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Full text of "Annual catalogue of Williamsport Dickinson Seminary for the academic year : from .."

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Annual Cataloome 



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WILLIAMSPORT 




ICKINSON Si''*' 






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FOR THE ACADEMIC YEAR 



FROM 



September 7, 1805, to June 18, 1896 



WILLIAMSPORT, PA. 



WILLIAMSPORT, PA.: 

GAZETTE AND BULLETIN PRINTING HOUSE. 

1896. 



Calendar. 






Terms and Vncations. 



1895. 

2 September, Monday—Fall Teriu uiivuvd. 
23 November, Saturday— Anniversary Belles Lettres Union Society. 
18 December, Wednesday— Fall Term closed. 



1896. 

FALL TERM 



Opens Monday, September 7, and closes Wednesday, 
December 16. Vacation eighteen days. 



1897. 
WINTER TERM 



Opens Monday, January 4, and closes Monday, March 29. 
No vacation. 



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1897. 

SPRING TERM 



Opens Monday, March 29, and closes June 17. 
eleven weeks. 



Vacation 



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1896. 

6 January, Monday— Winter Term opened. 

30 January, Thursday— Day of Prayer for Colleges. 

19 March, Thursday— Reception in Bradley HaU. 

20 March, Friday— Dedication of Bradley Hall. 
30 March, Monday— Winter Term closed. 

30 March, Monday— Spring Term opened. 

18 April, Saturday— Anniversary Gamma Epsilon Society. 

27 April, Monday— Pantomime, ''The Mistletoe Boueh.'' 

21 May, Thursday— Music Recital. 

23 May, Saturday— Anniversary of Tripartite Union Society 
29 May, Friday— Final Examinations of Senior Class. 
4 June, Thursday— President and Mrs. Gray's Reception to Senior Cla^s. 

10 June, Wednesday— Annual Examinations. 

11 June, Thursday— Annual Examinations. 

12 June, Friday— Annual Examinations. 

12 June, Friday, 8 P. M.— Exercises of Sophomore (lass. 

14 June, Sunday, 3 P. M.— Annual Sermon by Rev. Earl Cranston, D D 

14 June, Sunday, 6 P. M.— Song Service on Campus and Address bv Dr* 

Cranston. ^ 

15 June, Monday, 8 P. M.— Prize Contest in Music. 

16 June, Tuesday, 9 A. M.— Prize Contest in Essays. 
16 June, Tuesday, 10 A. M.— Class Day (Seniors).^ 

16 June, Tuesday, 2 P. M.— Exercises of Junior Class. 

16 June, Tuesday, 8 P. M.— Prize Contest in Elocution. 

17 June, Wednesday, 9 A. M.— Prize Contest in Oratory. 

17 June, Wednesday, 10 A. M.— Reunion of Gamma Epsilon Society 

17 June, Wednesday, 2:30 P. M.-Literary Meeting of Alumni Association. 

17 June, Wednesday, 7 P. M.-Business Meeting of Alumni Association. 

i« t''''^' Wednesday 8 P M -Reunion and Banquet of Alumni Association. 

18 June, Thursday, 9:30 A. M.— Commencement. 

17 June, Wednesday, 2 P. M.— Meeting of the Board of Directors 

18 June, Thursday, 2 P. M.— Annual Meeting of the Stockholders 
18 June, Thursday, 2:30 P. M.— Annual Meeting of the Directors 



Board of Directors. 



Hon. JOHN PATTON, President, Curwensville. 

WILLIAM F. THOMPSON, Esq., Secretary, Williamsport. 

GEORGE W. HIPPLE, Esq., Lock Haven. 

LOUIS Mcdowell, Esq., Willlamsport. 

THOMAS H. MURRAY, Esq., Cleariield. 

J. COLE GREEN, Esq., Williamsport. 

B. C. BOWMAN, Esq., Williamsport. 

Hewitt BODINE, Esq., Hughesville. 

Hon. DANIEL H. HASTINGS, Bellefonte. 

Hon. THOMAS BRADLEY, Philadelphia. 

Hon. H. C. McCORMICK, Williamsport. 

Mrs. ELIZABETH S. JACKSON, Berwick. 

JOHN SANKEY, Esq., Mifflinburg. 



E. J. GRAY, Steward and Treasurer. 
Miss ESTELLA M. FOLLMER, Book-keeper. 
Miss LYDIA TAYLOR, Matron. 
Mrs. M. HAINES, Assistant Matron. 



Visiting Committees. 



CENTRAL PENNSYLVANIA CONFERENCE. 



Rev. B. C. CONNER. 
Rev. JOSEPH GRAY. 
Rev. J. A. DeMOYER. 
Rev. JOHN HORNING. 
Rev. O. S. METZLER. 
Rev. S. D. WILSON. 



Rev. J. F. ANDERSON. 
Rev. S. B. EVANS. 
Rev. F. W. CURRY. 
Rev. W. C. HESSER. 
Rev. G. W. STEVENS. 
Rev. M. V. GANOE. 
Rev. J. B. SHAVER. 



PHILADELPHIA CONFERIiNCE. 



Rev. F. a. gilbert. 

Rev. henry FRANKLAND. 



Rev. L. B. HOFFMAN. 
Rev. S. W. smith. 



BALTIMORE CONFERENCP:. 



Rev. WATSON CASE. 



Rev. JAS. McLAREN. 



Alumni Organization. 



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OFFICERS. 



Hon. J. L. SPANGLER, President. 

L N. SWOPE, Esq., Vice-President. 

Miss MARY L. REIDER, A. B., Recording Secretary. ^— 

Miss HELEN E. WILSON, B. S., Corresponding Secretary 

Rev. C. W. BURNLEY, A. B., Treasurer. 



EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE. 



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Rev. C. W. BURNLEY, A. B. 

THOS. M. B. HICKS, A. B. 

Miss AUGUSTA H. GILMORE, M. E. L 

Miss MAUD L. MITCHELL, B. S. 

Miss ANNA SLATE, M. E. L. 

Miss LUCY BURNLEY, B. S. 

Miss MARGARET RUSSELL, M. E. L. 



ORATION. 



THOS. M. B. HICKS, A. B. 



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ADDRESS. 

Mrss CHARLOTTE C. EVEKETT, M. E. L., 

Oxford. 



RECITATION. 



Miss MINNIE A. MENGES. 



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WILLIAMSPORT DICKINSON SEMINARY. 



FOETY-EIGHTH ANNUAL CATALOGUE. 



I c^l C LI I i V . 



Rev. EDWARD JAMES GRAY, D. D., President, 

Ethics arid Logic. 

HELEN ELIZABETH AVILSON, B. S., Preceptress, 
Frenchy History and Literature. 

CLARENCE LOOMIS PEASLEE, A. M., 
Ancient Languages. 

WILLIAM ASBURY CASE, M. S., 
Mathematics. 

WILLIAM JOSEPH DOUGLASS, B. S., 
Natural Science. 

HARRY REED VanDEUSEN, A. B., 

Latin and Rhetoric, 

MARY STUART CRUICKSHANKS, 

Gerhum. 

HARRY WARD PYLES, B. E., 
Academic Department. 

CHARLOTTE CRITTENDEN EVERETT, M. E. L., 
Assistant in Academic Department. 

Mrs. JULIA LAWRANCE GASSAWAY, 
Painting and Drawiyig. 

HERMINE FRIEDA BOPP, 
Director Instrumental Music, 



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JESSIE LOUISE ANDREWS, A. B., 
Assistant in Instrumented Music. 

ESTELLA MAY McGEE, 
Vocal 3Iusic, 

HELLS liROMLLi WELSH, 
Elocution and Physical Culture. 

ESTELLA MAY FOLLMER, M. E. L., 

Book-keeping. 



LECTURES, 1 895-1 896. 

Bishop JOHN H. VINCENT, 
Tom and His Teachers. 

BARNARD BIXBY, OF London, 

Rughy and Arnold. 



GEORGE KENNAN, 
Convict Life in Siberia. 



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HANNIBAL WILLIAMS, 
Shakespearean Recntal—The Taming of the Shrew. 






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WILLIAMSPORT DICKINSON SEMINARY. 



General Information. 



WILLIAMsiUlM DiiKlX^ON SEMINARY 

Is an institution of high grade, with aniph- facilities for 
giving young ladies and gentlemen a superior educatirMi. 
It is organized upon the plans which have be^n approved 
by long experience, and adopted by the best schools in 
this country, embracing all modern appliances in means 
and methods of instruction. It was founded in 1848, and 
is regularly chartered by the Legislature of the state of 
Pennsylvania, and authorized to confer degrees upon 
those who complete the prescribed Courses of Study. 

The Seminary is under the patronage of the Central 
Pennsylvania Conference, being owned and practically 
managed by the Preachers' Aid Society. As this invest- 
ment w^as rather to promote the important work of 
higher Christian education than to make money, the 
paramount purpose is to combine thorough instruction 
and careful moral training with the comforts of a good 
home, at the lowest possible rates. 

LOCATION. 

Williamsport is one of the most beautiful and health- 
ful places in the state. It has never been subject to 
epidemics of any kind. Many coming to the school in 
poor health have returned fully restored. The city is 
Situated on the West Branch of the Susquehanna River, 
has a population of thirty thousand, is widely known for 
its intelligence, its enterprise, the taste displayed in the 
character of its public buildings and private residences, 
and the moral appliances with which it is furnished. In 
small towns and villages the facilities for culture — intel- 
lectual as well as aesthetic and moral — are generally 
limited, rarely reaching beyond the institution itself, and 
hence student life must become monotonous, lacking the 
inspiration which a larger place with wider opportuni- 
ties affords. Forty churches, an active temperance or- 



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BRADLEY HALL. 



WILLIAMSPORT I)lCIvI^'SON SEMINAKV 



General in f o r r n at i o n . 



WIJ.LJAMSPOKT DK^KIN80^ .SEMINARY 

i>^ an iustitutioii of hioii onule, with aiiiplc^ facilities for 
gi\'iiig yoiino' ladies and .ueiitleiiKai a superior education, 
tt is organizc^d upon the plans wiiicli have been approved 
hy long experience, and a dopted by the best schools in 
this country, embracing all niod(M'n a]>pliances in means 
and methods of instructioji. It was founded in 1848, and 
is regularly chartered by the Legislature of the state of 
Pennsylvania, and authorized to confer degrees upon 
those who complete the prescribed Courses of Study. 

The Seminary is under the patronage of the Central 
Pennsylvania Conference, being owned and practically- 
ijjanaged by the Preachers' Aid Society. As this invest- 
liient was rather to promote the important work of 
higher Christian education than to make money, the 
paramount purpose is to combine thorough instruction 
and careful moral training vvitli the comforts of a good 
home, at tin- lowest possible rates. 

LOCATiOX. 

Williamsport is one of tlie most beautiful and health- 
ful places in the state. It has never been subject to 
epidemics of any kind. Many coming to the school in 
poor health have returned fully restored. The city is 
Situated on the West Branch of the Susquehanna liiver, 
has a po])ulalion of thirty thousand, is widely known for 
its inteliigimce, its enterprise, the taste displayed in the 
character of its public buildings and private residences, 
and the moral appliances with which it is furnished. In 
small towns and villages the facilities for culture — intel- 
l(MLual as well as aesthetic and moral — are generally 
Jimited, rarely reaching beyond the institution itself, and 
hence student life must become monotonous, lacking the 
inspiration ^^'hicll a larger place with wider opportuni- 
ties aliords. Forty churches, an active temperance or- 




BRADLEY HALL. 



FORTY-EIGHTH ANNUAL CATALOGUE. 



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ganization, and a branch of the Young Men's Christian 
Association, embracing many of the most earnest Chris- 
tians in the community, with a large library, free to all, 
and accessible at all times, indicate some of the religious 
influences brought to bear upon the young in Williams- 

]»nrL 

BUILDINGS. 



The buihliags occupy an eminence overlooking H '^ 
city, and are surrounded by beautiful shade trees, wiiiie 
the grounds contain six acres, affording ample room for 
exercise and play. The buildings are brick, heated by 
steam, provided with fire escapes, and supplied through- 
out with pure mountain water. They are lighted through- 
out with electric incandescent light. The system adopted 
embodies the latest improvements in generating and 
utilizing electricity for illuminating purposes and in- 
sures entire safety from fire or shock, so that the wires 
may be handled without danger. The value of an illumi- 
nant which, consuming no oxygen, leaves the air perfectly 
pure and at the same time furnishes abundant light, 
cannot be over-estimated. 

The main edifice, recently rebuilt and improved, com- 
pares favorably with the best school buildings in the 
country, and the new Chapel is among the most attract- 
ive public halls in the city. 

Both departments are furnished with bath rooms and 
all modern appliances for comfort, and in the entire 
arrangement of the buildings great care has been taken 
for the convenience and health of the occupants. 

The ladies' apartments are entirely separate from the 
others, and there is no association of the sexes but in the 
presence of their instructors. The happy influence, mutu- 
ally exertedj in their slight association in the recitation 
room, at the table, and in the public exercises in the 
IChapel, is to be seen in the cultivation of a cheerful and 
animated disposition, in the formation of good habits 
and manners, in ardent devotion to study, and in the 
attainment of high moral character. These, with many 
other valuable results, have established the fact that the 
best plan for a school is, according to the evident design 
of Providence in the constitution of society, on the basis 



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WILLIAMSPORT DICKINSON SEMINARY. 



FORTY-EIGHTH ANNUAL CATALOGUE. 



11 



of a well-regulated Christian family. The members of the 
Faculty live in the building^ eat at the same tables, and have 
constant oversight of all the students. 

BRAi 1.EY HALL. 

The new ^Uiisic aini .\ii iluiliiiiig, iiaiiji-d lor Hon. 
Thomas T^rndley, of P1n]nn."]|il]in, is nii iiii])nsii!i^ strm*- 
ture, eighr\ live feet lof!;.;, ulty feet deep and four shii i.^s 
high. In ai\iiUectural design and ^syuiluAic ornamen- 
tation it represents a vei*y high type of utility and 
beauty. 

This commodious building is a part of a long-cherished 
purpose to provide a modern Music and Art conserva- 
tory which, in equipment of space and appliances, as 
well as in method and character of work, shall meet the 
increasing demand for wider oppdrtunity and broader 
culture in what has come to be esteemed an important 
factor in the higher education of young people. We 
offer advantages for the study of music, which compare 
favorably with the best music schools in this country, 
with the atmosphere of a high-toned literary institution 
and the safe-guard of a refined Christian home. 

Our Director and assistant teachers have studied 
abroad, as well as in the best schools in this country, and 
are thoroughly conversant with the latest and best 
methods of instruction. 

While chiefly devoted to the study of Music and Art, 
provision is made in Bradley Hall for a large and well- 
furnished gymnasium and bowling alley, with lockers, 
baths and all modern appliances for health and comfort 
added; as also a capacious Society Hall, a reading room 
and library. It is joined by an enclosed bridge with the 
main building of the Seminary, affording easy and shel- 
tered communication at all times for the young ladies. 

HEALTH. 

The value of physical culture is recognized. A large 
CJampus, with very fine ball and lawn tennis grounds for 
the gentlemen and lawn tennis court for the ladies, fur- 
nishes stimulus and opportunity for out-door athletic 
sports. 



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An eflScient Athletic Association is organized among 
the students, under the direction of a Professor. A pub- 
lic entertainment is given in behalf of the Association 
once a year. A Gymnasium, forty by sixty feet, supplied 
with the best rnrMiprri nppliniK o^^ for pliv^'icnl r-nltiire, is 
niainliiiiHMl Wn- ihc use of !h<* ^m! Ipnicn, niHhr prn])(^r 
r<\Uiilali<>ns, Tor whirh \\U\ (cnis |>cr term i,s ciiurgLHl. 
All yoinii^" inrii, uni j.hvsirnllv iii«Mpn<-itnto<1, ninv b'^ 
i«Mjniicd to take systematic exercise in I he (Jviimn nnu 
from two to three hours per week. They will pi ovide 
themselves with an appropriate gymnasium suit, includ- 
ing shoes. 

Lectures on health will also be given from time to 
time, by an eminent physician. 

ROOMS AND FURNITURE. 

The rooms are larger than in most boarding schools, 
the ladies^ being 16 x 13 feet and the gentlemen's 20 x 9i 
feet. They are all furnished with bedstead, mattress, 
table, chairs, wardrobe, washstand and crockery; the 
ladies' with bed-springs and dressing-bureau, and if 
desired, any room will be entirely furnished ; but students 
may provide their own sheets (for double beds), pillows, 
pillow cases, blankets, counterpanes, carpets and mir- 
rors, and thus lessen the expense. 

EXPENSES. 

Total cost of boarding, washing, heat, light, tuition 
in regular studies, and room furnished, except carpet and 
bed clothing, per year, |212.40, as follows: 



FaU Term — 15 weeks, 
Winter Term — 12 weeks, 
Spring Term — 12 weeks, 

Church Sittings — per term, - 
Gymnasium — per term, - 
General Chemistry— per term. 
Qualitative Analysis-— per term, 



$84.96 
63.72 
63.72 

$ .50 

.50 

- 3.00 

4.00 



$212.40 



Without tuition in any department: 

Fall Term, . . - - - 

Winter Term, . . - - 

Spring Term, . • - - - 



$67.63 
50.72 
50.72 



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WILLIAMSPOET DICKINSON SEMINARY. 



FORTY-EIGHTH ANNUAL CATALOGUE. 



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When rooms are entirely furnished, |13.00 will be 
added per year, or |6,00 per term, for each student. This 
includes all charges for furnished rooms, board, washing 
(12 plain pieces per week), heat, light, and tuition in 
J.atm, Greek, Mathematics, Sciences, Ethics, English 
and Penmanship. There are no extras whatever. The 
charges for Music, Art. Modern !.;n.-,ia-,s and IJoul.- 
keeping are stated elsuuii^ic. 

We dcaire to emplinsize this statement, because some 
schools, whose advertised rates are higher than ours, 
increase the expenses still more by numerous "extras." 
- We ask those who are seeking education for them- 
selves and parents who contemplate sending their chil- 
dren to a boarding school, to carefully note the fact that 
we furnish everything embraced in a thoroughly equip- 
ped school, with all the comforts of a good home, includ- 
ing a large, airy and completely furnished room, in a 
beautiful and healthful location, at the low rate of 
$225.40 per year, in courses of study which prepare the 
student for business, for professional life, or for the lower 
or higher classes in college; or, if they prefer to furnish 
their own rooms with bed-clothes, mirrors and carnet 
for 1212.40. 

Persons applying for rooms will please state whether 
they wish them furnished entirely or in part. 

DISCOUNTS. 

Special discounts are made on all bills, except tuition 
in Ornamental Branches, when two enter from the same 
family at the same time; to all Ministers; all persons 
preparing for the Ministry or Missionary work, and all 
who are preparing to teach. 

PAYMENTS. 

Term bills are payable in advance, one-half at opening 
and the balance at the middle of the term. 

Ten per cent, will be added to the ordinary rate per 
week for board, washing, heat, light, and room, when 
students leave before the end of the term. No reduction 
in hoarding or tuition for less than half a term, nor for 
furnished room for less than a term. 



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Extra washing, ordinary pieces, 50 cents per dozen; 
ladies' plain gowns, 20 cents each. 

Meals in dining room after regular tahle^ 10 cents extra. 
Meals carried to rooms, in case of sickness, 10 cents 
each, or 2r> ronts per day. 

Wli.-n students are called away by sickness ov irovi- 

dc'iiii;!! fiece.ssii^y, iiu>ueys ndyanced will be returiK'd, 

subject in roiidif iniis stated above. Stndont'^ ni^Tnis^^od 

or leci\iug w iiltont flie approval of the !*fr hlent may be 

charged for the full term. 

Deduction for absence is made on recommendation of 
the President to the Treasurer. 

ISfo reduction for hoard or tuition for ahsence of two weeks 
or less at the beginning, or the last four iveeks before the close 

of the term. 

Five dollars must be deposited by gentlemen and two 
dollars by ladies with the Treasurer on entering, to cover 
damages that the student may do to room or other prop- 
erty. This will be returned when the student leaves, 
but not before, in case no injury has been done. Any 
student rooming alone will be charged |8.00 extra per 
term. 

Day pupils in Primary branches will be charged $7.00, 
and in Higher branches |14.00 per term of twelve weeks. 
No reduction in tuition for less than half a term. 

ADMISSION. 

Pupils of good moral character will be received at any 
time, for a single term or longer period. 

Must arrange bills with the Treasurer before attend- 
ing recitations. 

Must take at least four studies, unless excused by the 

Faculty. 

Must register name and church, and agree to comply 
with all rules and regulations of the school. 

Each student will be considered a member of the Insti- 
tution until due notice shall have been given of intention 
to leave and permission obtained from the President. 

BOARDING. 

This department is under the general direction of the 
President, but an experienced and thoroughly competent 



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WILLIAMSPORT DICKINSON SEMINARY. 



FORTY-EIGHTH ANNUAL CATALOGUE. 



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Matron has immediate charge. The department com- 
mends itself by cleanliness, abundance of supply, excel- 
lence of quality, good cooking, and adaptation to health. 

DISCIPLINE. 

The discipline is firm, 1.11 i liiiM.in.l iiiij.;iri i;il. Whil.' 
every enc()Uf;meiii(.-iii. uill he j^iven fr^ ihi- ordorlv and 
studious, aiii! .hip nllrnvnrH-,. ]^,• tii-ii!,. loi- y,,ii( lifdl imlis- 
cretion, yei ihr hnsl-^ss Jin.l i-efractory Laiinut luu^ re- 



main among us. 



APPARATUS. 



The Scientific Department is furnished with very com- 
plete outfits of Physical and Chemical Apparatus. The 
Museum: contains a large number of rare and valuable 
specimens including a fine collection of Minerals and 
Zoological and Physiological specimens. Among recent 
additions are the following: 

In the Museum — 

Alcoholic specimens of the Human Heart, Brain, 
fetomach, Kidneys and Intestines. 

Bock-Steger Models of Ear, Skin, Eve, Larynx, 
Alimentary Canal, Lungs, Head and Brain.' 
^ A series of Drill Cores, a collection of different Woods 
in the form of blocks, showing bark, grain and finished 
surface, and a collection of Polished Granite specimens. 
In Physical Apparatus — 

A Holtz Machine, Gold Leaf Electroscopes, Pith Ball 
Electroscopes, Ruhrakorff Coil, Morse Key and Register a 
model Telegraphing Machine, Queen's superior Air Pump 
two large Globes, Still, furnishing distilled water for all 
work in Chemistry, Oxyhydrogen Light with all acces- 
sories, and a Queen's Excelsior Lantern. 

In Chemical Apparatus — 

Pair delicate Balances, sensitive to one milligram 
Assay Furnace, full set of Pipetts, Buretts and Gradu- 
ates for Volumetric Analysis. 

Rev. John A. DeMoyer and Rev. John Z. Lloyd, of the 
Central Pennsylvania Conference, have made valuable 
contributions to our Reference Library. 



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POST-GRADUATE WORK. 

We are prepared to do post-graduate work in Modern 
Languages, Music, Art, Chemistry and Physics. 

MERIT AND DEMERIT. 

A iLiily record is l.^^pt of nil ih(^' exercises of i lie sclH»n1, 
fiDiii wiiiili reconl the students w iii be graded. A 
rerord of d orn on ts ir hIro l;npt„ Tnrdiness, uuexcused 
absences from reqiinv ! (^xercises, jin 1 ill disorderly < od 
duct, will subject the student to demerit nuu ks. .Such 
marks bring a private reproof before the Faculty, a pub- 
lic reprimand before the whole school, aud may send the 
offender away. Sessional reports are sent to parents. 

HONORS. 

No student whose deportment is under 11 will be 
allowed to contest for class honors. 

RELIGIOUS OHARAOTER. 

Williamsport Dickinson Seminary is not sectarian in 
any sense, but it is positively and emphatically Christian 
in its administration and work. By combining practical 
Christian teaching with thorough intellectual training, 
under the personal supervision of Christian men and 
women, especially qualified by education and experience, 
the school has established a reputation among literary 
institutions and has won the confidence of the public in n 
degree of which its friends and patrons may be justly 
proud. 

RELIGIOUS SERVICES. 

Every boarding student is required to attend religious 
services in the Chapel daily, as well as public worship 
morning and evening every Sabbath, at such place as 
parents or guardians may designate^ the President assent- 
ing, unless excused. 

A Bible reading, conducted by the President, will be 
vsubstituted for the evening service as often as may be 
deemed proper. 

]^^ B, — Each student must be supplied with a Bible, to 



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WILLIAMSPOET DICKINSON SEMINARY. 



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be read, mthout note or sectarian comment, in the services 
of the Chapel. The whole school read in concert 

To promote the spirit of worship, we advise each 
stiident to procure the Hymnal of the Methodist Episco- 
pal Church, which is used in the Chapel services. 

A general experience meetiii- i. l,,!,! every Sul.l.uLh 
at half-past eight A. M., and generally ;; s.i-. iVo of song 
at SIX P. M., coiith.nin- mio hour. Also, a prayer ;in(l 
praise meeting for the ladies and -<'ntleiiii-ii .•n Ucdnes- 
day evenings. Attendance upuu iliese social services is 
optional with the students. 



EELIGIOUS ORGANIZATIONS. 

A Young Woman's Foreign Missionary Society has 
oeen in successful operation for several years This 
• society acquires and diffuses missionary 'intelligence 
creates and maintains an interest in the work of the 
(general Society, and prepares its members for efficient 
service as centres of Christian influence at their homes 

TntL^""^^^^^^ r^ ^''^^^- " ^^« largely contributed 
to the education of a missionary for India. 

CANDIDATES FOR THE MINISTRY. 

mtilT^v^L^^'' T' ^^'''' necessary, conduct the sing- 
a D«wt^fnJ "^^^'l?^^^ in a revival service, acquires 

lude^ f/r ^V^ ^^'''} '^^"^* otherwise be attained, 
ludeed, the usefulness of a preacher is largely augmented 

^V^^ fact we have arranged to give weeklv lessons 
«n singing and careful instruction in voice culture to all 
young men who are preparing to preach, at the nominal 
cost of one dollar per term. This provision also includes 
young women who are preparing for either home or 
foreign missionary work. 

STUDENTS OF LIMITED MEANS. 

We have organized a system by which a limited num- 
ber of students may earn a part of the cost of education. 

We now give light employment, not appreciably inter- 
fering with study, to seventeen young men and three 



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WILLIA.MSPOET DICKINSON SEMINARY. 



of%lTo r. "■''^',"'^n?'' "'■ "''^"''"" '"""""^' ^n ^^^ services 
ot the (. hape]. Tlio Avhole school vend in concert 

lo proHK^te the spirif of worship, we advise each 
snideTit to procure the llvnmal of the Methodist Episco- 
Vi\l ('hnrch, whicli is nsed in the Chapel services. 

A jiT'neral exixM-ienco meetino- is held everv Sabbath 
at half-past eight A. M., and o-enerally a service of son?- 
at six r. M., continninii- one honr. Also, a prayer and 
praise meetino- for the ladies and gentlemen on Wednes- 
day evenings. Attendance npon these social services is 
optional Avith the students. 



KE LTO TOTT S OV.G A mZ A TTOXS. 

A Young Woman's Foreign Missionarv Societv has 
been in successful operniion for several years ' This 
society acquires and diffuses missionarv 'intel'lioence 
creates and maintains an interest in the work of the 
(.eneral Society, and i»i-e],ares its members for efficient 
service as centres of Christian influence at their homes 
when school days are ended. Tt has largely contributed 
to Ihe education of a missionary for India. 

CANDIDATES FOR THE MINISTRY. 

in-nrfn^f ''■'"' '?•"' ''■'^"" "ecessary, conduct the sing- 
•1 nowPr^ Zr^' 'footing and in a revival service, acquires 
hirWd tlu?n5f'? ''■''•'i' ^■''^^"^•^ otherwise be attiined. 
l^Tvr^^^r T" ''^ '" ^^'"'^'"'^ '« ''-^^^'^^.^ augmented 
,<. t his f\ f ■" ' 1 '""'" '"^^ ^^''^'^y to «5ng. Recogniz- 
ug this fact, we have arranged to give weeklv lessons 

.n singing and careful instnu^lion in'^voice cnltureTo a 
.voiing men who are preparing to preach, at the nominal 
<<.st of o>,c dollar per Urm. This provision also includes 
young women who are preparing for either home or 
!oreign missionary work. 

STUDENTS OF LIMITED MEANS. 

We have organized a system by which a limited num- 
ber of students may earn a ].art of the cost of education. 

\Ve now give lighl employmeni, not appreciablv inter- 
f( ring with study, U. seventeen young men and three 



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00 
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"f; >\ 




FORTY-EIGHTH ANNUAL CATALOGUE. 



17 



V^ 



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young women, paying from fifteen to thirty per cent, of 
bills. Applicants for these positions are enrolled and 
vacancies are filled in the order of application, prefer- 
ence being given to those in the school. Applicants 
must be recoirnn mied by their pastor, or some respon- 
jsible pertson, as \rorthy of help, ^^o onn will fw- rofnino/i 
wlio is not earnest in his suhM^-s an^l faithful to all re- 
<jMi red da Lies. 

LITEUARY EXEK( !SI]S. 

In addition to class work, public exercises are held in 
the Seminary Chapel every Friday evening, at which the 
more advanced students read essays or deliver original 
speeches, interspersed with vocal or instrumental music, 
furnished by the Music Department. 

LITERARY SOCIETIES. 

There are three flourishing Literary Societies con- 
nected with the Seminary— the Belles Lettres, the Gam- 
ma Epsilon and the Tripartite Union. The first two 
are in the gentlemen's and the last in the ladies- depart- 
ment. Each has a well-furnished hall and a judiciously 
selected library, aggregating more than two thousand 
volumes. 

HOME FEATURES. 

The Seminary is a boarding school of the highest 
grade, taking rank among the very best, with superior 
appointments and appliances for the health and culture 
o^- its students. It is also a well-ordered home. First 
of all, the President and his family reside in the build- 
ing, forming a part of the school and are always acces- 
sible to all its members. The wife of the President 
entertains the Young Woman's Missionary Society once 
a month, in her apartments, and occasionally receives 
the entire school in her parlors, while in times of sickness 
she visits the students in their rooms, giving such sug- 
gestions and directions as the experience of a mother 
may supply. Again, the members of the Faculty are so 
distributed throughout the building as to be readily 
accessible at any time for such help as the students may 



i 



i 



18 



WILLIAMSPORT DICKINSON SEMINARY. 



FORTY-EIGHTH ANNUAL CATALOGUE. 



19 



dmre outside of the recitation room. Again, recogniz- 

fof fll^^TvI ^Z.^^^''^^^^^ ^^ ^ ^^^t^'^ i^ preparation 
for a useful life, the President and the Faculty give a 

forma reception once each term to the whole school in 
nn ??+tf /• "^ ? ^""^ ^^^ occasion is transformed into 

"sooS?."''.-'''""^ '■'"""' "^'''^ ^«^'^'^ mfurmai 

attei the iuiMu: Inda.y evcni.iir onfrrhninnculs, ,vli<.ve 
themnm.tom nv vouihu- u.rk, ,,,1, ivate :, cheerful .spirit 
an. uM^et the nntuml de.siie for .social pleasures. Tr. 
tuese aii.i ,dl practic;.i,h- ways a., ippeal is made to the 
higher elements in the nature; mutual interest inspires 
mutual respect; oppoitunity is afforded to study charac- 
ter, and the school becomes a pleasant and safe Christian 

traTn^ng! ""^ ^ ^^^'''' ^'''' '^^'"''^"^ ""'^"^^^ ^°*^ "^^^al 

INSTRUCTION. 

th^TtiJ^S^^" x?''^ '"?'^''''' ^^^ ^^^^P*^^^ to the need of 
nrLn^ni o "i ^^^ Pa/"^ ^re spared to give thorough, 
\n tl^i scholarly training in all the departments 

by teachers of superior attainments and experience 
lPP?n.!! ?n ?'fTK^° c-onnection with the text book,' 
to thne! '"'''*''^*^ ^y experiments are given from tim^ 

Students in Music have opportunity to hear distin- 
guished artists, which is of great advantage in acqnirin" 

LTdditL fl ^" ^^f .^ enlarging their knowledge. 
In addition to frequent Organ Recitals by musicians of 
recognized ability, eminent musicians from a distance 
frequently give concerts, to which our Music pupils are 
admitted at retluced rates. ^ 

SPECIAL LECTURES. 

Special lectures in the form of familiar talks will be 
given each term by the President. These lectures will 
cover the discussion of social ethics, the care of health 
tiow to eat, how to work, how to play, how to rest, current 
literature and cun-ent events in relation to school life 
Avith other subjects which may be helpful to young people 
who wish to make the most of opportunity 






^ 



The President will also give a course of lectures to 
young men preparing for the ministry, covering such 
themes as may be of value to them as preachers, as pas- 
tors and as citizens. Attendance at these lectures is 
required of all candidates for the ministry. 

YOUNG i.Ai)l]:«. 

OoTiKtant and systematic efforts are rnnch !<)olviTi[r to- 
\\:\Vi\ ilip uenernl « nitnre of tin- x^nnitr i-!«nes comnMih^'l 
U) our care, ilie lady members of tin: 1 acuity take 
personal interest in all things pertaining to their v^^elfare 
and are intimately associated with them in recreation 
hours. 

Every Saturday short lectures are given to all young 
ladies on social culture, literature, art and kindred 
topics. During the coming year, in addition to these 
lectures, the ladies of the Senior Class will meet the 
Preceptress monthly for purposes of literary criticism. 

TELEGRAPHY. 

Among the phj^sical apparatus are several telegraph- 
ing instruments, one of which, the gift of Benjamin G. 
Welch, is a very fine model, showing the various parts 
of different instruments. During the year a number of 
instruments have been placed in students' and teachers' 
rooms, affording excellent opportunity for study and 
practice to those who desire to tit themselves for prac- 
tical work in this gi'owing branch of industry. 

TEACHERS. 

A Normal Class may be organize<l during the Fall and 
Spring Terms for those who desire to teach. The Course 
will comprehend special instruction by lectures on the 
Theory and Methods of Teaching by the President. No 
extra charge will be made. 

SCHOLARSHIPS. 

Mr. DeWitt Bodine, of Hughesville, Pa., an alumnus 
hf the Seminary, has the honor of founding the first full 
scholarship in this Institution. It is to be filled from the 



/• 



20 



WILLIAMSPORT DICKINSON SEMINARY. 



public schools of Hughesville by competitive examina- 
tions and is designated 



u 



The DeWitt Bodine Scholarship.'' 



It pays all expenses of board, tuition, etc., iu any regu- 
lar course of si luLy. *' 

Who will iTri;i,-ite Ml- -nn-line's exainpl,'.' .Vix iliviv 
not generous nnti and woinvii ajiion- uur ;ilimiTii and 
friends ready to invest a porting „r tlieii- xvealih sslu-re 
It will be secure and work for God forever? A cuiui>uxa- 
tively small sum will do a large w^ork. Tlie interest on 
a thousand dollars, in many instances, will supplement 
the meagre resources of a worthy young man or woman 
whom God has given large ability, but from whom for- 
tune has withheld the means to develop it. This is 
especially true of those who are called into the ministry 
or into missionary work. Any sum will help, and three 
thousand dollars will found a ministry or missionary 
scholarship in this Institution and maintain it perpet- 
ually. 

To aid any one who may desire by gift or will to found 
a partial or full scholarship to assist worthy young men 
or women in preparing for the ministry or mission work, 
or for any other useful occupation, forms are appended 
which may be used: 

I give, bequeath and devise to the Williamsport Dick- 
inson Seminary, located at Williamsport, in the county 

of Lycoming, state of Pennsylvania, the sum of - 

dollars (if sto<-ks, b(m(ls or other personal property 
specify same), to be used for the purpose of (here state 
definitely the object for which the money or property is 
lo be use<l); said corporation to have and to hold and to 
employ the same for the purpose above named, and the 
receipt of the Treasurer thereof shall be a sufficient dis- 
charge to my executors for the same. 

If real estate is to be given this form will answer- I 
give, bequeath and devise to the Williamsport Dickinson 
Seminary, located at Williamsport, in the county of Ly- 
coming, state of Pennsylvania, the following lands and 
premises (here describe definitely); to have and to hold 
to said corporation, its successors and assigns forever' 



A 



I 



V ^ 



1 



I 



t 



FORTY-EIGHTH ANNUAL CATALOGUE. 



21 



the proceeds of which shall be employed in (here describe 
the object.) 

The Woman's College of Baltimore proffers annually 
four free scholnr<^hips?, vnliied at $100 each, to any four 

yoi]n<i." la<1i(^s of iIh* ^radiiaiing class who, a Her examina- 
tioii, shall be rccuiiiiiieiided by the Presideul auil I'ai uily 
nf the Seminary. This; scliolarsliiy^ roDf iTinos hi each 
case through feur years, gi\ing fi'ee tiiiiion in nisv dr-iee 
course. 

OUTFIT. 

The gentlemen should be provided with an umbrella, 
and a pair of slippers to be worn in the room. The ladies 
must be supplied with thick walking shoes, and um- 
brella. India-rubber overshoes, water-proof cloak and a 
suit for exercise in the gymnasium. Their attire for 
general use should be neat and simple, but not elegant 
)r expensive. All wearing apparel must he plainly marked 
icitli full name of the owner. We suggest that in addition 
to towels, napl.i IS and napkin ring, each pupil bring a 
knife, fork and spoon, for use in ease of siekness. 

A WORD TO PARENTS. 

1. Try to have your children here on the first day 
of the term, htit not before^ as we shall not be ready to 
receive them. The classes are formed on the second 
day, and it will be better for all concerned that the 
student start regularly with his class. 

2. If possible do not call them away during the ses- 
sion. When called home during the term the time of 
going and returning must be specified in the request. 
iAbsence, if only for a few days, disarranges the class, 
and is generally the beginning of irregularity on the part 
of the scholar. 

3. Do not allow your children to leave the school 
before the examinations, unless it cannot be avoided. 
Serious inconvenience to all concerned often arises from 
a neglect of this caution. 

4. Supply them very sparingly with spending money. 
Parents cannot be too cautious on this point. 

5. Select for your child one of the instructors as a 



22 



WILLIAMSPOET DICKINSON SEMINARY. 



FOBTY-EIGHTH ANNUAL CATALOGUE. 



23 



patron, to distribute his funds. In this way a more judi- 
cious use of your mouey will be made, and your child 
will be kept from many temptatious. 

DAY STUDENTS. 

Day students will be required to obr-rv,. (],,. r,,]i,n\ ii|o- 
rules: " 

1. Attend Chapel exercises, when tli.ir i-c.i^iiions 
come at 8 or 9 o'clock A. M unless excused by tli. i'lesi- 
dent. 

-2. Spend the intervals between recitations in the 
Study Hall. 

3. Present written excuse from present or guardian 
lor all abseuces, time and number of recitations beins' 
specified. * 

4 Must not visit the rooms of boarders at anv time 
without permission. 

5. All day students must deposit fl.OO with the Treas- 
urer when they enter, to cover damage done to Study 
Hall or other property. This will be returned when 
the student leaves, but not before, provided no injury 
has been done. 

MEANS OF ACCESS. 

Williamsport is eight and a half hours from New York, 
six hours from Philadelphia, nine hours from Pittsburg, 
six hours from Baltimore, three hours from Harrisburg, 
and three hours from Elmira, and is reached directly by 
the Pennsylvania, the Philadelphia and Reading, the 
Northern Central and the Philadelphia and Erie rail- 
roads, which pass through the city, and as these have 
connections directly with all the great railroads, is 
readily accessible from all quarters. ' 

GRADUATES AND FORMER STUDENTS. 

It may safely be estimated that from eight to ten thous- 
and persons have received Academic instruction, covering 
from one to three years, in Williamsport Dickinson Semi- 
nary, while six hundred and seventy-one have eoiTipVted 
the prescribed curriculum, graduating with the degrees 



\ f 



M. 






the Institution confers. We desire to bring all these 
into active sympathy and co-operation with their Alma 
Mater^ and hence we ask all persons to whom this notice 

iiiaj euiue, w iiu kave been ni uHi^nts here, to send us their 
address, with any informatioTi concerning- tliPir pci.buuai 
liistdrv that niav b(* of ucnn-nl inh^rcsl, ns w * wisTi to 
compile a ciuuplele caLulo^iic oT all llie studc nis nuvv 
living. 

There is a general nieeting of (he Alinnni ever\ \ <^ar, 
the day bofc^re r^oTnmencoTTumt. We extend a mu^^i cor- 
dial invitati* n f ill old students to attend the meeting 
this year, wliicii uiil be held J aue 17, in the afternoon 
and evpTiing. Tf you cannot come let us hear from you 
by letter. 

Ati«j now, may we not ask you to aid in enlarging the 
sphere and increasing the power of our Alma Mater? 
You can du much in many ways, ixit you can at least 
direct tln^^e lookinir f* r a good Tt^nr ling School to ours, 
or sen 1 us their address on a postal card. Carry the 
Seminary^ in your heart. .She is duing a worthy work, 
and earnestly asks her sons and daughters to help her. 



Special Information. 



We shall not be ready to receive students before the 
first day of the term. On the second day classes are 
formed, a term schedule for recitations adopted, and 
lessons assigned. 

Students from other schools may enter any class on 
passing a satisfactory examination in the previous 
studies of the Oonrse, or their equivalents. The exami- 
nation may be waived if the Faculty are assured, by 
certificates of scholarship, or otherwise, that it is un- 
necessary. Certificates must be presented within two 
weeks of admission. 

Invitations to visit any member of the school may be 
given only witli the approval of the President. The per- 



24 



WILLIAMSPOET DICKINSON SEMINARY. 



FOETY-EIGHTH ANNUAL CATALOGUE. 



25 



son inviting or entertaining a visitor will be charged 

Zt:S'oflT' ^'^ "^e' "^^'^P* P'--*« - brotSor 
sisters ot tne person inviting. 

Visitors will not be allowed on the halls nor in thP 
rooms of students without permission 

any year will not rank ., ah Lhe rl:,,. ,>f that year i nless 
tliey have completed equivalent advancW studts 

German covering three years, may be subslil i,l. .] for 
(xreek in the College Preparatory Course 

"Tn J?he F^l^Term" ^'"" '"'"''''' ''''^' Etymology dur- 

The language ''elec-ted" in the Oonrse in Science and 
Literature will be retained thronghont the required two 

The ladies are allowed to substitute a Course in xMusic 
Drawing and Painting, German or French, for the Greek 
Language, and for Analytical Geometry and Calculus 

rI^fJJ^^'''r''. "'.^•^' substitute two years in Greek or 
German for Analytical Geometry and Calculus. 

The election or substitution of German, French Music 
or Drawing and Painting does not remit the regular- 
tuition for these branches. ^^^^u 

B^ut^ftuf'^' Etymology, Heading, Composition and 

fxclusTveU h.T ''^"f f ^^ ^" ^*^^^"ts, ixcept those 
exclusively in Music, Art and Elocution. 

The classes in Trigonometry and Surveying are given 

surve^ng. '"" "' ''''' familiarize them witt praftica' 

In the departments of Ancient and Modern Lan- 
guages the classes are practiced in oral and written exer- 
cises throughout the Course. 



V. 



Courses of Study. 



In order to meet the wants of a i irg-er class of Students, nine regular 
Courses of Study are provided, namely: The Noiinnl lOnglish, Belles 
Lettres, Science and Literature. Classical, Practical Science, College 
Preparatory, Art, Music and Business. Students may adopt any of 
these Courses exclusively, or may select such studies from them as they 
desire, subject to the approval of the Faculty. 

The Normal English is designed to meet the increasing demand for 
teajchers in our Common Schools, and is heartily commended to young 
ladies and gentlemen who desire thorough instruction and drill in the 
English Branches. 

The Belles Lettres Course is especially arranged to accommodate young 
ladles who may wish to omit the Higher Mathematics beyond Elementary 
Algebra and Geometry. It thus affords opportunity to connect studies 
In Music and Art with a well-seleoted Course Ini Literature and Science. 

The Course in Science and Literature is intended to give wider culture 
and more /thorough men,tal discipline. It differs from the Classical 
^Course mainly in that it omits the Greek Language entirely, and makes 
Latin elective with German or French during the firsiti two years. Before 
entering upon this Course the Student must be thoroughly acquainted 
with the Common English Branches. 

The 'Classical Course is much more extensive than is ordinarily pur- 
sued at Semlnajrles. It will compare favorably with the curriculum 
•adopted by our best institutions of learning. We offer It with entire 
confidence to young men who are preparing for professional life; also to 
young ladles who aspire to superior Intellectual culture. The preparation 
for this Course Is a thorough knowledge of the studies embraced in the 
Academic Course. 

The Practical Science Course covers the required preparation for 
iadmissloni to schools of Technology and to Industrial Courses in our 
best 'Universities and Colleges- However, lit is specially arranged to 
meet the increasing demand for scientific and Uterary Instruction by 
those who contemplate an Academic training- As a preparation for as- 
sured success in Industrial occupaJtlons we heartily commend It 

The College Preparatory Course is arranged for those who desire 
thorough Instruction and systematic drill In all branches requisite for 
admission to our best Colleges and Universities. We commend It espe- 
cially to parents who wish to place their children under the watchful 
oare of experienced teachers, while they receive the literary culture of a 
high grade! institution of l^earnlng and enjoy the social advantages of a 
well-regulated Christian home. 






WILLIAMSPORT DICKINSON 8EMINAEY. 



FOETY-EIGHTH ANNUAL CATALOGUE. 



27 



ACADEMIC COURSE. 

This Course will give ttiorough instruction and drill in tlie Common English Branches 
and also prepare the Student for admission to the higher Courses. Classes are formed each 
term for beginning and advanced Students, in Arithmetic, Grammar, Geography History 
Algebra. Geometry and Latin. s ^ /. «■ ^y, 



Winter Teem. 



Fall Teem. 



Winter Teem. 



Speing Teem. 



Fall Teem. 



WiNTEE Teem, 



Speing Teem. 



Arithmetic, (Milne.) 

Giaiiiniat, Harvey. ) 
Geogiai)liy, (Svvinton.) 

Arithmetic, (Milne.] 

Grammar, (Harvey.) 

Geography and Map Drawing, (Swinton.) 
r Arithmetic, (Milne.) 
-j Grammar, (Harvej.) 
I Geography and Map Drawing, (Swinton.) 

SECOND YEAR. 

Arithmetic, (Milne.) 

Grammar, (Harvey.) 

History, United States, ( Montgomery. ) 

Latin—First Latin Book, (Tuell & Fowler.) 

Book-keeping— optional. 

Arithmetic, Mental and Written, (Milne.) 

Grammar, (Harvey.) 

History, United States, ( Montgomery. ) 

Latin, Grammar and Keader, (Allen & Greenough.) 

Book-keeping— optional. 

Arithmetic Reviewed. 

English Analysis. 

Algebra, to Fractions, (Went worth.) 

I^tin— Syntax and Caesar— (Allen & Greenqugh. ) 

Book-keeping— optional . 



^ > 



Speing Teem. 



Fall Teem. 



WiNTEE Teem. 



V [i 



Spring Teem. 



Spelling, Reading, Penmanship, Compoeition and Declamation through- 
out the Course. 

Examinationa for admission to any Course above the Academic will 
be -held the second day of each term, thougrh Students coming- at any 
time during the term may be -examined when they enter. 



NORMAL ENGLISH COURSE, 

This Course is designed to accommodate youug men and women whose time for school is 
limited, and especially those who are preparing to teach in our Common Schools. A Diploma 
will be given to those who complete the Course. 

SOPHOMORE YEAR. 

Arithmetic, Written and Mental, (Milne.) 
English Grammar, (Harvey.) 
Geography , ( S winton . ) 
Histoiy, United States, (Montgomery.) 
English Bible — once a week. 



Fall Term. 



Winter Term, 



Spring Term. 



Fall Term. 



' Arithmetic, Written and Mental, (Milne.) 
English Grammar, (Harvey.) 
Geography and Map Drawing, (Swinton.) 
History, United States, (Montgomery.) 
English Bible— once a week. 

Arithmetic, Written and Mental, (Milne.) 
English (Jrainniar, (Harvey.) 
Algebra, to fractions, (Wentworth. ) 
English Bible — once a week. 

JUNlOll YhlAR. 

Civil Government, (Young. ) 

Algebra, Fractions to Radicals, (Wentworth.) 

Physiology, (Hutchison.) 

Latin— First Book, (Tuell & Fowler.) 

English Bible— once a week. 

Rhetoric, (Kellogg.) 

Physical Geography, (Houston.) 

Geometry, Books I.-IIL, (Wentworth. ) 

Latin, Grammar and Reader, (Allen <& Greenough.) 

English Bible — once a week. 

Rhetoric, (Kellogg.) 

Physical Geography, (Houston.) 

Geometry, Books IV.-VIL, (Wentworth.) 

Latin- Syntax and Ciesar— (Allen & Greenough.) 

Arithmetic Reviewed. 

English Bible— once a week. 

SENIOR YEAR. 

History, ( S winton 's Outlines. ) 
English Literature, (Pancoast. ) 
Natural Philosophy, (Gage's Elements.) 
I^atin— Caesar- (Allen & Greenough.) 
Theory and Methods of Teaching. 
English Bible— once a week. 

History, (Swinton's Outlines. ) 
Mental Science, ( Way land. ) 
Natural Philosophy, (Gage's Elements.) 
Latin— Virgil— ( Greenough. ) 
English Bible— once a week. 

Mental Science, (Wayland.) 
BoUvny, (Gray.) 

American Literature — (Smythe. ) 
I^tin— Virgil— (Greenough. ) 
Theory and Methods of Teaching. 
English Bibb — once a week. 



WILLIAMSPORT DICKINSON SEMINARY. 



FORTY-EIGHTH ANNUAL CATALOGUE. 



29 



Fall Teem. 



Winter Term. 



Spring Term. 



Fall Term. 



u 



BELLES LETTRES COURSE. 

Upon completing this Course the Student will be entitled to the Degree of Mistress of 
English Literature— M. E. L. 

SOPHOMORE YEAR. 

Arithmetic, (Milne.) 

English Grammar, (Harvey.) 

History, United States, ( Montgomery. ) 

Latin, Gennaii or i'leisrh. 

Englisli Bible — once a week. 

Physical Geotrraphy, ( i loustoii. ) 
Algebra, to Iractions, (Wentworth. ) 
English Grammar, (Harvey.) 
History, United States, (Montgomery.) 
I^tin (Gram, and R. ), German or French. 
English Bible — once a week. 

Physical Geography, (Houston.) 

Algebra, Fractions to Radicals,^ (Wentworth.) 

English Analysis. — ** 

Latin (Syntax — Caisar), German or French. 

English Bible — once a week s 

JUNIOR YEAR. 

History, (Swinton's Outlines. ) 

Physiology, (Hutchison.) 

Natural Philosophy, (Gage's Elements.) 

Civil Government, (Young.) 

Latin (Caesar — Syntax), German or French. 

English Bible — once a week. 

History, (Swinton's Outlines. ) 
Rhetoric, ( Kellogg. ) 
Natural Philosophy, (Gage's Elements.) 
I^tin (Virgil), German or French. 
English Bible — once a week. 

Rhetoric, (Kellogg.) 

Geometry, Books I. -III., (Wentworth.) 

Botany, (Gray. ) 

Latin (Virgil), German or French. 

English Bible — once a week. 

SENIOR YEAR. 

English Literature, ( Pancoast. ) 

Moral Science, (V/ayland.) 

Zoology, ( Orton ) — optional . 

Geology, ( Dana. ) 

Political Economy, (Walker) — optional. 

English Bible — once a week. 

Mental Science, (Way land.) 
Chemistry, (Shepherd.) 
Logic, (Coppee. ) 
Astronomy, (Peck.) 
English Bible— once a week. 

Evidences of Christianity, (Paley) — optional. 
Mental Science, (Wayland. ) 
Chemistry, (Shepherd.) 
American Literature, (Smythe. ) 
English Bible— once a week. 



Winter Term, 



Spring Term. 



Fall Term. 



Winter Term. 



Spring Term. 



Fall Term. 



i 



COURSE IN SCIENCE AND LITERATURE. 

Upon completing the following Course the Student will be entitled to the Degree of 
Bachelor of Science. Those not wishing to take the whole Course can pursue such studies 
as they desire, subject to the action of the Faculty. 

oUl'iiUMOiUil YEAR. 

History, (Swinton's Outlines.) 

Civil Governnn nt, (Y()l^lJ^^) 

Algebra, Fractions to i Radicals, (Wentworth.) 
latin — First Latin f'u<»k | 
French. V Elective. 

German. J 

English Bible — once a week. 

History, (Swinton^s Outlines.) 

Rhetoric, (Kellogg.) 

Algebra, Radicals to Binomial Theorem, (Wentworth.) 
Latin, Grammar and Reader, ( Allen & Green- "j 
French. [ough. ) Y Elective. 

German. j 

English Bible — once a week. 

Rhetoric, (Kellogg.) 

Algebra, ( Wentworth ) — compl eted . 

Geometry, Books I.-IIL, (Wentworth.) 

Latin — Syntax — Csesar — (Allen & Green- 1 

[ough. ) y Elective. 



Winter Term. 



Spring Term. 



Fall Term. 



French. ^ „ , , 

German. j 

[ English Bible — once a week. 

JUNIOR YEAR. 

English Literature, ( Pancoast. ) 
Physiology, ( Hutchison. ) 
Geometry, Books IV. -VIL, (Wentworth.) 
Natural Philosophy, (Gfvge's Elements. ) 
i^atin — Ciesar — Syntax — (Allen & Green- 
French, [ough. ) !► Elective. 
German. 
L English Bible — once a week. 

Natural Philosoph}^, (Gage's Elements.) 
Mental Philosophy, (Wayland.) 
Trigonometry, ( Wentvvoith. ) 
Winter Term. ^ Latin -Virgil — (Greenough.) ^ 

French. V Elective. 

German. J 

English Bible — once a week. 

Evidences of Chrir^tianity, (Paley.) 
Mental Philosophy, ( Wayland. ) 

Botany, (Gray.) 

SpRTNa Tfrm ^ Surveying, (Wentworth.) 
hPRiNO lERM. s l^itin— Virgil— (Greenough.) ^ 

French. >- Elective. 

German. j 

English Bible— once a week. 



30 



WILLIAMSPORT DICKINSON SEMINARY. 



Fall Term. 



Winter Term. 



Spring Term. 



SENIOR YEAR. 

r Moral Science, ( Wayland. ) 
' Geology, (Dana.) 

Zoology, (Orton. ) 

Political Economy, (Walker.) 

Analytical Geometry, (Wentworth.) 

English Bible—once a week. 
" Logic. 

Cheniistrj, ( .Slitplieul)--with Lectures. 
S AstroiioTiij, (Peek.) 
! Calcuhis, (Ta}ior. ) 
t Eii^^lish Bible'—oncea week. 

IkitleLs Analogy, ( Emory & Crooks. ) 

Chemistry, (Shepherd)— with Lectures. 

Calculus, (Taylor.) 

American Literature, (Smythe.) 
I English Bible— once a week. 



Fall Term. 



OLA ^>^!(mL COURSE. 

SOPHOMORE YEAR. 

History, (Swiiiton's Outlines. ) 

Civil Government, (Young.) 

Algebra, Fractions to Radicals, (Wentworth.) fand II 

Latin -Cjesar--( A Hen cfe Greenough ) - completing Books I.* 

Greek-First Lessons, (White;) Grammar, (Goodwin.) 

English Bible— once a week. ^ 

r History, (Swinton's Outlines. ) 

I Rhetoric, (Kellogg. ) 
Winter Term. \ ;^^^^>ra, Radicals to Binomial Theorem, (Wentworth ) 

1 Latin — Virgil - ( Greenough )— Book I * 

Greek First Lessons, (White;) Grammar, (Goodwin.) 
English Bible- once a week. ^ 

Rhetoric, (Kellogg.) 

Algebra, ( Wentworth)— completed. 

Geometry, Books I.-IJL, (Wentworth. ) 

Latin— Virgil— (Greenough)— Book II 

Greek— Anabasis, (Goodwin) -Book I., 8 chapters. 

English Bible— once a week. 



I 



Spring Ter3i. 



I 



Fall Term. 



r 



Winter Term. 



I 



JUNIOR YEAR. 
English Literature, ( Pancoast. ) 
Natural Philosopliy, (Gage's Elements.) 
Physiology, (Hutchison.) 
Geometry, Books IV.-VIL, (Wentworth.) 
Latin— Virgil— (Greenough)— Books III -VI 
Greek— Anabasis, (Goodwin)— Three Books. 
English Bible— once a week. 

Menfeal Philosophy, (Wayland.) 
Natural Philosophy, (Gage's Elements.) 
Trigonometry, ( Wentworth. ) 

Latin -Cicero -Orations— I.-IV. Catiline. 
Greek— Homer— Iliad— Book I. 
English Bible— once a week. 



FORTY-EIGHTH ANNUAL CATALOGUE. 



31 



Spring Term. 



f Evidences of Christianity, (Paley.) 

Mental Philosophy, (Wayland.) 

Surveying, (Wentworth.) 

Latin — Cicero— Four Selected Orations. 

Greek — Homer — Iliad — Books 11. and III. 
1^ English Bible — once a week. 



Fall Term. 



SENIOU YEAR. 

Moral .Science, (Wayland.) 

Political Economy, (Walker.) 

Geology, ( Dana. ) 

Analytical Geometry, (Wentworth.) 

Latin — Horace. 

Greek — Xenophon — Memorabilia. 

English Bible — once a week. 

Logic, ( Coppee. ) 

Chemistry, (Shepherd) — with Lectures. 
Astronomy, ( Peck. ) 
Winter Term. { Calculus, (Taylor.) 

Latin — Livy. 

Greek — Plato — Apology and Crito. 
English Bible — once a week. 

Butler's Analogy, (Emory & Crooks.) 

Chemistry, ( Shepherd ) — with Lectures. 

Calculus, (Taylor.) 

Latin — Tacitus- Germania and Agricola. 
I Greek — Aeschylus — Prometheus Bound. 
1 English Bible — once a week. 



f 



Spring Term. 



Fall Term. 



COLLEGE PREPARATORY COURSE. 

This Course Is arranged for those who desire to prepare for admission to any American 
Colle^-'e or University. Students may enter at any point for which they are prepared. Those 
completing the Cour&e will receive a Diploma. 

SOPHOMORE YEAR. 

" Latin — First Latin Book, (Tuell & Fowler.) 

Arithmetic, ( Milne. ) 
{ Grammar, ( Harvey. ) 
I History, United States, (Montgomery.) 
I English Bible- once a week. 

f Latin, Reader and Grammar, (Allen & Greenough.) 

I Arithmetic, (Milne.) 

^ Grammar, (Harvey.) 

I History, United States, (Montgomery.) 

I English Bible— once a week. 

f Jjatin — CjTcsar — (Allen & Greenough,) 29 chapters. 

I Arithmetic Completed. 

-{ English Analysis. 

I Algebra — to Fractions, (Wentworth.) 

t English Bible — once a week. 



WiNTEFi Term. 



Spring Term. 



Fall Term. 



JUNIOR YEAR. 

f Latin — Cfcsar — completing Books I. and 11. 

' Greek — First Lessons, ( White ;) Grammar, (Goodwin.) 

Algebra, Fractions to Radicals, (Wentworth.) 

Roman History, (Allen.) 

English Bible — once a week. 



ft 



I*' 



i 



32 



WILLIAMSPORT DICKINSON SEMINARY. 



Winter Term, 



Spring Term. 



Latin — Caesar— Books III. and IV. Sight Readings. 

Greek —First Lessons — Grammar and Anabasis, ( Goodwin. ) 
^ Latin— Virgil - (Greenoiigh) — Book 1. and Scansion. 
I Algebra— Radicals to Binomial Theorem, (Wentworth.) 
i English Bible— once a week. 

f Latin -Virgil— (Greenongh)— Book II. 
J Greek — Anabasis — ( Goodwin ) , 8 chapters. 
I Greek History, ( Myers. ) 
L English Bible — once a week. 

SENIOR YEAR. 

I^atin — Virgil — ( Greenongh )— Books III., IV. and VI. 

Latin Prose Composition, ( Collar. ) 

Greek -Anabasis — (Goodwin)— Books I. and II. 

Geometry — Books I. -III., (Wentworth.) 

English Bible— once a week. 

Latin— Cicero— (Allen & Greenongh) — Catiline Orations. 
! Greek— Anabasis — 4 Books completed. 
Winter Term, -l Greek— Homer's Iliad— (Keep) — Book I. 

j Geometry— Books IV. -VII., (Wentworth.) 

English Bible— once a week. 

Latin — Cicero —(Allen & Greenongh) — Pro Archia and two 
Latin — Virgil — Bucolics and Book V. Aeneid. [others. 
Spring Term. ^ Greek — Homer's Iliad~(Keep) — Books II. and III 

I Classical Geography, (Tozer & Ginn's Atlas. ) 

[ English Bible — once a week. 



Fall Term. 



^ 



r 



r 



PRACTICAL SCIENCE COURSE. 

Upon completing this Course the Student will receive the Degree ofBachelor of Elements 

SOPHOMORE YEAR. 

Algebra— to Fractions, (Went worth's Elements.) 
Civil Government, ( Young. ) 
Physical Geography, (Houston.) 
German, French or Latin. 
Free-hand Drawing — twice a week. 
[ Englisli Bible — once a week. 

f Algebra — Fractions to l^idicals, (Elements— completed.) 

I 



Fall Term. 



Winter Term. ^ 



Spring Term. 



Fall Term. 



German, French or Latin. 

Khetoric, ( Kellogg. ) 

Johnston's American Politics. 
I Free-hand Drawing - twice a week. 
I English Bible — once a week. 

f Plane Geometry — Books I. -III., (Wentworlh. ) 

I German, French or I^tin. 

J Rhetoric, ( Kellogg. ) 

' Johnston's American Politico. 

I Free-hand Drawing — twice a week. 

1^ English Bible— once a week. 

JUNIOR YEAR. 

Geometry— Books IV. -VII., (Wentworth.) 
German, F'rench or Latin. 
Physiology, (Mutchison.) 
Physics, ( Gage's Elements. ) 
English Bible — once a week. 



f 



^ >' 



J 



N 



!-1 




32 



WILLI AMSPORT DICKINSON SEMINARY. 



Winter Term. 



r 



Spring Term. 



Fall Term. 



Winter Term, 



;^ THING Term. 



Lfvtin — ( 'iosar— Books ITl. and IV. Sight Reaclin^8. 
Greek - First Lessons — Grammar and Anabasis, ((ioodwin.) 
Latin— Viri^il - ((Jreenough) — Book L and Scansion. 
Al^eljra — Radicals to Binomial Theorem, ( Wentworth. ) 
English Bi})le — once a week. 

Latin Yirpl — (Greenonfrh)— Book IT. 

(Jreek- Anabasis — (Goodwin), 8 chapters. 
j Greek History, (Myers.) 
1^ English Bible — once a week. 

SENIOR YEAR. 

Latin — Virgil — (Greenough) -Books III., IV. «and VI. 

Latin Prose Composition, (Collar.) 

Greek -Anabasis — (Goodwin)— Books I. and IL 

Geometry — Books I. -ILL, (Wentworth.) 

English Bible— once a week. 

Latin- Cicero- -(Allen Sc Greenongh) —Catiline Orations. 
Greek— Anabasis — 4 Books completed. 
Greek Homer's Iliad ( Keep) — Book I. 
Geon\etry — Books IV. -VII., (Wentworth.) 
English Bible— once a week. 

Latin — Cicero — ( Allen & Greenongh) — Pro Archia and two 
i Latin — Virgil — Bucolics and Book V. Aeneid. [others. 
-] Greek — Homer's Iliad — ( Keep) — Books II. and III 
I Classical (Geography, (Tozer & (rinn's Atlas. ) 
[ English Bible once a week. 



'^ 



CO 

H 
C 
D 



Fall Term. 



Winter Term 



PKACTICAL SCIENCE COUKSE. 

I^pon completing this Course the Stiifleut will receive the Degree of Bachelor of Elements 

SOPHOMORE YEAR. 

f Algebra— to Fractions, ( Wentworth's Elements.) 

I Civil (Government, (Young.) 

J Physical Geography, (Houston.) 

I German, French or Latin. 

I I'ree-hand Drawing — twice a week. 

i English Bible— once a week. 

f Algebra — Fractions to Radicals, (Element-s— completed.) 

] German, Fven«^'h or Latin. 

' Khetoric, I Kellogg. ) 

I ,lohnslon's American IMitirs. 

i Free-hand Drawing twice a week. 

I English J^jible —once a week. 

f Plane (Jeometry — Books I.-IIL, (Wentworlh.) 

I German, French or Latin. 

J Rhetoric, ( Kellogg. ) 

' .Johnston's American l*olitic.«<. 

1 Free-hand Drawing — twice a week. 

I English P.ible-once a week. 

JUNIOR YEAR. 

f Geometry— Books IV.-VIL, (Wentworth.) 
I Gorman, French or Latin. 
-! Physiology, i Hjitchison. ) 

Physics, ( (iagf's Elements. ) 

English Bible -once a week. 



Spring Term. 



Fall Term. 




FORTY-EIGHTH ANNUAL CATALOaUE. 



33 



Winter Term. 



Algebra, ( Went worth ^s University) 
German, French or Latin. 
Physics, (Gage's Elements.) 

^' ' ' ' 1.) 



-Eadicals to Binomial 
[Theorem. 



Spring Term. 



•> 



Fall Term. 



\ 



\ 



Mental Science, ( Way land. , 
English Bible — once a week. 

Algebra, ( W. m ..oith's University)— completed. 

German, I'leiich <?i L.ttin. 
Mental Science, (Wajiand.) 
Botany, (Gray.) 

Englhsh r.ihle — once a wft-k. 

SENIOR YEAR. 

r English Literature, (Pancoast. ) 
Mineralogy and Geology. 
German, French or Latin. 
Political Economy or Zoology. 
Geometrical Drawing— twice a week. 
English Bible — once a week. 

Chemistry, (Shepherd) —with Lectures. 
Astronomy, (Peck.) 
Trigonometry or Logic. 
Commercial Law, ( Lectures. ) 
English Bible— once a week. 

Chemistry, Laboratory Practice and Lectures. 
Surveying, (Wentworth), (orlPaley.) 
Spring Term. \ American Literature, (Smythe.) 

Mechanical Drawing — twice a week. 
English Bible— once a week. 



L 



Winter Term. 



f 



L 



MODERN LANGUAGES, 



German Course. 



Elementary Grammar, (Otis—Edition of 1893. ) 
German Grammar, (Whitney -used as reference.) 
Studien und Plaudereien — First Series, (Stern.) 
Marchen, (Andersen.) 

Aus dem Leben eines Taugenichts, ( Eichendorf . ) 
Erzahlungen aus der Deutschen Geschichte, (Schrakamp), 

or Immensee, (Storm. ) 
Die Sohonsten Deutschen Lieder, ( Wenckebach. ) 
German Synonyms, ( Hoffman. ) 
Some drama by Schiller. 
Dictionary, (Whitney.) 

Abriss der Deutschen Literatur-Geschichte, (Koenig.) 
Hoher als die Kirche, (Hillern), or 
Die Harzreise, ( Heine. ) 

^ An Elementary Grammar, (Keetels. ) 
Progressive French Drill Book, A., (Peiffer. ) 
French Drill Book,,B., (Peiffer.) 
Causeries avec mes Eleves, (Sauveur. ) 
Un Mariage D' Amour, (Halevy.) 
La Belle-Nivernaise, (Daudet.) 
Le Roman d'un jeune homme, (Feuillet.) 
La France, (A^de Rougemont. ) 
Mon Oncle et Mon Cure, ( La Brete. ) 
Dictionary, (Heath.) 
L'Abbc Constantin, ( Halevy. ) 
Petite Histoire du Peuple Franyais, (Lacombe.) 
Tuition, term of 12 weeks, $5.00. 



French Course. 



f 



34 



WILLIAMSPOET DICKINSON SEMINARY. 



COURSES IN READING. 

A knowl'edg'e of JLiterature is a requisite of general culture, yet ob- 
S'ervation has shown' that no branch of education is more neglected. The 
majority of Students devote little time to a course of collateral reading, 
and consequently leave school without a well-defined tast'e for literature. 
To promote a correct use of the English Ijanguage, to enlarge the vocabu- 
lary, to develotp a love for books, and to serve as an introduction to the 
English Classics, is the purposie of this Course. 

To present a graded scheme in the study of literature is impossible, 
but the aim of thiis plan, which extends through four years, is, firstt, to 
gain the attention of the Student by a pleasing narrative and then grad- 
ually to advance him to more solid subjects. 

Two works are! read each term, except in the Academic and Sophomore 
yeairs, and an examination is given on each work, one at the middle and 
Ithe other at the end of ,the term. The examination covers the general 
points of plot, style, idio^m and vocabulary. 

THE COUESES. 

ACADEMICS AND SPECIALS. 

Fall Term. Christinas Stories — Dickens. 

Winter Term. Snow Bound — Whitiier. 

Spring Term. Rip Van Winkle and other sketches — Irving. 

SOPHOMORE YEAR. 

Fall Term. Pilgrim's Progress— ^ww^an. 

Winter Term. Lady of the Lake — Scott. 
Spring Term. Vicar of Wakefield— Goldsmith. 

JUNIOR YEAR. 



Fall Term. 

Winter Term. 
Spring Term. 



Fall Term. 



Winter Term. 
Spring Term. 



{ 
{ 



I. Ivanhoe — Scott. 
II. The Deserted Village 

and The Traveler — Goldsmith. 

I. David Copperfield — Dickens. 
11. Shorter Poems — 3Iilton. 

I. Merchant of Venice — Shakcspcar-r. 
II. Sir Roger De Coverley Papers —A ddison. 

SENIOR YEAR. 

I. Rasselas — Samuel Johnson. 
II. Silas Marner — George Eliot. 

I. Essays — Bacon. 

II. Vision of Sir Lannfal — Lowell. 

I. Macbeth — Shakespeare. 

II. Essay on Johnson — Macaulay. 



S 



FORTY-EiaHTH ANNUAL CATALOGUE. 



35 



Students in the College Preparatory Course will be examined in the 
works required for entrance by the New England College Association, 
which are as follows: 

For 1897: Shakespeare's Merchant of Venice and As You Like It, Scott's 
Marmion, Longfellow's Evangeline, De Foe's History of the 
London Plague, Macaulay's Life of Samuel Johnson, Irving's 
Tales of a Traveler, Burke's iSpeech on the Conciliation With 
i\Tn. Pica, Hawthorne's Twice Told Tales, George Eliot's Silas 
IMarTier. 

For 1898: Milton's Paradise Lost, Books I. and II. ; Pope's Iliad, Books I. 
and XXII.; The Sir Roger de Coverly Papers in The Spectator; 
Goldsmith's Thie Vicar of Wakefield; Coleridge's Ancient Mari- 
ner; Southey'si Life of Nelson; CarlyKe's Essay on Burns; 
Lowell's Vision of Sir Launfal; Hawthorne's The House of the 
Seven Cables; Shakespeare's Macbeth; Burke's Speech on Con- 
cttrataoii 'with America; DeQuincey's The Flight of a Tartar 
Tribe; Tennyson's The Princess. 

Any Student preparing for any particular college will be examined in 
the works prescribed by that college, upon application. The total cost of 
all books In these Courses does not exceed fifty cents per term. 



COURSE IN MUSIC. 

The aim in this department will be to give thorough instruction, both 
in the technique and the aesthetics of the art; and to this end only 
standard text-books and studies will be used. Students completing the 
Course will receive a Diploma. 

FIRST YEAR. 

Selections from the following works, or their equivalents: Raifs 
Technical Studies; Duvemoy's Etudes; Burgmuller I. and II.; Bertini, op. 
100; Heller, op. 47; Krause, op. 4. 

SECOND YEAR. 

Bertini, ops. 29 and Z2\ Czemy, op. 299; Krause's Trill Studies; Heller, 
ops. 46 and 45; Little Preludes by Bach; Technics by Raif and Mason. 

THIRD YEAR. 

Czerny, op. 740; Two-part Inventions by Bach; Heller's Art of Phrasing, 
op. 16; Cramer, (Bulon Edition), Book I.; Krause, op. 15; Moscheles, op. 70 '; 
dementi's "Gradus ad Pamassum;" Kleinmichel's Etudes; Chopin 
Etudes. 

The Course of Study on the Piano embraces as many of the different 
works of the Classics and (Modern Schools of Composition as it is possible 
to study, with a correct execution and interpretation, In the time allotted 
to the Course. 

Students are advanced according to their ability and proificiency, not 
according to the number of terms taken. 



36 



WILLIAMSPOET DICKINSON SEMINARY. 



TEXT-BOOKS USED IN HARMONY. 

Kmery's Elfements of Harmony; Rlchter's Manual, (translated by J. a 
D. Parker.) 

All pupils who wish to complete a Course of Study on the Piano must 
be able to pass a satisfactory examination in i Harmony. 

Students not wi-slnng to take tlie Graduating i*iano Course may take a 
Course on thei Reed Organ, selected by the teacher, and will be granted a 
diploma, if they acniiirf n]>ll!ty in reading ordinary church music at 
sight, and in a m unier sufRciently clear for imposes of accompaniment. 

Before graduating in Piano Course the Student will be expected to 
give a public Recital. 



A full Course of Violin Playing has also been prepared for the benefit 
of those who are seeking superior attainments in this department. 

All Music Scholars have Vocal Culture free of charge, but classes will 
only be formed whlen four or more desire to enter them- 



COURSE IN VOOAL TRAINING. 

FIRST YEAR. 

Physiolog-y, itsi bearing on Vocal Art; Rules for breathing and their 
application; Placing the tone; Study of the Scales with the Vowels A, I, O, 
pure and modiified; Concone's Fifty Uessons; Concone's Twenty-five 
Lessons; Seiber's Vocalizes, op. 131; Slow trills and simple musical figures; 
Some Songs. 

SECOND YEAR. 

Contlnuatiion' of above; Concone's Fifteen Lessons; Garcia's Studies in 
Agility; Vaccai's Exiercises in Italian; Songs by the best American aiid 
European Composers; Simple Senas and Arias from the Italian, French 
and German Operas; Easy airs from the Standard Oratorios; Songs. 

THIRD YEAR. 

Lamperti's Bravura Studies, Books I., II. and III.; Vocalizes by Bor- 

dignl; Songs by Schujman, Franz, Mendelssohn, Schubert, Rubemsteins 

and best Englisb and French writerts; Oratorio; Senas and Arias from 

Standard Operas; Operatijc Arias by Handel, (arramged by Robert 

Spronz.) 



TUITION-TERM, 12 WEEKS, 24 LESSONS. 

Instrumental Music, PLano or Reed Organ, by Director, . 
Instrumental Music, Piano or Reed Organ, by Assistant, • 
Pipe Orgian, . . ^ • . . . . 

Use of Instrument, one hour each day, . * 

Theory of Music, in classes of four or more, each, . 
Theory of Music, to single pupils, .... 



$ 18 00 
15 OO 
18 00 
10 00 
6 00 
15 00 



/f'^y^ 



\ 



^y 



FORTY-EIGHTH ANNUAL CATALOGUE. 



37 



Vocal Culture, In classes, ..... 

Vocal Culture, to single pupils, . . . . 

Vocal Music, in classes of ten or more, per month, each. 

Violin Music, in classes of four, each. 

Violin Music, to single pupils, .... 

Violin iMuslc, in classes of two, eachl 

Guitar Music, to siii^-ie pupil^s, .... 

Rudiincnis ai' Music, in classes, per month, each. 



Free 
18 00 

1 00 

6 00 
15 00 

8 00 
12 00 

1 00 



/i 



ynf 



COUTURE IN ART. 

This department is under the direction of a lady of rare ability and 
wide culture. Having added to the usual Art Curriculum of a Seminary 
the regular course at a School! of Design, she is thoroughly qualified to 
meet the most rigid demand for instruction in both the useful and orna- 
mental branches of the department. 

The Course in Drawing comprises Limear, Perspective, Object and 
Model Drawing. Due attention' is given ito the branches of Pastel, 
Crayonilng and China Decoratings— Portrait Crayoning being a specialty. 
The course in Oil embraces Landscape and Portraljtl Painting. 

Students desiring a full course in this department will, upon satisfac- 
tory advancement in all its branches, be entitled to a diploma. 



i^ 



TUITION-TERM, 12 WEEKS, 24 LESSONS. 

Monochromatic and Pastel Paintinig, each. 

Painting in Water Colors, 

Painting in Oil|, .i . . . 

Portrait Padntinig, . ., 

Pencil Drawing, .... 

Portrait Crayoning, 

Crayon Drawing, .... 

Photograph Painting, 

China Decorating, .... 

Mechanioal Drawing, to single pupils. 

Free-hand and Industrial Drawing, in classes of three or more, 



% 12 00 

12 00 
12 00 
20 00 

6 00 
12 00 

7 00 
12 00 
12 00 

6 00 
3 00 



ELOCUTION. 

Elocution is recognized as a most important branch of education. 
This department is under the supervision of a thoroughly qualified and 
experienced teacher, and will include a careful vocal drill, and practice 
In the entire range of expression. It will also embody such a variety 
of Recitations and Readings as may serve to exemplify the qualities and 
modulations of the voice, and will cover gesture and action. 

Six dollars per term of 12 weeks, in classes — 36 lessons. Private les- 
sons, 50 cents each. 



J 



38 



WILLIAMSPORT DICKINSON SEMINARY. 



BUSINESS DEPARTMENT. 

This Course is desigrned to grive a thorough knowledg-e of the principles 
of business transactions. It may be pursued alone or in connection with 
other studies, thus accommodating- those seeking a literary as well as 
those seeking only a business education. The time required to finish it 
fwill depend upon the proficiency of the pupil in the English branches, 
and the diligence with, which he works. 

The Course will include instruction in the Common Englisl, !> ranches, 
Book-keeping,-HSin|gle and Double Entry,— Business Correspondence, 
Business Papers of various forms, Civil Government and Political Econ^ 
omy. 

TUITION. 

Students may enter the regular classes without additional cost for 
tuition, except for Book-keeping:, for which 15.00 per term of three months 
will be charged, 

Boarld, Room, Washing, etc., same as in other departments. 

ADVANTAGES. 

This department offers all the opportunities for general culture 
afforded Students in other departments, assured by well-conducted liter- 
ary societies, lectures, large libraries, association with experienced teach- 
ers, and the refining influences of a Christian home. 

ADMISSION. 

Students may enter this department at any time in the Academic 
year, a fair knowledge of the English branches being the only requisite. 



METHODS OF INSTRUCTION. 

The instruction in the Primary Department is based on the inductive 
and objective methods, classes having objects presented which are studied 
analytically. Julia McNair Wright's Nature Readers have been intro- 
duced, where life is seen in its natural development. Praotlcal application 
of the "natural method" and the facts obtained from the Readers is made 
in conversational lessons. The language lessons embrace Memory Les- 
sons, Dictation Exercises, Stories read for Reproduction, Exercises in 
Letter Writing, Word Pictures and Composltlom Writing. Especial at- 
tention is given to Arithmetic and the analysis of problems. History and 
/Geography are taught with the aid of maps, books of reference and the 
best text-books. Information Lessons, or elementary science studies 
jin Natural History, teach the classes to observe and to make careful 
note of the objects of the animal, plant and mineral kingdoms. The 
method of study consists chiefly in examination of leaves, rocks and in- 
sects. The Prang Course of Form Study and Drawing, Including a series 
of exercises with suitable methods, Is studied. During the present year 
instruction in a systematic course of Voice Culture has been given to 
the pupils of this department by the teacher of Vocal Musi-c. 



FORTY-EIGHTH ANNUAL CATALOGUE. 



39 



^^ 



In Elementary Arithmetic, Grammar and Geography the catechetical 
method is largely employed, but in Higher English the same course is 
adopted which prevails in the more advanced branches of study. The 
pupil is taught to study the text-book by topics rather than by sentences 
or paragraphs, and encouraged in the lecture room to give the substance 
'of what he has learned, in his own language. In this manner, while h<^ 
is adding to his store of knowledge, he is enlarging his vocabulai > .ii -^ 
•while he is evolving; principles and arquirxing facts, he is increa:suii^ ins 
power of expression, and thus unconsciously, it may be, but nevertheless 
surely, he lays the foundations of an easy anr! concise style of com- 
position. 

In English Literature the origin of the English language and the 
growth of the literature are carefully traced. In this work the most 
interesting facts in the lives of the best authors and their principal pro- 
ductions are brought under review. 

Instruction in Mental Science covers the second and the third terms of 
the Junior year. It embodies deflnitions of the mental facultiies, and care- 
ful analysis of intellectual processes, with a brief history of the science, 
the main purpose being to stimulate the Student to think and investigate 
for himself. 

Ethics, Logic and Political Economy are taught in the Senior year. 
Text-books are used and daily recitations are required. Class inquiries 
and discussions are encouraged, and familiar lectures are given from 
time toi time by the teacher. 

NATURAL SCIENCE. 

In the department of Natural Science the underlying aim is to teach 
the Student to think and observe for himself, and at the same time to 
give him such a fund of practical knowledge as will fit him for the active 
duties of life. In all the branches the text-book is used as a means to 
gain a knowledge of topics rather than to be studied as an end in itself, and 
^s far as possible the Student is led to the study of the objects them- 
selvea No pains are spared to cultivate halbits of clear, accurate and 
systematic thought and expression. 

Geology is taken during the first term of the Senior year. A practical 
knowledge of the common rocks and minerals is acquired, and excur- 
sions are made to quarries and regions which illustrate various geological 
formations. Each Student miakes a written report and collects charac- 
tieristic specimens and fossils, and constructs of these specimens, dressed 
down and mounted in plaster of paris, a model representing an ideal 
arrangemient of tJhe seven different geological forttna^tions, fossil-bearing, 
admirably presented to view by outcrops within a few miles of the 
Seminary. 

Zoology occupies the first term of the Senior year. The work, during 
sthe first half of the term, consists of acquiring a knowledge of the struc- 
ture of the principal classes of the several sub-kingdoms, while during the 
last half the comparative anatomy and physiology of the animal 
kingdom is taken up, and the iStudent is led to appreciate the finely 
^graded relationship that exists between the classes. Orton's text-book 



40 



WILLIAMSPORT DICKINSON SEMINABY. 






is used, and as much laboratory work is initroduoed as is practicable. 
This year the class studied a clam, oyster, lobster, pigeon, fish, frog, snake 
and oat, observingr closely the physiology, the circulation and respiration 
in the last five subjects. 

Physics embraces two terms of the Junior year. Mechanics, Sound 
and Heat are taken in the Pall Term; and Optics, Electricity and Magnet- 
ism in the Winter. The principles and laws are illustrated as far as prac- 
ticable by apparatus. The relation between (h._ difCerent branches is 
held strongly before the ni\n<l, nid i ractical questions, drawn from every- 
day life, are constauliy bruugiu forward to teach the Student to apply 
the principles learned in the text-book. The subject of Electricity is 
[Presented by a series of experiments and lectures, on which full notes 
are made by each Student. 

In Botany, after a few weeks of work in Gray's School and Field Book, 
the Student goes direct to the plant, analysis- occupying- (the remainder 
of the term. An herbarium la collected and prepared by each member 
of the class. 

Chemistry occupies the second and third terms of the Senior year. 
During the Spring Term there is also elective work in Analytical Chem- 
istry. The chemical laboratory has been fitted up and Is fully equipped 
with apparatus and chemicals for advanced technical work. The room 
is furnished with Individual tables, each supplied with gas, Bunsen's 
burner, ring stajnd. water, case with full set of re-agents, and all n-eces- 
sary apparatus for illustrative experiment and qualitative analysis. There 
is also a complete set of apparatus for volumertic and gravimetric anal- 
ysis and assaying. In the regular work Shepherd's Chtemistry is used. 
Bach Student keeping fuU notes on the experiments which are performed 
indiividually, becomes thoroughly familiar with chemicals and manipula- 
tions. In the Spring Term mineralogy is taken up in the laboratory work. 
Qualitative analyses of alloys and commercial! articles are made, after 
which quantitative analysis, both volumetric and gravimetric, is taken up. 
Estimation of ores by these processes and assaying, and analyses of milk, 
sugars and mineral waters are made. 

A dark-room has been built and furnished with a complete photo- 
graphic outfit, and photography is taught during the Spring Term. 

Lectures on subjects of interest to the department are given from time 
to time, illustrated by stereoscopic viiews projected by a new oxy-hydrogea 
light. 

ANCIENT LANGUAGES. 

In the departments of Greek and Latin, scrupulous attention is given 
to the grammatical structure of these languages, their relation to Eng- 
lish, the illustration and application of principlies, accurate translation, 
and to the literary significance of each author studied. Mythology and 
Classical Geography are studied in the Senior year. It is aimed to give 
the Classics by these means their proper place as an aid to expression, to 
a thorough knowledge of our own language and to the pursuit of other 
languages, as well as to afford the usual mental discipline. iCareful 
attention is also given to those preparing for college or for professional 
study. 



FOBTY-KIGHTH ANNUAL CATALOGUE. 



41 



MODERN LANGUAGES. 

During the first year in German, classes complete Otis' Elementary 
Grammar, as far as the subject of Syntax, with study of Irregular Verbs, 
'committing to memory all conversations,, proverbs and selections. In 
second year Syntax of Otis' Grammar is completed, with frequent dic- 
tation exercises. (Several standard novelettes are used; for acquiring 
facility in sig-ht reading- Meissner's German Conversation is used daily. 
The Spring Ti-nn s ^riv^en to a study of Schiller's Works. 

During the tirsi two terms in, French, Peiffer's Progressive French 
Drill Book is used, man^ t^iiurt extracts being committed to memory. 
Til Lhe Spring Term there is a study of Keetel's Elementary Grammar 
1 through thu subject of Irregular Verbs, careful attention being given to 
the idiom of the languag^i. Also some work mentioned under text- 
books is read., In second year grammatical study is completed, conversa- 
tional' exercises are continued, and some French classic or historical work 
is made the basis of advanced study. 

MATHEMATICS. 

The Course Ini Mathematics is coextensive with that in the majority 
of our best colleges. Although the study is considered as chiefly discip- 
linary, the aim throughout the Course is to acquaint the Student with the 
Instruments in most familiar use by the practical scientists and mathema- 
ticians of the day, as well as to strengthen his mental faculties and 
.increase his logical acumen. At the commencement of each subject a 
familiar lecture is given on its history and practical utility. 

Four terms are given to Algebra. The aim of the instruction in ad- 
vanced Algebra is to free the Student from his previous dependence upon 
the text-book, and to cultivate aljbility and taste for original mathematical 
work. iGreat stress is laid upon mathematical generalization and the 
concise demonstration of principles. 

Two terms are given in Geometry, embracing both the Plane and Solid. 

One term is given to Plane Trigonometry and one term to Surveying, 
the latter combining both theory and practice. 

One term is spent In Analytical Geom.etry, and one term each in the 
Differential and Integral Calculus. 

HISTORY AND RHETORIC. 

In the study of History the object is to familiarize the Student with 
the main facts and principles, thus forming a foundation on which to 
build by future reading and investigation. To this end the text-book is 
'thoroughly studied in connection with a Manual of Classical Antiquities 
and an Atlas, while at the same time the Student is encouraged to con- 
sult other authorities and bring in additional matter bearing on the 
subject. Recitation is by the analytical and topical methods. 

Special attention Is given to instruction in Rhetoric, on account of 
Its great value to the Student. The principles of good writing are studied 
and analyzed with a view to their practical application. 

During the last term much of the time is devoted to original productions 
in the various departments of literary composition, on themes assigned 
by the teadher. These productions are read before the class, where 
general criticisms are offered, after which tihey are handed to the teacher 
for more careful correction* 



42 



WILLIAMSPOKT DICKINSON SEMINAEY. 



FOBTY-KIGHTH ANNUAL CATALOGUE. 



43 



Pri7pq Awaixied in 1895 



TFIE PRESIDENT'S PRIZE. 
For Excellence in Writing and Delivering an Oration. 
Joseph M. Marion Gray, - - - . . 



James Creek. 



THE FREEBORN G. SMITH PRIZE. 

The First Prize for Excellence in Instrumental Music. 
Estella May McGee, McGee's Mills. 



THE S. Q. MINGLE PRIZE. 
Second Prize for Excellence in Instrumental Music. 
Helen Clarinda Benscoter, - - . . 



Altoona. 



THE MISS CHARLOTTE J. HOAG PRIZE. 

For Excellence in French. 

Mary Coulbourn Conner, - - . . . Bloomsburg. 

THE REV. DR. SAMUEL A. HEILNER PRIZES. 

For Excellence in Mental Science. 

PZstella May Welteroth, first .... Williamsport. 

T^^r^TTAT J John Horace Shale, ) , . - . 

Equal, t Minnie Viola Taylor, p^^^^"^ - 



Williamsport. 
Cogan House. 



THE FACULTY PRIZE. 



The gift of the Faculty to that member of the Rhetoric Class who shall excel in 

Writing and Reading an Essay. 



Charles B. Piper, 



Sinnemahoning. 



THE DR. C. C. WALKER AND MAX L. MITCHELL PRIZES. 

For Excellence in German. 



EouAi } Waller Soderlintr, 

\ Benjamin Edgar Iledding, 



Harrisburer. 
Morrisdale Mines. 



Honors Awarded in 1895. 



FIRST CLASSICAL— VALEDICTORY. 



Mary Katharine Kurtz, 



Williamsport. 



SECOND CLASSICAL-CLASSICAL ORATION. 



Oliver Herman Albertson, 



Fairmount Springs. 



FHiST SCIENTIFIC— SALUTATORY. 



Clem Chester Creveling, 



Town Hill. 



SECOND SCIENTIFIC— SCH:NTIF1C ORATION. 



Cora Lois Jones, 



Williamsport. 



BEIXES LETTRES BELLES LETTRES ESSAY. 



Minnie Blanche MeCullough, 



Clearfield. 



44 



WILLIAMSPORT DICKINSON SEMINARY. 



I \ t : .:> 



HJcHit Graduates 



MUSIC. 

ANNA ALETTA ARTLEY. 
JENNIE DAE GREEN. 
ESTELLA ROCKWELL. 
ANNA BLANCHE SLATE. 
GEORGE JOHN KOONS. 

ART. 

SUSAN THOMPSON MUSSINA. 
ESTELLA ROCKWELL. 



ELOCUTION. 

CHARLOTTE CRITTENDEN EVERETT. 
DAISY MILLS. 



MODERN LANGUAGES. 

EVA V. GRAY. 

ANNA WILLIAMS KING. 



COLLEGE PREPARATORY. 

ANNA WILLIAMS KING. 
CHARLES WILBUR FRECK. 



FORTY-EIGHTH ANNUAL CATALOGUE. 



45 



Senior Class. 



Floi ence Patton< Bartcli — c. p Columibda 

CaroHnei Lorena Beek — b. 1 Wiilliams(port 

Annia Marg'uerite Blyithe' — b. 1 Madera 

Mary Coulbou r- 1 1 r u . n er — c. p Bloomp] vu r lt 

Grace Alverna Crevelin^ — b. 1 To v. ? i 1 lill 

Olive Robison. Kitchen: — ^b. 1 Hug-hesville 

Alice Low Low— b. 1 Lime Ridge 

S. Delmar Carskadon McNemar — b. 1 Gambrills, Md. 

Beulah Augusta Mulliner — s Williamsport 

Grace Lorene Mulliner — ^b. 1 Williamsport 

Mary Ann Rich — 'b. 1 Williiamspoirt 

Minnie Viola Taylor-^s Oog-an Holuse 

Margaret Elizabeth' Vansant — ^b. 1 Annapolis, Md. 

Elizabeth Green Wilcox — ^b. 1 Shamoikin 

Caroline Beaver Young — ^b. 1 Williamspont 

Joseph Randle Bailey — c. p Philadeilphla 

John Rookafeller feowman — c. p Austiji 

Harry Clay Freck — p. s Williamsport 

Joseph M. Marion Gray — c James Ct-eek 

Daniel Malvern Grover — s Williamsport 

Benjamin Adam Haa:Tis — p. s Williamsport 

Byrd Windfield Hively— s York 

Howard Dysart Kessler — c. p Altoona 

Dorsey Newten Miller — c- p Trout Run 

Wilbur Pisk Pene^packer — c Danville 

Edgaii Foster Piper — s Sinnemahoning 

Harold Little Rankin— s Bailtlmore, Md. 

Samuel Franklin Rounsley — & Houtzdale 

J. Horace Shale — s Burliingame 

Fred Grant Sleep — s Hazletan 

Harry Lawrence Stewart^ — p. s Tyrone 

Preston McComas Wallis— s Fortest Hill, Md. 

c ClasBical. b— Scientifin. b. 1 — Belles Lettres. c. p.— (College Preparatory. 

p. 8.— Practical Science. 



INSTRUMENTAL MUSIC. 



Martha B. Bowmani Austin 

PMith Garnette Correll Nagasiaki, Japajn 

Jessie Almedo Fulmer WilUamsport 

Helen Leona Greer Altoona 

Ilann/ah Mille Harrington Viola, Del. 

Julia Forrest Paine Williamsport 

Alice Mae Wait Johnstown 



46 



WILLIAMSPORT DICKINSON SEMINARY. 



ELOCUTION. 

Anna Marguerite Blytbe Madera 

Laura Stella De Wald WilUamsport 

La Blanche Violet Fegley Wiltomsport 

S. Jane Massey Camden, N. J. 

Daisy Mills Williamsport 



Junior Class. 



Alderdioe, Mary ElizaJbeth — e New York N. Y 

And'ersan, Rosa Tallhelm— b. 1 —rrr. Willi am sport 

Babb, Estella— b. 1 Medley, W. Va. 

Barclay, Francis Lillian Bartholf— b. 1 Sinnemahonin,^ 

Basil, Frances Marian— b. 1 Annapolis, Md. 

Beymer, Cora May— b. 1 Montoursville 

Benscoter, Mary Gussie— b. 1 Altoona 

Bowman, Martha B. — c Austin 

Cheston, Mary Irene— s William»port 

Follmer, M^irgaret Emma— b. 1 Williamsport 

Garrison, Martha Ruby— b. 1 WiUlamspont 

MclDtosh, Elizabeth Ames — s Burling-amej 

McVey, Bertha Curry— n. e Hollisiterville 

Murray, Mary Achenbach — s Burling^ame 

Parlett, Mary Olive— b. 1 Annapolis, Md. 

Sclioll, Margraretta Anna — s Buirling-amie 

Allen, Robert John— s Stocktooi 

Armstrong, Willliaim Landstreet — c Ralston 

Ash, Vincent Boak — s McVey town 

Ash, Wilbur Fisk — s McVeytown 

Barker, Wilbur Stewart — s Harrisburg 

Beck, George Carlton — s Williamsport 

Brenneman, Josepflti Ervin — s Dillsburg 

Follmer, William Wilcox— s Williamsport 

Graeff, Augustus Nicholas — c. p Readinig 

Hall, Samuel Perry — s Beech Creek 

Ha.rtman, Lester Baertgesi — s iWilliamsport 

Hooven, Thompson Mitchell — s Flemington 

McMurtrie, Henry Herbert — s Seybertsvllle 

Mearkle, William Wharton— « Mattie 

Piper, Charley Blaine — 9 Sinneimiahoniing 

Porter, Elbert Ansley — s Canton; 

Rigdon, Nathan — s Mill Green, Md. 

Sarver, Sidney Johnson^-s White Maa*sh, Md. 

Smith, Joseph Walton — c p Frederick, Md. 

Sprout, Boyd Baker — s Burlingame 

Warn, George Kline — s Hughesville 

Wood, J. Perry — 9 Curwensville 

c— Classical. s.— Scientific. b. 1.— Belles Lettres. c. p.— College Preparatory. 

p. 8. —Practical Science. 



FORTY-EIGHTH ANNUAL CATALOGUE. 



47 



Sophomore Class. 



Babb, Edna— b. 1 Greenland, W. V. 

Barrett, lluth Dinsmore — c. p Wellsville 

Belt, Miriam Alice — c. p Wellsvillie 

Davis, Martha H.— b. 1 Mt Pleasant, Del. 

Def ebai^gh, Emma Sylvania^— b. 1 West Fairfield 

Fisher, Elizabeth Anne — s Tomb's Run 

Ford, Anna Amelia: — b. 1 . .77777777."/. 7/.' 777 ..~.T.77.T^ .777 Gardeau 

Frost, Helen Hendrix— b. 1 Watsontown 

Gearhart, Adaline Isabella — ^b. 1 Clearfield 

MicMurray, Nelle Adams— b. 1 New Washington 

Neal, Lizzie Bowers^s WiHiamsport 

Novenski, Anna Mabel— c Montoursville 

Pierson, Bertha Linn— b- 1 Altoona 

Schrade, Anna Magdalene — c Willl'amsport 

Stevens, Sara Adelaide- ^*^U . w6>' New Bloomfield 

Wilson, Cornlella Gray— c Newberry 

Young, Violar-c Danville 

Bell, Jesse S.— s Williamsport 

Belt, James Edward — 'C. p Wellsville 

Beyer, Thomas Percival — ^s Ramey 

Bierly, Edwin S.— s Rebersburg 

Bryner, Charles Wilber— s Pleasant View 

Bubb, Michael B.— s Fredericksburg, Va. 

Coulston, Allisoni Housfton Philadelphia 

Forrest, Granville Lawson — s Lititlestown 

Fran<cis, James Franklin — c Shamokin 

Ganoe, William A.— o Williamsport 

Hahn, David Edward — c. p Philadelphia 

Hartsock, Henry Willis— s Buffalo Run 

Kiess, Howard Stanley— s Williamsport 

Kinsloe, John Hamilton — c. p Newton Ham;il)tOTi 

Mock, Stanley Upton — ^s Pavia 

Oyler, Richard Skyles — c Mann's Chodce 

Penepacker, Charles Fowler — c. p Danville 

Sholl, WiHiam WilliSH-s Rebersburg 

Showalter, Henry Miller — s Laurel ton 

Stutsman, Frank Vanhaag— c Harrisburg 

Yount, John Wesley— s Littlestown 

c— Classical. s.— Scientific. b. L— Belles Lettres. c. p.— College Preparatory. 

p. B.— Practical Science. 



48 



WILLIAMSPORT DICKINSON SEMINARY. 



Academic. 



SECOND YEAR. 



Anderson, Jessie Pearl.. 
Basehoone, Mary Effie... 

Preck, Ella Irene 

McEwen,, Esther Jennie 

Metzgfer, Ella Zaidee 

Miller. Edith Beulah.... 



Williamsport 

Shiremansito wn 

Williamsiport 

Willlam'spiOirt 

•*•••* 'Will iam sport 

,, ,^ ^ ,. Trouft Run 

Moltz Caroltoe Laura WHMamsport 

Rauch, Norn Rau<=htown 

Reese Elizabeth Saaiadiasb,urg 

Richardson, Hattle Hawes Newberry 

Betttms, James Edward "' stxwktan 

Bird, Charles Edwta: .'.' ".'.'prince Fred^itek. Md. 

Boush. J. Prank Harrlaburg 

Boyee. Ervin E cogan Station 

Bubb. Sylvester iHaye« Montourt^viDle 

Budimgw, Arthur Bowman g^aw She* 

Budlnger, William Samuel g^^w Shoe 

Burnley. Charles W Swarthmore 

Cardon, William Lee Clearfield 

Coder, Camtoridge Gfraham ^^^^ ^„g 

Collins, William S WiUlamsport 

Connter, Nathan Stephenson Tull's Corner Md 

(Corl, Jacob .L .' 

„ ' Pavia 

Dunlap. Charles Wmiamsport 

Dunlap, Frank Williiamteport 

Engler. Stuard Harrison harbor Mills 

Prycklund, Em-est Qsceola Mills 

Hulin^, Harry C Williamsport 

Hunt, William Taylor South Will ia/msporl: 

Hutc-hins. A. Rush ^^^^ ^j^ 

Jarrett, Warren Viator Burlin^ame 

Kavanaugh, Ramsey Daniel Wim'ameport 

La Rue, Harper Miles Dillsburg 

Levan, Jacob Kimber Numidfia 

Mansel, Harry Southard Williamsport 

Millard. Oliver Burt Centralis, 

Mott, Daniel G Unityville 

Odell, Charles Mandervllle Tarrytown N Y 

Runyan, John Truby 'Meroersburg 

Slate, George Williamsport 

St^ad, Richard Hayden Williamspoirt 

Straley, Charles L Rose Valley 

Sweng-le, William Wesley Paxtonviile 



H 
X 

m 

H 

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CO 

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»v%- \ 









48 



WILLIAJISPOKT DICKINSON SEMINARY, 



Academic. 



SECOND YEAR. 

Anderson Jessie Pearl WiUi^sport 

Basehore, Mary Effie au- 

^ , '„ ^ Shiremansftown 

Preck, Ella Irene „..,,. 

i\,T T^ rn. .-, ^ Willi am sport 

McEwen, PJsther Jennie ..r-.v 

T. > . ^„ \v iiriam'sport 

Me zger E la Zaidee Wmiamsn.,.f 

M,ller. Edith Beulah ...Trout Ln 

Moltz Caroline Laura WMliamsport 

Rauch, Nora RaucMown 

Reese, Elizabeth Saaiadasib.urs 

Richardson, Hattie Hawes -vt i. 

, x«,uLic xao^wca Newberry 

Bet ens, James Edward Stocktota 

Bud, Charles Edwin pnnpe Frederick, Md 

Boush. J. Frank Harrisburg 

Bovee, Ervin E ^ogan Sta,t1on 

Bubb. Sylvester Hayes Mrintouilsvillte 

Budingrer. Arthur Bowman gn^w Shoe 

Budingrer, William Samuel g^^^ g^og 

Burnley, Charles W Swarthmore 

Cardon. William Lee Clearfield 

Coder, Cam-bridpe Graham j^oyles Mills 

Collins. William S Williamsport 

Conn'er, Nathan Stephenson xull's Corner Md 

(Corl, Jacob ' . 

Dunlap, Charles ' .'^^"^* "'"'*' ^^*'^!!!Wniiam^^ 

Dunlap, Frank Willi'a.nTlsport 

Engler. Stuard Harrison jj^^^^^ ^.j^^ 

Frycklund, Ernest Osceola M'illg 

Hulinff, Harry C William^port 

Hunt, William Taylor South Williamsport 

Hutchins. A. Rush ^^^^ ^^j^,^ 

Jarrett. Warren Victor Burlinffame 

KavanaupTh, Ramsey Daniel Williamsport 

I^a Rue, Harper Miles Dillsburg 

Levan, Jacob Kimber Numidlia 

Mansel, Harry Southard Williamsport 

Millard, Oliver Burt .".*'... ..Centralis 

Mott, Daniel G Unityville 

Odoll, Charles Manderville Tarrytown N T 

Runyan, John Truby 'Mercersbur^ 

Slate, George Williamsport 

St^ ad, Richard Hayden Williamspoirt 

Straloy, Charles L Rose Valley 

Swengrle, William Wesley PaxtonviJle 



»V 



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FORTY-EIGHTH ANNUAL CATALOGUE. 



49 



Trimx, Ernest Bell Ansonville 

Weis, Augrustus Burlingame 

Whitehead, Charles G^abriel South Willlaimsport 

Wilcox, Thomas Sewell Shamokln 

Wingiert, Avery Edmund Fayetteville 



^W4 



A 9l \_^* C.-\, V.^1 v^ I i i I V^' M. 



1i< 



^-ff^ 



FIRST YEAR. 

Gearhart, Carrie M Philipsburg 

Hartman, Edna E Medix Run 

Levergood, Maud E Lebanon 

Rich, Susan Wllliamsport 

Shaver, Mary M Williamsport 

Spears, Vinnie Ream Bernice Karthaus 

Unterecker, Florence Edna Williamsport 

Wilson, Clara J Benezette 

Woods, Hazel Swinburne Williamsport 

Austin, John Abingrdon, Va. 

Austin, David Williamsport 

Marzh, Elijah Williamsport 

Moltz, William Weaver Williamsport 

Reighfard, Joseph Ault Newberry 

Salter, Bert Alvin Shamokin 

Schuchart, Harry Julias Stockton 

Talif erro, Charles Schaffer Christiansburg, Va. 

Wilcox, Maslin Prysinger Shamokin 



Classical Department. 



^ I'^ 



Alderdice, M. Elizabeth 2291 Second Avenue, New York, N. Y. 

Bov^^man, Martha B Austin 

Novenskl, Anna M Montoursville 

Schrade, Anna M 520 Market Street, Williamsport 

Wilson, Cornelia G Newberry 

Young, Viola Danville 

Francis, J. Franklin 241 East Dewart Street, Shamokin 

Ganoe, William A S22 Campbell Street, Williamsport 

Gray, J. M. Marion James Creek 

Oyler, R. S Mann's Choice 

Penepacker, W. F Danville 

Stutsman, F- V 1731 New Fifth Street, Harrisburg 



50 



WILLIAMSPORT DICKINSON SEMINAEY. 



FORTY-EIGHTH ANNUAL CATALOGUE. 



51 



>' 



Scientific Department. 

Cheston, Mary 1 425 West Edwin Street, Williamsport 

Fisher, Elizabeth A Tomb's Run 

Mcintosh, Elizabeth A '!!**.'.*/.*.!*.!'.;!;'..".; '..Burlin^me 

Mullmer, Beulah A 20 Washinigpton Street, Williamspo-rt 

Murray, Mary A..... Burlin^-ame 

Neal. Lizzie B 508 Edwin Street, Williamsport 

Scholl, Marg-aretta A Burling-ame 

Taylor, Minnie V Cogan House 

Alien, Robert J Stookton 

Armstrong", William L Ralston 

Ash, Vincent B McVeytawn 

Ash, Wilbur F McVey town 

Barker, Wilbur S HaTTisburg 

Beck, G. Carlton Williamsport 

Bell, Jesse S 439 Grant Street, Williamsport 

Beyer, T. Percival Ramey 

Bierly, Edwin S Rebersburg- 

Brenneman, Joseph E Dillsburg 

Bryner, Charles W Pleasant View 

Bubb, Michael B Fredericksburg-, Va. 

Follmer, William W Williamsport 

Forrest, Granville L Littlestoiwn 

Grover, Daniel M Williamsport 

Hall, Samuel P Beech Creek 

Hartsock, H. Willis Buffalo Run 

Hartman, Lester B 831 Elmira Street, Williamsport 

Hively, Byrd W York 

Hooven, Thompson M Flemington 

Kless, Howard 7IO Market Street, Williamsport 

McMurtrie, Henry H Seybertsville 

Mearkle, William W. Mattie 

Mock, Stanley U Pavia 

Piper, Charles B Sinnemahoning 

Piper, Edgar P Sinlnemahoning- 

Porter, Elbert A Canton 

Rankin, Harold L 2211 St. Paul's Street, Baltimope, Md. 

Rigdon, Nathan Mill Green,' Md. 

Rounsley, Samuel F Houtzdale 

Sarver, Sidney J White Marsh, Md. 

Shale, J. Horace Burilingame 

Sholl, William W Rebersburg 

Showalter, Harry M Laurelton 

Sleep, Fred G Hazleton 

Sprout, Boyd B Burling^amie 

Wallis, Preston M Forest Hill, Md. 

Warn, Georg-e K .Hughesville 

Wood, J. Perry Curwensville 

Yount, John W Littlestown 



I 



•^Ct 



^m^ 



Belles Lettres Department. 

Anderson, Rosa T 1416 West Fourth Street, Williamsport 

Babb, Edna. Greenland, W. Va. 

Babb, Estella j^^^j.^^ ^ ^^ 

Barclay, P. Llllinn B Sinnemahoning 

Basil, Prances M 30 Maryland Avenue, Annapolis Md 

Beck, Caroline L Williamsport 

Benscoter, M. Gussle 3^6 Howard Avenue, Altoona 

Beymer, May C Montoursvllle 

Blythe, Anna M Madera 

Crevelingr, Grace A .__^..Town Hill 

Davis, Martha H Mt. Pleasant, Del. 

Defebaugh, E. Sylvania ^est Fairfield 

Follmer, Margaret E Williamsport 

Ford, Anna A Gardeau 

Frost, Helen H Watsontmvn 

Garrison, M. Ruby 924 •Washington Street, Williamsport 

Gearhart, Adaline I Clearfield 

Kitchen Oli^e R HughesvlUe 

Low, Alice L ^ime Ridge 

MoMurray, Nellie A ^^w Washington 

McNemar, S. Delmar C Gambrills, Md. 

Mullmer, Grace L 20 Washington Street, Williamsport 

Pailett, M. Olive Prince George Street, Annapolis, Md. 

Pierson, Bertha L 1911 Twentieth Street, AltooTia 

Rich, Mary A 514 West Fourth Street, Williamsport 

Stevens, S. Adelaide.. ijl\ New Bloomfield 

Vansant, Margaret E 63 West Street, Annapolis, Md 

Wilcox, Elizabeth G Shamokin 

Young, Caroline B 331 Locust Street, Williamsport 



College Preparatory. 

Barrett, Ruth D Wellsvill'e 

Bartch, Florence P Columbda 

Belt, M. Alice Wellsville 

Conner, Mary C Bloomsburg 

Bailey, Joseph R 1243 West Forty-ninth Street, PhiladelphiJa 

Belt, J. Edward Wellsville 

Bowman, John R Austin 

Graeff, Augustus N 744 Pear Street. Reading 

Hahn, Edward E 923 Mifflin Street, Philadelphia 

Kessler, Howard D 1423 Twelfth A. venue, Altoona 

Kinsloe, John H Newton Hamilton 

Miller, Dorsey N Trout Run 

Penepacker, Charles F Danville 

Smith, Joseph W Frederick, Md, 



FORTY-EIGHTH ANNUAL CATALOGUE. 



53 



52 



WILLI AMSPORT DICKINSON SEMINARY. 



! 



I 



. is 



Practical Science. 



Freck, Harry C Williamsport 

Harris, Benjamin A 924 Walnut Street, Williamsport 

Stewart, Harry L Tyrone 



Normal English 



McVey, Bertihaj C Hollis(terville 



Academic Department 



Anderson, Jessie P 1416 West Fourth Street, Williamsport 

Basehore, Mary E Shiremanstown 

Freck, Ella I Williamsport 

Gearhart, Carrie M Philipsbuilg 

Hartman, Edna E Medix Run 

Levengood, Maud E 142 East Cumberland Street, Lebanon 

McEwen, Esther 332 Rural Avenue, Williamsport 

Metzger, E. Zaidee 1006 West Fourth Street, William sport 

Miller, Edith B Trout Run 

Moltz, Caroline L 128 East Third Streiet, Williamsport 

Rauch, Nora Bauchtown 

Reese, Elizabeth Salladastouirg 

Rich, Susan 514 West Fourth Street, Williamsport 

Richardson, Hattie H Elm Street, Newberry 

Shaver Mary M '^'^ ^^^^ Street, Williamsport 

Spears,' Vinnie B Karthaus 

Unterecker Florence E 789 Easit Third Street, Williamsport 

Wilson, Clara J Benezette 

Woods Hazel S West Fourth Street, Williamsport 

Austin, David.* v.'. Abingdon, Va. 

Austin, John Abingdon, Va. 

Bettens, James E ;.''V1? ..T 

Bird, Charles E ^^^^^ Frederick, Md. 

Boush, J. Frank, 407 Kelker Street, Harrisburg 

Bovee, Ervin E ^^o^^" ^'^'^;' 

-r. x.1. o XT Montoursville 

Bufcb, S. H ^ „, 

^ -., A^+i,,,^ Snow Shoe 

Budinger, Arthur 

„ ^, Txr G Snow Shoe 

Budinger, W. S 

^ , ^v, 1^ Txr Swartbrnore 

Burnley, Charles W 

^ ^ -cxrmio^ T Clearfield 

Cardon, William Lt 



^ 






Coder, Ounbridge G Doyles Mills 

Collins, William S Williamsport 

Conner, Nathan S Tull's Corner, Md. 

Corl, Jacob Pavia 

Coulston, Allison H 1008 Dehigh Avenue, Philadelphia ^ 

Dunlap, Charles 227 William Street, Williamsport 

Dunlap, Frank 227 William Street, Williamsport 

Engler, Stiiard H Harbor Mills 

Fry ckland, Ernest Osceola Mills 

Huhng, Harry C 880 Erie Avenue, Williamsport 

Hunt, William T South Williamsport 

Hut chins, A. R Rock Glen 

Jarrett, Warren V Burlingame 

Kavanaugh, Ramsey 1602 West Fourth Street, Williamsport 

I.a Rue, H. M Dillsburg 

Lftvan, Kimber Numidia 

Mansel, Harry S 417 Park Avenue, Williamsport 

Marzh, Elijah Williamsport 

Millard, Oliver B Centralia 

Moltz, William W 128 East Third Street, Williamsport 

Mott, Daniel G Unity ville 

Odell, Charles M Tarrytown, N. Y. 

Reighard, Joseph A Newberry 

Runyan, J. Truby Mercersburg 

Salter, Bert A Shamokin 

Schuchart, Harry J Stockton 

Slate, George 351 Mulberry Street, Williamsport 

Stead, Richard H 309 Mulberry Street, Williamsport 

Straley, Charles L Rose Valley 

Swengle, William W Paxtonville 

Taliferro, Charles S Christiansburg, Va. 

Truax, Ernest B Ansonville 

Weis, Augustus Burlingame 

Whitehead, Charles G So^th Williamsport 

Wilcox, Maslin F Shamokin 

Wilcox, Thomas S Shamokin 

Wingert, Avery E FayetteviUe 



Primary Department. 



Cochran, May Helen 1005 West Fourth Street, Williamsport 

Ennis, Iris 34 Washington Street, Williamsport 

Jordan, Elizabeth Pott 314 Locust Street, Williamsport 

Metzger, Clarice Geraldine 1006 West Fourth Street, Williamsport 

Metzger, Hannah Margaret 1006 West Fourth Street, Williamsport 

Savidge,' Hazel Elizabeth 147 East Fourth Street, Williamsport 

Stevens Bessie May ..345 Mulberry Street, Williamsport 

Stevens, Nellie Bell 345 Mulberry Street, Williamsport 



« 



54 



WILLIAMSPORT DICKINSON SEMINARY. 



I 



FOETY-EIGHTH ANNUAL CATALOGUE. 



55 



Worthington, Ada Caroline 

Allien, June Silas WUliamsport 

Anderson, John Ma^ I'li'^'^V^'Tt,^'^*' ^^"^^^ WiUiamsport 

Chrlstman, Milton Stmus's Z^ ^T^"" l'''^'' W^"'^™«P°' * 

Davis, Andrew CrockTt ''' ^"''^"?: IT^'' ^'•ia-sport 

F.llmer, Clinton Lee '^^ ®^'^^*' Williamsport 

Moltz, Elijah Gould. WiUiamsport 

Moltz, Harold Williamsport 

Reighard, James Gamble qqn M,Vn' ^1 Williamsport 

Shaffer. Burns V,'. w ^"'^T'' ^''^^'' Williamsport 

SpiK«lmver T^.iP-Pna v^'-li Washmgrton Street, Williamsport 

st'.'TS'SrfrRa:. ' '''^ '' z^T.r" ''''''' ^»»--^-' 

sump, William Cart.':: TT? .T'''' ^''''^^^^'•' 

Weis, Kalph Jay ,y:,Zi 7T J^^^'' W'"'^™«P°"-t 

— ^ • 1416 West Fourth Street, Williamsport 



Music Department 



INSTRUMENTAL. 

Alderdice. Marv Elizahf^th oooi ai ^ * 

Anderson Clara ""^^^ ^291 Stecond Aven uo New Yo,k, N. Y. 

Anaerson, Clara ^^g Market Street, Willis msport 

Anderson, Rosa Tallhelm Hie West Fourth qtrAo/ "l! .'^™^r^'^'^ 

Artley, Anna Aletta 10T2 Z,Z\ ' 3'"'^»PO''* 

Eabb Edna Avenue, Williamsport 

Babb! EsteUa.'. Greenland, W. Va. 

Barrett, Ruth Dinsmore'.V.V.' ^'^'^^^^- ^- ^^• 

S 5=1:1^^:: -Mamand-Xv;nue:Ann;prr^^^^ 

Beck. Mame Williamsport 

Beeber^ Julia Marie V.V. 13V EastFour'th Street,' WiSns^.I 

Belt, Mirram Alice Wellsville 

Benscoter, Mary Gussie o^c tr ^ . ' . 

• y vjustoie 3J5 Howard Avenue, Altoona 

Bowman, Hannah ,,!,, 

Bowman, Martha B M.llersbu.rg 

Susst; ""^7 "T.'?"' '■■■■■''' '""^^ ' ^-"-' ■ Wiiu^mSt 

Bussler. Daisy Adela n si^^^ gti^et, Williamsport 

Cochran, Mary Helen 1006 West Fourth Street, Williamsport 

Conner, Mary Coulbourn BloomsburJ 

Correll, Edith Gamette Mf,^n=.cti to 

^„ -, „ JN agasaki, Japan 

Cowan, Mary B -rJ , 

„ „, Karthaua 

Crownover C^ra Genevieve Williams,port 

Davis Mattie H ^^ Pleasant. Del. 

Douglass, Mary Bradley Bristol Vt 

Dutton, Laoka Leah 422 Third Avenue. Williamsport 

Ford, Anna Amelia Gardeau 

Freck, Ella Irene Williamsport 

Fries, Cora May 953 west Third Street, Williamsport 

Fros.t, (Helen Hendrlx Watsontown 



•t) 



'.1 






Fulmer Jessie Almedo East Third Street, Williamsport 

Gates, Minnie E ^ , . 

^ , ^ ^, ,. Coalport 

Gearhart, Adaline Isiaibella Clearfieild 

Gearhart, Carrie M ****.*.*.*.'.*.* Philipsburg 

Green, Jennie Dae 957 west Third Street, Williamsport 

Greer, Helen Leona mi Fourteenth Avenue, Altoona 

Gundrum, Maysie Elizaheth 858 Louisa Street, Williamsport 

Haines, Annie Beatrice Seminary, Williamsport 

Hanks, Fmnces Barton 90O Louisa Street, Williamsport 

Harringiton, Hannah Mille Viola Del 

Harris, Mertie Estella Moiitoursville 

Hartman, Edna E Medix Run 

Helm, Dolly 410 Academy Street, Williamsport 

Hoag-land, Eleanor MUller 760 West Third Street, Williamsport 

Hopkinsom, Gabriell>a BiddUe Williamspcr<t 

Huff, Bertha May 1138 East Third Street, Williamsport 

Huff, Frances Schuyler 1006 Washington Street, Williamsport 

King, Grace Miriam 906 Louisa Street, Williamsport 

Kinseley, Florence Sybella Orbiisontla 

Kolbe, Daisy Gertrude Burling-ame 

Konkle, Clara Montoursville 

Koons, Marg^aret Ef mina Williamsport 

Leamy, Ruth Ella Warrensville 

Levengood, Maud E 142 East Cumberland Street, Leibanon 

Long, Clara 460 Market Street, WilDiamsport 

Low, Alice Low Lime Ridge 

Massey, S. Jane Third and Becket Streets, Camden, N. J. 

Maxwell, Nellie Grant 102^5 Rural Avenue, Williaonsport 

McMurray, Nelle Adams New Washinirton 

Metzger, Ella Zaidee 1006 West Fourth Street, Williamsport 

Moltz, Caroline Laura 128 East Third Street, Williamspoirt 

Mulliner, Grace Lorene 20 Washington Street, Williamsport 

Myerri, Maggie 113 Boyd Street, Newberry 

Neal, Lizzie Bowers 608 Edwin Street, Williamsport 

Nice, Martha Eleanor 144 East Fourth Street, Williamsport 

Nugent, Elizabeth Daisy Jersey City, N. J. 

J'a.ne, Julia Forrest 629 Campbell Street, W- Uiamsport 

Pursell, Jessie Martha 26 Sixth Street, Williamsport 

Rank, Jennie M 241 Market Street, Williamsport 

Robfcins, Lilly Belle 131 Bennett Street, Williamsport 

Scholl, Mazie Leonora Buirlingame 

Shaffer, C- Elizabeth 623 Washington Street, Williamsport 

Shale, Marion A Burlingame 

Shope, Bessie Violet Saltillo 

Slate, Anna Blanche 351 Mulberry Street, Williamsport 

Smith, Daisy 1047 Erie Avenue, Williamspcxrt 

Stevens, Nellie Bell 345 Mulberry Street, Williamsport 

Swartz, Mabel R Muncy 

Tallman, Gertrude 344 Academy Street, Williamsport 

Tuckerman, Mrs. F. W Washington. D. C. 

Unterecker, Florence Edna 789 East Third Street, Williamsport 



i! 



56 



WILLIAMSPOET^DICKINSON SEMINARY. 



FORTY-EIGHTH ANNUAL CATALOGUE. 



57 



II 



! 



^ 



fi 



t 



Van Fos^en, Emily Maude 724 Grace Street, Wllliamsport 

Wajt, Alice Mae Johnstown 

\Vallis, Columbia Anna ^^^.^^ hiu. Md. 

Wilcox, Elizabeth Gree^n en. i • 

Williams, Bessie Humphrey Hazleton 

Wilson, Clara J.. ^ 4.x 

, K^La,x a, o Benezettei 

Wolfersbergrer, Elizabeth Catherine Rookwood 

Wright, Maud Odessa Calvin 

Younig, Caroline Beaver 331 Locust Street,' WilVia^sport 

1 oung, Carrie §01 Market Street, Williamsport 

Young, Ruth Ellsworth gOl Market Street, Williamsport 

Younken, Bertha May 1246 Vine Street, Williamsport 

La Rue, Harper Miles Dillsburg 

Millard, Oliver Burt .TTTv! !! !!centralia 

Munson. Walter Esseljque 830 East Third Street! WillianispDrt 

Mussina, Clarence Clyde 1022 West Fourth Street, William^sport 

Neeoe, Louis E ^1CT^^^^ 

Williamspoit 

Stead, Richard Hay den 309 Mulberry Street, Williamsport 

Stewart, Harry Lawrence Tyrone 



USIC 



u|.}. U 



iment. 



VOCAL. 

Alderdice, Mary Elizabeth 2291 Second Avenue. New York N Y 

Barclay, Frances Lillian Bartholf Sinneaiahorun^- 

Basil, Frances Marian 30 Maryland Avenue, Annapolis Md 

Belt, Mariam Alice Weli'sville 

Bentley, Helen 914 y^^,^ g^^reet, Williamsport 

Blythe, Anna Margruerite Madera 

Bowman, Hannah Ayrnil,, v. 

^, ^ ' , Millersburg- 

Cheston,, Mary Irene 426 West Edwin Street, Williamsport 

Cochran, Mary Helen 1005 West Fourth Street, WiUiamsport 

Correll, Edith Garnettte Nagasaki, Japa^ 

Davis, Jennie Dean ..346 High Street, Williamsport 

Freck, Ella Irene Williamspprtt 

Frost, Helen Hendrix WatsontoWn 

Gates, Minnie E Coalport 

Gearhar^, Adaline Isabella Clearfleld 

Greer, Helen Leona im Fourteenth Avenue. Altoona 

Gundrum, Maysle Elizabeth 858 Louisa Street, Williamsport 

Harrington, Hannah Mille Viola. Del. 

Hartman, Lulu May 212 Chatham Street, Williamsport 

Massey, S. Jane Third and Becket Streets, Camden, N. J. 

Maynard, Encie 905 West Third Street, Williamsport 

Mulliner, Grace Lorene 20 Washington Street, Williamsport 

Parle tt, Mary Olive Prince George Street, Annapolis, Md. 

Purse'll, Jessie Martha 26 Sixth Street, Williamsport 

Reese, Elizabeth Salladasburg 



i^^ 



4- 1 



Rick, Mrs. W- F Hess Building, Williamsport 

Rockwell, Estella 338 High Street, Williamsport 

Wait, Alice Mae Johnstown 

Wallis, Columbia Anna Forest Hill, Md. 

Williams, Bessie Humphrey Hazleton 

Wolfer^b^^rger, T^lizal)-^! h Catherine Rockwood 

Woodley, Stella Rosamond Burlingame 

Wright, Maud Odessa Calvin 

Freck, Cha ! h s Wilbur Williamsport 

Guncinnn, David 858 Louisa Street, Williamsport 

Kesslei , Ibjw dvd Dysart 1423 Twelfth Avenue. Altoona 

Koons, George John 600 Mulberry Street, Williamsport 

Penepacker, Wilbur Fisk Danville 

Rounsiley, Samuel Franklin T.^'.TTTTr.^TTTmTT. .777 Houtzdale 

Seads, Cloyd H 332 West Fourth S^treet, Williamsport 

Smith, Joseph Walton Frederick, Md- 

Stead, Richard Hay den 309 Mulberry Street, Williamsport 

Stew^art, Harry Lawrence Tyrone 

Wallis, Preston McComas Forest Hill, Md. 



Mnriern Language i)^partment. 



FRENCH. 

Carver, Maye Wellsvillie 

MaoDonald, Agnes Maude 1143 Vine Street, Williamsport 

Massey, S. Jane Third and Becket Streets, Camden, N. J. 

Mulliner, Beulah Augusta 20 Washington Street, Williamsport 

No\enski, Anna Mabel Montoursville 

Parlett, Mary Olive Prince George Street, Annapolis, Md. 

Schrade, Anna Magdalene 520 Market Street, Williamsport 

GERMAN. 

Barclay, Frances Lillian Bartholf Slnnemahoning 

Batrtch, Florence Patton Columbia 

Basil, Frances Marian 30 Maryland Avenue, Annapolis, Md. 

Blythe, Anna Marguerite Madera 

Correll, Edith Garnette Nagasaki, Japan 

Ford, Anna Amelia Gardeau 

Freck, Ella Irene Williamisport 

Gray, Mrs. Edward J Seminary, WlUiajn&port 

Holler, Mlllicent 1158 West Third Street, Williamsport 

Jewett, Elizabeth Estelle 452 William Street, Williamsport 

IKing, Anna Williams Newberry 

McNemar, S. Delmar Carskadon Gambrills, Md. 

Nugent, Elizabeth Daisy Jersey City, N. J. 

Schrade, Anna Magdalene 520 Market Street, Williamisport 

Vansant, Margaret Elizabeth 63 West Street, Annapolis, Md. 



/ 



¥.i 



58 



WILLIAMSPORT DICKINSON SEMINARY. 



FORTY-EIGHTH ANNUAL CATALOGUE. 



59 



Wilson, Corn'elia Gray Newberry 

Wright, Mlaud Odessa Calvifn 

Younken, Bertha May 1246 Vine Street, WiUiamsport 

Young-, Caroline Beaver 331 LfOcust Street, Williamsport 

Barker, Wilbur Stewart Harrisburg 

PoUmier, William Wiloox Williamsport 

Hahn, David Edward 923 Mifflin Street, Philadelphia 

Harris, Benjamin Adam 924 Walnut Street, Williamsport 

Heilbron, Justin William 627 Green Street, Williamspor't 

Hively, Byrd Windfield York 

Kavanaugh, Ramsey Daniel 1602 West Fourth Street, Williamsport 

Porter, Elbert Ansley Canton 

Rankin, Harold Little Baltimore, Md. 

Stead, Richard Hayden 309 Mulberry Street, Williamsport 

Warn, Georg-e Kline Hughesville 

Weis, Augustus 17 Southern Avenue, Burlingame 

Whitehead, Charles Gabriel South Williamsport 

Wright, Ernest August Re-ar 701 Penn Street, Williamsport 



Art Department. 



Andrews, Jessie Louise Elmira, N. Y. 

Barclay, Frances Lillian Bartholf Sinnemahoniiig' 

Blrkbeck, Lillian May Freeland 

Blythe, Anna Marguerite Madera 

Cochran, Mary Helen 1005 West Fourth Street, Williamsport 

Colby , Emily 125 East Third Street, Williamsport 

Correll, Edith Garnette Nagasaki, Japan 

Cruickshanks, Mrs. Susan Cecelia Spencer, Mass. 

Dove, Carrie O 165 East Fourth Street, Williamsport 

Everett, Mrs. Abbie M Seminary, Williamsport 

Kahler, Lulu May 703 Tucker Street, Williamsport 

Levi, Bertha East Third Street, Williamsport 

Low,' AUce Low Lime Ridge 

Mussina, Mrs. Susan Thompson.. ..1022 West Fourth Street, Williamsport 

Neece, Mary Gertrude 49 East Fourth Street, Williamsport 

Rockwell, Estella Williamsport 

Sloatman, Lydia 461 East Third Street, Williamsport 

Stabler, Minnie Anna 493 East Third Street, Williamsport 

Follmer, WUliam Wilcox Williamsport 

Freck, Harry Clay Williamsport 

Gilbert. Fred John Tyrone 

Harris, Benjamin Adam 924 Walnut Street, Williamsport 

Piper, Charles Blaine Sinnemahoning 

Slate, George 351 Mulberry Str<eet, Williamsport 

Stead, Richard Hayden 309 Mulberry Street, Williamsport 

Stewart, Harry Lawrence Tyrone 

Wilcox, Thomas Sewell Shamokln 



s t 



Elocution Department. 

Anderson, Effa Gertrude 1416 West Fourth Street, Williamsport 

Barclay, Ftramceisi Lillian Bartholf Sinneimahonin^ 

Bartch, Florence Patton Columbia 

Blythe, Anna Marguerite Madera 

Bowman, Hannah Millersbuirg 

Brown, Anna Jersey Shore 

Conner, Mary Coulbourn Bloornsburig 

DeWald, Laura Stella 619 Grace Street, Williamsport 

Ely, Gussie Joetta 710 Park Avenue, Williamsport 

Everett, Charlotte Crittenden Seminary, Williamspoirt 

Fegley, La Blanche Violet 126 Ross Street, Williamsport 

Fisher, Elizabeth Anne Tomb's Run 

Gates, Minnie E Coalport 

Gearhart, Adaline Isabella Clearfield 

Greer, Helen Leona 1111 Fourteenth Avenue, Altoona 

Harring'ton, Hannah Miille Viola, Del. 

Low. Alice Low Lime Ridge 

Mass-ey, S- Jane Third and Becket Streets, Camden, N. J. 

McMurray, Nelle Adamsi New Washington 

Mills, Daisy 355 East Fourth Street, Williamsport 

Myers, Margaret M Williamsport 

Nugent, Elizabeth Daisy Jersey City, N. J. 

Parlett, Mary Olive Prince George Street, Annapolis, Md. 

Pierson, B'ertha Linn 1911 Twentieth Street, Altoona 

Schrade, Anna Magdalene 520 Market Street, Williamsport 

Sides, Mary Jersey Shore 

Woods, Hazel Swinburne West Fourth Street, Williamsport 

Younken, Bertha May 1246 Vine Street, Williamspo-rt 

Allen, Robert John Stockton 

Barker, Wilbur Stewart Harrisburg 

Brenneman, Joseph Ervin Dillsburg 

Bryner, Charles W Pleasant View 

Dickson, Conway W Berwick 

Graeff, Augustus Nicholas 744 Pear Street, Reading 

Hahn, David Edward 923 Mifflin Street, Philadelphia 

Hall, Samuel Perry Beech Creek 

Harris, Benjamin Adajn 924 Walnut Street, Williamsport 

Heilbro'n, Justin William 627 Green Street, Williamsport 

Hively, Byrd Windfield York 

Huling, Harry C 880 Erie Avenue, Williamsport 

Kessler, Howard Dysart 1423 Twelfth Avenue, Altoona 

La Rue, Harper M Dillsburg 

Mearkle, William Wharton Mat tie 

Miller, Emory Michael Y. M. C A. , Williamsport 

Mock, Stanley Upton Pavia 

Nutt, John Budd 632 Pine Street, Williamsport 

Rijgdon, Nathan Mill Green, Md. 

Rounsley, Samuel Franklin Houtzdale 

Smith, Josieph Walton Fredeiick, Md. 

Stead, Rtchard H 309 Mulberry Street, Williamsport 



l 



I 



( 



I 



60 



WILLIAMSPORT DICKINSON SEMINARY. 



FORTY-EIGHTH ANNUAL CATALOGUE. 



61 



Students in Special Work. 



Sunnmary. 



« i 



Ault, Sibyl Newberry 

Bowman, Hannah , Millersburg 

Carver, Maye Wellsville 

Foster, Cuetta TVilliamsport 

Gilliland, Lillian Blanche Karthaus 

Greer, Helen Ijeona 1111 Fourteenth Avenue, Altoona 

Gundrum, Maysle Elizabeth 858 Louisa Street Williamspor t 

Holler, Millicent 1158 West Third Street, iWilliamsport 

Hunter, Olive Burling-ame 

Jewett, Elizabeth Estelle 452 William Street, Williamspor t 

King, Anna Williams Newberry 

Knislley, Florence Sybella Orbisonia 

MacDoniald, Agnes Maude 1143 Vine Street, Williamsport 

Mas&ey, S. Janie Third and Becket Streets, Camden, N. J- 

Nugent, EUzabeth Daisy Jersey City, N. J. 

Smith, Tre®sa Edith Seminary, Williamsport 

Wallis, Columbia Anna Forest Hill, Md. 

Williams, Bessie Humphrey Hazleton 

Wright, Maud Odessa Calvin 

Askew, T. J Williamsport 

Birdsall, Ralph Nelson North Tarrytown, N. T. 

Boak, J. Raymond Hughesvillie 

Dickson, Conway Wing Berwick 

Freck, Charles Wilbur Williamsport 

Gilbert, Fred John Tyrone 

Greevy, Charles F 452 Wilson Street, Williamsport 

Ileilbron, Justin William .627 Green Street, Williamsix>rt 

Lansdale, Philemon Smith Gaiithersburg, Md. 

Mansel, Bernard Hartswiok 417 Park Avenue, Williamsport 

Neff, Jacob Willilamsport 

Oman, Isaac W Orangeville 

Pearson, Walter George Oval 

Slaybaugh, James ^^y^^ ^I'^o 

Smith, Cameron Wil'liamsiportt 

Spotts, Harris Alvin Hepburn 

Vails, Jose A Santiago de Cuba 

Vails. William Santiago de Cuba 

Winter, Abraham Albert Farragut 

Wright, Ernest August Rear 701 Penn Street, Williamsport 



> 



S \ 



Resident Graduates ^^ 

Students in Clasisical Department 1^ 

Students in Scientific Department 48 

Students in Belles Lettres Department 29 

Students in Modern Language Department ^0 

Students in Special Work ^^ 

Students in Academic Department 67 

Students in Primary Department » 22 

Students in Eliocution Department ^^ 

Students in College Preparatory Department 14 

Students in Practioal Science Department 3 

Students in Normal English ^ 

MUSIC DEPARTMENT. 

students in Instrumental Music ^9 

Students in Thorough Bass and Harmony and History IS 

Students in Vocal Music ^4 

ART DEPARTMENT. 

students in Oil Painting ^ 

Students in China Painting ^^ 

Students in Portrait Crayoning ^ 

Students in Crayon Drawing ^ 

Students in Mechanical Drawing ^ 

STUDENTS IN ALL DEPARTMENTS. 

Ladiles ^'^^ 

Gentleme-n ^^^ 

Whole number ^^^ 



'if 



62 



WILLIAMSPORT DICKINSON SEMINARY. 



FORTY-EIGHTH ANNUAL CATALOGUE. 



63 



Alumni. 



Prizes. 



II 



r I . 



The following prizes will be awarded during tliis year: 

The President's Prize — The gift of the President to tlirit 
member of the Senior or Junior Class who shall excel in writing 
and delivering an oration. 

The F. G. Smith Prize — The gift of Freeborn Garrettson 
Smith, of Brooklyn, N. Y., to that Student who shall be awarded 
the first prize in Piano Music. 

The Music Director's Prize — The gift of the Director of 
Music to that Student who shall be awarded the second prize in 
Piano Music. 

The Miss Wilson Prize— The gift of Miss Helen E. Wilson 
to that Student who shall excel in French. 

The Miss Cruickshanks Prize — The gift of Miss Mary S. 
Cruickshanks to that Student who shall excel in German. 

The Heilner Prize — The gift of Rev. S. A. Heilner, D. D., 
of Philadelphia, to that member of the Mental Philosophy Class 
who shall be awarded the prize in Mental Philosophy. 

The Faculty Prize — The gift of the Faculty to that member 
of the Rhetoric Class who shall excel in writing and reading an 
essay. 



Names. Class. 

Adams, J, F 1895 

Akers, Miss Lizzie 1885 

Albertson, O. H 1895 

^Alexander, C. T 1853 

Alexander, E. B 1889 

Alexander, Miss Winifred 1893 

*Allen, R. P 1852 

Anderson, Miss Effa G 1895 

Anderson, G. R 1895 

Anderson, S. L. i .. ki a. ^ .n^t* *<..*. . 1887 

Andrews, W. A 1884 

*Arndt, C. K 1868 

Artley, Miss A. A 1895 

Babb, Miss Kate J 1889 

Baird, Eugene H 1891 

Baker, E. G 1 884 

Baker, G. W .' 1876 

Baker, Miss Margaret 1883 

Baldwin, J. B 1881 

Ball, Miss Cora L 1891 

Ball, Miss S. F 1889 

Barber, Miss A. E 1879 

Barnitz, CM 1890 

Bariiitz, S. J 1879 

Barr, Miss Adelle 1880 

Barton, Miss F. A 1865 

*Barton, J. II 1860 

Beck, Miss M. J 1852 

Beddow, William 1888 

Beers, L. H 1869 

tBell, J. E 1880 

tBender, H. R 1882 

*Bennett, Allen 1877 

Bennett, Miss H. C . .1858 

Bennett, Miss M. P 1884 

Bennett, Miss N. H 1880 

tBenscoter, C. C 1880 

Benscoter, W. E 1893 

Betts, William T 1891 

Beyer, Miss Sarah A 1891 

Biddle, Miss E 1861 

*Biggs, E. U 1862 

Bixler,J. W 1878 

Black, Miss Anna S 1889 

Bodine, DeWitt 1861 

Body, Miss Kate R 1889 

Bowman, A. S 1868 

fBowman, J. F 1882 

Bowman, J. H 1881 

Bowman, S. L 1852 

Bowman, S. S 1863 



Names. Class. 

Bowman, Sumner S 1886 

Boyntou, Miss E 1864 

Brady, L. M 1884 

Bradley, Miss K 1857 

Brinton, C. S 1890 

Brown, C. 1 1888 

Brown, H. L 1880 

Brown, J. C 1868 

Brown, J. J 1867 

BruListetter, F. H ^ ...... i.i. it i.i i 1895 

*Buckalew. W. J 1871 

Buckley, Miss E. M 1883 

Buckley, Miss S. E 1884 

Burke, E. W 1882 

Burnley, C. W 1863 

Burnley, Miss 1.. II 1893 

Burnley, Miss M. C 1893 

Busey, G. M 1882 

Calder, Miss M 1865 

Campbell, F. C 1863 

Campbell, I. P 1872 

Campbell, Miss M. L 1893 

*Campbell, R. P 1872 

Carnill, S. S 1895 

Carter, R. T 1875 

Carver, W. A 1871 

Cassidy, Miss E. F 1887 

Chamberlin, Miss R. A 1892 

Champion, Miss M 1879 

Chapman, H. O 1868 

Cheston, Miss A. II 1884 

Cheston, H. C 1886 

*Church, F. E 1863 

Clarke, F. A. C 1872 

Clarke, W. P 1880 

Clarke, J. C 1885 

Clarkson, J. A. C 1884 

Cleaver, Miss C. Y 1876 

Cleaver, Miss L. J 1866 

*Clees, T. O 1868 

Cole, Miss M. McE. S 1894 

*Comp, J. S 1869 

I onner, Miss Adella 1889 

Conner, B. C 1871 

Conner, Miss Sallie 1887 

*(;onner, S. J. A 1861 

Conner, S. J. A 1886 

('oopcr, Miss A 1864 

Cooper, Miss A. M 1864 

Cooper, Miss Antoinette 1891 

Cooper, R. W 1887 



*Deceased. 



^Honorary. 



II 



m 



64 



WILLIAMSPORT DICKINSON SEMINARY. 



Names, Class. 

Correll, Miss G. V 1893 

Correll, W. H 1892 

Cox, C. S 1866 

Crawford, Miss Lavina P 1855 

Crawford, Miss M. E 1865 

tCrawford, Mary R 1886 

*Crawford, Miss R. A 1857 

Creager, C. E 1876 

Creveling, C. C 1895 

Creveling, Miss Ida B. L 1890 

Creveling, Miss M. L 1887 

Creveling, S. A 1862 

Crever, MLss A. Rosa 1886 

Crotsley, H. H 1886 

Crust, T.L 1890 

♦Cummings, Miss L. W 1877 

Curns, Miss M. E 1883 

Curran, H. A 1858 

Dale, Miss F 1872 

Dann, Miss A. D 1893 

Dart, Miss L 1875 

Dashiell, Miss A. F 1877 

Davis, Miss H. B 1853 

Davis, Miss M. B 1852 

Dawes, Joseph H 1891 

Deavor, Miss Ida C 1887 

Deavor, J. D. W 1880 

Deavor, E. E. A 1871 

Deavor, W. T. S 1888 

De Armond, D. A 1866 

Dempsey, C. W 1893 

Detwiler, Miss P. C 1895 

*Diemer, J. B 1853 

Dietrick, F. P 1871 

*Dill, A. H 1852 

*Dill, M. R 1863 

Dill, W. H 1857 

Drinkle, Miss M. E 1867 

Drum. MissE. M 1885 

Drum, M. L 1857 

Dunkerly, J. R 1878 

Ebert, Miss A. M 1860 

Eckbert, Miss A. M 1874 

Eder, Miss M. G 1884 

Edger, Miss M 1857 

Edwards, Miss A. C 1881 

Eichelberger, J. AUie 1891 

Elliott, Miss M. F. 1862 

Emery, Miss Eva V 1857 

Emery, Miss Lizzie I I860 

Emery, Miss M. P 1857 

*Ent, W. 11 1 858 

Essington, Miss M. R 1877 

Essington, Miss N. A 1865 

Evans, S. B 1885 

Everett, Miss Lottie C 1886 

Eyer, H. B 1885 

* Deceased. \ Honorary. 



Names. Class. 

Faunce, J. E 1863 

Faus, George W 1891 

Fehr,H. A 1890 

Ferguson, Miss H. E 1885 

Fidler, C. L 1869 

Flick, Miss Trella M 1894 

Forrest, Miss Anna L 1887 

♦Foulke, Miss Jennie R 1878 

Frain, Edmund W 1894 

Fredericks, D. H. M 1862 

Fredericks, More 1860 

Friling, Miss M 1865 

Frost. W. M 1880 

Fullmer, C. F 1881 

Fullmer, C. L 1880 

Fullmer, Miss S. M 1887 

Furst, A. O 1854 

Furst, C. G 1853 

Ganoung, Miss C. M 1888 

Gearhart, H.F 1853 

Gearhart, W. T 1862 

Gehret, Miss E. L 1883 

vrGiGj iYllSo Jtl • A.» ••• •••••••••••••••• •••••• > ioO^ 

Gere, Miss S. F 1852 

Gibson, W. S 1877 

(iilmore, Miss A. H 1884 

Glenn, G. W. M 1884 

Glosser, W. E 1890 

Glover, Miss L. E 1884 

Goodlander, Miss J. E 1855 

Goodwill, W. F 1875 

V.T I ^w\ • X!i* *.'• •• •••• •••• «••■ -••••••••••« •••• • XOOO 

Gray, Miss E. K 1893 

Gray, Etta S 1887 

Gray, Miss Myrtle 1893 

Gray, W. E 1881 

Gray. William W 1886 

Grazier, Miss L. A 1888 

Green, Miss H. M 1852 

Green, Miss M. A 1855 

Green, Miss J. L 1892 

Greenly, Miss E. M 1888 

Greenly, T 1858 

Griggs, Miss B. E 1871 

Guldin, J 1872 

Gus8, Miss A. E 1882 

(luss. Miss S. C 1887 

Hahn, Miss L. S 1871 

Ilalenbake, Miss S. E 1862 

Hambleton, C 1888 

Hammond, W. S 1874 

*Hammond, W. A 1864 

Hanks, H. R 1876 

Hann, C. G 1878 

Harman, Miss A. E 1868 

Harris, Miss I. P 1870 



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64 



WILLI A3ISP0KT DICKINSON SEMINARY. 



Ncanes. Class. 

Correll, Miss G. V .. . . .1893 

Correll, W. K 1802 

Vox, C. S 18(iG 

Crawford, Miss I.avina P ISnb 

Crawford, Miss M. E 1865 

tCrawford. Mary R 1886 

^Crawford, Miss R. A 1857 

Crea.c^er, C. E 187»i 

Crcveling. C. C 1805 

Crevclinp^, ^riss Ida B. L 1800 

Crevcling, Miss M. L 1887 

Creveling, S. A 1862 

Crevcr, Miss A. Rosa 1886 

Crotsley, H. II 1886 



-1 I 



*Cnmminss, Miss L. W 1877 

Cunis, Missel. E .. .188:; 

Ciirran, H. A 1858 

Dale, Miss F 1872 

Daim, Miss A. D 1803 

Dart, Miss L 1875 

Dashiell, Miss A. F 1877 

1 )avis, Miss H . B 1853 

I )avis. Miss M. B 1 852 

Dawes, Joseph II 1891 

I )eavor, MivSs Ida C 1887 

Deavor, J. D. W 1880 

Deavor, E. E. A 1871 

Deavor, W. T. S 1«88 

De Arinond, D. A 1866 

Denipsey, C W 1^03 

Detwiler, Miss V. C 1895 

*Diemer, J. R 1853 

Dietrick, F. P 1871 

*Dill, A. II ^^o'l 

*\)\]\, M.R 1863 

Dill, W. II 1857 

Drinkle, Miss M. E 1867 

Drum. Miss E. M 1885 

Drum, M. L 1857 

J )iinkerly, .1. R 1878 

Ebcrt, Miss A. M I860 

Eckbert, Miss A. M 1871 

Eder, Miss M. G 1884 

Editor, Miss M 1857 

Edwards, Miss A. C 1881 

Eieholbcrger, .1. Allie 1801 

Elliott, Miss M. F 1862 

Emery, Miss Eva V l'^57 

Emery, Miss Lizzie 1 18^)0 

Emory, Miss M. P 1857 

*Eiil, W. ;r 1858 

E.ssi!igton, Miss M.R ; 1877 

Essiiigton, Miss N. A 1865 

Evans, S. B 1 88") 

Everett, Miss Lottie C 1886 

Eyer, II. B 1885 

* Deceased. \Honorarij. 



Naiyies. Class. 

Faunce, J. E 1863 

Faus, (leorge W 1801 

Fehr,IL A 1800 

Ferguson, Miss 11. E 1885 

Fidler, C. 1 I860 

Flick, Miss Trella M 1894 

Forrest, Miss Anna L 1887 

*Foulke, Miss .Jennie R 1878 

Frain, Edmund W 1894 

Fredericks. D. II. M 1862 

F^redericks, More 1860 

Friling, Miss M 1865 

Frost. W. M 1880 

Fullmer, C. F 1881 

FuUmer, C. L. ..^.^ 1880 

Fullmer, Miss S. M 1887 

Furst, A. 1854 

Furst, C. (4 1853 

Ganoung, Miss CM 1888 

Gearhart, H. F 1853 

Gearhart, W. T 1862 

Gehret, Miss E. 1 1883 

(icre, Miss IL A 1852 

Gere, Miss S. F 1852 

( i ibson, AV . S 1877 

(Jilmore, Miss A. II 1884 

(ileun, <i. W. M 1884 

Glosser, W . E 1890 

Glover, Miss L. E 1884 

(Jcodlander, Miss .1. V. 1855 

(Goodwill, \V. F 1875 

(i ray, ¥.. .1 1858 

Gray, Miss F. K 1803 

(;ray, Etta S 1887 

Gray, Miss Myrtle 1893 

Cray, VV. E 1881 

Gray. William W 1886 

(Jrazier, Miss L. A 1888 

Green, Mi.ss IL M 1852 

(jreen, IVIiss M. A 1855 

(ireen. Miss. J. L 1892 

(ireeuly, Miss E. M 1888 

Greenly, T 1858 

Griggs, Mi.ss B. E 1871 

( Juldin, J 1872 

(iuss, Miss A. E 1882 

(JTiss, MissS. C 1887 

Halin, MissL. S 1871 

IIaleid)ake, Miss S. E 1862 

llamblcton, C 1888 

Ilaiumond, W. S 1874 

*!lammond. \V. A 1864 

Hanks, IL R 1876 

Ilann, (\ G 1878 

Harman, Miss A. E 1868 

Harris, F. G 1873 

Harris, M iss 1. P. 1870 



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FOBTY-EIGHTH ANNUAL CATALOGUE. 



65 



f 






nZ'-7» 



i i 



i 



; 



Names. Class. 

Harris, Miss L. R 1872 

Hartman, Miss C 1863 

Hartman, Franklin E 1891 

Hartman, W. W 1892 

Hartsock, F. D 1890 

Hartzell, Miss A. M. C 1883 

Hartzell, C. V 1879 

Harvey, J. C 1880 

Haughawout, Miss L. M 1883 

Haughawout, Miss S. F 1862 

Haiipt, G. W 1860 

Heafer, Miss Louise 1890 

Heck, Albert S 1887 

Heck, O. G 1884 

Heckman, E. R..... 1894 

Heckman, Miss Helen B 1891 

Hedding, B. E 1895 

Hedges, Miss E. V 1879 

Heilman, Miss M 1894 

Heilman, R. P 1874 

tHeilner, S. A 1876 

Heim, C. F 1875 

Heisley, Miss R. N 1852 

Plepburn, A. D 1862 

♦Herr, Miss A. M 1861 

Hill, Miss A 1881 

Hill, George H 1891 

Hill, H. R 1892 

Hillman, George M 1891 

Himes, T. B 1865 

Hippie, T. C 1865 

IHtchins, H 1876 

fHoag, Miss C. J 1895 

Hollopeter, S. G. M 1865 

Hontz, A. W 1890 

Hooper, Miss M. L 1893 

Hooven, Miss E. R 1887 

Hooven, Miss M. M 1886 

Hoover, W. R 1885 

Houck, Miss G. H 1881 

Hoiick, W. G 1889 

Houck, W. L 1892 

Howes, Miss A 1864 

Howland, Miss M. A 1893 

Hunter, L. H 1884 

Huntley, G. W., Jr 1889 

Huntley, Mi>,s L. J 1888 

Hursh, Miss L. M 1882 

Hutchinson, J. G 1862 

Hutchinson, W. L 1884 

♦Hyman, Miss J. S 1880 

*Hyman, Miss S. R 1860 

♦Jackson, C. G 1858 

James, J. Harry 1866 

James, W. M 1878 

Janney, L. R 1874 

John, D. C 1865 

* Deceased, i Honorary, 



Names, Class. 

*John,G. W 1858 

John, R. R 1890 

Johns, J. E 1886 

Johns, William i884 

Johnson, Miss Jean i890 

Johnston, G. G 1893 

Jones, ^Miss C. Lois 1895 

Jones, Miss J. L 1884 

Jones, Miss S. T i872 

Joyce. Elijah i857 

Kalbfus, Charles H 1852 

Keefer, Miss Ella i884 

Kessler, Miss E. M 1887 

Kimball, A. W '^j:j_izjlllljjl^j.^^z.l^ 1^81 

King, Miss Ada .\. .1877 

King, G. E 1876 

Kirk, Miss N. A I88O 

*Kline, E. D I868 

Kline, Miss S. M 1888 

Koch, E. V 1880 

Koch, Miss Ida E I886 

Koch, Miss Laura M I886 

Koller, Miss I>ouise i89l 

Konkle, W. R i878 

Kress, Miss A. M I893 

Kress, Miss E. H I893 

Kress, W. C 1859 

Kurtz, Miss Mary K 1895 

*Landis, J. W 1857 

Lamed, F. W 188O 

Law, F. S 1868 

Leidy, Miss M. B 1885 

Leonard, H. E 1893 

Levan, Miss M 1864 

Lincoln, Miss A. R 1893 

Lincoln, Miss H. M 1884 

Little, William F I888 

Lloyd, A. P 1879 

Long, H. E 1878 

Long, Miss J. M 1884 

Loudenslager, Miss R. S 1867 

t Love, J. K 1877 

♦Loveland, R., Jr 1876 

Lovell, Miss A. M I866 

Lowe, Miss Emma 1857 

*Lowe, Miss A. S 1863 

Lowe, J. W 1877 

Madara, J. W 1873 

Madill, G. A 1858 

Madore, B. F 1892 

*Malin, Miss E I86I 

Mallalieu, Miss B. J 1890 

*Markle, A. M ]871 

Martyn, C. S 1887 

Mason, Miss T I866 

Massey, Miss A. E 1864 

Massey, Miss M. E 1873 



66 



WILLI AMSPORT DICKINSON SEMINARY. 



Karnes. Class. 

May, W. A 1873 

McBride, Miss L. R 1895 

McCloskey, C. E 1895 

♦McCloskey, M. J 1875 

McCloskey, Miss M. L 1894 

McCollum, Miss M. E 1890 

McCord, Miss Mary 1852 

tMcCormick, H. G 1895 

McCullough, Miss M. B 1895 

McCullough, Miss M. J 1877 

McDowell, A 1866 

*McDowell, Miss C 1866 

McDowell, H. W 1888 

McDowell, Miss I 1865 

McDowell, Lewis J. .:.t;^T77. .1891 

McDowell, T. A 1895 

McGraw, J. R 1886 

Mclntire, Miss Z. B 1890 

McKee, Miss N. E. B 1882 

ISIcWilliams, D A 1886 

Melick, O. B 1864 

Melshimer, J. A 1878 

Mendenhall, H. S 1853 

♦Metzger, MissE. Z 1879 

Metzger, Miss H. M 1888 

Metzler, O. S 1880 

Millard, Miss M. E 1894 

Miller, A. G 1888 

Miller, J. M 1875 

Miller, Miss J. R i860 

Mills, Miss Daisy 1894 

Milnes, Miss L. H 1885 

Minds, Miss E. A 1893 

Minds, J. H 1893 

Mingle, H. B 1895 

Mitchell, Miss M. J 1865 

Mitchell, Miss M. L 1885 

Mitchell, Max L 1885 

Moore, Miss B. B 1890 

Moore, R. S 1886 

Moore, S. G 1861 

Morgart, 11. M 1887 

Mosser, Miss Annie 1882 

Mosser, B. H 1877 

Mortimer, J. H 1881 

Moul, C. B 1878 

tMoyer, H. C 1882 

Mulford, Miss E. B 1887 

Murray, T. H 1867 

Masser, Miss M. E 1881 

Mussina, Miss H 1862 

Mussina, Miss L 1861 

Mussina, Miss M. H 1864 

*Nash, Miss F. E 1865 

Nash, MissK. E 1860 

Needy, Carl W 1886 

*Neff, J. 1 1861 

* Deceased. ^Honorary. 



Names. Class, 

tNeeley, T. B 1891 

Nicodemus, S. D 1874 

Norcross, W. H 1865 

Norris, Miss Sadie R 1886 

Oliver, INliss A. S 1861 

Olmstead, Miss E 1875 

Olmstead, Miss M 1875 

Opp, J. A 1870 

Osman, T. Milton 1891 

Ott,L.D 1885 

*Packer, Miss M 1852 

Packer, Miss S. B 1852 

Pardoe, Miss M. H 1885 

Pearce, Miss A. M 1876 

Pearce, Miss Bessie. .T..7.~.. .1877 

Pearre, A 1858 

Petty, Miss Edyth 1895 

Petty, Miss E. G 1895 

Pidcoe, A. S 1886 

*Poisal, R. E 1858 

Pomeroy, W. R 1885 

Porter, Miss E. S 1866 

*Pott, R.R 1858 

Price, L. M 1894 

Purdy, Miss Mary P 1889 

Pyles, E. A 1893 

Ransom, Miss K. E 1867 

Reeder, W. F 1875 

Reeder, R. K 1878 

Reeser, I. J 1888 

Reider, Miss Bertha A 1886 

Reider, Miss Mary L 1891 

Reighard, Miss vS. S 1866 

Remley, G. M 1892 

Reutz, W. F 1874 

Reynolds, S. A 1874 

Rex, J. B 1878 

Riale, Miss H. E 1885 

Rich, Charles O'N 1894 

Richards, Miss E. L 1873 

Riddle, E. C 1877 

Riddle, Miss E 1854 

Riddle, Miss J. D 1893 

Riddle, Miss M. E 1854 

Robeson, VV. F 1882 

Robeson, Miss M 1880 

Robins, Miss M. E 1884 

Rockwell, Miss Estella 1889 

Rosenberry, G. W 1894 

Rothfuss, Miss Phoebe 1882 

Rue, J. VV 1877 

Russell, Miss J. S 1885 

Russell, Miss M. J 1892 

Sadler, W. F 1863 

Sangree, P. H ..1865 

Saxon, Benjamin F 1891 

Saylor, Miss J. S 1862 



FOETY-EIGHTH ANNUAL CATALOGUE. 



67 



^-f 



<5iB' "A 



^ 

V 



Names. class. 

*Scarboraugh, G. H i878 

Schoch, A 1862 

*Schofield, E. L "!!a862 

Scoville, Miss J. E i863 

Sechler, W. A 1833 

Sensenbach, Miiss A. V 1893 

Sydow, Albert ^893 

Shamrao, Miss F. E 1879 

tShaver, J. B i891 

Sheatfer, W. J ^890 

Shick, Miss Mary M 1886 

Shipley, Miss Ida A '. i887 

Shoff, H. M 1895 

Shoop, W. R '^1883 

*Showalter, Miss A. B .... .7777777777717. . 1885 

Slate, Miss A. B i892 

glate, Miss F. W 1894 

Sliver, W. A i^qo 

*Smith,H.E .'..'.'.'..''.'.'1866 

Smith, N. B ^872 

Smith. T. J... '.'.'..'.'.'.'.'. .'.'..1861 

Snyder, Miss E 188I 

Souder, Miss R. L i865 

Spangler, J. L i871 

Speakman, Melville K 1891 



Names. class. 

Tewell, J. R iggg 

Thomas, Miss M. Maud i894 

Thomas, Miss Nellie M 1894 

Thomas, Miss Sadie D i876 

Thrush, Miss K. A 1875 

Tomlinson, F. H iggg 

Tomlinson, Miss M. E I88O 

Tonner, A. C 1853 

Townsend, W. F 1886 

Tracy, Miss M. P i890 

Treverton, Henry i887 

Treverton, Miss Minnie 1887 

Troxell, Miss M. A i890 

Vail, Miss R. C. ,_ i869 

Vanderslice, J. A. i863 

* Vanfossen, Miss Ada 1857 

Volkmar, W i883 

Wakefield, Miss Aimee 1893 

Walker, F. C ' . . 1890 

Walker, M. N 1894 

Wallace, Miss Carrie P i89i 

Waltz, Miss M. Bertha i89i 

Warehime, O. C 188I 

Watson, F. A 1864 

Watson, Miss F. E i865 



Spottswood, Miss A. E .'.'.*.* .1873 * Way, E. F. ....'...'*'."..'.*';*.'."..'! **..*.'."..*; ."1862 



Spottswood, Miss L. M ]865 

Stackhouse, Miss E. A i885 

Steinmitz, J. L 1868 

Stephens, H. M 1888 

Sterling, Miss E. K 1888 

Stevens, E. M i882 

Stevens, G. W 188I 

Stevens, J. C i885 

Stevenson, W. H 1883 

Stewart, J. S 1888 

Stoltz. Miss R. J ]873 

Stout, Miss P. R 1883 

Strine, Miss M. J 18^9 

*Strohm, W. H 1870 

Strong, Miss H. A 188O 

Stuart, Miss May T i882 

Swartz, Miss B. M 1890 

Swartz, Miss E. B 1390 

Swartz, T. 8 ' 'i885 

Swengle, D. F iseo 

Swope, I. N 1879 

Taneyhill, C. W '1868 

Taneyhill, G. L i858 

Taneyhill, Miss M. E 1857 

Taneyhill, O. B 1877 

Taneyhill, Miss S. A 1853 

Taylor, Miss Ida A 1875 

Taylor, Miss Jennie M I886 

Taylor, J. W 1863 

Taylor, R. S i882 

Teitsworth, E. T i887 

Test, Miss C. S 1881 

^Deceased, ^Honorary. 



Weigel, D. H 1862 

Weisel, Miss E. A 1895 

*Welch, Miss xM. P 1890 

Welteroth, Miss E. M 1895 

Welty, Miss MP .1875 

nvhaley, H ....1854 

Whitney, H. H 1834 

Williams, A. S 1895 

Wilson, Miss Helen E i885 

Wilson, James E igsa 

i Wilson, J. L 1883 

Wilson, S. D 1883 

Wlnegardner, Miss S. H. . i870 

Winger, J. 1 1893 

Woodin, Miss Dora 1864 

Woodward, J 1867 

♦Wright, Miss Ida M isTT 

* Yetter, Miss M isei 

Yocum, E. H ...I868 

Yocum, George C 1391 

*Yocum, G. M iSQO 

Yocum, J. J 1 863 

*Y0CUm, Miss N 1862 

Young, C. V. p !'.."'.1895 

Young, Edwin P 1392 

Young, J. B 1866 

Young, J. W. A 1883 

* Y oung, W. Z 1877 

*Ziders, Miss Minnie 1375 

*Zlders, Miss V. s .issi 

Zollinger, E. A 1332 



68 



WILLIAMSPORT DICKINSON SEMINARY. 



FORTY-EIGHTH ANNUAL CATALOGUE. 



69 



INSTRUMENTAL MUSIC. 



Names. Class. 

Barclay, Miss G. E 1888 

Barkle, Miss E. S 1895 

♦Bender, Miss Anna M 1884 

Benscoter, Miss H. C 1895 

Bllnt, Miss Nf M 1888 

Brooks, Miss Laura 1879 

Burkhart, Miss C. E 1895 

Cassldy, Miss E. P 1887 

Champion, Miss Maggie 1879 

cnilcoat. Miss Marguerite M 1891 

Chrlsman, Mary E , 1892 

Comp, MlssC. M 1895 

Danes, Miss E. C 1890 

Davis, Miss Clara 1882 

Ely, Miss A. E 1 893 

Eschenbacli, Miss Sophia 1881 

Eyer, Miss M. S 1888 

Fry, MlssE. M 1888 

Gable, Miss Annie 1884 

Ganoe, Miss M. Lauretta 1891 

Gehret, Miss Ella L 1881 

Glover, Miss Fannie S 1883 

Green, Miss J. D 1893 

Heck, Miss Clemma 1889 

HelnsUng, Miss J. M 1887 

Hicks, Miss Blanche L 1891 

Hicks, Miss G. W 1889 

Hooper, Miss M. L 1893 

Horn, Miss Mamie D 1881 

Houck, Miss Gertrude H. 1880 

Hullar, Miss Annie 18S4 

Hutchison, Wilbur L 1884 

Kelley, Miss R. M 1895 

King, Miss A. W 1 895 

Koch, Miss L. M 1887 

Krape, Miss S. M 1895 

Laedleln, Miss C. E 1895 

Larned, Miss Minnie 1894 

Leckle, Miss Ida M 1883 

Leldy, Miss Margaret B 1885 

Low, Miss H. M 1 889 

Maltland, Miss Anna 1880 

Malaby, Miss E. V 1893 

Mallalleu, Miss B. J 1890 

Martin, MlssChloe 1887 

McGee, Miss E. M 1896 



Names. Class. 

McGee, Miss I. H 1896 

McMurray, Miss E. A 1895 

Menges, Miss M. A 1893 

Metzger, Miss H. M 1889 

Mertz, Miss L. B 1892 

Mlllspaugh, Miss L. C 1886 

Musser, Miss Minnie E 1880 

JSTuss, Miss Laura. .. 1884 

Ohl, Miss Ella A 1 89 1 

Pardoe, Miss Minnie H 1885 

Pooler, George W 1880 

Prior.MlssE. M .1888 

Randall, Miss Josle 1882 

Relder, Miss Edith 1893 

Khoads, Miss Mary V 1891 

Ridden, Miss Claude 1885 

Ripley, Miss Ossle 1880 

RobDlns, Miss S. 1 1889 

Rothrock, Miss E. M 1889 

Rothrock, Miss Maggie 1879 

Rothrock, Miss S. M 1888 

Runy an. Miss F. J 1888 

Ryan, Miss M. L 1889 

Shaw, Amos R 1882 

Sanders, Miss C. E 1889 

Sharpless, Miss M. L 1889 

Sheadle, Miss R. R 1886 

Sheets, Miss Lulu 1878 

Shopbell, Miss L 1887 

Slate, Miss Crecy 1879 

Smith, Miss G. A 1890 

Stratford, Miss Kittle 1885 

Stuart, Miss May T 1880 

Swartz, Miss M. E 1888 

Titus, Miss Anna 1880 

Turley, Miss Mattle 1885 

Vcelkler, Miss L. S 1886 

Wallis, Miss M. Lulu 1891 

Wanamaker, Miss C. M 1892 

Watson, MlssE. M 1893 

Weddigen, Miss Wilhelmine 1891 

Wilde, E. W 1882 

Williams, Miss Minnie 1884 

Williamson, MlssO. H 1887 

Zeth, Miss Minnie 1887 



VOCAL MUSIC. 



Names. 
Huntley, Miss P. S. 



Class. 

...1894 



Names. 
Koons, G. J. 



Class. 
...1895 



McGee, Miss E. M 1895 



' 



^ 



ELOCUTION. 



Names. 
Barkle, Miss E. S. 



Class. 

'...1895 

McGee, Miss E. M 1895 



Names. 
Ilartraan, Miss B.M. 



Class. 
..1895 



' \ 



ART. 



NaTues. Class. 

Brooks, MissC. O 1887 

Conner, Miss Sallie 1889 

Dlttmar, Miss E. A 18S6 

Eder, Miss Mary O. 

Kverhart, Miss Kate 



Names. Class. 

Finney, Miss Grace B. 1886 

Guss, Miss Maggie 1883 

Harvey, Miss Carrie — 1879 

1891 I Mann, Miss L. Amelia 1885 

1879 I Thompson, Miss Crecy L 1882 



COLLEGE PREPARATORY. 



Names. 



Class. 



Drum, J. Marcelius 1891 

Freck, C. W 1895 

Gould, William H. G 1891 

King, Miss A. W 1895 

McMorrls, Harry 1893 

Moore, n. B 1895 



Class. 



Names. 

Parrish, S. R. W 1892 

Richards, J. R 1894 

Soderllng, Walter 1895 

Thomas, Walter 1893 

Wallace, W. C 1894 

Wallis, H. K 1892 



I 



^ 



NORMAL ENGLISH. 



Names. 
Huhbard, G. H, 



Class. 
...1892 



Names. 
McKenty, T. W. 



Class. 
...1893 



Miller, E. M 



,1891 



'\ 



70 



WILLIAMSPORT DICKINSON SEMINARY. 



FORTY-EIGHTH ANNUAL CATALOGUE. 



71 



! 



I 



6 



By-Laws. 



1. During the hours of ^lady lIlc tetudonts shall not bo 
unnece&saixly absent from theii' inmn?;. 

2. At the time uppuiiiLed lu attend pi;i \ .is;, rocitatinn 
lecture, or other exercise, each Student ish .H! repair miem 
and promptly to the ilace designated. 

3. At no time shall any Student loiter in the halls or 
about the doors, or indulge in jumping, wrestling, loud 
r,v;i^^?^^!^^^*^^^S' ^^ ^^y unnecessary noise, OR USE 

n^S^T^S, ^^ ™^ TIUILDINGS OK ON THE 
(jrKOUNDS. 

4. The Students shall not be absent from their rooms 
at night or after the hour of study indicated by the ring- 
ing of the bell, nor shall they attend parties or mixed 
assemblies without permission from the President: nor 
snail they at any time visit hotels or other places of public 
resort, or on any occasion indulge in the use of intoxi- 
cating liquors. 

5. All profane and indecent language, playing at 
games of chance, injuring the property of the Institution 
or of citizens, quarreling, fighting, the carrying of fire- 
arms or other dangerous weapons, are strictly forbidden. 

6. No Student shall leave the corporate limits of the 
city for a longer period than one hour, without permis- 
sion from the President. i^^^^^ 

7. Each Student will be held strictly accountable for 
any damage he or she may cause to the Seminary prop- 
thlhcho^^^^^^ ^^ unknown parties may be assessed on 

8. The Teachers must at all times have access to the 
Students' rooms, and if it be judged necessary, the rooms 
will be cleaned at the expense of the occupants. 

9. Cleanliness of person and apparel, and a gentle- 
manly and lady-like deportment must be observed by all. 

10. No water, dirt, or other material shall be thrown 



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fiom any window in the buildings, or in the halls after 
they have been cleaned. 

11. Students must have their rooms swept and in 

OTn< r, and li-Iits extiIl-ln^ll( 1 at the established hours, 
w(i<-n ull mujsl retire for the night. 

V2. No Sludeiil vviJl be aiiovscd lu go baliijiig, buat- 
ifjfZ, s^lcntinp", fishirip:, p'n^iiiiivj, nr r'<l!f?i!\ \\ iflinnf ih rmis- 
sinii ff'fMii lib- Prpsident. 

13. The Students must not visit the kitchen, dining- 
room, or any other room, except their own, without 
permission. 

14. The Sabbath must be strictly observed by all. 
Visiting or receiving visits will not be allowed. All' must 
'attend public worship twice during the day. 

15. No lady shall at any time receive calls from gen- 
tlemen at her own room. Friends from a distance can 
see the ladies in the parlor. 

16. The young ladies will not be allowed to leave the 
Seminary grounds at any time without permission; and 
the gentlemen will be restricted at the discretion of the 
Faculty. 

17. No Student shall change his or her room, or place 
at the table, without special permission from the Presi- 
dent. 

18. No Student will be permitted to leave the School 
during the session without an express request from the 
parent or .guardian, made to the President, and without 
the consent of the Faculty. 

19. Any Student who, without just cause, shall fail to 
attend the examinations, will be considered under cen- 
sure. 

20. Permission to be absent from any exercise must be 
obtained, if possible, before the absence occurs. 

21. No Student will be permitted to leave any class 
without the consent of the Faculty. 

22. The ladies and gentlemen must not visit each 
other's apartments, walk or ride together, without per- 
mission, nor converse together from the windows. 



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72 



WILLIAMSPORT DICKINSON SEMINARY. 



23. Students from the neighborhood will not be per- 
mitted to visit home at such times as will interfere with 
the regular exercises of the School. 

24. Any offendiiiir PimLih may be i niiished, accord- 
ing to the nature u! the ollcufec, by private or piil)lic 
reproof, suspension, dis^missRion or oxynilsioa. 

25. rimdeiits di«mifc>ised or expelled inn si h\nvo the 
premises at once. 

26. None but Students can attend the Society meet- 
ings, nor shall the Societies meet together, unless by 
express permission of the President. 

27. No special meeting of the Students shall be held 
at any time, nor shall any meeting of the Students or 
Societies continue later than 9.45 o'clock P. M., without 
permission of the President. 

28. All persons visiting Students at the Seminary 
will be required to conform to the rules adopted for the 
government of the School. Visitors remaining longer 
than one day will be charged for boarding at the pub- 
lished rates. 

29. Any temporary prudential regulation for the gov- 
ernment of the School that the Faculty may see fit to 
adopt shall be equally binding with these By-Laws. 



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STOr^E. 






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J. R. i-iAzr:LET, 



DEALER IN ALL KINDS OF 



Wall reaper and Window Sliades, 

no VVEb' rOURIH street. Cochran, f'avn.; ^ MrCn-M.:k Biiilding. 



AA7'IJLjI_iIu^\.'"lA^SP^Or^T, ir'^^. 



Stationery, Picture Frames, Cornices, Steel Engravings, Glass Shades, Cbromos, 

Wax and Artists' Materials. Also 

PAl^Vll'lU^ iiUMSllU AN!? !*Ar!:!^ HANGER. 

(aampion's Tire ilnsurance .i;?(gencij^ 



. '\y\/V\/\/N/\/\/>y'V/>-'\/<u»Nrk/\ 



ONLY FIRST-CLASS COMPANIES RHPRHSENTED. 



Office, 335 Pine Street, 



Williamsport, F*a. 



MARK A. CHAN^PION, 



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Agent for Imperial of London, Scottich Union of Edinburgh, Merchants of New- 
ark, Armenia of Pittsburgh. Telephone 3122. 

FllJIv. TlFli iWD AcCiDFM 

That have stood the test for more than a century represented by 



UK, I k ■ 
327 Pine Street, 



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WILLIAMSPORT, PA. 



Telephone 2804. 



THOMPSON, GIBSON & CO., 

rt-rj Goods and Dmpeties, 

ATTRACTIVE IN QUALITY, STYLE AND PRICE. 



Corner Fourth and Pine Streets, 



WILLIAMSPORT, 



PENN'A 



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Fasl^ioi^aWe ]Mcrcl70jQt Tailor, 

^ 1 I..OTHIER, 

A! vo 

Dialer in ! runks, Cients' F^urnishing Goods, &c. 

MO WEST FOURTH ST., WILLIAMSF^OHT, PA, 
Special Prices to Ministers and Sfu«l< iits. 




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d^DWEB ffc CD. 



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M 



GLUSIVE MILLINERY STOR 



IM T! IB CIT^ 



Drs. I^T.UMR <5c IIKRT2;, 

DENTISTS, 

S. W. Cor. Third and Market Sts., Williamsport, Pa. 

FIRST-CLASS DENTAL WORK AT REASONABLE PRICES. 

To obviate the necessity of wearing plates, we make 
Crown and Bridge Work a Specialty. 

PAINLESS EXTBACTION. AppointmeDts made by Mail or Telephone. 




A^. D. Lui^DY Co., 



WHOLESALE AND RETAIL 



b\r/i'rfi.iiNi Eh:S. 

Large Stock of School and Office Supplies, Wall Paper, Wrapping and Paper 
, ^ Bags, Window Shades— ready made and made to order. 

UNION AND OTHER BICYCLES. 

Blank and Miscellaneous Books a Specialty. 

S4 E-A.ST THII^r) STR^EET. 



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J ■' r^ * Ik 1 1 1 ifi li 1' A 






HEADQUARTERS FOR 



Crockery, Tinware, Notions, House- furnishing 

Goods;, Jpwolrv, Toys and Stationery, r> ainl 
iO Cent Cioods, S[)r<*ialdes, &c. 

Mo. 3G EAST i Jrl I K O Sm^KKi, 



vVijLL.1 AMSI-OR 



r, PA. 



Mrs. LIZZII: C. SCHrsJEll 

« o o ^^ ^^^^ *^^ owner of the A. R. Hinckley Co. store is now 

in charge of a fine new line of 

BOOKS, WALL PAPER AND STATION FRY, 

in the new store room, 

CORNER FOrT?TH AND n ffXIAM STREETS, 

where she will be glad to welcome former and new students. We will keep a 
full line of Seminary School Books at the lowest cash prices, 

both new and second hand. 

L. C. SCI I NEE, Manager, 

BOOKSELLER AND STATIONER. 



JL A. 'w' %X 



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Kimnkiii , 

J U ii^B STREET, 



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Have the largest assortment of footwear 
in the city. Call on them, they are 
bound to please you. 



C. C. WALKER, D.D.S., 

DENTIST, 



N. E. Corner Third and Market Sts. 

Over Mussina's Jewelry Store. 



TELBPHONB 



VILLinnSFORT, FA. 

J Office. 1263. 
(Residence. 373. 



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DUBLE & CORNELL 



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CORNER FOURTH AND FINE STREETS 
PARTICULAR ATTENTION GIVEN lu oUMPOUNDING PRESCRIPTIONS 



WE HAVE IN OUR ESTABLISHNf INT W^!AT IS CLAIMED 
TO BE THE FINEST SODA VAirK r UNTAIN IN THE 
UNITED STATES. CALL AND bLE IT 



TOILET rK[:I7\Rf\riON5 

HAIR, TODTH, NAIL MP CLOTH BRUSHES, PERFUMES 
MP FANCY ARTICLES AT LOWEST PRICES. 

SPECIAL RATES TO STUDENTS 



georgf: yi;yy ii soxs, 

\Y liolcsale (jroeeFs 




\V^ n inrn^pfu^i, Pa. 



WILHELM & SHEFFER, 
Seminary Book Store. 



A Complete Stock of Seminary Books Constantly on Hand. 

SCHOOL SUPPLIES OF EVERY DESCRIPTION. 

Any Books not in stock will be ordered immediately. 

Second-hand Books a specialty— bought, sold and exchanged. 

Fine Stationery, Bibles, Prayer Bool<s and Hymnals. 

A BEAUTIFUL LINE OF GBADUAIINQ PRESENTS. 

119 West Fourth Street, 

ELLIOT BLOCK. 



WlLLlAMbPUKF. PA. 



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238 and 240 Market Square, WILLIAMSPORT, PA. 






Manufacturer of PICTURE ERANIES 

r(chiii);>, Kn;4ia\ings, Aiti.st'^ Materials, &C. 



Gkorge 1^. Nkai,, 

flftiUincrv m\b IKlotione 

315 \PuK Street, 

^v\^ii^i^i^^AisPoitr. PA. 



McCORr^lCK & HEROIC, 

ire Insurance and Real Est 

Susquehanna Trust Building, 

WILIvIAlVISPORT, PENN'A. 




J. rkul ^uc^^, 1^1(. G^. 



DRUGGi:^r ANDC 






T r T > 

1:^1 



31 West Fourth Street, WlliLiIfl]VISPOHT, PR. 



T. J. FUNSTON. 



FRANK S. CLAPP. 



T. J. 







Headquarters for Baby Carriages and Refrigerators. 
Dealers in Hardware, White Lead, Oils, Glass and Build- 
ing Hardware. Belting and Saw Mill Supplies a specialty, 
and Agents for E. C. Atkin & Co.'s Mill Saws. Agricul- 
tural Implements. Also Agents for the South Bend 
Chilled Plows, Masury's Mixed Paints, Carriage Hardware. 

22 East Third Street, Williamsport, Pa. 



.1 (