^^^^^^Hf ',,jm^^^^k 



Lieut. Van Straubenzee. Capt. Bolton. C. D. Shute. Capt. Cooper Key. S. H. Walrond. 

Mr Carter. E. H. Bray. Major Gatliff. P. Lee. Col. Jopp. F. Dames Longworth. 

C. R. Seymour. J. F. Marshall. F. T. Welman. Major Hardy. P. F. Warner. 

Major Rice. Capt. E. Wynyard. Capt. Cuthbertson. E. Rutter. 

Capt. Rawlinson. Col. Ferguson. 



Free Foresters v. R. M. C. Staff, Sandhurst, 1894. 



PRINTED BY WILLIAM BLACKWOOD AND SONS. 



UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARY 
BERKELEY 

Return to desk from which borrowed. 
This book is DUE on the last date stamped below. 



23/an'54Ei; 



:VfW, ||?54^Li( 



'U 3 1973 



LD 21-100m-7,'52(A2528sl6)476 



lU ^M< 



iv!:?09is4