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Full text of "Annual catalogue of Williamsport Dickinson Seminary for the academic year : from .."

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^l)Orp(i*)CiT^ii.H-:.ir'y 



FOR THE ACADEMIC YEAR, 



■^w/>F RO M«-/^'\/^ 



y?(jg(a§i 30tl^, 188G, to June 16tl^, 1887 




WILLIAMSPORT, PA. 



WILLIAM^PORT, PA.: 
THE SUN AND BANNER PUBLISHING HOUSE. 

1887, 



B©apd ©f BipeGl©PS. 



Hon. JOHN PATTON, President, Cnrwensville. 

WirJ.TAM F. THOMPSON, Esg., 8e(;ketary, Williamsport, 

Kev. JAMES CUUNS, Huntingdon. 

Rev. THOMPSON MITCHELL, D. D., Williamsport 

Rev. WH.LIAM H. DH.L, A. M., Clearrteld. 

Hon. WH.BUR F. SADLER, Carlisle. 

THOMAS H. MURRAY, Esg., Clearfield. 

J. COLE GREEN, Es«2., Williamsport. 

13. C. BOWMAN, Es(^, Williamsport. 



THOMAS E. KIESS, Steward and Treasurer. 
Mrs. SARAH J. WHEELAND, Matron, 



WiSifeiBg Commifefeees. 



dentinal PeFinSvly^ia GonfopenGe. 



Rev. GEORGE GUYER. 

Rev. A. M. BARNITZ. 

Rev. S. a. CREVELING. 

Rev. J. H. MoCORD. 

Rev. J. B. MANN. 

Rev. H. E. SUTHERLAND. 



Rev. W. a. HOUCK. 
Rev. J. H. M( GARRAH. 
Rev. a. B. HOOVEN. 
Rev. R. H. GILBERT. 
Rev. J. A. WOOD. 
Rev. J. W. RUE. 



Balfcimopc GonfePcnGe. 

Rev. R. W. BLACK. 
Rev. G. W. HEYDE. 



"'If 



)3 



piumBi 8FgaBizafei©n. 



OfflGGPS. 

Hon. ROBERT P. ALLEN, President. 

Miss FRANK E. NASH, A. B., Vice-President. 

Miss MARY ROBESON, M. E. L., Recording Secretary. 

Miss ADA M. C. HARTZELL, M. E. L., Corresrondino Secretary. 

Rev. CHARLES W. BURNLEY, A. B., Treasurer. 



ExeGufeivo G©mmifetee. 

Rev. CHARLES W. BURNLEY, A. B. 
Mrs. M. C. CRAWFORD. 
Mrs. C. C. BENSCOTER, B. S. 
Wn.BUR F. REEDER, A. B. 
SUMNER S. BOWMAN, B. S. 



pddpegseg. 



Rev. JESSE B. YOUNG, A. M. 
Rev. henry R. BENDER, A. B. 
Hon. J. L. SPANGLER. 




Xfzy? 



Miss EDITH V. HEDGES, A. B. 



Dhiladclphia GonfePcnGe. 



Rev. S. a. HEILNER, D. D. 
Rev. J. R. T. GRAY. 



WILLTAMSrORT DK^KINSON SEMINARY 



tiiikty-:nintii annual catalogue. 



Mks. KATE E. PURVIS, 

Assistant in Vocal and Instrumental Music. 



¥^ 




Rev. EDWARD J. GRAY, D. D., President, 

Mental and Moral Science and Belles Ijcttres. 

J. W. FRELEY, M. S., 

Natural Science. 

HARVEY C. WILLIAMS, A. B., 

Ancient Languages and Political Science. 



I 



I 



>) 



Miss LI/7TE S. VCELKLER, 

Assistant in Instrumental Music. 

Mrs. J.' T ( ;.\-^-v\\\" \ V, 

Painti7ig and Di^awing. 

Miss ALICE E. SMILEY, 

Elocution and Calisthenics. 



HORACE HILLS, Jr., 

Assistant in Vocal Music. 



/ 



HENRY A. PECK, A. B., 

Mathematics. 



lieGbuPGPg. 



Miss EMMA S. BAKER, M. L. A., Preceitress, 

History and Rhetoric. 

GUSTAVUS VCELKLEII, 

V 7 

Instrumental and Vocal Music. 

WILLIAM A. WILSON, A. V,., 

Latin and Business Department. 



Hon. ROBERT P. ALLEN, 

Political IJconomy. 

Hon. JOHN J. METZGER, 

Commercial Law. 

WILLIAM B. KONKLE, M. D., 

Hygiene. 




FRANK M. McLAUPvY, 

Academic Department. 



Miss ADA M. C. IIARTZELL, M. E. L., 

Assistant in Academic Department. 



'-^ 



WILLIA^lSPOKT DICKINSON SEMINARY, 



if 

I ! I I i 



i. 



Nciines. Class. 

Akers, Mies Lizzie ^^^5 

^Alexander, C. T 1853 

Allen, R.P 1852 

Andrews, W. A 1884 

* Arndt, C. K 1868 

Baker, E. G 1884 

IJaker, (i. W 18T6 

Baker, Miss Marj^aret 1883 

Baldwin, J. B ' ^881 

Barber, Miss A. E 18T9 

Barnitz, 8. J 18T9 

Barr, Miss Adelle 1880 

Barton, Miss F. A 1865 

*Barton, J. H I860 

Beck, Miss M. J 1852 

Beers, L. II 1869 

fBell, J. E 1880 

t Bender, H. K 1882 

^Bennett, Allen 187T 

Bennett, Mise H. C 1858 

Bennett, Miss M. P 1884 

Bennett, Miss N. H 1880 

t Benscoter, C. C 1880 

Biddle, Miss E 1861 

*Bij,'<;8, E. 11 1862 

Bixler, J. W 1878 

Bodine, DeWitt 1861 

Bowman, A. S 1 868 

tBownian, J. F 1882 

Bowman, J. H 1881 

Bowman, S. L 1 852 

Bowman, S. S 1 863 

liowman, Sumner S 1 886 

Boynton, Miss E 1864 

Brady, L. M 1884 

Bradley, Miss K 1857 

Brown, ILL 1880 

Brown, J. C 1868 

Brown, J. J 1867 

*Biickalcw, W. J 1871 

Buckley, Miss E. M 1883 

Buckley, Miss S. E 1884 

Burke, E. W 1882 

* Deceased. \ Honorary. 



Names. Class. 

Burnley, C. W 1863 

Busey, G, M 1882 

Calder, MissM 1865 

Campbell, F. C 1863 

Campbell, LP 1872 

*Campbcll, R. P 1872 

Carter, K. T 1875 

Carver, W. A 1871 

Champion, Miss M '. 1879 

Chapman, H. O 1868 

Cheston, Miss A. H 1884 

Cheston, IL C 18^6 

Church, F. E 1863 

Clarke, F. A. C 1872 

Clarke, W. P 1880 

Clarke, J. C 1885 

Clarkson, J. A. C 1884 

Cleaver, Mi^s C. Y 1876 

Cleaver, Miss L. J 1866 

Clees, T. O 1868 

*Comp, J. S 1869 

Conner, B. C 1871 

*Conner, S. J. A 1861 

Conner, S. J. A 1886 

Cooper, Miss A . . 1864 

Cooper, M iss A. M 1864 

Cox, C. S 1866 

Crawford, Miss Lavina P 1855 

Crawford, Miss M. E 1865 

tCrawford, Mary K 1886 

*Crawford, Miss K. A 1857 

Crea^'er, C. E 1876 

Crevelin«,^ S. A 1862 

Crever, M iss A. Rosa 1886 

Crotsley, IL H 1886 

Cummings, Miss L. W 1877 

Curns, Miss M. E 1883 

Curran, IL A 1858 

Dale, Miss F 1872 

Dart, Miss L 1875 

j Dashiell, Miss A. F 1877 

Davis, Miss IL B 1853 

Davis, Miss M. B 1852 






I 



^ 



THIRTY-NINTH ANNUAL CATALOGUE. 



Navies. Class. 

Deavor, J. D. W 1880 

Deavor, PI E. A .1871 

De Armond, D. A 1866 

*Diemer, J. B. 1853 

Dietrick, F. V..... 1871 

Dill, A. II 18.52 

Dill, M. R J863 

Dill, W. II 1857 

Driiikle, Miss M. E 1867 

Drum, Miss E. M 1885 

Drum, M. L 1857 

Dunkerly, J. R 1878 

Ebert, M iss A. M I860 

Kckbert, Miss A. M 1874 

Eder, Miss M. G 1884 

Kdgcr, Miss M 1857 

Edwards, Miss A. C .1881 

Elliott, Miss M. F ^862 

Emery, Miss Eva V 18.57 

Emery, Miss Lizzie 1 1860 

Emery, Miss M. P 1857 

*Ent, W. II :• 1858 

Essin«jjton,Miss M. R 1877 

Essin<,'ton, Miss N. A 1865 

Evans, S. B 1885 

Everett, Miss Lottie C 1886 

Eyer, IL B 1885 

Faunce, J. E 1863 

Ferguson, Miss II. E 1885 

Fidler, C. L 1860 

*Foulke, Miss Jennie R 1878 

Fredericks, D. H. M 1862 

Fredericks, More 1860 

Friling, Miss M 1865 

Frost, W. M 1880 

Fullmer, C; F : . . .«. .1881 

Fullmer, C. L 1880 

Furst, A. O 1854 

Furst, C. G 1853 

Gearhart, H. F 1853 

Gearhart, W. H 1862 

Gehret, Miss E. L 1883 

Gere, Miss IL A 1852 

Gere, Miss S. F 1852 

Gibson, W. S ' 1877 

Gilmore, Miss A. II 1884 

Glenn, G. W. M 1884 

Glover, Miss L E 1884 

(ioodlander, Miss J. E 1855 

Goodwill, VV. F 1875 

Gray, E. J 1858 

Gray, W. E 1881 

(Jray, William W 1886 

(ireen. Miss II. M 1852 

(ireen. Miss M. A 1855 

( Jreenly, T 1858 

Griggs, Miss B. E 1871 

(iuldin, J 1872 

Guss, Miss A. E 1882 

^Deceased. f Honorary. 



Names. Class. 

Ilahn, Miss L. S 1871 

ILileiibake, Miss S. E 1862 

Hammond, W. S 1874 

*IIaniMiond, W. A 1864 

Hanks, IL R 1876 

nann,C\ G 187H 

Ilarman. Miss A. E 1868 

Harris, F. (i 1873 

Harris, MisH I. P 1870 

Harris, Miss L. R 1872 

Ilartman, Miss C 1863 

Ilartzell, Miss A. M. C 1883 

Hartzell, C. V 1S79 

Harvey, J. C 1H80 

Ilaughawout, Miss L. M 1883 

Haughawout, Miss 8. F 1862 

Haupt, G. W .1860 

Heck, O. (^ 1884 

Hedges, Miss E. V 1879 

Heilman, R. P 1874 

tHeilner, 8. A 1876 

Heim, C. F 1875 

Heisley, Miss R. N 1852 

Hepburn, A. I) 1862 

*Herr, Miss A. M 1861 

Hill, Miss A 1881 

Himes, T. B 1 K65 

Hippie, T. C 1865 

Hitchins, H 1876 

Ilollopeter, S. G. M ..1865 

Hooven, Miss M. M 1886 

Hoover, W. R 1885 

Houck, MissG. H 1881 

Howes, Miss A 1864 

Hunter, L. H 1884 

Ilursh, Miss L. M 1882 

Hutchison, J. G 1862 

Ilutchiscm, W. L 1884 

Hyman, Miss J. S 1880 

*Hyman, Miss S. R 1860 

*Jackson, C. G 1858 

James, J. Harry 1866 

James, W. M 1878 

Janney, L. R 1874 

John, D. C 1856 

*John, G. W : ...1858 

Johns, J. E 1886 

Johns, William 1884 

Jones, Miss J. L 1884 

Jones, Miss S. T 1872 

Joyce, Elijah 1857 

KHlbfuss, Charles. 18.52 

Reefer, Miss p:ila 1884 

Kimball, A. W 1881 

King, M iss Ada E 1877 

King, (i. E 1876 

Kirk, Miss N. A 1880 

*Kline, E. B 1868 

, Koch, E. V 18S0 



8 



WILLI AMSPORT DICKINSON SEMINARY. 



TIIIRTY-NINTIl ANNUAL CATALOGUK. 



9 



Names. Class. 

Koth, MiHH Ida E 188(5 

Koch, Winti Laura M 1880 

Konkle, W. B 1878 

Kress, W. C 1859 

*Laiulis, J. W 1857 

Larii<3d, F. W 1880 

Law. F. S 18G8 

Leidy, Miss M. B 1885 

Levan, Miss M 1864 

Lincoln, Miss 11. M 1884 

Lloyd, A. P 1879 

Lon^', 11. E 1878 

Lon«^% Miss J. M 1884 

Loiidenslaj^er, Miss H. S 18(>7 

tLove, J. K 1877 

*Loveland, K .. 187(5 

-Lovcll, Miss A. M . , AHm 

Lowe, Miss Emma 1857 

*Lowc, Miss A. S 18(58 

Lowe, J. W. 1877 

Madara, J. W ' 1873 

:Madill, G. A 1858 

Malin, Miss E 18t)l 

*Markle, A. M 1871 

Mason, Miss T 18(5(5 

Massey, Miss A. E 1 8(54 

Massey, Miss M. E 187H 

May, W. A 1873 

McCloskey, M. J 1875 

McCord, Miss Mary 1852 

McCuHoui^li, Miss M. J 1877 

McDowell, A 18(5(5 

^McDowell, Miss C 18(56 

McDowell, Miss I - . . .18(55 

McCiraw, J.- K 1886 

McKee, Miss N. E. B 1882 

McWilliamJi, D. A 1886 

Melick, O. B 18(54 

Melsheimer, J. A 1878 

Mendenliall, IL 8 18.53 

Metz^er, Miss E. Z 1879 

Mctzler, O. S 1880 

Miller, J. M 1875 

Miller, Miss J. U 18(50 

Milnes, Miss L. II 1885 

Mitchell, Miss M. J ls(55 

Mitchell, Miss M. L . . 1885 

Mitchell, M. L 1885 

Moore, R. S 1 88(5 

Moore, S. G ]S61 

Mosser, Miss Annie 1S82 

Mosser, B. II ls77 

Mortimer, J. H 1881 

Moiil, C. B.. 1878 

tMoytT, H. C 1 882 

Murray, T. II 1S(57 

Musser, Miss M. E 1881 

Mussina, Miss II 18(52 

Mussina, Miss Ti 1861 

*Dcceased. ■\IIonorary. 



Names. Class. 

Mussina, Miss M. A 18(54 

Nash, M iss F. E 1 8(55 

Nash, Miss K. E 18(50 

Needy, C'arl W 1886 

Neff , J.I 1 8(51 

Nicodemus, J. I) , 1874 

Norcross, W. 11^ 18(55 

Norris, Miss Sadie U 1886 

Oliver, Miss A. S 1861 

Olmstead, Miss E 1875 

Olmstead, Miss M 1875 

Oi)i), J. A 1870 

Ott, L. 1) 1885 

Packer, Miss M 1852 

Packer, Miss S. B 1852 

Pardoe, Miss M. II 1885 

Pearce, Miss A. M. .. ....>.. ..1876 

Pearce, Miss Bessie 1877 

Pearre, A 18,58 

Pidcoe, A. S 1886 

*Poisal, R. E 1858 

Pomeroy, W. R 1885 

Porter, Miss E. S 18(56 

*Pott, K. R 18.58 

Ransom, Miss K. E 1867 

Keeder, W. F 1875 

Reeder, R. K 1878 

Reider, Miss Bertha A 1886 

Reii^hard, Miss S. S 18(5(5 

Rentz, VV. F 1874 

Reynolds, S. A 1 874 

Rex, J. B 1878 

Riale, Miss IL E 1885 

Ricliards, Miss E. L 1873 

Ridden, E. C 1877 

Riddle, Miss E 1S54 

Riddle, Miss M. E 18.54 

Robeson, F. \V 1882 

Robeson, Miss M 1880 

Kobins, Miss M. E 1884 

Rothluss, Miss Pho'be 1882 

Rue, J. \V 1877 

Russell, Miss J. S 1885 

Sadler, W. F 18(53 

San<;ree, P. II K865 

Saylor, Miss J. S 18(52 

*Scarl)orouj;h, (J. M 1878 

Sclioch, A 18(52 

Schotield, E. I ]8(52 

Scoville, Miss »L E 18(53 

Seclder, W. A j 883 

Shammo, M iss F. E j 879 

Shick, Miss Mary M 188(5 

Shooj), \V. R 1883 

Showalter, Miss A. B 1885 

Sliver, W. A i8(52 

Smith, 1 1. E 18(56 

Smith, N. H i872 

Smith, 'V. J 1861 



i\ 



^ 



t 



N(mies. Class. 

Snyder, Miss E 1881 

Souder, Miss R L *. 18(55 

Span^ler, J. L 1871 

Spottswood, Miss A. E 1873 

Spottswood, Miss L. M 18(55 

Stackhouse, M iss E. A 1885 

Steinmitz, J. L 1868 

Stevens, E. M 1882 

Stevens, ii. W 1881 

Stevens, J. C 1885 

Stevenson, W. II 1883 

Stolz, M iss R. J 1873 

Stout, Mi^s P. R 1883 

.Strine, Miss M. J 18(59 

Strohm, \V. II 1870 

Strong-, M iss IL A 1880 

Stuart, Miss May T. . ... .1882 

Swartz, T. S 1885 

Swen«rle, D. F 18(50 

Swope, L N 1869 

Taneyhill, C. W . . . .^. 18(58 

Taneyhill, C. L 18.58 

Taneyhill, Miss M. E 1857 

Taneyhill, O. B 1877 

Taneyhill, Miss S. A 1853 

Taylor, Miss Ida A 1875 

Taylor, Miss Jennie M 1886 

Taylor, J. W 1863 

Taylor, R. S 1882 

Test, Miss C. S 1881 

Tewell, J. R 1886 

Thomas, Miss Sadio D 1876 

Thrush, Miss K. A 1879 

Tomlinson, F. II 1886 

'^.Deceased. 



Navies. Class. 

Tomlinson, Miss M. K Is80 

Tonner, A. C? : 18.53 

Townsend, W. F 18(5(5 

Vail, Miss H. C ls(59 

Vandcrslice, Miss J. A. . . ..., 18(53 

Vanfossen, Miss Ada .i.. 1857 

Volkmar, W 1883 

Warehime, O. C 1881 

Watson, F. A 18(54 

Watson, Miss F. K 18(55 

Way, E. F 18(52 

Weii-el, D. II 18(52 

Welty, Miss M. P 1875 

*Whaley, II 18.54 

Whitney, IL II 1884 

Wils(ni, Miss IL E 18s5 

Wilson, James E. . ..... .....:. • 18S6 

Wilson, J. L 1883 

Wilson, S. 1) X ^^^'^ 

Winegardner, Miss S. MI 1870 

Wooden, Miss Dora 18(54 

Woodward, »I 1 8(57 

'^Writ^ht, Miss Ida M 1877 

* Yetter, Miss M ." . 1861 

Yocum, E. II 1868 

*Yocum, G. M 18(50 

Yocum, J. J 1863 

*Yocum, Miss N 1852 

Younj;, J. B 1 8(56 

Youngs J. W. A 1883 

* Young, W. Z 1877 

'^Ziders, Miss Minnie 1875 

*Ziders, Miss V. S 1881 

Zollini^'er, Miss E. A 1882 



Gr?aduafeeS ir? ffiusiG. 



Names. Class. 

Bender, Miss Anna M 1884 

Brooks, Miss Laura 1879 

Champion, Miss MaLigie 1879 

Davis, Miss Clara 1882 

Ksclu'iibach, Miss Sophia 1881 

(Jable, Miss Annie 18,84 

(Jehret, Miss Ella I> 1881 

(ilover. Miss Fannie S 1883 

Horn, Miss Mamii' D 1881 

Houck, Miss (iertrude il 1880 

Ihiilar, Miss Annie 1884 

Hutchison, Wilbur L 1884 

Leckie, Miss Ida M 1883 

Leidy, Miss Mar^aret B 1885 

^L'litland, Miss Antia 1880 

Millspauj^h, Miss L. C 1886 

Musser, Miys Minnie E 1880 



Names. Clat^s. 

Nuss, Miss Laura 1884 

Pardoe, Miss Minnie II 1885 

Pooler, (leorLje W 1 880 

Handall, Miss .iosie 1882 

Richlell, Miss Claude 1885 

Ripley, Miss Ossie 1880 

Rothrock, Miss Maj^gie 18",9 

Shaw, Amos R 18S2 

Sheadle, Miss H. M 1886 

Slate, Miss Crecy 1 879 

St rat ford, M iss Kittie 1 885 

Stuart, Miss May ." 1880 

Titus, Miss Anna 1880 

Turley, Miss Mat tie 1885 

VcKlkler, Miss L. S 1886 

Wilde, E. W 1882 

Williams, Miss Minnie 1884 



10 



WILLIAMSPOUT DICKINSON SEMINARY. 



B^eiduabeS if? ppfe. 



Namm. Class. Names. 

J)ittinar, Miss E. A 1880 Ilnrvoy, Miss Carrie 

Everhart, Miss Kate isvy ; Mann, Miss L. Amelia. . . - 

Finney, Miss (irace B 1S8() ' Tlionipson, Miss Creey i.. 

Guss, Miss Ma^u;ie ISSii I 



Class. 
..1879 

..1885 
..188'2 



Resident GpadyaleS 



t; 



ffi0dei?i7 liangyagcs and flpb. 

Anna Kozilla Ciever — M. E. L. 

J\ Pfe. 
Mary Eugenia Curns— M. E. L. 

MuSiG. 

Laura May Koch— M. E. L. 



THIRTY-NINTH ANNUAL CATALOCUE 



11 



SeFiisr^ Glass. 



CrUiTE 16, 1887. 



Names. 
Emma Frances ('assidy — B. L., - 
Bailie Conner — B. L., - - - . - 

Mary Loraine Creveling — B. L., - 
Ida Carey Dcaver— B. L., 
Annie Lincoln Forrest— B, L., - 
{Stella May Fullmer— B. L., . . . - 

Emma Gertrude Gray— P. C, - - 

Etta Stark Gray— B. L., - - - 

Sallie Carter Guss—B. L., - - - - 

Ella Ray Hooven— B. L., 

Mary Edith Kessler—S., . - - - ■ 

Ida May Law— P. C, . . - - - 

Emma Boynton Mulford— B. L., - - - • 

Ida Amelia Shipley— B. L., - - - 

Minnie Treverton— B. L., - 

Samuel Lilly Anderson— C, - _ - - 

Harry K. Ash- P. C, 
Harry P. Canfield-P. C, 

Richard Watson Cooper— C, - - - 

Albert Simpson Heck — S., . - • - 

Charles Shoener Martyn— S., ... 

James Henry Morgart— S., . - - . 

Joseph Mason Stackhouse— P. C, 
Edward Thompson Teitsworth— S., 
Henry Treverton — S., 
Robert Thomas Whitely— P. C, - - - 

C— Classical. S.— Scientific. B. L.— Belles Lettres. V. C. 



Residences. 

Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Crisfield, Md. 

Green Village. 

Mifllintown. 

- Littleslown. 

Williamsport. 

Lewisburg. 

Williamsport. 

Mifllinburg. 

Orangeville. 

Altoona. 

Hollidaysburg. 

Woodbury, N. J. 

Daniel, Md. 

Everett. 

Atkinson's Mills. 

Miillinburg. 

Williamsport. 

Moorton, Del. 

Shirleysburg. 

Beaver Meadow. 

- Everett. 

Shickshinny. 

Elysburg. 

Everett. 

Preston, Md. 

—Partial Course. 



SeFii©i^S— MuSiG. 



Emma Frances Cassidy, 
Jennie May Heinsling, 
Laura May Koch, 
Chloe Martin, 



Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Dalmatia. 

Williamsport. 

Caledonia. 



12 



WILLI AMSPORT DICKINSON SEMINARY. 



Names. 



Lulu Sheets, -V 

^l;iy Emma Shopbell, 
Olive Hays Williamson, 
Minnie Elizabeth Zeth, 



Kcsrdcnces. 

Williamsport. 

Williamsport. 

llenovo. 

Hopewell. 



Senisps— flpfe. 



Cora Olivet J^rooks, 



Williamsport. 



JyBi©p Glass. 



Names. 
Babb, Kate J. — B. L., 
Dove, Carrie O. — B. L., 
Fessler, Ray G. — B. L., 
Ganoung, Cora M. — S., 
Gibson, ITattie — P. C, 
Greenly, E. Marian — B. L., 
Hill, Florence— N. E., 
Huntley, Louise J. — B. L, 
Kline, S. May — B. L., 
Metzger, IL Margaret— C;, 
HhalTer, Augusta L. — B. L., 
Smith, Amy—P. C, 
Steck, Carrie — B. L., 
Sterling, Emma K. — S , 
Wharton, May— B. L,, 
Beddow, William — S., 
Brown, C. La— S. , . 
Deavor, William T. S.— S , 
Hambleton, Conrad— S., 
Hesser, Charles T. — C, 
Huntley, George W., Jr.— S. 
Kamerly, Edwin F. — S., 
Kinsel, Harry C.—S., 
Little, W. F.-C, 



•v. 



Residences. 

Greenland, W. Va. 

Williamsport. 

Newberry. 

Williamsport. 

Williamsport. 

Williamsport. 

Williamsport. 

Driftwood. 

New Cumberland. 

Williamsport. 

Stahlstown. 

Greenland, W. Va. 

Williamsport. 

Reading. 

New Bloomtield. 

Minersvillc. 

Woodbury. 

Hustontown. 

Waynesboro. 

Perth Aml)oy, N. J. 

Driftwood. 

Town Hill. 

Tyrone. 

Loysburg. 



t 



t 



TIITRTV-NINTII ANNUAL CATALOGUE. 



13 



Names. 
McDowell, Harry W.— S., 
Miller, A. G.— S., 
Reeser, Isaiah J. — S., 
Stephens, Harry M. — S., 
Stewart, Charles B. — P. C, 
Stewart, Jesse S. — S., 

(^.—(Massical. S. —Scientific. H. L. 



Helios Lettres. 
Eiiirlish. 



Residences. 

- Newton Hamilton. 

Cedar Run. 

_ - - Herndon. 

Williamsport. 

Tyrone. 

- Tyrone. 

1». C— Partial Course. N. PI— Normal 



JuhIgi^S— ffiuSiG. 



Barclay, Georgia E., 
Blint, Nellie, 
Elwert, Cora, 
Eyer, Minnie S., 
Fry, Lizzie M. , 
Prior, Esther, 
Rothrock, Sallie, 
Runyan, Fannie, 
Swartz, Mary E., 
Walker, Gertrude A., 
V(clkler, Ernest J., 



Sinnemahoning. 

Williamsport. 

Williamsport. 

Shippensburg. 

York. 

AVilliamsport. 

Williamsport. 

Williams])ort. 

Dunc^mnon. 

Erffporium. 

Williamsport. 



JuniQPS—Pi^fe. 



Conner, Sallie, 
McKeage, Emma N. , 



Crisfield, Md. 
Cherry Tree. 



14 



AVILLIAMSPORT DICKINSON SEMINARY. 



r'i ' 




PG GlelSg. 



Namrs. 

J^arclay, Georgia E. , 
Black, Anna S,, 
Bly, Bessie B., - 

Brown, Annie J., 
Caldwell, Rebe J., 
Carter, Anna H., 
Champion, Elizabeth, 
Colburn, Jennie B., 
Colison, Carrie E,, 
Conner, Adella, 
Cook, Helen M., 
Dent, Gertrude A., 
Eder, Mary O., 
Guppy, Erie E., 
Hicks, Hattie W., 
llile, Maud D., - 
Houck, Grace B., 
Koch, Clara A., 
Mattern, Anna B., 
McCulloch, Nannie S., 
McCollum, Minnie E., 
Millspaugh, Laura C, 
Purdy, Mary P., 
Reamer, Grace M., 
Rockwell, Estella, 
Shenck, Stella B., 
Seiler, Vergie M. , 
Shoop, Minnie A. M,, 
Stevens, Annie M., - 
Swartz, Mary E., 
Trout, MattieC, 

Troxcll, Mary A., .. 

Walker, Gertrude A., 
Wynn, Mary PI, 
Aaron, W. Sherman, 
Alexander, E. Bruce, 
Bennett, W., 



Residences. 

Sinnemahoning. 

Rohersburg. 

Williamsport. 

Chatham's Run. 

- Lewistown. 

Williamsport. 

Williamsport. 

Sinnemahoning. 

Washington, D. C. 

- Crisfield, Md. 
Chambersburg. 

Henrietta. 

Williamsport. 

Lumber City. 

Altoona. 

Lumber City. 

Williamsport. 

Williamsport. 

BuiT'alo Run. 

McCulloch's Mills. 

Williamsport. 

Williamsport. 

Williamsport. 

Williamsport. 

-- Mainsburg. 

Hughesville. 

Watsontown. 

Dauphin. 

Mechanicsburg. 

Duncannon. 

RidgeviUe, W. Va. 

Emmittsburg, Md. 

Emporium. 

Woodland. 

Loysburg. 

- Kishacoquillis. 

Williamsport. 



i 



/i 



\ 



TIllRTV-NINTII ANNUAL CATALO(;UE. 



15 



Nannes. 

Cadle, Wilbert, 
Cooper, George B., 
Dyson, George, 
Edwards, William R., - 
Freed, J. Benson, 
Frownfelter, George M., 
Glosser, WilliM!!) E., 
Harman, P. M., 
Harvey, Benjamin J., 
Hontz, Almon W., 
Horner, Ju.->iiuiL T., 
Houck, U. Grant, 
Kuster, Herman J., 
Leidy, Frank W., 
Lingenfelter, Stewart B., 
Long, O. Harry, - 
Morris, Warden, 
Parker, Edwin L., 
Shealfer, W. J-, 
Smith, Aaron C, - 

Stephens, Walter C , 
West, Olin L., - 
Womer, George S., 



Residences. 

Williamsport. 

Williamsburg. 

Stroudsburg. 

Marti nsburg, W. Va. 

Williamsport. 

Harrisburg. 

Williamsport. 

Jarrettsville, Md. 

II nveyville. 

Shickshinny. 

Baltimore, Md. 

Berwick. 

Buck Horn. 

Tyrone. 

Philipsburg. 

Williamsport. 

Newberry. 

Baltimore, Md. 

Duncannon. 

Greenhwul, W. Va. 

Williamsport. 

Wilmington, Del. 

Reynoldsville. 



£GadeFiFii(i. 



SeG©Fid Year?. 



LADIES. 



Names. 

Detwiler, Mary, 
Gray, Florence, - 
Gray, Marian, 
Hughes, Anna G., 
Kuster, Mattie C, 
MahafTy, Laura, 
McGraw, Kate, 



Residences. 

Williamsport. 

Philipsburg. 

Philipsburg. 

Rainsburg. 

Buck Horn. 

Newberry. 

Claysburg. 



16 



WILUAMSPOKT DICKINSON SEMINARY. 



Names. 

Morti^art, Rachel, 
lioot, Anna M., 
Rothrock, May, 
Taylor, Mary E., 
Trout, Susie, 
Woodrufr, Martha M., 



Barrett, Charles F., 
Campbell, Frank, 
Clu^ri Hilton, Warren W., 
Clark, Charles B., 
(Hemens, Josepli, 
Creveling, Clem C, 
Duble, Jesfie C, 
Fleming, John W., 
Glosser, Abraham, 
Goodman, Fred, 
Graves, Girard E., 
Green, E. Lee, 
llarter, Elmer E., 
Kembel, Edward, 
Koons, George, - 
McCallister, C, 
McCulloch, George G., 
Miller, Charles L., 
Moyer, Charles S., 
Parker, Malcolm, 
Fletcher, Edward, 
Rawle, James, 
Rickert, William, 
Robins, Edwin S., 
Ryan, Thomas F., 
Sheffer, Elmer E., - 
Shoemaker, Homer, 
Voolkler, Ernest J., 
Weaver, Samuel A., 
Weddigen, William L., 
Williams, S. Marshall, 



GENTLEMEN. 



♦ • 



Residaiccti. 

Montpelier, Dak. 

Reading. 

Driftwood. 

Butler. 

Ridgeville, W. Va. 

Williamsport. 



Boston, Mass. 

AYilliamsport. 

Mill Grove. 

ReynoldsviHe. 

Eichelberger. 

Green Village. 

Williamsport. 

Plane No. 4, Md. 

Williamsport. 

ILunmerly's Fork. 

Boston, Mass. 

Williamsport. 

Pleasant View. 

Mt. Carmel. 

Williamsport. 

.Mt. Holly Springs. 

\VIcCulloch's Mills. 

Pottsville. 

Ashland. 

Baltimore, Md. 

Howard. 

Montoursville. 

Williamsport. 

Shamokin. 

Topeka, Kan. 

Williamsport. 

Howard. 

Newberry. 

- Montoursville. 

Williamsport. 

Everett. 






{ 



TI 



IIKTY-NINTH ANNUAL CATALOGUE. 



17 






FlipSfe Yeap. 



LADIES. 



Names. 
Carter, Mary J., 
John, Ida, 

Kinney, Harriet, * - 
Major, Hattie, 
Nicodemus, Lena M., 
Purvis, Annie L., 



Baker, Charles W. J., 
Calvert, Adam C, 
Campbell, Charles H., 
Fredericks, William M., 
Gearheart, Wilbur, 
Goodman, Edgar N., 
Greenly, Thomas B., 
John, Ralph R., 
*McKinny, W. A., - 
McVoy, George C, 
McVoy, James F., - 
Rentz, H. E., 
Roat, William D., 
Shaw, Frank, 
Stanley, William A., 
Strunk, R. W., - 
Vandyke, Harry, 
Vcelkler, Max G., 
Wilson, Harry, 

*J)ecea8ed. 



Rfddences. 

Williamsport. 

Catawissa. 

Bodinesville. 

Williamsport. 

Curry. 

Lock Haven. 



GENTLEMEN. 



Lambeth, Canada. 
. Williamsport. 
Kettle Creek. 
Lock Haven. 
Williamsport. 
Westport. 
Williamsport. 
Catawissa. 
Altoona. 
- Liberty. 
Liberty. 
Loyalsockville. 
Renovo. 
Williamsport. 
Ramey. 
Lewistown. 
Williamsport. 
Newberry. 
Sunbury. 



a 



18 



WILMAMSI'OUT DICKINSON SEMINARY. 



(Zlissiaal Bepapfei^Gnt. 



Names. 



Cook, Helen M., 
Metzger, H. Margaret, 

Anderson, Samuel L., 
Brown, C. I., 
Cooper, R. Watson, 
Edwaids, William R.^ 
Freed, J. Benson, 
Frownfelter, George M. 
Ilesser, C:iiarles T., 
Horner, Joshua, 
Ilontz, Almon W., 
Kuster, Herman J., 
Little, W. F., 
Morgart, James H., 
Sheaffer, William J., 
Stephens, Walter C, 
West, OlinL., 
Whitel3% Robert T., 



LADIES. 



GENTLEMEN. 



Rcsidniccfi. 

Chambersburg, 
Williamsport. 



Atkinson's Mills. 
Woodbury. 
Moorton, Del. 
Marti nsburg, W. Va. 
Williamsport. 
Harris burg. 
Perth Amboy, N. J. 
Baltimore, Md. 
Shickshinny. 
Buck Horn. 
- • Lo^'sburg. 
- Everett. 
Duncannon. 
Williamsport. 
Wilmington, Del. 
Preston, Md. 






1 



\i 



\ 



( 



TllTRTY-NTNTlI ANNUAL CATALOGl E. 






i( 



Namcf^. 
Black, Anna B., 
Bly, Bessie B., 
Cliampion, Elizabeth, 
Colburn, Jennie B., 
Eder, Mary O., 
Ganoung, Cora M., 
Kessler, Mary E., 
Millspaugh, Laura C, 
Purdy, Mary P., 
Rockwell, Estella, 
Sterling, Emma K., 

Aaron, W. Sherman, 
Alexander, "^E Bruce, 
Ash, Harry K., - 
Beddow, William, 
Bennett, Watson S., 
Cadle, Wilbert, 
Can field, Harry P., 
Cooper, George B., 
Deavor, William T. S., 
Dyson, George, 
Glosser, William E., 
Hambleton, Conrad, 
Harmon, P. M., 
Harvey, Benjamin J., 
Heck, Albert S., 
Houck, U. Grant, 
Huntley, George, 
Kamerly, Edwin F., 
Kinsel, Harry C, 
Leidy, Frank, 
Long, O. Harry, 
Marty n, Charles, 
McDowell, Harry W., 



LADIES. 



GENTLEMEN. 



19 



Do port me Fife. 



Jiff^idnicr.^. 
Rohersburg. 
Williamsport. 
Williamsport. 
Sinnemahoning. 
Willkimsport. 
Williamsport. 
Altoona. 
Williamsport. 
Williams]M)rt. 
Mai nsburg. 
Reading. 

Loysburg. 
Kishac()(piillas. 
Mi til in burg, 
Minersville. 
Williamsport. 
Williamsport. 
Williamsport. 
Williamsburg, 
llustontown. 
Stroudsburg. 
Williamsport. 
Waynesboro. 
Jarrettsville, Md. 
Harveyville. 
Shirleysburg. 
lU'rwic'iv. 
Driftwood. 
Town Hill. 
Tyrone. 
Tyrone. 
Williamsport. 
Braver Meadow. 
Newton Hamilton. 



/ 



20 



WILLTAMSPORT DICKINSON SKMINARY 



THIRTY-NINTH ANNUAL CATALOGUE. 



21 



yames. 
Miller, Andrew G., - 
Morris, Warden, 
Parker, Edwin L., . 
Keeser, Isaiaii J., 
Sinilh, Aaron C, 
Sniitli, Emory, - 
Stack house, J. M., 
Stephens, Harry M., 
Stewart, Charles B., 
Stewart, Jesse S., 
Teitsworth, Edward T., 
Treverton, Jlenry, 
Woiner, George S.,. 



Nnmrs. 
Bal)]), Kate J., . 
Barclay, Georgia E., 
Brown, Annie J., 
Caldwell, Rebe J., . 
Carter, Anna H., 
Cassidy, Emma F., 
('olison, Carrie E., 
Conn(M-, Adella, 
C^onner, Sallie, . 
Creveling, Mary L., 
Denver, IdaCV, y^ 
Dent, Gertrude A , 
Fessler, Hay G., 
Forrest, Annie L., . 
Fullmer, Stella G., 
Gibson, Haltie, 



liesldcnces. 

Slate Run. 
Newberry. 
Baltimore, Md. 
Hern don. 
Greenland, W. Va. 
Bedford. 
Shickshinny. 
Williamsport. 
Tyrone. 
Tyrone. 
Elysburg. 
Everett. 
Reynoldsville. 



Belles LiettPes Bepapfemenli. 



LADIES. 



Remlencffi. 
Greenland, W. Va. 
Sinnemahoning. 
Chatham's Run. 
. Lewistown. 
Williamsport. 
Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Washington, D. C. 
Crisfield, Md 
. Crisfield, Md. 
Green Village. 
Mitilintown. 
Henrietta. 
Newberr3\ 
Littlestown. 
Williamsport. 
Williamsport. 



m ^ 



> 



( 



Names. 
Gray, Emma G., 
Gray, P^tta S. , 
Greenly, E. Marian, 
Guppy, Erie E., 
Guss, Sallie C, 
Hicks, Haltie, 
Hile, .Muud, 
Hill, Florence, 
Hooven, Ella R., 
Huntley, Louise J,, 
Houck, Grace B., 
Kline, S. May, 
Koch, Clara, 
Law, Ida M. , 
Mattern, Anna B., 
McCollum, Minnie E., 
McCulloch, Nannie, 
Mulford, Emma B., 
Reamer, Grace, 
Seller, Vergie M., . 
Shaffer, Augusta L., 
Shenck, Stella B., . 
Shipley, Ida A., — 
Shoop, Minnie A. M., 
Smith, Amy, 
Steck, Carrie E., 
Stevens, Annie M., 
Treverton, Minnie, 
Trout, Susie, 
Troxeli, Mary A , 
Vangilder, Minnie C, 
Walker, Gertrude A , 
Wynn, Mary B., 



Residences. 

Lewisburg. 
Williamsport. 
Williamsport. 
Lumber City. 
Mifllinburg. 
Altoona. 
Lumber City. 
WiHiamst)ort. 
Oranireville. 
iJiiilwuod. 
Williamsport. 
New Cumberland. 
Williamsport. 
IloUidaysburg. 
Buffalo Run. 
Williamsport. 
McCulloch'8 Mills. 
Woodbury, N. J. 
Williamsport. 
Watsontown. 
Stahlstown. 
Hughesville. 
Wintield/Md. 
Dauphin. 
Greenland, W. Va. 
Burlingame. 
Mechanicsburg. 
Everett. 
Ridgeville, W. Va. 
Emmittsburg, Md. 
W^illiamsport. 
Emporium. 
Woodland. 



'!! 



22 



AVILLIAMSrOKT DICKINSON SEMINAUY 



THIKTY-NINTH ANNUAL CATALOG iUE. 



23 



JiGademiG Bepaptnii nk 



Names, 
Carter, Mary J., 
Dctwiler, Mary, 
Gray, Florence, . 

Gray, jNIariau, 
Hughes, Anna G., . 
John, Ida G., 
Kinney, Harriet, 
Kiister, Martha C, 
Mahairey, Laura V., 
Major, Hattie, . 
McGraw, Kate, 
Morgart, Rachel, 
Nicodemus, Mary M., 
Purvis, Annie L., 
Root, Annie M., 
Roth rock, May, 
Tayloi', Mary E., 
Woodruff, Martha M., 



Baker, Charles W. J., 
Rarrett, CJ4iarles F., 
Calvert, Adam C, . 
Campbell, Charles H., 
Campbell, Frank, . 
Cherington, Warren W., 
Clark, Charles R., . 
Clemens, Joseph, 

Creveling, ClemC, 

Duble, Jesse C, 

Fleming, J. W., 

Fredericks, William M., 

Gearheart, Wilbur, 

Glosser, Abraham, 

Goodman, Edgar N., 



LADIES. 



GENTLEMEN. 



Kemlences. 

Williamsport. 
Williamsport. 
Philipsburg. 
Philipsburg. 
Rainsburg. 
. Catawissa. 

Rodinesville. 
Buck Horn. 
Newberry. 
Williamsport. 
Claysburg. 
Montpelier, Dakota. 

Curry. 

Lock Haven. 

Reading. 

Driftwood. 

Butler. 

Williamsport. 



Lambeth, Canada. 
Boston, Mass. 
Williamsport. 
Kettle Creek. 
Williamsport. 
Mill Grove. 
Reynoldsville. 
Eichelberger. 
Green Village. 
Williamsport. 
Plane No. 4, ^d. 
Lock Haven. 
Williamsport. 
Williamsport. 
Westport. 



iS, 



^^ 



{ 



Namea. 
Goodman, Fred, 
Graves, Girard E., 
Green, Lee E., 
Greenly, Thomas B., 
Harter, Elmer E., 
John, Ralph R., 
Kembel, Edward B., 
Koons, George, 
Leathers, Haupt A., 
Lingenfelter, S. B., 
McCallister, Charles, 
McCulloch, George G., 
*Mc Kinney, William A., 
McVoy, George C, 
McVoy, James F. , 
Miller, Charles L., 
Moyer, Charles P., 
Parker, Malcolm, 
Fletcher, Edward, 
Rawle, James, 
Rentz, II. E., 
Roat, William D., . 
Robins, Edwin S., 
Ryan, Thomas F., . 
8haw, Frank, 
Shelter, Elmer E., 
Shoemaker, Homer, 
Stanley, William A., 
Stead, I. B., 
Strunk, R. W., 
Vandyke, Harry, 
Vtelkler, Ernest J., 
Va^lkler, Max G., 
Weaver, Samuel A., 
Weddigen, William L., 
Williams, S. Marshall, 
Wilson, Harry, . 

■^Deceased. 



Residences. 
Hammerley's Fork. 
Boston, Mass. 
Williamsport. 
Williamsport. 
Pleasant View. 
Catawissa. 
Mt. Carmel. 
Williamsport. 
Mount Eagle. 
Philipsburg. 
Mt. Holly Springs. 
McCulloch's Mills. 
Altoona. 
Liberty. 
Liberty. 
Pottsville. 
Ashland. 
Baltimore. 
Howard. 
Montoursville. 
Loyalsockville. 
Renovo. 
Shamokin. 
Topeka, Kansas. 
Williamsport. 
Williamsport. 
Howard. 
Ramey. 
Williamsport. 
Strode's Mills. 
Williamsport. 
Williamsport. 
Williamsport. 
Montoursville. 
Williamsport. 
Everett. 
Sunbury. 



24 



WILLIAMSPORT DICKINSON SEMINARY. 



THIRTY-NINTH ANNUAL CATALOGUE. 



25 



fpiFT^SFY Oopartrricrit. 



fnusiG Dcportrncnti. 



Kames. 



GIRLS. 



Burnley, Cloyd, 
Burnley, Lucy, 
Gray, Eva C , 
Harrison, Fannie, 
Kaliler, Lulu, 
Kahler, Rosa, 
Putnam, Ada Pearl, 



Billman, Bertram, 
Billman, Fred, 
Burnle}^ Charles, 
Clieston, Frank, 
Gray, Edward P., 
Houck, Frank, 
Houck, Herbert, 
Keiss, Howard S., . 
Magee, William, 
Pursel, Augustus, . 
Putnam, Ray, 
Putnam, Weir, 
Smith, Elmer, 
Shaw, William, 
Vanlew, Howard W., 



BOYS. 



A 



Residences. 

Williamsport. 
Willianisport. 
Williamsport. 
Williamsport. 
Williamsport. 
Williamsport. 
Williamsport. 

Williamsport. 

Williamsport. 

Williamsport. 

Williamsport. 

Williamsport. 

Williamsport. 

Williamsport. 

Williamsport. 

Phikdelphia. 

Bloomsburg. 

Williamsport. 

Williamsport. 

Williamsport. 

Williamsport. 

Williamsport. 



LADIES. 



i 
< 



4. 
I' 



} 



( 



Names. 
Baker, Margery A., 
Barclay, Georgia E., 
Bare, Anna, 
Blint, Nellie, 
Boyer, Ida S., 
Brown, Annie J., 
Burnley, Cloyd, 
Burnley, Lucy, 
Buzzard, Inez M., 
Caldwell, Rebe J., 
Cassidy, Emma F., 
Champion, Lizzie, 
Colburn, Jennie B., 
Colison, Carrie E., - 
Conner, Adella, - 
Cowden, Lillie J., - 
Elwert, Cora, 
Eyer, Minnie S., 
Fry, Lizzie M. , - 
Giddings, Lina, 
Gray, Etta S., 
Gray, Eva C, 
Gray, Florence, 
Gray, Marian, 
Guyer, Minnie M., 
Heck, Clemma, 
Heinsling, May J., 
Hicks, Hattie, 
Hughes, Anna G., 
John, Ida G., 
Kinney, Harriet, 
Kline, S. May, 
Koch, Laura M , 
Kuster, Martha C, - 
Langgans, Sophie, 



Residences. 

Montoursville. 
Sinnemahoning. 
Roaring Springs. 
Williamsport. 
Berwick. 
Chatham's Run. 
Williamsport. 
Williamsport. 
Newberry. 
Lewistown. 
Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Williamsport. 
Sinnemahoning. 
Washington, I). C. 
- Crisfield, Md. 
Linden. 
Williamsport. 
Shippensburg. 
York. 
Williamsport. 
Williaimsport. 
Williamsport. 
Philipsburg. 
IMiilipsburg. 
Warrior's Mark. 
Three Springs. 
Dal m at i a. 
Altoona. 
Rainsburg. 
Catawissa. 
Bodinesville. 
New Cumberland. 
Williams|)()rt. 
- Buck Horn. 
Williamsport. 



2G 



WILLIAMSI'OUT DICKINSON SEMINARY. 



Names. 
Miiliairey, Elsie, - 

Mann, Bessie, - 
Martin, Chloe, - 

McGraw, Kate, - 
Metzger, H. Mari!;aret, 
Mills])augli, Mabel Jx, 
Multord, Emma B., 
Nicodemiis, Mary M., 
Pearce, Grace D., 
Prior, Esther, 
Purvis, Kate E., 
Putnam, Ada Pearl, 
Robeson, Effie, - 

Root, Anna M., 
Rothroek, May E., 
Rotbrock, Sallie, 
Runyan, Fannie, 
Rvan, Laura ^L, 
Sbenck, Stella B., - 
SbalTer, Augusta L., 
Sheets, Lidu, 
Shopbell, May E., . 

Shoop, Minnie A. M., 
Smith, Dorothy Estella, 
Sterling, Emma K., 
Swartz, Mary E., 
Taylor, ]\lary B., 
Trout, Susie J., - 
Troxell, Mary A., 
Walker, Gertrude A., 
Wilson, Maggie L., 
Williamson, Glive II., 
Wright, Mrs Erastus, 
Wynn, Mary B., 
Zeth, Minnie E., 

Curns, Charles F., 
Goodman, E. N., 
Lingenfelter, S. B., 
McGee, William, 
Montelius, Frank S., 
Stewart, Charles, 
Stewart, Jesse, 
Vd'lkler, Ernest J., 
Voelkler, Max G., 



Residences. 

Mah alley. 
Newberry. 
Caledonia. 
C'iaysburg. 
Williamsport. 
Williams])ort 
Woodbury, N. J. 
Curry. 
Lewistown. 
Williamsport. 
Williamsport. 
Williamsport. 
Lewistown. 
Reading. 
Driftwood. 
Williamsport. 
Williamsport. 
- Halifax, 
llughesville. 
Stahlstown. 
Williamsport, 
Williamsi)ort. 
Dauphin. 
Altoona. 
Reading. 
Duncannon. 
Butler. 
Ridgeville, W. Va. 
Emmittsburg, Md. 
Emporium. 
Roaring Spring. 
Renovo. 
Williamsport. 
Woodland. 
Hopewell. 



GENTLEMEN. 



Huntingdon. 

Westport. 

Philipsburg. 

Philadelphia. 

Mt. Car m el. 

- Tyrone. 

Tyrone. 

Williamsport. 

Williamsport. 



TIIIRTY-NINTII ANNUAL CATALO(;UE. 



27 



^•" 






\ 



D 



r\Tv /iiiq rinc 



^a i ! ! 



iiici Dc 



)ui 



if 



LADIES. 



Names. 

Ayers, Aihy, 

Boyer, Lla S., 

Brooks, Cora ()., 

Buzzard, Inez M., 

Byers, Alice G., 

Cassidy, Emma F., 

Conner, Sallie, 

Crever, Anna R.. 

Fullmer, Jennie, 

Gassaway, Lulu, 

Gray, Marian, 

Hartzell, Ada M. C, 

Heinsling, May J., . 

Houck, Florence N., 

Kiess, Mrs. Thomas E., 

Kline, Mrs. James, 

Koch, Ida, 
Lutcher, Carrie, 
Mulford, Emma B., - 
McKeage, p]mma N., 
Nice, Mrs. John, 
Noble, Mrs. Emma, 
Rawle, Juliet, 
Smiley, Alice E., 
Smith, Amy, 
Swartz, Mary E., 
Thompson, Maggie, 
Trout, Mattie C, 
Updegraff, Laura, 
Wilson, Pascaline, 
Yocum, Mrs. E. IL, 

Baker, Charles W. J., - 
Beddow, William, 
Curns, Charles F., 



GENTLEMEN. 



Residences. 

Williamsp(jrt. 
l^crwick. 
Williamsport. 
Newberry. 
Philadelphia. 
Brooklyn, N. V. 
Cristield, Md. 
New Freedom. 
Williamsport. 
Williamsport. 
Philipsburg. 
Newport. 
Dal mat ia. 
Williamsport. 
Williamsport. 
Williamsport. 
Williamsport. 
- Orange, Texas. 
Woodbury, N. J. 
Cherry Tree. 
Williamsport. 
Williamspr)rt. 
Montoursvilh^ 
Carlisle. 
Greenland, W. Va. 

Duncannon. 

Cogan Station. 

Ridgeville, W. Va. 

Newberry. 

Clearfield. 

Berwick. 

Lambeth, Canada. 

- Minersville. 

Huntingdon. 



28 



WILLI AlSrSrORT DICKINSON SE^IINARY. 




•^ l«l V-) 




)artni(Mit. 



LADIES. 



Names. 
Black, Anna S., 
Boyer, Ida S., - 
Carter, Anna II., 
Champion, Elizabeth M., 
Colison, Carrie E., 
Collins, Kitty, 
Conner, Sallie, 
Cook, Helen M., 
Culver, Minnie E., 
Dent, Gertrude A., 
Eveleth, Cariie; 
Forrest, Annie L., 
Fry, Lizzie M., 
Gray, Etta S., 
Gray, Florence, 

Gray, Marian, 

Heinsling, May J., - 

Hicks, Hattie, 

Hughes, Anna G., 

Huntley, Louise J., 

Jones, Eva, 

Kessler, Mary E., 

Kline, S. May, 

Levi, Bertha, 

IVIahairey, Elsie, 

Mahalfey, Laura V., 

Martin, Chloe, 

McKeage, Emma N., 

MeUniish, Bhea, 

Nicodemus, Lena M., 

Pearce, Grace, 

Purdy, Mary P., 

Reider, Bertha A., 

Hidden, Minnie E., 

liobeson, Eflie, 



Residences. 

- Kohrsburg. 
Berwick. 
Williamsport. 
Williamsport. 
Washington, D. C. 
Williamsport. 
Cristield, Md. 
Chambersburg. 
Carlisle. 
Henrietta. 
Williamsport. 
Littlestown. 
York. 
Williamsport. 
Philipsburg. 
Philipsburg. 
Dalmatia. 
Altoona. 
Kainsburg. 
Driftwood. 
Williamsport. 
Altoona. 
New Cumberland. 
Williamsport. 
Mahaffey. 
Newberry. 
Caledonia. 
Cherry Tree. 
Long Reach. 
Curry. 
Lewistown. 
Williamsport. 
Williamsport. 
Nesbit. 
- Lewistown. 



TIIIRTY-NINTII ANNUAL CATALOGUE. 



29 



I 



\ 



t 



Names. 
Shipley, Ida A., 
Shoop, Minnie A. M., 
Smith, Estella Dorothy, 
Stras])urger, Jennie, 
Tinsman, Margaretta, 
Trout, Mattie, 
Zetli, .Minnie E., 

Barrett, Charles F., 
Bower, J. Irviii, 
Huntley, George, 
McCulloch, George G., 
*McKinney, William A., 
McLaury, Frank M., 
Leidy, Frank, 
Stewart, Charles B., 
Stewart, Jesse S., 
Teits worth, E. T., 
West, Olin L., . 
*DeceasecL 



GENTLEMEN. 



Residences. 

- Winfield, Md. 

Dauphin. 

Altoona. 

Williamsport. 

Williamsport. 

Ridgeville, W. Va. 

Hopewell. 

Boston, Mass. 

Williamsport. 

Driftwood. 

McCulloch's Mills. 

Altoona. 

Bloomville, N. Y. 

Tyrone. 

Tyrone. 

Tyrone. 

Elysburg. 

Wihkington, Del. 



Sfeudenis m SpeGial WqpIx. 



LADIES. 



\ Names. 

Bare, Anna, - 
Mann, Bessie, 
McKeage, Emma N., 
Pearce, Grace D., 
liobeson, Efhe, 
Vangilder, Minnie C, 

Curns, Charles F., . 
McFadden, (diaries J., . 
Menges, David M., . 
Montelius, Frank, 
Myers, Frank, 
Wallace, William E., . 



GENTLEMEN. 



Residences. 

Roaring Spring. 

Newberry. 

Cherry Tree. 

Lewistown. 

Lewistown. 

Williamsj)()rt. 

Huntingdon. 

Lewistown. 
' Turbotville. 

Mt. Carmel. 

Lewistown. 
Williamsport. 



e^ 



30 



WILLIAMSrOKT DICKINSON SEMINARY. 



Syi¥iFBaPY 



Students in Classical Department, 
Students in Scientific Department, 
St\idents in Belles Lettres Department, 
Students in Special Work, 
Students in Academic Department, 
Students in Primary Department, 
Students in Elocution Department, 



fRusiG DepQPtFnGnfc, 



Students in Instrumental Music, 
Students in Thorough Bass and Harmony, 
Students in Vocal Culture, - > 



Pr?fe Bepar^femeFife, 



Students in Oil Painting, - 
Students in Crayc^ning, - 
Students in China Painting, 
Students in Pencil Drawing, - 

(Fall Term, 
Numl)er by Terms: - Winter Term, 
^ (S])ring Term, 

Whole Number by Terms, 



18 
47 
50 
12 
70 



22 



58 



88 
88 
88 



20 

12 

3 





225 

201 
205 



081 



f 



I 



\ 



THIRTV-NINTII ANNUAL CATALOGUE. 



81 






i 



ipizGS Hwapded ir? 188(5. 

Tke Presuienfs Frne-for E.^ellence in Wnting an, DeHverin, an 

Oration : 
Miss Mary M. Shick, - . . 

Heading. 

-t M»rM*;,t ""^'~"': ''"■". """'" ''''"""" " "■'"•■'■"• ■■ 

Reading. 

rrank H. Jomlinson, 

Montoursville 

cut ion : 
Miss Minnie E. Yangilder, 

' " ■ Williamsport. 

^^ he F. G. Smith Prize the Fir,/ P^;^. /• z? // 

me J I, St J, izefor Excellence in Instrumental 

Afusic : 
Miss Laura C. Millspaugh, 

^ ' ' " " Williamsport. 

The a C. Mussina Pri.i-^tke Secon, Prise for Excellence in Inslru- 

mental Music : 
Miss Lizzie S. Vcelkler, 

Williamsport. 

The Professor Va-lkler Pri.e-tke Tkircl Pri.e for Excellence in Inslru- 

mental Music: 
Mlss May E. Sliopbell, 

•=• ' " " ■ Williamsport. 

The Hazelet Prize~for Excellence in Oil Painlin<r , 



Miss Emma A. Dittmar, 



Williamsport. 



^'^ ^'-''^^ ^---^/- J^^rsl Prize for Excellence in AlgCra : 
1^. U. Vrooman, - - . _ 

Gettysburg. 

71. Professor Peck Prize-Ike Second Prize for Excellence in Al.eLra • 
Andrew G. Miller, - . . _ _ ^^ ^^'• 

Slate Run. 

vTh' ff T "'"'"''"'" ''""-^'^ '"""""" '" ''■'•>^'"" '■'"''■'■'": 
-HISS A. Rosa Crever, 

New Freedom. 

Mis! 7(11 '''^"''" '^"''~^''' ''^''''"'' '^ ^---« ^^-^--V.- 
Miss kate J. Babb, - . . "^ 

Greenland, W. Va. 



J 



WILLI AM SPORT DICKINSON SEMINARY. 




THIRTY-NINTH ANNUAL CATALOGUE. 



33 



dBiiPSeg ©f Slydf. 



*"^ r"^ r" 



§©b©pS pwBPcied iF^^ iSbi 



j. 



First Classical— Valedictory 



Hiss Bertha A. Ueider, 



Williamsport, 



Second Classical— Philosophical Oration 



Miss Mary M. Shick, 



Heading. 






First Scientific— Salutatory : 



David A. McWllliams, 



Elysburg. 



Second Scientific— Scientific Oration: 



Lorin A. Pidcoe, 



Newl)erry. 



Belles Lettres— Belles Lettres Essay: 



\ 



Miss Minnie M. Ilooven, 



Orangeville. 



\ 



In order to meet the wants of a larger elass of Students, qiglit regular 
Courses of Study are provided, namely: The Normal English, Belles 
Lettres, Science and Literature, Classical, College Preparatory, Art, Music, 
and Business. Students may adopt any of these Courses exclusively, or 
may select such studies from them as they desire, subject to the approval of 
the Faculty. 

The Normal Englisli is designed to meet the increasing demand for 

teachers in our Common Schools, and is heartily commended to young 

ladies and gentlemen who desire thorough instruction and drill in the 

English branches. To those who complete this Course, a Diploma express- 

^ ing the scholarship attained will be given. 

The Belles Lettres Course is specially arranged to accommodate young 
ladies who may wish to omit the Higher Mathematics beyond Elementary 
Algebra and Geometry. It thus affords opportunity to connect studies in 
Music and Art with a well selected Course in Literature and Science. 

The Course in Science and Literature is intended to give wider culture 
and more tliorough mental discipline. It differs from the Classical Course 
mainly in that it omits the Greek Language entirely, and makes Latin elective 
with German or French during the first twb years. Before entering upon 
this Course, the Student must l)e thoroughly ac(iuainted with the Common 
r English branches. 

The Classical Course is much more extensive than is ordinal ily pursued 
at Seminaries. It will compare favorably with the curriculum adopted by 
our best institutions of learning. We offer it with entire confidence to 
young men who are preparing for professional life, and also to young ladies 
who aspire to superior intellectual culture. The preparation for this Course 
is a thorougli knowledge of the studies embraced in the Academic Course. 

Tlic College Preparatory Course is arranged for those who desire thorough 
instruction and systematic drill in all branches r<'(,uisite for admission to our 
host (Colleges and Universities. We commend it specially to parents who 
wish to place their sons under the watchful care of experienced twichers, 
while they receive the literary culture of a high grade institution of learning^ 
and enjoy the social advantages of a well-regulated Christian home. 



34 



WILLlAMSrORT DICKINSON SEMINARY. 




IG 

Tliis ('ouFBC will give thorough iii8triictioii and drill in the Common Englinh branches, and 
also prepare the KStudent for admission to the hii^her Courses. Classes are formed each term, 
for be<rinnino; and advanced Students, in Arithmetic, (Grammar, Ceoji^raphy, History, Al<;el)ra, 
Geometry and Latin. 

FIRST YEAR. 



Fall Term. 



( Arithmetic, (Robinson.) 

Grammar, (Harvey.) 
( Geography, (Swinton.) 



( Arithmetic, (Robinson.) 
Winter Term. Grammar, (lIarve3^) 

( Geography and Map Drawing, (Swinton.) 



Spring Term. 



Fall Term. 



Winter Term 



Spring Term. 



( Arithmetic, (Robinson.) 

Grammar, (Harvey.) 
( Geography and Map Drawing, (Swinton.) 

SECOND YEAR. 

f Arithmetic, (Fish's Complete, Robinson.) 

I Grammar, (Harvey.) 

<; History United States. 

I Tiatin — First Latin Book — (Comstock.) 

L Book-Keeping — o])tional. 

f Arithmetic — Mental and Written. 

I Grammar, (Harvey.) 

{ History United States. 

i Latin— Grammar and Reader— (Allen & Greenough ) 

1^ Book-Keeping — optional. 

f Arithmetic Reviewed. 

I English Analysis. 

{ Algebra, (Robinson's Elements.) 

I Latin — Syntax and Ca?sar— (A.llen <fe Greenough.) 

L Book-Keeping— optional. 



Spelling, Reading, Penmanship, Composition and Declamation through- 
out the Course. 

Examinations for admission to any Course above the Academic will be 
held the second day of each term, though Students coming at any time during 
the term may be examined when they enter. 



F^SFmal English GqufS©. 



This Conrse is dosiujnod to accommodate yonnpj men and women whose time for school is 
limited, and especially those who are i)reparing to teach in our Common Schools. A Diploma 
will be <jjiven to those who complete the Course. 

JUNIOR YEAR. 

f Arithmetic— Written and Mental— (Fish's Comph^te, Rob- 
I English Grammar, (Harvey.) [inson.) 

Fall Tkum. { Geography, (Swinton.) 

I History United States. 
[^ Book-Keeping— optional— (Bryant & Stratton.) 



\ 



THIRTY-NINTH ANNUAL CATALOOTTK. 



3.^ 



Winter Term. 



r 



I 



Arithmetic-Written and Mental-CFish's (Complete, Rob- 
English Grammar, (Harvev.) [inson ^ 

Geography and Map Drawinir, (Swinton ) i •> 

History United States. 



fAuthne c-Wntten and Mental-rFish's Complete, Rob- 
Si'RiNtJ Term. { ^^JVi^^l'«»i ^^';;Un mar, (Harvey.) Rnson 

1 Algebra, (Rol)inson's Elements.) ' 

I Book-Keeping— optional— (Bryant & Stratton.) 

SENIOR YEAIi. 



¥a\a. Term. 



r History, (Swinton's Outlines.) 
J Civil Government, (Yoinio- ) 
1 Algebra, (Robinson's Elements.) 
L Physiology, (Hutchison.) 






f History, (Swinton's Outlines.) 
,_. I Rhetoric, (!]anleen.) 

Winter Term. { l^hysical Geography, (Houston.) 

I Natural Philosophy, (Pec^k's Ganot, Revised 

L G^eometry, (Wentworth.) 



) 



Spring Term. 



r— 



J 



f Rhetoric, (Bardeen.) 

J Physical Geography, (Houston.) 

I Natural l^hilosophy, (Peck's Ganot, Revised ) 

L Geometry, ( Wentworth.) 



Belles Liefcfepes Geupse. 



Lite:!:^n;: K '1: ''^ ""'"^ '^^ '^-^^^^^ ^^^ '- -'''-' ^^^ ^^- ^^^^- ^^ ^^^^^-^ '•'• ^^^hsh 

SOPHOMORE YEAR. 



\ Fall Term. 



Winter Term. 



r Arithmetic, (Fish's Complete.) 

I English Grammar, (Harvey ) 

J History United States. 

I Latin. ) 

I French. - Elective. 

L German. ) 

r Physical Geography, (Houston.) 
Algebra, (Robinson's Elements ) 
English (Grammar, (Elarvey ) 
IHstory United States. , 

Latin. ) 

French. - Elective. 

German.) 



r T hysical Geography, (Houston.) 
Algebra, (Robinson's Eh^ments.) 
Spring Term. J Lnglish Analysis. 

I Latin. ) 

I French. Elective. 
L German.) 



36 



WILLIAMSPORT DICiaNSON SEMINARY. 



Fall Term. 



JUNIOR YEAR. 

{ History, (Swinton's Outlines.) 
Pliysioloe:y, (Hutchison.) 
Natural Philosophy, (Peck's Ganot, Revised.) 
^^ Civil Government, (Young.) 
Latin. ) 

French. - Elective. 
German.) 



THIRTY-NINTH ANNUAL CATALOGUE. 



37 



f History, (Swinton's Outlines.) 
I Rhetoric, (Bardeen.) 



Winter Tfrm } ^l^ehra, (Ro!)inson's University.) 

v\ IN 1 EK 1 EKM. ^ Latin— Grammar and Reader— (Allen & Green ) 

L 



French. 
German, 



ough.) • Elective. 
) 



'^ f History, (Swinton's Outlines.) 
I Rhetoric, (Bardeen.) 
^ J Natural Philosophy, (Peck's Ganot, Revised.) 

Winter Term, i ^atin. ) 

I French. Elective. 
(^ German.) 



SriiiNG Term. 



Fall Term. 



f Rhetoric, (Bardeen.) 
I Geometr}^ (Wentworth.) 
j Botany, (Gray.) 
^ Latin. ) 

French. Elective. 
L German. ) 

SENIOR YEAR. 

f English Literature, (Shaw.) 

I Moral Science, (Wayland ) 

{ Zoology, (Orton,)— optional. 

I Geology, (Dana ) 

L Political Economy, (Wayland -Cliapin,) -optional. 



Spring TeRxM. 



4 
I 



Fall Term. 



f Rhetoric, (Bardeen.) 

i Algebra, (Robinson's University.) 

! Geometry, (Wentworth.) 

I Latin — Syntax — Ca3sar — (Allen & Greenough.)) 

I French. - Elective. 

L German. ) 



JUNIOR YEAR. 



f English Literature, (Shaw\) 
Physiology, (Hutchison.) 
Geometry, (Wentworth.) 

Natural Philosophy, (Peck's Ganot, Revised.) 
Latin— Ca3sar — Syntax— (Allen & Greenough.)) 



■»»,^ 



f Mental Science. (Wayland.) 
„, ^ ) Chemistry, (Eliot & Storer.) 

Winter Term. { ^^^^,j^^ (Coppee,)-optional. 

1^ Astronomy, (Ray.) 



Sinking Term. 



f Evidences of Christianity, (Paley,)— optional. 

J Mental Science, (Wayland.) 

I Chemistry, (Eliot & Storer.) 

1^ English, Past and Present, (Trench.) 



-> 



Winter Term. 



Spring Term. 



"^ 



J ■ 



GeuFSe in SGieHce and liifeer?afeun>e. 

Upon completing the following Course, the Student will be entitled to the Degree of Bachelor 
of Science. Those not wishing to take the whole Course can pursue such studies as they desire, 
subject to the action of the Faculty. 

SOPHOMORE YEAR. 



Fall Term. 



f History, (Swinton's Outlines.) 

I C/ivil Government, (Young.) 

J Algehra, (liobinson's Elements.) 

j Latin— First Latin Rook— (Comstock.)) 

I French. ," Elective. 

1^ German. ) 






Fall Term. 



French. 
L German. 

f Natural Philoso])hy, (Peck's Ganot, Revised.) 
Mental Philosophy, (Wayland.) 
Trigonometry, (Wentworth ) 
Latin — Virgil — (Greenough.)) 
French. > Elective. 

1^ German. ) 

'" Evidences of Christianity, (Paley.) 

Mental Philosophy, (Wayland.) 

Botany, (Gray.) 

Surveying, (Wentworth.) 

Latin — Virgil — (Greenough.)) 

French. - Elective. 

German. ) 



SENIOR YEAR. 



f Moral Science, (Wayland.) 

I Geology, (Dana.) 

{ Zor)l()gy, (Orton.) 

I Political Economy, (Wayland— Chapin.) 

L Analytical Geometry, (Olney.) 



) 



- Eh^ctive. 



f Logic, (Co])pee. ) 
Winter Term ' Chemistry— with lA'ctures— (Eliot & Storer.) 

] Astronomy, (Ray.) 
1^ Calculus. (Olney.) 



Spring Term. 



f Butler's Analogy, (Emory & Crooks.) 

J Chemistry— with Lectures — (Eliot & Storer.) 

] English, Past and Present, (Trench.) 

1^ Calculus, (Olney.) 



38 



WILMAMSPOUT DICKINSON SEMINARY 



Classical GeuPSe. 



upon complcliii^ the following Course, the Student will be entitled to the Degree of liachelor 
of Arts. Those not wishing to complete the Course ean pursue. 8uch studies as they desire, 
subject to the action of the Faculty. 

SOrilOMOKE YEAU. 



Fall Tekm. 



WiNTKi! Tekm. 



SrinNG Tekm. 



ii 



Fall Term. 



f History, (Swinton's Outlines.) 
I Civil Govern nu'jit, (Young.) 
■{ Algebra, (Ro))ins()n's Elements.) 
I Latin— C{esar-( Allen tfc Greenough.) 
L Greek — First Lessons, (White;) Gruniuiar, (Goodwin.) 

{ History, (Swinton's (Outlines.) 

j lihetoric, (Bardeen.) 

■{ Algebra, (Robinson's University.) 

I Latin — Virgil — (Greenougb.) 

[ Greek — First Lessons, (White;) Grammar, (Goodwin.) 

f Rhetoric, (Bardeen.) 

I Algebra, (Robinson's University.) 

•{ Geometry, (Wentworth.) 

I Latin — Virgil — (Greenoiigh. ) 

L Greek — Anabasis. 

JUNIOR YEAR. 

f English Literature, (Shaw.) 

I Natural Philoso])hy, (Peek's Ganot, Revised.) 

J Physiology, (Hutchison.) 

j Geometry, (Wentworth.) 

I Latin — Virgil— (Greenougb. ) 

L Greek — Anabasis. 



TlIIRTY-I^INTII annual CATALOGUE. 



39 



{Spring Term. 



f Butler's Analogy, (Emory & C'rooks ) 

I Chemistry— with Lectures— (Eliot & Storcr.) 

■{ Calculus, (Olney.) 

I Latin— Tacntus—Germania and Agricola. 

[_ Greek— Demosthenes — Orations. 



This Course is arranged for those who desire to i)reparc for admission to any American 
Collei^e or University. Students may enter at any i)oint for wliich they are prepared. 

SOPHOMORE YEAR. 



4 



Fall Term. 



• ^^ 



r 



Mental Philosophy, (Wayland.) 

Natural Philosophy, (Peck's Ganot, Revised.) 



Winter Term. ■{ Trigonometry, (Wentworth.) 

I Latin — Cicero — Orations. 
L Greek — Homer — Iliad. 



Si'RiNG Term. 



f Evidences of Christianity, (Paley.) 
Mental Philosophy, (Wayland.) 



if 



Fall Term. 



^ Surveying, (Wentworth.) 
Latin — Cicero— Orations. 
[ Greek — Homer. 

SENIOR YEAR. 



f Moral Science, (Wayland.) 
I Political Economy, (Wayland -Cliapin.) 
J Geology, (Dana.) 
] Analytical Geometry, (Olney.) 
Latin — Horace. 



1^ Greek — Xcnophon— Memorabilia. 



. f Logic, (Coppee.) 
I Chemistry — with Lectures — (Eliot c^ Storer.) 
m 1 Astronomy, (Ray.) 

Winter Term. { (.^leulus, (Olney.) 

Latin— Li vy. 
Greek — Plato— Apology and Crito. 



f Latin — First Latin Book — (Comstock.) 

I Greek— First Lessons, (White;) Grammar, (Goodwin.) 

{ Arithmetic, (Robinson's Complete.) 

Grammar, (Harvey.) 

American History. 

f Latin — Grammar and Reader— (Allen & Greenougb.) 
I Greek— First Lessons, (White;) Grammar, (Goodwin.) 
Winter Term. { Arithmetic, (Robinson's Complete.) 

I Grammar, (Harvey.) 
1^ American History. 



Spring Term. 






f Latin— Syntax and Caesar- (Allen & Greenougb.) 

I Greek — Anabasis. 

{ English Analysis. 

I Arithmetic Completed. 

L Algebra, (Robinson's Elements.) 

JUNIOR YEAR. 

f Latin — Cjvsar. 
^ rp J Greek — Anabasis. 

j^ALL lERM. <; Algebra, (Robinson's Elements) 

1^ History, (Swinton's Outlines.) 

f Latin — Virgil — (Greenougb ) 
I Greei^ — Anabasis. 
Winter Term. ■{ Geometry, (Wentworth.) 

I History, (Swinton's Outlines.) 
L Rhetoric, (Bardeen.) 



y 



Spring Term. { 



f Latin — Virgil — (Greenougb.) 
Greek — Anabasis. 



Fall Term. 



Geometry, (Wentworth.) 
Rhetoric, (Bardeen. ) 

SENIOR YEAR. 

f Latin — Virgil— (Greenougb.) 

I Greek — Prose. 

<^ Natural Philosophy, (Peck's Ganot, Revised.) 
Geometry, (Wentworth.) 
Physiology, (Hutchison,) — optional. 



40 



■I 



n 






: 



WILLIAMSPORT DICKINSON SEMINARY. 



THIRTY-NINTH ANNUAL CATALOGUE. 



41 



Winter Term. 



Si'KiNG Term. 



f Latin — Cicero— Orations. 
) Greek — Homer — Iliad. 

^ Natural Philosophy, (Peck's Ganot, Revised ) 
Mental Philosophy, (Wayland.) 



f Latin^Cicero— Orations. 

) Greek— Homer — Iliad. 

] Mental Philosophy, (Wayland.) 

I Latin — Prose. 





14 i<a 



German Course. 



^ Comfort's German Course. 

German Conversation. 

Ahri's Synopsis. 

Sprachdenklehre, (Wurst.) 

Header, (Otto.) 
] WilhelmTell, (Schiller.) 

Jungfrau von Orleans, (Schiller.) 

Iphigenie auf Tauris. (Goithe ) 

Faust, (Goethe.) 

Dictionar}^ (Adler.) 

Buckingham's Eugenes. 

Abreg^ de La Grammaire Franyaise, (Noel et Chapsal.) 
Reader, (Aim.) 
Paul et Virginia, (St. Pierre.) 
French Course. -[ Classic Header, (De Fivas.) 

Corinne, (Madame de Stael.) 
French Literature. 
Les Miserables, (Victor Hugo.) 
Dictionary, (Surrenne.) 

Tuition.— Five dollars each, per term of twelve weeks. 



i> 



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dsuPSe ir^ ffiuSiG. 



V 



The aim in this department will be to give a thorough Musical Education, 
both in the technique and the a-sthetics of the art; and to this end only 
atajidard text-books and studies will be used. 

The Graduating Course comprises selections from the following studies, 
and is intended to occupy about three years. Students completing the 
Course, including Thorough Bass, will receive a Diploma. Pieces adapted 
to the attainments of the pupil are given from the tirst. 

FIRST YEAR. 

Sudds' National School for the Piano-Forte; New England Conservatorv 
Method; Duvernoy's Studies in Mechanism; llcrz's Studies, Book 1 and 2; 



Krause's Studies, op. 2 and 4; Loeschhcen's, op. Gf) ; Plaidy's Te(;hnical 
Studies; Bertini's, op. 29 and 82; Mason's System of Accents; Czerny's 
School of Velocity, Book 1 and 2; Czerny's 100 Progressive Studies, op. 130. 

SECOND YEAR. 

Sudds' National School for the Piano-Forte; Czerny's Studies on the 
Art of Developing the Fingers, op. 740, J^ook 1 and 2; Czerny's School 
of Velocity, Book 3; TTfrz's Studies, Book 3, 4 and 5; Moscheles, op. 73; 
Kohler's Special Studies, Book and Exercises; Kohler's Classical S(*ho()l, 
from No. 1 to 6; Mayer's Studies, op. 01, Book 1 and 2; Clement's Preludes 
and Exercises ; Heller's Studies, op. 40, Book 1 and 2. 

THIRD YEAR. 



Czerny's, op. 740, Book 3, 4, 5 and 0; Moscheles' Studies, op. 70; Clement's 
Studies; Gradus and Parnassun; Cramer's Studies; Liszt's Studies; Thal- 
berg's Studies; Schuman's Studies, op. 13. 

VOCAL TRAINING. 

First Year. — Study of the Registers, the Major Scale, Solfeggi, (Bassini, 
Lablanche, Concone or e(piivalent;) some songs. 

Second Year — Chromatic Scale, Minor Scale, Swelled Notes, Ornaments, 
(Bassini, Concone or equivalent;) some songs, (Abt, Kuecken, Gumbert, 
Proch, Millard, etc.) 

Third Year. — Solfeggi, (Bordogni, Concone, etc.,) Recitation, Oratorio, 
and Operatic Music. 

THEORY OF MUSIC. 

First Year — Rudiments of Thorough Bass. 

Second Year. — A. N. Johnson's Harmony, 

Third Year. — A. N. Johnson's Harmony and History of Music. 

Students not wishing to take the Graduating Piano Course may take 
a Course on the Reed Organ, selected by the teacher, and will be like- 
wise granted a diploma, if they acquire ability in reading ordinary church 
music at sight, and in a manner sutHciently clear for purposes of accom- 
paniment. 

Students of the Graduating Piano and Organ Courses, and those taking 
Vocal Culture, are required to join the General Singing Class. 

A full Course of Violin Playing has also been prepared for the benefit of 
those who are seeking superior attainments in this department. 

All Music Scholars have Vocal Culture //'^^ of charge^ but classes will only 
be formed w^hen four or more desire to enter them. 



fii 



42 



WILLIA^NISrORT DICKINSON SPLMINARY. 



f 



> ' TUITION— Term, 12 Weeks. 

Instrumental Music, Piano or Reed Oro-an, 

Use of Instrument, (two periods eacli day,) - 

Pipe Or^an, --...__ 

Use of Instrument, (one liour each day,) 

Theory of Music, in chisses of four or more, (each,) 

Theory of Music, to single pupils, 

Vocal Culture, in classes, . . - . . 

Vocal Culture, to single pupils, - - . 

Vocal Music, in classes of ten or more, per month, (each,) 

Violin Music, in classes of four, (each,) 

Violin Music, to single pupils, - . . _ 

Violin Music, in classes of two, (each,) 

Guitar Music, to single pupils, - . . _ 

Rudiments of Music, in classes, per month, (each,) - 



it 2 00 
3 00 

18 00 

10 00 
G 00 

15 00 

Free. 

15 00 
1 00 
() 00 

15 00 
8 00 

12 00 
1 00 



The growing love of Music has largely increased the demand for 
competent music teachers. To meet this demand this Course is estab- 
lished. We present it with entire confidence to those who desire to become 
skilled in their profession, but who have not had opportunity for Normal 
training. 

The Institution is amply supplied witli first-class instruments, comprising 
Grand, Upright and Square Pianos, with convenient access to a large and 
superior Pipe Organ. 

The Course will extend through one year, upon completing which the 
Student will be entitled to a Diploma, with the Degree of Bachelor of Music. 

Admission to the Normal Class will be by Diploma, or upon examination 
in the studies comprised in our regular *' Course in Music," or their equiva- 
lents. 

Among the special advantages offered may be mentioned: (1) Careful 
instruction by a thoroughly educated German Professor of acknowledged 
ability and wide experience; (2) Daily opportunity to hear how the different 
branches of Music are taught; (3) Practical work in teaching under the per- 
sonal direction of a superior instructor; (4) Rare facilities for cultivating a 
correct taste in music, in concerts given from time to time, and in weekly 
public entertainments, partly musical, in the Seminary Chapel; (5) Connec- 
tion with a long established and widely known Literary Institution, which 
will cheerfully aid in securing for its pupils positions as teachers. 

Six lessons will be given each week, namely: Two in teaching the 
Elements of Music, two in teaching the Theory of Music, and two private 
lessons on the Piano or Grand Pipe Organ, as preferred. 






4 * 



TIIIRTY-NINTII ANNUAL CATALO<iUE. 



43 



TUITION -Term, 12 Weeks. 

Seventy-two lessons, - - - ' - 

Use of Piano for practice, (two periods each day,) 
Use of Pipe Organ for practice, (one hour each day,) 



f 24 00 

■ 3 00 

10 00 



This department is under the direction of a lady of rare ability and wide 
culture. Having added to the usual Art Curriculum of a Seminary the regular 
course^t a School of Design, she is thoroughly qualified to meet the most 
riuid demand for instruction in both the useful and ornamental branches of 
the department. 

The Course in Drawing comprises Linear, Perspective, Object and Model 
Drawing. Due attention is given to the branches of India Ink, Water Colors, 
Pastel and Crayoning— Portrait Crayoning being a specialty. The Course in 
Oil embraces Landscape and Portrait Painting. 

Students desiring a full Course in this department will, upon satisfactory 
advancement in all its branches, be entitled to a Diploma. 



TUITION— Tekm, 12 Weeks, 24 Lessons. 



Monochromatic and Pastel Painting, (each,) 

Painting in Water Colors, 

Painting in Oil, _ . - . 

Portrait Painting, - 

Pencil Drawing, . . - . 

Portrait Crayoning, _ - . 

Crayon Drawing, . . . - 

Photograph Painting, ... 

China Decorating, 



5 00 
7 00 

12 00 
20 00 

6 00 
12 00 

7 00 
20 00 
15 00 



ElGGubion. 

Elocution is recognized as a most important branch of education. This 
department is under the supervision of a thoroughly (qualified and experienced j 
teacher, and will include a careful vocal drill, and practice in the entire range 
of expression. It will also embody such a variety of Recitations and Readings 
as may serve to exemplify the (lualities and modulations of tlie voice, and will 
cover gesture and action. 

Six dollars per term of 12 weeks— 36 lessons. Private lessons, 50 cents 
each. 



Business 0Gpar?femenfe. 

This Course is designed to give a thorough knowledge of the principles 
of business transactions. It may be pursued alone or in connection with 
other studies, thus accommodating those seeking a literary, as well as those 



f 

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44 



WILLI AMSPORT DICKINSON SP:MINARY. 



' seeking only a business education. The time required to finish it will depend 
upon tlie proficiency of the pupil in the English branches, and the diligence 
with which he works. 

STUDIES. 

The Course will include instruction in the Common English branches. 
Book- Keeping— Single and Double Entry— Business Correspondence, Busi- 
ness Papers of various forms, Civil Government and Political Economy. 

TUITION. 

Students may enter the regular classes without additional cost for tuition, 
except in Book-Keeping, for which f 5.00 per term of three months will be 
charged. 

_____ ADVANTAGES. 



This department offers all the opportunities for general culture afforded 
Students in othertlepartments, assured by well-conducted literary societies, 
lectures, large libraries, association with experienced teachers, and the refin- 
ing influences of a Christian home. 
. Board, Boom, Washing, etc., same as in other departments. 

ADMISSION. 

Students may enter this department at any time in the Academic year, a 
fair knowledge of the English branches being the only requisition. 




Mefeh©ds ef rnsferaGbieR. 



In Elementary Arithmetic, Grammar and Geography, the catechetical 
method is largely employed, but in Higher English the same course is 
adopted which prevails in the more advanced branches of study. The 
pupil is taught to study the text book by topics rather than by sentences 
or paragraphs, and encouraged in the lecture room to give the substance 
of what he has learned, in his own language. In this manner, while he is 
adding to his store of knowledge, he is enlarging his vocabulary, and while 
he is evolving principles and accpiiring facts, he is increasing his power of 
expression, and thus unconsciously, it may be, but nevertheless surely, he 
lays tke foundations of an easy and a concise style of composition. 

In English Literature, the origin of the English language and the growth 
of the literature are carefully traced. In this work the most interestinir facts 
in the lives of the best authors and their principal productions are bmught 
under review. 

Instruction in Mental Science covers the second and third terms of the 
Junior year. It embodies definitions of the mental faculties, and careful 
analyses of intellectual processes, with a brief history of the science, the main 
purpose being to stimulate the Student to think and investigate for himself. 









If 



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TIIIRTV-NINTH ANNUAL CATALOGUE. 



45 



Ethics, Logic and Political Economy are taught in the Senior year. 
Text-books are used and daily recitations are required. Class irtquiries 
and discussions are encouraged, and familiar lectures are given from time 
to time by the teacher. 

NATURAL SCIENCE. 

In the department of Natural Science, the underlying aim is to teach the 
Student to think and observe for himself, and at the same time to give him 
such a fund of practical knowledge as will fit him for the active duties of 
life. In all the branches the text book is used as a means to gain knowledge 
of topics rather than to be studied as an end in itself, and as far as possible 
the Student is led to the study of the objects themselves. No pains are 
spared to cultivate habits of clear, accurate and systematic thought and 
expression. 

Geology is taken during the first term of the Senior year. A practical 
knowledge of the commoner minerals and rocks is acquired, and excursions 
are made to quarries and regions which illustrate various geological forma- 
tions. During the past year the limestone quarries east of the city, the 
building stone quarries on the north, also a section through South Bald Eagle 
Mountain into Mosquito Valley were surveyed geologically and colored 
sections, drawn to a scale, were made. Each Student made a written report 
and collected a full set of rock specimens and fossils. Six different geologi- 
cal formations bearing fossils are admirably illustrated within a few miles of 
the Seminary. 

Chemistry occupies the second and third terms of the Senior year. The 
principles of the atomic theories are thoroughly taught by lectures. There is 
constant practice in writing chemical equations, and throughout the Course 
the main facts are illustrated by experiment. During the third term of tlie 
present year, twelve laboratory desks were equipped and the class was given 
a course in Qualitative Analysis. 

The study of Physics embraces two terms of the Junior year. Mechanics, 
Sound and Heat are taken in the Fall term, and Optics, Electricity and Mag-/ 
netism in the Winter. The principles and laws are illustrated as far as^ -^ 
practicable by apparatus. The relation between the different branches is 
held strongly before the mind, and practical questions, drawn from every- 
day life, are constantly brought forward to teach the Student to apply the 
principles learned in the text-book. 

In Botany, after a few weeks of work in Gray's School and Field Book, 
the Student goes directly to the plant, analysis occupying the latter half of 
the term. An herbarium is collected and prepared by each member of the 
class. 

Lectures are given from time to time upon subjects of interest to the 
department. 

ANCIENT LANGUAGES. 

In the departments of Greek and Latin, scrupulous attention is given to 
the grammatical structure of these languages, their relation to English, the 
illustration and application of principles, accurate translation, and to the 



■>. a' 



46 



WILLlAMSrORT DICKINSON SEMINARV 



I « 



literary significance of each author studied. It is aimed to give to the classics 
by these means their proper place as an aid to expression, to a thorough 
knowledge of our own language and to the pursuit of other langua<res lis 
well as to afford the usual mental discipline. Careful attention is given, 
also, to those preparing for college or for professional study. 

MODERN LANGUAGES. 

Modern Languages are taught with a view of enabling the Student to read 
them at sight, and write and speak them idh>matically. The Courses com- 
prises two, three or more years, as the Student may desire. 

In German, the text-books for the first year are ComfortVs German Course 
and Wurst's Sprachdenklehre ; for the second year some of the German 
Classics are translated and tlie constructions analyzed according to the 
German method, the Student being required to make explanations of the 
text in German. 

Besides the study of Classical German, Comfort's Conversations are studied 
as the basis of conversational exercises in the class. The Student is required 
to recite in the language as soon as he has sufiicient knowledge of construction 
to form a sentence. 

Lectures on the application of Grimm's Law of tlie Progression of Mutes, 
and on the Literature, are given during the Course. 

In French, the textd)ooks for the first year are Buckingham's Eu-^ne's 
French Grammar and Aim's Pronouncing Primer, accompanied with various 
original exercises, oral and written. The second year some standard French 
author or authors are read after the Student has been grounded in the princi 
pics of La Grammaire Fran(;aise CA])rege de) par Noel et Chapsal. Special 
attention is given to the pronunciation and to the idioms of the lano-uao-e 

to & * 

The latter part of the second year the class study the French newspaper 
the object being to meet the practical needs of the Student. 



MATHEMATICS. 



r 



The Course in Mathematics is co«tensive with that in the majority of our 
best colleges. Although the study is considered as chiefly disciplinary the 
aim throughout the Course is to acquaint the Student with the instrumVnts 
in most familiar use by the practical scientists and mathematicians of the day 
as well as to strengthen his mental faculties and increase his logical acumen 
At the commencement of eacli subject, a familiar lecture is given on its 
liistory and practical utility. 

Algebra is begun, the Student being led slowly through the rudiments 
and made to review the fnndan.enlals daily. Affr two terms spent in 
studying the elements, the University Algebra is taken up at the Calculus 
of Riuhcals, an<l continued through (Jnadratit's, Proportions, Permutations 
and Combinations, Progressions, Identical E.,uati<.ns, I)e<:ompositio„ of 
Fractions, Residual Formula, Newton's P.inomial Theorem. Method of 
ndetcrminate Coefficients. Reversion of Series, Logarithms, I{nle of ])es 
(.artes, Cardau's Solution of Cubic Equations, and Sturm's Theorem The 
aim of tlie instruction in advanced Algebra is to free the Student from hi.s 






\f 



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s 



THIRTY-NINTH ANNUAL CATALOriUE. 

•4 



47 



previous dependence upon the text-book, and to cultivate ability and taste 
for original mathematical work. Great stress is laid upon mathematical 
generalization and the concise demonstration of principles. 

The Course in Geometry covers seven books, embracing both the Plane 
and Solid Geometry. The demonstrations are partly oral and partly written, 
the written exercises being deemed a valuable aid to the cultivation of 
accuracy of thought and expression. Plane Trigonometry is taken entire, and 
the class is exercised in the solution of practical problems. Ti Surveying, 
. the Theory aiul Practice are combined. The class is conveniently divided, 
and eui li division in turn is taken by the teacher into the field for practical 
work. Plots of the surveys made are drawn, and, together with the com])u- 
tations, arc submitted to the teacher for inspection. 



V 



One term is spent in Analytical Geometry, completing the Cartesian 
Method of Coordinates, the Method of Polar Coordinates, and the Transform- 
ation of Coordinates. To Calculus two terms are given, covering, in the 
Differential Calculus, the Differentiation of Functions of a Single Variable, 
Maclaurin's and Taylor's Theorems, together with the deduction of the 
Binomial Theorem and the Theory of Logarithms, the Evaluation of Inde- 
terminate Forms, and the Maxima and Minima of Functions of a Single 
Variable; and in the Integral Calculus, the Integration of all the Elementary 
Forms. 

HISTORY AND RHETORIC. 

In the study of History, the object is to familiarize the Student with the 
main facts and principles, thus forming a foundation on which to build by 
future reading and investigation. To this end the text-book is thoroughly 
studied in connection with a Manual of Classical Antiquities and an Atlas, 
while at the same time the Student is encouraged to consult other authorities 
and bring in additional matter bearing on the sul)ject. Recitation is by the 
analytical and topical methods. 

Special attention is given to instruction in Rhetoric, on account of its 
great value to the Student. The principles of good writing arc studied and 
analyzed with a view to W\q\x 'practical application. 

During the last term much of the time is devoted to original productions 
in the various departments of literary composition, on themes assigned by 
the teacher. These productions are read before the class, where general 
criticisms are offered, after which they are handed to the teacher for more 
careful correction. 



j 



48 



WILUAMSPORT DICKINSON SP:MINARY. 



TIIIRTY-NINTII ANNUAL CATALOGUE. 



49 



peQial lnfmm&iUi&^. 



A Normal Class will be organized during the Fall and Spring 
Terms for those who desire to teach. The Course will comprehend 
special instruction and drill in the branches taught in i'ublic Schools, 
practical work in teaching under the direction of members of the 
_ Faculty, and Lectures on the Theory of Teaching by the President. 
JVo extra charge will be made. 

We shall not be ready to receive students before the first day of 
the term. On the second day classes are formed, a term schedule 
for recitations adopted, and lessons assigned. 

Students from other schools may enter any class on passing a 
satisfactory examination in the previous studies of the Course, or 
their equivalents. The examination may be waived if the Faculty 
are otherwise assured that it is unnecessary. 

Discounts are made on all bills, except tuition in ornamental 
branches, when two enter from the same family at the same time ; 
also to all ministers, all persons preparing for the ministry or mis- 
sionary work, and all persons preparing to teach. 

The language "elected" in the course in Science and Literature 
will be retained throughout the required two years. 

The ladies are allowed to substitute a Course in Music, Drawing 
and Painting, German or French, for the Greek Language, and for 
Analytical Geometry and Calculus. 

The gentlemen may substitute two years in Greek or (4erman for 
Analytical Geometry and Calculus. 

Orthography, Etymology, Eeading, Composition and Declamation 
throughout all the courses. 

The classes in Trigonometry and Surveying are given such field 
drill as will familiarize them with practical surveying-. 

In the departments of Ancient and Modern Languages the classes 
are practiced in oral and written exercises throughout the Course. 

Lectures will be given from time to time in the various depart- 
ments. 

A Biblical Class will also be formed for the benefit of such as 
have the Ministry in view, if desired. 






f: 



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Goncrol informatioi]. 



Is an Institution of high grade, with ample facilities for ujving young 
ladies and gentlemen a superior education. It is organized upon 
the plans which have been approved by long experience, and adopted 
by the best schools in this country, embracing all modern a):)pliances 
in means and methods of instruction. It was founded in 1848,' and 
is regularly chartered by the Legislature of the State of Pennsvl- 
vania, and authorized to confer degrees upon those who complete 
the prescribed Courses of Study. 

The Seminary is under the patronage of the Central Pennsylvania 
Conference, being owned and practically managed by the Preachers' 
Aid Society. As this ir^vestment was rather to promote the import- 
ant work of Higher Christian ]i:ducation than to make monev, the 
paramount purpose is to combine thorough instruction and careful 
moral training with the comforts of a good home, at the lowest 
possible rates. 




Williamsport is one of the most beautiful and healthful places 
in the State. It has never been subject to epidemics of any kind. 
Many coming to the school in poor health have returned fully 
restored. The city is situated on the West Branch of the Sus- 
quehanna River, has a population of thirty thousand, is widely 
known for its intelligence, its enterprise, the taste displayed in the 
character of its public buildings and private residences, and the 
moral appliances with which it is furnished. In small towns and 
villages tlie facilities for culture — intellectual as well as .esthetic and 
moral— are generally limited, rarely reaching beyond the institution 
itself, and hence student life must become monotonous, lacking the 
inspiration which a larger place with wider opportunities affords. 



M 



50 



WILLIAMSPORT DICKINSON SEMINARY. 



Twenty-seven churches, an active temperance organization, and a 
branch of the Young Men's Christian Association, embracing many 
of the most earnest Christians in the community, with a large 
library free to all, and accessible at all times, indicate some of the 
religious influences brought to bear upon the young in Williamsport. 

Buildings. 

The buildings occupy an eminence overlooking the city, and are 
surrounded by beautiful shade trees, while the grounds contain five 
acres, affording ample room for exercise and play. They are brick, 
heated by steam, provided with fire-escapes, and supplied throughout 
with pure mountain water. 

Both departments are furnished with bath-rooms and all modern 
appliances for comfort, and in the entire arrangement of the build- 
ings great care has been taken for the convenience and health of the 
occupants. 

The ladies' apartments are entirely separate from the others, 
and there is no associatio7i of the sexes but in the ^yresence of their 
instructors. The liapjDy influence, miititally exerted^ in their slight 
association in the recitation room, at the table, and in the public 
exercises in the Chapel, is to be seen in the cultivation of a cheerful 
and animated disposition, in the formation of good habits and man- 
ners, in ardent devotion to study, and in the attainment of high moral 
character. These, with many other valuabl^'esults, have established 
the fact that the best plan for a school is, according to the evident 
design of Providence in the constitution of society, on the basis of 
a well-regulated Christian family. The niemhers of the I^^aculty 
live in t/te Jniildi^ig., eat at the sa)ne tables, and have constant over- 
sight of all the Students. 

E^hvrSiGal Realfeh. 

Recognizing the importance of physical culture, am|)le provision 
is made for appropriate athletic sports, as well as for systematic 
physical development. A military company is organized, with drill 
during recreation hours, for the gentlemen. 

Suitable exercise is provided for the ladies in calisthenics and 
light gynuiastics, under the direction of a competent teacher. All 
the ladies are required to participate in these exercises. 

A gynniasium, forty by sixty feet, has been erected and furnished 
for the use of all Students, under proper regulation, for which fifty 
cents per term will be charged. 



1 






1 ~.) 






TIIIRTY-NINTII ANNUAL CATALOGUE. 



51 



Lectures on health will also be given from time to time, by an 
eminent physician. 

R©©EFig and FuMifeuFe. 

The rooms are larger than in most boarding schools, the ladies' 
being lGxl3 feet, and the gentlemen's 20x9 J^ feet. They are 1 ui uished 
with all heavy articles, and if desired, any room will be entirely 
furnished; but Students may bring their own sheets, (for double 
beds,) pillows, pillow cases, blankets, counterpanes, mirrors and 
lamps, and thus lessen the expense. 




Total cost, with room furnished as above: 

In Classical and Scientific Course, (per year,) 
In Classical and Scientific Course, (per term of 12 weeks,) 
In Common English Course, (per year,) . . , 

In Common English Course, (per term of 12 weeks,) - 



*208 38 

(U 00 

195 33 

58 fiO 



When rooms are entirely furnished, $13 will be added per year, 
or $6 per term, for each Student. This includes all charges for 
furnished rooms, carpet, board, washing, (12 plain pieces per week,) 
heat, Hght, and tuition in Latin, Greek, Mathematics, Sciences, English 
and Penmanship. There are no extras whatever, except for Book- 
Keeping, Ornamental Branches and Modern Languages, the charges 
for which are specifically stated elsewhere. 

We desire to emphasize this statement, because some schools, 
whose advertised rates are higher than ours, increase the expenses 
still more by numerous "extras.'' 

i^^^We ask those who are seeking education for themselves, and 
parents who contemplate sending their children to a boarding school, 
to carefully note the fact that we furnish everything embraced in a 
thoroughly equipped school, with all the comforts of a good homo, 
including a large, airy, and corn^detely furnished room, in a beautiful 
and healthful location, at the low rate of $216.83 per year, in courses 
of study which prepare the Student for business, for professional 
life, or for the lower or higher classes in college; or, if thc}^ prefer 
to furnish their own rooms with bed-clothes, mirrors, lamp and 
carpet, for $203.33 in Classical Studies, and $195.33 in Common 
English. 



t 

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52 



WILLI AMSPORT DICKINSON SEMINARY. 



• Persons applying for rooms will please state whether they wish 
them furnished entirely or in part. 



PaY^snfeS. 



^ 



Term bills are payable in advance, one-half at opening and the 
balance at the middle of the term. 

Twenty-five cents will be added to the ordinary rate per week 
for board, washing and room, when Students attend a part of a 
term. No reduction in ttdtlon for less than half a term. 

Extra washing, ordinary pieces, 50 cents per dozen; ladies' plain 



gowns, 20 cents each. Meals carried to rooms, 10 cents each, or 
25 cents per day. 

When Students are called away by sickness or providential neces- 
sity, moneys advanced will be returned. Students dismissed or 
leaving without the approval of the President may be charged for 
the full term. • 

Deduction for absence is made on recommendation of the Presi- 
dent to the Treasurer. No reduction for board or tuition for absence 
of two weeks or less at the beginning, or the last four weeks before 
the close of the term. 

Five dollars must be deposited with the Treasurer on entering, 
to cover damages that the Student may do to room or other prop- 
erty. This will be returned when the Student leaves, but not before, 
in case no injury has been done. Any Student rooming alone will 
be charged $5 extra per term. 

Day scholars w411 be charged from $G.OO to $18.00 per term of 
twelve weeks, according to the studies they pursue. No reduction 
in tuition for less than half a term. 

5FeFmS and ¥aGafei©FiS. 

The Seminary year is divided into three terms, as follows: 

Fall Tkrm — IG Weeks. Begins Tuesday, August 30th, 1887. 
Ends December 10th. Vacation, 8 Weeks. 

WiNTKR Tkrm— 12 Weeks. Begins Monday, January 9th, 1888. 
Ends April 2d. No vacation. 

SpRiNd Term— 12 Weeks. Begins Monday, April 2d, 1888. 
Ends June 21st. Vacation, 10 Weeks. 



THIRTY-NINTH ANNUAL CATALOGUE. 



53 



I 



V 



JldifiiSSi©f2. 

Pupils of good moral character will be received at any time, for 
a single term or longer period. 

Must arrange bills wdtli the Treasurer before attending recitations. 

Must take at least four studies, unless excused by the Faculty. 

Must register name and church, and agree to comply with all 
rules iuid regulations of the School. 

Each Student will be considered a member of the Institution 
vmtil due notice shall have been given of intention to leave and 
permission obtained of the President. 

Beapding. 

This department is under the general direction of the President, 
but an experienced Steward and a thoroughly competent Matron 
have immediate charge. The department commends itself by clean- 
liness, abundance of supply, excellence of quality, giood cooking, and 
adaptation to health. 

BiSGipline. 

The discipline is firm, but mild and impartial. While every 
encouragement will be given to the orderly and studious, and due 
allowance be made for youthful indiscretion, yet the lawless and 
refractory cannot long remain among us. 




The Seminary is furnished with a collection of apparatus, together 
I • with full sets of Globes, Maps and Charts, a Cabinet of Minerals, and 
a large supply of Chemical and Laboratory Utensils, thus affording 
facility for illustration and experiment. 

fRepife and Demopife. 

A daily record is kept of all the exercises of the School, from 
which record the Students will be graded. A record of demerits is 
also kept. Tardiness, unexcused absences from required exercises, 
and all disorderly conduct, will subject the Studeut to demerit marks. 
Ten such marks bring a private reproof before the Faculty ; twenty 
a public reprimand before the whole school, and thirty may send 
the offender away. Sessional reports are sent to i)arents. 



54 



WILLIAMSPORT DICKINSON SEMINARY. 



Religieyg Ser^vieeS. 

Every Student is required to attend religious services in the 
Chapel daily, as well as public Avorship morning and evening every 
Sabbath, at such place as parents or guardians may designate^ the 
l^resident assenting. 

N. B. — Each Student must be supplied with a TmIIo, to be read, 
wWiout note or sectarian comment^ in the services of tlit Chapel. 
The whole school read in concert. 

A general experience meeting is held every Sabbath at iiali'-past 
eight A. M., and generally a service, of song at six P. M., continuing 
one hour. Also, a prayer meeting for the ladies and gentlemen on 
Thursday evenings. Attendance upon these social services is optional 
with the Students. 

Exercises in Si3elling, Etymology, Reading, Declamation and 
Original Composition are required of all the Students throughout 
the year. In addition to these, public exercises are held in the 
Seminary Chapel every Friday evening, at which the more advanced 
Students read essays or deliver original speeches, interspersed with 
vocal or instrumental music, furnished by the Music Department. 

liibGMFY SeGiefeieS. 

There are three flourishing Literary Societies connected with the 
Seminary — the Belles Lettres, the Gamma Epsilon and the Tripartite 
Union. The first two are in the gentlemen's, and the last in the 
ladies' department. Each haB a well furnished hall, and a judiciously 
selected library, aggregating more than two thousand volumes. Each 
prepares and reads a paper in the Chapel once in three weeks, in 
connection with other literary exercises, thus furnishing inspiration 
to intellectual culture, as well as entertainment for the Students and 
the public. 




Our methods are modern, and adapted to the need of the 
Students. No pains are spared to give thorough, practical and 
scholarly training in all the departments by teachers of superior 
attainments and experience. Besides instruction in connection with 
the text-book, lectures illustrated by experiments are given from 
time to time. 



THIRTY-NINTH ANNUAL CATALOGUE. 



5e'5 



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Gyfefife. 

The gentlemen should be provided with durable clothing, heavy 
boots or shoes, an umbrella, and a pair of slij^pers to be worn in the 
room. The ladies must be supplied with thick walking-shoes, an 
umbrella, India-rubber overshoes, water proof cloak and a suit for 
exercise in calisthenics and light gymnastics. Their attire for gen- 
eral use should be neat and simple, but not elegant or expensive. 
All wearing apparel must he p^lahdy marked inlt/t the fnll name of 
tlie owner. We suggest that in addition to towels, napkins and 
napkin ring, each pupil bring a knife, fork and spoon, for use in 
case of sickness. 

R \x70r?d tee l^apeFifeS. 

1. J8€i"Try to have your children here on the first day of the 
term, but not before^ as we shall not be ready to receive them. The 
classes are formed on the second day, and it will be better for all 
concerned, that the Student start regularly with his class. 

2. If possible, do not call them away during the session. Ab- 
sence, if only for a few days, disarranges the class, and is generally 
the beginning of irregularity on the part of the scholar. 

3. Do not allow your children to leave the School before the 
examinations, unless it cannot be avoided. Serious inconvenience 
to all concerned often arises from a neglect of this caution. 

4. Supply them very sparingly with spending money Parents 
cannot be too cautious on this point. 

5. Select for your child one of the instructors as a patron, to 
distribute his funds. In this way a more judicious use of your money 
will be made, and your child will be kept from many temptations. 

JS^^Students not boarding in the Institution must observe the 
following rules: 

1. Attend daily prayers. 

2. Must attend all the Seminary exercises punctually. 

3. Must spend the intervals between recitations in the Study 
Hall. 

4. Must account for all absence by written excuse without 
delay, time and number of recitations being specified. 

5. Must not visit the rooms of boarders without permission. 



56 



WILLIAMSPORT DICKINSON SEMINARY 



THIRTY-NINTH ANNUAL CATALOGUE. 



57 



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II 



The Philadelphia and Erie, the Northern Central, the PhiladeljDhia 
and Reading, and the Pine Creek Kaih'oads pass through the city, 
so that Williams[)ort is readily accessible from all quarters. 

J8i^|j"^By special arrangements, students using the Philadelphia 
and Reading Railroad and its branches procure tickets at Sfnlents' 
rates, after adniisslon to the Seinlnary^ both going to and retnrnhig 
front their homes, at all times. The Pennsylvania, the Philadelphia 
and Erie, and the Northern Central Railroads issue excursion rates 
to cover the Winter vacation. 



G^aduafeeS and FepmeF Sfeydenfes. 

It may safely be estimated that from eight to ten thousand 
persons have received Academic instruction, covering from one 
to three years, in Williamsport Dickinson Seminary, while four 
hundred and twenty-two have completed the prescribed curriculum, 
graduating with the degrees the Institution confers. We desire to 
bring all these into active sympathy and co-operation with their 
Ahna Mater, and hence we ask all jjersons to whom this notice may 
come, who have been students here, to send us their address, with 
any information concerning their personal history that may be of 
general interest, as we wish to compile a complete catalogue of all 
the Students now living. 

There is a general meeting of the Alumni every year, the day 
before Commencement. We extend a most cordial invitation to all 
old Students to attend the meeting this year, which will be held 
June 15th, afternoon and evening. If you cannot come, let us hear 
from you by letter. 

And now, may I not ask you to aid in enlarging the sphere and 
increasing the power of our Alma Mater? You can do much in 
many ways, but you can at least direct those looking for a good 
]3oarding School to ours, or send me their address on a postal card. 
Carry the Seminary in your heart. She is doing a worthy work, and 
earnestly asks her sons and daughters to lielp her. 



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The fullowing Prizes will be awarded during this year: 

The Pkesident's Pkize — the gift of the President to that member of the 
Senior or Junior Class who shall excel in writing and delivering an Oration. 

The Faculty Pkize — the gift of the Faculty to that member of the Rhetoric 
Class who shall excel in writing and reading an Essay. 

The Mils. Gkay Pkize— the gift of Mrs. E. J. Gray to that Student who 
shall excel in Reading. 

The li. W. GiHsoN & Co. Pkize— the gift of R. W. Gibson & Co. to that 
Student who shall be awarded the first prize in Instrumental Music. 

The Bower & Co. Prize — the gift of I. J. Bower & Co. to that Student who 
shall be awarded the second prize in Instrumental Music. 

The Professor V(Elkler Prize — the gift of Professor Vtrlkler to that 
Student wlio shall be awarded the third prize in Instrumental Music. 

A Prize in Elocution. 

The IIazelet Prize— the gift of J. R. Hazelet to that Student in the Art 
Department wlio shall excel in Oil Painting. 

The Sadler Prize— the gift of Hon. W. F. Sadler to that Student who 
shall be awarded the first prize in Algebra. 

The Professor Peck Prize— the gift of Professor Peck to that Student 
who shall be awarded the second prize in Algebra. 

The Professor MoLaury Prize— the gift of Professor McLaury to that 
Student who shall excel in Uiiited States History. 



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WILLIAMSPORT DICKINSON SEMINARY 



BY'llaws. 



1. During tlie hour of study the Students shall not be unnecessarily 
absent from their rooms. 

2. At the time appointc^d to attend prayers, recitation, lecture, or other 
exercise, each Student shall repair quietly mid promptly/ to the place designated. 

« At no time shall any Student loiter in the halls or about the doors or 
indulge in jumping, wrestling, loud talking, whistling, or any other unneces- 
sary noise, or soil the building with tobacco. 

4. The Students shall not be absent from their rooms at night after the 
hour of study indicated by the ringing of the bell, nor shalfthey attend 
parties or mixed assemblies without permission from the President; nor shall 
they at any time visit hotels or other places of public resort, or on any 
occasion indulge in the use of intoxicating liquors. 

^ -5. All profane and indecent language, playing at games of chance 
injuring the property of the Institution or of citizens, quarreling, fighting 
the carrying of fire-arms, or other dangerous weapons, are strictly forbidden! 

6. No Student will leave the limits of the town for a longer period than 
one hour, without permission from the President. 

7. Each Student will be held strictly accountable for any damage he or 
she may cause to the Seminary property. Damages by unknown parties may 
be assessed on the school. 

8. The Teachers must at all times have access to the Students' roomtr, 
and If It be judged necessary, the rooms will be cleaned at the expense of the 
occupants. 

9. Cleanliness of person and of apparel, and a gentlemanly and lady-like 
deportment must be observed by all. 

10. No water, dirt or other material shall be thrown from any window in 
the buildings, or down the hot-air fl^ies, or in the halls after they have been 
cleaned. 

11. Students must have their rooms swept and in order, and lights 
extinguished at the established hours. 

12. No student will be allowed to go bathing, boating, skating, fishing 
gunning, or riding, without permission from the President. 

13. The Students must not visit the kitchen, dining-room, or any other 
room, except their own, without permission. 






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THIRTY-NINTH ANNUAL CATALOGUE. 



59 



14. The Sabbath must be strictly observed by all. Visiting or receiving 
visits will not be allowed. All must attend public worship twice during 
the day. 

15. No lady shall at any time receive calls from gentlemen at her own 
room. Friends from a distance can see the ladies in the parlor. 

10. The young ladies will not be allowed to leave the Seminary grounds 
at any time without permission; and the gentlemen will be restricted at the 
discretion of the Faculty. 

17. No Student shall change his or her room, or place at the table, with- 
out special'permission from the President. 

18. No Student will be permitted to leave the School during the session 
without an express request from the parent or guardian, made to the Presi- 
dent, and without the consent of the Faculty. 

19. Any Student who, without just cause, shall fail to attend the exami- 
nations, will be considered under censure. 

20. Permission to be absent from any exercise must be obtained, if 
possible, before the absence occurs. 

21. No Student will be permitted to leave any class without the consent 
of the Faculty. 

22. The ladies and gentlemen must not visit each others' apartments, 
walk or ride together, without permission, nor converse together from the 
windows. 

23. Students from the neighborhood will not be permitted to visit home 
at such times as will interfere with the regular exercises of the school. 

24. Any offending Student may be punished, according to the nature 
of the offence, by private or public reproof, suspension, dismission or 
expulsion. 

25. Students dismissed or expelled must leave the premises at once. 

26. None but Students can attend the Society meetings, nor shall the 
Societies meet together, unless by express permission of the Faculty. 

27. No special meeting of the Students shall be held at any time, nor 
shall any meeting of the Students or Societies continue later than ten o'clock 
P. M., without permission of the President. 

28. All persons visiting Students at the Seminary will be required to 
conform to the rules adopted for the government of the School, and in case 
they remain longer than three days, will be charged for boarding at the 
published rates. 

29. Any temporary prudential regulation for the government of the 
School that the Faculty may see fit to adopt, shall be equally binding with 
these By-Laws. 



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WILUAMSPORT DICKINSON SEMINARY. 



Galendap fep 188?. 



FitiDAY, May 27.— Examination of Senior Class begins. 

Wednesday, June 8.— Examination of otlier Classes begins. 

-FuiDAY, June 10, 8:00 o'cloek P. M.-Exercises of the Sophomore Class. 

Sabbath, June la, 8:00 o'cloek P. M. ^Annual Sermon by the Rev. Dr. A. 
Rittenhouse, Professor in Dickinson College. 

Monday, June 13, 8:00 o'clock P. M.-Concert and Contest in Music, for the 
R. W. Gibson & Co., the Bower & Co. and the Professor Vtelkler 
Prizes. 

Tuesday, June 14, 10:00 o'clock A. M. -Contest in Essays, for the Faculty 
Prize. 

2:00 o'clock P. M.— Junior Class Day. 

4:00 o'clock P. M.— Military Drill. 

8:00 o'clock P. M. -Contest in Oratory, for the President's Prize. 

Wednesday, June 15, 9:00 o'clock A. M. -Contest in Reading, for the Mrs. 
E. J. Gray Prize. 

10:00 o'clock A. M.-Reunion of the Garama Epsilon Society. 

2:00 o'clock P. M.— Contest in Elocution. 

3:30 o'clock P. M. -Literary Meeting of the Alumni. 

7:30 o'clock P. M.-Business Meeting of the Alumni. 

8:00 o'clock P. M.-Reunion and Banquet of the Alumni. 
TiiuKSDAY, June 10, l):e30 o'clock A. M.-Commencement. 
Wednesday, June 15, 2:00 o'clock P. M.-Meeting of the Board of Directors. 
TnuKsDAY, June IG, 2:30 o'clock P. M.-Meeting of the Stockholders. 

Tuesday, August 30.— Fall Term begins. 
Monday, January 9, 1888.— Winter Term begins. 
Monday, April 2, 1888. -Spring Term begins. 



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THIRTY-NINTIT ANNUAL CATALOGUE. 



61 



Ylmm KopGPfcS ef l^isifcing GGmmifeteeS. 



FROM REPORT OF 1881. 

This excellent School is already widely known to be most delightfully and 
healthfully situated in the beautiful city of Williamsport, and is accessible 
from all points by direct lines of railroad, all of which furnish excursion rates 
to both students and patrons. The buildings are large, well arranged, and 
especiall}^ adapted to their uses. 

Rev. E. J. Gray, A. M , the efficient, genial and scholarly President, 
impresses all with his comprehensive and practical views of the educational 
demands of the times; but his eminent fitness for the ^ce he occupies is 
demonstrated by the actual results he has achieved, while the skill and ability 
of the Faculty by which he is sustained were manifested to the Committee in 
the recitations, examinations, and public exercises of the classes in a most 
commendable degree. Their methods of instruction require a mastery of 
principles as well as a recitation of lessons, and by the process of topical 
discussion rather than catechetical exercise, their success was evinced in the 
clearness of apprehension, thoroughness of preparation and independence of 
thought on the part of all the students. A fine Preparatory Department 
furnishes to children the rare opportunity of entering the School with the 
primer and passing up through all its grades of study. In addition to the 
regular Academic Course, which embraces the Ancient and Modern Languages, 
Natural and Moral Science, Mathematics and Belles Lettres, are the ornamental 
branches of Music, vocal and instrumental. Painting and Drawing, Elocution 
also receiving its proper share of attention. Specimens of exquisite skill and 
beauty from the brushes of the students adorned the Chapel walls, to impress 
the admirer with the extent of proficiency attained in this branch. Professor 
Vcfilkler, in charge of the Department of Music, has no superior in his art in 
this country, and possesses in a high degree all those gentlemanly qualities 
necessary to recommend him to the confidence and patronage of parents who 
seek for their children a finished musical education. And throughout the 
Institution there is a prevailing atmosphere of discipline, int^ustry and 
enthusiasm on the part of both teachers and students that is fej^)y the most 
transient visitor, while wise and wholesome religious restraints and infiuences 
are constantly operating with the happiest results. The large number of 
those who come from the immediate vicinity, preferring the Seminary to 
High Schools of the greatest merit and free tuition, is sufficient evidence of 
the esteem the Institution commands at home. 

The exercises of Commencement were attended with remarkable interest, 
and the eager throng that crowded the vast hall made the heart of every lover 
of education to rejoice that the day of popular enthusiasm over the great 



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WILLIAMSl'OKT OICKINSON SEMINAKY. 



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II 



cause is actually at hand. Twenty-seven in all comprised the Graduating 
Class, the largest in the history of the Institution. The orations and essays 
were highly creditable, both in preparation and delivery, and throughout 
displayed the relative prominence given to the moral with the literary in the 
training of the minds that produced them. 

The Committee feel warranted in assuring both preachers and people who 
have children to educate, that a single visit to this worthy Institution would 
not only convince them of the truthfulness of this report, but at once induce 
them to select it as a safe and successful investment. 

J. H. Wood, Philadelphia Conference. 

C. W. Baldwin, Baltimore Conference, 

J. S. MoMuKKY,) n * T T^ 7 ' n ^ 

M. L. Ganoe i ^"^^^^^^ Pennsylvania Conference. 



FROM REPORT OF 1882, 

The Board of Visitors from the Philadelphia, Baltimore and Central 
Pennsylvania Conferences, after a thorough examination into the condition 
and prospects of this old and honored Institution, have great pleasure in 
submitting a very highly favorable report to their several Conferences. The 
School is located in one of the most beautiful and prosperous sections of the 
great State of Pennsylvania, and in the midst of a population of unusual 
enterprise and intelligence. The spacious buildings, situated on an eminence, 
with extensive grounds, are in excellent condition, and well supplied with all 
the appliances required by a first-class institution of its kind, with an 
ample corps of well trained and experienced teachers, who have the entire 
respect and confidence of the school, as well as of the community. 

The head of this working force. Rev. E. J. Gray, has proved his fitness for 
the place he occupies by most eflicient management of the Institution for 
many years. It is believed that it never exerteti so commanding an influence 
and was never so effective in its great work as at present. 

The order and discipline of the School are among its marked features, 
and while it is not denominational in any narrow sense, it maintains very 
thoroughly the creed of our great aggressive Evangelism, and hence revivals 
are common among the students, and nearly all of them are professors of 
religion. It has happened in other schools, to the great grief of Christian 
parents, that their children have* returned, after graduating, if not actually 
lost to the Church, yet with only a nominal religion; but we feel assured that 
the young people in this Seminary have all the helps and stimulants to a 
thoroughly Christian life which are to be found in our best Christian homes, 
and that it is as much the desire of the excellent President and his assistants 
to develop the religious character of those entrusted to their care as to 
promote their intellectual growth and culture. 

The exercises of Commencement Week by the various classes, the Literary 
Societies and the Department of Music, were of very creditable character 
indeed. The literary productions and eiforts in the various contests and 
entertainments were executed in a manner evincing a mental drill rarely 
equaled in schools of such grade. The large number of students participating 
in them, and the numerous friends of the students and of the Seminary in 



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THIRTY-NINTH ANNUAL CATALOGUE. 



G3 



attendance, imparted an air of interest, enthusiasm and prosperity abundantly 

satisfactory to the most exacting investigator. In preparation and delivery 

of orations and essays a remarkably high standard was well sustained 

throughout. After careful inquiry and personal observation, we heartily 

recommend this very excellent School to all who have children to educate, 

and feel assured that the great dominant purpose of Christian education 

will l)e as certainly attained within its walls as within those of any similar 

institution. J l;. Dobbins, > t^i .7 ^ t 7 • ^ ^ 

Tfiomas Montgomery,; ^^^^^^^^^^V^^^<^ Conference, 

Joel Brown, Baltimore Conference, 

E. T. Swartz, ) 

H. C. CuESTON, - Central Pennsylvania Conference. 

W. M. Frysinger,J 



FROM REPORT OF 1883. 

This well-known Seminary is in a most prosperous condition. The School 
is located in the beautiful and enterprising city of Williamsport, Pa., and 
furnished with all the appliances of a first class institution of learning. The 
grounds are ample; the buildings are spacious, in excellent repair, and 
admirably adapted to their uses. The teachers are men and won^en of broad 
culture, well qualified for, and assiduously devoted to, their work. Most of 
them have had large experience, and all enjoy the respect and confidence of 
the school and community. 

Rev. E. J. Gray, D. D., is eminently fitted for the position he holds as 
President. By his eflicient management the Institution is steadily increasing 
in the number of students and thoroughness of instruction. We find that 
the common objections against the coeducation of the sexes do not apply to 
Dickinson Seminary. It is the most home-like school of which we have any 
knowledge, while the order and discipline are worthy of special commenda- 
tion. The social and religious facilities afforded the students, so necessary 
in character-building, are all that can be desired, and the young ladies and 
gentlemen return to their homes with hearts and minds thoroughly imbued 
with the spirit of aggressive Christianity. Parents may rest assured that 
such advantages are enjoyed as must promote Christian growth, as well as 
intellectual culture. 

The examinations were thorough and entirely satisfactory. The works 
of art which adorned the Chapel walls, comprising portraits, landscapes, 
panels, plaques, crayons, and china decorations, were exceptionally good, 
reflecting great credit upon both teacher and pupils. The Music Department, 
under the direction of Professor Vcelkler, maintains the high character which 
has given it rank among the best "Music Schools" in the country. 

The Commencement exercises proper were held in Elliot's Academy of 
Music. The large hall was crowded to its utmost capacity, and many seeking 
admission were turned away for lack of room. The orations and essays of 
the Graduating Chiss were of a high order, evincing independence of thought 
and careful mental discipline on the part of those who produced them. 
Prizes were awarded for excellence in Latin, Algebra, Oratory, Essays, 
Reading, Elocution, Music and Painting. 

In the judgment of the (Committee, this is an excellent School; one where 
those who have children to educate may send them, assured that the chief 



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WILUAMSPORT DICKINSON SEMINARY. 



purpose of a Christian education will be realized. We most heartily recom- 
mend Williamsport Dickinson Seminary as worthy of a liberal patronage, 
and as meriting a loyal support by all those interested in higher culture under 
positively Christian influences. 

W. C. Robinson, > d7 -7 777- n ^ 

E. L. Schofield; ; Pl^ndelpliia Conference. 

S. C. Swallow, ) 

W. W. Evans, ~ Central Peniisyhania Conference. 

H. M AsFi, ) 



FROM REPORT OF 1884. 

The Committees appointed by the patronizing Conferences of Dickinson 
Seminary, Williamsport, Pa., report that having witnessed the examinations 
and Commencement exercises, they take pleasure in presenting the following 
commendation of the Institution and its work : 

The city of Williamsport is most favorably located, with pleasant and 
romantic mountain scenery on one side and a rich and highly cultivated rural 
district on the other. The vast lumber interests have brought unusual wealth 
to the population of twenty thousand. Much care and money have been 
expended upon the municipal regulations, public improvements and private 
residences, hence the city is beautiful, healthful and attractive, the people 
manifesting unusual intelligence, tlirift, good order, and devotion to church 
buildings and religious services. The Seminary buildings are imposing and 
capacious, surrounded by a charming campus, and well adapted to school 
purposes. The course of study nearly approaches a college curricidum, and 
is thoroughly utilized. The Faculty, with Rev. E. J. Gray, D. D., at the 
head, is able, diligent and efficient. The examinations, essays and contests 
gave evidence of thorough teaching, patient drill and faithful study. The 
productions of art and rendering of music were especially tine. 

The Graduating Class of twenty-six young ladies and gentlemen acquitted 
themselves most commendably. They were pronounced unsurpassed in the 
history of the School. They are certainly well fitted to comnumce life's active 
and responsible mission. With such superior advantages and work, secured 
at such low rates, it is not surprising that Dickinson Seminary has been very 
full during the past year. 

The religious oversight and influence, the refined social regulations, the 
manly and womanly deportment of the young lady and gentlemen students, 
and the general cheerful acquiescence in the wholesome discipline which is 
manifest in easy cheerfulness along the lines of perfect order, make a safe 
and desirable school in which to place our sons and daughters. 

We express our great satisfaction with the facilities and workings of the 
Seminary, and heartily recommend it to the most liberal i)atronage. 

S. N. Chew, \ 

J. J. TlMANUS, ! 7>7 •; 7 7 7 • ry ^ 

Thomas B. Reeves, f ^ ^^^^«^^^^M^^ Conference, 
William J. Paul, J 



B. F. Stevens, 
H. C. Pakdoe, 
A. S. Baldwin, 
W. A. Cakvek, 

H. R. MOHSER, 
T. H. MuiiKAY, 



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TIIIRTY-NINTIT ANNUAL CATALOGUE. 



60 



FROM REPORT OF 1885. 

The Committee appointed by the patronizing Conferences to visit Wil- 
liamsport Dickinson Seminary at its recent Commencement, respectfully 
report the following: 

We have carefully and somewhat minutely inquired into the condition 
and practical working of all the departments of the School, and have sought 
I to prepare a deliberate and unbiased judgment of its merits. The Seminary 
'/ is the property of the Preachers' Aid Society of the Central Wnnsylvania 
Conference of the Methodist Episcopal Church. It is a Boardihg School of 
high grade for both sexes, affording instruction in all branches, from primary 
English through the most advanced studies taught in academic institutions. 
It offers to all terms lower than any other school of similar grade of which 
we have knowledge, while to ministers' children it makes large reductions. 
It is under the presidency of Rev. E. J. Gray, D. D., a gentleman of large 
attainments in scholarship and mature experience in teaching, with a history 
of unparalleled success in conducting and governing the School. The build, 
ings are large, well arranged, and well adapted for dormitories and educa- 
tional purposes. Ample and beautiful grounds surround them, affording 
space to all for pure air and healthful exercise. Appliances for heating, 
ventilation, baking, laundering, bathing and fire escapes are all that could 
be desired. Proverbial healthfulness prevails, notwithstanding the vigorous 
prosecution of very advanced courses of study for which the Institution is 
noted. Tliis is due not to the eligible location alone, but also to the clean 
and tasteful condition maintained by the management throughout and around 
the premises, the efficiency of the culinary service, and the facilities for 
physical exercise and muscular development of the students in the Gymna- 
sium. In all the courses of study the recitations, examinations and public 
exercises of the different classes evinced a thoroughness of preparation and 
training which all present regarded as truly surprising. The work of students 
in the Department of Natural Science, which is under the care of Professor 
Freley, especially in Geology and Botany, and the displays in Mai hematics, 
presented for public inspection, were quite extensive and of exceptional 
merit. The Department of Music exhibited its efficiency in a public prize 
, <^contest, followed with an entertainment of rare excellence. Under Professor 
\ Vcelkler, who is an acknowledged master of his art, the Seminary certainly 
furnishes training in instrumental and vocal music as liberal as can be 
obtained anywhere in the country. Scarcely less should be said of the Art 
Department. Specimens of rare s\ill and beauty, from the brushes of stu- 
dents, adorned the Chapel walls and demonstrated the attention given to this 
branch of ornamental education. Much credit is due to Mrs. J. L. Gassaway, 
tlie accomplished teacher, through whose ability and large experience such 
attainments have been realized and such opportunity aiforded by the Semi- 
nary to students in Painting and Drawing. The science of Elocution also 
makes itself prominent in the exercises, commands respect and adds much 
to the completeness of appliances. 

Discipline, industry and enthusiasm are manifestly everywhere prevalent. 
A home-like feeling, engendered by properly directed intermingling of the 
sexes, counteracts homesickness, cultivates manners and tastes, and stimu- 




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WILLIAMSPORT DICKINSON SEMINARY. 



latcs emulation. Wholesome religious Restraints and influences are not 
wanting, and result in numerous conversions every year. 

The Commencement exercises were held in the Academy of Music, before 
a vast and select audience. The Graduating Class comprised twenty-five 
young ladies and gentlemen, ten of whom were children of ministers. Both 
in preparation and delivery, the orations and essays were all highly creditable. 
Some of them were remarkable. Prizes were awarded for excellence in 
Oratory, Music, Elocution, Gymnastics, etc. iMjlomas were awarded and 
degrees conferred by President Gray, and the exercises closed. Congratula- 
tions followed on every hand. 

Intelligent and reliable citizens of the place, who for years have closely 
observed the workings of the School, assured us that its efficiency is now 
steadily and rapidly increasing, while parents of students, after years of 
close and exacting 'insight, joined their children in unanimous and generous 
commendation. ^ 

Appointed to acquire and express an intelligent opinion of the character 
and claims for patronage of this worthy institution of learning, the Committee 
feel that with the facts before them, they could not say less than the fore- 
jToing, or conclude without commending the School to all parents who have 
children to educate, and urging them, by personal visitation, to satisfy them- 
selves of its superior advantages. 

M. L. Ganoe, "I 

li. HiNKLE, [ 

J. T. Wilson, C 
T. H. Murray, J 

G. A. Wolfe, Philadelphia Conference. 



Central Pennsylvania Conference. 



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FROM REPORT OF 1886. 

The Committees of the Philadelphia and Central Pennsylvania Conferences 
appointed to visit the Williamsport Dickinson Seminary report that, having 
visited and inquired into the management of the Institution, they are prepared 
to commend it most heartily. I 

The well-known work which this Institution has been doing throughout ' 
the forty years of its existence renders it unnecessary to make more than a 
brief statement in regard to the Educational Department. During these years 
it has l)een sending out young men and young women to take their places in 
life and become a blessing in their day and generation, and many of the old 
students have risen to eminence in the departments of activity which they 
have chosen. That the former prosperity continues and increases is indicated 
by the fact that the Graduating Class of this year is the largest which ever 
went from the institution. 

The present character of the educational work was shown in the nature of 
the examinations. This year members of the Committee were present at a 
large number of the examinations, and they are unanimous in the judgment 
that they evinced careful instruction and thorough drill on the part of the 
teachers, and diligent study on the part of the pupils. 



THIRTY-NINTH ANNUAL CATALOGUE. 



G7 



There are eight courses of study under the direction of fourteen competent 
professors, and at the head of the Faculty and of the Institution is the Rev. 
E. J. Gray, D D., who has been in charge for twelve years, and each passing 
year more clearly demonstrates his admirable fitness for the position. 

There are three Literary Societies connected with the Seminary, wliich 
supplement the work of the recitation rooms and give increased opportunities 
for practice in writing, public speaking, and the conduct of deliberative 
bodies. There are also three Libraries, containing valuable collections of 
books and the nucleus of a special reference library has been formed. 

During the year just closed the facilities for Chemical Analysis have been 
increased, and material additions have been made in the departments of 
Mineralogy and Geology. A largd^ donation of marine animals has been 
received and arranged, which will greatly aid the instructor and the students 
in the department of Natural Science. Among the improvements which will 
be made during the present summer is the introduction of steam-heat through- 
out the entire building. 

Among the many excellencies which might be mentioned, the Art Depart- 
ment stands out very conspicuously. The large and beautiful display of 
paintings and crayons on exhibition, the work of the students, gave proof 
that the Art Department is under competent management, and the quality of 
the work showed study, practice and decided artistic talent on the part of the 
pupils. 

It is with special gratification that we recognize the religious atmosphere 
which pervades the Seminary. A revival, resulting in the conversion of a 
large proportion of the students and the strengthening of the religious char- 
acter of others, is an annual occurrence. 

The healthfulness of the location, the character of the instruction, the 
careful oversight, and the very reasonable charge for board and tuition, make 
this Institution a very inviting school for many classes. 

-* -' ~ ' ' ^ Philadelphia Conference, 



S. G. Grove, > 

R. E. Wilson, 
A. B. HoovEN, 
J. T. Wilson, 
William A. Houok, J 



> Central Pennsylvania Conference. 



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The Largest Music House in Central Penna. 



D. S. ANDRUS & Co. 



EST^^BLISECEID I860. 



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PIANOS: 


OKi. A^^S: 


Stein way, 


Wilcox & White, 


Sohmer, 


Clough & Warren^ 


Emerson, 


Mason & Hamlin 


Kranich & Bach, 


New England, 


Fischer, 


Waterloo, 


Pease. 


^fVeaver. 



WE SELL FOR CASH OR ON THE INSTALMENT PLAN, 
AND SELL ONLY THE BEST GOODS. 



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DUBLb ^ i>< 'n;M! 



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IFLL, 

Druggists and Pharmacists 

Particular Attention Given to Compounding Prescriptions. 



Campliorated Glycerine Ice, Bay Kum Hair Tonic. 
Odontine, a Superior Tooth Wash. 

Fragrant Bouquet Cologne, Rose and Pearl Dentifrice. 

A Fine Assortment of Hair, Nail and Tooth Brushes. 

And General Fancy and Toilet Articles. 

DUBLE & CORNELL, Cor. Fourth and Pine Streets. 

Special Rates to Students. 






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P 1 1 o t o g 1" a p h i c Pa i ^ 1 o r s 



31 WEST TTT 



Opposite the Court House. 



'WIIjXjI.A.l^SI^OiaT. 



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T'HKET, 



Only One Flight of Stairs. 



'^IBZISTISTJ^. 



We extend a hearty welcome to all. 



GEORGE BUBB & SONS, 



'WM DXESAIE ©EDmH^ 



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— ^ANDj^ 



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Send for Catalogues. 



No. 17 West Third Street, ~ ~ Wiliiaipspuri, PcddcI, 



-^Tea Dealers 



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W I i, LI AM SPORT. PA 



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E. HllCi^S 



Formerly Market Square, now first Door below Post Office, 






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KEEPS ALL SEMINARY SUPPLIES, 



As well as 



Qt^^Books in the Course of Study for the Ministry of the M. E. Church. 

A full stock of New and Second-Hand School Books, Cheap. Teachers' 
Bibles and Sunday School Supplies. 

Orders by Telephone attended to promptly. 

CHARLES E. MICKS, 
— ^ No. 32 East Third Street, one door below Post Office. 



SEITZ BI^OTIPT'E'R.S 




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Aiii*4,; i*-ia.^^ # Silver 'Ware. 

HAVILAND k CO.'S CHINA F(iR DEi^ORATINd, 

No. 319 Pine Street, : : WILLIAMSPORT, PA. 



— WE ALSO CARRY A FINE LINE OF — 



STAPLE I FANCY GROCERIES, WOOD % WILLOW WARE, 

At No. 148 West Fourth Street. 



-A-I^T STOK.E!. 



^. 'R>. HI^ZEIjET, 



-DEALER IN ALL KINDS OF — 



W^ ^^ MPiR J WlNJUu/vk c>ii A i> L Si, 

No. 315 Pine Street, Williamsport, Pa. 

STATIONERY, PICTURE FRAMES, CORNICES, 

STEEL ENGRAVINGS, GLASS SHADES, 

• CHROMOS, WAX AND ARTISTS' MATERIALS. 

— ALSO, — 

PAINTER, GRAINER and PAPER HANGER. 



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HUGHES & BO^VMAN, 






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No. 343 Pine Street, \\ iniamRiMH l, Pa. 



/\ i_ 1^ ^V . ili 1_ JC LJ L UL "V- U -• 9 



Wholesale Grouci 






OFFER FULL STOCK, FRESH GOODS. 



SUGAR, SYRUP, TEA, TOBACCO, CANNED FRUIT, CHEESE, 

Flour, Soap, Coffee, Choice Tub Butter, &c. 

G-OOZD G-OOIDS J^ T L O -V^T IP E. I C IE S . 

Goods delivered to all parts of the city. ''- 



LARGEST ASSORTMENT AND LATEST STYLES OP 



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FLANNEL SHIRTS. BICYCLE HOSE, BELTS, 

A.ND 

No. 116 West Fourth Street, WilliamSDOrt, Pa. 



«S~WEAR THE EUIIIMIE PATENT SHIRT IF YOU WANT A GOOD FIT.-®* 



I 



G. W. Klump. 



W. W. Hertz. 





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South-west Corner Third and Market Streets, Over L. L. Stearns' Store. 



ACHING TEETH RESTORED TO COMFORT AXU USEFULiNESS. 

(I^^TEETH EXTRACTED WITHOl 1 I A!N 



Sittings should be secured in advance, through the mail or with one of the firm, either of 
whom will make appointments for himself or his associate, as may be preferred. 



'3?JBXji:E3: 



oisriEs cjoi«"i«-e:otioiv. 





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FASHIONABLE MERCHANT TAILOR 

AND CLOTHIER. 

Also Dealer in Trunks, Gents' Furnishing 

Goods, &c. 



No. 345 Pine Street, 



Williamsport, Va. 



CITY BAKERY AND CONFECTIONERY. 



Steam lee Cream Manufactory, 

CORNER FOURTH AND MARKET STREETS. 



Br§a(j^ PSiyil EiMf ©ifeii^ te OEiiMi 

• FRUITS, NUTS, CONFECTIONERY, &c., &c. 



OUDEU8 FROM A DISTANCE WILL RECEIVE PROMPT ATTENTION. 

TEILEFHOITE COlTITEiCTIOiT. 



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Plumber, Gas and Steam Fitter. 



A iPULL LINE OF PLUMBING GOODS, CHANDELIERS, 

BRACKETS. PLAIN AND FANCY LA.Mi'S, 

TAi'.l l-;6 A.NJ> i^ANCY GLASSWARE. 



7 



5 WEST THIRD STREET, WILLIAMSPORT, PA. 



-^JcC. F. & J. R. GORDON, 3}E^ 



Importers and Dealers in 




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Nos. 82 and 84 Pine Street, 



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Williamsport, Pa. 



STI^ICTI-.^5r OISTE FR,ICE- 



T. J. PUNSTON. 



II. U. Clapp. 



To M. wummTB 






Frank S. Clapp. 



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{Successors to L. McDowell A- Co.,) 



Dealers m Hardware, vVhite Lead, 

OILS, GLASS AND BUILDING HARDWARE. 



Belting and Saw Mill Supplies a Specialty. 



AGRICULTURAL IMPLEMENTS. 

Agents for the South Bend Chilled Plow, Masury's Mixed Paints, 

and Carriage Hardware. 

24 EAbTTHIRIi STRFFT W i LH AM;^! ORT, PA. 



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FIRE INSURANCE. 



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HENFIY- J. CLINGEF.\ 

113 WEST FOURTH STREET, (Above Pine,) WILLIAMSPORT, PA. 



-^Best American and Foreign Gompanies iioprosented.-^ 

Ciet our rates and examine the standing of our Companies before insuring elsewhere. 






WESTERN RAILROAD TICKETS 

sold over the Leading Railroads of the United States. This is the place to buy your Railroad 

Tickets. Call and get Rates, Time Tables and Mai)s, free. 






i. 




C A A/'l? ^^^"^y''^^"^^ A ATTklTl ^'g^^ ^^^^"Kes 114 A 1^17 Sure Connections 
OM. Y iL and 'i rouble, t\. Y \JV\J and 'J'ransfers, 1^1 M FN £^ and Fast Time, 

BUYING WESTERN RAILROAD TICKETS AT THIS OFEICE. 



AGENCY FOR ANCHOR LINE OF STEAMr RS. 

Passengers ])ooked at through rates to and from any Seai)ort or Railroad Station in the world. 

Full satisfaction guaranteed all passengers. 

Call, telephone or write for further information to 

Academy of Music Building, WILLIAMSPORT, PA. 



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