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Full text of "Annual Catalogue of the Pittsburgh Theological Seminary"

PITTSBURGH THEOLOGICAL 
SEMINARY LIBRARY 



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PittsWrgJi 
I Ikeological 



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Annual 
Oafaloguae 

1960-1961 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2012 with funding from 

LYRASIS Members and Sloan Foundation 



http://archive.org/details/annualcatalogue196065pitt 



THE 
ANNUAL CATALOGUE 

OF 

The Pittsburgh 
Theological Seminary 

OF 

THE UNITED PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH 

IN THE 

UNITED STATES OF AMERICA 

616 N. HIGHLAND AVENUE 
PITTSBURGH 6, PENNSYLVANIA 

1960-1961 



&V4-070 
P52. 



• CALENDAR FOR I960 • 




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THE SEMINARY CALENDAR 
1960 

27 June-29 July Summer Session in Beginning Hebrew 



11-15 July School of Religion 



First Semester 

6-7 Sept. junior Orientation. 

7 Sept. Formal Opening and Reception, 2:00 P.M. 

8 Sept. Class Work Begins. 

1(5 Sept. Seminary Communion Service, 7:30 P.M. 

7 Nov. Reading Week Begins. 

12 Nov. Reading Week Ends. 

24 Nov. Thanksgiving Recess. 

11 Dec. Annual Christmas Service. 

19 Dec. Examinations Begin. 

22 Dec. Semester Ends. 



Second Semester 



1961 

23 Jan. C/tfjj JFor& Begins. 

6 Mar. Reading Week Begins. 

11 Mar. Reading Week Ends. 

27 Mar. Easter Recess Begins. 

1 Apr. Easter Recess Ends. 

8 May Examinations Begin. 

14 May Baccalaureate and Communion Service, 8:00 P.M. 

16 May Annual Meeting of the Board of Directors. 

16 May Annual Meeting and Dinner of the Alumni Association. 

16 May One Hundred Sixty-seventh Commencement, 
8:00 P.M. 
The East Libertv United Presbyterian Church 



P*?£?/ 




Clifford E. Barbour, Ph.D. 

Vice President and Acting President 

Anything new is exciting — a new suit, a new car, a new house, 
a new school. The old is comfortable — the old suit, the old car, 
the old house, the old school. The old is not only comfortable, but 
also we have a certain confidence in it. We know how to drive the 
old car. We have learned its idiosyncrasies. We know our way 
around the old house. We have adjusted to the atmosphere of the 
old school. But the new is necessary. The old suit does wear out. 
The old car finally breaks down. Few people can live out their 
lives in the old house; and in the educational process, because of 
our need for progressive training, we change from school to school 
every few years. However, the new, while untried, is never com- 
pletely separate from the old. The experience of the old moves us 
naturally into adjustment with the new. The success of the new 
depends upon the effectiveness of the old. 



We have a new school in Pittsburgh: The Pittsburgh Theo- 
logical Seminary. It was constituted by the General Assembly in 
May, 1959. It has a new Constitution; yet the new Constitution 
is in line with the documents that gave direction to the activities 
of the constituent schools, Pittsburgh-Xenia and Western. It has 
a new Board of Directors, half from each of the consolidating 
seminaries — new, but with experience in the old. 

It has a new campus, only five years old; yet Pittsburgh-Xenia 
Seminary has been functioning on this campus during the last few 
years; and the Western staff and student body is looking forward 
to working on that campus in the opening semester of the new 
school year. It has a new faculty, but the new faculty is composed 
of the members of both old faculties. It has a new curriculum, but 
the new curriculum is not a departure from the assignments made 
to all United Presbyterian seminaries by the General Assembly. 
It is a readjustment with a new emphasis on the Division of the 
Church and the Ministry. 

It has a new dream. The new dream is for the achievement 
of the hopes and ideals of all seminaries but accelerated in its 
program of development. By its Constitution, the action of its 
Board of Directors, and the desire of its faculty, the new school 
will function under the highest possible level of academic standards 
and will seek to develop into one of the finest theological institu- 
tions not only in the country but in the world, for the preparation 
of men to bring the Gospel of Christ into effective impact on this 
particular generation. We shall accept as our first responsibility 
the preparation of men for the pastoral ministry but plan to devise 
courses of instruction to help meet the needs of the Church for 
a diversified ministry to include chaplaincies, both service and in- 
stitutional; workers in administrative responsibilities; sociological 
services; directors of Christian education; the teaching ministry; 
and so forth. 

The new school will be bigger than either of its constituent 
schools, and we plan for it to be better, building upon the best of 
each a future worthy of the heritage and hopes of both. It will 
be exciting to participate in the achievement of such an ideal and 
to become partners in this significant enterprise. 



VUe tf-acultq, 








James Leon Kelso, Processor of Old Testament History 
and Biblical Archaeology. Monmouth College, A.B.; Indiana 
University, A.M.; Xenia Theological Seminary, Th.M. and 
Th.D. 



William F. Orr, Professor of New Testament Literature 
and Exegesis. Southwestern University, A.B.; Louisville 
Presbyterian Seminary, B.D. and Th.M.; Hartford Theolog- 
ical Seminarv. Ph.D. 



Theophilus M. Taylor. Professor, The John McNaugher 
Chair of New Testament Literature and Exegesis. Univer- 
sity of Pennsylvania, B.Arch.; Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological 
Seminary, Th.B.; Yale University Divinity School, Ph.D. 



Frank Dixon McCloy, Jr., Associate Professor of Church 
History. University of Pittsburgh, A.B. and A.M.; Western 
Theological Seminary, S.T.B.; Harvard University, A.M. and 
Ph.D. 



Jarvis M. Cotton, Associate Professor of Church Govern- 
ment, and Director of Senior Placement and Alumni Rela- 
tions. Maryville College, A.B..; Western Theological Semi- 
nary, S.T.B. 



Walter R. Clyde, Professor of Christian Mission. Muskin- 



gum College, A.B.; 
Western Theological 
Foundation, Ph.D. 



Omaha Theological Seminary, B.D.; 
Seminary, S.T.M.; Hartford Seminary 



Vke tf-aculty 



Addison H. Leitch, Professor of Systematic Theology 
Muskingum College, B.A.; Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological 
Seminary, B.D. and Th.M.; Cambridge University. Ph.D. 



David Noel Freedman, Professor of Hebrew and Old Testa- 
ment Literature. UCLA, A.B.; Princeton Theological Semi- 
nary. Th.B.; Johns Hopkins University, Ph.D. 




Gordon E. Jackson, Dean of the Seminary and Professor of 
Christian Education. Monmouth College, A.B.; Pittsburgh- 
Xenia Theological Seminary, Th.B. and Th.M.; University of 
Chicago, Ph.D. 



f r\ 



John H. Gerstner, Professor of Church History. West- 
minster College, A.B.; Westminster Theological Seminary. 
Th.B. and Th.M.; Harvard University. Ph.D. 



Bessie M. Burrows, Assistant Professor of Christian Educa- 
tion. Geneva College, B.A.: Columbia University, M.A. 



James A. Walther, Associate Professor of New Testament 
Literature and Exegesis. Grove City College, A.B.; Western 
Theological Seminary, S.T.B.; Emmanuel College, Victoria 
University, Th.D. 










Sidney O. Hills, Associate Professor of Hebrew and Old 
Testament Literature. Northwestern University, B.A.; Mc- 
Cormick Theological Seminary, B.D.; Johns Hopkins Univer- 
sity. Ph.D. 



Robert Clyde Johnson, Professor of Systematic Theology. 
Davidson College, B.S.; Union Theological Seminary, B.D. 
and S.T.M.: Columbia University, M.A.; Vanderbilt Univer- 
sity. Ph.D. 



Howard M. Jamieson, Jr.. Associate Professor of Biblical 
Theology. Monmouth College, A.B.; Pittsburgh-Xenia The- 
ological Seminary. Th.B.; University of Pittsburgh, M.A. 



Robert Lee Kelley, Jr., Associate Professor of Biblical 
Languages. University of Pittsburgh, A.B.; Pittsburgh-Xenia 
Theological Seminary. B.D.; Princeton Theological Seminary, 
Th.M. 





John M. Bald. Associate 
Muskingum College, A.B. 
Seminary. Th.B. and Th.M. 



Professor of Christian Ethics. 
Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological 



Elwyn Allen Smith, Professor of Church History. Whea- 
ton College, A.B.; Yale Divinity School, B.D.; Princeton 
Theological Seminary, Th.M.; Harvard University, Ph.D. 



Walter E. Wiest, 

Religion. Lafayette 
Seminary, Th.B. 



Associate Professor of Philosophy of 
College, A.B.; Princeton Theological 




Malcolm S. Alexander, Associate Professor of Pastoral 
Theology, and Acting Director of Field Work. University of 
Southern California, A.B. and LL.B.; Pittsburgh-Xenia Theo- 
logical Seminary, B.D. 



Harold E. Scott, Associate Professor of Homiletics. Sterling 
College, B.A.; Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary, B.D. 



Howard L. Ralston, Assistant Professor of Church Music. 
Muskingum College, Mus.B.; Curtis Institute of Music, 
A.A.G.O. 



William A. Nicholson, Associate Professor of Homiletics. 
Washington & Jefferson College, A.B.; Western Theological 
Seminary, S.T.B. 



BOARD OF DIRECTORS 

Officers 
Rev. W. Bruce Wilson, D.D., President 
Rev. Frederick B. Speakman, D.D., Vice President 
Mr. George D. Lockhart, Secretary 
Rev. James T. Vorhis, D.D., Assistant Secretary 
Mr. T. J. Gillespie, Jr., Treasurer 
Mr. John G. Smithyman, C.P.A., Assistant Treasurer 
Mr. Henry C. Herchenroether, Jr., Counsel 

Members 

Term Expires May 1960 

Mr. A. C. Amsler Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Rev. John B. Barker, D.D. ....... Canton, Ohio 

Mr. Frank H. Davis ....... Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Rev. Robert H. French, D.D. . . . . Cleveland Heights, Ohio 

Mr. Henry C. Herchenroether, Jr. ..... Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Mr. W. Kenneth Menke ....... Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Rev. Don P. Montgomery, D.D. ..... Youngstown, Ohio 

Mr. William H. Rea . Pittsburgh. Pa. 

Rev. Robert H. Stephens, D.D. ...... Summit, N. J. 

Mr. James W. Vicary ......... Erie, Pa. 

Rev. Robert R. Vogelsang ....... Latrobe, Pa. 

Rev. Walter R. Young, D.D Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Term Expires May 1961 

Mr. Earle M. Craig ........ Pittsburgh, Pa. 

*Mr. Errett M. Grable Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Rev. Richard W. Graves, D.D., Litt.D. . . . New Wilmington, Pa. 

Mr. Milton J. Hein New York, N. Y. 

Mr. George D. Lockhart ....... Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Rev. W. Paul Ludwig, Ph.D Washington, D. C. 

Mr. John R. McCune, Jr Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Rev. Walter L. Moser, Ph.D., D.D Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Mr. Alexander P. Reed ....... Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Rev. John Coventry Smith, D.D. ..... New York, N. Y. 

Rev. Frederick Bruce Speakman, D.D Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Rev. C. T. R. Yeates, D.D Des Moines. Iowa 

Term Expires May 1962 

Mr. Wilson A. Campbell ....... Sewickley, Pa. 

Mr. T. J. Gillespie, Jr Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Rev. J. Hubert Henderson, D.D. ...... Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Mr. William R. Jackson ....... Sewickley. Pa. 

Rev. John C. Lorimer, D.D. ..... New Wilmington, Pa. 

Rev. Henry A. Riddle, D.D. ...... Lewistown, Pa. 

Rev. Charles P. Robshaw, S.T.D., D.D Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Mr. James H. Rogers . . . . . . . . Latrobe, Pa. 

Rev. Howard C. Scharfe, D.D. ...... Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Mr. H. Parker Sharp Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Rev. Samuel C. Weir, D.D. ...... Dearborn. Mich. 

Rev. W. Bruce Wilson, D.D , Pittsburgh. Pa. 

* Deceased— December 28, 1959 

10 



COMMITTEES OF THE BOARD OF DIRECTORS 

The Executive Committee 

Mr. A. C. Amsler Mr. George D. Lockhart 

Mr. Earle M. Craig Rev. Frederick B. Speakman, D.D. 

Mr. T. J. Gillespie, Jr. Rev. Samuel C. Weir, D.D. 

Rev. W. Bruce Wilson, D.D. 

The Education Committee 

Rev. Richard W. Graves, D.D., Litt.D. Rev. Don P. Montgomery, D.D. 
Rev. J. Hubert Henderson, D.D. Rev. Walter L. Moser, Ph.D., D.D. 

Rev. W. Paul Ludwig, Ph.D. Rev. Frederick B. Speakman, D.D. 

Rev. Robert R. Vogelsang 

The Finance Committee 

Mr. Wilson A. Campbell Mr. Alexander P. Reed 

Mr. Earle M. Craig Mr. James H. Rogers 

Mr. T. J. Gillespie, Jr. Rev. Howard C. Scharfe, D.D. 

Mr. H. Parker Sharp 

The Nominations Committee 
Rev. Robert H. French, D.D. Rev. John Coventry Smith, D.D. 

Mr. William H. Rea Mr. James W. Vicary 

Rev. Charles P. Robshaw, S.T.D., D.D. Rev. Samuel C. Weir, D.D. 

The Property Committee 

Mr. A. C. Amsler Mr. George D. Lockhart 

Mr. Frank H. Davis Mr. John R. McCune, Jr. 

Mr. William R. Jackson Mr. W. Kenneth Menke 

Rev. Walter R. Young, D.D. 



11 



THE FACULTY 



The Rev. Clifford Edward Barbour, Ph.D. (Edinburgh), D.D., LL.D. 
Vice President and Acting President 

The Rev. James Leon Kelso, A.M., Th.M., Th.D. (Xenia), D.D., LL.D. 
Professor of Old Testament History and Biblical Archaeology 

The Rev. William F. Orr, Th.M.. Ph.D. (Hartford), D.D. 
Professor of New Testament Literature and Exegesis 

The Rev. Theophilus Mills Taylor, Ph.D. (Yale), D.D. 

Professor, The John McNaugher Chair of New Testament Literature 
and Exegesis 

The Rev. Frank Dixon McCloy, Jr., A.M., Ph.D. (Harvard), D.D. 
Associate Professor of Church History 

The Rev. Jarvis M. Cotton, S.T.B. (Western), D.D. 

Associate Professor of Church Government and Director of Senior Placement 
and Alumni Relations 

The Rev. Walter R. Clyde, S.T.M, Ph.D. (Hartford) 
Professor of Christian Mission 

The Rev. Addison H. Leitch, Th.M., Ph.D. (Cambridge), D.D., Litt.D. 

Professor of Systematic Theology 

The Rev. David Noel Freedman, Ph.D. (Johns Hopkins) 
Professor of Hebrew and Old Testament Literature 

The Rev. Gordon E. Jackson, Th.M., Ph.D. (Chicago), D.D., Dean 
Professor of Christian Education 

The Rev. John H. Gerstner, Th.M., Ph.D. (Harvard), D.D. 
Professor of Church History 

Miss Bessie M. Burrows, M.A. (Columbia) 
Assistant Professor of Christian Education 

The Rev. James A. Walther, Th.D. (Victoria) 

Associate Professor of New Testament Literature 

The Rev. Sidney 0. Hills, Ph.D. (Johns Hopkins), Secretary 
Associate Professor of Hebrew and Old Testament Literature 

The Rev. Robert Clyde Johnson, M.A., S.T.M., Ph.D. (Vanderbilt), D.D. 
Professor of Systematic Theology 

The Rev. Howard M. Jamieson, Jr., M.A. (Pittsburgh), D.D. 
Professor of Biblical Theology 

The Rev. Robert Lee Kelley, Jr., Th.M. (Princeton) 
Associate Professor of Biblical Languages 

The Rev. John M. Bald, Th.M. (Pittsburgh-Xenia) 
Associate Professor of Christian Ethics 

The Rev. Elwyn Allen Smith, Th.M., Ph.D. (Harvard) 
Professor of Church History 

The Rev. Walter E. Wiest, Th.B. (Princeton) 
Associate Professor of Philosophy of Religion 

12 



The Rev. Malcolm S. Alexander, LL.B. (Southern California), B.D. 

Associate Professor of Pastoral Theology and Acting Director of Field Work 

The Rev. Harold E. Scott, B.D. (Pittsburgh-Xenia), D.D. 
Associate Professor of Homiletics 

Mr. Howard L. Ralston, Mus.B., A.A.G.O. 

Assistant Professor of Church Music 

The Rev. William A. Nicholson, S.T.B. (Western), D.D. 
Associate Professor of Homiletics 

The Rev. Edward D. Grohman, Ph.D. (Johns Hopkins) 
Instructor in Hebrew 

Miss Margaret Miller, M.A. 

Guest Instructor in Speech 

The Rev. G. Mason Cochran, D.D. 
Guest Instructor in Speech 

The Rev. Leonard H. Hoover, M.A., D.D. 

Guest Instructor in Methodist Polity 

The Rev. Scott Brenner, Th.D. 
Guest Instructor in Liturgies 

The Rev. Orville L. Kuhn, Ed.M., D.D. 
Guest Instructor in Audio-Visuals 

The Rev. Louis N. Grier, Jr. 

Guest Instructor in Missions, 1959-1960 

The Rev. Frederick Bruce Speakman, M.A., D.D. 

Guest Instructor in Homiletics 

The Rev. Clifford E. Davis, Ph.D. 

Guest Instructor in Christian Education 



EMERITUS PROFESSORS 

The Rev. Albert Henry Baldinger, D.D. 
Emeritus Professor of Practical Theology 

The Rev. David E. Culley, Ph.D., D.D. 

Emeritus Professor of Hebrew and Old Testament Literature 

The Rev. Robert McNary Karr, D.D. 

Emeritus Professor of Systematic and Biblical Theology 

The Rev. George Anderson Long, D.D., LL.D., Litt.D. 

President Emeritus and Emeritus Professor of English Bible 

The Rev. Henry A. Riddle, D.D., LL.D. 

President Emeritus 

The Rev. H. Ray Shear, M.A., D.D. 

Emeritus Professor of Practical Theology 

The Rev. Gaius Jackson Slosser, Ph.D., F.R.Hist.S. 

Emeritus Professor of Ecclesiastical History and History of Doctrine 

13 



SPECIAL LECTURES 1959-60 

Dr. William F. Albright 

Professor Emeritus of Semitic Languages. Johns Hopkins University 

Dr. Hermann N. Morse 

Consultant in theological education for the Council on Theological 
Education, The United Presbyterian Church in the U.S.A. 

The Rev. Celestine Fernando 

Chaplain, Protestant Students, University of Columbo. Ceylon 

Dr. Charles Ketcham 

Chaplain, Allegheny College 

Dr. T. Donald Black 

Assoc. General Secretary, The Commission on Ecumenical Mission and 
Relations, The United Presbyterian Church in the U.S.A. 

Dr. Laurence W. Lange 

Secretary of Mission Personnel, Board of National Missions. The United 
Presbyterian Church in the U.S.A. 

Dr. George M. Docherty 

Pastor, New York Avenue Presbyterian Church. Washington 

Rabbi Solomon B. Freehof 

Rabbi, Temple Rodef Shalom, Pittsburgh 

Dr. Alexander Fleming 

Associate Secretary. Division of Evangelism, The United Presbyterian 
Church in the U.S.A. 

The Rev. Walter Galop 

Member, The Interseminary Committee 

Dr. Wayne E. Oates 

Professor of Psychology of Religion, Southern Baptist Seminary 

Dr. Louis H. Evans 

Evangelist at Large. The United Presbyterian Church in the U.S.A. 

Dr. Arthur L. Miller 

Moderator of the General Assembly. The United Presbyterian Church 
in the U.S.A. 

Dr. John Coventry Smith 

General Secretary, The Commission on Ecumenical Mission and Rela- 
tions, The United Presbyterian Church in the U.S.A. 

Dr. W'illiam Morrison 

General Secretary, The Board of Christian Education. The United 
Presbyterian Church in the U.S.A. 

Dr. Paul Tillich 

University Professor. Harvard University 

Dr. Kenneth G. Neigh 

General Secretary. The Board of National Missions, The United Pres- 
byterian Church in the U.S.A. 

Dr. Liston Pope 

Dean, Yale University Divinity School 

14 



COMMITTEES OF THE FACULTY 

The Curriculum Committee 

Mr. Orr Mr. Leitch Mr. Alexander 

Mr. Freedman Mr. Wiest Mr. Clyde 

Mr. Jackson, Mr. Irvine, and Mr. Sigler, ex officio 

The Publications Committee 

Mr. Walther Mr. Gerstner Mr. Kelley 

Mr. Wiest Mr. Bald 

Mr. Vorhis and Mr. Sigler, ex officio 

The Admissions Committee 

Mr. Taylor Mr. Cotton Mr. Jamieson 

Mr. Johnson Mr. Smith 

Mr. Alexander, Mr. Jackson, and Mr. Sigler, ex officio 

Mr. Davis, consultant 

Conference Hour and Special Events Committee 

Mr. Freedmax Mr. Taylor 

Mr. Leitch 

Mr. McCloy Mr. Kelley 

Mr. Jackson, ex officio 

Mr. Sigler, ex officio (as Marshal) 

Student-Faculty Committee 

Mr. Jamieson Mr. Ralston 

Miss Burrows 

Mr. Nicholson Mr. Kelso 

Worship Committee 

Mr. Scott Mr. Nicholsox Mr. Ralston 

Mr. Clyde Mr. Walther 



15 



ADMINISTRATIVE STAFF 



The Rev. Clifford E. Barbour, Ph.D., D.D., LL.D. 
Vice President and Acting President 

The Rev. Gordon E. Jackson, Ph.D., D.D. 

Dean of the Seminary 

The Rev. James T. Vorhis, Th.M., D.D. 

Business Manager 

Mr. John G. Smithyman, B.B.A., C.P.A. 

Comptroller 

The Rev. Richard E. Sigler, B.D. 

Director of Admissions and Registrar 

The Rev. James S. Irvine, Ph.D. 
Librarian 

Miss Evelyn C. Edie, M.S. in L.S. 
Assistant Librarian 

Miss Mary Jane Kann, M.S. in L.S. 

Assistant Librarian 

Miss Lydia M. Steele, M.A. 
Director of Food Service 

Mr. Edward W. Doyle 

Superintendent of Buildings and Grounds 



16 



ALUMNI ASSOCIATION 



OFFICERS Pittsburgh-Xenia Western 

President William A. Minteer George W. Kiehl 

Vice-President Cuyler N. Ferguson Max B. Conley 

Secretary William H. Anderson, Jr Cornelius S. Thomas 

Treasurer Willard C. Mellin 

Should the unanimous recommendation of the Executive Com- 
mittees of the Alumni Associations of Pittsburgh-Xenia and Western 
Seminaries be approved at regular meetings held on commencement 
day, May 17, 1960, the Alumni Association of Pittsburgh Theologi- 
cal Seminary will be formed from the two alumni groups. 

Membership in the Alumni Association includes all former stu- 
dents and graduates of the constituent seminaries included in Pitts- 
burgh Theological Seminary. 

The purposes of the Association are to deepen the friendships 
begun in seminary and to afford opportunity for fellowship among 
all its graduates; to cooperate with the Seminary in enlisting the 
interests of young people in the ministry and recruiting likely and 
able candidates; to support actively the cause of theological education 
and of the Seminary in particular in its expanding needs to meet 
the demands of the future; and lastly, to have a sympathetic interest 
in the life and work of the Seminary as represented in its student 
body and faculty. 

The Association meets annually on the afternoon of commence- 
ment day to conduct such business as is necessary and proper to 
elect officers. This is followed by the alumni dinner after which 
the alumni are invited to join in the academic procession of the 
commencement exercises. 

THE PURPOSE OF THE SEMINARY 

The purpose of the Pittsburgh Theological Seminary as defined 
in the Constitution is to educate suitable persons for the work of 
the Christian ministry and for other fields of Christian service at 
the highest possible level of educational competence. For the at- 
tainment of this purpose, the Seminary shall provide instruction in 
the knowledge of the Word of God, contained in the Scriptures of 
the Old and New Testaments, and of the doctrine, order and institutes 
of worship taught in the Scriptures and summarily exhibited in the 
Constitution of The United Presbyterian Church in the United States 
of America; and shall impart to its students the various disciplines 
by which they may be properly prepared for service in the work of 
the Church; and shall cultivate in them spiritual gifts and the life 
of true godliness; all to the end that there may be trained a succession 
of able, faithful, and devoted ministers of the gospel and other 
Christian workers. 

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IN GOD'S PROVIDENCE . . . 

. . . A New Beginning In Pittsburgh 

The Pittsburgh Theological Seminary was created in 1959 of 
two institutions that had lived apart since 1825. The denomina- 
tional line that separated them was erased in 1958 with the union 
of the United Presbyterian Church with the Presbyterian Church 
(U.S.A.). The Pittsburgh Seminary, accordingly, has a genius pe- 
culiar among Presbyterian seminaries: in this institution the heri- 
tage, issues, and hopes of the Presbyterianisms that compose it are 
seeking and finding one another. Here a continuing church life is 
being erected upon decisions for unity made in 1958 and 1959. 

The denominational union and the refounding of the Seminary 
at Pittsburgh were possible because of ancient bonds. The Bible, 
the church fathers, the reformers, and the Scottish experience of 
witness and suffering belong to both denominational histories. But 
church divisions in Scotland were reproduced in the new world. 
Some Scots joined New England Calvinists in the Presbyterian 
Church (U.S.A.) while others preferred the fellowship of the Asso- 
ciate Synod, the Reformed Synod, the Associate Reformed Church, 
and the United Presbyterian Church which united the great bulk of 
these memberships in 1858. Since 1800, the American experience has 
obliterated some differences between these Presbyterian traditions 
and produced others, but the direction has been steadily toward 
common witness. Each tributary body, of course, educated its 
clergy. With the advancing tempo of union, schools were joined also. 
The issue of this history of growing fellowship in theological educa- 
tion is the Pittsburgh Theological Seminary. 

The present Seminary unites the Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological 
Seminary (United Presbyterian of North America) with Western 
Theological Seminary (Presbyterian, U.S.A.). The first of these 

19 



was formed in 1930 with the union of Xenia Seminary (Associate) 
and the Pittsburgh Seminary (Associate Reformed Synod). Xenia 
Seminary was born in a woodland academy of western Pennsylvania 
in 1794, but spent most of its life in Ohio and Missouri. Along the 
way, a variety of other beginnings were made. The notable John 
Mitchell Mason, perhaps the greatest personality of United Presby- 
terian history, founded a seminary in New York in 1805 (Associate 
Reformed Synod) which ultimately was merged with the mainstream 
from which issued the "hyphenated" seminary, Pittsburgh-Xenia. 

Western Seminary's history is simpler, although not less arduous. 
Its origin must be traced to the work of classical academies founded 
by Joseph Smith (1785) and John McMillan (1787) in Washington, 
Pennsylvania. Formal legal establishment came in 1825 by action 
of the General Assembly of the Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.) and 
teaching began in 1827 with one full-time professor. Western's strug- 
gle for existence was severe during the first thirty years but after 
the Civil War its student body outgrew its older sister in Princeton, 
New Jersey. It was indeed a "western" seminary in 1825 and its 
peculiar task was to furnish a ministry for the rapidly opening west- 
ern territories along the Ohio River — as it was called then, the 
"great valley of the Mississippi." 

The concentration of the energies of the United Presbyterian 
Church of North America on a single seminary at Pittsburgh brought 
great strength to that Church's program for educating its ministry 
and in 1955 a new campus was built in the East Liberty section of 
Pittsburgh. Western's campus on the North Side was built about 
1915. The Pittsburgh Theological Seminary is housed in the former, 
616 N. Highland Avenue. The very newness of the campus bespeaks 
the freshness of the task in progress there; the seasoned traditions 
that now dwell together compose some of the materials with which 
professors and students work. Something creative is being done at 
the Pittsburgh Theological Seminary. 

20 



PITTSBURGH . . . 

Our Environment 

The City of Pittsburgh is the workshop of America. Its pop- 
ulation includes people of every nationality, profession, and skill. 

Together with the contiguous town, it is one of the great com- 
mercial centers of the world. Its population includes people of every 
nationality, profession, and skill. It affords unexcelled opportunities 
for the study of social, economic, political, and racial problems. It 
is in itself an education to live and work in such a city and catch 
the pulse of its busy life. Moreover, the benefit of contact with 
those engaged in the varied forms of work for social, moral, and 
religious betterment, and of personal experience in such efforts, is 
evident to all. 

The cultural and educational life of Pittsburgh is no less rich. 
The University of Pittsburgh, Carnegie Institute of Technology, 
Duquesne University, and Chatham College are renowned institu- 
tions with excellent facilities and programs. The Carnegie Museum 
and Carnegie free libraries, the great university and college libraries, 
offer resources to all students. 

The Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra, the Pittsburgh Opera 
Society, various concert series, and choral societies, present many 
musical events each season. The Pittsburgh Chapter of the American 
Guild of Organists is a flourishing organization and stimulates wide 
interest in the best of church music. 

Buhl Planetarium, one of six planetaria in the United States, is 
the most modern in the world. It furnishes scientific and astronom- 
ical exhibits in addition to regular shows displaying configurations 
of the stars. 

Churches of all types are to be found, ranging from the large 
urban congregation to the small rural or industrial mission. The 
major historic denominations afford students opportunities for wide 
acquaintance with contemporary religious life in its worship and its 
work. Some of the nation's foremost preachers occupy pulpits in 
the area. 

Pittsburgh Presbytery is the largest presbytery in the United 
Presbyterian Church, U.S.A. Within its bounds are two hundred 
twenty-eight churches with a total membership of about one hundred 
thirty thousand. Of these, about half have more than five hundred 
members each; and mission work is conducted in over twenty differ- 
ent places. Within two hundred miles of Pittsburgh live one-fifth 
of the United Presbyterians in this country. Located in Pittsburgh 
also are many churches of other denominations, with which the 
Seminary maintains cordial relations. 



THE SEMINARY CAMPUS 



LOCATION OF THE SEMINARY 

The campus of Pittsburgh Theological Seminary consists of 
about ten acres, located at 616 North Highland Avenue, directly 
opposite Pittsburgh's large Peabody High School. It is in a residen- 
tial area between the East Liberty business district and Highland 
Park, and only a few minutes by automobile or street car from 
the University of Pittsburgh. This spacious and beautifully land- 
scaped site was given to the Seminary in 1951 by the heirs of the 
late H. Lee Mason, Jr. 

Frequent street car and bus service connects the Seminary with 
downtown Pittsburgh. Students coming by train or bus should 
take a Highland Avenue street car, number 73, on Fifth Avenue, 
and leave the car immediately in front of the entrance to the 
Seminary. Students traveling by automobile may follow Highland 
Avenue to the campus. 

THE SEMINARY BUILDINGS 

The new, modern seminary plant was dedicated September 8, 
1954. It is valued at about #3,000,000. The main buildings are of 
American Colonial design. They are constructed of Hampton Court 
Colonial red brick with Indiana limestone trim and are fireproof 
throughout. 

The George A. Long Administration Building occupies the 
central position on the campus. It provides six classrooms, four 
seminar rooms, faculty and administration offices, a reception room, 
a faculty conference room, a Bible Lands Museum, and an historical 
repository of the United Presbyterian Church in the United States 
of America. 

The McCune Chapel is an integral part of the main school 
building occupying a wing to the rear of the main entrance. It has 
a seating capacity of 310. The two-manual Schantz organ is a 
memorial to the United Presbyterian men and women who died 
in World War II. The memorial was established by the young 
people of our church. 

The Library, described on page 24, is also an integral part of 
the Administration Building. 

ACCOMMODATIONS FOR MEN 

The John McNaugher Memorial Hall, located to the right of 
the Administration Building, is connected with it by covered passage- 
ways on the first and second floor levels. It accommodates 88 men 
in single and double rooms. The dining hall and kitchen, a student 
lounge, two guest rooms, and an apartment for the matron are 
provided on the first floor. 

The central heating plant is situated in the basement of this 
building. 

22 



The Seminary provides furniture and bedding, including sheets, 
pillow cases, and one blanket for each bed. Students should bring 
extra blankets for their own use. Students will also furnish towels 
for their own use and provide for the laundering of these. All other 
dormitory laundry work will be furnished by the Seminary. 

HOUSING FOR MARRIED STUDENTS 

The Samuel A. Fulton Memorial Hall, an apartment-dormitory 
for married students, provides eighteen efficiency and twenty-one 
two-room apartments. Each unit includes a kitchenette and a bath. 
A storage locker in the basement is assigned to each family. Each 
apartment is fully equipped with desk, bookcase, table, chairs, 
davenport-bed, a chest of drawers, wardrobe, refrigerator and electric 
stove. Students must provide bedding, linens, silverware, china, 
cooking utensils, curtains, lamps and rugs. Laundry facilities (coin 
meter) are available in the basement. 

A six-room fully furnished apartment for the housing of a mis- 
sionary family on furlough is provided in Fulton Hall. It is made 
available, through cooperation with the Board of Ecumenical Mission 
and Relations, to missionaries seeking fuller preparation for service 
on return to their fields. 

Lowrie Hall, on Ridge Avenue, North Side, is a three-story 
brick building containing seven completely furnished apartments 
for couples with children. Rentals vary according to the size of the 
apartment. Laundry facilities are available in the basement of the 
building, and use is determined by a schedule agreed upon by the 
residents. Bedding, linens, silverware, china and cooking utensils 
must be provided by each family. 

Memorial Hall, on Ridge Avenue, North Side, has twelve fully 
furnished efficiency apartments for married couples, with six two- 
room and six three-room apartments. Each apartment has a bath 
and kitchenette. Bedding, linens, silverware, china, and cooking 
utensils must be furnished by the occupants. Laundry facilities are 
available to Memorial Hall residents. 

Three-room suites, partially furnished, without kitchen facilities 
are also available in Memorial Hall. A community kitchen and a 
dining room are located on the fourth floor for the use of occupants 
of these suites. 

Marvin Social Hall, located in the east wing of Memorial Hall, 
is used by students for informal conferences and social gatherings. 

Duplex Apartments. There are eight large apartments on the 
North Highland Avenue campus for students with families. 

Special arrangements may be made for summer occupancy of 
married students' apartments. 

ACCOMMODATIONS FOR WOMEN 

The Women's Residence House accommodates 16 women. It is 
equipped with a lounge and a kitchenette. 

23 



THE SEMINARY LIBRARY 

The library of Pittsburgh Theological Seminary offers a variety 
of materials for theological study and for historical research. The 
book collection contains over 100,000 books, housed in a wing of 
the administration building. Approximately 2,500 books are added 
to the collection each year to keep the seminary abreast of current 
theological interests and cultural developments. Some 200 of the 
latest periodicals embracing Biblical, theological, historical, and 
general fields of interest are located in the service area of the library. 
The extensive reference collection is located in the reading room 
which accommodates 76 persons. The main body of materials is 
located in the stack room which also contains carrels for individual 
study. Microfilm readers are available. 

The following special collections augment the book resources: 

The John M. Mason Memorial Collection 

The research area of the library contains this priceless collection 
of classical theological works dating from the Reformation period. 
This catalogued collection is housed to the left of the library en- 
trance in the John M. Mason Memorial Room. 

The James Warrington Collection of Hymnology 

Several thousand valuable hymn and psalm books which came 
from the estate of James Warrington, Philadelphia, provide research 
materials for scholars of American and English hymnody. Mr. 
Warrington minutely analyzed the works by composer, meter, tune, 
place, author, title, etc. 

The Nina S. Brittain Collection 

Through the generosity of Frank J. Brittain, Esq., of Erie, 
Pennsylvania, the sum of $5000 was used for the purchase of theo- 
logical and related works which are known as the Nina S. Brittain 
Collection. 

The Clarence J. Williamson Church History Collection 

In 1958 endowment funds were established, income of which is 
to be used for the purchase of books in Church History and closely 
related subjects. These books are in memory of Dr. Clarence J. 
Williamson, a graduate of Pittsburgh Seminary, for fifty-one years 
a minister in the United Presbyterian Church of North America, 
and for eighteen years Professor of Church History and Government 
in The Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary. 

24 



Historical Collections 

A vault of the library contains the Minutes and other records 
of Associate, Associate Reformed, and United Presbyterian congre- 
gations, presbyteries, synods, and General Assemblies. The library 
is also the depository for the Upper Ohio Valley Historical Society 
and Pittsburgh Presbytery of The United Presbyterian Church in 
the U. S. A. 

Library Hours 

The library is open about 70 hours a week and is available to 
all without restriction of creed, subject to the rules of the library. 
The hours are 8:00 A.M. to 5:00 P.M., Monday through Saturday. 
When the seminary is in session, the library is open in the evening 
from 7:00 to 10:30 P.M., Monday through Friday. 

THE BIBLE LANDS MUSEUM 

The Pittsburgh Theological Seminary is outstanding in its 
activity in archaeological research of Bible times in ancient Palestine. 
In conjunction with the American School of Oriental Research at 
Jerusalem, it has conducted explorations at Sodom and Gomorrah 
in 1924, excavations at Kirjath-Sepher in 1926, 1928, 1930, 1932, 
excavations at Bethel in 1934, at New Testament Jericho and Nitla 
in 1950, and Bethel in 1954 and 1957. 

This work was inaugurated by the late Dr. M. G. Kyle, for- 
merly Professor of Biblical Archaeology. It is now being carried on 
by Professor James L. Kelso. (The latter also served as Director 
of the American School of Oriental Research in Jerusalem, 1949-50). 
Members of the faculty and students often participate in these digs. 
Much of the Seminary's share of the antiquities excavated is now on 
exhibit in the Bible Lands Museum. Numerous other valuable pieces 
are awaiting special preparation before being placed on exhibition. 
Special gifts are being constantly added to the museum by interested 
friends. 

These objects all illustrate in the most striking way the life of 
the people of Bible lands, and so become of great value for interpre- 
tation as well as for apologetics. They illumine and corroborate the 
Biblical narratives. Thus an ineffaceable impression is made upon 
the student of the trustworthiness of the Biblical record, for only 
real events leave anything to be dug up out of the ground. The ob- 
jects in the museum are used constantly in the classes of the Seminary. 
Opportunity is also afforded the public to visit the museum at ap- 
pointed times. 

25 



LIFE ON THE CAMPUS 



RELIGIOUS LIFE 



Provision is made for the maintenance and development of the 
religious life. There are various gatherings for united worship in- 
cluding daily chapel services under the direction of the faculty, serv- 
ices of Holy Communion, and special convocations. Family worship 
is conducted by the students daily after the evening meal. A 
meeting for prayer is held every night at ten o'clock under student 
direction. 



THE STUDENT ASSOCIATION 

The academic year, 1959-60, was the last year in which the 
student bodies of Pittsburgh-Xenia and Western Seminaries operated 
separately. During this year each seminary had its own Student 
Association, the officers of which are listed below. 



Pittsburgh-Xenia Seminary 

The Executive Committee — 1959-60 

President .......... Ralph Graham 

Vice-President Richard McConnell 

Secretary . . . . . . . . . . Arthur Stanley 

Treasurer . . . . . . . . . . Thomas Stark 

Senior Class President ........ Wayne Faust 

Middler Class President John Mehl 

Junior Class President ........ William Steel 

Parliamentarian ........ Franklin Sparks 

Chairman, Webster Forum ...... Richard McConnell 

Chairman, Athletic Committee Ralph Green 

Chairman, Devotional Life Committee . . . . . Neil Severance 

Chairman, Service Projects Committee ..... Dan Bastin 

Chairman, Inter-seminary Relations Committee . . . Robert Van Dale 
Chairman, Mission Fellowship ...... James Vincent 

26 



Western Seminary 
Student Officers — 1959-60 

Moderator John M. Hulse 

Vice-Moderator ........ Wallace A. Smith 

Permanent Clerk ....... Thomas G. Wilbanks 

Stated Clerk George H. Lower 

Treasurer ......... Donald D. Wick, Jr. 

Chairman, Faith and Life Committee .... Graeme W. Sieber 

Chairman, Social Committee ...... J. Sherrick Gilbert 

Chairman, Inter-seminary Committee .... David R. Warren 

Chairman, Athletic Committee ...... Brooks Holtzclaw 

Chairman, Student-Faculty Relations Committee . . Wallace A. Smith 

Chairman, Committee on Union ..... Burke E. Dorworth 

Chairman, Social Education and Action Committee . . C. Robert Jansen 



MUSIC AT THE SEMINARY 



The Seminary has a Men's Choir and a Mixed Chorus, both 
under the direction of Mr. Howard Ralston. Auditions for member- 
ship in the Men's Choir are held in September. This group, care- 
fully chosen and of limited number, sings for daily chapel services 
and represents the Seminary from time to time in churches within 
easy traveling distance. A more extensive tour is undertaken in the 
spring when the choir presents a varied program of sacred music in 
churches and colleges. Members of the Men's Choir receive Work 
Scholarships. 

The Mixed Chorus is maintained for all those of the seminary 
community who enjoy singing. This group meets on Tuesday eve- 
nings and presents a program at Christmas and in the spring, and 
sings at commencement. There are many opportunities throughout 
the year for soloists and instrumentalists. 



ACCREDITATION OF THE SEMINARY 

The Seminary is an accredited member of the American Associ- 
ation of Theological Schools, and has had this standing from the 
time of the adoption of the Association's accrediting system in 1938. 
The Department of Christian Education was accredited in 1952 by 
the American Association of Schools of Religious Education. 

27 



ADMISSIONS 

Dr. H. Richard Niebuhr in his study, The Purpose of the Church 
and Its Ministry, gives almost one third of his book to a discussion 
of the theological seminary as "the intellectual center of the church's 
life." He points out that the seminary is infinitely more than a 
trade school where men are given the tools and skills of a trade and 
then sent off to practice their livelihood. 

The Pittsburgh Theological Seminary as a higher educational 
institution is a place for searching, grappling, finding. Therefore, 
it welcomes students who have an open mind dedicated to an honest 
search for truth, the intellectual and emotional ability which respon- 
sible leadership in the Church demands, a sense of imagination and 
adventure, and the contagious enthusiasm which combines with an 
ability to communicate. The Seminary believes that ultimate truth 
is in God who has revealed Himself in Jesus Christ, and that the 
Gospel of this revelation must be encountered relevantly by all men 
in every generation. 

It is for this reason that Pittsburgh Seminary seeks an aroused 
and searching applicant, one who is willing to struggle vitally with 
the things of his faith, and who will, after this period of encounter 
and struggle, go forth to serve Christ, His Church, and mankind in 
one of the many forms of ministry. 



PRE-SEMINARY STUDIES 

College courses prior to theological seminary should provide the 
cultural and intellectual foundations essential to an effective theo- 
logical education. They should issue in at least three broad kinds 
of attainment. 

1. The college work of a pre-seminary student should result in 
the ability to use certain tools of the educated man : 

(a) The ability to write and speak English clearly and cor- 
rectly. English composition should have this as a spe- 
cific purpose, but this purpose should also be cultivated 
in all written work. 

(b) The ability to think clearly. In some persons, this abil- 
ity is cultivated through courses in philosophy or spe- 
cifically in logic. In others it is cultivated by the use of 
scientific method, or by dealing with critical problems 
in connection with literary and historical documents. 

(c) The ability to read at least one foreign language and in 
some circumstances more than one. 

28 



2. The college work of a pre-seminary student should result in 
increased understanding of the world in which he lives : 

(a) The world of men and ideas. This includes knowledge 
of English literature, philosophy, and psychology. 

(b) The world of nature. This is provided by knowledge 
of the natural sciences, including laboratory work. 

(c) The world of human affairs. This is aided by knowledge 
of history and the social sciences. 

3. The college work of the pre-seminary student should result 
in a sense of achievement: 

(a) The degree of his mastery of his field of study is more 
important than the credits and grades which he ac- 
cumulates. 

(b) The sense of achievement may be encouraged through 
academic concentration, or through "honors" work, or 
through other plans for increasingly independent work 
with as much initiative on the student's part as he is able 
to use with profit. 



Desirable College Curriculum 

The American Association of Theological Schools has proposed 
the following college curriculum for pre-ministerial students. This 
is regarded by the Association as a minimum list of fields of study 
with which the student should have acquaintance before beginning 
seminary study. It is suggested that a student acquire a total of 90 
semester hours, or complete approximately three fourths of his college 
work, in the areas listed below although there is no requirement that 
this be rigidly adhered to. The liberal arts background is felt to 
provide the best foundation for seminary work and for later profes- 
sional studies. 

English — literature, composition, speech and related studies. 
At least 6 semesters. 

History — ancient, modern European, and American. 
At least 3 semesters. 

Philosophy — orientation in history, content and method. 
At least 3 semesters. 

Natural sciences — preferably physics, chemistry and biology. 
At least 2 semesters. 

Social sciences — psychology, sociology, economics, political science, education. 
At least 6 semesters, including at least 1 semester of psychology. 

29 



Foreign languages — one or more of the following linguistic avenues to man's 
thought and tools of scholarly research: Latin, Greek, Hebrew, German, 
French. Students who anticipate postgraduate studies are urged to under- 
take these disciplines early in their training as opportunity offers. 
At least 4 semesters. 

Religion — a thorough knowledge of the content of the Bible as indispensable, 
together with an introduction to the major religious traditions and theo- 
logical problems in the context of the principal aspects of human culture 
outlined above. The pre-seminary student may well seek counsel of the 
seminary of his choice in order most profitably to use the resources of 
his college. 

At least 3 semesters. 

Of the various possible areas of concentration, where areas of concentra- 
tion are required, English, philosophy and history are regarded as the most 
desirable. 

At the beginning of the first year students will take placement 
examinations in philosophy, Greek, speech, and Bible content to de- 
termine their level of competency. Students showing deficiencies 
in these fields will be required to make up such deficiencies. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR ADMISSION 

Applicants seeking degrees ordinarily move through three cate- 
gories under the supervision of the Admissions Committee of the 
faculty. 

1. Pre-Enrollment: An applicant may pre-enroll any time be- 
fore the beginning of his senior year in college. Approval 
is granted by the faculty Committee on Admissions upon re- 
ceipt of the following documents: 

(a) A formal application (available upon request) must be 
submitted by a student desiring admission to Pittsburgh 
Theological Seminary. 

(b) Application fee. A check or money order for #15.00 
must accompany the application. This will be applied 
to the first semester's tuition. While the fee will be 
refunded if the application is rejected, it is not return- 
able if the application is withdrawn. 

(c) Mental Capacity Test. The Seminary will correspond 
with the applicant's college concerning a Mental Ca- 
pacity test. If none is available, the applicant must 
take one under seminary direction. 

(d) A personal interview with the Director of Admissions, 
the Admissions Committee as a whole, or another rep- 
resentative of the Seminary who may be designated by 
the committee. 

30 



2. Admissions: After the opening of the senior year in college 
an applicant should add the following credentials. Admission 
may be granted conditionally or unconditionally at the dis- 
cretion of the Admissions Committee of the faculty. 

(a) A statement from a physician certifying the state of his 
physical health. (A seminary blank for "The Physician" 
will be sent to the applicant with the application blanks.) 

(b) Transcript. An official transcript from the Registrar of 
the college or university, showing grades for at least 
three years of college work. Procedures for securing 
this will be included with the application blanks. 

(c) Personality and Aptitude Tests. Shortly after indicating 
his desire to be admitted, each applicant will receive in- 
formation concerning a group of personality tests. He 
is to complete them as directed and return to Dr. 
Clifford E. Davis, Church Vocations Counselor, Pitts- 
burgh Theological Seminary, 616 North Highland Ave- 
nue, Pittsburgh 6, Pennsylvania. 

(d) An extensive (500-1000 words) statement in the appli- 
cant's handwriting describing his family, educational, 
and religious background, placing particular emphasis 
upon his motives for desiring to enter the Seminary and 
the ministry. 

All documents in the Pre-Enrollment and Admission categories 
should be in the hands of the Director of Admissions by April 15 
preceding the September for which admission is sought. 

3. Matriculation: A final transcript showing the degree and 
date of graduation of the applicant. 

After admission is granted, and before September 1st, each new 
student is asked to submit three (3) photographs (not snapshots) 
for the Registrar's Office, Field Work Office, and Publicity Office. 

TRANSFER STUDENTS 

A student transferring from another seminary is required to 
submit, in addition to the foregoing, a complete transcript of previous 
seminary work and a letter of dismissal from the Dean or President. 

FOREIGN STUDENTS 

Applicants from foreign countries will be required to give evi- 
dence of proficiencies in the English language before their admission. 
All correspondence concerning admission to the Seminary should be 

31 



addressed to the Director of Admissions, Pittsburgh Theological 
Seminary, 616 N. Highland Avenue, Pittsburgh 6, Pennsylvania. 

Further details and information may be secured by writing to 
The Director of Admissions, Pittsburgh Theological Seminary, 616 
N. Highland Avenue, Pittsburgh 6, Pennsylvania. 



FEES AND EXPENSES* 

Matriculation Fee $ 35.00 Room 120.00 

Library Fee (annual) 10.00 Books (approx.) 100.00 

Tuition (approx.) 400.00 Medical and Hospitalization 

Diploma Fee (Seniors) 5.00 Insurance (approx.) .. 28.00-125.70 

Cap and Gown Fee (Seniors) .. 5.00 Incidentals 75.00-300.00 

Board $410.00 

Part-Time Students: — Tuition will be $20 an hour for students carrying less 
than 12 hours. 

Late Registration Fee: — A charge of $5.00 will be made to students registering 
later than the specified time. 

Transcript Fee: — One copy of a student's academic record will be provided 
without charge. A fee of $1.00 will be charged for each additional transcript. 
* Subject to change. 



MARRIED STUDENT APARTMENT RENTALS 

The Samuel A. Fulton Memorial Hall 

Thirty-nine furnished apartments $40.00-$55.00 per month 

Memorial Hall 

Twelve furnished apartments 32.00- 44.00 per month 

Twenty-five partially furnished suites 29.50 per month 

Lowrie Hall 

Seven furnished apartments 38.00- 57.50 per month 

Duplexes 

Eight unfurnished apartments 42.50- 47.50 per month 

All apartment rents are payable monthly in advance. Applications for apart- 
ments should be made as early as possible. 

Residents of the men's and women's dormitories are required 
to eat in the seminary dining hall. Board includes nineteen meals 
a week; only breakfast is served on Sunday. The dining hall is 
closed on holidays which are scheduled on the seminary calendar. 
No deduction is allowed for absence from individual meals, although 
special consideration is given to students who regularly do not eat 
in the dining hall weekends. 

All bills are payable in advance on the opening day of each 
semester. When necessary, arrangements for a payment plan to 
cover a semester's expenses may be made at the Business Office. 
There is a carrying charge of #5.00 for the Deferred Payment Plan. 

32 



Settlement of all seminary bills is required before registration 
for a new semester, and before graduation or the release of official 
transcripts. 

MEDICAL AND HOSPITALIZATION INSURANCE 

Students are required to be insured by some type of medical and 
hospitalization insurance acceptable to the Seminary. All students 
who are registered as full-time students are eligible for such insur- 
ance under a group Student Policy issued by the Royal Indemnity 
Company, New York, N. Y. Detailed information concerning pre- 
miums and benefits may be secured at the Business Office. 



SCHOLARSHIP ASSISTANCE AND FINANCIAL AID 

Students are encouraged to maintain a maximum degree of fi- 
nancial independence. Self-reliance, rather than the expectation of 
special favors, is held up as the norm throughout life for servants 
of the Church as well as other members of society. However, for 
those students who find it impossible to finance all of their seminary 
course, a limited amount of aid is available. 

SCHOLARSHIP ENDOWMENT FUND 

Pittsburgh Theological Seminary has a Scholarship Endowment 
Fund of $240,000. The income from this fund serves as the basis 
for financial assistance which is available through the following 
sources: 

1. Work Scholarships. Pittsburgh Seminary's Work Scholar- 
ship Program enables some students to earn part of their 
fees. Students may apply for one of a variety of assign- 
ments within the Seminary and receive compensation com- 
mensurate with the duties performed. Work Scholarship 
assignments include: Choir Members, Organist, Choir Man- 
ager, Chapel Attendants, Head Waiter, Waiters, Library 
Assistants, Maintenance Assistants, Dormitory Clerks, 
Pittsburgh Perspective Assistants, and other special duties. 
Application for a Work Scholarship is made to the President 
prior to the beginning of each semester. Assignments are 
made on the basis of need, qualifications and approval of the 
faculty. Payment is made by check at the end of each 
semester. 

2. Academic Scholarships. These are available to incoming 
students whose need and college academic achievements 

33 



merit financial consideration. A prospective student who 
is interested should apply through the Director of Admissions 
when his college academic record is presented. 

3. The President's Loan Fund. Small amounts may be borrowed 
from the Seminary at a low rate of interest for emergency 
needs. 

VALENCIA CENTURY FUND 

At the time of the 100th Anniversary of the United Presbyterian 
Church of North America the United Presbyterian Church, Valencia, 
Pennsylvania, established a fund called the Valencia Century Fund, 
the income of which is used for grants to students needing scholar- 
ship aid. 

STUDENT LOAN FUNDS 

The Board of Christian Education Service Loans. United Pres- 
byterian students who need financial aid during their seminary course 
may apply to the Board of Christian Education through their pres- 
byteries for service loans. The completed application must be filed 
with the Board of Christian Education before October 1. The max- 
imum aid for ministerial candidates is $200 in any one year. The 
maximum aid for a candidate for the vocation of Commissioned 
Church Worker is also $200. 

The grant is in the form of a loan for which a note must be 
given. The loan may be repaid by service in the church vocation 
for which the loan was granted, after completion of the prescribed 
course of study. One year of service cancels one year's service loan. 
If the student withdraws from the course of study, the loan becomes 
repayable in cash. 

These loans are not available for those enrolled in a course of 
graduate study beyond the B.D. and the M.R.E. degrees. 

Service Loans may be supplemented from the scholarship funds 
of the Seminary. 

The Board of Christian Education Rotary Loans. United Pres- 
byterian students who need financial aid during their seminary 
course to supplement the service loans described above may apply 
directly to the Board of Christian Education for rotary loans. These 
loans must be repaid in cash within one year after the borrower either 
graduates or leaves school permanently or temporarily. Interest at 
the rate of 4% will begin on the first day of July next after the bor- 
rower either graduates or leaves school. 

34 



The student must have been a member of the United Presby- 
terian Church in the U.S.A. for at least one year and must have the 
endorsement of the session of his church. 

Walter G. Comin Memorial Fund. A loan fund for students 
who need financial assistance to continue their education was estab- 
lished in 1955 by Mrs. Walter G. Comin, Pawnee City, Nebraska, 
Mr. and Mrs. Walter G. Comin, Jr., Wilkinsburg, Pa., and Mr. 
Myron C. Comin, Spokane, Washington, in memory of Rev. Walter 
G. Comin, D.D. Loans from this fund are made on notes with in- 
terest and without further endorsement. Interest will be remitted 
on all sums paid during the first two years after graduation. 

Westphal Memorial Loan Fund. The session of the Reed Me- 
morial United Presbyterian Church, Lyndhurst, New Jersey, estab- 
lished in 1956 the Westphal Memorial Loan Fund. Under certain 
conditions specified by the donors loans from this fund may be made 
on notes without interest or further endorsement, and are repayable 
within ten years. 



THE TERM AND COURSE OF STUDY 

The regular course of ministerial training prescribed by the 
General Assembly covers a period of three academic years, each of 
which is divided into two semesters of fifteen weeks. 



CLASSIFICATION OF STUDENTS 



Pittsburgh Theological Seminary offers a basic theological cur- 
riculum for candidates for the Christian ministry: the preaching, 
teaching, and pastoral offices and related fields of service. Pitts- 
burgh Seminary admits any qualified applicant who desires a broader 
and deeper knowledge of the Christian faith, regardless of sex, race, 
nationality, or theological persuasion. 

The student body is classified as follows: 

Regular undergraduate students: those who are enrolled, either 
full time or part time, in a program leading to the Bachelor of 
Divinity degree. See requirements for admission below. 

Special students: those enrolled for credit under regular ad- 
mission requirements but who are not candidates for a B.D. degree. 

M.R.E. students: those who are enrolled, either full time or part 
time, in a program leading to the Master of Religious Education 
degree. Requirements for admission are the same as those for the 
Bachelor of Divinity candidates. 

35 



REQUIREMENTS FOR THE B.D. DEGREE 

The degree of Bachelor of Divinity is conferred upon any prop- 
erly qualified college student upon completion of the three-year 
curriculum in theology as follows: 

1. Completion of the course of study leading to the degree. 

2. Passing of the Comprehensive Examinations at the end of 
the Middler and Senior years. 

3. Attainment of an average grade of C or above throughout 
the seminary course. 

Students transferring from other theological seminaries must be 
in residence at Pittsburgh Seminary for a minimum of one full aca- 
demic year in order to become a candidate for the Bachelor of 
Divinity degree. 



SCHOLARSHIPS, AWARDS, AND PRIZES 

The following competitive scholarships have been provided 
for the benefit of United Presbyterian students for the ministry. 
In order to compete, students must take their full course of study in 
Pittsburgh Seminary; must carry not less than the regular quota of 
studies; must complete each term's work satisfactorily; and they 
must furthermore meet the particular requirements of the desired 
scholarship or prize as hereinafter specified. Under each scholarship 
an award is made once each year, at which time the faculty considers 
all regular degree students who, during the preceding twelve months, 
have completed the necessary amount of work in a satisfactory 
manner. 

The Sylvester S. Marvin Fellowship 

The Sylvester S. Marvin Fellowship, paying up to one thou- 
sand dollars, may be assigned to that member of the Senior Class 
who is recommended by the faculty as having achieved the highest 
standard in all departments of the seminary curriculum, provided 
that his average be above B. The faculty reserves the right to im- 
pose special tests and examinations in making this award. It is 
offered to those who take the entire course of three years in this 
institution. The recipient must pledge himself to a year of post- 
graduate study within three years of the award, in a field of study 
approved by the faculty. He is required to furnish quarterly reports 
of his progress. The money will be paid in three equal installments, 
on the first day of October, January, and April. Prolonged absence 
from the classroom in the discharge of extra-seminary duties makes 
a student ineligible for the fellowship. 

36 



The Thomas Jamison Scholarship 

The Thomas Jamison Scholarship, in memory of the late Thomas 
Jamison, Esq., of the North Side, Pittsburgh, for many years a mem- 
ber of the Board of Trustees of the Seminary, was established by Mrs. 
Jamison. The income of this endowment, not to exceed one thousand 
dollars, is given every year to the member of the Senior Class who 
attains the highest average in excellence of scholarship and in general 
qualifications for the Christian ministry during the Junior and Mid- 
dler years and the first semester of the Senior year. In the matter of 
grades, his general average must reach B. The honor is awarded on 
the basis of grades in required courses (Greek Exegesis being in- 
cluded.) 

The acceptance of this scholarship requires that the recipient 
spend a full academic year, the next following his graduation, at 
study in a theological institution to be approved by the faculty. He 
must further agree to make regular reports of the work he is doing 
and present within two years a thesis of not less than ten thousand 
words on some subject approved by the faculty. A portion of the 
award will be retained by the faculty until the thesis has been com- 
pleted to the satisfaction of the faculty. The academic credits re- 
ceived in fulfilling the requirements of the Jamison award may be 
credited toward an advanced degree. If for any reason the man who 
is first in the class does not accept the scholarship and its require- 
ments within one month of public announcement the scholarship 
will be offered to the man who is second in his class. If two men re- 
fuse the scholarship and its requirements by May 1 of the Senior 
year the scholarship money will be added to the capital funds of the 
original scholarship grant. 



The Jane Hogg Gardner Scholarship 

The Jane Hogg Gardner Scholarship was established in 1911. 
The income of the Gardner bequest, not to exceed two hundred dol- 
lars, is awarded to the Senior student ranking second in qualifica- 
tions for the ministry through the entire course of this seminary. 
A satisfactory thesis of at least five thousand words on a subject 
approved by the faculty must be presented to the faculty within a 
year from graduation. 

37 



The Jennie Rigg Barbour Memorial Prize 

The Jennie Rigg Barbour Memorial Prize was established No- 
vember 17, 1953, by Rev. Clifford E. Barbour, Ph.D., D.D., LL.D., 
president of Western Theological Seminary, as a memorial to his 
mother. This prize, paying four hundred dollars annually, is to be 
assigned to that member of the graduating class who has taken his 
full course of instruction in this institution and who has achieved 
the second highest academic rank of his class, if in the judgment of 
the faculty he is worthy in all other respects. It is hoped that the 
student will use his income for further study either within an aca- 
demic institution or by the enlargement of his own library. 

The Robert A. Lee Church History Foundation 

By bequest, in memory of her husband, the late Mrs. Henrietta 
M. Lee, of Oakmont, Pa., established the Robert A. Lee Church 
History Foundation, the annual income of which is to be given to 
the Senior student who ranks first in the entire required work of the 
Department of Church History. 

The First Presbyterian Church of McDonald Prize in Church History 

The First Presbyterian Church of McDonald Prize in Church 
History was established in October, 1947, by the First Presbyterian 
Church of McDonald, Pennsylvania. It is to be awarded to a 
member of the graduating class with the highest grades in church 
history. The award will be made by the vote of the faculty upon 
the recommendation of the professor of ecclesiastical history and 
history of doctrine at the time of the annual commencement. The 
recipient will be expected to preach at a morning service in the First 
Presbyterian Church of McDonald within two Sundays following 
graduation, for which he will receive compensation commensurate 
with that prevailing at the time. It will be the privilege of the faculty 
to withhold the award when in its opinion no student merits it in a 
given year. 

The Michael Wilson Keith Memorial Homiletical Prize 

This prize was founded in 1919 by the Keith Bible Class of the 
First Presbyterian Church of Coraopolis, Pennsylvania, by an en- 
dowment of two thousand dollars, in memory of the Reverend 
Michael Wilson Keith, D.D., the founder of the class and pastor of 
the church from 1911 to 1917. This foundation was established in 
grateful remembrance of his service to his country as Chaplain of 
the 111th Infantry Regiment. He fell while performing his duty at 
the front in France. The prize is awarded to a member of the Senior 

38 



Class who has spent three years in this seminary and has taken the 
highest standing in the department of homiletics. The winner of 
the prize is expected to preach in the First Presbyterian Church of 
Coraopolis and teach the Keith Bible Class one Sunday after the 
award is made. It will be the privilege of the faculty to withhold 
the award when in its opinion no student merits it in a given year. 

The John Watson Prize in New Testament Greek 

The John Watson Prize in New Testament Greek was established 
in February, 1919, by Mrs. Robert A. Watson, Columbus, Ohio. The 
income of an endowment of one thousand dollars will be awarded 
to that member of the Senior Class who shall submit the best gram- 
matical and exegetical treatment of an assigned portion of the Greek 
New Testament. The passage for 1958-1959, Romans 14:1-23; and 
for 1959-1960, II Cor. 3:1-18. 

The William B. Watson Prize in Hebrew 

The William B. Watson Prize in Hebrew was established in 
September, 1919, by Mrs. Robert A. Watson, Columbus, Ohio. The 
income of an endowment of one thousand dollars will be awarded to 
that member of the Senior Class who shall submit the best gram- 
matical and exegetical treatment of an assigned portion of the Hebrew 
Old Testament. The passage for 1958-1959, Psalm 110; and for 
1959-1960, Deut. 32:43. 

The Hugh Thomson Kerr Moderator Prize 

This prize was established in February, 1938, by the Men's Com- 
mittee of the Shadyside Presbyterian Church, Pittsburgh. An annual 
contribution of fifty dollars was pledged to be used for the purchase 
of books. The prize is to be awarded to that member of the grad- 
uating class who has exhibited, throughout the three years of the 
seminary course, leadership, originality, and accomplishments be- 
yond the normal requirements for graduation. This student will be 
selected by vote of the faculty, and the award will be made by the 
president at the time of the annual commencement. It will be the 
privilege of the faculty to withhold the award when in its opinion no 
student merits it in a given year. 

The Christian Education Award 

The Christian Education Award was established in 1947 by 
action of the Board of Directors. Out of the income from the Chris- 
tian Education Award Fund an award of #100 is to be granted to the 
candidate for the degree of Master of Religious Education who shall 
rank first in his or her course of study. The recipient's grade average 
must reach B. 

39 



The James Purdy Scholarship 

The James Purdy Scholarship was established in 1882. The in- 
come, not to exceed #300, is apportioned equally each year to the six 
members of the Junior Class who attain the highest average of ex- 
cellence in their seminary work. The scholarship is subject to the 
conditions that no award be made to a student whose general average 
is not above C and that the entire seminary course be taken at this 
seminary. 

Entrance Prize 

An entrance prize of three hundred dollars is offered by the 
Seminary to applicants for admission to the Junior Class. It will be 
awarded upon the basis of a competitive examination conducted 
early in the first semester. Candidates must indicate to the Office 
of the Registrar by not later than the first week of classes their in- 
tention to compete, and such statement of their purpose must specify 
the subjects elected for examination. The election of subjects foi 
examination shall be made from the following list: 

Latin — Latin grammar, translation of Latin, Latin composition. 

Classical Greek — Greek grammar, translation of Greek, Greek 
composition. 

Hebrew — Hebrew grammar, translation of Hebrew, Hebrew com- 
position. 

German — Translation of German into English and English into 
German. 

French — Translation of French into English and English into 
French. 

Philosophy — (a) History of Philosophy; (b) Psychology; 
(c) Ethics; (d) Metaphysics. 

History — (a) Ancient Oriental History; (b) Graeco-Roman 
History to A.D. 476; (c) Mediaeval History to the Refor- 
mation; (d) Modern History. 

Other subjects on approval of the faculty. 

Each competitor shall elect from the above list three subjects 
for examination. Each division of Philosophy and History shall be 
considered one subject, and a candidate may elect only one subject 
from each of these fields. 

40 



The awards of the scholarships will be made to the competitors 
passing the most satisfactory examinations, provided their average 
does not fall below 90. The payment will be made in two install- 
ments, the first at the time the award is made and the second on 
April 1. Failure to maintain a high standard in classroom work, 
or prolonged absence, will debar the recipients from receiving the 
second installment. 

The Andrew Reed Scholarship 

The Andrew Reed Scholarship was established in May, 1914, by 
Miss Anna M. Reed, Cross Creek, Pennsylvania, with an endow- 
ment of three thousand dollars, and prescribed the following condi- 
tions: the income of this scholarship to be awarded to the student 
who upon entering shall pass the best competitive examination in 
the English Bible with a grade of not less than eighty-five per cent; 
the successful competitor to have the use of it throughout the entire 
course of three years, provided that his attendance and class standing 
continue to be satisfactory. Two payments of twenty-five dollars 
each will be made each year, the first at the time the award is made 
and the second on April 1. 

The Joseph Watson Greek Prize 

The Joseph Watson Greek Prize was established in July, 
1920, by Mrs. Robert A. Watson, Columbus, Ohio. The income 
from an endowment of one thousand dollars will be awarded to the 
student who passes the best examination in classical Greek as he 
enters the Junior Class of the Seminary. The texts upon which the 
examination will be given are Xenephon's Anabasis, Book II, or 
Plato's Apology, Chapters I-X. 



THE GRADUATE DEPARTMENT 

The faculty has voted a moratorium on graduate work at the 
Master's and doctoral levels (exclusive of the Master of Religious 
Education program) until such time as a program of excellence for 
each of the degrees can be developed. In all probability graduate 
work will be reintroduced beginning at the Master's level. It is the 
hope of the seminary to be able to offer graduate work in conjunction 
with other graduate schools in the area. 

41 



THE NEW B. D. CURRICULUM 

The new B.D. curriculum which follows this brief description 
reflects the deep concern of the faculty to fuse into an integrated 
program of study the traditional classical approach to theological 
education and the strong contemporary emphasis on the so-called 
practical courses. The student will be primarily concerned in the 
Junior and part of the Middler years with the Church's thought and 
life as these are reflected in Biblical, historical, and theological 
studies. At the same time he will also be brought face to face with 
the culture to which the Christian faith must be communicated, 
and this confrontation will pick up momentum in the second and 
third years. 

One of the basic principles of the new curriculum is the prin- 
ciple of integration. This can be seen from several angles. The new 
curriculum is aimed to discourage departmentalization. There will 
be three divisions within the new curriculum: Bible, History and 
Theology, and Church and Ministry. The chairman of each division, 
elected from within the division for a three-year period, is auto- 
matically a member of the other two divisions but without vote. 
This is an attempt to bring together the faculty into an integrated 
whole. Some courses, traditionally taught in the Biblical, historical, 
or theological departments, will be moved into the new division of 
Church and Ministry. For example, while the Biblical Division will 
offer a required course in exegesis, exegesis as a tool for sermon 
composition will be offered the second year in Church and Ministry 
II and III where the preaching office forms part of the course. 
American Church History will not be taught within church history, 
but rather in Church and Ministry I the second semester of the 
Junior year, where it will be closely correlated with culture. The 
nature of the Church will not be taught in theology, but in Church 
and Ministry II and III, part of which course will deal with Christian 
education. Christian Ethics will be removed from the theological 

42 






field (though not from theology) and be correlated in Church and 
Ministry IV with the pastoral office, and in Church and Ministry V, 
with the program of the Church. Members of the faculty may well 
teach in more than one division. 

A further major effort at integration will be by way of field 
education, commonly known as field work, which will be introduced 
into the curriculum the second year. The student will be prepared 
for it because of the foundational Junior year. He will be assigned 
field experience in keeping with his own needs and interests. Courses 
in the preaching and teaching offices of the ministry will be cor- 
related with his field experience. For example, as he writes a sermon 
under the direction of the professors of Preaching he will do so 
with specific reference to his field experience; and when he studies 
children, youth, and adults with the professors of Christian Educa- 
tion he will do so within the context of his field assignment. In 
order to make this correlation more meaningful students will be 
placed in small seminar groups insofar as possible. (This principle 
of sectioning will obtain wherever possible throughout all of the 
courses, but especially in language study and in Church and Ministry 
courses.) 

The effort is being made through this new curriculum to bring 
together all the student has learned or is learning and to focus it at 
those points where he is directly related to the institutional church 
and to the culture. The expectation is that as the student comes 
to grips with the everyday life of the Church and of the culture he 
will have to develop a profound sense of relevance and he will be 
impelled to explore anew the problem of communicating the gospel 
to the world. 

So, in essence, the new curriculum is built around two foci: 
it focuses on the nature and meaning of the Christian faith which 
it is our responsibility to communicate. It also focuses on the 
culture with which we must communicate and the Church through 
which we communicate. 

43 



THE PRESCRIBED COURSE OF STUDY 

LEADING TO THE 
DEGREE OF BACHELOR OF DIVINITY 



Semester I 

Bible 
210 Greek 3 

110 Hebrew 3 

112 Old Testament Introduction 3 

410 Church History I 

510, 510A Philosophy 



Junior Year 

Semester II 
9 Bible 

211 Greek 2 

111 Hebrew 2 

213 New Testament Introduction 3 
411 Church History II 
711 Church and Ministry I: 

The Church in American 
Culture 
511 Contemporary Theology 



Bible 

Hermeneutics and Exegesis 
520 Systematic Theology I 
420 Church History III 
Church and Ministry II: The 

Preaching and Teaching Offices 
Elective 



Middler Year 






Bible 




3 


Old and New Testament 


6 


3 


521 Systematic Theology II 


3 


3 


Cnurch and Ministry III: The 






Preaching and Teaching Offices 


5 


5 


Elective 


2 


2 




\6 



16 





Senior Year 




Church and Ministry IV: 
Christian Ethics and the 
Pastoral Office 

Electives 


Church and Ministry V: 
Christian Ethics and the 
7 Mission of the Church 
9 Electives 


7 
9 



16 



16 



72 academic hours of required work 
22 academic hours of electives 

94 total academic hours required for graduation 



44 



PROPOSED M.R.E. CURRICULUM 



Semester I 
112 Old Testament Introduction 
410 Church History I 

Church and Ministry II 
Weekday Religious Education 
Audio-Visuals 



Junior 


Year 

Semester II 




3 


213 New Testament Introduction 


3 


3 


411 Church History II 


3 


5 


Bible 


3 


2 


Church and Ministry III 


5 


1 




— 



14 



14 



520 Systematic Theology I 
Creative Teaching 
Church and Ministry IV 
Elective 



Senior Year 




3 521 Systematic Theology II 


3 


3 Bible 


3 


7 Church and Ministry V 


7 


3 Seminar in Children's, 




— Youth and Adult Work 


3 


16 


— 




16 



45 



DESCRIPTION OF COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 



THE BIBLICAL DIVISION 

Mr. Taylor, Chairman 

Mr. Kelso Mr. Hills 

Mr. Orr Mr. Jamieson 

Mr. Freedman Mr. Kelley 

Mr. Walther Mr. Grohman 

REQUIRED COURSES 

The following courses are the Junior year program of study of the new 
curriculum. 

110 and 210. Biblical Language. A course designed to lead to an ap- 
preciation of Hebrew and Greek as languages of Biblical revelation. 
From the beginning the student learns inductively to read from the Old 
Testament Hebrew and the corresponding Septuagint Greek. Emphasis 
is placed on the acquisition of a working vocabulary as the ground for 
further reading and the illumination of key Biblical concepts. After an 
initial period in this combined program, separate classes are formed: 
study of the Hebrew of the Old Testament continues, and the Greek of the 
New Testament is studied on the basis of the Gospels. Instruction is in 
graded sections so that a maximum of individual attention and achieve- 
ment is possible. 

Juniors, first semester, 6 hours credit. 

111 and 211. Biblical Language. Continuation of 110 and 210 with in- 
struction continued in graded sections of both Hebrew and Greek. 

Juniors, second semester, 4 hours credit. 

112. Old Testament Introduction. A study of the political and religious 
history of the Hebrew people from the days of Abraham to the close of 
the Old Testament, with special emphasis on the more significant person- 
alities, events and institutions. The results of archaeological research are 
studied in conjunction with the Biblical record. 

Juniors, first semester, 3 hours credit. Mr. Kelso 

213. New Testament Introduction, (a) The New Testament World: 
Hebrew and Gentile culture; religious and philosophic syncretism and 
the mystery cults; Rabbinical, Hellenistic and esoteric Judaism, (b) Gos- 
pels and Acts; synoptic and Johannine problems; Luke- Acts and apos- 
tolic history; (c) Pauline epistles; (d) General epistles; (e) the Apoca- 
lypse. Introduction, survey, major textual and critical problems. 

Juniors, second semester, 3 hours credit. Mr. Taylor 

The following courses are the Middler and Senior year programs of study of 
the old curricula of Pittsburgh-Xenia and Western Seminaries. 

P-X 121 and 122. Hebrew Language. A practical course in the Hebrew 
Language designed to achieve the following objective: to familiarize the 
student with a working vocabulary of the language and the essential 
features of its grammar. Course 122 includes Hebrew Reading, taught 
by Mr. Kelso. It includes the accurate translation and interpretation of 

46 



Biblical Hebrew and is designed to show the wealth of sermonic material 
in the original Hebrew. Selected O. T. passages are studied. 

Middlers, first semester, 4 hours credit. 

Middlers, second semester, 3 hours credit. Mr. Grohman and Mr. Kelso 

P-X 132. Old Testament Theology. (1) A detailed study of some ma- 
jor doctrines of the Old Testament, (2) a survey of the historical progress 
of Revelation in the light of contemporary civilizations and religions, 
and (3) readings in current literature in this field. 

Seniors, second semester, 2 hours credit. Mr. Kelso 

P-X 242. Biblical Interpretation. Oriental and Semitic modes of 
thought and expression; survey history of interpretation in Judaism and 
the Church; the grammatico-historical method of interpretation. 

Middlers, first semester, 1 hour credit. Mr. Taylor 

P-X 243. New Testament Greek Exegesis: James. The Epistle of James: 
Introduction and exegesis on the basis of the Greek text. 

Middlers, first semester, 2 hours credit. Mr. Taylor 

P-X 244. New Testament Greek Exegesis: Romans. Introduction and 
critical exegesis on the basis of the Greek text. 

Middlers, second semester, 2 hours credit. Mr. Taylor 

W 121. Biblical Introduction (Old Testament). The course begins 
with a consideration of the text, versions, and canon of the Old Testa- 
ment followed by a brief survey of the history of criticism. Then the 
major literary units are treated in detail with the main emphasis on 
the historical books. Outside reading in modern critical works. 

Middlers, first semester, 2 hours credit. Mr. Hills 

W 122. Biblical Introduction (New Testament). Beginning with a 
survey of the historical and religious background of the New Testament, 
each New Testament book will be subjected to literary and critical study. 
Methods of textual criticism will be examined, and the development of 
the canon will be noted. Finally, the transmission and translation of the 
text will be studied including the history of the English Bible. 

Middlers, second semester, 2 hours credit. Mr. Walther 

W 123. Biblical Exegesis (New Testament). The methods and mater- 
ials of exegesis are introduced leading to a detailed study of Pauline 
Epistles. Exercises in formal, written exegesis are assigned. The orig- 
inal text and critical commentaries are stressed. 

Middlers, first semester, 2 hours credit. Mr. Orr 

W 124. Biblical Exegesis (Old Testament). Continuation of course 
123 in the Old Testament. Prophetic books. 

Middlers, second semester, 2 hours credit. Mr. Freedman 

W 131. Biblical Theology (Old Testament). A course designed to 
acquaint students with the principal themes, the progress of thought, and 
the theological terminology of the Bible; and, together with course 132, 
to study the unity of the Old and New Testaments and the continuity 
of Biblical religion. 

Seniors, first semester, 2 hours credit. Mr. Hills 

47 



W 132. Biblical Theology (New Testament). Continuation of course 
131. 

Seniors, second semester, 2 hours credit. Mr. Walther 

W 133. Biblical Literature (New Testament). Studies of the Catholic 
Epistles and The Apocalypse. In addition to a careful survey of the 
contents some attention is given to literary and historical problems in- 
volved. 

Seniors, first semester, 2 hours credit. Mr. Orr 

W 134. Biblical Literature (Old Testament). A study of the writings, 
the third division of the Hebrew canon. 

Seniors, second semester, 2 hours credit. Mr. Hills. 



ELECTIVES 

141 and 142. Hebrew Reading. Supervised reading of selected Old 
Testament passages. For those who desire to continue the language with- 
out emphasis. 

Two semesters. Mr. Freedman 

143 and 144. Hebrew Reading. Continuation of courses 141 and 142. 

Mr. Hills 

145. Old Testament Philology. Introduction to the formal structure 
of the Hebrew language (phonetics, morphology, syntax) with special 
attention to its historical development and relation to other Semitic 
languages. 

Mr. Hills 

146. Advanced Hebrew Grammar. Mr. Irvine 

147. Hebrew Exegesis. Practice in acquiring the principles of Old 
Testament exegesis, not only from the linguistic field, but also from the 
archaeological source material. The more difficult Hebrew passages with 
rich sermonic possibilities are used. 

Mr. Kelso 

148. Introduction to the Dead Sea Scrolls. Survey of the scrolls from 
the Dead Sea area, particularly Qumran. Archaeological background, 
analysis of contents, significance for the text, history, and theology of 
the Old and New Testaments. 

Mr. Hills 

149. Readings in the Dead Sea Scrolls. Selected passages (in the orig- 
inal Hebrew) from the newly-discovered Qumran scrolls dating from 
200 B.C. to 70 A.D. 

Prerequisite: basic Hebrew. Mr. Hills 

151. Elements of Accadian. A beginner's course in Assyro-Babylonian. 

152. Elements of Canaanite Cuneiform. A beginner's course in Ugaritic. 

153. Elements of North West Semitic. Decipherment, translation, and 
analysis of early Phoenician, Moabite, Hebrew, and Aramaic inscriptions, 
and investigations of their bearing on Old Testament studies. 

48 



154. Biblical Aramaic. A course in the grammar and reading of the 
Aramaic sections of the Old Testament with a possible inclusion of Fifth 
Century B.C. Aramaic letters from Elephantine. 

Prerequisite: one semester of Hebrew. 

155. Seminar on the Greek Old Testament. Introduction to the Greek 
translation and the problems of the text. Eapid reading of selected 
books and passages in the Septuagint. 

Mr. Orr 

161. Current Trends in Old Testament Criticism. A course designed 
to train students in the evaluation of new books and technical magazine 
articles in all fields of Old Testament research. 

Mr. Kelso 

162. Form-Critical Problems in the Old Testament. Study of the 
methods of form and tradition-criticism and their detailed application to 
selected passages. 

Mr. Hills 

171. The Composition of Isaiah. This course deals with the literary 
and form-critical problems of the Book of Isaiah, tracing its development 
from the earliest oral traditions to the final literary document. The 
prophetic experience and consciousness, message and meaning, are con- 
sidered in relation to the contents of the book against the background 
of Israel's history. 

Mr. Freedman 

172. Ancient Hebrew Poetry. Readings in the poems of the Pentateuch 
and early Psalms with emphasis on ancient Hebrew meter, style, orthog- 
raphy and vocabulary, and analysis of theological motifs and liturgical 
orientation. 

Mr. Freedman 

173. The Poetical Books. This course is designed to provide (a) a 
general introduction to the poetry and wisdom writings of the ancient 
Hebrews; (b) a comprehensive survey of the Psalter; and (3) an analy- 
sis of Job, Ecclesiastes and the Song of Songs. 

Mr. Jamieson 

174. Jeremiah. This course is a careful study of the life and work of 
this great prophet. Attention is given to the prophecy in the light of 
contemporary history and especially to the contribution made to the 
central message of the Bible. Its relevance for our day and its homilet- 
ical values are considered. 

Mr. Jamieson 

181. Geography of Biblical Lands. A survey course covering the major 
features of all ancient geography which influenced Biblical history, and 
a detailed study of Palestinian geography. The customs and manners 
of Bible people are also reviewed. 

Mr. Kelso 

182. Archaeology of Palestine. A rapid historical survey of archae- 
ological work in Bible lands, with particular attention to the cultural 
and religious life of the Israelite and non-Israelite populations in Pal- 
estine. Methods of archaeological research and the interpretation of 
findings are studied, not only for apologetic purposes, but especially 
for exegetical study of the Scriptures. Assigned readings, slides and ma- 
terials from the Bible Lands Museum. 

Mr. Kelso 

49 



183. Research in Old Testament Archaeology. Directed research along 
various lines as indicated by the student's needs. 

Mr. Kelso 

184. Ancient Near Eastern Texts and Pictures Relating to the Old 
Testament. A survey of selected extra-Biblical texts, and of pictures of 
monuments and objects, which cast light on the Old Testament. 

Mr. Grohman 

241. New Testament Canon and Text, (a) The Canon: A study of the 
formation of the New Testament. The limiting principle of the Canon 
and the consequent rejection of apocryphal and pseudepigraphical works. 
The position of the Roman Church, of the Church of England, and of the 
Presbyterian and Reformed bodies as shown in the Westminster Confes- 
sion. Lectures and required readings, (b) Textual Criticism: A survey 
of the history of the printed text, with an introduction to the apparatus 
criticus and the principles of textual criticism. An appraisal of the 
Tischendorf, Nestle, and Westcott and Hort texts. Textbook, lectures 
and required readings, and practice on textual problems. 

Prerequisite: Biblical Interpretation. Mr. Taylor 

242. Form Criticism and the Synoptic Problem. The purposes and 
techniques of Formgeschichte will be critically examined and its con- 
tributions illustrated and assessed. The application of Formgeschichte 
to illustrative passages in the Synoptic Gospels. An adequate working 
knowledge of Greek is required. 

243. Critical Introduction to the Pauline Epistles. A rapid survey of 
Paul's life. Historical validity of the records in Acts and the Epistles. 
The origin and completion of the Corpus Paulinum. The groupings of 
the ten major epistles. Recent criticism of the authorship of II Thess., 
Col., Eph., and of the place of origin of the captivity correspondence. 
The problems of Romans 16, and of the Pastorals. Sacramentalism, and 
other mystery features in Pauline theology. 

Mr. Taylor 

244. Critical Introduction to the Johannine Writings. An appraisal of 
recent criticism as to the unity of the Fourth Gospel with the Johannine 
epistolary group; and the relationship of the Apocalypse to other Johan- 
nine writings, dealing with the differences in grammar, vocabulary, and 
thought-concepts. Antagonism toward the Apocalypse among the early 
Fathers and among the Reformers. 

Mr. Taylor 

245. Apocalyptic and the Apocalypse. A survey of the development 
of Apocalyptic as a religio-literary genre. Apocalyptic in the Old Testa- 
ment, the Apocrypha and Pseudepigraph of the Jews, and in other an- 
cient cultures. The characteristics of a developed apocalyptic especially 
in relation to the prophetic movement in Israel. The Apocalypse of John 
against this background, its structure and meaning for its original re- 
cipients. 

Mr. Taylor 

246. Research in the New Testament. Directed research along various 
lines as indicated by the student's needs. 

Mr. Taylor 

247. The Pastoral Epistles of the New Testament. Beginning with 
I Timothy and continuing through Hebrews, this course will stress the re- 
lation of the historical context and the basic content of the letters to the 
art of preaching. 

Mr. Jamieson 

50 



248. The New Testament in Light of Contemporary Jewish writers. A 

survey of the history of Judaism in the First Century for the sake of 
relating the New Testament to its Jewish environments. Use will be 
made of the writings of Josephus, Philo, and other contemporary sources. 

Mr. Orr 



250. New Testament Exegesis: Gospel of John. Critical exegesis on 
the basis of the Greek text. 

Mr. Kelley 

251. New Testament Exegesis: Johannine Epistles. Critical exegesis 
on the basis of the Greek text. 

Mr. Kelley 

252. Petrine Epistles. Detailed exegesis of I Peter and II Peter. Abil- 
ity to use the Greek text is required. The commentaries of Selwyn, 
Beare, Bigg, and James will be used. 

Mr. Walther 



253 and 254. Greek Reading. Supervised reading of selected New 
Testament passages. For those who desire to continue the language 
without emphasis. 

Middlers. Mr. Orr 

255 and 256. Greek Reading. Continuation of Course 254. 

Mr. Walther 



257. Advanced Greek Grammar. An advanced, systematic study of the 
syntax and grammar of New Testament Greek. Principles studied in 
connection with specific Biblical passages. 

Mr. Kelley 

260. New Testament Christology. This course will survey the beliefs 
about Jesus as Messiah, Son of Man, Son of God, and his work as reveal- 
er of the Father, inaugurator of the Kingdom, and savior of the human 
race. Mr. Orr 



261. Eschatology in the New Testament. The background of the prob- 
lem in twentieth-century literature will be examined, and the New Testa- 
ment materials will be studied in detail. Some attention will be given 
to the Entmythologizierung controversy. 

Mr. Walther 

262. Life of Christ. An examination of the Biblical and extra-Biblical 
materials followed by a survey of the critical study of the "Quest" in the 
last century and the "new Quest" from kerygma to history at the present 
time; finally, a consideration of the possibilities of writing a "Life" today. 

Mr. Walther 



263. Practical Use of the New Testament. A seminar on the values 
and methods of using the New Testament in study, worship, preaching, 
evangelism, and counseling. 

Mr. Orr 

51 



270. Archaeology and the Pauline Epistles. A study of the results of 
exploration and excavation in Near East sites as they bear upon an un- 
derstanding of The Acts and the Pauline epistles. Colored slides and 
other exhibits are used to demonstrate the significance of the research. 

Mr. Jamieson 



280. II Century Christian Literature. An introduction to the Apostolic 
Fathers and to other Christian literature of the II Century, including 
Christian apocrypha. The Apostolic Fathers will be read in the Loeb 
translation (K. Lake), with exegetical discussion of significant passages 
in the Greek text. Representative passages of other writings will be 
discussed. Special attention will be directed to the rise of the phenome- 
non now designated as "gnosticism," and to its influence upon developing 
Christian thought. 

Mr. Taylor 



HONORS COURSES 

H 301. Greek Exegesis. Pauline Epistles will be read in the original 
text with special attention to exegetical detail. Exercise in formal, writ- 
ten exegesis will be required and may be prepared in conjunction with 
Hebrew honors courses. 

Middlers, first semester, 2 hours credit. 

Required in place of course 123 (Western). Mr. Walther 



H 302. Greek Exegesis. Continuation of Course H 301. 

Middlers, second semester, 2 hours credit. 

Required in equivalence of course 123 (Western). Mr. Walther 



H 303. New Testament Theology. Selected New Testament books 
will be read in the original text with special attention to theological 
detail. In addition to readings in the Greek text, some attention will be 
given to the modern literature of New Testament Theology. 

Seniors, first semester, 2 hours credit. 

Required of students not taking course W 131. Mr. Orr 



H 304. New Testament Theology. Continuation of course H 303. Es- 
says on key words and concepts will be assigned. 

Seniors, second semester, 2 hours credit. 

Required of students not taking course W 132. Mr. Orr 



52 



THE HISTORY AND THEOLOGY DIVISION 
Mr. Wiest, Chairman 
Mr. McCloy Mr. Johnson 

Mr. Leitch Mr. Bald 

Mr. Jackson Mr. Smith 

Mr. Gerstner 

REQUIRED COURSES 

The following courses are the Junior year program of study of the new 
curriculum. 

410 History of the Ancient Church. A survey of Christian life, thought 
and practice from the Apostolic Age to the period of Gregory the Great, 
and the beginning of the Middle Ages in the West; the mission and ex- 
pansion of the church; the rise of offices and government, art and 
literature. (Formerly Pittsburgh-Xenia 421 and Western 221.) 

Juniors, first semester, 3 hours credit. Mr. McCloy 

411. The Founding of the Protestant Church. Following an exposition 
of St. Augustine, this course traces church history from the breakdown 
of Roman Catholic unity to the Calvinist and Lutheran formulations of 
1550-1560. Medieval society and faith, pre-reformation movements, 
and the rise of the reform are considered. (Formerly Pittsburgh-Xenia 
422 and Western 222.) 

Juniors, second semester, 3 hours credit. Mr. Smith 

510. Theology and Philosophy. This course is designed for students 
who do not meet the prerequisite requirements in philosophy. A study 
of the systems of philosophy that have contributed to theological method 
and thought; and an analysis of the relation between philosophy and 
theology, and between faith and reason. Alternate to course 510-A. 

Juniors, first semester, 3 hours credit. Mr. Jackson and Mr. Wiest 

510-A. Philosophical Theology. A study of the systems of Christian 
thought that illustrate ways in which theology has been related to phil- 
osophy. Special attention is given to the problems of apologetics and 
communication in the modern period, and to contemporary philosophical 
challenges to Christian thought. 

Juniors, first semester, 3 hours credit. Mr. Jackson and Mr. Wiest 

511. Contemporary Theology. Introduction to the major figures, 
problems and issues in contemporary theological thought. 

Juniors, second semester, 2 hours credit. Mr. Johnson and Mr. Leitch 

The following courses are the Middler and Senior year programs of study of 
the old curricula of Pittsburgh-Xenia and Western Seminaries. 

410. Church History I as described above. 

411. Church History II as described above. 

420. Modern Church History. The history of the Christian church 
from the end of the sixteenth century to the present, exclusive of post- 
colonial American history. (Not to be offered in 1960-1961.) 

Middlers, first semester, 3 hours credit. Mr. Gerstner 

53 



520. Systematic Theology I. The person and work of Jesus Christ, the 
Christian understanding of man, and the nature of the Christian life. 
Classic theological systems representing the major movements of 
Protestant thought are read and critically evaluated. (Formerly Pitts- 
burgh-Xenia 531 and Western 322.) 

Middlers, first semester, 3 hours credit. Mr. Johnson and Mr. Leitch 

521. Systematic Theology II. The doctrine of God, the Christian view 
of revelation, and problems of theological thought and method. Reading 
and critical evaluation are continued in the systems employed in Sys- 
tematic Theology I. (Formerly Pittsburgh-Xenia 513 and Western 321.) 

Middlers, second semester, 3 hours credit. Mr. Bald and Mr. Wiest 

P-X 631. Philosophy of Religion. A course designed to help the stu- 
dent construct a Christian anthropology, epistemology and world-view. 
This study looks especially to the confusions and needs of modern man, 
and gives guidance toward an integrated Christian faith. 

Seniors, first semester, 2 hours credit. Mr. Jackson 

P-X 635. Christian Ethics. A presentation of the implications of 
Christian theology for the living of the Christian life in its relationship 
to current problems confronted in modern society and culture — family, 
community, vocation, economics, politics. 

Seniors, first semester, 2 hours credit. Mr. Bald 

W 332. Christian Ethics. The issues created by the interrelation of the 
church and the world. The implications of the doctrines of creation and 
redemption, justification and sanctification, law and grace, for the Chris- 
tian life, a Christian approach to current problems in politics, business 
and labor, marriage and family, education, the concept of Christian voca- 
tion, and the pastoral office. 

Seniors, second semester, 2 hours credit. Mr. Wiest 



ELECTIVES 

430. Patrology. A study of Christian literature including the Apos- 
tolic Fathers, the Apologists, the African and Alexandrian schools, the 
great writers of the fourth and fifth centuries in the East and West, and 
concluding with John of Damascus and Isidor of Saville. 

Mr. McCloy 

431. Christian Antiquities. A study of practices in the daily life of 
the ancient church, including its worship, art, social customs, law, etc., 
with special attention given to those elements which have survived in 
the present day church. 

Mr. McCloy 

432. Medieval Christendom. Mr. Smith 

440. Seminar in the Sixteenth Century. An introduction to the six- 
teenth century, its politico-religious problems, church history and the 
development of theology. Special attention is given to a selected problem 
and an extended paper is required. 

Mr. Smith 

54 



441. Symbols of the Reformation. An examination and comparison of 
various creeds, catechisms and confessions arising within the Protestant 
Reformation, having in view the theological aspects of present-day 
ecumenical conversations. 

Mr. Bald 

442. Theologians of the Reformation. Against the background of 
Luther and Calvin an effort is made to create interest in and understand- 
ing of the other reformers such as Zwingli, Bucer, Bullinger, and others. 

Mr. Leitch 

443. Roman Catholicism Since Trent. The historical and theological 
development of Rome from the Council of Trent to 1900. 

Mr. Gerstner 

444. The Age of Orthodoxy. The Reformation after the Reformers 
left the scene. A close study of Continental Reformed and Lutheran Or- 
thodoxy of the seventeenth century. 

Mr. Gerstner 

445. Puritanism. English and American Puritanism from the middle 
of the sixteenth to the middle of the eighteenth century, with particular 
attention given to the Westminster Assembly, Presbyterianism and 
Democracy. 

Mr. Gerstner 

450. Christian Biography. The lives of outstanding Christians and the 
literary forms of biography and autobiography: the development of 
hagiography as an historical phenomenon and of Christian personality 
both ancient and modern. 

Mr. McCloy 

451. Thomas Aquinas. An introduction to the philosophical and theo- 
logical thought of Thomas Aquinas. Particular emphasis is given to 
the expression of his system in the Summae, Summa Contra Gentiles and 
Summa Theologiae. 

Mr. Bald 

452. The Preaching and Writing of John Calvin. A study of the works 
of John Calvin exclusive of The Institutes, his preaching and writing, 
with some sampling of his correspondence. 

Mr. Leitch 

453. Seminar in Arminius and Wesley. Reading and discussion of the 
theological writings of Jacob Arminius and John Wesley. 

Mr. Johnson 

454. Seminar in Edwards. Reading and discussion of selected major 
writings of Edwards. 

Mr. Gerstner 

460. History of Apologetics. The nature of the defense of Christian 
faith explored through an examination of a number of apologetic sys- 
tems of the past and present. 

Mr. Bald 

461. History of the Doctrine of the Church. The doctrine of the Church 
is traced through key figures from Cyprian to modern times. 

Mr. Leitch 

55 



462. The New England Theology. Traces the theological develop- 
ment of the New England School from the death of Edwards to 1900. 
Especial consideration of Hopkins, Bushnell, Taylor and Parks. The 
relation of this school to the American Presbyterian Church indicated. 

Mr. Gerstner 

470. Advanced Reading and Research in Church History. Guided re- 
search and research in sources of church history. Subjects for study 
will be determined in conference with the instructor. Permission from the 
instructor is necessary for registration. 

Mr. Gerstner, Mr. Smith or Mr. McCloy 

530. Theology and History. Classic and contemporary interpretations 
of history. Herodotus, Thucydides, Augustine, the principal figures who 
developed the doctrine of progress, Hegel, Nietzsche, Marx and modern 
theologians, historians and philosophers who have been endeavoring to 
formulate a new philosophy or theology of history. 

Mr. Johnson 

531. Kierkegaard and Contemporary Existentialism. The thought of 
Kierkegaard, Marcel, Heidegger, Sartre, Jaspers and other philosophers 
and theologians who are contributing to the existentialist movement. 

Mr. Johnson 

532. Liberal Theology and the Social Gospel. The struggle between 
orthodoxy and liberal theology in America. Discussion of the main 
types of American liberal theology and the intellectual and social issues 
with which they have dealt. An analysis of the orthodox and liberal ele- 
ments in the thought of contemporary Protestant theologians. 

Mr. Wiest 

540. Contemporary Issues in Philosophical Theology. The problems 
that have been raised for Christian thought by recent naturalism, logical 
positivism and process philosophy; and a study of attempts to deal with 
current philosophical issues in the theologies of Temple, Heim, Tillich, 
Buber, Hartshorne and others. 

Mr. Wiest 

541. Seminar in the problem of Theological Authority. Reading and 
discussion of the development of the Protestant problem of authority in 
Reformation works, seventeenth and eighteenth century orthodoxy, and 
nineteenth century theology; and an examination of the attempts of 
several major contemporary theologians to speak to this problem. 

Mr. Johnson 

542. Protestant Theology and Modern Science. The impact of science 
upon the modern mind. Recent changes in scientific method of concepts, 
and the current controversies over the nature of knowledge, meaning 
and value. The lack of a Protestant "theology of nature," and the pos- 
sibilities of such a theological development in contemporary Protestant 
theology are discussed. 

Mr. Wiest 

543. Seminar in Tillich and Barth. A comparative study of the theo- 
logical systems of Paul Tillich and Karl Barth as the major representa- 
tives of modern philosophical and kerygmatic theology. Reading and dis- 
cussion. 

Mr. Johnson 

56 



544. British Theologians. Attention is given to theological figures of 
importance not treated in the general and required survey, Contemporary 
Theology. 

Mr. Leitch 

545. Seminar in Modern Christology. Reading and discussion of the 
unique developments in the interpretation of the person and work of 
Jesus Christ, or the doctrines of incarnation and atonement, in nineteenth 
and twentieth century Protestant theology. 

Mr. Johnson 

551. Advanced Reading in Theology. Guided reading and research in 
theological sources. The subjects and areas pursued are determined by 
the needs and interests of the students. Permission from the instructor 
is necessary for registration. 

Mr. Bald, Mr. Johnson or Mr. Leitch 

552. Advanced Reading in Philosophy of Religion. Guided reading and 
research. The subjects and areas pursued are determined by the needs 
and interests of the students. Permission from the instructor is neces- 
sary for registration. 

Mr. Wiest or Mr. Jackson 

560. Theology in the Great Classics. Studies will be made of The 
Odyssey, Dante's Inferno, Paradise Lost, The Idylls of the King, and 
selected plays of Shakespeare with a view to their theological presuppo- 
sitions and content. 

Mr. Leitch. 



HONORS COURSES 

H 610. Seminar in Augustine. Reading and discussion of the follow- 
ing works of St. Augustine: De Catechezandis Rudibus, De Moribus Ec- 
clesiae Catholicae, De Baptismo, Confessiones, De Libero Arbitrio, De 
Gratia Christi et de Peccato Originali, De Spiritu et Littera, De Trini- 
tate (in part), De Civitate Dei (in part). 

Middlers. Two hours weekly. First semester. Mr. Smith 

H 611. Seminar in Luther. Reading and discussion of selected writings 
of Martin Luther. 

Middlers. Two hours weekly. First semester. Mr. Johnson 

H 621 and 622. Reading in Theological French. Translation of sections 
from authors not utilized in the other courses in the honors program. 
Initial reading is in Etienne Gilson, Introduction a VEtude de S. Augu- 
stin. 

Middlers. One hour weekly. Offered both semesters. Mr. Smith 

H 623 and 624. Reading in Theological German. Reading in German 
historical and theological sources. 

Middlers. One hour weekly. Offered both semesters. Mr. McCloy 

H 625 and 626. Reading in Ecclesiastical Latin. This course is de- 
signed to introduce students who have studied classical Latin to the 
language of the Vulgate and more simple texts of the Latin Fathers. 

Middlers. One hour weekly. Offered both semesters. Mr. McCloy 

57 



H 627 and 628. Reading in Patristic Greek. Students who have achieved 
a certain competence in New Testament Greek will be introduced to 
selected writings of the Greek Fathers. 

Middlers. One hour weekly. Offered both semesters. Mr. McCloy 

H 637. Seminar in Nineteenth Century Theology. Reading and dis- 
cussion of the writings of major Protestant theologians of the nineteenth 
century in the context of a consideration of the intellectual and cultural 
currents of the period. 

Seniors. Two hours weekly. First semester. Mr. Wiest 



H 638. Seminar in History of Doctrine and Contemporary Theology. 

Guided research. The subjects and areas studied are determined by the 
needs and interests of the students. 

Seniors. Two hours weekly. Second semester. 

Mr. Johnson, Mr. Smith and Mr. Wiest 



H 640 and 641. Reading in Theological German. Reading in untrans- 
lated works of Karl Barth and German theological periodicals. 

Seniors. One hour weekly. Offered both semesters. Mr. Gerstner 



H 642 and 643. Reading in Theological French. Reading in the sources 
of sixteenth century French reformed history and in contemporary French 
literature. 

Seniors. One hour weekly. Offered both semesters. Mr. Smith 



H 644 and 645. Reading in Ecclesiastical Latin. A practice in reading 
the more difficult texts of Scholastic writings and medieval historical 
narratives. 

Seniors. One hour weekly. Offered both semesters. Mr. McCloy 

H 646 and 647. Reading in Patristic Greek. Readings in the Cappa- 
docian Fathers, St. John of Damascus and certain Byzantine texts. 

Seniors. One hour weekly. Offered both semesters. Mr. McCloy 



58 



THE CHURCH AND MINISTRY DIVISION 

Mr. Clyde, Chairman 

Mr. Cotton Mr. Alexander 

Mr. Jackson Mr. Scott 

Miss Burrows Mr. Ralston 

Mr. Bald Mr. Nicholson 
Mr. Smith 



REQUIRED COURSES 

The following courses are the Junior year program of study of the new cur- 
riculum. 

711. Church and Ministry I. The purpose of this course is to clarify 
to the student his prospective situation as a minister in American cul- 
ture. Both Church and culture are studied historically, sociologically, 
and theologically; and the Church is considered in specific relation to 
the problems of urban and industrial life, racial and economic tensions, 
populational growth and movement, and the church's conventional 
methods. 

Second semester, 3 hours credit. 

Mr. Smith, Mr. Bald, Mr. Wiest, and Mr. Jackson 

The following courses are the Middler and Senior year programs of study 
of the old curricula of Pittsburgh-Xenia and Western Seminaries. 

P-X 424 and W 531. Church Polity. This course is to acquaint the stu- 
dent with the political structure of the United Presbyterian Church, the 
authority and functions of its several judicatories, agencies, and depart- 
ments. This course allows opportunity for discussion of church prob- 
lems raised by students. Basic text is the Constitution of The United 
Presbyterian Church, latest edition. 

Middlers and Seniors, 1 hour credit. Mr. Cotton 

P-X 431 and W 731. Christian Mission. The work of the Church in 
what has long been called national and foreign missions will be studied. 
Attention will be directed to philosophy, methods, and actual operations. 
Resource leaders provided by the Presbyterian Boards of Foreign and 
National Missions will participate. 

Seniors, first semester, 2 hours credit. Mr. Clyde 

P-X 634 and W 534. Psychology and Counseling. A course designed to 
bring the insights of psychology to focus in counseling situations; and to 
reveal the theory and techniques of counseling from the Christian point 
of view. 

Seniors, second semester, 2 hours credit. Mr. Jackson 

P-X 635. Christian Ethics. A basic course setting forth the foundation 
for and the nature of Christian Ethics. Emphasis is upon the bases of 
Christian Ethics rather than upon applications to particular ethical 
problems. 

Seniors, first semester, 2 hours credit. Mr. Bald 

59 



P-X 723. Pastoral Theology. This course covers in a comprehensive 
way by lectures, discussion and assigned reading of books the pastor's 
call, preparation, relationship to his congregation, community and de- 
nomination, his leadership as pastor and administrator. The fields of 
worship, the sacraments, the wedding, the funeral, pastoral calling, 
evangelism, stewardship and other related subjects are included in this 
course. 

Seniors, first semester, 4 hours credit. Mr. Alexander 

P-X 012. Music in the Church. A practical approach to the many prob- 
lems arising in connection with church music with particular attention 
to the problems of the small congregation. Organizing the musical re- 
sources of the congregation, the music as a spiritual force in the church 
life and the minister's relation to choir and choirmaster. 

Seniors, second semester, 2 hours credit. Mr. Ralston 

W 332. Christian Ethics. The issues created by the interrelation of the 
church and the world. The implications of the doctrines of creation and 
redemption, justification and sanctification, law and grace, for the Chris- 
tian life, a Christian approach to current problems in politics, business 
and labor, marriage and family, education, the concept of Christian vo- 
cation, and the pastoral office. 

Seniors, second semester, 2 hours credit. Mr. Wiest 



W 421. Homiletics II. The analysis of sermons both from reading and 
hearing. What makes them interesting and vital. The composition of 
sermons and their forceful presentation. Sermon clinics in which stu- 
dents are led to correct faults in construction, logic or delivery. One 
hour weekly devoted to practice preaching. 

Middlers, first semester, 1 hour credit. Mr. Nicholson and Mr. Scott 

W 422. Homiletics III. Continuation of W 421. 

Mr. Nicholson and Mr. Scott 

W 431. Liturgies. A general study will be made of the forms and con- 
duct of Christian worship, and a specific study will be made of the forms 
and conduct of Christian worship in the Reformed tradition. Students 
will be made acquainted with the genius and usage of the Presbyterian 
Book of Common Worship. 

Seniors, first semester, 1 hour credit. Mr. Clyde 

W 532. Pastoral Theology. This course is designed to bring to Senior 
students various areas of the ministry where specialized pastoral skills 
are required. One-half of the course covers general matters important in 
parish work, church administration, minister's personal life and conduct, 
public worship, evangelism, stewardship, and pastoral calling. The 
second half of the course is devoted to lectures and discussion on the 
techniques of hospital ministry and related social areas. With the co- 
operation of the staff of the Presbyterian and Western Pennsylvania 
Psychiatric Hospitals, and physicians from other institutions of the 
Medical Center, lectures are presented on the relation between religion 
and health. 

Seniors, second semester, 2 hours weekly (1 credit). 

Mr. Nicholson and Mr. Cotton 

60 



W 535. Introduction to Hymnology and Church Music. This course 
considers the qualities of a good hymn. A survey of the periods of 
hymnody and study of examples found in The Presbyterian Hymnal is 
included. There is practical and effective use of The Hymnal. The sec- 
ond half of the course considers a practical approach to the many prob- 
lems of church music. It gives help in organizing the musical resources 
of the congregation as well as the minister's relation to the choir and 
the choir director. 

Seniors, first semester, 1 hour credit. Mr. Ralston 

W 632. The Presbyterian Program of Christian Education. The course 
makes a general survey of the Presbyterian program of Christian edu- 
cation with a look at related church programs and aids. It directs spe- 
cial attention to the pastor's leadership and participation in the pro- 
gram, the psychology of the several age levels, and problems encountered 
in teaching Christian beliefs and ethics. 

Seniors, second semester, 2 hours credit. Mr. Clyde 



ELECTIVES 

810. History and Theology of Preaching. A study will be made of the 
doctrinal and ethical content, literary style, homiletical method, his- 
torical and spiritual background of preaching from the days of the 
Apostles to the beginning of the 19th century. 

Mr. Scott 



811. Preaching the Parables. The course is two-fold: a study of the 
history of the interpretation of Parables, and the actual writing and 
classroom delivery of sermons from the Parables. 

Mr. Nicholson 



812. Preaching from Acts. The course is three-fold: a review of the 
historical-critical approach to Acts, the discovery of homiletical mater- 
ial, and the actual writing and classroom delivery of sermons. 

Mr. Nicholson 

_ 813. Preaching the Christian Year. A study will be made of the Chris- 
tian year and its use in preaching. Students will write and deliver 
selected sermons in class and prepare a full outline of a year's sermons. 

Mr. Scott 

814. Contemporary Preachers and Preaching. A study will be made 
of representative preachers from the 19th century to the present with 
special emphasis on the preaching of the last decade. 

Mr. Scott 



820. Theological Method and the Educational Work of the Church. This 
course is designed to show how Christian education is the process by 
which one comes to think theologically, to try to detail how this process 
works in the local church, and to try to establish norms for the evalua- 
tion of what the local church does within its teaching ministry. 

Mr. Jackson 

61 



821. Personality Development. The meaning of the self, its develop- 
ment, its aberrations, its societal nature, its symbolization, its motiva- 
tions, etc., will be studied from the point of view of the several psychiatric 
theories, social psychology, and Biblical images. The relation of person- 
ality development to the work of the ministry will be clarified. 

Mr. Jackson 

822. Theory and Practice of the Devotional Life. A consideration of 
the devotional life of the Christian in the modern world. The relation 
of doctrine to the devotional life. The means of grace studied. The 
course is also designed to acquaint the student with the devotional 
classics. 

Mr. Jackson 

823. Creative Teaching. A laboratory course providing opportunity 
for creative experiences through activities related to units of study in 
the graded curriculum of the church school. All methods are concerned 
with the teaching of children and are preceded with a consideration of 
how children learn. 

Miss Burrows 

824. Dramatics in Christian Education. A study of the purpose and 
place of dramatics in the program of the church. Lecture, discussion, 
and project work in the areas of creative dramatics, choral reading, role 
playing, puppetry, playreading, plays, and pageants. 

Miss Burrows 

825. Weekday Religious Education. A study of the purpose and pos- 
sibilities of the vacation church school, the local church weekday religious 
education program (youth club), and the released time program in the 
public schools. 

Miss Burrows 

826. Seminar in Children's, Youth and Adult Work. This course in- 
cludes discussion of problems, study of materials, and consideration of 
programming in the three age groups. 

Miss Burrows 

827. Building and Administering a Church Program. This course 
deals chiefly with the session committees of worship, evangelism, Chris- 
tian education, fellowship and stewardship, how they are formed, pre- 
pared to function, and how they relate to program and the people. The 
latest in helpful literature is provided. A project analyzing an actual 
church program is offered during the course so that the student might 
apply the principles of the course to the betterment of a local program. 
Related books are to be read and reported on. 

Mr. Alexander 

828. Seminar in The Church's Ministry in Higher Education. A course 
designed especially for students who have an interest in college teach- 
ing or the university pastorate. A survey of current issues in higher 
education and their historical background, of the theological issues in- 
volved in relating Christian faith to higher education, and of the Church's 
present efforts in church-related colleges and Westminster Foundations. 

Mr. Wiest 

829. Doctrine of Church and Ministry. A consideration of the recent 
attempts to reformulate the doctrine of the church, and redefine the na- 
ture of the ministry, within the present cultural situation. These will 
be critically evaluated in the light of the history of doctrine and Reform- 
ation theology. 

Mr. Johnson 

62 



830. Theology and Psychiatry. The metaphysical presuppositions, 
method, understanding of therapy, and some aspects of human nature 
will be compared. An attempt will be made to define mutuality and dis- 
creteness between the two disciplines. An introduction to Freudian, 
Jungian, and other psychiatric writings will be made. 

Mr. Jackson 



831. Seminar in Counseling. An advanced course utilizing the case 
work of students, drawing principles for both diagnosis and therapy 
out of the cases presented, and making evaluations. The role of the 
minister as counselor is carefully scrutinized. 

Mr. Jackson 



832. Evangelism. This course offers a detailed discussion and study 
of the definition, motivation, urgency and nature of evangelism. Personal 
work, evangelism for commitment, evangelism through fellowship, youth 
evangelism and various opportunities for pastor and laity through the 
church are covered. A program of reading and book reports acquaints 
the student with the best literature in the field. Opportunity for role 
playing in class is afforded. 

Mr. Alexander 



840. World Mission of the Church. A survey of the ecumenical witness 
of the church throughout the world, with special reference to the work 
of the United Presbyterian Church. 

Mr. Clyde 

841. Tutorial in Missions. Reading and discussions on missions, de- 
signed particularly for missionary candidates and those considering be- 
coming candidates. 

Mr. Clyde 

842. The Presbyterian Church. This course reviews the European 
origins of American Reformed thought, and traces the development of 
the bodies which have united to form the United Presbyterian Church in 
the U.S.A. Attention is given to the social and intellectual history of 
this tradition in its relations to secular history and to other church 
bodies. 

Mr. Smith 



843. Greek Orthodox Christianity. A study of modern Greek ortho- 
doxy and its historical background in the Byzantine period and thereafter; 
the liturgy, art, music and general culture of Eastern Christianity; 
monasticism; and the various national forms, including the Russian 
Orthodox Church. 

Mr. McCloy 

844. Comparative Religion. A study of the origin and development of 
religion, with special investigation of Primitive Religion, Hinduism, 
Buddhism, Confucianism, and Islam, with regard to their bearing on 
Modern Missions. 

Mr. Clyde 

845. Major Sects. Jehovah's Witnesses, Mormonism, Christian Sci- 
ence and other groups compared with catholic Christianity. Resem- 
blances and differences noted. 

Mr. Gerstner 

63 



846. The Protestant Approach to Catholicism. A comparative inves- 
tigation of Protestantism and Catholicism, with a study of the general 
problem of Protestant evangelism in connection with Catholicism. 

Mr. Clyde 



847. The Protestant Approach to Communism. A study of Communism, 
its challenge to Christianity, the special answer of Protestantism to 
Communism, and the general problems with which Communism is in- 
volved. 

Mr. Clyde 



850. The Theological Ethics of William Temple and Reinhold Niebuhr. 

A comparative study of the social thought of the late Archbishop of 
Canterbury and one of America's leading voices in the field of ethics in 
relation to their theological foundations. 

Mr. Bald 



851. Faith and Culture. The issues raised for theology by the inter- 
action between faith and culture. The relation of Christianity to present 
cultural currents, intellectual, social and artistic, and an analysis of the 
problems which they present for the communication of the Christian 
faith. 

Mr. Wiest 



852. Seminar in Social Ethics. The Christian address to the problems 
of economics, politics, international affairs, education, and the family. 
The implications of an understanding of these areas for theology, the 
vocation of the Christian, and the service of the church in the world. 



853. Research Seminar in Selected Social Problems. Students will 
elect specific areas of social concern for investigation and will present 
their findings in class discussions and in a paper. 

Mr. Bald 



64 



AWARDS GRANTED, 1958-59 
PITTSBURGH-XENIA SEMINARY 

Degree of Master of Theology 

Robert Douglas Brackenridge ...... Washington, Pa. 

A.B., Muskingum College, 1954 

B.D., Pittsburgh-Xenia Seminary, 1957 

Clair Herbert Brewer, Jr Lakeland, Ohio 

A.B., Muskingum College, 1952 

B.D., Pittsburgh-Xenia Seminary, 1955 

Robert V. Hotchkiss ........ Claysville, Pa. 

A.B., University of Pittsburgh, 1953 
B.D., Pittsburgh-Xenia Seminary, 1956 

William H. Philips Rochester, Pa. 

A.B., Muskingum College, 1954 

B.D., Pittsburgh-Xenia Seminary, 1957 

Stephen Lamont Polley ....... Pittsburgh. Pa. 

B.S., Grove City College, 1951 

B.D., Pittsburgh-Xenia Seminary, 1954 

John L. Schmidt ........ Pittsburgh, Pa. 

A.B., Westminster College, 1955 
B.D., Pittsburgh-Xenia Seminary, 1958 

Gene Elwood Sease ....... Wilkinsburg, Pa. 

BA., Juniata College, 1952 

B.D., Pittsburgh-Xenia Seminary, 1956 

Degree of Master of Religious Education 

Lila Fay Achor ......... Gary, Ind. 

B.S., State Teachers, Farmington, 1949 

Carolyn Close Grohman ...... Coral Gables, Fla. 

A.B., Florida State University, 1957 

JoAnn Griffith Charlotte, N. C. 

A.B., Erskine College, 1956 

Rosmarie Kuschmierz Matsuda ...... Pittsburgh, Pa. 

A.B., University of Pittsburgh, 1956 

Eleanor Mary Nye Cuyahoga Falls, Ohio 

B.M.Ed., Westminster College, 1957 

Ryoko Yotsumoto Kagoshima, Japan 

A.B., Muskingum College, 1954 

Degree of Bachelor of Divinity 

Robert Ernest Backstrom ...... Beaver Falls, Pa. 

A.B., Muskingum College, 1955 

James Burton Bailey ....... Wheeling, W. Va. 

B.S., Ohio University, 1953 

65 



James David Bigley ....... New Castle, Pa. 

B.A., Geneva College, 1956 

Ralph Wayne Brownfield Wyano, Pa. 

A.B., University of Pittsburgh, 1954 

William Floyd Burd Carversville, Pa. 

B.A., Whitworth College, 1956 

Henry Cade Selma, Ala. 

B.A., Knoxville College, 1956 

Dwayne Calvin Carter Pittsburgh, Pa. 

A.B., University of Pittsburgh, 1955 

William Herbert Douglas ....... Sharon, Pa. 

B.S., Bucknell University, 1948 

George Kenneth Gordon ....... Buffalo, N. Y. 

B.A., Westminster College, 1956 

David Bryce Gray ........ Gibsonia, Pa. 

B.A., Westminster College, 1956 

Donald Davis Grohman Butler, Pa. 

A.B., Muskingum College, 1956 

Robert Elliott Harvey ........ Sarver, Pa. 

A.B., Monmouth College, 1956 

Robert August Helstrom ....... Buffalo, N. Y. 

B.S., Buffalo Teachers College, 1938 

Allan Bruce Henderson ....... Ashland, Ohio 

A.B., Muskingum College, 1956 

Frederick Joseph Horst ....... Pittsburgh, Pa. 

B.A., Westminster College, 1956 

James Albert Keefer ........ Cheverly, Md. 

B.A., Westminster College, 1956 

Roger Williams Kelsey ....... Philadelphia, Pa. 

B.A., Westminster College, 1956 

David Harry Kennedy ........ Aliquippa, Pa. 

B.A., Geneva College, 1956 

Ichiro Matsuda ........ Kagoshima, Japan 

B.A., Erskine College, 1956 

James Wallace Moor ....... Long Beach, Calif. 

B.S., University of California, 1952 

Donald Burton Patchel ....... Buffalo, N. Y. 

B.S., Westminster College, 1956 

William McCaffery Paul ....... Pittsburgh, Pa. 

B.A., Muskingum College, 1956 

Melvin J. Pritts Daisytown, Pa. 

A.B., West Virginia Wesleyan College, 1951 

Ralph Gowdy Ranney Monmouth, 111. 

B.A., Monmouth College, 1956 

66 



Richard George Riedel ....... West Allis, Wis. 

B.A., Monmouth College, 1955 

Richard Douglas Rodda ....... Pittsburgh, Pa. 

B.A., Muskingum College, 1956 

Jack Bartlett Rogers ........ Lincoln, Neb. 

A.B., University of Nebraska, 1955 

Wallace Lawrence Smith ....... West Allis, Wis. 

B.A., Carroll College, 1956 

Donald Steudler Stewart ....... Buffalo, N. Y. 

B.A., Bob Jones University, 1955 

John William Stewart ........ Donora, Pa. 

B.A., Westminster College, 1956 

Robert Earl Swanson ....... McKeesport, Pa. 

BA., Muskingum College, 1956 

Bruce Wheeler Thielemann Pittsburgh, Pa. 

B.A., Westminster College, 1955 

Thomas Lee Threadgill ....... Annemanie, Ala. 

B.A., Morehouse College, 1951 

Charles Andrew VanDyne ..... East Liverpool, Ohio 
B.A., Bob Jones University, 1956 

Rex Elwood Wentzel ........ West Allis, Wis. 

B.S., University of Pittsburgh, 1956 



August, 1959 

James Thomas Snoke ..... 
B.A., Washington and Jefferson College, 1956 



Dean Michael Carzoo 

A.B., Duke University, 1956 



Pittsburgh, Pa. 
Cedarville, Ohio 



The Thomas Jamison Scholarship (not to exceed $1000) to Jack Bartlett Rogers. 

The Jane Hogg Gardner Scholarship (not to exceed $200) to Donald Davis 
Grohman. 

The Robert A. Lee Church History Award to James Burton Bailey. 

The Christian Education Award to Carolyn Close Grohman. 

Graduation Honors: Cum Laude to Jack Bartlett Rogers, Carolyn Close Grohman, 
Donald Davis Grohman. 

The James Purdy Scholarships (six in number, not to exceed $50 each) to John 
Edwin Adams, Frank Curtis Bates, Russell Edwin Mase, John Edward Mehl, 
Richard L. Rohrbaugh, and Thomas N. Stark. 



67 



REGISTER OF STUDENTS 1959-60 

Senior Class 

Robert John Achor . . . . . . . Gary, Indiana 

A.B., Indiana University, 1957 

Hugh Johnston Barbour ...... East Liverpool, Ohio 

B.A., Geneva College, 1956 

William Henry Bell Fall River, Mass. 

A.B., Westminster College, 1957 

Daniel Edward Bevington ....... Pittsburgh, Pa. 

A.B., Grove City College, 1957 

Bruce Marion Brawdy ........ Albia, Iowa 

A.B., Monmouth College, 1957 

Eugene S. Callaway ....... Hobart, Indiana 

A.B., Monmouth College, 1957 

Charles John Carson ....... Eskridge, Kansas 

A.B., Sterling College, 1957 

Thomas Patrick Clyde . • Ellwood City, Pa. 

A.B., Geneva College, 1957 

Robert Allen Coughenour Youngwood, Pa. 

B.S., State Teachers College, 1953 

Richard M. Cromie ........ Pittsburgh, Pa. 

A.B., University of Pittsburgh, 1957 

Benjamin Dow Davis ....... Youngstown, Ohio 

A.B., Muskingum College, 1956 

Glenn Lowell Essex Homestead Park, Pa. 

B.S., State University of New York, 1953 

Earl Hoffman Estill ........ Philadelphia, Pa. 

A.B., Sterling College, 1957 

Wayne Elwyn Faust ....... Pittsburgh, Pa. 

A.B., University of Pittsburgh, 1957 

Charles Lee Filker ....... Olmsted Falls, Ohio 

B.S., Sterling College, 1957 

John William Foester . . . . . . . Beaver Falls, Pa. 

B.S., Geneva College, 1957 

Ralph M. Graham Pittsburgh, Pa. 

A.B., Muskingum College, 1957 

Ralph Edward Green ....... Canonsburg, Pa. 

A.B., Muskingum College, 1957 

Charles Gerald Hallberg Pittsburgh, Pa. 

B.A., Sterling College, 1958 

David Landis Hare ....... Laurel Gardens, Pa. 

A.B., Westminster College, 1957 

Robert Calvin Henry ....... McCoysville, Pa. 

B.S., Sterling College, 1956 

James Theodore Hunniford, Jr. .... . Philadelphia, Pa. 

B.S.Ed., Temple University, 1957 

David Paul Irwin ........ Amoret, Missouri 

B.A., Sterling College, 1956 

68 



John Franklin Jamieson Stanford, Conn. 

A.B., Wheaton College, 1957 

William Alexander Jamieson ...... Clinton, Mass. 

A.B., Gordon College, 1957 

David James Johnson Pittsburgh, Pa. 

A.B., University of Pittsburgh, 1956 

Michael Kuhtik Pittsburgh, Pa. 

B.S., Waynesburg College, 1957 

Carl Thomas Lane Covina, Calif. 

A.B, Monmouth College, 1957 

Kenneth David Lister ....... Eagle Grove, Iowa 

B.A., Monmouth College, 1956 

John Moore Lyford ....... West Allis, Wis. 

A.B., Monmouth College, 1957 

Charles Owen Lyon ........ Chicago, 111. 

A.B., Monmouth College, 1957 

Kenneth Allen MacLeod ....... Paterson, N. J. 

A.B, Tarkio College, 1957 

James Lawrence Mawhinney ....... Gibsonia, Pa. 

B.A., Westminster College, 1956 

Richard Sterling McConnell ...... Pittsburgh, Pa. 

A.B., Wesleyan University, 1955 

George Stahl Phillips ....... N. Braddock, Pa. 

A.B., University of Pittsburgh, 1955 

Gene Gibson Phlegar ....... McKees Rocks, Pa. 

A.B., Wooster College, 1957 

Horace Blair Pollock ........ Sewickley, Pa. 

A.B., Geneva College, 1955 

Jack Robert Rees ........ Pittsburgh, Pa. 

A.B., University of Pittsburgh, 1957 

Richard John Reynolds ....... New Castle, Pa. 

A.B., Westminster College, 1957 

Jon Edward Riches ........ Akron, Ohio 

B.A., Ohio State University, 1956 

William Darwin Rodahaver ...... Franklin, Pa. 

B.A., Grove City College, 1954 

David William Ross ........ Prospect, Pa. 

A.B., Temple University, 1957 

Loran Erwin Scott ........ Buffalo, N. Y. 

A.B., Seattle Pacific College, 1956 

Jay Frank Shaffer ........ McKeesport, Pa. 

B.S., Clarion State Teachers, 1957 

John Alvin Shepard Buffalo, N. Y. 

A.B., Westminster College, 1957 

James Adin Snow ....... Los Angeles, Calif. 

B.S., University of California, 1957 

Arthur Loran Stanley ....... Arlington, Va. 

A.B., Muskingum College, 1950 



William Carson Thompson ....... Flint, Mich. 

A.B., Taylor University, 1957 

Robert LeRoy Van Dale West Allis, Wis. 

A.B., Lawrence College, 1957 

Ray La Verne Van Engen ....... Roca, Neb. 

A.B., Whitworth College, 1956 

Robert Leroy Veon ........ New Castle, Pa. 

A.B., Westminster College, 1958 

David Wallace St. Clairsville, Ohio 

B.A., Sterling College, 1955 

John Hay Williams Vevay, Ind. 

B.S., Indiana University, 1957 

Donal Robert Winckler Bedminster, N. J. 

A.B., Grove City College, 1957 

Stephen Albert Woodruff, III ...... Hanna City, 111. 

A.B., Wheaton College, 1957 

Charles Parker Wright ....... Johnstown, Pa. 

A.B, King's College, 1956 

Middler Class 

John Edwin Adams ........ Kenmore, N. Y. 

B.A., University of Buffalo, 1957 

John Francis Balliet Pittsburgh, Pa. 

B.A., Geneva College, 1958 

Dan Edmund Bastin ........ Mt. Vernon, Ohio 

B.A., Bowling Green University, 1958 

Frank Curtis Bates ........ Oakland, Calif. 

B.A., Whitworth College, 1958 

John Karl Baumann West Allis, Wis. 

B.A., Monmouth College, 1957 

Harry William Beveridge ...... Fayette City, Pa. 

A.B, Grove City College, 1952 

Bruce Lothian Blackie ........ Peoria, 111. 

B.A., Wheaton College, 1958 

John Robert Brown Pittsburgh, Pa. 

B.A, University of Pittsburgh, 1958 

Keith Alan Brown ........ Pittsburgh, Pa. 

B.A, Kenyon College, 1958 

William Norman Buell ....... Salineville, Ohio 

B.A, Asbury College, 1957 

Charles Victor Clark ........ Akron Ohio 

B.A, University of Akron, 1958 

Franklin Pierce Erck Youngstown, Ohio 

B.A, Denison University, 1958 

Earl Foster Fair ....... No. Washington, Pa. 

B.S, Slippery Rock State Teachers College, 1955 

John Hillary Finch ........ Ashland, Ky. 

A.B, Asbury College, 1956 

70 



Paul Dean George Dellroy, Ohio 

B.A, Asbury College, 1957 

Donald Eugene Gordon ....... Elyria, Ohio 

B.A., Houghton College, 1957 

Harold Edward Green way ....... Stahlstown, Pa. 

B.A., Wesleyan College, 1958 

John Duff Griffith Pittsburgh, Pa. 

A.B., University of Pittsburgh, 1954 

Donald William Hankins ....... St. Louis, Mo. 

B.A., Monmouth College, 1957 

Donald Lee Hartman ....... McKeesport, Pa. 

B.A., Asbury College, 1958 

Thomas Raymond Henstoctc ...... Dearborn, Mich. 

B.S., Michigan State University, 1958 

James Robert Hervey ....... Steubenville, Ohio 

B.A., Muskingum College, 1958 

John Melvin Hicks Port Huron, Mich. 

B.A., Westminster College, 1958 

Robert David Hill ........ Pittsburgh, Pa. 

B.A., Westminster College, 1956 

Robert Gray Hultz Pittsburgh, Pa. 

B.A., University of Pittsburgh, 1958 

William North Jackson ....... Pittsburgh, Pa. 

B.A., Westminster College, 1957 

Harold Owen Kelley Uniontown, Pa. 

B.A, Maryville College, 1958 

John E. Kennedy ........ Elizabeth, Pa. 

B.S., Carnegie Institute of Technology, 1957 

Gordon Wayne Kunde Pittsburgh, Pa. 

B.A., Muskingum College, 1958 

Donald Vernon Lintelman ....... Pittsburgh, Pa. 

B.A., Thiel College, 1958 

Russell Edwin Mase ........ Canton, Ohio 

B.S., Ohio State University, 1958 

Ralph Walters McCandless ....... Butler, Pa. 

B.A., Grove City College, 1958 

John Edwards Mehl ........ Pittsburgh, Pa. 

A.B., Dartmouth College, 1958 

Robert Laing Montgomery ....... Pittsburgh, Pa. 

B.A., Muskingum College, 1958 

Richard Ralph Mowry St. Louis, Mo. 

B.S., Millikin University, 1952 

Rodney M. Murray Omaha, Neb. 

B.A., Omaha University, 1958 

Edward Smith Napier Philadelphia, Pa. 

B.A., Houghton College, 1958 

Charles Melvin Olsen ....... Minden, Neb. 

B.A., Sterling College, 1957 

71 



Lloyd Jack Paxton ........ Edgewood, Pa. 

B.A., University of Pittsburgh, 1952 

Roy Walter Pneuman Pittsburgh, Pa. 

B. Ch. E., Pratt Institute, 1949 

Edwin Prophet Brooklyn, N. Y. 

B.A., Westminster College, 1958 

William John Provost Pittsburgh, Pa. 

B.S., University of Pittsburgh, 1958 

Mark Morgan Ray Oneonta, N. Y. 

B.A., Muskingum College, 1958 

Bernarr LeVerne Rhoades ....... Prospect, Pa. 

B.A., Tarkio College, 1958 

Richard Lee Rohrbaugh Seattle, Wash. 

B.A., Sterling College, 1958 

Dean Franklin Rowley ....... Pilot Rock, Ore. 

B.S., Oregon State College, 1954 

Roger Glen Rulong McKeesport, Pa. 

B.S. in Ed., Indiana State Teachers College, 1954 

Thomas Neil Severance ....... Detroit, Mich. 

B.A., Muskingum College, 1958 

Howard Sheridan Smith Los Angeles, Calif. 

B.A., La Verne College, 1958 

William Franklin Sparks ....... Dayton, Ohio 

B.A., Muskingum College, 1957 

Francis Everett Spear ....... Wichita, Kan. 

A.B., Friends University, 1954 

Thomas N. Stark ......... Chicago, 111. 

B.A., University of Illinois, 1958 

Horace Allan Talley ........ Akron, Ohio 

B.S., Sterling College, 1958 

Gordon MacLean Thompson White Cottage, Ohio 

B.S., Muskingum College, 1958 

Robert Milton Urie ...... Craftsbury Common, Vt. 

B.A., Monmouth College, 1958 

Robert Paul Veydt ......... Cecil, Pa. 

A.B., Asbury College 

James Everett Vincent ....... Loveland, Colo. 

B.A., Sterling College, 1958 

Richard Kenneth Wallarab ...... Davenport, Iowa 

B.A., St. Ambrose College, 1956 



Junior Class 



David E. Breckenridge 

B.S., Sterling College, 1959 

Donald E. Brown 

B.A., Muskingum College, 1959 

Neil W. Brown 

B.A., Westminster College, 1959 



72 



Woodston, Kansas 
Kenmore, N. Y. 
Columbus, Ohio 



Bruce E. Bryce McKeesport, Pa. 

B.A., Otterbein College, 1959 

Roger L. Bush Greensburg, Pa. 

A.B., Wooster College, 1959 

Edwin C. Carlson Springdale, Pa. 

B.A., Muskingum College, 1956 

George C. Carpenter Granger, Wash. 

B. A., Whitworth College, 1959 

Jerry L. Crawford ....... Culver City, Calif. 

B.A., Tarkio College, 1959 

Timothy D. Dalrymple ....... Portland, Ore. 

B.A., Whitworth College, 1959 

Stephen S. Dixon ....... Los Angeles, Calif. 

B.A., University of California, 1959 

Fred A. Feldner Allison Park, Pa. 

B.A., Geneva College, 1959 

Charles R. Fosnight ........ Coraopolis, Pa. 

A.B., Ottawa University, 1957 

Burton S. Froom, Jr. ...... San Francisco, Calif. 

B.S., University of California, 1958 

William C. Gawlas Pittsburgh, Pa. 

A.B., University of Pittsburgh, 1959 

William J. Green ........ Griffith, Ind. 

B.S. in C.E., Carnegie Institute of Technology, 1954 

Maynard Grunstra . Houston, Del. 

A.B., Elizabethtown, 1959 

D. Jackson Hockensmith ....... Johnstown, Pa. 

B.A., Otterbein College, 1956 

Gordon Irvine ........ Wintersville, Ohio 

B.A., Muskingum College, 1959 

Gordon A. Jones ........ Havertown, Pa. 

B.A., Houghton College, 1958 

Raymond A. Jones Pittsburgh, Pa. 

B.A., Geneva College, 1958 

Ronald E. Kinsey McKees Rocks, Pa. 

B.A., Tarkio College, 1959 

Zoltan A. Kovacs Springdale, Pa. 

B.S., Debrecen Reformed School of Education, 1946 

Earle D. McCrea, Jr Gibsonia, Pa. 

A.B., Allegheny College, 1939 

David J. McFarlane Niagara Falls, N. Y. 

B.A., University of Rochester, 1959 

William Meyer Charleroi, Pa. 

B.A., Westminster College, 1959 

73 



Dale E. Miller Pittsburgh, Pa. 

B.A., Westminster College, 1959 

Gerald A. Miller Industry, Pa. 

B.A., Geneva College, 1959 

Robert G. Miller East Orange, N. J. 

A.B., Upsala College, 1959 

Thomas J. Mori ........ Belle Vernon, Pa. 

B.A., Waynesburg College, 1959 

Patrick Morison Baltimore, Md. 

B.A., Whitworth College, 1959 

William G. Morris McKeesport, Pa. 

B.S. in Ed., California State Teachers College, 1959 

Robert E. Palisin ........ Youngstown, Ohio 

A.B., Westminster College, 1959 

David Philips .... ..... Rochester, Pa. 

B.A., Muskingum College, 1959 

Douglas A. Pomeroy .... .... Cleveland, Ohio 

A.B., Wooster College, 1959 

John S. Redmond ........ Canonsburg, Pa. 

B.S., Penn State University, 1957 

Stewart C. Rowles . Wilmerding, Pa. 

B.A., Indiana State Teachers College, 1959 

Edward Sensenbrenner ....... Columbus, Ohio 

B.S., Ohio State University, 1954 

John R. Sisley, Jr Troy, N. Y. 

B.S., Grove City College, 1953 

John P. Smith III East Liverpool, Ohio 

B.A., Muskingum College, 1959 

Roger A. Smith ........ Wilmington, Del. 

B.A., Monmouth College, 1959 

Richard B. Snyder Big Run, Pa. 

B.S., Clarion State Teachers College, 1959 

William Steel Los Angeles, Calif. 

B.A., University of California, 1959 

Theodore Taylor Ellicott City, Md. 

B.A., Westminster College, 1959 

Eugene Turner Brooklyn, N. Y. 

B.A., Knoxville College, 1957 

David A. Vogan New Castle, Pa. 

B.A., Westminster College, 1952 

Carlton Walker ........ Wilmington, Del. 

A.B., Wheaton College, 1959 

James B. Whiteside New Castle, Pa. 

B.S., Waynesburg College, 1949 

74 



John R. Wineman Pittsburgh, Pa. 

B.A., Tarkio College, 1959 

John E. Winnett Uniontown, Pa. 

B.S., Waynesburg College, 1951 

PART-TIME STUDENTS 

Paul E. Aley Gastonville, Pa. 

A.B., Geneva College, 1951 

Mildred D. Carpenter Granger, Wash. 

B.S., Whitworth College, 1956 

David J. Devey ......... Pittsburgh, Pa. 

B.A., University of Pittsburgh, 1952; M.Ed., 1955 

John G. Finley . Parsons, W. Va. 

A.B., University of Texas, 1948 
B.D., Westminster Seminary, 1952 

William B. Hudson ......... Butler, Pa. 

A.B., Asbury College, 1950 

James J. Morris ......... Munhall, Pa. 

A.B., University of Pittsburgh, 1955 

Frank N. Norris, Jr. ....... . Pittsburgh, Pa. 

B.S., Penn State University, 1956 

Ronald Oglesbee ......... Xenia, Ohio 

B.S., Bowling Green State University, 1959 

James Pennington ........ Beaver Falls, Pa. 

B.A., Geneva College, 1957 

John Rankin ........ Bradford Woods, Pa. 

A.B., Muskingum College, 1953 

John White ......... Newburg, N. Y. 

B.A., Geneva College, 1957 

Paul D. Wierman ........ Steuben ville, Ohio 

A.B., Westminster College, 1953 

GRADUATE DEPARTMENT 

Warren K. Alnor ......... Ligonier, Pa. 

A.B., Taylor University, 1949 

B.D., Drew Theological Seminary, 1952 

Edwin Jeremy Arthur ....... Moradabad, India 

B.A., Agra University, 1955 

B.D., Leonard Theological Seminary, 1958 

Kenneth L. Beams ........ Cleveland, Ohio 

A.B., Muskingum College, 1938 
B.D., Pittsburgh-Xenia Seminary, 1949 

Paul R. Beatty Elderton, Pa. 

B.A., Muskingum College, 1951 
B.D., Pittsburgh-Xenia Seminary, 1954 

75 



David E. Bickett Plumville, Pa. 

B.A., Muskingum College, 1949 
B.D., Pittsburgh-Xenia Seminary, 1952 

William J. Bovard ........ New Castle, Pa. 

A.B., Grove City College, 1950 

B.D., Pittsburgh-Xenia Seminary, 1953 

Robert L. Buchanan Pittsburgh, Pa. 

B.A., Monmouth College, 1953 

B.D., Pittsburgh-Xenia Seminary, 1956 

Robert William Caldwell Darlington, Pa. 

B.A., Westminster College, 1949 
B.D., Pittsburgh-Xenia Seminary, 1952 

Frank R. Churchill Pittsburgh, Pa. 

B.A., Monmouth College, 1951 

B.D., Pittsburgh-Xenia Seminary, 1954 

Lloyd A. Dalbey New Castle, Pa. 

B.A., Muskingum College, 1948 
B.D., Pittsburgh-Xenia Seminary, 1951 

Stanert L. Dransfield Pittsburgh, Pa. 

A.B., University of Pittsburgh, 1944 

B.D., Princeton Theological Seminary, 1947 

William M. Elliott Pittsburgh, Pa. 

A.B., Wheaton College, 1952 

B.D., Pittsburgh-Xenia Seminary, 1955 

John G. Evans Pittsburgh, Pa. 

B.A., Tarkio College, 1952 

B.D., Pittsburgh-Xenia Seminary, 1955 

Harry J. Fisher ........ Enon Valley, Pa. 

B.A., Westminster College, 1955 
B.D., Pittsburgh-Xenia Seminary, 1958 

Charles J. Gensheimer New Kensington, Pa. 

A.B., Westminster College, 1949 
B.D., Pittsburgh-Xenia Seminary, 1952 

Richard K. Giffen Butler, Pa. 

A.B., Muskingum College, 1952 

B.D., Pittsburgh-Xenia Seminary, 1955 

John B. Hawes Murrysville, Pa. 

A.B., Gordon College, 1952 

B.D., Pittsburgh-Xenia Seminary, 1955 

Robert A Helstrom McDonald, Pa. 

B.S., Buffalo State Teachers College, 1938 
B.D., Pittsburgh-Xenia Seminary, 1959 

George R. Jackson Sharon, Pa. 

A.B., Geneva College, 1951 
B.D., Ix>uisville Seminary, 1954 

W. Harvey Jenkins ........ Columbus, Ohio 

B.S., Columbia University, 1938 

Th.B., Princeton Theological Seminary, 1941 

76 






Harold Ross Karnes Mars, Pa. 

A.B., Sterling College, 1953 

B.D., Pittsburgh-Xenia Seminary, 1956 

Jerry R. Kirk Pittsburgh, Pa. 

B.A., University of Washington, 1953 
B.D., Pittsburgh-Xenia Seminary, 1956 

John H. Krier Youngstown, Ohio 

B.A., Eastern Baptist College, 1949 
B.D., Eastern Baptist Seminary, 1950 

Robert F. Larson Pittsburgh, Pa. 

B.A., Muskingum College, 1953 

B.D., Pittsburgh-Xenia Seminary, 1956 

Frederick J. Lenk, Jr. ...... . New Bedford, Pa. 

B.A., Sterling College, 1955 

B.D., Pittsburgh-Xenia Seminary, 1958 

Donald G. Lester New York, N. Y. 

B.A., Brown University, 1945 
B.D., Yale Divinity School, 1948 

Russell R. Lester Keota, Iowa 

A.B., Grove City College, 1947 

B.D., Pittsburgh-Xenia Seminary, 1950 

Samuel T. Lewis ......... Delmont, Pa. 

B.Music, Johns Hopkins University, 1952 
B.D., Western Seminary, 1958 

Richard A. Madsen Aliquippa, Pa 

B.S., Monmouth College, 1949 
B.D., Western Seminary, 1953 

Ichiro Matsuda Morgantown, W. Va. 

B.A., Erskine College, 1956 

B.D., Pittsburgh-Xenia Seminary, 1959 

Charles W. Moore Elkins, W. Va. 

B.S., Virginia Polytechnic Institute, 1949 
B.D., Union Theological Seminary, 1954 

Franklyn K. Morris Bridgeport, Ohio 

A.B., University of Louisville, 1953 

B.D., Lutheran Theological Seminary, 1956 

Glen D. Owens Washington, Pa. 

B.S., Geneva College, 1942 

B.D., Pittsburgh-Xenia Seminary, 1955 

Donald J. Patchel Cuyahoga Falls, Ohio 

B.A., Westminster College, 1956 
B.D., Pittsburgh-Xenia Seminary, 1959 

John C. Peterson Newville, Pa 

A.B., Westminster College, 1952 

B.D., Pittsburgh-Xenia Seminary, 1950 

Paul R. Pulliam Indiana, Pa. 

A.B., University of California, 1947 
B.D., Pittsburgh-Xenia Seminary, 1950 

77 



John L. Rauch Johnstown, Pa. 

A.B., Juniata College, 1951 

B.D., United Theological Seminary, 1954 

Edward H. Riedesel New Castle, Pa. 

B.S. in Ed, Kent State University, 1952 
B.D, Western Theological Seminary, 1955 

Albert L. Schartner ........ Irwin, Pa. 

A.B, Westminster College, 1953 

B.D, Pittsburgh-Xenia Seminary, 1956 

William D. Schmeling Johnstown, Pa. 

A.B, Indiana Central^ College^ 1955 
B.D, United Theological Seminary, 1958 

Donald S. Stewart Wheeling, W. Va. 

A.B, Bob Jones University, 1956 
B.D, Pittsburgh-Xenia Seminary, 1959 

Raymond Clarence Strine ....... Pittsburgh, Pa. 

A.B, Franklin and Marshall College, 1927 
B.D, E. and R. Theological Seminary, 1930 

James N. Strohm ........ Jeannette, Pa. 

A.B, Juniata College,_ 1948 

B.D, United Theological Seminary, 1951 

Bruce W. Thielemann ....... McKeesport, Pa. 

A.B, Westminster College, 1955 

B.D, Pittsburgh-Xenia Seminary, 1959 

Charles W. Watt . . ..... N. Braddock, Pa. 

B.A, Westminster College, 1953 
B.D, Pittsburgh-Xenia Seminary, 1956 

James L. Wilson ......... Koppel, Pa. 

A.B, Glenville State College, 1955 
B.D, Pittsburgh-Xenia Seminary, 1958 

Robert Bell Woodworth ....... 

B.A, Muskingum College, 1953 

B.D, Pittsburgh-Xenia Seminary, 1956 

Edwin G. York .......... Erie, Pa. 

A.B, Westminster College, 1953 

B.D, Princeton Theological Seminary, 1956 

M.R.E, Princeton Theological Seminary, 1957 



78 



DEPARTMENT OF CHRISTIAN EDUCATION 

Senior Class 

Cora Mae Bowman Follansbee, W. Va. 

B.A., Muskingum College, 1958 

Manuelito Alfonso Feria Detroit, Mich. 

Ph.B., University of Detroit, 1953 

Katharine Jean Finlay ....... Oak Lane, Pa. 

B.S., Geneva College, 1958 

Mary Elizabeth Kirch Pittsburgh, Pa. 

A.B., University of Pittsburgh, 1935 

Mary E. Quackenbush ....... Des Moines, Iowa 

B.S., Westminster College, 1953 

Joanne Esther Spicher ........ Indiana, Pa. 

B.S., Indiana State Teachers College, 1958 

Junior Class 

Sonja M. Forgrave Grand Rapids, Mich 

B.A., Muskingum College, 1959 

Mary M. Markley Cadiz, Ohio 

B.S., Muskingum College, 1948 

Alice Louise Moffett ........ Pikeville, Ky. 

B.S., Pikeville College, 1959 

Eleanore V. Perry ........ Pittsburgh, Pa. 

B.S., University of Pittsburgh, 1955 

Rosalyn M. Sammons Wattsburg, Pa 

B.S., Pennsylvania State College, 1956 

PART-TIME STUDENTS 

Amal Halaby Kab Elias, Lebanon 

A.B., Maryville College, 1958 

Christa Klingbeil ........ Hilden, Germany 

Heidelberg University, 1959 

E. Alan Webb London, England 

London University, 1944 



79 



AWARDS GRANTED, 1958-59 
WESTERN SEMINARY 

Degree of Bachelor of Divinity 

Harold Wesley Abram ....... Saltsburg, Pa. 

A.B., Franklin and Marshall College, 1956 

Loyd Lanning Baird ........ Wexford, Pa. 

A.B., Thiel College, 1956 

Gordon Samuel Bates Pittsburgh, Pa. 

B.S., Trinity College, 1956 

John Peter Borter ....... Springfield, N. J. 

A.B., Maryville College, 1956 

Dale Russell Bowne Pittsburgh, Pa. 

A.B., Washington and Jefferson College, 1956 

Donald Leroy Brown ... .... Pomono, Calif. 

A.B., University of California, Berkeley, 1956 

James David Cobb, Jr Pittsburgh, Pa. 

A.B., Bloomfield College, 1956 

Daniel Varnum Collins ....... Pittsburgh, Pa. 

A.B., College of Wooster, 1956 

Ernest John Cubbon Pittsburgh, Pa. 

B.B.A., Iona College, 1956 

Thomas Evan Davis ........ Washington, Pa. 

A.B., Washington and Jefferson College, 1956 

Russell Wallace Durler, Jr. ..... . Pittsburgh, Pa. 

A.B., Alma College, 1956 

Kenneth Norman Edelman Pittsburgh, Pa. 

A.B., University of Pittsburgh, 1956 

Richard Emery Fruit ........ Poland, Ohio 

A.B., Geneva College, 1951 

James Gorton Gardner ....... Pittsburgh, Pa. 

A.B., Maryville College, 1956 

James Ford Giesey ........ Ellsworth, Pa. 

A.B., Waynesburg College, 1956 

Ronald Ivan Glassman ....... Pittsburgh, Pa. 

A.B., City College of New York, 1956 

Robert Harvey Gnagy Tarentum, Pa. 

A.B., Youngstown College, 1949 

John Grant Lowe ........ Dravosburg, Pa. 

B.E.E., University of Delaware, 1955 

Archie William McPhail ...... Anaconda, Mont. 

A.B., Whitworth College, 1955 

Norman Robert Morrison Pittsburgh, Pa. 

A.B., College of Wooster, 1956 

Richard Beveridge Mowry St. Marys, Pa. 

A.B., Grove City College, 1956 

Glenn Lynn Myers ........ Franklin, Pa. 

A.B., Grove City College, 1954 

80 



Roy Earl Oldham ........ Pittsburgh, Pa. 

A.B., Fairmont State College, 1949 
M.A., West Virginia University, 1952 

Joseph Robert Phillips ........ Revloc, Pa. 

B.S., University of Pittsburgh, 1954 

Frederick David Pudsell ....... Pittsburgh, Pa. 

A.B., Tusculum College, 1956 

Jack Lewis Pursell ........ Lancaster, Ohio 

A.B., College of Wooster, 1956 

John Loomis Robertson ....... Pittsburgh, Pa. 

B.S., Wesleyan University, 1953 

James Joseph Robinson ....... Pittsburgh, Pa. 

A.B., University of Pittsburgh, 1951 

Roger Ray Shaffer ........ Pittsburgh, Pa. 

A.B., Grove City College, 1955 

Kenneth Howard Slater Independence, Pa. 

A.B., Lafayette College, 1956 

Herbert Leon Tennies ....... Pittsburgh, Pa. 

A.B., Grove City College, 1956 

Donald Ivan Thiel ........ Medina, N. Y. 

A.B., Maryville College, 1956 

William Hartle Thomas ...... Spring Church, Pa. 

A.B., Grove City College, 1956 

Robert Lewis Thompson ....... Pittsburgh, Pa. 

A.B., Grove City College, 1956 

Russell Davis Williams, Jr. ...... Canonsburg, Pa. 

A.B., Mount Union College, 1956 

Allen Richard Wollenberg ....... Eden, N. Y. 

A.B., College of Wooster, 1956 

Hugh King Wright, Jr. Pittsburgh, Pa. 

A.B., Wesleyan University, 1955 

December, 1959 

Raymond Verle Bengston ....... Pittsburgh, Pa. 

B.S. in Ed., Fredonia State Teachers College, 1956 

The Sylvester S. Marvin Fellowship to Mr. Dale Russell Bowne. 

The Jennie Rigg Barbour Memorial Prize to Mr. Gordon Samuel Bates. 

The Hugh Thomson Kerr Moderator Prize to Mr. Gordon Samuel Bates. 

The Michael Wilson Keith Memorial Prize in Homiletics to Mr. Glenn Lynn Myers. 

The Chevy Chase Presbyterian Church Prize in Christian Education (Young 
People's Work) to Mr. Gordon Samuel Bates. 

The First Presbyterian Church of McDonald Prize in Church History to Mr. Dale 
Russell Bowne. 

81 



REGISTER OF STUDENTS 1959-60 

Senior Class 

Robert Calvin Armstrong Noblestown, Pa 

B.S., George Williams College, 1948 

Raymond Verle Bengston Pittsburgh, Pa 

B.S. in Ed., Fredonia State Teachers College, 1956 

Roy Samuel Buffat, Jr. ...... Pittsburgh, Pa 

A.B., Maryville College, 1957 

Richard Samuel Buterbaugh ...... Pittsburgh, Pa. 

A.B., Western Maryland College, 1957 

Paul Robins Carlson ........ Pittsburgh, Pa. 

A.B., Providence-Barrington Bible College, 1954 

Robert Miller Carson, Jr. ..... . Avonmore, Pa. 

A.B., University of Pittsburgh, 1950 
LL.B., University of Pittsburgh, 1952 

Burke Eugene Dorworth ....... Franklin, Pa. 

A.B., University of Pennsylvania, 1951 

Leonard Edward Durbin ....... Millvale, Pa. 

A.B., Mt. Union College, 1955 

Thomas Walter Estes ........ Pittsburgh, Pa. 

A.B., American University, 1957 

James Hull Farley ........ Columbus, Ohio 

A.B., Ohio State University, 1957 

John Charles Garvin Pittsburgh, Pa. 

A.B., University of Pittsburgh, 1955 

Daniel Bruce Gerhardt ....... Delanson, N. Y. 

A.B., Davis and Elkins College, 1957 

Ernest William Gleditsch Pittsburgh, Pa. 

A.B., University of Pittsburgh, 1956 

Robert James Gruber Homestead, Pa. 

A.B., University of Pittsburgh, 1957 

Willis Armand Hacker ....... Sewickley, Pa. 

A.B., Grove City College, 1957 

Donald Earl Hatch ........ Portville, N. Y. 

A.B., College of Wooster, 1957 

Norman Charles Hunt ....... Washington, Pa. 

A.B., Washington and Jefferson College, 1956 

John Milton Hulse ........ Nineveh, Pa. 

A.B., Waynesburg College, 1957 

Lynn Lutz Illingworth State College, Pa. 

A.B., Pennsylvania State University, 1952 

William Edward Johnson ....... Pittsburgh, Pa. 

A.B., Knoxville College, 1954 

Donald Robert Keen ....... Dravosburg, Pa. 

A.B., College of Wooster, 1956 

Charles Howard Lee ........ Washington, Pa. 

A.B., Washington and Jefferson College, 1957 

82 






David Starr Lodge . . Pittsburgh, Pa. 

A.B., University of California, Berkeley, 1957 

Samuel Sheldon Logan Pittsburgh, Pa. 

B.S., Grove City College, 1957 

George Hallauer Lower ....... Westtown, Pa. 

B.S., Bucknell University, 1953 

Donald Robert MacPherson .... New Hyde Park, L. I., N. Y. 
A.B., College of Wooster, 1957 

David Ernest Martin ........ Pittsburgh, Pa. 

B.S., Kent University, 1957 

Marion Wilbert McCoy ....... Pittsburgh, Pa. 

A.B., Hanover College, 1957 

Kerry Allan Meier ........ New City, N. Y. 

A.B., Bloomfield College, 1957 

Gerald Wesley Michel ....... Pittsburgh, Pa. 

A.B., Grove City College, 1957 

Thomas Paton ......... Bronx, N. Y. 

A.B., Maryville College, 1956 

Robert Lewis Rhoades ....... Washington, Pa. 

A.B., Waynesburg College, 1957 

Walter Ransom Rice, Jr. ...... Pittsburgh, Pa. 

A.B., Middlebury College, 1953 

Fred McFeely Rogers ........ Latrobe, Pa. 

B.M., Rollins College, 1951 

John Dwight Sharick ........ Norwalk, Ohio 

A.B., College of Wooster, 1957 

Graeme Wilson Sieber ....... Blairs Mills, Pa. 

A.B., Maryville College, 1957 

Jerry Miller Smith ........ Pittsburgh, Pa. 

B.S., Waynesburg College, 1956 

Wallace Arnold Smith ....... Washington, Pa. 

A.B., Waynesburg College, 1957 

Robert Edward Temple ........ Wireton, Pa. 

A.B., University of Pittsburgh, 1956 

David Robert Warren ......... Erie, Pa. 

A.B., Allegheny College, 1957 

Thomas Gene Wilbanks ...... Texarkana, Texas 

A.B., Trinity University, 1957 

Frederick George Wyngarden ...... Pittsburgh, Pa. 

A.B., Alma College, 1956 

Middler Class 

James Ray Barber ......... Erie, Pa. 

A.B., Maryville College, 1958 

Edward Raymond Breece, Jr. ..... . Pittsburgh, Pa. 

A.B., College of Wooster, 1958 

Vincent Arnold Caruso ....... Arlington, N. J. 

A.B., Upsala College, 1958 

83 



Robert Harvey Cauffman ....... Norristown, Pa. 

A.B., Ursinus College, 1958 

Harry David Clewer Pittsburgh, Pa. 

B.B.A., University of Pittsburgh, 1953 

William Leroy Davis ........ Union, N. J. 

A.B., Tusculum College, 1958 

Raymond Duke Fravel ........ Bedford, Pa. 

A.B., Lycoming College, 1958 

Jay Sherrick Gilbert . Pittsburgh, Pa. 

A.B., Gettysburg College, 1958 

Kenneth Sprague Haines ....... Lowellville, Pa. 

A.B., College of Wooster, 1958 

Thomas Donald Hamilton Pittsburgh, Pa. 

B.B.A., University of Pittsburgh, 1958 

Wendell Earl Harford ....... Pittsburgh. Pa. 

A.B., University of Pittsburgh, 1957 

Thomson Kent Heinrichs ....... Pittsburgh, Pa. 

A.B., Waynesburg College, 1958 

Harry Leroy Holfelder ....... Ellwood City, Pa. 

A.B., Geneva College, 1958 

William Brooks Holtzclaw ....... Freeland, Pa. 

A.B., Albright College, 1957 

James Edward Hughes ....... Washington, D. C. 

A.B., Washington College, 1958 

Charles Robert Jansen ....... Philadelphia, Pa. 

A.B., Grove City College, 1958 

George Robinson Krupp, Jr. ..... Jackson Center, Pa. 

B.S. Animal Husbandry, Pennsylvania State University, 1942 

Rudolph Carl Menkens ....... Union, N. J. 

A.B., Tusculum College, 1958 

Richard Lee Meyer ........ Seward, Pa. 

A.B., University of Pittsburgh, 1958 

Frederick Eugene Mong ....... Franklin, Pa. 

A.B., Grove City College, 1958 

Leslie Robert Franklin Papp McKeesport, Pa. 

A.B., Elmhurst College, 1958 

Wesley Howard Poorman ....... Canton, Ohio 

A.B., Colgate University, 1957 

Donald Hugh Prytherch Syracuse, N. Y. 

A.B., Waynesburg College, 1958 

Robert Dean Reader ........ Tyrone, Pa. 

A.B., Juniata College, 1958 

Clair Willard Shaffer ....... New Castle, Pa. 

A.B., Grove City College, 1958 

Clarence Cornelius Shields ...... Greenville, Pa. 

A.B., Maryville College, 1958 

James Kilpatrick Smith ....... Pittsburgh, Pa. 

A.B., Mount Union College, 1958 

84 



Donald Edwin Spear Maplewood, N. J. 

A.B., Bucknell University, 1958 

David Herbert Stevenson ........ Arona, Pa. 

A.B., Pennsylvania State University, 1958 

Howard Clinton Varner, Jr. ...... Du Bois, Pa. 

A.B., College of Emporia, 1958 

Donald Dissette Wick, Jr. ....... Pittsburgh, Pa. 

B.S., Miami University, 1953 

Junior Class 

Laurence John Athorn ....... Newark, N. J. 

A.B., Bloomfield College, 1959 

Paul Richard Bergmueller ....... Avenel, N. J. 

A.B., Maryville College, 1959 

James McLeod Brinks ....... Dothan, Alabama 

A.B., Lynchburg College, 1956 

Glen Howard Burrows ....... Hanoverton, Ohio 

A.B., College of Wooster, 1955 

John Paul Cameron IV Pittsburgh, Pa. 

A.B., Denison University, 1960 

Edward Joseph Campbell Arlington Heights, 111. 

A.B., University of Dubuque, 1959 

Kermit French Clickner ....... Pittsburgh, Pa. 

A.B., Butler University, 1958 

Warren Cosmo Cravotta ....... Pittsburgh, Pa. 

A.B., University of Pittsburgh, 1959 

Donald Drew Custis ........ Riverdale, Md. 

A.B., College of Wooster, 1958 

John Clarence Dean Freedom, Pa. 

B.S. in Eng., Geneva College, 1958 

James Smith DeLo Pittsburgh, Pa. 

A.B., Thiel College, 1958 

Arthur Charles Dilg ....... New York, N. Y. 

A.B., Bethany College, 1959 

Daniel Reubin Duerksen ....... Pikesville, Md. 

B.M.E., University of Wichita, 1949 

Jack Fowlow Emerick ....... Beaver Falls, Pa. 

A.B., Geneva College, 1959 

John Harmond Francisco ....... Elmsford, N. Y. 

A.B., Lehigh University, 1956 

Robert Charles Fox Bethlehem, Pa. 

A.B., Albright College, 1957 

Toseph John Gasper ........ Jessup, Pa. 

A.B., Bloomfield College, 1959 

Richard Arthur George ....... Miller Park, Pa. 

B.S., Geneva College, 1959 

George Harold Giles Pittsburgh, Pa. 

A.B., University of Pittsburgh, 1959 

85 



Benjamin Gorbea ........ Washington, D. C. 

A.B, Maryville College, 1959 

John Mack Groat ........ Alliance, Ohio 

A.B., Mount Union College, 1959 

William Ray Gurley, Jr West Mifflin, Pa. 

A.B., Milligan College, 1959 

Frank Thomas Hainer ........ Parker, Pa. 

A.B., Duke University, 1956 

Carl Harold Herring ........ Clairton, Pa. 

A.B., Waynesburg College, 1959 

David Lloyd Heyser ........ Norristown, Pa. 

A.B., Ursinus College, 1956 

Russell Ward Holder ....... Collingswood, N. J. 

B.S., Edinboro State Teachers College, 1954 

John Edmund Johnson ........ Clairton, Pa. 

B.S., University of Pittsburgh, 1957 

Allan William Kinloch, Jr Philadelphia, Pa. 

A.B., Ursinus College, 1959 

David Christian Koch ....... Philadelphia, Pa. 

A.B., Temple University, 1959 

Byron Dale Leasure ........ Bridgeville, Pa. 

A.B., College of Wooster, 1959 

Phillip Arthur Maronde ....... Pulaski, Pa. 

A.B., Westminster College, 1959 

Harry Edward Martin, Jr. ....... Pittsburgh, Pa. 

A.B., Miami University, Ohio, 1949 

Robert Allan Messenger ....... Bridgeville, Pa. 

A.B., Hamilton College, 1950 

William Harold Moore ........ Pittsburgh, Pa. 

A.B., Waynesburg College, 1959 

Howard Frederick Peters ....... Pittsburgh, Pa. 

A.B., University of Pittsburgh, 1959 

Verne Edmond Sindlinger ....... Brilliant, Ohio 

A.B., Ohio University, 1959 

Robert Duvall Smith ....... Germantown, Md. 

A.B., Maryville College, 1959 

William George Stype, Jr. ....... Coraopolis, Pa. 

B.S. in Ed, Thiel College, 1959 

Joseph Leroy Tropansky ....... Du Bois, Pa. 

A.B, Maryville College, 1959 

James Leroy Ulrich Waynesburg, Pa. 

A.B., Waynesburg College, 1959 

Elvin Milton Williams Homer City, Pa. 

B.S. in Ed, Indiana State Teachers College, 1951 

Harry Glenn Winsheimer ....... Indiana, Pa. 

B.S, Waynesburg College, 1959 

Thomas Daniel Woodward ....... Bethesda, Md. 

A.B, Washington College, 1959 

86 



SPECIALS, GRADUATES, AUDITORS 

Samuel W. Allinder, Jr Carnegie, Pa. 

Loyd L. Baird ......... Wexford, Pa. 

Richard William Blice, Jr West Newton, Pa. 

Ha Eun Chung Seoul, Korea 

Daniel V. Collins Barnesville, Ohio 

Howard Eshbaugh ......... Clinton, Pa. 

George Giannaris ........ Ambridge, Pa. 

David H. Gill ......... Industry, Pa. 

C. Albert Guyer ......... Johnstown, Pa. 

William R. Harris ........ Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Charles C. W. Idler New Kensington, Pa 

William Ideson Johnson ...... New Kensington, Pa 

Arthur Boyd Keys ........ Washington, Pa 

Christa Klingbeil ........ Hilden, Germany 

V. Robert Klitz ......... Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Michael Kuhtik ..... .... Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Millard C. Lind ......... Scottdale, Pa. 

Donald G. Phillips ........ Pittsburgh, Pa. 

L. Eugene Roberts ........ Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Hengust Robinson, Jr. ........ Webster, Pa. 

W. Clemens Rosenberger ....... Johnstown, Pa. 

Robert K. Shaffer ........ Elizabeth, Pa. 

John Ferguson Torrence ....... Steubenville, Ohio 

E. J. Vardaman ......... Louisville, Ky. 

Eric Whitton Romford, England 

Thomas A. Wildman ........ Bentleyville, Pa. 

Judson Wiley ........ McKees Rocks, Pa. 






SUMMARY OF ATTENDANCE 

Pittsburgh- 
Undergraduate Department Xenia Western 

Juniors ........ 50 43 

Middlers 58 31 

Seniors ........ 56 43 

Special (Part-Time) 12 *27 

Total 176 144 

Graduate Department ...... 48 * 

Department of Christian Education 

Juniors ........ 5 

Seniors ........ 6 

Special (Part-Time) 3 

Total 14 

Total Enrollment 238 144 

* Graduate students included under Special (Part-Time) at Western Seminary. 

87 



HISTORICAL ROLL OF PROFESSORS 



John Anderson 
John Banks . 
James Ramsey 
Joseph Kerr . 
Jacob Jones Janeway 
Mungo Dick . 
Luther Halsey 



John Williamson Nevin 

David Elliott 

John Taylor Pressly 

David Carson 

Thomas Beveridge 

Moses Kerr 

Joseph Claybaugh 

Samuel W. McCracken 

Lewis Warner Green 

James Martin 

Alexander Taggart McGill 

James Lemonte Dinwiddie 

Abraham Anderson 

Alexander Downs Clark 

David Reynolds Kerr 

Melancthon Williams Jacobus 

William Swan Plumer . 

Samuel Wilson 

William Davidson . 

Alexander Young . 

Samuel Jennings Wilson 

John Scott 

Joseph Clokey 

William Miller Paxton 

Andrew Morrow Black . 

Archibald Alexander Hodge 

David Alexander Wallace 

Joseph Tate Cooper 

William Bruce 

William Henry Hornblower 



Place of 
Inauguration 


Penod of 
Service 


Service 


1794-1819 


Philadelphia 


1820-1826 


Canonsburg 


1821-1842 


Pittsburgh 


1825-1829 


Pittsburgh 


1828-1829 


Pittsburgh 


1829-1831 


Pittsburgh 


1829-1836 
1872-1880 


Pittsburgh 


1829-1840 


Pittsburgh 


1829-1874 


Allegheny 


1832-1870 


Canonsburg 


1834-1834 


Canonsburg 


1835-1871 


Allegheny 


1835-1836 


Oxford 


1839-1855 


Oxford 


1839-1840 


Pittsburgh 


1840-1847 


Canonsburg 


1842-1846 


Pittsburgh 


1842-1854 


Allegheny 


1843-1846 


Canonsburg 


1847-1855 


Allegheny 


1847-1884 


Allegheny 


1851-1887 


Pittsburgh 


1851-1876 


Pittsburgh 


1854-1862 


Xenia 


1855-1875 


Oxford 


1855-1858 


Oxford 


1855-1874 


Pittsburgh 


1857-1883 


Monmouth 


1858-1874 


Xenia 


1858-1873 


Pittsburgh 


1860-1872 


Monmouth 


1864-1874 


Pittsburgh 


1864-1877 


Monmouth & Xenis 


t 1867-1870 
1883-1883 


Allegheny 


1871-1886 


Xenia 


1871-1880 


Pittsburgh 


1871-1883 



88 



James Gillespie Carson 

William Gallogly Moorehead 

Jackson Burgess McMichael 

Samuel Thompson Lowrie 

Alexander Young . 

Samuel Henry Kellogg . 

William Hamilton Jeffers 

Benjamin Breckenbridge Warfield 

James Harper 

Thomas Hastings Robinson 

David MacDill 

David A. McClenahan 

Robert Dick Wilson 

James Alexander Grier 

John McNaugher . 

Henry T. McClelland 

Matthew Brown Riddle 

Oliver Joseph Thatcher 

Wilbert Webster White 

Robert Christie 

John A. Wilson 

John Douds Irons . 

James Anderson Kelso 

David Riddle Breed 

Joseph Kyle . 

Jesse Johnson 

David Schley Schaff 

John Elliott Wishart 

Ernest David Culley 

William Riley Wilson 

Charles Frederick Wishart 

William Robertson Farmer 

John Hunter Webster 

James Henry Snowden 

Melvin Grove Kyle 

James Doig Rankin 

David Frazier McGill 

Frank Eakin . 



Xenia 


1873-1888 


Xenia 


1873-1914 


Xenia 


1873-1878 


Pittsburgh 


1874-1877 


Allegheny 


1876-1891 


Pittsburgh 


1877-1886 


Pittsburgh 


1877-1914 


Pittsburgh 


1878'-1887 


Xenia 


1879-1899 


Pittsburgh 


1883-1906 


Xenia 


1884-1902 


Allegheny 


1885-1921 


Pittsburgh 


1885-1900 


Allegheny 


1886-1909 


Allegheny 


1886-1943 


Pittsburgh 


1886-1891 


Pittsburgh 


1887-1916 


Allegheny 


1888-1892 


Xenia 


1889-1894 


Pittsburgh 


1891-1923 


Allegheny 


1893-1915 


Xenia 


1895-1905 


Pittsburgh 


1897-1954 


Pittsburgh 


1898-1931 


Xenia 


18994921 


Xenia 


1903-1930 


Pittsburgh 


1903-1926 


Xenia 


1905-1923 


Pittsburgh 


1906- 


Allegheny 


1907-1940 


Allegheny 


1907-1914 


Pittsburgh 


1907-1958 


Xenia 


1908-1933 


Pittsburgh 


1911-1936 


Xenia 


1914-1930 


Pittsburgh 


1914-1929 


Pittsburgh 


1915-1931 


Pittsburgh 


1915-1927 



89 



James Gallaway Hunt . 

James Harper Grier 

Robert McNary Karr 

James Leon Kelso . 

George Boone McCreary 

Robert Nathaniel Montgomery 

Donald Mackenzie 

Gaius Jackson Slosser . 

Albert Henry Baldinger 

Clarence Joseph Williamson 

John Wick Bowman 

William F. Orr 

Jarvis M. Cotton . 

George Anderson Long 

Theophilus Mills Taylor 

Frank Dixon McCloy 

Henry Alexander Riddle 

J. Carter Swaim 

Walter R. Clyde . 

Addison Hardie Leitch 

H. Ray Shear 

David Noel Freedman 

Gordon Edmund Jackson 

Ralph G. Turnbull 

John H. Gerstner, Jr. 

Clifford E. Barbour 

James A. Walther . 

Sidney 0. Hills 

Howard M. Jamieson, Jr. 

Robert Clyde Johnson 

John M. Bald 

Elwyn Allen Smith 

Walter E. Wiest . 

Robert Lee Kelley, Jr. 

Malcolm S. Alexander 

Harold E. Scott 

William A. Nicholson 



Pittsburgh 


1920-1926 


Pittsburgh 


1922-1926 


St. Louis 


1922-1949 


St. Louis 


1923- 


St. Louis 


1924-1946 


Pittsburgh 


1926-1930 


Pittsburgh 


1928-1933 


Pittsburgh 


1928- 


Pittsburgh 


1931-1947 


Pittsburgh 


1932-1950 


Pittsburgh 


1936-1944 


Pittsburgh 


1936- 


Pittsburgh 


1940- 


Pittsburgh 


1942-1955 


Pittsburgh 


1942- 


Pittsburgh 


1943- 


Pittsburgh 


1944- 


Pittsburgh 


1944-1954 


Pittsburgh 


1945- 


Pittsburgh 


1946- 


Pittsburgh 


1947-1959 


Pittsburgh 


1948- 


Pittsburgh 


1949- 


Pittsburgh 


1949-1954 


Pittsburgh 


1950- 


Pittsburgh 


1951- 


Pittsburgh 


1954- 


Pittsburgh 


1954- 


Pittsburgh 


1955- 


Pittsburgh 


1955- 


Pittsburgh 


1957- 


Pittsburgh 


1957- 


Pittsburgh 


1957- 


Pittsburgh 


1958- 


Pittsburgh 


1958- 


Pittsburgh 


1959- 


Pittsburgh 


1960- 



90 



DONATIONS AND BEQUESTS 

All donations or bequests to the Seminary should be made to 
"The Pittsburgh Theological Seminary of the United Presbyterian 
Church in the United States of America, located at 616 North High- 
land Avenue, Pittsburgh 6, Pennsylvania." The proper legal form 
for making a bequest is as follows. 

"I hereby give and bequeath to Pittsburgh Theological Seminary 
of the United Presbyterian Church in the United States of America, 
incorporated in the State of Pennsylvania, the following: . . . ." 

If the person desires the Seminary to receive the full amount 
designated, free of tax, the following statement should be added: 
"The collateral inheritance tax to be paid out of my estate." 

Care should be taken to use the corporate name as given above, 
and to have the bequest conform to the laws of the state governing it. 

The memorial idea may be carried out either in the erection 
of a building or in the endowment of any of the special funds of 
the Seminary. 



91 



INDEX 

Accreditation of the Seminary . . . . . . . . . 27 

Admissions and Requirements ........ 28-30 

Alumni Association ........... 17 

Attendance, Summary of ........... 87 

Awards Granted, 1958-59 65,80 

B. D. Curriculum .......... 42-43 

Bible Lands Museum ........... 25 

Board of Directors and Committees ....... 10,11 

Calendar for 1960-1961 2 

Calendar of the Seminary .......... 3 

Courses of Instruction ......... 46-64 

Courses of Study .......... 44,45 

Credentials Required for Admission ....... 29,30 

Curriculum 44,45 

Degree of Bachelor of Divinity ......... 36 

Donations and Bequests .......... 91 

Faculty ............ 6,12 

Faculty Committees and Staff ........ 15,16 

Fees and Expenses ........... 32 

Genealogy ............. 18 

Graduate Department ........... 41 

Historical Roll of Professors ......... 88 

Housing ............ 22,23 

Insurance for Students .......... 33 

Lectures, Special ........... 14 

Library ............. 24 

Location of the Seminary Building ........ 22 

Musical Opportunity ........... 27 

Pittsburgh — Our Environment ......... 21 

Pre-Seminary Studies . . . . . . . . . . .28 

Purpose of the Seminary . . . . . . . . . .17 

Register of Students, 1959-60 . . 68-82 

Registration . . . . . . . . . . . .31 

Scholarship Assistance and Financial Aid . . . . . . .33 

Scholarships, Awards and Prizes ......... 36 

Student Loan Funds ........... 34 

Term and Course Prescribed by General Assembly .... 35-36 

Transfer Students . . . . . . . . . . .31 

92 



TV 

Pittsburgh 

1 Jkeological 

a 

enninary 




nnmaJ 



1961-1962 






THE 
ANNUAL CATALOGUE 

OF 

The Pittsburgh 
Theological Seminary 

OF 

THE UNITED PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH 

IN THE 

UNITED STATES OF AMERICA 

616 N. HIGHLAND AVENUE 
PITTSBURGH 6, PENNSYLVANIA 

1961-1962 



• CALENDAR FOR 1961 • 




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• CALENDAR FOR 1962 • 




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30 


u. .. 











THE BUSINESS OFFICE 

Hours: 9:00-5:00 Monday through Friday 

Telephone: EMerson 2-4546 






THE SEMINARY CALENDAR 
1961 

19 June-21 July Summer Session in Beginning Greek 

24 July-25 Aug. Summer Session in Beginning Hebrew 



10-14 July School of Religion 



First Semester 

5-6 Sept. Junior Orientation. 

1 Sept. Formal Opening and Reception, 2:00 P.M. 

8 Sept. Class Work Begins. 

15 Sept. Seminary Communion Service, 7:30 P.M. 

11-12 Oct. Convocation in Christian Education. 

6-12 Nov. Reading Week. 

23-26 Nov. Thanksgiving Recess. 

18 Dec. Examinations Begin. 

22 Dec. Semester Ends. 



Second Semester 
1962 

15 Jan. Class Work Begins. 

12-18 Mar. Reading Week. 

16-22 Apr. Easter Recess. 

30 Apr. Examinations Begin. 

6 May Baccalaureate and Communion Service, 8:00 P.M. 

8 May Annual Meeting of the Board of Directors. 

8 May Annual Meeting and Dinner of the Alumni Association. 

8 May One Hundred Sixty-eighth Commencement. 
8:00 P.M. 
The East Liberty United Presbyterian Church 




Clifford E. Barbour, Ph.D. 

Vice President and Acting President 



"Where there is no vision, the people perish," says the writer of 
Proverbs. What it means is that where there is no prophetic plan- 
ning- there is the dissipation of potential, the aimless squandering of 
capabilities. "Think big," says the architect whose buildings become 
monuments. "Think high," says the music coach whose pupil be- 
comes the able interpreter of great composers. 

So at Pittsburgh Theological Seminary from the time the consoli- 
dation of the two former schools seemed assured, we have been look- 
ing ahead with great dreams, not as visionaries but with vision of 
great goals to be achieved, of great designs to be realized. Our plans 
and programs are organized to attain their fulfillment. We have a 
new and dramatic curriculum intended to relate all academic disci- 
plines to the practice of the ministry in all its forms. We have es- 
tablished procedures which will aid faculty members to pursue their 
own scholarly research; and have carefully worked out methodology 
whereby students may become colleagues with their teachers in the 
exciting and venturesome experience of scholarly investigation. 

We are in the process of developing here a great theological 
university. It will take time, but we believe it is worth the taking of 
time. However, we are taking some steps now. For instance, there 
will be two programs offered this coming year in cooperation with the 
University of Pittsburgh, one with the Graduate School of Interna- 
tional Affairs, and one with the Graduate Department of the School 
of Education. This is the beginning. 



Now it must be said that while we are thinking and planning for 
the future we are not forgetting the past. As Moses called to the 
congregation of Israel, "Remember the days of old, consider the years 
of many generations," so our future has the support of strong theo- 
logical and academic foundations upon which we now build. To 
forget that, or to neglect that, might find us building the new struc- 
ture on sand. We start from where we are and build upon that which 
has already been done. We consider the years of many generations 
and we mean to be true to our heritage. 

At Pittsburgh Theological Seminary our excitement is in the 
prospects before us; our pledge is to be true to that which brought us 
to this good day. Our prayer is that God may help us to prove worthy 
both of the past and of the promise. 




Architect's Model Visualizes Future Campus 



Existing 

1. Samuel A. Fulton Memorial Hall — 
married students. 

2. The George A. Long Administration 
Building. 

3. McCune Chapel. 

4. Library — now part of the 
Administration Building. 

5. John McNaugher Memorial Hall — 
single students. 

Under Construction 

6. New Single Men's Dormitory. 



7. 



New dining room and kitchen 
addition. 



Proposed — This Campaign 

8. Married students' apartments. 

9. Library. 

10. Student Activities Building. 

Proposed Future Buildings 

11. Married Students' apartments. 

12. Married Students' apartments. 

13. Chapel. 

14. Single Students' dormitories. 



Landscaping and parking areas are included in the plans. All plans are subject to 
some modification as development progresses. Decision to effect changes in the pro- 
posed building schedule may be made by the Board, depending on need. 




Vke tf-acultif, 





James Leon Kelso, Professor of Old Testament History 
and Biblical Archaeology. Monmouth College, A.B.; Indiana 
University, A.M.; Xenia Theological Seminary, Th.M. and 
Th.D. 



William F. Orr, Professor of New Testament Literature 
and Exegesis. Southwestern University, A.B.; Louisville 
Presbyterian Seminary, B.D. and Th.M.; Hartford Theolog- 
ical Seminary, Ph.D. 



Theophilus M. Taylor, Professor, The John McNaugher 
Chair of New Testament Literature and Exegesis. Univer- 
sity of Pennsylvania, B.Arch.; Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological 
Seminary, Th.B.; Yale University, Ph.D. 



Jarvis M. Cotton, Associate Professor of Church Govern- 
ment, and Director of Senior Placement and Alumni Rela- 
tions. Maryville College, A.B.; Western Theological Semi- 
nary, S.T.B. 



Frank Dixon McCloy, Jr., Associate Professor of Church 
History. University of Pittsburgh, A.B. and A.M.; Western 
Theological Seminary, S.T.B. ; Harvard University, A.M. and 
Ph.D. 



Walter R. Clyde, Professor of Christian Mission. Muskin- 
gum College, A.B.; Omaha Theological Seminary, B.D.; 
Western Theological Seminary, S.T.M.; Hartford Seminary 
Foundation, Ph.D. 



i 






^Ike faculty 



Addison H. Leitch, Professor of Systematic Theology. 
Muskingum College, B.A.; Pittsburgh -Xenia Theological 
Seminary, Th.B. and Th.M.; Cambridge University, Ph.D. 



DAvro Noel Freedman, Professor of Hebrew and Old Testa- 
ment Literature. UCLA, A.B.; Princeton Theological Semi- 
nary, Th.B.; Johns Hopkins University, Ph.D. 




Gordon E. Jackson, Dean of the Seminary and Professor of 
Pastoral Care and Counseling. Monmouth College, A.B.; 
Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary, Th.B. and Th.M.; 
University of Chicago, Ph.D. 



John H. Gerstner, Professor of Church History. West- 
minster College, A.B.; Westminster Theological Seminary, 
Th.B. and Th.M.; Harvard University, Ph.D. 




Bessie M. Burrows, Assistant Professor of Christian Educa- 
tion and Acting Registrar. Geneva College, B.A.; Columbia 
University, M.A. 



James A. Walther, Associate Professor of New Testament 
Literature and Exegesis. Grove City College, A.B.; Western 
Theological Seminary, S.T.B.; Emmanuel College, Victoria 
University, Th.D. 



%w* i 









-O 




Sidney O. Hills, Associate Professor of Hebrew and Old 
Testament Literature. Northwestern University, B.A.; Mc- 
Cormick Theological Seminary, B.D.; Johns Hopkins Univer- 
sity, Ph.D. 



Robert Lee Kelley, Jr., Associate Professor of Biblical 
Languages. University of Pittsburgh, A.B.; Pittsburgh-Xenia 
Theological Seminary, B.D.; Princeton Theological Seminary, 
Th.M. 



Robert Clyde Johnson, Professor of Systematic Theology. 
Davidson College, B.S.; Union Theological Seminary, B.D. 
and S.T.M.; Columbia University, M.A.; Vanderbilt Univer- 
sity, Ph.D. 



Howard M. Jamieson, Jr., Associate Professor of Biblical 
Theology and Acting Dean of Students. Monmouth College, 
A.B.; Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary, Th.B.; Univer- 
sity of Pittsburgh, M.A. 



John M. Bald, Associate Professor of Christian Ethics. 
Muskingum College, A.B.; Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological 
Seminary, Th.B. and Th.M. 



Elwyn Allen Smith, Professor of Church History. Whea- 
ton College, A.B.; Yale Divinity School, B.D.; Princeton 
Theological Seminary, Th.M.; Harvard University, Ph.D. 



Walter E. Wiest, Associate Professor of Philosophy of 
Religion. Lafayette College, A.B.; Princeton Theological 
Seminary, Th.B. 



A 



Malcolm S. Alexander, Associate Professor of Pastoral 
Theology and Acting Director of Field Education. University 
of Southern California, A.B. and LL.B.; Pittsburgh-Xenia 
Theological Seminary, B.D. 



Harold E. Scott, Associate Professor of Homiletics. Sterling 
College, B.A.; Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary, B.D. 



Howard L. Ralston, Assistant Professor of Church Music. 
Muskingum College, Mus.B.; Curtis Institute of Music, 
A.A.G.O. 






William A. Nicholson, Associate Professor of Homiletics. 
Washington & Jefferson College, A.B.; Western Theological 
Seminary, S.T.B. 



James S. Irvine, Assistant Professor of Bibliography. Wash- 
ington and Jefferson College, A.B.; Western Theological Sem- 
inary, B.D.; Johns Hopkins University, Ph.D. 




PP%1« 





J. Gordon Chamberlin, Associate Professor of Christian 
Education. Cornell College in Iowa, A.B.; Union Theological 
Seminary, B.D.; Columbia University, Ed.D. 



Cayraud S. Wilmore, Jr., Assistant Professor of Social 
Ethics. Lincoln University, A.B.; Lincoln Seminary, B.D.; 
Temple University School of Theology, S.T.M. 



Arlan P. Doiirenburg, Assistant Professor of Speech, Frank- 
lin and Marshall College, A.B.; Princeton Theological Sem- 
inary, B.D. 



10 



BOARD OF DIRECTORS 
Officers 

Rev. W. Bruce Wilson, D.D., President 

Rev. Frederick B. Speakman, D.D., Vice President 

Mr. George D. Lockhart, Secretary 

Rev. James T. Vorhis, D.D., Assistant Secretary 

Mr. T. J. Gillespie, Jr., Treasurer 

Mr. John G. Smithyman, C.P.A., Assistant Treasurer 

Mr. Henry C. Herchenroether, Jr., Counsel 

Members 

Term Expires May 1961 
Mr. Robert L. Becker ....... Pittsburgh, Pa. 

President, Wear-Ever Aluminum, Inc. 

Mr. Earle M. Craig Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Retired — Chairman of the Board, Valvoline Oil Co. 

Rev. Richard W. Graves, D.D., Litt.D. . . . New Wilmington, Pa. 
Pastor, United Presbyterian Church 

Mr. Milton J. Hein New York, N. Y. 

Assistant Comptroller, Board of National Missions 

Mr. George D. Lockhart ....... Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Attorney, Kirkpatrick, Pomeroy, Lockhart and Johnson 

Rev. W. Paul Ludwig, Ph.D Washington, D. C. 

Pastor, Chevy Chase Presbyterian Church 

Mr. John R. McCune, Jr Pittsburgh, Pa. 

President, Consolidated Lamp and Glass Co. 

Rev. Walter L. Moser, Ph.D., D.D Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Stated Clerk, Pittsburgh Presbytery 

Mr. Alexander P. Reed, LL.D Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Attorney, Alter, Wright, and Barron 

Rev. John Coventry Smith, D.D., LL.D New York, N. Y. 

General Secretary, Commission on Ecumenical Mission and Relations 

Rev. Frederick Bruce Speakman, D.D Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Pastor, Third Presbyterian Church 

Rev. C. T. R. Yeates, D.D., LL.D Des Moines, Iowa 

Pastor, Westminster United Presbyterian Church 

Term Expires May 1962 
Mr. Wilson A. Campbell ....... Sewickley, Pa. 

Retired 

Mr. T. J. Gillespie, Jr Pittsburgh, Pa. 

President and Treasurer, Lockhart Iron and Steel Company 

Rev. J. Hubert Henderson, D.D Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Pastor, J. M. Wallace Memorial United Presbyterian Church 

Mr. William R. Jackson Pittsburgh, Pa. 

President, Pittsburgh-Des Moines Steel Company 

11 



Rev. John C. Lorimer, D.D. ..... New Wilmington, Pa. 

Retired 

Rev. Henry A. Riddle, D.D., LL.D. ..... Lewistown, Pa. 

Retired 

Rev. Charles P. Robshaw, S.T.D., D.D., LL.D. . . . Pittsburgh, Pa. 
Pastor, East Liberty Presbyterian Church 

Mr. James H. Rogers ........ Latrobe, Pa. 

Retired 

Rev. Howard C. Scharfe, D.D., LL.D Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Pastor, Shadyside Presbyterian Church 

Mr. H. Parker Sharp Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Vice President and General Counsel, Jones & Laughlin Steel Corporation 

Rev. Samuel C. Weir, D.D Detroit, Mich. 

Synod Executive 

Rev. W. Bruce Wilson, D.D Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Pastor, Sunset Hills United Presbyterian Church. 

Term Expires May 1963 

Mr. A. C. Amsler Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Retired— Westinghouse Electric Corporation 

Rev. John B. Barker, D.D Canton, Ohio 

Pastor, Calvary Presbyterian Church 

Mr. Frank H. Davis, LL.D Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Retired 

Rev. Robert H. French, D.D Des Moines, Iowa 

Synod Executive 

Mr. Henry C. Herchenroether, Jr. .... . Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Attorney, Alter, Wright, and Barron 

Mr. W. Kenneth Menke Pittsburgh, Pa. 

President, Pittsburgh Chemical Company 

Rev. Don P. Montgomery, D.D Youngstown, Ohio 

Pastor, Pleasant Grove United Presbyterian Church 

Mr. William H. Rea Pittsburgh, Pa. 

President, Oliver Tyrone Corporation 

Rev. Robert H. Stephens Summit, N. J. 

Pastor, Central Presbyterian Church 

Mr. James W. Vicary Erie, Pa. 

President, Ervite Corporation 

Rev. Robert R. Vogelsang Latrobe, Pa. 

Pastor, Main Street United Presbyterian Church 

Rev. Walter R. Young, D.D Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Pastor, Second United Presbyterian Church of Wilkinsburg 

12 



COMMITTEES OF THE BOARD OF DIRECTORS 

The Executive Committee 

Mr. A. C. Amsler Mr. George D. Lockhart 

Mr. Earle M. Craig Rev. Frederick B. Speakman, D.D. 

Mr. T. J. Gillespie, Jr. Rev. Samuel C. Weir, D.D. 

Rev. W. Bruce Wilson, D.D. 

The Education Committee 
Rev. Richard W. Graves, D.D., Litt.D. Rev. Don P. Montgomery, D.D. 
Rev. J. Hubert Henderson, D.D. Rev. Walter L. Moser, Ph.D., D.D. 

Rev. W. Paul Ludwig, Ph.D. Rev. Frederick B. Speakman, D.D. 

Rev. Robert R. Vogelsang 

The Finance Committee 

Mr. Wilson A. Campbell Mr. Alexander P. Reed, LL.D. 

Mr. Earle M. Craig Mr. James H. Rogers 

Mr. T. J. Gillespie, Jr. Rev. Howard C. Scharfe, D.D., LL.D. 

Mr. H. Parker Sharp 

The Nominations Committee 
Rev. Robert H. French, D.D. Mr. James W. Vicary 

Mr. William H. Rea Rev. Samuel C. Weir, D.D. 

Rev. Charles P. Robshaw, S.T.D., D.D., LL.D. 
Rev. John Coventry Smith, DD., LL.D. 

The Property Committee 

Mr. A. C. Amsler Mr. George D. Lockhart 

Mr. Frank H. Davis, LL.D. Mr. John R. McCune, Jr. 

Mr. William R. Jackson Mr. W. Kenneth Menke 

Rev. Walter R. Young, D.D. 



13 



THE FACULTY 



The Rev. Clifford Edward Barbour, Ph.D. (Edinburgh), D.D., LL.D. 
Vice President and Acting President 

The Rev. James Leon Kelso, A.M., Th.M., Th.D. (Xenia), D.D., LL.D. 
Professor of Old Testament History and Biblical Archaeology 

The Rev. William F. Orr, Th.M., Ph.D. (Hartford), D.D. 
Professor of New Testament Literature and Exegesis 

The Rev. Theophilus Mills Taylor, Ph.D. (Yale), D.D. 

Professor, The John McNaugher Chair of New Testament Literature 
and Exegesis 

The Rev. Jarvis M. Cotton, S.T.B. (Western), D.D. 

Associate Professor of Church Government and Director of Senior Placement 
and Alumni Relations 

The Rev. Frank Dixon McCloy, Jr., A.M., Ph.D. (Harvard), D.D. 

Associate Professor of Church History 

The Rev. Walter R. Clyde, S.T.M., Ph.D. (Hartford) 

Professor of Christian Mission 

The Rev. Addison H. Leitch, Th.M., Ph.D. (Cambridge), D.D., Litt.D. 

Professor of Systematic Theology 

The Rev. David Noel Freedman, Ph.D. (Johns Hopkins) 
Professor of Hebrew and Old Testament Literature 

The Rev. Gordon E. Jackson, Th.M., Ph.D. (Chicago), D.D., Dean of the Seminary 
Professor of Pastoral Care and Counseling 

The Rev. John H. Gerstner, Th.M., Ph.D. (Harvard), D.D. 
Professor of Church History 

Miss Bessie M. Burrows, M.A. (Columbia) 

Assistant Professor of Christian Education and Acting Registrar 

The Rev. James A. Walther, Th.D. (Victoria) 

Associate Professor of New Testament Literature 

The Rev. Sidney 0. Hills. Ph.D. (Johns Hopkins), Secretary 
Associate Professor of Hebrew and Old Testament Literature 

The Rev. Robert Lee Kelley. Jr., Th.M. (Princeton) 
Associate Professor of Biblical Languages 

The Rev. Robert Clyde Johnson, M.A., S.T.M., Ph.D. (Vanderbilt), D.D. 
Professor of Systematic Theology 

The Rev. Howard M. Jamieson, Jr., M.A. (Pittsburgh), D.D. 

Associate Professor of Biblical Theology and Acting Dean of Students 

The Rev. John M. Bald, Th.M. (Pittsburgh-Xcnia), D.D., Alternate Secretary 
Associate Professor of Christian Ethics 

The Rev. Elwyn Allen Smith, Th.M., Ph.D. (Harvard) 
Professor of Church History 

The Rev. Walter E. Wiest, Th.B. (Princeton) 
Associate Professor of Philosophy of Religion 

14 



The Rev. Malcolm S. Alexander, LL.B. (Southern California), B.D. 

Associate Professor of Pastoral Theology and Acting Director of Field 
Education 

The Rev. Harold E. Scott, B.D. (Pittsburgh-Xenia), D.D. 
Associate Professor of Homiletics 

Mr. Howard L. Ralston. Mus.B., A.A.G.O. 

Assistant Professor of Church Music 

The Rev. William A. Nicholson, S.T.B. (Western), D.D. 
Associate Professor of Homiletics 

The Rev. James S. Irvine, B.D., Ph.D. (Johns Hopkins) 
Assistant Professor of Bibliography 

The Rev. J. Gordon Chamberljn, B.D., Ed.D. (Columbia), D.D. 
Associate Professor of Christian Education 

The Rev. Gayraud S. Wilmore, Jr., B.D., S.T.M. (Temple), D.D. 
Assistant Professor of Social Ethics 

The Rev. Arlan P. Dohrenburg, B.D. (Princeton) 

Assistant Professor of Speech 

The Rev. Edward D. Grohman, Ph.D. (Johns Hopkins) 
Instructor in Hebrew 

Miss Margaret Miller, M.A. 
Guest Instructor in Speech 

The Rev. G. Mason Cochran, D.D. 
Guest Instructor in Speech 

The Rev. Leonard H. Hoover, M.A., D.D. 
Guest Instructor in Methodist Polity 

The Rev. Orville L. Kuhn, Ed.M., D.D. 

Guest Instructor in Audio-Visuals 

The Rev. Frederick Bruce Speakman, M.A., D.D. 
Guest Instructor in Homiletics 

The Rev. Clifford E. Davis, Ph.D. 

Guest Instructor in Christian Education 






EMERITUS PROFESSORS 

The Rev. Albert Henry Baldinger. D.D. 

Emeritus Professor of Practical Theology 

The Rev. David E. Culley, Ph.D., D.D. 

Emeritus Professor of Hebrew and Old Testament Literature 

The Rev. Robert McNary Karr, D.D. 

Emeritus Professor of Systematic and Biblical Theology 

The Rev. George Anderson Long, D.D., LL.D., Litt.D. 

President Emeritus and Emeritus Professor of English Bible 

The Rev. Henry A. Riddle, D.D., LL.D. 
President Emeritus 

The Rev. H. Ray Shear, M.A., D.D. 

Emeritus Professor of Practical Theology 

The Rev. Gaius Jackson Slosser, Ph.D., F.R.Hist.S. 

Emeritus Professor of Ecclesiastical History and History of Doctrine 

15 



SPECIAL LECTURES 1960-1961 

Dr. Edward A. Dowey, Jr. 

Professor of the History of Christian Doctrine 
Princeton Theological Seminary 

Dr. Krister Stendahl 

Professor of New Testament Studies 
Harvard Divinity School 

Dr. Kendrick Grobel 

Professor of New Testament 
Vanderbilt Divinity School 

The Rev. John E. Wallace 

Mainpuri, India 
Retired Missionary 

Dr. Frederick B. Speakman 

Pastor, Third Presbyterian Church, Pittsburgh 

Dr. R. Paul Ramsey 

Paine Professor of Religion 
Princeton University 

Dr. Clinton M. Marsh 

Pastor, Witherspoon United Presbyterian Church, Indianapolis 

Dr. Harry Peelor 

Christ Methodist Church, Bethel Park, Pa. 

Dr. John 0. Mellin 

Pastor, First Presbyterian Church, New York City 

Dr. Emmanuel Ben Dor 
Professor of Archaeology 
Emory University 

Dr. Conrad Steinbrenner 

Pastor, Wayside Presbyterian Church, Erie, Pa. 

Dr. Eugene Carson Blake 

Stated Clerk of the General Assembly 

The United Presbyterian Church in the U.S.A. 

Dr. Ivan Engnell 

Professor of Old Testament 
Uppsala University, Sweden 

16 



COMMITTEES OF THE FACULTY 

The Curriculum Committee 

Mr. Orr, Chairman 

Mr. Leitch 

Mr. Alexander 

Mr. Jackson, Mr. Irvine, and Miss Burrows, ex officio 



Mr. Wiest 

Mr. Freedman 

Mr. Clyde 



The Admissions. Committee 

Mr. Taylor, Chairman 

Mr. Cotton 

Mr. Jamieson 

Mr. Alexander, Mr. Jackson, and Mr. Sigler, ex officio 



Mr. Johnson 

Mr. Smith 

Mr. Davis, Consultant 



The Graduate Education Committee 

Mr. Johnson, Chairman 
Mr. Jackson 
Mr. Smith 



Mr. Leitch, Chairman 

Mr. Orr 

Mr. Bald 

Mr. Jackson, ex officio 



The Committee on Standings 



Mr. Leitch 

Mr. Freedman 

Mr. Taylor 



Mr. Jamieson 

Mr. Johnson 

Mr. Smith 



Mr. McCloy, Chairman 

Mr. Johnson 

Mr. Hills 

Mr. Jackson, ex officio 



The Library Committee 



Mr. Kelso 

Mr. Irvine 

Mr. Gerstner 



The Field Education Committee 

Mr. Cotton, Chairman Mr. Jamieson 

Mr. Orr Mr. Chamberlin 

Mr. Bald Mr. Nicholson 

Mr. Alexander and Mr. Jackson, ex officio Mr. Wiest 



The Conference Hour and Special Events Committee 



Mr. Freedman, Chairman 

Mr. Taylor 

Mr. Jackson and Mr. Sigler, ex officio 



Mr. McCloy 
Mr. Kelley 
Mr. Leitch 



Mr. Scott, Chairman 

Mr. Nicholson 

Mr. Jackson, ex officio 



The Worship Committee 



Mr. Clyde 
Mr. Walther 
Mr. Ralston 



Mr. Jamieson, Chairman 
Miss Burrows 
Mr. Kelso 



The Student-Faculty Committee 



Mr. Ralston 
Mr. Nicholson 



The Publications Committee 

Mr. Walther, Chairman 

Mr. Wiest 

Mr. Vorhis and Mr. Sigler, ex officio 

17 



Mr. Gerstner 

Mr. Kelley 

Mr. Bald 



ADMINISTRATIVE STAFF 



The Rev. Clifford E. Barbour, Ph.D., D.D., LL.D. 
Vice President and Acting President 

The Rev. Gordon E. Jackson, Ph.D., D.D. 
Dean of the Seminary 

The Rev. James T. Vorhis, Th.M., D.D. 

Business Manager 

Mr. John G. Smithyman, B.B.A., C.P.A. 

Comptroller 

The Rev. Howard M. Jamieson, Jr., M.A., D.D. 
Acting Dean of Students 

Miss Bessie M. Burrows, M.A. 
Acting Registrar 

The Rev. Richard E. Sigler, B.D. 
Director of Admissions and 
Director of Development 

The Rev. James S. Irvine, Ph.D. 
Librarian 

Miss Evelyn C. Edie, M.S. in L.S. 

Assistant Librarian 

Miss Mary Jane Kann, M.S. in L.S. 

Assistant Librarian 

Miss Lydia M. Steele, M.A. 
Director of Food Service 

Mr. Edward W. Doyle 

Superintendent of Buildings and Grounds 



18 



THE ALUMNI ASSOCIATION 



OFFICERS 

President George W. Kiehl '32 

Vice President Cuyler N. Ferguson '30 

Secretary Cornelius Thomas '3 1 

Treasurer William H. Anderson, Jr. '49 

Chairman of Necrology Committee Walter Young '33 

The Alumni Association of Pittsburgh Theological Seminary was 
established May 17, 1960, by the unanimous vote of the former Alumni 
Associations of Pittsburgh-Xenia and Western Seminaries. Its new 
membership is composed of former students, graduates and post- 
graduates of the constituent seminaries. A new Board of Directors, 
faculty, student body, and alumni made the commencement of 1960 
in the East Liberty United Presbyterian Church a thrilling and mem- 
orable event and a high point of dedication to all that is committed to 
the Seminary in our time. 

The purposes of the Association are to deepen the friendships 
begun in seminary and to afford opportunity for fellowship among 
all its graduates; to cooperate with the Seminary in enlisting the 
interests of young people in the ministry and recruiting likely and 
able candidates ; to support actively the cause of theological education 
and of the Seminary in particular in its expanding needs to meet 
the demands of the future; and lastly, to have a sympathetic interest 
in the life and work of the Seminary as represented in its student 
body and faculty. 

The Association meets annually on the afternoon of commence- 
ment day to conduct such business as is necessary and proper to 
elect officers. This is followed by the alumni dinner after which 
the alumni are invited to join in the academic procession of the 
commencement exercises. 

THE PURPOSE OF THE SEMINARY 

The purpose of the Pittsburgh Theological Seminary as defined 
in the Constitution is to educate suitable persons for the work of 
the Christian ministry and for other fields of Christian service at 
the highest possible level of educational competence. For the at- 
tainment of this purpose, the Seminary shall provide instruction in 
the knowledge of the Word of God, contained in the Scriptures of 
the Old and New Testaments, and of the doctrine, order and institutes 
of worship taught in the Scriptures and summarily exhibited in the 
Constitution of The United Presbyterian Church in the United States 
of America; and shall impart to its students the various disciplines 
by which they may be properly prepared for service in the work of 
the Church; and shall cultivate in them spiritual gifts and the life 
of true godliness ; all to the end that there may be trained a succession 
of able, faithful, and devoted ministers of the gospel and other 
Christian workers. 

19 



IN GOD'S PROVIDENCE . . . 

. . . A New Beginning in Pittsburgh 

The Pittsburgh Theological Seminary was created in 1959 of 
two institutions that had lived apart since 1825. The denomina- 
tional line that separated them was erased in 1958 with the union 
of the United Presbyterian Church with the Presbyterian Church 
(U.S.A.). The Pittsburgh Seminary, accordingly, has a genius pe- 
culiar among Presbyterian seminaries: in this institution the heri- 
tage, issues, and hopes of the Presbyterianisms that compose it are 
seeking and finding one another. Here a continuing church life is 
being erected upon decisions for unity made in 1958 and 1959. 

The denominational union and the refounding of the Seminary 
at Pittsburgh were possible because of ancient bonds. The Bible, 
the church fathers, the reformers, and the Scottish experience of 
witness and suffering belong to both denominational histories. But 
church divisions in Scotland were reproduced in the new world. 
Some Scots joined New England Calvinists in the Presbyterian 
Church (U.S.A.) while others preferred the fellowship of the Asso- 
ciate Synod, the Reformed Synod, the Associate Reformed Church, 
and the United Presbyterian Church which united the great bulk of 
these memberships in 1858. Since 1800, the American experience has 
obliterated some differences between these Presbyterian traditions 
and produced others, but the direction has been steadily toward 
common witness. Each tributary body, of course, educated its 
clergy. With the advancing tempo of union, schools were joined also. 
The issue of this history of growing fellowship in theological educa- 
tion is the Pittsburgh Theological Seminary. 

The present Seminary unites the Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological 
Seminary (United Presbyterian of North America) with Western 
Theological Seminary (Presbyterian, U.S.A.). The first of these 
was formed in 1930 with the union of Xenia Seminary (Associate) 
and the Pittsburgh Seminary (Associate Reformed Synod). Xenia 
Seminary was born in a woodland academy of western Pennsylvania 
in 1794, but spent most of its life in Ohio and Missouri. Along the 
way, a variety of other beginnings were made. The notable John 
Mitchell Mason, perhaps the greatest personality of United Presby- 
terian history, founded a seminary in New York in 1805 (Associate 
Reformed Synod) which ultimately was merged with the mainstream 

21 



from which issued the "hyphenated" seminary, Pittsburgh-Xenia. 

Western Seminary's history is simpler, although not less arduous. 
Its origin must be traced to the work of classical academies founded 
by Joseph Smith (1785) and John McMillan (1787) in Washington, 
Pennsylvania. Formal legal establishment came in 1825 by action 
of the General Assembly of the Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.) and 
teaching began in 1827 with one full-time professor. Western's strug- 
gle for existence was severe during the first thirty years but after 
the Civil War its student body outgrew its older sister in Princeton, 
New Jersey. It was indeed a "western" seminary in 1825 and its 
peculiar task was to furnish a ministry for the rapidly opening west- 
ern territories along the Ohio River — as it was called then, the 
"great valley of the Mississippi." 

The concentration of the energies of the United Presbyterian 
Church of North America on a single seminary at Pittsburgh brought 
great strength to that Church's program for educating its ministry 
and in 1955 a new campus was built in the East Liberty section of 
Pittsburgh. Western's campus on the North Side was built about 
1915. The Pittsburgh Theological Seminary is housed in the former, 
616 N. Highland Avenue. 

A new men's dormitory will be ready for occupancy in Septem- 
ber, 1961. Other buildings, including a library, a married students' 
dormitory, and a student union, are planned for construction in the 
near future. 

The very newness of the campus bespeaks the freshness of the 
work in progress at Pittsburgh Seminary. An exciting new curricu- 
lum is aimed to equip the student more adequately for the precise 
task he will undertake upon graduation. (Ninety per cent of the 
seminary's graduates become parish ministers.) The new curriculum 
is devoted to Biblical, historical, and theological studies, carefully 
supervised and interpreted field work, professional methods, and the 
study of American society. The seminary is looking beyond the B.D. 
curriculum to include more and more of its dream of becoming a 
great theological university with such diverse programs as graduate 
work at the Master's and doctoral levels, a lay school of theology, 
continuing education for the parish minister, and careful training in 
the specialized ministries. 

Pittsburgh Theological Seminary has not only a creditable his- 
tory but a promising future. The faculty is concerned with the latter. 

22 



PITTSBURGH . . . 

. . . Our Environment 

The City of Pittsburgh is the workshop of America. Its pop- 
ulation includes people of every nationality, profession, and skill. 

Together with the contiguous town, it is one of the great com- 
mercial centers of the world. Its population includes people of every 
nationality, profession, and skill. It affords unexcelled opportunities 
for the study of social, economic, political, and racial problems. It 
is in itself an education to live and work in such a city and catch 
the pulse of its busy life. Moreover, the benefit of contact with 
those engaged in the varied forms of work for social, moral, and 
religious betterment, and of personal experience in such efforts, is 
evident to all. 

The cultural and educational life of Pittsburgh is no less rich. 
The University of Pittsburgh, Carnegie Institute of Technology, 
Duquesne University, and Chatham College are renowned institu- 
tions with excellent facilities and programs. The Carnegie Museum 
and Carnegie free libraries, the great university and college libraries, 
offer resources to all students. 

The Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra, the Pittsburgh Opera 
Society, various concert series, and choral societies, present many 
musical events each season. The Pittsburgh Chapter of the American 
Guild of Organists is a flourishing organization and stimulates wide 
interest in the best of church music. 

Buhl Planetarium, one of six planetaria in the United States, is 
the most modern in the world. It furnishes scientific and astronom- 
ical exhibits in addition to regular shows displaying configurations 
of the stars. 

Churches of all types are to be found, ranging from the large 
urban congregation to the small rural or industrial mission. The 
major historic denominations afford students opportunities for wide 
acquaintance with contemporary religious life in its worship and its 
work. Some of the nation's foremost preachers occupy pulpits in 
the area. 

Pittsburgh Presbytery is the largest presbytery in the United 
Presbyterian Church, U.S.A. Within its bounds are two hundred 
twenty-eight churches with a total membership of about one hundred 
thirty thousand. Of these, about half have more than five hundred 
members each; and mission work is conducted in over twenty differ- 
ent places. Within two hundred miles of Pittsburgh live one-fifth 
of the United Presbyterians in this country. Located in Pittsburgh 
also are many churches of other denominations, with which the 
Seminary maintains cordial relations. 

23 



THE SEMINARY CAMPUS 



LOCATION OF THE SEMINARY 

The campus of Pittsburgh Theological Seminary consists of 
about ten acres, located at 616 North Highland Avenue, directly 
opposite Pittsburgh's large Peabody High School. It is in a residen- 
tial area between the East Liberty business district and Highland 
Park, and only a few minutes by automobile or street car from 
the University of Pittsburgh. This spacious and beautifully land- 
scaped site was given to the Seminary in 1951 by the heirs of the 
late H. Lee Mason, Jr. 

Frequent street car and bus service connects the Seminary with 
downtown Pittsburgh. Students coming by train or bus should 
take a Highland Avenue street car, number 73, on Fifth Avenue, 
and leave the car immediately in front of the entrance to the 
Seminary. Students traveling by automobile may follow Highland 
Avenue to the campus. 

THE SEMINARY BUILDINGS 

A new, modern seminary plant is valued at about #4,000,000. 
The main buildings are of American Colonial design. They are con- 
structed of Hampton Court Colonial red brick with Indiana limestone 
trim and are fireproof throughout. 

The George A. Long Administration Building occupies the 
central position on the campus. It provides six classrooms, four 
seminar rooms, faculty and administration offices, a reception room, 
a faculty conference room, a Bible Lands Museum, and an historical 
repository of the United Presbyterian Church in the United States 
of America. 

The McCune Chapel is an integral part of the main school 
building occupying a wing to the rear of the main entrance. It has 
a seating capacity of 310. The two-manual Schantz organ is a 
memorial to the United Presbyterian men and women who died 
in World War II. The memorial was established by the young 
people of our church. 

The Library, described on page 24, is also an integral part of 
the Administration Building. 

ACCOMMODATIONS FOR MEN 

The John McNaugher Memorial Hall, located to the right of 
the Administration Building, is connected with it by covered passage- 
ways on the first and second floor levels. It accommodates 88 men 
in single and double rooms. The dining hall and kitchen, a student 
lounge, two guest rooms, and an apartment for the matron are 
provided on the first floor. 

A new Men's Dormitory accommodating 80 men in single rooms 
will be ready for occupancy in the fall of 1961. It provides a student 
lounge on each floor, a game room and a snack room on the ground 
floor. 

24 



The Seminary provides furniture and bedding, including sheets, 
pillow cases, and one blanket for each bed. Students should bring 
extra blankets for their own use. Students will also furnish towels 
for their own use and provide for the laundering of these. All other 
dormitory laundry work will be furnished by the Seminary. 

Special arrangements may be made by students for summer 
occupancy of dormitory rooms. 

HOUSING FOR MARRIED STUDENTS 

The Samuel A. Fulton Memorial Hall, an apartment-dormitory 
for married students, provides eighteen efficiency and twenty-one 
two-room apartments. Each unit includes a kitchenette and a bath. 
A storage locker in the basement is assigned to each family. Each 
apartment is fully equipped with desk, bookcase, table, chairs, 
davenport-bed, a chest of drawers, wardrobe, refrigerator and electric 
stove. Students must provide bedding, linens, silverware, china, 
cooking utensils, curtains, lamps and rugs. Laundry facilities (coin 
meter) are available in the basement. 

A six-room fully furnished apartment for the housing of a mis- 
sionary family on furlough is provided in Fulton Hall. It is made 
available, through cooperation with the Board of Ecumenical Mission 
and Relations, to missionaries seeking fuller preparation for service 
on return to their fields. 



Lowrie Hall, on Ridge Avenue, North Side, is a three-story 
brick building containing seven completely furnished apartments 
for couples with children. Fees vary according to the size of the 
apartment. Laundry facilities are available in the basement of the 
building, and use is determined by a schedule agreed upon by the 
residents. Bedding, linens, silverware, china and cooking utensils 
must be provided by each family. (Building subject to sale.) 

Memorial Hall, on Ridge Avenue, North Side, has twelve fully 
furnished efficiency apartments for married couples, with six two- 
room and six three-room apartments. Each apartment has a bath 
and kitchenette. Bedding, linens, silverware, china, and cooking 
utensils must be furnished by the occupants. Laundry facilities are 
available to Memorial Hall residents. Three-room suites, partially 
furnished, without kitchen facilities are also available in Memorial 
Hall. A community kitchen and a dining room are located on the 
fourth floor for the use of occupants of these suites. (Building subject 
to sale.) 

Marvin Social Hall, located in the east wing of Memorial Hall, 
is used by students for informal conferences and social gatherings. 

25 



The Sheridan Avenue Apartments are located on campus at 519 
Sheridan Avenue. This three-story building contains six unfurnished 
apartments for couples with children. Washers and dryers may be 
installed in the basement. 

Duplex Apartments. There are ten unfurnished duplex apart- 
ments on the North Highland Avenue campus for students with 
families. 

Special arrangements may be made for summer occupancy of 
apartments. 

ACCOMMODATIONS FOR WOMEN 

The Women's Residence House accommodates 16 women. It is 
equipped with a lounge and a kitchenette. 

THE SEMINARY LIBRARY 

The library of Pittsburgh Theological Seminary offers a variety 
of materials for theological study and for historical research. The 
book collection contains over 100,000 books, housed in a wing of 
the administration building. Approximately 2,500 books are added 
to the collection each year to keep the seminary abreast of current 
theological interests and cultural developments. Some 200 of the 
latest periodicals embracing Biblical, theological, historical, and 
general fields of interest are located in the service area of the library. 
The extensive reference collection is located in the reading room 
which accommodates 76 persons. The main body of materials is 
located in the stack room which also contains carrels for individual 
study. Microfilm readers are available. 

The following special collections augment the book resources: 

The John M. Mason Memorial Collection 

The research area of the library contains this priceless collection 
of classical theological works dating from the Reformation period. 
This catalogued collection is housed to the left of the library en- 
trance in the John M. Mason Memorial Room. 

The James Warrington Collection of Hymnology 

Several thousand valuable hymn and psalm books which came 
from the estate of James Warrington, Philadelphia, provide research 
materials for scholars of American and English hymnody. Mr. 
Warrington minutely analyzed the works by composer, meter, tune, 
place, author, title, etc. 

The Nina S. Brittain Collection 

Through the generosity of Frank J. Brittain, Esq., of Erie, 
Pennsylvania, the sum of #5000 was used for the purchase of theo- 
logical and related works which are known as the Nina S. Brittain 
Collection. 

26 



The Clarence J. Williamson Church History Collection 
In 1958 endowment funds were established, income of which is 
to be used for the purchase of books in Church History and closely 
related subjects. These books are in memory of Dr. Clarence J. 
Williamson, a graduate of Pittsburgh Seminary, for fifty-one years 
a minister in the United Presbyterian Church of North America, 
and for eighteen years Professor of Church History and Government 
in The Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary. 

Historical Collections 
A vault of the library contains the Minutes and other records 
of Associate, Associate Reformed, and United Presbyterian congre- 
gations, presbyteries, synods, and General Assemblies. The library 
is also the depository for the Upper Ohio Valley Historical Society 
and Pittsburgh Presbytery of The United Presbyterian Church in 
the U. S. A. 

Library Hours 
The library is open about 70 hours a week and is available to 
all without restriction of creed, subject to the rules of the library. 
The hours are 8:00 A.M. to 5:00 P.M., 7:00 to 10:30 P.M., Monday 
through Friday; 9:00 A.M. to 3:00 P.M. Saturday. When the sem- 
inary is not in session, the library is open 9:00 to 5:00 P.M., Monday 
through Friday. 

THE BIBLE LANDS MUSEUM 

The Pittsburgh Theological Seminary is outstanding in its 
activity in archaeological research of Bible times in ancient Palestine. 
In conjunction with the American School of Oriental Research at 
Jerusalem, it has conducted explorations at Sodom and Gomorrah 
in 1924, excavations at Kirjath-Sepher in 1926, 1928, 1930, 1932, 
excavations at Bethel in 1934, at New Testament Jericho and Nitla 
in 1950, and Bethel in 1954, 1957, and 1960. 

This work was inaugurated by the late Dr. M. G. Kyle, for- 
merly Professor of Biblical Archaeology. It is now being carried on 
by Professor James L. Kelso. (The latter also served as Director 
of the American School of Oriental Research in Jerusalem, 1949-50). 
Members of the faculty and students often participate in these digs. 
Much of the Seminary's share of the antiquities excavated is now on 
exhibit in the Bible Lands Museum. Numerous other valuable pieces 
are awaiting special preparation before being placed on exhibition. 
Special gifts are being constantly added to the museum by interested 
friends. 

These objects all illustrate in the most striking way the life of 
the people of Bible lands, and so become of great value for interpre- 
tation as well as for apologetics. They illumine and corroborate the 
Biblical narratives. Thus an ineffaceable impression is made upon 
the student of the trustworthiness of the Biblical record, for only 
real events leave anything to be dug up out of the ground. The ob- 
jects in the museum are used constantly in the classes of the Seminary. 
Opportunity is also afforded the public to visit the museum at ap- 
pointed times. 

27 



LIFE ON THE CAMPUS 



RELIGIOUS LIFE 
Provision is made for the maintenance and development of the 
religious life. There are various gatherings for united worship in- 
cluding daily chapel services under the direction of the faculty, serv- 
ices of Holy Communion, and special convocations. Family worship 
is conducted by the students daily after the evening meal. 



THE STUDENT ASSOCIATION 
THE EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE— 1960-61 

President .......... Sherrick Gilbert 

Vice-President Dan Bastin 

Corresponding Secretary ....... Carlton Walker 

Recording Secretary Donald Custis 

Treasurer Richard Rohrbaugh 

Chairman, Webster Forum Bruce Blackie 

Chairman, Athletic Committee ...... Allan Talley 

Chairman, Devotional Life Committee ..... John Wineman 

Chairman, Social Education and Action Committee . . Thomas Woodward 
Chairman, Inter-seminary Relations Committee . . . William Davis 

Chairman, Student-Faculty Committee ..... Robert Carson 

Chairman, Mission Fellowship ...... James Vincent 

Senior Class President ....... Neil Severance 

Middler Class President ....... William Meyer 

Junior Class President ........ John Crock 

THE WEBSTER MEMORIAL FORUM 
The Webster Memorial Forum is a student organization which 
sponsors various speakers throughout the academic year. Each pro- 
gram consists of one or more rather extensive lectures, followed by a 
period of open discussion. After the death in 1933 of Dr. John 
Hunter Webster, formerly Professor of New Testament Language 
and Literature, the organization was named for him, its first sponsor. 

MUSIC AT THE SEMINARY 

The Seminary has a Men's Choir and a Mixed Chorus, both 
under the direction of Mr. Howard Ralston. Auditions for member- 
ship in the Men's Choir are held in September. This group, care- 
fully chosen and of limited number, sings for daily chapel services 
and represents the Seminary from time to time in churches within 
easy traveling distance. A more extensive tour is undertaken in the 
spring when the choir presents a varied program of sacred music in 
churches and colleges. Members of the Men's Choir receive Work 
Scholarships. 

The Mixed Chorus is maintained for all those of the seminary 
community who enjoy singing. This group meets on Tuesday eve- 
nings and presents a program at Christmas and in the spring, and 
sings at commencement. There are many opportunities throughout 
the year for soloists and instrumentalists. 

28 



ACCREDITATION OF THE SEMINARY 

The Seminary is an accredited member of the American Associ- 
ation of Theological Schools, and has had this standing from the 
time of the adoption of the Association's accrediting system in 1938. 
The Department of Christian Education was accredited in 1952 by 
the American Association of Schools of Religious Education. 



ADMISSIONS 

Dr. H. Richard Niebuhr in his study, The Purpose of the Church 
and Its Ministry, gives almost one third of his book to a discussion 
of the theological seminary as "the intellectual center of the church's 
life." He points out that the seminary is infinitely more than a 
trade school where men are given the tools and skills of a trade and 
then sent off to practice their livelihood. 

The Pittsburgh Theological Seminary as a higher educational 
institution is a place for searching, grappling, finding. Therefore, 
it welcomes students who have an open mind dedicated to an honest 
search for truth, the intellectual and emotional ability which respon- 
sible leadership in the Church demands, a sense of imagination and 
adventure, and the contagious enthusiasm which combines with an 
ability to communicate. The Seminary believes that ultimate truth 
is in God who has revealed Himself in Jesus Christ, and that the 
Gospel of this revelation must be encountered relevantly by all men 
in every generation. 

It is for this reason that Pittsburgh Seminary seeks an aroused 
and searching applicant, one who is willing to struggle vitally with 
the things of his faith, and who will, after this period of encounter 
and struggle, go forth to serve Christ, His Church, and mankind in 
one of the many forms of ministry. 

PRE-SEMINARY STUDIES 

College courses prior to theological seminary should provide the 
cultural and intellectual foundations essential to an effective theo- 
logical education. They should issue in at least three broad kinds 
of attainment. 

1. The college work of a pre-seminary student should result in 
the ability to use certain tools of the educated man: 

(a) The ability to write and speak English clearly and cor- 
rectly. English composition should have this as a spe- 
cific purpose, but this purpose should also be cultivated 
in all written work. 

(b) The ability to think clearly. In some persons, this abil- 
ity is cultivated through courses in philosophy or spe- 
cifically in logic. In others it is cultivated by the use of 
scientific method, or by dealing with critical problems 
in connection with literary and historical documents. 

(c) The ability to read at least one foreign language and in 
some circumstances more than one. 

29 



2. The college work of a pre-seminary student should result in 
increased understanding of the world in which he lives: 

(a) The world of men and ideas. This includes knowledge 
of English literature, philosophy, and psychology. 

(b) The world of nature. This is provided by knowledge 
of the natural sciences, including laboratory work. 

(c) The world of human affairs. This is aided by knowledge 
of history and the social sciences. 

3. The college work of the pre-seminary student should result 
in a sense of achievement: 

(a) The degree of his mastery of his field of study is more 
important than the credits and grades which he ac- 
cumulates. 

(b) The sense of achievement may be encouraged through 
academic concentration, or through "honors" work, or 
through other plans for increasingly independent work 
with as much initiative on the student's part as he is able 
to use with profit. 

Desirable College Curriculum 

The American Association of Theological Schools has proposed 
the following college curriculum for pre-ministerial students. This 
is regarded by the Association as a minimum list of fields of study 
with which the student should have acquaintance before beginning 
seminary study. It is suggested that a student acquire a total of 90 
semester hours, or complete approximately three fourths of his college 
work, in the areas listed below although there is no requirement that 
this be rigidly adhered to. The liberal arts background is felt to 
provide the best foundation for seminary work and for later profes- 
sional studies. 

English — literature, composition, speech and related studies. 
At least 6 semesters. 

History — ancient, modern European, and American. 
At least 3 semesters. 

Philosophy — orientation in history, content and method. 
At least 3 semesters. 

Natural sciences — preferably physics, chemistry and biology. 
At least 2 semesters. 

Social sciences — psychology, sociology, economics, political science, education. 
At least 6 semesters, including at least 1 semester of psychology. 

Foreign languages — one or more of the following linguistic avenues to man's 
thought and tools of scholarly research: Latin, Greek, Hebrew, German, 
French. Students who anticipate postgraduate studies are urged to under- 
take these disciplines early in their training as opportunity offers. 
At least 4 semesters. 

30 



Religion — a thorough knowledge of the content of the Bible is indispensable 
together with an introduction to the major religious traditions and theo- 
logical problems in the context of the principal aspects of human culture 
outlined above. The pre-seminary student may well seek counsel of the 
seminary of his choice in order most profitably to use the resources of 
his college. 

At least 3 semesters. 

Of the various possible areas of concentration, where areas of concentra- 
tion are required, English, philosophy and history are regarded as the most 
desirable. 

At the beginning of the first year students will take placement 
examinations in philosophy, Greek, speech, and Bible content to de- 
termine their level of competency. Students showing a deficiency 
in Bible content will be required to remedy such deficiency. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR ADMISSION 
Applicants seeking degrees ordinarily move through three cate- 
gories under the supervision of the Admissions Committee of the 
faculty. 

1. Pre-Enrollment: An applicant may pre-enroll any time be- 
fore the beginning of his senior year in college. Approval 
is granted by the faculty Committee on Admissions upon re- 
ceipt of the following documents: 

(a) A formal application (available upon request) must be 
submitted by a student desiring admission to Pittsburgh 
Theological Seminary. 

(b) Application fee. A check or money order for $15.00 
must accompany the application. This will be applied 
to the first semester's tuition. While the fee will be 
refunded if the application is rejected, it is not return- 
able if the application is withdrawn. 

(c) Mental Capacity Test. The Seminary will correspond 
with the applicant's college concerning a mental ca- 
pacity test. If none is available, the applicant must 
take one under seminary direction. 

(d) A personal interview with the Director of Admissions, 
the Admissions Committee as a whole, or another rep- 
resentative of the Seminary who may be designated by 
the committee. 

2. Admissions: After the opening of the senior year in college 
an applicant should add the following credentials. Admission 
may be granted conditionally or unconditionally at the dis- 
cretion of the Admissions Committee of the faculty. 

(a) A statement from a physician certifying the state of his 
physical health. (A seminary blank for "The Physician" 
will be sent to the applicant with the application blanks.) 

(b) Transcript. An official transcript from the Registrar of 
the college or university, showing grades for at least 
three years of college work. Procedures for securing 
this will be included with the application blanks. 

31 



(c) Personality and Aptitude Tests. Shortly after indicating 
his desire to be admitted, each applicant will receive in- 
formation concerning a group of personality tests. He 
is to complete them as directed and return to Dr. 
Clifford E. Davis, Church Vocations Counselor, Pitts- 
burgh Theological Seminary, 616 North Highland Ave- 
nue, Pittsburgh 6, Pennsylvania. 

(d) An extensive (500-1000 words) statement in the appli- 
cant's handwriting describing his family, educational, 
and religious background, placing particular emphasis 
upon his motives for desiring to enter the Seminary and 
the ministry. 

All documents in the Pre-Enrollment and Admission categories 
should be in the hands of the Director of Admissions by April IS 
preceding the September for which admission is sought. 

3. Matriculation: A final transcript showing the degree and 
date of graduation of the applicant. 

After admission is granted, and before September 1st, each new 
student is asked to submit three (3) photographs (not snapshots) 
for the Registrar's Office, Field Education Office, and Development 
Office. 

TRANSFER STUDENTS 
A student transferring from another seminary is required to 
submit, in addition to the foregoing, a complete transcript of previous 
seminary work and a letter of dismissal from the Dean or President. 

FOREIGN STUDENTS 

Qualified applicants from other countries are welcome as a part of 
the student body. Such applicants shall be required, in addition to 
the regular requirements for admission, to give evidence of proficien- 
cy in the English language before their admission. Tests such as the 
University of Michigan English Language test (available around the 
world) and/or the Lado English test (required by the U. S. State 
Department) normally shall be deemed sufficient. 

Such applicants shall have endorsement either of a representative 
of the Commission on Ecumenical Mission and Relations (in those 
areas where the United Presbyterian Church in the U.S.A. has fra- 
ternal workers) or the World Council of Churches (in other areas). 

An applicant from another country is also asked to submit a letter 
from his bank stating that there are on deposit sufficient funds to 
assure his passage home after his period of study in this country. 
This saves possible embarrassment to both student and seminary at 
a later time. 

All correspondence concerning admission to the seminary should 
be addressed to the Director of Admissions. 

32 



FEES AND EXPENSES* 

(for the acadmeic year) 

Tuition (approx.) $450.00 Books (approx.) $100.00 

Board 420.00 TT . .. . 

T> T7 mnnn Hospitalization 

Room Fee 120.00 T , . in t\r\ i ir\ nn 

T ., „ lx 1nAn Insurance (approx.) .. 30.00- 130.00 

Library Fee (annual) 10.00 

Student Association Fee (annual) 5.00 Incidentals 75.00- 300.00 

Matriculation Fee — $35.00 payable at the time of admission. 

Tuition Fee — $15.00 per semester hour. 

Late Registration Fee — A charge of $5.00 will be made to students registering later 

than the specified time. 
Graduation Fee— $10.00. 
Transcript Fee — One copy of a student's academic record will be provided without 

charge. A fee of $1.00 will be charged for each additional transcript. 
* Subject to change. 

MARRIED STUDENT APARTMENT FEES 

The Samuel A. Fulton Memorial Hall 

Thirty-nine furnished apartments $40.00-$55.00 per month 

Sheridan Avenue Apartments 

Six unfurnished apartments 42.50- 47.50 per month 

Memorial Hall (Subject to sale) 

Twelve furnished apartments 32.00- 44.00 per month 

Twenty-five partially furnished suites 29.50 per month 

Lowrie Hall (Subject to sale) 

Seven furnished apartments 38.00- 57.50 per month 

Duplexes 

Ten unfurnished apartments 42.50- 47.50 per month 

All apartment fees are payable monthly in advance. Applications for apart- 
ments should be made as early as possible. 

Residents of the men's and women's dormitories are required 
to eat in the seminary dining hall. Board includes nineteen meals 
a week; only breakfast is served on Sunday. The dining hall is 
closed on holidays which are scheduled on the seminary calendar. 
No deduction is allowed for absence from individual meals, although 
special consideration is given to students who regularly do not eat 
in the dining hall weekends. 

All bills are payable in advance on the opening day of each 
semester. When necessary, arrangements for a payment plan to 
cover a semester's expenses may be made at the Business Office. 
There is a carrying charge of #5.00 for the Deferred Payment Plan. 

Settlement of all seminary bills is required before registration 
for a new semester, and before graduation or the release of official 
transcripts. 

33 



MEDICAL AND HOSPITALIZATION INSURANCE 

Students are required to be insured by some type of medical and 
hospitalization insurance acceptable to the Seminary. All students 
who are registered as full-time students are eligible for such insur- 
ance under a group student policy issued by either the Royal Indem- 
nity Company, New York, N. Y., or Blue Cross and Blue Shield. 
Detailed information concerning premiums and benefits may be se- 
cured at the Business Office. 



SCHOLARSHIP ASSISTANCE AND FINANCIAL AID 

Students are encouraged to maintain a maximum degree of fi- 
nancial independence. Self-reliance, rather than the expectation of 
special favors, is held up as the norm throughout life for servants 
of the Church as well as other members of society. However, for 
those students who find it impossible to finance all of their seminary 
course, scholarship aid is available. 

SCHOLARSHIP ENDOWMENT FUND 

Pittsburgh Theological Seminary has a Scholarship Endowment 
Fund, the income from which serves as the basis for financial as- 
sistance through the following sources: 

1. Work Scholarships. Pittsburgh Seminary's Work Scholar- 
ship Program enables some students to earn part of their 
fees. Students may apply for one of a variety of assign- 
ments within the Seminary and receive compensation com- 
mensurate with the duties performed. Work Scholarship 
assignments include: Athletic Manager, Book Store Clerks, 
Choir Members, Organist, Choir Manager, Chapel Attend- 
ants, Waiters, Library Assistants, Maintenance Assistants, 
Mailing Assistants, and other special duties. Application 
for a Work Scholarship is made to the President prior to 
the beginning of each semester. Assignments are made on 
the basis of need, qualifications and approval of the faculty. 
Payment is made by check at the end of each semester. 

2. Academic Scholarships. These are available to incoming 
students whose need and college academic achievements 
merit financial consideration. A prospective student who 
is interested should apply through the Director of Admissions 
when his college academic record is presented. 

34 






3. The President's Loan Fund. Small amounts may be borrowed 
from the Seminary at a low rate of interest for emergency 
needs. 

STUDENT LOAN FUNDS 

The Board of Christian Education Service Loans. United Pres- 
byterian students who need financial aid during their seminary course 
may apply to the Board of Christian Education through their pres- 
byteries for service loans. The completed application for 1961-62 
must be filed with the Board of Christian Education by July 15, 
1961. The maximum aid for candidates for the ministry and for 
commissioned church work is $200 per year. 

The grant is in the form of a loan for which a note must be 
given. The loan may be repaid by service in the church vocation 
for which the loan was granted, after completion of the prescribed 
course of study. One year of service cancels one year's service loan. 
If the student withdraws from the course of study, the loan becomes 
repayable in cash with interest. These loans are not available for 
those enrolled in a course of graduate study beyond the B.D. and the 
M.R.E. degrees. Service Loans may be supplemented from the schol- 
arship funds of the Seminary. 

Write Office of Educational Loans and Scholarships, 830 With- 
erspoon Building, Philadelphia 7, Pa., for application forms and 
rules governing Service Loans. 

The Board of Christian Education Rotary Loans. United Pres- 
byterian students who need financial aid during their seminary 
course to supplement the service loans described above may apply 
directly to the Board of Christian Education for rotary loans. These 
loans must be repaid in cash within one year after the borrower either 
graduates or leaves school permanently or temporarily. Interest at 
the rate of 4% will begin on the first day of July next after the bor- 
rower either graduates or leaves school. 

The student must have been a member of the United Presby- 
terian Church in the U.S.A. for at least one year and must have the 
endorsement of the session of his church. 

James H. Snowden Memorial Loan Fund. A loan fund for 
students needing financial assistance to obtain a theological educa- 
tion was established in 1953 by R. R. Snowden, M.D., Pittsburgh, 
Pennsylvania, in memory of his father, Professor James H. Snowden, 
D.D., LL.D. Loans from this fund are made on notes with interest 
and without further endorsement. 

35 



Walter G. Comin Memorial Fund. A loan fund for students 
who need financial assistance to continue their education was estab- 
lished in 1955 by Mrs. Walter G. Comin, Pawnee City, Nebraska, 
Mr. and Mrs. Walter G. Comin, Jr., Wilkinsburg, Pa., and Mr. 
Myron C. Comin, Spokane, Washington, in memory of Rev. Walter 
G. Comin, D.D. Loans from this fund are made on notes with in- 
terest and without further endorsement. Interest will be remitted 
on all sums paid during the first two years after graduation. 

Westphal Memorial Loan Fund. The session of the Reed Me- 
morial United Presbyterian Church, Lyndhurst, New Jersey, estab- 
lished in 1956 the Westphal Memorial Loan Fund. Under certain 
conditions specified by the donors loans from this fund may be made 
on notes without interest or further endorsement, and are repayable 
within ten years. 

Albert G. Hamilton Memorial Loan Fund. A loan fund for 
students who need financial assistance during the seminary course 
was established in 1960 by Mrs. Albert G. Hamilton, Pittsburgh, 
Pennsylvania, in memory of her husband, Mr. Albert G. Hamilton. 
Loans from this fund may be made on notes at three percent interest 
without further endorsement. 

Dr. and Mrs. James D. Sands Memorial Loan Fund. A loan 
fund for seminary students was established in 1961 by Mrs. Albert 
G. Hamilton, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, in memory of her parents, 
Dr. and Mrs. James D. Sands. Loans from this fund may be made 
on notes at three percent interest without further endorsement. 

The First Presbyterian Church of New Kensington Rotary Loan 
Fund. Established by the session of the First Presbyterian Church 
of New Kensington, Pennsylvania, in 1961. This loan fund provides 
$300 for a single student and $600 for a married student during the 
first year of seminary when the schedule and curriculum do not 
allow remunerative field work. The principal is to be repaid follow- 
ing graduation from seminary in minimum amounts of $100 per year. 

THE TERM AND COURSE OF STUDY 
The regular course of ministerial training prescribed by the 
General Assembly covers a period of three academic years, (or, in 
cases where the student must engage in outside work, four years), 
each of which is divided into two semesters of fifteen weeks. 

CLASSIFICATION OF STUDENTS 
Pittsburgh Theological Seminary offers a basic theological cur- 
riculum for candidates for the Christian ministry: the preaching, 
teaching, and pastoral offices and specialized fields of service. Pitts- 
burgh Seminary admits any qualified applicant who desires a broader 
and deeper knowledge of the Christian faith, regardless of sex, race, 
nationality, or theological persuasion. 

36 



The student body is classified as follows : 

Regular undergraduate students: those who are enrolled, full 
time (a minimum course load of twelve hours per semester), in the 
program leading to the Bachelor of Divinity degree. See require- 
ments for admission below. 

M.R.E. students: those who are enrolled in the program leading 
to the Master of Religious Education degree. Requirements for ad- 
mission are the same as those for the Bachelor of Divinity candidates. 

M.Ed, students: those who are enrolled in the program leading 
to the Master of Education degree offered jointly by Pittsburgh Theo- 
logical Seminary and the University of Pittsburgh. Requirements 
for admission are specified on page 46 of this catalogue. 

Special students: those enrolled under regular admission require- 
ments as part-time students in one of the undergraduate degree pro- 
grams of the seminary. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE B.D. DEGREE 

The degree of Bachelor of Divinity is conferred upon any prop- 
erly qualified college student upon completion of the three-year 
curriculum in theology as follows : 

1. Completion of the course of study leading to the degree. 

2. Passing of the comprehensive examinations at the end of 
the Middler and Senior years. 

3. Attainment of an average grade of C or above throughout 
the seminary course. 

Students transferring from other theological seminaries must be 
in residence at Pittsburgh Seminary for a minimum of one full aca- 
demic year in order to become a candidate for the Bachelor of 
Divinity degree. 



SCHOLARSHIPS, AWARDS, AND PRIZES 

The following competitive scholarships have been provided 
for the benefit of United Presbyterian students for the ministry. 
In order to compete, students must take their full course of study in 
Pittsburgh Seminary; must carry not less than the regular quota of 
studies; must complete each term's work satisfactorily; and they 
must furthermore meet the particular requirements of the desired 
scholarship or prize as hereinafter specified. Under each scholarship 
an award is made once each year, at which time the faculty considers 
all regular degree students who, during the preceding twelve months, 
have completed the necessary amount of work in a satisfactory 
manner. 

37 



The Sylvester S. Marvin Fellowship 

The Sylvester S. Marvin Fellowship, paying up to one thou- 
sand dollars, may be assigned to that member of the Senior Class 
who is recommended by the faculty as having achieved the highest 
standard in all departments of the seminary curriculum, provided 
that his average be above B. The faculty reserves the right to im- 
pose special tests and examinations in making this award. It is 
offered to those who take the entire course of three years in this 
institution. The recipient must pledge himself to a year of post- 
graduate study within three years of the award, in a field of study 
approved by the faculty. He is required to furnish quarterly reports 
of his progress. The money will be paid in three equal installments, 
on the first day of October, January, and April. Prolonged absence 
from the classroom in the discharge of extra-seminary duties makes 
a student ineligible for the fellowship. 

The Thomas Jamison Scholarship 

The Thomas Jamison Scholarship, in memory of the late Thomas 
Jamison, Esq., of the North Side, Pittsburgh, for many years a mem- 
ber of the Board of Trustees of the Seminary, was established by Mrs. 
Jamison. The income of this endowment, not to exceed one thousand 
dollars, is given every year to the member of the Senior Class who 
attains the highest average in excellence of scholarship and in general 
qualifications for the Christian ministry during the Junior and Mid- 
dler years and the first semester of the Senior year. In the matter of 
grades, his general average must reach B. The honor is awarded on 
the basis of grades in required courses (Greek Exegesis being in- 
cluded.) 

The acceptance of this scholarship requires that the recipient 
spend a full academic year, the next following his graduation, at 
study in a theological institution to be approved by the faculty. He 
must further agree to make regular reports of the work he is doing 
and present within two years a thesis of not less than ten thousand 
words on some subject approved by the faculty. A portion of the 
award will be retained by the faculty until the thesis has been com- 
pleted to the satisfaction of the faculty. The academic credits re- 
ceived in fulfilling the requirements of the Jamison award may be 
credited toward an advanced degree. If for any reason the man who 
is first in the class does not accept the scholarship and its require- 
ments within one month of public announcement the scholarship 
will be offered to the man who is second in his class. If two men re- 
fuse the scholarship and its requirements by May 1 of the Senior 

38 



year the scholarship money will be added to the capital funds of the 
original scholarship grant. 

The Jane Hogg Gardner Scholarship 
The Jane Hogg Gardner Scholarship was established in 1911. 
The income of the Gardner bequest, not to exceed two hundred dol- 
lars, is awarded to the Senior student ranking second in qualifica- 
tions for the ministry through the entire course of this seminary. 
A satisfactory thesis of at least five thousand words on a subject 
approved by the faculty must be presented to the faculty within a 
year from graduation. 

The Jennie Rigg Barbour Memorial Prize 

The Jennie Rigg Barbour Memorial Prize was established No- 
vember 17, 1953, by Rev. Clifford E. Barbour, Ph.D., D.D., LL.D., 
president of Western Theological Seminary, as a memorial to his 
mother. This prize, paying four hundred dollars annually, is to be 
assigned to that member of the graduating class who has taken his 
full course of instruction in this institution and who has achieved 
the second highest academic rank of his class, if in the judgment of 
the faculty he is worthy in all other respects. It is hoped that the 
student will use his income for further study either within an aca- 
demic institution or by the enlargement of his own library. 

The Robert A. Lee Church History Foundation 
By bequest, in memory of her husband the late Mrs. Henrietta 
M. Lee, of Oakmont, Pa., established the Robert A. Lee Church 
History Foundation, the annual income of which is to be given to 
the Senior student who ranks first in the entire required work of the 
Department of Church History. 

The First Presbyterian Church of McDonald Prize in Church History 
The First Presbyterian Church of McDonald Prize in Church 
History was established in October, 1947, by the First Presbyterian 
Church of McDonald, Pennsylvania. It is to be awarded to the 
member of the graduating class with the highest grades in church 
history. The award will be made by the vote of the faculty upon 
the recommendation of the professor of ecclesiastical history and 
history of doctrine at the time of the annual commencement. The 
recipient will be expected to preach at a morning service in the First 
Presbyterian Church of McDonald within two Sundays following 
graduation, for which he will receive compensation commensurate 
with that prevailing at the time. It will be the privilege of the faculty 
to withhold the award when in its opinion no student merits it in a 

given year. 

39 



The Michael Wilson Keith Memorial Homiletical Prize 
This prize was founded in 1919 by the Keith Bible Class of the 
First Presbyterian Church of Coraopolis, Pennsylvania, by an en- 
dowment of two thousand dollars, in memory of the Reverend 
Michael Wilson Keith, D.D., the founder of the class and pastor of 
the church from 1911 to 1917. This foundation was established in 
grateful remembrance of his service to his country as Chaplain of 
the 111th Infantry Regiment. He fell while performing his duty at 
the front in France. The prize is awarded to a member of the Senior 
Class who has spent three years in this seminary and has taken the 
highest standing in the department of homiletics. The winner of 
the prize is expected to preach in the First Presbyterian Church of 
Coraopolis and teach the Keith Bible Class one Sunday after the 
award is made. It will be the privilege of the faculty to withhold 
the award when in its opinion no student merits it in a given year. 

The John Watson Prize in New Testament Greek 
The John Watson Prize in New Testament Greek was established 
in February, 1919, by Mrs. Robert A. Watson, Columbus, Ohio. The 
income of an endowment of one thousand dollars will be awarded 
to that member of the Senior Class who shall submit the best gram- 
matical and exegetical treatment of an assigned portion of the Greek 
New Testament. The passage for 1959-1960, II Cor. 3:1-18; and for 
1960-1961, Romans 1:18-32. 

The William B. Watson Prize in Hebrew 
The William B. Watson Prize in Hebrew was established in 
September, 1919, by Mrs. Robert A. Watson, Columbus, Ohio. The 
income of an endowment of one thousand dollars will be awarded to 
that member of the Senior Class who shall submit the best gram- 
matical and exegetical treatment of an assigned portion of the Hebrew 
Old Testament. The passage for 1959-1960, Deut. 32:43; and for 
1960-1961, Genesis 49:10. 

The Hugh Thomson Kerr Moderator Prize 
This prize was established in February, 1938, by the Men's Com- 
mittee of the Shadyside Presbyterian Church, Pittsburgh. An annual 
contribution of fifty dollars was pledged to be used for the purchase 
of books. The prize is to be awarded to that member of the grad- 
uating class who has exhibited, throughout the three years of the 
seminary course, leadership, originality, and accomplishments be- 
yond the normal requirements for graduation. This student will be 
selected by vote of the faculty, and the award will be made by the 
president at the time of the annual commencement. It will be the 
privilege of the faculty to withhold the award when in its opinion no 
student merits it in a given year. 

40 



The Christian Education Award 

The Christian Education Award was 'established in 1947 by 
action of the Board of Directors. Out of the income from the Chris- 
tian Education Award Fund an award of #100 is to be granted to the 
candidate for the degree of Master of Religious Education who shall 
rank first in his or her course of study. The recipient's grade average 
must reach B. 

The James Purdy Scholarship 

The James Purdy Scholarship was established in 1882. The in- 
come, not to exceed $300, is apportioned equally each year to the six 
members of the Junior Class who attain the highest average of ex- 
cellence in their seminary work. The scholarship is subject to the 
conditions that no award be made to a student whose general average 
is not above C and that the entire seminary course be taken at this 
seminary. 

The Andrew Reed Scholarship 

The Andrew Reed Scholarship was established in May, 1914, by 
Miss Anna M. Reed, Cross Creek, Pennsylvania, with an endow- 
ment of three thousand dollars, and prescribed the following condi- 
tions: the income of this scholarship to be awarded to the student 
who upon entering shall pass the best competitive examination in 
the English Bible with a grade of not less than eighty-five per cent; 
the successful competitor to have the use of it throughout the entire 
course of three years, provided that his attendance and class standing 
continue to be satisfactory. Two payments of twenty-five dollars 
each will be made each year, the first at the time the award is made 
and the second on April 1. 

The Joseph Watson Greek Prize 

The Joseph Watson Greek Prize was established in July, 
1920, by Mrs. Robert A. Watson, Columbus, Ohio. The income 
from an endowment of one thousand dollars will be awarded to the 
student who passes the best examination in classical Greek as he 
enters the Junior Class of the Seminary. The texts upon which the 
examination will be given are Xenephon's Anabasis, Book II, or 
Plato's Apology, Chapters I-X. 



THE GRADUATE DEPARTMENT 

The faculty has voted a moratorium on graduate work at the 
Master's and doctoral levels (the Master of Religious Education pro- 
gram and the Master of Education program are undergraduate) 
until such time as a program of excellence for each of the degrees 
can be developed. Graduate work will be reintroduced beginning at 
the Master's level. It is the hope of the seminary to be able to offer 
graduate work in conjunction with other graduate schools in the area. 

41 



THE BACHELOR OF DIVINITY CURRICULUM 

The B.D. curriculum which follows this brief introduction re- 
flects the deep concern of the faculty to fuse into an integrated 
program of study the traditional classical approach to theological 
education and the strong contemporary emphasis on the so-called 
practical courses. In the Junior and part of the Middler years the 
student will be concerned primarily with the Church's thought and 
life as these are reflected in Biblical, historical, and theological studies. 
At the same time he will also be brought face to face with the cul- 
ture to which the Christian faith must be communicated, and this 
confrontation will pick up momentum in the second and third years. 

A basic principle of the curriculum is that of integration. A 
strong effort is made to avoid departmentalization. While there are 
three divisions within the new curriculum — Bible, History and 
Theology, Church and Ministry — there are no departmental lines. 
Several members of the faculty will teach in more than one division. 
Some courses, traditionally taught in Biblical, historical, or theolog- 
ical departments, have been moved into the new division of Church 
and Ministry. For example, exegesis, taught by Biblical scholars, 
is closely related to the preaching office which is geared into the 
curriculum during the Middler year. Thus exegesis will be shown 
to be a primary tool for sermon composition. Students will study 
with a team of exegetes, homileticians, and speech instructors as 
they work on the sermon from text to delivery. American church 
history is not taught within church history but rather in Church 
and Ministry I the second semester of the Junior year, where it is 
closely correlated with culture. A scholar in American church history 
will teach this course with members of the faculty who are special- 
ists in culture. The nature of the Church is not to be taught in 
theology but in Church and Ministry II and III, part of which 
course deals with Christian education. Christian ethics is removed 
from the theological field (though not from theology) and is cor- 
related in Church and Ministry IV with the pastoral office, and in 
Church and Ministry V with the program of the Church. The 
faculty is attempting to bring together things that belong together. 

42 



A further effort at integration is by way of field education, com- 
monly known as field work, which is introduced into the curriculum 
at three different levels. The first level is observational and comes 
in the second semester of the Junior year. At this level the student 
will make a brief preliminary study of a church and its neighborhood 
and so become acquainted with some of the tensions involved. In 
the second year field education becomes a fundamental part of the 
curriculum. Prepared for it by a foundational junior year, the 
student will be assigned to a laboratory situation in keeping with 
his own needs and interests. Courses in the preaching and teaching 
offices will be in dialogue with his field experience. For example, 
as he writes a sermon and delivers it under the direction of the 
faculty, he will do so with special reference to his work in the field. 
When he studies children, youth, and adults with the professors of 
Christian education, he will do so with some relevance to his field 
assignment. In order to make the relationships of theory and 
practice more meaningful, students will be placed in small sections 
for supervisory purposes and supervision will come from the pro- 
fessors actually teaching in Church and Ministry II and III. (This 
principle of sectioning will obtain wherever possible throughout 
all of the courses, but especially in language study and in Church 
and Ministry courses.) Into the Senior year will also be introduced 
some field education as each student will be required to demonstrate 
a level of competence in pastoral care, liturgy, community analysis, 
etc. 

The effort is being made through this curriculum to bring to- 
gether all the student has learned or is learning and to focus it at 
those points where he is directly related to the institutional church 
and to the culture. The expectation is that as the student comes to 
grips with the everyday life of the Church and of the culture he will 
have to develop a profound sense of relevance and he will be im- 
pelled to explore anew the problem of communicating the gospel to 
the world. 

So, in essence, the curriculum is built around two foci: it focuses 
on the nature and meaning of the Christian faith which it is our 
responsibility to communicate. It also focuses on the culture with 
which we must communicate and the Church through which we 
communicate. 

43 



THE PRESCRIBED COURSE OF STUDY 

LEADING TO THE 
DEGREE OF BACHELOR OF DIVINITY 



Semester I 

Bible 9 

210 Greek 3 

110 Hebrew 3 

112 Old Testament Introduction 3 

410 Church History I 3 

510, S10A Philosophy 3 

710 Principles of Expression — 



15 



Junior Year 

Semester II 
9 Bible 

211 Greek 2 

111 Hebrew 2 

113 Old Testament Introduction 3 



411 Church History II 

511 Contemporary Theology 

711 Interpretative Reading 

713 Church and Ministry I: 
The Church in American 
Culture 



15 



Middler Year 



220 New Testament Introduction 

420 Church History III 

520 Systematic Theology I 

720 Church and Ministry II: 
The Preaching and 
Teaching Offices 



3" 

3 

3 

7 
16 



221 New Testament Introduction 

521 Systematic Theology II 

721 Church and Ministry III: 
The Preaching and 
Teaching Offices 

Elective 



3 
3 

6 

4 

16 



Church and Ministry IV: 
Christian Ethics and the 
Pastoral Office 

Electives 



Senior Year 

Church and Ministry V: 
Christian Ethics and the 
7 Mission of the Church 

9 Electives 

16 



7 
9 

16 



72 academic hours of required work 
22 academic hours of electives 

94 total academic hours required for graduation 



44 



THE PRESCRIBED COURSE OF STUDY 

LEADING TO THE 

DEGREE OF MASTER OF RELIGIOUS EDUCATION 



Junior Year 



Semester I 

112 Old Testament Introduction 

410 Church History I 

720 Church and Ministry II 

825 Weekday Religious Education 

830 Audio-Visuals 



3 
3 

7 

2 
1 

16 



Semester II 
113 Old Testament Introduction 
411 Church History II 
713 Church and Ministry I 
721 Church and Ministry III 



3 
3 
3 
6 

15 



Senior Year 



220 New Testament Introduction 
520 Systematic Theology I 
823 Creative Teaching 

Church and Ministry IV 



221 New Testament Introduction 

521 Systematic Theology II 

Church and Ministry V 

826 Seminar in Children's, 
Youth and Adult Work 



3 
3 
7 

3 

16 



45 



THE PRESCRIBED COURSE OF STUDY LEADING TO THE 
DEGREE OF MASTER OF EDUCATION (M.Ed.) 

This degree will be offered jointly by the University of Pitts- 
burgh and Pittsburgh Theological Seminary beginning in September, 
1961. It will be conferred by the University upon completion of a 
course of study which will include 18 hours taken in three trimesters 
at the University and 18 hours taken concurrently in two semesters 
at the Seminary. 

The University Requirements 
Ed. Psych. 272 — Psychology of Human Learning .... 2 hours 
Ed. Res. 200 — Introduction to Research and Statistics 
Fdns. Ed. 201 — General Philosophy of Education 
Fdns. Ed. 228 — History of Modern Education 
Department of Religious Education ..... 



The Seminary Requirements 

Survey of the Old Testament 

Survey of the New Testament .... 

Survey of Church History 

Survey of Theology 

Theology of Christian Education .... 

Field Education Practicum 

Elective ......... 



2 hours 


2 hours 


2 hours 


10 hours 


18 hours 


3 hours 


3 hours 


3 hours 


3 hours 


2 hours 


2 hours 


2 hours 



18 hours 

The M.Ed, course of study is designed as a one-year course for 
those who have an approved Bachelor's collegiate major in the fields 
of religion, Bible, or religious education, or their equivalent, to pro- 
vide further depth, understanding, and technical skills for work in 
local churches as accredited church educators. Admission require- 
ments, in addition to the "major," are those of the University and 
the Seminary. Housing will be provided by the admitting institution. 

Applicants for this degree may write to: 

Dr. Lawrence C. Little 
Department of Religious Education 
University of Pittsburgh 
Pittsburgh 13, Pennsylvania 
or 



Director of Admissions 
Pittsburgh Theological Seminary 
616 N. Highland Avenue 
Pittsburgh 6, Pennsylvania 



46 



DESCRIPTION OF COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 



THE BIBLICAL DIVISION 
Mr. Taylor, Chairman 

Mr. Kelso Mr. Hills 

Mr. Orr Mr. Jamieson 

Mr. Freedman Mr. Kelley 

Mr. Walther Mr. Grohman 

Some course offerings, both required and elective, customarily listed under 
the Biblical Division, are correlated with Church and Ministry and are listed under 
that division. 

REQUIRED COURSES 

The following courses are the program of study of the new curriculum for the 
Junior and Middler years. 

110 and 210. Biblical Language. A course designed to lead to an ap- 
preciative and competent use of Hebrew and Greek as languages of 
Biblical revelation. From the outset the student learns inductively to 
read from the original languages of the Old and New Testaments. Em- 
phasis is placed on the acquisition of a working vocabulary as the ground 
for further reading and the illumination of key Biblical concepts. In- 
struction is in small, graded sections so that a maximum of individual 
attention and achievement is possible. (Students who have previously 
studied Greek will be assigned to a special section on the basis of place- 
ment examinations.) 

Juniors, first semester, 6 hours credit. 

111 and 211. Biblical Language. Continuation of 110 and 210 with 
instruction continued in graded sections of both Hebrew and Greek. 

Juniors, second semester, 4 hours credit. 

112. Old Testament Introduction. A study of the political and reli- 
gious history of the Hebrew people from the days of Abraham to the close 
of the Old Testament, with special emphasis on the more significant per- 
sonalities, events and institutions. The results of archaeological research 
are studied in conjunction with the Biblical record. 

Juniors, first semester, 3 hours credit. Mr. Kelso 

113. Old Testament Introduction. Continuation of 112. 

Juniors, second semester, 3 hours credit. Mr. Kelso 

220. New Testament Introduction. A comprehensive historical, literary, 
and theological study of the New Testament: (a) religious and political 
backgrounds of the times; (b) formation of the Gospel tradition; (c) life 
of Jesus Christ; (d) activity and message of the Apostolic Church; (e) 
the Pauline corpus; (f) the Johannine witness. 

Middlers, first semester, 3 hours credit. Mr. Orr and Mr. Walther 

221. New Testament Introduction. Continuation of course 220: (a) 
Hebrews and Catholic Epistles; (b) apocalyptic; (c) formation of the 
Canon; (d) transmission of the Text; (e) history of the English Bible; 
(f ) outlines of New Testament Theology. 

Middlers, second semester, 3 hours credit. Mr. Orr and Mr. Walther 

47 



The following courses are the Senior year program of study of the old curricula 
of Pittsburgh-Xenia and Western Seminaries. 

P-X 132. Old Testament Theology. (1) A detailed study of some ma- 
jor doctrines of the Old Testament, (2) a survey of the historical progress 
of Revelation in the light of contemporary civilizations and religions, 
and (3) readings in current literature in this field. 

Seniors, second semester, 2 hours credit. Mr. Kelso 

P-X 332. The Prophets. There will be (a) a general survey of the pro- 
phetic movement in Israel, its origin and development from earliests times 
to the time of the canonical prophets; (b) a historical introduction to the 
Literaary Prophets; and (c) a detailed study of the content of the writ- 
ings of the prophets with special attention to the bearing of these pho- 
phecies on contemporary life. 

Seniors, second semester, 4 hours credit. Mr. Jamieson 

W 131. Biblical Theology (Old Testament). A course designed to 
acquaint students with the principal themes, the progress of thought, and 
the theological terminology of the Bible; and, together with course 132, 
to study the unity of the Old and New Testaments and the continuity 
of Biblical religion. 

Seniors, first semester, 2 hours credit. Mr. Hills 

W 132. Biblical Theology (New Testament). Continuation of course 
131. 

Seniors, second semester, 2 hours credit. Mr. Walther 

W 133. Biblical Literature (New Testament). Studies of the Catholic 
Epistles and The Apocalypse. In addition to a careful survey of the 
contents some attention is given to literary and historical problems in- 
volved. 

Seniors, first semester, 2 hours credit. Mr. Orr 

W 134. Biblical Literature (Old Testament). A study of the writings, 
the third division of the Hebrew canon. 

Seniors, second semester, 2 hours credit. Mr. Hills. 

ELECTIVES 

141 and 142. Hebrew Reading. Supervised reading of selected Old 
Testament passages. For those who desire to continue the language with- 
out emphasis. 

Two semesters. Mr. Freedman 

143 and 144. Hebrew Reading. Continuation of courses 141 and 142. 

Mr. Hills 

145. Old Testament Philology. Introduction to the formal structure 
of the Hebrew language (phonetics, morphology, syntax) with special 
attention to its historical development and relation to other Semitic 
languages. Mr> Hms 

146. Advanced Hebrew Grammar. Mr. Irvine 

147. Hebrew Exegesis. Practice in acquiring the principles of Old 
Testament exegesis, not only from the linguistic field, but also from the 
archaeological source material. The more difficult Hebrew passages with 
rich sermonic possibilities are used. jyi r g e ] so 

48 



148. Introduction to the Dead Sea Scrolls. Survey of the scrolls from 
the Dead Sea area, particularly Qumran. Archaeological background, 
analysis of contents, significance for the text, history, and theology of 
the Old and New Testaments. j^ r< Hills 

149. Readings in the Dead Sea Scrolls. Selected passages (in the orig- 
inal Hebrew) from the newly-discovered Qumran scrolls dating from 
200 B.C. to 70 A.D. 

Prerequisite: basic Hebrew. Mr. Hills 

151. Elements of Accadian. A beginner's course in Assyro-Babylonian. 

152. Elements of Canaanite Cuneiform. A beginner's course in Ugaritic. 

153. Elements of North West Semitic. Decipherment, translation, and 
analysis of early Phoenician, Moabite, Hebrew, and Aramaic inscriptions, 
and investigations of their bearing on Old Testament studies. 

154. Biblical Aramaic. A course in the grammar and reading of the 
Aramaic sections of the Old Testament with a possible inclusion of Fifth 
Century B.C. Aramaic letters from Elephantine. 

Prerequisite: one semester of Hebrew. 

155. Seminar on the Greek Old Testament. Introduction to the Greek 
translation and the problems of the text. Rapid reading of selected 
books and passages in the Septuagint. jyj r Q rr 

161. Current Trends in Old Testament Criticism. A course designed 
to train students in the evaluation of new books and technical magazine 
articles in all fields of Old Testament research. jy[ r j£ e \ so 

162. Form-Critical Problems in the Old Testament. Study of the 
methods of form and tradition-criticism and their detailed application to 
selected passages. ^ r jjills 

171. The Composition of Isaiah. This course deals with the literary 
and form-critical problems of the Book of Isaiah, tracing its development 
from the earliest oral traditions to the final literary document. The 
prophetic experience and consciousness, message and meaning, are con- 
sidered in relation to the contents of the book against the background 
of Israel's history. Mr Freedman 

172. Ancient Hebrew Poetry. Readings in the poems of the Pentateuch 
and early Psalms with emphasis on ancient Hebrew meter, style, orthog- 
raphy and vocabulary, and analysis of theological motifs and liturgical 
orientation. Mr Freedman 

173. The Poetical Books. This course is designed to provide (a) a 
general introduction to the poetry and wisdom writings of the ancient 
Hebrews; (b) a comprehensive survey of the Psalter; and (3) an analy- 
sis of Job, Ecclesiastes and the Song of Songs. jyj r j am i eS on 

174. Jeremiah. This course is a careful study of the life and work of 
this great prophet. Attention is given to the prophecy in the light of 
contemporary history and especially to the contribution made to the 
central message of the Bible. Its relevance for our day and its homilet- 
ical values are considered. Mr Jamieson 

49 



181. Geography of Biblical Lands. A survey course covering the major 
features of all ancient geography which influenced Biblical history, and 
a detailed study of Palestinian geography. The customs and manners 
of Bible people are also reviewed. 

Mr. Kelso 

182. Archaeology of Palestine. A rapid historical survey of archae- 
ological work in Bible lands, with particular attention to the cultural 
and religious life of the Israelite and non-Israelite populations in Pal- 
estine. Methods of archaeological research and the interpretation of 
findings are studied, not only for apologetic purposes, but especially 
for exegetical study of the Scriptures. Assigned readings, slides and ma- 
terials from the Bible Lands Museum. 

Mr. Kelso 

183. Research in Old Testament Archaeology. Directed research along 
various lines as indicated by the student's needs. 

Mr. Kelso 

184. Ancient Near Eastern Texts and Pictures Relating to the Old 
Testament. A survey of selected extra-Biblical texts, and of pictures of 
monuments and objects, which cast light on the Old Testament. 

Mr. Grohman 

241. New Testament Canon and Text, (a) The Canon: A study of the 
formation of the New Testament. The limiting principle of the Canon 
and the consequent rejection of apocryphal and pseudepigraphical works. 
The position of the Roman Church, of the Church of England, and of the 
Presbyterian and Reformed bodies as shown in the Westminster Confes- 
sion. Lectures and required readings, (b) Textual Criticism: A survey 
of the history of the printed text, with an introduction to the apparatus 
criticus and the principles of textual criticism. An appraisal of the 
Tischendorf, Nestle, and Westcott and Hort texts. Textbook, lectures 
and required readings, and practice on textual problems. 

Prerequisite: New Testament Introduction. Mr. Taylor 

242. Form Criticism and the Synoptic Problem. The purposes and 
techniques of Formgeschichte will be critically examined and its con- 
tributions illustrated and assessed. The application of Formgeschichte 
to illustrative passages in the Synoptic Gospels. An adequate working 
knowledge of Greek is required. 

243. Critical Introduction to the Pauline Epistles. A rapid survey of 
Paul's life. Historical validity of the records in Acts and the Epistles. 
The origin and completion of the Corpus Paulinum. The groupings of 
the ten major epistles. Recent criticism of the authorship of II Thess., 
Col., Eph., and of the place of origin of the captivity correspondence. 
The problems of Romans 16, and of the Pastorals. Sacramentalism, and 
other mystery features in Pauline theology. 

Mr. Taylor 

244. Critical Introduction to the Johannine Writings. An appraisal of 
recent criticism as to the unity of the Fourth Gospel with the Johannine 
epistolary group; and the relationship of the Apocalypse to other Johan- 
nine writings, dealing with the differences in grammar, vocabulary, and 
thought-concepts. Antagonism toward the Apocalypse among the early 
Fathers and among the Reformers. 

Mr. Taylor 

245. Apocalyptic and the Apocalypse. A survey of the development 
of Apocalyptic as a religio-literary genre. Apocalyptic in the Old Testa- 
ment, the Apocrypha and Pseudepigraph of the Jews, and in other an- 

50 



cient cultures. The characteristics of a developed apocalyptic especially 
in relation to the prophetic movement in Israel. The Apocalypse of John 
against this background, its structure and meaning for its original re- 
cipients. 

Mr. Taylor 

246. Research in the New Testament. Directed research along various 
lines as indicated by the student's needs. 

Mr. Taylor 

247. The Pastoral Epistles of the New Testament. Beginning with 
I Timothy and continuing through Hebrews, this course will stress the re- 
lation of the historical context and the basic content of the letters to the 
art of preaching. 

Mr. Jamieson 

248. The New Testament in Light of Contemporary Jewish writers. A 

survey of the history of Judaism in the First Century for the sake of 
relating the New Testament to its Jewish environments. Use will be 
made of the writings of Josephus, Philo, and other contemporary sources. 

Mr. Orr 

250. New Testament Exegesis: Gospel of John. Critical exegesis on 
the basis of the Greek text. 

Mr. Kelley 

251. New Testament Exegesis: Johannine Epistles. Critical exegesis 
on the basis of the Greek text. 

Mr. Kelley 

252. Petrine Epistles. Detailed exegesis of I Peter and II Peter. Abil- 
ity to use the Greek text is required. The commentaries of Selwyn, 
Beare, Bigg, and James will be used. 

Mr. Walther 

253 and 254. Greek Reading. Supervised reading of selected New 
Testament passages. For those who desire to continue the language 
without emphasis. 

Mr. Orr and Mr. Walther 

255 and 256. Greek Reading. Continuation of Course 254. 

Mr. Orr and Mr. Walther 

257. Advanced Greek Grammar. An advanced, systematic study of the 
syntax and grammar of New Testament Greek. Principles studied in 
connection with specific Biblical passages. 

Mr. Kelley 

260. New Testament Christology. This course will survey the beliefs 
about Jesus as Messiah, Son of Man, Son of God, and his work as reveal- 
er of the Father, inaugurator of the Kingdom, and savior of the human 
race. Mr. Orr 

261. Eschatology in the New Testament. The background of the prob- 
lem in twentieth-century literature will be examined, and the New Testa- 
ment materials will be studied in detail. Some attention will be given 
to the Entmythologizierung controversy. 

Mr. Walther 

51 



262. Life of Christ. An examination of the Biblical and extra-Biblical 
materials followed by a survey of the critical study of the "Quest" in the 
last century and the "new Quest" from kerygma to history at the present 
time; finally, a consideration of the possibilities of writing a "Life" today. 

Mr. Walther 

263. Practical Use of the New Testament. A seminar on the values 
and methods of using the New Testament in study, worship, preaching, 
evangelism, and counseling. 

Mr. Orr 

264. Bultmann Seminar. Reading and discussion of the literature by 
and about Rudolf Bultmann with critique of his critical and theological 
contributions, set in relief against the pertinent positions of Stauffer, 
Cullmann, and the post-Bultmannians. 

Mr. Walther 

270. Archaeology and the Pauline Epistles. A study of the results of 
exploration and excavation in Near East sites as they bear upon an un- 
derstanding of The Acts and the Pauline epistles. Colored slides and 
other exhibits are used to demonstrate the significance of the research. 

Mr. Jamieson 

280. II Century Christian Literature. An introduction to the Apostolic 
Fathers and to other Christian literature of the II Century, including 
Christian apocrypha. The Apostolic Fathers will be read in the Loeb 
translation (K. Lake), with exegetical discussion of significant passages 
in the Greek text. Representative passages of other writings will be 
discussed. Special attention will be directed to the rise of the phenome- 
non now designated as "gnosticism," and to its influence upon developing 
Christian thought. 

Mr. Taylor 



HONORS COURSES 

H 301. Greek Exegesis. Pauline Epistles will be read in the original 
text with special attention to exegetical detail. Exercise in formal, writ- 
ten exegesis will be required and may be prepared in conjunction with 
Hebrew honors courses. 

Middlers, first semester, 2 hours credit. Mr. Walther 

H 302. Greek Exegesis. Continuation of Course H 301. 

Middlers, second semester, 2 hours credit. 

Required in equivalence of course 123 (Western). Mr. Walther 

H 303. New Testament Theology. Selected New Testament books 
will be read in the original text with special attention to theological 
detail. In addition to readings in the Greek text, some attention will be 
given to the modern literature of New Testament Theology. 

Seniors, first semester, 2 hours credit. 

Required of students not taking course W 131. Mr. Orr 

H 304. New Testament Theology. Continuation of course H 303. Es- 
says on key words and concepts will be assigned. 
Seniors, second semester, 2 hours credit. 
Required of students not taking course W 132. Mr. Orr 

52 



THE HISTORY AND THEOLOGY DIVISION 
Mr. Wiest, Chairman 

Mr. McCloy Mr. Johnson 

Mr. Leitch Mr. Bald 

Mr. Jackson Mr. Smith 
Mr. Gerstner 

Some course offerings, both required and elective, customarily listed under the 
History and Theology division, are correlated with Church and Ministry and are 
listed under that division. 



REQUIRED COURSES 

The following courses are the program of study of the new curricu- 
lum for the Junior and Middler years. 

410. Church History I. A survey of Christian life, thought, and prac- 
tice from the Apostolic Age to the period of Gregory the Great, and the 
beginning of the Middle Ages in the West; the mission and expansion of 
the church; the rise of offices and government, art and literature. (For- 
merly Pittsburgh-Xenia 421 and Western 221.) 

Juniors, first semester, 3 hours credit. Mr. McCloy 

411. Church History II. Following an exposition of St. Augustine, 
this course traces church history from the breakdown of Roman Catholic 
unity to the Calvinist and Lutheran formulations of 1550-1560. Medieval 
society and faith, pre-reformation movements, and the rise of the reform 
are considered. (Formerly Pittsburgh-Xenia 422 and Western 222.) 

Juniors, second semester, 3 hours credit. Mr. Smith 

420. Church History III. The history of the Christian church from 
the end of the sixteenth century to the present, exclusive of post-colonial 
American history. 

Middlers, first semester, 3 hours credit. Mr. Gerstner 

510. Theology and Philosophy. This course is designed for students 
who do not meet the prerequisite requirements in philosophy. A study 
of the systems of philosophy that have contributed to theological method 
and thought; and an analysis of the relation between philosophy and 
theology, and between faith and reason. Alternate to course 510-A. 

Juniors, first semester, 3 hours credit. Mr. Jackson and Mr. Wiest 

510-A. Philosophical Theology. A study of the systems of Christian 
thought that illustrate ways in which theology has been related to phil- 
osophy. Special attention is given to the problems of apologetics and 
communication in the modern period, and to contemporary philosophical 
challenges to Christian thought. 

Juniors, first semester, 3 hours credit. Mr. Jackson and Mr. Wiest 

511. Contemporary Theology. Introduction to the major figures, 
problems and issues in contemporary theological thought. 

Juniors, second semester, 2 hours credit. Mr. Johnson and Mr. Leitch 

53 



520. Systematic Theology I. The person and work of Jesus Christ, the 
Christian understanding of man, and the nature of the Christian life. 
Classic and contemporary theological systems, representing the major 
movements of Christian thought, are read and critically evaluated. 

Middlers, first semester, 3 hours credit. Mr. Johnson and Mr. Leitch 

521. Systematic Theology II. The doctrine of God, the Christian view 
of revelation, and problems of theological thought and method. Reading 
and critical evaluation are continued in the systems employed in Sys- 
tematic Theology I. (Formerly Pittsburgh-Xenia 513 and Western 321.) 

Middlers, second semester, 3 hours credit. Mr. Bald and Mr. Wiest 

The following course is the Senior year program of study of the old curriculum 
of Pittsburgh-Xenia Seminary. 

P-X 631. Philosophy of Religion. A course designed to help the stu- 
dent construct a Christian anthropology, epistemology and world-view. 
This study looks especially to the confusions and needs of modern man, 
and gives guidance toward an integrated Christian faith. 

Seniors, first semester, 2 hours credit. Mr. Jackson 



ELECTIVES 

430. Patrology. A study of Christian literature including the Apos- 
tolic Fathers, the Apologists, the African and Alexandrian schools, the 
great writers of the fourth and fifth centuries in the East and West, and 
concluding with John of Damascus and Isidor of Seville. 

Mr. McCloy 

431. Christian Antiquities. A study of practices in the daily life of 
the ancient church, including its worship, art, social customs, law, etc., 
with special attention given to those elements which have survived in 
the present day church. 

Mr. McCloy 

432. Medieval Christendom. Mr. Smith 

440. Seminar in the Sixteenth Century. An introduction to the six- 
teenth century, its politico-religious problems, church history and the 
development of theology. Special attention is given to a selected problem 
and an extended paper is required. 

Mr. Smith 

441. Symbols of the Reformation. An examination and comparison of 
various creeds, catechisms and confessions arising within the Protestant 
Reformation, having in view the theological aspects of present-day 
ecumenical conversations. 

Mr. Bald 

442. Theologians of the Reformation. Against the background of 
Luther and Calvin an effort is made to create interest in and understand- 
ing of the other reformers such as Zwingli, Bucer, Bullinger, and others. 

Mr. Leitch 

443. Roman Catholicism Since Trent. The historical and theological 
development of Rome from the Council of Trent to 1900. 

Mr. Gerstner 

54 



444. The Age of Orthodoxy. The Reformation after the Reformers 
left the scene. A close study of Continental Reformed and Lutheran Or- 
thodoxy of the seventeenth century. „ _ 

Mr. Gerstner 

445. Puritanism. English and American Puritanism from the middle 
of the sixteenth to the middle of the eighteenth century, with particular 
attention given to the Westminster Assembly, Presbyterianism and 
Democracy. 

Mr. Gerstner 

450. Christian Biography. The lives of outstanding Christians and the 
literary forms of biography and autobiography: the development of 
hagiography as an historical phenomenon and of Christian personality 
both ancient and modern. „ m , __ 

Mr. McCloy 

451. Thomas Aquinas. An introduction to the philosophical and theo- 
logical thought of Thomas Aquinas. Particular emphasis is given to 
the expression of his system in the Summae, Summa Contra Gentiles and 
Summa Theologiae. jur g a jj 

452. The Preaching and Writing of John Calvin. A study of the works 
of John Calvin exclusive of The Institutes, his preaching and writing, 
with some sampling of his correspondence. « Leitch 

453. Seminar in Arminius and Wesley. Reading and discussion of the 
theological writings of Jacob Arminius and John Wesley. 

Mr. Johnson 

454. Seminar in Edwards. Reading and discussion of selected major 
writings of Edwards. Mr Gerstner 

460. History of Apologetics. The nature of the defense of Christian 
faith explored through an examination of a number of apologetic sys- 
tems of the past and present. ™ r> a i<i 

461. History of the Doctrine of the Church. The doctrine of the Church 
is traced through key figures from Cyprian to modern times. 

Mr. Leitch 

462. The New England Theology. Traces the theological develop- 
ment of the New England School from the death of Edwards to 1900. 
Especial consideration of Hopkins, Bushnell, Taylor and Parks. The 
relation of this school to the American Presbyterian Church indicated. 

Mr. Gerstner 

470. Advanced Reading and Research in Church History. Guided re- 
search and research in sources of church history. Subjects for study 
will be determined in conference with the instructor. Permission from the 
instructor is necessary for registration. 

Mr. Gerstner, Mr. Smith or Mr. McCloy 

530. Theology and History. Classic and contemporary interpretations 
of history. Herodotus, Thucydides, Augustine, the principal figures who 
developed the doctrine of progress, Hegel, Nietzsche, Marx and modern 
theologians, historians and philosophers who have been endeavoring to 
formulate a new philosophy or theology of history. j^ r tq^m-h 

55 



531. Kierkegaard and Contemporary Existentialism. The thought of 
Kierkegaard, Marcel, Heidegger, Sartre, Jaspers and other philosophers 
and theologians who are contributing to the existentialist movement. 

Mr. Johnson 

532. Liberal Theology and the Social Gospel. The struggle between 
orthodoxy and liberal theology in America. Discussion of the main 
types of American liberal theology and the intellectual and social issues 
with which they have dealt. An analysis of the orthodox and liberal ele- 
ments in the thought of contemporary Protestant theologians. 

Mr. Wiest 

540. Contemporary Issues in Philosophical Theology. The problems 
that have been raised for Christian thought by recent naturalism, logical 
positivism and process philosophy; and a study of attempts to deal with 
current philosophical issues in the theologies of Temple, Heim, Tillich, 
Buber, Hartshorne and others. 

Mr. Wiest 

541. Seminar in the Problem of Theological Authority. Reading and 
discussion of the development of the Protestant problem of authority in 
Reformation works, seventeenth and eighteenth century orthodoxy, and 
nineteenth century theology; and an examination of the attempts of 
several major contemporary theologians to speak to this problem. 

Mr. Johnson 

542. Theology and Science. The role of science in shaping the modern 
mind. Recent changes in our understanding of the nature of scientific 
knowledge. A survey of theological responses to modern science and of 
the possibilities for a "theology of nature" in contemporary protestant 
thought. 

Mr. Wiest 

543. Seminar in Tillich and Barth. A comparative study of the theo- 
logical systems of Paul Tillich and Karl Barth as the major representa- 
tives of modern philosophical and kerygmatic theology. Reading and dis- 
cussion. 

Mr. Johnson 

544. British Theologians. Attention is given to theological figures of 
importance not treated in the general and required survey, Contemporary 
Theology. 

Mr. Leitch 

545. Seminar in Modern Christology. Reading and discussion of the 
unique developments in the interpretation of the person and work of 
Jesus Christ, or the doctrines of incarnation and atonement, in nineteenth 
and twentieth century Protestant theology. 

Mr. Johnson 

551. Advanced Reading in Theology. Guided reading and research in 
theological sources. The subjects and areas pursued are determined by 
the needs and interests of the students. Permission from the instructor 
is necessary for registration. 

Mr. Bald, Mr. Johnson or Mr. Leitch 

56 



552. Advanced Reading in Philosophy of Religion. Guided reading and 
research. The subjects and areas pursued are determined by the needs 
and interests of the students. Permission from the instructor is neces- 
sary for registration. 

Mr. Wiest or Mr. Jackson 

560. Theology in the Great Classics. Studies will be made of The 
Odyssey, Dante's Inferno, Paradise Lost, The Idylls of the King, and 
selected plays of Shakespeare with a view to their theological presuppo- 
sitions and content. 

Mr. Leitch. 

HONORS COURSES 

H 610. Seminar in Augustine. Reading and discussion of the follow- 
ing works of St. Augustine: De Catechezandis Rudibus, De Moribus Ec- 
clesiae Catholicae, De Baptismo, Confessiones, De Libero Arbitrio, De 
Gratia Christi et de Peccato Originali, De Spiritu et Littera, De Trini- 
tate (in part), De Civitate Dei (in part). 

Middlers, first semester, 2 hours. Mr. Smith 

H 611. Seminar in Luther. Reading and discussion of selected writings 
of Martin Luther. 

Middlers, second semester, 2 hours. Mr. Johnson 

H 613. Seminar in Aquinas and Neo-Thomism. 

Middlers, second semester, 2 hours. (Alternative to H 611) Mr. Bald 

H 621 and 622. Reading in Theological French. Translation of sections 
from authors not utilized in the other courses in the honors program. 
Initial reading is in Etienne Gilson, Introduction a V Etude de S. Augustin. 

Middlers, offered both semesters, 1 hour weekly. Mr. Smith 

H 623 and 624. Reading in Theological German. Reading in German 
historical and theological sources. 

Middlers, offered both semesters, one hour weekly. Mr. McCloy 

H 625 and 626. Reading in Ecclesiastical Latin. This course is designed 
to introduce students who have studied classical Latin to the language of 
the Vulgate and more simple texts of the Latin Fathers. 

Middlers, offered both semesters, 1 hour weekly. Mr. McCloy 

H 627 and 628. Reading in Patristic Greek. Students who have achieved 
a certain competence in New Testament Greek will be introduced to 
selected writings of the Greek Fathers. 

Middlers, offered both semesters, 1 hour weekly. Mr. McCloy 

H 637. Seminar in Nineteenth Century Theology. Reading and dis- 
cussion of the writings of major Protestant theologians of the nineteenth 
century in the context of a consideration of the intellectual and cultural 
currents of the period. 

Seniors, first semester, 2 hours. Mr. Wiest 

H 638. Seminar in Contemporary Theology. Guided research. The 
subjects and areas studied are determined by the needs and interests of 
the students. 

Seniors, second semester, 2 hours. 

Mr. Johnson, Mr. Smith and Mr. Wiest 

57 



H 639. Seminar in Modem Philosophies of Religion. (Alternative to 
H 637). 

Seniors, first semester, 2 hours. Mr. Wiest and Mr. Jackson 



H 640 and 641. Reading in Theological German. Reading in untrans- 
lated works of Karl Barth and German theological periodicals. 

Seniors, offered both semesters, 1 hour weekly. Mr. Gerstner 



H 642 and 643. Reading in Theological French. Reading in the sources 
of sixteenth century French reformed history and in contemporary French 
literature. 

Seniors, offered both semesters, 1 hour weekly. Mr. Smith 



H 644 and 645. Reading in Ecclesiastical Latin. A practice in reading 
the more difficult texts of Scholastic writings and medieval historical 
narratives. 

Seniors, offered both semesters, 1 hour weekly. Mr. McCloy 

H 646 and 647. Reading in Patristic Greek. Readings in the Cappa- 
docian Fathers, St. John of Damascus and certain Byzantine texts. 
Seniors, offered both semesters, 1 hour weekly. Mr. McCloy 



58 



THE CHURCH AND MINISTRY DIVISION 
Mr. Clyde, Chairman 

Mr. Cotton Mr. Scott 

Mr. Jackson Mr. Ralston 

Miss Burrows Mr. Nicholson 

Mr. Bald Mr. Chamberlin 

Mr. Smith Mr. Wilmore 

Mr. Wiest Mr. Dohrenburg 
Mr. Alexander 



REQUIRED COURSES 

The following courses are the program of study of the new curriculum for the 
Junior and Middler years. 

710. Principles of Expression. Vital thinking as the basis of right 
expression for every speaking occasion. This course aims to enable the 
student to experience the word he speaks in thought, feeling, and imag- 
ination at the moment of utterance and share its vital qualities undimin- 
ished with his audience. Oral reading from the Scriptures and other 
sources. Preparation of the instrument through disciplines of voice and 
body, together with correction of individual faults. Small sections, drill 
periods, recordings, and private conferences. 

Juniors, first semester. Mr. Dohrenburg 

711. Interpretative Reading. Oral interpretation of a varied selection 
of prose, poetry, and drama as a means of developing keener sensitivity 
to the written word and greater effectiveness in communicating it. The 
objective will be to mature the skills and principles acquired in Principles 
of Expression course, which is prerequisite. Small sections, private 
conferences, recordings. 

Juniors, second semester. Mr. Dohrenburg 

713. Church and Ministry I. The purpose of this course is to clarify 
to the student his prospective situation as a minister in American culture. 
Both Church and culture are studied historically, sociologically, and 
theologically; and the Church is considered in specific relation to the 
problems of urban and industrial life, racial and economic tensions, pop- 
ulation growth and movement, and the church's conventional methods. 

Juniors, second semester, 3 hours credit. 

Mr. Smith, Mr. Bald, Mr. Wiest, and Mr. Wilmore 

720. Church and Ministry II. This course is multiple in design: a) to 
show the interrelationship of the preaching and teaching offices in one 
ministry as that ministry develops out of the theology of Church and 
Ministry; b) to introduce the student to the content and skills of these 
offices as they are informed by insights which derive from Biblical, theo- 
logical, and secular sources; c) to implement the student's acquiring of 
content and skills through the practice of the ministry in closely corre- 
lated field education under careful supervision. 

Middlers, first semester, 7 hours. Inter-divisional faculty 

721. Church and Ministry III. Continuation of 720. 

Middlers, second semester, 6 hours. Inter-divisional faculty 

59 



The following courses are the Senior year program of study of the old curricula 
of Pittsburgh-Xenia and Western Seminaries. 

W 531. Church Polity. This course is to acquaint the student with the 
political structure of the United Presbyterian Church, the authority and 
functions of its several judicatories, agencies, and departments. This 
course allows opportunity for discussion of church problems raised by 
students. Basic text is the Constitution of The United Presbyterian 
Church, latest edition. 

Seniors, first semester, 1 hour credit. Mr. Cotton 

P-X 431 and W 731. Christian Mission. The work of the Church in 
what has long been called national and foreign missions will be studied. 
Attention will be directed to philosophy, methods, and actual operations. 
Resource leaders provided by the Presbyterian Boards of Foreign and 
National Missions will participate. 

Seniors, first semester, 2 hours credit. Mr. Clyde 

P-X 634 and W 534. Psychology and Counseling. A course designed to 
bring the insights of psychology to focus in counseling situations; and to 
reveal the theory and techniques of counseling from the Christian point 
of view. 

Seniors, second semester, 2 hours credit. Mr. Jackson 

P-X 635. Christian Ethics. A presentation of the implications of 
Christian theology for the living of the Christian life in its relationship 
to current problems confronted in modern society and culture — family, 
community, vocation, economics, politics. 

Seniors, first semester, 2 hours credit. Mr. Bald 

P-X 723. Pastoral Theology. This course covers in a comprehensive 
way by lectures, discussion and assigned reading of books the pastor's 
call, preparation, relationship to his congregation, community and de- 
nomination, his leadership as pastor and administrator. The fields of 
worship, the sacraments, the wedding, the funeral, pastoral calling, 
evangelism, stewardship and other related subjects are included in this 
course. 

Seniors, first semester, 4 hours credit. Mr. Alexander 

P-X 012. Music in the Church. A practical approach to the many prob- 
lems arising in connection with church music with particular attention 
to the problems of the small congregation. Organizing the musical re- 
sources of the congregation, the music as a spiritual force in the church 
life and the minister's relation to choir and choirmaster. 

Seniors, second semester, 2 hours credit. Mr. Ralston 

W 332. Christian Ethics. The issues created by the interrelation of the 
church and the world. The implications of the doctrines of creation and 
redemption, justification and sanctification, law and grace, for the Chris- 
tian life, a Christian approach to current problems in politics, business 
and labor, marriage and family, education, the concept of Christian vo- 
cation, and the pastoral office. 

Seniors, second semester, 2 hours credit. Mr. Wiest 

W 431. Liturgies. A general study will be made of the forms and con- 
duct of Christian worship, and a specific study will be made of the forms 
and conduct of Christian worship in the Reformed tradition. Students 
will be made acquainted with the genius and usage of the Presbyterian 
Book of Common Worship. 

Seniors, first semester, 1 hour credit. Mr. Clyde 

60 



W 532. Pastoral Theology. This course is designed to bring to Senior 
students various areas of the ministry where specialized pastoral skills 
are required. One-half of the course covers general matters important in 
parish work, church administration, minister's personal life and conduct, 
public worship, evangelism, stewardship, and pastoral calling. The 
second half of the course is devoted to lectures and discussion on the 
techniques of hospital ministry and related social areas. With the co- 
operation of the staff of the Presbyterian and Western Pennsylvania 
Psychiatric Hospitals, and physicians from other institutions of the 
Medical Center, lectures are presented on the relation between religion 
and health. 

Seniors, second semester, 2 hours weekly (1 credit). 

Mr. Nicholson and Mr. Cotton 

W 535. Introduction to Hymnology and Church Music. This course 
considers the qualities of a good hymn. A survey of the periods of 
hymnody and study of examples found in The Presbyterian Hymnal is 
included. There is practical and effective use of The Hymnal. The sec- 
ond half of the course considers a practical approach to the many prob- 
lems of church music. It gives help in organizing the musical resources 
of the congregation as well as the minister's relation to the choir and 
the choir director. 

Seniors, first semester, 1 hour credit. Mr. Ralston 

W 632. The Presbyterian Program of Christian Education. The course 
makes a general survey of the Presbyterian program of Christian edu- 
cation with a look at related church programs and aids. It directs spe- 
cial attention to the pastor's leadership and participation in the pro- 
gram, the psychology of the several age levels, and problems encountered 
in teaching Christian beliefs and ethics. 

Seniors, second semester, 2 hours credit. Mr. Chamberlin 



ELECTIVES 

810. History and Theology of Preaching. A study will be made of the 
doctrinal and ethical content, literary style, homiletical method, his- 
torical and spiritual background of preaching from the days of the 
Apostles to the beginning of the 19th century. 

Mr. Scott 

811. Preaching the Parables. The course is two-fold: a study of the 
history of the interpretation of Parables, and the actual writing and 
classroom delivery of sermons from the Parables. 

Mr. Nicholson 

812. Preaching from Acts. The course is three-fold: a review of the 
historical-critical approach to Acts, the discovery of homiletical mater- 
ial, and the actual writing and classroom delivery of sermons. 

Mr. Nicholson 

m 813. Preaching the Christian Year. A study will be made of the Chris- 
tian year and its use in preaching. Students will write and deliver 
selected sermons in class and prepare a full outline of a year's sermons. 

Mr. Scott 

814. Contemporary Preachers and Preaching. A study will be made 
of representative preachers from the 19th century to the present with 
special emphasis on the preaching of the last decade. 

Mr. Scott 

61 



820. Theological Method and the Educational Work of the Church. This 
course is designed to show how Christian education is the process by 
which one comes to think theologically, to try to detail how this process 
works in the local church, and to try to establish norms for the evalua- 
tion of what the local church does within its teaching ministry. 

Mr. Jackson 

821. Personality Development. The meaning of the self, its develop- 
ment, its aberrations, its societal nature, its symbolization, its motiva- 
tions, etc., will be studied from the point of view of the several psychiatric 
theories, social psychology, and Biblical images. The relation of person- 
ality development to the work of the ministry will be clarified. 

Mr. Jackson 

822. Theory and Practice of the Devotional Life. A consideration of 
the devotional life of the Christian in the modern world. The relation 
of doctrine to the devotional life. The means of grace studied. The 
course is also designed to acquaint the student with the devotional 
classics. 

Mr. Jackson 

823. Creative Teaching. A laboratory course providing opportunity 
for creative experiences through activities related to units of study in 
the graded curriculum of the church school. All methods are concerned 
with the teaching of children and are preceded with a consideration of 
how children learn. 

Miss Burrows 

824. Dramatics in Christian Education. A study of the purpose and 
place of dramatics in the program of the church. Lecture, discussion, 
and project work in the areas of creative dramatics, choral reading, role 
playing, puppetry, playreading, plays, and pageants. 

Miss Burrows 

825. Weekday Religious Education. A study of the purpose and pos- 
sibilities of the vacation church school, the local church weekday religious 
education program (youth club), and the released time program in the 
public schools. 

Miss Burrows 

826. Seminar in Children's, Youth and Adult Work. This course in- 
cludes discussion of problems, study of materials, and consideration of 
programming in the three age groups. Introductory courses in Chris- 
tian Education are a prerequisite for the course. 

Miss Burrows 

827. Building and Administering a Church Program. This course 
deals chiefly with the session committees of worship, evangelism, Chris- 
tian education, fellowship and stewardship, how they are formed, pre- 
pared to function, and how they relate to program and the people. The 
latest in helpful literature is provided. A project analyzing an actual 
church program is offered during the course so that the student might 
apply the principles of the course to the betterment of a local program. 
Related books are to be read and reported on. 

Mr. Alexander 

828. The Church and Higher Education. Designed especially for those 
interested in college teaching, campus ministry, or serving a church 
near a campus. A review of the relation of the church to higher educa- 
tion; an examination of theological issues in the relation of the Christian 
faith to higher education; and an exploration of current patterns in the 
Church's ministry to students and faculty. 

Mr. Chamberlin 

62 



829. Doctrine of the Church and the Ministry. A consideration of the 
recent attempts to reformulate the doctrine of the church, and redefine 
the nature of the ministry, within the present cultural situation. These 
will be critically evaluated in the light of the history of doctrine and 
Reformation theology. 

Mr. Johnson 

830. Introduction to Church Use of Audio-Visuals. A course in the fun- 
damental principles of the use of Audio-Visuals in the program of the 
church. The course will acquaint the student with the materials, tools, 
proper use and the basic philosophy of Audio-Visuals in the church. 

Mr. Kuhn 

831. Christian Education Among Adults. Principles and approaches 
to the church's educational ministry to adults; introduction to established 
and changing patterns of program; relation to the insights from the gen- 
eral field of adult education; special emphasis upon work with young 
adults, parent education, and new approaches to the ministry to the aged. 

Mr. Chamberlin 

832. Contemporary Developments in Christian Education. Advanced 
course, especially for those hoping to be ministers or directors of Chris- 
tian education. Reviewing the recent history of church education, par- 
ticularly the relation of contemporary Protestant theology to general 
educational philosophy, and an examination of various efforts to express 
these theological developments in new forms of educational program. 

Mr. Chamberlin 

840. Theology and Psychiatry. The metaphysical presuppositions, 
method, understanding of therapy, and some aspects of human nature 
will be compared. An attempt will be made to define mutuality and dis- 
creteness between the two disciplines. An introduction to Freudian, 
Jungian, and other psychiatric writings will be made. 

Mr. Jackson 

841. Seminar in Counseling. An advanced course utilizing the case 
work of students, drawing principles for both diagnosis and therapy 
out of the cases presented, and making evaluations. The role of the 
minister as counselor is carefully scrutinized. 

Mr. Jackson 

842. Evangelism. This course offers a detailed discussion and study 
of the definition, motivation, urgency and nature of evangelism. Personal 
work, evangelism for commitment, evangelism through fellowship, youth 
evangelism and various opportunities for pastor and laity through the 
church are covered. A program of reading and book reports acquaints 
the student with the best literature in the field. Opportunity for role 
playing in class is afforded. 

Mr. Alexander 

850. World Mission of the Church. A survey of the ecumenical witness 
of the church throughout the world, with special reference to the work 
of the United Presbyterian Church. 

Mr. Clyde 

851. Tutorial in Missions. Reading and discussions on missions, de- 
signed particularly for missionary candidates and those considering be- 
coming candidates. 

Mr. Clyde 

63 



852. The American Calvinistic Churches. This course reviews the 
European origins of American Reformed thought and traces the develop- 
ment of the movements which have historically expressed the Calvinist 
tradition. Attention is given to the social and intellectual history of 
American Calvinism in its relations to secular history and the forming 
of the denominations, particularly the Presbyterian. 

Mr. Smith 

853. Greek Orthodox Christianity. A study of modern Greek ortho- 
doxy and its historical background in the Byzantine period and thereafter; 
the liturgy, art, music and general culture of Eastern Christianity; 
monasticism; and the various national forms, including the Russian 
Orthodox Church. 

Mr. McCloy 

854. Comparative Religion. A study of the origin and development of 
religion, with special investigation of Primitive Religion, Hinduism, 
Buddhism, Confucianism, and Islam, with regard to their bearing on 
Modern Missions. 

Mr. Clyde 

855. Major Sects. Jehovah's Witnesses, Mormonism, Christian Sci- 
ence and other groups compared with catholic Christianity. Resem- 
blances and differences noted. 

Mr. Gerstner 

856. The Protestant Approach to Catholicism. A comparative inves- 
tigation of Protestantism and Catholicism, with a study of the general 
problem of Protestant evangelism in connection with Catholicism. 

Mr. Clyde 

857. The Protestant Approach to Communism. A study of Communism, 
its challenge to Christianity, the special answer of Protestantism to 
Communism, and the general problems with which Communism is in- 
volved. 

Mr. Clyde 

860. The Theological Ethics of William Temple and Reinhold Niebuhr. 

A comparative study of the social thought of the late Archbishop of 
Canterbury and one of America's leading voices in the field of ethics in 
relation to their theological foundations. 

Mr. Bald 

861. Faith and Culture. The issues raised for theology by the inter- 
action between faith and culture. The relation of Christianity to present 
cultural currents, intellectual, social and artistic, and an analysis of the 
problems which they present for the communication of the Christian 
faith. 

Mr. Wiest 

862. Seminar in Social Ethics. The Christian address to the problems 
of economics, politics, international affairs, education, and the family. 
The implications of an understanding of these areas for theology, the 
vocation of the Christian, and the service of the church in the world. 

Mr. Bald 

863. Research Seminar in Selected Social Problems. Students will 
elect specific areas of social concern in modern culture for investigation 
in which they will seek to relate them to the demands and insights of 
the Christian ethic. 

Mr. Bald 
64 



AWARDS GRANTED, 1959-1960 

THE DEGREE OF BACHELOR OF DIVINITY 

Robert John Achor ........ Gary, Indiana 

A.B., Indiana University, 1957 

Robert Calvin Armstrong ...... Noblestown, Pa. 

B.S., George Williams College, 1948 

William Henry Bell .....'. Fall River, Mass. 
A.B., Westminster College, 1957 

Daniel Edward Bevington ...... Pittsburgh, Pa. 

A.B., Grove City College, 1957 

Roy Samuel Buffat, Jr Pittsburgh, Pa. 

A.B., Maryville College, 1957 

Richard Samuel Buterbaugh ...... Pittsburgh, Pa. 

A.B., Western Maryland College, 1957 

Paul Robins Carlson ....... Pittsburgh, Pa. 

A.B., Providence-Barrington Bible College, 1954 

Charles John Carson ....... Eskridge, Kansas 

A.B., Sterling College, 1957 

Robert Allen Coughenour ...... Youngwood, Pa. 

B.S., State Teachers College, 1953 

Benjamin Dow Davis ....... Youngstown, Ohio 

A.B., Muskingum College, 1956 

Burke Eugene Dorworth ....... Franklin, Pa. 

A.B., University of Pennsylvania, 1951 

*Earl H. Estill, Jr. ...... . Philadelphia, Pa. 

A.B., Sterling College, 1957 

Wayne Elwyn Faust ....... Pittsburgh, Pa. 

A.B., University of Pittsburgh, 1957 

Charles Lee Filker ...... Olmsted Falls, Ohio 

B.S, Sterling College, 1957 

John Glazener Finley ....... Parsons, W. Va. 

A.B., University of Texas, 1948 
B.D., Westminster Seminary, 1952 

John William Foester ....... Beaver Falls, Pa. 

B.S., Geneva College, 1957 

Daniel Bruce Gerhardt ...... Delanson, N. Y. 

A.B., Davis & Elkins College, 1957 

Ralph M. Graham Pittsburgh, Pa. 

A.B., Muskingum College, 1957 

Ralph Edward Green Canonsburg, Pa. 

A.B., Muskingum College, 1957 

Willis Armand Hacker ....... Sewickley, Pa. 

A.B., Grove City College, 1957 

Charles Gerald Hallberg ...... Pittsburgh, Pa. 

B.A., Sterling College, 1958 

David Landis Hare Laurel Gardens, Pa. 

A.B., Westminster College, 1957 

65 



Donald Earl Hatch ....... Portville, N. Y. 

A.B., College of Wooster, 1957 

Robert C. Henry McCoysville, Pa. 

B.S, Sterling College, 1956 

John Milton Hulse . . . . . . . . Nineveh, Pa. 

A.B., Waynesburg College, 1957 

James Theodore Hunniford, Jr. .... Philadelphia, Pa. 

B.S.Ed., Temple University, 1957 

Norman Charles Hunt Washington, Pa. 

A.B., Washington and Jefferson College, 1956 

William Bramwell Huson ....... Butler, Pa. 

A.B., Asbury College, 1950 

Lynn Lutz Illingworth ...... State College, Pa. 

A.B., Pennsylvania State University, 1952 

William Alexander Jamieson ...... Clinton, Mass. 

A.B., Gordon College, 1957 

William Edward Johnson ...... Pittsburgh, Pa. 

A.B., Knoxville College, 1954 

Michael Kuhtik ........ Pittsburgh, Pa. 

B.S., Waynesburg College, 1957 

Carl Thomas Lane ........ Covina, Calif. 

A.B., Monmouth College, 1957 

Charles Howard Lee ....... Washington, Pa. 

A.B., Washington & Jefferson College, 1957 

Kenneth David Lister ...... Eagle Grove, Iowa 

B.A., Monmouth College, 1956 

David Starr Lodge ........ Pittsburgh, Pa. 

A.B., University of California, Berkeley, 1957 

George Hallauer Lower ....... Westtown, Pa. 

B.S., Bucknell University, 1953 

John Moore Lyford ....... West Allis, Wis. 

A.B., Monmouth College, 1957 

Charles Owen Lyon ........ Chicago, 111. 

A.B., Monmouth College, 1957 

Kenneth Allen MacLeod ...... Paterson, N. J. 

A.B., Tarkio College, 1957 

Donald Robert MacPherson . . . New Hyde Park, L. I., N. Y. 

A.B., College of Wooster, 1957 

David Ernest Martin ....... Pittsburgh, Pa. 

B.S, Kent University, 1957 

Richard Sterling McConnell Pittsburgh, Pa. 

A.B, Wesleyan University, 1955 

Marion Wilbert McCoy Pittsburgh, Pa. 

A.B, Hanover College, 1957 

Kerry Allan Meier New York, N. Y. 

A.B, Bloomfield College, 1957 

66 



James J. Morris Munhali, Pa. 

A.B., University of Pittsburgh, 1955 

Thomas Paton ......... Bronx, N. Y. 

A.B., Maryville College, 1956 

Gene Gibson Phlegar ...... McKees Rocks, Pa. 

A.B., College of Wooster, 1957 

John Roberts Rankin ...... Bradford Woods, Pa. 

A.B., Muskingum College, 1953 

Robert Lewis Rhoades ....... Washington, Pa. 

A.B., Waynesburg College, 1957 

Walter Ransom Rice, Jr Pittsburgh, Pa. 

A.B., Middlebury College, 1953 

William D. Rodahaver ....... Franklin, Pa. 

B.A., Grove City College, 1954 

David William Ross ........ Prospect, Pa. 

A.B., Temple University, 1957 

John Dwight Sharick ....... Norwalk, Ohio 

A.B., College of Wooster, 1957 

Graeme Wilson Sieber ....... Blairs Mills, Pa. 

A.B., Maryville College, 1957 

Wallace Arnold Smith ...... Washington, Pa. 

A.B., Waynesburg College, 1957 

James Adin Snow ....... .Los Angeles, Calif. 

B.S., University of California, 1957 

Arthur L. Stanley ........ Arlington, Va. 

A.B., Muskingum College, 1950 

Robert Edward Temple ....... Wireton, Pa. 

A.B., University of Pittsburgh, 1956 

Robert LeRoy Van Dale ...... West Allis, Wis. 

A.B., Lawrence College, 1957 

David Wallace ....... St. Clairsville, Ohio 

B.A., Sterling College, 1955 

David Robert Warren ........ Erie, Pa. 

A.B., Allegheny College, 1957 

Thomas Gene Wilbanks ...... Texarkana, Texas 

A.B., Trinity University, 1957 

*John Hay Williams ....... Vevay, Indiana 

B.S., Indiana University, 1957 

Donal Robert Winckler ...... Bedminster, N. J. 

A.B., Grove City College, 1957 

Stephen Albert Woodruff, III .... Hanna City, 111. 

A.B., Wheaton College, 1957 

*Charles Parker Wright ....... Johnstown, Pa. 

A.B., King's College, 1956 

Frederick George Wyngarden ...... Pittsburgh, Pa. 

A.B., Alma College, 1956 

*Degree will be awarded when work is complete. 

67 



THE DEGREE OF MASTER OF THEOLOGY 



David E. Bickett ..... 

B.A., Muskingum College, 1949 
B.D., Pittsburgh-Xenia Seminary, 1952 

Robert L. Buchanan . . . . . . 

B.A., Monmouth College, 1953 

B.D., Pittsburgh-Xenia Seminary, 1956 

Lloyd Allen Dalbey .... 

B.A., Muskingum College, 1948 
B.D., Pittsburgh-Xenia Seminary, 1951 

Stanert L. Dransfield, Jr. 

A.B., University of Pittsburgh, 1944 

B.D., Princeton Theological Seminary, 1947 



William Matthew Elliott, Jr. 
A.B., Wheaton College, 1952 
B.D., Pittsburgh-Xenia Seminary, 



1955 



1955 



Richard Keith Giffen 

A.B., Muskingum College, 1952 
B.D., Pittsburgh-Xenia Seminary, 

George R. Jackson 

A.B., Geneva College, 1951 
B.D., Louisville Seminary, 1954 



William Harvey Jenkins 

B.S., Columbia University, 1938 

Th.B., Princeton Theological Seminary, 1941 

John Hart Krier ..... 

B.A., Eastern Baptist College, 1949 
B.D., Eastern Baptist Seminary, 1950 

Robert Frederick Larson .... 
B.A., Muskingum College, 1953 
B.D., Pittsburgh-Xenia Seminary, 1956 



Donald G. Lester ..... 
B.A., Brown University, 1945 
B.D., Yale Divinity School, 1948 

William Wallace Morgan 

B.A., Grove City College, 1937 

B.D., Western Theological Seminary, 1940 

Glen D. Owens ..... 

B.S., Geneva College, 1942 _ 
B.D., Pittsburgh-Xenia Seminary, 1955 

Donald Burton Patchel 

B.A., Westminster College, 1956 
B.D., Pittsburgh-Xenia Seminary, 1959 

John Charles Peterson, Jr. 

A.B., Westminster College, 1952 
B.D., Pittsburgh-Xenia Seminary, 1950 

Paul Ray Pulliam 

A.B., University of California, 1947 
B.D., Pittsburgh-Xenia Seminary, 1950 



Edmond Irving Watkins 

A.B., Sterling College, 1947 
B.D., Pittsburgh-Xenia Seminary, 



Plumville, Pa. 

Pittsburgh, Pa. 

New Castle, Pa. 

Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Butler, Pa. 



Sharon, Pa. 

Columbus, Ohio 

Youngstown, Ohio 

Pittsburgh, Pa. 

New York, N. Y. 

Fullerton, Calif. 

Washington, Pa. 

Cuyahoga Falls, Ohio 

Newville, Pa. 



Indiana, Pa. 



Pontiac, Mich. 



1950 
68 



THE DEGREE OF MASTER OF RELIGIOUS EDUCATION 

Cora Mae Bowman ....... Follansbee, W. Va. 

B.A., Muskingum College, 1958 

Manuelito Alfonso Feria ....... Detroit, Mich. 

Ph.B., University of Detroit, 1953 

Katharine Jean Finlay ....... Oak Lane, Pa. 

B.S., Geneva College, 1958 

Mary Elizabeth Kirch ....... Pittsburgh, Pa. 

A.B., University of Pittsburgh, 1935 

Joanne Esther Spicher Indiana, Pa. 

B.S., Indiana State Teachers College, 1958 



SCHOLARSHIPS AND HONORS 

The Thomas Jamison Scholarship 

Richard Sterling McConnell 

The Sylvester S. Marvin Fellowship 

Walter Ransom Rice, Jr. 

The Jane Hogg Gardner Scholarship 

Stephen Albert Woodruff, III 

The Robert A. Lee Church History Award 

Richard Sterling McConnell 

The Jennie Rigg Barbour Memorial Prize 

Thomas Paton Paul Robins Carlson 

The Hugh Thomson Kerr Moderator Prize 

John Milton Hulse 

The Michael Wilson Keith Memorial Prize in Homiletics 

Kerry Allan Meier 

The Chevy Chase Presbyterian Church Prize in Christian Education 

(Young People's Work) Donald Robert MacPherson 

The Christian Education Award 

Joanne Esther Spicher 

The First Presbyterian Church of McDonald Prize in Church History 

Thomas Paton 

The Edgewood Presbyterian Church Prize in Missions 

Daniel Bruce Gerhardt David Starr Lodge 



GRADUATION HONORS 

Magna Cum Laude 
Richard Sterling McConnell 



Cum Laude 
Robert Allen Coughenour Robert L. Van Dale 

Joanne Esther Spicher Stephen Albert Woodruff, III 



Graduating with Honors in HISTORICAL THEOLOGY: 



Roy Samuel Buffat, Jr. 
Paul Robins Carlson 
Burke Eugene Dorworth 
Willis Armand Hacker 



Walter Ransom Rice 
John Milton Hulse 
George Hallauer Lower 
David Ernest Martin 



Thomas Paton 

Graduating with Honors in BIBLICAL STUDIES: 

Marion Wilbert McCoy John Dwight Sharick 



THE JAMES PURDY SCHOLARSHIPS 



Donald Emory Brown 

Maynard Grunstra 

Earle DeWard McCrea, Jr. 



Edward William Sensenbrenner 
John Robert Sisley, Jr. 
David Alexander Vogan 



70 



REGISTER OF STUDENTS 1960-61 

Senior Class 

John Edwin Adams Kenmore, N. Y 

B.A., University of Buffalo, 1957 

John Francis Balliet Pittsburgh, Pa. 

B.A., Geneva College, 1958 

James Ray Barber Erie, Pa. 

A.B., Maryville College, 1958 

Jack H. Barton Brentwood, Pa. 

A.B., Grove City College, 1958 

Dan Edmund Bastin Mt. Vernon, Ohio 

B.A., Bowling Green University, 1958 

Frank Curtis Bates ........ Oakland, Calif. 

B.A., Whitworth College, 1958 

John Karl Baumann West Allis, Wis. 

B.A., Monmouth College, 1957 

Harry William Beveridge ...... Fayette City, Pa. 

A.B., Grove City College, 1952 

Bruce Lothian Blackie ........ Peoria, 111. 

B.A., Wheaton College, 1958 

Bruce Marion Brawdy ........ Albia, Iowa 

A.B., Monmouth College, 1957 

John Robert Brown ........ Pittsburgh, Pa. 

B.A., University of Pittsburgh, 1958 

Keith Alan Brown ........ Pittsburgh, Pa. 

B.A., Kenyon College, 1958 

Eugene S. Callaway ....... Hobart, Indiana 

A.B., Monmouth College, 1957 

Robert Miller Carson, Jr . Avonmore, Pa. 

A.B., University of Pittsburgh, 1950 
LL.B., University of Pittsburgh, 1952 

Vincent Arnold Caruso ....... Arlington, N. J. 

A.B., Upsala College, 1958 

Robert Harvey Cauffman Norristown, Pa. 

A.B, Ursinus College, 1958 

Charles Victor Clark ........ Akron, Ohio 

B.A., University of Akron, 1958 

Harry David Clewer Pittsburgh, Pa. 

B.B.A., University of Pittsburgh, 1953 

Thomas Patrick Clyde ....... Ellwood City, Pa. 

A.B., Geneva College, 1957 

Richard M. Cromie Pittsburgh, Pa. 

A.B., University of Pittsburgh, 1957 

William Leroy Davis ....... Union, New Jersey 

A.B., Tusculum College, 1958 

Leonard Edward Durbin Millvale, Pa. 

A.B, Mt. Union College, 1955 

71 



Franklin Pierce Erck Youngstown, Ohio 

B.A., Denison University, 1958 

Glenn Lowell Essex Homestead Park, Pa. 

B.S., State University of New York, 1953 

Thomas Walter Estes . . . . . . . . Pittsburgh, Pa. 

A.B., American University, 1957 

Earl Foster Fair No. Washington, Pa. 

B.S., Slippery Rock State Teachers College, 1955 

James Hull Farley Columbus, Ohio 

A.B., Ohio State University, 1957 

John Hillary Finch . . Ashland, Ky. 

A.B., Asbury College, 1956 

Raymond Duke Fravel Bedford, Pa. 

A.B., Lycoming College, 1958 

John Charles Garvin Pittsburgh, Pa. 

A.B., University of Pittsburgh, 1955 

Paul Dean George ........ Dellroy, Ohio 

B.A., Asbury College, 1957 

Jay Sherrick Gilbert Pittsburgh, Pa. 

A.B., Gettysburg College, 1958 

Ernest William Gleditsch Pittsburgh, Pa. 

A.B., University of Pittsburgh, 1956 

Donald Eugene Gordon ....... Elyria, Ohio 

B.A., Houghton College, 1957 

Harold Edward Green way Stahlstown, Pa. 

B.A., Wesleyan College, 1958 

John Duff Griffith ........ Pittsburgh, Pa. 

A.B., University of Pittsburgh, 1954 

Robert James Gruber ....... Homestead, Pa. 

A.B., University of Pittsburgh, 1957 

Kenneth Sprague Haines ....... Lowellville, Pa. 

A.B., College of Wooster, 1958 

Thomas Donald Hamilton Pittsburgh, Pa. 

B.B.A., University of Pittsburgh, 1958 

Donald William Hankins ....... St. Louis, Mo. 

B.A., Monmouth College, 1957 

Donald Lee Hartman ....... McKeesport, Pa. 

B.A., Asbury College, 1958 

Thomson Kent Heinrichs Pittsburgh, Pa. 

A.B., Waynesburg College, 1958 

James Robert Hervey ....... Steubenville, Ohio 

B.A., Muskingum College, 1958 

John Melvin Hicks Port Huron, Mich. 

B.A., Westminster College, 1958 

Robert David Hill Pittsburgh, Pa. 

B.A., Westminster College, 1956 

William Brooks Holtzclaw Freeland, Pa. 

A.B., Albright College, 1957 

72 



James Edward Hughes Washington, D. C. 

A.B, Washington College, 1958 

Robert Gray Hultz Pittsburgh, Pa. 

B.A., University of Pittsburgh, 1958 

William North Jackson Pittsburgh, Pa. 

B.A., Westminster College, 1957 

John Franklin Jamieson ...... Stanford, Conn. 

A.B., Wheaton College, 1957 

Charles Robert Jansen Philadelphia, Pa. 

A.B., Grove City College, 1958 

David James Johnson Pittsburgh, Pa. 

A.B., University of Pittsburgh, 1956 

Raymond A. Jones Pittsburgh, Pa. 

B.A., Geneva College, 1958 

Donald Robert Keen ....... Dravosburg, Pa. 

A.B., College of Wooster, 1956 

Harold Owen Kelley Uniontown, Pa. 

B.A., Maryville College, 1958 

John E. Kennedy ........ Elizabeth, Pa. 

B.S., Carnegie Institute of Technology, 1957 

Gordon Wayne Kunde Pittsburgh, Pa. 

BA., Muskingum College, 1958 

Samuel Sheldon Logan Pittsburgh, Pa. 

B.S., Grove City College, 1957 

Russell Edwin Mase ........ Canton, Ohio 

B.S., Ohio State University, 1955 
M.S., Ohio State University, 1957 

Ralph Walters McCandless ....... Butler, Pa. 

B.A., Grove City College, 1958 

James Lawrence Mawhinney Gibsonia, Pa. 

B.A., Westminster College, 1956 

John Edwards Mehl Pittsburgh, Pa. 

A.B., Dartmouth College, 1958 

Rudolph Carl Menkens ....... Union, N. J. 

A.B., Tusculum College, 1958 

Richard Lee Meyer . Seward, Pa. 

A.B., University of Pittsburgh, 1958 

Gerald Wesley Michel Pittsburgh, Pa. 

A.B., Grove City College, 1957 

Frederick Eugene Mong Franklin, Pa. 

A.B., Grove City College, 1958 

Robert Laing Montgomery ....... Pittsburgh, Pa. 

B.A., Muskingum College, 1958 

Richard Ralph Mowry ....... St. Louis, Mo. 

B.S., Millikin University, 1952 

Rodney M. Murray Omaha, Neb. 

B.A., Omaha University, 1958 

Edward Smith Napier Philadelphia, Pa. 

B.A., Houghton College, 1958 

73 



Charles Melvin Olsen ....... Minden, Neb. 

B.A., Sterling College, 1957 

Leslie Robert Franklin Papp ..... McKeesport, Pa. 

A.B., Elmhurst College, 1958 

Lloyd Jack Paxton . . . . . . . Edgewood, Pa. 

B.A., University of Pittsburgh, 1952 

George Stahl Phillips ....... N. Braddock, Pa 

A.B., University of Pittsburgh, 1955 

Roy Walter Pneuman Pittsburgh, Pa 

B. Ch. E., Pratt Institute, 1949 

Edwin Prophet Brooklyn, N. Y 

B.A., Westminster College, 1958 

William John Provost ........ Pittsburgh, Pa 

B.S., University of Pittsburgh, 1958 

Donald Hugh Prytherch ....... Syracuse, N. Y 

A.B., Waynesburg College, 1958 

Mark Morgan Ray ........ Oneonta, N. Y. 

B.A., Muskingum College, 1958 

Robert Dean Reader ......... Tyrone, Pa. 

A.B., Juniata College, 1958 

Jack Robert Rees ......... Pittsburgh, Pa. 

A.B., University of Pittsburgh, 1957 

Richard John Reynolds ....... New Castle, Pa. 

A.B., Westminster College, 1957 

Bernarr LeVerne Rhoades ....... Prospect, Pa. 

B.A., Tarkio College, 1958 

Jon Edward Riches Akron, Ohio 

B.A., Ohio State University, 1956 

Hengust Robinson, Jr. ...... . Webster, Pa. 

A.B., University of Pittsburgh, 1957 

Fred McFeely Rogers ........ Latrobe, Pa. 

B.M., Rollins College, 1951 

Richard Lee Rohrbaugh ....... Seattle, Wash. 

B.A., Sterling College, 1958 

Dean Franklin Rowley ....... Pilot Rock, Ore. 

B.S., Oregon State College, 1954 

Roger Glenn Rulong ....... McKeesport, Pa. 

B.S. in Ed., Indiana State Teachers College, 1954 

Loran Erwin Scott ........ Seattle, Wash. 

A.B., Seattle Pacific College, 1956 

Thomas Neil Severance ....... Detroit, Mich. 

B.A., Muskingum College, 1958 

Clair Willard Shaffer ....... New Castle, Pa. 

A.B., Grove City College, 1958 

Jay Frank Shaffer McKeesport, Pa. 

B.S., Clarion State Teachers College, 1957 

John Alvin Shepard ........ Buffalo, N. Y. 

A.B., Westminster College, 1957 

74 



Clarence Corneous Shields ...... Greenville, Pa. 

A.B., Maryville College, 1958 

Howard Sheridan Smith Los Angeles, Calif. 

B.A., La Verne College, 1958 

James Kilpatrick Smith ....... Pittsburgh, Pa. 

A.B., Mount Union College, 1958 

William Franklin Sparks ....... Dayton, Ohio 

B.A., Muskingum College, 1957 

Donald Edwin Spear ....... Maplewood, N. J. 

A.B., Bucknell University, 1958 

Francis Everett Spear ....... Wichita, Kan. 

A.B., Friends University, 1954 

David Herbert Stevenson ........ Arona, Pa. 

A.B., Pennsylvania State University, 1958 

Horace Allan Talley ........ Akron, Ohio 

B.S, Sterling College, 1958 

Gordon MacLean Thompson White Cottage, Ohio 

B.S., Muskingum College, 1958 

Robert Milton Urie ...... Craftsbury Common, Vt. 

B.A., Monmouth College, 1958 

Ray La Verne Van Engen Roca, Nebraska 

A.B., Whitworth College, 1956 

Howard Clinton Varner, Jr. ...... Du Bois, Pa. 

A.B., College of Emporia, 1958 

Robert Leroy Veon ........ New Castle, Pa. 

A.B., Westminster College, 1958 

James Everett Vincent ....... Loveland, Colo. 

B.A., Sterling College, 1958 

Richard Kenneth Wallarab ...... Davenport, Iowa 

B.A., St. Ambrose College, 1956 

Donald Dissette Wick, Jr Pittsburgh, Pa. 

B.S., Miami University, 1953 

Paul D. Wierman Steubenville, Ohio 

A.B., Westminster College, 1953 



Middler Class 



Laurence John Athorn 

A.B., Bloomfield College, 1959 

Paul Richard Bergmueller 

A.B., Maryville College, 1959 

David E. Breckenridge 

B.S., Sterling College, 1959 

James McLeod Brinks 

A.B., Lynchburg College, 1956 
M.A., University of Pittsburgh, 1960 

Donald E. Brown .... 
B.A., Muskingum College, 1959 



Newark, N. J. 

Avenel, N. J. 

Woodston, Kansas 

Dothan, Alabama 

Kenmore, N. Y. 



75 



Neil W. Brown ........ Columbus, Ohio 

B.A., Westminster College, 1959 

Bruce E. Bryce McKeesport, Pa. 

B.A., Otterbein College, 1959 

Glen Howard Burrows ....... Hanoverton, Ohio 

A.B., College of Wooster, 1955 

Roger L. Bush ........ Greensburg, Pa. 

A.B., College of Wooster, 1959 

Edwin C. Carlson Springdale, Pa. 

B.A., Muskingum College, 1956 

Edward Joseph Campbell ...... Arlington Heights, 111. 

A.B., University of Dubuque, 1959 

George C. Carpenter Granger, Wash. 

B. A., Whitworth College, 1959 

Kermit French Clickner Pittsburgh, Pa. 

A.B., Butler University, 1958 

Warren Cosmo Cravotta ....... Pittsburgh, Pa. 

A.B., University of Pittsburgh, 1959 

Donald Drew Custis Riverdale, Md. 

A.B., College of Wooster, 1958 

Timothy D. Dalrymple ....... Portland, Ore. 

B.A., Whitworth College, 1959 

John Clarence Dean Freedom, Pa. 

B.S., in Eng., Geneva College, 1958 

Stephen S. Dixon ....... Los Angeles, Calif. 

B.A., University of California, 1959 

Franklin Samuel Douglas ....... Pittsburgh, Pa. 

B.S., Juniata College, 1957 

Daniel Reubin Duerksen ...... Pikesville, Md. 

B.M.E., University of Wichita, 1949 

Jack Fowlow Emerick ....... Beaver Falls, Pa. 

A.B., Geneva College, 1959 

Fred A. Feldner ........ Allison Park, Pa. 

B.A., Geneva College, 1959 

John Harmond Francisco ....... Elmsford, N. Y. 

A.B.. Lehigh University, 1956 

Burton S. Froom, Jr San Francisco, Calif. 

B.S., University of California, 1958 

Robert Charles Fox Bethlehem, Pa. 

A.B, Albright College, 1957 

Joseph John Gasper ........ Jessup, Pa. 

A.B., Bloomfield College, 1959 

William C. Gawlas Pittsburgh, Pa. 

A.B., University of Pittsburgh, 1959 

Richard Arthur George ....... Franklin, Pa. 

B.S., Geneva College, 1959 

George Harold Giles ... .... Pittsburgh, Pa. 

A.B., University of Pittsburgh, 1959 

76 



Benjamin Gorbea Washington, D. C. 

A.B., Maryville College, 1959 

William J. Green Griffith, Ind. 

B.S. in C.E., Carnegie Institute of Technology, 1954 

John Mack Groat Alliance, Ohio 

A.B., Mount Union College, 1959 

Maynard Grunstra Houston, Del. 

A.B., Elizabethtown, 1959 

Frank Thomas Hainer ........ Parker, Pa. 

A.B., Duke University, 1956 

Wendell Earl Harford Pittsburgh, Pa. 

A.B., University of Pittsburgh, 1957 

David Lloyd Heyser ....... Norristown, Pa. 

A.B., Ursinus College, 1956 

D. Jackson Hockensmith ....... Johnstown, Pa. 

B.A., Otterbein College, 1956 

Russell Ward Holder ...... Collingswood, N. J. 

B.S., Edinboro State Teachers College, 1954 

Gordon Irvine ........ Wintersville, Ohio 

B.A., Muskingum College, 1959 

Gordon A. Jones ........ Havertown, Pa. 

B.A., Houghton College, 1958 

Allan William Kinloch, Jr Philadelphia, Pa. 

A.B., Ursinus College, 1959 

Ronald E. Kinsey McKees Rocks, Pa. 

B.A., Tarkio College, 1959 

Byron Dale Leasure ....... Bridgeville, Pa. 

A.B., College of Wooster, 1959 

Phillip Arthur Maronde ....... Pulaski, Pa. 

A.B., Westminster College, 1959 

Earle D. McCrea, Jr. ....... . Gibsonia, Pa. 

A.B., Allegheny College, 1939 

David J. McFarlane Niagara Falls, N. Y. 

B.A., University of Rochester, 1959 

Robert Allan Messenger ...... Bridgeville, Pa. 

A.B., Hamilton College, 1950 

William Meyer Charleroi, Pa. 

B.A., Westminster College, 1959 

Dale E. Miller Pittsburgh, Pa. 

B.A., Westminster College, 1959 

Gerald A. Miller Industry, Pa. 

B.A., Geneva College, 1959 

Robert G. Miller . East Orange, N. J. 

A.B., Upsala College, 1959 

William Harold Moore . . . . . . . Pittsburgh, Pa. 

A.B., Waynesburg College, 1959 

Thomas J. Mori Belle Vernon, Pa. 

B.A., Waynesburg College, 1959 

77 



Patrick Morison Baltimore, Md. 

B.A., Whitworth College, 1959 

William G. Morris McKeesport, Pa. 

B.S. in Ed., California State Teachers College, 1959 

Ronald Oglesbee ......... Xenia, Ohio 

B.S., Bowling Green State University, 1959 

Robert E. Palisin Youngstown, Ohio 

A.B., Westminster College, 1959 

Howard Frederick Peters ....... Pittsburgh, Pa. 

A.B., University of Pittsburgh, 1959 

David Philips .... ..... Rochester, Pa. 

B.A., Muskingum College, 1959 

Douglas A. Pomeroy .... .... Cleveland, Ohio 

A.B., Wooster College, 1959 

John S. Redmond ........ Canonsburg, Pa. 

B.S., Penn State University, 1957 

Edward Sensenbrenner ....... Columbus, Ohio 

B.S., Ohio State University, 1954 

Verne Edmond Sindlinger ....... Brilliant, Ohio 

A.B., Ohio University, 1959 

John R. Sisley, Jr Troy, N. Y. 

B.S., Grove City College, 1953 

John P. Smith, III ...... . East Liverpool, Ohio 

B.A., Muskingum College, 1959 

Robert Duvall Smith ....... Germantown, Md. 

A.B., Maryville College, 1959 

Roger A. Smith ........ Wilmington, Del. 

B.A., Monmouth College, 1959 

Richard B. Snyder Big Run, Pa. 

B.S., Clarion State Teachers College, 1959 

William Steel Los Angeles, Calif. 

B.A., University of California, 1959 

William George Stype, Jr Coraopolis, Pa. 

B.S. in Ed., Thiel College, 1959 

Theodore Taylor ........ Ellicott City, Md. 

B.A., Westminster College, 1959 

Joseph Leroy Tropansky ....... Du Bois, Pa. 

A.B., Maryville College, 1959 

Eugene Turner Brooklyn, N. Y. 

B.A., Knoxville College, 1957 

James Leroy Ulrich ........ Utica, N. Y. 

A.B., Waynesburg College, 1959 

David A. Vogan New Castle, Pa. 

B.A., Westminster College, 1952 

Carlton Walker Wilmington, Del. 

A.B., Wheaton College, 1959 

James R. Whiteside New Castle, Pa. 

B.S., Waynesburg College, 1949 

78 



Elvin Milton Williams Homer City, Pa. 

B.S. in Ed., Indiana State Teachers College, 1951 

John R. Wineman Pittsburgh, Pa. 

B.A., Tarkio College, 1959 

John E. Winnett Uniontown, Pa. 

B.S., Waynesburg College, 1951 

Harry Glenn Winsheimer ....... Indiana, Pa. 

B.S., Waynesburg College, 1959 

Thomas Daniel Woodward ....... Bethesda, Md. 

A.B., Washington College, 1959 

Junior Class 

William Thorpe Alter . Pittsburgh, Pa. 

B.S., Lehigh University, 1956 
B.S. in Bus. Adm, 1957 

John Harvey Ashenfelter ...... Ridley Park, Pa. 

B.S., Drexel Institute, 1960 

Clyde Carson Billings ....... Youngstown, Ohio 

B.A., Muskingum College, 1960 

Benjamin Stephen Booth ....... Pittsburgh, Pa. 

B.S., Grove City College, 1960 

Keith Burroughs ........ Philadelphia, Pa. 

B.S., University of Pennsylvania, 1960 

Lowell E. Byall Whittier, Calif. 

B.A., Sterling College, 1960 

J. Paul Cameron _ Pittsburgh, Pa. 

A.B., Denison University, 1960 

William Luther Coop ....... Tom's River, N. J. 

B.A., Wooster, College, 1960 

John N. Crock ......... Pittsburgh, Pa. 

B.A., University of Pittsburgh, 1960 

George William Dando ....... Baltimore, Md. 

B.A., Baylor University, 1960 

Forrest V. Fitzhugh ....... San Antonio, Texas 

B.A., Trinity University, 1960 

William Flagmeier ........ Canton, Ohio 

A.B., Muskingum College, 1949 

Merl L. Galusha, Jr Schenectady, N. Y. 

B.S., Union College, 1959 

James C. George New Castle, Pa. 

A.B., Westminster College, 1949 

Richard K. Gibson Pittsburgh, Pa. 

B.A., Muskingum College, 1960 

William Ray Gurley, Jr West Mifflin, Pa. 

A.B., Milligan College, 1959 

Edward S. Hammett ........ Pittsburgh, Pa. 

B.A., Washington and Jefferson College, 1951 

Aaron Griffith Hastie, Jr. ...... . Pittston, Pa. 

B.A., Wilkes College, 1960 

79 



Peter Charles Hauser ....... Harrisburg, Pa. 

A.B., Grove City College, 1960 

John Alfred Hellman ........ Irwin, Pa. 

B.A., West Virginia Wesleyan, 1959 

David Lynn Holmes, Jr. ... . . . Detroit, Mich. 

M.A., Columbia University, 1960 

Alfred Charles Horn ....... Charleroi, Pa. 

B.A., Westminster College, 1960 

Robert Fraser Hostetter, Jr. ..... Pittsburgh, Pa. 

B.A., Waynesburg College, 1960 

John Edmund Johnson ........ Clairton, Pa. 

B.S., University of Pittsburgh, 1957 

John Edward Karnes ........ Akron, Ohio 

B.A., Muskingum College, 1960 

James B. Keefer Hyattsville, Md. 

B.A., Bob Jones University, 1950 

Harold D. Kelley ........ Pittsburgh, Pa. 

B.B.A., University of Pittsburgh, 1958 
M.B.A., University of Pittsburgh, 1959 

Wayne K. King ........ Ellwood City, Pa. 

B.A., Muskingum College, 1960 

Steven James Kocsis ........ Pittsburgh, Pa. 

B.A., Muskingum College, 1960 

Zoltan A. Kovacs Debrecen, Hungary 

B.S., Reformed School of Education, Hungary, 1946 

Harry Donald Lash Rector, Pa. 

B.S., Clarion State Teachers College, 1960 

Harry E. Martin Pittsburgh, Pa. 

M.S., George Williams College, 1953 

Allen W. McCallum Detroit, Mich. 

B.A., Muskingum College, 1960 

Russell Howard McCuen, Jr Malvern, Pa. 

B.A., Maryville College, 1960 

William Franklin McIntyre ..... New Concord, Ohio 
B.A., Muskingum College, 1959 

John B. McLaren ........ New Brighton, Pa. 

B.A., Westminster College, 1959 
M.A., University of Pittsburgh, 1960 

Walter W. Miller ........ Montpelier, Ohio 

B.S., Ohio State University, 1955 
M.S., Ohio State University, 1960 

David Nelson Morton ....... Philadelphia, Pa. 

B.S., University of Pennsylvania, 1960 

Maurice James Murray ....... Dover, Delaware 

A.B., Wooster College, 1960 

Irvin Lee Page . . . . . . . . . Conemaugh, Pa. 

A.B., Waynesburg College, 1960 

Claude Van Ponting ........ Salinas, Calif. 

A.B., Muskingum College, 1960 

80 



John A. Price Elizabeth, Pa. 

B.A., Washington and Jefferson College, 1959 

Robert Edson Reed ........ Clairton, Pa. 

B.A., Waynesburg College, 1960 

Walter Terry Schoener . . . . . Pittsburgh, Pa. 

B.A., Muskingum College, 1960 

Paul W. Shocren, Jr Pittsburgh, Pa. 

B.S. in Forestry, Penn. State University, 1951 

Julia Sanderson Smith ....... Hackensack, N. J. 

A.B., Fairleigh Dickinson University, 1960 

George Young Stewart ....... Baltimore, Md. 

A.B., Maryville College, 1960 

Robert Dale Taylor ........ Pittsburgh, Pa. 

B.S., University of Pittsburgh, 1960 

Francis Elliott Tennies ...... Ontario Center, N. Y. 

A.B., Grove City College, 1960 

Edward R. Warner ......... Cola, Ohio 

B.A., Colgate University, 1942 

Elvin M. Williams Pittsburgh, Pa. 

B.S., Indiana State Teachers College, 1950 



DEPARTMENT OF CHRISTIAN EDUCATION 

Senior Class 

David James Devey Pittsburgh, Pa. 

B.S., University of Pittsburgh, 1952 
M.E., University of Pittsburgh, 1956 

Alice Louise Moffett ........ Pikeville, Ky. 

B.S., Pikeville College, 1959 

Eleanore V. Perry ........ Pittsburgh, Pa. 

B.S., University of Pittsburgh, 1959 

Mary E. Quackenbush ....... Des Moines, Iowa 

B.S, Westminster College, 1953 

Junior Class 

Ruth D. Benner Pittsburgh, Pa. 

B.A., Chatham College, 1942 

Elizabeth Jane Jobes Orwell, Ohio 

B.A, Hiram College, 1959 

Carolyn Jane Newton Columbus, Ohio 

B.S. Ed, Muskingum College, 1960 

Donna Lee Wagner Butler, Pa. 

B.S. in M. Ed, Westminster College, 1954 

Evelyn T. Wehrle Pittsburgh, Pa. 

B.A, DePauw University, 1938 

Margaret Suppes Yingling ...... Pittsburgh, Pa. 

B.S, Chatham College, 1943 

81 



GRADUATE DEPARTMENT 

Warren K. Alnor Ligonier, Pa. 

A.B., Taylor University, 1949 

B.D., Drew Theological Seminary, 1952 

Edwin Jeremy Arthur ....... Moradabad, India 

B.A., Agra University^ 1955 

B.D., Leonard Theological Seminary, 1958 

Kenneth Ewing Bailey ....... Minia, Egypt 

A.B., Monmouth College, 1952 

B.D., Pittsburgh-Xenia Seminary, 1955 

Kenneth L. Beams ........ Qeveland, Ohio 

B.A., Muskingum College, 1938 
B.D., Pittsburgh-Xenia Seminary, 1949 

David W. Baumann ........ Apollo, Pa. 

A.B., Monmouth College, 1953 

B.D., Pittsburgh-Xenia Seminary, 1956 

Paul R. Beatty Elderton, Pa. 

B.A., Muskingum College, 1951 
B.D., Pittsburgh-Xenia Seminary, 1954 

William J. Bovard ........ New Castle, Pa. 

A.B., Grove City College, 1949 

B.D., Pittsburgh-Xenia Seminary, 1952 

Robert William Caldwell ....... McDonald, Pa. 

B.A., Westminster College, 1949 
B.D., Pittsburgh-Xenia Seminary, 1952 

Chan Young Choi . . . . . . Seoul, Korea 

B.A., Hong-Ik College, 1955 

B.D., Presbyterian Theological Seminary, 1951 

John G. Evans New Kensington, Pa. 

B.A., Tarkio College, 1952 

B.D., Pittsburgh-Xenia Seminary, 1955 

C. Biddle Foster Elizabeth, Pa. 

B.A., University of Delaware, 1954 
B.D., Pittsburgh-Xenia Seminary, 1958 

Robert A Helstrom ........ McDonald, Pa. 

B.S., Buffalo State Teachers College, 1938 
B.D., Pittsburgh-Xenia Seminary, 1959 

Harold Ross Karnes Mars, Pa. 

A.B., Sterling College, 1953 < 

B.D., Pittsburgh-Xenia Seminary, 1956 

Jerry R. Kirk Pittsburgh, Pa. 

B.A., University of Washington, 1953 
B.D., Pittsburgh-Xenia Seminary, 1956 

Frederick J. Lenk, Jr New Bedford, Pa. 

B.A., Sterling College, 1955 

B.D., Pittsburgh-Xenia Seminary, 1958 

Russell R. Lester Keota, Iowa 

A.B., Grove City College, 1947 

B.D., Pittsburgh-Xenia Seminary, 1950 

Samuel T. Lewis Delmont, Pa. 

B.Music, Johns Hopkins University, 1952 
B.D., Western Seminary, 1958 

Harry J. Lichy, Jr. ....... Franklin, Pa. 

B.A., Mount Union College, 1954 
B.D., Pittsburgh-Xenia Seminary, 1957 

82 



Ichiro Matsuda Morgantown, W. Va. 

B.A., Erskine College, 1956 

B.D., Pittsburgh-Xenia Seminary, 1959 

John Earl Myers Pittsburgh, Pa. 

B.S., University of Pittsburgh, 1935 
Th.B., Princeton Seminary, 1940 
M.Ed., University of Pittsburgh, 1957 

Charles W. Moore . Elkins, W. Va. 

B.S., Virginia Polytechnic Institute, 1949 
B.D., Union Theological Seminary, 1954 

Kenneth Norton Peterson ....... Warren, Ohio 

A.B., University of Minnesota, 1937 
Th.M., Dallas Theological Seminary, 1943 

John L. Rauch Johnstown, Pa. 

A.B., Juniata College, 1951 

B.D., United Theological Seminary, 1954 

Edward H. Riedesel Washington, Pa. 

B.S. in Ed., Kent State University, 1952 
B.D., Western Theological Seminary, 1955 

Albert L. Schartner ........ Irwin, Pa. 

A.B., Westminster College, 1953 

B.D., Pittsburgh-Xenia Seminary, 1956 

William D. Schmeling Johnstown, Pa. 

A.B., Indiana Central College, 1955 
B.D., United Theological Seminary, 1958 

Donald S. Stewart Wheeling, W. Va. 

A.B., Bob Jones University, 1956 
B.D., Pittsburgh-Xenia Seminary, 1959 

Howard Frank VanValin Pittsburgh, Pa. 

A.B., Greenville College, 1953 < 

B.D., Asbury Theological Seminary, 1953 

David Pollock White ........ Elmer N J 

B.A., Bucknell University, 1948 

B.D., Pittsburgh-Xenia Seminary, 1952 

George W. Woodcock Cleveland, Ohio 

A.B., Wheaton College, 1952 

B.D., Pittsburgh-Xenia Seminary, 1955 

SUMMARY OF ATTENDANCE 

Undergraduate Department 

Juniors 51 

Middlers 82 

Seniors •••......... HI 

Total 244 

Department of Christian Education 

Juniors 6 

Seniors -••......... 4 

Total "~10 

Graduate Department 30 

Total Enrollment .... 284 
83 



HISTORICAL ROLL OF PROFESSORS 



John Anderson 
John Banks . 
James Ramsey 
Joseph Kerr . 
Jacob Jones Janeway 
Mungo Dick . 
Luther Halsey 



John Williamson Nevin 
David Elliott 
John Taylor Pressly 
David Carson 
Thomas Beveridge 
Moses Kerr . 
Joseph Claybaugh 
Samuel W. McCracken 
Lewis Warner Green 
James Martin 

Alexander Taggart McGill 
James Lemonte Dinwiddie 
Abraham Anderson 
Alexander Downs Clark 
David Reynolds Kerr 
Melancthon Williams Jacobus 
William Swan Plumer . 
Samuel Wilson 
William Davidson . 
Alexander Young . 
Samuel Jennings Wilson 
John Scott 
Joseph Clokey 
William Miller Paxton 
Andrew Morrow Black . 
Archibald Alexander Hodge 
David Alexander Wallace 

Joseph Tate Cooper 

William Bruce 

William Henry Hornblower 



Place of 
Inauguration 


Period of 
Service 


Service 


1794-1819 


Philadelphia 


1820-1826 


Canonsburg 


1821-1842 


Pittsburgh 


1825-1829 


Pittsburgh 


1828-1829 


Pittsburgh 


1829-1831 


Pittsburgh 


1829-1836 
1872-1880 


Pittsburgh 


1829-1840 


Pittsburgh 


1829-1874 


Allegheny 


1832-1870 


Canonsburg 


1834-1834 


Canonsburg 


1835-1871 


Allegheny- 


1835-1836 


Oxford 


1839-1855 


Oxford 


1839-1840 


Pittsburgh 


1840-1847 


Canonsburg 


1842-1846 


Pittsburgh 


1842-1854 


Allegheny 


1843-1846 


Canonsburg 


1847-1855 


Allegheny 


1847-1884 


Allegheny 


1851-1887 


Pittsburgh 


1851-1876 


Pittsburgh 


1854-1862 


Xenia 


1855-1875 


Oxford 


1855-1858 


Oxford 


1855-1874 


Pittsburgh 


1857-1883 


Monmouth 


1858-1874 


Xenia 


1858-1873 


Pittsburgh 


1860-1872 


Monmouth 


1864-1874 


Pittsburgh 


1864-1877 


Monmouth & Xenis 


1867-1870 
1883-1883 


Allegheny 


1871-1886 


Xenia 


1871-1880 


Pittsburgh 


1871-1883 



84 



James Gillespie Carson 








Xenia 


1873-1888 


William Gallogly Moorehead 






Xenia 


1873-1914 


Jackson Burgess McMichael 






Xenia 


1873-1878 


Samuel Thompson Lowrie 






Pittsburgh 


1874-1877 


Alexander Young . 






Allegheny 


1876-1891 


Samuel Henry Kellogg . 






Pittsburgh 


1877-1886 


William Hamilton Jeffers 






Pittsburgh 


1877-1914 


Benjamin Breckenbridge Warfield 






Pittsburgh 


1878.1887 


James Harper 






Xenia 


1879-1899 


Thomas Hastings Robinson 






Pittsburgh 


1883-1906 


David MacDill 






Xenia 


1884-1902 


David A. McClenahan 








Allegheny- 


1885-1921 


Robert Dick Wilson 








Pittsburgh 


1885-1900 


James Alexander Grier 








Allegheny- 


1886-1909 


John McNaugher . 








Allegheny 


1886-1943 


Henry T. McClelland 








Pittsburgh 


1886-1891 


Matthew Brown Riddle 






Pittsburgh 


1887-1916 


Oliver Joseph Thatcher 






Allegheny 


1888-1892 


Wilbert Webster White 






Xenia 


1889-1894 


Robert Christie 






Pittsburgh 


1891-1923 


John A. Wilson 








Allegheny 


1893-1915 


John Douds Irons . 








Xenia 


1895-1905 


James Anderson Kelso 








Pittsburgh 


1897-1954 


David Riddle Breed 








Pittsburgh 


1898-1931 


Joseph Kyle . 








Xenia 


1899-1921 


Jesse Johnson 








Xenia 


1903-1930 


David Schley Schaff 








Pittsburgh 


1903-1926 


John Elliott Wishart 








Xenia 


1905-1923 


Ernest David Culley 








Pittsburgh 


1906- 


William Riley Wilson 








Allegheny 


1907-1940 


Charles Frederick Wishart 






Allegheny 


1907-1914 


William Robertson Farmer 




Pittsburgh 


1907-1958 


John Hunter Webster . 




Xenia 


1908-1933 


James Henry Snowden 






Pittsburgh 


1911-1936 


Melvin Grove Kyle 






Xenia 


1914-1930 


James Doig Rankin 








Pittsburgh 


1914-1929 


David Frazier McGill 








Pittsburgh 


1915-1931 


Frank Eakin . 








Pittsburgh 


1915-1927 


James Gallaway Hunt 








Pittsburgh 


1920-1926 


Selby Frame Vance 








Pittsburgh 


1921-1935 


James Harper Grier 








Pittsburgh 


1922-1926 



85 



Robert McNary Karr 

James Leon Kelso . 

George Boone McCreary 

Robert Nathaniel Montgomery 

Donald Mackenzie 

Gaius Jackson Slosser . 

Albert Henry Baldinger 

Clarence Joseph Williamson 

John Wick Bowman 

William F. Orr 

George Anderson Long 

Theophilus Mills Taylor 

Jarvis M. Cotton . 

Frank Dixon McCloy 

Henry Alexander Riddle 

J. Carter Swaim 

Walter R. Clyde . 

Addison Hardie Leitch 

Florence M. Lewis . 

H. Ray Shear 

David Noel Freedman 

Gordon Edmund Jackson 

Ralph G. Turnbull 

John H. Gerstner. Jr. 

Clifford E. Barbour 

Bessie M. Burrows 

James A. Walther . 

Sidney 0. Hills 

Robert Lee Kelley, Jr. 

Robert Clyde Johnson 

Howard M. Jamieson, Jr. 

John M. Bald 

Elwyn Allen Smith 

Walter E. Wiest . 

Malcolm S. Alexander 

Harold E. Scott 

Howard L. Ralston. 

William A. Nicholson 

James Sheppard Irvine 

J. Gordon Chamberlin 

Gayraud S. Wilmore 

Arlan P. Dohrenburg 



St. Louis 


1922-1949 


St. Louis 


1923- 


St. Louis 


1924-1946 


Pittsburgh 


1926-193C 


Pittsburgh 


1928-1933 


Pittsburgh 


1928-1958 


Pittsburgh 


1931-1947 


Pittsburgh 


1932-1950 


Pittsburgh 


1936-1944 


Pittsburgh 


1936- 


Pittsburgh 


1942-1955 


Pittsburgh 


1942- 


Pittsburgh 


1944- 


Pittsburgh 


1944- 


Pittsburgh 


1944- 


Pittsburgh 


1944-1954 


Pittsburgh 


1945- 


Pittsburgh 


1946- 


Pittsburgh 


1947-1952 


Pittsburgh 


1947-1959 


Pittsburgh 


1948- 


Pittsburgh 


1949- 


Pittsburgh 


1949-1954 


Pittsburgh 


1950- 


Pittsburgh 


1951- 


Pittsburgh 


1953- 


Pittsburgh 


1954- 


Pittsburgh 


1954- 


Pittsburgh 


1955- 


Pittsburgh 


1955- 


Pittsburgh 


1955- 


Pittsburgh 


1957- 


Pittsburgh 


1957- 


Pittsburgh 


1957- 


Pittsburgh 


1958- 


Pittsburgh 


1959- 


.Pittsburgh 


1960- 


Pittsburgh 


1960- 


.Pittsburgh 


1960- 


.Pittsburgh 


1960- 


Pittsburgh 


1961- 


Pittsburgh 


1961- 



86 



DONATIONS AND BEQUESTS 

All donations or bequests to the Seminary should be made to 
"The Pittsburgh Theological Seminary of the United Presbyterian 
Church in the United States of America, located at 616 North High- 
land Avenue, Pittsburgh 6, Pennsylvania." The proper legal form 
for making a bequest is as follows. 

"I hereby give and bequeath to Pittsburgh Theological Seminary 
of the United Presbyterian Church in the United States of America, 
incorporated in the State of Pennsylvania, the following: . . . ." 

Care should be taken to use the corporate name as given above, 
and to have the bequest conform to the laws of the state governing it. 

The memorial idea may be carried out either in the erection 
of a building or in the endowment of any of the special funds of 
the Seminary. 



87 



INDEX 

Accreditation of the Seminary ......... 27 

Admissions and Requirements . . . . . . . . 29-31 

Alumni Association ........... 19 

Attendance, Summary of .......... 83 

Awards Granted, 1959-1960 65-70 

B. D. Curriculum 42-43 

Bible Lands Museum 27 

Board of Directors and Committees 11-13 

Calendar for 1961-1962 2 

Calendar of the Seminary .......... 3 

Courses of Instruction .......... 47-64 

Courses of Study ........... 44,45 

Credentials Required for Admission 30 

Curriculum ............ 44,45 

Degree of Bachelor of Divinity . . .37 

Donations and Bequests .......... 87 

Faculty „ 6,14 

Faculty Committees and Staff . _ 17,18 

Fees and Expenses ........... 33 

Genealogy . . .20 

Graduate Department 41 

Historical Roll of Professors 84 

Housing 24,25 

Insurance for Students .......... 34 

Lectures, Special 16 

Library . . . . . . . . . . . . .26 

Location of the Seminary Building ........ 24 

Musical Opportunity ........... 28 

Pittsburgh — Our Environment ......... 23 

Pre-Seminary Studies . . . . . . . . . . . 29 

Purpose of the Seminary .......... 19 

Register of Students, 1960-1961 ....... 71-83 

Registration . . . . . . . . . . . .32 

Scholarship Assistance and Financial Aid ....... 34 

Scholarships, Awards and Prizes . . .37 

Student Loan Funds . . . .35 

Term of Course Prescribed by General Assembly ...... 36 

Transfer Students ........... 32 

88 










Jfe- 






■wm^ ; 













THE 

PITTSBURGH 
THEOLOGICAL 
SEMINARY 




Annual 
Catalogue 

1962-1963 






i 



THE 
ANNUAL CATALOGUE 

OF 

The Pittsburgh 
Theological Seminary 

OF 

THE UNITED PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH 

IN THE 

UNITED STATES OF AMERICA 

616 N. HIGHLAND AVENUE 
PITTSBURGH 6, PENNSYLVANIA 

1962-1963 



• CALENDAR FOR 1962 • 




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THE BUSINESS OFFICE 

Hours: 9:00 - 5 :00 Monday through Friday 

Telephone: EMerson 2-5610 



THE SEMINARY CALENDAR 
1962 

18 June-20 July Summer Session in Beginning Greek 
23 July-24 Aug. Summer Session in Beginning Hebrew 



9-13 July School of Religion 



First Semester 

4-5 Sept. Junior Orientation and Registration 

6 Sept. Convocation and Reception, 2:00 P.M. 

7 Sept. Class Work Begins 

8 Sept. Junior Orientation Retreat 

14 Sept. Seminary Communion Service, 7:30 P.M. 

23-24 Oct. Fall Convocation 

20 Nov. Semi-annual Meeting, Board of Directors 

22-25 Nov. Thanksgiving Recess 

10-14 Dec. Reading Week 

17-21 Dec. Examination Period 

22 Dec-20 Jan. Christmas Recess 



1963 Second Semester 

21 Jan. Class Work Begins 

25 Jan. Seminary Communion Service, 7:30 P.M. 

12-13 Mar. Spring Convocation 

11-14 Apr. Easter Recess 

22-27 Apr. Reading Week for Seniors 

29 Apr.-4 May Reading Week for Juniors and Middlers 
Examination Week for Seniors 

6-10 May Examination Week for Juniors and Middlers 

12 May Baccalaureate and Communion Service, 8:00 P.M. 

14 May Annual Meeting of the Board of Directors 

14 May Annual Meeting and Dinner of the Alumni 

Association 

14 May One Hundred Sixty-ninth Commencement, 

8:00 P.M. 
The East Liberty United Presbyterian Church 




Pre sident-Ement us 
Clifford E. Barbour, Ph.D., D.D., LL.D. 



Before the beginning of the academic year for which this cata- 
logue is designed, Dr. Clifford E. Barbour will have retired from the 
presidency of the Seminary. The satisfaction and anticipation with 
which the new President is welcomed will not dull the regret and 
appreciation which the retiring President's leaving provokes. 

When Pittsburgh Seminary was formed in 1960 the Board of 
Directors recognized Dr. Barbour's years of service both to the 
Church and to theological education by appointing him Vice President 
and Acting President. In May, 1961, the remarkable progress of the 
new school and its firm promise of growth and usefulness prompted 
the Board to appoint him President for his final year of leadership. 

Dr. Barbour has manifested a substantial variety of talents in 
his administration. A combination of genial friendliness, steady di- 
rection, and a fine balance of firmness and flexibility, all exercised 
with Christian grace, has united the faculty in purpose and action. 
His long years in the pastorate and his experience in church judica- 
tories have enabled him to reach the constituency of the Seminary, 
both cleric and lay. His leadership in the development program has 
brought significant physical and financial betterment to the school. 

On more than one occasion Dr. Barbour has remarked that his 
eleven years of service to theological education have been in many 
ways the most satisfying period of his life. This has been reflected 
in the atmosphere which he has done so much to create at Pittsburgh. 
Dr. Barbour's unique contribution will endure in the theological 
university he has dreamed for Pittsburgh. The seminary "family" 
bespeaks God's blessing for Dr. and Mrs. Barbour in the years ahead. 



President-Elect 
Donald G. Miller, S.T.M., M.A., Ph.D. 




The Board of Directors of Pittsburgh Theological Seminary is 
honored to present the President-Elect of the Seminary, Dr. Donald 
G. Miller. The new President will assume his duties June 1, 1962, 
on the retirement of Dr. Clifford E. Barbour. 

Dr. Miller comes to this position of leadership with broad edu- 
cational training. A graduate of the Biblical Seminary in New York, 
with a Doctor of Philosophy degree from New York University, he 
has pursued post-doctoral studies in France and Switzerland during 
sabbatical leaves. He has taught in Pyengyang Foreign School, 
Korea, in the Biblical Seminary in New York, in the Lutheran Theo- 
logical Seminary at Gettysburg, and for the past nineteen years in 
Union Theological Seminary, Richmond, Virginia. 

Happily, Dr. Miller offers a combination of Presbyterian back- 
ground which equips him admirably for leadership in this merged 
institution. His mother and his wife were both reared in the United 
Presbyterian Church of North America. He was ordained and 
served his first pastorate in the Presbyterian Church, U.S.A., and his 
major teaching ministry has been in the Presbyterian Church, U.S. 
Thus he brings a rich heritage of Presbyterianism to this post in the 
newest, yet oldest, seminary of the new United Presbyterian Church, 
U.S.A. 

In the publication field Dr. Miller's reputation is well estab- 
lished. In addition to a number of books which bear his name, he 
has co-edited Interpretation since 1947 and is Associate Editor of the 
Layman's Bible Commentary. 

The Board of Directors is honored to present to its constituency 
Dr. Donald G. Miller, established scholar, gifted author, popular pro- 
fessor, and recognized leader in theological circles. 



VUe faculty 







James Leon Kelso, Professor of Old Testament History 
and Biblical Archaeology. Monmouth College, A.B.; Indiana 
University, A.M.; Xenia Theological Seminary, Th.M. and 
Th.D. 



William F. Orr, Professor of New Testament Literature 
and Exegesis. Southwestern University, A.B.; Louisville 
Presbyterian Seminary, B.D. and Th.M.; Hartford Theolog- 
ical Seminary, Ph.D. 



Theophilus M. Taylor, Professor, The John McNaugher 
Chair of New Testament Literature and Exegesis. Univer- 
sity of Pennsylvania, B.Arch.; Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological 
Seminary, Th.B.; Yale- University, Ph.D. 



Frank Dixon McCloy, Jr., Associate Professor of Church 
History. University of Pittsburgh, A.B. and A.M.; Western 
Theological Seminary, S.T.B.; Harvard University, A.M. and 
Ph.D. 



Walter R. Clyde, Professor of Christian Mission. Muskin- 
gum College, A.B.; Omaha Theological Seminary, B.D.; 
Western Theological Seminary, S.T.M.; Hartford Seminary 
Foundation, Ph.D. 



David Noel Freedman, Professor, The James Anderson Kelso 
Chair of Hebrew and Old Testament Literature. UCLA, 
A.B.; Princeton Theological Seminary, Th.B.; Johns Hopkins 
University, Ph.D. 



^Ike tf-acultif 



Gordon E. Jackson. Dean of the Seminary and Hugh 
Thomson Kerr Professor of Pastoral Theology. Monmouth 
College, A.B.; Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary, Th.B. 
and Th.M.; University of Chicago. Ph.D. 



John H. Gerstner, Professor of Church History. West- 
minster College, A.B.; Westminster Theological Seminary, 
Th.B. and Th.M.; Harvard University, Ph.D. 




Bessie M. Burrows, Assistant Professor of Christian Educa- 
tion and Registrar. Geneva College, B.A.; Columbia Univer- 
sity, M.A. 



James A. Walther, Associate Professor of New Testament 
Literature and Exegesis. Grove City College, A.B.; Western 
Theological Seminary, S.T.B.: Emmanuel College, Victoria 
University, Toronto, Th.D. 




Sidney O. Hills, Associate Professor of Hebrew and Old 
Testament Literature. Northwestern University, B.A.; Mc- 
Cormick Theological Seminary, B.D.; Johns Hopkins Univer- 
sity, Ph.D. 



Robert Lee Kelley, Jr., Associate Professor of Biblical 
Languages. University of Pittsburgh, A.B.; Pittsburgh-Xenia 
Theological Seminary, B.D.; Princeton Theological Seminary, 
ThJVL 



t^*' 











Vke faculty 



Robert Clyde Johnson, Professor of Systematic Theology. 
Davidson College, B.S.; Union Theological Seminary (N. Y.), 
B.D. and S.T.M.; Columbia University, M.A.; Vanderbilt 
University, Ph.D. 



Howard M. Jamieson, Jr., Associate Professor of Biblical 
Theology and Dean of Students. Monmouth College, A.B.; 
Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary, Th.B.; University of 



Pittsburgh, M.A. 



John M. Bald, Associate 
Muskingum College, A.B. 
Seminary, Th.B. and Th.M. 



Professor of Christian Ethics. 
Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological 



Elwyn Allen Smith, Professor of Church History. Whea- 
ton College, A.B.; Yale Divinity School, B.D.; Princeton 
Theological Seminary, Th.M.; Harvard University, Ph.D. 



Walter E. Wiest, 
Religion. Lafayette 
Seminary, Th.B. 



Associate Professor of Philosophy of 
College, A.B.; Princeton Theological 



7» *C' 



mrh 



Malcolm S. Alexander, Associate Professor of Pastoral 
Theology and Director of Field Education. University of 
Southern California, A.B. and LL.B.; Pittsburgh-Xenia Theo- 
logical Seminary, B.D. 



Vke tf-aeultif 



Harold E. Scott, Associate Professor of Homiletics and As- 
sistant Director of Field Education. Sterling College, B.A.; 
Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary, B.D. 



Howard L. Ralston, Assistant Professor of Church Music. 
Muskingum College, Mus.B.; Curtis Institute of Music, 
A.A.G.O. 



William A. Nicholson, Associate Professor of Homiletics. 
Washington & Jefferson College, A.B.; Western Theological 
Seminary, S-T.B. 




James S. Irvine, Assistant Professor of Bibliography. Wash- 
ington and Jefferson College, A.B.; Western Theological Sem- ^^'P^ r ^/* 
inary, B.D.; Carnegie Institute of Technology, M.L.S.; Johns #■#*' 
Hopkins University, Ph.D. ^^~* 



J. Gordon Chamberlin, Associate Professor of Christian 
Education. Cornell College in Iowa, A.B.; Union Theological 
Seminary (N. Y.), B.D.; Columbia University, Ed.D. 



Gayraud S. Wilmore, Jr., Assistant Professor of Social 
Ethics. Lincoln University, A.B.; Lincoln Seminary, B.D.; 
Temple University School of Theology, S.T.M. 




7 he faculty 




Arlan P. Dohrenburg, Assistant Professor of Speech. Frank- 
lin and Marshall College, A.B.; Princeton Theological Sem- 
inary, B.D. 







Edward D. Grohman, Instructor in Old Testament. Grove 
City College, A.B.; Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary, 
B.D.: Johns Hopkins University, Ph.D. 



David G. Buttrick, Instructor in Church and Ministry. 
Haverford College, B.A.; Union Theological Seminary (New 
York), B.D. 



10 



BOARD OF DIRECTORS 
Officers 

Rev. W. Bruce Wilson, D.D., President 

Rev. Frederick B. Speakman, D.D., Vice President 

Mr. George D. Lockhart, Secretary 

Rev. James T. Vorhis, D.D., Assistant Secretary 

Mr. T. J. Gillespie, Jr., Treasurer 

Mr. John G. Smithyman, C.P.A., Assistant Tuasurer 

Mr. Henry C. Herchenroether, Jr., Counsel 

Members 

Term Expires May 1962 

Mr. Wilson A. Campbell Sewickley, Pa. 

Retired 

Mr. T. J. Gillespie, Jr Pittsburgh, Pa. 

President and Treasurer, Lockhart Iron and Steel Company 

Rev. J. Hubert Henderson, D.D Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Pastor, J. M. Wallace Memorial United Presbyterian Church 

Mr. William R. Jackson Pittsburgh, Pa. 

President, Pittsburgh-Des Moines Steel Company 

Rev. John C. Lorimer, D.D. ..... New Wilmington, Pa. 

Retired 

Rev. Henry A. Riddle, D.D., LL.D. ..... Lewistown, Pa 

Retired 

Rev. Charles P. Robshaw, S.T.D., D.D., LL.D. . . . Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Pastor, East Liberty Presbyterian Church 

Mr. James H. Rogers Latrobe, Pa. 

Chairman, Latrobe Die Casting Company 

Rev. Howard C. Scharfe, D.D., LL.D Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Pastor, Shadyside Presbyterian Church 

Mr. H. Parker Sharp ........ Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Vice President and General Counsel, Jones & Laughlin Steel Corporation 

Rev. Samuel C. Weir, D.D Detroit, Mich. 

Synod Executive 

Rev. W. Bruce Wilson, D.D. ...... Youngstown, Ohio 

Pastor, Liberty United Presbyterian Church 

Term Expires May 1963 

Mr. A. C. Amsler Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Retired — Westinghouse Electric Corporation 

Rev. John B. Barker, D.D Canton, Ohio 

Pastor, Calvary Presbyterian Church 

Mr. Frank H. Davis, LL.D Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Retired 

11 



Rev. Robert H. French, D.D Des Moines, Iowa 

Synod Executive 

Mr. Henry C. Herchenroether, Jr. .... Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Attorney, Alter, Wright, and Barron 

Mr. W. Kenneth Menke Pittsburgh, Pa. 

President, Pittsburgh Chemical Company 

Rev. Don P. Montgomery, D.D. ..... Youngstown, Ohio 

Pastor, Pleasant Grove United Presbyterian Church 

Mr. William H. Rea Pittsburgh, Pa. 

President, Oliver Tyrone Corporation 

Rev. Robert H. Stephens, D.D. ..... Summit, N. J. 

Pastor, Central Presbyterian Church 

Mr. James W. Vicary ......... Erie, Pa. 

President, Ervite Corporation 

Rev. Robert R. Vogelsang ....... Latrobe, Pa. 

Pastor, Latrobe Presbyterian Church 

Rev. Walter R. Young, D.D Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Pastor, Second United Presbyterian Church of Wilkinsburg 



Term Expires May 1964 
Mr. Robert L. Becker ....... Pittsburgh, Pa. 

President, Wear-Ever Aluminum, Inc. 

Mr. Earle M. Craig Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Retired — Chairman of the Board, Valvoline Oil Co. 

Rev. Richard W. Graves, D.D., Litt.D. . . . New Wilmington, Pa. 
Pastor, United Presbyterian Church 

Mr. Milton J. Hein New York, N. Y. 

Assistant Comptroller, Board of National Missions 

Mr. George D. Lockhart ....... Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Attorney, Kirkpatrick, Pomeroy, Lockhart and Johnson 

Rev. W. Paul Ludwig, Ph.D Washington, D. C. 

Pastor, Chevy Chase Presbyterian Church 

Mr. John R. McCune, Jr Pittsburgh, Pa. 

President, Consolidated Lamp and Glass Co. 

Rev. Walter L. Moser, Ph.D., D.D Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Stated Clerk, Pittsburgh Presbytery 

Mr. Alexander P. Reed, LL.D Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Attorney, Alter, Wright, and Barron 

Rev. John Coventry Smith, D.D., LL.D New York, N. Y. 

General Secretary, Commission on Ecumenical Mission and Relations 

•Rev. Frederick Bruce Speakman, D.D. ..... Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Pastor, Third Presbyterian Church 

Rev. C. T. R. Yeates, D.D., LL.D Des Moines, Iowa 

Pastor, Westminster United Presbyterian Church 

12 



COMMHTEES OF THE BOARD OF DIRECTORS 

The Executive Committee 

Mr. A. C. Amsler Mr. George D. Lockhart 

Mr. H. Parker Sharp Rev. Frederick B. Speakman, D.D. 

Mr. T. J. Gillespie, Jr. Rev. Samuel C. Weir, D.D. 

Rev. W. Bruce Wilson, D.D. 

The Education Committee 

Rev. Richard W. Graves, D.D., Litt.D. Rev. Don P. Montgomery, D.D. 
Rev. J. Hubert Henderson, D.D. Rev. Walter L. Moser, Ph.D., D.D. 

Rev. W. Paul Ludwig, Ph.D. Rev. Frederick B. Speakman, D.D. 

Rev. Robert R. Vogelsang 

The Finance Committee 

Mr. Wilson A. Campbell Mr. Alexander P. Reed, LL.D. 

Mr. Earle M. Craig Mr. James H. Rogers 

Mr. T. J. Gillespie, Jr. Rev. Howard C. Scharfe, D.D., LL.D. 

Mr. H. Parker Sharp 

The Nominations Committee 

Rev. Robert H. French, D.D. Mr. James W. Vicary 

Mr. William H. Rea Rev. Samuel C. Weir, D.D. 

Rev. Charles P. Robshaw, S.T.D., D.D., LL.D. 
Rev. John Coventry Smith, D.D., LL.D. 

The Property Committee 

Mr. A. C. Amsler Mr. George D. Lockhart 

Mr. Frank H. Davis, LL.D. Mr. John R. McCune, Jr. 

Mr. William R. Jackson Mr. W. Kenneth Menke 

Rev. Walter R. Young, D.D. 



13 



THE FACULTY 



The Rev. Donald G. Miller, S.T.M., M.A., Ph.D. (New York University) 
President-Elect 

The Rev. James Leon Kelso, A.M., Th.M., Th.D. (Xenia), D.D., LL.D. 
Professor of Old Testament History and Biblical Archaeology 

The Rev. William F. Orr, Th.M., Ph.D. (Hartford), D.D. 
Professor of New Testament Literature and Exegesis 

The Rev. Theophilus Mills Taylor, Ph.D. (Yale), D.D. 

Professor, The John McNaugher Chair of New Testament Literature 
and Exegesis 

The Rev. Frank Dixon McCloy, Jr., A.M., Ph.D. (Harvard), D.D. 
Associate Professor of Church History 

The Rev. Walter R. Clyde, S.T.M., Ph.D. (Hartford) 
Professor of Christian Mission 

The Rev. David Noel Freedman, Ph.D. (Johns Hopkins) 

Professor, The James Anderson Kelso Chair of Hebrew and 
Old Testament Literature 

The Rev. Gordon E. Jackson, Th.M., Ph.D. (Chicago), D.D., Dean of the Seminary 
Hugh Thomson Kerr Professor of Pastoral Theology 

The Rev. John H. Gerstner, Th.M., Ph.D. (Harvard), D.D. 
Professor of Church History 

Miss Bessie M. Burrows, M.A. (Columbia) 

Assistant Professor of Christian Education and Registrar 

The Rev. James A. Walther, Th.D. (Victoria) 

Associate Professor of New Testament Literature 

The Rev. Sidney 0. Hills, Ph.D. (Johns Hopkins), Recording Secretary 
Associate Professor of Hebrew and Old Testament Literature 

The Rev. Robert Lee Kelley, Jr., Th.M. (Princeton) 
Associate Professor of Biblical Languages 

The Rev. Robert Clyde Johnson, M.A., S.T.M., Ph.D. (Vanderbilt), D.D. 
Professor of Systematic Theology 

The Rev. Howard M. Jamieson, Jr., M.A. (Pittsburgh), D.D. 
Associate Professor of Biblical Theology and Dean of Students 

The Rev. John M. Bald, Th.M., (Pittsburgh-Xenia), D.D., Alt. Recording Secretary 
Associate Professor of Christian Ethics 

The Rev. Elwyn Allen Smith, Th.M., Ph.D. (Harvard) 
Professor of Church History 

The Rev. Walter E. Wiest, Th.B. (Princeton) 
Associate Professor of Philosophy of Religion 

The Rev. Malcolm S. Alexander, LL.B. (Southern California), B.D. 

Associate Professor of Pastoral Theology and Director of Field Education 

The Rev. Harold E. Scott, B.D. (Pittsburgh-Xenia), D.D. 

Associate Professor of Homiletics and Assistant Director of Field Education 

14 



Mr. Howard L. Ralston, Mus.B., A.A.G.O. 

Assistant Professor of Church Music 

The Rev. William A. Nicholson, S.T.B. (Western), D.D. 
Associate Professor of Homiletics 

The Rev. James S. Irvine, B.D., M.L.S., Ph.D. (Johns Hopkins) 
Assistant Professor of Bibliography 

The Rev. J. Gordon Chamberlin, B.D., Ed.D. (Columbia), D.D. 
Associate Professor of Christian Education 

The Rev. Gayraud S. Wilmore, Jr., S.T.M. (Temple), D.D. 
Assistant Professor of Social Ethics 

The Rev. Arlan P. Dohrenburg, B.D. (Princeton) 
Assistant Professor of Speech 

The Rev. Edward D. Grohman, Ph.D. (Johns Hopkins) 
Instructor in Old Testament 

The Rev. David G. Buttrick, B.D. (Union, N. Y.) 
Instructor in Church and Ministry 

Mr. Herbert B. Huffmon, B.D. (McCormick) 

Teaching Fellow in the Biblical Division, 1961-1962 

The Rev. George H. Kehm, S.T.M. (Harvard) 

Teaching Fellow in the History and Theology Division, 1961-1962 

Miss Margaret Miller, M.A. 
Guest Instructor in Speech 

The Rev. G. Mason Cochran, D.D. 
Guest Instructor in Speech 

The Rev. Orville L. Kuhn, Ed.M., D.D. 
Guest Instructor in Audio-Visuals 

The Rev. Frederick Bruce Speakman, M.A., D.D. 
Guest Instructor in Homiletics 

The Rev. Clifford E. Davis, Ph.D. 

Guest Instructor in Christian Education 



EMERITUS PROFESSORS 

The Rev. Albert Henry Baldinger, D.D. 
Emeritus Professor of Practical Theology 

The Rev. Clifford Edward Barbour, Ph.D., D.D., LL.D. 
President Emeritus 

The Rev. David E. Culley, Ph.D., D.D. 

Emeritus Professor of Hebrew and Old Testament Literature 

The Rev. Robert McNary Karr, D.D. 

Emeritus Professor of Systematic and Biblical Theology 

The Rev. George Anderson Long, D.D., LL.D., Litt.D. 

President Emeritus and Emeritus Professor of English Bible 

The Rev. Henry A. Riddle, D.D., LL.D. 
President Emeritus 

The Rev. Gaius Jackson Slosser, Ph.D., F.R.Hist.S. 

Emeritus Professor of Ecclesiastical History and History of Doctrine 

15 



COMMITTEES OF THE FACULTY 

The Curriculum Committee 

Mr. Orr, Chairman 

Mr. Gerstner 

Mr. Alexander 

Mr. Jackson, Mr. Irvine, and Miss Burrows, ex officio 



Mr. Wiest 

Mr. Freedman 

Mr. Clyde 



The Admissions Committee 

Mr. Taylor, Chairman 

Mr. Nicholson 

Mr. Jamieson 

Mr. Alexander, Mr. Jackson, and Mr. Idler, ex officio 



Mr. Johnson 

Mr. Smith 

Mr. Davis, Consultant 



The Graduate Education Committee 

Mr. Johnson, Chairman Mr. Gerstner 

Mr. Jackson Mr. Freedman 

Mr. Smith Mr. Taylor 



Mr. Bald, Chairman 

Mr. Orr 

Mr. Walther 

Mr. Jackson, ex officio 



The Committee on Standings 



Mr. Jamieson 

Mr. Johnson 

Mr. Grohman 

Mr. Chamberlin 



Mr. McCloy, Chairman 

Mr. Buttrick 

Mr. Hills 

Mr. Jackson, ex officio 



The Library Committee 



Mr. Kelso 

Mr. Irvine 

Mr. Gerstner 



The Field Education Committee 

Mr. Chamberlin, Chairman Mr. Jamieson 

Mr. Orr Mr. Scott 

Mr. Bald Mr. Nicholson 

Mr. Alexander and Mr. Jackson, ex officio Mr. Wiest 



The Conference Hour and Special Events Committee 



Mr. Freedman, Chairman 

Mr. Taylor 

Mr. Grohman 

Mr. Jackson and Mr. Sigler, ex officio 



Mr. McCloy 

Mr. Kelley 

Mr. Buttrick 



Mr. Scott, Chairman 

Mr. Dohrenburg 

Mr. Jackson, ex officio 



The Worship Committee 



Mr. Clyde 
Mr. Walther 
Mr. Ralston 



The Student-Faculty Committee 



Mr. Jamieson, Chairman 
Miss Burrows 
Mr. Kelso 



Mr. Ralston 

Mr. Nicholson 

Mr. Wilmore 



The Publications Committee 

Mr. Walther, Chairman Mr. Dohrenburg 

Mr. Wiest Mr. Kelley 

Mr. Vorhis and Mr. Sigler, ex officio Mr. Bald 



16 



The Church and Society Committee 



Mr. Smith, Chairman 
Mr. Wilmore 
Mr. Scott 



The Summer Programs Committee 



Mr. Jackson, Chairman 
Mr. Clyde 
Mr. Freedman 



Mr. Wiest 
Mr. Nicholson 



Mr. Gerstner 

Mr. Vorhis 

Mr. Bald 



SPECIAL LECTURES — 1961-1962 

Dr. Joseph Haroutunian (Convocation Speaker) 

Cyrus H. McCormick Professor of Systematic Theology 
McCormick Theological Seminary. Chicago 

The Right Reverend Chandu Ray 
Assistant Bishop of Lahore 
President, The National Christian Council of Pakistan 

Dr. Roger L. Shinn 

Professor of Applied Christianity 
Union Theological Seminary, New York 

Dr. Claude Welch 

Professor of Religious Thought 
University of Pennsylvania. Philadelphia 

Dr. Franklin H. Littell 

Professor of Church. History 
Perkins School of Theology, Dallas 

Bishop Anders Th.S. Nygren (Elliott Lecturer) 
(Emeritus) Professor of Systematic Theology 
University of Lund, Lund, Sweden 
Resident Scholar at the Ecumenical Institute, Evanston, 111. 

Mr. Paul D. McKelvey 
Moderator 
The United Presbyterian Church in the United States of America 

Dr. Will Herberg 

Professor of Judaic Studies and Social Philosophy 
Drew University, Madison, New Jersey 

The Rev. George H. Tavard 
Professor of Theology 
Mount Mercy College, Pittsburgh 



Dr. Clifford E. Barbour 
President 
Pittsburgh Theological Seminary 



17 



ADMINISTRATIVE STAFF 



The Rev. Donald G. Miller, Ph.D. 

President-Elect 

The Rev. Gordon E. Jackson, Ph.D., D.D. 
Dean of the Seminary 

The Rev. James T. Vorhis, Th.M., D.D. 
Business Manager 

Mr. John G. Smithyman, B.B.A., C.P.A. 

Comptroller 

The Rev. Howard M. Jamieson, Jr., M.A., D.D. 
Dean of Students 

Miss Bessie M. Burrows, M.A. 
Registrar 

The Rev. Charles C. W. Idler, B.D. 

Director of Admissions 

The Rev, Richard E. Sigler, B.D. 

Director of Development and Alumni Relations 

The Rev. James S. Irvine, M.L.S., Ph.D. 
Librarian 

Miss Evelyn C. Edie, M.S. in L.S. 
Assistant Librarian 

Miss Mary Jane Kann, M.S. in LJ3. 
Assistant Librarian 



18 



THE ALUMNI ASSOCIATION 



OFFICERS 

President Cuyler N. Ferguson '30 

Vice President Ira O. Reed '52 

Secretary Cornelius S. Thomas '31 

Treasurer John A. Stuart '37 

Chairman of Necrology Committee Walter R. Young '33 

Nominating Committee J. A. Gillespie '54 

J. T. Brownlee '33 

Stephen A. Polley '54 

Director of Alumni Relations Richard E. Siglef '52 

The Alumni Association, now numbering more than 2,000 mem- 
bers, is composed of the former students, graduates and post-graduates 
of Pittsburgh Theological Seminary and its antecedent seminaries. 
The purposes of the Association are to deepen the friendships begun 
in seminary and to afford opportunity for fellowship among all its 
graduates; to cooperate with the Seminary in enlisting the interests 
of young people in church vocations and recruiting likely and able 
candidates; to support actively the cause of theological education 
and of the Seminary in particular in its expanding needs to meet the 
demands of the future; and lastly, to have a sympathetic interest in 
the life and work of the Seminary as represented in its student body 
md faculty. 

The Association meets annually on the afternoon of commence- 
ment day to conduct such business as is necessary and proper to 
elect officers. This is followed by the alumni dinner, after which the 
alumni are invited to join in the academic procession of the com- 
mencement exercises. 

Regional meetings of alumni are held periodically and a dinner 
at the annual meeting of The General Assembly is another highlight 
of the year's activities. 

THE PURPOSE OF THE SEMINARY 

The purpose of the Pittsburgh Theological Seminary as denned 
in the Constitution is to educate suitable persons for the work of 
the Christian ministry and for other fields of Christian service at 
the highest possible level of educational competence. For the at- 
tainment of this purpose, the Seminary shall provide instruction in 
the knowledge of the Word of God, contained in the Scriptures of 
the Old and New Testaments, and of the doctrine, order and institutes 
of worship taught in the Scriptures and summarily exhibited in the 
Constitution of The United Presbyterian Church in the United States 
of America; and shall impart to its students the various disciplines 
by which they may be properly prepared for service in the work of 
the Church; and shall cultivate in them spiritual gifts and the life 
of true godliness ; all to the end that there may be trained a succession 
of able, faithful, and devoted ministers of the gospel and other 
Christian workers. 

19 



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PITTSBURGH SEMINARY . . . 

. . . A New Beginning 

The Pittsburgh Theological Seminary was created in 1959 by 
the merger of two institutions which had lived apart since 1825: 
Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary (United Presbyterian Church 
of North America) and Western Theological Seminary (Presbyterian 
Church, U.S.A.). 

Pittsburgh-Xenia Seminary was formed in 1930 with the union 
of Pittsburgh (Associate Reformed Synod) and Xenia (Associate) 
Seminaries. The Xenia branch had been founded in 1794 in western 
Pennsylvania but had spent most of its life in Ohio and Missouri. 
The Pittsburgh branch originated in New York in 1805 with the 
founding of a seminary (Associate Reformed Synod) by John Mitchell 
Mason, perhaps the greatest personality of United Presbyterian 
history. 

Western Seminary, established legally in 1825- by the General 
Assembly of the Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.), began with classical 
academies founded by Joseph Smith (1785) and John McMillan 
(1787) in Washington, Pa. It was indeed a "western" seminary in 
1825, whose task was to furnish a ministry for the rapidly opening 
western territories along the Ohio River. 

The union in 1958 of the United Presbyterian Church of North 
America with the Presbyterian Church in the United States of Amer- 
ica and the subsequent merger of Pittsburgh-Xenia and Western 
Seminaries were possible because of ancient bonds: the Bible, the 
reformers, and the Scottish experience of witness and suffering. 
Church divisions in Scotland were reproduced in America. Some 
Scots joined New England Calvinists (Presbyterian Church, U.S.A.) 
while others preferred the Associate Synod, the Reformed Synod, 
the Associate Reformed Church, or the United Presbyterian Church 
which united the great bulk of these memberships in 1858. Since 
1800 the direction has been steadily toward common witness with a 
resulting joining of schools. Pittsburgh Theological Seminary is 
the issue of this growing fellowship in theological education. 

The new seminary has a promising future. It has an exciting 
new curriculum, described on page 44. It has hopes of becoming a 
fine theological university, going beyond the B.D. curriculum to offer 
such diverse programs as graduate work at the Master's and doctoral 
levels, a lay school of theology, continuing education for the parish 
minister, and careful training in specialized ministries. 

21 



PITTSBURGH . . . 

Our Environment 

The City of Pittsburgh is the workshop of America. Its pop- 
ulation includes people of every nationality, profession, and skill. 

Together with the contiguous towns, it is one of the great com- 
mercial centers of the world. Its population includes people of every 
nationality, profession, and skill. It affords unexcelled opportunities 
for the study of social, economic, political, and racial problems. It 
is in itself an education to live and work in such a city and catch 
the pulse of its busy life. Moreover, the benefit of contact with 
those engaged in the varied forms of work for social, moral, and 
religious betterment, and of personal experience in such efforts, is 
evident to all. 

The cultural and educational life of Pittsburgh is no less rich. 
The University of Pittsburgh, Carnegie Institute of Technology, 
Duquesne University, and Chatham College are renowned institu- 
tions with excellent facilities and programs. The Carnegie Museum 
and Carnegie free libraries, the great university and college libraries, 
offer resources to all students. 

The Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra, the Pittsburgh Opera 
Society, various concert series, and choral societies, present many 
musical events each season. The Pittsburgh Chapter of the American 
Guild of Organists is a flourishing organization and stimulates wide 
interest in the best of church music. 

Buhl Planetarium, one of six planetaria in the United States, is 
the most modern in the world. It furnishes scientific and astronom- 
ical exhibits in addition to regular shows displaying configurations 
of the stars. 

Churches of all types are to be found, ranging from the large 
urban congregation to the small rural or industrial mission. The 
major historic denominations afford students opportunities for wide 
acquaintance with contemporary religious life in its worship and its 
work. Some of the nation's foremost preachers occupy pulpits in 
the area. 

Pittsburgh Presbytery is the largest presbytery in the United 
Presbyterian Church, U.S.A. Within its bounds are two hundred 
twenty-eight churches with a total membership of about one hundred 
thirty thousand. Of these, about half have more than five hundred 
members each; and mission work is conducted in over twenty differ- 
ent places. Within two hundred miles of Pittsburgh live one-fifth 
of the United Presbyterians in this country. Located in Pittsburgh 
also are many churches of other denominations, with which the 
Seminary maintains cordial relations. 

23 








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24 



THE SEMINARY CAMPUS 



LOCATION OF THE SEMINARY 

The campus of Pittsburgh Theological Seminary consists of 
about ten acres, located at 616 North Highland Avenue, directly 
opposite Pittsburgh's large Peabody High School. It is in a residen- 
tial area between the East Liberty business district and Highland 
Park, and only a few minutes by automobile or street car from 
the University of Pittsburgh. This spacious and beautifully land- 
scaped site was given to the Seminary in 1951 by the heirs of the 
late H. Lee Mason, Jr. 

Frequent street car and bus service connects the Seminary with 
downtown Pittsburgh. Students coming by train or bus should 
take a Highland Avenue street car, number 73, on Fifth Avenue, 
and leave the car immediately in front of the entrance to the 
Seminary. Students traveling by automobile may follow Highland 
Avenue to the campus. 

THE SEMINARY BUILDINGS 

A new, modern seminary plant is valued at about $5,000,000. 
The main buildings are of American Colonial design. They are con- 
structed of Hampton Court Colonial red brick with Indiana limestone 
trim and are fireproof throughout. 

The George A. Long Administration Building occupies the 
central position on the campus. It provides six classrooms, four 
seminar rooms, faculty and administration offices, a reception room, 
a faculty conference room, a Bible Lands Museum, and an historical 
repository of the United Presbyterian Church in the United States 
of America. 

The McCune Chapel is an integral part of the main school 
building occupying a wing to the rear of the main entrance. It has 
a seating capacity of 310. The two-manual Schantz organ is a 
memorial to the United Presbyterian men and women who died 
in World War II. The memorial was established by the young 
people of our church. 

The Library, described on page 27, is also an integral part of 
the Administration Building. 



ACCOMMODATIONS FOR MEN 

The John McNaugher Memorial Hall, located to the right of 
the Administration Building, is connected with it by covered passage- 
ways on the first and second floor levels. It accommodates 88 men 

25 



in single and double rooms. The dining hall and kitchen, a student 
lounge, two guest rooms, and an apartment for the matron are 
provided on the first floor. 

The George C. Fisher Memorial Hall accommodates 80 men in 
single rooms. It provides a student lounge on each floor, a game 
room and a snack room on the ground floor, and six apartments for 
employees or married students. 

The Seminary provides furniture and bedding, including sheets, 
pillow cases, and one blanket for each bed. Students should bring 
extra blankets for their own use. Students will also furnish towels 
for their own use and provide for the laundering of these. All other 
dormitory laundry work will be furnished by the Seminary. 

Special arrangements may be made by students for summer 
occupancy of dormitory rooms. 



HOUSING FOR MARRIED STUDENTS 
The Samuel A. Fulton Memorial Hall, an apartment-dormitory 
for married students, provides eighteen efficiency and twenty-one 
two-room apartments. Each unit includes a kitchenette and a bath. 
A storage locker in the basement is assigned to each family. Each 
apartment is fully equipped with desk, bookcase, table, chairs, 
davenport-bed, a chest of drawers, wardrobe, refrigerator and electric 
stove. Students must provide bedding, linens, silverware, china, 
cooking utensils, curtains, lamps and rugs. Laundry facilities (coin 
meter) are available in the basement. 

A six-room fully furnished apartment for the housing of a mis- 
sionary family on furlough is provided in Fulton Hall. It is made 
available, through cooperation with the Commission on Ecumenical 
Mission and Relations, to missionaries seeking fuller preparation for 
service on return to their fields. 

The Sheridan Avenue Apartments are located on campus at 519 
Sheridan Avenue. This three-story building contains six unfurnished 
apartments for couples with children. Washers and dryers may be 
installed in the basement. 

Duplex Apartments. There are ten unfurnished duplex apart- 
ments on the North Highland Avenue campus for students with 
families. 

Special arrangements may be made for summer occupancy of 
apartments. 

ACCOMMODATIONS FOR WOMEN 
The Women's Residence House accommodates 16 women. It is 
equipped with a lounge and a kitchenette. 

26 



THE SEMINARY LIBRARY 

The library of Pittsburgh Theological Seminary offers a variety 
of materials for theological study and for historical research. The 
book collection contains over 100,000 books, housed in a wing of 
the administration building. Approximately 2,500 books are added 
to the collection each year to keep the seminary abreast of current 
theological interests and cultural developments. Some 200 of the 
latest periodicals embracing Biblical, theological, historical, and 
general fields of interest are located in the service area of the library. 
The extensive reference collection is located in the reading room 
which accommodates 76 persons. The main body of materials is 
located in the stack room which also contains carrels for individual 
study. Microfilm readers are available. 

The following special collections augment the book resources: 

The John M. Mason Memorial Collection 

The research area of the library contains this priceless collection 
of classical theological works dating from the Reformation period. 
This catalogued collection is housed to the left of the library en- 
trance in the John M. Mason Memorial Room. 

The James Warrington Collection of Hymnology 

Several thousand valuable hymn and psalm books which came 
from the estate of James Warrington, Philadelphia, provide research 
materials for scholars of American and English hymnody. Mr. 
Warrington minutely analyzed the works by composer, meter, tune, 
place, author, title, etc. 

The Nina S. Brittain Collection 

Through the generosity of Frank J. Brittain, Esq., of Erie, 
Pennsylvania, the sum of #5000 was used for the purchase of theo- 
logical and related works which are known as the Nina S. Brittain 
Collection. 

The Clarence J. Williamson Church History Collection 

In 1958 endowment funds were established, income of which is 
to be used for the purchase of books in Church History and closely 
related subjects. These books are in memory of Dr. Clarence J. 
Williamson, a graduate of Pittsburgh Seminary, for fifty-one years 
a minister in the United Presbyterian Church of North America, 
and for eighteen years Professor of Church History and Government 
in The Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary. 

27 



Historical Collections 

A vault of the library contains the Minutes and other records 
of Associate, Associate Reformed, and United Presbyterian congre- 
gations, presbyteries, synods, and General Assemblies. The library 
is also the depository for the Upper Ohio Valley Historical Society 
and Pittsburgh Presbytery of The United Presbyterian Church in 
the U. S. A. 

Library Hours 

The library is open about 70 hours a week and is available to 
all without restriction of creed, subject to the rules of the library. 
The hours are 8:00 A.M. to 5:00 P.M., 7:00 to 10:30 P.M., Monday 
through Friday; 9:00 A.M. to 3:00 P.M. Saturday. When the sem- 
inary is not in session, the library is open 9:00 to 5 : 00 P.M., Monday 
through Friday. 

A New Library 

A new library, for which funds have been provided by the Sarah 
Mellon Scaife and the Richard K. Mellon Foundations, is being 
planned; construction will begin during 1962 or 1963. 




Architect's Conception of New Library 

28 



THE BIBLE LANDS MUSEUM 

The Pittsburgh Theological Seminary is outstanding in its 
activity in archaeological research of Bible times in ancient Palestine. 
In conjunction with the American School of Oriental Research at 
Jerusalem, it has conducted explorations at Sodom and Gomorrah 
in 1924, excavations at Kirjath-Sepher in 1926, 1928, 1930, 1932, 
excavations at Bethel in 1934, at New Testament Jericho and Nitla 
in 1950, and Bethel in 1954, 1957, and 1960. 

This work was inaugurated by the late Dr. M. G. Kyle, for- 
merly Professor of Biblical Archaeology. It is now being carried on 
by Professor James L. Kelso. (The latter also served as Director 
of the American School of Oriental Research in Jerusalem, 1949-50). 
Members of the faculty and students often participate in these digs. 
Much of the Seminary's share of the antiquities excavated is now on 
exhibit in the Bible Lands Museum. Numerous other valuable pieces 
are awaiting special preparation before being placed on exhibition. 
Special gifts are being constantly added to the museum by interested 
friends. 

These objects all illustrate in the most striking way the life of 
the people of Bible lands, and so become of great value for interpre- 
tation as well as for apologetics. They illumine and corroborate the 
Biblical narratives. Thus an ineffaceable impression is made upon 
the student of the trustworthiness of the Biblical record, for only 
real events leave anything to be dug up out of the ground. The ob- 
jects in the museum are used constantly in the classes of the Seminary. 
Opportunity is also afforded the public to visit the museum at ap- 
pointed times. 



30 



LIFE ON THE CAMPUS 



RELIGIOUS LIFE 

Provision is made for the maintenance and development of the 
religious life. There are various gatherings for united worship in- 
cluding daily chapel services under the direction of the faculty, serv- 
ices of Holy Communion, and special convocations. Family worship 
is conducted by the students daily after the evening meal. 



THE STUDENT ASSOCIATION 

THE EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE— 1961-62 

President .......... Samuel Douglas 

Vice President ......... William Alter 

Secretary .......... John Wineman 

Treasurer .......... Peter Hauser 

Married Students' Representative ...... Ronald Kinsey 

Single Students' Representative ...... Aaron Hastie 

Off Campus Student Representative ..... Clyde Billings 

Committee Chairmen: 

Curriculum ........ Allen McCallum 

Field Education ......... Neil Brown 

Conference Hour ........ Byron Leasure 

Worship ......... David MacFarlane 

Student-Faculty . Allan Kinloch 

Publications ........ Robert Hostetter 

Church and Society Eugene Turner 

THE WEBSTER MEMORIAL FORUM 

The Webster Memorial Forum was named for its first sponsor, 
Dr. John Hunter Webster, formerly Professor of New Testament 
Language and Literature, who died in 1933. The forum is a student 
organization which sponsors various speakers throughout the aca- 
demic year. 

MUSIC AT THE SEMINARY 

The Seminary has a Men's Choir and a Mixed Chorus, both un- 
der the direction of Mr. Howard L. Ralston, Assistant Professor of 
Church Music. Auditions for membership in the Men's Choir are 
held in September. This group, carefully chosen and of limited num- 
ber, sings for daily chapel services and represents the Seminary from 
time to time in churches within easy traveling distance. A more ex- 
tensive tour is undertaken in the spring when the choir presents a 
varied program of sacred music in churches and colleges. 

The Mixed Chorus is maintained for all those of the seminary 
community who enjoy singing. This group meets on Tuesday eve- 
nings and presents a program at Christmas and in the spring, and 
sings at commencement. There are many opportunities throughout 
the year for soloists and instrumentalists. 

31 



ACCREDITATION OF THE SEMINARY 

The Seminary is an accredited member of the American Associ- 
ation of Theological Schools, and has had this standing from the 
time of the adoption of the Association's accrediting system in 1938. 



ADMISSIONS 

Pittsburgh Theological Seminary, as a higher educational insti- 
tution, offers work on a graduate school level. This presupposes a 
college or university B.A. or B.S. degree with a substantial founda- 
tion in the liberal arts. It also assumes that the student is ready to 
approach theological education with an open, searching attitude. 
Pittsburgh Seminary seeks that man or woman who is committed to 
the Christian faith, emotionally suited for work in the Church, and 
intellectually capable of the most rigorous kind of academic discipline. 



PRE-SEMINARY STUDIES 

College courses prior to theological seminary should provide the 
cultural and intellectual foundations essential to an effective theo- 
logical education. They should issue in at least three broad kinds 
of attainment. 

1. The college work of a pre-seminary student should result in 
the ability to use certain tools of the educated man : 

(a) The ability to write and speak English clearly and cor- 
rectly. English composition should have this as a spe- 
cific purpose, but this purpose should also be cultivated 
in all written work. 

(b) The ability to think clearly. In some persons, this abil- 
ity is cultivated through courses in philosophy or spe- 
cifically in logic. In others it is cultivated by the use of 
scientific method, or by dealing with critical problems 
in connection with literary and historical documents. 

(c) The ability to read at least one foreign language and in 
some circumstances more than one. 

2. The college work of a pre-seminary student should result in 
increased understanding of the world in which he lives: 

(a) The world of men and ideas. This includes knowledge 
of English literature, philosophy, and psychology. 

(b) The world of nature. This is provided by knowledge 
of the natural sciences, including laboratory work. 

(c) The world of human affairs. This is aided by knowledge 
of history and the social sciences. 

32 



3. The college work of the pre-seminary student should result 
in a sense of achievement: 

(a) The degree of his mastery of his field of study is more 
important than the credits and grades which he ac- 
cumulates. 

(b) The sense of achievement may be encouraged through 
academic concentration, or through "honors" work, or 
through other plans for increasingly independent work 
with as much initiative on the student's part as he is able 
to use with profit. 

Desirable College Curriculum 

The American Association of Theological Schools has proposed 
the following college curriculum for pre-ministerial students. This 
is regarded by the Association as a minimum list of fields of study 
with which the student should have acquaintance before beginning 
seminary study. It is suggested that a student acquire a total of 90 
semester hours, or complete approximately three fourths of his college 
work, in the areas listed below although there is no requirement that 
this be rigidly adhered to. The liberal arts background is felt to 
provide the best foundation for seminary work and for later profes- 
sional studies. 

English — literature, composition, speech and related studies. 
At least 6 semesters. 

History — ancient, modern European, and American. 
At least 3 semesters. 

Philosophy — orientation in history, content and method. 
At least 3 semesters. 

Natural sciences — preferably physics, chemistry and biology. 
At least 2 semesters. 

Social sciences — psychology, sociology, economics, political science, education. 
At least 6 semesters, including at least 1 semester of psychology. 

Foreign languages — one or more of the following linguistic avenues to man's 
thought and tools of scholarly research: Latin, Greek, Hebrew, German, 
French. Students who anticipate postgraduate studies are urged to under- 
take these disciplines early in their training as opportunity offers. 
At least 4 semesters. 

Religion — a thorough knowledge of the content of the Bible is indispensable 
together with an introduction to the major religious traditions and theo- 
logical problems in the context of the principal aspects of human culture 
outlined above. The pre-seminary student may well seek counsel of the 
seminary of his choice in order most profitably to use the resources of 
his college. 

At least 3 semesters. 
Of the various possible areas of concentration, where areas of concentra- 
tion are required, English, philosophy and history are regarded as the most 
desirable. 

33 



At the beginning of the first year students will take placement 
examinations in philosophy, Greek, speech, and Bible content to de- 
termine the sections in which they will be placed. Students showing 
a deficiency in Bible content will be required to remedy such de- 
ficiency. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR ADMISSION 

Applicants seeking degrees ordinarily move through three cate- 
gories under the supervision of the Admissions Committee of the 
faculty. 

1. Pre-Enrollment: An applicant may pre-enroll any time be- 
fore the beginning of his senior year in college. Approval 
is granted by the faculty Committee on Admissions upon re- 
ceipt of the following documents: 

(a) A formal application (available upon request) must be 
submitted by a student desiring admission to Pittsburgh 
Theological Seminary. 

(b) Application fee. A check or money order for #15.00 
must accompany the application. This will be applied 
to the first semester's tuition. While the fee will be 
refunded if the application is rejected, it is not return- 
able if the application is withdrawn. 

(c) Mental Capacity Test. The Seminary will correspond 
with the applicant's college concerning a mental ca- 
pacity test. If none is available, the applicant must 
take one under seminary direction. 

(d) A personal interview with the Director of Admissions, 
the Admissions Committee as a whole, or another rep- 
resentative of the Seminary who may be designated by 
the committee. 

2. Admissions: After the opening of the senior year in college 
an applicant should add the following credentials. Admission 
may be granted conditionally or unconditionally at the dis- 
cretion of the Admissions Committee of the faculty. 

(a) A statement from a physician certifying the state of his 
physical health. (A seminary blank for "The Physician" 
will be sent to the applicant with the application blanks.) 

(b) Transcript. An official transcript from the Registrar of 
the college or university, showing grades for at least 
three years of college work. Procedures for securing 
this will be included with the application blanks. 

(c) Personality and Aptitude Tests. Shortly after indicating 
his desire to be admitted, each applicant will receive in- 
formation concerning a group of personality tests. He 
is to complete them as directed and return to Dr. 
Clifford E. Davis, Church Vocations Counselor, Pitts- 
burgh Theological Seminary, 616 North Highland Ave- 
nue, Pittsburgh 6, Pennsylvania. 

34 



(d) An extensive (500-1000 words) statement in the appli- 
cant's handwriting describing his family, educational, 
and religious background, placing particular emphasis 
upon his motives for desiring to enter the Seminary and 
the ministry. 

All documents in the Pre-Enrollment and Admission categories 
should be in the hands of the Director of Admissions by April 15 
preceding the September for which admission is sought. 

3. Matriculation: A final transcript showing the degree and 
date of graduation of the applicant. 

After admission is granted and within thirty days of such notifi- 
cation, a #35 placement fee is required to assure the applicant of a 
place in the new class. This fee is applied on the student's tuition 
and is not returnable except under extreme hardship and at the dis- 
cretion of the Admissions Committee. A certification of the student's 
"intention to enroll" must accompany this fee. 

TRANSFER STUDENTS 

A student transferring from another seminary is required to 
submit, in addition to the foregoing, a complete transcript of previous 
seminary work and a letter of dismissal from the Dean or President. 



FOREIGN STUDENTS 

Qualified applicants from other countries are welcome as a part of 
the student body. Such applicants shall be required, in addition to 
the regular requirements for admission, to give evidence of proficien- 
cy in the English language before their admission. Tests such as the 
University of Michigan English Language test (available around the 
world) and/or the Lado English test (required by the U. S. State 
Department) normally shall be deemed sufficient. 

Such applicants shall have endorsement either of a representative 
of the Commission on Ecumenical Mission and Relations (in those 
areas where the United Presbyterian Church in the U.S.A. has fra- 
ternal workers) or the World Council of Churches (in other areas). 

An applicant from another country is also asked to submit a letter 
from his bank stating that there are on deposit sufficient funds to 
assure his passage home after his period of study in this country. 
This saves possible embarrassment to both student and seminary at 
a later time. 

All correspondence concerning admission to the seminary should 
be addressed to the Director of Admissions. 

35 



FEES AND EXPENSES* 

(for the academic year) 

Tuition (approx.) $500.00 Books (approx.) $100.00 

Board 420.00 „ . .. . 

c Hospitalization 

Room .bee 150.UU T . . -ja aa 1 -ja aa 

Insurance approx.) .. 30.00-130.00 
Library Fee (annual) 10.00 

Student Association Fee (annual) 5.00 Incidentals 75.00- 300.00 

Matriculation Fee — $35.00 payable at the time of admission. 

Tuition Fee — $16.00 per semester hour. 

Late Registration Fee — A charge of $5.00 will be made to students registering later 
than the specified time. 

Graduation Fee— $10.00. 

Transcript Fee — One copy of a student's academic record will be provided without 

charge. A fee of $1.00 will be charged for each additional transcript. 
* Subject to change. 

MARRIED STUDENT APARTMENT FEES 

The Samuel A. Fulton Memorial Hall 

Thirty-nine furnished apartments $42.50-$57.50 per month 

Sheridan Avenue Apartments 

Six unfurnished apartments 45.00- 50.00 per month 

Duplexes 

Fifteen unfurnished apartments 45.00- 50.00 per month 

All apartment fees are payable monthly in advance. Applications for apart- 
ments should be made as early as possible. 

Residents of the men's and women's dormitories are required 
to eat in the seminary dining hall. Board includes nineteen meals 
a week; only breakfast is served on Sunday. The dining hall is 
closed on holidays which are scheduled on the seminary calendar. 
No deduction is allowed for absence from individual meals, although 
special consideration is given to students who regularly do not eat 
in the dining hall weekends. 

All academic fees and expenses are payable in advance on the 
opening day of each semester. When necessary, arrangements for 
a payment plan to cover a semester's expenses may be made at the 
Business Office on the first day of each term, permitting (4) four 
equal payments: one-fourth on the first day of the term, and the 
balance due at the beginning of the fourth, eighth, and twelfth 
weeks respectively. There is a carrying charge of $5.00 for the de- 
ferred payment plan. 

Settlement of all seminary bills is required before registration 
for a new semester, and before graduation or the release of official 
transcripts. 



MEDICAL AND HOSPITALIZATION INSURANCE 

Students are required to be insured by some type of medical and 
hospitalization insurance acceptable to the Seminary. All students 
who are registered as full-time students are eligible for such insur- 
ance under a group student policy issued by either the Royal Indem- 
nity Company, New York, N. Y., or Blue Cross and Blue Shield. 
Detailed information concerning premiums and benefits may be se- 
cured at the Business Office. 



SCHOLARSHIP AID 

The Seminary provides general scholarship aid in varying 
amounts from endowed scholarship funds and general scholarship 
funds. Aid is not offered indiscriminately, but on the basis of 
scholarship and/or financial need. 

Specific details concerning these scholarships, together with ap- 
plication forms, may be obtained from the Dean of Students. 

STUDENT LOAN FUNDS 

The Board of Christian Education Service Loans. United Pres- 
byterian students who need financial aid during their seminary course 
may apply to the Board of Christian Education through their pres- 
byteries for service loans. The completed application for 1962-63 
must be filed with the Board of Christian Education by July 15, 
1962. The maximum aid for candidates for the ministry and for 
commissioned church work is $200 per year. 

The grant is in the form of a loan for which a note must be 
given. The loan may be repaid by service in the church vocation 
for which the loan was granted, after completion of the prescribed 
course of study. One year of service cancels one year's service loan. 
If the student withdraws from the course of study, the loan becomes 
repayable in cash with interest. These loans are not available for 
those enrolled in a course of graduate study beyond the B.D. and the 
M.R.E. degrees. Service loans may be supplemented from the schol- 
arship funds of the Seminary. 

Write Office of Educational Loans and Scholarships, 830 With- 
erspoon Building, Philadelphia 7, Pa., for application forms and 
rules governing service loans. 

The Board of Christian Education Rotary Loans. United Pres- 
byterian students who need financial aid during their seminary 
course to supplement the service loans described above may apply 
directly to the Board of Christian Education for rotary loans. These 
loans must be repaid in cash within one year after the borrower either 
graduates or leaves school permanently or temporarily. Interest at 

37 



the rate of 4% will begin on the first day of July next after the bor- 
rower either graduates or leaves school. 

The student must have been a member of the United Presby- 
terian Church in the U.S.A. for at least one year and must have the 
endorsement of the session of his church. 

James H. Snowden Memorial Loan Fund. A loan fund for 
students needing financial assistance to obtain a theological educa- 
tion was established in 1953 by R. R. Snowden, M.D., Pittsburgh, 
Pennsylvania, in memory of his father, Professor James H. Snowden, 
D.D., LL.D. Loans from this fund are made on notes with interest 
and without further endorsement. 

Waiter G. Comin Memorial Fund. A loan fund for students 
who need financial assistance to continue their education was estab- 
lished in 1955 by Mrs. Walter G. Comin, Pawnee City, Nebraska, 
Mr. and Mrs. Walter G. Comin, Jr., Wilkinsburg, Pa., and Mr. 
Myron C. Comin, Spokane, Washington, in memory of Rev. Walter 
G. Comin, D.D. Loans from this fund are made on notes at four 
percent interest and without further endorsement. 

Westphal Memorial Loan Fund. The session of the Reed Me- 
morial United Presbyterian Church, Lyndhurst, New Jersey, estab- 
lished in 1956 the Westphal Memorial Loan Fund. Under certain 
conditions specified by the donors loans from this fund may be made 
on notes without interest or further endorsement, and are repayable 
within ten years. 

Albert G. Hamilton Memorial Loan Fund. A loan fund for 
students who need financial assistance during the seminary course 
was established in 1960 by Mrs. Albert G. Hamilton, Pittsburgh, 
Pennsylvania, in memory of her husband, Mr. Albert G. Hamilton. 
Loans from this fund may be made on notes at three percent interest 
without further endorsement. 

Dr. and Mrs. James D. Sands Memorial Loan Fund. A loan 
fund for seminary students was established in 1961 by Mrs. Albert 
G. Hamilton, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, in memory of her parents, 
Dr. and Mrs. James D. Sands. Loans from this fund may be made 
on notes at three percent interest without further endorsement. 

The First Presbyterian Church of New Kensington Rotary Loan 
Fund. Established by the session of the First Presbyterian Church 
of New Kensington, Pennsylvania, in 1961. This loan fund provides 
$300 for a single student and $600 for a married student during the 
first year of seminary when the schedule and curriculum do not 
allow remunerative field work. The principal is to be repaid follow- 
ing graduation from seminary in minimum amounts of $100 per year. 

38 



Walter A. Long Memorial Student Rotary Loan Fund. Estab- 
lished in 1961 by the Estate of Emma Clark Long. Loans are not 
to exceed #100 to any one student in any one academic year and the 
amount borrowed is to be repaid not later than two years after grad- 
uation or not later than two years after the borrower would have 
graduated if he had progressed normally through the seminary to 
graduation in the event of failure to graduate. All loans are made 
without interest. 

The William G. Crow Memorial Loan Fund. Established in 
November, 1961. Loans from this fund may be made on notes with 
three percent interest. 



AWARDS, PRIZES, AND GRADUATE FELLOWSHIPS 

The following competitive awards, prizes, and graduate fellow- 
ships have been provided for the benefit of students for the ministry. 
In order to compete, students must take their full course of study in 
Pittsburgh Seminary; must carry not less than the regular quota of 
studies; must complete each term's work satisfactorily; and they 
must furthermore meet the particular requirements of the desired 
award, prize, or graduate fellowship as hereinafter specified. Under 
each, an award is made once each year, at which time the faculty 
considers all regular degree students who, during the preceding school 
year, have completed the necessary amount of work in a satisfactory 
manner. 

The Sylvester S. Marvin Memorial Fellowship 

The Sylvester S. Marvin Fellowship may be assigned upon grad- 
uation to that member of the Senior Class who is recommended by the 
faculty as having achieved the highest standard in all departments 
of the seminary curriculum, provided that his average be not below 
85%. The faculty reserves the right to impose special tests and ex- 
aminations in making this award. It is offered to those who take the 
entire course of three years in this institution. The recipient must 
pledge himself to a year of post-graduate study immediately follow- 
ing his graduation at some institution approved by the faculty. He 
is required to furnish quarterly reports of his progress. The money 
will be paid in three equal installments, on the first day of October, 
January, and April. Prolonged absence from the classroom in the 
discharge of extra-seminary duties makes a student ineligible for the 
fellowship. 

The Thomas Jamison Scholarship 

The Thomas Jamison Scholarship, in memory of the late Thomas 
Jamison, Esq., of North Side, Pittsburgh, was established by Mrs. 
Jamison. The income of this endowment is given every year to the 
member of the Senior Class whose average grades during the Middler 
and Senior years give him first place in the class. 

The acceptance of this scholarship requires that the recipient 
spend a full academic year in study in a foreign theological institution 

39 



selected by the faculty. He must further agree to make regular re- 
ports of the work he is doing and at the end of the year he will pre- 
sent a satisfactory thesis of not less than ten thousand words on some 
subject selected by the faculty or approved by the faculty. If for 
any reason the man who is first in the class does not accept the schol- 
arship and its requirements the scholarship will be offered to the stu- 
dent next in rank. 

The Jennie Rigg Barbour Memorial Prize 
The Jennie Rigg Barbour Memorial Prize was established by 
Rev. Clifford E. Barbour, Ph.D., D.D., LL.D., President of Pittsburgh 
Theological Seminary, as a memorial to his mother. The income 
from the endowment of this prize is assigned to that member of the 
graduating class who has taken his full course of instruction in this 
institution and who has achieved the second highest academic rank 
of his class, if in the judgment of the faculty he is worthy in all other 
iespects. It is hoped that the student will use this income for further 
study either within an academic institution or by the enlargement 
of his own library. 

The Michael Wilson Keith Memorial Homiletical Prize 
This prize was founded in 1919 by the Keith Bible Class of the 
First Presbyterian Church of Coraopolis, Pennsylvania, in memory 
of the Reverend Michael Wilson Keith, D.D., the founder of the 
class and pastor of the church from 1911 to 1917. The prize is award- 
ed to a member of the Senior Class who has spent three years in this 
seminary and has taken the highest standing in the department of 
homiletics. The winner of the prize is expected to preach in the 
First Presbyterian Church of Coraopolis and teach the Keith Bible 
Class one Sunday after the award is made. 

The Joseph Watson Greek Entrance Prize 
The Joseph Watson Greek Prize was established in 1920, by 
Mrs. Robert A. Watson, Columbus, Ohio. The income will be awarded 
to the student who passes the best examination in classical Greek as he 
enters the Junior Class of the Seminary. 

The William B. Watson Prize in Hebrew 
The William B. Watson Prize in Hebrew was established in 
1919, by Mrs. Robert A. Watson, Columbus, Ohio. The income will 
be awarded to that member of the Senior Class who, having elected 
Hebrew, shall submit the best grammatical and exegetical treatment 
of an assigned portion of the Hebrew Old Testament. 

The John Watson Prize in New Testament Greek 
The John Watson Prize in New Testament Greek was estab- 
lished in 1919, by Mrs. Robert A. Watson, Columbus, Ohio. The 
income will be awarded to that member of the Senior Class who, 
having elected Greek Exegesis, shall submit the best grammatical 
and exegetical treatment of an assigned portion of the Greek New 
Testament. 

40 



The Robert A. Lee Church History Foundation 
By bequest, in memory of her husband the late Mrs. Henrietta 
M. Lee, Oakmont, Pa., established the Robert A. Lee Church History 
Foundation, the annual income of which is to be awarded yearly to 
the students making first and second rank respectively in the Depart- 
ment of Church History. 

The Hugh Thomson Kerr Moderator Prize 
This prize was established in 1938 by the Men's Committee of 
the Shadyside Presbyterian Church, Pittsburgh. An annual contri- 
bution of fifty dollars was pledged to be used for the purchase of 
books. The prize is to be awarded to that member of the graduating 
class who has exhibited, throughout the three years of the seminary 
course, leadership, originality, and accomplishments beyond the 
normal requirements for graduation. 

The James Purdy Scholarship 
The James Purdy Scholarship was established in 1882. The 
income is apportioned equally each year to the six members of the 
Junior Class who attain the highest average of excellence in their 
seminary work. The distribution is made after the students return 
to the Seminary the following year. 

The Andrew Reed Scholarship 
The Andrew Reed Scholarship was established in 1914 by Miss 
Anna M. Reed, Cross Creek, Pennsylvania, the income being given 
to the student who, upon entering seminary, shall pass the best com- 
petitive examination in the English Bible. The successful competitor 
is to have the scholarship throughout the entire course of three years, 
provided that his general conduct and application to study shall con- 
tinue to be satisfactory to the faculty. 

The Christian Education Award 
The Christian Education Award was established in 1950 by action 
of the Board of Directors. An award is granted to the person in the 
Department of Christian Education having the highest grade average 
for the two year course, providing the average is "B" or above. 

The Home Training Bible Class Award In Missions 
This is an award of #100 which was established in January, 1961, 
by the Home Training Bible Class of the Edgewood Presbyterian 
Church, Pittsburgh, Pa. in the name of the Rev. Walter L. Moser, 
Ph.D., D.D. The recipient will be that member of the graduating 
class who is deemed most deserving among those entering the foreign 
or home missionary field upon graduation. 

41 



CLASSIFICATION OF STUDENTS 

Pittsburgh Theological Seminary offers a basic theological cur- 
riculum for candidates for the Christian ministry: the preaching, 
teaching, and pastoral offices and specialized fields of service. Pitts- 
burgh Seminary admits any qualified applicant who desires a broader 
and deeper knowledge of the Christian faith, regardless of sex, race, 
nationality, or theological persuasion. 

The student body is classified as follows: 

Regular undergraduate students: those who are enrolled, full 
time (a minimum course load of twelve hours per semester), in the 
program leading to the Bachelor of Divinity degree. See require- 
ments for admission below. 

M.R.E. students : those who are enrolled in the program leading 
to the Master of Religious Education degree. Requirements for ad- 
mission are the same as those for the Bachelor of Divinity candidates. 

M.Ed, students: those who are enrolled in the program leading 
to the Master of Education degree offered jointly by Pittsburgh Theo- 
logical Seminary and the University of Pittsburgh. Requirements 
for admission are specified on page 50 of this catalogue. 

Special students: those enrolled under regular admission require- 
ments as part-time students in one of the undergraduate degree pro- 
grams of the seminary. 



REQUIREMENTS FOR THE B.D. DEGREE 

The degree of Bachelor of Divinity is conferred upon any prop- 
erly qualified college student upon completion of the three-year 
curriculum in theology as follows: 

1. Completion of the course of study leading to the degree. 

2. Passing of the comprehensive examinations at the end of 
the Middler and Senior years. 

3. Attainment of an average grade of C or above throughout 
the seminary course. 

Students transferring from other theological seminaries must be 
in residence at Pittsburgh Seminary for a minimum of one full aca- 
demic year in order to become a candidate for the Bachelor of 
Divinity degree. 

42 



DEGREE PROGRAMS 

AND 
COURSES OF STUDY 

Bachelor of Divinity 

Degree description ..... pages 44-47 

Course descriptions ..... pages 51-69 

Master of Religious Education 

Degree description ..... pages 48-49 

Course descriptions ..... pages 51-64 

Master of Education ...... page 50 

Master of Theology ...... pages 70-75 



43 



THE BACHELOR OF DIVINITY CURRICULUM 

Of the making of curricula there is no end. A curriculum ex- 
presses the mind of the faculty, its sense of what is important, its 
intuition of relevance. So curricula change. Yet in theological edu- 
cation as in other disciplines there are enduring structures which re- 
main constant within change. The problem of curriculum is the 
problem of ordering meaningful change vis-a-vis structures of per- 
manence. Pittsburgh Seminary's Bachelor of Divinity curriculum is 
an attempt to deal with this problem. 

The Biblical Division has thirty out of seventy-nine required 
hours. These include both Greek and Hebrew and one might wonder 
whether these should be included in Biblical hours. The way language 
is taught in Pittsburgh — inductively — they should be included. After 
a brief period of orientation in both languages, the student begins to 
read in the Old and New Testaments. As he comes upon a new 
grammatical construction it is explained. Seeing it in a context helps 
him to come to grips with it. A chief study in the Biblical Division 
is exegesis. It runs through the Middler and Senior years in both 
Testaments. Exegesis appears in the catalogue as a Church and 
Ministry course because it is carefully related to the preaching office. 
Students study with a team of exegetes, homileticians, and speech 
instructors as they work on the sermon from text to delivery. 

The History and Theology Division has twenty-eight required 
hours, only twenty of which are apparent at first glance. Both his- 
tory and theology are closely correlated with church and ministry 
courses for the sake of greater relevance. P'or example, American 
church history is about two-thirds of Church and Ministry I where 
it is taught in dialogue with the culture which it has informed and 
which in turn has informed it. The doctrine of church and ministry 
is foundational to both the teaching and preaching offices and runs 
through the Middler year in Church and Ministry II and III. Chris- 
tian ethics, an extremely important part of the curriculum, is taught 
in conjunction with the pastoral office, broadly conceived, and so has 
three hours in Church and Ministry IV. The doctrine of the sacra- 
ments is intrinsic to liturgies which is a section within Church and 
Ministry V. 

The Church and Ministry Division, a new designation in theo- 
logical education, has twenty-one hours, although its course designa- 

44 



tions total thirty-seven hours. The difference in hours is due to 
work transferred from the other two divisions for the purpose of 
relevance. This division in one sense is the focus of the curriculum 
for all studies are for the purpose of church in its total ministry, in- 
cluding parish ministry and special ministries (Christian education, 
higher education, fraternal workers, administration, etc.). Through 
this division the whole curriculum confronts the world and is con- 
fronted by the world. In essence it is the division of communication; 
for the Gospel to be communicated, the knowledge and skills neces- 
sary to communication, and the understanding of the cultural milieu 
within which we do our communicating are all the business of this 
division. The course work of the Church and Ministry Division is 
taught considerably by inter-divisional faculty personnel. 

Field education is nuclear to the curriculum. It begins in an ob- 
servational way in the Junior year. The first semester students are 
taken on field trips to a prison, the courts, a union meeting, a session 
with management, a mental hospital, etc., and seminars are conducted 
on the basis of these experiences. The second semester the students 
make a brief preliminary study of a church and its neighborhood to 
become acquainted with some of the tensions involved. During the 
Middler year students are assigned to congregations where they learn 
the practice of ministry under careful supervision. This field ex- 
perience is correlated with class work in Church and Ministry II 
and III. Different types of field education are introduced into the 
Senior year to afford experience in counseling, community analysis, 
liturgies, etc., as well as experimentation in new forms of ministry. 
These laboratory experiences are correlated with Church and Ministry 
IV and V. 

Since a vital part of curriculum is dialogue in the classroom, 
every effort is made for small classes. Language study and exegesis, 
church and ministry courses, and history and theology classes are sec- 
tioned wherever possible into classes of 8-12. Where the lecture 
method is employed, one hour a week is usually given to preceptorials. 

Tradition is the identity within novelty; novelty is the relevance 
of tradition. The Bachelor of Divinity curriculum is the faculty's 
carefully designed course of study through which a community of 
scholars — students and professors — can work to relate tradition and 
novelty, the old and the new, in our time for our time. 

45 



THE PRESCRIBED COURSE OF STUDY 

LEADING TO THE 
DEGREE OF BACHELOR OF DIVINITY 



Junior Year 



Semester I 

Bible 9 

110 Hebrew 3 

210 Greek 3 

112 Old Testament Introduction 3 

410 Church History I 3 

510 Philosophy 3 

710 Principles of Expression — 



15 



Semester II 

Bible 

111 Hebrew 2 

211 Greek 2 

221 New Testament Introduction 3 

411 Church History II 

511 Contemporary Theology 

711 Interpretative Reading 

713 Church and Ministry I: 
The Church in American 
Culture 



15 



222 New Testament Introduction 

420 Church History III 

520 Systematic Theology I 

720 Church and Ministry II: 
The Preaching and 
Teaching Offices 



Middler Year 




3 213 Old Testament Introduction 


3 


3 521 Systematic Theology II 


3 


3 721 Church and Ministry III: 
The Preaching and 
Teaching Offices 


7 


7 Elective 


3 


16 


16 



Senior Year 



730 Church and Ministry IV: 




731 Church and Ministry V: 




Christian Ethics and the 




Mission and Program 




Pastoral Office 


7 


of the Church 


7 


732 Church and Ministry VI 


3 


733 Church and Ministry VII 


3 


Electives 


6 


Electives 


6 



16 



16 



79 academic hours of required work 
15 academic hours of electives 

94 total academic hours required for graduation 



46 



THE FOUR-YEAR BACHELOR OF DIVINITY CURRICULUM 



Semester I 
110 Hebrew 
210 Greek 

112 Old Testament Introduction 
410 Church History I 
710 Principles of Expression 
Field Education Supervision 



12 



Semester II 
111 Hebrew 
211 Greek 

221 New Testament Introduction 
411 Church History II 
711 Interpretative Reading 

Field Education Supervision 



10 



II 



222 New Testament Introduction 

420 Church History III 

720 Church and Ministry II 



3 
3 
7 

13 



213 Old Testament Introduction 
713 Church and Ministry I 
721 Church and Ministry III 



III 



510 Philosophy 
732 Church and Ministry VI 
Electives 



511 Contemporary Theology 
733 Church and Ministry VII 
Electives 



IV 



520 Systematic Theology I 
730 Church and Ministry IV 
Elective 



3 
7 
3 

13 



521 Systematic Theology II 
731 Church and Ministry V 



3 
7 

10 



47 



THE MASTER OF RELIGIOUS EDUCATION CURRICULUM 

The Master of Religious Education curriculum is a two year 
program including both theory and practice among the disciplines of 
Bible, history, theology, and the teaching ministry. The requirement 
of five hours each in Hebrew and Greek demonstrates the faculty's 
seriousness about this degree as it seeks to prepare students for the 
teaching office. That that office has fallen into disrepute and has 
come to be associated largely with methods is manifest. The recovery 
of the office will come through Biblical and theological competence 
coupled with the art and skills of communication. To know the Bible 
the student must enter into the world of the Bible, gain a "feel" for 
its idiom of thought, expression, practice. Language study is the pri- 
mary tool for this incursion. Sixteen hours in history and theology 
will also contribute to the needed competence. By taking the basic 
courses of theological education an M.R.E. candidate is prepared to 
work side by side with pastors, sharing a common understanding of 
the total ministry of which education is a part, and performing that 
ministry with professional competence. 

Within this program the teaching office is lifted up and empha- 
sized for the M.R.E. candidate. The B.D. Church and Ministry 
courses are especially adapted so that the student whose vocational 
interest is Christian education can explore the philosophy and theol- 
ogy, as well as develop methodological and administrative skills, of 
that special ministry. Throughout the two year course the student 
will be involved in Christian education theory and practice. Field 
education practicum is required each semester and is closely geared 
with class work. 

The Master of Religious Education program, open to both men 
and women, is designed primarily to prepare them to serve the Church 
of Jesus Christ as directors or ministers of Christian education in 
local congregations, as curriculum writers and fraternal workers, as 
well as to provide them background for related professional and serv- 
ice vocations. 



48 



THE PRESCRIBED COURSE OF STUDY 

LEADING TO THE 

DEGREE OF MASTER OF RELIGIOUS EDUCATION 



Junior Year 



Semester I 

Bible 9 

110 Hebrew 3 

210 Greek 3 

112 Old Testament Introduction 3 

410 Church History I 3 

720-A Church and Ministry II 4 

710 Principles of Expression 

16 



Semester II 
Bible 

111 Hebrew 2 

211 Greek 2 

221 New Testament Introduction 3 
411 Church History II 
511 Contemporary Theology 
721-A Church and Ministry III 
711 Interpretative Reading 



16 



Senior Year 



222 New Testament Introduction 
520 Systematic Theology I 
730 Church and Ministry IV 
826 Seminar in Christian 
Education 



3 
3 
7 

3 

16 



213 Old Testament Introduction 
521 Systematic Theology II 
713 Church and Ministry I 
731 Church and Ministry V 



3 
3 
3 
7 

16 



Sixty-four academic hours required for graduation. 



49 



THE PRESCRIBED COURSE OF STUDY LEADING TO THE 
DEGREE OF MASTER OF EDUCATION (M.Ed.) 

This degree is offered jointly by the University of Pittsburgh 
and Pittsburgh Theological Seminary. It will be conferred by the 
University upon completion of a course of study which will include 
18 hours taken in three trimesters at the University and 18 hours 
taken concurrently in two semesters at the Seminary. 



The University Requirements 
Ed. Psych. 272 — Psychology of Human Learning 
Ed. Res. 200 — Introduction to Research and Statistics 
Fdns. Ed. 201 — General Philosophy of Education 
Fdns. Ed. 228 — History of Modern Education 
Department of Religious Education .... 



The Seminary Requirements 
112 — Old Testament Introduction 
221 — New Testament Introduction 
470 — Reading and Research in Church History 
511-A — Contemporary Theology .... 
832 — Developments in Christian Education 
Field Education Practicum 



2 hours 
2 hours 
2 hours 

2 hours 
10 hours 

18 hours 

3 hours 
3 hours 
3 hours 

3 hours 

4 hours 
2 hours 

18 hours 



The M.Ed, course of study is designed as a one-year course for 
those who have an approved Bachelor's collegiate major in the fields 
of religion, Bible, or religious education, or their equivalent, to pro- 
vide further depth, understanding, and technical skills for work in 
local churches. Admission requirements, in addition to the "major," 
are those of the University and the Seminary. Housing will be pro- 
vided by the admitting institution. 

Applicants for this degree may write to: 

Dr. Lawrence C. Little 
Department of Religious Education 
University of Pittsburgh 
Pittsburgh 13, Pennsylvania 
or 

Director of Admissions 
Pittsburgh Theological Seminary 
616 N. Highland Avenue 
Pittsburgh 6, Pennsylvania 
50 



DESCRIPTION OF COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

FOR THE BACHELOR OF DIVINITY, 

MASTER OF RELIGIOUS EDUCATION, 

AND MASTER OF EDUCATION DEGREES 



THE BIBLICAL DIVISION 
Mr. Taylor, Chairman 
Mr. Kelso Mr. Hills 

Mr. Orr Mr. Jamieson 

Mr. Freedman Mr. Kelley 

Mr. Walther Mr. Grohman 

Some course offerings, both required and elective, customarily listed under 
the Biblical Division, are correlated with Church and Ministry and are listed under 
that division. 

REQUIRED COURSES 

110 and 210. Biblical Language. A course designed to lead to an ap- 
preciative and competent use of Hebrew and Greek as languages of 
Biblical revelation. From the outset the student learns inductively to 
read from the original languages of the Old and New Testaments. Em- 
phasis is placed on the acquisition of a working vocabulary as the ground 
for further reading and the illumination of key Biblical concepts. In- 
struction is in small, graded sections so that a maximum of individual 
attention and achievement is possible. (Students who have previously 
studied Greek will be assigned to a special section on the basis of place- 
ment examinations.) 

Juniors, first semester, 6 hours credit. 

111 and 211. Biblical Language. Continuation of 110 and 210 with 
instruction continued in graded sections of both Hebrew and Greek. 

Juniors, second semester, 4 hours credit. 

112. Old Testament Introduction. A study of the political and reli- 
gious history of the Hebrew people from the days of Abraham to the close 
of the Old Testament, with special emphasis on the more significant per- 
sonalities, events and institutions. The results of archaeological research 
are studied in conjunction with the Biblical record. 

Juniors, first semester, 3 hours credit. Mr. Kelso and Mr. Freedman 

213. Old Testament Introduction. Continuation of 112. 

Middlers, second semester, 3 hours credit. Mr. Freedman 

221. New Testament Introduction. A comprehensive historical, literary, 
and theological study of the New Testament: (a) religious and political 
backgrounds of the times; (b) life of Jesus Christ; (c) activity and mes- 
sage of the Apostolic Church; (d) the Pauline corpus; (e) the Johannine 
witness; (f) Hebrews and Catholic Epistles; (g) apocalyptic. 

Juniors, second semester, 3 hours credit. Mr. Orr and Mr. Taylor 

222. New Testament Introduction. Continuation of course 221: (a) 
formation of the Gospel tradition; (b) formation of the Canon; (c) trans- 
mission of the Text; (d) history of the English Bible; (e) outlines of 
New Testament theology. 

Middlers, first semester, 3 hours credit Mr. Orr and Mr. Taylor 

51 



ELECTIVES 

141 and 142. Hebrew Reading. Supervised reading of selected Old 
Testament passages. For those who desire to continue the language with- 
out emphasis. 

Two semesters. 

143 and 144. Hebrew Reading. Continuation of courses 141 and 142. 

145. Advanced Hebrew Grammar. Introduction to the formal structure 
of the Hebrew language (phonetics, morphology, syntax) with special 
attention to its historical development and relation to other Semitic 
languages. Mr . Hills 

148. Introduction to the Dead Sea Scrolls. Survey of the scrolls from 
the Dead Sea area, particularly Qumran. Archaeological background, 
analysis of contents, significance for the text, history, and theology of 
the Old and New Testaments. 

149. Readings in the Dead Sea Scrolls. Selected passages (in the orig- 
inal Hebrew) from the newly-discovered Qumran scrolls dating from 
200 B.C. to 70 A.D. 

Prerequisite: basic Hebrew. 

151. Elements of Accadian. A beginner's course in Assyro-Babylonian. 

152. Elements of Canaanite Cuneiform. A beginner's course in Ugaritic. 

153. Elements of North West Semitic. Decipherment, translation, and 
analysis of early Phoenician, Moabite, Hebrew, and Aramaic inscriptions, 
and investigations of their bearing on Old Testament studies. 

154. Biblical Aramaic. A course in the grammar and reading of the 
Aramaic sections of the Old Testament with a possible inclusion of Fifth 
Century B.C. Aramaic letters from Elephantine. 

Prerequisite: one semester of Hebrew. 

155. Seminar on the Greek Old Testament. Introduction to the Greek 
translation and the problems of the text. Rapid reading of selected 
books and passages in the Septuagint. 

161. Current Trends in Old Testament Criticism. A course designed 
to train students in the evaluation of new books and technical magazine 
articles in all fields of Old Testament research. A maximum of twelve 
students. Students must have the professor's approval to enroll. 

Mr. Kelso 

171. The Composition of Isaiah. This course deals with the literary 
and form-critical problems of the Book of Isaiah, tracing its development 
from the earliest oral traditions to the final literary document. The 
prophetic experience and consciousness, message and meaning, are con- 
sidered in relation to the contents of the book against the background 
of Israel's history. Mr. Freedman 

172. Ancient Hebrew Poetry. Readings in the poems of the Pentateuch 
and early Psalms with emphasis on ancient Hebrew meter, style, orthog- 
raphy and vocabulary, and analysis of theological motifs and liturgical 
orientation. Mr . Freedman 

52 



173. The Poetical Books. This course is designed to provide (a) a 
general introduction to the poetry and wisdom writings of the ancient 
Hebrews; (b) a comprehensive survey of the Psalter; and (3) an analy- 
sis of Job, Ecclesiastes and the Song of Songs. ^ r j am i eson 

174. Jeremiah. This course is a careful study of the life and work of 
this great prophet. Attention is given to the prophecy in the light of 
contemporary history and especially to the contribution made to the 
central message of the Bible. Its relevance for our day and its homilet- 
ical values are considered. Mr Jamieson 

175. Exegesis in Exodus and Numbers. Mr. Freedman 

176. Hosea and Micah. Introduction and exegesis. Mr. Grohman 

181. Geography of Biblical Lands. A survey course covering the major 
features of all ancient geography which influenced Biblical history, and 
a detailed study of Palestinian geography. The customs and manners 
of Bible people are also reviewed. Open to all. Mr Ke j s0 

182. Archaeology of Palestine. A rapid historical survey of archae- 
ological work in Bible lands, with particular attention to the cultural 
and religious life of the Israelite and non-Israelite populations in Pal- 
estine. Methods of archaeological research and the interpretation of 
findings are studied, not only for apologetic purposes, but especially 
for exegetical study of the Scriptures. Assigned readings, slides and ma- 
terials from the Bible Lands Museum. 

Mr. Kelso 

183. Research in Old Testament Archaeology. Directed research along 
various lines as indicated by the student's needs. 

Mr. Kelso 

184. Ancient Near Eastern Texts and Pictures Relating to the Old 
Testament. A survey of selected extra-Biblical texts, and of pictures of 
monuments and objects, which cast light on the Old Testament. 

185. Field Trip to the Holy Land. This is a 6-7 week summer field trip 
course in the geography, topography, archaeology, and history of the 
Holy Land. It will include a roundtrip charter flight to the Near East 
and guided visits to the major sites of historical and archaeological inter- 
est, as well as the principal museums and centers of learning. There 
will be lectures by faculty members accompanying the tour and by selec- 
ted experts in both Jordan and Israel. A syllabus outlines the main topic 
of study and specifies reading assignments and written reports. 

241. New Testament Canon and Text, (a) The Canon: A study of the 
formation of the New Testament. The limiting principle of the Canon 
and the consequent rejection of apocryphal and pseudepigraphical works. 
The position of the Roman Church, of the Church of England, and of the 
Presbyterian and Reformed bodies as shown in the Westminster Confes- 
sion. Lectures and required readings, (b) Textual Criticism: A survey 
of the history of the printed text, with an introduction to the apparatus 
criticus and the principles of textual criticism. An appraisal of the 
Tischendorf, Nestle, and Westcott and Hort texts. Textbook, lectures 
and required readings, and practice on textual problems. 

Prerequisite: New Testament Introduction. Mr. Taylor 

53 



242. Form Criticism and the Synoptic Problem. The purposes and 
techniques of Formgeschichte will be critically examined and its con- 
tributions illustrated and assessed. The application of Formgeschichte 
to illustrative passages in the Synoptic Gospels. An adequate working 
knowledge of Greek is required. 



243. Critical Introduction to the Pauline Epistles. A rapid survey of 
Paul's life. Historical validity of the records in Acts and the Epistles. 
The origin and completion of the Corpus Paulinum. The groupings of 
the ten major epistles. Recent criticism of the authorship of II Thess., 
Col., Eph., and of the place of origin of the captivity correspondence. 
The problems of Romans 16, and of the Pastorals. Sacramentalism, and 
other mystery features in Pauline theology. 

Mr. Taylor 

244. Critical Introduction to the Johannine Writings. An appraisal of 
recent criticism as to the unity of the Fourth Gospel with the Johannine 
epistolary group; and the relationship of the Apocalypse to other Johan- 
nine writings, dealing with the differences in grammar, vocabulary, and 
thought-concepts. Antagonism toward the Apocalypse among the early 
Fathers and among the Reformers. 

Mr. Taylor 

245. Apocalyptic and the Apocalypse. A survey of the development 
of Apocalyptic as a religio-literary genre. Apocalyptic in the Old Testa- 
ment, the Apocrypha and Pseudepigraph of the Jews, and in other an- 
cient cultures. The characteristics of a developed apocalyptic especially 
in relation to the prophetic movement in Israel. The Apocalypse of John 
against this background, its structure and meaning for its original re- 
cipients. 

Mr. Taylor 

246. Research in the New Testament. Directed research along various 
lines as indicated by the student's needs. 

Mr. Taylor 

247. The Pastoral Epistles of the New Testament. Beginning with 
I Timothy and continuing through Hebrews, this course will stress the re- 
lation of the historical context and the basic content of the letters to the 
art of preaching. 

Mr. Jamieson 

248. The New Testament in Light of Contemporary Jewish writers. A 

survey of the history of Judaism in the First Century for the sake of 
relating the New Testament to its Jewish environments. Use will be 
made of the writings of Josephus, Philo, and other contemporary sources. 



250. New Testament Exegesis: Gospel of John. Critical exegesis on 
the basis of the Greek text. 

Mr. Kelley 

251. New Testament Exegesis: Johannine Epistles. Critical exegesis 
on the basis of the Greek text. 

Mr. Kelley 

252. Petrine Epistles. Detailed exegesis of I Peter and II Peter. Abil- 
ity to use the Greek text is required. The commentaries of Selwyn, 
Beare, Bigg, and James will be used. 

Mr. Walther 

54 



253 and 254. Greek Reading. Supervised reading of selected New 
Testament passages. For those who desire to maintain facility in the 
language. 



255 and 256. Greek Reading. Continuation of Course 254. 



257. Advanced Greek Grammar. An advanced, systematic study of the 
syntax and grammar of New Testament Greek. Principles studied in 
connection with specific Biblical passages. 

Mr. Kelley 

260. New Testament Christology. This course will survey the beliefs 

about Jesus as Messiah, Son of Man, Son of God, and his work as reveal- 

er of the Father, inaugurator of the Kingdom, and savior of the human 

r &ce. ^ n 

Mr. Orr 

261. Eschatology in the New Testament. The background of the prob- 
lem in twentieth-century literature will be examined, and the New Testa- 
ment materials will be studied in detail. Some attention will be given 
to the Entmythologizierung controversy. 

Mr. Walther 

262. Bultmann Seminar. Reading and discussion of the literature by 
and about Rudolf Bultmann with critique of his critical and theological 
contributions, set in relief against the pertinent positions of Stauffer, 
Cullmann, and the post-Bultmannians. 

Mr. Walther 

263. Life of Jesus Christ. An examination of the Biblical and extra- 
Biblical materials followed by a survey of the critical study of the "Quest" 
in the last century and the "new Quest" from kerygma to history at the 
present time; finally, a consideration of the possibilities of writing a 
"Life" today. 

Mr. Walther 

264. 265, 266, and 267. Practical Use of the New Testament. A semi- 
nar on the religious meaning of the New Testament for study, worship, 
preaching, evangelism, and counseling. The course will be taught each 
year throughout a two-year cycle: in 1962-63 the Synoptic Gospels and 
the Fourth Gospel will be covered; in the alternate year the Epistles will 
be used. 

Mr. Orr 

270. Archaeology and the Pauline Epistles. A study of the results of 
exploration and excavation in Near East sites as they bear upon an un- 
derstanding of The Acts and the Pauline epistles. Colored slides and 
other exhibits are used to demonstrate the significance of the research. 

Mr. Jamieson 

280. II Century Christian Literature. An introduction to the Apostolic 
Fathers and to other Christian literature of the II Century, including 
Christian apocrypha. The Apostolic Fathers will be read in the Loeb 
translation (K. Lake), with exegetical discussion of significant passages 
in the Greek text. Representative passages of other writings will be 
discussed. Special attention will be directed to the rise of the phenome- 
non now designated as "gnosticism," and to its influence upon developing 
Christian thought. 

Mr. Taylor 

55 



HONORS PROGRAM 



In the Middler year the Honors Program consists of five hours each 
semester distributed as follows: 



H 301. New Testament Reading and Exegesis. There is extensive 
reading in the Pauline corpus and other epistles. Selected passages are 
studied intensively with emphasis upon linguistic analysis. Exegetical 
method is demonstrated and papers assigned for student preparation. 

Two hours credit. 

H 302. New Testament Reading and Exegesis. Continuation of H 301. 
Two hours credit. 

H 303. Old Testament Reading and Exegesis. There is extensive read- 
ing in the prophetic literature with emphasis upon the former prophets. 
Selected passages are studied intensely with emphasis upon linguistic 
analysis. Exegetical method is demonstrated and papers assigned for 
student preparation. 

Two hours credit. 

H 304. Old Testament Reading and Exegesis. Continuation of H 303, 
with emphasis upon the latter prophets. 

Two hours credit. 

H 305. Biblical Literature. Honors students are expected to cover the 
assigned readings in the regular Biblical courses 222 New Testament 
Introduction and 213 Old Testament Introduction during the second year. 
They will meet for review and discussion under special supervision for 
one period per week. 

One hour credit. 

H 306. Biblical Literature. Continuation of H 305. 
One hour credit. 



In the Senior year the Honors Program consists of five hours each 
semester distributed as follows: 

H 307. New Testament Reading and Word Study. During this year 
those in the Honors Program will cover the remainder of the books of 
the New Testament which were not covered in the Middler year. There 
will be intensive study including word study, further exegesis, and sys- 
tematic study of grammar. 

Two hours credit. 

56 



H 308. New Testament Reading and Word Study. Continuation of 
H 307. 

Two hours credit. 

H 309. Old Testament Reading and Word Study. There will be extensive 
reading in the third part of the Old Testament, the Writings. Selections 
from the Psalms, Proverbs and Job will be read. In addition there will 
be intensive study of key words and concepts in the Old Testament with 
emphasis on method in word study. Each student will prepare one or two 
word studies under supervision. 

Two hours credit. 

H 310. Old Testament Reading and Word Study. Continuation of H 309. 
Selections from the remaining literature will be read, with special consid- 
eration given to the Aramaic portions of Ezra and Daniel. 

Two hours credit. 



H 311. Biblical Literature. This seminar is designed to coordinate the 
students' reading and integrate the Honors Program. Students will be 
expected to read extensively in the scholarly literature relevant to Biblical 
Introduction and Theology. Methodology in research and bibliography 
will be stressed. 

One hour credit. 



H 312. Biblical Literature. Continuation of H 311. 
One hour credit. 



57 



THE HISTORY AND THEOLOGY DIVISION 

Mr. Wiest, Chairman 
Mr. McCloy Mr. Bald 

Mr. Gerstner Mr. Smith 

Mr. Johnson 

Some course offerings, both required and elective, customarily listed under the 
History and Theology division, are correlated with Church and Ministry and are 
listed under that division. 



REQUIRED COURSES 

410. Church History I. A survey of Christian life, thought, and prac- 
tice from the Apostolic Age to the period of Gregory the Great, and the 
beginning of the Middle Ages in the West; the mission and expansion of 
the church; the rise of offices and government, art and literature. 

Juniors, first semester, 3 hours credit. Mr. McCloy 

411. Church History II. Following an exposition of St. Augustine, 
this course traces church history from the breakdown of Roman Catholic 
unity to the Calvinist and Lutheran formulations of 1550-1560. Medieval 
society and faith, pre-reformation movements, and the rise of the reform 
are considered. 

Juniors, second semester, 3 hours credit. Mr. Smith 

420. Church History III. The history of the Christian church from 
the end of the sixteenth century to the present, exclusive of post-colonial 
American history. 

Middlers, first semester, 3 hours credit. Mr. Gerstner 

510. Philosophical Theology. A study of the systems of Christian 
thought that illustrate ways in which theology has been related to phil- 
osophy. Special attention is given to the problems of apologetics and 
communication in the modern period, and to contemporary philosophical 
challenges to Christian thought. 

Juniors, first semester, 3 hours credit. Mr. Wiest 

511. Contemporary Theology. Introduction to the major figures, 
problems and issues in contemporary theological thought. 

Juniors, second semester, 2 hours credit. Mr. Johnson and Mr. Wiest 

511-A. Contemporary Theology. Same course as 511, with an additional 
hour of reading. 

M.Ed., second semester, 3 hours credit. Mr. Johnson and Mr. Wiest 

520. Systematic Theology I. The person and work of Jesus Christ, the 
Christian understanding of man, and the nature of the Christian life. 
Classic and contemporary theological systems, representing the major 
movements of Christian thought, are read and critically evaluated. 

Middlers, first semester, 3 hours credit. Mr. Johnson 

58 



521. Systematic Theology II. The doctrine of God, the Christian view 
of revelation, and problems of theological thought and method. Reading 
and critical evaluation are continued in the systems employed in Sys- 
tematic Theology I. 

Middlers, second semester, 3 hours credit. Mr. Johnson 



ELECTIVES 

430. Patrology. A study of Christian literature including the Apos- 
tolic Fathers, the Apologists, the African and Alexandrian schools, the 
great writers of the fourth and fifth centuries in the East and West, and 
concluding with John of Damascus and Isidor of Seville. 

Mr. McCloy 

431. Christian Antiquities. A study of practices in the daily life of 
the ancient church, including its worship, art, social customs, law, etc., 
with special attention given to those elements which have survived in 
the present day church. 

Mr. McCloy 

432. Medieval Christendom. Mr. Smith 

440. Seminar in the Sixteenth Century. An introduction to the six- 
teenth century, its politico-religious problems, church history and the 
development of theology. Special attention is given to a selected problem 
and an extended paper is required. 

Mr. Smith 

441. Symbols of the Reformation. An examination and comparison of 
various creeds, catechisms and confessions arising within the Protestant 
Reformation, having in view the theological aspects of present-day 
ecumenical conversations. 

Mr. Bald 

443. Roman Catholicism Since Trent. The historical and theological 
development of Rome from the Council of Trent to 1900. 

Mr. Gerstner 

444. The Age of Orthodoxy. The Reformation after the Reformers 
left the scene. A close study of Continental Reformed and Lutheran Or- 
thodoxy of the seventeenth century. A knowledge of Latin required. 

Mr. Gerstner 

445. Puritanism. English and American Puritanism from the middle 
of the sixteenth to the middle of the eighteenth century, with particular 
attention given to the Westminster Assembly, Presbyterianism and 
Democracy. Mr Gerstner 

450. Christian Biography. The lives of outstanding Christians and the 
literary forms of biography and autobiography: the development of 
hagiography as an historical phenomenon and of Christian personality 
both ancient and modern. Mr McCloy 

451. Thomas Aquinas. An introduction to the philosophical and theo- 
logical thought of Thomas Aquinas. Particular emphasis is given to 
the expression of his system in the Summae, Summa Contra Gentiles and 
Summa Theologiae. ,, r 1H 

59 



453. Seminar in Arminius and Wesley. Reading and discussion of the 
theological writings of Jacob Arminius and John Wesley. (Two hours 
required of Methodist students for graduation.) 

Mr. Johnson 

454. Seminar in Edwards. Reading and discussion of selected major 
writings of Edwards. Mr Gergtner 

455. Methodist Doctrine and Polity. Required of Methodist students 
for graduation. Offered every three years. 

Three hours credit. Mr. Chamberlin 

460. History of Apologetics. The nature of the defense of Christian 
faith explored through an examination of a number of apologetic sys- 
tems of the past and present. M R Id 

462. The New England Theology. Traces the theological develop- 
ment of the New England School from the death of Edwards to 1900. 
Especial consideration of Hopkins, Bushnell, Taylor and Parks. The 
relation of this school to the American Presbyterian Church indicated. 

Mr. Gerstner 

470. Advanced Reading and Research in Church History. Guided re- 
search and research in sources of church history. Subjects for study 
will be determined in conference with the instructor. Permission from the 
instructor is necessary for registration. 

Mr. Gerstner, Mr. Smith or Mr. McCloy 

530. Theology and History. Classic and contemporary interpretations 
of history. Herodotus, Thucydides, Augustine, the principal figures who 
developed the doctrine of progress, Hegel, Nietzsche, Marx and modern 
theologians, historians and philosophers who have been endeavoring to 
formulate a new philosophy or theology of history. « Johnson 

531. Kierkegaard and Contemporary Existentialism. The thought of 
Kierkegaard, Marcel, Heidegger, Sartre, Jaspers and other philosophers 
and theologians who are contributing to the existentialist movement. 

Mr. Johnson 

532. Liberal Theology and the Social Gospel. The struggle between 
orthodoxy and liberal theology in America. Discussion of the main 
types of American liberal theology and the intellectual and social issues 
with which they have dealt. An analysis of the orthodox and liberal ele- 
ments in the thought of contemporary Protestant theologians. 

Mr. Wiest 

540. Contemporary Issues in Philosophical Theology. The problems 
that have been raised for Christian thought by recent naturalism, logical 
positivism and process philosophy; and a study of attempts to deal with 
current philosophical issues in the theologies of Temple, Heim, Tillich, 
Buber, Hartshorne and others. 

Mr. Wiest 

60 



541. Seminar in the Problem of Theological Authority. Reading and 
discussion of the development of the Protestant problem of authority in 
Reformation works, seventeenth and eighteenth century orthodoxy, and 
nineteenth century theology; and an examination of the attempts of 
several major contemporary theologians to speak to this problem. 

Mr. Johnson 

542. Theology and Science. The role of science in shaping the modern 
mind. Recent changes in our understanding of the nature of scientific 
knowledge. A survey of theological responses to modern science and of 
the possibilities for a "theology of nature" in contemporary protestant 
thought. 

Mr. Wiest 

543. Seminar in Tillich and Barth. A comparative study of the theo- 
logical systems of Paul Tillich and Karl Barth as the major representa- 
tives of modern philosophical and kerygmatic theology. Reading and dis- 
cussion. 

Mr. Johnson 

545. Seminar in Modern Christology. Reading and discussion of the 
unique developments in the interpretation of the person and work of 
Jesus Christ, or the doctrines of incarnation and atonement, in nineteenth 
and twentieth century Protestant theology. 

Mr. Johnson 

551. Advanced Reading in Theology. Guided reading and research in 
theological sources. The subjects and areas pursued are determined by 
the needs and interests of the students. Permission from the instructor 
is necessary for registration. 

Mr. Bald and Mr. Johnson 

552. Advanced Reading in Philosophy of Religion. Guided reading and 
research. The subjects and areas pursued are determined by the needs 
and interests of the students. Permission from the instructor is neces- 
sary for registration. 

Mr. Wiest or Mr. Jackson 



HONORS COURSES 

H 610. Seminar in Augustine. Reading and discussion of the follow- 
ing works of St. Augustine: De Catechezandis Rudibus, De Moribus Ec- 
clesiae Catholicae, De Baptismo, Confessiones, De Libero Arbitrio, De 
Gratia Christi et de Peccato Originali, De Spiritu et Littera, De Trini- 
tate (in part), De Civitate Dei (in part). 

Middlers, first semester, 2 hours. Mr. Smith 

H 611. Seminar in Luther. Reading and discussion of selected writings 
of Martin Luther. 

Middlers, second semester, 2 hours. Mr. Johnson 

H 613. Seminar in Aquinas and Neo-Thomism. 

Middlers, second semester, 2 hours. (Alternative to H 611) Mr. Bald 

H 621 and 622. Reading in Theological French. Translation of sections 
from authors not utilized in the other courses in the honors program. 
Initial reading is in Etienne Gilson, Introduction a VEtude de S. Jugustin. 

Middlers, offered both semesters, 1 hour weekly. Mr. Smith 

61 



H 623 and 624. Reading in Theological German. Reading in German 
historical and theological sources. 

Middlers, offered both semesters, one hour weekly. Mr. McCloy 



H 625 and 626. Reading in Ecclesiastical Latin. This course is designed 
to introduce students who have studied classical Latin to the language of 
the Vulgate and more simple texts of the Latin Fathers. 

Middlers, offered both semesters, 1 hour weekly. Mr. McCloy 



H 627 and 628. Reading in Patristic Greek. Students who have achieved 
a certain competence in New Testament Greek will be introduced to 
selected writings of the Greek Fathers. 

Middlers, offered both semesters, 1 hour weekly. Mr. McCloy 



H 637. Seminar in Nineteenth Century Theology. Reading and dis- 
cussion of the writings of major Protestant theologians of the nineteenth 
century in the context of a consideration of the intellectual and cultural 
currents of the period. 

Seniors, first semester, 2 hours. Mr. Wiest 



H 638. Seminar in Contemporary Theology. Guided research. The 
subjects and areas studied are determined by the needs and interests of 
the students. 

Seniors, second semester, 2 hours. 

Mr. Johnson, Mr. Smith and Mr. Wiest 



H 639. Seminar in Modern Philosophies of Religion. (Alternative to 
H 637). 

Seniors, first semester, 2 hours. Mr. Wiest and Mr. Jackson 



H 640 and 641. Reading in Theological German. Reading in untrans- 
lated works of Karl Barth and German theological periodicals. 

Seniors, offered both semesters, 1 hour weekly. Mr. Gerstner 



H 642 and 643. Reading in Theological French. Reading in the sources 
of sixteenth century French reformed history and in contemporary French 
literature. 

Seniors, offered both semesters, 1 hour weekly. Mr. Smith 



H 644 and 645. Reading in Ecclesiastical Latin. A practice in reading 
the more difficult texts of Scholastic writings and medieval historical 
narratives. 

Seniors, offered both semesters, 1 hour weekly. Mr. McCloy 



H 646 and 647. Reading in Patristic Greek. Readings in the Cappa- 
docian Fathers, St. John of Damascus and certain Byzantine texts. 

Seniors, offered both semesters, 1 hour weekly. Mr. McCloy 

62 



THE CHURCH AND MINISTRY DIVISION 
Mr. Clyde, Chairman 

Mr. Jackson Mr. Ralston 

Miss Burrows Mr. Nicholson 

Mr. Bald Mr. Chamberlin 

Mr. Smith Mr. Wilmore 

Mr. Wiest Mr. Dohrenburg 

Mr. Alexander Mr. Buttrick 
Mr. Scott 



REQUIRED COURSES 

710. Principles of Expression. Vital thinking as the basis of right 
expression for every speaking occasion. This course aims to enable the 
student to experience the word he speaks in thought, feeling, and imag- 
ination at the moment of utterance and share its vital qualities undimin- 
ished with his audience. Oral reading from the Scriptures and other 
sources. Preparation of the instrument through disciplines of voice and 
body, together with correction of individual faults. Small sections, drill 
periods, recordings, and private conferences. 

Juniors, first semester. Mr. Dohrenburg 

711. Interpretative Reading. Oral interpretation of a varied selection 
of prose, poetry, and drama as a means of developing keener sensitivity 
to the written word and greater effectiveness in communicating it. The 
objective will be to mature the skills and principles acquired in Principles 
of Expression course, which is prerequisite. Small sections, private 
conferences, recordings. 

Juniors, second semester. Mr. Dohrenburg 

713. Church and Ministry I. The purpose of this course is to clarify 
to the student his prospective situation as a minister in American culture. 
Both Church and culture are studied historically, sociologically, and 
theologically; and the Church is considered in specific relation to the 
problems of urban and industrial life, racial and economic tensions, pop- 
ulation growth and movement, and the church's conventional methods. 

Juniors, second semester, 3 hours credit. 

Mr. Wilmore and Mr. Smith 

720. Church and Ministry II. This course is designed to enable the 
student to achieve an understanding of the nature and function of the 
preaching and teaching offices within the one ministry of the Church and 
to introduce him, within the context of that understanding, to the content 
and skills requisite for an effective practice of these offices as they are 
informed by the insights that derive from Biblical, theological and secular 
sources. Carefully directed field education is required (1 credit hour) 
in which the student engages in ministry. Closely correlated with this 
field assignment is a concurrent classroom experience in which several 
theological disciplines are presented in their relationship to the field ex- 
perience and to each other within the purpose of the course: exegesis of 
Biblical passages selected for their implications for a doctrine of the 
Church and the Ministry and for the content and skills of the preaching 
and teaching offices (Old Testament and New Testament Exegesis, 1 credit 
hour each), theological reflection upon Biblical data leading to a doc- 
trine of the Church and the Ministry (Systematic Theology, 1 credit 
hour), the content and skills of the preaching and teaching offices in the 
one ministry of the Church as grounded in Biblical and theological under- 

63 



standing, and utilizing pertinent insights from secular sources (Homilet- 
ics, 1 credit hour, and Christian Education, 2 credit hours). 

Middlers, first semester, 7 hours credit. 

Inter-divisional faculty, Mr. Bald, coordinator 

720-A. Church and Ministry II. This course is designed to enable the 
student to achieve an understanding of the nature and function of the 
teaching office within the ministry of the Church and to introduce her to 
an effective practice of this office as it is informed by the insights that 
derive from Biblical, theological and secular sources. Carefully directed 
field observation is required (1 credit hour) in which the student observes 
the practice of the teaching ministry. Closely correlated with this field 
assignment is a concurrent classroom experience in which several theo- 
logical disciplines are presented in their relationship to the field experi- 
ence and to each other within the purpose of the course: theological re- 
flection upon Biblical data leading to a doctrine of the Church and the 
Ministry (Systematic Theology, 1 credit hour), the content and skills 
of the teaching office in the ministry of the Church as grounded in Bibli- 
cal and theological understanding, and utilizing pertinent insights from 
secular courses (Christian Education, 2 credit hours). 

M.R.E. Juniors, first semester, 4 hours credit. 

Inter-divisional faculty, Mr. Bald, coordinator 

721. Church and Ministry III. Continuation of 720 with the exception 
that the time allotted to the preaching office (Homiletics) is equivalent 
to 2 credit hours and to the teaching office (Christian Education) is 
equivalent to 1 credit hour. 

Middlers, second semester, 7 hours credit. 

Inter-divisional faculty, Mr. Bald, coordinator 

721-A. Church and Ministry III. Continuation of 720-A. 
M.R.E. Juniors, second semester, 4 hours credit. 

Inter-divisional faculty, Mr. Bald, coordinator 

730. Church and Ministry IV. This course deals with the theory and 
practice of the pastoral office. It brings together within the unifying 
concept of pastoral theology these concerns: Christian ethics, pastoral 
counseling, liturgies, mission, program, and polity of the Church. Quite 
diverse and experimental field experiences, selected according to the 
students' needs and interests, will be correlated with the academic ma- 
terials. 

Seniors, first semester, 7 hours credit. 

Inter-divisional faculty, Mr. Bald, coordinator 

731. Church and Ministry V. Continuation of Church and Ministry IV. 

Seniors, second semester, 7 hours credit. 

Inter-divisional faculty, Mr. Bald, coordinator 

732. Church and Ministry VI. One hour of Hebrew exegesis and one 
hour of Greek exegesis correlated with the preaching office. 

Seniors, first semester, 3 hours credit. 

Inter-divisional faculty, Mr. Bald, coordinator 

733. Church and Ministry VII. Continuation of Church and Ministry VI. 

Seniors, second semester, 3 hours credit. 

Inter-divisional faculty, Mr. Bald, coordinator 

64 



ELECTIVES 

810. The Great Ages of Preaching. A study will be made of the 
doctrinal and ethical content, literary style, homiletical method, his- 
torical and spiritual background of preaching from the days of the 
Apostles to the beginning of the 19th century. ^ Scott 

811. Preaching the Parables. The course is two-fold: a study of the 
history of the interpretation of Parables, and the actual writing and 
classroom delivery of sermons from the Parables. ™ Nicholson 

812. Preaching from Acts. The course is three-fold: a review of the 
historical-critical approach to Acts, the discovery of homiletical mater- 
ial, and the actual writing and classroom delivery of sermons. 

Mr. Nicholson 

813. Preaching the Christian Year. A study will be made of the Chris- 
tian year and its use in preaching. Students will write and deliver 
selected sermons in class and prepare a full outline of a year's sermons. 

Mr. Scott 

814. Contemporary Preachers and Preaching. A study will be made 
of representative preachers from the 19th century to the present with 
special emphasis on the preaching of the last decade. *» q *. 

820. Theological Method and the Educational Work of the Church. This 

course is designed to show how Christian education is the process by 
which one comes to think theologically, to try to detail how this process 
works in the local church, and to try to establish norms for the evalua- 
tion of what the local church does within its teaching ministry. 

Mr. Jackson 

821. Personality Development. The meaning of the self, its develop- 
ment, its aberrations, its societal nature, its symbolization, its motiva- 
tions, etc., will be studied from the point of view of the several psychiatric 
theories, social psychology, and Biblical images. The relation of person- 
ality development to the work of the ministry will be clarified. 

Mr. Jackson 

822. Theory and Practice of the Devotional Life. A consideration of 
the devotional life of the Christian in the modern world. The relation 
of doctrine to the devotional life. The means of grace studied. The 
course is also designed to acquaint the student with the devotional 

classics ' Mr. Jackson 

823. Hymnology. An analytical and historical study of the great hymns 
and tunes of the Christian Church. Consideration of the qualities of a 
good hymn. Practical and effective use of the hymnal. ^ r j^alston 

824. Masterpieces of Religious Music. A study of the various forms of 
music through which men have expressed their faith. Demonstration of 
the power of music to illuminate Christian truth and to "give wings to 
words." This would be primarily a "listening course" making use of 
records but with assigned background reading and class comment. The 
purpose would be to give the student an appreciation of various forms 
of musical expression as well as some familiarity with specific works of 

musical art ' Mr. Ralston 

65 



825. Dramatics in Christian Education. A study of the purpose and 
place of dramatics in the program of the church. Lecture, discussion, 
and project work in the areas of creative dramatics, choral reading, role 
playing, puppetry, playreading, plays, and pageants. 

Miss Burrows 

826. Seminar in Christian Education. A study of the organization and 
administration of Christian education in the local church. Special atten- 
tion is given to special aspects of the Church's teaching ministry: leader- 
ship education, drama, audio-visuals, and youth work. 

Miss Burrows 

827. Building and Administering a Church Program. This course 
deals chiefly with the session committees of worship, evangelism, Chris- 
tian education, fellowship and stewardship, how they are formed, pre- 
pared to function, and how they relate to program and the people. The 
latest in helpful literature is provided. A project analyzing an actual 
church program is offered during the course so that the student might 
apply the principles of the course to the betterment of a local program. 
Related books are to be read and reported on. 

Mr. Alexander 

828. The Church and Higher Education. Designed especially for those 
interested in college teaching, campus ministry, or serving a church 
near a campus. A review of the relation of the church to higher educa- 
tion; an examination of theological issues in the relation of the Christian 
faith to higher education; and an exploration of current patterns in the 
Church's ministry to students and faculty. 

Mr. Chamberlin 

829. Doctrine of the Church and the Ministry. A consideration of the 
recent attempts to reformulate the doctrine of the church, and redefine 
the nature of the ministry, within the present cultural situation. These 
will be critically evaluated in the light of the history of doctrine and 
Reformation theology. 

Mr. Johnson 

830. Christian Education Among Children. A study of the religious 
needs of children from birth through twelve years of age paralleled with 
the church's possibilities for meeting these needs. Weekday Christian 
education programs such as vacation church school, day camping, and 
youth club as well as the Sunday church school curriculum are studied 
within the framework of how children learn. A degree of observation 
and laboratory work is included as a part of the course. 

Miss Burrows 

831. Christian Education Among Adults. Principles and approaches 
to the church's educational ministry to adults; introduction to established 
and changing patterns of program; relation to the insights from the gen- 
eral field of adult education; special emphasis upon work with young 
adults, parent education, and new approaches to the ministry to the aged. 

Mr. Chamberlin 

832. Contemporary Developments in Christian Education. Advanced 
course, especially for those hoping to be ministers or directors of Chris- 
tian education. Reviewing the recent history of church education, par- 
ticularly the relation of contemporary Protestant theology to general 
educational philosophy, and an examination of various efforts to express 
these theological developments in new forms of educational program. 

Mr. Chamberlin 

66 



840. Theology and Psychiatry. The metaphysical presuppositions, 
method, understanding of therapy, and some aspects of human nature 
will be compared. An attempt will be made to define mutuality and dis- 
creteness between the two disciplines. An introduction to Freudian, 
Jungian, and other psychiatric writings will be made. j^ r j^^son 

841. Seminar in Counseling. An advanced course utilizing the case 
work of students, drawing principles for both diagnosis and therapy 
out of the cases presented, and making evaluations. The role of the 
minister as counselor is carefully scrutinized. -^ r j ac k son 

842. Evangelism. This course offers a detailed discussion and study 
of the definition, motivation, urgency and nature of evangelism. Personal 
work, evangelism for commitment, evangelism through fellowship, youth 
evangelism and various opportunities for pastor and laity through the 
church are covered. A program of reading and book reports acquaints 
the student with the best literature in the field. Opportunity for role 
playing in class is afforded. Mr Alexander 

850. World Mission of the Church. A survey of the ecumenical witness 
of the church throughout the world, with special reference to the work 
of the United Presbyterian Church. I^ r q V( j 6 

851. Tutorial in Missions. Reading and discussions on missions, de- 
signed particularly for missionary candidates and those considering be- 
coming candidates. Mr C1 , 

852. The American Calvinistic Churches. This course reviews the 
European origins of American Reformed thought and traces the develop- 
ment of the movements which have historically expressed the Calvinist 
tradition. Attention is given to the social and intellectual history of 
American Calvinism in its relations to secular history and the forming 
of the denominations, particularly the Presbyterian. « g m ui l 

853. Greek Orthodox Christianity. A study of modern Greek ortho- 
doxy and its historical background in the Byzantine period and thereafter; 
the liturgy, art, music and general culture of Eastern Christianity; 
monasticism; and the various national forms, including the Russian 
Orthodox Church. Mr> McCJoy 

854. Comparative Religion. A study of the origin and development of 
religion, with special investigation of Primitive Religion, Hinduism, 
Buddhism, Confucianism, and Islam, with regard to their bearing on 
Modern Missions. Mr C j yde 

855. Major Sects. Jehovah's Witnesses, Mormonism, Christian Sci- 
ence and other groups compared with catholic Christianity. Resem- 
blances and differences noted. « G ers tner 

856. The Protestant Approach to Catholicism. A comparative inves- 
tigation of Protestantism and Catholicism, with a study of the general 
problem of Protestant evangelism in connection with Catholicism. 

Mr. Clyde 

67 



857. The Protestant Approach to Communism. A study of Communism, 
its challenge to Christianity, the special answer of Protestantism to 
Communism, and the general problems with which Communism is in- 

volved ' Mr. Clyde 

858. The Ecumenical Movement. A survey of the origin and develop- 
ment of the modern Ecumenical Movement, combined with an exploration 
of the elements of church unity and some anticipation of the future. 

Mr. Clyde 

859. Seminar in Ecumenics. This course is offered at Duquesne Uni- 
versity under a joint faculty including Duquesne professors, Pittsburgh 
Seminary professors, and others. It is open to qualified Pittsburgh Sem- 
inary students. 

860. Church History and the Living Church. A study of the Christian 
denominations within the city of Pittsburgh as witnesses to their history. 
Guided visits to the local churches with a study of worship, theology, art, 
and culture against the background of general church history. 

Mr. McCloy 

861. Faith and Culture. The issues raised for theology by the inter- 
action between faith and culture. The relation of Christianity to present 
cultural currents, intellectual, social and artistic, and an analysis of the 
problems which they present for the communication of the Christian 

faith - Mr. Wiest 

870. The Theological Ethics of William Temple and Reinhold Niebuhr. 

A comparative study of the social thought of the late Archbishop of 
Canterbury and one of America's leading voices in the field of ethics in 
relation to their theological foundations. ** Bald 



871. Seminar in Social Ethics. The Christian address to the problems 
of economics, politics, international affairs, education, and the family. 
The implications of an understanding of these areas for theology, the 
vocation of the Christian, and the service of the church in the world. 

Mr. Bald 



872. Research Seminar in Selected Social Problems. Students will 
elect specific areas of social concern in modern culture for investigation 
in which they will seek to relate them to the demands and insights of 
the Christian ethic. « vt \a 



873. Faith and Contemporary Literature. A study of the relationship 
between the Christian Faith and themes in contemporary literature. 
Works by a number of modern writers including Kafka, Camus, Faulkner, 
and Warren, among others, will be read and discussed. ™ Buttrick 

877. The Classics of Christian Literature. A study of the outstanding 
literary masterpieces of the ancient, mediaeval, and reformation and 
post-reformation eras, including homilies, poetry, drama, devotional es- 
says, history, the Latin hymns, Dante, French religious literature, and 

Milton - Mr. McCloy 

68 



SUMMER FIELD EDUCATION 

Every student is encouraged to spend one summer in field 
education, preferably in some form of clinical training. Students 
who choose and qualify for clinical training in approved programs 
will be given two hours of elective credit for each six weeks clinical 
training to a maximum of four credit hours. For students who do 
not choose or do not qualify for a clinical training program a num- 
ber of options without any elective credit are allowed (such as 
national park chaplaincies, Board of National Missions assign- 
ments, assistantships, etc.), upon consultation with and approval 
by the Field Education Office. 

Any student seeking a church-related position for the summer 
must counsel with the Field Education Office so that provision 
may be made for supervision on the field. Summer pastorates 
for students who have completed only their Junior year are dis- 
couraged because such students will not have had the courses in 
Church and Ministry dealing with the teaching and preaching 
offices. 



THE MASTER OF THEOLOGY DEGREE 

The faculty of Pittsburgh Theological Seminary is pleased to 
announce a new program for the Master of Theology degree. Appli- 
cants will be accepted for the fall of 1962. Programs are offered in 
three fields: Biblical Studies, History and Theology, and Advanced 
Pastoral Studies. Further programs of graduate and professional 
study are under discussion and will be announced in future catalogues. 

The Masters' curricula announced on the following pages are 
open only to candidates for the Master's degree itself. Approximately 
six applicants will be admitted to each program per year. Every stu- 
dent will receive close personal attention from the professors in the 
curriculum of his choice. 

While Pittsburgh Seminary does not plan a doctoral program 
in the immediate future, the Masters' curricula here offered are ap- 
plicable to advanced graduate work in institutions with cognate pro- 
grams. These Masters' programs are planned for two purposes: 
to help qualify candidates for the campus ministry or the teaching 
profession; and to benefit pastors who may wish to improve their 
effectiveness in Biblical, theological, or pastoral studies in relation 
to ministerial responsibilities. 



70 



Standards for Admission 

1. A B.D. degree from an accredited seminary. 

2. An average of B or better in the B.D. degree or in a qualify- 
ing examination, according to the discretion of the Graduate 
Education Committee. 

3. The ability to use any language integral to the chosen field 
of study. 

4. The ability to handle English composition with competence. 



Requirements for the Degree 

1. Twenty-four course hours with an average of B or better. 
(A student in full residence is one who carries the full load of 
24 hours in one year, 12 each semester. A student in half- 
residence is one who carries six hours each semester over a 
two-year period.) 

2. Six hours for a thesis or a research project which would be 
written up in final and acceptable form and either option 
completed by the end of the third year. 

3. A comprehensive examination covering the 24 units of study. 

4. An oral examination on the thesis or research project. 



FEES AND EXPENSES 

Matriculation Fee $35.00 

Tuition ...... $20.00 per credit hour 

Library Fee ...... $20.00 per year 

Graduation Fee $10.00 



Applicants for this degree may write to the Director of Ad- 
missions. 



71 



DESCRIPTION OF COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

FOR THE 

MASTER OF THEOLOGY DEGREE 

THE MASTER OF THEOLOGY PROGRAM 

IN 

BIBLICAL STUDIES 

The Master's degree in the Biblical Division is precisely a Bib- 
lical degree. While the thesis may concentrate on one Testament, 
the course work is deliberately designed to provide a certain degree 
of qualification in the whole field. 

Advanced Hebrew Grammar Advanced Greek Grammar 

and Reading and Reading 

Aramaic Syriac 

Bible Seminar Bible Seminar 

Grammar and Reading (incl. LXX) Grammar and Reading 

Exegesis Exegesis 

Bibliography Bibliography 

Advanced Hebrew Grammar and Reading. Study to supplement and 
continue undergraduate work done with the Hebrew O.T. Two hours 
credit in each of two semesters. 

Advanced Greek Grammar and Reading. Study to supplement under- 
graduate work done with the Greek N.T. Books on the N.T. not previous- 
ly read will be completed, and selected portions of the Greek O.T. will be 
added. Two hours credit in each of two semesters. 

Aramaic. Elementary instruction in the language with reading of 
Aramaic portions of the O.T. and selected passages from other Aramaic 
documents. Two hours credit, one semester. 

Syriac. Elementary instruction in the language with readings from the 
Syriac version of the Bible. Two hours credit, one semester. 

Bible Seminar. Problems of introduction, text, archaeology, and the 
various areas of criticism are considered with special attention to the 
needs of the particular candidates enrolled. Two hours credit in each of 
two semesters. 

Exegesis. Thorough exegesis of selected passages in the Hebrew O.T. 
and the Greek N.T. Two hours credit in each of two semesters. 

Bibliography. Survey of the modern literature on the Bible with read- 
ing and discussion of selected volumes. Two hours credit in each of two 
semesters. 

72 



THE MASTER OF THEOLOGY PROGRAM 

IN 

HISTORY AND THEOLOGY 

The candidate for the Master's degree in History and Theology 
may major in either Church History or Theology, taking 21 hours, 
including a six-hour thesis credit, in the major field and nine hours 
in the minor field. Class work must be completed within two years; 
the final date for completion of the thesis may be extended to the 
close of a third academic year. The plan of the two programs is as 
follows, the last three courses named in each major being offered in 
the minor field. 

Church History Theology 

Historiography Seminar in Theological Method 

Patristics Christology 

Research in Puritanism 19th Century Theology 

The American Churches Elective 

and Secular Culture 

Guided Reading in Church History 

Thesis 

Christology 



Guided Reading in Theology 

Thesis 

Patristics 



19th Century Theology 17th Century Orthodoxy 

Guided Reading in Theology Guided Reading in Church History 

Historiography. The study of the history of the writing of church his- 
tories; the interrelationship of history and theology in Eusebius, Augus- 
tine, Orosius, the Magdeburg Centuries, Mosheim, Milner, Neander, 
Schaff, Harnack, etc.; modern philosophies of history and the writing of 
church history; the study of primary and secondary sources and the his- 
tory of Christian scholarship. Three hours credit. 

Seminar in Theological Method. The nature of theological thinking 
will be studied: Prolegomena, organization of systems, theological lan- 
guage, and hermeneutics with illustration from representative theolo- 
gians. Three hours credit. 

Patristics. The study of the idea of ecclesiastical tradition; the solu- 
tions of the Fathers of the ancient church to the recurrent or immediate 
problems of faith, life, and church order; the history of patristics and 
the controversies concerning it, and its significance for the modern ecu- 
menical movement. The manuals of Quasten and Altaner will serve as 
guides, and the texts will be studied for the most part in such series of 
English translations as the Ante-and Post Nicene Fathers, Ancient Christian 
Writers. The Fathers of the Church, etc. Three hours credit. 

73 



Christology. Research and discussion of the problem of Christology. 
Readings in the sources with particular emphasis on Christology as the 
definitive issue in contemporary theology. Three hours credit. 

Research in Puritanism. Special topics such as the covenant, seeking, 
church order and the relation of church and state will be explored. Three 
hours credit. 

17th Century Orthodoxy. This course will consider the orthodox back- 
ground of Schleiermacher and other later theologians. Three hours credit. 

19th Century Theology. Reading and discussion of the writings of 
Schleiermacher and Ritschl, showing their influence upon theological 
trends of thought leading to the present. Three hours credit. 

The American Churches and Secular Culture. A study of the literature 
of Christian ethics in America during the national period. Each year this 
course is offered, the literature of the following periods will be empha- 
sized: the era of the Revolution, 1760-1830; the era of national division, 
1830-1870; the first industrial period, 1870-1920. Three hours credit. 

Elective. To be announced. Three hours credit. 



Guided Reading in Church History. Readings approved by the professor 
designed to prepare the student for general examination in the field of 
Church History. Regular discussion of assignments is required. Three 
hours credit. 



Guided Reading in Theology. Guided reading in theological works, 
both historical and contemporary, with which the student is not sufficient- 
ly familiar, looking toward general examination in the field of Theology. 
Three hours credit. 



Thesis in Church History. Individual guidance of a major project of 
research is offered. Any topic within the field of Church History may be 
selected, contingent upon the approval of the advising professor. Six 
hours credit. 



Thesis in Theology. Individual guidance of a major project of research 
is offered. Any topic within the field of Theology may be selected, con- 
tingent upon the approval of the supervising professor. Six hours credit. 



74 



PROGRAM FOR ADVANCED PASTORAL STUDIES 

The Program for Advanced Pastoral Studies is designed to help 
students to know themselves better; to understand and become sensi- 
tive to inter-personal relationships; to be familiar with group process; 
to become involved in creative dialogue between theological studies 
and the social sciences; and to see more clearly the resources of the 
Christian church for health at the various levels. 

The faculty teaching in this program will be made up both of 
seminary personnel and those professionally involved in mental 
health in the community. 



THE PRESCRIBED COURSE OF STUDY 

IN THE 

PROGRAM FOR ADVANCED PASTORAL STUDIES 



Year One 



Development Theory of 
Personality I 

Philosophical Issues in 
Psychotherapy 

Practicum with Children 



Development Theory of 

Personality II 3 

Dynamics of Family Life 3 

General Hospital Practicum 2 



Group Process 
Research Project 
Counseling Seminar 



Y ear Two 

3 
2 
2 



Theology and Psychology 

Pastoral Care and the 
Church Program 

Counseling Seminar 



A twelve weeks' course in an approved clinical training program 
will be required before graduation and may be taken previous to ad- 
mission or in the summer between the first and second years. 



75 



AWARDS GRANTED, 1960-1961 
THE DEGREE OF BACHELOR OF DIVINITY 

John Edwin Adams Kenmore, N. Y. 

B.A., University of Buffalo, 1957 

John Francis Balliet ........ Pittsburgh, Pa. 

B.A., Geneva College, 1958 

James Raymond Barber ........ Erie, Pa. 

A.B., Maryville College, 1958 

Jack H. Barton . Brentwood, Pa. 

A.B, Grove City College, 1958 

Dan Edmund Bastin ....... Mt. Vernon, Ohio 

B.A., Bowling Green University, 1958 

Frank Curtis Bates ........ Oakland, Calif. 

B.A., Whitworth College, 1958 

John Karl Baumann West Allis, Wis. 

B.A., Monmouth College, 1957 

Harry William Beveridge ...... Fayette City, Pa. 

A.B., Grove City College, 1952 

Bruce Lothian Blackie ........ Peoria, 111. 

B.A., Wheaton College, 1958 

Bruce Marion Brawdy ........ Albia, Iowa 

A.B., Monmouth College, 1957 

Keith Alan Brown ........ Pittsburgh, Pa. 

B.A., Kenyon College, 1958 

Eugene S. Callaway ....... Hobart, Indiana 

A.B., Monmouth College, 1957 

Robert Miller Carson, Jr Avonmore, Pa. 

A.B., University of Pittsburgh, 1950 
LL.B., University of Pittsburgh, 1952 

Vincent Arnold Caruso Arlington, N. J. 

A.B., Upsala College, 1958 

Robert Harvey Cauffman Norristown, Pa. 

A.B., Ursinus College, 1958 

Charles Victor Clark . . Akron, Ohio 

B.A., University of Akron, 1958 

Harry David Clewer Pittsburgh, Pa. 

B.B.A., University of Pittsburgh, 1953 

Thomas Patrick Clyde Ellwood City, Pa. 

A.B., Geneva College, 1957 

Richard Marlin Cromie Pittsburgh, Pa. 

A.B., University of Pittsburgh, 1957 

William Leroy Davis Union, New Jersey 

A.B., Tusculum College, 1958 

Leonard Edward Durbin Millvale, Pa. 

A.B., Mt. Union College, 1955 

Glenn Lowell Essex Homestead Park, Pa. 

B.S., State University of New York, 1953 

76 



Thomas Walter Estes Pittsburgh, Pa. 

A.B., American University, 1957 

Earl Foster Fair No. Washington, Pa. 

B.S., Slippery Rock State Teachers College, 1955 

Raymond Duke Fravel Bedford, Pa. 

A.B., Lycoming College, 1958 

John Charles Garvin Pittsburgh, Pa. 

A.B.. University of Pittsburgh, 1955 

Jay Sherrick Gilbert Pittsburgh, Pa. 

A.B., Gettysburg College, 1958 

Donald Eugene Gordon Elyria, Ohio 

B.A., Houghton College, 1957 

Robert James Gruber ........ Homestead, Pa. 

A.B., University of Pittsburgh, 1957 

Kenneth Sprague Haines ....... Lowellville, Pa. 

A.B., College of Wooster, 1958 

Thomas Donald Hamilton ....... Pittsburgh, Pa. 

B.B.A., University of Pittsburgh, 1958 

Thomas Kent Heinrichs ....... Pittsburgh, Pa. 

A.B., Waynesburg College, 1958 

James Robert Hervey Steubenville, Ohio 

B.A., Muskingum College, 1958 

John Melvin Hicks ....... Port Huron, Mich. 

B.A.. Westminster College, 1958 

Robert David Hill ........ Pittsburgh, Pa. 

B.A., Westminster College, 1956 

William Brooks Holtzclaw ....... Freeland, Pa. 

A.B., Albright College, 1957 

James Edward Hughes ....... Washington, D. C. 

A.B., Washington College, 1958 

Robert Gray Hultz ........ Pittsburgh, Pa. 

B.A., University of Pittsburgh, 1958 

William North Jackson ....... Pittsburgh, Pa. 

B.A., Westminster College, 1957 

John Franklin Jamieson ....... Stanford, Conn. 

A.B, Wheaton College, 1957 

Charles Robert Jansen ....... Philadelphia, Pa. 

A.B., Grove City College, 1958 

David James Johnson Pittsburgh, Pa. 

A.B., University of Pittsburgh, 1956 

Raymond Archer Jones ....... Pittsburgh, Pa. 

B.A, Geneva College, 1958 

Donald Robert Keen ....... Dravosburg, Pa. 

A.B., College of Wooster, 1956 

Harold Owen Kelley Uniontown, Pa. 

B.A., Maryville College, 1958 

77 



Gordon Wayne Kunde ....... Pittsburgh, Pa. 

B.A., Muskingum College, 1958 

Samuel Sheldon Logan . . . • Pittsburgh, Pa. 

B.S., Grove City College, 1957 

Russell Edwin Mase ........ Canton, Ohio 

B.S., Ohio State University, 1955 
M.S., Ohio State University, 1957 

James Lawrence Mawhinney ....... Gibsonia, Pa. 

B.A., Westminster College, 1956 

Rudolph Carl Menkens ........ Union, N. J. 

A.B, Tusculum College, 1958 

Richard Lee Meyer ........ Seward, Pa. 

A.B., University of Pittsburgh, 1958 

Frederick Eugene Mong ....... Franklin, Pa. 

A.B., Grove City College. 1958 

Robert Laing Montgomery ....... Pittsburgh, Pa. 

B.A., Muskingum College, 1958 

Charles Melvin Olsen ........ Minden, Neb. 

B.A, Sterling College, 1957 

Leslie Robert Franklin Papp . . . . . McKeesport, Pa. 

A.B., Elmhurst College, 1958 

Lloyd Jack Paxton . . . . . . . . Edgewood, Pa. 

B.A., University of Pittsburgh, 1952 

George Stahl Phillips ....... N. Braddock, Pa. 

A.B., University of Pittsburgh, 1955 

Roy Walter Pneuman ...... Pittsburgh, Pa. 

B. Ch. E., Pratt Institute, 1949 

Edwin Prophet ......... Brooklyn, N. Y. 

B.A., Westminster College, 1958 

Donald Hugh Prytherch ....... Syracuse, N. Y. 

A.B., Waynesburg College, 1958 

Robert Dean Reader ........ Tyrone, Pa. 

A.B, Juniata College, 1958 

Richapd John Reynolds ....... New Castle, Pa. 

A.B., Westminster College, 1957 

Bernarr LeVerne Rhoades ....... Prospect, Pa. 

B.A, Tarkio College, 1958 

Jon MacKay Riches ........ Akron, Ohio 

B.A., Ohio State University, 1956 

Richard L. Rohrbaugh ........ Seattle, Wash. 

B.A, Sterling College, 1958 

Dean Franklin Rowley ....... Pilot Rock, Ore. 

B.S, Oregon State College, 1954 

Roger Glen Rulong McKeesport, Pa. 

B.S. in Ed, Indiana State Teachers College, 1954 

Thomas Netl Severance Detroit, Mich. 

B.A, Muskingum College, 1958 

78 



Jay Frank Shaffer ........ McKeesport, Pa. 

B.S., Clarion State Teachers College, 1957 

John Alvin Shepard ........ Buffalo, N. Y. 

A.B., Westminster College, 1957 

William Franklin Sparks ....... Dayton, Ohio 

B.A., Muskingum College, 1957 

Donald Edwin Spear ....... Maplewood, N. J. 

A.B., Bucknell University, 1958 

Francis Everett Spear ........ Wichita, Kan. 

A.B., Friends University, 1954 

Gordon MacLean Thompson ..... White Cottage, Ohio 

B.S.. Muskingum College, 1958 

Robert Milton Urie ...... Craftsbury Common, Vt. 

B.A., Monmouth College, 1958 

Ray LaVerne Van Engen ....... Roca, Nebr. 

A.B, Whitworth College, 1956 

Robert L. Veon ........ New Castle, Pa. 

A.B., Westminster College, 1958 

Richard Kenneth Wallarab ...... Davenport, Iowa 

B.A., St. Ambrose College, 1956 

Donald Dissette Wick, Jr. ...... Pittsburgh, Pa. 

B.S., Miami University, 1953 

Paul Dennis Wierman, Jr Steubenville, Ohio 

A.B., Westminster College, 1953 

THE DEGREE OF MASTER OF RELIGIOUS EDUCATION 

Alice Louise Moffett ........ Pikeville, Ky. 

B.S., Pikeville College, 1959 

Eleanore V. Perry Pittsburgh, Pa. 

B.S., University of Pittsburgh, 1959 

THE DEGREE OF MASTER OF THEOLOGY 

Warren K. Alnor ......... Ligonier, Pa. 

A.B., Taylor University, 1949 

B.D., Drew Theological Seminary, 1952 

Edwin Jeremy Arthur ....... Moradabad, India 

B.A., Agra University, 1955 

B.D., Leonard Theological Seminary, 1958 

Kenneth Ewing Bailey ....... Minia, Egypt 

A.B., Monmouth College, 1952 

B.D., Pittsburgh-Xenia Seminary, 1955 

David William Baumann ........ Apollo, Pa. 

A.B., Monmouth College, 1953 

B.D., Pittsburgh-Xenia Seminary, 1956 

Kenneth Lloyd Beams . Cleveland, Ohio 

B.A., Muskingum College, 1938 

B.D., Pittsburgh-Xenia Seminary, 1949 

Robert Gillis Bolt ........ Pittsburgh, Pa. 

A.B., Westminster College, 1954 

B.D., Pittsburgh-Xenia Seminary, 1957 

79 



William John Bovard ....... New Castle, Pa. 

A.B., Grove City College, 1949 
B.D., Pittsburgh-Xenia Seminary, 1952 

John G. Evans New Kensington, Pa. 

B.A., Tarkio College, 1952 _ 

B.D., Pittsburgh-Xenia Seminary, 1955 

C. Biddle Foster ........ Elizabeth, Pa. 

B.A., University of Delaware, 1954 
B.D., Pittsburgh-Xenia Seminary, 1958 

John Bingay Hawes, Jr. ...... . Murrysville, Pa. 

A.B., Gordon College, 1952 

B.D., Pittsburgh-Xenia Seminary, 1955 

Harold Ross Karnes Mars, Pa. 

A.B., Sterling College, 1953 > 

B.D., Pittsburgh-Xenia Seminary, 1956 

Jerry R. Kirk Pittsburgh, Pa. 

B.A., University of Washington, 1953 
B.D., Pittsburgh-Xenia Seminary, 1956 

Frederick John Lenk, Jr. ..... New Bedford, Pa. 

B.A., Sterling College, 1955 

B.D., Pittsburgh-Xenia Seminary, 1958 

Russell Roy Lester Keota, Iowa 

A.B., Grove City College, 1947 

B.D., Pittsburgh-Xenia Seminary, 1950 

Samuel T. Lewis III Delmont, Pa. 

B. Music, Johns Hopkins University, 1952 
B.D., Western Seminary, 1958 

Harry John Lichy, Jr Franklin, Pa. 

B.A., Mount Union College, 1954 
B.D., Pittsburgh-Xenia Seminary, 1957 

Ichiro Matsuda Morgantown, W. Va. 

B.A., Erskine College, 1956 

B.D., Pittsburgh-Xenia Seminary, 1959 

Thomas James McLaren ....... Syracuse, N. Y. 

A.B., Westminster College, 1951 

B.D., Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary, 1957 

Charles William Moore ....... Elkins, W. Va. 

B.S., Virginia Polytechnic Institute, 1949 
B.D., Union Theological Seminary, 1954 

John LeRoy Rauch ........ Johnstown, Pa. 

A.B., Juniata College, 1951 

B.D., United Theological Seminary, 1954 

Edward Harold Barrett Riedesel ..... Washington, Pa. 
B.S. in Ed., Kent State University, 1952 
B.D., Western Theological Seminary, 1955 

Albert Lyman Schartner ........ Irwin, Pa. 

A.B., Westminster College, 1953 
B.D., Pittsburgh-Xenia Seminary, 1956 

William D. Schmeling ....... Johnstown, Pa. 

A.B., Indiana Central College^ 1955 
B.D., United Theological Seminary, 1958 

David Wallace Sherwin ...... University Heights, O. 

A.B., University of California, 1949 
B.D., Pittsburgh-Xenia Seminary, 1954 

80 



Donald Steudler Stewart 

A.B., Bob Jones University, 1956 
B.D., Pittsburgh-Xenia Seminary, 



1959 



Elwyn Leslie Tedford . 
A.B., Sterling College, 1955 
B.D., Pittsburgh-Xenia Seminary, 1958 

Howard Frank Van Valin 

A.B., Greenville College, 1953 

B.D., Asbury Theological Seminary, 1955 

David Pollock White 

B.A., Bucknell University, 1948 

B.D., Pittsburgh-Xenia Seminary, 1952 

George Warren Woodcock 

A.B., Wheaton College, 1952 
B.D., Pittsburgh-Xenia Seminary, 



1955 



Robert Bell Woodworth II 

A.B., Muskingum College, 1953 

B.D., Pittsburgh-Xenia Seminary, 1956 

Edwin G. York .... 
A.B., Westminster College, 1953 
B.D., Princeton Theological Seminary, 



. Wheeling, W. Va. 

Stafford, Kansas 

Pittsburgh, Pa 

Elmer, N. J. 

Cleveland, Ohio 

Moorefield, W. Va. 

Waynesburg, Pa. 



1956 



SCHOLARSHIPS AND HONORS 

The Thomas Jamison Scholarship 

John Edwin Adams 

The Sylvester S. Marvin Fellowship 

Robert Miller Carson, Jr. 

The Jane Hogg Gardner Scholarship 

Russell Edwin Mase 

The Jennie Rigg Barbour Memorial Prize 

Kenneth Sprague Haines 

The Hugh Thomson Kerr Moderator Prize 

Jay Sherrick Gilbert 

The Michael Wilson Keith Memorial Prize in Homiletics 

Robert Miller Carson, Jr. 

The First Presbyterian Church of McDonald Prize in Church History 

Robert Miller Carson, Jr. 

The Robert A. Lee Church History Award 

John Edwin Adams 

The Chevy Chase Presbyterian Church Prize in Christian Education 

(Young People's Work) James Edward Hughes 

The Christian Education Award 

Eleanore Virginia Perry 

81 



GRADUATION HONORS 

Magna Cum Laude 

John Edwin Adams 

Robert Miller Carson, Jr. 



Cum Laude 
Kenneth Sprague Haines Russell Edwin Mase 

John F. Jamieson Richard L. Rohrbaugh 



Graduating with Honors in HISTORICAL THEOLOGY: 



Harry David Clewer 
Kenneth Sprague Haines 



Frederick Eugene Mong 
Robert Dean Reader 



Graduating with Honors in BIBLICAL STUDIES: 
Brooks Holtzclaw Donald Edwin Spear 



THE JAMES PURDY SCHOLARSHIPS 



Lowell E. Byall 
Merl L. Galusha, Jr. 
James B. Keefer 



Allen W. McCallum 
Maurice James Murray 
Robert Dale Taylor 



82 



REGISTER OF STUDENTS 1961-62 

Senior Class 

Laurence John Athorn ....... Newark, N. J. 

A.B., Bloomfield College, 1959 

Paul Richard Bergmueller . . . . . . Avenel, N. J. 

A.B., Maryville College, 1959 

James McLeod Brinks ....... Dothan, Alabama 

A.B., Lynchburg College, 1956 
M.A., University of Pittsburgh, 1960 

Donald E. Brown ........ Kenmore, N. Y. 

B.A., Muskingum College, 1959 

John Robert Brown ........ Pittsburgh, Pa. 

B.A., University of Pittsburgh, 1958 

Neil W. Brown ........ Columbus, Ohio 

B.A., Westminster College, 1959 

Bruce E. Bryce ......... McKeesport, Pa. 

B.A., Otterbein College, 1959 

Glen Howard Burrows ....... Hanoverton, Ohio 

A.B., College of Wooster, 1955 

Roger L. Bush ........ Greensburg, Pa. 

A.B., College of Wooster, 1959 

Edwin C. Carlson Springdale, Pa. 

B.A., Muskingum College, 1956 

George C. Carpenter Granger, Wash. 

B.A., Whitworth College, 1959 

Timothy D. Dalrymple ....... Portland, Ore. 

B.A., Whitworth College, 1959 

John Clarence Dean ........ Freedom, Pa. 

B.S. in Eng., Geneva College, 1958 

Stephen S. Dixon Los Angeles, Calif. 

B.A., University of California, 1959 

Franklin Samuel Douglas Pittsburgh, Pa. 

B.S., Juniata College, 1957 

Daniel Reubin Duerksen ...... Pikesville, Md. 

B.M.E., University of Wichita, 1949 

Jack Fowlow Emerick ....... Beaver Falls, Pa. 

A.B., Geneva College, 1959 

Franklin P. Erck Youngstown, Ohio 

B.A., Denison University, 1958 

James H. Farley Columbus, Ohio 

A.B., Ohio State University, 1957 

Fred A. Feldner Allison Park, Pa. 

B.A., Geneva College, 1959 

John Harmond Francisco Elmsford, N. Y. 

A.B., Lehigh University, 1956 

Burton S. Froom, Jr San Francisco, Calif. 

B.S., University of California, 1958 

Joseph John Gasper ........ Jessup, Pa. 

A.B., Bloomfield College, 1959 

83 



William C. Gawlas Pittsburgh, Pa. 

A.B., University of Pittsburgh, 1959 

Paul D. George ......... Dellroy, Ohio 

A.B., Asbury College, 1957 

Richard Arthur George ....... Franklin, Pa. 

B.S., Geneva College, 1959 

George Harold Giles ... .... Pittsburgh, Pa. 

A.B., University of Pittsburgh, 1959 

Benjamin Gorbea ........ Washington, D. C. 

A.B., Maryville College, 1959 

William J. Green ........ Griffith, Ind. 

B.S. in C.E., Carnegie Institute of Technology, 1954 

Harold E. Greenway Pittsburgh, Pa. 

B.A., Wesleyan College, 1958 

John D. Griffith ........ Pittsburgh, Pa. 

A.B., University of Pittsburgh, 1954 

Maynard Grunstra ........ Houston, Del. 

A.B., Elizabethtown, 1959 

Frank Thomas Hainer ........ Parker, Pa. 

A.B., Duke University, 1956 

Donald W. Hankins ........ St. Louis, Mo. 

B.A., Monmouth College, 1957 

Wendell Earl Harford ........ Pittsburgh, Pa. 

A.B., University of Pittsburgh, 1957 

Donald Lee Hartman ....... McKeesport, Pa. 

B.A., Asbury College, 1958 

Thomas R. Henstock ....... Dearborn, Mich. 

B.S., Michigan State University, 1958 

Darrell Jackson Hockensmith ...... Johnstown, Pa. 

B.A., Otterbein College, 1956 

Russell Ward Holder ...... Collingswood, N. J. 

B.S., Edinboro State Teachers College, 1954 

Harry L. Holfelder . Carrollton, Ohio 

B.A., Geneva College, 1954 

Gordon P. Irvine ........ Wintersville, Ohio 

B.A., Muskingum College, 1959 

Gordon A. Jones ........ Havertown, Pa. 

B.A., Houghton College, 1958 

John E. Kennedy Elizabeth, Pa. 

B.S., Carnegie Institute of Technology, 1957 

Allan William Kinloch, Jr. ..... . Philadelphia, Pa. 

A.B., Ursinus College, 1959 

Ronald E. Kinsey McKees Rocks, Pa. 

B.A., Tarkio College, 1959 

George R. Krupp, Jr Jackson Center, Pa. 

B.S. in Agriculture, Pennsylvania State College, 1942 

Byron Dale Leasure ....... Bridgeville, Pa. 

A.B., College of Wooster, 1959 

84 



Philip Arthur Maronde Pulaski, Pa. 

A.B., Westminster College, 1959 

Ralph Walters McCandless ....... Butler, Pa. 

B.A., Grove City College, 1958 

Earle D. McCrea, Jr Gibsonia, Pa. 

A.B., Allegheny College, 1939 

David J. McFarlane Niagara Falls, N. Y. 

B.A., University of Rochester, 1959 

John E. Mehl Pittsburgh, Pa. 

A.B., Dartmouth College, 1958 

William M. Meyer ........ Charleroi, Pa. 

B.A., Westminster College, 1959 

Dale E. Miller Pittsburgh, Pa. 

B.A., Westminster College, 1959 

Gerald A. Miller ......... Industry, Pa. 

B.A., Geneva College, 1959 

Robert G. Miller East Orange, N. J. 

A.B., Upsala College, 1959 

William Harold Moore Pittsburgh, Pa. 

A.B., Waynesburg College, 1959 

Thomas J. Mori Belle Vernon, Pa. 

B.A., Waynesburg College, 1959 

Patrick H. Morison ........ Baltimore, Md. 

B.A., Whitworth College, 1959 

William G. Morris McKeesport, Pa. 

B.S. in Ed., California State Teachers College, 1959 

Richard Ralph Mowry ....... St. Louis, Mo. 

B.S., Millikin University, 1952 

Rodney M. Murray ........ Omaha, Neb. 

B.A., Omaha University, 1958 

Edward Smith Napier ....... Philadelphia, Pa. 

B.A., Houghton College, 1958 

Ronald Oglesbee ......... Xenia, Ohio 

B.S., Bowling Green State University, 1959 

Robert E. Palisin Youngstown, Ohio 

A.B., Westminster College, 1959 

Howard Frederick Peters ....... Pittsburgh, Pa. 

A.B., University of Pittsburgh, 1959 

Douglas A. Pomeroy .... .... Cleveland, Ohio 

A.B., Wooster College, 1959 

Wesley H. Poorman ........ Canton, Ohio 

A.B., Colgate Universitv, 1957 

William J. Provost ........ Brooklyn, N. Y. 

B.S., University of Pittsburgh, 1958 

Mark M. Ray Oneonta, N. Y. 

B.A., Muskingum College, 1958 

John S. Redmond Canonsburg, Pa. 

B.S., Penn State University, 1957 

85 



Jack Robert Rees Pittsburgh, Pa. 

A.B., University of Pittsburgh, 1957 

Hengust Robinson, Jr Webster, Pa. 

A.B., University of Pittsburgh, 1957 

Fred McFeely Rogers ....... Pittsburgh, Pa. 

B.M., Rollins College, 1951 

Edward Sensenbrenner ....... Columbus, Ohio 

B.S., Ohio State University, 1954 

Clair Willard Shaffer ....... New Castle, Pa. 

A.B., Grove City College, 1958 

Clarence Cornelius Shields ...... Greenville, Pa. 

A.B., Maryville College, 1958 

Verne Edmond Sindlinger ....... Brilliant, Ohio 

A.B., Ohio University, 1959 

John R. Sisley, Jr Troy, N. Y. 

B.S., Grove City College, 1953 

Howard Sheridan Smith ...... Los Angeles. Calif. 

B.A., La Verne College, 1958 

James Kilpatrick Smith ....... Pittsburgh, Pa. 

A.B., Mount Union College, 1958 

John P. Smith, III ...... East Liverpool, Ohio 

B.A., Muskingum College, 1959 

Robert Duvall Smith ....... Germantown, Md. 

A.B., Maryville College, 1959 

Roger A. Smith ........ Wilmington, Del. 

B.A., Monmouth College, 1959 

Richard B. Snyder Big Run, Pa. 

B.S., Clarion State Teachers College, 1959 

Thomas N. Stark ......... Chicago, 111. 

B.A., University of Illinois, 1958 

William C. Steel ....... Los Angeles, Calif. 

B.A., University of California, 1959 

David H. Stevenson Arona, Pa. 

A.B., Pennsylvania State University, 1958 

William George Stype, Jr Coraopolis, Pa. 

B.S. in Ed., Thiel College, 1959 

John L. Symons ........ Lakewood, Ohio 

A.B., Muskingum College, 1957 

Horace Allan Talley . . . . . . . . Akron, Ohio 

B.S., Sterling College, 1958 

Theodore De Witt Taylor II Ellicott City, Md. 

B.A., Westminster College, 1959 

Joseph Leroy Tropansky . . . . . . . Du Bois, Pa. 

A.B., Maryville College, 1959 

Eugene G. Turner . . . . . . . Brooklyn, N. Y. 

B.A., Knoxville College, 1957 

James Leroy Ulrich ........ Utica, N. Y. 

A.B., Waynesburg College, 1959 

86 



James Everett Vincent ....... Loveland, Col. 

B.A., Sterling College, 1958 

Howard Clinton Varner, Jr. ..... Du Bois, Pa. 

A.B., College of Emporia, 1958 

David A. Vogan New Castle, Pa. 

B.A., Westminster College, 1952 

Carlton K. Walker ....... Wilmington, Del. 

A.B., Wheaton College, 1959 

James Richard Whiteside New Castle, Pa. 

B.S., Waynesburg College, 1949 

John R. Wineman Pittsburgh, Pa. 

B.A., Tarkio College, 1959 

John E. Winnett ........ Uniontown, Pa. 

B.S., Waynesburg College, 1951 

Harry Glenn Winsheimer ....... Indiana, Pa. 

B.S., Waynesburg College, 1959 

Thomas Daniel Woodward Bethesda, Md. 

A.B., Washington College, 1959 

Middler Class 

William Thorpe Alter Pittsburgh, Pa. 

B.S., Lehigh University, 1956 
B.S. in Bus. Adm., 1957 

John Harvey Ashenfelter ...... Ridley Park, Pa. 

B.S., Drexel Institute, 1960 

Lawrence R. Bergstresser ....... Ephrata, Pa. 

B.A., Albright College, 1960 

Clyde Carson Billings ...... Youngstown, Ohio 

B.A., Muskingum College, 1960 

Benjamin Stephen Booth ....... Pittsburgh, Pa. 

B.S., Grove City College, 1960 

Keith Burroughs ........ Philadelphia, Pa. 

B.S., University of Pennsylvania, 1960 

Lowell E. Byall Whittier, Calif. 

B.A., Sterling College, 1960 

J. Paul Cameron Pittsburgh, Pa. 

A.B., Denison University, 1960 

William Luther Coop Tom's River, N. J. 

B.A., The College of Wooster 1960 

John N. Crock Pittsburgh, Pa. 

B.A., University of Pittsburgh, 1960 

George William Dando ....... Baltimore, Md. 

B.A., Baylor University, 1960 

James Smith Delo ........ Pittsburgh, Pa. 

B.A., Thiel College, 1958 

Samuel C. Dunning ........ Pittsburgh, Pa. 

B.A., Geneva College, 1956 
Drew University, 1957 

87 



Forrest V. Fitzhugh ....... San Antonio, Texas 

B.A., Trinity University, 1960 

William G. Flagmeier ........ Canton, Ohio 

A.B., Muskingum College, 1949 

Robert Charles Fox Bethlehem, Pa. 

A.B., Albright College, 1957 

Richard K. Gibson Pittsburgh, Pa. 

B.A., Muskingum College, 1960 

John Mack Groat ........ Pittsburgh, Pa. 

B.A., Mount Union College, 1959 

William Ray Gurley, Jr West Mifflin, Pa. 

A.B., Milligan College, 1959 

Edward S. Hammett ........ Pittsburgh, Pa. 

B.A., Washington and Jefferson College, 1951 

Aaron Griffith Hastie, Jr. ...... . Pittston, Pa. 

B.A., Wilkes College, 1960 

Peter Charles Hauser ....... Harrisburg, Pa. 

A.B., Grove City College, 1960 

David L. Heyser Norristown, Pa. 

A.B., Ursinus College, 1956 

Alfred Charles Horn ....... Charleroi, Pa. 

B.A., Westminster College, 1960 

Robert Fraser Hostetter, Jr. ..... . Pittsburgh, Pa. 

B.A., Waynesburg College, 1960 

John Edmund Johnson ........ Clairton, Pa. 

B.S., University of Pittsburgh, 1957 

Harold D. Kelley Pittsburgh, Pa. 

B.B.A., University of Pittsburgh, 1958 
M.B.A., University of Pittsburgh, 1959 

Wayne K. King Ellwood City, Pa. 

B.A., Muskingum College, 1960 

David C. Koch Philadelphia, Pa. 

B.A., Temple University, 1959 

Steven James Kocsis Pittsburgh, Pa. 

B.A., Muskingum College, 1960 

Zoltan A. Kovacs Debrecen, Hungary 

B.S., Reformed School of Education, Hungary, 1946 

Harry Donald Lash Rector, Pa. 

B.S., Clarion State Teachers College, 1960 

Allen W. McCallum Detroit, Mich. 

B.A., Muskingum College, 1960 

Russell Howard McCuen, Jr Malvern, Pa. 

B.A., Maryville College, 1960 

William Franklin McIntyre ..... New Concord, Ohio 
B.A., Muskingum College, 1959 

John B. McLaren ........ New Brighton, Pa. 

B.A., Westminster College, 1959 
M.A., University of Pittsburgh, 1960 



Robert Allan Messenger Bridgeville, Pa. 

A.B., Hamilton College, 1950 

Walter W. Miller Montpelier, Ohio 

B.S., Ohio State University, 1955 
M.S., Ohio State University, 1960 

David Nelson Morton ....... Philadelphia, Pa. 

B.S., University of Pennsylvania, 1960 

Maurice James Murray Dover, Delaware 

A.B., Wooster College, 1960 

Irvin Lee Page Conemaugh, Pa. 

A.B., Waynesburg College, 1960 

Claude Van Ponting ........ Salinas, Calif. 

A.B., Muskingum College, 1960 

John A. Price Elizabeth, Pa. 

B.A., Washington and Jefferson College, 1959 

Robert Edson Reed . Clairton, Pa. 

B.A., Waynesburg College, 1960 

Walter Terry Schoener Pittsburgh, Pa. 

B.A., Muskingum College, 1960 

Paul W. Shogren, Jr. ....... . Pittsburgh, Pa. 

B.S. in Forestry, Pennsylvania State University, 1951 

George Young Stewart ....... Baltimore, Md. 

A.B., Maryville College, 1960 

Robert Dale Taylor ........ Pittsburgh, Pa. 

B.S., University of Pittsburgh, 1960 

Francis Elliott Tennies Ontario Center, N. Y. 

A.B., Grove City College, 1960 

Junior Class 

Richard D. Adams . . . . . . . . Buffalo, N. Y. 

B.A., Grove City College, 1961 

David L. Barrett ........ Providence, R. I. 

B.A., Barrington College, 1961 

Alfred Bennett ......... Beaver, Pa. 

B.A., Northwestern University, 1961 

Robert M. Bereit ....... Bay Village, Ohio 

B.A., Western Reserve, 1961 

Benjamin B. Booker ........ Tampa, Fla. 

B.S., Hampton Institute, 1935 

Muriel Brown ........ Ellensburg, Wash. 

B.A., Whitworth College, 1961 

Donald C. Byers Orrville, Ohio 

B.S., Ohio State University, 1961 

John H. Cherry ........ Pittsburgh, Pa. 

B.A., University of Pittsburgh, 1961 

Donald W. Chichester ....... Levittown, N. Y. 

B.S. in Appl. Physics, Hofstra College, 1955 

89 



Jack M. Chisholm . . Pittsburgh, Pa. 

B.A., University of Pittsburgh, 1961 

Donald H. Craig ........ Pittsburgh, Pa. 

B.A., Ohio Wesleyan University, 1961 

Samuel B. Craig, Jr. ...... Pittsburgh, Pa. 

B.A., University of Virginia, 1961 

Gene W. Crooks ........ Pontiac, Mich. 

B.A, Beloit College, 1953 

Leslie Alice Dole ........ Norton, Kansas 

B.A., Kansas City University, 1961 

Eugene C. Fieg ........ Louisville, Ky. 

A.B., Maryville College, 1961 

Richard E. Fouse ....... College Park, Md. 

B.A., University of Maryland, 1961 

Lyle E. Franzen ......... Omaha, Neb. 

B.A., University of Nebraska, 1961 

Robert Frederick ....... Slippery Rock, Pa. 

Slippery Rock College, 1961 

Robert L. Gordon ......... Irwin, Pa. 

B.A., Duquesne University, 1961 

Lloyd F. Gossler ........ Harrisburg, Pa. 

B.S., Florida State University, 1961 

Gary C. Haase ......... Wooster, Ohio 

B.A., The College of Wooster, 1961 

Edwin Blythe Hartman Ellwood City, Pa. 

B.B.A., Westminster College, 1959 

David L. Holmes, Jr . . . Detroit, Mich. 

B.A., Michigan State University, 1954 
M.A., Columbia University, 1960 

A. Vanlier Hunter, Jr. ...... . Meadville, Pa. 

B.A., Grove City College, 1961 

James A. Keller ........ Pittsburgh, Pa. 

B.S., Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 1961 

Linda Lee Killey ........ Monmouth, 111. 

B.A., Monmouth College, 1961 

Dong Soo Kim ......... Seoul, Korea 

B.A., Union Christian College 

William J. Lightbody ....... Pittsburgh, Pa. 

B.A., University of Pittsburgh, 1961 

Raymond F. Luber, Jr. ....... Pittsburgh, Pa. 

B.A., Westminster College, 1960 

Louis S. Lunardini ........ Pittsburgh, Pa. 

A.B., University of Pittsburgh, 1961 

W. Donald McClure ...... New Wilmington, Pa. 

B.S., Westminster College, 1961 

Charles W. McConnelee . . . . . . Warm Springs, Ore. 

B.S., Sterling College, 1%1 

John M. McNitt ....... Cuyahoga Falls, Ohio 

B.S., Allegheny College, 1952 

90 



Harry E. Martin Pittsburgh, Pa. 

M.S.. George Williams College, 1953 

Ronald P. Miller Buffalo, N. Y. 

B.A., Westminster College, 1961 

Albert Montanari ........ Buffalo, N. Y. 

B.S., State University of N. Y., College for Teachers at Buffalo, 1958 

Harold R. Moore Pittsburgh, Pa. 

B.A., University of Pittsburgh, 1961 

Henry O. Moore, Jr Dallas, Texas 

B.A., Trinity University, 1961 

John P. Muller ........ Lewistown, N. Y. 

B.A., Parsons College, 1961 

John W. Nelson . . Westfield, N. J. 

B.A., Pennsylvania State University 

Ernest W. Peterson ......... Buhl, Idaho 

B.S., College of Idaho, 1961 

Enid V. Pierce ........ Masontown, Pa. 

B.A., West Virginia University, 1960 

Gary S. Pinder Rochester, N. Y. 

A.B., The College of Wooster, 1961 

Dayanand David Pitamber ...... Mainpuri, India 

M.A., Agra University, 1961 

William J. Sharp ........ Washington, Pa. 

B.A., Washington and Jefferson College, 1960 

John Auld Simpson ........ Akron, Ohio 

B.A., Akron University, 1961 

Dellimer C. Smith ....... McKees Rocks, Pa. 

B.A., Tarkio College, 1961 

William F. Smith ........ Coshocton, Ohio 

B.S., University of Michigan, 1960 

John Marshall Snaman ....... Pittsburgh, Pa. 

B.A., University of Pittsburgh, 1961 

Robert Sproul ......... Pittsburgh, Pa. 

B.A., Westminster College, 1961 

James A. Tait ........ Mechanicsburg, Pa. 

B.S. in Building Construction, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, 1955 

Bruce C. Theunissen ....... Evansville, Ind. 

A.B., Central Michigan University, 1951 

Charles N. Thompson ....... Hawthorne, N. J. 

B.A., Davis and Elkins, 1961 

William A. Van Wie Wheeling, W. Va. 

A.B., The College of Wooster, 1961 

Robert N. Van Wyk ....... Paterson, N. J. 

B.A., The College of Wooster, 1961 

Allan Widerquist ........ Pittsburgh, Pa. 

B.S. in Eng., University of Michigan, 1951 

Margaret Yingling ........ Bridgeville, Pa. 

B.S., Chatham College, 1943 

91 



DEPARTMENT OF CHRISTIAN EDUCATION 

Senior Class 

David James Devey ........ Pittsburgh, Pa. 

B.S., University of Pittsburgh, 1952 
M.E., University of Pittsburgh, 1956 

Elizabeth Jane Jobes ........ Orwell, Ohio 

B.A, Hiram College, 1959 

Margaret Piersol ....... Belle Vernon, Pa. 

B.A., Muskingum College, 1933 

Donna Wagner Shogren Butler, Pa. 

B.S. in M. Ed., Westminster College, 1954 

Sonja Forgrave Stewart ....... Pittsburgh, Pa. 

B.A., Muskingum College, 1959 

Junior Class 
Mary Ruth Brawley ....... Blacksburg, S. C. 

A.B., Erskine College, 1960 

Joyce Helfer ......... Columbus, Ohio 

B.S. in Ed., Ohio State University, 1958 

Letha C. Hundredmark ....... Pittsburgh, Pa. 

B.S., Syracuse University, 1940 



CANDIDATES FOR DEGREE OF MASTER OF EDUCATION 

(to be granted by the University of Pittsburgh) 

Edgar W. Barham ........ Dallas, Texas 

Rev. John Choi ........ Bangkok, Thailand 

Rev. Swailem Sidhom ....... Malakal, Sudan 

Mrs. Swailem Sidhom ....... Malakal, Sudan 

Mrss Edith Drake ......... Pakistan 

Mrs. Evelyn T. Wehrle ....... Pittsburgh, Pa. 

SPECIAL STUDENTS 
Chong Mahn Lee ........ Seoul, Korea 

Lall Moti Lall ....... Sialkot, W. Pakistan 

Klaus Schmidt ........ Rhein, Germany 

Mrs. Marilyn Murray Pittsburgh, Pa. 

SUMMARY OF ATTENDANCE 
Bachelor of Divinity Program 

Juniors .......... 57 

Middlers 49 

Seniors 104 210 

Master of Religious Education Program 

Juniors • 3 

Seniors .......... 5 8 

Master of Education Program ...... 6 

Special Students ........ 4 

Total Enrollment . . 228 

92 



HISTORICAL ROLL OF PROFESSORS 



John Anderson 
John Banks . 
James Ramsey 
Joseph Kerr . 
Jacob Jones Janeway 
Mungo Dick . 
Luther Halsey 



John Williamson Nevin 

David Elliott 

John Taylor Pressly 

David Carson 

Thomas Beveridge 

Moses Kerr 

Joseph Claybaugh 

Samuel W. McCracken 

Lewis Warner Green 

James Martin 

Alexander Taggart McGill 

James Lemonte Dinwiddie 

Abraham Anderson 

Alexander Downs Clark 

David Reynolds Kerr . 

Melancthon Williams Jacobus 

William Swan Plumer . 

Samuel Wilson 

William Davidson . 

Alexander Young . 

Samuel Jennings Wilson 
John Scott 
Joseph Clokey 
William Miller Paxton 
Andrew Morrow Black . 
Archibald Alexander Hodge 
David Alexander Wallace 

James Harper 

Joseph Tate Cooper 

William Bruce 

William Henry Hornblower 



Seminary of 
Inauguration 


Period of 
Service 


Service 


1794-1819 


Philadelphia 


1820-1826 


Canonsburg 


1821-1842 


Pittsburgh 


1825-1829 


Western 


1828-1829 


Pittsburgh 


1829-1831 


Western 


1829-1836 
1872-1880 


Western 


1829-1840 


Western 


1829-1874 


Allegheny 


1832-1870 


Canonsburg 


1834-1834 


Canonsburg 


1835-1871 


Allegheny 


1835-1836 


Oxford 


1839-1855 


Oxford 


1839-1840 


Western 


1840-1847 


Canonsburg 


1842-1846 


Western 


1842-1854 


Allegheny 


1843-1846 


Canonsburg 


1847-1855 


Allegheny 


1847-1884 


Allegheny 


1851-1887 


Western 


1851-1876 


Western 


1854-1862 


Xenia 


1855-1875 


Oxford 


1855-1858 


Oxford 


1855-1874 
1876-1891 


Western 


1857-1883 


Monmouth 


1858-1874 


Xenia 


1858-1873 


Western 


1860-1872 


Monmouth 


1864-1874 


Western 


1864-1877 


Monmouth & Xenia 1867-1870 
1883-1883 


Newburg 


1867-1899 


Allegheny 


1871-1886 


Xenia 


1871-1880 


Western 


1871-1883 



93 



James Gillespie Carson 

William Gallogly Moorehead 

Jackson Burgess McMichael 

Samuel Thompson Lowrie 

Samuel Henry Kellogg . 

William Hamilton Jeffers 

Benjamin Breckenbridge Warfield 

Thomas Hastings Robinson 

David MacDill 

David A. McClenahan 

Robert Dick Wilson 

James Alexander Grier 

John McNaugher . 

Henry T. McClelland 

Matthew Brown Riddle 

Oliver Joseph Thatcher 

Wilbert Webster White 

Robert Christie 

John A. Wilson 

John Douds Irons . 

James Anderson Kelso 

David Riddle Breed 

Joseph Kyle . 

Jesse Johnson 

David Schley Schaff 

John Elliott Wishart 

David E. Cully 

William Riley Wilson 

Charles Frederick Wishart 

William Robertson Farmer 

John Hunter Webster 

James Henry Snowden 

Melvin Grove Kyle 

James Doig Rankin 

David Frazier McGill 

Frank Eakin . 

James Gallaway Hunt 

Selby Frame Vance 

James Harper Grier 

Robert McNary Karr 

James Leon Kelso . 



Xenia 


1873-1888 


Xenia 


1873-1914 


Xenia 


1873-1878 


Western 


1874-1877 


Western 


1877-1886 


Western 


1877-1914 


Western 


1878-1887 


Western 


1883-1906 


Xenia 


1884-1902 


Allegheny- 


1885-1921 


Western 


1885-1900 


Allegheny- 


1886-1909 


Allegheny 


1886-1943 


Western 


1886-1891 


Western 


1887-1916 


Allegheny 


1888-1892 


Xenia 


1889-1894 


Western 


1891-1923 


Allegheny 


1893-1915 


Xenia 


1895^-1905 


Western 


1897-1944 


Western 


1898-1931 


Xenia 


18994921 


Xenia 


1903-1930 


Western 


1903-1926 


Xenia 


1905-1923 


Western 


1906-1948 


Allegheny 


1907-1940 


Allegheny 


1907-1914 


Western 


1907-1939 


Xenia 


1908-1933 


Western 


1911-1928 


Xenia 


1914-1930 


Pittsburgh 


1914-1929 


Pittsburgh 


1915-1931 


Western 


1915-1927 


Pittsburgh 


19204926 


Western 


1921-1935 


Pittsburgh 


1922-1926 


Xenia 


1922-1949 


Xenia 


1923- 



94 



George Boone McCreary 

Robert Nathaniel Montgomery 

Donald Mackenzie 

Gaius Jackson Slosser . 

Albert Henry Baldinger 

Clarence Joseph Williamson 

John Wick Bowman 

William F. Orr 

George Anderson Long 

Theophilus Mills Taylor 

Jarvis M. Cotton . 

Frank Dixon McCloy 

Henry Alexander Riddle 

J. Carter Swaim 

Walter R. Clyde . 

Addison Hardie Leitch 

Florence M. Lewis . 

H. Ray Shear 

David Noel Freedman 

Gordon Edmund Jackson 

Ralph G. Turnbull 

John H. Gerstner 

Clifford E. Barbour 

Bessie M. Burrows 

James A. Walther . 

Sidney 0. Hills 

Robert Lee Kelley, Jr. 

Robert Clyde Johnson 

Howard M. Jamieson, Jr. 

John M. Bald 

Elwyn Allen Smith 

Walter E. Wiest . 

Malcolm S. Alexander 

Harold E. Scott 

Howard L. Ralston. 

William A. Nicholson 

James Sheppard Irvine 

J. Gordon Chamberlin 

Gayraud S. Wilmore 

Arlan P. Dohrenburg 

Edward D. Grohman 

David G. Buttrick 







Xenia 


1924-1946 






Pittsburgh 


1926-193C 






Western 


1928-1933 






Western 


1928-1958 






Pittsburgh-Xenia 


1931-1947 






Pittsburgh-Xenia 


1932-1950 






Western 


1936-1944 






Western 


1936- 






Pittsburgh-Xenia 


1942-1955 






Pittsburgh-Xenia 


1942- 






Western 


1944-1961 






Western 


1944- 






Western 


1944-1949 






Western 


1944-1954 






Western 


1945- 






Pittsburgh-Xenia 


1946-1961 






Pittsbu rgh-Xenia 


1947-1952 






Pittsburgh-Xenia 


1947-1959 






Western 


1948- 






Pittsburgh-Xenia 


1949u 






Western 


1949-1954 






Pittsburgh-Xenia 


1950- 






Western 


1951- 






Pittsburgh-Xenia 


1953- 






Western 


1954- 






Western 


1954- 






Pittsburgh-Xenia 


1955- 






Western 


1955- 






Pittsburgh-Xenia 


1955- 






Pittsburgh-Xenia 


1957- 






Western 


1957- 






Western 


1957- 






Pittsburgh-Xenia 


1958- 






Pittsburgh-Xenia 


1959- 


estern and Pittsburgh-Xenia 


1960- 


Western 


1960- 


. Western 


1960- 


.Pittsburgh 


1960- 


Pittsburgh 


1961- 


Pittsburgh 


1961- 


Pittsburgh 


1961- 






Pittsburgh 


1961- 



95 



DONATIONS AND BEQUESTS 

All donations or bequests to the Seminary should be made to 
"The Pittsburgh Theological Seminary of the United Presbyterian 
Church in the United States of America, located at 616 North High- 
land Avenue, Pittsburgh 6, Pennsylvania." The proper legal form 
for making a bequest is as follows. 

"I hereby give and bequeath to Pittsburgh Theological Seminary 
of the United Presbyterian Church in the United States of America, 
incorporated in the State of Pennsylvania, the following: . . . . " 

Care should be taken to use the corporate name as given above, 
and to have the bequest conform to the laws of the state governing it. 

The memorial idea may be carried out either in the erection 
of a building or in the endowment of any of the special funds of 
the Seminary. 



96 



INDEX 

Accreditation of the Seminary . . . . . .32 

Admissions and Requirements ...... 32-35 

Admission, Standards for . . . . . . .71 

Alumni Association ........ 19 

Architect's View of Campus ....... 24 

Attendance, Summary of ....... 92 

Awards Granted, 1960-1961 76-82 

B.D. Degree Requirements ....... 42 

B.D. Curriculum 44-45 

Bible Lands Museum 29-30 

Board of Directors and Committees 11-13 

Calendar for 1962-1963 2 

Calendar of the Seminary ....... 3 

College Curriculum ........ 33 

Courses of Instruction ....... 51-68 

Courses of Study ........ 46,49 

Credentials Required for Admission . . . . .33 

Curriculum . . . . . . . . . 46, 49 

Degree Programs ......... 43 

Degree of Bachelor of Divinity ..... 44-47 

Degree of Bachelor of Divinity Courses .... 51-69 

Donations and Bequests ....... 96 

Emeritus Professors . . . . . . . .15 

Faculty 6, 14 

Faculty Committees and Staff . . . . . .16-18 

Fees and Expenses ........ 36 

Foreign Students . . . . . . . .35 

Genealogy .......... 20 

97 



Graduation Honors 

Historical Roll of Professors 

Honors Courses . 

Honors Program . 

Housing ...... 

Insurance for Students 

Lectures, Special .... 

Library 

Library, Architect's Drawing 
Location of the Seminary Building 
Master of Religious Education Degree 
Master of Religious Education Courses 
Master of Education . . . . 

Master of Theology .... 
Married Student Apartment Fees 
Musical Opportunity . 
Pittsburgh — Our Environment 
Pre-Seminary Studies . 
Purpose of the Seminary 
Register of Students, 1961-1962 
Registration . .... 

Religious Life ..... 
Scholarship Assistance and Financial Aid 
Scholarships, Awards and Prizes 
Student Association .... 
Student Loan Funds . 
Summer Field Education 
Transfer Students .... 
Webster Memorial Forum 



82 
93 
61 
56 
25-26 
37 
17 
27 
28 
25 
48-49 
51-64 
. 50 
70-75 
36 
31 
23 
32 
19 
83-92 
35 
31 
37 
39 
31 
37 
69 
35 
31 



98 



mmmnmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmummmmmmmmm 



THE 

PITTSBURGH 
THEOLOGICAL 
SEMINARY 




Annual 
Catalogue 

1963-1964 



THE 
ANNUAL CATALOGUE 

OF 

The Pittsburgh 
Theological Seminary 

616 N. HIGHLAND AVENUE 
PITTSBURGH 6, PENNSYLVANIA 



A seminary of the United Presbyterian Church in the 
United States of America, founded 1794. Accredited 
by the American Association of Theological Schools. 



1963-1964 



THE SEMINARY CALENDAR 
1963 

22 July-23 Aug. Summer Session in Beginning Greek 



24-29 June School of Religion, Ohio 

8-12 July School of Religion, Pennsylvania 



3-4 Sept. 


5 Sept. 


6 Sept. 


7 Sept. 


8 Oct. 


21-25 Oct. 


19 Nov. 


28-29 Nov. 


9-13 Dec. 


16-20 Dec. 


23 Dec-2 Jan. 


1964 


3-24 Jan. 


27 Jan. 


4 Feb. 


9-13 Mar. 


27 Mar. 


27-29 Apr. 


27 Apr.-l May 


30 Apr.-l May 


4-8 May 


10 May 


12 May 


12 May 



First Semester 



Junior Orientation and Registration 

Convocation and Community Luncheon, 11:00 A.M. 

Class Work Begins 

Junior Orientation Retreat 

Continuing Education Program Begins 

First Reading Period 

Semi-Annual Meeting, Board of Directors 

Thanksgiving Recess 

Second Reading Period 

Examination Period 

Christmas Recess 



Intersession 



Second Semester 

Class Work Begins 

Continuing Education Program Begins 

First Reading Period 

Good Friday (No Classes) 

Second Reading Period for Seniors 

Second Reading Period for Juniors and Middlers 

Examination Period for Seniors 

Examination Week for Juniors and Middlers 

Baccalaureate, 8:00 P.M. 

Annual Meeting of the Board of Directors 

Annual Meeting and Dinner of the Alumni 

Association 
12 May Commencement, 8:00 P.M., 

The East Liberty Presbyterian Church 

2 



Donald G. Miller, S.T.M., M.A., Ph.D. 

President 




The Christian ministry to the modern world is a complex and 
demanding calling. The questioning, doubt, uncertainty, and fear 
of contemporary man, made poignant by a rapidly changing world 
that seems to have gotten out of hand, demand alert, intelligent, 
adaptable, dedicated ministers. 

The training of such ministers must combine the old and the new, 
the classic and the current, the well-tried and the experimental. 
Pittsburgh Theological Seminary, the oldest Presbyterian Seminary 
in America in its roots and yet the newest in its present structure, 
is making every effort to produce such a ministry. Adhering to the 
Biblical and theological heritage of the Reformed tradition, the Sem- 
inary seeks to understand these in the light of new knowledge as well 
as contemporary forms of the human predicament. A curriculum de- 
signed to coordinate otherwise disjointed areas of study has been 
designed and tested. 

A growing relationship with the University of Pittsburgh and 
other educational and cultural centers in the city keeps the Seminary 
aware of the currents of thought beyond its own walls. A faculty 
committed to academic excellence and constantly engaged in research 
which broadens knowledge and improves teaching directs students in 
the discipline of the mind and the cultivation of the graces of the 
spirit. All of this is focused on the mission of the Church, given to 
her by her Lord and made possible by the power of the Holy Spirit. 

This is Pittsburgh Seminary. This catalogue goes forth to sum- 
mon qualified students, generous donors, and the whole Church of 
which we are a part to link heart and hand with us as our faces are 
set toward the future — a future that is good because it is God's. 




Vke faculty 



William F. Orr, Professor of New Testament Literature 
and Exegesis. Southwestern University, A.B.; Louisville 



Presbyterian Seminary, B.D. and Th.M. 
ical Seminary, Ph.D. 



Hartford Theolog- 




Frank Dixon McCloy, Jr., Associate Professor of Church 
History. University of Pittsburgh, A.B. and A.M.; Western 
Theological Seminary, S.T.B.; Harvard University, A.M. and 
Ph.D. 



Walter R. Clyde, Professor of Christian Mission. Muskin- 
gum College, A.B.; Omaha Theological Seminary, B.D.; 
Western Theological Seminary, S.T.M.; Hartford Seminary 
Foundation, Ph.D. 




David Noel Freedman, Professor, The James Anderson Kelso 
Chair of Hebrew and Old Testament Literature. UCLA, 
A.B.; Princeton Theological Seminary, Th.B.; Johns Hopkins 
University, Ph.D. 



Gordon E. Jackson, Dean of the Seminary and Hugh 
Thomson Kerr Professor of Pastoral Theology. Monmouth 
College, A.B.; Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary, Th.B. 
and Th.M.; University of Chicago, Ph.D. 



John H. Gerstner, Professor of Church History. West- 
minster College, A.B.; Westminster Theological Seminary, 
Th.B. and Th.M.; Harvard University, Ph.D. 



^ke tf-acultif 



Bessie M. Burrows, Assistant Professor of Christian Educa- 
tion and Registrar. Geneva College, B.A.; Columbia Univer- 
sity, M.A. 



James A. Walther, Associate Professor of New Testament 
Literature and Exegesis. Grove City College, A.B.; Western 
Theological Seminary, S.T.B.; Emmanuel College, Victoria 
Universitv, Toronto, Th.D. 



Sidney O. Hills, Associate Professor of Hebrew and Old 
Testament Literature. Northwestern University, B.A.; Mc- 
Cormick Theological Seminary, B.D.; Johns Hopkins Univer- 
sity, Ph.D. 



Robert Lee Kelley, Jr., Associate Professor of Biblical 
Languages. University of Pittsburgh, A.B.; Pittsburgh-Xenia 
Theological Seminary, B.D.; Princeton Theological Seminary, 
Th.M. 



Robert Clyde Johnson, Professor of Systematic Theology. 
Davidson College, B.S.; Union Theological Seminary (N. Y.), 
B.D. and S.T.M.; Columbia University, M.A.; Vanderbilt 
University, Ph.D. 





Howard M. Jamieson, Jr., Associate Professor of Biblical 
Theology and Dean of Students. Monmouth College, A.B.; 
Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary, Th.B.; University of 
Pittsburgh, M.A. and Ph.D. 







Vke ^-acuity 



John M. Bald, Associate Professor of Christian Ethics. 
Muskingum College, A.B.; Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological 
Seminary, Th.B. and Th.M. 



Elvvyn Allen Smith, Professor of Church History. Whea- 
ton College, A.B.; Yale Divinity School, B.D.; Princeton 
Theological Seminary, Th.M.; Harvard University, Ph.D. 



A 



Walter E. Wiest, Associate Professor of Philosophy of 
Religion. Lafayette College, A.B.; Princeton Theological 
Seminary, Th.B. 




Malcolm S. Alexander, Associate Professor of Pastoral 
Theology and Director of Field Education. University of 
Southern California, A.B. and LL.B.; Pittsburgh-Xenia Theo- 
logical Seminary, B.D. 



Harold E. Scott, Associate Professor of Homiletics and As- 
sistant Director of Field Education. Sterling College, B.A.; 
Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary, B.D. 



Howard L. Ralston, Assistant Professor of Church Music. 
Muskingum College, Mus.B.; Curtis Institute of Music, 
A.A.G.O. 



Vke ^-acuity 



William A. Nicholson, Associate Professor of Homiletics. 
-Washington & Jefferson College, A.B.; Western Theological 
Seminary, S.T.B. 



James S. Irvine, Assistant Professor of Bibliography. Wash- 
ington and Jefferson College, A.B.; Western Theological Sem- 
inary, B.D.; Carnegie Institute of Technology, M.L.S.; Johns 
Hopkins University, Ph.D. 




J. Gordon Chamberlin, Associate Professor of Christian 
Education. Cornell College in Iowa, A.B.; Union Theological 
Seminary (N. Y.), B.D.; Columbia University, Ed.D. 




Gayraud S. Wilmore, Jr., Assistant Professor of Social 
Ethics. Lincoln University, A.B.; Lincoln Seminary, B.D.; 
Temple University School of Theology, S.T.M. 




Arlan P. Dohrenburg, Assistant Professor of Speech. Frank- 
lin and Marshall College, A.B.; Princeton Theological Sem- 
inary, B.D. 







Edward D. Grohman, Instructor in Old Testament. Grove 
City College, A.B.; Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary, 
B.D.; Johns Hopkins University, Ph.D. 






Vke faculty 



David G. Buttrick, Instructor in Church and Ministry. 
Haverford College, B.A.; Union Theological Seminary (New 
York), B.D. 



George H. Kehm, Instructor in Theology. Queens College, 
B.S.; Princeton Theological Seminary, B.D.; Harvard Divin- 
ity School, S.T.M. 



Dietrich Ritschl, Professor of History of Biblical Inter- 
pretation and Doctrine. University of Edinburgh, Ph.D. 



% 



Lynn Boyd Hinds, Instructor in Speech. University of 
Akron, B.A.; Eastern Baptist Theological Seminary, B.D.; 
Temple University, M.A. 



BOARD OF DIRECTORS 

Officers 

Rev. W. Bruce Wilson, D.D., President 

Rev. Frederick B. Speakman, D.D., Vice President 

Mr. George D. Lockhart, Secretary 

Rev. James T. Vorhis, D.D., Assistant Secretary 

Mr. Robert L. Becker, Treasurer 

Mr. John G. Smithyman, C.P.A., Assistant Treasurer 

Mr. Henry C. Herchenroether, Jr., Counsel 



Members 

Term Expires May 1963 

Mr. A. C. Amsler Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Retired — Westinghouse Electric Corporation 

Rev. John B. Barker, D.D. ....... Canton, Ohio 

Pastor, Calvary Presbyterian Church 

Mr. Frank H. Davis, LL.D Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Retired 

Rev. Robert H. French, D.D., LL.D Des Moines, Iowa 

Synod Executive 

Mr. Henry C. Herchenroether, Jr. .... . Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Attorney, Alter, Wright, and Barron 

Mr. W. Kenneth Menke Pittsburgh, Pa. 

President, Pittsburgh Chemical Company 

Rev. Don P. Montgomery, D.D. ..... Youngstown, Ohio 

Pastor, Pleasant Grove United Presbyterian Church 

Mr. William H. Rea Pittsburgh, Pa. 

President, Oliver Tyrone Corporation 

Rev. Robert H. Stephens, D.D. ..... Summit, N. J. 

Pastor, Central Presbyterian Church 

Mr. James W. Vicary ......... Erie, Pa. 

President, Ervite Corporation 

Rev. Robert R. Vogelsang ....... Latrobe, Pa. 

Pastor, Latrobe Presbyterian Church 

Rev. Walter R. Young, D.D Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Pastor, Second United Presbyterian Church of Wilkinsburg 



Term Expires May 1964 

Mr. Robert L. Becker ..... 

President, Wear-Ever Aluminum, Inc. 



Mr. Earle M. Craig 

Retired — Chairman of the Board, Valvoline Oil Company 

Rev. Richard W. Graves, D.D., Litt.D. 

Pastor, United Presbyterian Church 

Mr. Milton J. Hein ...... 

Assistant Comptroller, Board of National Missions 



Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Pittsburgh, Pa. 

New Wilmington, Pa. 

New York, N. Y. 



Mr. George D. Lockhart ....... Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Attorney, Kirkpatrick, Pomeroy, Lockhart and Johnson 

Rev. W. Paul Ludwig, Ph.D Washington, D. C. 

Pastor, Chevy Chase Presbyterian Church 

Mr. John R. McCune, Jr Pittsburgh, Pa. 

President, Consolidated Lamp and Glass Company 

Rev. Walter L. Moser, Ph.D., D.D Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Stated Clerk, Pittsburgh Presbytery 

Mr. Alexander P. Reed, LL.D Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Attorney, Alter, Wright, and Barron 

Rev. John Coventry Smith, D.D., LL.D New York, N. Y. 

General Secretary, Commission on Ecumenical Mission and Relations 

Rev. Frederick Bruce Speakman, D.D Dayton, Ohio 

Pastor, Westminster Presbyterian Church 

Rev. C. T. R. Yeates, D.D., LL.D Des Moines, Iowa 

Pastor, Westminster United Presbyterian Church 



Term Expires May 1965 

Mr. Wilson A. Campbell Sewickley, Pa. 

Retired 

Mr. T. J. Gillespie, Jr Pittsburgh, Pa. 

President and Treasurer, Lockhart Iron and Steel Company 

Rev. J. Hubert Henderson, D.D Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Pastor, J. M. Wallace Memorial United Presbyterian Church 

Mr. William R. Jackson Pittsburgh, Pa. 

President, Pittsburgh-Des Moines Steel Company 

Rev. John C. Lorimer, D.D New Wilmington, Pa. 

Retired 

Rev. Charles P. Robshaw, S.T.D., D.D., LL.D. . . . Pittsburgh, Pa. 
Pastor, East Liberty Presbyterian Church 

Mr. James H. Rogers Latrobe, Pa. 

Chairman, Latrobe Die Casting Company 

Rev. Howard C. Scharfe, D.D., LL.D Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Pastor, Shadyside Presbyterian Church 

Mr. H. Parker Sharp Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Vice President and General Counsel, Jones & Laughlin Steel Corporation 

Rev. Samuel C. Weir, D.D Detroit, Mich. 

Synod Executive 

Rev. W. Bruce Wilson, D.D Youngstown, Ohio 

Pastor, Liberty United Presbyterian Church 

Mr. Ralph M. Wyman ....... Greenwich, Conn. 

Vice President and Director, H. O. Canfield Company 

10 



COMMITTEES OF THE BOARD OF DIRECTORS 



Mr. A. C. Amsler 
Mr. H. Parker Sharp 
Mr. Robert L. Becker 



The Executive Committee 

Mr. George D. Lockhart 
Rev. Frederick B. Speakman, D.D. 
Rev. Samuel C. Weir, D.D. 
Rev. W. Bruce Wilson, D.D. 



The Education Committee 

Rev. Richard W. Graves, D.D., Litt.D. Rev. Don P. Montgomery, D.D. 
Rev. J. Hubert Henderson, D.D. Rev. Walter L. Moser, Ph.D., D.D. 

Rev. W. Paul Ludwig, Ph.D. Rev. Frederick B. Speakman, D.D. 

Rev. Robert R. Vogelsang 



Mr. Robert L. Becker 
Mr. Wilson A. Campbell 
Mr. Earle M. Craig 
Mr. T. J. Gillespie, Jr. 



The Finance Committee 

Mr. Alexander P. Reed, LL.D. 
Mr. James H. Rogers 
Rev. Howard C. Scharfe, D.D., LL.D. 
Mr. H. Parker Sharp 



The Nominations Committee 

Rev. Robert H. French, D.D., LL.D. Mr. James W. Vicary 
Mr. William H. Rea Rev. Samuel C. Weir, D.D. 

Rev. Charles P. Robshaw, S.T.D., D.D., LL.D. 
Rev. John Coventry Smith, D.D., LL.D. 



The Property Committee 

Mr. A. C. Amsler Mr. George D. Lockhart 

Mr. Frank H. Davis, LL.D. Mr. John R. McCune, Jr. 

Mr. William R. Jackson Mr. W. Kenneth Menke 

Rev. Walter R. Young, D.D. 



11 



THE FACULTY 



The Rev. Donald G. Miller, S.T.M., M.A., Ph.D. (New York University) 
President 

The Rev. William F. Orr, Th.M., Ph.D. (Hartford), D.D. 
Professor of New Testament Literature and Exegesis 

The Rev. Frank Dixon McCloy, Jr., A.M., Ph.D. (Harvard), D.D. 
Associate Professor of Church History 

The Rev. Walter R. Clyde, S.T.M., Ph.D. (Hartford) 
Professor of Christian Mission 

The Rev. David Noel Freedman, Ph.D. (Johns Hopkins) 

Professor, The James Anderson Kelso Chair of Hebrew and 
Old Testament Literature 

The Rev. Gordon E. Jackson, Th.M., Ph.D. (Chicago), D.D., Dean of the Seminary 
Hugh Thomson Kerr Professor of Pastoral Theology 

The Rev. John H. Gerstner, Th.M., Ph.D. (Harvard), D.D. 
Professor of Church History 

Miss Bessie M. Burrows, M.A. (Columbia) 

Assistant Professor of Christian Education and Registrar 

The Rev. James A. Walther, Th.D. (Victoria) 

Associate Professor of New Testament Literature 

The Rev. Sidney 0. Hills, Ph.D. (Johns Hopkins), Recording Secretary 
Associate Professor of Hebrew and Old Testament Literature 

The Rev. Robert Lee Kelley, Jr., Th.M. (Princeton) 
Associate Professor of Biblical Languages 

The Rev. Robert Clyde Johnson, M.A., S.T.M., Ph.D. (Vanderbilt), D.D. 
Professor of Systematic Theology 

The Rev. Howard M. Jamieson, Jr., M.A., Ph.D. (Pittsburgh), D.D. 
Associate Professor of Biblical Theology and Dean of Students 

The Rev. John M. Bald, Th.M., (Pittsburgh-Xenia), D.D., Alt. Recording Secretary 
Associate Professor of Christian Ethics 

The Rev. Elwyn Allen Smith, Th.M., Ph.D. (Harvard) 
Professor of Church History 

The Rev. Walter E. Wiest, Th.B. (Princeton) 
Associate Professor of Philosophy of Religion 

The Rev. Malcolm S. Alexander, LL.B. (Southern California), B.D. 

Associate Professor of Pastoral Theology and Director of Field Education 

The Rev. Harold E. Scott, B.D. (Pittsburgh-Xenia), D.D. 

Associate Professor of Homiletics and Assistant Director of Field Education 

Mr. Howard L. Ralston, Mus.B., A.A.G.O. 

Assistant Professor of Church Music 

The Rev. William A. Nicholson, S.T.B. (Western), D.D. 
Associate Professor of Homiletics 

12 



The Rev. James S. Irvine, B.D., M.L.S., Ph.D. (Johns Hopkins) 
Assistant Professor of Bibliography 

The Rev. J. Gordon Chamberlin, B.D., Ed.D. (Columbia), D.D. 
Associate Professor of Christian Education 

The Rev. Gayraud S. Wilmore, Jr., S.T.M. (Temple), D.D. 
Assistant Professor of Social Ethics 

The Rev. Arlan P. Dohrenburg, B.D. (Princeton.) 
Assistant Professor of Speech 

The Rev. Edward D. Grohman, Ph.D. (Johns Hopkins) 
Instructor in Old Testament 

The Rev. David G. Buttrick, B.D. (Union, N. Y.) 
Instructor in Church and Ministry 

The Rev. George H. Kehm, S.T.M. (Harvard) 
Instructor in Theology 

The Rev. Dietrich Ritschl, Ph.D. (Edinburgh) 

Professor of History of Biblical Interpretation and Doctrine 

The Rev. Lynn Boyd Hinds, M.A. (Temple) 
Instructor in Speech 

The Rev. William Lane, Ph.D. (Johns Hopkins) 
Guest Instructor in Old Testament, 1962-1963 

The Rev. Douglas R. A. Hare, S.T.M. (Union, N. Y.) 
Teaching Fellow in New Testament, 1962-1963 

The Rev. Neil R. Paylor, B.D. (Princeton) 

Guest Instructor, the Program for Advanced Pastoral Studies, 1962-1963 

William S. Tacey, M.A., Ed.D. (Pennsylvania State) 
Guest Instructor in Speech 

The Rev. Orville L. Kuhn, Ed.M., D.D. 
Lecturer in Audio-Visuals 

The Rev. Clifford E. Davis, Ph.D. 
Lecturer in Christian Education 

Robert J. Shoemaker, M.D. (Pittsburgh) 

(Clinical Assistant Professor of Psychiatry, the University of Pittsburgh 

School of Medicine) 

Lecturer and Consultant in Psychiatry 

John B. Reinhart, M.D. (Bowman Gray School of Medicine) 

(Associate Professor of Child Psychiatry and Pediatrics, University of 

Pittsburgh School of Medicine; Director of the Psychiatric Clinic, Children's 

Hospital) 

Lecturer, the Program for Advanced Pastoral Studies 

Margaret B. McFarland, Ph.D. (Columbia) 

(Associate Professor of Psychology, University of Pittsburgh; 
Director, Arsenal Family and Children's Center) 
Lecturer, the Program for Advanced Pastoral Studies 

Rex A. Pittenger, M.D. (Minnesota) 

(Staunton Assistant Professor of Psychiatry, University of Pittsburgh 
School of Medicine; Chief, Staunton Clinic) 
Lecturer, the Program for Advanced Pastoral Studies 

Werner Lutz, M.S. (Columbia) 

(Professor of Social Case Work, the Graduate School of Social Work, 

University of Pittsburgh) 

Lecturer, the Program for Advanced Pastoral Studies 

13 



EMERITUS PROFESSORS 

The Rev. Albert Henry Baldinger, D.D. 

Emeritus Professor of Practical Theology 

The Rev. Clifford Edward Barbour, Ph.D., D.D., LL.D. 

President Emeritus 

The Rev. David E. Culley, Ph.D., D.D. 

Emeritus Professor of Hebrew and Old Testament Literature 

The Rev. Robert McNary Karr, D.D. 

Emeritus Professor of Systematic and Biblical Theology 

The Rev. James Leon Kelso, A.M., Th.M., Th.D., D.D., LL.D. 

Emeritus Professor of Old Testament History and Biblical Archaeology 

The Rev. George Anderson Long, D.D., LL.D., Litt.D. 

President Emeritus and Emeritus Professor of English Bible 

The Rev. Henry A. Riddle, D.D., LL.D. 

President Emeritus 

The Rev. Gaius Jackson Slosser, Ph.D., F.R.Hist.S. 

Emeritus Professor of Ecclesiastical History and History of Doctrine 



COMMITTEES OF THE FACULTY 

The Curriculum Committee 

Mr. Orr, Chairman 

Mr. Gerstner 

Mr. McCloy 

Mr. Chamberlin 

Mr. Irvine, Miss Burrows, and Mr. Alexander, ex officio 



Mr. Johnson 

Mr. Freedman 

Mr. Clydf 



The Admissions and Standings Committee 

Mr. Jamieson, Chairman Mr. Wilmore 

Mr. Nicholson Mr. Bald, Vice Chairman 

Mr. Wiest Mr. Davis, Consultant 

Mr. Alexander and Mr. Idler, ex officio 

The Graduate Education Committee 

Mr. Johnson, Chairman Mr. Gerstner 

Mr. Jackson Mr. Freedman 

Mr. Smith Mr. Ritschl 

Mr. Idler, ex officio 



The Convocation and Worship Committee 



Mr. 
Mr. 
Mr. 



Scott, Chairman 

Chamberlin 

Buttrick 



Mr. Dohrenburg 
Mr. Ralston 



Mr. 
Mr. 



Walther, Chairman 
Vorhis, ex officio 



The Publications Committee 



Mr. Kelley 
Mr. Dohrenburg 



Mr. 
Mr. 
Mr. 



Smith, Chairman 

Wilmore 

Kehm 



The Church and Society Committee 



Mr. Buttrick 

Mr. Grohman 

Mr. Clyde 



The President and the Dean are ex officio members of all committees. 

14 



SPECIAL LECTURES— 1962-1963 

Dr. Markus Barth (Opening Convocation Speaker) 

Associate Professor of New Testament, The Federated Theological Faculty, 
The University of Chicago 

Mr. Edward A. Sovik, A.I. A. 

Architectural Firm of Sovik, Mathre and Madson 
Northfield, Minnesota 

Dr. Masao Takenaka 

Professor of Christian Social Ethics, Doshisha University, 

Kyoto, Japan, and Henry W. Luce Visiting Professor of World Christianity, 

Union Theological Seminary in New York 

Dr. Samuel H. Miller 

Dean of Harvard Divinity School 
Cambridge, Massachusetts 

Mr. Charles P. Taft 
Cincinnati, Ohio 
Fourth National Study Conference on The Church and Economic Life 

Dr. Edwin B. Fairman 

Commission Representative on Ecumenical Mission and Relations 
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

Dr. James Hastings Nichols 

Observer at Ecumenical Council and Professor of Church History, 
Princeton Theological Seminary, Princeton, N. J. 

Dr. Allan A. Zaun 

Pastor, Jefferson Avenue Presbyterian Church 
Detroit, Michigan 

The Right Rev. John J. Wright 

Bishop of the Roman Catholic Diocese of Pittsburgh 

Dr. Marshall Scott 
Moderator 
The United Presbyterian Church in the United States of America 

Professor Gunther Bornkamm (Elliott Lecturer) 
Professor of New Testament Theology 
The University of Heidelberg, Germany 

Dr. Theodore 0. Wedel 

Harry Emerson Fosdick Visiting Professor at Union Theological Seminary 
in New York, 1962-1963 

15 



ADMINISTRATIVE STAFF 



The Rev. Donald G. Miller, Ph.D. 
President 

The Rev. Gordon E. Jackson, Ph.D., D.D. 
Dean of the Seminary 

The Rev. James T. Vorhis, Th.M., D.D. 

Business Manager 

Mr. John G. Smithyman, B.B.A., C.P.A. 

Comptroller 

The Rev. Howard M. Jamieson, Jr., Ph.D., D.D. 
Dean of Students 

Miss Bessie M. Burrows, M.A. 
Registrar 

The Rev. Charles C. W. Idler, B.D 

Director of Admissions 

The Rev. James S. Irvine, M.L.S., Ph.D. 
Librarian 

Miss Evelyn C. Edie, M.S. in L.S. 

Assistant Librarian 

Miss Mary Jane Kann, M.S. in L.S. 
Assistant Librarian 



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PITTSBURGH SEMINARY . . . 

. . . Oar History 

The Pittsburgh Theological Seminary was created in 1959 by 
the merger of two institutions which had lived apart since 1825: 
Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary (United Presbyterian Church 
of North America) and Western Theological Seminary (Presbyterian 
Church, U.S.A.). 

Pittsburgh-Xenia Seminary was formed in 1930 with the union 
of Pittsburgh (Associate Reformed Synod) and Xenia (Associate) 
Seminaries. The Xenia branch had been founded in 1794 in western 
Pennsylvania but had spent most of its life in Ohio and Missouri. 
The Pittsburgh branch originated in New York in 1805 with the 
founding of a seminary (Associate Reformed Synod) by John Mitchell 
Mason, perhaps the greatest personality of United Presbyterian 
history. 

Western Seminary, established legally in 1825 by the General 
Assembly of the Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.), began with classical 
academies founded by Joseph Smith (1785) and John McMillan 
(1787)~ in Washington, Pa. It was indeed a "western" seminary in 
1825, whose task was to furnish a ministry for the rapidly opening 
western territories along the Ohio River. 

The union in 1958 of the United Presbyterian Church of North 
America with the Presbyterian Church in the United States of Amer- 
ica and the subsequent merger of Pittsburgh-Xenia and Western 
Seminaries were possible because of ancient bonds: the Bible, the 
reformers, and the Scottish experience of witness and suffering. 
Church divisions in Scotland were reproduced in America. Some 
Scots joined New England Calvinists (Presbyterian Church, U.S.A.) 
while others preferred the Associate Synod, the Reformed Synod, 
the Associate Reformed Church, or the United Presbyterian Church 
which united the great bulk of these memberships in 1858. Since 
1800 the direction has been steadily toward common witness with a 
resulting joining of schools. Pittsburgh Theological Seminary is 
the issue of this growing fellowship in theological education. 

The purpose of the Seminary as defined in the Constitution is to 
educate suitable persons for the work of Christian ministry in its 
various forms at the highest possible level of educational competence. 
This purpose is fulfilled in terms of continuity with the past and 
relevance for the present. 

19 




The University of Pittsburgh — Four degree programs 
Three of the teaching centers with which the Seminary is related 




PITTSBURGH . . . 

Our Environment 

The City of Pittsburgh is the workshop of America. Together 
with the contiguous towns, it is one of the great commercial centers 
of the world. Its population includes people of every nationality, 
profession, and skill, and therefore it affords unexcelled opportunities 
for the study of social, economic, political, and racial problems. In- 
deed, Pittsburgh Seminary has working relationships with community 
and social agencies, labor unions, business management, human de- 
velopment research centers, teaching hospitals, etc., whereby these 
agencies and organizations become further resources for the educating 
of theological students. 

The cultural and educational life of Pittsburgh is no less rich. 
Five major colleges and universities are located in Pittsburgh: The 
University of Pittsburgh, Carnegie Institute of Technology, Duquesne 
University, Chatham College, and Mt. Mercy College. Their facil- 
ities, programs, and libraries, plus the Carnegie free libraries, afford 
added resources to all students. 

For music and art there are the world-famous Pittsburgh Sym- 
phony Orchestra; the Pittsburgh Opera Society; the Bach Choir and 
other choral and concert groups which bring to the city many out- 
standing musical events each season; the Pittsburgh Plan for Art, an 
extensive art rental and sales organization; and Carnegie Institute, 
which houses one of the largest contemporary art collections in the 
country, and which every third year presents the Pittsburgh Inter- 
national Exhibition of Paintings and Sculpture. Begun in 1896, the 
Pittsburgh International is one of the most important events of its 
kind in the world. 

Churches of all types and denominations are to be found, rang- 
ing from the large urban congregation to the small rural or industrial 
mission. Some of the nation's foremost preachers occupy pulpits in 
the area. 

Pittsburgh Presbytery is the largest presbytery in the United 
Presbyterian Church, U.S.A. Within its bounds are two hundred 
twenty-eight churches with a total membership of about one hundred 
thirty thousand. Of these, about half have more than five hundred 
members each, and mission work is conducted in over twenty differ- 
ent places. Within two hundred miles of Pittsburgh live one-fifth 
of the United Presbyerians in this country. 

21 




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THE SEMINARY CAMPUS 



LOCATION OF THE SEMINARY 

The campus of Pittsburgh Theological Seminary consists of 
about ten acres, located at 616 North Highland Avenue, directly 
opposite Pittsburgh's large Peabody High School. It is in a residen- 
tial area between the East Liberty business district and Highland 
Park, and only a few minutes by automobile or street car from 
the University of Pittsburgh. This spacious and beautifully land- 
scaped site was given to the Seminary in 1951 by the heirs of the 
late H. Lee Mason, Jr. 

Frequent street car and bus service connects the Seminary with 
downtown Pittsburgh. Students coming by train or bus should 
take a Highland Avenue street car, number 73, on Fifth Avenue, 
and leave the car immediately in front of the entrance to the 
Seminary. Students traveling by automobile may follow Highland 
Avenue to the campus. 

THE SEMINARY BUILDINGS 
A new, modern seminary plant is valued at about #5,000,000. 
The main buildings are of American Colonial design. They are con- 
structed of Hampton Court Colonial red brick with Indiana limestone 
trim and are fireproof throughout. 

The George A. Long Administration Building occupies the 
central position on the campus. It provides six classrooms, four 
seminar rooms, faculty and administration offices, a reception room, 
a faculty conference room, a Bible Lands Museum, and an historical 
repository of the United Presbyterian Church in the United States 
of America. 

The McCune Chapel is an integral part of the main school 
building occupying a wing to the rear of the main entrance. It has 
a seating capacity of 310. The two-manual Schantz organ is a 
memorial to the United Presbyterian men and women who died 
in World War II. The memorial was established by the young 
people of our church. 

The Library, described on page 25, is also an integral part of 
the Administration Building. 

ACCOMMODATIONS FOR MEN 
The John McNaugher Memorial Hall, located to the right of 
the Administration Building, is connected with it by covered passage- 
ways on the first and second floor levels. It accommodates 88 men 
in single and double rooms. The dining hall and kitchen, a student 
lounge, two guest rooms, and an apartment for the matron are 
provided on the first floor. 

23 



The George C. Fisher Memorial Hall accommodates 80 men in 
single rooms. It provides a student lounge on each floor, a game 
room and a snack room on the ground floor, and six apartments for 
employees or married students. 

The student must supply his own sheets, pillow cases, blankets, 
and towels and provide for their laundering. 

Special arrangements may be made by students for summer 
occupancy of dormitory rooms. 

HOUSING FOR MARRIED STUDENTS 
The Highlander is an apartment-dormitory for married students 
located on the campus at the corner of North Highland Avenue and 
St. Marie Street. It was purchased in 1962 with funds provided by 
the Development Fund Campaign. There are twenty-three unfurn- 
ished apartment units in the building of which seventeen have one 
bedroom and six have two bedrooms. Each unit includes a living 
room, kitchen, bath and storage locker. Some kitchens are equipped 
with a gas range and an electric refrigerator. Laundry facilities 
(coin meter) are available in the basement. 

The Samuel A, Fulton Memorial Hall, an apartment-dormitory 
for married students, provides eighteen efficiency and twenty-one 
two-room apartments. Each unit includes a kitchenette and a bath. 
A storage locker in the basement is assigned to each family. Each 
apartment is fully equipped with desk, bookcase, table, chairs, 
davenport-bed, a chest of drawers, wardrobe, refrigerator and electric 
stove. Students must provide bedding, linens, silverware, china, 
cooking utensils, curtains, lamps and rugs. Laundry facilities (coin 
meter) are available in the basement. 

A six-room fully furnished apartment for the housing of a mis- 
sionary family on furlough is provided in Fulton Hall. It is made 
available, through cooperation with the Commission on Ecumenical 
Mission and Relations, to missionaries seeking fuller preparation for 
service on return to their fields. 

The Sheridan Avenue Apartments are located on campus at 519 
Sheridan Avenue. This three-story building contains six unfurnished 
apartments for couples with children. Washers and dryers may be 
installed in the basement. 

Duplex Apartments. There are fifteen unfurnished duplex 
apartments on the North Highland Avenue campus for students 
with families. 

Special arrangements may be made for summer occupancy of 
apartments. 

ACCOMMODATIONS FOR WOMEN 
The Women's Residence House accommodates 16 women. It is 
equipped with a lounge and a kitchenette. 

24 



THE SEMINARY LIBRARY 

The library of Pittsburgh Theological Seminary offers a variety 
of materials for theological study and for historical research. The 
book collection contains over 100,000 books, housed in a wing of 
the administration building. Approximately 3,000 books are added 
to the collection each year to keep the seminary abreast of current 
theological interests and cultural developments. Some 300 of the 
latest periodicals embracing Biblical, theological, historical, and 
general fields of interest are located in the service area of the library. 
The extensive reference collection is located in the reading room 
which accommodates 76 persons. The main body of materials is 
located in the stack room which also contains carrels for individual 
study. Microfilm readers are available. 

The following special collections augment the book resources: 

The John M. Mason Memorial Collection 
The research area of the library contains this priceless collection 
of classical theological works dating from the Reformation period. 
This catalogued collection is housed to the left of the library en- 
trance in the John M. Mason Memorial Room. 

The James Warrington Collection of Hymnology 
Several thousand valuable hymn and psalm books which came 
from the estate of James Warrington, Philadelphia, provide research 
materials for scholars of American and English hymnody. Mr. 
Warrington minutely analyzed the works by composer, meter, tune, 
place, author, title, etc. 

The Nina S. Brittain Collection 

Through the generosity of Frank J. Brittain, Esq., of Erie, 
Pennsylvania, the sum of $5000 was used for the purchase of theo- 
logical and related works which are known as the Nina S. Brittain 
Collection. 

The Clarence J. Williamson Church History Collection 
In 1958 endowment funds were established, income of which is 
to be used for the purchase of books in Church History and closely 
related subjects. These books are in memory of Dr. Clarence J. 
Williamson, a graduate of Pittsburgh Seminary, for fifty-one years 
a minister in the United Presbyterian Church of North America, 
and for eighteen years Professor of Church History and Government 
in The Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary. 

Historical Collections 
A vault of the library contains the Minutes and other records 
of Associate, Associate Reformed, and United Presbyterian congre- 
gations, presbyteries, synods, and General Assemblies. The library 

25 



is also the depository for the Upper Ohio Valley Historical Society 
and Pittsburgh Presbytery of The United Presbyterian Church in 
the U. S. A. 

Library Hours 
The library is open about 75 hours a week and is available to 
all without restriction of creed, subject to the rules of the library. 
The hours are 8:00 A.M. to 5:30 P.M., 7:00 to 10:30 P.M., Monday 
through Friday; 9:30 A.M. to 3:30 P.M. Saturday. When the sem- 
inary is not in session, the library is open 9:00 A.M. to 5:00 P.M., 
Monday through Friday. 

A New Library 

A new library, for which funds have been provided by the Sarah 
Mellon Scaife and the Richard K. Mellon Foundations, is being 
planned; construction will begin during 1963 with the hope that it 
will be ready for use in September, 1964. 

The new library will contain research carrels, study areas among 
the stacks, a special periodical area, music room, seminar area and 
audio-visual viewing room. The central part of the library is a 
bibliography room with adjoining reference room. Designed to 
house 300,000 books, the library will seat over 250 persons and pro- 
vide all the facilities necessary to support a graduate seminary 
program. 




Architect's Conception of New Library 
26 



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THE BIBLE LANDS MUSEUM 

The Pittsburgh Theological Seminary is outstanding in its 
activity in archaeological research of Bible times in ancient Palestine. 
In conjunction with the American School of Oriental Research at 
Jerusalem, it has conducted explorations at Sodom and Gomorrah 
in 1924, excavations at Kirjath-Sepher in 1926, 1928, 1930, 1932, 
excavations at Bethel in 1934, at New Testament Jericho and Nitla 
in 1950, and Bethel in 1954, 1957, and 1960. In conjunction with 
Carnegie Museum the Seminary conducted an archaeological dig at 
the Biblical site of Ashdod in 1962, and there will be a continuation 
of that investigation in 1963. 

The archaeological work was inaugurated by Professor M. G. 
Kyle, was carried on by Professor James L. Kelso, and is being con- 
tinued under the direction of Professor David Noel Freedman. 
Members of the faculty and students often participate in the digs. 
Much of the Seminary's share of the antiquities excavated is now on 
exhibit in the Bible Lands Museum. Numerous other valuable pieces 
are awaiting special preparation before being placed on exhibition. 

These objects all illustrate in the most striking way the life of 
the people of Bible lands, and so become of great value for interpre- 
tation as well as for apologetics. They illumine and corroborate the 
Biblical narratives. Thus an ineffaceable impression is made upon 
the student of the trustworthiness of the Biblical record, for only 
real events leave anything to be dug up out of the ground. The 
museum is used by the classes of the Seminary. Opportunity is alsc 
afforded the public to visit the museum at appointed times. 

27 



LIFE ON THE CAMPUS 



CONVOCATIONS AND WORSHIP 

Through the faculty-student Committee on Convocation and 
Worship outstanding people are brought to the campus. Each fall 
and spring there is a two-day lectureship when theologians, Biblical 
scholars, psychiatrists, writers, social thinkers and planners, etc., are 
heard by the seminary family. 

Monthly convocations also introduce scholars from the various 
fields and disciplines to the seminary community. 

While there is chapel worship four days a week, conducted by 
students and faculty, there is also a full worship service in which a 
prominent preacher participates. 

CHURCH AND SOCIETY 
The Seminary reaches out to the community through field edu- 
cation, through laboratory assignments, and through the faculty- 
student Committee on Church and Society. The latter is a dynamic 
part of the East Liberty community as it has established relations 
with settlement houses, urban renewal and development offices, and 
the churches of the community for work with slum clearance, housing 
units, gangs, etc. Experiences provided by the direct contact of the 
Seminary with its neighborhood give to the students vital informa- 
tion and know-how for dealing with urban America. 

COMMUNITY LIFE 

The social life of the campus is probably enhanced by the pres- 
ence of married couples and some children. It is certainly enriched 
by those students from the Orient, Europe, Africa, the Middle East, 
South America, etc., who come to study but also to share their cultures. 

Missionary families spending their furloughs on the campus for 
study bring to the community a sense of the Church ecumenical 
coupled with a sense of urgency. 

The Women's Association, for all women on campus, provides 
opportunities for socializing as well as studying. 

Admittedly, the emphasis in a theological seminary is not on 
social activities, but inter-personal relationships run deep and the 
socializing values are maintained by way of small group get-togethers 
and periodical school functions. 

OPPORTUNITIES IN MUSIC 
The Seminary has a Men's Choir and a Mixed Chorus, both un- 
der the direction of Mr. Howard L. Ralston, Assistant Professor of 
Church Music. Auditions for membership in the Men's Choir are 
held in September. This group, carefully chosen and of limited num- 
ber, sings for daily chapel services and represents the Seminary from 
time to time in churches within easy traveling distance. A more ex- 

28 



tensive tour is undertaken in the spring when the choir presents a 
varied program of sacred music in churches and colleges. 

The Mixed Chorus is maintained for all those of the seminary 
community who enjoy singing. This group meets on Tuesday eve- 
nings and presents a program at Christmas and in the spring, and 
sings at commencement. There are many opportunities throughout 
the year for soloists and instrumentalists. 

The Seminary, in cooperation with the Pittsburgh Council of 
Churches and the American Guild of Organists, presents each year 
a church music seminar for choir directors, organists, and ministers 
of the area. The course, for which tuition is charged, meets for one 
and one-half hours on six Tuesday evenings. On occasion nationally 
known figures in church music are brought in for lectures and 
demonstration. 



THE STUDENT ASSOCIATION 
THE EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE— 1962-63 



President 

Secretary-Treasurer 

Parliamentarian 



John Ashenfelter 
Muriel Brown 
Paul Cameron 



The committees of the Student Association for the most part 
parallel faculty committee structure and meet with the committees of 
the faculty for study and consideration of subjects of mutual interest. 
The committee chairmen for 1962-63 were: 



Curriculum 

Convocation and Worship 

Publications 

Church and Society- 



Allen McCallum 

John McLaren 

John McNitt 

John Nelson 




The Bower Family 
Occupants of Missionary Apartment 1962-63 



29 



ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS 

Pittsburgh Theological Seminary, as a higher educational insti- 
tution, offers work on a graduate school level. This presupposes a 
B.A. or B.S. degree from a regionally accredited college or university, 
the degree work to have a substantial foundation in the liberal arts. 
It also assumes that the student is ready to approach theological edu- 
cation with an open, searching attitude. Pittsburgh Seminary seeks 
that man or woman who is committed to the Christian faith, emotion- 
ally suited for work in the Church, and intellectually capable of the 
most rigorous kind of academic discipline. 



PRE-SEMINARY STUDIES 

College courses prior to theological seminary should provide the 
cultural and intellectual foundations essential to an effective theo- 
logical education. They should issue in at least three broad kinds 
of attainment. 

1. The college work of a pre-seminary student should result in 
the ability to use certain tools of the educated man: 

(a) The ability to write and speak English clearly and cor- 
rectly. English composition should have this as a spe- 
cific purpose, but this purpose should also be cultivated 
in all written work. 

(b) The ability to think clearly. In some persons, this abil- 
ity is cultivated through courses in philosophy or spe- 
cifically in logic. In others it is cultivated by the use of 
scientific method, or by dealing with critical problems 
in connection with literary and historical documents. 

(c) The ability to read at least one foreign language and in 
some circumstances more than one. 

2. The college work of a pre-seminary student should result in 
increased understanding of the world in which he lives: 

(a) The world of men and ideas. This includes knowledge 
of English literature, philosophy, and psychology. 

(b) The world of nature. This is provided by knowledge 
of the natural sciences, including laboratory work. 

(c) The world of human affairs. This is aided by knowledge 
of history and the social sciences. 

3. The college work of the pre-seminary student should result 
in a sense of achievement: 

(a) The degree of his mastery of his field of study is more 
important than the credits and grades which he ac- 
cumulates. 

30 



(b) The sense of achievement may be encouraged through 
academic concentration, or through "honors" work, or 
through other plans for increasingly independent work 
with as much initiative on the student's part as he is able 
to use with profit. 

Desirable College Curriculum 

The American Association of Theological Schools has proposed 
the following college curriculum for pre-ministerial students. This 
is regarded by the Association as a minimum list of fields of study 
with which the student should have acquaintance before beginning 
seminary study. It is suggested that a student acquire a total of 90 
semester hours, or complete approximately three fourths of his college 
work, in the areas listed below although there is no requirement that 
this be rigidly adhered to. The liberal arts background is felt to 
provide the best foundation for seminary work and for later profes- 
sional studies. 

English — literature, composition, speech and related studies. 
At least 6 semesters. 

History — ancient, modern European, and American. 
At least 3 semesters. 

Philosophy — orientation in history, content and method. 
At least 3 semesters. 

Natural sciences — preferably physics, chemistry and biology. 
At least 2 semesters. 

Social sciences — psychology, sociology, economics, political science, education. 
At least 6 semesters, including at least 1 semester of psychology. 

Foreign languages — one or more of the following linguistic avenues to man's 
thought and tools of scholarly research: Latin, Greek, Hebrew, German, 
French. Students who anticipate post-graduate studies are urged to under- 
take these disciplines early in their training as opportunity offers. 
At least 4 semesters. 

Religion — a thorough knowledge of the content of the Bible is indispensable 
together with an introduction to the major religious traditions and theo- 
logical problems in the context of the principal aspects of human culture 
outlined above. The pre-seminary student may well seek counsel of the 
seminary of his choice in order, most profitably to use the resources of 
his college. 

At least 3 semesters. 

Of the various possible areas of concentration, where areas of concentra- 
tion are required, English, philosophy and history are regarded as the most 
desirable. 

At the beginning of the first year students will take placement 
examinations in philosophy, Greek, speech, and Bible content to de- 
termine the sections in which they will be placed. Students showing 
a deficiency in Bible content will be required to remedy such de- 
ficiency. 

31 



PROCEDURE FOR ADMISSION 
Applicants seeking degrees ordinarily move through three cate- 
gories under the supervision of the Admissions Committee of the 
faculty. 

1. P re-Enrollment: An applicant may pre-enroll any time be- 
fore the beginning of his senior year in college. Approval 
is granted by the Admissions Committee upon receipt of the 
following documents: 

(a) A formal application. 

(b) Application fee. A check or money order for $15.00 
must accompany the application. This will be applied 
to the first semester's tuition. While the fee will be 
refunded if the application is rejected, it is not return- 
able if the application is withdrawn. 

(c) Mental Capacity Test. The Seminary will correspond 
with the applicant's college concerning a mental ca- 
pacity test. If none is available, the applicant must 
take one under seminary direction. 

(d) A personal interview with the Director of Admissions, 
the Admissions Committee as a whole, or another rep- 
resentative of the Seminary who may be designated by 
the committee. 

2. Admissions: After the opening of the senior year in college 
an applicant should add the following credentials. Admission 
may be granted conditionally or unconditionally at the dis- 
cretion of the Admissions Committee. 

(a) A medical report on a blank furnished by the Seminary. 

(b) An official transcript from the Registrar of the college or 
university, showing grades for at least three years of 
college work. 

(c) Shortly after indicating his desire to be admitted each 
applicant will receive information concerning a group of 
personality tests, which should be completed and re- 
turned as directed. 

(d) An extensive (500-1000 words) statement in the appli- 
cant's handwriting describing his family, educational, 
and religious background, placing particular emphasis 
upon his motives for desiring to enter the Seminary and 
the ministry. 

All documents for admission should be in the hands of the Direc- 
tor of Admissions by April 15 preceding the September for which ad- 
mission is sought. 

3. Matriculation: A final transcript showing the degree and 
date of graduation of the applicant. 

32 



After admission is granted and within thirty days of such notifi- 
cation, a $35 placement fee is required to assure the applicant of a 
place in the new class. This fee is applied on the student's tuition 
and is not returnable except under extreme hardship and at the dis- 
cretion of the Admissions Committee. A certification of the student's 
"intention to enroll" must accompany this fee. 

TRANSFER STUDENTS 
A student transferring from another seminary is required to 
submit, in addition to the foregoing, a complete transcript of previous 
seminary work and a letter of dismissal from the Dean or President. 
A transfer student must be in residence at Pittsburgh Seminary for a 
minimum of one full academic year in order to become a candidate 
for the Bachelor of Divinity degree. 

FOREIGN STUDENTS 

Qualified applicants from other countries are welcome as a part of 
the student body. Such applicants shall be required, in addition to 
the regular requirements for admission, to give evidence of proficien- 
cy in the English language before their admission. Tests such as the 
University of Michigan English Language Test (available around the 
world) and/or the Lado English Test (required by the U. S. State 
Department) normally shall be deemed sufficient. The former is ar- 
ranged through the Seminary or the Commission on Ecumenical Mis- 
sion and Relations of the United Presbyterian Church. 

Such applicants shall have endorsement either of a representative 
of the Commission on Ecumenical Mission and Relations (in those 
areas where the United Presbyterian Church in the U.S.A. has fra- 
ternal workers) or the World Council of Churches (in other areas). 

An applicant from another country is also asked to submit a letter 
from his bank stating that there are on deposit sufficient funds to 
assure his passage home after his period of study in this country. 
This saves possible embarrassment to both student and seminary at 
a later time. 

All correspondence concerning admission to the seminary should 
be addressed to the Director of Admissions. 



33 



FEES AND EXPENSES* 

(for the academic year) 
Tuition (approx.) $500.00 Books (approx.) $100.00 

g oard v JS-22 Hospitalization 

Room *ee lbU.UU i nsurance (approx.) . .32.00- 137.00 

Library Fee (annual) 10.00 v yy ' 

Student Association Fee (annual) 5.00 Incidentals 75.00- 300.00 

Matriculation Fee — $35.00 payable at the time of registration. 

Tuition Fee — $16.00 per semester hour. 

Late Registration Fee — A charge of $5.00 will be made to students registering later 

than the specified time. 
Graduation Fee— $10.00. 
Transcript Fee — One copy of a student's academic record will be provided without 

charge. A fee of $1.00 will be charged for each additional transcript. 
* Subject to change. 

MARRIED STUDENT APARTMENT FEES 
The Highlander 

Twenty-three unfurnished apartments $67.50-$75.00 per month 

The Samuel A. Fulton Memorial Hall 

Thirty-nine furnished apartments 47.50- 62.50 per month 

Sheridan Avenue Apartments 

Six unfurnished apartments 50.00- 55.00 per month 

Duplexes 

Fifteen unfurnished apartments 50.00- 55.00 per month 

Fees for apartment occupancy are payable monthly. If they are paid by the 

10th of the month there will be a discount of $5.00. Applications for apartments 

should be made as early as possible. 

ACADEMIC EXPENSES 

All academic fees and expenses are payable in advance on the 
opening day of each semester. When necessary, arrangements for 
a payment plan to cover a semester's expenses may be made at the 
Business Office on the first day of each term, permitting (4) four 
equal payments: one-fourth on the first day of the term, and the 
balance due at the beginning of the fourth, eighth, and twelfth 
weeks respectively. There is a carrying charge of #5.00 for the de- 
ferred payment plan. Failure to pay any deferred payment within 
ten days from the due date will incur a penalty of 1% of the amount 
due. 

Settlement of all seminary bills is required before registration 
for a new semester, and before graduation or the release of official 
transcripts. 

SEMINARY MEALS 

Residents of the men's and women's dormitories are required 
to eat in the seminary dining hall. Board includes nineteen meals 
a week; only breakfast is served on Sunday. The dining hall is 
closed on holidays which are scheduled on the seminary calendar. 
No deduction is allowed for absence from individual meals, although 
special consideration is given to students who regularly do not eat 
in the dining hall weekends. 

34 



MEDICAL AND HOSPITALIZATION INSURANCE 

Students are required to be insured by some type of medical and 
hospitalization insurance acceptable to the Seminary. All students 
who are registered as full-time students are eligible for such insur- 
ance under a group student policy issued by either the Insurance 
Company of North America or Blue Cross and Blue Shield. Detailed 
information concerning premiums and benefits may be secured at 
the Business Office. 



STUDENT FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE 

While students are encouraged to maintain a maximum of fi- 
nancial independence, Pittsburgh Seminary does provide financial 
aid in varying amounts from endowed and general funds. Aid is of- 
ferred on the basis of scholarship and/or financial need. Several 
merit scholarships are available to entering students as well as 
Middlers and Seniors. Once a student is admitted the Seminary 
makes every effort to see that he does not drop out due to financial 
problems. 

The Board of Christian Education of the United Presbyterian 
Church, through its Office of Educational Loans and Scholarships, 
has a total plan for student financial aid including National Presby- 
terian Theological Scholarships, loan funds, and grants-in-aid. Nom- 
inations for the theological scholarships are made by the faculty of 
the Seminary. Loan applications and grants-in-aid requests are 
made through the Dean of Students. 

Specific details concerning scholarships, student aid, and loan 
funds, together with application forms, may be obtained from the 
Dean of Students. 

SCHOLARSHIP FUNDS 

Students achieving a degree of excellence in scholarship and con- 
fronted with financial need may secure scholarship aid from several 
funds. A number of individual scholarships are available, such as 
the Dr. Charles Swaney Memorial Scholarship which was established 
in 1962 by the First United Presbyterian Church of New Cumber- 
land, West Virginia. It is an annual scholarship of #500 and is award- 
ed by the faculty of the Seminary to a student on the basis of 
scholarship and need. 

GRANTS-IN-AID FUNDS 

Money from these funds is awarded to students on the basis of 
financial need. 

35 



LOAN FUNDS 

James H. Snowden Memorial Loan Fund. A loan fund for 
students needing financial assistance to obtain a theological educa- 
tion was established in 1953 by R. R. Snowden, M.D., Pittsburgh, 
Pennsylvania, in memory of his father, Professor James H. Snowden, 
D.D., LL.D. Loans from this fund are made on notes with interest 
and without further endorsement. 



Walter G. and Esther B. Comin Student Loan Fund. A loan 
fund for students who need financial assistance to continue their ed- 
ucation was established in 1955 by Mrs. Walter G. Comin, Pawnee 
City, Nebraska, Mr. and Mrs. Walter G. Comin, Jr., Wilkinsburg, 
Pa., and Mr. Myron C. Comin, Spokane, Washington, in memory of 
Rev. Walter G. Comin, D.D. Loans from this fund are made on 
notes at four percent interest and without further endorsement. 

Westphal Memorial Loan Fund. The session of the Reed Me- 
morial United Presbyterian Church, Lyndhurst, New Jersey, estab- 
lished in 1956 the Westphal Memorial Loan Fund. Under certain 
conditions specified by the donors loans from this fund may be made 
on notes without interest or further endorsement, and are repayable 
within ten years. 



Albert G. Hamilton Memorial Loan Fund. A loan fund for 
students who need financial assistance during the seminary course 
was established in 1960 by Mrs. Albert G. Hamilton, Pittsburgh, 
Pennsylvania, in memory of her husband, Mr. Albert G. Hamilton. 
Loans from this fund may be made on notes at three percent interest 
without further endorsement. 



Dr. and Mrs. James D. Sands Memorial Loan Fund. A loan 
fund for seminary students was established in 1961 by Mrs. Albert 
G. Hamilton, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, in memory of her parents, 
Dr. and Mrs. James D. Sands. Loans from this fund may be made 
on notes at three percent interest without further endorsement. 

The First Presbyterian Church of New Kensington Rotary Loan 
Fund. Established by the session of the First Presbyterian Church 
of New Kensington, Pennsylvania, in 1961. This loan fund provides 
#300 for a single student and $600 for a married student during the 
first year of seminary when the schedule and curriculum do not 
allow remunerative field work. The principal is to be repaid follow- 
ing graduation from seminary in minimum amounts of $100 per year. 

36 



Walter A. Long Memorial Student Rotary Loan Fund. Estab- 
lished in 1961 by the Estate of Emma Clark Long. Loans are not 
to exceed #100 to any one student in any one academic year and the 
amount borrowed is to be repaid not later than two years after grad- 
uation or not later than two years after the borrower would have 
graduated if he had progressed normally through the seminary to 
graduation in the event of failure to graduate. All loans are made 
without interest. 

The William G. Crow Memorial Loan Fund. Established in 
November, 1961. Loans from this fund may be made on notes with 
three percent interest. 



AWARDS, PRIZES, AND GRADUATE FELLOWSHIPS 

The following competitive awards, prizes, and graduate fellow- 
ships have been provided for the benefit of students for the ministry. 
In order to compete, students must take their full course of study in 
Pittsburgh Seminary; must carry not less than the regular quota of 
studies; must complete each term's work satisfactorily; and they 
must furthermore meet the particular requirements of the desired 
award, prize, or graduate fellowship as hereinafter specified. Under 
each an award is made once a year, at which time the faculty 
considers all regular degree students who, during the preceding school 
year, have completed the necessary amount of work in a satisfactory 
manner. 

The Sylvester S. Marvin Memorial Fellowship 
The Sylvester S. Marvin Fellowship may be assigned upon grad- 
uation to that member of the Senior Class who is recommended by the 
faculty as having achieved the highest standard in all departments 
of the seminary curriculum, provided that his average be not below 
85%. The faculty reserves the right to impose special tests and ex- 
aminations in making this award. It is offered to those who take the 
entire course of three years in this institution. The recipient must 
pledge himself to a year of post-graduate study immediately follow- 
ing his graduation at some institution approved by the faculty. He 
is required to furnish quarterly reports of his progress. The money 
will be paid in three equal installments, on the first day of October, 
January, and April. Prolonged absence from the classroom in the 
discharge of extra-seminary duties makes a student ineligible for the 
fellowship. 

37 



The Thomas Jamison Scholarship 

The Thomas Jamison Scholarship, in memory of the late Thomas 
Jamison, Esq., of North Side, Pittsburgh, was established by Mrs. 
Jamison. The income of this endowment is given every year to the 
member of the Senior Class whose average grades during the Middler 
and Senior years give him first place in the class. 

The acceptance of this scholarship requires that the recipient 
spend a full academic year in study in a foreign theological institution 
selected by the faculty. He must further agree to make regular re- 
ports of the work he is doing and at the end of the year he will pre- 
sent a satisfactory thesis of not less than ten thousand words on some 
subject selected by the faculty or approved by the faculty. If for 
any reason the man who is first in the class does not accept the schol- 
arship and its requirements the scholarship will be offered to the stu- 
dent next in rank. 



The Jennie Rigg Barbour Memorial Prize 

The Jennie Rigg Barbour Memorial Prize was established by 
Rev. Clifford E. Barbour, Ph.D., D.D., LL.D., President of Pittsburgh 
Theological Seminary, as a memorial to his mother. The income 
from the endowment of this prize is assigned to that member of the 
graduating class who has taken his full course of instruction in this 
institution and who has achieved the second highest academic rank 
of his class, if in the judgment of the faculty he is worthy in all other 
respects. It is hoped that the student will use this income for further 
study either within an academic institution or by the enlargement 
of his own library. 

The Michael Wilson Keith Memorial Homiletical Prize 

This prize was founded in 1919 by the Keith Bible Class of the 
First Presbyterian Church of Coraopolis, Pennsylvania, in memory 
of the Reverend Michael Wilson Keith, D.D., the founder of the 
class and pastor of the church from 1911 to 1917. The prize is award- 
ed to a member of the Senior Class who has spent three years in this 
seminary and has taken the highest standing in the department of 
homiletics. The winner of the prize is expected to preach in the 
First Presbyterian Church of Coraopolis and teach the Keith Bible 
Class one Sunday after the award is made. 

The Joseph Watson Greek Entrance Prize 

The Joseph Watson Greek Prize was established in 1920, by 
Mrs. Robert A. Watson, Columbus, Ohio. The income will be awarded 
to the student who achieves the highest grade in an examination in 
classical Greek as he enters the Junior Class of the Seminary. 

38 



The William B. Watson Prize in Hebrew 
The William B. Watson Prize in Hebrew was established in 
1919, by Mrs. Robert A. Watson, Columbus, Ohio. The income will 
be awarded to that member of the Senior Class who, having elected 
Hebrew, shall submit the best grammatical and exegetical treatment 
of an assigned portion of the Hebrew Old Testament. 

The John Watson Prize in New Testament Greek 
The John Watson Prize in New Testament Greek was estab- 
lished in 1919, by Mrs. Robert A. Watson, Columbus, Ohio. The 
income will be awarded to that member of the Senior Class who, 
having elected Greek Exegesis, shall submit the best grammatical 
and exegetical treatment of an assigned portion of the Greek New 
Testament. 

The Robert A. Lee Church History Award 
By bequest, in memory of her husband the late Mrs. Henrietta 
M. Lee, Oakmont, Pa., established the Robert A. Lee Church History 
Foundation, the annual income of which is to be awarded yearly to 
the students making first and second rank respectively in the Depart- 
ment of Church History. 

The Hugh Thomson Kerr Moderator Prize 
This prize was established in 1938 by the Men's Committee of 
the Shadyside Presbyterian Church, Pittsburgh. An annual contri- 
bution of fifty dollars was pledged to be used for the purchase of 
books. The prize is to be awarded to that member of the graduating 
class who has exhibited to the greatest degree, throughout the three 
years of the seminary course, leadership, originality, and accomplish- 
ments beyond the normal requirements for graduation. 

The James Purdy Scholarship 

The James Purdy Scholarship was established in 1882. The 
income is apportioned equally each year to the six members of the 
Junior Class who attain the highest average of excellence in their 
seminary work. The distribution is made after the students return 
to the Seminary the following year. 

The Andrew Reed Scholarship 
The Andrew Reed Scholarship was established in 1914 by Miss 
Anna M. Reed, Cross Creek, Pennsylvania, the income being given 
to the student who, upon entering seminary, shall achieve the highest 
grade in a competitive examination in the English Bible. The suc- 
cessful competitor is to have the scholarship throughout the entire 
course of three years, provided that his general conduct and applica- 
tion to study shall continue to be satisfactory to the faculty. 

39 



The Christian Education Award 

The Christian Education Award was established in 1950 by action 

of the Board of Directors. An award is granted to the person in the 

Department of Christian Education having the highest grade average 

for the two year course, providing the average is "B" (2.0) or above. 

The Home Training Bible Class Award In Missions 
This is an award of $100 which was established in January, 1961, 
by the Home Training Bible Class of the Edgewood Presbyterian 
Church, Pittsburgh, Pa. in the name of the Rev. Walter L. Moser, 
Ph.D., D.D. The recipient will be that member of the graduating 
class who is deemed most deserving among those entering the foreign 
or home missionary field upon graduation. 

The Chevy Chase Christian Education Award 
This award was established by the college age young people 
of the Chevy Chase Presbyterian Church, Washington, D. C, in 
appreciation of those who are interested in youth. It is to be given 
to the person who, throughout the seminary course, has best minis- 
tered to young people and who intends to specialize in youth work 
upon completion of his studies. 

The Alice Myers Sigler Memorial Prize In History And Theology 
This award was established in 1962 by Robert M., John H., 
Richard E., and Alan B. Sigler in memory of their mother. The 
income from this endowed fund is granted to the student who, in the 
judgment of the professors of the History and Theology Division, is 
most worthy of this award at the end of the Middler year. 

The Fred McFeely Rogers Prize In Biblical Studies 
The Fred McFeely Rogers Prize in Biblical Studies was estab- 
lished in 1962 by Mr. and Mrs. James H. Rogers in honor of their 
son, a graduate in the Class of 1962. The income from this endowed 
fund is granted to the student who, in the judgment of the professors 
of the Biblical Division, is most worthy of this award at the end of 
the Junior year. 



40 



DEGREE PROGRAMS 

AND 
COURSES OF STUDY 



Bachelor of Divinity 
Degree description 
Course descriptions 



pages 42-45 
pages 50-65 



Master of Religious Education 
Degree description 
Course descriptions 



pages 46-47 
pages 50-60 



Master of Education 



page 48 



Master of Theology 

Degree description 
Course description 



pages 66-67 
pages 68-72 



Master of Public Administration, or 
Master of Public and International Affairs 



page 75 



41 



THE BACHELOR OF DIVINITY CURRICULUM 

Of the making of curricula there is no end. A curriculum ex- 
presses the mind of the faculty, its sense of what is important, its 
intuition of relevance. So curricula change. Yet in theological edu- 
cation as in other disciplines there are enduring structures which re- 
main constant within change. The problem of curriculum is the 
problem of ordering meaningful change vis-a-vis structures of per- 
manence. Pittsburgh Seminary's Bachelor of Divinity curriculum is 
an attempt to deal with this problem. 

The Biblical Division has thirty out of eighty-one required 
hours. These include both Greek and Hebrew and one might wonder 
whether these should be included in Biblical hours. The way language 
is taught in Pittsburgh — inductively — they should be included. After 
a brief period of orientation in both languages, the student begins to 
read in the Old and New Testaments. As he comes upon a new 
grammatical construction it is explained. Seeing it in a context helps 
him to come to grips with it. A chief study in the Biblical Division 
is exegesis. It runs through the Middler and Senior years in both 
Testaments. Exegesis appears in the catalogue as a Church and 
Ministry course because it is carefully related to the preaching office. 
Students study with a team of exegetes, homileticians, and speech 
instructors as they work on the sermon from text to delivery. 

The History and Theology Division has twenty-eight required 
hours, only twenty of which are apparent at first glance. Both his- 
tory and theology are closely correlated with church and ministry 
courses for the sake of greater relevance. For example, American 
church history is about two-thirds of Church and Ministry I where 
it is taught in dialogue with the culture which it has informed and 
which in turn has informed it. The doctrine of church and ministry 
is foundational to both the teaching and preaching offices and runs 
through the Middler year in Church and Ministry II and III. The 
doctrine of the sacraments is intrinsic to liturgies which is a section 
within Church and Ministry IV. Christian ethics, an extremely im- 
portant part of the curriculum, is taught in conjunction with the 
pastoral office broadly conceived, and so has three hours in Church 
and Ministry V. 

The Church and Ministry Division, a new designation in theo- 
logical education, has twenty-three hours, although its course designa- 

42 



tions total thirty-nine hours. The difference in hours is due to 
work transferred from the other two divisions for the purpose of 
relevance. This division in one sense is the focus of the curriculum 
for all studies are for the purpose of church in its total ministry, in- 
cluding parish ministry and special ministries (Christian education, 
higher education, fraternal workers, administration, etc.). Through 
this division the whole curriculum confronts the world and is con- 
fronted by the world. In essence it is the division of communication; 
for the Gospel to be communicated, the knowledge and skills neces- 
sary to communication, and the understanding of the cultural milieu 
within which we do our communicating are all the business of this 
division. The course work of the Church and Ministry Division is 
taught largely by inter-divisional faculty personnel. 

Field education is nuclear to the curriculum. It begins in an ob- 
servational way in the Junior year. The first semester students are 
taken on field trips to a prison, the courts, a union meeting, a session 
with management, a mental hospital, etc., and seminars are conducted 
on the basis of these experiences. The second semester in connection 
with Church and Ministry I students makes a brief preliminary study 
of a church and its neighborhood to become acquainted with some 
of the tensions involved. During the Middler year students are as- 
signed to congregations where they learn the practice of ministry 
under careful supervision by faculty personnel as well as pastors. 
This field experience is correlated with class work in Church and 
Ministry II and III. Different types of field education are intro- 
duced into the Senior year to afford experience in counseling, com- 
munity analysis, liturgies, etc., as well as experimentation in new 
forms of ministry. These laboratory experiences are correlated 
with Church and Ministry IV and V. 

Since a vital part of curriculum is dialogue in the classroom, 
every effort is made for small classes. Language study and exegesis, 
church and ministry courses, and history and theology classes are sec- 
tioned wherever possible into classes of 8-12. Where the lecture 
method is employed, one hour a week is usually given to preceptorials. 

Tradition is the identity within novelty; novelty is the relevance 
of tradition. The Bachelor of Divinity curriculum is the faculty's 
carefully designed course of study through which a community of 
scholars — students and professors — can work to relate tradition and 
novelty, the old and the new, in our time for our time. 

43 



THE PRESCRIBED COURSE OF STUDY 

LEADING TO THE 
DEGREE OF BACHELOR OF DIVINITY 



Semester I 

Bible 

110 Hebrew 3 

210 Greek 3 

112 Old Testament Introduction 3 

410 Church History I 

510 Philosophy 

710 Principles of Expression I 



Junior Year 

Semester II 
9 Bible 7 

111 Hebrew 2 

211 Greek 2 

213 New Testament Introduction 3 
411 Church History II 3 

511 Contemporary Theology 2 

711 Principles of Expression II 1 

713 Church and Ministry I: 

The Church in American Culture 3 



16 



16 



Middler Year 



220 New Testament Introduction 

420 Church History III 

520 Systematic Theology I 

720 Church and Ministry II: 
The Preaching and 
Teaching Offices 



3 
3 
3 

7 

16 



121 Old Testament Introduction 

521 Systematic Theology II 

721 Church and Ministry III: 
The Preaching and 
Teaching Offices 

Elective 



Senior Year 



730 Church and Ministry IV: 

The Pastoral Office 
732 Church and Ministry VI 
Electives 



731 Church and Ministry V: 

Christian Ethics and the 
Mission of the Church 

733 Church and Ministry VII 
Electives 



7 
3 
6 

16 



81 academic hours of required work 
15 academic hours of electives 

96 total academic hours required for graduation 



44 



THE FOUR-YEAR BACHELOR OF DIVINITY CURRICULUM 



Semester I 
110 Hebrew 
210 Greek 

112 Old Testament Introduction 
410 Church History I 
710 Principles of Expression I 
Field Education Supervision 



Semester II 
111 Hebrew 
211 Greek 

213 New Testament Introduction 
411 Church History II 
711 Principles of Expression II 
Field Education Supervision 



II 



220 New Testament Introduction 

420 Church History III 

720 Church and Ministry II 



3 
3 
7 

13 



121 Old Testament Introduction 
713 Church and Ministry I 
721 Church and Ministry III 



510 Philosophy 3 

732 Church and Ministry VI 3 

Electives 6 



III 



511 Contemporary Theology 2 

733 Church and Ministry VII 3 

Electives 6 



12 



11 



520 Systematic Theology I 
730 Church and Ministry IV 
Elective 



IV 



521 Systematic Theology II 
731 Church and Ministry V 



3 
7 

10 



45 



TOE MASTER OF RELIGIOUS EDUCATION CURRICULUM 

The Master of Religious Education curriculum is a two year 
program including both theory and practice among the disciplines of 
Bible, history, theology, and the teaching ministry. The requirement 
of five hours each in Hebrew and Greek demonstrates the faculty's 
seriousness about this degree as it seeks to prepare students for the 
teaching office. That that office has fallen into disrepute and has 
come to be associated largely with methods is manifest. The recovery 
of the office will come through Biblical and theological competence 
coupled with the art and skills of communication. To know the Bible 
the student must enter into the world of the Bible and gain a "feel" for 
its idiom of thought, expression, practice. Language study is the pri- 
mary tool for this incursion. Sixteen hours in history and theology 
will also contribute to the needed competence. By taking the basic 
courses of theological education an M.R.E. candidate is prepared to 
work side by side with pastors, sharing a common understanding of 
the total ministry of which education is a part, and performing that 
ministry with professional competence. 

Within this program the teaching office is lifted up and empha- 
sized for the M.R.E. candidate. The B.D. Church and Ministry 
courses are especially adapted so that the student whose vocational 
interest is Christian education can explore the philosophy and theol- 
ogy, as well as develop methodological and administrative skills, of 
that special ministry. Throughout the two year course the student 
will be involved in Christian education theory and practice. Field 
education practicum is required each semester and is closely geared 
with class work. 

The Master of Religious Education program, open to both men 
and women, is designed primarily to prepare them to serve the Church 
of Jesus Christ as directors or ministers of Christian education in 
local congregations, as curriculum writers and fraternal workers, as 
well as to provide them background for related professional and serv- 
ice vocations. 



46 



THE PRESCRIBED COURSE OF STUDY 

LEADING TO THE 

DEGREE OF MASTER OF RELIGIOUS EDUCATION 



Junior Year 



Semester I 

Bible 9 

110 Hebrew 3 

210 Greek 3 

112 Old Testament Introduction 3 

410 Church History I 3 

710 Principles of Expression I 1 

826 Seminar in Christian Education 3 



16 



Semester II 

Bible 7 

111 Hebrew 2 

211 Greek 2 

213 New Testament Introduction 3 

411 Church History II 3 

511 Contemporary Theology 2 

711 Principles of Expression II 1 

713 Church and Ministry I 3 



16 



Senior Year 



220 New Testament Introduction 3 
520 Systematic Theology I 3 

*720A Church and Ministry II 

4 or 6 
730 Church and Ministry IV 4 



16 



121 Old Testament Introduction 3 

521 Systematic Theology II 3 
*721A Church and Ministry III 

3 or 5 

731 Church and Ministry V 5 



16 



Sixty-four academic hours required for graduation. 



*Language is elective. If language is not elected, there will be two hours 
of elective credit. 



47 



THE PRESCRIBED COURSE OF STUDY LEADING TO THE 
DEGREE OF MASTER OF EDUCATION (M.Ed.) 

This degree is offered jointly by the University of Pittsburgh 
and Pittsburgh Theological Seminary. It will be conferred by the 
University upon completion of a course of study which will include 
18 hours taken in three trimesters at the University and 18 hours 
taken concurrently in two semesters at the Seminary. 



The University Requirements 
Ed. Psych. 271 — Advanced Educational Psychology- 
Ed. Res. 200 — Introduction to Research and Statistics 
Fdns. Ed. 201 — General Philosophy of Education 
Fdns. Ed. 228 — History of Modern Education 
Department of Religious Education .... 



The Seminary Requirements 
112 — Old Testament Introduction 
213 — New Testament Introduction 
470 — Reading and Research in Church History 
511 A — Contemporary Theology .... 
826 — Seminar in Christian Education 
Field Education Practicum . 



2 hours 
2 hours 
2 hours 
2 hours 
10 hours 

18 hours 



3 hours 
3 hours 
3 hours 
3 hours 
3 hours 
3 hours 

18 hours 



The M.Ed, course of study is designed as a one-year course for 
those who have an approved Bachelor's collegiate major in the fields 
of religion, Bible, or religious education, or their equivalent, to pro- 
vide further depth, understanding, and technical skills for work in 
local churches. Admission requirements, in addition to the "major," 
are those of the University and the Seminary. Housing will be pro- 
vided by the admitting institution. 

Applicants for this degree may write to: 

Dr. Lawrence C. Little 
Department of Religious Education 
University of Pittsburgh 
Pittsburgh 13, Pennsylvania 

or 
Director of Admissions 
Pittsburgh Theological Seminary 
616 N. Highland Avenue 
Pittsburgh 6, Pennsylvania 



48 



THE HONORS PROGRAM 

It is a major intention of the faculty not only to allow, but also 
to encourage, every student to proceed in his academic work at the 
profoundest level of which he is capable. To fulfill this intention the 
principle of sectioning is employed across the entire curriculum. 
Moreover, for those students who demonstrate superior academic 
ability the faculty has devised an honors program compounded of 
independent study and sectioning or tutorials. To be eligible for 
the honors program a student must maintain a minimum cumulative 
average of 2.00 and a 2.25 average in the division in which he elects 
to do honors work. 

Each division provides its own scheme for sections or tutorials 
in which the honors students will be placed. The honors student may 
be excused from regular lectures and even from readings for those 
lectures. If he is so excused, and the decision is that of the professor 
of the class, he will substitute much more primary source material 
and will pursue these sources in independent study as well as in 
conferences with the professor. The only minimum requirement for 
class participation for an honors student is that which the professor 
sets. Thus, the strong, inquisitive and disciplined mind has the splen- 
did opportunity for a more strictly graduate approach to his studies. 

While Theological German and French, as well as Greek and 
Latin offerings, are elective for the entire student body and are not 
required for the honors students, the faculty recommends to them 
that they elect such courses if their language background has pre- 
pared them for such election. 

The Dean's office apprises students of their eligibility for honors, 
and then the student himself makes the decision as to whether or not 
he will enter the program. Honors begin with the Middler year. The 
principle of sectioning begins to get students ready, however, during 
the second semester of their Junior year. 



49 



DESCRIPTION OF COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

FOR THE BACHELOR OF DIVINITY, 

MASTER OF RELIGIOUS EDUCATION, 

AND MASTER OF EDUCATION DEGREES 



THE BIBLICAL DIVISION 

Mr. Freedman, Chairman 
Mr. Orr Mr. Kelley 

Mr. Walther Mr. Grohman 

Mr. Hills Mr. Miller 

Mr. JamiesO'N Mr. Ritschl 

Some course offerings, both required and elective, customarily listed under 
the Biblical Division, are correlated with Church and Ministry and are listed under 
that division. 

REQUIRED COURSES 

110. Elementary Hebrew. A course designed to lead to an apprecia- 
tive and competent use of Hebrew as one of the languages of Biblical 
revelation. From the outset the student learns inductively to read from 
the original language of the Old Testament. Emphasis is placed on the 
acquisition of a working vocabulary as the ground for further reading, 
and the illumination of key Biblical concepts. Instruction is in small, 
graded sections so that a maximum of individual attention and achieve- 
ment is possible. 

Juniors, first semester. 3 hours credit. 

111. Elementary Hebrew. Continuation of 110 with instruction in 
graded sections. 

Juniors, second semester, 2 hours credit. 

210. New Testament Greek. A course complementary to 110 designed 
to lead to a competent use of Greek as one of the languages of Biblical 
revelation. As in 110, from the outset the student learns inductively 
to read from the original language of the New Testament. Instruction, 
likewise, is in small, graded sections. Students who have previously 
studied Greek will be assigned to a special section for their New Testa- 
ment linguistic work on the basis of placement examinations. 

Juniors, first semester, 3 hours credit. 

211. New Testament Greek. Continuation of 210 with instruction in 
graded sections. 

Juniors, second semester, 2 hours credit. 

112. Old Testament Introduction. The Law and the Former Prophets. 
A survey of the historical books of the Old Testament (Genesis through 
Kings), with special attention to the formation of the literature and its 
religious significance. The history of Israel is traced from earliest times 
to the Babylonian Exile, and set in the framework of Near Eastern civil- 
ization, as that has been recovered through archaeological research. The 
principal objective is mastery of the Biblical material. There are also 
assigned readings in current scholarly literature. 

Juniors, first semester, 3 hours credit. Mr. Freedman 

50 



121. Old Testament Introduction. The Latter Prophets and the Writ- 
ings. A survey of the prophetic and poetic books of the Old Testament. 
The first part of the course is devoted to the major and minor prophets, 
their message and their times. In the latter part of the course, attention 
is given to the Psalms, Proverbs, Job, and other writings. The history of 
the post-exilic community, its life and worship, is surveyed to the end 
of the Old Testament period. As in course 112, the principal objective is 
mastery of the Biblical material. There are also assigned readings in 
current scholarly literature. 

Middlers, second semester, 3 hours credit. 

213. New Testament Introduction. A comprehensive historical, literary, 
and theological study of the New Testament: (a) religious and political 
backgrounds of the times; (b) life of Jesus Christ; (c) activity and mes- 
sage of the Apostolic Church; (d) the Pauline corpus; (e) the Johannine 
witness; (f) Hebrews and Catholic Epistles; (g) apocalyptic. 

Juniors, second semester, 3 hours credit. Mr> Walther and Mr Ritschl 

220. New Testament Introduction. Continuation of course 221: (a) 
formation of the Gospel tradition; (b) formation of the Canon; (c) trans- 
mission of the Text; (d) history of the English Bible; (e) outlines of 
New Testament theology. 

Middlers, first semester, 3 hours credit. Mr> Wahher and Mr> RitscW 



ELECTIVES 

141, 142, 143, and 144. Hebrew Reading. Supervised reading of selec- 
ted Old Testament passages. 
Two semesters. 

145. Advanced Hebrew Grammar. Introduction to the formal structure 
of the Hebrew language (phonetics, morphology, syntax) with special 
attention to its historical development and relation to other Semitic 
languages. 

148. Introduction to the Dead Sea Scrolls. Survey of the scrolls from 
the Dead Sea area, particularly Qumran. Archaeological background, 
analysis of contents, significance for the text, history, and theology of 
the Old and New Testaments. 

149. Readings in the Dead Sea Scrolls. Selected passages (in the orig- 
inal Hebrew) from the newly-discovered Qumran scrolls dating from 
200 B.C. to 70 A.D. 

Prerequisite: basic Hebrew. 

151. Elements of Accadian. A beginner's course in Assyro-Babylonian. 

152. Elements of Canaanite Cuneiform. A beginner's course in Ugaritic. 

153. Elements of North West Semitic. Decipherment, translation, and 
analysis of early Phoenician, Moabite, Hebrew, and Aramaic inscriptions, 
and investigations of their bearing on Old Testament studies. 

154. Biblical Aramaic. A course in the grammar and reading of the 
Aramaic sections of the Old Testament with a possible inclusion of Fifth 
Century B.C. Aramaic letters from Elephantine. 

Prerequisite: one semester of Hebrew. 

51 



155. Seminar on the Greek Old Testament. Introduction to the Greek 
translation and the problems of the text. Rapid reading of selected 
books and passages in the Septuagint. 

161. Trends in Recent Old Testament Hermeneutics. This seminar, 
preferably in cooperation with a colleague from the Old Testament field, 
will discuss the book Problems of Old Testament Hermeneutics. 

Prerequisites: 2 exegesis courses and Reformation history. 

Mr. Ritschl 

171. The Composition of Isaiah. This course deals with the literary 
and form-critical problems of the Book of Isaiah, tracing its development 
from the earliest oral traditions to the final literary document. The 
prophetic experience and consciousness, message and meaning, are con- 
sidered in relation to the contents of the book against the background 
of Israel's history. Mr. Freedman 

172. Ancient Hebrew Poetry. Readings in the poems of the Pentateuch 
and early Psalms with emphasis on ancient Hebrew meter, style, orthog- 
raphy and vocabulary, and analysis of theological motifs and liturgical 
orientation. Mr. Freedman 

173. Jeremiah: from Exegesis to Exposition. The course includes an 
introduction to the book of Jeremiah, a general survey of its contents, 
exegesis of the Hebrew text of selected passages, investigation of the 
book's contemporary relevance and homiletical possibilities, and the 
supervised preparation of sermons. 

174. Old Testament Exegesis. Exegesis of the Hebrew text of select- 
ed Old Testament passages. 

181. Geography of Biblical Lands. A survey course covering the major 
features of all ancient geography which influenced Biblical history, and 
a detailed study of Palestinian geography. The customs and manners 
of Bible people are also reviewed. Open to all. 

182. Archaeology of Palestine. A rapid historical survey of archae- 
ological work in Bible lands, with particular attention to the cultural 
and religious life of the Israelite and non-Israelite populations in Pal- 
estine. Methods of archaeological research and the interpretation of 
findings are studied, not only for apologetic purposes, but especially 
for exegetical study of the Scriptures. Assigned readings, slides and ma- 
terials from the Bible Lands Museum. 

183. Research in Old Testament Archaeology. Directed research along 
various lines as indicated by the student's needs. 

185. Archaeological Excavation. In this course qualified students are 
offered the opportunity to work with an archaeological excavation at the 
site of ancient Ashdod. Students will gain valuable field experience by 
engaging in a variety of archaeological activities at the site. Lectures 
will be given by leading authorities, and regular seminars will be held 
during the excavation period. A syllabus with assigned and suggested 
readings will be provided, and a written report will be required for credit 
in the course. 

52 



240. The History of Biblical Interpretation (Early Church). This lec- 
ture course deals with the history of Biblical interpretation from the time 
of the beginning of the second century to Augustine in the West and John 
of Damascus in the East. 

Prerequisites: History of the Early Church, one course in Old Testa- 
ment and in New Testament Exegesis. Mr. Ritschl 

241. Biblical Interpretation from 1860 to 1960. This lecture course 
deals with the development of Old Testament and New Testament exe- 
gesis after Schleiermacher, with discussion of the positions of De Wette, 
F. S. Baur and the subsequent historical-critical school, the history of 
religion school, and finally the hermeneutical positions up to Ernst Fuchs. 

Prerequisite: two exegesis courses, Reformation history, jy, rj+ sc ui 

242. New Testament Canon and Text, (a) The Canon: A study of the 
formation of the New Testament. The limiting principle of the Canon 
and the consequent rejection of apocryphal and pseudepigraphical works. 
The position of the Roman Church, of the Church of England, and of the 
Presbyterian and Reformed bodies as shown in the Westminster Confes- 
sion. Lectures and required readings, (b) Textual Criticism: A survey 
of the history of the printed text, with an introduction to the apparatus 
criticus and the principles of textual criticism. An appraisal of the 
Tischendorf, Nestle, and Westcott and Hort texts. Textbook, lectures 
and required readings, and practice on textual problems. 

Prerequisite: New Testament Introduction. Mr. Walther 

243. Form Criticism and the Synoptic Problem. The purposes and 
techniques of Formgeschichte will be critically examined and its con- 
tributions illustrated and assessed. The application of Formgeschichte 
to illustrative passages in the Synoptic Gospels. An adequate working 
knowledge of Greek is required. 

244. Critical Introduction to the Pauline Epistles. A rapid survey of 
Paul's life. Historical validity of the records in Acts and the Epistles. 
The origin and completion of the Corpus Paulinum. The groupings of 
the ten major epistles. Recent criticism of the authorship of II Thess., 
Col., Eph., and of the place of origin of the captivity correspondence. 
The problems of Romans 16, and of the Pastorals. Sacramentalism, and 
other mystery features in Pauline theology. Mr. Jamieson 

245. Apocalyptic and the Apocalypse. A survey of the development 
of Apocalyptic as a religio-literary genre. Apocalyptic in the Old Testa- 
ment, the Apocrypha and Pseudepigraph of the Jews, and in other an- 
cient cultures. The characteristics of a developed apocalyptic especially 
in relation to the prophetic movement in Israel. The Apocalypse of John 
against this background, its structure and meaning for its original re- 
cipients. 

247. The Pastoral Epistles of the New Testament. Beginning with 
I Timothy and continuing through Hebrews, this course will stress the re- 
lation of the historical context and the basic content of the letters to the 
art of preaching. Mr. Jamieson 

248. The New Testament in Light of Contemporary Jewish writers. A 

survey of the history of Judaism in the First Century for the sake of 
relating the New Testament to its Jewish environments. Use will be 
made of the writings of Josephus, Philo, and other contemporary sources. 

53 



250. New Testament Exegesis: Gospel of John. Critical exegesis on 
the basis of the Greek text. Mr. Kelley 

251. New Testament Exegesis: Johannine Epistles. Critical exegesis 
on the basis of the Greek text. Mr. Kelley 

252. Petrine Epistles. Detailed exegesis of I Peter and II Peter based 
on the Greek text, with additional study of the standard commentaries. 

Mr. Walther 

253 and 254. Greek Reading. Supervised reading of selected New 
Testament passages. For those who desire to maintain facility in the 
language. 

255 and 256. Greek Reading. Continuation of Course 254. 

257. Advanced Greek Grammar. An advanced, systematic study of the 
syntax and grammar of New Testament Greek. Principles studied in 
connection with specific Biblical passages. Mr. Kelley 

260. New Testament Christology. This course will survey the beliefs 
about Jesus as Messiah, Son of Man, Son of God, and his work as reveal- 
er of the Father, inaugurator of the Kingdom, and savior of the human 
race. Mr. Orr 

261. Eschatology in the New Testament. The background of the prob- 
lem in twentieth-century literature will be examined, and the New Testa- 
ment materials will be studied in detail. Some attention will be given 
to the Entmythologizierung controversy. Mr. Walther 

262. Bultmann Seminar. Reading and discussion of the literature by 
and about Rudolf Bultmann with critique of his critical and theological 
contributions, set in relief against the pertinent positions of Stauffer, 
Cullmann, and the post-Bultmannians. Mr. Walther 

263. Life of Jesus Christ. An examination of the Biblical and extra- 
Biblical materials followed by a survey of the critical study of the "Quest" 
in the last century and the "new Quest" from kerygma to history at the 
present time; finally, a consideration of the possibilities of writing a 
"Life" today. Mr. Walther 

264. Practical Use of the New Testament. A seminar on the religious 
meaning of the New Testament for study, worship, preaching, evangel- 
ism, and counseling. The Synoptic Gospels. Mr. Orr 

265. Practical Use of the New Testament: The Fourth Gospel and 
Revelation. Mr. Orr 

266. Practical Use of the New Testament: The Pauline Corpus. 

Mr. Orr 

267. Continuation of Course 266. Mr. Orr 

270. Archaeology and the Pauline Epistles. A study of the results of 
exploration and excavation in Near East sites as they bear upon an un- 
derstanding of The Acts and the Pauline epistles. Colored slides and 
other exhibits are used to demonstrate the significance of the research. 

Mr. Jamieson 

54 



THE HISTORY AND THEOLOGY DIVISION 

Mr. Wiest, Chairman 
Mr. McCloy Mr. Bald 

Mr. Gerstner Mr. Smith 

Mr. Kehm 

Some course offerings, both required and elective, customarily listed under the 
History and Theology division, are correlated with Church and Ministry and are 
listed under that division. 



REQUIRED COURSES 

410. Church History I. A survey of Christian life, thought, and prac- 
tice from the Apostolic Age to the period of Gregory the Great, and the 
beginning of the Middle Ages in the West; the mission and expansion of 
the church; the rise of offices and government, art and literature. 

Juniors, first semester, 3 hours credit. Mr. McCloy 

411. Church History II. Beginning with an exposition of the elements 
of St. Augustine which particularly influenced the development of the 
Middle Ages and the religious revolt in the 16th century, this course 
surveys church history in three sections: from Gregory the Great to 
the High Middle Ages; the breakdown of the medieval synthesis and 
the period of pre-reform; and the Reformation until 1560. 

Juniors, second semester, 3 hours credit. Mr. Smith 

420. Church History III. The history of the Christian church from 
the end of the sixteenth century to the present, exclusive of post-colonial 
American history. 

Middlers, first semester, 3 hours credit. Mr. Gerstner 

510. Philosophical Theology. A study of the systems of Christian 
thought that illustrate ways in which theology has been related to phil- 
osophy. Special attention is given to the problems of apologetics and 
communication in the modern period, and to contemporary philosophical 
challenges to Christian thought. 

Juniors, first semester, 3 hours credit. Mr. Wiest and Mr. Kehm 

511. Contemporary Theology. Introduction to the major figures, 
problems and issues in contemporary theological thought. 

Juniors, second semester, 2 hours credit. Mr. Wiest and Mr. Kehm 

511A. Contemporary Theology. Same course as 511, with an additional 
hour of reading. 

M.Ed., second semester, 3 hours credit. Mr. Wiest and Mr. Kehm 

520. Systematic Theology I. The person and work of Jesus Christ, the 
Christian understanding of man, and the nature of the Christian life. 
Classic and contemporary theological systems, representing the major 
movements of Christian thought, are read and critically evaluated. 

Middlers, first semester, 3 hours credit. 

55 



521. Systematic Theology II. The doctrine of God, the Christian view 
of revelation, and problems of theological thought and method. Reading 
and critical evaluation are continued in the systems employed in Sys- 
tematic Theology I. 

Middlers, second semester, 3 hours credit. Mr. Johnson 



ELECTIVES 

430. Patrology. A study of Christian literature including the Apos- 
tolic Fathers, the Apologists, the African, Antiochan, and Alexandrian 
Schools, the great writers of the fourth and fifth centuries in the East 
and West, and concluding with John of Damascus and Gregory the Great. 

Mr. McCloy 

431. Eastern Christianity. A study of the history of the church of 
Constantinople and the other patriarchs of the East including the Russian 
Orthodox Church and other national churches within the sphere of 
Eastern Orthodoxy; a history of the Uniat churches of Eastern rites, 
but in communion with Rome; the rise and development of the Mono- 
physite churches in Ethiopia, Syria, Armenia and the Nestorian church 
in its expansion eastward. Mr. McCloy 

432. Medieval Christendom. This course is a study of the particular 
form of Christian life created by the Middle Ages. Particular attention 
is given to the history of morals, the unitive character of medieval 
society, and the characteristic concepts and presuppositions of the era. 
One particular purpose of the course is to enable students to grasp 
modern Catholicism and contemporary ecumenical conversation with 
Catholics. Mr. Smith 

433. Seminar in Augustine. After a survey of the history and culture 
of the late fourth century, students read and analyze D£ Cathechezandis 
Rudibus, De Moribus Ecclesiae Catholicae, De Baptismo, Confessiones, De Libero 
Arbitrio, De Gratia Christi et de Peccato Originali, De Spiritu et Littera, and 
selections from De Trinitate and De CivitaU Dei. Mr. Smith 

440. The Libertarian Reformation. The course opens with a survey 
of the 16th century historical and ecclesiastical situation designed to 
show the place of thinkers who repudiated the state church. This is 
followed by consideration of selected figures: Thomas Munzer, Menno 
Simons, Sebatian Castellion, Michael Servetus, Socinus, and others. 

Mr. Smith 

441. Symbols of the Reformation. An examination and comparison of 
various creeds, catechisms and confessions arising within the Protestant 
Reformation, having in view the theological aspects of present-day 
ecumenical conversations. Mr. Bald 

443. Roman Catholicism Since Trent. The historical and theological 
development of Rome from the Council of Trent to 1900. Mr. Gerstner 

444. The Age of Orthodoxy. The Reformation after the Reformers 
left the scene. A close study of Continental Reformed and Lutheran Or- 
thodoxy of the seventeenth century. A knowledge of Latin required. 

Mr. Gerstner 

56 



450. Christian Biography. A study of the lives and personalities of 
outstanding Christians beginning with Ignatius of Antioch and extending 
to Albert Schweitzer; the various religions and cultural factors which 
helped to shape conspicuously Christian character; the ideals and art 
of Christian biography and autobiography. Mr. McCloy 

451. Thomas Aquinas. An introduction to the philosophical and theo- 
logical thought of Thomas Aquinas. Particular emphasis is given to 
the expression of his system in the Summae, Summa Contra Gentiles and 
Summa Theologiae. Mr. Bald 

454. Christianity in America. The course describes the course of church 
history in America from the Massachusetts Bay Colony to the 20th 
century. It includes a survey of the major religious traditions and the 
impact of American life on them; the revival and development of the 
denominations; the growth of Catholicism; and the marginal Christian 
groups from eastern Orthodoxy to the sects. Emphasis is placed on the 
interaction of tradition and environment. Mr. Smith 

455. Methodist Doctrine and Polity. Required of Methodist students 
for graduation. Offered every three years. 

Three hours credit. Mr. Chamberlin 

460. History of Apologetics. The nature of the defense of Christian 
faith explored through an examination of a number of apologetic sys- 
tems of the past and present. Mr. Bald 

462. American Theology through the 19th Century. Traces the theol- 
ogical development from Edwards to 1900. Especial consideration of 
Hopkins, Bushnell, Taylor and Parks. The relation of this school to the 
American Presbyterian Church indicated. Mr. Gerstner 

470. Advanced Reading and Research in Church History. Guided re- 
search and research in sources of church history. Subjects for study 
will be determined in conference with the instructor. Permission from the 
instructor is necessary for registration. 

Mr. Gerstner, Mr. Smith or Mr. McCloy 

530. Theology and History. Classic and contemporary interpretations 
of history. Herodotus, Thucydides, Augustine, the principal figures who 
developed the doctrine of progress, Hegel, Nietzsche, Marx and modern 
theologians, historians and philosophers who have been endeavoring to 
formulate a new philosophy or theology of history. Mr. Johnson 

531. Kierkegaard and Contemporary Existentialism. The thought of 
Kierkegaard, Marcel, Heidegger, Sartre, Jaspers and other philosophers 
and theologians who are contributing to the existentialist movement. 

Mr. Johnson 

532. Liberal Theology: A Reappraisal. An analysis and evaluation of 
the theologies of some liberal Protestant thinkers in America in the 
nineteenth and twentieth centuries. The relation of liberal theology 
to neo-orthodoxy. Present trends in liberal thought. Mr. Wiest 

57 



533. New Trends in Continental Theology. Exploration of the "new 
directions" in continental theology in the wake of Barth and Bultmann. 
The course will be concerned mainly with efforts to devise a more 
adequate understanding of the relation between the Word, "history," 
language, and human existence. Prerequisite, Course 511. ™ Kehm 

540. Contemporary Issues in Philosophical Theology. An examination 
of some current trends in philosophical thought and the questions they 
raise for Christian belief. Special attention is given to analytical 
philosophy and to the phenomenological movement. Mr. Wiest 

541. Apologetics: Problems and Possibilities. Barth's challenge: can 
there be a Christian apologetic? Revelation, reason and the cultural 
context. The apologetic element in preaching, evangelism and mission; 
its implications for theology. Theologians as apologists: theological 
responses to some contemporary issues. Mr. Wiest 

542. Theology and Science. The role of science in shaping the modern 
mind. Recent changes in our understanding of the nature of scientific 
knowledge. A survey of theological responses to modern science and of 
the possibilities for a "theology of nature" in contemporary protestant 
thought. Mr. Wiest 

543. Seminar in Tillich and Barth. A comparative study of the theo- 
logical systems of Paul Tillich and Karl Barth as the major representa- 
tives of modern philosophical and kerygmatic theology. Reading and dis- 
cussion. Mr. Johnson 

544. German Theology in the 19th Century. Study of the line of 
development in German theology from Schleiermacher through Albrecht 
Ritschl and Wilhelm Herrmann, with special attention to the contribu- 
tions of this "line" to the formation of the varieties of continental "neo- 
orthodoxy." Prerequisite, Course 511. Mr. Kehm 

545. Christology and Anthropology. A study of the ways in which 
reflection upon the humanity of Jesus Christ is related to their under- 
standing of the nature of man in the theologies of Barth, Brunner, 
Bonhoeffer, and Tillich. Prerequisites, Courses 511 and 520. ^ r j^ e j im 

546. Theological Issues in the Faith and Order Movement. A study 
of the literature of ecumenical discussions concerning the nature of the 
Church, the ministry, and the sacraments. An attempt will be made to 
formulate the crucial theological issues presently confronting the divided 
Churches in these areas. Prerequisite, Course 511. Mr. Kehm 

551. Advanced Reading in Theology. Guided reading and research in 
theological sources. The subjects and areas pursued are determined by 
the needs and interests of the students. Permission from the instructor 
is necessary for registration. Mr. Bald and Mr. Kehm 

552. Advanced Reading in Philosophy of Religion. Guided reading and 
research. The subjects and areas pursued are determined by the needs 
and interests of the students. Permission from the instructor is neces- 
sary for registration. Mr. Wiest or Mr. Jackson 

58 



THE CHURCH AND MINISTRY DIVISION 

Mr. Clyde, Chairman 

Mr. Jackson Mr. Ralston 

Miss Burrows Mr. Nicholson 

Mr. Bald Mr. Chamberun 

Mr. Smith Mr. Wilmore 

Mr. Wiest Mr. Dohrenburg 

Mr. Alexander Mr. Buttrick 

Mr. Scott Mr. Hinds 



REQUIRED COURSES 

710 and 711. Principles of Expression. Vital thinking as the basis of 
right expression for every speaking occasion. This course aims to enable 
the student to experience the word he speaks in thought, feeling, and 
imagination at the moment of utterance and share its vital qualities 
undiminished with his audience. Oral reading from the Scriptures and 
other sources. Preparation of the instrument through disciplines of voice 
and body, together with correction of individual faults. Small sections, 
drill periods, recordings, and private conferences. 

Juniors, both semesters, one hour credit each. 

Mr. Dohrenburg and Mr. Hinds 

713. Church and Ministry I. The purpose of this course is to clarify 
to the student his prospective situation as a minister in American culture. 
Both Church and culture are studied historically, sociologically, and 
theologically; and the Church is considered in specific relation to the 
problems of urban and industrial life, racial and economic tensions, pop- 
ulation growth and movement, and the church's conventional methods. 

Juniors, second semester, 3 hours credit. Mr> Wilmore and Mr Smith 

720. Church and Ministry II. This course is designed to enable the 
student to achieve an understanding of the nature and function of the 
preaching and teaching offices within the one ministry of the Church and 
to introduce him, within the context of that understanding, to the content 
and skills requisite for an effective practice of these offices as they are 
informed by the insights that derive from Biblical, theological and secular 
sources. Carefully directed field education is required (1 credit hour) 
in which the student engages in ministry. Closely correlated with this 
field assignment is a concurrent classroom experience in which several 
theological disciplines are presented in their relationship to the field ex- 
perience and to each other within the purpose of the course: exegesis of 
Biblical passages selected for their implications for a doctrine of the 
Church and the Ministry and for the content and skills of the preaching 
and teaching offices (Old Testament and New Testament Exegesis, 1 credit 
hour each), theological reflection upon Biblical data leading to a doc- 
trine of the Church and the Ministry (Systematic Theology, 1 credit 
hour), the content and skills of the preaching and teaching offices in the 
one ministry of the Church as grounded in Biblical and theological under- 
standing, and utilizing pertinent insights from secular sources (Homilet- 
ics, 1 credit hour, and Christian Education, 2 credit hours). 

Middlers, first semester, 7 hours credit. Inter-divisional faculty 

59 



720A. Church and Ministry II. This course is designed to enable the 
student to achieve an understanding of the nature and function of the 
teaching office within the ministry of the Church and to introduce her to 
an effective practice of this office as it is informed by the insights that 
derive from Biblical, theological and secular sources. Carefully directed 
field observation is required (1 credit hour) in which the student observes 
the practice of the teaching ministry. Closely correlated with this field 
assignment is a concurrent classroom experience in which several theo- 
logical disciplines are presented in their relationship to the field experi- 
ence and to each other within the purpose of the course: theological re- 
flection upon Biblical data leading to a doctrine of the Church and the 
Ministry (Systematic Theology, 1 credit hour), the content and skills 
of the teaching office in the ministry of the Church as grounded in Bibli- 
cal and theological understanding, and utilizing pertinent insights from 
secular courses (Christian Education, 2 credit hours). 

M.R.E. Juniors, first semester, 4 hours credit. Inter-divisional faculty 

721. Church and Ministry III. Continuation of 720 with the exception 
that the time allotted to the preaching office (Homiletics) is equivalent 
to 2 credit hours and to the teaching office (Christian Education) is 
equivalent to 1 credit hour. 

Middlers, second semester, 7 hours credit. Inter-divisional faculty 

721A. Church and Ministry III. Continuation of 720A. 
M.R.E. Juniors, second semester, 4 hours credit. 

Inter-divisional faculty 

730. Church and Ministry IV. This course deals with the theory and 
practice of the pastoral office. It brings together within the unifying 
concept of pastoral theology these concerns: Christian ethics, pastoral 
counseling, liturgies, mission, program, and polity of the Church. Quite 
diverse and experimental field experiences, selected according to the 
students' needs and interests, will be correlated with the academic ma- 
terials. 

Seniors, first semester, 7 hours credit. Inter-divisional faculty 

731. Church and Ministry V. Continuation of Church and Ministry IV. 
Seniors, second semester, 7 hours credit. Inter-divisional faculty 

732. Church and Ministry VI. One hour of Hebrew exegesis and one 
hour of Greek exegesis correlated with the preaching office. 

Seniors, first semester, 3 hours credit. Inter-divisional faculty 

733. Church and Ministry VII. Continuation of Church and Ministry VI. 
Seniors, second semester, 3 hours credit. Inter-divisional faculty 



ELECTIVES 

810. The Great Ages of Preaching. A study will be made of the 
doctrinal and ethical content, literary style, homiletical method, his- 
torical and spiritual background of preaching from the days of the 
Apostles to the beginning of the 19th century. Mr. Scott 

811. Preaching the Parables. The course is two-fold: a study of the 
history of the interpretation of Parables, and the actual writing and 
classroom delivery of sermons from the Parables. Mr. Nicholson 

60 



812. Preaching from Acts. The course is three-fold: a review of the 
historical-critical approach to Acts, the discovery of homiletical mater- 
ial, and the actual writing and classroom delivery of sermons. 

Mr. Nicholson 

813. Preaching the Christian Year. A study will be made of the Chris- 
tian year and its use in preaching. Students will write and deliver 
selected sermons in class and prepare a full outline of a year's sermons. 

Mr. Scott 

814. Contemporary Preachers and Preaching. A study will be made 
of representative preachers from the 19th century to the present with 
special emphasis on the preaching of the last decade. ]yfi\ Scott 

818. Interpretative Reading. Oral interpretation of a varied selection 
of prose, poetry, and drama as a means of developing keener sensitivity 
to the written word and greater effectiveness in communicating it. The 
objective will be to mature the skills and principles acquired in Principles 
of Expression, Courses 710 and 711, which are prerequisite. Small sec- 
tions, private conferences, recordings. 

One or two hours. Mr. Dohrenburg 

820. Music in the Church. A practical approach to the many problems 
arising in connection with church music with particular attention to the 
problems of the small congregation. Organizing the musical resources 
of the congregation, the music as a spiritual force in the church life, 
and the minister's relation to choir and choirmaster. ]\f r . Ralston 

821. Hymnology. An analytical and historical study of the great hymns 
and tunes of the Christian Church. Consideration of the qualities of a 
good hymn. Practical and effective use of the hymnal. M n Ralston 

822. Masterpieces of Religious Music. A study of the various forms of 
music through which men have expressed their faith. Demonstration of 
the power of music to illuminate Christian truth and to "give wings to 
words." This is primarily a "listening course" making use of records 
but with assigned background reading and class comment. The purpose 
is to give the student an appreciation of various forms of musical ex- 
pression as well as some familiarity with specific works of musical art. 

Mr. Ralston 

825. Dramatics in Christian Education. A study of the purpose and 
place of dramatics in the program of the church. Lecture, discussion, 
and project work in the areas of creative dramatics, choral reading, role 
playing, puppetry, playreading, plays, and pageants. Miss Burrows 

826. Seminar in Christian Education. Designed to give the student 
the opportunity to accumulate and evaluate resources in a few of the 
major areas of concern in the teaching ministry of the local church: 
leadership development, curriculum, audio-visuals, drama, youth work, 
etc. Miss Burrows 

827. Building and Administering a Church Program. This course 
deals chiefly with the session committees of worship, evangelism, Chris- 
tian education, fellowship and stewardship, how they are formed, pre- 
pared to function, and how they relate to program and the people. The 
latest in helpful literature is provided. A project analyzing an actual 
church program is offered during the course so that the student might 
apply the principles of the course to the betterment of a local program. 
Related books are to be read and reported on. Mr. Alexander 

61 



828. The Church and Higher Education. Designed especially for those 
interested in college teaching, campus ministry, or serving a church 
near a campus. A review of the relation of the church to higher educa- 
tion; an examination of theological issues in the relation of the Christian 
faith to higher education; and an exploration of current patterns in the 
Church's ministry to students and faculty. Mr. Chamberlin 

829. History of Christian Education. A survey of the major move- 
ments and personalities which have influenced the development of the 
teaching ministry in the church, with particular emphasis upon the 
historical roots of present-day church education. Mr. Chamberlin 

830. Christian Education Among Children. A study of the religious 
needs of children from birth through twelve years of age paralleled with 
the church's possibilities for meeting these needs. Weekday Christian 
education programs such as vacation church school, day camping, and 
youth club as well as the Sunday church school curriculum are studied 
within the framework of how children learn. A degree of observation 
and laboratory work is included as a part of the course. «. R urrows 

831. Christian Education Among Adults. Principles and approaches 
to the church's educational ministry to adults; introduction to established 
and changing patterns of program; relation to the insights from the gen- 
eral field of adult education; special emphasis upon work with young 
adults, parent education, and new approaches to the ministry to the aged. 

Mr. Chamberlin 

832. Contemporary Developments in Christian Education. Advanced 
course, especially for those hoping to be ministers or directors of Chris- 
tian education. Reviewing the recent history of church education, par- 
ticularly the relation of contemporary Protestant theology to general 
educational philosophy, and an examination of various efforts to express 
these theological developments in new forms of educational program. 

Mr. Chamberlin 

833. The Processes of Christian Education. An exploration of the 
various patterns of program and structure (curriculum, class grouping, 
administrative procedures, supervision) employed by churches, and the 
relation of these processes to the interpretation of the Christian faith. 
Particularly for students interested in special educational ministries. 

Mr. Chamberlin 

834. Advanced Reading in Christian Education. Guided reading and 
research, the subjects and areas to be determined by the needs and 
interests of the students. Permission of the instructor is necessary for 
registration. Mr. Chamberlin 

840. Theology and Psychiatry. The metaphysical presuppositions, 
method, understanding of therapy, and some aspects of human nature 
will be compared. An attempt will be made to define mutuality and dis- 
creteness between the two disciplines. An introduction to Freudian, 
Jungian, and other psychiatric writings will be made. Mr. Jackson 

841. Seminar in Counseling. An advanced course utilizing the case 
work of students, drawing principles for both diagnosis and therapy 
out of the cases presented, and making evaluations. The role of the 
minister as counselor is carefully scrutinized. Mr. Jackson 

62 



842. Personality Development. The meaning of the self, its develop- 
ment, its aberrations, its societal nature, its symbolization, its motiva- 
tions, etc., will be studied from the point of view of the several psychiatric 
theories, social psychology, and Biblical images. The relation of person- 
ality development to the work of the ministry will be clarified. 

Mr. Jackson 

843. The Aging: Personality Formation and Pastoral Care. This 
seminar will look at the question of aging from three significant direc- 
tions: the psychology of religion in specific relevance to the aging; 
socio-psychological patterns in the aging process; and the role of the 
church in ministering to the aging. 

846. Theory and Practice of the Devotional Life. A consideration of 
the devotional life of the Christian in the modern world. The relation 
of doctrine to the devotional life. The means of grace studied. The 
course is also designed to acquaint the student with the devotional 
classics. Mr. Jackson 

850. World Mission of the Church. A survey of the ecumenical witness 
of the church throughout the world, with special reference to the work 
of the United Presbyterian Church. Mr. Clyde 

851. Tutorial in Missions. Reading and discussions on missions, de- 
signed particularly for missionary candidates and those considering be- 
coming candidates. Mr. Clyde 

852. Evangelism. This course offers a detailed discussion and study 
of the definition, motivation, urgency and nature of evangelism. Personal 
work, evangelism for commitment, evangelism through fellowship, youth 
evangelism and various opportunities for pastor and laity through the 
church are covered. A program of reading and book reports acquaints 
the student with the best literature in the field. Opportunity for role 
playing in class is afforded. Mr. Alexander 

854. Comparative Religion. A study of the origin and development of 
religion, with special investigation of Primitive Religion, Hinduism, 
Buddhism, Confucianism, and Islam, with regard to their bearing on 
Modern Missions. Mr. Clyde 

855. Major Sects. Jehovah's Witnesses, Mormonism, Christian Sci- 
ence and other groups compared with catholic Christianity. Resem- 
blances and differences noted. Mr. Gerstner 

856. The Protestant Approach to Catholicism. A comparative inves- 
tigation of Protestantism and Catholicism, with a study of the general 
problem of Protestant evangelism in connection with Catholicism. 

Mr. Clyde 

857. The Protestant Approach to Communism. A study of Communism, 
its challenge to Christianity, the special answer of Protestantism to 
Communism, and the general problems with which Communism is in- 
volved. Mr. Clyde 

63 



858. The Ecumenical Movement. A survey of the origin and develop- 
ment of the modern Ecumenical Movement, combined with an exploration 
of the elements of church unity and some anticipation of the future. 

Mr. Clyde 

859. Seminar in Ecumenics. This course is offered at Duquesne Uni- 
versity under a joint faculty including Duquesne professors, Pittsburgh 
Seminary professors, and others. It is open to qualified Pittsburgh Sem- 
inary students. 

870. The Theological Ethics of William Temple and Reinhold Niebuhr. 

A comparative study of the social thought of the late Archbishop of 
Canterbury and one of America's leading voices in the field of ethics in 
relation to their theological foundations. Mr. Bald 

871. Seminar in Social Ethics. The Christian address to the problems 
of economics, politics, international affairs, education, and the family. 
The implications of an understanding of these areas for theology, the 
vocation of the Christian, and the service of the church in the world. 

Mr. Bald 

872. Research Seminar in Selected Social Problems. Students will 
elect specific areas of social concern in modern culture for investigation 
in which they will seek to relate them to the demands and insights of 
the Christian ethic. Mr. Bald 

873. Church and State in Marxist Countries. This course will deal 
with the recent history and present positions of the Protestant and 
Orthodox Churches in Marxist countries. Primary sources will be read 
and a research paper will be required. Prerequisite: Modern Church 
History. Mr. Ritschl 

874. Sociology and Religion. This course investigates the sociological 
analysis of religion from Troelsch and Weber to Gerhard Lenski. Stress 
is placed on the nature of religious phenomena in western society and 
their relationship to the basic institutions of American culture. Struc- 
tural-functional theory is compared wth other approaches. The role of 
the Church in American society is studied in the current literature of the 
social sciences and in the writings of Christian social ethicists. 

Mr. Wilmore 

875. Community Analysis and Church Strategy. This course will study 
community in terms of place, people and ethos in the inner-city and 
suburbia. Certain census data will be discussed. Special emphasis will 
be given to power structure analysis and guidelines for contact with 
minorities and other alienated segments. The second half of this course 
will deal with strategies and techniques in local church social action. 

Mr. Wilmore 

876. Social Ethics. This course deals with the Biblical and theological 
basis of the good society and the nature of personal decision and church 
action in contemporary life. Philosophical ethics and the relationship 
of the social sciences to value theory and decision-making are considered. 
The writings of European and American theologians and ethicists are 
studied with reference to modern social problems. Mr. Wilmore 

64 



877. Seminar in Race Relations. This course integrates history, social 
science theory, and theological analysis in the study of race relations. 
Special emphasis is given to Negro-white relations in the United States. 
The course also deals with the writings of secularists as well as Christian 
ethicists in the analysis of racial problems. Attention is given to de- 
veloping sound inter-group relations theory and local church action. At 
each session student papers are read and discussed. Mr. Wilmore 



880. Christian Faith and Contemporary Literature. A study of the 
relationship between the Christian faith and themes in contemporary 
literature. Works by a number of modern writers including Kafka, 
Camus, Faulkner, and Warren, among others, will be read and discussed. 
May be taken for 2 or 3 credits. Students enrolling for 3 credits will at- 
tend both seminars. Mr. Buttrick 



884. The Classics of Christian Literature. A study of the outstanding 
literary masterpieces of Christian history selected from the ancient, 
mediaeval and various national literatures, such as Italy, France, Spain 
and England; poetry, drama, sermons, devotions, all writings wherein 
there is a consciousness of artistic excellence. Mr. McCloy 

885. Christian Humanism. A study of the relations of the Christian 
Church to the values and excellencies of human culture as seen in the 
Classical ideals (paideia) of the fourth and fifth centuries and again in 
the period of the Renaissance, and later; special study will be given to 
Erasmus and the English and Italian humanists. Mr. McCloy 



Elective Credit at the University 

Up to four credit hours may also be taken in the Graduate School of 
Public and International Affairs of the University of Pittsburgh. The 
differential in tuition between that of the Seminary and that of the Uni- 
versity is taken care of through foundation grants at the University. 
These elective courses would be primarily in urbanization, economics, and 
international affairs. 

Summer Field Education 

Every student is encouraged to spend one summer in field education, 
preferably in some form of clinical training. Students who choose and 
qualify for clinical training in approved programs will be given two 
hours of elective credit for each six weeks of clinical training to a maxi- 
mum of four credit hours. For students who do not choose or do not 
qualify for a clinical training program a number of options without any 
elective credit are allowed (such as national park chaplaincies, Board of 
National Missions assignments, assistantships, etc.), upon consultation 
with and approval by the Field Education Office. 

Any student seeking a church-related position for the summer must 
counsel with the Field Education Office so that provision may be made 
for supervision on the field. Summer pastorates for students who have 
completed only their Junior year are discouraged because such students 
will not have had the courses in Church and Ministry dealing with the 
teaching and preaching office. 



65 



THE MASTER OF THEOLOGY DEGREE 

A strong program of graduate education at the Master's level is 
offered by the Seminary in three fields : Biblical Studies, History and 
Theology, and Advanced Pastoral Studies. The curricula announced 
on the following pages are open only to degree candidates who expect 
to pursue serious study requiring three days a week over a period of 
two years (equivalent to full-time over one year). 

Every effort will be made to fill up gaps in theological knowledge, 
and this is made more possible since only six applicants will be ad- 
mitted to each program per year. There is considerable freedom in 
which the student is encouraged to explore in depth his own interests. 
Each student will receive close personal attention from the professors 
in the curriculum of his choice. 

These Masters' programs are planned for two purposes: to help 
prepare candidates for such specialized services as teaching, counsel- 
ing, and the campus ministry; and to benefit pastors who may wish 
to improve their effectiveness in Biblical, theological, or pastoral 
studies in relation to ministerial responsibilities. It is with the pastor 
in mind that the faculty views these programs as being right at the 
heart of continuing education. The courses are designed for a learned, 
relevant ministry, whatever form the ministry takes. 



66 



Standards for Admission 

1. A B.D. degree from an accredited seminary. 

2. An average of B or better in the B.D. degree or in a qualify- 
ing examination, according to the discretion of the Graduate 
Education Committee. 

3. The ability to use any language integral to the chosen field 
of study. While not a requirement for admission, a reading 
knowledge of French or German is required before a student 
can begin the second half of the course. Language examina- 
tions are given in June and September. 

4. The ability to handle English composition with competence. 



Requirements for the Degree 

1. Twenty-four course hours with an average of B or better. 
More than two C grades will eliminate a student from the 
program. 

(A student in full residence is one who carries the full load of 
24 hours in one year, 12 each semester. A student in half- 
residence is one who carries six hours each semester over a 
two-year period.) 

2. Six hours for a thesis or a research project which would be 
written up in final and acceptable form and either option 
completed by the end of the third year. 

3. A comprehensive examination covering the 24 units of study. 

4. An oral examination on the thesis or research project. 



FEES AND EXPENSES 

Matriculation Fee $35.00 

Tuition $20.00 per credit hour 

Library Fee ...... $20.00 per year 

Graduation Fee $10.00 



Applicants for this degree should apply to the Director of 
Admissions. 



67 



DESCRIPTION OF COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

FOR THE 

MASTER OF THEOLOGY DEGREE 

THE MASTER OF THEOLOGY PROGRAM 

IN 

BIBLICAL STUDIES 

The Master's degree in the Biblical Division is precisely a Bib- 
lical degree. While the thesis may concentrate on one Testament, 
the course work is deliberately designed to provide a certain degree 
of qualification in the whole field. 

Advanced Hebrew Grammar Advanced Greek Grammar 

and Reading and Reading 

Aramaic Syriac 

Bible Seminar Bible Seminar 

Grammar and Reading (inch LXX) Grammar and Reading 

Exegesis Exegesis 

Bibliography Bibliography 



M100 and M101. Advanced Hebrew Grammar and Reading. Study to 
supplement and continue undergraduate work done with the Hebrew 
O.T. Two hours credit in each of two semesters. 

M200 and M201. Advanced Greek Grammar and Reading. Study to sup- 
plement undergraduate work done with the Greek N.T. Books on the 
N.T. not previously read will be completed, and selected portions of the 
Greek O.T. will be added. Two hours credit in each of two semesters. 

MHO. Aramaic. Elementary instruction in the language with reading 
of Aramaic portions of the O.T. and selected passages from other 
Aramaic documents. Two hours credit, one semester. 

M120. Syriac. Elementary instruction in the language with readings 
from the Syriac version of the Bible. Two hours credit, one semester. 

M300 and M301. Bible Seminar. Problems of introduction, text, arch- 
aeology, and the various areas of criticism are considered with special 
attention to the needs of the particular candidates enrolled. Two hours 
credit in each of two semesters. 

M102 and M202. Exegesis. Thorough exegesis of selected passages in 
the Hebrew O.T. and the Greek N.T. Two hours credit in each of two se- 
mesters. 

M302 and M303. Bibliography. Survey of the modern literature on the 
Bible with reading and discussion of selected volumes. Two hours credit 
in each of two semesters. 



THE MASTER OF THEOLOGY PROGRAM 

IN 

HISTORY AND THEOLOGY 

The candidate for the Master's degree in History and Theology 
may major in either Church History or Theology, taking 21 hours, 
including a six-hour thesis credit, in the major field and nine hours 
in the minor field. Class work must be completed within two years; 
the final date for completion of the thesis may be extended to the 
close of a third academic year. The plan of the two programs is as 
follows, the last three courses named in each major being offered in 
the minor field. 

Church History Theology 

Historiography Seminar in Theological Method 

Patristics Christology 

Research in Puritanism 19th Century Theology 

The American Churches Elective 

and Secular Culture . ™ , 

Guided Reading in Church History Gmded Readmg m Theology 

Thesis T^ 818 

Christology Patristics 

19th Century Theology 17th Century Orthodoxy 

Guided Reading in Theology Guided Reading in Church History 

M400. Historiography. The study of the history of the writing of church 
histories; the interrelationship of history and theology in Eusebius, 
Augustine, Orosius, the Magdeburg Centuries, Mosheim, Milner, Neander, 
Schaff, Harnack, etc.; modern philosophies of history and the writing of 
church history; the study of primary and secondary sources and the his- 
tory of Christian scholarship. Three hours credit. 

M500. Seminar in Theological Method. The nature of theological think- 
ing will be studied: Prolegomena, organization of systems, theological 
language, and hermeneutics with illustration from representative theo- 
logians. Three hours credit. 

M401. Patristics. The study of the idea of ecclesiastical tradition; the 
solutions of the Fathers of the ancient church to the recurrent or immedi- 
ate problems of faith, life, and church order; the history of patristics and 
the controversies concerning it, and its significance for the modern ecu- 
menical movement. The manuals of Quasten and Altaner will serve as 
guides, and the texts will be studied for the most part in such series of 
English translations as the Ante-and Post Nicene Fathers, Ancient Christian 
Writers, The Fathers of the Church, etc. Three hours credit. 

M501. Christology. Research and discussion of the problems of Chris- 
tology. Readings in the sources with particular emphasis on Christology 
as the definitive issue in contemporary theology. Three hours credit. 

M402. Research in Puritanism. Special topics such as the covenant, 
seeking, church order and the relation of church and state will be explored. 
Three hours credit. 



M403. 17th Century Orthodoxy. This course will consider the orthodox 
background of Schleiermacher and other later theologians. Three hours 
credit. 



M502. 19th Century Theology. Reading and discussion of the writings 
of Schleiermacher and Ritschl, showing their influence upon theologi- 
cal trends of thought leading to the present. Three hours credit. 



M404. Seminar in the American Churches and Secular Culture. Each 
year a special topic will be selected and announced for study: for example, 
church and state, the Protestant ethos in the 19th century, the social 
gospel. 



M504. Elective. To be announced. Three hours credit. 



M405. Guided Reading in Church History. Readings approved by the 
professor designed to prepare the student for general examination in the 
field of Church History. Regular discussion of assignments is required. 
Three hours credit. 



M503. Guided Reading in Theology. Guided reading in theological 
works, both historical and contemporary, with which the student is not 
sufficiently familiar, looking toward general examination in the field of 
Theology. Three hours credit. 



Thesis in Church History. Individual guidance of a major project of 
research is offered. Any topic within the field of Church History may be 
selected, contingent upon the approval of the advising professor. Six 
hours credit. 



Thesis in Theology. Individual guidance of a major project of research 
is offered. Any topic within the field of Theology may be selected, con- 
tingent upon the approval of the supervising professor. Six hours credit. 



70 



THE MASTER OF THEOLOGY PROGRAM 

IN 

ADVANCED PASTORAL STUDIES 



The Program for Advanced Pastoral Studies is designed to help 
students to know themselves better; to understand and become sensi- 
tive to inter-personal relationships; to be familiar with group process; 
to become involved in creative dialogue between theological studies 
and the social sciences; and to see more clearly the resources of the 
Christian church for health at the various levels. 

The faculty teaching in this program is composed of both sem- 
inary personnel and those professionally involved in mental health 
in the community. The latter include Robert J. Shoemaker, M.D., 
John B. Reinhart, M.D., Margaret B. McFarland, Ph.D., Rex A. 
Pittenger, M.D., and Werner Lutz, M.S. 



Development Theory of 
Personality I 

Philosophical Issues in 
Psychotherapy 

Practicum with Children 



Year 


One 




3 


Development Theory of 
Personality II 


3 


3 


Dynamics of Family Life 


3 


2 


General Hospital Practicum 


2 



Group Process 

The Socio-Cultural Environment 

Counseling Seminar 



Year Two 

3 
2 
2 



Theology and Psychology 

Pastoral Care and the 
Church Program 

Counseling Seminar 



71 



M600. Developmental Theory of Personality I. The age span is traced 
from pre-natal influences and birth through the various stages of child- 
hood, showing normal growth patterns, the abnormalities of neurotic and 
psychotic development, and the relation of the child to the social milieu. 

M601. Developmental Theory of Personality II. Continuation of M600 
from adolescence through the aging process. 

M602. Philosophical Issues in Psychotherapy. Freudian thought and 
existential analysis are studied with regard to such issues as epistemol- 
ogy, ontology, anxiety, freedom, time, value theory. 

M603. Practicum with Children. This practicum is conducted at Arsen- 
al Family and Children's Center, the Medical School, the University of 
Pittsburgh, under the direction of the staff at Arsenal. Interpretive 
seminars are held regularly. 

M604. Dynamics of Family Life. 

M605. General Hospital Practicum. This practicum is conducted at the 
Presbyterian-University Hospital under the direction of the hospital med- 
ical and nursing staffs. The students are not chaplains but male orderlies 
assigned to nurses' stations. Interpretive seminars are held regularly. 

M606. Group Process. The theory and practice of group experience 
are studied with the end in view of better understanding the dynamics of 
church groups. 

M607. The Socio-cultural Environment. This course deals with the 
ecological and cultural factors which make functional and dysfunctional 
contributions to personality and community development. It will empha- 
size the role of institutions (other than the family) and power structures 
in their direct and indirect effect upon the indvidual. 

M608. Counseling Seminar. Each student is required to work with 
four counselees, under supervision, and to participate in the presentation 
of case material. 

M609. Counseling Seminar. Continuation of M608. 

M610. Theology and Psychology. The material of the entire program 
is pulled together in dialogue between theology and the human sciences, 
especially psychology and psychiatry. Such themes as God, man, sin, 
redemption are dealt with. 

M611. Pastoral Care and the Church Program. Pastoral care, informed 
theologically and psychologically, becomes the vantage-point for taking 
a hard look at church programming: its relevance, its resources, etc. 
A primary concern is to ask what the church can do in its supportive and 
preventive roles as well as in its redemptive and re-creative roles. 

Clinical Training. A twelve weeks' course in an approved clinical train- 
ing program will be required before graduation and may be taken pre- 
vious to admission or in the summer between the first and second years. 

72 



JN 



«T € 




■_%^ 




Rev. George F. Shaffer, Student, and Rex Pittenger, M.D., Lecturer, in the Program for 
Advanced Pastoral Studies at Western Psychiatric Institute. 







Reception for Dietrich Ritschl, New Professor 
in the B.D. and Th.M. Programs. 



A NEW JOINT PROGRAM 

THE GRADUATE SCHOOL OF PUBLIC AND 
INTERNATIONAL AFFAIRS, 

The University of Pittsburgh, 
and PITTSBURGH THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

A cooperative educational program which will have special mean- 
ing for international service (ecumenical mission and relations), ad- 
ministration, and urbanization has been worked out with one of the 
world's outstanding graduate schools of public and international af- 
fairs. The areas of concentration in this program are: 

General Public Administration 

Administration of International Affairs 

Economic and Social Development 

Municipal-Metropolitan Affairs 

Community and Voluntary Organization Affairs 

The program allows Bachelor of Divinity students to elect up 
to four hours from the offerings of the Graduate School of Public and 
International Affairs, the tuition differential being graciously financed 
from fellowship funds provided by the Heinz and Ford Foundations. 
This B.D. enrichment will be especially valuable to those students 
preparing to become fraternal workers, missionaries, Peace Corps 
volunteers, United Nations workers, etc. 

Basic to the program are the M.P.I.A. degree, Master of Public 
and International Affairs, and the M.P.A. degree, Master of Public 
Administration. Qualified persons from overseas as well as the 
United States may enroll as regular or special students in these de- 
gree programs. Such students are subject to the exclusive academic 
control of the University and receive their Masters' degrees from the 
University. However, latitude is injected into these programs so that 
elective course work can be taken at the Seminary, credit to be ap- 
plied to the university degrees. 

It is the policy of the Graduate School of Public and Internation- 
al Affairs that half its students are from overseas. This provides for 
rich trans-cultural experience. Through this joint program Pitts- 
burgh offers an exciting and exceptional opportunity for preparation 
for ecumenical mission and relations. 

Inquiries should be directed to: 

The Graduate School of Public and International Affairs 
University of Pittsburgh 
Pittsburgh 13, Pennsylvania 

or 
The Director of Admissions 
Pittsburgh Theological Seminary 
Pittsburgh 6, Pennsylvania 

75 



CONTINUING EDUCATION 



Under the direction of the Graduate Education Committee of 
the faculty, continuing education is fast assuming a major place in the 
life of the Seminary. Four programs are now available: 



THE EIGHT WEEKS SCHOOLS 

For eight Tuesdays in October and November and again in 
February and March the regular faculty offers courses in a wide 
range of areas but always with particular relevance to ministry, what- 
ever its forms (pastoral, administrative, etc.). For example, Church 
and State, Community Analysis, The Vatican Council, Current De- 
velopments in Christian Education, among others, have been offered 
this past year. During the past year over one hundred ministers 
participated in this program. Each class runs two hours, and a stu- 
dent may take up to three courses. Announcement of course offerings 
is made in Panorama, the quarterly bulletin, as well as in folder 
form. The fee of #5.00 per course includes the use of the library. 
Inquiries should be directed to the Registrar. 



SUMMER PROGRAMS 

The School of Religion, held each summer on the campus of 
Shady Side Academy, Pittsburgh, and supported by the Pitcairn- 
Crabbe Foundation, invites ISO ministers from within the Synod of 
Pennsylvania. The faculty is drawn from all over the United States 
as well as from the Seminary. A new format has been devised for 
the 1963 school, whose dates are July 8-12, the plan allowing for 
more study and small group discussion. 

Under the joint sponsorship of the Seminary and the Synod of 
Ohio a school for ministers and their wives is being planned for June 
23-29, 1963, on the campus of Muskingum College. It will be staffed 
by seminary personnel and will focus on three areas of interest: Bible 
study, theological foundations for Christian education, and the theory 
and practice of counseling. This school will also emphasize study 
and group discussion. 

A pilot project, sponsored by the Seminary, Pittsburgh Presby- 
tery, and the Board of Christian Education, will be held May 6-15, 
1963, at the Seminary. The student body will be limited to twenty. 
Much use will be made of the seminary library. The theme for this 
school will be the renewal of the Church. Biblical and theological 
foundations will be explored, the meaning of the "world" examined, 
and problems, especially those of the human dimension implicit or ex- 
plicit in renewal, faced. 

76 



ADULT COURSES 

A limited number of auditors will be admitted to regular B.D. 
and M.R.E. courses. To protect the integrity of the degree programs 
the approval of both the Academic Dean and the professor is neces- 
sary for auditing. The cost for auditing is half the regular tuition 
fee plus half the library fee. While no grade is given or recorded, 
it is expected that auditors will be faithful in attendance and do the 
required readings. Approximately fifty auditors a semester can be 
helped to continue their theological education through this program. 
Inquiries should be directed to the Registrar. 



CREDIT COURSES 

A limited number of students already having the B.D. degree 
may be enrolled for regular Bachelor of Divinity courses. The pur- 
pose of this program is to help prepare those who wish to do graduate 
work but who need to buttress their seminary training, fill in gaps, 
or do additional prerequisite work toward specialization. A grade 
is given and recorded for transcript purposes. The cost is one-half 
the regular matriculation fee and full tuition. Application forms 
should be secured from the Director of Admissions. 



77 



THE ALUMNI ASSOCIATION 



OFFICERS 

President Ira 0. Reed '52 

Vice President W. Roy McGeary, Sr. "24 

Secretary Curtis J. Patterson '37 

Treasurer John A. Stuart '37 

Necrological Secretary Walter R. Young '33 



The Alumni Association, now numbering more than 2,000 mem- 
bers, is composed of the former students, graduates and post-graduates 
of Pittsburgh Theological Seminary and its antecedent seminaries. 
The purposes of the Association are to deepen the friendships begun 
in seminary and to afford opportunity for fellowship among all its 
graduates; to cooperate with the Seminary in enlisting the interests 
of young people in church vocations and recruiting likely and able 
candidates; to support actively the cause of theological education 
and of the Seminary in particular in its expanding needs to meet the 
demands of the future; and lastly, to have a sympathetic interest in 
the life and work of the Seminary as represented in its student body 
and faculty. 

The Association meets annually on the afternoon of commence- 
ment day to conduct such business as is necessary and proper to 
elect officers. This is followed by the alumni dinner, after which the 
alumni are invited to join in the academic procession of the com- 
mencement exercises. 

Regional meetings of alumni are held periodically and a dinner 
at the annual meeting of The General Assembly is another highlight 
of the year's activities. 



78 



DEGREES AWARDED, 1961-1962 



THE DEGREE OF BACHELOR OF DIVINITY 

Laurence John Athorn ....... Newark, N. J. 

A.B, Bloomfield College, 1959 

Paul Richard Bergmueller Avenel, N. J. 

A.B., Maryville College, 1959 

Donald E. Brown Kenmore, N. Y. 

B.A., Muskingum College, 1959 

John Robert Brown Pittsburgh, Pa. 

B.A., University of Pittsburgh, 1958 

Neil W. Brown Columbus, Ohio 

B.A., Westminster College, 1959 

Bruce E. Bryce ........ McKeesport, Pa. 

B.A., Otterbein College, 1959 

Glen Howard Burrows Hanoverton, Ohio 

A.B., College of Wooster, 1955 

Rorer L. Bush Greensburg, Pa. 

A.B., College of Wooster, 1959 

Edwin C. Carlson ........ Springdale, Pa. 

B.A., Muskingum College, 1956 

Timothy D. Dalrymple ....... Portland, Ore. 

B.A., Whitworth College, 1959 

John Clarence Dean ........ Freedom, Pa. 

B.S. in Eng., Geneva College, 1958 

Stephen S. Dixon ........ Los Angeles, Calif. 

B.A., University of California, 1959 

Franklin Samuel Douglas .... Pittsburgh, Pa. 

B.S, Juniata College, 1957 

James H. Farley Columbus, Ohio 

A.B, Ohio State University, 1957 

Burton S. Froom, Jr. ...... San Francisco, Calif. 

B.S, University of California, 1958 

Joseph John Gasper Jessup, Pa. 

A.B, Bloomfield College, 1959 

Paul D. George Dellroy, Ohio 

A.B., Asbury College, 1957 

Richard Arthur George Franklin, Pa. 

B.S, Geneva College, 1959 

William J. Green Griffith, Ind. 

B.S. in C.E, Carnegie Institute of Technology, 1954 

Harold E. Greenway ........ Pittsburgh, Pa. 

B.A, Wesleyan College, 1958 

79 



John D. Griffith Pittsburgh, Pa. 

A.B., University of Pittsburgh, 1954 

Maynard Grunstra ........ Houston, Del. 

A.B., Elizabethtown College, 1959 

Frank Thomas Hainer ........ Parker, Pa. 

A.B., Duke University, 1956 

Donald W. Hankins ........ St. Louis, Mo. 

B.A., Monmouth College, 1957 

Wendell Earl Harford Pittsburgh, Pa. 

A.B., University of Pittsburgh, 1957 

Donald Lee Hartman ....... McKeesport, Pa. 

B.A., Asbury College, 1958 

Thomas R. Henstock Dearborn, Mich. 

B.S., Michigan State University, 1958 

Darrell Jackson Hockensmith ...... Johnstown, Pa. 

B.A., Otterbein College, 1956 

Russell Ward Holder Collingswood, N. J. 

B.S., Edinboro State Teachers College, 1954 

Harry L. Holfelder Carrollton, Ohio 

B.A., Geneva College, 1954 

Gordon P. Irvine ........ Wintersville, Ohio 

B.A., Muskingum College, 1959 

John E. Kennedy, II ....... Elizabeth, Pa. 

B.S., Carnegie Institute of Technology, 1957 

Allan William Kinloch, Jr. ..... . Philadelphia, Pa. 

A.B., Ursinus College, 1959 

Ronald E. Kinsey McKees Rocks, Pa. 

B.A., Tarkio College, 1959 

George R. Krupp, Jr. ....... Jackson Center, Pa. 

B.S. in Agriculture, Pennsylvania State College, 1942 

Byron Dale Leasure Bridgeville, Pa. 

A.B., College of Wooster, 1959 

Philip Arthur Maronde . Pulaski, Pa. 

A.B., Westminster College, 1959 

Ralph Walters McCandless ....... Butler, Pa. 

B.A., Grove City College, 1958 

Earle D. McCrea, Jr Gibsonia, Pa. 

A.B., Allegheny College, 1939 

David J. McFarlane ....... Niagara Falls, N. Y. 

B.A., University of Rochester, 1959 

John E. Mehl Pittsburgh, Pa. 

A.B., Dartmouth College, 1958 

William M. Meyer Charleroi, Pa. 

B.A., Westminster College, 1959 

80 



Robert G. Miller East Orange, N. J. 

A.B., Upsala College, 1959 

Thomas J. Mori Belle Vernon, Pa. 

B.A., Waynesburg College, 1959 

Richard Ralph Mowry ... . . . . . . St. Louis, Mo. 

B.S., Millikin University, 1952 

Rodney M. Murray Omaha, Neb. 

B.A., Omaha University, 1958 

Robert E. Palisin ........ Youngstown, Ohio 

A.B., Westminster College, 1959 

Douglas A. Pomeroy ........ Cleveland, Ohio 

A.B., Wooster College, 1959 

Wesley H. Poorman Canton, Ohio 

A.B., Colgate University, 1957 

William J. Provost Brooklyn, N. Y. 

B.S., University of Pittsburgh, 1958 

Mark M. Ray Oneonta, N. Y. 

B.A., Muskingum College, 1958 

John S. Redmond ........ Canonsburg, Pa. 

B.S., Pennsylvania State University, 1957 

Jack Robert Rees Pittsburgh, Pa. 

A.B., University of Pittsburgh, 1957 

Hengust Robinson, Jr. ....... . Webster, Pa. 

A.B., University of Pittsburgh, 1957 

Fred McFeely Rogers . Pittsburgh, Pa. 

B.M., Rollins College, 1951 

Edward Sensenbrenner ....... Columbus, Ohio 

B.S., Ohio State University, 1954 

Clair Willard Shaffer ....... New Castle, Pa. 

A.B., Grove City College, 1958 

Clarence Cornelius Shields Greenville, Pa. 

A.B., Maryville College, 1958 

Verne Edmond Sindlinger ....... Brilliant, Ohio 

A.B., Ohio University, 1959 

John R. Sisley, Jr. ........ Troy, N. Y. 

B.S., Grove City College, 1953 

Howard Sheridan Smith ...... Los Angeles, Calif. 

B.A., La Verne College, 1958 

James Kilpatrick Smith ....... Pittsburgh, Pa. 

A.B., Mount Union College, 1958 

John P. Smith, III East Liverpool, Ohio 

B.A., Muskingum College, 1959 

Robert Duvall Smith ....... Germantown, Md. 

A.B., Maryville College, 1959 

81 



Roger A. Smith 

B.A., Monmouth College, 1959 

Thomas N. Stark ..... 
B.A., University of Illinois, 1958 

William C. Steel 

B.A., University of California, 1959 

David H. Stevenson .... 
A.B., Pennsylvania State University, 1958 



William George Stype, Jr. 

B.S. in Ed., Thiel College, 1959 

Horace Allan Talley 

B.S., Sterling College, 1958 

Theodore De Witt Taylor, II 
B.A., Westminster College, 1959 

Eugene G. Turner 

B.A., Knoxville College, 1957 

James Leroy Ulrich 

A.B., Waynesburg College, 1959 

Howard Clinton Varner, Jr. 

A.B., College of Emporia, 1958 

James Everett Vincent 

B.A., Sterling College, 1958 

David A. Vogan .... 
B.A., Westminster College, 1952 

Carlton K. Walker 

A.B., Wheaton College, 1959 

James Richard Whiteside 

B.S., Waynesburg College, 1949 

Thomas Daniel Woodward 

A.B., Washington College, 1959 



Wilmington, Del. 

Chicago, III. 

Los Angeles, Calif. 

Arona, Pa. 

Coraopolis, Pa. 

Akron, Ohio 

EUicott City, Md. 

Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Utica, N. Y. 

DuBois, Pa. 

Loveland, Col. 

New Castle, Pa. 

Wilmington, Del. 

New Castle, Pa. 

Bethesda, Md. 



THE DEGREE OF MASTER OF RELIGIOUS EDUCATION 

Elizabeth Jane Jobes ........ Orwell, Ohio 

B.A., Hiram College, 1959 

Donna Lee Wagner Shogren ....... Butler, Pa. 

B.S. in M.Ed., Westminster College, 1954 

THE DEGREE OF DOCTOR OF THEOLOGY 

Ha Eun Chung Seoul, Korea 

B.D., Han Kuk Theological Seminary, 1951 
Th.M., Southeastern Theological Seminary, 1957 



82 



HONORS AND AWARDS 



Summa Cum Laude 
David Alexander Vogan 



Magna Cum Laude 

Fred McFeely Rogers John Edwards Mehl 

Wesley Howard Poorman Edward William Sensenbrenner 



Cum Laude 

Franklin Samuel Douglas Maynard Grunstra 

Frank Thomas Hainer Donald Emory Brown 

Earle D. McCrea, Jr. John Clarence Dean 

John R. Sisley, Jr. Stephen S. Dixon 



GRADUATING WITH HONORS IN 

History and Theology 

Stephen S. Dixon James Hull Farley 

David Herbert Stevenson 



GRADUATING WITH HONORS IN 

Biblical Studies 

Glenn H. Burrows Wesley Howard Poorman 

Harry L. Holfelder Allan W. Kinloch, Jr. 



GRADUATING WITH HONORS IN 

History and Theology, and Biblical Studies 

Frank Thomas Hainer 



83 



The Thomas Jamison Scholarship 
David Alexander Vogan 

The Sylvester S. Marvin Memorial Fellowship 
Wesley Howard Poorman 

The Jane Hogg Gardner Scholarship 

John Edwards Mehl 

The Jennie Rigg Barbour Memorial Prize 
Fred McFeely Rogers 

The Hugh Thomson Kerr Moderator Prize 
Frank Thomas Hainer 

The Michael Wilson Keith Memorial Homiletical Prize 
Fred McFeely Rogers 

The First Presbyterian Church of McDonald Prize in Church History 
Wesley Howard Poorman 

The Robert A. Lee Church History Award 
John Edwards Mehl 

The Home Training Bible Class Award in Missions 

Edwin C. Carlson 
Gordon Paul Irvine 

The Chevy Chase Christian Education Award 

(Young People's Work) 
Wesley Howard Poorman 



JUNIOR CLASS AWARDS 

The James Purdy Scholarships 

Mary Ruth Brawley 

Muriel Cleone Brown 

Robert Lee Gordon 

A. Vanlier Hunter, Jr. 

James A. Keller 

Robert Nicholas Van Wyk 

84 



REGISTER OF STUDENTS 1962-63 

Senior Class 

William Thorpe Alter Pittsburgh, Pa. 

B.S., Lehigh University, 1956 
B.S. in Bus. Adm., 1957 

John Harvey Ashenfelter . . ... Ridley Park, Pa. 

B.S., Drexel Institute, 1960 

Clyde Carson Billings ...... Youngstown, Ohio 

B.A., Muskingum College, 1960 

Benjamin Stephen Booth ....... Pittsburgh, Pa. 

B.S., Grove City College, 1960 

David E. Breckenridge ....... Woodston, Kansas 

B.S., Sterling College, 1959 

James M. Brinks Dothan, Alabama 

A.B., Lynchburg College, 1956 
M.A., University of Pittsburgh, 1960 

Keith Burroughs ........ Philadelphia, Pa. 

B.S., University of Pennsylvania, 1960 

Lowell E. Byall Whittier, Calif. 

B.A., Sterling College, 1960 

J. Paul Cameron ........ Pittsburgh, Pa. 

A.B., Denison University, 1960 

John N. Crock Pittsburgh, Pa. 

B.A., University of Pittsburgh, 1960 

Donald C. Custis . Riverdale, Md. 

A.B., College of Wooster, 1958 

George William Dando ....... Baltimore, Md. 

B.A., Baylor University, 1960 

Daniel Reubin Duerksen ....... Pikesville, Md. 

B.M.E., University of Wichita, 1949 

Jack Fowlow Emerick ....... Beaver Falls, Pa. 

A.B., Geneva College, 1959 

Fred A. Feldner ........ Allison Park, Pa. 

B.A., Geneva College, 1959 

Forrest V. Fitzhugh San Antonio, Texas 

B.A.. Trinity University, 1960 

William G. Flagmeier .... ... Canton, Ohio 

A.B., Muskingum College, 1949 

Robert Charles Fox ........ Bethlehem, Pa. 

A.B., Albright College, 1957 

John Harmond Francisco ....... Elmsford, N. Y. 

A.B., Lehigh University, 1956 

William C. Gawlas ........ Pittsburgh, Pa. 

A.B., University of Pittsburgh, 1959 

Richard K. Gibson Pittsburgh, Pa. 

B.A., Muskingum College, 1960 

George Harold Giles Pittsburgh, Pa. 

A.B., University of Pittsburgh, 1959 

85 



Benjamin Gorbea ....... Washington, D. C. 

A.B., Maryville College, 1959 

John Mack Groat ........ Pittsburgh, Pa. 

B.A., Mount Union College, 1959 

Edward S. Hammett ........ Pittsburgh, Pa. 

B.A., Washington and Jefferson College, 1951 

Aaron Griffith Hastie, Jr. ...... . Pittston, Pa. 

B.A., Wilkes College, 1960 

Peter Charles Hauser ....... Harrisburg, Pa. 

A.B., Grove City College, 1960 

David L. Heyser ...... ... Norristown, Pa. 

A.B., Ursinus College, 1956 

Alfred C. Horn Charleroi, Pa. 

B.A., Westminster College, 1960 

Robert Fraser Hostetter, Jr. ... . . Pittsburgh, Pa. 

B.A., Waynesburg College, 1960 

John Edmund Johnson ........ Clairton, Pa. 

B.S., University of Pittsburgh, 1957 

Gordon A. Jones Havertown, Pa. 

B.A., Houghton College, 1958 

Wayne K. King Ellwood City, Pa. 

B.A., Muskingum College, 1960 

David C. Koch Philadelphia, Pa. 

B.A., Temple University, 1959 

Steven James Kocsis Pittsburgh, Pa. 

B.A., Muskingum College, 1960 

Zoltan A. Kovacs Debrecen, Hungary 

B.S., Reformed School of Education, Hungary, 1946 

Harry Donald Lash Rector, Pa. 

B.S., Clarion State Teachers College, 1960 

Allen W. McCallum Detroit, Mich. 

B.A., Muskingum College, 1960 

Russell Howard McCuen, Jr Malvern, Pa. 

B.A., Maryville College, 1960 

John B. McLaren New Brighton, Pa. 

B.A., Westminster College, 1959 
M.A., University of Pittsburgh, 1960 

Dale E. Miller Pittsburgh, Pa. 

B.A., Westminster College, 1959 

Gerald A. Miller Industry, Pa. 

B.A., Geneva College, 1959 

Walter W. Miller Montpelier, Ohio 

B.S., Ohio State University, 1955 
M.S., Ohio State University, 1960 

William Harold Moore . . . . . Pittsburgh, Pa. 

A.B., Waynesburg College, 1959 

Patrick H. Morison Baltimore, Md. 

B.A., Whitworth College, 1959 

86 



William G. Morris McKeesport, Pa. 

B.S. in Ed., California State Teachers College, 1959 

Maurice James Murray ....... Dover, Delaware 

A.B., Wooster College, 1960 

Ronald L. Oglesbee ... ... ... Xenia, Ohio 

B.S., Bowling Green State University, 1959 

Irvin Lee Page Conemaugh, Pa. 

A.B., Waynesburg College, 1960 

Howard F. Peters Pittsburgh, Pa. 

A.B., University of Pittsburgh, 1959 

David Philips ..... .... Valencia, Pa. 

B.A., Muskingum College, 1959 

Claude Van Ponting Salinas, Calif. 

A.B., Muskingum College, 1960 

Robert Edson Reed ........ Clairton, Pa. 

B.A., Waynesburg College, 1960 

Lloyd Salazar ...... . . Hawthorne, Calif. 

B.A., Biola College, 1956 

B.D., Talbot Theological Seminary, 1961 

Walter Terry Schoener ....... Pittsburgh, Pa. 

B.A., Muskingum College, 1960 

Paul W. Shogren, Jr. ...... . Pittsburgh, Pa. 

B.S. in Forestry, Pennsylvania State University, 1951 

Richard B. Snyder ........ Big Run, Pa. 

B.S., Clarion State Teachers College, 1959 

George Young Stewart ....... Baltimore, Md. 

A.B., Maryville College, 1960 

John L. Symons ......... Lakewood, Ohio 

A.B., Muskingum College, 1957 

Robert Dale Taylor ........ Pittsburgh, Pa. 

B.S., University of Pittsburgh, 1960 

Francis Elliott Tennies ...... Ontario Center, N. Y. 

A.B., Grove City College, 1960 

Joseph L. Tropansky ........ Du Bois, Pa. 

A.B., Maryville College, 1959 

John R. Wineman ........ Pittsburgh, Pa. 

B.A., Tarkio College, 1959 

John E. Winnett Uniontown, Pa. 

B.S., Waynesburg College, 1951 

Harry Glenn Winsheimer ....... Indiana, Pa. 

B.S., Waynesburg College, 1959 

Middler Class 

Richard D. Adams ........ Buffalo, N. Y. 

B.A., Grove City College, 1961 

David L. Barrett ........ Providence, R. I. 

B.A., Barrington College, 1961 

87 



Robert M. Bereit ....... Bay Village, Ohio 

B.A., Western Reserve, 1961 

Lawrence R. Bergstresser ....... Ephrata, Pa. 

B.A., Albright College, 1960 

Benjamin B. Booker ........ Tampa, Fla. 

B.S., Hampton Institute, 1935 

Muriel C. Brown Ellensburg, Wash. 

B.A., Whitworth College, 1961 

John H. Cherry ........ Pittsburgh, Pa. 

B.A., University of Pittsburgh, 1961 

Donald W. Chichester ....... Levittown, N. Y. 

B.S. in Appl. Physics, Hofstra College, 1955 

Jack M. Chisholm ...... «. Pittsburgh, Pa. 

B.A., University of Pittsburgh, 1961 

Donald H. Craig ........ Pittsburgh, Pa. 

B.A., Ohio Wesleyan University, 1961 

Samuel B. Craig, Jr. ...... Pittsburgh, Pa. 

B.A., University of Virginia, 1961 

Gene W. Crooks ........ Pontiac, Mich. 

B.A, Beloit College, 1953 

Samuel C. Dunning . . . . . . . . Pittsburgh, Pa. 

B.A., Geneva College, 1956 

Eugene C. Fieg ........ Louisville, Ky. 

A.B., Maryville College, 1961 

Richard E. Fouse . . .... College Park, Md. 

B.A., University of Maryland, 1961 

Robert Frederick ....... Slippery Rock, Pa. 

Slippery Rock College, 1961 

Merl L. Galusha, Jr Schenectady, N. Y. 

B.S., Union College, 1959 

James C. George New Castle, Pa 

A.B., Westminster College, 1949 

Robert L. Gordon ......... Irwin, Pa. 

B.A., Duquesne University, 1961 

Lloyd F. Gossler ........ Harrisburg, Pa. 

B.S., Florida State University, 1961 

Gary C. Haase Wooster, Ohio 

B.A., The College of Wooster, 1961 

Hewon Han Seoul, Korea 

A.B, The College of Emporia, 1960 

Edwin Blythe Hartman Ellwood City, Pa. 

B.B.A., Westminster College, 1959 

A. Vanlier Hunter, Jr. ... . Meadville, Pa. 

B.A., Grove City College, 1961 

John Edward Karnes ........ Akron, Ohio 

B.A., Muskingum College, 1960 

James A. Keller ........ Pittsburgh, Pa. 

B.S., Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 1961 

88 



Harold D. Kelley Pittsburgh, Pa. 

B.B.A., University of Pittsburgh, 1958 
M.B.A., University of Pittsburgh, 1959 

Dong Soo Kim ......... Seoul, Korea 

B.A., Union Christian College 

William J. Lightbody ....... Pittsburgh, Pa. 

B.A., University of Pittsburgh, 1961 

Raymond F. Luber, Jr. ...... Pittsburgh, Pa. 

B.A., Westminster College, 1960 

Louis S. Lunardini ........ Pittsburgh, Pa. 

A.B., University of Pittsburgh, 1961 

Harry E. Martin ........ Pittsburgh, Pa. 

M.S., George Williams College, 1953 

W. Donald McClure ...... New Wilmington, Pa. 

B.S., Westminster College, 1961 

John M. McNitt ....... Cuyahoga Falls, Ohio 

B.S., Allegheny College, 1952 

Ronald P. Miller Buffalo, N. Y. 

B.A., Westminster College, 1961 

Albert Montanari ........ Buffalo, N. Y. 

B.S., State University of N. Y., College for Teachers at Buffalo, 1958 

Harold R. Moore ........ Pittsburgh, Pa. 

B.A., University of Pittsburgh, 1961 

Henry 0. Moore, Jr Dallas, Texas 

B.A., Trinity University, 1961 

John W. Nelson ........ Westfield. N. J. 

B.A., Pennsylvania State University, 1961 

Ernest W. Peterson Buhl, Idaho 

B.S., College of Idaho, 1961 

Gary S. Pinder ........ Rochester, N. Y. 

A.B., The College of Wooster, 1961 

Dayanand David Pitamber ...... Mainpuri, India 

M.A., Agra University, 1961 

John A. Price . Elizabeth, Pa. 

B.A., Washington and Jefferson College, 1959 

William J. Sharp ........ Washington, Pa. 

B.A., Washington and Jefferson College, 1960 

John Auld Simpson ........ Akron, Ohio 

B.A., Akron University, 1961 

William F. Smith Coshocton, Ohio 

B.S., University of Michigan, 1960 

Robert C. Sproul Pittsburgh, Pa. 

B.A., Westminster College, 1961 

James A. Tait Mechanicsburg, Pa. 

B.S. in Building Construction, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, 1955 

Bruce C. Theunissen Evansville, Ind. 

A.B., Central Michigan University, 1951 

89 



Charles N. Thompson ....... Hawthorne, N. J. 

B.A., Davis and Elkins College, 1961 

William A. Van Wie Wheeling, W. Va. 

A.B., The College of Wooster, 1961 

Robert N. Van Wyk ....... Paterson, N. J 

B.A., The College of Wooster, 1961 

James C. Ware . . . . . . . . . Mansfield, Ohio 

A.B., Ohio Wesleyan University, 1956 

Junior Class 

Charles E. Alcorn III Pittsburgh, Pa. 

A.B., Wheaton College, 1961 

Roy J. Altman ......... Trafford, Pa. 

B.A., Pennsylvania State University. 1962 

Charles H. Banning ....... Mt. Vernon, Ohio 

B.S., Social Welfare, Ohio State University, 1960 
M.S.W., Ohio State University 

Kenneth Lee Bergner ....... Hammond, Ind. 

B.A., Tarkio College, 1962 

William M. Birdsall ........ Toledo, Ohio 

B.S., Muskingum College, 1962 

Carl W. Bogue ......... Princeton, Ind. 

A.B., Muskingum College, 1961 

John C. Boor ......... Shippenville, Pa. 

B.S.Ed., Clarion State Teachers College, 1962 

James B. Brasel Kell, 111. 

A.B., Monmouth College, 1962 

Paulo D. Brasil . ........ Goias, Brazil 

Colegio Municipal de Anapolis, 1957 

Colegio Jose M. da Conceicao, Jandira, S.P., 1960 

Presbyterian Theological Seminary, Campinas, S.P., 1962 

Sharlene Ann Brokering ...... New Milford, N. J. 

A.B., Maryville College, 1962 

Franklin Arthur Brown ....... New Castle, Pa. 

B.A., Geneva College, 1962 

Richard Metz Brown Easton, Pa. 

B.S., Pennsylvania State University, 1962 

Wayne A. Buchtel Dayton, Ohio 

B.S., Muskingum College, 1961 

Charles L. Bulger Omaha, Nebraska 

B.A., Hastings College, 1962 

James Allen Camp Nevada, Ma 

B.A., Missouri Valley College, 1962 

William M. Campbell Stamford, Cona 

B.A., College of Wooster, 1962 

Robert T. Cassell Pittsburgh, Pa. 

B.A., University of Pittsburgh, 1962 

90 



William V. Davis ......... Canton, Ohio 

A.B., Ohio University, 1962 

Thomas C. Fairley ......... Beaver, Pa. 

B.S., Edinboro State Teachers College, 1962 

John M. Fife ......... Titusville, Pa. 

B.A., Washington and Jefferson College, 1962 

Thomas W. Filbern ....... West Newton, Pa. 

B.A., Westminster College, 1962 

Donald S. French Ithaca, N. Y. 

B.S., Cornell University, 1962 

Robert K. Greer ......... Trafford, Pa. 

B.A., Westminster College, 1962 

James William Hanna Black Lick, Pa. 

A.B., Waynesburg College, 1962 

Howard Hansen Blairsville, Pa. 

B.A., University of Pittsburgh, 1952 

James L. Hobson ......... Linden, Mich. 

B.A., Alma College, 1962 

Harry R. Holmes Sewickley, Pa. 

A.B., Grove City College, 1962 

Harold S. Horan Silver Spring, Md. 

B.A., University of Maryland, 1962 

Carl Robert Hull ........ East Brady, Pa. 

B.A., Grove City College, 1962 

Edward John Hunt ........ Bronx, N. Y. 

B.A., Davis and Elkins College, 1962 

Bruce A. Hyslop ........ St. Clairsville, Ohio 

B.A., Wheaton College, 1961 

Ralph B. Jones ......... Baltimore, Md. 

B.A., Maryland University, 1962 

William M. Keeney ........ Harrisburg, Pa. 

B.A., College of Wooster, 1962 

John Robert Loch ......... Sharon, Pa. 

B.A., Grove City College, 1962 

Ross N. MacDonald ........ Berea, Ohio 

B.A., Baldwin Wallace College, 1962 

Raymond J. Marquette ........ Scranton, Pa. 

B.S., Geneva College, 1961 

Paul J. Masquelier McDonald, Pa. 

B.B.A., University of Pittsburgh, 1960 

Robert B. McCrumb New Castle, Pa. 

B.A., Muskingum College, 1962 

Guy H. McIver Columbus, Ohio 

B.S., Ohio State University, 1962 

Robert Allan Messenger ....... Bridgeville, Pa. 

B.A., Hamilton College, 1950 

George M. Mighells Salamanca, N. Y. 

Th.B., Malone College, 1950 

91 



Paul J. Milio Detroit, Mich. 

A.B., Wayne State University, 1962 

McClain J. Moredock ....... Rices Landing, Pa. 

B.A., Westminster College, 1962 

Robert Raymond Reich ........ Salem, Ohio 

B.A., Davis & Elkins College, 1962 

Richard L. Schall ......... Salina, Pa. 

B.S. in E.E., University of Pittsburgh, 1962 

Richard Scherpenisse ....... Bowling Green, Mo. 

A.B., Missouri Valley College, 1962 

C. Thatcher Schwartz Pittsburgh, Pa. 

B.S., Penn State University, 1959 

Hugh B. Springer ........ Fairmont, W. Va. 

A.B., West Virginia University, 1961 

Gerald Floyd Stacy ....... Minneapolis, Minn. 

B.A., Macalester College, 1962 

Lewis R. Thomas Lewis Run, Pa. 

M.E., University of Cincinnati, 1959 

John Arthur Toth ........ Johnstown, Pa. 

B.A., Waynesburg College, 1962 

Dwayne Vogt Middle Point, Ohio 

B.A., Tusculum College, 1962 

Edward F. Wightman Jamestown, R. I. 

B.A., Colgate University, 1957 

Margaret Suppes Yingling . Pittsburgh, Pa. 

B.S., Chatham College, 1943 

CANDIDATES FOR DEGREE OF MASTER OF RELIGIOUS EDUCATION 

Senior Class 

Mary Ruth Brawley ....... Blacksburg, S. C. 

A.B., Erskine College, 1960 

David James Devey ........ Pittsburgh, Pa. 

B.S., University of Pittsburgh, 1952 
M.E., University of Pittsburgh, 1956 

Joyce Lee Helfer Columbus, Ohio 

B.S. in Ed., Ohio State University, 1958 

Chong Mahn Lee Seoul, Korea 

B.D., Han Kuk Theological Seminary 

Junior Class 

Sally Childs ......... Pittsburgh, Pa. 

B.A., Sarah Lawrence College, 1949 

Janet Leslie Mann Breckenridge . . . . . Springfield, Mass. 

B.S. in E.E., Springfield College, 1958 

Lane Richardson ...... . . Canby, Oregon 

B.A., College of Idaho, 1962 

Judith M. Sievers St. Louis, Mo. 

B.A., Missouri Valley College, 1962 

92 



CANDIDATES FOR DEGREE OF MASTER OF EDUCATION 

(to be granted by the University of Pittsburgh) 

Mary Jean Engle . Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Betty Henderson Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Chang Kuei Lee ........ Taiwan, Formosa 



SPECIAL STUDENTS 



Harold W. Abram 
R. Russell Bixler 
Lloyd 0. DeLong 
Lavern Gardai 
John Gatu 
Rah abu Gatu 
Dennis K. Koch 
Robert I. Moore 
Marilyn Murray 
suchitra taweesin 
wlchean watakeecharoen 
Carolyn Williams 



Indiana, Pa. 

Pittsburgh, Pa. 
New Albany, Ohio 

Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Nairobi, Kenya 

Nairobi, Kenya 

New Eagle, Pa. 
Columbus, Ohio 

Pittsburgh, Pa. 
Bangkok, Thailand 
Bangkok, Thailand 

Pittsburgh, Pa. 



CANDIDATES FOR THE DEGREE OF MASTER OF THEOLOGY 



Biblical Studies 



Rev. Robert A. Coughenour .... 
B.S., State Teachers College, 1953 
B.D., Pittsburgh Theological Seminary, 1960 

Rev. Howard Eshbaugh .... 
A.B., Grove City College, 1955 
B.D., Western Theological Seminary, 1956 

Rev. Frank T. Hainer . 

A.B., Duke University, 1956 

B.D., Pittsburgh Theological Seminary, 1962 

Rev. Philip M. Hastings .... 
B.E., Johns Hopkins University, 1953 
B.D., Western Theological Seminary, 1956 

Rev. John W. Irwin ..... 
B.A., Sterling College, 1955 
B.D., Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary, 

Rev. Robert L. Thompson .... 
A.B., Grove City College, 1956 
B.D., Western Theological Seminary, 1959 



1958 



Pittsburgh, Pa. 
Oakdale, Pa. 
Franklin, Pa. 



Sewickley, Pa. 

Colliers, W. Va. 

Bloomingdale, Ohio 



History and Theology 



Rev. Kenneth P. Alpers .... 
B.A., Capital University, 1949 
B.D., Capital Theological Seminary, 1952 

Rev. Fred W. Cassell .... 
B.S., Westminster College, 1951 
B.D., Princeton Theological Seminary, 1954 

93 



Pittsburgh, Pa. 



Wexford, Pa. 



Rev. James G. Gardner 

B.A., Maryville College, 1956 _ 

B.D., Western Theological Seminary, 1959 

Rev. W. Scott Hengen, III .... 
A.B., Franklin and Marshall College, 1957 
B.D., Lancaster Theological Seminary, 1961 

Rev. John M. Hulse 

B.A., Waynesburg College, 1957 

B.D., Pittsburgh Theological Seminary, 1960 

Rev. James D. Leathery ....... 

A.B., Capital University, 1955 

B.D., Evangelical Lutheran Theological Seminary, 1958 

Rev. David E. Martin 

B.S., Kent State University, 1957 

B.D., Pittsburgh Theological Seminary, 1960 

Rev. Wayne L. Smith ....... 

A.B., Franklin and Marshall College, 1957 
B.D., Lancaster Theological Seminary, 1961 

Rev. Donald K. Welsh ...... 

B.S. in Ed., Washington City Teachers College, 1954 
B.D., McCormick Theological Seminary, 1957 



Pittsburgh, Pa. 

West Mifflin, Pa. 

McKeesport, Pa. 

Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Sewickley, Pa. 

Duquesne, Pa. 

Tarentum, Pa. 



Program for Advanced Pastoral Studies 

Rev. James B. Bailey Weirton. W. Va. 

B.S.C., Ohio University, 1953 

B.D., Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary, 1959 

Rev. S. Hayden Britton ....... Pittsburgh, Pa. 

B.A., University of Tennessee, 1955 

B.D., Western Theological Seminary, 1958 

Rev. Wayne E. Faust Waynesburg, Ohio 

A.B., University of Pittsburgh, 1957 

B.D., Pittsburgh Theological Seminary, 1960 

Rev. J. Robert Phillips Pittsburgh, Pa. 

B.S., University of Pittsburgh, 1954 
B.D., Western Theological Seminary, 1959 

Fred M. Rogers Pittsburgh, Pa. 

B.M., Rollins College, 1951 

B.D., Pittsburgh Theological Seminary, 1962 

Rev. Bertram H. Saunders Walnut Creek, Calif. 

A.B., University of California, 1949 

S.T.B., Biblical Seminary in New York, 1952 

Rev. George F. Shaffer Pittsburgh, Pa. 

A.B., Wittenberg University, 1950 
B.D., Hamma Divinity School, 1954 

Rev. Walter F. Toperzer ....... Greensburg, Pa. 

B.S., Carnegie Institute of Technology, 1957 

B.D., Philadelphia Lutheran Theological Seminary, 1960 



94 



SUMMARY OF ATTENDANCE 

Bachelor of Divinity Program 

Juniors .......... 54 

Middlers 53 

Seniors .......... 65 172 



Master of Religious Education Program 

Juniors .......... 4 

Seniors .......... 4 8 

Master of Education Program ....... 3 

Master of Theology Program ....... 23 

Special Students ......... 12 

Total Enrollment ... 218 



95 



HISTORICAL ROLL OF PROFESSORS 



John Anderson 
John Banks . 
James Ramsey 
Joseph Kerr . 
Jacob Jones Janeway 
Mungo Dick . 
Luther Halsey 



John Williamson Nevin 

David Elliott 

John Taylor Pressly 

David Carson 

Thomas Beveridge 

Moses Kerr 

Joseph Claybaugh 

Samuel W. McCracken 

Lewis Warner Green 

James Martin 

Alexander Taggart McGill 

James Lemonte Dinwiddie 

Abraham Anderson 

Alexander Downs Clark 

David Reynolds Kerr 

Melancthon Williams Jacobus 

William Swan Plumer . 

Samuel Wilson 

William Davidson . 

Alexander Young . 

Samuel Jennings Wilson 
John Scott 
Joseph Clokey 
William Miller Paxton 
Andrew Morrow Black . 
Archibald Alexander Hodge 
David Alexander Wallace 

James Harper 

Joseph Tate Cooper 

William Bruce 

William Henry Hornblower 



Seminary of 
Inauguration 


Period of 

Service 


Service 


1794-1819 


Philadelphia 


1820-1826 


Canonsburg 


1821-1842 


Pittsburgh 


1825-1829 


Western 


1828-1829 


Pittsburgh 


1829-1831 


Western 


1829-1836 
1872-1880 


Western 


1829-1840 


Western 


1829-1874 


Allegheny 


1832-1870 


Canonsburg 


1834-1834 


Canonsburg 


1835-1871 


Allegheny 


1835-1836 


Oxford 


1839-1855 


Oxford 


1839-1840 


Western 


1840-1847 


Canonsburg 


1842-1846 


Western 


1842-1854 


Allegheny 


1843-1846 


Canonsburg 


1847-1855 


Allegheny 


1847-1884 


Allegheny 


1851-1887 


Western 


1851-1876 


Western 


1854-1862 


Xenia 


1855-1875 


Oxford 


1855-1858 


Oxford 


1855-1874 
1876-1891 


Western 


1857-1883 


Monmouth 


1858-1874 


Xenia 


1858-1873 


Western 


1860-1872 


Monmouth 


1864-1874 


Western 


1864-1877 


Monmouth & Xenia 1867-1870 
1883-1883 


Newburg 


1867-1899 


Allegheny 


1871-1886 


Xenia 


1871-1880 


Western 


1871-1883 



96 



James Gillespie Carson 

William Gallogly Moorehead 

Jackson Burgess McMichael 

Samuel Thompson Lowrie 

Samuel Henry Kellogg . 

William Hamilton Jeffers 

Benjamin Breckenbridge Warfield 

Thomas Hastings Robinson 

David MacDill 

David A. McClenahan 

Robert Dick Wilson 

James Alexander Grier 

John McNaugher . 

Henry T. McClelland 

Matthew Brown Riddle 

Oliver Joseph Thatcher 

Wilbert Webster White 

Robert Christie 

John A. Wilson 

John Douds Irons . 

James Anderson Kelso 

David Riddle Breed 

Joseph Kyle . 

Jesse Johnson 

David Schley Schaff 

John Elliott Wishart 

David E. Cully 

William Riley Wilson 

Charles Frederick Wishart 

William Robertson Farmer 

John Hunter Webster 

James Henry Snowden 

Melvin Grove Kyle 

James Doig Rankin 

David Frazier McGill 

Frank Eakin . 

James Gallaway Hunt 

Selby Frame Vance 

James Harper Grier 

Robert McNary Karr 

James Leon Kelso . 

George Boone McCreary 

Robert Nathaniel Montgomery 



Xenia 


1873-1888 


Xenia 


1873-1914 


Xenia 


1873-1878 


Western 


1874-1877 


Western 


1877-1886 


Western 


1877-1914 


Western 


1878-1887 


Western 


1883-1906 


Xenia 


1884-1902 


Allegheny 


1885-1921 


Western 


1885-1900 


Allegheny 


1886-1909 


Allegheny 


1886-1943 


Western 


1886-1891 


Western 


1887-1916 


Allegheny 


1888-1892 


Xenia 


1889-1894 


Western 


1891-1923 


Allegheny 


1893-1915 


Xenia 


1895-1905 


Western 


1897-1944 


Western 


1898-1931 


Xenia 


18994921 


Xenia 


1903-1930 


Western 


1903-1926 


Xenia 


1905-1923 


Western 


1906-1948 


Allegheny 


1907-1940 


Allegheny 


1907-1914 


Western 


1907-1939 


Xenia 


1908-1933 


Western 


1911-1928 


Xenia 


1914-1930 


Pittsburgh 


1914-1929 


Pittsburgh 


1915-1931 


Western 


1915-1927 


Pittsburgh 


1920-1926 


Western 


1921-1935 


Pittsburgh 


1922-1926 


Xenia 


1922-1949 


Xenia 


1923-1963 


Xenia 


1924-1946 


Pittsburgh 


1926-1930 



97 



Donald Mackenzie 
Gaius Jackson Slosser . 
Albert Henry Baldinger 
Clarence Joseph Williamson 
John Wick Bowman 
William F. Orr 
George Anderson Long 
Theophilus Mills Taylor 
Jar vis M. Cotton . 
Frank Dixon McCloy 
Henry Alexander Riddle 
J. Carter Swaim 
Walter R. Clyde . 
Addison Hardie Leitch 
Florence M. Lewis . 
H. Ray Shear 
David Noel Freedman 
Gordon Edmund Jackson 
Ralph G. Turnbull 
John H. Gerstner 
Clifford E. Barbour 
Bessie M. Burrows 
James A. Walther . 
Sidney 0. Hills 
Robert Lee Kelley, Jr. 
Robert Clyde Johnson 
Howard M. Jamieson, Jr. 
John M. Bald 
Elwyn Allen Smith 
Walter E. Wiest . 
Malcolm S. Alexander 
Harold E. Scott 
Howard L. Ralston. 
William A. Nicholson 
James Sheppard Irvine 
J. Gordon Chamberlin 
Gayraud S. Wilmore 
Arlan P. Dohrenburg 
Edward D. Grohman 
David G. Buttrick 
George H. Kehm 
Dietrich Ritschl 
Lynn Boyd Hinds 





Western 


1928-1933 




Western 


1928-1958 




Pittsburgh-Xenia 


1931-1947 




Pittsburgh-Xenia 


1932-1950 




Western 


1936-1944 




Western 


1936- 




Pittsburgh-Xenia 


1942-1955 




Pittsburgh-Xenia 


1942-1962 




Western 


1944-1961 




Western 


1944- 




Western 


1944-1949 




Western 


1944-1954 




Western 


1945- 




Pittsburgh-Xenia 


1946-1961 




Pittsburgh-Xenia 


1947-1952 




Pittsburgh-Xenia 


1947-1959 




Western 


1948- 




Pittsburgh-Xenia 


1949- 




Western 


1949-1954 




Pittsburgh-Xenia 


1950- 




Western 


1951-1962 




Pittsburgh-Xenia 


1953- 




Western 


1954- 




Western 


1954- 




Pittsburgh-Xenia 


1955- 




Western 


1955- 




Pittsburgh-Xenia 


1955- 




Pittsburgh-Xenia 


1957- 




Western 


1957- 




Western 


1957- 




Pittsburgh-Xenia 


1958- 




Pittsburgh-Xenia 


1959- 


estern and Pittsburgh-Xenia 


1960- 


Western 


1960- 


Western 


1960- 


Pittsburgh 


1960- 


Pittsburgh 


1961- 




Pittsburgh 


1961- 




Pittsburgh 


1961- 




Pittsburgh 


1961- 




Pittsburgh 


1962- 




Pittsburgh 


1963- 




Pittsburgh 


1963- 



98 



DONATIONS AND BEQUESTS 

All donations or bequests to the Seminary should be made to 
"The Pittsburgh Theological Seminary of the United Presbyterian 
Church in the United States of America, located at 616 North High- 
land Avenue, Pittsburgh 6, Pennsylvania." The proper legal form 
for making a bequest is as follows. 

"I hereby give and bequeath to Pittsburgh Theological Seminary 
of the United Presbyterian Church in the United States of America, 
incorporated in the State of Pennsylvania, the following: ..'.." 

Care should be taken to use the corporate name as given above, 
and to have the bequest conform to the laws of the state governing it. 

The memorial idea may be carried out either in the erection 
of a building or in the endowment of any of the special funds of 
the Seminary. 



99 



INDEX 

Accreditation of the Seminary .... Frontispiece 

Administrative Staff ........ 16 

Admissions: College Requirements, Credentials, 

Procedure, etc 30-33 

Alumni Association ........ 78 

Application for Admission ...... 30-33 

Attendance, Summary of ....... 95 

Awards Granted, 1961-62 79-84 

Awards, prizes, and graduate fellowships .... 37-40 

Bachelor of Divinity Degree ..... 42-45, 50-65 

Board of Directors and Committees . .9-11 

Buildings ......... 23-27 

Calendar of Events, 1963-64 2 

Campus 23-27 

Continuing Education ....... 76-77 

Courses of Instruction ....... 42-72 

Curriculum ......... 42-72 

Degree Programs, Index to ....... 41 

Degrees Awarded, 1961-1962 79-82 

Donations and Bequests ....... 99 

Emeritus Professors ........ 14 

Enrollment, Summary of ....... 95 

Faculty and Faculty Committees .... 4-8, 12-14 

Fees and Expenses ........ 34 

Field Education . . . . . . . 43, 65 

Financial Assistance . . . . . . 35-37 

Foreign Students ...... . . .33 

Four-year Program ........ 45 

Graduation Awards 37-40, 79-84 

100 



Graduation Honors ....... 83-84 

Historical Roll of Professors 96-98 

History of the Seminary .19 

Honors Program ......... 49 

Hospitalization Insurance . . . . . . .35 

Housing .......... 23-24 

Insurance, Medical and Hospital . . . . .35 

Lectures, Special . . . . . . . . .15 

Library .......... 25-26 

Loan Funds ......... 36-37 

Location of the Seminary Buildings . . . .23 

Married Student Apartment Fees ...... 34 

Master of Education Degree . . . .48 

Master of Public Administration Degree . . . .75 

Master of Public and International Affairs Degree 75 

Master of Religious Education Degree . . . 46-47, 50-60 

Master of Theology Degree 66-67, 68-72 

Medical Insurance . . . . . . .35 

Museum, Bible Lands ........ 27 

Music, Opportunities in 28-29 

Pittsburgh — Our Environment . . . .21 

Pittsburgh, University of, joint program with . 48, 75 

Pre-Seminary Studies ....... 30-31 

Professors, Historical Roll of 96-98 

Register of Students, 1962-63 85-94 

Scholarships, loans, etc. . . . . . . . 35-37 

Student Association ........ 29 

Summer Field Education ....... 65 

Transfer Students .... . . . .33 

Worship 15, 28 

101 

















i 






f-P* 






THE 

PITTSBURGH 
THEOLOGICAL 
SEMINARY 




Annual 

Catalogue 

1964-1965 



THE 
ANNUAL CATALOGUE 

OF 

The Pittsburgh 
Theological Seminary 

616 N. HIGHLAND AVENUE 
PITTSBURGH, PENNSYLVANIA 15206 



A seminary of the United Presbyterian Church in the 
United States of America, founded 1794. Accredited 
by the American Association of Theological Schools. 



1964-1965 



THE SEMINARY CALENDAR 
1964 

15 June-17 July Summer Session in Beginning Hebrew 
20 July-21 Aug. Summer Session in Beginning Greek 



22-26 June School of Religion, Pennsylvania 

28 June-3 July School of Religion, Ohio 



1-2 Sept. 


3 Sept. 


4 Sept. 


5 Sept. 


7 Sept. 


6 Oct. 


19-23 Oct. 


18 Nov. 


26 Nov. 


7-11 Dec. 


14-18 Dec. 


21 Dec-3 Jan 


1965 


4-22 Jan. 


25 Jan. 


2 Feb. 


8-12 Mar. 


16 Apr. 


26-28 Apr. 


26-30 Apr. 


29-30 Apr. 


3-7 May 


9 May 


11 May 


11 May 



First Semester 



Junior Orientation and Registration 

Convocation and Community Luncheon, 11:00 A.M. 

Class Work Begins 

Junior Orientation Retreat 

Labor Day (No Classes) 

Continuing Education Program Begins 

First Reading Period 

Semi-Annual Meeting, Board of Directors 

Thanksgiving Day (No Classes) 

Second Reading Period 

Examination Period 

Christmas Recess 



Intersession 



Second Semester 

Class Work Begins 

Continuing Education Program Begins 

First Reading Period 

Good Friday (No Classes) 

Second Reading Period for Seniors 

Second Reading Period for Juniors and Middlers 

Examination Period for Seniors 

Examination Week for Juniors and Middlers 

Baccalaureate, 8:00 P.M. 

Annual Meeting of the Board of Directors 

Annual Meeting and Dinner of the Alumni 

Association 
11 May Commencement, 8:00 P.M., 

The East Liberty Presbyterian Church 



Vke faculty 



Donald G. Miller, President. Greenville College, A.B.; 
The Biblical Seminary in N.Y., S.T.B. and S.T.M.; New 
York University, M.A. and Ph.D. 



William F. Orr, Professor of New Testament Literature 
and Exegesis. Southwestern University, A.B.; Louisville 
Presbyterian Seminary, B.D. and Th.M.; Hartford Theolog- 
ical Seminary, Ph.D. 




'JL 



4it 



Frank Dixon McCloy, Jr., Associate Professor of Church 
History. University of Pittsburgh, A.B. and A.M.; Western 
Theological Seminary, S.T.B. ; Harvard University, A.M. and 
Ph.D. 




Walter R. Clyde, Professor of Christian Mission. Muskin- 
gum College, A.B.; Omaha Theological Seminary, B.D.; 
Western Theological Seminary, S.T.M.; Hartford Seminary 
Foundation, Ph.D. 



David Noel Freedman, James Anderson Kelso Professor of 
Hebrew and Old Testament Literature. UCLA, A.B.; Prince- 
ton Theological Seminary, Th.B.; Johns Hopkins University, 
Ph.D. 



Gordon E. Jackson, Dean of the Seminary and Hugh 
Thomson Kerr Professor of Pastoral Theology. Monmouth 
College, A.B.; Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary, Th.B. 
and Th.M.; University of Chicago, Ph.D. 




^Ike faculty 




John H. Gerstner, Professor of Church History. West- 
minster College, A.B.; Westminster Theological Seminary, 
Th.B. and Th.M.; Harvard University, Ph.D. 



Bessie M. Burrows, Assistant Professor of Christian Educa- 
tion and Registrar. Geneva College, B.A.; Columbia Univer- 
sity, M.A. 



James A. Walther, Associate Professor of New Testament 
Literature and Exegesis. Grove City College, A.B.; Western 
Theological Seminary, S.T.B.; Emmanuel College, Victoria 
University, Toronto, Th.D. 



Sidney 0. Hills, Associate Professor of Hebrew and Old 
Testament Literature. Northwestern University, B.A.; Mc- 
Cormick Theological Seminary, B.D.; Johns Hopkins Univer- 
sity, Ph.D. 



Robert Lee Kelley, Jr., Associate Professor of Biblical 
Languages. University of Pittsburgh, A.B.; Pittsburgh-Xenia 
Theological Seminary, B.D.; Princeton Theological Seminary, 
Th.M. 



Howard M. Jamieson, Jr., Associate Professor of Biblical 
Theology and Dean of Students. Monmouth College, A.B.; 
Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary, Th.B.; University of 
Pittsburgh, M.A. and Ph.D. 



Vke faculty 



John M. Bald, Associate Professor of Christian Ethics and 
Student Financial Officer. Muskingum College, A.B.; Pitts- 
burgh-Xenia Theological Seminary, Th.B and Th.M. 



Elwyn Allen Smith, Professor of Church History. Whea- 
ton College, A.B.; Yale Divinity School, B.D.; Princeton 
Theological Seminary, Th.M.; Harvard University, Ph.D. 





Walter E. Wiest, Associate Professor of Philosophy of 
Religion. Lafayette College, A.B.; Princeton Theological 
Seminary, Th.B.; Columbia University, Ph.D. 



Malcolm S. Alexander, Associate Professor of Pastoral 
Theology and Director of Field Education. University of 
Southern California, A.B. and LL.B.; Pittsburgh-Xenia Theo- 
logical Seminary, B.D. 



Harold E. Scott, Associate Professor of Homiletics and As- 
sistant Director of Field Education. Sterling College, B.A.; 
Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary, B.D. 



Howard L. Ralston, Assistant Professor of Church Music. 
Muskingum College, Mus.B.; Curtis Institute of Music, 
A.A.G.O. 



A 



">' 






Vke fyacultq, 



William A. Nicholson, Associate Professor of Homiletics. 
Washington & Jefferson College, A.B.; Western Theological 
Seminary, S.T.B. 



James S. Irvine, Assistant Professor of Bibliography. Wash- 
ington and Jefferson College, A.B.; Western Theological Sem- 
inary, B.D.; Carnegie Institute of Technology, M.L.S.; Johns 
Hopkins University, Ph.D. 






J. Gordon Chamberlin, Associate Professor of Christian 
Education. Cornell College in Iowa, A.B.; Union Theological 
Seminary (N.Y.), B.D.; Columbia University, Ed.D. 



Gayraud S. Wilmore, Jr., Assistant Professor of Social 
Ethics. Lincoln University, A.B.; Lincoln Seminary, B.D.; 
Temple University School of Theology, S.T.M. 



Edward D. Grohman, Instructor in Old Testament. Grove 
City College, A.B.; Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary, 
B.D.; Johns Hopkins University, Ph.D. 




David G. Buttrick, Assistant Professor in Church and Min- 
istry. Haverford College, B.A.; Union Theological Seminary 
(N.Y.), B.D. 



7 he faculty 



George H. Kehm, Assistant Professor in Theology. Queens 
College, B.S.; Princeton Theological Seminary, B.D.; Harvard 
Divinity School, S.T.M. 



Dietrich Ritschl, Professor of History of Doctrine. Uni- 
versity of Edinburgh, Ph.D. 



Markus Barth, Professor of New Testament. Dr. Theol. 
University of Goettingen. 





JlfV 



Edward Farley, Associate Professor of Systematic Theology. 
Centre College, A.B.; Louisville Presbyterian Theological 
Seminary, B.D.; Columbia University, Ph.D. 



Lynn Boyd Hinds, Instructor in Speech. University of 
Akron, B.A.; Eastern Baptist Theological Seminary, B.D.; 
Temple University, M.A. 



Iain G. Wilson, Professor of Homiletics. University of 
Edinburgh, M.A. and B.D. 



*th 




BOARD OF DIRECTORS 

Officers 

Rev. Charles P. Robshaw, S.T.D., D.D., LL.D., President 

Rev. J. Hubert Henderson, D.D., Vice President 

Mr. George D. Lockhart, Secretary 

Mr. J, Rowe Hinsey, Assistant Secretary 

Mr. Robert L. Becker, Treasurer 

Mr. John G. Smith yman, C.P.A., Assistant Treasurer 

Mr. Henry C. Herchenroether, Jr., Counsel 

Members 

Term Expires May 1964 

Mr. Robert L. Becker ....... Pittsburgh, Pa. 

President, Wear-Ever Aluminum, Inc. 

Mr. Earle M. Craig Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Retired — Chairman of the Board, Valvoline Oil Company 

Rev. Richard W. Graves, D.D., Litt.D. . . . New Wilmington, Pa. 

Retired 

Mr. Milton J. Hein New York, N. Y. 

Assistant Comptroller, Board of National Missions 

Mr. George D. Lockhart ....... Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Attorney, Kirkpatrick, Pomeroy, Lockhart and Johnson 

Rev. W. Paul Ludwig, Ph.D Washington, D. C. 

Pastor, Chevy Chase Presbyterian Church 

Mr. John R. McCune, Jr Pittsburgh, Pa. 

President, Consolidated Lamp and Glass Company 

Rev. Walter L. Moser, Ph.D., D.D Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Stated Clerk, Pittsburgh Presbytery 

Mr. Alexander P. Reed ....... Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Attorney at Law 

Rev. John Coventry Smith, D.D., LL.D New York, N. Y. 

General Secretary, Commission on Ecumenical Mission and Relations 

Rev. Frederick Bruce Speakman, D.D. ..... Dayton, Ohio 

Pastor, Westminster Presbyterian Church 

Rev. C. T. R. Yeates, D.D., LL.D Des Moines, Iowa 

Pastor, Westminster United Presbyterian Church 



Term Expires May 1965 



Mr. Wilson A. Campbell ....... Sewickley, Pa. 

Retired 

Mr. T. J. Gillespie, Jr Pittsburgh, Pa. 

President and Treasurer, Lockhart Iron and Steel Company 



Rev. J. Hubert Henderson, D.D Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Pastor, J. M. Wallace Memorial United Presbyterian Church 

Mr. William R. Jackson Pittsburgh, Pa. 

President, Pittsburgh-Des Moines Steel Company 

Rev. John C. Lorimer, D.D New Wilmington, Pa. 

Retired 

Rev. Charles P. Robshaw, S.T.D., D.D., LL.D. . . . Pittsburgh, Pa, 
Pastor, East Liberty Presbyterian Church 

Mr. James H. Rogers, H.H.D Latrobe, Pa. 

Chairman, Latrobe Die Casting Company 

Rev. Howard C. Scharfe, D.D., LL.D Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Pastor, Shadyside Presbyterian Church 

Mr. H. Parker Sharp Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Vice President and General Counsel, Jones & Laughlin Steel Corporation 

Rev. Samuel C. Weir, D.D Detroit, Mich. 

Synod Executive 

Rev. W. Bruce Wilson, D.D. ...... Youngstown, Ohio 

Pastor, Liberty United Presbyterian Church 

Mr. Ralph M. Wyman ....... Greenwich, Conn. 

Vice President and Director, H. 0. Canfield Company 

Term Expires May 1966 

Mr. A. C. Amsler Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Retired — Westinghouse Electric Corporation 

Rev. John B. Barker, D.D Canton, Ohio 

Pastor, Calvary Presbyterian Church 

Mr. Frank H. Davis, LL.D Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Retired 

Rev. Robert H. French, D.D., LL.D. .... Des Moines, Iowa 
Synod Executive 

Mr. Henry C. Herchenroether, Jr. .... . Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Attorney, Alter, Wright, and Barron 

Mr. W. Kenneth Menke . Pittsburgh, Pa. 

President, Pittsburgh Chemical Company 

Rev. Don P. Montgomery, D.D. ..... Youngstown, Ohio 

Pastor, Pleasant Grove United Presbyterian Church 

Mr. William H. Rea Pittsburgh, Pa. 

President, Oliver Tyrone Corporation 

Rev. Robert H. Stephens, D.D. ..... Summit, N. J. 

Pastor, Central Presbyterian Church 

Mr. James W. Vicary Erie, Pa. 

President, Ervite Corporation 

Rev. Robert R. Vogelsang ....... Latrobe, Pa. 

Pastor, Latrobe United Presbyterian Church 

Rev. Walter R. Young, D.D Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Pastor, Second United Presbyterian Church of Wilkinsburg 

9 



COMMITTEES OF THE BOARD OF DIRECTORS 



The Executive Committee 

Mr. A. C. Amsler Mr. George D. Lockhart 

Mr. Robert L. Becker Rev. Don P. Montgomery, D.D. 

Rev. J. Hubert Henderson, D.D. Mr. H. Parker Sharp 

Rev. Charles P. Robshaw, S.T.D., D.D., LL.D. 

The Education Committee 
Rev. Richard W. Graves, D.D., Litt.D. Rev. Robert H. Stephens, D.D. 
Rev. J. Hubert Henderson, D.D. Rev. Frederick B. Speakman, D.D. 

Rev. W. Paul Ludwig, Ph.D. Rev. Robert R. Vogelsang 

Rev. W. Bruce Wilson, D.D. 



Mr. Robert L. Becker 
Mr. Wilson A. Campbell 
Mr. Earle M. Craig 
Mr. T. J. Gillespie, Jr. 



The Finance Committee 

Mr. Alexander P. Reed 
Mr. James H. Rogers 
Rev. Howard C. Scharfe, D.D., LL.D. 
Mr. H. Parker Sharp 
Mr. Ralph M. Wyman 



The Nominations Committee 

Rev. Robert H. French, D.D., LL.D. Rev. John Coventry Smith, D.D., LL.D. 

Rev. Don P. Montgomery, D.D. Mr. James W. Vicary 

Mr. William H. Rea Rev. Samuel C. Weir, D.D. 



The Property Committee 

Mr. A. C. Amsler Mr. John R. McCune, Jr. 

Mr. Frank H. Davis, LL.D. Mr. W. Kenneth Menke 

Mr. William R. Jackson Rev. Walter L. Moser, Ph.D., D.D. 

Mr. George D. Lockhart Rev. Walter R. Young, D.D. 



10 



THE FACULTY 



The Rev. Donald G. Miller, S.T.M., M.A., Ph.D. (New York University), LL.D. 
President 

The Rev. William F. Orr, Th.M., Ph.D. (Hartford), D.D. 
Professor of New Testament Literature and Exegesis 

The Rev. Frank Dixon McCloy, Jr., A.M., Ph.D. (Harvard), D.D. 
Associate Professor of Church History 

The Rev. Walter R. Clyde, S.T.M., Ph.D. (Hartford) 
Professor of Christian Mission 

The Rev. David Noel Freedman, Ph.D. (Johns Hopkins) 
James Anderson Kelso Professor of Hebrew and 
Old Testament Literature 

The Rev. Gordon E. Jackson, Th.M., Ph.D. (Chicago), D.D., Dean of the Seminary 
Hugh Thomson Kerr Professor of Pastoral Theology 

The Rev. John H. Gerstner, Th.M., Ph.D. (Harvard), D.D. 
Professor of Church History 

Miss Bessie M. Burrows, M.A. (Columbia) 

Assistant Professor of Christian Education and Registrar 

The Rev. James A. Walther, Th.D. (Victoria) 

Associate Professor of New Testament Literature 

The Rev. Sidney 0. Hills, Ph.D. (Johns Hopkins), Recording Secretary 
Associate Professor of Hebrew and Old Testament Literature 

The Rev. Robert Lee Kelley, Jr., Th.M. (Princeton) 
Associate Professor of Biblical Languages 

The Rev. Howard M. Jamieson, Jr., M.A., Ph.D. (Pittsburgh), D.D. 
Associate Professor of Biblical Theology and Dean of Students 

The Rev. John M. Bald, Th.M., (Pittsburgh-Xenia), D.D., Alt. Recording Secretary 
Associate Professor of Christian Ethics and Student Financial Officer 

The Rev. Elwyn Allen Smith, Th.M., Ph.D. (Harvard) 
Professor of Church History 

The Rev. Walter E. Wiest, Ph.D. (Columbia) 
Associate Professor of Philosophy of Religion 

The Rev. Malcolm S. Alexander, LL.B. (Southern California), B.D. 

Associate Professor of Pastoral Theology and Director of Field Education 

IX 



The Rev. Harold E. Scott, B.D. (Pittsburgh-Xenia), D.D. 

Associate Professor of Homiletics and Assistant Director of Field Education 

Mr. Howard L. Ralston, Mus.B., A.A.G.O. 

Assistant Professor of Church Music 

The Rev. William A. Nicholson, S.T.B. (Western), D.D. 
Associate Professor of Homiletics 

The Rev. James S. Irvine, M.L.S., Ph.D. (Johns Hopkins) 
Assistant Professor of Bibliography 

The Rev. J. Gordon Chamberlin, Ed.D. (Columbia), D.D. 
Associate Professor of Christian Education 

The Rev. Gayraud S. Wilmore, Jr., S.T.M. (Temple), D.D. 
Assistant Professor of Social Ethics 

The Rev. Edward D. Grohman, Ph.D. (Johns Hopkins) 
Instructor in Old Testament 

The Rev. David G. Buttrick, B.D. (Union, N.Y.) 
Assistant Professor in Church and Ministry 

The Rev. George H. Kehm, S.T.M. (Harvard) 
Assistant Professor in Theology 

The Rev. Dietrich Ritschl, Ph.D. (Edinburgh) 
Professor of History of Doctrine 

The Rev. Markus Barth, Dr. Theol. (Goettingen) 
Professor of New Testament 

The Rev. Edward Farley, Ph.D. (Columbia) 
Associate Professor of Systematic Theology 

The Rev. Lynn Boyd Hinds, M.A. (Temple) 
Instructor in Speech 

The Rev. Iain G. Wilson, M.A. and B.D. (Edinburgh), D.D. 
Professor of Homiletics 

The Rev. Douglas R. A. Hare, S.T.M. (Union, N.Y.) 
Guest Instructor in New Testament and 
Director of Continuing Education 

12 



GUEST PROFESSORS 

The Rev. Neil R. Paylor, B.D. (Princeton) 

Lecturer, the Program for Advanced Pastoral Studies 

The Rev. Diedrik A. Nelson, Th.M. (Union, Richmond) 
Teaching Fellow in Old Testament, 1963-1964 

The Rev. David B. Pedersen, B.D. (Columbia) 

Teaching Fellow in New Testament, 1963-1964 

The Rev. Clifford E. Davis, Ph.D. (Pennsylvania State) 
Lecturer in Christian Education 

William S. Tacey, M.A., Ed.D. (Pennsylvania State) 
Guest Professor in Speech 

Robert J. Shoemaker, M.D. (Pittsburgh) 

(Clinical Assistant Professor of Psychiatry, University of Pittsburgh 

School of Medicine) 

Lecturer and Consultant in Psychiatry 

Margaret B. McFarland, Ph.D. (Columbia) 

(Associate Professor of Psychology, University of Pittsburgh; 
Director, Arsenal Family and Children's Center) 
Lecturer, the Program for Advanced Pastoral Studies 

Rex A. Pittenger, M.D. (Minnesota) 

(Staunton Assistant Professor of Psychiatry, University of Pittsburgh 
School of Medicine; Chief, Staunton Clinic) 
Lecturer, the Program for Advanced Pastoral Studies 

Werner Lutz, M.S. (Columbia) 

(Professor of Social Case Work, Graduate School of Social Work, 

University of Pittsburgh) 

Lecturer, the Program for Advanced Pastoral Studies 

Erma T. Meyerson, B.S., M.A.A.S.S. (Pittsburgh) 

(Professor of Sociology and Social Work, College of Liberal 

Arts and Graduate School of Social Work, University of Pittsburgh) 

Lecturer, the Program for Advanced Pastoral Studies 

Jack Matthews, M.A., Ph.D. (Ohio State) 

(Professor and Chairman, the Department of Speech, 

University of Pittsburgh) 

Lecturer, the Program for Advanced Pastoral Studies 

The Rev. James Hutchison Smylie, Th.M., Th.D. (Princeton) 
(Professor of Church History, Union Seminary, Richmond) 
Guest Professor of Church History, second semester, 1963-1964 

The Rev. Ernst Jenni, Dr. Theol. (Basel) 

(Professor of Old Testament, University of Basel) 

Guest Professor of Old Testament, second semester, 1963-1964 

Marguerite Hofer 

(Executive Director, Department of Church and Community, 

Pittsburgh Presbytery) 

Lecturer in Church and Ministry, second semester, 1963-1964 

13 



EMERITI 

The Rev. Clifford Edward Barbour, Ph.D., D.D., LL.D. 

President Emeritus 

The Rev. David E. Culley, Ph.D., D.D. 

Emeritus Professor of Hebrew and Old Testament Literature 

The Rev. Robert McNary Karr, D.D. 

Emeritus Professor of Systematic and Biblical Theology 

The Rev. James Leon Kelso, A.M., Th.M., Th.D., D.D., LL.D. 

Emeritus Professor of Old Testament History and Biblical Archaeology 

The Rev. George Anderson Long, D.D., LL.D., Litt.D. 

President Emeritus and Emeritus Professor of English Bible 

The Rev. Henry A. Riddle, D.D., LL.D. 

President Emeritus 

The Rev. Gaius Jackson Slosser, Ph.D., F.R.Hist.S. 

Emeritus Professor of Ecclesiastical History and History of Doctrine 



COMMITTEES OF THE FACULTY 
The Curriculum Committee 



Mr. Gerstner, Chairman 
Mr. McCloy 
Mr. Chamberlin 
Mr. Irvine 



Mr. Farley 

Mr. Hills 

Mr. Clyde 

Miss Burrows 



The Admissions and Standings Committee 

Mr. Jamieson, Chairman Mr. Freedman 

Mr. Nicholson Mr. Bald, Vice Chairman 

Mr. Wilson 
Mr. Alexander and Mr. Idler ex officio, and Mr. Davis ex officio as Consultant 



The Graduate Education Committee 

Mr. Freedman, Chairman Mr. Gerstner 

Mr. Jackson Mr. Irvine 

Mr. Barth Mr. Ritschl 

Mr. Idler and Mr. Hare ex officio 



The Convocation and Worship Committee 

Mr. Scott, Chairman Mr. Hinds 

Mr. Chamberlin Mr. Clyde 



The Publications Committee 

Mr. Kelley, Chairman 

Mr. Atkins and Mr. Hinsey ex officio 



Mr. Walther 
Mr. Alexander 



Mr. Kehm, Chairman 
Mr. Wilson 
Mr. Kelley 



The Church and Society Committee 



Mr. Ritschl 
Mr. Grohman 



The President and the Dean are ex officio members of all committees. 

14 



SPECIAL LECTURES— 1963-1964 

Dr. Charles Converse West (Opening Convocation Speaker) 
Associate Professor of Ethics 
Princeton Theological Seminary 
Princeton, New Jersey 

Dr. D. Reginald Thomas 

Pastor, First Presbyterian Church 
Germantown, Pennsylvania 

The Rev. Will D. Campbell 
Director, Southern Office 
National Council of Churches 
Nashville, Tennessee 

Dr. Carlyle Marney 

Pastor, Myers Park Baptist Church 
Charlotte, North Carolina 

Dr. Roy M. Pearson 

Dean of Andover Newton Theological Seminary 
Newton Center, Massachusetts 

The Rev. John G. Gensel 

Pastor, Lutheran Church of the Advent 
New York, New York 

The Rev. H. Ben Sissel 

Secretary for National Affairs 

The United Presbyterian Church in the United States of America 

Washington, D. C. 

Dr. Silas G. Kessler 
Moderator 
The United Presbyterian Church in the United States of America 

Dr. Cyril C. Richardson 

Professor and Director of Graduate Studies 
Union Theological Seminary 
New York, New York 

Dr. Robert McAfee Brown 

Delegate to Ecumenical Council and 

Professor of Religion, Special Programs and Humanities 

Stanford University 

Stanford, California 

Dr. Theophilus M. Taylor (Commencement Speaker) 
Secretary of the General Council 
The United Presbyterian Church in the United States of America 

15 



ADMINISTRATIVE STAFF 



The Rev. Donald G. Miller, Ph.D., LL.D. 

President 

The Rev Gordon E. Jackson, Ph.D., D.D. 
Dean of the Seminary 

Mr. William R. Atkins, B.S., M.R.E. 

Business Manager 

Mr. J. Rowe Hinsey, B.S. 
Director of Development 

Mr. John G. Smithyman, B.B.A., C.P.A. 
Comptroller 

The Rev. Howard M. Jamieson, Jr., Ph.D., D.D. 
Dean of Students 

Miss Bessie M. Burrows, M.A. 
Registrar 

The Rev. James S. Irvine, M.L.S., Ph.D. 
Librarian 

The Rev. Charles C. W. Idler, B.D. 
Director of Admissions 

The Rev. John M. Bald, Th.M., D.D. 

Student Financial Officer 



JAMES T. VORHIS 

(opposite page) 



The Rev. James T. Vorhis, Th.M., D.D., Business Manager of 
the Seminary from 1951 to 1964 and Assistant Secretary of the 
Board of Directors since 1945, has played a major role in the de- 
velopment of the total campus. Every building has been planned 
and erected under his careful eye. All properties which have been 
purchased have had his inspection and approval. Non-faculty per- 
sonnel have been responsible to him. 

The retirement of this tough-minded, tender-hearted man af- 
fords the opportunity for grateful recognition of him who epito- 
mizes the tradition and the creativity of Pittsburgh Seminary. 

16 




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PITTSBURGH SEMINARY 

. . . Our History 

The Pittsburgh Theological Seminary was created in 1959 by the 
consolidation of two institutions which had lived apart since 1825: 
Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary (United Presbyterian Church 
of North America) and Western Theological Seminary (Presbyterian 
Church, U.S.A.). 

Pittsburgh-Xenia Seminary was formed in 1930 by the union 
of Pittsburgh and Xenia Seminaries. The Xenia branch had been 
founded in 1794 in Western Pennsylvania but had spent most of its 
life in Ohio and Missouri. The Pittsburgh branch originated in 1825 
in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. Both branches were later augmented 
by the resources of Newburgh Seminary which was founded in New 
York City in 1805 by John Mitchell Mason. 

Western Seminary, established legally in 1825 by the General 
Assembly of the Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.), began with classical 
academies founded by Joseph Smith (1785) and John McMillan 
(1787) in Washington, Pa. It was indeed a "western" seminary in 
1825, whose task was to furnish a ministry for the rapidly opening 
western territories along the Ohio River. 

The union in 1958 of the United Presbyterian Church of North 
America with the Presbyterian Church in the United States of Amer- 
ica and the subsequent merger of Pittsburgh-Xenia and Western 
Seminaries were possible because of ancient bonds: the Bible, the 
reformers, and the Scottish experience of witness and suffering. 
Church divisions in Scotland were reproduced in America. Since 
1800 the direction has been steadily toward common witness with a 
resulting joining of schools. Pittsburgh Theological Seminary is 
the issue of this growing fellowship in theological education. 

The purpose of the Seminary as defined in the Constitution is to 
educate suitable persons for the work of Christian ministry in its 
various forms at the highest possible level of educational competence. 
Set down in the midst of one of the key industrial centers of the na- 
tion, the Seminary experiments in the city about it, wrestles with the 
nature of the gospel, strives for eventful communication. The pur- 
pose of the Seminary is clear-cut: to know our time, the gospel for 
the healing of our time, and the ministry for our time. 

19 



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PITTSBURGH 

. . . Our Environment 

The City of Pittsburgh is the workshop of America. Together 
with the contiguous towns, it is one of the great commercial centers 
of the world. Its population includes people of every nationality, 
profession, and skill, and therefore it affords unexcelled opportunities 
for the study of social, economic, political, and racial problems. In- 
deed, Pittsburgh Seminary has working relationships with community 
and social agencies, labor unions, business management, human de- 
velopment research centers, teaching hospitals, etc., whereby these 
agencies and organizations become further resources for the educating 
of theological students. 

The cultural and educational life of Pittsburgh is no less rich. 
Five major colleges and universities are located in Pittsburgh: The 
University of Pittsburgh, Carnegie Institute of Technology, Duquesne 
University, Chatham College, and Mt. Mercy College. Their facil- 
ities, programs, and libraries, plus the Carnegie free libraries, afford 
added resources to all students. 

For music and art there are the world-famous Pittsburgh Sym- 
phony Orchestra; the Pittsburgh Opera Society; the Bach Choir and 
other choral and concert groups which bring to the city many out- 
standing musical events each season; the Pittsburgh Plan for Art, an 
extensive art rental and sales organization; and Carnegie Institute, 
which houses one of the largest contemporary art collections in the 
country, and which every third year presents the Pittsburgh Inter- 
national Exhibition of Paintings and Sculpture. Begun in 1896, the 
Pittsburgh International is one of the most important events of its 
kind in the world. 

Churches of all types and denominations are to be found, rang- 
ing from the large urban congregation to the small rural or industrial 
mission. Some of the nation's foremost preachers occupy pulpits in 
the area. 

Pittsburgh Presbytery is the largest presbytery in the United 
Presbyterian Church, U.S.A. Within its bounds are two hundred 
twenty-eight churches with a total membership of about one hundred 
thirty thousand. Of these, about half have more than five hundred 
members each, and mission work is conducted in over twenty differ- 
ent places. Within two hundred miles of Pittsburgh live one fifth 
of the United Presbyterians in this country. 

21 




22 



THE CAMPUS .... Location 

The campus of Pittsburgh Theological Seminary consists of 
about ten acres, located at 616 North Highland Avenue, directly 
opposite Pittsburgh's large Peabody High School. It is in a residen- 
tial area between the East Liberty business district and Highland 
Park, and only a few minutes by automobile or street car from 
the University of Pittsburgh. This spacious and beautifully land- 
scaped site was given to the Seminary in 1951 by the heirs of the 
late H. Lee Mason, Jr. 

Frequent street car and bus service connects the Seminary with 
downtown Pittsburgh. Students coming by train or bus should 
take a Highland Avenue street car, number 73, on Fifth Avenue, 
and leave the car immediately in front of the entrance to the 
Seminary. Students traveling by automobile may follow Highland 
Avenue to the campus. 



. . . Buildings 

A new, modern seminary plant is valued at about $6,000,000. 
The main buildings are of American Colonial design. They are con- 
structed of Hampton Court Colonial red brick with Indiana limestone 
trim and are fireproof throughout. 

The George A. Long Administration Building occupies the 
central position on the campus. It provides six classrooms, five 
seminar rooms, faculty and administration offices, a reception room, 
a Bible Lands Museum, and an historical repository of the United 
Presbyterian Church in the United States of America. 

The McCune Chapel is an integral part of the main school 
building occupying a wing to the rear of the main entrance. It has 
a seating capacity of 310. The two-manual Schantz organ is a 
memorial to the United Presbyterian men and women who died 
in World War II. The memorial was established by the young 
people of our church. 



ACCOMMODATIONS FOR SINGLE STUDENTS 

The George C. Fisher Memorial Hall accommodates 80 men in 
single rooms. It provides a student lounge on each floor, a game 
room and a snack room on the ground floor, and six apartments for 
employees or married students. The student must supply his own 
sheets, pillow cases, blankets and towels and provide for their laun- 
dering. Special arrangements may be made by students for summer 
occupancy of dormitory rooms. 

23 



The John McNaugher Memorial Hall, located to the right of the 
Administration Building, is connected with it by covered passage- 
ways on the first and second floor levels. It provides accommodations 
for 63 men and 25 women. The dining hall with a seating capacity 
of 500, lounge and guest rooms are located in this dormitory. 



HOUSING FOR MARRIED STUDENTS 

The Highlander is an apartment-dormitory for married students 
located on the campus at the corner of North Highland Avenue and 
St. Marie Street. It was purchased in 1962 with funds provided by 
the Development Fund Campaign. There are twenty-three unfur- 
nished apartment units in the building of which seventeen have one 
bedroom and six have two bedrooms. Each unit includes a living 
room, kitchen, bath and storage locker. Some kitchens are equipped 
with a gas range and an electric refrigerator. Laundry facilities 
(coin meter) are available in the basement. 

The Samuel A. Fulton Memorial Hall, an apartment-dormitory 
for married students, provides eighteen efficiency and twenty-one 
two-room apartments. Each unit includes a kitchenette and a bath. 
A storage locker in the basement is assigned to each family. Each 
apartment is fully equipped with desk, bookcase, table, chairs, 
davenport-bed, a chest of drawers, wardrobe, refrigerator and electric 
stove. Students must provide bedding, linens, silverware, china, 
cooking utensils, curtains, lamps and rugs. Laundry facilities (coin 
meter) are available in the basement. 

A six-room fully furnished apartment for the housing of a mis- 
sionary family on furlough is provided in Fulton Hall. It is made 
available, through cooperation with the Commission on Ecumenical 
Mission and Relations, to missionaries seeking fuller preparation for 
service on return to their fields. 

The Sheridan Avenue Apartments are located on campus at 519 
Sheridan Avenue. This three-story building contains six unfurnished 
apartments for couples with children. Washers and dryers may be 
installed in the basement. 

Duplex Apartments. There are fifteen unfurnished duplex 
apartments on the North Highland Avenue campus for students 
with families. Special arrangements may be made for summer oc- 
cupancy of apartments. 

24 



The Library 




NEW LIBRARY NEARING COMPLETION 

The Clifford E. Barbour Library, for which funds were provided 
by the Sarah Mellon Scaife and the Richard K. Mellon Foundations, 
will be ready for the new school year in September, 1964. Designed 
to house 300,000 volumes, the library will seat over 250 persons and 
provide all the facilities necessary to support a graduate seminary 
program. 

The central part of the new library is a bibliography room with 
adjoining reference area. It contains research carrels, study areas 
among the stacks, a special periodical area, music listening room, 
seminar area, and audio-visual viewing room. Microfilm readers are 
available. The library is air-conditioned. 

The contents of the library include over 100,000 books, to which 
are added 3,000 books each year to keep the seminary abreast of 
current theological interests and cultural developments. Some 300 
periodicals cover both theological and nontheological disciplines. 

The following special collections augment the book resources: 

The John M. Mason Memorial Collection 
The research area of the library contains this priceless collection 
of classical theological works dating from the Reformation period. 
This catalogued collection is housed to the left of the library en- 
trance in the John M. Mason Memorial Room. 



The James Warrington Collection of Hymnology 
Several thousand valuable hymn and psalm books which came 
from the estate of James Warrington, Philadelphia, provide research 
materials for scholars of American and English hymnody. Mr. 
Warrington minutely analyzed the works by composer, meter, tune, 
place, author, title, etc. 

25 



The Nina S. Brittain Collection 
Through the generosity of Frank J. Brittain, Esq., of Erie, 
Pennsylvania, the sum of #5000 was used for the purchase of theo- 
logical and related works which are known as the Nina S. Brittain 
Collection. 

The Clarence J. Williamson Church History Collection 
In 1958 endowment funds were established, income of which is 
to be used for the purchase of books in Church History and closely 
related subjects. These books are in memory of Dr. Clarence J. 
Williamson, a graduate of Pittsburgh Seminary, for fifty-one years 
a minister in the United Presbyterian Church of North America, 
and for eighteen years Professor of Church History and Government 
in The Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary. 

Historical Collections 
A room of the library contains the Minutes and other records 
of Associate, Associate Reformed, and United Presbyterian congre- 
gations, presbyteries, synods, and General Assemblies. The library 
is also the depository for the Upper Ohio Valley Historical Society 
and Pittsburgh Presbytery of The United Presbyterian Church in 
the U. S. A. 

THE BIBLE LANDS MUSEUM 

The Pittsburgh Theological Seminary is outstanding in its 
activity in archaeological research of Bible times in ancient Palestine. 
In conjunction with the American School of Oriental Research at 
Jerusalem, it has conducted explorations at Sodom and Gomorrah 
in 1924, excavations at Kirjath-Sepher in 1926, 1928, 1930, 1932, 
excavations at Bethel in 1934, at New Testament Jericho and Nitla 
in 1950, and Bethel in 1954, 1957, and 1960. In conjunction with 
Carnegie Museum and the Department of Antiquities of Israel, the 
Seminary conducted archaeological digs at the Biblical site of Ashdod 
in 1962 and 1963, with additional excavations planned for future 
years. 

The archaeological work was inaugurated by Professor M. G. 
Kyle, was carried on by Professor James L. Kelso, and is being con- 
tinued under the direction of Professor David Noel Freedman. 
Members of the faculty and students often participate in the digs. 
Much of the Seminary's share of the antiquities excavated is now on 
exhibit in the Bible Lands Museum. Numerous other valuable pieces 
are awaiting special preparation before being placed on exhibition. 

These objects all illustrate in the most striking way the life of 
the people of Bible lands, and so become of great value for under- 
standing and interpretation. Occasionally archaeological discoveries 
corroborate Biblical statements as in the case of the fragments of a 
royal inscription of Sargon II of Assyria found at Ashdod which re- 
lates to the passage in Isaiah 20:1. For the most part archaeological 
excavations illuminate the background of the Bible, supplying many 
of the mundane facts about the culture and pursuits of the citizens 
of the Holy Land. 

26 




Scene at Ashdod Dig 




The Bible Lands Museum 

27 



LIFE ON THE CAMPUS 



CONVOCATIONS AND WORSHIP 

Through the faculty-student Convocation and Worship Com- 
mittee, outstanding people are brought to the campus. Each fall 
and spring there is a two-day lectureship when theologians, Biblical 
scholars, psychiatrists, writers, social thinkers and planners, etc., are 
heard by the seminary family. 

Monthly convocations also introduce scholars from the various 
fields and disciplines to the seminary community. 

While there is chapel worship four days a week, conducted by 
students and faculty, there is also a full worship service in which a 
prominent preacher participates. 

CHURCH AND SOCIETY 
The Seminary reaches out to the community through field edu- 
cation, through laboratory assignments, and through the faculty- 
student Church and Society Committee. The latter is a dynamic 
part of the East Liberty community as it has established relations 
with settlement houses, urban renewal and development offices, and 
the churches of the community for work with slum clearance, housing 
units, gangs, etc. Experiences provided by the direct contact of the 
Seminary with its neighborhood give to the students vital informa- 
tion and know-how for dealing with urban America. 

COMMUNITY LIFE 

The social life of the campus is enhanced by the presence of 
single students, married couples, and families. It is certainly enriched 
by those students from the Orient, Europe, Africa, the Middle East, 
South America, etc., who come to study but also to share their cultures. 

Missionary families spending their furloughs on the campus for 
study bring to the community a sense of the Church ecumenical 
coupled with a sense of urgency. 

The Women's Association, for all women on campus, provides 
opportunities for socializing as well as studying. 

Admittedly, the emphasis in a theological seminary is not on 
social activities, but inter-personal relationships run deep and the 
socializing values are maintained by way of small group get-togethers 
and periodical school functions. 

OPPORTUNITIES IN MUSIC 
The Seminary has a Men's Choir and a Mixed Chorus, both un- 
der the direction of Mr. Howard L. Ralston, Assistant Professor of 
Church Music. Auditions for membership in the Men's Choir are 
held in September. This group, carefully chosen and of limited num- 
ber, sings for daily chapel services and represents the Seminary from 
time to time in churches within easy traveling distance. A more ex- 
tensive tour is undertaken in the spring when the choir presents a 
varied program of sacred music in churches and colleges. 

28 



The Mixed Chorus is maintained for all those of the seminary 
community who enjoy singing. This group meets on Tuesday eve- 
nings and presents a program at Christmas and in the spring, and 
sings at commencement. There are many opportunities throughout 
the year for soloists and instrumentalists. 

The Seminary, in cooperation with the Pittsburgh Council of 
Churches and the American Guild of Organists, presents each year 
a church music seminar for choir directors, organists, and ministers 
of the area. The course, for which tuition is charged, meets for one 
and one-half hours on six Tuesday evenings. On occasion nationally 
known figures in church music are brought in for lectures and 
demonstration. 

THE STUDENT ASSOCIATION 
THE EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE— 1963-1964 

President John McNitt 

Secretary-Treasurer ........ Muriel Brown 

The committees of the Student Association for the most part 
parallel faculty committee structure and meet with the committees of 
the faculty for study and consideration of subjects of mutual interest. 

The committee chairmen for 1963-64 were: 

Curriculum .......... James Keller 

Convocation and Worship ....... Robert Gordon 

Publications ......... William Sharp 

Church and Society ........ Benjamin Booker 

CLASS PRESIDENTS 1963-1964 

Senior Class Dayanand Pitamber 

Middler Class George Mighells 

Junior Class . William Hayes 




ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS 

Pittsburgh Theological Seminary, as a higher educational insti- 
tution, offers work on a graduate school level. This presupposes a 
B.A. or B.S. degree from a regionally accredited college or university, 
the degree work to have a substantial foundation in the liberal arts. 
It also assumes that the student is ready to approach theological edu- 
cation with an open, searching attitude. Pittsburgh Seminary seeks 
that man or woman who is committed to the Christian faith, emotion- 
ally suited for work in the Church, and intellectually capable of the 
most rigorous kind of academic discipline. 



PRE-SEMINARY STUDIES 

College courses prior to theological seminary should provide the 
cultural and intellectual foundations essential to an effective theo- 
logical education. They should issue in at least three broad kinds 
of attainment. 

1. The college work of a pre-seminary student should result in 
the ability to use certain tools of the educated man : 

(a) The ability to write and speak English clearly and cor- 
rectly. English composition should have this as a spe- 
cific purpose, but this purpose should also be cultivated 
in all written work. 

(b) The ability to think clearly. In some persons, this abil- 
ity is cultivated through courses in philosophy or spe- 
cifically in logic. In others it is cultivated by the use of 
scientific method, or by dealing with critical problems 
in connection with literary and historical documents. 

(c) The ability to read at least one foreign language and in 
some circumstances more than one. 

2. The college work of a pre-seminary student should result in 
increased understanding of the world in which he lives: 

(a) The world of men and ideas. This includes knowledge 
of English literature, philosophy, and psychology. 

(b) The world of nature. This is provided by knowledge 
of the natural sciences, including laboratory work. 

(c) The world of human affairs. This is aided by knowledge 
of history and the social sciences. 

3. The college work of the pre-seminary student should result 
in a sense of achievement: 

(a) The degree of his mastery of his field of study is more 
important than the credits and grades which he ac- 
cumulates. 

30 



(b) The sense of achievement may be encouraged through 
academic concentration, or through "honors" work, or 
through other plans for increasingly independent work 
with as much initiative on the student's part as he is able 
to use with profit. 



Desirable College Curriculum 

The American Association of Theological Schools has proposed 
the following college curriculum for pre-ministerial students. This 
is regarded by the Association as a minimum list of fields of study 
with which the student should have acquaintance before beginning 
seminary study. It is suggested that a student acquire a total of 90 
semester hours, or complete approximately three fourths of his college 
work, in the areas listed below although there is no requirement that 
this be rigidly adhered to. The liberal arts background is felt to 
provide the best foundation for seminary work and for later profes- 
sional studies. 

English — literature, composition, speech and related studies. 
At least 6 semesters. 

History — ancient, modern European, and American. 
At least 3 semesters. 

Philosophy — orientation in history, content and method. 
At least 3 semesters. 

Natural sciences — preferably physics, chemistry and biology. 
At least 2 semesters. 

Social sciences — psychology, sociology, economics, political science, education. 
At least 6 semesters, including at least 1 semester of psychology. 

Foreign languages — one or more of the following linguistic avenues to man's 
thought and tools of scholarly research: Latin, Greek, Hebrew, German, 
French. Students who anticipate post-graduate studies are urged to under- 
take these disciplines early in their training as opportunity offers. 

At least 4 semesters. 

Religion — a thorough knowledge of the content of the Bible is indispensable 
together with an introduction to the major religious traditions and theo- 
logical problems in the context of the principal aspects of human culture 
outlined above. The pre-seminary student may well seek counsel of the 
seminary of his choice in order most profitably to use the resources of 
his college. 

At least 3 semesters. 

Of the various possible areas of concentration, where areas of concentra- 
tion are required, English, philosophy and history are regarded as the most 
desirable. 

At the beginning of the first year students will take placement 
examinations in philosophy, Greek, speech, and Bible content to de- 
termine the sections in which they will be placed. Students showing 
a deficiency in Bible content will be required to remedy such de- 
ficiency. 

31 



PROCEDURE FOR ADMISSION 

Applicants seeking degrees ordinarily move through three cate- 
gories under the supervision of the Admissions Committee: 

1. P re-Enrollment: An applicant may pre-enroll any time be- 
fore the beginning of his senior year in college. Approval 
is granted by the Admissions Committee upon receipt of the 
following documents: 

(a) A formal application. 

(b) Application fee. A check or money order for $15.00 
must accompany the application. This will be applied 
to the first semester's tuition. While the fee will be 
refunded if the application is rejected, it is not return- 
able if the application is withdrawn. 

(c) Mental capacity test. The Seminary will correspond 
with the applicant's college concerning a mental ca- 
pacity test. If none is available, the applicant must 
take one under seminary direction. 

(d) A personal interview with the Director of Admissions, 
the Admissions Committee as a whole, or another rep- 
resentative of the Seminary who may be designated by 
the committee. 

2. Admissions: After the opening of the senior year in college 
an applicant should add the following credentials. Admission 
may be granted conditionally or unconditionally at the dis- 
cretion of the Admissions Committee. 

(a) A medical report on a blank furnished by the Seminary. 

(b) An official transcript from the registrar of the college or 
university, showing grades for at least three years of 
college work. 

(c) Shortly after indicating his desire to be admitted each 
applicant will receive information concerning a group of 
personality tests, which should be completed and re- 
turned as directed. 

(d) An extensive (500-1000 words) statement in the appli- 
cant's handwriting describing his family, educational, 
and religious background, placing particular emphasis 
upon his motives for desiring to enter the Seminary and 
the ministry. 

All documents for admission should be in the hands of the Direc- 
tor of Admissions by April 15 preceding the September for which ad- 
mission is sought. 

3. Matriculation: A final transcript showing the degree and 
date of graduation of the applicant. 

32 



After admission is granted and within thirty days of such notifi- 
cation, a #35 placement fee is required to assure the applicant of a 
place in the new class. This fee is applied on the student's tuition 
and is not returnable except under extreme hardship and at the dis- 
cretion of the Admissions Committee. A certification of the student's 
"intention to enroll" must accompany this fee. 

TRANSFER STUDENTS 

A student transferring from another seminary is required to 
submit, in addition to the foregoing, a complete transcript of previous 
seminary work and a letter of dismissal from the Dean or President. 
A transfer student must be in residence at Pittsburgh Seminary for a 
minimum of one full academic year in order to become a candidate 
for the Bachelor of Divinity degree. 

FOREIGN STUDENTS 

Qualified applicants from other countries are welcome as a part of 
the student body. Such applicants shall be required, in addition to 
the regular requirements for admission, to give evidence of proficien- 
cy in the English language before their admission. Tests such as the 
University of Michigan English Language Test (available around the 
world) and/or the Lado English Test (required by the U. S. State 
Department) normally shall be deemed sufficient. The former is ar- 
ranged through the Seminary or the Commission on Ecumenical Mis- 
sion and Relations of the United Presbyterian Church. 

Such applicants shall have endorsement either of a representative 
of the Commission on Ecumenical Mission and Relations (in those 
areas where the United Presbyterian Church in the U.S.A. has fra- 
ternal workers) or the World Council of Churches (in other areas). 

An applicant from another country is also asked to submit a letter 
from his bank stating that there are on deposit sufficient funds to 
assure his passage home after his period of study in this country. 
This saves possible embarrassment to both student and seminary at 
a later time. 

All correspondence concerning admission to the seminary should 
be addressed to the Director of Admissions. 



33 



FEES AND EXPENSES* 

(for the academic year) 

Tuition (incl. Intersession) $550.00 Student Association Fee (annual) $5.00 

(approx.) Books (approx.) 150.00 

Board (incl. Intersession) 500.00 Hospitalization Insurance ..32.00-137.00 

Room Fee (incl. Intersession) .. 175.00 (approx.) 

Library Fee (annual) 10.00 Incidentals 75.00-300.00 

Matriculation Fee — $35.00 payable at the time of registration. 

Tuition Fee — $16.00 per semester hour. 

Late Registration Fee — A charge of $5.00 will be made to students registering later 
than the specified time. 

Graduation Fee— $10.00. 

Transcript Fee — One copy of a student's academic record will be provided without 
charge. A fee of $1.00 will be charged for each additional transcript. 

* Subject to change. 

MARRIED STUDENT APARTMENT FEES 
The Highlander 

Twenty-three unfurnished apartments $70.00-$77.50 per month 

The Samuel A. Fulton Memorial Hall 

Thirty-nine furnished apartments 50.00- 65.00 per month 

Sheridan Avenue Apartments 

Six unfurnished apartments 52.50- 57.50 per month 

Duplexes 

Fifteen unfurnished apartments 52.50- 57.50 per month 

Fees for apartment occupancy are payable monthly. If they are paid by the 

10th of the month there will be a discount of $5.00. Applications for apartments 

should be made as early as possible. 

ACADEMIC EXPENSES 

All academic fees and expenses are payable in advance on the 
opening day of each semester. When necessary, arrangements for 
a payment plan to cover a semester's expenses may be made at the 
Business Office on the first day of each term, permitting (4) four 
equal payments: one-fourth on the first day of the term, and the 
balance due at the beginning of the fourth, eighth, and twelfth 
weeks respectively. There is a carrying charge of $5.00 for the de- 
ferred payment plan. Failure to pay any deferred payment within 
ten days from the due date will incur a penalty of \°/o of the amount 
due. 

Settlement of all seminary bills is required before registration 
for a new semester, and before graduation or the release of official 
transcripts. 

SEMINARY MEALS 

Residents of the men's and women's dormitories are required 
to eat in the seminary dining hall. Board includes nineteen meals 
a week; only breakfast is served on Sunday. The dining hall is 
closed on holidays which are scheduled on the seminary calendar. 
No deduction is allowed for absence from individual meals, although 
special consideration is given to students who regularly do not eat 
in the dining hall weekends. 

34 



TUITION REFUNDS ON COURSES DROPPED 

First week of semester $1.00 withheld for each credit hour; balance refunded. 

Second to seventh week One half refunded. 

Seventh week on No refund. 

MEDICAL AND HOSPITALIZATION INSURANCE 
Students are required to be insured by some type of medical and 
hospitalization insurance acceptable to the Seminary. All students 
who are registered as full-time students are eligible for such insur- 
ance under a group student policy issued by either the Insurance 
Company of North America or Blue Cross and Blue Shield. Detailed 
information concerning premiums and benefits may be secured at 
the Business Office. 

TOTAL COST 
The total cost for one academic year, based upon a survey of 
actual student expenditures at Pittsburgh Seminary, is approximately 
$1,850 for an unmarried student and $2,850 for a married student 
without children. A married student having children should add 
$400 for each child in his family. These totals include expenses for 
clothing, laundering and cleaning, medical and dental care not cov- 
ered by hospitalization insurance, incidentals and recreation, as well 
as tuition, fees (hospitalization insurance premiums included), board, 
room and books. Not included are automobile operating costs, pay- 
ments on purchases, life insurance premiums, repayment of indebted- 
ness, and expenses for travel to and from the Seminary. 



STUDENT FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE 

While students are encouraged to maintain a maximum of finan- 
cial independence, Pittsburgh Seminary does provide financial aid 
in varying amounts from endowed and general funds. Aid is of- 
fered on the basis of scholarship and/or financial need. Several 
merit scholarships are available to entering students as well as up- 
perclassmen. Loans, grants-in-aid and remunerative campus work 
are also made available as a part of the Seminary's financial assist- 
ance program. Once a student is admitted the Seminary makes every 
effort to see that he does not drop out because of financial problems. 

The Board of Christian Education of the United Presbyterian 
Church, through its Office of Educational Loans and Scholarships, 
provides financial assistance for United Presbyterian seminary stu- 
dents under a three-fold program: (1) National Presbyterian Theo- 
logical Scholarships ($100 to $1,000), (2) Loans ($100 to $500 in a 
given year) and (3) Grants-in-Aid (up to $500 in a given year). 
Nominations for the theological scholarships are made by the faculty 
of the Seminary and winners are named by a selection committee ap- 
pointed by the Board of Christian Education. 

Specific details concerning scholarships, grants-in-aid, and loan 
funds, together with application forms for both seminary and Board 
of Christian Education programs, may be obtained from the Finan- 
cial Aid Officer. 

35 



LOAN FUNDS 

James H. Snowden Memorial Loan Fund. A loan fund for 
students needing financial assistance to obtain a theological educa- 
tion was established in 1953 by R. R. Snowden, M.D., Pittsburgh, 
Pennsylvania, in memory of his father, Professor James H. Snowden, 
D.D., LL.D. Loans from this fund are made on notes with interest 
and without further endorsement. 



Walter G. and Esther B. Comin Student Loan Fund. A loan 
fund for students who need financial assistance to continue their ed- 
ucation was established in 1955 by Mrs. Walter G. Comin, Pawnee 
City, Nebraska, Mr. and Mrs. Walter G. Comin, Jr., Wilkinsburg, 
Pa., and Mr. Myron C. Comin, Spokane, Washington, in memory of 
Rev. Walter G. Comin, D.D. Loans from this fund are made on 
notes at four percent interest and without further endorsement. 



Westphal Memorial Loan Fund. The session of the Reed Me- 
morial United Presbyterian Church, Lyndhurst, New Jersey, estab- 
lished in 1956 the Westphal Memorial Loan Fund. Under certain 
conditions specified by the donors loans from this fund may be made 
on notes without interest or further endorsement, and are repayable 
within ten years. 



Albert G. Hamilton Memorial Loan Fund. A loan fund for 
students who need financial assistance during the seminary course 
was established in 1960 by Mrs. Albert G. Hamilton, Pittsburgh, 
Pennsylvania, in memory of her husband, Mr. Albert G. Hamilton. 
Loans from this fund may be made on notes at three percent interest 
without further endorsement. 



Dr. and Mrs. James D. Sands Memorial Loan Fund. A loan 
fund for seminary students was established in 1961 by Mrs. Albert 
G. Hamilton, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, in memory of her parents, 
Dr. and Mrs. James D. Sands. Loans from this fund may be made 
on notes at three percent interest without further endorsement. 

The First Presbyterian Church of New Kensington Rotary Loan 
Fund. Established by the session of the First Presbyterian Church 
of New Kensington, Pennsylvania, in 1961. This loan fund provides 
$300 for a single student and $600 for a married student during the 
first year of seminary when the schedule and curriculum do not 
allow remunerative field work. The principal is to be repaid follow- 
ing graduation from seminary in minimum amounts of $100 per year. 

36 



Walter A. Long Memorial Student Rotary Loan Fund. Estab- 
lished in 1961 by the Estate of Emma Clark Long. Loans are not 
to exceed $100 to any one student in any one academic year and the 
amount borrowed is to be repaid not later than two years after grad- 
uation or not later than two years after the borrower would have 
graduated if he had progressed normally through the seminary to 
graduation in the event of failure to graduate. All loans are made 
without interest. 

The William G. Crow Memorial Loan Fund. Established in 
November, 1961. Loans from this fund may be made on notes with 
three percent interest. 

The Mary Jane Dando Student Loan Fund. Loans from this 
fund are available to Junior students with interest and without fur- 
ther endorsement. Any loan from this fund must be repaid by the 
first day of the borrower's Senior year, or if the borrower for any rea- 
son discontinues his enrollment at the Seminary it becomes due at 
the termination of his relationship with the Seminary. 



AWARDS, PRIZES, AND GRADUATE FELLOWSHIPS 



The Sylvester S. Marvin Memorial Fellowship 

The Sylvester S. Marvin Fellowship may be assigned upon grad- 
uation to that member of the Senior Class who is recommended by the 
faculty as having achieved the highest standard in all departments 
of the seminary curriculum, provided that his average be not below 
85%. The faculty reserves the right to impose special tests and ex- 
aminations in making this award. It is offered to those who take the 
entire course of three years in this institution. The recipient must 
pledge himself to a year of post-graduate study immediately follow- 
ing his graduation at some institution approved by the faculty. He 
is required to furnish quarterly reports of his progress. The money 
will be paid in three equal installments, on the first day of October, 
January, and April. Prolonged absence from the classroom in the 
discharge of extra-seminary duties makes a student ineligible for the 
fellowship. 

37 



The Thomas Jamison Scholarship 

The Thomas Jamison Scholarship, in memory of the late Thomas 
Jamison, Esq., of North Side, Pittsburgh, was established by Mrs. 
Jamison. The income of this endowment is given every year to the 
member of the Senior Class who has the highest average at the begin- 
ning of his final semester of study. 

The acceptance of this scholarship requires that the recipient 
spend a full academic year in study in any graduate institution ap- 
proved by the faculty. He must further agree to make regular re- 
ports of the work he is doing and at the end of the year he will pre- 
sent a satisfactory thesis of not less than ten thousand words on some 
subject selected by the faculty or approved by the faculty. If for 
any reason the man who is first in the class does not accept the schol- 
arship and its requirements the scholarship will be offered to the stu- 
dent next in rank. 



The Jennie Rigg Barbour Memorial Prize 

The Jennie Rigg Barbour Memorial Prize was established by 
Rev. Clifford E. Barbour, Ph.D., D.D., LL.D., President Emeritus of 
Pittsburgh Theological Seminary, as a memorial to his mother. The 
income from the endowment of this prize is assigned to that member 
of the graduating class who has taken his full course of instruction in 
this institution and who has achieved the second highest academic 
rank of his class, if in the judgment of the faculty he is worthy in all 
other respects. It is hoped that the student will use this income for 
further study either within an academic institution or by the enlarge- 
ment of his own library. 



The Michael Wilson Keith Memorial Homiletical Prize 

This prize was founded in 1919 by the Keith Bible Class of the 
First Presbyterian Church of Coraopolis, Pennsylvania, in memory 
of the Reverend Michael Wilson Keith, D.D., the founder of the 
class and pastor of the church from 1911 to 1917. The prize is award- 
ed to a member of the Senior Class who has spent three years in this 
seminary and has taken the highest standing in the department of 
homiletics. The winner of the prize is expected to preach in the 
First Presbyterian Church of Coraopolis and teach the Keith Bible 
Class one Sunday after the award is made. 

The Joseph Watson Greek Entrance Prize 

The Joseph Watson Greek Prize was established in 1920, by 
Mrs. Robert A. Watson, Columbus, Ohio. The income will be awarded 
to the student who achieves the highest grade in an examination in 
classical Greek as he enters the Junior Class of the Seminary. 

38 



The William B. Watson Prize in Hebrew 
The William B. Watson Prize in Hebrew was established in 
1919 by Mrs. Robert A. Watson, Columbus, Ohio. The income will 
be awarded to that member of the Senior Class who, having elected 
Hebrew, shall submit the best grammatical and exegetical treatment 
of an assigned portion of the Hebrew Old Testament. 

The John Watson Prize in New Testament Greek 
The John Watson Prize in New Testament Greek was estab- 
lished in 1919 by Mrs. Robert A. Watson, Columbus, Ohio. The 
income will be awarded to that member of the Senior Class who, 
having elected Greek Exegesis, shall submit the best grammatical 
and exegetical treatment of an assigned portion of the Greek New 
Testament. 

The Robert A. Lee Church History Award 
By bequest, in memory of her husband the late Mrs. Henrietta 
M. Lee, Oakmont, Pa., established the Robert A. Lee Church History 
Foundation, the annual income of which is to be awarded yearly to 
the students making first and second rank respectively in the Depart- 
ment of Church History. 

The Hugh Thomson Kerr Moderator Prize 
This prize was established in 1938 by the Men's Committee of 
the Shadyside Presbyterian Church, Pittsburgh. An annual contri- 
bution of fifty dollars was pledged to be used for the purchase of 
books. The prize is to be awarded to that member of the graduating 
class who has exhibited to the greatest degree, throughout the three 
years of the seminary course, leadership, originality, and accomplish- 
ments beyond the normal requirements for graduation. 

The James Purdy Scholarship 
The James Purdy Scholarship was established in 1882. The 
income is apportioned equally each year to the six members of the 
Junior Class who attain the highest average of excellence in their 
seminary work. The distribution is made after the students return 
to the Seminary the following year. 

The Andrew Reed Scholarship 
The Andrew Reed Scholarship was established in 1914 by Miss 
Anna M. Reed, Cross Creek, Pennsylvania, the income being given 
to the student who, upon entering seminary, shall achieve the highest 
grade in a competitive examination in the English Bible. The suc- 
cessful competitor is to have the scholarship throughout the entire 
course of three years, provided that his general conduct and applica- 
tion to study shall continue to be satisfactory to the faculty. 

39 



The Home Training Bible Class Award In Missions 
This is an award of $100 which was established in January, 1961, 
by the Home Training Bible Class of the Edgewood Presbyterian 
Church, Pittsburgh, Pa., in the name of the Rev. Walter L. Moser, 
Ph.D., D.D. The recipient will be that member of the graduating 
class who is deemed most deserving among those entering the foreign 
or home missionary field upon graduation. 

The Chevy Chase Christian Education Award 
This award was established by the college age young people 
of the Chevy Chase Presbyterian Church, Washington, D. C, in 
appreciation of those who are interested in youth. It is to be given 
to the person who, throughout the seminary course, has best minis- 
tered to young people and who intends to specialize in youth work 
upon completion of his studies. 

The Alice Myers Sigler Memorial Prize In History And Theology 
This award was established in 1962 by Robert M., John H., 
Richard E., and Alan B. Sigler in memory of their mother. The 
income from this endowed fund is granted to the student who, in the 
judgment of the professors of the History and Theology Division, is 
most worthy of this award at the end of the Middler year. 

The Fred McFeely Rogers Prize In Biblical Studies 
The Fred McFeely Rogers Prize in Biblical Studies was estab- 
lished in 1962 by Mr. and Mrs. James H. Rogers in honor of their 
son, a graduate in the Class of 1962. The income from this endowed 
fund is granted to the student who, in the judgment of the professors 
of the Biblical Division, is most worthy of this award at the end of 
the Junior year. 



40 










vs. 







*™k- 



Dr. Barth with students in exegesis 



Hi 1 f ! 

B 




I1I1,'T« 


«% 


[ ■ ~*rf 


y 


/ 

/ 

i 


tl 
mLSk 





Student "grinding it out v in his room 



Dr. Farley with students in theology 



Mir 



DEGREE PROGRAMS 

AND 
COURSES OF STUDY 



Bachelor of Divinity 
Degree description 
Course descriptions 



pages 42-45 
pages 50-66 



Master of Religious Education 
Degree description 
Course descriptions 



pages 46-47 
pages 50-60 



Master of Education 



page 48 



Master of Theology 
Degree description 
Course descriptions 



pages 67-68 
pages 69-73 



Master of Public Administration, or 
Master of Public and International Affairs 



page 75 



41 



THE BACHELOR OF DIVINITY CURRICULUM 

The curriculum which follows this brief introduction reflects the 
deep concern of the faculty to fuse into an integrated program of 
study the traditional classical approach to theological education and 
the strong contemporary emphasis on the so-called practical courses. 
In the Junior and Middler years the student will be concerned pri- 
marily with the Church's thought and life as these are reflected in 
Biblical, historical, and theological studies. During the Middler and 
Senior years he will also be brought face to face with the culture 
to which the Christian faith must be communicated. 

The Biblical Division has thirty out of eighty-one required 
hours. These include both Greek and Hebrew and one might wonder 
whether these should be included in Biblical hours. The way language 
is taught in Pittsburgh — inductively — they should be included. After 
a brief period of orientation in both languages, the student begins to 
read in the Old and New Testaments. As he comes upon a new 
grammatical construction it is explained. Seeing it in a context helps 
him to come to grips with it. A chief study in the Biblical Division 
is exegesis. It runs through the Middler and Senior years in both 
Testaments. Exegesis appears in the catalogue as a Church and 
Ministry course because it is carefully related to the preaching office. 
Students study with a team of exegetes, homileticians, and speech 
instructors as they work on the sermon from text to delivery. 

The History and Theology Division has twenty-eight required 
hours, only twenty of which are apparent at first glance. Both his- 
tory and theology are closely correlated with church and ministry 
courses for the sake of greater relevance. For example, American 
church history is about two-thirds of Church and Ministry I where 
it is taught in dialogue with the culture which it has informed and 
which in turn has informed it. The doctrine of church and ministry 
is taught by a systematic theologian in connection with the teaching 
office in Church and Ministry IV. The doctrine of the sacraments is 
intrinsic to liturgies which is a section within Church and Ministry 
IV. Christian ethics, an extremely important part of the curriculum, 
is taught in conjunction with the pastoral office broadly conceived, 
and so has three hours in Church and Ministry V. 

The Church and Ministry Division, a new designation in theo- 
logical education, has twenty-three hours, although its course designa- 

42 



tions total thirty-nine hours. The difference in hours is due to 
work transferred from the other two divisions for the purpose of 
relevance. This division in one sense is the focus of the curriculum 
for all studies are for the purpose of church in its total ministry, in- 
cluding parish ministry and special ministries (Christian education, 
higher education, fraternal workers, administration, etc.). Through 
this division the whole curriculum confronts the world and is con- 
fronted by the world. In essence it is the division of communication; 
for the Gospel to be communicated, the knowledge and skills neces- 
sary to communication, and the understanding of the cultural milieu 
within which we do our communicating are all the business of this 
division. The course work of the Church and Ministry Division is 
taught largely by inter-divisional faculty personnel. 

Field education is nuclear to the curriculum. It begins in an ob- 
servational way in the Junior year. The first semester students are 
taken on field trips to a prison, the courts, a union meeting, a session 
with management, a mental hospital, etc., and seminars are conducted 
on the basis of these experiences. The second semester in connection 
with Church and Ministry I students make a brief preliminary study 
of a church and its neighborhood to become acquainted with some 
of the tensions involved. During the Middler year students are as- 
signed to congregations where they learn the practice of ministry 
under careful supervision by faculty personnel as well as pastors. 
This field experience is correlated with class work in Church and 
Ministry II and III. Different types of field education are intro- 
duced into the Senior year to afford experience in counseling, com- 
munity analysis, liturgies, etc., as well as experimentation in new 
forms of ministry. These laboratory experiences are correlated 
with Church and Ministry IV and V. 

Since a vital part of curriculum is dialogue in the classroom, 
every effort is made for small classes. Language study and exegesis, 
church and ministry courses, and history and theology classes are sec- 
tioned wherever possible into classes of 8-12. Where the lecture 
method is employed, one hour a week is usually given to preceptorials. 

In essence, the Bachelor of Divinity curriculum is built around 
two foci: it focuses on the nature and meaning of the Christian faith 
which it is our responsibility to communicate. It also focuses on the 
culture with which we must communicate and the Church through 
which we communicate. 

43 



THE PRESCRIBED COURSE OF STUDY 

LEADING TO THE 
DEGREE OF BACHELOR OF DIVINITY 



Junior Year 



Semester I 

Bible 9 

110 Hebrew 3 

210 Greek 3 

112 Old Testament Introduction 3 

410 Church History I 3 

510 Philosophy 3 

710 Principles of Expression I 1 



Semester II 

Bible 4 

111 Hebrew 2 

211 Greek 2 

411 Church History II 3 

412 History of Doctrine 3 
511 Contemporary Theology 2 
711 Principles of Expression II 1 
713 Church and Ministry I: 

The Church in American Culture 3 



16 

Intersession 
213 New Testament Introduction 



16 



220 New Testament Introduction 
520 Systematic Theology I 
720 Church and Ministry II: 

The Preaching and 

Pastoral Offices 
Electives 



Liturgies 



Iiddler Year 




3 121 Old Testament Introduction 


3 


3 521 Systematic Theology II 


3 


721 Church and Ministry III: 
The Preaching and 
7 Pastoral Offices 


6 


2 Electives 


3 


15 


15 


Intersession 





730 Church and Ministry IV: 
Theology, Exegesis, 
Homiletics and 
Christian Education 
Electives 



Senior Year 

731 Church and Ministry V: 
Christian Ethics and the 
Mission of the Church 

c Electives 



14 

Intersession 
Polity and Administration 



81 academic hours of required work 
15 academic hours of electives 



96 total academic hours required for graduation 
44 



THE PRESCRIBED COURSE OF STUDY 

LEADING TO THE 
DEGREE OF BACHELOR OF DIVINITY 

(Effective September, 1964) 



Junior Year 



Semester I 
Old Testament Introduction 
Greek 
Church History and History 

of Doctrine 
Church & Ministry I: American 

Historical Context 



Semester II 
New Testament Introduction 
Greek 
Church History and History 

of Doctrine 
Church and Ministry II: 

Sociological Context 



5 
3 

5 

2 

15 



Intersession 
Intertestamental Period 



Middler Year 



Systematic Theology I 

Hebrew 

Church & Ministry III: Foun- 
dations (psychological, 
educational, communicative) 

Elective 



4 
3 

15 



Systematic Theology II 

Hebrew 

Church & Ministry IV: Foundations 
(homiletical and liturgical) 

Elective 



Counseling 



Intersess'ion 



Church & Ministry V: 
and Homiletics 

Electives 



Senior Year 

Ethics Church & Ministry VI: Education, 

4 Administration, Polity, 

Homiletics 
' Electives 



13 



4 
9 

13 



Inter session 
Independent Study 



Required hours 
Elective hours 



66 
26 



Total hours 



92 



44 



THE FOUR-YEAR BACHELOR OF DIVINITY CURRICULUM 
(Effective September, 1964) 



Semester I 
Old Testament Introduction 
Church History and History 
of Doctrine 



I 



Semester II 



5 New Testament Introduction 
Church History and History 



of Doctrine 



10 



5 
5 

10 



Intersession 
Intertestamental Period 



II 



Systematic Theology I 


5 Systematic Theology II 


5 


Greek 


3 Greek 


3 


Church and Ministry I 


2 Church and Ministry II 


2 



10 



10 



Hebrew 

Church and Ministry III 

Electives 



III 

3 Hebrew 

4 Church and Ministry IV 
6 Electives 



Counseling 



13 
Intersession 



13 



Church and Ministry V 
Electives 



IV 

4 Church and Ministry VI 
6 Electives 



10 



10 



Intersession 
Independent Study 



45 



THE FOUR-YEAR BACHELOR OF DIVINITY CURRICULUM 



Semester I 

110 Hebrew 3 

210 Greek 3 

112 Old Testament Introduction 3 

410 Church History I 3 

710 Principles of Expression I 1 
Field Education Supervision 



Semester II 

111 Hebrew 2 

211 Greek 2 

411 Church History II 3 

412 History of Doctrine 3 
711 Principles of Expression II 1 

Field Education Supervision 



13 



11 



Inter session 
213 New Testament Introduction 



II 



220 New Testament Introduction 3 

510 Philosophy 3 

720 Church and Ministry II 7 

13 



121 Old Testament Introduction 3 

713 Church and Ministry I 3 

721 Church and Ministry III 6 



12 



Liturgies 



Intersession 



730 Church and Ministry IV 
Electives 



III 

9 511 Contemporary Theology 
3 731 Church and Ministry V 



Electives 



12 



Intersession 
Polity and Administration 



520 Systematic Theology I 
Electives 



IV 

3 521 Systematic Theology II 
5 Electives 



45 



THE MASTER OF RELIGIOUS EDUCATION CURRICULUM 

The Master of Religious Education curriculum is a two year 
program including both theory and practice among the disciplines of 
Bible, history, theology, and the teaching ministry. The requirement 
of five hours each in Hebrew and Greek demonstrates the faculty's 
seriousness about this degree as it seeks to prepare students for the 
teaching office. That that office has fallen into disrepute and has 
come to be associated largely with methods is manifest. The recovery 
of the office will come through Biblical and theological competence 
coupled with the art and skills of communication. To know the Bible 
the student must enter into the world of the Bible and gain a "feel" for 
its idiom of thought, expression, practice. Language study is the pri- 
mary tool for this incursion. Sixteen hours in history and theology 
will also contribute to the needed competence. By taking the basic 
courses of theological education an M.R.E. candidate is prepared to 
work side by side with pastors, sharing a common understanding of 
the total ministry of which education is a part, and performing that 
ministry with professional competence. 

Within this program the teaching office is lifted up and empha- 
sized for the M.R.E. candidate. The B.D. Church and Ministry 
courses are especially adapted so that the student whose vocational 
interest is Christian education can explore the philosophy and theol- 
ogy, as well as develop methodological and administrative skills, of 
that special ministry. Throughout the two year course the student 
will be involved in Christian education theory and practice. Field 
education practicum is required each semester and is closely geared 
with class work. 

The Master of Religious Education program, open to both men 
and women, is designed primarily to prepare them to serve the Church 
of Jesus Christ as directors or ministers of Christian education in 
local congregations, as curriculum writers and fraternal workers, as 
well as to provide them background for related professional and serv- 
ice vocations. 



46 



THE PRESCRIBED COURSE OF STUDY 

LEADING TO THE 

DEGREE OF MASTER OF RELIGIOUS EDUCATION 

(Effective September, 1964) 





Junior 


Year 




Semester I 






Semester II 




Old Testament Introduction 




5 


New Testament Introduction 


5 


Greek 




3 


Greek 


3 


Church History and History 
of Doctrine 




5 


Church History and History 
of Doctrine 


5 


Christian Education 




2 


Christian Education 


2 



15 



15 



Intersession 
Intertestamental Period 



Systematic Theology I 

Hebrew 

Church and Ministry III: 

Foundations (psychological, 
educational, communicative) 

Elective 



IOI 


> Year 




5 


Systematic Theology II 


5 


i 


Hebrew 


3 


4 


Christian Education 


4 


Elective 


3 



15 



15 



Counseling 



Intersession 



Required hours 


58 


Elective hours 


6 


Total hours 


64 



47 



THE PRESCRIBED COURSE OF STUDY 

LEADING TO THE 

DEGREE OF MASTER OF RELIGIOUS EDUCATION 



Junior Year 



Semester I 

Bible 9 

110 Hebrew 3 

210 Greek 3 

112 Old Testament Introduction 3 

410 Church History I 3 

710 Principles of Expression I 1 



Semester II 

Bible 7 

111 Hebrew 2 

211 Greek 2 

213 New Testament Introduction 3 

411 Church History II 3 

511 Contemporary Theology 2 

711 Principles of Expression II 1 



712 Seminar in Christian Education 3 713 Church and Ministry I 

16 



16 



Senior Year 



220 New Testament Introduction 3 
520 Systematic Theology I 3 

*720A Church and Ministry II 5 or 7 
730 Church and Ministry IV 3 



16 



121 Old Testament Introduction 3 

521 Systematic Theology II 3 

*721A Church and Ministry III 3 or 5 

731 Church and Ministry V 5 



16 



Sixty-four academic hours required for graduation. 



♦Language is elective, 
of elective credit. 



If language is not elected, there will be two hours 



47 



THE PRESCRIBED COURSE OF STUDY LEADING TO THE 
DEGREE OF MASTER OF EDUCATION (M.Ed.) 

This degree is offered jointly by the University of Pittsburgh 
and Pittsburgh Theological Seminary. It will be conferred by the 
University upon completion of a course of study which will include 
18 hours taken in three trimesters at the University and 18 hours 
taken concurrently in two semesters at the Seminary. 



The University Requirements 
Ed. Psych. 271 — Advanced Educational Psychology . . .2 hours 

Ed. Res. 200 — Introduction to Research and Statistics ... 2 hours 
Fdns. Ed. 201 — General Philosophy of Education .... 2 hours 

Fdns. Ed. 228 — History of Modern Education 2 hours 

Department of Religious Education .10 hours 

18 hours 

The Seminary Requirements 
112 — Old Testament Introduction ....... 3 hours 

213 — New Testament Introduction ....... 3 hours 

470 — Reading and Research in Church History . . . . .3 hours 

SUA — Contemporary Theology 3 hours 

712 — Seminar in Christian Education . . . . . .3 hours 

Field Education Practicum ........ 3 hours 

18 hours 



The M.Ed, course of study is designed as a one-year course for 
those who have an approved Bachelor's collegiate major in the fields 
of religion, Bible, or religious education, or their equivalent, to pro- 
vide further depth, understanding, and technical skills for work in 
local churches. Admission requirements, in addition to the "major," 
are those of the University and the Seminary. Housing will be pro- 
vided by the admitting institution. 

Applicants for this degree may write to: 

Dr. Lawrence C. Little 
Department of Religious Education 
University of Pittsburgh 
Pittsburgh 13, Pennsylvania 

or 
Director of Admissions 
Pittsburgh Theological Seminary 
616 N. Highland Avenue 
Pittsburgh 6, Pennsylvania 

48 



THE HONORS PROGRAM 

It is a major intention of the faculty not only to allow, but to 
encourage, every student to proceed in his academic work at the 
deepest level of which he is capable. Toward the fulfilment of this 
intention the principle of sectioning is employed wherever feasible 
across the entire curriculum. 

For those students who demonstrate superior academic ability 
the faculty has devised an honors program compounded of independ- 
ent study and sectioning or tutorials. To be eligible for this pro- 
gram a student must maintain a minimum cumulative average of 
2.00 and a 2.25 average in the division in which he elects to do honors 
work. 

At the end of the first semester of the middler year students who 
are eligible are invited to devise an honors program which they will 
work through in their senior year. They may take up to eight hours 
in independent study in this program. 

While Theological German and French, as well as Greek and 
Latin offerings, are elective for the entire student body and are not 
required for the honors students, the faculty recommends to them 
that they elect such courses if their language background has pre- 
pared them for such election. 



49 



DESCRIPTION OF COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

FOR THE BACHELOR OF DIVINITY, 

MASTER OF RELIGIOUS EDUCATION, 

AND MASTER OF EDUCATION DEGREES 



THE BIBLICAL DIVISION 

Mr. Walther, Chairman 

Mr. Barth Mr. Irvine 

Mr. Freedman Mr. Jamieson 

Mr. Grohman Mr. Kelley 

Mr. Hare Mr. Miller 

Mr. Hills Mr. Orr 

Some course offerings, both required and elective, customarily listed under the 
Biblical Division, are correlated with Church and Ministry and are listed under that 
division. All required exegesis courses are so listed, since they are correlated with 
homiletics. 

REQUIRED COURSES 

110. Elementary Hebrew. A course designed to lead to an apprecia- 
tive and competent use of Hebrew as one of the languages of Biblical 
revelation. From the outset the student learns inductively to read from 
the original language of the Old Testament. Emphasis is placed on the 
acquisition of a working vocabulary as the ground for further reading, 
and the illumination of key Biblical concepts. Instruction is in small, 
graded sections so that a maximum of individual attention and achieve- 
ment is possible. 

Juniors, first semester, 3 hours credit. 

111. Elementary Hebrew. Continuation of 110 with instruction in 
graded sections. 

Juniors, second semester, 2 hours credit. 

210. New Testament Greek. A course complementary to 110 designed 
to lead to a competent use of Greek as one of the languages of Biblical 
revelation. As in 110, from the outset the student learns inductively 
to read from the original language of the New Testament. Instruction, 
likewise, is in small, graded sections. Students who have previously 
studied Greek will be assigned to a special section for their New Testa- 
ment linguistic work on the basis of placement examinations. 

Juniors, first semester, 3 hours credit. 

211. New Testament Greek. Continuation of 210 with instruction in 
graded sections. 

Juniors, second semester, 2 hours credit. 

112. Old Testament Introduction. The Law and the Former Prophets. 
A survey of the historical books of the Old Testament (Genesis through 
Kings), with special attention to the formation of the literature and its 
religious significance. The history of Israel is traced from earliest times 
to the Babylonian Exile, and set in the framework of Near Eastern civil- 
ization, as that has been recovered through archaeological research. The 
principal objective is mastery of the Biblical material. There are also 
assigned readings in current scholarly literature. 

Juniors, first semester, 3 hours credit. Mr. Freedman 

50 



121. Old Testament Introduction. The Latter Prophets and the Writ- 
ings. A survey of the prophetic and poetic books of the Old Testament. 
The first part of the course is devoted to the major and minor prophets, 
their message and their times. In the latter part of the course, attention 
is given to the Psalms, Proverbs, Job, and other writings. The history of 
the post-exilic community, its life and worship, is surveyed to the end 
of the Old Testament period. As in course 112, the principal objective is 
mastery of the Biblical material. There are also assigned readings in 
current scholarly literature. 

Middlers, second semester, 3 hours credit. Mr. Freedman 

213 and 220. New Testament Introduction I and II. The purpose of 
this course is to convey, in preparation of careful exegesis of individual 
texts, a basic knowledge and enjoyment of, and respect for, each New 
Testament book. 

On the background of Israel and the Old Testament, of Jewish, Greek 
and Roman history, culture and religion, and of the early churches' 
growth and problems, the character and message, the divinity and unity 
of the NT books, and the open questions concerning authors, dates, 
places, recipients are faced. Some aspects of the manifold interpretations 
and of the influence of the NT upon later church life and modern scholarly 
endeavor are outlined. 

Part I deals with the Gospels, Acts, and the Book of Revelation; Part 
II, with the letters of the New Testament. jy[ r Barth 



ELECTIVES 

140, 141, 142, and 143. Hebrew Reading. Supervised reading of selected 
Old Testament passages. 

144. Hebrew Grammar. Introduction to the formal structure of the 
Hebrew language, (phonetics, morphology, syntax) with special attention 
to its historical development and relation to other Semitic languages. 

Offered on request. Mr. Hills 

148. The Dead Sea Scrolls. Survey of the scrolls from the Dead Sea 
area, particularly Qumran. Archaeological background, analysis of 
contents, significance for the text, history, and theology of the Old and 
New Testaments. Selected passages will be read in the original lan- 
guages. 

Offered on request. Mr. Freedman and Mr. Hills 

151. Elements of Accadian. A beginner's course in Assyro-Babylonian. 
Offered on request. Mr. Irvine 

152. Elements of Canaanite Cuneiform. A beginner's course in Ugaritic. 
Offered on request. Mr. Freedman 

153. Elements of North West Semitic. Decipherment, translation, and 
analysis of early Phoenician, Moabite, Hebrew, and Aramaic inscriptions, 
with investigation of their bearing on Old Testament studies. 

Offered on request. Mr. Freedman 

154. Biblical Aramaic. Reading and the grammar of the Aramaic 
sections of the Old Testament. Additional material may be included 
from the fifth century B.C. Aramaic letters from Elephantine. 

Offered on request. Mr. Hills 

51 



155. Septuagint Studies. Introduction to the Greek Old Testament, 
and problems of the Greek and Hebrew texts. Reading and comparative 
study of passages in Hebrew and Greek. 

Offered on request. Mr. Freedman and Mr. Walther 

161. Trends in Recent Old Testament Hermeneutics. A seminar based 
on discussions of the book Problems of Old Testament Hermeneutics. 
Prerequisites: 2 exegesis courses and Reformation history. 

Mr. Ritschl and Old Testament Instructor 

171. The Composition of the Latter Prophets. The literary and form- 
critical problems of (a) Isaiah, (b) Jeremiah, (c) Ezekiel, or (d) The Twelve, 
tracing the development from the earliest oral traditions to the final 
literary document. The prophetic experience and consciousness, mes- 
sage and meaning, are considered in relation to the contents of the 
book against the background of Israel's history. Mr. Freedman 

172. Ancient Hebrew Poetry. Readings in the poems of the Pentateuch 
and early Psalms with emphasis on ancient Hebrew meter, style, orthog- 
raphy and vocabulary, and analysis of theological motifs and liturgical 
orientation. M r. Freedman 

173. The Old Testament: Torah. Exegesis of passages from the Hebrew 
text of the first five books of the Old Testament. 

Mr. Freedman and Mr. Hills 

174. The Old Testament: Prophetic Books. Exegesis of passages from 
the Hebrew text of the "Former" and the "Latter" Prophets. 

Mr. Freedman and Mr. Hills 

175. The Old Testament: Writings. Exegesis of passages from the He- 
brew text of the "Writings" of the Old Testament canon. 

Mr. Freedman and Mr. Hills 

180. Archaeology of Palestine. A study of archaeological method 
and the results of excavations of Near Eastern sites as they relate to 
the Old and New Testaments. Mr. Freedman and Mr. Jamieson 

240, 241, 242, 243. Greek Reading. Supervised reading of selected New 
Testament passages. 

244. Greek Grammar. Introduction to the formal structure of New 
Testament Greek; systematic study of grammar and syntax, illustrated 
by specific New Testament passages. Mr. Kelley 

250. The Gospels. Exegesis of passages from the Greek text of one 
or more of the Gospels. Mr. Barth 

251. The Pauline Epistles. Exegesis of passages from the Greek text 
of one or more of Paul's letters. Mr. Barth or Mr. Jamieson 

52 



252. The Pastoral Epistles. Exegesis of the Greek text. 

Mr. Jamieson 

253. The General Epistles. Exegesis of the Greek text of one or more 
of the General Epistles. Mr. Barth or Mr. Walther 

254. The Revelation. Study of the background and meaning of the last 
book of the New Testament based on exegetical study of the Greek text. 

Mr. Barth 

255. Studies in Luke. Mr. Miller 

260. New Testament Christology. The beliefs about Jesus as Messiah, 
Son of Man, Son of God, and his work as revealer of the Father, inaugu- 
rator of the Kingdom, and Savior of the human race. 

Mr. Orr or Mr. Barth 

261. The Life of Jesus Christ. Detailed study of one or more phases of 
the Life, including (a) the data for constructing a "life"; (b) the trial 
of Jesus; (c) the resurrection. Mr. Barth or Mr. Walther 

262. Eschatology in the New Testament. The background of the prob- 
lem in twentieth-century literature will be examined, and the New Testa- 
ment materials will be studied in detail. Some attention will be given 
to the Entmythologizierung controversy. Mr. Walther 

270. Practical Use of the New Testament. A seminar on the Christian 
meaning of the New Testament for study, worship, preaching, evange- 
lism, and counseling. In successive semesters (a) the Synoptic Gospels, 
(b) the Fourth Gospel and Revelation, (c) and (d) the Pauline Corpus 
are considered. Mr. Orr 



53 



THE HISTORY AND THEOLOGY DIVISION 

Mr. Smith, Chairman 

Mr. Farley Mr. McCloy 

Mr. Gerstner Mr. Ritschl 

Mr. Kehm Mr. Wiest 

Required and elective course offerings in the theology of church and ministry, 
theology of the sacraments, ethics, and American church history, customarily listed 
under the History and Theology Division, are correlated with Church and Ministry 
courses and are listed under that division. 



REQUIRED COURSES 

410. Church History I. A survey of Christian life, thought, and prac- 
tice from the Apostolic Age to the twelfth century; the mission and 
expansion of the church; the rise of offices and government, art and 
literature. 

Juniors, first semester, 3 hours credit. Mr. McCloy and Mr. Smith 



411. Church History II. The history of the Christian church from 
the twelfth century to the present, exclusive of post-colonial American 
history. 

Juniors, second semester, 3 hours credit. Mr. Smith and Mr. Gerstner 



412. History of Doctrine. This course is an introduction to the his- 
torical developments of the theological discussion connected with the 
names of important Church Fathers and Councils in the period between 
Ignatius and John of Damascus (in the East) and Anselm (in the West). 

Juniors, second semester, 3 hours credit. Mr. Ritschl 



510. Philosophical Analysis. A study of major philosophical problems 
in the history of Western thought, especially those closely related to 
Christian theology, such as the nature of knowledge, faith and reason; 
natural theology; the freedom of the will; the meaning of theological 
statements, etc. 

Juniors, first semester, 3 hours credit. Mr. Wiest and Mr. Kehm 



510A. Philosophical Analysis. For students who score high on the 
philosophy placement examination. Same course as 510, with special 
attention given to the problems of apologetics and communication in 
the modern period, and to contemporary philosophical challenges to 
Christian thought. 

Juniors, first semester, 3 hours credit. Mr. Wiest 



511. Contemporary Theology. Introduction to the major figures, 
problems and issues in contemporary theological thought. 

Juniors, second semester, 2 hours credit. Mr. Wiest and Mr. Kehm 

54 



511A. Contemporary Theology. Same course as 511, with an additional 
hour of reading. 

M.Ed., second semester, 3 hours credit. Mr. Wiest and Mr. Kehm 



520. Systematic Theology I. The person and work of Jesus Christ, the 
Christian understanding of man, and the nature of the Christian life. 
Classic and contemporary theological systems, representing the major 
movements of Christian thought, are read and critically evaluated. 

Middlers, first semester, 3 hours credit. Mr. Ritschl 



521. Systematic Theology II. The doctrine of God, the Christian view 
of revelation, and problems of theological thought and method. Reading 
and critical evaluation are continued in the systems employed in Sys- 
tematic Theology I. 

Middlers, second semester, 3 hours credit. Mr. Farley 



ELECTIVES 

430. Patrology. A study of Christian literature including the Apos- 
tolic Fathers, the Apologists, the African, Antiochan, and Alexandrian 
Schools, the great writers of the fourth and fifth centuries in the East 
and West, and concluding with John of Damascus and Gregory the Great. 

Mr. McCloy 

431. Eastern Christianity. A study of the history of the church of 
Constantinople and the other patriarchs of the East including the Russian 
Orthodox Church and other national churches within the sphere of 
Eastern Orthodoxy; a history of the Uniat churches of Eastern rites, 
but in communion with Rome; the rise and development of the Mono- 
physite churches in Ethiopia, Syria, Armenia and the Nestorian church 
in its expansion eastward. Mr. McCloy 

432. Medieval Christendom. This course is a study of the particular 
form of Christian life created by the Middle Ages. Particular attention 
is given to the history of morals, the unitive character of medieval 
society, and the characteristic concepts and presuppositions of the era. 
One particular purpose of the course is to enable students to grasp 
modern Catholicism and contemporary ecumenical conversation with 
Catholics. Mr. Smith 



433. Seminar in Augustine. After a survey of the history and culture 
of the late fourth century, students read and analyze De Cathechezandis 
Rudibus, De Moribus Ecclesiae Catholicae, De Baptismo, Confessiones, De Libero 
Arbitrio, De Gratia Christi et de Peccato Originali, De Spiritu et Littera, and 
selections from De Trinitate and De Civitate Dei. Mr. Smith 



434. Thomas Aquinas. An introduction to the philosophical and theo- 
logical thought of Thomas Aquinas. Particular emphasis is given to 
the expression of his system in the Summae, Summa Contra Gentiles and 
Summa Theologiae. Mr. Bald 

55 



435. Seminar in Luther. This course is concerned with the writings 
of Luther in the period before 1525, with particular emphasis on "The 
Freedom of a Christian Man." Short papers will be required. Prereq- 
uisite: Church History II and 3 hours of Systematic Theology. Regis- 
tration dependent upon interview with the professor. ]\| ri Ritschl 



436. The History of Biblical Interpretation (Early Church). This lec- 
ture course deals with the history of Biblical interpretation from the time 
of the beginning of the second century to Augustine in the West and John 
of Damascus in the East. 

Prerequisites: History of the Early Church, one course in Old Testa- 
ment and in New Testament Exegesis. ]y[ r Ritschl 



437. Biblical Interpretation from 1860 to 1960. This lecture course 
deals with the development of Old Testament and New Testament exe- 
gesis after Schleiermacher, with discussion of the positions of De Wette, 
F. S. Bauer and the subsequent historical-critical school, the history of 
religion school, and finally the hermeneutical positions up to Ernst Fuchs. 

Prerequisite: two exegesis courses, Reformation history. Mr. Ritschl. 



440. The Libertarian Reformation. The course opens with a survey 
of the 16th century historical and ecclesiastical situation designed to 
show the place of thinkers who repudiated the state church. This is 
followed by consideration of selected figures: Thomas Munzer, Menno 
Simons, Sebatian Castellion, Michael Servetus, Socinus, and others. 

Mr. Smith 



441. Symbols of the Reformation. An examination and comparison of 
various creeds, catechisms and confessions arising within the Protestant 
Reformation, having in view the theological aspects of present-day 
ecumenical conversations. jy| r . Bald 



443. Roman Catholicism Since Trent. The historical and theological 
development of Rome from the Council of Trent to 1900. jyi r< Gerstner 



444. The Age of Orthodoxy. The Reformation after the Reformers 
left the scene. A close study of Continental Reformed and Lutheran Or- 
thodoxy of the seventeenth century. A knowledge of Latin required. 

Mr. Gerstner 



450. Christian Biography. A study of the lives and personalities of 
outstanding Christians beginning with Ignatius of Antioch and extending 
to Albert Schweitzer; the various religions and cultural factors which 
helped to shape conspicuously Christian character; the ideals and art 
of Christian biography and autobiography. M r# McCloy 



454. Christianity in America. The course describes the course of church 
history in America from the Massachusetts Bay Colony to the 20th 
century. It includes a survey of the major religious traditions and the 

56 



impact of American life on them; the revival and development of the 
denominations; the growth of Catholicism; and the marginal Christian 
groups from eastern Orthodoxy to the sects. Emphasis is placed on the 
interaction of tradition and environment. Mr. Smith 

455. Methodist Doctrine and Polity. Required of Methodist students 
for graduation. Offered every three years. 

Three hours credit. Mr. Chamberlin 

460. History of Apologetics. The nature of the defense of Christian 
faith explored through an examination of a number of apologetic sys- 
tems of the past and present. Mr. Bald 

462. American Theology through the 19th Century. Traces the theo- 
logical developments from Edwards to 1900. Especial consideration of 
Hopkins, Bushnell, Taylor and Parks. The relation of this school to the 
American Presbyterian Church indicated. Mr. Gerstner 

470. Advanced Reading and Research in Church History. Guided read- 
ing and research in sources of church history. Subjects for study 
will be determined in conference with the instructor. Permission from the 
instructor is necessary for registration. 

Mr. Gerstner, Mr. Smith or Mr. McCloy 

530. Theological Method. The investigation of one or several prob- 
lems related to the doing of theology: theology and philosophy, the 
authority of Scripture, the status and use of tradition, the nature of 
theological statements, the problem of system, theology as analytic- 
synthetic, theoretical-practical. Mr. Farley or Mr. Wiest 

531. Major Theological Loci. The investigation of one or more doc- 
trines, such as God, election, sin and fall, Jesus Christ, redemption, 
Holy Spirit, church, eschaton. Mr. Farley, Mr. Kehm, or Mr. Ritschl 

532. Controversial Theological Issues. The investigation of one the- 
ological problem through the study of the major "orthodox," "heretical," 
"heterodox," or sectarian formulations of that problem. The study of 
such controversial issues as the freedom of the will, the trinity, pre- 
destination, the status of natural theology, the two natures, demyth- 
ologizing. Mr. Farley 

533. Liberal Theology: A Reappraisal. An analysis and evaluation of 
the theologies of some liberal Protestant thinkers in America in the 
nineteenth and twentieth centuries. The relation of liberal theology 
to neo-orthodoxy. Present trends in liberal thought. Mr. Wiest 

534. New Trends in Continental Theology. Exploration of the "new 
directions" in continental theology in the wake of Barth and Bultmann. 
The course will be concerned mainly with efforts to devise a more 
adequate understanding of the relation between the Word, "history," 
language, and human existence. Prerequisite, Course 511. Mr. Kehm 

57 



540. Contemporary Issues in Philosophical Theology. An examination 
of some current trends in philosophical thought and the questions they 
raise for Christian belief. Special attention is given to analytical 
philosophy and to the phenomenological movement. Mr. Wiest 



541. Apologetics: Problems and Possibilities. Barth's challenge: can 
there be a Christian apologetic? Revelation, reason and the cultural 
context. The apologetic element in preaching, evangelism and mission; 
its implications for theology. Theologians as apologists: theological 
responses to some contemporary issues. Mr. "Wiest 



542. Theology and Science. The role of science in shaping the modern 
mind. Recent changes in our understanding of the nature of scientific 
knowledge. A survey of theological responses to modern science and of 
the possibilities for a "theology of nature" in contemporary protestant 
thought. M r. Wiest 



543. Time and the Christian Schema. An investigation of the tem- 
poral or non-temporal status of such "events" as creation, fall, incar- 
nation, seconding; considering also the temporality or non-temporality 
of the Christian schema as a whole. Mr. Farley 



544. German Theology in the 19th Century. Study of the line of 
development in German theology from Schleiermacher through Albrecht 
Ritschl and Wilhelm Herrmann, with special attention to the contribu- 
tions of this "line" to the formation of the varieties of continental "neo- 
orthodoxy." Prerequisite, Course 511. Mr. Kehm 



545. Christology and Anthropology. A study of the ways in which 
reflection upon the humanity of Jesus Christ is related to their under- 
standing of the nature of man in the theologies of Barth, Brunner, 
Bonhoeffer, and Tillich. Prerequisites, Courses 511 and 520. Mr. Kehm 



546. Theological Issues in the Faith and Order Movement. A study 
of the literature of ecumenical discussions concerning the nature of the 
Church, the ministry, and the sacraments. An attempt will be made to 
formulate the crucial theological issues presently confronting the divided 
Churches in these areas. Prerequisite, Course 511. Mr. Kehm 



551. Advanced Reading in Theology. Guided reading and research in 
theological sources. The subjects and areas pursued are determined by 
the needs and interests of the students. Permission from the instructor 
is necessary for registration. Mr. Bald and Mr. Kehm 



552. Advanced Reading in Philosophy of Religion. Guided reading and 
research. The subjects and areas pursued are determined by the needs 
and interests of the students. Permission from the instructor is neces- 
sary for registration. Mr. Wiest or Mr. Jackson 

58 



THE CHURCH AND MINISTRY DIVISION 
Mr. Bald, Chairman 

Mr. Alexander Mr. Kehm 

Miss Burrows Mr. Nicholson 

Mr. Buttrick Mr. Ralston 

Mr. Chamberlin Mr. Scott 

Mr. Clyde Mr. Smith 

Mr. Hinds Mr. Wiest 

Mr. Jackson Mr. Wilmore 
Mr. Wilson 



REQUIRED COURSES 

710 and 711. Principles of Expression. Vital thinking as the basis 
of right expression for every speaking situation. Concentration upon 
meaningful communication in worship, preaching, and Scripture reading. 
Preparation through discipline of voice and body with correction of 
individual faults. Small sections, recordings, private conferences. 

Juniors, both semesters, one hour credit each. Mr. Hinds 



712. Christian Education Seminar. Designed to give the student the 
opportunity to accumulate and evaluate resources in major areas of 
concern in the teaching ministry of the local church: administration, 
curriculum, and age group aspects of programming. The framework is 
that of the local church director of Christian education. Observation is 
an integral part of the course. 

M.R.E. and M.Ed., first semester, 3 hours credit. Miss Burrows 



713. Church and Ministry I. The purpose of this course is to clarify 
to the student his prospective situation as a minister in American culture. 
Both Church and culture are studied historically, sociologically, and 
theologically; and the Church is considered in specific relation to the 
problems of urban and industrial life, racial and economic tensions, pop- 
ulation growth and movement, and the church's conventional methods. 

Juniors, second semester, 3 hours credit. Mr. Wilmore and Mr. Smith 



720. Church and Ministry II. This course is designed to enable the 
student to achieve an understanding of the nature and function of the 
preaching and pastoral offices within the one ministry of the Church and 
to introduce him, within the context of that understanding, to the content 
and skills requisite for an effective practice of these offices as they are 
informed by the insights that derive from Biblical, theological and secular 
sources. Carefully directed field education is required (1 credit hour) 
in which the student engages in ministry- Closely correlated with this 
field assignment is a concurrent classroom experience in which several 
theological disciplines are presented in their relationship to the field ex- 
perience and to each other within the purpose of the course: exegesis of 
Biblical passages selected for their implications for a doctrine of the 
Church and the Ministry and for the content and skills of the preaching 

59 



and pastoral offices (Old Testament and New Testament Exegesis, 1 credit 
hour each), reflection upon psychological data leading to an under- 
standing of human nature from a secular perspective (2 credit hours), 
and the content and skills of the preaching office in the one ministry 
of the Church as grounded in Biblical and theological understanding, 
and utilizing pertinent insights from secular sources (Homiletics, 2 
credit hours.) 

Middlers, first semester, 7 hours credit. Inter-divisional faculty 



720A. Church and Ministry II. This course is designed to enable the 
student to achieve an understanding of the nature and function of the 
teaching office within the ministry of the Church and to introduce her to 
an effective practice of this office as it is informed by the insights that 
derive from Biblical, theological and secular sources. Carefully directed 
field observation is required in which the student observes the practice 
of the teaching ministry. Closely correlated with this field assignment 
is a concurrent classroom experience dealing with the content and skills 
of the teaching office as these are grounded in Biblical, theological and 
psychological understanding. 

M.R.E. Juniors, first semester, 4 hours credit. Inter-divisional faculty 



721. Church and Ministry III. Continuation of 720 with the exception 
that the time allotted to the preaching office is equivalent to 1 credit 
hour, and Counseling (2 credit hours) replaces Psychological Foun- 
dations. 

Middlers, second semester, 6 hours credit. Inter-divisional faculty 



721A. Church and Ministry III. Continuation of 720A. 
M.R.E. Juniors, second semester, 3 hours credit. 

Inter-divisional faculty 



730. Church and Ministry IV. This course continues to correlate the 
major theological concerns with the practice of the ministry. Old 
Testament exegesis (1 credit) and New Testament exegesis (1 credit) 
are the basis for homiletics (1 credit). The doctrine of the Church and 
Ministry (3 credits) is systematically taught and is foundational to the 
teaching office, in which the content and skills of Christian education 
(3 credits) are considered. 

Seniors, first semester, 9 hours credit. Inter-divisional faculty 



731. Church and Ministry V. Theological and social ethics are care- 
fully studied. The relationship of ethics to the mission of the Church 
is explored. The socio-cultural milieu is probed in field assignments 
which include direct experience through research and participation in 
neighborhood power structures, urban renewal, racial tensions, and other 
problematic urban situations (5 credits). Old and New Testament 
exegesis (1 credit each) continues to be correlated with homiletics 
(1 credit). 

Seniors, second semester, 8 hours credit. Inter-divisional faculty 

60 



ELECTIVES 

800. The Constitution of the United Presbyterian Church. A spe- 
cialized study of the polity of the United Presbyterian Church as it 
concerns the faith, order, program, and administration of the United 
Presbyterian Church within itself and in its ecumenical relations. 

Mr. Clyde 



801. Building and Administering a Church Program. This course 
deals chiefly with the session committees of worship, evangelism, Chris- 
tian education, fellowship and stewardship, how they are formed, pre- 
pared to function, and how they relate to program and the people. The 
latest in helpful literature is provided. A project analyzing an actual 
church program is offered during the course so that the student might 
apply the principles of the course to the betterment of a local program. 
Related books are to be read and reported on. Mr. Alexander 



810. The Great Ages of Preaching. A study will be made of the 
doctrinal and ethical content, literary style, homiletical method, his- 
torical and spiritual background of preaching from the days of the 
Apostles to the beginning of the 19th century. Mr. Scott 



811. Preaching the Parables. The course is two-fold: a study of the 
history of the interpretation of Parables, and the actual writing and 
classroom delivery of sermons from the Parables. Mr. Nicholson 



812. Homiletical Study of the Acts. The course is three-fold: a review 
of the historical-critical approach to Acts, the discovery of homiletical 
material, and the actual writing and classroom delivery of sermons. 

Mr. Nicholson 



813. Preaching the Christian Year. A study will be made of the Chris- 
tian year and its use in preaching. Students will write and deliver 
selected sermons in class and prepare a full outline of a year's sermons. 

Mr. Scott 

814. Contemporary Preachers and Preaching. A study will be made 
of representative preachers from the 19th century to the present with 
special emphasis on the preaching of the last decade. Mr. Scott 



815. Preaching the Old Testament to our Contemporaries. An ex- 
amination of Old Testament themes in relation to the Gospel and to 
selected contemporary intellectual and socio-cultural situations, leading 
to study of the hermeneutical and homiletical treatment of selected Old 
Testament books and passages. There will be sermon preparation, deliv- 
ery, and class discussion. Mr. Wilson 



818. Interpretative Reading. Oral interpretation of a varied selection 
of prose, poetry, and drama as a means of developing keener sensitivity 
to the written word and greater effectiveness in communicating it. The 

61 



objective will be to mature the skills and principles acquired in Principles 
of Expression, Courses 710 and 711, which are prerequisite. Small sec- 
tions, private conferences, recordings. 

One or two hours. Mr. Hinds 



820. Music in the Church. A practical approach to the many problems 
arising in connection with church music with particular attention to the 
problems of the small congregation. Organizing the musical resources 
of the congregation, the music as a spiritual force in the church life, 
and the minister's relation to choir and choirmaster. jv[ r> Ralston 



821. Hymnology. An analytical and historical study of the great hymns 
and tunes of the Christian Church. Consideration of the qualities of a 
good hymn. Practical and effective use of the hymnal. ]y[ r . Ralston 



822. Masterpieces of Religious Music. A study of the various forms of 
music through which men have expressed their faith. Demonstration of 
the power of music to illuminate Christian truth and to "give wings to 
words." This is primarily a "listening course" making use of records 
but with assigned background reading and class comment. The purpose 
is to give the student an appreciation of various forms of musical ex- 
pression as well as some familiarity with specific works of musical art. 

Mr. Ralston 



825. Creative Teaching. A course designed to give the student the 
opportunity to explore creative ways of teaching the Christian faith to 
children, youth, and adults within the program of the church. Ob- 
servation, laboratory experience, demonstration, and guest lectures will 
be used throughout the course. Miss Burrows 



826. The Local Church Program of Christian Education. Designed to 
give the student the opportunity to accumulate and evaluate resources 
in the administration of the local church program of Christian education, 
including all age groups. Philosophy and organization of nursery and 
kindergarten weekday schools, church related youth clubs, vacation 
church school, camping programs, youth fellowship, and all departments 
of the church school will be considered. 

B.D. students only. Miss Burrows 



828. The Church and Higher Education. Designed especially for those 
interested in college teaching, campus ministry, or serving a church 
near a campus. A review of the relation of the church to higher educa- 
tion; an examination of theological issues in the relation of the Christian 
faith to higher education; and an exploration of current patterns in the 
Church's ministry to students and faculty. j\| r# Chamberlin 



829. History of Christian Education. A survey of the major move- 
ments and personalities which have influenced the development of the 
teaching ministry in the church, with particular emphasis upon the 
historical roots of present-day church education. Mi\ Chamberlin 

62 



830. Christian Education Among Children. A study of the religious 
needs of children from birth through twelve years of age paralleled with 
the church's possibilities for meeting these needs. Weekday Christian 
education programs such as vacation church school, day camping, and 
youth club as well as the Sunday church school curriculum are studied 
within the framework of how children learn. A degree of observation 
and laboratory work is included as a part of the course. Miss Burrows 

831. Christian Education Among Adults. Principles and approaches 
to the church's educational ministry to adults; introduction to established 
and changing patterns of program; relation to the insights from the gen- 
eral field of adult education; special emphasis upon work with young 
adults, parent education, and new approaches to the ministry to the aged. 

Mr. Chamberlin 

832. Contemporary Developments in Christian Education. Advanced 
course, especially for those hoping to be ministers or directors of Chris- 
tian education. Reviewing the recent history of church education, par- 
ticularly the relation of contemporary Protestant theology to general 
educational philosophy, and an examination of various efforts to express 
these theological developments in new forms of educational program. 

Mr. Chamberlin 

833. The Processes of Christian Education. An exploration of the 
various patterns of program and structure (curriculum, class grouping, 
administrative procedures, supervision) employed by churches, and the 
relation of these processes to the interpretation of the Christian faith. 
Particularly for students interested in special educational ministries. 

Mr. Chamberlin 

834. Advanced Reading in Christian Education. Guided reading and 
research, the subjects and areas to be determined by the needs and 
interests of the students. Permission of the instructor is necessary for 
registration. M r. Chamberlin 



840. Theology and Psychiatry. The metaphysical presuppositions, 
method, understanding of therapy, and some aspects of human nature 
will be compared. An attempt will be made to define mutuality and dis- 
creteness between the two disciplines. An introduction to Freudian, 
Jungian, and other psychiatric writings will be made. Mr. Jackson 



841. Seminar in Counseling. An advanced course utilizing the case 
work of students, drawing principles for both diagnosis and therapy 
out of the cases presented, and making evaluations. The role of the 
minister as counselor is carefully scrutinized. Mr. Jackson 



842. Personality Development. The meaning of the self, its develop- 
ment, its aberrations, its societal nature, its symbolization, its motiva- 
tions, etc., will be studied from the point of view of the several psychiatric 
theories, social psychology, and Biblical images. The relation of person- 
ality development to the work of the ministry will be clarified. 

Mr. Jackson 

63 



843. The Aging: Personality Formation and Pastoral Care. This 
seminar will look at the question of aging from three significant direc- 
tions: the psychology of religion in specific relevance to the aging; 
socio-psychological patterns in the aging process; and the role of the 
church in ministering to the aging. 

846. Theory and Practice of the Devotional Life. A consideration of 
the devotional life of the Christian in the modern world. The relation 
of doctrine to the devotional life. The means of grace studied. The 
course is also designed to acquaint the student with the devotional 
classics. Mr. Jackson 

850. World Mission of the Church. A survey of the ecumenical witness 
of the church throughout the world, with special reference to the work 
of the United Presbyterian Church. Mr. Clyde 

851. Tutorial in Missions. Reading and discussions on missions, de- 
signed particularly for missionary candidates and those considering be- 
coming candidates. Mr. Clyde 

852. Evangelism. This course offers a detailed discussion and study 
of the definition, motivation, urgency and nature of evangelism. Personal 
work, evangelism for commitment, evangelism through fellowship, youth 
evangelism and various opportunities for pastor and laity through the 
church are covered. A program of reading and book reports acquaints 
the student with the best literature in the field. Opportunity for role 
playing in class is afforded. Mr. Alexander 

854. Comparative Religion. A study of the origin and development of 
religion, with special investigation of Primitive Religion, Hinduism, 
Buddhism, Confucianism, and Islam, with regard to their bearing on 
Modern Missions. Mr. Clyde 

855. Major Sects. Jehovah's Witnesses, Mormonism, Christian Sci- 
ence and other groups compared with catholic Christianity. Resem- 
blances and differences noted. Mr. Gerstner 

856. The Protestant Approach to Catholicism. A comparative inves- 
tigation of Protestantism and Catholicism, with a study of the general 
problem of Protestant evangelism in connection with Catholicism. 

Mr. Clyde 

857. The Protestant Approach to Communism. A study of Communism, 
its challenge to Christianity, the special answer of Protestantism to 
Communism, and the general problems with which Communism is in- 
volved. Mr. Clyde 

858. The Ecumenical Movement. A survey of the origin and develop- 
ment of the modern Ecumenical Movement, combined with an exploration 
of the elements of church unity and some anticipation of the future. 

Mr. Clyde 

64 



859. Seminar in Ecumenics. This course is offered at Duquesne Uni- 
versity under a joint faculty including Duquesne professors, Pittsburgh 
Seminary professors, and others. It is open to qualified Pittsburgh Sem- 
inary students. 



870. The Theological Ethics of William Temple and Reinhold Niebuhr. 

A comparative study of the social thought of the late Archbishop of 
Canterbury and one of America's leading voices in the field of ethics in 
relation to their theological foundations. Mr. g a id 



871. Seminar in Social Ethics. The Christian address to the problems 
of economics, politics, international affairs, education, and the family. 
The implications of an understanding of these areas for theology, the 
vocation of the Christian, and the service of the church in the world. 

Mr. Bald 



872. Research Seminar in Selected Social Problems. Students will 
elect specific areas of social concern in modern culture for investigation 
in which they will seek to relate them to the demands and insights of 
the Christian ethic. Mr. ^ & \d 



873. Church and State in Marxist Countries. This course will deal 
with the recent history and present positions of the Protestant and 
Orthodox Churches in Marxist countries. Primary sources will be read 
and a research paper will be required. Prerequisite: Modern Church 
History. Mr. Ritschl 



874. Sociology and Religion. This course investigates the sociological 
analysis of religion from Troelsch and Weber to Gerhard Lenski. Stress 
is placed on the nature of religious phenomena in western society and 
their relationship to the basic institutions of American culture. Struc- 
tural-functional theory is compared with other approaches. The role of 
the Church in American society is studied in the current literature of the 
social sciences and in the writings of Christian social ethicists. 

Mr. Wilmore 



875. Community Analysis and Church Strategy. This course will study 
community in terms of place, people and ethos in the inner-city and 
suburbia. Certain census data will be discussed. Special emphasis will 
be given to power structure analysis and guidelines for contact with 
minorities and other alienated segments. The second half of this course 
will deal with strategies and techniques in local church social action. 

Mr. Wilmore 



876. Social Ethics. This course deals with the Biblical and theological 
basis of the good society and the nature of personal decision and church 
action in contemporary life. Philosophical ethics and the relationship 
of the social sciences to value theory and decision-making are considered. 
The writings of European and American theologians and ethicists are 
studied with reference to modern social problems. Mr. Wilmore 

65 



877. Seminar in Race Relations. This course integrates history, social 
science theory, and theological analysis in the study of race relations. 
Special emphasis is given to Negro-white relations in the United States. 
The course also deals with the writings of secularists as well as Christian 
ethicists in the analysis of racial problems. Attention is given to de- 
veloping sound inter-group relations theory and local church action. At 
each session student papers are read and discussed. Mr. Wilmore 



880. Christian Faith and Contemporary Literature. A study of the 
relationship between the Christian faith and themes in contemporary 
literature. Works by a number of modern writers including Kafka, 
Camus, Faulkner, and Warren, among others, will be read and discussed. 
May be taken for 2 or 3 credits. Students enrolling for 3 credits will at- 
tend both seminars. M r. Buttrick 



884. The Classics of Christian Literature. A study of the outstanding 
literary masterpieces of Christian history selected from the ancient, 
mediaeval and various national literatures, such as Italy, France, Spain 
and England; poetry, drama, sermons, devotions, all writings wherein 
there is a consciousness of artistic excellence. Mr. McCloy 



885. Christian Humanism. A study of the relations of the Christian 
Church to the values and excellencies of human culture as seen in the 
Classical ideals (paideia) of the fourth and fifth centuries and again in 
the period of the Renaissance, and later; special study will be given to 
Erasmus and the English and Italian humanists. Mr. McCloy 



Elective Credit at the University 

Up to four credit hours may also be taken in the Graduate School of 
Public and International Affairs of the University of Pittsburgh. The 
differential in tuition between that of the Seminary and that of the Uni- 
versity is taken care of through foundation grants at the University. 
These elective courses would be primarily in urbanization, economics, and 
international affairs. 



Summer Field Education 

Every student is encouraged to spend one summer in field education, 
preferably in some form of clinical training. Students who choose and 
qualify for clinical training in approved programs will be given two 
hours of elective credit for each six weeks of clinical training to a maxi- 
mum of four credit hours. For students who do not choose or do not 
qualify for a clinical training program a number of options without any 
elective credit are allowed (such as national park chaplaincies, Board of 
National Missions assignments, assistantships, etc.), upon consultation 
with and approval by the Field Education Office. 

Any student seeking a church-related position for the summer must 
counsel with the Field Education Office so that provision may be made 
for supervision on the field. Summer pastorates for students who have 
completed only their Junior year are discouraged because such students 
will not have had the courses in Church and Ministry dealing with the 
preaching, teaching and pastoral office. 

66 



THE MASTER OF THEOLOGY DEGREE 

A strong program of graduate education at the Master's level is 
offered by the Seminary in three fields : Biblical Studies, History and 
Theology, and Advanced Pastoral Studies. The curricula announced 
on the following pages are open only to degree candidates who expect 
to pursue serious study requiring three days a week over a period of 
two years (equivalent to full-time over one year). 

Every effort will be made to fill up gaps in theological knowledge, 
and this is made more possible since only six applicants will be ad- 
mitted to each program per year. There is considerable freedom in 
which the student is encouraged to explore in depth his own interests. 
Each student will receive close personal attention from the professors 
in the curriculum of his choice. 

These Masters' programs are planned for two purposes: to help 
prepare candidates for such specialized services as teaching, counsel- 
ing, and the campus ministry; and to benefit pastors who may wish 
to improve their effectiveness in Biblical, theological, or pastoral 
studies in relation to ministerial responsibilities. It is with the pastor 
in mind that the faculty views these programs as being right at the 
heart of continuing education. The courses are designed for a learned, 
relevant ministry, whatever form the ministry takes. 



67 



Standards for Admission 

1. A B.D. degree from an accredited seminary. 

2. An average of B or better in the B.D. degree or in a qualify- 
ing examination, according to the discretion of the Graduate 
Education Committee. 

3. The ability to use any language integral to the chosen field 
of study. While not a requirement for admission, a reading 
knowledge of French or German is required before a student 
can begin the second half of the course. Language examina- 
tions are given in September, January, and June. 

4. The ability to handle English composition with competence. 



Requirements for the Degree 

1. Twenty-four course hours (30 in the Advanced Pastoral 
Studies Program) with an average of B or better. More 
than two C grades will eliminate a student from the program. 

(A student in full residence is one who carries the full course 
of study in one year. A student in half-residence is one who 
carries half the course of study in one year.) 

2. Six hours for a thesis or a research project which would be 
written up in final and acceptable form and either option 
completed by the end of the third year. 

3. A comprehensive examination covering the 24 (or 30) units 
of study. 

4. An oral examination on the thesis or research project. 



FEES AND EXPENSES 

Matriculation Fee #35.00 

Tuition $20.00 per credit hour 

Library Fee $20.00 per year 

Graduation Fee $10.00 



Applicants for this degree should apply to the Director of 
Admissions. 



68 



DESCRIPTION OF COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

FOR THE 

MASTER OF THEOLOGY DEGREE 



Grammar and Reading 



THE MASTER OF THEOLOGY PROGRAM 

IN 

BIBLICAL STUDIES 

The Master's degree in the Biblical Division covers both Tes- 
taments. While the thesis may concentrate on one Testament, the 
course work is deliberately designed to provide a certain degree of 
qualification in the whole field. The six hours of electives must be 
taken either in History and Theology or the Program in Advanced 
Pastoral Studies. 

Advanced Hebrew Grammar Advanced Greek Grammar 

and Reading and Reading 

Bible Seminar Bible Seminar 

Grammar and Reading (incl. LXX) 

Exegesis 

Electives— 6 hours Exegesis 

Thesis — 6 hours Bibliography 

M100 and M101. Advanced Hebrew Grammar and Reading. Study to 
supplement and continue undergraduate work done with the Hebrew 
O.T. Two hours credit in each of two semesters. 

M200 and M201. Advanced Greek Grammar and Reading. Study to sup- 
plement undergraduate work done with the Greek N.T. Books on the 
N.T. not previously read will be completed, and selected portions of the 
Greek O.T. will be added. Two hours credit in each of two semesters. 

M300 and M301. Bible Seminar. Problems of introduction, text, arch- 
aeology, and the various areas of criticism are considered with special 
attention to the needs of the particular candidates enrolled. Two hours 
credit in each of two semesters. 

M102 and M202. Exegesis. Thorough exegesis of selected passages in 
the Hebrew O.T. and the Greek N.T. Two hours credit in each of two se- 
mesters. 

M302. Bibliography. Survey of the modern literature on the Bible 
with reading and discussion of selected volumes. Two hours credit. 



THE MASTER OF THEOLOGY PROGRAM 

IN 

HISTORY AND THEOLOGY 

The candidate for the Master's degree in History and Theology 
may major in either Church History or Theology, taking 18 hours, 
including a six-hour thesis credit, in the major field, six hours in 
the minor field, and six hours of electives in Biblical Studies or the 
Program in Advanced Pastoral Studies. Class work must be com- 
pleted within two years; the final date for completion of the thesis 
may be extended to the close of a third academic year. The plan of 
the two programs is as follows: 

Church History Theology 

Patristics Seminar in Theological Method 

Research in Puritanism Christology 

The American Churches 19th Century Theology 
and Secular Culture 



Guided Reading in Theology 
Patristics 



Guided Reading in Church History 

Christology 

19th Century Theology 17th Cent ^ Orthodoxy 

Electives-6 hours Electives-6 hours 

Thesis— 6 hours Thesis— 6 hours 

M500. Seminar in Theological Method. The nature of theological think- 
ing will be studied: Prolegomena, organization of systems, theological 
language, and hermeneutics with illustration from representative theo- 
logians. Three hours credit. 

M401. Patristics. The study of the idea of ecclesiastical tradition; the 
solutions of the Fathers of the ancient church to the recurrent or immedi- 
ate problems of faith, life, and church order; the history of patristics and 
the controversies concerning it, and its significance for the modern ecu- 
menical movement. The manuals of Quasten and Altaner will serve as 
guides, and the texts will be studied for the most part in such series of 
English translations as the Ante-and Post Nicene Fathers, Ancient Christian 
Writers, The Fathers of the Church, etc. Three hours credit. 

M501. Christology. Research and discussion of the problems of Chris- 
tology. Readings in the sources with particular emphasis on Christology 
as the definitive issue in contemporary theology. Three hours credit. 

M402. Research in Puritanism. Special topics such as the covenant, 
seeking, church order and the relation of church and state will be explored. 
Three hours credit. 

M403. 17th Century Orthodoxy. This course will consider the orthodox 
background of Schleiermacher and other later theologians. Three hours 
credit. 

70 



M502. 19th Century Theology. Reading and discussion of the writings 
of Schleiermacher and Ritschl, showing their influence upon theologi- 
cal trends of thought leading to the present. Three hours credit. 



M404. Seminar in the American Churches and Secular Culture. Each 
year a special topic will be selected and announced for study: for example, 
church and state, the Protestant ethos in the 19th century, the social 
gospel. 



M405. Guided Reading in Church History. Readings approved by the 
professor designed to prepare the student for general examination in the 
field of Church History. Regular discussion of assignments is required. 
Three hours credit. 



M503. Guided Reading in Theology. Guided reading in theological 
works, both historical and contemporary, with which the student is not 
sufficiently familiar, looking toward general examination in the field of 
Theology. Three hours credit. 



Thesis in Church History. Individual guidance of a major project of 
research is offered. Any topic within the field of Church History may be 
selected, contingent upon the approval of the advising professor. Six 
hours credit. 



Thesis in Theology. Individual guidance of a major project of research 
is offered. Any topic within the field of Theology may be selected, con- 
tingent upon the approval of the supervising professor. Six hours credit. 



71 



THE MASTER OF THEOLOGY PROGRAM 

IN 

ADVANCED PASTORAL STUDIES 



The Program for Advanced Pastoral Studies is designed to help 
students to know themselves better; to understand and become sensi- 
tive to inter-personal relationships; to be familiar with group process; 
to become involved in creative dialogue between theological studies 
and the social sciences; and to see more clearly the resources of the 
Christian church for health at the various levels. 

The faculty teaching in this program is composed of seminary 
personnel and members of several faculties of the University of Pitts- 
burgh, including the Medical School, the Graduate School of Social 
Work, and the Department of Speech. The latter include Robert 
J. Shoemaker, M.D., Margaret B. McFarland, Ph.D., Rex A. Pitten- 
ger, M.D., Werner Lutz, M.S., Erma T. Meyerson, M.A.A.S.S., and 
Jack Matthews, Ph.D. 

In addition to the following program, six hours of electives must 
be taken in either Biblical Studies or History and Theology. 



Year One 



Developmental Theory of 
Personality I 

Philosophical Issues in 
Psychotherapy 

Practicum with children 



Developmental Theory of 
Personality II 

Dynamics of Family Life 

General Hospital Practicum 



Group Process 

The Socio-Cultural Environment 

Counseling Seminar 



Year Two 



Theology and Psychology 

Pastoral Care and the 
Church Program 

Counseling Seminar 



72 



M600. Developmental Theory of Personality I. The age span is traced 
from pre-natal influences and birth through the various stages of child- 
hood, showing normal growth patterns, the abnormalities of neurotic and 
psychotic development, and the relation of the child to the social milieu. 

M60L Developmental Theory of Personality II. Continuation of M600 
from adolescence through the aging process. 

M602. Philosophical Issues in Psychotherapy. Freudian thought and 
existential analysis are studied with regard to such issues as epistemol- 
ogy, ontology, anxiety, freedom, time, value theory. 

M603. Practicum with Children. This practicum is conducted at Arsen- 
al Family and Children's Center, the Medical School, the University of 
Pittsburgh, under the direction of the staff at Arsenal. Interpretive 
seminars are held regularly. 

M604. Dynamics of Family Life. 

M605. General Hospital Practicum. This practicum is conducted at the 
Presbyterian-University Hospital under the direction of the hospital med- 
ical and nursing staffs. The students are not chaplains but male orderlies 
assigned to nurses' stations. Interpretive seminars are held regularly. 

M606. Group Process. The theory and practice of group experience 
are studied with the end in view of better understanding the dynamics of 
church groups. 

M607. The Socio-cultural Environment. This course deals with the 
ecological and cultural factors which make functional and dysfunctional 
contributions to personality and community development. It will empha- 
size the role of institutions (other than the family) and power structures 
in their direct and indirect effect upon the individual. 

M608. Counseling Seminar. Each student is required to work with 
four counselees, under supervision, and to participate in the presentation 
of case material. 

M609. Counseling Seminar. Continuation of M608. 

M610. Theology and Psychology. The material of the entire program 
is pulled together in dialogue between theology and the human sciences, 
especially psychology and psychiatry. Such themes as God, man, sin, 
redemption are dealt with. 

M611. Pastoral Care and the Church Program. Pastoral care, informed 
theologically and psychologically, becomes the vantage-point for taking 
a hard look at church programming: its relevance, its resources, etc. 
A primary concern is to ask what the church can do in its supportive and 
preventive roles as well as in its redemptive and re-creative roles. 

Clinical Training. A twelve weeks' course in an approved clinical train- 
ing program will be required before graduation and may be taken pre- 
vious to admission or in the summer between the first and second years. 

73 




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THE UNIVERSITY OF PITTSBURGH'S GRADUATE SCHOOL 

OF PUBLIC AND INTERNATIONAL AFFAIRS 

and 

PITTSBURGH THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

(A Joint Program) 

A cooperative educational program which will have special mean- 
ing for international service (ecumenical mission and relations), ad- 
ministration, and urbanization has been worked out with one of the 
world's outstanding graduate schools of public and international af- 
fairs. The areas of concentration in this program are: 

General Public Administration 

Administration of International Affairs 

Economic and Social Development 

Municipal-Metropolitan Affairs 

Community and Voluntary Organization Affairs 

The program allows Bachelor of Divinity students to elect up 
to four hours from the offerings of the Graduate School of Public and 
International Affairs, the tuition differential being graciously financed 
from fellowship funds provided by the Heinz and Ford Foundations. 
This B.D. enrichment will be especially valuable to those students 
preparing to become fraternal workers, missionaries, Peace Corps 
volunteers, United Nations workers, etc. 

Basic to the program are the M.P.I.A. degree, Master of Public 
and International Affairs, and the M.P.A. degree, Master of Public 
Administration. Qualified persons from overseas as well as the 
United States may enroll as regular or special students in these de- 
gree programs. Such students are subject to the exclusive academic 
control of the University and receive their Masters' degrees from the 
University. However, latitude is injected into these programs so that 
elective course work can be taken at the Seminary, credit to be ap- 
plied to the university degrees. 

It is the policy of the Graduate School of Public and Internation- 
al Affairs that half its students are from overseas. This provides for 
rich trans-cultural experience. Through this joint program Pitts- 
burgh offers an exciting and exceptional opportunity for preparation 
for ecumenical mission and relations. 

Inquiries should be directed to: 

The Graduate School of Public and International Affairs 
University of Pittsburgh 
Pittsburgh 13, Pennsylvania 

or 
The Director of Admissions 
Pittsburgh Theological Seminary 
Pittsburgh 6, Pennsylvania 

75 



CONTINUING EDUCATION 

Under the direction of the Graduate Education Committee con- 
tinuing education is fast assuming a major place in the life of the 
Seminary. Five programs are now available: 



THE EIGHT WEEKS SCHOOLS 

For eight Tuesdays in October and November and again in 
February and March the regular faculty offers courses in a wide 
range of areas but always with particular relevance to ministry, what- 
ever its forms (pastoral, administrative, etc.). For example, The Book 
of Revelation, Pastoral Counseling, Contemporary Criticisms of the 
Christian Faith, and Pastoral Preaching Today, among others, have 
been offered this past year. Over one hundred twenty-five ministers 
participated in this program. Each class runs two hours, and a stu- 
dent may take up to three courses. Announcement of course offerings 
is made in Panorama, the quarterly bulletin, as well as in folder 
form. The fee of $5.00 per course includes the use of the library. 
Inquiries should be directed to the Registrar. 



SPRING AND SUMMER PROGRAMS 

The School of Religion, held each summer on the campus of 
Shady Side Academy, Pittsburgh, and supported by the Pitcairn- 
Crabbe Foundation, invites 150 ministers from within the Synod of 
Pennsylvania. The faculty is drawn from all over the United States 
as well as from the Seminary. The dates for the 1964 school are 
June 22-26. 

Under the joint sponsorship of the Seminary and the Synod of 
Ohio a continuing education seminar for ministers and their wives 
will be held on the campus of Muskingum College June 28 to July 3, 
1964. It will be staffed primarily by seminary personnel and will 
emphasize study and group discussion. The curriculum: The Church's 
Healing Ministry, Homiletics Workshop, Social Ethics and Politics, 
and The Holy Spirit and the Book of Acts. In addition to attending 
the Biblical lectures, participants will elect one of the three seminars 
for intensive study. Those who attend will be expected to do pre- 
scribed reading before the beginning of the school in order that the 
best use may be made of seminar time. 

The Third Annual Ministers' Institute, sponsored by the Sem- 
inary, Pittsburgh Presbytery, and the Board of Christian Education, 
will be held March 31 to April 9, 1964, at the Seminary. A small 
group of pastoral ministers will be invited to participate. Much use 
will be made of the library. Discussion of theological and social 
issues will be guided by leaders drawn from the seminary faculty 
and elsewhere. The theme of the institute will be "The Word in the 
World," with seminars as follows: The Word as found in the Scrip- 
tures; The Word as found in the Christian Community; and The 
Word related to the World. 

76 



Pittsburgh Seminary will join with Johnson C. Smith University 
and the Board of National Missions in supporting an institute for 
ministers to be held on the campus of Johnson C. Smith University 
July 13-25, 1964. 



AUDIT COURSES 

A limited number of auditors will be admitted to regular B.D. 
and M.R.E. courses. To protect the integrity of the degree programs 
the registrant must have the approval of both the Academic Dean 
and the professor for auditing. The cost for auditing is half the reg- 
ular tuition fee plus half the library fee. While no grade is given or 
recorded, auditors are expected to be faithful in attendance and to 
do the required readings. Approximately fifty auditors a semester 
can be helped to continue their theological education through this 
program. Inquiries should be directed to the Registrar. 



CREDIT COURSES 

A limited number of students already having the B.D. degree 
may be enrolled for regular Bachelor of Divinity courses. The pur- 
pose of this program is to help prepare those who wish to do graduate 
work but who need to buttress their seminary training, fill in gaps, 
or do additional prerequisite work toward specialization. A grade 
is given and recorded for transcript purposes. The cost is one-half 
the regular matriculation fee and full tuition. Application forms 
should be secured from the Director of Admissions. 



77 



THE ALUMNI ASSOCIATION 



OFFICERS 

President W. Roy McGeary, Sr. '24 

Vice President W. Malcolm Brown '41 

Secretary Curtis J. Patterson '37 

Treasurer John A. Stuart '37 

Necrological Secretary Clarence F. Anderson '28 

Director of Alumni Relations J. Rowe Hinsey 



The Alumni Association, now numbering more than 2,000 mem- 
bers, is composed of the former students, graduates and post-graduates 
of Pittsburgh Theological Seminary and its antecedent seminaries. 
The purposes of the Association are to deepen the friendships begun 
in seminary and to afford fellowship among all its graduates; to co- 
operate with the Seminary in enlisting young people for church 
vocations and recruiting prospective seminary candidates; to support 
actively the cause of theological education and of the Seminary in 
particular in its development to meet the demands of the future; and 
lastly, to have a sympathetic interest in the life and work of the Sem- 
inary's students and faculty. The Alumni Association sponsors sev- 
eral seminary convocations. 

The Association meets annually on the afternoon of commence- 
ment day to conduct certain business and to elect officers. This is 
followed by the alumni dinner, after which the graduating seniors 
are inducted into the Association, and alumni join in the academic 
procession of the commencement exercises. 

Regional meetings of alumni are held frequently, and a dinner 
at the annual meeting of The General Assembly is another highlight 
of the year's activities. 



78 



DEGREES AWARDED, 1962-1963 



THE DEGREE OF BACHELOR OF DIVINITY 

John Harvey Ashenfelter ...... Ridley Park, Pa. 

B.S., Drexel Institute, 1960 

Clyde Carson Billings ...... Youngstown, Ohio 

B.A., Muskingum College, 1960 

Benjamin Stephen Booth ....... Leechburg, Pa. 

B.S., Grove City College, 1960 

David E. Breckenridge ....... Woodston, Kansas 

B.S., Sterling College, 1959 

James M. Brinks Dothan, Alabama 

A.B., Lynchburg College, 1956 
M.A., University of Pittsburgh, 1960 

Lowell E. Byall Whittier, Calif. 

B.A., Sterling College, 1960 

John N. Crock Pittsburgh, Pa. 

B.A., University of Pittsburgh, 1960 

George William Dando ....... Baltimore, Md. 

B.A., Baylor University, 1960 

Daniel Reubin Duerksen ....... Pikesville, Md. 

B.M.E., University of Wichita, 1949 

Jack Fowlow Emerick Beaver Falls, Pa. 

A.B., Geneva College, 1959 

Fred A. Feldner Allison Park, Pa. 

B.A., Geneva College, 1959 

Forrest V. Fitzhugh San Antonio, Texas 

B.A., Trinity University, 1960 

Robert Charles Fox Bethlehem, Pa. 

A.B., Albright College, 1957 

John Harmond Francisco ....... Elmsford, N. Y. 

A.B., Lehigh University, 1956 

William C. Gawlas Pittsburgh, Pa. 

A.B., University of Pittsburgh, 1959 

Richard K. Gibson ....... Castle Shannon, Pa. 

B.A., Muskingum College, 1960 

George Harold Giles Pittsburgh, Pa. 

A.B., University of Pittsburgh, 1959 

Benjamin Gorbea ....... Washington, D. C. 

A.B., Maryville College, 1959 

John Mack Groat Pittsburgh, Pa. 

B.A., Mount Union College, 1959 

79 



Aaron Griffith Hastie, Jr Pittston, Pa. 

B.A., Wilkes College, 1960 

Peter Charles Hauser ....... Harrisburg, Pa. 

A.B., Grove City College, 1960 

David L. Heyser Norristown, Pa. 

A.B., Ursinus College, 1956 

Alfred C. Horn ......... Charleroi, Pa. 

B.A., Westminster College, 1960 

Robert Fraser Hostetter, Jr Pittsburgh, Pa. 

B.A., Waynesburg College, 1960 

John Edmund Johnson Clairton, Pa. 

B.S., University of Pittsburgh, 1957 

Gordon A. Jones Havertown, Pa. 

B.A., Houghton College, 1958 

Wayne K. King Ellwood City, Pa. 

B.A., Muskingum College, 1960 

David C. Koch Philadelphia, Pa. 

B.A., Temple University, 1959 

Steven James Kocsis Pittsburgh, Pa. 

B.A., Muskingum College, 1960 

Zoltan A. Kovacs Debrecen, Hungary 

B.S., Reformed School of Education, Hungary, 1946 

Russell Howard McCuen, Jr Malvern, Pa. 

B.A., Maryville College, 1960 

John B. McLaren New Brighton, Pa. 

B.A., Westminster College, 1959 
M.A., University of Pittsburgh, 1960 

Dale E. Miller Pittsburgh, Pa. 

B.A., Westminster College, 1959 

Gerald A. Miller Industry, Pa. 

B.A., Geneva College, 1959 

Walter W. Miller Montpelier, Ohio 

B.S., Ohio State University, 1955 
M.S., Ohio State University, 1960 

William Harold Moore ....... Pittsburgh, Pa, 

A.B., Waynesburg College, 1959 

Patrick H. Morison Baltimore, Md. 

B.A., Whitworth College, 1959 

William G. Morris McKeesport, Pa. 

B.S. in Ed., California State Teachers College, 1959 

Maurice James Murray . Dover, Delaware 

A.B., Wooster College, 1960 

Ronald L. Oglesbee ......... Xenia, Ohio 

B.S., Bowling Green State University, 1959 

80 



Irvin Lee Page Conemaugh, Pa. 

A.B., Waynesburg College, 1960 

Howard F. Peters Pittsburgh, Pa. 

A.B., University of Pittsburgh, 1959 

David Philips Valencia, Pa 

BA, Muskingum College, 1959 

Claude Van Ponting Salinas, Calif. 

A.B., Muskingum College, 1960 

Robert Edson Reed ........ Clairton, Pa. 

B.A., Waynesburg College, 1960 

Lloyd Salazar Hawthorne, Calif. 

B.A., Biola College, 1956 

B.D., Talbot Theological Seminary, 1961 

Walter Terry Schoener Pittsburgh, Pa. 

B.A., Muskingum College, 1960 

Paul W. Shogren, Jr Pittsburgh, Pa. 

B.S. in Forestry, Pennsylvania State University, 1951 

Richard B. Snyder ........ Big Run, Pa. 

B.S., Clarion State Teachers College, 1959 

George Young Stewart Baltimore, Md. 

A.B., Maryville College, 1960 

John L. Symons Lakewood, Ohio 

A.B., Muskingum College, 1957 

Robert Dale Taylor Pittsburgh, Pa. 

B.S., University of Pittsburgh, 1960 

Francis Elliott Tennies Ontario Center, N. Y. 

A.B., Grove City College, 1960 

Joseph L. Tropansky Du Bois, Pa. 

A.B., Maryville College, 1959 

John R. Wineman Pittsburgh, Pa. 

B.A., Tarkio College, 1959 

John E. Winnett Uniontown, Pa. 

B.S., Waynesburg College, 1951 

Harry Glenn Winsheimer Indiana, Pa. 

B.S., Waynesburg College, 1959 

THE DEGREE OF MASTER OF RELIGIOUS EDUCATION 

Mary Ruth Brawley Blacksburg, S. C. 

A.B., Erskine College, 1960 

Joyce Lee Helfer Columbus, Ohio 

B.S. in Ed., Ohio State University, 1958 

81 



HONORS AND AWARDS 



Summa Cum Laude 

Robert Dale Taylor 



Magna Cum Laude 

Mary Ruth Brawley 



Cum Laude 

David Philips Lowell E. Byall 



GRADUATING WITH HONORS IN 
Biblical Studies 

Lowell E. Byall Robert Dale Taylor 



The Thomas Jamison Scholarship 

and 

The Sylvester S. Marvin Memorial Fellowship 

Robert Dale Taylor and David Philips 

The Jennie Rigg Barbour Memorial Prize 
Lowell E. Byall 

The Hugh Thomson Kerr Moderator Prize 

Walter W. Miller 

The Michael Wilson Keith Memorial HomUetical Prize 
Robert Dale Taylor 



82 



The Robert A. Lee Church History Award 

First Place — Robert Dale Taylor 
Second Place — David Philips and John Francisco 

The Home Training Bible Class Award in Missions 
David Erwin Breckenridge 

The Chevy Chase Christian Education Award 

(Young People's Work) 

Joseph Leroy Tropansky 

The Christian Education Award 
Mary Ruth Brawley 



MIDDLER CLASS AWARDS 

The Alice Myers Sigler Memorial Prize in History and Theology 

James A. Keller 



JUNIOR CLASS AWARDS 

The James Purdy Scholarships 

Charles E. Alcorn 

James B. Brasel 

Ralph B. Jones 

Paul John Milio 
Judith Mary Sievers 
Hugh Brock Springer 

Lewis R. Thomas 



The Andrew Reed Scholarship 
Gary E. Huffman 



The Fred McFeely Rogers Prize in Biblical Studies 
Charles E. Alcorn 



The Joseph Watson Greek Entrance Prize 
Leland R. Stoops and Gary E. Huffman 



REGISTER OF STUDENTS 1963-1964 
Senior Class 

Richard D. Adams ........ Buffalo, N. Y. 

B.A., Grove City College, 1961 

William Thorpe Alter Pittsburgh, Pa. 

B.S., Lehigh University, 1956 
B.S. in Bus. Adm., 1957 

David L. Barrett Providence, R. I. 

B.A., Barrington College, 1961 

Robert M. Bereit ....... Bay Village, Ohio 

B.A., Western Reserve, 1961 

Benjamin B. Booker Tampa, Fla. 

B.S., Hampton Institute, 1935 

Muriel C. Brown Ellensburg, Wash. 

B.A., Whitworth College, 1961 

Keith Burroughs Philadelphia, Pa. 

B.S., University of Pennsylvania, 1960 

J. Paul Cameron ........ Pittsburgh, Pa. 

A.B., Denison University, 1960 

John H. Cherry ........ Pittsburgh, Pa. 

B.A., University of Pittsburgh, 1961 

Donald W. Chichester ....... Levittown, N. Y. 

B.S. in Appl. Physics, Hofstra College, 1955 

Jack M. Chisholm ........ Pittsburgh, Pa. 

B.A., University of Pittsburgh, 1961 

Donald H. Craig ........ Pittsburgh, Pa. 

B.A., Ohio Wesleyan University, 1961 

Samuel B. Craig, Jr. ...... Pittsburgh, Pa. 

B.A., University of Virginia, 1961 

Gene W. Crooks ........ Pontiac, Mich. 

B.A., Beloit College, 1953 

Donald C. Custis . . . . . . . . Riverdale, Md. 

A.B., College of Wooster, 1958 

Samuel C. Dunning Pittsburgh, Pa. 

B.A., Geneva College, 1956 

Eugene C. Fieg ........ Louisville, Ky. 

A.B., Maryville College, 1961 

Richard E. Fouse ....... College Park, Md. 

B.A., University of Maryland, 1961 

Robert Frederick ....... Slippery Rock, Pa. 

Slippery Rock College, 1961 

Merl L. Galusha, Jr . Schenectady, N. Y. 

B.S., Union College, 1959 

James C. George ........ New Castle, Pa. 

A.B., Westminster College, 1949 

84 



Robert L. Gordon Irwin, Pa. 

B.A., Duquesne University, 1961 

Lloyd F. Gossler ........ Harrisburg, Pa. 

B.S., Florida State University, 1961 

Gary C. Haase Wooster, Ohio 

B.A., The College of Wooster, 1961 

Edward S. Hammett Pittsburgh, Pa. 

B.A., Washington and Jefferson College, 1951 

Hewon Han .......... Seoul, Korea 

A.B., The College of Emporia, 1960 

Edwin Blythe Hartman . Ellwood City, Pa. 

B.B.A., Westminster College, 1959 

A. Vanlier Hunter, Jr Meadville, Pa. 

B.A., Grove City College, 1961 

John Edward Karnes ........ Akron, Ohio 

B.A., Muskingum College, 1960 

James A. Keller ........ Pittsburgh, Pa. 

B.S., Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 1961 

Harold D. Kelley ........ Pittsburgh, Pa. 

B.B.A., University of Pittsburgh, 1958 
M.B.A., University of Pittsburgh, 1959 

Dong Soo Kim Seoul, Korea 

B.A., Union Christian College 

Harry Donald Lash Rector, Pa. 

B.S., Clarion State Teachers College, 1960 

William J. Lightbody ....... Pittsburgh, Pa. 

B.A., University of Pittsburgh, 1961 

Raymond F. Luber, Jr Pittsburgh, Pa. 

B.A., Westminster College, 1960 

Louis S. Lunardini Pittsburgh, Pa. 

A.B., University of Pittsburgh, 1961 

Allen W. McCallum Detroit, Mich. 

B.A., Muskingum College, 1960 

John M. McNitt Cuyahoga Falls, Ohio 

B.S., Allegheny College, 1952 

Robert Allan Messenger ....... Bridgeville, Pa. 

B.A., Hamilton College, 1950 

Ronald P. Miller Buffalo, N. Y. 

B.A., Westminster College, 1961 

Albert Montanari ........ Buffalo, N. Y. 

B.S., State University of N. Y., College for Teachers at Buffalo, 1958 

Harold R. Moore Pittsburgh, Pa. 

B.A., University of Pittsburgh, 1961 

Henry 0. Moore, Jr Dallas, Texas 

B.A., Trinity University, 1961 

85 



DAvrD N. Morton ....... 

B.S. in Economics, University of Pennsylvania, 1960 

Edward Smith Napier ...... 

B.A., Houghton College, 1958 

John W. Nelson ....... 

B.A., Pennsylvania State University, 1961 

Richard Arthur Olsson ...... 

A.B., Barrington College, 1958 

Ernest W. Peterson 

B.S., College of Idaho, 1961 

Gary S. Pinder ....... 

A.B., The College of Wooster, 1961 

Dayanand David Pitamber ..... 
M.A., Agra University, 1961 

William J. Sharp 

B.A., Washington and Jefferson College, 1960 

John Auld Simpson ....... 

B.A., Akron University, 1961 

William F. Smith ....... 

B.S., University of Michigan, 1960 

Robert C. Sproul 

B.A., Westminster College, 1961 

James A. Tait ........ Mechanicsburg, Pa 

B.S. in Building Construction, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, 1955 



Philadelphia, Pa. 

Philadelphia, Pa. 

Westfield, N. J. 

Parkersburg, Pa. 

Buhl, Idaho 

Rochester, N. Y. 

Mainpuri, India 

Washington, Pa. 

Akron, Ohio 

Coshocton, Ohio 

Pittsburgh, Pa 



Bruce C. Theunissen 

A.B., Central Michigan University, 1951 

Charles N. Thompson . . . . 
B.A., Davis and Elkins College, 1961 

William A. Van Wie .... 
A.B., The College of Wooster, 1961 

Robert N. Van Wyk .... 
B.A., The College of Wooster, 1961 

James C. Ware 

A.B., Ohio Wesleyan University, 1956 



Evansville, Ind, 

Hawthorne, N. J 

Wheeling, W. Va 

Paterson, N. J 

Mansfield, Ohio 



Middler Class 



Charles E. Alcorn III 

A.B., Wheaton College, 1961 



Roy J. Altman . . . 

B.A., Pennsylvania State University, 1962 



Charles H. Banning ..... 
B.S., Social Welfare, Ohio State University, 1960 
M.S.W., Ohio State University 



William M. Birdsall 

B.S., Muskingum College, 1962 



Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Trafford, Pa. 

Mt. Vernon, Ohio 



Toledo, Ohio 



86 



Carl W. Bogue Princeton, Ind. 

A.B., Muskingum College, 1961 

James B. Brasel Kell, 111. 

A.B., Monmouth College, 1962 

Paulo D. Brasil Goias, Brazil 

Colegio Municipal de Anapolis, 1957 

Colegio Jose M. da Conceicao, Jandira, S.P., 1960 

Presbyterian Theological Seminary, Campinas, S.P., 1962 

Franklin Arthur Brown New Castle, Pa. 

BA, Geneva College, 1962 

Wayne A. Buchtel ........ Dayton, Ohio 

B.S., Muskingum College, 1961 

Charles L. Bulger Omaha, Nebraska 

B.A., Hastings College, 1962 

Donald C. Byers Orrville, Ohio 

B.S., Ohio State University, 1961 

James Allen Camp Nevada, Mo. 

B.A., Missouri Valley College, 1962 

William M. Campbell . Stamford, Conn. 

B.A., College of Wooster, 1962 

Robert T. Cassell Pittsburgh, Pa. 

BA., University of Pittsburgh, 1962 

William V. Davis Canton, Ohio 

A.B., Ohio University, 1962 

Charles Cameron Dickinson, III ... Wichita Falls, Texas 

B.A., Dartmouth College, 1958 

Thomas C. Fairley Beaver, Pa. 

B.S., Edinboro State Teachers College, 1962 

John M. Fife Titusville, Pa. 

B.A., Washington and Jefferson College, 1962 

Thomas W. Filbern ....... West Newton, Pa. 

BA., Westminster College, 1962 

Donald S. French Ithaca, N. Y. 

B.S., Cornell University, 1962 

Robert K. Greer Trafford, Pa. 

B.A., Westminster College, 1962 

James William Hanna Black Lick, Pa. 

A.B., Waynesburg College, 1962 

James L. Hobson Linden, Mich. 

B.A., Alma College, 1962 

Harry R. Holmes Sewickley, Pa. 

A.B., Grove City College, 1962 

Harold S. Horan Silver Spring, Md. 

B.A., University of Maryland, 1962 

Carl Robert Hull East Brady, Pa. 

BA., Grove City College, 1962 

87 



Edward John Hunt . . . . . . . Bronx, N. Y. 

B.A., Davis and Elkins College, 1962 

Ralph B. Jones Baltimore, Md. 

B.A., Maryland University, 1962 

William M. Keeney Harrisburg, Pa. 

B.A., College of Wooster, 1962 

Ross N. Macdonald ....... Hamilton, Ontario 

B.A., Baldwin Wallace College, 1962 

Harry E. Martin Pittsburgh, Pa. 

M.S., George Williams College, 1953 

Raymond J. Marquette Scranton, Pa. 

B.S., Geneva College, 1961 

Paul J. Masquelier McDonald, Pa. 

B.B.A., University of Pittsburgh, 1960 

Robert B. McCrumb New Castle, Pa. 

B.A., Muskingum College, 1962 

Guy H. McIver Columbus, Ohio 

B.S., Ohio State University, 1962 

George M. Mighells Salamanca, N. Y. 

Th.B., Malone College, 1950 

Paul J. Milio Detroit, Mich. 

A.B., Wayne State University, 1962 

McClain J. Moredock Rices Landing, Pa. 

B.A., Westminster College, 1962 

Robert Raymond Reich Salem, Ohio 

B.A., Davis & Elkins College, 1962 

Richard L. Schall Salina, Pa. 

B.S. in E.E., University of Pittsburgh, 1962 

Richard Scherpenisse Bowling Green, Mo. 

A.B., Missouri Valley College, 1962 

C. Thatcher Schwartz Pittsburgh, Pa. 

B.S., Penn State University, 1959 

Hugh B. Springer Fairmont, W. Va. 

A.B., West Virginia University, 1961 

Gerald Floyd Stacy ....... Minneapolis, Minn. 

B.A., Macalester College, 1962 

Lewis R. Thomas Lewis Run, Pa. 

M.E., University of Cincinnati, 1959 

John Arthur Toth Johnstown, Pa. 

B.A., Waynesburg College, 1962 

Edward F. Wightman Jamestown, R. I. 

B.A., Colgate University, 1957 

Margaret Suppes Yingling Pittsburgh, Pa. 

B.S., Chatham College, 1943 

88 



Junior Class 

Gary Dean Alexander Leawood, Kansas 

A.B., University of Kansas, 1963 

Rex E. Arnold Medina, Ohio 

B.BA, Fenn College, 1957 

Gary Lyle Baer Baltimore, Md. 

B.A., Davis and Elkins College, 1963 

Rawley D. Boone Hickory, Pa. 

BA, Grove City College, 1963 

David Blaine Cable Belle Vernon, Pa. 

B.S., California State College, 1963 

Lloyd Carlson Pittsburgh, Pa. 

B.S., University of Pittsburgh, 1943 

In Soon Choi ......... Seoul, Korea 

B.A., Seoul National University, 1958 

Ralph G. Clingan ........ Okmulgee, Okla. 

B.A., College of the Ozarks, 1963 

Rodger L. Cragun Niagara Falls, N. Y. 

A.A., Lincoln College, 1960 
B.A., Tusculum College, 1963 

Walter K. Davis Eau Claire, Pa. 

A.B., Findlay College, 1962 

Larry Arthur Dunster Middle Granville, N. Y. 

B.A., Bloomfield College, 1963 

George Edward Espy Pittsburgh, Pa. 

B.A., University of Pittsburgh, 1963 

John D. Evans Pittsburgh, Pa. 

A.B., Harvard College, 1961 
BA, St Peter's College, 1963 

Peter Judd Fosburg ....... Westfield, N. J. 

B.A., Westminster College, 1963 

Charles Ray Fosnight Pittsburgh, Pa. 

A.B., Ottawa University, 1957 

Stephen Wayne Getty Wallingford, Pa. 

BA., Grove City College, 1963 

Robert W. Gracey Wheeling, W. Va. 

BA., Davis & Elkins College, 1963 

James W. Graham ........ Pittsburgh, Pa. 

BA, Temple University, 1963 

Dennis Haines Pittsburgh, Pa. 

BA., University of Dubuque, 1963 

Howard James Hansen Blairsville, Pa. 

B.A., University of Pittsburgh, 1952 

William Russell Hayes East Paterson, N. J. 

B.A., Bloomfield College, 1963 

89 



Philip M„ Hazelton Lancaster, Ohio 

B.S., Ohio State University, 1963 

Jon Louis Hoadley ........ Seattle, Wash. 

B.A., Seattle Pacific College, 1962 

Harvey Samuel Holtgraver Pittsburgh, Pa. 

B.A., Westminster College, 1963 

Richard Kenneth Horn ....... Pittsburgh, Pa. 

B.A., Grove City College, 1963 

David Z. Howard Monrovia, Liberia 

B.S., University of Liberia, 1960 

J. Wallace Huber, Jr Princeton, Ind. 

B.A., Muskingum College, 1963 

Gary Evans Huffman ....... Loves Park, 111. 

A.B., Monmouth College, 1963 

Douglas James ........ Spokane, Wash. 

B.A., Whitworth College, 1963 

Timothy Aaron Koah Carlton, Pa 

B.A., Westminster College, 1961 

Richard Lee Seattle, Wash. 

B.A., Futan University, Shanghai, China, 1942 

William James Legge, Jr Pittsburgh, Pa. 

B.S., Indiana State College, 1963 

J. Reynolds Lewis ........ Greensburg, Pa. 

B.A., Bethany College, 1958 

Fred Loutsenhizer ......... Irwin, Pa. 

B.S., Indiana State College, 1963 

Donald Roy MacKay Brighton, Mass. 

B.A., Boston University, 1963 

Richard B. McCune New Castle, Pa. 

B.A., Westminster College, 1963 

Harry Paul McCurdy, Jr. ..... Monongahela, Pa. 

B.A., Lafayette College, 1963 

Frank David Moser Pittsburgh, Pa. 

B.M., Grove City College, 1963 

Myron A. Newell Alexandria, Va. 

B.S., Pennsylvania State University, 1960 

Wayne F. Parker Monmouth, 111. 

BA, Monmouth College, 1962 

Ronald G. Pritchard ....... Baltimore, Md. 

B.A., University of Maryland, 1963 

Jay King Rabuck Port Arthur, Tex. 

B.S., Stephen F. Austin College, 1963 

Donald H. Ralston Munhall, Pa. 

A.B., Monmouth College, 1950 

John D. Reuben Pensacola, Fla. 

B.A., Knoxville College, 1962 

90 



Jack Donald Richardson Smithfield, Pa. 

B.A., Roberts Wesleyan College, 1959 

Thomas J. Sawyer Sharon, Pa. 

B.A., University of Pittsburgh, 1955 

Milton E. Skiff Pittsburgh, Pa. 

B.S., Cornell University, 1957 

Joseph Dunnell Small ....... Gibsonia, Pa. 

A.B., Brown University, 1963 

Michael Fleming Smathers ...... Crossville, Tenn. 

B.A., College of Wooster, 1963 

Leland Ralph Stoops, Jr New Castle, Pa. 

B.A., Westminster College, 1963 

Kirk Patrick Swiss ........ Baltimore, Md 

B.A., Muskingum College, 1962 

John Raub VanTine, III Bay Village, Ohic 

B.A., College of Wooster, 1963 

Paul R. Watson Pittsburgh, Pa. 

B.A., University of Pittsburgh, 1963 

David Williams Oak Park, 111. 

B.A., Millikin University, 1963 

Stephen Boyce Woods . Pittsburgh, Pa. 

B.A., Westminster College, 1963 

Beng Lin Wu Taiwan, Free China 

B.Th., Tainan Theological College, 1959 

William R. Yeats Morton, Pa. 

B.A., Bloomfield College, 1963 



CANDIDATES FOR DEGREE OF MASTER OF RELIGIOUS EDUCATION 

Senior Class 

David James Devey ........ Pittsburgh, Pa. 

B.S., University of Pittsburgh, 1952 
M.E., University of Pittsburgh, 1956 

Chong Mahn Lee Seoul, Korea 

B.D., Han Kuk Theological Seminary 

Lane Richardson ......... Canby, Ore. 

B.A., College of Idaho, 1962 

Judith M. Sievers St. Louis, Mo. 

B.A., Missouri Valley College, 1962 

Sonja Forgraves Stewart ..... New Wilmington, Pa. 
A.B., Muskingum College, 1959 

Junior Class 

Diane K. Adsit . . . Kenmore, N. Y. 

B.S., State University of New York, College for Teachers, 1961 

Sally Childs Pittsburgh, Pa. 

B.A., Sarah Lawrence College, 1949 

91 



Madge Black Floyd Verona, Pa. 

B.A., Emory University, 1958 

Gail Guptill Philadelphia, Pa. 

B.A., The College of Wooster, 1963 

Donna Rae Houser Pittsburgh, Pa. 

B.S. in Education, Westminster College, 1963 

June Joyce Luebben ....... Youngstown, Ohio 

B.S. in Music Education, Muskingum College, 1955 

Caroline Kay McCaskill Glenshaw, Pa. 

B.A., Maryville College, 1963 

Karen Ann Seelar ......... Erie, Pa. 

B.A., Westminster College, 1963 

Carolyn Williams Pittsburgh, Pa. 

B.S., Tufts College, 1948 

M.Ed., University of Texas, 1955 

Patricia J. Zapka Windsor Heights, W. Va. 

A.B., West Liberty State Teachers College, 1963 



CANDIDATES FOR DEGREE OF MASTER OF EDUCATION 

(to be granted by the University of Pittsburgh) 

Mary Jean Engle Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Betty Harris ......... Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Eugenio Illidge ........ Bogota, Colombia 

Acy Lee Jackson ........ Youngstown, Ohio 

Elaine Kozar Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Barbara L. Mann Cumberland, Md. 

Anna Amelia Mershimer ...... Slippery Rock, Pa. 

Mildred Arlene Slater ....... Norristown, Pa. 

SPECIAL STUDENTS 

Lloyd 0. DeLong Newark, Ohio 

Ruth F. Fraser Baltimore, Md. 

Mary Jane Gerhardt Murrysville, Pa. 

John Reid Grant Northumberland, England 

John Haniford Brownsville, Pa. 

Rita Miu Chee Luk Hong Kong, China 

Hartzell A. Michael Pittsburgh, Pa. 

William L. Petcovic Belle Vernon, Pa. 

Clara C. Settlemire Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Suchitra Taweesin Bangkok, Thailand 

Kenneth Vaux Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Jose Velasco, Jr Isabela, Philippines 

Wichean Watakeecharoen Bangkok, Thailand 

92 



CANDIDATES FOR THE DEGREE OF MASTER OF THEOLOGY 

Biblical Studies 

Rev. Robert A. Coughenour Pittsburgh, Pa. 

B.S., State Teachers College, 1953 

B.D., Pittsburgh Theological Seminary, 1960 

Rev. Howard Eshbaugh Oakdale, Pa. 

A.B., Grove City College, 1955 

B.D., Western Theological Seminary, 1956 

Rev. Philip M. Hastings Sewickley, Pa. 

B.E., Johns Hopkins University, 1953 
B.D., Western Theological Seminary, 1956 

Rev. John W. Irwin Colliers, W. Va. 

B.A., Sterling College, 1955 

B.D., Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary, 1958 

History and Theology 

Rev. Kenneth P. Alpers Pittsburgh, Pa. 

B.A., Capital University, 1949 

B.D., Capital Theological Seminary, 1952 

Rev. James G. Gardner Pittsburgh, Pa. 

B.A., Maryville College, 1956 

B.D., Western Theological Seminary, 1959 \ 

Rev. Frank T. Hainer Franklin, Pa. 

A.B., Duke University, 1956 

B.D., Pittsburgh Theological Seminary, 1962 

Rev. John M. Hulse McKeesport, Pa. 

B.A., Waynesburg College, 1957 

B.D., Pittsburgh Theological Seminary, 1960 

Rev. David E. Martin Sewickley, Pa. 

B.S., Kent State University, 1957 

B.D., Pittsburgh Theological Seminary, 1960 

Rev. William S. Rowling Pittsburgh, Pa. 

B.A., College of Wooster, 1950 

B.D., McCormick Theological Seminary, 1953 

Program for Advanced Pastoral Studies 

Rev. John E. Adams Cross Creek, Pa. 

B.A., University of Buffalo, 1957 

B.D., Pittsburgh Theological Seminary, 1961 

Rev. James B. Bailey Weirton, W. Va. 

B.S.C., Ohio University, 1953 

B.D., Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary, 1959 

Rev. Milton L. Bierman Johnstown, Pa. 

B.A., Carleton College, 1953 

B.D., Union Theological Seminary, 1958 

93 



Rev. Wayne E. Faust Waynesburg, Ohio 

A.B., University of Pittsburgh, 1957 
B.D., Pittsburgh Theological Seminary, 1960 

Rev. Donald F. Hursh Johnstown, Pa. 

A.B., Elizabethtown College, 1950 

B.D., Bethany Theological Seminary, 1953 

Rev. Chang Kuei Lee Formosa, Free China 

B.Th., Tainan Theological College, 1958 

Rev. J. Robert Phillips Pittsburgh, Pa. 

B.S., University of Pittsburgh, 1954 
B.D., Western Theological Seminary, 1959 

Rev. John P. Pro Jeannette, Pa. 

B.Ed., Duquesne University, 1949 

B.D., Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary, 1957 

Rev. Bertram H. Saunders Walnut Creek, Calif. 

A.B., University of California, 1949 

S.T.B., Biblical Seminary in New York, 1952 

Rev. George F. Shaffer Pittsburgh, Pa. 

A.B., Wittenberg University, 1950 
B.D., Hamma Divinity School, 1954 

Rev. Walter F. Toperzer Greensburg, Pa. 

B.S., Carnegie Institute of Technology, 1957 

B.D., Philadelphia Lutheran Theological Seminary, 1960 



94 



SUMMARY OF ATTENDANCE 

Bachelor of Divinity Program 

Juniors .......... 56 

Middlers 48 

Seniors .......... 60 164 



Master of Religious Education Program 

Juniors .......... 10 

Seniors .......... 5 15 

Master of Education Program 8 

Master of Theology Program ....... 21 

Special Students ......... 13 

Total Enrollment ... 221 



95 



HISTORICAL ROLL OF PROFESSORS 



John Anderson 
John Banks . 
James Ramsey 
Joseph Kerr . 
Jacob Jones Janeway 
Mungo Dick . 
Luther Halsey 



John Williamson Nevin 
David Elliott 
John Taylor Pressly 
David Carson 
Thomas Beveridge 
Moses Kerr . 
Joseph Claybaugh 
Samuel W. McCracken 
Lewis Warner Green 
James Martin 

Alexander Taggart McGill 
James Lemonte Dinwiddie 
Abraham Anderson 
Alexander Downs Clark 
David Reynolds Kerr 
Melancthon Williams Jacobus 
William Swan Plumer . 
Samuel Wilson 
William Davidson . 
Alexander Young . 

Samuel Jennings Wilson 
John Scott 
Joseph Clokey 
William Miller Paxton 
Andrew Morrow Black . 
Archibald Alexander Hodge 
David Alexander Wallace 

James Harper 

Joseph Tate Cooper 

William Bruce 

William Henry Hornblower . 

James Gillespie Carson 



Seminary of 
Inauguration 


Period of 
Service 


Service 


1794-1819 


Philadelphia 


1820-1826 


Canonsburg 


1821-1842 


Pittsburgh 


1825-1829 


Western 


1828-1829 


Pittsburgh 


1829-1831 


Western 


1829-1836 
1872-1880 


Western 


1829-1840 


Western 


1829-1874 


Allegheny 


1832-1870 


Canonsburg 


1834-1834 


Canonsburg 


1835-1871 


Allegheny- 


1835-1836 


Oxford 


1839-1855 


Oxford 


1839-1840 


Western 


1840-1847 


Canonsburg 


1842-1846 


Western 


1842-1854 


Allegheny 


1843-1846 


Canonsburg 


1847-1855 


Allegheny 


1847-1884 


Allegheny 


1851-1887 


Western 


1851-1876 


Western 


1854-1862 


Xenia 


1855-1875 


Oxford 


1855-1858 


Oxford 


1855-1874 
1876-1891 


Western 


1857-1883 


Monmouth 


1858-1874 


Xenia 


1858-1873 


Western 


1860-1872 


Monmouth 


1864-1874 


Western 


1864-1877 


Monmouth & Xenia 1867-1870 
1883-1883 


Newburg 


1867-1899 


Allegheny 


1871-1886 


Xenia 


1871-1880 


Western 


1871-1883 


Xenia 


1873-1888 



96 



William Gallogly Moorehead 

Jackson Burgess McMichael 

Samuel Thompson Lowrie 

Samuel Henry Kellogg . 

William Hamilton Jeffers 

Benjamin Breckenbridge Warfield 

Thomas Hastings Robinson 

David MacDill 

David A. McClenahan 

Robert Dick Wilson 

James Alexander Grier 

John McNaugher . 

Henry T. McClelland 

Matthew Brown Riddle 

Oliver Joseph Thatcher 

Wilbert Webster White 

Robert Christie 

John A. Wilson 

John Douds Irons . 

James Anderson Kelso 

David Riddle Breed 

Joseph Kyle . 

Jesse Johnson 

David Schley Schaff 

John Elliott Wishart 

David E. Cully 

William Riley Wilson 

Charles Frederick Wishart 

William Robertson Farmer 

John Hunter Webster 

James Henry Snowden 

Melvin Grove Kyle 

James Doig Rankin 

David Frazier McGill 

Frank Eakin . 

James Gallaway Hunt 

Selby Frame Vance 

James Harper Grier 

Robert McNary Karr 

James Leon Kelso . 

George Boone McCreary 

Robert Nathaniel Montgomery 

Donald Mackenzie 

Gaius Jackson Slosser 

Albert Henry Baldinger 



Xenia 


1873-1914 


Xenia 


1873-1878 


Western 


1874-1877 


Western 


1877-1886 


Western 


1877-1914 


Western 


1878-1887 


Western 


1883-1906 


Xenia 


1884-1902 


Allegheny- 


1885-1921 


Western 


1885-1900 


Allegheny- 


1886-1909 


Allegheny 


1886-1943 


Western 


1886-1891 


Western 


1887-1916 


Allegheny 


1888-1892 


Xenia 


1889-1894 


Western 


1891-1923 


Allegheny 


1893-1915 


Xenia 


189S-1905 


Western 


1897-1944 


Western 


1898-1931 


Xenia 


1899-1921 


Xenia 


1903-1930 


Western 


1903-1926 


Xenia 


1905-1923 


Western 


1906-1948 


Allegheny 


1907-1940 


Allegheny 


1907-1914 


Western 


1907-1939 


Xenia 


1908-1933 


Western 


1911-1928 


Xenia 


1914-1930 


Pittsburgh 


1914-1929 


Pittsburgh 


1915-1931 


Western 


1915-1927 


Pittsburgh 


19204926 


Western 


1921-1935 


Pittsburgh 


1922-1926 


Xenia 


1922-1949 


Xenia 


1923-1963 


Xenia 


1924-1946 


Pittsburgh 


1926-193C 


Western 


1928-1933 


Western 


1928-1958 


Pittsburgh-Xenia 


1931-1947 



97 



Clarence Joseph Williamson . 








Pittsburgh-Xenia 


1932-1950 


John Wick Bowman 








Western 


1936-1944 


William F. Orr 








Western 


1936- 


George Anderson Long . 








Pittsburgh-Xenia 


1942-1955 


Theophilus Mills Taylor 








Pittsburgh-Xenia 


1942-1962 


Jarvis M. Cotton . 








Western 


1944-1961 


Frank Dixon McCloy . 








Western 


1944- 


Henry Alexander Riddle 








Western 


1944-1949 


J. Carter Swaim 








Western 


1944-1954 


Walter R. Clyde . 








Western 


1945- 


Addison Hardie Leitch . 








Pittsburgh-Xenia 


1946-1961 


Florence M. Lewis . 








Pittsburgh-Xenia 


1947-1952 


H. Ray Shear 








Pittsburgh-Xenia 


1947-1959 


David Noel Freedman 








Western 


1948- 


Gordon Edmund Jackson 








Pittsburgh-Xenia 


1949- 


Ralph G. Turnbull 








Western 


1949-1954 


John H. Gerstner 


. 


. 




Pittsburgh-Xenia 


1950- 


Clifford E. Barbour 








Western 


1951-1962 


Bessie M. Burrows 








Pittsburgh-Xenia 


1953- 


James A. Walther . 








Western 


1954- 


Sidney 0. Hills 








Western 


1954- 


Robert Lee Kelley, Jr. . 








Pittsburgh-Xenia 


1955- 


Robert Clyde Johnson . 








Western 


1955-1962 


Howard M. Jamieson, Jr. 








Pittsburgh-Xenia 


1955- 


John M. Bald 








Pittsburgh-Xenia 


1957- 


Elwyn Allen Smith 








Western 


1957- 


Walter E. Wiest . 








Western 


1957- 


Malcolm S. Alexander . 








Pittsburgh-Xenia 


1958- 


Harold E. Scott 








Pittsburgh-Xenia 


1959- 


Howard L. Ralston. . . . Western and Pittsburgh-Xenia 


1960- 


William A. Nicholson Western 


1960- 


James Sheppard Irvine .... Western 


1960- 


J. Gordon Chamberlin .... Pittsburgh 


1960- 


Gayraud S. Wilmore Pittsburgh 


1961- 


Arlan P. Dohrenburg ..... Pittsburgh 


1961- 


Edward D. Grohman Pittsburgh 


1961- 


David G. Buttrick ..... Pittsburgh 


1961- 


Donald G. Miller ..... Pittsburgh 


1962- 


George H. Kehm Pittsburgh 


1962- 


Dietrich Ritschl Pittsburgh 


1963- 


Markus Barth Pittsburgh 


1963- 


Edward Farley ...... Pittsburgh 


1963- 


Lynn Boyd Hinds ...... Pittsburgh 


1963- 


Iain G. Wilson 








Pittsburgh 


1963- 



98 



DONATIONS AND BEQUESTS 

All donations or bequests to the Seminary should be made to 
"The Pittsburgh Theological Seminary of the United Presbyterian 
Church in the United States of America, located at 616 North High- 
land Avenue, Pittsburgh 6, Pennsylvania." The proper legal form 
for making a bequest is as follows. 

"I hereby give and bequeath to Pittsburgh Theological Seminary 
of the United Presbyterian Church in the United States of America, 
incorporated in the State of Pennsylvania, the following: . . . . " 

Care should be taken to use the corporate name as given above, 
and to have the bequest conform to the laws of the state governing it. 

The memorial idea may be carried out either in the erection 
of a building or in the endowment of any of the special funds of 
the Seminary. 



99 



INDEX 

Administrative Staff . . . . . . . .16 

Admissions: College Requirements, Credentials, 

Procedure, etc. ........ 30-33 

Alumni Association ........ 78 

Application for Admission ...... 30-33 

Attendance, Summary of ....... 95 

Awards, Granted, 1962-1963 79-83 

Awards, prizes, and graduate fellowships . . . . 37-40 

Bachelor of Divinity Degree 42-45, 50-66 

Board of Directors and Committees 8-10 

Buildings . 23-27 

Calendar of Events, 1964-65 ...... 2 

Campus 23-27 

Continuing Education ....... 76-77 

Courses of Instruction ....... 42-73 

Curriculum . . . . 42-73 

Degree Programs, Index to 41 

Degrees Awarded, 1962-1963 79-83 

Donations and Bequests ....... 99 

Emeritus Professors . . ...... 14 

Enrollment, Summary of ....... 95 

Faculty and Faculty Committees ..... 11-14 

Fees and Expenses ........ 34 

Field Education 43, 66 

Financial Assistance ....... 35-37 

Foreign Students 33 

Four-year Program ........ 45 

Graduation Awards 37-40, 79-83 

100 



Graduation Honors ..... 

Historic Roll of Professors .... 

History of the Seminary 

Honors Program ...... 

Hospitalization Insurance . 

Housing 

Insurance, Medical and Hospital ... 

Lectures, Special 

Library ........ 

Loan Funds ....... 

Location of the Seminary Buildings 

Married Student Apartment Fees 

Master of Education Degree .... 

Master of Public Administration Degree 

Master of Public and International Affairs Degree 

Master of Religious Education Degree 

Master of Theology Degree .... 

Medical Insurance ...... 

Museum, Bible Lands 

Music, Opportunities in 

Pittsburgh — Our Environment . 
Pittsburgh, University of, joint program with 
Pre-Seminary Studies ..... 
Professors, Historical Roll of ... 
Register of Students, 1963-64 .... 
Scholarships, loans, etc. ..... 

Student Association 

Summer Field Education ..... 
Transfer Students ...... 

Worship ........ 

101 



82-83 

96-98 

. 19 

. 49 

. 35 

23-24 

. 35 

. 15 

25-26 

36-37 

23 

34 

48 

75 

75 

46-47, 50-60 

66-67, 68-72 

. 35 

. 26 

. 28-29 

. 21 

. 48, 75 

. 30-31 

. 96-98 

. 84-94 

. 35-37 

. 29 

. 66 

. 33 

. 28 






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