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Full text of "Annual catalogue of Williamsport Dickinson Seminary for the academic year : from .."

CATALOGUE 



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Anntial Cataloguie 



OF 



WILLIAMSPORT 



ICKINSON SemIN 




FOR THE ACADEMIC YEAR 



FROM 



September 4, 1803, to Jiane 21, 1894. 



WILLIAMSPORT, PA. 



WILLIAMSPORT, PA.: 

GAZETTE AND BULLETIN PRINTING HOUSE. 

1894. 



/ 



Calendar. 



> 



Terms and Vacations. 



1 894. 

FALL TERM 



{ 



Opens Monday, September 3, and closes Wednesday 
December 19. Vacation eighteen days. 



1895. 
WINTER TERM 



/ 



Opens Monday, January 7, and closes Monday, April i 
No vacation. 



1895. 
SPRING TERM 



Opens Monday, April i, and closes June 20. Vacation 
ten weeks. 



* ^1 



k 



1803. 

4 September, Monday — Fall Term opened. 

27 November, Saturday — Anniversary of Belles Jjettres Union Society. 
22 December, Friday — Fall Term closed. 

1894. 

8 January, Monday — Winter Term opened. 
29 January, Monday — Music Recital. 

5 March, Monday — Cantata-Athalia. 

24 March, Saturday — Anniversary of Gamma Epsilon Society. 
2 April, Monday — Winter Term closed. 
2 April, Monday — Spring Term opened. 

1 June, Friday — Final F^xaminations of Senior Class. 

2 June, Saturday — Anniversary of Tripartite Union Society. 
4 June, Monday— Pupils' Music Recital. 

7 June, Thursday — President and Mrs. Gray's Reception to Senior Class. 
11 June, Monda}^— Cantata— The Rose Maiden— Benefit Athlelic Association. 

13 June, Wednesday — Annual F]xaminations. 

14 June, Thursday — Annual Examinations. 

15 June, Friday — Annual Examinations. 

15 June, Friday, 8 P. M. — Exercises of Sophomore Class. 
17 June, Sunday, 3 P. M. — Annual Sermon by Rev. James M. Bucklev, D. D. 
LL. D. 

17 June, Sunday, 6 P. M. — Song Service on Campus. 

18 June, Monday, 3 P. M. — Class Day. 

18 June, Monday, 8 P. M. — Prize Contest in Music. 

19 June, Tuesday, 9 A. M. — Prize Contest in Reading. 

19 June, Tuesday, 10:30 A. M. — Prize Contest in Oratory. 
19 June, Tuesday, 2 P. M. — Exercises of Junior Class. 

19 June, Tuesday, 8 P. M. — Prize Contest in Elocution. 

20 June, Wednesday, 9 A. M. — Prize Contest in Essays. 

20 June, Wednesday, 10 A. M. — Reunion of Belles Lettres Union Societv. 
20 June, WednCvsday, 2:30 P. M. — Literary Meeting of the Alumni. 
20 June, Wednesday, 7 P. M. — Business Meeting of the Alumni. 

20 June, Wednesday, 8 P. M. — Reunion and Banquet of the Alumni. 

21 June, Thursday, 9:30 A. M. — Commencement. 

20 June, Wednesday, 2 P. M.— Meeting of the Board of Directors. 

21 June, Thursday, 2 P. M.— Annual Meeting of the Stockholders. 
21 June, Thursday, 2:30 P. M.— Annual Meeting of the Directors. 

21 June, Thursday, 5:30 P. M.— President and Mrs. Gray's Reception to the 
Directors and their Wives. 



/ t/m 



Board of Directors. 



Alumni Organization. 



Hon. JOHN PATTON, President, Curwensville. 

WILLIAM F. THOMPSON, Esq., Secretary, Williamsport. 

GEORGE W. Jlli PLE, Esq., Lock Haven. 

LOUIS McDowell, Esq., Willimic^port. 

THOMAS H. MUPvRAY, Esq., Uearfield. 

J. COLE GREP:N, Esq., Williamsport. 

B. C. BOWMAN, KsQ., Williamsport. 

DeWITT BODINE, Esq., Hiighesville. 

Hon. DANIEL PL HASTINGS, Bellefonte. 



E. J. GRAY, Steward and Treasurer. 
Miss STELLA M. FOLLMER, Book-keeper. 
Miss LYDIA TAYLOR, Matron. 
Mrs. M. HAINEvS, Assistant Matron. 



Visiting Committees. 



CENTRAL PENNSYLVANIA CONFERENCE. 



Rev. H. M. ASH. 
Rev. T. L. TOMPKINSON. 
Rev. J. K. LLOYD. 
Rev. a. D. McCLOSKEY. 
Rev. I. N. MOORHEAD. 
Rev. G. M. HOKE. 
Rev. B. C. CONNER. 



Rev. T. S. WILCOX. 

Rev. S. B. EVANS. 

Rev. M. C. PIPER. 

Rev. a. S. BOWMAN. 

Rev. G. M. FROWNFELTER. 

Rev. W. C. IiP:8SER. 

Rev. G. D. PENEPACKER, D. D. 



PHILADELPHIA CONFERENCE. 

Rev. JOHN F. CROUCH. Rev. SYLVANUS G. GROVE. 

Rev. GEORGE M. DUNGAN. 

BALTIMORE CONFERENCP:. 



Rev. W. I. McKENNY. 



Rev. H. F. DOWNS. 



( i 



OFFICERS. 



Hon. a. O. FURST, A. B., President. 

Miss SOPHIA REKiHARD, A. B., Vice-President. 

Miss LOTTIE C. EVERKIT, M. E. L., Recording Secretary. 

*Miss MIRIAM P. WELCH, M. E. L., Corresponding Secretary. 

Rev. C. W. BURNLEY, A. B., Treasurer. 



EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE. 

Rev. C. W. BURNLEY, A. B. 

MAX L. MITCHELL, A. B. 

Miss AUGUSTA H. GILMORE, M. E. L. 

THOMAS M. B. HICKS, A.B. 

MISS ELLA Z. METZGER, A. B. 

MRS. MAGGIE KRAUSE, B. S. 

ORATION. 

Rev. HENRY R. BENDER, D. D. 

ESSAY. 
Miss MARY McDOWELL SHICK, A. B. 

RECITATION. 

Miiis BESSIE M. SWARTZ, M. E. L. 



^Deceased. 



6 



WILLIAMSPORT DICKINSON SEMINARY. 



FORTY-SIXTH ANNUAL CATALOGUE. 



Faculty 



Eev. EDWARD JAMES GRAY, D. D., President, 

Ethics and Lone. 

Miss CHARLOTTE JOSEPHINE HOAG, Preceptress, 

MoJer?7 Languages, 

THOMAS JAMES PENEIELD, A. M., 

Ancient L^an^ua^es. 

FRED ELLIOT DOWNES, Ph. B., 

AlatJiematies. 

WILLIA.M JOSEPH DOUGLASS, B. S., 

A^aturai Science. 

CLARENCE LOOMIS PEASLEE, A. B., 

L^atin ami Rhetoric, 

MiS3 HELEN ELIZABETH WILSON, B. S., 
History and Literature. 

ARTHUR HAMILTON CHAMBERLAIN, ^.L P., 

Academic Department. 

Miss CHARLOTTE CRITTENDEN EVERETT, M. E. L., 

Assistant in Acadeviic Department. 

Mrs. JANE LAWRANCE GASSAWAY, 

Painting and Drawing, 



MISS MAY TEIMBLE STUART, B. S., 

Director Lnstrumental Music, 



' I ' 



4 



i 



Miss ALLIE MAUD BATES, 

Assistant in Lnstrumental Music. 

Mrs. MHYLE FOWLER, 

Assistant in Piano, 

MISS ANNA NETTA GIBSON, 
Vocal Music. 

Miss BESSIE MARGUERITE SWARTZ, M. E. L., 

Elocution and Physical Culture, 



LECTURES 1893-94. 

Hon. henry C. McCORMICK, 

Political Economy. 

HERBERT T. AMES, Esq., 

Co?N?nercial Law. 

WILLIAM B. KONKLE, M. D., 
hygiene. 

/. — 7he Use and Mission of Drugs. 2. — Essentialsto LLealth, 

Bishop THOMAS BOWMAN, D. D., LL. D., 

The Lmportance of a Right Education. 

Bishop WILLIAM TAYLOR, D. D., 

Africa. 

Rev. martin L. GANOE, 

A Boy in the War, 

LEON H. VINCENT, 

Nathaniel LLawthorne, 

HAMLIN GARLAND, 

Living Writers, 



^ 



WILLIAMSPORT DICKINSON SEMINARY. 



Alumni. 



Raines. class. 
Akers, Miss Lizzie i885 



^^ames. class, 

Brady, L. M 1834 

Bradley, Miss K X857 

Brill ton, C. S 1890 

...1893 1 Brown, C. I ig^g 

. . . 1852 i Brown, H. L 188O 

Anderson, S. L i887 Brown, J. C !*..*".'.'.."'. 1868 

1884 I Brown, J. J ;- ^ jgCT 



* Alexander, C. T 1853 

Alexander, E. B i889 

Alexander, Miss Winifred 

•Alien, It. P 

\nderson, S. I 
Andrews, W. A, 



*Arudt, C.K 1868 ! * Buckalew, W. J ]871 

Babb, Miss Kate J i889 I Buckley, Miss E. M ..1883 

Baird, Eugene H i891 j Buckley, Miss IS. E ....!.. 1884 

Baker, E. (i i884 ! Burke, E. W '.*.". 1882 

Baker, G. W i876 j Burnley, C. W ig^jo 

Baker, Miss Margaret 1883 Burnley, Miss L. H 1893 



Baldwin, J. B 188I 



Burnley, Miss M. C I89;: 



Ball, Miss Cora I i891 | Busey, CJ . M ]88'^ 

Ball, MissS. F 1889 I Calder, Miss M "i865 

Barber, Miss A. E 1879 | Campbell, F. C .' i8(j3 

Barnitz.C. M 1890 i Campbell, I. P .! 1872 

Barnitz,S.J i879 ! Campbell, Miss M. L I893 

Barr, Miss Adelle I88O I * Campbell, R. P 1879 

Barton, Miss F. A 1865 I Carter, K. T 1875 

♦Barton, J. H 1860 i Carver, W. A !.' 1871 

Beck, MissM. J 1852 , Cassidy, Miss E. F i887 

Beddow, William I888 | Chamberlin, Miss R. A ......1892 

Beers, L. H 1869 | Champion, Miss M i87y 

tBell, J. E 1880 j Chapman, H. O "1868 

tBender, H. R 1882 i Cheston, Miss A. H ! i884 

♦Bennett, Allen 1877 | Cheston, H. C 1886 

Bennett, Miss H. C 1858 * Church, F. E ..!!!!!...! !l863 

Bennett, Miss M. P 1884 | C:larke, F. A. C .^/^ ...... ...... !l87'^ 

Bennett, Miss N. H 1880 | Clarke, W. i» ISSO 

tBenscoter, C. C I88O I Clarke, J. (' 1885 

Benscoter, W. E 1893 \ Clarkson, J. A. C i884 

Betts, William T 1891 1 Cleaver, Miss C. Y .......!. 1876 



Cleaver, Miss L. J. 



1866 



* Glees, T.O ^^^s 

*Comp, J. s ige9 



Beyer. Miss Sarah A 1891 

Biddle, Miss E 1861 

♦Biggs, E. H 1862 

Bixler, J. W 1878 j Conner, Miss Adella 1889 

Black, Miss Anna S 1889 I Conner, B. C .!..... 1871 

Bodine, De Witt 1861 I Conner, Miss Sallie 1887 

Body, Miss Kate R 1889 j *Conner, S. J. A 18GI 

Bowman, A. S 1868 j Conner, S. J. A !!!!!!!!l886 

fBowman, J. F 1882 ^ Cooper, Miss A .1864 

Bowman, J. H 1881 j Cooper, Miss A. M .......1864 

Bowman, S. L 1852 Cooper, Miss Nettie !!.!!!!l891 

Bowman, S. S 1863 Cooper, R. W ]]]] "1887 

Bowman, Summer S 1886 j Correll, Miss (J. V 

Boynton, MissE 1864 I Correll, W. U... 

^Deceased. ^Honorary. 



,1893 



1892 



I ■ 



i. \ 



FORTY-SIXTH ANNUAL CATALOGUE. 



9 



Names, class. ' Names, ciats. 

Cox, C. S 1866 Forrest, Miss Anna L i887 

Crawford, Miss Lavina P 1855 *Foulke, Miss Jennie R.. ....... . . . . . . . i878 

Crawford, MissM. E 1865 Fredericks, D. H. M 1862 

tCrawford, Mary R . ' ]S86 Fredericks, More 1 860 

♦Crawford, Miss R. A 1857 : Friliug, Miss M i865 

Creager, C. E 1876 Frost, W. M \mo 

^ Creveling, Miss Ida B. L 1890 : Fullmer, C. F 188I 

Creveling, MissM. L 1887 ' Fullmer, C. L I88O 

Creveling, S. A 1862 Fullmer, Miss S. M T.! . . .. .^ y. !l887 

Crever, Miss A. Ro.sa 1886 Furst, A. O ' ^ ^1854 

Crotsley, H. H 1886 ; Furst, V.(\ ^ . . ' . ! .1853 

---^^^^' '^- ^' Iii90 I Ganoung, Miss C. M I888 

Cummings, Miss L. W., 1877 j Gearhart, H. F 1853 

Curns, Miss M. E 1883 Gearhart, W. T i«o2 

Curran, H. A 1858 ! Gehret, Miss E. L i883 

Dale, MissF 1872 i Gere. Miss H. A.........^. i8f,2 

Dann, Miss A. D 1893 j Gere, Miss, S. F........ i8o2 

Dart, MissL 1875 ^ Gibson, W. S 1877 

Dashiell, Miss A. F 1877 | Gilmore, xMiss A. H '...'...1881 

Davis, Miss H. B 1853 Glenn, G. W. iVI i884 

Davis, MissM. B 1852 | Glosser, W. E....* 1890 

Dawes, Joseph H 1891 \ Glover, Miss L. E 188I 

Deavor, MissldaC 1887 I Goodlander, Miss J. E i85-> 



Deavor, J. 1). W. 

Deavor, E. E. A 1871 

Deavor, W. T. S I888 

De Armond, D. A I866 

Dempsey, C. W..,<r7r?^ 1893 

♦Diemer, J. B \... ./. 1853 

Dietrick, F. P /. i87i 

*Dill, A. II 1852 

*Dill,M. R 1863 

I^ill,W.lI 1857 

Drinkle, Miss M. E 1867 

Drum, MissE. M 1885 j Greenly, Miss E. M 

Drum, M. L 1857 I (Jreenlv, T 

Dunkerly, J. R 1878 | Griggs.* Miss B. E 1871 

Ebert, MissA.M 1860 j Guldin, J 1870 

Eckbert, Miss A. M 1874 I Guss, Miss A. E "i88"*' 

Eder, MissM. G 1884 j Guss. Miss S. C 1887 



1880 i Goodwill, W. F 1875 

<^^i'ayrE.f 1858 

Gray, Miss E. K i8»j3 

( rray, Etta S 1 ^^87 

(Jray, Miss Myrtle i893 

Gray, W. E 188I 

(Jray, William W 1886 

Glazier, Miss L. A 1888 

Green , Miss II. M 1852 

Green, Miss M. A I855 

(1 reen. Miss J. L 1892 

1888 

1858 



Edger, Miss M 1857 

Edwards, Miss X. C> I88I 

Eichelberger, J. Allie 1891 

Elliott, Mis.s M. F 1862 

Emery, Miss Eva V 1857 

Emery, Miss Lizzie I i860 | Hanks, H. R 

Emery, MissM. P i857 ; Hann, C. G.. 



Hahn, Miss L. S 1871 

Halenbake, Miss S. E 1862 

Hambleton, C 1888 

Hammond, W. S 1874 

Hammond, W. A i8G4 

1876 
1878 



*Eut, W. H 1858 I Harmau, Miss A. E 18O8 

Essington, MissM. R 1877 I Harris, F. G ....1873 

Harris, Miss LP i870 



Harris, Miss L. R 1^^-72 

Hartman, Miss C i8(j3 



Essington, Miss N. A 1865 

Evans, S. B i885 

Everett, Miss Lottie (J I886 

^yer, H. B .1885 I Hartman, Franklin E 1891 

Faunce, J. E 1863 I Hartman, W. W i892 

Fans, George W 1891 | Hartsock, F. D i«yo 

6-Fehr, H. A 1890 i Hartzell, Miss A. M. C i883 

Ferguson, Miss H. E 1885 ; Hartzell, C. V 1879 

Fidler, C. L i860 i Harvey, J. C ..!..! ..T.. ! 'l880 

*Deceased. ^Honorary, 



10 



WILLTAMSrORT DICKINSON SKMINAKY. 



Names. Class, 

Haughawont, Miss L. M 1883 

Haughawout. Miss S. F ,. 1802 

Haupt, G. W 18G0 

Heafer, Miss Louise ^S90 

Heck, Albert S 1887 

Heek, O. G 1884 

Heckman, Miss Helen E 1891 

Hedges, Miss E. V ! 1879 

Heilman, K. P 1874 

tHeiluer, S. A 187G 

Heim, C. F 1875 

Heisley, xMiss R. N 1852 

Hepburn, A. D 18C2 

*HeiT, Miss A. M 1801 

Hill, Miss A 1881 

Hill, (Jeorge H 1891 

Hill, H.R 1892 



FORTY-SIXTH ANNUAL CATALOGUE. 



11 



Hillraan, George M 1891 

Himes, T. B 18C5 

Hippie, T. 1865 

Hitchius, H 1870 

Hollopeter, S. G. M 1865 

Hontz, A. W 1890 

Hooper, Miss M. L 189:] 

Hooven, Miss E. R 1887 

Hooven, Miss M. M 1880 

Hoover, W. R i885 

Houek, Miss G. H 1881 

Houck, W. G 1889 

Hounk, W. L 1892 

Howes, Miss A 1864 

Howland, Miss M. A 1893 

Hunter, L. H iss-l 

Huntley, G. W., Jr i889 

Huntley, Miss L. J i888 

Hursh, Miss L. M i882 

Hutchinson, J. G i802 

Hutchinson, W. L i884 

*Hynian, Miss J. S i880 

*Hyman, Miss S. R i860 

*Jackson, C. G i858 

James, J. Harry igcG 

James, \V. M 1^78 

Janney, L. R 1874 

John, D. C 1856 

*John,G.W 18,58 

'T- John, R. R 1890 

Johns, J. E 1886 

Johns, William i884 

"---Johnson, Miss Jean 1890 

Johnston, G. G., 1893 

Jones, Miss J. L i884 

Jones, Miss 8. T 1872 

Joyce, Elijah 1857 

Kalblus, Charles H 1852 

Keefer, Miss Ella i884 

Kessler, Miss E. M i887 

Kimball, A. W 188I 



uYames, Qiass. 

King, Miss Ada 1877 

l^i"g'<- K 1870 

Kirk, Miss N. A I88O 

*Kline, E. R iges 

Kline, Miss S. M. 1888 

Koch, E. V 1880 

Koch, :;Iiss Ida E 1886 

Koch, Miss Laura .M 188O 

Koller, Miss Louise i89l 

Konkle, W. B 1878 

K ress, Miss A. M 1 893 

Kress, Miss E. H 1893 

^^ess, W.C .1859 

*Landis, J. W 1^57 

Larned, F. W 188O 

I^^^^' ^^'^ 1868 

Leidy, Miss M. B is85 

Leonard, H. E 1893 

Levan, Miss . M 1864 

Lincoln, Miss A. R 1893 

Lincoln, Miss H. M 1884 

Little, V»'illiam F i^ss 

Lloyd, A. P 1879 

Long, H. E 1^73 

Long, Miss J. M ^884 

Loudenslager, Miss R. S i867 

tLove, J. K 1877 

*Loveland, R., Jr jg^Q 

Lovell, Miss A. M i8(;g 

Lowe, Miss Emma 1857 

*Lowe, Miss A, S 1863 

Lowe, J. W 1877 

Madara, J. W i873 

Madill, (;. A jgr^s 

Madore, B. F 1899 

Malin, Miss E i8gi 

Mallalieu, Miss B. J . .1890 

*Markle, A. M 1871 

Martyn, C. S i887 

]\rason, Miss T i8{;c 

Massey, Miss A. E i8G4 

Massey, Miss M. E 1873 

May, W. A 1373 

*McCloskey, M. J 1875 

McCollum, Miss M. E 1890 

Mc(Jord, Miss Mary 1852 ^ 

McCullough, Miss M. J 1877 

McDowell, A ig^o 

* McDowell, MissC, 1866 

McDowell, H. W 1888 

McDowell, Miss I i8(j5 

McDowell, Lewis J i891 

Mc(iraw, J. R iggg 

McTntire, Miss Z. B 1390 

McKee, Miss N. E. B i882 

McWilliams, D. A 1886 

Melick, O. B i8G4 

Melshimer, J. A 187$ 



/ 



^ \ 



Names. Class. 

Mendenhall, H. S 1853 

Metzger, Miss E. Z 1879 

Metzger, Miss H. M I88S 

Metzler, O. S 188O 

Miller, A. G 1888 

Miller, J. M 1875 

Aliller, Miss J. R i860 

Milnes, Miss L. H ]88ri 

Minds, Miss E. A ]893 

Minds, J. H i893 

Mitchell, Miss M. J 1865 

Mitchell, Miss M. L 1885 

Mitchell, Max L 1885 



Names. class. 
Reeser, I. J ig^g 

Reider, Miss Bertha A v 1886 

Reider, :Miss Mary L I. i89i 

Reighard, Miss S. S >>^. .18O6 

Remley, G. M igyo 

Rentz, W. F 1874 

Reynolds, S. A 1874 

t^^^^.J-K .1878 

Riale, Miss H. E i885 

Richards, Miss E. L I873 

Riddle, E. C 1^77 

Riddle, Miss E 1851 



Riddle, Miss J. 1) 1890 

Moore, Miss B. B ys^ Riddle, Miss M. E .* 1854 

Moore, R. S 188O Rohpsnn w h^ 

Moore, S. G 18GI 



Morgart, IL M i887 

Mosser, Miss Annie 1882 

Mosser, B. H ;. .1877 

Mortimer, J. II ]881 

^Ioul,C.B 1878 

tMoyer, H. C. . . i882 



Robeson, W. F 1^8 

Robeson, Miss M iggo 

R(ibins, Miss M. E i884 

Rockwell, Miss Estella i889 

Roth fuss, Miss Ph(x^be 1882 

Rue, J. W ig77 

Russell, Miss J. S igga 

Russell, Miss M, J 1890 



Mulford, MissE. B 1887 Sadler, W. F i^r^ 

^^^n-^y^T.Il 1867 : Sangree, P. H ;;;;; ^^ 

Musser, MissM. E 1881 Saxon, Benjamin F '.'.'.'.'.'.Am 



Saylor, Miss J. S i862 

♦Scarborough, G. H 1878 

^ Schoch, A ige2 

, *Schofield, E. L ; 1862 

j Scoville, Miss J. E 1863 

I Sechler, W. A 1883 

Sensenbach, Miss A. V 1893 

I Sydow, Albert 1893 

I Shammo, Miss F. E 1879 

tShaver, J. B 1^91 

I Sheaffer, W. J 139^ 

Shick, Miss Mary M 188G 

I Shoop, W. R igg3 

Showalter, Miss A. B 1885 

Slate, Miss A. B 1^90 



*Deceased. 



^Honorary, 



M ussina. Miss H i8G2 

M ussina, Miss L 186I 

Mussina, Miss M. H I8OI 

*Nash, MissF. E i865 

Nash, Miss K. E igco 

Needy, Carl \V 1886 

*NtJff, •^. I 1861 

tNeeley, T. B 1 891 

Nicodemus, J. D 1374 

Norcross, W. H i865 

Xorris, Miss Sadie R 1886 

Oliver, Miss A. S 18GI 

Olmstead, Miss E 18T5 

Olmstead, Miss M 1875 

<^PP' J- A 1870 

Osman, T. Milton 1891 | Sliver, W. A .....'..;.' Jg^^ 

^"'I^- I^ 1885l*Smith, H. E ^i^(^> 

*Packer,Miss M 1852 Smith, N. B 1^7.' 

Packer, Miss S. B 1852 Smith, T. J .of. 

Pardoe, Miss M. II 1885 i Snyder, Miss E.. .. .\ igo. 

Pearce, Miss A. M 1870 Souder, Miss R. L .^A 

Pearce, Miss Bessie 1877 ; Spangler, J. L *'''.'.'.'.'.!" 'l871 

Pearre, A 1858 Speakman, Melville K 1891 

Pidcoe, A. S 1886 ; Spottswood, Miss A. E 1373 

*Poisal, R. E 1858 Spottswood, Miss L. M icn^ 

Pomeroy,W. R 1885 Stackhouse, Miss E. A i885 

Porter, Miss K. S 1866 " Steinmitz, J. L .".;;;; Jgcg 

♦Pott, R. R 1858 Stephens, H. M logq 

Purdy, Miss Mary P 1889 , Sterling, Miss E. K .'".'' iggs 

Pyles, E. A 1393 Stevens, E. M jcuo 

Ransom, Miss K. E 1867 Stevens, G. W. .. .o., 

Reeder, W. F 1875 Stevens, J. C .'.' igg^ 

Reeder, R. K 1873 Stevenson, W. H \\,\\\ ."iggg 

^Deceased. ^Honorary. 



12 



WILLIAMSPORT DICKINSON SEMINARY. 



Names. ^lass. 

Vanfosseu, Miss Ada 1357 

Volkmar, W 1333 

Wakefield, Miss Aimee i893 

Walker, F. C * [i^,^^ 

Wallace, Miss Carrie P 1^91 

Waltz, Miss M. Bertha i«9i 



Names. Class. 

h^tewart, J. S 1888 

Stoltz, Miss K. J .,. 1873 

Stout, Miss P. R 1883 

Striue, Miss M.J i869 

'^Strohm, W. H i870 

Strong, Miss H. A I88O 

Stuart, Miss May T 1882 1 Warehirae, O. C ^881 

-^:Swartz, MissB. M 1890 I Watson, F. A .....V 18G4 

Svvartz, Miss K B 1890 | Watson, Miss F. E i865 

S wartz, T. S 1885 * Way, E. F i86'> 

Swengle, D. F 1860 | Weigel, D. H .1862 

Swope, I. N 1979 : *Welch, Miss M. P * i89o^ 

Taneyliill, ('. W 1868 I Welly, Miss M. P ' . " " '1375 

Taneyhill, G. L 18;>8 | *Whaley, H ..*.'* "1854 

Taneyhill, Miss M. E 1857 Whitney, H. II 1884 



Taneyhill, O. B. 



.1877 



Wilson, Miss Helen E i885 



Taneyhill, Miss S. A ..„^. 1853 ; Wilson, James E. 1886 

Taylor, Miss Ida A 1875 Wilson, J. L .........'.*.*.*'*.*.*.*.. .1883 

Taylor, Miss Jennie M I886 Wilson, S. D .1888 

Taylor, J. W i863 Winegardner, Miss S. H '...'....'. AH70 

Taylor, R. S 1882 ^ Winger, J. 1 1393 

Teitsworth, E. T 1887 ' Woodin, Miss Dora 1864 



Test, Miss (\ S I88I 

Tewell, J. R 1886 

Thomas, Miss Sadie D 1876 

Thrush, Miss K. A 1879 

Tomlinson, F. H I886 

Tomlinson, Miss M. E 1S80 



\N'oo(lward, J 18G7 

*\V right, Miss Ida M 1877 

*Yetter, Miss M 186I 

Yocum, E. H 18G8 

Yocum, George C i89i 

* Yocum, G. M 1 8G0 



Tonner, A. C 1853 i Yocum, J.J 1863 

Townsend, W. F I866 I *Yocum, Miss N .i852 

Tracy, MissM. P 1890 ! Young, Edwin P ....'l890 

Treverton, Henry i887 | Young, J. B ...1866 

Treverton, Miss Minnie 1887 j Young, J. W. A .....1883 

Troxell, Miss M. A 1890 | *Young, W. Z ^ ^ ' * ' j877 

Vail, Miss R. C 1869 | ^Ziders, Miss Minnie 'l875 

Vanderslice, J. A 1863 1 ♦Ziders, Miss V. S i88i 

♦Zollinger, Miss E. A i882 

MUSIC. 



Naynes. Class. 

Barclay, Miss G. E 1888 

Bender, Miss Anna M 1884 

Blint, Miss N. M 1888 

Brooks, Miss Laura 1879 

Cassidy, Miss E. F 1887 

Champion, Miss Maggie 1879 

Chilcoat, Miss Marguerite M 1891 

VChrisman, Mary E 1892 

Davies, Miss E. C 1890 

Davis, Miss Clara 1882 

Ely, Miss A. E 1893 

Eschenbach, Miss Sophia 1881 

Eyer, Miss M. S 1888 

Fry, Miss E. M 1888 

Gable, Miss Annie, 1884 

Ganoe, Miss M. Lauretta 1891 

Gehret, Miss Ella L 1881 

*Deceased. 



Names. class. 

Glover, Miss Fannie S i883 

Green, Miss J. D 1893 

Heck, Miss Clemma i889 

Heinsling, Miss J. M i887 

Hicks, Miss Blanche L 1891 

Hicks, Miss G. W i889 

Hooper, Miss M. L I893 

Horn, Miss Mamie D 188I 

Houck, Miss Gertrude H I88O 

Hullar, Miss Annie 1884 

Hutchison, Wilbur L 1884 

Koch, Miss L. M 1887 

Leckie, Miss Ida M 1883 

Leidy, Miss Margaret B 1885 

Low, Miss H. M 1889 

Maitland, Miss Anna I88O 

Malaby, Miss E. V 1893 



FORTY-SIXTH ANNUAL CATALOGUE. 



13 



Names. Class. 

— ^lallalieu. Miss B. J 1890 

Martin, Miss Chloe 1887 

Menges, Miss M. A 1893 

Metzger, Miss H. M 1889 

Mertz, Miss L. B I892 

Millspaugh, Miss L. C I886 

Musser, Miss Minnie E ]880 

Nuss, Miss Laura i884 

Ohl, Miss Ella A i89i 

Pardoe, Miss Minne H 1885 

Pooler, (Jeorge W I88O 

Prior, Miss E. M 1888 

Randall, Miss Josie 1882 ; 

Reider, Miss Edith I893 

Rhoads, Miss Mary V.. ,1891 : 

Riddell, Miss Claude 1885 j 

Ripley, Miss Ossie I88O ' 

Robbins, Miss S. 1 1889 I 

Rothrock, Miss E. M 1889 ; 

Rothrock, Miss Maggie 1879 

Rothrock, Miss S. M I888 

Runyan, Miss F. J I888 

Ryan, Miss M. L 1889 



i Names. Class. 

j Shaw, Amos R 1882 

; Sanders, Miss C. K 1889 

I Sharpless, Miss M. L 1889 

j Sheadle, Miss R. R I886 

I Sheets, Miss Lulu 1887 

Shopbell, Miss M. L 1887 

Slate, Miss Crecy 1879 

Smith, MissG. A 1890 

Stratford, Miss Kittle 1885 

Stuart, Miss May T 1880 

Svvartz, Miss M. E I888 

Titus, Miss Anna I88O 

Turley, Miss Mattie 1885 

Vcelkler, Miss L. S .I886 

Wallis, Miss M. Lulu 1891 

Wanamaker, Miss C. M 1892 

Watson, Miss E. M 1893 

Weddigen, Miss Wilhelminc 1891 

Wilde, E. W 1882 

Williams, Miss Minnie 1884 

Williamson, Miss O. H 1887 

Zeth, Miss Minnie 1887 



/ 



ART. 



^(^rnes. Class. , Names. Class 

Brooks, MissC. 1887 Finney, Miss Grace B I886 

Conner, Miss Sallie I88O Guss, Miss Maggie 1883 

Dittmar, MissE. A I886 : Harvey, Miss Carrie 1879 

Eder, Miss Mary 1891 | Mann, Miss L. Amelia 1885 

Everhart, Miss Kate 1879 1 Thompson, Miss Crecy L 1882 



COLLEGE PREPARATORY. 



Barnes. Class. \ Names. Class. 

Drum, J. Marcellus i89l ; Parrish, s. R. w 1392 

Gould, William H. G 1891 | Thomas, Walter 1893 

McMorris, Harry 1893 1 Wallis, H. K ^1392 



NORMAL ENGLISH. 



Names. Class, f Name. 

Hubbard, G. H i892 Shipley, Misslda A. 

McKenty, T. W 1893 1 



Class. 

,..1887 



14 



WILLIAMSPORT DICKINSON SEMINARY. 



FORTY-SIXTH ANNUAL CATALOGUE. 



15 



. 1 I ' I » 



Residnnt Gt aduates. 



ART. 

MINNIE ADELLE MENGES. 
SUSAN THOMPSON MUSSINA. 
ESTELLA KOCKWELL. 
CATHARINE ELLA SANDERS. 
ANNA BLANCHE SLATE. 
MAY TRIMBLE STUART. 
BESSIE MARGUERITE SWARTZ. 
CORA OLIVET WALTON. 

MODERN LANGUAGES. 

ANNA NETTA GIBSON. 
EVA VANDERBILT GRAY. 
MINNIE ADELLE MENGE:S. 
MAY TRIMBLE STUART. 

MUSIC. 

JENNIE DAY^ GREEX. 
MINNIE ADELLE MENGES. 
EDITH REIDER. 

ELOCUTION. 

ESTHER MARY PRIOR, 



I. 



ScMiior Class 



Mary McElrath Strebeigh Cole— B. L., 
Trella May FJick— B. L., 
Margaret Heilraan — S., 
Mary Lee McCloskey — B. L., 
Mary Elizabeth Millard— B. L., 
Daisy Mills— B. L., 
Florence Walton Slate — B. L., 
Mary Maud Thomas — B. L., 
Nellie Margaret Thomas — B. L., 
P^dmund Wilson Frain—C, 
Edgar Rohrer Heck man — C., 
Emory Michael Miller— N. E., 
Lyttleton Morgan Price— S., 
Charles O'Neill Rich— S., 
James Richard Richards — C. t^ 
George Washington Rosenberry — C, 
Matthew Nevvkirk Walker ~S., 
William Clarence Wallace — C. P., 



Montoursville. 

Hiighesville. 

Williamsport. 

Picture Rocks. 

Centralia. 

Williamsport. 

Williamsport. 

Montgouiery. 

Montgomery. 

Williamsport. 

Mifflinburg. 

Wapwallopcn. 

Baltimore, Md. 

Williamsport. 

Smethport. 

Atkinson's Mills. 

East Dowington. 

Philadelphia. 



C— Classical. S.— Scientific. B. L.— Belles Lettrer,. C. P.— College Preparatory. 

P. S.— Practical Science. N. E.— Normal English. 



SENIORS— MUSIC. 

Minnie Augusta Jane Earned, - . - 

SENIOR— VOCAL. 

Francelia Sophia Huntley, - - - 



Jeansville. 



Driftwood. 



16 



WILLTAMSPORT DICKINSON SEMINARY, 



FORTY-SrXITT ANNT^VL CATALOGUE. 



17 



J 



Sophomore Clas 



o 



iinior Cla 



•oc^ 



Anderson, Effa Gertrude— B. L., - 

Artley, Anna Elleta— S., 

Detwiler, Pearl Catharine— B. L., - 

Jones, Cora Lois— S., - . . . 

Kavanaiigh, Nina M.— C, - 

King, Anna Williams— C. P., - 

Kurtz, Mary Catharine— C, 

McCullough, Minnie Blanche— B. L., - 

Petty, Emily Gertrude— C, - 

Weisel, Ethel Amelia— C, 

Welteroth, Estella Mary— B. L., 

Adams, John Furman— S., 

Albertson, Oliver Herman— C, 

Anderson, Guy Koland— S., 

Brunstetter, Frank Howard— S., : - 

Carnill, Samuel Slack— C, - - 

Creveling, Clem Cheston— S., 

Freck, Charles Wilbur— C. P., 

Hedding, Benjamin Edgar— S., - 

McCloskey, Clarence ICugene— P. S., 

McDowell, Theodore Appel- S., 

Miller, Charles Harry— S., 

Mingle, Harry Bowers— S., 

Moore, Howard Burton- C. P., 

Penepacker, Wilbur Fisk— C, - ... 

Shofi; Harry M.—S., 

Soderling, Walter- C. P., 

Stiltz, Daniel Dorey— P. vS., 

Williams, Alvin S.— S., - - . . 

Young, Charles VanPatten—C. P., - 

C. -Classical. S.-Scieutific. B. L. -Belles Lettres. 

r. S.— Practical Science. 



Sinnemahoning. 
Williamsport. 
Hopewell. 
Williamsport. 
Williamsport. 
- Newberry. 

Williamsport. 
Clearfield. 
Berwick. 
Williamsport. 
Williamsport. 
Stewartstown. 
Fairmount Springs. 
Sinnemahoning. 
Orangeville. 
Altoona. 
Town Hill. 
Bradford. 
Morrisdale Mines. 
- Town Hill. 
Williamsport. 
York. 
Williamsport. 
Curwensville. 
Williamsport. 
Madera. 
Harrisburg. 
Williamsport. • 

Hazleton. 
Williamsport. 

C. P.— College Preparatory. 



N 






H 



(^ 



4 



Anderson, Kosa (J. -P). L., 
Rlylh, Annn M.— H. L., 
Bowman, Martha — ('., 
(V)nner, Mary (oiilbonrn — C. P., 
Crcveliiii:, Grace A. — B. L., 
FiillnuT, /\niia Haclicl — \\. L,, 
.Aluilinei', I>eiilaii Aii<j;Mista — H. l^., 
Mulliner, Grace Lorene — B. L., 
Murray, Mary Aclienhach — B. L., 
liiclT, jf;u y Ann — P). L., 
Taylor, Minnie X^iola — S., 
AVilcox, E]iza})eth (irccnc — ]>. L., 
Younii:, Caroline Heaver — 1). L., 
Yonnken, I'ertlui May — V>. I^, 
Armstrorii!^, William Landstrcct— ('., 
P.arker, AVilbnr Stewart — C. P., 
Black, James Harper — C., 
T'Tcnnan, Jjinies .McClellan — C. P., 
Creij;iiton, William Aiulrew— P. S., 
Dcr.stine. .Michael Shailer — S., 
Ferij^nson, William — S., 
Frcck, ir;\rry (lav — S., 
(ulherl, Fred. .John— P. S., 
(xray, .Joseph M. Marian — (\, 
(i rover, Daniel Malvern— S., 
1 lively, Byrd Whitclield— S., 
liUndy, Bruce Parker— P. S., 
]\Iillcr, Dorsey Xewten — C, 
Piper. Kd<;ar I'ostcr — C., 
Kankin, Harold T/iU!c — S., 
Ivounsley, Samuel F. — S.. 
Sholl, William Willis-S., 
Sleep, h' red (»rant-—S., 
Wallis, Preston IMcComas- S., 
AV\>rthin,^ton, J'Jdwin Scott — S., 



('. --Classical . 



S.— Scientific. B. L.—lioUes Lettres. 
P. H.— Practical Science. 



Sinnemahoning. 

Madera. 

Newberry. 

Vrilliamsport. 

Town Hill. 

AVilliam;-p(ji t. 

Williamsport. 

AViHiams]:)ort. 

r>nrlinfj^anic. 

Williamsport. 

( 'o;;an Ilonsc. 

AVilliamsport. 

AVilliamsport. 

^Villiams|»ort. 

Slormstowi"'.. 

Ilarrij4)nrg. 

Lock Jlavci]. 

Ashley. 

Yea<;ei'town. 

AVillir.msport. 

Shenandoah. 

J>radford. 

Tvronc. 

Buckhorn. 

Williamsport. 

York. 

AVilliam^p'»rt. 

I)nl>oislo\vn. 

AVilliams[)r)rt. 

Baltimore, Md. 

lloutzdalc. 

Kenovo. 

Hazleton. 

Forest Hill, Md. 

Darlington, Md. 

C. P.— College Preparatory. 



1^ 



WILLTAMSPORT DICKINSON SEMINARY. 



Academic. 



SECOND YEAR. 



Ague, S. Maude, 
Alderdice, Marv Elizabeth, 
Cheston, Mary Irene, 
Conner, Fannie Rouland, 
- Dowlor, Janie Trvin, 
Follmer, Margaret Emma, 
Hoover, Idura Lillie, 
Macintosh, P]lizabeth A., 
McDade, Mabel Elizabeth, 
Robinson, Jennie, 
Allen, Robert John, 
Bell, Jesse S., . . 

Bowman, John Rockafeller, 
Brooks, Thomas Howard, 
Brown, Stephen Vandu Zee, 
Clark, Guy B., ^ 

DeFrehn, Jerry Josiah, 
Dodson, Samuel H., 
Dun lap, Frank, 
Estep, Henry ('., . 
Feight, Alfred Joel, 
Follmer, William Wilcox, 
Fredericks, Dean Hager, 
Graeff, Augustus Nicholas, 
Gray, Edward James, 
Gray, Edward Purdue, 
Guthrie, Willie Vankirk, 
Hall, Chester Edwin, 
Hooven, Thompson Mitchell, 
Kessler, Howard Dysart, 
Mansel, Bernard Plartswick, 
Mansel, Harry Southard, 
MoMurtrie, Ffenry Herbert, 
NefT, Jacob, , 

Penepacker, Charles Fowler, 
Piper, (/harles Blaine, 
^Reighard, Harry J., 
Rigdon, Nathan, 
Stratford, Thomas F., . 
"^Deceased, 



^ 



Bell wood. 
New York, N. Y. 
Williamsport. 
Williamsport. 
Glen Campbell. 
Williamsport. 
Odessa. 
Burlingame. 
Kane. 
Sinnemahoning. 
Stockton. 
Williamsport. 
Newberry. 
Williamsport. 
Williamsport. 
. Curwensville. 
Hazleton. 
Muhlenburg. 
W^i Hi am sport. 
Osceola Mills. 
Salladasburg, 
Williamsport. 
Flemington. 
Reading. 
Williamsport. 
Buffalo Run. 
Baltimore, Md. 
Muncy. 
Petersburg. 
Altoona. 
Williamsport. 
. Williamsport. 
Seybertsville. 
Williamsport, 
Williamsport. 
. Williamsport. 
Williamsport. 
Mill (jreen, Md. 
Mount Union. 






/ 



H. 




FORTY SIXTH ANNUAL CATALOGUE. 



19 



Updegraff, Eben B. C, 
Yocum, John Paul, 
Yorks, Joseph Preston, 
Yount, John Wesley, 
Zimmerman, Charles E., 



Williamsport. 

Sunbury. 

. Divide. 

Littlestown. 
Altoona. 



Academic. 



FIRST YEAR 



Davis, Edith, 
Feight, Emma Mary, 
Miller, Edith Beulah, 
Miller, Mattie Jane, 
Adams, William Llewellyn, 
Applegate, Frederick R., 
Bovee, Ervin E., 
Collins, William S., 
Crawford, Chas. A., 
Crooks, Wesley, 
Ertel, Edward, 
Good, James, 
Lehman, Willard M., 
McDade, James R., 
Reese, Walter Louderbaugb, 
Royer, Olney E. 
Silvers, Jerome, 
Smith, Cameron, 
Weigartz, William Albert, 
White, Charles S., 
Wolfe, John Wesley, 



Baltimore, Md. 

Salladasburg. 

Duboistown. 

Petersburg. 

Audonried, 

South Williamsport. 

Cogan Station. 

Williamsport. 

Chatham's Run. 

Burlingame. 

Williamsport. 

Newberrv. 

. AVilliamsport. 

Kane. 

Sal on a. 

Martinsbui'g. 

. Williamsport. 

Williamsport. 

Hepburn. 

Williamsport. 

Watsontown. 



Classical Department. 



Alderdice, ^\^ Elizabeth, 
Bowman, Martha B., 
Kavanaugh, Nina M., 
Kurtz, Mary K., 
Petty, Emily G., 
Weisel, Ethel A., 



256 W. Thirty-seventh St., New York, N. Y. 

Newberry. 

. 1604 W. Fourth St., Williamsport. 

638 Edwin St., Williamsport. 

Berwick. 
Cor. Fourth and Market Sts., Williamsport. 



::^ 



r^ 



20 



^vi !.LrA:.r.sr-.'riT Dickinson 3E?.riXAi;Y. 



FORTY-SIXTir ANNUAL CATALOGUE. 



21 



Albcrt;;on, Oliver If., 

Black, James H., 
Carnill, Samuel S., 
Frain, Kdniiind AV., 
CJray, J. IM. Marian, 
ITeckrnan, Kdgar K., 
Miller, Dovmy N., 
IViiepacker, Wilbur F., 
I*i[)er, Ed;^^ar F., 
Kosenbcrj-y, (icorge AV., 



r'ainuounl, S[tring-;. 

Sioriiistown. 

3i W. Main Street, [A)ck Haven. 

2<')I9 Maple Avenue, A 1 toon a. 

800 Hepburn St., Wil'.ianisport. 

J^uckborn, 
.... Miftlinliurg. 

Duboislown, 

322 Criinpbeil Street, Willia-UL^port. 

. 1416 Wcid Fourtb 'jlrect, V/illiainsp-ort. 

Atkinson's Mills. 



Scientific Department 



Artley, A. Klleta, 
ileilman, Margaret, . 
Jones, C. Hois, 
Taylor, Alinnie V., 
Adams, Jobn F., . 
Anderscm, (^uy 11., 
Drunstetter, Frank 11., 
Crevcling, Clem. C, 
Herstine, ivlicbael S., 
Ferguson, William, 
Freek, Harry C, 
(J rover, L)aniel M., 
Hedding, Benjamin E., 
Hively, Byrd AV., 
McDowell, Tbeodorc, . 
]Millcr, ( barles H., 
^lillcr, Emory M., 
Mingle, Harry B., . 
Price, L. Morgan, 
llankin, Howard L., 
Uicli, Cliarles O'N., . 
Kounsley, Sanniel F., 
Sho/r, Harry M., 
Sholl, William W., 
Sleep, Fred, (r., 
Walker, Matthew N., 
Wall is, Preston i\I., 
Williams, Alvin S., 
Worth ington, Edwin S., 



10.32 Bural Avenut^, \ViliIanispv?rt. 

471 East Third Stieet, AViHir.nisport. 

3(S Ro.ss Street, Wiliiainsnort. 

. ( V)i{an ilou.-e. 

. . . . Ste.varts^)v>'n. 

, . . Sinnemahonihg. 

. . . . Orangovillc. 

. Town Hill. 

. 212 Washington Street, Williamsport. 

504 \Vest (herrv Street, Shenandoah. 

18 Pleaf^nnt Street, J-.radford. 

212 Washington Street, Williamsport. 

. Morrisd'ile M ines. 

York. 

410 Mulberry Street, AVilliamsport. 

Cor, Beaver and Princess Streets, York. 

Wa[)wallo[)en. 

. 520 Wrst Fourth Street, Williamsport. 

423 North P.ond Street. Baltimore, Md. 

679 West h'ayette Street, Haiti more, Md. 

514 West Fourth Street, Williamsport. 

Houtzdale. 

Madera. 

. Rcnovo. 

Ilazleton. 

East Downinglo]!. 

Forest Hill, Md. 

, . . . Hazh^ton. 

Darlington, Md, 



Belles Lettres Department. 



%, 



4 



nJI* J 



Anderson, Eila (J., 
Anderson, Rosa t i., 
lilyth, Anna M., 
Cole, Mary iO., 
('reveling, (J race A., 
Detwiler, Pearl C., 
Flick, Trelhi M,, 
i'^iUmer, Anna P., 
McCioskev, Ivlary L., 
MeCuliougii, Minnie I). 
Mi Hard, Mary K., 
jMills, P'aisy, 
Mullinei", Beulah /\., 
IMidliner, ( Ji-ace L., 
ivfnrray, jSlary A., . 
Pich, Mai-y A., 
Slatt^ Florence W., 
Thomas, M. Maud, 
Thomas, Nellie M., 
Welteroth, Estella >»[., 
Wilcox, l^^lizabeth ( J., 
Yoiinken, lilrTtha M., 
Young, Caroline P., . 



Sinnemahoning. 

Siniu-mahoning. 

A'adera. 

iMojUouirville. 

Town Hill. 

Hopewell. 

Hughesvllle. 

. 504 Market Street, \Villlams})ort. 

Picture Pocks. 

Cleartield. 

Cenli-alia. 

355 F'ast Fonrtli Street, Williamsport. 

135 East Willow Street, Williamsport. 

135 East Willow Street, Williamsport. 

Burlintrame. 

514 AV^est l^^ourih Street, Williams[)ort. 

351 Mulberry Street, \\'iHiams})oi-t. 

Montgomery, 

IMontgomerv. 

727 Elmira Street, Williamsport. 

447 l*ine Street, Williamsjiort. 

1246 \'iiu- Street, Williamsport. 

331 I^ocust Street, \\'illian>,-:port. 



Col lege Preparatory. 



Conner, ^lary ( '., 
King, Anna W., 
Barker, Wilbur S., 
Brennan, James M,, 
Freck, ( harles \V., 
AFoore, Howard P., . 
Kichards, James P., 
Soderling, Walter, . 
Wallace, Williarii t'., 
Young, Charles V. P., 



345 Mulberry Street, Williamsport. 

Newberrv. 

. Harrisburg. 

. Ash lev. 

PS Pleasant Street, Pradford. 

Cui'wensville. 
. . . Smethport. 

Harrisburg. 

5331 Edward Street, Frankford, l^hiladel}Jri:i. 

801 Market Street, Williamsport. 



22 



WILLIAMSPORT DICKINSON SEMINARV. 



fOUTY-Si>tTH ANNUAL CAl*ALOGUE. 



23 



Practical Science. 



Creigliton, William A., 
(Hlbert, Fred. J., . 
Lnndy, Bruce P., 
MoCloskey, Clarence E., 
Sliltz, Daniel D., 



. Yea ger town. 

Tyrone. 

Williamsport. 

. . . Town inn 

904 West Fourth Street, Willi amsport. 



Academic Department 



Ague, S. Maude, 
Alderdice, M. Elizabeth, 
Clieston, Mary I., 
Conner, Fannie K., 
Davis, I:Cdith, 
Dowler, Janie I., 
Feight, Kmnia M., 
FoUmer, Margaret E., 
Hoover, Idura L., 
Macintosh, P^lizabeth A., 
"llcDade, M. Elizabeth, 
Miller, Edith B., 
Miller, Mattie J., 
Kobinson, Jennie, 
Adams, William L., 
Allen, Robert J., 
Applegate, Frederick K., 
Bell, Jesse S., 
Bovee, Irwin E., . 
Bowman, John R., 
Brooks, Thomas H., 
Brown, Stephen Y., 
Clark, Guy B., 
Collins, William S., -^ 
Crawford, Charles A., 
Oooks, Wesley, 
DeFrehn, Jerry J., 
Dodson, Samuel H., 



Bellwood. 

256 West 37th Street, New York, N. Y. 

420 Edwin Street, Williamsport. 

345 Mulberry Street, Williamsport. 

220 and 222 N. Charles Street, Baltimore, Md. 

. . . Glen Campbell. 

. . . . Salladasburg. 

, . . . . W^illiamsport. 

. . . . . Odessa. 

, . . . . Burlingame. 

. . . . . Kane. 

, . , . . Duboistown. 

.... Petersburg. 

• . . . Sinnemahoning. 

Audenried. 

Stockton. 

Burlingame. 

904 Penn Street, Williamsport 

Cogan Station. 
. . . . Newberry 

, 60;^ High Street, Williamsport 

Williamsport. 
, . . . . Curwensville. 

Williamsport. 

Chatham's Run. 

Burlingame. 

Hazleton. 

Muhlenburg. 



I I 






Dun lap, Frank, 
Ertel, Edward, 
Estep, Harry C „ 
Feight, Alfred Joel, 
P'ollmer, William W., 
P'redericks, Dean H., 
Gooil, J Limes 
Graeiii Augustus N., 
Gray, Edu :tr«! .1., 
Gray, IC<lvv:i['«i P., 
Hall, Chester E., 
Hooven, Thompson M., 
Kessler, Howard D., 
Lehman, Willard M., 
Mansel, Bernard H., 
Mansel, Harry S., . 
McDade, James R., 
McMurtrie, Henry H., 
NetiJ Jacob, 

Penepacker, Charles F., 
Piper, Charles B., 
Reese, Walter L., 
^Reighard, Harry J., 
Rigdon, Nathan, 
Royer, Olney PI, 
Silvers, Jerome 
Smith, Cameron, 
Stratford, Thomas P\, 
Updegraff, Eben B. C, 
Weigartz, William A., 
White, Charles S., 
Wolfe, John W. 
Yocum, J. Paul, 
Yorks, J. Preston, 
Yount, John W. 
Zimmerman, Charles E. 
*Dec€ased. 



William Street, Williamsport. 
Ill Seminary Street, Williamsport. 

Osceola Mills. 

Salladasburg. 

Williamsport. 

P'lemington. 

Elm Street, Newberry. 

744 Pear Street, Reading. 

Seminary, \\'i.nKi[u-|M.r! 

Butialo Run. 

Muiicy. 

Petersburg. 

1423 Twelfth Avenue, Altoona. 

1602 Erie Avenue, Williamsport. 

. 417 Park Avenue, Williamsport. 

417 Park Avenue, Williamsport. 

Kane. 

Seybertsville. 

Williamsport. 

. 322 Campbell Street, Williamsport. 

1416 West Fourth Street, Williamsport. 

Salona. 

WillIam8{)ort. 

Mill Green, Md. 

Martinsburg. 

1034 Vine Street, Williamsport. 

Williamsport. 

Mount Union. 

1121 Vine Street, Williamsport. 

* . . . . Hepburn. 

333 West Jetlerson Street, Williamsport. 

Watsontown. 

Sunbury. 

Divide. 

Littlestown. 

Altoona. 



24 



WILLIAMSPORT DICKINSON SKMINAKY. 



Primary Department. 



Conner, iilancii'- McC'abe, . 
Hartnian, Florencv A., . 
Jordan, l^^liz.ihetli Poet, 
Lmuly, I'^Uirciice Amelia, 
-Metzger, Chiris (jleraldlne, . 

JVi etzger, 101 1 a Z < idee, ^^ 

Melzger, liannali Margaret, 
IV'nei)acker, Aiargar(?t lUaek, 
Penepacker, Xettie Mabel, 
Uieh, S;is in, 

llnii'liead, lionise Gniee, 
Riid'head, Nellie Myrtle, 
Agar, Frank Clarence, 
Clark, Horace, 
Davis, Andrew Crocket, 
l>avi.s, C!>arle>' Iveene, . 
llarttnan, Harry Parsons, . 
lioot, William A., 
Slate, (ieorge, Jr., 
Troxell, Harry La line, 
Welch, Civde b'innev, 
WhiteheMtl, v'liarles Cabiijl, 
Wilcox, .Maslin r'rysinger, 
Wilcox, Thomas Sewell, 
Williams^ Edwin S., 



") 



Pe;ile. 

o I") Mulberry Street, AVilii;\msi)ort. 

. S*J7 Mai'ket Strei't, Wiiii.imsporL 

4'S,'> iMlvvin Street, Wiiiiams[)()it. 

Wiliiainsport. 

470 K. Third Street, Willi unsp;)rt. 

448 E. Tiiird Slreei, Williamspo- 1. 

470 10. Third Street, Williamsj)(>ri. 

M22 Campbell Street, Williamsj)ort. 

. 322 C^ampbell Street, V^^illiamspurt. 

7)14 W. Fourth Street, Williann})()rL 

058 l^'ranklln Street, AVilliamspoi-t. 

1)08 iM-aiddln Street, Williamsport. 

Ponghkeepsie, N. V. 

. 320 Park Avenue, Williamsi)ort.. 

340 High Street, Williamspoit. 

20 and 222 North Charles Street, iialiiniore, Md. 

827 Market Street, AViiliiunsport. 

230 West Iu)urth Street, Willi-imsport. 

3»ol Mulberry Street, AVilliamsport. 

lo Washington Street, Williamsport. 

010 He[)f)urn Street, Williaf!isp<.r{. 

South Williamsjxjrt. 
447 Pine Street, Williamsport. 
447 Pine Street, \Villiams{>or!. 

Shamokin. 



Music Department 



instruau^:ntal. 



Ague, S. Maud, 
Alderdice, Mary Elizabeth, 
Anderson, Clara Lnuise, 
Artley, Mary Catharine, . 
]>ailey, Mary Pelle, 
Barkle, Eleanor Steel, 
Bartles, Mary Olivia, 
Beck, Caroline, 
Benscoter, Helen Clarinda, 



Bell wood. 

27)0 West 3;th Street, New York, N. Y. 

700 Market Street, Williauisport, 

1032 Rural Averuie, Williamsport. 

liVM) West Fourth Street. Williatusport. 

()ri)isonia. 

Oo;') West Fourth Street, Williamsport. 

. P2 Washingt(«ii Street, Williamsport. 

Altoona. 



FORTY -.SI XT 11 ANNLTAL CATALOfJUE. 



25 



^ 



Bowman, Afartha, 

lirewer, Jc^ssie, 

Ih'ooks, ( 'arrie, 

Bubb, (4ara Belle, 

Jiubb, lOlsie, 

Bfirkhart, Clara Emma, 

]>uss!er, Daisy Adela, 

Cam])bell, Katie Luzina, 

Com}), Charlotte AFary, 

Cornier, lilanrhe M('Cal)o, 

Co?uier, l^^mnv Pouland, 

Coiuier, Alarv Colljouru, 

Pa vis, Juiith, 

Deujarest, Anna Augusta, 

Detwiler, Pearl Catharine 

DeWald, Eauia, 

Dowler, Janie Irvin 

Fegley, Blanche, 

Feight, I^juma, Mary, 

Fisk, IJIian, 

Fiilmer, Jessie, 

Hraii' Flora Scott 

(Jreen, Jennie Hae, 

(jlregg, lyda Li<b 

Hanks, i"ran<;!s Bai'ton, 

Hartman, Lula Ma}', . 

J I ill, Ma? V l>lan(4ie 

Hoover, Idura Filiie. 

Hull; Bertha Ma}^, 

Hull, l^auilv A., 

Huntley, I^Yancelia Sojjhi.i, 

Jones, Cora L(us, 

Jones, Susan, 

KahUu-, (4ara iLOsalio. 

Keliey, Uose .May, . ' . 

King, Aima Williams, 

i\rape, Susie, 

liaedlein, Charlolte l^lizabefh, 

Ltn-ncd, Minnie Augusta, 

Linck, Mina 1 lannah, 

Jwong, ( lara, 

JiOW, Alice, 

Lyon, 1 'aroline, 

Maliu, (ienindeve, 

?dann, Josephine Atkinson, 

Massey, S. Jennie, 

McCee, l^stella May, 



New4)errv. 

010 Arch Street, Newberrv. 

313 Mavnard Street, Williamsoort. 

* . 215 Pine Street, \Viiliamspoi't. 

425 Pine Street, ^Villiams[)orl. 

300 (irier Sti"eet, A\'illianjsport. 

11 Sixth Stre; t, ^Villiamsport. 

Peale. 

Iveedsville. 

3»45 Mulberry Street, Williaiiispfut. 

315 .Mulberry Street, Williairi.-port. 

'> 15 >[u!berry Street, Williaiuspr^rl. 

220 and !>22 North (4iarles Street, P>a]timore, ALL 

. 480 East '14iii(l Street, Willi.amsjx.ri. 

Ho})evv«!l. 
0P> (J race Street, Williamsport. 

Clen ( 'am[)bell. 
120 Boss Street, AViiliamsi'ort. 

Sailadasbiu'ii'. 
South AViiliamsj)()rl. 

West 41»ird Street, Williamsport. 

5or Pine Street, WilHamsjtort. 

i)57 \Vest 4 bird Street, ^Villiai)isp..r(. 

liellet on tr. 

000 i.oulsa Street, Wil}iams}).>it. 

212 (4iatham Street, AViiliarnsi>(u1. 

504 North (5rier Stieet, ^Viiliamsfxjrt. 

Odessa. 

1138 i^ast 4^hird Street, Williamsport. 

115 101m Street, Newberrv. 

Driftwood. 

38 Boss Street, Williamsport. 

Mahanoy Plane. 

70:> 4\icker Street, Williamsport. 

Osceola. 

Newberrv. 

411 Lycoming Street, Williamsport. 

•'45 High Str^'t, \ViHiams[)ort,. 

Jeansviile. 

000 \'ine Street, Williamsport. 

. 4(>0 .Market Street, Williamsport. 

Jjime Ridge. 

jMuney. 

. 521 Anthony Street, Wiliiaujsport. 

Ye;igertown. 

South Ptiver, N. J. 

McOee's xMi I Is. 



26 



WILLlAMSPORt DICI^INSO^ SEMINARY. 



fORTY-STXTH ANNUAL CATALOGUE. 



Z/ 



McGee, Isabella Holmes, 
McMnrray, Delle, i 

McMurray, Raehael, 
Miller, Maine S., 
Miller, Mattie Jane, . 
Moltz, Caroline Anne, 
IMoore, Media, 
Myers, Maggie, 
Heading, Jennie, 
Keider, Edith, 
Kobinson, Jennie 
Savidge, Minnie, 
Shale, Katharine, 
Shamnjo, Bertha A., 
Shetler, Lilian, . — . 
Stabler, Minnie Anna, 
Strebeigh, Agiies, 
Swartz, Eva May, 
Tall man, Gertrude, 
Thomaa, Mary Maud, 
VanDiisen, Lulu Myrtle, 
Whitney, Anna Elizabeth, 
Wilcox, Elizabeth Greene, 
Young, Caroline Beaver, 
Young, Mary, . . 

Young, Kuth Ellsworth, 
Munson, AValter Esselicjue, 
Painter, Joseph, 
Penei)a'jker, Charles Fowler, 
Iteading, Morris Floyd, 
Stewart, Harry L., . 



McGee's Mills. 

New Washington. 

Montoursville. 

3ul West Fourth Street, Williauisport. 

Petersburg. 

. 12S East Third Street, Williamsport. 

203 Mulberry Street, Williauisport. 

113 Boyd Street, Newberry. 

1418 West Fourth Street, Willianisport. 

71 ti Market Street \\'i!!!;niisport. 

Sinnemahoning. 

. Jersey town. 

137 East Third Street, Williamsport. 

Halifax. 

1010 Louisa Street, Williamsport. 

493 East Third Street, Williamsport. 

Montoursville. 

343 Penn Street, AVilliamsport. 

344 Academy Street, Williamsport. 

Montgomery. 
957 Vine Street, Williamsport. 

Philipsburgh. 

447 Pine Street, Williamsport. 

. 801 Market Street, Williamsport. 

801 Market Street, Williamsport. 

801 Market Street, Williauisport. 

830 East Third Street, Williamsport. 

. . . . Gilbt-rton. 

. 322 Campbell Street, Williauisport. 

1448 West Fourth Street, Williauisport. 

I'yrone. 



VOCAL DEPARTIVIENT. 



Barkle, Eleanor Steel, 
Bartles, Marie Olivia, 
Blyth, Anna M., 
Comp, Charlotte Mary, . 
Dowler, Janie Irvin, 
Feight, Emma Mary, 
Gauthier, Kate, 
Heilman, Margaret, 
Hi bier, Helen Lewis, 
Hoover, Idura Lillie, 
Huntley, Franeelia Sophi 
Jones, Carrie Holcomb, 
Jones, Cora Lois, 
Jones, Susan, 



a, 



Orbisonia. 
955 West Fourth St., Williamsport. 

Madera. 

Reeds vi lie. 

Glen Campbell. 

Salladasburg. 

423 Edwin St., W^illiamsport. 

471 East Third St., Williamsport. 

81 West 101st St., New York, N. Y. 

Odessa. 

Driftwood. 

38 Ross St., Williamsport. 

38 Ross St., Williamsport. 

Mahanov Plane. 



^ i I 



Kurtz, Mary Katherine, 
Low, Alice, 
Lumley, Nan, 
Massey, S. Jennie, 
MeCloskey, Mary Lee, 
McCormick, May, 
McCuliijiigh, Minnie Blanche, 
McDade, Main 1 Elizabeth, 
McGee, Estelhi May, 
McGee, Isabella Holme?, 
McMurray, Delle, . 
Menges, Minnie Adelle, 
Millard, Mary Elizabeth, 
Mingle, Elizabeth, 
Mowry, Bessie, 
Murb, Ida, 
Niemeyer, Louise, . 
Petrikin, Janet Stuart, . 
Robbins, Lillie, 
Savidge, Minnie, 
Swartz, Minnie Irene, 
7'aylor, Minnie Viola, 
Weasner, Carrie M., . 
Woods, Harriette Rockafeller, 
Adams, W^illiam Llewellyn, 
Brennan, James McCldlan, 
Brunstetter, Frank Howard, 
Collins, Williams.. 
Derstine, Michael Shaflbr, 
Ertel, Edward, 
Freck, Charles Wilbur, 
Ferguson, William, 
Gray, Josejdi M. Marian, 
Heckman, Edgar Rohrer, 
Hedding, Benjamin Edgar, . 
Koons, George, 
Miller, Emory Michael, 
Osgood, Walter Wadsworth, 
Painter, Joseph, 
Price, Lyttleton Morgan, 
Richards, James Richard, 
Rigdon, Nathan, 
Rounsley, Samuel F., 
Stewart, Harry L., 
Wallace, William Clarence, 
Walker, Matthew Newkirk, 
Yocura, John Paul, 



oool 



G38 Edwin St., Williamsport. 

Lime Ridge. 
406 West Fourth St., Williamsport. 

South River, N. J. 

Picture Rocks. 

21 Washington St., \Villiamsport. 

Clearfield. 

Kane. 

McGee's Mills. 

McGee's Mills. 

New W^ashington. 

Montgomery. 

Centralia. 

520 West Fourth Street, Williamsport. 

Mulberry Street, W^illiamsport. 

793 East Third Street, Williamsport. 

334 East Fourth Street, Williamsport. 

Montoursville. 
131 Bennett Street, Williamsport. 

Jerseytown. 
343 Penn Street, Williamsport. 

Cogan Station. 

. 713 Elizabeth Street, Williamsport. 

10 Walnut Street, Danville. 

Audenried. 

Ashley. 

Orangeville. 

Williamsport. 

212 Washington Street, Williamsport. 

Ill Seminary Street, Williamsport. 

18 Pleasant Street, Bradford. 

504 West Cherry Street, Shenandoah. 

Buckhorn. 
Mifflinburg. 
Morrisdale Mines 

• 

W^illiamsport. 
. Wapwallo[)en. 
. 1815 Surf Street, Chicago, Ills. 

Gilberton. 
423 North Bond Street, Baltimore, Md. 

Smethi)ort. 

. Mill Green, Md. 

Houtzdale. 

Tyrone. 

Edward Street, Frankford, Philadelphia. 

East Downiugton. 
Sun bury. 



28 



WILIJAMSroKT niCKfMSON- RKMINAUY. 



Modern Language Department 



FRKNCII. 



I '.a riles, Marie Olivia, 
i><)\vman, Martha, 
Conner, Marv Colbourn, 
Harrison, Mal)e], 
Harrison, Miriam 1^'Jlen, 
Jlihler, Helen Lewis, 
Kinf,^, Anna AVillianis, 
Levi, P>trtlin, 
Stnart, .^fay Trimble, 
Osgood, Walter Watlsworlh. 



9'j5 West Fourth sStreet, Wiiliam-oorl. 

Neuberrv. 

:M5 :\rulberry Street, \VilIiamspori. 

iiiy West Fo.n-tii Street, Wiiliamsper;. 

92'^) West jMinrtii Street, ^Vilii;unsj)orI. 

SI West lOJst Street, iXew York, .N. Y. 

Newbei'iy. 

. 510 East Third, Williamsport. 

Last Third Smn^t, Wiiliarnspojt. 

. Lislo SinT Street, rhi('ao:o, 111. 



GERMAN. 



Alderdiee, ^VTary Elizabeth, 
Arthy, Anna Elleta, . ,. 

liarkle, Eleanor Steel, 
l>eek, ( 'arollne, 

Cole, ^Fary AFeElralh Strebeigh, 
]>eWald, Laui-a, 
I'^illmer, Anna Kai'hel, 
l^^dimer, Laura, . 

(iibson, Anuji Netta, 
(J ray, Kva Vanderbilt, 
Harrison, Mabel, 
Harrison, ]\liriam Ellen, 
Kahler, Clara Kosalie, 
King, Anna Williams, 
Earned, Minnie Augusta, 
Luw, Alice, 
Lundey, Nan, 

Macintosh, Elizabeth Amera, 
ITann, Jose[)hine Atkinson, 
]\Iel)a(Ie, IvLdjel lOlizubeth, 
Me(«ee, Estella May, 
MeCee, Isabella Holmes, . 
McMurray, Delie, / 

Menges, Minnie Adelle, 
Miller, Mame S., 



250 West a7th Street, Xew Yoric, N. Y. 
lOoli Uin-al Avenue, Williamsjmrt. 

Orbisoiiia. 
12 Washington Street, AVilliamsi)ort. 

Montom-sville. 

GIO Grace Street, Willir.msport. 

504 Market Street, \Viiriamspojt. 

504 Market Street, \Villiams[)ort. 

Muney. 

. Seminary, Williamsport. 

9l>l) West Fourth Strec^t, Williamsport. 

1)21) \\\^st Fourth Street, Williiimsport. 

70:> Tucker Sti-eet, Williamsport. 

Nevvberrv. 

Jeansville. 

Line liidge. 

40<; West Fourth Street, Williamsi)()rt. 

• • . Luilingame. 

Yeagertovvn. 

Kane. 

Mc(;ee\s Mills. 

V • . . McCJee'H Mills. 

New Washington. 

iVIontgomery. 

'^Ol West iwjurth Street, Williamsport. 



I 

> 



FORTY-SIXTH ANNUAL CATALOGUE. 



29 



• Murray, Marv Aelunbach, 
Kich, Alary Ann, 
Shanuno, liertha A., 
Stewart, Kdmi L.. 
Wliitncy, Anna i^lizabeth, . 
Wilcox, P^lizabeth Cieene, 
\\'()(»ds, Harriet Lockafeller, 
Younken, Ilei tha May, . 
Young, Caroline I'eaver, 
Adams, Joiin i^'urman, 
Anderson, *.'Uy iiola.ud, 
P)arker, W^ill)ur Stev.'arl, . 
i'emiett, Alvin A., 
F^rowji, Stejdien Vsindu/A'e, 
Creighton, AViili.ajn Andrew, 
Dubl-, l^dward Clyde, 
Ferguson, William, 
I fa.nis, Iknjamin A., 
Heddiug, I'enjamin hxlgar, 
Heihiian, John iiarry, 
Kline, J. liurton, 
Fvowther, Harry C')rnman, 
Lundy, lUaice Parker, 
J Vice, L VI tie ton Morgan, 
Kankin, Harold Little, 
Soderling, \Valter, 
Stratford, Thomas F., . • 

^Vo^tllington, Edwin Scott, 



Lurlihgatne. 
514 \V'est lM)urth Street, Williamsport. 

ILjlifax. 
r>27 East Third Street, AVilliamsi)ort. 

. Fhilipsburgh. 

417 F^ine Street, ^v'illiamsport. 

10 Walnut Street, Danville. 

124G VineStree!, Williamsj^ort. 

ool Locust Stieet, \VilIiaii!sport. 

Stcwartstown. 

Sinnemalioning. 

JFarrisburg. 

, Williamsport. 

Williamsport. 

Yeagertown. 

ol7 Park Avenue, Williams[)ort. 

504 West (!herrv Street, Shenandoah. 

("^17 Elmira Street, Williauispoit. 

^Forrisdale AFines. 
oO'J I'dmira Street, Williamsport. 
'>I4 ]A)cust Street, \ViIliamsport. 

P)ellwood. 
AVilliams})ort. 
42;] North Pond Street, Baltimore, AFd. 
()7l) West Fayette Street, IJaltimore, Md 

JIarrisburg. 

Mount l^nion. 

Darlington, Md. 



J 



30 



WILLIAMSPORT DICKINSON SEMINARY. 



Art Department. 



Cochran, Avis, 
Comp, Charlotte Marv. 
Foster, Mary Lydia, 
Harrison, Miriam Ellen, 
Huntley, Francelia Sophia, 
Hnntly, Lnlii Cornelia, 
^ Johns, Edith, 
Kahler, Lulu M., 
Levi, Bertha, 
Lundy, Mabel Laura, 
McCormick, May, 
Menges, Minnie Adelle, 
Muf^sina, Susan Thompson, 
Neece, Mary Gertrude,. 
Rockwell, Estella, 
Sanders, Catharine Ella, 
Shale, P^stella, 
Slate, Anna Blanch, 
Stone, Mrs. C. C, 
Stone, Edna Lois, 
Stuart, May Trimble, 
Swartz, Bessie Marguerite, 
Walton, Cora Olivet, 
Lundy, Bruce Parker, 
McCIoskey, Clarence Eugene, 
Penepacker, Wilbur Fisk, 
Piper, Charles Blaine, 
vStiltz, Daniel Dorey, 



945 West Fourth Street, Williamsport. 

Reedsville. 

329 Walnut Street, Willi nnsport. 

929 West P'ourth Street, A\ illiamsport. 

Driftwood. 

Driftwood. 

620 Railway Street, Williamsport. 

. 70.*^ Tucker Street, Williamsport. 

510 East Third Street, Williamsport. 

Williamsport. 
21 AV^ashington Street, Williamsport. 

Montgomery. 

1022 West Fourth Street, Williamsport. 

49 East Third Street, Williamsport. 

338 High Street, Williamsport. 

833 Maple Place, Williamsport. 

137 East Fourth Street, Williamsport. 

351 Mulberry Street, Williamsport. 

Williamsport. 

. Henrietta, N. Y. 

553 East Third Street, Williamsport. 

Park Place. 

Williamsport. 

Williamsport. 

Town Hill. 

322 Campbell Street, Williamsport. 

1416 West Fourth Street, Williamsport. 

904 West Fourth Street, Williamsport. 



Elocution Department. 



Anderson, EfTa CJertrude, 
Barkle, Eleanor Steel, 
Bartles, Marie Olivia, 
Beck, Caroline, 
Blyth, Anna M., 
Creveling, Grace Alverna, 
Detwiler, Pearl Catharine, 
Ely, Johetta Gussie, 



Sinnemahoning. 

Orbisonia. 

955 West Fourth Street, Williamsport. 

Williamsport. 

Madera. 

Town Plill. 

Hopewell. 

710 Park Avenue, Williamsport. 



F >RTV-STXTH ANNUAL CATALOGUE. 



»>1 



o 



Gleim, Florence, 

Harrison, Mabel, 

Harrison, Miriam Ellen, 

Hartman, Belle Marion, 

Hibler, Helen Lewis, . 

Jones, (>)ra Lois, 

Kelly, Hose May, 

Low, Alice, 

Lundy, Mabel Laura, 

McCullough, Minnie Blanche, 

McDade, Mabel Elizabeth, 

McGee, ^>;tella May, 

McGee, Isabella Holmes, 

McMiUTay, Delle, ^ . 

Millard, Mary ElizHbeth, 

Miller, Mattie Jane, 

Mingle, Martha Elizabeth, 

My rick, Annie, 

Prior, p]sther Mary, 

Savidge, Minnie. 

Thomas, Nellie Margaret, 

Wliitney. Anna Elizabeth, 

Adams, John Furman, 

Allen, Robert John, . 

Brennan, James McClellan, 

Brunstetter, Frank Howard, 

Carnill, S^nuiel Slack, 

Collins, William S., 

Dodson, Samuel IL, 

Ferguson, William, 
Graeff, Augustus Nicholas, 
Grover, Daniel Malvern, 
Heck man, P^dgar Ho brer, . 
Hively, Byrd Whitefield, 
Miller, Charles Harry, 
Miller, Emory Michael, 
Mingle, Harry Bowers, 
Osgood, Walter Wadsworth, . 
Richards, James Richard, 
Rigdon, Nathan, 
Rosenberry, George Washington, 
Sleep, Fred (J rant, 
Soderling, Walter, . 
Wallace, William Clarence, 
Williams, Alvin S., 



0»)0 1 



311 Pine Street, WiIliams})ort. 

929 West Fourth Street, W^illiamsport. 

929 West Fourth Street, Williamsport. 

212 Chatham Street, Williamsport. 

81 West 101 Street, New York, N. Y. 

38 Ross Street, VVilliams|)ort. 

Osceola Mills. 

Lime Ridge. 

^Villiamsport. 

Clearpeld. 

Kane. 

McGee' s Mills. 

McGee/s Mills. 

New Washington. 

Central ia. 

Petersburg. 

5-:0 West Fourth Street, Williamsport. 

1234 Anne Street, Williamsport. 

1000 Hepburn Street, Williams[)ort. 

J(^rsevtown. 

Moiitgomerv. 

Phili[)sl)nrg, 

Stewartstown. 

Stockton. 

Ash lev. 

Orangeville. 

Altoona. 

Williamsport. 

Muhlenburs:. 

vShenandoah. 

744 Pear Street, Reading. 

212 WaJiington Street, Williamsport. 

• MilHinburg. 

York. 

York. 

Wapwallopen. 

Williamsport. 

1815 Surf Street, Chicago, 111. 

Smethport. 

Mill Cireen, Md. 

Atkinson's Mills. 

Hazleton. 

Harrisburg. 

Edward Street. Frankford, Phila(leli)liia. 

Hazleton. 



32 



WrLLIAMSPOHT 'HrKINSON SFMINARY. 



FORTY-SIXTH ANNUAL CATALOGUE. 



33 



Students in Special Work. 



]>artley, ^farie Olivia, 
lU'ck, C'uroliiie, 
Iknscotcr, lU'lon (lariiulaj . 
(0111}), ('luirlotte Mary, 
Mcniifig, Margaret, 
I'lillnier. Fvanra, 

/ 7 

1 liMcj-, Helen Lewis, 

Jones, Carrie Ilolconib, 

Jx)w, Alice, 

i\[ann, Josephine Atkinson, 

]M;issey, S. Jennie, 

McCiee, Kstella May, 

Me(iee, Isabella Holmes, 

Mc^rurray, I7el!e, 

^lenges, Minnie Adelle, 

Miller, ^Fame S., 

^lingle, Martha Klizal)etl), 

K'eighanL lUanehe, 

^hatrnn, f>eitha A., 

Snvder, Delia .^^arv, 

Stone, I\(lna Ivois, 

A\'o()(ls, Harrictte JuiekalVlltr, 

liennett, Alvin A., . . 

Driggs, Thomas M. 

Colni, (Jarry Daniel, 

Corle, Jacob, 

Dnble, Edward Clyde, 

Kiehelberger, Glen C ypher, 

(jood. Ocean W., 

Harris, I>enjamin A., 

Heilman, John ilarry, 

Hilbish, li. F., . "^ . 

Kiine, J. ]>urlon, 

\a)\\\ Thomas Hill, 

J.owlher, Hariy ('ornman, 

Mcl'adden, Alphonso JJgouri, 

^Nligrath, W'allie K., 

3lills[)angh, Henry Watson, 

Morgan, William Lloyd, 

Osgood, Walter Wadsworlli, 

Htewart, Harry L., 

Trevaskis, T. J., 



0o5 West Fourth St., Williamsport. 
Ill AVashington St., Williamsport. 

Alt((ona. 

Kcedsville. 

Hay ton. 

501 ]\[arket St., Williams[)ort. 

. 81 West lOlsl St., T^ew York, N. Y. 

08 Iloss St., AVilliamsport. 

Lime Kidge. 

Y^eagertown. 

South lliver, N. J. 

McGee's i^Jills. 

McOee's Mills. 

New AVasliington. 

Montgomery. 

;)t)l West Fourth St., Williamsport. 

520 West Fourth St., AVilliamsport. 

Williamsport. 

ILilifax. 

Ilartleton. 

Heniietta, is. Y. 

10 \Valnut St, Danville. 

Williams[)ort. 

Fast Tvroue. 

7-17 Park Ave., AVilliamsjtort. 

■ • • • lavia. 

.S17 Dark Ave., Williams[)ort. 

H()i)ewell. 

Elm Street, Newberry. 

817 Flmira Street, Williamsport. 

oOO Flnnra. Street, W^illiamsport. 

Washington Street, Williamsport. 

oil LcMjUst Street, WiHiamsj>ort. 

Lin)c liidv^e. 

Jjellwood. 

. 450 William Street, Williamsport. 

Hughesville. 
. ()5o IIep])urn Street, \Vi!liamsport. 

IFazleton. 
1815 Surf Street, Chicago, 111, 

Tyrone. 
Leaver Me:»dow. 



O 



oiirnniary. 



4 



Resident Graduates, 

Students in Classical Department, 

Students in Scientific Department, 

Students in Belles Lettres Department, 

Students in Modern Language Department, 

Students in Special Work, .... 

Students in Academic Department, 

Students in Primary Department, 

Students in Elocution Department, 

Students in College Preparatory Department, 

Students in Practical Science Department, 

MUSIC DEPARTMENT. 

Students in Instrumental Music, 

■ * . » 

Students in Thorough Bass and Llarmony and Llistory, 
Students in Vocal Music, 

ART DEPARTMENT. 

Students in Oil Painting, • . . , . 

Students in China Painting, 

Students in Portrait Crayoning, 

Students in Crayon Drawing, .... 

Students in Mechanical Drawing, . 



STUDENTS IN ALL DEPARTMENTS. 



Ladies, . 
Gentlemen, 



Whole number. 



16 
17 
29 
23 
63 
42 
64 
26 

10 



5 



87 
15 
61 



10 
11 



4 



171 
137 

308 



34 



WILLIAM&1»0RT DICKINSON SEMINARY. 



Prizes Avvarded in 1893. 



THE PRESIDENT'S PRIZE. 

Tor Excellence in Writing and Delivering an Oration. 
Aimee Wakefield, ...... Eureka, Kansas. 

THE S. Q. MINGLE PRIZE. 

The First Prize for Excellence in Instrumental Music. 
Edith Reider, ....... Williamsport. 

THE MISS MAY T. STUART PRIZE. 

The Second Prize for Excellence in Instrumental Music. 
Jennie Dae Green, . . . . . . Williamsport. 

THE MISS CHARLOTTE J. HOAG PRIZE. 

For P^xcellence in German. 

Annie Derrah, ...... Williamsport. 

THE REV. DR. SAMUEL A. HEILNER PRIZES. 

For Excellence in Mental Science. 
George W. Rosenberry, First, .... Atkinson's Mills. 

Aimee Wakefield, Second, ..... Enreka, Kansas. 

THE JUDGE FURST PRIZE. 

For Excellence in Writing an Essay on W. H. Prescott and his works, 
Winifred Alexander, ...... Bufialo, N. Y. 



/ 



H 



CD 

m 



m 

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34 



WfLTJ A M^POTH' PIC KIN-OX PKMINAR Y. 



Prizes Awarded in 1893. 



thf: presidents prize. 

For Excellenre in Writing and r>eliverins an Oration. 
Aimee Wakefield, .... ■„ . Eureka, Kansas^. 



THE S. Q. >IJN(;LE PRIZE. 
The First Prize for Excellence m Instrnmental Music. 



Edith Reidei 



Williamsport. 



THE MIvSS M\Y T. STUART PRIZE. 

The second I'rize for Excellence in Instrumental Mu.^ic. 
.lenme Dae (^reen, ...... Williamsport. 

THE MISS ( HAREOTTE J. HOAd PRIZE. 

For Excellence in German. 
Annie Derrali, ...... William.^port. 

THE KEV. DR. SAMUEL A. HEILXER PRIZES. 

For ICxcellence in Mental Science. 
(ieorge W. Kosenberry, Eirst, .... Atkinson's Mills. 

A iniec \Val;cficl<l, Second. ..... Eureka, Kansas. 

THE .HlKrE EURST PRIZE. 

For Excellence in Writinp: an Essay on W. IT. I'rcscott aiwl his works, 
WmilVed Alexander, ...... Rullalo, N. Y. 



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FORTY-SrXTH ANNUAL CATALOGUE. 



Hnnnrs Awarded in 1SD3. 



FIEST CLASSICAL- VALEDICTORY. 



Elizabeth Anne Minds, 



FIRST SCIENTmC-SALUTATORY 



Edwin Arthur Pyles, 



35 



Ramey. 



Waterloo. 



\\ A 



SECOND SCIENTIFIC— SCIENTIFIC ORATION. 



Charles Weslej Dempsey, 



Philadelphia. 



BELLES LETTRES-BELLES LETTRES ESSAY. 



Esther Katharine Gray, 



Buffalo Run. 



,'.! 



36 



WILLIAMSPORT DICKINSON SEMINARY. 



Courses of Study 



In order to meet the wants of a larger class of Students, nine regular Courses 

of Study are provided, namely : The Normal English, Belles Lettres, Science and 

Literature, Classical, Practical Science, College Preparatory, Art, Music and 

Business. ^ Students may adopt any of, these Courses exclusively, or may select 

_such studies from them as they desire, subject to the approval of the Faculty. 

The Normal English is designed to meet the increasing demand for teachers 
in our ( ommon Schools, and is heartily commended to young ladies and gentle- 
men who desire thorough instruction and drill in the English branches. 

The Belles Lettres Course is especially arranged to accommodate young ladies 
who may wish to omit the Higher Mathematics beyond Elementary Algebra and 
Geometry. It thus affords opportunity to connect studies in Music and Art with 
a well-selected Course in Literature and Science. 

The Course in Science and Literature is intended to give wider culture and 
more thorough mental discipline. It differs from the Classical Course mainly in 
that it omits the Greek Language entirely, and makes Latin elective with German 
or French during the first two years. Before entering upon this Course, the 
Student must be thoroughly acquainted with the Common English Branches. 

The Classical Course is much more extensive than is ordinarily pursued at 
Seminaries. It will compare favorably with the curriculum adopted by our best 
institutions of learning. We offer it with entire confidence to young nien who 
are preparing for professional life, also to young ladies who aspire to superior 
intellectual culture. The preparation for this Course is a thorough knowledge of 
the studies embraced in the Academic Course. 

The Practical Science Course covers the required preparation for admission to 
schools of Technology and to Industrial Courses in our best Universities and 
Colleges. However, it is specially arranged to meet the increasing demand for 
cientific and literary instruction by those wbo contemplate an Academic training. 
As a preparation for assured success in industrial occupations we heartily com- 
mend it. • 
• 

The College Preparatory Course is arranged for those who desire thorough 
instruction and systematic drill in all branches requisite for admission to our best 
(oileges and Universities. We commend it especially to parents who wish to 
place their children under the watchful care of experienced teachers, while they 
receive the literary culture of a high grade institution of learning and enjoy the 
social advantages of a well-regulated Christian home. 



^v 



i 



FORTY-SIXTH ANNUAL CATALOGUE. 



37 



- r 



ACADEMIC COURSE. 

This Course will give thorough instruction and drill in the Common English branches 
and also prepare the Student for a<imission to the higher Courses. Classes are formed each 
term for hegiuuiug and advanced Students, in Arithmetic, CJrammar, Geography, History, 
Algebra, Ceometry and Latin. 



Fall Term. 



Winter Term. 



Spring Term. 



Fall Term. 



Winter Term. 



Spring Term. 



FIIIST YIOAR. 

Arithmetic, (Milne.) 
Grain in ;ir, (Harvey.) 
Geogiaphy, (Swinton.) 

Arithmetic, (Milne.) 
Grammar, (Plarvey.) 
Geography and Map Drawing, (Svvinton.) 

Arithmetic, (Milne.) 
(irammar, (Harvey.) 
Geography and Map Drawing, (Svvinton.) 

SECOND YEAR. 

f Arithmetic. (Milne.) 
I (Grammar, (Harvey.) 
-J History, United States, (Mont£:omery.) 

Latin— First Latin Book,(Tuell & Fowler.) 

Book-keeping — optional. 

f Arithmetic, Mental and Written, (Milne.) 

I Grammar, (Harvey.) 

\ History, United States, (Montgomery.) 

I Latin— Grammar and Reader— (Allen k Greenough.) 

L Book-keeping — optional. 

f Arithmetic Reviewed. 

I English Analysis. 

\ Algebra, ( Wentworth.) 

i Latin— Syntax and Caesar— (Allen & Greenough.) 

[ Book-keeping — o|)tional. 



Spelling, Reading, Pennianshi[), Composition and Declamation throughout the 
Course. 

Examinations for admission to any Course above the Academic will be held the 
second day of each term, though Students coming at any time during the term 
may be examined when they enter. 



NORMAL ENGLISH COURSE. 

This Course is designed to accomodate young men and women whose time for school is 
limited, and especially those who are preparing to teach in our Common Schools. A Diploma 
will be given to those who complete the Course. 

SOPHOMORE YEAR. 



Fall Term. 



A ritlimetic— Written and Mental— (Milne.) 

English (riammar, (Harvey.) 
\ (xeography, (Swintou.) 
I History, United States, (Montgomery.) 
1^ English Bible — once a week. 



\J 



38 



Whiter Term. 



Spring Term. 



WILLIAMSPORT' DICKINSON SEMINARV. 



f Arithmetic— Written and Mental — (Milne.) 
I English Grammar, (Harvey.) 
-! (leography and Map Drawing, (Swinton.) 
I History, United States, (Montgomery.) 
I English Bible— once a week. 

f Arithmetic— Written and Mental— (Milne.) 

J English Grammar, (Harvey.) 

1 Algebra, (Wentworth.) 

L English Bible — once a week. 



Fall Term. 



Winter Term. 



Fall Term. 



Winter Term. 



Spring Term. { 



JUKIOIl YEAR. 

{ Civil Government, (Young.) 

I Algebra, (Wentworth.) 

^ Physiology, (Hutchison.) 

I Lalin—First Book— (Tuell & Fowler.) 

L English Bible— once a week. 

f Rhetoric, (Kellogg.) 
I Physical Geography, (Houston.) 
-{ Geometry, (Wentworth.) 

I Latin —Grammar and Reader- (Allen & Greenough.) 
t English Bible— once a week. 

f Riietoric, (Kellogg.) 

I Physical Geography, (Houston.) 

I Geometry, (VVentwortli.) 

I Latin —Syntax and Oesar— (Allen & Greenough.) 

I Arithmetic Reviewed. 

L English Bible — once a week. 

* 

SENIOR YEAR. 



f History, (Swinton's Outlines.) 

I English Literature, (Shaw.) 

J Natural Philosophy, (Peck's Ganot, Revised.) 

I Latin -CVesar — (Allen (& Greenough.) 

I Theory and Methods of Teaching. 

[ English Bible — once a week. 

f History, (Swinton's Outlines.) 

I Mental Science, (Way land.) 

<( Natural Philosophy, ( Peck's G:inot, Revised.) 

I Latin— Virgil— (Greenough.) 

L Englisli Bible— once a week. 



Spring Term. -{ 



Mental Science, (Wayland.) 

Botany, ((iray.) 

American Literature — (Smythe.) 

Latin — Virgil — (Greenough.) 
I Theory and Methods (A' Teaching. 
t English Bible — once a week. 



FORTY-SIXTH ANNUAL CATALOGUE. 



39 



BELLES LETTRES COURSE. 

Eu lish Litem?uf - M^ E^ T"^^^ ^^^ Student will be entitled to the Degree of Mistress of 



SOPHOMORE YEAR. 



r 



Fall Term. 



J 



I 

I 



Winter Term. 



J 



I 



Spring Term. 



i 



L 



r 



Fall Term. 



J 



r 



j^ 



Arithmetic, (Milne.) 
English Grammar, (Harvey.) 
History, United States, (Montgomery.) 
Latin, (ierman or French. 
English I'.i'ulit — once a week. 

i'iiysical Geography, (Houston.) 
Algebra, (Wentworth.) 
English Grammar, (Harvey.) 
History, United States, (Montgomery.) 
Latin (Gram, and K.), German or French. 
English Eible—once a week. 

Physical Geography, (Houston.) 

Algebra, (Wentworth.) 

English, Analysis. ' 

Latin (Syntax^Ciesar), German or French. 

English Eible—once a week. 

JUNIOR YEAR. 

History, (Swinton's Outlines.) 

Physiology, (Hutchison.) 

Natunil Philosophy, (Peck's Ganot, Revised.) 

Civil Government, (Young.) 

Latin (Ca^ar— Syntax), German or French. 

English Bible — once a week. 

History, (Swinton's Outlines.) 
Rhetoric, (Kellogg.) 
Winter Term. ^ Natural Philosophy, (Peck's Ganot, Revised.) 

Latin (Virgil), German or French. 
English Bible — once a week. 

Rhetoric, (Kellogg.) 

Geometry, (Wentworth.) 

Botany, (Gray.) 

Latin, (Virgil), German or French. 

English Bible— once a week. 

* SENIOR YEAR. 

English Literature, (Shaw.) 

Moral Science, (Wayland.) 

Zoology, (Orton.)— optional. 

(ieology, (Dana.) 

Political Economy, (Walker)— optional. 

English Bible— once a week. 

Mental Science, (Wayland.) 
Chemistry, (Shepherd.) 
Winter Term. ] Logic. 

Astronomy, (Peck.) 
English Bible — once a week. 

Evidences of Christianity, (Paley)— optional. 
Mental Science, (Wayland.) 
Chemistry, (Shepherd.) 
American Literature, (Smyth.) 
English Bible — once a week. 



Spring Term. 



I 

I 

f 
I 



L 



r 



Fall Term. 



r 



r 



Spring Term. 



"^ 



40 



WILLIAMS PORT DICKINSON SEMINARY. 



COURSE IN SCIENCE AND LITERATURE. 

Vpon completing the following Course, the Student will be eutitled to the Degree of 
Bachelor of Science. Those not wishing to take the whole Course can pursue sucli studies 
as they desire, subject to the action of the Faculty. 

SOPHOMOR-R VEAR. 

f History, (Swinton's Outlines.) 
Civil Government, (Young.) 
Algebra, (Wentworth.) 

Latin— First Latin Book. 

French. 

German. 
English Bible— once a week. 



Fall Term. 



Elective. 



r 



Winter Term. -j 

I 
I 

I 

r 



Spring Term. 



History, (Swinton's Outlines.) 

Rhetoric, (Kellogg.) 

Algebra, T Went worth.) 

Latin — Grammar and Reader — (Allen & Green 
French. [ough.) 

German. 

English Bible— once a week. 

Rhetoric, (Kellogg.) 
Algebra, (Wentworth,) 
Geometry, (Wentworth.) 

Latin— Syntax— Cfiesar—( Allen & Greenough.) 
French. 

German. 

English Bible—once a week. 



Elective. 



Elective. 



Fall Term. 



J 



] 



Winter Term. 



Spring Term. 



JUNIOR YEAR. 

English Literature, (Shaw.) 

Physiology, (Hutchison.) 

Geometry, (Wentworth.) 

Natural Philosophy, (Peck's Ganot, Revised.) 

Latin— Osar— Syntax— (Allen & Greenough.) 

}\^^''^^^' y Elective, 

(jrerman. 

English Bible— once a week. 

V 

Xritural Philosophy, (Peck's Ganot, Revised.) 
Mental Philosopy, (Wayland.) 
Trigonometry, ( VV^ent worth.) 

Latin— Virgil — (Greenough.) 

French. 

German. 
[ English Bible— once a week. 

f Evidences of Christianity, (Paley.) 
Mental Philosophy, (Wayland.) 
Botany, (Gray.) 
Surveying, ( Wentworth.) 

Latin—Virgil — (Greenough.) ) 

}■ Elective. 



Elective. 



French. 
German. 
^ English Bible— once a week. 






^ORTY-SIXTH ANNUAL CATALOGUE. 



41 



Fall Term. 






r 



SENIOR YEAR. 

Moral Science, (Wayland.) 
Geology, (Dana.) 
Zoology, (Orton.) 
Political Economy, (Walker.) 
Analytical (leometry, (Wentworth.) 
English Bible — once a week. 
Logic. 

Chemistry, (Shepherd), with Lectures. 
Winter Ierm. ^ Astronomy, (Peck.) 

Calculus, (Taylor.) 
English Bible—once a week. 
Butler's Analogy, (Emory & Crooks.) 
Chemistry— with Lectures— (Shej. herd.) 
Calculus, (Taylor.) 
American Liteiature. 
L English Bible— once a week. 



r 



Spring Term. 



CLASSICAL COURSE. 



Upon completing the following Course, the Student will be entitled to tlie DeeroP nf 



r 



SOPHOMORE YEAR. 



.V 



Eale Term. 



J 



I 



Winter Term. ^ 



Spring Term. -J 



[ 



History, (Swinton's Outlines.) 

Civil Government, (Young.) 

Algebra, (Wentworth.) r^i-,j |j 

Latin-Oesar— (Allen & (ireeuough)-Completing Books L 

Cxreek-First Lessons, (White;) Grammar, (Goodwin.) 

Lnghsh Bible — once a week. 

History, (Swinton's Outlines.) 

Rhetoric, (Kellogg.) 

Algebra, (Wentworth.) 

Latin -Virgil— (Greenough)— Book I. 

i^*'^^!'~^i^'l^ f^^^ssons, (\Vhiie;) Grammar, (Goodwin.) 
English Bible— once a week. 

Khetoric, (Kellogg.) 

Algebra, (Wentworth.) 

Geometry, ( VVentworth.) 

Latin— Virgil— (Greenough)— Book 11. 

Greek -Anabasis, (Goodwin) -Book L, 8 chanters. 

Lnglish Bible — once a week. 

JUNIOR YEAR. 



J^ 



Fall Term. 



Winter Term. 



English Literature, (Shaw.) 

^Natural Philosophy, (Peck's Ganot, Revised.) 

Physiology, ( Hutchison.) 

(ieometry, (Wentworth.) 

Latin— Virgil— (Greenough)— Books IIL-VI. 

Greek— Anabasis, (Goodwin)— Three Books. 

English Bible — once a week. 

f Mental Philosophy, (Wayland.) 

I Natural Philosophy, (Peck's Ganot, Revised.) 

! Irigouometry, (Wentworth.) 

^ Latin— Cicero— Orations— L-IV. Catiline 
Greek— Homer— Iliad- -Book I. 
English Bible— once a week. 



42 



WILLIAMSPORT DICKINSON SKMINARY. 



Sprin(t Ter 



M. 



Fall Term. 



f Evidences of Cliristianltv, (Paley.) 

I Mental Philosophv, (Wavland.) 

I Surveying, (Wentworth.)' 

] Latin— Cicero— Four Selected Orations. 

i Oreek—PIonier—Jliad— Books Jl. and III. 

L Eucriish Bible— once a week. 

SENIOR YEAR. 
Moral Science, ( Wavland. j 
Political Economy, j Walker.) 
Geology, (Dana.)* 
{ Analytical Geometry, (AVent worth.) 
Latin — Horace. 

Greek— Xenophon— Memorabilia. 
English Bible— once a week. 

Logic. 

Chemistry, (Shepherd;, with Lectures. 
Astronomy, (Peck.) 
U INTER Term. ^ Calculus, (Taylor.) 

Latin -Li vy. 

Greek— Plato— Apology and Crito. 
English Bible — once a week. 

f Butler's Analogy, (Emoiy & Crooks ) 
I Chemistry— with Lectures — (Shepherd.) 
J Calculus, (Taylor.) 

I Latin — Tacitus — Germania and Agricola. 
I Greek— Aeschylus— Promethus Bound. 
1 English Bible— once a week. 



r 



Spbi>'g Term. 



COLLEGE PREPARATORY COURSE 



Fall Term. 



Winter Term. 



Spring Term. 



Fall Term. 



r 



r 
I 



SOPHOMORE YEAR. 

Latin -First Latin Book, (Tuell & Fowler ) 

Arithmetic, (Milne.) 

Grammar, (Harvey.) 

History, United States, (Montgomery.) 

English Bible— once a week. 

Latin— Reader and (Grammar, (Allen & Greenoutrh ) 

Arithmetic, (Milne.) ^ ^^ 

CJrammar, (Harvey.) 

History, Uiwted States, (Montgomery.) 

English Bible— once a week. 

Latin— C8esar—(Allen A Greenough,) 29 chapters 
Arithmetic (V>mpleted. 
English Analysis. 
Algebra, (Went worth.) 
English Bible- -once a week. 

JUNIOR YEAR. ' 

Latin— Ciesar— Completing Books L and H. 

Greek— First Lessons, (White;) Grammar, (Goodwin.) 
i Algebra, ( Wentworth.) 
I Koman History, (Allen.) 
L English Bible- -once a week. 



r 



I 

L 



f oktY-sixth annual catalogue. 



43 



Winter Term. 



r 

Spring Term. ^ 

I 

I 



r 



Fall Term. 



i 



Winter Term. I 



I 



Spring Term. -< 



I 



Latin— Caesar— Books HL, IV. Sight Readings. 

Greek— First Lessons— Grammar and Anabasis, (Goodwin.) 

Algebra, (Wentworth.) 

Latin--Virgil---((ireenoiigh)--Book L and Scansion. 
Lnglish Bible— once a week. 

Latin— Virgil— (Greenough)— Book H. 
Greek— Anabasis~(Goodwin), 8 chapters. 
Greek History, (Myers.) 
English l>ible— once a week. 

;Sii]NT01{ Y'RAR. 

Latin---Virgil-((xreenough)— Hooks HL, IV. and VL 
Latin Prose Composition (Arnold), 18 chapters. 
Greek— Anabasis— (Goodwin) -Books J. and Jl. 
Geometry, (Wentw^orth.) 
English Bible— once a week. 

Latin— Cicero- (A lien & Greenough )-Catiline Orations. 
Greek— Anabasis— 4 Books Completed. 
Greek— Homer's Iliad— (Keep)— Book L 
Geometry, (W^entworth.) 
English Bible — once a week. 

Latin-Cicero-(Allen & (;reenough)-Pro Archia and two 
Latin— \irgil— Bucolics and Book V. Aeneid. [others 

Greek- Homer's Iliad -(Keep)— Books H. and HL 
Classical Geography, (Tc.zer & Cinn's Atlas.) 
English Bible— once a week. 



/ " 



Fall Term. 



jCi^ 



PRACTICAL SCIENCE COURSE. 

Upon completing this Course the Student will receive the Degree of Bachelor of Elements. 

SOPHOMORE YEAR. 

Algebra, ( VVentworth's Elements.) ^ 
Civil Government, (Young.) - 

Physical Geography, (Houston.) 
German, French or Latin. ^ 

Free-hand Drawing — twice a week. 
English Bible— once a week. 

Algebra, (Elements— Completed.) — 
German, French or Latin. 
Khetoric, (Kellogg.) — 

Johnston's American Politics. 
Free-hand Drawing— twice a week. 
English Bible— once a week. — 

Plane Creometry, (Wentworth.) - 
German, Frencli or Latin. -' 

Khetoric, (Kellogg.) ^ 

Free-hand Drawing— twice a week. 
English liible— once a week. ^ 

JUNIOR YEAR. 
Geometry, (Wentworth.) ^ 

German, French or Latin. *" 

Physiology, (Hutchison.) *" 

Physics, (Peck's Ganot, Revised.) — 
English Bible— once a week. _ 



Winter Term. -| 

I 

I 

I 
r 

Spkino Term. ' 

I 



Fall Term. 






44 



WILLIAMSPORT DICKINSON SEMINARV. 



Winter Term. ■{ 



Fall Term. 



Winter Term. 



Spring Term. 



Spring Term. ■{ 



I 



J 



I 



I 



L 



Algebra, (Wentworth's University.) ** 
German, French or Latin. — 

Phy?iics, (Peck's Ganot Revised.) - 
Mental Science, (Way land.) -^ 
English Bible — once a week. -- 

Algebra, (Wentworth's University.) — 
German, French or Latin. — 

Mental Science, (Wayland.) — 
Botany, (Gray.) •* 

English ]^>ible — once a week. *" 

SENIOll YEAR. 

English Literature, (Shaw.) '^ 
Mineralogy and Geology. "^ 

German, French or Latin. "" 

Political ICconomy or Zoology. *- 
(leometrical Drawing — twice a week. 
English Bible — once a week. — 

Chemistry, (Shepherd), with Lectures. - 
Astronomy, (Peck). <— 
Trigonometry or Logic. "^ — 

Commercial Law, (Lectures.) 
English Bible — once a week. - 

Chemistry, Laboratory Practice and Lectures. 
Surveying, (Wentworth or Paley.) — 
American Literature. 
Mechanical Drawing— twice a week. 
English Bible — once a week. — 



MODERN LANGUAGES. 



f Elementary Grammar, (Otis— Edition of 1893.) 
German Grammar, (Whitney — used as reference.) 
Studien und Plaudereien—First Series, (Stern.; 
Miirchen, (Andersen.) 

Aus dem Leben eines Taugenichts, (Eichendorf.) 
Erzahlungen aus der Deutschen Geschichte, (Schrakamp,) 
German Course i or Immensee, (Storm.) 

} Die Schonsten Deutschen Lieder, (Wenckebach.) 
German Synonyms, (Hoffman.) 
Some drama by Schiller. 
Dictionary, (Whitney.) 

Abriss der Deutschen Literatur-Geschichte, (Koenig.) 
Hoher als die Kirche, (Hillern,) or 
Die Harzreise, (Heine.) 

An Elementary Grammar, (Keetels.) 
Progressive French Drill Book, A., (Peiffer.) 
French Drill Book,,B., (PeifTer.) 
Causeries avec mes Eleves, (Sauveur.) 
Un Mariage D'Amour, (Halevy.) 
La Belle-Nivernaise, (Daudet.) 
i^e Koman d'un jeune homme, (Feuillet.) 
La France, (A de Kongemont.) 
Mon Oncle et Mon Cure, (La Brete.) 
Dictionary, (Heath.) 
L'Abbe (bnstantin, (Halevy.) 
Petite Histoire du Peuple Franyais, (Lacombe.) 
Tuition, term of 12 weeks, $5.00. 



French Course. ^ 



FORTY-SIXTH ANNUAL CATALOGUE. 



45 



Jlrf 



COURSE IN MUSIC. 

The aim in this department will be to give thorough instruction, both in the 
technique and the aesthetics of the art; and to this end only standard text-books 
and studies will be used. Students completing the course will receive a diploma. 

FIRST YliiAK. 

Selections from the following works, or their equivalents: Raif's Technical 
Studies; Duvernoy's Etudes; Burgmuller L and II.; Bertini, op. 100; Heller, op. 
47 ; Krause, op. 4. 

SECOND YEAR. 

Bertini, ops. 29 and 32; Czerny, op. 299; Krause's Trill Studies; Heller, ops. 
46 and 45; Little Preludes by Bach ; Technics bv Raif and Mason. 



rv 



THIRD YEAR. 

Czerny, op. 740; Two-part Inventions by Bach; Heller's Art of Phrasing, op. 
16; Cramer, (Bulon Edition,) Book I.; Krause, op. 15; Moschelas, op. 70; de- 
menti's ''Gradus ad Parnassum"; Kleinmichel's Etudes; Chopin Etudes. 

The Course of study on the Piano embraces as many of the different works of 
the Classics and Modern Schools of Composition as it is possible to study, with a 
correct execution and interpretation, in the time alloted to the Course. 

Students are advanced according to their ability and proficiency, not according 
to the number of terms taken. 



TEXT-BOOKS USED IN HARMONY. 

Emery's Elements of Harmony; Richter's Manual, (translated by J. C. D 
Parker.) 

All pupils who wish to complete a Course of Study on the Piano must be able 
to pass a satisfactory examination in Harmony. 

Students not wishing to take the Ciraduating Piano (burse may take a Course 
on the Reed Organ, selected by the teacher, and will be granted a diploma, if they 
acquire ability in reading ordinary church music at sight, and in a manner 
sufficiently clear for purposes of accompaniment. 

Students of the Graduating Piano and Organ Courses are required to join the 
General Singing Class. 

A full Course of Violin Playing has also been prepared for the benefit of those 
who are seeking superior attainments in this department. 

All Music Scholars have Vocal Culture /rcc of charge, but classes will onlv be 
formed when four or more desire to enter them. 



46 



WILLIAMSPORT DICKINSON SEMINARY. 



COURSE IN VOCAL TRAINING. 

FIRST YEAR. 

Physiology, its bearing on Vocal Art; Kiiles for breathing and their appli- 
cation ; Placing the tone ; Study of the Scales with the Vowels A, I, O, pure and 
modified ; Concone's Fifty Lessons ; Concone's Twenty-five Lessons ; Seiber's 
Vocalizes, op. 131 ; Slow trills and simple musical figures; Some Songs. 

SECOND YEAR. 

Continuation of above; Concone's Fifteen Lessons; Garcia's Studies in 
Agility; Vaccai's P:xercises in Italian; Songs by the best American and Euro- 
pean Composers; Simple Senas and Arias from the Italian, French and German 
Operas; Easy airs from the Standard Oratorios; Songs. 

THIRD YEAR. 

Lamperti's Bravura Studies, Books I., II. and III.; Vocalizes by Bordigni ; 
Songs by Schuman, Franz, Mendelssohn, Schubert, Rubenstein, and best English 
and French writers; Oratorio ; Senas and Arias from Standard Operas; Operatic 
Arias by Handel, (arranged by Robert Spronz.) 

TUITION-TERM, 12 WEEKS, 24 LESSONS. 

Instrumental Music, Piano or Reed Organ, .... 

Use of Instrument, two periods each day, .... 

Pipe Organ, 

Use of Instrument, one hour each day, .... 

Theory of Music, in clasvses of four or more, each. 

Theory of Music, to single [xipi Is, • . . , , 

Vocal Culture, in classes, 

Vocal Culture, to single pupils, • • . . . 

Vocal Music, in classes of ten or more, per month, each. 

Violin Music, in classes of four, each. 

Violin Music, to single pupils, • . . . , 

Violin Music, in classes of two, each, ..... 

Guitar Music, to single pupils, ..... 

Rudiments of Music, in classes, per month, each. 



$15 00 

3 75 
18 00 
10 00 

6 00 
15 00 

Free 
15 00 

1 00 

6 00 
15 00 

8 00 
12 00 

1.00 



COURSE IN ART. 

This department is imdor the direction of a lady of rare ability and wide cul- 
ture. Having added to the usual Art Curriculum of a Seminary the regular 
course at a School of Design, she is thoroughly qualified to meet the most rigid 
demand for instruction in both the useful and ornamental branches of the depart- 
ment. 

The Course in Drawing comprises Linear, Perspective, Object and Model 
Drawing. Due attention is given to the branches of Pastel, Crayoning and China 



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WILLIAM. PORT DICKINSON SEMINARY 



COURSi: IN \^OCAL TRAINING. 

FIRST YEAR. 

Plivc;iolor;y, it3 benrifi^ on VocmI Art ; Knlos for breathing and their appli- 
cation ; Plnrino: the tone ; Study of the Sealer. ;vith the Vowels A, I, O, pnre nnd 
modified; ( onrone's Fifty Lessons; Conone's Twenty-tive Lensons ; Seiber's 
Vornli/es, op. l.",l ; Slow trills and simple nmsieal figures; Some Songs. 

SECOND YEAR. 

Continuation of above; Coneone's I'ifteen Lessons; ( rarcia's Studies in 
Agihty; Vaceai';, Kxereises in Italian; Son^s by the best American and Euro- 
pean romposers; Simple Senas and Arias f rom the Italian, French and (ierman 
/>peras; F:a:^y airs iVom the Standard Oratorios; Songs. 

THLRD YEAR. 

Lanij.erti's I'.ravura Studies. Looks L, ILanrl 1 1 L; Voealizes by Bordigni ; 
.-ongs by S( human, Franz, Mmdelssohn, Sehubert, Rubenstein, and best English 
and French writers; Oratorio; Senas and Arias from Standard Operas ; Operatic 
Arias by Handel, (arrangfwl by Kolnrt Sproiiz.) 

TUITION-TERM, 12 WEEKS, 24 LESSONS. 

Instruniental Ahjsie, Liano or LecMl Organ, 

1 se of Instnnnent, two periods each d.iv. 

Lipf Orjraii, ..... 

• • • • 

Lse of lustnunent, one Ihmu' each dav. 

' « > * • • . 

Theory r>f Musie, in classes of tour or more each 
riicfti V of Music, to single impils. 
Voc.d ( ulture, in classes, 

VoeaM ultun*, to single pupils, .... 

\ oc.d Music, in classes of ten or rufire, p(M' month, each, 
\ inlin Music, in classes f»f four, each, 

\ iolin Music, to single pupils, .... 

\ iolin Music, in (dasses of (wo, each, 

Onitar Music, to single jmpils, ..... 

liudimcnts of Music, in classes, per month, each, 



$15 


00 


3 


75 


18 


00 


10 


00 


6 


00 


15 


00 


Free 


15 


00 


1 


00 


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00 


15 


00 


8 


00 


12 


00 


1.00 



COURSi: IN ART. 

Tins department is imdcr thr direction of a lady of rare ability and wide cul- 
ture. Having added to the usual Art Ourricuhnn of a Seminary the regular 
<ourse at a School of Design, she is thoroughly (pialitied to meet the most rigid 
demand for instruction in both the useAd and ornamental branches of the depart- 
ment. 

The Course in Drawing comprises Linear, Perspective, Object and Model 
Drawing. JJue attcution is given to the l>ranches of Pastel, Crayoning and China. 



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FORTY-SIXTH ANNUAL CATALOGUE. 



47 



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Decorating — Portrait Crayoning being a specialty. The course in Oil embraces 
Landscape and Portrait Painting. 

Students desiring a full course in this department will, upon satisfactory 
advancement in all its branches, be entitled to a diploma. 

TUITION -TERM, 12 WEEKS, 24 LESSONS. 

Monochromatic and Pastel Painting, eacii, . . . . $12.00 

Painting in Water Colors, ...... 12.00 

Painting in Oil, ....... 12.00 

Portrait Painting, ....... 20.00 

Pencil Drawing, ....... 6.00 

Portrait Crayoning, ....... 12.00 

Crayon Drawing, . . . . . . . 7.00 

Photograph Painting, ....... 12.00 

China Decoratinj^:, ....... 12.00 

Mechanical Drawing, to single pupils, . . . . . 6.00 

Free-hand and Industrial Drawing, in classes of three or more, . 3.00 



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ELOCUTION. 

Elocution is recognized as a most important branch of education. This depart- 
ment is under the supervision of a thoroughly qualified and experienced teacher, 
and will include a careful vocal drill, and practice in the entire range of expres- 
sion. It will also embody such a variety of Recitations and Readings as may 
serve to exemplify the qualities and modulations of the voice, and will cover 
gesture and action. 

Six dollars per term of 12 weeks, in classes— 36 lessons. Private lessons, 50 
cents each. 



BUSINESS DEPARTMENT. 



I 



This Course is designed to give a thorough knowledge of the principles of 
business transactions. It may be pursued alone or in connection with other 
studies, thus accommodating those seeking a literary as well as those seeking 
only a business education. The time required to finish it will depend upon the 
proficiency of the pupil in the English branches^ and the diligence with which he 
works. 



STUDIES. 



The Course will include instruction in the Common English branches, Book- 
keeping — Single and Double P]ntry — Business Correspondence, Business Papers 
of various forms, Civil (rovernment and Political P'cononiy. 



48 



WILLIAMSPORT DICKINSON SEMINARY. 



TUITION. 

Students may enter the regular classes without additional cost for tuition, 
except for Book-keeping, for which $5.00 per term of three months will be 
charged. 

Board, Room, Washing, etc., same as in other departments. 

ADVANTAGES. 

This department offers all the opportunities for general culture afforded 
Students in other departments, assured by well conducted literary societies, lec- 
tures, large libraries, association with ex[)cricnced teachers, and the refining 
influences of a Christian home. 



ADMISSION. 

Students may enter this department at any time in the Academic year, a fair 
knowledge of the English branches being the only requisite. 



' METHODS OF INSTRUCTION. 

The instruction in the Primary Department is based on the inductive and ob- 
jective methods, classes having objects presented which are studied analytically. 
Julia McNair Wright's Nature Readers have been introduced, where life is seen 
in its natural development. Practical application of the "natural method" and 
the facts obtained from the Readers is made in conversational lessons. The lan- 
guage lessons embrace Memory Lessons, Dictation Exercises, Stories read for 
Reproduction, Exercises in Letter Writing, Word Pictures and Composition 
Writing. Especial attention is given to Arithmetic and the analysis of problems. 
History and Geography are taught with the aid of maps, books of reference and 
the best text-books. Information I^essons, or elementary science studies in Natural 
Jiistory, teach the classes to observe and to make careful note of the objects of 
the animal, plant and mineral kingdoms. The method of study consists chiefly 
in examination of leaves, rocks and insects. The Prang Course of Form Study 
and Drawing, including a series of exercises with suitable methods, is studied. 
During the present year instruction in a systematic course of Voice Culture has 
been given to the pupils of this department by the teacher of Vocal Music. 

In Elementary Arithmetic, Grammar, and Geography, the catechetical method 
is largely employed, but in Higher English the same course is adopted which 
prevails in the more advanced branches of study. The pupil is taught to study 
the text-book by topics rather than by sentences or paragraphs, and encouraged 
in the lecture room to give the substance of what he has learned, in his own 
language. In this manner, while he is adding to his store of knowledge, he is 
enlarging his vocabulary, and while he is evolving principles and acquiring facts ^ 
he is increasing his power of expression, and thus unconsciously, it may be, but 
nevertheless surely, he lays the foundations of an easy and concise style of com- 
position, 



FORTY-SIXTH ANNUAL CATALOGUE. 



49 



k" 



In P:nglish Literature, the origin of the English language and the growth of 
the literature are carefully traced. In this work the most interesting facts in the 
lives of the best authors and their principal productions are brought under review. 

Instruction in Mental Science covers the second and third terms of the Junior 
year. It embodies definitions of the mental faculties, and careful analyses of in- 
tellectual processes, with a brief history of the science, the main puri)08e being 
to stimulate the Student to think and investigate for himself. 

Ethics, Logic and Political Economy are taught in the Senior year. Text- 
books are used and daily recitations are required. Class inquires and discu:^«ions 
are encouraged, and familiar lectures are given from time to time by the teacher. 

NATURAL. SCIENCE. 
In the department of Natural Science, the underlying aim Is to teach the 
Student to think and observe for himself, and at the same time to give him such a 
fund of practical knowledge as will fit him for the active duties of life. In all 
the branches the text book is used as a means to gain a knowledge of topics rnther 
than to be studied as an end in itself, and as far as possible the Stndetit is le<l to 
the study of the objects themselves. No pains are spared to cultivate hal>it« of 
clear, accurate and systematic thought and expression. 

Geology is taken during the first term of the Senior year. A practii al 
knowledge of the common rocks and minerals is acquired, and excursions are 
made to quarries and regions which illustrate various geological formations. 
During the past vear the class made surveys of the Lower Helderberg limestone 
quarries east of this city, the Chemung building stone quarries on the north, a 
section through North Bald Eagle Mountain into Mosquito Valley, comi>rising 
four members of the Silurian, and colored sections drawn to a scale were made of 
each place visited. Each Student made a written report and collected ( haract-r- 
istic specimens and fossils, and constructed of these specimens, dressed down and 
mounted in plaster of paris, a model representing an ideal arran-cm-nt of the 
seven diflerent geological formations, fossil-bearing, admirably presented to view 
by outcrops within a few miles of the Seminary. 

ZooLO(4Y occupies the first term of the Senior year. The work, during the 
first half of the term, consists of acquiring a knowledge of the structure ot the 
principal classes of the several sub-kingdoms, while during the last half the com- 
parative anatomy and physiology of the animal kingdom is taken up, and the 
Student is led to appreciate the finely graded relationship that exists between the 
classes. Orton's text-book is used, and as much labratory work is introduced as 
is practicable. This year the class studied a clam, lobster, bee, fish, frog and a 
cat, observing closely the physiology of the circulation and respiration in the last 
subject, and dissecting an alcoholic specimen of the brain. 

Physics embraces two terms of the Junior year. Mechanics, Sound and Heat 
are taken in the Fall term ; and Optics, Electricity and Magnetism in the Winter. 
The principles and laws are illustrated as far as practicable by apparatus. The 
relation between the ditlerent branches is held strongly before the mind, and prac- 
tical questions, drawn from every -day life, are constantly brought foreward to teach 
the Student to apply the principles learned in the text-book. The subject of 



}- 



50 



WILLI AMSPORT DICKINSON SEMINARY. 



Electricity is presented by a series of experiments and lectures, on which full 
notes are made by each student. 

In Botany, after a few weeks of work in Gray's Scliool and Field Book, the 
Student goes direct to the plant, analysis occupying the remainder of the term. 
An herbarium is collected and prepared by each member of the class. 

Chemistry occupies the second and third terms of the Senior year. During 
the Spring term tiiere is also elective work in Analytical Chemistry. The chemical 
laboratory has been fitted up this year and is fully equipped with apparatus and 
chemicals for advanced technical work. The room is furnished with individual 
tables, each supplied with gas, Eunsen's burner, ring stand, water, case with full 
set of reagents, and all necessary apparatus for illustrative experiment and qual- 
itative analysis. There is also a complete set of apparatus for volumetric and 
gravimetric analysis and assaying. In the regular work Shepherd's Chemistry is 
used. Each Student keeping full notes on the experiments which are performed 
individually, becomes thoroughly familiar with chemicals and manipulations. In 
the S})ring term minerology is taken up in the laboratory work, and the latter 
part of the term is devoted to the general principles of Organic Chemistry. 
In the analytical work Fenton and Fleischer are used as reference books. 
Qualitative analyses of alloys and commercial articles are made, after which 
quantitative analysis, both volumetric and gravimetric, is taken up. Estimation 
of ores by these processes and by assaying, and analyses of milk, sugars, and 
mineral waters are made. 

During the last year a dark-room has been built and furnished with a complete 
photograi)hic outfit, and the advanced scientific students are given an opportunity 
to acquire a practical knowledge of the art of photography. 

I^ectures on subjects of interest to the department are given from time to time, 
illustrated by stereoscopic views projected by a new oxy-hydrogen light. 

ANCIENT LANGUAGES. 

In the departments of Greek and Latin, scrupulous attention is given to the 
grammatical structure of these languages, their relation to English, the illustration 
and application of principles, accurate translation, and to the literary significance 
of each author studied. Mythology and Classical Geography are studied in the 
Senior year. It is aimed to give to the classics by these means their proper place 
as an aid to expression, to a thorough knowledge of ouf own language and to the 
pursuit of other languages, as well as to afford the usual mental discipline. Care- 
ful attention is also given to those preparing for college or for professional study. 

MODERN LANGUAGES. 

During first year in German, classes complete Otis' Elementary Grammar, 
(edition .of 1890), as far as the subject of Syntax, with study of Irregular Verbs, 
committing to mefnory all conversations, proverbs and selections. Exercises are 
prepared in (Jerman script with careful attention to the idiom of the language. 
Stern's Studien und Plaudereien is used as the basis of conversation lessons and, 
during Spring, one of the works mentioned under list of text-books is read. In 
second year Syntax of Otis' Grammar is completed, with frequent dictation exer- 
cises. Schrakamp's Erziihlungen aus der Deutschen Geschichte, or its equivalent 



• % 



IV- 



- > 



FORTY-SIXTH ANNUAL CATALOGUE. 



51 



is studied, much of text being memorized. Several standard novelettes are used 
for acquiring facility in sight reading. Meissner's (merman Conversation is used 
daily. The Spring term is given to a study of Schiller's Works. 

During the first two terms in French, Peifler's Progressive French Drill Book 
is used, many short extracts being committed to memory. In the Spring term 
there is a study of Keetel's Elementary Grammar through the subject of Irregular 
Verbs, careful attention being given, in the preparation of all exercises, to the 
idiom of the language. Also some work mentioned under text-books is read. In 
second year grammatical study is completed, conversational exercises are con- 
tinued, and some French classic or historical work is made the basis of advanced 
study. 

Literary exercises and historical work are given frecpiently in both lann^uages 
throughout the course, with object, history and geography lessons based upon the 
best charts and maps. Standard selections are frequently memorized, and a 
study of synonyms is also made. 

MATHEMATICS. 

The Course in Mathematics is coextensive with that in tlie majority of our 
best colleges. Although the study is considered as chiefly disciplinary, the aim 
throughout the Course is to acquaint the Student with the instrimients in most 
familiar use by the practical scientists and mathematicians of the day, as well as 
to strengthen his mental faculties and increase his logical acumen. At the com- 
mencement of each subject, a familiar lecture is given on its history and [)ractical 
utility. 

Algebra is begun, the Student being led slowly through the rudiments, and 
made to review the fundamentals daily. After two terms spent in .Studying the 
elements, the University Algebra is taken up at the Calculus of Radicals, and 
continued through Quadratics, Proportions, Permutations, and Combinations, 
Progressions, Identical Equations, Decomposition of Fractions, Kesidula Formula, 
Newton's F>inominal Theorem, Method of Indeterminate Coefiicicnts, Reversion 
of Series, Logarithm^*, Rule of Des Cartes, Cardan's Solution of Cubic Equations, 
and Sturm's Theorem. The aim of the instruction in advanced Algebra is to free 
the Student from his previous dependence upon the text-book, and to cidtivate 
ability and taste for original mathematical work. Great stress is laid u[)on math- 
ematical generalization and the consise demonstration of principles. 

The course in Geometry covers seven books, embracing both the Plane and 
Solid Geometry. The demonstrations are partly oral and partly written, the 
written exercises being deemed a valuable aid to the cultivation of accuracy o.f 
thought and expression. Plane Trigonometry is taken entire, and the class is 
exercised in the solution of practical i)roblems. In surveying, the Theory and 
Practice are combined. The class is conveniently divided, and each division in 
turn is taken by the teac her into the iield for practical work. Plots of the sur- 
veys made are drawn, and, together with the computations, are submitted to the 
teacher for inspection. 

One term is spent in Analytical Geometry, completing the Cartesian Method 
of Co-ordinates, the Method of Polar Co-ordinates, and the Transformation of 
Co-ordinates. To Calculus two terms are given, covering, in the Diiierenti*il 



n 



62 



WILLIAMSPORT DICKINSON SEMINARY. 



Calculus, the Differentiation of Functions of a single Variable, Maclaurin's and 
Taylor's Theorems, together with the deduction of the Binomial Theorem and 
the Theory of Logarithms, the Evaluation of Indeterminate Forms, and the 
^Maxima and Minima of Functions of a single Variable ; and in the Integral 
(^alculus, the Integration of all the Elementary Forms. 

HISTOlvY AND MIlKTOlMd 

In the study of History, the object is to familiarize the student with the main 
facts and principles, thus forming a foundaii«)ii uu which to Innid by future read- 
ing and investigation. To this end the text-book is thoroughly studied in con- 
nection with a Manual of Classical Antiquities and an Atlas, while at the same 
time the 8tudent is encouraged to consult other authorities and bring in additional 
matter bearing on the subject. Recitation is by the analytical and topical methods. 

Special attention is given to instruction in Rhetoric, on account of its great 
value to the Student. The principles of good writing are studied and analyzed 
with a view to their practical application. 

Durinc: the last term much of the time is devoted to original productions in 
the various departments of literary composition, on themes assigned by the teacher. 
These productions are read before the class, where general criticisms are offered, 
after which they are handed to the teacher for more careful correction. 



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( nl(iilii:^, Ihr niflrrcnliation of I'lmctions of ji sinj^^lo Variable, MMclaurin's and 
Tnylor's TluorcDis, ton;etlier with the (lediietion of the Binomial Theorem and 
the Tlieory of I^onrarithnis, the Kvahiatioii of liKlelerininate Forms, and the 
Maxima and Minima of T'nnetions of a sinojle N'ariahle ; and in the Integral 
( alcnlus, the Integration of all the Klementary I'ortns. 

HISTORY AND RHETORIC. 

In thr study of History, the ohject is to familiari/e the .-tndent with the main 
lartii and principles, thus forming a foundation on which to Imild l»y fntn.re read- 
ing and investigation. To this end the text-hook is thoroughly studied in con- 
nKction with a Mamial of ( lassical Antiquities and an Atlas, while at the same 
time the Student is encouraged toconsult other aiUhorities and bring in a<lditional 
matter hearing on the siibject. Kecitiition is by the analytical and topical methods. 

S|H <ial att(^ntion is given to instruction in Rhetoric, on account of its great 
value to (he Stndcnt. The principles of good writing arc studied and analyzed 
Avith a view to their prarticaJ application. 

Pufinir the last term much of the time is devoted to original productions in 
the varioiiv depnrtmeiits f)f literary composition, on themes assigned by the teacher. 
J'hese prod IK t ions are read before the class, where general criticisms are offered, 
alter which thev are handed to the teacher for more careful correction. 



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FORTY-SIXTH ANNUAL CATALOGUE. 



53 









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Special Information. 

We shall not be ready to receiv^e students before the first day 
of the term. On the second day, classes are formed, a term 
schedule for recitations adopted, and lessons assigned. 

Students from other schools may enter any class on passing a 
satisfactory examination in the previous studies of the Course, or 
their equivalents. The examination may be waived if the Faculty 
are assurred, by certificates of scholarship, or otherwise, that it is 
unnecessary. 

Invitations to visit any member of the school may be given 
only with the approval of the President. The person inviting or 
entertaining a visitor will be charged twenty-five cents per meal, 
except parents or brothers or sisters of the person inviting. 

Visitors will not be allowed on the halls nor in the rooms of 
students without permission. 

Students who are back in more than three studies in any year 
will not rank with the class of that year unless they have com- 
pleted equivalent advanced studies. 

German, covering three years, may be substituted for Greek in 
the College Preparatory Course. 

The Junior and Senior Classes study E^tymology during the 
Fall Term. 

The language '' elected " in the course in Science and Litera- 
ture will be retained throughout the required two years. 

The ladies are allowed to substitute a Course in Music, Draw- 
ing and Painting, German or French, for the Greek Language, 
and for Analytical Geometry and Calculus. 

The gentlemen may substitute two years in Greek or German 
for Analytical Geometry and Calculus. 

The election or substitution of German, Frenc'h, Music or 
Drawin^r and Painting: does not remit the regular tuition for 
these branches. 

Orthography, Etymology, Reading, Composition and Decla- 
mation are required of all students, except those exclusively in 
Music, Art, and Elocution. 

The classes in Trigonometry and Surveying are given such 
field drill as will familiarize them with practical surveying. 

In the departments of Ancient and Modern Languages the 
classes are practiced in oral and written exercises throughout the 
Course. 



54 



WlLtiAMSPORT DICKIXSOX SEMINARV. 



General Information. 



WILLIAMSPORT DICKINSON SEMINARY 

Is an institution of high grade, with ample facilities for giving 
young ladies and gentlemen a superior education. It is organized 
upon the plans which liave been approved by long experience, 
_ and adoi)ted by the best schools in this country, embracing all' 
modern appliances in means and methods of instruction. It" was 
founded in 1848, and is regularly chartered by the Legislature of 
the State of Pennsylvania, and authorized to confer degrees upon 
those who complete tiie prescribed Courses of Study. "" 

The Seminary is under the patronage of the Central Pennsyl- 
\'ania Conference, being owned and practically managed by the 
Preachers' Aid Society. As this investment was rather to pro- 
mote the important work of higher Christian education than' to 
make mone\', the paramount purpose is to combine thorough 
instruction and careful moral training with the comforts of a good 
home, at the lowest possible rates. 

LOCATION. 

Wiiliamsport is one of t-iie most beautiful and healthful places 
in the .State. It has never been subject to epidemics pf any kind 
Many coming to the school in poor health have returned fully 
restored. The city is situated on the West Branch of the Sus- 
quehanna River, has a population of thirty thousand, is widely 
known for its intelligence, its enterpri.se, the taste illsplayed in the 
character of its public buildings and private residences, and the 
moral appliances with which it is furnished. In small towns and 
villages the facilities for culture— intellectual as well as a.^sthetic 
and moral— are generally limited, rarely reaching beyond the 
institution itself, and hence student life must become monotonous, 
lacking the inspiration which a larger place with wider opportu- 
nities aff )rds. Thirty-six churches, an active temperance organi- 
zation, and a branch of the Young Men's Christian Association 
embracing many of the most earnest Christians in the community' 



I'ORTY-SIXTH ANNUAL CATALOGUE. 



55 



< ' 






with a large library, free to all, and accessible at all times, indicate 
some of the religious influences brought to bear upon the youn 
in Wiiliamsport. 

BUILDINGS. 

the buildings occupy an eminence overlooking the city, and 
are surrounded by beautiful shade trees, while the grounds contain 
six acres, affording ample room for exercise and play. The 
buildings are brick, heated by steam, provided with fire escapes, 
and supplied throughout with pure mountain water. They are 
lighted throughout with electric incandescent light. The system 
adopted embodies the latest improvements in generating and 
utilizing electricity for illuminating purposes and insures entire 
safety from fire or shock, so that the wires may be handled with- 
out danger. The value of an illuminant which consuming no 
oxygen, leaves the air perfectly pure and at the same 'time 
furnishes abundant light, cannot be over estimated. 

The main edifice, recently rebuilt and improved, compares 
favorably with the best school buildings in the country, and the 
new Chapel is the most attractive public liall in the city.' 

Both departments are fiunished with bath rooms and all modern 
appliances for comfort, and in the entire arrangement of the 
buildings great care has been taken for the comenience and 
health of the occupants. 

The ladies' apartments are entirely separate from the others, 
and there is no association of the sexes but in the presence of their 
instructors. The happy influence, viiitually exerted, in their slight 
association in the recitation room, at the table, and in the public 
exercises in the Chapel, is to be seen in the cultivation of a cheer- 
ful and animated disposition, in the formation of good habits and 
manners, in ardent devotion to study, and in the attainment of 
high moral character. These, with many other valuable results, 
have established the fact that the best plan for a school is, accord- 
ing to the evident design of Providence in the constitution of 
society, on the basis of a well-regulated Christian family. The 
members of the Faculty live in the building, eat at the same tables, 
and have constant oversight of all the students. 






51 



WILLIAMSPORT DICKINSON SEMINARY. 



PHYSICAL HEALTH. 

The value of physical culture is recognized. A large Campus, 
with very fine ball and lawn tennis grounds for the gentlemen 
and lawn tennis court for the ladies, furnishes stimulus and 
opportunity for out-door athletic sports. 

An efficient Athletic Association is organized among the 
students, under the direction of a Professor. A public enter- 
tainment is given in behalf of the Association once a year. 
A Gymnasium, forty by sixty feet, supplied with the best 
modern appliances for physical culture, is maintained for the use 
of the students, under proper regulations, for which fifty cents 
per term is charged. All young men, not physically incapacitated, 
may be required to take systematic exercise in the Gymnasium' 
from two to three hours per week. They will provide themselves 
with an appropriate gymnasium suit, including shoes. 

Suitable exercise is provided for the ladies in calisthenics and 
light gymnastics, under the direction of a competent teacher. 
^// the ladies are required to participate in these exercises, unless 
excused upon a physician's certificate. 

Lectures on health will also be given from time to time, by an 
eminent physician. 

ROOMS AND FURNITURE. 

The room^ are larger than in most boarding schools, the ladies' 
being 16 x 13 feet and the gentlemen's 20 x 9^ feet. They are 
all furnishel with bedstead, mattress, table, chairs, wardrobe, 
washstand and crockery; the ladies' with bed -springs and dress- 
ing-bureau, and if desired, any room will be entirely furnished; 
but students may provide their own sheets (for double beds)' 
pillows, pillow cases, blankets, counterpanes, carpets and mirrors^ 
and thus lessen the expense. 

EXPENSES. 



Total cost of boarding, washing, heat, light, tuition in reo-ular 
studies, and room furnished, except carpet and bed clothi 
year, jg2 12.40, as follows: 



ng, per 



Fall Term — 1(5 weeks, 
Winter Term — 12 weeks, - 
Spring Term — 12 weeks, 

Chnrch Sitting— ])er term, 
Gymnasium — per term, 
General Chemistry — per term, 
Qualitative Analysis — per term, 



$•.84.90 
63.72 
03.72 

% .50 

.50 

3.00 

4.00 



$212.40 



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PHYSICAL ITICALTII 



The value of jjlix-slcal culture is recocrni/ed. A lar-e C 



'.vltli vcrv laie liall and lawn t 
id 1 



ampus, 
ennis iM-ounds for the t/-entlciuen 



an.i lAwn tennis court for the ladies, hnnishes stiinid 
opj)(jitunit\' lor out-door athletic sports. 

A]] rlh- ient Athletic Association is oi'L^ani/ed anio 
students, undi r the 'direction of a Proft 



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tauinuiit rs «n\en in hc^haU' of the Association 
A (i\ innasiuni, {ort\' 1)\' sixt\' feet 



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once a \'ear 



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(^in appuances lor ph\'sica 



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:t\' feet, supplied with the best 
.1 cult ure, i s maintained for tlie use 



ot the students, under proper re-- ul at ions, for which iiftv cent: 



pel- term is ciiar^'cd. Ah vouno- m 



en. not physically incapacitated 



ma\ be required to take systematic exercise in the Gynniasium 
Irom two to three hours per week. The\' will ].)ro\'ide themsehes 



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1 an aj)|)r*.priate ^-\annasumi surt, includiuij- siioe 



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exercise is provided for the lathes in cah'sthe 



h\dit <nunnastics, under the directi 



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All the ladies are required to participate in 



<n\ oi a c(^nipetent teacher 



these exercise: 



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ex.:;used v\\)i)\\ a piiysician s (XM-tihcate 



Lectures on health will also b; 
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iven from time to time, b)' an 



ROOMS AND MJRXlTUPvh: 



The room ; are lander than in most boardin.^ schools, the ladie.* 
io X 13 feet arid the i^entlemen's .?0 x Q>< feet. Thev ar 



»em 



all fiun;,h.'I Willi b.-dUead, mattress, taijle, chairs, wardrob 
washstand and crocker)-; the ladies' with bed sprin</s and d 



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my room will be entirely furnished; 



but stud-nts mav provide their own sheets (for double beds) 
ijillows. nill )W casei. blan!:ets. eoiinltMihnie-^ rn-r^.-^t-.^ o.i/J on'.-.-, ..-.^ 



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llo 

i;l thu , IcNsen the ex])ense 



pillow case^, blan!:ets, counterpanes, cari)et: and 



nnrror 



KXPKNSICS. 



Total cost of boarding-, wasln'n •■, heat, livht. tuit 



studi 
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les, aiiil room turnished, 



Ion in rci'-ular 



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1 J. 40, a: 



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except carpet and bed clothi 



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]• nil ierni- 1() wcH'ks, 
WiiiUT Term — 12 weclv^j - 
SjMiii»r 'IVtiii — 12 weeks, 

('Inu'cli Sitting -]>er term, 
* i yiimasiiim — pt-r term, 
(leueiMl i liemislrv — ptT tei 
C^uulitutive Analysis — per tei 



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,50 

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FORTY-SIXTH ANNUAL CATALOGUE. 



67 



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When rooms are entirely furnished, $13.00 will be added per 
year, or ^6.00 per term, for each student. This includes all char<jes 
for furnished rooms, board, washini^(i2 plain pieces per week), 
heat, light, and tuition in Latin, Greek, Mathematics, Sciences,' 
Ethics, English and Penmanship.^ There are no e.xtras whatV^ 
everJ The charges for Music, Art, Modern Languages and 
Book-keeping are .stated elsewhere. 

We desire to emphasize this statement, because some schools, 
whose advertised rates are higher than ours, increase the e.xpenses 
still more by numerous "extras." 

W^ We ask those who are seeking education for themselves 
and parents who contemplate sending their children to a board- 
ing school, to carefully note the fact that we furnish everythin-.x 
embraced in a thoroughly equipped scho.jl, with all the comforts 
of a good home, including a large, airy and completely furnished 
room, in a beautiful and healthful location, at the low rate of 
2225.40 per year, in courses of study which prepare the student 
for business, for professional life, or for the lower or higher classes 
in college; or. if they prefer to furnish their own rooats with bed 
clothes, mirrors and carpet, for $212.40. 

Persons applying for rooms will please state whether they wish 
them furnished entirely or in part. 

DISCOUNTS. 
Special discounts are made on all bills, except tuition in Orna- 
mental Branches, when two enter from the same family at the 
same time; to all Ministers ; all persons preparing for the Ministry 
or Missionary work, and all who are preparing to teach. 

PAYMENTS. 

Term bills are payable in advance, one-half at opening and the 
balance at the middle of the term. 

Ten per cent, will be added to the orelinary rate per week for 
board, washing, heat, light, and room, when students attend a part 
of a term. No reduction in tuition for less than half a term, nor 
for furnished room for less than a term. 

Extra washing, ordinary pieces, 50 cents per dozen • ladies' 
plain gowns, 20 cents each. Meals carried to rooms, io cents 
each, or 25 cents per day. 




e«--Vt.-C. 



58 



WILLIAMSPORT DICKINSON SEMINARY. 



When students are called away by sickness or providential 
necessity, moneys advanced will be returned. Students dismissed 
or leaving without the approval of the President may be charged 
for the full term. 

Deduction for absence is made on recommendation of the 
President to the Treasurer. 

No reduction for board or tuition for absence of two weeks or 
less at the beginning, or the last four iveeks before the close of the 
term. 

Five dollars must be deposited with the Treasurer on entering, 
to cover damages that the student may do to room or otheV 
property. This will be returned when the student leaves, but not 
before, in case no injury has been done. Any. student rooming 
alone will be charged $8.00 extra per term. 

Day pupils in Primary branches will be charged $7.00, and in 
Higher branches ^14.00 per term of twelve weeks. No reduction 
in tuiton for less than half a term. 

ADMISSION. 

Pupils of good moral 'character will be received at any time, 
for a single term or longer period. 

Must arrange bills with the Treasurer before attending recita- 
tions. 

Must take at least four studies, unless excused by the Faculty. 
Must register name and church, and agree to comply with all 
rules and regulations of the school. 

Each student will be considered a member of the Institution 
until due notice shall have been given of intention to leave and 
permission obtained of the President. 

BOARDING. 

This department is under the general direction of the Presi- 
dent, but an experienced and thoroughly competent Matron has 
immediate charge. The department commends itself by cleanli- 
ness, abundance of supply, excellence of quality, good cooking 
and adaptation to health. 



fORTY-SIXTII ANNUAL CATALOGUE. 



59 



•.'♦ 



DISCIPLINE. 
The dicipline is firm, but mild and impartial. While every 
encouragement will be given to the orderly and studious, and due 
allowance be made for youthful indiscretion, yet the lawless and 
refractory cannot long remain among us. 

APPARATUS. 
The Scientific Department is furnished with very complete 
outfits of Physical and Chemical Apparatus. The Mu.seum con- 
tarns a large nu.nber of rare and valuable specimens, includinc. a 
fine collection of Minerals and Zoological and Phj-siolo-ical 
specimens. Among recent additions are the following : 
/// the Museum — 

Alcoholic specimens of the Human Heart, Brain, Stomach 
Kidneys and Intestines. 

Bock-Steger Models of Ear, Eye, Larynx. Lungs. Head and 
Brain. 

A series of Drill Cores, a collection of different Woods in the 
form of blocks, showing bark, grain and finished surface, and a 
collection of Polished Granite .specimens. 
In Physical Apparatus — 

A lloltz Machine, Gold Leaf Electroscopes, Pith Ball Electro- 
scopes. RuhmkorfifCoil. Morse Key and Register, a niodel Tele- 
graphing Machine, Queen's superior Air Pump, two large Globes 
Stdl, furnishing distilled water for all work in Chemistry Oxv- 
hydrogen Light with all accessories, and a Queen's Excelsior 
Lantern. " 

In Chemical Apparatus — 

Pair delicate Balances, sensitive to one milligram, Assay Fur- 
nace, full set of Pipetts, Buretts and Graduates for Volumetric 
Analysis. 

Rev. John A. DeMoyer and Rev. John Z. Lloyd, of the Cen- 
tral Pennsylvania Conference, have made valuable contributions 
to our Reference Library. 

POST-GRADUATE WORK. 
We are prepared to do post graduate work in Modern Lan- 
guages, Music, Art, Chemistry and Physics. 






GO 



WiLLIAMSPORT DICKINSON SEMINARY. 



MERIT AND DEMERIT. 

A daily record is kept of all the exercises of the School, from 
which record the students will be graded. A record of demerits 
is also kept. Tardiness, unexcused absences from required exer- 
cises, and all disorderly conduct, will subject the student to demerit 
marks. Such marks bring a private reproof before the Faculty, 
a public reprimand before the whole school, and may semi ilie 
oftender away. Sessional reports are sent to parents. 



~~"^~— ^ RELIGIOUS CHARACTER. 

Williamsport Dickinson Seminary is not sectarian in any sense, 
but it is positively and emphatically Christian in its admin- 
istration and work. By combining practical Christian teaching 
with thorough intellectual training, under the personal supervision 
of Christian men and women, especially qualified by education 
and experience, the School has established a reputation among 
literary institutions and won the confidence of the public in a 
degree of which its friends and patrons may be justly proud. 

RELIGIOUS SERVICES. 

Every boarding student is required to attend religious services 
in the Chapel daily, as well as public worship morning and even- 
ing every Sabbath, at such place as parents or guardians may des- 
ignate, the President assenting, unless excused. 

A Bible reading, conducted by the President, will be substituted 
for the evening service as often as may be deemed proper. 

N. B. — Each student must be supplied with a Bible, to be read, 
without note or sectarian comment, in the services of the Chapel. 
The whole school read in concert. 

To promote the spirit of worship, we advise each student to 
procure the Hymnal of the Methodist Episcopal Church, which 
is used in the Chapel services. 

A general experience meeting is held every Sabbath at half- 
past eight A. M., and generally a service of song at six P. M., 
continuing one hour. Also, a prayer meeting for the ladies and 
gentlemen on Thursday evenings. Attendance upon these social 
services is optional with the students. 



FORXr-SIXTH ANNUAL CATALOGUE. 



61 



X..^ 



#^ 



RELIGIOUS ORGANIZATIONS. 

A Young Woman's Foreign Missionary Society has been in 
successful operation for several years. This society acquires and 
diffuses missionary intelligence, creates and maintains an interest 
in ihc worl: r.f the General Society, and prepares its members for 
efficient service as centers of Christian influence at their homes 
when school days are ended. It has largely contributed to the 
education of a missionary for India. 

CANDIDATES FOR THE MINISTRY. 

A preacher who can, when necessary, conduct the singing in a 
prayer meeting and in a revival service, acquires a power for good 
which cannot otherwise be attained. Indeed, the usefulness of a 
preacher is largely augmented by a knowledge of music and 
ability to sing. Recognizing this fact, we have arranged to give 
weekly lessons in singing and careful instruction in voice culture 
to all young men who are preparing to preach, at the nominal 
co^t of one dollar per term. This provision also includes young 
women who are preparing for either home or foreign missionary 
work. 

STUDENTS OF LIMITED MP:ANS. 

We have organized a system by which a limited number of 
students may earn a part of the cost of education. 

We now give light employment, not appreciably interfering 
with study, to seventeen young men and three young women, 
paying from fifteen to thirty per cent, of bills. Applicants for 
these positions are enrolled and vacancies are filled in the order 
of application, preference being given to those in the School. 
Applicants must be recommended by their pastor, or some 
responsible person, as worthy of help. No one will be retained 
who is not earnest in his studies and faithful to all required duties. 

LITERARY P:XERCISES. 

In addition to class work, public exercises are held in the Semi- 
nary Chapel every Friday evening, at which the more advanced 
students read essays or deliver original speeches, interspersed with 
vocal or instrumental music, furnished by the Music department. 



62 



WILLIAMSPORT DICKINFON SEMINARY. 



LITERARY SOCIETIES. 

There are three nourishing Literary Societies connected with 
the Seminary — the Belles Lettrcs, the Gamma Epsilon and the 
Tripartite Union. The first two are in the gentlemen's and the 
last in the ladies' department. Each has a well-furnished hall and 
a judiciously selected library, aggregating more than two thousand 
volumes. 

HOME FEATURES. 

The Seminary is a boarding school of the highest grade, taking 
rank among the very best, with superior appointments and appli- 
ances for the health and culture of its students. It is also a well- 
ordered home. First of all, the President and his family reside in 
the building, forming a part of the school and are always acces- 
sible to all its members. The wife of the President entertains the 
Young Woman's Missionary Society once a month, in her apart- 
ments, and occasionally receives the entire school in her parlors, 
while in times of sickness she visits the students in their rooms, 
giving such suggestions and directions as the experience of a 
mother may supply. Again, the members of the Faculty are so 
distributed throughout the building as to be readily accessible at 
any time for such hclj/as the students may desire outside of the 
recitation room. Again, recognizing the value of social culture as 
a factor in preparation for a useful life, the President and Faculty 
give a formal reception once each term to the whole school in the 
Chapel, wdiich for the occasion is transformed into an attractive 
drawing-room, while weekly informal ''socials," continuing from 
thirty minutes to an hour, after the public Friday evening enter- 
tainments, relieve the monotony of routine work, culttvatea cheer- 
ful sj,)irit and meet the natural desire for social pleasures. In 
these and all practicable ways an appeal is made to the higher 
elements in the nature; mutual interest inspires mutual respect; 
opportunity is afforded to study character, and the school becomes 
a pleasant and safe Christian home, as well as a place for careful 
mental and moral training. 

INSTRUCTION. 

Our methods are modern, and adapted to the need of the 
students. No pains are spared to give thorough, practical and 






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WJLLlAMSPoRT DICKINFON SKMINARY 



LlTl'.RAKY SOCII'TIKS. 

There are three noiirisliitT^ TJlerarv Societie:, connected with 
the ')eininar\- — ihc IjcIIcs l.eUrcs, tlie (iamma ]'',|v,il()n and the 
Trij-jartite Union. ddu: tir;>l two are in the ;^enlienien's and the 
la:>t in the I.idie / dep.irlinent. ICaeh iias a well-rurnishcd hall and 
a iiidicii)usly .-.cteelcLl library ai^'^rcjatin'.' more than two thousand 

VoluUiO. 

IIOMh: l^dvYTURlCS. 
The Seminary i, a boardin^^ school of the hi'dicst p-rade, taking; 



rank anion;; the v^ry l»e 1, with sn[)eri<M- .i[)])( )intmcnts and appli- 
ances lor tile heaUh and (_ulLure of it > students. It i < also a well- 
ordered h'.)me. Imi;! of all, tlie President and his faiuily reside \n 
the buildin". formin''- .1 iJirt of the school and arc alwav^s acces- 
sible to ail it > members. Tlie wife of tlie President entertains the 
Youn^.; Woman':. Mission. uy Society once a month, in lier apart- 
ments, and occa.a'onally receives the entire school in her parlor;-, 
while in times of sickness she \i>its the students in their r(K)ms, 
;;!vin;^ .such :ai;4;;cstions and directions as the experience of a 
mother ma\' su|»i)ly. A^ain, the members of the Faculty arc so 
di liibuted throu;diout the l^iiiidiivj^ as to be rcadil}' accessible at 
an\' tiiiie for sueh lielj) as the students may desin: outside of tlie 
reeitati'»n room. A;^aiii, recof.;-nizin-- ihewilueof social culture as 
a f u tor in preparation f^>r a irseful hife, the IVesident and I^iculty 
;.;i\e a formal rec-ej)tion ouce ea< h terni to the whole school in the 
Uhai^cl, \'vlu"ch lor the occasion is transf >rmed into an attractiv^e 
diawin:; room, whiie weekh/ informal "socials," continuin;^ from 
thuty unnuics t') .m hour, after the public P'riday evening enter- 
tainments, reh'e\'e the monotony of routine work, cultfv'atca cheer- 
ful spirit .md mcel the natural desire for s(jcial pleasures. In 
these and all practicable ua\'s an appeal is made to tlie hiidicr 
clement^ in the uatme; mutual interest inspires mutual respect; 
oppoitunit}' is afford' (1 to stud\- character, and the sehool becomes 
a |)Ka.ant cUid .safe Christian home, as well as a place for careful 
mental .md moral training". 

INSTRUCTION. 

( )ur meth(jd.s a.rc modern, and adapted to the need of the 
student.^. No paui.. cU'c sp.ired to ^uve thorough, practical and 



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FORTY-STXTH ANNUAL CATALOGUE. 



63 



scholarly training in all the departments by teachers of superior 
attainments and experience. Besides instruction in connection 
with the text book, lectures illustrated by experiments are given 
from time to time. 

Students in Music have opportunity to hear distinguished 
artists, which is of great advantage in acquiring a correct taste, 
as also in enlarging their knowledge. In addition to frequent 
Organ Recitals by musicians of recognized ability, eminent musi- 
cians from a distance frequently give concerts to which our Music 
pupils are admitted at reduced rates. 

SPECIAL LECTURES. 

Special lectures in the form of familiar talks will be given each 
term by the President. These lectures will cover the discussion 
of social ethics, the care of health, how to eat, how to work, how 
to play, how to rest, current literature and current events in rela- 
tion to school life, with other subjects which may be helpful to 
young people who wish to make the most of opportunity. 

The President will also give a course of lectures to young men 
preparing for the ministry, covering such themes as may be of 
value to them as preachers, as pastors and as citizens. 

YOUNG LADIES. 

Constant and systematic efforts are made looking toward the 
general culture of the young ladies committed to our care. The 
lady members of the Faculty take personal interest in all things 
pertaining to their welfare and are intimately associated with them 
in recreation hours. 

Every Saturday short lectures are given by the Preceptress to 
all young ladies on social culture, literature, art and kindred topics. 
During the coming year, in addition to these lectures, the ladies 
of the Senior class will meet the Preceptress monthly for purposes 
of literary criticism. 

TELEGRAPHY. 

Among the physical apparatus are several telegraphing instru- 
ments, one of which, the gift of Benjamin G. Welch, Superin- 
tendent of the Williamsport and North Branch Railroad, is a very 



64 



WILLIAMSFORT DICKINSON SEMINARY. 



FORTY SIXTH ANNUAL CATALOGUE. 



65 



fine model, showing the various parts of different instruments. 
During the year a number of instruments have been placed in 
students' and teachers' rooms, affording excellent opportunity for 
study and practice to those who desire to fit themselves for prac- 
tical work in this growing branch of industry. 

TEACHERS. 

A Normal Class may be organized during the Fall and Spring 
Terms for those who desire to teach. The Course will compre"^ 
-hend special instruction by Lectures on the Theory and Methods 
of teaching by the President. No extra charge zvill be made. 

SCHOLARSHIPS. 

Mr. DeWitt Bodine, of Hughesville, Pa., an alumnus of the 
Seminary, has the honor of founding the first full scholarship in 
this Institution. It is to be filled from the public schools of 
Hughesville by competitive examinations and is designated 

Tpie DeWitt Bodine Scholarship. 

It pays all expenses of board, tuition, etc., in any regular course 
of study. 

Who will imitate Mr. Bodine's example? Are there not 
generous men and women among our alumni and friends ready to 
invest a portion of their wealth where it will be secure and work 
for God forever? A comparatively small sum will do a large 
work. The interest on a thousand dollars, in many instances, will 
supplement the meager resources of a worthy young man or 
woman whom God has given large ability, but from whom fortune 
has withheld the means to develop it. This is especially true of 
those who are called into the ministry or into missionary work. 
Any sum will help, and three thousand dollars will found a min- 
istry or missionary scholarship in this Institution and maintain it 
perpetually. 

To aid any one who may desire by gift or will to found a 
partial or full scholarship to assist worthy young men or women 
in preparing for the ministry or mission work, or for any other 
useful occupation, forms are appended which may be used : 



H^l 



L. 



I give, bequeath and devise to the Williamsport Dickinson 
Seminary, located at Williamsport, in the county of Lycoming, 

state of Pennsylvania, the sum of dollars (if 5?tocks, bonds 

or other personal property specify same), to be used for the pur- 
pose of (here state definitely the object for which the money or 
propert}' is to be used); said corporation to have and to hold and 
to employ the same for the purpose above named, and the receipt 
of the Treasurer thereof shall be a sufficient discharge to my 
executors for the same. 

If real estate to be given this form will answer : I give, bequeath 
and devise to the Williamsport Dickinson Seminary, located at 
Williamsport, in the county of Lycoming, state of Pennsylvania, 
the following lands and premises (here describe definitely); to have 
and to hold, to said corporation, its successors and assigns forever, 
the proceeds of which shall be employed in (here describe the 
object). 

The Woman's College of Baltimore proffers annually four free 
scholarships, valued at ;^I00 each, to any four young ladies of the 
graduating class who, after examination, shall be recommended 
by the President and Faculty of the Seminary. This scholarship 
continues in each case through four years, giving free tuition in 
any degree course. 

OUTFIT. 

The gentlemen should be provided with an umbrella, and a pair 
f){ slippers to be w^orn in the room. The ladies must be supplie^^ 
with thick walking shoes, an umbrella, India-rubber overshoes, 
water-proof cloak and a suit for exercise in calisthenics and light 
gymnastics. Their attire for general use should be neat and 
simple, but not elegant or expensive. All ivearing apparel must 
be plainly marked ivith full name of the owner. We suggest that 
in addition to towels, napkins and napkin ring, each pupil bring a 
knife, fork and spoon, y^r use incase of sickness. 

A WORD TO PARENTS. 

I- 8@°*Try to have your children here on the first day of the 
term, bnt not before, as we shall not be ready to receive them. 
The classes are formed on the second day, and it will be better 
for all concerned that the student start regularly with his class. 



66 



WILLIAMSPORT DICKINSON SEMINARY. 



2. If possible, do not call them away during the session. 
Absence, if only for a few days, disarranges the class, and is 
generally the beginning of irregularity on the part of the scholar. 

3. Do not allow your children to leave the School before the 
examinations, unless it cannot be avoided. Serious inconvenience 
to all concerned often arises from a neglect of this caution. 

4. Supply them very sparmgly with spending money. Parents 
cannot be too cautious on this point. 

5. Select for your child one of the instructors as a patron, to 
distribute his funds. In this way a more judicious use of your 
money will be made, and your child will be kept from many 
temptations. 

DAY STUDENTS. 

Day Students will be required to observe the following rules : 

1. Attend Chapel exercises, when their recitations come at 8 
or 9 o'clock A. M., unless excused by the President. 

2. Spend the intervals between recitations in the Study Hall. 

3. Present written excuse from parent or guardian for all 
absences, time and number of recitations being specified. 

^, Must not visit the rooms of boarders at any time without 
permission. ' 

5. The gentlemen must deposit $1.00 with the Treasurer when 
they enter, to cover damage done to Study Hall or other property^ 
This will be returned when the student leaves, but not before, 
provided no injury has been done. 

MEANS OF ACCESS. 

Williamsport is eight and a half hours from New York, six 
hours from Philadelphia, nine hours from Pittsburg, six hours 
from Baltimore, three hours from Harrisburg, and three hours 
from Elmira, and is reached directly by the Pennsylvania, the 
Philadelphia and Reading, the Northern Central and the Phila- 
delphia and P>ie railroads, which pass through the city, and as 
these have connections directly with all the great railroads, is 
readily accessible from all quarters. 



FORTY-SIXTH ANNUAL CATALOGUE. 



67 



1^ 



«u/ 



i 



graduatp:s and former students. 

It may safely be estimated that from eight to ten thousand per- 
sons have received Academic instruction, covering from one to 
three years, '-^n W^illiamsport Dickinson Seminary, while six hun- 
dred and eleven have completed thr prescribed curriculum, 
graduating \\ it h ihe degrees the Tu-titution confers. We desire 
to l^iiii^ ail these into active sympathy and co-operation with their 
Alma Mater, and hence we ask all persons to whom this notice 
may come, who hav^e been students here, to send us their address, 
w^ith any information concerning their personal history that may 
be of general interest, as we wish to compile a complete catalogue 
of all the students now living. 

There is a general meeting of the Alumni every year, the day 
before Commencement. We extend a most cordial invitation to 
all old students to attend the meeting this year, which wifl be 
held June 20, in the afternoon and evening. If you cannot come 
let us hear from you by letter. 

'And now, may I not ask you to aid in enlarging the sphere and 
increasing the power of our Alma Mater? You can do much in 
many ways, but you can at least direct those looking for a good 
Boarding School to ours, or send me their address on a postal 
card. Carry the Seminary in your heart. She is a doing a worthy 
work, and earnestly asks her sons and daughters to help her. 



68 



WiLLIAMSPORT DICKINSON SEMINARY. 



Prizes. 



The followincj prizes will be awarded during this year: 

The Prksident's Prize— The gift of the President to that 
member of the Senior or Junior Class who shall excel in writing 
and deliverini^ an oration. 



The Mrs. Gray Prize— The gift of Mrs. Edward J. Gray to 
that Student who shall excel in Readincr 

The S. O. Mingle Prize— The gift of S. Q. Mingle to that 
Student who shall be awarded the first prize in Instrumental 
Music. 

The Music Director's Prize— The gift of the Director of 
Music to that Student who shall be awarded the second prize in 
In'jtruiViental Music. 

The Miss Hoag Prize— The gift of Miss Charlotte J. Hoag 
to that Student who shall excel in German. 



The Heilner Prizes— The gift of Rev. S. A. Heilner, D. 
of Philadelphia, to those members of the Mental Philosophy Class 
who shall be awarded the first and second prizes in Mental Phil- 
osophy. 

The Judge Furst Prize— The gift of fifty Dollars by Hon. 
A. O. Furst to that member of the Senior Class who shall excel 
in writing an essay on Selected Works of Oliver Wendell 
Holmes. 

The P^acultv Prize— The gift of the Faculty to that member 
of the Rhetoric Class who sliall excel in writing and reading an 
essay. 

The Judge Sadler Prize— The gift of Hon. W. F. Sadler to 
that Student who shall excel in Algebra. 

The Miss Swartz Prize— The gift of a Gold Medal by Miss 
Bessie M. Swartz to that Member of the Elocution Department 
who shall excel in Elocution. 




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WnjJAM.-ipOIlT DICKINSON SEMINARY. 



Prizes. 



Tlic f(.!Io\vin'^ prize; will b(^ awarded duriiif/ this vcav : 

Tin: IMviv.inKNTs Pki/k— The rvift of the Tiesident to that 
meinher of tlie Senior or Junior Class who shall excel in writin^^ 
and dr]iverin^>; an oration. 



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Till- :\iKs. Gk.w 1'ki/k— The oift of Mi-;. Edward J. (irax- to 
tliat Stiidcnl who shall e>:cfl in Readiii'--. 

Till- :•; (). MixoLK Prize— The -ift of S. O. Mingle to that 
IMudcUL \\h<. shall be awarded the fu'st pri/.e in Instrumental 
rjieie. 

Tin: AP SIC Djkkctoh's Prize— The gift of the Dire^or of 
All! ie to that Student who shall be awarded the second prize in 

In- trun.enlal M ii.sic. 

'JiiK Alhs iloAc l^KizK— Tlie -ift of Miss Charlotte P lioa^ 
t»; tiKiL .Mudtiit \Cii») ,hall excel in German. 

Tin: llinxKK PinzKs- Tlie pTt of Rt:\-. S. A. Heilner, D. D., 
of Philadelphia, to those members of the Mental Idiilosopliy Class 
wlio ^lJall be awarded the first and second prizes in Alental Phil- 

' 'S .>ph\s 

'lin: Ji DCK Fi K.,T pRizK— Tlie oift of fifty Dollars by Hon. 
A. ( ). Imii- I to that member of tlie Senior Cla-.s who shall excel 
in writln;; an e; a\' on reelected Worh^: of Oliver Wendell 
1 Palmes. 

TiiK 1-Aei;i;iv 1N<IZK- -The pift e.f the l^KmltA' to that member 
(•i tlu; Klietoric CPes; who siiall excel in writiuLjand readin-j an 

es'-.ay. 

Pin: Ji IX. r: Sadi.ek I^mzi: — The [dft of if^n^ \\\ l\ S.adler to 
that !.tudent w Ik^ shall exeel in Ahvebia. 

Till' :\fi !;\VAKTZ ]*Ri/i:— ddis' r-rifi of a Cold Medal by Miss 
J'essie M. Swart/, to that Member of the P^locution Department 
who shall excel in Klocution. 



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i'ORTY-SIXTII ANNUAL CAtAtOGUE. 



69 



By-Laws. 



I 
I 



1. During the hours of study the Students shall not be un- 
necessarily absent from their rooms. 

2. At the time appointed to attend prayers, recitation, lecture, 
or other exercise, each Student shall repair quietly and promptly 
to the place designated. 

3. At no time shall any Student loiter in the halls or about 
the doors, or indulge in jumping, wrestling, loud talking, whist- 
ling, or any other unnecessary noise, OR USE TOBACCO IN 
THE BUILDINGS OR ON THE GROUNDS. 

4. The Students shall not be absent from their rooms at nip-ht 
or after the hour of study indicated by the ringing of the bell, nor 
shall they attend parties or mixed assemblies without permission 
from the President ; nor shall they at any time visit hotels or 
other places of public resort, or on any occasion indulpe in the 
use of intoxicating liquors. 

5. All profane and indecent language, pla\'ing at games of 
chance, injuring the property of the Institution or of citizens, 
quarreling, fighting, the carrying of fire-arms or other dangerous 
weapons, are strictly forbidden. 

6. No Student shall leave the corporate limits of the city for a 
longer period than one hour, witliout permission from the Presi- 
dent. 

7. Each Student will be held strictly accountable for any 
damage he or she may cause to the Seminary property. Dam- 
ages by unknown parties may be assessed on the School. 

8. The Teachers must at all times have access to the Students' 
rooms, and if it be judged necessary, the rooms will be cleaned 
at the expense of the occupants. 

9. Cleanliness of person and apparel, and a gentlemanly and 
lady-like deportment must be observed by all. 

10. No water, dirt, or other material shall be thrown from 
any window in the buildings, or in the halls after they have been 
cleaned. 



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70 



WILLIAMSPORT DICKINSON SEMINARY. 



11. Students must have their rooms swept and in order, and 
hghts extinguished at the estabhshed hours, when all must retire 
for the night. 

12. No Student will be allowed to go bathing, boating, skat- 
nig, fishing, gunning, or riding, without permission from ilic 
President. 

13. The Students must not visit the kitchen, dining-room, or 
any other room, except their own, without permission. 

.14- The Sabbath must be strictly observed by all. Visitino- 



or receiving visits will not be allowed. All must attend public 
worship twice during the daj'. 

15. No lady shall at any time receive calls from gentlemen at 
her own room. Friends from a distance can see the ladies in the 
parlor. 

16. The young ladies will not be allowed to leave the Semi- 
nary grounds at any time without permission ; and the gentlemen 
will be restricted at the discretion of the Faculty. 

17. No Student shall change his or her room, or place at the 
table, without special permission from the President. 

18. No Student will be permitted to leave the School during 
the session without an express request from the parent or guardian^, 
made to the President, and without the consent of the Faculty. 

19. Any Student who, without just cause, shall fail to attend 
the examinations, will be considered under censure. 

20. Permission to be absent from any exercise must be ob- 
tained, if possible, before the absence occurs. 

21. No Student will be permitted to leave any class without 
the consent of the Faculty. 

22. The ladies and gentlemen must not visit each other's 
apartments, walk or ride together, without permission, nor con- 
verse together from the windows. 

23. Students from the neighborhood will not be permitted to 
visit home at such times as will interfere with the regular exer- 
cises of the Schooh 



FORTY-SIXTH ANNUAL CATALOGUE. 



71 



J 



24. Any offending Student may be punished, according to 
the nature of the offense, by private or public reproof, suspension, 
dismission or expulsion. 

25. Students dismissed or expelled must leave the premises 
at once. 

* 

26. None but Students can attend the Society meetings, nor 
shall liie Societies meet together, unless by express permis.Mon of 
the President. 

27. No special meeting of the Students shall be held at any 
time, nor shall any meeting of the Students or Societies continue 
later than 9.45 o'clock P. AT, without permission of the President. 

28. All persons visiting Students at the Seminary will be re- 
quired to conform to the rules adopted for the goverment of the 
School. Visitors remaining longer than one day will be charged 
for boarding at the published rates. 

29. Any temporary prudential regulation for the government 
of the School that the Faculty may see fit to adopt shall b 
equally binding with these By-Laws. 



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J. R. ha;:]zlet, 

DEALER IN ALL KINDS OF 

^"^'all l^apcr and Window Shades, 

315 PINE STK^PF T. Wn ? ! VMSlMXn , PA. 

-%^ ^Ik. '%. -^ib. '^Sfe. ^sflfc. 

Stationery, Picture Frames, Cornices, 5tccl Enjrr n ings, Glass Shades, 

Chronios, Wax and Artists' Materials. Also 



PAINTER, QRAINER AVfi f^PHR t! ANGER- 




Kampion's IFire ilnsurance ^gencij. 



ONLY FIRST-CLASS COMPANIES RHPRHSENTED, ' 

Office, 335 F^ine Street, - William^port, IPsl. 

NIARK A. CHAIVIPION, 

Agent for Imperial of London, Scottish Union of Ec]inl)urgh, Merchants of Newark, 

Armenia of Pittsburgh. Telephone 3122. 






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INSURANCE C0MPAME5 

That have stood the test for more than a century, represented by 



UNION INSl Ur<Q rn 



327 Pine Street, 



WILLI AMSPORT, PA. 



Telephone 2804. 



THOMPSON, GIBSON & CO., 

Dry Goods and Dm peri es, 

Attractive in Quality, Style and Price. 



CORNER FOURTH AND PINE STREETS, 



WILLI AMSPORT, 



PENNA. 



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F^sluoTinble M crcl]aiil Tailor, 

AST) ri:OTHiE.R 



— AL50 — 



Dealer in Trunks, Gents' Furnishin- rjDoJs. &c. 

Speciai Prices to flinisters and students. 





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liLTjJ 1I:S 6c P>( 

3A3 t^INK STREET, 

Our assortment, of seasonble 

... FOOTWEAR.. . 

IS the largest we have ever shown, and prices below 

competition. 



DENTISTS, 



S.W. Cor. Third nncl ^arko! S;rjjt:,,wmu.ii3port, Pa. 

First-Class Dental Work at Reasonable Prices. 

To obviate the necessity of wearing plates, we make 
Crown and Bridge Work a Specially. 

PAINLESS EXTRACTION. 

Appointments made by ra.iil or telephone. 



A. D. LUNDY & Co. 

Offer extraordinary inducements to wholesale buyers of 

School @ Office Stationery, 

Wall Paper, Window Shades, Blank Books, 
Wrapping Paper, Paper Bags. 

PAPER OR EVERY I3ESORIPXION. 

CORRESPONDENCE SOLICITED. 

Retail '»^ :■• .iii:»,^iu, a'^n ^ry.2t Hasl Tl-i:;- -street. 



J. M. DUNCAN & SON, 

HEADQUARTERS FOR 

Crockerg, Tir^waie, ]^otions, 

HOUSEFURNISHING GOODS, JEWELRY, 

TOYS AND <?T\T10NERY, 

5' and lO Cent Guudb, Spt\ ialiit -, Etc., 

No. 36 East Third Street, 

___VV^ILLIAMSPORT, - PENNA. 



^ 



^c\\ \^()vk (Jcillciy, 




CHAS. A. SWEET. Manager. 

Kine Worl^ a Specialty 

COR, Third and pine Sxrkets, 

Williamsport, IPsl. 



WHOT ESA T.E C Rr>r FRS 

OFFER FULL STOCK, FRESH GOODS, 

Sugar, Synip, Tea, Coffee, Tnbacco, Canned Fmit, Cheese, 

FLOUR, SOAP, CHOICE TUB BUTTER, Etc. 

G-OOID GrOOHDS .A.T XjCD^^ IPIRICES. 

Goods delivered to all parts of the City. 

Cor. Fourtli and ^ITilliam Streets, V^illiamsport, Pa. 



C. C. WALKER, D.D.S. 



N. E. Corner Third and Market Sts. 



Over Mussina's Jewelry store. 



WILLIAMSPORT, PA. 



TELEPHONE :-!°''™^' 1263. 

(Residence, 373. 



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DUBLD & CORNELL 




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ffiKidi^iN nnDinnKriniivr^ 



CORNER FOURTH AND FINE STREETS 
PARTICULAR ATTENTION GIVEN TO COMPOUNDING PRESCRIPTIONS 



WE HAVE IN OUR ESTABLISHMENT WHAT IS CLAIMED 
TO BE THE FINEST SODA WATER rOU/STA!N IN THE 
UNITED STATES. CALL AND SEE IT 



TOILET PREPARATIONS 



HAIR, TGDTH, NAIL SliP CL9TH BRUSHES, PERFUMES 
SlfD FANCY ARTICLES AT LOWEST PRICES. 



SrEClAL F?ATE5 TO STUDENTS 




GEORGE BUBB X SOXS, 



ofe^ale ( I rr>eeis 




ai^d "Jca j leal 






Willian^sport, Pa. 



A. R. HINCKLEY & CO., 
Seminary Book Store. 



A Complete Stock o[ Seminary Books Constantly on Hand. 

SCHOOL SUPPLIES OF EVERY DESCRIPTION. 

Any Books not in stock will be ordered immediately. 

5econd-hand books a specialty— bought, sold and exchanged 

Fine Stationery, C I les, Prayer Books and Hymnals. 

A BEAUTIFUL LINE OF GRADUATING PRESENTS. 

119 ^^f^ST I CM f?'l II ^T %TIl i I %iiSrOKT ¥'1, 

Academy of Music BuHding. 



J. J. BIRCHARD^ 

BAKERY, CONFECTIONERY 
AND ICE CREAM PaRLuRS 

PF?9nPT ATTENTION Gl'i/EN TO ORDERS 

CornerTiiud ma a t.;uU-mv Streets, 

—WILLiAMSPORT. PA. 



.ffl&'.j--^. ___ 




George P. Xrai., 

iilinery and No! ions, 



—^-' 337 PINE SXREHT, 

^VILLIAMSPORX, 



PA. 







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& Mi k'i)!C, 



Fire Insuraiice and Real Esia 

SUSQUEHANNA TRUST BUILDING, 

Williamsport, - = Penna. 



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J. PAUL SUESS, Ph. G. 

DRUGGIST AND CHEMIST 

31 West poartr? Street, WmiilflJVISPORT, PA. 



T. J. FUNSTON. 



H. U. CLAPP. 



T. J. Funsl 



FRANK S. CLAPP. 



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Headquarters for Baby Carriages and Refricr- 
erators. Dealer in Hardware, White Leall 
Oils, Glass and Building Hardware. Beltin^^ 
and Saw Mill supplies a specialty, and Agents 
for E. C. .4tkin & Co.'s Mill Saws. Agricul- 
tural Implements. Also Agents for the South 
Bend Chilled Plows, Masury's Mixed Paints 
Carnage Hardware 

22 EAST THIRD STREET, WILLIAMSPORT, PA. 




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