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Full text of "Annual Catalogue of Xenia Theological Seminary"

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LIBRARY OF 
XENIA THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

6V407 
1/30 



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SERVICE, PA! - - 1794 
CANONSBURG, PA. 1821 
XENIA, OHIO - - 1855 
ST. LOUIS, MO. - 1920 



Calendar for 1921 


JANUARY 


FEBRUARY 


MARCH 


APRIL 


S M T W T P S 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F 8 














1 

8 

15 

22 

29 


6 
13 
20 
27 


7 
14 
21 
28 


1 

8 

15 

22 


2 

9 

16 

23 


3 
10 
17 
24 


4 
1 1 
18 
25 


5 
12 
19 
26 


6 
13 
20 
27 


7 
14 
21 
26 


1 

8 

15 

22 

29 


2 

9 

16 

23 

30 


3 
10 
17 
24 
31 


4 
11 
18 
25 


5 
12 
19 
26 












1 

8 

15 

22 

29 


2 

9 

16 

23 

30 


2 

9 

16 

23 

30 


3 
10 
17 
24 
31 


4 
1 1 
18 
25 


5 
12 
19 
26 


6 
13 
20 
27 


7 
14 
21 
28 


3 
10 
17 
24 


4 
1 1 
18 
25 


5 
12 
19 
26 


6 
13 
20 
27 


7 
14 
21 
28 


MAY 


JUNE 


JULY 


AUGUST 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


1 

8 

15 

22 

29 


2 

9 

16 

23 

30 


3 
10 
17 
24 
31 


4 
1 1 
18 
25 


5 
12 
19 
26 


6 
13 
20 
27 


7 
14 
21 
28 








1 

8 

15 

22 

29 


2 

9 

16 

23 

30 


3 
10 
17 
24 


4 
11 
18 
26 












1 

8 

15 

22 

29 


2 

9 

16 

23 

30 


7 

14 
21 
28 


1 2 

8 9 

15 16 

22 23 

2930 


3 
10 
17 
24 
31 


4 
1 1 
18 
25 


5 
12 

19 
26 


6 
13 
20 
27 


5 
12 
19 
26 


6 
13 
20 
27 


7 
14 
21 
28 


3 
10 
17 
24 
31 


4 
1 1 
18 
25 


5 
12 
19 
26 


6 
13 
20 
27 


7 
14 
21 
28 


















SEPTEMBER 


OCTOBER 


NOVEMBER 


DECEMBER 


S M T W T P S 


S M T W T F 8 


8 M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 










1 

8 

15 

22 

29 


2 

9 

16 

23 

30 


3 
10 
17 
24 


2 

9 

16 

23 

30 


3 
10 
17 
24 
31 


4 
1 1 
18 
25 




6 
13 
20 
27 


7 
14 
21 
28 


1 

8 

15 

22 

29 


6 
13 
20 
27 


.. ,i 1 
7 8 
1416 
21 22 
28 29 


2 

9 
16 
23 
30 


3 
10 
17 
24 


4 
1 1 
18 
25 


5 
12 
19 
26 


4 
1 1 
18 
25 


5 
12 
19 
26 


6 

13 
20 
27 


7 
14 
21 
28 


1 

8 

15 

22 

29 


2 3 


4 
1 1 
18 
25 


5 
12 
19 
26 


6 
13 
20 
27 


7 
14 
21 
28 


1 
1 
? 


5 
2 
3 
R 


9 
16 

23 
30 


10 
17 
24 
31 














Calendar for 1922 

„,; , , ,in , ', _____________ 


JANUARY 


FEBRUARY 


MARCH 


APRIL 


. 8 M T W T P S 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F 8 


S M T W T F S 


1 

8 

15 

22 

29 


2 

9 

16 

23 

30 


3 
10 
17 
24 

m 


4 
1 1 
18 
25 


5 
12 
19 
26 


6 
13 
20 
27 


7 
14 
21 
28 








1 

8 

15 

22 


2 

9 

16 

23 


3 
10 
17 
24 


4 
1 1 
18 
25 








1 

8 
15 
22 
29 


2 

9 

16 

23 

30 


3 
10 
17 
24 
31 


4 
1 1 
18 
25 




| 








1 
8 

15 
22 
29 


5 
12 
19 
26 


6 
13 
20 
27 


7 
14 
21 
28 


5 
12 
19 
26 


6 
13 
20 
27 


7 
14 
21 
28 


2 

9 

16 

23 

30 


■ 3 * 
10 11 

17 18 

2425 


5 
12 
19 
26 


6 
13 
20 
27 


7 
14 
21 
28 













...I... 


MAY 


JUNE 


JULY 


AUGUST 


S M T W T P S 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F 8 


7 
14 
21 
,28 


1 

8 

15 

22 

29 


2 

9 

16 

23 

30 


3 
10 
17 
24 
31 


4 
1 1 
18 
25 


5 
12 
19 
26 


6 
13 
20 
27 


4 

11 
18 
25 


5 
12 
19 
26 


6 
13 
20 
27 


7 
14 
21 
28 


1 

8 

15 

22 

29 


2 

9 

16 

23 

30 


3 
10 
17 
24 














1 

8 
15 
22 
29 


6 
13 
20 
27 


. 1 
7i 8 
14 15 
21 22 
28 29 


2 

9 
16 
23 
30 


3 
10 
17 
24 
31 


4 6 
1 112 
18119 
2526 


2 

9 

16 

23 

30 


3 
10 
17 
24 
31 


4 
1 1 
18 
25 


5 
12 
19 
26 


6 
13 
20 
27 


7 
14 
21 
28 








SEPTEMBER 


OCTOBER 


NOVEMBER 


DECEMBER 


8 M T W T F 8 


8 M T W T K S 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 












1 

8 

15 

22 

29 


2 

9 
16 
23 
30 


1 

8 

15 

22 

29 


21 3 


a 


5 
12 
19 
26 


6 
13 
20 
27 


7 
14 
21 
28 








1 

8 

15 

22 

29 


2 .1 


4 
1 1 
18 
25 












1 

8 
15 
22 
29 


2 

9 

16 

23 

30 


3 
10 
17 
24 


4 
1 1 
18 
25 


5 
12 
19 
26 


6 

13 
20 
27 


7 
14 
21 
2B 


9 

16 
23 
30 


10 
!7 
24 
31 


1 

1 

2 


1 
8 
5 


5 
12 
19 
26 


6 

13 
20 
27 


7 
14 
21 
28 


9 
16 
23 
30 


10 
17 
24 


3 
10 
1 7 
24 

31 


4 
1 1 
18 
25 


5 
12 
19 
26 


6 
13 
20 
27 


7 
14 
21 
28 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2011 with funding from 

LYRASIS Members and Sloan Foundation 



http://www.archive.org/details/annualcatalogue192030xeni 



THE ANNUAL CATALOGUE 



OF THE 



Xenia 
Theological Seminary 




OF ST. LOUIS, MISSOURI 



1921 



THE CONTROL OF THE 
SEMINARY 



THE SEMINARY is under the control of 
the Second Synod, and the Synods of 
Illinois, Iowa, Kansas and Nebraska of 
the United Presbyterian Church. Its immediate 
control is committed to a Board of Managers, 
twenty-five in number, appointed by the Synods, 
and a Board of Trustees, nine in number, ap- 
pointed by the Board of Managers. The Terms 
and Course of Study are determined by the Gen- 
eral Assembly. 



, 



XENIA THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 



THE BOARD OF MANAGERS. 



SECOND SYNOD. 

Term Expires 

Rev. E. G. McKibben, Rushville, Ind 1921 

Frank Boyd, D. D., Cincinnati, Ohio 1921 

Rev. S. R. Jamieson, Oxford, Ohio 1922 

Mr. W. J. Fulton, Columbus, Ohio 1922 

John A. Henderson, D. D., Dayton, Ohio 1923 

J. P. Cowan, D. D., Indianapolis, Ind 1923 

SYNOD OF ILLINOIS. 

J. T. Meloy, D. D., Hoopeston, 111 1921 

Rev. J. B. Pollock, Aledo, 111 1921 

Rev. John I*. Acheson, West Allis, Wis 1922 

John P. Nesbitt, D. D., Sparta, 111 , 1922 

Rev. J. W. McClenahan, Chicago, 111 1923 

Rev. E. F. Kimmelshue, Monmouth, 111 1923 

SYNOD OF IOWA. 

Rev. W. G. Comin, Goldfield, Iowa : 1921 

J. B. Work, D. D., Tarkio, Mo 1921 

J. F. Jamieson, D. D., Clarion, Iowa 1922 

Rev. A. S. Bailey, Stanwood, Iowa 1922 

J. M. Wishart, D. D., Washington, Iowa 1923 

Mr. W. H. Ramsey, Garner, Iowa 1923 

SYNOD OF KANSAS. 

F. M. Spencer, D. D., Sterling, Kansas 1921 

J. H. Hutchman, D. D., Pittsburg, Kansas 1922 

Rev. R. Francis Hall, Kansas City, Kansas 1923 

SYNOD OF NEBRASKA. 

Rev. W. C. Davidson, North Bend, Neb 1921 

Rev. R. A. Pollock, Denver, Colo - -1922 

Mr. A. M. McClenahan, Greeley, Colo 1923 



6 XENIA THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

EX-OFFICIO MEMBER OF BOARD OF MANAGERS. 

President, Joseph Kyle, D. D., LL.D. 

6834 Washington Avenue, St. Louis, Mo. 



THE OFFICERS OF THE BOARD OF MANAGERS. 

President, John A. Plenderson, D. D Dayton, Ohio. 

Vice President, J. P. Cowan, D. D Indianapolis, Ind. 

Financial Secy, and Treas., Mr. T. Dales Kyle Xenia, Ohio. 

Recording Secretary, Jesse Johnson, D. D 

5734 Vernon Avenue, St. Louis, Mo. 



BOARD OF TRUSTEES. 

Term Expires 

Mr. Robert E. Bryson, Xenia, Ohio .1921 

Mr. D. M. Stewart, Xenia, Ohio 1921 

Mr. Frank Bickett, Xenia, Ohio 1921 

Hon. C. H. Kyle, Xenia, Ohio 1922 

Hon. J. Carl Marshall, Xenia, Ohio 1922 

Mr. T. Dales Kyle, Xenia, Ohio 1922 

B. R. McClellan, M. D., Xenia, Ohio 1923 

Mr. J. M. Prugh, Dayton, Ohio, R. F. D. 2 .' 1923 

Mr. John C. Williamson, Xenia, Ohio 1923 

EX-OFFICIO MEMBER OF BOARD OF TRUSTEES. 

President, Joseph Kyle, D. D., LL.D 

6834 Washington Avenue, St. Louis, Mo. 

OFFICERS OF THE BOARD OF TRUSTEES. 

President Joseph Kyle, D. D., LL.D 

6834 Washington Avenue, St. Louis, Mo. 

Financial Secy, and Treas., Mr. T. Dales Kyle Xenia, Ohio. 

Recording Secretary, Jesse Johnson, D. D 

5734 Vernon Avenue, St. Louis, Mo. 



XENIA THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 7 

MEMBERS OF THE LOCAL BOARD OF TRUSTEES ACTING UNDER 

THE APPOINTMENT OF THE COMMISSION OF 

THE BOARD OF MANAGERS. 

Rev. John A. Henderson, D. D R. D. No. 2, Dayton, Ohio. 

Jesse Johnson, D. D 5734 Vernon Ave., St. Louis, Mo. 

Mr. W. J. Johnston 3606 Forest Park Blvd., St. Louis, Mo. 

Hon. C. H. Kyle Xenia, Ohio. 

Joseph Kyle, D. D 

6834 Washington Avenue, St. Louis, Mo. 

Mr. T. Dales Kyle Xenia, Ohio. 

Mr. J. M. Lashly 20 Windermere Place, St. Louis, Mo. 

Rev. J. F. LeClere 2605 Union Blvd., St. Louis, Mo. 

Mr. Erie Ormsby ...: 4508 McPherson Ave., St. Louis, Mo. 

Mr. William Schattgen 2934 Allen Ave., St. Louis, Mo. 

Dr. J. W. Weir _ : Sparta, 111. 

Mr. A. O. Wilson 14 Windermere Place, St. Louis, Mo. 

THE CONSULTATIVE MEMBERS OF BOTH BOARDS. 

Jesse Johnson, D. D. 

M. G. Kyle, D. D. J. E. Wishart, D. D. 

J. H. Webster, D. D. 

THE LADIES' VISITING AND ADVISORY BOARD. 

Mrs. Joseph Kyle, President. 

Mrs. J. H. Webster, Vice President. 

Mrs. Jesse Johnson, Treasurer. 

Mrs. J. E. Wishart. 

Mrs. J. F. Hutchison. 

*Mrs. W. G. Moorehead. 

Mrs. W. C. Hutchison. 

Mrs. T. Dales Kyle. 

Mrs. M. G. Kyle. 
Miss Margaret Moorehead. 

THE STUDENTS' Y. M. C. A. 

Scott Withrow, President. 

H. A. Kent, Vice President. 

A. W. Gordon, Secretary and Treasurer. 

♦Honorary member. 



XENIA THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 



THE FACULTY 



JOSEPH KYLE, D. D., LL.D., 

President of the Seminary, 
Professor of Systematic Theology and Homiletics. 

JESSE JOHNSON, D. D., 
Professor of Church History and Apologetics. 

J. E. WISHART, D. D., 
Professor of Hebrew Exegesis and Old Testament Literature. 

J. H. Webster, D. D., 
Professor of Greek Exegesis and New Testament Literature. 

M. G. KYLE, D. D., LL.D., 

Newburg Professor of Biblical Theology, and Biblical 

Archaeology. 

Acting Professor of Pastoral Theology. 



Instructor in Pulpit Oratory. 



PROFESSOR EMERITUS. 
J. G. Carson, D. D., LL.D. 



OFFICERS OF THE FACULTY. 

President, Joseph Kyle, D. D., LL.D. 
Secretary, J. H. Webster, D. D. 
Registrar, Jesse Johnson, D. D. 
Librarian, J. E. Wishart, D. D. 



XENIA THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 



THE REGISTER OF STUDENTS FOR THE 
YEAR 1920-1921. 



CANDIDATES FOR THE DEGREE OF BACHELOR OF DIVINITY. 

Name Residence 

David Lawrence Ferguson .-...Xenia, Ohio. 

V Rev. Thomas Bradley Mather Kirkwood, Mo. 



THE SENIOR CLASS. 



( 



Name and Residence 


College 


Presbytery 


David Lawrence Ferguson, 


Muskingum 


Xenia 


Xenia, Ohio. 






Paul Edwin Ferguson, 


Monmouth 


Xenia 


Xenia, Ohio. 






John Merle Rife, i 


Cedarville 


Xenia 


Cedarville, Ohio. 






Bonner Dale White, 


Erskine 


Xenia 


Chester, S. C. 






THE 


MIDDLE CLASS. 




Name and Residence 


College 


Presbytery 


John Milford Baird, 


Tarkio 


College Springs 


Allerton, Iowa. 






Clinton Radford Beach, 


Hamilton 


Geneva 


Seneca Falls, N. Y. 




(Pres. Church) 


Edward Everett Grice, 


Muskingum 


Northern 


Frankfort, Ind. 




Indiana 


Homer Austin Kent, 


Los Angeles 


The Brethren &*■ 


Long Beach, Calif. 


Bible Institute 




Earl Collins McConnelee, 


Muskingum 


Xenia 


Xenia, Ohio. 






Cornelius Clark McNary, 


Muskingum 


Chartiers \^ 



VU2^ 



Canonsburg, Pa. 



10 



XENIA THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 



THE REGISTER OF STUDENTS FOR THE YEAR 1920-1921— 
Continued. 



THE MIDDLE CLASS— Continued. 



Name and Residence 

y Cecil Plumb, 

Malone, N. Y. 
- Herbert Henry Tay, 

Long Beach, Calif. 
— - Walter Vail Watson, 

Scranton, Pa. 
\/ Scott Withrow, 

Tarkio, Mo. 



College 

Middleburgh 

Salt Lake 

High School 
Scranton 

High School 
Tarkio 



Presbytery 

Champlain 

(Pres. Church) 
The Brethren 

Lackawanna 
(Pres. Church) 

College Springs 



JUNIOR CLASS. 
Name and Residence College 

\f Ernest Everett Beattie, Tarkio 

Shannon City, Iowa. 
John Moore Findley Brown, Tarkio 
Tarkio, Mo. 
\/ Andrew Walker Gordon, Muskingum 

St. Louis, Mo. 
James Robert Lee, •. .Tarkio 

North Bend, Neb. 
— . James Sylvester Wagner, Camp Creek 
Greeneville, Tenn. High School 



Presbytery 

College Springs 

College Springs 

Xenia 

Omaha 

Southern 
Illinois 



SPECIAL STUDENTS. 

•Nelson E. Aregood St. Louis, Mo. 

Rev. Walter Barlow Lenox, la. 

. . Rev. John M. Gunson . Birmingham, England 

- — John L. Jordan St. Louis, Mo. 

Paul L. Reed St. Louis, Mo. 

— Percy L. Yett Long Beach, Calif. 



XENIA THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 11 



OUTLINE OF STUDY FOR THE SESSION OF 
1921-1922. 



SYSTEMATIC THEOLOGY. 
PROFESSOR JOSEPH KYLE. 

Required Courses. 

1. Systematic Theology is studied throughout the entire 
course of seminary training, two recitations a week with exam- 
inations in December and April being required. According to the 
present arrangement of the studies in this department the second 
division of the course will occupy the attention of the students 
of all the classes during the session. This embraces chapters 
XII-XXVII of Hodge's Outlines of Theology, which is the text- 
book used. - 

Supplemental lectures will be given on topics that seem to 
require additional treatment. 

Elective Courses. 

2. The Inspiration of the Scriptures. (Major.) 

3. The Person of Christ. (Major.) 

4. The Doctrine of Sin. (Minor.) 

5. The Atonement. (Major.) 

6. The Second Advent. (Minor.) 

HOMILETICS. 
PROFESSOR JOSEPH KYLE. 

1. The Junior Class will devote one recitation period a week 
throughout the session to the general principles of sermonizing 
and preaching as these are outlined in the text-book employed : 
viz., "The Preparation and Delivery of Sermons," by Professor 
Broadus. 

2. The students of all the classes will be exercised in the 
criticism of published discourses of acknowledged merit, in the 
analysis of texts and in the presentation of outlines of sermons 
for examination and correction in the class-room. One hour a 
week throughout the seminary course is devoted to this discipline. 



12 XENIA THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

3. All the students have in turn the advantage of the weekly 
presentation of discourses before the Faculty. One such exercise 
is required of each senior, and two of each middler and junior, 
during the session. Friendly criticism of the work by fellow 
students is encouraged. 

HISTORY OF CHRISTIAN DOCTRINE. 
PROFESSOR JOSEPH KYLE. 

The Middle Class will study the first volume of Shedd's 
History of Christian Doctrine, and the Senior Class will study 
the second volume of the same work. One recitation a week is 
required. 

CHURCH GOVERNMENT AND WORSHIP. 
PROFESSOR JOSEPH KYLE. 

During the latter half of the session the Senior Class will 
give one hour a week to the examination of "The Book of 
Government and Worship" of the United Presbyterian Church, 
and the Middle Class will take up such subjects in the same book 
as will be necessary to their preparation for licensure. The 
distinctive Testimony of the United Presbyterian Church will 
also be reviewed. 

COMPARATIVE RELIGION. 
PROFESSOR JOSEPH KYLE. 

The Senior Class will receive a course of training in Com- 
parative Religion with special reference to conditions that pre- 
vail in our Foreign Mission fields. 

The Handbook of Comparative Religion by the Rev. S. H. 
Kellogg, D. D., LL.D., will be used to mark out the line of study 
to be pursued. 

CHURCH HISTORY. 
PROFESSOR JESSE JOHNSON. 

Required Courses. 

Junior Class. — Two hours a week throughout the year. Out- 
line study of the history of the Church to the birth of Luther, 
1483. 

Middle Class. — Two hours a week throughout the year. The 
Protestant Reformation and the Roman Catholic reaction, to the 



XENIA THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 13 

Peace of Westphalia, 1648. As part of the work of this year, 
there will be required of United Presbyterian students a study 
of the Westminster Assembly and of the Testimony of the United 
Presbyterian Church. The work just mentioned may be taken 
by students of other churches if they desire. 

Senior Class. — Two hours a week throughout the year. Out- 
line study of the history of the Church from 1648 to the present 
time. A review of Modern Missions. The churches at the 
present time, especially in the United States. 

The work in Church History is done by means of text-books, 
lectures on important events and movements, library readings and 
students' reports on assigned topics. 



Elective Courses. 

1. Studies in the lives and writings of the early Church 
Fathers. Open to those who have studied General Church History 
to 590 A. D. (Minor.) 

2. Early doctrinal discussions. Open to those who have 
studied General Church History to 1483 A. D. (Major.) 

3. The Era of the Reformation. Open to those who have 
studied General Church History to 1483 A. D., and who have a 
knowledge of the Protestant Reformation in outline. (Major.) 

4. Origin and history of the United Presbyterian Church 
of North America. A prerequisite to this is a fair knowledge 
of the history of the Reformation in Scotland. (Minor.) 

5. The rise, culmination, decline and present state of the 
Papal power. Open to those who have studied General Church 
History to 1648 A. D. (Minor.) 



APOLOGETICS. 

Seniors and Middlers meeting as one class two hours a week 
during the second semester. The subject for 1921-1922 will be 
the Evidences of Christianity. Toward the close of the year 
some subject of present-day debate will be taken up for brief 
consideration. 



14 XENIA THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

OLD TESTAMENT DEPARTMENT. 
PROFESSOR J. E. WISHART. 

Required Courses. 

1. The Hebrew Language. Open to Juniors. The study of 
the principles of Hebrew Grammar, the acquiring of a working 
vocabulary, and the reading of the first eight chapters of Genesis, 
and of a portion of some one of the historical books. The text- 
books are Harper's Hebrew Grammar, and Harper's Hebrew 
Method and Manual. 

2. Hebrew Exegesis. The Major Prophets. The interpreta- 
tion of selected chapters, with special reference to contemporary 
history. Two hours a week on alternate years. Open to the 
Middlers and Seniors. 1922-23. 

3. Hebrew Exegesis. The Minor Prophets and the Psalms. 
The interpretation of selected portions, with special reference to 
contemporary history, and some study of Hebrew poetry and 
other points bearing on the Psalter. Two hours a week on alter- 
nate years. Open to Middlers and Seniors. 1921-22. 

4. Introduction to the Hebrew Bible. A study of the origin 
and transmission of the Old Testament scriptures, on the basis 
of Geden's Introduction to the Hebrew Bible. One hour a week, 
during the second semester. Open to Juniors. 

5. Introduction to the literature of the Old Testament. A 
study of some of the more advanced problems of criticism, such 
as the unity, authorship, date and historical setting of different 
sections of the Old Testament ; usually on the basis of a suitable 
text-book. One hour a week, on alternate years. Open to Mid- 
dlers and Seniors. 1921-22. 

6. The Geography of Palestine. On the basis of The His- 
torical Geography of the Holy Land, by Sir George Adam Smith. 
One hour a week on alternate years. Open to Middlers and 
Seniors. 1922-23. 

Elective Courses. 

7. Biblical Aramaic. A study of the elements of the lan- 
guage and the reading of the Aramaic sections of the Old Testa- 
ment. The text-book is Marti's Biblisch-Aramaeische Grammatik. 
Open to Middlers and Seniors. (Minor.) 

8. The Septuagint. The reading of selected portions of the 
Old Testament in Greek, comparing with the Hebrew and with 



XENIA THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 15 

other versions ; and the study of the origin and the problems of 
the Septuagint, on the basis of Swete's "Introduction to the Old 
Testament in Greek." Open to Middlers and Seniors. (Major.) 

9. The Minor Prophets. In English. An analysis and a 
study of the historical setting, the meaning, and the lessons of 
each book. The chief commentaries recommended are The Ex- 
positor's Bible, The New Century Bible, and the Cambridge 
Bible. Open to Middlers and Seniors. (Minor.) 

10. The Wisdom Literature of the Old Testament. In 
English. An analysis and a study of the historical setting, the 
meaning, and the lessons of Job, Proverbs, Ecclesiastes, and The 
Song of Songs. On the basis chiefly of The Expositor's Bible, 
the Cambridge Bible, and The New Century Bible. Open to Mid- 
dlers and Seniors. (Minor.) 

11. Extra-Canonical Jewish Literature from 200 B. C. to 
100 A. D. A study of the books contained in Charles' "Apocrypha 
and Pseudepigrapha" and some selections from Philo and 
Josephus. Open to Middlers and Seniors. (Major.) 

CHRISTIAN SOCIOLOGY. 
PROFESSOR J. E. WISHART. 

Required Courses. 

1. A study of the sociological implications and applications 
of the gospel. Usually a text-book is employed, and each mem- 
ber of the class is assigned some book for review. One hour a 
week. Open to Seniors. 

GREEK EXIGESIS. 
PROFESSOR J. H. WEBSTER. 

Required Courses. 

1. The Junior Class will read the Gospel according to John 
and the Pastoral Epistles. 

Attention will be given to sight reading and the grammar of 
New Testament Greek. 

Green's Hand-Book to the Grammar of New Testament Greek 
will be used. 

2. The Middle Class will study The Acts and Hebrews. 

3. The Senior Class will study Galatians, Romans, Ephe- 
sians and other selected portions of the Greek New Testament. 



16 XENIA THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 



NEW TESTAMENT LITERATURE. 
PROFESSOR J. H. WEBSTER. 

4. In New Testament Literature, the Gospels will be studied. 
This course will embrace the genuineness, authenticity and design 
of each book with a full analysis of its contents. The basis of 
study will be Kerr's introduction to the Study of the Books of 
the New Testament. The History of Textual Criticism will re- 
ceive due attention. 

Elective Courses. 

5. New Testament Introduction. (Major 240.) 

6. The Epistle to the Hebrews. (Minor 120.) 

7. The Johannine Writings. (Major 240.) 

8. The Pastoral Epistles. (Minor 120.) 

BIBLICAL THEOLOGY AND BIBLICAL ARCHAEOLOGY. 
PROFESSOR M. G. KYLE. 

Work in this Department has a two-fold purpose ; to know 
the Progress of Revelation and to know it in its Setting; so there 
are Studies in the Progress of Revelation to acquire a compre- 
hensive grasp of what the Bible teaches as a whole and in its 
various parts in the order of Revelation, together with the Study 
of the Historical Setting of Scripture made known through Arch- 
aeological Research, in order to see the truths of Revelation as 
those saw them to whom they were revealed. 

Biblical Theology. 

PROFESSOR M. G. KYLE. 

Required Courses. 

There are class-room studies and quizzes through which the 
student discovers for himself the plan and progress of Revela- 
tion ; also theses by all the students, together with assigned library 
research work. The Bible is the only text-book used, the English 
Bible for constant work and the Hebrew and Septuagint Old 
Testament and the Greek New Testament for reference. 

1. The whole course covers the Patriarchal Period, the 
Tribal Period, the National Period, the Messianic Period, and the 
Apostolic Period. This year, the work will cover the Tribal 
Period from the Descent into Egypt to the Conquest of Canaan. 



XENIA THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 17 

Principal subjects: God in the Burning Bush; The Judg- 
ments upon Egypt ; The Exodus ; The Pilgrimage to the Promised 
Land ; Revelation at Sinai ; The Pentateuchal Problem. , 

Elective Courses. 

2. Study of Biblical Methods. (Major, 240; Minor, 120.) 

3. Prophetism and Prophecy. (Major, 240; Minor, 120.) 

4. Book Study. (Major, 240; Minor, 120.) 

Biblical Archaeology. 

PROFESSOR M. G. KYLE. 

Required Courses. 

There are lectures from the Monuments and from first- 
hand research, so arranged with the studies in Biblical Theology 
as to enable the student constantly to see the Biblical story in its 
original setting. It follows thus the same order of Periods as 
Biblical Theology. (See above.) To this are added quizzes, much 
library work and an assigned reading course throughout the 
year. * 

1. All classes this year will study the Tribal Period. 
Principal subjects: The Pharoah that "knew not Joseph;" 

Moses and Emancipation ; The Times of the Exodus ; Wandering 
in the Wilderness ; The Tabernacle and its Furniture ; Egyptian 
Sacrifices and the Mosaic Ceremonial ; Beginnings of Hebrew 
Literature ; Archaelogical evidence for the Pentateuch in Mosaic 
Times. 

Junior Class. — Some introductory lectures will be given the 
Junior Class to prepare them for a proper understanding of the 
work in the general course. 

2. Middle Class. — The Middle Class will be directed in re- 
search work and the preparation of theses utilizing archaeological 
material in Exegesis and for sermon illustrations. 

3. Senior Class. — A special course of lectures is given the 
Senior Class on the Canons and Fallacies of Research. A special 
graduating thesis is required of each member of the Senior Class 
upon an assigned subject. 

Public research lectures are given each year out of the re- 
search work of the professor in charge of the department. Three 
lectures fully illustrated, and other subjects to be announced at 
the beginning of the term. 



IS XENIA THEOLOGICAL. SEMINARY 

Elective Courses. 
ARCHAEOLOGY. 

4. Archaeology of the Bible, especially Archaeological Ma- 
terial for Homiletical Uses. (Major, 240; Minor, 120.) 

5. Methods of Archaeological Research, Canons and Falla- 
cies. (Major, 240 — by residence only.) 

6. Archaeology and Criticism. (Major, 240; Minor, 120.) 

PASTORAL THEOLOGY. 
PROFESSOR M. G. KYLE. 

Required Courses. 

Instruction in Pastoral Theology is by means of studies, 
quizzes, lectures and practical exercises for each class separately, 
together with practical training for all classes in the problems of 
personal effort in soul saving. 

Junior Class. 
The Minister as a Student. 

1. Subjects: 

(1) The Call to the Ministry; Scripture Warrant, Psycho- 
logical Basis ; Essential Elements. 

(2) Habits: Personal Habits, Study Habits, Devotional 
Habits. 

(3) Ministerial Manliness. 

(4) Ministerial Ideals. 

(5) Keeping One's Self. 

(6) Settlement, Candidating, Installation. 

Middle Class. 
The Minister as a Pastor in the Congregation. 

2. Subjects: 

(1) The Pastor in the Pulpit. 

(2) The Problems of the Ministerial Life. 

(3) A Study of Methods : Social Methods, Business Meth- 
ods, Spiritual Methods. 

(4) The Pastor in the Sabbath School : Methods and Ideals. 

(5) The Pastor in the Prayer-services: Congregational 
Prayer-meeting, Young People's Meetings, Prayer Circles. 



XENIA THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 19 

Senior Class. 
The Minister as a Pastor in the Larger Relations to the Church and the 

Community. 

3. Subjects : 

(1) Pastoral Evangelism. 

(2) Sociological Problems: City Life Problems, Country 

Life Problems, The Institutional Church. 

(3) The Ministry of Sympathy: Pastoral Visiting, the 
Pastor as Counsellor. 

(4) The Pastor in the Benevolences of the Church. 

(5) Ecclesiastical Relations. 

SABBATH SCHOOL PEDAGOGY AND PRACTICAL EVANGELISM. 

4. Instruction in that division of Practical Theology which 
in modern usage is styled "Religious Education" has been estab- 
lished and now has place in the regular schedule of recitations 
this year as extra curriculum work for the Junior Class. This 
includes instruction in plans of organization and administration 
of the Sabbath School, and practical exemplification and applica- 
tion of the best methods of evangelism. 

Elective Courses. 
PASTORAL EVANGELISM. 

1. Scriptural Basis. (Minor, 30.) 

2. Psychological Problems. (Minor, 90.) 

3. Sociological Problems. (Minor, 60.) 

4. A Study of Methods. (Minor, 30 — by residence only.) 

THE DEGREE OF BACHELOR OF DIVINITY. 

Students of this Seminary who hold from an institution 
approved by the Faculty the degree of Bachelor or Master of 
Arts, or other certificate of the completion of an equivalent course 
in liberal learning, may become candidates for the degree of 
Bachelor of Divinity. The degree may also be conferred upon 
such students when they have completed, either in this Seminary 
or any approved school of theology, the several courses of theo- 
logical study that constitute the curriculum of this Seminary, 
after they shall have accomplished satisfactorily a one year's 
course of Extra-Curriculum study at this Seminary. This course 



20 XENIA THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

of study shall be arranged, and the examinations shall be con- 
ducted by the Faculty. Undergraduates in the Seminary who 
maintain an average grade of 85, with no department less than 
80, may take one-third of the course for degree of Bachelor of 
Divinity each year. 

REGULATIONS. 

I. Every applicant must have taken a course of liberal 
learning, as above defined, and have satisfactorily completed a 
three years' course of theological study in an approved theo- 
logical institution, or be pursuing a course with a view to gradua- 
tion in this Seminary. 

II. The equivalent of at least twelve hours of class-room 
work a week for one Seminary year is required. 

Examinations shall be held on these studies, as on the studies 
of the undergraduate courses. 

III. In case it is impossible for the candidate for this degree 
to be in residence, the work may be done by correspondence, for 
which a fee sufficient to cover the necessary expense will be 
charged, but his personal presence will be required for examina- 
tion on all studies pursued, except in extraordinary cases. 

IV. On the fulfilment of these conditions the degree will 
be conferred upon the candidate at the ensuing annual com- 
mencement. 

V. Examinations and theses must be completed by April 15. 

VI. The courses of study required for this degree will be 
varied from time to time according to the decision of the Faculty. 

For the session of 1921-1922 those which will be required 
may be chosen from the lists of electives in the various depart- 
ments. 

ORATORY. 

Instruction in oratory will be given during the second semes- 
ter by a competent instructor. 



XENIA THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 21 



FELLOWSHIPS AND SPECIAL 
OPPORTUNITIES. 



Xenia Seminary is one of the group of Universities, Colleges 
and Theological Seminaries in this country co-operating in the 
support and control of the American School of Oriental Research 
in Jerusalem and is thus able to offer to her students the unique 
facilities afforded by this School. No other Post-graduate work 
is, or can be, so helpful, as none other is so attractive, to young 
men looking forward to the work of the Ministry, as study and 
research in Bible lands. The American School of Oriental Re- 
search at Jerusalem was founded to afford such opportunities as 
have never before been open to American students. Special 
arrangements are made to reduce the expenses of such students 
to the lowest point. 

ADMISSION TO THE SCHOOL AT JERUSALEM. 

The School offers, to properly qualified students excellent 
opportunities for pursuing such studies as the following: Biblical 
and Palestinian Archaeology; the Geography and Natural Fea- 
tures of the Land ; the History of Israel ; Early Church History 
and Patristics ; the Arabic Language, and the other Semitic Lan- 
guages as connected with it ; Mohammedanism ; the Political, 
Social and Industrial Conditions in the Turkish Empire ; Roman 
Administration and Colonization in the East ; the Crusades ; and 
the Comparative History of Religions. 

The School has a well selected working library, which is 
steadily growing. There are other considerable libraries in Jeru- 
salem, some of which contain large collections of manuscripts, 
chiefly Greek and Arabic. As a central point for the study of 
Palestinian antiquities, for making tours of research and explora- 
tion, and for visiting the numerous scenes of past or present 
excavations, Jerusalem is peculiarly well situated. 

Those who avail themselves of the privileges of this School 
can go at once after the Commencement at St. Louis, and enter 
the School at Jerusalem. The altitude and the latitude of Jeru- 



22 XENIA THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

salem make the summer climate there quite satisfactory. The 
remainder of the year will afford abundant opportunity for travel 
through the land and researches in Historical Geography and 
Archaeology. 

% 
THE THAYER MEMORIAL FELLOWSHIP. 

The Thayer Memorial Fellowship of the School at Jerusalem, 
with a stipend of $800, is awarded annually on examination. A 
list of the books recommended to candidates for the Fellowship, 
and special facilities for preparation will be supplied by the 
Seminary. 

FELLOWSHIP FOR POST-GRADUATE STUDY IN BIBLE LANDS. 

"A Friend of the Seminary" has offered to the class enter- 
ing the Seminary at the beginning of the term in September, 
1919, as Juniors, a fellowship for post-graduate study in Bible 
lands. The amount is one thousand dollars. The competition 
will be for the three years of the seminary course and cover all 
departments of the whole course. The fellowship will be awarded 
to the one having the highest average grade for the whole course 
among those who have an average grade of not less than 90 in 
the Departments of Biblical Theology and Biblical Archaeology, 
Old Testament Language and Literature, and New Testament 
Language and Literature. The grade will include also* attend- 
ance at all classes and public exercises at which the roll is called. 
Entering after the beginning or leaving before the end of the 
term will be accounted absences. But absence on account of 
sickness or preaching outside of the city, if excused in each 
instance, will not be counted against one in the competition. 

The one to whom the fellowship is awarded must engage to 
use the money in study in Bible lands under the direction of the 
Faculty of the Seminary within two years from the time of 
graduation, failing in which, the fellowship will be awarded to 
the next student on the list. 

OTHER FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE. 

Members of the Junior Class will receive the sum of fifty 
dollars each on condition of their engaging in religious work in 
the churches of this community, or in adjacent fields. 



XENIA THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 23 

From a fund gathered from private sources and placed at the 
disposal of the Faculty additional aid will be granted as there 
may be need to any whose work in the class-room is of standard 
character. 

Prizes for a sermon contest, open to students of the Middle 
Class, have been provided through the generosity of Mr. Zenas 
McCoy, of Loveland, Colorado. 

COURSES FOR LAY-WORKERS. 

Students not candidates for the ministry, but seeking train- 
ing for general Christian work or for positions as Biblical in- 
structors in schools and colleges,, may select courses of study for 
one, two or three years. Such students will be accorded all the 
privileges of the institution, and every effort will be made to 
meet their requirements. 

This opportunity will be especially advantageous to those 
who propose io be medical missionaries and wish to pursue their 
studies in the Medical Department of Washington University. 



24 XENIA THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 



HISTORICAL SKETCH. 



Owing to the various unions and consolidations of theological 
seminaries that have been effected in the history of our church, 
both before and after the year 1858, whence is dated the assump- 
tion of her distinctive ecclesiastical title, the Xenia Theological 
Seminary is in a peculiar sense a United Presbyterian- school of 
the prophets. She is the lineal descendant of the three Associate 
Presbyterian seminaries, or rather, of the seminary that had 
three local habitations; and she holds also the honorable heritage 
received from the Associate Reformed Presbyterian seminary, 
which was first located at Oxford, Ohio, and later was removed 
to Monmouth, Illinois. 



I. THE ASSOCIATE SEMINARY AT SERVICE. 

When the Rev. John Anderson, D. D., was appointed profes- 
sor of theology for the Associate Church, April 21, 1794, the 
history of the Xenia Theological Seminary began. In the woods 
near to his own pioneer home Dr. Anderson built a log cabin, 
and there for a full quarter of a century he was the sole instructor 
of the young men who were preparing for the ministry of that 
church. This historic site has been marked by the erection of a 
memorial stone which was dedicated with appropriate ceremony 
on the twenty-second day of June, 1916. 



II. THE ASSOCIATE SEMINARY AT PHILADELPHIA. 

Following the resignation of Dr. Anderson, in 1819, the 
Associate Synod appointed the Rev. John Banks, D. D., to the 
work of training her candidates for the ministry. A second semi- 
nary was opened in Philadelphia, the home of Dr. Banks, and 
was conducted by him without assistance until his death, which 
occurred April 10, 1826. In the meantime the original seminary 
had been transferred to Canonsburg, Pa., and on the death of 
Dr. Banks the work was consolidated at that place. 



XENIA THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 25 

III. THE ASSOCIATE SEMINARY AT CANONSBURG. 

The Service Seminary continued to hold the field in the 
West until the election of the Rev. James Ramsey, of Canons- 
burg, Pa., in 1821, to fill the vacancy occasioned by the resigna- 
tion of Dr. Anderson. In this case, as was the rule in those days, 
the professor was the seminary ; and the parsonage, located on a 
farm one mile from the town, became the resort of the young 
candidates for the ministry. 

While the action of the Associate Synod uniting the two 
divisions of the seminary was taken in 1828, it was not fully 
carried out until 1830, when it was resolved to erect a building 
in the town and to consummate the purpose by the election of 
Dr. Ramsey to the professorship of the reunited branches. Here 
for a full generation, 1821-1855, the seminary had its home. In 
the year 1833 a new departure was taken in the establishment of 
a professorship of Biblical Literature and Church History. The 
Rev. David Carson, of Blount County, Tenn., was selected to 
occupy this chair; but just before the opening of the seminary, 
on September 23, 1834, he finished his work on earth. His son, 
the Rev. James G. Carson, D. D., Professor-Emeritus of the 
Xenia Theological Seminary, is the one surviving graduate of 
Canonsburg Seminary, in the United Presbyterian Church. 



IV. THE ASSOCIATE SEMINARY AT XENIA. 

The Rev. Abraham Anderson, D. D., who had filled the pro- 
fessorship of Didactic and Polemic Theology for eight years, 
died on the 8th of May, 1855. The Synod met a few weeks later 
and the Rev. Samuel Wilson, D. D., pastor of the Associate con- 
gregation of Xenia, Ohio, was elected to the vacant position. 
Again the seminary came to the professor, the Synod deciding 
upon removal to Xenia. The one remaining member of the 
Canonsburg faculty, the Rev. Thomas Beveridge, D. D., had been 
pastor of the Xenia congregation for a little more than three 
years, 1821-1824; hence the old school of the prophets had a 
double welcome to its new home, since it had come to the com- 
munity in which the Associate Church of the West had its first 
establishment and had for its instructors men so loved and hon- 
ored by the people. 



26 XENIA THEOLOGICAL SEMIN ARY 

V. THE ASSOCIATE REFORMED SEMINARY AT OXFORD. 

The founding of the Oxford Seminary dates from the meet- 
ing of the Associate Reformed Synod in the month of October, 
1837; but the opening of the first session was delayed for two 
years. The Rev. Joseph Claybaugh, D. D., was practically the 
sole professor from the date of the opening until his death, 
September 9, 1855. The Rev. Alexander Young, D. D., was 
chosen to succeed Dr. Claybaugh, and entered upon his duties in 
the fall of 1855. At the meeting of Synod in 1857 action was 
taken, in view of the prospect for union with the Associate 
Church, transferring the seminary from Oxford, Ohio, to Mon- 
mouth, Illinois, in order that one of the four seminaries of the 
united church might be located in the West. 

VI. THE UNITED PRESBYTERIAN SEMINARY AT MONMOUTH. 

Monmouth Seminary opened about the first of September, 
1858, as a United Presbyterian seminary, under the care of Pro- 
fessors Alexander Young, D. D., and John Scott, D. D., and 
continued the work of training ministers until the fall of 1874, 
when it was transferred to Xenia, Ohio, and united with the 
seminary located there. Dr. Young retired from his connection 
with the seminary at the time of its transfer, but Dr. Scott was 
recognized as professor emeritus until his death, in 1877. 

VII. THE UNITED PRESBYTERIAN SEMINARY AT XENIA. 

With few exceptions the supporters of Xenia Seminary en- 
tered the union of 1858, which gave to the institution its second 
title, as it appears on its charter : "The United Presbyterian 
Seminary of Xenia, Ohio." 

Soon after this union of blessed memory and issue, the 
faculty of the seminary was strengthened by the election of the 
Rev. Joseph Clokey, D. D., then pastor of the Springfield, Ohio, 
congregation, to the Chair of Pastoral Theology and Sacred 
Rhetoric. Dr. Clokey had been a leader in the Associate Re- 
formed Presbyterian Church, and his election was a testimony 
to the seminary's whole-hearted entrance into the union of the 
two churches. The war between the states, 1861-1865, seriously 
interfered with the work of the seminary in the way of lessening 










MAIN ENTRANCE TO WASHINGTON UNIVERSITY. 



XENIA THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 27 

the attendance of students; but the sessions opened and closed 
without interruption as in the days of peace. • 

Following the transfer of the interests of Monmouth Semi- 
nary to Xenia, the seminary came under the control of the synods 
of Illinois, Iowa, and Kansas, in addition to that of the Second 
Synod. The synod of Nebraska, on its organization, also became 
one of the governing bodies. 



VIII. THE UNITED PRESBYTERIAN SEMINARY AT ST. LOUIS. 

At a special meeting of the Board of Managers, held on 
December 3, 1919, it was decided that the seminary should be 
removed to a new location, and a commission consisting of a 
minister and an elder from each of the five Synods which con- 
trol the institution, was appointed to select the site. This com- 
mission held several meetings and carefully canvassed the situa- 
tion, certain of their number visiting the places that were con- 
sidered most advantageous. After mature deliberation the com- 
mission fixed upon the city of St. Louis as the future home of the 
Seminary. This decision of the Commission was unanimously 
approved by the Board and by the Synods. 



WASHINGTON UNIVERSITY. 

One of the chief considerations which induced the Commis- 
sion of the Board of Managers, charged with the relocation of 
Xenia Theological Seminary, to fix upon the city of St. Louis, 
was the extremely favorable university connection that was 
offered. Washington University is an old and honored founda- 
tion, with a magnificent set of buildings, and is regarded as the 
greatest graduate school of the whole Southwest. Xenia's new 
location is within a few minutes' walk of its grounds. Through 
the courtesy of the Chancellor and the other authorities, a full 
exchange of credits has been granted, without any control of our 
teachings or policies. So short is the distance that those wishing 
to complete their academic course or to work for an advanced 
degree, can do so without inconvenience or loss of time. The 
advantages of this affiliation will, it is thought, be very great. 



28 XENIA THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

OPPORTUNITIES FOR WORK. 

The Seminary has received a most warm and hearty welcome 
in the city of St. Louis. So great a center of population, of 
course, offers an excellent field for Christian effort and for socio- 
logical study. It also affords great advantages in the matter of 
employment for those who must make their own way. The 
churches are most enthusiastic in pledging co-operation and sup- 
port. Such support was, of course, expected from the United 
Presbyterian congregations, and it is being given in full measure. 
But other denominations, especially the Presbyterians, U. S., The 
Presbyterians U. S. A., the Congregationalists, and the Method- 
ists, have assumed a most sympathetic attitude, have yielded the 
field to us with assurance of their best wishes and their patron- 
age, and in some cases propose to employ the students of the 
Seminary in congregational work. 

During the one hundred and twenty-seven years of the semi- 
nary's history, under various names and in different localities, 
in all twenty-nine men have served as instructors for more or less 
extended periods of time. The roll of professors is as follows : 

Name Seminary Period of Service 

John Anderson Service 1794-1819 

John Banks Philadelphia 1820-1826 

James Ramsey Canonsburg 1821-1842 

David Carson Canonsburg 1834-1834 

Thomas Beveridge Canonsburg 1835-1855 

Thomas Beveridge Xenia 1855-1871 

Joseph Claybaugh Oxford 1839-1855 

Samuel W. McCracken Oxford 1839-1840 

James Martin Canonsburg 1842-1846 

Abraham Anderson Canonsburg 1847-1855 

Samuel Wilson Xenia 1855-1875 

William Davidson Oxford 1855-1858 

Alexander Young Oxford 1855-1857 

Alexander Young Monmouth 1858-1874 

John Scott : Monmouth 1858-1874 

Joseph Clokey Xenia 1858-1873 

Andrew M. Black Monmouth 1864-1874 

David A. Wallace Monmouth 1867-1870 

David A. Wallace ...Xenia 1883-1883 



XENIA THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 29 

Name Seminary Period of Service 

William Bruce '....Xenia 1871-1880 

James G. Carson Xenia 1873-1888 

William G. Moorehead Xenia 1873-1914 

Jackson B. McMichael Xenia 1873-1878 

James Harper Xenia 1879-1899 

David MacDill Xenia 1884-1902 

Wilbert W. White Xenia 1889-1894 

John D. Irons Xenia 1895-1905 

Joseph Kyle Xenia 1899 

Jesse Johnson Xenia 1902 

John E. Wishart Xenia 1905 

John H. Webster Xenia 1908 

Melvin G. Kyle Xenia 1914 

Since the beginning of the present century Xenia Seminary 
has trained for the Church of Jesus Christ one hundred and 
ninety-four ministers, of which number one hundred and seventy- 
seven have been students of theology of the United Presbyterian 
Church. , 

A recent count furnished evidence that Xenia's graduates 
constitute thirty-six and one-half per cent, of the ministry of the 
United Presbyterian Church at the present time, not reckoning 
the native ministers of India and Egypt ; and that a similar pro- 
portion holds among the missionaries in the foreign work. At 
least ten seminaries are represented in the remaining sixty-three 
and one-half per cent. In the same study it was discovered that 
one-half of the United Presbyterian ministers west of Pennsyl- 
vania to the Pacific coast had been students of Xenia Seminary. 



30 XENIA THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 



GENERAL INFORMATION. 



STUDENTS. 

Persons wishing to enter the Seminary shall present to the 
Faculty satisfactory evidence of church membership and piety; 
and students of the United Presbyterian Church shall be under 
the care of some Presbytery before entering the Seminary, or 
as soon thereafter as possible. The Faculty will admit, at their 
discretion, students of other denominations. 

Before being admitted to the Seminary, every student shall, 
in the presence of the Faculty, subscribe to a written declara- 
tion to the effect that while he is a student in the Seminary he 
will regularly, punctually and diligently attend upon all the in- 
structions of the Professors and promptly comply with all lawful 
requisitions of the Faculty, and be subject to their authority; 
that he will honestly conform to all regulations of the Seminary 
and that he will not propagate any opinion in opposition to the 
principles of the United Presbyterian Church. 

Every student who has been accepted by the Faculty as a 
candidate for graduation, and who has completed the prescribed 
course of study and passed the required examinations, shall be 
publicly graduated and receive a proper diploma. 



THE LIBRARY. 

The number of volumes in the library is about 15,000. The 
books have been thoroughly classified and the library thus made 
readily available to the students for preparation for class-room 
and for investigations upon any subject. 

Through the generosity of the late Mr. Alexander Dempster, 
of Pittsburgh, Pa., the Seminary has been provided with the 
raised map of Palestine published by the Palestine Exploration 
Fund, London, England, from surveys made by George Arm- 
strong. This map is very valuable in the study of Sacred Geog- 
raphy and History. 



XENIA THEOLOGICAL, SEMINARY 31 

THE TAGGART LIBRARY. 

A very important addition to our library has been made 
through a generous donation on the part, of the. owner and pur- 
chase on the part of the Seminary of a large portion of the library 
of the Reverend R. B. Taggart, D. D., of Morganton, North 
Carolina. Dr. Taggart has succeeded in getting together one of 
the largest and finest collections of works on The Psalms to be 
found in any library. Among these is a very rare and valuable 
copy of the Huguenot Psalter. Very few copies of this splendid 
French Psalter are in existence. The Seminary has profited to 
the full by the success of Dr. Taggart, and his kindly interest in 
the welfare of his Alma Mater is greatly appreciated. 

THE MISSIONARY SOCIETY. 

The Students' Missionary Society* meets weekly for prayer 
and conference. The society is connected with the American 
Inter-Seminary. Missionary Alliance. To the good work of this 
organization is largely due the excellent Missionary spirit which 
prevails among the students. It has furnished most commend- 
able supplemental work to that of the class-room on the subject 
of Missions. 

RELIGIOUS EXERCISES. 

A weekly prayer meeting, attended by the Faculty and stu- 
dents, is held every Tuesday. The students also hold group 
prayer meetings in their rooms on three evenings each week. 

TEXT-BOOKS. 

Necessary reference books and commentaries are found in 
the library, and text-books may be obtained on favorable terms. 



EXAMINATIONS. 

At the close of each term examinations are held covering 
the ground gone over in the several departments of study. 

Ordinarily the examinations are written and are directed by 
the professors and by them are reported to the Board. 



32 XENIA THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

From the class standing, the examination and the attendance, 
the grade of the student, based on a scale of 100, is determined, 
and reported to his Presbytery. 

EXPENSES. 

The necessary expenses of a course of theological training 
are reduced to the minimum. There are no "fees" or "rentals" 
for privileges and accommodations. The Seminary dining room 
has been managed most acceptably, and the cost of maintenance 
has amounted to about $25.00 per month to each person. Text- 
books may be procured through the book-store of the Washington 
University or the publishing houses of the various denominations 
represented in the city at the lowest practical cost, and all other 
personal needs may be supplied on favorable terms through the 
great stores and shops of this "Metropolis of the Central West." 

FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE. 

The members of the Junior class who engage in practical 
Christian work, under the direction of the Faculty, will receive 
compensation to the amount of fifty dollars. From the income 
of our Students' Fund we are prepared to loan to those who may 
desire it, the sum of fifty dollars a year, or more in case of real 
need, on their personal notes, without interest for five years from 
date of loan; at the expiration of this period, interest at the rate 
of five per cent, per annum will be charged until payment is 
made. This amount, with funds to which worthy students are 
entitled on proper recommendation to the Board of Education, 
and money which may be earned by themselves, will almost, if 
not altogether, cover the necessary expenses of the Seminary 
session. 

CORRESPONDENCE. 

For catalogues, or any information concerning the work of 
the Seminary, address Professor Joseph Kyle, D. D., President of 
the Faculty, Xenia, Ohio; Professor J. H. Webster, D. D., Sec- 
retary of the Faculty, Xenia, Ohio ; or Professor Jesse Johnson, 
D. D., 5734 Vernon Ave., St. Louis, Mo. Letters relating to the 
endowment and other funds of the Seminary should be addressed 
to Mr. T. Dales Kyle, Xenia, Ohio, the Financial Secretary and 
Treasurer. 



XENIA THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 33 

DONATIONS AND BEQUESTS. 

On account of the low rate of interest, a large amount of 
invested funds is required to meet the expenses. Accordingly 
the Seminary is cordially commended to the liberality of those 
to whom our church and ministry are dear. Appeal is also made 
to those making bequests to remember this institution. Special 
attention is requested to the "Annuity Plan." The form which 
should be carefully followed in making donations according to 
this plan may be found under the heading, "Form of Bequest." 



FORM OF BEQUEST. 



! FOR PERSONAL PROPERTY. 

I hereby give and bequeath to the Xenia United Presbyterian 

Theological Seminary, of St. Louis, Mo., the sum of 

Dollars, or notes or bonds. 

(Here describe them.) 



FOR REAL ESTATE. 

I give and devise to the Xenia United Presbyterian Theo- 
logical Seminary, of St. Louis, Mo., its successors and assigns, 
forever, the following described tract or lot of land, in township 

o f , County o f 

State of , and bounded and described as 

follows. (Here describe the piece of land with such accuracy and 
definiteness that it may certainly be known.) If such devisors 
wish to make bequests to any of the Semirary funds (endowment, 
income or library fund), they should specify the particular fund 
they have in view. 



34 XENIA THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 



FOR ANNUITY BEQUESTS. 

Know all men by these presents : That the Xenia United 
Presbyterian Theological Seminary, St. Louis, Mo., is held and 

firmly bound unto in the 

sum of Dollars, 

to the payment of which it hereby binds itself, its successors and 
assigns. The foregoing obligation is conditioned and limited as 
follows : 

That, Whereas, the said 

has this day made a gift to the said, The Xenia United Presby- 
terian Theological Seminary, of St. Louis, Mo., in the said sum of 

Dollars, 

the receipt of which is hereby acknowledged. 

Now, if the said, The Xenia United Presbyterian Theological 
Seminary, of St. Louis, Mo., its successors, and assigns, shall pay 

or cause to be paid, unto the said 

the sum of 

Dollars annually in :. 

installments, during each and every year 

of the natural life of the said 

and no longer, then this obligation to be void, otherwise to be 
and remain in full force and virtue in law. 



XENIA THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 35 



OPENING AND CLOSING EXERCISES. 



The opening of the next session and the enrollment of stu- 
dents will take place on Wednesday, September 21, 1921, at two 
o'clock p. m., in the Seminary chapel, St. Louis, Mo. 

The opening sermon will be preached on Sabbath, October 2, 

1921, at 7:30 o'clock p. m., by Reverend Professor Jesse Johnson, 
D. D. 

The baccalaureate sermon will be preached on Sabbath, May 
7, 1922, at 7 :30 o'clock p. m., by the Rev. Professor John Hunter 
Webster, D. D. 

The closing exercises will be held Thursday evening, May 11, 

1922. The Annual Address will be delivered by the Rev. John G. 
King, D. D., of Columbus, Ohio. 

Diplomas will be presented and degrees conferred by the 
President of the Faculty. 



36 XBNIA THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 



THE CALENDAR FOR 1921-1922. 



1921. 



September 21, Wednesday, at 2 o'clock p. m. — The opening 
of the session and enrollment of students. 

October 2, Sabbath, at 7 :30 o'clock p. m. — The opening 
sermon. 

December 20-22 — Mid-Term Examinations. 

December 23 — First day of holiday vacation. 



1922. 



January 5 — Recitations begin. 

May A — The written examinations begin. 

May 7, Sabbath, at 8:00 o'clock p. m. — The baccalaureate 
sermon. 

May 9, Tuesday, at 10 o'clock a. m. — The annual meeting 
of the Board of Trustees. 

May 10, Wednesday, at 10 o'clock a. m. — The annual meeting 
of the Board of Managers. Class Theses. 

May 11, Thursday, at 8:00 o'clock p. m— The Annual Ad- 
dress ; the presentation of diplomas and conferring of degrees. 







SERVICE, PA. 1794 

CANONSBURG, PA. 1821 
XENIA, OHIO 1855 

ST. LOUIS, MO. 1920 























Calendar for 1922 


























JANUARY 


FEBRUARY 


MARCH 


APRIL 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T P S 


S M T W T P S 


S M T W T P S 


1 

8 

15 

22 

29 


2 

9 
16 
23 
30 


3 
10 
17 
24 
31 


4 
11 
18 
26 


6 
12 
19 
26 


6 
13 
20 
27 


7 
14 
21 
28 








1 

8 

16 
22 


2 

9 

16 

23 


3 
10 
17 
24 


4 
1 1 
18 
26 








1 

8 

16 

22 

29 


2 

9 

16 

23 

30 


3 
10 
17 
24 

ai 


4 
1 1 
18 
26 














1 

8 
15 
22 
29 


5 
12 
19 
26 


6 
13 
20 
27 


7 
14 
21 
28 


6 
12 
19 
26 


6 
13 
20 
27 


7 
14 
21 
28 


2 

9 

16 

23 

30 


3 

10 
17 
24 


4 
1 1 
18 
25 


6 
12 
19 
26 


6 
13 
20 
27 


7 
14 
21 
28 














MAY 


JUNE 


JULY 


AUGUST 


S M T W T P . S 


S M T W T P S 


S M T W T P S 


S M T W T F S 


"l 
14 
21 
28 


1 

8 

15 

22 

29 


2 

9 

16 

23 

30 


3 
10 
17 
24 
31 


4 
1 1 


5 
12 


6 
13 
20 
27 










1 

8 

16 

22 

29 


2 

9 
16 
23 
30 


3 
10 
17 
24 














1 

8 
15 
22 


6 
13 
20 
27 


7 
14 
21 
28 


1 

8 

16 

22 

29 


2 

9 

16 

23 

30 


3 
10 
17 
24 
31 


4 
11 
18 
25 


6 
12 
19 
26 


4 
11 
18 
25 


5 
12 
19 
26 


6 
13 
20 
27 


7 
14 
21 
28 


2 

9 

16 

23 

30 


3 
10 
17 
24 
31 


4 
11 
18 
25 


5 
12 
19 
26 


6 
13 
20 
•?-r 


7 
14 
21 
28 


18 
25 


19 
26 












SEPTEMBER 


OCTOBER 


NOVEMBER 


DECEMBER 


S M T W T P a 


S M T W T P S 


S M T W T P S 


S M T W' T P S 












1 

8 

16 

22 

29 


2 

9 

16 

23 

30 


1 

8 

16 

22 

29 


2 

9 

16 

23 

30 


3 

10 
17 
24 
31 


4 
11 
18 
26 


5 
12 
19 
26 


6 
13 
20 
27 


7 
14 
21 
28 








1 

8 

15 

22 

29 


2 

9 

16 

23 

30 


3 
10 
17 
24 


4 

1 1 

18 
25 












1 

8 
16 
22 
29 


2 

9 

16 

23 

30 


3 

10 
17 
24 


4 
1 1 
18 
25 


5 
12 
19 
26 


6 
13 
20 
27 


7 
14 
21 
28 


6 
12 
19 
26 


6 

13 
20 
27 


7 
14 
21 
28 


3 
10 
17 
24 
31 


4 
1 1 
18 

25 


5 
12 
19 
26 


6 
13 
20 
27 


7 
14 
21 
28 










Calendar for 1923 


JANUARY 


FEBRUARY 


MARCH 


APRIL 


S M T W T F s 


S M T W T P S 


S M T W T P S 


S M T W T " F S 


"i 

14 
21 
28 


1 

8 

15 

22 

29 


2 

9 
16 
23 
30 


3 
10 
17 
24 
31 


4 
1 1 
18 
25 


6 
12 
19 
26 


6 
13 
20 
27 










1 

8 

15 

22 


2 
9 

1G 
23 


3 
10 
17 
24 


4 
1 1 
18 
25 


6 
12 
19 
26 


6 
13 
20 
27 


7 
14 
21 
28 


1 

8 

16 

22 

29 


2 

9 

16 

23 

30 


3 
10 
17 
24 
31 


1 
8 

15 
22 
29 


2 

9 

16 

23 

30 


3 4 


5 
12 
19 
26 


6 
13 
20 
27 


7 
14 
21 
28 


4 
1 1 
18 

25 


5 
12 
19 
26 


6 
13 
20 
27 


7 
14 
21 
20 


10 
17 
24 


11 
18 
25 


























MAY 


JUNE 


JULY 


AUGUST' 


S M T W T P. S 


S M T W T ' P S 


8 M T W T P S 


8 M T W T F S 


6 

13 
20 
27 


7 
14 
21 
28 


1 

8 
15 
22 
29 


2 

9 

16 

23 

30 


3 
10 
17 
24 
31 


4 
1 1 
18 

25 


5 
12 
19 
28 












1 

8 

15 

22 

29 


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9 

16 

23 

30 




















1 

8 

15 

22 

29 


2 

9 

16 

23 

30 


31 4 
10 1 1 
17|18 
2425 

311... 


3 
10 
17 
24 


4 

1 1 
18 
25 


5 
12 
19 
26 


6 

13 
20 
27 


7 
14 
21 
28 


1 

8 

15 

22 

29 


2 

9 

16 

23 

30 


3 
10 
17 
24 
31 


4 
1 1 
18 
25 


5 
12 
19 
26 


6 
13 
20 
27 


7 
14 
21 
28 


6 6 
12113 
19120 

26 27 


7 
14 
21 
28 


SEPTEMBER 


OCTOBER 


NOVEMBER 


DECEMBER 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T P S 


S M T W T P S 


S M T W T F S 














1 

8 

15 

22 

29 


7 
14 
21 
28 


1 

8 

15 

22 

29 


2 

9 

16 

23 

30 


3 
10 
17 
24 
31 


4 
1 1 
18 
25 


5 
12 
19 
26 


6 
13 
20 
27 










1 

8 

15 

22 

29 


2 

9 

16 

23 

30 


3 
10 
17 
24 














1 

8 
15 
22 
29 


2 

9 

16 

23 

30 


3 
10 
17 
24 


4 
1 1 
18 
25 


5 

12 
19 
26 


6 
13 
20 
27 


7 
14 
21 
28 


4 
1 1 
18 
26 


5 
12 
19 
26 


6 
13 
20 
27 


7 
14 
21 
28 


2 

9 

16 

23 

30 


3 
10 
17 
24 
31 


4 
1 1 
18 
25 


5 
12 
19 
26 


6 
13 
20 
27 


7 
14 
21 
28 









THE ANNUAL CATALOGUE 



OF THE 



Xenia 
Theological Seminary 




OF ST. LOUIS, MISSOURI 



1922 




JOSEPH KYLE, D. D„ L.L..D. 

Joseph Kyle, D. D., LUD., President of Xenia Theological Seminary, 
was born near Cedarville. Ohio, on November the 20th, 1849; was grad- 
uated from Monmouth College in 1872; from Xenia Seminary in 1876; 
was pastor at Springfield, Ohio, 1877-1891, and at Allegheny (now Pitts- 
burgh), Pa., 1891-1899. He was called to the chair of Systematic Theology 
and Homiletics in Xenia Theological Seminary in 1899 and became presi- 
dent of the institution in 1912. He was Moderator of the General Assem- 
bly of the United Presbyterian Church in 1914. He received the degree 
of D. D. from Westminster College in 1892, and the degree of LL.D. from 
Monmouth College in 1906. He fell asleep at Clayton, Mo., December the 
8th, 1921. He was an earnest and thoughtful preacher of the gospel, 
a teacher of strong convictions and magnetic personality, and a man of 
wide influence in the United Presbyterian Church and in other com- 
munions. 




JAMES GIL.L.ESPY CARSON, D. D., L.L.D. 

James Gillespy Carson, D. D., LL.D., was born at Maryville, Blount 
Co., Tenn., February 11, 1833, graduated from Jefferson College in 1849, 
and from Canonsburg (now Xenia) Seminary in 1855; was pastor of 
South Buffalo Congregation, Buffalo, Pa., 1856-1867; of Canonsburg, Pa., 
1867-1869; of Second Church, Xenia, O., 1869-1902. He served as Pro- 
fessor of Homiletics and Pastoral Theology in Xenia Theological Semi- 
nary from 1873-1S88. He represented his district in the Ohio State Senate 
from 1904-1906. In 1908 he was chosen Moderator of the General Assem- 
bly of the United Presbyterian Church. He died at Xenia, O., August 27, 
1921. He was a man of keen and logical intellect, apparently devoid of 
all fear, physical or moral, a natural orator, an exceedingly able teacher 
of Homiletics, and, during his long life, a dominating figure in his Church 
and community. 



THE CONTROL OF THE 
SEMINARY 



THE' SEMINARY is under the control of 
the Second Synod, and the Synods of 
Illinois, Iowa, Kansas, and Nebraska of 
the United Presbyterian Church. Its immediate 
control is committed to a Board of Managers, 
twenty-five in number, appointed by the Synods, 
and a Board of Trustees, nine in number, ap- 
pointed by the Board of Managers. The Terms 
and Course of Study are determined by the Gen- 
eral Assembly. 



XENIA THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 



THE BOARD OF MANAGERS. 



SECOND SYNOD. 

Term Expires 

Rev. S. R. Jamieson, Oxford, Ohio 1922 

Mr. W. J. Fulton, Columbus, Ohio 1922 

John A. Henderson, D. D., Indianapolis, Ind 1923 

J. P. Cowan, D. D., Indianapolis, Ind 1923 

C. P. Proudfit, D. D., Xenia, Ohio 1924 

Rev. J. L. Kelso, Bloomington, Ind 1924 

SYNOD OF ILLINOIS. 

Rev. J. M. Duncan, Lodi, Wis 1922 

J. P. Nesbit, D. D., Princeton, Ind .'. 1922 

Rev. J. W. McClenahan, Chicago, 111 1923 

Rev. E. F. Kimmelshue, Des Moines, Iowa 1923 

J. T. Meloy, D. D., Evanston, 111 1924 

Rev. J. B. Pollock, Aledo, 111 1924 

SYNOD OF IOWA. 

J. F. Jamieson, D. D., Clarion, la 1922 

Rev. W. H. Anderson, DeWitt, la 1922 

Rev. W. J. Stewart, Oskaloosa, la 1923 

W. H. Ramsay, Esq., Garner, la 1923 

Rev. W. G. Comin, Goldfield, la _ 1924 

W. C. Williamson, D. D., Clarinda, la ...1924 

SYNOD OF KANSAS. 

J. H. Hutchman, D. D., Pittsburg, Kan 1922 

Rev. R. Francis Hall, Kansas City, Kan 1923 

Rev. D. Everett Smith, Arkansas City, Kan 1924 

SYNOD OF NEBRASKA. 

Rev. R. A. Pollock, Denver, Colo 1922 

Mr. A. M. McClenahan, Greeley, Colo 1923 

W. R. Gray, D. D., Summerfield, Kan 1924 



XENIA THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 



EX-OFFICIO MEMBERS OF THE BOARD OF MANAGERS. 

President, M. G. Kyle, D. D., LL.D. 

6834 Washington Ave., St. Louis, Mo. 

THE OFFICERS OF THE BOARD OF MANAGERS. 

President, J. H. Hutchman, D. D Pittsburg, Kansas 

Vice-President, W. R. Gray, D. D Summerfield, Kansas 

Financial Secy, and Treas., Mr. T. Dales Kyle Xenia, Ohio 

Recording Secretary, A. M. Campbell, D. D., Ph. D 

St. Louis, Mo. 

BOARD OF TRUSTEES. 

(Under Missouri Charter.) 

J. M. Lashly, Esq St. Louis, Mo. 

Mr. A. O. Wilson :. St. Louis, Mo. 

Mr. T. D. Kyle Xenia, Ohio 

Rev. J. F. LeClere St. Louis, Mo. 

Mr. W. J. Johnston St. Louis, Mo. 

Mr. Erie Ormsby St. Louis, Mo. 

Mr. William Schattgen St. Louis, Mo. 

J. W. Weir, M. D Sparta, Illinois 

John A. Henderson, D. D Indianapolis, Ind. 

Hon. C. H. Kyle Xenia, Ohio 

BOARD OF TRUSTEES. 
(Under Ohio Charter.) 

Hon. C. H. Kyle, Xenia, Ohio 1922 

Hon. J. Carl Marshall, Xenia, Ohio 1922 

Mr. T. D. Kyle, Xenia, Ohio 1922 

B. R. McClellan, M. D„ Xenia, Ohio 1923 

Mr. J. M. Prugh, Dayton, Ohio 1923 

Mr. J. C. Williamson, Xenia, Ohio 1923 

Mr. Robert E. Bryson, Xenia, Ohio 1924 

Mr. D. M. Stewart, Xenia, Ohio 1924 

Mr. Frank Bickett, Xenia, Ohio 1924 

EX-OFFICIO MEMBER OF THE BOARD OF TRUSTEES. 

President, M. G. Kyle, D. D., LL.D 

6834 Washington Ave., St. Louis, Mo. 



XENIA THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 



OFFICERS OF THE BOARD OF TRUSTEES. 

President, M. G. Kyle, D. D., LL.D 

6834 Washington Ave., St. Louis, Mo. 

Financial Secy, and Treas., Mr. T. Dales Kyle Xenia, Ohio 

Recording Secretary, A. M. Campbell, D. D St. Louis, Mo. 

THE CONSULTATIVE MEMBERS OF BOTH BOARDS. 

Jesse Johnson, D. D. J. E. Wishart, D. D. 

J. H. Webster, D. D. 

THE LADIES' VISITING AND ADVISORY BOARD. 

Mrs. Joseph Kyle, President. 

Mrs. J. H. Webster, Vice President. 

Mrs. Jesse Johnson, Treasurer. 

Mrs. J. E. Wishart. 

Mrs. M. G. Kyle. 

Mrs. A. O. Wilson. 

Mrs. Wm. Schattgen. 

Mrs. J. F. LeClere. 

Miss Elizabeth Brownlee. 

Miss Pearl Mann. 

THE STUDENTS' Y. M. C. A. 

E. E. Beattie, President. 

Clifford Ramsdale, Vice President. 

A. T. Moore, Secretary and Treasurer. 

OFFICERS OF THE ALUMNI ASSOCIATION. 

President Rev. S. R. Jamieson, Oxford, Ohio 

Vice President A. M. Campbell, D. D., St. Louis, Mo. 

Secy, and Treas Rev. D. Lawrence Ferguson, St. Louis, Mo. 

f Rev. D. Lawrence Ferguson 
Executive Committee ) A. M. Campbell, D. D. 

I Rev. W. F. Crafts 



XENIA THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 



THE FACULTY. 



JOSEPH KYLE, D. D,, LL.D. * 

President of the Seminary, 
Professor of Systematic Theology and Homiletics. 

JESSE JOHNSON, D. D., 
Professor of Church History and Apologetics. 

J. E. WISHART, D. D., 

Professor of Hebrew Exegesis and Old Testament Literature, 

Adjunct ' Professor of Christian Sociology. 

J. H. WEBSTER, D. D. 
Professor of Greek Exegesis and New Testament Literature. 

M. G. KYLE, D. D., LL.D., 

Newburg Professor of Biblical Theology, and Biblical 
Archaeology. 

Adjunct Professor of Practical Theology and Religious 
Education. 

REV. HENRY S. NESBITT, 
Instructor in Missions. 

THOMAS SHEARER DUNCAN, M. A., Ph.D., 
Instructor in Pulpit Oratory. 



PROFESSOR EMERITUS. 

J. G. Carson, D. D., LL.D.* 



OFFICERS OF THE FACULTY. 

President, M. G. Kyle, D. D., LL.D. 
Vice President, J. E. Wishart, D. D. 
Secretary, J. H. Webster, D. D. 
Registrar, Jesse Johnson, D. D. 



^Deceased, December 8, 1921. 
*Deceased, August 27, 1921. 



XENIA THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 



THE REGISTER OF STUDENTS FOR THE 
YEAR 1921-1922. 



O THE SENIOR CLASS. ^ ^_ 


Name and Residence 


College 


Presbytery 


John Milford Baird, 


Tarkio 


College Springs 


Allerton, Iowa. 






Edward Everett Grice, 


Muskingum 


Northern 


Frankfort, Ind. 




Indiana 


Homer Austin Kent, 


Los Angeles 


The Brethren 


Long Beach, Calif. 


Bible Institute 




Earl Collins McConnelee, 


Muskingum 


Xenia 


Xenia, Ohio. 






Cornelius Clark McNary, 


Muskingum 


Chartiers 


Canonsburg, Pa. 






Cecil Plumb, 


Middlebury 


Champlain 


Malone, N. Y. 




(Pres. Church) 


Herbert Henry Tay, 


Salt Lake 


The Brethren 


Long Beach, Calif. 


High School 




Walter Vail Watson, 


Scranton 


Lackawanna 


Scranton, Pa. 


High School 


(Pres. Church) 


Scott Withrow, 


Tarkio 


College Springs 


Tarkio, Mo. 


< 




THE 1 


MIDDLE CLASS. 




Name and Residence 


College 


Presbytery 


Ernest Everett Beattie, 


Tarkio 


College Springs 


Shannon City, Iowa. 






John Moore Findley Brown, 


Tarkio 


College Springs 


Tarkio, Mo. 






Andrew Walker Gordon, 


Muskingum 


Xenia 


St. Louis, Mo. 






James Robert Lee, 


Tarkio 


Omaha 


North Bend, Neb. 






James Sylvester Wagner, 


Camp Creek 


Southern 


Greeneville, Tenn, 


High School 


Illinois 



10 



XBNIA THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 



THE REGISTER OF STUDENTS FOR THE YEAR 1921-22— 

Continued. 

THE JUNIOR CLASS. 

Name and Residence Coilege Presbytery 

Lackland Beeding, Wash. Univ. Presbyterian, 

St. Louis, Mo. (Under Grad.) U.S.A. 

William Crowe, Jr., Southwestern Memphis 

St. Louis, Mo. Pres. Univ. (Pres. U. S.) 

John Russell Dugan, Monmouth Xenia 

Springfield, Ohio. 

Albert S. Feller, McKendree St. Louis M. E. 

St. Louis, Mo. Conference 

Harold D. Fry, Univ. S. Calif. Brethren 

Long Beach, Calif. (Under Grad.) 

William John Hannum, Ohio State Xenia 

Columbus, Ohio. Univ. 

Jacquel Kelewae, Moody Bible Chicago 

Chicago, 111. Institute 

Hugh Cameron McClure, Wooster Delaware 

De Lancey, N. Y. 

Walter C. McCrory, Sterling (Un- Arkansas Valley 

Cutler, 111. der Grad.) 

William Arthur Martin, Moody Bible Presbyterian, 

Hallstead, Pa. Institute U. S. A. 

Alexander T. Moore, Northern 

Hebron, Ind. Indiana 

Clifford Shaw Ramsdale, Los Angeles Los Angeles 

Alhambra, Calif. Bible Institute 

James H. Scott, Sterling Argyle 

St. Louis, Mo. 

Floyd William Taber, Long Beach Brethren 

Long Beach, Calif. Poly. High 

Charles Russell Wilkins, Phila. School of Phila. Confer- 

Philadelphia, Pa. the Bible ence M. E. 

William Bruce Wilson, Muskingum Southern 

Pittsburgh, Pa. Illinois 

SPECIAL STUDENTS. 

Charles George Arras East St. Louis, 111. 

Alexander Asher St. Louis, Mo. 

Howard L. Bourner St. Louis, Mo. 

Harry Wesley Curtis Wellston, Mo. 

John Olin Lynes Clayton, Mo. 



XENIA THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 11 



OUTLINE OF STUDY FOR THE SESSION OF 
1922-1923. 



SYSTEMATIC THEOLOGY. 
PROFESSOR JOSEPH KYLE.* 

Required Courses. 

1. Systematic Theology is studied throughout the entire 
course of seminary training, two recitations a week, with exam- 
inations in December and April, being required. According to the 
present arrangement of the studies in this department the third 
division of the course will occupy the attention of the students 
of all the classes during the session. This embraces chapters 
XXVI-XLIII of Hodge's Outlines of Theology, which is the text- 
book used. 

Supplemental lectures will be given on topics that seem to 
require additional treatment. 

Elective Courses. 

2. The Inspiration of the Scriptures. (Major.) 

3. The Person of Christ. (Major.) 

4. The Doctrine of Sin. (Minor.) 

5. The Atonement. (Major.) 

6. The Second Advent. (Minor.) 

HOMILETICS. 
PROFESSOR JOSEPH KYLE.* 

1. The Junior Class will devote one recitation period a week 
throughout the session to the general principles of sermonizing 
and preaching as these are outlined in the text-book employed : 
viz., "The Preparation and Delivery of Sermons," by Professor 
Broadus. 

2. The students of all the classes will be exercised in the 
criticism of published discourses of acknowledged merit, in the 
analysis of texts and in the presentation of outlines of sermons 
for examination and correction in the class-room. One hour a 
week throughout the seminary course is devoted to this discipline. 

*Deceased, December 8, 1921. 



12 XENIA THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

3. All the students have in turn the advantage of the weekly 
presentation of discourses before the Faculty. One such exercise 
is required of each senior, and two of each middler and junior 
during the session. Friendly criticism of the work by fellow- 
students is encouraged. 

HISTORY OF CHRISTIAN DOCTRINE. 
PROFESSOR JOSEPH KYLE.* 

The Middle Class will study the first volume of Shedd's 
History of Christian Doctrine, and the Senior Class will study 
the second volume of the same work. One recitation ai week is 
required. 

CHURCH GOVERNMENT AND WORSHIP. 
PROFESSOR JOSEPH KYLE.* 

During the latter half of the session the Senior Class will 
give one hour a week to the examination of "The Book of 
Government and Worship" of the United Presbyterian Church, 
and the Middle Class will take up such subjects in the same book 
as will be necessary to their preparation for licensure. The 
distinctive Testimony of the United Presbyterian Church will 
also be reviewed. 

COMPARATIVE RELIGION. 
PROFESSOR JOSEPH KYLE.* 

The Senior Class will receive a course of training in Com- 
parative Religion, with special reference to conditions that pre- 
vail in our Foreign Mission fields. 

The Handbook of Comparative Religion by the Rev. S. H. 
Kellogg, D. D., LL.D., will be used to mark out the line of study 
to be pursued. 

CHURCH HISTORY. 
PROFESSOR JESSE JOHNSOIV. 

Required Courses. 

Junior Class. — Two hours a week throughout the yea?. Out- 
line study of the history of the Church to the birth of Luther, 
1483. 

Middle Class. — Two hours a week throughout the year. The 
period to be covered will be from 800 to the Peace of Westphalia, 
1648. As part of the work of this year, there will be required 

*Deceased, December 8, 1921. 



XENIA THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 13 

of United Presbyterian students a study of the Westminster 
Assembly, and of the Testimony of the United Presbyterian 
Church. The work just mentioned may be taken by students of 
other churches if they desire. 

Senior Class. — Two hours a week throughout the year. A 
study of the Reformation in the lands outside Germany, followed 
by an outline study of the Church from 1648 to the present time. 
A review of Modern Missions. The churches at the present time, 
especially in the United States. 

The work in Church History is done by means of text-books, 
lectures on important events and movements, library readings and 
students' reports on assigned topics. 

Elective Courses. 

1. Studies in the lives and writings of the early Church 
Fathers. Open to those who have studied General Church His- 
tory to 590 A. D. (Minor.) 

2. Early doctrinal discussions. Open to those who have 
studied General Church History to 1483 A. D. (Major.) 

3. The Era of the Reformation. Open to those who have 
studied General Church History to 1483 A. D., and who have a 
knowledge of the Protestant Reformation in outline. (Major.) 

4. Origin and history of the United Presbyterian Church 
of North America. A prerequisite to this is a fair knowledge 
of the history of the Reformation in Scotland. (Minor.) 

5. The rise, culmination, decline, and present state of the 
Papal power. Open to those who have studied General Church 
History to 1648 A. D. (Minor.) 

APOLOGETICS. 

Seniors and Middlers meeting as one class two hours a w r eek 
during the second semester. The subject for 1922-1923 will be 
Theism. Toward the close of the year some subject of present- 
day debate will be taken up for brief consideration. 

OLD TESTAMENT DEPARTMENT. 
PROFESSOR J. E. WISHART. 

Required Courses. 

1. The Hebrew Language. Open to Juniors. The study of 
the principles 'of Hebrew Grammar, the acquiring of a working 



14 XENIA THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

vocabulary, and the reading of the first eight chapters of Genesis, 
and of a portion of some one of the historical books. The text- 
books are Harper's Hebrew Grammar, and Harper's Hebrew 
Method and Manual. 

2. Hebrew Exegesis. The Major Prophets. The interpre- 
tation of selected chapters, with special reference to contem- 
porary history. Two hours a week on alternate years. Open 
to the Middlers and Seniors, 1922-1923. 

3. Hebrew Exegesis. The Minor Prophets and the Psalms. 
The interpretation of selected portions, with special reference to 
contemporary history, and some study of Hebrew poetry and 
other points bearing on the Psalter. Two hours a week on alter- 
nate years. Open to Middlers and Seniors, 1923-1924. 

4. Introduction to the Hebrew Bible. A study of the origin 
and transmission of the Old Testament Scriptures, on the basis 
of Geden's Introduction to the Hebrew Bible. One hour a week, 
during the second semester. Open to Juniors. 

5. Introduction to the literature of the Old Testament. A 
study of some of the more advanced problems of criticism, such 
as the unity, authorship, date and historical setting of different 
sections of the Old Testament ; usually on the basis of a suitable 
text-book. One hour a week, on alternate years. Open to Mid- 
dlers and Seniors, 1923-1924. 

6. The Geography of Palestine. On the basis of The His- 
torical Geography of the Holy Land, by Sir George Adam Smith. 
One hour a week on alternate years. Open to Middlers and 
Seniors, 1922-1923. 

Elective Courses. 

7. Biblical Aramaic. A study of the elements of the lan- 
guage and the reading of the Aramaic sections of the Old Testa- 
ment. The text-book is Marti's ■ Biblisch-Aramaeische Gram- 
matik. Open to Middlers and Seniors. (Minor.) 

8. The Septuagint. The reading of selected portions of the 
Old Testament in Greek, comparing with the Hebrew and with 
other versions, and the study of the origin and the problems of 
the Septuagint, on the basis of Swete's "Introduction to the Old 
Testament in Greek." Open to Middlers and Seniors. (Major.) 

9. The Minor Prophets. In English. An analysis and a 
study of the historical setting, the meaning, and the lessons of 



XENIA THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 15 

each book. The chief commentaries recommended are The Ex- 
positor's Bible, The New Century Bible, and The Cambridge 
Bible. Open to Middlers and Seniors. (Minor.) 

10. The Wisdom Literature of the Old Testament. In 
English. An analysis and a study of the historical setting, the 
meaning, and the lessons of Job, Proverbs, Ecclesiastes, and The 
Song of Songs. On the basis chiefly of The Expositor's Bible, 
The Cambridge Bible, and The New Century Bible. Open to 
Middlers and Seniors. (Minor.) 

11. Extra-Canonical Jewish Literature from 200 B. C. to 
100 A. D. A study of the books contained in Charles' "Apocrypha 
and Pseudepigrapha" and some selections from Philo and Jose- 
phus. Open to Middlers and Seniors. (Major.) 

CHRISTIAN SOCIOLOGY. 
PROFESSOR J. E. WISHART. 

Required Course. 

1. A study of the sociological implications and applications 
of the Gospel. Usually a text-book is employed, and each mem- 
ber of the class is assigned some book for review. Two hours 
a week. Open to Seniors. 

GREEK EXEGESIS. 
PROFESSOR J. H. WEBSTER 

Required Courses. 

1. The Junior Class will read the Gospel according to John 
and will be drilled in sight reading. 

Green's Hand-Book to the Grammar of New Testament 
Greek will be used. 

2. The Middle Class will study the Pastoral Epistles and 
The Acts. 

3. The Senior Class will study Romans, Ephesians and 
other selected portions of the Greek New Testament. 

NEW TESTAMENT LITERATURE. 
PROFESSOR J. H. WEBSTER 

4. In New Testament Literature, the Acts to Philippians 
will be studied. This course will embrace the genuineness, au- 



16 XENIA THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

thenticity, and design, of each book with a full analysis of its 
contents. The basis of study will be Kerr's Introduction to the 
Study of the Books of the New Testament. The History of 
Textual Criticism will receive due attention. 

Elective Courses. 

5. New Testament Introduction. (Major 240.) 

6. The Epistle to the Hebrews. (Minor 120.) 

7. The Johannine Writings. (Major 240.) 

8. The Pastoral Epistles. (Minor 120.) 

BIBLICAL THEOLOGY AND BIBLICAL ARCHAEOLOGY. 
PROFESSOR M. G. KYLE. 

Work in this Department has a two-fold purpose: to know 
the Progress of Revelation and to know it in its Setting; so 
there are Studies in the Progress of Revelation to acquire a 
comprehensive grasp of what the Bible teaches as a whole and 
in its various parts in the order of Revelation, together with the 
Study of the Historical Setting of Scripture made known through 
Archaeological Research, in order to see the truths of Revelation 
as those saw them to whom they were revealed. 

Biblical Theology. 
PROFESSOR M. G. KYLE. 

Required Courses. 

There are class-room studies and quizzes through which the 
student discovers for himself the plan and progress of Revela- 
tion ; also theses by all the students, together with assigned li- 
brary research work. The Bible is the only text-book used, the 
English Bible for constant work and the Hebrew and Septuagint 
Old Testament, and the Greek New Testament for reference. 

1. The whole course covers the Patriarchal Period, the 
Tribal Period, the National Period, the Messianic Period, and the 
Apostolic Period. This year, the work will cover the National 
Period from the Conquest of Canaan to the end of the Old Testa- 
ment Period. 

Principal subjects: The Sheltering Providence of God in the 
Promised Land ; The Development in the Time of the Judges ; 
The Great Emergence in the Days of David; The Great Period 
of Biblical Literature ; The Decline and Apostasy ; The Exile and 



XENIA THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 17 

Reformation ; The Return and the Second Glory of Israel ; Mes- 
sianism, Prophetism and Inspiration. 

Elective Courses. 

2. Study of Biblical Methods. (Major, 240; Minor, 120.) 

3. Prophetism and Prophecy. (Major, 240; Minor, 120.) 

4. Book Study. (Major, 240; Minor, 120.) 

Biblical Archaeology. 

PROFESSOR M. G. KYLE. 

Required Courses. 

There are lectures from the Monuments and from first- 
hand research, so arranged with the studies in Biblical Theology 
as to enable the student constantly to see the Biblical story in its 
original setting. It follows thus the same order of Periods as 
Biblical Theology. ( See above.) To this are added quizzes, much 
library work and an assigned reading course throughout the 
year. 

1. All classes this year will study the National Period. 
Principal subjects: Times of the Conquest; Order^of Judges; 
Conflict with Small Nations Roundabout ; The Great Invasions, 
Babylon, Egypt, Assyria ; Isaiah and His Times ; Daniel and His 
Book. 

Junior Class — Some introductory lectures will be given the 
Junior Class to prepare them for a proper understanding of the 
work in the general course. 

2. Middle Class — The Middle Class will be directed in re- 
search work and the preparation of theses utilizing archaeological 
material in Exegesis and for sermon illustrations. 

3. Senior Class — A special course of lectures is given the 
Senior Class on the Canons and Fallacies of Research. A special 
graduating thesis is required of each member of the Senior Class 
upon an assigned subject. 

Public research lectures are given each year out of the 
research work of the professor in charge of the department. The 
lectures this year will be on the subject, "Jerusalem from the 
Walls." Three lectures, fully illustrated from photographs, 1921. 



18 XENIA THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

Elective Courses. 
ARCHAEOLOGY. 

4. Archaeology of the Bible, especially Archaeological 
Material for Homiletical Uses, (Major, 240; Minor, 120.) 

5. Methods of Archaeological Research, Canons and 
Fallacies. (Major, 240 — by residence only.) 

6. Archaeology and Criticism. (Major, 240; Minor, 120.) 

PASTORAL THEOLOGY. 
PROFESSOR M. G. KYLE. 

Required Courses. 

Instruction in. Pastoral Theology is by means of studies, 
quizzes, lectures, and practical exercises for each class separately, 
together with practical training for all classes in the problems of 
personal effort in soul saving. ■ 

Junior Class. 

The Minister as a Student. 

1. Subjects: 

(1) The Call to the Ministry; Scripture Warrant, Psycho- 
logical Basis ; Essential Elements. 

(2) Habits: Personal Habits, Study Habits, Devotional 
Habits. 

(3) Ministerial Manliness. 

(4) Ministerial Ideals. 

(5) Keeping One's Self. 

(6) Settlement, Candidating, Installation. 

Middle Class. 
The Minister as a Pastor in the Congregation. 

2. Subjects: 

(1) The Pastor in the Pulpit. 

(2) The Problems of the Ministerial Life. 

(3) A Study of Methods: Social Methods, Business 
Methods, Spiritual Methods. 

(4) The Pastor in the Sabbath School: Methods and 
Ideals. 

(5) The Pastor in the Prayer Services: Congregational 
Prayer Meeting, Young People's Meetings, Prayer Circles. 



XENIA THEOLOGICAL, SEMINARY 19 

Senior Class. 

The Minister as a Pastor in the Larger Relations to the Church and 

the Community. 

3. Subjects: 

(1) Pastoral Evangelism. 

(2) Sociological Problems : City Life Problems, Country 
Life Problems, The Institutional Church. 

(3) The Ministry of Sympathy: Pastoral Visiting, the 
Pastor as Counsellor. 

(4) The Pastor in the Benevolences of the Church. 

(5) Ecclesiastical Relations. 

SABBATH SCHOOL PEDAGOGY AND PRACTICAL EVANGELISM. 

4. Instruction in that division of Practical Theology which 
in modern usage is styled "Religious Education" has been estab- 
lished and now has place in the regular schedule of recitations 
(the second semester of each third year, 1923-1926). This in- 
cludes instruction in plans of organization and administration 
of the Sabbath School, and practical exemplification and appli- 
cation of the best methods of evangelism. 

Elective Courses. 
PASTORAL EVANGELISM. 

1. Scriptural Basis. (Minor, 30.) 

2. Psychological Problems. (Minor, 90.) 

3. Sociological Problems. (Minor, 60.) 

4. A Study of Methods. (Minor, 30 — by residence only.) 

PUBLIC SPEAKING. 
PROFESSOR T. S. DUNCAN. 

A course in the principles and practice of public speaking. 
The various types of speech are studied in detail and students 
are drilled in the important types. Considerable attention is given 
to debating. Careful study is made not only of delivery but of 
the proper method of arranging material. In the study of the 
Speech care is taken to relate the work to the special needs of the 
minister. 

The course includes practice in the reading of the Scriptures 
with a view to making this part of the church service more 
effective. 



20 XENIA THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

An attempt is made to give a fair amount of individual atten- 
tion to students who seem to be especially in need of the work. 

ADMISSION OF STUDENTS. 

The privileges of the seminary shall be open on equal terms 
to students of all evangelical denominations. The applicant shall 
present evidence of membership in good standing in his own 
church, a certificate from his presbytery or other ecclesiastical 
authorities, and credentials indicating that he has received the 
degree of B. A. from a college or university, or that he has taken 
courses of study fairly equivalent thereto, especially in the classi- 
cal languages. The Faculty shall, in the latter case, determine 
whether the academic attainments of the candidate are sufficient, 
upon the basis of reports of the work done, recommendations from 
church courts or competent individuals, and examinations. The 
courses offered shall be these: 

Course A. This shall be the standard required course, in- 
cluding, besides the other disciplines, study of the Bible in the 
original languages, throughout the three years. All who have 
the requisite preliminary training are urged to adopt it. Gradu- 
ates will receive a diploma, and may be candidates for the degree 
of Bachelor of Divinity. 

Course B. This shall be called the Greek-English Course, 
and shall be open to those who elect not to study Hebrew, but 
have sufficient academic training, including at least two years of 
Greek. This course shall also entitle graduates to an appropriate 
diploma. 

Course C. Those whose college or university work is not 
regarded as sufficient, or who for any reason are prevented from 
pursuing full courses, shall be permitted to enter for any subjects 
with which they are competent to deal, and shall, on graduation, 
or on completion of their studies, receive certificates indicating 
the work done, and commending them to the churches. 

THE DEGREE OF BACHELOR OF DIVINITY. 

Students who hold from an institution approved by the 
Faculty the degree of Bachelor or Master of Arts, and have com- 
pleted, either in this Seminary or any school of theology of like 
character, the several courses of study that constitute the stand- 



XENIA THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 21 

ard curriculum, may be granted the degree of Bachelor of Divin- 
ity, after they shall have pursued satisfactorily a one year's course 
of Extra-Curriculum study in this institution. The courses shall 
be arranged and the examinations shall be conducted by the 
•Faculty. Undergraduates who maintain an average grade of 85, 
with not less than 80 in any department, may take one-third of 
the course leading to the degree of Bachelor of Divinity, in ad- 
dition to the required work, each year. 



22 XENIA THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 



FELLOWSHIPS AND SPECIAL 
OPPORTUNITIES. 



Xenia Seminary is one of the group of Universities, Colleges 
and Theological Seminaries in this country co-operating in the 
support and control of the American School of Oriental Research 
in Jerusalem and is thus able to offer to her students the unique 
facilities afforded by this School. No other Post-graduate work 
is, or can be, so helpful, as none other is so attractive, to young 
men looking forward to the work of the Ministry, as study and 
research in Bible lands. The American School of Oriental Re- 
search at Jerusalem was founded to afford such opportunities as 
have never before been open to American students. Special 
arrangements are made to reduce the expenses of such students 
to the lowest point. 

ADMISSION TO THE SCHOOL AT JERUSALEM. 

The School offers to properly qualified students excellent 
opportunities for pursuing such studies as the following : Biblical 
and Palestinian Archaeology ; the Geography and Natural Fea- 
tures of the Land ; the History of Israel ; Early Church History 
and Patristics; the Arabic Language, and the other Semitic Lan- 
guages as connected with it ; Mohammedanism ; the Political. 
Social and Industrial Conditions in the Turkish Empire; Roman 
Administration and Colonization in the East ; the Crusades ; and 
the Comparative History of Religions. 

The School has a well selected working library, which is 
steadily growing. There are other considerable libraries in Jeru- 
salem, some of which contain large collections of manuscripts, 
chiefly Greek and Arabic. As a central point for the study of 
Palestinian antiquities, for making tours of research and explora- 
tion, and for visiting the numerous scenes of past or present 
excavations, Jerusalem is peculiarly well situated. 

Those who avail themselves of the privileges of this School 
can go at once after the Commencement at St. Louis, and enter 
the School at Jerusalem. The altitude and the latitude of Jeru- 



XENIA THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 23 

salem make the summer climate there quite satisfactory. The 
remainder of the year will afford abundant opportunity for travel 
through the land and researches in Historical Geography and 
Archaeology. 

THE THAYER MEMORIAL FELLOWSHIP. 

The Thayer Memorial Fellowship of the School at Jerusalem, 
with a stipend of $800, is awarded annually on- examination. A 
list of the books recommended to candidates for the Fellowship, 
and special facilities for preparation, will be supplied by the 
Seminary. 

OTHER FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE. 

Members of the Junior Class will receive the sum of fifty 
dollars each on condition of their engaging in religious work in 
the churches of this community, or in adjacent fields. 

From a fund gathered from private sources, and placed at the 
disposal of the Faculty, additional aid will be granted as there 
may be need to any whose work in the class-room is of standard 
character. 

Prizes for a sermon contest, open to students of the Middle 
Class, have been provided through the generosity of Mr. Zenas 
McCoy, of Loveland, Colorado. 

COURSES FOR LAY-WORKERS. 

Students not candidates for the ministry, but seeking train- 
ing for general Christian work or for positions as Biblical in- 
structors in schools and colleges, may select courses of study for 
one, two or three years. Such students will be accorded all the 
privileges of the institution, and every effort will be made to 
meet their requirements. 

This opportunity will be especially advantageous to those 
who propose to be medical missionaries and wish to pursue their 
studies in the Medical Department of Washington University. 



24 XENIA THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 



HISTORICAL SKETCH. 



Owing to the various unions and consolidations of theological 
seminaries that have been effected in the history of our church, 
both before and after the year 1858, whence is dated the assump- 
tion of her distinctive ecclesiastical title, the Xenia Theological 
Seminary is in a peculiar sense a United Presbyterian school of 
the prophets. She is the lineal descendant of the three Associate 
Presbyterian seminaries, or rather, of the seminary that had 
three local habitations ; and she holds also the honorable heritage 
received from the Associate Reformed Presbyterian Seminary, 
which was first located at Oxford, Ohio, and later, was removed 
to Monmouth, Illinois. 

I. THE ASSOCIATE SEMINARY AT SERVICE. 

When the Rev. John Anderson, D. D., was appointed profes- 
sor of theology for the Associate Church, April 21, 1794, the 
history of the Xenia Theological Seminary began. In the woods 
near to his own pioneer home Dr. Anderson built a log cabin, 
and there for a full quarter of a century he was the sole instructor 
of the young men who were preparing for the ministry of that 
church. This historic site has been marked by the erection of a 
memorial stone which was dedicated with appropriate ceremony 
on the twenty-second day of June, 1916. 

II. THE ASSOCIATE SEMINARY AT PHILADELPHIA. 

Following the resignation of Dr. Anderson, in 1819, the 
Associate Synod appointed the Rev. John Banks, D. D., to the 
work of training her candidates for the ministry. A second semi- 
nary was opened in Philadelphia, the home of Dr. Banks, and 
was conducted by him without assistance until his death, which 
occurred April 10, 1826. In the meantime the original seminary 
had been transferred to Canonsburg, Pa., and on the death of 
Dr. Banks the work was consolidated at that place. 



XENIA THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 25 

III. THE ASSOCIATE SEMINARY AT CANONSBURG. 

The Service Seminary continued to hold the field in the 
West until the election of the Rev. James Ramsey, of Canons- 
burg, Pa., in 1821, to fill the vacancy occasioned by the resig- 
nation of Dr. Anderson. In this case, as was the rule in those 
days, the professor was the seminary; and the parsonage, located 
on a farm one mile from the town, became the resort of the 
young candidates for the ministry. 

While the action of the Associate Synod uniting the two 
divisions of the seminary was taken in 1828, it was not fully 
carried out until 1830, when it was resolved to erect a building 
in the town and to consummate the purpose by the election of 
Dr. Ramsey to the professorship of the reunited branches. Here 
for a full generation, 1821-1855, the seminary had its home. In 
the year 1833 a new departure was taken in the establishment of 
a professorship of Biblical Literature and Church History. The 
Rev. David Carson, of Blount County, Tenn., was selected to 
occupy this chair, but just before the opening of the seminary, 
on September 23, 1834, he finished his work on earth. 

IV. THE ASSOCIATE SEMINARY AT XENIA. 

The Rev. Abraham Anderson, D. D., who had filled the pro- 
fessorship of Didactic and Polemic Theology for eight years, 
died on the 8th of May, 1855. The Synod met a few weeks later 
and the Rev. Samuel Wilson, D. D., pastor of the Associate con- 
gregation of Xenia, Ohio, was elected to the vacant position. 
Again the seminary came to the professor, the Synod deciding 
upon removal to Xenia. The one remaining member of the 
Canonsburg faculty, the Rev. Thomas Beveridge, D. D., had been 
pastor of the Xenia congregation for a little more than three 
years, 1821-1824, hence the old school of the prophets had a 
double welcome to its new home, since it had come to the com- 
munity in which the Associate Church of the West had its first 
establishment and had for its instructors men so loved and hon- 
ored by the people. 

V. THE ASSOCIATE REFORMED SEMINARY AT OXFORD. 

The founding of the Oxford Seminary dates from the meet- 
ing of the Associate Reformed Synod in the month of October, 



26 XENIA THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

1837, but the opening of the first session was delayed for two 
years. The Rev. Joseph Claybaugh, D. D., was practically the 
sole professor from the date of the opening until his death, 
September 9, 1855. The Rev. Alexander Young, D. D., was 
chosen to succeed Dr. Claybaugh, and entered upon his duties in 
the fall of 1855. At the meeting of Synod in 1857 action was 
taken, in view of the prospect for union with the Associate 
Church, transferring the seminary from Oxford, Ohio, to Mon- 
mouth, Illinois, in order that one of the four seminaries of the 
united church might be located in the West. 

VI. THE UNITED PRESBYTERIAN SEMINARY AT MONMOUTH. 

Monmouth Seminary opened about the first of September, 
1858, as a United Presbyterian seminary, under the care of Pro- 
fessors Alexander Young, D. D., and John Scott, D. D., and 
continued the work of training ministers until the fall of 1874, 
when it was transferred to Xenia, Ohio, and united with the 
seminary located there. Dr. Young retired from his connection 
with the seminary at the time of its transfer, but Dr. Scott was 
recognized as professor emeritus until his death, in 1877. 

VII. THE UNITED PRESBYTERIAN SEMINARY AT XENIA. 

With few exceptions the supporters of Xenia Seminary en- 
tered the union of 1858, which gave to the institution its second 
title, as it appears on its charter: "The United Presbyterian 
Seminary of Xenia, Ohio." 

Soon after this union of blessed memory and issue, the 
faculty of the seminary was strengthened by the election of the 
Rev. Joseph Clokey, D. D., then pastor of the Springfield, Ohio, 
congregation, to the Chair of Pastoral Theology and Sacred 
Rhetoric. Dr. Clokey had been a leader in the Associate Re- 
formed Presbyterian Church, and his election was a testimony 
to the seminary's whole-hearted entrance into the union of the 
two churches. The war between the states, 1861-1865, seriously 
interfered with the work of the seminary in the way of lessening 
the attendance of students, but the sessions opened and closed 
without interruption as in the days of peace. 






• .i 



<W**W«MHWTM«, [ 




MAIN ENTRANCE TO WASHINGTON UNIVERSITY. 



XENIA THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 27 

Following the transfer of the interests of Monmouth Semi- 
nary to Xenia, the seminary came under the control of the synods 
of Illinois, Iowa, and Kansas, in addition to that of the Second 
Synod. The synod of Nebraska, on its organization, also became 
one of the governing bodies. 

VIII. THE UNITED PRESBYTERIAN SEMINARY AT ST. LOUIS. 

At a special meeting of the Board of Managers, held on 
December 3, 1919, it was decided that the seminary should be 
removed to a new location, and a commission consisting of a 
minister and an elder from each of the five Synods which con- 
trol the institution, was appointed to select the site. This com- 
mission held several meetings and carefully canvassed the situa- 
tion, certain of their number visiting the places that were con- 
sidered most advantageous. After mature deliberation the com- 
mission fixed upon the City of St. Louis as the future home of the 
Seminary. This decision of the Commission was unanimously 
approved by the Board and by the Synods. 

WASHINGTON UNIVERSITY. 

One of the chief considerations which induced the Commis- 
sion of the Board of Managers, charged with the relocation of 
Xenia Theological Seminary, to fix upon the City of St. Louis, 
was the extremely favorable university connection that was 
offered. Washington University is an old and honored founda- 
tion, with a magnificent set of buildings, and is regarded as the 
greatest graduate school of the whole Southwest. Xenia's new 
location is within a few minutes' walk of its grounds. Through 
the courtesy of the Chancellor and the other authorities, a full 
exchange of credits has been granted, without any control of our 
teachings or policies. So short is the distance that those wishing 
to complete their academic course or to work for ah advanced 
degree, can do so without inconvenience or loss of time. The 
advantages of this affiliation will, it is thought, be very great. 

OPPORTUNITIES FOR WORK. 

The Seminary has received a most warm and hearty welcome 
in the City of St. Louis. So great a center of population, of 



28 XENIA THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

course, offers an excellent field for Christian effort and for socio- 
logical study. It also affords great advantages in the matter of 
employment for those who must make their own way. The 
churches are most enthusiastic in pledging co-operation and sup- 
port. Such support was, of course, expected from the United 
Presbyterian congregations, and it is being given in full measure. 
But other denominations, especially the Presbyterians, U. S., the 
Presbyterians, U. S. A., the Congregationalists, and the Meth- 
odists, have assumed a most sympathetic attitude, have yielded 
the field to us with assurance of their best wishes and their 
patronage, and in some cases propose to employ the students of 
the Seminary in congregational work. 

During the one hundred and twenty-seven years of the semi- 
nary's history, under various names and in different localities, 
in all twenty-nine men have served as instructors for more or less 
extended periods of time. The roll of professors is as follows : 

Name Seminary Period of Service 

John Anderson Service 1 794- 1819 

John Banks Philadelphia 1820-1826 

James Ramsey Canonsburg 1821-1843 

David Carson .Canonsburg 1834-1834 

Thomas Beveridge Canonsburg 1835-1855 

Thomas Beveridge Xenia — 1855-1871 

Joseph Claybaugh Oxford 1839-1855 

Samuel W. McCracken Oxford 1839-1840 

James Martin l.Canonsburg 1842-1846 

Abraham Anderson Canonsburg 1847-1855 

Samuel Wilson Xenia 1855-1875 

William Davidson Oxford 1855-1858 

Alexander Young Oxford 1855-1857 

Alexander Young Monmouth ...1858-1874 

John Scott .Monmouth 1858-1874 

Joseph Clokey Xenia .1858-1873 

Andrew M. Black ! Monmouth 1864-1874 

David A. Wallace Monmouth 1867-1870 

David A. Wallace Xenia 1883-1883 

William Bruce Xenia 1871-1880 

James G. Carson Xenia 1873-1888 

William G. Moorehead Xenia 1873-1914 



XENIA THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 



29 



Name 

Jackson B. McMichael 

James Harper ?. 

David MacDill 

Wilbert W. White 

John D. Irons 

Joseph Kyle 

Jesse Johnson Xenia 

Tohn E. Wishart Xenia 



Seminary Period of Service 

Xenia 1873-1878 

Xenia 1879-1899 

Xenia 1884-1902 

Xenia 1889-1894 

Xenia 1895-1905 

Xenia 1899-1921 

1902 

...., 1905 



John H. Webster Xenia 

Melvin G. Kyle Xenia 



.1908 
.1914 



30 XENIA THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 



GENERAL INFORMATION. 



STUDENTS. 

Persons wishing to enter the Seminary shall present to the 
Faculty satisfactory evidence of church membership and piety; 
and students of the United Presbyterian Church shall be under 
the care of some Presbytery before entering the Seminary, or 
as soon thereafter as possible. The Faculty will admit, at their 
discretion, students of other denominations. 

Before being admitted to the Seminary, every student shall, 
in the presence of the Faculty, subscribe to a written declara- 
tion to the effect that while he is a student in the Seminary he 
will regularly, punctually and diligently attend upon all the in- 
structions of the Professors and promptly comply with all lawful 
requisitions of the Faculty, and be subject to their authority; 
that he will honestly conform to all regulations of the Seminary 
and that he will not propagate any opinion in opposition to the 
principles of the United Presbyterian Church. 

Every student who has been accepter! by the Faculty as a 
candidate for graduation, and who has completed the prescribed 
course of study and passed the required examinations, shall be 
publicly graduated and receive* a proper diploma or certificate. 

THE LIBRARY. 

The number of volumes in the library is about 15,000. The 
books have been thoroughly classified and the library thus made 
readily available to the students for investigations upon any 
subject. 

Through the generosity of the late Mr. Alexander Dempster, 
of Pittsburgh, Pa., the Seminary has been provided with the 
raised map of Palestine published by the Palestine Exploration 
Fund, London, England, from surveys made by George Arm- 
strong. This map is very valuable in the study of Sacred Geog- 
raphy and History. 

THE TAGGART LIBRARY. 

A very important addition to our library has been made 
through a generous donation on the part of the owner, and pur- 



XENIA THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 31 

chase on the part of the Seminary, of a large portion of the library 
of the Reverend R. B. Taggart, D. D., of Morganton, North 
Carolina. Dr. Taggart has succeeded in getting together one of 
the largest and finest collections of works on The Psalms to be 
found in any library. Among these is a very rare and valuable 
copy of the Huguenot Psalter. Very few copies of this splendid 
French Psalter are in existence. The Seminary has profited to 
the full by the success of Dr. Taggart, and his kindly interest in 
the welfare of his Alma Mater is greatly appreciated. 

THE MISSIONARY SOCIETY. 

The Students' Missionary Society meets weekly for prayer 
and conference. The society is connected with the American 
Inter-Seminary Missionary Alliance. To the good work of this 
organization is largely due the excellent Missionary spirit which 
prevails among the students. It has furnished most commend- 
able supplemental work to that of the class-room on the subject 
of Missions. 

RELIGIOUS EXERCISES. 

A weekly prayer meeting, attended by the Faculty and stu- 
dents, is held every Tuesday. The students also hold group 
prayer meetings in their rooms on three evenings each week. 

TEXT-BOOKS. 

Necessary reference books and commentaries are found in 
the library, and text-books may be obtained on favorable terms. 

EXAMINATIONS. 

At the close of each semester examinations are held covering 
the ground gone over in the several departments of study. 

Ordinarily the examinations are written and are directed by 
the professors and by them are reported to the Board. 

From the class standing, the examination and the attendance, 
the grade of the student, based on a scale of 100, is determined, 
and reported to his Presbytery. 

EXPENSES. 

The necessary expenses of a course of theological training 
are reduced to the minimum. There are no "fees" or "rentals" 



32 XENIA THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

for privileges and accommodations. The Seminary dining room 
has been managed most acceptably, and the cost of maintenance 
has amounted to about $25.00 per month to each person. Text- 
books may be procured through the book-store of the Washington 
University or the publishing houses of the various denominations 
represented in the city at the lowest practical cost, and all other 
personal needs may be supplied on favorable terms through the 
great stores and shops of this "Metropolis of the Central West." 

FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE. 

The members of the Junior class who engage in practical 
Christian work, under the direction of the Faculty, will receive 
compensation to the amount of fifty dollars. From the income 
of our Students' Fund we are prepared to loan to those who may 
desire it, the sum of fifty dollars a year, or more in case of real 
need, on their personal notes, without interest for five years from 
date of loan ; at the expiration of this period, interest at the rate 
of five per cent, per annum will be charged until payment is 
made. This amount, with funds to which worthy students are 
entitled on proper recommendation to the Board of Education, 
and money which may be earned by themselves, will almost, if 
not altogether, cover the necessary expenses of the Seminary 
session. 

CORRESPONDENCE. 

For catalogues, or any information concerning the work of 
the Seminary, address Professor M. G. Kyle, D. D., LL.D., 
President of the Faculty, 6834 Washington Ave., St. Louis, Mo. ; 
or Professor J. H. Webster, D. D., Secretary of the Faculty, 
5738 Clemens Ave., St. Louis, Mo. Letters relating to the en- 
dowment and other funds of the Seminary should be addressed 
to Mr. T. Dales Kyle, Xenia, Ohio, the Financial Secretary and 
Treasurer. 

DONATIONS AND BEQUESTS. 

On account of the low rate of interest, a lai'ge amount 'of 
invested funds is required to meet the expenses. Accordingly 
the Seminary is cordially commended to the liberality of those 
to whom our church and ministry are dear. Appeal is also made 
to those making bequests to remember this institution. Special 



XENIA THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 33 

attention is requested to the "Annuity Plan." The form which 
should be carefully followed in making donations according to 
this plan may be found under the heading, "Form of Bequest." 



FORM OF BEQUEST. 



FOR PERSONAL PROPERTY. 

I hereby give and bequeath to the Xenia United Presbyterian 
Theological Seminary, of St. Louis, Mo., the sum of 

Dollars, or notes or bonds. 

(Here describe them.) 



FOR REAL ESTATE. 

I give and devise to the Xenia United Presbyterian Theo- 
logical Seminary, of St. Louis, Mo., its successors and assigns, 
forever, the following described tract or lot of land, in township 

of , County of 



State of , and bounded and described as 

follows: (Here describe the piece of land with such accuracy 
and definiteness that it may certainly be known.) If such devisors 
wish to make bequests to any of the Seminary funds (endowment, 
income or library fund), they should specify the particular fund 
they have in view. 



34 XBNIA THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 



FOR ANNUITY BEQUESTS. 

Know all men by these presents : That the Xenia United 
Presbyterian Theological Seminary, St. Louis, Mo., is held and 

firmly bound unto in the 

sum of Dollars, 

to the payment of which it hereby binds itself, its successors and 
assigns. The foregoing obligation is conditioned and limited as 
follows : 

That, Whereas, the said 

has this day made a gift to the said, The Xenia United Presby- 
terian Theological Seminary, of St. Louis, Mo., in the said sum of 

Dollars, 

the receipt of which is hereby acknowledged. 

Now, if the said, The Xenia United Presbyterian Theological 
Seminary, of St. Louis, Mo., its successors, and assigns, shall pay 

or cause to be paid, unto the said 

the sum of 

Dollars annually in ,. 

installments, during each and every year 

of the natural life of the said 

and no longer, then this obligation to be void, otherwise to be 
and remain in full force and virtue in law. 



XENIA THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 35 



OPENING AND CLOSING EXERCISES. 



The opening of the next session, and the enrollment of 
students, will take place on Wednesday, September 20, 1922, at 
2 o'clock p. m. in the Seminary chapel, St. Louis, Mo. 

An address of welcome will be given by the President, M. 
G. Kyle, D. D., LL.D., followed by a paper on "The Epistle to 
the Hebrews," by Professor J. H. Webster, D. D. A reception 
to the students and friends of the Seminary will be tendered the 
same evening at 8 p. m. in the Seminary parlors. 

The opening sermon will be preached on Sabbath, October 1, 

1922, at 8 o'clock p. m., in the Seminary chapel, by W. C. Wil- 
liamson, D. D., of Clarinda, Iowa. 

The baccalaureate sermon will be preached on Sabbath, May 
7, 1923, at 8 o'clock p. m., by President M. G. Kyle, D. D., LL.D. 

The closing exercises will be held on Thursday, May 10, 

1923, at 8 o'clock p. m. The Annual Address will be delivered 
by Rev. Paul Calhoun, Omaha, Neb. Diplomas will be presented 
and degrees conferred by the President of the Faculty. 



36 XENIA THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 



THE CALENDAR FOR 1922-1923. 



1922. 



September 20, Wednesday, at 2 o'clock p. m. — The opening 
of the session and enrollment of students. Address of Welcome 
by the President. Paper by Prof. Webster. At 8 o'clock p. m., 
reception and social. 

October 1, Sabbath, at 8 o'clock p. m. — The opening sermon, 
W. C. Williamson, D. D. 

December 19-21 — Mid-Term Examinations. 

December 22 — First day of holiday vacation. 

1923. 

January 4 — Recitations begin. 

May 3 — The written examinations begin. 

May 6, Sabbath, at 8« o'clock p. m. — The baccalaureate 
sermon, Pres. M. G. Kyle, D. D., LL.D. 

May 8, Tuesday, at 10 o'clock a. m. — The annual meeting 
of the Board of Trustees. 

May 9, Wednesday, at 10 o'clock a. m. — The annual meeting 
of the Board of Managers. Class Theses. 

May 10, Thursday, at 8 o'clock p. m. — The annual ad- 
dress, Rev. Paul Calhoun, Omaha, Neb. ; the presentation of 
diplomas and conferring of degrees by the President. 



IH 



*7 



*" 








SERVICE, PA. 1794 

CANONSBURG, PA. 1821 
XENIA, OHIO, 1855 

ST. LOUIJ3, MO. 1920 



Calendar for 1923 


JANUARY 


FEBRUARY 


MARCH 


APRIL 


S M T W T P S 


S M T W T F 8 


8 M T "W T F S 


8 M T W T F S 


7 
14 
21 
28 


1 

8 

15 

22 

29 


2 

9 

16 

23 

30 


3 
10 

17 
24. 
31 


4 
1 1 
18 
25 


5 
12 
19 
26 


6 
13 
20 
27 










1 

8 

15 

22 


2 

9 

16 

23 


3 
10 
17 
24 










1 

8 

15 

22 

29 


2 

9 

16 

23 

30 


3 
10 
17 
24 
31 


1 

8 
15 
22 
29 


2 

9 

16 

23 

30 


3 
10 
17 
24 


4 

1 1 
18 
25 


5 
12 
19 
26 


6 
13 
20 
27 


7 
14 
21 
28 


4 
1 1 
18 
25 


6 
12 
19 
26 


6 
13 
20 
27 


7 
14 
21 
28 


4 
11 
18 
25 


5 
12 
19 
26 


6 
13 
20 
27 


7 
14 
21 
28 
























' MAY 


JUNE 


JULY 


AUGUST 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


6 

13 
20 
27 


7 
14 
21 
28 


1 

8 

15 

22 

29 


2 

9 

16 

23 

30 


3 
10 
17 
24 
31 


4 
1 1 
18 
25 


5 
12 
19 
26 












1 

8 

15 

22 

29 


2 

9 

16 

23 

30 


1 

8 

15 

22 

29 


2 

9 

16 

23 

30 


3 
10 
17 
24 
31 


4 
11 
18 
25 


5 
12 
19 
26 


6 
13 
20 
27 


7 
14 
21 
28 








1 

8 
15 
22 
29 


2 

9 

16 

23 

30 


3 
10 
17 
24 
31 


4 
11 

18 
26 


3 
10 
17 
24 


4 
11 
18 
25 


5 
12 
19 
26 


6 
13 
23 
27 


7 
14 
21 
28 


5 
12 
19 
26 


6 
13 
20 
27 


7 
14 
21 
28 










SEPTEMBER 


OCTOBER 


NOVEMBER 


DECEMBER 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


8 M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 














1 
8 

15 
22 


"i 

14 
21 


1 

8 

15 

22 

29 


2 

9 

16 

23 


3 
10 
17 
24 
31 


4 
1 1 
18 
25 


5 
12 
19 
26 


6 
13 
20 
27 










1 

8 

15 

22 

29 


2 

9 

16 

23 

30 


3 
10 
17 
24 














1 

8 

15 

22 

29 


2 

9 
16 
23 
30 


3 
10 
17 
24 


4 
1 1 
18 
25 


5 
12 
19 
26 


6 
13 
20 
27 


7 
14 
21 
28 


4 
1 1 
18 
25 


5 
12 
19 
26 


6 
13 
20 
27 


7 
14 
21 
28 


2 

9 
16 
23 
30 


3 
10 
17 
24 
31 


4 
1 1 
18 
25 


5 
12 
19 
26 


6 
13 
20 
27 


7 
14 
21 
28 


29 


28 














] Calendar for 1924 


JANUARY 


FEBRUARY 


MARCH 


APRIL 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


8 M T W T F 8 


S M T W T F *S 


6 
13 
20 
27 


7 
14 
21 
28 


1 

8 

15 

22 

29 


2 

9 

16 

23 

30 


3 
10 
17 
24 
31 


4 
11 
18 
25 


5 
12 
19 
26 












1 
8 

16 
22 
29 


2 

9 

16 

23 














1 

8 

15 

22 

29 


6 
13 
20 
27 


7 
14 
21 
28 


1 

8 

15 

22 

29 


2 

9 

16 

23 

30 


3 
10 
17 
24 


4 

1 1 
18 
25 


5 
12 
19 
26 


3 
10 
17 
24 


4 
1 1 
18 
25 


6 
12 
19 
26 


6 
13 
20 
27 


7 
14 
21 
28 


2 

9 

16 

23 

30 


3 
10 
17 
24 
31 


4 

1 1 
18 
25 


6 
12 
19 
26 


6 
13 
20 
27 


7 
14 
21 
28 










MAY 


JUNE 


JULY 


AUGUST 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 










1 

8 

15 

22 

29 


2 

9 

16 

23 

30 


3 

10 
17 
24 
31 


1 
8 

15 
22 
29 


2 

9 

16 

23 
30 


3 
10 
17 
24 


4 
11 
18 

25 


5 
12 
19 
26 


6 
13 
20 
27 


7 
14 
21 
28 


6 
13 
20 
27 


7 
14 
21 
28 


1 

8 

15 

22 

29 


2 

9 

16 

23 

30 


3 
10 
17 
24 
31 


4 
1 1 
18 
25 


5 
12 
19 
26 


3 
10 
17 
24 
31 


4 

1 1 
18 
26 


6 
12 
19 
26 


6 
13 
20 
27 


7 
14 
21 
28 


1 

8 

15 

22 

29 


2 

9 

16 

23 

30 


4 
11 

18 
25 


5 
12 
19 
26 


6 
13 
20 
27 


7 
14 
21 
28 












SEPTEMBER 


OCTOBER 


NOVEMBER 


DECEMBER 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


V 

14 
21 
28 


1 

8 
15 
22 
29 


O 

9 
16 
23 
30 


3 
10 
17 
24 


4 
1 1 
18 
25 


6 
12 
19 
26 


6 
13 
20 
27 








1 
8 

15 
22 
29 


2 

9 

16 

23 


3 
10 
17 
24 
31 


4 
11 
18 
25 














1 
8 

15 
22 
29 


"7 
14 
21 
28 


1 

8 
15 
22 
29 


2 

9 

16 

23 

30 


3 
10 
17 
24 
31 


4 

1 1 
18 
25 


6 
12 
19 
26 


6 
13 
20 
27 


5 
12 
19 
26 


6 
13 
20 
27 


7 
14 
21 
28 


2 

9 

16 

23 

30 


3 
10 
17 
24 


4 

11 
18 
25 


5 
12 
19 
26 


6 
13 
20 
27 


7 
14 
21 
28 

























?«-Mi; r 




THE ANNUAL CATALOGUE 



OF THE 



Xenia 

United Presbyterian 

Theological Seminary 




OF ST. LOUIS, MISSOURI 



1923 



THE CONTROL OF THE 
SEMINARY 



THE SEMINARY is under the control of 
the Second Synod, and the Synods of 
Illinois, Iowa, Kansas, Nebraska, Cali- 
fornia, and The Columbia, of the United Pres- 
byterian Church. Its immediate control is com- 
mitted to a Board of Managers, twenty-five in 
number, appointed by the Synods, and a Board 
of Trustees, nine in number, appointed by the 
Board of Managers. The Terms and Course of 
Study are determined by the General Assembly. 



XENIA THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 



THE BOARD OF MANAGERS. 
1922-1923 



SECOND SYNOD (5*). Term Expires 

John A. Henderson, D. D., Indianapolis, Ind 1923 

J. P. Cowan, D. D., Indianapolis, Ind .'. 1923 

C. P. Proudfit, D. D., Xenia, Ohio 1924 

Rev. J. L. Kelso, Bloomington, Ind 1924 

J. P. Nesbit, D. D., Princeton, Ind 1925 

Mr. W. J. Fulton, Columbus, Ohio 1925 

SYNOD OF ILLINOIS (6*). 

Rev. J. W. McClenahan, Chicago, 111 1923 

Rev. A. A. Graham, Monmouth, 111 1923 

J. T. Meloy, D. D., Evanston, 111 1924 

Rev. J. B. Pollock, Aledo, 111 1924 

Rev. J. M. Duncan, Lodi, Wis 1925 

Rev. H. H. McConnell, St. Louis, Mo 1925 

SYNOD OF IOWA (4*). 

Rev. W. J. Stewart, Oskaloosa, la 1923 

W. H. Ramsay, Esq., Garner, la 1923 

Rev. W. G. Comin, Goldfield, la 1924 

W. C. Williamson, D. D., Clarinda, la 1924 

J. E. Jamieson, D. D., Clarion, la 1925 

W. J. French, Esq., Waterloo, la 1925 

SYNOD OF KANSAS (3*). 

Rev. R. Francis Hall, Kansas City, Kan 1923 

Rev. D. Everett Smith, Arkansas City, Kan 1924 

J. H. Hutchman, D. D., Pittsburg, Kan : 1925 

SYNOD OF NEBRASKA (2*). 

Mr. A. M. McClenahan, Greeley, Colo 1923 

W. R. Gray, D. D., Summerfield, Kan. 1924 

Mr. Robert Sloss, North Bend, Neb 1925 

*No. of representatives to which Synod is entitled next year. 



XENIA THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 



SYNOD OF CALIFORNIA (2*). 
SYNOD OF THE COLUMBIA (2*). 

EX-OFFICIO MEMBER OF THE BOARD OF MANAGERS 

President M. G. Kyle, D. D., LL.D 

6834 Washington Ave., St. Louis, Mo. 

THE OFFICERS OF THE BOARD OF MANAGERS. 

President, Rev. J. B. Pollock Aledo, 111. 

Vice-President, C. P. Proudfit, D. D Xenia, Ohio 

Financial Secy, and Treas., Mr. T. Dales Kyle Xenia, Ohio 

Recording Secy., A. M. Campbell, D. D.,,Ph. D St. Louis, Mo. 

Assistant Secretary, Rev. W. H. Hastings St. Louis, Mo. 

BOARD OF TRUSTEES. 
(Under Missouri Charter.) 

Mr. John M. Stuart, St. Louis, Mo 1924 

Mr. W. J. Johnston, St. Louis, Mo 1924 

Mr. William Schattgen, St. Louis, Mo 1924 

Mr. Frank H. Hackmann, East St. Louis, 111 1924 

Mr. T. Dales Kyle, Xenia, Ohio 1925 

Mr. H. C. Grote, St. Louis, Mo 1925 

Mr. A. O. Wilson, St. Louis, Mo 1925 

Mr. G. W. McCullough, St. Louis, Mo 1925 

J. M. Lashly, Esq., St. Louis, Mo 1926 

Rev. J. F. LeClere, St. Louis, Mo 1926 

Mr. Erie Ormsby, St. Louis, Mo 1926 

Rev. W. H. Hastings, St. Louis, Mo 1926 

BOARD OF TRUSTEES. 
(Under Ohio Charter.) 

Mr. Robert E. Bryson, Xenia, Ohio 1924 

Mr. D. M. Stewart, Xenia, Ohio 1924 

Mr. Robert A. Innes, Rushville, Ind 1924 

Hon. C. H. Kyle, Xenia, Ohio ^ 1925 

Hon. J. Carl Marshall, Xenia, Ohio 1925 

Mr. f. D. Kyle, Xenia, Ohio 1925 

B. R. McClellan, M. D., Xenia, Ohio .'. 1926 

Mr. Thomas M. Green, Rushville, Ind 1926 

Mr. Nathan Logan, Spring Hill, Ind 1926 

*No. of representatives to which Synod is entitled next year. 



XENIA THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 



EX-OFFICIO MEMBER OF THE BOARD OF TRUSTEES. 

President M. G. Kyle, D. D., LL.D 

6834 Washington Ave., St. Louis, Mo. 

OFFICERS OF THE BOARD OF TRUSTEES. 

President, Erie Ormsby, 4508 McPherson Ave., St. Louis, Mo. 

Financial Secy, and Treas., Mr. T. Dales Kyle Xenia, Ohio. 

Recording Secy., A. M. Campbell, D. D., Ph.D St. Louis, Mo. 

Asst. Secretary, Rev. W. H. Hastings St. Louis, Mo. 

THE CONSULTATIVE MEMBERS OF BOTH BOARDS, 

Jesse Johnson, D. D. J. H. -Webster, D. D. 

Robt. M. Kerr, D. D. 

THE LADIES' VISITING AND ADVISORY BOARD. 

Mrs. Joseph Kyle, President. 

Mrs. J. H. Webster, Vice President. 

Mrs. Jesse Johnson, Treasurer. 

Mrs. M. G. Kyle. 

Mrs. Robt. M. Kerr. 

Mrs. A. O. Wilson. 

Mrs. L. D. Ferguson. 

Mrs, J. F. LeClere. 

Miss Elizabeth Brownlee. 

Miss Pearl Mann. 

THE STUDENTS' Y. M. C. A. 

Clifford Ramsdale, President. 

Paul Graham, Vice President. 

Floyd W. Taber, Secretary and Treasurer. 

OFFICERS OF THE ALUMNI ASSOCIATION. 

President Rev. D. L. Ferguson, St. Louis, Mo. 

Vice President Rev. Paul Calhoun, Omaha, Nebr. 

Secy, and Treas Rev. J. L. Kelso, Bloomington, Ind. 

OFFICERS OF THE FACULTY— 1923-1924. 

President, M. G. Kyle, D. D., LL.D. 
Vice President, Robt. M. Kerr, D. D. 
Dean and Secretary, J. H.Webster, D. D. 
Registrar, Jesse Johnson, D. D. 



XENIA THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 



THE FACULTY. 
1922-1923. 



JESSE JOHNSON, D. D., 
Professor of Church History and Apologetics. 

J. E. WISHART, D. D: * 

Professor of Hebrew Exegesis and Old Testament Literature, 

Adjunct Professor of Christian Sociology. 

J. H. WEBSTER, D. D. 
Professor of Greek Exegesis and New Testament Literature. 

M. G. KYLE, D. D., LL.D., 

Newburg Professor of Biblical Theology, and Biblical 

Archaeology. Adjunct Professor of Practical 

Theology and Religious Education. 

I 

ROBT. M. KERR, D. D., 
Professor of Systematic Theology and Homiletics. 

THOMAS SHEARER DUNCAN, M. A, Ph. D., 
Instructor in Pulpit Oratory. 

PREACHERS IN SEMINARY PULPIT— 1923-1924. 

President J. A. Thompson, D. D., Tarkio College. 

President, T. PL McMichael, D. D., Monmouth College. 

The Reverend William Crowe, D. D., Westminster Presbyterian 

Church, St. Louis. 
The Reverend Charles L. Goodell, D. D., Methodist Episcopal 

Evangelistic Committee. 
Others to be announced. 



* Resigned May, 1923. 



XENIA THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 



SPECIAL LECTURERS— 1923-1924. 

President W. O. Thompson, D. D., Ohio State University — 
Address at Inauguration Ceremonies, September twentieth. 

President J. Knox Montgomery, D. D., Muskingum College. 

Professor James I. Good, D. D., Central Theological Seminary, 
Dayton, Ohio — 
"The Tragedy of Religious Conditions in Central Europe." 

Hon. Henry W. Temple, D. D., LL.D., Washington, D. C. 

The Reverend H. K. Fox, D. D., Geneseo, 111.— 
"Building the Rural Church." 

The Reverend D. Everett Smith, D. D., Arkansas City, Kansas — 
"The Value of Studies in the Psychology of Religion." 
"The Church's Program of Religious Education." 

Professor R. J. Love, D. D., Westminster College — 
"Christian Optimism." 

Professor J. L. McCreight, Sterling College — 
"The Ministry of the Holy Spirit." 

The Reverend C. M. Laing, Tarkio, Mo. — 
"James 1 :2-18. An Exposition." 

Professor A. T. Clay, Ph. D., LL.D., Yale University — 

"Archaeological Refutation of the Pan-Babylonian Theory 
of Biblical Origins." 

Addresses by Secretaries of the Missionary Boards, and by Mem- 
bers of the Faculty of the Seminary, to be announced. 



10 XENIA THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 



THE REGISTER OF STUDENTS FOR THE 
YEAR 1922-1923. 



THE GRADUATE SCHOOL. 



STUDENTS IN RESIDENCE. 



Name and Address Seminary 

Noyes Otis Bartholomew, Pastor Maplewood 

Congregational Church, St. Louis, Mo Washburn College 

David Lawrence Ferguson, Pastor Gibson 

Heights LTnited Presb. Church, St. Louis, 

Mo Xenia 

William Henry Hastings, Pastor Grand Ave- 
nue United Presb. Church, St. Louis, Mo Pittsburgh 

George Wales King, D. D., Pastor Markham 

Memorial Presb. Church, St. Louis, Mo Auburn 

James Frederic LeClere, Pastor Third United 

Presb. Church, St. Louis, Mo Pittsburgh 

Harold Harper McConnell, Pastor First United 

Presbyterian Church, St. Louis, Mo Pittsburgh 

William Clarence Mahr, Pastor Presb. Church, 

Salem, 111 Divinity School 

Cumberland Univ. 

Mrs. A. J. Matthews, St. Louis, Mo Peabody Normal 

College 
Owen W. Pratt, Associate Pastor Kingshigh- 

way Presb. Church, St. Louis, Mo Western 

Robert Mcintosh Sturgeon, Pastor United 

Presb. Church, Tilden, 111 Pittsburgh 

William Dunn Vater, Pastor Manor Presb. 

Church, St. Louis, Mo Princeton 

STUDENTS BY CORRESPONDENCE. 

Cecil Plumb, Pastor Congregational Church, 

Reeseville, N. Y , Xenia 



XENIA THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 



11 



THE SENIOR CLASS 

Name and Residence College 

Ernest Everett Beattie, Tarkio 

Shannon City, Iowa. 
John Moore Findley Brown, Tarkio 

Tarkio, Mo. 
Andrew Walker Gordon, Muskingum 

St. Louis, Mo. 
James Robert Lee, Tarkio 

North Bend, Neb. 
Norman Wilde Taylor, 

Springfield, 111. 



St. John's College 
and Moody 
Bible Institute 



Presbytery 

College Springs 

College Springs 

Southern Illinois 

Omaha 

Springfield, 
Presbyterian* 
U.S.A. 



Name and Residence 

Lackland Beeding, 

St. Louis, Mo. 
John Russell Dugan, 

Springfield, Ohio. 
Harold D. Fry, 

Long Beach, Calif. 
Jacquel Kelewae, 

East St. Louis, 111. 
Walter C. McCrory, 

Pinckneyville, 111. 
William Arthur Martin, 

Hallstead, Pa. 
Alexander T. Moore, 

Hebron, Ind. 
Clifford Shaw Ramsdale, 

Alhambra, Calif. 
James H. Scott, 

St. Louis, Mo. 
Floyd William Taber, 

Long Beach, Calif. 
Charles Russell Wilkins, 

Philadelphia, Pa. 



THE MIDDLE CLASS. 

College Presbytery 

Washington Univ. Presbyterian, 

( Under-grad.) U. S. A. 
Monmouth Xenia 



Univ. S. Calif. Brethren 

(Under-grad. ) 
Moody Bible 

Institue 
Sterling 

(Under-grad. ) 
Moody Bible 

Institute 



Los Angeles 

Bible Institute 
Sterling 

Long Beach 
Poly. High 

Phila. School 
of the Bible 



Chicago 
Southern Illinois 

Presbyterian, 

U. S. A. 
Northern 

Indiana 
Los Angeles 

Argyle 

Brethren 

Phila. Confer- 
ence M. E. 



12 



XENIA THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 



Name and Residence College Presbytery 

William Bruce Wilson, Muskingum Southern Illinois 

Pittsburgh, Pa. 

THE JUNIOR CLASS. 

Name and Residence College Presbytery 

Raymond Hutchison Cherry, Muskingum Xenia 

Xenia, Ohio. 

Ray McCreight Davis, Muskingum Muskingum 

New Concord, Ohio. 

Leander Finley, Muskingum Muskingum 

New Concord, Ohio. 

Ralph Wilbur Frost, Muskingum Steubenville 

Chester, W. Va. 

James Paul Graham, Muskingum Xenia 

Reynoldsburg, Ohio. 

Harold Edward Lobaugh, Muskingum Butler 

Conoquenessing, Pa. 

Dean Moneymaker, Missouri Valley St. Louis Presb., 

Raymore, Mo. . U. S. A. 

Henry Ernest Moore, Bryson Southern Illinois 

Covington, Tenn. 

Milton William Mosbacher, Moody Bible St. Louis Asso. 

St. Louis, Mo. Institute Cong. Conf. 

George Wishart Peoples, Muskingum Muskingum 

Cambridge, Ohio. (Under-grad.) 

Robert Coleman Shaub, Moody Bible M. E. Church 

Harrisburg, Pa. Institute 

Archibald Wilson Webster, Princeton Southern Illinois 

St. Louis, Mo. 

SPECIAL STUDENTS. 

Ernest Spencer Abbott St. Louis, Mo. 

J. Allen Anderson Pattonville, Mo. 

Charles George Arras East St. Louis, 111. 

Howard Lawrence Bourner St. Louis, Mo. 

Lewis Daniel Brewer St. Louis, Mo. 

Harry Wesley Curtis Wellston, Mo. 

Adele Lucina Eames St. Louis, Mo. 

Mrs. A. W. Gordon St. Louis, Mo. 

William F. McAllister Chicago, 111. 



XENIA THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 13 

Of those here classed as special students, some are working 
as they have time toward the completion of a regular course of 
study, and will be given ranking in the regular classes as soon 
as their work justifies such classification. 

The following students in Washington University pursued 
a course of study in the English Bible. 

Jessie Chamberlain. 
Mary L,. Chamberlain. - 
Inez Kimball. 
Jane Belle Sante. 
vYdele Lucina Eames. 
Geo. E. Egger, Jr. 

SUMMARY OF STUDENTS. 

Graduate School 12 

Seniors 5 

Middlers 12 

Juniors 12 

Special 9 

In University _ 6 

Total (excluding duplicate) 55 



14 XENIA THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 



OUTLINE OF STUDY FOR THE SESSION OF 
1923-1924. 



CHURCH HISTORY. 
PROFESSOR JESSE JOHNSON. 

Required Courses. 

Junior Class. — Two hours a week throughout the year. Out- 
line study of the history of the Church to the birth of Luther, 
1483. 

Middle Class. — Two hours a week throughout the year. The 
period to be covered will be from the birth of Luther, 1483, to 
the Peace of Westphalia, 1648. As part of the work of this year, 
there will be required of United Presbyterian students a study 
of the Westminster Assembly, and of the Testimony of the United 
Presbyterian Church. The work just mentioned may be taken 
by students of other churches if they desire. 

Senior Class. — Two hours a week throughout the year. A 
study of the Reformation in the lands outside Germany, followed 
by an outline study of the Church from 1648 to the present time. 
A review of Modern Missions. The churches at the present time, 
especially in the United States. The history of the Presbyterian 
churches receives special attention. 

The work in Church History is done by means of textbooks, 
lectures on important events and movements, library readings and 
students' reports on assigned topics. 

Elective Courses, 

1. Studies in the lives and writings of the early Church 
Fathers. Open to those who have studied General Church His- 
tory to 590 A. D. (Minor.) 

2. Early doctrinal discussions. Open to those who have 
studied General Church History to 1483 A. D. (Major.) 

3. The Era of the Reformation. Open to those who have 
studied General Church History to 1483 A. D., and who have a 
knowledge of the Protestant Reformation in outline. (Major.) 



/ 

XENIA THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 15 

4. Origin and history of the United Presbyterian Church 
of North America. A prerequisite to this is a fair knowledge 
of the history of the Reformation in Scotland. (Minor.) 

5. American Church History. Open to those who have 
studied General Church History to 1648 A. D. A review of 
the Reformation in some such work as Lindsay's two volumes 
would be a good preparation for this course. This will be the 
course in Church History offered to resident students of the 
Graduate School. 

APOLOGETICS. 
PROFESSOR JESSE JOHXSOX. 

All Seniors and Middlers meet as one class one hour a week 
throughout the year. The subject for 1923-1924 will be the 
Evidences of Christianity. During the second semester a course 
of lectures will be given on current religious isms. 

OLD TESTAMENT DEPARTMENT. 
PROFESSOR J. E. WISHART* 

Required Courses. 

1. The Hebrew Language. Open to Juniors. The study of 
the principles of Hebrew Grammar, the acquiring of a working 
vocabulary, and the reading of the first eight chapters of Genesis, 
and of a portion of some one of the historical books. The text- 
books are Harper's Hebrew Grammar, and Harper's Hebrew 
Method and Manual. 

2. Hebrew Exegesis. The Major Prophets. The interpre- 
tation of selected chapters, with special reference to contem- 
porary history. Two hours a week on alternate years. Open 
to the Middlers and Seniors, 1924-1925. 

3. Hebrew Exegesis. The Minor Prophets and the Psalms. 
The interpretation of selected portions, with special reference to 
contemporary history, and some study of Hebrew poetry and 
other points bearing on the Psalter. Two hours a week on alter- 
nate years. Open to Middlers and Seniors, 1923-1924. 

4. Introduction to the Hebrew Bible. A study of the origin 
and transmission of the Old Testament Scriptures, on the basis 

♦Resigned, May, 1923. 



16 XENIA THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

of Geden's Introduction to the Hebrew Bible. One hour a week, 
during the second semester. Open to Juniors. 

5. Introduction to the literature of the Old Testament. A 
study of some of the more advanced problems of criticism, such 
as the unity, authorship, date and historical setting of different 
sections of the Old Testament ; usually on the basis of a suitable 
text-book. One hour a week, on alternate years. Open to Mid- 
dlers and Seniors, 1923-1924. 

6. The Geography of Palestine. On the basis of The His- 
torical Geography of the Holy Land, by Sir George Adam Smith. 
One hour a week on alternate years. Open to Middlers and 
Seniors, 1924-1925. 

Elective Courses. 

7. Biblical Aramaic. A study of the elements of the lan- 
guage and the reading of the Aramaic sections of the Old Testa- 
ment. The text-book is Marti's Biblisch-Aramaeische Gram- 
matik. Open to Middlers and Seniors. (Minor.) 

8. The Septuagint. The reading of selected portions of the 
Old Testament in Greek, comparing with the Hebrew and with 
other versions, and the study of the origin and the problems of 
the Septuagint, on the basis of Swete's "Introduction to the Old 
Testament in Greek." Open to Middlers and Seniors. (Major.) 

9. The Minor Prophets. In English. An analysis and a 
study of the historical setting, the meaning, and the lessons of 
each book. The chief commentaries recommended are The Ex- 
positors Bible, The New Century Bible, and The Cambridge 
Bible. Open to Middlers and Seniors. (Minor.) 

10. The Wisdom Literature of the Old Testament. In 
English. An analysis and a study of the historical setting, the 
meaning, and the lessons of Job, Proverbs, Ecclesiastes, and The 
Song of Songs. On the basis chiefly of The Expositor's Bible, 
The Cambridge Bible, and The New Century Bible.. Open to 
Middlers and Seniors. (Minor.) 

11. Extra-Canonical Jewish Literature from 200 B. C. to 
100 A. D. A study of the books contained in Charles' "Apocrypha 
and Pseudepigrapha" and some selections from Philo and Jose- 
phus. Open to Middlers and Seniors. (Major.) 



XENIA THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 17 

GREEK EXEGESIS. 
PROFESSOR J. H. WEBSTER. 

Required Courses. 

1. The Junior Class will read the Gospel according to John 
and will be drilled in sight reading. 

Green's Hand-Book to the Grammar of New Testament 
Greek will be used. 

2. The Middle Class will study the Pastoral Epistles and 
The Acts. 

3. The Senior Class will study Romans, Ephesians and 
other selected portions of the Greek New Testament. 

NEW TESTAMENT LITERATURE. 
PROFESSOR J. H. WEBSTER. 

~4, In New Testament Literature, the Acts to Philippians 
will be studied. This course will embrace tHe genuineness, au- 
thenticity, and design, of each book with a full analysis of its 
contents. The basis of study will be Kerr's Introduction to the 
Study of the Books of the New Testament. The History of 
Textual Criticism will receive due attention. 

Elective Courses. 

5. New Testament Introduction. (Major 240.) 

6. The Epistle to the Hebrews, (Minor 120.) 

7. The Johannine Writings. (Major 240.) 

8. The Pastoral Epistles. (Minor 120.) 

BIBLICAL THEOLOGY AND BIBLICAL ARCHAEOLOGY. 
PROFESSOR M. G. KYLE. 

Work in this Department has a two-fold purpose: to know 
the Progress of Revelation and to know it in its Setting; so 
there are Studies in the Progress of Revelation to acquire a 
comprehensive grasp of what the Bible teaches as a whole and 
in its various parts in the order of Revelation, together with the 
Study of the Historical Setting of Scripture made known through 
Archaeological Research, in order to see the truths of Revelation 
as those saw them to whom they were revealed. 



18 XENIA THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

Biblical Theology. 

PROFESSOR M. G. KYLE. 

Required Courses. 

There are class-room studies and quizzes through which the 
student discovers for himself the plan and progress of Revela- 
tion ; also theses by all the students, together with assigned library 
research work. The Bible is the only text-book used, the English 
Bible for constant work, and the Hebrew and Septuagint Old 
Testament, and the Greek New Testament for reference. 

1. The whole course covers the Patriarchal Period, the 
Tribal Period, the National Period, the Messianic Period, and the 
Apostolic Period. This year, the work will cover the National 
Period from the Conquest of Canaan to the end of the Old Testa- 
ment Period. 

Principal subjects : The Sheltering Providence of God in the 
Promised Land; The Development in the Time of the Judges; 
The Great Emergence in the Days of David ; The Great Period 
of Biblical Literature ; The Decline and Apostasy ; The Exile and 
Reformation ; The Return and the Second Glory of Israel ; Mes- 
sianism, Prophetism and Inspiration. 

Elective Courses. 

2. Study of Biblical Methods. (Major, 240; Minor, 120.) 

3. Prophetism and Prophecy. (Major, 240; Minor, 120.) 

4. Book Study. (Major, 240; Minor, 120.) 

Biblical Archaeology. 

PROFESSOR M. G. KYL.E. 

Required Courses. 

There are lectures from the Monuments and from first- 
hand research, so arranged with the studies in Biblical Theology 
as to enable the student constantly to see the Biblical story in its 
original setting. It follows thus the same order of Periods as 
Biblical Theology. (See above.) To this are added quizzes, much 
library work and an assigned reading course throughout the 
year. 

1. All classes this year will study the Patriarchal Period. 
Principal subjects: Literary Methods of Early Biblical Times: 



XENIA THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 19 

Primitive Man and the Temptation ; Antediluvian Civilization 
and Revelation ; The Deluge ; Abraham and His Times ; The 
( Descent Into Egypt. 

Junior Class — Some introductory lectures will be given the 
Junior Class to prepare them for a proper understanding of the 
work in the general course. 

2. Middle Class— The Middle Class will be directed in re- 
search work and the preparation of theses utilizing archaeological 
material in Exegesis and for sermon illustrations. 

3. Senior Class — A special course of lectures is given the 
Senior Class on the Canons and Fallacies of Research. A special 
graduating thesis is required of each member of the Senior Class 
upon an assigned subject. 

Public research lectures are given each year out of the 
research work of the professor in charge of the department. The 
lectures this year will be on the subject, "Jerusalem from the 
Walls." Two lectures, fully illustrated from photographs, 1921. 

Elective Courses. 
ARCHAEOLOGY. 

4. Archaeology of the Bible, especially Archaeological 
Material for Homiletical Uses. (Major, 240; Minor, 120.) 

5. Methods of Archaeological Research, Canons and 
Fallacies. (Major, 240 — by residence only.) 

6. Archaeology and Criticism. (Major, 240; Minor, 120.) 

PASTORAL THEOLOGY. 
PROFESSOR M. G. KYLE. 

Required Courses. 

Instruction in Pastoral Theology is by means of studies, 
quizzes, lectures and practical exercises for each class separately, 
together with practical training for all classes in the problems of 
personal effort in soul saving. 

Junior Class. 

The Minister as a Student. 

1. Subjects: 

(1) The Call to the Ministry; Scripture Warrant, Psycho- 
logical Basis; Essential Elements. 



20 XENIA THEOLOGICAL, SEMINARY 

(2) Habits: Personal Habits, Study Habits, Devotional 
Habits. 

(3) Ministerial Manliness. 

(4) Ministerial Ideals. 

(5) Keeping One's Self. 

(6) Settlement, Candidating, Installation. 

Middle Class. 
The Minister as a Pastor in the Congregation. 

2. Subjects: 

(1) The Pastor in the Pulpit. 

(2) The Problems of the Ministerial Life. 

(3) A Study of Methods: Social Methods, Business 
Methods, Spiritual Methods. 

(4) The Pastor and the Sabbath. School : Methods and 
Ideals. 

(5) The Pastor in the Prayer Services: Congregational 
Prayer Meeting, Young People's Meetings, Prayer Circles. 

Senior Class. 

The Minister as a Pastor in the Larger Relations to the Church 

and the Community. 

3. Subjects: 

(1) Pastoral Evangelism. 

(2) Sociological Problems: City Life Problems, Country 
Life Problems, The Institutional Church. 

(3) The Ministry of Sympathy: Pastoral Visiting, the 
Pastor as Counsellor. 

(4) The Pastor in the Benevolences of the Church. 

(5) Ecclesiastical Relations. 

SABBATH SCHOOL PEDAGOGY AND PRACTICAL EVANGELISM. 

4. Instruction in that division of Practical Theology which 
in modern usage is styled "Religious Education" has been estab- 
lished and now has place in the regular schedule of recitations 
(the second semester of each third year, 1924-1927). This in- 
cludes instruction in plans of organization and administration 
of the Sabbath School, and practical exemplification and appli- 
cation of the best methods of evangelism, and conduct of public 
services. 



XENIA THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 21 

Elective Courses. 
PASTORAL EVANGELISM. 

1. Scriptural Basis. (Minor, 30.) 

2. Psychological Problems. (Minor, 90.) 

3. Sociological Problems. (Minor, 60.) 

' 4. A Study of Methods. (Minor,. 30 — by residence only.) 

DEPARTMENT OF SYSTEMATIC THEOLOGY AND HOMILETICS. 

SYSTEMATIC THEOLOGY. 
PROFESSOR ROBT. M. KERR. 

Required Courses. 

1. Systematic Theology is studied throughout the entire 
course of Seminary training, two recitations a week, with exami- 
nations in December and April, being required. According, to the 
present arrangement of studies in this department, the first divi- 
sion of the course, "The Doctrine of God," will occupy the atten- 
tion of students of all classes during the session. This subject 
is treated in Vol. I, pp. 1-370, of Professor Strong's Systematic 
Theology (complete work), which is the text-book now in use. 
Supplemental lectures will be given on such topics as may require 
additional treatment. 

Elective Courses. 

2. The Inspiration of the Scriptures. (Major.) 

3. The Person of Christ. (Major.) 
• 4. The Doctrine of Sin. (Minor.) 

5. The Atonement. (Major.) 

6. The Second Advent. (Minor.) 

HOMILETICS. 
PROFESSOR ROBT. M. KERR. 

1. The Junior Class will devote one recitation period a week 
throughout the session to the general principles of sermonizing 
and preaching as these are outlined in the text-book employed, 
viz., "The Preparation and Delivery of Sermons," by Professor 
Broadus. 

2. The students of the Middle Class will be trained in 
the analysis of texts, in the construction and criticism of sermon- 



22 XENIA THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

outlines, and in the criticism of published discourses of acknowl- 
edged merit. One hour a week throughout the session will be 
devoted to this discipline. 

3. The members of all classes will take their turn in the 
student-preaching service, held once a week in the Chapel. One 
sermon is required of each Senior, and two of each Middler and 
Junior during the session. The exercise is followed by friendly 
criticism and suggestion from members of the Faculty and from 
student-critics appointed from week to week. 

HISTORY OF CHRISTIAN DOCTRINE. 
PROFESSOR ROBT. M. KERR. 

1. The Senior Class will devote one period a week to the 
completion of the two-year course begun last year, using the 
text, "History of Christian Doctrine, 1 " by Professor Geo. P. 
Fisher. They will be concerned with the development of The- 
ology in the Modern Period. 

2. Beginning with this year, the History of Christian Doc- 
trine as treated in this department, will be closely co-ordinated 
with Systematic Theology. Accordingly, all the classes will meet 
together once a week to study the history of those doctrines com- 
prised under the general head of "The Doctrine of God," which 
is the subject of study in theology for the year. This doctrinal 
history will be dealt with by means of lectures and assigned 
reading. 

CHURCH GOVERNMENT AND WORSHIP. 

PROFESSOR ROBT. M. KERR. 

Last year, in connection with the theological subjects of the 
Church and the Sacraments, "The Book of Government and 
Worship" of the United Presbyterian Church was taken up for 
special study. This plan of co-ordination will be adhered to in 
the future. From year to year, however, the attention of Juniors, 
Middlers, and Seniors will be directed to the study of those 
particular sections of the Book of Government which bear upon 
the presbyterial care and licensure of probationers and the ordi- 
nation and installation of ministers. The Testimony of the United 
Presbyterian Church will also be reviewed by the Seniors. 



' XENIA THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 23 

COMPARATIVE RELIGION. 
PROFESSOR ROBT. M. KERR. 

The Senior Class will receive a course of training in Com- 
parative Religion, with special reference to conditions that prevail 
in our Foreign Mission Fields. The Handbook of Comparative 
Religion by the Rev. S. H. Kellogg, D. D., LL.D., will be used 
to mark out the line of study to be pursued. The classes in 
theology, while engaged in the study of "The Doctrine of God," 
will compare and contrast the Christian teaching with that of 
the world religions concerning God. 

CHRISTIAN SOCIOLOGY. 
PROFESSOR ROBT. M. KERR. 

The Senior Class will study the social teachings of the 
Gospel, the principles involved and their application to modern 
problems. In addition to the mastery of a text-book, each member 
of the class will be assigned some book for review. 

PUBLIC SPEAKING. 
PROFESSOR T. S. DUNCAN. 

A course in the principles and practice of public speaking. 
The various types of speech are studied in detail and students 
are drilled in the important types. Considerable attention is given 
to debating. Careful study is made not only of delivery but of 
the proper method of arranging material. In the study of the 
Speech care is taken to relate the work to the special needs of the 
minister. 

The course includes practice in the reading of the Scriptures 
with a view to making this part of the church service more 
effective. 

An attempt is made to give a fair amount of individual atten- 
tion to students who seem to be especially in need of the work. 

ADMISSION OF STUDENTS,* 

The privileges of the seminary shall be open on equal terms 
to students of all evangelical denominations. The applicant shall 
present evidence of membership in good standing in his own, 
church, a certificate from his presbytery or other ecclesiastical 
authorities, and credentials indicating that he has received the 



24 • XENIA THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

degree of B. A. from a college or university, or that he has taken 
courses of study fairly equivalent thereto, especially in the classi- 
cal languages. The Faculty shall, in the latter case, determine 
whether the academic attainments of the candidate are sufficient, 
upon the basis of reports of the work done, recommendations 
from church courts or competent individuals, and examinations. 
The courses offered shall be these : 

Course A. This shall be the standard required course, in- 
cluding, besides the other disciplines, study of the Bible in the 
original languages, throughout the three years. All who have 
the requisite preliminary training are urged to adopt it. Gradu- 
ates will receive a diploma, and may be candidates for the degree 
of Bachelor of Divinity. 

Course B. This shall be called the Greek-English Course, 
and shall be open to those who elect not to study Hebrew, but 
have sufficient academic training, including at least two years of 
Greek. This course shall also entitle graduates to an appropriate 
diploma. 

Course C. Those whose college or university work is not 
regarded as sufficient, or who for any reason are prevented from 
pursuing full courses, shall be permitted to enter for any subjects 
with which they are competent to deal, and shall, on graduation, 
or on completion of their studies, receive certificates indicating 
the work done, and commending them to the churches. 

THE DEGREE OF BACHELOR OF DIVINITY, 

Students who hold from an institution approved by the 
Faculty the degree of Bachelor or Master of Arts, and have com- 
pleted, either in this Seminary or any school of theology of like 
character, the several courses of study that constitute the stand- 
ard curriculum, may be granted the degree of Bachelor of Divin- 
ity, after they shall have pursued satisfactorily a one year's course 
of Extra-Curriculum study in this institution. The courses shall 
be arranged and the examinations shall be conducted by the 
Faculty. Undergraduates who maintain an average grade of 85, 
with not less than 80 in any department, may take one-third of 
the course leading to the degree of Bachelor of Divinity, in ad- 
dition to the required work,' each year. 



XBNIA THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 25- 



FELLOWSHIPS AND SPECIAL 
OPPORTUNITIES. 



Xenia Seminary is one of the group of Universities, Colleges 
and Theological Seminaries in this country co-operating in the 
support and control of the American School of Oriental Research 
in. Jerusalem and is thus able to offer to her students the unique 
facilities afforded by this School. No other Post-graduate work 
is, or can be, so helpful, as none other is so attractive, to young 
men looking forward to the work of the Ministry, as study and 
research in Bible lands. The x\merican School of Oriental Re- 
search at Jerusalem was founded to afford such opportunities as 
have never before been open to American students. Special 
arrangements are made to reduce the expenses of such students 
to the lowest point. 

ADMISSION TO THE SCHOOL AT JERUSALEM. 

The School offers to properly qualified students excellent 
opportunities for pursuing such studies as the following : Biblical 
and Palestinian Archaeology ; the Geography and Natural Fea- 
tures of the Land ; the History of Israel ; Early Church History 
and Patristics ; the Arabic Language, and the other Semitic Lan- 
guages as connected with it ; Mohammedanism ; the Political, 
Social and Industrial Conditions in Bible Lands ; Roman Admin- 
istration and Colonization in the East ; the Crusades ; and the 
Comparative History of Religions. 

The School has a well selected working library, which is 
steadily growing. There are other considerable libraries in Jeru- 
salem, some of which contain large collections of manuscripts, 
chiefly Greek and Arabic. As a central point for the study of 
Palestinian antiquities, for making tours of research and explora- 
tion, and for visiting the numerous scenes of past or present 
excavations, Jerusalem is peculiarly well situated. 

Those who avail themselves of the privileges of this School 
can go at once after the Commencement at St. Louis, and enter 
the School at Jerusalem. The altitude and the latitude of Jeru- 



26 XENIA THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

salem make the summer climate there quite satisfactory. The 
remainder of the year will afford abundant opportunity for travel 
through the land and researches in Historical Geography and 
Archaeology. 

THE THAYER MEMORIAL FELLOWSHIP. 

The Thayer Memorial Fellowship of the School at Jerusalem, 
with a stipend of $800, is awarded annually on examination. A 
list of the books recommended to candidates for the Fellowship, 
and special facilities for preparation, will be supplied by the 
Seminary. 

OTHER FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE. 

Members of the Junior Class will receive the sum of fifty 
dollars each on condition of their engaging in religious work not 
otherwise fully compensated, in the churches of this community, 
or in adjacent fields. 

From a fund gathered from private sources, and placed at the 
disposal of the Faculty, additional aid will be granted as there 
may be need to any whose work in the class-room is of standard 
character. 

COURSES FOR LAY-WORKERS. 

Students not candidates for the ministry, but seeking train- 
ing for general Christian work or for positions as Biblical in- 
structors in schools and colleges, may select courses of study for 
one, two or three years. Such students will be accorded all the 
privileges of the institution, and every effort will be made to 
meet their requirements. Plans are under way greatly to extend 
this department. 

This opportunity will be especially advantageous to those 
who propose to be medical missionaries and wish to pursue their 
studies in the Medical Department of Washington University. 



XENIA THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 27 



HISTORICAL SKETCH. 



Owing to the various unions and consolidations of theological 
seminaries that have been effected in the history of our church, 
both before and after the year 1858, whence is dated the assump- 
tion of her distinctive ecclesiastical title, the Xenia Theological 
Seminary is in a peculiar sense a United Presbyterian school of 
the prophets. She is the lineal descendant of the three Associate 
Presbyterian seminaries, or rather, of the seminary that had 
three local habitations ; and she holds also the honorable heritage 
received from the Associate Reformed Presbyterian Seminary, 
which was first located at Oxford, Ohio, and later was removed 
to Monmouth, Illinois. 

I. THE ASSOCIATE SEMINARY AT SERVICE. 

When the Rev. John Anderson, D. D., was appointed pro- 
fessor of theology for the Associate Church, April 21, 1794, the 
history of the Xenia Theological Seminary began. In the woods 
near to his own pioneer home Dr. Anderson built a log cabin, 
containing recitation and library room, with dormitory adjoining, 
and there for a full quarter of a century he was the sole instructor 
of the young men who were preparing for the ministry of that 
church. This historic site has been marked by the erection of a 
memorial stone which was dedicated with appropriate ceremony 
on the twenty-second day of June, 1916. 

II. THE ASSOCIATE SEMINARY AT PHILADELPHIA. 

Following the resignation of Dr. Anderson, in 1819, the 
Associate Synod appointed the Rev. John Banks, D. D., to the 
work of training her candidates for the ministry. A second semi- 
nary was opened in Philadelphia, the home of Dr. Banks, and 
was conducted by him without assistance until his death, which 
occurred April 10, 1826. In the meantime the original seminary 
had been transferred to Canonsburg, Pa., and on the death of 
Dr. Banks the work was consolidated at that place. 



28 XENIA THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

111. THE ASSOCIATE SEMINARY AT CANONSBURG. 

The Service Seminary continued to hold the field in the 
West until the election of the Rev. James Ramsey, of Canons- 
burg, Pa., in 1821, to fill the vacancy occasioned by the resig- 
nation of Dr. Anderson. In this case, as was the rule in those 
days, the professor was the seminary ; and the parsonage, located 
on a farm one mile from the town, became the resort of the 
young candidates for the ministry. 

While the action of the Associate Synod uniting the two 
divisions of the seminary was taken in 1828, it was not fully 
carried out until 1830, when it was resolved to erect a building 
in the town and to consummate the purpose by the election of 
Dr. Ramsey to the professorship of the reunited branches. Here 
for a full generation, 1821-1855, the seminary had its home. In 
the year 1833 a new departure was taken in the establishment of 
a professorship of Biblical Literature and Church' History. The 
Rev. David Carson, of Blount County, Tenn., was selected to 
occupy this chair, but just before the opening of the seminary, 
on September 23, 1834, he finished his work on earth. 

IV. THE ASSOCIATE SEMINARY AT XENIA. 

The Rev. Abraham Anderson, D. D., who had filled the pro- 
fessorship of Didactic and Polemic Theology for eight years, 
died on the 8th of May, 1855. The Synod met a few weeks later 
and the Rev. Samuel Wilson, D. D., pastor of the Associate con- 
gregation of Xenia, Ohio, was elected to the vacant position. 
Again the seminary came to the professor, the Synod deciding 
upon removal to Xenia. The one remaining member of the 
Canonsburg faculty, the Rev. Thomas Beveridge, D. D., had been 
pastor of the Xenia congregation for a little more than three 
years, 1821-1824, hence the old school of the prophets had a 
double welcome to its new home, since it had come to the com- 
munity in which the Associate Church of the West had its first 
establishment and had for its instructors men so loved and hon- 
ored by the people. 

V. THE ASSOCIATE REFORMED SEMINARY AT OXFORD. 

The founding of the Oxford Seminary dates from the meet- 
ing of the Associate Reformed Synod in the month of October, 




MAIN ENTRANCE TO WASHINGTON UNIVERSITY 



XBNIA THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 29 

1837, but the opening of the first session was delayed for two 
years. The Rev. Joseph Claybaugh, D. D., was practically the 
sole professor from the date of the opening until his death, 
September 9, 1855. The Rev. Alexander Young, D. D., was 
chosen to succeed Dr. Claybaugh, and entered upon his duties in 
the fall of 1855. At the meeting of Synod in 1857 action was 
taken, in view of the prospect for union with the Associate 
Church, transferring the seminary from Oxford, Ohio, to Mon- 
mouth, Illinois, in order that one of the four seminaries of the 
united church might be located in the West. 

VI. THE UNITED PRESBYTERIAN SEMINARY AT MONMOUTH. 

Monmouth Seminary opened about the first of September, 
1858, as a United Presbyterian seminary, under the care of Pro- 
fessors Alexander Young, D. D., and John Scott, D. D., and 
continued the work of training ministers until the fall of 1874, 
when it was transferred to Xenia, Ohio, and united with the 
seminary located there. Dr. Young retired from his connection 
with the seminary at the time of its transfer, but Dr. Scott was 
recognized as professor emeritus until his death, in 1877. 

VII. THE UNITED PRESBYTERIAN SEMINARY AT XENIA. 

With few exceptions the supporters of Xenia Seminary en- 
tered the union of 1858, which gave to the institution its second 
title, as it appears on its charter: "The United Presbyterian 
Seminary of Xenia, Ohio." 

Soon after this union of blessed memory and issue, the 
faculty of the seminary was strengthened by the election of the 
Rev. Joseph Clokey, D. D., then pastor of the Springfield, Ohio, 
congregation, to the Chair of Pastoral Theology and Sacred 
Rhetoric. Dr. Clokey had been a leader in the Associate Re- 
formed Presbyterian Church, and his election was a testimony 
to the seminary's whole-hearted entrance into the union of the 
two churches. The war between the states, 1861-1865, seriously 
interfered with the work of the seminary in the way of lessening 
the attendance of students, but the sessions opened and closed 
without interruption as in the days of peace. 

• Following the transfer of the interests of Monmouth Semi- 
nary to Xenia, the seminary came under the control of the synods 



XENIA THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 



of Illinois, Iowa, and Kansas, in addition to that of the Second. 
Synod. The synod of Nebraska, on its organization, also became 
one of the governing bodies. 

VIII. THE UNITED PRESBYTERIAN SEMINARY AT ST. LOUIS. 

At a special meeting of the Board of Managers, held on 
December 3, 1919, it was decided that the seminary should be 
removed to a new location, and a commission consisting of a 
minister and an elder from each of the five Synods which con- 
trol the institution, was appointed to select the site. This com- 
mission held several meetings and carefully canvassed the situa- 
tion, certain of their number visiting the places that were con- 
sidered most advantageous. After mature deliberation the com- 
mission fixed upon the City of St. Louis as the future home of the 
Seminary. This decision of the Commission was unanimously 
approved by the Board and by the Synods. 

WASHINGTON UNIVERSITY. 

One of the chief considerations which induced the Commis- 
sion of the Board of Managers, charged with the relocation of 
Xenia Theological Seminary, to fix upon the City of St. Louis, 
was the extremely favorable university connection that was 
offered. Washington University is an old and honored founda- 
tion, with magnificent buildings, and is regarded as the greatest 
graduate school of the whole Southwest. Xenia's new location 
is within a few minutes' walk of its grounds. Through the 
courtesy of the Chancellor and the other authorities, a full ex- 
change of credits has been granted, without any control of our 
teachings or policies. So short is the distance that those wishing 
to complete their academic course or to work for an advanced 
degree, can do so without inconvenience or loss of time. The 
advantages of this affiliation will, it is thought, be very great. 

OPPORTUNITIES FOR WORK. 

The Seminary has received a most warm and hearty welcome 
in the City of St. Louis. So great a center of population, of 
course, offers an excellent field for Christian effort and for socio- 
logical study. It also affords great advantages in the matter of 



XENIA THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 31 

employment for those who must make their own way. The 
churches are most enthusiastic in pledging co-operation and sup- 
port. Such support was, of course, expected from the United 
Presbyterian congregations, and it is being given in full measure. 
But other denominations, especially the Presbyterians, U. S., the 
Presbyterians, U. S. A., the Congregationalists, and the Meth- 
odists, have assumed a most sympathetic attitude, have yielded 
the field to us with assurance of their best wishes and their 
patronage, and in some cases propose to employ the students of 
the Seminary in congregational work. 

During the one hundred and twenty-nine years of the semi- 
nary's history, under various names and in different localities, 
in all thirty men have served as instructors for more or less 
extended periods of time. The roll of professors is as follows : 

Name Seminary Period of Service 

John Anderson Service 1794-1819 

John Banks Philadelphia 1820-1826 

James Ramsey Canonsburg 1821-1842 

David Carson Canonsburg 1834-1834 

Thomas Beveridge Canonsburg 1835-1855 

Thomas Beveridge Xenia 1855-1871 

Joseph Claybaugh Oxford 1839-1855 

Samuel W. McCracken Oxford 1839-1840 

James Martin Canonsburg 1842-1846 

Abraham Anderson Canonsburg 1847-1855 

Samuel Wilson Xenia 1855-1875 

William Davidson Oxford 1855-1858 

Alexander Young Oxford 1855-1857 

Alexander Young Monmouth 1858-1874 

John Scott Monmouth 1858-1874 

Joseph Clokey Xenia 1858-1873 

Andrew M. Black Monmouth 1864-1874 

David A. Wallace Monmouth 1867-1870 

David A. Wallace Xenia 1883-1883 

William Bruce Xenia 1871-1880 

James G. Carson Xenia 1873-1888 

William G. Moorehead Xenia 1873-1914 

Jackson B. McMichael Xenia 1873-1878 



32 XBNIA THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

Name Seminary Period of Service 

James Harper .Xenia 1879-1899 

David MacDill Xenia 1884-1902 

Wilbert W. White ...Xenia 1889-1894 

John D. Irons Xenia 1895-1905 

Joseph Kyle : Xenia 1899-1921 

Jesse Johnson Xenia 1902 

John E. Wishart Xenia .' 1905-1923 

John H. Webster Xenia ...1908 

Melvin G. Kyle Xenia 1914 

Robert M. Kerr Xenia 1922 



XENIA THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 33 



GENERAL INFORMATION. 



STUDENTS. 

Persons wishing to enter the Seminary shall present to the 
Faculty satisfactory evidence of church membership and piety ; 
and students of the United Presbyterian Church shall be under 
the care of some Presbytery before entering the Seminary, or 
as soon thereafter as possible. The Faculty will admit, at their 
discretion, students of other denominations. 

All students are required to be present at the opening of 
each semester. Absences at any time affect the standing of 
students. 

Before being admitted to the Seminary, every student shall, 
in the presence of the Faculty, subscribe to a written declara- 
tion to the effect that while he is a student in the Seminary he 
will regularly, punctually and diligently attend upon all the in- 
structions of the Professors and promptly comply with all lawful 
requisitions of the Faculty, and be subject to their authority; 
that he will honestly conform to all regulations of the Seminary 
and that he. will not propagate any opinion in opposition to the 
principles of the United Presbyterian Church. 

Every student who has been accepted by the Faculty as a 
candidate for graduation, and who has completed the prescribed 
course of study and passed the required examinations, shall be 
publicly graduated and receive a proper diploma or certificate. 
And all students are required to be present at commencement 
for promotion unless excused by the Board of Managers. 

THE LIBRARY. 

The number of volumes in the library is about 15,000. The 
books have been thoroughly classified and the library thus made 
readily available to the students for investigations upon any 
subject. 

Through the generosity of the late Mr. Alexander Dempster, 
of Pittsburgh, Pa., the Seminary has been provided with the 
raised map of Palestine published by the Palestine Exploration 



XENIA THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 



Fund, London, England, from surveys made by George Arm- 
strong. This map is very valuable in the study of Sacred Geog- 
raphy and History. 

THE TAGGART LIBRARY. 

A very important addition to our library has been made 
through a generous donation on the part of the owner, and pur- 
chase on the part of the Seminary, of a large portion of the library 
of the Reverend R. B. Taggart, D. D., of Morganton, North 
Carolina. Dr. Taggart has succeeded in getting together one of 
the largest and finest collections of works on The Psalms to be 
found in any library. Among these is a very rare and valuable 
copy of the Huguenot Psalter. Very few copies of this splendid 
French Psalter are in existence. The Seminary has profited to 
the full by the success of Dr. Taggart, and his kindly interest in 
the welfare of his Alma Mater is greatly appreciated. 

THE MISSIONARY SOCIETY. 

The Students' Missionary Society meets weekly for prayer 
and conference. The society is connected with the American 
Inter-Seminary Missionary Alliance. To the good work of this 
organization is largely due the excellent Missionary spirit which 
prevails among the students. It has furnished most commend- 
able supplemental work to that of the class-room on the subject 
of Missions. 

RELIGIOUS EXERCISES. 

A weekly prayer meeting, attended by the Faculty and stu- 
dents, is held every Tuesday. The students also hold group 
prayer meetings in their rooms on three evenings each week. 

TEXT-BOOKS. 

Necessary reference books and commentaries are found in 
the library, and text-books may be obtained on favorable terms 
at the Seminary book store. 



EXAMINATIONS. 



At the close of each semester examinations are held covering 
the ground gone over in the several departments of study. 



XENIA THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 35 

Ordinarily the examinations are written and are directed by 
the professors and by them are reported to the Board. 

From the class standing - , the examination, and the attendance, 
the grade of the student, based on a scale of 100, is determined, 
and reported to his Presbytery. 

EXPENSES. 

The necessary expenses of a course of theological training 
are reduced to the minimum. There are no "fees" or "rentals" 
for privileges and accommodations. The Seminary dining room 
has been managed most acceptably, and the cost of maintenance 
has amounted to about $25.00 per month to each person. Stu- 
dents are expected to furnish their own soap and towels and a 
travelling rug will be found a convenience. All other personal 
needs may be supplied on favorable terms through the great 
stores and shops of this "Metropolis of the Central West." 

FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE. 

From the income of our Students' Fund we are prepared 
to loan to those who may desire it, the sum of fifty dollars a 
year, or more in case of real need, on their personal notes, with- 
out interest for five years from date of loan; at the expiration 
of this period, interest at the rate of five per cent, per annum will 
be charged until payment is made. This amount, with funds to 
which worthy students are entitled on proper recommendation 
to the Board of Education, and money which may be earned by 
themselves, will almost, if not altogether, cover the necessary 
expenses of the Seminary session. 

CORRESPONDENCE. 

For catalogues, or any information concerning the work of 
the Seminary, address Professor M. G. Kyle, D. D., LL.D., 
President of the Faculty, $834 Washington Ave., St. Louis, Mo. ; 
or Professor J. H. Webster, D. D., Dean and Secretary of the 
Faculty, 5738 Clemens Ave., St. Louis, Mo. Letters relating to 
the endowment and other funds of the Seminary should be ad- 
dressed to Mr. T. Dales Kyle, Xenia, Ohio, the Financial Secre- 
tary and Treasurer. 



36 XENIA THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

DONATIONS AND BEQUESTS. 

On account of the low rate of interest, a large amount of 
invested funds is required to meet the expenses. Accordingly 
the Seminary is cordially commended to the liberality of those 
to whom our church and ministry are dear. Appeal is also made 
to those making bequests to remember this institution. Special 
attention is requested to the "Annuity Plan." The form which 
should be carefully followed in making donations according to 
this plan may be found under the heading, "Form of Bequest." 



FORM OF BEQUEST. 



FOR PERSONAL PROPERTY. 

I hereby give and bequeath to the Xenia United Presbyterian 
Theological Seminary, of St. Louis, Mo., the sum of 

Dollars, or notes or bonds. 

(Here describe them.) 



FOR REAL ESTATE. 

I give and devise to the Xenia United Presbyterian Theo- 
logical Seminary, of St. Louis, Mo., its successors and assigns, 
forever, the following described tract or lot of land, in township 

of , County of 

State of , and bounded and described as 

follows: (Here describe the piece of land with such accuracy 
and definiteness that it may certainly be known.) If such devisors 
wish to make bequests to any of the Seminary funds (endowment, 
income or library fund), they should specify the particular fund 
they have in view. 



XENIA THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 37 

\ 
FOR ANNUITY BEQUESTS. 

Know all men by these presents : That the Xenia United 
Presbyterian Theological Seminary, St. Louis, Mo., is held and 

firmly bound unto , in the 

sum of Dollars, 

to the payment of which it hereby binds itself, its successors and 
assigns. The foregoing obligation is conditioned and limited as 
follows : 

That, Whereas, the said : 

has this day made a gift to the said, The Xenia United Presby- 
terian Theological Seminary, of St. Louis, Mo., in the said sum of 

Dollars, 

the receipt of which is hereby acknowledged. 

Now, if the said, The Xenia United Presbyterian Theological 
Seminary, of St. Louis, Mo., its successors, and assigns, shall pay 

or cause to be paid, unto the said 

the sum of 

Dollars annually in 

installments, during each and every year 

of the natural life of the said 

and no longer, then this obligation to be void, otherwise to be 
and remain in full force and virtue in law. 



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40 XENIA THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 



OPENING AND CLOSING EXERCISES. 



The opening of the next session, and the enrollment of 
students, will take place on Wednesday, September 19, 1923, at 
1 o'clock p. m. in the Seminary chapel, St. Louis, Mo. 

An address of welcome will be given by the President, M. 
G. Kyle, D. D., LL.D., followed by an address by the President 
of the Board of Managers, Rev. J. B. Pollock. A reteption 
to the students and friends of the Seminary will be tendered the 
same afternoon in the Seminary parlors or elsewhere. 

The inauguration of Melvin Grove Kyle, D. D., ' LL.D., 
President of the Seminary, and Robert M. Kerr, D. D., Professor 
of Systematic Theology and Homiletics, will take place in the 
First United Presbyterian Church, Thursday evening at 8 o'clock, 
September 20th. There will be an address by Pres. W. O. Thomp- 
son, D. D., Ohio State University. 

The opening sermon will be preached on Sabbath, Septem- 
ber 23, 1923, at 8 o'clock p. m., by President J. A. Thompson, 
D. D., Tarkio College. 

The baccalaureate sermon will be preached on Sabbath, 
May 4, 1924, at 8 o'clock p. m., by Professor Robert M. 
Kerr, D. D. 

The closing exercises will be held on Thursday, May 8, 
1923, at 8 o'clock p. m. The Annual Address will be delivered 
by Rev. J. H. Hutchman, D. D., Pittsburg, Ivans. Diplomas 
will be presented and degrees conferred by the President of the 
Faculty. 



XBNIA THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 41 



THE CALENDAR FOR 1923-1924. 



1923. 

September 19, Wednesday, at 1 o'clock p. m.— The opening 
of the session and enrollment of students. Address of Welcome 
by the President. Address by President of Board of Managers, 
Rev. J. B. Pollock. Followed by reception and social. 

September 23, Sabbath, at 8 o'clock p. m. — The opening 
sermon, by President J. A. Thompson, D. D., Tarkio College. 

December 1 — Mid-Term Examinations. 

December 1 — First day of holiday vacation. 

1924. 
January 3 — Recitations begin. 

April 29 — The written examinations begin. 

May 4, Sabbath, at 8 o'clock p. m. — The baccalaureate ser- 
mon, Professor Robt. M. Kerr, D. D. 

May 6 — Tuesday, at 10 o'clock a. m. — The annual meeting 
of the Board of Trustees. 

May 7, Wednesday, at 10 o'clock a. m. — The annual meeting 
of the Board of Managers. Class Theses. 

May 8, Thursday, at 8 o'clock p. m. — The annual address, 
Rev. J. H. Hutchman, D. D., Pittsburg, Kans. ; the promotion 
of classes, the presentation of diplomas, and conferring of degrees 
by the President. 



Itf ^t± 



ANNUAL CATALOGUE 



OF THE 



Xettia Theological 
Seminary 




Service, Pa. 1794 

Canonsburg, Pa. 1821 

Xenia, Ohio 1855 

St. Louis, Mo. 1920 



Calendar for 1924 


JANUARY 


FEBRUARY 


MARCH 


APRIL 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F 8 


S M T W T F 8 


S M T W T F S 


6 
13 
20 
27 


7 
14 
21 
28 


1 

8 

16 

22 

29 


2 

9 

16 

23 

30 


3 
10 
17 
24 
31 


4 
11 

18 
25 


6 
12 
19 
26 












1 

8 

15 

22 

29 


2 

9 

16 

23 














1 

8 

15 

22 

29 


6 
13 
20 
27 


7 
14 
21 
28 


1 
8 

15 
22 
29 


2 

9 

16 

23 

30 


3 
10 
17 
24 


4 
11 
18 
25 


6 

12 
19 
26 


3 
10 
17 
24 


4 
11 
18 
25 


6 
12 
19 
26 


6 
13 
20 
27 


7 
14 
21 
28 


2 

9 
16 
23 
30 


3 
10 
17 
24 
31 


4 
1 1 
16 
25 


6 
12 
19 
26 


6 

13 
20 
27 


7 
14 
21 
28 










MAY 


JUNE 


JULY 


AUGUST 


S M T W T P S 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 










1 

8 
15 
22 
29 


2 

9 

16 

23 

30 


3 
10 
17 

24 
31 


1 

8 
15 

22 
29 


2 

9 

16 

23 

30 


3 
10 
17 
24 


4 
1 1 
18 
25 


5 
12 
19 
26 


6 
13 
20 
27 


7 
14 
21 
28 


6 
13 
20 
27 


7 
14 
21 
28 


1 

8 

16 

22 

29 


2 
9 

16 
23 
30 


3 
10 
17 
24 
31 


4 
1 1 
18 
25 


5 
12 
19 
26 


. 








1 

8 

15 

22 

29 


2 

9 

16 

23 

30 


4 
11 

18 

25 


6 
12 
19 
26 


6 
13 
20 
27 


7 
14 
21 
28 


3 

10 
17 
24 
31 


4 

1 1 
18 
25 


5 
12 
19 
26 


6 

13 
20 
27 


7 
14 
21 
28 












SEPTEMBER 


OCTOBER 


NOVEMBER 


DECEMBER 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


8 M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


7 
14 

21 

28 


1 
8 

15 
22 
29 


2 

9 

16 

23 

30 


3 4 


6 
12 
19 
26 


6 
13 
20 
27 








1 

8 

15 

22 

29 


2 

9 
16 
23 
30 


3 
10 
17 

24 
31 


4 
11 
18 
25 














1 
8 

16 
22 
29 


"7 
14 
21 
28 


1 

8 
15 
22 
29 


2 

9 

16 

23 

30 


3 
10 
17 
24 
31 


4 
1 1 
18 
25 


6 
12 
19 
26 


6 
13 
20 
27 


10 

17 

24 


1 1 
18 
25 


5 
12 
19 
26 


6 
13 
20 

77 


7 
14 
21 
28 


2 
9 

16 
23 
30 


3 
10 
17 
24 


4 

1 1 
18 

25 


5 
12 
19 
26 


6 
13 
20 
27 


7 
14 
21 
28 





















Calendar for 1925 


JANUARY 


FEBRUARY 


MARCH 


APRIL 


S M t W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


,S M T W T F S 










1 

8 

15 

22 

29 


2 

9 

16 

23 

30 


3 
10 
17 
24 
31 


1 

8 

15 

22 


2 

9 

16 

23 


3 
10 
17 
24 


4 
11 
18 
25 


6j 6 
12 13 
1920 
26 27 


7 
14 
21 
28 


1 

8 
15 
22 
29 


2 
9 

16 
23 
30 


3 
10 
17 
24 
31 


4 
1 1 
18 
25 


5 
12 

19 
26 


6 
13 
20 
27 


7 
14 
21 
28 








1 

8 

15 

22 

29 


2 

9 

16 

23 

30 


3 
10 
17 
24 


4 
11 
18 
25 


4 
11 
18 
26 


5 
12 
19 
26 


6 
13 
20 
27 


7 
14 
21 
28 


6 
12 
19 
26 


6 
13 
20 
27 


7 
14 
21 
28 






















MAY 


JUNE 


JULY 


AUGUST 


S M T W T F S 


8 M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 












8 
15 
22 
29 


2 

9 

16 

23 

30 


7 
14 
21 
28 


1 

8 

15 

22 

29 


2 

9 

16 

23 

30 


3 
10 
17 
24 


4 
1 1 
18 
25 


5 
12 
19 
26 


6 
13 
20 
27 








1 

8 

15 

22 

29 


2 

9 

16 

23 

30 


3 
10 
17 
24 
31 


4 
1 1 
18 
26 












1 

8 

15 

22 

29 


3 
10 
17 
24 
31 


4 
11 
18 
25 


5 
12 
19 
26 


6 
13 

20 
27 


7 
14 
21 
28 


6 
12 
19 
26 


6 
13 
20 
27 


7 
14 
21 
28 


2 

9 

16 

23 

30 


3 

10 
17 
24 

31 


4 
11 
18 
26 


6 
12 
19 
26 


6 
13 
20 
27 


7 
14 
21 
28 










SEPTEMBER 


OCTOBER 


NOVEMBER 


DECEMBER * 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


6 
13 
20 
27 


7 
14 
21 
28 


1 

8 

16 

22 

29 


2 

9 

16 

23 

30 


3 
10 
17 
24 


4 
1 1 
18 
25 


6 
12 
19 
26 










1 
8 

15 
22 
29 


2 

9 

16 

23 

30 


3 
10 
17 
24 
31 


1 

8 

15 

22 

29 


2 

9 

16 

23 

30 


3 
10 
17 
24 


4 
1 1 
18 
25 


5 
12 
19 
26 


6 
13 
20 
27 


7 
14 
21 
28 




1 

8 
15 
22 
29 


2 

9 

16 

23 

30 


3 
10 

■ 7 
24 
31 


4 
1 1 
18 
25 


6 
12 
19 
26 


4 
1 1 
18 
25 


5 
12 
19 
26 


6 
13 
20 
27 


7 
14 
21 
28 


6 

13 
20 
27 


7 
14 
21 
28 



















THE ANNUAL CATALOGUE 



OF THE 



Xenia 

United Presbyterian 

Theological Seminary 

of St. Louis, Missouri 



ONE HUNDRED AND THIRTY-FIRST YEAR 
1924-1925 



TABLE OF CONTENTS. 



PAGE 

Calendar 1924 and 1925 2nd Cover 

Calendar of Special Days. 1924-1925 4 

Control of the Seminary 5 

Board of Managers 7 

Board of Trustees 8 

Consultative Members of Managers and Trustees 9 

Ladies' Visiting and Advisory Board 9 

Young Men's Christian Association 9 

Alumni Association 9 

The Faculty and Its Officers 10 

Historical Roll of Professors, 1794-1925 [, ....11 

Special Lecturers and Preachers, 1924-1925 12 

Register of Students , 13 

Purpose of the Seminary 18 

Course of Study (General Statement) 18 

Outline of Prescribed Courses (Tabulated) 19 

Description of Courses of Study . ... 20 

Hebrew Exegesis and Old Testament Literature. 20 

Greek Exegesis and New Testament Literature 21 

Biblical Theology and Biblical Archaeology 22 

Pastoral Theology .24 

Church History 25 

Systematic Theology and Homiletics 27 

Philosophy of Religion and Applied Christianity 29 

Public Speaking 30 

Graduate Courses (Described in Departmental Courses Preceding). 

Schedules of Daily Recitations (Both Semesters) '. . .31, 32 

Adaptations of Regular Courses to Exceptional Cases 33 

Terms of Admission .34 

Attendance Requirements 34 

Examinations 34 

Graduation Requirements 35 

Degree of Bachelor of Divinity 35 

American School of Oriental Research at Jerusalem 36 

Affiliation with Washington University . . .37 

Location of the Seminary 37 

How to Reach the Seminary : ... .37 

General Equipment 38 

Library 38 

Reservation of Rooms 38 

Religious and Social Life of the Seminary 39 

Physical Training 40 

Seminary Quartette 40 

Expenses '. 40 

Opportunities for Self-Help 41 

Student Aid 41 

Donations and Bequests 42 

Forms for Bequests and Annuity Bonds 43, 44 



CALENDAR OF SPECIAL DAYS. 



1924 

1. The Opening of the Session. 

Wednesday, September 24th, at 1 P. M. Registration of Students. 
Address of Welcome by the President. Address by the President of the 
Board of Managers. Reception and social. 

2. The Inauguration of New Professors. 

Thursday, September 25th, at 8 P. M., in the First United Presbyterian 
Church. The Rev. James h. Kelso, M.A., B.D., will be inaugurated as 
Professor of Hebrew Exegesis and Old Testament Literature, and the Rev. 
George B. McCreary, Ph.D., D.D., as Professor of Philosophy of Religion 
and Applied Christianity. Address by the Rev. Charles H. Robinson, D.D. 

3. The Opening Sermon. 

Sabbath, September 28th, at 8 P. M., by the Rev. W. R. Gray, D.D. 

4. The Mid-Term Examinations Begin. 
Monday, December 15th. 

5. The Christmas Vacation. 

Friday, December 19th, at 12 M. till Tuesday, December 30th, at 8 A. M. 

1925 

6. The Day of Prayer for Colleges and Seminaries. 
Sabbath, February 22nd. 

7. The Final Examinations Begin. 
Monday, April 27th. 

8. The Baccalaureate Sermon. 

Sabbath, May 3rd, at 8 P. M., by Professor James L. Kelso, M.A., B.D. 

9. The Annual Meeting of the Board of Trustees. 
Tuesday, May 5th, at 10 A. M. 

10. The Annual Meeting of the Board of Managers, 

Wednesday, May 6th, at 10 A. M. The Senior Thesis will be read at 
the afternoon session. 

11. The Annual Meeting of the Alumni Association. 
Wednesday, May 6th, at 4 P. M. Alumni Banquet at 6 P. M. 

12. The Graduation Exercises. 

Thursday, May 7th, at 8 P. M., in the First United Presbyterian Church. 
Address by the Rev. William Crowe, D.D. Promotion of Classes, Pre- 
sentation of Diplomas, and Conferring of Degrees, by the President. 




-_" — -"— — i: 



THE CONTROL OF THE 
SEMINARY. 



THE SEMINARY is under the control of 
the Second Synod, and the Synods of 
Illinois, Iowa, Kansas, Nebraska, Cali- 
fornia, and The Columbia, of the United Pres- 
byterian Church. Its immediate control is com- 
mitted to a Board of Managers, twenty-five in 
number, appointed by the Synods, and a Board 
of Trustees, twelve in number, appointed by the 
Board of Managers. The Term and the Course 
of Study are determined by the General Assembly. 



XENIA THEOLOGICAL, SEMINARY 



BOARD OF MANAGERS. 



Officers 

Rev. W. R. Gray, D.D., President Summerfield, Kan. 

Rev. A. A. Graham, Vice-President Monmouth, 111. 

Mr. T. Dales Kyle, Financial Sec. and Treas Xenia, Ohio 

Rev. W. H. Hastings, Recording Secretary St. Louis, Mo. 

Members 

THE SECOND SYNOD 

Term expires 

Rev. C. P. Proudeit, D.D., Xenia, Ohio 1924 

*Mr. W. J. Fulton, Columbus, Ohio 1925 

Rev. J. P. Nesbitt, D.D., Princeton, Ind '...1925 

Rev. John A. Henderson, D.D., Indianapolis, Ind 1926 

Rev. H. A. Thompson, Columbus, Ohio 1926 

SYNOD OF ILLINOIS 

Rev. J. T. Meloy, D.D., Evanston, 111 1924 

Mr. Robt. RutlEdge, St. Louis, Mo 1924 

Rev. J. M. Duncan, Lodi, Wis 1925 

Rev. H. H. McConnell, St. Louis, Mo 1925 

Rev. R. C Gibson, D.D., Chicago, 111 1926 

Rev. A. A. Graham, Monmouth, 111 1926 

SYNOD OF IOWA 

Rev. W. C. Williamson, D.D., Clarinda, Iowa 1924 

Mr. W. J. French, Esq., Waterloo, Iowa 1925 

Rev. J. F. Jamieson, D.D., Clarion, Iowa 1925 

Mr. W. H. Ramsey, Esq., Garner, Iowa 1926 

SYNOD OF KANSAS 

Rev. D. Everett Smith, Pittsburgh, Pa 1924 

Rev. J. H. Hutchman, D.D., Pittsburg, Kan .1925 

Rev. A. M. Reed, Manhattan, Kan 1926 

*Removed from the bounds of Synod. 



XENIA THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 



SYNOD OF NEBRASKA 

Rev. W. R. Gray, D.D., Summerfield, Kan 1924 

Mr. Robert Seoss, North Bend, Neb ! 1925 

SYNOD OF CALIFORNIA 

R^v. W. E. McCulloch, D.D., Los Angeles, Cal 1924 

Rev. J. M. Ross, D.D., San Jose, Cal 1924 

SYNOD OF THE COLUMBIA 

Rev. H. F. GiveN, D.D., Portland, Ore 1924 

Rev. W. A. Spalding, D.D., Pullman, Wash 1924 

EX-OFFICIO MEMBER 

PResroeNT M. G. Kyle, D.D., LL.D _ St. Louis, Mo. 

BOARD OF TRUSTEES 
(Under the Missouri Charter) 

Officers 
Mr. ERee Orm sb y, President 

4508 McPherson Ave., St. Louis, Mo. 

Mr. T. DAees Kyle, Financial Sec. and Treas Xenia, Ohio 

Rev. W. H. Hastings, Recording Secretary 

3524a Wyoming St., St. Louis, Mo. 

Members 

Mr. H. C. GROTe, 6169 Pershing Ave., St. Louis, Mo 1925 

Mr. T. DAees KylE, Xenia, Ohio 1925 

Mr. G. R. McCullough, 6117 Westminster, St. Louis, Mo....l925 

Mr. A. O. WiesoN, 14 Windermere Place, St. Louis, Mo 1925 

Rev. W. H. Hastings, 3524a Wyoming St., St. Louis, Mo 1926 

Mr. ERLe Ormsby, 4508 McPherson Ave., St. Louis, Mo 1926 

Mr. J. M. Lashly, Esq., 20 Windermere PL, St. Louis, Mo....l926 

Rev. J. F. LeCeeRE, 2605 Union Blvd., St. Louis, Mo 1926 

Mr. W. J. Johnston, 3610 Forest Park Blvd., St. Louis 1927 

Mr. J. M. Murry, 1324 Laurel St., St. Louis, Mo 1927 

Mr. WieeiAM ScHATTGeN, 2934 Allen Ave., St. Louis, Mo....l927 
Mr. John M. Stuart, 4252a Cleveland Ave., St. Louis, Mo....l927 

PResmeNT M. G. Kyle, D.D., LL.D., St. Louis, Mo 

Bx-Ofhcio Member 



XENIA THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 



BOARD OF TRUSTEES 
(Under the Ohio Charter) 

Hon. C. H. Kyle, Xenia, Ohio 1925 

Mr. T. Dales Kyle, Xenia, Ohio 1925 

Hon. J. Carl Marshall, Xenia, Ohio 1925 

Mr. S. Walter Collins, Bloomington, Ind 1926 

Mr. Nathan Logan, Spring Hill, Ind 1926 

Dr. B. R. McClEllan, M.D., Xenia, Ohio 1926 

Mr. Robert Bryson, Xenia, Ohio 1927 

Mr. W. B. Cherry, Xenia, Ohio 1927 

Mr. J. C. Williamson, Xenia, Ohio 1927 

President M. G. Kyle, D.D., LL.D., St. Louis, Mo 

Bx-Ofhcio Member 

CONSULTATIVE MEMBERS OF THE BOARD OF MANAGERS 
AND THE BOARD OF TRUSTEES 

Rev. Jesse Johnson, D.D. Rev. Robt. M. Kerr, D.D. 
Rev. J. H. Webster, D.D. Rev. J. L. Kelso, M.A., B.D. 
Rev. G. B. McCreary, Ph.D., D.D. 

LADIES' VISITING AND ADVISORY BOARD 

Mrs. Joseph Kyle, President Mrs. J. F. LeClErE, 
Mrs. J. H. Webster, Vic e-Pres. Miss Elizabeth Brownlee, 
Mrs. A. O. Wilson, Secretary Mrs. J. L. Kelso, 
Mrs. Jesse Johnson, Treasurer Mrs. G. B. McCreary, 
Mrs. M. G. Kyle, Mrs. D. L. Ferguson, 

Mrs. Robt. M. Kerr, Miss Pearl Mann. 

THE STUDENTS' Y. M. C. A. 

Ralph W. Frost, President 

Roy D. Strong, Vice-President 

Kenneth M. Monroe, Secretary and Treasurer 

OFFICERS OF THE ALUMNI ASSOCIATION 

Rev. D. L. Ferguson, President. St. Louis, Mo. 

Rev. J. P. Nesbitt, D.D., Vice-President Princeton, Ind. 

Rev. J. L. Kelso, M.A., B.D., Secretary and Treasurer 

St. Louis, Mo. 



10 XENIA THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 



OFFICERS OF THE FACULTY. 



The Rev. M. G. Kyle, D.D., LL.D., President 

The Rev. Robt. M. Kerr, D.D., Vice-President 

The Rev. J. H. Webster, D.D., Librarian and Secretary 

The Rev. Jesse Johnson, D.D., Registrar 

THE FACULTY. 



The. Rev. Jesse Johnson, D.D. 
Professor of Church History. 

The Rev. J. H. Webster, D.D. 
Professor of Greek Exegesis and New Testament Literature. 

The Rev. M. G. Kyle, D.D., LL.D. 

Newburg Professor of Biblical Theology and Biblical 

Archaeology. Adjunct Professor of Practical 

Theology and Religious Education. 

The Rev. Robt. M. Kerr, D.D. 
Professor of Systematic Theology and Homiletics. 

The Rev. James L. Kelso, M.A., B.D. 
Professor of Hebrew Exegesis and Old Testament Literature. 

The Rev. Geo. B. McCreary, Ph.D., D.D. 
Professor of the Philosophy of Religion and Applied Christianity. 

Thomas Shearer Duncan, M.A., Ph.D. 
Instructor in Public Speaking. 



XENIA THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 11 



HISTORICAL ROLL OF PROFESSORS. 

During the one hundred and thirty years of the seminary's 
history, under various names and in different localities, in all 
thirty-two men have served as instructors for more or less ex- 
tended periods of time. The roll of professors is as follows : 

Name Inaugu- Period 

rated at of Service 

John Anderson Service 1794-1819 

John Banks '- Philadelphia 1820-1826 

James Ramsey Canonsburg 1821-1842 

David Carson Canonsburg 1834-1834 

Thomas Beveridge Canonsburg 1835-1855 

Thomas Beveridge Xenia 1855-1871 

Joseph Claybaugh -Oxford 1839-1855 

Samuel W. McCracken Oxford 1839-1840 

James Martin Canonsburg 1842-1846 

Abraham Anderson Canonsburg 1847-1855 

Samuel Wilson Xenia 1855-1875 

William Davidson Oxford 1855-1858 

Alexander Young Oxford 1855-1857 

Alexander Young Monmouth 1858-1874 

John Scott Monmouth - 1858-1874 

Joseph Clokey Xenia 1858-1873 

Andrew M. Black , Monmouth 1864-1874 

David A. Wallace - Monmouth 1867-1870 

David A. Wallace Xenia -- 1883-1883 

William Bruce Xenia - - 1871-1880 

James G. Carson Xenia 1873-1888 

William G. Moorehead Xenia 1873-1914 

Jackson B. McMichael -Xenia 1873-1878 

James Harper Xenia 1879-1899 

David MacDill Xenia 1884-1902 

Wilbert W. White Xenia 1889-1894 

John D. Irons Xenia - 1895-1905 

Joseph Kyle - Xenia - 1899-1921 

Jesse Johnson Xenia 1902 

John E. Wishart , Xenia 1905-1923 

John H. Webster Xenia 1908 

Melvin G. Kyle Xenia 1914 

Robert M. Kerr St. Louis 1922 

James L. Kelso : St. Louis 1923 

Geo. B. McCreary St. Louis 1924 



12 XENIA THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

XENIA SEMINARY PULPIT. 

1924-1925 

The Reverend" W. R. Gray, D.D. 

The; Reverend A. W. Jamieson, D.D. 

The Reverend E. C. McCown, D.D. 

The Reverend J. L,. FowlE 

The Reverend President T. H. McMichael, D.D. 

The Reverend David M. Skidding, D.D. 

SPECIAL LECTURERS. 

1924-1925 

The Reverend R. J. Midler, D.D. 

The Reverend Professor John McNaugher, D.D., LL.D.- 

The Reverend J. E. Bradford, D.D. 

Professor T. S. Duncan, Ph.D. 

Mr. H. T. Henderson. 

The Reverend Professor J. A. Montgomery, Ph.D.. D.D. 

The Reverend Professor Robert Dick Wilson, D.D., IX.D. 

Mr. S. A. Fulton. 

J. M. Patterson, LX.D. 



XENIA THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 13 



THE REGISTER OF STUDENTS. 

For the Year 1923-1924. 



THE GRADUATE SCHOOL. 

STUDENTS IN RESIDENCE. 

The Rev. Taylor Bernard, D.D. 

Graduate of Cumberland University Divinity School, Secre- 
tary of the Missouri Society for the Friendless, St. Louis 
District, St. Louis, Mo. 

The Rev. Herbert Andrew BrEThauer 

Graduate of Eden Theological Seminary, Pastor of St. An- 
drew's Evangelical Church, St. Louis, Mo. 

The Rev. David Lawrence Ferguson 

Graduate of Xenia Theological Seminary, Pastor of Gibson 
Heights United Presbyterian Church, St. Louis, Mo. 

The Rev. William Henry Hastings 

Graduate of Pittsburgh Theological Seminary, Pastor of 
Grand Avenue United Presbyterian Church, St. Louis, Mo. 

The Rev. Howard Daniels Johnson 

Graduate of McCormick Theological Seminary, Pastor of 
Elm Street Presbyterian Church, Alton, 111. 

The Rev. George Wales King, D.D. 

Graduate of Auburn Theological Seminary, Pastor of Mark- 
ham Memorial Presbyterian Church, St. Louis, Mo. 

The Rev. Richard Lee Kortkamp 

Princeton Theological Seminary, Pastor of Presbyterian 
Church, Witt, 111. 

The Rev. Walter McAeee Langtry, D.D. 

Graduate of McCormick Theological Seminary, Pastor of 
Clayton Presbyterian Church, Clayton, Mo. 

The Rev. James Frederic Le ClEre 

Graduate of Pittsburgh Theological Seminary, Pastor of 
Third United Presbyterian Church, St. Louis, Mo. 



14 XENIA THEOLOGICAL. SEMINARY 

The Rev. Harold Harper McConnell 

Graduate. of Pittsburgh Theological Seminary, Pastor of 
First United Presbyterian Church, St. Louis, Mo. 

The Rev. Amos John Niebruegge 

Graduate of McCormick Theological Seminary, Pastor of 
Twelfth Street Presbyterian Church, Alton, 111. 

The Rev. Henry Lee Sneed 

Graduate of Southwestern Presbyterian University Divinity 
School, Pastor of First Presbyterian Church, St. Charles, Mo. 

The Rev. Louis Christian Stumpe 

Graduate of Moody Bible Institute, Pastor of First Pres- 
byterian Church, Madison, 111. 

The Rev. William Ernest Sullens 

Graduate of Yale Divinity School, Pastor of University Meth- 
odist Episcopal Church, University City, Mo. 

The Rev. Herrick Lee Todd 

Graduate of McCormick Theological Seminary, Pastor of 
Chester Presbyterian Church, Chester, 111. 

The Rev. Williamson Dunn Vater 

Graduate of Princeton Theological Seminary, Pastor of 
Manor Presbyterian Church, St. Louis, Mo. 

William Bruce Wilson 

Student in Xenia Theological Seminary. 

STUDENTS BY CORRESPONDENCE. 

The Rev. Thomas Arends 

Graduate of Dubuque Theological Seminary, Pastor of 
Bethany Presbyterian Church, Council Bluffs, Iowa. 

The Rev. Cecil Plumb 

Graduate of Xenia Theological Seminary, Pastor of the 
Union of Churches, Almond, N. Y. 

The Rev. John Bright Pollock 

Graduate of Pittsburgh Theological Seminary, Pastor of 
United Presbyterian Church, Reinbeck, Iowa. 



XENIA THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 



15 



The; Rev. John Leyda Vance;- 

Graduate of Pittsburgh Theological Seminary, Pastor 
Second United Presbyterian Church, Rock Island, 111. 

Q THE SENIOR CLASS 
Name and Residence College 

St. Louis Univ. 



ot 






Charles George Arras, 

East St. Louis, 111. 
Eli Lackland Beeding, 

St. Louis, Mo. 
John Russell Dugan 

Springfield, Ohio 
Harold Dewey Fry, 

Long Beach, Calif. 
Jacquel Kelewae, 

East St. Louis, 111. 
Walter Clement McCrory, 

Pinckneyville, 111. 
William Arthur Martin, 
(Cum gratia spcciali) 

Hallstead, Pa. 
Alexander Templeton Moore, 

Hebron, Ind. 
Clifford Shaw Ramsdale, 

Alhambra, Calif. 
James Haddock Scott, - 

St. Louis, Mo. 
Floyd William Taber, 

Long Beach, Calif. 
Charles Russell Wilkins, 

Philadelphia, Pa. 
William Bruce Wilson, 

Pittsburgh, Pa. 



Presbytery 
Presbyterian, 
U. S. A. 
Washington Univ. Presbyterian, 
U. S. A. 



Monmouth 
B. A., 1921 

University of 
South. Calif. 

Moody Bible 
Institute 

Sterling 

Moody Bible 
Institute 



Los Angeles 

Bible Institute 
Sterling 

B. A., 1920 






Long Beach 
Polytechnic 

Phila. School 
of the Bible 

Muskingum 
B. A.. 1921 



THE MIDDLE CLASS 
Name and Residence College 

Ernest Spencer Abbott 
St. Louis, Mo. 

Raymond Hutchison Cherry, Muskingum 
Xenia, Ohio. B. A. 1922 



Xenia 

Brethren 

Chicago 

Southern 

Illinois 

Presbyterian, 

U. S. A. 

Northern 
Indiana 
Los Angeles 

Argyle 

Brethren 

M. E. Church 

Southern 
Illinois 



Presbytery 
Presbyterian, 

U. S. A. 
Xenia 




16 



XENIA THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 



Name and Residence 

Ray McCreight Davis, 

New Concord, Ohio. 
Leander Finley, 

New Concord, Ohio. 
Ralph Wilbur Frost, 

Chester, W. Va. 
James Paul Graham, 

Reynoldsburg, Ohio. 
Harold Edward Lobaugh, 

Conoquenessing, Pa. 
Henry Ernest Moore, 

Covington, Tenn. 
Milton William Mosbacher, 

St. Louis, Mo. 
Robert Coleman Shaub, 

Harrisburg, Pa. 
Archibald Wilson Webster, 

St. Louis, Mo. 



Name and Residence 

Robert Henry Belton, 

Chicago, 111. 
James Daryl Davis, 

Kirkwood, 111. 
Lewis Herman Eraser, 

Wellsville, Ohio. 
Roy Milton Hoffstetter, 

Tulare, Calif. 
Ruby Leroy Logan, 

Pinckneyville, 111. 
Kenneth Milton Monroe, 

Los 'Angeles, Calif. 
Archibald Karr Stewart, 

Ft. Morgan, Colo. 



College 


Presbytery 


Muskingum 


Muskingum 


B. A., 1922 




Muskingum 


Muskingum 


B. A., 1921 




Muskingum 


Steubenville 


B. A., 1922 




Muskingum 


Xenia 


B. A., 1922 




Muskingum 


Butler 


B. A., 1922 




Bryson 


Southern 


B. A., 1922 


Illinois 


Moody Bible 


St. Louis Asso. 


Institute 


Cong. Conf . 


Moody Bible 


M. E. Church 


Institute 




Princeton 


Southern 


B. A., 1921 


Illinois 


JNIOR CLASS 




College 


Presbytery 


Lewis Institute 


Congregational 


Findlay 


Monmouth 


B. A., 1923 




Muskingum 


Steubenville 


B. A., 1923 




Monmouth 


Colorado 


B. S., 1923 




Park 


Southern 




Illinios 


Univ. of S. Calif. 


Brethren 


B. A., 1922 




Tarkio 


Colorado 


B. S., 1923 





XBNIA THEOLOGICAL. SEMINARY 



17 



Name and Residence 


College 


Presbytery 


Roy Dale Strong, 


Bryson 


Southern 


Brighton, Tenn. 


B. A., 1923 


Illinois 


Miles Harold Taber, 




Brethren 


Long Beach, Calif. 






Henry Van Dyke, 




Des Moines 


Newton, Iowa. 






Floyd Withrow, 


Tarkio 


College Springs 


Tarkio, Mo. 


B. A., 1923 




Frederic Sylvester Zeller, 


Sterling 


Arkansas 


Sterling, Kansas. 


B. A, 1922 


Valley 



SPECIAL STUDENTS 

Of those here classed as special students, some are working 
as they have time toward the completion of a regular course of 
study, and will be given ranking in the regular classes as soon 
as their work justifies such classification. 

J. Allen Anderson Pattonville, Mo . 

Isabel Asher St. Louis, Mo. 

Howard Lawrence Bourner St. Louis, Mo. 

Harry Wesley Curtis Wellston, Mo. 

Francis Ahrens Dunnagan University City, Mo. 

Adele Lucina Eames..... St. Louis, Mo. 

Mrs. A. J. Matthews St. Louis, Mo. 

Mrs. Kenneth Monroe Los Angeles, Calif. 

Paul Leonard Reed St. Louis, Mo. 

Cecelia Siegle St. Louis, Mo. 

Brooks Smith Los Angeles, Calif. 

Mrs. Brooks Smith Los Angeles, Calif. 



The following students in Washington University pursued a 
course of study in the English Bible. 

Sylvia Henrietta Albright Adele Lucinda Eames 

Jessie Bell Chamberlain Avery Mason 

Mary Lydia Chamberlain Mrs. Mary Mason 

Edward Rainey 



18 XENIA THEOLOGICAL, SEMINARY 

SUMMARY OF STUDENTS 

Graduate School : — Resident students 17 

Correspondence students 4 

Regular Seminary Classes: — Seniors 13 

Middlers 11 

Juniors „ 12 

Special students (see explanation above) 12 

In University 7 

Total ( excluding duplicates) 74 

THE PURPOSE OF THE SEMINARY 

"The object of the Seminary shall be to instruct candidates for 
the Gospel ministry, and others who may be preparing for spe- 
cial lines of Christian service, in the knowledge of the doctrine 
of the Scriptures and the order and institutes of worship taught 
therein and summarily exhibited in the Standards of the United 
Presbyterian Church of North America ; to cherish in them the 
life of true godliness, and to cultivate the gifts which Christ, the 
Head of the Church, confers on those whom He calls to the 
ministry, to the end that there may be raised up a succession of 
able, faithful, and godly ministers of the Gospel and other Chris- 
tian workers." (Constitution, Ch. I., Sec. 2.) 

THE COURSE OF STUDY 

The full course of Seminary training extends over a period 
of three years. The Seminary year begins on the first Wednesday 
after the 17th of September, and closes on the first Wednesday 
or Thursday after the first of May. Each annual session is 
divided into two semesters. 

The different departments, with their respective courses of 
study, and the amount of time required for each course, are set 
forth in the following diagram. The unit of study is the semester 
hour, which represents one recitation a week for one semester. 
One hundred and twelve semester hours, including six in Public 
Speaking, are required for graduation. 



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20 XENIA THEOLOGICAL. SEMINARY 



DESCRIPTION OF COURSES OF STUDY. 



I. HEBREW EXEGESIS AND OLD TESTAMENT LITERATURE 
PROFESSOR KEIiSO 

Hebrew Courses 

1. Elements of Hebrew. The Principles of Hebrew Grammar, acquisi- 
tion of a working vocabulary, and the reading of the first eight chapters 
of Genesis. 

Juniors, first semester, four hours a week. 

2. Hebrew Prose. Analytical study of the Hebrew text and exegesis 
of the Book of Ruth. Sight-reading of selected passages of Historical 
Books. 

Juniors, second semester, four hours a week. 

3. Isaiah. Exegetical study of selected chapters, with special reference 
to contemporary history and Messianic prophecy. 

Middlers and Seniors, first semester, two hours a week (1924-25). 

4. Jeremiah and Bsekiel. Exegetical study of selected chapters with 
special reference to sermonic material. 

Middlers and Seniors, second semester, two hours a week (1924-25). 

5. The Minor Prophets. Exegetical study of several books with special 
reference to their theological and social teachings. 

Middlers and Seniors, first semester, two hours a week (1925-26). 

6. The Psalms and Job. Study of selected Psalms in the light of 
Hebrew Poetry, and as devotional literature of the present day. Research 
work in Job. 

Middlers and Seniors, second semester, two hours a week (1925-26). 

English Courses 

7. Old Testament Introduction. A study of the authorship, date, 
historical setting, design, and outline, of Joshua, Judges, Ruth, 1 & 2 
Samuel. 

Middlers and Seniors, first semester, one hour a week (1924-25). 

8. Old Testament Introduction. A study of the authorship, date, 
historical setting, design, and outline, of 1 & 2 Kings, 1 & 2 Chronicles, 
Lamentations, Ezra, and Nehemiah. 

Middlers and Seniors, second semester, one hour a week (1924-25). 

9. Old Testament Introduction. A study of the authorship, date, 
historical setting, design, and outline, of the Minor Prophets and Daniel. 

Middlers and Seniors, first semester, one hour a week (1925-26). 

10. Old Testament Introduction. A study of the authorship, date, 



XENTA THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 21 

historical setting, design, and outline, of Job, Psalms, Proverbs, Eccle- 
siastes, Song of Songs, and Esther. 

Middlers and Seniors, second semester, one hour a week (1925-26). 

11. Isaiah. (For those who do not read Hebrew.) A study of the 
unity of the Book, its historical setting, its Messianic teaching, and its 
homiletic value. 

Middlers and Seniors, first semester, two hours a week (1924-25). 

12. Jeremiah and Bzekiel. (For those who do not read Hebrew.) An 
analysis and a study of the historical setting, the meaning, and the lessons 
of each book. 

Middlers and Seniors, second semester, two hours a week (1924-25). 

13. The Minor Prophets. (For those who do not read Hebrew.) An 
analysis and a study of the historical setting, the meaning, and the lessons 
of each book. 

Middlers and Seniors, first semester, two hours a week (1925-26). 

14. The Psalms and Job. (For those who do not read Hebrew.) A 
careful study of the Psalter as a unit and of selected Psalms. Analysis 
of the book of Job. 

Middlers and Seniors, second semester, two hours a week (1925-26). 

Graduate Courses 

15. Biblical Aramaic. A study of the elements of the language, and 
the reading of the Aramaic sections of the Old Testament. 

Minor, eight semester hours. 

16. The Septuagint. The reading of selected portions of the Old Testa- 
ment in Greek, comparing with the Hebrew and with other versions. A 
study of the origin and the problems of the Septuagint, on the basis of 
Swete's "Introduction to the Old Testament in Greek." 

Major, sixteen semester hours. 

II. GREEK EXEGESIS AND NEW TESTAMENT LITERATURE 
DR. WEBSTER 

The purpose of this Department is to teach the students to 
know and use the Greek New Testament. While the value of 
exact scholarship is emphasized, the chief aim is to make the 
student an able minister of the New Testament. Instruction is 
given both by text-books and lectures, and everything is made 
subservient to learning "the mind of Christ," the vital requisite 
for a successful ministry. 

Introductory Greek is a prerequisite to the exegetical studies 
of this Department. Those who have not had sufficient Greek in 
college are required to take a special course in Introduction to the 
Greek of the Testament under Dr. McCreary. (See page 30.) 



22 XENIA THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

Required Courses 

1. Introduction to the New Testament. This course embraces a gen- 
eral survey of the books of the New Testament, including their genuine- 
ness, authenticity, historical setting, and a full analysis of their contents. 

Juniors, second semester, two hours a week. 

2. The Gospel by John. An exegetical study of the book. 
Juniors, first semester, three hours a week. 

3. The Pauline Epistles. An exegetical study of selected passages. 
Juniors, second semester, three hours a week. 

4. The Pastoral Epistles. An exegetical study. 
Middlers, first semester, two hours a week. 

5. The Acts. An exegetical study of the first twelve chapters. 
Middlers, second semester, two hours a week. 

6. Romans. An exegetical study. 
Seniors, first semester, two hours a week. 

7. Ephesians or Hebrews. Exegetical study of one of the books. 
Seniors, second semester, two hours a week. 

8. Assigned Reading. In addition to the foregoing exegetical studies, 
each class will be assigned selected portions of the Greek New Testament 
for outside reading. Monthly tests will be given to determine the progress 
made. 

9. History of Textual Criticism. 

Middlers and Seniors, first semester, one hour a week (1924-25). 

10. Studies in the Life of Paul. 

Middlers and Seniors, second semester, one hour a week (1924-25). 

11. The Life of Christ. 

Middlers and Seniors, one hour a week through the year (1925-26). 

Graduate Courses 

12. The Synoptic Problem. 
Minor, eight semester hours. 

13. The Epistle to the Hebrews. 
Minor, eight semester hours. 

14. The Christology of the Pauline Epistles. 
Major, sixteen semester hours. 

15. The Johannine Writings. 
Major, sixteen semester hours. 

111. BIBLICAL THEOLOGY AND BIBLICAL ARCHAEOLOGY 

DR. KYLE 

Work in this department has a two-fold purpose, — to know the 
progress of Revelation, and to know it in its setting. So there 
are studies in the progress of Revelation to acquire a compre- 
hensive grasp of what the Bible teaches as a whole and in its 



XENIA THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 23 

various parts in the order of Revelation, together with the study 
of the historical setting- of Scripture made known through Arch- 
aeological Research, in order to see the truths of Revelation as 
those saw them to whom they were revealed. 

There are class-room studies and quizzes through which the 
student discovers for himself the plan and progress of Revela- 
tion : also theses by all the students, together with assigned library 
research work. The Bible is the only text-book used, the English 
Bible for constant work, and the Hebrew and Septuagint Old 
Testament and the Greek New Testament for reference. There 
are lectures in Biblical Archaeology from the monuments and 
from first-hand research, so arranged with the studies in Biblical 
Theology as to enable the student constantly to see the Biblical 
story in its original setting. To this work are added quizzes, 
much library work, and an assigned reading course throughout 
the year. Some introductory lectures will be given to the Junior 
Class meeting separately to prepare them for a proper under- 
standing of the work in the general course. 

Required Courses 

1. The Patriarchal Period. Principal subjects: Literary methods of 
early Biblical times ; primitive man and the temptation ; antediluvian 
civilization and Revelation ; the deluge ; Abraham and his times ; the de- 
scent into Egypt. 

All classes, first semester, three hours a week (1926-27). 

2. The Tribal Period. From the descent into Egypt to the conquest 
of Canaan. Principal subjects: From court to corvee; Moses; the Reve- 
lation of God through the plagues of Egypt; the Exodus and the wilder- 
ness life ; the Revelation at Sinai ; the problem of the Pentateuch, and 
Old Testament chronology. 

All classes, first semester, three hours a week (1924-25). 

3. The National Period. From the Conquest of Canaan to the end of 
the Old Testament. Principal subjects: Times of the conquest; period 
of the Judges; David; the great period of Biblical literature; decline and 
apostasy ; the great invasions ; Isaiah ; Daniel ; the exile and reformation ; 
the return and second glory of Israel; Messianism; prophetism, and 
inspiration. The Messianic Period: The consummation of the Messianic 
hope developed in the former periods. The Apostolic Period : The Appli- 
cation of Messianic teaching to preaching. 

All classes, first semester, three hours a week (1925-26). 

4. Research Methods. The class is directed in research work and in 



24 XENIA THEOLOGICAL. SEMINARY 

the preparation of theses utilizing archaeological material in Exegesis and 
for sermon illustrations. 
Middlers, first semester, one hour a week. 

5. Canons and Fallacies. A special course of studies to set forth the 
Canons and Fallacies of Archaeological Research. A thesis is required 
of each member of the class upon an assigned subject. 

Seniors, first semester, one hour a week. 

6. Public Research Lectures are given each year out of the research 
work of the Professor in charge. Three lectures will be given this year 
upon "Exploration at the Cities of the Plain," and another upon "The 
Doctrine of the Future Life in the book of Job, from a study of the 
Royal Tombs in Egypt." All lectures are fully illustrated. 

Graduate Courses 

7. Study of Methods in Biblical Theology. The aim here is to lead the 
student to discover the Biblical teachings through an application of the 
inductive method. 

Major, sixteen semester hours. Minor, eight semester hours. 

8. Prophetism and Prophecy. A study of the meaning and scope of 
prophecy. 

Major, sixteen semester hours. Minor, eight semester hours. 

9. Book Study. The aim is to lead the student to ascertain the setting 
and the doctrinal content of the book, and how to utilize the findings. 

Major, sixteen semester hours. Minor, eight semester hours. 

10. Archaeology of the Bible, especially the use of Archaeological 
material for homiletical purposes. 

Major, sixteen semester hours. Minor, eight semester hours. 

11. Methods of Archaeological Research, and Canons and Fallacies. 
Major, sixteen semester hours. By residence only. 

12. Archaeology and Criticism. An introduction to the use of Archaeo- 
logical material in Biblical criticism. 

Major, sixteen semester hours. Minor, eight semester hours. 

PASTORAL THEOLOGY 
DR. KYLE 

Instruction in this subject is given by means of studies, quizzes, 
lectures, and practical exercises for each class separately, together 
with practical training for all classes in the problems of personal 
effort in soul saving. 

Required Courses 

1. The Minister as a Student in the Seminary. Subjects: The call 
to the ministry ; the minister's habits ; ministerial manliness, ministerial 
ideals ; keeping one's self ; settlement, candidating, installation. 

Juniors, first semester, one hour a week. 



XENIA THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 25 

2. The Minister as Pastor of the Congregation (A). Subjects: The 
pastor in the pulpit; problems of the ministerial life; social, business, and 
spiritual methods ; the pastor in relation to the Sabbath School, the Young 
People's Society, the Prayer Meeting, and prayer circles. 

Middlers, first semester, one hour a week. 

3. The Minister as Pastor of the Congregation (B). Subjects : Super- 
vising the Sabbath School ; moderating the Session ; directing the congre- 
gational meeting; the teachers' meeting; conduct of pulpit service and 
prayer meeting ; the administration of the sacraments ; marriages ; and 
funerals. 

Middlers, second semester, one hour a week. 

4. The Minister in the Larger Relations to Church and Community. 
Subjects: Pastoral evangelism; problems of city and country life; the 
institutional church ; pastoral visitation and counsel ; the benevolences of 
the Church ; ecclesiastical relations. 

Seniors, first semester, one hour a week. 

Graduate Courses 

5. The Scriptural Basis of Pastoral Evangelism. 
Minor, two semester hours. 

6. Psychological Problems in Pastoral Evangelism. 
Minor, six semester hours. 

7. Sociological Problems in Pastoral Evangelism. 
Minor, four semester hours. 

8. Methods in Pastoral Evangelism. 

Minor, two semester hours. By residence only. 

IV. CHURCH HISTORY 
DR. JOHNSON 

The aim of this department is to give a general knowledge of 
Church History, with emphasis on the most important movements 
and events ; to arouse an interest in the history of the Church 
which will lead to later study in this profitable field ; and to train 
in methods of historical study. The work is done by means of 
text-books, lectures, library readings, and students' reports on 
assigned topics. 

1. The Ancient Period (to 590 A. D.). Principal subjects: Provi- 
dential preparation for Christianity; brief review of the life of Christ 
and the Apostolic age ; spread of Christianity ; opposition ; alliance between 
Church and State ; heresies, councils, and creeds ; Christian life ; schisms ; 
the Fathers and their writings ; the theological schools. 

Juniors, first semester, two hours a week. 

2. The Medieval Period (590-1517). Principal subjects: Missions; 



26 XENIA THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

Islam; the Papacy and the Papal Church; the Eastern Church; Monas- 
ticism ; the Crusades ; medieval sects and persecutions ; Scholasticism ; 
the Mystics ; general Church conditions ; movements for reform ; pre- 
cursors of the Reformation; the Renaissance. 
Juniors, second semester, two hours a week. 

3. The Reformation Era (1517-1648). Principal subjects: Provi- 
dential preparatives for the Reformation; the Reformation in Germany, 
and the Lutheran Reformation in other lands. The aim will be to bring 
the history of the Church in the Lutheran countries down to the Peace of 
Westphalia, 1648. Here the text will be Vol. I. of Lindsay's "History 
of the Reformation." 

Middlers, first semester, two hours a week. 

4. The Reformation Era, continued. Principal subjects: The Refor- 
mation in Switzerland; the reforms within the Roman Catholic Church, 
and its efforts to check the Protestant movement; Roman Catholic mis- 
sions. Here again the aim will be to bring the history, in each case as 
nearly as may be, down to 1648. Vol. II of Lindsay's work will be the 
text-book. 

Middlers, second semester, two hours a week. 

5. European Church History (1648-1924). Principal subjects: The 
Roman Catholic Church in its relation to civil government and the na- 
tional churches ; controversies within the Roman Catholic Church ; Ration- 
alism and its effects ; Lutheranism and its controversies ; the Reformed 
Churches, with special notice of Presbyterianism ; the Anglican Church; 
Deism ; the Methodist revival ; nineteenth century controversies. This 
study will be for the most part by countries. 

Seniors, first semester, two hours a week. 

6. American Church History. Principal subjects: Old world sources; 
early Roman Catholic missions ; the churches in the colonies ; decline and 
revival ; the great denominations ; divisions and unions ; home missions. 
The Presbyterian family of churches receives special study. 

Seniors, second semester, two hours a week. 

7. History of Doctrine. Outline study of the period 1517-1720. The 
theology of the Reformers ; Tridentine theology ; Protestant controversies ; 
the great Protestant Confessions. For the most part the plan will be to 
set forth the views held on each great theological question separately. 

Middlers, second semester, two hours a week (1924-25). 

8. History of Doctrine. Briefer treatment of the same period as in 
course No. 7. 

Seniors, first semester, one hour a week (1924-25). 

9. History of Doctrine. Outline study of the period from 1720 to the 
present. Philosophical systems ; Rationalistic criticism. A separate study 
will be made of particular doctrines. 

Seniors, second semester, one hour a week (1924-25). 

10. General History of Missions. A rapid review of the successes and 
reverses experienced by the Church in its mission work down to about 



XENIA THEOLOGICAL. SEMINARY 27 

1800, followed by a more detailed study of missions from Carey to the 
present time. 

Juniors, second semester, one hour a week. 

11. History of the United Presbyterian Church of North America. 
Beginnings in Scotland ; beginnings in America ; the Union of 1782 ; the 
Associate Presbyterian Church, 1782-1858; the Associate Reformed Church, 
1782-1858; the Union of 1858; the United Presbyterian Church, 1858-1924. 
Any member of the class who is not a United Presbyterian may substitute 
for this course a study of his own Church, reporting to the Professor and 
the class as required. Middlers, second semester, one hour a week. 

Graduate Courses 

12. The Lives and Writings of the Early Church Fathers. Open to 
those who have studied General Church History to 590 A. D. 

Minor, eight semester hours. 

13. Early Doctrinal Discussions. Open to those who have studied Gen- 
eral Church History to 1483 A. D. 

Major, sixteen semester hours. 

14. The Era of the Reformation. Open to those who have studied 
General Church History to 1483 A. D., and who have a knowledge of the 
Protestant Reformation in outline. 

Major, sixteen semester hours. 

15. Origin and History of the United Presbyterian Church of North 
America. A prerequisite to this is a fair knowledge of the history of the 
Reformation in Scotland. 

Minor, eight semester hours. 

V. SYSTEMATIC THEOLOGY AND HOMILETICS 
DR. KERR 

The purpose in the study of Systematic Theology is to lead the 
student to clear and well-balanced views of the great doctrines and 
principles comprised in the Christian faith. The text-book used 
is the complete work on Systematic Theology by Dr. A. H. Strong. 
There is class-room discussion based on a careful analysis of the 
text, supplemented by lectures and reports on assigned reading. 
Two hours a week throughout the entire course are required. 

Required Courses 

1. (a) Introduction to the Study of Theology. The idea and purpose 
of Theology, the sources of material and the method of treatment, (b) 
The Doctrine of God. Origin of the idea of God, and evidence of His 
existence. The witness of miracle and prophecy to the fact of a divine 
Revelation. 

Juniors, first semester, two hours a week. 



28 XENIA THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

2. The Doctrine of God (continued), (a) The Scriptures a divine 
Revelation : the genuineness of the documents, the credibility of the 
writers, the supernatural character and inspiration of Scripture, (b) The 
nature of God : The divine attributes ; the doctrine of the Trinity. 

Juniors, second semester, two hours a week. 

3. The Doctrine of God (continued), (a) The decrees and works of 
God : creation, preservation, providence, the angels, (b) The Doctrine 
of Man. The origin and nature of man, and the unity of the human race. 

Middlers, first semester, two hours a week. 

4. (a) The Doctrine of Man (continued). The primitive state and 
the fall of man ; the nature and universality of sin, and its consequences 
to mankind, (b) Preparation for Redemption. The Person of Christ, His 
two natures and two states. 

Middlers, second semester, two hours a week. 

5. The Doctrine of Redemption, (a) Offices and work of Christ. 
The Atonement, (b) The work of the Holy Spirit; calling, union with 
Christ, regeneration, conversion, justification, sanctification. 

Seniors, first semester, two hours a week. 

6. (a) The Doctrine of the Church. Its constitution, organization, 
government, sacraments and other ordinances of worship, (b) The Doc- 
trine of Last Things. Death, the intermediate state, the second coming 
of Christ, the resurrection, the judgment, and final awards. 

Seniors, second semester, two hours a week. 

HOMILETICS 

The study of Homiletics is designed to give the student high 
ideals of pulpit ministration, to correlate his growing knowledge 
and powers and bring them all to bear upon the effective expres- 
sion of Christian truth. 

1. The Preparation of Sermons. The permanent function and impor- 
tance of preaching; the selection and interpretation of the text; the struc- 
ture of the sermon ; the different kinds of sermons. A homily preached 
before the Faculty and student body. 

Juniors, first semester, one hour a week. 

2. The Preparation and Delivery of Sermons. The work of the first 
semester continued. Sermon materials, — explanation, argument, illustra- 
tion, and application ; qualities of style ; and modes of delivery. The 
relative advantages of the three modes of delivery are presented, — reading, 
speaking memoriter, and speaking extemporaneously. A doctrinal or sub- 
ject sermon preached before the Faculty and student body. 

Juniors, second semester, one hour a week. 

3. Sermon Outlines (A). Students are trained in the interpretation 
and analysis of texts, and in the construction and criticism of outlines 
of the various approved types of sermons. All outlines presented in 



XENIA THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 29 

writing. An expository lecture preached before the Faculty and student 
body. 
Middlers, first semester, one hour a week. 

4. Sermon Outlines (5). Work of the first semester continued, with 
special emphasis on the outlining of pasages of Scripture for continuous 
exposition. All outlines presented in writing. A critical discourse on a 
passage assigned in the Hebrew or the Greek shall be publicly presented. 

Middlers, second semester, one hour a week. 

5. Sermon Outlines (C). In this course the students are trained in 
the construction of plans for doctrinal and subject sermons. All work 
presented in writing. A sermon preached publicly on a text of the 
student's own selection. 

Seniors, first semester, one hour a week. 

6. Sermon Outlines (D). Written analysis of the sermons of great 
preachers, ancient and modern. A thesis on a subject assigned by the 
Faculty is due April 21st. 

Seniors, second semester, one hour a week. 

VI. PHILOSOPHY OF RELIGION AND APPLIED CHRISTIANITY 

DR. McCREART 

1. The Psychology of Religion. After a brief but comprehensive 
survey of the field of Psychology in general, noting the leading current 
theories, particular applications are made in genetics, in the principles 
of teaching, in social expressions, and in religious experience. Several 
texts are used with lectures. 

Juniors, first semester, two hours a week. 

2. Biblical Ethics. Beginning with a philosophic introduction, both 
historical and critical, the Christian ideal of conduct is unfolded, noting 
contrasts and agreements with the more prominent systems. Particular 
attention is given to the applicatory feature, both individual and social 
bearings being considered. 

Juniors, second semester, three hours a week. 

3. Christian Sociology. After a review of general social theory as 
presented by leading authorities, the recognized problems are set forth 
with their proposed solutions. The Christian method of approaching and 
solving these problems is presented. Particular emphasis is given to the 
application of the teaching of Jesus to the social order. 

Middlers, first semester, two hours a week. 

4. The Philosophy of Religion. This course includes the usual materials 
of Theism. It also seeks to exhibit the epistemological foundations of 
faith, to state the analogical argument expositionally, to find an adequate 
ground of values, and to set forth the Christian religion as a philosophic 
system. A rationale of method is undertaken regarding religion in his- 
torical, aesthetical, and critical aspects. 

Middlers and Seniors, second semester, three hours a week (1924-25). 



30 XENIA THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

5. Apologetics. The ground of the older arguments is covered, with 
modern restatements and additions. Christianity is shown to be logically 
defensible. 

Middlers and Seniors, second semester, three hours a week (1925-26). 

6. Comparative Religion. The great religions of the world are 
studied historically and comparatively. Their philosophic bases and ethical 
and social features are carefully inspected. Particular attention is be- 
stowed on those rival faiths with which Christianity now most strongly 
competes. 

Seniors, second semester, two hours a week. 

INTRODUCTORY GREEK 
DR. McCREARY 

This work is provided for those who have not had Greek in 
college, and is a pre-requisite to the regular work in New Testa- 
ment exegesis. 

1. Introduction to New Testament Greek (A). A rapid survey of the 
outstanding features of the grammar of the Greek New Testament. 
Huddilston's "Essentials of New Testament Greek," or a similar text-book 
is used. 

Juniors, first semester, four hours a week. 

2. Introduction to New Testament Greek (B) A careful study of the 
New Testament syntax, based on Green's "Handbook to the Grammar 
of the Greek Testament." The Gospel by John is read from the Greek. 

Juniors, second semester, four hours a week. 

3. Supplementary Reading in Greek. In addition to the foregoing 
courses, the student is required to read selected portions of the Greek New 
Testament before entering the Middle class in New Testament exegesis. 

VII. PUBLIC SPEAKING 
DR. DUNCAN 

1. The Principles and Practice of Public Speaking. The various types 
of speech are studied in detail, and students are drilled in the important 
types. Considerable attention is given to debating. Careful study is 
made, not only of delivery, but of the proper method of arranging ma- 
terial. In the study of speech care is taken to relate the work to the 
special needs of the minister. The course includes practice in the reading 
of the Scriptures with a view to making this part of the Church service 
more effective. 

All classes, one hour a week, throughout the year. 

2. Individual Training in Public Speaking. In addition to the regular 
class work, an attempt is made to give a fair amount of individual atten- 
tion to the students. The best progress is made by those who combine 
the class work regularly with private instruction. 

Students of all classes, by special appointment. 



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XENIA THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 33 

ADAPTATIONS OF THE REGULAR COURSE 

Since our denominational standards specify that "in all ordi- 
nary cases a full collegiate course of study, or its equivalent, 
shall be required of those entering on the study of theology/' 
the Course of Study in this Seminary is primarily designed for 
college graduates. It has been found necessary, however, to make 
special provision for non-college men, and also for college grad- 
uates who have not had two years of Greek, and for those who 
must give up the study of Hebrew at the close of the first year. 
In the case of these special groups, the Course of Study is to 
some extent modified, so that in practice, the one Course of Study, 
which is for the most part the same for all, is administered as 
three courses, which are described below as Course A, Course B, 
and Course C. 

Course A. This is the Standard Required Course, including, 
besides the other disciplines, study of the Bible in the original 
languages throughout the three years. All who have the requisite 
preliminary training, including at least two years of Greek, are 
expected to take this course. By action of the General Assembly 
the study of Hebrew is required of all students throughout the 
first year. Graduates in this course will receive the standard 
diploma, and may be candidates for the degree of Bachelor of 
Divinity. 

Course B. This is called the Greek-English Course, and is pro- 
vided for those who must abandon the study of Hebrew at the 
close of the first year, but who have sufficient academic training- 
to pursue the other theological studies. The regular work in 
New Testament Greek is required, but in place of Hebrew alter- 
nate subjects are provided. The completion of this course also 
entitles graduates to an appropriate diploma. 

Course C — the Certificate Course. Those whose college or 
university work is not regarded as sufficient to admit them to a 
diploma course, or who for any reason are prevented from pur- 
suing full courses, shall be permitted to enter for any subjects 
with which they are competent to deal, and shall, on graduation, 
or on the completion of their studies, receive certificates indi- 
cating the work done, and commending them to the churches. 



34 XENIA THEOLOGICAL, SEMINARY 

TERMS OF ADMISSION 

1. The privileges of the Seminary are extended on equal terms 
to students of all evangelical denominations. 

2. The applicant shall present — 

(a) Evidence of membership in good standing in his own 
church. 

(b) A certificate from his own Presbytery or other ecclesi- 
astical authorities, and 

(c) Credentials indicating that he has received the degree of 
Bachelor of Arts or its equivalent from an accredited college or 
university, or that he has taken courses of study fairly equivalent 
thereto, especially in the classical languages. The Faculty shall, 
in the latter case, determine whether the academic attainments 
of the candidate are sufficient, upon the basis of reports of the 
work done, recommendations from church courts or competent 
individuals, and examination. 

3. Before being admitted to the Seminary, every student shall, 
in the presence of the Registrar, subscribe to a written declara- 
tion to the effect that while he is a student in the Seminary he 
will regularly, punctually, and diligently attend upon all the in- 
structions of the Professors and promptly comply with all lawful 
requisitions of the Faculty, and be subject to their authority; 
that he will honestly conform to all regulations of the Seminary, 
and that he will not propagate any opinion in opposition to the 
principles of the United Presbyterian Church. 

ATTENDANCE 

All students are required to be present in all the classes in which 
they are enrolled, and at the weekly preaching service in the 
Chapel. Attendance is also required at the opening of each semes- 
ter, and again at Commencement time for promotion unless ex- 
cused by the Board of Managers. All absences, excused and un- 
excused, are reported to the Presbyteries having the student under 
their care. Absence at any time during the Seminary session has 
an unfavorable effect on the student's standing. 

EXAMINATIONS 

At the close of each semester, examinations are held to test 
and organize the student's knowledge of the ground covered in 



XENIA THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 35 

the several departments. Ordinarily the examinations are written, 
and are directed by the Professors and by them reported to the 
Board of Managers. From the class standing, the examinations, 
and the attendance, the grade of the student, based on a scale of 
100, is determined and reported to his Presbytery. 

GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS 

One hundred and twelve semester hours of work, including 
six in Public Speaking, are required for graduation. A semester 
hour means one recitation a week in a given subject throughout 
a semester. The courses of study in the various departments 
are so arranged that the students take nineteen hours each semes- 
ter during the Junior and Middle years, and eighteen hours each 
semester during the Senior year. 

THE DEGREE OF BACHELOR OF DIVINITY 

1. Candidates for the Bachelor's Degree. 

(a) Students who hold from an institution approved by the 
Faculty the degree of Bachelor of Arts or its equivalent and 
have completed, either in this Seminary or in some other School 
of Theology of like character, the several courses of study that 
constitute the Standard Curriculum (see Course A above) may 
be candidates for the degree of Bachelor of Divinity. 

(b) Undergraduates pursuing the Standard Required Course, 
who maintain an average grade of 85 per cent., with not less than 
80 per cent, in any department, may be allowed to take one-third 
of the course leading to the degree of Bachelor of Divinity, in 
addition to the required work, each year. 

2. Work Required for the Bachelor's Degree. 

(a) The work required for the Bachelor's degree shall be the 
equivalent of twenty- four semester hours. The student shall 
devote sixteen semester hours to one subject, which shall be called 
a major, and eight semester hours to another subject, which shall 
be called a minor; or, if desired, two or more minor subjects may 
be chosen, with the approval of the Faculty. 

(b) In connection with the major subject, a thesis of 5,000 
words shall be required. The subject of the thesis shall be as- 
signed by, or have the approval of, the professor in charge of 



36 XENIA THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

the department not later than December 1st of the academic year 
in which the degree is sought. A type-written copy of the thesis 
shall be in the hands of the professor for examination not later 
than April 1st. 

(c) At the conclusion of the assigned work, the student shall 
pass a thorough examination in both major and minor subjects. 

THE AMERICAN SCHOOL OF ORIENTAL RESEARCH AT 
JERUSALEM 

Xenia Seminary is one of the group of Universities, Colleges, 
and Theological Seminaries in this country co-operating in the 
support and control of the American School of Oriental Research 
in Jerusalem, and is thus able to offer to her students the unique 
facilities possessed by this School. No other Post-graduate work 
is more profitable and attractive to young men looking forward to 
the work of the Ministry than study and research in Bible lands. 
The American School of Oriental Research at Jerusalem was 
founded to afford such opportunities as have never before been 
open to American students. Special arrangements are made to 
reduce the expenses of such students to the lowest point. 

Educational Opportunities Afforded 

The School offers to properly qualified students excellent oppor- 
tunities for pursuing such studies as the following: Biblical and 
Palestinian Archaeology ; the Geography and Natural Features 
of the Land; the History of Israel; Early Church History and 
Patristics ; the Arabic Language, and the other Semitic Lan- 
guages connected with it; Mohammedanism; the Political, Social, 
and Industrial Conditions in Bible Lands ; Roman Administra- 
tion and Colonization in the East ; the Crusades ; and the Com- 
parative History of Religions. 

The School has a well selected working library, which is 
steadily growing. There are other considerable libraries in Jeru- 
salem, some of which contain large collections of manuscripts, 
chiefly Greek and Arabic. As a central point for the study of 
Palestinian antiquities, for making tours of research and explora- 
tion, and for visiting the numerous scenes of past or present 
excavations, Jerusalem is peculiarly well situated. 

Those who avail themselves of the privileges of this School 




MAIN ENTRANCE TO WASHINGTON UNIVERSITY 



XENIA THEOLOGICAL. SEMINARY 37 

can go at once after the Commencement at St. Louis, and enter 
the School at Jerusalem. The altitude and the latitude of Jeru- 
salem make the summer climate there quite satisfactory. The 
remainder of the year will afford abundant opportunity for travel 
through the land and researches in Historical Geography and 
Archaeology. 

The Thayer Memorial Fellowship 

The Thayer Memorial Fellowship of the School at Jerusalem, 
with a stipend of $800, is awarded annually on examination. A 
list of the books recommended to candidates for the Fellowship, 
and special facilities for preparation, will be supplied by the 
Seminary. 

AFFILIATION WITH WASHINGTON UNIVERSITY 

One of the chief considerations which induced the Commission 
of the Board of Managers, charged with the relocation of Xenia 
Theological Seminary, to fix upon the City of St. Louis, was 
the extremely favorable university connection that was offered. 
Washington University is an old and honored foundation, with 
magnificent buildings, and is regarded as the greatest graduate 
school of the whole Southwest. Xenia's new location is within 
a few minutes' walk of its grounds. Through the courtesy of the 
Chancellor and the other authorities, a full exchange of credits 
has been granted, without any control of our teachings or policies. 
So short is the distance that those wishing to complete their 
academic course or to work for an advanced degree, can do so 
without inconvenience or loss of time. Manifestly, the advantages 
of this affiliation are very great. 

LOCATION OF THE SEMINARY 

The Seminary is located at the corner of Washington and 
Trinity Avenues, in University City, a beautiful suburb of St. 
Louis. The slight elevation above the City and the distance from 
river and factory deliver us from most of the fog and smoke 
of the St. Louis region. 

HOW TO REACH THE SEMINARY 

From the Union Station take any northbound car and ride three 
blocks to Eighteenth and Olive Streets. Transfer to a Delmar- 



38 XENIA THEOLOGICAL. SEMINARY 

Olive car westbound and ride to the end of the line. A short 
walk of one block south and one block west brings you to the 
Seminary Building. 

GENERAL EQUIPMENT 

There are two buildings, joined on the fourth floor and on the 
ground floor. The Administration Building contains the Presi- 
dent's office, most of the class rooms and the Professors' studies, 
the Library, and the Chapel. In the Dormitory are rooms for 
the students and quarters for the Matron and for the Janitor. 
An attractive Reception Hall leads into the Dining Room on the 
one hand and into the Parlor on the other. Both Dining Room 
and Parlor are large and well furnished, and open for use. We 
have steam heat, electric lights, good water, a bath room on each 
dormitory floor, and, in the basement, a Seminary Laundry which 
is directed by one of the students in the interest of students. 

THE LIBRARY 

The Seminary Library contains about 15,000 volumes, among 
which are many rare books. Under the direction of the Librarian 
of the Faculty, the students have access to these books for the 
investigation of any assigned subject. 

Through the generosity of the late Mr. Alexander Dempster, 
of Pittsburgh, Pa., the Seminary has been provided with the raised 
map of Palestine published by the Palestine Exploration Fund, 
London, England, from surveys by George Armstrong. Mounted 
in normal position on a substantial table, this map is of special 
value in the study of Sacred Geography and History. 

RESERVATION OF ROOMS 

Students who have been here one or two years may reserve 
rooms at the end of the Seminary session by consulting the 
Matron. The two-year men have first choice of rooms, the one- 
year men have second choice, the alphabetical order being ob- 
served within each group. New students are assigned to their 
rooms in the fall, and have right of choice in the order of their 
written application. 

We are not prepared to accommodate married students and 



XENIA THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 39 

their wives in the Dormitory, but will assist them in finding 
proper accommodations. 

USE OF ROOMS DURING THE SUMMER 

Students may have free use of their rooms for two weeks before 
the opening in September and for two weeks after Commence- 
ment in May. Otherwise, those who desire to use their rooms 
during the summer vacation must secure permission from the 
President, and pay a nominal charge of $5.00 a month to cover 
expenses. When two students occupy the same room, a joint 
monthly charge of $7.50 shall be made. 

THE RELIGIOUS LIFE OF THE SEMINARY 

The religious life of the Seminary is on a high plane. Xenia 
students are trained in the cultivation of personal religion, and 
provision is made for the development and expression of religion 
in its social aspects. A Chapel service forms part of the daily 
schedule. The young men are organized as a local branch of 
the Student Y. M. C. A. This organization conducts its own 
devotional service one evening during the week, and provides the 
leader for the Seminary prayer meeting, in Chapel, Tuesday 
morning. The Student Volunteers meet weekly for prayer and 
conference, and in other ways promote the missionary spirit of 
the Seminary. 

THE SOCIAL LIFE OF THE SEMINARY 

A spirit of good cheer and mutual helpfulness pervades the 
institution. The atmosphere is decidedly home-like. Castes and 
cliques are taboo, and all are united in a wholesome Christian 
fellowship. The members of the Faculty are the students' best 
friends, and every student is a brother to every other student. 
Without excessive diversion from study, there are seasonable 
socials and entertainments at the Seminary, and the students also 
have an appropriate share in the social life of the Churches of 
the City. Every season brings forward high-class lectures and 
concerts in the City which further enlarge the students' oppor- 
tunity for social and aesthetic culture. 



40 XENIA THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

PHYSICAL TRAINING 

The physical man is not forgotten. "Mens sana in corpore 
sano" is a principle from which Christian students do not seek 
exemption. Wholesome food, pure air and water, abundant op- 
portunities for exercise, — all the requisites to good health are 
provided. On the Seminary property, next to the Dormitory, is 
a splendid tennis court and a ball field, where the young men, 
thanks to a favoring climate, can secure outdoor exercise the 
greater part of the year. Moreover, the commodious gymnasium 
of the First United Presbyterian Church, in the same block with 
the Seminary, is open to the students for basket-ball and other 
indoor games at certain times during the week. These opportuni- 
ties, which are by no means neglected, in some measure account 
for the excellent health enjoyed by the students at Xenia. 

THE SEMINARY QUARTETTE 

Training in music is a necessary part of a minister's education. 
The Seminary Glee Club, which is a new and developing feature 
of the institution, affords musical opportunity to all students, 
while the Quartette is within reach of the best singers. During 
the past year, the Quartette made a tour of the Middle West, 
appearing in four college towns and many other places with emi- 
nent satisfaction. They have been loaned repeatedly to sing at 
important gatherings in the City, and on occasion their entertain- 
ments are broadcasted by some of the best modern radio facili- 
ties. The St. Louis Chamber of Commerce, after hearing these 
young men, paid them a most exceptional compliment. The Quar- 
tette will be in Winona Lake, Ind., this summer, and will assist 
Dr. J. B. Herbert in leading the music of the Y. P. C. U. Con- 
vention. 

EXPENSES 

The necessary expenses of a course of theological training are 
reduced to a minimum. The building is thoroughly equipped, 
and there are no fees or rentals for privileges and accommoda- 
tions. The Seminary Dining Room has been managed most eco- 
nomically by the Student Club, and the cost of maintenance has 
amounted to about $25.00 a month to each member. The Semi- 
nary Laundry and the Seminary Book Store enable the students 
to effect a still further savins:. 




XEiNIA SEMINARY QUARTETTE 

Standing: Arch. K. Stewart, second tenor; Ray M. Davis, baritone. 
Sitting: Robert H. Belton, first tenor; J. Russell Dugan, bass. 



XENIA THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 41 

OPPORTUNITIES FOR WORK 

The Seminary has received a most cordial welcome in the City 
of St. Louis. This great center of population offers an excellent 
field for Christian effort and sociological study. It also affords 
numerous opportunities of employment to those who must make 
their own way. The Churches are enthusiastic in pledging co- 
operation and support. Such support was, of course, to be ex- 
pected from the United Presbyterian congregations, and it is 
being given in full measure. But other denominations also, espe- 
cially the Presbyterian, U. S., the Presbyterian, U. S. A., the 
Congregationalist, and the Methodist, have shown a most friendly 
attitude from the outset. Some of them employ students of the 
Seminary in congregational work. 

COMPENSATED RELIGIOUS WORK 

Members of the Junior Class will receive the sum of fifty dol- 
lars each for the year, on condition of their engaging in religious 
work, not otherwise fully compensated, in the churches of this 
community, or in adjacent fields. As the students advance into 
the Middle and Senior Classes, they have increasing opportunities 
of preaching, for which they receive an appropriate compensation. 

STUDENT LOANS 

From the income of our Students' Fund, we are prepared to 
loan to those who may desire it, the sum of fifty dollars a year, 
or more in case of real need, on their personal notes, without 
interest for five years from date of loan ; at the expiration of 
this period, interest at the rate of six per cent., per annum will be 
charged until payment is made. 

AID FROM THE BOARD OF EDUCATION 

The Board of Education is authorized by the General Assembly 
to make special grants in aid to United Presbyterian students of 
theology upon the recommendation of their Presbytery. The 
annual payments are as follows : 

"To first year students not to exceed $180.00; to second year 
students not to exceed $120.00; and to third year students not 
to exceed $80.00. * * * 



42 XENIA THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

"No money shall be paid to students of the first year who 
during the sessions of the Seminary receive compensation for 
preaching on the Sabbath, nor to students of the second year who 
preach for compensation more than an average of two Sabbaths 
a month during the Seminary session. And no money shall be 
paid to any student who holds a pastoral charge or engages in 
special religious work such as will interfere with his duties in 
the Seminary. * . * * Ordinarily no grant will be made to a 
student who marries immediately prior to entering upon or while 
pursuing his Seminary course. * * * Absolute abstinence 
from the use of tobacco is made an essential requirement for 
receiving aid from the Beneficiary Fund." 

"Students receiving aid must be under the care of the Presby- 
tery, receive its formal endorsement and recommendation, and 
be in attendance at one of our denominational institutions. The 
amount paid to each student shall be fixed, in its relation to the 
full appropriation granted, by the time of his actual attendance 
during the year. * . * * In all ordinary cases the benefactions 
shall date from the time of application." 

DONATIONS AND BEQUESTS 

On account of the low rate of interest, a large amount of in- 
vested funds is required to meet the current expenses of the 
Seminary. The enlargement of our permanent Endowment Fund 
has not kept pace with the necessary growth of our work and 
the advancing prices of all commodities. It is imperative that 
Xenia's Endowment Fund be very greatly augmented. Accord- 
ingly, the Seminary is cordially commended to the liberality of 
all to whom our church and ministry are dear. Appeal is also 
made to such as are making bequests to remember this institu- 
tion. Special attention is called to the Annuity Plan. The form 
of Annuity Bond issued by the Seminary in this connection may 
be found on page 44. 



XENIA THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 43 



FORM OF BEQUEST. 



FOR PERSONAL PROPERTY 

I hereby give and bequeath to the Xenia United Presbyterian 

Theological Seminary, of St. Louis, Mo., the sum of 

Dollars, or notes or bonds. 

(Here describe them.) 



FOR REAL ESTATE 

I give and devise to the Xenia United Presbyterian Theological 
Seminary, of St. Louis, Mo., its successors and assigns, for- 
ever, the following described tract or lot of land, in township 

o f , County o f ■. , 

State of , and bounded and described as 

follows: (Here describe the piece of land with such accuracy 
and definiteness that it may certainly be known.) If such devisors 
wish to make bequests to any of the Seminary funds (endowment, 
income or library fund), they should specify the particular fund 
they have in view. 



44 XENIA THEOLOGICAL, SEMINARY 

FORM OF ANNUITY BOND 

Series A. No 

THE XENIA UNITED PRESBYTERIAN 

THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

OF ST. LOUIS, MO. 

In consideration of a GIFT of Dollars, 

the receipt of which is hereby acknowledged, 

issued this 

LIFE ANNUITY BOND 

and agrees to pay to the order of 

of in the state of 

an annuity or yearly sum of Dollars, 

in equal semi-annual installments, on June fifteenth and December 

fifteenth of each year during the remainder of h life, and upon 

the death of said annuitant this obligation shall be void and said 
annuity shall cease. 

The heirs, executors, administrators, or assigns, of said an- 
nuitant shall be entitled to any proportionate share of said annuity 
from the last semi-annual payment to the date of said annuitant's 
death. 

In Witness Whereof, the said Theological Seminary has 
caused its corporate seal to be hereunto affixed and these presents 

to be signed by its President and Secretary this 

day of , One Thousand Nine Hundred 

and 



Secretary. President. 



CORRESPONDENCE. 

For Catalogues or any other information concerning the Seminary, address 

President M. G. KYLE, D.D., LL.D., 

6834 Washington Avenue, St. Louis, Mo. 



/ f 2-5 



ANNUAL CATALOGUE 



OF THE 



Xenia Theological 
Seminary 




Service, Pa. 1794 

Canonsburg, Pa. 1821 

Xenia, Ohio 1855 

St. Louis, Mo. 1920 




Calendar for 1925 


JANUARY 


FEBRUARY 


MARCH 


APRIL 


8 M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 




1 

e 

15 
22 
29 


2 

9 

16 

23 

30 


3 
10 
17 
24 
31 


1 

8 
15 
22 


2 
9 

16 
23 


3 
10 
17 
24 


4 
1 1 
18 
25 


6 
12 
19 
26 


6 

13 
20 
27 


7 
14 
21 
28 


1 

8 
15 
22 
29 


2 

9 

16 

23 

30 


3 
10 
1 7 
24 
31 


4 
1 1 
18 
25 


6 

12 
19 
26 


6 
13 
20 
27 


7 
14 
21 
28 








1 

6 
15 
22 
29 


2 

9 

16 

23 

30 


3 
10 
17 
24 


4 
11 
18 
25 


4 
11 
16 
25 


5 
12 
19 
26 


6 

13 
20 
27 


7 
14 
21 
28 


6 
12 
19 
26 


6 
13 
20 
27 


7 
14 
21 
28 
























MAY 


JUNE 


JULY 


AUGUST 


S M T W T 1 


8 M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 






1 

8 

15 

22 

29 


2 

9 

16 

23 

30 


7 
14 
21 

28 


1 

8 

15 

22 

29 


2 

9 

16 

23 

30 


3 
10 
17 
24 


4 
1 1 
18 
25 


5 
12 
19 
26 


6 
13 
20 
27 








1 

8 

15 

22 

29 


2 

9 

16 

23 

30 


3 
10 
17 
24 
31 


4 
1 1 
18 
25 














1 

8 
15 
22 
29 


3 
10 
17 
24 

31 


4 
11 
18 
25 


6 
12 
19 
26 


6 
13 
20 
27 


7 
14 
21 
28 


6 
12 
19 
26 


6 
13 
20 
27 


7 
14 
21 
28 


2 

9 

16 

23 

30 


3 
10 
17 
24 
31 


4 
11 
18 
25 


6 
12 
19 
26 


6 
13 
20 
27 


7 
14 
21 
28 










SEPTEMBER 


OCTOBER 


NOVEMBER 


DECEMBER 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


8 M T W T F S 


6 
13 
20 
27 


7 
14 
21 
28 


1 

8 

15 

22 

29 


2 

9 

16 

23 


3 
10 
17 
24 


4 
1 1 
18 
25 


5 
12 
19 
26 










1 

8 

15 

22 

29 


2 

9 

16 

23 

30 


3 
10 
17 
24 
31 


11 2 

8 9 

15 16 

22 23 
29 30 


3 
10 
17 
24 


4 
1 1 
18 
25 


6 
12 
19 
26 


6 

13 
20 
27 


7 
14 
21 
28 


6 
13 
20 
27 


7 
14 
21 


1 

8 

15 

22 

29 


2 

9 

16 

23 

30 


3 

10 
17 
24 
31 


4 
1 1 
18 
25 


5 
12 
19 
26 


4 
1 1 

18 
25 


5 
12 
19 
26 


6 

13 
20 
27 


7 
14 
21 
23 




















Calendar for 1926 


JANUARY 


FEBRUARY 


MARCH 


APRIL 


8 M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 












1 

8 

15 

22 

29 


2 

9 
16 
23 
30 


"j 

14 
21 

28 


1 

8 

15 

22 


2 

9 

16 

23 


3 
10 
17 
24 


4 
1 1 
18 
25 


5 
12 
19 
26 


6 

13 
20 
27 


"7 
14 
21 
28 


1 

8 

15 

22 

29 


2 

9 

16 

23 

30 


3 
10 
17 
24 
31 


4 
1 1 
18 
25 


5 
12 
19 
26 


6 

13 
20 
27 










1 

8 

15 

22 

29 


2 

9 

16 

23 

30 


3 
10 
17 
24 


3 
10 
17 
24 
31 


4 
1 1 
18 
25 


5 
12 
19 
26 


6 
13 
20 
27 


7 
14 
21 


4 
1 1 

18 
25 


5 
12 
19 
26 


6 
13 
20 
27 


7 
14 
21 
28 






















MAY 


JUNE 


JULY 


AUGUST 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 














1 

8 

15 

22 

29 


6 

13 
20 

27 


7 
14 
21 

28 


1 

8 

15 

22 

29 


2 

9 
16 
23 
30 


3 
10 
17 

24 


4 
11 
18 
25 


5 
12 
19 

26 










1 

8 

15 

22 

29 


2! 3 

9 10 

16 17 

23 24 

30131 


1 

8 

15 

22 

29 


2 

9 

16 

23 

30 


3 
10 
17 
24 
31 


4 
1 1 
18 
25 


6 
12 
19 
26 


6 
13 
20 
27 


7 
14 
21 
28 


2 

9 

16 

23 

30 


3 
10 
17 
24 
31 


4 
1 1 
18 
25 


5 
12 
19 
26 


6 
13 
20 
27 


7 
14 
21 
28 


4 
11 
18 

25 


5 
12 
19 
26 


6 
13 
20 
27 


7 
14 
21 
28 










SEPTEMBER 


OCTOBER 


NOVEMBER 


DECEMBER 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


8 M T W T F S 


| 




1 

8 

15 

22 

29 


2 

9 

16 

23 

30 


3 
10 
17 
24 


4 
1 1 
18 

25 


3 
10 
17 
24 
31 


4 
1 1 
18 
25 


5 
12 
19 
26 


6 
13 
20 
27 


7 
14 
21 
28 


1 
8 

15 

22 
29 


2 

9 

16 

23 

30 


"7 
14 
21 
28 


1 

8 

15 

22 

29 


2 

9 

16 

23 

30 


3 
10 
17 
24 


4 
1 1 
18 

25 


6 
12 
19 
26 


6 
13 
20 
27 








1 

8 

15 

22 

29 


2 

9 
16 
23 
30 


3 
10 
17 
24 
31 


4 
1 1 
18 
25 


5 6 
12 13 
19 20 
2627 


7 
14 
21 
28 


5 
12 
19 

26 


6 
13 
20 

27 


7 
14 
21 
28 














w 

w 

< 
o 

o 
o 

o 

w 
K 

E-i 



The Annual Catalogue 



OF THE 



Xenia 

United Presbyterian 

Theological Seminary 

of St. Louis, Missouri 




One Hundred and Thirty-Second Year 
1925-1926 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 



page 

Calendar, 1925 and 1926 Inside Cover 

Calendar of Special Days, 1925-1926 6 

Control of the Seminary 9 

Board of Managers : 11 

Board of Trustees ....12. 13 

Promotion Secretary 12 

Ladies' Visiting and Advisory Board 13 

Young Men's Christian Association 13 

Student Volunteer Band 13 

Alumni Association.. 13 

The Faculty and Its Officers 14 

Historical Roll of Professors, 1794-1925 15 

Special Lecturers and Preachers 16 

Register of Students: 

Graduate School 17-19 

Divinity School 19-22 

School of Religious Education ....22-23 

Summary 23 

Purpose of the Seminary 24 

The Divinity School: 

Course of Study (General Statement) 1. 24 

Outline of Prescribed Course (Tabulated) 25 

Description of Courses of Study by Departments 26-34 

Hebrew Exegesis and Old Testament Literature 26 

Greek Exegesis and New Testament Literature 27 

Biblical Theology and Archaeology 28 

Pastoral Theology.. 29 

Church History 30 

Systematic Theology and Homiletics 31 

Philosophy of Religion and Applied Christianity 33 

Introductory Greek 34 

Public Speaking 34 

Schedules of Recitations, both semesters 35-36 

Administration of the Regular Course 37 

Admission and Classification of Students ....38 

Attendance Requirements 39 

Examinations 40 

Graduation Requirements 40 

Diplomas and Degrees at Graduation 40 

Other Graduation Honors 41 

The Graduate School: 

The Degree of Master of Theology 42 

The Degree of Doctor of Theology 43 

Graduate Seminars offered, 1925-26 43 

Other Graduate Seminars, by Departments 43-46 

American School of Oriental Research at Jerusalem 46 

Affiliation with Washington University 49 

The School of Religious Education: 

At the Seminary ._ 50 

Seminary Extension ; ._ 51 

General Information: 

Location of the Seminary and How to Reach It 52 

General Equipment 52 

Library Facilities 52 

Reservation of Rooms 55 

Religious Life of the Seminary 55 

Social Life of the Seminary 56 

Physical Training and Recreation 56 

The Seminary Quartette 59 

Expenses _ 59 

Opportunities for Self -Help 59 

Compensated Religious Work 60 

Student Aid 60 

Donations and Bequests 61 

Forms for Bequests and Annuity Bonds 62-63 



CALENDAR OF SPECIAL DAYS 



1925 



1. The Opening of the Session. 

Wednesday, September 23rd, at 1 P. M. Registration of Students. 
Address of Welcome by the President. Address by the President 
of the Board of Managers. 

2. Reception to Students. 

Wednesday, September 23rd, following the opening exercises in the 
Chapel, the young people of the United Presbyterian Churches of 
the City will tender a Reception to the students concluding with a 
Dinner and Social Hour. 

3. The Opening Sermon. 

Sabbath, September 27th, at 8 P. M., at the Gibson Heights United 
Presbyterian Church, by the Rev. James L. Fowle. 

4. The Mid-Term Examinations Begin. 
Monday, December 14th. 

5. The Christmas Vacation. 

Wednesday, December 23rd, at 12 M., till Wednesday, January 6th, 
at 8 A. M. 

1926 

6. The Day of Prayer for Colleges and Seminaries. 
Wednesday, February 17th. 

7. The Final Bxaminations Begin. 
Monday, April 26th. 

8. The Baccalaureate Sermon. 

Sabbath, May 2nd, at 8 P. M., at the First United Presbyterian 
Church, by the Rev. Prof. Geo. B. McCreary, Ph.D., D.D. 

9. The Annual Meeting of the Board of Trustees. 
Tuesday, May 4th, at 10 A. M. 

10. The Annual Meeting of the Board of .Managers. 

Wednesday, May 5th, at 10 A. M. The Senior Theses will be read 
at the afternoon session. 

11. The Annual Meeting of the Alumni Association. 
Wednesday, May 5th, at 4 P. M. Alumni Banquet at 6 P. M. 

12. The Graduation Exercises. 

Thursday, May 6th, at 8 P. M., in the First United Presbyterian 
Church. Graduation Address. 

Promotion of Classes, Presentation of Diplomas, and Conferring 
of Degrees, by the President. 



THE CONTROL OFiTHE 
SEMINARY 



THE SEMINARY is under the control of 
the Second Synod, and the Synods of 
Illinois, Iowa, Kansas, Nebraska, Cali- 
fornia, and The Columbia, of the United Pres- 
byterian Church. Its immediate control is com- 
mitted to a Board of Managers, twenty-five in 
number, appointed by the Synods, and a Board 
of Trustees, twelve in number, appointed by the 
Board of Managers. The Term and the Course 
of Study are determined by the General Assembly. 



XENIA THEOLOGICAL, SEMINARY 11 



BOARD OF MANAGERS 



Officers 

Rev. A. A. Graham, President - Monmouth, 111. 

Rev. W. R. Irvine, Vice-President Richmond, Kan. 

Mr. T. Dales KylE, Financial Sec, and Treas. -Xenia, Ohio 

Rev. W. H. Hastings, Recording Secretary St. Louis, Mo. 

Members 

THE SECOND SYNOD 

Term Expires 

Rev. J. P. Nesbit, D.D., Princeton, Ind 1925 

*Mr. W. J. Fulton, Columbus, Ohio 1925 

Mr. Wm. E. McKEE, Indianapolis, Ind 1926 

REV. H. A. Thompson, Columbus, Ohio 1927 

Rev. C. P. ProudEit, D.D., Xenia, Ohio 1927 

SYNOD OF ILLINOIS 

Rev. J. M. Duncan, Lodi, Wis. 1925 

Rev. H. H. McConnEll, St. Louis, Mo. 1925 

Rev. R. C. Gibson, D.D., Chicago, 111 1926 

Rev. A. A. Graham, Monmouth, 111 1926 

REV. A. Campbell BailEy, Moline, 111. 1927 

**Mr. Robert RutlEdge, St. Louis, Mo. 1927 

SYNOD OF IOWA 

REV. J. B. Work, D.D., Tarkio, Mo Jan. 1, 1926 

Mr. W. J. French, Esq., Waterloo, Iowa Jan. 1, 1927 

Mr. W. H. Ramsey, Esq., Garner, Iowa Jan. 1, 1928 

Rev. W. C. Williamson, D.D., LL.D., Clarinda, Iowa Jan. 1, 1929 

SYNOD OF KANSAS 

Rev. J. H. HuTchman, D.D., Pittsburg, Kan. 1925 

Rev. A. M. Reed, Manhattan, Kan. 1926 

Rev. W. R. Irvine, Richmond, Kan 1927 

SYNOD OF NEBRASKA 

Mr. Robert Sloss, North Bend, Neb 1925 

REV. W. R. Gray, D.D., Summerfield, Kan 1926 

*Removed from the bounds of the Synod. 
**Deceased, Mar. 23, 1925. 



12 XBNIA THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

SYNOD OF CALIFORNIA 

Rev. J. O. McConnEll, Culver City, Cal.~~ 1925 

Rev. A. E. Kelly, San Francisco, Cal. - - 1925 

SYNOD OF THE COLUMBIA 

REV. M. E. Dunn, D.D., Portland, Ore. - 1925 

Rev. A. W. Wilson, Mt. Vernon, Wash. -1925 

EX-OFFICIO MEMBER 

President M. G. KylE, D.D., LL.D. St. Louis, Mo. 

CONSULTATIVE MEMBERS OF THE BOARD OF MANAGERS 

Proe. Jesse Johnson, D.D. Proe. Robt. M. Kerr, D.D. 

Proe. J. H. Webster, D.D. Proe. J. L. Kelso, M.A., B.D. 

Proe. G. B. McCrEary, Ph.D., D.D. 

BOARD OF TRUSTEES 

(Under the Missouri Charter) 

Officers 

Mr. ErlE Ormsby, President, 4508 McPherson Ave., St. Louis, Mo. 

Mr. T. DaeES Kyle, Financial Sec. and Treas., Xenia, Ohio. 

Rev. W. H. Hastings, Recording Sec, 3524a Wyoming St., St. Louis, Mo. 

Members 

Term Expires 

Rev. W. H. Hastings, 3524a Wyoming St., St. Louis, Mo. - 1926 

Mr. ErlE Ormsby, 4508 McPherson Ave., St. Louis, Mo. - 1926 

Mr. J. M. Lashly, Esq., 20 Windermere Place, St. Louis, Mo 1926 

Rev. J. F. LeClERE, 2605 Union Blvd., St. Louis, Mo.- 1926 

Mr. W. J. Johnston, 3610 Forest Park Blvd., St. Louis, Mo 1927 

Mr. J. M. Murry, 1324 Laurel St., St. Louis, Mo. - 1927 

Mr. Wm. Schattgen, 2934 Allen Ave., St. Louis, Mo. 1927 

Mr. John M. Stuart, 4252a Cleveland Ave., St. Louis, Mo. 1927 

Mr. H. C. Grote, 6169 Pershing Ave., St. Louis, Mo.- v 1928 

Mr. T. Dales Kyle, Xenia, Ohio. - 1928 

Mr. G. R. McCullough, 6117 Westminster Place, St. Louis, Mo. 1928 

Mr. A. O. Wilson, 14 Windermere Place, St. Louis, Mo - 1928 

President M. G. Kyle, D.D., LLD., St. Louis, Mo. -Ex-Officio Member 

PROMOTION SECRETARY 

and 
ASSISTANT TO THE PRESIDENT IN THE SYNODS 

Rev. John A. Henderson, D.D., 6834 Washington Ave., St. Louis, Mo. 



XBNIA THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 13 

BOARD OF TRUSTEES 

(Under the Ohio Charter) 

Mr. S. Walter Collins, Bloomington, Ind. - 1920 

Mr. Nathan Logan, Spring Hill, Ind 1926 

Dr. B. R. McClEllan, M. D., Xenia, Ohio 1926 

Mr. Robert Bryson, Xenia, Ohio 1927 

Mr. W. B. Cherry, Xenia, Ohio - 1927 

Mr. J. C. Williamson, Xenia, Ohio-- 1927 

Hon. C. H. KylE, Xenia, Ohio 1928 

Mr. T. Dales KylE. Xenia, Ohio 1928 

Hon. J. Carl Marshall, Xenia, Ohio - 1928 

President M. G. KylE, D.D., LL.D., St. Louis, Mo. Ex-Officio Member 

LADIES' VISITING AND ADVISORY BOARD 

Mrs. M. G. KylE, President. Mrs. J. L. Kelso. 

Mrs J. H. Webster, Vice-President. Mrs. G. B. McCrEary. 

Mrs. A. O. Wilson, Secretary. Mrs. J. F. LeClERE. 

Mrs. Jesse Johnson, Treasurer. Miss Elizabeth BrownlEE. 

Mrs. Joseph Kyle. Mrs. D. L. Ferguson. 

Mrs. Robt. M. Kerr. Miss Pearl Mann. 

THE STUDENTS 1 Y. M. C. A. 

Robert Henry Belton, President. 

Roy Wilson HoEstetter, Vice-President. 

Stanley TamaTEA NichollS, Secretary and Treasurer. 

THE STUDENT VOLUNTEER BAND 

Stanley TamaTEa Nicholls, President. 

Frederic Sylvester ZellER, Secretary and Treasurer. 

THE ALUMNI ASSOCIATION 

Rev. D. L. Ferguson, President St. Louis, Mo. 

Rev. J. P. Nesbit, D.D., Vice-President - Princeton, Ind. 

Rev. J. L. Kelso, M.A., B.D., Secretary and Treasurer St. Louis, Mo. 



14 XENIA THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 



OFFICERS OF THE FACULTY 



The Rev. M. G. Kyle, M.A., D.D., LL.D., President. 

The Rev. Robt. M. Kerr, M.A„ D.D., Vice-President. 

The Rev. Jesse Johnson, MA., D.D., Registrar. 

The Rev. J. H. Webster, M.A., D.D., Librarian and Secretary. 

The Rev. J. L. Keeso, M.A., B.D., Assistant Librarian. 

THE FACULTY 



The Rev. Jesse Johnson, MA., D.D., 
Professor of Church History. 

The Rev. J. H. Webster, M.A., D.D., 
Professor of Greek Exegesis and New Testament Literature. 

The Rev. M. G. Kyle, MA., D.D., LL.D., 

Newbwg Professor of Biblical Theology and Biblical 

Archaeology. Adjunct Professor of Practical 

Theology and Religious Education. 

The Rev. Robt. M. Kerr, M.A., D.D., 
Professor of Systematic Theology and Homiletics. 

The Rev. James L. Kelso, M.A., B.D., 
Professor of Hebrew Exegesis and Old Testament Literature. 

The Rev. Geo. B. McCreary, Ph.D., D.D., 
Professor of the Philosophy of Religion and Applied Christianity. 

Thomas Shearer Duncan, M.A., Ph.D., 

Instructor in Public Speaking. 



XENIA THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 15 



HISTORICAL ROLL OF PROFESSORS 



During the one hundred and thirty-one years of the Seminary's 
history, under various names and in different localities, in all 
thirty-two men have served as instructors for more or less ex- 
tended periods of time. The roll of professors is as follows : 

Inaugu- Period 

Name rated at of Service 

John Anderson Service 1794-1819 

John Banks Philadelphia 1820-1826 

James Ramsey Canonsburg - 1821-1842 

David Carson - Canonsburg 1834-1834 

Thomas BevEridgE Canonsburg 1835-1855 

Thomas Beveridge Xenia 1855-1871 . 

Joseph Claybaugh Oxford 1839-1855 

Samuel W. McCrackEn Oxford 1839-1840 

James Martin — - Canonsburg 1842-1846 

Abraham Anderson Canonsburg 1847-1855 

Samuel Wilson Xenia 1855-1875 

William Davidson Oxford 1855-1858 

Alexander Young Oxford 1855-1857 

Alexander Young Monmouth - 1858-1874 

John Scott - Monmouth - 1858-1874 

Joseph ClokEy Xenia 1858-1873 

Andrew M. Black Monmouth 1864-1874 

David A. Wallace - Monmouth 1867-1870 

David A. Wallace - Xenia 1883-1883 

William Bruce Xenia 1871-1880 

James G. Carson - Xenia 1873-1888 

William G. MoorEhead Xenia 1873-1914 

Jackson B. McMichael Xenia - 1873-1878 

James Harper Xenia 1879-1899 

David MacDill Xenia 1884-1902 

WilbErt W. White Xenia 1889-1894 

John D. Irons - Xenia -- 1895-1905 

Joseph Kyle Xenia - 1899-1921 

Jesse Johnson Xenia 1902 

John E. Wishart Xenia 1905-1923 

John H. Webster -- - Xenia 1908 

MElvin G. Kyle Xenia - - 1914 

Robert M. Kerr St. Louis - 1922 

James L. Kelso St. Louis 1923 

Geo. B. McCrEary St. Louis 1924 



16 XENIA THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

The following Special Preachers and Lecturers have been heard 
in the Seminary during the year 1924-1925: 

PREACHERS 

The; Reverend W. R. Gray, D.D. 
The Reverend A. W. JamiEson, D.D. 
The Reverend David M. Skilling, D.D. 

LECTURERS 

The Reverend Chas. H. Robinson, D.D., 

Moderator of the General Assembly, 1924-25. 
President John McNaugher, D.D., LL.D. 
The Reverend J. E. Bradford, D.D. 
Professor T. S. Duncan, Ph.D. 
Mr. H. F. Henderson. 

The Reverend Professor Robert Dick Wilson. D.D., LL.D. 
The Reverend A. B. Winchester, D.D. 
The Reverend L. E. Smith, D.D. 
The Reverend W. B. Anderson, D.D. 
Professor Robt. S. McClEnahan, M.A., LL.D. 

The following Preachers and Lecturers are to be heard during the 
year 1925-1926: 

PREACHERS 

The Reverend Jas. L. Fowls. 
The Reverend J. Alvin Orr, D.D. 
President T. H. McMichael, D.D. 
The Reverend E. C. McCown, D.D. 
President J. Knox Montgomery, D.D., LL.D. 

LECTURERS 

The Reverend W. T. McConnEll, D.D. 

Sir William Mitchell Ramsay. 

The Reverend R. R. Bigger, D.D. 

The Reverend Professor H. A. KelsEy, D.D. 

The Reverend Professor J. GrEsham Machen, D.D. 

The Reverend W. I. Wishart, D.D., 

Moderator of the General Assembly, 1925-26. 
The Reverend T. D. Edgar, D.D. 
Professor L. E. Robinson, M. A. 
President W. L. Bryan, LL.D. 
The Reverend W. E. McCulloch, D.D. 
J. M. Patterson, LL.D. 
Professor O. S. Johnston. 
Mr. S. A. Fulton. 



XENIA THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 



THE REGISTER OF STUDENTS 

1924-1925 



THE GRADUATE SCHOOL 

Students who received the Degree of Master of Theology (Th M.) 

May 7, 1925 

Reverend Homer Austin Kent Ashland, Ohio 

B.A., Ashland College, 1925. 
Xenia Theological Seminary, 1922. 

Reverend George Wales King, D.D. -St. Louis, Mo. 

Syracuse University 

Auburn Theological Seminary, 1901. 

Reverend Alva J. McClain — - Los Angeles, Cal. 

B.A., Occidental College, 1925. 
Xenia Theological Seminary, 1917. 

Reverend Williamson Dunn Vater -■ - St. Louis, Mo. 

M.S., Purdue University, 1894. 
Princeton Theological Seminary, 



Reverend Walter Vail Watson - - York, N. Y. 

Xenia Theological Seminary, 1922. 

Reverend William Bruce Wilson.— Pittsburgh, Pa. 

B.A., Muskingum College, 1921. 
Xenia Theological Seminary, 1924. 

Candidates for the Degree of Master of Theology : Students in 

Residence 

Reverend Carl Leo AtTiG- - - Ed-.vardsville, 111. 

B.A., Cincinnati University, 1907. 
Lane Theological Seminary, 1910. 

Reverend William Henry Hastings — - St. Louis, Mo. 

B.A., Monmouth College, 1916. 
Pittsburgh Theological Seminary, 1919. 

Reverend James Frederic LeClErE - - St. Louis, Mo. 

B.A., Monmouth College, 1906. 
Pittsburgh Theological Seminary, 1909. 



18 XENIA THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

Reverend Harold Harper McConnele St. Louis, Mo. 

B.A., Monmouth College, 1916. 
Pittsburgh Theological Seminary, 1919. 

Reverend John Henderson MoorEhead St. Louis, Mo. 

B.A., Monmouth College, 1892. 
Xenia Theological Seminary, 1895. 

Reverend John Norman Morrison Alton, 111. 

B.A., Franklin College, 1911. 
Auburn Theological Seminary, 1915. 

Reverend Arnold Smith St. Louis, Mo. 

B.A., Park College, 1903. 

Auburn Theological Seminary, 1906. 

Reverend Herrick LEE Todd Oregon, 111. 

B.A., Wabash College, 1908. 

McCormick Theological Seminary, 1911. 

Students doing Assigned Work Elsewhere 

Reverend Cecil Plumb Almond, N. Y. 

B.A., Middlebury College, 1919. 
Xenia Theological Seminary, 1922. 

Reverend John Bright Pollock - - Reinbeck, Iowa 

B.A., Washington and Jefferson College, 1890. 
Pittsburgh Theological Seminary, 1893. 

Reverend John Leyda Vance Rock Island, 111. 

B.A., Washington and Jefferson College, 1887. 
Pittsburgh Theological Seminary, 1890. 

Undergraduate Students doing Extra-Curriculum Work for the 
Degree of Master of Theology 

Kenneth Milton Monroe Los Angeles, Cal. 

B.A., University of Southern California, 1922. 

Archibald Karr Stewart Boyden, Iowa 

B.S., Tarkio College, 1923. 

Persons attending Lectures as Auditors 

Reverend Noyes Otis Bartholomew Maplewood, Mo. 

B.A., Washburn College, 1898. 
Chicago Theological Seminary, 1902. 

Reverend Charles Everett Draper, S.T.B., D.D. 
Ph.B., Arkansas Conference College, 1913. 
Garrett Biblical Institute, 1916. 



XENIA THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 19 

Reverend David Lawrence Ferguson, B.D St. Louis, Mo. 

B.A., Muskingum College, 1917. 
Xenia Theological Seminary, 1921. 

Reverend Richard LEE Kortkamp Witt, III. 

Washington University. 
Princeton Theological Seminary. 

Reverend Owen Wieeiam Pratt - St. Louis, Mo. 

B.A., Wabash College, 1916. 
Western Theological Seminary, 1919. 

THE DIVINITY SCHOOL 

O SENIOR CLASS, Graduated May 7, 1925 

Ernest Spencer Abbott, Cum Laudc- St. Louis, Mo. 

St. Louis Presbytery, Presbyterian Church, U. S. A. 

Raymond Hutchison Cherry, Th.B - Xenia, Ohio 

B.A., Muskingum College, 1922. 
Xenia Presbytery. 

Ray McCrEight Davis, Th.B.- New Concord, Ohio 

B.A., Muskingum College, 1922. 
Muskingum Presbytery. 

Leander FineEy, Th.B. - New Concord, Ohio 

B.A., Muskingum College, 1921. 
Muskingum Presbytery. 

Raeph Wilbur Frost, Th.B.-- Chester, W. Va. 

B.A., Muskingum College, 1922. 
Steubenville Presbytery. 

James Paul Graham, Th.B., Cum Laudc Reynoldsburg, Ohio 

B.A., Muskingum College, 1922. 
Xenia Presbytery. 

Haroed Edward Lobaugh, Th.B., Cum Laudc Conoquenessing, Pa. 

B.A., Muskingum College, 1922. 
Butler Presbytery. 

Henry Ernest Moore, Th.B Covington, Tenn. 

B.A., Bryson College, 1922. 
Southern Illinois Presbytery. 

MlETON WiEEIAM MoSBACHER St. Louis, Mo. 

Moody Bible Institute. 

St. Louis Association, Congregational Conference. 

Robert CoeEman Shaub - Harrisburg, Pa. 

Moody Bible Institute. 
Southern Illinois Presbytery. 



20 XENIA THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 



Archibald Wilson Webster, Th.B., Magna cum laude St. Louis, Mo. 

B.A., Princeton University, 1921. 
Southern Illinois Presbytery. 

THE MIDDLE CLASS 

Robert Henry Belton - Chicago, 111. 

Lewis Institute. 

Chicago Association, Congregational Conference. 

James Daryl Davis - - Kirkwood, 111. 

B.A., Findlay College, 1923. 
Monmouth Presbytery. 

Lewis Hecman Fraser - - Wellsville, Ohio 

B.A., Muskingum College, 1923. 
Steubenville Presbytery. 

Roy Wilson HoEstetter - Tulare, Cal. 

B.S., Monmouth College, 1923. 
Colorado Presbytery. 

Ruby LEroy Logan - - - Pickneyville, 111. 

Park College. 

Southern Illinois Presbytery. 

Kenneth Milton Monroe Los Angeles, Cal. 

B.A., University of So. Cal., 1922. 
The Brethren Church. 

Archibald Karr Stewart Fort Morgan, Cal. 

B.S. Tarkio College, 1923. 
Colorado Presbytery. 

Roy Dale Strong Brighton, Tenn. 

B.A., Bryson College, 1923. 
Southern Illinois Presbytery. 

Miles Harold Taber Long Beach, Cal. 

The Brethren Church. 

Henry Van Dyke - : --Newton, Iowa 

Des Moines Presbytery. 

Floyd WiThrow Tarkio, Mo. 

B.A., Tarkio College, 1923. 
College Springs Presbytery. 

Frederic Sylvester ZellEr — — Sterling, Kans. 

B.A., Sterling College, 1922. 
Arkansas Valley Presbytery. 



XENIA THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 21 

THE JUNIOR CLASS 

Edward Davenport Byrd St. Louis, Mo. 

Moody Bible Institute. 
Presbyterian Church, U. S. A. 

Clarence Alfred Campbell St. Louis, Mo. 

B.A., Washington University, 1924. 
Southern Illinois Presbytery. 

Ross William CopEland Coulterville, 111. 

University of Illinois. 
Southern Illinois Presbytery. 

Victor Edward Ford - Christchurch, New Zealand 

Los Angeles Bible Institute. 
Presbyterian Church, U. S. A. 

Leonard LeRoy Gaylord Great Falls, Mont. 

Los Angeles Bible Institute. 

St. Louis Presbytery, Presbyterian Church, U. S. A. 

John Roy Hunsberger - Philadelphia, Pa. 

B.A., Muskingum College, 1923. 
Philadelphia Presbytery. 

Hugh EspEy KelsEy New Concord, Ohio 

B.A.,. Muskingum College, 1923. 
Muskingum Presbytery. 

Wallace Leslie Kennedy Fresno, Cal 

B.A., Wheaton College, 1924. 
San Francisco Presbytery. 

William Charlton Latta College Corner, Ohio 

B.A., Miami University, 1924. 
First Ohio Presbytery. 

David James Lewis Greenville, Pa. 

B.A., Muskingum College, 1924. 
Lake Presbytery. 

Stanley Tamatea Nicholls Te Kuiti, New Zealand 

Los Angeles Bible Institute. 

St. Louis Conference, Methodist Episcopal Church. 

Raymond Clifford Rogers Los Angeles, Cal. 

Los Angeles Bible Institute. 
Los Angeles Presbytery. 

George William Sanderson St. Louis, Mo. 

Westminster College, Fulton, Mo. 

St. Louis Presbytery, Presbyterian Church, U. S. A. 



22 XENIA THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

Raymond Frederick SuEriG - St. Louis, Mo. 

Benton College of Law. 

Missouri Classis, Reformed Church in the U. S. 

SPECIAL STUDENTS 



r. 



Reverend J. Allen Anderson - Pattonville, Mo. 

Edna MathildE Deahl St. Louis, Mo. 

Reverend Jacquel KelEwae East St. Louis, 111. 

Mrs. Kenneth M. Monroe Los Angeles, Cal. 

SCHOOL OF RELIGIOUS EDUCATION 

Bible Class at Washington University 

Elsa Breckinridge — - —St. Louis, Mo. 

W. E. Elliott, Sec. Y. M. C. A - - - -St. Louis, Mo. 

A. E. REiss - --St Louis, Mo. 

Viola Wiesenborn— — - - - —St. Louis, Mo. 

Irvin Glass - - St. Louis, Mo. 

Class at the Community Training School 

Mrs. LoTTy BicklEy St. Louis, Mo. 

Margaret Boyd - St. Louis, Mo. 

Mrs. H. D. CarlEy - - St. Louis, Mo. 

Lucille CarlEy St. Louis, Mo. 

Elizabeth CarlEy - — St. Louis, Mo. 

EthElyn ClinE - - - St. Louis, Mo. 

ChalliE Denson - — - - - St. Louis, Mo. 

Marian DiEnstbach— - - - . ---St. Louis, Mo. 

Mrs. M. Donovan - - - - St. Louis, Mo. 

Mrs. Lucy Ecoee — -- — - St. Louis, Mo. 

Mrs. Mildred Ecoee - - St. Louis, Mo. 

Mrs. J. R. Freeman - — — - — - St. Louis, Mo. 

Lavina Gauen - St. Louis, Mo. 

Mattie Gibson - — St. Louis, Mo. 

Mrs. F. J. Keiser SL Louis, Mo. 

C. R. Kemmerer St. Louis, Alo. 

Viola Kilgen - - St. Louis, Mo. 

Mrs. W. B. KluckEr — - - -St. Louis, Mo. 

J. P. Licklider St. Louis, Mo. 

Mrs. J. P. Licklider St. Louis, Mo. 

Mrs. A. McSpadden - St. Louis, Mo. 

MablE Mears - St. Louis, Mo. 

Mrs. D. J. Millison St. Louis, Mo. 

Jessie Patterson — - St. Louis, Mo. 

Mrs. W. A. Phebus St. Louis, Mo. 



XENIA THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 23 

Ory Randall - St. Louis, Mo. 

Mrs. E. ScheEr St. Louis, Mo. 

LuELLA SCHLOEMAN St. Louis, Mo. 

Christie Schmitt - St. Louis, Mo. 

Cordelia Schneider - East St. Louis, 111. 

Lucille Smith St. Louis, Mo. 

Anna Stumpp - ~ --East St. Louis, 111. 



Mrs. C. M. Sturges - - St. Lou 

Agnes Sturges - - St. Lou 

Mrs. M. SundEll '- St. Lou 

Augusta Varwig St. Lou 

Rev. W. D. Vater- ..-'- - - - -St. Lou 

Julia Wegman - St. Lou 

Mrs. C. WiEGand - - St. Lou 

Ida Whitmer — - — St. Lou 

AdEle Whitmer - - St. Lou 

Mary Zook - - - St. Lou 

SUMMARY OF STUDENTS 

The Graduate School : 

Resident Students - 17 

Non-Residen't Students - - - 7 

The Divinity School : 

Seniors - - - - 11 

Middlers - - - - - - 12 

Juniors - — - 14 

Special 4 

The School oe Religious Education: 

Bible Class in Community Training School 42 

Bible Class at Washington University 5 



s, Mo. 

s, Mo. 

s, Mo. 

s, Mo. 

s, Mo. 

s, Mo. 
Mo. 

s, Mo. 

s, Mo. 

s, Mo. 



24 



41 



47 



24 XENIA THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

THE PURPOSE OF THE SEMINARY 

"The object of the Seminary shall be to instruct candidates for 
the Gospel ministry, and others who may be preparing for spe- 
cial lines of Christian service, in the knowledge of the doctrine 
of the Scriptures and the order and institutes of worship taught 
therein and summarily exhibited in the Standards of the United 
Presbyterian Church of North America ; to cherish in them the 
life of true godliness, and to cultivate the gifts which Christ, the 
Head of the Church, confers on those whom He calls to the 
ministry, to the end that there may be raised up a succession of 
able, faithful, and godly ministers of the Gospel and other Chris- 
tian workers." (Constitution, Ch. L, Sec. 2.) 

THE DIVINITY SCHOOL 



THE COURSE OF STUDY 

The full course of Seminary training extends over a period 
of three years. The Seminary year begins on the first Wednesday 
after the 17th of September, and closes on the first Wednesday 
or Thursday after the first of May. Each annual session is 
divided into two semesters. 

The different departments, with their respective courses of 
study, and the amount of time required for each course, are set 
forth in the following diagram. The unit of study is the semester 
hour, which represents one recitation a week for one semester. 
One hundred and ten semester hours, including four in Public 
Speaking, are required for graduation. 





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26 XENIA THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 



DESCRIPTION OF COURSES OF STUDY 



I. HEBREW EXEGESIS AND OLD TESTAMENT LITERATURE 
PROFESSOR KELSO 

The purpose of this department is to teach the students to 
read the less difficult portions of the Hebrew Old Testament 
accurately, fluently, and with a real sense of appreciation ; and 
to handle the more difficult sections with the aid of a proper 
lexicon and an advanced grammar. Thus, at the close of the 
three year course a student is competent to be his own exegete. 

In connection with the Hebrew work, the Canon of the Old 
Testament and the introductory problem of each of the Old- 
Testament books are considered in detail. 

Hebrew Courses 

1. Element x of Hebrczv. A mastery of the principles of Hebrew Gram- 
mar, and the acquisition of a working vocabulary. 

Juniors, first semester, four hours a week. 

2. Hcbrezv Prose. Sight reading of selected passages of Genesis and 
the Historical Books. Analytical study of the Hebrew Text and exegesis 
of the Book of Ruth. The Old Testament Canon. 

Juniors, second semester, four hours a week. 

3. The Minor Prophets. Exegetical study of these books with special 
reference to their theological and social teachings. The introductory 
problem of each book is also treated. 

Middlers and Seniors, first semester, three hours a week, (1925-26). 

4. The Psalms and the Wisdom Literature. Exegetical study of selected 
Psalms in the light of Hebrew Poetry, and as devotional literature of the 
present day. Rapid survey of the Wisdom Literature. 

Middlers and Seniors, second semester, three hours a week, (1925-26). 

5. Isaiah. Exegetical study of the book, with special reference to con- 
temporary history and Alessianic prophecy. 

Middlers and Seniors, first semester, three hours a week, (1926-27). 

6. Old Testament Summary. Rapid survey of Jeremiah and Ezekie! 
with special reference to sermonic material. Summary of the whole field 
of the Old Testament using the historical books as a framework. Special 
emphasis on introductory problems. 

Middlers and Seniors, second semester, three hours a week, (1926-27). 



XENIA THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 27 

English Courses 

7. The Minor Prophets. (For those who do not read Hebrew.) An 
analysis and study of the historical setting, the meaning, and the lessons 
of each book. The introductory problem of each book is also treated. 

Middlers and Seniors, first semester, three hours a week, ( 1925-26). 

8. The Psalms and the Wisdom Literature. (For those who do not 
read Hebrew.) A careful study of the Psalter as a unit and of selected 
Psalms. A careful analysis of the Wisdom Literature. 

Middlers and Seniors, second semester, three hours a week, (1925-26). 

II. GREEK EXEGESIS AND NEW TESTAMENT LITERATURE 

DR. WEBSTER 

The purpose of this department is to teach the students to 
know and use the Greek New Testament. While the value of 
exact scholarship is emphasized, the chief aim is to make the 
student an able minister of the New Testament, Instruction is 
given both by text-books and lectures, and everything is made 
subservient to learning "the mind of Christ," the vital requisite 
for a successful ministry. 

Introductory Greek is a prerequisite to the exegetical studies 
of this department. Those who have not had sufficient Greek 
in college are required to take a special course in Introduction to 
the Greek of the New Testament under Dr. McCreary. (See 
page 34.) 

1. New Testament Literature and Criticism. This course embraces a 
general survey of the books of the New Testament and the history of 
New Testament Criticism. 

Juniors, three hours a week, throughout the year. 

2. The Gospel of John. An exegetical study of the book. 
Juniors, second semester, two hours a week. 

3. Exegetical studies in the Acts. 
Middlers, first semester, three hours a week. 

4. The Pastoral Epistles. An exegetical study. 
Middlers, second semester, three hours a week. 

5. Romans. An exegetical study. 

Seniors, three hours a week throughout the year. 

6. Assigned Reading. In addition to the foregoing exegetical studies, 
each class will be assigned selected portions of the Greek New Testament 
for outside reading. 

7. The Life of Christ will be studied during the year by the Senior 
class. 



28 XENIA THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

III. BIBLICAL THEOLOGY AND BIBLICAL ARCHAEOLOGY 

DR. KYLE 

Work in this department has a two-fold purpose, — to know the 
progress of Revelation, and to know it in its setting. So there 
are studies in the progress of Revelation to acquire a compre- 
hensive grasp of what the Bible teaches as a whole and in its 
various parts in the order of Revelation, together with the study 
of the historical setting of Scripture made known through Arch- 
aeological Research, in order to see the truths of Revelation as 
those saw them to whom they were revealed. 

There are class-room studies and quizzes through which the 
student discovers for himself the plan and progress of Revela- 
tion : also theses by all the students, together with assigned library 
research work. The Bible is the only text-book used, the English 
Bible for constant work, and the Hebrew and Septuagint Old 
Testament and the Greek New Testament for reference. There 
are lectures in Biblical Archaeology from the monuments and 
from first-hand research, so arranged with the studies in Biblical 
Theology as to enable the student constantly to see the Biblical 
story in its original setting. To this work are added quizzes, 
much library work, and an assigned reading course throughout 
the year. Some introductory lectures will be given to the Junior 
Class meeting separately to prepare them for a proper under- 
standing of the work in the general course. 

1. The Patriarchal Period. Principal subjects: Literary methods of 
early Biblical times ; primitive man and the temptation ; antediluvian 
civilization and Revelation ; the deluge ; Abraham and his times ; the de- 
scent into Egypt. 

All classes, first semester, three hours a week (1926-27). 

2. The Tribal Period. From the descent into Egypt to the Conquest 
of Canaan. Principal subjects: From court to corvee; Moses; the Reve- 
lation of God through the plagues of Egypt; the Exodus and the wilder- 
ness life ; the Revelation at Sinai ; the problem of the Pentateuch, and 
Old Testament chronology. 

All classes, first semester, three hours a week (1927-28). 

3. The National Period. From the Conquest of Canaan to the end of 
the Old Testament. Principal subjects: Times of the conquest; period 
of the Judges ; David ; the great period of Biblical literature ; decline and 
apostasy ; the great invasions ; Isaiah ; Daniel ; the exile and reformation ; 
the return and second glory of Israel ; Messianism ; prophetism, and 



XENIA THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 29 

inspiration. The Messianic Period: The consummation of the Messianic 
hope developed in the former periods. The Apostolic Period: The Appli- 
cation of Messianic teaching to preaching. 
All classes, first semester, three hours a week (1925-26). 

4. Research Methods. The class is directed in research work and in 
the preparation of theses utilizing archaeological material in Exegesis and 
for sermon illustrations. 

Middlers, first semester, one hour a week. 

5. Canons and Fallacies. A special course of studies to set forth the 
Canons and Fallacies of Archaeological Research. A thesis is required 
of each member of the class upon an assigned subject. 

Seniors, first semester, one hour a week. 

6. Public Research Lectures are given each year out of the research 
work of the Professor in charge. A lecture fully illustrated will be given 
this year upon "The Doctrine of the Future Life in the book of Job, from 
a study of the Royal Tombs in Egypt." 

PASTORAL THEOLOGY 

DR. KYLE 

Instruction in this subject is given by means of studies, quizzes, 
lectures, and practical exercises for each class separately, together 
with practical training for all classes in the problems of personal 
effort in soul saving. 

1. The Minister as a Student in the Seminary. Subjects: The call 
to the ministry ; the minister's habits ; ministerial manliness, ministerial 
ideals ; keeping one's self ; settlement, candidating, installation. 

Juniors, first semester, one hour a week. 

2. The Minister as Pastor of the Congregation {A). Subjects: The 
pastor in the pulpit; problems of the ministerial life; social, business, and 
spiritual methods ; the pastor in relation to the Sabbath School, the Young 
People's Society, the Prayer Meeting, and prayer circles. 

Middlers, first semester, one hour a week. 

3. The Minister as Pastor of the Congregation (B). Subjects: Super- 
vising the Sabbath School ; moderating the Session ; directing the congre- 
gational meeting ; the teachers' meeting ; conduct of pulpit service and 
prayer meeting ; the administration of the sacraments ; marriages ; and 
funerals. 

Middlers, second semester, one hour a week. 

4. The Minister in the Larger Relations to Church and Community. 
Subjects: Pastoral evangelism; problems of city and country life; the 
institutional church ; pastoral visitation and counsel ; the benevolences of 
the Church ; ecclesiastical relations. 

Seniors, first semester, one hour a week. 



30 XENIA THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

IV. CHURCH HISTORY 

DR. JOHNSON 

The aim of this department is to give a general knowledge 
of Church History, with emphasis on the most important move- 
ments and events ; to arouse an interest in the history of the 
Church which will lead to further study in this profitable field ; 
and to train in methods of historical study. In the study of each 
period special attention will be given to missionary development 
and expansion. The work is done by means of text-books, lec- 
tures, library readings, and students' reports on assigned topics. 

1. The Ancient Period, to 590 A. D. Principal subjects: Providential 
preparation for Christianity ; brief review of the life of Christ and the 
Apostolic Age; spread of Christianity; opposition; alliance between Church 
and State ; heresies, councils, and creeds ; Christian life ; schisms ; the 
Fathers and their writings ; the theological schools. 

Juniors, first semester, two hours a week. 

2. The Medieval Period, 590-1517 A. D. Principal subjects : Missions; 
Islam ; the Papacy and the Papal Church ; the Eastern Church ; Monasti- 
cism ; the Crusades ; medieval sects and persecutions ; Scholasticism ; the 
Mystics ; general Church conditions ; movements for reform ; precursors of 
the Reformation ; the Renaissance. 

Juniors, second semester, three hours a week. 

3. The Reformation Era, 1517-1648 A. D. After a brief review of the 
providential preparatives for the Reformation, the principal subjects will 
be (1) the Reformation in Germany and the Lutheran Reformation in 
other lands; (2) the Reformation in Switzerland and in other lands where 
the Reformed type of Protestantism prevailed; (3) the Counter-Reforma- 
tion; and (4) Roman Catholic Missions. The aim will be to bring the 
history of the Church in each country, as nearly as may be, down to the 
Peace of Westphalia, 1648. Here the text will be the two volume work, 
"History of the Reformation," by Lindsay. 

Middlers, first semester, three hours a week. 

4. European and American Church History, 1648-1925 A. D. 

(a) The principal subjects in European Church History will be the 
Roman Catholic Church in its relation to civil government and the national 
churches ; controversies within the Roman Catholic Church ; Rationalism 
and its effects; Lutheranism and its controversies; the Reformed Churches, 
with special notice of Presbyterianism ; the Anglican Church ; Deism ; the 
Methodist revival ; nineteenth century controversies. This study will be 
for the most part by countries. 

(b) In American Church History a study will be made of the Old 
World Sources ; early Roman Catholic missions ; the churches in the 
colonies ; decline and revival ; the great denominations ; divisions and 



XENIA THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 31 

unions; home missions. The Presbyterian family of churches will receive 
special study. 

Middlers, second semester, five hours a week. 

5. History of the United Presbyterian Church of North America. 
Beginnings in Scotland; beginnings in America; the Union of 1782; the 
Associate Presbyterian Church, 1782-1858; the Associate Reformed Church, 
1782-1858; the Union of 1858; the United Presbyterian Church, 1858-1925. 
Any member of the class who is not a United Presbyterian may substitute 
for this course a study of his own Church, reporting to the Professor and 
the class as required. 

Seniors, first semester, one hour a week. 

6. History of Doctrine, (A). A study will be made especially of the 
history of Trinitarianism and Christology. If time permits, the history of 
Anthropology will be brought down to the time of Anselm. 

Seniors, first semester, two hours a week. 

7. History of Doctrine, (B). The study of Anthropology will be con- 
tinued, and will be followed by the doctrinal history of the Atonement, 
of Justification by Faith, and of Regeneration. Attention will then be 
given to Post-Reformation theology and to modern forms of statement 
of doctrines. 

Seniors, second semester, two hours a week. 

V. SYSTEMATIC THEOLOGY AND HOMILETICS 

DR. KERR 

The purpose in the study of Systematic Theology is to lead 
the student to clear and well-balanced views of the great doc- 
trines and principles comprised in the Christian faith. The 
text-book used is the complete work on Systematic Theology 
by Dr. A. H. Strong. There is class-room discussion based on 
a careful analysis of the text, supplemented by lectures and re- 
ports on assigned reading. Two hours a week throughout the 
entire course are required, 

1. (a) Introduction to the Study of Theology: The idea and purpose 
of Theology, the sources of material and the method of treatment. 

(b) The Existence of God: Origin of the idea of God, and evidence of 
His existence, (c) The Scriptures a Divine Revelation : The witness 
of miracle and prophecy to the fact of a divine revelation. 
Juniors, first semester, two hours a week. 

2. (a) The Doctrine of Scripture (continued) : The genuineness of 
the documents, the credibility of the writers, the supernatural character 
and inspiration of Scripture. (b) The Doctrine of God: The divine- 
attributes ; the doctrine of the Trinity. 

Juniors, second semester, two hours a week. 



32 XENIA THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

3. (a) The Doctrine of God (continued) : The decrees and works of 
God: creation, preservation, providence, the angels, (b) The Doctrine of 
Man : The origin and nature of man, and the unity of the human race. 

Middlers, first semester, two hours a week. 

4. (a) The Doctrine of Man (continued) : The origin of the soul, 
the moral nature and primitive state of man. (b) The Doctrine of Sin : 
The Fall of man, the nature and universality of sin, and its consequences 
to the human race, (c ) The Doctrine of Redemption : Preparation for 
redemption; the person of Christ, His two natures and states. 

Middlers, second semester, two hours a week. 

5. (a) The Doctrine of Redemption (continued) : Offices and work 
of Christ; the Atonement, (b) The Doctrine of the Holy Spirit: The 
application of Redemption, — calling, union with Christ, regeneration, con- 
version, justification, sanctification. 

Seniors, first semester, two hours a week. 

6. (a) The Doctrine of the Church: Its constitution, organization, 
government, sacraments, and other ordinances of worship. (b) The 
Doctrine of Last Things: Death, the intermediate state, the second com- 
ing of Christ, the resurrection, the judgment, and final awards. 

Seniors, second semester, two hours a week. 

HOMILETICS 

The study of Homiletics is designed to give the student high 
ideals of pulpit ministration, to correlate his growing knowledge 
and powers and bring them all to bear upon the effective expres- 
sion of Christian truth. 

1. The Preparation of Sermons. The permanent function and impor- 
tance of preaching ; the selection and interpretation of the text ; the struc- 
ture of the sermon ; the different kinds of sermons. A homily preached 
before the Faculty and student body. 

Juniors, first semester, one hour a week. 

2. The Preparation and Delivery of Sermons. The work of the first 
semester continued. Sermon materials, — explanation, argument, illustra- 
tion, and application ; qualities of style : and modes of delivery. The 
relative advantages of the three modes of delivery are presented, — reading, 
speaking memoriter, and speaking extemporaneously. A doctrinal or sub- 
ject sermon preached before the Faculty and student body. 

Juniors, second semester, one hour a week. 

3. Sermon Outlines (A). Students are trained in the interpretation 
and analysis of texts, and in the construction and criticism of outlines 
of the various approved types of sermons. All outlines presented in 
writing. An expository lecture preached before the Faculty and student 
body. 

Middlers, first semester, one hour a week. 



XENIA THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 33 

4. Sermon Outlines (B). Work of the first semester continued, with 
special emphasis on the outlining of passages of Scripture for continuous 
exposition. All outlines presented in writing. A critical discourse on a 
passage assigned in the Hebrew or the Greek shall be publicly presented. 

Middlers, second semester, one hour a week. 

5. Sermon Outlines (C). In this course the students are trained in 
the construction of plans for doctrinal and subject sermons. All work 
presented in writing. A sermon preached publicly on a text of the 
student's own selection. 

Seniors, first semester, one hour a week. 

6. Sermon Outlines (D). Written analysis of the sermons of great 
preachers, ancient and modern. A thesis on a subject assigned by the 
Faculty is due April 21st. 

Seniors, second semester, on hour a week. 

VI. PHILOSOPHY OF RELIGION AND APPLIED CHRISTIANITY 

DR. McCREARY 

1. The Psychology of Religion. After a brief but comprehensive 
survey of the field of Psychology in general, noting the leading current 
theories, particular applications are made in genetics, in the principles 
of teaching, in social expressions, and in religious experience. Several 
texts are used with lectures. 

Juniors, first semester, two hours a week. 

2. Biblical Ethics. Beginning with a philosophic introduction, both 
historical and critical, the Christian ideal of conduct is unfolded, noting 
contrasts and agreements with the more prominent systems. Particular 
attention is given to the applicatory feature, both individual and social 
bearings being considered. 

Juniors, second semester, three hours a week. 

3. Christian Sociology. After a review of general social theory as 
presented by leading authorities, the recognized problems are set forth 
with their proposed solutions. The Christian method of approaching and 
solving these problems is presented. Particular emphasis is given to the 
apptication of the teaching of Jesus to the social order. 

Middlers, first semester, two hours a week. 

4. Apologetics.. The ground of the older arguments is covered, with 
modern restatements and additions. Christianity is shown to be logically 
defensible. 

Middlers and Seniors, second semester, two hours a week (1925-26). 

5. Comparative Religion. The great religions of the world are studied 
historically and comparatively. Their philosophic bases and ethical 
and social features are carefully inspected. Particular attention is be- 
stowed on those rival faiths with which Christianity now most strongly 
competes. '''.'. 

Middlers and Seniors, second semester, two hours a week. (1926-27). 



34 XBNIA THEOLOGICAL, SEMINARY 

6. The Philosophy of Religion. This course includes the usual materials 
of Theism. It also seeks to exhibit the epistemological foundations of 
faith, to state the analogical argument expositionally, to find an adequate 
ground of values, and to set forth the Christian religion as a philosophic 
system. A rationale of method is undertaken regarding religion in his- 
torical, aesthetical, and critical aspects. 

Seniors, two hours a week throughout the year. 

INTRODUCTORY GREEK 

DR. McCREARY 

This work is provided for those who have not had Greek in 
college, and is a prerequisite to the regular work in New Testa- 
ment exegesis. 

1. Introduction to New Testament Greek (A). A rapid survey of the 
outstanding features of the grammar of the Greek New Testament. 
Huddilston's "Essentials of New Testament Greek," or a similar text-book, 
is used. 

Juniors, first semester, four hours a week. 

2. Introduction to New. Testament Greek (B). A careful study of the 
New Testament syntax, based on Green's "Handbook to the Grammar 
of the Greek Testament." The Gospel by John is read from the Greek. 

Juniors, second semester, four hours a week. 

3. Supplementary Reading in Greek. In addition to the foregoing- 
courses, the student is required to read selected portions of the Greek New 
Testament before entering the Middle class in New Testament exegesis. 

VII. PUBLIC SPEAKING 

DR. DUNCAN 

1. The Principles and Practice of Public Speaking. 

The various types of speech are studied in detail, and students are 
drilled in the important types. Considerable attention is given to debat- 
ing. Careful study is made, not only of delivery, but of the proper method 
of arranging material. In the study of speech care is taken to relate the 
work to the special needs of the minister. The course includes practice 
in the reading of the Scriptures with a view to making this part of the 
Church service more effective. 

Juniors, one hour a week throughout the year. 

2. Advanced Course in Public Speaking. 

Attention is given to the development and proper control of the voice 
and to the study and practice of the principles of gesture. Reading the 
Scriptures as part of the course is continued from the preceding year's 
work. 

Middlers and Seniors, second semester, one hour a week. 



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XBNIA THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 37 

3. Individual Training in Public Speaking. 

In addition to the regular class work, an attempt is made to give a fair 
amount of individual attention to the students. The best progress is made 
by those who combine the class work regularly with private instruction. 

Students of all classes by special appointment. 

ADMINISTRATION OF THE REGULAR COURSE 

Since our denominational standards specify that "in all ordi- 
nary cases a full collegiate course of study, or its equivalent, shall 
be required of those entering on the study of theology," the 
Course of Study in this Seminary is primarily designed for college 
graduates. It has been found necessary, however, to make some 
provision for those who must give up the study of Hebrew at the 
close of the first year, for those who have not had two years of 
Greek, and for part-time students. In the case of these special 
groups, suitable modifications of the Course of Study have been 
made, as will appear in paragraphs A, B and C, below. 

1. The Standard Course includes, besides the other disciplines, 
study of the Bible in the original languages throughout the three 
years. All who have the requisite preliminary training are ex- 
pected to take this course: the successful completion of it is one 
of the requirements for diploma with degree of Th.B. 

A. The Greek-English Course. By action of the General As- 
sembly the study of Hebrew is required of all students throughout 
the first year. The Greek-English Course is provided for those 
who must abandon the study of Hebrew at the close of the first 
year, but who have sufficient academic training to pursue the other 
theological studies. The regular work in New Testament Greek is 
required throughout the Course, but in place of second and third 
year Hebrew alternate subjects are provided. The successful 
completion of this Course entitles graduates to the diploma of the 
Seminary. 

B. Introductory Greek. As a prerequisite to Greek Exegesis, 
the student must have a sufficient knowledge of the Greek lan- 
guage to enable him to take the Junior exegetical work in a 
manner satisfactory to the Professor in charge. Those who 
may be lacking in this regard are expected to make up the de- 
ficiency before the beginning of the Middle year. For the benefit 



38 XENIA THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

of this class of students the Seminary provides a Course in Intro- 
ductory Greek. This is not, however, a credit course, and may 
not be substituted for any part of the regular course in Greek Exe- 
gesis, — all of which must be done to the satisfaction of the Pro- 
fessor in charge and according to his appointment. 

C. Selected Studies. Students who for any reason are pre- 
vented from pursuing the full Course may, upon the special 
recommendation of their Presbytery and by action of the Faculty, 
be permitted to register for any part of the Course with which 
they may be competent to deal. Upon the satisfactory completion 
of their work, of which one semester hour shall be the minimum 
in any subject, they will receive a report of their grades and 
credits. The successful completion of fifty-six semester hours 
entitles the special student to a Certificate. 

CLASSIFICATION OF STUDENTS 

Students are classified as Regular Students and Special Students 
according as they take the full Course or only a part of it. Regu- 
lar Students may be either Degree Students or Diploma Students, 
according as they are candidates for diploma with degree or for 
diploma without degree. 

TERMS OF ADMISSION 

1. General Terms. The privileges of the Seminary are ex- 
tended on equal terms to students of all evangelical denominations. 
The applicant shall present — 

a. Evidence of membership in good standing in his own Church. 

b. A certificate from his own Presbytery, or other ecclesiasti- 
cal authorities, indicating that he has been taken under their care, 
and approved as a student of theology. 

c. Credentials showing his academic attainments. 

2. Academic Requirements. 

a. Degree Students. Those who desire to qualify for degree 
on graduation should, upon entrance, have the degree of Bachelor 
of Arts, or its equivalent, from a standard college or university. 
Otherwise, they must satisfy the Facult)^ by credentials and ex- 
amination, that they have had courses of study and discipline fully 



XENIA THEOLOGICAL SEMINAR"* 39 

equivalent to a standard college course, with special attention to 
the classical languages. Degree students shall enroll for the 
Standard' Course. 

b. Diploma Students. Students not having the full college 
preparation specified in our denominational standards may, upon 
the special recommendation of their Presbytery and by action of 
the Faculty, enter the Seminary for the regular Course. If they 
are able to take the whole Course creditably, they will receive the 
diploma of the Seminary at graduation. But they may not be 
candidates for degrees unless by additional study they satisfy all 
the requirements specified for degrees. Students of this class 
who expect to make up their deficiency in college credits and 
qualify for the degree of Th.B. at graduation must have this 
w r ork completed by the beginning of the second semester of the 
Senior year. Diploma Students shall enroll for the Standard 
Course the first year. Only under the direction of the Faculty 
may they change to the Greek-English Course for the second and 
third years. And all for whom this change is permitted thereby 
forfeit the opportunity of securing degrees. 

3. Formal Registration. Before being admitted to the Semi- 
nary, every student shall, in the presence of the Registrar, sub- 
scribe to a written declaration to the effect that while he is a stu- 
dent in the Seminary he will regularly, punctually, and diligently 
attend upon all the instructions of the Professors, and promptly 
comply with all lawful requisitions of the Faculty, and be subject 
to their authority; that he will honestly conform to all regulations 
of the Seminary, and that he will not propagate any opinion in op- 
position to the principles of the United Presbyterian Church. 

ATTENDANCE 

All students are required to be present in all the classes in which 
they are enrolled, and at the weekly preaching service in the 
Chapel. Attendance is also required at the opening of each sem- 
ester, and again at Commencement time for promotion unless ex- 
cused by the Board of Managers. All absences of the students, ex- 
cused and unexcused, are reported to their respective Presbyteries. 
Absence at any time during the Seminary session has an unfavor- 
able effect on the student's standing. 



40 XENIA THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

EXAMINATIONS 

At the close of each semester, examinations are held to test and 
organize the student's knowledge of the ground covered in the 
several departments. Ordinarily the examinations are written and 
the results are reported by the Faculty to the Board of Managers. 
From the class standing, the examinations, and the attendance, 
the grade of the student, based on a scale of 100, is determined 
and reported to his Presbytery. 

GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS 

One hundred and ten semester hours of work, including four 
in Public Speaking, are required for graduation. A semester hour 
means one recitation a week in a given subject throughout a sem- 
ester. The courses of study in the various departments are so 
arranged that all the students take nineteen hours the first sem- 
ester, and during the second semester the Juniors take nineteen 
hours, the Middlers eighteen hours, and the Seniors sixteen hours. 

DIPLOMAS AND DEGREES AT GRADUATION 

1. Diploma. The diploma of the Seminary will be granted 
to all who complete creditably either the Standard Course or the 
Greek-English Course. One year of their work must be done in 
residence at this Seminary, and they must maintain an average 
grade of at least 75 per cent, throughout the whole course, with no 
semester grade in any subject less than 70 per cent. 

2. Diploma with Degree of Bachelor of Theology (Th.B.) 
The Diploma of the Seminary with the degree of Th.B. will 
be granted to those students who — 

a. Have the degree of Bachelor of Arts, or its equivalent, 
from a standard college or university ; 

b. Take the Standard three-year Course of the Seminary, — 
one year of which must be in residence at this Seminary; 

c. Maintain an average grade of at least 75 per cent, through- 
out the whole Course, with no semester grade in any subject less 
than 70 per cent. 

Note : Graduates having diplomas without degree may become 
candidates for degrees by making up all deficiencies to the satisfaction 



XENIA THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 41 

of the Faculty. The degree of A. B. which is mentioned herein as a 
prerequisite to Seminary degrees must represent bona fide college work 
or its equivalent, without appropriation of any of the one hundred and 
ten credits secured in the regular Seminary Course. 

GRADUATION HONORS 

Graduation honors, not competitive, but open to all who qualify, 
whether graduated with diploma only, or with diploma and degree, 
are granted as follows : 

Cum laude, to all who are clearly distinguished during the 
whole course 1) for natural capabilities, 2) for academic attain- 
ments, 3) for regular and punctual attendance, and 4) for general 
fitness for the Gospel Ministry. 

Magna cum laude, to all who possess these qualifications in an 
unusual degree. 

Summa cum laude, in very rare instances, in recognition of sur- 
passing merit. 



42 XENIA THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 



THE GRADUATE SCHOOL 

Advanced work is provided for those who wish to pursue 
studies beyond those required for the degree of Bachelor of 
Theology. The Graduate School offers work leading to the de- 
gree of Master of Theology ( Th.M.) and to the degree of Doctor 
of Theology (Th.D.) 

THE DEGREE OF MASTER OF THEOLOGY (Th.M.) 

1. Candidates for the Master's Degree. 

a. Students who hold from a standard college or university 
the degree of Bachelor of Arts or its unquestioned equivalent, 
and who have received either from this Seminary or from some 
other School of Theology of like character the degree of Th. B. 
or its equivalent (or have complied with all the requirements), 
may be candidates for the degree of Th. M. 

b. Undergraduates in this Seminary who have the degree of 
A. B. or its equivalent from a standard college or university and 
who are pursuing the Standard Course and maintain therein an 
average grade of 85 per cent, with not less than 80 per cent, in any 
subject, may be allowed to take one-third of the course leading- to 
the degree of Th. M., in addition to the required work, each year. 

2. Work required for the Master's Degree. 

a. The work required for the degree of Th.M. shall be 
the equivalent of twenty-four semester hours. The student shall 
devote sixteen semester hours to one subject, which shall be 
called a major, and eight semester hours to another subject, 
which shall be called a minor ; or, if desired, two or more minor 
subjects may be chosen, with the approval of the Faculty. 

b. In connection with the major subject, a thesis of 5,000 
words shall be required. The subject of the thesis shall be as- 
signed by, or have the approval of, the Professor in charge of the 
department not later than December 1st of the academic year in 
which the degree is sought. A type-written copy of the thesis 
shall be in the hands of the Professor for examination not later 
than April 1st. 



XBNIA THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 43 

c. At the conclusion of the assigned work, the student shall 
pass a thorough examination in both major and minor subjects. 

3. Personal presence. In all ordinary cases the candidate for 
a degree must be present when the degree is conferred. 

4. Fee. A fee of ten dollars will be charged to cover the ex- 
pense of graduation. 

THE DEGREE OF DOCTOR OF THEOLOGY (Th.D.) 

This degree is granted only after a very extended Course which 
is open only to those who have already the degree of Master of 
Theology, or its unquestionable equivalent, and who present also 
additional entrance requirements. Particulars will be furnished 
on application, the applicant specifying the department in which 
the major study is desired. In all cases two full years of in- 
tensive work in residence will be required, or three years, with 
the last semester of four months in residence. 

GRADUATE SEMINARS OFFERED FOR 1925-1926 

For the benefit of graduate Students in residence, regular 
seminars are provided in addition to the other assigned work. 
The following seminars are offered the coming year (1925-1926) : 

First Semester 

Tues., 1 :30 P. M. — -Archaeology and Prophetism Dr. KylE 

Tues., 2 :30 P. M. — Philosophy of Religion Dr. McCreary 

Second Semester 

Tues., 1 :30 P. M. — formation of Protestant Creeds, 

Dr. Johnson 

Tues., 2 :30 P. M. — Bxegetical and Practical Study of the 

Epistle to the Hebrews Dr. Webster 

OTHER GRADUATE SEMINARS 

Other seminars in the Graduate School will be scheduled in due 
time by the different Professors in their various departments, 
such as the following: 



44 XENIA THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

I. HEBREW EXEGESIS AND OLD TESTAMENT LITERATURE 

PROFESSOR KELSO 

1. Biblical Aramaic. A study of the elements of the language, and 
the reading of the Aramaic sections of the Old Testament. 

Minor, eight semester hours. 

2. The Septuagint. The reading of selected portions of the Old 
Testament in Greek, comparing with the Hebrew and with other versions. 
A study of the origin and the problems of the Septuagint, on the basis 
of Swete's "Introduction to the Old Testament in Greek." 

Major, sixteen semester hours. 

3. Hebrew Vocabularies. A seminar in the synonyms and antonyms 
of the Hebrew Old Testament. 

Minor, eight semester hours. 

II. GREEK EXEGESIS AND NEW TESTAMENT LITERATURE 

DR. WEBSTER 

1. The Synoptic Problem. 
Minor, eight semester hours. 

2. The Epistle to the Hebrews. 
Minor, eight semester hours. 

3. The Christology of the Pauline Epistles. 
Major, sixteen semester hours. 

4. The Johannine Writings. 
Major, sixteen semester hours. 

III. BIBLICAL THEOLOGY AND ARCHAEOLOGY 

DR. KYLE 

1. Study of Methods in Biblical Theology. The aim here is to lead 
the student to discover the Biblical teachings through an application of 
the inductive method. 

Major, sixteen semester hours. Minor, eight semester hours. 

2. Prophctism and Prophecy. 

A study of the meaning and scope of prophecy. 

Major, sixteen semester hours. Minor, eight semester hours. 

3. Book Study. The aim is to lead the student to ascertain the setting 
and the doctrinal content of the book, and how to utilize the findings. 

Major, sixteen semester hours. Minor, eight semester hours. 

4. Archaeology of the Bible, especially the use of Archaeological ma- 
terial for homiletical purposes. 

Major, sixteen semester hours. Minor, eight semester hours. 

5. Methods of Archaeological Research, and Canons and Fallacies. 
Major, sixteen semester hours. By residence only. 



XENIA THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 45 

6. Archaeology and Criticism. An introduction to the use of Archae- 
ological material in Biblical criticism. 

Major, sixteen semester hours. Minor, eight semester hours. 

PASTORAL THEOLOGY 

DR. KYLE 

1. The Scriptural Basis of Pastoral Evangelism. 
Minor, two semester hours. 

2. Psychological Problems in Pastoral Evangelism. 
Minor, six semester hours. 

3. Sociological Problems in Pastoral Evangelism. 
Minor, four semester hours. 

4. Methods in Pastoral Evangelism. 

Minor, two semester hours. By residence only. 

IV. CHURCH HISTORY 

DR. JOHNSON 

1. The Lives and Writings of the Early Church Fathers. 

Open to those who have studied General Church History to 590 A. D. 
Minor, eight semester hours. 

2. Early Doctrinal Discussions. Open to those who have studied Gen- 
eral Church History to 1483 A. D. 

Major, sixteen semester hours. 

3. The Era of the Reformation. Open to those who have studied 
General Church History to 1483 A. D., and who have a knowledge of the 
Protestant Reformation in outline. 

Major, sixteen semester hours. 

4. Origin and History of the United Presbyterian Church of North 
America. A prerequisite to this is a fair knowledge of the Reformation in 
Scotland. 

Minor, eight semester hours. 

V. SYSTEMATIC THEOLOGY 

DR. KERR 

1. Doctrinal Studies in the Teaching of Jesus. 
Minor, eight semester hours. 

2. The Inspiration of the Scriptures. 
Major, sixteen semester hours. 

3. The Person of Christ. 
Major, sixteen semester hours. 

4. The Doctrine of Sin. 
Minor, eight semester hours. 

5. The Atonement. 

Major, sixteen semester hours. 

6. The Second Advent. 
Minor, eight semester hours. 



46 XENIA THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

VI. PHILOSOPHY OF RELIGION AND APPLIED CHRISTIANITY 

DR. McCREARY 

1. The Philosophy of Religion. A critical review of the foundation 
concepts of religion. Interpretations of knowledge, reality, personality, 
deity, and similar subjects in their bearing upon Christian faith. 

Minor, eight semester hours. 

2. Apologetics. An evaluation of the apologetic element in present-day 
Theology and in current literature. 

Minor, four semester hours. 

3. Psychology of Religion. The newer phases of Psychology investi- 
gated and their significance for religion weighed. 

Minor, four semester hours. 

4. Religions Education. Curricular and methodological problems. The 
general theory of teaching applied. 

Minor, four semester hours. 

5. Christian Sociology. A seminar in concrete contemporary problems. 
Minor, four semester hours. 

THE AMERICAN SCHOOL OF ORIENTAL RESEARCH AT 
JERUSALEM 

Xenia Seminary is one of the group of Universities, Colleges, 
and Theological Seminaries in this country co-operating in the 
support and control of the American School of Oriental Research 
in Jerusalem, and is thus able to offer to her students the unique 
facilities possessed by this School. No other Post-graduate work 
is more profitable and attractive to young men looking forward to 
the work of the Ministry than study and research in Bible lands. 
The American School of Oriental Research at Jerusalem was 
founded to afford such opportunities as have never before been 
open to American students. Special arrangements are made to 
reduce the expenses of such students to the lowest point. 

Educational Opportunities Afforded 

The School offers to properly qualified students excellent oppor- 
tunities for pursuing such studies as the following: Biblical and 
Palestinian Archaeology ; the Geography and Natural features 
of the Land ; the History of Israel ; Early Church History and 
Patristics ; the Arabic Language, and the other Semitic Lan- 
guages connected with it ; Mohammedanism ; the Political, Social, 
and Industrial Conditions in Bible Lands ; Roman Administration 
and Colonization in the East ; the Crusades ; and the Comparative 
Plistory of Religions. 




± 



T 










MAIN ENTRANCE TO WASHINGTON UNIVERSITY 



XENIA THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 49 

The School has a well selected working library, which is stead- 
ily growing. There are other considerable libraries in Jerusalem, 
some of which contain large collections of manuscripts, chiefly 
Greek and Arabic. As a central point for the study of Palestin- 
ian antiquities, for making tours of research and exploration, and 
for visiting the numerous scenes of past or present excavations, 
Jerusalem is peculiarly well situated. 

Those who avail themselves of the privileges of this School 
can go at once after the Commencement at St. Louis, and enter 
the School at Jerusalem. The altitude and the latitude of Jeru- 
salem make the summer climate there quite satisfactory. The 
remainder of the year will afford abundant opportunity for travel 
through the land and researches in Historical Geography and 
Archaeology. 

The Thayer Memorial Fellowship 

The Thayer Memorial Fellowship of the School at Jerusalem, 
with a stipend of $800, is awarded annually on examination. A 
list of the books recommended to candidates for the Fellowship, 
and special facilities for preparation, will be supplied by the 
Seminary. 

AFFILIATION WITH WASHINGTON UNIVERSITY 

One of the chief considerations which induced the Commission 
of the Board of Managers, charged with the relocation of Xenia 
Theological Seminary, to fix upon the City of St. Louis, was 
the extremely favorable university connection that was offered. 
Washington University is an old and honored foundation, with 
magnificent buildings, and is regarded as the greatest graduate 
school of the whole Southwest. Xenia's new location is within 
a few minutes' walk of its grounds. Through the courtesy of the 
Chancellor and the other authorities, a full exchange of credits 
has been granted, without any control of our teachings or policies. 
So short is the distance that those wishing to complete their 
academic course or to work for an advanced degree, can do so 
without inconvenience or loss of time. The advantages of this 
affiliation are manifest. 



50 XENIA THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 



THE SCHOOL OF RELIGIOUS EDUCATION 

In response to a very prevalent desire that the Seminary should 
make some provision for the training of lay workers in Church 
and Sabbath School, Xenia Seminary has begun the development 
of a School of Religious Education. Owing to the demands 
made upon the Faculty by the regular work of the Seminary, the 
present scope of this School is necessarily limited; but a begin- 
ning has been made, and the work has been growing for several 
years past. The following courses were given last year : 

At the Seminary 

1. The Psychology of Religion Dr. McCr^ary 

This course includes a study of the pupil in the various stages 
of development from childhood to maturity, and also a con- 
sideration of the principles of effective teaching. Although this 
is a regular Junior course, it is open to others who are in training 
for work in the Church School. 

First semester, two hours a week. 

2. The Life of Christ Dr. Webster 

The story of Jesus Christ "in the days of His flesh," as it may be 
gathered from a comparative study of the four gospels. Particu- 
lar attention is paid to the most significant words and works of 
the Master. The aim of this course is to become better acquainted 
with the Christ of the gospels as the Christ of history. A 
Senior course, but open to the public. 

One hour a week, throughout the Seminary year. 

3. Analysis of the Sabbath School Lesson Dr. Kylk 

A scholarly yet popular outline and exposition of the International 
Uniform Sabbath School Lessons, with special suggestions for 
their adaptation to different grades and classes in the Sabbath 
School. Open to the public. 

Saturday morning, at the Chapel hour, throughout the Sem- 
inary year. 



XBNIA THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 51 

Seminary Extension 

4. Outline Study of the Old Testament Prof. Kelso 

The aim of this course is 1) to create an appreciation of the Old 
Testament, 2) to point out methods for its study, and 3) to inter- 
pret it in terms of modern life. With this in view, introductory 
lectures are given dealing with "Hebrew Methods of Thought 
and Literary Form;" then the outstanding teachings of the Old 
Testament as a unit are studied ; and finally the books of the Old 
Testament are studied in detail. The student is required to read 
and study each portion of the Old Testament used in the course 
before the lectures are given, and to keep careful notes of lec- 
tures and submit them for examination. 

Monday evenings, throughout the Seminary year, at the Third 
Baptist Church, in connection with the Community Training 
School for Church and School workers. 

5. The Teachings of Jesus Dr. Kerr 

What did Jesus claim for Himself? What did he reveal about 
the Father and the Holy Spirit? What did he teach concerning 
Man, Sin, Salvation, the Christian Life, Ideal Society, Death, and 
the Hereafter? It is the aim of this course to answer these ques- 
tions from an inductive study of the gospel records. The course 
is largely a lecture course. Students read in advance the pas- 
sages to be used in a given study, keep careful notes of the lec- 
tures, and do collateral reading as assigned. 

Thursday afternoons, throughout the Seminary year, at the 
Washington University. 

6. Other Courses, suited to the training of leaders in Church 
and School, are given from time to time in the churches of St. 
Louis and vicinity. All the members of the Faculty have a share 
in some form of Seminary Extension. 



52 XBNIA THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 



GENERAL INFORMATION 



LOCATION OF THE SEMINARY 

The Seminary is located at the corner of Washington and 
Trinity Avenues in University City, a beautiful suburb of St. 
Louis. The slight elevation above the City and the distance from 
river and factory deliver us from most of the fog and smoke 
of the St. Louis region. 

HOW TO REACH THE SEMINARY 

From the Union Station take any northbound car and ride three 
blocks to Eighteenth and Olive Streets. Transfer to a Delmar- 
Olive car westbound and ride to the end of the line. A short 
walk of one block south and one block west brings you to the 
Seminary Building. All students are required to be present at 
the opening session. 

GENERAL EQUIPMENT 

There are two buildings, joined on the fourth floor and on the 
ground floor. The Administration Building contains the Presi- 
dent's office, most of the class rooms and the Professors' studies, 
the Library, and the Chapel. In the Dormitory are rooms for 
the students and quarters for the Matron and for the Janitor. 
An attractive Reception Hall leads into the Dining Room on the 
one hand and into the Parlor on the other. Both Dining Room 
and Parlor are large and well furnished, and open for use. We 
have steam heat, electric lights, good water, a bath room on each 
dormitory floor, and, in the basement, a Seminary Laundry which 
is directed by one of the students in the interest of students. 

THE LIBRARY 

The Seminary Library contains about 15,000 bound volumes, 
among which are many rare old books. Under the direction of 
the Librarian of the Faculty, the students use these books for 
the investigation of assigned subjects. Students also have access 
to the Library of the Washington University of 240,000 bound 



HMHHHH 







XENIA THEOLOGICAL, SEMINARY 55 

volumes, and to the St. Louis Public Library of 650,000 bound 
volumes. 

About fifty current American religious magazines and jour- 
nals come regularly to the Seminary ; also, twelve leading for- 
eign religious journals, representing England, France, Germany, 
Italv, Belgium Sweden. This extensive and varied current liter- 
ature is available to the students. 

Through the generosity of the late Mr. Alexander Dempster, 
of Pittsburgh, Pa., the Seminary has been provided with the raised 
map of Palestine published by the Palestine Exploration Fund, 
London, England, from surveys by George Armstrong. Mounted 
in normal position on a substantial table, this map is of special 
value in the study of Sacred Geography and History. 

RESERVATION OF ROOMS 

Students who have been here for one or two years may reserve 
rooms at the end of the Seminary session by consulting the 
Matron. The two-year men have first choice of rooms, the one- 
year men have second choice, the alphabetical order being ob- 
served within each group. New students are assigned to their 
rooms in the fall, and have right of choice in the order of their 
written application. 

We are not prepared to accommodate married students and. 
their wives in the Dormitory, but will assist them in finding 
proper accommodations. 

USE OF ROOMS DURING THE SUMMER 

Students may have free use of their rooms for two weeks before 
the opening in September and for two weeks after Commence- 
ment in May. Otherwise, those who desire to use their rooms 
during the summer vacation must secure permission from the 
President, and pay a nominal charge of $5.00 a month to cover 
expenses. When two students occupy the same room, a joint 
monthly charge of $7.50 shall be made. These rates apply only 
to students. Any others desiring to use the Dormitory facilities 
must make special arrangements with the President. 

THE RELIGIOUS LIFE OF THE SEMINARY 

The religious life of the Seminary is on a high plane. Xenia 
students are trained in the cultivation of personal religion, and 



56 XENIA THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

provision is made for the development and expression of religion 
in its social aspects. A chapel service forms part of the daily 
schedule. The young men are organized as a local branch of 
the Student Y. M. C. A. This organization conducts its own 
devotional service one evening during the week, and provides the 
leader for the Seminary prayer meeting, in Chapel, Tuesday 
morning. The Student Volunteers meet weekly for prayer and 
conference, and in other ways promote the missionary spirit of 
the Seminary. 

THE SOCIAL LIFE OF THE SEMINARY 

A spirit of good cheer and mutual helpfulness pervades the 
institution. The atmosphere is decidedly home-like. Castes and 
cliques are taboo, and all are united in a wholesome Christian 
fellowship. The members of the Faculty are the students' best 
friends, and every student is a brother to every other student. 
Without excessive diversion from study, there are seasonable 
socials and entertainments at the Seminary, and the students also 
have an appropriate share in the social life of the Churches of 
the City. Every season brings forward high-class lectures and 
concerts in the City which further enlarge the students' oppor- 
tunity for social and aesthetic culture. 

'PHYSICAL TRAINING 

The physical man is not forgotten. ''Mens sana in corpore 
sano" is a principle from which Christian students do not seek 
exemption. Wholesome food, pure air and water, abundant op- 
portunities for exercise, — all the requisites to good health are 
provided. On the Seminary property, next to the Dormitory, is 
a splendid tennis court and a ball field, where the young men, 
thanks to a favoring climate, can secure outdoor exercise the 
greater part of the year. Moreover, the commodious gymnasium 
of the First United Presbyterian Church, in the same block with 
the Seminary, is open to the students for basket ball and other 
indoor games at certain times during the week. These opportuni- 
ties, which are by no means neglected, in some measure account 
for the excellent health enjoyed by the students at Xenia. 



# 



XENIA THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY QUARTETTE; 

In order from left to right : Ray M. Davis, baritone ; Arch K. Stewart, 
second tenor ; Victor E. Ford, bass ; Robt. H. Belton, first tenor. 



XENIA THEOLOGICAL, SEMINARY 59 

THE SEMINARY QUARTETTE 

Training in music is a necessary part of a minister's educa- 
tion. The Xenia Quartette is one of the very attractive features 
of Seminary life and is within reach of the best singers. Dur- 
ing the past year the Quartette made two trips through the middle 
West, appearing in numerous places with eminent satisfaction. 
They have been loaned again and again to sing at important- 
gatherings in and about our own City, — for instance, at the Lenten 
services, at the Commercial Club meetings, at the Illinois State 
Teachers' Convention (5,000 delegates). From time to time their 
entertainments are broadcasted by some of the best modern radio 
facilities. 

EXPENSES 

The necessary expenses of a course of theological training are 
reduced to a minimum. The building is thoroughly equipped, and 
there are no fees or rentals for privileges and accommodations. 
The Seminary furnishes bedding, towels, etc., but each student is 
urged to bring with him a travelling rug or blanket, for which, 
in occasional extreme weather, he may have use. The Seminary 
Dining Room is economically managed by the Student Club, the 
cost of maintenance amounting to about $26 a month to each 
member. The Seminary Laundry and the Seminary Book Store 
enable the students to effect a still further saving. 

OPPORTUNITIES FOR WORK 

The Seminary has received a most cordial welcome in the City 
of St. Louis. This great center of population offers an excellent- 
field for Christian effort and sociological study. It also affords 
numerous opportunities of employment to those who must make 
their own way. The Churches are enthusiastic in pledging co- 
operation and support. Such support was, of course, to be ex- 
pected from the United Presbyterian congregations, and it is 
being given in full measure. But other denominations also, espe- 
cially the Presbyterian, U. S., the Presbyterian, U. S. A., the 
Congregationalist and the Methodist, have shown a most friendly 
attitude from the outset. Some of them employ students of the 
Seminary in congregational work. All the students have some 
experience in preaching in the City Missions. 



60 XENIA THEOLOGICAL, SEMINARY 

COMPENSATED RELIGIOUS WORK 

Members of the Junior Class will receive the sum of fifty dol- 
lars each for the year, on condition of their engaging in religious 
work, not otherwise fully compensated, in the churches of this 
community, or in adjacent fields. As the students advance into 
the Middle and Senior Classes, they have increasing opportunities 
of preaching, for which they receive an appropriate compensation. 

STUDENT LOANS 

From the income of our Students' Fund, we are prepared to 
loan to those who may desire it, the sum of fifty dollars a year, 
or more in case of real need, on their personal notes, without 
interest for five years from date of loan; at the expiration of 
this period, interest at the rate of six per cent, per annum will be 
charged until payment is made. 

AID FROM THE BOARD OF EDUCATION 

The Board of Education is authorized by the General Assembly 
to make special grants in aid to United Presbyterian students of 
theology upon the recommendation of their Presbytery. The 
annual payments are as follows : 

"To first year students not to exceed $180.00 ; to second year 
students not to exceed $120.00; and to third year students not 
to exceed $80.00. * * * 

"No money shall be paid to students of the first year who 
during the sessions of the Seminary receive compensation for 
preaching on the Sabbath, nor to students of the second year who 
preach for compensation more than an average of two Sabbaths 
a month during the Seminary session. And no money shall be 
paid to any student who holds a pastoral charge or engages in 
special religious work such as will interfere with his duties in 
the Seminary. * * * Ordinarily no grant will be made to a 
student who marries immediately prior to entering upon or while 
pursuing his Seminary course. * * * Absolute abstinence 
from the use of tobacco is made an essential requirement for 
receiving aid from the Beneficiary Fund." 

"Students receiving aid must be under the care of the Presby- 
tery, receive its formal endorsement and recommendation, and 



XENIA THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 61 

be in attendance at one of our denominational institutions. The 
amount paid to each student shall be fixed, in its relation to the 
full appropriation granted, by the time of his actual attendance 
during the year. * * * In all ordinary cases the benefactions 
shall date from the time of application." 

DONATIONS AND BEQUESTS 

On account of the low rate of interest, a large amount of in- 
vested funds is required to meet the current expenses of the 
Seminary. The enlargement of our permanent Endowment Fund 
has not kept pace with the necessary growth of our work and 
the advancing prices of all commodities. It is imperative that 
Xenia's Endowment Fund be very greatly augmented. Accord- 
ingly, the Seminary is cordially commended to the liberality of 
all to whom our church and ministry are dear. Appeal is also 
made to such as are making bequests to remember this institu- 
tion. Special attention is called to the Annuity Plan. The form 
of Annuity Bond issued by the Seminary in this connection may 
be found on page 63. 



62 XENIA THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 



FORM OF BEQUEST 



FOR PERSONAL PROPERTY 

I hereby give and bequeath to the Xenia United Presbyterian 

Theological Seminary of St. Louis, Mo., the sum of 

Dollars, or notes or bonds. 

(Here describe them.) 



FOR REAL ESTATE 

I give and devise to the Xenia United Presbyterian Theological 
Seminary of St. Louis, Mo., its successors and assigns, for- 
ever, the following described tract or lot of land, in township 

of , County of , 

State of , and bounded and described as 

follows: (Here describe the piece of land with such accuracy 
and definiteness that it may certainly be known. If such devisors 
wish to make bequests to any of the Seminary funds, — endowment, 
income, or library fund, — they should specify the particular fund 
they have in view.) 



XENIA THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 63 

FORM OF ANNUITY BOND 

Series A. No 



THE XENIA UNITED PRESBYTERIAN 

THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

OF ST. LOUIS, MO. 

In consideration of a GIFT of Dollars. 

the receipt of which is hereby acknowledged, 

issued this 

LIFE ANNUITY BOND 
and agrees to pay to the order of 



of in the state of. 



an annuity or yearly sum of dollars, 

in equal semi-annual installments, on June fifteenth and December 
fifteenth of each year during the remainder of h — ...life, and upon 
the death of said annuitant this obligation shall be void and said 
annuity shall cease. 

The heirs, executors, administrators, or assigns, of said an- 
nuitant shall be entitled to any proportionate share of said annuity 
from the last semi-annual payment to the date of said annuitant's 
death. 

In Witness Whereof, the said Theological Seminary has 
caused its corporate seal to be hereunto affixed and these presents 
to be signed by its President and Secretary this 

day of , One Thousand Nine Hundred 

and 



Secretary. President. 



CORRESPONDENCE 

For Catalogues or any other information concerning the Seminary , 
address 

President M. G. KYLE, DD., LL.D., 

6834 Washington Avenue, St. Louis, Mo. 



HZb 



ANNUAL CATALOGUE 



OF THE 



Xenia Theological 
Seminary 




Service, Pa* 
Canonsburg, Pa. 
Xenia. Ohio 
St. Louis, Mo. 



1794 
1821 
185S 
19X0 



Calendar for 1926 


JANUARY 


FEBRUARY 


MARCH 


APRIL 


S M T W T F S 


S 


M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 












1 

8 

15 

22 

29 


2 

9 

16 

23 

30 


"i 

14 
21 

28 


1 
8 

15 
22 


2 

9 

16 

23 


3 

10 
17 
24 


4 
11 

18 
25 


5 
12 
19 

26 


6 
13 
20 
27 


"l 
14 
21 
28 


1 

8 

15 

22 

29 


2 

9 

16 

23 

30 


3 
10 
17 
24 
31 


4 
1 1 
18 
25 


5 
12 
19 
26 


6 

13 
20 
27 









1 

8 

15 

22 

29 


2 

9 

16 

23 

30 


3 
10 
17 
24 


3 
10 
17 
24 
31 


4 

11 
18 

26 


5 
12 
19 
26 


6 
13 
20 
27 


7 
14 
21 
28 


4 
1 1 
18 
25 


5 
12 
19 
26 


6 
13 
20 
27 


7 
14 
21 
28 
















MAY 


JUNE 


JULY 


AUGUST 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


S M 


T W T F S 














1 
8 

15 

22 


" 6 

13 

2 >> 
27 


7 
14 
21 
28 


1 

8 

15 

22 
29 


2 

9 
16 
23 

30 


3 
10 
17 
24 


4 
1 1 

18 
25 


5 
12 
19 
26 










1 

8 

15 

22 

29 


2 

9 
16 
23 
30 


3 
10 

1 7 
24 

31 


1 
8 

15 
22 
29 


2 

9 

16 

23 

30 


3 

10 
17 
24 

31 


4 
1 1 

ie 

25 


5 
12 
19 

26 


6 
13 
20 

27 


7 
14 
21 
28 


2 

9 

16 

23 

30 


3 
10 

17 
24 
31 


4 
1 1 
18 
25 


5 

12 
19 
23 


6 

13 

20 
27 


7 
14 
211 
28 


4 
1 1 
18 
25 


5 
12 
19 

26 


6 
13 

20 
27 


7 
14 
21 
28 












SEPTEMBER 


OCTOBER 


NOVEMBER 


DECEMBER 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S" 


S M T W T F S 








1 
8 

15 

22 
29 


2 

9 

16 

23 

30 


3 
10 
17 
24 


4 

1 1 
18 
25 












1 

8 

15 

22 

29 


2 

9 

16 

23 

30 


7 

14 

21 
28 


1 

8 
15 
22 
29 


2 

9 

16 

23 

30 


3 
10 
17 
24 


4 
1 1 

18 
25 


5 
12 
19 

26 


6 

13 
20 
27 


"g 

12 

19 
26 


S 
13 
20 
27 


7 
14 
21 
28 


1 

8 
15 
22 
29 


2 

9 

16 

23 

30 


3 
10 
17 
24 
31 


4 
1 1 
18 
26 


5 
12 
19 
26 


6 

13 
20 
27 


7 
14 
21 
28 


3 
10 
17 
24 
31 


4 
1 1 

18 

25 


5 
12 

19 
26 


6 

113 
20 
27 


7 

14 
21 
28 


Calendar for 1327 


JANUARY 


FEBRUARY 


MARCH 


APRIL 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 














1 
8 

15 

22 
29 


6 

13 
20 
27 


7 
14 
21 
28 


11 2 

8 9 

16 16 

22 23 


3 
10 
17 

24 


4 

1 1 
18 
25 


5 
12 
19 
26 


"a 

13 
20 
27 


7 
14 
21 
28 


1 

8 

15 

22 

29 


2 

9 

16 

23 

30 


3 
10 

17 
24 
31 


4 
1 1 
18 

25 


5 
12 
19 
26 












1 

8 

15 

22 

29 


2 

9 

16 

23 

30 


2 

9 

16 

23 

30 


3 
10 

17 
24 
31 


4 
1 1 
18 
25 


6 
12 
19 


6 
13 
20 

27 


7 
14 
21 
28 


3 

10 
17 
24 


4 
1 1 
18 
25 


6 
12 
19 
26 


6 

13 
20 
27 


7 
14 
21 
28 
















MAY 


JUNE 


JULY 


AUGUST 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


1 

8 
16 
22 
29 


2 

9 

16 

23 

30 


3 4 


6 

12 
19 
26 


6 

13 
20 
27 


7 
14 
21 
28 


5 
12 

19 
26 


6 
13 
20 
27 


7 
14 
21 
9R 


1 

8 

15 

22 

29 


2 

9 

16 

23 

30 


3 

10 
17 
24 


4 
11 
18 
26 












1 

8 

15 

22 

29 


2 

9 

16 

23 

30 


"i 

14 
21 
28 


1 

8 

15 

22 

29 


2 

9 

16 

23 

30 


3 
10 
17 
24 
T1 


4 

1 1 
18 

25 


5 
12 
19 
26 


6 

13 
20 
27 


10 

17 
24 
31 


11 
18 
25 


3 
10 
17 
24 
31 


4 
11 
18 
25 


6 
12 
19 

OR 


6 
13 
20 
27 


7 
14 
21 
28 


















. • • 


... 


SEPTEMBER 


OCTOBER 


NOVEMBER 


DECEMBER 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


8 M T W T F S 










1 

8 

15 

22 

29 


2 

9 

16 

23 

30 


3 
10 
17 
24 














1 

8 

15 

22 

29 


6 
13 
20 
27 


7 
14 
21 
28 


1 

8 

15 
22 
29 


2 

9 

16 

23 

30 


3 
10 
17 
24 


4 
1 1 
18 
25 


5 

12 
19 
26 






I 


1 

8 

15 

22 

29 


2 

9 

16 

23 

an 


3 
10 
17 
24 
31 


4 
1 1 
18 
25 


5 
12 
19 
26 


6 
13 
20 
27 


7 
14 
21 
28 


2 

9 

16 

23 

30 


3 
10 
17 
24 
31 


4 
1 1 

18 
25 


5 
12 
19 
26 


6 

13 
20 
27 


7 
14 
21 
28 


4 
11 
18 
25 


5 
12 
19 
26 


6 7 

13 14 
20 21 
27 28 















The Annual Catalogue 



OF THE 



Xenia 

United Presbyterian 

Theological Seminary 

of St. Louis, Missouri 




One Hundred and Thirty-Third Year 
1926-1927 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 



PAGE 

Calendar, 1925 and 1926 ...Inside Cover 

Calendar of Special Days. 1926-27 6 

Control of the Seminary 9 

Board of Managers 11 

Board of Trustees 12, 13 

Promotion Secretary 12 

Ladies' Visiting and Advisory Board 13 

Young Men's Christian Association 13 

Student Volunteer Band 13 

Alumni Association 13 

The Faculty and Its Officers ... 14 

Historical Roll of Professors. 1794-1926 15 

Special Lecturers and Preachers 16 

Register of Students: 

Graduate School 17-19 

Divinity School 19-22 

Summary 23 

Purpose of the Seminary _ 24 

The Divinity School: 

Course of Study (General Statement) 24 

Outline of Prescribed Course (Tabulated) 25 

Description of Courses of Study by Departments .'. 26-37 

Hebrew Exegesis and Old Testament Literature 26 

Greek Exegesis and New Testament Literature 27 

Biblical Theology and Archaeologv 27 

Pastoral Theology 29 

Church History 30 

Systematic Theology and Homiletics 31 

Philosophy of Religion and Applied Christianity 33 

Introductory Greek -. 34 

Public Speaking 34 

Schedules of Recitations, both semesters 35-36 

Administration of the Regular Course 37 

Admission and Classification of Students 38 

Attendance Requirements. 39 

Examinations 40 

Graduation Requirements 40 

Diplomas and Degrees at Graduation 40 

Other Graduation Honors 41 

The Graduate School: 

The Degree of Master of Theology 42 

The Degree of Doctor of Theology. 43 

Graduate Seminars offered, 1926-1927 —43 

Other Graduate Seminars, by Departments 43-46 

American School of Oriental Research at Jerusalem 46 

Affiliation with Washington University. 49 

General Information: 

Location of the Seminary and How to Reach It 50 

General Equipment 50 

Library Facilities 50 

Reservation of Rooms 53 

Religious Life of the Seminary 53 

Social Life of the Seminary 54 

Physical Training and Recreation .54 

The Seminary Quartette 57 

Expenses 57 

Opportunities for Self- Help 57 

Compensated Religious Work ....' 58 

Student Aid 58 

Donations and Bequests 59 

Forms for Bequests and Annuity Bonds 60-61 



CALENDAR OF SPECIAL DAYS 



1926 



1. The Opening of the Session. 

Wednesday, September 22d, at 1 P. M. Registration of Students. 
Address of Welcome by the President. Address by the President 
of the Board of Managers. 

2. Reception to Students. 

Wednesday, September 22d, following the opening exercises in the 
Chapel, the young people of the United Presbyterian Churches of 
the City will tender a Reception to the students concluding with a 
Dinner and Social Hour. 

3. The Opening Sermon. 

Sabbath, September 26th, at 8 P. M., at the Grand Ave. United 
Presbyterian Church, by the Rev. Wm. B. Lampe, D.D. 

4. The Mid-Term Examinations Begin, 
Wednesday, December 15th. 

5. The Christmas Vacation. 

Wednesday, December 22d, at 12 M., till Wednesday, January 5th, 
at 8 A. M. 

1927 

6. The Day of Prayer for Colleges and Seminaries. 
Wednesday, February 16th. 

7. The Final Examinations Begin. 

Monday, April 25th. 

8. The Baccalaureate Sermon. 

Sabbath, May 1st, at 8 P. M., at the Third United Presbyterian 
Church, by the Rev. Professor Jesse Johnson, D.D. 

9. The Annual Meeting of the Board of Trustees. 
Tuesday, May 3rd, at 10 A. M. 

10. The Annual Meeting of the Board of Managers. 

Wednesday, May 4th, at 10 A. M. The Senior Theses will be read 
at the afternoon session. 

11. The Annual Meeting of the Alumni Association. 
Wednesday, May 4th, at 4 P. M. 

12. The Graduation Exercises. 

Thursday, May 5th, at 8 P. M., in the First United Presbyterian 
Church. Graduation Address. 

Promotion of Classes, Presentation of Diplomas, and Conferring 
of Degrees, by the President. 



THE CONTROL OF THE 
SEMINARY 



THE SEMINARY is under the control of 
the Second Synod, and the Synods of 
Illinois, Iowa, Kansas, Nebraska, Cali- 
fornia, and The Columbia, of the United Pres- 
byterian Church. Its immediate control is com- 
mitted to a Board of Managers, twenty-five in 
number, appointed by the Synods, and a Board 
of Trustees, twelve in number, appointed by the 
Board of Managers. The Term and the Course 
of Study are determined by the General Assemblv. 



XENIA THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 11 



BOARD OF MANAGERS 



Officers 

Rev. J. P. Nesbit, D.D., President Princeton, Ind. 

Rev. A. M. Reed, J Ice-President Manhattan, Kan. 

Mr. T. Dales KylE. Financial Secretary and Treasurer Xenia, Ohio 

Rev. W. H. Hastings, Recording Secretary St. Louis, Mo. 

Members 

THE SECOND SYNOD 

Term Expires 

Mr. Wm. E. McKEE. Indianapolis, Ind. 1926 

Rev. H. A. Thompson, Columbus, Ohio - 1927 

Rev. E. P. Smith, Forest, Ohio 1927 

Rev. J. P. Nesbit, D.D., Princeton, Ind. 1928 

Rev. D. L. Ferguson, Richmond, Ind. 1928 

SYNOD OF ILLINOIS 

Rev. R. C. Gibson, D.D., Chicago, 111. - - 1926 

Rev. A. A. Graham, Monmouth, 111. - 1926 

Rev. A. Campbell Bailey, Moline, 111. - -1927 

Mr. R. H. White, Marissa, 111 1927 

Rev. J. M. Duncan, Lodi, Wis. 1928 

Rev. H. H. McConnell, Th.M., St. Louis, Mo. 1928 

SYNOD OF IOWA 

W. J. French, Esq., Waterloo, Iowa- —.. Jan. 1, 1927 

W. H. Ramsey, Esq., Garner, Iowa Jan. 1, 1928 

Rev. W. C. Williamson, D.D., LL.D., Clarinda, Iowa -Jan. 1, 1929 

Rev. J. B. Work, D.D., Tarkio, Mo Jan. 1, 1930 

SYNOD OF KANSAS 

Rev. A. M. Reed. Manhattan, Kan. 1926 

Rev. W. R. Irvine, Richmond, Kan. 1927 

Mr. W. I. Early. Kansas City, Kan. 1928 

SYNOD OF NEBRASKA 

Rev. W. R. Gray, D.D., Summerfield, Kan 1926 

Rev. N. J. Calhoun. D.D., Loveland, Colo. - 1927 



12 XBNIA THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

SYNOD OF CALIFORNIA 

Rev. D. C. McCoy, Fresno, Calif. - - - - -1926 

Rev. E. S. McKitrick, D.D., Los Angeles, Calif. - - - 1926 

SYNOD OF THE COLUMBIA 

Rev. M. E. Dunn, D.D., Portland, Ore - 1926 

Rev. A. W. Wilson, Mt. Vernon, Wash. - 1926 

EX-OFFICIO MEMBER 

President M. G. Kyle. D.D., LL.D. St. Louis, Mo. 

CONSULTATIVE MEMBERS OF THE BOARD OF MANAGERS 

Proeessor Jesse Johnson, D.D. Proeessor Robt. M. Kerr, D.D. 

Professor J. H. Webster, D.D. Professor J. L. Kelso, M.A., B.D. 

Professor G. B. McCreary, Ph.D., D.D. 

BOARD OF TRUSTEES 

(Under the Missouri Charter) 

Officers 

Mr. ErlE Ormsby, President. 4508 McPherson Ave., St. Louis, Mo. 
Mr. T. Dales Kyle, Financial Secretary and Treasurer, Xenia, Ohio. 
Rev. W. H. Hastings, Recording Sec., 3524a Wyoming St., St. Louis, Mo. 

Members 

Terra Expires 

Mr. W. J. Johnston, 3610 Forest Park Blvd., St. Louis, Mo. 1927 

Mr. J. M. Murry. 1324 Laurel St., St. Louis, Mo. ---1927 

Mr. Wm. Schattgen, 2934 Allen Ave., St. Louis, Mo. 1927 

Mr. John M. Stuart, 4252a Cleveland Ave., St. Louis, Mo. 1927 

Mr. H. C. Grote, Forest Park Hotel, St. Louis, Mo. 1928 

Mr. T. Dales Kyle, Xenia, Ohio 1928 

Mr. G. R. McCullough, 6117 Westminster Place, St. Louis, Mo. 1928 

Mr. A. O. Wilson, 14 Windermere Place, St. Louis, Mo. 1928 

Mr. B. F. Edwards, 10 Kingsbury Place, St. Louis, Mo. 1929 

William R. Gentry, Esq.. 5157 Vernon Ave., St. Louis, Mo. 1929 

J. M. Lashly, Esq., 20 Windermere Place, St. Louis, Mo. 1929 

Mr. ErlE Ormsby, 4508 McPherson Ave., St. Louis, Mo 1929 

President M. G. Kyle. D.D., LL.D., St. Louis, Mo., Ex-Ofiicio Member 

PROMOTION SECRETARY 

and 
ASSISTANT TO THE PRESIDENT IN THE SYNODS 

Rev. John A. Henderson, D.D., 6834 Washington Ave., St. Louis, Mo. 



XENIA THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 13 

BOARD OF TRUSTEES 

(Under the Ohio Charter) 

Mr. Robert Bryson, Xenia, Ohio - 1927 

Mr. W. B. Cherry, Xenia, Ohio - 1927 

Mr. J. C. Williamson, Xenia, Ohio 192? 

Hon. C. H. Kyle, Xenia, Ohio - - - - - 1928 

Mr. T. Dales Kyle. Xenia, Ohio - ----- - 1928 

Hon. J. Carl Marshall, Xenia, Ohio - - - 1928 

Mr. S. Walter Collins. Bloomington, Ind. 1929 

Mr. Nathan Logan, Spring Hill, Ind. 1929 

B. R. McClEllan. M.D., Xenia, Ohio - - 1929 

President M. G. KylE, D.D., LL.D., St. Louis, Mo., E.v-Officio Member 

LADIES 1 VISITING AND ADVISORY BOARD 

Mrs. M. G. KylE, President. . Mrs. J. L. Kelso. 
Mrs. J. H. Webster. lice-President. Mrs. G. B. McCrEary. 
Mrs. A. O. Wilson, Secretary. Mrs. J. F. LeClErE. 

Mrs. Jesse Johnson, Treasurer. Miss Elizabeth BrownlEE. 

Mrs. Joseph Kyle. Miss Pearl Mann. 

Mrs. Robt. M. Kerr. Mrs. C. B. Reed. 

THE STUDENTS' Y. M. C. A. 

Stanley TamaTEa Nicholls, President. 
Hugh Espy Kelsey, Vice-President. 
George William Hutton, Secretary and Treasurer. 
Victor E. Ford, Chairman of Devotional Committee. 
Fred J. McConnELEE, Chairman of Missionary Committee. 
William C. LaTTa, Chairman of Preaching Committee. 
Lewis R. Brown, Chairman of Social Committee. 
Robert McCunE, Chairman of Athletic Committee. 

THE STUDENT VOLUNTEER BAND 

David James Lewis. President. 

Joseph Lemuel Wells, Secretary and Treasurer. 

THE ALUMNI ASSOCIATION 

REV. J. P. NesbiT, D.D., President Princeton, Ind. 

REv. E. P. Smith, Vice-President - --Forest, Ohio 

REv. H. A. Thompson, Secretary and Treasurer Columbus, Ohio 



14 XENIA THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 



OFFICERS OF THE FACULTY 



The Rev. Melvin Grove KyeE, M.A., D.D., LL.D., Presid.en 
The Rev. Robert McNary Kerr, M.A., D.D., Vice-President. 
The Rev. Jesse Johnson, M.A., D.D., Registrar. 
The Rev. John Hunter Webster, M.A., D.D., Librarian. 
The Rev. George Boone McCrEary, Ph.D., D.D., Secretary. 



THE FACULTY 



The Rev. Jesse Johnson, M.A., D.D., 
Professor of Church History. 

The Rev. John Hunter Webster, M.A., D.D., 
Professor of Greek Exegesis and New Testament Literature. 

The Rev. Melvin Grove Kyle, M.A., D.D., LL.D., 

Newburg Professor of Biblical Theology and Biblical 

Archaeology. Adjunct Professor of Practical 

Theology and Religious Education. 

The Rev. Robert McNary Kerr, M.A., D.D., 
Professor of Systematic Theology and Homilefics. 

The Rev. James Leon Keeso, M.A., B.D., 
Professor of Hebrew Exegesis and Old Testament Literature. 

The Rev. George Boone McCrEary, Ph.D., D.D., 

Professor of the Philosophy of Religion and Applied Christianity. 

Thomas Shearer Duncan, M.A., Ph.D., 
Instructor in Public Speaking. 



XENIA THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 15 



HISTORICAL ROLL OF PROFESSORS 



During the one hundred and thirty-two years of the Seminary's 
history, under various names and in different localities, in all 
thirty-two men have served as instructors for more or less ex- 
tended periods of time. The roll of professors is as follows : 

Inaugu- Period 

Name rated at of Service 

John Anderson Service 1794-1819 

John Banks Philadelphia 1820-1826 

James Ramsey Canonsburg 1821-1842 

David Carson Canonsburg - 1834-1834 

Thomas BevEridge - Canonsburg - 1835-1855 

Thomas BevEridge - Xenia - 1855-1871 

Joseph Claybaugh - Oxford 1839-1855 

Samuel W. McCrackEn Oxford 1839-1840 

James Martin Canonsburg 1842-1846 

Abraham Anderson Canonsburg - 1847-1855 

SamuEe Wilson -_- Xenia - - 1855-1875 

William Davidson Oxford 1855-1858 

AiExandEr Young Oxford - -1855-1857 

Alexander Young Monmouth 1858-1874 

John Scott Monmouth - 1858-1874 

Joseph Clokey Xenia - 1858-1873 

Andrew M. Black Monmouth -—1864-1874 

David A. Wallace Monmouth 1867-1870 

David A. Wallace - Xenia ----- - 1883-1883 

William Bruce Xenia ~~ 1871-1880 

James G. Carson Xenia - 1873-1888 

William G. Moorehead Xenia 1873-1914 

Jackson B. McMichael Xenia 1873-1878 

James Harper Xenia - - 1879-1899 

David MacDill Xenia - - — 1884-1902 

WilbErt W. White Xenia - 1889-1894 

John D. Irons Xenia 1895-1905 

Joseph Kyle - Xenia - 1899-1921 

Jesse Johnson - Xenia - 1902 

John E. Wishart Xenia 1905-1923 

John H. Webster Xenia — 1908 

Melvin G. Kyle Xenia - - 1914 

Robert M. Kerr -St. Louis 1922 

James L. Kelso St. Louis 1923 

Geo. B. McCrEary St. Louis 1924 



16 XENIA THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

PREACHERS AND LECTURERS 

1925-1926 

The Reverend James L. Fowle. 

The Reverend J. Alvin Orr, D.D. 

The Reverend W. T. McConnell, D.D. 

The Reverend R. R. Biggar, D.D. 

The Reverend Professor H. A. Kelsey, D.D. 

The Reverend Professor J. Gresham Machen, D.D. 

The Reverend W. I. Wishart, D.D. 

Moderator of the General Assembly. 
The Reverend T. D. Edgar, D.D. 
Professor L. E. Robinson, M.A. 
Mr. S. A. Fulton. 

PREACHERS AND LECTURERS 

1926-1927 

The Reverend J. P. Nesbit, D.D. 

The Reverend Wm. B. Lampe. D.D. 

The Reverend F. Scott McBride, D.D. 

The Reverend Norman B. Harrison, D.D. 

The Reverend Arthur H. Armstrong, D.D. 

Professor John Vaelance Brown, M.A. 

The Reverend E C. Nesbit, D.D. 

The Reverend Edmund S. LorEnz. 

The Reverend Professor Theodore Graebner, D.D. 

The Reverend James F. Le CeErE, Th.M. 

The Reverend J. M. WyliE, D.D. 

The Reverend J. J. Ehrstein. 

Mr. Lansing F. Smith. 

The Reverend Professor Jesse Johnson, D.D. 



XENIA THEOLOGICAL. SEMINARY 17 



THE REGISTER OF STUDENTS 

1925-1926 



THE GRADUATE SCHOOL 

Students who received the Degree of Master of Theology (Th. M.), 

May 6, 1926 

Reverend William Crowe, Jr. St. Louis, Mo. 

B.A., Southwestern Presbyterian University, 1921. 

B.D., Union 'Theological Seminary, Richmond, Va., 1924. 

Reverend James Frederick LeClErE - -St. Louis, Mo. 

B.A., Monmouth College, 1906. 
Pittsburgh Theological Seminary, 1909. 

Reverend Harold Harper McConnell - St. Louis, Mo. 

B.A., Monmouth College, 1916. 
Pittsburgh Theological Seminary, 1919. 

Kenneth Milton Monroe Los Angeles, Calif. 

B.A., University of Southern California, 1922. 
Th.B., Xenia Theological Seminary, 1926. 

Archibald Karr Stewart - Boyden, Iowa 

B.A., Tarkio College, 1923. 

Th.B., Xenia Theological Seminary, 1926. 

Candidates for the Degree of Master of Theology : 
A. Students in Residence 

Reverend Carl Leo Attig Edwardsville, 111. 

B.A., Cincinnati University, 1907. 
Lane Theological Seminary, 1910. 

Reverend Frank GrEnvillE BeardslEy, S.T.D. St. Louis, Mo. 

B.A., Coe College, 1894. 

B.D., Oberlin Theological Seminary, 1900. 

Reverend Herbert Andrew BrEThauer St. Louis, Mo. 

Eden Theological Seminary, 1918. 
B. A., Washington University, 1925. 



18 XENIA THEOLOGICAL, SEMINARY 

Reverend Robert Scott Calder, Ph.D., D.D.— - St. Charles, Mo. 

B.A., Washington and Jefferson College, 1893. 
B.D., Western Theological Seminary, 1897. 

Reverend William Henry Hastings St. Louis, Mo. 

B.A., Monmouth College, 1916. 
Pittsburgh Theological Seminary, 1919. 

Reverend Albert Jay Levengood St. Louis, Mo. 

B.A., Mission House College, 1913. 
Mission House Seminary, 1916. 

Reverend John Henderson MoorEhead, D.D. St. Louis, Mo. 

B.A., Monmouth College, 1892. 
Xenia Theological Seminary, 1895. 

Reverend John Norman Morrison-- — Alton, 111. 

B.A., Franklin College, 1911. 
Auburn Theological Seminary, 1915. 

Reverend Arnold Smith St. Louis, Mo. 

B.A., Park College, 1903. 

Auburn Theological Seminary, 1906. 

B. Students doing Assigned Work Elsewhere 

Reverend James Robert LEE Omaha, Neb. 

B.A., Tarkio College, 1920. 
Xenia Theological Seminary, 1923. 

Reverend William Thomas McIntyre Indiana Harbor, Ind. 

B.A., Tarkio College, 1916. 

Xenia Theological Seminary, 1919. 

Reverend Archibald Wilson Webster - Omaha, Neb. 

B.A., Princeton University, 1921. 

Th.B., Xenia Theological Seminary, 1925. 

Candidates for the Degree of Doctor of Theology (Th. D.) 

Reverend George Wales King, D.D - St. Louis, Mo. 

Syracuse University. 

Auburn Theological Seminary, 1901. 

Th.M., Xenia Theological Seminary, 1925. 

Reverend Thomas Bradley Mather Marshall, Mo. 

B.A., Central College, 1915. 

M.A., Princeton University, 1916. 

Th.M., Xenia Theological Seminary, 1921. 



XENIA THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 19 

Reverend Williamson Dunn Vater - St. Louis, Mo. 

M.S., Purdue University, 1894. 
Princeton Theological Seminary, 1898. 
Th.M., Xenia Theological Seminary, 1925. 

THE DIVINITY SCHOOL 

Graduated with Diploma, May 6, 1926 

Robert Henry Belton, Cum Laude. 

Miles Harold Taber. 

Henry Van Dyke. 

Graduated with Degree of Bachelor of Theology, May 6, 1926 

James Daryl Davis, Cum Laude. 
Lewis Herman FrasEr. 

Roy Wilson Hoestetter. 

Kenneth Milton Monroe. 

Archibald Karr Stewart. 
Roy Dale Strong. 

Floyd With row. 

Frederick Sylvester Zeller. 



O THE SENIOR CLASS, 1925-1926 



Robert Henry Belton Chicago, 111. 

Lewis Institute of Technology. 

Chicago Association, Congregational Conference. 

James Daryl Davis - ; Kirkwood, 111. 

B.A., Findlay College, 1923. 
Southern Illinois Presbytery. 

Lewis Herman FrasEr - -- Wellsville, Ohio 

B.A., Muskingum College, 1923. 
Steubenville Presbytery. 

Roy Wilson Hoestetter Glendale. Calif. 

B.S., Monmouth College, 1923. 
Southern Illinois Presbytery. 

Park College. 

Southern Illinois Presbytery. 

Kenneth Milton Monroe Los Angeles, Calif. 

B.A., University of Southern California, 1922. 

Southern California Conference, the Brethren Church. 



20 XENIA THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

Archibald Karr Stewart Boyden, Iowa 

B.S., Tarkio College, 1923. 
Southern Illinois Presbytery. 

Roy Dai,E Strong - - Brighton, Tenn. 

B.A., Bryson College, 1923. 
Southern Illinois Presbytery. 

Miles Harold Taber - Long Beach, Calif. 

Southern California Conference, the Brethren Church. 

Henry Van Dyke - St. Louis, Mo. 

Southern Illinois Presbytery. 

Floyd Withrow - - Tarkio, Mo. 

B.A., Tarkio College, 1923. 
College Springs Presbytery. 

Frederick Sylvester ZellEr Sterling, Kan. 

B.A., Sterling College, 1922. 
Arkansas Valley Presbytery. 



THE MIDDLE CLASS, 1925-1926 

Clarence Alfred Campbell St. Louis, Mo. 

B.A., Washington University, 1924. 
Southern Illinois Presbytery. 

Ross William CopEland — --Coulterville, 111. 

University of Illinois. 
Southern Illinois Presbytery. 

Victor Edward Ford - — - Christchurch, New Zealand 

Los Angeles Bible Institute. 
Los Angeles Presbytery. 

Hugh Espy Kelsey - New Concord, Ohio 

B.A., Muskingum College, 1923. 
Muskingum Presbytery. 

Wallace Leslie Kennedy -Santa Ana, Calif. 

B.A., Wheaton College, 1924. 
Southern Illinois Presbytery. 

William Charlton Latta College Corner, Ohio 

B.A., Miami University, 1924. 
First Ohio Presbytery. 



XENIA THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 21 

David James Lewis Greenville, Pa. 

B.A., Muskingum College, 1924. 
Lake Presbytery. 

Stanley Tamatea Nicholls— Te Kuiti, New Zealand. 

Los Angeles Bible Institute. 

St. Louis Conference, Methodist Episcopal Church, South. 

Raymond Clifford Rogers - - Los Angeles, Calif. 

Los Angeles Bible Institute. 
Los Angeles Presbytery. 

George William Sanderson St. Louis, Mo. 

Westminster College, Fulton, Mo. 

St. Louis Presbytery, Presbyterian Church, U. S. A. 

Raymond Frederick SuErig St. Louis, Mo. 

Benton College of Law. 

Missouri Classis, Reformed Church in the U. S. 

THE JUNIOR CLASS, 1925-1926 

Adrien Rene Aeschliman- - - St. Louis, Mo. 

Los Angeles Bible Institute. 
Missouri Congregational Conference. 

Lewis Robin Brown - - Wilkinsburg, Pa. 

B.A., Muskingum College, 1925. 
Monongahela Presbytery. 

Edward Davenport Byrd St. Louis, Mo. 

Moody Bible Institute. 

St. Louis Presbytery, Presbyterian Church, U. S. A. 

Leonard Le Roy Gaylord - Great Falls, Mont. 

Los Angeles Bible Institute. 

St. Louis Presbytery, Presbyterian Church, U. S. A. 

George William Hutton Chicago, 111. 

B.A., Muskingum College, 1924. 
Chicago Presbytery. 

Frederick John McConnElEE — - - - St. Louis, Mo. 

B.A., Sterling College, 1925. 
Arkansas Valley Presbytery. 



22 XENIA THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

Robert McCune - - ~— N. S. Pittsburgh, Pa. 

B.A., Muskingum College, 1925. 
Allegheny Presbytery. 

Daniel AdElberT MoorE -- - St. Louis, Mo. 

Moody Bible Institute. 
Presbyterian Church, U. S. A. 

Maurice CeiEEord Seaman - - De Lancey, N. Y. 

B.A., Muskingum College, 1925. 
Muskingum Presbytery. 

Joseph Lemuel WEi.es Fayetteville, Tenn. 

B.A., Bryson College, 1924. 
Methodist Episcopal Church, South. 

SPECIAL STUDENTS, 1925-1926 

ChareES Augustus BoweEr - St. Louis, Mo. 

M.A., University of Chicago, 1919. 

St. Louis Presbytery, Presbyterian Church, U. S. A. 

Briggs Pierce Dingman - ----- - —Union, Mo. 

Dickinson College. 

Chippewa Presbytery, Presbyterian Church, U. S. A. 

Feijx John GrospE - — - Pasadena, Calif. 

University of Southern California. 

Methodist Episcopal Church, Philippine Islands. 

Reverend Robert LiETz East Alton, 111. 

Ph.B, Shurtleff College, 1925. 

Alton Association, Baptist Church, North. 

Miss Marjorie Louise Harrison - St. Louis, Mo. 

Gerald Vivian HalsEy MelonE-- -St. Louis, Mo. 

B.A., Muskingum College, 1920. 
United Presbyterian Church. 

Mrs. Kenneth Milton Monroe- - Los Angeles, Calif. 

Joseph Benjamin TylEr - St. Louis, Mo. 

University of Missouri. 
Presbyterian Church, U. S. A. 



XENIA THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 



SUMMARY OF STUDENTS, 1925-1926 

The Graduate School: 

Resident Students 18 

Non-Resident Students 3 21 

The Divinity School : 

Seniors - - — - 12 

Middlers 11 

Juniors - 10 

Special students - - 8 41 



L 



24 XENIA THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

THE PURPOSE OF THE SEMINARY 

"The object of the Seminary shall be to instruct candidates for 
the Gospel ministry, and others who may be preparing for spe- 
cial lines of Christian service, in the knowledge of the doctrine 
of the Scriptures and the order and institutes of worship taught 
therein and summarily exhibited in the Standards of the United 
Presbyterian Church of North America; to cherish in them the 
life of true godliness, and to cultivate the gifts which Christ, the 
Head of the Church, confers on those whom He calls to the 
ministry, to the end that there may be raised up a succession of 
able, faithful, and godly ministers of the Gospel and other Chris- 
tian workers." (Constitution, Ch. I., Sec. 2.) 

THE DIVINITY SCHOOL 



THE COURSE OF STUDY 

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after the 17th of September, and closes on the first Wednesday 
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divided into two semesters. 

The different departments, with their respective courses of 
study, and the amount of time required for each course, are set 
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One hundred and ten semester hours, including two in Public 
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26 XENIA THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 



DESCRIPTION OF COURSES OF STUDY 



I. HEBREW EXEGESIS AND OLD TESTAMENT LITERATURE 

PROFESSOR KELSO 

The purpose of this department is to teach the students to 
read the less difficult portions of the Hebrew Old Testament 
accurately, fluently, and with a real sense of appreciation; and 
to handle the more difficult sections with the aid of a proper 
lexicon and an advanced grammar. Thus, at the close of the 
three year course a student is competent to be his own exegete. 

In connection with the Hebrew work, the Canon of the Old 
Testament and the introductory problem of each of the Old 
Testament books are considered in detail. 

1. Elements of Hebrczv. A mastery of the principles of Hebrew Gram- 
mar, and the acquisition of a working vocabulary. 

Juniors, first semester, four hours a week. 

2. Hebrew Prose. Sight reading of selected passages of Genesis and 
the Historical Books. Analytical study of the Hebrew Text and exegesis 
of the Book of Jonah. The Old Testament Canon. 

Juniors, second semester, four hours a week. 

5. The Minor Prophets. Exegetical study of these books with special 
reference to their theological and social teachings. The introductory 
problem of each book is also treated. 

Middlers, first semester, three hours a week. 

4. The Psalms and the Wisdom Literature. Exegetical study of selected 
Psalms in the light of Hebrew Poetry, and as devotional literature of the 
present day. Rapid survey of the Wisdom Literature. 

Middlers, second semester, three hours a week. 

5. Isaiah. Exegetical study of the book, with special reference to con- 
temporary history and Messianic prophecy. 

Seniors, first semester, three hours a week. 

6. Old Testament Summary. Rapid survey of Jeremiah and Ezekiel 
with special reference to sermonic material. Summary of the whole field 
of the Old Testament using the historical books as a framework. Special 
emphasis on introductory problems. 

Seniors, second semester, three hours a week. 



XENIA THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 27 

II. GREEK EXEGESIS AND NEW TESTAMENT LITERATURE 

DR. WEBSTER 

The purpose of this department is to teach the students to 
know and use the Greek New Testament. While the value of 
exact scholarship is emphasized, the chief aim is to make the 
student an able minister of the New Testament. Instruction is 
given both by text-books and lectures, and everything is made 
subservient to learning "the mind of Christ," the vital requisite 
for a successful ministry. 

Introductory Greek is a prerequisite to the exegetical studies 
of this department. Those who have not had sufficient Greek 
in college are required to take a special course in Introduction to 
the Greek of the New Testament under Dr. McCreary. (See 
page 34.) 

1. New Testament Literature and Criticism. This course embraces a 
general survey of the books of the New Testament and the history ox 
New Testament Criticism. 

Juniors, three hours a week, throughout the year. 

2. The Gospel of John. An exegetical study of the book. 
Juniors, second semester, two hours a week. 

3. The Pastoral Epistles. An exegetical study. 
Middlers, second semester, three hours a week. 

4. Exegetical studies in the Acts. 
Middlers, first semester, three hours a week. 

5. Romans. An exegetical study. 

Seniors, three hours a week throughout the year. 

6. Assigned Reading. In addition to the foregoing exegetical studies, 
each class will be assigned selected portions of the Greek New Testament 
for outside reading. 

7. The Life of Christ will be studied during the year by the Senior 
class. 

III. BIBLICAL THEOLOGY AND BIBLICAL ARCHAEOLOGY 

DR. KYLE 

Work in this department has a two-fold purpose, — to know the 
progress of Revelation, and to know it in its setting. So there 
are studies in the progress of Revelation to acquire a compre- 
hensive grasp of what the Bible teaches as a whole and in its 



28 XENIA THEOLOGICAL, SEMINARY 

various parts in the order of Revelation, together with the study 
of the historical setting of Scripture made known through Arch- 
aeological Research, in order to see the truths of Revelation as 
those saw them to whom they were revealed. 

There are class-room studies and quizzes through which the 
student discovers for himself the plan and progress of Revela- 
tion : also theses by all the students, together with assigned library 
research work. The Bible is the only text-book used, the English 
Bible for constant work, and the Hebrew and Septuagint Old 
Testament and the Greek New Testament for reference. There 
are lectures in Biblical Archaeology from the monuments and 
from first-hand research, so arranged with the studies in Biblical 
Theology as to enable the student constantly to see the Biblical 
story in its original setting. To this work are added quizzes, 
much library work, and an assigned reading course throughout 
the year. Some introductory lectures will be given to the Junior 
Class meeting separately to prepare them for a proper under- 
standing of the work in the general course. 

1. The Patriarchal Period. Principal subjects: Literary methods of 
early Biblical times ; primitive man and the temptation ; antediluvian 
civilization and Revelation ; the deluge ; Abraham and his times ; the de- 
scent into Egypt. 

All classes, first semester, three hours a week (1926-27). 

2. The Tribal Period. From the descent into Egypt to the Conquest 
of Canaan. Principal subjects: From court to corvee; Moses; the Reve- 
lation of God through the plagues of Egypt ; the Exodus and the wilder- 
ness life; the Revelation at Sinai; the problem of the Pentateuch, and 
Old Testament chronology. 

All classes, first semester, three hours a week (1927-28). 

3. The National Period. From the Conquest of Canaan to the end of 
the Old Testament. Principal subjects: Times of the conquest; period 
of the Judges ; David ; the great period of Biblical literature ; decline and 
apostasy; the great invasions; Isaiah; Daniel; the exile and reformation; 
the return and second glory of Israel ; Messianism ; prophetism, and 
inspiration. The Messianic Period: The consummation of the Messianic 
hope developed in the former periods. The Apostolic Period: The Appli- 
cation of Messianic teaching to preaching. 

All classes, first semester, three hours a week (1928-29). 



XENIA THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 29 

4. Research Methods. The class is directed in research work and in 
the preparation of theses utilizing archaeological material in Exegesis and 
for sermon illustrations. 

Middlers, first semester, one hour a week. 

5. Canons and Fallacies. A special course of studies to set forth the 
Canons and Fallacies of Archaeological Research. A thesis is required 
of each member of the class upon an assigned subject. 

Seniors, first semester, one hour a week. 

6. Public Research Lectures are given each year out of the research 
work of the Professor in charge. 



PASTORAL THEOLOGY 

DR. KYLE 

Instruction in this subject is given by means of studies, quizzes, 
lectures, and practical exercises for each class separately, together 
with practical training for all classes in the problems of personal 
effort in soul saving. 

1. The Minister as a Student in the Seminary. Subjects: The call 
to the ministry ; the minister's habits ; ministerial manliness, ministerial 
ideals ; keeping one's self ; settlement, candidating, installation. 

Juniors, first semester, one hour a week. 

2. The Minister as Pastor of the Congregation {A). Subjects: The 
pastor in the pulpit ; problems of the ministerial life ; social, business, and 
spiritual methods ; the pastor in relation to the Sabbath School, the Young 
People's Society, the Prayer Meeting, and prayer circles. 

Middlers, first semester, one hour a week. 

3. The Minister as Pastor of tlic Congregation (B). Subjects: Super- 
vising the Sabbath School ; moderating the Session ; directing the congre- 
gational meeting ; the teachers' meeting ; conduct of pulpit service and 
prayer meeting; the administration of the sacraments; marriages; and 
funerals. 

Middlers, second semester, one hour a week. 

4. The Minister in the Larger Relations to Church and Community. 
Subjects: Pastoral evangelism; problems of city and country life; the 
institutional church ; pastoral visitation and counsel ; the benevolences of 
the Church ; ecclesiastical relations. 

Seniors, first semester, one hour a week. 



XENIA THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 



IV. CHURCH HISTORY 

DR. JOHNSON 

The aim of this department is to give a genera] knowledge 
of Church History, with emphasis on the most important move- 
ments and events ; to arouse an interest in the history of the 
Church which will lead to further study in this profitable field; 
and to train in methods of historical study. In the study of each 
period special attention will be given to missionary development 
and expansion. The work is done by means of text-books, lec- 
tures, . library readings, and students' reports on assigned topics. 

1. The Ancient Period, to 590 A. D. Principal subjects: Providential 
preparation for Christianity; brief review of the life of Christ and the 
Apostolic Age; spread of Christianity; opposition; alliance between Church 
and State ; heresies, councils, and creeds ; Christian life ; schisms ; the 
Fathers and their writings ; the theological schools. 

Juniors, first semester, two hours a week. 

2. The Medieval Period, 590-1517 A. D. Principal subjects : Missions; 
Islam ; the Papacy and the Papal Church ; the Eastern Church ; Monasti- 
cism ; the Crusades ; medieval sects and persecutions ; Scholasticism ; the 
Mystics ; general Church conditions ; movements for reform ; precursors of 
the Reformation ; the Renaissance. 

Juniors, second semester, three hours a week. 

3. The Reformation Bra, 1517-1648 A. D. After a brief review of the 
providential preparatives for the Reformation, the principal subjects will 
be (1) the Reformation in Germany and the Lutheran Reformation in 
other lands ; (2) the Reformation in Switzerland and in other lands where 
the Reformed type of Protestantism prevailed; (3) the Counter-Reforma- 
tion ; and (4) Roman Catholic Missions. The aim will be to bring the 
history of the Church in each country, as nearly as may be, down to the 
Peace of Westphalia, 1648. Here the text will be the two volume work, 
"History of the Reformation," by Lindsay. 

Middlers, first semester, three hours a week. 

4. European and American Church History, 1648-1925 A. D. 

(a) The principal subjects in European Church History will be the 
Roman Catholic Church in its relation to civil government and the national 
churches ; controversies within the Roman Catholic Church ; Rationalism 
and its effects ; Lutheranism and its controversies ; the Reformed Churches, 
with special notice of Presbyterianism ; the Anglican Church ; Deism ; the 
Methodist revival ; nineteenth century controversies. This study will be 
for the most part by countries. 



XENIA THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 31 

(b) In American Church History a study will be made of the Old 
World Sources ; early Roman Catholic missions ; the churches in the 
colonies ; decline and revival ; the great denominations ; divisions and 
unions ; home missions. The Presbyterian family of churches will receive 
special study. 

Middlers, second semester, five hours a week. 

5. History of the United Presbyterian Church of North America. 
Beginnings in Scotland; beginnings in America; the Union of 1782; the 
Associate Presbyterian Church, 1782-1858; the Associate Reformed Church, 
1782-1858; the Union of 1858; the United Presbyterian Church, 1858-1925. 
Any member of the class who is not a United Presbyterian may substitute 
for this course a study of his own Church, reporting to the Professor and 
the class as required. 

Seniors, first semester, one hour a week. 

6. History of Doctrine, {A). A study will be made especially of the 
history of Trinitarianism and Christology. If time permits, the history of 
Anthropology will be brought down to the time of Anselm. 

Seniors, first semester, two hours a week. 

7. History of Doctrine, (B). The study of Anthropology will be con- 
tinued, and will be followed by the doctrinal history of the Atonement, 
of Justification by Faith, and of Regeneration. Attention will then be 
given to Post-Reformation theology and to modern forms of statement 
of doctrines. 

Seniors, second semester, two hours a week. 

V. SYSTEMATIC THEOLOGY AND HOMILETICS 

DR. KERR 

The purpose in the study of Systematic Theology is to lead 
the student to clear and well-balanced views of the great doc- 
trines and principles comprised in the Christian faith. The 
text-book used is the complete work on Systematic Theology 
by Dr. A. H. Strong. There is class-room discussion based on 
a careful analysis of the text, supplemented by lectures and re- 
ports on assigned reading. Two hours a week throughout the 
entire course are required. 

1. (a) Introduction to the Study of Theology : The idea and purpose 
of Theology, the sources of material and the method of treatment. 
(b) The Existence of God : Origin of the idea of God, and evidence of 
His existence, (c) The Scriptures a Divine Revelation: The witness 
of miracle and prophecy to the fact of a divine revelation. 

Juniors, first semester, two hours a week. 



32 XENIA THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

2. (a) The Doctrine of Scripture (continued) : The genuineness of 
the documents, the credibility of the writers, the supernatural character 
and inspiration of Scripture, (b) The Doctrine of God: The divine 
attributes ; the doctrine of the Trinity. 

Juniors, second semester, two hours a week. 

3. (a) The Doctrine of God (continued) : The decrees and works of 
God: creation, preservation, providence, the angels. ( b) The Doctrine of 
Man : The origin and nature of man, and the unity of the human race. 

Middlers, first semester, two hours a week. 

4. (a) The Doctrine of Man (continued) : The origin of the soul, 
the moral nature and primitive state of man. (b) The Doctrine of Sin: 
The Fall of man, the nature and universality of sin, and its consequences 
to the human race, (c) The Doctrine of Redemption: Preparation for 
redemption; the person of Christ, His two natures and states. 

Middlers, second semester, two hours a week. 

5. (a) The Doctrine of Redemption (continued) : Offices and work 
of Christ; the Atonement, (b) The Doctrine of the Holy Spirit: The 
application of Redemption, — calling, union with Christ, regeneration, con- 
version, justification, sanctification. 

Seniors, first semester, two hours a week. 

6. (a) The Doctrine of the Church: Its constitution, organization, 
government, sacraments, and other ordinances of worship. (b) The 
Doctrine of Last Things : Death, the intermediate state, the second com- 
ing of Christ, the resurrection, the judgment, and final awards. 

Seniors, second semester, two hours a week. 

HOMILETICS 

The study of Homiletics is designed to give the student high 
ideals of pulpit ministration, to correlate his growing knowledge 
and powers and bring them all to bear upon the effective expres- 
sion of Christian truth. 

1. The Preparation of Sermons. The permanent function and impor- 
tance of preaching ; the selection and interpretation of the text ; the struc- 
ture of the sermon; the different kinds of sermons. A homily preached 
before the Faculty and student body. 

Juniors, first semester, one hour a week. 

2. The Preparation and Delivery of Sermons. The work of the first 
semester continued. Sermon materials, — explanation, argument, illustra- 
tion, and application; qualities of style; and modes of delivery. The 
relative advantages of the three modes of delivery are presented, — reading. 



XENIA THEOLOGICAL, SEMINARY 33 

speaking memoriter, and speaking extemporaneously. A doctrinal or sub- 
ject sermon preached before the Faculty and student body. 
Juniors, second semester, one hour a week. 

3. Sermon Outlines {A). Students are trained in the interpretation 
and analysis of texts, and in the construction and criticism of outlines 
of the various approved types of sermons. All outlines presented in 
writing. An expository lecture preached before the Faculty and student 
body. 

Middlers, first semester, one hour a week. 

4. Sermon Outlines (B). Work of the first semester continued, with 
special emphasis on the outlining of passages of Scripture for continuous 
exposition. All outlines presented in writing. A critical discourse on a 
passage assigned in the Hebrew or the Greek shall be publicly presented. 

Middlers, second semester, one hour a week. 

5. Sermon Outlines (C). In this course the students are trained in 
the construction of plans for doctrinal and subject sermons. All work 
presented in writing. A sermon preached publicly on a text of the 
student's own selection. 

Seniors, first semester, one hour a week. 

6. Sermon Outlines (D). Written analysis of the sermons of great 
preachers, ancient and modern. A thesis on a subject assigned by the 
Faculty is due April 21st. 

Seniors, second semester, on hour a week. 

VI. PHILOSOPHY OF RELIGION AND APPLIED CHRISTIANITY 

DR. McCREARY 

1. The Psychology of Religion. After a brief but comprehensive 
survey of the field of Psychology in general, noting the leading current 
theories, particular applications are made in genetics, in the principles 
of teaching, in social expressions, and in religious experience. Several 
texts are used with lectures. 

Juniors, first semester, two hours a week. 

2. Biblical Ethics. Beginning with a philosophic introduction, both 
historical and critical, the Christian ideal of conduct is unfolded, noting 
contrasts and agreements with the more prominent systems. Particular 
attention is given to the applicatory feature, both individual and social 
bearings being considered. 

Juniors, second semester, three hours a week. 

3. Christian Sociology. After a review of general social theory as 
presented by leading authorities, the recognized problems are set forth 
with their proposed solutions. The Christian method of approaching and 



34 XBNIA THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

solving these problems is presented. Particular emphasis is given to the 
application of the teaching of Jesus to the social order. 
Middlers, first semester, two hours a week. 

4. Apologetics. The ground of the older arguments is covered, with 
modern restatements and additions. Christianity is shown to be logically 
defensible. 

Middlers and Seniors, second semester, two hours a week (1927-28). 

5. Comparative Religion. The great religions of the world are studied 
historically and comparatively. Their philosophic bases and ethical 
and social features are carefully inspected. Particular attention is be- 
stowed on those rival faiths with which Christianity now most strongly 
competes. 

Middlers and Seniors, second semester, two hours a week. (1926-27). 

6. The Philosophy of Religion. This course includes the usual materials 
of Theism. It also seeks to exhibit the epistemological foundations of 
faith, to state the analogical argument expositionally, to find an adequate 
ground of values, and to set forth the Christian religion as a philosophic 
system. A rationale of method is undertaken regarding religion in his- 
torical, aesthetical, and critical aspects. 

Seniors, two hours a week throughout the year. 

INTRODUCTORY GREEK 

DR. McCREARY 

This work is provided for those who have not had Greek in 
college, and is a prerequisite to the regular work in New Testa- 
ment exegesis. 

1. Introduction to New Testament Greek {A). A rapid survey of the 
outstanding features of the grammar of the Greek New Testament. 
Huddilston's "Essentials of New Testament Greek," or a similar text-book, 
is used. 

Juniors, first semester, five hours a week. 

2. Introduction to Nciv Testament Greek (B). A careful study of the 
New Testament syntax, based on Green's "Handbook to the Grammar 
of the Greek Testament." The Gospel by John is read from the Greek. 

Juniors, second semester, three hours a week. 

3. Supplementary Reading in Greek. In addition to the foregoing- 
courses, the student is required to read selected portions of the Greek New 
Testament before entering the Middle class in New Testament exegesis. 

VII. PUBLIC SPEAKING 

DR. DUNCAN 

1. The Principles and Practice of Public Speaking. 
The various types of speech are studied in detail, and students are 
drilled in the important types. Attention is given to the development and 



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proper control of the voice and to the study and practice of the principles 
of gesture. Considerable attention is given to debating. Careful study 
is made, not only of delivery, but of the proper method of arranging ma- 
terial. In the study of speech care is taken to relate the work to the 
special needs of the minister. The course includes practice in the reading 
of the Scriptures with a view to making this part of the Church service 
more effective. 
Juniors, one hour a week throughout the year. 

2. Individual Training in Public Speaking. 

In addition to the regular class work, an attempt is made to give a fair 
amount of individual attention to the students. The best progress is made 
by those who combine the class work regularly with private instruction. 

Juniors by special appointment. 

ADMINISTRATION OF THE REGULAR COURSE 

Since our denominational standards specify that "in all ordi- 
nary cases a full collegiate course of study, or its equivalent, shall 
be required of those entering on the study of theology," the 
Course of Study in this Seminary is primarily designed for college 
graduates. It has been found necessary, however, to make some 
provision for those who have not had two years of Greek, and 
for part-time students. In the case of these special groups, suit- 
able arrangements have been made, as will appear in paragraphs 
A and P> below. 

1. The Standard Course includes, besides the other disciplines, 
study of the Bible in the original languages throughout the three 
years. All who have the requisite preliminary training are ex- 
pected to take this course : the successful completion of it is one 
of the requirements for diploma with or without degree of Th.B. 

A. Introductory Greek. As a prerequisite to Greek Exegesis, 
the student must have a sufficient knowledge of the Greek lan- 
guage to enable him to take the Junior exegetical work in a 
manner satisfactory to the Professor in charge. Those who 
may be lacking in this regard are expected to make up the de- 
ficiency before the beginning of the Middle year. For the benefit 
of this class of students the Seminary provides a Course in Intro- 
ductory Greek. This is not, however, a credit course, and may 
not be substituted for any part of the regular course in Greek Exe- 



38 XENIA THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

gesis, — all of which must be done to the satisfaction of the Pro- 
fessor in charge and according to his appointment. 

B. Selected Studies. Students who for any reason are pre- 
vented from pursuing the full Course may, upon the special 
recommendation of their Presbytery and by action of the Faculty, 
be permitted to register for any part of the Course with which 
they may be competent to deal. Upon the satisfactory completion 
of their work, of which one semester hour shall be the minimum 
in any subject, they will receive a report of their grades and 
credits. The successful completion of fifty-six semester hours 
entitles the special student to a Certificate. 

CLASSIFICATION OF STUDENTS 

Students are classified as Regular Students and Special Students, 
according as they take the full Course or only a part of it. Regu- 
lar Students may be either Degree Students or Diploma Students, 
according as they are candidates for diploma with degree or for 
diploma without degree. 

TERMS OF ADMISSION 

1. General Terms. The privileges of the Seminary are ex- 
tended on equal terms to students of all evangelical denominations. 
The applicant shall present — 

a. Evidence of membership in good standing in his own Church. 

b. A certificate from his own Presbytery, or other ecclesiasti- 
cal authorities, indicating that he has been taken under their care, 
and approved as a student of theology. 

c. Credentials showing his academic attainments. 

2. Academic Requirements. 

a. Degree Students. Those who desire to qualify for degree 
on graduation should, upon entrance, have the degree of Bachelor 
of Arts, or its equivalent, from a standard college or university. 
Otherwise, they must satisfy the Faculty, by credentials and ex- 
amination, that they have had courses of study and discipline fully 
equivalent to a standard college course, with special attention to 
the classical languages. Degree students shall enroll for the 
Standard Course. 



XENIA THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 39 

b. Diploma Students. Students not having the full college 
preparation specified in our denominational standards may, upon 
the special recommendation of their Presbytery and by action of 
the Faculty, enter the Seminary for the regular Course. If they 
are able to take the whole Course creditably, they will receive the 
diploma of the Seminary at graduation. But they may not be 
candidates for degrees unless by additional study they satisfy all 
the requirements specified for degrees. Students of this class 
who expect to make up their deficiency in college credits and 
qualify for the degree of Th.B. at graduation must have this 
work completed by the beginning of the second semester of the 
Senior year. Diploma Students shall enroll for the Standard 
Course the first year. 

3. Formal Registration. Before being admitted to the Semi- 
nary, every student shall, in the presence of the Registrar, sub- 
scribe to a written declaration to the effect that while he is a stu- 
dent in the Seminary he will regularly, punctually, and diligently 
attend upon all the instructions of the Professors, and promptly 
comply with all lawful requisitions of the Faculty, and be subject 
to their authority ; that he will honestly conform to all regulations 
of the Seminary, and that he will not propagate any opinion in op- 
position to the principles of the United Presbyterian Church. 

TIME OF ENTRANCE 

The proper time to enter the Seminary is at the opening of 
the annual session in September. Those who enter at mid-year, 
except by regular transfer from some other standard theological 
seminary, may be accepted as Special Students, but will not be 
regularly classified as Juniors until the following fall. 

ATTENDANCE 

All students are required to be present in all the classes in which 
they are enrolled, at the weekly preaching service in the Chapel, 
and at the appointed examinations. Attendance is also required 
at the opening of each semester, and again at the Baccalaureate 
and Graduation services in the spring, unless excused by the 
Faculty and Board of Managers. All absences of the students. 
excused and unexcused are reported to their respective Pres- 



40 XENIA THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

byteries. Absence at any time during the Seminary session has 
an unfavorable effect on the student's standing. 

EXAMINATIONS 

At the close of each semester, examinations are held to test and 
organize the student's knowledge of the ground covered in the 
several departments. Ordinarily the examinations are written and 
the results are reported by the Faculty to the Board of Managers. 
From the class standing, the examinations, and the attendance, 
the grade of the student, based on a scale of 100, is determined 
and reported to his Presbytery. 

GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS 

One hundred and ten semester hours of work, including four 
in Public Speaking, are required for graduation. A semester hour 
means one recitation a week in a given subject throughout a sem- 
ester. The courses of study in the various departments are so 
arranged that all the students take nineteen hours the first sem- 
ester, and during the second semester the Juniors take nineteen 
hours, the Middlers eighteen hours, and the Seniors sixteen hours. 

DIPLOMAS AND DEGREES AT GRADUATION 

1. Diploma. The diploma of the Seminary will be granted 
to all who complete creditably the Standard Course. One year 
of their work must be done in residence at this Seminary, and 
they must maintain an average grade of at least 75 per cent, 
throughout the whole course, with no semester grade in any sub- 
ject less than 70 per cent. 

2. Diploma with Degree of Bachelor of Theology (Th.B.) 
The Diploma of the Seminary with the degree of Th.B. will 
be granted to those students who — 

a. Have the degree of Bachelor of Arts, or its equivalent, 
from a standard college or university; 

b. Take the Standard three-year Course of the Seminary, — 
one year of which must be in residence at this Seminary; 

c. Maintain an average grade of at least 75 per cent, through- 
out the whole Course, with no semester grade in any subject less 
than 70 per cent. 



XENIA THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 41 

Note : Graduates having diplomas without degree may become 
candidates for degrees by making up all deficiencies to the satisfaction 
of the Faculty. The degree of A. B. which is mentioned herein as a 
prerequisite to Seminary degrees must represent bona fide college work 
or its equivalent, without appropriation of any of the one hundred and 
ten credits secured in the regular Seminary Course. 

GRADUATION HONORS 

Graduation honors, not competitive, but open to all who qualify, 
whether graduated with diploma only, or with diploma and degree, 
are granted as follows : 

Cum laude, to all who are clearly distinguished during the 
whole course 1) for academic attainments, 2) for regular and 
punctual attendance, and 3) for general fitness for the Gospel 
Ministry. 

Magna cum laude, .to all who possess these qualifications in an 
unusual degree. 

Summa cum laude, in very rare instances, in recognition of sur- 
passing merit. 



42 XENIA THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 



THE GRADUATE SCHOOL 

Advanced work is provided for those who wish to pursue 
studies beyond those required for the degree of Bachelor of 
Theology. The Graduate School offers work leading to the de- 
gree of Master of Theology (Th.M.) and to the degree of Doctor 
of Theology (Th.D.) 

THE DEGREE OF MASTER OF THEOLOGY (Th.M.) 

1. Candidates for the Master's Degree. 

a. Students who hold from a standard college or university 
the degree of Bachelor of Arts or its unquestioned equivalent, 
and who have received either from this Seminary or from some 
other School of Theology of like character the degree of Th. B. 
or its equivalent (or have complied with all the requirements), 
may be candidates for the degree of Th. M. 

b. Undergraduates in this Seminary who have the degree of 
A. B. or its equivalent from a standard college or university and 
who are pursuing the Standard Course and maintain therein an 
average grade of 85 per cent, with not less than 80 per cent, in any 
subject, may be allowed to take one-third of the course leading to 
the degree of Th. M., in addition to the required work, during 
their Middle year and their Senior year. 

2. Work required for the Master's Degree. 

a. The work required for the degree of Th.M. shall be 
the equivalent of twenty-four semester hours. The student shall 
devote sixteen semester hours to one subject, which shall be 
called a major, and eight semester hours to another subject, 
which shall be called a minor ; or, if desired, two or more minor 
subjects may be chosen, with the approval of the Faculty. 

b. In connection with the major subject, a thesis of 5,000 
words shall be required. The subject of the thesis shall be as- 
signed b) r , or have the approval of, the Professor in charge of the 
department not later than December 1st of the academic year in 
which the degree is sought. A type-written copy of the thesis 
shall be in the hands of the Professor for examination not later 
than April 1st. ^ 



XBNIA THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 43 

c. At the conclusion of the assigned work, the student shall 
pass a thorough examination in both major and minor subjects. 

3. Personal presence. In all ordinary cases the candidate for 
a degree must be present when the degree is conferred. 

4. Fee. A fee of ten dollars will be charged to cover the ex- 
pense of graduation. 

THE DEGREE OF DOCTOR OF THEOLOGY (Th.D.) 

This degree is granted only after a very extended Course which 
is open only to those who have already the degree of Master of 
Theology, or its unquestionable equivalent, and who present also 
additional entrance requirements. Particulars will be furnished 
on application, the applicant specifying the department in which 
the major study is desired. In all cases two full years of in- 
tensive work in residence will be required, or three years, with 
the last semester of four months in residence. 

GRADUATE SEMINARS OFFERED FOR 1926-1927 

For the benefit of graduate Students in residence, regular 
seminars are provided in addition to the other assigned work. 
The following seminars are offered the coming year (1925-1926) : 

First Semester 

Tues., 1 :30 P. M. — Formation of Protestant Creeds, 

Dr. Johnson 

Tues., 2 :30 P. M. — Bxegetical and Practical Study of the 

Bpistle to the Hebrews Dr. Webster 

Second Semester 

Tues., 1 :30 P. M.— The Patriarchal Period Dr. Kyle 

OTHER GRADUATE SEMINARS 

Other seminars in the Graduate School will be scheduled in due 
time by the different Professors in their various departments, 
such as the following: 



44 XENIA THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

I. HEBREW EXEGESIS AND OLD TESTAMENT LITERATURE 

PROFESSOR KELSO 

1. Biblical Aramaic. A study of the elements of the language, and 
the reading of the Aramaic sections of the Old Testament. 

Minor, eight semester hours. 

2. The Septuagint. The reading of selected portions of the Old 
Testament in Greek, comparing with the Hebrew and with other versions. 
A study of the origin and the problems of the Septuagint, on the basis 
of Swete's "Introduction to the Old Testament in Greek." 

Major, sixteen semester hours. 

3. Hebrew Vocabularies. A seminar in the synonyms and antonyms 
of the Hebrew Old Testament. 

Minor, eight semester hours. 

4. Prophecy of Jonah. 
Minor, eight semester hours. 

II. GREEK EXEGESIS AND NEW TESTAMENT LITERATURE 

DR. WEBSTER 

1. The Synoptic Problem. 
Minor, eight semester hours. 

2. The Epistle to the Hebrews. 
Minor, eight semester hours. 

3. The Christ ology of the Pauline Epistles. 
Major, sixteen semester hours. 

4. The Johannine Writings. 
Major, sixteen semester hours. 

III. BIBLICAL THEOLOGY AND ARCHAEOLOGY 

DR. KYLE 

1. Study of Methods in Biblical Theology. The aim here is to lead 
the student to discover the Biblical teachings through an application of 
the inductive method. 

Major, sixteen semester hours. Minor, eight semester hours. 

2. Prophetism and Prophecy. 

A study of the meaning and scope of prophecy. 

Major, sixteen semester hours. Minor, eight semester hours. 

3. Book Study. The aim is to lead the student to ascertain the setting 
and the doctrinal content of the book, and how to utilize the findings. 

Major, sixteen semester hours. Minor, eight semester hours. 

4. Archaeology of the Bible, especially the use of Archaeological ma- 
terial for homiletical purposes. 

Major, sixteen semester hours. Minor, eight semester hours. 

5. Methods of Archaeological Rescarcli. and Canons and Fallacies. 
Major, sixteen semester hours. By residence only. 



XENIA THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 45 

6. Archaeology and Criticism. An introduction to the use of Archae- 
ological material in Biblical criticism. 

Major, sixteen semester hours. Minor, eight semester hours. 

PASTORAL THEOLOGY 

DR. KYLE 

1. The Scriptural Basis of Pastoral Evangelism. 
Minor, two semester hours. 

2. Psychological Problems in Pastoral Evangelism. 
Minor, six semester hours. 

3. Sociological Problems in Pastoral Evangelism. 
Minor, four semester hours. 

4. Methods in Pastoral Evangelism. 

Minor, two semester hours. By residence only. 

IV. CHURCH HISTORY 

DR. JOHNSON 

1. The Lives and Writings of the Early Church Fathers. 

Open to those who have studied General Church History to 590 A. D. 
Minor, eight semester hours. 

2. Early Doctrinal Discussions. Open to those who have studied Gen- 
eral Church History to 1483 A. D. 

Major, sixteen semester hours. 

3. The Era of the Reformation. Open to those who have studied 
General Church History to 1483 A. D., and who have a knowledge of the 
Protestant Reformation in outline. 

Major, sixteen semester hours. 

4. Origin and History of the United Presbyterian Church of North 
America. A prerequisite to this is a fair knowledge of the Reformation in 
Scotland. 

Minor, eight semester hours. 

V. SYSTEMATIC THEOLOGY 

DR. KERR 

1. Doctrinal Studies in the Teaching of Jesus. 
Minor, eight semester hours. 

2. The Inspiration of the Scriptures. 
Major, sixteen semester hours. 

3. The Person of Christ. 
Major, sixteen semester hours. 

4. The Doctrine of Sin. 
Minor, eight semester hours. 

5. The Atonement. 

Major, sixteen semester hours. 

6. The Second Advent. 
Minor, eight semester hours. 



46 XENIA THEOLOGICAL, SEMINARY 

VI. PHILOSOPHY OF RELIGION AND APPLIED CHRISTIANITY 

DR. McCREARY 

1. The Philosophy of Religion. A critical review of the foundation 
concepts of religion. Interpretations of knowledge, reality, personality, 
deity, and similar subjects in their bearing upon Christian faith. 

Minor, eight semester hours. 

2. Apologetics. An evaluation of the apologetic element in present-day 
Theology and in current literature. 

Minor, four semester hours. 

3. Psychology of Religion. The newer phases of Psychology investi- 
gated and their significance for religion weighed. 

Minor, four semester hours. 

4. Religions Education. Curricular and methodological problems. The 
general theory of teaching applied. 

Minor, four semester hours. 

5. Christian Sociology. A seminar in concrete contemporary problems. 
Minor, four semester hours. 

THE AMERICAN SCHOOL OF ORIENTAL RESEARCH AT 
JERUSALEM 

Xenia Seminary is one of the group of Universities, Colleges, 
and Theological Seminaries in this country co-operating in the 
support and control of the American School of Oriental Research 
in Jerusalem, and is thus able to offer to her students the unique 
facilities possessed by this School. No other Post-graduate work 
is more profitable and attractive to young men looking forward to 
the work of the Ministry than study and research in Bible lands. 
The American School of Oriental Research at Jerusalem was 
founded to afford such opportunities as have never before been 
open to American students. Special arrangements are made to 
reduce the expenses of such students to the lowest point. 

Educational Opportunities Afforded 

The School offers to properly qualified students excellent oppor- 
tunities for pursuing such studies as the following: Biblical and 
Palestinian Archaeology ; the Geography and Natural features 
of the Land; the History of Israel; Early Church History and 
Patristics ; the Arabic Language, and the other Semitic Lan- 
guages connected with it ; Mohammedanism ; the Political, Social, 
and Industrial Conditions in Bible Lands ; Roman Administration 
and Colonization in the East ; the Crusades ; and the Comparative 
History of Religions. 




..•-•.- 



, I ■ . M 




MAIN ENTRANCE; TO WASHINGTON UNIVERSITY 



XENIA THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 49 

The School has a well selected working library, which-is stead- 
ily growing. There are other considerable libraries in Jerusalem, 
some of which contain large collections of manuscripts, chiefly 
Greek and Arabic. As a central point for the study of Palestin- 
ian antiquities, for making tours of research and exploration, and 
for visiting the numerous scenes of past or present excavations, 
Jerusalem is peculiarly well situated. 

Those who avail themselves of the privileges of this School 
can go at once after the Commencement at St. Louis, and enter 
the School at Jerusalem. The altitude and the latitude of Jeru- 
salem make the summer climate there quite satisfactory. The 
remainder of the year will afford abundant opportunity for travel 
through the land and researches in Historical Geography and 
Archaeology. 

The Thayer Memorial Fellowship 

The Thayer Memorial Fellowship of the School at Jerusalem, 
with a stipend of $800, is awarded annually on examination. A 
list of the books recommended to candidates for the Fellowship, 
and special facilities for preparation, will be supplied by the 
Seminary. 

AFFILIATION WITH WASHINGTON UNIVERSITY 

One of the chief considerations which induced the Commission 
of the Board of Managers, charged with the relocation of Xenia 
Theological Seminary, to fix upon the City of St. Louis, was 
the extremely favorable university connection that was offered. 
Washington University is an old and honored foundation, with 
magnificent buildings, and is regarded as the greatest graduate 
school of the whole Southwest. Xenia's new location is within 
a few minutes' walk of its grounds. Through the courtesy of the 
Chancellor and the other authorities, a full exchange of credits 
has been granted, without any control of our teachings or policies. 
So short is the distance, that those who desire to complete their 
academic course or to work for an advanced degree, can do so 
without inconvenience or loss of time. The advantages of this 
affiliation are manifest. 



50 XENIA THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 



GENERAL INFORMATION 



LOCATION OF THE SEMINARY 

The Seminary is located at the corner of Washington and 
Trinity Avenues in University City, a beautiful suburb of St. 
Louis. The slight elevation above the City and the distance from 
river and factory deliver us from most of the fog and smoke 
of the St. Louis region. 

HOW TO REACH THE SEMINARY 

From the Union Station take any northbound car and ride three 
blocks to Eighteenth and Olive Streets. Transfer to a Delmar- 
Olive car westbound and ride to the end of the line. A short 
walk of one block south and one block west brings you to the 
Seminary Building. All students are required to be present at 
the opening session. 

GENERAL EQUIPMENT 

There are two buildings, joined on the fourth floor and on the 
ground floor. The Administration Building contains the Presi- 
dent's office, most of the class rooms and the Professors' studies, 
the Library, and the Chapel. In the Dormitory are rooms for 
the students and quarters for the Matron and for the Janitor. 
An attractive Reception Hall leads into the Dining Room on the 
one hand and into the Parlor on the other. Both Dining Room 
and Parlor are large and well furnished, and open for use. We 
have steam heat, electric lights, good water, a bath room on each 
dormitory floor, and, in the basement, a Seminary Laundry which 
is directed in the interest of students. 

THE LIBRARY 

The Seminary Library contains about 17,000 bound volumes, 
among which are many rare old books. About 2,000 of these have 
been acquired during the past year. Under the direction of 
the Librarian of the Faculty, the students use these books for 
the investigation of assigned subjects. Students also have, access 
to the Library of the Washington University of 240.000 bound 



XENIA THEOLOGICAL, SEMINARY 53 

volumes, and to the St. Louis Public Library of 650,000 bound 
volumes. 

About fifty (50) current American religious magazines and 
journals come regularly to the Seminary; also, twelve (12) lead- 
ing foreign religious journals, representing England, France, 
Germany, Italy, Belgium, Sweden. This extensive and varied 
current literature is available to the students. 

Through the generosity of the late Mr. Alexander Dempster, 
of Pittsburgh, Pa., the Seminary has been provided with the raised 
map of Palestine published by the Palestine Exploration Fund, 
London, England, from surveys by George Armstrong. Mounted 
in normal position on a substantial table, this map is of special 
value in the study of Sacred Geography and History. 

RESERVATION OF ROOMS 

Students who have been here for one or two years may reserve 
rooms at the end of the Seminary session by consulting the 
Matron. The two-year men have first choice of rooms, the one- 
year men have second choice, the alphabetical order being ob- 
served within each group. New students are assigned to their 
rooms in the fall, and have right of choice in the order of their 
written application. 

We are not prepared to accommodate married students and 
their wives in the Dormitory, but will assist them in finding 
proper accommodations. 

USE OF ROOMS DURING THE SUMMER 

Students may have free use of their rooms for two weeks before 
the opening in September and for two weeks after Commence- 
ment in May. Otherwise, those who desire to use their rooms 
during the summer vacation must secure permission from the 
President, and pay a nominal charge of $10.00 a month to cover 
expenses. When two students occupy the same room, a joint 
monthly charge of $15.00 shall be made. These rates apply only 
to students. Any others desiring to use the Dormitory facilities 
must make special arrangements with the President. 

THE RELIGIOUS LIFE OF THE SEMINARY 

The religious life of the Seminary is on a high plane. Xenia 
students are trained in the cultivation of personal religion, and 



54 XENIA THEOLOGICAL, SEMINARY 

provision is made for the development and expression of religion 
in its social aspects. A chapel service forms part of the daily 
schedule. The young men are organized as a local branch of 
the Student Y. M. C. A. This organization conducts its own 
devotional service one evening during the week, and provides the 
leader for the Seminary prayer meeting, in Chapel, Tuesday 
morning. The Student Volunteers meet weekly for prayer and 
conference, and in other ways promote the missionary spirit of 
the Seminary. 

THE SOCIAL LIFE OF THE SEMINARY 

A spirit of good cheer and mutual helpfulness pervades the 
institution. The atmosphere is decidedly home-like. Castes and 
cliques are taboo, and all are united in a wholesome Christian 
fellowship. The members of the Faculty are the students' best- 
friends, and every student is a brother to every other student. 
Without excessive diversion from study, there are seasonable 
socials and entertainments at the Seminary, and the students also 
have an appropriate share in the social life of the Churches of 
the City. Every season brings forward high-class lectures and 
concerts in the City which further enlarge the students' oppor- 
tunity for social and aesthetic culture. 

PHYSICAL TRAINING 

The physical man is not forgotten. "Mens sana in corpore 
sano" is a principle from which Christian students do not seek 
exemption. Wholesome food, pure air and water, abundant op- 
portunities for exercise, — all the requisites to good health are 
provided. On the Seminary property, next to the Dormitory, is 
a splendid tennis court and a ball field, where the young men, 
thanks to a favoring climate, can secure outdoor exercise the 
greater part of the year. Moreover, the commodious gymnasium 
of the First United Presbyterian Church, in the same block with 
the Seminary, is open to the students for basket ball and other 
indoor games at certain times during the week. These opportuni- 
ties, which are by no means neglected, in some measure account 
for the excellent health enjoyed by the students at Xenia. 











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XENIA THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 57 

THE SEMINARY QUARTETTE 

The Xenia Quartette is one of the very attractive features of 
Seminary life, the most popular symbol of the culture and har- 
mony for which Xenia stands. During the past year, the Quartette 
has filled a score of engagements. They visited three of our 
Colleges, — Tarkio, Muskingum, and Monmouth ; they sang in thir- 
teen different Churches, five of these being in St. Louis ; twice 
their entertainments were broadcasted by the "Voice of St. Louis" 
(KMOX), and other opportunities of like nature had to be 
declined on account of the limitations of their time. Three of 
the members of the Quartette are members of the Apollo Club of 
St. Louis. 

EXPENSES 

The necessary expenses of a course of theological training are 
reduced to a minimum. The building is thoroughly equipped, and 
there are no fees or rentals for privileges and accommodations. 
The Seminary furnishes bedding, towels, etc., but each student is 
urged to bring with him a travelling rug or blanket, for which, 
in occasional extreme weather, he may have use. The Seminary 
Dining Room is economically managed by the Student Club, the 
cost of maintenance amounting to about $27 a month to each 
member. The Seminary Laundry and the Seminary Book Store 
enable the students to effect a still further saving. 

OPPORTUNITIES FOR WORK 

The Seminary has received a most cordial welcome in the City 
of St. Louis. This great center of population offers an excellent- 
field for Christian effort and sociological study. It also affords 
numerous opportunities of employment to those who must make 
their own way. The Churches are enthusiastic in pledging co- 
operation and support. Such support was, of course, to be ex- 
pected from the United Presbyterian congregations, and it is 
being given in full measure. But other denominations also, espe- 
cially the Presbyterian, U. S., the Presbyterian, U. S. A., the 
Congregationalist and the Methodist, have shown a most friendly 
attitude from the outset. Some of them employ students of the 
Seminary in congregational work. All the students have some 
experience in preaching in the City Missions. 



58 XENIA THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

COMPENSATED RELIGIOUS WORK 

Members of the Junior Class will receive the sum of fifty dol- 
lars each for the year, on condition of their engaging in religious 
work, not otherwise fully compensated, in the churches of this 
community, or in adjacent fields. As the students advance into 
the Middle and Senior Classes, they have increasing opportunities 
of preaching, for which they receive an appropriate compensation. 

STUDENT LOANS 

From the income of our Students' Fund, we are prepared to 
loan to those who may desire it, the sum of fifty dollars a year, 
or more in case of real need, on their personal notes, without 
interest for five years from date of loan ; at the expiration of 
this period, interest at the rate of six per cent, per annum will be 
charged until payment is made. 

AID FROM THE BOARD OF EDUCATION 

The Board of Education is authorized by the General Assembly 
to make special grants in aid to United Presbyterian students of 
theology upon the recommendation of their Presbytery. The 
annual payments are as follows : 

''To first year students not to exceed $180.00 ; to second year 
students not to exceed $120.00; and to third year students not 
to exceed $80.00. * * * 

"No money shall be paid to students of the first year who 
during the sessions of the Seminary receive compensation for 
preaching on the Sabbath, nor to students of the second year who 
preach for compensation more than an average of two Sabbaths 
a month during the Seminary session. And no money shall be 
paid to any student who holds a pastoral charge or engages in 
special religious work such as will interfere with his duties in 
the Seminary. * * * Ordinarily no grant will be made to a 
student who marries immediately prior to entering upon or while 
pursuing his Seminary course. * * * Absolute abstinence 
from the use of tobacco is made an essential requirement for 
receiving aid from the Beneficiary Fund." 

"Students receiving aid must be under the care of the Presby- 
tery, receive its formal endorsement and recommendation, and 



XENIA THEOLOGICAL, SEMINARY 59 

be in attendance at one of our denominational institutions. The 
amount paid to each student shall be fixed, in its relation to the 
full appropriation granted, by the time of his actual attendance 
during the year. * * * In all ordinary cases the benefactions 
shall date from the time of application." 

DONATIONS AND BEQUESTS 

On account of the low rate of interest, a large amount of in- 
vested funds is required to meet the current expenses of the 
Seminaiy. The enlargement of our permanent Endowment Fund 
has not kept pace with the necessary growth of our work and 
the advancing prices of all commodities. It is imperative that 
Xenia's Endowment Fund be very greatly augmented. Accord- 
ingly, the Seminary is cordially commended to the liberality of 
all to whom our church and ministry are dear. Appeal is also 
made to such as are making bequests to remember this institu- 
tion. Special attention is called to. the Annuity Plan. The form 
of Annuity Bond issued by the Seminary in this connection may 
be found on page 61. 



60 XENIA THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 



FORM OF BEQUEST 



FOR PERSONAL PROPERTY 

I hereby give and bequeath to the Xenia United Presbyterian 

Theological Seminary of St. Louis, Mo., the sum of 

Dollars, or notes or bonds. 

(Here describe them.) 



FOR REAL ESTATE 

I give and devise to the Xenia United Presbyterian Theological 
Seminary of St. Louis, Mo., its successors and assigns, for- 
ever, the following described tract or lot of land, in township 

of , County of , 

State of , and bounded and described as 

follows: (Here describe the piece of land with such accuracy 
and definiteness that it may certainly be known. If such devisors 
wish to make bequests to any of the Seminary funds, — endowment, 
income, or library fund, — they should specify the particular fund 
thev have in view.) 



XENIA THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 61 

FORM OF ANNUITY BOND 

Series A. No 

THE XENIA UNITED PRESBYTERIAN 

THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

OF ST. LOUIS, MO. 

In consideration of a GIFT of Dollars. 

the receipt of which is hereby acknowledged, 

issued this 

LIFE ANNUITY BOND 

and agrees to pay to the order of 

of in the state of 

an annuity or yearly sum of dollars, 

in equal semi-annual installments, on June fifteenth and December 
fifteenth of each year during the remainder of h — ...life, and upon 
the death of said annuitant this obligation shall be void and said 
annuity shall cease. 

The heirs, executors, administrators, or assigns, of said an- 
nuitant shall be entitled to any proportionate share of said annuity 
from the last semi-annual payment to the date of said annuitant's 
death. 

In Witness WhEREoF, the said Theological Seminary ha? 
caused its corporate seal to be hereunto affixed and these presents 
to be signed by its President and Secretary this 

day of , One Thousand Nine Hundred 

and 



Secretary. President. 



CORRESPONDENCE 

For Catalogues or any other information concerning the Seminary , 
address 

President M. G. KYLE, D.D., LL.D., 

6334 Washington Avenue, St. Louis, Mo. 



/ ? z7 



ANNUAL CATALOGUE 



OF THE 



Xenia Theological 
Seminary 




Service, Pa, 
Canonsburg, Pa. 
Xenia, Ohio 
St. Louis, Mo. 



1794 
18X1 
1855 

19X0 



Calendar for 1927 


JANUARY 


FEBRUARY 


MARCH 


APRIL 


S M T W T P S 


S M T W T P S 


S M T W T P S 


S M T W T P S 














1 

8 

15 

22 

29 


6 
13 
20 
27 


7 
14 
21 
26 


1 

8 

16 

22 


2 

9 

16 

23 


3 
10 
17 
24 


4 
11 
18 
25 


5 
12 
19 
26 


' e 

13 
20 
27 


7 
14 
21 
28 


1 

8 

16 

22 

29 


2 

9 

16 

23 

30 


3 
10 
17 
24 
31 


4 
11 
18 

25 


5 
12 
19 
26 












1 

8 

15 

22 

29 


2 

9 

16 

23 

30 


2 

9 

16 

23 

30 


3 
10 
17 
24 
31 


4 

11 
18 
25 


6 
12 
19 
26 


6 
13 
20 
27 


7 
14 
21 
28 


3 

10 
17 
24 


4 
1 1 
18 
25 


5 
12 
19 
26 


6 
13 
20 
27 


7 
14 
21 
28 














MAY 


JUNE 


JULY 


AUGUST 


S M T W T P 8 


S M T W T P 8 


S M T W T P S 


S M T W T P S 


1 
8 

15 
22 
29 


2 

9 

16 

23 

30 


3 
10 
17 
24 
31 


4 
11 
18 
25 


6 
12 
19 
26 


6 
13 
20 
27 


7 
14 
21 
23 


5 
12 
19 
26 


6 
13 
20 
27 


7 
14 
21 
28 


1 
8 

15 
22 
29 


2 

9 

16 

23 

30 


3 
10 
17 
24 


4 
11 
18 
25 












1 

8 

15 

22 

29 


2 

9 

16 

23 

30 


7 
14 
21 
28 


1 
8 

15 
22 

29 


2 

9 

16 

23 

30 


3 

10 
17 
24 
31 


4 
11 
18 
25 


6 
12 
19 
26 


6 
13 
20 
27 


3 
10 
17 
24 
31 


4 
11 
18 
25 


5 
12 
19 
26 


6 
13 
20 
27 


7 
14 
21 
28 
















SEPTEMBER 


OCTOBER 


NOVEMBER 


DECEMBER 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T P S 


S M T W T P S 


S M T W T P S 










1 

8 

16 

22 

29 


2 

9 

16 

23 

30 


3 
10 
17 
24 














1 

8 

15 

22 

29 


6 
13 
20 
27 


7 
14 
21 
28 


1 

8 

15 

22 

29 


2 

9 

16 

23 

30 


3 
10 
17 
24 


4 
11 
18 
25 


6 
12 
19 
26 










1 

8 

15 

22 

29 


2 

9 

16 

23 

30 


3 
10 
17 
24 
31 


4 
11 

18 
25 


5 
12 
19 
26 


6 
13 
20 
27 


7 
14 
21 
28 


2 

9 

16 

23 

30 


3 
10 
17 
24 
31 


4 
11 
18 

25 


6 
12 
19 
26 


6 
13 
20 
27 


7 
14 
21 
28 


4 
11 
18 

25 


5 
12 
19 
26 


6 
13 
20 
27 


7 
14 
21 
28 








Calendar for 1928 


JANUARY 


FEBRUARY 


MARCH 


APRIL 


S M T W T P S 


S M T W T P S 


S M T W T P S 


S M T W T P S 


1 

8 

15 

22 

29 


2 

9 

16 

23 

30 


3 
10 
17 
24 
31 


4 
11 

18 
25 


5 
12 
19 
26 


6 
13 
20 
27 


7 
14 
21 
28 


"5 
12 
19 
26 


6 
13 
20 
27 


7 
14 
21 
28 


1 

8 

15 

22 

29 


2 

9 

16 

23 


3 
10 
17 
24 


4 
11 
18 
25 










1 

8 

15 

22 

29 


2 

9 

16 

23 

30 


3 
10 
17 
24 
31 


1 

8 

15 

22 
29 


2 

9 

16 

23 

30 


3 
10 
17 
24 


4 
11 
18 
25 


5 
12 
19 
26 


6 
13 
20 
27 


7 
14 
21 
28 


4 
11 
18 
25 


6 
12 
19 
26 


6 
13 
20 
27 


7 
14 
21 
28 




















MAY 


JUNE 


JULY 


AUGUST 


S M T W T P S 


S M T W T P S 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T P S 


6 
13 
20 
27 


7 
14 
21 
28 


1 

8 

16 

22 

29 


2 

9 

16 

23 

30 


3 
10 
17 
24 
31 


4 
11 
18 
25 


5 
12 
19 
26 












1 

8 

15 

22 

29 


2 

9 

16 

23 

30 


1 

8 

15 

22 

29 


2 

9 

16 

23 

30 


3 
10 
17 
24 
31 


4 
11 
18 
25 


6 
12 
19 
26 


6 
13 
20 
27 


7 
14 
21 
28 








1 

8 

15 

22 

29 


2 
9 

16 
23 
30 


3 
10 
17 
24 
31 


4 
11 

18 
25 


3 
10 
17 
24 


4 
11 

ie 

25 


6 
12 
19 
26 


6 
13 
20 
27 


7 
14 
21 
28 


6 
12 
19 
26 


6 
13 
20 
27 


7 
14 
21 
28 










SEPTEMBER 


OCTOBER 


NOVEMBER 


DECEMBER 


S M T W T P S 


S M T W T P S 


S M T W T P S 


S M T W T P S 














1 

8 

15 

22 

29 


" 7 
14 
21 
28 


1 
6 

15 
22 

29 


2 

9 

16 

23 
30 


3 
10 
17 
24 
31 


4 
11 
18 
25 


5 
12 
19 
26 


6 
13 
20 
27 










1 

8 

15 

22 

29 


2 

9 

16 

23 

30 


3 
10 
17 

24 














1 
8 

15 
22 
29 


2 

9 

16 

23 

30 


3 
10 
17 
24 


4 
11 
18 
25 


6 
12 
19 
26 


6 
13 
20 
27 


7 
14 
21 
28 


4 
11 
18 
25 


6 
12 
19 
26 


6 

13 
20 
27 


7 
14 
21 
28 


2 

9 

16 

23 

30 


3 
10 
17 
24 
31 


4 
11 
18 
25 


5 
12 
19 
26 


6 
13 
20 
27 


7 
14 
21 
28 











The Annual Catalogue 



OF THE 



Xenia 

United Presbyterian 

Theological Seminary 

of St. Louis, Missouri 




One Hundred and Thirty-Fourth Year 
1927-1928 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 



PACK 

Calendar, 1927 and 1928 Inside Cover 

Calendar of Special Days, 1927-28 - c 

Control of the Seminary 9 

Board of Managers H 

Board of Trustees - 12. 13 

Promotion Secretary 12 

Ladies' Visiting and Advisory Board - - 13 

Young Men's Christian Association 13 

Student Volunteer Band 13 

Alumni Association 13 

The Faculty and Its Officers i4 

Historical Roll of Professors, 1794-1927 IS 

Special Lecturers and Preachers - - 16 

Register of Students: 

Graduate School 17-20 

Divinity School 20-23 

Summary 23 

Purpose of the Seminary - 24 

The Divinity School: 

Course of Study (General Statement) 24 

Outline of Prescribed Course (Tabulated). 25 

Description of Courses of Study by Departments..- •. . 26-37 

Hebrew Exegesis and Old Testament Literature 26 

Greek Exegesis and New Testament Literature 27 

Biblical Theology and Archaeology 27 

Pastoral Theology 29 

Church History - 30 

Systematic Theology and Homiletics - 31 

Philosophy of Religion and Applied Christianity 33 

Introductory Greek 34 

Public Speaking - 34 

Schedules of Recitations, both semesters 35-36 

Administration of the Regular Course 37 

Admission and Classification of Students 38 

Attendance Requirements 39 

Examinations - 40 

Graduation Requirements - 40 

Diplomas and Degrees at Graduation 40 

Other Graduation Honors ---41 

The Graduate School: 

The Degree of Master of Theology 42 

The Degree of Doctor of Theology '. 43 

Graduate Seminars offered, 1927-1928 43 

Other Graduate Seminars, by Departments. 43-46 

American School of Oriental Research at Jerusalem 46 

Affiliation with Washington University - 49 

General Information: 

Location of the Seminary and How to Reach It... 50 

General Equipment 50 

Library Facilities.. 50 

- Reservation of Rooms 53 

Religious Life of the Seminary.. 53 

Social Life of the Seminary 54 

Physical Training and Recreation 54 

The Seminary Quartette 57 

Expenses 57 

Opportunities for Self -Help 57 

Compensated Religious Work 57 

Student Aid 58 

Donations and Bequests 59 

Forms for Bequests and Annuity Bonds 60-61 



CALENDAR OF SPECIAL DAYS 



1927 



1. The Opening of the Session. 

Wednesday, September 21st, at 1 P. M. Registration of Students. 
Address of Welcome by the President. Address by the President of 
the Board of Managers, Rev. H. H. McConnell, Th.M. 

2 Reception to Students. 

Wednesday, September 21st, following the opening exercises in the 
Chapel, the young people of the United Presbyterian Churches of the 
City will tender a Reception to the students concluding with a Dinner 
and Social Hour. 

3. The Opening Sermon. 

Thursday, September 29th, at 11 :20 A. M., in the Seminary Chapel, 
by the Rev. George A. Campbell, D.D., Pastor of the Union Ave. 
Christian Church. 

4. The Christmas Vacation. 

Friday, December 23d, at 12 M., till Wednesday, January 4th, at 
8 A. M. 

1928 

5. The Day of Prayer for Colleges and Seminaries. , 
As determined by the General Assembly. 

6. The Baccalaureate Sermon. 

Sabbath, April 29th, at 8 P. M., at the Fourth United Presbyterian 
Church, by the Rev. Professor J. H. Webster, D.D. 

7. The Annual Meeting of the Board of Trustees. 
Tuesday, May 1st, at 10 A. M. 

8. The Seminary Banquet. Alumni and Friends. 
Tuesday, May 1st, at 6:30 P. M. 

9. The Annual Meeting of the Board of Managers. 

Wednesday, May 2d, at 10 A. M. The Senior Theses will be read 
at the afternoon session. 
10. The Graduation Exercises. 

Thursday, May 3d, at 8 P. M. in the First United Presbyterian Church. 
Commencement Address, President William Lowe Bryan, D.D., LL.D. 
Promotion of Classes, Presentation of Diplomas, and Conferring of 
Honors and Degrees. 



THE CONTROL OF THE 
SEMINARY 



THE SEMINARY is under the control of 
the Second Synod, and the Synods of 
Illinois, Iowa, Kansas, Nebraska, Cali- 
fornia, and The Columbia, of the United Pres- 
byterian Church. Its immediate control is com- 
mitted to a Board of Managers, twenty-five in 
number, appointed by the Synods, and a Board 
of Trustees, twelve in number, appointed by the 
Board of Managers. The Term and the Course 
of Study are determined by the General Assemblv. 



XENIA THEOLOGICAL, SEMINARY 11 



BOARD OF MANAGERS 



Officers 

Rev. H. H. McConnell, Th.M, President : St. Louis, Mo. 

Rev. A. Campbell BailEy, Vice-President Moline, 111. 

Mr. T. Dales KylE. Financial Secretary and. Treasurer Xenia, Ohio 

Rev. W. H. Hastings, Recording Secretary St. Louis, Mo. 

Members 

THE SECOND SYNOD 

Term Expires 

REv. H. A. Thompson, Columbus, Ohio - - - 1927 

REV. E. P. Smith, Forest, Ohio, (removed from our bounds) 1927 

Rev. J. P. Nesbit, D.D., Princeton, Ind. - »~ -"• 1928 

Rev. D. L. Ferguson, Richmond, Ind. — - - - 1928 

Mr. Wm. E. McKEE, Indianapolis, Ind 1929 

SYNOD OF ILLINOIS 

Rev. A. Campbell BailEy, Moline, 111.-— - - -1927 

Mr. R. H. White, Marissa, 111 1927 

Rev. C. G. Mann, Templeton, Wis. - 1928 

Rev. H. H. McConnell, Th.M., St. Louis, Mo. - 1928 

Rev. R. C. Gibson, D.D., Chicago, 111. - - 1929 

Rev. A. A. Graham, Monmouth, 111 1929 

SYNOD OF IOWA 

W. H. Ramsey, Esq., Garner, Iowa Jan. 1, 1928 

Rev. W. C. Williamson. D.D., LL.D., Monmouth, 111 - Jan. 1, 1929 

Rev. J. B. Work, D.D., Tarkio, Mo. -Jan. 1, 1930 

Rev. J. ReadE McCrory, Washington, Iowa - Jan. 1, 1931 

SYNOD OF KANSAS 

Rev. W. R. Irvine, Richmond, Kan. — - - 1927 

Mr. W. I. Early, Kansas City, Kan. 1928 

REv. F. H. Wright, Tulsa, Okla - 1929 

SYNOD OF NEBRASKA 

Rev. N. J. Calhoun, D.D., Loveland, Colo. - 1927 

REv. J. F. Ross, D.D., Colorado Springs, Colo. - 1928 



12 XENIA THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

SYNOD OF CALIFORNIA 

REV. D. C. McCoy, Fresno, Calif. — ~ - 1926 

Rev. Johnston Calhoun, Long Beach, Calif. — - 1929 

SYNOD OF THE COLUMBIA 

Rev. M. E. Dunn, D.D., Portland, Ore.- 1926 

Rev. A. W. Wilson, Mt. Vernon, Wash. 1926 

EX-OFFICIO MEMBER 

President M. G. Kyle, D.D., LL.D. St. Louis, Mo. 

CONSULTATIVE MEMBERS OF THE BOARD OF MANAGERS 

Proeessor Jesse Johnson, D.D. Professor Robt. M. Kerr, D.D. 
Professor J. H. Webster, D.D. Professor J. L. Kelso. A.M., Th.D., D.D. 
Professor G. B. McCreary, Ph.D., D.D. 

BOARD OF TRUSTEES 

(Under the Missouri Charter) 

Officers 

Mr. ErlE Ormsby, President. 4508 McPherson Ave., St. Louis, Mo. 
Mr. T. Dales KylE, Financial Secretary and Treasurer, Xenia, Ohio. 
Rev. W. H. Hastings, Recording Sec, 3524a Wyoming St., St. Louis, Mo. 

Members 

Term Expires 

Mr. H. C. Grote. Forest Park Hotel, St. Louis, Mo 1928 

Mr. T. Dales Kyle, Xenia, Ohio - 1928 

Mr. G. R. McCullough, 6117 Westminster Place, St. Louis, Mo. ---1928 

Mr. A. O. Wilson, 14 Windermere Place, St. Louis, Mo. - 1928 

Mr. B. F. Edwards, 10 Kingsbury Place, St. Louis, Mo. 1929 

William R. Gentry, Esq., 5157 Vernon Ave., St. Louis, Mo. — 1929 

J. M. Lashi.y, Esq., 20 Windermere Place, St. Louis, Mo. 1929 

Mr. ErlE Ormsby, 4508 McPherson Ave., St. Louis, Mo 1929 

Mr. W. J. Johnston, 3610 Forest Park Blvd., St. Louis, Mo. 1930 

Mr. J. M. Murry, 1324 Laurel St., St. Louis, Mo... - 1930 

Mr. Wm. Schattgen, 2934 Allen Ave., St. Louis, Mo - 1930 

Mr. John M. Stuart, 4252a Cleveland Ave., St. Louis, Mo. 1930 

President M. G. Kyle, D.D., LL.D., St. Louis, Mo., Ex-Officio Member 

PROMOTION SECRETARY 

and 

ASSISTANT TO THE PRESIDENT IN THE SYNODS 

Rev. John A. Henderson, D.D., 6834 Washington Ave., St. Louis, Mo. 



XENIA THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 13 

BOARD OF TRUSTEES 

(Under the Ohio Charter) 

Mr. J. A. Finney, Xenia, Ohio 1928 

Mr. T. Dales Kyle, Xenia, Ohio - - 1928 

Hon. J. Care Marshall, Xenia, Ohio — 1928 

Mr. S. Walter Collins. Bloomington, Ind. 1929 

Mr. Nathan Logan, Spring Hill, Ind. 1929 

B. R. McClEllan, M.D., Xenia, Ohio - 1929 

Mr. Robert Bryson, Xenia, Ohio - 1930 

Mr. W. B. Cherry, Xenia, Ohio .-.. 1930 

Mr. J. C. Williamson, Xenia, Ohio - 1930 

President M. G. Kyle, D.D., LL.D., St. Louis, Mo., Ex-Officio Member 

LADIE'S VISITING AND ADVISORY BOARD 

Mrs. M. G. KylE, President. Mrs. J. L. Kelso. 

Mrs. J. H. Webster, lice-President. Mrs. G. B. McCrEary. 
Mrs. A. O. Wilson, Secretary. . Mrs. J. F. LeClere. 

Mrs. Jesse Johnson, Treasurer. Miss Elizabeth BrownlEE. 
Mrs. Joseph KylE. Miss Pearl Mann. 

Mrs. Robt. M. Kerr. Mrs. C. B. Reed. 

THE STUDENTS' Y. M. C. A. 

Geo. W. HuTTon, President. 

Daniel A. Moore, Vice-President. 

J. Walter Irwin. Secretary and Treasurer. 

Maurice C. Seaman, Chairman of Devotional Committee. 

Fred L. Reeves, Chairman of Missionary Committee. 

Fred J. McConnElEE, Chairman of Preaching Committee. 

Edward D. Byrd, Chairman of Social Committee. 

William M. Nichol, Chairman of Athletic Committee. 

THE STUDENT VOLUNTEER BAND 

Joseph Lemuel Wells, Secretary and Treasurer. 

THE ALUMNI ASSOCIATION 

REv. J. P. Nesbit, D.D., President .* Princeton, Ind. 

REV. R. C Gibson, D.D., rice-President Chicago, 111. 

Rev. H. A. Thompson, Secretary and Treasurer Columbus, Ohio 



14 XENIA THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 



OFFICERS OF THE FACULTY 



The Rev. Meevin Grove Kyle, A.M., D.D., LL.D., President. 
The Rev. Robert McNary Kerr, A.M., D.D., Vice-President. 
The Rev. JESSE Johnson, A.M., D.D., Registrar. 
The Rev. John Hunter Webster, A.M., D.D.,%ibrarian. 
The Rev. J. L. Keeso, A.M., Th.D., D.D., Ass't Librarian. 
The Rev. George Boone McCrEary, Ph.D., D.D., Secretary. 



THE FACULTY 

The Rev. Jesse Johnson, A.M., D.D., 
Professor of Church History. 

The Rev. John Hunter Webster, A.M., D.D., 
Professor of Greek Exegesis and Nezv Testament Literature. 

The Rev. Melvin Grove Kyle, A.M., D.D., LL D., 

Nezvburg Professor of Biblical Theology and Biblical 

Archaeology. Adjunct Professor of Practical 

Theology and Religions Education. 

The Rev. Robert McNary Kerr, A.M., D.D., 
Professor of Systematic Theology and Homiletics. 

The Rev. James Leon Kelso, A.M., Th.D., D.D., 
Professor of Hebrezu Exegesis and Old Testament Literature. 

The Rev. George Boone McCreary, Ph.D., D.D., 
Professor of the Philosophy of Religion and Applied Christianity. 

Thomas Shearer Duncan, A.M., Ph.D., 
Instructor in Public Speaking. 



XENIA THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 15 



HISTORICAL ROLL OF PROFESSORS 



During the one hundred and thirty-three years of the Seminary's 
history, under various names and in different localities, in all 
thirty-two men have served as instructors for more or less ex- 
tended periods of time. The roll of professors is as follows : 

Inaugu- Period 

Name rated at of Service 

John Anderson Service — - 1794-1819 

John Banks -- Philadelphia ----- 1820-1826 

James Ramsey - Canonsburg 1821-1842 

David Carson - Canonsburg - 1834-1834 

Thomas BevEridge — - Canonsburg 1835-1855 

Thomas BevEridge Xenia : 1855-1871 

Joseph Claybaugh - Oxford — - 1839-1855 

Samuel W. McCracken - Oxford 1839-1840 

James Martin Canonsburg 1842-1846 

Abraham Anderson Canonsburg 1847-1855 

Samuel Wilson - Xenia 1855-1875 

William Davidson - Oxford - 1855-1858 

AiExandEr Young Oxford - - -1855-1857 

Alexander Young Monmouth 1858-1874 

John Scott , Monmouth 1858-1874 

Joseph Clokey Xenia - 1858-1873 

Andrew M. Black - - -Monmouth - -1864-1874 

David A. Wallace - Monmouth -- 1867-1870 

David A. Wallace - - Xenia - 1883-1883 

William Bruce ----- Xenia 1871-1880 

James G. Carson Xenia - 1873-1888 

William G. MoorEhead .... Xenia 1873-1914 

Jackson B. McMichael - Xenia 1873-1878 

James Harper - Xenia - 1879-1899 

David MacDill Xenia 1884-1902 

WilbErt W. White Xenia - 1889-1894 

John D. Irons Xenia - 1895-1905 

Joseph Kyle Xenia 1899-1921 

Jesse Johnson Xenia 1902 

John E. Wishart Xenia - 1905-1923 

John H. Webster Xenia 1908 

Melvin G. Kyle Xenia 1914 

Robert M. Kerr ----- St. Louis 1922 

James L. Kelso St. Louis 1923 

Geo. B. McCrEary St. Louis 1924 



16 XENIA THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 



PREACHERS AND LECTURERS 

1926-1927 

The Reverend J. P. Nesbit, D.D. 

The Reverend Wm. B. Lampe, D.D. 

The Reverend F. Scott McBride, D.D. 

The Reverend Norman B. Harrison, D.D. 

The Reverend Arthur H. Armstrong, D.D. 

Proeessor John Vallance Brown, A.M. 

The Reverend E C. Nesbit, D.D. 

The Reverend Edmund S. Lorenz. 

The Reverend Proeessor Theodore Graebner, D.D. 

The Reverend James F. Le C'lErE, Th.M. 

The Reverend J. M. WyliE, D.D. 

The Reverend J. J. Ehrstein. 

Mr. Lansing F. Smith. 

The Reverend Professor Jesse Johnson, D.D. 

The Reverend Proeessor Thornton Whaling, D.D., LL.D. 

PREACHERS AND LECTURERS 

1927-1928 

The Reverend A. H. Baldinger, D.D., 
"The Holiness of God." 

The Reverend Leonard V. Buschmann, D.D., 
"Christianity and International Relationships." 

The Reverend Proeessor James L. Kelso, A.M., Th.D., D.D., 
"History, Prophecy and Geography." 

The Reverend Professor John T. Mueller, Ph.D., Th.D., 

"Mosaic Authorship of Job. with Special Emphasis on the Egyptian 
Data." 

The Reverend Professor Merle Rife, A.M., B.D., 
"The Value of the Codex Besae." 



XENIA THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 



THE REGISTER OF STUDENTS 

1926-1927 



THE GRADUATE SCHOOL 

Students who received the Degree of Doctor of Theology (Th. D.), 

May 5, 1927 

Reverend James Leon Keeso, D.D. - St. Louis, Mo. 

A.B., Monmouth College, 1916 

B.D., Xenia Theological Seminary, 1918. 

A.M., Indiana University, 1921. 

Reverend Thomas Bradley Mather Marshall, Mo. 

A.B., Central College, 1915. 

A.M., Princeton University, 1916. 

Th.M., Xenia Theological Seminary, 1921. 

Reverend John Theodore Mueller St. Louis, Mo. 

Graduate Concordia College, Ft. Wayne, Ind., 1904. 
Graduate Concordia Theological Seminary, St. Louis, Mo., 1907. 
Lit.M., People's National University, Atlanta, Ga., 1921. 
Ph.D., People's National University, Atlanta, Ga., 1922. 

Reverend Williamson Dunn Vater - - St. Louis, Mo. 

M.S., Purdue University, 1894. 
Princeton Theological Seminary, 1898. 
Th.M., Xenia Theological Seminary, 1925. 

Students who received the Degree of Master of Theology (Th. M.), 

May 5, 1927 

Reverend Carl Leo Attic Edwardsville, III. 

A.B., Cincinnati University, 1907. 
Lane Theological Seminary, 1910. 

Reverend Thomas Ross Hicks - - Webster Groves, Mo. 

A.B., Boston University, 1909. 
S.T.B., Boston University, 1911. 

Reverend John Henderson Moorehead, D.D. St. Louis, Mo. 

A.B., Monmouth College, 1892. 
Xenia Theological Seminary, 1895. 



18 XENIA THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

Reverend John Norman Morrison Alton, 111. 

A.B., Franklin College, Indiana, 1911. 
Auburn Theological Seminary, 1915. 

Reverend Arnold Smith - Union, Mo. 

A.B., Park College, 1903. 

Auburn Theological Seminary, 1906. 



Candidates for the Degree of Doctor of Theology: 
A. Students in Residents 

Reverend George Wales King, D.D St. Louis, Mo. 

Syracuse University. 

Auburn Theological Seminary, 1901. 

Th.M., Xenia Theological Seminary, 1925. 

Reverend James Frederick LeClErE St. Louis, Mo. 

A.B., Monmouth College, 1906. 
Pittsburgh Theological Seminary, 1909. 
Th.M., Xenia Theological Seminary, 1926. 

Reverend Harold Harper McConnell St. Louis, Mo. 

A.B., Monmouth College, 1916. 
Pittsburgh Theological Seminary, 1919. 
Th.M., Xenia Theological Seminary, 1926. 

B. Students doing Assigned Work Elsewhere 

Reverend William Crowe, Jr. Tuscumbia, Ala. 

A.B., Southwestern Presbyterian University, 1921. 

B.D., Union Theological Seminary, Richmond, Va., 1924 

Th.M., Xenia Theological Seminary, 1926. 

Reverend Kenneth Milton Monroe - Spokane, Wash. 

A.B., University of Southern California, 1922. 
Th.B., Xenia Theological Seminary, 1926. 
Th.M., Xenia Theological Seminary, 1926. 

Reverend Robert McIntosh Sturgeon Cranston. R. I. 

A.B., Muskingum College, 1898. 
Pittsburgh Theological Seminary, 1902. 
B.D., Xenia Theological Seminary, 1923. 



XENIA THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 19 

Candidates for the Degree of Master of Theology : 
A. Students in Residence 

Reverend Noyes Otis Bartholomew Maplewood, Mo. 

A.B., Washburn College, 1898. 
Chicago Theological Seminary, 1902. 

Reverend William Henry Hastings St. Louis, Mo. 

A.B., Monmouth College, 1916. 
Pittsburgh Theological Seminary, 1919. 

Reverend Albert Jay Levengood St. Louis, Mo. 

A.B., Mission House College, 1913. 
Mission House Seminary, 1916. 

Reverend Fred Edward John Schenck— St. Louis, Mo. 

Graduate Elmhurst College, 1913. 
Eden Theological Seminary, 1916. 

Reverend Walter Schlaretzki East St. Louis, 111. 

Graduate Concordia College, Ft. Wayne, Ind., 1911. 
Concordia and Chicago Theological Seminaries. 

B. Students Doing Assigned Work Elsewhere 

Reverend Herbert Andrew Brethauer -Buffalo, N. Y. 

Elmhurst College, 1915. 

Eden Theological Seminary, 1918. 

A.B., Washington University, 1925. 

Reverend James Robert LEE Omaha, Neb. 

A.B., Tarkio College, 1920. 

Xenia Theological Seminary, 1923. 

Reverend Elbert L. McCrEERy Fort Morgan, Colo. 

A.B., Monmouth College, 1903. 
Xenia Theological Seminary, 1906. 

Reverend William Thomas McIntyre Indiana Harbor, Ind. 

A. B., Tarkio College, 1916. 

Xenia Theological Seminary, 1919. 

Reverend Cecil Plumb Almond, N. Y. 

A.B., Middlebury College, 1919. 
Xenia Theological Seminary, 1922. 

Reverend John Bright Pollock Reinbeck, Iowa 

A.B., Washington and Jefferson College, 1890. 
Pittsburgh Theological Seminary, 1893. 

Reverend HErrick LEE Todd Oregon, 111. 

A.B., Wabash College, 1908. 
McCormick Theological Seminary, 1911. 



20 XENIA THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

Reverend Archibald Wilson Webster - Omaha, Neb. 

A.B., Princeton University, 1921. 
A.M., Washington University, 1926. 
Th.B., Xenia Theological Seminary, 1925. 

Undergraduate Students Doing Extra-Curriculum Work for the 
Degree of Master of Theology. 

Lewis Robin Brown - - Wilkinsburg, Pa. 

A.B., Muskingum College, 1925. 

William Charlton Latta.- -College Corner, Ohio 

A.B. Miami University, 1924. 

David James Lewis - -- - -Greenville, Pa. 

A.B., Muskingum College, 1924. 

Persons Attending Lectures as Auditors 

L. P. Frohardt - - - Granite City, 111. 

A.B., Missouri Wesleyan College, 1881. 
A.M., Missouri Wesleyan College, 1885. 
Graduate School Washington University. 

Irwin Raut - Granite City, 111. 

A.B., University of Missouri, 1898. 
Graduate School University of Chicago. 

Raymond Clifford Rogers Los Angeles, Calif. 

Los Angeles Bible Institute. 

Miss Anna Shaw - - - - Madison, 111. 

Southern Illinois Normal University. 

THE DIVINITY SCHOOL 

THE SENIOR CLASS, 1925-1926 

Graduated with Diploma, May 5, 1927 

Ross William CopEland Coulterville, 111. 

University of Illinois. 
Southern Illinois Presbytery. 

Victor Edward Ford Christchurch, New Zealand 

Los Angeles Bible Institute. 
Los Angeles Presbytery. 

Stanley Tamatea Nicholls - - Te Kuiti, New Zealand. 

Los Angeles Bible Institute. 

St. Louis Conference, Methodist Episcopal Church, South. 



XBNIA THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 21 

Raymond Clifford Rogers - Los Angeles, Calif. 

London University. 

Los Angeles Bible Institute. 

Los Angeles Presbytery. 

George William Sanderson ~ St. Louis, Mo. 

Westminster College, Fulton, Mo. 

St. Louis Presbytery, Presbyterian Church, U. S. A. 

Raymond Frederick SuErig - - St. Louis, Mo. 

Benton College of Law. 

Missouri Classis, Reformed Church in the U. S. 

Graduated with Degree of Bachelor of Theology, May 5, 192 7 

Clarence Alfred Campbell, Cum Laudc St. Louis, Mo. 

A.B., Washington University, 1924. 
A.M., Washington University, 1926. 
Southern Illinois Presbytery. 

Hugh Espy KelsEy, Cum Laudc New Concord, Ohio 

A.B., Muskingum College, 1923. 
Muskingum Presbytery. 

Wallace Leslie Kennedy Santa Ana, Calif. 

A.B., Wheaton College, 1924. 
Southern Illinois Presbytery. 

William Charlton Latta, Cum Laudc College Corner, Ohio 

A.B., Miami University, 1924. 
First Ohio Presbytery. 

David James Lewis Greenville, Pa. 

A.B., Muskingum College, 1924. 
Lake Presbytery. 

THE MIDDLE CLASS, 1926-1927 

Adrien Rene Aeschliman - St. Louis, Mo. 

Los Angeles Bible Institute. 
Missouri Congregational Conference. 

Lewis Robin Brown - Wilkinsburg, Pa. 

A.B., Muskingum College, 1925. 
Monongahela Presbytery. 

Edward Davenport Byrd - St. Louis, Mo. 

Moody Bible Institute. 

St. Louis Presbytery, Presbyterian Church, U. S. A. 

Leonard LE Roy Gaylord - Great Falls, Mont. 

Los Angeles Bible Institute. 

St. Louis Presbytery, Presbyterian Church, U. S. A. 



22 XENIA THEOLOGICAL, SEMINARY 

George William Hutton : Chicago, 111. 

A.B., Muskingum College, 1924. 
Chicago Presbytery. 

Frederick John McConnElEE- St. Louis, Mo. 

A.B., Sterling College, 1925. 
Arkansas Valley Presbytery. 

Robert McCunE -- - N. S. Pittsburgh, Pa. 

A.B., Muskingum College, 1925. 
Allegheny Presbytery. 

Daniel AdelbErt Moore —St. Louis, Mo. 

Moody Bible Institute. 

Presbyterian Church, U. S. A. 
Maurice Clifford Seaman ~ -De Lancey, N. Y. 

A.B., Muskingum College, 1925. 

Muskingum Presbytery. 
Joseph LEmuEe WEees - - - Fayetteville, Tenn. 

A.B., Bryson College, 1924. 

Methodist Episcopal Church, South. 

THE JUNIOR CLASS, 1926-1927 

Roy Otis Bartholomew-— - - St. Louis, Mo. 

Moody Bible Institute and Brookes Bible Institute. 

Missouri Congregational Conference. 
Charles Theodore Heusinkveed St. Louis, Mo. 

A.B., University of Illinois, 1925. 

St. Louis Presbytery, Presbyterian Church, U. S. A. 
James Walter Irwin ~ - - —Belle Center, Ohio 

A.B., Muskingum College, 1926. 

Ohio Northwestern Presbytery. 
Harold Ross Karnes - --- - - New Concord, Ohio 

A.B., Muskingum College, 1926. 

Muskingum Presbytery. 
William Montgomery Nichol, Jr. Brooklyn, N. Y. 

A.B., Muskingum College, 1926. 

Presbytery of the Hudson. 
Fred LorimEr Reeves— — Philadelphia, Pa. 

Moody Bible Institute. 

Chippewa Presbytery, Presbyterian Church, U. S. A. 

SPECIAL STUDENTS, 1926-1927 

Charles Augustus Bowler St. Louis, Mo. 

A.M., University of Chicago, 1919. 

St. Louis Presbytery, Presbyterian Church, U. S. A. 
Briggs Pierce Dingman Union, Mo. 

Dickinson College. 

Chippewa Presbytery, Presbyterian Church, U. S. A. 



XENIA THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 23 

L. P. Knox - - - — -— Elsberry, Mo. 

Due West College, S. C. 

Erskine Theological Seminary, S. C. 

Reverend Robert LiETz East Alton, 111. 

Ph.B., Shurtleff College, 1925. 

Alton Association, Baptist Church, North. 

Gerai.d Vivian HaesEy MelonE ----St. Louis, Mo. 

A.B., Muskingum College, 1920. 
United Presbyterian Church. 

SUMMARY OF STUDENTS, 1926-1927 
The Graduate School : 

Resident Students 25 

Non-resident Students - 11 36 

The Divinity Schooe : 

Seniors. - - - 11 

Middlers - - - 10 

Juniors. - 6 

Special Students - - - 5 32 



24 XENIA THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

THE PURPOSE OF THE SEMINARY 

"The object of the Seminary shall be to instruct candidates for 
the Gospel ministry, and others who may be preparing for spe- 
cial lines of Christian service, in the knowledge of the doctrine 
of the Scriptures and the order and institutes of worship taught 
therein and summarily exhibited in the Standards of the United 
Presbyterian Church of North America ; to cherish in them the 
life of true godliness, and to cultivate the gifts which Christ, the 
Head of the Church, confers on those whom He calls to the 
ministry, to the end that there may be raised up a succession of 
able, faithful, and godly ministers of the Gospel and other Chris- 
tian workers." (Constitution, Ch. I., Sec. 2.) 

THE DIVINITY SCHOOL 



THE COURSE OF STUDY 

The full course of Seminary training extends over a period 
of three years. The Seminary year begins on the first Wednesday 
after the 17th of September, and closes on the first Wednesday 
or Thursday after the first of May. Each annual session is 
divided into two semesters. 

The different departments, with their respective courses of 
study, and the amount of time required for each course, are set 
forth in the following diagram. The unit of study is the semester 
hour, which represents one recitation a week for one semester. 
One hundred and ten semester hours, including two in Public 
Speaking, are required for graduation. 



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26 XENIA THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 



DESCRIPTION OF COURSES OF STUDY 



I. HEBREW EXEGESIS AND OLD TESTAMENT LITERATURE 

PROFESSOR KELSO 

The purpose of this department is to teach the students to 
read the less difficult portions of the Hebrew Old Testament 
accurately, fluently, and with a real sense of appreciation ; and 
to handle the more difficult sections with the aid of a proper 
lexicon and an advanced grammar. Thus, at the close of the 
three year course a student is competent to be his own exegete. 

In connection with the Hebrew work, the Canon of the Old 
Testament and the introductory problem of the Old Testament 
books are considered in detail. 

1. Elements of Hebrew. A mastery of the principles of Hebrew Gram- 
mar, and the acquisition of a working vocabulary. 

Juniors, first semester, four hours a week. 

2. Hebrew Prose. Sight reading of selected passages of Genesis and 
the Minor Prophets. Analytical study of the Hebrew Text and exegesis 
of the Book of Jonah. 

Juniors, second semester, four hours a week. 

3. The Minor Prophets. Exegetical study of these books with special 
reference to their theological and social teachings. The Old Testament 
Canon. 

Middlers, first semester, three hours a week. 

4. The Psalms and the Wisdom Literature. Exegetical study of selected 
Psalms in the light of Hebrew Poetry, and as devotional literature of the 
present day. Rapid survey of the Wisdom Literature. 

Middlers, second semester, three hours a week. 

5. Isaiah. Exegetical study of the book, with special reference to con- 
temporary history and Messianic prophecy. 

Seniors, first semester, three hours a week. 

6. Jeremiah and Bsekiel. Rapid survey of Jeremiah and Ezekiel 
with special reference to sermonic material. Summary of the whole field 
of the Old Testament Prophets. 

Seniors, second semester, three hours a week. 



XBNIA THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 27 

II. GREEK EXEGESIS AND NEW TESTAMENT LITERATURE 

DR. WEBSTER 

The purpose of this department is to teach the students to 
know and use the Greek New Testament. While the value of 
exact scholarship is emphasized, the chief aim is to make the 
student an able minister of the New Testament. Instruction is 
given both by text-books and lectures, and everything is made 
subservient to learning "the mind of Christ," the vital requisite 
for a successful ministry. 

Introductory Greek is a prerequisite to the exegetical studies 
of this department. Those who have not had sufficient Greek 
in college are required to take a special course in Introduction to 
the Greek of the New Testament under Dr. McCreary. (See 
page 34.) 

1. Introduction to the Nezv Testament. This course embraces a general 
survey of the books of the New Testament. 

Juniors, first semester, three hours a week. 

2. Textual Criticism of the New Testament. 
Juniors, second semester, one hour a week. 

3. The Gospel of John. An exegetical study of the book. 
Juniors, second semester, four hours a week. 

4. Exegetical studies in the Acts. 
Middlers, first semester, three hours a week. 

5. The Pastoral Epistles. An exegetical study. 
Middlers, second semester, three hours a week. 

6. Romans. An exegetical study. 

Seniors, two hours a week throughout the year. 

7. The Life of Christ. 

Seniors, one hour a week throughout the year. 

8. Assigned Reading. In addition to the foregoing exegetical studies, 
each class will be assigned selected portions of the Greek New Testament 
for outside reading. Oral examinations from time to time. 

III. BIBLICAL THEOLOGY AND BIBLICAL ARCHAEOLOGY 

DR. KYLE 

Work in this department has a two-fold purpose, — to know the 
progress of Revelation, and to know it in its setting. So there 
are studies in the progress of Revelation to acquire a compre- 
hensive grasp of what the Bible teaches as a whole and in its 



28 XENIA THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

various parts in the order of Revelation, together with the study 
of the historical setting of Scripture made known through Arch- 
aeological Research, in order to see the truths of Revelation as 
those saw them to whom they were revealed. 

There are class-room studies and quizzes through which the 
student discovers for himself the plan and progress of Revela- 
tion : also theses by all the students, together with assigned library 
research work. The Bible is the only text-book used, the English 
Bible for constant work, and the Hebrew and Septuagint Old 
Testament and the Greek New Testament for reference. There 
are lectures in Biblical Archaeology from the monuments and 
from first-hand research, so arranged with the studies in Biblical 
Theology as to enable the student constantly to see the Biblical 
story in its original setting. To this work are added quizzes, 
much library work, and an assigned reading course throughout 
the year. Some introductory lectures will be given to the Junior 
Class meeting separately to prepare them for a proper under- 
standing of the work in the general course. 

1. The Patriarchal Period. Principal subjects: Literary methods of 
early Biblical times; primitive man and the temptation; antediluvian 
civilization and Revelation ; the deluge ; Abraham and his times ; the de- 
scent into Egypt. 

All classes, first semester, three hours a week (1929-30). 

2. The Tribal Period. From the descent into Egypt to the Conquest 
of Canaan. Principal subjects: From court to corvee; Moses; the Reve- 
lation of God through the plagues of Egypt ; the Exodus and the wilder- 
ness life ; the Revelation at Sinai ; the problem of the Pentateuch, and 
Old Testament chronology. 

All classes, first semester, three hours a week (1927-28). 

3. The National Period. From the Conquest of Canaan to the end of 
the Old Testament. Principal subjects: Times of the conquest; period 
of the Judges; David; the great period of Biblical literature; decline and 
apostasy; the great invasions; Isaiah; Daniel; the exile and reformation: 
the return and second glory of Israel ; Messianism ; prophetism, and 
inspiration. The Messianic Period : The consummation of the Messianic 
hope developed in the former periods. The Apostolic Period: The Appli- 
cation of Messianic teaching to preaching. 

All classes, first semester, three hours a week (1928-29). 



XENIA THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 29 

4. Research Methods. The class is directed in research work and in 
the preparation of theses utilizing archaeological material in Exegesis and 
for sermon illustrations. 

Middlers, first semester, one hour a week. 

5. Canons and Fallacies. A special course of studies to set forth the 
Canons and Fallacies of Archaeological Research. A thesis is required 
of each member of the class upon an assigned subject. 

Seniors, first semester, one hour a week. 

6. Public Research Lectures are given each year out of the research 
work of the Professor in charge. 



PASTORAL THEOLOGY 

DP. KYLE 
DR. KELSO 

Instruction in this subject is given by means of studies, quizzes, 
lectures, and practical exercises for each class separately, together 
with practical training for all classes in the problems of personal 
effort in soul saving. 

1. The Minister as a Student in the Seminary. Subjects: The call 
to the ministry; the minister's habits; ministerial manliness, ministerial 
ideals ; keeping one's self ; settlement, candidating, installation. 

Juniors, first semester, one hour a week. Dr. Kyle. 

2. The Minister as Pastor of the Congregation (A). Subjects: The 
pastor in the pulpit; problems of the ministerial life; social, business, and 
spiritual methods ; the pastor in relation to the Sabbath School, the Young 
People's Society, the Prayer Meeting, and prayer circles. 

Middlers, first semester, one hour a week. Dr. Kyle. 

3. The Minister as Pastor of the Congregation (/?). Subjects: Super- 
vising the Sabbath School ; moderating the Session ; directing the congre- 
gational meeting; the teachers' meeting; conduct of pulpit service and 
prayer meeting ; the administration of the sacraments ; marriages ; and 
funerals. 

Middlers, second semester, one hour a week. Dr. Kelso. 

4. The Minister in the Larger Relations to Church and Community 
Subjects: Pastoral evangelism; problems of city and country life; the 
institutional church ; pastoral visitation and counsel ; the benevolences of 
the Church ; ecclesiastical relations. 

Seniors, first semester, one hour a week. Dr. Kyle. 



30 XENIA THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

IV. CHURCH HISTORY 

DR. JOHNSON 

The aim of this department is to give a general knowledge 
of Church History, with emphasis on the most important move- 
ments and events; to arouse an interest in the history of the 
Church which will lead to further study in this profitable field; 
and to train in methods of historical study. In the study of each 
period special attention will be given to missionary development 
and expansion. The work is done by means of text-books, lec- 
tures, library readings, and students' reports on assigned topics. 

1. The Ancient Period, to 590 A. D. Principal subjects: Providential 
preparation for Christianity ; brief review of the life of Christ and the 
Apostolic Age ; spread of Christianity ; opposition ; alliance between Church 
and State ; heresies, councils, and creeds ; Christian life ; schisms ; the 
Fathers and their writings ; the theological schools. 

Juniors, first semester, two hours a week. 

2. The Medieval Period, 590-1517 A. D. Principal subjects: Missions; 
Islam ; the Papacy and the Papal Church ; the Eastern Church ; Monasti- 
cism ; the Crusades; medieval sects and persecutions; Scholasticism; the 
Mystics ; general Church conditions ; movements for reform ; precursors of 
the Reformation ; the Renaissance. 

Juniors, second semester, three hours a week. 

3. The Reformation Bra, 1517-1648 A. D. After a brief review of the 
providential preparatives for the Reformation, the principal subjects will 
be (1) the Reformation in Germany and the Lutheran Reformation in 
other lands ; (2) the Reformation in Switzerland and in other lands where 
the Reformed type of Protestantism prevailed; (3) the Counter-Reforma- 
tion; and (4) Roman Catholic Missions. The aim will be to bring the 
history of the Church in each country, as nearly as may be, down to the 
Peace of Westphalia, 1648. Here the text will be the two volume work, 
"History of the Reformation," by Lindsay. 

Middlers, first semester, three hours a week. 

4. European and American Church History, 1648-1925 A. D. 

(a) The principal subjects in European Church History will be the 
Roman Catholic Church in its relation to civil government and the national 
churches ; controversies within the Roman Catholic Church ; Rationalism 
and its effects ; Lutheranism and its controversies ; the Reformed Churches, 
with special notice of Presbyterianism ; the Anglican Church ; Deism ; the 
Methodist revival ; nineteenth century controversies. This study will be 
for the most part by countries. 



XEN1A THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 31 

(b) In American Church History a study will be made of the Old 
World Sources ; early Roman Catholic missions ; the churches in the 
colonies ; decline and revival ; the great denominations ; divisions and 
unions ; home missions. The Presbyterian family of churches will receive 
special study. 

Middlers, second semester, five hours a week. 

5. History of the United Presbyterian Church of North America. 
Beginnings in Scotland; beginnings in America; the Union of 1782; the 
Associate Presbyterian Church, 1782-1858; the Associate Reformed Church, 
1782-1858; the Union of 1858; the United Presbyterian Church, 1858-1925. 
Any member of the class who is not a United Presbyterian may substitute 
for this course a study of his own Church, reporting to the Professor and 
the class as required. 

Seniors, first semester, one hour a week. 

6. History of Doctrine, (A). A study will be made especially of the 
history of Trinitarianism and Christology. If time permits, the history of 
Anthropology will be brought down to the time of Anselm. 

Seniors, first semester, two hours a week. 

7. History of Doctrine, (B). The study of Anthropology will be con- 
tinued, and will be followed by the doctrinal history of the Atonement, 
of Justification by Faith, and of Regeneration. Attention will then be 
given to Post-Reformation theology and to modern forms of statement 
of doctrines. 

Seniors, second semester, two hours a week. 

V. SYSTEMATIC THEOLOGY AND HOMILETICS 

DR. KERR 

The purpose in the study of Systematic Theology is to lead 
the student to clear and well-balanced views of the great doc- 
trines and principles comprised in the Christian faith. The 
text-book used is the complete work on Systematic Theology 
by Dr. A. H. Strong. There is class-room discussion based on 
a careful analysis of the text, supplemented by lectures and re- 
ports on assigned reading. Two hours a week throughout the 
entire course are required. 

1. (a) Introduction to the Study of Theology : The idea and purpose 
of Theology, the sources of material and the method of treatment. 
(b) The Existence of God: Origin of the idea of God, and evidence of 
His existence, (c) The Scriptures a Divine Revelation : The witness 
of miracle and prophecy to the fact of a divine revelation. 

Juniors, first semester, two hours a week. 



32 XENIA THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

2. (a) The Doctrine of Scripture (continued) : The genuineness of 
the documents, the credibility of the writers, the supernatural character 
and inspiration of Scripture, (b) The Doctrine of God: The divine- 
attributes ; the doctrine of the Trinity. 

Juniors, second semester, two hours a week. 

3. (a) The Doctrine of God (continued) : The decrees and works of 
God: creation, preservation, providence, the angels, (b) The Doctrine of 
Man : The origin and nature of man, and the unity of the human race. 

Middlers, first semester, two hours a week. 

4. (a) The Doctrine of Man (continued) : The origin of the soul, 
the moral nature and primitive state of man. (b) The Doctrine of Sin: 
The Fall of man, the nature and universality of sin, and its consequences 
to the human race, (c) The Doctrine of Redemption: Preparation for 
redemption ; the person of Christ, His two natures and states. 

Middlers, second semester, two hours a week. 

5. (a) The Doctrine of Redemption (continued) : Offices and work 
of Christ; the Atonement, (b) The Doctrine of the Holy Spirit: The 
application of Redemption, — calling, union with Christ, regeneration, con- 
version, justification, sanctification. 

Seniors, first semester, two hours a week. 

6. (a) The Doctrine of the Church : Its constitution, organization, 
government, sacraments, and other ordinances of worship. (b) The 
Doctrine of Last Things: Death, the intermediate state, the coming of 
Christ, the resurrection, the judgment, and final awards. 

Seniors, second semester, two hours a week. 



HOMILETICS 

The study of Homiletics is designed to give the student high 
ideals of pulpit ministration, to correlate his growing knowledge 
and powers and bring them all to bear upon the effective expres- 
sion of Christian truth. 

1. The Preparation of Sermons. The permanent function and impor- 
tance of preaching; the selection and interpretation of the text; the struc- 
ture of the sermon ; the different kinds of sermons. A homily preached 
before the Faculty and student body. 

Juniors, first semester, one hour a week. 

2. The Preparation and Delivery of Sermons. The work of the first 
semester continued. Sermon materials, — explanation, argument, illustra- 
tion, and application ; qualities of style ; and modes of delivery. The 
relative advantages of the three modes of delivery are presented, — reading. 



XBNIA THEOLOGICAL, SEMINARY 33 

speaking memoriter, and speaking extemporaneously. A doctrinal or sub- 
ject sermon preached before the Faculty and student body. 
Juniors, second semester, one hour a week. 

3. Sermon Outlines (A). Students are trained in the interpretation 
and analysis of texts, and in the construction and criticism of outlines 
of the various approved types of sermons. All outlines presented in 
writing. An expository lecture preached before the Faculty and student 
body. 

Middlers, first semester, one hour a week. 

4. Sermon Outlines (B). Work of the first semester continued, with 
special emphasis on the outlining of passages of Scripture for continuous 
exposition. All outlines presented in writing. A critical discourse on n 
passage assigned in the Hebrew or the Greek shall be publicly presented. 

Middlers, second semester, one hour a week. 

5. Sermon Outlines (C). In this course the students are trained in 
the construction of plans for doctrinal and subject sermons. All work 
presented in writing. A sermon preached publicly on a text of the 
student's own selection. 

Seniors, first semester, one hour a week. 

6. Sermon Outlines (D). Written analysis of the sermons of great 
preachers, ancient and modern. A thesis on a subject assigned by the 
Faculty is due April 21st. 

Seniors, second semester, on hour a week. 

VI. PHILOSOPHY OF RELIGION AND APPLIED CHRISTIANITY 

DR. McCREARY 

1. The Psychology of Religion. After a brief but comprehensive 
survey of the field of Psychology in general, noting the leading current 
theories, particular applications are made in genetics, in the principles 
of teaching, in social expressions, and in religious experience. Several 
texts are used with lectures. 

Juniors, first semester, two hours a week. 

2. Biblical Ethics. Beginning with a philosophic introduction, both 
historical and critical, the Christian ideal of conduct is unfolded, noting 
contrasts and agreements with the more prominent systems. Particular 
attention is given to the applicatory feature, both individual and social 
bearings being considered. 

Juniors, second semester, three hours a week. 

3. Christian Sociology. After a review of general social theory as 
presented by leading authorities, the recognized problems are set forth 
with their proposed solutions. The Christian method of approaching and 



34 XENIA THEOLOGICAL, SEMINARY 

solving these problems is presented. Particular emphasis is given to the 
application of the teaching of Jesus to the social order. 
Middlers, first semester, two hours a week. 

4. Apologetics. The ground of the older arguments is covered, with 
modern restatements and additions. Christianity is shown to be logically 
defensible. 

Middlers and Seniors, second semester, two hours a week (1927-28). 

5. Comparative Religion. The great religions of the world are studied 
historically and comparatively. Their philosophic bases and ethical 
and social features are carefully inspected. Particular attention is be- 
stowed on those rival faiths with which Christianity now most strongly 
competes. 

Middlers and Seniors, second semester, two hours a week. (1928-29). 

6. The Philosophy of Religion. This course includes the usual materials 
of Theism. It also seeks to exhibit the epistemological foundations of 
faith, to state the analogical argument expositionally, to find an adequate 
ground of values, and to set forth the Christian religion as a philosophic 
system. A rationale of method is undertaken regarding religion in his- 
torical, aesthetical, and critical aspects. 

Seniors, two hours a week throughout the year. 

INTRODUCTORY GREEK 

DR. McCREARY 

This work is provided for those who have not had Greek in 
college, and is a prerequisite to the regular work in New Testa- 
ment exegesis. 

1. Introduction to New Testament Greek (A). A rapid survey of the 
outstanding features of the grammar of the Greek New Testament. 

Juniors, first semester, five hours a week. 

2. Introduction to Nezv Testament Greek (B). A careful study of the 
New Testament syntax, based on Green's "Handbook to the Grammar 
of the Greek Testament." The Gospel by John is read from the Greek. 

Juniors, second semester, three hours a week. 

3. Supplementary Reading in Greek. In addition to the foregoing 
courses v the student is required to read selected portions of the Greek New 
Testament before entering the Middle class in New Testament exegesis. 

VII. PUBLIC SPEAKING 

DR. DUNCAN 

1. The Principles and Practice of Public Speaking. 
The various types of speech are studied in detail, and students are 
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XENIA THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 37 

proper control of the voice and to the study and practice of the principles 
of gesture. Considerable attention is given to debating. Careful study 
is made, not only of delivery, but of the proper method of arranging ma- 
terial. In the study of speech care is taken to relate the work to the 
special needs of the minister. The course includes practice in the reading 
of the Scriptures with a view to making this part of the Church service 
more effective. 
Juniors, one hour a week throughout the year. 

2. Individual Training in Public Speaking. 

In addition to the regular class work, an attempt is made to give a fair 
amount of individual attention to the students. The best progress is made 
by those who combine the class work regularly with private instruction. 

Juniors by special appointment. 

ADMINISTRATION OF THE REGULAR COURSE 

Since our denominational standards specify that "in all ordi- 
nary cases a full collegiate course of study, or its equivalent, shall 
be required of those entering on the study of theology," the 
Course of Study in this Seminary is primarily designed for college 
graduates. It has been found necessary, however, to make some 
provision for those who have not had two years of Greek, and 
for part-time students. In the case of these special groups, suit- 
able arrangements have been made, as will appear in paragraphs 
A and B below. 

1. The Standard Course includes, besides the other disciplines, 
study of the Bible in the original languages throughout the three 
years. All who have the requisite preliminary training are ex- 
pected to take this course: the successful completion of it is one 
of the requirements for diploma with or without degree of Th.B. 

A. Introductory Greek. As a prerequisite to Greek Exegesis, 
the student must have a sufficient knowledge of the Greek lan- 
guage to enable him to take the Junior exegetical work in a 
manner satisfactory to the Professor in charge. Those who 
may be lacking in this regard are expected to make up the de- 
ficiency before the beginning of the Middle year. For the benefit 
of this class of students the Seminary provides a Course in Intro- 
ductory Greek. This is not, however, a credit course, and may 
not be substituted for any part of the regular course in Greek Exe- 



38 XENIA THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

gesis, — all of which must be done to the satisfaction of the Pro- 
fessor in charge and according to his appointment. 

B. Selected Studies. Students who for any reason are pre- 
vented from pursuing the full Course may, upon the special 
recommendation of their Presbytery and by action of the Faculty, 
be permitted to register for any part of the Course with which 
they may be competent to deal. Upon the satisfactory completion 
of their work, of which one semester hour shall be the minimum 
in any subject, they will receive a report of their grades and 
credits. The successful completion of fifty-six semester hours 
entitles the special student to a Certificate. 

CLASSIFICATION OF STUDENTS 

Students are classified as Regular Students and Special Students, 
according as they take the full Course or only a part of it. Regu • 
lar Students may be either Degree Students or Diploma Students, 
according as they are candidates for diplpma with degree or for 
diploma without degree. 

TERMS OF ADMISSION 

1. General Terms. The privileges of the Seminary are ex- 
tended on equal terms to students of all evangelical denominations. 
The applicant shall present — 

a. Evidence of membership in good standing in his own Church. 

b. A certificate from his own Presbytery, or other ecclesiasti- 
cal authorities, indicating that he has been taken under their care, 
and approved as a student of theology. 

c. Credentials showing his academic attainments. 

2. Academic Requirements. 

a. Degree Students. Those who desire to qualify for degree 
on graduation should, upon entrance, have the degree of Bachelor 
of Arts, or its undoubted equivalent, from a standard college or 
university. Otherwise, they must satisfy the Faculty, by creden- 
tials and examination, that they have had courses of study and 
discipline fully equivalent to a standard college course, with 
special attention to the classical languages. Degree students shall 
enroll for the Standard Course. 



XENIA THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 39 

b. Diploma Students. Students not having the full college 
preparation specified in our denominational standards may, upon 
the special recommendation of their Presbytery and by action of 
the Faculty, enter the Seminary for the regular Course. If they 
are able to take the whole Course creditably, they will receive the 
diploma of the Seminary at graduation. But they may not be 
candidates for degrees unless by additional study they satisfy all 
the requirements specified for degrees. Students of this class 
who expect to make up their deficiency in college credits and 
qualify for the degree of Th.B. at graduation must have this 
work completed by the beginning of the second semester of the 
Senior year. Diploma Students shall enroll for the Standard 
Course the first year. 

3. formal Registration. Before being admitted to the Semi- 
nary, every student shall, in the presence of the Registrar, sub- 
scribe to a written declaration to the effect that while he is a stu- 
dent in the Seminary he will regularly, punctually, and diligently 
attend upon all the instructions of the Professors, and promptly 
comply with all lawful requisitions of the Faculty, and be subject 
to their authority; that he will honestly conform to all regulations 
of the Seminary, and that he will not propagate any opinion in op- 
position to the principles of the United Presbyterian Church. 

TIME OF ENTRANCE 

The proper time to enter the Seminary is at the opening of 
the annual session in September. Those who enter at mid-year, 
except by regular transfer from some other standard theological 
seminary, may be accepted as Special Students, but will not be 
regularly classified as Juniors until the following fall. 

ATTENDANCE 

All students are required to be present in all the classes in which 
they are enrolled, at the weekly preaching service in the Chapel, 
and at the appointed examinations. Attendance is also required 
at the opening of each semester, and again at the Baccalaureate 
and Graduation services in the spring, unless excused by the 
Faculty and Board of Managers. All absences of the students, 
excused and unexcused are reported to their respective Pres- 



40 XENIA THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

byteries. Absence at any time during the Seminary session has 
an unfavorable effect on the student 's standing.. 

EXAMINATIONS 

At the close of each semester, examinations are held to test and 
organize the student's knowledge of the ground covered in the 
several departments. Ordinarily the examinations are written and 
the results are reported by the Faculty to the Board of Managers. 
From the class standing, the examinations, and the attendance, 
the grade of the student, based on a scale of 100, is determined 
and reported to his Presbytery. 

GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS 

One hundred and ten semester hours of work, including four 
in Public Speaking, are required for graduation. A semester hour 
means one recitation a week in a given subject throughout a sem- 
ester. The courses of study in the various departments are so 
arranged that all the students take nineteen hours the first sem- 
ester, and during the second semester the Juniors take nineteen 
hours, the Middlers eighteen hours, and the Seniors sixteen hours. 

DIPLOMAS AND DEGREES AT GRADUATION 

1. Diploma. The diploma of the Seminary will be granted 
to all who complete creditably the Standard Course. One year 
of their work must be done in residence at this Seminary, and 
they must maintain an average grade of at least 75 per cent, 
throughout the whole course, with no semester grade in any sub- 
ject less than 70- per cent. 

2. Diploma zvith Degree of Bachelor of Theology (Th.B.) 
The Diploma of the Seminary with the degree of Th.B. will 
be granted to those students who — 

a. Have the degree of Bachelor of Arts, or its equivalent, 
from a standard college or university; 

b. Take the Standard three-year Course of the Seminary, — 
one year of which must be in residence at this Seminary; 

c. Maintain an average grade of at least 75 per cent, through- 
out the whole Course, with no semester grade in any subject less 
than 70 per cent. 



XENIA THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 41 

Note : Graduates having diplomas without degree may become 
candidates for degrees by making up all deficiencies to the satisfaction 
of the Faculty. The degree of A. B. which is mentioned herein as a 
prerequisite to Seminary degrees must represent bona fide college work 
or its equivalent, without appropriation of any of the one hundred and 
ten credits secured in the regular Seminary Course. 

GRADUATION HONORS 

Graduation honors, not competitive, but open to all who qualify, 
whether graduated with diploma only, or with diploma and degree, 
are granted as follows : 

Cum laude, to all who are clearly distinguished during the 
whole course 1) for academic attainments, 2) for regular and 
punctual attendance, and 3) for general fitness for the Gospel 
Ministry. 

Magna cum laude, to all who possess these qualifications in an 
unusual degree. 

Summa cum laude, in very rare instances, in recognition of sur- 
passing merit. 



42 XBNIA THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 



THE GRADUATE SCHOOL 

Advanced work is provided for those who wish to pursue 
studies beyond those required for the degree of Bachelor of 
Theology. The Graduate School offers work leading to the de- 
gree of Master of Theology (Th.M.) and to the degree of Doctor 
of Theology (Th.D.) 

THE DEGREE OF MASTER OF THEOLOGY (Th.M.) 

1. Candidates for the Master's Degree. 

a. Students who hold from a standard college or university 
the degree of Bachelor of Arts or its unquestioned equivalent, 
and who have received either from this Seminary or from some 
other School of Theology of like character the degree of Th. B. 
or its equivalent (or have complied with all the requirements), 
may be candidates for the degree of Th. M. 

b. Undergraduates in this Seminary who have the degree of 
A. B. or its equivalent from a standard college or university and 
who are pursuing the Standard Course and maintain therein an 
average grade of 85 per cent, with not less than 80 per cent, in any 
subject, may be allowed to take one-third of the course leading to 
the degree of Th. M., in addition to the required work, during 
their Middle year and their Senior year. 

2. Work required for the Master's Degree. 

a. The work required for the degree of Th.M. shall be 
the equivalent of twenty-four semester hours. The student shall 
devote sixteen semester hours to one subject, which shall be 
called a major, and eight semester hours to another subject, 
which shall be called a minor ; or, if desired, two or more minor 
subjects may be chosen, with the approval of the Faculty. 

b. In connection with the major subject, a thesis of 5,000 
words shall be required. The subject of the thesis shall be as- 
signed b) r , or have the approval of, the Professor in charge of the 
department not later than December 1st of the academic year in 
which the degree is sought. A type-written copy of the thesis 
shall be in the hands of the Professor for examination not later 
than April 1st. 



XENIA THEOLOGICAL, SEMINARY 43 

c. At the conclusion of the assigned work, the student shall 
pass a thorough examination in both major and minor subjects. 

3. Personal presence. In all ordinary cases the candidate for 
a degree must be present when the degree is conferred. ■ 

4. Fee. A fee of ten dollars will be charged to cover the ex- 
pense of graduation. 

THE DEGREE OF DOCTOR OF THEOLOGY (Th.D.) 

This degree is granted only after a very extended Course which 
is open only to those who have already the degree of Master of 
Theology, or its unquestionable equivalent, and who present also 
additional entrance requirements. Particulars will be furnished 
on application, the applicant specifying the department in which 
the major study is desired. In all cases two full years of in- 
tensive work in residence will be required, or three years, with 
the last semester of four months in residence. 

GRADUATE SEMINARS OFFERED FOR 1927-1928 

For the benefit of graduate Students in residence, regular 
seminars are provided in addition to the other assigned work. 
The following seminars are offered the coming year (1927-1928) : 

First Semester 

Tues., 1 :30 P. M. — Formation of Protestant Creeds, One- 
half Semester Dr. Johnson 

Tues., 1 :30 P. M. — E-vegetical Study of Epistle to Hebrews, 

One-half Semester Dr. WebstKr 

Tues., 2:20 P. M— The problem of the Pentateuch Dr. KvlK 

Second Semester 

Tues., 1 :30 P. M.— Philosophy of Religion Dr. McCrKarv 

Tues., 2:20 P. M— The Prophecy of Amos Dr. Kelso 

OTHER GRADUATE SEMINARS 

Other seminars in the Graduate School will be scheduled in due 
time by the different Professors in their various departments, 
such as the following : 



44 XENIA THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

I. HEBREW EXEGESIS AND OLD TESTAMENT LITERATURE 

PROFESSOR KELSO 

1. Biblical Aramaic. A study of the elements of the language, and 
the reading of the Aramaic sections of the Old Testament. 

Minor, eight semester hours. 

2. The Septuagint. The reading of selected portions of the Old 
Testament in Greek, comparing with the Hebrew and with other versions. 
A study of the origin and the problems of the Septuagint, on the basis 
of Swete's "Introduction to the Old Testament in Greek." 

Major, sixteen semester hours. 

3. Hebreiv Vocabularies. A seminar in the synonyms and antonyms 
of the Hebrew Old Testament. 

Minor, eight semester hours. 

4. Historical Geography of the Old Testament. 
Minor, eight semester hours. 

II. GREEK EXEGESIS AND NEW TESTAMENT LITERATURE 

DR. WEBSTER 

1. The Synoptic Problem. 
Minor, eight semester hours. 

2. The Epistle to the Hebrews. 
Minor, eight semester hours. 

3. The Christology of the Pauline Epistles. 
Major, sixteen semester hours. 

4. The Johannine Writings. 
Major, sixteen semester hours. 

III. BIBLICAL THEOLOGY AND ARCHAEOLOGY 

DR. KYLE 

1. Study of Methods in Biblical Theology. The aim here is to lead 
the student to discover the Biblical teachings through an application of 
the inductive method. 

Major, sixteen semester hours. Minor, eight semester hours. 

2. Prophetism and Prophecy. 

A study of the meaning and scope of prophecy. 

Major, sixteen semester hours. Minor, eight semester hours. 

3. Book Study. The aim is to lead the student to ascertain the setting 
and the doctrinal content of the book, and how to utilize the findings. 

Major, sixteen semester hours. Minor, eight semester hours. 

4. Archaeology of the Bible, especially the use of Archaeological ma- 
terial for homiletical purposes. 

Major, sixteen semester hours. Minor, eight semester hours. 

5. Methods of Archaeological Research, and Canons and Fallacies. 
Major, sixteen semester hours. By residence only. 



XENIA THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 45 

6. Archaeology and Criticism. An introduction to the use of Archae- 
ological material in Biblical criticism. 

Major, sixteen semester hours. Minor, eight semester hours. 

PASTORAL THEOLOGY 

DR. KYLE 

1. The Scriptural Basis of Pastoral Evangelism. 
Minor, two semester hours. 

2. Psychological Problems in Pastoral Evangelism. 
Minor, six semester hours. 

3. Sociological Problems in Pastoral Evangelism. 
Minor, four semester hours. 

4. Methods in Pastoral Evangelism. 

Minor, two semester hours. By residence only. 

IV. CHURCH HISTORY 

DR. JOHNSON 

1. The Lives and Writings of the Early Church Fathers. 

Open to those who have studied General Church History to 590 A. D. 
Minor, eight semester hours. 

2. Early Doctrinal Discussions. Open to those who have studied Gen- 
eral Church History to 1483 A. D. 

Major, sixteen semester hours. 

3. The Era of the Reformation. Open to those who have studied 
General Church History to 1483 A. D., and who have a knowledge of the 
Protestant Reformation in outline. 

Major, sixteen semester hours. 

4. Origin and History of the United Presbyterian Church of North 
America. A prerequisite to this is a fair knowledge of the Reformation in 
Scotland. 

Minor, eight semester hours. 

V. SYSTEMATIC THEOLOGY 

DR. KERR 

1. Doctrinal Studies in the Teaching of Jesus. 
Minor, eight semester hours. 

2. The Inspiration of the Scriptures. 
Major, sixteen semester hours. 

3. The Person of Christ. 
Major, sixteen semester hours. 

4. The Doctrine of Sin. 
Minor, eight semester hours. 

5. The Atonement. 

Major, sixteen semester hours. 

6. The Second Advent. 
Minor, eight semester hours. 



46 XENIA THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

VI. PHILOSOPHY OF RELIGION AND APPLIED CHRISTIANITY 

DR. McCREARY 

1. The Philosophy of Religion. A critical review of the foundation 
concepts of religion. Interpretations of knowledge, reality, personality, 
deity, and similar subjects in their bearing upon Christian faith. 

Minor, eight semester hours. 

2. Apologetics. An evaluation of the apologetic element in present-day 
Theology and in current literature. 

Minor, four semester hours. 

3. Psychology of Religion. The newer phases of Psychology investi- 
gated and their significance for religion weighed. 

Minor, four semester hours. 

4. Religious Education. Curricular and methodological problems. The 
general theory of teaching applied. 

Minor, four semester hours. 

5. Christian Sociology. A seminar in concrete contemporary problems. 
Minor, four semester hours. 

THE AMERICAN SCHOOL OF ORIENTAL RESEARCH AT 
JERUSALEM 

Xenia Seminary is one of the group of Universities, Colleges, 
and Theological Seminaries in this country co-operating in the 
support and control of the American School of Oriental Research 
in Jerusalem, and is thus able to offer to her students the unique 
facilities possessed by this School. No other Post-graduate work 
is more profitable and attractive to young men looking forward to 
the work of the Ministry than study and research in Bible lands. 
The American School of Oriental Research at Jerusalem was 
founded to afford such opportunities as have never before been 
open to American students. Special arrangements are made to 
reduce the expenses of such students to the lowest point. 

Educational Opportunities Afforded 

The School offers to properly qualified students excellent oppor- 
tunities for pursuing such studies as the following: Biblical and 
Palestinian Archaeology ; the Geography and Natural features 
of the Land ; the History of Israel ; Early Church History and 
Patristics ; the Arabic Language, and the other Semitic Lan- 
guages connected with it ; Mohammedanism ; the Political, Social, 
and Industrial Conditions in Bible Lands ; Roman Administration 
and Colonization in the East; ihe Crusades; and the Comparative 
History of Religions. 



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MAIN ENTRANCE TO WASHINGTON UNIVERSITY 



XENIA THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 49 

The School has a well selected working library, which is stead- 
ily growing. There are other considerable libraries in Jerusalem, 
some of which contain large collections of manuscripts, chiefly 
Greek and Arabic. As a central point for the study of Palestin- 
ian antiquities, for making tours of research and exploration, and 
for visiting the numerous scenes of past or present excavations, 
Jerusalem is peculiarly well situated. 

Those who avail themselves of the privileges of this School 
can go at once after the Commencement at St. Louis, and enter 
the School at Jerusalem. The altitude and the latitude of Jeru- 
salem make the summer climate there quite satisfactory. The 
remainder of the year will afford abundant opportunity for travel 
through the land and researches in Historical Geography and 
Archaeology. 

The Thayer Memorial Fellowship 

The Thayer Memorial Fellowship of the School at Jerusalem, 
with a stipend of $800, is awarded annually on examination. A 
list of the books recommended to candidates for the Fellowship, 
and special facilities for preparation, will be supplied by the 
Seminary. 

AFFILIATION WITH WASHINGTON UNIVERSITY 

One of the chief considerations which induced the Commission 
of the Board of Managers, charged with the relocation of Xenia 
Theological Seminary, to fix upon the City of St. Louis, was 
the extremely favorable university connection that was offered. 
Washington University is an old and honored foundation, with 
magnificent buildings, and is regarded as the greatest graduate 
school of the whole Southwest. Xenia's new location is within 
a few minutes' walk of its grounds. Through the courtesy of the 
Chancellor and the other authorities, a full exchange of credits 
has been granted, without any control of our teachings or policies. 
So short is the distance, that those who desire to complete their 
academic course or to work for an advanced degree, can do so 
without inconvenience or loss of time. The advantages of this 
affiliation are manifest. 



50 XENIA THEOLOGICAL, SEMINARY 



GENERAL INFORMATION 



LOCATION OF THE SEMINARY 

The Seminary is located at the corner of Washington and 
Trinity Avenues in University City, a beautiful suburb of St. 
Louis. The slight elevation above the City and the distance from 
river and factory deliver us from most of the fog and smoke 
of the St. Louis region. 

HOW TO REACH THE SEMINARY 

From the Union Station take any northbound car and ride three 
blocks to Eighteenth and Olive Streets. Transfer to a Delmar- 
Olive car westbound and ride to the end of the line. A short- 
walk of one block south and one block west brings you to the 
Seminary Building. All students are required to be present at 
the opening session. 

GENERAL EQUIPMENT 

There are two buildings, joined on the fourth floor and on the 
ground floor. The Administration Building contains the Presi- 
dent's office, most of the class rooms and the Professors' studies, 
the Library, and the Chapel. In the Dormitory are rooms for 
the students and quarters for the Matron and for the Janitor. 
An attractive Reception Hall leads into the Dining Room on the 
one hand and into the Parlor on the other. Both Dining Room 
and Parlor are large and well furnished, and open for use. We 
have steam heat, electric lights, good water, a bath room on each 
dormitory floor, and a Seminary Laundry in the basement. 

THE LIBRARY 

The Seminary Library contains about 17,000 bound volumes, 
among which are many rare old books. About 2,000 of these have 
been acquired during the past year. Under the direction of 
the Librarian of the Faculty, the students use these books for 
the investigation of assigned subjects. Students also have access 
to the Library of the Washington University of 240,000 bound 



XENIA THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 53 

volumes, and to the St. Louis Public Library of 650,000 bound 
volumes. 

About fifty (50) current American religious magazines and 
journals come regularly to the Seminary; also, twelve (12) lead- 
ing foreign religious journals, representing England, France, 
Germany, Italy, Belgium, Sweden. This extensive and varied 
current literature is available to the students. 

Through the generosity of the late Mr. Alexander Dempster, 
of Pittsburgh, Pa., the Seminary has been provided with the raised 
map of Palestine published by the Palestine Exploration Fund, 
London, England, from surveys by George Armstrong. Mounted 
in normal position on a substantial table, this map is of special 
value in the study of Sacred Geography and History. 

RESERVATION OF ROOMS 

Students who have been here for one or two years may reserve 
rooms at the end of the Seminary session by consulting the 
Matron. The two-year men have first choice of rooms, the one- 
year men have second choice, the alphabetical order being ob- 
served within each group. New students are assigned to their 
rooms in the fall, and have right of choice in the order of their 
written application. 

We are not prepared to accommodate married students and 
their wives in the Dormitory, but will assist them in finding 
proper accommodations. 

USE OF ROOMS DURING THE SUMMER 

Students may have free use of their rooms for two weeks before 
the opening in September and for two weeks after Commence- 
ment in May. Otherwise, those who desire to use their rooms 
during the summer vacation must secure permission from the 
Vice-President, and pay a nominal charge of $10.00 a month to 
cover expenses. When two students occupy the same room, a joint 
monthly charge of $15.00 shall be made. These rates apply only 
to students. Any others desiring to use the Dormitory facilities 
must make special arrangements with the Vice-President. 

THE RELIGIOUS LIFE OF THE SEMINARY 

The religious life of the Seminary is on a high plane. Xenia 
students are trained in the cultivation of personal religion, and 



54 XENIA THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

provision is made for the development and expression of religion 
in its social aspects. A chapel service forms part of the daily 
schedule. The young men are organized as a local branch of 
the Student Y. M. C. A. This organization conducts its own 
devotional service one evening during the week, and provides the 
leader for the Seminary prayer meeting, in Chapel, Tuesday 
morning. The Student Volunteers meet weekly for prayer and 
conference, and in other ways promote the missionary spirit of 
the Seminary. 

THE SOCIAL LIFE OF THE SEMINARY 

A spirit of good cheer and mutual helpfulness pervades the 
institution. The atmosphere is decidedly home-like. Castes and 
cliques are taboo, and all are united in a wholesome Christian 
fellowship. The members of the Faculty are the students' best 
friends, and every student is a brother to every other student. 
Without excessive diversion from study, there are seasonable 
socials and entertainments at the Seminary, and the students also 
have an appropriate share in the social life of the Churches of 
the City. Every season brings forward high-class lectures and 
concerts in the City which further enlarge the students' oppor- 
tunity for social and aesthetic culture. 

PHYSICAL TRAINING 

The physical man is not forgotten. "Mens sana in corpore 
sano" is a principle from which Christian students do not seek 
exemption. Wholesome food, pure air and water, abundant op- 
portunities for exercise, — all the requisites to good health are 
provided. On the Seminary property, next to the Dormitory, is 
a splendid tennis court and a ball field, where the young men, 
thanks to a favoring climate, can secure outdoor exercise the 
greater part of the year. Moreover, the commodious gymnasium 
of the First United Presbyterian Church, in the same block with 
the Seminary, is open to the students for basket ball and other 
indoor games at certain times during the week. These opportuni- 
ties, which are by no means neglected, in some measure account 
for the excellent health enjoyed by the students at Xenia. 



XENIA THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 57 

THE SEMINARY QUARTETTE 

The Xenia Quartette is one of the very attractive features of 
Seminary life, the most popular symbol of the culture and har- 
mony for which Xenia stands. Notwithstanding occasional inter- 
ruptions due to the graduation of students, the Quartette has had 
an almost continuous existence for a number of years past. Its 
services, both in this community and in the more remote parts of 
the Church, have been of a high order and have evoked the 
warmest expressions of appreciation. The outlook for the coming 
year is very good. 

EXPENSES 

The necessary expenses of a course of theological training are 
reduced to a minimum. The building is thoroughly equipped, and 
there are no fees or rentals for privileges and accommodations. 
The Seminary furnishes bedding, but each student is urged to 
bring with him towels; also a traveling rug or blanket, for which, 
in occasional extreme weather, he may have use. The Seminary 
Dining Room is economically managed by the Student Club, the 
cost of maintenance amounting to about $27 a month to each 
member. Students living in the Dormitory free of rent are ex- 
pected to take all regular meals in the Seminary Dining Room. 
The Seminary Laundry and the Seminary Book Store enable the 
students to effect a still further saving. 

OPPORTUNITIES FOR WORK 

The Seminary has received a most cordial welcome in the City 
of St. Louis. This great center of population offers an excellent 
field for Christian effort and sociological study. It also affords 
numerous opportunities of employment to those who must make 
their own way. The Churches are enthusiastic in pledging co- 
operation and support. Such support was, of course, to be ex- 
pected from the United Presbyterian congregations, and it is 
being given in full measure. But other denominations also, espe- 
cially the Presbyterian, U. S., the Presbyterian, U. S. A., the 
Congregationalist and the Methodist, have shown a most friendly 
attitude from the outset. Some of them employ students of the 
Seminary in congregational work. All the students have some 
experience in preaching in the City Missions. 



58 XENIA THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

COMPENSATED RELIGIOUS WORK 

Members of the Junior Class will receive the sum of fifty dol- 
lars each for the year, on condition of their engaging in religious 
work, not otherwise fully compensated, in the churches of this 
community, or in adjacent fields. As the students advance into 
the Middle and Senior Classes, they have increasing opportunities 
of preaching, for which they receive an appropriate compensation. 

STUDENT LOANS 

From the income of our Students' Fund, we are prepared to 
loan to those who may desire it, the sum of fifty dollars a year, 
or more in case of real need, on their personal notes, without 
interest for five years from date of loan ; at the expiration of 
this period, interest at the rate of six per cent, per annum will be 
charged until payment is made. 

AID FROM THE BOARD OF EDUCATION 

The Board of Education is authorized by the General Assembly 
to make special grants in aid to United Presbyterian students of 
theology upon the recommendation of their Presbytery. The 
annual payments are as follows : 

"To first year students not to exceed $180.00; to second year 
students not to exceed $120.00; and to third year students not 
to exceed $60.00. * * * 

"No money shall be paid to students of the first year who 
during the sessions of the Seminary receive compensation for 
preaching on the Sabbath, nor to students of the second year who 
preach for compensation more than an average of two Sabbaths 
a month during the Seminary session. And no money shall be 
paid to any student who holds a pastoral charge or engages in 
special religious work such as will interfere with his duties in 
the Seminary. * * * Ordinarily no grant will be made to a 
student who marries immediately prior to entering upon or while 
pursuing his Seminary course. * * * Absolute abstinence 
from the use of tobacco is made an essential requirement for 
receiving aid from the Beneficiary Fund." 

"Students receiving aid must be under the care of the Presby- 
tery, receive its formal endorsement and recommendation, and 
be in attendance at one of our denominational institutions. The 



XENIA THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 59 

amount paid to each student shall be fixed, in its relation to the 
full appropriation granted, by the time of his actual attendance 
during the year. * * * In all ordinary cases the benefactions 
shall date from the time of application." 

DONATIONS AND BEQUESTS 

On account of the low rate of interest, a large amount of in- 
vested funds is required to meet the current expenses of the 
Seminary. The enlargement of our permanent Endowment Fund 
has not kept pace with the necessary growth of our work and 
the advancing prices of all commodities. It is imperative that 
Xenia's Endowment Fund be very greatly augmented. Accord- 
ingly, the Seminary is cordially commended to the liberality of 
all to whom our church and ministry are dear. Appeal is also 
made to such as are making bequests to remember this institu- 
tion. Special attention is called to the Annuity Plan. The form 
of Annuity Bond issued by the Seminary in this connection may 
be found on page 61. 



60 XENIA THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 



FORM OF BEQUEST 



FOR PERSONAL PROPERTY 

I hereby give and bequeath to the Xenia United Presbyterian 

Theological Seminary of St. Louis, Mo., the sum of •.. 

Dollars, or notes or bonds. 

(Here describe them.) 



FOR REAL ESTATE 

I give and devise to the Xenia United Presbyterian Theological 
Seminary of St. Louis, Mo., its successors and assigns, for- 
ever, the following described tract or lot of land, in township 

of , County of , 

State of , and bounded and described as 

follows: (Here describe the piece of land with such accuracy 
and definiteness that it may certainly be known. If such devisors 
wish to make bequests to any of the Seminary funds, — endowment, 
income, or library fund, — they should specify the particular fund 
they have in view.) 



XENIA THEOLOGICAL, SEMINARY 61 

FORM OF ANNUITY BOND 

Series A. No 



THE XENIA UNITED PRESBYTERIAN 

THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

OF ST. LOUIS, MO. 

In consideration of a GIFT of Dollars. 

the receipt of which is hereby acknowledged, 

issued this 

LIFE ANNUITY BOND 
and agrees to pay to the order of 



of in the state of. 



an annuity or yearly sum of dollars, 

in equal semi-annual installments, on June fifteenth and December 
fifteenth of each year during the remainder of h — ...life, and upon 
the death of said annuitant this obligation shall be void and said 
annuity shall cease. 

The heirs, executors, administrators, or assigns, of said an- 
nuitant shall be entitled to any proportionate share of said annuity 
from the last semi-annual payment to the date of said annuitant's 
death. 

In Witness Whereof, the said Theological Seminary has 
caused its corporate seal to be hereunto affixed and these presents 
to be signed by its President and Secretary this 

day of , One Thousand Nine Hundred 

and 



Secretary. President. 



CORRESPONDENCE 

For Catalogues or any other information concerning the Seminary , 
address 

President M. G. KYLE, D.D., LL.D., 

6834 Washington Avenue, St. Louis, Mo. 



ANNUAL CATALOGUE 



OF THE 



Xenia Theological 
Seminary 



1928- 



§$$$&* 



Service, Pa. 1794 

Canonsburg, Pa. 1821 

Xenia, Ohio 1855 

St. Louis, Mo. 1920 



Calendar for 1928 


JANUARY 


FEBRUARY 


MARCH 


APRIL 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


1 
8 


2 
9 


3 
10 


4 
11 


5 
12 


6 
13 


7 
14 


' 5 


6 


7 


1 
8 


2 
9 


3 
10 


4 
1 1 










1 
8 


2 
9 


3 
10 


1 

8 


2 
9 


3 
10 


4 
11 


5 
12 


6 
13 


7 
14 


4 


5 


6 


7 


15 


16 


17 


18 


19 


20 


21 


12 


13 


14 


15 


16 


17 


18 


11 


12 


13 


14 


15 


16 


17 


15 


16 


17 


18 


19 


20 


21 


22 


23 


24 


25 


26 


27 


28 


19 


20 


21 


22 


23 


24 


25 


18 


19 


20 


21 


22 


23 


24 


22 


23 


24 


25 


26 


27 


28 


29 


30 


31 










26 


27 


28 


29 








25 


26 


27 


28 


29 


30 


31 


29 


30 






























MAY 


JUNE 


JULY 


AUGUST 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


6 


7 


1 
8 


2 
9 


3 
10 


4 
11 


5 
12 












1 
B 


2 
9 


1 
8 


2 
9 


3 
10 


4 
11 


5 
12 


6 

13 


7 
14 








1 
8 


2 
9 


3 
10 


4 
11 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 


5 


6 


7 


13 


14 


15 


16 


17 


18 


19 


10 


11 


1? 


13 


14 


15 


1R 


15 


16 


17 


18 


19 


20 


21 


12 


13 


14 


15 


16 


17 


18 


20 


21 


22 


23 


24 


25 


26 


17 


1B 


19 


20 


21 


22 


23 


22 


23 


24 


25 


26 


27 


28 


19 


20 


21 


22 


23 


24 


25 


27 


28 


29 


30 


31 






24 


25 


26 


27 


28 


29 


30 


29 


30 


31 










26 


27 


28 


29 


30 


31 












SEPTEMBER 


OCTOBER 


NOVEMBER 


DECEMBER 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 














1 
8 


7 


1 
8 


2 
9 


3 
10 


4 
11 


5 
12 


6 
13 










1 
8 


2 
9 


3 
10 














1 

8 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 


4 


5 


6 


7 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 


9 


10 


11 


12 


13 


14 


15 


14 


15 


16 


17 


18 


19 


20 


11 


12 


13 


14 


15 


16 


17 


9 


10 


11 


12 


13 


14 


15 


16 


17 


18 


19 


20 


21 


22 


21 


22 


23 


24 


25 


26 


27 


18 


19 


20 


21 


22 


23 


24 


16 


17 


18 


19 


20 


21 


22 


23 


24 


25 


26 


27 


28 


29 


28 


29 


30 


31 


., 






25 


26 


27 


28 


29 


30 




23 


24 


25 


26 


27 


28 


29 


30 










































30 


31 












Calendar for 1929 


JANUARY 


FEBRUARY 


MARCH 


APRIL 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


' 6 


7 


1 
8 


2 
9 


3 
10 


4 
1 1 


5 
12 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 


1 
8 


2 
9 










7 


1 
8 


2 
9 


7 


1 
8 


2 
9 


3 
10 


4 
1 1 


5 
12 


6 
13 


3 


4 


5 


6 


13 


14 


15 


16 


17 


18 


19 


10 


1 1 


12 


13 


14 


15 


16 


10 


1 1 


12 


13 


14 


15 


16 


14 


15 


16 


17 


18 


19 


20 


20 


21 


22 


23 


24 


25 


26 


17 


18 


19 


20 


21 


22 


23 


17 


18 


19 


20 


21 


22 


23 


21 


22 


23 


24 


25 


26 


27 


27 


28 


29 


30 


31 






24 


25 


26 


27 


28 






24 
31 


25 


26 


27 


28 


29 


30 


28 


29 


30 






. 




MAY 


JUNE 


JULY 


AUGUST 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


8 M T W T F 8 








1 
8 


2 
9 


3 
10 


4 
1 1 












1 
8 


7 


1 
8 


2 
9 


3 
10 


4 

1 1 


5 
12 


6 
13 








1 
8 


2 
9 


3 
10 


5 


6 


7 


2 


... ... 

3 


4 


5 


6 


7 


4 


5 6 


7 


12 


13 


14 


15 


16 


17 


18 


9 


10 


1 1 


12 


13 


14 


15 


14 


15 


16 


17 


18 


19 


20 


1 1 


12l 13 


14 


15 


16 


17 


19 


20 


21 


22 


23 


24 


25 


16 


17 


18 


19 


20 


21 


22 


21 


22 


23 


24 


25 


26 


27 


18 


19120 


21 


22 


23 


24 


26 


27 


28 


29 


30 


31 




23 
30 


24 


25 


26 


27 


28 


29 


28 


29 


30 


31 








25 


26 27 


28 


29 


30 


31 


SEPTEMBER 


OCTOBER 


NOVEMBER 


S 


DECEMBER 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F 


S M T W T F S 


1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 






1 


2 


3 


4 


5 












1 


P 


1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 


8 


9 


10 


1 1 


12 


13 


14 


6 


7 


8 


9 


10 


1 1 


12 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 


a 


9 


8 


9 


10 


1 1 


12 


13 


14 


15 


16 


17 


18 


19 


20 


21 


13 


14 


15 


16 


17 


18 


19 


10 


1 1 


12 


13 


14 


15 


16 


15 


16 


17 


18 


19 


20 


21 


22 


23 


24 


25 


26 


27 


28 


20 


21 


22 


23 


24 


25 


26 


17 


18 


19 


20 


21 


22 


23 


22 


23 


24 


25 


26 


27 


28 


29 


30 












27 


28 


29 


30 


31 






24 


25 


26 


07 


28 


29 


30 


29 


30 


31 

































The Annual Catalogue 



OF THE 



Xenia 

United Presbyterian 

Theological Seminary 

of St. Louis, Missouri 




One Hundred and Thirty-Fifth Year 
1928-1929 



CALENDAR OF SPECIAL DAYS 



1928 



1. The Opening of the Session. 

Wednesday, September 19th, at 1 P. M. Registration of Students. 
Address of Welcome by the President. Address by the President of 
the Board of Managers, Rev. J. F. Ross, D.D. 

2. Reception of Students. 

Wednesday, September 19th, following the opening exercises in the 
Chapel, the young people of the United Presbyterian Churches of the 
City will tender a Reception to the students concluding with a Dinner 
and Social Hour. 

3. The Opening Sermon. 

Thursday, September 27th, at 11:20 A. M., in the Seminary Chapel, 
by the President, M. G. Kyle, D.D., LL.D. 

4. The Christmas Vacation. 

Friday, December 21st, at 12 M., till Wednesday, January 2nd, at 
8 A. M. 

1929 

5. The Day of Prayer for Colleges and Seminaries. 
Wednesday, February 20th. 

6. The Baccalaureate Sermon. 

Sabbath, April 28th, at 8 P. M., at the Second United Presbyterian 
Church, by the Rev. Professor J. H. Webster, D.D. 

7. The Annual Meeting of the Board of Trustees. 
Tuesday, April 30th, at 10 A. M. 

8. The Seminary Banquet, Alumni and Friends. 
Tuesday, April 30th. at 6:30 P. M. 

9. The Annual Meeting of the Board of Managers. 

Wednesday, May 1st, at 10 A. M. The Senior Theses will be read 
at the afternoon session. 
10. The Graduation Exercises. 

Thursday, May 2d, at 8 P. M. in the First United Presbyterian Church. 
Commencement Address, Rev. Arthur H. Armstrong, D.D. Promo- 
tion of Classes, Presentation of Diplomas, and Conferring of Honors 
and Degrees. 



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THE CONTROL OF THE 
SEMINARY 



THE SEMINARY is under the control of 
the Second Synod, and the Synods of 
Illinois, Iowa, Kansas, Nebraska, Cali- 
fornia, and The Columbia, of the United Pres- 
byterian Church. Its immediate control is com- 
mitted to a Board of Managers, twenty-five in 
number, appointed by the Synods, and a Board 
of Trustees, twelve in number, appointed by the 
Board of Managers. The Term and the Course 
of Study are determined by the General Assemblv. 



XENIA THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 11 



BOARD OF MANAGERS 



Officers 

Rev. J. F. Ross, D.D., President Colorado Springs, Colo. 

Rev. Wm. Murchie, Vice-President - Wichita, Kans. 

Mr. T. Dales Kyle, Financial Secretary and Treasurer Xenia, Ohio 

Rev. W. H. Hastings, Recording Secretary St. Louis, Mo. 

Members 

THE SECOND SYNOD 

Term Expires 

Rev. J. P. Nesbit, D.D., Princeton, Ind - 1928 

Rev. D. L. Ferguson, B.D., Richmond, Ind 1928 

Mr. Wm. E. McKEE, Indianapolis, Ind - 1929 

Rev. R. A. JamiEson, Cedarville, Ohio 1930 

REv. Frank Boyd, D.D., College Corner, Ohio 1930 

SYNOD OF ILLINOIS 

REv. C. G. Mann, Sussex, Wis 1928 

Rev. H. H. McConnell, Th.M., St. Louis, Mo 1928 

*Rev. R. C. Gibson, D.D., Chicago, 111. 1929 

Rev. A. A. Graham. D.D., Monmouth, 111 1929 

Rev. A. Campbell BailEy, Moline, 111 1930 

Mr. R. H. White, Marissa, 111. 1930 

SYNOD OF IOWA 

Rev. W. C Williamson, D.D., LL.D., Monmouth, 111. Jan. 1, 1929 

REv. J. B. Work, D.D., Tarkio, Mo. Jan. 1, 1930 

REV. R. E. Lackey, Carlisle, Iowa Jan. 1, 1931 

W. H. Ramsey, Esq., Garner, Iowa Jan. 1, 1932 

SYNOD OF KANSAS 

Mr. W. I. Early, Kansas City, Kan.... .■ 1928 

Rev. F. H. Wright, Tulsa, Okla. 1929 

Rev. Wm. Murchie, Wichita, Kan. 1930 

SYNOD OF NEBRASKA 

Rev. J. F. Ross, D.D., Colorado Springs, Colo - 1928 

Rev. J. Clyde Mahaeey, Loveland, Colo - 1929 

*Resigned. 



12 XBNIA THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

SYNOD OF CALIFORNIA 

Rev. J. M. Ross, D.D., Fowler, Calif. 1928 

Rev. J. A. GlassE, San Jose, Calif 1928 

SYNOD OF THE COLUMBIA 

Rev. M. E. Dunn, D.D., Portland, Ore.-- 1928 

Rev. W. G. Comin, Nampa, Idaho - 1928 

EX-OFFICIO MEMBER 

President M. G. KylE, D.D., LL.D. St. Louis, Mo. 

CONSULTATIVE MEMBERS OF THE BOARD OF MANAGERS 

Professor Jesse Johnson, D.D. Pkoeessor Robt. M. Karr, D.D. 
Professor J. H. Webster, D.D. Professor J. L. Kelso., A.M., Th.D., D.D. 
Professor G. B. McCrEary, Ph.D., D.D. 



BOARD OF TRUSTEES 

(Under the Missouri Charter) 

Officers 

Mr. EreE Ormsby, President, 4508 McPherson Ave., St. Louis, Mo. 
Mr. T. Dales Kyle, Financial Secretary and Treasurer, Xenia, Ohio. 
Rev. W. H. Hastings, Recording Sec, 3524a Wyoming St., St. Louis, Mo. 

Members 

Term Expires 

Mr. B. F. Edwards, 10 Kingsbury Place, St. Louis, Mo. 1929 

William R. Gentry, Esq., 5157 Vernon Ave., St. Louis, Mo. 1929 

J. M. Lashly, Esq., 20 Windermere Place, St. Louis, Mo. 1929 

Mr. ErlE Ormsby, 4508 McPherson Ave., St. Louis, Mo. 1929 

Mr. W. J. Johnston, 3610 Forest Park Blvd., St. Louis, Mo 1930 

Mr. Wm. Schattgen, 2034 Allen Ave, St. Louis, Mo.. 1930 

Mr. John M. Stuart, 4252a Cleveland Ave., St. Louis, Mo. 1930 

Mr. J. M. Murry, 1324 Laurel St., St. Louis, Mo. 1930 

REV. J. F. LeClEkE, Th.M., 2605 Union Blvd., St. Louis, Mo. 1931 

Mr. T. Dales Kyle, Xenia, Ohio 1931 

Mr. G. R. McCullough, 6117 Westminster Place, St. Louis, Mo. 1931 

Mr. A. O. Wilson, 14 Windermere Place, St. Louis, Mo. 1931 

President M. G. Kyle, D.D., LL.D., St. Louis, Mo Bx-Offic'w Member 



XENIA THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 13 

BOARD OF TRUSTEES 

(Under the Ohio Charter) 

Mr. S. Walter Collins, Bloomington, Ind. 1929 

Mr. Nathan Logan, Spring Hill, Ind 1929 

B. R. McClEllan, M.D., Xenia, Ohio 1929 

Mr. Robert Bryson, Xenia, Ohio 1930 

Mr. W. B. Cherry, Xenia, Ohio 1930 

Mr. J. C. Williamson, Xenia, Ohio 1930 

Mr. J. A. Finney, Esq., Xenia, Ohio 1931 

Mr. T. Dales KylE, Xenia, Ohio 1931 

Mr. J. E. KylE, Cedarville, Ohio 1931 

LADIES' VISITING AND ADVISORY BOARD 

Mrs. M. G. KylE, President. Mrs. J. L. Kelso. 

Mrs. J. H. Webster, Vice-President. Mrs. G. B. McCrEary. 
Mrs. A. O. Wilson, Secretary. Mrs. J. F. LeClErE. 

Mrs. Jesse Johnson, Treasurer. Miss Elizabeth BrownlEE. 
Mrs. Joseph KylE. Miss Pearl Mann. 

Mrs. Robt. M. Karr. Mrs. C B. Reed. 

THE STUDENTS' Y. M. C A. 

James Walter Irwin, President. 
Zion Robbins, Vice-President. 
EvERT L. Haney, Secretary-Treasurer. 
Harry W. Orr, Devotional. 
Harold R. Karnes, Missionary. 
William M. Nichol, Preaching. 
Harold S. Wilson, Social. 

THE STUDENT VOLUNTEER BAND 

James Walter Irwin, Secretary and Treasurer. 

THE ALUMNI ASSOCIATION 

REV. J. P. NesbiT, D.D., President Princeton, Ind. 

Rev. R. E. Lackey, Vice-President Carlisle, Iowa 

Rev. R. A. JamiESON, Secretary Cedarville, Ohio 



14 XBNIA THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 



OFFICERS OF THE FACULTY 



The; Rev. Melvin Grove KyeE, A.M., D.D., LL.D., President. 
The Rev. Robert McNary Karr, A.M., D.D., Vice-President. 
The Rev. Jesse Johnson, A.M., D.D., Registrar. 
The Rev. John Hunter Webster, A.M., D.D., Librarian. 
The Rev. J. L. Kelso, A.M., Th.D., D.D., Ass't Librarian. 
The Rev. George Boone McCrEary, Ph.D., D.D., Secretary. 



THE FACULTY 



The; Rev. Jesse; Johnson, A.M., D.D., 
Professor of Church History. 

The; Rev. John Hunter Webster, A.M., D.D., 
Professor of Greek Exegesis and New Testament Literature. 

The Rev. Melvin Grove Kyl,e, A.M., D.D., LL.D., 

Newburg Professor of Biblical Theology and Biblical 

Archaeology. Adjunct Professor of Practical 

Theology and Religious Education. 

The Rev. Robert McNary Karr, A.M., D.D., 
Professor of Systematic Theology and Homilefics. 

The Rev. James Leon Keeso, A.M., Th.D., D.D., 
Professor of Hebrew Exegesis and Old Testament Literature. 

The Rev. George Boone McCreary, Ph.D., D.D., 

Professor of the Philosophy of Religion and Applied Christianity. 

Thomas Shearer Duncan, A.M., Ph.D., 
Instructor in Public Speaking. 



XENIA THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 15 



HISTORICAL ROLL OF PROFESSORS 



During the one hundred and thirty-four years of the Seminary's 
history, under various names and in different localities, in all 
thirty-two men have served as instructors for more or less ex- 
tended periods of time. The roll of professors is as follows : 

Inaugu- Period 

Name rated at of Service 

John Anderson Service 1794-1819 

John Banks - Philadelphia 1820-1826 

James Ramsey Canonsburg -— 1821-1842 

David Carson Canonsburg 1834-1834 

Thomas Beveridge Canonsburg — 1835-1855 

Thomas Beveridge Xenia 1855-1871 

Joseph Claybaugh Oxford - 1839-1855 

Samuel W. McCracken Oxford 1839-1840 

James Martin Canonsburg 1842-1846 

Abraham Anderson Canonsburg 1847-1855 

Samuel Wilson Xenia 1855-1875 

William Davidson Oxford 1855-1858 

Alexander Young Oxford 1855-1857 

Alexander Young - Monmouth 1858-1874 

John Scott Monmouth - 1858-1874 

Joseph Clokey Xenia 1858-1873 

Andrew M. Black — - Monmouth - 1864-1874 

David A. Wallace - Monmouth - 1867-1870 

David A. Wallace Xenia 1883-1883 

William Bruce Xenia 1871-1880 

James G. Carson Xenia - 1873-1888 

William G. MoorehEad Xenia 1873-1914 

Jackson B. McMichaEl Xenia 1873-1878 

James Harper Xenia -1879-1899 

David MacDill Xenia 1884-1902 

WilbErt W. White - Xenia - 1889-1894 

John D. Irons Xenia 1895-1905 

Joseph Kyle - Xenia - 1899-1921 

Jesse Johnson Xenia 1902 

John E. WisharT Xenia 1905-1923 

John H. Webster Xenia - - 1908 

Melvin G. Kyle .-- Xenia 1914 

Robert M. Karr St. Louis -1922 

James L. Kelso St. Louis 1923 

Geo. B. McCreary - St. Louis 1924 



16 XBNIA THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

SPECIAL LECTURES AND SERMONS 1927-28 

The Rev. H. H. McConnell, Th.M., President of the Board of Managers. 

Professor Thomas S. Duncan, Ph.D., Washington University. 

The Rev. A. H. Baldinger, D.D., Pastor, Butler, Pa. 

Mr. Brad Craig, Secretary of Sabbath School Work, Pittsburgh, Pa. 

The Rev. Leonard V. Buschman, D.D., Pastor, Tyler Place Presbyterian 

Church. 
The Rev. Professor James L. Kelso, Th.D., D.D. 
Dr. John Garstang, Director of Palestinian Antiquities, Jerusalem. 
The Rev. Geo. A. Campbell, D.D., Pastor, Union Ave. Christian Church. 
The Rev. Geo. E. White,, D.D., President of Anatolia College. 
The Rev. Professor J. Merle Rife, A.M., B.D., Tarkio College. 
The Rev. Chas. F. Wishart, D.D., LL.D., President, The College of 

Wooster. 
The Rev. R. A. Hutchison, D.D., Secretary Board of Home Missions. 
The Rev. Thos. Hanna McMichael, D.D., President Monmouth College. 



XENIA THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 17 



THE REGISTER OF STUDENTS 

1927-1928 



THE GRADUATE SCHOOL 

Students who received the Degree of Master of Theology (Th. M.), 

May 3, 1928 

William Charlton Latta College Corner, Ohio 

A.B., Miami University, 1924. 

Th.B., Xenia Theological Seminary, 1927. 

Reverend William Thomas McInTyrE East Chicago, Ind. 

A.B., Tarkio College, 1916. 

Graduate Xenia Theological Seminary, 1919. 

Reverend Raymond Clifford Rogers St. Louis, Mo. 

Candidate for A.B., Washington University, 1928. 
Graduate Xenia Theological Seminary, 1927. 

Reverend Frederick Sylvester ZellEr Aledo, 111. 

A.B., Sterling College, 1922. 

Th.B., Xenia Theological Seminary, 1926. 



Candidates for the Degree of Doctor of Theology: 
A. Students in Residence 

Reverend Carl Leo Attig Edwardsville, 111. 

A.B., Cincinnati University, 1907. 
Lane Theological Seminary, 1910. 
Th.M., Xenia Theological Seminary, 1927. 

Reverend Thomas Ross Hicks — Webster Groves, Mo. 

A.B., Boston University, 1909. 

S.T.B., Boston University, 1911. 

Th.M., Xenia Theological Seminary, 1927. 

Reverend George Wales King, D.D St. Louis, Mo. 

Syracuse University. 

Auburn Theological Seminary, 1901. 

Th.M., Xenia Theological Seminary, 1925. 



18 XENIA THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

Reverend James Frederick LeClErE St. Louis, Mo. 

A.B., Monmouth College, 1916. 
Pittsburgh Theological Seminary, 1919. 
Th.M., Xenia Theological Seminary, 1926. 

Reverend Harold Harper McConnEll St. Louis, Mo. 

A.B., Monmouth College, 1916. 
Pittsburgh Theological Seminary, 1919. 
Th.M., Xenia Theological Seminary, 1926. 

Reverend John Henderson MoorEhead, D.D. St. Louis, Mo. 

A.B., Monmouth College, 1892. 
Xenia Theological Seminary, 1895. 
Th.M., Xenia Theological Seminary, 1927. 

B. Students doing Assigned Work Elsewhere 

Reverend James Best, D.D., = Steubenville, Ohio 

A.B., Tarkio College, 1905. 

Xenia Theological Seminary, 1908. 

B.D., Princeton Theological Seminary, 1910. 

Reverend William Crowe, Jr. Tuscumbia, Ala. 

A.B., Southwestern Presbyterian University, 1921. 
B.D., Union Theological Seminary, Richmond, Va., 1924. 
Th.M., Xenia Theological Seminary, 1926. 

Reverend Kenneth Milton Monroe — - Spokane, Wash. 

A.B., University of Southern California, 1922. 
Th.B., Xenia Theological Seminary, 1926. 
Th.M., Xenia Theological Seminary, 1926. 

Reverend Willard VedEllE Ritchie Kittanning, Pa. 

A.B., Muskingum College, 1910. 

Xenia Theological Seminary, 1914. 

Th.M., Pittsburgh Theological Seminary, 1925. 

Reverend Robert McIntosh Sturgeon - - Cranston. R. I. 

A.B., Muskingum College, 1898. 
Pittsburgh Theological Seminary, 1902. 
B.D., Xenia Theological Seminary, 1923. 

Candidates for the Degree of Master of Theology : 
A. Students in Residence 

Reverend Noyes Otis Bartholomew Maplewood, Mo. 

A.B., Washburn College, 1898. 
Chicago Theological Seminary, 1902. 



XENIA THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 19 



Reverend William Henry Hastings St. Louis, Mo. 

A.B., Monmouth College, 1916. 
Pittsburgh Theological Seminary, 1919. 

Reverend Albert Jay Levengood St. Louis, Mo. 

A.B., Mission House College, 1913. 
Mission House Seminary, 1916. 

Reverend Fred Edward John Schenk St. Louis, Mo. 

Graduate Elmhurst College, 1913. 
Eden Theological Seminary, 1916. 

Reverend Walter Schlaretzki East St. Louis, 111. 

Graduate Concordia College, Ft. Wayne, Ind., 1911. 
Concordia and Chicago Theological Seminaries. 

Reverend Leigh OrvillE Wright - St. Louis, Mo. 

Ph.B., The College of Wooster, 1915. 
Princeton Theological Seminary, 1920. 

B. Students Doing Assigned Work Elsewhere 

Reverend William Earl Crane Porterdale, Ga. 

A.B., Davidson College, 1922. 

B.D., Union Theological Seminary, Richmond, Va., 1925. 

Reverend David James Lewis Garner, Iowa 

A.B., Muskingum College, 1924. 

Th.B., Xenia Theological Seminary, 1927. 

Reverend Cecil Plumb Guilford, N. Y. 

A.B., Middlebury College, 1919. 
Xenia Theological Seminary, 1922. 

Undergraduate Students Doing Extra-Curriculum Work for the 
Degree of Master of Theology. 

Lewis Robin Brown — Wilkinsburg, Pa. 

Muskingum College, 1925. 

George William Hutton - Chicago, 111. 

A.B., Muskingum College, 1924. 

Robert McCunE - N. S. Pittsburgh, Pa. 

A.B., Muskingum College, 1925. 

Persons Attending Lectures as Auditors 

Reverend Benjamin Adams Granite City, 111. 

Wesleyan College. 



20 XENIA THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

Reverend Job Harry Bullock Overland, Mo. 

A.B., Eureka College, 1907. 
Disciples of Christ. 

Reverend Frank Fred Otto Edwardsville, 111. 

Methodist Episcopal Church. 

Irwin Raut Granite City, 111. 

A.B., University of Missouri, 1898. 
Graduate School University of Chicago. 

Reverend Arnold Smith Union, Mo. 

A.B., Park College, 1903. 

Auburn Theological Seminary, 1906. 

Th.M.. Xenia Theological Seminary. 1927. 

THE DIVINITY SCHOOL 

THE SENIOR CLASS, 1927-1928 

Graduated with Diploma, May 3, 1928 

AdriEn Rene Aeschliman, Cum Laude St. Louis, Mo. 

Los Angeles Bible Institute. 
Missouri Congregational Conference. 

Leonard LeRoy Gaylord -Great Falls, Mont. 

Los Angeles Bible Institute. 
Illinois Southern Presbytery. 

Daniel AdElbErt Moore Decatur, 111. 

Moody Bible Institute. 

St. Louis Presbytery, Presbyterian Church, U. S. A. 

Graduated with Degree of Bachelor of Theology, May 3, 192 8 

Lewis Robin Brown Wilkinsburg, Pa. 

Muskingum College, 1925. 

George William Hutton - Chicago, 111. 

A.B., Muskingum College, 1924. 
Chicago Presbytery. 

Frederick John McConneleE - -- St. Louis, Ma 

A.B., Sterling College, 1925. 
Arkansas Valley Presbytery. 

Robert McCunE, Cum Laude N. S. Pittsburgh, Pa. 

A.B., Muskingum College, 1925. 
Allegheny Presbytery. 



XENIA THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 21 

Maurice Clifford Seaman DeLancey, N. Y. 

A.B., Muskingum College, 1925. 
Delaware Presbytery. 

Joseph Lemuel Wells Fayetteville, Tenn. 

A.B., Bryson College, 1925. 

East St. Louis Association, Baptist Church. 

THE MIDDLE CLASS, 1927-1928 

*Roy Otis Bartholomew St. Louis, Mo. 

Moody Bible Institute and Brookes Bible Institute. 
Missouri Congregational Conference. 

James Walter Irwin - - Belle Center, Ohio 

A.B., Muskingum College, 1926. 
Ohio Northwestern Presbytery. 

Harold Ross Karnes - - -- - -New Concord, Ohio 

A.B., Muskingum College, 1926. 
Muskingum Presbytery. 

William Montgomery Nichol, Jr. Brooklyn, N. Y. 

A.B., Muskingum College, 1926. 
Presbytery of the Hudson. 

Fred Lorimer Reeves - — - Philadelphia, Pa. 

Moody Bible Institute. 

Chippewa Presbytery, Presbyterian Church, U. S. A. 

THE JUNIOR CLASS, 1927-1928 

Evert LEE Haney Sterling, Kan. 

A.B., Sterling College, 1927. 
Arkansas Valley Presbytery. 

James Claypool Hodson Searcy, Ark. 

Monmouth College. 

Miss Muriel Inez Inlow University City, Mo. 

Brookes Bible Institute. 

The Gospel Center, St. Louis. 

Cletus Pinkston Lamb Ridgway, 111. 

Blackburn College 

Cairo Presbytery, Presbyterian Church, U. S. A. 

Gerald Guyot Latal St. Louis, Mo. 

A.B., Westminster College (Mo.), 1927. 

Hannibal Presbytery, Presbyterian Church, U. S. A. 

•Died January 30th, 1928. 



22 XENIA THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

Roy Charles Linberg St. Louis, Mo. 

A.B., Missouri Valley College, 1927. 

St. Louis Presbytery, Presbyterian Church, U. S. A. 

Arthur Byrns McMullin Hillsboro, Mo. 

A.B., Park College, 1912. 

Harry Wilson Orr Fowler, Kan. 

Sterling College. 

Iowa Presbytery, Associate Presbyterian Church. 

Zion Robbins Stanton, Ky. 

Muskingum College. 
First Ohio Presbytery. 

Harold Stewart Wilson Sterling, Kan. 

A.B., Sterling College, 1927. 
Arkansas Valley Presbytery. 

SPECIAL STUDENTS, 1927-1928 

Charles Theodore Heusinkveld St. Louis, Mo. 

A.B., University of Illinois, 1925. 

St. Louis Presbytery, Presbyterian Church, U. S. A. 

Mrs. G. G. Latal St. Louis, Mo. 

Presbyterian Church, U. S. A. 

Frederick John Lenk St. Louis, Mo. 

Moody Bible Institute. 

St. Louis Presbytery, Presbyterian Church, U. S. 

Miss Georgia McKinney St. Louis, Mo. 

The College of Wooster. 
Presbyterian Church, U. S. A. 

Mrs. J. R. Moefitt Webster Groves, Mo. 

Miss ArlinE Marie Prichard St. Louis, Mo. 

A.B., Washington University, 1923. 

SUMMARY OF STUDENTS, 1927-1928 

The Graduate School : 

Resident Students 19 

Non-resident Students :13 32 

The Divinity School: 

Seniors 9 

Middlers - 5 

Juniors 10 

Special Students - 6 30 



XENIA THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 



A BEREAVEMENT 

The Seminary experienced a painful loss in the sudden death of Mr. 
Roy O. Bartholomew which occurred January 30, 1928. 

Cordiality in personal relations and complete devotion to duty were 
prime characteristics of Mr. Bartholomew. Being in charge of a congre- 
gation whose work was prospering under his care, and carrying a heavy 
schedule of seminary studies, he broke under the burden of it. An in- 
spiring example is left us in that he was literally faithful unto death. 



THE PURPOSE OF THE SEMINARY 

"The object of the Seminary shall be to instruct candidates for 
the Gospel ministry, and others who may be preparing for spe- 
cial lines of Christian service, in the knowledge of the doctrine 
of the Scriptures and the order and institutes of worship taught 
therein and summarily exhibited in the Standards of the United 
Presbyterian Church of North America ; to cherish in them the 
life of true godliness, and to cultivate the gifts which Christ, the 
Head of the Church, confers on those whom He calls to the 
ministry, to the end that there may be raised up a succession of 
able, faithful, and godly ministers of the Gospel and other Chris- 
tian workers." (Constitution, Ch. I., Sec. 2.) 



THE DIVINITY SCHOOL 



THE COURSE OF STUDY 

The full course of Seminary training extends over a period 
of three years. The Seminary year begins on the first Wednesday 
after the 17th of September, and closes on the first Wednesday 
or Thursday after the first of May. Each annual session is 
divided into two semesters. 



24 XENIA THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

The different departments, with their respective courses of 
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26 XBNIA THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 



DESCRIPTION OF COURSES OF STUDY 



I. HEBREW EXEGESIS AND OLD TESTAMENT LITERATURE 

DR KELSO 

The purpose of this department is to teach the students to 
read the less difficult portions of the Hebrew Old Testament 
accurately, fluently, and with a real sense of appreciation ; and 
to handle the more difficult sections with the aid of a proper 
lexicon and an advanced grammar. Thus, at the close of the 
three year course a student is competent to be his own exegete. 

In connection with the Hebrew work, the Canon of the Old 
Testament and the introductory problems of the Old Testament 
books are considered in detail. 

1. Elements of Hebrew. A mastery of the principles of Hebrew Gram- 
mar, and the acquisition of a working vocabulary. 

Juniors, first semester, four hours a week. 

2. Hebrew Prose. Sight reading of selected passages of the Minor 
Prophets. Analytical study of the Hebrew Text and exegesis of the 
Book of Jonah. The Old Testament Canon. 

Juniors, second semester, four hours a week. 

3. Isaiah. Exegetical study of the book, with special reference to con- 
temporary history and Messianic prophecy. 

Middlers and Seniors, first semester, three hours a week (1928-29). 

4. Jeremiah and Bsekiel. Rapid survey of Jeremiah and Ezekiel 
with special reference to sermonic material. Summary of the whole field 
of the Old Testament Prophets. 

Middlers and Seniors, second semester, three hours a week (1928-29). 

5. The Minor Prophets. Exegetical study of these books with special 
reference to their theological and social teachings. The Old Testament 
Canon. 

Middlers and Seniors, first semester, three hours a week (1929-30). 

6. The Psalms and the Wisdom Literature. Exegetical study of selected 
Psalms in the light of Hebrew Poetry, and as devotional literature of the 
present day. Rapid survey of the Wisdom Literature. 

Middlers and Seniors, second semester, three hours a week (1929-30). 



XENIA THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 27 

II. GREEK EXEGESIS AND NEW TESTAMENT LITERATURE 

DR. WEBSTER 

The purpose of this department is to teach the students to 
know and use the Greek New Testament. While the value of 
exact scholarship is emphasized, the chief aim is to make the 
student an able minister of the New Testament. Instruction is 
given both by text-books and lectures, and everything is made 
subservient to learning "the mind of Christ," the vital requisite 
for a successful ministry. 

Introductory Greek is a prerequisite to the exegetical studies 
of this department. Those who have not had sufficient Greek 
in college are required to take a special course in Introduction to 
the Greek of the New Testament under Dr. McCreary. 

1. Introduction to the New Testament. This course embraces a general 
survey of the books of the New Testament. 

Juniors, first semester, three hours a week. 

2. Textual Criticism of the New Testament. 
Juniors, second semester, one hour a week. 

3. The Gospel of John. An exegetical study of the book. 
Juniors, second semester, four hours a week. 

4. Exegetical studies in the Acts. 
Middlers, first semester, three hours a week. 

5. The Pastoral Epistles. An exegetical study. 
Middlers, second semester, three hours a week. 

6. The Life of Christ. 

Middlers, one hour a week throughout the year. 

7. Romans. An exegetical- study. 

Seniors, two hours a week throughout the year. 

8. Assigned Reading. In addition to the foregoing exegetical studies, 
each class will be assigned selected portions of the Greek New Testament 
for outside reading. Oral examinations from time to time. 

III. BIBLICAL THEOLOGY AND BIBLICAL ARCHAEOLOGY 

DR. KYLE 

Work in this department has a two-fold purpose, — to know the 
progress of Revelation, and to know it in its setting. So there 
are studies in the progress of Revelation to acquire a compre- 
hensive grasp of what the Bible teaches as a whole and in its 



28 XBNIA THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

various parts in the order of Revelation, together with the study 
of the historical setting of Scripture made known through Arch- 
aeological Research, in order to see the truths of Revelation as 
those saw them to whom they were revealed. 

There are class-room studies and quizzes through which the 
student discovers for himself the plan and progress of Revela- 
tion : also theses by all the students, together with assigned library 
research work. The Bible is the only text-book used, the English 
Bible for constant work, and the Hebrew and Septuagint Old 
Testament and the Greek New Testament for reference. There 
are lectures in Biblical Archaeology from the monuments and 
from first-hand research, so arranged with the studies in Biblical 
Theology as to enable the student constantly to see the Biblical 
story in its original setting. To this work are added quizzes, 
much library work, and an assigned reading course throughout 
the year. Some introductory lectures will be given to the Junior 
Class meeting separately to prepare them for a proper under- 
standing of the work in the general course. 

1. The Patriarchal Period. Principal subjects: Literary methods of 
early Biblical times; primitive man and the temptation; antediluvian 
civih'zation and Revelation; the deluge; Abraham and his times; the de- 
scent into Egypt. 

All classes, first semester, three hours a week (1929-30). 

2. The Tribal Period. From the descent into Egypt to the Conquest 
of Canaan. Principal subjects: From court to corvee; Moses; the Reve- 
lation of God through the plagues of Egypt; the Exodus and the wilder- 
ness life ; the Revelation at Sinai ; the problem of the Pentateuch, and 
Old Testament chronology. 

All classes, first semester, three hours a week (1930-31). 

3. The National Period. From the Conquest of Canaan to the end of 
the Old Testament. Principal subjects: Times of the conquest; period 
of the Judges; David; the great period of Biblical literature; decline and 
apostasy ; the great invasions ; Isaiah ; Daniel ; the exile and reformation ; 
the return and second glory of Israel; Messianism; prophetism, and 
inspiration. The Messianic Period: The consummation of the Messianic 
hope developed in the former periods. The Apostolic Period: The Appli- 
cation of Messianic teaching to preaching. 

All classes, first semester, three hours a week (1928-29). 



XENIA THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 29 

4. Research Methods. The class is directed in research work and in 
the preparation of theses utilizing archaeological material in Exegesis and 
for sermon illustrations. 

Middlers, first semester, one hour a week. 

5. Canons and Fallacies. A special course of studies to set forth the 
Canons and Fallacies of Archaeological Research. A thesis is required 
of each member of the class upon an assigned subject. 

Seniors, first semester, one hour a week. 

6. Public Research Lectures are given each year out of the research 
work of the Professor in charge. 



PASTORAL THEOLOGY 

DR. KYLE 
DR. KELSO 

Instruction in this subject is given by means of studies, quizzes, 
lectures, and practical exercises for each class separately, together 
with practical training for all classes in the problems of personal 
effort in soul saving. 

1. The Minister as a Student in the Seminary. Subjects: The call 
to the ministry ; the minister's habits ; ministerial manliness, ministerial 
ideals ; keeping one's self ; settlement, candidating, installation. 

Juniors, first semester, one hour a week. Dr. Kyle. 

2. The Minister as Pastor of the Congregation (A). Subjects: The 
pastor in the pulpit; problems of the ministerial life; social, business, and 
spiritual methods ; the pastor in relation to the Sabbath School, the Young 
People's Society, the Prayer Meeting, and prayer circles. 

Middlers, first semester, one hour a week. Dr. Kyle. 

3. The Minister as Pastor of the Congregation (B). Subjects: Super- 
vising the Sabbath School ; moderating the Session ; directing the congre- 
gational meeting ; the teachers' meeting ; conduct of pulpit service and 
prayer meeting ; the administration of the sacraments ; marriages ; and 
funerals. 

Middlers, second semester, one hour a week. Dr. Kelso. 

4. The Minister in the Larger Relations to Church and Community 
Subjects: Pastoral evangelism; problems of city and country life; the 
institutional church ; pastoral visitation and counsel ; the benevolences of 
the Church ; ecclesiastical relations. 

Seniors, first semester, one hour a week. Dr. Kyle. 



30 XENIA THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

IV. CHURCH HISTORY 

DR. JOHNSON 

The aim of this department is to give a general knowledge 
of Church History, with emphasis on the most important move- 
ments and events ; to arouse an interest in the history of the 
Church which will lead to further study in this profitable field ; 
and to train in methods of historical study. In the study of each 
period special attention will be given to missionary development 
and expansion. The work is done by means of text-books, lec- 
tures, library readings, and students' reports on assigned topics. 

1. The Ancient Period, to 590 A. D. Principal subjects: Providential 
preparation for Christianity; brief review of the life of Christ and the 
Apostolic Age; spread of Christianity; opposition; alliance between Church 
and State ; heresies, councils, and creeds ; Christian life ; schisms ; the 
Fathers and their writings ; the theological schools. 

Juniors, first semester, two hours a week. 

2. The Medieval Period, 590-1517 A. D. Principal subjects : Missions; 
Islam; the Papacy and the Papal Church; the Eastern Church; Monasti- 
cism ; the Crusades ; medieval sects and persecutions ; Scholasticism ; the 
Mystics ; general Church conditions ; movements for reform ; precursors of 
the Reformation ; the Renaissance. 

Juniors, second semester, three hours a week. 

3. The Reformation Bra, 1517-1648 A. D. After a brief review of the 
providential preparatives for the Reformation, the principal subjects will 
be (1) the Reformation in Germany and the Lutheran Reformation in 
other lands; (2) the Reformation in Switzerland and in other lands where 
the Reformed type of Protestantism prevailed; (3) the Counter-Reforma- 
tion ; and (4) Roman Catholic Amissions. The aim will be to bring the 
history of the Church in each country, as nearly as may be, down to the 
Peace of Westphalia, 1648. Here the text will be the two volume work, 
"History of the Reformation," by Lindsay. 

Middlers, first semester, three hours a week. 

4. European and American Church History, 1648-1925 A. D. 

(a) The principal subjects in European Church History will be the 
Roman Catholic Church in its relation to civil government and the national 
churches ; controversies within the Roman Catholic Church ; Rationalism 
and its effects ; Lutheranism and its controversies ; the Reformed Churches, 
with special notice of Presbyterianism ; the Anglican Church; Deism; the 
Methodist revival ; nineteenth century controversies. This study will be 
for the most part by countries. 



XENIA THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 31 

(b) In American Church History a study will be made of the Old 
World Sources ; early Roman Catholic missions ; the churches in the 
colonies ; decline and revival ; the great denominations ; divisions and 
unions ; home missions. The Presbyterian family of churches will receive 
special study. 

Middlers, second semester, five hours a week. 

5. History of the United Presbyterian Church of North America. 
Beginnings in Scotland; beginnings in America; the Union of 1782; the 
Associate Presbyterian Church, 1782-1858; the Associate Reformed Church, 
1782-1858; the Union of 1858; the United Presbyterian Church, 1858-1925. 
Any member of the class who is not a United Presbyterian may substitute 
for this course a study of his own Church, reporting to the Professor and 
the class as required. 

Seniors, first semester, one hour a week. 

6. History of Doctrine, (A). A study will be made especially of the 
history of Trinitarianism and Christology. If time permits, the history of 
Anthropology will be brought down to the time of Anselm. 

Seniors, first semester, two hours a week. 

7. History of Doctrine, (B). The study of Anthropology will be con- 
tinued, and will be followed by the doctrinal history of the Atonement, 
of Justification by Faith, and of Regeneration. Attention will then be 
given to Post-Reformation theology and to modern forms of statement 
of doctrines. 

Seniors, second semester, two hours a week. 

V. SYSTEMATIC THEOLOGY AND HOMILETICS 
DR. KARR 

The purpose in the study of Systematic Theology is to lead 
the student to clear and well-balanced views of the great doc- 
trines and principles comprised in the Christian faith. The 
text-book used is the complete work on Systematic Theology 
by Dr. A. H. Strong. There is class-room discussion based on 
a careful analysis of the text, supplemented by lectures and re- 
ports on assigned reading. Two hours a week throughout the 
entire course are required. 

1. (a) Introduction to the Study of Theology : The idea and purpose 
of Theology, the sources of material and the method of treatment. 
(b) The Existence of God: Origin of the idea of God, and evidence of 
His existence, (c) The Scriptures a Divine Revelation : The witness 
of miracle and prophecy to the fact of a divine revelation. 

Juniors, first semester, two hours a week. 



32 XENIA THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

2. (a) The Doctrine of Scripture {continued) : The genuineness of 
the documents, the credibility of the writers, the supernatural character 
and inspiration of Scripture, (b) The Doctrine of God: The divine 
attributes ; the doctrine of the Trinity. 

Juniors, second semester, two hours a week. 

3. (a) The Doctrine of God (continued) : The decrees and works of 
God: creation, preservation, providence, the angels, (b) The Doctrine of 
Man: The origin and nature of man, and the unity of the human race. 

Middlers, first semester, two hours a week. 

4. (a) The Doctrine of Man (continued) : The origin of the soul, 
the moral nature and primitive state of man. (b) The Doctrine of Sin : 
The Fall of man, the nature and universality of sin, and its consequences 
to the human race, (c) The Doctrine of Redemption: Preparation for 
redemption ; the person of Christ, His two natures and states. 

Middlers, second semester, two hours a week. 

5. (a) The Doctrine of Redemption (continued) : Offices and work 
of Christ; the Atonement, (b) The Doctrine of the Holy Spirit: The 
application of Redemption, — calling, union with Christ, regeneration, con- 
version, justification, sanctification. 

Seniors, first semester, two hours a week. 

6. (a) The Doctrine of the Church : Its constitution, organization, 
government, sacraments, and other ordinances of worship. (b) The 
Doctrine of Last Tilings : Death, the intermediate state, the coming of 
Christ, the resurrection, the judgment, and final awards. 

Seniors, second semester, two hours a week. 

HOMILETICS 

DR. KARR 

The study of Homiletics is designed to give the student high 
ideals of pulpit ministration, to correlate his growing knowledge 
and powers and bring them all to bear upon the effective expres- 
sion of Christian truth. 

1. The Preparation of Sermons. The permanent function and impor- 
tance of preaching; the selection and interpretation of the text; the struc- 
ture of the sermon ; the different kinds of sermons. A homily preached 
before the Faculty and student body. 

Juniors, first semester, one hour a week. 

2. The Preparation and Delivery of Sermons. The work of the first 
semester continued. Sermon materials, — explanation, argument, illustra- 
tion, and application ; qualities of style ; and modes of delivery. The 
relative advantages of the three modes of delivery are presented, — reading. 



XENIA THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 33 

speaking memoriter, and speaking extemporaneously. A doctrinal or sub- 
ject sermon preached before the Faculty and student body. 
Juniors, second semester, one hour a week. 

3. Sermon Outlines (A). Students are trained in the interpretation 
and analysis of texts, and in the construction and criticism of outlines 
of the various approved types of sermons. All outlines presented in 
writing. An expository lecture preached before the Faculty and student 
body. 

Middlers, first semester, one hour a week. 

4. Sermon Outlines (B). Work of the first semester continued, with 
special emphasis on the outlining of passages of Scripture for continuous 
exposition. All outlines presented in writing. A critical discourse on a 
passage assigned in the Hebrew or the Greek shall be publicly presented. 

Middlers, second semester, one hour a week. 

5. Sermon Outlines (C). In this course the students are trained in 
the construction of plans for doctrinal and subject sermons. All work 
presented in writing. A sermon preached publicly on a text of the 
student's own' selection. 

Seniors, first semester, one hour a week. 

6. Sermon Outlines (D). Written analysis of the sermons of great 
preachers, ancient and modern. A thesis on a subject assigned by the 
Faculty is due in its final form March 1st. 

Seniors, second semester, one hour a week. 

VI. PHILOSOPHY OF RELIGION AND APPLIED CHRISTIANITY 

DR. McCREARY 

1. The Psychology of Religion. After a brief but comprehensive 
survey of the field of Psychology in general, noting the leading current 
theories, particular applications are made in genetics, in the principles 
of teaching, in social expressions, and in religious experience. Several 
texts are used with lectures. 

Juniors, first semester, two hours a week. 

2. Biblical Ethics. Beginning with a philosophic introduction, both 
historical and critical, the Christian ideal of conduct is unfolded, noting 
contrasts and agreements with the more prominent systems. Particular 
attention is given to the applicatory feature, both individual and social 
bearings being considered. 

Juniors, second semester, three hours a week. 

3. Christian Sociology. After a review of general social theory as 
presented by leading authorities, the recognized problems are set forth 
with their proposed solutions. The Christian method of approaching and 



34 XENIA THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

solving these problems is presented. Particular emphasis is given to the 
application of the teaching of Jesus to the social order. 
Middlers, first semester, two hours a week. 

4. Apologetics. The ground of the older arguments is covered, with 
modern restatements and additions. Christianity is shown to be logically 
defensible. 

Middlers and Seniors, second semester, two hours a week (1929-30). 

5. Comparative Religion. The great religions of the world are studied 
historically and comparatively. Their philosophic bases and ethical 
and social features are carefully inspected. Particular attention is be- 
stowed on those rival faiths with which Christianity now most strongly 
competes. 

Middlers and Seniors, second semester, two hours a week. (1928-29). 

6. The Philosophy of Religion. This course includes the usual materials 
of Theism. It also seeks to exhibit the epistemological foundations of 
faith, to state the analogical argument expositionally, to find an adequate 
ground of values, and to set forth the Christian religion as a philosophic 
system. A rationale of method is undertaken regarding religion in his- 
torical, aesthetical, and critical aspects. 

Seniors, two hours a week throughout the year. 

INTRODUCTORY GREEK 

DR. McCREARY 

This work is provided for those who have not had Greek in 
college, and is a prerequisite to the regular work in New Testa- 
ment exegesis. 

1. Introduction to New Testament Greek (A). A rapid survey of the 
outstanding features of the grammar of the Greek New Testament. 

Juniors, first semester, five hours a week. 

2. Introduction to New Testament Greek (B). A careful study of the 
New Testament syntax, based on Green's "Handbook to the Grammar 
of the Greek Testament." One of the Gospels is read from the Greek. 

Juniors, second semester, three hours a week. 

3. Supplementary Reading in Greek. In addition to the foregoing 
courses, the student is required to read selected portions of the Greek New 
Testament before entering the Middle class in New Testament exegesis. 

VII. PUBLIC SPEAKING 

DR. DUNCAN 

1. The Principles and Practice of Public Speaking. 
The various types of speech are studied in detail, and students art- 
drilled in the important types. Attention is given to the development and 



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XBNIA THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 37 

proper control of the voice and to the study and practice of the principles 
of gesture. Considerable attention is given to debating. Careful study 
is made, not only of delivery, but of the proper method of arranging ma- 
terial. In the study of speech care is taken to relate the work to the 
special needs of the minister. The course includes practice in the reading 
of the Scriptures with a view to making this part of the Church service 
more effective. 
Juniors, one hour a week throughout the year. 

2. Individual Training in Public Speaking. 

In addition to the regular class work, an attempt is made to give a fair 
amount of individual attention to the students. The best progress is made 
by those who combine the class work regularly with private instruction. 

Juniors by special appointment. 

ADMINISTRATION OF THE REGULAR COURSE 

Since our denominational standards specify that "in all ordi- 
nary cases a full collegiate course of study, or its equivalent, shall 
be required of those entering on the study of theology," the 
Course of Study in this Seminary is primarily designed for college 
graduates. It has been found necessary, however, to make some 
provision for those who have not had two years of Greek, and 
for part-time students. In the case of these special groups, suit- 
able arrangements have been made, as will appear in paragraphs 
A and B below. 

1. The Standard Course includes, besides the other disciplines, 
study of the Bible in the original languages throughout the three 
years. All who have the requisite preliminary training are ex- 
pected to take this course: the successful completion of it is one 
of the requirements for diploma with or without degree of Th.B. 

A. Introductory Greek. As a prerequisite to Greek Exegesis, 
the student must have a sufficient knowledge of the Greek lan- 
guage to enable him to take the Junior exegetical work in a 
manner satisfactory to the Professor in charge. Those who 
may be lacking in this regard are expected to make up the de- 
ficiency before the beginning of the Middle year. For the benefit 
of this class of students the Seminary provides a Course in Intro- 
ductory Greek. This is not, however, a credit course, and may 
not be substituted for any part of the regular course in Greek Exe- 



38 XENIA THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

gesis, — all of which must be done to the satisfaction of the Pro- 
fessor in charge and according to his appointment. 

B. Selected Studies. Students who for any reason are pre- 
vented from pursuing the full Course may, upon the special 
recommendation of their Presbytery and by action of the Faculty, 
be permitted to register for any part of the Course with which 
they may be competent to deal. Upon the satisfactory completion 
of their work, of which one semester hour shall be the minimum 
in any subject, they will receive a report of their grades and 
credits. The successful completion of fifty-six semester hours 
entitles the special student to a Certificate. 

CLASSIFICATION OF STUDENTS 

Regular Students may be either Degree Students or Diploma 
Students, according as they are candidates for diploma with 
degree or for diploma without degree. 

TERMS OF ADMISSION 

1. General Terms. The privileges of the Seminary are ex- 
tended on equal terms to students of all evangelical denominations. 
The applicant shall present — 

a. Evidence of membership in good standing in his own Church. 

b. A certificate from his own Presbytery, or other ecclesiasti- 
cal authorities, indicating that he has been taken under their care, 
and approved as a student of theology. 

c. Credentials showing his academic attainments. 

2. Academic Requirements. 

a. Degree Students. Those who desire to qualify for degree 
on graduation should, upon entrance, have the degree of Bachelor 
of Arts, or its undoubted equivalent, from a standard college or 
university. Otherwise, they must satisfy the Faculty, by creden- 
tials and examination, that they have had courses of study and 
discipline fully equivalent to a standard college course, with 
special attention to the classical languages. Degree students shall 
enroll for the Standard Course. 



XENIA THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 39 

b. Diploma Students. Students not having the full college 
preparation specified in our denominational standards may, upon 
the special recommendation of their Presbytery and by action of 
the Faculty, enter the Seminary for the regular Course. If they 
are able to take the whole Course creditably, they will receive the 
diploma of the Seminary at graduation. But they may not be 
candidates for degrees unless by additional study they satisfy all 
the requirements specified for degrees. Students of this class 
who expect to make up their deficiency in college credits and 
qualify for the degree of Th.B. at graduation must have this 
work completed by the beginning of the second semester of the 
Senior year. Diploma Students shall enroll for the Standard 
Course the first year. 

3. Formal Registration. Before being admitted to the Semi- 
nary, every student shall, in the presence of the Registrar, sub- 
scribe to a written declaration to the effect that while he is a stu- 
dent in the Seminary he will regularly, punctually, and diligently 
attend upon all the instructions of the Professors, and promptly 
comply with all lawful requisitions of the Faculty, and be subject 
to their authority ; that he will honestly conform to all regulations 
of the Seminary, and that he will not propagate any opinion in op- 
position to the principles of the United Presbyterian Church. 

TIME OF ENTRANCE 

The proper time to enter the Seminary is at the opening of 
the annual session in September. Those who enter at mid-year, 
except by regular transfer from some other standard theological 
seminary, may be accepted as Special Students, but will not be 
regularly classified as Juniors until the following fall. 

ATTENDANCE 

All students are required to be present in all the classes in which 
they are enrolled, at the weekly preaching service in the Chapel, 
and at the appointed examinations. Attendance is also required 
at the opening of each semester, and again at the Baccalaureate 
and Graduation services in the spring, unless excused by the 
Faculty. All absences of the students, excused and unexcused, 
are reported to their respective Presbyteries. Absence at any time 



40 XENIA THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

during the Seminary session has an unfavorable effect on the* 
student's standing. 

EXAMINATIONS 

At the close of each semester, examinations are held to test and 
organize the student's knowledge of the ground covered in the 
several departments. Ordinarily the examinations are written and 
the results are reported by the Faculty to the Board of Managers. 
From the class standing, the examinations, and the attendance, 
the grade of the student, based on a scale of 100, is determined 
and reported to his Presbytery. 

GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS 

One hundred and ten semester hours of work, including two 
in Public Speaking, are required for graduation. A semester hour 
means one recitation a week in a given subject throughout a sem- 
ester. The courses of study in the various departments are so 
arranged that all the students take nineteen hours the first sem- 
ester, and during the second semester the Juniors take nineteen 
hours, the Middlers eighteen hours, and the Seniors sixteen hours. 

DIPLOMAS AND DEGREES AT GRADUATION 

1. Diploma. The diploma of the Seminary will be granted 
to all who complete creditably the Standard Course. One year 
of their work must be done in residence at this Seminary, and 
they must maintain an average grade of at least 75 per cent, 
throughout the whole course, with no semester grade in any sub- 
ject less than 70 per cent. 

2. Diploma with Degree of Bachelor of Theology (Th.B.). 
The Diploma of the Seminary with the degree of Th.B. will 
be granted to those students who — 

a. Have the degree of Bachelor of Arts, or its equivalent, 
from a standard college or university; 

b. Take the Standard three-year Course of the Seminary, — 
one year of which must be in residence at this Seminary; 

c. Maintain an average grade of at least 75 per cent, through- 
out the whole Course, with no semester grade in any subject less 
than 70 per cent. 



XBNIA THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 41 

Note : Graduates having diplomas without degree may become 
candidates for degrees by making up all deficiencies to the satisfaction 
of the Faculty. The degree of A. B. which is mentioned herein as a 
prerequisite to Seminary degrees must represent bona fide college work 
or its equivalent, without appropriation of any of the one hundred and 
ten credits secured in the regular Seminary Course. 

GRADUATION HONORS 

Graduation honors, not competitive, but open to all who qualify, 
whether graduated with diploma only, or with diploma and degree, 
are granted as follows : 

Cum laude, to all who are clearly distinguished during the 
whole course 1. for academic attainments; 2. for regular and 
punctual attendance, and 3. for general fitness for the Gospel 
Ministry. 

Magna cum laude, to all who possess these qualifications in an 
unusual degree. 

Summa cum laude, in very rare instances, in recognition of sur- 
passing merit. 



42 XENIA THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 



THE GRADUATE SCHOOL 

Advanced work is provided for those who wish to pursue 
studies beyond those required for the degree of Bachelor of 
Theology. The Graduate School offers work leading to the de- 
gree of Master of Theology (Th.M.) and to the degree of Doctor 
of Theology (Th.D.). 

Only credits earned in accredited institutions, colleges, uni- 
versities and seminaries and expressed in standards units, duly 
certified, will be accepted for evaluation in arriving at the eligibil- 
ity of candidates for the Master's degree. 

THE DEGREE OF MASTER OF THEOLOGY (Th.M.) 

1. Candidates for the Master's Degree. 

a. The requirements for entrance to the Graduate School as 
candidates for the degree of Th.M. are (1) The Bachelor's de- 
gree from a standard college or university and (2) Graduation 
from this Seminary or some other of like character upon the 
completion of a full three-year standard course of theological 
studies. The studies just mentioned must be entirely additional 
to those by which the college or university degree was won. 
These conditions are indispensable. Graduates of standard semin- 
aries, however, whose courses are equivalent, but which do not 
confer the bachelor's degree in theology, will be admitted as candi- 
dates for the master's degree. 

b. Undergraduates in this Seminary who have the degree of 
A. B. or its equivalent from a standard college or university and 
who are pursuing the Standard Course and maintain therein an 
average grade of 85 per cent, with not less than 80 per cent, in any 
subject, may be allowed to take one-third of the course leading to 
the degree of Th. M., in addition to the required work, during 
their Middle year and their Senior year. 

2. Work required for the Master's Degree. 

a. The work required for the degree of Th.M. shall be 
the equivalent of twenty- four semester hours. The student shall 
devote sixteen semester hours to one subject, which shall be 



XENIA THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 43 

called a major, and eight semester hours to another subject, 
which shall be called a minor; or two minor subjects may be 
chosen instead of the major, with the approval of the Faculty. 

b. In connection with the major subject, a thesis of 5,000 
words shall be required. The subject of the thesis shall be as- 
signed by, or have the approval of, the Professor in charge of the 
department not later than December 1st of the academic year in 
which the degree is sought. A type-written copy of the thesis 
shall be in the hands of the Professor for examination not later 
than April 1st. In case two minors are substituted for the major, 
the appointment of a thesis or of theses shall be left to the Pro- 
fessor or Professors in charge. 

c. At the conclusion of the assigned work, the student shall 
pass a thorough examination in both major and minor subjects. 

3. Personal presence. In all ordinary cases the candidate for 
a degree must be present when the degree is conferred. 

4. Fee. A fee of ten dollars will be charged to cover the ex- 
pense of graduation. 

THE DEGREE OF DOCTOR OF THEOLOGY (Th.D.) 

This degree is granted only after a very extended course of 
study. It is open only to those who have first received the Bache- 
lor's degree from a standard college or university, then have 
taken a full three-year standard theological course, then have 
won the degree of Master of Theology, in the manner described 
above, in Xenia Seminary or some other like school. 

These steps must have been taken without duplication of 
credits. 

There are other requirements, the particulars of which will be 
made known on application. 

GRADUATE SCHOOL LECTURES OFFERED FOR 1928-1929 

On Tuesday afternoons the following schedule will be car- 
ried out : 

First Semester — For entering students : 
1 :30 P. M. — Studies in First Timothy Dr. Webster 



44 XBNIA THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

2 :30 P. M. — Lives and Writings of the Early Church 

Fathers Dr. Johnson 

First Semester — For advanced students. 

1 :30 P. M. — Exegesis of Isaiah Dr. Kelso 

2 :30 P. M. — Revelation and Prophecy Dr. Kyle 

Second Semester — For entering students : 

1 :30 P. M. — Early Doctrinal Discussions Dr. Johnson 

2:30 P. M. — Foundations of Religion Dr. McCrEary 

Second Semester — For advanced students : 

1 :30 P. M. — Sermonic Material in Jeremiah Dr. Kelso 

2 :30 P. M. — Studies in First John Dr. Webster 



XENIA . THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 45 

OUTLINE OF GRADUATE COURSES 

The following outline by departments indicates the general 
scope within which graduate courses will be given by lectures 
and research seminars. 

I. HEBREW EXEGESIS AND OLD TESTAMENT LITERATURE 

DR. KELSO 

1. Biblical Aramaic. A study of the elements of the language, and 
the reading of the Aramaic sections of the Old Testament. 

Minor, eight semester hours. 

2. The Septuagint. The reading of selected portions of the Old 
Testament in Greek, comparing with the Hebrew and with other versions. 
A study of the origin and the problems of the Septuagint, on the basis 
of Swete's "Introduction to the Old Testament in Greek." 

Major, sixteen semester hours. 

3. Hebrezv Vocabularies. A seminar in the synonyms and antonyms 
of the Hebrew Old Testament. 

Minor, eight semester hours. 

4. Historical Geography of the Old Testament. 
Minor, eight semester hours. 

II. GREEK EXEGESIS AND NEW TESTAMENT LITERATURE 

DR. WEBSTER 

1. The Synoptic Problem. 
Minor, eight semester hours. 

2. The Epistle to the Hebrews. 
Minor, eight semester hours. 

3. The Christ ology of the Pauline Epistles. 
Major, sixteen semester hours. 

4. The Johannine Writings. 
Major, sixteen semester hours. 

III. BIBLICAL THEOLOGY AND ARCHAEOLOGY 

DR. KYLE 

1. Study of Methods in Biblical Theology. The aim here is to lead 
the student to discover the Biblical teachings through an application of 
the inductive method. 

Major, sixteen semester hours. Minor, eight semester hours. 
t, 2. Prophetism and Prophecy. 

A study of the meaning and scope of prophecy. 

Major, sixteen semester hours. Minor, eight semester hours. 
3. Book Study. The aim is to lead the student to ascertain the setting 
and the doctrinal content of the book, and how to utilize the findings. 
Major, sixteen semester hours. Minor, eight semester hours. 



46 XENIA THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

4. Archaeology of the Bible, especially the use of Archaeological ma- 
terial for homiletical purposes. 

Major, sixteen semester hours. Minor, eight semester hours. 

5. Methods of Archaeological Research, and Canons and Fallacies. 
Major, sixteen semester hours. By residence only. 

6. Archaeology and Criticism. An introduction to the use of Archae- 
ological material in Biblical criticism. 

Major, sixteen semester hours. Minor, eight semester hours. 

PASTORAL THEOLOGY 

DR. KYLE 

1. The Scriptural Basis of Pastoral Evangelism. 
Minor, two semester hours. 

2. Psychological Problems in Pastoral Evangelism. 
Minor, six semester hours. 

3. Sociological Problems in Pastoral Evangelism. 
Minor, four semester hours. 

4. Methods in Pastoral Evangelism. 

Minor, two semester hours. By residence only. 

IV. CHURCH HISTORY 

DR. JOHNSON 

1. The Lives and Writings of the Early Church Fathers. 

Open to those who have studied General Church History to 590 A. D. 
Minor, eight semester hours. 

2. Early Doctrinal Discussions. Open to those who have studied Gen- 
eral Church History to 1483 A. D. 

Major, sixteen semester hours. 

3. The Era of the Reformation. Open to those who have studied 
General Church History to 1483 A. D., and who have a knowledge of the 
Protestant Reformation in outline. 

Major, sixteen semester hours. 

4. Origin and History of the United Presbyterian Church of North 
America. A prerequisite to this is a fair knowledge of the Reformation in 
Scotland. 

Minor, eight semester hours. 

V. SYSTEMATIC THEOLOGY 

DR. KARR 

1. Doctrinal Studies in the Teaching of Jesus. 
Minor, eight semester hours. 

2. The Inspiration of the Scriptures. 
Major, sixteen semester hours. 

3. The Person of Christ. 
Major, sixteen semester hours. 

4. The Doctrine of Sin. 
Minor, eight semester hours. 



XENIA THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 47 

5. The Atonement. 

Major, sixteen semester hours. 

6. The Second Advent. 
Minor, eight semester hours. 

VI. PHILOSOPHY OF RELIGION AND APPLIED CHRISTIANITY 

DR. McCREARY 

1. The Philosophy of Religion. A critical review of the foundation 
concepts of religion. Interpretations of knowledge, reality, personality, 
deity, and similar subjects in their bearing upon Christian faith. 

Minor, eight semester hours. 

2. Apologetics. An evaluation of the apologetic element in present-day 
Theology and in current literature. 

Minor, four semester hours. 

3. Psychology of Religion. The newer phases of Psychology investi- 
gated and their significance for religion weighed. 

Minor, four semester hours. 

4. Religious Education. Curricular and methodological problems. The 
general theory of teaching applied. 

Minor, four semester hours. 

5. Christian Sociology. A seminar in concrete contemporary problems. 
Minor, four semester hours. 

THE AMERICAN SCHOOL OF ORIENTAL RESEARCH AT 
JERUSALEM 

Xenia Seminary is one of the group of Universities, Colleges, 
and Theological Seminaries in this country co-operating in the 
support and control of the American School of Oriental Research 
in Jerusalem, and is thus able to offer to her students the unique 
facilities possessed by this School. No other Post-graduate work 
is more profitable and attractive to young men looking forward to 
the work of the Ministry than study and research in Bible lands. 
The American School of Oriental Research at Jerusalem was 
founded to afford such opportunities as have never before been 
open to American students. Special arrangements are made to 
reduce the expenses of such students to the lowest point. 

Educational Opportunities Afforded 

The School offers to properly qualified students excellent oppor- 
tunities for pursuing such studies as the following: Biblical and 
Palestinian Archaeology; the Geography and Natural features 
of the Land ; the History of Israel ; Early Church History and 
Patristics; the Arabic Language, and the other Semitic Lan- 



48 XENIA THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

guages connected with it ; Mohammedanism ; the Political, Social, 
and Industrial Conditions in Bible Lands ; Roman Administration 
and Colonization in the East ; the Crusades ; and the Comparative 
History of Religions. 

The School has a well selected working library, which is stead- 
ily growing. There are other considerable libraries in Jerusalem, 
some of which contain large collections of manuscripts, chiefly 
Greek and Arabic. As a central point for the study of Palestin- 
ian antiquities, for making tours of research and exploration, and 
for visiting the numerous scenes of past or present excavations, 
Jerusalem is peculiarly well situated. 

Those who avail themselves of the privileges of this School 
can go at once after the Commencement at St. Louis, and enter 
the School at Jerusalem. The altitude and the latitude of Jeru- 
salem make the summer climate there quite satisfactory. The 
remainder of the year will afford abundant opportunity for travel 
through the land and researches in Historical Geography and 
Archaeology. 

The Thayer Memorial Fellowship 

The Thayer Memorial Fellowship of the School at Jerusalem, 
with a stipend of $800, is awarded annually on examination. A 
list of the books recommended to candidates for the Fellowship, 
and special facilities for preparation, will be supplied by the 
Seminary. 

AFFILIATION WITH WASHINGTON UNIVERSITY 

One of the chief considerations which induced the Commission 
of the Board of Managers, charged with the relocation of Xenia 
Theological Seminary, to fix upon the City of St. Louis, was 
the extremely favorable university connection that was offered. 
Washington University is an old and honored foundation, with 
magnificent buildings, and is regarded as the greatest graduate 
school of the whole Southwest. Xenia's new location is within 
a few minutes' walk of its grounds. Through the courtesy of the 
Chancellor and the other authorities, a full exchange of credits 
has been granted, without any control of our teachings or policies. 
So short is the distance, that those who desire to complete their 
academic course or to work for an advanced degree, can do so 
without inconvenience or loss of time. The advantages of this 
affiliation are manifest. 




MAIN ENTRANCE TO WASHINGTON UNIVERSITY 



XENIA THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 51 



GENERAL INFORMATION 



LOCATION OF THE SEMINARY 

The Seminary is located at the corner of Washington and 
Trinity Avenues in University City, a beautiful suburb of St. 
Louis. The slight elevation above the City and the distance from 
river and factory deliver us from most of the fog and smoke 
of the St. Louis region. 

HOW TO REACH THE SEMINARY 

From the Union Station take any northbound car and ride three 
blocks to Eighteenth and Olive Streets. Transfer to a Delmar- 
Olive car westbound and ride to the end of the line. A short 
walk of one block south and one block west brings you to the 
Seminary Building. All students are required to be present at 
the opening session. 

GENERAL EQUIPMENT 

There are two buildings, joined on the fourth floor and on the 
ground floor. The Administration Building contains the Presi- 
dent's office, most of the class rooms and the Professors' studies, 
the Library, and the Chapel. In the Dormitory are rooms for 
the students and quarters for the Matron and for the Janitor. 
An attractive Reception Hall leads into the Dining Room on the 
one hand and into the Parlor on the other. Both Dining Room 
and Parlor are large and well furnished, and open for use. We 
have steam heat, electric lights, good water, a bath room on each 
dormitory floor, and a Seminary Laundry in the basement. 

THE LIBRARY 

The Seminary Library contains about 18,000 bound volumes, 
among which are many rare old books. About 1,000 of these have 
been acquired during the past year. Under the direction oi 
the Librarian of the Faculty, the students use these books for 
the investigation of assigned subjects. Students also have access 
to the Library of the Washington University of 240,000 bound 



52 XENIA THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

volumes, and to the St. Louis Public Library of 650,000 bound 
volumes. 

About fifty current American religious magazines and journals 
come regularly to the Seminary; also, twelve leading foreign 
religious journals, representing England, France, Germany, Italy, 
Belgium, Sweden. This extensive and varied current literature 
is available to the students. 

Through the generosity of the late Mr. Alexander Dempster, 
of Pittsburgh, Pa., the Seminary has been provided with the raised 
map of Palestine published by the Palestine Exploration Fund, 
London, England, from surveys by George Armstrong. Mounted 
in normal position on a substantial table, this map is of special 
value in the study of Sacred Geography and History. 

RESERVATION OF ROOMS 

Students who have been here for one or two years may reserve 
rooms at the end of the Seminary session by consulting the 
Matron. The two-year men have first choice of rooms, the one- 
year men have second choice, the alphabetical order being ob- 
served within each group. New students are assigned to their 
rooms in the fall, and have right of choice in the order of their 
written application. 

We are not prepared to accommodate married students and 
their wives in the Dormitory, but will assist them in finding 
proper accommodations. 

USE OF ROOMS DURING THE SUMMER 

Students may have free use of their rooms for two weeks before 
the opening in September and for two weeks after Commence- 
ment in May. Otherwise, those who desire to use their rooms 
during the summer vacation must secure permission from the 
Vice-President, and pay a nominal charge of $10.00 a month to 
cover expenses. When two students occupy the same room, a joint 
monthly charge of $15.00 shall be made. These rates apply only 
to students. Any others desiring to use the Dormitory facilities 
must make special arrangements with the Vice-President. 

THE RELIGIOUS LIFE OF THE SEMINARY 

The religious life of the Seminary is on a high plane. Xenia 
students are trained in the cultivation of personal religion, and 



XBNIA THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 55 

provision is made for the development and expression of religion 
in its social aspects. A chapel service forms part of the daily 
schedule. The young men are organized as a local branch of 
the Student Y. M. C. A. This organization conducts its own 
devotional service one evening during the week, and provides the 
leader for the Seminary prayer meeting, in Chapel, Tuesday 
morning. The Student Volunteers meet weekly for prayer and 
conference, and in other ways promote the missionary spirit of 
the Seminary. 

THE SOCIAL LIFE OF THE SEMINARY 

A spirit of good cheer and mutual helpfulness pervades the 
institution. The atmosphere is decidedly home-like. Castes and 
cliques are taboo, and all are united in a wholesome Christian 
fellowship. The members of the Faculty are the students' best 
friends, and every student is a brother to every other student. 
Without excessive diversion from study, there are seasonable 
socials and entertainments at the Seminary, and the students also 
have an appropriate share in the social life of the Churches of 
the City. Every season brings forward high-class lectures and 
concerts in the City which further enlarge the students' oppor- 
tunity for social and aesthetic culture. 

PHYSICAL TRAINING 

The physical man is not forgotten. "Mens sana in corpore 
sano" is a principle from which Christian students do not seek 
exemption. Wholesome food, pure air and water, abundant op- 
portunities for exercise, — all the requisites to good health are 
provided. On the Seminary property, next to the Dormitory, is 
a splendid tennis court and a ball field, where the young men, 
thanks to a favoring climate, can secure outdoor exercise the 
greater part of the year. Moreover, the commodious gymnasium 
of the First United Presbyterian Church, in the same block with 
the Seminary, is open to the students for basket ball and other 
indoor games at certain times during the week. These opportuni- 
ties, which are by no means neglected, in some measure account 
for the excellent health enjoyed by the students at Xenia. 



56 XBNIA THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

THE SEMINARY QUARTETTE 

The Xenia Quartette is one of the very attractive features of 
Seminary life, the most popular symbol of the culture and har- 
mony for which Xenia stands. Notwithstanding occasional inter- 
ruptions due to the graduation of students, the Quartette has had 
an almost continuous existence for a number of years past. Its 
services, both in this community and in the more remote parts of 
the Church, have been of a high order and have evoked the 
warmest expressions of appreciation. 

EXPENSES 

The necessary expenses of a course of theological training are 
reduced to a minimum. The building is thoroughly equipped, and 
there are no fees or rentals for privileges and accommodations. 
The Seminary furnishes bedding, but each student is urged to 
bring with him towels; also a traveling rug or blanket, for which, 
in occasional extreme weather, he may have use. The Seminary 
Dining Room is economically managed by the Student Club, the 
cost of maintenance amounting to about $27 a month to each 
member. Students living in the Dormitory free of rent are ex- 
pected to take all regular meals in the Seminary Dining Room. 
The Seminary Laundry and the Seminary Book Store enable the 
students to effect a still further saving. 

OPPORTUNITIES FOR WORK 

The Seminary has received a most cordial welcome in the City 
of St. Louis. This great center of population offers an excellent 
field for Christian effort and sociological study. It also affords 
numerous opportunities of employment to those who must make 
their own way. The Churches are enthusiastic in pledging co- 
operation and support. Such support was, of course, to be ex- 
pected from the United Presbyterian congregations, and it is 
being given in full measure. But other denominations also, espe- 
cially the Presbyterian, U. S., the Presbyterian, U. S. A., the 
Congregationalist and the Methodist, have shown a most friendly 
attitude from the outset. Some of them employ students of the 
Seminary in congregational work. All the students have some 
experience in preaching in the City Missions. 



XENIA THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 57 

COMPENSATED RELIGIOUS WORK 

Members of the Junior Class will receive the sum of fifty dol- 
lars each for the year, on condition of their engaging in religious 
work, not otherwise fully compensated, in the churches of this 
community, or in adjacent fields. As the students advance into 
the Middle and Senior Classes, they have increasing opportunities 
of preaching, for which they receive an appropriate compensation. 

STUDENT LOANS 

From the income of our Students' Fund, we are prepared to 
loan to those who may desire it, the sum of fifty dollars a year, 
or more in case of real need, on their personal notes, without 
interest for five years from date of loan ; at the expiration of 
this period, interest at the rate of six per cent, per annum will be 
charged until payment is made. 

AID FROM THE BOARD OF EDUCATION 

The Board of Education is authorized by the General Assembly 
to make special grants in aid to United Presbyterian students of 
theology upon the recommendation of their Presbytery. The 
annual payments are as follows : 

"To first year students not to exceed $180.00 ; to second year 
students not to exceed $120.00; and to third year students not 
to exceed $60.00. * * * 

"No money shall be paid to students of the first year who 
during the sessions of the Seminary receive compensation for 
preaching on the Sabbath, nor to students of the second year who 
preach for compensation more than an average of two Sabbaths 
a month during the Seminary session. And no money shall be 
paid to any student who holds a pastoral charge or engages in 
special religious work such as will interfere with his duties in 
the Seminary. • * * * Ordinarily no grant will be made to a 
student who marries immediately prior to entering upon or while 
pursuing his Seminary course. * * * Absolute abstinence 
from the use of tobacco is made an essential requirement for 
receiving aid from the Beneficiary Fund." 

"Students receiving aid must be under the care of the Presby- 
tery, receive its formal endorsement and recommendation, and 
be in attendance at one of our denominational institutions. The 



58 XBNIA THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

amount paid to each student shall be fixed, in its relation to the 
full appropriation granted, by the time of his actual attendance 
during- the year. * * * In all ordinary cases the benefactions 
shall date from the time of application." 

DONATIONS AND BEQUESTS 

On account of the low rate of interest, a large amount of in- 
vested funds is required to meet the current expenses of the 
Seminary. The enlargement of our permanent Endowment Fund 
has not kept pace with the necessary growth of our work and 
the advancing prices of all commodities. It is imperative that 
Xenia's Endowment Fund be very greatly augmented. Accord- 
ingly, the Seminary is cordially commended to the liberality of 
all to whom our church and ministry are dear. Appeal is also 
made to such as are making bequests to remember this institu- 
tion. Special attention is called to the Annuity Plan. The form 
of Annuity Bond issued by the Seminary in this connection may 
be found on a subsequent page. 

DR. HENDERSON'S WORK AS PROMOTION SECRETARY 

For three years ending May 1, 1928, Dr. John A. Henderson 
served as promotion secretary and assistant to the president. Dr. 
Henderson labored with unremitting zeal to make the churches 
of the seven supporting synods acquainted with the merits of the 
Seminary and responsive to its needs. The fruits of his labors 
are becoming manifest in enlarged revenues of money and friend- 
ship. His recent retirement makes it fitting that the Seminary 
thus recognize the arduous work of Dr. Henderson. 



XENIA THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 59 



FORM OF BEQUEST 



FOR PERSONAL PROPERTY 

I hereby give and bequeath to the Xenia United Presbyterian 

Theological Seminary of St. Louis, Mo., the sum of 

Dollars, or notes or bonds. 

(Here describe them.) 



FOR REAL ESTATE 

I give and devise to the Xenia United Presbyterian Theological 
Seminary of St. Louis, Mo., its successors and assigns, for- 
ever, the following described tract or lot of land, in township 

of , County of , 

State of , and bounded and described as 

follows: (Here describe the piece of land with such accuracy 
and definiteness that it may certainly be known. If such devisor? 
wish to make bequests to any of the Seminary funds, — endowment, 
income, or library fund, — they should specify the particular fund 
they have in view.) 



60 XBNIA THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

FORM OF ANNUITY BOND 

Series A. No „ 

THE XENIA UNITED PRESBYTERIAN 

THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

OF ST. LOUIS, MO. 

In consideration of a GIFT of Dollars. 

the receipt of which is hereby acknowledged, 

issued this 

LIFE ANNUITY BOND 

and agrees to pay to the order of 

of in the state of 

an annuity or yearly sum of dollars, 

in equal semi-annual installments, on June fifteenth and December 
fifteenth of each year during the remainder of h — ...life, and upon 
the death of said annuitant this obligation shall be void and said 
annuity shall cease. 

The heirs, executors, administrators, or assigns, of said an- 
nuitant shall be entitled to any proportionate share of said annuity 
from the last semi-annual payment to the date of said annuitant's 
death. 

In Witness Whereof, the said Theological Seminary has 
caused its corporate seal to be hereunto affixed and these presents 
to be signed by its President and Secretary this 

day of , One Thousand Nine Hundred 

and 



Secretary. President. 



CORRESPONDENCE 

For Catalogues or any other information concerning the Seminary , 
address 

XENIA THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY, 

6834 Washington Avenue, St. Louis, Mo. 



INDEX 

PAGE 

Administration of the regular course - 37 

Admission of Students—- - - — 38 

Aid for Students 57, 53 

Alumni Association - — - 13 

American School of Oriental Research at Jerusalem - 47, 48 

Annuity Bonds, forms for - - - 60 

Applied Christianity, courses in - 33, 34 

Archaeology, Biblical, courses in — 27-29 

Attendance requirements - - — 39, 40 

Bachelor of Theology, degree of - - -— 40 

Bequests, forms for - 59 

Biblical Theology, courses in - 27-29 

Board of Managers - - — — - 11 

Board of Trustees - -- 12 

Calendar of Special Days — - 5 

Calendars of 1928 and 1929 Inside Cover 

Church History, courses in - 30, 31 

Classification of Students - 38 

Control of the Seminary 9 

Curriculum of Divinity School (general statement) ,.—....23 

Curriculum of Divinity School (tabulated outline) 25 

Diploma at graduation- - - - -40 

Divinity School, courses outlined and described - - 26-37 

Divinity School, Curriculum (general statement) — 23 

Divinity School, Curriculum (tabulated outline) - - 25 

Divinity School, register of students — - - - - - - 20-22 

Doctor of Theology, degree of - - - - -43 

Doctrinal History, courses in - -31 

Donations - — -58 

Equipment, general - - -.- — ' —51 

Examinations 40 

Expenses — 56 

Faculty 14 

Graduate courses - - 42 

Graduate School, courses outlined and described 45-47 

Graduate School, register of students - — - 17-20 

Graduate work, Tuesday schedules, 1928-1929 - 43, 44 

Graduation, requirements for 40 

Greek, Introductory - - 34 

History of Doctrines, courses in - -31 

Homiletics, courses in — — - - 32, 33 

Honors, graduation — 41 

Information, general - - 51-58 



62 XENIA THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 



PAGE 

Ladies' Visiting and Advisory Board 13 

Library 51-54 

Master of Theology, degree of 42, 43 

New Testament Exegesis, courses in-- — .....27 

New Testament Literature, courses in 27 

Officers of the Faculty — - 14 

Old Testament Exegesis, courses in ■- —26 

Old Testament Literature, courses in 26 

Pastoral Theology, courses in 29 

Philosophy of Religion, courses in - 33, 34 

Physical training - 55 

Professors, historical roll of, 1794-1928 -IS 

Public Speaking, courses in - 34-37 

Purpose of the Seminary 23 

Quartette 56 

Recreation 55 

Register of Students, Divinity School 20-22 

Register of Students, Graduate School -17-20 

Religion, Philosophy of, courses in 33, 34 

Religious life — - 54, 55 

Religious work, compensated - 57 

Rooms, reservation of - 54 

Schedules for 1928-1929 35, 36 

Self-help, opportunities for - 56 

Social Life 55 

Special lecturers and preachers, 1927-1928- - 16 

Students, classification of - - 38 

Student Volunteer Band - 13 

Systematic Theology, courses in 31, 32 

Theology, Biblical, courses in - 27-29 

Theology, Pastoral, courses in 29 

Theology, Systematic, courses in 31, 32 

Washington University, affiliation with 48 

Young Men's Christian Association— - 13 



[June Edition} 

ANNUAL CATALOGUE 

OF THE 

Xenia Theological 
Seminary 




Service, Pa. 1794 

Canonsburg, Pa. 1821 

Xenia, Ohio 1855 

St. Louis, Mo. 1920 



Calendar for 1929 


JANUARY 


FEBRUARY 


MARCH 


APRIL 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


" 6 


7 


1 
8 


2 
9 


3 
10 


4 
1 1 


5 
12 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 


1 
8 


2 
9 










7 


1 
8 


2 
9 


7 


1 
8 


2 
9 


3 
10 


4 
1 1 


5 
12 


6 
13 


3 


4 


5 


6 


13 


14 


15 


16 


17 


ie 


1S 


10 


1 1 


12 


13 


14 


15 


16 


10 


1 1 


12 


13 


14 


15 


16 


14 


15 


16 


17 


18 


19 


20 


20 


21 


22 


23 


24 


25 


26 


17 


18 


19 


20 


21 


22 


22 


17 


18 


19 


20 


21 


22 


23 


21 


22 


23 


24 


25 


26 


27 


27 


28 


29 


30 


31 






24 


25 


26 


27 


28 






24 
31 


25 


26 


27 


28 


29 


30 


28 


29 


30 










MAY 


JUNE 


JULY 


AUGUST 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 








1 
8 


2 
9 


3 
10 


4 

11 














1 
8 


* 7 


1 
8 


2 
9 


3 
10 


4 
1 1 


5 
12 


6 
13 




i 




1 
8 


2 
9 


3 
10 


5 


6 


7 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 


4 


6 6 


7 


12 


13 


14 


15 


16 


17 


16 


9 


10 


1 1 


12 


13 


14 


15 


14 


15 


16 


17 


18 


19 


20 


1 1 


12(13 


14 


15 


16 


17 


19 


20 


21 


22 


23 


24 


25 


16 


17 


18 


19 


20 


21 


22 


21 


22 


23 


24 


25 


26 


27 


18 


19120 


21 


22 


23 


24 


26 


27 


28 


29 


30 


31 




23 
30 


24 


25 


26 


27 


28 


29 


28 


29 


30 


31 








25 


26 27 


28 


29 


30 


31 


SEPTEMBER 


OCTOBER 


NOVEMBER 


DECEMBER 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F 8 


1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 






1 


2 


3 


4 


5 












1 


2 


1 


2 


3 


4 


6 


6 


7 


8 


9 


10 


1 1 


12 


13 


14 


6 


7 


8 


9 


10 


1 1 


12 


3 


4 


6 


6 


7 


6 


9 


8 


9 


10 


1 1 


12 


13 


14 


15 


16 


17 


18 


19 


20 


21 


13 


14 


15 


16 


17 


18 


19 


10 


1 1 


12 


13 


14 


15 


16 


15 


16 


17 


18 


19 


20 


21 


22 


23 


24 


25 


26 


27 


26 


20 


21 


22 


23 


24 


25 


26 


1 7 


18 


19 


20 


21 


22 


23 


22 


23 


24 


25 


26 


27 


28 


29 


30 












27 


28 


29 


30 


31 






24 


25 


26 


27 


28 


29 


30 


29 


30 


31 










Calendar for 1930 


JANUARY 


FEBRUARY 


MARCH 


APRIL 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 








1 
8 


2 

9 


3 
10 


4 
1 1 














1 
8 














1 
8 


6 


7 


1 
8 


2 
9 


3 
10 


4 
1 1 


5 
12 


5 


6 


7 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 


12 


13 


14 


15 


16 


1 7 


18 


y 


10 


1 1 


12 


13 


14 


15 


9 


10 


1 1 


1? 


13 


14 


15 


13 


14 


15 


16 


17 


18 


19 


19 


20 


21 


22 


23 


24 


25 


16 


17 


18 


19 


20 


21 


22 


16 


17 


18 


19 


20 


21 


22 


20 


21 


22 


23 


24 


25 


26 


26 


27 


28 


29 


30 


31 




23 


24 


25 


26 


27 


28 




23 
30 


24 
31 


25 


26 


27 


28 


29 


27 


28 


29 


30 














MAY 


JUNE 


JULY 


AUGUST 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 










1 
8 


2 
9 


3 
10 


1 
8 


2 
9 


3 
10 


4 
11 


5 
12 


6 
13 


7 
14 


6 


7 


1 
R 


2 
9 


3 
10 


4 
1 1 


5 
12 












1 
8 


2 
9 


4 


5 


6 


7 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 


1 1 


12 


13 


14 


15 


16 


17 


15 


16 


17 


18 


19 


20 


21 


13 


14 


15 


16 


17 


18 


19 


10 


1 1 


12 


13 


14 


16 


16 


18 


19 


20 


21 


22 


23 


24 


22 


23 


24 


25 


26 


27 


28 


20 


21 


22 


23 


24 


25 


26 


17 


18 


19 


20 


21 


22 


23 


25 


26 


27 


28 


29 


30 


31 


29 


30 












27 


28 


29 


30 


31 






24 
31 


25 


26 


27 


28 


?Q 


30 


. . .i . . . 














SEPTEMBER 


OCTOBER 


S 


NOVEMBER 


DECEMBER 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


7 


1 
8 


2 
9 


3 
10 


4 
1 1 


5 
12 


6 
13 








1 
8 


2 
9 


3 
10 


4 
1 1 














1 
8 


' 7 


1 
8 


2 
9 


3 
10 


4 

1 1 


5 

12 


6 

13 


5 


6 


7 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 


14 


15 


16 


17 


18 


19 


20 


12 


13 


14 


15 


16 


17 


18 


9 


10 


1 1 


12 


13 


14 


15 


14 


15 


16 


17 


18 


19 


20 


21 


22 


23 


24. 


25 


26 


27 


19 


20 21 


22 


23 


24 


25 


16 


17 


18 


19 


20 


21 


22 


21 


22 


23 


24 


25 


26 


27 


28 


29 


30 










26 


27.28 


29 


30 


31 




23 


24 


25 


?fi 


27 


?R 


29 


?R 


29 


30 


31 
























. . .1 . . 










30 . 


























The Annual Catalogue 



OF THE 



Xenia 

United Presbyterian 

Theological Seminary 

of St. Louis, Missouri 




One Hundred and Thirty-Sixth Year 
1929-1930 



CALENDAR OF SPECIAL DAYS 



1929 



1. The Opening of the Session. 

Wednesday, September 18th, 9 A. M. to 12 M., Registration of Stu- 
dents. 2 P. M., in the Chapel, Address of Welcome by the President. 
Address by the President of the Board of Managers. 

2. The Opening Sermon. 

Thursday, September 26th, at 11 :20 A. M., in the Seminary Chapel, 
by the Reverend Norman B. Harrison, D.D., St. Louis, Missouri. 

3. Opening of the Graduate School. 
Tuesday, October 1st, at 1 :30 P. M. 

4. The Christmas Vacation. 

Friday, December 20th, at 12 M., until Tuesday, January 7th, at 
8 A. M. 

1930 

5. The Day of Prayer for Colleges and Seminaries. 
Wednesday, February 19th. 

6. The Baccalaureate Sermon. 

Sabbath, May 4th, at 8 P. M., at the Third United Presbyterian 
Church, by the Reverend Professor M. G. Kyle, D.D., LL.D. 

7. The Annual Meeting of the Board of Trustees. 
Tuesday, May 6th, at 10 A. M. 

8. The Seminary Banquet, Alumni and Friends. 
Tuesday, May 6th, at 6:30 P. M. 

9. The Annual Meeting of the Board of Managers. 

Wednesday, May 7th, at 10 A. M. The Senior Theses will be read at 
the afternoon session. 
10. The Graduation Exercises. 

Thursday, May 8th, at 8 P. M., in the First United Presbyterian 
Church. Commencement Address, Reverend J. Layton Mauze, D.D., 
Kansas City, Missouri. 



THE CONTROL OF THE 
SEMINARY 



THE SEMINARY is under the control of 
the Second Synod, and the Synods of 
Illinois, Iowa, Kansas, Nebraska, Cali- 
fornia, and The Columbia, of the United Pres- 
byterian Church. Its immediate control is com- 
mitted to a Board of Managers, twenty-five in 
number, appointed by the Synods, and a Board 
of Trustees, twelve in number, appointed by the 
Board of Managers. The Term and the Course 
of Study are determined by the General Assemblv. 



Xenia Seminary has lost by death three highly valued 
members of its Board of Managers within the last year. 

The Reverend Francis Ross, D.D., entered into his re- 
ward December 14. 1928. He was elected President of the 
Board of Managers in May, 1928. He was a faithful and 
efficient minister of Christ and ably filled the various 
offices with which the church honored him. 

The Reverend Professor Jeremiah Boston Work, D.D., 
who was called home on March 27, 1929, served his Master 
and the Church long and well as minister and teacher. 
He will be held in grateful remembrance especially by the 
large number who in youth came under his influence in 
college classrooms. 

Mr. W. H. Ramsay, a business man of Garner, Iowa, 
was a fine type of Christian gentleman. He was interested 
and active in the enterprises of the church, and faithful 
as a steward of his time and his means. The Christian 
character and service of such men are the hope of the 
church. 

These three men were actively interested in the seminary. 
While the institution deeply feels its loss in their removal, 
it bows in submission to Him whose dealings with His 
people are the expression of an infinite wisdom and love. 



XENIA THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 11 



BOARD OF MANAGERS 



Officers 

REV. Wm. MurchiE, D.D., President Wichita, Kans. 

Rev. Frank Boyd, D.D., Vice-President Greeley, Colo. 

Mr. T. Dales Kyle, Financial Secretary and Treasurer Xenia, Ohio 

Rev. W. H. Hastings, Recording Secretary St. Louis, Mo. 

Members 
THE SECOND SYNOD 

Term Expires 

Prof. R. R. Ramsay, Ph.D., Bloomington, Ind 1929 

Rev. E. H. Thompson, Idaville, Ind 1930 

Rev. R. A. JamiEson, Cedarville, Ohio 1930 

Rev. J. P. Nesbit, D.D., Princeton, Ind 1931 

Rev. D. L. Ferguson, B.D., Richmond, Ind 1931 

THE SYNOD OF ILLINOIS 

Rev. R. C. Gibson, D.D., Chicago, 111 1929 

Rev. A. A. Graham, D.D., Monmouth, 111 1929 

Rev. A. Campbell Bailey, Moline, 111 1930 

Mr. R. H. White, Marissa, 111 1930 

REV. C. G. Mann, Sussex, Wis - 1931 

REV. H. H. McConnell, Th.M., St. Louis, Mo 1931 

THE SYNOD OF IOWA 

Mr. Will MillEn, Red Oak, Iowa Jan. 1, 1930 

Rev. R. E. Lackey, Carlisle, Iowa Jan. 1, 1931 

*W. H. Ramsay, Esq., Garner, Iowa Jan. 1, 1932 

Rev. W. C. Williamson, D.D., LL.D., Monmouth, 111. Jan. 1, 1933 

THE SYNOD OF KANSAS 

Rev. F. H. Wright, Tulsa, Okla 1929 

Rev. Wm. MurchiE. D.D., Wichita, Kan. 1930 

REV. H. E. Scott, Sterling, Kan. 1931 

THE SYNOD OF NEBRASKA 

Rev. J. Clyde Mahaefey, D.D., Loveland, Colo 1929 

Rev. Frank Boyd. D.D., Greeley, Colo 1930 

*Mr. Ramsay died on May 26, 1929. 



12 XENIA THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

THE SYNOD OF CALIFORNIA 

Rev. H. P. Espy, Fresno, Calif 1929 

Rev. C. E. Hanna, Whittier, Calif. - 1929 

THE SYNOD OF THE COLUMBIA 

Rev. W. G. Comin, Nampa, Idaho 1929 

Rev. M. E. Dunn, D.D., Portland, Ore. - 1929 

EX-OFFICIO MEMBER 

President M. G. KylE, D.D., LL.D St. Louis, Mo. 

CONSULTATIVE MEMBERS OF THE BOARD OF MANAGERS 

Proeessor Jesse Johnson, D.D. Professor Robt. M. Karr, D.D. 
Professor J. H. Webster, D.D. Professor J. L. Kelso, A.M., Th.D., D.D. 
Professor G. B. McCreary, Ph.D., D.D. 



BOARD OF TRUSTEES 

(Under the Missouri Charter) 

Officers 

Mr. ErlE Ormsby, President, 146 N. Central Ave., Clayton, Mo. 
Mr. T. Dales Kyle, Financial Secretary and Treasurer, Xenia, Ohio. 
Rev. W. H. Hastings, Recording Sec, 3524a Wyoming St., St. Louis, Mo. 

Members 

Term Expires 

Mr. W. J. Johnston, 3610 Forest Park Blvd., St. Louis, Mo.- 1930 

Mr. Wm. SchattgEn, 2934 Allen Ave., St. Louis, Mo. 1930 

Mr. John M. Stuart, 4252a Cleveland Ave., St. Louis, Mo. -•*? 1930 

Mr. J. M. Murry, 1324 Laurel St., St. Louis, Mo. 1930 

REV. J. F. LeClErE, Th.M., 2605 Union Blvd., St Louis, Mo. 1931 

Mr. T. Dales Kyle. Xenia, Ohio 1931 

Mr. G. R. McCullough, 6117 Westminster Place, St. Louis, Mo. 1931 

Mr. A. O. Wilson, 14 Windermere Place, St. Louis, Mo. 1931 

Mr. B. F. Edwards, 10 Kingsbury Place, St. Louis, Mo. 1932 

William R. Gentry, Esq., 5157 Vernon Ave., St. Louis, Mo. 1932 

J. M. Lashly, Esq., 20 Windermere Place, St. Louis, Mo 1932 

Mr. ErlE Ormsby, 146 N. Central Ave., Clayton, Mo 1932 

President M. G. KylE, D.D., LL.D., St. Louis, Mo. Ex-Officio Member 



XENIA THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 13 

BOARD OF TRUSTEES 

(Under the Ohio Charter) 

Mr. Robert Bryson, Xenia, Ohio 1930 

Mr. W. B. Cherry, Xenia, Ohio 1930 

Mr. J. C. Williamson, Xenia, Ohio 1930 

Mr. J. A. Finney, Esq., Xenia, Ohio 1931 

Mr. T. Dales KylE, Xenia, Ohio 1931 

Mr. J. E. KylE, Cedarville, Ohio 1931 

Mr. S. Walter Collins, Bloomington, Ind. 1932 

Mr. O. A. Dobbins, Cedarville, Ohio 1932 

B. R. McClEllan, M.D., Xenia, Ohio 1932 

LADIES' VISITING AND ADVISORY BOARD 

Mrs. M. G. KylE, President. Mrs. J. L. Kelso. 

Mrs. J. H. Webster, Vice-President, Mrs. G. B. McCrEary. 
Mrs. A. O. Wilson, Secretary. Mrs. J. F. LeClErE. 

Mrs. Jesse Johnson, Treasurer. Miss Elizabeth BrownlEE. 
Mrs. Joseph KylE. Mrs. Libbie M. Keller. 

Mrs. Robt. M. Karr. Mrs. Wm. Schattgen. 

THE STUDENTS' Y. M. C. A. 

Evert L. Haney, President. 
Harry W. Orr, Vice-President. 
Charles Smith, Secretary-Treasurer. 

THE ALUMNI ASSOCIATION 

Rev. J. P. Nesbit, D.D., President Princeton, Ind. 

Rev. R. E. Lackey, Vice-President Carlisle, Iowa 

REV. R. A. JamiESOn, Secretary Cedarville, Ohio 



14 XENIA THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 



PRESIDENT OF THE SEMINARY 

The Reverend Melvin Grove KyeE, A.M., D.D., LL.D. 



THE FACULTY 



The Rev. Jesse Johnson, A.M., D.D., 

Professor of Church History. 

Registrar. 

The Rev. John Hunter Webster, A.M., D.D., 
Professor of Greek Exegesis and New Testament Literature. 

Librarian. 

The Rev. Melvin Grove Kyle, A.M., D.D., LL.D., 

Newburg Professor of Biblical Theology and Biblical 

Archaeology. Adjunct Professor of Practical 

Theology and Religious Education. 

The Rev. Robert McNary Karr, A.M., D.D., 

Professor of Systematic Theology and Homiletics. 

Vice-President. 

The Rev. James Leon Keeso, A.M., Th.D., D.D., 
Professor of Hebrew Exegesis and Old Testament Literature. 

The Rev. George Boone McCrEary, Ph.D., D.D., 
Professor of the Philosophy of Religion and Applied Christianity. 

Secretary. 

Thomas Shearer Duncan, A.M., Ph.D., 
Instructor in Public Speaking. 



XENIA THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 15 



HISTORICAL ROLL OF PROFESSORS 



During the one hundred and thirty-six years of the Semi- 
nary's history, under, various names and in different localities, 
in all thirty-two men have served as professors for more or less 
extended periods of time. The roll is as follows : 

Inaugu- Period 

Name * rated at of Service 

John Anderson : Service 1794-1819 

John Banks -- Philadelphia 1820-1826 

James Ramsey Canonsburg 1821-1842 

David Carson Canonsburg 1834-1834 

Thomas BevEridge - Canonsburg 1835-1855 

Thomas BevEridge Xenia 1855-1871 

Joseph Claybaugh Oxford 1839-1855 

Samuel W. McCracken Oxford 1839-1840 

James Martin Canonsburg 1842-1846 

Abraham Anderson Canonsburg 1847-1855 

Samuel Wilson Xenia — — - 1855-1875 

William Davidson Oxford 1855-1858 

Alexander Young Oxford 1855-1857 

Alexander Young Monmouth 1858-1874 

John Scott - Monmouth 1858-1874 

Joseph Clokey - - Xenia 1858-1873 

Andrew M. Black Monmouth 1864-1874 

David A. Wallace Monmouth 1867-1870 

David A. Wallace Xenia 1883-1883 

William Bruce Xenia 1871-1880 

James G. Carson Xenia 1873-1888 

William G. Moorehead Xenia 1873-1914 

Jackson B. McMichael Xenia 1873-1878 

James Harper Xenia 1879-1899 

David MacDill Xenia 1884-1902 

Wilbert W. White Xenia 1889-1894 

John D. Irons Xenia 1895-1905 

Joseph KylE Xenia 1899-1921 

Jesse Johnson Xenia 1902 

John E. Wishart Xenia 1905-1923 

John H. Webster Xenia 1908 

Melvin G. KylE Xenia 1914 

Robert M. Karr, St. Louis 1922 

James L. Kelso St. Louis 1923 

Geo. B. McCrEary —St. Louis -1924 



16 XENIA THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

SPECIAL LECTURES AND SERMONS 1928-29 

The Rev. William Murchie, President of the Board of Managers, 

Wichita, Kan. 
The Rev. Professor M. G. KylE, D.D., LL.D., President of the Seminary. 
Dr. and Mrs. Howard Taylor, of the China. Inland Mission. 
The Rev. Thos. D. Edgar, D.D., Pastor Second United Presbyterian 

Church, Wilkinsburg, Pa. 
The Rev. Frank G. BeardslEy, Ph.D., Pastor Fountain Park Congrega- 
tional Church, St. Louis, Mo. 
The Rev. Ivan LEE Holt, D.D., Pastor St. John's M. E. Church, South, 

St. Louis, Mo. 
The Rev. W. J. McMichaEl, D.D., Pastor United Presbyterian Church. 

Greensburg, Pa. 
The Rev. W. A. Spalding, D.D., Moderator of the General Assembly, 

Albany, Ore. 
The Rev. R. Calvin Dobson, D.D., Pastor First Presbyterian Church, 

St. Louis, Mo. 
The Rev. R. W. BurnsidE, D.D., Cor. Secretary Board of Ministerial 

Relief. Philadelphia, Pa. 
The Rev. M. Ashby Jones, D.D., Pastor Second Baptist Church. St. 

Louis, Mo. 
The Rev. W. B. Anderson, D.D., Corresponding Secretary Board of For- 
eign Missions, Philadelphia, Pa. 
The Rev. J. H. Webster, D.D., Professor of Neiv Testament Literature 

and Exegesis, Xenia Seminary. 
The Rev. Arthur H. Armstrong, D.D., Executive Secretary the Church 

Federation, St. Louis, Mo. 
The Rev. J. E. Bradford, D.D., General Secretary Board of Education, 

Chicago, 111. 



XENIA THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 17 



THE REGISTER OF STUDENTS 

1928-1929 



THE GRADUATE SCHOOL 

I. Candidates for the Degree of Doctor of Theology 

A. Students in Residence 

Reverend Care Leo Attig Edwardsville, 111. 

A.B., Cincinnati University, 1907. 
Lane Theological Seminary, 1910. 
Th.M., Xenia Theological Seminary, 1927. 

Reverend Thomas Ross Hicks Webster Groves, Mo. 

A.B., Boston University, 1909. 

S.T.B., Boston University, 1911. 

Th.M.,, Xenia Theological Seminary, 1927. 

Reverend George Wales King, D.D - St. Louis, Mo. 

Syracuse University. 

Auburn Theological Seminary, 1901. 

Th.M., Xenia Theological Seminary, 1925. 

Reverend James Frederick LeClErE St. Louis, Mo. 

A.B., Monmouth College, 1916. 
Pittsburgh Theological Seminary, 1919. 
Th.M., Xenia Theological Seminary, 1926. 

Reverend Harold Harper McConnell St. Louis, Mo. 

A.B., Monmouth College, 1916. 
Pittsburgh Theological Seminary, 1919. 
Th.M., Xenia Theological Seminary, 1926. 

Reverend Lowell A. Van Patten - St. Louis, Mo. 

A.B., Sterling College, 1923. 
Princeton Seminary, 1926. 
Th.M., Princeton Seminary, 1928. 

B. Students doing Assigned Work Elsewhere 

Reverend James Best, D.D. Wilkinsburg, Pa. 

A.B., Tarkio College, 1905. 

Xenia Theological Seminary, 1908. 

B.D., Princeton Theological Seminary, 1910. 



18 XENIA THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

Reverend Wieeiam Crowe, Jr. - Tuscumbia, Ala. 

A.B., Southwestern Presbyterian University, 1921. 
B.D., Union Theological Seminary, Richmond, Va., 1924. 
Th.M., Xenia Theological Seminary, 1926. 

Reverend Wieeiam Chareton Latta Wellsville, O. 

A.B., Miami University, 1924. 

Th.B., Xenia Theological Seminary, 1927. 

Th.M., Xenia Theological Seminary, 1928. 

Reverend Kenneth Mieton Monroe Ashland, Ohio 

A.B., University of Southern California, 1922. 
Th.B., Xenia Theological Seminary, 1926. 
Th.M., Xenia Theological Seminary, 1926. 

Reverend John Henderson Moorehead, D.D Dayton, Ohio 

A.B., Monmouth College, 1892. 
Xenia Theological Seminary, 1895. 
Th.M., Xenia Theological Seminary, 1927. 

Reverend Wileard VedeeeE Ritchie Kittanning, Pa. 

A.B., Muskingum College, 1910. 

Xenia Theological Seminary, 1914. 

Th.M., Pittsburgh Theological Seminary, 1925. 

Reverend Robert McIntosh Sturgeon Cranston, R. I. 

A.B., Muskingum College, 1898. 
Pittsburgh Theological Seminary, 1902. 
B.D., Xenia Theological Seminary, 1923. 

Reverend Frederick Syevester ZeeeEr Aledo, 111. 

A.B., Sterling College, 1922. 

Th.B., Xenia Theological Seminary, 1926. 



II. Students who received the Degree of Master of Theology 
May 27, 1929 

Reverend Wieeiam Henry Hastings St. Louis, Mo. 

A.B., Monmouth College, 1916. 
Pittsburgh Theological Seminary 1919. 

Reverend Albert Jay Levengood St. Louis, Mo. 

A.B., Mission House College, 1913. 
Mission House Seminary, 1916. 



XENIA THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 19 

III. Candidates for the Degree of Master of Theology 
A. Students in Residence 

Reverend Carl Richard HempEl Belleville, 111. 

Elmhurst College, 1897. 
Eden Seminary, 1900. 

Reverend Penn. H. Howard St. Louis, Mo. 

A.B., Carleton College, 1915. 

B.D., Southern Methodist University, 1924. 

Divinity School, University of Chicago, 1927-28. 

Reverend Fred Edward John SchEnk St. Louis, Mo. 

Graduate Elmhurst College, 1913. 
Eden Theological Seminary, 1916. 

Reverend Leigh OrvillE Wright St. Louis, Mo. 

Ph.B., The College of Wooster, 1915. 
Princeton Theological Seminary, 1920. 

B. Students Doing Assigned Work Elsewhere 

Reverend Lewis Robin Brown Pinckneyville, 111. 

Muskingum College, 1925. 

Th.B., Xenia Theological Seminary, 1928. 

Reverend William Earl Crane • Porterdale, Ga. 

A.B., Davidson College, 1922. 

B.D., Union Theological Seminary (Va.), 1925. 

Reverend Walter Montgomery Crofton Dublin, Ga. 

B.A., Rice Institute, 1922. 

M.A., University of Carolina, 1927. 

B.D., Columbia Theological Seminary, 1928. 

Reverend John Russell Dugan Philadelphia, Pa. 

A.B., Monmouth College. 

B.D., Xenia Theological Seminary, 1924. 

Reverend Elbert L. McCreery Fort Morgan, Colo. 

A.B., Monmouth College, 1903. 
Xenia Theological Seminary, 1906. 

Reverend Robert McCunE Cedar Rapids, Iowa 

Muskingum College, 1925. 

Xenia Theological Seminary, 1928. 

Reverend John Bright Pollock Reinbeck, Iowa 

A.B., Washington and Jefferson College, 1890. 
Pittsburgh Theological Seminary, 1893. 



20 XBNIA THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

Reverend Maurice Clifford Seaman Atlantic, Iowa 

A.B., Muskingum College, 1925. 

Th.B., Xenia Theological Seminary, 1928. 

Reverend Archibald Wilson Webster — Salinas, Calif. 

A.B., Princeton University, 1921. 
A.M., Washington University, 1926. 
Th.B., Xenia Theolgical Seminary, 1925. 

IV. Undergraduate Student Doing Extra-Curriculum Work for the 
Degree of Master of Theology. 

Gerald Guyot Latal St. Louis, Mo. 

A.B., Westminster College (Mo.), 1927. 

Hannibal Presbytery, Presbyterian Church, U. S. A. 

V. Persons Attending Lectures as Auditors 

Reverend Job Harry Bullock - Overland, Mo. 

A.B., Eureka College, 1907. 
Disciples of Christ. 

Reverend F. A. Goetsch - - St. Louis, Mo. 

Eden Theological Seminary, 1908. 

Reverend Frank Fred Otto — - Edwardsville, 111. 

Methodist Episcopal Church. 

Irwin Raut Granite City, 111. 

A.B., University of Missouri, 1898. 
Graduate School University of Chicago. 

Reverend August C. Rosche St. Louis, Mo. 

Reverend J. Field SpEEl - - St. Louis, Mo. 



THE DIVINITY SCHOOL 

THE SENIOR CLASS, 1928-1929 

Graduated with Degree of Bachelor of Theology 

James Walter Irwin Belle Center, Ohio 

A.B., Muskingum College, 1926. 
Ohio Northwestern Presbytery. 

Harold Ross Karnes - New Concord, Ohio 

A.B., Muskingum College, 1926. 
Muskingum Presbytery. 



XENIA THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 21 

William Montgomery Nichol, Jr.—.- - Brooklyn, N. Y. 

A.B., Muskingum College, 1926. 
Presbytery of the Hudson. 

THE MIDDLE CLASS, 1928-1929 

Evert LEE HanEy — - Sterling, Kan. 

A.B., Sterling College, 1927. 
Arkansas Valley Presbytery. 

Charles Theodore Heusinkveld St. Louis, Mo. 

A.B., University of Illinois, 1925. 

St. Louis Presbytery, Presbyterian Church, U. S. A. 

Miss MuriEl Inez Inlow - University City, Mo. 

Brookes Bible Institute. 

The Gospel Center, St. Louis, Mo. 

Gerald Guyot Latal - - - - -- St. Louis, Mo. 

A.B., Westminster College (Mo.), 1927. 

Hannibal Presbytery, Presbyterian Church, U. S. A. 

Frederick John Lenk - — - St. Louis, Mo. 

Moody Bible Institute. 

St. Louis Presbytery, Presbyterian Church, U. S. 

Harry Wilson Orr - Fowler, Kansas 

Sterling College. 

Iowa Presbytery, Associate Presbyterian Church. 

FrEd LorimEr REEvES - - -Philadelphia, Pa. 

Moody Bible Institute. 

St. Louis Presbytery, Presbyterian Church, U. S. 

Zion Robbins Stanton, Ky. 

A.B., Muskingum College, 1928. 
First Ohio Presbytery. 

Harold Stewart Wilson - Sterling, Kan. 

A.B., Sterling College, 1927. 
Arkansas Valley Presbytery. 

THE JUNIOR CLASS, 1928-1929 

Louis Day Kennedy Coulterville, 111. 

A.B., Cedarville College, 1928. 
Presbytery of Southern Illinois. 

Andrew McGaffin, Jr - Philadelphia, Pa. 

A.B., Muskingum College, 1928. 
Philadelphia Presbytery. 



22 XENIA T HEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

Charles Smith, Jr : Millvale, Pa. 

Pittsburgh Academy. 
Allegheny Presbytery. 

William Arthur Thompson Pinckneyville, 111. 

B.S., Monmouth College, 1928. 
Presbytery of Southern Illinois. 

George Carl Westberg - Norwich, Ohio 

Muskingum College. 
Muskingum Presbytery. 

Robert Alvin Wilson - Tilden, 111. 

A.B., Monmouth College, 1926. 
Presbytery of Southern Illinois. 



SPECIAL STUDENTS, 1928-1929 

ClETus Pinkston Lamb Ridgway, 111. 

Blackburn College. 

Cairo Presbytery, Presbyterian Church, U. S. A. 

Gerald Vivian HalsEy Melone - St. Louis, Mo. 

A.B., Muskingum College, 1920. 

Mrs. J. R. MoFEiTT Webster Groves, Mo. 

Miss Margaret Webster St. Louis, Mo. 

A.B., Monmouth College, 1925. 



SUMMARY OF STUDENTS, 1928-1929 

The Graduate School: 

Candidates for the Degree of Doctor of Theology : 

Resident Students 6 

Non-resident Students 8 

Candidates for the Degree of Master of Theology: 

Resident Students 6 

Non-resident Students — 9 

Auditors 6 

35 



XENIA THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 23 

Th£ Divinity School : 

Seniors 3 

Middlers 9 

Juniors 6 

Special Students 4 

22 

THE PURPOSE OF THE SEMINARY 

"The object of the Seminary shall be to instruct candidates for 
the Gospel ministry, and others who may be preparing for spe- 
cial lines of Christian service, in the knowledge of the doctrine 
of the Scriptures and the order and institutes of worship taught 
therein and summarily exhibited in the Standards of the United 
Presbyterian Church of North America ; to cherish in them the 
life of true godliness, and to cultivate the gifts which Christ, the 
Head of the Church, confers on those whom He calls to the 
ministry, to the end that there may be raised up a succession of 
able, faithful, and godly ministers of the Gospel and other Chris- 
tian workers." (Constitution, Ch. I., Sec. 2.) 



THE DIVINITY SCHOOL 



THE COURSE OF STUDY 

The full course of Seminary training extends over a period 
of three years. The Seminary year begins on the first Wednesday 
after the 17th of September, and closes on the first Wednesday 
or Thursday after the first of May. Each annual session is 
divided into two semesters. 



24 XBNIA THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

The different departments, with their respective courses of 
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One hundred and ten semester hours, including two in Public 
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26 XENIA THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 



DESCRIPTION OF COURSES OF STUDY 



I. HEBREW EXEGESIS AND OLD TESTAMENT LITERATURE 

DR. KELSO 

The purpose of this department is to teach the students to 
read the less difficult portions of the Hebrew Old Testament 
accurately, fluently, and with a real sense of appreciation; and 
to handle the more difficult sections with the aid of a proper 
lexicon and an advanced grammar. Thus, at the close of the 
three year course a student is competent to be his own exegete. 

In connection with the Hebrew work, the Canon of the Old 
Testament and the introductory problems of the Old Testament 
books are considered in detail. 

1. Elements of Hebreiv. A mastery of the principles of Hebrew Gram- 
mar, and the acquisition of a working vocabulary. 

Juniors, first semester, four hours a week. 

2. Hebrew Prose. Sight reading of selected passages of the Minor 
Prophets. Analytical study of the Hebrew Text and exegesis of the 
Book of Jonah. The Old Testament Canon. 

Juniors, second semester, four hours a week. 

3. The Minor Prophets. Exegetical study of these books with special 
reference to their theological and social teachings. The Old Testament 
Canon. 

Middlers and Seniors, first semester, three hours a week (1929-30). 

4. The Psalms and the Wisdom Literature. Exegetical study of selected 
Psalms in the light of Hebrew Poetry, and as devotional literature of the 
present day. Rapid survey of the Wisdom Literature. 

Middlers and Seniors, second semester, three hours a week (1929-30). 

5. Isaiah. Exegetical study of the book, with special reference to con- 
temporary history and Messianic prophecy. 

Middlers and Seniors, first semester, three hours a week (1930-31). 

6. Jeremiah and Esekiel. Rapid survey of Jeremiah and Ezekiel 
with special reference to sermonic material. Summary of the whole field 
of the Old Testament Prophets. 

Middlers and Seniors, second semester, three hours a week (1930-31). 



XENIA THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 27 

II. GREEK EXEGESIS AND NEW TESTAMENT LITERATURE 

DR. WEBSTER 

The purpose of this department is to teach the students to 
know and use the Greek New Testament. While the value of 
exact scholarship is emphasized, the chief aim is to make the 
student an able minister of the New Testament. Instruction is 
given both by text-books and lectures, and everything is made 
subservient to learning "the mind of Christ," the vital requisite 
for a successful ministry. 

Introductory Greek is a prerequisite to the exegetical studies 
of this department. Those who have not had sufficient Greek 
in college are required to take a special course in Introduction to 
the Greek of the New Testament under Dr. McCreary. 

1. Introduction to the Nezv Testament. This course embraces a general 
survey of the books of the New Testament. 

Juniors, first semester, three hours a week. 

2. Textual Criticism of the New Testament. 
Juniors, second semester, one hour a week. 

3. The Gospel of John. An exegetical study of the book. 
Juniors, second semester, four hours a week. 

4. Exegetical studies in the Acts. 
Middlers, first semester, two hours a week. 

5. The Pastoral Epistles. An exegetical study. 
Middlers, second semester, two hours a week. 

6. The Life of Christ. 

Middlers, one hour a week throughout the year. 

7. Romans. An exegetical study. 

Seniors, three hours a week throughout the year. 

8. Assigned Reading. In addition to the foregoing exegetical studies, 
each class will be assigned selected portions of the Greek New Testament 
for outside reading. Oral examinations from time to time. 

HI. BIBLICAL THEOLOGY AND BIBLICAL ARCHAEOLOGY 

DR. KYLE 

Work in this department has a two-fold purpose, — to know the 
progress of Revelation, and to know it in its setting. So there 
are studies in the progress of Revelation to acquire a compre- 
hensive grasp of what the Bible teaches as a whole and in its 



28 XBNIA THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

various parts in the order of Revelation, together with the study 
of the historical setting of Scripture made known through Arch- 
aeological Research, in order to see the truths of Revelation as 
those saw them to whom they were revealed. 

There are class-room studies and quizzes through which the 
student discovers for himself the plan and progress of Revela- 
tion : also theses by all the students, together with assigned library 
research work. The Bible is the only text-book used, the English 
Bible for constant work, and the Hebrew and Septuagint Old 
Testament and the Greek New Testament for reference. There 
are lectures in Biblical Archaeology from the monuments and 
from first-hand research, so arranged with the studies in Biblical 
Theology as to enable the student constantly to see the Biblical 
story in its original setting. To this work are added quizzes, 
much library work, and an assigned reading course throughout 
the year. Some introductory lectures will be given to the Junior 
Class meeting separately to prepare them for a proper under- 
standing of the work in the general course. 

1. The Patriarchal Period. Principal subjects: Literary methods of 
early Biblical times; primitive man and the temptation; antediluvian 
civilization and Revelation ; the deluge ; Abraham and his times ; the de- 
scent into Egypt. 

All classes, first semester, three hours a week (1929-30). 

2. The Tribal Period. From the descent into Egypt to the Conquest 
of Canaan. Principal subjects: From court to corvee; Moses; the Reve- 
lation of God through the plagues of Egypt; the Exodus and the wilder- 
ness life ; the Revelation at Sinai ; the problem of the Pentateuch, and 
Old Testament chronology. 

All classes, first semester, three hours a week (1930-31). 

3. The National Period. From the Conquest of Canaan to the end of 
the Old Testament. Principal subjects: Times of the conquest; period 
of the Judges; David; the great period of Biblical literature; decline and 
apostasy; the great invasions; Isaiah; Daniel; the exile and reformation; 
the return and second glory of Israel ; Messianism ; prophetism, and 
inspiration. The Messianic Period: The consummation of the Messianic 
hope developed in the former periods. The Apostolic Period : The Appli- 
cation of Messianic teaching to preaching. 

All classes, first semester, three hours a week (1931-32). 



XENIA THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 29 

4. Research Methods. The class is directed in research work and in 
the preparation of theses utilizing archaeological material in Exegesis and 
for sermon illustrations. 

Middlers, first semester, one hour a week. 

5. Canons and Fallacies. A special course of studies to set forth the 
Canons and Fallacies of Archaeological Research. A thesis is required 
of each member of the class upon an assigned subject. 

Seniors, first semester, one hour a week. 

6. Public Research Lectures are given each year out of the research 
work of the Professor in charge. 



PASTORAL THEOLOGY 

DR. KYLE 
DR. KELSO 

Instruction in this subject is given by means of studies, quizzes, 
lectures, and practical exercises for each class separately, together 
with practical training for all classes in the problems of personal 
effort in soul saving. 

1. The Minister as a Student in the Seminary. Subjects: The call 
to the ministry; the minister's habits; ministerial manliness, ministerial 
ideals; keeping one's self; settlement, candidating, installation. 

Juniors, first semester, one hour a week. Dr. Kyle. 

2. The Minister as Pastor of the Congregation {A). Subjects: The 
pastor in the pulpit; problems of the ministerial life; social, business, and 
spiritual methods ; the pastor in relation to the Sabbath School, the Young 
People's Society, the Prayer Meeting, and prayer circles. 

Middlers, first semester, one hour a week. Dr. Kyle. 

3. The Minister as Pastor of the Congregation (B). Subjects: Super- 
vising the Sabbath School ; moderating the Session ; directing the congre- 
gational meeting ; the teachers' meeting ; conduct of pulpit service and 
prayer meeting ; the administration of the sacraments ; marriages ; and 
funerals. 

Middlers, second semester, one hour a week. Dr. Kelso. 

4. The Minister in the Larger Relations to Church and Community. 
Subjects: Pastoral evangelism; problems of city and country life; the 
institutional church ; pastoral visitation and counsel ; the benevolences of 
the Church ; ecclesiastical relations. 

Seniors, first semester, one hour a week. Dr. Kyle. 



30 XENIA THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

IV. CHURCH HISTORY 

DR. JOHNSON 

The aim of this department is to give a general knowledge 
of Church History, with emphasis on the most important move- 
ments and events ; to arouse an interest in the history of the 
Church which will lead to further study in this profitable field ; 
and to train in methods of historical study. In the study of each 
period special attention will be given to missionary development 
and expansion. The work is done by means of text-books, lec- 
tures, library readings, and students' reports on assigned topics. 

1. The Ancient Period, to 590 A. D. Principal subjects: Providential 
preparation for Christianity ; brief review of the life of Christ and the 
Apostolic Age ; spread of Christianity ; opposition ; alliance between Church 
and State ; heresies, councils, and creeds ; Christian life ; schisms ; the 
Fathers and their writings ; the theological schools. 

Juniors, first semester, two hours a week. 

2. The Medieval Period, 590-1517 A. D. Principal subjects: Missions; 
Islam; the Papacy and the Papal Church; the Eastern Church; Monasti- 
cism ; the Crusades ; medieval sects and persecutions ; Scholasticism ; the 
Mystics ; general Church conditions ; movements for reform ; precursors of 
the Reformation ; the Renaissance. 

Juniors, second semester, three hours a week. 

3. The Reformation Bra, 1517-1648 A. D. After a brief review of the 
providential preparatives for the Reformation, the principal subjects will 
be (1) the Reformation in Germany and the Lutheran Reformation in 
other lands ; (2) the Reformation in Switzerland and in other lands where 
the Reformed type of Protestantism prevailed; (3) the Counter-Reforma- 
tion; and (4) Roman Catholic Missions. The aim will be to bring the 
history of the Church in each country, as nearly as may be, down to the 
Peace of Westphalia, 1648. Here the text will be the two volume work, 
"History of the Reformation," by Lindsay. 

Middlers, first semester, three hours a week. 

4. European and American Church History, 1648-1925 A. D. 

(a) The principal subjects in European Church History will be the 
Roman Catholic Church in its relation to civil government and the national 
churches; controversies within the Roman Catholic Church; Rationalism 
and its effects ; Lutheranism and its controversies ; the Reformed Churches, 
with special notice of Presbyterianism ; the Anglican Church ; Deism ; the 
Methodist revival ; nineteenth century controversies. This study will be 
for the most part by countries. 



XENIA THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 31 

(b) In American Church History a study will be made of the Old 
World Sources ; early Roman Catholic missions ; the churches in the 
colonies ; decline and revival ; the great denominations ; divisions and 
unions ; home missions. The Presbyterian family of churches will receive 
special study. 

Middlers, second semester, five hours a week. 

5. History of the United Presbyterian Church of North America. 
Beginnings in Scotland; beginnings in America; the Union of 1782; the 
Associate Presbyterian Church, 1782-1858; the Associate Reformed Church, 
1782-1858; the Union of 1858; the United Presbyterian Church, 1858-1925. 
Any member of the class who is not a United Presbyterian may substitute 
for this course a study of his own Church, reporting to the Professor and 
the class as required. 

Seniors, first semester, one hour a week. 

6. History of Doctrine, {A). A study will be made especially of the 
history of Trinitarianism and Christology. If time permits, the history of 
Anthropology will be brought down to the time of Anselm. 

Seniors, first semester, two hours a week. 

7. History of Doctrine, (B). The study of Anthropology will be con- 
tinued, and will be followed by the doctrinal history of the Atonement, 
of Justification by Faith, and of Regeneration. Attention will then be 
given to Post-Reformation theology and to modern forms of statement 
of doctrines. 

Seniors, second semester, two hours a week. 

V. SYSTEMATIC THEOLOGY AND HOMILETICS 

DR. KARR 

The purpose in the study of Systematic Theology is to lead 
the student to clear and well-balanced views of the great doc- 
trines and principles comprised in the Christian faith. The 
text-book used is the complete work on Systematic Theology 
by Dr. A. H. Strong. There is class-room discussion based on 
a careful analysis of the text, supplemented by lectures and re- 
ports on assigned reading. Two hours a week throughout the 
entire course are required. 

1. (a) Introduction to the Study of Theology : The idea and purpose 
of Theology, the sources of material and the method of treatment. 
(b) The Existence of God: Origin of the idea of God, and evidence of 
His existence, (c) The Scriptures a Divine Revelation : The witness 
of miracle and prophecy to the fact of a divine revelation. 

Juniors, first semester, two hours a week. 



32 XENIA THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

2. (a) The Doctrine of Scripture {continued) : The genuineness of 
the documents, the credibility of the writers, the supernatural character 
and inspiration of Scripture, (b) The Doctrine of God: The divine 
attributes ; the doctrine of the Trinity. 

Juniors, second semester, two hours a week. 

3. (a) The Doctrine of God (continued) : The decrees and works of 
God: creation, preservation, providence, the angels, (b) The Doctrine of 
Man : The origin and nature of man, and the unity of the human race. 

Middlers, first semester, two hours a week. 

4. (a) The Doctrine of Man (continued) : The origin of the soul, 
the moral nature and primitive state of man. (b) The Doctrine of Sin: 
The Fall of man, the nature and universality of sin, and its consequences 
to the human race, (c) The Doctrine of Redemption: Preparation for 
redemption ; the person of Christ, His two natures and states. 

Middlers, second semester, two hours a week. 

5. (a) The Doctrine of Redemption (continued) : Offices and work 
of Christ; the Atonement, (b) The Doctrine of the Holy Spirit: The 
application of Redemption, — calling, union with Christ, regeneration, con- 
version, justification, sanctification. 

Seniors, first semester, two hours a week. 

6. (a) The Doctrine of the Church : Its constitution, organization, 
government, sacraments, and other ordinances of worship, (b) The 
Doctrine of Last Things: Death, the intermediate state, the coming of 
Christ, the resurrection, the judgment, and final awards. 

Seniors, second semester, two hours a week. 

HOMILETICS 
DR. KARR 

The study of Homiletics is designed to give the student high 
ideals of pulpit ministration, to correlate his growing knowledge 
and powers and bring them all to bear upon the effective expres- 
sion of Christian truth. 

1. The Preparation of Sermons. The permanent function and impor- 
tance of preaching ; the selection and interpretation of the text ; the struc- 
ture of the sermon ; the different kinds of sermons. A homily preached 
before the Faculty and student body. 

Juniors, first semester, one hour a week. 

2. The Preparation and Delivery of Sermons. The work of the first 
semester continued. Sermon materials, — explanation, argument, illustra- 
tion, and application ; qualities of style ; and modes of delivery. The 
relative advantages of the three modes of delivery are presented,— reading. 



XENIA THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 33 

speaking memoriter, and speaking extemporaneously. A doctrinal or sub- 
ject sermon preached before the Faculty and student body. 
Juniors, second semester, one hour a week. 

3. Sermon Outlines (A). Students are trained in the interpretation 
and analysis of texts, and in the construction and criticism of outlines 
of the various approved types of sermons. All outlines presented in 
writing. An expository lecture preached before the Faculty and student 
body. 

Middlers, first semester, one hour a week. 

4. Sermon Outlines (B). Work of the first semester continued, with 
special emphasis on the outlining of passages of Scripture for continuous 
exposition. All outlines presented in writing. A critical discourse on a 
passage assigned in the Hebrew or the Greek shall be publicly presented. 

Middlers, second semester, one hour a week. 

5. Sermon Outlines (C). In this course the students are trained in 
the construction of plans for doctrinal and subject sermons. All work 
presented in writing. A sermon preached publicly on a text of the 
student's own selection. 

Seniors, first semester, one hour a week. 

6. Sermon Outlines (D). Written analysis of the sermons of great 
preachers, ancient and modern. 

Seniors, second semester, one hour a week. 

VI. PHILOSOPHY OF RELIGION AND APPLIED CHRISTIANITY 

DR. McCREARY 

1. The Psychology of Religion. After a brief but comprehensive 
purvey of the field of Psychology in general, noting the leading current 
theories, particular applications are made in genetics, in the principles 
of teaching, in social expressions, and in religious experience. Several 
texts are used with lectures. 

Juniors, first semester, two hours a week. 

2. Biblical Ethics. Beginning with a philosophic introduction, both 
historical and critical, the Christian ideal of conduct is unfolded, noting 
contrasts and agreements with the more prominent systems. Particular 
attention is given to the applicatory feature, both individual and social 
bearings being considered. 

Juniors, second semester, three hours a week. 

3. Christian Sociology. After a review of general social theory as 
presented by leading authorities, the recognized problems are set forth 
with their proposed solutions. The Christian method of approaching and 



34 XENIA THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

solving these problems is presented. Particular emphasis is given to the 
application of the teaching of Jesus to the social order. 
Middlers, first semester, two hours a week. 

4. Apologetics. The ground of the older arguments is covered, with 
modern restatements and additions. Christianity is shown to be logically 
defensible. 

Middlers and Seniors, second semester, two hours a week (1929-30). 

5. Comparative Religion. The great religions of the world are studied 
historically and comparatively. Their philosophic bases and ethical 
and social features are carefully inspected. Particular attention is be- 
stowed on those rival faiths with which Christianity now most strongly 
competes. 

Middlers and Seniors, second semester, two hours a week (1930-31). 

6. The Philosophy of Religion. This course includes the usual materials 
of Theism. It also seeks to exhibit the epistemological foundations of 
faith, to state the analogical argument expositionally, to find an adequate 
ground of values, and to set forth the Christian religion as a philosophic 
system. A rationale of method is undertaken regarding religion in his- 
torical, aesthetical, and critical aspects. 

Seniors, two hours a week throughout the year. 

INTRODUCTORY GREEK 

DR. McCREARY 

This work is provided for those who have not had Greek in 
college, and is a prerequisite to the regular work in New Testa- 
ment exegesis. 

1. Introduction to Nezv Testament Greek (A). A rapid survey of the 
outstanding features of the grammar of the Greek New Testament. 

Juniors, first semester, five hours a week. 

2. Introduction to Nezv Testament Greek (B). A careful study of the 
New Testament syntax, based on Green's "Handbook to the Grammar 
of the Greek Testament." One of the Gospels is read from the Greek. 

Juniors, second semester, three hours a week. 

3. Supplementary Reading in Greek. In addition to the foregoing 
courses, the student is required to read selected portions of the Greek New 
Testament before entering the Middle class in New Testament exegesis. 

VII. PUBLIC SPEAKING 
DR. DUNCAN 

1. The Principles and Practice of Public Speaking. 
The various types of speech are studied in detail, and students are 
drilled in the important types. Attention is given to the development and 



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XENIA THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 37 

proper control of the voice and to the study and practice of the principles 
of gesture. Considerable attention is given to debating. Careful study 
is made, not only of delivery, but of the proper method of arranging ma- 
terial. In the study of speech care is taken to relate the work to the 
special needs of the minister. The course includes practice in the reading 
of the Scriptures with a view to making this part of the Church service 
more effective. 
Juniors, one hour a week throughout the year. 

2. Individual Training in Public Speaking. 

In addition to the regular class work, an attempt is made to give a fair 
amount of individual attention to the students. The best progress is made 
by those who combine the class work regularly with private instruction. 

Juniors by special appointment. 

ADMINISTRATION OF THE REGULAR COURSE 

Since our denominational standards specify that "in all ordi- 
nary cases a full collegiate course of study, or its equivalent, shall 
be required of those entering on the study of theology," the 
Course of Study in this Seminary is primarily designed for college 
graduates. It has been found necessary, however, to make some 
provision for those who have not had two years of Greek, and 
for part-time students. In the case of these special groups, suit- 
able arrangements have been made, as will appear in paragraphs 
A and B below. 

1. The Standard Course includes, besides the other disciplines, 
study of the Bible in the original languages throughout the three 
years. All who have the requisite preliminary training are ex- 
pected to take this course : the successful completion of it is one 
of the requirements for diploma with or without degree of Th.B. 

A. Introductory Greek. As a prerequisite to Greek Exegesis, 
the student must have a sufficient knowledge of the Greek lan- 
guage to enable him to take the Junior exegetical work in a 
manner satisfactory to the Professor in charge. Those who 
may be lacking in this regard are expected to make up the de- 
ficiency before the beginning of the Middle year. For the benefit 
of this class of students the Seminary provides a Course in Intro- 
ductory Greek. This is not, however, a credit course, and may 
not be substituted for any part of the regular course in Greek Exe- 



38 XENIA THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

gesis, — all of which must be done to the satisfaction of the Pro- 
fessor in charge and according to his appointment. 

B. Selected Studies. Students who for any reason are pre- 
vented from pursuing the full Course may, upon the special 
recommendation of their Presbytery and by action of the Faculty, 
be permitted to register for any part of the Course with which 
they may be competent to deal. Upon the satisfactory completion 
of their work, of which one semester hour shall be the minimum 
in any subject, they will receive a report of their grades and 
credits. The successful completion of fifty-six semester hours 
entitles the special student to a Certificate. 

CLASSIFICATION OF STUDENTS 

Students taking the regular course may be either Degree Stu- 
dents or Diploma Students, according as they are candidates for 
diploma with degree or for diploma without degree. 

TERMS OF ADMISSION 

1. General Terms. The privileges of the Seminary are ex- 
tended on equal terms to students of all evangelical denominations. 
The applicant shall present — 

a. Evidence of membership in good standing in his own Church. 

b. A certificate from his own Presbytery, or other ecclesiasti- 
cal authorities, indicating that he has been taken under their care, 
and approved as a student of theology. 

c. Credentials showing his academic attainments. 

2. Academic Requirements. 

a. Degree Students. Those who desire to qualify for degree 
on graduation should, upon entrance, have the degree of Bachelor 
of Arts, or its undoubted equivalent, from a standard college or 
university. Otherwise, they must satisfy the Faculty, by creden- 
tials and examination, that they have had courses of study and 
discipline fully equivalent to a standard college course, with 
special attention to the classical languages. Degree students shall 
enroll for the Standard Course. 



XBN1A THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 39 

b. Diploma Students. Students not having the full college 
preparation specified in our denominational standards may, upon 
the special recommendation of their Presbytery and by action of 
the Faculty, enter the Seminary for the regular Course. If they 
are able to take the whole Course creditably, they will receive the 
diploma of the Seminary at graduation. But they may not be 
candidates for degrees unless by additional study they satisfy all 
the requirements specified for degrees. Students of this class 
who expect to make up their deficiency in college credits and 
qualify for the degree of Th.B. at graduation must have this 
work completed by the beginning of the second semester of the 
Senior year. Diploma Students shall enroll for the Standard 
Course the first year. 

3. Formal Registration. Before being admitted to the Semi- 
nary, every student shall, in the presence of the Registrar, sub- 
scribe to a written declaration to the effect that while he is a stu- 
dent in the Seminary he will regularly, punctually, and diligently 
attend upon all the instructions of the Professors, and promptly 
comply with all lawful requisitions of the Faculty, and be subject 
to their authority; that he will honestly conform to all regulations 
of the Seminary, and that he will not propagate any opinion in op- 
position to the principles of the United Presbyterian Church. 

TIME OF ENTRANCE 

The proper time to enter the Seminary is at the opening of 
the annual session in September. Those who enter at mid-year, 
except by regular transfer from some other standard theological 
seminary, may be accepted as Special Students, but will not be 
regularly classified as Juniors until the following fall. 

ATTENDANCE 

All students are required to be present in all the classes in which 
they are enrolled, at the weekly preaching service in the Chapel, 
and at the appointed examinations. Attendance is also required 
at the opening of each semester, and again at the Baccalaureate 
and Graduation services in the spring, unless excused by the 
Faculty. All absences of the students, excused and unexcused, 
are reported to their respective Presbyteries. Absence at any time 



40 XENIA THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

during the Seminary session has an unfavorable effect on the 1 
student's standing. 

EXAMINATIONS 

At the close of each semester, examinations are held to test and 
organize the student's knowledge of the ground covered in the 
several departments. Ordinarily the examinations are written and 
the results are reported by the Faculty to the Board of Managers. 
From the class standing, the examinations, and the attendance, 
the grade of the student, based on a scale of 100, is determined 
and reported to his Presbytery. 

GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS 

One hundred and ten semester hours of work, including two 
in Public Speaking, are required for graduation. A semester hour 
means one recitation a week in a given subject throughout a sem- 
ester. A graduation thesis upon a subject agreed on by Student 
and Faculty must be completed by March 1st. The courses of 
study in the various departments are so arranged that all the 
students take nineteen hours the first semester, and during the 
second semester the Juniors take nineteen hours, the Middlers 
eighteen hours, and the Seniors sixteen hours. 

DIPLOMAS AND DEGREES AT GRADUATION 

1. Diploma. The diploma of the Seminary will be granted 
to all who complete creditably the Standard Course. One year 
of their work must be done in residence at this Seminary, and 
they must maintain an average grade of at least 75 per cent, 
throughout the whole course, with no semester grade in any sub- 
ject less than 70 per cent. 

2. Diploma with Degree of Bachelor of Theology (Th.B.). 
The Diploma of the Seminary with the degree of Th.B. will 
be granted to those students who — 

a. Have the degree of Bachelor of .Arts, or its equivalent, 
from a standard college or university; 

b. Take the Standard three-year Course of the Seminary, — 
one year of which must be in residence at this Seminary; 

c. Maintain an average grade of at least 75 per cent, through- 
out the whole Course, with no semester grade in any subject less 
than 70 pej cent. 



XBNIA THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 41 

Note : Graduates having diplomas without degree may become 
candidates for degrees by making up all deficiencies to the satisfaction 
of the Faculty. The degree of A. B. which is mentioned herein as a 
prerequisite to Seminary degrees must represent bona fide college work 
or its equivalent, without appropriation of any of the one hundred and 
ten credits secured in the regular Seminary Course. 

GRADUATION HONORS 

Graduation honors, not competitive, but open to all who qualify, 
whether graduated with diploma only, or with diploma and degree, 
are granted as follows : 

Cum laude, to all who are clearly distinguished during the 
whole course 1. for academic attainments; 2. for regular and 
punctual attendance, and 3. for general fitness for the Gospel 
Ministry. 

Magna cum laude, to all who possess these qualifications in an 
unusual degree. 

Summa cum laude, in very rare instances, in recognition of sur- 
passing merit. 



42 XENIA THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 



THE GRADUATE SCHOOL 

Advanced work is provided for those who wish to pursue 
studies beyond those required for the degree of Bachelor of 
Theology. The Graduate School offers work leading to the de- 
gree of Master of Theology (Th.M.) and to the degree of Doctor 
of Theology (Th.D.). 

Only credits earned in accredited institutions, colleges, uni- 
versities and seminaries and expressed in standards units, duly 
certified, will be accepted for evaluation in arriving at the eligibil- 
ity of candidates for the Master's degree. 

THE DEGREE OF MASTER OF THEOLOGY (Th.M.) 

1. Candidates for the Master's Degree. 

a. The requirements for entrance to the Graduate School 
as candidates for the degree of Th.M. are (1) The Bachelor's 
Degree from a standard college or university and (2) The Degree 
of Bachelor of Theology from this seminary or some other of 
like character, secured without duplication of credits. Grad- 
uates of standard seminaries, however, whose courses are equiva- 
lent, but which do not confer the Bachelor's Degree in Theology, 
will be admitted as candidates for the Master's Degree. 

b. Undergraduates in this Seminary who have the degree of 
A. B. or its equivalent from a standard college or university and 
who are pursuing the Standard Course and maintain therein an 
average grade of 85 per cent, with not less than 80 per cent, in anv 
subject, may be allowed to take one-third of the course leading to 
the degree of Th. M., in addition to the required work, during 
their Middle year and their Senior year. 

2. Work required for the Master's Degree. 

a. The work required for the degree of Th.M. shall be 
the equivalent of twenty-four semester hours. The student shall 
devote sixteen semester hours to one subject, which shall be 
called a major, and eight semester hours to another subject 
which shall be called a minor; or two minor subjects may be 
chosen instead of the major, with the approval of the Faculty. 



XENIA THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 43 

b. In connection with the major subject, a thesis of 5,000 
words shall be required. The subject of the thesis shall be as- 
signed by, or have the approval of, the Professor in charge of the 
department not later than December 1st of the academic year in 
which the degree is sought. A type-written copy of the thesis 
shall be in the hands of the Professor for examination not later 
than April 1st. In case two minors are substituted for the major, 
the appointment of a thesis or of theses shall be left to the Pro- 
fessor or Professors in charge. 

c. At the conclusion of the assigned work, the student shall 
pass a thorough examination in both major and minor subjects. 

3. Personal presence. In all ordinary cases the candidate for 
a degree must be present when the degree is conferred. 

4. Fee. A fee of ten dollars will be charged to cover the ex- 
pense of graduation. 

THE DEGREE OF DOCTOR OF THEOLOGY (Th.D.) 

This degree is granted only after a very extended course of 
study. It is open only to those who have first received the Bache- 
lor's degree from a standard college or university, then have 
taken a full three-year standard theological course, then have 
won the degree of Master of Theology, in the manner described 
above, in Xenia Seminary or some other like school. 

These steps must have been taken without duplication of 
credits. 

There are other requirements, the particulars of which will be 
made known on application. 



44 XENIA THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

OUTLINE OF GRADUATE COURSES 

The following outline by departments indicates the general 
scope within which graduate courses will be given by lectures 
and research seminars. Announcement of courses offered and 
hours of lectures for work in residence will be issued about 
September 15. 

I. HEBREW EXEGESIS AND OLD TESTAMENT LITERATURE 

DR. KELSO 

1. Biblical Aramaic. A study of the elements of the language, and 
the reading of the Aramaic sections of the Old Testament. 

Minor, eight semester hours. 

2. The Septuagint. The reading of selected portions of the Old 
Testament in Greek, comparing with the Hebrew and with other versions. 
A study of the origin and the problems of the Septuagint, on the basis 
of Swete's "Introduction to the Old Testament in Greek." 

Major, sixteen semester hours. 

3. Hebreiv Vocabularies. A seminar in the synonyms and antonyms 
of the Hebrew Old Testament. 

Minor, eight semester hours. 

4. Historical Geography of the Old Testament. 
Minor, eight semester hours. 

II. GREEK EXEGESIS AND NEW TESTAMENT LITERATURE 

DR. WEBSTER 

1. The Synoptic Problem. 
Minor, eight semester hours. 

2. The Epistle to the Hebrews. 
Minor, eight semester hours. 

3. The Christology of the Pauline Epistles. 
Major, sixteen semester hours. 

4. The Johannine Writings. 
Major, sixteen semester hours. 

III. BIBLICAL THEOLOGY AND ARCHAEOLOGY 

DR. KYLE 

1. Study of Methods in Biblical Theology. The aim here is to lead 
the student to discover the Biblical teachings through an application of 
the inductive method. 

Major, sixteen semester hours. Minor, eight semester hours 



XENIA THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 45 

2. Prophctism and Prophecy. 

A study of the meaning and scope of prophecy. 

Major, sixteen semester hours. Minor, eight semester hours. 

3. Book Study. The aim is to lead the student to ascertain the setting 
and the doctrinal content of the book, and how to utilize the findings. 

Major, sixteen semester hours. Minor, eight semester hours. 

4. Archaeology of the Bible, especially the use of Archaeological ma- 
terial for homiletical purposes. 

Major, sixteen semester hours. Minor, eight semester hours. 

5. Methods of Archaeological Research, and Canons and Fallacies. 
Major, sixteen semester hours. By residence only. 

6. Archaeology and Criticism. An introduction to the use of Arrhar 
ological material in Biblical criticism. 

Major, sixteen semester hours. Minor, eight semester hours. 

PASTORAL THEOLOGY 

DR. KYLE 

1. The Scriptural Basis of Pastoral Evangelism. 
Minor, two semester hours. 

2. Psychological Problems in Pastoral Evangelism. 
Minor, six semester hours. 

3. Sociological Problems in Pastoral Evangelism. 
Minor, four semester hours. 

4. Methods in Pastoral Evangelism. 

Minor, two semester hours. By residence only. 

IV. CHURCH HISTORY 

DR. JOHNSON 

1. The Lives and Writings of the Early Church Fathers. 

Open to those who have studied General Church History to 590 A. 1). 
Minor, eight semester hours. 

2. Early Doctrinal Discussions. Open to those who have studied Gen- 
eral Church History to 1483 A. D. 

Major, sixteen semester hours. 

3. The Era of the Reformation. Open to those who have studied 
General Church History to 1483 A. D., and who have a knowledge of the 
Protestant Reformation in outline. 

Major, sixteen semester hours. 

4. Origin and History of the United Presbyterian Church of North 
America. A prerequisite to this is a fair knowledge of the Reformatior. in 
Scotland. 

Minor, eight semester hours. 



46 XENIA THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

V. SYSTEMATIC THEOLOGY 

DR. KARR 

1. Doctrinal Studies in the Teaching of Jesus. 
Minor, eight semester hours. 

2. The Inspiration of the Scriptures. 
Major, sixteen semester hours. 

3. The Person of Christ. 
Major, sixteen semester hours. 

4. The Doctrine of Sin. 
Minor, eight semester hours. 

5. The Atonement. 

Major, sixteen semester hours. 

6. The Second Advent. 
Minor, eight semester hours. 

VI. PHILOSOPHY OF RELIGION AND APPLIED CHRISTIANITY 

DR. McCREARY 

1. The Philosophy of Religion. A critical review of the foundation 
concepts of religion. Interpretations of knowledge, reality, personality, 
deity, and similar subjects in their bearing upon Christian faith. 

Minor, eight semester hours. 

2. Apologetics. An evaluation of the apologetic element in present-day 
Theology and in current literature. 

Minor, four semester hours. 

3. Psychology of Religion. The newer phases of Psychology investi- 
gated and their significance for religion weighed. 

Minor, four semester hours. 

4. Religious Education. Curricular and methodological problems. The 
general theory of teaching applied. 

Minor, four semester hours. 

5. Christian Sociology. A seminar in concrete contemporary problems. 
Minor, four semester hours. 

THE AMERICAN SCHOOL OF ORIENTAL RESEARCH AT 
JERUSALEM 

Xenia Seminary is one of the group of Universities, Colleges, 
and Theological Seminaries in this country co-operating in the 
support and control of the American School of Oriental Research 
in Jerusalem, and is thus able to offer to her students the unique 
facilities possessed by this School. No other Post-graduate work 
is more profitable and attractive to young men looking forward to 



XENIA THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 47 

the work of the Ministry than study and research in Bible lands. 
The American School of Oriental Research at Jerusalem was 
founded to afford such opportunities as have never before been 
open to American students. Special arrangements are made to 
reduce the expenses of such students to the lowest point. 

Educational Opportunities Afforded 

The School offers to properly qualified students excellent oppor- 
tunities for pursuing such studies as the following: Biblical and 
Palestinian Archaeology; the Geography and Natural features 
of the Land; the History of Israel; Early Church History and 
Patristics; the Arabic Language, and the other Semitic Lan- 
guages connected with it ; Mohammedanism ; the Political, Social, 
and Industrial Conditions in Bible Lands ; Roman Administration 
and Colonization in the East ; the Crusades ; and the Comparative 
History of Religions. 

The School has a well selected working library, which is stead- 
ily growing. There are other considerable libraries in Jerusalem, 
some of which contain large collections of manuscripts, chiefly 
Greek and Arabic. As a central point for the study of Palestin- 
ian antiquities, for making tours of research and exploration, and 
for visiting the numerous scenes of past or present excavations, 
Jerusalem is peculiarly well situated. 

Those who avail themselves of the privileges of this School 
can go at once after the Commencement at St. Louis, and enter 
the School at Jerusalem. The altitude and the latitude of Jeru- 
salem make the summer climate there quite satisfactory. The 
remainder of the year will afford abundant opportunity for travel 
through the land and researches in Historical Geography and 
Archaeology. 

The Thayer Memorial Fellowship 

The Thayer Memorial Fellowship of the School at Jerusalem, 
with a stipend of $800, is awarded annually on examination. A 
list of the books recommended to candidates for the Fellowship, 
and special facilities for preparation, will be supplied by the 
Seminary. 



48 XBNIA THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

AFFILIATION WITH WASHINGTON UNIVERSITY 

One of the chief considerations which induced the Commission 
of the Board of Managers, charged with the relocation of Xenia 
Theological Seminary, to fix upon the City of St. Louis, was 
the extremely favorable university connection that was offered. 
Washington University is an old and honored foundation, with 
magnificent buildings, and is regarded as the greatest graduate 
school of the whole Southwest. Xenia's new location is within 
a few minutes' walk of its grounds. Through the courtesy of the 
Chancellor and the other authorities, a full exchange of credits 
has been granted, without any control of our teachings or policies. 
So short is the distance, that those who desire to complete their 
academic course or to work for an advanced degree, can do so 
without inconvenience or loss of time. The advantages of this 
affiliation are manifest. 



• -n 




MAIN ENTRANCE TO WASHINGTON UNIVERSITY 



XENIA THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 51 



GENERAL INFORMATION 



LOCATION OF THE SEMINARY 

The Seminary is located at the corner of Washington and 
Trinity Avenues in University City, a beautiful suburb of St. 
Louis. The slight elevation above the City and the distance from 
river and factory deliver us from most of the fog and smoke 
of the St. Louis region. 

HOW TO REACH THE SEMINARY 

From the Union Station take any northbound car and ride three 
blocks to Eighteenth and Olive Streets. Transfer to a Delmar- 
Olive car westbound and ride to the end of the line. A short 
walk of one block south and one block west brings you to the 
Seminary Building. All students are required to be present at 
the opening session. 

GENERAL EQUIPMENT 

There are two buildings, joined on the fourth floor and on the 
ground floor. The Administration Building contains the Presi- 
dent's office, most of the class rooms and the Professors' studies, 
the Library, and the Chapel. In the Dormitory are rooms for 
the students and quarters for the Matron and for the Janitor. 
An attractive Reception Hall leads into the Dining Room on the 
one hand and into the Parlor on the other. Both Dining Room 
and Parlor are large and well furnished, and open for use. We 
have steam heat, electric lights, good water, a bath room on each 
dormitory floor, and a Seminary Laundry in the basement. 

THE LIBRARY 

The Seminary Library contains about 18,000 bound volumes, 
among which are many rare old books. Under the direction of 
the Librarian of the Faculty, the students use these books for 
the investigation of assigned subjects. Students also have access 
to the Library of the Washington University of 240,000 bound 



52 XENIA THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

volumes, and to the St. Louis Public Library of 650,000 bound 
volumes. 

About fifty current American religious magazines and journals 
come regularly to the Seminary ; also, twelve leading foreign 
religious journals, representing England, France, Germany, Italy, 
Belgium, Sweden. This extensive and varied current literature 
is available to the students. 

Through the generosity of the late Mr. Alexander Dempster, 
of Pittsburgh, Pa., the Seminary has been provided with the raised 
map of Palestine published by the Palestine Exploration Fund, 
London, England, from surveys by George Armstrong. Mounted 
in normal position on a substantial table, this map is of special 
value in the study of Sacred Geography and History. 

RESERVATION OF ROOMS 

Students who have been here for one or two years may reserve 
rooms at the end of the Seminary session by consulting the 
Matron. The two-year men have first choice of rooms, the one- 
year men have second choice, the alphabetical order being ob- 
served within each group. New students are assigned to their 
rooms in the fall, and have right of choice in the order of their 
written application. 

We are not prepared to accommodate married students and 
their wives in the Dormitory, but will assist them in finding 
proper accommodations. 

USE OF ROOMS DURING THE SUMMER 

Students may have free use of their rooms for two weeks before 
the opening in September and for two weeks after Commence- 
ment in May. Otherwise, those who desire to use their rooms 
during the summer vacation must secure permission from the 
Vice-President, and pay a nominal charge of $10.00 a month to 
cover expenses. When two students occupy the same room, a joint 
monthly charge of $15.00 shall be made. These rates apply only 
to students. Any others desiring to use the Dormitory facilities 
must make special arrangements with the Vice-President. 

THE RELIGIOUS LIFE OF THE SEMINARY 

The religious life of the Seminary is on a high plane. Xenia 
students are trained in the cultivation of personal religion, and 



XENIA THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 55 

provision is made for the development and expression of religion 
in its social aspects. A chapel service forms part of the daily 
schedule. The young men are organized as a local branch of 
the Student Y. M. C. A. This organization conducts its own 
devotional service one evening during the week, and provides the 
leader for the Seminary prayer meeting, in Chapel, Tuesday 
morning. 

THE SOCIAL LIFE OF THE SEMINARY 

A spirit of good cheer and mutual helpfulness pervades the 
institution. The atmosphere is decidedly home-like. Castes and 
cliques are taboo, and all are united in a wholesome Christian 
fellowship. The members of the Faculty are the students' best 
friends, and every student is a brother to every other student. 
Without excessive diversion from study, there are seasonable 
socials and entertainments at the Seminary, and the students also 
have an appropriate share in the social life of the Churches of 
the City. Every season brings forward high-class lectures and 
concerts in the City which further enlarge the students' oppor- 
tunity for social and aesthetic culture. 



PHYSICAL TRAINING 

The physical man is not forgotten. "Mens sana in corpore 
sano" is a principle from which Christian students do not see\ 
exemption. Wholesome food, pure air and water, abundant op- 
portunities for exercise, — all the requisites to good health are 
provided. On the Seminary property, next to the Dormitory, is 
a splendid tennis court and a ball field, where the young men, 
thanks to a favoring climate, can secure outdoor exercise the 
greater part of the year. Moreover, the commodious gymnasium 
of the First United Presbyterian Church, in the same block with 
the Seminary, is open to the students for basket ball and other 
indoor games at certain times during the week. These opportuni- 
ties, which are by no means neglected, in some measure account 
for the excellent health enjoyed by the students at Xenia. 



56 XBNIA THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

EXPENSES 

The necessary expenses of a course of theological training are 
reduced to a minimum. The building is thoroughly equipped, and 
there are no fees or rentals for privileges and accommodations. 
The Seminary furnishes bedding, but each student is urged to 
bring with him towels ; also a traveling rug or blanket, for which, 
in occasional extreme weather, he may have use. The Seminary 
Dining Room is economically managed by the Student Club, the 
cost of maintenance amounting to about $27 a month to each 
member. Students living in the Dormitory free of rent are ex- 
pected to take all regular meals in the Seminary Dining Room. 
The Seminary Laundry and the Seminary Book Store enable the 
students to effect a still further saving. 



OPPORTUNITIES FOR WORK 

The Seminary has been welcomed in the City of St. Louis. 
This great center of population offers an excellent field for 
Christian effort and sociological study. A friendly and helpful 
attitude has been shown by Churches of various denomina- 
tions. Some have employed students in congregational work. 
The City Missions have given opportunity for experience in 
evangelistic preaching. 

Students should have the advice of the Faculty as to the kind 
and the amount of work to be done outside the Seminary. 

COMPENSATED RELIGIOUS WORK 

Members of the Junior Class will receive the sum of fifty dol- 
lars each for the year, on condition of their engaging in religious 
work, not otherwise fully compensated, in the churches of this 
community, or in adjacent fields. As the students advance into 
the Middle and Senior Classes, they have increasing opportunities 
of preaching, for which they receive an appropriate compensation. 



XENIA THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 57 

AID FROM THE SEMINARY 

From the income of our Students' Fund, we are prepared to 
loan to those who may desire it, the sum of fifty dollars a year, 
or more in case of real need, on their personal notes, without 
interest for five years from date of loan ; at the expiration of 
this period, interest at the rate of six per cent, per annum will be 
charged until payment is made. Further aid will be provided in 
special cases as may be necessary. 

AID FROM THE BOARD OF EDUCATION 

The Board of Education is authorized by the General Assembly 
to make special grants in aid to United Presbyterian students of 
theology upon the recommendation of their Presbytery. The 
annual payments are as follows : 

"To first year students not to exceed $250.GO; to second year 
students not to exceed $175.00; and to third year students not 
to exceed $75.00. * * * 

The Board is "authorized to grant an allowance on Seminary 
Students' traveling expenses on the same general basis as College 
Students, except that the student may choose which Seminary he 
desires to attend, the mileage allowed to him within two hundred 
miles of the Seminary he desires to attend." 

"No money shall be paid to students of the first year who 
during the sessions of the Seminary receive compensation for 
preaching on the Sabbath, nor to students of the second year who 
preach for compensation more than an average of two Sabbaths 
a month during the Seminary session. And no money shall be 
paid to any student who holds a pastoral charge or engages in 
special religious work such as will interfere with his duties in 
the Seminary. * * * Ordinarily no grant will be made to a 
student who marries immediately prior to entering upon or while 
pursuing his Seminary course. * * * Absolute abstinence 
from the use of tobacco is made an essential requirement for 
receiving aid from the Beneficiary Fund." 

"Students receiving aid must be under the care of the Presby- 
tery, receive its formal endorsement and recommendation, and 
be in attendance at one of our denominational institutions. The 



58 XENIA THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

amount paid to each student shall be fixed, in its relation to the 
full appropriation granted, by the time of his actual attendance 
during the year. * * * In all ordinary cases the benefactions 
shall date from the time of application." 

"Persons admitted as students in full standing to our theologi- 
cal seminaries shall be graduates of a standard Liberal Arts Col- 
lege, and shall present the following as evidence of their Christian 
character and their promise of acceptability and usefulness in 
the ministry : 

"A letter from the pastor and session of the congregation of 
which the student is a member, certifying his membership in that 
church, and his character, scholarship and general fitness for the 
ministry. 

"A recommendation from the Presbytery whose supervision 
he seeks. 

"A transcript of his scholastic record in the educational insti- 
tutions attended by him, together with a certification from the 
President or Dean of the institution last attended as to his special 
attainments, integrity and general fitness for the ministry. 

"Satisfactory letters of communication from at least two of 
the five persons whose names are submitted in the application. 

"That financial assistance be granted theological students on the 
basis of service to be rendered, rather than on account of the 
financial need of the student." 

DONATIONS AND BEQUESTS 

On account of the low rate of interest, a large amount of in- 
vested funds is required to meet the current expenses of the 
Seminary. The enlargement of our permanent Endowment Fund 
has not kept pace with the necessary growth of our work and 
the advancing prices of all commodities. It is imperative that 
Xenia's Endowment Fund be very greatly augmented. Accord- 
ingly, the Seminary is cordially commended to the liberality of 
all to whom our church and ministry are dear. Appeal is also 
made to such as are making bequests to remember this institu- 
tion. Special attention is called to the Annuity Plan. The form 
of Annuity Bond issued by the Seminary in this connection may 
be found on a subsequent page. 



XENIA THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 59 



FORM OF BEQUEST 



FOR PERSONAL PROPERTY 

I hereby give and bequeath to the Xenia United Presbyterian 

Theological Seminary of St. Louis, Mo., the sum of 

Dollars, or notes or bonds. 

(Here describe them.) 



FOR REAL ESTATE 

I give and devise to the Xenia United Presbyterian Theological 
Seminary of St. Louis, Mo., its successors and assigns, for- 
ever, the following described tract or lot of land, in township 

of , County of , 

State of , and bounded and described as 

follows: (Here describe the piece of land with such accuracy 
and definiteness that it may certainly be known. If such devisors 
wish to make bequests to any of the Seminary funds, — endowment, 
income, or library fund, — they should specify the particular fund 
they have in view.) 



60 XENIA THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

FORM OF ANNUITY BOND 

Series A. No. 



THE XENIA UNITED PRESBYTERIAN 

THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

OF ST. LOUIS, MO. 

In consideration of a GIFT of Dollars,. 

the receipt of which is hereby acknowledged, 

issued this 

LIFE ANNUITY BOND 

and agrees to pay to the order of 

o f in the state o f 

an annuity or yearly sum of dollars, 

in equal semi-annual installments, on June fifteenth and December 
fifteenth of each year during the remainder of h — ...life, and upon 
the death of said annuitant this obligation shall be void and said 
annuity shall cease. 

The heirs, executors, administrators, or assigns, of said an- 
nuitant shall be entitled to any proportionate share of said annuity 
from the last semi-annual payment to the date of said annuitant's 
death. 

In Witness Whereof, the said Theological Seminary has 
caused its corporate seal to be hereunto affixed and these presents 
to be signed by its President and Secretary this 

day of , One Thousand Nine Hundred 

and 



Secretary. President. 



CORRESPONDENCE 

For Catalogues or any other information concerning the Seminary , 
address 

XENIA THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY, 

6834 Washington Avenue, St. Louis, Mo. 



INDEX 

PAGE 

Administration of the regular course - - 37 

Admission of Students - - - - 38 

Aid from the Board of Education —57, 58 

Aid from the Seminary-- 57 

Alumni Association -■— 13 

American School of Oriental Research at Jerusalem - -46, 47 

Annuity Bonds, forms for - - - — 60 

Applied Christianity, courses in - , 33, 34 

Archaeology, Biblical, courses in - 27-29 

Attendance requirements - -- - 39, 40 

Bachelor of Theology, degree of — - — 40 

Bequests, forms for - - — -59 

Biblical Theology, courses in - — -27-29 

Board of Managers - — - - 11, 12 

Board of Trustees - — - 12, 13 

Calendar of Special Days 5 

Calendars of 1929 and 1930— - - - -Inside Cover 

Church History, courses in - - — 30, 31 

Classification of Students - - 38 

Control of the Seminary - - - 9 

Curriculum of Divinity School (general statement) - 23 

Curriculum of Divinity School (tabulated outline) ----- 25 

Diploma at graduation — - - - 40 

Divinity School, courses outlined and described - -26-37 

Divinity School, Curriculum (general statement) 23 

Divinity School, Curriculum (tabulated outline) - -—25 

Divinity School, register of students - - 20-22 

Doctor of Theology, degree of - - — — - 43 

Doctrinal History, courses in — - - 31 

Donations and Bequests - - - 58 

Equipment, general - — - - - — 51 

Examinations - — - — -—40 

Expenses 56 

Faculty 14 

Graduate School (General Statement) - - 42 

Graduate School, courses outlined and described— - 44-46 

Graduate School, register of students - - 17-20 

Graduation, requirements for - ----- 40 

Greek, Introductory—- - - , 34 

History of Doctrines, courses in - - - 31 

Homiletics, courses in - 32, 33 

Honors, graduation - - - 41 

Information, general — 51-58 

Ladies' Visiting and Advisory Board - 13 



62 XENTA THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 



PAGE 

Library 51-52 

Master of Theology, degree of 42, 43 

New Testament Exegesis, courses in - 27 

New Testament Literature, courses in 27 

Officers of the Faculty 14 

Old Testament Exegesis, courses in - - —26 

Old Testament Literature, courses in 26 

Pastoral Theology, courses in 29 

Philosophy of Religion, courses in — 33, 34 

Physical training :... - 55 

Professors, historical roll of, 1794-1929 15 

Purpose of the Seminary - - 23 

Recreation 55 

Register of Students, Divinity School 20-23 

Register of Students, Graduate School 17-20 

Religion, Philosophy of, courses in -33, 34 

Religious life — - 52, 55 

Religious work, compensated - 56 

Rooms, reservation of - - -- —.52 

Schedules for 1929-1930 - 35, 36 

Self-help, opportunities for - — - 56 

Social Life 55 

Special lecturers and preachers, 1929-1930 16 

Students, classification of 38 

Systematic Theology, courses in - 31, 32 

Theology, Biblical, courses in - - 27-29 

Theology, Pastoral, courses in - 29 

Theology, Systematic, courses in 31, 32 

Washington University, affiliation with 43 

Young Men's Christian Association - 13