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(Tart^age (Tollegc 



1910-1911 



IlllNOIS HISTORICAL SURVLt 



CARTHAGE COLLEGE BULLETIN 



SERIES 2. APRIL, 1911. NO. 11 



Entered March 14, 1904, at Cai-thage, Illinois, as second-class matter, under 
Act of Congress, July 16, 1894. 



Carthage College 

1910-1911 



Incornorated January 10, 1870. First Commencement May 4, 1875. 





CALENDAR 1911 - 1912 






JANUARY. 


JULY. 


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CARTHAGE COLLEGE 



COLLEGE CALENDAR. 



1910 

August 31, Wednesday Registration Day 

September 1, Thursday First Semester Began 

November 24 and 25 Thanksgiving Recess 

December 16, Friday Holiday Recess Began 

1911 

January 3, Tuesday Holiday Recess Ended 

January 18, Wednesday First Semester Closed 

January 19, Thursday Second Semester Began 

April 14, Good Friday Holiday 

COMMENCEMENT WEEK. 

May 21, Sunday, 11 a. m Annual Sermon on Education 

May 21, Sunday, 8 p. m Baccalaureate Sermon 

May 22, Monday, 3 p. m.... Recital, Department of Expression 

May 22, Monday, 8 p. m Academy Commencement 

May 23, Tuesday, 10 a. m.. Annual Meeting Board of Trustees 
May 23, Tuesday, Music Day 

3 p. m., Recital, Department of Music 

May 23, Tuesday, 8 p. m Concert 

May 24, Wednesday, 10 a. m... Annual Meeting Stockholders 
May 24, Wednesday, 10 a. m 

_ Annual Meeting Alumni Association 

May 24, Wednesday, 2 p. m Athletic Field Day 

May 24, Wednesday, 8 p. m Alumni Banquet 

May 25, Thursday, 10 a. m Commencement 

SUMMER VACATION. 

September 6, Wednesday Registration Day 

September 7, Thursday, 10 a. m First Semester Begins 

November 30-December 1 Thanksgiving Recess 

December 15, Friday, 4:30 p. m Holiday Recess Begins 

1912 

January 2, Tuesday, 8:15 a. m Holiday Recess Ends 

January 24, Wednesday First Semester Ends 

January 25, Thursday Second Semester Begins 

May 30, Thursday Commencement 



CARTHAGE COLLEGE 



BOARD OF TRUSTEES. 



SYNOD OI'- NORTHERN ILLINOIS. 

Rev. H. M. Bannen, D. D Rockford 

Rev, Paul B. Holtgreve Wa.shington 

Mr. Henrv Denhart Washington 

S. W. King, Eso Joliet 

synod OF IOWA. 

Rev. William H. Blancke, D. D Davenport, Iowa 

Rev. Charles W. Maggart. D. D Cedar Rapids, Iowa 

Mr. Andrew Hans Nevada, Iowa 

wart burg synod. 

Rev. William Rosenstengel, D. D Carthage 

Rev. Bruno Garthn Chester 

synod of central ILLINOIS. 

Rev. H, L. McGill Anna 

Mr. Philip Eager Murphysboro 

trustees for HANCOCK COUNTY. 

Hon. Apollos W. O'Harra Dr. Edward M. Roijuins 

Judge D. E. Mack. 

TRUSTEE for THE ALUMNI ASSOCIATION. 

Dr. C. L Ferris, '76 Carthage 

The Board was elected for two years at the annual meet- 
ing of the stockholders May 24, 1910, upon nomination of the 
Synods holding the stock of the College. 



CARTHAGE COLLEGE 



OFFICERS AND COMMITTEES OF 
THE BOARD. 



OFFICERS. 



Rev, Ezra Keller President 

Rev. H. M. Bannen, D. D Vice-President 

Rev. William Rosenstengel, D. D Secretary 

Mr. S. H. Ferris Treasurer 

Hon. Apollos W. O'Harra Attorney 

executive committee. 

Revs. Ezr.a Keller and William Rosenstengel, 

AND Messrs. A. W. O'Harra, E. M. Robbins, D. E. Mack, 

C. L. Ferris and Henry Denhart. 

committee on buildings and grounds. 

Rev. Wm. Rosenstengel, Dr. E. M. Robbins, 

Mr. W. B. Marvel, Mr. Edward Clark. 

finance committee. 

Dr. E. M. Robbins, Mr. Henry Denhart, 

Judge D. E. Mack, Dean W. K. Hill. 

auditing committee. 

Mr. O. B. Turner, Mr. Reason W. Saer, 

Mr. J. S. Palmer 



CARTHAGE COLLEGE 



FACULTY AND INSTRUCTORS. 



REV. HARVEY DANIEL HOOVER, A.M. .Ph.D., 

PRESIDENT, 

David Loy Tressler Professor of Philosophy, and John 
C. Afar tin Professor of Biblical Literature. 

(A. B. 1899, Susquehanna University; D. B. 1902, Susquehanna 
University; A. M. 1902. Susquehanna University; Ph. D. 1907, 
Illinois Wesleyan University; Professor of SocioloKy and Theology 
in Susquehanna University, 1907-1909 ; President of Carthage 
College, 1909.) 

REV. WILLIAM KUHNS HILL, A. M., Sc. D., 

DEAN OF THE FACULTY, 

Professor of Biology and Chemistry. 

(A. B. Pennsylvania College, 1879 ; Instructor in Mathematics 
Dayton (Penna.) Academy, 1880 ; Principal Blairsville Academy 
1881-1882; A.M.Pennsylvania College, 1882; Graduated from 
Gettysburg Seminary, 1884; Professor Natural and Physical 
Science, Carthage College, 1884-1892; Superintendent City Schools 
Carthage, Illinois. 1893-1901 ; Professor Chemistry and Bi(jlogy, 
Carthage College since 1901 ; Dean of the Faculty since 1905; 
Sc. D. Pennsylvania College, 1910.) 

JUSTIN LOOMIS VAN GUNDY, A.M., Ph.D., 
Professor of Greek and Latin Languages. 

(A. B. Bucknell College, 1887 ; A. M., ibid., 1890 ; Professor of 
Classical Languages Bordentown (N. J.) Military Academy, 
1887-1891 ; Professor of Classical Languages Kee Mar College, 
1891-2 ; Student of Classical Philology Johns Hopkins University, 
1892-3; Head of Department of Ancient and Modern Languages 
and Vice-Principal Norristowm (Pa.) High School, 1893-1902; 
Student of Philosophy University of Berlin, 1902-3; Ph. D. Uni- 
versity of Jena, 1905 ; Professor of Classical Languages Carthage 
College, 1906.) 



CARTHAGE COLLEGE 



' CARL O. SUNDSTROM, A. B., 

Professor of Modern Languages. 

(A. B. Bethany College, 1901 ; Principal of Public Schools, 
Assaria, Kansas, 1901-1903; Principal of High School, Marquette, 
Kansas, 1903-1904 ; Principal of High School, Conway. Kansas, 
1904-1905; Professor of Languages New Mexico Normal Univer- 
sity, Las Vegas, New Mexico, 1905-1907; Professor of Modern 
Languages, Carthage College, 1907. 

HARRY L. HORNER, A.M., 
Professor of Mathematics and Physics. 

(A. B. Indiana University. 1906; A. M. 1907; Fellow in Mathe- 
matics Indiana University 1906-1907; Instructor High School, 
Ishpeming, Mich., 1907-1908: Professor Mathematics and Physics, 
Carthage College, 1908.) 

REV. JACOB YUTZY, D. D., 

Professor of Biblical History, and Biblical 

Hebrew and Creek. 

(Graduate Pennsylvania College, 1876; Graduate Gettysburg 
Theological Seminary, 1879; A. B. and A. M. Pen. College; D. D. 
Hartwick Seminary, Professor Moral Science and Church His- 
tory in Divinity School of Susquehanna University, Pa., 1882- 
1892; Dean of Divinity School in Susquehanna University, and 
Professor of Dogmatics, Symbolics, Hebrew and Greek Exegesis. 
1892-1903; Pastor of College Church, Selinsgrove, Pa., 1882-1894; 
Pastor Grace Lutheran Church, Peoria, 111., 1904-1905; Pastor 
College Church, Carthage, 111., 1905-1911. 

REV. SANFORD NER CARPENTER, A. M., B. D., 

Professor of History, and the English 
Language and Literature. 

(A. B., Susquehanna University, 1898; A. M., ibid., 1901; B. D. 
Susquehanna Theological Seminary, 1901; Pastor at Pittsburg, 
Pa., 1900-1909; Professor of English and History, Carthage Coi- 
lege, 1909. 



CARTHAGE COLLEGE 



MISS EMMA J. BELL, B. S., 

Instructor in En'fC^lis/i and I [istory. 

(B. S. Carthage College, 1907; Graduate Student in English, 
Chicago University 1907-19J8; Principal High School Glencoe, 
Minn.; Principal High School Carthage. 111., 1896-190Q; Instructor 
in English, Carthage College Academy, since 1901, witli one 
year'3 leave of absence 1907-1908.) 



MISS ERMA RAND, A. B., 

Instructor in Latin a)id Histo> y. 

(A.. B. Carthage College, 190G; Teacher of English, Ogden (Iowa) 
High School 1906-07; Carthage Public Schools, 19l 7-08; Instruc- 
tor in Latin Carthage College Academy, 1909.) 



MISS SUSAN M. DAVIDSON, 

Instructor in Voice 

(Studied voice with Mr. Bicknell Young, Madam Mazzucato 
Young.Mr. Francis Fisher Powers, G. Edward Stubbs, Mus. Doc, 
Mr. Dudley Buck Jr.; has taught in Megguire Seminary, Boone- 
ville. Mo.; College of the Sisters of Bethany, Topeka, Kansas; 
Brownell Hall, Omaha, Neb.) 



MISS MARGHERITA KOCH, A. B., 

Instructor in Piano. 

(B. A. University of Iowa, 1909; Student in Music School of Uni- 
versity of Iowa under Mary Wood Chase, Ida Felkner Coffeen, 
and Ralph Lawton, 1906-1909; Teacher of Piano, Pipe Organ, 
Harmony and History of Mu.^ic, Carthage College, 19*i9.) 



CARTHAGE COLLEGE 



MISS S. GRACE HAUSER, 

Instritctor in Expression and Physical 
Culture ( Wofnen). 

(Student at York Collegiate Institute, First Penn. State Normal 
School '03-'04. under direction of King's School of Oratory '04"-i)5, 
B. I. Neff College of Oratory 1909, teacher grade schools 'u5-'06. 
Expression Department York, Pa., Y. W. C. A. '09-'10, private 
teaching Belmar, N. J. summer '10, Carthage College School of 
Expression 1910. 



JAMES ARTHUR BAIRD. A. B., 

Instructor in History and Physical 
Culture {Men). 

(A. B. Carthage College, 1900; Student Northwestern University 
Law School, 1900-19<J3; Admitted to Bar in State of Illinois, 1904; 
Right Guard All- Western Football Team, 19)3; Football Coach 
Carlton College, Northfield, Minn., 1903-1906; Football Coach 
Whitman College, Walla Walla, Wash., 1907; Athletic Director 
and Instructor in Civics and U. S. History, Carthage College, 
1908; Elected County Judge of Hancock County, 1910. 



ORLO D. SLATER, 

Assistant in Mathematics. 



WILLIAM G. HILL, 
Laboratory Assistant, 



10 CARTHAGE COLLEGE 

COMMITTEES OF THE FACULTY 

FOR THE YEAR 1910-11. 
{T/ie first named is chairman of the committee.') 



Schedule and Courses ok Study — Professors Hill, Sund- 
strom and Horner. 

Credits — Professors Van Gundy and Horner. 

Rules and Delinquencies — President Hoover and Pro- 
fessor Hill. 

Athletics — Professor Horner and Mr. Baird. 

LiTEKARY Societies — Professors Yutzy, Carpenter and 
Sundstrom. 

Catalogue — Professors Hill, Van Gundy and Carpenter. 

Public Events — Professors Van Gundy and Hill. 



OTHER OFFICERS AND ASSISTANTS IN 
ADMINISTRATION. 

Professor Carl O. '$>wvi(^&\.rom.—t>ecretary of the Faculty. 

Professor Harry L. Horner — Registrar. 

Dr. Justin L. Van Gundy — Librarian. 

Dr. William Rosenstengel — Treasurer of the Contingent 
Fund. 

Mrs, Hattie L. Harris— ilAj/rc;^ of Denhart Hall. 

Mr. James Arthur 'RaXvA— Director of the Gymnasium. 



CARTHAGE COLLEGE 11 

"A College with an Ideal," which aims to educate 
young men and young women to be the best possible citizens 
of the age. The aim of the instruction is less to train 
specialists than to give such knowledge as belongs to a well- 
rounded education. Carthage College provides the liberal 
training and culture which are the prerequisites of a success- 
ful university course. 

We tolerate only the best of ideals, personal influence, 
teaching methods, and standards of character. The College 
spirit is inspirational and elevating. A progressive, youth- 
ful and persistent spirit pervades all college activities. The 
highest and best of life's goals are placed before each 
student; then conscientious and faithful efforts are put forth 
to enable each one to attain and achieve. 

The College ideal is not a large student body. Carthage 
aims to produce truly cultured and refined, liberally edu- 
cated, diligent, spirited and dauntless men and women of 
pure and strong character. The College is not operated for 
gain or selfish ends, but for the welfare of honest, hopeful 
and worthy young people who wish the priceless gifts of 
correct education. 

Carthage College was founded in 1870 by representative 
citizens of Carthage, Illinois, and special commissioners 
appointed for the purpose by the English Evangelical 
Lutheran Synods of Illinois and Iowa, under whose direction 
the first President (D. L. Tressler, Ph. D.) was elected, and 
the main building was constructed and dedicated. The first 
class was graduated in 1875. After the death of President 
Tressler in 1880, the stock of the institution was transferred 
to the Synods interested, and the College is now controlled 



12 CARTHAGE COLLEGE 

by the Evangelical Lutheran Synods of Northern Illinois, of 
Central Illinois, of Southern Illinois, of Iowa, and the Wart- 
burg Synod, by whom all the trustees are nominated. On 
the Board of Trustees, in addition to the representatives from 
these Synods, there are three from Hancock County, and 
one from the Alumni Association, all elected by the stock- 
holders appointed by the Synods. The institution is thus 
conducted under the auspices of the General Synod of the 
Evangelical Lutheran Church in the United States of 
America, and has been as.sisted financially for the last 
sixteen years by the Board of Education in the increase of 
the endowment fund, and by direct contributions toward the 
current expenses. 

^Location anb ^uU6lngs. 

Carthage College is located at Carthage, the county seat 
of Hancock County, Illinois. It is a pleasant inland town 
of over twenty-five hundred inhabitants. It is a quiet, 
healthful and temperate community, which has not licensed 
the liquor traffic for more than thirty years, and is thus 
well-adapted to academic and college life. The citizens are 
cultured and hospitable, and deeply interested in the College 
and the students, to whom the homes are open constantly, 
Carthage is situated twelve miles east of Keokuk, Iowa, and 
midway between Burlington, Iowa, and Quincy, Illinois. 
Lines of the Chicago, Burlington and Quincy and the Wabash 
systems pass through the city, and the main line of the 
Toledo, Peoria and Western railroad passes four miles to the 
north, connecting at Ferris for Carthage. New students, upon 
writing to the President, can receive all needed information. 

The campus comprises about eighteen acres of improved 
and timbered grounds, situated in the northeast portion of 
the city, about eight blocks from the public square, and 
slightly elevated above the rest of the town. 



LOCATION AND BUILDINGS 13 

The main building is a large brick structure of three 
stories and basement. It has been improved and beautified 
recently at an expense of several thousand dollars; is furn- 
ished with modern conveniences, and is in all respects both 
attractive and well-adapted to the work of the institution. 
In addition to the large, well-lighted recitation rooms and 
laboratories, are to be found the College Chapel, the Christian 
Association chapel, the library and reading-room, and the 
literary society halls. 

Denhart Hall for young ladies is situated on the west 
side of the campus, and is a beautiful two-story brick cottage 
with basement, capable of accommodating thirty students. 
It is heated by steam and is furnished with lavatories and 
baths. The dining-hall and refectory are located in the base- 
ment, while a double pai'lor and music room add to its social 
attractiveness. Mrs. Harris, the matron, has proved herself 
exceptionally capable in her care of the young ladies, and in 
every respect Denhart Hall has been found to be a beautiful 
and comfortable home for them. 

The gymnasium is a handsome building. It was erected 
in 1905-6 at a cost of twelve thousand dollars, and is now 
being used by classes in physical culture. The building is 
43x91 feet on the outside, giving available floor space inside 
of 40x88 feet, and is fully equipped with apparatus of the best 
quality, with running track and hot and cold baths. 

The laboratories of the College furnish all that is essential 
for successful laboratory work in the usual undergraduate 
courses. The Biological Laboratory is equipped with com- 
pound microscopes, dissecting microscopes, microtomes, 
baths, aquaria, and such other apparatus, glassware and 
reagents as are needed in the study of the morphology and 
histology of plants and animals. The laboratory has been 
fitted up with students' desks, drawers and lockers, and 
with cabinets to accommodate our various collections in 
Natural History, Geology and Mineralogy. The Chemical 



14 CARTHAGE COLLEGE 

Laboratory is furnished with individual desks and lockers to 
accommodate twenty-four students, and is provided with all 
the apparatus, glassware and reagents needed for experi- 
mental work in general chemistry. The Physical Laboratory 
is a large, well-lighted room, fitted with tables for individual 
work, water supply and all necessary apparatus, balances, 
barometer, etc. 

The College Library contains about seven thousand 
volumes and several thousand pamphlets. The collection is 
classified according to the Dewey decimal system, and is 
furnished with complete card catalogues of authors and sub- 
jects. A large number of books have been added by dona- 
tions and purchase within the past few years, and the 
collection now contains the books most essential for under- 
graduate work in the various departments. The following 
additions have been made during the current year: 

Bound Magazines 148 Volumes 

U. S. Government 38 

Purchase 53 

Book Review 15 

State of Illinois 14 

University of Illinois 7 

Smithsonian Institution 5 

Bross Lecture Foundation 4 

Miscellaneous 110 

Total number of volumes 394 

Grateful acknowledgment is hereby extended to all 
donors. 

The two literary societies have good collections of books, 
to which standard works are being added annually. Each 
society has invested funds, the interest of which is used for 
library purposes. Cicero Society has recently placed its col- 
lection in the College Library, and thrown it open to the use 



STUDENT ORGANIZATIONS 15 

of all students. The Public Library of Carthage, containing 
several thousand volumes, is open to the students, while 
the private libraries of the members of the Faculty are also 
accessible for studies upon special topics. 

The Reading Room has been furnished with tables, 
shelves, magazine case, newspaper rack, et cetera, and is open 
daily except Saturday from 8:15 until 12 a. m., and from 1:15 
until 4:30 p. m.; on Saturday the hours are from 9 until 11 
a. m. The library is open during the same hours. The 
reading room is equipped with the best scientific and literary 
magazines and many of the best religious and secular papers. 

Stuicnt Organizations. 

Two societies — Galileo, organized in 1870, and Cicero, 
organized a year later — are sustained in connection with the 
College. Through the medium of these, students get val- 
uable aid in composition, delivery, debate and parliamentary 
practice, besides opportunities for social culture. All Col- 
legiate and Senior Academic students are required to unite 
with one or the other of these societies, and to perform a 
prescribed amount of literary work annually. Each of the 
societies occupies a large, attractive hall, handsomely furn- 
ished for literary and social purposes. 

The Young Men's Christian Association, which was organ- 
ized in 1881, has exerted a marked influence upon the life 
and character of the students during the years since. Prayer 
meetings are held on each Tuesday evening. The Young 
Women's Christian Association is a flourishing organization, 
which holds a service every Monday evening. It receives 
the cordial support of all the young women of the College. 
Devotional Bible study and missionary classes have been 
conducted by both associations. Each association sends del- 
egates every summer to the Geneva Conference of College 
Students. New students are urged to unite with these asso- 



16 CARTHAGE COLLEGE 

ciations, and will do well to avail themselves of the assistance 
which is offered them at the opening of each year. 

The Glee Club, an organization of young men, led by the 
head of the vocal department, made a very successful concert 
tour during the spring term. 

The Athletic Association is a voluntary student organiza- 
tion which affords the students opportunity to participate in 
the conduct of business touching the College athletics. 

The Dramatic Club consists of a limited number of 
students who have qualified in the Department of Expression. 
The purpose of the club is to promote interest in dramatic 
literature and art. 

The Brain and Brawn is a society composed of students 
who have distinguished themselves for scholarship, or have 
won prizes on the athletic field. 

Religious (Tulture. 

The tone of the institution has been positively religious 
since the beginning. It is the purpose of the institution 
under the newly organized Department of Biblical Instruction, 
to afford every student an opportunity to gain, during his 
course, a thorough and systematic knowledge of Biblical 
History and Literature; also, to give training in Christian 
work for those who desire it. A marked feature of the 
religious life of the institution is the intimate relation existing 
between the students and the local congregations. Besides 
the English Lutheran church, whose pastor. Rev. S. N. 
Carpenter, is regarded as College pastor, and the German 
Lutheran congregation, there are represented in Carthage 
organizations of the Baptist, the Catholic, the Christian, the 
Episcopal, the Methodist Episcopal, and the Presbyterian 
denominations. Students from any of these branches of the 
Christian church are encouraged to attend services of their 
own denomination and to become regularly identified with its 
religious work. 



PUBLICATIONS — SCHOLARSHIPS 17 

"Publications. 

The literary societies of the College publish a monthly 
journal — The Collegian — which is edited by a staff of 
editors chosen from the societies. This paper is the organ 
of the student body, and is helpful in stimulating literary 
activity among them. It also affords the Alumni, friends, 
and patrons of the college the best means of keeping in 
touch with the life and work of the institution. 

The College publishes a bi-monthly Bulletin, the purpose 
of which is to keep friends and patrons informed of the work 
of the institution, and of improvement and progress in all 
lines of college activity. There is no charge for subscription, 
ond all persons interested may have their names added to the 
mailing list by addressing a request to the President. 

Sct)olars^lf»5. 

Free tuition for one year is annually offered to that 
member of the Senior class of Carthage High School who 
shall receive the highest average grade in scholarship 
during the year. Miss Grace Kunkel, of Carthage, wag 
the recipient last year. 

A similar scholarship is awarded to that member of the 
Senior class of the Academy whose average for the year is 
the highest. This scholarship was awarded last year to Mr. 
Frank Fleming, of Denver. 

The W. C. T. U. of the county annually purchases a 
scholarship good for one year, which is awarded by a com- 
petitive examination in physiology. 

A scholarship in the Academy is annually awarded to 
that student in the schools of Hancock County who receives 
the highest average grade in the county central examination 
for the year. 

In general, it is the policy of Carthage College to meet all 



18 CARTHAGE COLLEGE 

competition, and young people holding scholarships given by 
other institutions for excellence in scholarship, can usually 
receive the same privilege here. Correspondence along this 
line is invited. 

"Prizes. 

Mr. Leon W. Berry, of the city of Carthage, offers annu- 
ally a gold medal to that regular member of the Freshman 
class who secures the highest average grade in all studies 
pursued during the year. Mr. Lynn O. Welge, of Hillsboro, 
received the medal at the last commencement. 

Mr. Ed Hoch, of the city of Carthage, offers annually a 
gold medal to that member of the Greek class who excels 
in final competitive examination. This medal was last year 
awarded to Miss Ruth Schell, of Polo. 

The Board of Trustees offers a gold medal to that member 
of the Junior class who, under the supervision of the Faculty, 
shall produce the best original oration at the Junior oratori- 
cal entertainment, regard being had for both thought and 
delivery. 

'Jacditii.s for Sclf-lKelp. 

While we cannot promise opportunities for earning sup- 
port to all who may desire it, there are means for helping a 
limited number to defray or to reduce their expenses. A 
portion of the janitor service in the main building and in 
Denhart Hall is being performed by students at present. 
Offices, residences and a few stores in town furnish a number 
of students with employment. A few students are earning 
their way in homes. Several young people are meeting a 
portion of their expenses by table service, while others are 
adding to their income by management of laundry agencies 
among the students and in the community. During the 
coming year a number of young men and young women will 
be needed to render service in the institution, for which 
credit will be given them on their tuition and other expenses. 



GOVERNMENT 19 



All the young ladies from a distance will be expected to 
room and board in Denhart Hall, where comfortable and 
convenient rooms are provided at a very moderate expense. 
The rooms are carpeted and furnished with bedsteads, springs, 
mattress, bureau, washstand, toilet set. chairs, table and 
book shelves, and are heated by steam. Connected with 
each room are two clothes presses. Pillows, pillowslips, 
sheets, spreads and blankets are supplied; hence young 
ladies need bring with them only towels and napkins. 

As the cottage is limited to thirty students, all persons 
desiring to secure their rooms should make application as soon 
as possible, indicating any preferences. Board is furnished 
at $2.50 a week; the charge for inside rooms, furnished, is 50 
cents a week; for corner rooms, 75 cents a week. An addi- 
tional charge of 50 cents a week will be made for students 
rooming alone, provided it is possible to furnish single rooms. 
During the year a number of rooms have been beautified at 
the expense of friends of the College. 

Young men can find comfortable homes near the College 
and good board at reasonable rates — $2.50 to $2.75 per week; 
or they may secure boarding at the regular rates at the 
dining-room of Denhart Hall. 

(Government. 

The government of the institution is vested in the Faculty, 
who administer the discipline and impose such penalties for 
violation of good order as seem to be required. As a rule, 
little more than friendly admonition is required to preserve 
order among the students, and the purpose is to retain only 
such students as may conduct themselves in gentlemanly or 
ladylike manner, giving attention to the work undertaken by 
the school and recognizing the claims of their professors and 
fellow students in all their relations. Should any student be 



20 CARTHAGE COLLEGE 

found unfaithful to his duties or unworthy of the respect of 
his associates, he will be summarily dealt with, both for his 
own good and the general welfare of the institution. Stu- 
dents who have failed to conduct themselves properly in 
other institutions are not wanted in Carthage College. 

A proper care for the health and good name of the young 
ladies is exercised; and, while their privileges are restricted 
to certain hours and days, it will in no way interfere with 
their social pleasures or culture. The aim will be constantly 
to develop a spirit of industry, fidelity, truthfulness and good 
order, while only such restrictions will be imposed upon any 
student as may be required to maintain the authority of the 
Faculty or to advance the best interests of the institution. 

^crms anb Vacations. 

The school year of the three regular departments consists 
of thirty-six weeks, divided into two semesters of equal 
length. There are two vacations — the usual holiday vacation 
lasting about two weeks, and the long summer vacation of 
about thirteen weeks after commencement. By this arrange- 
ment students can pursue their studies through the school 
year, and needy students can make the very best use of the 
long vacation for procuring means of support while at school. 
Students may enter any of the departments at any time, but 
the best results are secured by those who commence at the 
beginning of the year or the beginning of a semester. 

^Expenses. 

The necessary expenses at Carthage College are quite 
low. The regular expenses are here given in detail: 

College tuition, per year, in advance $40 00 

College tuition, per semester, in advance 20 50 

Academy tuition, per semester 15 00 



EXPENSES 21 



Registration fee, for the year 1 00 

(After Registration Day, $2) 

Contingent fee, per semester 1 50 

Library fee, per semester 1 50 

Gymnasium fee, per semester 1 50 

Laboratory fee, Biology, Physics or Mineralogy, per 

semester 2 50 

Laboratory fee, Chemistry, per semester 3 00 

Academy Botany, Physics or Zoology, per semester 1 50 

Academy Chemistry, per semester 2 00 

Room rent in Denhart Hall, per week 50 to 75 

MUSIC. 

Piano, one lesson a week, per semester $18 00 

Piano, two lessons a week, per semester 27 00 

Voice, one lesson a week, per semester 18 00 

Voice, two lessons a week, per semester 27 00 

Chorus, one lesson a week, per year 3 00 

Use of Piano, one hour daily, per year 4 50 

Use of Piano, three hours daily, per year 11 25 

Harmony, one lesson a week, per year 18 00 

Harmony, two lessons a week, per year 27 00 

Harmony (class) one lesson a week, per year 10 50 

Musical History (class) one lesson a week, per year 4 50 

Pipe Organ, per lesson 1 00 

Special Coaching, per lesson , 1 50 

EXPRESSION. 

One lesson a week (private), per semester $13 50 

Two lessons a week (private), per emestesr 22 50 

Classes of three, two lessons a week, per semester 7 50 

Single lessons (private) 75 

No reductions for lessons missed except in case of illness, 
and then only when lessons cannot be made up. 



22 CARTHAGE COLLEGE 



TLegacles. 

It is highly important that all friends of the College 
should interest themselves in increasing the endowment fund 
of the institution as rapidly as possible. To this end much 
service can be rendered by those who have been prospered in 
temporal things by remembering the institution with lega- 
cies. Too often those who could contribute a few hundred 
dollars hesitate because of the comparative smallness of the 
amount, while by their example as well as by the aggregate 
of such contributions, they could materially assist the institu- 
tion to a large permanent fund. Only one professorship has 
thus far been endowed— The David L. Tressler Professorship 
of Mental and Moral Philosophy— to which the heirs of Fred- 
erick William Klemme, Henry Denhart and Andrew Hans 
have each contributed at least $1000. 

In making bequests, care should be taken to use the 
correct and full cAporate title of the College; also to state 
clearly the amount of the bequest, and the special use, if 
any, for which it may be designed. The following general 
form of bequest is recommended : 

"I give, devise and bequeath to Carthage College, 

Carthage, IlHnois, the sum of $ (or if real estate or 

other property, describe accurately), said funds to be held by 
it and applied to the endowment fund of Carthage College 
(or if for any other purpose, state clearly). But in case the 
College should cease to be controlled by the General Synod 
of the Evangelical Lutheran Church in the United States of 
America, or a Synod or Synods belonging thereto, said money 
or proceeds shall revert to the Board of Education of said 
General Synod for the support of some other General Synod 
college in the present Carthage College territory." 



ADMISSION 23 



Requirements for Admission, 

Candidates for admission must present satisfactory testi- 
monials of good moral character; certificates of honorable 
dismissal are required of those vvhocomefrom other colleges. 
The scholarship requirements for admission to the Freshman 
class are based upon four years of secondary school work, 
with four daily recitations. A daily recitation throughout a 
year constitutes a unit of credit. Four years of secondary 
school work, therefore, will constitute sixteen units of credit, 
and sixteen units are required for unconditional admission to 
the Freshman class. These credits are to be offered in 
harmony with the outline of subjects given below, with the 
understanding that the time assigned in every case is simply 
a convenient average and that the work outlined must have 
been completed. 

Students coming from high schools and academies of 
recognized standing are admitted on certificate of scholar- 
ship and character without examination, as far as they have 
pursued the required preparatory studies. Candidates for 
admission without condition to the Freshman class, who are 
unable to offer a sufficient ni:mber of satisfactory credits, 
will be given the opportunity to secure such standing by 
means of written examinations. 

Blank forms of application for admission may be secured 
from the President or Registrar. These should be filled out 
and returned before Registration Day. 

Students will not be admitted to Freshman classification 
with an arrearage of more than two credits. Any deficiency 
must be made up during the Freshman and Sophomore years. 
Standing secured by certificate is only for the first semester, 
that semester being regarded as probationary. The student's 
subsequent rank depends upon the results of his work. 



24 CARTHAGE COLLEGE 

All candidates for admission must ofifer the following 
subjects : 

English 3 units 

History 1 unit 

Mathematics 2% units 

Foreign Language 4 units 

Laboratory Science 1 unit 

And four and one-half units additional, chosen in 
harmony with the College course to be pursued. The follow- 
ing list indicates the subjects that may be offered, together 
with the amount of credit allowed in each: 

Bible_ 2 

Botany y^ to 1 

Chemistry 1 

English 3-4 

German 1-2 

Greek 1-2 

Latin 2-4 

History and Civics 1-3 

Algebra lyi 

Plane Geometry 1 

Solid Geometry y^ 

Astronomy % 

Physics _ 1 

Physiography ^ to 1 

Physiology y^ 

Zoology Yz to 1 

The courses and requirements are shown more in detail 
as follows : 

I. ENGLISH : 

(1) Not less than a three years' course in composition 
and rhetoric, including the study of standard texts, and suf- 
ficient practice in composition to insure a fair degree of pro- 



COURSES AND REQUIREMENTS 25 

ficiency in writing in English. The student is expected to 
be able to give unity and coherence to his ideas, and to con- 
struct correctly the three units of discourse, — the sentence, 
the paragraph, and the essay. This presupposes correctness 
of orthography and grammar, and knowledge of the simpler 
principles of punctuation. 

2. The reading and study of classics recommended 
for uniform college requirements by the Committee of Col- 
lege Entrance Requirementjs in English. This incUules : 

a. The four classics for study and practice selected by 
the Committee. 

b. Ten classics for reading, to be chosen from the six 
groups recommended by the Committee. 

II. FOREIGN LANGUAGE : 

Four units of foreign language are required. This 
must include at least two units of Latin. Those who expect 
to take Latin in the College must present two additional 
units, making in all four units of Latin. 

Latin : 

1. Collar & Daniell's /Vrj/ Latin Book. Latin Gram- 

mar: Allen & Greenough, Harkness or Bennett. 

2. Via Latina, Caesar, four books of the Gallic War. 

3. Cicero ; four orations against Cataline, for Roscius, 

for Archias. 

4. Vergil, ^neid, Books i.-iv., with prosody. 

5. Prose Composition, thirty lessons of Bennett's Latin 

Prose Composition. 

Greek : 

1. White's Beginner s Greek Book. Goodwin's Greek 

Grammar. 

2. Xenophon, Anabasis, four books. 

3. Prose Composition; the equivalent of the first twenty 

lessons of Jones' Greek Prose Composition. 



26 CARTHAGE COLLEGE 

III. MATHEMATICS: 

1. Arithmetic Complete. 

2. Algebra, through Quadratics. Wells' Essentials 

of Algebra^ or equivalent. 

3. Geometry, Plane; Phillips & Fisher, or equivalent. 

4. Geometry, Solid, Phillips & Fisher, or equivalent. 

IV. HISTORY. 

1. United States. Channing's Students'' History of 

the United States, or equivalent. The United 
States History studied in the Public Schools 
below the ninth grade will not be accepted as 
meeting entrance requirements. 

2. Ancient History. Botsford's Ancient History^ or 

its equivalent. 

3. Mediaeval History. Munro's Media^inil History^ 

or its equivalent. 

4. English History. Cheyney's Short History of 

Engl and, or its equivalent. 

V. GERMAN: 

As a test of the student's elementary preparation, 
he should be able to read at sight, and to translate, if 
called upon, a passage of easy dialogue or narrative prose, 
help being given upon unusual words or constructions, to 
put into German short English sentences taken from the 
language of every day life, or based on the text translated, 
and to answer questions on the rudiments of grammar, as 
defined below. 

1. Pronunciation, the memorizing and use of easy collo- 
quial sentences; the rudiments of grammar, inflection of the 
articles, ordinary nouns, adjectives, pronouns, weak verbs, 
and the more usual strong verbs ; the use of the more com- 
mon prepositions ; the simpler uses of modal auxiliaries and 
the elementary rules of syntax and word order; abundant 



REOUIREMEXTS FOR ADMISSION 27 

exercises ; the reading of from seventy-five to one hundred 
pages of graduated texts. 

2. The reading of from one hundred and fifty to two 
hundred pages of literature in the form of easy plays and 
stories ; translation into German of matter based upon works 
read ; continued drill upon rudiments of grammar. 

VI. SCIENCE: 

The preparation must include both text book and 
laboratory work ; and the candidate should submit his note- 
book. It is recommended that an entire year be devoted 
to one Science, except Physiology and Physiography, and 
credit will not be granted for less than one unit of Chemistry 
or Physics. 

1. Elementary Biology (one unit). The requirement 
in Biology may be met by one-half unit in Botany and one- 
half unit in Zoology. It is recommended, however, that the 
entire unit be offered in one of these sciences. In any 
case, laboratory work must constitute an important part of 
the course. 

2. Elementary Chemistry (one unit.) The work 
offered in Chemistry must include recitations and labora- 
tory work for one year. The ground covered should be 
essentially that of the best elementary text books on general 
Chemistry. 

3. Physiography (one-half unit). The course should 
include supplemental work as well as the study of some 
good modern textbook. 

4. Physiology. A study of some standard elementary 
textbook, s^ipplemented by laboratory work. The Physiology 
studied in the Public School below the ninth grade will not 
be accepted as meeting entrance requirements. 

5. Physics. The requirement in Physics is sufficiently 
outlined in any one of several good modern textbooks of 



28 CARTHAGE COLLEGE 

Elementary Physics. Of these Milliken & Gale's "-4 First 
Course in Physics, is preferred. 

T^ivancci StanMng. 

Students who present letters of honorable dismissal 
from other colleges of recognized rank may be admitted to 
advanced standing subject to adjustment. Credit toward 
a college degree will be allowed for work done in college 
preparatory schools and high schools only when upon inves- 
tigation such work is found to be equal in time, quality and 
thoroughness to the same work done in college classes. 

In no case will the baccalaureate degree be granted for 
less than one year of resident work in Carthage College. 

(Tourses of ^restructlon. 

The College Department embraces the usual four years 
of study in the regular classes. 

In order to provide for the proper correlation of subjects 
and for an adequate range of election and adaptation to 
individual needs, the courses offered are arranged in a limited 
number of groups. This arrangement, while practically 
limiting election in the Freshmen and Sophomore years to 
the choice of one of several groups of logically correlated 
subjects, allows a considerable range of free electives in the 
Junior and Senior years. It is not the purpose of this 
arrangement to secure, nor to prevent, early specialization, 
but to control and direct it. It is believed that too close 
specialization in the early years of the course defeats the 
only true end of college training, namely, the attainment of 
such broad and liberal culture as alone can lay the foundation 
for the highest possible success in any calling in life. It is 
not forgotten, however, that students may wish to specialize 
after they have finished their college course. To such the 
group system gives the opportunity of emphasizing their 



GRADUATION 29 



chosen subjects, while to all are secured the manifest ad- 
vantages of proper correlation, and a continuous study of 
the subjects which by common consent are recognized as 
fundamental in any scheme of liberal education. In short, 
the group system aims to combine the advantages of the rigid 
course system with those of the free elective systems, and 
while avoiding in a measure at least the dangers of each to 
maintain a proper balance between educational control on 
the one hand and individual freedom of choice, often uncon- 
sidered, on the other. Each group offers the opportunity of 
a well-rounded, liberal education, while preventing the waste 
and dissipation of energy incident to unlimited election. 

Requirements for (Graduation. 

In all courses the requirement for graduation is 130 college 
credits. A college credit represents one semester hour of 
work — that is, one recitation per week for one semester; two 
hours of laboratory or seminar work counting as one hour of 
recitation. In adjusting the work and standing of students 
with entrance conditions, a four or five-hour academy course 
is counted as a three-hour course in college. 

Classification. 

The class to which a student is assigned depends on the 
number of credits on record in the books of the Registrar at 
the opening of the year. In counting credits the number of 
conditions outstanding against any name will be subtracted 
from the full number of credits. 

Students lacking more than two units of preparatory 
work, as explained in requirements for admission, will be 
classed as academy students. Those meeting the entrance 
requirements with an arrearage of not more than two units 
of credit are ranked as Freshmen. The requirements for 
advanced standing are as follows: Sophomore, a minimum 



30 CARTHAGE COLLEGE 

of 28 college credits; full standing, 36 credits; Junior, a min- 
imum of 60; full standing, 68 credits; Senior, a minimum of 
94; full standing, 102; graduation, a minimum of 130 credits. 

(Tbolce of (Bourses. 

All students entering the College have the privilege of 
choosing, in consultation with the President, their group of 
subjects. A group once fully entered upon must be pursued 
to the end of the Freshman year, unless a change be granted 
by special action of the Faculty. If at the end of the first 
year a new selection is desired, this will be permitted so far 
as the prerequisite requirements in other groups have been 
met. 

No student is permitted to acquire more than eighteen 
college credits per semester except by a special action of 
the Faculty, and no application from a Freshman for more 
than eighteen hours for his first semester will be considered, 
except that a Freshman may be allowed by the Faculty to 
take additional work in order to remove entrance conditions. 
The maximum number of credits that may by Faculty action 
be granted to any student in any year is as follows: 

Freshmen 36, Sophomores 40, Juniors 44. 

Special Students. 

Students who do not desire to pursue a regular course 
of study may pursue a select course, if they are prepared to 
take the work of the regular classes pursuing those branches. 
Such students must take the examinations with the regular 
class, are subject to all rules and regulations of the College, 
and are expected to take sufficient work to occupy their 
time. 

The following representative groups are offered. Other 
combinations will be made to accommodate students who are 



REPRESENTATIVE GROUPS 



31 



preparing for subsequent work in medicine or engineering. 
The degree of Bachelor of Arts is conferred on students who 
have completed the requirements in Group A; the degree of 
Bachelor of Science on those who have completed Group S 
or Group G, and those who complete Group L will be granted 
the degree of Bachelor of Literature: 

REPRESENTATIVE GROUPS. 



GROUP A. 

Ancient Language 32 

English 22 

Philosophy 18 

History 14 

Science 12 

Mathematics 8 

Sacred Literature 6 

Political Economy 6 

Free Electives 12 

GROUP G 

Foreign Language 20 

English _ „ 15 

History 10 

Mathematics 16 

Science 34 

Philosophy 18 

Sacred Literature 6 

Political Economy 6 

Free Electives 4 



GROUP S. 

Foreign Language 24 

English 16 

History „ 14 

Mathematics 16 

Science 28 

Philosophy 18 

Political Economy 6 

Sacred Literature 6 

Free Electives 4 

GROUP L 

Foreign Language 38 

English 22 

History 14 

Science. 12 

Philosophy 18 

Mathematics 8 

Political Economy 6 

Sacred Literature 6 

Free Electives 6 



32 



CARTHAGE COLLEGE 



SYNOPSIS OF COURSES. 



FRESHMAN YEAR. 



GROUP A. 



*, 



Greek I, H or la 4 

Latin I, H „ _ 4 

English I-n 3 

Sacred History 3 

Mathematics I, H 4 



GROUP s. 

Latin I, II 4 

English I, II 3 

Sacred History 3 

Mathematics I, II 4 

Biology 4 



SOPHOMORE YEAR. 



Greek III-V 3 

Latin III-IV 3 

English III-IV 3 

Chemistry la 2 

Biology la 2 

Sacred Literature 2 

History I-III 2 

JUNIOR 

Psychology and Logic 3 

History IV-VI 2 

Latin V-VIII 2 

Archeology and Ethics 3 

English V-VII 3 

Gr£gkVl-VU or German I 3 
Educational Psychology .... 2 

Sociology 1 

French 1 3 



Latin III-IV 3 

English III-IV 3 

History I-III 2 

Chemistry la, lb _ 4 

Sacred Literature 3 

^Mathematics III-IV 4 

YEAR. 

Psychology and Logic 3 

tHistory IV-VI 2 

JLatin V-VII 2 

Archeology and Ethics 3 

German I _ 3 

Physics I-II _.... 4 

Educational Psychology .... 2 

Sociology 1 

English 3 



*In Group S, Greek may be substituted in place of Latin, 
provided the student has had preparatory Latin. 

tSubstitution may be made by consent of Faculty. 



SYNOPSIS OF COURSES 33 



SENIOR YEAR. 

GROUP A. GROUP S. 

Evidences and Pedagogy 3 Evidences and Pedagogy 3 

Economics and Politics IX-X 3 Economics and Politics IX-X 3 

English VIII-XI 2 English VIII-XI 2 

Geology 2 Geology 2 

Philosophy 3 Mineralogy I 1 

Education 3 Philosophy 3 

Biology II 3 Lati7i VIII-X 2 

Physics 4 German II 3 

German II 3 Organic Chemistry 3 

Greek IX-X 2 Analytical Chemistry 3 

Latin VIII-X 2 History VII-VIII 2 

History VII-VIII 2 Astronomy „ 2 

Hebrew or French II 3 

FRESHMAN YEAR. 

GROUP G. GROUP L. 

English I, II 3 English I, II 3 

Sacred History 3 Sacred History 3 

Mathematics I, II 4 Mathematics I, II 4 

Biology 4 German III 3 

German I 3 French I 4 

SOPHOMORE YEAR. 

English III-IV 3 English III-IV 3 

History I-III 2 History I-III 2 

Chemistry I«, \b 4 Chemistry \a 2 

Sacred Literature 3 Biology \a.,_ 2 

Mathematics III-IV 4 Sacred Literature .....3 

German II „ 3 German IV 3 

French 3 



34 CARTHAGE COLLEGE 



JUNIOR YEAR. 

GROUP G. GROUP L. 

Psychology and Logic 3 Psychology and Logic 3 

Physics I-II 4 History IV-VI 2 

Archeology and Ethics 3 English V-VH 3 

Chemistry H 3 Archeology and Ethics 3 

German IH or French 1 3 German V 3 

Educational Psychology 2 French HI 3 

Sociology 2 Educational Psychology 2 

History IV-VI 2 Sociology 2 

English 3 History IV-VI 2 

Spanish 1 3 



SENIOR YEAR. 

Evidences and Pedagogy 3 Evidences and Pedagogy 3 

Economics and Politics IX-X 3 Economics and Politics IX-X 3 

English VIII-XI 2 English VIII-XI 2 

Geology _ 2 Geology 2 

Mineralogy 1 Philosophy 3 

Philosophy ;....3 Education 3 

Education 3 Organic Chemistry 4 

Orgattic Chemistry 4 Eretich IV 3 

German IV 3 Biology 3 

French II 2 Physics I, II 5 

History VII-VIII 2 History VII-VIII 2 

Astronomy 2 Spanish II 2 



DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION 35 



DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION. 



BIBLICAL HISTORY AND LITERATURE. 

DOCTORS HOOVER AND YUTZY. 

I. History. (1) Semitic history. Text, Blaikie. 

(2) Studies in the Life of Jesus. Text, Bosworth. 
Required of Freshmen. 

II. Literature. (1) Bible as Literature. 

(2) Studies in Psalms. Text, McFadyen. 

(3) Biblical Idyls. Text, Moulton. 

(4) Studies in Wisdom Literature. Text, Fowler. 

(5) Leaders in Israel. Text, Robinson. 

III. Archeology. 

(1) Sketches of Jewish Social Life. Text, Edersheim. 

(2) Biblical Archaeology. 

(3) Studies in Old Testament characters. Text, White. 

IV. Principles of Christianity. 

(1) Sacred pedagogy and child study. Text, Weigle, 

(2) Personal work and religious education. 

(3) Studies in prophecy. 

(4) Teachings and principles of Jesus. Text, Bosworth. 

(5) Philosophy of Christianity. (See Philosophy.) 

ETHICS. 

PRESIDENT HOOVER. 

I. Introduction to and principles of Christia:n Ethics. 
Text, Browne. Required of Juniors. 

II. Social Ethics from the Christian standpoint. Text, 
Peabody. Required of Juniors. 



36 CARTHAGE COLLEGE 

PHILOSOPHY. 

PRESIDENT HOOVER. 

I. Introduction. Problems of Philosophy are set forth 
in pre-recitation lectures. These are followed by a compre- 
hensive introduction. Text, Jerusalem. Elective to Seniors. 

II. History. History of Ancient Philosophy. History 
of Mediaeval and Modern Philosophy are carefully studied 
by use of text (Cushman), Source Book (Bakewell) and lec- 
tures. Elective to Seniors. 

III. Problems of Human Life. Text, Euken. Elec- 
tive to Seniors. 

IV. Studies in Humanity. Seminar and lectures. 
Elective to Seniors. 

V. Philosophy of Christianity. An apologetic study 
of the truths of Christianity and Theism. Text, Bowne, 
Speer, Bruce, etc. 

PSYCHOLOGY. 
president hoover. 

I. Introduction AND Principles. This course offers a 
thorough study of the fundamentals of mental phenomena, 
and prepares for a study of advanced and graduate branches 
of psychology. Text book : Murray, References; James, 
Baldwin. Required of all Juniors. 

II. ScciAL. An interesting study of social planes and 
currents. Text, Ross. Reference, McDougall. Required of 
Juniors. 

III. Educational; see Education. Requisite, I and II. 

IV. Elective : Mental Development. Psychology of 
Beauty. Practical Psychology or Animal Psychology. Req- 
uisite I and II. 



LOGIC — EDUCATION 37 

LOGIC. 

PRESIDENT HOOVER. 

A Study of the outlines of logic. An introduction to 
deductive and inductive methods. Required of Juniors. 
Text. Bode. References, Hibben, Taylor, Jones. 

EDUCATION. 

PRESIDENT HOOVER. 

I. Psychological : 

1. Psychological Principles of Education. Text, 
Home. 

2. Psychological Problems of Education. The 
problems of the Teacher, the Pupil and the Process, receive 
attention. Lectures. 

3. Study of Adolescence. Text, Hall's Adolescence. 
Elective to Seniors. 

II. General Course: 

1. History of Education. Text, Monroe. Ref- 
erences, many of the leading authors. 

2. History of Education in the United States. 

Lectures. 

3. Principles of Education. Lectures. Wide reading 
required. Home's Principles and Idealism, De Garmo's 
Interest ajid Education, Compayne's Lectures, and such 
authors as Ruediger, Froebel, and Herbert. 

4. School and Class Management. Theory and 
practice of principal and teachers, and teacher and child, 
administration and hygiene, receive attention. Text: 
Arnold. Reference, Bagley, Dutton and Tompkins. Elec- 
tive to Seniors. 



38 CARTHAGE COLLEGE 



HISTORY AND THE SOCIAL SCIENXES. 

PROFESSOR CARPENTER. 

The Department includes History, Politics, Economy 
and .Sociology. 

COURSES. 

I. History of Western Europe, from the begin- 
ning of the Middle Ages, 476 A. D. to 1453. Rapid review; 
three hours first semester. Required of Sophomores in all 
courses. 

II. Philosophy of History. Text, Adams' Civili- 
zation During the Middle Ages. Three hours second 
semester. For Sophomores. 

III. The Reformation and Religious Wars. Text- 
book and lectures. For Sophomores following course II. 
Three hours. 

IV. Modern History. History of the social, industrial 
and constitutional development of modern Europe. Two 
hours first semester. For Juniors. 

V. English Constitutional History. Two hours, 
following course IV. For Juniors. 

VI. The American Con.stitution. For Juniors. Two 
hours, following course V. 

VII. The History of Modern Diplomacy. Critical 
study of the careers of Metternich, Bismark, Cavour, and 
others, followed by a course of lectures on methods of 
teaching history. Two hours throughout the year. Elective 
for Seniors. 

VIII. Recent History. The United States and the 
Diplomatic problems of the day. Two hours second semester. 
Elective for Seniors. 

IX. Economics. Textbook. Lectures and Seminar. 
Three hours first semester. For Seniors. 



DEPARTMENT OF ENGLISH 39 

X. Political Science. Comparative study of the pol- 
litical systems of the United States and the leading European 
nations, with study of political parties and problems in the 
United States. Three hours second semester. For seniors. 

XL Sociology. A study of the principles and problems 
of society. Textbook and seminar. Two hours second 
semester. Elective for Seniors. 

ENGLISH LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE. 

PROFESSOR CARPENTER. 

Study of the development and correct use of the English 
Language and Literature. 

COURSES. 

I. Etymology and Composition. A study of the his- 
tory and etymology of the language, followed by study and 
practice of the various forms of discourse. Readings and 
essays. Required of Freshmen in all courses. Two hours 
throughout the year. 

II. History of English Literature. A study of the 
successive periods in the development of English Literature 
and representative authors of each period. One hour per 
week throughout the year. Required of freshmen in all 
courses. 

III. Advanced Rhetoric. A thorough analysis of the 
principles of spoken and written discourse, followed by a 
study of literary criticism. Textbooks, readings and terra 
essays. Two hours per week throughout the year. Required 
of Sophomores in all courses. 

IV. History of American Literature. Historical 
sketch of the development of our American literature, with 
detailed study of representative authors. Text, essays 



40 CARTHAGE COLLEGE 

iind criticisms. One hour per week throughout the year. 
Required of Sophomores in all courses. 

V. Anglo-Saxon. A study of the grammar and syntax 
of Old English, followed by the reading of selections in prose 
and verse. Three hours per week for the first semester. 
Required of Juniors in courses A and L. Elective for others. 

VL Middle English. Grammar and Syntax of Middle 
English, followed by comparative, critical and philological 
study of Langland's Piers the Plowman, and the works of 
Chaucer, including I'he Prologue and selections from The 
Canterbury Tales. Three hours per week during second 
semester. Prerequisite: course V. 

Vn. Spenser. Detailed and critical study of the life, 
times and works of Edmund Spenser. Three hours per week 
following course VI. For Juniors. Prerequisite: courses 
V. and VL 

VIII. Shakespeare. Critical and literary study of the 
life, times and plays of Shakespeare, followed by rapid read- 
ing of a number of plays. Required of Seniors in all courses. 
Two hours first semester. 

IX. The Puritan Age. A careful study of the char- 
acteristics of the age which produced John Milton, with 
critical study of portions of Paradise Lost. Two hours per 
week for six weeks, following course VIII. For Seniors in 
all courses. Elective for the class instead of course X. 

X. The Victorian Authors. Studies in the produc- 
tions of the poets and prose writers of the later period 
of English Literature, including Browning and Tennyson, 
Carlyle, Ruskin, Arnold and Newman. Two hours second 
semester; following course IX. For Seniors in all courses. 



DEPARTMENT OF GREEK 41 



GREEK LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE. 

PROFESSOR VAN GUNDY. 

la. Elementary Course. The purpose of this course 
is to furnish to mature students, who have never studied 
Greek, an opportunity to begin this subject in college. The 
rate of progress is rapid. At the end of the year the student 
should be able to read Attic Greek with facility, in order 
the following year to pursue courses I and IL This course 
is recommended to students who are looking forward to 
the study of theology or literature, and also to students of 
science, in connection with the use of Greek in scientific 
nomenclature. Full credit is given for this course. Five 
hours a week. 

L Lysias. The course in Lysias embraces the eight 
orations given in Morgan's Lysias. Twenty lessons in Greek 
prose. Required of Classical Freshmen first half year. Four 
hours a week. 

IL Homer, ///t^^/, Books I-VI . Special attention given 
to Greek prosody and the dialectic peculiarities of Homer. 
Study of the Homeric question. Required of classical 
Freshmen second half year. Four hours a week. 

III. Plato, Apology and Crito. Study of Socrates as 
a public teacher. 

IV. Sophocles, Electra. 

V. Euripides, Medea. In connection with this and the 
preceding courses, the class will make a study of Dramatic 
Literature and the Greek stage. Considerable attention will 
be giv.en to the prosody of the dialogue and choral odes. 
Courses III, IV and V are required of classical Sophomores, 
four hours a week. 

VI. Demosthenes, <9«^///<? Crtfww. Study of the public 
life of the Greeks. 



42 CARTHAGE COLLEGE 



Vn. Thucydides, Book VII, with studies in Greek 
History. 

VIII. Aristophanes, Clouds. Courses VI, VII, VIII, 
are elective. Open to Juniors and Seniors. Three hours 
a week. 

IX. Justin Martyr, Apology Major. 

X. Nbw Testament. Winter Term. Courses IX and 
X are elective. Open to Juniors and Seniors. Two hours 
a week. 



LATIN LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE. 

PROFESSOR VAN GUNDY 

I. Cicero's De Sertecittte and Be Amicitia are read. 
Sight reading- is required frequently. Required of Classical 
Freshmen and Scientific Freshmen in Group S. Four hours 
a week first half year. 

II. Livv. Books I. and XI. Sight reading continued. 
One hour a week is devoted to the study of Roman Litera- 
ture (Prof. Wilkins' Primer). Required of Classical and 
Scientific Freshmen of Group S. Four hours a week second 
half-year. 

III. Horace. Odes. Books I and II, with the Epodes 
and selected Satires and Epistles. Review of Prosody and 
study of Horatian metres. Scansion of entire text read. The 
pupil is required to memorize several odes assigned by the 
instructor. Roman Mythology, one hour a week. Required 
of Sophomores in Groups A and S. Three hours a week. 

IV. Pliny, Selected Letters; or Ouintilian, Institutes, 
Books X. and XI. Preston and Dodge's Pri7>ate Life of 



DEPARTMENT OF LATIN 43 

the Romans. Three hours a week. Required of Sophomores 
in Groups A and S. 

V. Juvenal and Perseus. Study of Roman life under 
the Caesars. 

VI. Tacitus. Ger mania and Agricola. Study of the 
colonial policy of Rome. 

VII. Cicero. Tusculan Disputations. This work will 
be read in large installments, and some time will be given 
to the discussion of the subject matter of the dialogue under 
consideration. Courses V and VI may be changed and other 
texts substituted after conference with students who purpose 
taking these courses. Along with courses V, VI and VII, 
the class will make a rapid survey of Roman Literature and 
an extensive study of Cicero, his Public Life and Literary 
Work. The library facilities are ample for special studies 
in classical subjects. Required of Classical Juniors and 
elective for Scientific students. Two hours a week. 

VIII. Suetonius. Lives of the Ctesars, Julius. Ati- 
gustus, Tilwrii/s. Two hours a week. 

IX. Tacitus. Dialogus de Oratoribus. Two hours a 
week. 

X. Lucretius, De Naitira Reruin; or some one or more 
of the philosophical works of Cicero. Two hours a week. 

Courses VIII, IX and X are elective, and are subject to 
change to suit the requirements of the class. If the members 
of the class desire to prepare for teaching Latin, a course 
may be given in the method of presenting preparatory 
Latin, and in advanced Latin prose, with systematic study 
of the grammar. 



44 CARTHAGE COLLEGE 



GERMAN LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE. 

PROFESSOR SUNDSTROM. 

In the instruction in this department, three objects are 
kept constantly in view : 

First — To give a practical reading knowledge of German, 
so that students preparing for professional careers, in teach- 
ing, literature, theology, law, medicine, science, etc., may 
be prepared to read and understand such foreign books as 
may be required in their respective curricula. Sight reading 
forms a part of the course. 

Second — To introduce the student to the best German 
literature, both classic and modern, and develop in him a 
proper conception of its value, and an appreciation of the 
German idiom. The author of each selection is studied. 
Original papers are prepared on the subject matter read. 
Songs and lyrics are memorized. 

Third — To help the student acquire the ability to speak 
the language. Questions and answers in German and original 
reproductions of the story form a part of almost every reci- 
tation, the object being so to implant the fundamental 
principles of the language that when the opportunity comes 
to use it in daily speech the task will be simple. 

The following courses are offered : 

I. Elementary Course. Four recitations a week 
throughout the year. The time is devoted to the acquisition 
of a correct pronunciation, mastery of inflectional forms, the 
ability to write German script, and the principles of sentence 
structure in German. Short poems are memorized and 
German songs taught. 

Textbooks : Bacon's A Neat' German Course is made 
the principal text for the year, and with strong classes an 



DEPARTMENT OF GERMAN. 45 

;asy text may follow. Required of Freshmen in courses 
J and L who have not offered German for admission ; also 
jpen to students in courses A and S. 

II. Intermediate Course. Four recitations a week 
hroughout the year. Students are taug-ht to read and 
ranslate moderately difficult prose and poetry, and devote 
rom one to two hours each week to prose composition, 
rhroughout the course much attention is paid to practice in 
;onversation. 

Textbooks: The grammar is reviewed together with com- 
position exercises. Krons' Daily German Life; IVi/koiinncn 
n Deutschland; Stern's Geschichten von Rhein; Eichen- 
lorff's TaKgenichts; Goethe's Nerman and DorotJiea; Karl 
Heinrich, by Meyer; Schiller's Wilhelm Tell\ Foque's 
Undine ; Hillern's Hoher als die Kirche. Texts vary. 

Required of Sophomores in courses G. and L. who have 
aken only course I ; open to students in courses A and S 
vho have had one year of German. 

HI. Advanced Course. Three recitations a week 
hroughout the year. At the end of the course the student 
;hould be able to read, after brief inspection, any selection 
)f German literature of the last one hundred and fifty years 
vhich is free from unusual textual difficulties, as well as to 
>ut into German a passage of simple English prose, and to 
mswer, in German, questions relating to the lives and works 
)f the great writers studied. 

Suitable reading matter : Bernhardt, German Compo- 
ition; Scheffel's Der Trompeter von Saekkingen; Freytag, 
Soil und Haben; Lessing, Minna von Barnhelm. During 
,he past year Fossler's Practical German Conversation was 
;tudied once a week. 

Required in course L; open to students in course G v/ho 
lave had two years of German, 



46 CARTHAGE COLLEGE 

IV Classical Course. Three recitations a week 
throughout the year. Introduction to the historj' of German 
Literature. Practice in speaking in German. Short independ- 
ent themes upon some assigned topics. Scientific German. 

Keller's Bildcr aiis der Deutschen Littcratur, Schiller's 
principal works, Goethe's representative works; Sudermann's 
Frau Sorge; Hauptmann's Die Weber. 

Required of students in course L. 

V. Conversation and Advanced Composition. Prac- 
tice in translating English or American prose, partly at 
sight ; conversation in German on German life and institu- 
tions. Essays. The course will be planned to suit the 
needs of the class. 

VI. International Correspondence. Students 
desiring it are given an opportunity to carry on, under direc- 
tion, correspondence with students in German institutions. 

FRENCH LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE. 
professor sundstrom. 

The two courses are designed to impart to the student 
the ability to read and appreciate critically modern and 
classical French. Practice in French conversation is also 
given, and Kroeh's How to Think in French is studied in 
class, 

I. Elementary Course. Four recitations a week 
throughout the year. At the end of the course the student 
should be able to pronounce French accurately, to read at 
sight easy French prose, to put into French simple English 
sentences taken from the language of everyday life, and to 
answer questions on the rudiments of the grammar. 

Textbooks : Chardenal's Complete French Course, Fon- 



DEPARTMENT OF FRENCH 47 

taine's Doicze Conies Noin'eaux, Super's French Reader, 
Verne's Vingt Mille Lieues sous les ilfers, Guerber's La 
Main Afalheueruse, Dumas' Les Trots Mousquetaires, or 
other texts. 

Required in courses G and L ; elective in courses A. 
and S. 

II. Advanced Course. Three recitations a week 
throughout the year. At the end of the advanced course 
the student should be able to read at sight, with the help of 
a vocabulary, difficult French at any period not earlier than 
the seventeenth century, and to put into French a passage 
of easy English prose. Systematic practice in irregular 
verbs. Writing from dictation. 

Suitable reading : Moliere's Le Gentilhomnie, Victor 
Hugo's Les Miserables, Halvey's L Abbe Constantin, and 
other suitable texts. 

Composition and conversation exercises with grammar 
review. 

Required in course L; open to all students who have had 
one year of French. 

III. Advanced Grammar and Composition. History of 
French Literature. Reading of classics and recent authors. 
Conversation. Required of students in course L ; elective 
to students in course G. 

IV. Original Composition and continued grammar 
study. Old French literature in original forms, such as 
La Chanson de Roland and Aucassin et Nicolette. Modern 
literature. Phonology and Morphology. Required of 
Seniors in Literary course. 



48 CARTHAGE COLLEGE 

SPANISH LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE. 

PROFESSOR SUNDSTROM. 

Realizing the growing importance of the Spanish 
language as a purely practical study, and the cultural value 
of its distinctly characteristic literature, the following two 
courses are offered : 

I. Elementary Course. Grammar and composition, 
with Hill and Ford's A Spanish Grammar as text. A 
suitable introductory reader and Cuentos Casfe/lanos, fol- 
lowed by easy texts. Required of Juniors in course L. 

II. Advanced Course. Composition and conversation, 
with Ybarra's Metodo Practico as text. Reading of suitable 
selections from modern and mediaeval Spanish literature, 
such as Padre Isla's Gil Blas^ Galdos' Mariancla^ Valdes' 
Jose, Cervantes' Don Quixote, and others. Open to Seniors 
in course L. 

MATHEMATICS. 

PROFESSOR HORNER. 

I. Algebra. This course will include a study of gen- 
eral methods of factoring, the general quadratics, progres- 
sions, permutations, combination, binomial theorem, partial 
fractions, surds, determinants and elements of the theory 
of equations. Required of Freshmen in all courses. First 
semester, four hours a week. 

II. Trigonometry. Plane and Spherical, Required of 
Freshmen in all courses. Second semester, four hours a week, 

III. Analytic Geometry. Plane. Required of Sopho- 
mores taking groups S and G. First semester, four hours 
a week. 



PHYSICS AND ASTRONOMY 49 

IV. Calculus. An elementary course in differential 
and integral calculus, including geometrical and physical 
applications. Required of Sophomores taking groups G 
and S. 

Second semester. Four hours a week. 

V. Advanced Coursks. Students desiring advanced 
courses in Mathematics may arrange to take courses in the 
Theory of Equations, Advanced Differential and Integral 
Calculus, Differential Equations, etc. 

PHYSICS AND ASTRONOMY. 

PROFESSOR HORNER. 

I. General Physics. First semester, Mechanics and 
Heat. Second semester, Electricity, Magnetism, Sound and 
Light, Lectures and recitations. Hastings and Beach's 
General Physics is the text used. Required of all Juniors 
in groups S, G and L. Elective in group A. 

First and second semester. Four hours a week. 

II. Laboratory Practice. A laboratory course to 
accompany Physics I. The experiments will be selected 
from a manual of experiments in physics by Ames and Bliss. 
Requirements the same as Physics I. 

First and second semester. Two periods of two hours 
each a week. 

III. Descriptive Astronomy. A study of the funda- 
mental facts and laws of astronomy and of the methods and 
instruments of modern astronomical research. The treat- 
ment is non-mathematical. Open to Juniors and Seniors 
in groups S and G. 

First and second semester. Two hours a week. 



50 CARTHAGE COLLEGE 



CHEMISTRY. 

PROFESSOR HILL. 

la. General Inorganic Chemistrv. Descriptive and 
Theoretical. Experimental lectures and recitations. Two 
hours throughout the year. Required of all students. 

li. General Inorganic Chemistry. Laboratory 
course. Accompanies course l(t, and is required of all stu- 
dents in the Scientific groups. Four hours. 

These courses are based upon Dr. Alexander Smith's 
General Chemistry for Colleges, and Smith and Hale's 
A Laboratory Outline of General Chemistry. 

II. Qualitative Analysis. This course includes lec- 
tures, recitations and laboratory practice in the general 
methods and processes of qualitative analytical chemistry. 
Five hours. First semester. Open to students who have 
completed courses la and I^; required in group G. 

III. Quantitative Analysis. A study of the stan- 
dard gravimetric and volumetric methods of analytical 
chemistry. Lectures, recitations and laboratory work. Five 
hours. Second semester. Prerequisites, courses la, \b 
and II. Required in group G. 

IV. Organic Chemistry. A study of the characteris- 
tics of typical and simple organic compounds, followed by 
a consideration of the classification and most important 
classes of the derivatives of carbon. Lectures and recita- 
tions ; laboratory practice in organic synthesis and analysis. 
Three hours. Prerequisites, courses la and I^. 



BIOLOGY — GEOLOGY. 51 



BIOLOGY. 

PROFESSOR HILL. 

la. General Biology. A general introduction to the 
subject through a broad, comprehensive study of living 
things. Emphasis is laid on the general facts of morphology 
and physiology as illustrated by the thorough study of a few 
types, rather than upon the minutiae of classification. As 
far as possible in an elementary course, the problems of 
theoretical biology are stated and discussed. Lectures and 
recitations. Two hours throughout the year. Required in 
all groups. 

Id. General Biology. Laboratory course. Accompa- 
nies course la. Four hours throughout the year. Required 
in groups S and G. 

II. Advanced Physiology and Vertebrate 
Histology. Three hours. Prerequisites, Biology la and 
Id, and Chemistry la. 

GEOLOGY. 
professor hill. 

la. Structural and Dynamic Geology. Textbook, 
Chamberlin and Salisbury's College Geology. Two hours. 
First semester. Required in all groups. 

lb. Historical Geology and Paleontology. A study 
of the history of the earth with special reference to the 
development of the North American continent, and the evo- 
lution of life as revealed in the order and sequence of fossils. 
Two hours. Second semester. Required in all groups. 

II. Mineralogy. Descriptive and determinative Min- 
eralogy and Petrology. Accompanies courses la and lb, 
and required in group G. 



52 CARTHAGE COLLEGE 



GRADUATE COURSES. 



The College gives opportunity to its own graduates and 
those of other institutions to do graduate work. Under the 
direction of the Faculty, courses will be outlined leading to 
the degrees of A. M. and M. S. 

At present the College does not undertake to give class- 
room instruction in the subjects leading to advanced degrees. 
It offers to direct the study of the applicant, to conduct the 
examinations, and to confer the appropriate degree upon 
such as complete creditably the prescribed course and submit 
an approved thesis. 

Full work for the Master's degree comprises the sat- 
isfactory completion of three graduate cotirses, not more 
than two of which shall be in any one department. The 
time for the completing of the course is not limited, but 
the candidate will be required to make stated reports of 
his progress, and is expected to pursue sustained and sys- 
tematic study. Under no circumstances will a degree be 
conferred for less than full two years of non: resident work. 
Final examinations must in all cases be conducted at the 
College ; others may be arranged for elsewhere at the ex- 
pense of the candidate. 

The fees charged are: For matriculation, $5.00; exami- 
nation, $10.00; diploma, $5.00. 

For further information, address the President. 



ACADEMIC DEPARTMENT 53 



THE ACADEMY. 



FACULTY OF THE ACADEMY. 



REV. H. D. HOOVER, A.M., Ph.D., 
President of the College and Instructor in the Bible. 

REV. W. K. HILL, A. M., Sc. D., 
Insirtictor in Chemistry and Biology. 

JUSTIN L. VAN GUNDY, A. M., Ph. D., 
Instructor in Greek. 

CARL O. SUNDSTROM, A. B., 
Instructor in German. 

HARRY L. HORNER, A. M., 
Instructor in Mathematics and Physics. 

REV. JACOB YUTZY, A.M., D. D., 
Instructor in Greek and Biblical History, 

EMMA J. BELL, B. S., 
Instrtictor in English and History. 

ERMA RAND, A. B., 
KInstructor iji Latin. 

J. ARTHUR BAIRD, A. B., 
Instructor in History. 

ORLO D. SLATER, 
Assistant in Mathematics. 



54 CARTHAGE COLLEGE 



WORK OF THE ACADEMY 



The Academy is under the immediate direction of the 
Faculty of the College. This direction is controlled by a 
two-fold purpose. In the first place, the design is to offer 
preparation for College, which will be sufficient in quality 
and quantity to admit a student to any college or university. 
In the second place the work of the Academy is designed 
to furnish for young men and women who may be denied 
the advantage of a college course, as much training and 
culture as is possible in four years of secondary school 
work, under the most favorable conditions of atmosphere 
and environment. 

Sixteen units of credit are required for graduation. A 
unit is the amount of work involved in five (or four) recita- 
tions each week for an entire year. Each student in the 
Academy is expected to pursue regularly not more than five 
subjects, one of which shall be Bible study (two hours), in 
all aggregating not more than twenty recitation periods per 
week. Deviation from this arrangement can be made only 
with the approval of the Faculty. Ordinarily four years 
will be necessary to secure the required sixteen units of 
credit; nevertheless, students of maturity of mind and in 
good health may be able to meet the requirements in less 
time, and will be given every opportunity to do .so. 

The subjects required of students preparing for subse- 
quent work in college are indicated under college entrance 
requirements on page 23. 

Students who desire to take a general course in the 
Academy without preparing for College will be permitted to 



ACADEMIC COURSES OF STUDY 55 

enter any classes for which their previous training fits them, 
provided the studies selected do not conflict on the schedule 
of recitations. 

Students who have finished the eighth year work in the 
public schools of the county and schools of similar grade, 
will be prepared to enter the first-year class of the Academy, 

Diplomas will be granted to all students who have com- 
pleted any one of the regular courses of the Academy. 

The graduates of our Academy are entitled to admission 
on certificate to any of the institutions having membership 
in the North Central Association of Universities and Col- 
leges. This association is composed of all the leading 
universities and colleges of the north central states, includ- 
ing Ohio on the east and Kansas and Colorado on the 
south and west. 

COURSES OF STUDY. 
FIRST YEAR. 

English D. Grammar and Composition. English Classics, 

History D. Greek History, first semester. Roman His- 
tory, second semester. 

Mathematics D. Algebra. 

Latin D. Beginning Latin. 

Science D. Physical Geography, first semester. Physi- 
ology, second semester. 

Bible D. Life and Works of Jesus; Murray. Bible Geo^ 
graphy, or Outline by Dr. Yutzy. 

SECOND YEAR. 

English C. Practical Rhetoric and Composition. English 

Classics, college requirements. 
Mathematics C. Geometry, Plane. 
History C. Mediaeval History, first semester. English 

History, second semester, 



56 CARTHAGE COLLEGE 

Latin C. Caesar. Latin Prose. 

Science C. Zoology, or Botany. 

Bible C. Life of Paul; Leacock, Bible Biography. 

THIRD YEAR, 

English B. Practical Rhetoric and Composition. English 
Classics, college requirements. 

History B. United States History. Civics. 

Latin B. Cicero. Latin Prose. 

Greek B. Beginning Greek. 

Science B. Chemistry. 

German B. Beginning German. See German I. in Col- 
lege Courses. 

Bible B. Men of the Old Testament ; Willman. Bible 
Teachings. 

FOURTH year- 
English A. Practical Rhetoric and Composition. 
Mathematics A. Algebra, first semester. Geometry, 

Solid, or Astronomy, second semester. 
Science A. Physics. 

Latin A. Vergil. Prosody and Mythology. 
Greek A. Xenophon's Anabasis. 
German A. See German \l. in College Courses. 
Bible A. Studies in Letters of Paul. Bible Literature. 



BIBLE TRAINING 57 



BIBLE TRAINING DEPARTMENT. 



UPON THE JOHN C. MARTIN FOUNDATION. 



This department was brought into existence by the gen- 
erosity of Mr. John C. Martin of New York City, and aims 
to meet a genuine need of the young people of today. 

The Bible has had a tremendous influence upon the 
literature, education, and civilization of mankind. One who 
would thoroughly understand history must have a more or 
less complete knowledge of the .Scriptures. Bible study is 
receiving greater attention today than ever before. Many 
eminent scholars have devoted their lives to the study and 
teaching of its truths. In harmony with this new interest 
in the great source Book, and in answer to the needs of the 
age, Carthage College offers a strong course of instruction 
of instruction in Biblical History, Literature, Philosophy, 
Ethics, Archaeology, and Pedagogy. The textbooks have 
been prepared bj' experts in this country and abroad, and 
are used in the best schools of the land. 

For detailed information, see description under Biblical 
History and Literature, page 34; and also an outline of 
academy studies, pages 55 and 56. For complete informa- 
tion, address the President. 



58 CARTHAGE COLLEGE 



SPECIAL COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 



MUSIC. 



VOICE. 

MISS DAVIDSON. 

This department will retain all that has proved merito- 
rious in the teaching methods of the past, and keep in 
touch with and utilize the best in modern methods. It is 
the aim of this department to develop the musical tastes 
and capabilities of each pupil. 

The following course is open to those who are capable 
of acceptably doing the work. It is not necessarj' that 
the pupil should be highly gifted musically, but he should 
have a natural love for music, a fair degree of health, a 
correct ear, and freedom from any abnormal condition of 
the vocal organs. 

No definite length of time can be specified for the com- 
pleting of this course, as the voices of some will develop 
more rapidly than others, and as some will more readily 
accomplish the work than others. As a rule no one should 
hope to graduate from this department under twenty years 
of age, as a young, undeveloped voice is incapable of doing 
the work prescribed in the latter part of the course. 

FIRST YEAR. 

Breathing, tone production, voice placing. Exercises for 
tone development and flexibility. Sight reading, enunciation, 
artistic interpretation and expression. Marzo's The Art of 
Vocalizatio7i. Songs by Ries, Lassen, Greig and Franz. 
Easy songs by the best American and other composers. 



VOICE CULTURE 59 



SECOND YEAR. 

Continued exercises for flexibility and tone development 
The Art of Vocaltsaiion. Songs by Rubinstein, Liszt, 
Mendelssohn, Schumann, Schubert, and leading composers 
of other schools of music. Some coloratura songs. 

THIRD YEAR. 

Arias from Italian operas to take the place of vocalizes. 
Songs by standard composers of the various schools, includ- 
ing Schumann, Schubert, Brahms, Von Fielitz, Hugo Wolf, 
Richard Strauss, Debussy and D'Indy. Selections from 
oratorios and German operas. 

£S FOURTH YEAR. 

Continued study of classic songs by the great composers. 
Further selections from oratorios and operas, including a 
more comprehensive study of the Wagner operas. Broader 
and more advanced work in interpretation and expression. 

GRADUATION. 

Candidates for graduation must have a general education 
equal at least to a high school course, must have had one 
year of German, French, Harmony, and History of Music, 
and must have completed the second grade in piano. 

Candidates must also have undoubted musical taste and 
ability, must be able to sing at sight, be able to interpret 
and render songs artistically, and are required to give at 
least one creditable recital. 

CHORAL SINGING. 

Work along this line will consist of note reading and the 
study of choruses from the simplest four-voiced song forms 
to the great choruses from the oratorios and operas. The 
class is open to all who have sufficient musical knowledge 
to do the work. 



60 CARTHAGE COLLEGE 



PIANO DEPARTMENT. 

MISS KOCH. 

It is the aim of this department to give to those w 
come under its supervision the best musical education pos 
ble, and to awaken aspirations for the highest ideals in i 
and everyday life as well. To do this, pupils are advised 
take as much of the theoretical work as possible in additi^ 
to the work in piano. In order to stimulate greater intere: 
pupils are urged to make use of every opportunity to he 
good music, and to keep in touch with the happenings of t 
musical world. To further broaden their ability to interpr( 
pupils are urged to avail themselves of their opportuniti 
and take courses in other departments as they have time f 
them. The following course of study is not rigidly followe 
but selections are made as the need and individuality of t 
pupil require, as it is the aim of the department to devel 
well-rounded musicians, capable of expressing iudividv 
ideas in the interpretation of the compositions studie 
Mere mechanical skill will therefore not suffice. Such sl^ 
is simply a means in interpretation. 

ELEMENTARY. 

Fundamental principles of technique and phrasing, at 
their application in such compositions as the foUowinj 
Mrs. Crosby Adams' First Lessons at the Piano; Tchi 
kowsky's Album for the Young, Schumann's Albuin J 
the Young, Bach's Tivo Part Inventions, Heller's Prelua 
and Etudes, Reinecke's Sonatas. 

INTERMEDIATE. 

Further work in technicjue, and such compositions as t 
following: Mozart's Sonatas, Haydn's Sonatas, some of t 
easier Beethoven Sonatas, Bach's Three Part Inventiot 
MacDowell's Woodland Sketches and Sea Pieces, Schuberl 



PIANO DEPARTMENT 61 

'nents Mtisicaux and Iinp7-omptus, Mendelssohn's Songs 
hout IVords, Chopin's Nocturnes, Waltzes and Mazur- 
, Liszt's Licbestraum, etc. 

ADVANCED. 
Further work in technique, and such compositions as the 
)wing : Grieg's Sonata and Ballade, Brahm's Sonata 
Intermezzos, Beethoven's Sonatas, Schumann Sonata 
Etudes Symphonic, Chopin's Etudes, Scherzos and Bal- 
'■s, Liszt's Etudes and Concertos, Saint Saen's Concerto, 
lenstein's Concerto, etc. 

EQUIPMENT. 

There are in the piano teacher's studio, which is situated 
he main building, two pianos, an upright and a grand, 
a clavier. A Mason & Hamlin grand piano is kept at 
Trinity Lutheran Church, where all recitals are held, for 
tal use only. Several practice rooms are available for 
;e who desire to practice at the college. 

ENSEMBLE CLASS. 

To develop the pupils in ability to read at sight and in 
iracy of rhythm, ensemble work is given once a week, 
extra charge is made, and the work is open to all capable 
loing it. Compositions which can be arranged for two 
los, but not readily adapted for solo work, such as the 
rak A^ew World Symphony, are used. 

TECHNIQUE. 

Special work in technique will be given either in classes 
rivately. Different technical forms will be studied, fol- 
;d by a study of the Chopin, Schumann and Liszt Etudes 
m from a technical standpoint. 

NORMAL TRAINING. 

This work is open only to those whom the teacher con- 
rs ready for such a course. The pupil must be taking 



62 CARTHAGE COLLEGE 

other work in the department and be far enough advanced 
to understand the subject matter which will be discussed. 
A study of the muscles of the arm and hand, their functions 
and the means of developing them, will be taken up. A 
review of the different kinds of technique and their uses 
will be made, also a review of the rules and principles of 
phrasing, interpretation, rhythm and reading. The matter 
of selecting pieces suitable for different types of individuals 
and their needs, will be thoroughly discussed. The lectures 
will be practically illustrated by actually teaching in the 
presence of the class. Teaching work will be assigned each 
member, and the result criticised before the class. 

RECITALS. 

Frequent recitals are given by the pupils capable of 
taking part, so as to accustom them to playing in public and 
that all may become familiar with the various compositions 
being studied. Numerous recitals are also given by the 
faculty of the music department. Other opportunities for 
hearing good music are offered by the college organizations, 
such as the Boys' Glee Club, the Girls' Glee Club, Choral 
Society; and the Y. M. and Y. W. C. A., who furnish several 
musical numbers in their annual lecture course. 

The requirements for completing a course, are a year's 
work in the history of music, two years of harmony and an 
amount of work in piano deemed satisfactory to the in- 
structors, the length of time depending upon the ability 
and industry of the pupil. 

ORGAN. 

Those' intending to take work in pipe organ playing, are 
urged to supplement it with work on the piano and in the 
theory of music, when possible. The fundamental princi- 
ples of technique, both manual and pedal, rhythm, sight 
reading and phrasing are taught. Especial attention is 



ORGAN— HARMONY WORK. 63 

paid to interpretation and registration. Such works as 
Lemmen's Organ School, Mendelssohn's Organ Sonatas, 
Bach's Fugues, Guilmant's Practical Organist, Dubois' 
Toccata, are used. 

HARMONY. 

Two years will be required satisfactorily to complete 
the course in harmony. The work may be taken privately 
or in classes, either once or twice a week. Foote and 
Spaulding's Hartnony will be used as a text. The work 
will include study in ear training in connection with the 
other requirements. Especial attention is given to original 
composition. 

HISTORY. 

The course in the history of music is intended to cover 
a year's work. Untersteiner's History of Music will be 
used as a text, supplemented by outside reading. 

RULES AND REGULATIONS. 

Instructors are not required to make up lessons lost 
through the absence of a pupil. 

No deductions will be made for omitted lessons except 
in case of protracted illness. 

Special vocal coaching for work outside the course will 
be given only to advanced pupils, and then on the condition 
that it does not interfere with the regular work. 

Two years of ensemble work are required of graduates 
in the piano department. 

All pupils are required to take part in pupils' recitals, 
which will be given from time to time during the year. 

A statement of the work done by the pupil will be given 
if so desired. 



64 CARTHAGE COLLEGE 



TERMS IN MUSIC DEPARTMENT. 

Piano, one lesson a week, per semester $IS 00 

Piano, two lessons a week, per semester 27 00 

Voice, one lesson a week, per semester 18 00 

Voice, two lessons a week, per semester 27 00 

Chorus, one lesson a week, per year 3 00 

Use of piano, one hour daily, per year 4 50 

Use of piano, three hours dailv; per year 11 25 

Harmony, one lesson a week, per year 18 00 

Harmony, two lessons a week, per year 27 00 

Harmony, class, one lesson a week, per year 10 50 

Musical History, class, one lesson a week, per year, 4 50 

Pipe Organ, per lesson 1 00 

Special coaching, per lesson 1 50 



EXPREvSSION. 

MISS HOUSER. 

It is the aim of this department to develop speakers whose 
style shall be simple and natural, and, when occasion requires, 
forceful. The great end is to develop the entire man, then 
teach him to think and feel while on his feet before an audi- 
ence, and to express those thoughts and emotions through 
his own individuality. The speaker is educated, not by 
fashioning him after a certain model, but by quickening and 
developing the intellectual faculties, cultivating the imagi- 
nation, then leaving him free to express his thoughts and 
emotions; hence the pupil is not the imitator of the teacher. 
After the student has had general preparation, he is required 
to study as many literary masterpieces, great poems, orations, 
etc., as the time will permit. 

Voice Culture. This is of the first importance, as the 
voice, when free and unrestricted by defects or misuse, is a 
true reporter of the soul. It must respond to every impulse 
of thought, will and passion. First, we find the true voice. 



EXPRESSION— PHYSICAL CULTURE 65 

and then develop this voice, that it may, in the most natural 
and forcible manner convey the thought of the speaker to 
the audience. (Correct breathing, articulation, range of 
pitch, defect of speech — cause and cure, etc.) 

Bodily Expression. A method of teaching gesture 
which results in spontaneous and subtle gestures. It acts to 
develop harmony, to suppress superriuous gesture, and pro- 
duce a closer adjustment of form to content. 

Life Study and Personation. The study and por- 
trayal of living characters and the personation of characters 
famous in literature. This cultivates the perceptive faculties 
and encourages the timid student. It breaks up mannerisms 
and develops unsuspected talent in expression, 

terms. 

One lesson a week (private), per semester $13 50 

Two lessons a week (private), per semester 22 50 

Classes of three, two lessons a week, per semester 7 50 
Single lessons (private) 75 

No reduction for lessons missed except in case of illness, 
and then only when lessons cannot be made up. 



PHYSICAL CULTURE FOR WOMEN. 

miss houser. 

It is our aim. in this department to promote the physical 
well-being of each student, that the body may be made the 
-sustaining and propelling power for the student's mental 
activity during the whole period of her college training, and 
also fitted for the performance of the duties of later life. 
The importance of daily exercise is emphasized, and the work 
undertaken of correcting physical irregularities and of pro- 
moting grace and ease in carriage. A variety of exercises 
is used, comprising esthetic exercises and drills for general 
physical development, both with and without apparatus. 



66 CARTHAGE COLLEGE 

PHYSICAL CULTURE FOR MEN. 

MR. BAIRD. 

Every man in college is required to take two hours' 
gymnasium work per week, or its equivalent in out-door 
athletics, for which one-half of a credit is given. 

During the fall the men play football and have a mod- 
erate number of games scheduled with other institutions of 
learning, the object being to give added interest in out-door 
exercise by giving men something extra for which to play, 
besides the mere daily routine. Men gain an additional 
benefit by meeting others in clean, honest games. 

Carthage College can boast of a better gymnasium than 
many institutions of five or six times its enrollment. After 
Thanksgiving the men go into the gymnasium, taking regu- 
lar drills in Indian club, bar bell, dumb bells and free hand 
movements, together with work on the French horse, 
ladders, parallel and horizontal bars. Much interest is 
taken in basket ball, and teams from neighboring schools 
and cities are played. 

After March 1, track athletics are taken up and in-door 
and out-door interclass meets are held; also track meets with 
as many other colleges as time will permit. 

The College Athletic Field is well equipped with 120- 
yard cinder path, jumping and vaulting places, ample room 
for the hurling of the weights, a good bluegrass gridiron, a 
quarter-mile track and base-ball diamond. It is convenient 
to the gymnasium, and is not surpassed by any such fields 
in this part of the country. 

Carthage College's ideal of a man is one who is intel- 
lectual, and who has a physique which is not a disgrace to 
his intellect. 



STUDENT ROLL 



67 



STUDENTS. 



THE COLLEGE. 



Cannon, Blanche 
Chevillon, Blanche 
Chevillon, Lenore 
Davidson. Floy 
Davidson, Grace 
Getzendaner, William 
Hartman, Harry 
Hill, Esther 
Hoover, Ada 
Lipe, Carrie 
Lipe, Cora 
Martin, Pearl 
McCreary, Hazel 
Nethery, George 
Nethery, James 
Rand, Lucile 
Rosenstengel, Minnie 
Slater, Orlo 
Walter, Luther 



Foley, James Turner 
Hill, William G. 
Moore, Helen 
O'Harra, Gladys J. 
Poland, Earl 
Taylor, Stephen 



SENIOR CLASS. 

Classical 

Scientific 

Scientific 

Classical 

Classical 

Scientific 

Scientific 

Scientific 

Scientific 

Scientific 

Scientific 

Scientific 

Classical 

Scientific 

Scientific 

Classical 

Scientific 

Scientific 

Scientific 

JUNIOR CLASS. 

Scientific 

Scientific 

Scientific 

Scientific 

Classical 

Scientific 



Carthage 
Carthage 
Carthage 
Carthage 
Carthage 
Polo 

Mt. Carroll 
Carthage 
Muscatine, Iowa 
Carthage 
Carthage 
Burnside 
Carthage 
Carthage 
Carthage 
Carthage 
Carthage 

West Point 
Canton 



Plymouth 
Carthage 
Carthage 
Carthage 
Elvaston 
Carthage 



68 



CARTHAGE COLLEGE 



Black, Harold W. 
Carlson, Esther 
Dorow, Elizabeth 
Dorow, Erna 
Ferris, Adelaide 
Martin, Edward 
McFarland, Robert 
O'Harra, Roswell 
Parker, Karr 
Schell, Ruth 
Swaney, Dennis 
Swaney, Luther 
Walker, Hale 
Welge, Lynn 

Alford, Letha 
Berry, Frieda 
Botts, Nellie 
Clark, Mary 
Clark, Nellie 
Craig, Florence 
Craig, Orville 
Crossland, Ralph 
Geiger. Flora 
Geiger, Sara 
Getzendaner, Mark 
Hartman, Ray 
Hartzell, Ruth 
Huston, Helen 
Kunkel, Grace 
Listmann, Phoebe 
Snyder, Harmon 
Webb, Jasper 



SOPHOMORK CLASS. 

Scientific 

Classical 

Classical 

Classical 

Scientific 

Scientific 

Scientific 

Scientific 

Scientific 

Classical 

Classical 

Classical 

Scientific 

Scientific 

FRESHMAN CLASS. 

Scientific 

Classical 

Scientific 

Classical 

Classical 

Scientific 

Scientific 

Scientific 

Classical 

Classical 

Scientific 

Scientific 

Scientific 

Scientific 

Classical 

Classical 

Classical 

Scientific 



West Point 

Cherry Valley 

Golden 

Golden 

Carthage 

Carthage 

Carthage 

Carthage 

Carthage 

Polo 

Nokomis 

Nokomis 

Carthage 

Hillsburo 

Clayton 

Carthage 

Carthage 

Carthage 

Polo 

Carthage 

Carthage 

Bo wen 

Tipton, Iowa 

Tipton, Iowa 

Polo 

Mt. Carroll 

Carthage 

Carthage 

Carthage 

Beardstown 

Polo 

Niota 



STUDENT ROLL 



69 



Williams, Kathryn Classical Fort Stockton, Texas 

SPECIAL STUDENT, 

Loomis, Arthur _ . . . Dallas 

GRADUATE STUDENT. 

Hightower, Clarence ... Hillsboro 



THE ACADEMY. 



FOURTH YEAR. 



Bannen, Hugh 
Gent, John 
Harper, Edna 
Harris, Charles 
Hill, Katharine 
Hill, Robert 
Hunter, Gertrude 
Lawless, Mary 
O'Harra, Marvel 
Schmidt, Zelia 
Thompson, Inez 
Warwick, Geneva 

Bauer, Martha 

Botts, Forest 
Crane, Nettie 
Erwin, Earl 
Jones, William 
Hilbish, Harry 
Hendricks, Harold 
Johnson, Mabel 
Lawless, Carl 
O' Haver, Willie 



SPECIAL STUDENT. 



THIRD YEAR. 



Rockford 

Muscatine, Iowa 

Carthage 

Carthage 

Carthage 

Carthage 

California, Mo. 

Carthage 

Rapids City, S. D. 

Arenzville 

Carthage 

Carthage 

Green, Kansas 

Plymouth 

McConnell 

Carthage 

Carthage 

Dixon 

Carthage 

Chicago 

Carthage 

Denver 



70 



CARTHAGE COLLEGE 



Schmidt, Arthur 
Windman, George 
Wolfe, Harold 

Carlin, Carl 
Carlin, Wilbur 
Cox, Pearl 
Harris, Albert 
Harrison, Ray 
Hill, Rowland 
Jenkins, Herbert 
Mortensen, Alma 
Roath, Virgie 
Ruggles, Ada 
Swain, Ethelyn 
Yetter, Bertha 

Beckstrand, Garfield 
BoUin, Mark, 
Cutler, Paul 
Conrad, Harold 
Cutler, Leota 
Figge, Clyde 
Garlow, Helen 
Gibson, Frances 
Groves, Howard 
Hamrick, Harold 
Hill, Marchand 
Hoelscher, Bernard 
Ihnen, George 
Jackson. Josephine 
Jenkins, James 
Raster, Meddie 
Lewis, Joseph 
McCullough, Ruth 



SECOND YEAR. 



FIRST YEAR. 



Arenzville 
Carthage 
Carthage 

Clayton 

Clayton 

Carthage 

Adrian 

Denver 

Carthage 

Carthage 

Chicago 

Carthage 

Carthage 

Carthage 

Carthage 

Carthage 

Carthage 

Carthage 

Sedgwickville, Mo, 

Carthage 

Queen City, Mo 

CBqi-iT^ge 

Burnside 

Burnside 

Burnside 

Carthage 

Hershman 

La Prairie 

Carthage 

Carthage 

Green Top, Mo. 

Powellton 

Carthage 



STUDENT ROLL 



71 



Martin, Aurelia 
Massie, Virgil 
Miller, Bertha 
Murphy, Leander 
Perry, Jacob 
Richards, Floyd 
Roasa, Greta 
Rucker, Rolland 
Ruger, Myrtle 
Thompson, Wayne 
Yetter, Eva 
Zimmerman, Ada 



Elvaston 

Carthage 

Queen City, Mo. 

Carthage 

Timewell 

Plymouth 

Elvaston 
Carthage 
McCall 
Carthage 
Carthage 

Burnside 



MUSIC DEPARTMENT. 

VOCAL. 



Bauer, Martha 
Berry, Frieda 
Carlin, Alma 
Carpenter, Mrs. S. N. 
Craig, Orville 
Doud, Mrs. R. F. 
Davidson, Floy 
Davidson, Grace 
Dorow, Erna 
Hartman, Harry W. 
Hartman, Raymond 
Hartzell, Ruth 
Hendricks, Harold 
Hill, Katharine 
Hoelscher, Bernard 
Hunter, Gertrude 
Jones, William E. 
Listmann, Phoebe 
Loomis, Arthur 
O'Harra, Edith 



Green, Kansas 

Carthage 

Bowen 

Carthage 

Carthage 

Ferris 

Carthage 

Carthage 

Golden 

Mount Carroll 

Mount Carroll 

Carthage 

Carthage 

Carthage 

Hershman 

California, Mo. 

Carthage 

Beardstown 

Dallas 

Carthage 



72 



CARTHAGE COLLEGE 



O'Harra, Gladys 
Schmidt, Zelia 
Snyder, Harmon 
Symonds, Mary 
Welge, Lynn 
Williams, Kathryn 

Bauer, Martha 
Botts, Forest 
Bruce, Helen 
Carlin, Carl 
Carlin, Wilbur 
Cherrill, Elizabeth 
Chevillon, Blanche 
Chevillon, Leonore 
Davis, Neva 
Davidson, Grace 
Davidson, Mary 
Flynn, Kittie 
Greer, Nellie 
Griffith, Ethlyn 
Harper, Edna 
Helfrich, Trevor 
Hill, Katharine 
Hill, William 
Hoch, Helen 
Hunter, Gertrude 
Johnson, Mabel 
Lewis, W, O. 
Lipe, Carrie 
Listmann, Phoebe 
McCormick, Grace 
Mortensen, Alma 
Newcomer, Mrs. C, B. 



PIANO. 



Carthage 

Arenzville 

Polo 

Carthage 

Hillsboro 

Fort Stockton, Texas 

Green, Kansas 
Plymouth 
Carthage 

Clayton 

Clayton 
Carthage 
Carthage 
Carthage 
Carthage 
Carthage 
Carthage 
Carthage 
Hamilton 
Carthage 
Carthage 
Carthage 
Carthage 
Carthage 
Carthage 
California, Mo. 

Chicago 

Carthage 

Carthage 

Beardstown 

Carthage 

Chicago 
Carthage 



STUDENT ROLL 



73 



Owsley, Miriam 
Parker, Beryl 
Powell, Mabel 
Ruger, Myrtle 
Swain, Pearl 
Talbot, Bernice 
Talbot, Ruth 
Thompson, Inez 
Walker, Hale 
Yutzy, Anna 
Zimmerman. Ada 



Cherrill, Elizabeth 
Griffith, Ethlyn 
Groom, Mavide 
Lewis, W. D. 
Newcomer, Mrs 
Parker, Beryl 
Symmonds, Mary 



C. B. 



Hill, William 

Flynn, Kittie 
Hill, William 
Lewis, W. D. 
Newcomer, Mrs 



ORGAN. 



HISTORY. 



HARMONY. 



C. B. 

DEPARTMENT OF EXPRESSION. 



Alford, Letha 
Bauer, Martha 
Berry, Frieda 
Chevillon, Blanche 
Chevillon, Leonore 



Carthage 
Carthage 
Carthage 
McCall 
Carthage 
Carthage 
Carthage 
Carthage 
Carthage 
Carthage 
Burnside 



Carthage 
Carthage 
Basco 
Carthage 
Carthage 
Carthage 
Carthage 

Carthage 

Carthage 
Carthage 
Carthage 
Carthage 



Clayton 

Green, Kansas 

Carthage 

- Carthage 

Carthage 



74 



CARTHAGE COLLEGE 



Clark, Mary 
Craig, Florence 
Craig, Orville 
Dorow, Elizabeth 
Geiger, Flora 
Geiger, Sarah 
Gent, John 
Hartman, Raymond 
Hartzell, Ruth 
Hursh, Harold 
Huston, Helen 
Hunter, Gertrude 
Kunkel, Grace 
Lipe, Cora 
Listmann, Phoebe 
Loomis, Arthur 
Poland, Earl 
Quivey, Bertha 
Roath, Virgie 
Runyon, Greta 
Swaney, Dennis 
Swaney, Luther 
Talbot, Clarence 
White, Myrtle 
Williams, Kathryn 



- Carthage 
Carthage 

- Carthage 

Golden 

- Carthage 
Carthage 

Muscatine, Iowa 
Mt. Carroll 

- Carthage 
Vandalia 

- Carthage 
California, Mo. 

- Carthage 
Carthage 

Beardstown 
Dallas 

- Carthage 

Colusa 

- Carthage 
Carthage 
Nokomis 
Nokomis 

- Carthage 
Carthage 

- Carthage 



STUDENT ROLL 75 



SUMMARY. 



THE COLLEGE: 

Graduate Student , 1 

Seniors _ 19 

Juniors „ 6 

Sophomores 13 

Freshmen 22 

Special 2 63 

THE ACADEMY: 

Fourth Year 12 

Third Year 8 

Second Year _ 20 

First Year 26 

Special ,...„ 1 67 

SPECIAL DEPARTMENTS: 

Music 62 

Expression „ 30 92 

222 
Names Repeated 59 

Total „ „ 163 



76 CARTHAGE COLLEGE 



Alumni et Alumnae. 



t OFFICERS OF THE ASSOCIATION. 

President J. Arthur Baird, '00 

First Vice-President R. W. Saer, '92 

Second Vice-President Mabel Martinis, '98 

Third Vice-President Mrs. W. K. Hill, "82 

Recording Secretary Emily Pennock, '00 

Corresponding Secretary Alice Marvel, '97 

Treasurer S. H. Ferris, '82 

Edbtor Mary Tressler Newcomer, '87 

Biographer Dr. C. L. Ferris, '76 

College Trustee Dr. C. L. Ferris, '76 

1875 

James M. Cromer, A. M., D. D., minister 

2720 E. 36th Street, Kansas City, Mo 
*Ida Harris King, A. M., - - - Prescott, Iowa 

Maggie Taylor Bovvers, A. M., - Boise City, Idaho 

Kate Thummel Fisher, M. S., - - Prairieville 

1876 

*Hon. George A. Anderson, A. M., - - Ouincy 

*Grace Cherrill, B. S,, - . - Carthage 

Ben L. Cress, M. S., civil engineer - Red Cliff, Col 

J. M. Dempster Davidson, A. M., D. D., General 

Missionary, Diocese of Quincy, - Carthage 

*Deceased. Last residence given. 

tThe faculty and the officers of the Association desire to have the 
correct address of every graduate. It will be deemed a favor if the Presi- 
dent of the college and the secretary of the Association be informed of 
errors and of changes in address. 



ALUMNI 



77 



Oscar M. Easterday, M. S. 

Ina Elder, A. M., real estate agent 

Joseph C. Elder, M. S. 

Charles L. Ferris, A. M., physician 



Palo Alto, Cal 
Carthage 
Carthage 
Carthage 



J. O. A. Kimmel, M. S., LL. B., 

Sophronia Nesbit, A. M. 
*Hattie Scofield Cromer, A. M. 
T. J. Scofield, A.M., attorney 
Rose Spitler Scofield, A. M. 
Judge A. A. Wolfersperger, M 



attorney at law 

Murphysboro 

Hood River, Oregon 

Kansas City, Mo 

Chicago 

Carthage 

, S., attorney at law 

Sterling 



1877 

*George H. Albright, A. M. 

*Jennie Fletcher, M. S. 

Mary Hawley Findley, M. S. 

*Addie Logan Ray, A. M. 

Laura A. Manier, A. M., music teacher 

Emma Sample Darrough, M, S. 

Julia Scofield McKemey, A. M. 

Rev. James E. Weir, A. M., real estate and 

insurance agent - Grand Junction, Colo 

*J. J. Williams, A. M., attorney at law - Carthage 



Carthage 

Wichita, Kansas 

Chester 

Carthage 

Red BluiT, Cal 

Fairfield, Iowa 



1878 

*L. P. Cravens, A. M. 
Maggie Cravens, A. M., teacher 
Emma J. Cromer Ladd, A. M. 
Charles S. DeHart, A. M., banker - 
John F. Fair, A.M., physician 
Junius Colton Ferris, A. M., M. E., 
William G. Gettle, A. M., minister 



Lake City, Minn 

Richland, Mo 

Sheldon, Iowa 

Carthage 

Freeport 

banker Carthage 

Table Rock, Neb 



78 CARTHAGE COLLEGE 

E. ClarkHughes, A.M.. LL.D., U. S. Dist. judge 

Seattle, Wash 
J. Frank Kiefer, A. M., LL. D., physician Sterling 

George W. Loop, A. M., farmer - - Huntsville 

Charles M. McMillan, B. S., insurance agent Carthage 

M. G, Rohrbaugh, M.S., pres. business college, Omaha, Neb 

1879 

Caroline Bartlett Crane, A. M., minister Kalamazoo, Mich 
Alice E. Crawford Sanford, M. S. - Palo Alto, Cal 

*Peter Ewald, A. M., 

W. G. W. Geiger, A. M., attorney at law Tipton, Iowa 

Frank H. Helsell, A. M., circuit judge Sioux Rapids, Iowa 
Scott M. Ladd, M. S., LL.D., judge supreme 

court - Sheldon, Iowa 

*Flora Manier Geiger, A. M. - Tipton, Iowa 

Nellie Nesbit Hunn, A. M. - Des Moines, Iowa 

Fernando Sanford, M. S., head professor of physics 

in Leland Stanford Jr. University Palo Alto, Cal 

Albert B. Shrader, A. M., minister Kansas City, Kansas 

FI. M. Swope, A. M., attorney at law - Quincy 

Mary V. Thompson Harris, M. S. - Carthage 

Hattie L. Tillapaugh Shrader, M. S. Kansas City, Kansas 
William H. Weaver, M. S., physician McDonoughville, La 

1880 

Stephen K. Bittenbender, A. M., farmer Cal 

Frank M. Campbell, M. S., physician Claflin, Kansas 

Robert L. Casburn, M. S., physician Dexter, N. M 

Emma DeHart Hughes, A. M., - Seattle, Wash 

Joseph G. Gilchrist, M. S., civil engineer Brooktield, Mo 

Minnie Gilchrist Wood, M. S. - Ridgewood, N. J 

M. Blanche Griffin McArthur, M. S. - Hamilton 

W. D. Henkle, A. M., printer - Philadelphia, Pa 

Herman Juilfs, A. M. - White Oak, Ohio 



ALUMNI 



79 



M. Inez Robbins Bickford, M. S., 
Andrew S. Zimmerman, A. M., minister 
Frank H. Graves, A. B., attorney 



Plymouth 

Newark, N. J 

Spokane, Wash 



Newcastle, Wyo 



1881 

Will O. Carlton, B. S., editor 

William F. Ebright, A. M., county superintendent 

of schools - - North Platte, Neb 

Adelia Griffin Barnett, B. S., 2540 Prospect Ave., 

Kansas City, Mo 
*Frank C. Harris, B. S. 
Edgar F. Hurdle, B. S., farmer 
Josiah Kuhn, B. S., minister 
Joseph H. Miller, A. M., physician 
^Clifford C. Musser, A. M. 
Mary Overman Damrell, B. S. 
*W. P. Overman, B. S. 
John K. Reed, B. S., minister 
Walter Vanzile, B. S., farmer 
R. D. Zimbeck, A. M., physician 



Los Angeles, Cal 

Wheatland, Wyo 

Bunker Hill, Kansas 

Surprise, Neb 

Hastings, Neb 



Oscar E. Aleshire, A. M 

street. Room 504 National Life Bld'g 
Stephen H. Ferris, A. M., banker 
A. C. T. Geiger, A. M., district judge 
Kate Griffith Hill, A. M. 
*Francisca Hopp Geiger, A. M. 
David E. Mack, A. M., attorney at law 
Florence J. Mereness Tressler, M. S. 
George H. Schnur, A. M., minister, 

730 Marshall Ave 
nVilliam N. Weir, B. S., M. D. 
Frank Wertz, A. M., attorney at law 
Susan Williams, M. vS 



Martinez, Cal 

Rowland, Ala 

Montevideo, Minn 

1882 

insurance agent, 159 LaSalle 

Chicago 



Carthage 
Oberlin, Kansas 

Carthage 
Oberlin, Kansas 

Carthage 
Shelbyville, Ind 

, St. Paul, Minn 

Carthage 

Forreston 

Carthage 



80 



CARTHAGE COLLEGE 



1883 

Alice Biery Miller, B. S. - - Dixon 

\V. Henry Blancke, A. B., D. D., minister Davenport, Iowa 
Fannie M. Dryden, A. M., Religieuse in Convent of 

Sacred Heart - New York City 

Noah Fritz, A. B., manufacturer - Onida, S. D 

*Edwin S. Hoffman, A. B. - Hornellsville, N. Y 

*Mamie Hooker Daoust, A. B. - Defiance, Ohio 

D. Alban Kistler, B. S., publisher. World Building 

New York City 
Adam Schaefer, A. B., Ph. D., minister - Rossville 

Henry A. Spielman, A. B., merchant Topeka, Kansas 

Jessie Williams Hart, A. M. - Nora Springs, Iowa 

Lillie Zimmerman Schaefer, A. B. - - Rossville 

1884 

Roberta Brewer Risse, B. S. - - Carthage 

Julia Ferris Hubbs, B. S. - Lebanon, Ore 

E. Lee Fleck, A. B., minister, 910 S. 20th street 

Lincoln, Neb 
Mattie Gray, B. S. - 

Olive Hosford Fleck, A. B., 910 S. 20th St. 
Lura V. Thompson, A. M., state organizer 
C. W. B. M. 



Elderville 
Lincoln, Neb 



Carthage 



1885 



Keokuk, Iowa 
Carthage 



Clara Browning Johnson, A. B. 

Minerva Holland, A. B. 

*W. J. Martin, A. B. 

A. L. Miller, B. S., physician - - Dixon 

George A. Rohrbaugh, A. B., teacher in business college 

Omaha Neb 
Ralph E. Scofield, A. B., attorney at law Kansas City, Mo 
J. E. Williams, A. M., merchant - Carthage 



ALUMNI 81 



1886 

Edwin Bollman, A.B., minister Oxford Junction, Iowa 

Sarah L. Hyde Mensel, A. B. - Northampton, Mass 

C. B. Lintwed, A. B., minister - - Oshkosh, Wis 

Elizabeth Nace Holtgreve, A. B. - - Washington 

1887 

Paul B. Holtgreve, A. B., D. D., minister Washington 

Rev. John N. Hyde, A.B., missionary, Lodiana, Punjab, India 
Julia Kellogg Goldwater, A. B., - Los Angeles, Calif 

Abbie Kuhl Riser, B. S. - - - Tipton, Iowa 

Laura McColm Dysinger, A. B. , 

1518 Jacob St., Wheeling, W. Va 
*Sallie Manier, A. B. - - - - Carthage 

Rev. E. H. Mensel, A. M., Ph.D., Prof, of German 
Language and Literature, Smith College, 

Northampton, Mass 
William H. Naffziger, A. B., minister 

119 West State St., Alliance, Ohio 
Mai-y Tressler Newcomer, A. M. - - Carthage 

1888 

Hugh M. Bannen, A, M., D. D. minister - ' Rockford 

Albert F. Ernst, A.M., minister - - Macomb 

Fred W. Hawley, A.M., D. D., President 

Henry Kendall College, Tulsa, Okla 
Albert Miller, A. B., missionary - Paotingfu, China 

Harry H. Whitten, A. B,, physician - - Peoria 

1889 

W. S, Dysinger, A. B., minister 

1518 Jacob St., Wheeling, W. Va 
C. B. Newcomer, A. M., real estate dealer - Carthage 
Bess A. Tressler Maloney, A. B. - . - Polo 



82 CARTHAGE COLLEGE 

1890 

Belle Bolton Balmer, B. S. - - - Loomis, Calif 

J. L. Mishler, B. S., farmer - - Pearl City 

L. J. Motschman, A. B., minister 

3507 N. Marshfield Av,, Chicago 

1891 

Cleophas C. O'Harra, B. S., Ph.D., Prof, of Geology 

State School of Mines, Rapid City, S. Dak 

1892 

C. B. Beckmeyer, attorney at law - - Mt. Pulaski 

H. C. Funk, A. B., minister - - Calif 

Mrs. Lillian Monk, B. L. - - Los Angeles, Calif 

R. W. Saer, A. B., banker, - - - Carthage 

1893 

Mollie Marvel O'Harra, B. S., - Rapid City, S. Dak 

1894 

Will M. Beck, A. B., missionary, Muhlenberg, Liberia, Africa 
Nellie Cherrill Merrill, B. L. 

602 Mumford Court, Kansas City, Mo 
George C. Cromer, A. B., - - Louisville, Ky 

Maggie Delo, B.S., head Latin dept., high school, 

Oklahoma City, Okla 
Joseph Hegener, A. B., minister Colorado Springs, Colo 

Herbert L. Jackson, A. B., attorney at law Seattle, Wash 
Penfield E. Mason, A.M., Chemical Building, 

Business Service Co., St. Louis, Mo 

1895 

E. K. Cherrill, A. B., Merchants' Exchange 

National Bank, New York City 
T. Edwin Gill, B. S., 196 West Fourth St., Pueblo, Colo 



ALUMNI 



83 



*J. Louis Nace, A. B. 

C. W. Ramsey, B. S., carpenter 

J. Kent Riser, A. M., minister 

*Eddy Robbins, B.S., - 

Anna E. Sanford, A. B., missionary, 

O. B. Turner, A. B., farmer 

1896 

Effie Cromer Nelson, B. S., 
M. Isabel Felgar Wilson, B. S., 
Leona May McAnulty, B. S., 
John H. McCullough, A. B., minister 
Matie H. Schlenker. B. L., teacher 

1897 

Matthew M. Anderson, B. L., 

M. Golden Davidson Williams, B. S., 

Frederick W. Jasper, B, L., bookkeeper 

Alice L. Marvel, B. S., 

Mary C. Noyes McKee, B.S., - 



Carthage 

Hannibal, Mo 

Tipton, Iowa 

Carthage 
Guntur, India 

St. Marvs 



Canton, S. Dak 

Niota 

Carthage 

Burlington, Iowa 

- Toledo, Ohio 



Samuel B, Robbins, A. B., 



Hamilton 
Minneapolis, Minn 
Newton, Iowa 
- Carthage 
Orono, Maine 
Colorado Springs, Colo 



1898 



*Claudius Knudton, A. B., - - - Chicago 

Mabel Hope Martinis, B. S., - - Carthage 

Chas. J. Tressler, A. B., attorney Swift & Co. - Chicago 

1899 

Royal B. Brandon, B. S., farmer - - Fountain Green 

Charles C. Carlton, B. vS., lawyer - San Diego, Calif 

John M. Herbst, A. B., minister, 701 Euclid Av., Pueblo, Colo 
Theo. J. Jensen, A. B., medical student, Breklum, Germany 
Alfred R. Kent, B. S., lawyer, - - Peabody, Kan 

Philena Marvel Rand, B. L,, - . - Bowen 

Frederick W. Obert, B. S., physician - New Minden 



84 CARTHAGE COLLEGE 

Herbert S. Salisbury, B. S., surveyor and engfineer Ferris 
Morgan L. Webb, B, S., minister - - Camden, Ind 

1900 

Roy M. Badger, A. B., minister 923 Elk St., Beatrice, Neb 
James A. Baird, A. B., Physical Director Carthage 

College; County Judge; Carthage 
Maud Elder Matthi's, B. L., - - - Hamilton 

H. G. Ferris, B. S., traveling salesman - - "Warsaw 

vSamuel Naylor, Jr., A. B , lawyer - - Carthage 

F. H. Ottman, A. B., prin. Commercial department 

high school, Pittsburg, Penn 
Emily C. Pennock, B. S., high school teacher Carthage 

Tilden F. Phillips, B. S., high school teacher, Duluth, Minn 
Bess J. Ringheim Tres.sler. B. S. 616 W. 71st St.. Chicago 
Ellen B. Schuff, A. M., missionary - Prescott, Ariz 

Anna L. vSimmons, B.S., high school principal, Nevada, Iowa 
Charles E. Sparks, A.M., minister - Canon City, Colo 

1901 

Lucy S. Cherrill Marsh, B. S., 828 Franklin St.. Keokuk, Iowa 
Ida J. Helfrich, B. L., high school teacher, - Carthage 
Harold Lee Jones, B. S., traveling salesman 

6009 Washington Av., Chicago 
Bertha Lane Webb, B.S., - - Camden, Ind 

1902 

Mary E. Crotzer, B. S., - - - - Lena 

Clyde Cutler. B. S. - - 403 Jackson Bvd., Chicago 

George H. Fonken. A. B., sec'y Y. M. C. A., New York City 
Ben L. Matthis, farmer, B. S,. - - Hamilton 

Elizabeth T. Mayor, A. B., high school teacher 

Watertown, S. Dak 
Helen M- Noyes, B. S., teacher in mathematics 

Ferry Hall, Lake Forest 



ALLMxM 85 



1903 

Jolm Culkin Jr., A. B., tanner - - Carthaj::e 

Helen Ferris, M. S., teacher in English, liij^h school, 

Oklahoma City, Okla 
A. Earl Isham, A. B., minister, - Muscatine, Iowa 

Ethel E. McAnulty Brown, B. S. 522 Nims St., Wicliita. Kan 
John H. ^fcAllister, A. B., farmer - - St. Marys 

Margaret Proctor, A.B., high school teacher - Carthage 
r.co. E. Walter, A. B., lawyer, 1519 Fifth Av., Seattle, Wash 
Blanche WebbScofield. B. S., 1523 Senate St., Columbia, S. C 

1904 

Harriet Davis Ciibson, B. S., - - - Ferris 

Clyde P. Johnson, B. S., state's attorney - Carthage 

Carrie M. McCollum Rasmussen, B. S. 

104 Gunnison Av., Burlington, Iowa 
William 1 >. SitVcrci, B S., theol. student Springtiold. Iowa 
Anna M. Wilhelmscn, A. M., missionary 

Mission Protestante, Fort Dauphin, Madagascar 
O. W. Williams, B. S., surveyor - - Hope, N. M. 

1905 

Frederick A. Johnson, A. 1?., minister - Fowler, Ind 

Marie Rosenstengel Sanford. B.S., 918 Nortl; St., Peoria 

1906 
*Tressler Barr, B. S., - - - Fountain Green 

William R. Frcriclis, A. B., tninistcr, Hillsboro, Oregon 

Bessie Xoble (iuthrie, A. B., teacher - - Pontoosuc 

Clifton J. O'Harra, B. S.. LL.B., lawyer - - Carthage 

Erma Rand. A. B., teacher in C. C. Academy Carthage 

William Webb, B. S., LL.B., lawyer, 

University Club, Bridgeport. Conn 
Earl W. Wood, B. S., lawyer - - Hamilton 



86 CARTHAGE COLLEGE 

1907 

James D. Baird, B. S.. city attorney - - Carthagfe 

Emma J. Bell, B. S., instructor in C. C. x\cademy, Carthage 
Eugenia M.Bell, B.S., - - - Mich 

Ruth Ferris, M. S., high school teacher, - - Quincy 

Helen Griffith, B. S., - - - - Carthage 

J. C. Helms, B. S., law student, - Ann Arbor, Mich 

Alma Kammerer, A. B., high school teacher Beardstown 
Jessie Kirkpatrick Smith, A. B., - - Carthage 

Alice M, Listmann, B. S., high school teacher Beardstown 
*Frank Xord, A. B., - 

Edith O'Harra Walker, B.vS, - - - Keokuk 

Deena Thompson, B. S., high school teacher, Eldorado, Kan 

1908 

George T. Crossland, B. S., law student, 

5637 Drexel Av., Chicago 
Alfred Heitman, A. B., principal high school Waterloo 

Carl A. Sundberg, A. B., minister, - Ottumwa, Iowa 

Henry S. Walker, B. S., lawyer, - - Keokuk, Iowa 

1909 

Paul A. Buelow, A. B., theological student Atchison, Kan 
Ola Huston, A. B., high school teacher Shenandoah, Iowa 
Leonard F. Martin, B. S., law student Ann Arbor, Mich 

Lee Siebenborn, B. S. 3348 Harrison Street, Chicago 

Carl Walter. B. S., fruit grower - Trinidad, Wash 

1910 

Clifford Everhart, A. B., teacher - - - Carthage 

Forrest L. Harnest, B. S., - - - Carthage 

Flossie Harris, A. B., teacher - - Grant City, Mo 

Clarence Hightower, A. B., - - - Lancaster 

Alma Horney, B. S., .... Carthage 



ALUMNI 87 



Lawrence Huey, B. S., - - - Plymouth 

Edna B. Huston, A. B., high school teacher Cumberland 
Roy Little, A. B., teacher in Syrian Protestant College 

Beirut, Syria 
Lewis W, Rupp, B. S., postgraduate student - Urbana 
Christian P. Tranberg, A. B., theological student Chicago 



GRADUATES IN MUSIC. 

1905 

Cora Listmann, teacher - - - Beardstown 

Helen R. Shrader Kent, 3318 Garfield Av., Kansas City, Mo 
Edith Gunn Seebirt - - - South Bend, Ind 

Maud Hewitt .... Beardstown 

1906 

Edythe Eurnette McCallister - - - Bentley 

Etta Galloway Hooker - - - Altus, Okla 

1907 
Laura Schwab, teacher - Oxford Junction, Iowa 

1909 
Hazel Hammond Walters - - Trinidad, Wash 



GRADUATES IN ORATORY. 

1906 
Jessie Kirkpatrick Smith .... Carthage 

1910 
Grace Mack --.-.. Carthage 



INDEX. 



Academy, The 53 

Administration, Officers 

and assistants in 10 

Admission Requirements. .23 

Advanced Standing 28 

Alumni at Alumnae 76 

Astronomy 49 

Athletics 66 

Bequests 22 

Bible Training Dept 57 

Biblical Hist, and Lit 35 

Biology 57 

Board of Trustees 4 

Boarding 19 

Botany 51 

Buildings 12 

"Bulletin, The" 17 

Calendar, College 3 

Chemistry 50 

Church Attendance 16 

Cla.'^sification 29 

College, The 11 

"Collegian. The" 17 

Committees of the Faculty 10 
Choice of Courses of Study 30 
Courses of Study, Synopsis32 

Credits, Academy 23 

Credits. College 29 

Economics 38 

Education 37 

English 39 

Entrance Requirements 23 

Ethics 35 

Examinations 23 

Expenses 20 

Faculty 6 

Fees 20 

Foundation of the College 11 

French 46 

Geology .". 51 

German 44 

Government 19 

Greek 41 

Graduate Courses 52 



Graduation, requirements 

for, in the College 29 

" Academy 54 

Group System, The 28 

Groups, Representative 31 

Gymnasium 13 

History 38 

Laboratories 13 

Ladies' Hall 13 

Latin 42 

Legacies 22 

Libraries 14 

Literary Societies 15 

Location 12 

Logic 37 

Mathematics 48 

Mineralogy 51 

Music 58 

Officers and Committees 

of the Board 5 

Philosophy 36 

Physics 49 

Physiology 51 

Physical Culture 65, 66 

Political Science 39 

Prizes 18 

Psychology 33 

Reading Room 15 

Registration 23 

Religious Culture.. .•. 16 

Rooms 19 

Scholarships : 17 

Self-help, Facilities for IS 

Social Science 39 

Spanish 48 

Special Students 30 

Students' organizations 15 

Students, Roll of 67 

Terms and vacations 20 

Trustees, Board of 4 

Tuition 20 

Vacations 20 

Y.M.C.A and Y.W.C.A. 15 
Zoology 15 



7200-815 

C 



>«iA"aA\\VTV® 



UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS-URBANA 

C C24HA C001 

ANNOUNCEMENT CARTHAGE, ILL 

1910/11 





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