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Full text of "Annual catalogue of Williamsport Dickinson Seminary for the academic year : from .."

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Semi ' Centennial Catalogue 



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THE- 



SEMI-CENTENN'lAL CATALUuLli; 



— OF- 



WILLIAM 




DiCKIN 







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roR THc ncHDmic year 



— FROM — 



SEPTmBCR 6, 1597, TO JUNE 16, I595, 



WILLianSPORT, PK 



wir,i:,rAMSPORT, pa. : 

THE SUN PRINTING AND BINDING COMPANY. 

1898. 



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ANf) v\\(:a110NS, 



1898. — - 

FAI,I, TERM 



Opens Monday, September 5, and closes Wednesday, 
December 14. Vacation eighteen days. 



1899. 
WINTER TERM 



Opens Monday, January 2, and closes Monday, March 27. 
No vacation. 



1899. 
SPRING TERM 



Opens Monday, March 27, and closes June 15. 
eleven weeks. 



Vacation 



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'* 



CALENDAR. 



1897. 

6 September, Monday — Fall Terra Opened. 
10 September, Friday — Fall Term Reception. 

27 November, Saturday— Anniversary Belles Ivcttrcs Union Society. 
10 December, Friday — Christmas Cantata. 
15 December, Wednesday — Fall Term Closed. 

1898. 

3 Jaiuuiiy, Monday — Winter Term Opened. 

7 January, Friday — Winter Term Reception. 

24 January, Monday— President and Mrs. Gray's Reception to School. 

27 January, Thursday— Day of Prayer for Colleges. 
21 February, Monday — Musical in Chapel. 

12 March, Saturday — Anniversary Gamma Epsilon Society. 

24 March, Thursday— Lowell Day Exercises by Primary Department. 

28 March, Monday— Winter Term Closed. 

28 March, Monday — Spring Term Opened. 

29 March, Tuesday— Piano Recital by Misses King and Tallman. 

1 April, Friday— Spring Term Reception. 

29 April, Friday — Gymnastic Exhibition in Ladies' Gymnasium. 

30 April, Saturday— Children's Musical in Bradley Hall. 

7 May, Saturday — Anniversary Tripartite Union Society. 
10 May, Tuesday — Senior's Recital in Elocution. 
12 May, Thursday— Ensemble Evening by Misses Stuart and Quin. 
14 May, vSaturday— Field Sports with Y. M. C. A. 
19 May, Thursday— Piano Recital by Misses Wilson and Unterecker. 

26 May, Thursday — Piano Recital by Misses Frost and Cillmeyer. 

27 May, Friday— Final Examinations of Senior Class. 

31 May, Tuesday— President and Mrs. Gray's Reception to Senior Class. 

2 June, Thursday — Cantata, Rose Maiden. 

4 June, Saturday — Inter-Academic Meet. 

7 June, Tuesday — Annual Examinations. 

8 June, Wednesday — Annual Examinations. 

9 June, Thursday — Annual Examinations. 

9 June, Thursday, 8 P. M.— Exercises of Sophomore Class. 
10 June, Friday, 3 P. M.— Field Sports. 

10 Tune, PYiday, 8 P. M. — Exercises of Junior Class. 

11 June, Saturday — Reception by Senior Class. 

12 June, Sunday, 10:30 A. M. — Baccalaureate Sermon by Bishop Thomas 

Bowman, D. D., LL. D. 
12 June, Sunday 3:00 P. M.— Semi-Centennial Sermon by Bishop John 
H. Vincent, D. D., LL. D. 

12 June, Sunday, 6 P. M. — Song Service on Campus. 

13 June, Monday, 2 P. M. — Senior Class Day. 

13 June, Monday, 8 P. M.— Prize Contest in Music and Elocution. 

14 June, Tuesday — Semi-Centennial Celebration. 

15 June, Wednesday, 9:30 A. M.— Reunion of the Literary Societies. 
15 June, Wednesday, 2 P. M. — Reunion of Classes. 

15 June, Wednesday, 7 P. M.— Business Meeting of Alumni Association. 

15 June, Wednesday, 8 P. M. — Semi-Centennial Reunion and Banquet. 

16 June, Thursday, 9:30 A. M. — Commencement. 

15 June, Wednesday, 2 P. M. — Meeting of the Board of Directors. 

16 June, Thursday, 2 P. M.— Annual Meeting of the vStockholders. 
j6 June, Thursday, 2:30 P. M,— Annual Meeting of the Directors. 



^ 



BOARD OF DIRECTORS. 



*HoN. JOHN PATTON, PrksidknT, Curwewsville. 
WILLIAM F. THOMPSON, Esq., Secretary, Wiliiamsport. 
GEORGE W, HIPPLE, Eso., Lock Haven. 
LOUIS Mcdowell, ESQ.,"'williamsport. 
THOMAS H. MURRAY, Esq., Clearfield. 
J. COLE GREEN, Esq., Wiliiamsport. 
DEWITT BODINE, Esq., Hiighesville. 
Hon. DANIEL H. HAvSTlNGS, Bellefonte. 
Hon. THOMAS BRADLEY, Philadelphia. 
Hon. H. C. McCORMICK, Wiliiamsport. 
Mrs. ELIZABETH S. JACKSON, Berwick. 



E. J. GRAY, Steward and Treasurer. 
Miss ESTELLA M. FOLLMER, Book-keeper. 
Mr. E. FAYETTE OLMSTED, Stenographer. 
Miss LYDIA TAYLOR, Matron. 
Mrs. M. HAINES, Assistant Matron. 



VISITING COMMITTEE- 



CENTRAL PENNSYLVANIA CONFERENCE. 



REV. E. T. SWARTZ. 
Rev. W. C. ROBBINS. 
Rev. J. A. WOOD, Jr. 
Rev. J. L. LEILICH. 
Rev. B. F. DIMMICK. 
Rev. J. B. POLSGROVE. 
Rev. G. W. STEVENS. 
Rev. T. S. WILCOX. 
Rev. a. B. HOOVEN. 
Rev. J. H. DAUGHERTY. 



Rev. G. M. GLENN. 
Rev. J. W. FORREST. 
Rev. M. L. SMYSER. 
Rkv. J. B. SHAVER. 
Rev. M. V. GANOE. 
Rev. J. F. ANDERSON, 
Rev. I. HECKMAN. 
Rev. F. W. curry. 
Rev. S. ham. 
Rev. a. S. WILLIAMS. 



COMMITTEE ON SEMI-CENTENNIAL. 

Rev. M. L. GANOE. Rkv. C. V. HARTZELL. 

REV. B. C. CONNER. Rev. W. A. HOUCK 

Rev. J. R. DUNKERLEY. 

PHILADELPHIA CONFERENCE. 

REV. T. C. MURPHY, D. D. Rev. A. A. ARTHUR 

Rev. S. A. HEILNER, D. D. Rev. AMOS JOHNSON 

Rev. a. G. KYNETT. 



BALTIMORE CONFERENCE. 

Rev. C. D. smith. Rev. J. P. WRIGHT. 



♦Deceased. 



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<V 



ALUMNI ORGANIZATION. 



OFFICERS. 

THOMAS H. MURRAY, ESQ., President. 

Rev. THOMAS B. NEELEY, D. D., LL. D., Vice President. 

Miss MARY L. REIDER, A. B., Recording Secretary. 

Mrs. C. L. PEASLEE, B. S., ) ^ 

Miss CHARLOTTE C. EVERETT, M. E. l., > ^^^\?^^^^^^^^ 

Miss MINNIE M. HOOVEN, M. E. L. ) Secretaries. 

Rev. C. W. BURNLEY, A. B., Treasurer. 



EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE. 

Rev. C. W. BURNLEY, A. B. 

Rev. a. s. bowman, a. B. 

Miss AUGUSTA H. GILMORE, M. E. L. 

Miss MARY C. KURTZ, A. B. 

Miss ANNA SLATE, M. E. L. 

Miss LUCY BURNLEY, B. S. 

Miss MARY P. PURDY, B. S. 

Miss MINNIE MENGES. 

GEORGE J. KOONS. 



SEMI-CENTENNIAL REUNION OF CLASSES, 



FACULTY. 



Rev. EDWARD JAMES GRAY, D. D., Pre:side:nt, 

Ethics arid Logic. 

HARRIETTE AUGUSTA HYNES, A. B., PrkcepTrkss, 

Fre7ich a?id German. 

HARRY REED VAN DEUSEN, A. B., 
Ancient Languages, 



"MAURICE rSFFERIS BABB, M. E., 

Mathematics, 



GEORGE EDWARD POLIvOCK, B. S., 
Natural Science, 

ERNEST KETCH AM SMITH, M. A., 
Latin and Rhetoric. 

CHARI^OTTE CRITTENDEN EVERETT, M. E. Iv., 

History and Literature, 

HARRY WARD PYI.ES, B. E., 
Academic Department, 

MINNIE MAE HOOVEN, M. E. L., 
Assistafit in Academic Department, 

Mrs. JUIvIA LAWRENCE GASSAWAY, 
Painting and Draiving, 

MAY TRIMBLE STUART, B. S., 
Director Instrumental Music. 

MARY LILLIAN QUIN, 
Assistant in Instrumental Music, 

ANNA NETTA GIBSON, 
— Vocal Music, 



JESSICA FRANCES TER WILLIGER, 
Elocution and Physical Culture, 



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ESTELLA MAY FOLLMER, M. E. L., 

Book-keeping, 

CHARLES SUMNER SHIELDS, 
Flute, Guitar, Banjo and Mandolin, 



IvECirRES, 1897-1898. 



Hon. henry C. McCORMICK, 
Political Economy, 

HERBERT T. AMES, Esq., 
Cofumercial Law, 

ANTRANIG AZHDERIAN, 
Life in Armenia, 

Mrs. ELLA BOOLE, 
Temperafice Work, 

Mrs. henry W. palmer, 
How to Help Boys, 

Bishop JOHN H. VINCENT, D. D., LL. D., 

Elements 0/ Efficiency for the Ministry, 

Practical Ideals, 

Hon. SAMUEL DICKIE, 
Essentials to Success, 

Prof. MaRCUS BUELL, 
Emergencies, 

Mrs. W. H. SHERWOOD, 
Recital and Lecture, 

FREDERICK GOINGS, 
King Henry V, Macbeth, 

Miss LOUISA HEAFER, 
Life in hidia. 



Mrs. 



NORVELL, 



Choosing Makes Destiny, 

rkv. h. h. barber, D. D., 

The Story of the War, 



8 



SKMI-CENTKNNIAI, CATALOGUE. 



GENERAL INFORMATION. 

WILLIAMSPORT DICKINSON SEMINARY. 

Is an institution of high grade, with ample faciHties for giving 
young ladies and gentlemen a superior education. It is or- 
ganized upon the plans which have been approved by long 
experience, and adopted by the best schools in this country, 
embracing all modern appliances in means and methods of in- 
struction. It was founded in 1848, and is regularly chartered 



by the Legislature of the state of Pennsylvania, and author- 
ized to confer degrees upon those who complete the pre- 
scribed Courses of Study. 

The Seminary is under the patronage of the Central Penn- 
sylvania Conference, being owned and practically managed by 
the Preachers' Aid Society. As this investment was rather 
to promote the important work of higher Christian education 
than to make money, the paramount purpose is to combme 
thorough instruction and careful moral training with the com- 
forts of a good home, at the lowest possible rates. 

LOCATION. 
Williamsport is one of the most beautiful and healthful 
places in the state. It has never been subject to epidemics of 
any kind. Many coming to the school in poor health have 
returned fully restored. The city is situated on the West 
Branch of the Susquehanna River, has a population of thirty 
thousand, is widely known for its intelligence, its enterprise, 
the taste displayed in the character of its public buildings and 
private residences, and the moral appliances with which it is 
furnished. In small towns and villages the facilities for cul- 
ture — intellectual as well as aesthetic and moral — are gener- 
ally limited, rarely reaching beyond the institution itself, and 
hence student life must become monotonous, lacking the in- 
spiration which a larger place with wider opportunities af- 
fords. Forty churches, an active temperance organization, 
and branches of the Young Men's and Young Women's 



^ 



'-V. 




BRADLEY HALL. 



WII.I.IAMSPORT DICKINSON SEMINARY. 



^K 



Christian Associations, embracing many of the most earnest 
Christians in the community, with a large library, free to all, 
and accessible at all times, indicate some of the social and re- 
lis^-ious advantages accessible to the young people in Williams- 
port. 

BUILDINGS. 

llic buildings occupy an eminence overlooking the city, 
and are surrounded by beautiful shade trees, while the 
grounds contain six acres, affording ample room for exercise 
and play. The buildings are brick, heated by steam, provided 
with fire escapes, and supplied throughout with pure moun- 
tain water. They are lighted with electric incandescent light. 
The system adopted embodies the latest improvements in 
generating and utilizing electricity for illuminating purposes, 
and insures entire safety from fire or shock, so that the wires 
may be handled without danger. The value of an illuminant 
which, consuming no oxygen, leaves the air perfectly pure 
and at the same time furnishes abundant light, cannot be over- 
estimated. 

The main edifice, recently rebuilt and improved, compares 
favorably with the best school buildings in the country, and 
the new Chapel is among the most attractive public halls in 
the city. 

Both departments are furnished with bath rooms and all 
modern appliances for comfort, and in the entire arrange- 
ment of the buildings great care has been taken for the con- 
venience and health of the occupants. 

The ladies' apartments are entirely separate from the others, 
and there is no association of the sexes but in the 
presence of their instructors. The happy influence, mutually 
exerted, in their slight association in the recitation room, at 
the table, and in the public exercises in the Chapel, is to be 
seen in the cultivation of a cheerful and animated disposition, 
in the formation of good habits and manners, in ardent de- 
votion to study, and in the attainment of high moral character. 
These, with many other valuable results, have established the 



lO 



SKMI-CKNTENNIATv CATALOGUE. 



WILUAMSPORT DICKINSON SEMINARY. 



II 



fact that the best plan for a school is, according to the evident 
design of Providence in the constitution of society, on the 
basis of a well-regulated Christian family. 

The members of the faculty live in the building, eat at the same 
tables, and have constayit oversight of all the students, 

BRADLEY HALL. 

The new Music and Art Building, named for lion. 
Thomas Bradley, of Philadelphia, is an imposing structure, 
eighty-five feet long, fifty feet deep and four stories high. 
In architectural design and symbolic ornamentation it repre- 
sents a very high type of utility and beauty. 

This commodious building is a part of a long-cherished 
purpose to provide a modern Music and Art conservatory 
which, in equipment of space and appliances, as well as in 
method and character of work, shall meet the increasing de- 
mands for wider opportunity and broader culture in what has 
come to be esteemed an important factor in the higher educa- 
tion of young people. We ofifer advantages for the study of 
music, vocal and instrumental, which compare favorably with 
the best music schools in this country, with the atmosphere of 
a high-toned literary institution and the safe-guard of a re- 
fined Christian home. 

Our Directors and assistant teachers have studied abroad, 
as well as in the best schools in this country, and are thor- 
oughly conversant with the latest and best methods of instruc- 
tion. 

While chiefly devoted to the study of Music and Art, pro- 
vision is made in Bradley Hall for a large and well-furnished 
gymnasium and bowling alley, for young ladies, with lockers, 
baths and all modern appliances for health and comfort added, 
as also a capacious Society Hall, a reading room and library. 
It is joined by an enclosed bridge with the main building of the 
Seminary, affording them easy and sheltered communication 
at all times. 

HEALTH. 

The value of physical culture is recognized. A large Cam- 



:i 



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pus, with very fine ball and lawn tennis grounds for the gen- 
tlemen and lawn tennis court for the ladies, furnishes stimulus 
and opportunity for out-door athletic sports. 

All rffirirnt Athletic Association is organized among the 
students, iindi i ihe direction of a Professor. A public enter- 
tainnirnt is given in behalf of the Association once a year. A 
Gymnasiuiii, forty by sixty feet, supplied with the best modern 
appliances for physical culture, is maintained for the use of the 
gentlemen, under proper regulations. All young men, not 
physically incapacitated, may be required to take systematic 
exercise in the Gymnasium from two to three hours per week. 
They will provide themselves with an appropriate gymnasium 
suit, including shoes. 

Lectures on health will also be given from time to time, 
by an eminent physician. 

ROOMS AND FURNITURE. 

The rooms are larger than in most boarding schools, the 
ladies' being 16x13 ^eet and the gentlemen's 20x9 1-2 feet. 
They are all furnished with bedstead, mattress, table, chairs, 
wardrobe, washstand and crockery; the ladies' with bed- 
springs and dressing-bureau, and if desired, any room will be 
entirely furnished; but students may provide their own sheets 
(for double beds), pillows, pillow cases, blankets, counter-- 
panes, carpets and mirrors, and thus lessen the expense. 

EXPENSES. 

Total cost of boarding, washing, heat, light, tuition in 
regular studies, and room furnished, except carpet and bed 
clothing, per year $212.40, as follows: 

Fall Term I84.96 

Winter Term 6^ 72 

Spring Term .'.*.'.* ^^,^2 

$212.40 

Church Sittings — per term $ .50 

Gymnasium — per term * ]ro 

General Chemistry — per term * 3*00 

Qualitative Analysis— per term . ^[oo 



12 



SEMI-CKNTENNIAI, CATALOGUE. 



Without tuition in any department : 

Fall Term $67.63 

Winter Term 50-72 

Spring Term 50.72 

When rooms are entirely furnished, $13.00 will be added 
per year, or $6.00 per term, for each student. This includes 
all charges for furnished rooms, board, washing (12 f lain 
pieces per week), heat, light, and tuition in T stin, Greek, 
Literature, Mathematics, Sciences, Ethics, English and Pen- 
manship. There are no extras whatever. The charges for 
Music, Art, Modern Languages and Bookkeeping are stated 
elsewhere. 

We desire to emphasize this statement, because some 
schools, whose advertised rates are higher than ours, increase 
the expenses still more by numerous ''extras.^' 

We ask those who are seeking education for themselves and 
parents who contemplate sending their children to a boarding 
school, to carefully note the fact that we furnish everything 
embraced in a thoroughly equipped school, with all the com- 
forts of a good home, including a large, airy and completely 
furnished room, in a beautiful and healthful location, at the 
low rate of $225.40 per year, in courses of study which prepare 
the student for business, for professional life, or for the lower 
or higher classes in college; or, if they prefer to furnish their 
own rooms with bed-clothes and carpet, for $212.40. 

Persons applying for rooms will please state whether they 
wish them furnished entirely or in part. 

DISCOUNTS. 

Special discounts are made on all bills, except tuition in 

Ornamental Branches, when two enter from the same family 

at the same time; to all Ministers; all persons preparing for 

the Ministry or Missionary work, and all who are preparing 

to teach. 

PAYMENTS. 

Term bills are payable in advance, one half at opening and 
the balance at the middle of the term. 



WII.I.IAMSPORT DICKINSON SEMINARY. 



13 



Fifteen per cent, will be added to the ordinary rate per week 
for board, washing, heat, light and room, when students leave 
before the end of the term. No redtiflio?i or discount in board- 

ing (■■} luiiiofi (Of it^d f/iiJN /ni// if Av///, //i/r fi(rvisJird ronin for 
less fhiui ij trn)K Nor will ilicre be any ><-'hiclio7i fo) absence 
dnrino a tmn except in tase of protraH^ed illness. 

Kxtra washiiu;, nidi iiiry pieces, 50 cents per dozen ; ladies' 
plain gowns, 20 cents each. 

Meals in dinijig room after regular table^jo cents extra. 
Meals carried to rooms, in case of sickness, 10 cents each, or 
25 cents per day. 

When students are called away by sickness or providential 
necessity, moneys advanced will be returned, subject to con- 
ditions stated above. Students dismissed or leaving without 
the approval of the President may be charged for the full term. 

Deduction for absence is made on recommendation of the 
President to the Treasurer. 

No reduction for board or tuition for absence of two zveeks or 
less at the begijining, or the last four weeks before the close of the 
term. 

Five dollars must be deposited by gentlemen and two dol- 
lars by ladies with the Treasurer on entering, to cover damages 
that the student may do to room or other property. This will 
be returned when the student leaves, but not before, in case no 
injury has been done. Any student rooming alone will be 
charged $10.00 extra per term. 

DAY PUPILS. 

Day pupils in Primary branches will be charged $10.50 for 
Fall Term and $8.00 for Winter and Spring Terms each ; in 
Higher branches $20.00 for Fall Term and $15.00 for Winter 
and Spring Terms each. 

ADMISSION. 

Pupils of good moral character will be received at any time, 
for a single term or longer period. 

Must arrange bills with the Treasurer before attending reci- 
tations. 



14 



SEMI-CENTENNIAL CATALOGUE. 



Must take at least ionr studies, unless excused by the Faculty. 

Must register name and church, and agree to comply with all 
rules and regulations of the school. 

Each student will be considered a member of the Institution 
until due notice shall have been given of intention to leave and 
permission obtained from the President. 

BOARDING. 

This department is under the general direction of the Presi- 
dent, but an experienced and thoroughly competent Matron has 
immediate charge. The department commends itself by clean- 
liness, abundance of supply, excellence of quality, good cook- 
ing, and adaptation to health. 

DISCIPLINE. 

The discipline is firm, but mild and impartial. While every 
encouragement will be given to the orderly and studious, and 
due allowance be made for youthful indiscretion, yet the law- 
less and refractory cannot long remain among us. 

APPARATUS. 

The Scientific Department is furnished with very complete 
outfits of Physical and Chemical Apparatus. The Museum 
contains a large number of rare and valuable specimens, in- 
cluding a fine collection of Minerals and Zoological and Phys- 
iological specimens. Among these are the following : 

In the Museum — 

Alcoholic specimens of the Human Heart, Brain, Stomach, 
Kidneys and Intestines. 

Bock-Steger Models of Ear, Skin, Eye, Larynx, Alimentary 
Canal, Lungs, Head, Brain and Tongue. 

A finely articulated Human Skeleton is accessible to the 
classes in Physiology and Anatomy. A valuable collection of 
Microscopic Slides has been presented for the use of the De- 
partment. 

A series of Drill ores, a collection of different Woods in the 
form of blocks, showing bark, grain and finished surface, and 
a collection of Polished Granite vSpecimens. 



&, 



WILLIAMSPORT DICKINSON SEMINARY. 



15 




In Physical Apparatus — 

A Hohz Machine, Gold Leaf Electroscopes, Pith Ball 
Electroscopes, Ruhmkorfif Coil, Morse Key and Register, a 
model Telegraplnng Machine, Queen's supeiiui An rump, 
two large Globes, Still, furnishing distilled water for all work 
in Cheni!>t ry, Oxyhydrogen Light wiih ail ULcessories, aiiJ a 
Queen's Excelsior Lantern. 

In Chemical Apparatus — 

Pair delicate Balances, sensitive to one milligram. Assay 
Furnace, full set of Pipetts, Buretts and Graduates for Volu- 
metric Analysis. 

Miss Myrtle Gray, of the Class of '93, presented a large col- 
lection of rare Botanical specimens, gathered in Kentucky 
and mounted for use in the study of Botany. 

POST-GRADUATE WORK. 

We are prepared to do post-graduate work in Modern Lan- 
guages, Music, Art, Chemistry and Physics. 

MERIT AND DEMERIT. 

A daily record is kept of all the exercises of the school, 
from which record the students will be graded. A record of 
demerits is also kept. Tardiness, unexcused absences from 
required exercises, and all disorderly conduct, will subject the 
student to demerit marks. Such marks bring a private re- 
proof before the Faculty, a public reprimand before the whole 
school, and may send the offender away. Sessional reports 
are sent to parents. 

GOVERNMENT. 

Our system of government seeks to encourage self-control 
rather than control by statute law and rule. It deals with 
each one as an individual, as well as a part of the school, mak- 
ing each one largely the arbiter of his own immunities and 
limitations. This principle will be emphasized in the coming 
year. 



i6 



SEMI-CENTENNIAL CATALOGUE. 



Manliness and womanliness manifested in a uniform recog- 
nition of relations to school and school life; appreciation of 
what opportunity means as a value and factor in the acquisition 
of learning and culture, and courteous, straightforward, truth- 
ful dealing with teachers and fellow-students in matters per- 
taining to mutual associations in the life and work of the 
school, will earn and obtain such privileges as properly con- 
sist with the purpose for which school life is desired and main- 
tained. 

But indolence, evasion of duties implied in the relations of 
student and school, unmanly or unwomanly attitude toward 
the life assumed in entering the school, and especially equivo- 
cation or prevarication in statement, bearing or living, will 
be treated as weakness or positive vice, imposing such correc- 
tives and limitations as each individual case may demand. 

HONORS. 
No student whose deportment is unsatisfactory will be al- 
lowed to contest for class honors. 

RELIGIOUS CHARACTER. 
Williamsport Dickinson Seminary is not sectarian in any 
sense, but it is positively and emphatically Christian in its ad- 
ministration and work. By combining practical Christian 
teaching with thorough intellectual training, under the per- 
sonal supervision of Christian men and women, especially 
qualified by education and experience, the school has estab- 
lished a reputation among literary institutions and has won 
the confidence of the public in a degree of which its friends 
and patrons may be justly proud. 

RELIGIOUS SERVICES. 
Every boarding student is required to attend religious ser- 
vices in the Chapel daily, as well as public worship morning 
and evening every Sabbath, at such place as parents or 
guardians may designate, the President assenting, unless ex- 
cused. 

A Bible reading, conducted by the President, will be sub- 



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WILLIAMSPORT DICKINSON SEMINARY. 



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stituted for the evening service as often as may be deemed 
proper. 

N. B. — Each student must be supphed with a Bible, to be 
read, zvithont note or sectarian comment^ m the services of the 
Chapel. The whole school read ni concert. 

To promote the spiii? < f worship, we advise each student 
to procure the Hymnal ui ilie Methodi.-.i Episcopal Church, 
which is used in the Chapel services. 

A general experience meeting is held every Sabbath at half- 
past eight A. M., and generally a service of song at six P. M., 
continuing one hour. Also, a prayer and praise meeting for 
the ladies and gentlemen on Wednesday evenings. Attend- 
ance upon these social services is optional with the students. 

RELIGIOUS ORGANIZATIONS. 
A Young Woman's Foreign Missionary Society has been 
in successful operation for several years. This society ac- 
quires and diffuses missionary intelligence, creates and main- 
tains an interest in the work of the General Society and pre- 
pares its members for efificient service as centres of Christian 
influence at their homes when school days are ended. It has 
largely contributed to the education of a missionary for 
India. 

CANDIDATES FOR THE MINISTRY. 

A preacher who can, when necessary, conduct the singing 
in a prayer meeting and in a revival service, acquires a power 
for good which cannot otherwise be attained. Indeed, the 
usefulness of a preacher is largely augmented by a knowledge 
of music and ability to sing. Recognizing this fact, we have 
arranged to give weekly lessons in singing and careful in- 
struction in voice culture to all young men who are preparing 
to preach, at the nominal cost of one dollar per term. This 
provision also includes young women who are preparing for 
either home or foreign missionary work. 

STUDENTS OF LIMITED MEANS. 
We have organized a system by which a limited number of 
students may earn a part of the cost of education. 



i8 



SEMI-CENTKNNIAL CATALOGUK. 



We now give light employment, not appreciably interfering 
with study, to seventeen young men and three young women, 
paying from fifteen to twenty-five per cent, of the bills. Appli- 
cants for these positions are enrolled and vacancies are fi11rd in 
the order of application, preference being given to those m the 
school. Applicants must be recommended by their pastor, 
or some responsible person, as worthy of help. No one will 
be retained who is not earnest in his studies and faithful to 
all required duties. 

~"~ LITERARY EXERCISES. 

In addition to class work, public exercises are held in the 
Seminary Chapel every Friday evening, at which the Juniors 
and Seniors in literary courses read essays or deliver original 
speeches, interspersed with vocal or instrumental music, fur- 
nished by the Music Department. 

LITERARY SOCIETIES. 
There are three flourishing Literary Societies connected 
with the Seminary— the Belles Lettres, the Gamma Epsilon 
and the Tripartite Union. The first two are in the gentle- 
men's and the last in the ladies' department. Each has a 
well-furnished hall and a judiciously selected library, aggre- 
gating more than two thousand volumes. 

HOME FEATURES. 
The Seminary is a boarding school of the highest grade, 
taking rank among the very best, with superior appointments 
and appliances for the health and culture of its students. It 
is also a well-ordered home. First of all, the President and 
his family reside in the building, forming a part of the school 
and are always accessible to all its members. The wife of the 
President entertains the Young Woman's Missionary Society 
once a month in her apartments, and occasionally receives the 
entire school in her parlors, while in times of sickness she 
visits the students in their rooms, giving such suggestions 
and directions as the experience of a mother may supply. 
Again, the members of the Faculty are so distributed through- 



» 1 ^ 



WILIvIAMSPORT DICKINSON SEMINARY. 



19 



out the building as to be readily accessible at any time for 
such help as the students may desire outside of the recitation 
room. Again, recognizing the value of social culture as a 
factor m |)ir|»aration for a usciul liic, the ricsidcnl ami the 
Faculty give a formal reception once each term to the \v1h>1<' 
school ill the Chapel, wluch iui the occasiuu i^ uansioiiiicil 
into an attractive drawing-room, while weekly informal *^so- 
cials," continuing from thirty minutes to an hour, after the 
public Friday evening entertainments, relieve the monotony 
of routine work, cultivate a cheerful spirit and meet the 
natural desire for social pleasures. In these and all practi- 
cable ways an appeal is made to the higher elements in the 
nature; mutual interest inspires mutual respect; opportunity 
is afforded to study character, and the school becomes a pleas- 
ant and safe Christian home, as well as a place for careful 
mental and moral training. 

INSTRUCTION. 

Our methods are modern, and adapted to the need of the 
students. No pains are spared to give thorough, practical 
and scholarly training in all the departments by teachers of 
superior attainments and experience. Besides instruction in 
connection with the text book, lectures illustrated by experi- 
ments are given from time to time. 

Students in Music have opportunity to hear distinguished 
artists, which is of great advantage in acquiring a correct 
taste, as also in enlarging their knowledge. In addition to 
frequent Recitals by musicians of recognized ability, eminent 
musicians from a distance frequently give concerts, to which 
our Music pupils are admitted at reduced rates. 

SPECIAL LECTURES. 

Special lectures in the form of familiar talks will be given 
each term by the President. These lectures will cover the 
discussion of social ethics, the care of health, how to eat, how 
to work, how to play, how to rest, current literature and cur- 
rent events in relation to school life, with other subjects which 



20 



SBMI-CENI^KNNIAI. CATALOGUE. 



may be helpful to young people who wish to make the most 
of opportunity. 

The President will also give a course of lectures to young 
men preparing for the ministry, covering sucli themes as may 
be of value to them as preucliers, as pasiuis nul ab ( itizciis. 
Attendance at these lectures is required of all can lilites for 
the ministry. 

YOUNG LADIES. 

___ Constant and systematic efforts are made looking toward 



the general culture of the young ladies committed to our care. 
The lady members of the Faculty take personal interest in all 
things pertaining to their welfare and are intimately asso- 
ciated with them in recreation hours. 

Every Saturday short lectures are given to all young ladies 
on social culture, literature, art and kindred topics. During 
the coming year, in addition to these lectures, the ladies of the 
Senior Class will meet the Preceptress monthly for purposes 
of literary criticism. 

TELEGRAPHY. 

Among the physical apparatus are several telegraphing in- 
struments, one of which, the gift of Benjamin G. Welch, is a 
very fine model, showing the various parts of different in- 
struments. During the year a number of instruments have 
been placed in students' and teachers' rooms, affording ex- 
cellent opportunity for study and practice to those who desire 
to fit themselves for practical work in this growing branch of 
industry. 

TEACHERS. 

A Normal Class may be organized during the Fall and 

Spring Terms for those who desire to teach. The Course will 

comprehend special instruction by lectures on the Theory 

and Methods of Teaching by the President. No extra charge 

will be made. 

SCHOLARSHIPS. 

Mr. DeWitt Bodine, of Hughesville, Pa., an alumnus of the 
Seminary, has the honor of founding the first full scholar- 



WII.I.IAMSP0RT DICKINSON SEMINARY. 



21 



^ 



>.#« 



ship in this Institution. It is to be filled from the public 
schools of Hughesville by competitive examinations and is 
designated 

"TjIK DkWiTT EuDlNlv SciiUl.AKSiUP.'' 

It pav^ all expenses of boarri tuition, etc., m am regular 
course of study. 

Wlio will imitate iVl i Pindiiie's example? Are there not 
generous men and women among our alumni and friends 
ready to invest a portion of their wealth where it will be secure 
and work for God forever? A comparatively small sum will 
do a large work. The interest on a thousand dollars, in many 
instances, will supplement the meagre resources of a worthy 
young man or woman whom God has given large ability, but 
from whom fortune has withheld the means to develop it. 
This is especially true of those who are called into the ministry 
or into missionary work. Any sum will help, and three thous- 
and dollars will found a ministry or missionary scholarship 
in this Institution and maintain it perpetually. 

To aid any one who may desire by gift or will to found a 
partial or full scholarship to assist worthy young men or 
women in preparing for the ministry or mission work, or for 
any other useful occupation, forms are appended which may 
be used: 

I give, bequeath and devise to the Williamsport Dickinson 
Seminary, located at Williamsport, in the county of Lycom- 
ing, state of Pennsylvania, the sum of dollars (if 

stocks, bonds or other personal property specify same), to be 
used for the purpose of (here state definitely the object for 
which the money or property is to be used) ; said corporation 
to have and to hold and to employ the same for the purpose 
above named, and the receipt of the Treasurer thereof shall be 
a sufficient discharge to my executors for the same. 

If real estate is to be given this form will answer: I give, 
bequeath and devise to the Williamsport Dickinson Seminary, 
located at Williamsport, in the county of Lycoming, state of 
Pennsylvania, the following lands and premises (here describe 



I 



I 



22 



SKMI-CENTKNNIAL CATAI^OGUE. 



definitely); to have and to hold, to said corporation, its suc- 
cessors and assigns forever, the proceeds of which shall be 
employed in (here describe the object). 

The Woman's College of Baltimore proffers annually four 
free scholarships, valued at $ioo eacii, to any four young 
ladies of the graduating class who, after examination, shall 
be recommended by the Presideni and i acultv of the Semi- 
nary. This scholarship continues in each case through four 
years, giving free tuition in any degree course. 



OUTFIT. 

The gentlemen should be provided with an umbrella, and a 
pair of slippers to be worn in the room. The ladies must be 
supplied with thick walking shoes, and umbrella, India- 
rubber overshoes, water-proof cloak and a suit for exercise in 
the gymnasium. Their attire for general use should be neat 
and simple, but not elegant or expensive. All wearing apparel 
must be plainly marked with ftill name of the owner. We sug- 
gest that in addition to towels, napkins and napkin ring, each 
pupil bring a knife, fork and spoon, for use in case of sick- 



ness. 



A WORD TO PARENTS. 



1. Try to have your children here on the first day of the 
term, but not before, as we shall not be ready to receive them. 
The classes are formed on the second day, and it will be better 
for all concerned that the student start regularly with his 
class. 

2. If possible do not call them away during the session. 
When called home during the term the time of going and 
returning must be specified in the request. Absence, if only 
for a few days, disarranges the class, and is generally the be- 
ginning of irregularity on the part of scholar. 

3. Do not allow your children to leave the school before 
the examinations, unless it cannot be avoided. Serious in- 
convenience to all concerned often arises from a neglect of 
this caution. 



WII.I.IAMSPORT DICKINSON SEMINARY. 



23 



4. Supply them very sparingly with spending money. 
Parents cannot be too cautious on this point. 

5 Select for your child one of the instructors as a patron, 

to disiiibiiLc lii:3 iiiiiab. ill this wav a luDre jtirlicioti^ ti<^o of 
your money will hr ni;ulr. aini y.^ir child v. ill hi; kc|)i irom 
liicUi} lemptations. 

DAY STT^DF.NTS. 

Day students will be required to observe the following 
rules: 

1. Attend Chapel exercises, when their recitations come at 
8 or 9 o'clock A. M., unless excused by the President. 

2. Spend the intervals between recitations in the Study 
Hall. 

3. Present written excuse from parent or guardian for all 
absences, time and number of recitations being specified. 

4. Must not visit the rooms of boarders at any time with- 
out permission. 

5. All day students must deposit $1.00 with the Treasurer 
when they enter, to cover damage done to Study Hall or 
other property. This will be returned when the student 
leaves, but not before, provided no injury has been done. 

MEANS OF ACCESS. 
Williamsport is eight and a half hours from New York, six 
hours from Philadelphia, nine hours from Pittsburg, six hours 
from Baltimore, three hours from Harrisburg, and three hours 
from Elmira, and is reached directly by the Pennsylvania, the 
Philadelphia & Reading, the Northern Central, the Philadel- 
phia & Erie, the Beech Creek and the Fall Brook railroads, 
which pass through the city, and as these have connections 
directly with all the great railroads, is readily accessible from 
all quarters. 

GRADUATES AND FORMER STUDENTS. 
It may safely be estimated that from ten to twelve thousand 
persons have received Academic instruction, covering from 
one to four years, in Williamsport Dickinson Seminary, 



24 



SKMI-CKNTKNNIAI. CATAI^OGUK. 



while seven hundred and sixty-one have completed the pre- 
scribed curriculum, graduating with the degrees the Institu- 
tion confers. We desire to bring all these into active sym- 
pathy and co-operation with their Alma Mater, and hence we 
ask all persons to whom this notice may come, who have been 
students here, to send us their address, with any information 
concerning their personal history that may be of general in- 
terest, as we wish to compile a complete catalogue of all the 
students now living. 

There is a general meeting of the Alumni every year, the 
day before Commencement. We extend a most cordial in- 
vitation to all old students to attend the meeting this year, 
which will be held June 15, in the afternoon and evening. If 
you cannot come let us hear from you by letter. 

And now, may we not ask you to aid in enlarging the 
sphere and increasing the power of our Alma Mater? You 
can do much in many ways, but you can at least direct those 
looking for a good Boarding School to ours, or send us their 
address on a postal card. Carry the Seminary in your heart. 
She is doing a worthy work, and earnestly asks her sons and 
daughters to help her. 

SPECIAL INFORMATION. 



We shall not be ready to receive students before the first 
day of the term. On the second day classes are formed, a 
term schedule for recitations adopted, and lessons assigned. 

Students from other schools may enter any class on passing 
a satisfactory examination in the previous studies of the 
Course, or their equivalents. The examination may be 
waived if the Faculty are assured, by certificates of scholar- 
ship, or otherwise, that it is unnecessary. Certificates must 
be presented within two weeks after admission. 

Invitation to visit any member of the school may be given 
only with the approval of the President. The person invit 
ing or entertaining a visitor will be charged twenty-five cents 



i^ 




C 

o 

D 






WII.I.IAMSPORT DICKINSON SEMINARY. 



25 



• 



per meal, except parents or brothers or sisters of the person 
inviting. 

Visitors will not be allowed on the halls nor in the rooms 
oi students without permission. 

v^tnrlrnts who nrr hnc]-: in vrinro tlinti tl'ree studies in any 
year will u*_>{ rank with the class of thai year uiilc:^- ihc} have 
cotnpleted equivalent advanced stiuHes. 

German, covering three years, may be substituted for 
Greek in the College Preparatory Course. 

The Junior and Senior Classes study Etymology during the 
Fall Term. 

The language "elected'' in the Courses in Science and 
Literature and Practical Science will be retained throughout 
the required two years. 

The ladies are allowed to substitute a Course in Music, 
Drawing and Painting, German or French, for the Greek 
Language, and for Analytical Geometry and Calculus. 

The gentlemen may substitute two years in Greek or Ger- 
man for Analytical Geometry and Calculus. 

The election or substitution of German, French, Music or 
Drawing and Painting does not remit the regular tuition for 
these branches. 

Orthography, Etymology, Reading, Composition and De- 
clamation are required of all students, except those exclus- 
ively in Music, Art and Elocution. 

The classes in Trigonometry and Surveying are given such 
field drill as will familiarize them with practical surveying. 

In the departments of Ancient and Modern Languages the 
classes are practical in oral and written exercises throughout 
the Course. 

The study of the English Bible, one lesson a week, is re- 
quired in all Literary Courses. 

Essays by the young women and speeches by the young 
men, one each term, delivered at the regular Friday evening 
exercises, are required as a part of the Literary Courses. 

Special examinations in Orthography will be held the second 
week of each term. All students failing in this examination 
will be required to take a special course in spelling. 



26 



SEMI-CENTENNIAL CATALOGUE. 



WILLIAMSPORT DICKINSON SEMINARY. 



27 



COURSES OF STUDY. 



In order to meet the wants of a larger class of students, nine i.ku- 
lar Courses of Study are provided, namely: The Norn..) I ii:nglijBh, 
Belles Lettres, Science and Literature, Classical, Piaclicai Science,' 
College Preparatory, Art, Music and Business. Student:^ mny ndnpt 
any of these Courses exclusively, or may select such studies from 
them as they desire, subject to the approval of the Faculty. 

— The Normal English is designed to meet the increasing demand 
for teachers in our Common Schools, and is heartily commended to 
young ladies and gentlemen who desire thorough instruction and drill 
in the English Branches. 

The Belles Lettres Course is especially arranged to accommodate 
young ladies who may wish to omit the Higher Mathematics beyond 
Elementary Algebra and Geometry. It thus affords opportunity to 
connect studies in Music and Art with a well-selected Course in Lit- 
erature and Science. 

The Course in Science and Literature is intended to give wider 
culture and more thorough mental discipline. It differs from the 
Classical Courses mainly in that it omits the Greek Language en- 
tirely, and makes Latin elective with German or French during the 
first two years. Before entering upon this Course the Student must 
be thoroughly acquainted with the Common English Branches. 

The Classical Course is much more extensive than is ordinarily 
pursued at Seminaries. It will compare favorably with the curricu- 
lum adopted by our best institutions of learning. We offer it with 
entire confidence to young men who are preparing for professional 
life; also to young ladies who aspire to superior Intellectual culture. 
The preparation for this Course is a thorough knowledge of the 
studies embraced in the Academic Course. 

The Practical Science Course covers the required preparation for 
admission to schools of Technology and to Industrial Courses in our 
best Universities and Colleges. However, it is specially arranged to 
meet the increasing demand for scientific and literary instruction by 
those who contemplate an Academic training. As a preparation for 
assured success in industrial occupations we heartily commenii it. 

The College Preparatory Course is arranged for those who desire 
thorough instruction and systematic drill in all branches requisite for 
admission to our best Colleges and Universities. We commend it 
especially to parents who wish to place their children under the 
watchful care of experienced teachers, while they receive the liter- 
ary culture of a high grade institution of learning and enjoy the 
social advantages of a well-regulated Christian home. 



a' 



ACADEMIC COURSE. 

This Course will give thorough instruction and drill in the Common English 
Branches, and also prepare the Student for admission to the higher Courses. Classes 
are formed each term for beginning and advanced Students in Arithmetic, Grammar, 
Geography, History, Algebra, Geometry and I^atin. 



Fai,!, Tkrm : 



Winter Term : 



Spring Term 



Fai^i, Term 



FIRST YKAR. 

Arithmetic, (Milne.) 
Grammar, (Harvey.) 
Geography, (Swiuton.) 

Arithmetic, (Milue.) 
Grammar, ( Harvey. ) 
Geography and Map Drawing, (Swinton. ) 

Arithmetic, (Milne.) 
Grammar, (Harvey.) 
Geography and Map Drawing, (Swinton.) 

SECOND YEAR. 

Arithmetic, (Milue.) 

Algebra, chapters I.-XL, (Hall & Knight, Begin- 

Grammar, (Harvey.) [ners. ) 

Ivatin, (Tuell& Fowler.) 

Book-keeping — optional. 

Arithmetic, Mental and Written, (Milne.) 

Algebra, complete, (Hall & Knight, Beginners.) 

Grammar, (Harvey.) 

History, United States, (Montgomery.) 

Ivatin, (Tuell & Fowler. ) 

Book-keeping — optional. 

Arithmetic Reviewed. 

English Analysis. 

Latin — Caesar — (Grammar, Allen & Greenough.) 

History, United States, (Montgomery.) 

Spelling, Reading, Penmanship, Composition and Declamation 
throughout the Course. 

Examinations for admission to any Course above the Academic will 
be held the second day of each term, though Students coming at any time 
during the term may be examined when they enter. 



Winter Term: 



Spring Term : 



NORMAI, ENGI.ISH COURSE. 

This Course is designed to accommodate young men and women whose time for 
school is limited, and especially those who are preparing to teach in our Common 
Schools. A Diploma will be given to those who complete the Course. 

SOPHOMORE YEAR. 



Fai^i, Term : 



Arithmetic, Written and Mental, (Milne.) 
English Grammar, (Harvey.) 
Geography, (Swinton.) 
^ Civil Government, (Young.) 



1 



28 



Winter Tj^rm : 



Spring Term : 



Fai^i, Term: 



Winter Term 



Spring Term : 



Fai.1, Term : 



Winter Term: 



Spring Term: 



SKMI-CKNTKNNIAI. CATAI^OGUK. 



" Arithmetic, Written and Mental, (Milne.) 
Algebra, chapters I.-XL, (Hall & Knight, Begin- 
Enghsh Grammar, (Harvev.) [ners ) 

Geography and Map Drawmg, ( Swinton. ) 
History, United States, (Montgomery.) 

' AritliniclH-, Wntten and Mental, (MiliicM 
Algebra, complete, (Hall .^ Kiiight, HoKiniiers.) 
Kuglish Grain in.ir, (Harvey.) 
History, United States, (Muiitgumcry.) 

JUNTOT^ YKA]^ 

Physical Geography. 

Algebra, Simple Equations to Radicals, (Hall & 

PhysioWy ( Hutchison. ) [Knight, Revised. ) 

Latin, (Tuell& Fowler.) l & , ; 

Rhetoric, ( Quackenbos. ) 

American Literature, (Smythe.) 

Algebra, Radicals to Binomial Theorem, (Hall & 

Latin, ( Tuell & Fowler. ) [Knight, Revised. ) 

Rhetoric, (Quackenbos.) 

Geometry, Books I.-HI., (Fisher & Philips.) 

Latin— Caesar— (Grammar, Allen & Greenough.) 

Arithmetic Reviewed. 

SENIOR YEAR. 

English History, (Higginson & Channing.) 

English Literature, (Pancoast.) 

Physics, (Gage.) 

Theory and Methods of Teaching, 
r History, ( Swinton 's Outlines.) 
I Mental Science, (Wayland.) 
' Physics, (Gage.) 

Latin— Virgil— ( Greenough. ) 

Mental Science, (Wayland.) 

Botany, (Spaulding. ) 

History, ( Swinton 's Outlines.) 

Latin— Virgil— ( Greenough. ) 
^ Theory and Methods of Teaching. 



COURSE IN SCIENCE AND LITERATURE. 

^f XX Y^" completing the following Course the Student will be entitled to the Decree 
of Bachelor of Science. Those not wishing to take the whole Course can pursue fuch 
studies as they desire, subject to the a^ion of the Faculty. pursue such 

SOPHOMORE YKAR. 

English History, (Higginson & Channing.) 

Physical Geography. 

Civil Government, (Young.) 

Algebra, Simple Equations to Radicals, (Hall & 

Ivatin, (Tuell & Fowler. ) ] [Knight, Revised. ) 

German. \ Elective. 

French. 



Fai,!, Tkrm : 



WILI.IAMSPORT DICKINSON SEMINARY. 



29 



Winter Term 



Spring Term : 



Fai,i, Term : 



Winter Term 



Spring Term : 



Fai,!, Term : 



Winter Term 



Spring Term : 



History, (Swinton's Outlines. ) 

Rhetoric, (Quackenbos.) 

American I^iterature, (Pattee. ) 

Algebra, Radicals to Binomial Theorem, (Hall & 



I.atin, (Tuell & Fowler.) ] 

German. 

French. 



[Knight, Revised.) 
Elective. 



>■ Elective. 



Elective. 



^ History, (Swinton'?; Ontlinos. ) 
Rhetoric, (Quackcnlxjs. ) 

Geometry, Books I. -HI., (Fisher ik. i'hilips. ) 
Ivatin — Caesar — (Grammar, Alien & 
German. [Greenough.) 

French. 

JUNIOR YEAR. 

English Literature, (Pancoast.) 

Physiology, ( Hutchison. ) 

Physics, (Gage.) 

Geometry, Books IV.-VII., (Fisher & Philips.) 

lyatin — Caesar — (Grammar, Allen & ] 

German. [Greenough.) J- Elective. 

French. 

Mental Philosophy, (Wayland.) 
Physics, (Gage.) 
Trigonometry, (Wentworth.) 
Latin — Virgil — (Greenough. ) 
German. 
French. 

Mental Philosophy, (Wayland.) 

Botany, (Spaulding.) 

Algebra — completed — (Hall & Knight, Revised.) 

vSurveying, (Wentworth.) 

Latin — Virgil — (Greenough.) 1 

German. I Elective. 

French. J 

SENIOR YEAR. 

Moral Science. 

Geology, (Dana.) 

Astronomy, (Young.) 

Analytical Geometry, (Wentworth.) 

Logic. 

Chemistry, (Shepherd) — with Lectures. 
Political Economy, (Walker.) 
Calculus, (Taylor.) 

Butler's Analogy, (Emory & Crooks.) 
Chemistry, (Shepherd) — with Lectures. 
Biology. 
Calculus, (Taylor.) 



30 



SEMI-CENTENNIAL CATALOGUE. 



BELLES LETTRES COURSE. 



% » 



Upon completing this 
of English lyiterature— M 



Fai,!, Term : 



Winter Term : 



Spring Term : 



Fai^i, Term : 



Winter Term 



Spring Term : 



Fai,!, Term : 



Winter Term: 



^ 



Course the Student will be entitled to the Degree of Mistress 

E. ly. 

SOPHOMORB YEAR. 

English History, (Higginson & Channing.) 

English Analysis. 

Arithmetic, (Milne.) 

Latin, (Tuell & Fowler.) 

German. 

French. 



* ^1 



Elective. 



American History, (Montgomery.) 
Rhetoric, (Quackenbos.) [ners.) 

Algebra, chapters I.-XI., (Hall & Knight, Begin- 
Latin, (Tuell & Fowler.) ^ 



German. 
French. 



Elective. 



Elective. 



American History, (Montgomery.) 

Rhetoric, (Quackenbos.) 

Algebra, complete, (Hall & Knight, Beginners.) 

Latin — Caesar — (Grammar, Allen & ' 

German. [Greenough. ) 

French. 

JUNIOR YEAR. 

English Literature, (Pancoast. ) 

Physiology, (Hutchison.) 

Physical Geography. 

Civil Government, (Young.) 

Latin — Caesar — (Grammar, Allen & 

German. [Greenough. ) 

French. 



Elective. 



Elective. 



History, (Swinton's Outlines. ) 

American Literature, (Pattee. ) 

Geometry, Books I.-III., (Fisher & Philips.) 

Latin— Virgil~( Greenough. ) ^ 

German. 

French. 

History, (Swinton's Outlines.) 
Botany, (Spaulding. ) 

Latin— Virgil— (Greenough.) ^ 

German. 

French. 



Elective. 



SENIOR YEAR. 

Moral Science. 
Geology, (Dana.) 
Astronomy, (Young.) 
Physics, (Gage.) 

Mental Science, (Wayland. ) 
Logic. 

Chemistry, (Shepherd)— with Lectures, 
Physics, (Gage.) 



WILLIAMSPORT DICKINSON SEMINARY. 



31 



Spring Term : 



r Mental Science, (Wayland.) 

^ Chemistry, (Shepherd)— with Lectures. 

[ Biology. 



COLLEGE PREPARA'l 



i i f » \ '' 



COURSE. 



This Course is arranged for those who desire to prepare for admission to any 
American College or University. vStudents may enter at any point for which they are 
prepared. Those completing the Course will receive a Diploma. 



Fa 1,1, Term : 



Winter Term 



Spring Term : 



Fai.1, Term : 



Winter Term 



Spring Term : 



Fai,!, Term: 



Winter Term 



SOPHOMORE YEAR. 

Latin, (Tuell & Fowler.) 
Arithmetic, (Milne.) 
English Analysis. 
English History. 

Latin, (Tuell & Fowler.) 

Arithmetic — completed, ( Milne. ) 

Algebra, chapters I.-XI., (Hall & Knight, Begin- 

Rhetoric, (Quackenbos.) [ners.) 

American History, (Montgomery.) 

Latin— CcEsar, 29 chapters, (Grammar, Allen & 

Greenough. ) 
Algebra, completed, (Hall & Knight, Beginners.) 
Rhetoric, ( Quackenbos. ) 
American History, (Montgomery.) 

• JUNIOR YEAR. 

Latin—Caesar, completing Books I.-II., (Grammar, 
Allen & Greenough. ) [win. ) 

Greek— First Lessons, ( White. ) ( Grammar, Good- 
Algebra, Simple Equations to Radicals, (Hall & 
Physics, ( Gaoe. ) [Knight, Revised. ) 

Greek History, (Myers.) 

Latin— Virgil, Book I. and Scansion, (Greenough.) 
Greek— First Lessons, ( White. ) ( Grammar, Good- 
Physics, (Gage.) [win.) 
Algebra, Radicals to Binomial Theorem, (Hall & 
Knight, Revised. ) 

Latin — Caesar, Books III. and IV. 
Latin— Virgil, Books II. and HL, (Greenough.) 
Greek— Anabasis, 8 chapters, (Goodwin.) 
Roman History, (Allen.) 

SENIOR YEAR. 

Latin—Virgil, Books IV.-VI., (Greenough.) 
Latin— Prose Composition , ( Collar. ) [win. ) 

Greek— Anabasis, complete Books I. and II., (Good- 
Geometry— Books I.-IH., (Fisher & Philips.) 
Latin— Cicero— Catiline Orations, (Allen & Green- 
ough. ) 

Greek— Anabasis, Books IH. and IV., (Goodwin.) 

Greek— Iliad, Book I., (Keep.) 

Geometry— Books IV.-VII., (Fisher 8c Philips.) 



32 



SEMI-CENTKNNIAL CATALOGUE. 



Latin — Cicero, (Pro Archia and three others.) 

Latin — Virgil — Bucolics and Ovid. 

Greek — Iliad, Books II. and III., (Keep.) 

Greek Prose, (Harper & Castle.) 

Classical Geography, (Tozer) — with Ginn's Atlas. 



Spring Term : 



CLASSICAL COURSE. 



Fall Term : 



Winter Term : 



Spring Term : 



Fall Term : 



Winter Term 



Spring Term: 



upon completing the following Course the Student will be entitled to the Degree 
of Bachelor of Arts. Those not wishing to complete the Course can pursue such studies 
as they desire, subjedl to the a<5lion of the Faculty. 

SOPHOMORE YEAR. 

Civil Government, (Yonng. ) [Knight, Revised.) 
Algebra, Simple Equations to Radicals, (Hall & 
Latin — Csesar, completing Books I. and II., (Gram- 
mar, Allen & Greenough.) [win.) 
Greek — First Lessons, ( White. ) ( Grammar, Good- 
History, (Swinton's Outlines.) 

Algebra, Radicals to Binomial Theorem, (Hall & 
Rhetoric, ( Quackenbos. ) [Knight, Revised. ) 

Latin — Virgil, Book I., (Greenough.) [win.) 

Greek — First Lessons, ( White. ) ( Grammar, Good- 

History, (Swinton's Outlines. ) 

Rhetoric, (Quackenbos.) 

Geometry — Books I. -III., (Fisher & Philips.) 

Latin — Virgil, Book II., (Greenough.) 

Greek — Anabasis, 3 chapters, (Goodwin.) 

JUNIOR YEAR. 

English Literature, (Pancoast.) 
Physiology, (Hutchison.) 
Physics, (Gage.) 

Geometry— Books IV.-VII., (Fisher & Philips.) 
Latin— Virgil, Books IV.-VI. , ( Greenough. ) [wm. ) 
Greek — Anabasis, complete Books I. and II., (Good- 
Mental Philosophy, (Wayland. ) 
Physics, (Gage.) 
Trigonometry, (Wentworth.) 
Latin — Cicero, Orations, I. -VI. Catiline. 
Greek — Iliad Book I., (Keep.) 

Mental Philosophy, (Wayland.) 

Algebra, completed, (Hall & Knight, Revised.) 

Surveying, (Wentworth.) 

Latin — Cicero, four selected orations. 

Greek — Iliad, Books II. and III., (Keep.) 



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3 
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z 



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6 



WXLLIAMSPORT DICKINSON SEMINARY. 



33 



Fai,!, Term : 



Winter Term 



Spring Term : 



SENIOR YEAR. 

Moral Science. 

Geology, (Dana.) 

Astronomy, (Young.) 

Analytical Geometry, (Wentworth. ) 

Latin — Horace. 

Greek — Xenophon — Memorabilia. 

Logic. 

CheTTiistry, (Shepherd) — with Lectures. 

Political Economy, (Walker.) 

Calculus, (Taylor.) 

Latin — Livy. 

Greek — Plato, Apology and Crito. 

Butler's Analogy, (Emory & Crooks.) 
Chemistry, (Shepherd) — with Lectures. 
Calculus, (Taylor.) 

Latin — Tacitus — Germania and Agricola. 
Greek — ^schylus — Prometheus Bound. 



PRACTICAI^ SCIENCE COURSE. 



Fai,!, Term 



upon completing this Course the Student will receive the Degree of Bachelor of 
Elements. 

SOPHOMORE YEAR. 

English History, (Higginson & Channing.) 

Physical Geography. 

Civil Government, (Young.) [ners.) 

Algebra, chapters I. -XI., (Hall & Knight, Begin- 

Latin, (Tuell & Fowler.) ] 

German. I Elective. 

French. J 

Free-hand Drawling — twice a week. 

History, (Swinton's Outlines.) 
Rhetoric, ( Quackenbos. ) 

Algebra, completed, (Hall & Knight, Beginners.) 
^ Latin, (Tuell & Fowler.) 1 

German. I Elective. 

French. J 

Free-hand Drawing — twice a week. 

History, (Swinton's Outlines.) 

Rhetoric, (Quackenbos.) [Knight, Revised.) 

Algebra, Simple Equations to Radicals, (Hall & 

Latin — Caesar, (Grammar, Allen & 

German. [Greenough.) 

French. 

Free-hand Drawing — twice a week. 



Winter Term : 



Spring Term 



Elective. 



34 



SKMI-CKNTENNIAI, CATALOGUE. 



Fai,!, Term : 



Winter Term 



JUNIOR YEAR. 

Physiology, (Hutchisou.) 

Physics, ( Gage. ) [Knight, Revised. ) 

Algebra, Radicals to Binomial Theorem, (Hall & 

lyatin— Caesar, (Grammar, Allen & ] 

German. [Greenough.) }- Elective. 

French. 

Mental Philosophy, (Wayland.) 

Physics, (Gage.) 

Geometry, I.-III., (Fisher & Philips.) 

Latin— Virgil, (Greenough.) 

German. 

French. 



WILLIAMSPORT DICKINSON SEMINARY. 



35 



Spring Term : 



Elective. 



Spring Term : 



Elective. 



Fall Term: 



Winter Term: 



Spring Term : 



Mental Philosophy, (Wayland.) 

Botany, (Spanlding. ) 

Geometry, IV.-VIL, (Fisher & Philips.) 

I^atin — Virgil, (Greenough.) 

German. 

French. 

SENIOR YEAR. 

English Iviterature, (Pancoast.) 
Mineralogy and Geology. 
Astronomy, (Young.) 
Geometrical Drawing — twice a week. 

Chemistry, (Shepherd)— with I^ecturcs. 
Political Economv, (Walker.) 
American Literature, (Pattec.) 
Trigonometry. 

Chemistry, (Shepherd)— with Lectures. 

Biolog}'. 

vSurvey ing, ( Went worth. ) 

Algebra, completed, (Hall & Knight, Revised.) 

Mechanical Drawing — twice a week. 



P'all Term : 



Winter Term 



Spring Tkrm : 



COURSE IN HISTORY AND I.ITERATURE. 

This Course is arranged in answer to an oft-repeated request for special instruaion 
in the branches which it inchides, and also for those who desire to connect these 
studies with Courses in Music, Art and Elocution. Upon completing it a Diploma will 



German Course 



Fai^i, Term : 



Winter Term : 



JUNIOR YEAR. 

Greek History, (Myers.) 
Civil Government, (Young.) 
German or French. 

American History, (Montgomery.) 
American Literature, (Pattce. ) 
Rhetoric, (Quackcnbos.) 
German or French. 



French Course : 



American History, (Montgomery.) 
Rhetoric, ( Quackcnbos, ) 
German or French. 

vSKNIOK Vf^AR. 

lai^libh iiibLuiy, i iligginson & Channing.) 
English Literature, (Pancoast.) 
German or French. 

P^rench History. 

Mental Science, (Wayland.) 

German or P'rench. 

Roman History, (Allen.) 
Mental Science, (Wayland.) 
German or French. 



MODERN I.ANGUAGES. 

f Elementary Grammar, (Otis— Edition of 1893.) 
German Grammar, ( Whitney— used as reference.) 
Studien und Plaudereien— First Series, (Stern.) 
Marcheu, (Andersen.) 

Aus dem Leben eines Taugenichts, (Eichendorf ) 
Erzahlungen aus der Deutsche n Geschichte, (Schra- 

kamp), or Immensee, (Storm.) 
Die Schonstcn Dcutschen Lieder, (Wenckebach.) 
German Synonyms, (Hoffman.) 
Some drama by Schiller. 
Dictionary, (Whitney.) 

Abrissder Deutschen Literatur-Geschichte, (Koenig) 
Holier als die Kirche, (Hillern), or 
Die Harzreise, (Heine.) 

An Elementary Grammar, (Keetels.) 

Progressive French Drill Book, A., (Peiffer.) 

French Drill Book,,B., (Peiffer.) 

Causeries avec mes El^ves, (Sauveur. ) 

Un Manage D' Amour, (Halevy.) 

La Belle-Nivernaise, (Daudet. ) 

La Roman d'un jeune liomme, (Feuillet.) 

La France, (A'de Rougemont.) 

Mon Oncle et Mon Cure, (La Brete.) 

Dictionary, (Heath.) 

L'Abb<^ Constantin, (Halevy.) 

Petite Histoire du Peuple Fran9ais, (Lacombe.) 



Tuition, term of twelve weeks, I5.00. 






36 



SBMI-CKNTKNNIAL CATAI^OGUE. 



COURSES IN READING. 

A knowledge of Literature is a requisite of general culture, yet ob- 
servation has shown that no branch of education is more neglected 
The majority of Students devote little time to a course of collateral 
readmg, and consequently leave school without a well-defined taste 
for literature. To promote a correct use of the English Languare to 
enlarge the vocabulary, to develop a love for books, and to servo' a^ 
an mtroduction to the English Classics, is the purpose of this Course 

To present a graded scheme in the study of literature is impossi- 
ble, but the aim of this plan, which extends through four years, is 
first, to gain the attention of the Student by a pleasing narrative knd 
then gradually to advance him to more solid subjects. 

Two works are read each term, except in the Academic and Sopho- 
more years, and an examination is given on each work, one at the 
middle and the other at the end of the term. The examination covers 
the general points of plot, style, idiom and vocabulary. 

ACADEMICS AND SPECIAIvS. 

Fai.!, Term. Uncle Tom's Cahin.—S^owe. 

Winter Term. Snow Bound. — ll^kiUter. 
Spring Term. Selections from The Sketch Book. 



-Irving, 



FAti. Term. 
Winter Term. 
Spring Term. 



Fai,i, Term. 

Winter Term. 
Spring Term. 



Fai^i, Term. 



Winter Term. 
Spring Term. 



SOPHOMORE YEAR. 

Pilgrim's Progress.—^// ;/j/a«. 
Ivady of the Lake.— ^<:^//f. 
Vicar of Wakefield.— G'^/^^wnV//. 

JUNIOR YEAR. 



Ivanhoe. — Scott. 

The Deserted Village and 

The Traveler. — Goldsmith, 

The House of the Seven Gables.— //^zz^/- 
Shorter Voams.— Milton, \thorne. 

Merchant of ^o^nxz^. Shakespeare, 
Sir Roger De Covcrly V^Y^o^vs.—Addison, 

SENIOR YEAR. 
I. Rasselas. — Saniicel Johnson. 




f 

til. 
I. 
II. 



{ 



Silas Maruer. — George Eliot, 
Essays. — Bacon, 
Vision of Sir Launfal.— Zoze/^//. 
Macbeth. — Shakespeare, 
Essay on ^o\ixi^on.—Macauley. 



Students in the College Preparatory Course will be examined in 
the works required for entrance by the New England College Asso- 
ciation, which are as follows; 



WII^LIAMSPORT DICKINSON SEMINARY. 



For 1899: 



37 



For 1900: 



Dryden's Palamon and Arcite; Pope's Iliad, Books I VI 
XXII. and XXIV; The Sir Roger de Coverley Papers in 
the Spectator; Goldsmith's Vicar of Wakefield; Coleridge's 
Ancient Mariner; DeQuincey's Flight of a Tartar Tribe- 
Cooper's Last of the Mohicans; LowellVs Vision of Sir 
Launfal; Hawthorne's The House of the Seven Gables. 
Dryden's Palamon and Arcite; Pope's Iliad, Books I.. VI 
XXII. and XXTV the Sir Roger de Coverley Papers in 
The Spectator; Goldsmith's The Vicar of Wakefield- 
Scott's Ivanhoe; De Quincey's The Flight of a Tartar 
Tribe; Cooper's The Last of the Mohicans; Tennyson's The 
Princess; Lowell's The Vision of Sir Launfal. 
Any Student preparing for any particular college will be exam- 
ined m the work prescribed by that college, upon application. The 
total cost of all books in these Courses does not exceed fifty cents 
per term. ^ '-^"ta 



COURSES IN MUSIC. 



y.^^^- ^!^ !" l*"'.^ department will be to give thorough instruction, 
both in the technique and the aesthetics of the art; and to this end 
only standard text-books and studies will be used. Students com- 
pleting the Course will receive a Diploma. 

THEORETICAL. 
Emery's Harmony; Counterpoint; History of Music (Filmore)- 
(JhrTstJano!''"" '° ^"'"'" ^'^'^'''''''^ ■ Principles of Expression! 

An opportunity for practice in singing, sight-reading and cultiva- 
tion of musical taste, is given in the Chorus Class, which meets twice 
a week. This year they have studied selections from Handel's 
Messiah. Haydn's Creation, Daniel by Root. Rose Maiden by Cowen 
and Part Songs. 

Students may enter the Courses in Instrumental or Vocal Music 
at any point for which they are prepared, and are advanced accord- 
ing to their ability and proficiency, not according to the number of 

terms taken. 

All pupils who wish to complete a Course of Study on the Piano 
or in Vocal must be able to pass a satisfactory examination in Har- 
mony. * 

Students not wishing to take the Graduating Piano Course may 
take a Course on the Reed Organ, selected by the teacher, and will 
be granted a diploma, if they acquire ability in reading ordinary 
church music at sight, and in a manner sufficiently clear for pur- 
poses of accompaniment. 

Before graduating in Piano Course the Student will be expected to 
give a public Recital. p«=i->.eu lo 



r 



38 



SE)MI-CKNTKNNIAL CATAI^OGUE. 



A full Course of Violin Playing has also been prepared for the 
benefit of those who are seeking superior attainments in this depart- 
ment. 

All Music Scholars have Vocal Culture free of charge, in classes. 
Attendance at Lectures on Composers required. 



COURSE IN PIANO. 

PREPARATORY WORK. 
__ Clementi op. 66; Czerny, op. 139; Krause, op. 4; Reinecke, op. 136- 
Berens, op. 81; Gurlitt, op. 76; Heller, op. 22; Kuhlan, op. 20- Bach 
"Little Preludes and Fugues;" with pieces of corresponding difficulty! 

FIRST YKAR. 
-^Hummel, op. 49; Moscheles, op. 66; Bertini; Schumann, op. 68 
book 3; Berens, op. 89, (for left hand); Heller, op. 47; Bach "Well 
Tempered Clavichord;" Czerny, op. 170; Haydn, "Sonaten Studien " 
book 5. ' 

SECOND YEAR. 
Mozart, Sonaten Studien; Cramer, Etudes; Moscheles, op 101- 
Kleinmichel, op. 50; Bach, "Well Tempered Clavichord;" Beethoven 
Sonaten; Kullak, op. 48; octave studies. 

THIRD YEAR. 
Clementi, "Grades and Parnassum;" Liszt, 2 Concert Etuden- 
Thalberg, op. 26; Bach, Inventions; Chopin, Etudes; Henselt, Etudes' 
Rubenstein. 

TUITION IN INSTRUMENTAI, MUSIC. 

PIANO OR REKD ORGAN BY DIRECTOR. 

Fall (long) Term, 30 lessons $22 50 

Half Pall (long) Term, 15 Lessons 1125 

Winter or Spring Term one-fifth less. 

Single Lesson, or less than half term, each i oo 

PIANO OR RICKD ORGAN BY ASSISTANT. 

Pall Term, 30 Lessons $18 75 

Half Pall Term, 15 Lessons 9 38 

Winter or Spring Term one-fifth less. 
Single Lesson, or less than half term, each 75 

USK OF PIANO OR REED ORGAN TWO PERIODS EACH DAY. 

^^" Term $5 00 

Winter and Spring Terms, each 3 75 

Additional periods at same rate. 
Pipe organ, each lesson 1 00 

Use of Organ, ten cents per hour. 



WII.I.IAMSPORT DICKINSON SEMINARY. 



39 



Violin, Fall (long) Term, 30 Lessons 22 50 

Piute, Guitar, Banjo or Mandolin, Pall (long) Term 30 Les- 

^^"« ' 15 00 

Theory of Music, Pall (long) Term, 30 Lessons 22 50 

Winter or Spring Term one-fifth less. 

In case of sickness or unavoidable absence, lessons will be made 
up, if the teacher is notified beforehand. 



COURSE IN VOCAI, MUSIC. 

FIRST YKAR. 
Placing the Tone; Breathing Exercises; Study of all the Intervals 
of the Scale with the Vowels; Concone's Pifty Lessons; Concone's 
Thirty Lessons; Sight Reading; Pillmore's Pirst Lessons in Musical 
History. 

^ SECOND YEAR. 

Concone's Twenty-five Lessons; Sieber's Vocalizes, op. 131; Slow 
Trills and Simple Musical Pigures; Concone's Pifteen Lessons- 
Vaocai Exercises in Italian; Some Songs; Sight Reading; Music in 
America, by Ritter. 

THIRD YEAR. 
Garcia's Studies; Songs by the Best American and European Com- 
posers, including Mendelssohn and Schubert; Sight Reading and 
Lives of the Composers. 

FOURTH YEAR. 
Vocalizes by Bordogni; Songs by Schumann, Franz and Ruben- 
stein; Scenas and Arias from Standard Operas and Oratorios- Sight 
Reading; Purity in Music, Thebaut. 

TUITION IN VOCAI. MUSIC. 

Vocal Culture, Pall (long) Term, 30 Lessons $22 50 

Vocal Culture, Winter or Spring Term, 24 Lessons 18 00 

Vocal Culture in Classes "* p^.^^ 

Classes in Sight Reading, per month, each.. *!!.!.....'**.*.'*' i* ] " 1 00 

Chorus Class, adults. Pall (long) Term 3 oo 

Chorus Class, adults. Winter or Spring Term. ....... ....*. 2 50 

Chorus Class, children, per Term, each 1 50 



COURSE IN ART. 

This department is under the direction of a lady of rare ability and 
wide culture. Having added to the usual Art Curriculum of a Semi- 
nary the regular course at a School of Design, she is thoroughly 
qualified to meet the most rigid demand for instruction in both the 
useful and ornamental branches of the department. 



40 



SKMI-CKNTKNNIAL CATAI^OGUE. 



The Course in Drawing comprises Linear, Perspective, Object and 
Model Drawing. Due attention is given to the branches of Pastel 
Crayoning and China Decorating— Portrait Crayoning being a 
specialty. The course in Oil embraces Landscape and Portrait 
Painting. 

Students desiring a full course in this department will, upon satis- 
factory advancement in all its branches, be entitled to a diploma. 

TUITION. 

Painting in Water Colors, Fall (long) Term, 30 Lessons.... $15 00 

Painting in Oil, Fall (long) Term, 30 Lessons 15 qo 

Portrait Painting, Fall (long) Term, 30 Lessons 25 00 

Portrait Crayoning, Fall (long) Term. 30 Lessons .* ." " 15 oo 

Photograph Painting, Fall (long) Term, 30 Lessons .'.'.* 15 oo 

China Decorating, Fall (long) Term, 30 Lessons [[ 15 oo 

Crayon Drawing, Fall (long) Term, 30 Lessons 9 34 

Pencil Drawing, Fall (long) Term, 30 Lessons g 00 

Mechanical Drawing, Fall (long) Term, 30 Lessons, singie 

^ f^^l^^ 1500 

Free-hand or Mechanical Drawing, in classes of three or 

more , ^^ 

^^. ^ „ : 4 00 

Wmter or Sprmg Term, one-fifth less than Fall Term. 

Single Lessons, or less than half of a Term, each 75 

In case of sickness or unavoidable absence, lessons missed will be 
made up, if the teacher is notified beforehand. 



EI.OCUTION. 

Elocution is recognized as a most important branch of education 
This department is under the supervision of a thoroughly qualified 
and experienced teacher, and will include a careful vocal drill and 
practice in the entire range of expression. It will also embody'such 
a variety of Recitations and Readings as may serve to exemplify the 
qualities and modulations of the voice, and will cover gesture and 
action. 

Students are examined physically when admitted to the gymna- 
sium, and then systematically prepared, by a series of exercises for 
Intelligent use of the apparatus. 

FIRST YKAR. 

^ Physical Culture. 

Voice Culture. [Porce, Volume. ) 

Articulation, Inflection, Quality of Tone, Pitch 

Modulation, Power, Brilliancy and Abandonment in 

Elementary Gesture. [Rendering. 

Declamation [Expression. 

Lectures on the Sixteen Steps in the Evolution of 



Fai,!, Tkrm : 



i 



WILLIAMSPORT DICKINSON SEMINARY. 



41 



Winter Term : 



i 



Spring Term: 



Fai^i, Term : 



f Physical Culture. 
Voice Culture. 
Rhythm. 

Music and Imagination in Rendering. Gestures. ' 
Laws of Annhsis, and their Application. 
Porftonrilitv in Rendering. 

Reialion of Values and Taste. fcism. 

Recitation rnul I )cclaiiiati'>n , \sitli itidi viilnal i-riti- 
Physical Culture, with IvCCturcs on Health. 
Voice Cultuie, with Special Reference to vSuggest- 
Purpose and Unity. [iveness. 

Study ill Rendering. [pression. 

lyectures on Esthetics and the Philosophy of Ex- 

SECOND YEAR. 

Physical Culture. 

Voice Culture. 

Advanced Rendering. 

Rendering and Analysis of Shakespeare. 

Recitations. 

Perfective Laws of Art. 

Physical Culture. 

Voice Culture. 

Philosophy of Expression. 

Shakespeare Studies. 

-Esthetics. 

Third Volume Perfective I^aws. 

Recitations. 

Physical Culture. 
Voice Culture. 
Construction of Gesture. 
Translation of Gesture at Sight. 
Bible and Hymn Reading. 

Shakespeare. [Work. 

Perfective Laws as applied to Oratory and Normal 
Esthetic and Hygienic Values of the Physical Cul- 
ture Exercises. 

Course of Work in the Gymnasium :— Emerson System of Physi- 
cal Culture ; Body Building Exercises ; Apparatus Work. 

TUITION IN ELOCUTION. 

Private Lessons, Fall (long) Term, 30 Lessons $15 oo 

Lessons In Classes, Pall (long) Term, 45 Lessons .,,,,, 7 50 

Winter or Spring Term, one-fifth less. 



Winter Term : 



Spring Term: 



BUSINESS DEPARTMENT. 

This Course is designed to give a thorough knowledge of the 
principles of business transactions. It may be pursued alone or in 
connection with other studies, thus accommodating those seeking a 



42 



SEMI-CENTENNIAI, CATALOGUE. 



terary as well as those seeking only a business education The 
time required to finish it will depend upon the proficiency of the pupil 
in the English branches, and the diligence with which he worlcs. 

STUDIES. 
The Course will include instruction in the Common English 
branches, Book-keeping, Single and Double Entry.-Business Corres- 

Pnrt'"?;. ^^^''''' °^ ''^'■*''"" ^°™«' <^'^" Government and 

-Political Economy. 

TUITION. 
Students may enter the regular classes without additional cost for 
tuition, except for Book-keeping, for which $5.00 per term of three 
_ months will be charged. 

Board, Room, Washing, etc., same as in other departments. 

ADVANTAGKS. 
This department offers all the opportunities for general culture 
afforded Students in other departments, assured by well-cLduc'ed 
iterary societies, lectures, large libraries, association with exper 
ienced teachers, and the refining influences of a Christian home. 

ADMISSION. 

ye!rTTlTJ TT '''" department at any time in the Academic 
qu^si'te ^^^^^^^^^ ^f the English branches being the only re- 



METHODS OF INSTRUCTION. 

The instruction in the Primary Department is based on the induc- 
tive and objective methods, classes having objects presented which 
are studied analytically. Julia McNair Wright's Nature Readers 
have been introduced, where life is seen in its natural development 

from tt Tr'r '' '"' """'"^"^ "^^"^^" ^-^ ^^^ ^-ts Obtained 
from the Readers is made in conversational lessons. The language 

flTTe.tTT ^r"^ '^''^""^' ^^^'"^^^" ^-erases. Stories read 
for Reproduction, Exercises in Letter Writing. Word Pictures and 

composition Writing. Especial attention is given to Arithmetic 
tuh fh. .Th"^? problems. History and Geography are taught 
with the aid of maps, books of reference and the best text-books 
Information Lessons, or elementary science studies in Natural His' 
tory, teach the classes to observe and to make careful note of the 
Objects of the animal, plant and mineral kingdoms. The methods 
of study consist chiefly in examination of leaves, rocks and insects 
The series Of Supplementary readers include writings of the best 
literary and historical authors. 



WII.LIAMSPORT DICKINSON SEMINARY. 



43 



Instruction in Elocution and Physical culture is given by the 
teacher of these branches. The teacher of Vocal Music has organized 
a chorus class for the pupils in this department. 

In Elementary Arithmetic, Grammar and Geography the cate- 
chetical method is largely employed, but in Higher English the same 
course is adopted which prevails m the more advanced branches of 
study. The pupil is taught to study the text-book by tuples rathi i 
than by sentences or paragraphs, and encouraged in the lecture room 
to give the substance of what he has learned, in his own language. 
In this manner, while he is adding to his store of knowledge, he is 
enlarging his vocabulary, and while he is evolving principles and ac- 
quiring facts, he is increasing his power of expression, and thus un- 
consciously, it may be, but nevertheless surely, he lays the founda- 
tions of an easy and concise style of composition. 

In English and American Literature, the origin of the English lan- 
guage and the growth of the literature are carefully traced. In this 
work the most interesting facts in the lives of the best authors and 
their principal productions are brought under review. 

Instruction in Mental Science covers the second and the third terms 
of the Junior year. It embodies definitions of the mental faculties, 
and careful analysis of intellectual processes, with a brief history 
of the science, the main purpose being to stimulate the Student to 
think and investigate for himself. 

Ethics, Logic and Political Economy are taught in the Senior year. 
Text-books are used and daily recitations are required. Class in- 
quiries and discussions are encouraged, and familiar lectures are 
given from time to time by the teacher. 



NATURAI. SCIENCE. 

In the department of Natural Science the underlying aim is to 
teach the Student to think and observe for himself, and at the same 
time to give him such a fund of practical knowledge as will fit him 
for the active duties of life. In all the branches the text-book is used 
as a means to gain a knowledge of topics rather than to be studied 
as an end in itself, and as far as possible the Student is led to the 
study of the objects themselves. No pains are spared to cultivate 
habits of clear, accurate and systematic thought and expression. 

Geology is taken during the first term of the Senior year. A 
practical knowledge of the common rocks and minerals is acquired, 
and excursions are made to quarries and regions which illustrate 
various geological formations. Each Student makes a written report 
and collects characteristic specimens and fossils, and constructs of 
these specimens, dressed down and mounted in plaster of paris, a 
model representing an ideal arrangement of the seven different geolo- 
gical formations, fossil-bearing, admirably presented to view by out- 
crops within a few miles of the Seminary. 



44 



SEMI-CENTENNIAL CATALOGUE. 



An Elementary Course in Biology is pursued in the Spring Term 
Of the Semor year, in which thorough preparation is made for iT 

To ie\r ryTs\rdrr ^h 'T " "" ^^^ ^-^^^^^ 

The oyster, era^h and cTa^re ^^.so^dUTd ar/rgTneraTtiS 
in structure and physiology of nlant^ ^nri o • f""^^^^^ relation 
brought out. ^^ animals is carefully 

Physics embraces two tprm<s nf fv,^ t 

+^«+ ^ ^ vvmier. ihe principles and laws are illn^ 

rr - Sa-;— r - X=e Th- rnnnT= S 

- tTreS^hrsrudenrto'^^^r:?; "^^ ^^^ ^°"^*^""^ bro^gLTrwar^d 

The subject of Sectriou'''' '' """'""'^"^^ '"^™"<^ '" '''' text-book, 

ne subject of Electricity is presented by a series of experiments 

and lectures, on which full notes are made by each Student 

In Botany, the laboratory method is followed Comnound rr,i 
croscopes are accessible to the class and each Tup 1 is pToviSed wTth 
a powerful lens and apparatus for plant dissection The work is 

s^edT r?ot"stlm feafT" °^'""^ ^^^^"^ °^ ^'-*«' ^-wtrflm 
seeds, root stem, leaf, flowers and fruit; Natural Groups of Plants 

with especial studies of Algae. Fungi. Muscineae. Pilcineae etc 

f/prrd^rTachraXr °"^' """^'"^"^' -^^^ ^--« ^^^^ 

Uon^Botan ::,* "'"''°"' """^ '^^"^"^""^ ^'-"- ^ valu^S co, ec" 
Sy: of^HreTv'il^e'^Kr"^ '^^ ^"" '^^" '''''''''' ''^ ^'^ ^-^'^ 

Bunr"^' '"""''' "^'^ ^^'^^'^^"^^ *-^^-' -^h suppTiS vi h gas 
Bunsen s burner, ring stand, water, case with full set of rl agents 

and all necessary apparatus for illustrative experiment and qua 1 
tative analysis. There is also a complete set of apparatus for vo^u 
metric and gravimetric analysis and assavine- Tn t hi 7 

Shepherd's Chemistry is used. Each ^Snf Uee^pi?; fT^teHn 
the experiments which are performed individually, becomes thor 
oug:hly familiar with chemicals and manipulations In tTe Spr^n; 
Term mineralogy is taken up in the laboratory work oLfZ 
analyses of alloys and commercial articles are mid e af^er w^^^^^^^^ 
quantitative analysis, both volumetric and gravimetric ts tL 
Estimation of ores by these processes and aTs^^^g a"d anaS 
milk, sugars and mineral waters are made analyses of 

gratht'outfir ""T l"""" ^""' ""^ '"^"^^^^^ ^^^^ ^ --^P^ete photo- 
g^raphic outfit, and photography is taught during the Spring Term 



^ 



WII.I.IAMSPORT DICKINSON SEMINARY. 



45 



Lectures on subjects of interest to the department are given from 
time to time, illustrated by stereopticon views projected by a new 
oxy-hydrogen light. 

ANCIENT IvANGUAGES. 

In the departments of Greek and Latin, scrupulous attention is 
given to the grammatical structure of these hui^uages, their relation 
to English, the illustration and application of principles, accurate 
translation, and to the literary significance of each author studied. 
Mythology and Classical Geography are studied in the Senior year. 
It is aimed to give the Classics by these means their proper place 
as an aid to expression, to a thorough knbv/ledge of our own lan- 
guage and to the pursuit of other languages, as well as to afi^ord the 
usual mental discipline. Careful attention is also given to those pre- 
paring for college or for professional study. 

MODERN LANGUAGES. 

During the first year in German, classes complete Otis' Elemen- 
tary Grammar, as far as the subject of Syntax, with study of Irre- 
gular Verbs, committing to memory all conversations, proverbs and 
selections. In second year Syntax of Otis' Grammar is completed, 
with • frequent dictation exercises. Several standard novelettes are 
used for acquiring facility in sight reading. Meissner's German Con- 
versation is used daily. The Spring Term is given to a study of 
Schiller's Works. 

During the first two terms in French, Peiffer's Progressive French 
Drill Book is used, many short extracts being committed to memory 
In the Spring Term there is a study of Keetel's Elementary Gram- 
mar through the subject of Irregular Verbs, careful attention being 
given to the idiom of the language. Also some work mentioned 
under text-books is read. In second year grammatical study is com- 
pleted, conversational exercises are continued, and some French 
classic or historical work is made the basis of advanced study. 

MATHEMATICS. 
The Course in Mathematics is coextensive with that in the ma- 
jority of our best colleges. Although the study is considered as 
chiefly disciplinary, the aim throughout the Course is to acquaint 
the Student with the instruments in most familiar use by the practi- 
cal scientists and mathematicians of the day, as well as to strengthen 
his mental faculties and increase his logical acumen. At the com- 
mencement of each subject a familiar lecture is given on its history 
and practical utility. 

Four terms are given to Algebra. The aim of the instruction in 
advanced Algebra is to free the Student from his previous depend- 
ence upon the text-book, and to cultivate ability and taste for 
original mathematical work. Great stress is laid upon mathemati- 
cal generalization and the concise demonstration of principles. 



46 



SEMI-CKNTENNIAI. CATAI^OGUK. 



WILI.IAMSPORT DICKINSON SEMINARY. 



47 



Two terms are given in Geometry, embracing both the Plane and 
Solid. 

One term is given to Plane Trigonometry and one term to Sur- 
veying, the latter combining theory and practice. 

One term is spent in Analytical Geometry, and one term each 
in Differential and Integral Calculus. 

HISTORY AND RHETORIC. 
In the study of History the object is to familiarize the Student 
with the main facts and principles, thus forming a foundation on 
which to build by future reading and investigation. To this end the 
text-book is thoroughly studied in connection with a Manual of 
Classical Antiquities and an Atlas, while at the same time the 
Student is encouraged to consult other authorities and bring in addi- 
tional matter bearing on the subject. Recitation is by the analy- 
tical and topical methods. 

Special attention is given to instruction in Rhetoric, on account 
of its great value to the Student. The principles of good writing are 
studied and analyzed with a view to their practical application. 

During the last term much of the time is devoted to original pro- 
ductions in the various departments of literary composition, on 
themes assigned by the teacher. These productions are read before 
the class, where general criticisms are offered, after which they are 
handed to the teacher for more careful correction. 






1 



1 Ix A4cl.^JL.^ V,.? i *. W i xAvJL^l *1 * A X t| i O ' / ♦ 



THE FREEBORN G. SMITH PRIZE. 

The First Prize for Excellence in Instrumental Music. 

Eleanor Miller Hoagland Williamsport 



THE MISS HELEN E. WILSON PRIZE. 

For Kxcellence in PYench. 

Mary Olive Parlett Anapolis, Md. 

THE REV. DR. SAMUEL A. HEILNER PRIZES. 

For F)xcellence in Mental Science. 

Henry Willis Hartsock Buffalo Run 



THE FACULTY PRIZE. 

The gift of the Faculty to that member of the Rhetoric Class who 
shall excel in Writing and Reading an Kssay. 

Anna Magdalene Schrade Williamsport 



THE MISS MARY L. CRUICKSHANKS PRIZE. 

For Kxcellence in German. 
Cornelia Gray Wilson Newberry 

THE PRESIDENT'S PRIZE. 
For Excellence in Writing and Delivering an Oration. 

Charles Blaine Piper Sinncmahoning 



1^ 




48 



SEMI-CENTENNIAL CATALOGUE. 



HONORS AWARDED IN 1897. 



FIRST CLASSICAL— VALEDICTORY 
Martha B. Bowman, 



Austin 



FIRST SCIENTIFIC— SALUTATORY. 
William Wilcox Follmer, . . . . . . WiUiamsport 

SECOND CLASSICAL— CLASSICAL ORATION. 
William Landstreet Armstrong, ...... Ralston 

SECOND SCIENTIFIC— SCIENTIFIC ORATION. 
Joseph Ervin Brenneman, Dillsburg 

BEIvIvES IvETTRES— BEI.LES LETTRES ESSAY. 
Margaret Emma Follmer, WiUiamsport 



! 



' I 



' I 




00 

a> 

00 

I 

00 



ll 
O 



< 

LU 



< 
en 

f- 

o 
o 



J 



48 



SKMI-CKNTKNNIAL CATAT.OGUH. 



HONORS AWARDED IN 1897. 



FIRST CLASSICAI.— VAI^KDICTORY 
Martha B. Bowman, 



Austin 



FIRST SCIENTIFIC— SALUTATORY. 
William Wilcox Follmer, Williamsport 

SECOND CLASSICAL-CLASSICAL ORATION. 
William Landstrcet Armstrong, Ralston 

SECOND vSCIENTIFIC— SCIENTIFIC ORATION. 
Joseph Ervin Brenncman, Dillsburg 

BELLES LETTRES -BELLES LETTRES ESvSAY. 
Margaret Emma Follmer, Williamsport 




00 

00 
I 

00 



LL 

O 



< 

LU 



< 

QQ 

H 
O 
O 

Ll 



WILI.IAMSPORT DICKINSON SEMINARY. 



49 



J 






RESIDHNT (}RA!)IJA;I^HS. 



MUSIC. 

MARY IvOrainp: crkvkung. 

ELLA RAY HOOVEN. 
MiNNIE iMAE HOOVEN. 



ART. 



DAISY MILLS. 

SUSAN THOMPSON MUSSINA 



ni 



ELOCUTION. 



BEULAH AUGUSTA MUWJNKR. 



50 



SEMI-CENTENNIAI. CATALOGUE. 



SENIOR CLASS^ 

jy^T tT~^ ' Co^an Station 

Luticia Lucinda Baker-b. 1 Canton, O. 

Miriam Alice Belt— c. p „. ,, .„ 

T^ -r^ ^ ^ Wellsville 

Jane Dean Davis— c txt-ii- 

.„ . ,, ^ Williamsport 

Anna Amelia Ford— b. 1. . 

Mildred Elma Fox-s t^ * *V i, 

TT I TT J . ^ Hughesville 

Helen Hendrix Frost— b. 1... t^„ 

-D , t, -r^,., Duncansville 

Beulah Elthea Horning— b 1.. -r., 

Ti,ii« TVT ^. ^ Duncannon 

Juha Moyer Macintosh— b. 1 x? , u 

_ Elizabeth Bowers Neal-s. . . .' .'."i:: — ■ w^mlr""! 

A«v,« ,, , , ^^ Williamsport 

Anna Mabel Novenski-c Montoursvllle 

Anna Magdalene Schrade-c Williamsport 

Caroline Estelle Stabler— s wiin , . 

Cornelia Gray Wilson-c '. '. '. '. '. [ \ \ \ \ \ \ \ \ ". ; V. N^br 

Thomas Percival^ Beyer— s ^Z. ^^^^ 

Ralph Nelson Birdsall-c. p '.■.'.■.■.■.■.'.■.'.'.■.'.NorthTarrytown nT 

Charles Wilber Bryner_s Pleaslnt View 

M.chael B. Bubb-s Woodbridse Va 

William Lee Cardon-c. p wooaoridge, Va 

Jerry Joslah DeFrehn-c. p... t^earheld 

Granville Lawson Forrest— s... t .**i * 

T.j«,„„ T31 1 .. T, Littlestown 

James Franklin Francis— c cu 

William Addleman Ganoe-c. p Williamsnort 

Augustus Nichols Graeff-p. s. WiUiamspoit 

Henry Wiiiis Hartsock-s •■.••....... ^.. Heading 

Howard Stanley Kiess-p. s...... ^nT. .' 

John Hamilton Kinsloe-c p ^t' ' ' ; ^""^'"^P^'-t 

Tar^nh T^.^K. ^'^'"^'"'^ ^- P Newton Hamilton 

Jacob Kimber Levan— c. p.. ,.. 

Claude Elmer I.yon-c. p ^.Num.d.a 

Richard SkylesOyler-s.... ■.'.■.; m'' ,T°u "^ 

Charles Fowler Penepacker-c. p 'r. •,? 

Elbert Ansley Porter-s V,;;,V.^''"'""° 

John Truby Runyan-n. e.... WUhamsport 

Harry Miller Showalter-s Stormstown 

Frank Van Haag Stutsman-c. p •_ Laurelton 

James Voorhees Thompson-c. p r^^, t,"""^ 

Horace Leroy Wilson-p. s.... •^"!^^'° ^"" 

John Wesley Yount-n. e Wl Uiamsport 

Littlestown 

c— Classical, s.— Scientific, b. 1.— Belles I ettres r n r^n 

p. s.-Praaical ^ci.ncf'V:l]%%rnJn^^^^ Preparatory. 

INSTRUMENTAL MUSIC. 

Florence Billmeyer ^^ ^ 

Helen Hendrix Frost.. Washingtonville 

Duncansville 



WILLIAMSPORT DICKINSON SEMINARY. 



51 



Grace Miriam King: Txnni^^ 

^ ^ ^ ^ „, ^ Williamsport 

Gertrude Tallrtian Williamsport 

Florence Edna Unterecker Williamsport 

Eva Elizabeth Wilson Newport 

ETOCUTION. 

Frances Barton Hanks Williamsport 

Daisy Gertrude Kolbe Burlingame 

Eva Elizabeth Wilson ^ey^^ovt 

ART. 

Grace Hinckley Williamsport 



JUNIOR CLASS. 



Burch, Edith Marie-b. 1 Jefferson City, Mo 

Burch, Mary Asenath-b. 1 Jefferson City. Mo 

Dildine. Florence Ethel-b. 1 Hughesville 

Ely Joetta Augusta-b. 1 Williamsport 

Galbraith, Anna-c Williamsport 

Grabow, Harriet Howard-b. 1 Cleveland, O 

Gutelius. Edith Mary-b. 1 MlfHlnburg 

Harris, Lucy Virginia-b. 1 Williamsport 

Johnston, Mary Wilson-b. 1 Emporium 

f rf'.,^"^ Za'<lee-« Williamsport 

Smith, Alma Gertrude-b. 1 Orangeville 

Speyerer Anne Elizabeth-c. p Rochester 

Tibbits. Clara Belle-b. 1 j,^^^^^^ ^_ ^ 

Ake James Howard-s Williamsburg 

Budinger, William Samuel-c. p gnow Shoe 

Coder Cambridge Graham-s ^oyles Mills 

Compton Arthur Garfleld ^^^^^^ 

Conner, Nathan Stephenson-s tuII's Corner, Md. 

Ebner, John Rollin— s. t,, 

T^„ ,, , .„ Muncy Station 

cZf7.- 7T~^ Osceola Mills 

SerlvT. r"'' •"■-' • Williamsport 

^Tf^'JuJ^"^^^-^ > Shenandoah 

Olmsted Elhs Fayette-s ! Kenmore, Buffalo, N. Y. 

Slade, Arthur Roland-p. s Vlneland N. J. 

T?Ja\"='t tr-^ ---port 

Welch, Edgar Thomas-p.sV.V.:.;;v.:.;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;-^~";f 

C-aassical. s.-scie„ti«c.^_ b. ^-Be«. .ett^^^^^^ . p.-CollegelP.eparatory. 



52 



SEMI-CENTENNIAL CATALOGUE. 



WILLIAMSPORT DICKINSON SEMINARY. 



53 



SOPHOMORE CLASS. 



ACADT MIC. 



Anderson, Jessie Pauline — b. 1 Williamsport 

Ames, Mary Creighton— c Williamsport 

Baldwin, Mary Elizabeth— b. 1 Clearfield 

Cramer, Mary Cora— b. 1 East Salem 

Creager, Ethel— c Eureka, Kan. 

Creager, Marion Olmstead— c Eureka, Kan. 

Critchlow, Anna Mae— b. 1 Burlingame 

Darby, Florence Esther— b. 1 Hoytville 

-Donaldson, Mary Louise— b. 1 . . Williamsport 

Gee, Ida Louise — b. 1 Trout Run 

Grabow, Nellie Louise— c. p Cleveland, O. 

Irvin, Nellie Veil— b. 1 Big Run 

Johnson, Gladys Lloyd— b. 1 Girardville 

McMurray, Nelle Adams— b. 1 New Washington 

Miller, Beulah Elizabeth— s Mt. Carmel, Md. 

Moltz, Caroline Laura— b. 1 Williamsport 

Moorhead, Anna Rubbetta — c Hazleton 

Rauch, Nora— b. 1 Rauchtown 

Rice, Mary Florence — b. 1 Centre 

Rich, Jennie Florence — b. 1 Woolrich 

Richardson, Harriet Hawes— s Newberry 

Robbins, Lilly Belle— b. 1 Williamsport 

Shaver, Mary Mumper— c Williamsport 

Baker, William Frank — c Scottdale 

Barton, George Washington— c Six Mile Run 

Bettens, James Henry — s Hazleton 

Bidlack, Stephen Bruce — s Hard Pan 

Brown, Albert Barton— s Johnstown 

Budinger, Arthur Bowman— c. p Snow Shoe 

Duncan, Chester Arthur — s Williamsport 

Engler, Stuard Harrison— s Catasauqua 

Hooven, Carmer Bozorth— s Duboisto wn 

Huling, Harry Cook— s Williamsport 

Hutchins, Clarence T.— s Barstow, Md. 

Neal, Ellis Walton— s Williamsport 

Odell, Charles Manderville — s Tarrytown, N. Y. 

Salter, Bert Alvin— s Shamokin 

Schuchart, Harry Julias — s Stockton 

Shaffer, Harry Piper— c Woodland 

Sklllington, James Edgar — c Ray's Hill 

Smith, Arthur Haven — c Orangeville 

Tibbins, Perry McDowell — s Beech Creek 

Weis Augustus— s Burlingame 

Wilkinson, Asaph Samuel — s Burlingame 

Wood, Gilbert Haven— s Curwensville 

c— Classical, s.— Scientific, b. 1.— Belles I^ettres. c. p.— College Preparatory. 



SECOND VICAR. 

Bloomer, Elsie Amelia English Center 

Boone, Edith Alice Williamsport 

Gearhart, Carrie May riiilipshin k 

McDowell, Lula Catonsville, Md. 

Rider, Elizabeth Schofleld Philadelphia 

Rudisill, Jessie Ethel Altoona 

Rutherford, Florence Hannah Laurelton 

Shoemaker, Mary Frances Hustontown 

Stevens, Nellie Bell Lewistown 

Worthington, Ada Caroline Williamsport 

Archibald, Carlton Levan Philadelphia 

Bain, William Ira Kipple 

Burkholder, Harry Clay Kipple 

Campbell, Donald Williamsport 

Collins, William Sherman Williamsport 

Corl, Jacob Pavia 

Croft, Bert Jefferson Keeney ville 

Cudlip, Joshua Samuel Nesquehoning 

Davis, Andrew Crocket Williamsport 

Dunlap, Charles New York 

Forrest, Eddy Ganoe C Littlestown 

Hart, Lupher Israel East Waterford 

Heiser, Arthur Clarke Mahanoy City 

Hiller, Karl William Frankford 

Keeley, Edmund Burke Bellwood 

King, Norman Williamsport 

Koch, A. Harry Burlingame 

Leader, William Henry Excelsior 

Lloyd, Henry Loane Baltimore, Md. 

Miller, Wilson Daniel Williamsport 

Mutchler, Ellsworth Camby Nisbet 

Oyster, Charles Clifford New Cumberland 

Rhawn, Harry Yetter Catawissa 

Ruch, Frank Reuben Williamsport 

Savldge, Ralph A Town Hill 

Scott, Alexander Petersburg 

Shoemaker, Thaddeus Stephens Hustontown 

Sleep, William Oliver Cameron 

Tubbs, Ralph Emory Muhlenburg 

Weis, Ralph Jay Burlingame 

Williamson, Ellis Edward Field's 

Wilson, Erastus Fairfield Center 



J 



54 



SEMI-CENTENNIAL CATALOGUE. 



FIRST YEAR. 

Weller. Grace May Montgomery 

Moltz, Harold Williamsport 

Graham, Willis O'Qulwlllis Woolrich 



CLASSIC A 1 i)H.K\AR rMENi: 



Ames, Mary C .■ ... ..SSS High St., Williamsport 

-Creager. Ethel.;;:; Eureka, Kan. 

Creager Marion O Eureka. Kan. 

^Vn^'fr! ^'•« ^'^^ St., Williamsport 

Gal bra.th, Anna 708 Locust St., Williamsport 

Metzger, £. Zaidee 1006 West Fourth St., Williamsport 

Moorhead, A. Rubbetta Green St., Hazleton 

Novensk., Anna M MontoursviUe 

^H \f ""* ^^ ^-*' ^^^'■l^^t St., Williamsport 

Shaver, Mary M 447 p>i„o at Tur-i,. . 

,,r-. ^ ,. *' ^'"^ ^t- williamsport 

Wilson, Cornelia G ,.t , 

T3„, Tir..,, ..., Newberry 

Baker, William F r, .., , 

T-, . _, Scottdale 

Barton, George W „• -k.-^ ^ 

s:r ■ i ""'"^ ■■■■■■■•■»" ■=*" ■-™ "" --Si" 

bhaffer, Harry P ^r ^. 

Skillington. James E -Woodland 

Smith, Arthur H -^^^ ^ ^'" 

Orangeville 



SCffiNTIFTC DEPARTMENT. 



Fox, Mildred E 

Miller, Beulah E • ■ • • .^HughesvUle 

Neal, Elizabeth B.... .ns'p:;," i" o. -S^™^'' ^•^• 

Richardson, Hattie H... ■.•.■.■;.■.■ '"' Edwin St.. Williamsport 

Stabler, Caroline E 493East"Thi;f ^ St Newberry 

Ake, J. Howard ™"^ ^*' Williamsport 

Bettens, James H \l^'^''V^: V.-' " ' ' y""^'ns'^"'-g 

Beyer. T. Percival... '' ^""'"-^ ""'"^ ^*- H^^'^*"" 

Bldlack, S. Bruce... Ramey 

Brown, A. B... ^^'"'^ P*^" 

Bryner, Charles W...' '■■ •••..Johnstown 

Bubb, Michael B.. Pleasant View 

Coder, Cambridge G Woodbridge, Va. 

Doyles Mills 



WILLIAMSPORT DICKINSON SEMINARY. 



55 



Compton, Arthur G Radnor 

Conner, Nathan S tuH's Corner, Md 

Duncan, Chester A 341 Academy St., Williamsport 

Ebner, J. Rollin Muncy SUlliuu 

Engler, Stuard H Catasauqua 

Forrest, G. L Littlest:«n 

Pryckluiid, Ernest Osceola M ills 

Gray, Edward J., Jr Seminary, Williamsport 

Hartsock. H. Willis Buffalo Run 

Hooven, Carmer B Duboistown 

Huling, Harry C....„._,_^_.^^„ gso Erie Ave., Williamsport 

Hutchins, Clarence T Barstow, Md. 

Kerslake, John J Shenandoah 

Neal, Ellis W 508 Edwin St., Williamsport 

Odell, Charles M 8 North Broadway. Tarrytown. N. Y. 

Olmsted, E. Fayette Kenmore, Buffalo,' N. Y. 

Oyler, Richard S Mann's Choice 

Porter, Elbert A 727 Elmira St., Williamsport 

Salter, Bert A Shamokin 

Schuchart, Harry J Stockton 

Showalter, Harry M Laurelton 

Slate, George, Second 351 Mulberry St., Williamsport 

Tibbins, Perry McD Beech Creek 

Truax, Ernest B AnsonvIUe 

Weis. Augustus 17 Southern Ave., Burlingame 

Wilkinson, Asaph S Burlingame 

Wood, Gilbert H Curwensvllle 



BELLES LETTRES DEPARTMENT. 



Anderson, Jessie P 14I6 West Fourth St., Williamsport 

^"•'- Sibyl K cogan Station 

Baker, Luticia L canton. O. 

Baldwin, Mary E Clearfield 

Burch, Edith M Jefferson City, Mo. 

Burch, M. Asenath Jefferson City, Mo. 

Cramer, Mary C ^ast Salem 

Crltchlow, Anna M Burlingame 

Darby, Florence E Hoytvllle 

DUdine, Florence E Hughesville 

Donaldson, Mary L 447 East Third St., Williamsport 

Ely. Joetta A 710 Park Ave.. Williamsport 

Ford, Anna A t 

_, . •■ Lantz 

Frost, Helen H DuncansvlUe 



56 



SBMI- CENTENNIAL CATALOGUE. 



Gee, Ida L, ,. Trout Run 

Grabow. Harriet H Cleveland, O. 

Gutelius, Edith M Mifflinburg 

Harris, Lucy 924 Walnut St., Williamsport 

Horning, Beulah E Duncannon 

Irvin, Nellie V Big Run 

Johnson, Glady L Girardville 

Johnston, Mary W Emporiium 

Macintosh, Julia M Burlingame 

McMurray, Nelle A New Washington 

Moltz, Caroline L 128 East Third St., Williamsport 

Ranch, Nora Rauchtown 

Rice, Mary F Centre 

Rich, Jennie F Woolrich 

Robbins, Lilly B 131 Bennett St., Williamsport 

Smith, Alma G Orangeville 

Tibbits, C. Belle 213 Temple St., Astoria, N. Y. 



COLLEGE PREPARATORY. 



Belt, M. Alice Wellsville 

Grabow, Nellie L Cleveland, O. 

Speyerer, A. Elizabeth Rochester 

Birdsall, Ralph N .North Tarrytown, N. Y. 

Budinger, Arthur B Snow Shoe 

Budinger, W. Samuel Snow Shoe 

Cardon, William L Clearfield 

De Frehn, Jerry J 265 Locust St., Hazleton 

Ganoe, William A 229 Campbell St., Williamsport 

Kinsloe, John H ? Newton Hamilton 

Levan, J. Kimber Numidia 

Lyon, Claude E Emporium 

Penepacker, Charles F 14 West Market St., Danville 

Stutsman, Frank V 416 Colder St., Harrisburg 

Thompson, James V Buffalo Run 



PRACTICAL SCIENCE. 



Graeff, Augustus N 744 Pear St., Reading 

Kiess, Howard S 710 Market St., Williamsport 

Slade, A. Roland Vineland, N. J. 

Welch, Edgar T Watkins, N. Y. 

Wilson, H. Leroy 434 Rural Ave., Williamsport 



WILLIAMSPORT DICKINSON vSEMINARY. 



57 



NOi^^vlAL ENGLISH. 



Runyan, J. Truby 
Yount, John W — 



Stormstown 
.Littlestown 



ACADEMIC DEPARTMFNT. 



Bloomer, Elsie A English Center 

Boone, Edith A "725 West Third St., Williamsport 

Gearhkrt, Carrie M Philipsburg 

McDowell, Lula Catonsville, Md. 

Rider, Elizabeth S Philadelphia 

Rudisill, Jessie E 1120 Twelfth Ave, Altoona 

Rutherford, Florence H Laurelton 

Shoemaker, Mary F Hustontown 

Stevens. Nellie B Lewistown 

Weller, Grace M Montgomery 

Worthington, Ada C Williamsport 

Archibald, Carlton L 1321 South Sixth St., Philadelphia 

Bain, William I Kipple 

Burkholder, Harry C Kipple 

Campbell, Donald Williamsport 

Collins, William S ' Williamsport 

Corl, Jacob Pavia 

Croft, Bert J Kuneyville 

Cudlip, Joshua S Nesquehoning 

Davis, Andrew C 346 High St., Williamsport 

Dunlap, Charles New York 

Graham, Willis O Woolrich 

Hart, Lupher I East Waterford 

Heiser, Arthur C 423 East Center St., Mahanoy City 

Hiller, Karl W Frankford 

Keeley, Edmund B Bellwood 

King, Norman 210 Washington St., Williamsport 

Koch, A. Harry Burlingame 

Leader, William H Excelsior 

Lloyd, Henry L 227 St. Paul St., Baltimore, Md. 

Miller, Wilson D 449 Grant St., Williamsport 

Moltz, Harold Williamsport 

Mutchler, Ellsworth C. . , Nisbet 

Oyster, C. Clifford New Cumberland 

Rhawn, Plarry Y Catawissa 



58 



SEMI-CENTENNIAL CATALOGUE. 



WILLIAMSPORT DICKINSON SEMINARY. 



59 



Ruch, Prank R Williamsport 

Savidgc. Ralph A Town Hill 

Scott, Alexander Petersburg 

Shoemaker. Thaddeus S Hustontown 

Sleep. William O Cameron 

Tubbs, Ralph E Muhlenburg 

Weis. Ralph J 17 Southern Ave., Burlingame 

Williamson, Ellis E Field's 

Wilson. Erastus .'.'.'.'. '.'.V.'.V.'.Pairfl'eld ' Centre 



PRIMARY DEPARTMENT. 



Cochran. Mary Helen 1005 West Fourth St., Williamsport 

Metzger, Hannah Margaret 1006 West Fourth St., Williamsport 

Mccormick, Eleanor 3O6 Campbell St., Williamsport 

Mccormick, Myra Kinkade 945 West Fourth St.. Williamsport 

Neilson, Martha.... ^Imira, N. Y. 

R.chter, Vera Adelaide 434 Market St.. Williamsport 

Savidge, Hazel Elizabeth 147 East Fourth St., Williamsport 

Stevens, Bessie May Lewistown 

Sweeley Isabella Stewart 777 West Third St., Williamsport 

Von scheliha Ethel Third St., Williamsport 

Allen, June Silas 4091^ High St., Williamsport 

Anderson, John Max 14I6 West Fourth St., Williamsport 

Hartman, Amer Mortimer 827 Market St., Williamsport 

Moltz, Elijah Gould xxr-n- . 

cj„,,,-, ^, , „ Williamsport 

Savidge. Charles Earle 147 East Fourth St., Williamsport 

Stevens, Harry Raey ^ , ^ 

Lewistown 



MUSIC DEPARTMENT. 



INSTRUMENTAL. 

Apker. Laura Edna 14?fi irrio a„„ ^r„„ 

■R^^hc.,. T„i. ivT • ^^''^ J^rie Ave., Williamsport 

Bet::; Ara.''.^:;:-::::::::::::::;:^^^^^^* ^°"^*' '*•• ^""-«-t 

Berkheimer, Mary Wilkinson ^V ^^^'^^^ 

Billmeyer, Florence •_..• ^.Woodbury 

Blxler, Carrie Elizabeth Washingtonvllle 

Newport 



Bloomer, Elsie Amelia English Centre 

Buchman. Jessie Adelia New York 

Cochran, Mary Helen 1005 West Fourth St., Williamsport 

Crawford, Alatheia Hughesvllle 

Creager. Marion Olmstead Eureka, Kan. 

Creveling, Mary Loralne Roh'rsburg 

Darby, Florence Esther Hoytvllle 

Davis, Alice Rogerson 345 High St., WiHinm<^port 

Follmer, Mabel Wiiliam.sport 

Ford, Anna Amelia Lantz 

Frost, Helen Hendrix .'. .. .V.Duncansville 

Gearhart, Carrie May PhiUpsburg 

Gearhart, Edna Eva Clearfield 

Gohl, Emma 55 Washington St., Williamsport 

Gohl. Mabel 55 Washington St., Williamsport 

Gosline. Josephine L 1132 vine St., Williamsport 

Grieb, Maud Superia ^gtate College 

Gutelius, Edith Mary Mifflinburg 

Hames, Annie Beatrice Seminary, Williamsport 

Hartman, Carrie Erma 159 Market St., Williamsport 

Holloway, Margaret Salona 

Hopkinson, Gabriella Biddle Cor. 2nd and Rural Ave!, W'msport 

Horning, Beulah Elthea Duncannon 

Hutchins, Clara Monkton, Md. 

Jenks, Mabel Irene 509 Edwin St., Williamsport 

Johnston. Mary Wilson Emporium 

Kmg, Grace Miriam 9O6 Louisa St., Williamsport 

Leamy, Ruth Ella 1127 East Third St., Williamsport 

Levi, Claire M 510 East Third St., Williamsport 

Levi, Florence 510 East Third St., Williamsport 

Long, Bessie 517 East Third St.. Williamsport 

Maxwell, Nellie Grant 1025 Rural Ave., Williamsport 

MacCart, Ethel Olive 9I6 West Third St., Williamsport 

McDowell, Lulu CatonsviUe, Md. 

Metzger, Ella Zaidee 1006 West Fourth St., Williamsport 

Millard, Lena Hunt Crystal Springs, N. Y. 

Miller, Beulah Elizabeth Mount Carmel, Md 

Miller, Jeannette 326 Mulberry St., Williamsport 

Minds, Eliza Magdalene Ramey 

Moorhead, Mary Elizabeth '. Green ' St".,' Hazleton 

Mutchler, Margaret Ellen Nisbet 

Neilson, Martha V.V.'.V.'.V.Eimira', N. Y. 

Phoenix, Mame Ardella Cameron 

Pratt, Lulu 615 Second Ave., Williamsport 

Rice, Mary Florence Centre 

Rich, Jennie Florence Woolrich 

Rider, Elizabeth Schofield 3312 North Fifteenth St., Philadelphia 

Roberts, Grace Downing ne East Third St., Williamsport 



6o 



SEMI-CENTENNIAIv CATAI.OGUK. 



Rudisill, Jessie Ethel............... 1120 Twelfth Ave., Altoona 

Seager, Harriet 1012 North Broadway, Baltimore, Md. 

Shaffer, Catherine Elizabeth 623 Washington St., Williamsport 

Shaver, Mary Mumper 447 Pine St., Williamsport 

Shoemaker, Mary Frances Hustontown 

Smith, Alma Gertrude Orangeville 

Sprague, Blanche 47 East Fourth St., Williamsport 

Staples, Elizabeth Long Kane 

Stevens, Nellie Bell *. Lrewistown 

Tallman, Gertrude 344 Academy St., Williamsport 

Unterecker, Florence Edna 789 East Third St., Williamsport 

Vollmer, Emma 1010 East Third St., Williamsport 

Von Scheliha, Ethel..................... Third St., Williamsport 

Weasner, Carrie May.............. 713 Elizabeth St., Williamsport 

Weller, Grace May Montgomery 

Wilson, Eva Elizabeth Newport 

Winder, Bessie 402 Rural Ave., Williamsport 

Wykoff, Florence Luella South Williamsport 

Beck. Lewis Gray Miles City, Mont. 

Budinger, William Samuel Snow Shoe 

Hart, Walter Williamsport 

Huling, Harry Cook................. 880 Erie Ave., Williamsport 

Schneider, George Louis South Williamsport 

Taylor, Myron Allen Grover 



VOCAL. 

Ames, Mary Creighton 338 High St., Williamsport 

Baldwin, Mary Elizabeth Clearfield 

Behres, Anna Waddle 

Belt, Miriam Alice Wellsville 

Berkheimer, Mary Wilkinson Woodbury 

Bixler, Carrie Elizabeth Newport 

Bloomer, Elsie Amelia English Centre 

Buchman, Jessie Adelia New York 

Bulfinch, Alice South Williamsport 

Burch, Edith Marie Jefferson City, Mo. 

Burkholder, Mrs. Harry Clay Kipple 

Chrisman, Berryl Burlingame 

Cochran, Mary Helen 1005 West Fourth St., Williamsport 

Cramer, Mary Cora East Salem 

Creager, Marion Olmstead Eureka, Kan. 

Creveling, Mary Loraine Rohrsburg 

Curns, Isabel 141 East Fourth St., Williamsport 

Davis, Alice Rogerson 346 High St., Williamsport 

Davis, Jane Dean 346 High St., Williamsport 

Ephlin, Jennie Williamsport 

Ford, Anna Amelia Lantz 

Forster, Margaret 707 Packer St., Williamsport 



WILLIAMSPORT DICKINSON SEMINARY. 



6l 



Frost, Helen Hendrix Duncansville 

Ganoe, Elsie Price 229 Campbell St., Williamsport 

Gearhart, Carrie May Philipsburg 

Gearhart, Edna Eva Clearfield 

Grabow, Harriet Howard Cleveland, O. 

Green, Bessie IJurt 957 West Third St., W i iliamsport 

Grieb, Maud Superia State College 

Gutelius, Edith Mary Mifflinburg 

Hooven, Ella Ray Duboistov/n 

Hooven, Minnie Mae Duboistown 

Horning, Beulah Elthea Duncannon 

Huff, Bertha M 1138 East Third St., Williamsport 

Hutchins, Clara Monkton, Md. 

McCormick, Eleanor 306 Campbell St., Williamsport 

McCormick, Myra Kinkade 945 West Fourth St., Williamsport 

Metzger, Hannah Margaret 1006 West Fourth St., Williamsport 

Meyer, Delia Walnut St., Williamsport 

Millard, Lena Hunt Crystal Springs, N. Y. 

Minds, Eliza Magdalene Ramey 

Mollz, Caroline Laura 128 East Third St., Williamsport 

. Neilson, Martha Elmira, N. Y. 

Phoenix, Mame Ardella Cameron 

Pollock, Mrs. George Edward Schenectady, N. Y. 

Rich, Jennie Florence Woolrich 

Richter, Vera Adelaide 436 Market St., Williamsport 

Rider, Elizabeth Schofield 3312 North Fifteenth St., Philadelphia 

Rudisill, Jessie Ethel 1120 Twelfth Ave., Altoona 

Savidge, Hazel Elizabeth 147 East Fourth St., Williamsport 

Shaver, Mary Mumper 447 Pine St., Williamsport 

Staples, Elizabeth Long Kane 

Stetler, Joan Rachel Montoursville 

Stevens, Nellie Bell Lewistown 

Swartz, Rhoda Helen New Oxford 

Wilson, Eva Elizabeth Newport 

Ake, James Howard Williamsburg 

Allen, June Silas 409y2 High St., Williamsport 

Baker, William Frank Scottdale 

Barton, George Washington Six Mile Run 

Belt, James Edward Wellsville 

Bidlack, Stephen Bruce Hard Pan 

Bierly, Edwin S Rebersburg 

Birdsall, Ralph Nelson North Tarrytown, N. Y. 

Brown, Albert Barton Johnstown 

Bryner, Charles Wilber Pleasant View 

Bubb, Michael B Woodbridge, Va. 

Burkholder, Harry Clay Kipple 

Coder, Cambridge Graham Doyles Mills 

Corl, Jacob Pavia 



62 



SEMI-CENTENNIAI. CATAI.OGUK. 



Croft, Bert Jefferson Keeney ville 

Ebner, John Rollin Muncy Station 

Forrest, Granville Lawson Littlestown 

Hart, Lupher Israel East Waterford 

Hartsock, Henry Willis Buffalo Tlmi 

La Rue, Harper Miles Dnishintr 

Leader, William Henry Excelsior 

Mock, Stanley Upton Saint Clairsville 

Oyler, Richard Skyles Mann's Choice 

Ruch, Prank Reuben Williamsport 

Salter, Bert Alvin..... Shamokin 

Shaver, Oscar D... ...™^.„ _^^,., ,. .. . .me Fourteenth Ave., Altoona 

Swengle, William Wesley Paxtonville 

Thompson, James Voorhees Buffalo Run 

Truax, Ernest Bell Ansonvllle 

Wilson Erastus Fairfield Centre 

Yount, John Wesley Littlestown 



MODERN LANGUAGE DEPARTMH^^T. 



FRENCH. 

Hartman, Carrie Erma 159 Market St., Williamsport 

Lyon, Eliza Adelaide 401 High St., Williamsport 

McMurray, Nelle Adams New Washington 

Moltz, Caroline Laura 128 East Third St., Williamsport 

Rice, Mary Florence Centre 

Richardson, Harriet Hawes Elm St., Newberry 

Stetler, Joan Rachel Montoursville 

Tibbits, Clara Belle 213 Temple St., Astoria. N. Y. 

GERMAN. 

Ames, Mary Creighton 338 High St., Williamsport 

Belt, Miriam Alice Wellsville 

Buchman, Jessie Adelia 'New York 

Creager, Ethel , .'.Eureka, Kan. 

Crist, Anna R 115 William St., Williamsport 

Darby, Florence Esther Hoy tville 

Ford, Anna Amelia Lantz 

Galbraith, Anna 7O8 Locust St./wiiiiamsport 

Grabow, Nellie Louise Cleveland, Ohio 

Grieb, Maud Superla State College 

Metzger, Ella Zaidee 1006 West Fourth St., Williamsport 

Miller. Beulah Elizabeth Mount Camel, Md, 



WILLIAMSPORT DICKINSON SEMINARY. 



63 



Moorhead, Anna Rubbetta Green St., Hazleton 

Schrade, Anna Magdalene 520 Market St., Williamsport 

Shaver, Mary Mumper 447 Pine St., Williamsport 

Sprague, Blanche 47 East Fourth St., Williamsport 

Androvette, Jesse Alfred Kreischerville, Staten Island, N. Y. 

Budinger, William Samuel Snow Shoe 

Engler. Stuard Harrison Catasauqua 

Frycklund, Ernest . . Osceola Aliiis 

Kavanaugh, Ramsey Daniel 1602 West Fourth 61., Wiliiamsport 

Koch, A. Harry South Williamsport 

Olmsted, Ellis Fayette Kenmore, Buffalo, N. Y. 

Penepacker, Charles Fowler 14 West Market St., Danville 

Porter, Elbert Ansley 727 Elmira St., Williamsport 

Shaver, David Oscar 1116 Fourteenth Ave., Altoona 

Sholl, William Willis McElhattan 

Slate, George Second 351 Mulberry St., Williamsport 

Weis, Augustus Burlingame 

Welch, Edgar Thomas Watkins, N. Y. 



ARl ' DHP ARl'MEN T. 



Baker, Luticia Lucinda Canton, O. 

Billmeyer, Florence Washingtonville 

Flock, Eva Barbara 627 Franklin St., Williamsport 

Fox, Mildred Elma Hughesville 

Gildner, Catharine 816 Baldwin St., Williamsport 

Hinckley, Grace 878 West Fourth St., Williamsport 

Horning, Beulah Elthea Duncannon 

Levi, Bertha 5IO East Third St., Williamsport 

Mather, Maud Wellsboro 

Mills, Daisy 355 East Fourth St., Williamsport 

Moorhead, Mary Elizabeth Green St., Hazleton 

Mussina, Mrs. Charles C 1022 West Fourth St., Williamsport 

Niemeyer, Emma 334 East Fourth St., Williamsport 

Otto, Lillian 431 Centre St., Williamsport 

Porter, Amanda 814 Baldwin St., Williamsport 

Roach, Mrs. D. A 313 Centre St., Williamsport 

Singer, Annetta Friend 7OO Hepburn St., Williamsport 

Strieby, Mrs. J. F 519 West Fourth St., Williamsport 

Thomas, Ruby 423 East Third St., Williamsport 

Wilson, Eva Elizabeth Newport 

Graeff, Augustus Nichols 744 Pear St., Reading 

Kiess, Howard Stanley 7IO Market St.. Williamsport 

Truax, Ernest Bell a h, 

' i^nicrot J3t,ii Ansonville 

Wilson, Horace I^eroy 434 R^-al Ave., Williamsport 



64 



SEMI-CKNTKNNIAL CA^TAIvOfcUE. 



ELOCUTION DEPARTMENT. 



Buchman, Jessie Adelia ^ew York 

Burch, Mary Gertrude 904 Rural Ave., Williamsport 

Grouse Ethel 730 West Fourth St., Williamsport 

Droffner. Katharine Regina 215 William St., Williamsport 

Ely, Joetta Augusta ™ Park Ave., Williamsport 

Grieb, Maud Superia ^^^^^ College 

Haines, Annie Beatrice Seminary, Williamsport 

Hanks, Frances Barton 900 Louisa St., Williamsport 

Horning, Beulah Elthea Duncannon 

Hutchins, Clara Monkton, Md. 

Kolbe, Daisy Gertrude Burlingame 

Lyon, Eliza Adelaide 401 High St., Williamsport 

Millard, Lena Hunt Crystal Springs, N. Y. 

Mulliner, Beulah Augusta, 20 Washington St., Williamsport 

Myrick, Annie Williamsport 

Phoenix, Mame Ardella Cameron 

Rudisill. Jessie Ethel 1120 Twelfth Ave., Altoona 

Rutherford, Florence Hannah Laurelton 

Savidge, Hazel Elizabeth 147 East Fourth St., Williamsport 

Strieby, Ilai 519 West Fourth St., Williamsport 

Watson, Mary 1 659 Hepburn St., Williamsport 

Weller, Grace May Montgomery 

Wilson, Eva Elizabeth Newport 

Worthington, Ada Caroline Williamsport 

Hartman, Harry Parsons... 827 Market St., Williamsport 

Rhawn, Harry Yetter Catawissa 

Wilkinson, Asaph Samuel Burlingame 

Zoller, John Benhard Cogan Station 



STUDENTS IN SPECIAL WORK. 



Allen, Jennie Martin 761 West Third St., Williamsport 

Behres, Anna Waddle 

Bixler, Carrie Elizabeth Newport 

Buchman, Jessie Adelia • New York 

Burch, Mary Gertrude 904 Rural Ave., Williamsport 

Crist, Anna R 115 William St., Williamsport 

Gearhart, Edna Eva Clearfield 

Hartman, Carrie Erma 159 Market 3t., Williamsport 



1 



I 



4 







Z 

o 

z 

3 



o 

CO 






LL 
O 

CO 
DC 

o 

Q 
U 

U. 
O 

Q 

< 

O 

QQ 




WII.LIAMSPORT DICKINSON SEMINARY. 



65 



V I* 



•1 



I 



Memstreet, Helen Mar 132 La Salle St., Chicago, 111. 

Hutching. Clara Monkton, Md. 

Leamy, Ruth Ella 1127 East Third St., Williamsport 

Lyon, Eliza Adelaide 401 High St., Williamsport 

Phoenix, Mame Ardella Cameron 

Roberts, (U:\ce T)(y\\n'uis 116- East 'J'hird SL, WiiiiaiiKspurL 

Seager, Harriet 1012 North Broadway, Baltimore, Md. 

iSprague, Blanche 47 East Fourth Sf Willinmsport 

Staples, Elizabeth Liong Kane 

Stetler, Joan Rachel Montoursville 

Swartz, Rhoda Helen New Oxford 

Tallman, Gertrude 344 Academy St., Williamsport 

Watson, Bessie Irene Lamar 

Wise, Florence 24 Seventh St., Williamsport 

Androvette, Jesse Alfred Kreischerville, Staten Island. N. Y. 

Beck, Lewis Gray Miles City, Mon. 

Belt, James Edward Wellsville 

Bierly. Edwin S V. '.!!'.'.! Rebersburg 

Bonn, Charles Frederick 3003 Elliott St., Baltimore, Md. 

English, James M Montoursville 

Faus. William Alfred Hughesville 

Karns, William Emerson Loysburg 

Kavanaugh, Ramsey Daniel. . ..1602 W^est Fourth St.. Williamsport 

La Rue, Harper Miles Dillsburg 

Mock, Stanley Upton Saint Clairsville 

Rhone. Mortimer Crosthwaite 821 Wilson St.. Williamsport 

Scarborough, William Zidcrs 508 Lycoming St.. Williamsport 

Shaver, David Oscar me Fourteenth Ave.. Altoona 

Sholl, William Willis McElhattan 

Sponsler, Eli Edward Everett 

Straub Joseph 333 Washington St'..* Williamsport 

Swengle, William Wesley Paxtonville 

Thomas Earl Huntington ^^^^^^ 

Ulmer, Levi Joseph „ , 

XKTUM ^,,. Hepburn 

Williamson, Ellis Edward p,, ,.. 

Wolfe. James Martin 'r^'ilr^]^ V 

Birmingham 



su: 



\i 



jLj. i.i ^^ 



Y. 



Resident Graduates 

Students in Classical Department .! 

Students in Scientific Department *.....'. 4! 

Students in Belles Lettres Department ^? 

Students in Modern Language Department.. . .* ^o 

Student? in Special Work, . . 

44 



66 



SEMI-CENTKNNIAIv CATAI^OGUE. 



Students in Academic Department 44 

Students in Primary Department 17 

Students in Elocution Department 28 

Students in College Preparatory Department 15 

Students in Practical Science Department 5 

Students in Normal English 2 

MUSIC DEPARTMENT. 

students in Instrumental Music 78 

Students in Thorough Bass and Harmony and History 17 

Students In Vo cal Music 87 

ART DEPARTMENT. 

students in Oil Painting 9 

Students in China Painting 7 

Students In Portrait Crayoning 2 

Students in Crayon Drawing 6 

Students in Water Colors 7 

Students in Mechanical Drawing 5 

Students in Pencil Drawing 1 

STUDENTS IN ALL DEPARTMENTS. 

Ladies 154 

Gentlemen 127 

Whole number 291 



WHvLIAMvSPORT DICKINSON SEMINARY. 



67 



PRIZES 



The following prizes will be awarded during this year : 

Thk President's Prize— The gift of the President to that 
member of the Senior or Junior Class who shall excel in writ- 
ing and delivering an oration. 

The F. G. Smith Prize— The gift of Freeborn Garrettson 
Smith, of Brooklyn, N. Y. , to that Student who shall be awarded 
the first prize in Piano Music. 

The Music Director's Prize— The gift of the Director of 
Music to that Student who shall be awarded the second prize 
in Piano Music. 

The HE11.NER Prize— The gift of Rev. S. A. Heilner, D. D., 
of Philadelphia, to that member of the Mental Philosophy Class 
who shall be awarded the prize in Mental Philosophy. 

The FACUI.TY Prize— The gift of the Faculty to that mem- 
ber of the Rhetoric Class who shall excel in writing and read- 
ing an essay. 



68 



SEMI-CENTENNIAL CATALOGUE. 



ALUMNI. 



Names, Class. 

Adams, J. F 1895 

Akers, Miss Lizzie 1885 

Albertson, O. H 1895 

Alderdice, Miss M. E 1897 

♦Alexander, C. T 1853 

Alexander, E. B 1889 

Alexander, Miss Winifred 1S93 

Allen, R. J 1897 

*Allen, R. P 1852 

Anderson, Miss Effa G 1895 

Anderson, G. R 1895 

Anderson, Miss Rosa T 1897 

Anderson, S. L 1887 

Andrews, W. A 1884 

Armstrong, W. L 1897 

♦Arndt, C. K 1868 

Artley, Miss A. A 1895 

Ash, V. B 1897 

Ash, W. F 1897 

Babb, Miss Estella 1897 

Babb, Miss Kate J 1889 

Baird, Eugene H 1891 

Baker, E. G 1884 

Baker, G. W 1876 

Baker, Miss Margaret 1883 

Baldwin, J. B 1881 

Ball, Miss Cora L 1891 

Ball Miss S. F 1889 

Barber, Miss A. E 1879 

Barker, W. S 1897 

Barnitz, C. M 1890 

Barnitz, S. J 1879 

Barr, Miss Adelle 18S0 

Barton, Miss F. A 1865 

♦Barton, J. H i860 

Basil, Miss F. M 1897 

Beck, Miss C. L 1896 

Beck, G. C 1897 

Beck, Miss M. J 1852 

Beddow, William 1888 

Beers, L,. H 1869 

t Bell, J. E 1880 

t Bender, H. R 1882 

♦Bennett, Allen 1877 

Bennett, Miss H. C 1858 

Bennett, Miss M. P 1884 

Bennett, Miss N. H 1880 

tBenscoter, C. C 1880 

♦Benscoter, Miss M. G 1897 

Benscoter, W. E 1893 

Betts, William T 1891 

Beyer, Miss Sarah A 1891 

Beymer, Miss C. M 1897 

Biddle, Miss E 1861 

* Deceased. i Honorary. 



i\omcs. cidss. 

♦Biggs, E. H 1862 

Bixler, J. W 1878 

Black, Miss Anna S 1889 

Blythe, Miss A. M 1896 

Bodine, DeWitt 1861 

Bowman, A. S 1868 

t Bowman, J. F 1882 

Bowman, J. H 1881 

Bowman, Miss M. B 1897 

Bowman, S. L. 1852 

Bowman, S. S 1863 

Bowman, Sumner S 1886 

Boynton, Miss E 1864 

Brady, L. M 1884 

Bradley, Miss K 1857 

Brenneman, J. E 1897 

Brinton, C. S 1890 

Brown, C. 1 1888 

Brown, H. L 1880 

Brown, J. C 1868 

Brow^n, J. J 1867 

Brunstetter, F. H 1895 

♦Buckalew, W. J 1871 

Buckley, Miss E. M 1883 

Buckley, Miss S. E 1884 

Burke, E. W 1882 

Burnley, C. W 1863 

Burnley, Miss L. H 1893 

Burnley, Miss M. C 1893 

Busey, G. M 1882 

Calder, Miss M 1865 

Campbell, F. C 1863 

Campbell, I. P i872 

Campbell, Miss M. L 1893 

♦Campbell, R. P 1872 

Carnill, S. S 1895 

Carter, R. T 1875 

Carver, W. A 1871 

Cassidy, Miss E. F 1887 

Chamberlain, Miss R. A 1892 

Champion, Miss M 1879 

Chapman, H. 1868 

Cheston, Miss A. H 1884 

Cheston, H. C 1886 

Cheston, Miss M. 1 1897 

♦Church, F. E 1863 

♦Clarke, F. A. C 1872 

Clarke, W. P i880 

Clarke. J. C 1885 

Clarkson, J. A. C 1884 

Cleaver, Miss C. Y 1876 

Cleaver, Miss L. J 1866 

♦Clees, T. 1868 

Cole, Miss M. McE. S 1894 



WILI.IAMSPORT DICKINSON SEMINARY. 



69 



Names. class. 

♦Comp, J. S 1869 

Conner, Miss Adella 1889 

Conner, B. C 1871 

Conner, Miss Sallie 1887 

♦Conner, S. J. A 1861 

Conner, F' J A 1886 

Cooper, Miss A 1864 

Cooper, Miss A. M 1864 

Cooper, Miss Antoinette 1891 

Cooper, R. W 1887 

Correll, Miss G. V 1893 

Correll, W. H 1892 

Cox, C. S 1866 

Crawford, Miss Lavina P 1855 

Crawford, Miss M. E 1865 

tCrawford, Mary R I886 

♦Crawford, Miss R. A 1857 

Creager, C. E 1876 

Creveling, C. C 1895 

Creveling, Miss G. A 1896 

Creveling, Miss Ida B. L 1890 

Creveling, Miss M. L 1887 

Creveling, S. A 1862 

Crever, Miss A. Rosa 1886 

Crotsley, H. H I886 

Crust, T. L 1890 

♦Cummings, Miss L. W 1877 

Curns, Miss M. E 1883 

Curran, H. A 1858 

Dale, Miss F 1872 

Dann, Miss A. D 1893 

Dart, Miss L 1875 

Dashiell, Miss A. F 1877 

Davis, Miss H. B 1853 

Davis, Miss M. B 1852 

Dawes, Joseph H 1891 

Deavor, Miss Ida C 1887 

Deavor, J. D. W 1880 

Deavor, E. E. A 1871 

Deavor, W. T. S 1888 

De Armond, D. A 1866 

Dempsey, C. W 1893 

Detwiler, Miss P. C 1895 

♦Diemer, J. B 1853 

Dietrick, F. P 1871 

♦Dill, A. H .'.*..**..* 1852 

*Dill M. R 1863 

Dill, W. H 1857 

Drinkle, Miss M. E 1867 

Drum, Miss E. M 1885 

♦Drum, M. L 1857 

Dunkerly, J. R i878 

Ebert, Miss A. M i860 

Eckbert, Miss A. M 1874 

Eder, Miss M. G 1884 

Edger, Miss M 1857 

Edwards, Miss A. C 1881 

Eichelberger, J. Allie 1891 

Elliott, Miss M. F 1862 

Emery, Miss Eva V 1857 

*Decea8€d. ^Honorary. 



Names. ciats. 

Emery, Miss Lizzie I I860 

Emery, Miss M. P 1857 

*Ent, W. H 1858 

Essington, Miss M. R 1877 

Essington, Miss N. A 1865 

Evans, S. B 1885 

Everett, Miss Lottie C 1886 

Eyer. H. B 1885 

Faunce, J. E 1863 

Faus, Miss Eva R 1897 

Faus, George W .*!!l891 

Fehr, H. A 1890 

Ferguson, Miss H. 15 1885 

Fidler, C. L 1869 

Flick, Miss Trella M 1894 

Follmer, Miss M. E 1897 

Follmer, Miss S. M 1887 

Follmer, W. W 1897 

Forrest, Miss Anna L .'.'!! 1887 

♦Foulke, Miss Jennie R 1878 

Frain, Edmund W 1894 

Freck, H. C ...1896 

Fredericks, D. H. M 1862 

Fredericks, More i860 

Friling, Miss M ..1865 

Frost, W. M 1880 

Fullmer, C. F I88I 

Fullmer, C. L .".!l880 

Furst, A. 1854 

Furst, C. G 1853 

Ganoung, Miss C. M 1888 

Garrison, Miss M. R 1897 

Gearhart, H. F I853 

♦Gearhart, W. T 1862 

Gehret, Miss E. L 1883 

Gere, Miss H. A 1852 

Gere, Miss S. F 1852 

Gibson, W. S I877 

Gilmore, Miss A. H ! ! 1884 

Glenn, G. W. M 1884 

Glosser, W. E 1890 

Glover, Miss L. E .*!.**.1884 

Goodlander, Miss J. E .'.1855 

Goodwill, W. F 1875 

Gray, E. J .*i858 

Gray, Miss E. K 1893 

Gray, Etta S 1887 

Gray, J. M. M 1896 

Gray, Miss Myrtle 1893 

Gray, W. E I88I 

Gray, William W 1886 

Grazier, Miss L. A 1888 

Green, Miss H. M 1852 

Green, Miss M. A 1855 

Green, Miss J. L 1892 

Greenly, Miss E. M '. !.1888 

Greenly, T i858 

Griggs, Miss B. E 1871 

Grover, D. M 1896 

Guldin, J 1872 



i| 



70 



SEMI-CENTENNIAL CATAI^OGUE. 



Names. class. 

Guss, Miss A. E. 1882 

Gus3, Miss S. C 1887 

Hahn, Miss L. S 1871 

Halenbake, Miss S. E 1862 

Hall, S. P 1897 

Hambleton, C 1888 

Hammond, W. S 1874 

♦Hammond, W. A 1864 

rianRs, XX. R 18 < *" 

Hann, C. G 1878 

Harman, Miss A. E 1868 

Harris, B. A 1896 

Harris, P. G 1873 

Harris, Miss I. P 1870 

Harris, Miss L. R 1872 

Hartman, Miss C 1863 

Hartman, Franklin E 1891 

Hartman, L. B 1897 

Hartman, W. W 1892 

Hartsock, F. D 1890 

Hartzell, Miss A. M. C 1883 

Hartzell, C. V 1879 

Harvey, J. C 1880 

Haughawout, Miss L. M 1883 

Haug'hawout, Miss S. F 1862 

Haupt, G. W 1860 

Heafer, Miss Louise 1890 

Heck, Albert S 1887 

Heck, O. G 1884 

Heckman, E. R 1894 

Heckman, Miss Helen B 1891 

Hedding, B. E 1895 

Hedges, Miss E. V 1879 

Heilman, Miss M 1894 

Heilman, R. P 1874 

tHeilner, S. A 1876 

Helm, C. F 1875 

Heisley, Miss R. N 1852 

Hepburn, A. D 1862 

*Herr, Miss A. M 1861 

Hill, Miss A 1881 

Hill, George H 1891 

Hill, H. R 1892 

Hillman, George M 1891 

Himes, T. B 1865 

Hippie, T. C 1865 

Hitchins, H 1876 

Hively, B. W 1896 

tHoag-, Miss C. J 1895 

Hollopeter, S. G. M 1865 

Hontz, A. W 1890 

Hooper, Miss M. L 1893 

Hooven, Miss E. R 1887 

Hooven, Miss M. M 1886 

Hooven, T. M 1897 

Hoover, W. R 1885 

Houck, Miss G. H 1881 

Houck, U. G '. 1889 

Houck, W. L 1892 

Howes, Miss A 1864 

Howland, Miss M. A 1893 

^Deceased. ^Honorary. 



Names. class. 

Hunter, L. H 1884 

Huntley, G. W., Jr 1889 

Huntley, Miss L. J 1888 

Hursh, Miss L. M 1882 

Hiitphinson, J. G 1862 

lluUiiinson, W. L 1884 

*Hyman, Miss J. S 1880 

*Hyman, Miss S. R i860 

*Jackson, C. G 1858 

James, J. Harry 1866 

James, W. M 1878 

Janney, L. R I874 

John, D. C 1865 

♦John, G. W 1858 

John, R. R 1890 

Johns, J. E 1886 

Johns, William 1884 

Johnson, Miss Jean 1890 

Johnston, G. G 1893 

Jones, Miss C. Lois 1895 

Jones, Miss J. L 1884 

Jones, Mils S. T 1872 

Joyce, Elijah I857 

Kalbfus, Charles H 1852 

Keefer, Miss Ella 1884 

Kessler, Miss E. M 1887 

Kimball, A. W I88I 

King, Miss Ada 1877 

King-, G. E 1876 

*Kirk, Miss N. A 1880 

Kitchen, Miss O. R 1896 

♦Kline, E. D I868 

Kline, Miss S. M 1888 

Koch, E. V 1880 

Koch, Miss Ida E 1886 

Koch, Miss Laura M 1886 

KoUer, Miss Louise 1891 

Konkle, W. B 1878 

Kress, Miss A. M ..!l893 

Kress, Miss E. H 1893 

Kress, W. C 1859 

Kurtz, Miss Mary K 1895 

♦Landis, J. W 1857 

Larned, F. W 1880 

Law, F. S 1868 

Leidy, Miss M. B 1885 

Leonard, H. E 1893 

Levan, Miss M 1864 

Lincoln, Miss A. R 1893 

Lincoln, Miss H. M 1884 

Little, William F 1888 

Lloyd, A. P 1879 

Long:, H. E 1878 

Long:, Miss J. M 1884 

Loudenslager, Miss R. S 1867 

tLove, J. K 1877 

♦Loveland, R., Jr 1876 

Lovell, Miss A. M 1866 

Low, Miss Alice L 1896 

Lowe, Miss Emma 1857 

♦Lowe, Miss A. S 1863 



WII.I.IAMSPORT DICKINSON SEMINARY. 



71 



Names. Class. 

Lowe, J. W 1877 

Madara, J. W 1873 

Madill, G. A 1858 

Madore, B. F 1892 

♦Malin, Miss E 1861 

Mall.ili. u MiHH P». J 1890 

♦MMrkie, A. M 1871 

Maityn, C. iS 1887 

MuHon, Miss T 1866 

Massey, Miss A. E 1864 

Massey, Miss M. IC 1873 

May, W. A 1873 

McBride, Miss L. R 1895 

McCloskey, C. E 1895 

♦McCloskey, M. J 1875 

McCloskey, Miss M. L 1894 

McCollum, Miss M. E 1890 

McCord, Miss Mary 1853 

tMcCormick, H. G 1895 

McCullough, Miss M. B 1895 

McCullough, Miss M. J 1877 

McDowell, A I866 

♦McDowell, Miss C .!l866 

McDowell, H. W 1888 

McDowell, Miss 1 1865 

McDowell, Lewis J 1891 

McDowell, T. A ....!l895 

McGraw, J. R .!l886 

Mclntire, Miss Z. B 1890 

McKee, Miss N. E. B !.1882 

McMurtrie, H. H 1897 

McNemar, Miss D. C ...1896 

McWilliams, D. A 1886 

Mearkle, W. W 1897 

Melick, O. B 1864 

Melshimer, J. A 1878 

Mendenhall, H. S 1853 

♦Metzger, Miss E. Z 1879 

Metzger, Miss H. M 1888 

Metzler, O. S 1880 

Millard, Miss M. E 1894 

Miller, A. G 1888 

Miller, J. M 1875 

Miller, Miss J. R i860 

Mills, Miss Daisy 1894 

Milnes, Miss L. H 1885 

Minds, Miss E. A 1893 

Minds, J. H 1893 

Mingle, H. B 1895 

Mitchell, Miss M. J 1865 

Mitchell, Miss M. L 1885 

Mitchell, Max L 1885 

Moore, Miss B. B 1890 

Moore, R, S 1886 

Moore, S. G 1861 

Morgart, H. M 1887 

Mosser, Miss Annie 1882 

Mosser, B. H 1877 

Mortimer, J. H 1881 

Moul, C. B 1878 

tMoyer, H. C 1882 

*Deceased. ^Honorary. 



Names. Class. 

Mulford, Miss E. B 1887 

Mulliner, Miss B. A 1896 

Mulliner, Miss G. L 1896 

Murray, Miss M. A 1897 

Murray, T. H 1867 

Musser. Miss M. E 1881 

Mussina, Miss H 1862 

Mussina, Miss L ISf)! 

Mussina , Miss M. H istli 

♦Nash, M itss F. E 1 NGr> 

Nash, Miss K. E 18GU 

Needy, Carl W 1886 

♦Neff, J. 1 1861 

tNeeley, T. B 1891 

Nicodemus, S. D 1874 

Norcross, W. H 1865 

Norris, Miss Sadie R 1886 

Oliver, Miss A. S 1861 

Olmstead, Miss E 1875 

Olmstead, Miss M 1875 

Opp, J. A 1870 

Osman, T. Milton 1891 

Ott, L. D 1885 

♦Packer, Miss M 1852 

Packer, Miss S. B 1852 

Pardoe, Miss M. H 1885 

Parlett, Miss M. 1897 

Pearce, Miss A. M 1876 

Pearce, Miss Bessie 1877 

Pearre, A 1858 

Penepacker, W. F 1896 

Petty, Miss Edyth 1895 

Petty, Miss E. G 1895 

Pidcoe, A. S 1886 

Piper, C. B 1897 

Piper, E. F 1896 

♦Poisal, R. E 1858 

Pomeroy, W. R 1885 

Porter, Miss E. S 1866 

♦Pott, R. R 1858 

Price, L. M 1894 

Purdy, Miss Mary P 1889 

Pyles, E. A 1893 

Rankin. H. L 1896 

Ransom, Miss K. E 1867 

Reeder, W. F 1875 

Reeder, R. K 1878 

Reeser, L J I888 

Reider, Miss Bertha A 1886 

Reider, Miss Mary L 1891 

Reighard, Miss S. S 1866 

Remley, G. M 1892 

Rentz, W. F 1874 

Reynolds, S. A 1874 

Rex, J. B 1878 

Riale, Miss H. E 1885 

Rich, Charles O'N 1894 

Rich, Miss M. A 1896 

Richards, Miss E. L 1873 

Riddle, E. C 1877 

Riddle, Miss E 1854 



72 



SKMI-CKNTENNIAI, CATAI^OGUK. 



Names, cias*. 

Riddle, Miss J. D 1893 

Riddle, Miss M. E 1854 

Rigdon, Nathan 1897 

Robeson, W. P 1882 

Robeson, Miss M 1880 

Robins, Miss M. E 1884 

Rockwell, Miss Estella 1889 

Rosenberry, G. W 1894 

Rothfuss, Miss Phoebe 1882 

Rounsley, S. P 189G 

Rue, J. W 1877 

Russell, Miss J. S 1885 

Russell, Miss M. J 1892 

Sadler, W. P 1863 

_ Sangree, P. H 1865 

Sarver, S. J i897 

Saxon, Benjamin P 1891 

Saylor, Miss J. S 1862 

♦Scarborough, G. H 1878 

Schoch, A 1862 

*Schofield, E. L 1862 

Scholl, Miss M. A 1897 

Scoville, Miss J. E 1863 

Sechler, W. A 1883 

Sensenbach, Miss A. V 1893 

Sydow, Albert 1893 

Shale, J. H 1896 

Shammo, Miss P. E 1879 

tShaver, J. B 1891 

Sheaffer, W. J 1890 

Shick, Miss Mary M 1886 

Shiply, Miss Ida A 1887 

Shoff, H. M 1895 

Shoop, W. R 1883 

*Sho waiter, Miss A. B 1885 

Slate, Miss A. B 1892 

Slate, Miss P. W 1894 

Sleep, P. G 1896 

Sliver, W. A 1862 

*Smlth, H. E 1866 

Smith. N. B 1872 

Smith, T. J 1861 

Snyder, Miss E 1881 

Souder, Miss R. L 1865 

Spangler, J. L 1871 

Speakman, Melville K 1891 

Spottswood, Miss A. E 1873 

Spottswood, Miss L. M 1865 

Sprout, B. B 1897 

Stackhouse, Miss E. A 1885 

Steinmitz, J. L 1868 

Stephens, H. M 1888 

Sterling, Miss E. K 1888 

Stevens, E. M 1882 

Stevens, G. W 1881 

Stevens, J. C 1885 

Stevenson, W. H 1883 

Stewart, H. L. 1896 

Stewart, J. S 1888 

Stoltz, Miss R. J 1873 

Stout, Miss P. R 1883 

"Deceased. MIonorary. 



WII.UAMSPORT DICKINSON SEMINARY. 



73 



Names. class. 

Strine, Miss M. J i869 

♦Strohm, W. H ....1870 

Strong, Miss H. A 1880 

Stuart, Miss May T 1882 

S war tz, Miss B. M 1890 

Swartz, Miss E. B * 1890 

Swartz, T. S .'.*!l885 

Swengle, D. P i^eo 

??wope, T N !*. 1879 

raneyhili, C. W ISQS 

raneyhill, G. L igsg 

Taneyhill, Miss M. E 1857 

Taneyhill, O. B 1877 

Taneyhill, Miss S. A 1853 

Taylor, Miss Ida A . ...1875 

♦Taylor, Miss Jennie M 1886 

Taylor, J. W 1863 

Taylor, Miss M. V 1896 

Taylor, R. S ;i882 

Teitsworth, E. T 1887 

Test, Miss C. S **.'l881 

Tewell, J. R iggg 

Thomas, Miss M. Maud 1894 

Thomas, Miss Nellie M 1894 

Thomas, Miss Sadie D 1876 

Thrush, Miss K. A 1875 

Tomlinson, P. H ..1886 

Tomlinson, Miss M. E 1880 

Tonner, A. C 1853 

Townsend, W. P I886 

Tracy, Miss M. P !l890 

Treverton, Henry 1887 

Treverton, Miss Minnie 1887 

Troxell, Miss M. A 1890 

Vail. Miss R. C 1869 

Vanderslice, J. A 1863 

♦Vanfossen, Miss Ada 1857 

Vansant, Miss M. E 1896 

Volkmar, W i883 

Wakefield, Miss Aimee ....!l893 

Walker, P. C 1890 

Walker, M. N 1894 

Wallace, Miss Carrie P !l891 

Wallis, P. M 1896 

Waltz, Miss M. Bertha 1891 

Warehime, O. C 1881 

Watson, P. A .!l864 

Watson, Miss P. E 1865 

*Way, E. P .*;i862 

Weigel, D. H 1862 

Weisel, Miss E. A 1895 

♦Welch, Miss M. P 1890 

Welteroth, Miss E. M 1895 

Welty, Miss M. P 1875 

♦Whaley, H I854 

Whitney, H. H 1884 

Wilcox, Miss E. G 1896 

Williams, A. S 1895 

Wilson, Miss Helen E 1885 

Wilson, James E 1886 

Wilson, J. L 1883 



i # 



4 * V 



Names. class. 

Wilson, S. D 1883 

Winegardner, Miss S. H 1870 

Winger, J. .1 1893 

Wood, J. Perry 1897 

Woodin, Miss Dora 18G4 

Woodward, J 1867 

♦Wright, Miss Ida M ..1877 

*Yetter, Miss M 1861 

Yocum, E. II 1868 

YociiMi George C 1891 

*Yocuni, G. M .i860 



Narn€i>. class. 

Yocum, J. J 1863 

* Yocum, Miss N 1852 

Young, Miss C. B 1896 

Young, C. V. P 1895 

Young, Edwin P 1892 

Yniing, J. B 1866 

Vuung, J. W. A 1883 

♦Young, W. Z 1877 

♦Ziders, Miss Minnie 1875 

♦Ziders, Miss V. S 1881 

♦Zollinger, Miss E. A 1882 



INSTRUMENTAL MUSIC. 



Names. class. 

Barclay, Miss G. E 1888 

Barkle, Miss E. S 1895 

Basil, Miss P. M 1897 

♦Bender, Miss Anna M 1884 

Benscoter, Miss H. C 1895 

Blint, Miss N. M 1888 

Bowman, Miss M. B 1896 

Brooks, Miss Laura 1879 

Burkhart, Miss C. E 1895 

Cassidy, Miss E. P 1887 

Champion, Miss Maggie 1879 

Chilcoat, Miss Marguerite M...1891 

Chrisman, Mary E 1892 

Comp, Miss C. M 1895 

Correll, Miss E. G 1896 

Davies, Miss E. C 1890 

Davis, Miss Clara 1882 

Ely, Miss A. E 1893 

Eschenbach, Miss Sophia 1881 

Eyer, Miss M. S 1888 

Pry, Miss E. M 1888 

Pulmer, Miss J. A 1896 

Gable, Miss Annie 1884 

Ganoe, Miss M. Lauretta 1891 

Gehret, Miss Ella L 1881 

Glover, Miss Pannie S 1883 

Green, Miss J. D 1893 

Greer, Miss H. L 1896 

Harrington, Miss H. M 1896 

Heck, Miss Clemma 1889 

Heinsling, Miss J. M 1887 

Hicks, Miss Blanche L 1891 

Hicks, Miss G. W 1889 

Hoagland, Miss E. M 1897 

Hooper, Miss M. L 1893 

Horn, Miss Mamie D 1881 

Houck, Miss Gertrude H 1880 

Hullar, Miss Annie 1884 

Hutchinson, Wilbur L 1884 

Kelley, Miss R. M 1895 

King, Miss A. W 1895 

Koch, Miss L.. M 1887 

Koons, Miss M. E 1897 

Krape, Miss S. M 

^Deceased. Wonorary. 



1895 



Names. class. 

Laedlein, Miss C. E 1895 

Larned, Miss Minnie 1894 

Leckie, Miss Ida M 1883 

Leidy, Miss Margaret B 1885 

Low, Miss H. M 1889 

Maitland, Miss Anna 1880 

Malaby, Miss E. V 1893 

Mallalieu, Miss B. J 1890 

Martin, Miss Chloe 1887 

McGee, Miss E. M 1895 

McGee, Miss I. H 1895 

McMurray, Miss E. A 1895 

Menges, Miss M. A 1893 

Metzger, Miss H. M 1889 

Mertz, Miss L. B 1892 

Millspaugh, Miss L. C 1886 

MuUiner, Miss G. L 1897 

Musser, Miss Minnie E 1880 

Nuss, Miss Laura 1884 

Ohl, Miss Ella A 1891 

Paine, Miss J. P 1896 

Pardoe, Miss Minnie H 1885 

Pooler, George W 1880 

Prior, Miss E. M 1888 

Randall, Miss Josie 1882 

Reider, Miss Edith 1893 

Rhoads, Miss Mary V 1891 

Ridden, Miss Claude 1885 

Ripley, Miss Ossie 1880 

Robbins, Miss S. 1 1889 

Rothrock, Miss E. M 1889 

Rothrock, Miss Maggie 1879 

Rothrock, Miss S. M 1888 

Runyan, Miss P. J I888 

♦Ryan, Miss M. L 1889 

Shaw, Amos R 1882 

Sanders, Miss C. E 1889 

Sharpless, Miss M. L 1889 

Sheadle, Miss R. R I886 

Sheets, Miss Lulu 1887 

Shopbell, Miss May L 1887 

Slate, Miss Crecy I879 

Smith, Miss G. A ....1890 

Stratford, Miss Kittie 1885 



74 



SKMI-CENTKNNIAL CATAI.OGUK. 



Names, 

Stuart, Miss May T. 

Swartz, Miss M. E 

Titus, Miss Anna.... 
Turley, Miss Mattie 
Voelkler, Miss L. S 
Wait. Miss A. M. 



Class. 

.1880 
.1888 
.1880 
.1885 
.1886 
1896 



Wallis, Miss M. Lulu.. ..*!.**!!.*.' 1891 



^'«^^^^- Class, 

Wanarnaker, Miss C. M 1892 

Watson, Miss E. M 1893 

Weddigen, Miss Wllhelmirie .'.'.*.* 1891 

Wilde, E. W i882 

Williams, Miss Minnie.. ..'!!.*.'.'.' 1884 

Williamson. Miss O. H 1887 

Zeth, Miss Minnie ..1887 



VOCAI, MUSIC. 

/«^;;- Class. , Names, 
Huntley, Miss F. S I894 | 



Koons, G. J. 



McGee, Miss E. M !..i895' 



Class. 
.1895 



ELOCUTION. 



^"*^^- Class. 

Barker, W. S 1097 

Barkle, Miss E. S 1895 

Blythe, Miss A. M i896 

Bowman, Miss Hannah....' 1897 

DeWald, Miss L. S *" 1896 

Feg-ley, Miss B. V 18% 

Hartman, Miss B. M... 1895 



Names. 



Class, 



Lundy, Miss L.. M 1897 

Massey, Miss S. J *i896 

McGee, Miss E. M I895 

Mills, Miss Daisy 1896 

Parlett, Miss M. O 1397 

Pierson, Miss B. L .....1897 

Younken, Miss B. M ..!.!. 1897 



ART. 

^"^^*- Class. 

Brooks, Miss C. 1887 

Conner, Miss Sallie ...'!* 1889 

Dittmar, Miss E. A 1886 

Eder, Miss Mary O 1891 

Everhart, Miss Kate.... 1879 



Thompson, Miss Crecy L 



Names, 

Finney, Miss Grace B. 

Guss, Miss Maggie 

Harvey, Miss Carrie... 
Mann, Miss L. Arpelia, 
Neece, Miss M. G.... 



1882 



Class. 

.1886 
.1883 
.1879 
.1885 
.1897 



Class. 

.1896 

.1896 

.1896 

1896 



Names, 

Bailey, J. R 

Bartch, Miss F. P.. 

Bowman, J. R 

Conner, Miss M. C. 

Drum, J. Marcellus ..' 18911 

Freck, C. W 1395 

Gould, William H. G "i89l 

Kessler, H. D "'l896 

King, Miss A. W .!.....1895 

Wallis, H. k.... 



COLLEGE PREPARATORY. 



Names. 

Low, T. H 

McMorris, Harry, 

Miller, D. N 

Moore, H. B .*. 

Parrish, S. R. W. 
Richards, J. R. 



Class, 

1897 

1893 

1896 

1895 

1892 

Soderling, Walter. .'.',[[ illi 

Thomas, Walter icoo 

Wallace, W. C itqi 

1892 * 



Names. 

Body, Miss Kate R, 

Hoffman, E. E 

Hubbard, G. H 



NORMAL ENGLISH. 



Class. 

.1889 
.1888 
.1892 



^^^^«' Class. 

McKenty, T. W 1893 

Miller, D. L 1000 

Miller, E. M .*.'!.* 1 .*.'*; .1894 



•r 



WII.I.IAMSPORT DICKINSON SEMINARY. 



75 



BY-LAW 






1. During the hours of study the Students shall not be 
unnecessarily absent from tlirir rooms. 

2. At the iiiiie appointed to attend prayers, recitation, lec- 
ture, or other exercises, each Student shall repair quietly and 
promptly to the place designated. 

3. At no time shall any Student loiter in the halls or about 
the doors, or indulge in jumping, wrestling, loud talking, 
whistling, or any unnecessary noise, OR USE TOBACCO 
IN THE BUILDINGS OR ON THE GROUNDS. 

4. The students shall not be absent from their rooms at 
night or after the hour of study indicated by the ringing of 
the bell, nor shall they attend parties or mixed assemblies 
without permission from the President; nor shall they at any 
time visit hotels or other places of public resort, or on any oc- 
casion indulge in the use of intoxicating liquors. 

5. All profane and indecent language, playing at games 
of chance, injuring the property of the Institution or of citi- 
zens, quarreling, fighting, the carrying of firearms, or other 
dangerous weapons, are strictly forbidden. 

6. No Students shall leave the corporate limits of the city 
for a longer period than one hour, without permission from 
the President. 

7. Each Student will be held strictly accountable for any 
damage he or she may cause to the Seminary property. 
Damages by unknown parties may be assessed on the School. 

8. The teachers must at all times have access to the 
Students' rooms, and if it be judged necessary, the rooms will 
be cleaned at the expense of the occupants. 

9. Cleanliness of person and apparel, and a gentlemanly 
and lady-like deportment must be observed by all. 

10. No water, dirt, or other material shall be thrown from 



76 



SKMI-CKNTENNIAI. CATALOGUE. 



any window in the building, or in the halls after they have 
been cleaned. 

11. Students must have their rooms swept and in order, 
and lights extinguished at the established hours, when all 
must retire for the night. 

12. No Student will be allowed to go bat! i in-, i)oating, 
skating, fishing, gunning, or riding, without permission from 
the President. 



^3- The Students must not visit the kitchen, dining-room, 
or any other room, except their own, without permission. 

14. The Sabbath must be strictly observed by all. Visit- 
ing or receiving visits will not be allowed. All must attend 
public worship twice during the day. 

15. No lady shall at any time receive calls from gentlemen 
at her own room. Friends from a distance can see the 
ladies in the parlor. 

16. The young ladies will not be allowed to leave the 
Seminary grounds at any time without permission; and the 
gentlemen will be restricted at the discretion of the Faculty. 

17. No Student shall change his or her room, or place at 
the table, without special permission from the President. 

18. No Student will be permitted to leave the School dur> 
ing the session without an express request from the parent or 
guardian, made to the President, and without the consent of 
the Faculty. 

19. Any Student who, without just cause, shall fail to at- 
tend the examinations, will be considered under censure. 

20. Permission to be absent from any exercise must be ob- 
tained, if possible, before the absence occurs. 

21. No Student will be permitted to leave any class with^ 
out the consent of the Faculty. 

22. The ladies and gentlemen must not visit each other's 
apartments, walk or ride together, without permission, nor 
converse together from the windows. 



WILIvIAMSPORT DICKINSON SEMINARY. 



77 



2;^, Students from the neighborhood will not be per- 
mitted to visit home at such times as will interfere with the 
regular exercises of the School. 

24. Any ofTen^ing Student may be punished, according tc 
the nil lire of the offense, by privnte ui public reproof, suspen- 
sion, dismission or cxjMilsion. 

25. Students dismissed or expelled must leave the 
premises at once. 

26. None but Students can attend the Society meetings 
nor shall the Societies meet together, unless by express per- 
mission of the President. 

2y. No special meeting of the Students shall be held at any 
time, nor shall any meeting of the Students or Societies con- 
tinue later than 9.45 o'clock P. M., without permission of the 
President. 

28. All persons visiting Students at the Seminary will be 
required to conform to the rules adopted for the government 
of the School. Visitors will be charged for boarding at the 
published rates. 

29. Any temporary prudential regulation for the govern- 
ment of the School that the Faculty may see fit to adopt shall 
be equally binding with these By-Laws. 



/» 



J. R. HAZELET 



ART STORE 



DEALER IN 



:ALER IN XXTT f f T\ * * „ . ^ 

'"- "''' OF Wj]^ Paper anj Wiii dowSliaJes. 

No. 149 WEST FOURTH STREET, 



COCHRAN. PAYNE & M'COnMICK 
BUILDING, 



\V ILLi A JVI S ! '( ) RT, I ' A, 



»^^"°"^'MS"S.S^f^,-!!{fgS^,S'!ffi"---- 



•^l»c>, 3E>Ain.t«x-, 



kixi.©r Ax&d. JE»Ap»c»v Otl 



» *» «^'exr. 



ONLY FIRST-CLa^S COflPAMES Rl pRnsrvTm 

i:i)ampion $ ?ire Insurance flgency, 

OFFICE, 888 PINE STREET^ ^ WILLIAMSPORT. PA. 

Z-'k Pi. ! X' 1< ; T . O H 7A AT F^ 1 O N 

^ 

Fire, Life and Accident Insurance Companies 
that have stood the test for more than a century 

represented by the 

Union Insuring Co m } a n y 



No. 327 Pine Street. 



TELEPHONE 4484. 



Williamsport, Penna. 



Thompson, Gibson & Co., 




pg ©O0d§ arpd ©popcpieg 



ATTRACTIVE IN QUALITY, STYLE AND PRICE. 



JL5.j^3E3TS, 



WILLIAMSPORT, PENNA. 









*^ 



)l 



rr' 



Iv. SiiKFFER, 

fashionable merchant Caiior and Cloibier. 



A!s«n fVafer in Trunks, Gent:/ Furnisrimg Goods, &c. 



No,. 140 WF-ST FOURTH STREET, WILLIAMSPORT PA, 

Special Prices to iviinisters and Students. 



GRANT D STAD(3N. 



^Tl ! '^^'" ' •' — 



xclusiOe Millii\ei V §rore 



IN rilH CWY, 



Drs. Klump & Hertz, 

S. W, Cor. Third & Market Streets, Williamsport, Pa, 

FIRST-CLASS DENTAL WORK AT REASONABLE PRICES. 

To Obviate the necessity of wearing plates, we make Crown and Bridge Work a 
Specialty. Painless Extraction. Appointments made by Mall or Telephone. 



THE A. D. LuNOY 



$tariorier$. 




ilflil Refill 



LARGE STOCK OF SCHOOL AND OFFICE SUPPLIES, WALL PAPER, WRAPPING AND 
PAPER BAGS, WINDOW SHADES-READY MADE AND MADE TO ORDER. 



Blank and Miscellaneous Books a Specialty. 
No. ?A FAST THIRD STREET, WILLIAMSPOR 



'^. 



Cbe Dwncdii Oepartmenf $(ore^ 



HEADQUARTERS FOR 



Crockery, Tinware, Nnfions, House hmmn Goods 



JEWELRY, T 



C3YS AND brAllONERY. 



5 cSi 10 CLNl GOODS, SPECIALriES, ETC. 



NO. imr \A/ I 



<-; T u.. O U R T H S T R JB £= J' 



Mrs. LIZZIE C. SCHNEE, 

So long the owner of the A. R. Hinckley Co. 
Store Is now In charge of a nne new line of 

IN THB NEW STORE ROOM 

COR. FOURTH AND WILLIAM STS., 

Wp^ wnfr'" '^Z'*'* '° ^«"«'"«erormer and new students. 
We win keep a full line of Seminary School Books at the 
lowest cash prices, both new and second hand. 

• • ♦ 

L. C SCHNEE, ManaP'ef 

' *"*«"' BOOKSELLER AND STATIONER. 



GEORGE P. NEAL, 



.^ 



Millinepg and "BoMonz, 



315 PINE STREET, WILLIAMSPORT, PA 



n s 



^"TELEPHONE: office 2523; residence 373. 

O • O • iAi. /A L l< I - h-^ 1 1' 

N. E. COR. THIRD AND MARKET ST<? n ^ 

^i^ ivir^rusai 1 :> 1 v>.^ Over Mussina's Jewelry Store 



m 



ii a 




Druggists iind Pharmacists. 



•^W;: 



Ci)it I otuiii Asu i^ihL ^rs. 



Particular Attention Given to Co7npotcnding Prescriptions, 

TOILET PREPARATIONS. 

HHIR, TOOTH, NMfL AND CLOTH BRUSHES. PBRFUTV^DS TTND FHNCV 

KRTIGLES HT LOi«£EST PRICES. 

AGENTS FOR HUYLERS CELEBRATED CAUulES. 



SPECiAL 



^i;^» I L^ T 



'"■ \J Dt NTS. 




'.EORGE BUBB & SUNS. 

f?o!e5al^ droeprs... 



• • • ^..i « / Uj O O 



r\.^ 



\ ,....,» 



tJxf u i<ji O, 



WILLIA Mbi uflT, PA. 



Mccormick & heroic, 

FIRE INSURa NCE ^ REAL ESTATE, 

SUSQUEHANNA TRUST BUILDING, 

^v^ii:,ijXAL.3yrs:F>oi^T, :p.a- 



'< 



t s %t 



|...._ pr. I 




o., 



LST nRANdl BOil Lii W(il;KS 



WILL.IAMSPORT. PA. 

We make a specialty of Steam and Hot Water Heating. Full line of Engineers' 



Supplies. 



T. J. FUNSTON & CO., 



T. J. PUNSTON. 
PRANK 8. CLAPP. 



Ilat dw aie and Stoves 









i 



t 



No. 22 East Third Street, Williamsport, Penna. 



C M A H 



;* ■' ■''*-»»5, 



C. MUSSINA, 



DIAMONDS, WATCHES, JLWEL 

18 WEST THIRD STREET, Market Square, 
WILLIAMSPORT. PENNA. 



I 



I 



f 



t 



4 



_•> L.Sii ','r 






Course catalog not 

available for film 




1 








1 





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