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Full text of "Annual Catalogue of the Pittsburgh Theological Seminary"

Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2012 with funding from 

LYRASIS Members and Sloan Foundation 



http://archive.org/details/annualcatalogue196570pitt 



THE 
PITTSBURGH 
THEOLOGICAL 
SEMINARY 



PI17S3URGH THEOLOGICAL 
SEMINARY LIBRARY 




Annual 

Catalogue 

1965-1966 



<** </;,:?, 



;*- < 












THE 

ANNUAL CATALOGUE 

OF 

The Pittsburgh 
Theological Seminary 

616 N. HIGHLAND AVENUE 
PITTSBURGH, PENNSYLVANIA 15206 



A seminary of the United Presbyterian Church in the 
United States of America, founded 1794. Accredited 
by the American Association of Theological Schools. 



1965-1966 



t 






THE SEMINARY CALENDAR 
1965 

21-25 June School of Religion, Pennsylvania 

27 June-2 July School of Religion, Ohio 



7-8 Sept. 


9 Sept. 


10 Sept. 


11 Sept. 


5 Oct. 


18-22 Oct. 


17 Nov. 


25 Nov. 


8-14 Dec. 


15-17 Dec. 


20 Dec-2 Jan 


1966 


3-21 Jan. 



24 


Jan. 


1 


Feb. 


7-11 


Mar. 


8 


Apr. 


25-27 


Apr. 


25-29 


Apr. 


28-29 


Apr. 


2-6 


May 


8 


May 


8 


May 


10 


May 


10 


May 



First Semester 

Junior Orientation and Registration 
Convocation, 11:00 A.M., and 
Community Luncheon 

Class Work Begins 

Junior Orientation Retreat 

Continuing Education Program Begins 

First Reading Period 

Semi- Annual Meeting, Board of Directors 

Thanksgiving Day (No Classes) 

Second Reading Period 

Examination Period 

Christmas Recess 



Inter session 



Second Semester 
Class Work Begins 



Continuing Education Program Begins 

First Reading Period 

Good Friday (No Classes) 

Second Reading Period for Seniors 

Second Reading Period for Juniors and Middlers 

Examination Period for Seniors 

Examination Week for Juniors and Middlers 

Communion Service for Seniors, 4:00 P.M., 

and Buffet Supper 
Baccalaureate, 8:00 P.M. 
Annual Meeting of the Board of Directors 

Annual Meeting and Dinner of the Alumni 
Association 

10 May Commencement, 8:00 P.M., 

The East Liberty Presbyterian Church 

2 



^ke faculty 



Donald G. Miller, President. Greenville College, A.B.; 
The Biblical Seminary in N.Y., S.T.B. and S.T.M.; New 
York University, M.A. and Ph.D. 



William F. Orr, Professor of New Testament Literature 
and Exegesis. Southwestern University, A.B.; Louisville 
Presbyterian Seminary, B.D. and Th.M.; Hartford Theolog- 
ical Seminary, Ph.D. 



Frank Dixon McCloy, Jr., Associate Professor of Church 
History. University of Pittsburgh, A.B. and A.M.; Western 
Theological Seminary, S.T.B. ; Harvard University, A.M. and 
Ph.D. 




Walter R. Clyde, Professor of Christian Mission. Muskin- 
gum College, A.B.; Omaha Theological Seminary, B.D.; 



Western Theological Seminary, 
Foundation, Ph.D. 



S.T.M.; Hartford Seminary 



Gordon E. Jackson, Dean of the Seminary and Hugh 
Thomson Kerr Professor of Pastoral Theology. Monmouth 
College, A.B.; Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary, Th.B. 
and Th.M.; University of Chicago, Ph.D. 



John H. Gerstner, Professor of Church History. West- 
minster College, A.B.; Westminster Theological Seminary, 
Th.B. and Th.M.; Harvard University, Ph.D. 







Vke tf-aculty 



Bessie M. Burrows, Assistant Professor of Christian Educa- 
tion and Registrar. Geneva College, B.A.; Columbia Univer- 
sity, M.A. 



James A. Walther, Associate Professor of New Testament 
Literature and Exegesis. Grove City College, A.B.; Western 
Theological Seminary, S.T.B.; Emmanuel College, Victoria 
University, Toronto, Th.D. 



Sidney O. Hills, Associate Professor of Hebrew and Old 
Testament Literature. Northwestern University, B.A.; Mc- 
Cormick Theological Seminary, B.D.; Johns Hopkins Univer- 
sity, Ph.D. 



Robert Lee Kelley, Jr., Associate Professor of Biblical 
Languages. University of Pittsburgh, A.B.; Pittsburgh-Xenia 
Theological Seminary, B.D.; Princeton Theological Seminary, 
Th.M. 







Howard M. Jamieson, Jr., Associate Professor of Biblical 
Theology and Dean of Students. Monmouth College, A.B.; 
Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary, Th.B.; University of 
Pittsburgh, M.A. and Ph.D. 



John M. Bald, Associate Professor of Christian Ethics and 
Financial Aid Officer. Muskingum College, A.B.; Pittsburgh- 
Xenia Theological Seminary, Th.B. and Th.M. 



Vke tf-acultif 



Elwyn Allen Smith, Professor of Church History. Whea- 
ton College, A.B.; Yale Divinity School, B.D.; Princeton 
Theological Seminary, Th.M.; Harvard University, Ph.D. 



Walter E. Wiest, Professor of Philosophy of Religion. 
Lafayette College, A.B.; Princeton Theological Seminary, 
Th.B.; Columbia University, Ph.D. 



Malcolm S. Alexander, Associate Professor of Pastoral 
Theology and Director of Field Education. University of 
Southern California, A.B. and LL.B.; Pittsburgh-Xenia Theo- 
logical Seminary, B.D. 




Harold E. Scott, Associate Professor of Homiletics and As- 
sistant Director of Field Education. Sterling College, B.A.; 
Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary, B.D. 



Howard L. Ralston, Assistant Professor of Church Music. 
Muskingum College, Mus.B.; Curtis Institute of Music, 
A.A.G.O. 




William A. Nicholson, Associate Professor of Homiletics. 
Washington & Jefferson College, A.B.; Western Theological 
Seminary, S.T.B. 



fm-m^ 



> 





Vke faculty 



James S. Irvine, Assistant Professor of Bibliography. Wash- 
ington and Jefferson College, A.B.; Western Theological Sem- 
inary, B.D.; Carnegie Institute of Technology, M.L.S.; Johns 
Hopkins University, Ph.D. 



J. Gordon Chamberlin, Associate Professor of Christian 
Education. Cornell College in Iowa, A.B.; Union Theological 
Seminary (N.Y.), B.D.; Columbia University, Ed.D. 



David G. Buttrick, Assistant Professor in Church and Min- 
istry. Haverford College, B.A.; Union Theological Seminary 
(N.Y.), B.D. 



George H. Kehm, Assistant Professor in Theology. Queens 
College, B.S.; Princeton Theological Seminary, B.D.; Harvard 
Divinity School, S.T.M. 





Dietrich Ritschl, Professor of History of Doctrine and 
Systematic Theology. University of Edinburgh, Ph.D. 



Markus Barth, Professor of New Testament. University of 
Goettingen, Dr. Theol. 



VUe faculty 



Edward Farley, Associate Professor of Systematic Theology. 
Centre College, A.B.; Louisville Presbyterian Theological 
Seminary, B.D.; Columbia University, Ph.D. 




Lynn Boyd Hinds, Instructor in Speech. University of 
Akron, B.A.; Eastern Baptist Theological Seminary, B.D.; 
Temple University, M.A. 



Iain G. Wilson, William Oliver Campbell Professor of 
Homiletics. University of Edinburgh, M.A. and B.D. 




Douglas R. A. Hare, Instructor in New Testament. Victoria 
College, University of Toronto, B.A.; Emmanuel College, 
B.D.; Union Theological Seminary (N.Y.), S.T.M. 



Drs. Mays, Murphy, Gowan, Wolf 

VISITING PROFESSORS IN OLD TESTAMENT 
1964 - 1965 





BOARD OF DIRECTORS 

Officers 

Rev. Charles P. Robshaw, S.T.D., D.D., LL.D., President 

Rev. J. Hubert Henderson, D.D., Vice President 

Mr. George D. Lockhart, Secretary 

Mr. J. Rowe Hinsey, Assistant Secretary 

Mr. Robert L. Becker, Treasurer 

Mr. John G. Smithyman, C.P.A., Assistant Treasurer 

Mr. Henry C. Herchenroether, Jr., Counsel 



Members 

Term Expires May 1965 

Mr. T. J. Gillespie, Jr Pittsburgh, Pa. 

President and Treasurer, Lockhart Iron and Steel Company 

Rev. J. Hubert Henderson, D.D Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Pastor, J. M. Wallace Memorial United Presbyterian Church 

Mr. William R. Jackson ....... Pittsburgh, Pa. 

President, Pittsburgh-Des Moines Steel Company 

Rev. John C. Lorimer, D.D. ..... New Wilmington, Pa. 

Retired 

Rev. Charles P. Robshaw, S.T.D., D.D., LL.D. . . . Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Pastor, East Liberty Presbyterian Church 

Mr. James H. Rogers, HH.D Latrobe, Pa. 

Chairman, Latrobe Die Casting Company 

Rev. Howard C. Scharfe, D.D., LL.D Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Pastor, Shadyside Presbyterian Church 

Mr. H. Parker Sharp ........ Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Vice President and General Counsel, Jones & Laughlin Steel Corporation 

Rev. Samuel C. Weir, D.D . . Detroit, Mich. 

Minister of Visitation, Cherry Hill United Presbyterian Church 

Rev. W. Bruce Wilson, D.D Bethel Park, Pa. 

Minister of Visitation, Westminster United Presbyterian Church 

Mr. Ralph M. Wyman ....... Greenwich, Conn. 

Vice President and Director, H. O. Canfield Company 

Term Expires May 1966 

Mr. A. C. Amsler Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Retired — Westinghouse Electric Corporation 

Rev. John B. Barker, D.D Canton, Ohio 

Pastor, Calvary Presbyterian Church 

Mr. Frank H. Davis, LL.D Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Retired 

Rev. Robert H. French, D.D., LL.D. .... Des Moines, Iowa 
Synod Executive, Synod of Iowa 

8 



Mr. Henry C. Herchenroether, Jr. .... . Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Attorney, Alter, Wright, and Barron 

Mr. W. Kenneth Menke ....... Pittsburgh, Pa. 

President, Pittsburgh Chemical Company, a division of 
United States Steel Corporation 

Rev. Don P. Montgomery, D.D. ..... Youngstown, Ohio 

Pastor, Pleasant Grove United Presbyterian Church 

Mr. William H. Rea Pittsburgh, Pa. 

President, Oliver Tyrone Corporation 

Rev. Robert H. Stephens, D.D. ..... Summit, N. J. 

Pastor, Central Presbyterian Church 

Mr. James W. Vicary Erie, Pa. 

President, Ervite Corporation 

Rev. Robert R. Vogelsang ....... Latrobe, Pa. 

Pastor, Latrobe United Presbyterian Church 

Rev. Walter R. Young, D.D Pittsburgh. Pa. 

Pastor, Second United Presbyterian Church of Wilkinsburg 

Term Expires May 1967 

Mr. Robert L. Becker ....... Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Retired-President, Wear-Ever Aluminum, Inc. 

Mr. Earle M. Craig ........ Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Retired — Chairman of the Board, Valvoline Oil Company 

Rev. Richard W. Graves, D.D., Litt.D. . . . New Wilmington, Pa. 
Retired 

Mr. Max A. Lauffer, Ph.D Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Andrew Mellon Professor of Biophysics and Chairman, Department of 
Biophysics, University of Pittsburgh 

Mr. George D. Lockhart ....... Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Attorney, Kirkpatrick, Pomeroy, Lockhart and Johnson 

Rev. W. Paul Ludwig, Ph.D Washington, D. C. 

Pastor, Chevy Chase Presbyterian Church 

Mr. John R. McCune Pittsburgh, Pa. 

President, Consolidated Lamp and Glass Company 

Rev. Walter L. Moser, Ph.D., D.D Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Secretary-Treasurer, Johnson C. Smith University 

Mr. Alexander P. Reed ....... Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Attorney at Law 

Rev. John Coventry Smith, D.D., LL.D. .... New York, N. Y. 
General Secretary, Commission on Ecumenical Mission and Relations 

Rev. Frederick Bruce Speakman, D.D Dayton, Ohio 

Pastor, Westminster Presbyterian Church 

Rev. C. T. R. Yeates, D.D., LL.D Des Moines, Iowa 

Pastor, Westminster United Presbyterian Church 

9 



COMMITTEES OF THE BOARD OF DIRECTORS 

The Executive Committee 

Mr. A. C. Amsler Mr. George D. Lockhart 

Mr. Robert L. Becker Rev. Don P. Montgomery, D.D. 

Rev. J. Hubert Henderson, D.D. Mr. H. Parker Sharp 

Rev. Robert R. Vogelsang 
Rev. Charles P. Robshaw, S.T.D., D.D., LL.D. 

The Education Committee 
Rev. Richard W. Graves, D.D., Litt.D. Rev. Robert H. Stephens, D.D. 
Rev. J. Hubert Henderson, D.D. Rev. Frederick B. Speakman, D.D. 

Rev. W. Paul Ludwig, Ph.D. Rev. Robert R. Vogelsang 

Rev. W. Bruce Wilson, D.D. 



Mr. Robert L. Becker 
Mr. Earle M. Craig 
Mr. T. J. Gillespie, Jr. 
Mr. William H. Rea 



The Finance Committee 

Mr. Alexander P. Reed 
Mr. James H. Rogers 
Rev. Howard C. Scharfe, D.D., LL.D. 
Mr. H. Parker Sharp 
Mr. Ralph M. Wyman 



The Nominations Committee 

Rev. Robert H. French, D.D., LL.D. Rev. John Coventry Smith, D.D., LL.D. 

Mr. Max A. Lauffer Mr. James W. Vicary 

Rev. Don P. Montgomery, D.D. Rev. Samuel C Weir, D.D. 



The Property Committee 

Mr. A. C. Amsler Mr. John R. McCune 

Mr. Frank H. Davis, LL.D. Mr. W. Kenneth Menke 

Mr. William R. Jackson Rev. Walter L. Moser, Ph.D., D.D. 

Mr. George D. Lockhart Rev. Walter R. Young, D.D. 



10 



THE FACULTY 



The Rev. Donald G. Miller, S.T.M., MA, Ph.D. (New York University), 
LL.D., Litt.D. 

President 

The Rev. William F. Orr, Th.M., Ph.D. (Hartford), D.D. 

Professor of New Testament Literature and Exegesis 

The Rev. Frank Dixon McCloy, Jr., A.M., Ph.D. (Harvard), D.D. 

Associate Professor of Church History 

The Rev. Walter R. Clyde, S.T.M., Ph.D. (Hartford) 
Professor of Christian Mission 

The Rev. Gordon E. Jackson, Th.M., Ph.D. (Chicago), D.D., Dean of the Seminary 

Hugh Thomson Kerr Professor of Pastoral Theology 

The Rev. John H. Gerstner, Th.M., Ph.D. (Harvard), D.D. 
Professor of Church History 

Miss Bessie M. Burrows, M.A. (Columbia) 

Assistant Professor of Christian Education and Registrar 

The Rev. James A. Walther, Th.D. (Victoria) 

Associate Professor of New Testament Literature 

The Rev. Sidney 0. Hills, Ph.D. (Johns Hopkins), Recording Secretary 
Associate Professor of Hebrew and Old Testament Literature 

The Rev. Robert Lee Kelley, Jr., Th.M. (Princeton) 

Associate Professor of Biblical Languages 

The Rev. Howard M. Jamieson, Jr., M.A., Ph.D. (Pittsburgh), D.D. 
Associate Professor of Biblical Theology and Dean of Students 

The Rev. John M. Bald, Th.M., (Pittsburgh-Xenia), D.D., Alt. Recording Secretary 
Associate Professor of Christian Ethics and Financial Aid Officer 

The Rev. Elwyn Allen Smith, Th.M., Ph.D. (Harvard) 
Professor of Church History 

The Rev. Walter E. Wiest, Ph.D. (Columbia) 
Professor of Philosophy of Religion 

The Rev. Malcolm S. Alexander, LL.B. (Southern California), B.D. 

Associate Professor of Pastoral Theology and Director of Field Education 

The Rev. Harold E. Scott, B.D. (Pittsburgh-Xenia), D.D. 

Associate Professor of Homiletics and Assistant Director of Field Education 

11 



Mr. Howard L. Ralston, Mus.B., A.A.G.O. 

Assistant Professor of Church Music 

The Rev. William A. Nicholson, S.T.B. (Western), D.D. 
Associate Professor of Homiletics 

The Rev. James S. Irvine, M.L.S., Ph.D. (Johns Hopkins) 
Assistant Professor of Bibliography 

The Rev. J. Gordon Chamberlin, Ed.D. (Columbia), D.D. 
Associate Professor of Christian Education 

The Rev. David G. Buttrick, B.D. (Union, N.Y.) 
Assistant Professor in Church and Ministry 

The Rev. George H. Kehm, S.T.M. (Harvard) 
Assistant Professor in Theology 

The Rev. Dietrich Ritschl, Ph.D. (Edinburgh) 

Professor of History of Doctrine and Systematic Theology 

The Rev. Markus Barth, Dr. Theol. (Goettingen) 
Professor of New Testament 

The Rev. Edward Farley, Ph.D. (Columbia) 
Associate Professor of Systematic Theology 

The Rev. Lynn Boyd Hinds, M.A. (Temple) 
Instructor in Speech 

The Rev. Iain G. Wilson, M.A. and B.D. (Edinburgh), D.D. 
William Oliver Campbell Professor of Homiletics 

The Rev. Douglas R. A. Hare, S.T.M. (Union, N.Y.) 

Instructor in New Testament 



GUEST PROFESSORS 



The Rev. Neil R. Paylor, Ph.D. (Harvard) 

Lecturer, the Program for Advanced Pastoral Studies 

The Rev. James Luther Mays, Ph.D. 

(Professor of Biblical Interpretation, Union Theological 

Seminary, Richmond) 

Guest Professor of Old Testament, 1964-65 

Father Roland E. Murphy, S.T.D. (Catholic University of America), S.S.L. 
(Professor of Old Testament, The Catholic University of America) 
Guest Professor of Old Testament, 1964-65 

12 



The Rev. Donald E. Gowan, Ph.D. (Chicago) 

(Head of Bible Department, North Texas State University) 
Guest Professor of Old Testament, 1964-65 

The Rev. C. Umhau Wolf, Ph.D. (Hartford) 

(Pastor, St. Paul's Lutheran Church, Toledo) 
Guest Professor of Old Testament, 1964-65 

The Rev. Clifford E. Davis, Ph.D. (Pennsylvania State) 
Lecturer in Christian Education 

Mr. Alfred Andrews, B.A. (Davis and Elkins) 

(Graduate Assistant, Speech Department, University of Pittsburgh) 
Guest Professor of Speech, 1964-65 

Mr. Philip Wander, B.A. (Southern Illinois) 

(Graduate Assistant, Speech Department, University of Pittsburgh) 
Guest Professor of Speech, 1964-65 

Robert J. Shoemaker, M.D. (Pittsburgh) 

(Clinical Assistant Professor of Psychiatry, University of Pittsburgh 

School of Medicine) 

Lecturer and Consultant in Psychiatry 

Margaret B. McFarland, Ph.D. (Columbia) 

(Associate Professor of Psychology, University of Pittsburgh; 
Director, Arsenal Family and Children's Center) 
Lecturer, the Program for Advanced Pastoral Studies 

Rex A. Pittenger, M.D. (Minnesota) 

(Staunton Assistant Professor of Psychiatry, University of Pittsburgh 
School of Medicine; Chief, Staunton Clinic) 
Lecturer, the Program for Advanced Pastoral Studies 

Werner Lutz, M.S. (Columbia) 

(Professor of Social Case Work, Graduate School of Social Work, 

University of Pittsburgh) 

Lecturer, the Program for Advanced Pastoral Studies 

Erma T. Meyerson, B.S., M.A.A.S.S. (Pittsburgh) 

(Professor of Sociology and Social Work, College of Liberal 

Arts and Graduate School of Social Work, University of Pittsburgh) 

Lecturer, the Program for Advanced Pastoral Studies 

Jack Matthews, M.A., Ph.D. (Ohio State) 

(Professor and Chairman, the Department of Speech, 

University of Pittsburgh) 

Lecturer, the Program for Advanced Pastoral Studies 

Marguerite Hofer 

(Executive Director, Department of Church and Community, 

Pittsburgh Presbytery) 

Lecturer in Church and Ministry, 1964-1965 

The Rev. Fred M. Rogers, B.D. (Pittsburgh) 

(Minister of Children, the Oakland Ministry, Pittsburgh, and in Television) 
Teaching Fellow in Church and Ministry, 1965-66 

13 



EMERITI 

The Rev. Clifford Edward Barbour, Ph.D., D.D., LL.D. 

President Emeritus 

The Rev. David E. Culley, Ph.D., D.D. 

Emeritus Professor of Hebrew and Old Testament Literature 

The Rev. Robert McNary Karr, D.D. 

Emeritus Professor of Systematic and Biblical Theology 

The Rev. James Leon Kelso, A.M., Th.M., Th.D., D.D., LL.D. 

Emeritus Professor of Old Testament History and Biblical Archaeology 

The Rev. George Anderson Long, D.D., LL.D., Litt.D. 

President Emeritus and Emeritus Professor of English Bible 

The Rev. Henry A. Riddle, D.D., LL.D. 
President Emeritus 

The Rev. Gaius Jackson Slosser, Ph.D., F.R.Hist.S. 

Emeritus Professor of Ecclesiastical History and History of Doctrine 



COMMITTEES OF THE FACULTY 
The Curriculum Committee 



Mr. Gerstner, Chairman 
Mr. Chamberlin 
Mr. Farley 
Mr. Orr 



Mr. Hare 

Mr. Bald 

Mr. Clyde 

Mr. Irvine, ex officio 



The Admissions and Standings Committee 

Mr. Jamieson, Chairman 

Mr. Buttrick 

Mr. Hinds 

Messrs. Bald, Idler, Alexander, Phillippe and Davis, ex officio 



Mr. Hills 
Mr. Wilson 



The Graduate Education Committee 

Mr. Smith, Chairman 

Mr. Barth 

Mr. Gerstner 

Mr. Bald, Mr. Idler and Mr. Phillippe, ex officio 



Mr. Irvine 

Mr. Ritschl 

Mr. Wiest 



The Convocation and Worship Committee 

Mr. Walther, Chairman Mr. Alexander 

Mr. Nicholson Mr. Kehm 



Miss Burrows 



The Publications Committee 

Mr. Kelley, Chairman 

Mr. Alexander 

Messrs. Hinsey, Atkins, Phillippe, and Walther, ex officio 



Mr. Ralston, ex officio 
Mr. Hinds 



Mr. Kehm, Chairman 
Mr. Wilson 
Mr. Kelley 



The Church and Society Committee 



Mr. Ritschl 

Mr. Smith 

Mr. Bald 



The President and the Dean are ex officio members of all committees. 

14 



SPECIAL LECTURES— 1964-1965 

Dr. Theodore A. Gill (Opening Convocation Speaker) 
President, San Francisco Theological Seminary- 
San Anselmo, California 

The Rev. David H. C. Read 

Pastor, Madison Avenue Presbyterian Church 
New York, New York 

Dr. Martin Niemoeller (Library Dedication Speaker) 

President of the Evangelical Church of Hesse-Nassau, Germany 
and President of the World Council of Churches 
Wiesbaden, Germany 

The Rev. Harold R. Albert 

Pastor, First Lutheran Church 
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

Dr. John Macquarrie 

Professor of Systematic Theology- 
Union Theological Seminary 
New York, New York 

Dr. W. Glen Harris 

Pastor, First Presbyterian Church 
Birmingham, Michigan 

The Rev. Harold E. Meyers 

Pastor, Indianola Presbyterian Church 
Columbus, Ohio 

The Rev. Robert M. Russell, Jr. 
Pastor, Westminster Foundation 
Ohio State University 
Columbus, Ohio 

The Rev. John E. Cameron 

Pastor, Faith Tabernacle Baptist Temple 
Hattiesburg, Mississippi 

Pere Roland DeVaux 

Ecole Biblique et Archeologique 
Jerusalem 

15 



The Rev. Edwin B. Fairman 

East Central Area Representative 

Commission on Ecumenical Mission and Relations 

Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

Dr. Hollis Summers 

Professor of English Literature 
Ohio University 
Athens, Ohio 



Dr. John Newton Thomas 

World Council Observer to the Vatican Council and 
Professor of Systematic Theology 
Union Theological Seminary 
Richmond, Virginia 



The Rev Edler G. Hawkins 
Moderator 
The United Presbyterian Church in the U.S.A. 

The Rev. Felix Gear 

Moderator 

The Presbyterian Church, U.S. 

Dr. Albert C. Winn 

Professor of Doctrinal Theology 

Louisville Presbyterian Theological Seminary 

Louisville, Kentucky 

The Rev. Professor Robert McLachlan Wilson 

Lecturer in New Testament Language and Literature 
University of St. Andrews, Scotland 



Dr. James R. Sydnor 

Professor of Church Music 

Presbyterian School of Christian Education 

and Union Theological Seminary 
Richmond, Virginia 



The Rev. James H. Robinson (Commencement Speaker) 
Pastor, Church of the Master 
New York, New York 



16 



ADMINISTRATIVE STAFF 



The Rev. Donald G. Miller, Ph.D., LL.D., Litt.D. 

President 



The Rev. Gordon E. Jackson, Ph.D., D.D. 
Dean of the Seminary 

Mr. J. Rowe Hinsey, B.S. 
Director of Development 

Mr. William R. Atkins, B.S., M.R.E. 

Business Manager 

Mr. John G. Smithyman, B.B.A., C.P.A. 

Comptroller 

The Rev. Howard M. Jamieson, Jr., Ph.D., D.D. 

Dean of Students 



Miss Bessie M. Burrows, M.A. 
Registrar 

The Rev. James S. Irvine, M.L.S., Ph.D. 
Librarian 



The Rev. Charles C. W. Idler, B.D. 
Director of Admissions 



The Rev. John M. Bald, Th.M., D.D. 

Financial Aid Officer 



The Rev. William R. Phillippe, B.D. 
Director of Continuing Education 



17 



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PITTSBURGH SEMINARY 

Our History 

The Pittsburgh Theological Seminary was created in 1959 by the 
consolidation of two institutions which had lived apart since 1825: 
Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary (United Presbyterian Church 
of North America) and Western Theological Seminary (Presbyterian 
Church, U.S.A.). 

Pittsburgh-Xenia Seminary was formed in 1930 by the union 
of Pittsburgh and Xenia Seminaries. The Xenia branch had been 
founded in 1794 in Western Pennsylvania but had spent most of its 
life in Ohio and Missouri. The Pittsburgh branch originated in 1825 
in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. Both branches were later augmented 
by the resources of Newburgh Seminary which was founded in New 
York City in 1805 by John Mitchell Mason. 

Western Seminary, established legally in 1825 by the General 
Assembly of the Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.), began with classical 
academies founded by Joseph Smith (1785) and John McMillan 
(1787) in Washington, Pa. It was indeed a "western" seminary in 
1825, whose task was to furnish a ministry for the rapidly opening 
western territories along the Ohio River. 

The union in 1958 of the United Presbyterian Church of North 
America with the Presbyterian Church in the United States of Amer- 
ica and the subsequent merger of Pittsburgh-Xenia and Western 
Seminaries were possible because of ancient bonds: the Bible, the 
reformers, and the Scottish experience of witness and suffering. 
Church divisions in Scotland were reproduced in America. Since 
1800 the direction has been steadily toward common witness with a 
resulting joining of schools. Pittsburgh Theological Seminary is 
the issue of this growing fellowship in theological education. 

The purpose of the Seminary as defined in the Constitution is to 
educate suitable persons for the work of Christian ministry in its 
various forms at the highest possible level of educational competence. 
Set down in the midst of one of the key industrial centers of the na- 
tion, the Seminary experiments in the city about it, wrestles with the 
nature of the gospel, strives for eventful communication. The pur- 
pose of the Seminary is clear-cut: to know our time, the gospel for 
the healing of our time, and the ministry for our time. 

19 




Pittsburgh at Night 



University of Pittsburgh 



- . 




• • 



PITTSBURGH 

Our Environment 

The City of Pittsburgh is the workshop of America. Together 
with the contiguous towns, it is one of the great commercial centers 
of the world. Its population includes people of every nationality, 
profession, and skill, and therefore it affords unexcelled opportunities 
for the study of social, economic, political, and racial problems. In- 
deed, Pittsburgh Seminary has working relationships with community 
and social agencies, labor unions, business management, human de- 
velopment research centers, teaching hospitals, etc., whereby these 
agencies and organizations become further resources for the educating 
of theological students. 

The cultural and educational life of Pittsburgh is no less rich. 
Five major colleges and universities are located in Pittsburgh: The 
University of Pittsburgh, Carnegie Institute of Technology, Duquesne 
University, Chatham College, and Mt. Mercy College. Their facil- 
ities, programs, and libraries, plus the Carnegie free libraries, afford 
added resources to all students. 

For music and art there are the world-famous Pittsburgh Sym- 
phony Orchestra; the Pittsburgh Opera Society; the Bach Choir and 
other choral and concert groups which bring to the city many out- 
standing musical events each season; the Pittsburgh Plan for Art, an 
extensive art rental and sales organization; and Carnegie Institute, 
which houses one of the largest contemporary art collections in the 
country, and which every third year presents the Pittsburgh Inter- 
national Exhibition of Paintings and Sculpture. Begun in 1896, the 
Pittsburgh International is one of the most important events of its 
kind in the world. 

Churches of all types and denominations are to be found, rang- 
ing from the large urban congregation to the small rural or industrial 
mission. Some of the nation's foremost preachers occupy pulpits in 
the area. 

Pittsburgh Presbytery is the largest presbytery in the United 
Presbyterian Church, U.S.A. Within its bounds are two hundred 
twenty-eight churches with a total membership of about one hundred 
thirty thousand. Of these, about half have more than five hundred 
members each, and mission work is conducted in over twenty differ- 
ent places. Within two hundred miles of Pittsburgh live one fifth 
of the United Presbyterians in this country. 

21 



THE CAMPUS .... Location 

The campus of Pittsburgh Theological Seminary consists of 
about ten acres, located at 616 North Highland Avenue, directly- 
opposite Pittsburgh's large Peabody High School. It is in a residen- 
tial area between the East Liberty business district and Highland 
Park, and only a few minutes by automobile or street car from 
the University of Pittsburgh. This spacious and beautifully land- 
scaped site was given to the Seminary in 1951 by the heirs of 
H. Lee Mason, Jr. 

Frequent street car and bus service connects the Seminary with 
downtown Pittsburgh. A person coming by train or bus should 
take a Highland Avenue street car (number 73) on Fifth Avenue, 
and leave the car immediately in front of the entrance to the 
Seminary. Anyone traveling by automobile may follow Highland 
Avenue to the campus. 

. . . Buildings 

A new, modern seminary plant is valued at about #7,000,000. 
The main buildings are of American Colonial design. They are con- 
structed of Hampton Court Colonial red brick with Indiana limestone 
trim and are fireproof throughout. 

The George A. Long Administration Building occupies the 
central position on the campus. It provides six classrooms, five 
seminar rooms, faculty and administration offices, a student center, 
a reception room, and The Bible Lands Museum. 

The McCune Chapel is an integral part of the main school 
building occupying a wing to the rear of the main entrance. It has 
a seating capacity of 310. The two-manual Schantz organ is a 
memorial to the United Presbyterian men and women who died 
in World War II. The memorial was established by the young 
people of our church. 

The Clifford E. Barbour Library is described on page 27. 

ACCOMMODATIONS FOR SINGLE STUDENTS 

The George C. Fisher Memorial Hall accommodates 80 men in 
single rooms. It provides a student lounge on each floor, a game 
room and a snack room on the ground floor, and six apartments for 
employees or married students. The student must supply his own 
sheets, pillow cases, blankets and towels and provide for their laun- 
dering. Special arrangements may be made by students for summer 
occupancy of dormitory rooms. 

23 



The John McNaugher Memorial Hall, located to the right of the 
Administration Building, is connected with it by covered passage- 
ways on the first and second floor levels. It provides accommodations 
for 63 men and 25 women. The dining hall with a seating capacity 
of 500, lounge and guest rooms are located in this dormitory. 



HOUSING FOR MARRIED STUDENTS 

The Highlander is an apartment-dormitory for married students 
located on the campus at the corner of North Highland Avenue and 
St. Marie Street. It was purchased in 1962 with funds provided by 
the Development Fund Campaign. There are twenty-three unfur- 
nished apartment units in the building of which seventeen have one 
bedroom and six have two bedrooms. Each unit includes a living 
room, kitchen, bath and storage locker. Some kitchens are equipped 
with a gas range and an electric refrigerator. Laundry facilities 
(coin meter) are available in the basement. 

The Samuel A. Fulton Memorial Hall, an apartment-dormitory 
for married students, provides eighteen efficiency and twenty-one 
two-room apartments. Each unit includes a kitchenette and a bath. 
A storage locker in the basement is assigned to each family. Each 
apartment is fully equipped with desk, bookcase, table, chairs, 
davenport-bed, a chest of drawers, wardrobe, refrigerator and electric 
stove. Students must provide bedding, linens, silverware, china, 
cooking utensils, curtains, lamps and rugs. Laundry facilities (coin 
meter) are available in the basement. 

A six-room fully furnished apartment for the housing of a mis- 
sionary family on furlough is provided in Fulton Hall. It is made 
available, through cooperation with the Commission on Ecumenical 
Mission and Relations, to missionaries seeking fuller preparation for 
service on return to their fields. 

The Sheridan Avenue Apartments are located on campus at 519 
Sheridan Avenue. This three-story building contains six unfurnished 
apartments for couples with children. Washers and dryers may be 
installed in the basement. 

Duplex Apartments. There are seventeen unfurnished duplex 
apartments on the North Highland Avenue campus for students 
with families. Special arrangements may be made for summer oc- 
cupancy of apartments. 

24 



THE BIBLE LANDS MUSEUM 

The Pittsburgh Theological Seminary is outstanding in its 
activity in archaeological research of Bible times in ancient Palestine. 
In conjunction with the American School of Oriental Research at 
Jerusalem, it has conducted explorations at Sodom and Gomorrah 
in 1924, excavations at Kirjath-Sepher in 1926, 1928, 1930, 1932, 
excavations at Bethel in 1934, at New Testament Jericho and Nitla 
in 1950, and at Bethel in 1954, 1957, and 1960. In conjunction with 
Carnegie Museum and the Department of Antiquities of Israel, 
through the Holy Lands Exhibition Fund the Seminary conducted 
archaeological digs at the Biblical site of Ashdod in 1962 and 1963, 
with additional excavations planned for future years. In 1964 the 
Kyle-Kelso Fund for Archaeological Research in Jordan was estab- 
lished, and a joint project with the American School of Oriental Re- 
search was carried on at Gibeah of Saul in the summer of 1964. 

The archaeological work was inaugurated by Professor M. G. 
Kyle and was then carried on by Professor James L. Kelso. In the 
spring of 1964 Associate Professor Howard M. Jamieson, Jr., was 
appointed Faculty Administrator of the Kyle-Kelso Fund. Mem- 
bers of the faculty and students often participate in the digs. Much 
of the Seminary's share of the antiquities excavated in the digs is now 
on exhibit in the Bible Lands Museum. Numerous other valuable 
pieces are awaiting special preparation before being placed on 
exhibition. 

These objects all illustrate in the most striking way the life of 
the people of Bible lands, and so become of great value for under- 
standing and interpretation. Occasionally archaeological discoveries 
corroborate Biblical statements as in the case of the fragments of a 
royal inscription of Sargon II of Assyria, found at Ashdod, which re- 
lates to the passage in Isaiah 20:1. For the most part archaeological 
excavations illuminate the background of the Bible, supplying many 
of the mundane facts about the culture and pursuits of the citizens 
of the Holy Land. 



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The New Library 

The Clifford E. Barbour Library, built and furnished with funds 
provided by the Sarah Mellon Scaife and Richard K. Mellon Founda- 
tions, opened September, 1964, with dedicatory services addressed 
by Dr. Martin Niemoller. As the libraries of the former Pittsburgh- 
Xenia and Western Seminaries are housed in one building for the 
first time, it is appropriate that the library be named for Dr. Clifford 
E. Barbour, first president of Pittsburgh Seminary, whose vision 
of a great library became reality. Planned to provide a wide variety 
of study conditions and air-conditioned throughout, the library 
affords easy access to book resources located in four stack areas; a 
book capacity of 300,000 allows for forty years of steady growth in 
resource materials. One hundred and three desk carrels placed in 
and around the book stacks are available to all readers, in addition 
to which there are thirteen enclosed typing carrels which allow 
greater privacy for research work. Twenty research study rooms 
provide ideal conditions in which the faculty, visiting scholars and 
graduate students may pursue serious scholarly endeavors. Several 
study rooms and lounges, informally arranged, invite leisurely read- 
ing for more than 75 persons aside from many areas devoted to 
special purposes. Facilities are available for small seminar classes, 
conference and group study lessons, audio-visual work, music listen- 
ing, microfilm reading, and hymnological and historical research. 

The heart of the library is the card catalog and associated bibliog- 
raphy and reference rooms, conveniently located around the circula- 
tion desk and reserve book room; adjacent to the catalog is current 
periodical reading with the extensive bound periodical collection. 

On display in the Main Floor exhibit area are the desk and chair 
of Dr. Karl Barth, Basel, Switzerland, presented to Pittsburgh 
Seminary at the time of the library dedication. Accompanying the 
desk at which Dr. Barth wrote his theological treatises from 1922 was 
an autographed copy of his Kirchliche Dogmatik 1/1. 



Dr. Markus Barth and Dr. Miller at Dr. Karl Barth's Desk 




The book collection, classified by the Library of Congress and 
Union Seminary systems, is arranged according to the basic divisions 
of the curriculum — Biblical, History-Theology, and Church and 
Ministry. The collection of 110,000 volumes, to which are added 
over 3,000 books each year, is fully adequate to support the various 
programs offered by the Seminary. More than 350 current periodi- 
cals cover both theological and non-theological disciplines. 

The following special collections augment the book resources: 



The John M. Mason Memorial Collection 
The research area of the library contains this priceless collection 
of classical theological works dating from the Reformation period. 



The James Warrington Collection of Hymnology 
Several thousand valuable hymn and psalm books which came 
from the estate of James Warrington, Philadelphia, provide research 
materials for scholars of American and English hymnody. Mr. 
Warrington minutely analyzed the works by composer, meter, tune, 
place, author, title, etc. 



The Nina S. Brittain Collection 
Through the generosity of Frank J. Brittain, Esq., of Erie, 
Pennsylvania, the sum of $5000 was used for the purchase of theo- 
logical and related works which are known as the Nina S. Brittain 
Collection. 



The Clarence J. Williamson Church History Collection 
In 1958 endowment funds were established, income of which is 
to be used for the purchase of books in Church History and closely 
related subjects. These books are in memory of Dr. Clarence J. 
Williamson, a graduate of Pittsburgh Seminary, for fifty-one years 
a minister in the United Presbyterian Church of North America, 
and for eighteen years Professor of Church History and Government 
in The Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary. 



Historical Collections 
A room of the library contains the Minutes and other records 
of Associate, Associate Reformed, and United Presbyterian congre- 
gations, presbyteries, synods, and General Assemblies. The library 
is also the depository for the Upper Ohio Valley Historical Society 
and Pittsburgh Presbytery of The United Presbyterian Church in 
the U. S. A. 

28 



LIFE ON THE CAMPUS 



CONVOCATIONS AND WORSHIP 

Through the faculty-student Convocation and Worship Com- 
mittee, outstanding people are brought to the campus. Each fall 
and spring there is a two-day lectureship in which a prominent person 
— theologian, Biblical scholar, psychiatrist, writer, social thinker 
and planner, etc. — is heard by the seminary family. 

Chapel worship is conducted by students and faculty four days a 
week, and monthly convocations introduce scholars from the various 
fields and disciplines to the seminary community. 



CHURCH AND SOCIETY 

Experiences provided by the direct contact of the Seminary with 
its neighborhood give to the students vital information and know- 
how for dealing with urban America. The Seminary reaches out to 
the community through field education, through laboratory assign- 
ments, and through the faculty-student Church and Society Commit- 
tee. The latter is a dynamic part of the seminary neighborhood as 
it has established relations with settlement houses, urban renewal 
and development offices, and with churches of the community for work 
with slum clearance, housing units, gangs, etc. The committee spon- 
sors a tutoring relationship between seminary personnel and neigh- 
borhood school children, and forcefully directs faculty and student 
involvement in civil rights problems, both locally and elsewhere in 
the nation. 

COMMUNITY LIFE 

The social life of the campus is enhanced by the presence of 
single students, married couples, and families. It is greatly enriched 
by those students from the Orient, Europe, Africa, the Middle East, 
South America, etc., who come to study but also to share their cultures. 

Missionary families spending their furloughs on the campus for 
study bring to the community a sense of the Church ecumenical 
coupled with a sense of urgency. 

The Women's Association, for all women on campus, provides 
opportunities for socializing as well as studying. 

A beautiful contemporary student center with a snack bar has 
been the most recent addition to the community life on the campus. 
Located below the chapel wing of the administration building, it is a 
place for refreshment, campus movies, group or class parties, and 
just a good place to get together. 

Admittedly, the emphasis in a theological seminary is not on 
social activities, but inter-personal relationships run deep and the 
socializing values are maintained by way of small group get-togethers 
and periodical school functions. 

29 



THE STUDENT ASSOCIATION 

THE EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE— 1964-1965 

President Edward Hunt 

Secretary-Treasurer Karen Seelar 

The committees of the Student Association for the most part 
parallel faculty committee structure and meet with the committees of 
the faculty for study and consideration of subjects of mutual interest. 

The committee chairmen for 1964-65 were: 

Curriculum Thatcher Schwartz 

Convocation and Worship Benjamin Booker 

Publications Harold Horan 

Church and Society Lawrence Bergstresser 

CLASS PRESIDENTS— 1964-1965 

Senior Class James Hanna 

Middler Class James Graham 

Junior Class Louis Wollenberg 



THE SEMINARY MUSICAL PROGRAM 

The Seminary has a Men's Choir and a Mixed Chorus, both un- 
der the direction of Mr. Howard L. Ralston, Assistant Professor of 
Church Music. Auditions for membership in the Men's Choir are 
held in September. This group, carefully chosen and of limited num- 
ber, sings for daily chapel services and represents the Seminary from 
time to time in churches within easy traveling distance. A more ex- 
tensive tour is undertaken in the spring when the choir presents a 
varied program of sacred music in churches and colleges. 

The Mixed Chorus is maintained for all those of the seminary 
community who enjoy singing. This group meets on Tuesday eve- 
nings and presents a program at Christmas and in the spring, and 
sings at commencement. There are many opportunities throughout 
the year for soloists and instrumentalists. 

The Seminary, in cooperation with the Pittsburgh Council of 
Churches and the American Guild of Organists, presents each year 
a church music seminar for choir directors, organists, and ministers 
of the area. The course, for which tuition is charged, meets for one 
and one-half hours on six Tuesday evenings. On occasion nationally 
known figures in church music are brought in for lectures and 
demonstration. 

One of the highlights of the seminary year is the James H. 
Snowden Memorial Concert, established in 1964 by Dr. Roy R. 
Snowden in memory of his father, a longtime former professor in the 
Seminary. This annual event enriches the cultural life of the sem- 
inary community by bringing to the campus Metropolitan Opera 
stars and other concert artists of the highest rank. 

30 










Frances Yeend, Snowden Concert Artist, with her 

Husband-Accompanist, James Benner (left) 

and Dr. Roy Snowden 



The Men's Choir— 1964 - 1965 



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ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS 

Pittsburgh Theological Seminary, as a higher educational insti- 
tution, offers work on a graduate school level. This presupposes a 
B.A. or B.S. degree from a regionally accredited college or university, 
the degree work to have a substantial foundation in the liberal arts. 
It also assumes that the student is ready to approach theological edu- 
cation with an open, searching attitude. Pittsburgh Seminary seeks 
that man or woman who is committed to the Christian faith, emotion- 
ally suited for work in the Church, and intellectually capable of the 
most rigorous kind of academic discipline. 



PRE-SEMINARY STUDIES 

College courses prior to theological seminary should provide the 
cultural and intellectual foundations essential to an effective theo- 
logical education. They should issue in at least three broad kinds 
of attainment. 

1. The college work of a pre-seminary student should result in 
the ability to use certain tools of the educated man: 

(a) The ability to write and speak English clearly and cor- 
rectly. English composition should have this as a spe- 
cific purpose, but this purpose should also be cultivated 
in all written work. 

(b) The ability to think clearly. In some persons, this abil- 
ity is cultivated through courses in philosophy or spe- 
cifically in logic. In others it is cultivated by the use of 
scientific method, or by dealing with critical problems 
in connection with literary and historical documents. 

(c) The ability to read at least one foreign language and in 
some circumstances more than one. 

2. The college work of a pre-seminary student should result in 
increased understanding of the world in which he lives: 

(a) The world of men and ideas. This includes knowledge 
of English literature, philosophy, and psychology. 

(b) The world of nature. This is provided by knowledge 
of the natural sciences, including laboratory work. 

(c) The world of human affairs. This is aided by knowledge 
of history and the social sciences. 

3. The college work of the pre-seminary student should result 
in a sense of achievement: 

(a) The degree of his mastery of his field of study is more 
important than the credits and grades which he ac- 
cumulates. 

32 



(b) The sense of achievement may be encouraged through 
academic concentration, or through "honors" work, or 
through other plans for increasingly independent work 
with as much initiative on the student's part as he is able 
to use with profit. 

Desirable College Curriculum 

The American Association of Theological Schools has proposed 
the following college curriculum for pre-ministerial students. This 
is regarded by the Association as a minimum list of fields of study 
with which the student should have acquaintance before beginning 
seminary study. It is suggested that a student acquire a total of 90 
semester hours, or complete approximately three fourths of his college 
work, in the areas listed below although there is no requirement that 
this be rigidly adhered to. The liberal arts background is felt to 
provide the best foundation for seminary work and for later profes- 
sional studies. 

English — literature, composition, speech and related studies. 
At least 6 semesters. 

History — ancient, modern European, and American. 
At least 3 semesters. 

Philosophy — orientation in history, content and method. 
At least 3 semesters. 

Natural sciences — preferably physics, chemistry and biology. 
At least 2 semesters. 

Social sciences — psychology, sociology, economics, political science, education. 
At least 6 semesters, including at least 1 semester of psychology. 

Foreign languages — one or more of the following linguistic avenues to man's 
thought and tools of scholarly research: Latin, Greek, Hebrew, German, 
French. Students who anticipate postgraduate studies are urged to under- 
take these disciplines early in their training as opportunity offers. 
At least 4 semesters. 

Religion — a thorough knowledge of the content of the Bible is indispensable 
together with an introduction to the major religious traditions and theo- 
logical problems in the context of the principal aspects of human culture 
outlined above. The pre-seminary student may well seek counsel of the 
seminary of his choice in order most profitably to use the resources of 
his college. 

At least 3 semesters. 

Of the various possible areas of concentration, where areas of concentra- 
tion are required, English, philosophy and history are regarded as the most 
desirable. 

At the beginning of the first year of seminary students will take 
placement examinations in philosophy, Greek, speech, Bible content, 
and basic English to determine the sections in which they will be 
placed. Students showing a deficiency in philosophy will be required 
to remedy such deficiency before proceeding to Systematic Theology I. 
Students showing a deficiency in English will be required to rem- 
edy such deficiency before graduation. 

33 



PROCEDURE FOR ADMISSION 

Applicants seeking degrees ordinarily move through three cate- 
gories under the supervision of the Admissions Committee: 

1. Pre-Enrollment: An applicant may pre-enroll any time be- 
fore the beginning of his senior year in college. Approval 
is granted by the Admissions Committee upon receipt of the 
following documents: 

(a) A formal application. 

(b) Application fee. A check or money order for $15.00 
must accompany the application. This will be applied 
to the first semester's tuition. While the fee will be 
refunded if the application is rejected, it is not return- 
able if the application is withdrawn. 

(c) Mental capacity test. The Seminary will correspond 
with the applicant's college concerning a mental ca- 
pacity test. If none is available, the applicant must 
take one under seminary direction. 

(d) A personal interview with the Director of Admissions, 
the Admissions Committee as a whole, or another rep- 
resentative of the Seminary who may be designated by 
the committee. 

2. Admissions: After the opening of the senior year in college 
an applicant should add the following credentials. Admission 
may be granted conditionally or unconditionally at the dis- 
cretion of the Admissions Committee. 

(a) A medical report on a blank furnished by the Seminary. 

(b) An official transcript from the registrar of the college or 
university, showing grades for at least three years of 
college work. 

(c) Shortly after indicating his desire to be admitted each 
applicant will receive information concerning a group of 
personality tests, which should be completed and re- 
turned as directed. 

(d) An extensive (500-1000 words) statement in the appli- 
cant's handwriting describing his family, educational, 
and religious background, placing particular emphasis 
upon his motives for desiring to enter the Seminary and 
the ministry. 

All documents for admission should be in the hands of the Direc- 
tor of Admissions by April 15 preceding the September for which ad- 
mission is sought. 

3. Matriculation: A final transcript showing the degree and 
date of graduation of the applicant. 

34 



After admission is granted and within thirty days of such notifi- 
cation, a $35 placement fee is required to assure the applicant of a 
place in the new class. This fee is applied on the student's tuition 
and is not returnable except under extreme hardship and at the dis- 
cretion of the Admissions Committee. A certification of the student's 
"intention to enroll" must accompany this fee. 

TRANSFER STUDENTS 

A student transferring from another seminary is required to 
submit, in addition to the foregoing, a complete transcript of previous 
seminary work and a letter of dismissal from the Dean or President. 
A transfer student must be in residence at Pittsburgh Seminary for a 
minimum of one full academic year in order to become a candidate 
for the Bachelor of Divinity degree. 

FOREIGN STUDENTS 

Qualified applicants from other countries are welcome as a part of 
the student body. Such applicants shall be required, in addition to 
the regular requirements for admission, to give evidence of proficien- 
cy in the English language before their admission. Tests such as the 
University of Michigan English Language Test (available around the 
world) and/or the Lado English Test (required by the U. S. State 
Department) normally shall be deemed sufficient. The former is ar- 
ranged through the Seminary or the Commission on Ecumenical Mis- 
sion and Relations of the United Presbyterian Church. 

Such applicants shall have endorsement either of a representative 
of the Commission on Ecumenical Mission and Relations (in those 
areas where the United Presbyterian Church in the U.S.A. has fra- 
ternal workers) or the World Council of Churches (in other areas). 

An applicant from another country is also asked to submit a letter 
from his bank stating that there are on deposit sufficient funds to 
assure his passage home after his period of study in this country. 
This saves possible embarrassment to both student and seminary at 
a later time. 

All correspondence concerning admission to the seminary should 
be addressed to the Director of Admissions. 



FEES AND EXPENSES* 

(for the academic year) 

Tuition (incl. Intersession) $550.00 Student Association Fee (annual) $5.00 

(approx.) Books (approx.) 150.00 

Board (incl. Intersession) 500.00 Hospitalization Insurance ..32.00-137.00 

Room Fee (incl. Intersession) .. 175.00 (approx.) 

Library Fee (annual) 10.00 Incidentals 75.00-300.00 

Matriculation Fee — $3,5.00 payable at the time of registration. 

Tuition Fee — $16.00 per semester hour. 

Late Registration Fee — A charge of $5.00 will be made to students registering later 

than the specified time. 
Graduation Fee— $10.00. 
Transcript Fee — One copy of a student's academic record will be provided without 

charge. A fee of $1.00 will be charged for each additional transcript. 
* Subject to change. 

MARRIED STUDENT APARTMENT FEES 
The Highlander 

Twenty-three unfurnished apartments $70.00-$77. 50 per month 

The Samuel A. Fulton Memorial Hall 

Thirty-nine furnished apartments 50.00- 65.00 per month 

Hoeveler Street Apartments 

Two unfurnished apartments 65.00 per month 

One furnished apartment 80.00 per month 

Sheridan Avenue Apartments 

Six unfurnished apartments 52.50- 57.50 per month 

Stanton Avenue Apartments 

Three unfurnished apartments 65.00- 75.00 per month 

Duplexes 

Fifteen unfurnished apartments 52.50- 57.50 per month 

Fees for apartment occupancy are payable monthly. If they are paid by the 
10th of the month there will be a discount of $5.00. Applications for apartments 
should be made as early as possible. 

A deposit of $10 per married couple, payable at registration, is required of all 
those living in seminary apartments. The deposit will be returned after satisfactory 
inspection at the time the apartment is vacated. 

PAYMENT OF FEES 

All academic fees and expenses are payable in advance on the 
opening day of each semester. When necessary, arrangements for 
a payment plan to cover a semester's expenses may be made at the 
Business Office on the first day of each term, permitting (4) four 
equal payments: one-fourth on the first day of the term, and the 
balance due at the beginning of the fourth, eighth, and twelfth 
weeks respectively. There is a carrying charge of #5.00 for the de- 
ferred payment plan. Failure to pay any deferred payment within 
ten days from the date due will incur a penalty of 1 % of the amount 
due. 

Settlement of all seminary bills is required before registration 
for a new semester, and before graduation or the release of official 
transcripts. 

36 



SEMINARY MEALS 
Residents of the men's and women's dormitories are required 
to eat in the seminary dining hall. Board includes nineteen meals 
a week; only breakfast is served on Sunday. The dining hall is 
closed on holidays which are scheduled on the seminary calendar. 
No deduction is allowed for absence from individual meals, although 
special consideration is given to students who regularly do not eat 
in the dining hall weekends. 

TUITION REFUNDS ON COURSES DROPPED 

First week of semester $1.00 withheld for each credit hour; balance refunded. 

Second to seventh week One half refunded. 

Seventh week on No refund. 

MEDICAL AND HOSPITALIZATION INSURANCE 
Students are required to be insured by some type of medical and 
hospitalization insurance acceptable to the Seminary. All students 
who are registered as full-time students are eligible for such insur- 
ance under a group student policy issued by either the Insurance 
Company of North America or Blue Cross and Blue Shield. Detailed 
information concerning premiums and benefits may be secured at 
the Business Office. 

TOTAL COST 
The total cost for one academic year, based upon a survey of 
actual student expenditures at Pittsburgh Seminary, is approximately 
#1,850 for an unmarried student and $2,850 for a married student 
without children. A married student having children should add 
#400 for each child in his family. These totals include expenses foi 
clothing, laundering and cleaning, medical and dental care not cov- 
ered by hospitalization insurance, incidentals and recreation, as well 
as tuition, fees (hospitalization insurance premiums included), board, 
room and books. Not included are automobile operating costs, pay- 
ments on purchases, life insurance premiums, repayment of indebted- 
ness, and expenses for travel to and from the Seminary. 



STUDENT FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE 

While students are encouraged to maintain a maximum of finan- 
cial independence, Pittsburgh Seminary does provide financial aid 
from endowed and general funds on the basis of demonstrated finan- 
cial need. Several merit scholarships are offered to entering students 
who have excellent academic records in their pre-seminary work and 
who must have financial help. Scholarship aid is also given according 
to need to upperclassmen whose academic attainments in their semi- 
nary work are high. Loans, grants-in-aid and remunerative campus 
work are also available as a part of the Seminary's financial assistance 
program. Approximately fifty work opportunities are available to 
students in the library, dining hall, and student center, and as at- 
tendants for various campus facilities. The work is limited to ten 

37 



hours per week and the remuneration is credited to the student's 
account or paid in cash. Once a student is admitted the Seminary 
makes every effort to see that he need not drop out for financial 
reasons. 

The Board of Christian Education of the United Presbyterian 
Church, through its Office of Educational Loans and Scholarships, 
provides financial assistance for United Presbyterian seminary stu- 
dents under a three-fold program: (1) National Presbyterian Theo- 
logical Scholarships ($100 to $1,000), (2) Loans ($100 to $500 in a 
given year) and (3) Grants-in-Aid (up to $500 in a given year). 
Nominations for the theological scholarships are made by the faculty 
of the Seminary and winners are named by a selection committee ap- 
pointed by the Board of Christian Education. 

Specific details concerning scholarships, grants-in-aid, work as- 
sistance, and loan funds, together with application forms for both 
seminary and Board of Christian Education programs, may be ob- 
tained from the Financial Aid Officer. 



LOAN FUNDS 



James H. Snowden Memorial Loan Fund. A loan fund for 
students needing financial assistance to obtain a theological educa- 
tion was established in 1953 by R. R. Snowden, M.D., Pittsburgh, 
Pennsylvania, in memory of his father, Professor James H. Snowden, 
D.D., LL.D. Loans from this fund are made on notes with interest 
and without further endorsement. 

Walter G. and Esther B. Comin Student Loan Fund. A loan 
fund for students who need financial assistance to continue their ed- 
ucation was established in 1955 by Mrs. Walter G. Comin, Pawnee 
City, Nebraska, Mr. and Mrs. Walter G. Comin, Jr., Wilkinsburg, 
Pa., and Mr. Myron C. Comin, Spokane, Washington, in memory of 
Rev. Walter G. Comin, D.D. Loans from this fund are made on 
notes at four percent interest and without further endorsement. 

Westphal Memorial Loan Fund. The session of the Reed Me- 
morial United Presbyterian Church, Lyndhurst, New Jersey, estab- 
lished in 1956 the Westphal Memorial Loan Fund. Under certain 
conditions specified by the donors loans from this fund may be made 
on notes without interest or further endorsement, and are repayable 
within ten years. 

Albert G. Hamilton Memorial Loan Fund. A loan fund for 
students who need financial assistance during the seminary course 
was established in 1960 by Mrs. Albert G. Hamilton, Pittsburgh, 
Pennsylvania, in memory of her husband, Mr. Albert G. Hamilton. 
Loans from this fund may be made on notes at three percent interest 
without further endorsement. 

38 



Dr. and Mrs. James D. Sands Memorial Loan Fund. A loan 
fund for seminary students was established in 1961 by Mrs. Albert 
G. Hamilton, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, in memory of her parents, 
Dr. and Mrs. James D. Sands. Loans from this fund may be made 
on notes at three percent interest without further endorsement. 

Walter A. Long Memorial Student Rotary Loan Fund. Estab- 
lished in 1961 by the Estate of Emma Clark Long. Loans are not 
to exceed #100 to any one student in any one academic year and the 
amount borrowed is to be repaid not later than two years after grad- 
uation or not later than two years after the borrower would have 
graduated if he had progressed normally through the seminary to 
graduation in the event of failure to graduate. All loans are made 
without interest. 

The William G. Crow Memorial Loan Fund. Established in 
November, 1961. Loans from this fund may be made on notes with 
three percent interest. 

The Mary Jane Dando Student Loan Fund. Loans from this 
fund are available to Junior students with interest and without fur- 
ther endorsement. Any loan from this fund must be repaid by the 
first day of the borrower's Senior year, or if the borrower for any rea- 
son discontinues his enrollment at the Seminary it becomes due at 
the termination of his relationship with the Seminary. 



AWARDS, PRIZES, AND GRADUATE FELLOWSHIPS 

The Sylvester S. Marvin Memorial Fellowship 

The Sylvester S. Marvin Fellowship may be assigned upon grad- 
uation to that member of the Senior Class who is recommended by the 
faculty as having achieved the highest standard in all departments 
of the seminary curriculum, provided that his average be not below 
85%. The faculty reserves the right to impose special tests and ex- 
aminations in making this award. It is offered to those who take the 
entire course of three years in this institution. The recipient must 
pledge himself to a year of post-graduate study immediately follow- 
ing his graduation at some institution approved by the faculty. He 
is required to furnish quarterly reports of his progress. The money 
will be paid in three equal installments, on the first day of October, 
January, and April. Prolonged absence from the classroom in the 
discharge of extra-seminary duties makes a student ineligible for the 
fellowship. 

39 



The Thomas Jamison Scholarship 

The Thomas Jamison Scholarship, in memory of the late Thomas 
Jamison, Esq., of North Side, Pittsburgh, was established by Mrs. 
Jamison. The income of this endowment is given every year to the 
member of the Senior Class who has the highest average at the begin- 
ning of his final semester of study. 

The acceptance of this scholarship requires that the recipient 
spend a full academic year in study in any graduate institution ap- 
proved by the faculty. He must further agree to make regular re- 
ports of the work he is doing and at the end of the year he will pre- 
sent a satisfactory thesis of not less than ten thousand words on some 
subject selected by the faculty or approved by the faculty. If for 
any reason the man who is first in the class does not accept the schol- 
arship and its requirements the scholarship will be offered to the stu- 
dent next in rank. 



The Jennie Rigg Barbour Memorial Prize 

The Jennie Rigg Barbour Memorial Prize was established by 
Rev. Clifford E. Barbour, Ph.D., D.D., LL.D., President Emeritus of 
Pittsburgh Theological Seminary, as a memorial to his mother. The 
income from the endowment of this prize is assigned to that member 
of the graduating class who has taken his full course of instruction in 
this institution and who has achieved the second highest academic 
rank of his class, if in the judgment of the faculty he is worthy in all 
other respects. It is hoped that the student will use this income for 
further study either within an academic institution or by the enlarge- 
ment of his own library. 

The Michael Wilson Keith Memorial Homiletical Prize 

This prize was founded in 1919 by the Keith Bible Class of the 
First Presbyterian Church of Coraopolis, Pennsylvania, in memory 
of the Reverend Michael Wilson Keith, D.D., the founder of the 
class and pastor of the church from 1911 to 1917. The prize is award- 
ed to a member of the Senior Class who has spent three years in this 
seminary and has taken the highest standing in the department of 
homiletics. The winner of the prize is expected to preach in the 
First Presbyterian Church of Coraopolis and teach the Keith Bible 
Class one Sunday after the award is made. 

The Joseph Watson Greek Entrance Prize 

The Joseph Watson Greek Prize was established in 1920 by 
Mrs. Robert A. Watson, Columbus, Ohio. The income will be awarded 
to the student who achieves the highest grade in an examination in 
classical Greek as he enters the Junior Class of the Seminary. 

40 



The William B. Watson Prize in Hebrew 
The William B. Watson Prize in Hebrew was established in 
1919 by Mrs. Robert A. Watson, Columbus, Ohio. The income will 
be awarded to that member of the Senior Class who, having elected 
Hebrew, shall submit the best grammatical and exegetical treatment 
of an assigned portion of the Hebrew Old Testament. 

The John Watson Prize in New Testament Greek 
The John Watson Prize in New Testament Greek was estab- 
lished in 1919 by Mrs. Robert A. Watson, Columbus, Ohio. The 
income will be awarded to that member of the Senior Class who, 
having elected Greek Exegesis, shall submit the best grammatical 
and exegetical treatment of an assigned portion of the Greek New 
Testament. 

The Robert A. Lee Church History Award 
By bequest, in memory of her husband the late Mrs. Henrietta 
M. Lee, Oakmont, Pa., established the Robert A. Lee Church History 
Foundation, the annual income of which is to be awarded yearly to 
the students making first and second rank respectively in the Depart- 
ment of Church History. 

The Hugh Thomson Kerr Moderator Prize 

This prize was established in 1938 by the Men's Committee of 
the Shadyside Presbyterian Church, Pittsburgh. An annual contri- 
bution of fifty dollars was pledged to be used for the purchase of 
books. The prize is to be awarded to that member of the graduating 
class who has exhibited to the greatest degree, throughout the three 
years of the seminary course, leadership, originality, and accomplish- 
ments beyond the normal requirements for graduation. 

The James Purdy Scholarship 
The James Purdy Scholarship was established in 1882. The 
income is apportioned equally each year to the six members of the 
Junior Class who attain the highest average of excellence in their 
seminary work. The distribution is made after the students return 
to the Seminary the following year. 

The Andrew Reed Scholarship 
The Andrew Reed Scholarship was established in 1914 by Miss 
Anna M. Reed, Cross Creek, Pennsylvania, the income being given 
to the student who, upon entering seminary, shall achieve the highest 
grade in a competitive examination in the English Bible. The suc- 
cessful competitor is to have the scholarship throughout the entire 
course of three years, provided that his general conduct and applica- 
tion to study shall continue to be satisfactory to the faculty. 

41 



The Home Training Bible Class Award In Missions 

This is an award of $100 which was established in January, 1961, 
by the Home Training Bible Class of the Edgewood Presbyterian 
Church, Pittsburgh, Pa., in the name of the Rev. Walter L. Moser, 
Ph.D., D.D. The recipient will be that member of the graduating 
class who is deemed most deserving among those entering the foreign 
or home missionary field upon graduation. 



The Chevy Chase Christian Education Award 

This award was established by the college age young people 
of the Chevy Chase Presbyterian Church, Washington, D. C, in 
appreciation of those who are interested in youth. It is to be given 
to the person who, throughout the seminary course, has best minis- 
tered to young people and who intends to specialize in youth work 
upon completion of his studies. 



The Alice Myers Sigler Memorial Prize In History And Theology 

This award was established in 1962 by Robert M., John H., 
Richard E., and Alan B. Sigler in memory of their mother. The 
income from this endowed fund is granted to the student who, in the 
judgment of the professors of the History and Theology Division, is 
most worthy of this award at the end of the Middler year. 



The Fred McFeely Rogers Prize In Biblical Studies 

The Fred McFeely Rogers Prize in Biblical Studies was estab- 
lished in 1962 by Mr. and Mrs. James H. Rogers in honor of their 
son, a graduate in the Class of 1962. The income from this endowed 
fund is granted to the student who, in the judgment of the professors 
of the Biblical Division, is most worthy of this award at the end of 
the Junior year. 



The First Presbyterian Church of McKeesport Preaching Prize 

This prize was established in 1964 by the congregation of The 
First Presbyterian Church of McKeesport, to be awarded to a student 
at the end of the fall semester of his Senior year for excellence in 
preaching. The winner of the prize is expected to preach one Sunday 
in The First Presbyterian Church of McKeesport during the spring 
semester of his Senior year. 



The Walter P. and Anna L. McConkey Award in Homiletics 

This award was established in 1964 by the Central Presbyterian 
Church in Washington, Pa., in honor of Dr. and Mrs. McConkey, 
who served that pastorate for many years. It is to be given to a 
student who, at the end of his Middler year has, in the judgment of 
the homiletics professors, demonstrated excellence in preaching. 

42 



DEGREE PROGRAMS 

AND 
COURSES OF STUDY 

Bachelor of Divinity 

Degree description ..... pages 44-47 

Course descriptions ..... pages 52-70 

Master of Religious Education 

Degree description ..... page 48 

Course descriptions ..... pages 52-69 

Master of Education ...... page 50 

Master of Theology 

Degree descriptions ..... pages 71-72 

Course descriptions ..... pages 73-77 



Master of Public Administration, or 

Master of Public and International Avoirs . . page 70 



43 



THE BACHELOR OF DIVINITY CURRICULUM 

Any theological curriculum is the result of some very basic de- 
cisions by the faculty. Will it be classically or practically oriented? 
Fundamentally, will it be the curriculum of a graduate school or a 
professional school? What will be the requirements for the Biblical 
languages? Will it be a "catchall" curriculum, so that the student 
gets a bit of this and that, or will it try to probe in depth at least 
3 few of the profound problems in theology today? What will be the 
role of field education? To these and other major questions the 
Pittsburgh faculty has given its current answers in the curriculum 
on the following pages. 

Among these answers we can sort out certain basic principles: 

. . . theological education is a search for meaning for the sake 
of ministry, and so faculty and students are colleagues in the inquiry 
and in the practice; 

. . . the curriculum seeks depth, and so the student will carry 
not more than four courses a term; 

. . . Biblical and theological scholarship requires Hebrew and 
Greek, and these are for the sake of careful exegesis; 

. . . teaching method depends on the material, the professor, 
the class, the stage of development, and so the lecture sometimes, the 
seminar often, and the library always are the pattern; 

. . . field education is the human laboratory, and the old and 
the new, church and culture, theology and the social sciences are 
the vast context for laboratory experience. 

The Biblical Division starts out the curriculum with an intensive 
working through of the Bible during the first year so that theology, 
ethics, education, preaching, etc., might build on that base. Greek 
comes the first year, and Hebrew the second, each followed by a se- 
mester of exegesis with the student choosing the course and professor. 

The History and Theology Division continues the setting of 
foundations in the first year with a sequence of history and history of 

44 



doctrine which is team-taught. On the basis of this plus what the Bibli- 
cal Division has done, systematic theology in the second year is an in- 
tensive study of theological problems. The student and professor 
together are caught up in the doing of theology; that is, the student 
learns firsthand what the practice of the theologian is. The making 
of the theologian is in process. Each student will also choose an 
elective in church history and one in theology to further the theologiz- 
ing process. 

The Church and Ministry Division contributes basic material to 
the first year by examining the historical context of the American 
church one semester and the sociological context the other. The 
second year, when field education in the churches is introduced, sees 
the foundations laid and some practice begun in education, coun- 
seling, preaching, and liturgies. Pastors of churches are required to 
give to their students experiences in worship leadership, counseling, 
hospital and home calling, teaching, board meetings, etc., which form 
the grist for supervisory sessions back on the campus. (The pastor 
is a supervisor, too: an on-the-job supervisor!) In the third year 
ethics dominates the first semester and the practice of preaching and 
teaching is continued during the year. 

Some form of field experience is going on throughout the B.D. 
course. For example, when the historical context is examined in the 
first semester of the Junior year, some involvement is required on the 
part of the student in labor meetings, police courts, management dis- 
cussions, family and children's services, etc. This helps him to see 
that the church did not grow up in a vacuum and does not continue 
in one. When a student is studying the sociological context, he must 
as part of the course examine carefully a specific church and its rela- 
tionships to its neighborhood. In the Senior year as part of the 
course in ethics each student becomes involved in a concrete ethical 
problem (e.g., race, ward politics, medical decisions, depressed area, 
school drop-outs). Faculty members are assigned to hear Seniors 
preach and conduct worship in area churches. 

The Pittsburgh faculty has committed itself to provide theo- 
logical inquiry that is profoundly probing on the level of graduate 
education for highly competent practice of ministry. 

45 



THE PRESCRIBED COURSE OF STUDY 

LEADING TO THE 
DEGREE OF BACHELOR OF DIVINITY 



Semester I 
110 Old Testament Introduction 
210 Greek 
410 Church History and History 

of Doctrine I 
710 Church & Ministry I: American 

Historical Context 



Junior 


Year 

Semester II 




5 


211 Greek 


3 


3 


213 New Testament Introduction 


5 


5 


411 Church History and History 
of Doctrine II 


5 


an 
2 


711 Church & Ministry II: 
Sociological Context 


2 



15 



Intersession 
115 I ntertesta mental Period 



120 Hebrew 

520 Systematic Theology I 
720 Church & Ministry III: Foun- 
dations (psychological, 
educational, communicative) 
Elective 



Middler Year 
3 

5 



4 
3 

15 



121 Hebrew 

521 Systematic Theology II 

721 Church & Ministry IV: 

Foundations (homiletical 

and liturgical) 
Elective 



4 
3 

15 



Intersession 



723 Counseling 



730 Church & Ministry V: 
Ethics and Homiletics 

Electives 



Senior Year 

731 Church & Ministry VI: 
4 Education, Administration, 

Polity, Homiletics 
9 Electives 



13 



4 
9 

13 



Intersession 
Independent Study 



66 academic hours of required work 
26 academic hours of electives 



92 total academic hours required for graduation 
46 



THE FOUR-YEAR BACHELOR OF DIVINITY CURRICULUM 



Semester I 
110 Old Testament Introduction 
410 Church History and History 
of Doctrine I 



Semester II 
213 New Testament Introduction 
411 Church History and History 
of Doctrine II 



10 



10 



Inter session 
113 Intertestamental Period 



210 Greek 

520 Systematic Theology I 

710 Church and Ministry I 



II 

3 211 Greek 3 

5 521 Systematic Theology II 5 

2 711 Church and Ministry II 2 



10 



10 



III 



120 Hebrew 


3 


121 Hebrew 


3 


720 Church and Ministry III 


4 


721 Church and Ministry IV 


4 


Electives 


6 


Electives 


6 



13 



13 



Intersession 



723 Counseling 



730 Church and Ministry V 
Electives 



IV 



4 731 Church and Ministry VI 4 

6 Electives 6 



10 



10 



Intersession 
Independent Study 



47 



THE MASTER OF RELIGIOUS EDUCATION CURRICULUM 

The Master of Religious Education curriculum is a two year 
program including both theory and practice among the disciplines of 
Bible, history, theology, and the teaching ministry. The requirement 
of both Hebrew and Greek demonstrates the faculty's seriousness 
about this degree as it seeks to prepare students for the teaching 
office. That that office has fallen into disrepute and has come to be 
associated largely with methods is manifest. The recovery of the 
office will come through Biblical and theological competence coupled 
with the art and skills of communication. To know the Bible the 
student must enter into the world of the Bible and gain a "feel" 
for its idiom of thought, expression, practice. Language study is 
the primary tool for this incursion. Twenty hours in church history, 
history of doctrine, and theology will also contribute to the needed 
competence. By taking the basic courses of theological education an 
M.R.E. candidate is prepared to work side by side with pastors, 
sharing a common understanding of the total ministry of which edu- 
cation is a part, and performing that ministry with professional com- 
petence. 

Within this program the teaching office is lifted and empha- 
sized for the M.R.E. candidate. The B.D. Church and Ministry 
courses are especially adapted so that the student whose vocational 
interest is Christian education can explore the philosophy and theol- 
ogy of, as well as develop methodological and administrative 
skills in, that special ministry. Throughout the two year course 
the student will be involved in Christian education theory and prac- 
tice. Field education practicum is required each semester and is 
closely geared with class work. 

The Master of Religious Education program, open to both men 
and women, is designed primarily to prepare them to serve the 
Church of Jesus Christ as directors or ministers of Christian edu- 
cation in local congregations, as curriculum writers and fraternal 
workers, as well as to provide them background for related profes- 
sional and service vocations such as public school education, social 
work, nursing, and the nursery school. 

48 



THE PRESCRIBED COURSE OF STUDY 

LEADING TO THE 

DEGREE OF MASTER OF RELIGIOUS EDUCATION 



Semester I 

110 Old Testament Introduction 

210 Greek 

410 Church History and History 
of Doctrine I 

Christian Education 



Junior 


Year 

Semester II 




5 


211 Greek 


3 


3 


213 New Testament Introduction 


5 


5 


411 Church History and History 
of Doctrine II 


5 


2 


Christian Education 


2 



15 



15 



Intersession 
115 Intertestamental Period 



120 Hebrew 

520 Systematic Theology I 

720 Church & Ministry III: Founda 
tions (psychological, educa- 
tional, communicative) 
Elective 



Senior Year 




3 121 Hebrew 


i 


521 Systematic Theology II 


5 


Christian Education 
4 
n Elective 


4 


3 



15 



15 



Intersession 



723 Counseling 



58 academic hours of required work 
6 academic hours of electives 



64 total academic hours required for graduation 
49 



THE PRESCRIBED COURSE OF STUDY LEADING TO THE 
DEGREE OF MASTER OF EDUCATION (M.Ed.) 

This degree is offered jointly by the University of Pittsburgh 
and Pittsburgh Theological Seminary. It will be conferred by the 
University upon completion of a course of study which will include 
18 hours taken in three trimesters at the University and 18 hours 
taken concurrently in two semesters at the Seminary. 



Ed. Psych. 
Ed. Res. 
Fdns. Ed. 
Fans. Ed. 



The University Requirements 
271 — Advanced Educational Psychology 
200 — Introduction to Research and Statistics 
201 — General Philosophy of Education 
228 — History of Modern Education 



Department of Religious Education 



2 hours 
2 hours 
2 hours 
2 hours 
10 hours 

18 hours 



The Seminary Requirements 
Biblical Studies ....... 

Church History ....... 

Theology ........ 

712 — Seminar in Christian Education 
Field Education Practicum . 



6 hours 
3 hours 
3 hours 
3 hours 

3 hours 

18 hours 



The M.Ed, course of study is designed as a one-year course for 
those who have an approved Bachelor's collegiate major in the fields 
of religion, Bible, or religious education, or their equivalent, to pro- 
vide further depth, understanding, and technical skills for work in 
local churches. Admission requirements, in addition to the "major," 
are those of the University and the Seminary. Housing will be pro- 
vided by the admitting institution. 

Applicants for this degree may write to: 

Dr. Lawrence C. Little 
Department of Religious Education 
University of Pittsburgh 
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15213 

or 
Director of Admissions 
Pittsburgh Theological Seminary 
616 N. Highland Avenue 
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15206 

50 



THE HONORS PROGRAM 

It is a major intention of the faculty not only to allow, but to 
encourage, every student to proceed in his academic work at the 
deepest level of which he is capable. Toward the fulfilment of this 
intention the principle of sectioning is employed wherever feasible 
across the entire curriculum. 

For those students who demonstrate superior academic ability 
the faculty has devised an honors program compounded of independ- 
ent study and sectioning or tutorials. To be eligible for this pro- 
gram a student must maintain a minimum cumulative average of 
2.00 and a 2.25 average in the division in which he elects to do honors 
work. 

At the end of the first semester of the middler year students who 
are eligible are invited to devise an honors program which they will 
work through in their senior year. They may take up to eight hours 
in independent study in this program. 

While Theological German and French, as well as Greek and 
Latin offerings, are elective for the entire student body and are not 
required for the honors students, the faculty recommends to them 
that they elect such courses if their language background has pre- 
pared them for such election. 



51 



DESCRIPTION OF COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

FOR THE BACHELOR OF DIVINITY, 

MASTER OF RELIGIOUS EDUCATION, 

AND MASTER OF EDUCATION DEGREES 



THE BIBLICAL DIVISION 
Mr. Walther, Chairman 
Mr. Barth Mr. Jamieson 

Mr. Hare Mr. Kelley 

Mr. Hills Mr. Miller 

Mr. Irvine Mr. Orr 

Some course offerings which might be listed under the Biblical Division are 
correlated with Church and Ministry and are listed under that division. Moreover, 
most exegesis courses listed below are correlated with Church and Ministry 
( especially homiletics ) . 



REQUIRED COURSES 

110. Old Testament Introduction. A survey of the books of the Old 
Testament with special attention to the formation of the literature and 
its religious significance. The history of Israel is traced from earliest 
times and set in the framework of Near Eastern civilization as recovered 
through archaeological research. The message and times of the prophets 
are surveyed, as well as the life and worship of the post-exilic community. 
The principal objective is mastery of the Biblical material. There are 
also assigned readings in current scholarly literature. 

Juniors, first semester, 5 hours credit. 

115. The Intertestamental Period. A survey of the historical, literary, 
and religious background of the New Testament, concentrating on Pal- 
estinian Judaism from which Christianity was born, with some attention 
to the Hellenistic world in which it developed. 

Juniors, Intersession, 2 hours credit. 

120. Elementary Hebrew. A course designed to lead to an apprecia- 
tive and competent use of Hebrew as one of the languages of Biblical 
revelation. From the outset the student learns inductively to read from 
the original language of the Old Testament. Emphasis is placed on the 
acquisition of a working vocabulary as the ground for further reading, 
and the illumination of key Biblical concepts. Instruction is in small, 
graded sections so that a maximum of individual attention and achieve- 
ment is possible. 

Middlers, first semester, 3 hours credit. 

121. Elementary Hebrew. Continuation of 120 with instruction in 
graded sections. 

Middlers, second semester, 3 hours credit. 

52 



210. New Testament Greek. A course designed to lead to a competent 
use of Greek as one of the languages of Biblical revelation. From the 
outset the student learns inductively to read from the Greek New Testa- 
ment, and unique study aids prepared by the Division are used. Instruc- 
tion is in small, graded sections. Students who have previously studied 
Greek will be assigned to special sections for their New Testament lin- 
guistic work. 

Juniors, first semester, 3 hours credit. 



211. New Testament Greek. Continuation of 210 with instruction in 
graded sections. As much of the New Testament will be read as progress 
permits. Some attention will be given to textual criticism, and exeget- 
ical method and practice will be introduced. 

Juniors, second semester, 3 hours credit. 



213. New Testament Introduction. The purpose of this course is to 
convey a basic knowledge and enjoyment of, and respect for, each New 
Testament book by preparation of careful exegesis of individual texts. 
Beginning from the background afforded by courses 110 and 115, the 
course faces the character and message, the diversity and unity of the 
New Testament books, as well as the open questions concerning authors, 
dates, places, and recipients. Some aspects of the manifold interpreta- 
tions of the New Testament are outlined together with its influence 
upon later church life and modern scholarly endeavor. 

Juniors, second semester, 5 hours credit. Mr. Barth 



ELECTIVES 

140, 141, 142, and 143. Hebrew Reading. Supervised reading of selected 
Old Testament passages. 

Offered each semester, 1 hour credit. 



144. Hebrew Grammar. Introduction to the formal structure of the 
Hebrew language, (phonetics, morphology, syntax) with special attention 
to its historical development and relation to other Semitic languages. 

Offered on request. Mr. Hills 



148. The Dead Sea Scrolls. Survey of the scrolls from the Dead Sea 
area, particularly Qumran. Archaeological background, analysis of 
contents, significance for the text, history, and theology of the Old and 
New Testaments. Selected passages will be read in the original lan- 
guages. 

Offered on request. Mr. Hills 



151. Elements of Accadian. A beginner's course in Assyro-Babylonian. 
Offered on request. Mr. Irvine 

53 



152. Biblical Aramaic. Reading and the grammar of the Aramaic 
sections of the Old Testament. Additional material may be included 
from the fifth century B.C. Aramaic letters from Elephantine. 

Offered on request. Mr. Hills 



155. Septuagint Studies. Introduction to the Greek Old Testament, 
and problems of the Greek and Hebrew texts. Reading and comparative 
study of passages in Hebrew and Greek. 

Offered on request. Mr. Orr or Mr. Walther 



156. Hellenistic Greek Studies. Selected readings in Philo, Josephus, 
the Apostolic Fathers, and other Greek literature approximately contem- 
porary with the New Testament period. First year students whose abil- 
ity and experience warrant may be assigned to this course in place of 
210 or 211. 

Offered on request. Mr. Orr 



161. Trends in Recent Old Testament Hermeneutics. A seminar based 

on discussions of the book Problems of Old Testament Hermeneutics. 

Prerequisites: 2 exegesis courses and Reformation history. 

Mr. Ritschl and Old Testament Instructor 



173. The Old Testament: Torah. Exegesis of passages from the Hebrew 
text of the first five books of the Old Testament. 

Offered on request. Mr. Hills 



174. The Old Testament: Prophetic Books. Exegesis of passages from 
the Hebrew text of the "Former" and the "Latter" Prophets. 

II Isaiah offered first semester, 1964-65. 
Amos, Micah offered second semester, 1964-65. 

Mr. Hills and guest faculty 



175. The Old Testament: Writings. Exegesis of passages from the He- 
brew text of the "Writings" of the Old Testament canon. 

Psalms, Wisdom Literature offered first semester, 1964-65. 

Mr. Hills and guest faculty 



180. Archaeology of Palestine. A study of archaeological method 
and the results of excavations of Near Eastern sites as they relate to 
the Old and New Testaments. 

Offered first semester, 1965-66. Mr. Jamieson 

54 



182. Old Testament Messianism. Origins and development of various 
strands of Old Testament hope: royal messianism, eschatological king- 
dom, Day of Yahweh, etc. Analysis of selected Old Testament texts. 
Messianism in Judaism (Qumran). 

Offered second semester, 1964-65. guest faculty 



240, 241, 242, 243. Greek Reading. Supervised reading of selected New 
Testament or Septuagint passages. 



Offered each semester, 1 hour credit. 



244. Greek Grammar. Introduction to the formal structure of New 
Testament Greek; systematic study of grammar and syntax, illustrated 
by specific New Testament passages. 

Offered first semester (except 1965-66). Mr. Kelley 



250. The Gospel of Luke. An inductive study of the purpose, structure, 
meaning, and contemporary significance of the third Gospel. 

Offered second semester, 1965-66. Mr. Miller 



251. Galatians. A verse-by-verse study of the Greek text, together 
with study of its key words and themes, and of the literary elements 
and historical place of Paul. Finally, the main types of interpretation 
throughout the centuries are reviewed. In short, this is an attempt at a 
theological exegesis of the book. 

Offered both semesters, 1964-65. Mr. Barth 



252. First Peter. An exegetical seminar, including syntactical studies 
of I Peter 1:3-2:10, and word studies of the major theological words in 
the epistle. Stress on exegetical methodology. Requirement: weekly 
syntactical preparation and one major seminar paper. (Limited to 12 
students.) 

Offered second semester, 1964-65. Mr. Miller 



253. Colossians. Exegesis of the text of the epistle. 

Offered first semester, 1965-66. Mr. Barth 



254. Interpreting the First Gospel. An examination of the presuppo- 
sitions and problems of exegesis with particular reference to the dis- 
courses of the Gospel according to St. Matthew. 

Offered first semester, 1965-66. Mr. Hare 

55 



260. New Testament Christology. The beliefs about Jesus as Messiah, 
Son of Man, Son of God, and his work as revealer of the Father, inaugu- 
rator of the Kingdom, and Savior of the human race. 

Mr. Barth 



261. The Life of Jesus Christ. An examination of the Biblical mater- 
ials supplemented by reference to the extra-Biblical sources and readings 
in the literature. The latter will include a survey of the critical study 
of the "Quest" in the last century and the "New Quest" from kerygma 
to history at the present time. Consideration will be given to the possi- 
bilities of writing a "life" today. 

Offered second semester, 1965-66. Mr. Walther 



262. Eschatology in the New Testament. The New Testament mater- 
ials will be studied in exegetical detail with supplementary reading in the 
twentieth century literature on the subject. 

Offered first semester, 1966-67. Mr. Walther 



265. New Testament Theology. A course designed to acquaint students 
with the principal themes, the strands of thought, and the theological 
terminology of the New Testament. Attention will be given to the con- 
tinuity of Biblical religion in Old and New Testaments. Lectures and 
discussion with reading and research in the literature. 

Offered second semester, 1966-67. Mr. Hare and Mr. Walther 



270. Practical Use of the Synoptic Gospels. An exegetical examina- 
tion of selected portions of the first three Gospels with special reference 
to their meaning for preaching, teaching, worship, evangelism, and 
counseling. 

Offered second semester, 1966-67. Mr. Orr 



271. Practical Use of the Fourth Gospel and Revelation. (See Course 
270.) 

Offered first semester, 1965-66. Mr. Orr 



272. Practical Use of the Pauline Epistles. (See Course 270.) 
Offered second semester, 1965-66. Mr. Orr 



273. Practical Use of the Pauline Epistles. Similar to 272, with special 
attention to the Corinthian correspondence. 

Offered first semester, 1966-67. Mr. Orr 

56 



THE HISTORY AND THEOLOGY DIVISION 

Mr. Smith, Chairman 

Mr. Farley Mr. McCloy 

Mr. Gerstner Mr. Ritschl 

Mr. Kehm Mr. Wiest 

Required and elective course offerings in the theology of church and ministry, 
theology of the sacraments, ethics, and American church history, customarily listed 
under the History and Theology Division, are correlated with Church and Ministry 
courses and are listed under that division. 



REQUIRED COURSES 

410. Church History and History of Doctrine I. A composite course in 
church history and history of doctrine from the Apostolic Age to the 
twelfth century; an introduction to the historical developments of the 
theological discussion connected with the names of important Church 
Fathers and Councils in the period between Ignatius and John of Damas- 
cus (in the East) and Anselm (in the West.) The mission and expansion 
of the church and the rise of offices and government, art and literature 
are covered. 

Juniors, first semester, 5 hours credit. Mr. McCloy and Mr. Ritschl 



411. Church History and History of Doctrine II. A composite course in 
church history and the history of doctrine from the thirteenth century 
to the present, exclusive of American church history. History of doc- 
trine is reviewed from the Scholastics through the Reformation Fathers 
to the 20th century. 

Juniors, second semester, 5 hours credit. Mr. Gerstner and Mr. Ritschl 



520. Systematic Theology I. Three areas of Christian doctrine are 
studied. A. The presuppositions and procedures of theology; revelation, 
scripture, faith and reason, philosophy and theology. The stress is 
placed on what is involved in theological thinking and inquiry. B. The 
being and attributes of God, including such "works" as election and cre- 
ation. C. Man as sinner. The reading of major theological systems 
provides occasions for the student to do his own theological thinking and 
inquiry. 

Middlers, first semester, 5 hours credit. Mr. Farley 



521. Systematic Theology II. The person and work of Jesus Christ, 
justification, sanctification, the Church and its mission, the sacraments, 
the ministry, and eschatology. 

Middlers, second semester, 5 hours credit. 

Mr. Wiest, Mr. Farley, Mr. Ritschl, Mr. Kehm 

57 



ELECTIVES 

430. Patrology. A study of Christian literature of the ancient church 
from the Apostolic Fathers to Gregory the Great and John of Damascus. 
Texts of the Fathers in English translations will be used, together with 
the Patrology of Berthold Altaner. 

Offered first semester, 1965-66. Mr. McCloy 



431. Eastern Christianity. A study of the history of the church of 
Constantinople and the various national divisions of Orthodoxy: its 
liturgy, tradition, theology, and its contemporary situation; the rise and 
development of the Monophysite churches in Syria, Egypt, Armenia, and 
of the Nestorian church. 

Offered second semester, 1965-66. Mr. McCloy 



432. Medieval Christendom. This course is a study of the particular 
form of Christian life created by the Middle Ages. Particular attention 
is given to the history of morals, the unitive character of medieval 
society, and the characteristic concepts and presuppositions of the era. 
One particular purpose of the course is to enable students to grasp 
modern Catholicism and contemporary ecumenical conversation with 
Catholics. Mr. Smith 



435. Seminar in Luther. This course is concerned with the writings 
of Luther in the period before 1525, with particular emphasis on "The 
Freedom of a Christian Man." Short papers will be required. Prereq- 
uisite: Course 411 and 3 hours of Systematic Theology. Registration de- 
pendent upon interview with the professor. jyj r Rjt sc hl 



436. The History of Biblical Interpretation (Early Church). This lec- 
ture course deals with the history of Biblical interpretation from the time 
of the beginning of the second century to Augustine in the West and John 
of Damascus in the East. 

Prerequisites: History of the Early Church, one course in Old Testa- 
ment and in New Testament Exegesis. jy| r Rjtschl 



437. Biblical Interpretation from 1860 to 1960. This lecture course 
deals with the development of Old Testament and New Testament exe- 
gesis after Schleiermacher, with discussion of the positions of De Wette, 
F. S. Bauer and the subsequent historical-critical school, the history of 
religion school, and finally the hermeneutical positions up to Ernst Fuchs. 

Prerequisite: two exegesis courses, Reformation history. Mr. Ritschl. 



440. The Libertarian Reformation. The course opens with a survey 
of the 16th century historical and ecclesiastical situation designed to 
show the place of thinkers who repudiated the state church. This is 
followed by consideration of selected figures: Thomas Munzer, Menno 
Simons, Sebatian Castellion, Michael Servetus, Socinus, and others. 

Mr. Smith 

58 



441. Symbols of the Reformation. An examination and comparison of 
various creeds, catechisms and confessions arising within the Protestant 
Reformation, having in view the theological aspects of present-day- 
ecumenical conversations. jyi r g a ]^ 



443. Roman Catholicism Since Trent. The historical and theological 
development of Rome from the Council of Trent to 1900. jy| r Gerstner 



444. The Age of Orthodoxy. The Reformation after the Reformers 
left the scene. A close study of Continental Reformed Orthodoxy from 
the end of the sixteenth to the middle of the eighteenth century. A 
knowledge of Latin not required. ^ r Gerstner 



450. Christian Biography. A study of the lives and personalities of 
outstanding Christians beginning with Ignatius of Antioch and extending 
to Albert Schweitzer; the various religions and cultural factors which 
helped to shape conspicuously Christian character; the ideals and art 
of Christian biography and autobiography. ^ r M c doy 



452. Seminar in the History of the Ancient Church. Specialized areas 
will be considered upon consultation with the instructor: e.g., the expan- 
sion of Christianity into Northern Europe and Great Britain, Christian 
art and archaeology, the historical geography of the Ancient Church, 
daily life and culture in the Ancient Church. 

Offered second semester, 1966-67. Mr. McCloy 



454. Christianity in America. The course describes the course of church 
history in America from the Massachusetts Bay Colony to the 20th 
century. It includes a survey of the major religious traditions and the 
impact of American life on them; the revival and development of the 
denominations; the growth of Catholicism; and the marginal Christian 
groups from eastern Orthodoxy to the sects. Emphasis is placed on the 
interaction of tradition and environment. ^ r g m u n 



455. Methodist History and Doctrine. Required of Methodist students 
for graduation; elective for other students. 

Offered on alternate years, 3 hours credit. Mr. Chamberlin 



460. History of Apologetics. The nature of the defense of Christian 
faith explored through an examination of a number of apologetic sys- 
tems of the past and present. jyj r g a j^ 



462. American Theology through the 19th Century. Traces the theo- 
logical developments from Edwards to 1900. Especial consideration of 
Hopkins, Bushnell, Taylor and Parks. The relation of this school to the 
American Presbyterian Church indicated. Mr Gerstner 

59 



470. Advanced Reading and Research in Church History. Guided read- 
ing and research in sources of church history. Subjects for study 
will be determined in conference with the instructor. Permission from the 
instructor is necessary for registration. 

Mr. Gerstner, Mr. Smith or Mr. McCloy 



530. Theological Method. The investigation of one or several prob- 
lems related to the doing of theology: theology and philosophy, the 
authority of Scripture, the status and use of tradition, the nature of 
theological statements, the problem of system, theology as analytic- 
synthetic, theoretical-practical. Mr . Farley or Mr# Wiest 



531. Major Theological Loci. The investigation of one or more doc- 
trines, such as God, election, sin and fall, Jesus Christ, redemption, 
Holy Spirit, church, eschaton. 

Mr. Farley, Mr. Kehm, Mr. Wiest or Mr. Ritschl 



532. Controversial Theological Issues. The investigation of one the- 
ological problem through the study of the major "orthodox," "heretical," 
"heterodox," or sectarian formulations of that problem. The study of 
such controversial issues as the freedom of the will, the trinity, pre- 
destination, the status of natural theology, the two natures, demyth- 
ologizing, issues of Faith and Order in the ecumenical movement. 

Mr. Farley and Mr. Kehm 



533. Major Christian Theologians. Intensive study of the works of one 
of the great theologians of the Church, such as Origen, Augustine, 
Aquinas, Luther, Calvin, Schleiermacher, Barth, and Tillich. 

Offered annually. 

Mr. Wiest, Mr. Ritschl, Mr. Farley, Mr. Kehm, Mr. Bald 



534. Twentieth Century Protestant Theology. A study of the develop- 
ment of one or more of the most influential theological movements in 
Protestantism in the twentieth century, such as fundamentalism and 
neo-evangelicalism, liberalism, neo-Reformation theology, and the Bult- 
mann school. 

Offered annually. Mr. Wiest and Mr. Kehm 



540. Contemporary Issues in Philosophical Theology I. An examina- 
tion of the "philosophy of analysis" and the questions it raises for Chris- 
tian belief and thought. Mr ^j est 



541. Contemporary Issues in Philosophical Theology II. An examina- 
tion of existentialism and phenomenology and their bearing upon the 
content and method of Christian theology. jyj r ^j est 

60 



542. Theology and Science. The role of science in shaping the modern 
mind. Recent changes in our understanding of the nature of scientific 
knowledge. A survey of theological responses to modern science and of 
the possibilities for a "theology of nature" in contemporary protestant 
bought. Mr. Wiest 



543. Time and the Christian Schema. An investigation of the tem- 
poral or non-temporal status of such "events" as creation, fall, incar- 
nation, seconding; considering also the temporality or non-temporality 
of the Christian schema as a whole. 



Mr. Farley 



544. German Theology in the 19th Century. Study of the line of 
development in German theology from Schleiermacher through Albrecht 
Ritschl and Wilhelm Herrmann, with special attention to the contribu- 
tions of this "line" to the formation of the varieties of continental "neo- 
orthodoxy." 

Offered every other year. Mr. Kehm 



545. Christology and Anthropology. A study of the ways in which 
reflection upon the humanity of Jesus Christ is related to their under- 
standing of the nature of man in the theologies of Barth, Brunner, 
Bonhoeffer, and Tillich. Prerequisites, Courses 520 and 521. *. Kehm 



546. Modern Critics of Christian Theology. A study of some of the 
most important critics of theology in modern times, such as Feuerbach, 
Marx, Nietzsche, Freud, Durkheim, Ayer, Russell, Julian Huxley, Sartre, 
and the newer linguistic analysts like Hepburn. 

Offered every other year. Mr. Wiest, Mr. Farley, Mr. Kehm 



547. Studies in the History of Philosophical Theology. A study of 
selected philosophical works and systems of thought which have played a 
part in the history of theology and which continue to have significance 
for theological thinking. In a given semester the course will be devoted 
to the thinking of one or more philosophers such as Plato, Aristotle, 
Kant, Leibniz, Hegel, Whitehead, and Heidegger. 

Mr. Wiest or Mr. Farley 



552. Advanced Reading in Philosophy of Religion. Guided reading and 
research. The subjects and areas pursued are determined by the needs 
and interests of the students. Permission from the instructor is neces- 
sary for registration. Mr wiegt or Mr Jackson 

61 



THE CHURCH AND MINISTRY DIVISION 

Mr. Bald, Chairman 

Mr. Alexander Mr. Jackson 

Miss Burrows Mr. Kehm 

Mr. Buttrick Mr. Nicholson 

Mr. Chamberlin Mr. Ralston 

Mr. Clyde Mr. Scott 

Mr. Hinds Mr. Smith 
Mr. Wilson 



REQUIRED COURSES 

710. Church and Ministry I. The purpose of this course is to clarify- 
to the student, through a study of American church and cultural history, 
his prospective situation as a minister (or other church professional) in 
the American environment. Church and culture are studied with empha- 
sis on the history of the Calvinist groups, and the Church is viewed in 
specific relationship to urban and industrial life, racial and economic 
problems, and growth and movement of population. Field trips are 
arranged. 

Juniors, first semester, 2 hours credit. Mr. Smith 

711. Church and Ministry II. The purpose of this course is to acquaint 
the student with the social milieu of the Christian ministry through 
sociological study of the American environment. The problem of think- 
ing ethically in a Christian context is discussed with particular emphasis 
on church-state relationship. Pittsburgh is utilized as an object of in- 
vestigation and laboratory for student research. 

Juniors, second semester, 2 hours credit. Mr. Smith and guest faculty 

712. Christian Education Seminar. Designed to give the student the 
opportunity to accumulate and evaluate resources in major areas of 
concern in the teaching ministry of the local church: administration, 
curriculum, and age group aspects of programming. The framework is 
that of the local church director of Christian education. Observation is 
an integral part of the course. 

M.R.E. and M.Ed., first semester, 3 hours credit. Miss Burrows 

720. Church and Ministry III. The Church and Ministry sequence con- 
tinues in this course which seeks to lay down psychological, communica- 
tive, and educational foundations, always related to theological material, 
for the bearing of the Church's witness. Field education includes several 
different experiences which are analyzed in the light of course material. 

Middlers, first semester, 4 hours credit. 

Mr. Chamberlin, Mr. Hinds, and Mr. Jackson 

721. Church and Ministry IV. The course prepares students in preach- 
ing and in the ordering of worship. Theological norms are developed and 
discussed in relation to historic practice, psychological insight, and the 
task of the Church's ministry. Lectures on the history and theology of 
preaching will be followed by an investigation of hermeneutic principles, 
workshop sessions in sermon preparation, and practice preaching with 
homiletic and speech criticism. Small sectioned classes and tutorial 

62 



instruction will be scheduled. The study of Christian worship includes the 
doctrine of the sacraments, the history of worship, the preparation and 
conduct of special services, and the role of music in congregational 
worship. 

Middlers, second semester, 4 hours credit. Divisional faculty 

723. Counseling. A course designed to equip the student for a ministry 
to particular human problems (grief, marital conflict, guilt, emotional 
crisis, etc.) with theological insight and psychological sensitivity. A 
supervised practicum continues throughout the second semester. 

Middlers, Intersession, 2 hours credit. Mr. Jackson 

730. Church and Ministry V. With the foundation of previous studies 
of the Church, its ministry and mission, and its relations to society, an 
examination is now made of the responsibilities of Christians in the 
secular world. Students are required to read some of the important 
literature in Christian ethics, to inquire into the Biblical and theological 
framework within which ethical decisions may be made, and to make an 
ethical analysis of a problem in a particular field such as economics or 
politics. A practicum in preaching is correlated with both exegesis and 
the ethical concerns of this course. 

Seniors, first semester, 4 hours credit. Inter-divisional faculty 

731. Church and Ministry VI. The major emphasis in this unit of the 
Church and Ministry sequence will be upon the teaching ministry of the 
church. Assuming all seminary studies are background, this course will 
review the history of present educational patterns of the churches; will 
examine contemporary philosophies of church education with particular 
attention to the relation of theology and education; will study various 
approaches to teaching doctrine, the Bible, and church history; and will 
develop skills in program planning, teaching, and administration in the 
framework of a broad understanding of administration in contemporary 
Protestant churches. In addition, one hour a week will be given to a final 
practicum in homiletics which will be correlated with exegesis and a 
theological doctrine. 

Seniors, second semester, 4 hours credit. Divisional faculty 



ELECTIVES 

800. The Constitution of the United Presbyterian Church. A spe- 
cialized study of the polity of the United Presbyterian Church as it 
concerns the faith, order, program, and administration of the United 
Presbyterian Church within itself and in its ecumenical relations. 

Offered second semester, 1966-67. Mr. Clyde 

801. Building and Administering a Church Program. This course 
deals chiefly with the session committees of worship, evangelism, Chris- 
tian education, fellowship and stewardship, how they are formed, pre- 
pared to function, and how they relate to program and the people. The 
latest in helpful literature is provided. A project analyzing an actual 
church program is offered during the course so that the student might 
apply the principles of the course to the betterment of a local program. 
Related books are to be read and reported on. 

Offered on request. Mr. Alexander 

802. Methodist Polity. Required of Methodist students for graduation. 
Offered as part of C & M VI. Mr. Chamberlin 

63 



810. The Great Ages of Preaching. A study will be made of the 
doctrinal and ethical content, literary style, homiletical method, his- 
torical and spiritual background of preaching from the days of the 
Apostles to the beginning of the 19th century. 

Offered first semester, 1965-66. Mr. Scott 



811. Preaching from the Parables. The course is two-fold: a study of 
the history of the interpretation of Parables, and the actual writing and 
classroom delivery of sermons from the Parables. 

Offered first semester, 1965-66, 1966-67. Mr. Nicholson 



812. Homiletical Study of the Acts. The course is three-fold: a review 
of the historical-critical approach to Acts, the discovery of homiletical 
material, and the actual writing and classroom delivery of sermons. 

Offered second semester, 1965-66, 1966-67. Mr. Nicholson 



813. Preaching the Christian Year. A study will be made of the Chris- 
tian year and its use in preaching. Students will write and deliver 
selected sermons in class and prepare a full outline of a year's sermons. 

Offered second semester, 1965-66, 1966-67. Mr. Scott 



814. Contemporary Preachers and Preaching. A study will be made 
of representative preachers from the 19th century to the present with 
special emphasis on the preaching of the last decade. 

Offered first semester, 1966-67. Mr. Scott 



815. Preaching the Old Testament to our Contemporaries. An ex- 
amination of Old Testament themes in relation to the Gospel and to 
selected contemporary intellectual and socio-cultural situations, leading 
to study of the hermeneutical and homiletical treatment of selected Old 
Testament books and passages. There will be sermon preparation, deliv- 
ery, and class discussion. 

Offered first semester, 1965-66. Mr. Wilson 

816. Preaching from the Catholic Epistles. A study, in terms of exe- 
gesis and theological context, of preaching from the Catholic Epistles, es- 
pecially from Johannine and Petrine material. Consideration will be 
given to their historical as well as contemporary use. Sermons will be 
prepared and discussed. (Limited to 10 students.) 

Offered second semester, 1964-65. Mr. Wilson 



817. Preaching in the Pastorate. A study of preaching in the specific 
context of the congregational ministry: the relation of pastoral preach- 
ing to liturgy, education, counseling and "prophetic proclamation"; the 
planning of preaching according to the Christian Year. 

Offered second semester, Seniors only. Mr. Scott, Mr. Wilson 



818. Christian Doctrine and the Language of Preaching. A study of the 
problems involved in the communication of doctrine — creation, sin, elec- 
tion, atonement, etc. — in "ordinary" language. The use of homiletic 
structure, style, and metaphor to convey theological meaning will be dis- 
cussed. 

Offered second semester of alternate years. Mr. Buttrick 

64 



819. The Theological Understanding of Preaching. A study of the 
theology of preaching from the Reformation to the present with special 
emphasis on contemporary positions held by representative proponents. 
The student will be introduced to the twentieth century context in which 
preaching takes place and its influence on the theology of preaching. 

Offered first semester. Mr. Scott 



820. Preaching from the Synoptic Gospels. A study, on the basis of 
Mark's Gospel, of homiletical treatment of the records of the birth, bap- 
tism, teaching, temptation, transfiguration, passion, resurrection and 
ascension of Christ; the calling and training of the Twelve; with the 
exegetical use of parallel and relevant passages in the other Gospels. 

Offered first semester. Mr. Nicholson, Mr. Wilson 



825. Creative Teaching. A course designed to give the student the 
opportunity to explore creative ways of teaching the Christian faith to 
children, youth, and adults within the program of the church. Ob- 
servation, laboratory experience, demonstration, and guest lectures will 
be used throughout the course. 

Offered on request. Miss Burrows 



826. Christian Education in the Local Church. Designed to give the 
student the opportunity to accumulate and evaluate resources in the 
administration of the local church program of Christian education, 
including all age groups. Philosophy and organization of nursery and 
kindergarten weekday schools, church related youth clubs, vacation 
church school, camping programs, youth fellowship, and all departments 
of the church school will be considered. 

B.D. students only. Offered second semester, 1965-66, 1966-67. 

Miss Burrows 



828. The Church and Higher Education. Designed especially for those 
interested in college teaching, campus ministry, or serving a church 
near a campus. A review of the relation of the church to higher educa- 
tion; an examination of theological issues in the relation of the Christian 
faith to higher education; and an exploration of current patterns in the 
Church's ministry to students and faculty. 

Offered first semester, 1965-66. Mr. Chamberlin 



829. History of Christian Education. A survey of the major move- 
ments and personalities which have influenced the development of the 
teaching ministry in the church, with particular emphasis upon the 
historical roots of present-day church education. 

Offered first semester, 1965-66. Mr. Chamberlin 



830. Christian Education Among Children. A study of the religious 
needs of children from birth through twelve years of age paralleled with 
the church's possibilities for meeting these needs. Weekday Christian 
education programs such as vacation church school, day camping, and 
youth club as well as the Sunday church school curriculum are studied 
within the framework of how children learn. A degree of observation 
and laboratory work is included as a part of the course. 

Offered on request. Miss Burrows 

65 



831. Christian Education Among Adults. Principles and approaches 
to the church's educational ministry to adults; introduction to established 
and changing patterns of program; relation to the insights from the gen- 
eral field of adult education; special emphasis upon work with young 
adults, parent education, and new approaches to the ministry to the aged. 

Mr. Chamberlin 



832. Contemporary Developments in Christian Education. Advanced 
course, especially for those hoping to be ministers or directors of Chris- 
tian education. Reviewing the recent history of church education, par- 
ticularly the relation of contemporary Protestant theology to general 
educational philosophy, and an examination of various efforts to express 
these theological developments in new forms of educational program. 

Mr. Chamberlin 



833. The Processes of Christian Education. An exploration of the 
various patterns of program and structure (curriculum, class grouping, 
administrative procedures, supervision) employed by churches, and the 
relation of these processes to the interpretation of the Christian faith. 
Particularly for students interested in special educational ministries. 

Offered second semester, 1965-66. Mr. Chamberlin 



834. Advanced Reading in Christian Education. Guided reading and 
research, the subjects and areas to be determined by the needs and 
interests of the students. Permission of the instructor is necessary for 
registration. 

Offered on request. Mr. Chamberlin 



840. Theology and Psychiatry. The metaphysical presuppositions, 
method, understanding of therapy, and some aspects of human nature 
will be compared. An attempt will be made to define mutuality and dis- 
creteness between the two disciplines. An introduction to Freudian, 
Jungian, and other psychiatric writings will be made. ]y[ r . Jackson 

841. Seminar in Counseling. An advanced course utilizing the case 
work of students, drawing principles for both diagnosis and therapy 
out of the cases presented, and making evaluations. The role of the 
minister as counselor is carefully scrutinized. Mr. Jackson 



842. Personality Development. The meaning of the self, its develop- 
ment, its aberrations, its societal nature, its symbolization, its motiva- 
tions, etc., will be studied from the point of view of the several psychiatric 
theories, social psychology, and Biblical images. The relation of person- 
ality development to the work of the ministry will be clarified. 

Mr. Jackson 



843. The Aging: Personality Formation and Pastoral Care. This 
seminar will look at the question of aging from three significant direc- 
tions: the psychology of religion in specific relevance to the aging; 
socio-psychological patterns in the aging process; and the role of the 
church in ministering to the aging. 

66 



846. Theory and Practice of the Devotional Life. A consideration of 
the devotional life of the Christian in the modern world. The relation 
of doctrine to the devotional life. The means of grace studied. The 
course is also designed to acquaint the student with the devotional 
classics. Mr. Jackson 



850. World Mission of the Church. A survey of the ecumenical witness 
of the church throughout the world, with special reference to the work 
of the United Presbyterian Church. 

Offered on request. Mr. Clyde 

851. Tutorial in Missions. Reading and discussions on missions, de- 
signed particularly for missionary candidates and those considering be- 
coming candidates. 

Offered on request. Mr. Clyde 

852. Evangelism. This course offers a detailed discussion and study 
of the definition, motivation, urgency and nature of evangelism. Personal 
work, evangelism for commitment, evangelism through fellowship, youth 
evangelism and various opportunities for pastor and laity through the 
church are covered. A program of reading and book reports acquaints 
the student with the best literature in the field. Opportunity for role 
playing in class is afforded. 

Offered second semester, 1965-66, 1966-67. Mr. Alexander 

854. Comparative Religion. A study of the origin and development of 
religion, with special investigation of Primitive Religion, Hinduism, 
Buddhism, Confucianism, and Islam, with regard to their bearing on 
Modern Missions. 

Offered on request. Mr. Clyde 

855. Major Sects. Jehovah's Witnesses, Mormonism, Christian Sci- 
ence and other groups compared with traditional Christianity. Resem- 
blances and differences noted. 

Offered first semester, 1966-67. Mr. Gerstner 

856. The Protestant Approach to Catholicism. A comparative inves- 
tigation of Protestantism and Catholicism, with a study of the general 
problem of Protestant evangelism in connection with Catholicism. 

Offered second semester, 1966-67. Mr. Clyde 

857. The Protestant Approach to Communism. A study of Communism, 
its challenge to Christianity, the special answer of Protestantism to 
Communism, and the general problems with which Communism is in- 
volved. 

Offered first semester, 1966-67. Mr. Clyde 

858. The Ecumenical Movement. A survey of the origin and develop- 
ment of the modern Ecumenical Movement, combined with an exploration 
of the elements of church unity and some anticipation of the future. 

Offered on request. Mr. Clyde 

859. Seminar in Ecumenics. This course is offered at Duquesne Uni- 
versity under a joint faculty including Duquesne professors, Pittsburgh 
Seminary professors, and others. It is open to qualified Pittsburgh Sem- 
inary students. 

67 



870. The Theological Ethics of William Temple and Reinhold Niebuhr. 

A comparative study of the social thought of the late Archbishop of 
Canterbury and one of America's leading voices in the field of ethics in 
relation to their theological foundations. 

Offered first semester, 1965-66. Mr. Bald 



872. Research Seminar in Selected Social Problems. Students will 
elect specific areas of social concern in modern culture for investigation 
in which they will seek to relate them to the demands and insights of 
the Christian ethic. Prerequisite, C & M V. 

Offered second semester, 1965-66. Mr. Bald 



873. Church and State in Marxist Countries. This course will deal 
with the recent history and present positions of the Protestant and 
Orthodox Churches in Marxist countries. Primary sources will be read 
and a research paper will be required. Prerequisite: Modern Church 
History. Mr. Ritschl 



880. Christian Faith and Contemporary Literature. A study of the 
relationship between Christian faith and themes in contemporary liter- 
ature. Works by a number of modern writers including Sartre, Updike, 
Greene, and Beckett will be read and discussed. Three class sessions 
per week will be scheduled. 

Offered first semester, 1965-66. Mr. Buttrick 



884. The Classics of Christian Literature. A study of the outstanding 
literary masterpieces of Christian history selected from ancient, medi- 
aeval and various national literatures of Great Britain and America, 
France, Spain, Italy: poetry, drama, sermons, essays, all writings wherein 
there is a consciousness of artistic excellence. 

Offered first semester, 1966-67. Mr. McCloy 



885. Poetry, Poetics, and Christian Language. A study of contempor- 
ary poetry and poetics in relation to the use of religious metaphor and 
imagery. Long poems by one or two contemporary poets will be analyzed. 
Reading in modern literary criticism will be discussed. Prerequisite, 
Course 880. 

Offered on request. Mr. Buttrick 



889. Christian Humanism. A study of the relations of the Christian 
Church to the values and excellencies of human culture as seen in the 
Classical ideals {paideia) of the fourth and fifth centuries and again in 
the period of the Renaissance, and later; special study will be given to 
Erasmus and the English and Italian humanists. ^ r ]\f c CJloy 



890. Interpretative Reading. Oral interpretation of a varied selection 
of prose, poetry, and drama as a means of developing keener sensitivity 
to the written word and greater effectiveness in communicating it. The 
objective will be to mature the skills and principles already acquired in 
speech courses. Small sections, private conferences, recordings. 

One hour, first and second semesters, 1965-66, 1966-67. Mr. Hinds 

68 



891. Communication: Theory and Practice. Examination of the func- 
tion of communication in the ministry. Various approaches to communi- 
cation will be surveyed with an emphasis on modern communication 
theory as it relates to the various media by which the Gospel may be 
communicated, such as preaching, teaching, group process, radio-T.V., etc. 
Students will be encouraged to develop their own theory of communica- 
tion. 

Offered first semester to Seniors. Mr. Hinds 



900. Music in the Church. A practical approach to the many problems 
arising in connection with church music with particular attention to the 
problems of the small congregation. Organizing the musical resources 
of the congregation, the music as a spiritual force in the church life, 
and the minister's relation to choir and choirmaster. 

Offered second semester, 1966-67. Mr. Ralston 



901. Hymnology. An analytical and historical study of the great hymns 
and tunes of the Christian Church. Consideration of the qualities of a 
good hymn. Practical and effective use of the hymnal. 

Offered first semester, 1965-66, 1966-67. Mr. Ralston 



902. Masterpieces of Religious Music. A study of the various forms of 
music through which men have expressed their faith. Demonstration of 
the power of music to illuminate Christian truth and to "give wings to 
words." This is primarily a "listening course" making use of records 
but with assigned background reading and class comment. The purpose 
is to give the student an appreciation of various forms of musical ex- 
pression as well as some familiarity with specific works of musical art. 

Offered second semester, 1965-66. Mr. Ralston 



Elective Credit at the University of Pittsburgh 

Up to four credit hours may also be taken in the Graduate School of 
Public and International Affairs of the University of Pittsburgh. The 
differential in tuition between that of the Seminary and that of the Uni- 
versity is taken care of through foundation grants at the University. 
These elective courses would be primarily in urbanization, economics, and 
international affairs. 

Summer Field Education 

Every student is encouraged to spend one summer in field education, 
preferably in some form of clinical training. Students who choose and 
qualify for clinical training in approved programs will be given two 
hours of elective credit for each six weeks of clinical training to a maxi- 
mum of four credit hours. For students who do not choose or do not 
qualify for a clinical training program a number of options without any 
elective credit are allowed (such as national park chaplaincies, Board of 
National Missions assignments, assistantships, etc.), upon consultation 
with and approval by the Field Education Office. 

Any student seeking a church-related position for the summer must 
counsel with the Field Education Office so that provision may be made 
for supervision on the field. Summer pastorates for students who have 
completed only their Junior year are discouraged because such students 
will not have had the courses in Church and Ministry dealing with the 
preaching, teaching, and pastoral office. 

69 



THE UNIVERSITY OF PITTSBURGH'S GRADUATE SCHOOL 
OF PUBLIC AND INTERNATIONAL AFFAIRS 

and 
PITTSBURGH THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

(A Joint Program) 

A cooperative educational program which will have special mean- 
ing for international service (ecumenical mission and relations), ad- 
ministration, and urbanization has been worked out with one of the 
world's outstanding graduate schools of public and international af- 
fairs. The areas of concentration in this program are: 

General Public Administration 
Administration of International Affairs 
Economic and Social Development 
Municipal-Metropolitan Affairs 
Community and Voluntary Organization Affairs 

The program allows Bachelor of Divinity students to elect up 
to four hours from the offerings of the Graduate School of Public and 
International Affairs, the tuition differential being graciously financed 
from fellowship funds provided by the Heinz and Ford Foundations. 
This B.D. enrichment will be especially valuable to those students 
preparing to become fraternal workers, missionaries, Peace Corps 
volunteers, United Nation workers, etc. 

Basic to the program are the M.P.I.A. degree, Master of Public 
and International Affairs, and the M.P.A. degree, Master of Public 
Administration. Qualified persons from overseas as well as the 
United States may enroll as regular or special students in these de- 
gree programs. Such students are subject to the exclusive academic 
control of the University and receive their Masters' degrees from the 
University. However, latitude is injected into these programs so that 
elective course work can be taken at the Seminary, credit to be ap- 
plied to the university degrees. 

It is the policy of the Graduate School of Public and Internation- 
al Affairs that half its students are from overseas. This provides for 
rich trans-cultural experience. Through this joint program Pitts- 
burgh offers an exciting and exceptional opportunity for preparation 
for ecumenical mission and relations. 

Inquiries should be directed to: 

The Graduate School of Public and International Affairs 
University of Pittsburgh 
Pittsburgh 13, Pennsylvania 

or 
The Director of Admissions 
Pittsburgh Theological Seminary 
Pittsburgh 6, Pennsylvania 

70 



THE MASTER OF THEOLOGY DEGREE 

A strong program of graduate education at the Master's level is 
offered by the Seminary in three fields: Biblical Studies, History and 
Theology, and Advanced Pastoral Studies. The curricula announced 
on the following pages are open only to degree candidates who expect 
to pursue serious study requiring three days a week over a period of 
two years (equivalent to full-time over one year). 

Every effort will be made to fill up gaps in theological knowledge, 
and this is made more possible since only six applicants will be ad- 
mitted to each program per year. There is considerable freedom in 
which the student is encouraged to explore in depth his own interests. 
Each student will receive close personal attention from the professors 
in the curriculum of his choice. 

These Masters' programs are planned for two purposes: to help 
prepare candidates for such specialized services as teaching, counsel- 
ing, and the campus ministry; and to benefit pastors who may wish 
to improve their effectiveness in Biblical, theological, or pastoral 
studies in relation to ministerial responsibilities. It is with the pastor 
in mind that the faculty views these programs as being right at the 
heart of continuing education. The courses are designed for a learned, 
relevant ministry, whatever form the ministry takes. 



71 



Standards for Admission 

1. A B.D. degree from an accredited seminary. 

2. An average of B or better in the B.D. degree or in a qualify- 
ing examination, according to the discretion of the Graduate 
Education Committee. 

3. The ability to use any language integral to the chosen field 
of study. While not a requirement for admission, a reading 
knowledge of French or German is required before a student 
can begin the second half of the course. Language examina- 
tions are given in September, January, and June. 

4. The ability to handle English composition with competence. 



Requirements for the Degree 

1. Twenty-four course hours (30 in the Advanced Pastoral 
Studies Program) with an average of B or better. More 
than two C grades will eliminate a student from the program. 

(A student in full residence is one who carries the full course 
of study in one year. A student in half-residence is one who 
carries half the course of study in one year.) 

2. Six hours for a thesis or a research project which would be 
written up in final and acceptable form and either option 
completed by the end of the fourth year. 

3. A comprehensive examination covering the 24 (or 30) units 
of study. 

4. An oral examination on the thesis or research project. 



FEES AND EXPENSES 

Matriculation Fee #35.00 

Tuition ...... $20.00 per credit hour 

Library Fee $20.00 per year 

Graduation Fee $10.00 



Applicants for this degree should apply to the Director of 

Admissions. 



72 



DESCRIPTION OF COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

FOR THE 

MASTER OF THEOLOGY DEGREE 



THE MASTER OF THEOLOGY PROGRAM 

IN 

BIBLICAL STUDIES 

The Master's degree in the Biblical Division covers both Tes- 
taments. While the thesis may concentrate on one Testament, the 
course work is deliberately designed to provide a certain degree of 
qualification in the whole field. The six hours of electives may be 
taken in Biblical Studies, in History and Theology, or in the Pro- 
gram in Advanced Pastoral Studies, or the hours may be used in 
guided research. 

Advanced Hebrew Grammar Old Testament Seminar 

and Reading 
Hebrew Exegesis New Testament Seminar 

Advanced Greek Grammar Electives— 6 hours 

and Reading 
Greek Exegesis Thesis— 6 hours 

M100. Advanced Hebrew Grammar and Reading. Study to supplement 
and continue undergraduate work done with the Hebrew Old Testament. 
Three hours credit. 

M200. Advanced Greek Grammar and Reading. Study to supplement 
undergraduate work done with the Greek New Testament. Books of the 
New Testament not previously read will be completed, and selected por- 
tions of the Greek Old Testament may be added. Three hours credit. 

M102 and M202. Exegesis. Thorough exegesis of selected passages in 
the Hebrew Old Testament and the Greek New Testament. Three hours 
credit in each of two courses. 

M103 and M203. Seminars. Problems of introduction, text, archaeology, 
and the various areas of criticism are considered. The bibliography of the 
modern literature on the Bible is surveyed with reading and discussion 
of selected volumes. The particular needs of the candidates enrolled are 
given special attention. Three hours credit in each of two courses. 

Electives to be announced. 

73 



THE MASTER OF THEOLOGY PROGRAM 

IN 

HISTORY AND THEOLOGY 

The candidate for the Master's degree in History and Theology 
may major in either Church History or Systematic Theology, taking 
twelve hours in required courses, twelve hours in electives from the 
list below (in the selection of which he must have the approval of 
his adviser), and six hours in work on a thesis. Majors in history 
will select primarily from the history elective offerings, majors in 
theology primarily from the theology elective offerings. Where it is 
deemed advisable in view of a candidate's special interests, electives 
may also be chosen from Masters' courses offered in Biblical Studies 
and the Program in Advanced Pastoral Studies. 

Half -Time Sequence 

Year One 
Semester I Semester II 

Seminar in Theological Method 3 Seminar in Historical Method 3 

Elective 3 Elective 3 



Year Two 

Guided Research 3 Guided Research 3 

Elective 3 Elective 3 

lull-Time Sequence 

Seminar in Theological Method 3 Seminar in Historical Method 3 

Guided Research 3 Guided Research 3 

Electives 6 Electives 6 



M400. Seminar in Historical Method. Study of research technique, 
problems of interpretation, jointures between history and other disci- 
plines, and the problem of limiting such interconnections, bibliography, 
historiography, and comparable problems. Normally this instruction 
is conducted through the prosecution of a specified research project. 
Three hours credit. 



M500. Seminar in Theological Method. The nature of theological think- 
ing will be studied: Prolegomena, organization of systems, theological 
language, and hermeneutics with illustration from representative theo- 
logians. Three hours credit. 

74 



ELECTIVES 



M401, M402, M403, M404, M405, M531, M533, M540, M544, M547, and 
M551. (See corresponding numbers, pp. 60-61, for Courses M531-M547.) 



M401. Patristics. The study of the idea of ecclesiastical tradition; the 
solutions of the Fathers of the ancient church to the recurrent or immedi- 
ate problems of faith, life, and church order; the history of patristics and 
the controversies concerning it, and its significance for the modern ecu- 
menical movement. The manuals of Quasten and Altaner will serve as 
guides, and the texts will be studied for the most part in such series of 
English translations as the Ante-and Post Nicene Fathers, Ancient Christian 
Writers, The Fathers of the Church, etc. Three hours credit. 



M402. Research in Puritanism. Special topics such as the covenant, 
seeking, church order and the relation of church and state will be explored. 
Three hours credit. 



M403. 17th Century Orthodoxy. This course will consider the orthodox 
background of Schleiermacher and other later theologians. Three hours 
credit. 



M404. Seminar in the American Churches and Secular Culture. Each 
year a special topic will be selected and announced for study: for example, 
church and state, the Protestant ethos in the 19th century, the social 
gospel. 



M405. Guided Reading in Church History. Readings approved by the 
professor designed to prepare the student for general examination in the 
field of Church History. Regular discussion of assignments is required. 
Three hours credit. 



M551. Advanced Reading in Theology. Guided reading and research in 
theological sources. The subjects and areas pursued are determined by 
the needs and interests of the students. 



Guided Research. The candidate will be guided by a professor in read- 
ing in an area of special interest, to which it is assumed his thesis will 
belong. Reading and research will lead to the definition of a thesis topic 
and writing of a precis to be submitted for approval. Six hours credit. 



75 



THE MASTER OF THEOLOGY PROGRAM 

IN 

ADVANCED PASTORAL STUDIES 

The Program for Advanced Pastoral Studies is designed to help 
students to know themselves better; to understand and become sensi- 
tive to interpersonal relationships; to be familiar with group process; 
to become involved in creative dialogue between theological studies 
and the social sciences; and to see more clearly the resources of the 
Christian church for health at the various levels. 

The faculty teaching in this program is composed of seminary 
personnel and members of several faculties of the University of Pitts- 
burgh, including the Medical School, the Graduate School of Social 
Work, and the Department of Speech. The latter include Robert 
J. Shoemaker, M.D., Margaret B. McFarland, Ph.D., Rex A. Pitten- 
ger, M.D., Werner Lutz, M.S., Erma T. Meyerson, M.A.A.S.S., and 
jack Matthews, Ph.D. 

In addition to the following program, six hours of electives must 
be taken in either Biblical Studies or History and Theology. 

Year One 



Developmental Theory of 
Personality I 

Philosophical Issues in 
Psychotherapy 

General Hospital Practicum 



Developmental Theory of 
Personality II 

Dynamics of Family Life 

Practicum with children 



Group Process 

The Socio-Cultural Environment 

Counseling Seminar 



Year Two 
2 



Theology and Psychology 

Pastoral Care and the 
Church Program 

Counseling Seminar 



Clinical Training. A six weeks' course in an approved clinical train- 
ing program will be required before graduation. It is recommended that 
it be taken previous to admission or in the summer between the first 
and second years. 

76 



M600. Developmental Theory of Personality I. The age span is traced 
from pre-natal influences and birth through the various stages of child- 
hood, showing normal growth patterns, the abnormalities of neurotic and 
psychotic development, and the relation of the child to the social milieu. 

M601. Developmental Theory of Personality II. Continuation of M600 
from adolescence through the aging process. 

M602. Philosophical Issues in Psychotherapy. Freudian thought and 
existential analysis are studied with regard to such issues as epistemol- 
ogy, ontology, anxiety, freedom, time, value theory. 

M603. Practicum with Children. This practicum is conducted at Arsen- 
al Family and Children's Center, the Medical School, the University of 
Pittsburgh, under the direction of the staff at Arsenal. Interpretive 
seminars are held regularly. 

M604. Dynamics of Family Life. 

M605. General Hospital Practicum. This practicum is conducted at the 
Presbyterian-University Hospital under the direction of the hospital med- 
ical and nursing staffs. The students are not chaplains but male orderlies 
assigned to nurses' stations. Interpretive seminars are held regularly. 

M606. Group Process. The theory and practice of group experience 
are studied with the end in view of better understanding the dynamics of 
church groups. 

M607. The Socio-cultural Environment. This course deals with the 
ecological and cultural factors which make functional and dysfunctional 
contributions to personality and community development. It will empha- 
size the role of institutions (other than the family) and power structures 
in their direct and indirect effect upon the individual. 

M608. Counseling Seminar. Each student is required to work with 
four counselees, under supervision, and to participate in the presentation 
of case material. 

M609. Counseling Seminar. Continuation of M608. 

M610. Theology and Psychology. The material of the entire program 
is pulled together in dialogue between theology and the human sciences, 
especially psychology and psychiatry. Such themes as God, man, sin, 
redemption are dealt with. 

M611. Pastoral Care and the Church Program. Pastoral care, informed 
theologically and psychologically, becomes the vantage-point for taking 
a hard look at church programming: its relevance, its resources, etc. 
A primary concern is to ask what the church can do in its supportive and 
preventive roles as well as in its redemptive and re-creative roles. 

77 



CONTINUING EDUCATION 

Under the direction of the Graduate Education Committee con- 
tinuing education is fast assuming a major place in the life of the 
Seminary. Six programs are now available: 



THE EIGHT WEEKS SCHOOLS 

At the Seminary. For eight Tuesdays in October and November 
and again in February and March the regular faculty offers courses 
in a wide range of areas but always with particular relevance to 
ministry, whatever its forms (pastoral, administrative, etc.). For 
example, the following courses were offered last year: Theology and 
Contemporary Literature; Studies in Wisdom Literature; Eastern 
Christianity; The Church in Mass Communications of Radio and 
Television; An Approach to the Psalms; American Liberal Theology: 
A Reappraisal; and The Synoptic Gospels. One hundred fifty min- 
isters were enrolled first semester. 

Each class runs two hours, and a student may take up to three 
courses. Announcement of course offerings is made in Panorama, 
the quarterly bulletin, as well as in folder form. The fee of #5.00 
per course includes the use of the library. Inquiries should be di- 
rected to the Director of Continuing Education. 

At Canton, Ohio. Last fall 60 pastors of the area participated 
in the first semester of a school similar to that described above, and 
for eight Mondays in February and March of 1965 two courses will 
be offered: The American Churches in Secular Culture, and Faith 
and Piety, a Contemporary Problem. A special announcement and 
registration form may be secured from the Director of Continuing 
Education. 

SPRING AND SUMMER PROGRAMS 

The School of Religion at Shady Side Academy, Pittsburgh, sup- 
ported by the Pitcairn-Crabbe Foundation, each summer invites 150 
ministers from within the Synod of Pennsylvania. The faculty is 
drawn from all over the United States as well as from the Seminary. 
The dates for the 1965 school are June 21-25. 

Continuing Education Seminar, Synod of Ohio. Under the joint 
sponsorship of the Seminary and the Synod of Ohio a seminar for 
ministers and their wives will be held on the campus of Muskingum 
College June 27 to July 2, 1965. It will be staffed by seminary per- 
sonnel and will emphasize study and group discussion. The curric- 
ulum will include An Exegetical Study of the Fourth Gospel — Donald 
G. Miller, and seminars as follows: Protestant-Roman Catholic Dia- 

78 



logue — Elwyn A. Smith; Worship and Liturgies — David G. Buttrick; 
Contemporary Trends in Theology — George H. Kehm. In addition 
to attending the Biblical lectures, participants will elect one of the 
three seminars for intensive study. Those who attend will be ex- 
pected to do prescribed reading before the beginning of the school ir 
order that the best use may be made of seminar time. 

The Fourth Annual Ministers' Institute, sponsored by the Sem- 
inary, Pittsburgh Presbytery, and the Board of Christian Education, 
v/ill be held in the spring of 1965 at the Seminary. A small group of 
pastoral ministers will be invited to participate. Much use will be 
made of the library. Discussion of theological and social issues will 
be guided by leaders drawn from the seminary faculty and elsewhere. 
The theme of the institute will be "Christian Theology and the 
Family." 

Institute for Ministers at Johnson C. Smith University. Pitts- 
burgh Seminary will again join with Johnson C. Smith University 
and the Board of National Missions in supporting an institute for 
ministers to be held on the campus of Johnson C. Smith in the sum- 
mer of 1965. 

AUDIT COURSES 

A limited number of auditors will be admitted to regular B.D. 
and M.R.E. courses. To protect the integrity of the degree programs 
the registrant must have the approval of both the Academic Dean 
and the professor for auditing. The cost for auditing is half the reg- 
ular tuition fee plus half the library fee. While no grade is given or 
recorded, auditors are expected to be faithful in attendance and to 
do the required readings. Approximately fifty auditors a semester 
can be helped to continue their theological education through this 
program. Inquiries should be directed to the Registrar. 



CREDIT COURSES 

A limited number of students already having the B.D. degree 
may be enrolled for regular Bachelor of Divinity courses. The pur- 
pose of this program is to help prepare those who wish to do graduate 
work but who need to buttress their seminary training, fill in gaps, 
or do additional prerequisite work toward specialization. A grade 
is given and recorded for transcript purposes. The cost is one-half 
the regular matriculation fee and full tuition. Application forms 
should be secured from the Director of Admissions. 



79 



THE ALUMNI ASSOCIATION 



OFFICERS 

President W. Malcolm Brown '41 

Vice President Dale K. Milligan 'SI 

Secretary Curtis J. Patterson '37 

Treasurer Frank C. Black '27 

Necrological Secretary Clarence F. Anderson '28 

Director of Alumni Relations J. Rowe Hinsey 



The Alumni Association, now numbering more than 2,000 mem- 
bers, is composed of the former students, graduates and post-graduates 
of Pittsburgh Theological Seminary and its antecedent seminaries. 
The purposes of the Association are to deepen the friendships begun 
in seminary and to afford fellowship among all its graduates; to co- 
operate with the Seminary in enlisting young people for church 
vocations and recruiting prospective seminary candidates; to support 
actively the cause of theological education and of the Seminary in 
particular in its development to meet the demands of the future; and 
lastly, to have a sympathetic interest in the life and work of the Sem- 
inary's students and faculty. The Alumni Association sponsors sev- 
eral seminary convocations. 

The Association meets annually on the afternoon of commence- 
ment day to conduct certain business and to elect officers. This is 
followed by the alumni dinner, after which the graduating seniors 
are inducted into the Association. 

Regional meetings of alumni are held frequently, and a dinner 
at the annual meeting of The General Assembly is another highlight 
of the year's activities. 



80 



DEGREES AWARDED, 1963-1964 



THE DEGREE OF BACHELOR OF DIVINITY 

Richard D. Adams Buffalo, N. Y. 

B.A., Grove City College, 1961 

William Thorpe Alter Pittsburgh, Pa. 

B.S, Lehigh University, 1956 

B.S. in Bus. Adm., Lehigh University, 1957 

David L. Barrett ........ Providence, R. I. 

B.A., Barrington College, 1961 

Robert M. Bereit ....... Bay Village, Ohio 

B.A., Western Reserve, 1961 

Muriel C. Brown ........ Ellensburg, Wash. 

B.A., Whitworth College, 1961 

J. Paul Cameron, IV ....... Pittsburgh, Pa. 

A.B., Denison University, 1960 

Donald W. Chichester Levittown, N. Y. 

B.S. in Appl. Physics, Hofstra College, 1955 

Donald H. Craig ........ Pittsburgh, Pa. 

B.A., Ohio Wesleyan University, 1961 

Samuel B. Craig, Jr. ...... Pittsburgh, Pa. 

B.A., University of Virginia, 1961 

Gene W. Crooks ........ Pontiac, Mich. 

B.A., Beloit College, 1953 

Donald D. Custis Riverdale, Md. 

A.B., College of Wooster, 1958 

Richard E. Fouse College Park, Md. 

B.A., University of Maryland, 1961 

Merl L. Galusha, Jr. ...... . Schenectady, N. Y. 

B.S., Union College, 1959 

James C. George New Castle, Pa. 

A.B., Westminster College, 1949 

Robert L. Gordon ......... Irwin, Pa. 

B.A., Duquesne University, 1961 

Edward S. Hammett ........ Pittsburgh, Pa. 

B.A., Washington and Jefferson College, 1951 

Hewon Han Seoul, Korea 

A.B., The College of Emporia, 1960 

A. Vanlier Hunter, Jr. ...... . Meadville, Pa. 

B.A., Grove City College, 1961 

John Edward Karnes Akron, Ohio 

B.A., Muskingum College, 1960 

James A. Keller . Pittsburgh, Pa. 

B.S., Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 1961 

Harold D. Kelley Pittsburgh, Pa. 

B.B.A., University of Pittsburgh, 1958 
M.B.A., University of Pittsburgh, 1959 

81 



Harry Donald Lash ........ Rector, Pa. 

B.S., Clarion State Teachers College, 1960 

Raymond F. Luber, Jr. ...... . Pittsburgh, Pa. 

B.A., Westminster College, 1960 

Louis S. Lunardini . . . . . . . . Pittsburgh, Pa. 

A.B., University of Pittsburgh, 1961 

Allen W. McCallum Detroit, Mich. 

B.A., Muskingum College, 1960 

John M. McNitt ....... Cuyahoga Falls, Ohio 

B.S., Allegheny College, 1952 

Robert Allan Messenger ....... Bridgeville, Pa. 

B.A., Hamilton College, 1950 

Henry 0. Moore, Jr. ....... Dallas, Texas 

B.A., Trinity University, 1961 

David N. Morton Philadelphia, Pa. 

B.S. in Economics, University of Pennsylvania, 1960 

John W. Nelson Westfield, N. J. 

B.A., Pennsylvania State University, 1961 

Gary S. Pinder . ...... Rochester, N. Y. 

A.B., The College of Wooster, 1961 

Dayanand David Pitamber ...... Mainpuri, India 

M.A., Agra University, 1961 

William J. Sharp ........ Washington, Pa. 

B.A., Washington and Jefferson College, 1960 

William F. Smith ........ Coshocton, Ohio 

B.S., University of Michigan, 1960 

Robert C. Sproul Pittsburgh, Pa. 

B.A., Westminster College, 1961 

Bruce C. Theunissen ....... Evansville, Ind. 

A.B., Central Michigan University, 1951 

Charles N. Thompson Hawthorne, N. J. 

B.A., Davis and Elkins College, 1961 

William A. Van Wie Wheeling, W. Va. 

A.B., The College of Wooster, 1961 

Robert N. Van Wyk Paterson, N. J. 

B.A., The College of Wooster, 1961 

James C. Ware Mansfield, Ohio 

A.B., Ohio Wesleyan University, 1956 

THE DEGREE OF MASTER OF RELIGIOUS EDUCATION 

Chong Mahn Lee Seoul, Korea 

B.D., Han Kuk Theological Seminary 

Judith M. Sievers St. Louis, Mo. 

B.A., Missouri Valley College, 1962 

Sonja Forgraves Stewart New Wilmington, Pa. 

A.B., Muskingum College, 1959 

82 



HONORS AND AWARDS 

Summa Cum Laude 
James Albert Keller 



Magna Cum Laude 

Robert Lee Gordon 

A. Vanlier Hunter, Jr. 

Allen Webster McCallum 



Cum Laude 

Donald Drew Custis Judith Mary Sievers 

Raymond F. Luber, Jr. Robert Nicholas Van Wyk 



Graduating With Honors In 
Biblical Studies 

Donald Drew Custis Allen Webster McCallum 

A. Vanlier Hunter, Jr. James C. Ware 



Graduating With Honors In 

History and Theology 

John Wiley Nelson 



The Thomas Jamison Scholarship 

and 

The Sylvester S. Marvin Memorial Fellowship 

James Albert Keller 

The Jennie Rigg Barbour Memorial Prize 
A. Vanlier Hunter, Jr. 

The Hugh Thomson Kerr Moderator Prize 
John Mead McNitt 

The Michael Wilson Keith Memorial Homiletical Prize 
Allen Webster McCallum 

83 



The Robert A. Lee Church History Award 

James Albert Keller 
Allen Webster McCallum 

The Home Training Bible Class Award in Missions 
William A. Van Wie II 

The Chevy Chase Christian Education Award 

(Young People's Work) 
Judith Mary Sievers 

The First Presbyterian Church of 

McKeesport Preaching Prize 

Louis S. Lunardini 



MIDDLER CLASS AWARDS 

The Alice Myers Sigler Memorial Prize 
in History and Theology 

Paul J. Milio 



JUNIOR CLASS AWARDS 

The James Purdy Scholarships 

George E. Espy 

James W. Graham 

Gary E. Huffman 

Joseph D. Small 

Michael F. Smathers 

Stephen B. Woods 



The Andrew Reed Scholarship 
Roxanna Ryman Bertini 

The Fred McFeely Rogers Prize in Biblical Studies 
James W. Graham 

The Joseph Watson Greek Entrance Prize 
John Shumaker 

84 



REGISTER OF STUDENTS 1964-1965 

Senior Class 

Charles E. Alcorn III . . . . . Pittsburgh, Pa. 

A.B., Wheaton College, 1961 

Roy J. Altman . ...... Trafford, Pa. 

B.A., Pennsylvania State University, 1962 

Charles H. Banning ....... Mt. Vernon, Ohio 

B.S., Social Welfare, Ohio State University, 1960 
M.S.W., Ohio State University 

Lawrence Roy Bergstresser ....... Ephrata, Pa. 

B.A., Albright College, 1960 

William M. Birdsall ........ Toledo, Ohio 

B.S., Muskingum College, 1962 

Carl W. Bogue Princeton, Ind. 

A.B., Muskingum College, 1961 

Benjamin B. Booker ...... Durham, N. Carolina 

B.S., Hampton Institute, 1935 

James B. Brasel . ....... Kell, 111. 

A.B., Monmouth College, 1962 

Paulo D. Brasil . ........ Goias, Brazil 

Colegio Municipal de Anapolis, 1957 

Colegio Jose M. da Conceicao, Jandira, S.P., 1960 

Presbyterian Theological Seminary, Campinas, S.P., 1962 

Wayne A. Buchtel Dayton, Ohio 

B.S., Muskingum College, 1961 

Charles L. Bulger ........ Omaha, Nebraska 

B.A., Hastings College, 1962 

Keith J. Burroughs . Philadelphia, Pa. 

B.S. in Economics, University of Pennsylvania, 1960 

Donald C. Byers Orrville, Ohio 

B.S., Ohio State University, 1961 

James Allen Camp Nevada, Mo. 

B.A., Missouri Valley College, 1962 

William M. Campbell ....... Stamford, Conn. 

B.A., The College of Wooster, 1962 

Robert T. Cassell ........ Pittsburgh, Pa. 

B.A., University of Pittsburgh, 1962 

J. Howard Cherry ........ Pittsburgh, Pa. 

B.A., University of Pittsburgh, 1961 

Jack M. Chisholm ........ Pittsburgh, Pa. 

B.A., University of Pittsburgh, 1961 

William L. Coop ........ Monmouth, N. J. 

B.A., The College of Wooster, 1960 

Walter K. Davis ........ Eau Claire, Pa. 

A.B., Findlay College, 1962 

85 



William V. Davis Canton, Ohio 

A.B., Ohio University, 1962 

Charles Cameron Dickinson, III ... Wichita Falls, Texas 

B.A., Dartmouth College, 1958 

Samuel C. Dunning ........ Pittsburgh, Pa. 

B.A., Geneva College, 1956 

Thomas C. Fairley ......... Beaver, Pa. 

B.S., Edinboro State Teachers College, 1962 

Eugene Carl Fieg, Jr. ...... . Greensboro, N. C. 

A.B., Maryville College, 1961 

John M. Fife ......... Titusville, Pa. 

B.A., Washington and Jefferson College, 1962 

Thomas W. Filbern ....... West Newton, Pa. 

B.A., Westminster College, 1962 

Robert Frederick ........ Slippery Rock, Pa. 

Slippery Rock State College 

Lloyd F. Gossler ........ Harrisburg, Pa. 

B.S., Florida State University, 1961 

Robert K. Greer ......... Trafford, Pa. 

B.A., Westminster College, 1962 

Gary Conrad Haase ........ Wooster, Ohio 

B.A., The College of Wooster, 1961 

James William Hanna Black Lick, Pa. 

A.B., Waynesburg College, 1962 

Edwin Blythe Hartman Washington, Pa. 

B.B.A., Westminster College, 1959 

James L. Hobson Linden, Mich. 

B.A., Alma College, 1962 

Harry R. Holmes Sewickley, Pa. 

A.B., Grove City College, 1962 

Harold S. Horan . Silver Spring, Md. 

B.A., University of Maryland, 1962 

Carl Robert Hull ........ East Brady, Pa. 

B.A., Grove City College, 1962 

Edward John Hunt Bronx, N. Y. 

B.A., Davis and Elkins College, 1962 

Ralph B. Jones Baltimore, Md. 

B.A., Maryland University, 1962 

William M. Keeney Harrisburg, Pa. 

B.A., The College of Wooster, 1962 

Dong Soo Kim Seoul, Korea 

B.A., Union Christian College, 1959 

William John Lightbody Pittsburgh, Pa. 

B.A., University of Pittsburgh, 1961 

Ross N. Macdonald ....... Hamilton, Ontario 

B.A., Baldwin Wallace College, 1962 

86 



Raymond J. Marquette Scranton, Pa. 

B.S., Geneva College, 1961 

Paul J. Masquelier ........ McDonald, Pa. 

B.B.A., University of Pittsburgh, 1960 

Donald William McClure ..... Addis Ababa, Ethiopia 
B.S., Westminster College, 1961 

Robert B. McCrumb New Castle, Pa. 

B.A., Muskingum College, 1962 

Guy H. McIver Columbus, Ohio 

B.S., Ohio State University, 1962 

George M. Mighells ....... Salamanca, N. Y. 

TLB., Malone College, 1950 

Paul J. Milio Detroit, Mich. 

A.B., Wayne State University, 1962 

Ronald Pearson Miller ....... Buffalo, N. Y. 

B.A., Westminster College, 1961 

Albert U. Montanari Buffalo, N. Y. 

B.S., Teachers College, Buffalo, N. Y., 1958 

Harold Richard Moore Pittsburgh, Pa. 

A.B., University of Pittsburgh, 1961 

Edward S. Napier Philadelphia, Pa. 

B.A., Houghton College, 1958 

Richard Arthur Olsson Westfield, Pa. 

A.B., Barrington College, 1958 

Ernest W. Peterson Buhl, Idaho 

B.S., College of Idaho, 1961 

Robert Raymond Reich Salem, Ohio 

B.A., Davis & Elkins College, 1962 

Richard H. Scherpenisse Bowling Green, Mo. 

A.B., Missouri Valley College, 1962 

C. Thatcher Schwartz Pittsburgh, Pa. 

B.S., Penn State University, 1959 

John A. Simpson Akron, Ohio 

B.A., University of Akron, 1961 

Hugh B. Springer Fairmont, W. Va. 

A.B., West Virginia University, 1961 

Lewis R. Thomas Lewis Run, Pa. 

M.E., University of Cincinnati, 1959 

John Arthur Toth Johnstown, Pa. 

B.A., Waynesburg College, 1962 

Wichean Watakeecharoen Bangkok, Thailand 

B.A., Dubuque University, 1960 

87 



Edward F. Wightman Jamestown, R. I. 

B.A., Colgate University, 1957 

Margaret Suppes Yingling ....... Pittsburgh, Pa. 

B.S., Chatham College, 1943 



Middler Class 

Gary Dean Alexander ....... Leawood, Kansas 

A.B., University of Kansas, 1963 

Gary Lyle Baer Baltimore, Md. 

B.A., Davis and Elkins College, 1963 

Rawley D. Boone Hickory, Pa. 

B.A., Grove City College, 1963 

Lloyd Carlson . . . Pittsburgh, Pa. 

B.S., University of Pittsburgh, 1943 

In Soon Choi ......... Seoul, Korea 

B.A., Seoul National University, 1958 

Rodger L. Cragun ....... Niagara Falls, N. Y. 

A.A., Lincoln College, 1960 
B.A., Tusculum College, 1963 

Larry Arthur Dunster Middle Granville, N. Y. 

B.A., Bloomfield College, 1963 

George Edward Espy Pittsburgh, Pa. 

B.A., University of Pittsburgh, 1963 

John D. Evans ......... Pittsburgh, Pa. 

A.B., Harvard College, 1961 
B.A., St. Peter's College, 1963 

Peter Judd Fosburg ....... Westfield, N. J. 

B.A., Westminster College, 1963 

Stephen Wayne Getty ....... Wallingford, Pa. 

B.A., Grove City College, 1963 

Robert W. Gracey Wheeling, W. Va. 

B.A., Davis & Elkins College, 1963 

James W. Graham ........ Pittsburgh, Pa. 

B.A., Temple University, 1963 

Dennis Haines Pittsburgh, Pa. 

B.A., University of Dubuque, 1963 

Howard James Hansen Blairsville, Pa. 

B.A., University of Pittsburgh, 1952 

William Russell Hayes ...... East Paterson, N. J. 

B.A., Bloomfield College, 1963 

Harvey Samuel Holtgraver Pittsburgh, Pa. 

B.A., Westminster College, 1963 

88 



Richard Kenneth Horn Pittsburgh, Pa. 

B.A., Grove City College, 1963 

David Z. Howard ........ Monrovia, Liberia 

B.S., University of Liberia, 1960 

J. Wallace Huber, Jr Princeton, Ind. 

B.A., Muskingum College, 1963 

Gary Evans Huffman ....... Loves Park, 111. 

A.B., Monmouth College, 1963 

Douglas James ........ Spokane, Wash. 

B.A., Whitworth College, 1963 

Richard Lee ......... Seattle, Wash. 

B.A., Futan University, Shanghai, China, 1942 

William James Legge, Jr Pittsburgh, Pa. 

B.S., Indiana State College, 1963 

J. Reynolds Lewis ........ Greensburg, Pa. 

B.A., Bethany College, 1958 

Harry E. Martin Pittsburgh, Pa. 

A.B., Miami University, 1949 
M.S., George Williams College, 1953 

Richard B. McCune New Castle, Pa 

B.A., Westminster College, 1963 

Harry Paul McCurdy, Jr. ..... . Monongahela, Pa. 

B.A., Lafayette College, 1963 

Frank David Moser ........ Pittsburgh, Pa. 

B.M., Grove City College, 1963 

Myron A. Newell ........ Alexandria, Va. 

B.S., Pennsylvania State University, 1960 

Wayne F. Parker ........ Monmouth, 111. 

B.A., Monmouth College, 1962 

Ronald G. Pritchard ....... Baltimore, Md. 

B.A., University of Maryland, 1963 

Jay King Rabuck Port Arthur, Tex. 

B.S., Stephen F. Austin College, 1963 

Donald H. Ralston Munhall, Pa. 

A.B., Monmouth College, 1950 

John D. Reuben Pensacola, Fla. 

B.A., Knoxville College, 1962 

Joseph Dunnell Small ....... Gibsonia, Pa. 

A.B., Brown University, 1963 

Michael Fleming Smathers ...... Crossville, Tenn. 

B.A., The College of Wooster, 1963 

Leland Ralph Stoops, Jr New Castle, Pa. 

B.A., Westminster College, 1963 

89 



Kirk Patrick Swiss ........ Baltimore, Md 

B.A., Muskingum College, 1962 

Paul R. Watson Pittsburgh, Pa. 

B.A., University of Pittsburgh, 1963 

David Williams Oak Park, 111. 

B.A., Millikin University, 1963 

Stephen Boyce Woods Pittsburgh, Pa. 

B.A., Westminster College, 1963 

William R. Yeats Morton, Pa. 

B.A., Bloomfield College, 1963 

Junior Class 

James Glen Bell ........ Grove City, Pa. 

B.S., Grove City College, 1964 

Kenneth Edwin Bell Paola, Kansas 

B.S., Kansas State University, 1949 
Ph.D., University of Illinois, 1953 

Robert Elliott Speer Burtt Delmont, Pa. 

B.S., Indiana State College, 1959 
M.Ed., Indiana State College, 1964 

Dennis Frank Butler Fair Lawn, N. J. 

B.A., Bloomfield College, 1964 

David Blaine Cable ....... Belle Vernon, Pa. 

B.S., California State College, 1963 

Donald George Campbell ....... Clairton, Pa. 

B.A., Westminster College, 1964 

Andrew C. Chalmers ....... Bernardsville, N. J. 

B.A., Bloomfield College, 1964 

Gary Glenmar Close ....... Pittsburgh, Pa. 

B.S., Norwich University, 1964 

Alice McGee Collins ....... Pittsburgh, Pa. 

B.A., Chatham College, 1957 

Robert Scott Collins ........ Tarkio, Mo. 

A.B., Tarkio College, 1960 

William Alan Crawford ....... Cincinnati, Ohio 

B.S., University of Cincinnati, 1964 

James Eugene Cuppett ....... Bedford, Pa. 

B.A., University of Pittsburgh, 1964 

Norman L. Dalton Independence, Mo. 

A.B., William Jewell College, 1964 

Brent Fergus Davidson Seattle, Wash. 

B.A., Seattle Pacific College, 1964 

90 



John James Dromazos Hamburg, N. Y. 

B.S., New York State University, 1961 

Robert F. Fassbach Allison Park, Pa. 

A.B., Westminster College, 1964 

Robert Lee Finch Peoria, III. 

A.B., Taylor University, 1964 

Charles Ray Fosnight Coraopolis, Pa. 

A.B., Ottawa University, 1957 

Clinton Clair Glenn, Jr Hyattsville, Md. 

B.A., University of Maryland, 1964 

Clyde Henry Goff Toledo, Ohio 

B.A., University of Toledo, 1959 

Daniel Clark Graham ...... Cuyahoga Falls, Ohio 

B.A., Westminster College, 1964 

James William Hartley ....... Euclid, Ohio 

B.A., The College of Wooster, 1964 

Philip Marlowe Hazelton ...... Lancaster, Ohio 

B.S., Ohio State University, 1963 

William Harry Hudson ........ Sharon, Pa. 

B.A., Westminster College, 1964 

John C. Huff Bowie, Md. 

B.A., Davis & Elkins College, 1964 

Fitz Allen John ........ Kingston, Jamaica 

Dip. Th., London University, 1958 

Harry H. Johns Pittsburgh, Pa. 

A.B., Geneva College, 1964 

John Melvin Johnson Beloit, Wis. 

B.S., Wheaton College, 1964 

Timothy Charles Johnson ..... Harbor Beach, Mich. 

B.A., Alma College, 1964 

William M. Johnson East Aurora, N. Y. 

B.A., Monmouth College, 1964 

John Jones Salem, Ohio 

A.B., University of North Carolina, 1948 
M.Ed., Kent State University, 1960 

David Conrad Kearns-Preston ..... Silver Spring, Md. 

B.A., American University, 1964 

William John Kemp Buffalo, N. Y. 

B.A., Westminster College, 1964 

Festo KrvENGERE ........ Kabale, Uganda 

University of London Institute of Education, 1956-57 

Timothy Aaron Koah Carlton, Pa. 

BA., Westminster College, 1961 

91 



Joseph Leonard Luciana ....... Oakmont, Pa. 

B.A., University of Pittsburgh, 1948 

L.L.B., University of Pittsburgh Law School, 1951 

Harry M. Lutton ....... East Liverpool, Ohio 

B.A., Grove City College, 1951 

Kenneth V. Mapstone ........ Hellam, Pa. 

A.A., York Junior College, 1962 
A.B., Waynesburg College, 1964 

Charles Marks ........ Savannah, Ga. 

B.A., Knoxville College, 1964 

Helsel Roland Marsh ....... Pittsburgh, Pa. 

B.S., Westminster College, 1964 

Robert Harrison McClure, Jr. .... Pittsburgh, Pa. 

B.A., Monmouth College, 1964 

James W. McDowell ....... Knoxville, Tenn. 

B.A., Knoxville College, 1959 

Dean Carlyle Mead ....... Beaverton, Oregon 

B.A, Lewis & Clark College, 1964 

Hartzell A. Michael ....... Pittsburgh, Pa. 

B.S.E.E., West Virginia University, 1935 
M.B.A., Harvard University, 1946 

Jack R. Moon ........ McKeesport, Pa. 

B.S.M.E., Carnegie Institute of Technology, 1955 

William Machain Morgan, Jr. .... . Worthington, Pa. 

B.S., Indiana State College, 1963 

Bearly Bruce Mounts ....... Washington, Pa. 

B.A., Washington & Jefferson College, 1964 

William Richard Myers ....... Oil City, Pa. 

B.A., Westminster College, 1964 

Allen Lee Nephew Gowanda, N. Y. 

B.A., Huron College, 1964 

Bernard William Nord ....... Bessemer, Pa. 

B.A., Pennsylvania State University, 1963 

Dale T. O'Connell ........ Pittsburgh, Pa. 

B.A., Tarkio College, 1964 

Robert Alexander Orr, Jr. ..... . Mayfield, Ky. 

B.A., Southwestern at Memphis, 1964 

George J. Peters ......... Joliet, 111. 

B.S., West Virginia University, 1957 

Walter Radulovich ....... Westerville, Ohio 

B.S., University of Illinois, 1950 

Jack Donald Richardson ....... Smithfield, Pa. 

B.A., Roberts Wesleyan College, 1959 

92 



Henry Elwood Robinson, III Pittsburgh, Pa. 

B.A., Emory University, 1963 

Vernon Clarke Rushing Ellicott City, Md. 

B.S., Brown University, 1964 

Thomas J. Sawyer ... Sharon, Pa. 

B.A., University of Pittsburgh, 1955 

Peter David Schlichting Arlington, N. J. 

B.A., Bloomfield College, 1964 

Bill Vernon Seastrom ...... N. Muskegon, Mich. 

B.M., Michigan State University, 1960 

John William Shumaker Pittsburgh, Pa. 

B.A., University of Pittsburgh, 1964 

Jonathan Carl Siehl Cincinnati, Ohio 

B.A., Muskingum College, 1964 

Robert Edward Singdahlsen ...... Decatur, Ga. 

B.A., Dickinson College, 1957 

M.A., Western Reserve University, 1961 

Milton Edward Skiff ....... Greenwich, N. Y, 

B.S., Cornell University, 1957 

James Avery Smith ....... Southampton, Pa. 

B.S., Drexel Institute, 1958 

Theodore Nicholas Tate ...... Johnsonville, N. Y. 

A.B., State University of New York, 1963 

William Clarence Weckerly ....... Butler, Pa. 

B.S., Indiana State College, 1959 

Donald Paul Wilson ....... Carmichaels, Pa. 

A.B., Waynesburg College, 1964 

Louis Henry Wollenberg ..... Orchard Park, N. Y. 

B.A., The College of Wooster, 1952 

Fred Joseph Wood N. Haledon, N. J. 

B.A., Bloomfield College, 1964 

Hugh Stanley Zimmerman ....... Clyde, Ohio 

B.A., The College of Wooster, 1962 



B.D. STUDENTS SERVING INTERNSHIPS 

Donald S. French Ithaca, N. Y. 

B.S., Cornell University, 1962 

Jon Louis Hoadley Seattle, Wash. 

B.A., Seattle Pacific College, 1962 

McClain J. Moredock Rices Landing, Pa. 

B.A., Westminster College, 1962 

Gerald Floyd Stacy Minneapolis, Minn. 

B.A., Macalester College, 1962 

93 



CANDIDATES FOR DEGREE OF MASTER OF RELIGIOUS EDUCATION 

Senior Class 

Diane K. Adsit Kenmore, N. Y. 

B.S., State University of New York, College for Teachers, 1961 



Gail G. Buchwalter ..... 
B.A., The College of Wooster, 1963 

Patricia Zapka Gracey . . . 

A.B., West Liberty State Teachers College, 1963 

Donna Rae Houser ...... 

B.S. in Education, Westminster College, 1963 

Karen Ann Seelar ...... 

B.A., Westminster College, 1963 

Carolyn Williams ...... 

B.S., Tufts College, 1948 

M.Ed., University of Texas. 1955 



Philadelphia, Pa. 

Windsor Heights, W. Va. 

Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Erie, Pa. 

Pittsburgh, Pa. 



Junior Class 
Roxanna Ryman Bertini .... 

B.A., Smith College, 1955 

Sally Hillman Childs . . . . . 

B.A., Sarah Lawrence College, 1949 

Deidre Fox Collins ..... 
B.A., Thiel College. 1959 

Madge B. Floyd ...... 

B.A., Emory University, 1958 

Ruth Morton Griffiths . . . . . 

B.A., The College of Wooster, 1960 
B.S., Columbia University, 1962 

Tean Hyde Humason 

B.A., Davis & Elkins, 1964 

Nancy Carolyn Mills ..... 
B.A., Akron University, 1959 

Jean Marian Oberlin 

B.A., Kansas University. 1948 

Sook Ja (Erika) Paik ..... 
B.S., Seoul National University (Korea), 1964 



Margaret Elizabeth Papsch ..... 

B.S. in Education, Slippery Rock State College, 1960 

Carol Rose Polivka ....... 

A.B., Muskingum College, 1964 



West Newbury, Mass. 

Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Washington, D. C. 

Verona, Pa. 

Columbus, Ohio 

Fairmont, W. Va. 

Cuyahoga Falls, Ohio 

Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Seoul, Korea 

Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Bridgeport, Ohio 



CANDIDATES FOR DEGREE OF MASTER OF EDUCATION 

(to be granted by the University of Pittsburgh) 

Susan Elizabeth Brunk ....... Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Betty Dorothy Henderson Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Elaine Kozar ......... Ambridge, Pa. 

Amba Durga Prasad ........ Mainpuri, India 

Nancy Jean Shaffer ........ Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Mildred Arlene Slater ....... Norristown, Pa. 



<M 



SPECIAL STUDENTS 

Robert C. Clifford Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Rosy Dayal Gadarwara, India 

John Howard Engler Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Rebecca S. Erb Marion, Ohio 

Cedric A. Flying Hawk Lake Andes, S. D. 

Ruth Florence Frazer Baltimore, Md. 

Ernest J. Frederick ....... New York, N. Y. 

John Clifford Haniford ....... Brownsville, Pa. 

Arnold S. Kastner West Finley, Pa. 

James K. L. McClane Parsons, W. Va. 

James Morgan McKelvey, Jr. ..... . Little York, 111. 

Bobbie Eleanor McMullen ...... Grove City, Pa. 

Alfred Miller ......... Kayenta, Ariz. 

Bruce Warner Reeves ........ Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Christa A. H. E. Reuter ..... Pfarrhaus, W. Germany 

James Clyde Wright ....... Knoxville, Tenn. 



CANDIDATES FOR THE DEGREE OF MASTER OF THEOLOGY 

Biblical Studies 

Rev. Robert A. Coughenour Pittsburgh, Pa. 

B.S., State Teachers College, 1953 

B.D., Pittsburgh Theological Seminary, 1960 

Rev. Howard Eshbaugh Oakdale, Pa. 

A.B., Grove City College, 1955 

B.D., Western Theological Seminary, 1956 

Rev. Hobert Kenneth Farrell ..... Dunbar, W. Va. 

B.A., Wheaton College, 1961 
B.D., Gordon Divinity School, 1964 
M.A., Wheaton College, 1964 

Rev. Philip M. Hastings ....... Sewickley, Pa. 

B.E., Johns Hopkins University, 1953 
B.D., Western Theological Seminary, 1956 

Rev. A. Vanlier Hunter ....... Pittsburgh, Pa. 

A.B., Grove City College, 1961 

B.D., Pittsburgh Theological Seminary, 1964 

Rev. John W. Irwin ........ Colliers, W. Va. 

B.A., Sterling College, 1955 

B.D., Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary, 1958 

Rev. John Bavington McLaren Pittsburgh, Pa. 

B.A., Westminster College, 1957 

B.D., Pittsburgh Theological Seminary, 1963 

Rev. David W. Philips Pittsburgh, Pa. 

B.A., Muskingum College, 1959 

B.D., Pittsburgh Theological Seminary, 1963 

95 



Rev. Rowland Dean Van Es ..... 
A.B., Hope College, 1960 
B.D., Western Theological Seminary (Holland, Mich.), 1964 



Pittsburgh, Pa. 



History and Theology 

Rev. Kenneth P. Alpers ....... Pittsburgh, Pa. 

B.A., Capital University, 1949 

B.D., Capital Theological Seminary, 1952 

Rev. William Cheston Berlin ...... Johnstown, Pa. 

B.A., Muskingum College, 1953 

B.D., Western Theological Seminary, 1956 

Rev. Raymond Whitford Cartwright, Jr. ... . Sewickley, Pa. 

B.A, Otterbein College, 1958 
B.D., United Theological Seminary, 1961 

Rev. Din Dayal ........ Gadarwara, India 

B.A., Allahabad University, 1949 

B.D., Leonard Theological College, 1952 

Rev. John M. Hulse McKeesport, Pa. 

B.A., Waynesburg College, 1957 

B.D., Pittsburgh Theological Seminary, 1960 

Rev. Hugh King Wright, Jr. ..... . Pittsburgh, Pa. 

B.A., Wesleyan University, 1955 

B.D., Western Theological Seminary, 1959 

Program for Advanced Pastoral Studies 

Rev. John E. Adams Cross Creek, Pa. 

B.A., University of Buffalo, 1957 

B.D., Pittsburgh Theological Seminary, 1961 

Rev. James B. Bailey Weirton, W. Va. 

B.S.C., Ohio University, 1953 

B.D., Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary, 1959 

Rev. Milton L. Bierman Johnstown, Pa. 

B.A., Carleton College, 1953 

B.D., Union Theological Seminary, 1958 

Rev. S. Hayden Britton Pittsburgh, Pa. 

B.S. in Ed., University of Tennessee, 1955 
B.D., Western Theological Seminary, 1958 

Rev. Duncan Campbell Argyll, Scotland 

M.A., St. Andrews University, 1952 

B.D., Austin Presbyterian Theological Seminary, 1956 

96 



Rev. Alfred M. Deemer ...... Natrona Heights, Pa. 

A.B., Greenville College, 1948 

B.D., Western Theological Seminary, 1953 

M.Ed., University of Pittsburgh, 1955 

Rev. Wayne E. Faust Waynesburg, Ohio 

A.B., University of Pittsburgh, 1957 
B.D., Pittsburgh Theological Seminary, 1960 

Rev. Donald F. Hursh Johnstown, Pa. 

A.B., Elizabethtown College, 1950 

B.D., Bethany Theological Seminary, 1953 

Rev. Chang Kuei Lee Formosa, Free China 

B.Th., Tainan Theological College, 1958 

Rev. George Hallauer Lower ...... Westtown, Pa. 

B.S., Bucknell University, 1953 

B.D., Pittsburgh Theological Seminary, 1960 

M.A., Hartford Theological Seminary, 1961 

Rev. J. Robert Phillips Pittsburgh, Pa. 

B.S., University of Pittsburgh, 1954 
B.D., Western Theological Seminary, 1959 

Mr. Dayanand David Pitamber Mainpuri, India 

M.A., Agra University, 1960 

B.D., Pittsburgh Theological Seminary, 1964 

Rev. John P. Pro Jeannette, Pa. 

B.Ed., Duquesne University, 1949 

B.D., Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary, 1957 

Rev. Fred M. Rogers Pittsburgh, Pa. 

B.M., Rollins College, 1951 

B.D., Pittsburgh Theological Seminary, 1962 

Rev. Hugh King Rose Clairton, Pa. 

A.B., Muskingum College, 1951 

B.D., Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary, 1954 

Rev. Bertram H. Saunders ...... Walnut Creek, Calif. 

A.B., University of California, 1949 

S.T.B., Biblical Seminary in New York, 1952 

Rev. George F. Shaffer Pittsburgh, Pa. 

A.B., Wittenberg University, 1950 
B.D., Hamma Divinity School, 1954 

Rev. Robert James Walker ...... Coraopolis, Pa. 

A.B., Muskingum College, 1953 

B.D., Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary, 1956 

Rev. Judson Wiley Bakerstown, Pa. 

A.B., Washington and Jefferson College, 1950 
B.D., Western Theological Seminary, 1953 

97 



SUMMARY OF ATTENDANCE 

Bachelor of Divinity Program 

Juniors .......... 71 

Middlers 43 

Seniors .......... 66 

Interns .......... 4 



184 



Master of Religious Education Program 

Juniors . . . . . . . . . .11 

Seniors .......... 7 18 

Master of Education Program ....... 6 

Master of Theology Program ....... 34 

Special Students ......... 16 

Total Enrollment ... 258 



HISTORICAL ROLL OF PROFESSORS 



John Anderson 
John Banks . 
James Ramsey 
Joseph Kerr . 
Jacob Jones Janeway 
Mungo Dick . 
Luther Halsey 



John Williamson Nevin 

David Elliott 

John Taylor Pressly 

David Carson 

Thomas Beveridge 

Moses Kerr 

Joseph Claybaugh 

Samuel W. McCracken 

Lewis Warner Green 

James Martin 

Alexander Taggart McGill 

James Lemonte Dinwiddie 

Abraham Anderson 

Alexander Downs Clark 

David Reynolds Kerr 

Melancthon Williams Jacobus 

William Swan Plumer . 

Samuel Wilson 

William Davidson . 

Alexander Young . 

Samuel Jennings Wilson 
John Scott 
Joseph Clokey 
William Miller Paxton 
Andrew Morrow Black . 
Archibald Alexander Hodge 
David Alexander Wallace 

James Harper 

Joseph Tate Cooper 

William Bruce 

William Henry Hornblower 

James Gillespie Carson 



Seminary of 
Inauguration 


Period of 
Service 


Service 


1794-1819 


Philadelphia 


1820-1826 


Canonsburg 


1821-1842 


Pittsburgh 


1825-1829 


Western 


1828-1829 


Pittsburgh 


1829-1831 


Western 


1829-1836 
1872-1880 


Western 


1829-1840 


Western 


1829-1874 


Allegheny 


1832-1870 


Canonsburg 


1834-1834 


Canonsburg 


1835-1871 


Allegheny- 


1835-1836 


Oxford 


1839-1855 


Oxford 


1839-1840 


Western 


1840-1847 


Canonsburg 


1842-1846 


Western 


1842-1854 


Allegheny 


1843-1846 


Canonsburg 


1847-1855 


Allegheny 


1847-1884 


Allegheny 


1851-1887 


Western 


1851-1876 


Western 


1854-1862 


Xenia 


1855-1875 


Oxford 


1855-1858 


Oxford 


1855-1874 
1876-1891 


Western 


1857-1883 


Monmouth 


1858-1874 


Xenia 


1858-1873 


Western 


1860-1872 


Monmouth 


1864-1874 


Western 


1864-1877 


Monmouth & Xenia 1867-1870 
1883-1883 


Newburg 


1867-1899 


Allegheny 


1871-1886 


Xenia 


1871-1880 


Western 


1871-1883 


Xenia 


1873-1888 



99 



William Gallogly Moorehead 

Jackson Burgess McMichael 

Samuel Thompson Lowrie 

Samuel Henry Kellogg . 

William Hamilton Jeffers 

Benjamin Breckenbridge Warfield 

Thomas Hastings Robinson 

David MacDill 

David A. McClenahan 

Robert Dick Wilson 

James Alexander Grier 

John McNaugher . 

Henry T. McClelland 

Matthew Brown Riddle 

Oliver Joseph Thatcher 

Wilbert Webster White 

Robert Christie 

John A. Wilson 

John Douds Irons . 

James Anderson Kelso 

David Riddle Breed 

Joseph Kyle . 

Jesse Johnson 

David Schley Schaff 

John Elliott Wishart 

David E. Cully 

William Riley Wilson 

Charles Frederick Wishart 

William Robertson Farmer 

John Hunter Webster 

James Henry Snowden 

Melvin Grove Kyle 

James Doig Rankin 

David Frazier McGill 

Frank Eakin . 

James Gallaway Hunt 

Selby Frame Vance 

James Harper Grier 

Robert McNary Karr 

James Leon Kelso . 

George Boone McCreary 

Robert Nathaniel Montgomery 

Donald Mackenzie 

Gaius Jackson Slosser . 

Albert Henry Baldinger 



Xenia 


1873-1914 


Xenia 


1873-1878 


Western 


1874-1877 


Western 


1877-1886 


Western 


1877-1914 


Western 


1878-1887 


Western 


1883-1906 


Xenia 


1884-1902 


Allegheny 


1885-1921 


Western 


1885-1900 


Allegheny 


1886-1909 


Allegheny 


1886-1943 


Western 


1886-1891 


Western 


1887-1916 


Allegheny 


1888-1892 


Xenia 


1889-1894 


Western 


1891-1923 


Allegheny 


1893-1915 


Xenia 


1895-1905 


Western 


1897-1944 


Western 


1898-1931 


Xenia 


18994921 


Xenia 


1903-1930 


Western 


1903-1926 


Xenia 


1905-1923 


Western 


1906-1948 


Allegheny 


1907-1940 


Allegheny 


1907-1914 


Western 


1907-1939 


Xenia 


1908-1933 


Western 


1911-1928 


Xenia 


1914-1930 


Pittsburgh 


1914-1929 


Pittsburgh 


1915-1931 


Western 


1915-1927 


Pittsburgh 


1920-1926 


Western 


1921-1935 


Pittsburgh 


1922-1926 


Xenia 


1922-1949 


Xenia 


1923-1963 


Xenia 


1924-1946 


Pittsburgh 


1926-1930 


Western 


1928-1933 


Western 


1928-1958 


Pittsburgh-Xenia 


1931-1947 



100 



Clarence Joseph Williamson 
John Wick Bowman 
William F. Orr 
George Anderson Long 
Theophilus Mills Taylor 
Jar vis M. Cotton . 
Frank Dixon McCloy 
Henry Alexander Riddle 
J. Carter Swaim 
Walter R. Clyde . 
Addison Hardie Leitch 
Florence M. Lewis . 
H. Ray Shear 
David Noel Freedman 
Gordon Edmund Jackson 
Ralph G. Turnbull 
John H. Gerstner 
Clifford E. Barbour 
Bessie M. Burrows 
James A. Walther . 
Sidney 0. Hills 
Robert Lee Kelley, Jr. 
Robert Clyde Johnson 
Howard M. Jamieson, Jr, 
John M. Bald 
Elwyn Allen Smith 
Walter E. Wiest . 
Malcolm S. Alexander 
Harold E. Scott 
Howard L. Ralston 
William A. Nicholson 
James Sheppard Irvine 
J. Gordon Chamberlin 
Gayraud S. Wilmore 
Arlan P. Dohrenburg 
Edward D. Grohman 
David G. Buttrick 
Donald G. Miller 
George H. Kehm 
Dietrich Ritschl 
Markus Barth 
Edward Farley 
Lynn Boyd Hinds 
Iain G. Wilson 
Douglas R. A. Hare 



Western 



Pittsburgh-Xenia 


1932-1950 


Western 


1936-1944 


Western 


1936- 


Pittsburgh-Xenia 


1942-1955 


Pittsburgh-Xenia 


1942-1962 


Western 


1944-1961 


Western 


1944- 


Western 


1944-1949 


Western 


19444954 


Western 


1945- 


Pittsburgh-Xenia 


1946-1961 


Pittsburgh-Xenia 


1947-1952 


Pittsburgh-Xenia 


1947-1959 


Western 


1948-1964 


Pittsburgh-Xenia 


1949- 


Western 


1949-1954 


Pittsburgh-Xenia 


1950- 


Western 


1951-1962 


Pittsburgh-Xenia 


1953- 


Western 


1954- 


Western 


1954- 


Pittsburgh-Xenia 


1955- 


Western 


1955-1963 


Pittsburgh-Xenia 


1955- 


Pittsburgh-Xenia 


1957- 


Western 


1957- 


Western 


1957- 


Pittsburgh-Xenia 


1958- 


Pittsburgh-Xenia 


1959- 


and Pittsburgh-Xenia 


1960- 


Western 


1960- 


Western 


1960- 


Pittsburgh 


1960- 


Pittsburgh 


1961-1965 


Pittsburgh 


1961-1964 


Pittsburgh 


1961-1964 


Pittsburgh 


1961- 


Pittsburgh 


1962- 


Pittsburgh 


1962- 


Pittsburgh 


1963- 


Pittsburgh 


1963- 


Pittsburgh 


1963- 


Pittsburgh 


1963- 


Pittsburgh 


1963- 


Pittsburgh 


1964- 



101 



DONATIONS AND BEQUESTS 

All donations or bequests to the Seminary should be made to 
"The Pittsburgh Theological Seminary of the United Presbyterian 
Church in the United States of America, located at 616 North High- 
land Avenue, Pittsburgh 6, Pennsylvania." The proper legal form 
for making a bequest is as follows. 

"I hereby give and bequeath to Pittsburgh Theological Seminary 
of the United Presbyterian Church in the United States of America, 
incorporated in the State of Pennsylvania, the following: . . . ." 

Care should be taken to use the corporate name as given above, 
and to have the bequest conform to the laws of the state governing it. 

The memorial idea may be carried out either in the erection 
of a building or in the endowment of any of the special funds of 
the Seminary. 



102 



INDEX 

Administrative Staff ........ 17 

Admissions: College Requirements, Credentials, 

Procedure, etc. . . . . . . .32-35 

Alumni Association ........ 80 

Attendance, Summary of ....... 98 

Awards Granted, 1963-1964 81-84 

Awards, prizes, and graduate fellowships .... 39-42 

Bachelor of Divinity Degree .... 44-47, 51-70 

Board of Directors and Committees 8-10 

Buildings 23-27 

Calendar of Events, 1964-65 2 

Campus 23-27 

Continuing Education ....... 78-79 

Courses of Instruction ....... 43-77 

Curriculum ......... 43-77 

Degree Programs, Index to ....... 43 

Degrees Awarded, 1963-1964 81-82 

Donations and Bequests ....... 102 

Emeritus Professors ........ 14 

Enrollment, Summary of ....... 98 

Expenses ......... 36-37 

Faculty and Faculty Committees .... 3-7, 11-14 

Fees and Expenses ........ 36-37 

Field Education 45, 69 

Financial Assistance ........ 37-39 

Foreign Students . . . . . . . . .35 

Four-year Program ........ 47 

Graduation Honors and Awards ..... 83-84 

103 



Historical Roll of Professors 99-101 

History of Seminary ........ 19 

Honors Program . . . . . . . . .51 

Hospitalization Insurance ....... 37 

Housing 23-24 

Insurance, Medical and Hospital ...... 37 

Lectures, Special ........ 15-16 

Library .......... 26-27 

Loan Funds ......... 37-39 

Location of the Seminary Buildings .... 23-24 

Married Student Apartment Fees 36 

Master of Education Degree ...... 50 

Master of Public Administration Degree . . . .70 

Master of Public and International Affairs Degree . . 70 

Master of Religious Education Degree . . . 48-49, 52-69 
Master of Theology Degree ...... 71-77 

Medical Insurance ........ 37 

Museum, Bible Lands 25 

Music, Opportunities in 30-31 

Pittsburgh — Our Environment . . . . . .21 

Pittsburgh, University of, joint program with . . 50, 70, 76 

Pre-Seminary Studies ....... 32-33 

Professors, Historical Roll of . . . . . 99-101 

Register of Students, 1964-1965 85-97 

Scholarships, loans, etc. ....... 37-39 

Student Association ........ 30 

Student Committee Chairmen ...... 30 

Summer Field Education ....... 69 

Transfer Students .35 

Worship . . . . . .... . .29 



104 









IP — 



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Seminar 



1966-6 



PITTSBURGH THEOLOGICAL 
SEMINARY LIBRARY 



^m 




The Annual Catalogue of 

TkePtttsturak 

TWoaical 

Seminarij 

1966-67 



A SEMINARY OF THE UNITED PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH IN THE 
UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, FOUNDED 1794. ACCREDITED 
BY THE AMERICAN ASSOCIATION OF THEOLOGICAL SCHOOLS. 



616 N. HIGHLAND AVENUE 
PITTSBURGH, PENNSYLVANIA 15206 



THE SEMINARY CALENDAR 
1966 



Summer Programs of Continuing Education 

20-24 June School of Religion, Pennsylvania 

26 June-1 July School of Religion, Ohio 

First Semester 

6-8 Sept. Junior Orientation and Registration 

8 Sept. Convocation, 11:00 a.m., and Community Luncheon 

9 Sept. Class Work Begins 

10 Sept. Junior Orientation Retreat 

4 Oct. Continuing Education Eight Weeks School Begins 

21 Oct. Last day for dropping courses 

24-28 Oct. Schaff Lecture Week 

16 Nov. Semi-Annual Meeting, Board of Directors 

24 Nov. Thanksgiving Day (No Classes) 

12-16 Dec. Second Reading Period 

19-21 Dec. Examination Period 

22 Dec. -2 Jan. Christmas Recess 

1967 

3-20 Jan. Intersession 

Second Semester 

23 Jan. Class Work Begins 

7 Feb. Continuing Education Eight Weeks School Begins 

3 Mar. Last day for dropping courses 

6-10 Mar. First Reading Period 

24 Mar. Good Friday (No Classes) 

24 Apr. Last class day 

25-27 Apr. Second Reading Period for Seniors 

25 Apr.-l May Second Reading Period for Juniors and Middlers 

28-29 Apr. Examination Period for Seniors 

2-5 May Examination Week for Juniors and Middlers 

7 May Communion Service for Seniors, 4:00 p.m., and Buffet S 

7 May Baccalaureate, 8:00 p.m. 

9 May Annual Meeting of the Board of Directors 

9 May Annual Meeting and Dinner of the Alumni Association 

9 May Commencement, 8:00 p.m., 

The East Liberty Presbyterian Church 



The Faculty 






Donald G. Miller, President. Greenville College, A.B.; 
The Biblical Seminary in N.Y., S.T.B. and S.T.M.; 
New York University, M.A. and Ph.D. 



William F. Orr, Professor of New Testament Litera- 
ture and Exegesis. Southwestern University, A.B. 
Louisville Presbyterian Seminary, B.D. and Th.M. 
Hartford Theological Seminary, Ph.D. 



Frank Dixon McCloy, Jr., Associate Professor of 
Church History. University of Pittsburgh, A.B. and 
A.M.; Western Theological Seminary, S.T.B. ; Har- 
vard University, A.M. and Ph.D. 



Walter R. Clyde, Professor of Christian Mission. 
Muskingum College, A.B.; Omaha Theological Sem- 
inary, B.D.; Western Theological Seminary, S.T.M.; 
Hartford Seminary Foundation, Ph.D. 



m 





Gordon E. Jackson, Dean of the Seminary and Hugh 
Thomson Kerr Professor of Pastoral Theology. Mon- 
mouth College, A.B.; Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological 
Seminary, Th.B. and Th.M.; University of Chicago, 
Ph.D. 



John H. Gerstner, Professor of Church History. West- 
minster College, A.B.; Westminster Theological Sem- 
inary, Th.B. and Th.M.; Harvard University, Ph.D. 



The Faculty 



Bessie M. Burrows, Assistant Professor of Christian 
Education and Registrar. Geneva College, B.A.; Co- 
lumbia University, M.A. 



James A. Walther, Associate Professor of New Testa- 
ment Literature and Exegesis. Grove City College, 
A.B.; Western Theological Seminary, S.T.B.; Em- 
manuel College, Victoria University, Toronto, Th.D. 



Sidney O. Hills, Associate Professor of Hebrew and 
Old Testament Literature. Northwestern University, 
B.A.; McCormick Theological Seminary, B.D.; Johns 
Hopkins University, Ph.D. 



Robert Lee Kelley, Jr., Associate Professor of Biblical 
Languages. University of Pittsburgh, A.B.; Pittsburgh- 
Xenia Theological Seminary, B.D.; Princeton Theo- 
logical Seminary, Th.M. 



Howard M. Jamieson, Jr., Associate Professor of Bib- 
lical Theology and Dean of Students. Monmouth 
College, A.B.; Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Semi- 
nary, Th.B.; University of Pittsburgh, M.A. and 
Ph.D. 



John M. Bald, Associate Professor of Christian Ethics 
and Financial Aid Officer. Muskingum College, A.B.; 
Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary, Th.B. and 
Th.M. 













Ail 



The Faculty 



Elwyn Allen Smith, Professor of Church History. 
Wheaton College, A.B.; Yale Divinity School, B.D.; 
Princeton Theological Seminary, Th.M.; Harvard 
University, Ph.D. 



Walter E. Wiest, Professor of Philosophy of Religion. 
Lafayette College, A.B.; Princeton Theological Semi- 
nary, Th.B.; Columbia University, Ph.D. 



Malcolm S. Alexander, Associate Professor of Pastoral 
Theology. University of Southern California, A.B. 
and LL.B.; Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary, 
B.D. 



Harold E. Scott, Associate Professor of Homiletics 
and Director of Field Education. Sterling College, 
B.A.; Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary, B.D. 



Howard L. Ralston, Assistant Professor of Church 
Music. Muskingum College, Mus.B.; Curtis Institute 
of Music, A.A.G.O. 



William A. Nicholson, Assistant Professor of Homi- 
letics. Washington & Jefferson College, A.B.; West- 
ern Theological Seminary, S.T.B. 



The Faculty 



James S. Irvine, Assistant Professor of Bibliography. 
Washington and Jefferson College, A.B.; Western 
Theological Seminary, B.D.; Carnegie Institute of 
Technology, M.L.S.; Johns Hopkins University, Ph.D. 



/. Gordon Chamberlin, Associate Professor of Chris- 
tian Education. Cornell College in Iowa, A.B.; Union 
Theological Seminary (N.Y.), B.D.; Columbia Uni- 
versity, Ed.D. 



David G. Buttrick, Assistant Professor in Church and 
Ministry. Haverford College, B.A.; Union Theologi- 
cal Seminary (N.Y.), B.D. 




., r ^. 



* ** 





George H. Kehm, Assistant Professor in Theology. 
Queens College, B.S.; Princeton Theological Semi- 
nary, B.D.; Harvard Divinity School, S.T.M. 



Dietrich Ritschl, Professor of History of Doctrine 
and Systematic Theology. University of Edinburgh, 
Ph.D. 



Markus Earth, Professor of New Testament. Univer- 
sity of Goettingen, Dr. Theol. 





The Faculty 








Edward Farley, Associate Professor of Systematic 
Theology. Centre College, A.B.; Louisville Presby- 
terian Theological Seminary, B.D.; Columbia Uni- 
versity, Ph.D. 



Lynn Boyd Hinds, Instructor in Speech. University 
of Akron, B.A.; Eastern Baptist Theological Semi- 
nary, B.D.; Temple University, M.A. 



Iain G. Wilson, William Oliver Campbell Professor 
of Homiletics. University of Edinburgh, M.A. and 
B.D. 



Douglas R. A. Hare, Assistant Professor of New Tes- 
tament. Victoria College, University of Toronto, B.A.; 
Emmanuel College, B.D.; Union Theological Semi- 
nary (N.Y.), S.T.M. and Th.D. 



Donald E. Gowan, Assistant Professor of Old Testa- 
ment. University of South Dakota, B.A.; Dubuque 
Theological Seminary, B.D.; University of Chicago, 
Ph.D. 



Jared Judd Jackson, Assistant Professor of Old Testa- 
ment. Harvard College, A.B.; Episcopal Theological 
School (Cambridge, Mass.), B.D.; Union Theological 
Seminary (N.Y.), Th.D. 



10 



The Faculty 



H. Eberhard von Waldow, Visiting Professor of Old 
Testament. Bonn University, Dr. Theol. 



Guest Professors 

Neil R. Paylor, Ph.D. (Harvard) 

Lecturer, the Program for Advanced Pastoral Studies 

Clifford E. Davis, Ph.D. (Pennsylvania State) 
Lecturer in Christian Education 

Robert J. Shoemaker, M.D. (Pittsburgh) 

(Clinical Assistant Professor of Psychiatry, University 

of Pittsburgh School of Medicine) 

Lecturer and Consultant in Psychiatry 

Margaret B. McFarland, Ph.D. (Columbia) 

(Associate Professor of Psychology, University of 

Pittsburgh; Director, Arsenal Family and Children's 

Center) 

Lecturer, the Program for Advanced Pastoral Studies 

Rex A. Pittenger, M.D. (Minnesota) 
(Staunton Assistant Professor of Psychiatry, Univer- 
sity of Pittsburgh School of Medicine; Chief, Staun- 
ton Clinic) 
Lecturer, the Program for Advanced Pastoral Studies 

Moises Wodnicki, M.D. (Havana) 
(Clinical Assistant Professor of Psychiatry, Univer- 
sity of Pittsburgh School of Medicine; Director of 
Professional Education and Medical Research, May- 
view State Hospital) 

Lecturer, the Program for Advanced Pastoral Studies, 
1965-1966 

M. Royden C. Astley, M.D. (Pennsylvania) 
(Professor of Psychiatry, University of Pittsburgh 
School of Medicine; Director, Pittsburgh Psychoan- 
alytic Institute) 

Lecturer, the Program for Advanced Pastoral Studies, 
1965-1966 



J0^; i 



> 



i 



Werner Lutz, M.S. (Columbia) 

(Professor of Social Case Work, Graduate School of 

Social Work, University of Pittsburgh) 

Lecturer, the Program for Advanced Pastoral Studies 

Erma T. Meyerson, B.S., M.A.A.S.S. (Pittsburgh) 
(Professor of Sociology and Social Work, College of 
Liberal Arts and Graduate School of Social Work, 
University of Pittsburgh) 
Lecturer, the Program for Advanced Pastoral Studies 

Jack Matthews, M.A., Ph.D. (Ohio State) 
(Professor and Chairman, the Department of Speech, 
University of Pittsburgh) 
Lecturer, the Program for Advanced Pastoral Studies 

A. Vanlier Hunter, Jr., B.D. (Pittsburgh) 
Teaching Fellow in Biblical Languages 

Fred M. Rogers, B.D. (Pittsburgh) 
(Minister to Children, the Oakland Ministry, Pitts- 
burgh, and in Television) 
Guest Instructor in Church and Ministry 

Marguerite Hofer 

(Executive Director, Department of Church and 

Community, Pittsburgh Presbytery) 

Lecturer in Church and Ministry, 1965-1966 

William S. Tacey, M.A., Ed.D. (Pennsylvania State) 
(Professor of Speech, University of Pittsburgh) 
Guest Professor of Speech, 1965-1966 

Edith Warman Skinner, M.A. (Columbia) 
(Professor, Drama Department, Carnegie Institute 
of Technology) 
Guest Professor of Speech, 1965-1966 

Robert L. Parks, B.F.A. (Carnegie Tech.) 
(Assistant Professor of Voice and Speech, Carnegie 
Institute of Technology) 
Guest Professor of Speech, 1965-1966 

Andrew T. Roy, Ph.D. (Princeton) 

(Vice President for Public Relations, Chung Chi 

College, Hong Kong) 

Guest Professor in Church and Ministry, 1965-1966 

Jacob M. Myers, S.T.D., Ph.D. 

(Professor of Hebrew and Old Testament Literature 
and Theology, Lutheran Theological Seminary, Get- 
tysburg) 
Guest Professor of Old Testament, 1965-1966 



12 



James B. Bloomfield, M.S.W. (Pittsburgh) 
(Chief, Social Work Service, Veterans Administra- 
tion Hospital) 
Lecturer, the Program for Advanced Pastoral Studies 

Margaret M. Wynne, M.S.W. (Pittsburgh) 
(Assistant Chief, Social Work Service, Veterans Ad- 
ministration Hospital) 
Lecturer, the Program for Advanced Pastoral Studies 



Emeriti 

The Rev. Clifford Edward Barbour, Ph.D., D.D., LL.D. 
President Emeritus 

The Rev. David E. Culley, Ph.D., D.D. 

Emeritus Professor of Hebrew and Old Testament 

Literature 

The Rev. Robert McNary Karr, D.D. 

Emeritus Professor of Systematic and Biblical 

Theology 

The Rev. James Leon Kelso, A.M., Th.M., Th.D., 
D.D., LL.D. 

Emeritus Professor of Old Testament History and 
Biblical Archaeology 

The Rev. George Anderson Long, D.D., LL.D., Litt.D. 
President Emeritus and Emeritus Professor of English 
Bible 

The Rev. Henry A. Riddle, D.D., LL.D. 
President Emeritus 

The Rev. Gaius Jackson Slosser, Ph.D., F.R.Hist.S. 
Emeritus Professor of Ecclesiastical History and His- 
tory of Doctrine 



13 



Special Lectures— 1965-1966 



Dr. Paul L. Lehmann 

Auburn Professor of Systematic Theology 

Union Theological Seminary 

New York, New York 

Dr. C. Umhau Wolf 

Pastor, St. Paul's Lutheran Church 

Toledo, Ohio 

The Rev. Hugh C. White, Jr. 
Executive Director 
Detroit Industrial Mission 
Detroit, Michigan 

Dr. John Bright 

Cyrus H. McCormick Professor of Hebrew and the 

Interpretation of the Old Testament 

Union Theological Seminary 

Richmond, Virginia 

The Rev. David W. Romig 
Pastor, Sea and Land Church 
New York, New York 

Mr. Key Yuasa 

Research Director for the Ad Hoc Committee on 

Church Development in Latin America 

Sao Paulo, Brazil 

Dr. William Hamilton 

William Newton Clarke Professor of Christian 

Theology 

Colgate-Rochester Divinity School 

Rochester, New York 

Mr. Al Mellman 

Executive Director 

Jewish Community Relations Council of Greater 

Pittsburgh 

Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

Mr. William P. Thompson 

Moderator 

The United Presbyterian Church in the U.S.A. 

The Rev. George D. Younger 

Pastor, The Mariners' Temple Baptist Church 

New York, New York 

14 



The Rev. James Barr 

Professor of Semitic Languages and Literatures 

University of Manchester 

Manchester, England 

Professor Heinrich Ott 
Professor of Systematic Theology 
University of Basel 
Basel, Switzerland 

The Rev. Jack E. Weller 
Minister-at-Large, Ebenezer Presbytery 
Hazard, Kentucky 

Professor D. Walther Eichrodt 
Emeritus Professor of Old Testament 
University of Basel 
Basel, Switzerland 

Dr. C. F. D. Moule 
Lady Margaret Chair of Divinity 
Cambridge University 
Cambridge, England 

Dr. James Muilenburg 

Gray Professor of Hebrew Exegesis and Old Testa- 
ment 

San Francisco Theological Seminary 
San Anselmo, California 



Dr. C. F. D. Moule 
First Schaff Lecturer 




15 




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Pittsburgh Seminary 

Our History 

The Pittsburgh Theological Seminary was created in 1959 by the con- 
solidation of two institutions which had lived apart since 1825: Pittsburgh- 
Xenia Theological Seminary (United Presbyterian Church of North Amer- 
ica) and Western Theological Seminary (Presbyterian Church, U.S.A.). 

Pittsburgh-Xenia Seminary was formed in 1930 by the union of Pitts- 
burgh and Xenia Seminaries. The Xenia branch had been founded in 1794 
in Western Pennsylvania but had spent most of its life in Ohio and Mis- 
souri. The Pittsburgh branch originated in 1825 in Pittsburgh, Pennsyl- 
vania. Both branches were later augmented by the resources of Newburgh 
Seminary which was founded in New York City in 1805 by John Mitchell 
Mason. 

Western Seminary, established legally in 1825 by the General Assembly 
of the Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.), began with classical academies founded 
by Joseph Smith (1785) and John McMillan (1787) in Washington, Pa. 
It was indeed a "western" seminary in 1825, whose task was to furnish a 
ministry for the rapidly opening western territories along the Ohio River. 

The union in 1958 of the United Presbyterian Church of North America 
with the Presbyterian Church in the United States of America and the 
subsequent merger of Pittsburgh-Xenia and Western Seminaries were pos- 
sible because of ancient bonds: the Bible, the reformers, and the Scottish 
experience of witness and suffering. Church divisions in Scotland were re- 
produced in America. Since 1800 the direction has been steadily toward 
common witness with a resulting joining of schools. Pittsburgh Theological 
Seminary is the issue of this growing fellowship in theological education. 

The purpose of the Seminary as defined in the Constitution is to edu- 
cate suitable persons for the work of Christian ministry in its various 
forms at the highest possible level of educational competence. Set down in 
the midst of one of the key industrial centers of the nation, the Seminary 
experiments in the city about it, wrestles with the nature of the gospel, 
strives for eventful communication. The purpose of the Seminary is clear- 
cut: to know our time, the gospel for the healing of our time, and the 
ministry for our time. 

19 



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Pittsburgh 



Our Environment 



Pittsburgh Seminary is located in the workshop of America. Together with 
the contiguous towns, Pittsburgh is one of the great commercial centers of 
the world. Its population includes people of every nationality, profession, 
and skill, and therefore it affords unexcelled opportunities for the study 
of social, economic, political, and racial problems. Indeed, Pittsburgh Sem- 
inary has working relationships with community and social agencies, labor 
unions, business management, human development research centers, teach- 
ing hospitals, etc., .whereby these agencies and organizations become further 
resources for the educating of theological students. 



The cultural and educational life of Pittsburgh is no less rich. Five 
major colleges and universities are located in Pittsburgh: The University of 
Pittsburgh, Carnegie Institute of Technology, Duquesne University, Chatham 
College, and Mt. Mercy College. Their facilities, programs, and libraries, 
plus the Carnegie free libraries, afford added resources to all students. 



For music and art there are the world-famous Pittsburgh Symphony 
Orchestra; the Pittsburgh Opera Society; the Mendelssohn and Bach Choirs 
and other choral and concert groups; numerous art galleries including the 
Arts and Crafts Center and the Pittsburgh Plan for Art, both near the 
campus; and Carnegie Institute, which houses one of the largest contem- 
porary art collections in the country, and which every third year presents 
the Pittsburgh International Exhibition of Paintings and Sculpture. Begun 
in 1896, the Pittsburgh International is one of the most important exhibi- 
tions of contemporary art in the world. 



Churches of all types and denominations are to be found, ranging from 
the large urban congregation to the small rural or industrial mission. Some 
of the nation's foremost preachers occupy pulpits in the area. 



Pittsburgh Presbytery is the largest presbytery in the United Presbyterian 
Church, U.S.A. Within its bounds are two hundred twenty-eight churches 
with a total membership of about one hundred thirty thousand. Of these, 
about half have more than five hundred members each, and mission work 
is conducted in over twenty different places. Within two hundred miles of 
Pittsburgh live one fifth of the United Presbyterians in this country. 

21 



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The Campus 

Setting 

Pittsburgh Theological Seminary is ideally situated to symbolize by its very 
setting the church in the world. Located at the heart of a metropolitan 
center of two and a half million people, it is bordered on one side by an 
urban renewal project, including business and apartment buildings, churches, 
and schools, and on the other side by a residential area housing people of 
many ethnic backgrounds. By looking out almost any window on campus, 
one sees not only the broad expanse of lawn and trees of a once lovely 
estate given to the Seminary in 1951 by the heirs of the late H. Lee 
Mason, Jr., but is reminded also of the world in which the church lives 
and serves. 

Buildings 

New, modern buildings of American Colonial design, constructed of Hamp- 
ton Court Colonial red brick trimmed with Indiana limestone and fire- 
proof throughout, house the seminary activities. 

At the center of the campus stands The George A. Long Administration 
Building, which is the nerve center of campus life. Here classrooms, sem- 
inar rooms, faculty and administrative offices, a student center, a reception 
room, a Bible Lands Museum, a speech center, and the mail room all con- 
stitute a beehive of learning and social fellowship. 

The McCune Chapel, opening off the rotunda at the rear of the main 
building, done in chaste Colonial style, is the place where the seminary 
community gathers for worship and the renewal of spiritual life. 




23 



I 




The Clifford E. Barbour Library, built and furnished with funds provided 
by the Sarah Mellon Scaife and Richard K. Mellon Foundations, was dedi- 
cated in 1964. As the libraries of the former Pittsburgh-Xenia and Western 
Seminaries are housed in one building for the first time, it is appropriate 
that the library be named for Dr. Clifford E. Barbour, first president of 
Pittsburgh Seminary, whose vision of a great library became reality. The 
library is air-conditioned throughout. There is easy access to book resources 
located in four stack areas. One hundred and three desk carrels placed in 
and around the book stacks are available to all readers, in addition to 
which there are thirteen enclosed typing carrels which allow greater privacy 
for research work. Twenty research study rooms provide ideal conditions 
in which the faculty, visiting scholars and graduate students may pursue 
serious scholarly endeavors. Several study rooms and lounges, informally 
arranged, invite leisurely reading for more than 75 persons aside from many 
areas devoted to special purposes. Facilities are available for small seminar 
classes, conference and group study lessons, audio-visual work, music listen- 
ing, microfilm reading, and hymnological and historical research. 

On display in the Main Floor exhibit area are the desk and chair of 
Dr. Karl Barth, Basel, Switzerland, presented to Pittsburgh Seminary by 
Dr. Barth in 1964. Accompanying the desk at which Dr. Barth wrote his 
theological treatises from 1922 is an autographed copy of his Kirchliche 
Dogmatik 1/1. 

The following special collections augment the book resources: 
The John M. Mason Memorial Collection 

The research area of the library contains this priceless collection of classical 
theological works dating from the Reformation period. 

The James Warrington Collection of Hymnology 

Several thousand valuable hymn and psalm books which came from the 
estate of James Warrington, Philadelphia, provide research materials for 
scholars of American and English hymnody. Mr. Warrington minutely 
analyzed the works by composer, meter, tune, place, author, title, etc. 

The Nina S. Brittain Collection 

Through the generosity of Frank J. Brittain, Esq., of Erie, Pennsylvania, 
the sum of $5000 was used for the purchase of theological and related 
works which are known as the Nina S. Brittain Collection. 





The Clarence J. Williamson Church History Collection 
In 1958 endowment funds were established, income of which is to be used 
for the purchase of books in Church History and closely related subjects. 
These books are in memory of Dr. Clarence J. Williamson, a graduate of 
Pittsburgh Seminary, for fifty-one years a minister in the United Presby- 
terian Church of North America, and for eighteen years Professor of Church 
History and Government in The Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary. 

Historical Collections 

A room of the library contains the Minutes and other records of Associate, 
Associate Reformed, and United Presbyterian congregations, presbyteries, 
synods, and General Assemblies. The library is also the depository for the 
Upper Ohio Valley Historical Society and Pittsburgh Presbytery of The 
United Presbyterian Church in the U.S.A. 

Housing 

Single students are comfortably and commodiously housed in two buildings 
connected to the Administration Building by a covered passageway on both 
the first and second floor levels. The George C. Fisher Memorial Hall ac- 
commodates 80 men in single rooms. The John McNaugher Memorial Hall 
provides for 63 men, with an additional wing which houses 25 women. 
Six apartments for employees and married students are also located in this 
building. The dormitories have student lounges on each floor, in addition 
to a game room and a snack room on the ground floor. The dining room, 
with a seating capacity of 500, and guest rooms complete the dormitory 
complex. 

Although student rooms are fully and comfortably furnished, students 
must supply their own sheets, pillowcases, blankets, and towels, and pro- 
vide for their laundering. Summer occupancy of dormitory rooms is avail- 
able by special arrangement. 

Married students and their families are housed on campus in three 
apartment buildings and several duplex houses. 

The Highlander is a modern apartment building on the northwest 
corner of the campus. It contains seventeen one bedroom and six two bed- 
room units. Each apartment includes a living room, kitchen, bath, and 
storage locker. These apartments are unfurnished, although some kitchens 
are equipped with a gas range and an electric refrigerator. Laundry facili- 
ties (coin meter) are available in the basement. 

The Samuel A. Fulton Memorial Hall provides eighteen efficiency and 
twenty-one two-room apartments. Each unit includes a kitchenette and a 
bath, with a storage locker in the basement. These apartments are fully 
furnished with desk, bookcase, dining table, chairs, davenport-bed, a chest 
of drawers, wardrobe, refrigerator, and electric stove. Students must pro- 
vide bedding, linens, silverware, china, cooking utensils, curtains, lamps, 
and rugs. Laundry facilities (coin meter type) are available in the basement. 

A six-room fully furnished apartment for the housing of a missionary 
family on furlough is provided in Fulton Hall. It is made available, through 
cooperation with the Commission on Ecumenical Mission and Relations,: 
to missionaries seeking fuller preparation for service on return to their fields. 

26 



The Sheridan Avenue Apartments are located on campus at 519 Sheridan 
Avenue. This three-story building contains six unfurnished apartments for 
couples with children. Washers and dryers may be installed in the basement. 

Duplex Apartments. There are seventeen unfurnished duplex apartments 
on the campus for students with families. Special arrangements may be 
made for summer occupancy of apartments. 

Life for married students and their families is as comfortable and 
efficient as is possible in student apartments. Rents are far below commer- 
cial rates, shops and stores are within easy reach, public transportation 
comes right to the campus gate, and good schools are nearby for children 
of school age. It is planned shortly to add another modern apartment build- 
ing to the campus which will take the place of the duplex houses now in 
use. The completion of this will give Pittsburgh Seminary excellent housing 
for all of its married students and their families. 




27 






1 s 




* 



•*** 



The Bible Lands Museum 

Pittsburgh Theological Seminary has an outstanding list of accomplish- 
ments in archaeological research of Bible times in ancient Palestine. In 
conjunction with the American Schools of Oriental Research at Jerusalem, 
in Jordan, it conducted an exploration at Bab ed-Dra at the southern end 
of the Dead Sea in 1924. A series of joint excavations was made at Kirjath- 
Sepher in 1926, 1928, 1930 and 1932. Bethel became the site of research 
in 1934, 1954, 1957, and 1960, and a significant project was carried out 
at New Testament Jericho and Nitla in 1950. In 1964 the Kyle-Kelso Fund 
for Archaeological Research in Jordan was established and a joint project 
with the American Schools of Oriental Research was carried on at Gibeah 
of Saul in the summer of 1964. Approval was granted for a joint expedi- 
tion at Tell er Rumeith either in 1966 or 1967. This site is thought to be 
Old Testament Rumeith Gilead. For the year 1966-67 Howard M. Jamieson, 
Jr., has been named Honorary Associate of the American School of Oriental 
Research in Jerusalem. 

In conjunction with Carnegie Museum and the Department of Antiq- 
uities of Israel, through the Holy Lands Exhibition Fund, Pittsburgh Theo- 
logical Seminary conducted archaeological digs at the biblical site at Ashdod 
in 1962, 1963, and 1965. Publication of the findings of the work during 
these seasons is now being prepared. 

The archaeological work at Pittsburgh Theological Seminary was in- 
augurated by Professor M. G. Kyle and was then carried on by Professor 
James L. Kelso until his retirement in 1963. In the spring of 1964 Associate 
Professor Howard M. Jamieson, Jr., was appointed Faculty Administrator 
of the Kyle-Kelso Fund. Members of the faculty and students often partici- 
pate in the digs. Assistant Professor Donald M. Gowan and A. Vanlier 
Hunter, a teaching fellow, were recent participants in the Ashdod project. 
Much of the Seminary's share of the antiquities excavated in the digs is 
now on exhibit in the Bible Lands Museum, which is located in the ad- 
ministration building. The museum is used as a teaching facility for the 
seminary program. A unique collection of ancient coins has been catalogued 
by Professor Iain Wilson. 

The objects in the Bible Lands Museum illustrate the way of life of the 
people of Palestine, and so become of great value for understanding and 
interpretation. Occasionally archaeological discoveries corroborate biblical 
statements, as in the case of the fragments of a royal inscription of Sargon 
II of Assyria, found at Ashdod, which relates to Isaiah 20:1. For the most 
part, however, archaeological excavations illumine the cultural, social, eco- 
nomic, political, and religious background of the Bible, supplying much data 
for deeper understanding of the people and the land of the Bible. 



29 



Life on The Campus 

Community Life 

The social life of the campus is enhanced by the presence of single students, 
married couples, and families. It is greatly enriched by those students from 
the Orient, Europe, Africa, the Middle East, South America, etc., who come 
to study but also to share their cultures. 

Missionary families spending their furloughs on the campus for study 
bring to the community a sense of the Church ecumenical coupled with 
a sense of urgency. 

Admittedly, the emphasis in a theological seminary is not on social 
activities, but inter-personal relationships run deep and the socializing 
values are maintained by way of group get-togethers and periodical school 
functions. Among these are selected motion pictures, square dances, school 
picnics, art shows displaying works of seminary artists, and musical talent 
shows by seminary vocalists and instrumentalists trained in classical and 
folk music. 

A beautiful contemporary student center has been a recent addition to 
the community life on the campus. Located below the chapel wing of the 
administration building, it is a place for refreshment, campus movies, group 
or class parties, and just a good place to get together. 

The Women's Association, for all women on campus, provides oppor- 
tunities for group participation in a varied program of study, community 
activity, and social concern. 



Exhibition of Japanese Artist 




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dao 





WAT* 



sase 





! 



31 





32 



Convocations and Worship 

Through the faculty-student Convocation and Worship Committee, out- 
standing people are brought to the campus. Each fall and spring there is 
a two-day lectureship in which a prominent person— theologian, Biblical 
scholar, psychiatrist, writer, social thinker and planner, etc.— is heard by 
the seminary family. 

Chapel worship is conducted by students and faculty four days a week, 
and monthly convocations introduce scholars from the various fields and 
disciplines to the seminary community. 

Church and Society 

Experiences provided by the direct contact of the Seminary with its neigh- 
borhood give to the students vital information and know-how for dealing 
with urban America. The Seminary reaches out to the community through 
field education, through laboratory assignments, and through the faculty- 
student Church and Society Committee. The later is a dynamic part of 
the seminary neighborhood as it has established relations with settlement 
houses, urban renewal and development offices, and with churches of the 
community for work with slum clearance, housing units, gangs, etc. The 
committee sponsors a tutoring relationship between seminary personnel 
and neighborhood school children, and forcefully directs faculty and student 
involvement in civil rights problems, both locally and elsewhere in the nation. 

The Student Association 

The Student Association provides the organization through which the 
students carry on a program of involvement in community life, determined 
only by the interest and concern of the students themselves. A student 
Curriculum Committee meets twice during the year with the faculty Cur- 
riculum Committee and is called upon to offer counsel and initiate continu- 
ing curriculum evaluation. The Convocation and Worship Committee of 
the faculty works out the annual program of chapel services and lecture 
series after consultation with the student Convocation and Worship Com- 
mittee. The student Publication Committee shares in the publication of 
Perspective, Panorama, and The Directory. An all-student publication, 
Unofficial Perspective, offers frequent opportunity for the expression of 
opinion and the examination of issues. One of the most active groups is 
the student Church and Society Committee, which works constantly with 
a similar faculty committee in a study of current social problems. This 
joint committee also organizes student and faculty action when deemed 
necessary. A student Social Committee and a student Stewardship Com- 
mittee direct activities in their respective areas of concern. 

The Executive Committee of the Student Association for the year, 1965- 
1966, was led by John Reuben, President, and Roxanna Bertini, Secretary- 
Treasurer. 



33 



The Seminary Musical Program 

The Seminary has a Men's Choir and a Mixed Chorus, both under the 
direction of Mr. Howard L. Ralston, Assistant Professor of Church Music. 
Auditions for membership in the Men's Choir are held in September. This 
group, carefully chosen and of limited number, sings for daily chapel 
services and represents the Seminary from time to time in churches within 
easy traveling distance. A more extensive tour is undertaken in the spring 
when the choir presents a varied program of sacred music in churches 
and colleges. 

The Mixed Chorus is maintained for all those of the seminary com- 
munity who enjoy singing. This group meets on Tuesday evenings and pre- 
sents a program at Christmas and in the spring, and sings at commence- 
ment. There are many opportunities throughout the year for soloists and 
instrumentalists. 

The Seminary, in cooperation with the Pittsburgh Council of Churches 
and the American Guild of Organists, presents each year a church music 
seminar for choir directors, organists, and ministers of the area. The course, 
for which tuition is charged, meets for one and one-half hours on six Tues- 
day evenings. On occasion nationally known figures in church music are 
brought in for lectures and demonstration. 

One of the highlights of the seminary year is the James H. Snowden 
Memorial Concert, established in 1964 by Dr. Roy R. Snowden in memory 
of his father, a longtime former professor in the Seminary. This annual 
event enriches the cultural life of the seminary community by bringing 
to the campus Metropolitan Opera stars and other concert artists of the 
highest rank. 

Dr. and Mrs. Roy R. Snowden with noted Brazilian pianist, Mme. Guiomar Novaes 




35 



i 

Admission Requirements 

Pittsburgh Theological Seminary offers work on a graduate school level.: 
This presupposes a B.A. or B.S. degree from a regionally accredited college^ 
or university, the degree work to have a substantial foundation in the liberal: 
arts. It also assumes that the student is ready to approach theological edu- 
cation with an open, searching attitude. Pittsburgh Seminary seeks that 
man or woman who is committed to the Christian faith, emotionally suited 
for work in the Church, and intellectually capable of the most rigorous 
kind of academic discipline. 

Pre-Seminary Studies 

College courses prior to theological seminary should provide the cultural 
and intellectual foundations essential to an effective theological education. 
They should issue in at least three broad kinds of attainment. 

1. The college work of a pre-seminary student should result in the ability 
to use certain tools of the educated man: 

(a) The ability to write and speak English clearly and correctly. This 
purpose should also be cultivated in all written work. 

(b) The ability to think clearly. In some persons, this ability is cultivated 
through courses in philosophy or specifically in logic. In others it 
is cultivated by the use of scientific method, or by dealing with 
critical problems in connection with literary and historical documents. 

(c) The ability to read at least one foreign language and in some cir- 
cumstances more than one. 

2. The college work of a pre-seminary student should result in increased 
understanding of the world in which he lives: 

(a) The world of men and ideas. This includes knowledge of English 
literature, philosophy, and psychology. 

(b) The world of nature. This is provided by knowledge of the natural 
sciences, including laboratory work. 

(c) The world of human affairs. This is aided by knowledge of history 
and the social sciences. 

3. The college work of a pre-seminary student should result in a sense 
of achievement: 

(a) The ability to think, to see relationships, to follow out logical steps 
of an argument, to develop procedures for dealing with problems. 
This ability is achieved in part through independent study. 

(b) The degree of his mastery of his field of study is more important 
than the credits and grades which he accumulates. 

36 



The American Association of Theological Schools has proposed a mini- 
mum list of fields of study with which the student should have acquaint- 
ance before beginning seminary study. The liberal arts background is felt 
to provide the best foundation for seminary work. 

English— literature, composition, speech and related studies. 
At least 6 semesters. 



History— ancient, modern European, and American. 
At least 3 semesters. 



Philosophy— orientation in history, problems and method. 
At least 3 semesters. 



Natural sciences— preferably physics, chemistry and biology. 
At least 2 semesters. 



Social sciences— psychology, sociology, anthropology, economics, political 
science, education. 
At least 6 semesters. 



Foreign languages— one or more of the following linguistic avenues to man's 
thought and tools of scholarly research: Latin, Greek, Hebrew, German, 
French. Students who anticipate post-graduate studies are urged to under- 
take these disciplines early in their training as opportunity offers. Greek 
should be taken in the final year of college, as well as before, if possible. 
At least 4 semesters. 



Religion— a thorough knowledge of the content of the Bible is indispensable 
together with an introduction to the major religious traditions and theo- 
logical problems. The pre-seminary student may well seek counsel of the 
seminary in order most profitably to use the resources of his college. 
At least 3 semesters. 



Of the various possible areas of concentration, where areas of concentra- 
tion are required, English, philosophy and history are regarded as the most 
desirable, and, where the department is strong, religion. 

At the beginning of the first year of seminary students will take examina- 
tions in philosophy, Greek, speech, Bible content, and basic English. Stu- 
dents showing a deficiency in philosophy will be required to remedy such 
deficiency before proceeding to Systematic Theology I. Students showing 
a deficiency either in English or Bible content will be required to remedy 
such deficiency before graduation. The Greek and speech examinations are 
for the purpose of placement. 

37 



Procedure for Admission 

Candidates seeking degrees may apply any time after the Junior year: 
is completed and prior to June 1 preceding the September for which ad- 
mission is sought. All correspondence concerning admission to the seminary 
should be addressed to the Director of Admissions. Applications are con- 
sidered by the committee when the following credentials are submitted. 

(1) A formal application. 

(2) Application fee. A check or money order for $15.00 must accompany: 
the application. This will be applied to the first semester's tuition.: 
While the fee will be refunded if the application is rejected, it is. 
not returnable if the application is withdrawn. 

(3) Mental capacity test. The Seminary normally will correspond with; 
the applicant's college concerning a mental capacity test. If none is i 
available, the applicant must take one under seminary direction. 

(4) A personal interview with the Director of Admissions or another- 
representative of the Seminary who may be designated by the Di- 
rector of Admissions. 

(5) A medical report on a blank furnished by the Seminary. 

(6) An official transcript from the registrar of the college or university,'; 
showing grades for at least three years of college work. 

(7) A battery of psychological tests which will be forwarded to a proctor) 
as soon as the application form is received. These are the same tests?! 
that Presbytery requires of all candidates. You need take them only;, 
once. j 

(8) An extensive (500-1000 words) statement in the applicant's hand-; 
writing describing his family, educational, and religious background,;! 
placing particular emphasis upon his motives for desiring to enter; 1 ; 
the Seminary and the ministry. 

After admission is granted and within thirty days of such notification, 
a $35 placement fee is required to assure the applicant of a place in the 
new class. This fee is applied on the student's tuition and is not returnable; 
except under extreme hardship and at the discretion of the Admissions 
Committee. A certification of the student's "intention to enroll" must 
accompany this fee. 

Transfer Students 

A student transferring from another seminary is required to submit, in 
addition to the foregoing, a complete transcript of previous seminary work 
and a letter of dismissal from the Dean or President. A transfer student 
must be in residence at Pittsburgh Seminary for a minimum of one full 
academic year in order to become a candidate for the Bachelor of Divinity; 



38 






Foreign Students 

Qualified applicants from other countries are welcome as a part of the 
student body. Such applicants shall be required, in addition to the regular 
requirements for admission, to give evidence of proficiency in the English 
language before their admission. TOEFL (Test of English as a Foreign 
Language) is the standard test used by the Commission on Ecumenical 
Mission and Relations and the World Council of Churches. The test is 
arranged through the Seminary or the Commission on Ecumenical Mission 
and Relations of the United Presbyterian Church. 

Such applicants shall have endorsement either of a representative of the 
Commission on Ecumenical Mission and Relations (in those areas where 
the United Presbyterian Church in the U.S.A. has fraternal workers) or 
the World Council of Churches (in other areas). 

An applicant from another country is also asked to submit a letter from 
his bank stating that there are on deposit sufficient funds to assure his 
passage home after his period of study in this country. This saves possible 
embarrassment to both student and seminary at a later time. 

Matriculation 

A final transcript showing the degree and date of graduation of the ap- 
plicant must be submitted to the registrar. 



39 



Fees and Expenses* 

(for the academic year) 

$550.00 Tuition (incl. Intersession) (approx.) 

500.00 Board (incl. Intersession) 

175.00 Room Fee (incl. Intersession) 

10.00 Library Fee (annual) 

5.00 Student Association Fee (annual) 

150.00 Books (approx.) 

32.00-137.00 Hospitalization Insurance (approx.) 

75.00-300.00 Incidentals 

Matriculation Fee— $35.00 payable at the time of registration. 

Tuition Fee— $16.00 per semester hour. 

Late Registration Fee— A charge of $5.00 will be made to students register- 
ing later than the specified time. 

Graduation Fee— $10.00 

Transcript Fee— One copy of a student's academic record will be provided ! 
without charge. A fee of $1.00 will be charged for each additional transcript. 
* Subject to change. 

Married Student Apartment Fees 

The Highlander 

Twenty-three unfurnished apartments, $70.00-$77.50 per month 

The Samuel A. Fulton Memorial Hall 

Thirty-nine furnished apartments, $50.00-$65.00 per month 

Hoeveler Street Apartments 

Two unfurnished apartments, $65.00 per month 

One furnished apartment, $80.00 per month 

Sheridan Avenue Apartments 

Six unfurnished apartments, $52.50-$57.50 per month 

Stanton Avenue Apartments 

Three unfurnished apartments, $65.00-$75.00 per month 

Duplexes 

Fifteen unfurnished apartments, $52.50-$57.50 per month 

Fees for apartment occupancy are payable monthly. If they are paid by the ; 
10th of the month there will be a discount of $5.00. Applications for apart- ! 
ments should be made as early as possible. 

A deposit of $10 per married couple, payable at registration, is required;! 
of all those living in seminary apartments. The deposit will be returned:! 
after satisfactory inspection at the time the apartment is vacated. 

I 
40 



Payment of Fees 

All academic fees and expenses are payable in advance on the opening day 
of each semester. When necessary, arrangements for a payment plan to 
cover a semester's expenses may be made at the Business Office on the first 
day of each term, permitting (4) four equal payments: one-fourth on the 
first day of the term, and the balance due at the beginning of the fourth, 
eighth, and twelfth weeks respectively. There is a carrying charge of $5.00 
for the deferred payment plan. Failure to pay any deferred payment within 
ten days from the date due will incur a penalty of 1% of the amount due. 
Settlement of all seminary bills is required before registration for a new 
semester, and before graduation or the release of official transcripts. 

Seminary Meals 

Residents of the men's and women's dormitories are required to eat in the 
seminary dining hall. Board includes nineteen meals a week; only breakfast 
is served on Sunday. The dining hall is closed on holidays which are 
scheduled on the seminary calendar. No deduction is allowed for absence 
from individual meals, although special consideration is given to students 
who regularly do not eat in the dining hall weekends. 

Tuition Refunds on Courses Dropped 

First week of semester, $ 1 .00 withheld for each credit hour; balance refunded. 
Second to seventh week, one half refunded. 
Seventh week on, no refund. 

Medical and Hospitalization Insurance 

Students are required to be insured by some type of medical and hospitali- 
zation insurance acceptable to the Seminary. All students who are registered 
as full-time students are eligible for such insurance under a group student 
policy issued by either the Insurance Company of North America or Blue 
Cross and Blue Shield. Detailed information concerning premiums and 
benefits may be secured at the Business Office. 

Total Cost 

The total cost for one academic year, based upon a survey of actual student 
expenditures at Pittsburgh Seminary, is approximately $1,850 for an un- 
married student and $2,850 for a married student without children. A 
married student having children should add $400 for each child in his 
family. These totals include expenses for clothing, laundering and cleaning, 
medical and dental care not covered by hospitalization insurance, incidentals 
and recreation, as well as tuition, fees (hospitalization insurance premiums 
included), board, room and books. Not included are automobile operating 
costs, payments on purchases, life insurance premiums, repayment of in- 
debtedness, and expenses for travel to and from the Seminary. 

41 



Student Financial Assistance 



While students are encouraged to maintain a maximum of financial inde- 
pendence, Pittsburgh Seminary does provide financial aid from endowed 
and general funds on the basis of demonstrated financial need. Several 
merit scholarships are offered to entering students who have excellent aca- 
demic records in their pre-seminary work and who must have financial | 
help. Scholarship aid is also given according to need to upperclassmen I 
whose academic attainments in their seminary work are high. Loans, 
grants-in-aid and remunerative campus work are also available as a part of 
the Seminary's financial assistance program. Approximately fifty work op- 
portunities are available to students in the library, dining hall, and student 
center, and as attendants for various campus facilities. The work is limited 
to ten hours per week and the remuneration is credited to the student's 
account or paid in cash. Once a student is admitted the Seminary makes 
every effort to see that he need not drop out for financial reasons. 

The Board of Christian Education of the United Presbyterian Church, 
through its office of Educational Loans and Scholarships, provides assis- 
tance for United Presbyterian seminary students who demonstrate financial ! 
need in two programs: (1) Loans ($100 to $1,000 in a given year) and i 
(2) United Presbyterian Study Grants (up to $1,000 in a given year). 

Specific details concerning scholarships, grants-in-aid, work assistance, 
and loan funds, together with application forms for both seminary and f 
Board of Christian Education programs, may be obtained from the Finan- 
cial Aid Officer. 

Loan Funds 

James H. Snowden Memorial Loan Fund. A loan fund for students need- 
ing financial assistance to obtain a theological education was established in i 
1953 by R. R. Snowden, M.D., Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, in memory of his 
father, Professor James H. Snowden, D.D., LL.D. Loans from this fund are 
made on notes with interest and without further endorsement. 

Walter G. and Esther B. Comin Student Loan Fund. A loan fund for stu- : 
dents who need financial assistance to continue their education was estab- 
lished in 1955 by Mrs. Walter G. Comin, Pawnee City, Nebraska, Mr. and jf 
Mrs. Walter G. Comin, Jr., Wilkinsburg, Pa., and Mr. Myron C. Comin, 
Spokane, Washington, in memory of Rev. Walter G. Comin, D.D. Loans j 
from this fund are made on notes at four percent interest and without j 
further endorsement. 

Westphal Memorial Loan Fund. The session of the Reed Memorial United 
Presbyterian Church, Lyndhurst, New Jersey, established in 1956 the West- 
phal Memorial Loan Fund. Under certain conditions specified by the donors 
loans from this fund may be made on notes without interest or further 
endorsement, and are repayable within ten years. 

42 



Albert G. Hamilton Memorial Loan Fund. A loan fund for students who 
need financial assistance during the seminary course was established in 
1960 by Mrs. Albert G. Hamilton, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, in memory 
of her husband, Mr. Albert G. Hamilton. Loans from this fund may be 
made on notes at three percent interest without further endorsement. 

Dr. and Mrs. James D. Sands Memorial Loan Fund. A loan fund for semi- 
nary students was established in 1961 by Mrs. Albert G. Hamilton, Pitts- 
burgh, Pennsylvania, in memory of her parents, Dr. and Mrs. James D. 
Sands. Loans from this fund may be made on notes at three percent interest 
without further endorsement. 

Walter A. Long Memorial Student Rotary Loan Fund. Established in 1961 
by the Estate of Emma Clark Long. Loans are not to exceed $100 to any 
one student in any one academic year and the amount borrowed is to be 
repaid not later than two years after graduation or not later than two 
years after the borrower would have graduated if he had progressed nor- 
mally through the seminary to graduation in the event of failure to grad- 
uate. All loans are made without interest. 

The William G. Crow Memorial Loan Fund. Established in November, 
1961. Loans from this fund may be made on notes with three percent 
interest. 

The Mary Jane Dando Student Loan Fund. Loans from this fund are 
available to Junior students with interest and without further endorsement. 
Any loan from this fund must be repaid by the first day of the borrower's 
Senior year, or if the borrower for any reason discontinues his enrollment 
at the Seminary it becomes due at the termination of his relationship with 
the Seminary. 



Awards, Prizes, and Graduate Fellowships 

The Sylvester S. Marvin Memorial Fellowship 

The Sylvester S. Marvin Fellowship may be assigned upon graduation to 
that member of the Senior Class who is recommended by the faculty as 
having achieved the highest standard in all departments of the seminary 
curriculum, provided that his average be not below 85%. The faculty re- 
serves the right to impose special tests and examinations in making this 
award. It is offered to those who take the entire course of three years in 
this institution. The recipient must pledge himself to a year of post- 
graduate study immediately following his graduation at some institution 
approved by the faculty. He is required to furnish quarterly reports of his 
progress. The money will be paid in three equal installments, on the first 
day of October, January, and April. Prolonged absence from the classroom 
in the discharge of extra-seminary duties makes a student ineligible for 
the fellowship. 

43 



The Thomas Jamison Scholarship 

The Thomas Jamison Scholarship, in memory of the late Thomas Jamison,! 
Esq., of North Side, Pittsburgh, was established by Mrs. Jamison. The in- 
come of this endowment is given every year to the member of the Senior 
Class who has the highest average at the beginning of his final semester 
of study. 

The acceptance of this scholarship requires that the recipient spend a; 
full academic year in study in any graduate institution approved by then 
faculty. He must further agree to make regular reports of the work he is 
doing and at the end of the year he will present a satisfactory thesis ofl 
not less than ten thousand words on some subject selected by the faculty or 
approved by the faculty. If for any reason the man who is first in the class 
does not accept the scholarship and its requirements the scholarship will 
be offered to the student next in rank. 

The Jennie Rigg Barbour Memorial Prize 

The Jennie Rigg Barbour Memorial Prize was established by Rev. Clifford E. 
Barbour, Ph.D., D.D., LL.D., President Emeritus of Pittsburgh Theological 
Seminary, as a memorial to his mother. The income from the endowment 
of this prize is assigned to that member of the graduating class who has 
taken his full course of instruction in this institution and who has achieved 
the second highest academic rank of his class, if in the judgment of the 
faculty he is worthy in all other respects. It is hoped that the student will 
use this income for further study either within an academic institution or 
by the enlargement of his own library. 

The Michael Wilson Keith Memorial Homiletical Prize 

This prize was founded in 1919 by the Keith Bible Class of the First Pres- \ 
byterian Church of Coraopolis, Pennsylvania, in memory of the Reverend j 
Michael Wilson Keith, D.D., the founder of the class and pastor of the 
church from 1911 to 1917. The prize is awarded to a member of the Senior 
Class who has spent three years in this seminary and has taken the highest 
standing in the department of homiletics. The winner of the prize is ex- 
pected to preach in the First Presbyterian Church of Coraopolis and teach 
the Keith Bible Class one Sunday after the award is made. 

The Joseph Watson Greek Entrance Prize 

The Joseph Watson Greek Prize was established in 1920 by Mrs. Robert A. 
Watson, Columbus, Ohio. The income will be awarded to the student 
who achieves the highest grade in an examination in classical Greek as 
he enters the Junior Class of the Seminary. 

The William B. Watson Prize in Hebrew 

The William B. Watson Prize in Hebrew was established in 1919 by Mrs. 
Robert A. Watson, Columbus, Ohio. The income will be awarded to that 
member of the Senior Class who, having elected Hebrew, shall submit the 
best grammatical and exegetical treatment of an assigned portion of the 
Hebrew Old Testament. 

44 



The John Watson Prize in New Testament Greek 

The John Watson Prize in New Testament Greek was established in 1919 
by Mrs. Robert A. Watson, Columbus, Ohio. The income will be awarded 
to that member of the Senior Class who, having elected Greek Exegesis, 
shall submit the best grammatical and exegetical treatment of an assigned 
portion of the Greek New Testament. 

The Robert A. Lee Church History Award 

By bequest, in memory of her husband the late Mrs. Henrietta M. Lee, 
Oakmont, Pa., established the Robert A. Lee Church History Foundation, 
the annual income of which is to be awarded yearly to the students making 
first and second rank respectively in the Department of Church History. 

The Hugh Thomson Kerr Moderator Prize 

This prize was established in 1938 by the Men's Committee of the Shady- 
side Presbyterian Church, Pittsburgh. An annual contribution of fifty dollars 
was pledged to be used for the purchase of books. The prize is to be awarded 
to that member of the graduating class who has exhibited to the greatest 
degree, throughout the three years of the seminary course, leadership, origi- 
nality, and accomplishments beyond the normal requirements for graduation. 

The James Purdy Scholarship 

The James Purdy Scholarship was established in 1882. The income is 
apportioned equally each year to the six members of the Junior Class who 
attain the highest average of excellence in their seminary work. The dis- 
tribution is made after the students return to the Seminary the following 
year. 

The Andrew Reed Scholarship 

The Andrew Reed Scholarship was established in 1914 by Miss Anna M. 
Reed, Cross Creek, Pennsylvania, the income being given to the student 
who, upon entering seminary, shall achieve the highest grade in a com- 
petitive examination in the English Bible. The successful competitor is to 
have the scholarship throughout the entire course of three years, provided 
that his general conduct and application to study shall continue to be 
satisfactory to the faculty. 

The Home Training Bible Class Award in Missions 

This is an award of $100 which was established in January, 1961, by the 
Home Training Bible Class of the Edgewood Presbyterian Church, Pitts- 
burgh, Pa., in the name of the Rev. Walter L. Moser, Ph.D., D.D. The 
recipient will be that member of the graduating class who is deemed most 
deserving among those entering the foreign or home missionary field upon 
graduation. 

The Chevy Chase Christian Education Award 

This award was established by the college age young people of the Chevy 

45 



Chase Presbyterian Church, Washington, D. C, in appreciation of those 
who are interested in youth. It is to be given to the person who, throughout 
the seminary course, has best ministered to young people and who intends 
to specialize in youth work upon completion of his studies. 

The Alice Myers Sigler Memorial Prize in History and Theology 

This award was established in 1962 by Robert M., John H., Richard E., 
and Alan B. Sigler in memory of their mother. The income from this en- 
dowed fund is granted to the student who, in the judgment of the pro- 
fessors of the History and Theology Division, is most worthy of this award 
at the end of the Middler year. 

The Fred McFeely Rogers Prize in Biblical Studies 

The Fred McFeely Rogers Prize in Biblical Studies was established in 1962 
by Mr. and Mrs. James H. Rogers in honor of their son, a graduate in the 
Class of 1962. The income from this endowed fund is granted to the stu- 
dent who, in the judgment of the professors of the Biblical Division, is 
most worthy of this award at the end of the Junior year. 

The First Presbyterian Church of McKee sport Preaching Prize 

This prize was established in 1964 by the congregation of The First Pres- • 
byterian Church of McKeesport, to be awarded to a student at the end of I 
the fall semester of his Senior year for excellence in preaching. The winner 
of the prize is expected to preach one Sunday in The First Presbyterian 
Church of McKeesport during the spring semester of his Senior year. 

The Walter P. and Anna L. McConkey Award in Homiletics 

This award was established in 1964 by the Central Presbyterian Church in 
Washington, Pa., in honor of Dr. and Mrs. McConkey, who served that 
pastorate for many years. It is to be given to a student who, at the end 
of his Middler year has, in the judgment of the homiletics professors, 
demonstrated excellence in preaching. 



46 




47 





Mfc 




■:S"~ : ''--';^t':'^ ■■-•-■ 






"' ':,-. ■ 



Degree Programs and 
Courses of Study 



Bachelor of Divinity 

Degree description pages 52-55 

Course descriptions pages 60-79 

Master of Religious Education 

Degree description page 56 

Course descriptions pages 60-79 

Master of Education page 58 

Master of Theology 

Degree description pages 80-81 

Course descriptions pages 83-87 



Master of Public Administration and 

Master of Public and International Affairs page 



49 




50 





Joe Small {Brown) in a tutorial with Dr. 
Barth in the Honors Program 



Alice Collins {Chatham), excused from 
American Church History through advanced 
standing, has free elective hours for inde- 
pendent study. 



The following passed the advanced standing 
examination and were excused from the class 
in Psychological Foundations for indepen- 
dent study in the field: Tim Johnson {Alma), 
Bob Singdahlsen {Dickinson and Western 
Reserve), Hugh Zimmerman {Wooster), 
and William Kemp {Westminster) 




The Bachelor of Divinity Curriculum 



To be quite candid, the curriculum of Pittsburgh Seminary is heavily 
loaded on the side of requirements. However, this is modified through thei' 
program of Advanced Standing. But before we get to that, it is important) 
to peer into the mind of the faculty to grasp the raison d-etre of the cur- 
riculum. The faculty has asked the question: What kind of studies must? 
a student pursue in the seminary in order to become an able minister?! 
The requirements of the curriculum reflect the judgment of the faculty 
about what the student needs to know so that he can take his place in thep 
intellectual and professional leadership of the church. 

Not all students need to go through the requirements of the curriculum. 
Some will have already taken excellent courses in church history, New 
Testament, ethics, etc., before coming to seminary. A number of college! 
religion departments are of such high quality that their students can attain 1 
advanced standing at Pittsburgh Seminary. The Pittsburgh faculty delights 
in this. It has opened up every required course in the entire curriculum 
for advanced standing. All a student must do is to take an advanced stand-; 
ing examination in any required course. If he passes with a superior rating, 
he will be excused from that requirement and will have a corresponding 
number of elective hours anywhere in the curriculum. If he passes butii 
without superior rating, he will go into independent study under thei 
guidance of the professor of the course. Thus he will be freed from the; 
required course itself in order to pursue a deepened understanding of the; 
subject area. If he fails, he fails without prejudice and remains in the 
required course. 

52 



The program of Advanced Standing illustrates what the faculty is and 
is not concerned about. It is concerned about subject areas; it is not con- 
cerned about course credits. The Old Testament is vitally important to 
the life of the Church. Yet if a student comes to the seminary with a fine 
background in the Old Testament and is able to pass the advanced stand- 
ing examination, he should not have to take the course which a novice in 
the field would be taking. The faculty determines to take a student where 
he is; if he belongs in advanced standing that is where he will be. 

Furthermore, if a student demonstrates B + work in any area, for ex- 
ample, history and theology, he is encouraged to do Honors Work in that 
area of his special interest and competence. This program begins in the 
senior year, enables the student to elect some work in graduate courses at 
the Master's level, and brings the student into a tutorial relationship with 
the faculty. The Honors Program is designed to encourage very able stu- 
dents to work independently to fulfil their own potential and exploit their 
own interests. 



A seminary is a small enough school that a great deal of independent 
study can go on. Not only in Advanced Standings and in the Honors Pro- 
gram do students work independently; in a number of other ways is the 
ideal of independent study fulfilled. For example, each student must elect 
one offering in the field of church history. Some students prefer to do this 
in independent study as they work out a major project in Patristics, Augus- 
tine, Luther, Schleiermacher, etc. Intersession in the senior year is devoted 
to independent study. Exegetical studies may be elected on an individual 
basis. The point is that a student can go about as far and as fast as he 
can with the enthusiastic approval of the faculty. This is the way the 
faculty itself likes to work; this is the way it would like to see the student 
body working. 

Requirements? Yes, we have them. They are the minimal expectation 
in the preparation of a minister. We want our students to get through 
with the requirements as early as possible— college, why not?— and to get 
on with the business of theological education at the truly graduate level. 

53 



The Prescribed Course of Study 

Degree of Bachelor of Divinity 
Junior Year 



Semester I 
110 Old Testament Introduction 
210 Greek 
410 Church History and History 

of Doctrine I 
710 Church & Ministry I: American 

Historical Context 





Semester II 




5 


211 Greek 


3 


3 


213 New Testament Introduction 


5 


5 


411 Church History and History 
of Doctrine II 


5 


2 


711 Church & Ministry II: 
Sociological Context 


2 



15 

Intersession 
115 Intertestamental Period 



Middler Year 



120 Hebrew 

520 Systematic Theology I 
720 Church & Ministry III: Foun- 
dations (psychological, 
homiletical, communicative) 
Elective 



3 


121 Hebrew 


3 


5 


521 Systematic Theology II 
721 Church & Ministry IV: 

Foundations (homiletical 


5 


4 


and liturgical) 


4 


3 


Elective 


3 



15 



Intersession 

723 Foundations (Counseling 

and Education) 2 



Senior Year 



730 Church & Ministry V: 

Ethics and Homiletics 
Electives 



731 Church & Ministry VI: 
Education, Polity, 
Homiletics 
Electives 



13 



Intersession 
Independent Study 



66 academic hours of required work 
26 academic hours of electives 



92 total academic hours required for graduation 

54 



The Four-Year Bachelor of Divinity Curriculum 

(for students whose economic needs require them to serve as student pastors) 

I 



Semester I 

1 10 Old Testament Introduction 
410 Church History and History 
of Doctrine I 



Semester II 

213 New Testament Introduction 
411 Church History and History 
of Doctrine II 



Intersession 
115 Intertestamental Period 2 



210 Greek 

520 Systematic Theology I 

710 Church and Ministry I 



3 211 Greek 

5 521 Systematic Theology II 

2 711 Church and Ministry II 



10 



10 



III 



120 Hebrew 

720 Church and Ministry III 
Electives 



3 121 Hebrew 

4 721 Church and Ministry IV 
6 Electives 



13 



Intersession 



723 Foundations 



IV 



13 



730 Church and Ministry V 
Electives 



4 731 Church and Ministry VI 

6 Electives 



10 

Intersession 
Independent Study 



10 



55 



The Master of Religious Education Curriculum 

The Master of Religious Education program, open to both men and women, 
is designed primarily to prepare them to serve the Church of Jesus Christ ; 
as directors or ministers of Christian education in local congregations, as 
curriculum writers and fraternal workers, as well as to provide them back- 
ground for related professional and service vocations such as public school 
education, social work, nursing, and the nursery school. 



The Master of Religious Education curriculum is a two year program 
including both theory and practice among the disciplines of Bible, history, 
theology, and the teaching ministry. The requirement of both Hebrew and 
Greek demonstrates the faculty's seriousness about this degree as it seeks 
to prepare students for the teaching office. That that office has fallen into 
disrepute and has come to be associated largely with methods is manifest. 
The recovery of the office will come through Biblical and theological com- 
petence coupled with the art and skills of communication. To know the 
Bible the student must enter into the world of the Bible and gain a "feel" 
for its idiom of thought, expression, practice. Language study is the primary 
tool for this incursion. Twenty hours in church history, history of doctrine, 
and theology will also contribute to the needed competence. By taking the 
basic courses of theological education an M.R.E. candidate is prepared to 
work side by side with pastors, sharing a common understanding of the 
total ministry of which education is a part, and performing that ministry 
with professional competence. 



Within this program the teaching office is lifted up and emphasized for 
the M.R.E. candidate. The B.D. Church and Ministry courses are especially 
adapted so that the student whose vocational interest is Christian education 
can explore the philosophy and theology of, as well as develop method- 
ological and administrative skills in, that special ministry. Throughout the 
two year course the student will be involved in Christian education theory 
and practice. Field education practicum is required each semester and is 
closely geared with class work. 

56 



The Prescribed Course of Study 

Degree of Master of Religious Education 



unior 



Year 



Semester I 

1 10 Old Testament Introduction 

210 Greek 

410 Church History and History 

of Doctrine I 
712 Christian Education of Children 



Semester II 



5 


211 Greek 


3 


3 


213 New Testament Introduction 


5 


5 


411 Church History and History 
of Doctrine II 


5 


2 


713 Christian Education Seminar 


2 



15 

Intersession 
115 Intertestamental Period 



15 



Senior Year 



120 Hebrew 


3 


121 Hebrew 


520 Systematic Theology I 


5 


521 Systematic Theology II 


720 Church & Ministry III: Founda- 




733 Christian Education 


tions (psychological, educa- 




Elective 


tional, communicative) 


4 




Elective 


3 
15 






Intersession 


723 Foundations (Counseling) 2 



58 academic hours of required work 
6 academic hours of electives 

64 total academic hours required for graduation 



57 



The Prescribed Course of Study 
Degree of Master of Education (M.Ed.) 

The M.Ed, course of study is designed as a one-year course for those who; 
have an approved Bachelor's collegiate major in the fields of religion, Bible, 
or religious education, or their equivalent, to provide further depth, under- j 
standing, and technical skills for work in local churches. 

This degree is offered jointly by the University of Pittsburgh and Pitts- 
burgh Theological Seminary. It will be conferred by the University upon: 
completion of a course of study which will include 18 hours taken in three ■ 
trimesters at the University and 18 hours taken concurrently in two se- 
mesters at the Seminary. 



The University Requirements 

Ed. Psych. 27 1 —Advanced Educational Psychology 2 hours 

Ed. Res. 200— Introduction to Research and Statistics 2 hours 

Fdns. Ed. 201— General Philosophy of Education 2 hours 

Fdns. Ed. 228— History of Modern Education 2 hours. 

Department of Religious Education 10 hours 

18 hours 

The Seminary Requirements 

Biblical Studies 6 hours 

Church History 3 hours 

Theology 3 hours 

712 and 713— Christian Education 4 hours 

Field Education Practicum 2 hours 



18 h( 



Admission requirements, in addition to the "major," are those of the 
University and the Seminary. Housing will be provided by the admitting 
institution. 

Applicants for this degree may write to: 

Dr. Lawrence C. Little 
Department of Religious Education 
University of Pittsburgh 
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15213 

or 
Director of Admissions 
Pittsburgh Theological Seminary 
616 N. Highland Avenue 
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15206 



58 



\ 





• 




Description of Courses of Instruction 

For the Bachelor of Divinity, 
Master of Religious Education, 
and Master of Education Degrees 



The Biblical Division 



Mr. Barth, Chairman 



Mr. Gowan Mr. J. Jackson Mr. Orr 

Mr. Hare Mr. Jamieson Mr. von Waldow 

Mr. Hills Mr. Kelley Mr. Walther 

Mr. Irvine Mr. Miller 

Some course offerings which might be listed under the Biblical Division are correlated 
with Church and Ministry and are listed under that division. Moreover, most exegesis 
courses listed below are correlated with Church and Ministry (especially homiletics). 

Required Courses 

110. Old Testament Introduction. A survey of the books of the Old 
Testament with special attention to the formation of the literature and its 
religious significance. The history of Israel is traced from earliest times and 
set in the framework of Near Eastern civilization as recovered through 
archaeological research. The message and times of the prophets are sur- 
veyed, as well as the life and worship of the post-exilic community. The 
principal objective is mastery of the Biblical material. There are also 
assigned readings in current scholarly literature. 
Juniors, first semester, 5 hours credit. 

7 75. The Intertestamental Period. A survey of the historical, literary, 
and religious background of the New Testament, concentrating on Pal- 
estinian Judaism from which Christianity was born, with some attention 
to the Hellenistic world in which it developed. 

Juniors, Intersession, 2 hours credit. Mr. Gowan 

120. Elementary Hebrew. A course designed to lead to an appreciative 
and competent use of Hebrew as one of the languages of Biblical revelation. 
From the outset the student learns inductively to read from the original 
language of the Old Testament. Emphasis is placed on the acquisition of 
a working vocabulary as the ground for further reading, and the illumina- 
tion of key Biblical concepts. Instruction is in small, graded sections so 
that a maximum of individual attention and achievement is possible. 

Middlers, first semester, 3 hours credit. 

727. Elementary Hebrew. Continuation of 120 with instruction in graded 
sections. 

Middlers, second semester, 3 hours credit. 

60 



210. New Testament Greek. A course designed to lead to a competent 
use of Greek as one of the languages of Biblical revelation. From the out- 
set the student learns inductively to read from the Greek New Testament, 
and unique study aids prepared by the Division are used. Instruction is 
in small, graded sections. Students who have previously studied Greek will 
be assigned to special sections for their New Testament linguistic work. 

Juniors, first semester, 3 hours credit. 

211. New Testament Greek. Continuation of 210 with instruction in 
graded sections. As much of the New Testament will be read as progress 
permits. Some attention will be given to textual criticism, and exegetical 
method and practice will be introduced. 

Juniors, second semester, 3 hours credit. 

213. New Testament Introduction. The purpose of this course is to con- 
vey a basic knowledge and enjoyment of, and respect for, each New Testa- 
ment book by preparation of careful exegesis of individual texts. Beginning 
from the background afforded by courses 110 and 115, the course faces 
the character and message, the diversity and unity of the New Testament 
books, as well as the open questions concerning authors, dates, places, and 
recipients. Some aspects of the manifold interpretations of the New Testa- 
ment are outlined together with its influence upon later church life and 
modern scholarly endeavor. 

Juniors, second semester, 5 hours credit. Mr. Barth 

Electives 

140, 141, 142, and 143. Hebrew Reading. Supervised reading of selected 

Old Testament passages. 

Offered each semester, 1 hour credit. 

144. Hebrew Grammar. Introduction to the formal structure of the 
Hebrew language, (phonetics, morphology, syntax) with special attention 
to its historical development and relation to other Semitic languages. 

Offered on request. Mr. Hills 

145. Hebrew Exegetical. A student with a B average in the Biblical 
field may elect to do independent study in the exegesis of an Old Testa- 
ment passage under the supervision of a member of the Biblical Division. 
The exegetical paper, 30-40 pages in length, will be due on the first day of 
classes in September. 

Offered during the summer, two hours credit. 

748. The Dead Sea Scrolls. Survey of the scrolls from the Dead Sea 
area, particularly Qumran. Archaeological background, analysis of contents, 
significance for the text, history, and theology of the Old and New Test- 
aments. Selected passages will be read in the original languages. 

Offered on request. Mr. Hills 

151. Elements of Accadian. A beginner's course in Assyro-Babylonian. 
Offered on request. Mr. Irvine 

61 



152. Biblical Aramaic. Reading and the grammar of the Aramaic sec- 
tions of the Old Testament. Additional material may be included from 
the fifth century B.C. Aramaic letters from Elephantine. 

Offered on request. Mr. Hills 

155. Septuagint Studies. Introduction to the Greek Old Testament, and 
problems of the Greek and Hebrew texts. Reading and comparative study 
of passages in Hebrew and Greek. 

Offered on request. Mr. Orr or Mr. Walther 

156. Hellenistic Greek Studies. Selected readings in Philo, Josephus, the 
Apostolic Fathers, and other Greek literature approximately contemporary 
with the New Testament period. First year students whose ability and 
experience warrant may be assigned to this course in place of 210 or 211. 

Offered on request. Mr. Orr 

161. Trends in Recent Old Testament Hermeneutics. A seminar based on 
discussions of the book Problems of Old Testament Hermeneutics. 
Prerequisites: 2 exegesis courses and Reformation history. 

Mr. Ritschl and Old Testament Instructor 

170. Old Testament Theology. Introduction to current methods of in- 
terpretation of the theology of the Old Testament, as exemplified by 
Eichrodt and von Rad. Students will investigate major motifs of biblical 
thought, such as myth and history, chaos and creation, first and last, time 
and eternity, election and covenant, king and priest, prophet and wise 
man, man and woman, father and son, master and servant. 

Offered first semester, 1966-67. Mr. J. Jackson 

Courses 173, 174, and 175 will satisfy the three hours of Old Testament 
exegesis elective required of each student. 

173. The Old Testament: Torah. Exegesis of passages from the Hebrew 
text of the first five books of the Old Testament. 

Deuteronomy offered first semester, 1966-67. Mr. Hills 

174. The Old Testament: Prophetic Books. Exegesis of passages from the 
Hebrew text of the "Former" and the "Latter" Prophets. 

Habakkuk offered first semester, 1966-67. Mr. Gowan 

Amos offered second semester, 1966-67. Mr. von Waldow 

175. The Old Testament: Writings. Exegesis of passages from the He- 
brew text of the "Writings" of the Old Testament canon. 

Psalms offered second semester, 1966-67. Mr. J. Jackson 

Daniel offered second semester, 1966-67. Mr. Gowan 

180. Archaeology of Palestine. A study of archaeological method .and 
the results of excavations of Near Eastern sites as they relate to the Old 
and New Testaments. 

Not offered 1966-67. Mr. Jamieson 



62 



240, 241, 242, 243. Greek Reading. Supervised reading of selected New 
Testament or Septuagint passages. 

Offered each semester, 1 hour credit. 

244. Greek Grammar. Introduction to the formal structure of New 
Testament Greek; systematic study of grammar and syntax, illustrated by 
specific New Testament passages. 

Offered first semester, 1966-67. Mr. Kelley 

245. Greek Exegetical. A student with a B average in the Biblical field 
may elect to do independent study in the exegesis of a New Testament 
passage under the supervision of a member of the Biblical Division. The 
exegetical paper, 30-40 pages in length, will be due on the first day of 
classes in September. 

Offered during the summer, two hours credit. 

Courses numbering in the 250's will satisfy the three hours of New Tes- 
tament exegesis elective required of each student. 

250. The Gospel of Luke. An inductive study of the purpose, structure, 
meaning, and contemporary significance of the third Gospel. 

Offered second semester, 1966-67. Mr. Miller 

251. Galatians. A verse-by-verse study of the Greek text, together with 
study of its key words and themes, and of the literary elements and his- 
torical place of Paul. Finally, the main types of interpretation throughout 
the centuries are reviewed. In short, this is an attempt at a theological 
exegesis of the book. 

Offered both semesters, 1966-67. Mr. Barth 

252. First Peter. An exegetical seminar, including syntactical studies of 
I Peter 1:3-2:10, and word studies of the major theological words in the 
epistle. Stress on exegetical methodology. Requirement: weekly syntactical 
preparation and one major seminar paper. (Limited to 12 students.) 

Offered first semester, 1966-67. Mr. Miller 

253. Colossians or Ephesians. Exegesis of the text of the epistle. 
Offered first semester, 1966-67. Mr. Barth 

254. Interpreting the First Gospel. An examination of the presupposi- 
tions and problems of exegesis with particular reference to the discourses 
of the Gospel according to St. Matthew. 

Offered first semester, 1967-68. Mr. Hare 

\260. New Testament Christology. The beliefs about Jesus as Messiah, 

Son of Man, Son of God, and his work as revealer of the Father, inaugu- 
(rator of the Kingdom, and Savior of the human race. 

Mr. Barth 

]261. The Life offesus Christ. An examination of the Biblical materials 
(supplemented by reference to the extra-Biblical sources and readings in 
the literature. The latter will include a survey of the critical study of the 

63 



"Quest" in the last century and the "New Quest" from kerygma to history j 
at the present time. Consideration will be given to the possibilities of 
writing a "life" today. 

Offered second semester, 1967-68. Mr. Walther 

262. Eschatology in the New Testament. The New Testament materials 
will be studied in exegetical detail with supplementary reading in the I 
twentieth century literature on the subject. 

Offered first semester, 1966-67. Mr. Walther ] 

265. New Testament Theology. A course designed to acquaint students 
with the principal themes, the strands of thought, and the theological i 
terminology of the New Testament. Attention will be given to the con- 
tinuity of Biblical religion in Old and New Testaments. Lectures and 
discussion with reading and research in the literature. 

Offered second semester, 1966-67. Mr. Hare and Mr. Walther 

i 

270. Practical Use of the Synoptic Gospels. An exegetical examination 
of selected portions of the first three Gospels with special reference to 
their meaning for preaching, teaching, worship, evangelism, and counseling. 

Offered second semester, 1966-67. Mr. Orr j 

271. Practical Use of the Fourth Gospel and Revelation. (See Course j 
270.) 

Offered first semester, 1967-68. Mr. Orr I 

272. Practical Use of the Pauline Epistles. (See Course 270.) 

Offered second semester, 1967-68. Mr. Orr i 

273. Practical Use of the Pauline Epistles. Similar to 272, with special 
attention to the Corinthian correspondence. 

Offered first semester, 1966-67. Mr. Orr 



64 



The History and Theology Division 



Mr. Ritschl, Chairman 

Mr. Farley Mr. Kehm Mr. Smith 

Mr. Gerstner Mr. McCloy Mr. Wiest 



Required and elective course offerings in the theology of church and ministry, theology of the 
sacraments, ethics, and American church history, customarily listed under the History and 
Theology Division, are correlated with Church and Ministry courses and are listed under 
that division. 



Required Courses 

410. Church History and History of Doctrine I. A composite course in 
church history and history of doctrine from the Apostolic Age to the 
twelfth century; an introduction to the historical developments of the 
theological discussion connected with the names of important Church 
Fathers and Councils in the period between Ignatius and John of Damas- 
cus (in the East) and Anselm (in the West.) The mission and expansion 
of the church and the rise of offices and government, art and literature 
are covered. 

Juniors, first semester, 5 hours credit. Mr. McCloy and Mr. Ritschl 

411. Church History and History of Doctrine II. A composite course in 
church history and the history of doctrine from the thirteenth century to 
the present, exclusive of American church history. History of doctrine is 
reviewed from the Scholastics through the Reformation Fathers to the 
20th century. 

Juniors, second semester, 5 hours credit. Mr. Gerstner and Mr. Ritschl 

520. Systematic Theology I. Three areas of Christian doctrine are 
studied. A. The presuppositions and procedures of theology; revelation, 
scripture, faith and reason, philosophy and theology. The stress is placed 
ion what is involved in theological thinking and inquiry. B. The being 
and attributes of God, including such "works" as election and creation. 
|C. Man as sinner. The reading of major theological systems provides 
•occasions for the student to do his own theological thinking and inquiry. 

Middlers, first semester, 5 hours credit. 

Mr. Wiest, Mr. Farley, Mr. Ritschl, Mr. Kehm 

521. Systematic Theology II. The person and work of Jesus Christ, 
justification, sanctification, the Church and its mission, the sacraments, 
jthe ministry, and eschatology. 

Middlers, second semester, 5 hours credit. 

Mr. Wiest, Mr. Farley, Mr. Ritschl, Mr. Kehm 

65 



Electives 

430. Patrology. A study of Christian literature of the ancient church 
from the Apostolic Fathers to Gregory the Great and John of Damascus. 
Texts of the Fathers in English translations will be used, together with 
the Patrology of Berthold Altaner. 

Offered first semester, 1967-68. Mr. McCloy 

431. Eastern Christianity. A study of the history of the church of 
Constantinople and the various national divisions of Orthodoxy: its liturgy, 
tradition, theology, and its contemporary situation; the rise and develop- 
ment of the Monophysite churches in Syria, Egypt, Armenia, and of the 
Nestorian church. 

Offered second semester, 1967-68. Mr. McCloy 

432. Medieval Christendom. This course is a study of the particular 
form of Christian life created by the Middle Ages. Particular attention is 
given to the history of morals, the unitive character of medieval society, 
and the characteristic concepts and presuppositions of the era. One par- 
ticular purpose of the course is to enable students to grasp modern Cathol- 
icism and contemporary ecumenical conversation with Catholics. 

Mr. Smith 

435. Seminar in Luther. This course is concerned with the writings of 
Luther in the period before 1525, with particular emphasis on "The Free- 
dom of a Christian Man." Short papers will be required. Prerequisite: 
Course 411 and 3 hours of Systematic Theology. Registration dependent 
upon interview with the professor. jy[ r Ritschl 

436. The History of Biblical Interpretation (Early Church). This lecture 
course deals with the history of Biblical interpretation from the time of 
the beginning of the second century to Augustine in the West and John 
of Damascus in the East. 

Prerequisites: History of the Early Church, one course in Old Testa- 
ment and in New Testament Exegesis. yVJr. Ritschl 

431 . Biblical Interpretation from 1860 to 1960. This lecture course deals 
with the development of Old Testament and New Testament exegesis after 
Schleiermacher, with discussion of the positions of De Wette, F. S. Bauer 
and the subsequent historical-critical school, the history of religion school, 
and finally the hermeneutical positions up to Ernst Fuchs. 

Prerequisite: two exegesis courses, Reformation history. Mr. Ritschl 

440. The Libertarian Reformation. The course opens with a survey of 
the 16th century historical and ecclesiastical situation designed to show the 
place of thinkers who repudiated the state church. This is followed by 
consideration of selected figures: Thomas Munzer, Menno Simons, Sebatian 
Castellion, Michael Servetus, Socinus, and others. Mr. Smith 

441. Symbols of the Reformation. An examination and comparison of 
various creeds, catechisms and confessions arising within the Protestant 

66 



Reformation, having in view the theological aspects of present-day ecu- 
menical conversations. Mr. Bald 

443. Roman Catholicism since Trent. The historical and especially the 
theological development of the Roman Church to 1900 with particular 
concentration on the decrees and canons of Trent. 

Offered second semester, 1966-67. Mr. Gerstner 

444. The Age of Orthodoxy. The Reformation after the Reformers. A 
study of seventeenth century continental Reformed Orthodoxy especially 
in Turretin's Theological Institutes with reference to German Lutheranism 
and English Puritanism. A knowledge of Latin not required. 

Offered second semester, 1966-67. Mr. Gerstner 

450. Christian Biography. A study of the lives and personalities of out- 
standing Christians beginning with Ignatius of Antioch and extending to 
Albert Schweitzer; the various religions and cultural factors which helped 
to shape conspicuously Christian character; the ideals and art of Christian 
biography and autobiography. 

Offered first semester, 1966-67. Mr. McCloy 

452. Seminar in the History of the Ancient Church. Specialized areas 

will be. considered upon consultation with the instructor: e.g., the expan- 
sion of Christianity into Northern Europe and Great Britain, Christian 
art and archaeology, the historical geography of the Ancient Church, daily 
life and culture in the Ancient Church. 

Offered second semester, 1966-67. Mr. McCloy 

454. Christianity in America. The course describes the course of church 
history in America from the Massachusetts Bay Colony to the 20th century. 
It includes a survey of the major religious traditions and the impact of 
American life on them; the revival and development of the denominations; 
the growth of Catholicism; and the marginal Christian groups from eastern 
Orthodoxy to the sects. Emphasis is placed on the interaction of tradition 
and environment. Mr. Smith 

455. Methodist History and Doctrine. ' Required of Methodist students 
for graduation; elective for other students. 

Offered on alternate years, 3 hours credit. Mr. Chamberlin 

460. History of Apologetics. The nature of the defense of Christian 
faith explored through an examination of a number of apologetic systems 
of the past and present. Mr. Bald 

462. American Theology through the 19th Century. Examination by pri- 
mary sources of Edwards' theology and the subsequent developments with 
special reference to Hopkins, Taylor, Bushnell, and the Princeton School. 
Offered second semester, 1967-68. Mr. Gerstner 

410. Advanced Reading and Research in Church History. Guided reading 
and research in sources of church history. Subjects for study will be de- 

67 



termined in conference with the instructor. Permission from the instructor 
is necessary for registration. Mr. Smith 

530. Theological Method. The investigation of one or several problems 
related to the doing of theology: theology and philosophy, the authority of 
Scripture, the status and use of tradition, the nature of theological state- 
ments, the problem of system, theology as analytic-synthetic, theoretical- 
practical. Mr. Farley or Mr. Wiest 

531. Major Theological Loci. The investigation of one or more doctrines, 
such as God, election, sin and fall, Jesus Christ, redemption, Holy Spirit, 
church, eschaton. 

Offered annually. Mr. Farley, Mr. Kehm, Mr. Wiest or Mr. Ritschl 

532. Controversial Theological Issues. The investigation of one theological 
problem through the study of the major "orthodox," "heretical," "hetero- 
dox," or sectarian formulations of that problem. The study of such con- 
troversial issues as the freedom of the will, the trinity, predestination, the 
status of natural theology, the two natures, demythologizing, issues of 
Faith and Order in the ecumenical movement. Mr. Farley and Mr. Kehm 

533. Major Christian Theologians. Intensive study of the works of one 
of the great theologians of the Church, such as Origen, Augustine, Aquinas, 
Luther, Calvin, Schleiermacher, Barth, and Tillich. 

Offered annually. 

Mr. Wiest, Mr. Ritschl, Mr. Farley, Mr. Kehm, Mr. Bald 

534. Twentieth Century Protestant Theology. A study of the develop- 
ment of one or more of the most influential theological movements in 
Protestantism in the twentieth century, such as fundamentalism and neo- 
evangelicalism, liberalism, neo-Reformation theology, and the Bultmann 
school. 

Offered annually. Mr. Wiest and Mr. Kehm 

540. Contemporary Issues in Philosophical Theology I. An examination 
of the "philosophy of analysis" and the questions it raises for Christian 
belief and thought. Mr. Wiest 

541. Contemporary Issues in Philosophical Theology II. An examination 
of existentialism and phenomenology and their bearing upon the content 
and method of Christian theology. Mr. Wiest 

542. Theology and Science. The role of science in shaping the modern 
mind. Recent changes in our understanding of the nature of scientific 
knowledge. A survey of theological responses to modern science and of 
the possibilities for a "theology of nature" in contemporary protestant 
thought. Mr. Wiest 

543. Time and the Christian Schema. An investigation of the temporal 
or non-temporal status of such "events" as creation, fall, incarnation, 
seconding; considering also the temporality or non-temporality of the 

68 



Christian schema as a whole. Mr. Farley 

544. German Theology in the 19th Century. Study of the line of de- 
velopment in German theology from Schleiermaeher through Albreeht 
Ritsehl and Wilhelm Herrmann, with special attention to the contribu- 
tions of this "line" to the formation of the varieties of continental "neo- 
orthodoxy." 

Offered every other year. Mr. Kehm 

545. Christology and Anthropology. A study of the ways in which re- 
flection upon the humanity of Jesus Christ is related to their understanding 
of the nature of man in the theologies of Barth, Brunner, Bonhoeffer, and 
Tillich. Prerequisites, Courses 520 and 521. Mr. Kehm 

541. Studies in the History of Philosophical Theology. A study of selected 
philosophical works and systems of thought which have played a part in 
the history of theology and which continue to have significance for theo- 
logical thinking. In a given semester the course will be devoted to the 
thinking of one or more philosophers such as Plato, Aristotle, Kant, Leibniz, 
Hegel, Whitehead, and Heidegger. Mr. Wiest or Mr. Farley 

552. Advanced Reading in Philosophy of Religion. Guided reading and 

research. The subjects and areas pursued are determined by the needs and 
interests of the students. Permission from the instructor is necessary for 
registration. Mr. Wiest or Mr. fackson 

560. Theological Readings in Latin. The principal text is H. P. V. Nunn, 
An Introduction to Ecclesiastical Latin, 1951, together with the annotated 
liturgical texts in M. Flad, Le Latin de VEglise, 1938. Readings in K. P. 
Harrington, Mediaeval Latin, 1962; The Penguin Book of Latin Verse, ed. 
by Frederick Brittain, 1962; Turretin, Institutio Theologiae Elencticae. 

Offered on request. Mr. McCloy and Mr. Gerstner 

561. Theological Readings in German. Karl Barth's Die Christliche Lehre 
nach dem Heidelherger Katechismus and/or similar theological works. 

Offered annually. Mr. Gerstner, Mr. Kehm, and Mr. Smith 

562. Theological Readings in French. Contemporary theological and 
historical literature: Etienne Gilson, Jacques Maritain, and others. 

Offered annually. Mr. Smith and Mr. McCloy 



69 



The Church and Ministry Division 

Mr. Wilson, Chairman 

Mr. Alexander Mr. Clyde Mr. Ralston 

Mr. Bald Mr. Hinds Mr. Rogers 

Miss Burrows Mr. Jackson Mr. Scott 

Mr. Buttrick Mr. Kehm Mr. Smith 

Mr. Chamberlin Mr. Nicholson 

Required Courses 

710. Church and Ministry I. The purpose of this course is to clarify to 
the student, through a study of American church and cultural history, his 
prospective situation as a minister (or other church professional) in the 
American environment. Church and culture are studied with emphasis on 
the history of the Calvinist groups, and the Church is viewed in specific 
relationship to urban and industrial life, racial and economic problems, 
and growth and movement of population. Field trips are arranged. 

Juniors, first semester, 2 hours credit. Mr. Smith 

711. Church and Ministry II. The purpose of this course is to acquaint 
the student with the social milieu of the Christian ministry through socio- 
logical study of the American environment. The problem of thinking 
ethically in a Christian context is discussed with particular emphasis on 
church-state relationship. Pittsburgh is utilized as an object of investigation 
and laboratory for student research. 

Juniors, second semester, 2 hours credit. Mr. Smith and guest faculty 

712. Christian Education of Children. (For M.Ed, students an additional 
hour of practicum will be required.) 

M.R.E. and M.Ed., first semester, 2 hours credit. Mr. Rogers 

713. Christian Education Seminar. Designed to give the student the 
opportunity to accumulate and evaluate resources in major areas of con- 
cern in the teaching ministry of the local church: administration, curric- 
ulum, and age group aspects of programming. The framework is that of 
the local church director of Christian education. Observation is an integral 
part of the course. (For M.Ed, students an additional hour of practicum 
will be required.) 

M.R.E. and M.Ed., second semester, 2 hours credit. Miss Burrows 

720. Church and Ministry III. The Church and Ministry sequence con- 
tinues in this course which seeks to lay down psychological, communica- 
tive, and homiletical foundations, always related to theological material, 
for the bearing of the Church's witness. Field education includes several 
different experiences which are analyzed in the light of course material. 

Middlers, first semester, 4 hours credit. 

Mr. Buttrick, Mr. Wilson, Mr. Hinds, and Mr. G. Jackson 

721. Church and Ministry IV. The course prepares students in preach- 

71 



ing and in the ordering of worship. Theological norms are developed and 
discussed in relation to historic practice, psychological insight, and the 
task of the Church's ministry. Lectures on the history and theology of 
preaching will be followed by an investigation of hermeneutic principles, 
workshop sessions in sermon preparation, and practice preaching with 
homiletic and speech criticism. Small sectioned classes and tutorial in- 
struction will be scheduled. The study of Christian worship includes the 
doctrine of the sacraments, the history of worship, the preparation and 
conduct of special services, and the role of music in congregational worship. 
Middlers, second semester, 4 hours credit. Divisional faculty 

723. Foundations: Counseling and Education. A course designed to equip 
the student for a ministry to particular human problems (grief, marital 
conflict, guilt, emotional crisis, etc.) with theological insight and psycho- 
logical sensitivity. A supervised practicum continues throughout the second 
semester. The section on education explores secular foundations and in- 
troduces a theological critique. 

Middlers, Intersession, 2 hours credit. 

Mr. Chamberlin and Mr. G. Jackson 

730. Church and Ministry V. With the foundation of previous studies 
of the Church, its ministry and mission, and its relations to society, an 
examination is now made of the responsibilities of Christians in the secular 
world. Students are required to read some of the important literature in 
Christian ethics, to inquire into the Biblical and theological framework 
within which ethical decisions may be made, and to make an ethical 
analysis of a problem in a particular field such as economics or politics. 
A practicum in preaching is correlated with both exegesis and the ethical 
concerns of this course. 

Seniors, first semester, 4 hours credit. Inter-divisional faculty 

731. Church and Ministry VI. The major emphasis in this unit of the 
Church and Ministry sequence will be upon the teaching ministry of the 
church. Assuming all seminary studies are background, this course will 
review the history of present educational patterns of the churches; will 
examine contemporary philosophies of church education with particular 
attention to the relation of theology and education; will study various 
approaches to teaching doctrine, the Bible, and church history; and will 
develop skills in program planning, teaching, and administration in the 
framework of a broad understanding of administration in contemporary 
Protestant churches. In addition, one hour a week will be given to a final 
practicum in homiletics which will be correlated with exegesis and a 
theological doctrine. 

Seniors, second semester, 4 hours credit. Divisional faculty 

733. Christian Education. This course will include the Christian edu- 
cation portion of C&M VI, and will provide an additional two hours each 
week for special projects and advanced supplementary work pointed directly 
toward professional preparation for positions in Christian education. 

M.R.E. Seniors, second semester, 4 hours credit. Mr. Chamberlin 

72 



Electives 

800. The Constitution of the United Presbyterian Church. A specialized 
study of the polity of the United Presbyterian Church as it concerns the 
faith, order, program, and administration of the United Presbyterian Church 
within itself and in its ecumenical relations. 

Offered second semester, 1966-67. Mr. Clyde 

801. Building and Administering a Church Program. This course deals 
chiefly with the session committees of worship, evangelism, Christian ed- 
ucation, fellowship and stewardship, how they are formed, prepared to 
function, and how they relate to program and the people. The latest in 
helpful literature is provided. A project analyzing an actual church pro- 
gram is offered during the course so that the student might apply the 
principles of the course to the betterment of a local program. Related 
books are to be read and reported on. 

Offered on request. Mr. Alexander 

802. Methodist Polity. Required of Methodist students for graduation. 
Offered as part of C&M VI. Mr. Chamberlin 

810. The Great Ages of Preaching. A study will be made of the doc- 
trinal and ethical content, literary style, homiletical method, historical and 
spiritual background of preaching from the days of the Apostles to the 
beginning of the 19th century. Mr. Scott 

811. Preaching from the Parables. The course is two-fold: a study of 
the history of the interpretation of Parables, and the actual writing and 
classroom delivery of sermons from the Parables. 

Offered first semester, 1966-67. Mr. Nicholson 

812. Homiletical Study of the Acts. The course is three-fold: a review 
of the historical-critical approach to Acts, the discovery of homiletical 
material, and the actual writing and classroom delivery of sermons. 

Offered second semester, 1966-67. Mr. Nicholson 

815. Preaching the Old Testament to our Contemporaries. An examina- 
tion of Old Testament themes in relation to the Gospel and to selected 
contemporary intellectual and socio-cultural situations, leading to study of 
the hermeneutical and homiletical treatment of selected Old Testament 
books and passages. There will be sermon preparation, delivery, and class 
discussion. 

Offered first semester, 1966-67. Mr. Wilson 

816. Preaching from the Catholic Epistles. A study, in terms of exegesis 
and theological context, of preaching from the Catholic Epistles, especially 
from Johannine and Petrine material. Consideration will be given to their 
historical as well as contemporary use. Sermons will be prepared and dis- 
cussed. (Limited to 10 students.) jy[ r Wilson 

817. Preaching in the Pastorate. A study of preaching in the specific 
context of the congregational ministry: the relation of pastoral preaching 

73 



to liturgy, education, counseling and "prophetic proclamation"; the plan- 
ning of preaching according to the Christian Year. 

Seniors only. Mr. Scott, Mr. Wilson 

819. The Theological Understanding of Preaching. A study of the theol- 
ogy of preaching from the Reformation to the present with special em- 
phasis on contemporary positions held by representative proponents. The 
student will be introduced to the twentieth century context in which preach- 
ing takes place and its influence on the theology of preaching. 

Mr. Scott 

820. Preaching from the Synoptic Gospels. A study, on the basis of 
Mark's Gospel, of homiletical treatment of the records of the birth, bap- 
tism, teaching, temptation, transfiguration, passion, resurrection and ascen- 
sion of Christ; the calling and training of the Twelve; with the exegetical 
use of parallel and relevant passages in the other Gospels. 

Mr. Nicholson, Mr. Wilson 

825. Creative Teaching. A course designed to give the student the 
opportunity to explore creative ways of teaching the Christian faith to 
children, youth, and adults within the program of the church. Observa- 
tion, laboratory experience, demonstration, and guest lectures will be used 
throughout the course. 

Offered on request. Miss Burrows 

826. Christian Education in the Local Church. Designed to give the 
student the opportunity to accumulate and evaluate resources in the admin- 
istration of the local church program of Christian education, including all 
age groups. Philosophy and organization of nursery and kindergarten week- 
day schools, church related youth clubs, vacation church school, camping 
programs, youth fellowship, and all departments of the church school will 
be considered. 

B.D. students only. Offered second semester, 1966-67. Miss Burrows 

828. The Church and Higher Education. Designed especially for those 
interested in college teaching, campus ministry, or serving a church near 
a campus. A review of the relation of the church to higher education; an 
examination of theological issues in the relation of the Christian faith to 
higher education; and an exploration of current patterns in the Church's 
ministry to students and faculty. Mr. Chamberlin 

829. History of Christian Education. A survey of the major movements 
and personalities which have influenced the development of the teaching 
ministry in the church, with particular emphasis upon the historical roots 
of present-day church education. Mr. Chamberlin 

830. Christian Education Among Children. A study of the religious 
needs of children from birth through twelve years of age paralleled with 
the church's possibilities for meeting these needs. Weekday Christian edu- 
cation programs such as vacation church school, day camping, and youth 
club as well as the Sunday church school curriculum are studied within 

74 



the framework of how children learn. A degree of observation and labora- 
tory work is included as a part of the course. 

Offered on request. Miss Burrows 

831. Christian Education Among Adults. Principles and approaches to 
the church's educational ministry to adults; introduction to established and 
changing patterns of program; relation to the insights from the general 
field of adult education; special emphasis upon work with young adults, 
parent education, and new approaches to the ministry to the aged. 

Mr. Chamberlin 

832. Contemporary Developments in Christian Education. Advanced 
course, especially for those hoping to be ministers or directors of Christian 
education. Reviewing the recent history of church education, particularly 
the relation of contemporary Protestant theology to general educational 
philosophy, and an examination of various efforts to express these theo- 

I logical developments in new forms of educational program. 

Mr. Chamberlin 

833. The Processes of Christian Education. An exploration of the various 
patterns of program and structure (curriculum, class grouping, administra- 
tive procedures, supervision) employed by churches, and the relation of 
these processes to the interpretation of the Christian faith. Particularly 
for students interested in special educational ministries. 

Mr. Chamberlin 

834. Advanced Reading in Christian Education. Guided reading and 
research, the subjects and areas to be determined by the needs and interests 
of the students. Permission of the instructor is necessary for registration. 

Offered on request. Mr. Chamberlin 

835. Research Seminar: New Patterns in Christian Presence. An explora- 
tion of the many new forms of ministry being conducted experimentally 
both in this country and abroad; a review of studies by denominational 
agencies, particularly the World Council of Churches study of the mission- 
ary structure of the parish; and an examination of the implications of 
these developments for the parish and its educational ministry. Registration 
is limited. Mr. Chamberlin 

840. Theology and Psychiatry. The metaphysical presuppositions, meth- 
od, understanding of therapy, and some aspects of human nature will be 
compared. An attempt will be made to define mutuality and discreteness 
between the two disciplines. An introduction to Freudian, Jungian, and other 
psychiatric writings will be made. jy[ r Jackson 

841. Seminar in Counseling. An advanced course utilizing the case work 
of students, drawing principles for both diagnosis and therapy out of the 
cases presented, and making evaluations. The role of the minister as coun- 
selor is carefully scrutinized. yVf r Jackson 

842. Personality Development. The meaning of the self, its develop- 
ment, its aberrations, its societal nature, its symbolization, its motivations, 

75 



etc., will be studied from the point of view of the several psychiatric the-S 
ories, social psychology, and Biblical images. The relation of personality! 
development to the work of the ministry will be clarified. jy[ r Jackson 

843. The Aging: Personality Formation and Pastoral Care. This seminar 
will look at the question of aging from three significant directions: the 
psychology of religion in specific relevance to the aging; socio-psychological 
patterns in the aging process; and the role of the church in ministering 
to the aging. 

846. Theory and Practice of the Devotional Life. A consideration of the 
devotional life of the Christian in the modern world. The relation of 
doctrine to the devotional life. The means of grace studied. The course is 
also designed to acquaint the student with the devotional classics. 

Mr. G. fackson 

850. World Mission of the Church. A survey of the ecumenical witness 
of the church throughout the world, with special reference to the work 
of the United Presbyterian Church. 

Offered on request. Mr. Clyde 

851. Tutorial in Missions. Reading and discussions on missions, designed 
particularly for missionary candidates and those considering becoming 
candidates. 

Offered on request. Mr. Clyde 

852. Evangelism. This course offers a detailed discussion and study of 
the definition, motivation, urgency and nature of evangelism. Personal work, 
evangelism for commitment, evangelism through fellowship, youth evan- 
gelism and various opportunities for pastor and laity through the church 
are covered. A program of reading and book reports acquaints the student 
with the best literature in the field. Opportunity for role playing in class 
is afforded. 

Offered second semester, 1966-67. Mr. Alexander 

854. Comparative Religion. A study of the origin and development of 
religion, with special investigation of Primitive Religion, Hinduism, Bud- 
dhism, Confucianism, and Islam, with regard to their bearing on Modern 
Missions. 

Offered on request. Mr. Clyde 

855. Major Sects. Jehovah's Witnesses, Mormonism, Christian Science 
and other groups compared with traditional Christianity. Resemblances 
and differences noted. 

Offered first semester, 1967-68. Mr. Gerstner 

856. The Protestant Approach to Catholicism. A comparative investiga- 
tion of Protestantism and Catholicism, with a study of the general problem 
of Protestant evangelism in connection with Catholicism. 

Offered second semester, 1966-67. Mr. Clyde 

857. The Protestant Approach to Communism. A study of Communism, 

76 



its challenge to Christianity, the special answer of Protestantism to Com- 
munism, and the general problems with which Communism is involved. 
Offered first semester, 1966-67. Mr. Clyde 

858. The Ecumenical Movement. A survey of the origin and develop- 
ment of the modern Ecumenical Movement, combined with an exploration 
of the elements of church unity and some anticipation of the future. 

Offered on request. Mr. Clyde 

859. Seminar in Ecumenics. This course is offered at Duquesne Uni- 
versity under a joint faculty including Duquesne professors, Pittsburgh 
Seminary professors, and others. It is open to qualified Pittsburgh Semi- 
nary students. 

870. The Theological Ethics of William Temple and Reinhold Niebuhr. 
A comparative study of the social thought of the late Archbishop of Canter- 
bury and one of America's leading voices in the field of ethics in relation 
to their theological foundations. ]y[ r Bald 

872. Research Seminar in Selected Social Problems. Students will elect 
specific areas of social concern in modern culture for investigation in which 
they will seek to relate them to the demands and insights of the Christian 
ethic. Prerequisite, C&M V. TVfr. Bald 

873. Church and State in Marxist Countries. This course will deal with 
the recent history and present positions of the Protestant and Orthodox 
Churches in Marxist countries. Primary sources will be read and a re- 
search paper will be required. Prerequisite: Modern Church History. 

Mr. Ritschl 

880. Christian Faith and Contemporary Literature. A study of the re- 
lationship between Christian faith and themes in contemporary literature. 
Works by a number of modern writers including Sartre, Updike, Greene, 
and Beckett will be read and discussed. Three class sessions per week will 
be scheduled. 

Offered first semester, 1966-67. Mr. Buttrick 

884. The Classics of Christian Literature. A study of the outstanding 
literary masterpieces of Christian history selected from ancient, mediaeval 
and various national literatures of Great Britain and America, France, 
Spain, Italy: poetry, drama, sermons, essays, all writings wherein there is 
a consciousness of artistic excellence. 

Offered first semester, 1966-67. Mr. McCloy 

885. Poetry, Poetics, and Christian Language. A study of contemporary 
poetry and poetics in relation to the use of religious metaphor and imagery. 
Long poems by one or two contemporary poets will be analyzed. Reading 
in modern literary criticism will be discussed. ]\/[ r Buttrick 



Christian Humanism. A study of the relations of the Christian 
Church to the values and excellencies of human culture as seen in the 
Classical ideals (paideia) of the fourth and fifth centuries and again in 






77 



the period of the Renaissance, and later; special study will be given to 
Erasmus and the English and Italian humanists. Mr. McCloy 

890. Interpretative Reading. Oral interpretation of a varied selection 
of prose, poetry, and drama as a means of developing keener sensitivity 
to the written word and greater effectiveness in communicating it. The 
objective will be to mature the skills and principles already acquired in 
speech courses. Small sections, private conferences, recordings. 

One hour, first and second semesters, 1966-67. Mr. Hinds 

891. Communication: Theory and Practice. Examination of the function 
of communication in the ministry. Various approaches to communication 
will be surveyed with an emphasis on modern communication theory 
as it relates to the various media by which the Gospel may be communi- 
cated, such as preaching, teaching, group process, radio-T.V., etc. Students 
will be encouraged to develop their own theory of communication. 

Seniors only. Mr. Hinds 

900. Music in the Church. A practical approach to the many problems 
arising in connection with church music with particular attention to the 
problems of the small congregation. Organizing the musical resources of 
the congregation, the music as a spiritual force in the church life, and 
the minister's relation to choir and choirmaster. 

Offered second semester, 1966-67. Mr. Ralston 

901. Hymnology. An analytical and historical study of the great hymns 
and tunes of the Christian Church. Consideration of the qualities of a 
good hymn. Practical and effective use of the hymnal. 

Offered first semester, 1966-67. Mr. Ralston 

902. Masterpieces of Religious Music. A study of the various forms of 
music through which men have expressed their faith. Demonstration of 
the power of music to illuminate Christian truth and to "give wings to 
words." This is primarily a "listening course" making use of records but 
with assigned background reading and class comment. The purpose is to 
give the student an appreciation of various forms of musical expression as 
well as some familiarity with specific works of musical art. Mr. Ralston 

Elective Credit at the University of Pittsburgh 
Up to four credit hours may also be taken in the Graduate School of Public 
and International Affairs of the University of Pittsburgh. The differential 
in tuition between that of the Seminary and that of the University is 
taken care of through foundation grants at the University. These elective 
courses would be primarily in urbanization, economics, and international 
affairs. 

Summer Field Education 
Every student is encouraged to spend one summer in field education, pref- 
erably in some form of clinical training. Students who choose and qualify 
for clinical training in approved programs will be given two hours of 

78 



elective credit for each six weeks of clinical training to a maximum of four 
credit hours. For students who do not choose or do not qualify for a clinical 
training program a number of options without any elective credit are 
allowed (such as national park chaplaincies, Board of National Missions 
assignments, assistantships, etc.), upon consultation with and approval by 
the Field Education Office. 

Any student seeking a church-related position for the summer must 
counsel with the Field Education Office so that provision may be made 
for supervision on the field. Summer pastorates for students who have 
completed only their Junior year are discouraged because such students 
will not have had the courses in Church and Ministry dealing with the 
preaching, teaching, and pastoral office. 




The Master of Theology Degree 



A strong program of graduate education at the Master's level is offered by 
the Seminary in three fields: Biblical Studies, History and Theology, and 
Advanced Pastoral Studies. These Masters' programs are planned for two 
purposes: to help prepare candidates for such specialized services as teach- 
ing, counseling, and the campus ministry; and to benefit pastors who may 
wish to improve their effectiveness in Biblical, theological, or pastoral 
studies in relation to ministerial responsibilities. It is with the pastor in 
mind that the faculty views these programs as being right at the heart of 
continuing education. The courses are designed for a learned, relevant 
ministry, whatever form the ministry takes. 



The course requirements outlined on the following pages may be com- 
pleted in two academic years by students in half-residence (six hours of 
course work in each of four consecutive semesters) in which they will be 
expected to devote three days in each week to serious study. The remaining 
requirements listed must be met within five academic years from the date 
of matriculation. Candidates in the fields of Biblical Studies and History 
and Theology may elect to complete the requirements for the degree in a 
minimum period of thirteen calendar months by enrolling in full-residence 
(twelve hours of course work in each of two consecutive semesters) in 
which all of their time would be devoted to the program of study, fulfilling 
the remaining requirements by September 30 of the year following the 
date of matriculation. 



All candidates for this degree will be required to maintain a high level 
of achievement throughout their course work and to sustain a compre- 
hensive examination on it. They will also be required to prepare and pre- 
sent a thesis or a research project. In the fulfillment of this final require- 
ment they will be expected to make a significant contribution to the 
discussion of the subject, to demonstrate the scholarly competence and 
the uniform excellence of form and content associated with academic work 
at the graduate level, and successfully to undergo an oral examination on 
the thesis or research project. 

Every effort will be made to fill up gaps in theological knowledge, and 
this is made more possible since only six applicants will be admitted to 
each program per year. There is considerable freedom in which the stu- 
dent is encouraged to explore in depth his own interests. Each student 
will receive close personal attention from the professors in the curriculum 
of his choice. 

80 



Admission Requirements 



ERRATUM 

On page 81. under Requirements for the Degree, item 3 was omitted and 
should be added as follows : 

3. Six hours for a thesis or a research project. 



Applicants for this degree should apply to the Director of Admissions. 

81 



The Master of Theology Degree 



iwe.n~a.i ivinjvvicuiic, dliu 



this is made more possible since only six applicants will be admitted to 
each program per year. There is considerable freedom in which the stu- 
dent is encouraged to explore in depth his own interests. Each student 
will receive close personal attention from the professors in the curriculum 
of his choice. 

80 



Admission Requirements 



B.D. degree from an accredited seminary. 

An average of B or better in the B.D. degree or in a qualifying examina- 
tion, according to the discretion of the Graduate Education Committee. 

The ability to use any language integral to the chosen field of study. 
While not a requirement for admission, a reading knowledge of French 
or German is required before a student can begin the second half of the 
course. Language examinations are given in September, January, and 
June. 

The ability to handle English composition with competence. 



Requirements for the Degree 

1. Twenty-four course hours (30 in the Advanced Pastoral Studies Pro- 
gram) with an average of B or better. More than two C grades will 
eliminate a student from the program. 

2. A comprehensive examination covering the 24 (or 30) units of study. 

4. An oral examination on the thesis or research project. 

5. The requirements for the degree must be met no later than five aca- 
demic years from the date of matriculation. 



Fees and Expenses 

Matriculation Fee, $35.00 
Tuition, $20.00 per credit hour 
Library Fee, $20.00 per year 
Graduation Fee, $10.00 



Applicants for this degree should apply to the Director of Admissions. 

81 



Description of Courses of Instruction 

Master of Theology Degree 

The Master of Theology Program in 
Biblical Studies 

The Master's degree in the Biblical Division covers both Testaments. While 
the thesis may concentrate on one Testament, the course work is deliberately 
designed to provide a certain degree of qualification in the whole field. 
The six hours of electives may be taken in Biblical Studies, in History and 
Theology, or in the Program in Advanced Pastoral Studies, or the hours 
may be used in guided research. 

Year One 

Semester I Semester II 

Advanced Hebrew Grammar and Reading 3 Exegesis (Hebrew) 3 

Advanced Greek Grammar and Reading 3 Exegesis (Greek) 3 

Year Two 

Seminar 3 Seminar 3 

Elective 3 Elective 3 



Ml 00. Advanced Hebrew Grammar and Reading. Study to supplement 
and continue undergraduate work done with the Hebrew Old Testament. 
Three hours credit. 

M200. Advanced Greek Grammar and Reading. Study to supplement 
undergraduate work done with the Greek New Testament. Books of the 
New Testament not previously read will be completed, and selected por- 
tions of the Greek Old Testament may be added. 
Three hours credit. 

Ml 02 and M202. Exegesis. Thorough exegesis of selected passages in 
the Hebrew Old Testament and the Greek New Testament. 
Three hours credit in each of two courses. 

Ml 03 and M203. Seminars. Problems of introduction, text, archaeology, 
and the various areas of criticism are considered. The bibliography of the 
modern literature on the Bible is surveyed with reading and discussion 
of selected volumes. The particular needs of the candidates enrolled are 
given special attention. 

Three hours credit in each of two courses. 

Electives to be announced. 

83 



The Master of Theology Program 

History and Theology 

The candidate for the Master's degree in History and Theology may major 
in either Church History or Systematic Theology, taking twelve hours in 
required courses, twelve hours in electives from the list below (in the selec- 
tion of which he must have the approval of his adviser), and six hours in 
work on a thesis. Majors in history will select primarily from the history 
elective offerings, majors in theology, primarily from the theology elective 
offerings. Where it is deemed advisable in view of a candidate's special 
interests, electives may also be chosen from Masters' courses offered in 
Biblical Studies and the Program in Advanced Pastoral Studies. 



Half-Time Sequence 








Year One 










Semester I 






Semester II 




Seminar in Theological 
Elective 


Method 


3 
3 


Seminar in Historical Method 
Elective 


3 
3 


Year Two 










Guided Research 
Elective 




3 
3 


Guided Research 
Elective 


3 
3 



Full-Time Sequence 



Seminar in Theological Method 


3 


Seminar in Historical Method 


3 


Guided Research 


3 


Guided Research 


3 


Electives 


6 


Electives 


6 



M400. Seminar in Historical Method. Study of research technique, prob- 
lems of interpretation, jointures between history and other disciplines, and 
the problem of limiting such interconnections, bibliography, historiography, 
and comparable problems. Normally this instruction is conducted through 
the prosecution of a specified research project. 
Three hours credit. 

M500. Seminar in Theological Method. The nature of theological think- 
ing will be studied: Prolegomena, organization of systems, theological lan- 
guage, and hermeneutics with illustration from representative theologians. 
Three hours credit. 



84 



Electives 

M401, M402, M403, M404, M405, M531, M533, M540, M544, M547, and 
M551. (See corresponding numbers, pp. 68-69, for Courses M531-M547.) 

M401. Patristics. The study of the idea of ecclesiastical tradition; the 
solutions of the Fathers of the ancient church to the recurrent or immedi- 
ate problems of faith, life, and church order; the history of patristics and 
the controversies concerning it, and its significance for the modern ecu- 
menical movement. The manuals of Quasten and Altaner will serve as 
guides, and the texts will be studied for the most part in such series of 
English translations as the Ante-and Post Nicene Fathers, Ancient Christian 
Writers, The Fathers of the Church, etc. 
Three hours credit. 

M402. Research in Puritanism. Special topics such as the covenant, 
seeking, church order and the relation of church and state will be explored. 

Three hours credit. 

M403. 17th Century Orthodoxy. This course will consider the orthodox 
background of Schleiermacher and other later theologians. 
Three hours credit. 

M404. Seminar in the American Churches and Secular Culture. Each 
year a special topic will be selected and announced for study: for example, 
church and state, the Protestant ethos in the 19th century, the social gospel. 

M405. Guided Reading in Church History. Readings approved by the 
professor designed to prepare the student for general examination in the 
field of Church History. Regular discussion of assignments is required. 
Three hours credit. 

M551. Advanced Reading in Theology. Guided reading and research in 
theological sources. The subjects and areas pursued are determined by the 
needs and interests of the students. 

Guided Research. The candidate will be guided by a professor in read- 
ing in an area of special interest, to which it is assumed his thesis will 
belong. Reading and research will lead to the definition of a thesis topic 
and writing of a precis to be submitted for approval. 
Six hours credit. 



85 



The Master of Theology Program 

Advanced Pastoral Studies 



The Program for Advanced Pastoral Studies is designed to help students 
to know themselves better; to understand and become sensitive to inter- 
personal relationships; to be familiar with group process; to become in- 
volved in creative dialogue between theological studies and the social 
sciences; and to see more clearly the resources of the Christian church for 
health at the various levels. 

The faculty teaching in this program is composed of seminary personnel 
and members of several faculties of the University of Pittsburgh, including 
the Medical School, the Graduate School of Social Work, and the Depart- 
ment of Speech. The latter include Robert J. Shoemaker, M.D., Margaret 
B. McFarland, Ph.D., Rex A. Pittenger, M.D., Werner Lutz, M.S., Erma 
T. Meyerson, M.A.A.S.S., Jack Matthews, Ph.D., and Moises Wodnicki, M.D. 



Year One 



Semester I 

Seminar in Theological Method 
Developmental Theory of 
Personality I 

General Hospital Practicum 
(Veterans Administration Hospital) 



Year Two 



Semester II 

Developmental Theory of 

Personality II 
Philosophical Issues in Psychotherapy 
Practicum with Children 

(Child Study Center) 



: 



8 



Dynamics of Family Life 


2 


Theology and Psychology 


The Socio-Cultural Environment 


3 


Group Process 


Counseling Seminar 


2 


Counseling Seminar 



Clinical Training. A six weeks' course in an approved clinical training 

program will be required before graduation. It is recommended that it be 
taken previous to admission or in the summer between the first and second 
years. 



86 



M500. Seminar in Theological Method. For course description see bottom 

of page 84. 

M600. Developmental Theory of Personality I. The age span is traced 
from pre-natal influences and birth through the various stages of child- 
hood, showing normal growth patterns, the abnormalities of neurotic and 
psychotic development, and the relation of the child to the social milieu. 

M601. Developmental Theory of Personality II. Continuation of M600 

from adolescence through the aging process. 

M602. Philosophical Issues in Psychotherapy. Freudian thought and 

existential analysis are studied from the biblical and theological perspective 
with regard to such issues as epistemology, ontology, anxiety, freedom, 
time, value theory. 

M603. Practicum with Children. This practicum is conducted at the 
Child Study Center, the Medical School, and the University of Pittsburgh 
under the direction of the staff at the Child Study Center. Interpretive 
seminars are held regularly. 

M604. Dynamics of Family Life. 

M605. General Hospital Practicum. This practicum is conducted at the 
Veterans Administration Hospital under the direction of the social work 
staff of the hospital. Interpretive seminars are held regularly. 

M606. Group Process. The theory and practice of group experience are 
studied with the end in view of better understanding the dynamics of 
church groups. 

M607. The Socio-cultural Environment. This course deals with the eco- 
logical and cultural factors which make functional and dysfunctional con- 
tributions to personality and community development. It will emphasize 
the role of institutions (other than the family) and power structures in 
their direct and indirect effect upon the individual. 

M608. Counseling Seminar. Each student is required to work with four 
counselees, under supervision, and to participate in the presentation of 
case material. 

M609. Counseling Seminar. Continuation of M608. 

M610. Theology and Psychology. The material of the entire program is 
pulled together in dialogue between theology and the human sciences, 
especially psychology and psychiatry. Such themes as God, man, sin, re- 
demption are dealt with. Pastoral care, informed theologically and psy- 
chologically, becomes the vantage-point for taking a hard look at church 
programming: its relevance, its resources, etc. A primary concern is to ask 
what the church can do in its supportive and preventive roles as well as 
in its redemptive and re-creative roles. 



87 



The University of Pittsburgh's Graduate School 

of Public and International Affairs 

and 

Pittsburgh Theological Seminary 

(A Joint Program) 

A cooperative educational program which will have special meaning for 
international service (ecumenical mission and relations), administration, 
and urbanization has been worked out with one of the world's outstanding 
graduate schools of public and international affairs. The areas of concen- 
tration in this program are: 

General Public Administration 
Administration of International Affairs 
Economic and Social Development 
Municipal-Metropolitan Affairs 
Community and Voluntary Organization Affairs 

It is the policy of the Graduate School of Public and International 
Affairs that half its students are from overseas. This provides for rich 
trans-cultural experience. Through this joint program Pittsburgh offers an 
exciting and exceptional opportunity for preparation for ecumenical mission 
and relations. 

Basic to the program are the M.P.I. A. degree, Master of Public and 
International Affairs, and the M.P.A. degree, Master of Public Administra- 
tion. Qualified persons from overseas as well as the United States may 
enroll as regular or special students in these degree programs. Such students 
are subject to the exclusive academic control of the University and receive 
their Masters' degrees from the University. However, latitude is injected 
into these programs so that elective course work can be taken at the Semi- 
nary, credit to be applied to the university degrees. 

The program allows Bachelor of Divinity students to elect up to four 
hours from the offerings of the Graduate School of Public and International 
Affairs, the tuition differential being graciously financed from fellowship 
funds provided by the Heinz and Ford Foundations. This B.D. enrichment 
will be especially valuable to those students preparing to become fraternal 
workers, missionaries, Peace Corps volunteers, United Nation workers, etc. 



Inquiries should be directed to: 

The Graduate School of Public and International Affairs 
University of Pittsburgh 
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15213 

or 
The Director of Admissions 
Pittsburgh Theological Seminary 
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15206 



1 


l~ 






■-■:■■'■.. 






Continuing Education 

Under the direction of the Graduate Education Committee continuing 
education is fast assuming a major place in the life of the Seminary. Over 
300 pastors in the Pittsburgh and Canton, Ohio, areas regularly participate 
in Eight Weeks Schools. A distinctive feature, and the catalyst that pre- 
cipitates a truly vital learning experience, is the active participation of 
pastors from over a dozen denominations who make up a majority of those 
enrolled. 



The Eight Weeks Schools 

At the Seminary. For eight Tuesdays in October and November and again 
in February and March the regular faculty offers courses in a wide range 
of areas but always with particular relevance to ministry, whatever its forms 
(pastoral, administrative, etc.). For example, the following courses were 
offered last year: A Study of the Fourth Gospel; Church and State in 
Marxist Lands; Speech in the Ministry; Social Change, Revolution, and 
Christian Responsibility: The Church in the American Environment; and 
The Intertestamental Period. 

Each class runs two hours, and a student may take up to three courses. 
Announcement of course offerings is made in Panorama, the quarterly 
bulletin, as well as in folder form. The fee of $5.00 per course includes 
the use of the library. Inquiries should be directed to the Director of Con- 
tinuing Education. 

At Canton, Ohio. Each fall the Seminary conducts an eight week session 
for pastors of this area, with the same format and courses as listed above. 
Other schools in other areas will be announced as they are developed. 
A special announcement and registration form may be secured from the 
Director of Continuing Education. 



Spring and Summer Programs 

The School of Religion at Shady Side Academy, Pittsburgh, supported by 
the Pitcairn-Crabbe Foundation, each summer invites 150 ministers from 
within the Synod of Pennsylvania. The faculty is drawn from all over the 
United States as well as from the Seminary. The dates for the 1966 school 
are June 20-24. 

Continuing Education Seminar, Synod of Ohio. Under the joint sponsor- 
ship of the Seminary and the Synod of Ohio a seminar for ministers and 
their wives will be held on the campus of Muskingum College June 26 to 
July 1, 1966. The seminar this summer, whose theme will be "The Nature 
of Man," will bring together faculty representing the areas of biological 
science, economics, drama and the arts, and theology. Those who attend 

92 



will be expected to do prescribed reading before the beginning of the school 
in order that the best use may be made of seminar time. 



Audit Courses 

A limited number of auditors will be admitted to regular B.D. and M.R.E. 
courses. To protect the integrity of the degree programs the registrant 
must have the approval of both the Academic Dean and the professor for 
auditing. The cost for auditing is half the regular tuition fee plus half the 
library fee. While no grade is given or recorded, auditors are expected to 
be faithful in attendance and to do the required readings. Approximately 
fifty auditors a semester can be helped to continue their theological edu- 
cation through this program. Inquiries should be directed to the Registrar. 



Credit Courses 

A limited number of students already having the B.D. degree may be 
enrolled for regular Bachelor of Divinity courses. The purpose of this pro- 
gram is to help prepare those who wish to do graduate work but who need 
to buttress their seminary training, fill in gaps, or do additional prerequisite 
work toward specialization. A grade is given and recorded for transcript 
purposes. The cost is one-half the regular matriculation fee and full tuition. 
Application forms should be secured from the Director of Admissions. 



93 



The Alumni Association 

Officers 

President, Dale K. Milligan '51 

Vice President, Curtis J. Patterson '37 

Secretary, Harry W. Rankin '45 

Treasurer, Frank C. Black '27 

Necrological Secretary, Clarence F. Anderson '28 

Director of Alumni Relations, William R. Phillippe '55 



The Alumni Association, now numbering more than 2,300 members, is 
composed of the former students, graduates and post-graduates of Pitts- 
burgh Theological Seminary and its antecedent seminaries. The purposes 
of the Association are to deepen the friendships begun in seminary and 
to afford fellowship among all its graduates; to cooperate with the Seminary 
in enlisting young people for church vocations and recruiting prospective 
seminary candidates; to support actively the cause of theological education 
and of the Seminary in particular in its development to meet the demands 
of the future; and lastly, to have a sympathetic interest in the life and 
work of the Seminary's students and faculty. The Alumni Association spon- 
sors several seminary convocations. 

The Association meets annually on the afternoon of commencement 
day to conduct certain business and to elect officers. This is followed by 
the alumni dinner, after which the graduating seniors are inducted into 
the Association. 

Regional meetings of alumni are held frequently, and a dinner at the 
annual meeting of The General Assembly is another highlight of the year's 
activities. 

An alumni directory, listing the living alumni of the Seminary, was 
published in January, 1966, for the first time, bringing together the names 
of the members of the Association. Three listings were made: alphabetical, 
by class, and geographical. This was sent to each member of the Associa- 
tion. It is hoped that this can be revised and republished within a few years. 

94 



95 



Degrees Awarded, 1964-1965 



The Degree of Bachelor of Divinity 

Charles E. Alcorn III, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

A.B., Wheaton College, 1961 
Roy J. Altman, Trafford, Pennsylvania 

B.A., Pennsylvania State University, 1962 
Charles H. Banning, Mt. Vernon, Ohio 

B.S., Social Welfare, Ohio State University, 1960 

M.S.W., Ohio State University 
Lawrence Roy Bergstresser, Ephrata, Pennsylvania 

B.A., Albright College, 1960 
William M. Birdsall, Toledo, Ohio 

B.S., Muskingum College, 1962 
Carl W. Bogue, Princeton, Indiana 

A.B., Muskingum College, 1961 
Benjamin B. Booker, Durham, N. Carolina 

B.S., Hampton Institute, 1935 
James B. Brasel, Kell, Illinois 

A.B., Monmouth College, 1962 
Paulo D. Brasil, Goias, Brazil 

Colegio Municipal de Anapolis, 1957 

Colegio Jose M. da Conceicao, Jandira, S.P., 1960 

Presbyterian Theological Seminary, Campinas, S.P., 1962 
Wayne A. Buchtel, Dayton, Ohio 

B.S., Muskingum College, 1961 
Keith J. Burroughs, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 

B.S. in Economics, University of Pennsylvania, 1960 
James Allen Camp, Nevada, Missouri 

B.A., Missouri Valley College, 1962 
/. Howard Cherry, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

B.A., University of Pittsburgh, 1961 
Jack M. Chisholm, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

B.A., University of Pittsburgh, 1961 
Walter K. Davis, Eau Claire, Pennsylvania 

A.B., Findlay College, 1962 
William V. Davis, Canton, Ohio 

A.B., Ohio University, 1962 
Charles Cameron Dickinson, III, Wichita Falls, Texas 

B.A., Dartmouth College, 1958 
Samuel C. Dunning, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

B.A., Geneva College, 1956 
Thomas C. Fairley, Beaver, Pennsylvania 

B.S., Edinboro State Teachers College, 1962 

96 



Eugene Carl Fieg, Jr., Greensboro, North Carolina 

A.B., Maryville College, 1961 
Thomas W. Filbern, West Newton, Pennsylvania 

B.A., Westminster College, 1962 
Robert Frederick, Slippery Rock, Pennsylvania 

Slippery Rock State College 
Lloyd F. Gossler, Harrisburg, Pennsylvania 

B.S., Florida State University, 1961 
Robert K. Greer, Trafford, Pennsylvania 

B.A., Westminster College, 1962 
Gary Conrad Haase, Wooster, Ohio 

B.A., The College of Wooster, 1961 
James William Hanna, Black Lick, Pennsylvania 

A.B., Waynesburg College, 1962 
Edwin Blythe Hartman, Washington, Pennsylvania 

B.B.A., Westminster College, 1959 
Harry R. Holmes, Sewickley, Pennsylvania 

A.B., Grove City College, 1962 
Harold S. Horan, Silver Spring, Maryland 

B.A., University of Maryland, 1962 
Carl Robert Hull, East Brady, Pennsylvania 

B.A., Grove City College, 1962 
Edward John Hunt, Bronx, New York 

B.A., Davis and Elkins College, 1962 
Fitz Allen John, Kingston, Jamaica 

Dip. Th., London University, 1958 
William M. Keeney, Harrisburg, Pennsylvania 

B.A., The College of Wooster, 1962 
Dong Soo Kim, Seoul, Korea 

B.A., Union Christian College, 1959 
William John Lightbody, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

B.A., University of Pittsburgh, 1961 
.Ross N. Macdonald, Hamilton, Ontario 

B.A., Baldwin Wallace College, 1962 
Paul J. Masquelier, McDonald, Pennsylvania 

B.B.A., University of Pittsburgh, 1960 
Donald William McClure, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia 

B.S., Westminster College, 1961 
Robert B. McCrumb, New Castle, Pennsylvania 

B.A., Muskingum College, 1962 
Paul J. Milio, Detroit, Michigan 

A.B., Wayne State University, 1962 
Ronald Pearson Miller, Buffalo, New York 

B.A., Westminster College, 1961 
Albert U. Montanari, Buffalo, New York 

B.S., Teachers College, Buffalo, N. Y., 1958 

97 



Edward S. Napier, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 

B.A., Houghton College, 1958 
Richard Arthur Olsson, Westfield, Pennsylvania 

A.B., Barrington College, 1958 
Ernest W. Peterson, Buhl, Idaho 

B.S., College of Idaho, 1961 
Richard H. Scherpenisse, Bowling Green, Missouri 

A.B., Missouri Valley College, 1962 
John A. Simpson, Akron, Ohio 

B.A., University of Akron, 1961 
Hugh B. Springer, Fairmont, West Virginia 

A.B., West Virginia University, 1961 
Lewis R. Thomas, Lewis Run, Pennsylvania 

M.E., University of Cincinnati, 1959 
John Arthur Toth, Johnstown, Pennsylvania 

B.A., Waynesburg College, 1962 

Edward F. Wightman, Jamestown, Rhode Island 

B.A., Colgate University, 1957 
Margaret Suppes Yingling, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

B.S., Chatham College, 1943 

June, 1965 

C. Thatcher Schwartz, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 
B.S., Penn State University, 1959 

September, 1965 

William L. Coop, Monmouth, New Jersey 
B.A., The College of Wooster, 1960 



The Degree of Master of Religious Education 

Diane K. Adsit, Kenmore, New York 

B.S., State University of New York, College for Teachers, 1961 

Patricia Zapka Gracey, Windsor Heights, West Virginia 
A.B., West Liberty State Teachers College, 1963 

Donna Rae Houser, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 
B.S. in Education, Westminster College, 1963 

September, 1965 

Karen Ann Seelar, Erie, Pennsylvania 
B.A., Westminster College, 1963 



The Degree of Master of Theology 

Rev. John M. Hulse, McKeesport, Pennsylvania 
B.A., Waynesburg College, 1957 
B.D., Pittsburgh Theological Seminary, 1960 

98 



honors and Awards 



Zum Laude 

Hharles Edgar Alcorn, III 
ZslA W. ^ogue 
ames Blair Brasel 
D aul John Milio 
riugh Brock Springer 
ewis Ronald Thomas 

Graduating With Honors In 
Siblical Studies 

ames Blair Brasel 
Vlargaret Suppes Yingling 

raduating With Honors In 
History and Theology 

harles Edgar Alcorn, III 
Carl W. Bogue 
ohn Paul Milio 

The Thomas Jamison Scholarship 

and 

The Sylvester S. Marvin Memorial Fellowship 

James Blair Brasel 

The Jennie Rigg Barbour Memorial Prize 
Paul John Milio 

The Hugh Thomson Kerr Moderator Prize 
Edward J. Hunt 

The Michael Wilson Keith Memorial Homiletical Prize 
Paul Julian Masquelier, Jr. 

The Robert A. Lee Church History Award 

Paul John Milio 
James Blair Brasel 

The Home Training Bible Class Award in Missions 
William Donald McClure, Jr. 

The Chevy Chase Christian Education Award 
(Young People's Work) 

Harold S. Horan 

99 



The First Presbyterian Church of 
McKeesport Preaching Prize 

R. Benjamin Jones 

The John Watson Prize in New Testament Greek 
Eugene C. Fieg, Jr. 

Middler Class Awards 

The Alice Myers Sigler Memorial Prize 
in History and Theology 

Joseph Dunnell Small 

Junior Class Awards 

The James Purdy Scholarships 

Roxanna Ryman Bertini 
Clinton Clair Glenn, Jr. 
Timothy Charles Johnson 
Carol Rose Polivka 
Henry Elwood Robinson, III 
Vernon Clarke Rushing 

The Andrew Reed Scholarship 
Carolyn Jane Easdale 

The Fred McFeely Rogers Prize in Biblical Studies 
Vernon Clarke Rushing 

The Joseph Watson Greek Entrance Prize 
Kenneth R. Newhams 



Register of Students 1965-1966 

Senior Class 

Gary Dean Alexander, Lea wood, Kansas 
A.B., University of Kansas, 1963 

Gary Lyle Baer, Baltimore, Maryland 
B.A., Davis and Elkins College, 1963 

Rawley D. Boone, Hickory, Pennsylvania 

100 



B.A., Grove City College, 1963 
Charles L. Bulger, Omaha, Nebraska 

B.A., Hastings College, 1962 
Donald C. Byers, Orrville, Ohio 

B.S., Ohio State University, 1961 
Robert T. Cassell, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

B.A., University of Pittsburgh, 1962 
In Soon Choi, Seoul, Korea 

B.A., Seoul National University, 1958 
Rodger L. Cragun, Niagara Falls, New York 

A. A., Lincoln College, 1960 

B.A., Tusculum College, 1963 
Larry Arthur Dunster, Middle Granville, New York 

B.A., Bloomfield College, 1963 
George Edward Espy, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

B.A., University of Pittsburgh, 1963 
John D. Evans, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

A.B., Harvard College, 1961 

B.A., St. Peter's College, 1963 
John M. Fife, Titusville, Pennsylvania 

B.A., Washington and Jefferson College, 1962 

Thomas W. Filbern, West Newton, Pennsylvania 

B.A., Westminster College, 1962 
Peter Judd Fosburg, Westfield, New Jersey 

B.A., Westminster College, 1963 
Donald S. French, Ithaca, New York 

B.S., Cornell University, 1962 
Stephen Wayne Getty, Wallingford, Pennsylvania 

B.A., Grove City College, 1963 
Robert W. Gracey, Wheeling, West Virginia 

B.A., Davis and Elkins College, 1963 
James W. Graham, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 

B.A., Temple University, 1963 
Dennis Haines, Harvard, Illinois 

B.A., University of Dubuque, 1963 
Howard James Hansen, Blairsville, Pennsylvania 

B.A., University of Pittsburgh, 1952 
William Russell Hayes, East Paterson, New Jersey 

B.A., Bloomfield College, 1963 
Jon Louis Hoadley, Seattle, Washington 

B.A., Seattle Pacific College, 1962 
James L. Hobson, Linden, Michigan 

B.A., Alma College, 1962 
Harvey Samuel Holtgraver, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

B.A., Westminster College, 1963 

101 



Richard Kenneth Horn, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

B.A., Grove City College, 1963 
David Z. Howard, Monrovia, Liberia 

B.S., University of Liberia, 1960 
Gary Evans Huffman, Loves Park, Illinois 

A.B., Monmouth College, 1963 
Douglas James, Spokane, Washington 

B.A., Whitworth College, 1963 
Ralph B. Jones, Baltimore, Maryland 

B.A., Maryland University, 1962 
Richard Lee, Seattle, Washington 

B.A., Futan University, Shanghai, China, 1942 
William James Legge, Jr., Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

B.S., Indiana State College, 1963 
/ Reynolds Lewis, Greensburg, Pennsylvania 

B.A., Bethany College, 1958 
Raymond J. Marquette, Scranton, Pennsylvania 

B.S., Geneva College, 1961 
Harry E. Martin, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

A.B., Miami University, 1949 

M.S., George Williams College, 1953 
Richard B. McCune, New Castle, Pennsylvania 

B.A., Westminster College, 1963 
Guy H. Mclver, Columbus, Ohio 

B.S., Ohio State University, 1962 
George M. Mighells, Salamanca, New York 

Th.B., Malone College, 1950 
Harold Richard Moore, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

A.B., University of Pittsburgh, 1961 
McClain J. Moredock, Rices Landing, Pennsylvania 

B.A., Westminster College, 1962 
Frank David Moser, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

B.M., Grove City College, 1963 
Myron A. Newell, Alexandria, Virginia 

B.S., Pennsylvania State University, 1960 
Wayne F. Parker, Monmouth, Illinois 

B.A., Monmouth College, 1962 
Ronald G. Pritchard, Baltimore, Maryland 

B.A., University of Maryland, 1963 
Jay King Rabuck, Port Arthur, Texas 

B.S., Stephen F. Austin College, 1963 
John D. Reuben, Pensacola, Florida 

B.A., Knoxville College, 1962 
George John Scoulas, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

Greek Theological Institute, 1950 

102 



Joseph Dunnell Small, Gibsonia, Pennsylvania 

A.B., Brown University, 1963 
Leland Ralph Stoops, Jr., New Castle, Pennsylvania 

B.A., Westminster College, 1963 
Kirk Patrick Swiss, Baltimore, Maryland 

B.A., Muskingum College, 1962 
Wichean Watakeecharoen, Bangkok, Thailand 

B.A., Dubuque University, 1960 
Paul R. Watson, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

B.A., University of Pittsburgh, 1963 
David Williams, Oak Park, Illinois 

B.A., Millikin University, 1963 
Stephen Boyce Woods, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

B.A., Westminster College, 1963 
William R. Yeats, Morton, Pennsylvania 

B.A., Bloomfield College, 1963 

Middler Class 

Robert Elliott Speer Burtt, Delmont, Pennsylvania 

B.S., Indiana State College, 1959 

M.Ed., Indiana State College, 1964 
Dennis Frank Butler, Fair Lawn, New Jersey 

B.A., Bloomfield College, 1964 
David Blaine Cable, Belle Vernon, Pennsylvania 

B.S., California State College, 1963 
Donald George Campbell, Clairton, Pennsylvania 

B.A., Westminster College, 1964 
Andrew C. Chalmers, Bernardsville, New Jersey 

B.A., Bloomfield College, 1964 
Gary Glenmar Close, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

B.S., Norwich University, 1964 
Alice McGee Collins, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

B.A., Chatham College, 1957 
Robert Scott Collins, Tarkio, Missouri 

A.B., Tarkio College, 1960 
James Eugene Cuppett, Bedford, Pennsylvania 

B.A., University of Pittsburgh, 1964 
Norman L. Dalton, Independence, Missouri 

A.B., William Jewell College, 1964 
Brent Fergus Davidson, Seattle, Washington 

B.A., Seattle Pacific College, 1964 

John James Dromazos, Hamburg, New York 
B.S., New York State University, 1961 

103 



Robert Lee Finch, Peoria, Illinois 

A.B., Taylor University, 1964 
Charles Ray Fosnight, Coraopolis, Pennsylvania 

A.B., Ottawa University, 1957 
Kenneth Paul Gammons, Santa Barbara, California 

B.A., Whitworth College, 1964 
Clinton Clair Glenn, Jr., Hyattsville, Maryland 

B.A., University of Maryland, 1964 
Clyde Henry Goff, Toledo, Ohio 

B.A., University of Toledo, 1959 
Daniel Clark Graham, Cuyahoga Falls, Ohio 

B.A., Westminster College, 1964 
Ruth Morton Griffiths, Columbus, Ohio 

B.A., The College of Wooster, 1960 

B.S., Columbia University, 1962 
James Willam Hartley, Euclid, Ohio 

B.A., The College of Wooster, 1964 
Philip Marlowe Hazelton, Lancaster, Ohio 

B.S., Ohio State University, 1963 
William Harry Hudson, Sharon, Pennsylvania 

B.A., Westminster College, 1964 

John C. Huff, Bowie, Maryland 

B.A., Davis & Elkins College, 1964 

Harry H. Johns, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 
A.B., Geneva College, 1964 

John Melvin Johnson, Beloit, Wisconsin 
B.S., Wheaton College, 1964 

Timothy Charles Johnson, Harbor Beach, Michigan 
B.A., Alma College, 1964 

William M. Johnson, East Aurora, New York 
B.A., Monmouth College, 1964 

John Jones, Salem, Ohio 

A.B., University of North Carolina, 1948 
M.Ed., Kent State University, 1960 

David Conrad Kearns-Preston, Silver Spring, Maryland 
B.A., American University, 1964 

William John Kemp, Buffalo, New York 
B.A., Westminster College, 1964 

Festo Kivengere, Kabale, Uganda 

University of London Institute of Education, 1956-57 

Timothy Aaron Koah, Carlton, Pennsylvania 
B.A., Westminster College, 1961 

Joseph Leonard Luciana, Oakmont, Pennsylvania 
B.A., University of Pittsburgh, 1948 
L.L.B., University of Pittsburgh Law School, 1951 

104 



Kenneth V. Mapstone, Hellam, Pennsylvania 

A.A., York Junior College, 1962 

A.B., Waynesburg College, 1964 
Charles Marks, Savannah, Georgia 

B.A., Knoxville College, 1964 
Helsel Roland Marsh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

B.S., Westminster College, 1964 
Robert Harrison McClure, Jr., Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

B.A., Monmouth College, 1964 
James W. McDowell, Knoxville, Tennessee 

B.A., Knoxville College, 1959 
Dean Carlyle Mead, Beaverton, Oregon 

B.A., Lewis & Clark College, 1964 
Hartzell A. Michael, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

B.S.E.E., West Virginia University, 1935 

M.B.A., Harvard University, 1946 
Ralph Wayne Milligan, Augusta, Kansas 

B.A., Sterling College, 1961 
Jack R. Moon, McKeesport, Pennsylvania 

B.S.M.E., Carnegie Institute of Technology, 1955 
William Machain Morgan, Jr., Worthington, Pennsylvania 

B.S., Indiana State College, 1963 
Bearly Bruce Mounts, Washington, Pennsylvania 

B.A., Washington & Jefferson College, 1964 
William Richard Myers, Oil City, Pennsylvania 

B.A., Westminster College, 1964 
Allen Lee Nephew, Gowanda, New York 

B.A., Huron College, 1964 
Bernard William Nord, Bessemer, Pennsylvania 

B.A., Pennsylvania State University, 1963 
Dale T. O'Connell, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

B.A., Tarkio College, 1964 
Robert Alexander Orr, Jr., May field, Kentucky 

B.A., Southwestern at Memphis, 1964 
George J. Peters, Joliet, Illinois 

B.S., West Virginia University, 1957 
Carol Rose Polivka, Bridgeport, Ohio 

A.B., Muskingum College, 1964 
Walter Radulovich, Westerville, Ohio 

B.S., University of Illinois, 1950 
Jack Donald Richardson, Smithfield, Pennsylvania 

B.A., Roberts Wesleyan College, 1959 
Henry Elwood Robinson, III, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

B.A., Emory University, 1963 
Vernon Clarke Rushing, Ellicott City, Maryland 

B.S., Brown University, 1964 

105 



Thomas J. Sawyer, Sharon, Pennsylvania 

B.A., University of Pittsburgh, 1955 
Peter David Schlichting, Arlington, New Jersey 

B.A., Bloomfield College, 1964 
Bill Vernon Seastrom, N. Muskegon, Michigan 

B.M., Michigan State University, 1960 
John William Shumaker, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

B.A., University of Pittsburgh, 1964 
Jonathan Carl Siehl, Cincinnati, Ohio 

B.A., Muskingum College, 1964 
Robert Edward Singdahlsen, Decatur, Georgia 

B.A., Dickinson College, 1957 

M.A., Western Reserve University, 1961 
Milton Edward Skiff, Greenwich, New York 

B.S., Cornell University, 1957 
James Avery Smith, Southampton, Pennsylvania 

B.S., Drexel Institute, 1958 
Theodore Nicholas Tate, Johnsonville, New York 

A.B., State University of New York, 1963 
William Clarence Weckerly, Butler, Pennsylvania 

B.S., Indiana State College, 1959 
Donald Paul Wilson, Carmichaels, Pennsylvania 

A.B., Waynesburg College, 1964 
Louis Henry Wollenberg, Orchard Park, New York 

B.A., The College of Wooster, 1952 
Fred Joseph Wood, N. Haledon, New Jersey 

B.A., Bloomfield College, 1964 
Hugh Stanley Zimmerman, Clyde, Ohio 

B.A., The College of Wooster, 1962 



unior 



Class 



Robert Herbert Barnes, Maple Heights, Ohio 

B.A., Park College, 1964 
Boyd A. Bell, Parker, Arizona 

B.S., Pennsylvania State University, 1942 
Laszlo Berzeviczy, Ontario, California 

B.A., The College of Wooster, 1965 
W. Wilson Bradburn, Jr., Oakdale, Pennsylvania 

B.A., The College of Wooster, 1965 
Allan Campbell, III, Mill City, Oregon 

B.S., University of Massachusetts, 1958 

Arthur John Campbell, Jeannette, Pennsylvania 
B.A., Waynesburg College, 1965 

106 



Edward Allen Campbell, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

B.A., Muskingum College, 1965 
/. Terry Carnahan, Beaver, Pennsylvania 

B.A., Westminster College, 1965 
Lawrence Walter Corbett, Harrisville, Ohio 

B.A., Muskingum College, 1965 
Joseph Frederick Crawford, Monaghan, Ireland 

B.A., Muskingum College, 1965 
William Alan Doyle, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

B.A., Davis and Elkins College, 1965 
David Harrison Foubert, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

B.A., Beloit College, 1965 
William D. Fox, Jeannette, Pennsylvania 

A.B., Lycoming College, 1960 
John Charles Free, Washington, District of Columbia 

B.A., Davis and Elkins College, 1965 
William Irvin Gracey, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

B.A., Waynesburg College, 1965 
Arthur George Hampson, Seattle, Washington 

B.A., Seattle Pacific College, 1965 
Robert Alfred Harris, Jr., Kansas City, Missouri 

B.S., Missouri School of Mines, 1963 
Kenneth W. Herman, Rochester, New York 

B.S., New York State University, 1961 
Robert Joseph Huck, Downers Grove, Illinois 

A.B., Wheaton College, 1965 
Alexander Phillips Hurt, Towson, Maryland 

B.A., Norwich University, 1962 
Midhat Daoud Ibrahim, Tripoli, Lebanon 

Th.B., Near East School of Theology, 1964 
■ Warren Jacobs, Waynesburg, Pennsylvania 

A.B., Waynesburg College, 1965 
David Ralph Johnston, West Lafayette, Indiana 

B.S., Iowa State University, 1959 

M.S., Purdue University, 1965 
David S. King, Coraopolis, Pennsylvania 

B.A., Maryville College, 1965 
John Francis Kirkham, Canton, Ohio 

B.A., Malone College, 1964 
John G. Koesel, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

A.B., Muskingum College, 1962 

M.Ed., University of Pittsburgh, 1965 
Judith Evelyn Kress, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

B.A., Westminster College, 1965 

107 



Benjamin Peter Ksiazek, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

B.A., Butler University, 1965 
John Roger Larson, Canton, Ohio 

B.A., Bowling Green State University, 1965 
Peter Church Leathersich, Hornell, New York 

A.B., Union College, 1965 
James Graham Lockhart, Butler, Pennsylvania 

B.A., Westminster College, 1965 

Robert Nicholas Lodwick, Sao Paulo, Brasil 
Instituto Jose Manuel da Conceicao, 1963 

Robert Louis Lowry, West Chester, Pennsylvania 

B.S., University of Pennsylvania, 1955 

M.B.A., Temple University, 1965 
Donald Drew Ludwig, Washington, District of Columbia 

B.A., The College of Wooster, 1965 
Harry M. Lutton, East Liverpool, Ohio 

B.A., Grove City College, 1951 
Paul Scott McQueen, West Middlesex, Pennsylvania 

A.B., Youngstown University, 1965 
/. Michael Mullin, Fredericktown, Ohio 

A.B., Pikeville College, 1965 
Peggy Lou Nauman, Mound City, Missouri 

B.A., Tarkio College, 1963 
Kenneth Russell Newhams, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

B.A., The College of Wooster, 1965 
Milton Harold Ohlsen, Jr., Weaverville, North Carolina 

B.A., Muskingum College, 1965 
Alan Van de Mark Pareis, Union, New Jersey 

A.B., Albright College, 1965 
Charles Neal Perrine, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

B.A., Grove City College, 1965 
John A. Pilutti, Irondale, Ohio 

B.A., Kent State University, 1965 
Ronald Edward Pugh, Hyattsville, Maryland 

B.A., Tusculum College, 1965 
Vaughn Paul Purnell, Glassport, Pennsylvania 

B.S., Grove City College, 1965 
Rhea Antoinette Rose, Butler, Pennsylvania 

B.A., Slippery Rock State College, 1961 
William Paul Saxman, West Mifflin, Pennsylvania 

B.S., Slippery Rock State College, 1961 
Jon Wayne Shelton, Venetia, Pennsylvania 

B.A., Asbury College, 1962 
William Marshall Simpson, Henry, Illinois 

B.A., Monmouth College, 1965 

108 



Douglas Earl Smith, Barrington, Rhode Island 

B.A., Barrington College, 1964 
Edward Eldon Spence, Los Alamos, New Mexico 

B.A., Hastings College, 1965 
Ralph Carleton Stock, Kenmore, New York 

B.A., Grove City College, 1965 
William Leroy Thompson, East McKeesport, Pennsylvania 

B.A., Waynesburg College, 1965 
Harvey Gibson Throop, Omaha, Nebraska 

B.A., Missouri Valley College, 1965 
Barry T. Vance, McMurray, Pennsylvania 

B.A., Bethany College, 1965 
Terry Conrad Waibel, Allison Park, Pennsylvania 

B.A., Colgate University, 1965 
Steven Hoodless Washburn, Monmouth, Illinois 

B.A., Monmouth College, 1963 
Kenneth James Watt, Spokane, Washington 

B.A., Whitworth College, 1965 
Colin Thomas Webster, Hamburg, New York 

B.B.A., University of Wisconsin, 1959 
Frederick Wayne Weiss, Hamburg, New York 

B.S., Cortland State Teachers College, 1958 
William Scott Wills, New Kensington, Pennsylvania 

A.B., Tarkio College, 1965 
Roland Clarence Wroten, Scranton, Pennsylvania 

B.S., University of Scranton, 1956 

M.A., University of Scranton, 1963 
Kenneth Edward Zweig, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 

B.A., Houghton College, 1965 



B.D. Students Serving Internships 

James Glen Bell, Grove City, Pennsylvania 

B.S., Grove City College, 1964 
William Alan Crawford, Cincinnati, Ohio 

B.S., University of Cincinnati, 1964 
Michael Fleming Smathers, Crossville, Tennessee 

B.A., The College of Wooster, 1963 
Gerald Floyd Stacy, Minneapolis, Minnesota 

B.A., Macalester College, 1962 



109 



Candidates for Degree of Master of Religious Education! 
Senior Class 

Roxanna Ryman Bertini, West Newbury, Massachusetts 

B.A., Smith College, 1955 
Gail G. Buchwalter, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 

B.A., The College of Wooster, 1963 
David James Devey, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

B.S., University of Pittsburgh, 1952 

M.E., University of Pittsburgh, 1956 
Jean Hyde Humason, Fairmont, West Virginia 

B.A., Davis and Elkins, 1964 
Mary Laura Markley, Cadiz, Ohio 

B.S., Muskingum College, 1948 
Margaret Elizabeth Papsch, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

B.S. in Education, Slippery Rock State College, 1960 

Junior Class 

Susan Jane Becker, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

B.A., Muskingum College, 1963 
Ruth Emma Caldwell, Harrisburg, Pennsylvania 

B.M., Westminster Choir College, 1950 
Sally Hillman Childs, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

B.A., Sarah Lawrence College, 1949 
Carolyn Jane Easdale, Tilden, Illinois 

B.A., Monmouth College, 1965 
Madge B. Floyd, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

B.A., Emory University, 1958 
Jean Marian Oberlin, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

B.A., Kansas University, 1948 
Lucille Kathryne Rupe, Ezel, Kentucky 

B.A., Monmouth College, 1965 
Nancy Jean Shaffer, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

B.A., Taylor University, 1961 

Candidates for Degree of Master of Education 

(to be granted by the University of Pittsburgh) 

Mary Jean Engle, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 
Elaine Kozar, Ambridge, Pennsylvania 
Catherine M. Strang, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

110 



Special Students 

Francisco Penha Alves, Sao Paulo, Brasil 

Milton William Aylor, Kokomo, Indiana 

Kenneth E. Bailey, New York, New York 

Ruth Florence Frazer, Baltimore, Maryland 

Eudaldo Silva Lima, Brasilia, Brasil 

Isao Otomo, Kyoto-shi, Japan 

Amba Durga Prasad, Mainpuri, India 

Sung Jong Shin, Seoul, Korea 

Don Raymond Smith, Masontown, Pennsylvania 

Anne E. Sponsler, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

Edward Horace Thomas, Salisbury, Rhodesia 

Roselis Wachholz, Stuttgart, Germany 

James Clyde Wright, Knoxville, Tennessee 

Candidates for The Degree of Master of Theology 

Biblical Studies 

Rev. Robert A. Coughenour, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

B.S., State Teachers College, 1953 

B.D., Pittsburgh Theological Seminary, 1960 
Rev. Howard Eshbaugh, Oakdale, Pennsylvania 

A.B., Grove City College, 1955 

B.D., Western Theological Seminary, 1956 
Rev. Ernest J. Frederick, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

B.S., University of Pittsburgh, 1955 

B.D., Biblical Seminary, 1964 
Rev. Philip M. Hastings, Sewickley, Pennsylvania 

B.E., Johns Hopkins University, 1953 

B.D., Western Theological Seminary, 1956 
Rev. Charles C. Hendricks, Fort Worth, Texas 

B.A., Austin College, 1961 

B.D., Austin Seminary, 1965 
Rev. A. Vanlier Hunter, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

A.B., Grove City College, 1961 

B.D., Pittsburgh Theological Seminary, 1964 
Rev. John W. Irwin, Colliers, West Virginia 

B.A., Sterling College, 1955 

B.D., Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary, 1958 
Rev. John Bavington McLaren, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

B.A., Westminster College, 1957 

111 



B.D., Pittsburgh Theological Seminary, 1963 
Rev. David W. Philips, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

B.A., Muskingum College, 1959 

B.D., Pittsburgh Theological Seminary, 1963 
Rev. Jay Rochelle, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

B.A., Concordia College, 1961 

B.D., Concordia Seminary, 1965 
Rev. Rowland Dean Van Es, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

A.B., Hope College, 1960 

B.D., Western Theological Seminary (Holland, Mich.), 1964 

History and Theology 

Rev. Kenneth P. Alpers, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

B.A., Capital University, 1949 

B.D., Capital Theological Seminary, 1952 
Rev. William Cheston Berlin, Johnstown, Pennsylvania 

B.A., Muskingum College, 1953 

B.D., Western Theological Seminary, 1956 
Rev. Raymond Whitford Cartwright, Jr., Sewickley, Pennsylvania 

B.A., Otterbein College, 1958 

B.D., United Theological Seminary, 1961 
Rev. Din Dayal, Gadarwara, India 

B.A., Allahabad University, 1949 

B.D., Leonard Theological College, 1952 
Rev. Benjamin T. Griffin, Mt. Pleasant, Pennsylvania 

B.A., Baylor University, 1961 

B.D., Andover Newton Theological Seminary, 1965 
Rev. Dong Soo Kim, Seoul, Korea 

B.A., Union Christian College, 1959 

B.D., Pittsburgh Theological Seminary, 1965 
Rev. Kerry Meier, Glenwillard, Pennsylvania 

A.B., Bloomfield College, 1957 

B.D., Pittsburgh Theological Seminary, 1960 
Rev. Robert Van Wyk, Clinton, Pennsylvania 

A.B., The College of Wooster, 1961 

B.D., Pittsburgh Theological Seminary, 1964 
Rev. Ralph K. Weber, Derry, Pennsylvania 

B.A., Bluffton College, 1951 

B.D., Bethany Biblical Seminary, 1954 

S.T.M., Biblical Seminary, 1955 



112 



Program for Advanced Pastoral Studies 

Rev. John E. Adams, Cross Creek, Pennsylvania 

B.A., University of Buffalo, 1957 

B.D., Pittsburgh Theological Seminary, 1961 
Rev. James B. Bailey, Weirton, West Virginia 

B.S.C., Ohio University, 1953 

B.D., Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary, 1959 
Rev. Milton L. Bierman, Johnstown, Pennsylvania 

B.A., Carleton College, 1953 

B.D., Union Theological Seminary, 1958 
Rev. S. Hayden Britton, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

B.S. in Ed., University of Tennessee, 1955 

B.D., Western Theological Seminary, 1958 
Rev. Duncan Campbell, Argyll, Scotland 

M.A., St. Andrews University, 1952 

B.D., Austin Presbyterian Theological Seminary, 1956 

Rev. Alfred M. Deemer, Natrona Heights, Pennsylvania 
A.B., Greenville College, 1948 
B.D., Western Theological Seminary, 1953 
M.Ed., University of Pittsburgh, 1955 

Rev. Wayne E. Faust, Waynesburg, Ohio 
A.B., University of Pittsburgh, 1957 
B.D., Pittsburgh Theological Seminary, 1960 

Rev. D. M. Geconcillo, Pasay City, Philippines 

Th.B., Union Theological Seminary, Manila, 1953 
A.B., Philippine Christian College, 1964 

Rev. Richard C. Horn, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 
B.A., American University, 1957 
B.D., Colgate Rochester Divinity School, 1960 

Rev. J. Theodore Hunniford, Roscoe, Pennsylvania 
B.S., Temple University, 1957 
B.D., Pittsburgh Theological Seminary, 1960 

Rev. Donald F. Hursh, Johnstown, Pennsylvania 
A.B., Elizabethtown College, 1950 
B.D., Bethany Theological Seminary, 1953 

Rev. William P. Kearns, West Newton, Pennsylvania 
B.A., Bob Jones University, 1956 
M.A., Bob Jones University, 1957 
Ph.D., Bob Jones University, 1960 

Rev. George Hallauer Lower, Westtown, Pennsylvania 
B.S., Bucknell University, 1953 
B.D., Pittsburgh Theological Seminary, 1960 
M.A., Hartford Theological Seminary, 1961 



13 



Rev. Iqbal Nisar, Lyallpur, W. Pakistan 

B.A., Gordon College, 1952 

B.D., Gujranwala Seminary, 1961 
Rev. J. Robert Phillips, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

B.S., University of Pittsburgh, 1954 

B.D., Western Theological Seminary, 1959 
Mr. Dayanand David Pitamber, Mainpuri, India 

M.A., Agra University, 1960 

B.D., Pittsburgh Theological Seminary, 1964 
Rev. John P. Pro, Jeannette, Pennsylvania 

B.Ed., Duquesne University, 1949 

B.D., Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary, 1957 
Rev. Bruce Warner Reeves, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

B.A., The College of Wooster, 1955 

B.D., Union Theological Seminary, 1959 
Rev. Fred M. Rogers, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

B.M., Rollins College, 1951 

B.D., Pittsburgh Theological Seminary, 1962 
Rev. Hugh King Rose, Clairton, Pennsylvania 

A.B., Muskingum College, 1951 

B.D., Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary, 1954 
Rev. Bertram H. Saunders, Walnut Creek, California 

A.B., University of California, 1949 

S.T.B., Biblical Seminary in New York, 1952 
Rev. Judson Wiley, Bakerstown, Pennsylvania 

A.B., Washington and Jefferson College, 1950 

B.D., Western Theological Seminary, 1953 



Summary of Attendance 

Bachelor of Divinity Program 

Juniors 64 

Middlers 69 

Seniors 54 

Interns 4 191 

Master of Religious Education Program 

Juniors 8 

Seniors 6 14 

Master of Education Program 3 

Master of Theology Program 43 

Special Students 12 

Total Enrollment 263 

114 



Board of Directors 



Officers 

Rev. Charles P. Robshaw, S.T.D., D.D., LL.D., President 

Rev. J. Hubert Henderson, D.D., Vice President 

Mr. George D. Lockhart, Secretary 

Mr. J. Rowe Hinsey, Assistant Secretary 

Mr. Robert L. Becker, Treasurer 

Mr. A. Douglas Swanberg, B.S., M.B.A., Assistant Treasurer 

Mr. Henry C. Herchenroether, Jr., Counsel 

Members 

Term Expires May 1966 

Mr. A. C. Amsler, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

Retired— Westinghouse Electric Corporation 
Rev. John B. Barker, D.D., Canton, Ohio 

Pastor, Calvary Presbyterian Church 
Mr. Frank H. Davis, LL.D., Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

Retired 
Rev. Robert H. French, D.D., LL.D., Des Moines, Iowa 

Synod Executive, Synod of Iowa 
Mr. Henry C. Herchenroether, Jr., Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

Attorney, Alter, Wright, and Barron 
Mr. W. Kenneth Menke, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

President, Pittsburgh Chemical Company, a division of 

United States Steel Corporation 
Rev. Don P. Montgomery, D.D., Youngstown, Ohio 

Pastor, Pleasant Grove United Presbyterian Church 
Mr. William H. Rea, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

President, Oliver Tyrone Corporation 
Rev. Robert H. Stephens, D.D., Summit, New Jersey 

Pastor, Central Presbyterian Church 
Mr. James W. Vicary, Erie, Pennsylvania 

President, Ervite Corporation 
Rev. Robert R. Vogelsang, Latrobe, Pennsylvania 

Pastor, Latrobe United Presbyterian Church 
Rev. Walter R. Young, D.D., Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

Pastor, Second United Presbyterian Church of Wilkinsburg 

Term Expires May 1967 

Mr. Robert L. Becker, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 
Retired— President, Wear-Ever Aluminum, Inc. 

116 



Mr. Earle M. Craig, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

Retired— Chairman of the Board, Valvoline Oil Company 
Rev. Richard W. Graves, D.D., Litt.D., New Wilmington, Pennsylvania 

Retired 
Mr. Max A. Lauffer, Ph.D., Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

Andrew Mellon Professor of Biophysics and Chairman, 

Department of Biophysics, University of Pittsburgh 
Mr. George D. Lockhart, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

Attorney, Kirkpatrick, Pomeroy, Lockhart and Johnson 
Rev. W. Paul Ludwig, Ph.D., Washington, District of Columbia 

Pastor, Chevy Chase Presbyterian Church 
Mr. John R. McCune, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

Vice President, Lockhart Iron and Steel Company 
Rev. Walter L. Moser, Ph.D., D.D., Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

Secretary-Treasurer, Johnson C. Smith University 
Mr. Alexander P. Reed, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

Attorney at Law 
Rev. John Coventry Smith, D.D., LL.D., New York, New York 

General Secretary, Commission on Ecumenical Mission and Relations 
Rev. Frederick Bruce Speakman, D.D., Dayton, Ohio 

Pastor, Westminster Presbyterian Church 
Rev. C. T. R. Yeates, D.D., LL.D., Des Moines, Iowa 

Pastor, Westminster United Presbyterian Church 

Term Expires May 1968 

Rev. Charles C. Bray, Jr., Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

Pastor, Third Presbyterian Church 
Mr. Donald C. Burnham, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

President, Westinghouse Electric Corporation 
Rev. J. Hubert Henderson, D.D., Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

Pastor, J. M. Wallace Memorial United Presbyterian Church 
Mr. William R. Jackson, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

President, Pittsburgh-Des Moines Steel Company 
Rev. John C. Lorimer, D.D., New Wilmington, Pennsylvania 

Retired 

Rev. Charles P. Robshaw, S.T.D., D.D., LL.D., Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

Pastor, East Liberty Presbyterian Church 
Mr. James H. Rogers, HH.D., Latrobe, Pennsylvania 

Chairman, Latrobe Die Casting Company 
Rev. Howard C. Scharfe, D.D., LL.D., Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

Pastor, Shadyside Presbyterian Church 

Mr. H. Parker Sharp, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

Vice President and General Counsel, Jones & Laughlin Steel Corporation 

117 



Rev. Samuel C. Weir, D.D., Detroit, Michigan 

Minister of Visitation, Cherry Hill United Presbyterian Church, Dearborn 
Rev. W. Bruce Wilson, D.D., Bethel Park, Pennsylvania 

Minister of Visitation, Westminster United Presbyterian Church 
Mr. Ralph M. Wyman, Greenwich, Connecticut 

Vice President and Director, H. O. Canfield Company 



Administrative Staff 



The Rev. Donald G. Miller, Ph.D., LL.D., Litt.D. 
President 

The Rev. Gordon E. Jackson, Ph.D., D.D. 
Dean of the Seminary 

Mr. J. Rowe Hinsey, B.S. 
Director of Development 

Mr. William R. Atkins, B.S., M.R.E. 
Business Manager 

Mr. A. Douglas Swanberg, B.S., M.B.A. 
Comptroller 

The Rev. Howard M. Jamieson, Jr., Ph.D., D.D. 
Dean of Students 

Miss Bessie M. Burrows, M.A. 
Registrar 

The Rev. James S. Irvine, M.L.S., Ph.D. 
Librarian 

The Rev. Charles C. W. Idler, B.D. 
Director of Admissions 

The Rev. John M. Bald, Th.M., D.D. 
Financial Aid Officer 

The Rev. William R. Phillippe, B.D. 
Director of Continuing Education 



118 



Historical Roll of Professors 



Name 



John Anderson 
John Banks 
fames Ramsey 
Joseph Kerr 
Jacob Jones Janeway 
Mungo Dick 
Luther Halsey 

John Williamson Nevin 

David Elliott 

John Taylor Pressly 

David Carson 

Thomas Beveridge 

Moses Kerr 

Joseph Claybaugh 

Samuel W. McCracken 

Lewis Warner Green 

James Martin 

Alexander Taggart McGill 

James Lemonte Dinwiddie 

Abraham Anderson 

Alexander Downs Clark 

David Reynolds Kerr 

Melancthon Williams Jacobus 

William Swan Plumer 

Samuel Wilson 

William Davidson 

Alexander Young 

Samuel Jennings Wilson 
John Scott 
Joseph Clokey 
William Miller Paxton 
Andrew Morrow Black 
Archibald Alexander Hodge 
David Alexander Wallace 

James Harper 

Joseph Tate Cooper 

William Bruce 

William Henry Hornblower 

James Gillespie Carson 

William Gallogly Moorehead 



Seminary of 


Period of 


Inauguration 


Service 


Service 


1794-1819 


Philadelphia 


1820-1826 


Canonsburg 


1821-1842 


Pittsburgh 


1825-1829 


Western 


1828-1829 


Pittsburgh 


1829-1831 


Western 


1829-1836 




1872-1880 


Western 


1829-1840 


Western 


1829-1874 


Allegheny 


1832-1870 


Canonsburg 


1834-1834 


Canonsburg 


1835-1871 


Allegheny 


1835-1836 


Oxford 


1839-1855 


Oxford 


1839-1840 


Western 


1840-1847 


Canonsburg 


1842-1846 


Western 


1842-1854 


Allegheny 


1843-1846 


Canonsburg 


1847-1855 


Allegheny 


1847-1884 


Allegheny 


1851-1887 


Western 


1851-1876 


Western 


1854-1862 


Xenia 


1855-1875 


Oxford 


1855-1858 


Oxford 


1855-1874 




1876-1891 


Western 


1857-1883 


Monmouth 


1858-1874 


Xenia 


1858-1873 


Western 


1860-1872 


Monmouth 


1864-1874 


Western 


1864-1877 


Monmouth & Xenia 


1867-1870 




1883-1883 


Newburg 


1867-1899 


Allegheny 


1871-1886 


Xenia 


1871-1880 


Western 


1871-1883 


Xenia 


1873-1888 


Xenia 


1873-1914 



119 



Jackson Burgess McMichael 

Samuel Thompson Lowrie 

Samuel Henry Kellogg 

William Hamilton Jeffers 

Benjamin Breckenbridge Warfield 

Thomas Hastings Robinson 

David MacDill 

David A. McClenahan 

Robert Dick Wilson 

James Alexander Grier 

John McNaugher 

Henry T. McClelland 

Matthew Brown Riddle 

Oliver Joseph Thatcher 

Wilbert Webster White 

Robert Christie 

John A. Wilson 

John Douds Irons 

James Anderson Kelso 

David Riddle Breed 

Joseph Kyle 

Jesse Johnson 

David Schley Schaff 

John Elliott Wishart 

David E. Cully 

William Riley Wilson 

Charles Frederick Wishart 

William Robertson Farmer 

John Hunter Webster 

James Henry Snowden 

Melvin Grove Kyle 

James Doig Rankin 

David Frazier McGill 

Frank Eakin 

James Gallaway Hunt 

Selby Frame Vance 

James Harper Grier 

Robert McNary Karr 

James Leon Kelso 

George Boone McCreary 

Robert Nathaniel Montgomery 

Donald Mackenzie 

Gaius Jackson Slosser 

Albert Henry Baldinger 

Clarence Joseph Williamson 

John Wick Bowman 

William F. Orr 

George Anderson Long 

Theophilus Mills Taylor 



Xenia 

Western 

Western 

Western 

Western 

Western 

Xenia 

Allegheny 

Western 

Allegheny 

Allegheny 

Western 

Western 

Allegheny 

Xenia 

Western 

Allegheny 

Xenia 

Western 

Western 

Xenia 

Xenia 

Western 

Xenia 

Western 

Allegheny 

Allegheny 

Western 

Xenia 

Western 

Xenia 

Pittsburgh 

Pittsburgh 

Western 

Pittsburgh 

Western 

Pittsburgh 

Xenia 

Xenia 

Xenia 

Pittsburgh 

Western 

Western 

Pittsburgh-Xenia 

Pittsburgh-Xenia 

Western 

Western 

Pittsburgh-Xenia 

Pittsburgh-Xenia 



1873-1878 

1874-1877 

1877-1886 

1877-1914 

1878-1887 

1883-1906 

1884-1902 

1885-1921 

1885-1900 

1886-1909 

1886-1943 

1886-1891 

1887-1916 

1888-1892 

1889-1894 

1891-1923 

1893-1915 

1895-1905 

1897-1944 

1898-1931 

1899-1921 

1903-1930 

1903-1926 

1905-1923 

1906-1948 

1907-1940 

1907-1914 

1907-1939 

1908-1933 

1911-1928 

1914-1930 

1914-1929 

1915-1931 

1915-1927 

1920-1926 

1921-1935 

1922-1926 

1922-1949 

1923-1963 

1924-1946 

1926-1930 

1928-1933 

1928-1958 

1931-1947 

1932-1950 

1936-1944 

1936- 

1942-1955 

1942-1962 



120 



Jarvis M. Cotton 
Frank Dixon McCloy 
Henry Alexander Riddle 
J. Carter Swaim 
Walter R. Clyde 
Addison Hardie Leitch 
Florence M. Lewis 
H. Ray Shear 
David Noel Freedman 
Gordon Edmund Jackson 
Ralph G. Turnbull 
John H. Gerstner 
Clifford E. Barbour 
Bessie M. Burrows 
James A. Walther 
Sidney O. Hills 
j Robert Lee Kelley, Jr. 

I Robert Clyde Johnson 
Howard M. Jamieson, Jr. 
| John M. Bald 
Elwyn Allen Smith 
Walter E. Wiest 
Malcolm S. Alexander 
Harold E. Scott 
Howard L. Ralston Western 
William A. Nicholson 
James Sheppard Irvine 
J. Gordon Chamberlin 
Gayraud S. Wilmore 
Arlan P. Dohrenburg 
Edward D. Grohman 
David G. Buttrick 
Donald G. Miller 
George H. Kehm 
Dietrich Ritschl 
Markus Barth 
Edward Farley 
Lynn Boyd Hinds 
Iain G. Wilson 
Douglas R. A. Hare 
Donald E. Gowan 
Jared J. Jackson 



Western 




1944-1961 


Western 




1944- 


Western 




1944_1949 


Western 




1944_1954 


Western 




1945- 


Pittsburgh- 


Xenia 


1946-1961 


Pittsburgh- 


Xenia 


1947-1952 


Pittsburgh- 


Xenia 


1947-1959 


Western 




1948-1964 


Pittsburgh- 


Xenia 


1949- 


Western 




1949.1954 


Pittsburgh- 


Xenia 


1950- 


Western 




1951-1962 


Pittsburgh- 


Xenia 


1953- 


Western 




1954- 


Western 




1954- 


Pittsburgh- 


Xenia 


1955- 


Western 




1955-1963 


Pittsburgh- 


Xenia 


1955- 


Pittsburgh- 


Xenia 


1957- 


Western 




1957- 


Western 




1957- 


Pittsburgh- 


Xenia 


1958- 


Pittsburgh- 


Xenia 


1959- 


and Pittsburgh- 


Xenia 


1960- 


Western 




1960- 


Western 




1960- 


Pittsburgh 




1960- 


Pittsburgh 




1961-1965 


Pittsburgh 




1961-1964 


Pittsburgh 




1961-1964 


Pittsburgh 




1961- 


Pittsburgh 




1962- 


Pittsburgh 




1962- 


Pittsburgh 




1963- 


Pittsburgh 




1963- 


Pittsburgh 




1963- 


Pittsburgh 




1963- 


Pittsburgh 




1963- 


Pittsburgh 




1964- 


Pittsburgh 




1965- 


Pittsburgh 




1965- 



121 



Donations and Bequests 



All donations or bequests to the Seminary should be made to "The Pitts- [ 
burgh Theological Seminary of the United Presbyterian Church in the United | 
States of America, located at 616 North Highland Avenue, Pittsburgh, 
Pennsylvania 15206." The proper legal form for making a bequest is as 
follows. 

"I hereby give and bequeath to Pittsburgh Theological Seminary of the 
United Presbyterian Church in the United States of America, incorporated 1 
in the State of Pennsylvania, the following: . . ." 

Care should be taken to use the corporate name as given above, and! 
to have the bequest conform to the laws of the state governing it. 

The memorial idea may be carried out either in the erection of a build-; 
ing or in the endowment of any of the special funds of the Seminary. 



122 



Index Page 

Administrative Staff 118 

Admissions: College Requirements, Credentials, Procedure, etc. . . . 36-39 

Advanced Standing 51-53 

Alumni Association 94 

Attendance, Summary of 114 

Awards Granted, 1964-1965 99-100 

Awards, prizes, and graduate fellowships 43-46 

Bachelor of Divinity Degree 52-55, 60-79, 88 

Board of Directors 116-118 

Buildings 23-28 

Calendar of Events, 1966-1967 4 

Campus 23-31 

Continuing Education 92-93 

Curriculum 49-88 

Degree Programs, Index to 49 

Degrees Awarded, 1964-1965 96-98 

Donations and Bequests 122 

Emeriti 13 

Enrollment, Summary of 114 

Expenses 40-41 

Faculty 5-13 

Fees and Expenses 40-4 1 

Field Education 78 

Financial Assistance 42-43 

Foreign Students 39 

Four-year Program 55 

Graduation Honors and Awards 99-100 



123 



History of Seminary 19 

Honors Program 53 

Hospitalization Insurance 41 

Housing 26-28 

Insurance, Medical and Hospital 41 

Lectures, Special 15 

Library 25-26 

Loan Funds 42-43 

Married Student Apartment Fees 40-41 

Master of Education Degree 58 

Master of Public Administration Degree 88 

Master of Public and International Affairs Degree 88 

Master of Religious Education Degree 56-57, 60-79 

Master of Theology Degree . '. 80-87 

Medical Insurance 41 

Museum, Bible Lands 29 

Music, Opportunities in 34 

Pittsburgh— Our Environment 21 

Pittsburgh, University of, joint program with 78, 88 

Pre-Seminary Studies 36-37 

Professors, Historical Roll of 119-121 

Register of Students, 1965-1966 100-114 

Scholarships, loans, etc 42-43 

Student Association 33 

Summer Field Education 78 

Transfer Students 38 

Worship 33 



124 



lunar 



"x] ■■ %^m 



The Annual Catalogue of 

TkeTtttsWafi 

TWoaical 

Semmari) 

1967-68 



A SEMINARY OF THE UNITED PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH IN THE 
UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, FOUNDED 1794. ACCREDITED 
BY THE AMERICAN ASSOCIATION OF THEOLOGICAL SCHOOLS. 



616 N. HIGHLAND AVENUE 
PITTSBURGH, PENNSYLVANIA 15206 



THE SEMINARY CALENDAR 

1967 

Summer Programs of Continuing Education 

19-23 June School of Religion, Pennsylvania 

First Semester 

5-7 Sept. Junior Orientation and Registration 

7 Sept. Convocation, 11:00 a.m., and Community Luncheon 

8 Sept. Class Work Begins 
16 Sept. Junior Orientation Retreat 

3 Oct. Continuing Education Eight Weeks School Begins 

20 Oct. Last day for dropping courses 

23-27 Oct. Schaff Lecture Week 

15 Nov. Semi-Annual Meeting, Board of Directors 

23 Nov. Thanksgiving Day (No Classes) 

11-15 Dec. Reading Period 

18-20 Dec. Examination Period 

21 Dec. -2 Jan. Christmas Recess 

1968 

3-19 Jan. Intersession 

Second Semester 

22 Jan. Class Work Begins 

6 Feb. Continuing Education Eight Weeks School Begins 
10 Mar. Last day for dropping courses 

4-8 Mar. First Reading Period 

12 Apr. Good Friday (No Classes) 

22 Apr. Last Class day 

22-25 Apr. Second Reading Period for Seniors 

23-26 Apr. Second Reading Period for Juniors and Middlers 

26-27 Apr. Examination Period for Seniors 

29 Apr.-3 May Examination week for Juniors and Middlers 

5 May Communion Service for Seniors, 4:00 p.m., and Buffet Suppei| 

7 May Annual Meeting of the Board of Directors 
7 May Annual Meeting and Dinner of the Alumni Association 
7 May Commencement, 8:00 p.m., 

The East Liberty Presbyterian Church 



The Faculty 








Donald G. Miller, President. Greenville College, A.B. 
The Biblical Seminary in N.Y., S.T.B. and S.T.M. 
New York University, M.A. and Ph.D. 



William F. Orr, Professor of New Testament Litera- 
ture and Exegesis. Southwestern University, A.B.; 
Louisville Presbyterian Seminary, B.D. and Th.M.; 
Hartford Theological Seminary, Ph.D. 



Frank Dixon McCloy, Jr., Associate Professor of 
Church History. University of Pittsburgh, A.B. and 
A.M.; Western Theological Seminary, S.T.B. ; Har- 
vard University, A.M. and Ph.D. 



Walter R. Clyde, Professor of Christian Mission. 
Muskingum College, A.B.; Omaha Theological Sem- 
inary, B.D.; Western Theological Seminary, S.T.M. ; 
Hartford Seminary Foundation, Ph.D. 



Gordon E. Jackson, Dean of the Seminary and Hugh 
Thomson Kerr Professor of Pastoral Theology. Mon- 
mouth College, A.B.; Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological 
Seminary, Th.B. and Th.M.; University of Chicago, 
Ph.D. 



John H. Gerstner, Professor of Church History. West- 
minster College, A.B.; Westminster Theological Sem- 
inary, Th.B. and Th.M.; Harvard University, Ph.D. 



The Faculty 



Bessie M. Burrows, Assistant Professor of Christian 
Education and Registrar. Geneva College, B.A.; Co- 
lumbia University, M.A. 



James A. Walther, Associate Professor of New Testa- 
ment Literature and Exegesis. Grove City College, 
A.B.; Western Theological Seminary, S.T.B.; Em- 
manuel College, Victoria University, Toronto, Th.D. 



Sidney O. Hills, Associate Professor of Hebrew and 
Old Testament Literature. Northwestern University, 
B.A.; McCormick Theological Seminary, B.D.; Johns 
Hopkins University, Ph.D. 



Robert Lee Kelley, Jr., Associate Professor of Biblical 
Languages. University of Pittsburgh, A.B.; Pittsburgh- 
Xenia Theological Seminary, B.D.; Princeton Theo- 
logical Seminary, Th.M.; Princeton University, M.A. 



Howard M. Jamieson, Jr., Associate Professor of Bib- 
lical Theology and Dean of Students. Monmouth 
College, A.B.; Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Semi- 
nary, Th.B.; University of Pittsburgh, M.A. and 
Ph.D. 



John M. Bald, Associate Professor of Christian Ethics 
and Financial Aid Officer. Muskingum College, A.B.; 
Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary, Th.B. and 
Th.M.; Emmanuel College, Victoria University, 
Toronto, Th.D. 









The Faculty 



Walter E. Wiest, Professor of Philosophy of Religion. 
Lafayette College, A.B.; Princeton Theological Semi- 
nary, Th.B.; Columbia University, Ph.D. 




Harold E. Scott, Associate Professor of Homiletics 
and Director of Field Education. Sterling College, 
B.A.; Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary, B.D.; 
Princeton Theological Seminary, Th.D. 



Howard L. Ralston, Assistant Professor of Church 
Music. Muskingum College, Mus.B.; Curtis Institute 
of Music, A.A.G.O. 





William A. Nicholson, Assistant Professor of Homi- 
letics. Washington & Jefferson College, A.B.; West- 
ern Theological Seminary, S.T.B. 



/. Gordon Chamberlin, Associate Professor of Chris- 
tian Education. Cornell College in Iowa, A.B.; Union 
Theological Seminary (N.Y.), B.D.; Columbia Uni- 



versity, Ed.D. 



David G. Buttrick, Assistant Professor in Church and 
Ministry. Haverford College, B.A.; Union Theologi- 
cal Seminary (N.Y.), B.D. 

8 



The Faculty 



George H. Kehm, Professor in Theology. Queens 
College, B.S.; Princeton Theological Seminary, B.D.; 
Harvard Divinity School, S.T.M.; Harvard Univer- 
sity, Th.D. 




Dietrich Ritschl, Professor of History of Doctrine 
and Systematic Theology. University of Edinburgh, 
Ph.D. 




Markus Barth, Professor of New Testament. Univer- 
sity of Goettingen, Dr. Theol. 




Edward Farley, Professor of Systematic Theology. 
Centre College, A.B.; Louisville Presbyterian Theo- 
logical Seminary, B.D.; Columbia University, Ph.D. fm 




Lynn Boyd Hinds, Assistant Professor of Speech. Uni- 
versity of Akron, B.A.; Eastern Baptist Theological 
Seminary, B.D.; Temple University, M.A. 




Iain G. Wilson, William Oliver Campbell Professor 
of Homiletics. University of Edinburgh, M.A. and 
B.D. 




The Faculty 





Douglas R. A. Hare, Assistant Professor of New Tes- 
tament. Victoria College, University of Toronto, B.A.; 
Emmanuel College, B.D.; Union Theological Semi- 
nary (N.Y.), S.T.M. and Th.D. 



Donald E. Gowan, Assistant Professor of Old Testa- 
ment. University of South Dakota, B.A.; Dubuque 
Theological Seminary, B.D.; University of Chicago, 
Ph.D. 





Jared Judd Jackson, Assistant Professor of Old Testa- 
ment. Harvard College, A.B.; Episcopal Theological 
School (Cambridge, Mass.), B.D.; Union Theological 
Seminary (N.Y.), Th.D. 



H. Eberhard von Waldow, Associate Professor of Old 
Testament. Bonn University, Dr. Theol. 



Dikran Y. Hadidian, Librarian and Professor of 
Bibliography. American University of Beirut, B.A.; 
Hartford Theological Seminary, B.D.; Hartford 
School of Religious Education, M.A.; Hartford Theo- 
logical Seminary, S.T.M. ; Columbia University, M.S. 



Peter Fribley, Instructor in Homiletics. Hanover Col- 
lege (Hanover, Indiana), B.A.; Union Theological 
Seminary (N.Y.), B.D. and S.T.M. 



10 



The Faculty 



Robert S. Paul, Professor of Modern Church History. 
Saint Catherine's (Oxford University), B.A. and 
M.A.; Mansfield College (Oxford University), Ph.D. 



Guest Professors 



Paul Louis Lehmann, Th.D. (Union, N.Y.) 
Guest Professor in Ethics, 1966-1967 

Carl Ellis Nelson, Ph.D. (Columbia) 

Guest Professor in Christian Education, 1966-1967 

Neil R. Paylor, Ph.D. (Harvard) 

Lecturer, the Program for Advanced Pastoral Studies 

Clifford E. Davis, Ph.D. (Pennsylvania State) 
Lecturer in Christian Education 

Robert J. Shoemaker, M.D. (Pittsburgh) 
(Clinical Assistant Professor of Psychiatry, University 
of Pittsburgh School of Medicine) 
Lecturer and Consultant in Psychiatry 

Margaret B. McFarland, Ph.D. (Columbia) 

(Associate Professor of Psychology, University of 

Pittsburgh; Director, Arsenal Family and Children's 

Center) 

Lecturer, the Program for Advanced Pastoral Studies 

Rex A. Pittenger, M.D. (Minnesota) 
(Staunton Assistant Professor of Psychiatry, Univer- 
sity of Pittsburgh School of Medicine; Chief, Staun- 
ton Clinic) 
Lecturer, the Program for Advanced Pastoral Studies 

Moises Wodnicki, M.D. (Havana) 
(Clinical Assistant Professor of Psychiatry, Univer- 
sity of Pittsburgh School of Medicine; Director of 
Professional Education and Medical Research, May- 
view State Hospital) 

Lecturer, the Program for Advanced Pastoral Studies, 
1967-1968 



11 




Erma T. Meyerson, B.S., M.A.A.S.S. (Pittsburgh) 
(Professor of Sociology and Social Work, College of 
Liberal Arts and Graduate School of Social Work, 
University of Pittsburgh) 
Lecturer, the Program for Advanced Pastoral Studies 

Jack Matthews, M.A., Ph.D. (Ohio State) 
(Professor and Chairman, the Department of Speech, 
University of Pittsburgh) 
Lecturer, the Program for Advanced Pastoral Studies 

Victor Freeman, M.D. 

(University of Toronto, Canada) 

Lecturer, the Program for Advanced Pastoral Studies 

A. Vanlier Hunter, Jr., B.D. (Pittsburgh) 
Teaching Fellow in Biblical Languages 

Fred M. Rogers, B.D. (Pittsburgh) 
(Minister to Children, the Oakland Ministry, Pitts- 
burgh, and in Television) 
Guest Instructor in Church and Ministry 

George Todd, B.D. (Yale) 

Guest Instructor in Church and Ministry, 1966-1967 

William Storey, D.M.S. (Notre Dame) 
Guest Professor in Church History 

Edith Warman Skinner, M.A. (Columbia) 
(Professor, Drama Department, Carnegie Institute 
of Technology) 
Guest Professor of Speech, 1965-1966 

Robert L. Parks, B.F.A. (Carnegie Tech.) 
(Assistant Professor of Voice and Speech, Carnegie 
Institute of Technology) 
Guest Professor of Speech, 1965-1966 

James B. Bloomfield, M.S. W. (Pittsburgh) 
(Chief, Social Work Service, Veterans Administra- 
tion Hospital) 
Lecturer, the Program for Advanced Pastoral Studies 

Margaret M. Wynne, M.S. W. (Pittsburgh) 
(Assistant Chief, Social Work Service, Veterans Ad- 
ministration Hospital) 
Lecturer, the Program for Advanced Pastoral Studies 



12 



Emeriti 

The Rev. Clifford Edward Barbour, Ph.D., D.D., LL.D. 
President Emeritus 

The Rev. Robert McNary Karr, D.D. 

Emeritus Professor of Systematic and Biblical 

Theology 

The Rev. James Leon Kelso, A.M., Th.M., Th.D., 
D.D., LL.D. 

Emeritus Professor of Old Testament History and 
Biblical Archaeology 

The Rev. George Anderson Long, D.D., LL.D., Litt.D. 
President Emeritus and Emeritus Professor of English 
Bible 

The Rev. Henry A. Riddle, D.D., LL.D. 
President Emeritus 

The Rev. Gaius Jackson Slosser, Ph.D., F.R.Hist.S. 
Emeritus Professor of Ecclesiastical History and His- 
tory of Doctrine 




A Pittsburgh Seminary Alumnus 
Captain T. D. Par ham Jr., Che, USN 



Special Lectures— 1966-1967 



Dr. Gordon D. Kaufman 
Professor of Systematic Theology 
Harvard Divinity School 
Cambridge, Massachusetts 

Dr. David A. MacLennan 

Pastor, Brick Presbyterian Church 

Rochester, New York 

Dr. Max A. Laujfer 

Andrew Mellon Professor and Chairman of 

Department of Biophysics 

University of Pittsburgh 

Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

Dr. Anna Teresa Tymieniecka 
Visiting Professor for Phenomenology 
Duquesne University 
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

Dr. Paul W. Lapp 

Professor of Near Eastern History and Archaeology 
American School of Oriental Research 
Jerusalem, Jordan 

Fr. Peter E. Gemayel 
Professor of Oriental Liturgy, 
Syriac Patrology and Syriac 
St. Joseph University 
Beirut, Lebanon 

Dr. Paul Ricoeur 
Professor of Philosophy 
at the Sorbonne 
Paris, France 

Dr. Gabriel Vahanian 
Associate Professor of Religion 
Syracuse University 
Syracuse, New York 

The Rev. George Todd 

Division of Church Strategy and Development 
Board of National Missions, UPCUSA 
New York, New York 

The Honorable Wayne Morse 
U. S. Senator from Oregon 

14 



Professor J. L. Hromddka 
Retired Dean and Professor of Systematic 
Theology at the Comenius Faculty 
Prague, Czechoslovakia 

Henry W. Brosin, M.D. 

Chief of Psychiatry, School of Medicine 

University of Pittsburgh 

Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

Professor Fritz Buri 
Professor of Dogmatics 
University of Basel 
Basel, Switzerland 

The Rev. Paul C. Mills 

Director of Training 

The Pastoral Counseling Center of Dayton 

Dayton, Ohio 

Captain T. D. Parham, Jr., CHC, USN 
U. S. Naval Air Station 
Quonset Point, Rhode Island 

The Rev. Donald G. Roper 

Division of Radio, Television and Audio- Visuals 

Board of National Missions, UPCUSA 

New York, New York 

Dr. Schubert M. Ogden 
Professor of Theology 
Perkins School of Theology 
Dallas, Texas 

Professor Eduard Schweizer 
Professor of New Testament 
University of Zurich 
Zurich, Switzerland 

Dr. James Moody Gustafson 
Professor of Christian Ethics 
Yale Divinity School 
New Haven, Connecticut 

The Rev. Ganse Little 

Moderator 

The United Presbyterian Church in the U.S.A. 

Dr. Edmund A. Steimle 
Brown Professor of Homiletics 
Union Theological Seminary 
New York, New York 

15 



Senator Wayne Morse, a Convocation Speaker 



m 



<*-* 



•*& 





Dr. Paul Ricoeur, Schaff Lecturer 



16 



17 







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FOUND 10 






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Pittsburgh Seminary 

Our History 

The Pittsburgh Theological Seminary was created in 1959 by the con- 
solidation of two institutions which had lived apart since 1825: Pittsburgh- 
Xenia Theological Seminary (United Presbyterian Church of North Amer- 
ica) and Western Theological Seminary (Presbyterian Church, U.S.A.). 

Pittsburgh-Xenia Seminary was formed in 1930 by the union of Pitts- 
burgh and Xenia Seminaries. The Xenia branch had been founded in 1794 
in Western Pennsylvania but had spent most of its life in Ohio and Mis- 
souri. The Pittsburgh branch originated in 1825 in Pittsburgh, Pennsyl- 
vania. Both branches were later augmented by the resources of Newburgh 
Seminary which was founded in New York City in 1805 by John Mitchell 
Mason. 

Western Seminary, established legally in 1825 by the General Assembly 
of the Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.), began with classical academies founded 
by Joseph Smith (1785) and John McMillan (1787) in Washington, Pa. 
It was indeed a "western" seminary in 1825, whose task was to furnish a 
ministry for the rapidly opening western territories along the Ohio River. 

The union in 1958 of the United Presbyterian Church of North America 
with the Presbyterian Church in the United States of America and the 
subsequent merger of Pittsburgh-Xenia and Western Seminaries were pos- 
Lsible because of ancient bonds: the Bible, the reformers, and the Scottish 
experience of witness and suffering. Church divisions in Scotland were re- 
I produced in America. Since 1800 the direction has been steadily toward 
common witness with a resulting joining of schools. Pittsburgh Theological 
Seminary is the issue of this growing fellowship in theological education. 

The purpose of the Seminary as defined in the Constitution is to edu- 
ate suitable persons for the work of Christian ministry in its various 
forms at the highest possible level of educational competence. Set down in 
the midst of one of the key industrial centers of the nation, the Seminary 
xperiments in the city about it, wrestles with the nature of the gospel, 
strives for eventful communication. The purpose of the Seminary is clear- 
cut: to know our time, the gospel for the healing of our time, and the 

inistry for our time. 

19 



Pittsburgh at Night 



. -■■ -■■ ■ ■ 



University of Pittsburgh 




Pittsburgh 



Our Environment 



Pittsburgh Seminary is located in the workshop of America. Together with 
the contiguous towns, Pittsburgh is one of the great industrial centers of 
the world. Its population includes people of every nationality, profession, 
and skill, and therefore it affords unexcelled opportunities for the study 
of social, economic, political, and racial problems. Pittsburgh Seminary 
has working relationships with community and social agencies, labor unions, 
business management, human development research centers, teaching hos- 
pitals, etc., whereby these agencies and organizations become further re- 
sources for the educating of theological students. 



The cultural and educational life of Pittsburgh is no less rich. Five 
major colleges and universities are located in Pittsburgh: The University of 
Pittsburgh, Carnegie Institute of Technology, Duquesne University, Chatham 
College, and Mt. Mercy College. Their facilities, programs, and libraries, 
plus the Carnegie free libraries, afford added resources to all students. 



For music and art there are the world-famous Pittsburgh Symphony 
Orchestra; the Pittsburgh Opera Society; the Mendelssohn and Bach Choirs 
and other choral and concert groups; the Pittsburgh Playhouse, in its 
thirty-third year, which presents a total repertoire of plays; numerous art 
galleries including the Arts and Crafts Center and the Pittsburgh Plan for 
Art, both near the campus; and Carnegie Institute, which houses one of 
the largest contemporary art collections in the country, and which every 
third year presents the Pittsburgh International Exhibition of Paintings 
and Sculpture. Begun in 1896, the Pittsburgh International is one of the 
most important exhibitions of contemporary art in the world. 



Churches of all types and denominations are to be found, ranging from 
the large urban congregation to the small rural or industrial mission. 
Pittsburgh Presbytery is one of the largest presbyteries in the United Pres- 
byterian Church, U.S.A. Within its bounds are two hundred eleven churches 
- with a total membership of about one hundred twenty-six thousand. Of 
:hese, about one-fifth have more than five hundred members each, and 

fission work is conducted in over twenty different places. 
21 




: , , , 



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'It V. '* ** 












,.'.«**?* 



■ 



j 




The Campus 
Setting 

Pittsburgh Theological Seminary is ideally situated to symbolize by its very 
setting the church in the world. Located at the heart of a metropolitan 
center of two and a half million people, it is bordered on one side by an 
urban renewal project, including business and apartment buildings, churches, 
and schools, and on the other side by a residential area housing people of 
many ethnic backgrounds. By looking out almost any window on campus, 
one sees not only the broad expanse of lawn and trees of a once lovely 
estate given to the Seminary in 1951 by the heirs of the late H. Lee 
Mason, Jr., but is reminded also of the world in which the church lives 
and serves. 

Buildings 

New, modern buildings of American Colonial design, constructed of Hamp- 
ton Court Colonial red brick trimmed with Indiana limestone and fire- 
proof throughout, house the seminary activities. 

At the center of the campus stands The George A. Long Administration 
Building, which is the nerve center of campus life. Here classrooms, sem- 
inar rooms, faculty and administrative offices, a student center, a reception 
room, a Bible Lands Museum, a speech center, and the mail room all con- 
stitute a beehive of learning and social fellowship. 

The McCune Chapel, opening off the rotunda at the rear of the main 
building, done in chaste Colonial style, is the place where the seminary 
community gathers for worship and the renewal of spiritual life. 




23 



The Clifford E. Barbour Library was built and furnished with funds 
provided by the Sarah Mellon Scaife and Richard K. Mellon Foundations. 
The library is air-conditioned throughout. There is easy access to book re- 
sources located in four stack areas. One hundred and three desk carrels 
placed in and around the book stacks are available to all readers, in addition 
to which there are thirteen enclosed typing carrels which allow greater 
privacy for research work. Twenty research study rooms provide ideal con- 
ditions in which the faculty, visiting scholars and graduate students may 
pursue serious scholarly endeavors. Several study rooms and lounges, in- 
formally arranged, invite leisurely reading for more than 75 persons aside 
from many areas devoted to special purposes. Facilities are available for 
small seminar classes, conference and group study lessons, audio-visual work, 
music listening, microfilm reading, and hymnological and historical research. 

On display in the Main Floor exhibit area are the desk and chair of 
Dr. Karl Barth, Basel, Switzerland, presented to Pittsburgh Seminary by 
Dr. Barth in 1964. Accompanying the desk at which Dr. Barth wrote his 
theological treatises from 1922 is an autographed copy of his Kirchliche 
Dogmatik 1/1. 

The following special collections augment the book resources: 
The John M. Mason Memorial Collection 

The research area of the library contains this priceless collection of classical 
theological works dating from the Reformation period. 

The James Warrington Collection of Hymnology 

Several thousand valuable hymn and psalm books which came from the 
estate of James Warrington, Philadelphia, provide research materials for 
scholars of American and English hymnody. Mr. Warrington minutely 
analyzed the works by composer, meter, tune, place, author, title, etc. 

The Nina S. Brittain Collection 

Through the generosity of Frank J. Brittain, Esq., of Erie, Pennsylvania, 
the sum of $5000 was used for the purchase of theological and related 
works which are known as the Nina S. Brittain Collection. 




25 



The Clarence J. Williamson Church History Collection 
In 1958 endowment funds were established, income of which is to be used 
for the purchase of books in Church History and closely related subjects. 
These books are in memory of Dr. Clarence J. Williamson, a graduate of 
Pittsburgh Seminary, for fifty-one years a minister in the United Presby- 
terian Church of North America, and for eighteen years Professor of Church 
History and Government in The Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary. 

Historical Collections 

A room of the library contains the Minutes and other records of Associate, 
Associate Reformed, and United Presbyterian congregations, presbyteries, 
synods, and General Assemblies. The library is also the depository for the 
Upper Ohio Valley Historical Society and Pittsburgh Presbytery of The 
United Presbyterian Church in the U.S.A. 

Housing 

Single students are comfortably and commodiously housed in two build- 
ings connected to the Administration Building by a covered passageway on 
both the first and second floor levels. The George C. Fisher Memorial 
Hall accommodates 80 men in single rooms. Six apartments for employees 
and married students are also located on the ground floor in this building. 
The John McNaugher Memorial Hall provides for 63 men, with an addi- 
tional wing which houses 25 women. The dormitories have student lounges 
on each floor in addition to a game room and a snack room on the ground 
floor. There are three large dining rooms served by a cafeteria and having 
a seating capacity of over 500; in addition, there are six guests rooms which 
complete the dormitory complex. 

Although student rooms are fully and comfortably furnished, students 
must supply their own sheets, pillowcases, blankets, and towels, and provide 
for their own laundering. Summer occupancy of dormitory rooms is avail- 
able by special arrangement. 

Married students and their families are housed on campus in five apart- 
ment buildings and a number of duplex houses. 

The Highlander is a modern apartment building on Highland Avenue 
near the northwest corner of the campus. It contains seventeen one bedroom 
and six two bedroom units. Each apartment includes a living room, kitchen, 
bath, and storage locker. These apartments are unfurnished, although all 
kitchens are equipped with electric ranges and refrigerators. Laundry 
facilities (coin meter) are available in the basement. 

The Samuel A. Fulton Memorial Hall provides eighteen efficiency and 
twenty-one two-room apartments. Each unit includes a kitchenette, a bath, 
with a storage locker in the basement. These apartments are fully furnished 
with desk, bookcase, dining table, chairs, davenport-bed, a chest of drawers, 
wardrobe, electric stove and refrigerator. Students must provide bedding, 
linens, silverware, china, cooking utensils, curtains, lamps and rugs. Laundry 
facilities (coin meter type) are available in the basement. A six-room, fully 
furnished apartment for the housing of a missionary family on furlough 
is provided in Fulton Hall. It is made available through cooperation with 
the Commission on Ecumenical Mission and Relations, to missionaries 

26 



seeking fuller preparation for service on return to their various fields. 

New Stanton Avenue Apartments. On October 3rd, 1966, work was 
started on the latest project of Pittsburgh Seminary's campus extension. A 
new residence hall consisting of 31 married student apartments is being 
constructed on the corner of Stanton and Highland Avenues. Because of 
our increasing enrollment, this new, three story "townhouse type" resident 
hall will consist of 31 unfurnished apartments. The plan calls for 10 three- 
bedroom, 18 two-bedroom and 3 one-bedroom units, together with a com- 
plete nursery playroom. 

We are hopeful that the apartments will be completed near the end of 
August. In any event they will be a tremendous addition to the campus 
and will greatly improve our facilities in accommodating married students 
and their families. 

The Sheridan Avenue Apartments are located on campus at 519 Sheridan 
Avenue. This three-story building contains six unfurnished apartments for 
couples with children. Washers and dryers may be installed in the basement. 

Duplex Apartments. There are a number of unfurnished duplex apart- 
ments on campus for students with families. Special arrangements may be 
made for summer occupancy of these apartments. 

Life for married students and their families is as comfortable and 
efficient as is possible in student apartments. Rents are well below the 
commercial rates, shops and stores are within easy reach, public trans- 
portation comes right to the campus gate, and good schools are nearby 
for children of school age. There is an enclosed play area with several 
pieces of playground equipment located on the campus and near the 
married students housing facilities. 




27 



i 



• ' 



The Bible Lands Museum 

Pittsburgh Theological Seminary has an outstanding list of accomplish- 
ments in archaeological research of Bible times in ancient Palestine. In 
conjunction with the American Schools of Oriental Research at Jerusalem, 
in Jordan, it conducted an exploration at Bab ed-Dra at the southern end 
of the Dead Sea in 1924. A series of joint excavations was made at Kirjath- 
Sepher in 1926, 1928, 1930 and 1932. Bethel became the site of research 
in 1934, 1954, 1957, and 1960, and a significant project was carried out 
at New Testament Jericho and Nitla in 1950. In 1964 the Kyle-Kelso Fund 
for Archaeological Research in Jordan was established and a joint project 
with the American Schools of Oriental Research was carried on at Gibeah 
of Saul in the summer of 1964. Approval was granted for a joint expedi- 
tion at Tell er Rumeith either in 1966 or 1967. This site is thought to be 
Old Testament Rumeith Gilead. For the year 1966-67 Howard M. Jamieson, 
Jr., has been named Honorary Associate of the American School of Oriental 
Research in Jerusalem. 

In conjunction with Carnegie Museum and the Department of Antiq- 
uities of Israel, through the Holy Lands Exhibition Fund, Pittsburgh Theo- 
logical Seminary conducted archaeological digs at the biblical site at Ashdod 
in 1962, 1963, and 1965. Publication of the findings of the work during 
these seasons is now being prepared. 

The archaeological work at Pittsburgh Theological Seminary was in- 
augurated by Professor M. G. Kyle and was then carried on by Professor 
James L. Kelso until his retirement in 1963. In the spring of 1964 Associate 
Professor Howard M. Jamieson, Jr., was appointed Faculty Administrator 
of the Kyle-Kelso Fund. Members of the faculty and students often partici- 
pate in the digs. Assistant Professor Donald M. Gowan and A. Vanlier 
Hunter, a teaching fellow, were recent participants in the Ashdod project. 
Much of the Seminary's share of the antiquities excavated in the digs is 
now on exhibit in the Bible Lands Museum, which is located in the ad- 
ministration building. The museum is used as a teaching facility for the 
seminary program. A unique collection of ancient coins has been catalogued 
by Professor Iain Wilson. 

The objects in the Bible Lands Museum illustrate the way of life of the 
people of Palestine, and so become of great value for understanding and 
interpretation. Occasionally archaeological discoveries corroborate biblical 
statements, as in the case of the fragments of a royal inscription of Sargon 
II of Assyria, found at Ashdod, which relates to Isaiah 20:1. For the most 
part, however, archaeological excavations illumine the cultural, social, eco- 
nomic, political, and religious background of the Bible, supplying much data 
for deeper understanding of the people and the land of the Bible. 



29 




Students at All-Seminary Picnic 




A Fast Play 



The Covenant Players 

30 




Life on The Campus 
Community Life 

The social life of the campus is enhanced by the presence of single students, 
married couples, and families. It is greatly enriched by those students from 
the Orient, Europe, Africa, the Middle East, South America, etc., who come 
to study but also to share their cultures. 

Missionary families spending their furloughs on the campus for study 
bring to the community a sense of the Church ecumenical coupled with 
a sense of urgency. 

Admittedly, the emphasis in a theological seminary is not on social 
activities, but inter-personal relationships run deep and the socializing 
values are maintained by way of group get-togethers and periodical school 
functions. Among these are selected motion pictures, square dances, school 
picnics, art shows displaying works of seminary artists, and musical talent 
shows by seminary vocalists and instrumentalists trained in classical and 
folk music. 

A beautiful contemporary student center has been a recent addition to 
the community life on the campus. Located below the chapel wing of the 
administration building, it is a place for refreshment, campus movies, group 
or class parties, and just a good place to get together. 

The Women's Association, for all women on campus, provides oppor- 
tunities for group participation in a varied program of study, community 
activity, and social concern. 



Speakers for Viet Nam Debate Sitting on Left: Dr. fohn H. 
Gerstner, Pittsburgh Theological Seminary; Standing: 
Frederick Flott, Representative from the State Department; 
Sitting on Right: Dr. Joseph Zasloff, University of Pittsburgh 




31 




32 



Convocations and Worship 

Through the faculty-student Convocation and Worship Committee, out- 
standing people are brought to the campus. Each fall and spring there is 
a major lectureship in which a prominent person— theologian, Biblical 
scholar, psychiatrist, writer, social thinker, and planner, etc.— is heard by 
the seminary family. Every Thursday a visiting scholar from some field 
of intellectual inquiry, or some service project is on campus to speak in 
the weekly convocation. A list of some of these speakers from 1966-1967 
is on pages 14 and 15 of this catalogue. Chapel worship is conducted by 
students and faculty four days a week. 



Church and Society 

Experiences provided by the direct contact of the Seminary with its neigh- 
borhood give to the students vital information and know-how for dealing 
with urban America. The Seminary reaches out to the community through 
field education, through laboratory assignments, and through the faculty- 
student Church and Society Committee. The latter is a dynamic part of 
the seminary neighborhood as it has established relations with settlement 
houses, urban renewal and development offices, and with churches of the 
community for work with slum clearance, housing units, gangs, etc. The 
committee sponsors a tutoring relationship between seminary personnel 
and neighborhood school children, and directs faculty and student involve- 
ment in civil rights problems, both locally and elsewhere in the nation. 



The Student Association 

The Student Association provides the organization through which the 
students carry on a program of involvement in community life, determined 
only by the interest and concern of the students themselves. A student 
Curriculum Committee meets twice during the year with the faculty Cur- 
riculum Committee and is called upon to offer counsel and initiate continu- 
ing curriculum evaluation. The Convocation and Worship Committee of 
the faculty works out the annual program of chapel services and lecture 
series after consultation with the student Convocation and Worship Com- 
mittee. The student Publication Committee shares in the publication of 
Perspective, Panorama, and The Directory. An all-student publication, 
Unofficial Perspective, offers weekly opportunity for the expression of 
opinion and the examination of issues. One of the most active groups is 
the student Church and Society Committee, which works with a similar 
faculty committee in a study of current social problems. This joint com- 
mittee also organizes student and faculty action when deemed necessary. 
A student Social Committee and a student Stewardship Committee direct 
activities in their respective areas of concern. 

The Executive Committee of the Student Association for the year, 1966- 
1967, was led by Clint Glenn, President, and Sue Becker, Secretary-Treasurer. 

33 



The Seminary Musical Program 

The Seminary has a Men's Choir and a Mixed Chorus, both under the 
direction of Mr. Howard L. Ralston, Assistant Professor of Church Music. 
Auditions for membership in the Men's Choir are held in September. This 
group, carefully chosen and of limited number, sings for daily chapel 
services and represents the Seminary from time to time in churches within 
easy traveling distance. A more extensive tour is undertaken in the spring 
when the choir presents a varied program of sacred music in churches 
and colleges. 

The Mixed Chorus is maintained for all those of the seminary com- 
munity who enjoy singing. This group meets on Tuesday evenings and pre- 
sents a program at Christmas and in the spring, and sings at commence- 
ment. There are many opportunities throughout the year for soloists and 
instrumentalists. 

One of the highlights of the seminary year is the James H. Snowden 
Memorial Concert, established in 1964 by Dr. Roy R. Snowden in memory 
of his father, a longtime former professor in the Seminary. This annual 
event enriches the cultural life of the seminary community by bringing 
to the campus Metropolitan Opera stars and other concert artists of the 
highest rank. 



John Browning, Pianist 




34 



35 



Admission Requirements 

Pittsburgh Theological Seminary offers work on a graduate school level. 
This presupposes a B.A. or B.S. degree from a regionally accredited college 
or university, the degree work to have a substantial foundation in the liberal 
arts. It also assumes that the student is ready to approach theological edu- 
cation with an open, searching attitude. Pittsburgh Seminary seeks that 
man or woman who is committed to the Christian faith, emotionally suited 
for work in the Church, and intellectually capable of the most rigorous 
kind of academic discipline. 

Pre-Seminary Studies 

College courses prior to theological seminary should provide the cultural 
and intellectual foundations essential to an effective theological education. 
They should issue in at least three broad kinds of attainment. 

1. The college work of a pre-seminary student should result in the ability 
to use certain tools of the educated man: 

(a) The ability to write and speak English clearly and correctly. This! 
purpose should also be cultivated in all written work. 

(b) The ability to think clearly. In some persons, this ability is cultivated 
through courses in philosophy or specifically in logic. In others it!; 
is cultivated by the use of scientific method, or by dealing with; 
critical problems in connection with literary and historical documents.: 

(c) The ability to read at least one foreign language and in some cir-| 
cumstances more than one. 

2. The college work of a pre-seminary student should result in increased! 
understanding of the world in which he lives: ,' 

(a) The world of men and ideas. This includes knowledge of English 
literature, philosophy, and psychology. 

(b) The world of nature. This is provided by knowledge of the natural 
sciences, including laboratory work. 

(c) The world of human affairs. This is aided by knowledge of history 
and the social sciences. 

3. The college work of a pre-seminary student should result in a sense 
of achievement: 

(a) The ability to think, to see relationships, to follow out logical step! 
of an argument, to develop procedures for dealing with problems 
This ability is achieved in part through independent study. 

(b) The degree of his mastery of his field of study is more importanj 
than the credits and grades which he accumulates. 

36 



The American Association of Theological Schools has proposed a mini- 
mum list of fields of study with which the student should have acquaint- 
ance before beginning seminary study. The liberal arts background is felt 
to provide the best foundation for seminary work. 

English— literature, composition, speech and related studies. 
At least 6 semesters. 



History— ancient, modern European, and American. 
At least 3 semesters. 



Philosophy— orientation in history, problems and method. 
At least 3 semesters. 



Natural sciences— preferably physics, chemistry and biology. 
At least 2 semesters. 



Social sciences— psychology, sociology, anthropology, economics, political 
science, education. 
At least 6 semesters. 



Foreign languages— one or more of the following linguistic avenues to man's 
thought and tools of scholarly research: Latin, Greek, Hebrew, German, 
French. Students who anticipate post-graduate studies are urged to under- 
take these disciplines early in their training as opportunity offers. Greek 
should be taken in the final year of college, as well as before, if possible. 
At least 4 semesters. 



Religion— a thorough knowledge of the content of the Bible is indispensable 
together with an introduction to the major religious traditions and theo- 
jlogical problems. The pre-seminary student may well seek counsel of the 
seminary in order most profitably to use the resources of his college. 
At least 3 semesters. 



Of the various possible areas of concentration, where areas of concentra- 
tion are required, English, philosophy and history are regarded as the most 
pesirable, and, where the department is strong, religion. 

At the beginning of the first year of seminary students will take examina- 
tions in philosophy, Greek, speech, and basic English. Students showing a 
deficiency in philosophy will be required to remedy such deficiency before 
proceeding to Systematic Theology I. Students showing a deficiency in 
English will be required to remedy such deficiency before graduation. The 
Greek and speech examinations are for the purpose of placement. 

37 



Procedure for Admission 

Candidates seeking degrees may apply any time after the Junior year 
is completed and prior to June 1 preceding the September for which ad- 
mission is sought. All correspondence concerning admission to the seminary 
should be addressed to the Director of Admissions. Applications are con- 
sidered by the committee when the following credentials are submitted. 

(1) A formal application. 

(2) Application fee. A check or money order for $15.00 must accompany 
the application. This will be applied to the first semester's tuition. 
While the fee will be refunded if the application is rejected, it is 
not returnable if the application is withdrawn. 

(3) Mental capacity test. The Seminary normally will correspond with 
the applicant's college concerning a mental capacity test. If none is 
available, the applicant must take one under seminary direction. 

(4) A personal interview with the Director of Admissions or another 
representative of the Seminary who may be designated by the Di- 
rector of Admissions. 

(5) A medical report on a blank furnished by the Seminary. 

(6) An official transcript from the registrar of the college or university, 
showing grades for at least three years of college work. 

(7) A battery of psychological tests which will be forwarded to a proctor 
as soon as the application form is received. These are the same tests 
that Presbytery requires of all candidates. You need take them only 
once. 

(8) An extensive (500-1000 words) statement in the applicant's hand-; 
writing describing his family, educational, and religious background,, 
placing particular emphasis upon his motives for desiring to enterj 
the Seminary and the ministry. 

After admission is granted and within thirty days of such notification, 
a $35 placement fee is required to assure the applicant of a place in the 
new class. This fee is applied on the student's tuition and is not returnable 
except under extreme hardship and at the discretion of the Admissions 
Committee. A certification of the student's "intention to enroll" must 
accompany this fee. 

Transfer Students 

A student transferring from another seminary is required to submit, irl 
addition to the foregoing, a complete transcript of previous seminary worl 
and a letter of dismissal from the Dean or President. A transfer studen 
must be in residence at Pittsburgh Seminary for a minimum of one fulj' 
academic year in order to become a candidate for the Bachelor of Divinitj 
degree. 

38 



Foreign Students 

Qualified applicants from other countries are welcome as a part of the 
student body. Such applicants shall be required, in addition to the regular 
requirements for admission, to give evidence of proficiency in the English 
language before their admission. TOEFL (Test of English as a Foreign 
Language) is the standard test used by the Commission on Ecumenical 
Mission and Relations and the World Council of Churches. The test is 
arranged through the Seminary or the Commission on Ecumenical Mission 
and Relations of the United Presbyterian Church. 

Such applicants shall have endorsement either of a representative of the 
Commission on Ecumenical Mission and Relations (in those areas where 
the United Presbyterian Church in the U.S.A. has fraternal workers) or 
the World Council of Churches (in other areas). 

An applicant from another country is also asked to submit a letter from 
his bank stating that there are on deposit sufficient funds to assure his 
passage home after his period of study in this country. This saves possible 
embarrassment to both student and seminary at a later time. 

Matriculation 

A final transcript showing the degree and date of graduation of the ap- 
plicant must be submitted to the registrar. 




39 



Fees and Expenses* 

(for the academic year) 

$640.00 Tuition (incl. Intersession) (approx.) 
550.00 Board (incl. Intersession) 
200.00 Room Fee (incl. Intersession) 
10.00 Library Fee (annual) 
5.00 Student Association Fee (annual) 
150.00 Books (approx.) 
50.00-150.00 Hospitalization Insurance (approx.) 
100.00-200.00 Incidentals 

Matriculation Fee— $35.00 payable at the time of registration. 

Tuition Fee— $20.00 per semester hour. 

Late Registration Fee— A charge of $5.00 will be made to students register- 
ing later than the specified time. 

Graduation Fee— $10.00 

Transcript Fee— One copy of a student's academic record will be provided 
without charge. A fee of $1.00 will be charged for each additional transcript. 
* Subject to change. 

Married Student Apartment Fees 

The Highlander 

Twenty-three unfurnished apartments, $75.00-$85.00 per month 

The Stanton Avenue Apartments (under construction)** 
Thirty-one unfurnished apartments, $80.00-$ 120.00 per month 

The Samuel A. Fulton Memorial Hall 

Thirty-nine furnished apartments, $55.00-$70.00 per month 

Sheridan Avenue Apartments 

Six unfurnished apartments, $55.00-$70.00 per month 

Duplexes 

Five unfurnished apartments, $55.00-$70.00 per month 

**The availability of these apartments depends on their completion which 
is scheduled for August 15, 1967. 

All apartments include refrigerator, stove, and storage locker or area. 

Fees for apartment occupancy are payable monthly. A $5.00 assessment will 
be added to all accounts not paid by the tenth of the month. Applications 
for apartments should be made as early as possible. 

A deposit of $10 per married couple, payable at registration, is required 
of all those living in seminary apartments. The deposit will be returned 
after satisfactory inspection at the time the apartment is vacated. 

40 



Payment of Fees 

All academic fees and expenses are payable in advance on the opening day 
of each semester. When necessary, arrangements for a payment plan to 
cover a semester's expenses may be made at the Business Office on the first 
day of each term, permitting (4) four equal payments: one-fourth on the 
first day of the term, and the balance due at the beginning of the fourth, 
eighth, and twelfth weeks respectively. There is a carrying charge of $5.00 
for the deferred payment plan. Failure to pay any deferred payment within 
ten days from the date due will incur a penalty of 1% of the amount due. 
Settlement of all seminary bills is required before registration for a new 
semester, and before graduation or the release of official transcripts. 

Seminary Meals 

Residents of the men's and women's dormitories are required to eat in the 
seminary dining hall. Board includes nineteen meals a week; only breakfast 
is served on Sunday. The dining hall is closed on holidays which are 
scheduled on the seminary calendar. No deduction is allowed for absence 
from individual meals, although special consideration is given to students 
who regularly do not eat in the dining hall weekends. 

Tuition Refunds on Courses Dropped 

First week of semester, $ 1 .00 withheld for each credit hour; balance refunded. 
Second to seventh week, one half refunded. 
Seventh week on, no refund. 

Medical and Hospitalization Insurance 

Students are required to be insured by some type of medical and hospitali- 
zation insurance acceptable to the Seminary. All students who are registered 
as full-time students are eligible for such insurance under a group student 
policy issued by either the Insurance Company of North America or Blue 
Cross and Blue Shield. Detailed information concerning premiums and 
benefits may be secured at the Business Office. 

Total Cost 

The total cost for one academic year, based upon a survey of actual student 
expenditures at Pittsburgh Seminary, is approximately $2,100 for an un- 
married student and $3,000 to $3,250 for a married student without chil- 
dren, depending on the variation in rentals. The cost for a married student 
having children is correspondingly higher. These totals include expenses 
for clothing, laundering and cleaning, medical and dental care not covered 
by hospitalization insurance, incidentals and recreation, as well as tuition, 
fees (hospitalization insurance premiums included), board, room and books. 
Not included are automobile operating costs, payments on purchases, life 
insurance premiums, repayment of indebtedness, and expenses for travel 
to and from the Seminary. 

41 



Student Financial Assistance 

Pittsburgh Seminary provides financial help from endowed and general 
funds for students who demonstrate that their resources from their own 
earnings and savings, their families, local congregations and presbyteries 
are not sufficient to meet their Seminary expenses. Several merit scholar- 
ships are offered to entering students who have excellent academic records 
in their pre-seminary work and who must have financial help. Scholarship 
aid is also given according to need to upperclassmen whose academic attain- 
ments in their seminary work are high. Loans, grants-in-aid and remunera- 
tive campus work are also available as a part of the Seminary's financial 
assistance program. Approximately fifty work opportunities are available to 
students in the library, dining hall, and student center, and as attendants 
for various campus facilities. The work is limited to ten hours per week 
and the remuneration is credited to the student's account or paid in cash. 
Once a student is admitted the Seminary makes every effort to see that 
he need not drop out for financial reasons. 

The Board of Christian Education of the United Presbyterian Church, 
through its office of Educational Loans and Scholarships, provides assistance 
for United Presbyterian seminary students who demonstrate financial need 
in two programs: (1) Loans ($100 to $1,000 in a given year) and (2) United 
Presbyterian Study Grants (up to $1,000 in a given year). 

Specific details concerning scholarships, grants-in-aid, work assistance, 
and loan funds, together with application forms for both seminary and 
Board of Christian Education programs, may be obtained from the Finan- 
cial Aid Officer. 



Loan Funds 

James H. Snowden Memorial Loan Fund. A loan fund for students need- 
ing financial assistance to obtain a theological education was established in 
1953 by R. R. Snowden, M.D., Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, in memory of his 
father, Professor James H. Snowden, D.D., LL.D. Loans from this fund are 
made on notes with interest and without further endorsement. 

Walter G. and Esther B. Comin Student Loan Fund. A loan fund for stu- 
dents who need financial assistance to continue their education was estab- 
lished in 1955 by Mrs. Walter G. Comin, Pawnee City, Nebraska, Mr. and 
Mrs. Walter G. Comin, Jr., Wilkinsburg, Pa., and Mr. Myron C. Comin, 
Spokane, Washington, in memory of Rev. Walter G. Comin, D.D. Loans 
from this fund are made on notes at four percent interest and without 
further endorsement. 

Westphal Memorial Loan Fund. The session of the Reed Memorial United 
Presbyterian Church, Lyndhurst, New Jersey, established in 1956 the West- 
phal Memorial Loan Fund. Under certain conditions specified by the donors 
loans from this fund may be made on notes without interest or further 
endorsement, and are repayable within ten years. 

42 



Albert G. Hamilton Memorial Loan Fund. A loan fund for students who 
need financial assistance during the seminary course was established in 
1960 by Mrs. Albert G. Hamilton, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, in memory 
of her husband, Mr. Albert G. Hamilton. Loans from this fund may be 
made on notes at three percent interest without further endorsement. 

Dr. and Mrs. James D. Sands Memorial Loan Fund. A loan fund for semi- 
nary students was established in 1961 by Mrs. Albert G. Hamilton, Pitts- 
burgh, Pennsylvania, in memory of her parents, Dr. and Mrs. James D. 
Sands. Loans from this fund may be made on notes at three percent interest 
without further endorsement. 

Walter A. Long Memorial Student Rotary Loan Fund. Established in 1961 
by the Estate of Emma Clark Long. Loans are not to exceed $100 to any 
one student in any one academic year and the amount borrowed is to be 
repaid not later than two years after graduation or not later than two 
years after the borrower would have graduated if he had progressed nor- 
mally through the seminary to graduation in the event of failure to grad- 
uate. All loans are made without interest. 

The William G. Crow Memorial Loan Fund. Established in November, 
1961. Loans from this fund may be made on notes with three percent 
interest. 

The Mary Jane Dando Student Loan Fund. Loans from this fund are 
available to Junior students with interest and without further endorsement. 
Any loan from this fund must be repaid by the first day of the borrower's 
Senior year, or if the borrower for any reason discontinues his enrollment 
at the Seminary it becomes due at the termination of his relationship with 
the Seminary. 



Awards, Prizes, and Graduate Fellowships 

The Sylvester S. Marvin Memorial Fellowship 

The Sylvester S. Marvin Fellowship may be assigned upon graduation to 
that member of the Senior Class who is recommended by the faculty as 
having achieved the highest standard in all departments of the seminary 
curriculum, provided that his average be not below 85%. The faculty re- 
serves the right to impose special tests and examinations in making this 
award. It is offered to those who take the entire course of three years in 
this institution. The recipient must pledge himself to a year of post- 
graduate study immediately following his graduation at some institution 
approved by the faculty. He is required to furnish quarterly reports of his 
progress. The money will be paid in three equal installments, on the first 
day of October, January, and April. Prolonged absence from the classroom 
in the discharge of extra-seminary duties makes a student ineligible for 
the fellowship. 

43 



The Thomas Jamison Scholarship 

The Thomas Jamison Scholarship, in memory of the late Thomas Jamison, 
Esq., of North Side, Pittsburgh, was established by Mrs. Jamison. The in- 
come of this endowment is given every year to the member of the Senior 
Class who has the highest average at the beginning of his final semester 
of study. 

The acceptance of this scholarship requires that the recipient spend a 
full academic year in study in any graduate institution approved by the 
faculty. He must further agree to make regular reports of the work he is 
doing and at the end of the year he will present a satisfactory thesis of 
not less than ten thousand words on some subject selected by the faculty or 
approved by the faculty. If for any reason the man who is first in the class 
does not accept the scholarship and its requirements the scholarship will 
be offered to the student next in rank. 

The Jennie Rigg Barbour Memorial Prize 

The Jennie Rigg Barbour Memorial Prize was established by Rev. Clifford E. 
Barbour, Ph.D., D.D., LL.D., President Emeritus of Pittsburgh Theological 
Seminary, as a memorial to his mother. The income from the endowment 
of this prize is assigned to that member of the graduating class who has 
taken his full course of instruction in this institution and who has achieved 
the second highest academic rank of his class, if in the judgment of the 
faculty he is worthy in all other respects. It is hoped that the student will 
use this income for further study either within an academic institution or 
by the enlargement of his own library. 

The Michael Wilson Keith Memorial Homiletical Prize 

This prize was founded in 1919 by the Keith Bible Class of the First Pres- 
byterian Church of Coraopolis, Pennsylvania, in memory of the Reverend 
Michael Wilson Keith, D.D., the founder of the class and pastor of the 
church from 1911 to 1917. The prize is awarded to a member of the Senior 
Class who has spent three years in this seminary and has taken the highest 
standing in the department of homiletics. The winner of the prize is ex- 
pected to preach in the First Presbyterian Church of Coraopolis and teach 
the Keith Bible Class one Sunday after the award is made. 

The Joseph Watson Greek Entrance Prize 

The Joseph Watson Greek Prize was established in 1920 by Mrs. Robert A. 
Watson, Columbus, Ohio. The income will be awarded to the student 
who achieves the highest grade in an examination in classical Greek as 
he enters the Junior Class of the Seminary. 

The William B. Watson Prize in Hebrew 

The William B. Watson Prize in Hebrew was established in 1919 by Mrs. 
Robert A. Watson, Columbus, Ohio. The income will be awarded to that 
member of the Senior Class who, having elected Hebrew, shall submit the 
best grammatical and exegetical treatment of an assigned portion of the 
Hebrew Old Testament. 

44 






The John Watson Prize in New Testament Greek 

The John Watson Prize in New Testament Greek was established in 1919 
by Mrs. Robert A. Watson, Columbus, Ohio. The income will be awarded 
to that member of the Senior Class who, having elected Greek Exegesis, 
shall submit the best grammatical and exegetical treatment of an assigned 
portion of the Greek New Testament. 

The Robert A. Lee Church History Award 

By bequest, in memory of her husband the late Mrs. Henrietta M. Lee, 
Oakmont, Pa., established the Robert A. Lee Church History Foundation, 
the annual income of which is to be awarded yearly to the students making 
first and second rank respectively in the Department of Church History. 

The Hugh Thomson Kerr Moderator Prize 

This prize was established in 1938 by the Men's Committee of the Shady- 
side Presbyterian Church, Pittsburgh. An annual contribution of fifty dollars 
was pledged to be used for the purchase of books. The prize is to be awarded 
to that member of the graduating class who has exhibited to the greatest 
degree, throughout the three years of the seminary course, leadership, origi- 
nality, and accomplishments beyond the normal requirements for graduation. 

The James Purdy Scholarship 

The James Purdy Scholarship was established in 1882. The income is 
apportioned equally each year to the six members of the Junior Class who 
attain the highest average of excellence in their seminary work. The dis- 
tribution is made after the students return to the Seminary the following 
year. 

The Andrew Reed Scholarship 

The Andrew Reed Scholarship was established in 1914 by Miss Anna M. 
Reed, Cross Creek, Pennsylvania, the income being given to the student 
who, upon entering seminary, shall achieve the highest grade in a com- 
petitive examination in the English Bible. The successful competitor is to 
have the scholarship throughout the entire course of three years, provided 
that his general conduct and application to study shall continue to be 
satisfactory to the faculty. 

The Home Training Bible Class Award in Missions 

This is an award of $100 which was established in January, 1961, by the 
Home Training Bible Class of the Edgewood Presbyterian Church, Pitts- 
burgh, Pa., in the name of the Rev. Walter L. Moser, Ph.D., D.D. The 
recipient will be that member of the graduating class who is deemed most 
deserving among those entering the foreign or home missionary field upon 
graduation. 

The Chevy Chase Christian Education Award 

This award was established by the college age young people of the Chevy 

45 



Chase Presbyterian Church, Washington, D. C, in appreciation of those 
who are interested in youth. It is to be given to the person who, throughout 
the seminary course, has best ministered to young people and who intends 
to specialize in youth work upon completion of his studies. 

The Alice Myers Sigler Memorial Prize in History and Theology 

This award was established in 1962 by Robert M., John H., Richard E., 
and Alan B. Sigler in memory of their mother. The income from this en- 
dowed fund is granted to the student who, in the judgment of the pro- 
fessors of the History and Theology Division, is most worthy of this award 
at the end of the Middler year. 

The Fred McFeely Rogers Prize in Biblical Studies 

The Fred McFeely Rogers Prize in Biblical Studies was established in 1962 
by Mr. and Mrs. James H. Rogers in honor of their son, a graduate in the 
Class of 1962. The income from this endowed fund is granted to the stu- 
dent who, in the judgment of the professors of the Biblical Division, is 
most worthy of this award at the end of the Junior year. 

The First Presbyterian Church of McKeesport Preaching Prize 

This prize was established in 1964 by the congregation of The First Pres- 
byterian Church of McKeesport, to be awarded to a student at the end of 
the fall semester of his Senior year for excellence in preaching. The winner 
of the prize is expected to preach one Sunday in The First Presbyterian 
Church of McKeesport during the spring semester of his Senior year. 

The Henry A. Riddle Fund for Graduate Study 

This fund was established in 1966 by the family and friends of Dr. Henry A. 
Riddle, a former president of Pittsburgh Theological Seminary, to provide 
an annual award to a member of the graduating class designated by the 
faculty for assistance in post-graduate study, preferably in the field of 
New Testament. 

The Walter P. and Anna L. McConkey Award in Homiletics 

This award was established in 1964 by the Central Presbyterian Church in 
Washington, Pa., in honor of Dr. and Mrs. McConkey, who served that 
pastorate for many years. It is to be given to a student who, at the end 
of his Middler year has, in the judgment of the homiletics professors, 
demonstrated excellence in preaching. 



46 



47 



■■■■■' :■■.■.■.") -*■'•:■■■■ ■ 



*5w3^ I !^«B 



Degree Programs and 
Courses of Study 



Bachelor of Divinity 

Degree description pages 50-53 

Course descriptions pages 58-76 

Master of Religious Education 

Degree description pages 54-55 

Course descriptions pages 58-76 

Master of Education page 56 

Master of Theology 

Degree description pages 78-79 

Course descriptions pages 80-85 



Master of Public Administration and 

Master of Public and International Affairs page 86 



Doctor of Philosophy pages 87-89 



49 



The Bachelor of Divinity Curriculum 



To be quite candid, the curriculum of Pittsburgh Seminary is heavily 
loaded on the side of requirements. However, this is modified through the 
program of Advanced Standing. But before we get to that, it is important 
to peer into the mind of the faculty to grasp the raison d-etre of the cur- 
riculum. The faculty has asked the question: What kind of studies must 
a student pursue in the seminary in order to become an able minister? 
The requirements of the curriculum reflect the judgment of the faculty 
about what the student needs to know so that he can take his place in the 
intellectual and professional leadership of the church. 

Not all students need to go through the requirements of the curriculum. 
Some will have already taken excellent courses in church history, New 
Testament, ethics, etc., before coming to seminary. A number of college 
religion departments are of such high quality that their students can attain 
advanced standing at Pittsburgh Seminary. The Pittsburgh faculty delights 
in this. It has opened up every required course in the entire curriculum 
for advanced standing. All a student must do is to take an advanced stand- 
ing examination in any required course. If he passes with a superior rating, 
he will be excused from that requirement and will have a corresponding 
number of elective hours anywhere in the curriculum. If he passes but 
without superior rating, he will go into independent study under the 
guidance of the professor of the course. Thus he will be freed from the 
required course itself in order to pursue a deepened understanding of the^ 
subject area. If he fails, he fails without prejudice and remains in the 
required course. 

50 



The program of Advanced Standing illustrates what the faculty is and 
is not concerned about. It is concerned about subject areas; it is not con- 
cerned about course credits. The Old Testament is vitally important to 
the life of the Church. Yet if a student comes to the seminary with a fine 
background in the Old Testament and is able to pass the advanced stand- 
ing examination, he should not have to take the course which a novice in 
the field would be taking. The faculty determines to take a student where 
he is; if he belongs in advanced standing that is where he will be. 

Furthermore, if a student demonstrates B + work in any area, for ex- 
ample, history and theology, he is encouraged to do Honors Work in that 
area of his special interest and competence. This program begins in the 
senior year, enables the student to elect some work in graduate courses at 
the Master's level, and brings the student into a tutorial relationship with 
the faculty. The Honors Program is designed to encourage very able stu- 
dents to work independently to fulfil their own potential and exploit their 
own interests. 



A seminary is a small enough school that a great deal of independent 
study can go on. Not only in Advanced Standings and in the Honors Pro- 
gram do students work independently; in a number of other ways is the 
ideal of independent study fulfilled. For example, each student must elect 
one offering in the field of church history. Some students prefer to do this 
in independent study as they work out a major project in Patristics, Augus- 
tine, Luther, Schleiermacher, etc. Intersession in the senior year is devoted 
to independent study. Exegetical studies may be elected on an individual 
basis. The point is that a student can go about as far and as fast as he 
can with the enthusiastic approval of the faculty. This is the way the 
faculty itself likes to work; this is the way it would like to see the student 
body working. 

Requirements? Yes, we have them. They are the minimal expectation 
in the preparation of a minister. We want our students to get through 
with the requirements as early as possible— college, why not?— and to get 
on with the business of theological education at the truly graduate level. 

51 



The Prescribed Course of Study 
Degree of Bachelor of Divinity 



Junior Year 

Semester I 
110 Old Testament Introduction 
210 Greek 
410 Church History and History 

of Doctrine I 
710 The Church in American Culture; 

Historical Perspective 



Semester II 
5 211 Greek 

3 213 New Testament Introduction 

411 Church History and History 
5 of Doctrine II 

711 The Church in American Culture; 
2 Sociological Perspective 



15 



15 



January Intersession 
115 Intertestamental Period 2 



Middler Year 



120 Hebrew 

520 Systematic Theology I 
720 Psychological Foundations and 
Introduction to Homiletics 
Elective 



3 


121 Hebrew 


3 


5 


521 Systematic Theology II 

721 Liturgies and Homiletical and 


5 


4 


Counseling Practica 


4 


3 


Elective 


3 



15 



15 



January Intersession 
723 Pastoral Care and 

Counseling 2 



Senior Year 



730 Ethics and Homiletics 
732 Christian Education 
Electives 



Electi 



12 



14 



12 



January Intersession 



Elective 



66 academic hours of required work 
24 academic hours of electives 



90 total academic hours required for graduation 

52 



The Four- Year Bachelor of Divinity Curriculum 

(for students whose economic needs require them to serve as student pastors) 

I 



Semester I 

110 Old Testament Introduction 
410 Church History and History 
of Doctrine I 



Semester II 

213 New Testament Introduction 
411 Church History and History 
of Doctrine II 



January Inter session 
115 Intertestamental Period 2 

II 



210 Greek 3 

520 Systematic Theology I 5 
710 The Church in American Culture; 

Historical Perspective 2 



211 Greek 3 

521 Systematic Theology II 5 
711 The Church in American Culture; 

Sociological Perspective 2 



10 



10 



III 



120 Hebrew 

720 Psychological Foundations and 
Introduction to Homiletics 
Electives 



3 


121 Hebrew 

721 Liturgies and Homiletical and 


3 


4 


Counseling Practica 


4 


6 


Electives 


6 



13 



13 



January Intersession 
723 Pastoral Care and 
Counseling 

IV 



730 Ethics and Homiletics 
732 Christian Education 
Elective 



Electi 



10 



Elective 






January Intersession 



53 



The Master of Religious Education Curriculum 

The Master of Religious Education program, open to both men and women, 
is designed primarily to prepare them to serve the Church of Jesus Christ 
as directors or ministers of Christian education in local congregations, as 
curriculum writers and fraternal workers, as well as to provide them back- 
ground for related professional and service vocations such as public school 
education, social work, nursing, and the nursery school. 



The Master of Religious Education curriculum is a two year program 
including both theory and practice among the disciplines of Bible, history, 
theology, and the teaching ministry. The requirement of Hebrew or Greek 
demonstrates the faculty's seriousness about this degree as it seeks to prepare 
students for the teaching office. That that office has fallen into disrepute 
and has come to be associated largely with methods is manifest. The recovery 
of the office will come through Biblical and theological competence coupled 
with the art and skills of communication. To know the Bible the student 
must enter into the world of the Bible and gain a "feel" for its idiom of 
thought, expression, practice. Language study is a primary tool for this 
incursion. Twenty hours in church history, history of doctrine, and theology 
will also contribute to the needed competence. By taking the basic courses 
of theological education an M.R.E. candidate is prepared to work side by 
side with pastors, sharing a common understanding of the total ministry 
of which education is a part, and performing that ministry with professional 
competence. 



Within this program the teaching office is lifted up and emphasized for 
the M.R.E. candidate. The B.D. Church and Ministry courses are especially 
adapted so that the student whose vocational interest is Christian education 
can explore the philosophy and theology of, as well as develop method- 
ological and administrative skills in, that special ministry. Throughout the 
two year course the student will be involved in Christian education theory 
and practice. Field education practicum is required each semester and is 
closely geared with class work. 

54 



The Prescribed Course of Study 

Degree of Master of Religious Education 






Junior Year 



Semester I 
110 Old Testament Introduction 
120 Hebrew, or 210 Greek 
410 Church History and History 

of Doctrine I 
720 Psychological Foundations 



Semester II 

121 Hebrew, or 211 Greek 3 

213 New Testament Introduction 5 
4 1 1 Church History and History 

of Doctrine II 5 

711 Sociological Foundations 2 



15 

January Intersession 
115 Intertestamental Period 



15 



Senior Year 



520 Systematic Theology I 


5 


521 Systematic Theology II 


5 


730 Ethics 


4 


Counseling Practicum 


1 


734 Christian Education 


3 


721 Liturgies 


2 


Greek or Hebrew 




Electives 


6 


Exegesis Elective 


3 







15 

January Intersession 

723 Pastoral Care and 
Counseling 



14 



54 academic hours of required work 
9 academic hours of electives 



63 total academic hours required for graduation 

55 



The Prescribed Course of Study 
Degree of Master of Education (M.Ed.) 

The M.Ed, course of study is designed as a one-year course for those who 
have an approved Bachelor's collegiate major in the fields of religion, Bible, 
or religious education, or their equivalent, to provide further depth, under- 
standing, and technical skills for work in local churches. 

This degree is offered jointly by the University of Pittsburgh and Pitts- 
burgh Theological Seminary. It will be conferred by the University upon 
completion of a course of study which will include 18 hours taken in three 
trimesters at the University and 18 hours taken concurrently in two se- 
mesters at the Seminary. 



The University Requirements 

Ed. Psych. 271— Advanced Educational Psychology 2 hours 

Ed. Res. 200— Introduction to Research and Statistics 2 hours 

Fdns. Ed. 201— General Philosophy of Education 2 hours 

Fdns. Ed. 228— History of Modern Education 2 hours 

Department of Religious Education 10 hours 

18 hours 



The Seminary Requirements 

Biblical Studies 6 hours 

History of Doctrine 6 hours 

712 and 713-Christian Education 4 hours 

Field Education Practicum 2 hours 



18 hours 



Admission requirements, in addition to the "major," are those of the 
University and the Seminary. Housing will be provided by the admitting 
institution. 

Applicants for this degree may write to: 

Dr. Lawrence C. Little 
Department of Religious Education 
University of Pittsburgh 
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15213 

or 
Director of Admissions 
Pittsburgh Theological Seminary 
616 N. Highland Avenue 
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15206 



56 






% 



u. 

< 

I 

W 
^5 






«F 



*-' 









r. 



Description of Courses of Instruction: B.D., M.R.E., ]\ 
The Biblical Division 



Mr. Barth, Chairman 

Mr. Gowan Mr. J. Jackson Mr. Orr 

Mr. Hadidian Mr. Jamieson Mr. von Waldow 

Mr. Hare Mr. Kelley Mr. Walther 

Mr. Hills Mr. Miller 



Some course offerings which might be listed under the Biblical Division are correlated 
with Church and Ministry and are listed under that division. Moreover, most exegesis 
courses listed below are correlated with Church and Ministry (especially homiletics). 



Required Courses 

110. Old Testament Introduction. A survey of the books of the Old 
Testament with special attention to the formation of the literature and its 
religious significance. The history of Israel is traced from earliest times and 
set in the framework of Near Eastern civilization as recovered through 
archaeological research. The message and times of the prophets are sur- 
veyed, as well as the life and worship of the post-exilic community. The 
principal objective is mastery of the Biblical material. There are also 
assigned readings in current scholarly literature. 

Juniors, first semester, 5 hours credit. Mr. von Waldow 

115. The Intertestamental Period. A survey of the historical, literary, 
and religious background of the New Testament, concentrating on Pal- 
estinian Judaism from which Christianity was born, with some attention 
to the Hellenistic world in which it developed. 

Juniors, Intersession, 2 hours credit. Mr. Gowan 

120. Elementary Hebrew. A course designed to lead to an appreciative 
and competent use of Hebrew as one of the languages of Biblical revelation. 
From the outset the student learns inductively to read from the original 
language of the Old Testament. Emphasis is placed on the acquisition of 
a working vocabulary as the ground for further reading, and the illumina- 
tion of key Biblical concepts. Instruction is in small, graded sections so 
that a maximum of individual attention and achievement is possible. 

Middlers, first semester, 3 hours credit. 

121. Elementary Hebrew. Continuation of 120 with instruction in graded 
sections. 

Middlers, second semester, 3 hours credit. 

58 



210. New Testament Greek. A course designed to lead to a competent 
use of Greek as one of the languages of Biblical revelation. From the out- 
set the student learns inductively to read from the Greek New Testament, 
and unique study aids prepared by the Division are used. Instruction is 
in small, graded sections. Students who have previously studied Greek will 
be assigned to special sections for their New Testament linguistic work. 

Juniors, first semester, 3 hours credit. 

211. New Testament Greek. Continuation of 210 with instruction in 
graded sections. As much of the New Testament will be read as progress 
permits. Some attention will be given to textual criticism, and exegetical 
method and practice will be introduced. 

Juniors, second semester, 3 hours credit. 

213. New Testament Introduction. The purpose of this course is to con- 
vey a basic knowledge and enjoyment of, and respect for, each New Testa- 
ment book by preparation of careful exegesis of individual texts. Beginning 
from the background afforded by courses 110 and 115, the course faces 
the character and message, the diversity and unity of the New Testament 
books, as well as the open questions concerning authors, dates, places, and 
recipients. Some aspects of the manifold interpretations of the New Testa- 
ment are outlined together with its influence upon later church life and 
modern scholarly endeavor. 

Juniors, second semester, 5 hours credit. Mr. Hare 



Electives 

140, 141, 142, and 143. Hebrew Reading. Supervised reading of selected 
Old Testament passages. 

Offered each semester, 1 hour credit. 

144. Hebrew Grammar. Introduction to the formal structure of the 
Hebrew language, (phonetics, morphology, syntax) with special attention 
to its historical development and relation to other Semitic languages. 

Offered on request. Mr. Hills 

145. Hebrew Exegetical. A student with a B average in the Biblical 
field may elect to do independent study in the exegesis of an Old Testa- 
ment passage under the supervision of a member of the Biblical Division. 
The exegetical paper, 30-40 pages in length, will be due on the first day of 
classes in September. 

Offered during the summer, two hours credit. 

748. The Dead Sea Scrolls. Survey of the scrolls from the Dead Sea 
area, particularly Qumran. Archaeological background, analysis of contents, 
significance for the text, history, and theology of the Old and New Test- 
aments. Selected passages will be read in the original languages. 

Offered on request. Mr. Hills 

59 



152. Biblical Aramaic. Reading and the grammar of the Aramaic sec- 
tions of the Old Testament. Additional material may be included from 
the fifth century B.C. Aramaic letters from Elephantine. 

Offered on request. Mr. Hills 

155. Septuagint Studies. Introduction to the Greek Old Testament, and 
problems of the Greek and Hebrew texts. Reading and comparative study 
of passages in Hebrew and Greek. 

Offered on request. Mr. Orr or Mr. Walther 

156. Hellenistic Greek Studies. Selected readings in Philo, Josephus, the 
Apostolic Fathers, and other Greek literature approximately contemporary 
with the New Testament period. First year students whose ability and 
experience warrant may be assigned to this course in place of 210 or 211. 

Offered on request. Mr. Orr 

161. Trends in Recent Old Testament Hermeneutics. A seminar based on 
discussions of the book Problems of Old Testament Hermeneutics. 
Prerequisites: 2 exegesis courses and Reformation history. 

Mr. Ritschl and Old Testament Instructor 

170. Old Testament Theology. Introduction to current methods of in- 
terpretation of the theology of the Old Testament, as exemplified by 
Eichrodt and von Rad. Students will investigate major motifs of biblical 
thought, such as myth and history, chaos and creation, first and las.t, time 
and eternity, election and covenant, king and priest, prophet and wise 
man, man and woman, father and son, master and servant. 

Offered first semester, 1966-67. Mr. J. Jackson 



Courses 173, 174, and 175 will satisfy the three hours of Old Testament 
exegesis elective required of each student. 

173. The Old Testament: Torah. Exegesis of passages from the Hebrew 
text of the first five books of the Old Testament. 

Israel's cult and worship offered first semester, 1967-68. 

Mr. von Waldow 
Exodus offered second semester, 1967-68. Mr. Gowan 

174. The Old Testament: Prophetic Books. Exegesis of passages from the 
Hebrew text of the "Former" and the "Latter" Prophets. 

Isaiah 1-39 offered first semester, 1967-68. Mr. Gowan 

175. The Old Testament: Writings. Exegesis of passages from the He- 
brew text of the "Writings" of the Old Testament canon. 

Psalms offered second semester, 1967-68. Mr. von Waldow 

180. Archaeology of Palestine. A study of archaeological method and 
the results of excavations of Near Eastern sites as they relate to the Old 
and New Testaments. 

Offered first semester, 1967-68. Mr. Jamieson 

60 



240, 241, 242, 243. Greek Reading. Supervised reading of selected New 
Testament or Septuagint passages. 

Offered each semester, 1 hour credit. 

244. Greek Grammar. Introduction to the formal structure of New 
Testament Greek; systematic study of grammar and syntax, illustrated by 
specific New Testament passages. 

Mr. Kelley 

245. Greek Exegetical. A student with a B average in the Biblical field 
may elect to do independent study in the exegesis of a New Testament 
passage under the supervision of a member of the Biblical Division. The 
exegetical paper, 30-40 pages in length, will be due on the first day of 
classes in September. 

Offered during the summer, two hours credit. 

Courses numbering in the 250's will satisfy the three hours of New Tes- 
tament exegesis elective required of each student. 

250. The Gospel of Luke. An inductive study of the purpose, structure, 
meaning, and contemporary significance of the third Gospel. 

Mr. Miller 

251. Galatians. A verse-by-verse study of the Greek text, together with 
study of its key words and themes, and of the literary elements and his- 
torical place of Paul. Finally, the main types of interpretation throughout 
the centuries are reviewed. In short, this is an attempt at a theological 
exegesis of the book. 

Mr. Barth 

252. First Peter. An exegetical seminar, including syntactical studies of 
I Peter 1:3-2:10, and word studies of the major theological words in the 
epistle. Stress on exegetical methodology. Requirement: weekly syntactical 
preparation and one major seminar paper. (Limited to 12 students.) 

Offered first semester, Mr. Miller 

253. Christ, The Church, and The World in Ephesians and Colossians. 
An exegetical study. 

Offered first semester, 1967-68. Mr. Barth 

254. Interpreting the First Gospel. An examination of the presupposi- 
tions and problems of exegesis with particular reference to the discourses 
of the Gospel according to St. Matthew. 

Offered second semester, 1967-68. Mr. Hare 

255. The Gospel of Mark. An exegetical study. 

Offered first semester, 1967-68. Mr. Barth 

260. New Testament Christology. The beliefs about Jesus as Messiah, 
Son of Man, Son of God, and his work as revealer of the Father, inaugu- 
rator of the Kingdom, and Savior of the human race. 

Mr. Barth 

61 



26/. The Life of Jesus Christ. An examination of the Biblical materials 
supplemented by reference to the extra-Biblical sources and readings in 
the literature. The latter will include a survey of the critical study of the 
"Quest" in the last century and the "New Quest" from kerygma to history 
at the present time. Consideration will be given to the possibilities of 
writing a "life" today. 

Offered first semester, 1967-68. Mr. Walther 

262. Eschatology in the New Testament. The New Testament materials 
will be studied in exegetical detail with supplementary reading in the 
twentieth century literature on the subject. 

Offered first semester. Mr. Walther 

264. Biblical Theology. An introduction to current methods of inter- 
pretation and to the terminology of Biblical Theology. Examination of 
major motifs of biblical thought with attention to the continuity and dis- 
continuity of biblical themes in the Old and New Testaments. 

Offered second semester, 1967-68. Mr. J. Jackson and Mr. Walther 

265. New Testament Theology. A course designed to acquaint students 
with the principal themes, the strands of thought, and the theological 
terminology of the New Testament. Attention will be given to the con- 
tinuity of Biblical religion in Old and New Testaments. Lectures and 
discussion with reading and research in the literature. 

Mr. Hare and Mr. Walther 

270. Practical Use of the Synoptic Gospels. An exegetical examination 
of selected portions of the first three Gospels with special reference to 
their meaning for preaching, teaching, worship, evangelism, and counseling. 

Offered second semester. Mr. Orr 

271. Practical Use of the Fourth Gospel and Revelation. (See Course 
270.) 

Offered first semester, 1967-68. Mr. Orr 

272. Practical Use of the Pauline Epistle: Romans. (See Course 270.) 
Offered second semester, 1967-68. Mr. Orr 

273. Practical Use of the Pauline Epistles. Similar to 272, with special 
attention to the Corinthian correspondence. 

Offered first semester. Mr. Orr 



()2 



The History and Theology Division 





Mr. Ritschl, Chairman 




Mr. Farley 
Mr. Gerstner 


Mr. Kehm 
Mr. McCloy 


Mr. Paul 
Mr. Wiest 



Required and elective course offerings in the theology of church and ministry, theology of the 
sacraments, ethics, and American church history, customarily listed under the History and 
Theology Division, are correlated with Church and Ministry courses and are listed under 
that division. 



Required Courses 

410. Church History and History of Doctrine I. A composite course in 
church history and history of doctrine from the Apostolic Age to the 
twelfth century; an introduction to the historical developments of the 
theological discussion connected with the names of important Church 
Fathers and Councils in the period between Ignatius and John of Damas- 
cus (in the East) and Anselm (in the West.) The mission and expansion 
of the church and the rise of offices and government, art and literature 
are covered. 

Juniors, first semester, 5 hours credit. Mr. McCloy and Mr. Ritschl 

411. Church History and History of Doctrine II. A composite course in 
church history and the history of doctrine from the thirteenth century to 
the present, exclusive of American church history. History of doctrine is 
reviewed from the Scholastics through the Reformation Fathers to the 
20th century. 

Juniors, second semester, 5 hours credit. Mr. Gerstner and Mr. Ritschl 

520. Systematic Theology I. Three areas of Christian doctrine are 
studied. A. The presuppositions and procedures of theology; revelation, 
scripture, faith and reason, philosophy and theology. The stress is placed 
on what is involved in theological thinking and inquiry. B. The being 
and attributes of God, including such "works" as election and creation. 
C. Man as sinner. The reading of major theological systems provides 
occasions for the student to do his own theological thinking and inquiry. 

Middlers, first semester, 5 hours credit. 

Mr. Wiest, Mr. Farley, Mr. Ritschl, Mr. Kehm 

521. Systematic Theology II. The person and work of Jesus Christ, 
justification, sanctification, the Church and its mission, the sacraments, 
the ministry, and eschatology. 

Middlers, second semester, 5 hours credit. 

Mr. Wiest, Mr. Farley, Mr. Ritschl, Mr. Kehm 

63 



Electives 

430. Patrology. A study of Christian literature of the ancient church 
from the Apostolic Fathers to Gregory the Great and John of Damascus. 
Texts of the Fathers in English translations will be used, together with 
the Patrology of Berthold Altaner. 

Offered first semester, 1967-68. Mr. McCloy 

431. Eastern Christianity. A study of the history of the church of 
Constantinople and the various national divisions of Orthodoxy: its liturgy, 
tradition, theology, and its contemporary situation; the rise and develop- 
ment of the Monophysite churches in Syria, Egypt, Armenia, and of the 
Nestorian church. 

Offered second semester, 1967-68. Mr. McCloy 

432. The Classics of Christian Literature. A study of the outstanding 
literary masterpieces of Christian history selected from ancient, mediaeval, 
and various national literatures of Great Britain and America, France, 
Spain, Italy: poetry, drama, sermons, essays, all writings wherein there is 
a consciousness of artistic excellence. Mr. McCloy 

433. Christian Humanism. A study of the relations of the Christian 
church to the values and excellencies of human culture as seen in the 
Classical ideals (paideia) of the fourth and fifth centuries and again in 
the period of the Renaissance, and later; special study will be given to 
Erasmus and the English and Italian humanists. Mr. McCloy 

435. Seminar in Luther. This course is concerned with the writings of 
Luther in the period before 1525, with particular emphasis on "The Free- 
dom of a Christian Man." Short papers will be required. Prerequisite: 
Course 4 1 1 and 3 hours of Systematic Theology. Registration dependent 
upon interview with the professor. Mr. Ritschl 

436. The History of Biblical Interpretation (Early Church). This lecture 
course deals with the history of Biblical interpretation from the time of 
the beginning of the second century to Augustine in the West and John 
of Damascus in the East. 

Prerequisites: History of the Early Church, one course in Old Testa- 
ment and in New Testament Exegesis. Mr. Ritschl 

431. Biblical Interpretation from 1860 to 1960. This lecture course deals 
with the development of Old Testament and New Testament exegesis after 
Schleiermacher, with discussion of the positions of De Wette, F. S. Bauer | 
and the subsequent historical-critical school, the history of religion school, 
and finally the hermeneutical positions up to Ernst Fuchs. 

Prerequisite: two exegesis courses, Reformation history. Mr. Ritschl 

441. Symbols of the Reformation. An examination and comparison of 
various creeds, catechisms and confessions arising within the Protestant j 
Reformation, having in view the theological aspects of present-day ecu- 
menical conversations. Mr. Bald 

64 



443. Roman Catholicism since Trent. The historical and especially the 
theological development of the Roman Church to 1900 with particular 
concentration on the decrees and canons of Trent. Mr. Gerstner 

444. The Age of Orthodoxy. The Reformation after the Reformers. A 
study of seventeenth century continental Reformed Orthodoxy especially 
in Turretin's Theological Institutes with reference to German Lutheranism 
and English Puritanism. A knowledge of Latin not required. Mr. Gerstner 

450. Christian Biography. A study of the lives and personalities of out- 
standing Christians beginning with Ignatius of Antioch and extending to 
Albert Schweitzer; the various religions and cultural factors which helped 
to shape conspicuously Christian character; the ideals and art of Christian 
biography and autobiography. Mr. McCloy 

452. Seminar in the History of the Ancient Church. Specialized areas 

will be considered upon consultation with the instructor: e.g., the expan- 
sion of Christianity into Northern Europe and Great Britain, Christian 
art and archaeology, the historical geography of the Ancient Church, daily 
life and culture in the Ancient Church. ^ r McClou 

455. Methodist History and Doctrine. Required of Methodist students 
for graduation; elective for other students. 

Offered on alternate years, 3 hours credit. Mr. Chamberlin 

460. History of Apologetics. The nature of the defense of Christian 
faith explored through an examination of a number of apologetic systems 
of the past and present. Mr. Bald 

462. American Theology through the 19th Century. Examination by pri- 
mary sources of Edwards' theology and the subsequent developments with 
special reference to Hopkins, Taylor, Bushnell, and the Princeton School. 
Offered second semester, 1967-68. Mr. Gerstner 

410. Advanced Reading and Research in Church History. Guided reading 
and research in sources of church history. Subjects for study will be de- 
termined in conference with the instructor. Permission from the instructor 
is necessary for registration. Mr. Paul 

530. Theological Method. The investigation of one or several problems 
related to the doing of theology: theology and philosophy, the authority of 
Scripture, the status and use of tradition, the nature of theological state- 
ments, the problem of system, theology as analytic-synthetic, theoretical- 
practical. Mr. Farley or Mr. Wiest 

65 



531. Major Theological Loci. The investigation of one or more doctrines, 
such as God, election, sin and fall, Jesus Christ, redemption, Holy Spirit, 
church, eschaton. 

Offered annually. Mr. Farley, Mr. Kehm, Mr. Wiest or Mr. Ritschl 

532. Controversial Theological Issues. The investigation of one theological 
problem through the study of the major "orthodox," "heretical," "hetero- 
dox," or sectarian formulations of that problem. The study of such con- 
troversial issues as the freedom of the will, the trinity, predestination, the 
status of natural theology, the two natures, demythologizing, issues of 
Faith and Order in the ecumenical movement. Mr. Farley and Mr. Kehm 

533. Major Christian Theologians. Intensive study of the works of one 
of the great theologians of the Church, such as Origen, Augustine, Aquinas, 
Luther, Calvin, Schleiermacher, Barth, and Tillich. 

Offered annually. 

Mr. Wiest, Mr. Ritschl, Mr. Farley, Mr. Kehm, Mr. Bald 

534. Twentieth Century Protestant Theology. A study of the develop- 
ment of one or more of the most influential theological movements in 
Protestantism in the twentieth century, such as fundamentalism and neo- 
evangelicalism, liberalism, neo-Reformation theology, and the Bultmann 
school. 

Offered annually. Mr. Wiest and Mr. Kehm 

540. Contemporary Issues in Philosophical Theology I. An examination 
of the "philosophy of analysis" and the questions it raises for Christian 
belief and thought. Mr. Wiest 

541. Contemporary Issues in Philosophical Theology II. An examination 
of existentialism and phenomenology and their bearing upon the content 
and method of Christian theology. Mr. Wiest 

542. Theology and Science. The role of science in shaping the modern 
mind. Recent changes in our understanding of the nature of scientific 
knowledge. A survey of theological responses to modern science and of 
the possibilities for a "theology of nature" in contemporary protestant 
thought. Mr. Wiest 

543. Time and the Christian Schema. An investigation of the temporal 
or non-temporal status of such "events" as creation, fall, incarnation, 
seconding; considering also the temporality or non-temporality of the 
Christian schema as a whole. Mr. Farley 

544. German Theology in the 19th Century. Study of the line of de- 
velopment in German theology from Schleiermacher through Albrecht 
Ritschl and Wilhelm Herrmann, with special attention to the contribu- 
tions of this "line" to the formation of the varieties of continental "neo- 
orthodoxy." 

Offered every other year. Mr. Kehm 

66 



545. Christology and Anthropology. A study of the ways in which re- 
flection upon the humanity of Jesus Christ is related to their understanding 
of the nature of man in the theologies of Barth, Brunner, Bonhoeffer, and 
Tillich. Prerequisites, Courses 520 and 521. Mr. Kehm 

547. Studies in the History of Philosophical Theology. A study of selected 
philosophical works and systems of thought which have played a part in 
the history of theology and which continue to have significance for theo- 
logical thinking. In a given semester the course will be devoted to the 
thinking of one or more philosophers such as Plato, Aristotle, Kant, Leibniz, 
Hegel, Whitehead, and Heidegger. Mr. Wiest or Mr. Farley 

552. Advanced Reading in Philosophy of Religion. Guided reading and 
research. The subjects and areas pursued are determined by the needs and 
interests of the students. Permission from the instructor is necessary for 
registration. Mr. Wiest 

560. Theological Readings in Latin. The principal text is H. P. V. Nunn, 
An Introduction to Ecclesiastical Latin, 1951, together with the annotated 
liturgical texts in M. Flad, Le Latin de VEglise, 1938. Readings in K. P. 
Harrington, Mediaeval Latin, 1962; The Penguin Book of Latin Verse, ed. 

| by Frederick Brittain, 1962; Turretin, Institutio Theologiae Elencticae. 

Offered on request. Mr. McCloy or Mr. Gerstner 

561. Theological Readings in German. Karl Barth's Die Christliche Lehre 
j nach dem Heidelberger Katechismus and/or similar theological works. 

Offered annually. Mr. Gerstner or Mr. Kehm 

I 562. Theological Readings in French. Contemporary theological and 
j historical literature: Etienne Gilson, Jacques Maritain, and others. 

Offered annually. Mr. McCloy 



67 






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The Church and Ministry Division 

Mr. Wilson, Chairman 

Mr. Bald Mr. Fribley Mr. Paul 

Miss Burrows Mr. Hinds Mr. Ralston 

Mr. Buttrick Mr. G. Jackson Mr. Rogers 

Mr. Chamberlin Mr. Kehm Mr. Scott 

Mr. Clyde Mr. Nicholson 

Required Courses 

710. The Church in American Culture; Historical Perspective. The pur- 
pose of this course is to clarify to the student, through a study of American 
church and cultural history, his prospective situation as a minister (or other 
church professional) in the American environment. Church and culture are 
studied with emphasis on the history of the Calvinist groups, and the Church 
is viewed in specific relationship to urban and industrial life, racial and 
economic problems, and growth and movement of population. Field trips 
are arranged. 

Juniors, first semester, 2 hours credit. Mr. Paul 

111. The Church in American Culture; Sociological Perspective. The pur- 
pose of this course is to acquaint the student with the social milieu of the 
Christian ministry through sociological study of the American environment. 
The problem of thinking ethically in a Christian context is discussed with 
particular emphasis on church-state relationship. Pittsburgh is utilized as 
an object of investigation and laboratory for student research. 
Juniors, second semester, 2 hours credit. 

712. Christian Education of Children. (For M.Ed, students an additional 
hour of practicum will be required.) 

M.R.E. and M.Ed., first semester, 2 hours credit. Mr. Rogers 

713. Christian Education Seminar. Designed to give the student the 
opportunity to accumulate and evaluate resources in major areas of con- 
cern in the teaching ministry of the local church: administration, curric- 
ulum, and age group aspects of programming. The framework is that of 
the local church director of Christian education. Observation is an integral 
part of the course. (For M.Ed, students an additional hour of practicum 
will be required.) 

M.R.E. and M.Ed., second semester, 2 hours credit. Miss Burrows 

720. Psychological Foundations and Introduction to Homiletics. The 
Church and Ministry sequence continues in this course which seeks to lay 
down psychological, communicative, and homiletical foundations, always 
related to theological material, for the bearing of the Church's witness. 
Field education includes several different experiences which are analyzed 
in the light of course material. 

Middlers, first semester, 4 hours credit. 

Mr. Buttrick, Mr. Wilson, Mr. Hinds, and Mr. G. Jackson 

69 



721. Liturgies and Homiletical and Counseling Practica. The course 
prepares students in preaching and in the ordering of worship. Theological 
norms are developed and discussed in relation to historic practice, psycho- 
logical insight, and the task of the Church's ministry. Lectures on the history 
and theology of preaching will be followed by an investigation of hermeneutic 
principles, workshop sessions in sermon preparation, and practice preaching 
with homiletic and speech criticism. Small sectioned classes and tutorial 
instruction will be scheduled. The study of Christian worship includes the 
doctrine of the sacraments, the history of worship, the preparation and 
conduct of special services, and the role of music in congregational worship. 
Counseling seminars center on case presentations. 

Middlers, second semester, 4 hours credit. Divisional faculty 

723. Pastoral Care and Counseling. A course designed to equip the stu- 
dent for a ministry to particular human problems (grief, marital conflict, 
guilt, emotional crisis, etc.) with theological insight and psychological sensi- 
tivity. A supervised practicum continues throughout the second semester. 
Middlers, Intersession, 2 hours credit. Mr. G. Jackson 

730. Ethics and Homiletics. With the foundation of previous studies 
of the Church, its ministry and mission, and its relations to society, an 
examination is now made of the responsibilities of Christians in the secular 
world. Students are required to read the important literature in Christian 
ethics, to inquire into the Biblical and theological framework within which 
ethical decisions may be made, and to make an ethical analysis of a problem 
in a particular field such as economics or politics. A practicum in preaching 
is correlated with both exegesis and the ethical concerns of this course. 
Seniors, first semester, 4 hours credit. Inter-divisional faculty 

732. Christian Education. The major emphasis in this unit of the Church 
and Ministry sequence will be upon the teaching ministry of the church. 
Assuming all seminary studies are background, this course will review the 
history of present educational patterns of the churches; will examine con- 
temporary philosophies of church education with particular attention to 
the relation of theology and education; will study various approaches to 
teaching doctrine, the Bible, and church history; and will develop skills in 
program planning, teaching, and administration in the framework of a 
broad understanding of administration in contemporary Protestant churches. 
Seniors, first semester, 3 hours credit. Mr. Chamberlin 

734. Christian Education. This course will include the Christian edu- 
cation portion of 732, and will provide an additional two hours each week 
for special projects and advanced supplementary work pointed directly toward 
professional preparation for positions in Christian education. 

M.R.E. Seniors, first semester, 5 hours credit. Mr. Chamberlin 



70 



Electives 

Polity 

800. Life and Work of the United Presbyterian Church. Understanding 
of the life and work of the United Presbyterian Church, factual, critical, 
and creative, is sought by study of pertinent historical developments, present 
organization and administration at all levels and especially at the parish 
level, and developing understanding and action relative to the national 
and world mission of the Church. 

Mr. Clyde 

801. Polity and Program of the United Presbyterian Church. An intro- 
duction to the polity and program of the United Presbyterian Church, 
designed in part to help students to prepare for denominational examina- 
tions in that field. Mr. Clyde 

802. Methodist Polity. Required of Methodist students for graduation. 

Mr. Chamberlin 

Preaching 

810. The Great Ages of Preaching. A study will be made of the doc- 
trinal and ethical content, literary style, homiletical method, historical and 
spiritual background of preaching from the days of the Apostles to the 
beginning of the 19th century. Mr. Scott 

811. Preaching in the Pastorate. A study of preaching in the specific 
context of the congregational ministry: the relation of pastoral preaching 
to liturgy, education, counseling and "prophetic proclamation"; the plan- 
ning of preaching according to the Christian Year. 

Seniors only. Mr. Scott, Mr. Wilson 

812. The Theological Understanding of Preaching. A study of the theol- 
ogy of preaching from the Reformation to the present with special em- 
phasis on contemporary positions held by representative proponents. The 
student will be introduced to the twentieth century context in which preach- 
ing takes place and its influence on the theology of preaching. 

Mr. Scott 

813. Preaching from the Parables. The course is two-fold: a study of 
the history of the interpretation of Parables, and the actual writing and 
classroom delivery of sermons from the Parables. 

Mr. Nicholson 

814. Homiletical Study of the Acts. The course is three-fold: a review 
of the historical-critical approach to Acts, the discovery of homiletical 
material, and the actual writing and classroom delivery of sermons. 

Mr. Nicholson 

815. Preaching from the Catholic Epistles. A study, in terms of exegesis 
and theological context, of preaching from the Catholic Epistles, especially 

71 



from Johannine and Petrine material. Consideration will be given to their 
historical as well as contemporary use. Sermons will be prepared and dis- 
cussed. (Limited to 10 students.) Mr. Wilson 

816. Preaching from the Synoptic Gospels. A study, on the basis of 
Mark's Gospel, of homiletical treatment of the records of the birth, bap- 
tism, teaching, temptation, transfiguration, passion, resurrection and ascen- 
sion of Christ; the calling and training of the Twelve; with the exegetical 
use of parallel and relevant passages in the other Gospels. 

Mr. Nicholson, Mr. Wilson 

811. Preaching the Old Testament to our Contemporaries. An examina- 
tion of Old Testament themes in relation to the Gospel and to selected 
contemporary intellectual and socio-cultural situations, leading to study of 
the hermeneutical and homiletical treatment of selected Old Testament 
books and passages. There will be sermon preparation, delivery, and class 
discussion. Mr. Wilson 

818. Preaching on the Psalms. 

Mr. Fribley 

819. The New Look of Roman Catholic Preaching. A study will be made 
of the new concept of preaching within the Roman Catholic Church with 
particular reference to the influence of the Biblical and Liturgical move- 
ments and their influence on the homily as an integral part of the Mass. 

Offered second semester, 1967-68. Mr. Scott 



Christian Education 

825. Creative Teaching. A course designed to give the student the 
opportunity to explore creative ways of teaching the Christian faith to 
children, youth, and adults within the program of the church. Observa- 
tion, laboratory experience, demonstration, and guest lectures will be used 
throughout the course. 

Offered on request. Miss Burrows 

826. Christian Education in the Local Church. Designed to give the stu- 
dent the opportunity to accumulate and evaluate resources in the admini- 
stration of the local church program of Christian education, including all 
age groups. Special attention is given to the possibilities of organization 
and program for the Christian education of children and youth. 

Offered second semester, 1967-68. Miss Burrows 

831. Christian Education in Cultural Context. Church education theory 
has recognized the significance of theology and psychology, but insufficient 
attention has been given to the influence of the cultural factors in both 
the theory and practice of education in the churches. The relation of edu- 
cation and culture will be examined in the light of the major contributions 
of sociology and anthropology, and the implications of the findings for 
church education will be traced. Mr. Chamberlin 

72 



832. The Churches and Public Education. Significant new challenges 
confront the churches in the growing inclusion of "religion" courses at all 
levels of public education. The historical relation between churches and 
public schools, the legal issues involved, the experience of religion in higher 
education, and present religion programs of State educational agencies- 
all these will be examined in preparation for understanding and designing 
what churches may do in this new situation. M r Chamberlin 

833. Appropriating the Christian Faith. An examination of various views 
about the relation of the Holy Spirit to human activity in the processes of 
appropriation of faith, and the problems this poses for the educator. Con- 
temporary learning theories will be studied in terms of their implications 
for a theological understanding of appropriation. 

Mr. Chamberlin 

834. The Minister of Christian Education. Patterns of local church staff 
responsibility for education, from the "Doctor" designated by Calvin, to 
the present time, will be reviewed. In the light of this history, the class 
will analyse problems of multiple-staff relationships and their implications 
for the complex processes of church education. An attempt will be made 
for each class member to clarify his own philosophy of educational admini- 
stration (whether Minister of Education, Associate Minister, or Director of 
Christian Education) in the light of his total seminary course. 

Mr. Chamberlin 

835. New Patterns of Christian Presence. An exploration of the many 
new forms of ministry being conducted experimentally both in this country 
and abroad; a review of studies by denominational agencies, particularly 
the World Council of Churches study of the missionary structure of the 
parish; and an examination of the implications of these developments for 
the parish and its educational ministry. Registration is limited. 

Mr. Chamberlin 

Pastoral Care 

840. Theology and Psychiatry. The metaphysical presuppositions, meth- 
od, understanding of therapy, and some aspects of human nature will be 
compared. An attempt will be made to define mutuality and discreteness 
between the two disciplines. An introduction to Freudian, Jungian, and other 
psychiatric writings will be made. Mr. G. Jackson 

841. Seminar in Counseling. An advanced course utilizing the case work 
of students, drawing principles for both diagnosis and therapy out of the 
cases presented, and making evaluations. The role of the minister as coun- 
selor is carefully scrutinized. jy[r G Jackson 

843. The Aging: Personality Formation and Pastoral Care. This seminar 
will look at the question of aging from three significant directions: the 
psychology of religion in specific relevance to the aging; socio-psychological 
patterns in the aging process; and the role of the church in ministering 
to the aging. Mr Pay i or 

73 



844. Research in Pastoral Care. This course will investigate and develop 
criteria for pastoral counseling with in-patients and after-care patients hav- 
ing serious emotional illnesses. Methods of study will include readings, 
seminars, and clinical work at Woodville State Hospital. 

By invitation of the instructor. Mr. Paylor 

World Mission 

850. Changing Patterns in Christian World Mission. In a changing world 
demanding changing patterns of Christian mission, the nature of the 
changes and the reasons for them, their implications for the contemporary 
understanding of the Gospel, and their possible effect upon the world ex- 
tension of the Gospel in the present and the future, will constitute major 
themes for investigation. M r Clyde 

854. Comparative Religion. A study of the origin and development of 
religion, with special investigation of Primitive Religion, Hinduism, Bud- 
dhism, Confucianism, and Islam, with regard to their bearing on Modern 
Missions. 

Offered on request. Mr. Clyde 

855. Major Sects. Jehovah's Witnesses, Mormonism, Christian Science 
and other groups compared with traditional Christianity. Resemblances 
and differences noted. 

Offered first semester, 1967-68. Mr. Gerstner 

857. Christian Responsibility and the World Social Revolution. The 
course will explore the nature and technique of Christian world responsi- 
bility in view of the nature of the Gospel and the action of the Church as 
both confront today's global revolution, with special attention given to the 
Christian approach to the non-Christian religions and to Communism. 

Mr. Clyde 

858. Contemporary Movements in Ecumenics. Through study of current 
ecumenical relations among churches resultant from such developments as 
Vatican II, the Consultation on Church Union, the Wheaton Conference 
of non-world Council churches, and selected denominational unions, effort 
will be made to prepare students for knowledgeable action in situations of 
ecumenical significance. Mr. Clyde 

859. Seminar in Ecumenics. This course is offered at Duquesne Uni- 
versity under a joint faculty including Duquesne professors, Pittsburgh 
Seminary professors, and others. It is open to qualified Pittsburgh Semi- 
nary students. 

Ethics 

870. The Theological Ethics of William Temple and Reinhold Niebuhr. 
A comparative study of the social thought of the late Archbishop of Canter- 
bury and one of America's leading voices in the field of ethics in relation 
to their theological foundations. TVfr. Bald 

74 



872. Research Seminar in Selected Social Problems. Students will elect 
specific areas of social concern in modern culture for investigation in which 
they will seek to relate them to the demands and insights of the Christian 
ethic. Prerequisite, 730. Mr. Bald 

Cultural Forms 

880. Christian Faith and Contemporary Literature. A study of the re- 
lationship between Christian faith and themes in contemporary literature. 
Works by a number of modern writers including Sartre, Updike, Greene, 
and Beckett will be read and discussed. Three class sessions per week will 
be scheduled. 

Mr. Buttrick 

885. Poetry, Poetics, and Christian Language. A study of contemporary 
poetry and poetics in relation to the use of religious metaphor and imagery. 
Long poems by one or two contemporary poets will be analyzed. Reading 
in modern literary criticism will be discussed. Mr. Buttrick 

890. Interpretative Reading. Oral interpretation of a varied selection 
of prose, poetry, and drama as a means of developing keener sensitivity 
to the written word and greater effectiveness in communicating it. The 
objective will be to mature the skills and principles already acquired in 
speech courses. Small sections, private conferences, recordings. 

One hour, first and second semesters, 1967-68. Mr. Hinds 

891. Communication: Theory and Practice. Examination of the function 
of communication in the ministry. Various approaches to communication 
will be surveyed with an emphasis on modern communication theory 
as it relates to the various media by which the Gospel may be communi- 
cated, such as preaching, teaching, group process, radio-T.V., etc. Students 
will be encouraged to develop their own theory of communication. 

Seniors only. Mr. Hinds 

900. Music in the Church. A practical approach to the many problems 
arising in connection with church music with particular attention to the 
problems of the small congregation. Organizing the musical resources of 
the congregation, the music as a spiritual force in the church life, and 
the minister's relation to choir and choirmaster. Mr. Ralston 

901. Hymnology. An analytical and historical study of the great hymns 
and tunes of the Christian Church. Consideration of the qualities of a 
good hymn. Practical and effective use of the hymnal. Mr. Ralston 

902. Masterpieces of Religious Music. A study of the various forms of 
music through which men have expressed their faith. Demonstration of 
the power of music to illuminate Christian truth and to "give wings to 
words." This is primarily a "listening course" making use of records but 
with assigned background reading and class comment. The purpose is to 
give the student an appreciation of various forms of musical expression as 
well as some familiarity with specific works of musical art. Mr. Ralston 

75 



Elective Credit at the University of Pittsburgh 

Up to four credit hours may also be taken in the Graduate School of Public 
and International Affairs of the University of Pittsburgh. These elective 
courses would be primarily in urbanization, economics, and international 
affairs. Work may also be taken in several other departments and schools 
in the University. 

Summer Field Education 
Every student is encouraged to spend one summer in field education, pref- 
erably in some form of clinical training. Students who choose and qualify 
for clinical training in approved programs will be given two hours of 
elective credit for each six weeks of clinical training to a maximum of four 
credit hours. For students who do not choose or do not qualify for a clinical 
training program a number of options without any elective credit are 
allowed (such as national park chaplaincies, Board of National Missions 
assignments, assistantships, etc.), upon consultation with and approval by 
the Field Education Office. 

Any student seeking a church-related position for the summer must 
counsel with the Field Education Office so that provision may be made 
for supervision on the field. Summer pastorates for students who have 
completed only their Junior year are discouraged because such students 
will not have had the courses in Church and Ministry dealing with the 
preaching, teaching, and pastoral office. 




76 



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The Master of Theology Degree 



A strong program of graduate education at the Master's level is offered by 
the Seminary in three fields: Biblical Studies, History and Theology, and 
Advanced Pastoral Studies. These Masters' programs are planned for two 
purposes: to help prepare candidates for such specialized services as teach- 
ing, counseling, and the campus ministry; and to benefit pastors who may 
wish to improve their effectiveness in Biblical, theological, or pastoral 
studies in relation to ministerial responsibilities. It is with the pastor in 
mind that the faculty views these programs as being right at the heart of 
continuing education. The courses are designed for a learned, relevant 
ministry, whatever form the ministry takes. 



The course requirements outlined on the following pages may be com- 
pleted in two academic years by students in half-residence (six hours of 
course work in each of four consecutive semesters) in which they will be 
expected to devote three days in each week to serious study. The remaining 
requirements listed must be met within five academic years from the date 
of matriculation. Candidates in the fields of Biblical Studies and History 
and Theology may elect to complete the requirements for the degree in a 
minimum period of thirteen calendar months by enrolling in full-residence 
(twelve hours of course work in each of two consecutive semesters) in 
which all of their time would be devoted to the program of study, fulfilling 
the remaining requirements by September 30 of the year following the 
date of matriculation. 



All candidates for this degree will be required to maintain a high level 
of achievement throughout their course work and to sustain a compre- 
hensive examination on it. They will also be required to prepare and pre- 
sent a thesis or a research project. In the fulfillment of this final require- 
ment they will be expected to make a significant contribution to the 
discussion of the subject, to demonstrate the scholarly competence and 
the uniform excellence of form and content associated with academic work 
at the graduate level, and successfully to undergo an oral examination on 
the thesis or research project. 

Every effort will be made to fill up gaps in theological knowledge, and 
this is made more possible since only six applicants will be admitted to 
each program per year. There is considerable freedom in which the stu- 
dent is encouraged to explore in depth his own interests. Each student 
will receive close personal attention from the professors in the curriculum 
of his choice. 

78 



Admission Requirements 



1. B.D. degree from an accredited seminary. 

2. An average of B or better in the B.D. degree or in a qualifying examina- 
tion, according to the discretion of the Graduate Education Committee. 

3. The ability to use any language integral to the chosen field of study. 
While not a requirement for admission, a reading knowledge of French 
or German is required before a student can begin the second half of the 
course. Language examinations are given in September, January, and 
June. 

4. The ability to handle English composition with competence. 



Requirements for the Degree 

1. Twenty-four course hours (30 in the Advanced Pastoral Studies Pro- 
gram) with an average of B or better. More than two C grades will 
eliminate a student from the program. 

2. A comprehensive examination covering the 24 (or 30) units of study, 
oral and/or written. 

3. Six hours for a thesis or a research project. 

4. An oral examination on the thesis or research project. 

5. The requirements for the degree must be met no later than five aca- 
demic years from the date of matriculation. 



Fees and Expenses 

Matriculation Fee, $35.00 
Tuition, $20.00 per credit hour 
Library Fee, $20.00 per year 
Graduation Fee, $10.00 



Applicants for this degree should apply to the Director of Admissions. 

79 




'■ 



Description of Courses of Instruction 

Master of Theology Degree 

The Master of Theology Program in 
Biblical Studies 

The Master's degree in the Biblical Division covers both Testaments. While 
the thesis may concentrate on one Testament, the course work is deliberately 
designed to provide a certain degree of qualification in the whole field. 
The six hours of electives may be taken in Biblical Studies, in History and 
Theology, or in the Program in Advanced Pastoral Studies, or the hours 
may be used in guided research. 

Year One 

Semester I Semester II 

Advanced Hebrew Grammar and Reading 3 Exegesis (Hebrew) 3 

Advanced Greek Grammar and Reading 3 Exegesis (Greek) 3 

Year Two 

Seminar 3 Seminar 3 

Elective 3 Elective 3 



Ml 00. Advanced Hebrew Grammar and Reading. Study to supplement 
and continue undergraduate work done with the Hebrew Old Testament. 
Three hours credit. 

M200. Advanced Greek Grammar and Reading. Study to supplement 
undergraduate work done with the Greek New Testament. Books of the 
I New Testament not previously read will be completed, and selected por- 
tions of the Greek Old Testament may be added. 
Three hours credit. 

Ml 02 and M202. Exegesis. Thorough exegesis of selected passages in 
the Hebrew Old Testament and the Greek New Testament. 
Three hours credit in each of two courses. 

Ml 03 and M203. Seminars. Problems of introduction, text, archaeology, 
and the various areas of criticism are considered. The bibliography of the 
modern literature on the Bible is surveyed with reading and discussion 
of selected volumes. The particular needs of the candidates enrolled are 
given special attention. 

Three hours credit in each of two courses. 

Electives to be announced. 

81 



The Master of Theology Program 

History and Theology 

The candidate for the Master's degree in History and Theology may major 
in either Church History or Systematic Theology, taking twelve hours in 
required courses, twelve hours in electives from the list below (in the selec- 
tion of which he must have the approval of his adviser), and six hours in 
work on a thesis. Majors in history will select primarily from the history 
elective offerings, majors in theology, primarily from the theology elective 
offerings. Where it is deemed advisable in view of a candidate's special 
interests, electives may also be chosen from Masters' courses offered in 
Biblical Studies and the Program in Advanced Pastoral Studies. 



Half -Time Sequence 






Year One 






Semester I 




Semester II 


Seminar in Theological Method 
Elective 


3 
3 


Seminar in Historical Method 
Elective 


Year Two 






Guided Research 
Elective 


3 
3 


Guided Research 
Elective 



Full-Time Sequence 



Seminar in Theological Method 


3 


Seminar in Historical Method 


3 


Guided Research 


3 


Guided Research 


3 


Electives 


6 


Electives 


6 



M400. Seminar in Historical Method. Study of research technique, prob- 
lems of interpretation, jointures between history and other disciplines, and 
the problem of limiting such interconnections, bibliography, historiography, 
and comparable problems. Normally this instruction is conducted through 
the prosecution of a specified research project. 
Three hours credit. 

M500. Seminar in Theological Method. The nature of theological think- 
ing will be studied: Prolegomena, organization of systems, theological lan- 
guage, and hermeneutics with illustration from representative theologians. 
Three hours credit. 

82 



Electives 

M401, M402, M403, M404, M405, M531, M533, M540, M544, M547, and 
M551 . (See corresponding numbers, pp. 68-69, for Courses M53 1 -M547.) 

M401. Patristics. The study of the idea of ecclesiastical tradition; the 
solutions of the Fathers of the ancient church to the recurrent or immedi- 
ate problems of faith, life, and church order; the history of patristics and 
the controversies concerning it, and its significance for the modern ecu- 
menical movement. The manuals of Quasten and Altaner will serve as 
guides, and the texts will be studied for the most part in such series of 
English translations as the Ante-and Post Nicene Fathers, Ancient Christian 
Writers, The Fathers of the Church, etc. 
Three hours credit. 

M402. Research in Puritanism. Special topics such as the covenant, 
seeking, church order and the relation of church and state will be explored. 
Three hours credit. 

M403. 17th Century Orthodoxy. This course will consider the orthodox 
background of Schleiermacher and other later theologians. 
Three hours credit. 

M404. Seminar in the American Churches and Secular Culture. Each 
year a special topic will be selected and announced for study: for example, 
church and state, the Protestant ethos in the 19th century, the social gospel. 

M405. Guided Reading in Church History. Readings approved by the 
professor designed to prepare the student for general examination in the 
field of Church History. Regular discussion of assignments is required. 
Three hours credit. 

M551. Advanced Reading in Theology. Guided reading and research in 
theological sources. The subjects and areas pursued are determined by the 
needs and interests of the students. 

Guided Research. The candidate will be guided by a professor in read- 
ing in an area of special interest, to which it is assumed his thesis will 
belong. Reading and research will lead to the definition of a thesis topic 
and writing of a precis to be submitted for approval. 
Six hours credit. 



83 



The Master of Theology Program 

Advanced Pastoral Studies 



The Program for Advanced Pastoral Studies is designed to help students 
to know themselves better; to understand and become sensitive to inter- 
personal relationships; to be familiar with group process; to become in- 
volved in creative dialogue between theological studies and the social 
sciences; and to see more clearly the resources of the Christian church for 
health at the various levels. 

The faculty teaching in this program is composed of seminary personnel 
and members of several faculties of the University of Pittsburgh, including 
the Medical School, the Graduate School of Social Work, and the Depart- 
ment of Speech. The latter include Robert J. Shoemaker, M.D., Margaret 
B. McFarland, Ph.D., Rex A. Pittenger, M.D., Erma T. Meyerson, M.A.A.S.S., 
Jack Matthews, Ph.D., Moises Wodnicki, M.D., and Victor Freeman, M.D. 



Year One 



Semester I 

Seminar in Theological Method 
Developmental Theory of 
Personality I 

General Hospital Practicum 
(Veterans Administration Hospital) 



Semester II 

3 Developmental Theory of 

Personality II 3 

3 Philosophical Issues in Psychotherapy * 

Practicum with Children 
r, (Child Study Center) r> 



Year Two 



Dynamics of Family Life 

The Socio-Cultural Environment 

Counseling Seminar 



2 Theology and Psychology 

3 Group Process 

2 Counseling Seminar 



Clinical Training. A six weeks' course in an approved clinical training 
program will be required before graduation. It is recommended that it be 
taken previous to admission or in the summer between the first and second 
years. 



84 



M500. Seminar in Theological Method. For course description see bottom 
of page 84. 

M600. Developmental Theory of Personality I. The age span is traced 
from pre-natal influences and birth through the various stages of child- 
hood, showing normal growth patterns, the abnormalities of neurotic and 
psychotic development, and the relation of the child to the social milieu. 

M601. Developmental Theory of Personality II. Continuation of M600 
from adolescence through the aging process. 

M602. Philosophical Issues in Psychotherapy. Freudian thought and 
existential analysis are studied from the biblical and theological perspective 
with regard to such issues as epistemology, ontology, anxiety, freedom, 
time, value theory. 

M603. Practicum with Children. This practicum is conducted at the 
Child Study Center, the Medical School, and the University of Pittsburgh 
under the direction of the staff at the Child Study Center. Interpretive 
seminars are held regularly. 

M604. Dynamics of Family Life. 

M605. General Hospital Practicum. This practicum is conducted at the 
Veterans Administration Hospital under the direction of the social work 
staff of the hospital. Interpretive seminars are held regularly. 

M606. Group Process. The theory and practice of group experience are 
studied with the end in view of better understanding the dynamics of 
church groups. 

M607. The Socio-cultural Environment. This course deals with the eco- 
logical and cultural factors which make functional and dysfunctional con- 
tributions to personality and community development. It will emphasize 
the role of institutions (other than the family) and power structures in 
their direct and indirect effect upon the individual. 

M608. Counseling Seminar. Each student is required to work with four 
counselees, under supervision, and to participate in the presentation of 
case material. 

M609. Counseling Seminar. Continuation of M608. 

M610. Theology and Psychology. The material of the entire program is 
pulled together in dialogue between theology and the human sciences, 
especially psychology and psychiatry. Such themes as God, man, sin, re- 
demption are dealt with. Pastoral care, informed theologically and psy- 
chologically, becomes the vantage-point for taking a hard look at church 
programming: its relevance, its resources, etc. A primary concern is to ask 
what the church can do in its supportive and preventive roles as well as 
in its redemptive and re-creative roles. 



85 



The University of Pittsburgh's Graduate School 

of Public and International Affairs 

and 

Pittsburgh Theological Seminary 

(A Joint Program) 

A cooperative educational program which will have special meaning for 
international service (ecumenical mission and relations), administration, 
and urbanization has been worked out with one of the world's outstanding 
graduate schools of public and international affairs. The areas of concen- 
tration in this program are: 

General Public Administration 
Administration of International Affairs 
Economic and Social Development 
Municipal-Metropolitan Affairs 
Community and Voluntary Organization Affairs 

It is the policy of the Graduate School of Public and International 
Affairs that half its students are from overseas. This provides for rich 
trans-cultural experience. Through this joint program Pittsburgh offers an 
exciting and exceptional opportunity for preparation for ecumenical mission 
and relations. 

Basic to the program are the M.P.I. A. degree, Master of Public and 
International Affairs, and the M.P.A. degree, Master of Public Administra- 
tion. Qualified persons from overseas as well as the United States may 
enroll as regular or special students in these degree programs. Such students 
are subject to the exclusive academic control of the University and receive 
their Masters' degrees from the University. However, latitude is injected 
into these programs so that elective course work can be taken at the Semi- 
nary, credit to be applied to the university degrees. 

The program allows Bachelor of Divinity students to elect up to four 
hours from the offerings of the Graduate School of Public and International 
Affairs, the tuition differential being graciously financed from fellowship 
funds provided by the Heinz and Ford Foundations. This B.D. enrichment 
will be especially valuable to those students preparing to become fraternal 
workers, missionaries, Peace Corps volunteers, United Nation workers, etc. 



Inquiries should be directed to: 

The Graduate School of Public and International Affairs 
University of Pittsburgh 
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15213 

or 
The Director of Admissions 
Pittsburgh Theological Seminary 
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15206 

86 



he Cooperative Doctoral Program In Religious Studies 

The University of Pittsburgh 

and Pittsburgh Theological Seminary 

The University of Pittsburgh and Pittsburgh Theological Seminary will 
inaugurate a cooperative graduate program in the study of religion in the 
Fall of 1967. This program, interdisciplinary in scope, will draw upon the 
resources of both institutions and will culminate in the awarding of a 
Ph.D. degree by the University of Pittsburgh. 



The purpose of this program is to engage and assist qualified students 
in a responsible and original academic research in religious source literature, 
history, and theology; to train them in the use of appropriate methods of 
specialized study; and to help them to prepare for teaching ministry in 
colleges, universities and seminaries or more fully for the pastoral ministry, 
or for some specialized form of ministry. 

The program will begin in three fields: New Testament, Church History, 
and Theology. It will be expanded to include Old Testament, Ethics, and 
History of Religions. Relevant fields to be offered by the University include 
Anthropology, Classics, History, Philosophy, Psychology, Sociology, or others 
as approved by the program's administrative committee. This committee will 
be composed of four from the seminary and five from the university. 

The program will consist of a minimum of four terms of full residence. 
The student will take the equivalent of at least eight one term courses 
and one half term of dissertation research. The minimum eight courses will 
be distributed according to the following schema: 

1. Two special seminar courses, required of all students and taught either 
individually by members of the Seminary and University faculties, one 
on some aspect of religion as a social phenomenon, and one on some 
aspect of religion as a system of thought. 

2. Two courses in a single University field. 

3. Two courses in the candidate's field of specialization, other than 
those satisfying requirement two. 

4. Two electives in either the field of specialization or any cognate field 
or fields. 



The faculty will be drawn from the Seminary and from the University. 
Certain members of the Seminary faculty will be recommended by the 
President of the Seminary to the University as adjunct professors in the 
University. Only an adjunct professor may direct dissertations. However, 
any member of the seminary faculty is eligible to teach a course in the 
program providing that course is in the area of his specialty and is needed 

87 



by the program itself. Other faculty members may be used in the program 
from Duquesne University as well as other schools in the area as they 
may be needed and are qualified. 

A preliminary written examination will normally be taken before the 
end of the second term of residence. This examination, covering general 
background at the B.D. level of competence, will include the following 
areas: Old Testament, New Testament, Church History, Theology, Ethics, 
and History of Religions. Students who enter the program without a B.D. 
preparation, or its equivalent, should expect to spend more than the usual 
amount of time preparing for this examination. Furthermore, all students 
will have to pass examination in two modern foreign languages, normally 
French and German, before they are eligible to sit for the comprehensive 
examination. Additional examinations will be required in languages nec- 
essary as tools of research in fields of study in which primary materials 
are in those languages. 

When all course, language, and preliminary examination requirements 
have been met, the student will be admitted to the comprehensive exami- 
nation, which will consist of both written and oral components. The com- 
prehensive examination will measure competence in each of four fields, one 
of which will be the student's area of specialization. At least one field will 
be from each of the cooperating institutions. A dissertation and final oral 
examination will complete the requirements. 

A very significant aspect of this Ph.D. program is that the student will 
be encouraged to move into independent study in the area of his own 
specialization and interest just as quickly as possible. There will be no 
great emphasis upon courses; rather, there will be a minimum of courses 
as indicated above. A very serious attempt will be made to pick up the 
student in his eagerness and allow him to go full speed ahead into his 
research and writing. 

There will be some financial aid available for needy students. All stu- 
dents will be matriculated in the University of Pittsburgh and, therefore, 
those coming from within the State of Pennsylvania will benefit from the 
State-relatedness of the University and the lowered tuition fees of $450.00 
per year. 



The program itself will be kept small so that it can be of the highest 
quality possible. Admissions requirements will be those of the University 
which include the usual transcripts and letters of recommendations. Fur- 
thermore, the students will be required to provide scores on the Graduate 
Record Examination or the Miller Analogies Test and will also be responsi- 
ble for providing a seminar paper or other evidence of scholarly research 



experience. Applications can be requested through writing to either insti- 
tution, but preferably to the University of Pittsburgh, the Division of 
Humanities. 

This program will be extremely valuable to the Seminary not only in 
the area of the Ph.D. but also for the B.D. program itself. It will assist 
the Seminary in continuing to employ the very finest faculty available, 
providing that faculty with teaching and research experience at the doctoral 
level. Already the Seminary library has earmarked large sums of money 
for the building up of book collections in the fields in which the Doctorate 
will be offered. This, again, of course, will strengthen the Bachelor of 
Divinity program. 



Admission Committee for Doctoral Program in Religious Studies 

Standing, left to right: Prof. Robert D. Marshall, English; Prof. Nicholas Rescher, 

Philosophy; Prof. Walter Wiest, Theology; Prof. William Stanton, 

History; Prof. Markus Barth, New Testament 

Seated: Dean Walter Evert; Dean Gordon Jackson 

Absent: Prof. George P. Murdock, Anthropology; Prof. Edward Farley, Theology 



M 






nuin 






91 



Continuing Education 

Under the direction of the Graduate Education Committee continuing 
education is fast assuming a major place in the life of the Seminary. Over 
300 pastors in the Pittsburgh and Canton, Ohio, areas regularly participate 
in Eight Weeks Schools. A distinctive feature, and the catalyst that pre- 
cipitates a truly vital learning experience, is the active participation of 
pastors from over a dozen denominations who make up a majority of those 
enrolled. 



The Eight Weeks Schools 

At the Seminary. For eight Tuesdays in October and November and again 
in February and March the regular faculty offers courses in a wide range 
of areas but always with particular relevance to ministry, whatever its forms 
(pastoral, administrative, etc.). For example, the following courses were 
offered last year: The Individual and the Community in New Testament 
Thought, New Testament Greek Refresher Seminar; Christianity as an 
Historical Religion, The Problems of Guilt and Hostility, Roots of Vatican II 
in the Medieval Church, History of Negroes in the United States; and 
Introduction to the Problems of Old Testament Prophecy. 



Each class runs two hours, and a student may take up to three courses. 
Announcement of course offerings is made in Panorama, the quarterly 
bulletin, as well as in folder form. The fee of $5.00 per course includes 
the use of the library. Inquiries should be directed to William R. Phillippe, 
Director of Continuing Education. 



At Canton, Ohio. Each fall the Seminary conducts an eight week session 
for pastors of this area, with the same format and courses as listed above. 
Other schools in other areas will be announced as they are developed. 
A special announcement and registration form may be secured from the 
Director of Continuing Education. 



A Program of Training and Research in Pastoral Counseling was started 
this past year in cooperation with St. Francis Community Mental Health 
Center. A number of pastors were admitted to the program on a "pilot 
project" basis, committing themselves to a thirty week schedule. This new 
project will be expanded and linked with other centers in the greater 
Pittsburgh area in the next year. The schedule calls for a one hour seminar 
for case consultation at the St. Francis Center and a one hour weekly 
presentation at the seminary per week. Tuition for the 30 week program 
is $30.00. 

92 



Spring and Summer Programs 

Seminar on Preaching will be held on the campus June 12-16 and consist 
of exegetical lectures and a homiletics workshop utilizing members of our 
faculty. A fee of $45.00 covers the cost of room board and tuition. The 
seminar is limited to 40 persons. 

The School of Religion at Shady Side Academy, Pittsburgh, supported by 
the Pitcairn-Crabbe Foundation, each summer invites 150 ministers from 
within the Synod of Pennsylvania. The faculty is drawn from all over the 
United States as well as from the Seminary. The dates for the 1967 school 
are June 19-23. 

Continuing Education Seminar, Synod of Ohio. Under the joint sponsor- 
ship of the Seminary and the Synod of Ohio a seminar for ministers and 
their wives will be held on the campus of Muskingum College June 26-30, 
1967. The seminar this summer, whose theme will be "Current Crucial 
Issues" will bring together an interdisciplinary faculty from four major 
institutions. A Geneticist from Ohio State, an Economist from the College 
of Wooster, a Political Scientist from the University of Pittsburgh and an 
Ethicist from our own seminary will join the Director of Continuing Edu- 
cation for this experience. Those who attend are expected to do prescribed 
reading before the beginning of the school in order that the best use may 
be made of seminar time. The cost is $40.00 per person for room, board 
and tuition. 



Audit Courses 

A limited number of auditors will be admitted to regular B.D. and M.R.E. 
courses. To protect the integrity of the degree programs the registrant 
must have the approval of both the Academic Dean and the professor for 
auditing. The cost for auditing is half the regular tuition fee plus half the 
library fee. While no grade is given or recorded, auditors are expected to 
be faithful in attendance and to do the required readings. Approximately 
fifty auditors a semester can be helped to continue their theological edu- 
cation through this program. Inquiries should be directed to the Registrar. 



Credit Courses 

A limited number of students already having the B.D. degree may be 
enrolled for regular Bachelor of Divinity courses. The purpose of this pro- 
gram is to help prepare those who wish to do graduate work but who need 
to buttress their seminary training, fill in gaps, or do additional prerequisite 
work toward specialization. A grade is given and recorded for transcript 
purposes. The cost is one-half the regular matriculation fee and full tuition. 
Application forms should be secured from the Director of Admissions. 

93 



The Alumni Association 

Officers 

President, Dale K. Milligan '51 .. 

Vice President, Curtis J. Patterson '37 

Secretary, Harry W. Rankin '45 

Treasurer, Frank C. Black '27 

Necrological Secretary, Clarence F. Anderson '28 

Director of Alumni Relations, William R. Phillippe '55 



The Alumni Association, now numbering more than 2,300 members, is 
composed of the former students, graduates and post-graduates of Pitts- 
burgh Theological Seminary and its antecedent seminaries. The purposes 
of the Association are to deepen the friendships begun in seminary and 
to afford fellowship among all its graduates; to cooperate with the Seminary 
in enlisting young people for church vocations and recruiting prospective 
seminary candidates; to support actively the cause of theological education 
and of the Seminary in particular in its development to meet the demands 
of the future; and lastly, to have a sympathetic interest in the life and 
work of the Seminary's students and faculty. The Alumni Association spon- 
sors several seminary convocations. 

The Annual Alumni Day will be held on May 9, 1967 and begin with 
an address by a major figure in the field of science. At noon there will be 
the 5 year reunion luncheons and a general luncheon for all alumni. The 
afternoon program consists of a faculty panel to discuss the issues raised 
in the morning, a brief business session for election of officers, and a re- 
ception by President and Mrs. Donald Miller. This is followed by the 
alumni dinner, after which the graduating seniors are inducted into the 
Association. 

Regional meetings of alumni are held frequently, and a dinner at the 
annual meeting of The General Assembly is another highlight of the year's 
activities. 

Annual supplements to the Alumni Directory are published each summer 
and list changes of address and the newly received alumni. 

94 



95 



Degrees Awarded, 1965-1966 



The Degree of Bachelor of Divinity 

Gary Dean Alexander, Leawood, Kansas 

A.B., University of Kansas, 1963 
Gary Lyle Baer, Baltimore, Maryland 

B.A., Davis and Elkins College, 1963 
Rawley D. Boone, Hickory, Pennsylvania 

B.A., Grove City College, 1963 
Charles L. Bulger, Omaha, Nebraska 

B.A., Hastings College, 1962 
Donald C. Byers, Orrville, Ohio 

B.S., Ohio State University, 1961 
Robert T. Cassell, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

B.A., University of Pittsburgh, 1962 
In Soon Choi, Seoul, Korea 

B.A., Seoul National University, 1958 
Larry Arthur Dunster, Middle Granville, New York 

B.A., Bloomfield College, 1963 
George Edward Espy, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

B.A., University of Pittsburgh, 1963 
Thomas W. Filbern, West Newton, Pennsylvania 

B.A., Westminster College, 1962 
Peter Judd Fosburg, Westfield, New Jersey 

B.A., Westminster College, 1963 
Donald S. French, Ithaca, New York 

B.S., Cornell University, 1962 
Stephen Wayne Getty, Wallingford, Pennsylvania 

B.A., Grove City College, 1963 
Robert W. Gracey, Wheeling, West Virginia 

B.A., Davis and Elkins College, 1963 
James W. Graham, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 

B.A., Temple University, 1963 
Dennis Haines, Harvard, Illinois 

B.A., University of Dubuque, 1963 
William Russell Hayes, East Paterson, New Jersey 

B.A., Bloomfield College, 1963 
James L. Hobson, Linden, Michigan 

B.A., Alma College, 1962 
Richard Kenneth Horn, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

B.A., Grove City College, 1963 
Gary Evans Huffman, Loves Park, Illinois 

A.B., Monmouth College, 1963 

96 



Ralph B. Jones, Baltimore, Maryland 

B.A., Maryland University, 1962 
Raymond J. Marquette, Scranton, Pennsylvania 

B.S., Geneva College, 1961 
Guy H. Mclver, Columbus, Ohio 

B.S., Ohio State University, 1962 
George M. Mighells, Salamanca, New York 

Th.B., Malone College, 1950 
Harold Richard Moore, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

A.B., University of Pittsburgh, 1961 
McClain J. Moredock, Rices Landing, Pennsylvania 

B.A., Westminster College, 1962 
Frank David Moser, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

B.M., Grove City College, 1963 
Myron A. Newell, Alexandria, Virginia 

B.S., Pennsylvania State University, 1960 
Wayne F. Parker, Monmouth, Illinois 

B.A., Monmouth College, 1962 
Ronald G. Pritchard, Baltimore, Maryland 

B.A., University of Maryland, 1963 
Jay King Rabuck, Port Arthur, Texas 

B.S., Stephen F. Austin College, 1963 
Joseph Dunnell Small, III, Gibsonia, Pennsylvania 

A.B., Brown University, 1963 
Leland Ralph Stoops, Jr., New Castle, Pennsylvania 

B.A., Westminster College, 1963 
Wichean Watakeecharoen, Bangkok Thailand 

B.A., Dubuque University, 1960 
Paul R. Watson, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

B.A., University of Pittsburgh, 1963 
Stephen Boyce Woods, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

B.A., Westminster College, 1963 
William R. Yeats, Morton, Pennsylvania 

B.A., Bloomfield College, 1963 



June, 1966 

\alph B. Jones, Baltimore, Maryland 
B.A., Maryland University, 1962 



September, 1966 

John D. Reuben, Pensacola, Florida 
B.A., Knoxville College, 1962 



97 



The Degree of Master of Religious Education 

Gail G. Buchwalter, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 

B.A., The College of Wooster, 1963 
Mary Laura Markley, Cadiz, Ohio 

B.S., Muskingum College, 1948 
Iqbal Nisar, Lyallpur, W. Pakistan 

B.A., Gordon College, 1952 

B.D., Gujranwala Seminary, 1961 

The Degree of Master of Theology 

Rev. Din Dayal, Gadarwara, India 

B.A., Allahabad University, 1949 

B.D., Leonard Theological College, 1952 
Rev. Rowland Dean Van Es, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

A.B., Hope College, 1960 

B.D., Western Theological Seminary (Holland, Mich.), 1964 



Honors and Awards 

Magna Cum Laude 
Gail Guptill Buchwalter 

Cum Laude 

George Edward Espy 
James Wilson Graham 
Mary L. Markley 
Joseph Dunnell Small, III 
Stephen Boyce Woods 

Graduating With Honors In 
Biblical Studies 

Joseph Dunnell Small, III 

The Thomas Jamison Scholarship 

and 

The Sylvester S. Marvin Memorial Fellowship 

George Edward Espy 

The Jennie Rigg Barbour Memorial Prize 
Joseph Dunnell Small, III 

The Hugh Thomson Kerr Moderator Prize 
Gary Dean Alexander 

98 



The Michael Wilson Keith Memorial Homiletical Prize 
Peter Judd Fosburg 

The Robert A. Lee Church History Award 

Joseph Dunnell Small, III 
Stephen Boyce Woods 

The Home Training Bible Class Award In Missions 
Rawley Dodd Boone 

The Chevy Chase Christian Education Award 
(Young People's Work) 

McClain Jeffrey Moredock 

The First Presbyterian Church of 
McKeesport Preaching Prize 

Joseph Dunnell Small, III 

The John Watson Prize in New Testament Greek 
R. Benjamin Jones 

The Henry A. Riddle Award 
For Graduate Study 

In Soon Choi 

Middler Class Awards 

The Alice Myers Sigler Memorial Prize 
in History and Theology 

Henry E. Robinson, III 

The Walter P. and Anna L. McConkey 
Award in Homiletics 

John M. Fife 

Junior Class Awards 

The James Purdy Scholarships 

Carolyn Jane Easdale 
Arthur George Hampson 
J. Warren Jacobs 
James Graham Lockhart 
Robert Louis Lowry 
Edward Eldon Spence 

The Fred McFeely Rogers Prize in Biblical Studies 
Arthur George Hampson 

99 



Register of Students, 1966-1967 



Senior Class 

Arthur C. Broadwick, Somerdale, New Jersey 

B.S., Muhlenberg College, 1957 
David Blaine Cable, Belle Vernon, Pennsylvania 

B.S., California State College, 1963 
Donald George Campbell, Clairton, Pennsylvania 

B.A., Westminster College, 1964 
Andrew C Chalmers, Bernardsville, New Jersey 

B.A., Bloomfield College, 1964 
Gary Glenmar Close, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

B.S., Norwich University, 1964 
Alice McGee Collins, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

B.A., Chatham College, 1957 
Robert Scott Collins, Tarkio, Missouri 

A.B., Tarkio College, 1960 
Rodger L. Cragun, Niagara Falls, New York 

A.A., Lincoln College, 1960 

B.A., Tusculum College, 1963 
James Eugene Cuppett, Bedford, Pennsylvania 

B.A., University of Pittsburgh, 1964 
Brent Fergus Davidson, Seattle, Washington 

B.A., Seattle Pacific College, 1964 
John James Dromazos, Hamburg, New York 

B.S., New York State University, 1961 
John D. Evans, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

A.B., Harvard College, 1961 

B.A., St. Peter's College, 1963 
John M. Fife, Titusville, Pennsylvania 

B.A., Washington and Jefferson College, 1962 
Robert Lee Finch, Peoria, Illinois 

A.B., Taylor University, 1964 
Kenneth Paul Gammons, Santa Barbara, California 

B.A., Whitworth College, 1964 
Clinton Clair Glenn, Jr., Hyattsville, Maryland 

B.A., University of Maryland, 1964 
Clyde Henry Gojf, Toledo, Ohio 

B.A., University of Toledo, 1959 
Daniel Clark Graham, Cuyahoga Falls, Ohio 

B.A., Westminster College, 1964 
Ruth Morton Griffiths, Columbus, Ohio 

B.A., The College of Wooster, 1960 

B.S., Columbia University, 1962 

100 



Howard James Hansen, Blairsville, Pennsylvania 

B.A., University of Pittsburgh, 1952 
James William Hartley, Euclid, Ohio 

B.A., The College of Wooster, 1964 
Philip Marlowe Hazelton, Lancaster, Ohio 

B.S., Ohio State University, 1963 
Jon Louis Hoadley, Seattle, Washington 

B.A., Seattle Pacific College, 1962 
Harvey Samuel Holtgraver, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

B.A., Westminster College, 1963 
David Z. Howard, Monrovia, Liberia 

B.S., University of Liberia, 1960 
/. Wallace Huber, Princeton, Indiana 

B.A., Muskingum College, 1963 
William Harry Hudson, Sharon, Pennsylvania 

B.A., Westminster College, 1964 
John C. Huff, Bowie, Maryland 

B.A., Davis & Elkins College, 1964 
Douglas James, Spokane, Washington 

B.A., Whitworth College, 1963 
Harry H. Johns, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

A.B., Geneva College, 1964 
John Melvin Johnson, Beloit, Wisconsin 

B.S., Wheaton College, 1964 
Timothy Charles Johnson, Harbor Beach, Michigan 

B.A., Alma College, 1964 
William M. Johnson, East Aurora, New York 

B.A., Monmouth College, 1964 
John Jones, Salem, Ohio 

A.B., University of North Carolina, 1948 

M.Ed., Kent State University, 1960 
David Conrad Kearns-Preston, Silver Spring, Maryland 

B.A., American University, 1964 
William John Kemp, Buffalo, New York 

B.A., Westminster College, 1964 
Festo Kivengere, Kabale, Uganda 

University of London Institute of Education, 1956-57 
Timothy Aaron Koah, Carlton, Pennsylvania 

B.A., Westminster College, 1961 
William James Legge, Jr., Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

B.S., Indiana State College, 1963 
/. Reynolds Lewis, Greensburg, Pennsylvania 

B.A., Bethany College, 1958 
Joseph Leonard Luciana, Oakmont, Pennsylvania 

B.A., University of Pittsburgh, 1958 

L.L.B., University of Pittsburgh Law School, 1951 

101 



Kenneth V. Mapstone, Hellam, Pennsylvania 
A.A., York Junior College, 1962 
A.B., Waynesburg College, 1964 

Charles Marks, Savannah, Georgia 

B.A., Knoxville College, 1964 
Helsel Roland Marsh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

B.S., Westminster College, 1964 
Harry E. Martin, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

A.B., Miami University, 1949 

M.S., George Williams College, 1953 
Robert Harrison McClure, Jr., Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

B.A., Monmouth College, 1964 
Richard B. McCune, New Castle, Pennsylvania 

B.A., Westminster College, 1963 
James W. McDowell, Knoxville, Tennessee 

B.A., Knoxville College, 1959 
Dean Carlyle Mead, Beaverton, Oregon 

B.A., Lewis & Clark College, 1964 
Hartzell A. Michael, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

B.S.E.E., West Virginia University, 1935 

M.B.A., Harvard University, 1946 
Ralph Wayne Milligan, Augusta, Kansas 

B.A., Sterling College, 1961 
Jack R. Moon, McKeesport, Pennsylvania 

B.S.M.E., Carnegie Institute of Technology, 1955 
William Machain Morgan, Jr., Worthington, Pennsylvania 

B.S., Indiana State College, 1963 
William Richard Myers, Oil City, Pennsylvania 

B.A., Westminster College, 1964 
Allen Lee Nephew, Gowanda, New York 

B.A., Huron College, 1964 
Bernard William Nord, Bessemer, Pennsylvania 

B.A., Pennsylvania State University, 1963 
Robert Alexander Orr, Jr., Mayfield, Kentucky 

B.A., Southwestern at Memphis, 1964 
George J. Peters, Joliet, Illinois 

B.S., West Virginia University, 1957 
Bertrand C. Pitchford, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

B.A., Washington and Jefferson College, 1956 
Carol Rose Polivka, Bridgeport, Ohio 

A.B., Muskingum College, 1964 
Walter Radulovich, Westerville, Ohio 

B.S., University of Illinois, 1950 
Donald H. Ralston, Salineville, Ohio 

B.A., Monmouth College, 1950 



102 



Henry Elwood Robinson, III, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

B.A., Emory University, 1963 
Thomas J. Sawyer, Sharon, Pennsylvania 

B.A., University of Pittsburgh, 1955 
George John Scoulas, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

Greek Theological Institute, 1950 
Jonathan Carl Siehl, Cincinnati, Ohio 

B.A., Muskingum College, 1964 
Robert Edward Singdahlsen, Decatur, George 

B.A., Dickinson College, 1957 

M.A., Western Reserve University, 1961 
Milton Edward Skiff, Greenwich, New York 

B.S., Cornell University, 1957 
Michael Fleming Smathers, Big Lick, Tennessee 

B.A., The College of Wooster, 1963 
James Avery Smith, Southampton, Pennsylvania 

B.S., Drexel Institute, 1958 
Gerald Floyd Stacy, Minneapolis, Minnesota 

B.A., Macalester College, 1962 
Kirk Patrick Swiss, Baltimore, Maryland 

B.A., Muskingum College, 1962 
Theodore Nicholas Tate, Johnsonville, New York 

A.B., State University of New York, 1963 
William Clarence Weckerly, Butler, Pennsylvania 

B.S., Indiana State College, 1959 
David C. Williams, Oak Park, Illinois 

B.A., Millikin University, 1963 
Donald Paul Wilson, Carmichaels, Pennsylvania 

A.B., Waynesburg College, 1964 
Louis Henry Wollenberg, Orchard Park, New York 

B.A., The College of Wooster, 1952 
Hugh Stanley Zimmerman, Clyde, Ohio 

B.A., The College of Wooster, 1962 

Middler Class 

Robert Herbert Barnes, Maple Heights, Ohio 

B.A., Park College, 1964 
Boyd A. Bell, Parker, Arizona 

B.S., Pennsylvania State University, 1942 
James Glen Bell, Grove City, Pennsylvania 

B.S., Grove City College, 1964 
Laszlo Berzeviczy, Ontario, California 

B.A., The College of Wooster, 1965 
W. Wilson Bradburn, Jr., Oakdale, Pennsylvania 

B.A., The College of Wooster, 1965 



103 



Robert Ousley Brown, Weirton, West Virginia 

B.A., The College of Wooster, 1965 
Arthur John Campbell, Jeannette, Pennsylvania 

B.A., Waynesburg College, 1965 
Edward Allen Campbell, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

B.A., Muskingum College, 1965 
/. Terry Carnahan, Beaver, Pennsylvania 

B.A., Westminster College, 1965 
Lawrence Walter Corbett, Harrisville, Ohio 

B.A., Muskingum College, 1965 
Norman L. Dalton, Independence, Missouri 

A.B., William Jewell College, 1964 
William Alan Doyle, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

B.A., Davis and Elkins College, 1965 
Carolyn Jane Easdale, Tilden, Illinois 

B.A., Monmouth College, 1965 
Madge B. Floyd, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

B.A., Emory University, 1958 
David Harrison Foubert, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

B.A., Beloit College, 1965 
John Charles Free, Washington, District of Columbia 

B.A., Davis and Elkins College, 1965 
William Irvin Gracey, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

B.A., Waynesburg College, 1965 
Arthur George Hampson, Seattle, Washington 

B.A., Seattle Pacific College, 1965 
Robert Alfred Harris, Jr., Kansas City, Missouri 

B.S., Missouri School of Mines, 1963 
Robert Joseph Huck, Downers Grove, Illinois 

A.B., Wheaton College, 1965 
Alexander Phillips Hurt, Towson, Maryland 

B.A., Norwich University, 1962 
Midhat Daoud Ibrahim, Tripoli, Lebanon 

Th.B., Near East School of Theology, 1964 
/. Warren Jacobs, Waynesburg, Pennsylvania 

A.B., Waynesburg College, 1965 
David Ralph Johnston, West Lafayette, Indiana 

B.S., Iowa State University, 1959 

M.S., Purdue University, 1965 
A. Boyd Keys, New Kensington, Pennsylvania 

B.S., Waynesburg College, 1939 
David S. King, Coraopolis, Pennsylvania 

B.A., Maryville College, 1965 
John Francis Kirkham, Canton, Ohio 

B.A., Malone College, 1964 



104 



Judith Evelyn Kress, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

B.A., Westminster College, 1965 
Benjamin Peter Ksiazek, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

B.A., Butler University, 1965 
John D. Kutz, Grafton, North Dakota 

A.B., University of North Dakota, 1966 
Peter Church Leathersich, Hornell, New York 

A.B., Union College, 1965 
James Graham Lockhart, Butler, Pennsylvania 

B.A., Westminster College, 1965 
Robert Nicholas Lodwick, Sao Paulo, Brazil 

Institute Jose Manuel da Conceicao, 1963 
Robert Louis Lowry, West Chester, Pennsylvania 

B.S., University of Pennsylvania, 1955 

M.B.A., Temple University, 1965 

Donald Drew Ludwig, Washington, District of Columbia 

B.A., The College of Wooster, 1965 
Paul Scott McQueen, West Middlesex, Pennsylvania 

A.B., Youngstown University, 1965 
/. Michael Mullin, Fredericktown, Ohio 

A.B., Pikeville College, 1965 
Kenneth Russell Newhams, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

B.A., The College of Wooster, 1965 
Milton Harold Ohlsen, Jr., Weaverville, North Carolina 

B.A., Muskingum College, 1965 
Alan Van de Mark Pareis, Union, New Jersey 

A.B., Albright College, 1965 
Charles Neal Perrine, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

B.A., Grove City College, 1965 
John A. Pilutti, Irondale, Ohio 

B.A., Kent State University, 1965 
Vaughn Paul Purnell, Glassport, Pennsylvania 

B.S., Grove City College, 1965 
William Paul Saxman, West Mifflin, Pennsylvania 

B.S., Slippery Rock State College, 1961 
Jon Wayne Shelton, Venetia, Pennsylvania 

B.A., Asbury College, 1962 
Douglas Earl Smith, Barrington, Rhode Island 

B.A., Barrington College, 1964 
Edward Eldon Spence, Los Alamos, New Mexico 

B.A., Hastings College, 1965 
Ralph Carleton Stock, Kenmore, New York 

B.A., Grove City College, 1965 
Harvey Gibson Throop, Omaha, Nebraska 

B.A., Missouri Valley College, 1965 



105 



Barry T. Vance, McMurray, Pennsylvania 

B.A., Bethany College, 1965 
Robert L. Trimble, Sr., Fayette City, Pennsylvania 

B.S., Slippery Rock State College, 1965 
Terry Conrad Waibel, Allison Park, Pennsylvania 

B.A., Colgate University, 1965 
Steven Hoodless Washburn, Monmouth, Illinois 

B.A., Monmouth College, 1963 
Kenneth James Watt, Spokane, Washington 

B.A., Whitworth College, 1965 
Colin Thomas Webster, Hamburg, New York 

B.B.A., University of Wisconsin, 1959 
Frederick Wayne Weiss, Hamburg, New York 

B.S., Cortland State Teachers College, 1958 
William Scott Wills, New Kensington, Pennsylvania 

A.B., Tarkio College, 1965 
D. Darrell Woomer, Dayton, Ohio 

A.B., Juniata College, 1964 
Roland Clarence Wroten, Scranton, Pennsylvania 

B.S., University of Scranton, 1956 

M.A., University of Scranton, 1963 
Kenneth Edward Zweig, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 

B.A., Houghton College, 1965 

Junior Class 

Michael Graham Anderson, Yakima, Washington 

B.A., Whitworth College, 1966 
Paul Edwin Anderson, Clinton, Massachusetts 

B.A., Trinity University, 1964 
Lance L. M. Brown, Niagara Falls, New York 

B.A., Buena Vista College, 1966 
Donald Davis Crowe, Eighty Four, Pennsylvania 

B.A., Asbury College, 1966 
James Edwin Davison, Glenshaw, Pennsylvania 

B.A., Westminster College, 1966 
James Torrence Dennison, Jr., Beaver Falls, Pennsylvania 

B.S., Geneva College, 1965 
Donald J. Dilley, II, Edmonds, Washington 

B.A., University of Washington, 1966 
Robert Louis Eckard, Vero Beach, Florida 

B.A., Tusculum College, 1966 
Merritt Wayne Ednie, Vandergrift, Pennsylvania 

A.B., Indiana University of Pennsylvania, 1966 
David James Evans, El Paso, Texas 

B.A., Trinity University, 1966 



106 



Joseph Elmo Ferrara, New Brunswick, New Jersey 

A.B., Rutgers University, 1966 
Robert Douglas Forsythe, Dundalk, Maryland 

B.S., University of Maryland, 1958 
William Dean Fox, Jeannette, Pennsylvania 

A.B., Lycoming College, 1960 
Robert Alan Greene, Elnora, New York 

B.A., Lycoming College, 1966 
David Quincy Hall, Muskegon, Michigan 

B.A., University of Michigan, 1966 
Lee Roy Hearn, Bethel Park, Pennsylvania 

B.M., Westminster Choir College, 1960 

M.M., Westminster Choir College, 1963 
Lorna E. Hempstead, Houston, Minnesota 

B.A., Whitworth College, 1966 
Clarence Ernst Hoener, Jr., Pitcairn, Pennsylvania 

B.A., Lebanon Valley College, 1967 
William Edward Hoffman, Newark, New Jersey 

B.A., Bloomfield College, 1966 
William George Holliday, Conneaut, Ohio 

B.A., Westminster College, 1966 
Elinor Jane Hubert, Cincinnati, Ohio 

B.A., Muskingum College, 1966 
Paul Kabo, Jr., Hickory, Pennsylvania 

B.A., Waynesburg College, 1966 
Ralph Kenneth Keiper, Jr., Johnstown, Pennsylvania 

B.A., University of Pittsburgh, 1964 
Ronald Thomas Kilpatrick, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

B.A., Westminster College, 1966 
William Albert Kramp, Normal, Illinois 

B.A., Beloit College, 1964 
Gerard Roland Kuyk, Fenton, Michigan 

B.A., Alma College, 1966 
John Robert Lane, Columbus, Ohio 

B.A., Capital University, 1966 
Neal Evan Lloyd, Cambria, Wisconsin 

B.A., Macalester College, 1966 
James Edgar Long, Jr., Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

B.A., Westminster College, 1966 
Botond Bulcsu Makar, Franklin, New Jersey 

B.A., Bloomfield College, 1966 
Robert Vaughn Mathias, Rockville Centre, New York 

B.A., The College of Wooster, 1966 
John Wallace McCreight, Washington, Pennsylvania 

B.A., The College of Wooster, 1966 



107 



W. Thomas Mecouch, Upper Darby, Pennsylvania 
B.A., Dickinson College, 1966 

Harold James Mills, Warren, Ohio 
B.A., Kent State University, 1966 

Homer Eugene Nye, Galion, Ohio 
A.B., Ohio University, 1966 

John William Orr, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 
B.A., Muskingum College, 1966 

Donald P. Owens, Jr., Arlington, Texas 
B.A., Trinity University 

Richard Irving Peters, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 
B.A., Kenyon College, 1965 

Harold A. Rainey, Clifton, New Jersey 
B.A., Tusculum College, 1966 

Robert Everett Ralston, Canton, Ohio 
A.B., Malone College, 1966 

Mary Stossel Rishel, Indiana, Pennsylvania 

B.S., Indiana University of Pennsylvania, 1966 

Fred Edward Roedger, Jr., Cleveland, Ohio 
B.A., The College of Wooster, 1966 

Robert Edward Salmon, Cheswick, Pennsylvania 
B.A., Westminster College, 1966 

Marvin Bailey Scott, Henderson, North Carolina 
B.A., Johnson C. Smith University, 1966 

Kenneth Raymond Stahl, Ligonier, Pennsylvania 
B.A., Westminster College, 1966 

Thomas Richard Stout, Glenshaw, Pennsylvania 
A.B., Grove City College, 1966 

Samuel Greason Strohm, Uniontown, Pennsylvania 
B.A., Davis and Elkins College, 1965 

R. Eldon Trubee, Minerva, Ohio 

A.B., The College of Wooster, 1966 

George William Walker, III, Buffalo, New York 
A.B., Westminster College, 1966 

Douglas Robert Walters, Royal Oak, Michigan 
B.A., Waterloo Lutheran University, 1966 

George Newins Ward, III, Walden, New York 
B.A., Williams College, 1966 

Lewis Clifton Weldon, Jr., Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 
B.A., DePauw University, 1966 

Gary Lee Wolfer, Spokane, Washington 
B.A., Whitworth College, 1965 

108 



B.D. Students Serving Internships 

Dennis Frank Butler, Fair Lawn, New Jersey 

B.A., Bloomfield College, 1964 
Jean Hyde Humason, Fairmont, West Virginia 

B.A., Davis and Elkins College, 1964 
Beady Bruce Mounts, Washington, Pennsylvania 

B.A., Washington and Jefferson College, 1964 
Dale T. O'Connell, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

B.A., Tarkio College, 1964 
Vernon Clarke Rushing, Ellicott City, Maryland 

B.S., Brown University, 1964 
Peter David Schlichting, Arlington, New Jersey 

B.A., Bloomfield College, 1964 
Fred Joseph Wood, N. Haledon, New Jersey 

B.A., Bloomfield College, 1964 



Candidates for The Degree of Master of Theology 



Biblical Studies 

Rev. Waldir Berndt, Blumenau, Brazil 

B.D., Campinas Presbyterian Theological Seminary, 1964 

Rev. In Soon Choi, Seoul, Korea 

B.A., Seoul National University, 1958 

B.D., Pittsburgh Theological Seminary, 1966 

Rev. Howard Eshbaugh, Oakdale, Pennsylvania 
A.B., Grove City College, 1955 
B.D., Western Theological Seminary, 1956 

Rev. Philip M. Hastings, Sewickley, Pennsylvania 
B.E., Johns Hopkins University, 1953 
B.D., Western Theological Seminary, 1956 

Rev. Charles C. Hendricks, Fort Worth, Texas 
B.A., Austin College, 1961 
B.D., Austin Seminary, 1965 

Rev. A. Vanlier Hunter, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 
A.B., Grove City College, 1961 
B.D., Pittsburgh Theological Seminary, 1964 

Rev. John W. Irwin, Colliers, West Virginia 
B.A., Sterling College, 1955 
B.D., Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary, 1958 

Rev. John Bavington McLaren, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 
B.A., Westminster College, 1957 
B.D., Pittsburgh Theological Seminary, 1963 

109 



Rev. David W. Philips, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

B.A., Muskingum College, 1959 

B.D., Pittsburgh Theological Seminary, 1963 
Rev. Jay Rochelle, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

B.A., Concordia College, 1961 

B.D., Concordia Seminary, 1965 

History and Theology 

Rev. Elias Abrahao, Campinas, Brazil 

B.D., Campinas Presbyterian Theological Seminary, 1965 
Rev. Kenneth P. Alpers, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

B.A., Capital University, 1949 

B.D., Capital Theological Seminary, 1952 
Rev. William Cheston Berlin, Johnstown, Pennsylvania 

B.A., Muskingum College, 1953 

B.D., Western Theological Seminary, 1956 
Rev. Benjamin T. Griffin, Mt. Pleasant, Pennsylvania 

B.A., Baylor University, 1961 

B.D., Andover Newton Theological Seminary, 1965 
Rev. Dong Soo Kim, Seoul, Korea 

B.A., Union Christian College, 1959 

B.D., Pittsburgh Theological Seminary, 1965 
Rev. Jacob E. hall, Rawalpindi, West Pakistan 

B.A., Gordon College, 1954 

B.D., Theological Seminary, Gujranwala, 1959 
Rev. Kerry Meier, Glenwillard, Pennsylvania 

A.B., Bloomfield College, 1957 

B.D., Pittsburgh Theological Seminary, 1960 
Rev. Robert M. A. L. Miller, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

B.A., Muhlenberg College, 1960 

B.D., Lutheran Theological Seminary, 1963 
Rev. Ralph K. Weber, Derry, Pennsylvania 

B.A., Bluffton College, 1951 

B.D., Bethany Biblical Seminary, 1954 

S.T.M., Biblical Seminary, 1955 
Rev. John Robert Walchenbach, Holland, Michigan 

A.B., Hope College, 1957 

B.D., New Brunswick Theological Seminary, 1961 

Program for Advanced Pastoral Studies 

Rev. John E. Adams, Cross Creek, Pennsylvania 
B.A., University of Buffalo, 1957 
B.D., Pittsburgh Theological Seminary, 1961 

110 



Rev. James B. Bailey, Weirton, West Virginia 

B.S.C., Ohio University, 1953 

B.D., Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary, 1959 
Rev. Milton L. Bierman, Johnstown, Pennsylvania 

B.A., Carleton College, 1953 

B.D., Union Theological Seminary, 1958 
Rev. S. Hayden Britton, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

B.S. in Ed., University of Tennessee, 1955 

B.D., Western Theological Seminary, 1958 
Rev. Duncan Campbell, Argyll, Scotland 

M.A., St. Andrews University, 1952 

B.D., Austin Presbyterian Theological Seminary, 1956 
Rev. Alfred M. Deemer, Natrona Heights, Pennsylvania 

A.B. Greenville College, 1948 

B.D., Western Theological Seminary, 1953 

M.Ed., University of Pittsburgh, 1955 
Rev. Wayne E. Faust, Waynesburg, Ohio 

A.B., University of Pittsburgh, 1957 

B.D., Pittsburgh Theological Seminary, 1960 
Rev. Ernest J. Frederick, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

B.S., University of Pittsburgh, 1955 

B.D., Biblical Seminary, 1964 
Rev. D. M. Geconcillo, Pasay City, Philippines 

Th.B., Union Theological Seminary, Manila, 1953 

A.B., Philippine Christian College, 1964 
Rev. Ronald Ivan Glassman, Wilmington, Delaware 

B.A., City College of New York, 1952 

B.D., Western Theological Seminary, 1959 
Rev. William John Green, New Florence, Pennsylvania 

B.S.C.E., Carnegie Institute of Technology, 1954 

B.D., Pittsburgh Theological Seminary, 1962 
Rev. Eduardo Hernandez, Matanzas, Cuba 

B.A., Instituto Segunda Ensenanza, 1938 

B.Th., Western Theological Seminary, 1947 
Rev. Richard C. Horn, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

B.A., American University, 1957 

B.D., Colgate Rochester Divinity School, 1960 
Rev. J. Theodore Hunniford, Roscoe, Pennsylvania 

B.S., Temple University, 1957 

B.D., Pittsburgh Theological Seminary, 1960 
Rev. Donald F. Hursh, Johnstown, Pennsylvania 

A.B., Elizabethtown College, 1950 

B.D., Bethany Theological Seminary, 1953 
Rev. William P. Reams, West Newton, Pennsylvania 

B.A., Bob Jones University, 1956 

M.A., Bob Jones University, 1957 

Ph.D., Bob Jones University, 1960 

111 



Rev. George Hallauer Lower, Westtown, Pennsylvania 

B.S., Bucknell University, 1953 

B.D., Pittsburgh Theological Seminary, 1960 

M.A., Hartford Theological Seminary, 1961 
Rev. J. Robert Phillips, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

B.S., University of Pittsburgh, 1954 

B.D., Western Theological Seminary, 1959 
Rev. Dayanand David Pitamber, Mainpuri, India 

M.A., Agra University, 1960 

B.D., Pittsburgh Theological Seminary, 1964 
Rev. John P. Pro, Jeannette, Pennsylvania 

B.Ed., Duquesne University, 1949 

B.D., Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary, 1957 
Rev. William Jessie Redmon, Follansbee, West Virginia 

B.S., University of Baltimore, 1960 

B.D., Bexley Hall Divinity School, 1963 
Rev. Bruce Warner Reeves, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

B.A., The College of Wooster, 1955 

B.D., Union Theological Seminary 
Rev. Fred M. Rogers, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

B.M., Rollins College, 1951 

B.D., Pittsburgh Theological Seminary, 1962 
Rev. Bertram H. Saunders, Walnut Creek, California 

A.B., University of California, 1949 

S.T.B., Biblical Seminary in New York, 1952 
Rev. Robert Edward Thomas, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

A.B., Thiel College, 1962 

B.D., Philadelphia Lutheran Seminary, 1965 
Rev. Judson Wiley, Bakerstown, Pennsylvania 

A.B., Washington and Jefferson College, 1950 

B.D., Western Theological Seminary, 1953 



Candidates for The Degree Doctor of Philosophy 

Rev. John Charles Biesemeier, Fort Worth, Texas 

B.S.M.E., University of Texas, 1959 

B.D., Brite Divinity School, 1965 
Rev. Charles Cameron Dickinson, III, Charleston, West Virginia 

B.A., Dartmouth College, 1958 

B.D., Pittsburgh Theological Seminary, 1965 
Rev. Winslow Hackley Galbraith, Tarrytown, New York 

B.S., Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 1962 

B.D., Western Theological Seminary, 1965 
Rev. Robert Van Wyk, Clinton, Pennsylvania 

A.B., The College of Wooster, 1961 

B.D., Pittsburgh Theological Seminary, 1964 

112 



Rev. Arthur Hayes Williams, Jr., Craigsville, Virginia 
B.A., Washington and Lee University, 1954 
B.D., Austin Presbyterian Theological Seminary, 1959 

Candidates for the Degree of 
Master of Religious Education 

Senior Class 

Susan Jane Becker, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

B.A., Muskingum College, 1963 
Ruth Emma Caldwell, Harrisburg, Pennsylvania 

B.M., Westminster Choir College, 1950 
Sally Hillman Childs, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

B.A., Sarah Lawrence College, 1949 
Roxanna Bertini Coop, Severna Park, Maryland 

B.A., Smith College, 1955 
Sookja Paik Kim, Seoul, Korea 

B.S., Seoul National University (Korea), 1964 
Margaret Elizabeth Papsch, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

B.S. in Ed., Slippery Rock State College, 1960 



unior 



Class 



Elizabeth Anne Cessna, Fairview, Pennsylvania 

B.S., Edinboro State College, 1966 
Elizabeth Ann Gessler, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

B.A., Florida Presbyterian College, 1966 
Jean Marian Oberlin, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

B.A., Kansas University, 1948 
Mary E. Rindlaub, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

B.A., University of Pittsburgh, 1966 
Barbara Ann Rowden, Alton, Illinois 

B.A., Davis and Elkins College, 1966 
Mary Ellen Templeton, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

A.B., Dickinson College, 1964 

M.A., New York University, 1965 
Mary S. Williams, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

B.A., Russell Sage College, 1937 

Candidates for The Degree of Master of Education 

(to be granted by the University of Pittsburgh) 

Christine Anne Galgoczy, Butler, Pennsylvania 
B.S., Geneva College, 1965 

113 



Amal Rizkallah Halaby, Beirut, Lebanon 

B.A., Maryville College, 1960 
Insorn Metah, Chiengmai, Thailand 

B.Ed., Chulalongkorn University, 1963 
Elaine Lenore Kozar, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

B.A., Grove City College, 1962 
Martha Lynn Woodruff, Akron, Ohio 

B.S., Carson-Newman College, 1966 

Special Students 

Robert Bellingham, Pasadena, California 
George R. Bleil, Clairton, Pennsylvania 
Macrina Geconcillo, Manila, Philippines 
Amba Durga Prasad, Mainpuri, India 
Helmut Staudt, Manheim, Germany 
Roselis Wachholz, Stuttgart, Germany 



Summary of Attendance 

Bachelor of Divinity 

Juniors 53 

Middlers 60 

Seniors 78 

Interns 7 198 

Master of Religious Education Program 

Juniors 7 

Seniors 6 13 

Master of Education 5 

Master of Theology Program 46 

Doctoral Program 5 

Special Students 6 75 

Total Enrollment 273 



114 




115 



Board of Directors 



Officers 

Rev. J. Hubert Henderson, D.D., President 

Rev. Howard C. Scharfe, D.D., LL.D., Vice President 

Mr. George D. Lockhart, Secretary 

Mr. J. Rowe Hinsey, Assistant Secretary 

Mr. Robert L. Becker, Treasurer 

Mr. John T. Logan, B.B.A., C.P.A., Assistant Treasurer 

Mr. Henry C. Herchenroether, Jr. Counsel 

Members 

Term Expires May 1967 

Mr. Robert L. Becker, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

Retired— President, Wear-Ever Aluminum, Inc. 
Mr. Earle M. Craig, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

Retired— Chairman of the Board, Valvoline Oil Company 
Rev. Richard W. Graves, D.D., Litt.D., New Wilmington, Pennsylvania 

Retired 
Mr. Max A. Lauffer, Ph.D., Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

Andrew Mellon Professor of Biophysics and Chairman, 

Department of Biophysics, University of Pittsburgh 
Mr. George D. Lockhart, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

Attorney, Kirkpatrick, Pomeroy, Lockhart and Johnson 
Rev. W. Paul Ludwig, Ph.D., Washington, District of Columbia 

Pastor, Chevy Chase Presbyterian Church 
Mr. John R. McCune, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

Vice President, Lockhart Iron and Steel Company 
Rev. Walter L. Moser, Ph.D., D.D., Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

Secretary-Treasurer, Johnson C. Smith University 
Mr. Alexander P. Reed, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

Attorney at Law 
Rev. John Coventry Smith, D.D., LL.D., New York, New York 

General Secretary, Commission on Ecumenical Mission and Relations 
Rev. Frederick Bruce Speakman, D.D., Dayton, Ohio 

Pastor, Westminster Presbyterian Church 
Rev. C. T. R. Yeates, D.D., LL.D., Des Moines, Iowa 

Pastor, Westminster United Presbyterian Church 

Term Expires May 1968 

Rev. Charles C. Bray, Jr., Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 
Pastor, Third Presbyterian Church 

116 



Mr. Donald C. Burnham, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

President, Westinghouse Electric Corporation 
Rev. J. Hubert Henderson, D.D., Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

Pastor, J. M. Wallace Memorial United Presbyterian Church 
Mr. William R. Jackson, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

President, Pittsburgh-Des Moines Steel Company 
Rev. John C. Lorimer, D.D., New Wilmington, Pennsylvania 

Retired 
Rev. Charles P. Robshaw, S.T.D., D.D., LL.D., Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

Pastor, East Liberty Presbyterian Church 
Mr. James H. Rogers, HH.D., Latrobe, Pennsylvania 

Chairman, Latrobe Die Casting Company 
Rev. Howard C. Scharfe, D.D., LL.D., Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

Pastor, Shadyside Presbyterian Church 

Mr. H. Parker Sharp, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

Vice President and General Counsel, Jones & Laughlin Steel Corporation 
Rev. Samuel C. Weir, D.D., Detroit, Michigan 

Minister of Visitation, Cherry Hill United Presbyterian Church, Dearborn 
Rev. W. Bruce Wilson, D.D., Bethel Park, Pennsylvania 

Minister of Visitation, Westminster United Presbyterian Church 
Mr. Ralph M. Wyman, Greenwich, Connecticut 

Vice President and Director, H. O. Canfield Company 

Term Expires May 1969 

Mr. A. C. Amsler, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

Retired— Westinghouse Electric Corporation 
Rev. John B. Barker, D.D., Canton, Ohio 

Pastor, Calvary Presbyterian Church 
Mr. Frank H. Davis, LL.D., Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

Retired 
Rev. Robert H. French, D.D., LL.D., Des Moines, Iowa 

Synod Executive, Synod of Iowa 
Mr. Henry C. Herchenroether, Jr., Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

Attorney, Alter, Wright, and Barron 
Mr. W. Kenneth Menke, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

President, Pittsburgh Chemical Company, a division of 

United States Steel Corporation 
Rev. Don P. Montgomery, D.D., Youngstown, Ohio 

Pastor, Pleasant Grove United Presbyterian Church 
Mr. William H. Rea, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

President, Oliver Tyrone Corporation 
Rev. Robert H. Stephens, D.D., Summit, New Jersey 

Pastor, Central Presbyterian Church 

117 



Mr. James W. Vicary, Erie, Pennsylvania 
President, Ervite Corporation 

Rev. Robert R. Vogelsang, D.D., Latrobe, Pennsylvania 
Pastor, Latrobe United Presbyterian Church 

Rev. Walter R. Young, D.D., Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

Pastor, Second United Presbyterian Church of Wilkinsburg 



Administrative Staff 



The Rev. Donald G. Miller, Ph.D., LL.D., Litt.D. 
President 

The Rev. Gordon E. Jackson, Ph.D., D.D. 
Dean of the Seminary 

Mr. J. Rowe Hinsey, B.S. 
Director of Development 

Mr. William R. Atkins, B.S., M.R.E. 
Business Manager 

Mr. John T. Logan, B.B.A., C.P.A. 
Comptroller 

The Rev. Howard M. Jamieson, Jr., Ph.D., D.D. 
Dean of Students 

Miss Bessie M. Burrows, M.A. 
Registrar 

Mr. Dikran Y. Hadidian, M.S., S.T.M. 
Librarian 

The Rev. Charles C. W. Idler, B.D. 
Director of Admissions 

The Rev. John M. Bald, Th.D., D.D. 
Financial Aid Officer 

The Rev. William R. Phillippe, B.D. 
Director of Continuing Education 

118 



Historical Roll of Professors 



Name 


Seminary of 


Period of 




Inauguration 


Service 


John Anderson 


Service 


1794-1819 


John Banks 


Philadelphia 


1820-1826 


James Ramsey 


Canonsburg 


1821-1842 


Joseph Kerr 


Pittsburgh 


1825-1829 


Jacob Jones Janeway 


Western 


1828-1829 


Mungo Dick 


Pittsburgh 


1829-1831 


Luther Halsey 


Western 


1829-1836 
1872-1880 


John Williamson Nevin 


Western 


1829-1840 


David Elliott 


Western 


1829-1874 


John Taylor Pressly 


Allegheny 


1832-1870 


David Carson 


Canonsburg 


1834-1834 


Thomas Beveridge 


Canonsburg 


1835-1871 


Moses Kerr 


Allegheny 


1835-1836 


Joseph Claybaugh 


Oxford 


1839-1855 


Samuel W. McCracken 


Oxford 


1839-1840 


Lewis Warner Green 


Western 


1840-1847 


James Martin 


Canonsburg 


1842-1846 


Alexander Taggart McGill 


Western 


1842-1854 


James Lemonte Dinwiddie 


Allegheny 


1843-1846 


Abraham Anderson 


Canonsburg 


1847-1855 


Alexander Downs Clark 


Allegheny 


1847-1884 


David Reynolds Kerr 


Allegheny 


1851-1887 


Melancthon Williams Jacobus 


Western 


1851-1876 


William Swan Plumer 


Western 


1854-1862 


Samuel Wilson 


Xenia 


1855-1875 


William Davidson 


Oxford 


1855-1858 


Alexander Young 


Oxford 


1855-1874 
1876-1891 


Samuel Jennings Wilson 


Western 


1857-1883 


John Scott 


Monmouth 


1858-1874 


Joseph Clokey 


Xenia 


1858-1873 


William Miller Paxton 


Western 


1860-1872 


Andrew Morrow Black 


Monmouth 


1864-1874 


Archibald Alexander Hodge 


Western 


1864-1877 


David Alexander Wallace 


Monmouth & Xenia 


1867-1870 
1883-1883 


James Harper 


Newburg 


1867-1899 


Joseph Tate Cooper 


Allegheny 


1871-1886 


William Bruce 


Xenia 


1871-1880 


William Henry Hornblower 


Western 


1871-1883 


James Gillespie Carson 


Xenia 


1873-1888 


William Gallogly Moorehead 


Xenia 


1873-1914 



119 



Jackson Burgess McMichael 

Samuel Thompson Lowrie 

Samuel Henry Kellogg 

William Hamilton Jeffers 

Benjamin Breckenbridge Warfield 

Thomas Hastings Robinson 

David MacDill 

David A. McClenahan 

Robert Dick Wilson 

James Alexander Grier 

John McNaugher 

Henry T. McClelland 

Matthew Brown Riddle 

Oliver Joseph Thatcher 

Wilbert Webster White 

Robert Christie 

John A. Wilson 

John Douds Irons 

James Anderson Kelso 

David Riddle Breed 

Joseph Kyle 

Jesse Johnson 

David Schley Schaff 

John Elliott Wishart 

David E. Cully 

William Riley Wilson 

Charles Frederick Wishart 

William Robertson Farmer 

John Hunter Webster 

James Henry Snowden 

Melvin Grove Kyle 

James Doig Rankin 

David Frazier McGill 

Frank Eakin 

James Gallaway Hunt 

Selby Frame Vance 

James Harper Grier 

Robert McNary Karr 

James Leon Kelso 

George Boone McCreary 

Robert Nathaniel Montgomery 

Donald Mackenzie 

Gaius Jackson Slosser 

Albert Henry Baldinger 

Clarence Joseph Williamson 

John Wick Bowman 

William F. Orr 

George Anderson Long 

Theophilus Mills Taylor 



Xenia 


1873-1878 


Western 


1874-1877 


Western 


1877-1886 


Western 


1877-1914 


Western 


1878-1887 


Western 


1883-1906 


Xenia 


1884-1902 


Allegheny 


1885-1921 


Western 


1885-1900 


Allegheny 


1886-1909 


Allegheny 


1886-1943 


Western 


1886-1891 


Western 


1887-1916 


Allegheny 


1888-1892 


Xenia 


1889-1894 


Western 


1891-1923 


Allegheny 


1893-1915 


Xenia 


1895-1905 


Western 


1897-1944 


Western 


1898-1931 


Xenia 


1899-1921 


Xenia 


1903-1930 


Western 


1903-1926 


Xenia 


1905-1923 


Western 


1906-1948 


Allegheny 


1907-1940 


Allegheny 


1907-1914 


Western 


1907-1939 


Xenia 


1908-1933 


Western 


1911-1928 


Xenia 


1914-1930 


Pittsburgh 


1914-1929 


Pittsburgh 


1915-1931 


Western 


1915-1927 


Pittsburgh 


1920-1926 


Western 


1921-1935 


Pittsburgh 


1922-1926 


Xenia 


1922-1949 


Xenia 


1923-1963 


Xenia 


1924-1946 


Pittsburgh 


1926-1930 


Western 


1928-1933 


Western 


1928-1958 


Pittsburgh-Xenia 


1931-1947 


Pittsburgh-Xenia 


1932-1950 


Western 


1936-1944 


Western 


1936- 


Pittsburgh-Xenia 


1942-1955 


Pittsburgh-Xenia 


1942-1962 



120 



Jarvis M. Cotton 


Western 


1944_1961 


Frank Dixon McCloy 


Western 


1944- 


Henry Alexander Riddle 


Western 


1944.1949 


J. Carter Swaim 


Western 


1944_1954 


Walter R. Clyde 


Western 


1945- 


Addison Hardie Leitch 


Pittsburgh-Xenia 


1946-1961 


Florence M. Lewis 


Pittsburgh-Xenia 


1947-1952 


H. Ray Shear 


Pittsburgh-Xenia 


1947-1959 


David Noel Freedman 


Western 


1948-1964 


Gordon Edmund Jackson 


Pittsburgh-Xenia 


1949- 


Ralph G. Turnbull 


Western 


1949-1954 


John H. Gerstner 


Pittsburgh-Xenia 


1950- 


Clifford E. Barbour 


Western 


1951-1962 


Bessie M. Burrows 


Pittsburgh-Xenia 


1953- 


James A. Walther 


Western 


1954- 


Sidney O. Hills 


Western 


1954- 


Robert Lee Kelley, Jr. 


Pittsburgh-Xenia 


1955- 


Robert Clyde Johnson 


Western 


1955-1963 


Howard M. Jamieson, Jr. 


Pittsburgh-Xenia 


1955- 


John M. Bald 


Pittsburgh-Xenia 


1957- 


Elwyn Allen Smith 


Western 


1957-1966 


Walter E. Wiest 


Western 


1957- 


Malcolm S. Alexander 


Pittsburgh-Xenia 


1958-1966 


Harold E. Scott 


Pittsburgh-Xenia 


1959- 


Howard L. Ralston Western 


and Pittsburgh-Xenia 


1960- 


William A. Nicholson 


Western 


1960- 


James Sheppard Irvine 


Western 


1960-1966 


J. Gordon Chamberlin 


Pittsburgh 


1960- 


Gayraud S. Wilmore 


Pittsburgh 


1961-1965 


Arlan P. Dohrenburg 


Pittsburgh 


1961-1964 


Edward D. Grohman 


Pittsburgh 


1961-1964 


David G. Buttrick 


Pittsburgh 


1961- 


Donald G. Miller 


Pittsburgh 


1962- 


George H. Kehm 


Pittsburgh 


1962- 


Dietrich Ritschl 


Pittsburgh 


1963- 


Markus Barth 


Pittsburgh 


1963- 


Edward Farley 


Pittsburgh 


1963- 


Lynn Boyd Hinds 


Pittsburgh 


1963- 


Iain G. Wilson 


Pittsburgh 


1963- 


Douglas R. A. Hare 


Pittsburgh 


1964- 


Donald E. Gowan 


Pittsburgh 


1965- 


Jared J. Jackson 


Pittsburgh 


1965- 


Eberhard von Waldow 


Pittsburgh 


1966- 


Dikran Y. Hadididian 


Pittsburgh 


1966- 


Peter Fribley 


Pittsburgh 


1966- 


Robert S. Paul 


Pittsburgh 


1967- 



121 



Donations and Bequests 



All donations or bequests to the Seminary should be made to "The Pitts- 
burgh Theological Seminary of the United Presbyterian Church in the United 
States of America, located at 616 North Highland Avenue, Pittsburgh, 
Pennsylvania 15206." The proper legal form for making a bequest is as 
follows. 

"I hereby give and bequeath to Pittsburgh Theological Seminary of the 
United Presbyterian Church in the United States of America, incorporated 
in the State of Pennsylvania, the following: . . ." 

Care should be taken to use the corporate name as given above, and 
to have the bequest conform to the laws of the state governing it. 

The memorial idea may be carried out either in the erection of a build- 
ing or in the endowment of any of the special funds of the Seminary. 



122 



Index Page 

Administrative Staff 118 

Admissions: College Requirements, Credentials, Procedure, etc. . . . 36-39 

Advanced Standing 50-51 

Alumni Association 94 

Attendance, Summary of 114 

Awards Granted, 1965-1966 98-99 

Awards, prizes, and graduate fellowships 43-46 

Bachelor of Divinity Degree 50-53, 58-76, 86 

Board of Directors 116-118 

Buildings 23-28 

Calendar of Events, 1967-1968 4 

Campus 23-32 

Continuing Education 92-93 

Curriculum 49-89 

Degree Programs, Index to 49 

Degrees Awarded, 1965-1966 96-98 

Doctoral Program 87-89 

Donations and Bequests 122 

Emeriti 13 

Enrollment, Summary of 114 

Expenses 40-41 

Faculty 5-13 

Fees and Expenses 40-41 

Field Education 76 

Financial Assistance 42-43 

Foreign Students 39 

Four-year Program 53 

Graduation Honors and Awards 98-99 



23 



History of Seminary 19 

Honors Program 51 

Hospitalization Insurance 41 

Housing 26-27 

Insurance, Medical and Hospital 41 

Lectures, Special 14-15 

Library 24-26 

Loan Funds 42-43 

Married Student Apartment Fees 40 

Master of Education Degree 56 

Master of Public Administration Degree 86 

Master of Public and International Affairs Degree 86 

Master of Religious Education Degree 54-55, 58-77 

Master of Theology Degree 78-85 

Medical Insurance 41 

Museum, Bible Lands 29 

Music, Opportunities in 34 

Pittsburgh— Our Environment 21 

Pittsburgh, University of, joint program with 76, 86 \ 

Pre-Seminary Studies 36-37 

Professors, Historical Roll of 119-121 

Register of Students, 1966-1967 100-114 

Scholarships, loans, etc 42-43 

Student Association 33 

Summer Field Education 76 

Transfer Students 38 

Worship 33 



124 



! 



umKniuKHs 



rHEOLOGICAL 
iEMINARY 



68-1969 



r.VLOGUE ISSUE OF THE SEMINARY QUARTERLY 



The Annual Catalogue of 



The Pittsburgh 

Theological 

Seminary 



1968-69 



A SEMINARY OF THE UNITED PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH 
IN THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, FOUNDED 1794. 
ACCREDITED BY THE AMERICAN ASSOCIATION OF 
THEOLOGICAL SCHOOLS. 



616 N. HIGHLAND AVENUE 
PITTSBURGH, PENNSYLVANIA 15206 



I 



THE SEMINARY CALENDAR 
1968 

Summer Programs of Continuing Education 

3-7 June Ministers' Institute, The Seminary 
16-21 June School of Religion, Shadyside Academy 

First Semester 

3-5 Sept. Junior Orientation and Registration 

5 Sept. Convocation, 1 1:00 a.m., and Community Luncheon 

6 Sept. Class Work Begins (Thursday classes) 
14 Sept. Junior Orientation Retreat 

1 Oct. Continuing Education Eight Weeks School Begins 

18 Oct. Last day for dropping courses 

21-25 Oct. Schaff Lecture Week 

20 Nov. Semi-Annual Meeting, Board of Directors 

28 Nov. Thanksgiving Day (No Classes) 

9-13 Dec. Reading Period 

16-20 Dec. Examination Period 

21 Dec.-5 Jan. Christmas Recess 

1969 

6-24 Jan. Intersession 

Second Semester 



27 Jan. Class Work Begins 

3 Feb. Continuing Education Eight Weeks School Begins 
7 Mar. Last day for dropping courses 

10-14 Mar. First Reading Period 

4 Apr. Good Friday (No Classes) 
25 Apr. Last Class day 

28-30 Apr. Second Reading Period for Seniors 

28 Apr. -2 May Second Reading Period for Juniors and Middlers 

1-2 May Examination Period for Seniors 

5-9 May Examination Week for Juniors and Middlers 

11 May Communion Service for Seniors, 4:00 p.m., and Buffet Supp< 

13 May Annual Meeting of the Board of Directors 

( 13 May Annual Meeting and Dinner of the Alumni Association 

'J 13 May Commencement, 8:00 p.m., 

The East Liberty Presbyterian Church 



The Faculty 




.- m 




Donald G. Miller, President. Greenville College, A.B.; 
The Biblical Seminary in N.Y., S.T.B. and S.T.M.; 
New York University, M.A. and Ph.D. 



William F. Orr, Professor of New Testament Litera- 
ture and Exegesis. Southwestern University, A.B.; 
Louisville Presbyterian Seminary, B.D. and Th.M.; 
Hartford Theological Seminary, Ph.D. 



Walter R. Clyde, Professor of Christian Mission. 
Muskingum College, A.B.; Omaha Theological Sem- 
inary, B.D.; Western Theological Seminary, S.T.M.; 
Hartford Seminary Foundation, Ph.D. 



Gordon E. Jackson, Dean of the Seminary and Hugh 
Thomson Kerr Professor of Pastoral Theology. Mon- 
mouth College, A.B.; Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological 
Seminary, Th.B. and Th.M.; University of Chicago, 
Ph.D. 



John H. Gerstner, Professor of Church History. West- 
minster College, A.B.; Westminster Theological Sem- 
inary, Th.B. and Th.M.; Harvard University, Ph.D. 



Bessie M. Burrows, Assistant Professor of Christian 
Education and Registrar. Geneva College, B.A.; Co- 
lumbia University, M.A. 



The Faculty 



James A. Walther, Associate Professor of New Testa- 
ment Literature and Exegesis. Grove City College, 
A.B.; Western Theological Seminary, S.T.B.; Em- 
manuel College, Victoria University, Toronto, Th.D. 



Sidney O. Hills, Associate Professor of Hebrew and 
Old Testament Literature. Northwestern University, 
B.A.; McCormick Theological Seminary, B.D.; Johns 
Hopkins University, Ph.D. 



Robert Lee Kelley, Jr., Associate Professor of Biblical 
Languages. University of Pittsburgh, A. B. ; Pittsburgh- 
Xenia Theological Seminary, B.D.; Princeton Theo- 
logical Seminary, Th.M.; Princeton University, M.A. 



Howard M. Jamiesowt0m0fissoci2ite Professor of New 
Testament and Dean of Students. Monmouth College, 
A.B.; Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary, Th.B.; 
University of Pittsburgh, M.A. and Ph.D. 



John M. Bald, Associate Professor of Christian Ethics 
and Associate Dean. Muskingum College, A.B.; Pitts- 
burgh-Xenia Theological Seminary, Th.B. and Th.M.; 
Emmanuel College, Victoria University, Toronto, 
Th.D. 







Walter E. Wiest, Professor of Philosophy of Religion. 
Lafayette College, A.B.; Princeton Theological Semi- 
nary, Th.B.; Columbia University, Ph.D. 



The Faculty 



Harold E. Scott, Associate Professor of Homiletics 
and Director of Field Education. Sterling College, 
B.A.; Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary, B.D.; 
Princeton Theological Seminary, Th.D. 



Howard L. Ralston, Assistant Professor of Church 
Music. Muskingum College, Mus. B.; Curtis Institute 
of Music, A.A.G.O. 







William A. Nicholson, Assistant Professor of Homi- 
letics. Washington & Jefferson College, A.B.; West- 
ern Theological Seminary, S.T.B. 



/. Gordon Chamberlin, Htmrnttm Professor of Chris- 
tian Education. Cornell College in Iowa, A.B.; Union 
Theological Seminary (N.Y.), B.D.; Columbia Uni- 
versity, Ed.D. 



David G. Buttrick, Associate Professor in Church and 
Ministry. Haverford College, B.A.; Union Theologi- 
cal Seminary (N.Y.), B.D. 



George H. Kehm, Associate Professor in Theology. 
Queens College, B.S.; Princeton Theological Seminary, 
B.D. ; Harvard Divinity School, S.T.M. ; Harvard Univer- 
sity, Th.D. 



8 



The Faculty 



Dietrich Ritschl, Professor of History of Doctrine 
and Systematic Theology. University of Edinburgh, 
Ph.D. 



Markus Barth, Professor of New Testament. Univer- 
sity of Goettingen, Dr. Theol. 




^"> 



Edward Farley, Professor of Systematic Theology. 
Centre College, A.B.; Louisville Presbyterian Theo- 
logical Seminary, B.D.; Columbia University, Ph.D. 



, i 



l?S 



Lynn Boyd Hinds, Assistant Professor of Speech. Uni- 
versity of Akron, B.A.; Eastern Baptist Theological 
Seminary, B.D.; Temple University, M.A. 



Iain G. Wilson, William Oliver Campbell Professor 
of Homiletics. University of Edinburgh, M.A. and B.D. 



Douglas R. A. Hare, Associate Professor of New Tes- 
tament. Victoria College, University of Toronto, B.A.; 
Emmanuel College, B.D.; Union Theological Semi- 
nary (N.Y.), S.T.M. and Th.D. 

9 



The Faculty 




Donald E. Gowan, Assistant Professor of Old Testa- 
ment. University of South Dakota, B.A.; Dubuque 
Theological Seminary, B.D.; University of Chicago, 
Ph.D. 





Jared Judd Jackson, Assistant Professor of Old Testa- 
ment. Harvard College, A.B.; Episcopal Theological 
School (Cambridge, Mass.), B.D.; Union Theological 
Seminary (N.Y.), Th.D. 



H. Eberhard von Waldow, Associate Professor of Old 
Testament. Bonn University, Dr. Theol. 



Dikran Y. Hadidian, Librarian and Professor of 
Bibliography. American University of Beirut, B.A.; 
Hartford Theological Seminary, B.D. ; Hartford School 
of Religious Education, M.A.; Hartford Theological 
Seminary, S.T.M.; Columbia University, M.S. 



Peter Fribley, Instructor in Homiletics. Hanover Col- 
lege (Hanover, Indiana), B.A.; Union Theological 
Seminary (N.Y.), B.D. and S.T.M. 



Robert S. Paul, Professor of Modern Church History. 
Saint Catherine's (Oxford University), B.A. and M.A.; 
Mansfield College (Oxford University), Ph.D. 



10 



The Faculty 



Ford Lewis Battles, Professor of Church History and 
History of Doctrine. West Virginia University, B.A.; 
Tufts College, M.A.; Hartford Seminary Foundation, 
Ph.D. 



Paul Wilbert Lapp, Professor of Old Testament and 
Archeology. Concordia College, B.A.; Washington 
University, M.A. in Education; University of California, 
Ph.D.; Harvard University, Th.D. 




Guest Professors 



David Henderson, Ph.D. (Pittsburgh) 

(Dean, Chatham College) 

Guest Professor in Church and Ministry, 1967-1968 

Jacob M. Myers, S.T.D., Ph.D. (Johns Hopkins) 
(Lutheran Theological Seminary, Gettysburg) 
Guest Professor in Old Testament, 1967-1968 



Paul Achtemeier, Th.D. (Union, N.Y.) 
Guest Professor in New Testament 



NeilR. Pay lor, Ph.D. (Harvard) 

Lecturer, the Program for Advanced Pastoral Studies 



Clifford E. Davis, Ph.D. (Pennsylvania State) 
Lecturer in Christian Education 



I Robert J. Shoemaker, M.D. (Pittsburgh) 
(Clinical Assistant Professor of Psychiatry, University 
of Pittsburgh School of Medicine) 
Lecturer and Consultant in Psychiatry 

11 



Margaret B. McFarland, Ph.D. (Columbia) 

(Associate Professor of Psychology, University of 

Pittsburgh; Director, Arsenal Family and Children's 

Center) 

Lecturer, the Program for Advanced Pastoral Studies 

Rex A. Pittenger, M.D. (Minnesota) 
(Staunton Assistant Professor of Psychiatry, Univer- 
sity of Pittsburgh School of Medicine; Chief, Staun- 
ton Clinic) 
Lecturer, the Program for Advanced Pastoral Studies 

Erma T. Meyerson, B.S., M.A.A.S.S. (Pittsburgh) 
(Professor of Sociology and Social Work, College of 
Liberal Arts and Graduate School of Social Work, 
University of Pittsburgh) 
Lecturer, the Program for Advanced Pastoral Studies 

Jack Matthews, M.A., Ph.D. (Ohio State) 

(Professor and Chairman, the Department of Speech, 

University of Pittsburgh) 

Lecturer, the Program for Advanced Pastoral Studies 

Victor Freeman, M.D. 

(University of Toronto, Canada) 

Lecturer, the Program for Advanced Pastoral Studies 

FredM. Rogers, B.D. (Pittsburgh) 
(Minister to Children, the Oakland Ministry, Pitts- 
burgh, and in Television) 
Guest Instructor in Church and Ministry 

Edith Warman Skinner, M.A. (Columbia) 

(Professor, Drama Department, Carnegie Institute of 

Technology) 

Guest Professor of Speech 

Robert L. Parks, B.F.A. (Carnegie Tech.) 
(Assistant Professor of Voice and Speech, Carnegie 
Institute of Technology) 
Guest Professor of Speech 

James B. Bloomfield, M.S. W. (Pittsburgh) 

(Chief, Social Work Service, Veterans Administration 

Hospital) 

Lecturer, the Program for Advanced Pastoral Studies 

12 



Margaret M. Wynne, M.S. W. (Pittsburgh) 
(Assistant Chief, Social Work Service, Veterans Ad- 
ministration Hospital) 
Lecturer, the Program for Advanced Pastoral Studies 

Teaching Pastors in East Liberty Pilot Project 
Charles Bray 
Robert Finertie 
Charles Robshaw 
Mrs. John Yingling 

Emeriti 

The Rev. Clifford Edward Barbour, Ph.D., D.D., L.L.D. 

President Emeritus 

The Rev. Robert McNary Karr, D.D. 

Emeritus Professor of Systematic and Biblical Theology 

The Rev. James Leon Kelso, A.M., Th.M., Th.D., 
D.D., LL.D. 

Emeritus Professor of Old Testament History and 
Biblical Archaeology 

The Rev. George Anderson Long, D.D., LL.D., LittD. 
President Emeritus and Emeritus Professor of English 
Bible 

The Rev. Henry A. Riddle, D.D., LL.D. 
President Emeritus 

The Rev. Gaius Jackson Slosser, Ph.D., F.R.Hist.S. 
Emeritus Professor of Ecclesiatical History and His- 
tory of Doctrine 




Gordon Kaufmann, Schaff Lecturer 

13 



SPECIAL LECTURERS -1967-1968 



Dr. Albert C. Winn 

President, Louisville Presbyterian Theological Seminary 

Louisville, Kentucky 

Dr. George A. Buttrick 

Emeritus Professor, Harvard University 

Professor of Preaching, Garrett Theological Seminary 

Evanston, Illinois 

Dr. Emil L. Fackenheim 
Professor of Philosophy 
University of Toronto 
Toronto, Canada 

Dr. Roland M. Frye 
Professor of English Literature 
University of Pennsylvania 
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 

Very Reverend Demetrius R. Dumm, O.S.B. 
Rector, St. Vincent Seminary 
Latrobe, Pennsylvania 

Dr. George S. Johnson 

Professor of New Testament Language and Literature 

McGill University 

Principal, United Theological College 

Montreal, Canada 

Dr. J. C. Wynn 

Professor of Christian Education 

and Director of Studies 

Colgate Rochester Divinity School 

Rochester, New York 

John R. Fry 

Pastor, First Presbyterian Church of Chicago 

Nicholas Rescher 
Professor of Philosophy 
University of Pittsburgh 
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

The Rev. James M. Dix 

Rector, St. Thomas Episcopal Church 

Oakmont, Pennsylvania 

14 



Dr. Willem A. Bijlefeld 
Associate Professor of Islamics 
Hartford Theological Seminary 
Hartford, Connecticut 

David W. Craig 

Director, Department of Public Safety 

Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

Dr. Martin E. Marty 

Chairman, Historical Field 

Divinity School, University of Chicago 

Associate Editor of THE CHRISTIAN CENTURY 

The Reverend Eugene Smathers 
Moderator of the General Assembly 
Crossville, Tennessee 

The Rev. Hans Kung 

Director of the Institute for Ecumenical Research 
Professor of Dogmatic Theology in the Catholic Faculty 
University of Tubingen 

Dr. Paul Abernathy Crow, Jr. 
Professor of Church History 
Lexington Theological Seminary 
Lexington, Kentucky 

Dr. Hans Werner Bartsch 
Professor of Theology 
Johann Wolfgange Goethe University 
Frankfurt, Germany 

Fr. Bernard Haring 
Professor of Moral Theology 
Academia Alfonsiana 
Rome, Italy 

Dr. Gordon Kaufmann 
Professor of Systematic Theology 
Harvard Divinity School 
Cambridge, Massachusetts 

Professor L.K. Dupree 
Department of Philosophy 
Georgetown University 
Georgetown, D.C. 

The Honorable Joseph Clark 
U.S. Senator from Pennsylvania 

Dr. Joseph Fletcher 
Professor of Social Ethics 
Episcopal Theological Seminary 
Cambridge, Massachusetts 

15 




Dr. Frank Dixon McCloy, Jr. 1910-1967 



Miss Mildred Cowan, Secretary to Four Presidents 





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Pittsburgh Seminary 
Our History 



The Pittsburgh Theological Seminary was created in 1959 by the consolida- 
tion of two institutions which had lived apart since 1825: Pittsburgh-Xenia 
Theological Seminary (United Presbyterian Church of North America) and 
Western Theological Seminary (Presbyterian Church, U.S.A.). 

Pittsburgh-Xenia Seminary was formed in 1930 by the union of Pittsburgh 
and Xenia Seminaries. The Xenia branch had been founded in 1794 in West- 
ern Pennsylvania but had spent most of its life in Ohio and Missouri. The 
Pittsburgh branch originated in 1825 in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. Both 
branches were later augmented by the resources of Newburgh Seminary which 
was founded in New York City in 1805 by John Mitchell Mason. 

Western Seminary, established legally in 1825 by the General Assembly of 
the Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.), began with classical academies founded by 
Joseph Smith (1785) and John McMillan (1787) in Washington, Pa. It was in- 
deed a "western" seminary in 1825, whose task was to furnish a ministry for 
the rapidly opening western territories along the Ohio River. 

The union in 1958 of the United Presbyterian Church of North America 
with the Presbyterian Church in the United States of America and the subse- 
quent merger of Pittsburgh-Xenia and Western Seminaries were possible be- 
cause of ancient bonds: the Bible, the reformers, and the Scottish experience 
of witness and suffering. Church divisions in Scotland were reproduced in 
America. Since 1800 the direction has been steadily toward common witness 
with a resulting joining of schools. Pittsburgh Theological Seminary is the 
issue of this growing fellowship in theological education. 

The purpose of the Seminary as defined in the Constitution is to educate 
suitable persons for the work of Christian ministry in its various forms at the 
highest possible level of educational competence. Set down in the midst of 
one of the key industrial centers of the nation, the Seminary experiments in 
the city about it, wrestles with the nature of the gospel, strives for eventful 
communication. The purpose of the Seminary is clearcut: to know our time, 
the gospel for the healing of our time, and the ministry for our time. 

19 



Pittsburgh 
Our Environment 



Pittsburgh Seminary is located in the workshop of America. Together with 
the contiguous towns, Pittsburgh is one of the great industrial centers of 
the world. Its population includes people of every nationality, profession, 
and skill, and therefore it affords unexcelled opportunities for the study 
of social, economic, political, and racial problems. Pittsburgh Seminary has 
working relationships with community and social agencies, labor unions, 
business management, human development research centers, teaching hospitals, 
etc., whereby these agencies and organizations become further resources for 
the educating of theological students. 



The cultural and educational life of Pittsburgh is no less rich. Five major 
colleges and universities are located in Pittsburgh: The University of Pitts- 
burgh, Carnegie-Mellon University, Duquesne University, Chatham College, 
and Mt. Mercy College. Their facilities, programs, and libraries, plus the 
Carnegie free libraries, afford added resources to all students. 



For music and art there are the world-famous Pittsburgh Symphony Or- 
chestra; the Pittsburgh Opera Society; the Mendelssohn and Bach Choirs and 
other choral and concert groups; the Pittsburgh Playhouse, in its thirty-third 
year, which presents a total repertoire of plays; numerous art galleries includ- 
ing the Arts and Crafts Center and the Pittsburgh Plan for Art, both near the 
campus; and Carnegie Institute, which houses one of the largest contemporary 
art collections in the country, and which every third year presents the Pitts- 
burgh International Exhibition of Paintings and Sculpture. Begun in 1896, 
the Pittsburgh International is one of the most important exhibitions of 
contemporary art in the world. 



Churches of all types and denominations are to be found, ranging from the 
large urban congregation to the small rural or industrial mission. Pittsburgh 
Presbytery is one of the largest presbyteries in the United Presbyterian 
Church, U.S.A. Within its bounds are two hundred eleven churches with a 
total membership of about one hundred twenty-six thousand. Of these, about 
one-fifth have more than five hundred members each, and mission work is 
conducted in over twenty different places. 

21 



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The Campus 



Setting 

Pittsburgh Theological Seminary is ideally situated to symbolize by its very 
setting the church in the world. Located at the heart of a metropolitan center 
of two and a half million people, it is bordered on one side by an urban re- 
newal project, including business and apartment buildings, churches, and 
schools, and on the other side by a residential area housing people of many 
ethnic backgrounds. By looking out almost any window on campus, one sees 
not only the broad expanse of lawn and trees of a once lovely estate given to 
the Seminary in 1951 by the heirs of the late H. Lee Mason, Jr., but is re- 
minded also of the world in which the church lives and serves. 



Buildings 

New, modern buildings of American Colonial design, constructed of Hampton 
Court Colonial red brick trimmed with Indiana limestone and fireproof 
throughout, house the seminary activities. 

At the center of the campus stands The George A. Long Administration 
Building, which is the nerve center of campus life. Here classrooms, seminar 
rooms, faculty and administrative offices, a student center, a reception room, 
a Bible Lands Museum, a speech center, and the mail room all constitute a 
beehive of learning and social fellowship. 

The McCune Chapel, opening off the rotunda at the rear of the main build- 
ing, done in chaste Colonial style, is the place where the seminary community 
gathers for worship and the renewal of spiritual life. 




23 



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The Clifford E. Barbour Library was built and furnished with funds provid- 
ed by the Sarah Mellon Scaife and Richard K. Mellon Foundations. The 
library is air-conditioned throughout. There is easy access to book resources 
located in four stack areas. One hundred and three desk carrels placed in and 
around the book stacks are available to all readers, in addition to which there 
are thirteen enclosed typing carrels which allow greater privacy for research 
work. Twenty research study rooms provide ideal conditions in which the 
faculty, visiting scholars and graduate students may pursue serious scholarly 
endeavors. Several study rooms and lounges, informally arranged, invite 
leisurely reading for more than 75 persons aside from many areas devoted to 
special purposes. Facilities are available for small seminar classes, conference 
and group study lessons, audio-visual work, music listening, microfilm read- 
ing, and hymnological and historical research. 

On display in the Main Floor exhibit area are the desk and chair of Dr. Karl 
Barth, Basel, Switzerland, presented to Pittsburgh Seminary by Dr. Barth 
in 1964. Accompanying the desk at which Dr. Barth wrote his theological 
treatises from 1922 is an autographed copy of his Kirchliche Dogmatik 1/1. 

The following special collections augment the book resources: 

The John M. Mason Memorial Collection 

The research area of the library contains this priceless collection of classical 

theological works dating from the Reformation period. 

The James Warrington Collection ofHymnology 

Several thousand valuable hymn and psalm books which came from the 
estate of James Warrington, Philadelphia, provide research materials for 
scholars of American and English hymnody. Mr. Warrington minutely ana- 
lyzed the works by composer, meter tune, place, author, title, etc. 

The Nina S. Brittain Collection 

Through the generosity of Frank J. Brittain, Esq., of Erie, Pennsylvania, the 
sum of $5000 was used for the purchase of theological and related works 
which are known as the Nina S. Brittain Collection. 




25 



The Clarence J. Williamson Church History Collection 

In 1958 endowment funds were established, income of which is to be used 
for the purchase of books in Church History and closely related subjects. 
These books are in memory of Dr. Clarence J. Williamson, a graduate of 
Pittsburgh Seminary, for fifty-one years a minister in the United Presbyterian 
Church of North America, and for eighteen years Professor of Church History 
and Government in the Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary. 

Historical Collections 

A room of the library contains the Minutes and other records of Associate, 
Associate Reformed, and United Presbyterian congregations, presbyteries, 
synods, and General Assemblies. The library is also the depository for the 
Upper Ohio Valley Historical Society and Pittsburgh Presbytery of The 
United Presbyterian Church in the U.S.A. 



Housing 

Single students are comfortably and commodiously housed in two buildings 
connected to the Administration Building by a covered passageway on both 
the first and second floor levels. The George C. Fisher Memorial Hall accom- 
modates 80 men in single rooms. Six apartments for employees and married 
students are also located on the ground floor in this building. The John 
McNaugher Memorial Hall provides for 63 men, with an additional wing 
which houses 25 women. The dormitories have student lounges on each floor 
in addition to a game room and a snack room on the ground floor. There 
are three large dining rooms served by a cafeteria and having a seating capacity 
of over 500; in addition, there are six guests rooms which complete the 
dormitory complex. 

Although student rooms are fully and comfortably furnished, students 
must supply their own sheets, pillowcases, blankets, and towels, and provide 
for their own laundering. Summer occupancy of dormitory rooms is available 
by special arrangement. 

Married students and their families are housed on campus in five apartment 
buildings and a number of duplex houses. 

The Highlander is a modern apartment building on Highland Avenue near 
the northwest corner of the campus. It contains seventeen one bedroom and 
six two bedroom units. Each apartment includes a living room, kitcheri, bath, 
and storage locker. These apartments are unfurnished, although all kitchens 
are equipped with electric ranges and refrigerators. Laundry facilities (coin 
meter) are available in the basement. 

The Samuel A. Fulton Memorial Hall provides eighteen efficiency and 
twenty-one two-room apartments. Each unit includes a kitchenette, a bath, 
with a storage locker in the basement. These apartments are fully furnished 
with desk, bookcase, dining table, chairs, davenport-bed, a chest of drawers, 
wardrobe, electric stove and refrigerator. Students must provide bedding, 
linens, silverware, china, cooking utensils, curtains, lamps and rugs. Laundry 
facilities (coin meter type) are available in the basement. A six-room, fully 
furnished apartment for the housing of a missionary family on furlough is 
provided in Fulton Hall. It is made available through cooperation with the 

26 



Commission on Ecumenical Mission and Relations, to missionaries seeking 
fuller preparation for service on return to their various fields. 

Anderson and McMillan Halls were completed for occupancy early in 1968 
and provide 31 unfurnished "town house type" apartments. The buildings 
form a quadrangle with the existing two wings of the Highlander. This may be 
used as an enclosed play area for children. Anderson Hall includes 6 two 
bedroom and 6 three bedroom apartments on three floors. A laundry and 
locker storage area is provided in the basement. 

McMillan Hall provides 19 apartments which include one four bedroom, 
three three bedroom, 12 two bedroom, and 3 one bedroom apartments. 
Again, there is a laundry in the basement together with ample locker storage 
space. 

The apartments are unfurnished although a refrigerator and electric stove 
are provided. These appliances are a permanent part of the apartments and 
cannot be moved out to allow personal appliances. All windows are equipped 
with shades and traverse rods. The walls are an off-white neutral shade and the 
floors are covered wall to wall with a wheat heather carpeting. On the 
ground level of McMillan Hall a large community room has been provided 
for use as a children's play-care room as well as a general activities room for 
the student community. 

The Sheridan Avenue Apartments are located on the campus at 519 
Sheridan Avenue. This three story building contains 6 unfurnished apartments 
for couples with children. Washers and dryers may be installed in the base- 
ment. 

There are a limited number of unfurnished apartments on campus for 
students and families. Many of these houses will be eliminated as there is 
assurance of adequate housing in other seminary facilities. 

Life for married students and their families is as comfortable and efficient 
as is possible in student apartments. Rents are well below the commercial 
rates, shops and stores are within easy reach, public transportation is available 
right to the seminary gate, and good schools are nearby for children of school 
age. 




Anderson and McMillan Halls 



27 



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The Bible Lands Museum 

Pittsburgh Theological Seminary has an outstanding list of accomplishments 
in archaeological research of Bible times in ancient Palestine. In conjunction 
with the American Schools of Oriental Research at Jerusalem, in Jordan, it 
conducted an exploration at Bab ed-Dra at the southern end of the Dead Sea 
in 1924. A series of joint excavations was made at Kirjath-Sepher in 1926, 
1928, 1930 and 1932. Bethel became the site of research in 1934, 1954, 
1957, and 1960, and a significant project was carried out at New Testament 
Jericho and Nitla in 1950. In 1964 the Kyle-Kelso Fund for Archaeological 
Research in Jordan was established and a joint project with the American 
Schools of Oriental Research was carried on at Gibeah of Saul in the summer 
of 1964. Approval was granted for a joint expedition at Tell er Rumeith either 
in 1966 or 1967. This site is thought to be Old Testament Rumeith Gilead. 
For the year 1966-67 Howard M. Jamieson, Jr., has been named Honorary 
Associate of the American School of Oriental Research in Jerusalem. 

In conjunction with Carnegie Museum and the Department of Antiquities 
of Israel, through the Holy Lands Exhibition Fund, Pittsburgh Theological 
Seminary conducted archaeological digs at the biblical site at Ashdod in 1962, 
1963, and 1965. Publication of the findings of the work during these seasons 
is now being prepared. 

The archaeological work at Pittsburgh Theological Seminary was inaugurated 
by Professor M. G. Kyle and was then carried on by Professor James L. Kelso 
until his retirement in 1963. In the spring of 1964 Associate Professor 
Howard M. Jamieson, Jr., was appointed Faculty Administrator of the Kyle- 
Kelso Fund. Members of the faculty and students often participate in the digs. 
Assistant Professor Donald M. Gowan and A. Vanlier Hunter, a teaching 
fellow, were recent participants in the Ashdod project. Much of the Sem- 
inary's share of the antiquities excavated in the digs is now on exhibit in the 
Bible Lands Museum, which is located in the administration building. The 
museum is used as a teaching facility for the seminary program. A unique 
collection of ancient coins has been catalogued by Professor Iain Wilson. 

The objects in the Bible Lands Museum illustrate the way of life of the 
people of Palestine, and so become of great value for understanding and 
interpretation. Occasionally archaeological discoveries corroborate biblical 
statements, as in the case of the fragments of a royal inscription of Sargon 
II of Assyria, found at Ashdod, which relates to Isaiah 20:1. For the most 
part, however, archaeological excavations illumine the cultural, social, eco- 
nomic, political, and religious background of the Bible, supplying much data 
for deeper understanding of the people and the land of the Bible. 






29 



Life on The Campus 

Community Life 

1 The social life of the campus is enhanced by the presence of single students, 
married couples, and families. It is greatly enriched by those students from 
i the Orient, Europe, Africa, the Middle East, South America, etc., who come 
to study but also to share their cultures. 
Missionary families spending their furloughs on the campus for study bring 
I to the community a sense of the Church ecumenical coupled with a sense of 
urgency. 
Admittedly, the emphasis in a theological seminary is not on social activities, 
: but inter-personal relationships run deep and the socializing values are main- 
tained by way of group get-togethers and periodical school functions. Among 
1 these are selected motion pictures, square dances, school picnics, art shows 
displaying works of seminary artists, and musical talent shows by seminary 
vocalists and instrumentalists trained in classical and folk music. 

A beautiful contemporary student center has been a recent addition to 
the community life on the campus. Located below the chapel wing of the 
administration building, it is a place for refreshment, campus movies, group 
or class parties, and just a good place to get together. 

The Woman's Association, for all women on campus, provides opportunities 
for group participation in a varied program of study, community activity, 
and social concern. 




31 




In the Bookstore 




ii ^ 

A Student's Apartment 



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A Festive Evening 



32 



Convocations and Worship 

Through the faculty-student Convocation and Worship Committee, outstand- 
ing people are brought to the campus. Each fall and spring there is a major 
lectureship in which a prominent person— theologian, Biblical scholar, psychi- 
atrist, writer, social thinker, and planner, etc.-is heard by the seminary family. 
Every Tuesday a visiting scholar from some field of intellectual inquiry, or 
some service project is on campus to speak in the weekly convocation. A list 
of some of these speakers from 1967-1968 is on pages 14 and 15 of this 
catalogue. Chapel worship is conducted by students and faculty four days a 
week. 



Church and Society 

Experiences provided by the direct contact of the Seminary with its neigh- 
borhood give to the students vital information and know-how for dealing 
with urban America. The Seminary reaches out to the community through 
field education, through laboratory assignments, and through the faculty- 
student Church and Society Committee. The latter is a dynamic part of the 
seminary neighborhood as it has established relations with settlement houses, 
urban renewal and development offices, and with churches of the community 
for work with slum clearance, housing units, gangs, etc. The committee spon- 
sors a tutoring relationship between seminary personnel and neighborhood 
school children, and directs faculty and student involvement in civil rights 
problems, both locally and elsewhere in the nation. 



The Student Association 

The Student Association provides the organization through which the students 
carry on a program of involvement in community life, determined only by 
the interest and concern of the students themselves. A student Curriculum 
Committee meets twice during the year with the faculty Curriculum Commit- 
tee and is called upon to offer counsel and initiate continuing curriculum 
evaluation. The Convocation and Worship Committee of the faculty works 
out the annual program of chapel services and lecture series after consultation 
with the student Convocation and Worship Committee. The student Publica- 
tion Committee shares in the publication of Perspective, Panorama, and The 
Directory. An all-student publication, Unofficial Perspective, offers weekly 
opportunity for the expression of opinion and the examination of issues. One 
of the most active groups is the student Church and Society Committee, 
which works with a similar faculty committee in a study of current social 
problems. This joint committee also organizes student and faculty action 
when deemed necessary. A student Social Committee and a student Steward- 
ship Committee direct activities in their respective areas of concern. 

The Executive Committee of the Student Association for the year, 1967- 
1968, was led by Allen Campbell, President, and Barbara Rowden, Secretary- 
Treasurer. 



33 



The Seminary Musical Program 

The Seminary has a Men's Choir and a Mixed Chorus, both under the direction 
of Mr. Howard L. Ralston, Assistant Professor of Church Music. Auditions | 
for membership in the Men's Choir are held in September. This group, care- 
fully chosen and of limited number, sings for daily chapel services and re- 
presents the Seminary from time to time in churches within easy traveling 
distance. A more extensive tour is undertaken in the spring when the choir 
presents a varied program of sacred music in churches and colleges. 

The Mixed Chorus is maintained for all those of the seminary community 
who enjoy singing. This group meets on Tuesday evenings and presents a 
program at Christmas and in the spring, and sings at commencement. There 
are many opportunities throughout the year for soloists and instrumentalists. 

One of the highlights of the seminary year is the James H. Snowden 
Memorial Concert, established in 1964 by Dr. Roy R. Snowden in memory 
of his father, a longtime former professor in the Seminary. This annual event 
enriches the cultural life of the seminary community by bringing to the cam- 
pus Metropolitan Opera stars and other concert artists of the highest rank. 



John Gustafson, Snowden artist 




34 



35 



Admission Requirements 



Pittsburgh Theological Seminary offers work on a graduate school level. This 
presupposes a B.A. or B.S. degree from a regionally accredited college or 
university, the degree work to have a substantial foundation in the liberal 
arts. It also assumes that the student is ready to approach theological edu- 
cation with an open, searching attitude. Pittsburgh Seminary seeks that man 
or woman who is committed to the Christian faith, emotionally suited for 
work in the Church and intellectually capable of the most rigorous kind of 
academic discipline. 



Pre-Seminary Studies 

College courses prior to theological seminary should provide the cultural 
and intellectual foundations essential to an effective theological education. 
They should issue in at least three broad kinds of attainment. 

1. The college work of a pre-seminary student should result in the ability to 
use certain tools of the educated man: 

(a) The ability to write and speak English clearly and correctly. This 
purpose should also be cultivated in all written work. 

(b) The ability to think clearly. In some persons, this ability is cultivated 
through courses in philosophy or specifically in logic. In others it is 
cultivated by the use of scientific method, or by dealing with critical 
problems in connection with literary and historical documents. 

(c) The ability to read at least one foreign language and in some circum- 
stances more than one. 

2. The college work of a pre-seminary student should result in increased 
understanding of the world in which he lives: 

(a) The world of men and ideas. This includes knowledge of English 
literature, philosophy, and psychology. 

(b) The world of nature. This is provided by knowledge of the natural 
sciences, including laboratory work. 

(c) The world of human affairs. This is aided by knowledge of history 
and the social sciences. 

3. The college work of a pre-seminary student should result in a sense of 
achievement: 

(a) The ability to think, to see relationships, to follow out logical steps 
of an argument, to develop procedures for dealing with problems. 
This ability is achieved in part through independent study. 

(b) The degree of his mastery of his field of study is more important than 
the credits and grades which he accumulates. 

36 



The American Association of Theological Schools has proposed a minimum 
list of fields of study with which the student should have acquaintance before 
beginning seminary study. The liberal arts background is felt to provide the 
best foundation for seminary work. 



English— literature, composition, speech and related studies. 
At least 6 semesters. 



History— ancient, modern European, and American. 
At least 3 semesters. 



Philosophy— orientation in history, problems and method. 
At least 3 semesters. 



Natural sciences— preferably physics, chemistry and biology. 
At least 2 semesters. 



Social sciences— psychology, sociology, anthropology, economics, political 
science, education. 
At least 6 semesters. 



Foreign languages— one or more of the following linguistic avenues to man's 
thought and tools of scholarly research: Latin, Greek, Hebrew, German, 
French. Students who anticipate post-graduate studies are urged to under- 
take these disciplines early in their training as opportunity offers. Greek 
should be taken in the final year of college, as well as before, if possible. 
At least 4 semesters. 



Religion— a thorough knowledge of the content of the Bible is indispensable 
together with an introduction to the major religious traditions and theological 
problems. The pre-seminary student may well seek counsel of the seminary 
in order most profitably to use the resources of his college. 
At least 3 semesters. 



Of the various possible areas of concentration, where areas of concentra- 
tion are required, English, philosophy and history are regarded as the most 
desirable, and, where the department is strong, religion. 

At the beginning of the first year of seminary students will take examina- 
tions in philosophy, Greek, speech, and basic English. Students showing a 
deficiency in English will be required to remedy such deficiency before 
graduation. The Greek, philosophy, and speech examinations are for the pur- 
pose of placement. 

37 



Procedure for Admission 

Candidates seeking degrees may apply any time after the Junior year is com- 
pleted and prior to June 1 preceding the September for which admission is 
sought. All correspondence concerning admission to the seminary should be 
addressed to the Director of Admissions. Applications are considered by the 
committee when the following credentials are submitted. 

(1) A formal application. 

(2) Application fee. A check or money order for $15.00 must accompany 
the application. This will be applied to the first semester's tuition. 
While the fee will be refunded if the application is rejected, it is not 
returnable if the application is withdrawn. 

(3) Mental capacity test. The Seminary normally will correspond with the 
applicant's college concerning a mental capacity test. If none is avail- 
able, the applicant must take one under seminary direction. 

(4) A personal interview with the Director of Admissions or another 
representative of the Seminary who may be designated by the Director 
of Admissions. 

(5) A medical report on a blank furnished by the Seminary. 

(6) An official transcript from the registrar of the college or university, 
showing grades for at least three years of college work. 

(7) A battery of psychological tests which will be forwarded to a proctor 
as soon as the application form is received. These are the same tests 
that Presbytery requires of all candidates. They need to be taken only 
once. 

(8) An extensive (500-1000 words) statement in the applicant's hand- 
writing describing his family, educational, and religious background, 
placing particular emphasis upon his motives for desiring to enter the 
Seminary and the ministry. 

After admission is granted and within thirty days of such notification, a 
$35 placement fee is required to assure the applicant of a place in the new 
class. This fee is applied on the student's tuition and is not returnable except 
under extreme hardship and at the discretion of the Admissions Committee. 
A certification of the student's "intention to enroll" must accompany this 
fee. 



Transfer Students 

A student transferring from another seminary is required to submit, in 
addition to the foregoing, a complete transcript of previous seminary work 
and a letter of dismissal from the Dean or President. A transfer student must 
be in residence at Pittsburgh Seminary for a minimum of one full academic 
year in order to become a candidate for the Bachelor of Divinity degree. 



38 



Foreign Students 

Qualified applicants from other countries are welcome as a part of the student 
body. Such applicants shall be required, in addition to the regular require- 
ments for admission, to give evidence of proficiency in the English language 
before their admission. TOEFL (Test of English as a Foreign Language) is 
the standard test used by the Commission on Ecumenical Mission and Rela- 
tions and the World Council of Churches. The test is arranged through the 
Seminary or the Commission on Ecumenical Mission and Relations of the 
United Presbyterian Church. 

Such applicants shall have endorsement either of a representative of the 
Commission on Ecumenical Mission and Relations (in those areas where the 
United Presbyterian Church in the U.S.A. has fraternal workers) or the World 
Council of Churches (in other areas). 

An applicant from another country is also asked to submit a letter from 
his bank stating that there are on deposit sufficient funds to assure his passage 
home after his period of study in this country. This saves possible embarrass- 
ment to both student and seminary at a later time. 



Matriculation 

A final transcript showing the degree and date of graduation of the applicant 
must be submitted to the registrar. 



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39 



Fees and Expenses* 

(for the academic year) 

$640.00 Tuition (incl. Intersession) (approx.) 
650.00 Tuition B.D.-Th.M., (third and fourth years) 
550.00 Board (incl. Intersession) 
200.00 Room Fee (incl. Intersession) 
10.00 Library Fee (annual) 
7.00 Student Association Fee (annual) 
150.00 Books (approx.) 
50.00-150.00 Hospitalization Insurance (approx.) 
100.00-200.00 Incidentals 

25.00 Campus Facility Fee for Non-Resident Students 
Maticulation Fee- $35.00 payable at the time of registration. 

Tuition Fee- $20.00 per semester hour. 

Late Registration Fee- A charge of $5.00 will be made to students registering 
later than the specified time. 

Graduation Fee- $ 1 0.00 

Transcript Fee-One, copy of a student's academic record will be provided 
without charge. A fee of $1.00 will be charged for each additional transcript. 

*Subject to change. 

Married Student Apartment Fees 

Off Campus Residents 

All students admitted to the Seminary are expected to live on campus, unless, 
in the judgment of the Seminary, circumstances make it necessary to live 
elsewhere. All students who live off campus are required to pay a $25 campus 
fee. Students choosing to live off campus without the approval of the 
Seminary will not be eligible for financial assistance from the Seminary. 

The Highlander 

Twenty-three unfurnished apartments, $75.00-$85.00 per month 

The Samuel A. Fulton Memorial Hall 

Thirty-nine furnished apartments, $55.00-$70.00 per month 

Anderson Hall 

Twelve unfurnished apartments, $90.00-$ 100.00 per month 

McMillan Hall 

Nineteen unfurnished apartments, $80.00-$ 120.00 per month 

Sheridan Avenue Apartments 

Six unfurnished apartments, $55.00-$70.00 per month 

40 



Duplexes 

Five unfurnished apartments, $55.00-$70.00 per month 
All apartments include refrigerator, stove, and storage locker or area. 

Fees for apartment occupancy are payable monthly. A $5.00 assessment will 
be added to all accounts not paid by the tenth of the month. Applications 
for apartments should be made as early as possible. 

A deposit of $10 per married couple, payable at registration, is required 
of all those living in seminary apartments. The deposit will be returned after 
satisfactory inspection at the time the apartment is vacated. 



Payment of Fees 

All academic fees and expenses are payable in advance on the opening day 
of each semester. When necessary, arrangements for a payment plan to cover 
a semester's expenses may be made at the Business Office on the first day of 
each term, permitting (4) four equal payments: one-fourth on the first day 
of the term, and the balance due at the beginning of the fourth, eighth, and 
twelfth weeks respectively. There is a carrying charge of $5.00 for the defer- 
red payment plan. Failure to pay any deferred payment within ten days from 
the date due will incur a penalty of 1% of the amount due . 

Settlement of all seminary bills is required before registration for a new 
semester, and before graduation or the release of official transcripts. 



Seminary Meals 

Residents of the men's and women's dormitories are required to eat in the 
seminary dining hall. Board includes nineteen meals a week; only breakfast 
is served on Sunday. The dining hall is closed on holidays which are scheduled 
on the seminary calendar. No deduction is allowed for absence from individual 
meals, although special consideration is given to students who regularly do 
not eat in the dining hall weekends. 



Tuition Refunds on Courses Dropped 

First week of semester, $1 .00 withheld for each credit hour; balance refunded. 
Second to seventh week, one half refunded. 
Seventh week on, no refund. 



Medical and Hospitalization Insurance 

Students are required to be insured by some type of medical and hospitali- 
zation insurance acceptable to the Seminary. All students who are registered 
as full-time students are eligible for such insurance under a group student 
policy issued by Minister's Life and Casualty Company. Detailed information 
concerning premiums and benefits may be secured at the Business Office. 

41 



Total Cost 

The total cost for one academic year, based upon a survey of actual student 
expenditures at Pittsburgh Seminary, is approximately $2,100 for an un- 
married student and $3,000 to $3,250 for a married student without children, 
depending on the variation in rentals. The cost for a married student having 
children is correspondingly higher. These totals include expenses for clothing, 
laundering and cleaning, medical and dental care not covered by hospitaliza- 
tion insurance, incidentals and recreation, as well as tuition, fees (hospitaliza- 
tion insurance premiums included), board, room and books. Not included are 
automobile operating costs, payments on purchases, life insurance premiums, 
repayment of indebtedness, and expenses for travel to and from the Seminary. 

Student Financial Assistance 

Pittsburgh Seminary provides financial help from endowed and general funds 
for students who demonstrate that their resources from their own earnings 
and savings, their families, local congregations and presbyteries are not suf- 
ficient to meet their Seminary expenses. Several merit scholarships are offered 
to entering students who have excellent academic records in their pre-seminary 
work and who must have financial help. Scholarship aid is also given accord- 
ing to need to upperclassmen whose academic attainments in their seminary 
work are high. Loans, grants-in-aid and remunerative campus work are also 
available as a part of the Seminary's financial assistance program. Approx- 
imately fifty work opportunities are available to students in the library, 
dining hall, and student center, and as attendants for various campus facilities. 
The work is limited to ten hours per week and the remuneration is credited 
to the student's account or paid in cash. Once a student is admitted the 
Seminary makes every effort to see that he need not drop out for financial 
reasons. 

The Board of Christian Education of the United Presbyterian Church, 
through its office of Educational Loans and Scholarships, provides assistance 
for United Presbyterian seminary students who demonstrate financial need 
in two programs: (1) Loans ($100 to $1,000 in a given year) and (2) United 
Presbyterian Study Grants (up to $1,000 in a given year). 

Specific details concerning scholarships, grants-in-aid, work assistance, and 
loan funds, together with application forms for both seminary and Board of 
Christian Education programs, may be obtained from the Financial Aid 
Officer. 



Loan Funds 

James H. Snowden Memorial Loan Fund. A loan fund for students needing 
financial assistance to obtain a theological education was established in 1953 
by R. R. Snowden, M.D., Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, in memory of his father, 
Professor James H. Snowden, D.D., LL.D. Loans from this fund are made on 
notes with interest and without further endorsement. 

42 



Walter G. and Esther B. Comin Student Loan Fund. A loan fund for students 
who need financial assistance to continue their education was established in 
1955 by Mrs. Walter G. Comin, Pawnee City, Nebraska, Mr. and Mrs. Walter G. 
Comin, Jr., Wilkinsburg, Pa., and Mr. Myron C. Comin, Spokane, Washington, 
in memory of Rev. Walter G. Comin, D.D. Loans from this fund are made on 
notes at four percent interest and without further endorsement. 

Westphal Memorial Loan Fund. The session of the Reed Memorial United 
Presbyterian Church, Lyndhurst, New Jersey, established in 1956 the West- 
phal Memorial Loan Fund. Under certain conditions specified by the donors 
loans from this fund may be made on notes without interest or further 
endorsements, and are repayable within ten years. 

Albert G. Hamilton Memorial Loan Fund. A loan fund for students who need 
financial assistance during the seminary course was established in 1960 by 
Mrs. Albert G. Hamilton, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, in memory of her husband, 
Mr. Albert G. Hamilton. Loans from this fund may be made on notes at three 
percent interest without further endorsement. 

Dr. and Mrs. James D. Sands Memorial Loan Fund. A loan fund for seminary 
students was established in 1961 by Mrs. Albert G. Hamilton, Pittsburgh, 
Pennsylvania, in memory of her parents, Dr. and Mrs. James D. Sands. Loans 
from this fund may be made on notes at three percent interest without further 
endorsement. 

Walter A. Long Memorial Student Rotary Loan Fund. Established in 1961 by 
the Estate of Emma Clark Long. Loans are not to exceed $100 to any one 
student in any one academic year and the amount borrowed is to be repaid 
not later than two years after graduation or not later than two years after the 
borrower would have graduated if he had progressed normally through the 
seminary to graduation in the event of failure to graduate. All loans are made 
without interest. 

The William G. Crow Memorial Loan Fund. Established in November, 1961. 
Loans from this fund may be made on notes with three percent interest. 

The Mary Jane Dando Student Loan Fund. Loans from this fund are available 
to Junior students with interest and without further endorsement. Any loan 
from this fund must be repaid by the first day of the borrower's Senior year, 
or if the borrower for any reason discontinues his enrollment at the Seminary 
it becomes due at the termination of his relationship with the Seminary. 



Awards, Prizes, and Graduate Fellowships 

The Sylvester S. Marvin Memorial Fellowship 

The Sylvester S. Marvin Fellowship may be assigned upon graduation to that 
member of the Senior Class who is recommended by the faculty as having 
achieved the highest standard in all departments of the seminary curriculum, 
provided that his average be not below 85%. The faculty reserves the right to 

43 



impose special tests and examinations in making this award. It is offered to 
those who take the entire course of three years in this institution. The 
recipient must pledge himself to a year of post-graduate study immediately 
following his graduation at some institution approved by the faculty. He is 
required to furnish quarterly reports of his progress. The money will be paid 
in three equal installments, on the first day of October, January, and April. 
Prolonged absence from the classroom in the discharge of extra-seminary 
duties makes a student ineligible for the fellowship. 

The Thomas Jamison Scholarship 

The Thomas Jamison Scholarship, in memory of the late Thomas Jamison, 
Esq., of North Side, Pittsburgh, was established by Mrs. Jamison. The income 
of this endowment is given every year to the member of the Senior Class who 
has the highest average at the beginning of his final semester of study. 

The acceptance of this scholarship requires that the recipient spend a full 
academic year in study in any graduate institution approved by the faculty. 
He must further agree to make regular reports of the work he is doing and at 
the end of the year he will present a satisfactory thesis of not less than ten 
thousand words on some subject selected by the faculty or approved by the 
faculty. If for any reason the man who is first in the class does not accept 
the scholarship and its requirements the scholarship will be offered to the 
student next in rank. 

The Jennie Rigg Barbour Memorial Prize 

The Jennie Rigg Barbour Memorial Prize was established by Rev. Clifford E. 
Barbour, Ph.D., D.D., LL.D., President Emeritus of Pittsburgh Theological 
Seminary, as a memorial to his mother. The income from the endowment of 
this prize is assigned to that member of the graduating class who has taken 
his full course of instruction in this institution and who has achieved the 
second highest academic rank of his class, if in the judgment of the faculty he 
is worthy in all other respects. It is hoped that the student will use this 
income for further study either within an academic institution or by the 
enlargement of his own library. 

The Michael Wilson Keith Memorial Homiletical Prize 

This prize was founded in 1919 by the Keith Bible Class of the First Pres- 
byterian Church of Coraopolis, Pennsylvania, in memory of the Reverend 
Michael Wilson Keith, D.D., the founder of the class and pastor of the church 
from 1911 to 1917. The prize is awarded to a member of the Senior Class 
who has spent three years in this seminary and has taken the highest standing 
in the department of homiletics. The winner of the prize is expected to 
preach in the First Presbyterian Church of Coraopolis and teach the Keith 
Bible Class one Sunday after the award is made. 

The Joseph Watson Greek Entrance Prize 

The Joseph Watson Greek Prize was established in 1920 by Mrs. Robert A. 
Watson, Columbus, Ohio. The income will be awarded to the student who 
achieves the highest grade in an examination in classical Greek as he enters 
the Junior Class of the Seminary. 

44 



The William B. Watson Prize in Hebrew 

The William B. Watson Prize in Hebrew was established in 1919 by Mrs. 
Robert A. Watson, Columbus, Ohio. The income will be awarded to that 
member of the Senior Class who, having elected Hebrew, shall submit the 
best grammatical and exegetical treatment of an assigned portion of the 
Hebrew Old Testament. 

The John Watson Prize in New Testament Greek 

The John Watson Prize in New Testament Greek was established in 1919 by 
Mrs. Robert A. Watson, Columbus, Ohio. The income will be awarded to that 
member of the Senior Class who, having elected Greek Exegesis, shall submit 
the best grammatical and exegetical treatment of an assigned portion of the 
Greek New Testament. 

The Robert A. Lee Church History Award 

By bequest, in memory of her husband the late Mrs. Henrietta M. Lee, 
Oakmont, Pa., established the Robert A. Lee Church History Foundation, 
the annual income of which is to be awarded yearly to the students making 
first and second rank respectively in the Department of Church History. 

The Hugh Thomson Kerr Moderator Prize 

This prize was established in 1938 by the Men's Committee of the Shady- 
side Presbyterian Church, Pittsburgh. An annual contribution of fifty dollars 
was pledged to be used for the purchase of books. The prize is to be awarded 
to that member of the graduating class who has exhibited to the greatest 
degree, throughout the three years of the seminary course, leadership, origi- 
nality, and accomplishments beyond the normal requirements for graduation. 

The James Purdy Scholarship 

The James Purdy Scholarship was established in 1882. The income is appor- 
tioned equally each year to the six members of the Junior Class who attain 
the highest average of excellence in their seminary work. The distribution 
is made after the students return to the Seminary the following year. 

The Andrew Reed Scholarship 

The Andrew Reed Scholarship was established in 1914 by Miss Anna M. 
Reed, Cross Creek, Pennsylvania, the income being given to the student who, 
upon entering seminary, shall achieve the highest grade in a competitive 
examination in the English Bible. The successful competitor is to have the 
scholarship throughout the entire course of three years, provided that his 
general conduct and application to study shall continue to be satisfactory to 
the faculty. 

The Home Training Bible Class Award in Missions 

This is an award of $100 which was established in January, 1961, by the 
Home Training Bible Class of the Edgewood Presbyterian Church, Pittsburgh, 
Pa., in the name of the Rev. Walter L. Moser, Ph.D., D.D. The recipient will 
be that member of the graduating class who is deemed most deserving among 
those entering the foreign or home missionary field upon graduation. 

45 



The Alice Myers Sigler Memorial Prize in History and Theology 
This award was established in 1962 by Robert M., John H., Richard E., and 
Alan B. Sigler in memory of their mother. The income from this endowed 
fund is granted to the student who, in the judgment of the professors of the 
History and Theology Division, is most worthy of this award at the end of the 
Middler year. 

The Fred McFeely Rogers Prize in Biblical Studies 

The Fred McFeely Rogers Prize in Biblical Studies was established in 1962 
by Mr. and Mrs. James H. Rogers in honor of their son, a graduate in the 
Class of 1962. The income from this endowed fund is granted to the student 
who, in the judgment of the professors of the Biblical Division, is most 
worthy of this award at the end of the Junior year. 

The First Presbyterian Church of McKeesport Preaching Prize 
This prize was established in 1964 by the congregation of The First Pres- 
byterian Church of McKeesport, to be awarded to a student at the end of 
the fall semester of his Senior year for excellence in preaching. The winner 
of the prize is expected to preach one Sunday in The First Presbyterian 
Church of McKeesport during the spring semester of his Senior year. 

The Henry A. Riddle Fund for Graduate Study 

This fund was established in 1966 by the family and friends of Dr. Henry A. 

Riddle, a former president of Pittsburgh Theological Seminary, to provide 

an annual award to a member of the graduating class designated by the 

faculty for assistance in post-graduate study, preferably in the field of New 

Testament. 

The Walter P. and Anna L. McConkey Award in Homiletics 
This award was established in 1964 by the Central Presbyterian Church in 
Washington, Pa., in honor of Dr. and Mrs. McConkey, who served that 
pastorate for many years. It is to be given to a student who, at the end of 
his Middler year has, in the judgment of the homiletics professors, demon- 
strated excellence in preaching. 



46 



47 



1. 



'% 



,—. 



Degree Programs and 
Courses of Study 



Bachelor of Divinity 

Degree description pages 50-53 

Course descriptions pages 56-74 



Master of Religious Education 

Degree description pages 54-55 

Course descriptions pages 56-74 



Master of Theology 

Degree description pages 76-77 

Course descriptions pages 78-81 



Degree Relationships with University of Pittsburgh 

Master of Social Work— Bachelor of Divinity pages 84-85 

Master of Education page 86 

Master of Public Administration and Master of Public and 

International Affairs page 87 

Doctor of Philosophy pages 88-90 



49 



The Bachelor of Divinity Curriculum 



To be quite candid, the curriculum of Pittsburgh Seminary is heavily loaded 
on the side of requirements. However, this is modified through the program 
of Advanced Standing. But before we get to that, it is important to peer into 
the mind of the faculty to grasp the raison d-etre of the curriculum. The 
faculty has asked the question: What kind of studies must a student pursue in 
the seminary in order to become an able minister? The requirements of the 
curriculum reflect the judgment of the faculty about what the student needs 
to know so that he can take his place in the intellectual and professional 
leadership of the church. 

Not all students need to go through the requirements of the curriculum. 
Some will have already taken excellent courses in church history, New 
Testament, ethics, etc., before coming to seminary. A number of college 
religion departments are of such high quality that their students can attain 
advanced standing at Pittsburgh Seminary. The Pittsburgh faculty delights 
in this. It has opened up every required course in the entire curriculum for 
advanced standing. All a student must do is to take an advanced standing 
examination in any required course. If he passes with a superior rating, he 
will be excused from that requirement and will have a corresponding number 
of elective hours anywhere in the curriculum. If he passes but without 
superior rating, he will go into independent study under the guidance of the 
professor of the course. Thus he will be freed from the required course itself 
in order to pursue a deepened understanding of the subject area. If he fails, 
he fails without prejudice and remains in the required course. 

50 



The program of Advanced Standing illustrates what the faculty is and is not 
concerned about. It is concerned about subject areas; it is not concerned 
about course credits. The Old Testament is vitally important to the life of the 
Church. Yet if a student comes to the seminary with a fine background in the 
Old Testament and is able to pass the advanced standing examination, he 
should not have to take the course which a novice in the field would be tak- 
ing. The faculty determines to take a student where he is; if he belongs in 
advanced standing that is where he will be. 

Furthermore, if a student demonstrates B+ work in any area, for example, 
history and theology, he is encouraged to do Honors Work in that area of 
his special interest and competence. This program begins in the senior year, 
enables the student to elect some work in graduate courses at the Master's 
level, and brings the student into a tutorial relationship with the faculty. The 
Honors Program is designed to encourage very able students to work inde- 
pendently to fulfil their own potential and exploit their own interests. 

A seminary is a small enough school that a great deal of independent study 
can go on. Not only in Advanced Standings and in the Honors Program do 
students work independently; in a number of other ways is the ideal of 
independent study fulfilled. For example, each student must elect one offer- 
ing in the field of church history. Some students prefer to do this in inde- 
pendent study as they work out a major project in Patristics, Augustine, 
Luther, Schleiermacher, etc. Intersession in the senior year is devoted to 
independent study. Exegetical studies may be elected on an individual basis. 
The point is that a student can go about as far and as fast as he can with the 
enthusiastic approval of the faculty. This is the way the faculty itself likes to 
work; this is the way it would like to see the student body working. 

Requirements? Yes, we have them. They are the minimal expectation in 
the preparation of a minister. We want our students to get through with the 
requirements as early as possible— college, why not?— and to get on with the 
business of theological education at the truly graduate level. 

51 



The Prescribed Course of Study 
Degree of Bachelor of Divinity 
Junior Year 



Semester I 

110 Old Testament Introduction 5 

210 Greek 3 
410 Church History and History 

of Doctrine I 5 
710 The Church in American Culture; 

Historical Perspective 2 



Semester II 



211 Greek 

213 New Testament Introduction 

411 Church History and History 

of Doctrine II 
711 The Church in American Culture; 

Sociological Perspective 



15 



15 



January Intersession 
115 Intertestamental Period 



Middler Year 



120 Hebrew 

520 Systematic Theology I 
720 Psychological Foundations and 
Introduction to Homiletics 
Elective 



121 Hebrew 

521 Systematic Theology II 
721 Liturgies and Homiletical and 
Counseling Practica 
Elective 



15 



15 



Senior Year 



January Intersession 

72 3 Pastoral Care and 
Counseling 



730 Ethics 

732 Christian Education 
734 Homiletics Practicum 
Electives 



Electives 



12 



14 

January Intersession 
Elective 



66 academic hours of required work 

24 academic hours of electives 

90 total academic hours required for graduation 

52 



The Four-Year Bachelor of Divinity Curriculum 



(for students whose economic needs require them to serve as student pastors) 



Semester I 

110 Old Testament Introduction 5 

410 Church History and History 

of Doctrine I 5 



Semester II 

213 New Testament Introduction 5 

411 Church History and History 

of Doctrine II 5 



10 

January Intersession 
115 Intertestamental Period 



210 Greek 

520 Systematic Theology I 
710 The Church in American Culture: 
Historical Perspective 



3 211 Greek 3 

5 521 Systematic Theology II 5 

711 The Church in American Culture; 

2 Sociological Perspective 2 



III 



10 



120 Hebrew 

720 Psychological Foundations and 
Introduction to Homiletics 
Electives 



121 Hebrew 

721 Liturgies and Homiletical and 
Counseling Practica 
Electives 



13 



January Intersession 
nd 



723 Pastoral Care 
Counseling 



IV 



730 Ethics 

732 Christian Education 
734 Homiletics Practicum 
Elective 



Electives 



11 

January Intersession 
Elective 



53 



The Master of Religious Education Curriculum 



The Master of Religious Education program, open to both men and women, 
is designed primarily to prepare them to serve the Church of Jesus Christ as 
directors or ministers of Christian education in local congregations, as curric- 
ulum writers and fraternal workers, as well as to provide them background 
for related professional and service vocations such as public school education, 
social work, nursing, and the nursery school. 

The Master of Religious Education curriculum is a two year program includ- 
ing both theory and practice among the disciplines of Bible, history, theology, 
and the teaching ministry. The requirement of Hebrew or Greek demonstrates 
the faculty's seriousness about this degree as it seeks to prepare students for 
the teaching office. That that office has fallen into disrepute and has come 
to be associated largely with methods is manifest. The recovery of the office 
will come through Biblical and theological competence coupled with the art 
and skills of communication. To know the Bible the student must enter into 
the world of the Bible and gain a "feel" for its idiom of thought, expression, 
practice. Language study is a primary tool for this incursion. Twenty hours in 
church history, history of doctrine, and theology will also contribute to the 
needed competence. By taking the basic courses of theological education an 
M.R.E. candidate is prepared to work side by side with pastors, sharing a 
common understanding of the total ministry of which education is a part, 
and performing that ministry with professional competence. 

Within this program the teaching office is lifted up and emphasized for 
the M.R.E. candidate. The B.D. Church and Ministry courses are especially 
adapted so that the student whose vocational interest is Christian education 
can explore the philosophy and theology of, as well as develop method- 
ological and administrative skills in, that special ministry. Throughout the 
two year course the student will be involved in Christian education theory 
and practice. Field education practicum is required each semester and is 
closely geared with class work. 

54 



The Prescribed Course of Study 
Degree of Master of Religious Education 



Junior Year 



Semester I 



110 Old Testament Introduction 
120 Hebrew, or 210 Greek 
410 Church History and History 

of Doctrine I 
720 Psychological Foundations 



Semester II 

121 Hebrew, or 211 Greek 

213 New Testament Introduction 

411 Church History and History 

of Doctrine II 
711 Sociological Foundations 



15 



15 



January Intersession 
115 Intertestamental Period 2 



Senior Year 



520 Systematic Theology I 

730 Ethics 

732 Christian Education 
Greek or Hebrew 
Exegesis Elective 



5 521 Systematic Theology II 

4 Counseling Practicum 

3 721 Liturgies 

Electives 



14 



January Intersession 

72 3 Pastoral Care and 
Counseling 



54 academic hours of required work 
9 academic hours of electives 



63 total academic hours required for graduation 

55 



Description of Courses of Instruction: 
B.D., M.R.E., M.Ed. 
The Biblical Division 

Mr. Barth, Chairman 

Mr. Gowan Mr. J. Jackson Mr. Miller 

Mr. Hadidian Mr. Jamieson Mr. Orr 

Mr. Hare Mr. Kelley Mr. von Waldow 

Mr. Hills Mr. Lapp Mr. Walther 

Some course offerings which might be listed under the Biblical Division are correlated 
with Church and Ministry and are listed under that division. Moreover, most exegesis 
courses listed below are correlated with Church and Ministry (especially homiletics). 

Required Courses 

110. Old Testament Introduction. A survey of the books of the Old 
Testament with special attention to the formation of the literature and its 
religious significance. The history of Israel is traced from earliest times and 
set in the framework of Near Eastern civilization as recovered through 
archaeological research. The message and times of the prophets are surveyed, 
as well as the life and worship of the post-exilic community. The principal 
objective is mastery of the Biblical material. There are also assigned readings 
in current scholarly literature. 
Juniors, first semester, 5 hours credit. Mr. J. Jackson 

115. The Intertestamental Period. A survey of the historical, literary, and 
religious background of the New Testament, concentrating on Palestinian 
Judaism from which Christianity was born, with some attention to the 
Hellenistic world in which it developed. 
Juniors, Intersession, 2 hours credit. Mr. Gowan 

120. Elementary Hebrew. A course designed to lead to an appreciative 
and competent use of Hebrew as one of the languages of Biblical revelation. 
From the outset the student learns inductively to read from the original 
language of the Old Testament. Emphasis is placed on the acquisition of a 
working vocabulary as the ground for further reading, and the illumination 
of key Biblical concepts. Instruction is in small, graded sections so that a 
maximum of individual attention and achievement is possible. 

Middlers, first semester, 3 hours credit. 

121. Elementary Hebrew. Continuation of 120 with instruction in graded 
sections. 

Middlers, second semester, 3 hours credit. 

210. New Testament Greek. A course designed to lead to a competent 
use of Greek as one of the languages of Biblical revelation. From the out- 
set the student learns inductively to read from the Greek New Testament, 
and unique study aids prepared by the Division are used. Instruction is in 

56 



small, graded sections. Students who have previously studied Greek will be 
assigned to special sections for their New Testament linguistic work. 
Juniors, first semester, 3 hours credit. 

211. New Testament Greek. Continuation of 210 with instruction in grad- 
ed sections. As much of the New Testament will be read as progress permits. 
Some attention will be given to textual criticism, and exegetical method and 
practice will be introduced. 
Juniors, second semester, 3 hours credit. 

213. New Testament Introduction. The purpose of this course is to con- 
vey a basic knowledge and enjoyment of, and respect for, each New Testa- 
ment book by preparation of careful exegesis of individual texts. Beginning 
from the background afforded by courses 110 and 115, the course faces 
the character and message, the diversity and unity of the New Testament 
books, as well as the open questions concerning authors, dates, places, and 
recipients. Some aspects of the manifold interpretations of the New Testa- 
ment are outlined together with its influence upon later church life and 
modern scholarly endeavor. 
Juniors, second semester, 5 hours credit. Mr. Barth 



Electives 

140. Hebrew Reading. Supervised reading of selected Old Testament pas- 
sages. 
Offered each semester, 1 hour credit. 

142. Hebrew Grammar. Introduction to the formal structure of the He- 
brew language, (phonetics, morphology, syntax) with special attention to 
its historical development and relation to other Semitic languages. 
Offered on request. Mr. Hills 

144. Hebrew Exegetical. A student with a B average in the Biblical field 
may elect to do independent study in the exegesis of an Old Testament 
passage under the supervision of a member of the Biblical Division. The 
exegetical paper, 30-40 pages in length, will be due on the first day of classes 
in September. 
Offered during the summer, two hours credit. 

146. Ugaritic. Northwest Semitic language and literature: I. Introduction 
to Ugaritic. Elements of syntax and grammer; translations of the Legend of 
King KRT, selections from the Ba'al cycle. 
Graduate and Honors Students. Mr. J. Jackson 

148. The Dead Sea Scrolls. Survey of the scrolls from the Dead Sea area, 
particularly Qumran. Archaeological background, analysis of contents, signif- 
icance for the text, history, and theology of the Old and New Testaments. 
Selected passages will be read in the original languages. 
Offered on request. Mr. Hills 

51 



152. Biblical Aramaic. Reading and the grammar of the Aramaic sections 
of the Old Testament. Additional material may be included from the fifth 
century B.C. Aramaic letters from Elephantine. 
Offered on request. Mr. Hills 

155. Sep tuagint Studies. Introduction to the Greek Old Testament, and 
problems of the Greek and Hebrew texts. Reading and comparative study of 
passages in Hebrew and Greek. 

Offered on request. Mr. Orr or Mr. Walther 

156. Hellenistic Greek Studies. Selected readings in Philo, Josephus, the 
Apostolic Fathers, and other Greek literature approximately contemporary 
with the New Testament period. First year students whose ability and expe- 
rience warrant may be assigned to this course in place of 210 or 21 1. 

Offered on request. Mr. Orr 

170. Old Testament Theology. Introduction to current methods of inter- 
pretation of the theology of the Old Testament, as exemplified by Eichrodt 
and von Rad. Students will investigate major motifs on biblical thought, such 
as myth and history, chaos and creation, first and last, time and eternity, 
election and covenant, king and priest, prophet and wise man, man and 
woman, father and son, master and servant. Mr. J. Jackson 

Courses 1 73, 1 74, and 1 75 will satisfy the three hours of Old Testament 
exegesis elective required of each student. 

173. The Old Testament: Pentateuch. Exegesis of passages from the He- 
brew text of the first five books of the Old Testament. 

Israel's cult and worship, offered first semester, 1968-69. Mr. von Waldow 
Exodus offered first semester, 1968-69. Mr. Lapp 

Deuteronomy offered second semester, 1968-69. Mr. von Waldow 

1 74. The Old Testament: Prophetic Books. Exegesis of passages from the 
Hebrew text of the "Former" and the "Latter" Prophets. 

Amos offered first semester, 1968-69. 

Ezekiel offered first semester, 1968-69. Mr. J. Jackson 

175. The Old Testament: Writings. Exegesis of passages from the Hebrew 
text of the "Writings" of the Old Testament canon. 

Selected Psalms offered first semester, 1968-69. Mr. von Waldow 

Selections from the Wisdom Literature offered second semester, 1968-69. 

Mr. Gowan 

180. Archaeology of Palestine. A study of archaeological method and the 
results of excavations of Near Eastern sites as they relate to the Old and New 
Testaments. Mr. Jamieson 

240. Greek Reading. Supervised reading of selected New Testament or 
Septuagint passages. 
Offered each semester, 1 hour credit. 

58 



242. Greek Grammar. Introduction to the formal structure of New Testa- 
ment Greek; systematic study of grammar and syntax, illustrated by specific 
New Testament passages. Mr. Kelley 

244. Greek Ex egetical. A student with a B average in the Biblical field 
may elect to do independent study in the exegesis of a New Testament 
passage under the supervision of a member of the Biblical Division. The 
exegetical paper, 30-40 pages in length, will be due on the first day of classes 
in September. 
Offered during the summer, two hours credit. 

Courses numbering in the 250's will satisfy the three hours of New Testa- 
ment exegesis elective required of each student. 

250. The Gospels: 

Matthew: An examination of the presuppositions and problems of 

exegesis with particular reference to the discourses of the Gospel according 

to St. Matthew. Mr. Hare 

Mark: An exegetical study. Mr. Barth 

Luke: An inductive study of the purpose, structure, meaning, and 

contemporary significance of the third Gospel. Mr. Miller 

251. Galatians. A verse-by-verse study of the Greek text, together with 
study of its key words and themes, and of the literary elements and historical 
place of Paul. Finally, the main types of interpretation throughout the 
centuries are reviewed. In short, this is an attempt at a theological exegesis of 
the book. Mr. Barth 

252. First Peter. An exegetical seminar, including syntactical studies of 
I Peter 1:3-2:10, and word studies of the major theological words in the 
epistle. Stress on exegetical methodology. Requirement: weekly syntactical 
preparation and one major seminar paper. (Limited to 12 students.) Mr. Miller 

253. Christ, The Church, and The World in Ephesians and Colossians. 
An exegetical study. Mr. Barth 

254. Exegetical Seminar. A workshop course to study exegetical method 
and to develop habits of use by practice. New Testament passages represent- 
ing a variety of exegetical problems will be examined. Both oral and written 
work will be required. Mr. Walther 

255. Philippians. An exegetical study with special emphasis on 2:5-11. 

Mr. Jamieson 

256. Corinthian Letters. An exegetical study of selected chapters from I 
and II Corinthians. Mr. Jamieson 

260. New Testament Christology. The beliefs about Jesus as Messiah, Son 
of Man, Son of God, and his work as revealer of the Father, inaugurator of 
the Kingdom, and Savior of the human race. Mr. Barth 

59 



261. The Life of Jesus Christ. An examination of the Biblical materials 
supplemented by reference to the extra-Biblical sources and readings in the 
literature. The. latter will include a survey of the critical study of the "Quest" 
in the last century and the "New Quest" from kerygma to history at the 
present time. Consideration will be given to the possibilities of writing a "life" 
today. Mr. Walther 

262. Eschatology in the New Testament. The New Testament materials 
will be studied in exegetical detail with supplementary reading in the twentieth 
century literature on the subject. Mr. Walther 

264. Biblical Theology. An introduction to current methods of interpreta- 
tion and to the terminology of Biblical Theology. Examination of major 
motifs of biblical thought with attention to the continuity and discontinuity 
of biblical themes in the Old and New Testaments. 

Mr. J. Jackson and Mr. Walther 

265. New Testament Theology. A course designed to acquaint students 
with the principal themes, the strands of thought, and the theological termi- 
nology of the New Testament. Attention will be given to the continuity of 
Biblical religion in Old and New Testaments. Lectures and discussion with 
reading and research in the literature. Mr. Hare and Mr. Walther 

266. Problems Pertaining to Christian Origins. A research seminar with 
primary emphasis on the bibliographical approach to the study of Christian 
Origins which raises many questions and problems— geographical, historical, 
library and related problems. Requirement for the seminar is one major paper 
and weekly progress reports. Mr. Hadidian 

270. Practical Use of the Synoptic Gospels. An exegetical examination of 
selected portions of the first three Gospels with special reference to their 
meaning for preaching, teaching, worship, evangelism, and counseling. 

Offered second semester. Mr. Orr 

271. Practical Use of the Fourth Gospel and Revelation. (See Course 270.) 
Offered first semester. Mr. Orr 

272. Practical Use of the Pauline Epistle: Romans. (See Course 270.) 
Offered second semester. Mr. Orr 

273. Practical Use of the Pauline Epistles. Similar to 272, with special 
attention to the Corinthian correspondence. 

Offered first semester. Mr. Orr 



60 



The History and Theology Division 



Mr. Ritschl, Chairman 
Mr. Battles Mr. Gerstner Mr. Paul 

Mr. Farley Mr. Kehm Mr. Wiest 

Required and elective course offerings in the theology of church and ministry, theology 
of the sacraments, ethics, and American church history, customarily listed under the 
History and Theology Division, are correlated with Church and Ministry courses and are 
listed under that division. 



Required Courses 

41 0. Church History and History of Doctrine I. A composite course in church 
history and history of doctrine from the Apostolic Age to the twelfth century; 
an introduction to the context and development of theological discussion 
during the period between Ignatius and John of Damascus (in the East) and 
Anselm (in the west). The mission and expansion of the church, offices and 
government, art and literature are covered. 

Juniors, first semester, 5 hours credit. History Staff 

41 1. Church History and History of Doctrine II. A composite course in church 
history and the history of doctrine from the thirteenth century to the present, 
exclusive of America. History of doctrine from the Scholastics through the 
Reformers to the 20th century is examined. 

Juniors, second semester, 5 hours credit. History Staff 

In order to meet the preparatory requirement in historical studies for 
Systematic Theology a Divisional Examination will be set at the end of 
Semester II on the course material covered in 410 and 41 1. The grade will be 
based 50% on course work; 50% on the Divisional Examination. 

While the Divisional Examination will expect a reasonable coverage of the 
whole material, opportunity will be given for the student to show the areas in 
which he has given independent thought and study. 



520. Systematic Theology I. Three areas of Christian doctrine are studied. 
A. The presuppositions and procedures of theology; revelation, scripture, 
faith and reason, philosophy and theology. The stress is placed on what is 
involved in theological thinking and inquiry. B. The being and attributes of 
God, including such "works" as election and creation. C. Man as sinner. The 
reading of major theological systems provides occasions for the student to do 
his own theological thinking and inquiry. 

Middlers, first semester, 5 hours credit. Theology Staff 

521. Systematic Theology II. The person and work of Jesus Christ, justifica- 
tion, sanctification, the Church and its mission, the sacraments, the ministry, 
and eschatology. 

Middlers, second semester, 5 hours credit. Theology Staff 

61 



Electives 

434. Studies in Medieval Thought. Monasticism, Mysticism, Medieval Dis- 
sent, The Church; also the life and thought of a particular medieval church- 
man. Mr. Battles 

435. Seminar in Luther. This course is concerned with the writings of 
Luther in the period before 1525, with particular emphasis on "The Freedom 
of a Christian Man." Short papers will be required. Prerequisite: Course 411 
and 3 hours of Systematic Theology. Registration dependent upon interview 
with the professor. Mr. Ritschl 

436. Studies in John Calvin. An introductory course centering in the 1536 
Institutes and the other writings of the pre-Genevan and early Genevan 
Periods. Mr. Battles 

438. The History of Biblical Interpretation (Early Church). This lecture 
course deals with the history of Biblical interpretation from the time of the 
beginning of the second century to Augustine in the West and John of 
Damascus in the East. 

Prerequisites: History of the Early Church, one course in Old Testament 
and in New Testament Exegesis. Mr. Ritschl 

439. Biblical Interpretation from 1860 to 1960. This lecture course deals 
with the development of Old Testament and New Testament exegesis after 
Schleiermacher, with discussion of the positions of De Wette, F. S. Bauer 
and the subsequent historical-critical school, the history of religion school, 
and finally the hermeneutical positions up to Ernst Fuchs. 

Prerequisite: two exegesis courses, Reformation history. Mr. Ritschl 

440. The Problem of Unity in History and Theology. 

A. Prior to the Reformation Mr. Battles 

B. Since the Reformation Mr. Paul 

441. Christian Classics: Serapion to Thomas a Kempis. Mr. Battles 

442. Christian Classics from the Time of the Reformation. Mr. Paul 

443. Roman Catholicism since Trent. The historical and especially the 
theological development of the Roman Church to 1900 with particular 
concentration on the decrees and canons of Trent. Mr. Gerstner 

444. The Documents of Vatican II in Historical Perspective. Emphasis will 
be placed on the shifts seen in the various drafts and their bearing on the 
ecumenical enterprise. Mr. Battles 

445. The Age of Orthodoxy. The Reformation after the Reformers. A 
study of seventeenth century continental Reformed Orthodoxy especially in 
Turretin's Theological Institutes with reference to German Lutheranism and 
English Puritanism. A knowledge of Latin not required. Mr. Gerstner 

62 



446. The Rise of Puritansim: (A) England. (B) America. Mr. Paul 

455. Methodist History and Doctrine. Required of Methodist students for 
graduation ; elective for other students. 
Offered on alternate years, 3 hours credit. Mr. Chamberlin 

460. History of Apologetics. The nature of the defense of Christian faith 
explored through an examination of a number of apologetic systems of the 
past and present. Mr. Bald 

462. American Theology through the 19th Century. Examination by pri- 
mary sources of Edwards' theology and the subsequent developments with 
special reference to Hopkins, Taylor, Bushnell, and the Princeton School. 
Offered second semester. Mr. Gerstner 

470. Advanced Reading and Research in Church History. Guided reading 
and research in sources of church history. Subjects for study will be deter- 
mined in conference with the instructor. Permission from the instructor is 
necessary for registration. Mr. Paul or Mr. Battles 

530. Theological Method. The investigation of one or several problems 
related to the doing of theology: theology and philosophy, the authority of 
Scripture, the status and use of tradition, the nature of theological statements, 
the problem of system, theology as analytic-synthetic, theoretical-practical. 

Mr. Farley or Mr. Wiest 

531. Major Theological Loci. The investigation of one or more doctrines, 
such as God, election, sin and fall, Jesus Christ, redemption, Holy Spirit, 
church, eschaton. 

Offered annually. Mr. Farley, Mr. Kehm, Mr. Wiest or Mr. Ritschl 

532. Controversial Theological Issues. The investigation of one theological 
problem through the study of the major "orthodox," "heretical," "hetero- 
dox," or sectarian formulations of that problem. The study of such controver- 
sial issues as the freedom of the will, the trinity, predestination, the status of 
natural theology, the two natures, demythologizing, issues of Faith and Order 
in the ecumenical movement. Mr. Farley and Mr. Kehm 

533. Major Christian Theologians. Intensive study of the works of one of 
the great theologians of the Church, such as Origen, Augustine, Aquinas, 
Luther, Calvin, Schleiermacher, Barth, and Tillich. 

Offered annually. Mr. Wiest, Mr. Ritschl, Mr. Farley, Mr. Kehm, Mr. Bald 

534. Twentieth Century Protestant Theology. A study of the development 
of one or more of the most influential theological movements in Protestantism 
in the twentieth century, such as fundamentalism and neoevangelicalism, 
liberalism, neo-Reformation theology, and the Bultmann school. 

Offered annually. Mr. Wiest and Mr. Kehm 

540. Contemporary Issues in Philosophical Theology I. An examination of 

63 



the "philosophy of analysis" and the questions it raises for Christian belief 
and thought. Mr. Wiest . 

541. Contemporary Issues in Philosophical Theology II. An examination of 
existentialism and phenomenology and their bearing upon the content and 
method of Christian theology. Mr. Wiest 

542. Theology and Science. The role of science in shaping the modern 
mind. Recent changes in our understanding of the nature of scientific know- 
ledge. A survey of theological responses to modern science and of the possibil- 
ities for a "theology of nature" in contemporary protestant thought. 

Mr. Wiest 

544. German Theology in the 19th Century. Study of the line of develop- 
ment in German Theology from Schleiermacher through Albrecht Ritschl and 
Wilhelm Herrmann, with special attention to the contributions of this "line" 
to the formation of the varieties of continental "neo-orthodoxy." 

Offered every other year. Mr. Kehm 

545. Christology and Anthropology. A study of the ways in which reflec- 
tion upon the humanity of Jesus Christ is related to their understanding of 
the nature of man in the theologies of Barth, Brunner, Bonhoeffer, and Tillich. 
Prerequisites, Courses 520 and 521. Mr. Kehm 

547. Studies in the History of Philosophical Theology. A study of selected 
philosophical works and systems of thought which have played a part in the 
history of theology and which continue to have significance for theological 
thinking. In a given semester the course will be devoted to the thinking of one 
or more philosophers such as Plato, Aristole, Kant, Leibniz, Hegel, Whitehead, 
and Heidegger. Mr. Wiest or Mr. Farley 

552. Advanced Reading in Philosophy of Religion. Guided reading and re- 
search. The subjects and areas pursued are determined by the needs and 
interests of the students. Permission from the instructor is necessary for 
registration. Mr. Wiest 

560. Theological Readings in Latin. A) The principal text is H. P. V. Nunn, 
An Introduction to Ecclesiastical Latin, 1951, together with the annotated 
Liturgical texts in M. Flad, Le Latin de TEglise, 1938. Readings in K. P. 
Harrington, Mediaeval Latin, 1962; The Penguin Book of Latin Verse, ed. 
by Frederick Brittain, 1962; Turretin, Institutio Theologiae Elencticae. B) 
Ecclesiastical Latin. 

Offered on request. Mr. Battles 

561. Theological Readings in German. Karl Barth's Die Christliche Lehre 
nach dem Heidelberger Katechismus and/or similar theological works. 

Offered annually. Mr. Gerstner or Mr. Kehm 

562. Theological Readings in French. Contemporary theological and his- 
torical literature: Etienne Gilson, Jacques Maritain, and others. 

Offered annually. 

64 



Dr. Dietrich Ritschl 










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The Church and Ministry Division 



Mr. Wilson, Chairman 

Mr. Bald Mr. Clyde Mr. Nicholson 

Miss Burrows Mr. Fribley Mr. Ralston 

Mr. Buttrick Mr. Hinds Mr. Rogers 

Mr. Chamberlin Mr. G. Jackson Mr. Scott 



Required Courses 

71 0. The Church in American Culture; Historical Perspective. The purpose 
of this course is to clarify to the student, through a study of American church 
and cultural history, his prospective situation as a minister (or other church 
professional) in the American environment. Church and culture are studied 
with emphasis on the history of the Calvinist groups, and the Church is viewed 
in specific relationship to urban and industrial life, racial and economic prob- 
lems, and growth and movement of population. Field trips are arranged. 

Juniors, first semester, 2 hours credit. Mr. Paul 

711. The Church in American Culture; Sociological Perspective. The pur- 
pose of this course is to acquaint the student with the social milieu of the 
Christian ministry through sociological study of the American environment. 
The problem of thinking ethically in a Christian context is discussed with 
particular emphasis on church-state relationship, Pittsburgh is utilized as an 
object of investigation and laboratory for student research. 

Juniors, second semester, 2 hours credit. 

712. Christian Education of Children. (For M.Ed, students an additional 
hour of practicum will be required.) 

M.R.E. and M.Ed., first semester, 2 hours credit. Mr. Rogers 

713. Christian Education Seminar. Designed to give the student the oppor- 
tunity to accumulate and evaluate resources in major areas of concern in the 
teaching ministry of the local church: administration, curriculum, and age 
group aspects of programming. The framework is that of the local church 
director of Christian education. Observation is an integral part of the course. 
(For M.Ed, students an additional hour of practicum will be required.) 

M.R.E. and M.Ed., second semester, 2 hours credit. Miss Burrows 

720. Psychological Foundations and Introduction to Homiletics. The Church 
and Ministry sequence continues in this course which seeks to lay down 
psychological, communicative, and homiletical foundations, always related 
to theological material, for the bearing of the Church's witness. Field educa- 
tion includes several different experiences which are analyzed in the light of 
course material. 
Middlers, first semester, 4 hours credit. 

Mr. Buttrick, Mr. Wilson, Mr. Hinds, and Mr. G. Jackson 

67 



721. Liturgies and Homiletical and Counseling Practica. The course pre- 
pares students in preaching and in the ordering of worship. Theological norms 
are developed and discussed in relation to historic practice, psychological 
insight, and the task of the Church's ministry. Lectures on the history and 
theology of preaching will be followed by an investigation of hermeneutic 
principles, workshop sessions in sermon preparation, and practice preaching 
with homiletic and speech criticism. Small sectioned classes and tutorial 
instruction will be scheduled. The study of Christian worship includes the 
doctrine of the sacraments, the history of worship, the preparation and 
conduct of special services, and the role of music in congregational worship. 
Counseling seminars center on case presentations. 
Middlers, second semester, 4 hours credit. Divisional faculty 

723. Pastoral Care and Counseling. A course designed to equip the student 
for a ministry to particular human problems (grief, marital conflict, guilt, 
emotional crisis, etc.) with theological insight and psychological sensitivity. 
A supervised practicum continues throughout the second semester. 
Middlers, Intersession, 2 hours credit. Mr. G. Jackson 

730. Ethics. With the foundation of previous studies of the Church, its 
ministry and mission, and its relations to society, an examination is now made 
of the responsibilities of Christians in the secular world. Students are required 
to read the important literature in Christian ethics, to inquire into the Biblical 
and theological framework within which ethical decisions may be made, and 
to make an ethical analysis of a problem in a particular field such as economics 
or politics. 
Seniors, first semester, 4 hours credit. Mr. Wiest 

732. Christian Education. The major emphasis in this unit of the Church 
and Ministry sequence will be upon the teaching ministry of the church. 
Assuming all seminary studies are background, this course will review the 
history of present educational patterns of the churches; will examine con- 
temporary philosophies of church education with particular attention to the 
relation of theology and education; will study various approaches to teaching 
doctrine, the Bible, and church history; and will develop skills in program 
planning, teaching, and administration in the framework of a broad under- 
standing of administration in contemporary Protestant churches. 
Seniors, first semester, 3 hours credit. Mr. Chamberlin 

734. Homiletics Practicum. 
Seniors, first semester, 1 hour credit. Homiletics Faculty 



68 



Electives 



Polity 

800. Life and Work of the United Presbyterian Church. Understanding of 
the life and work of the United Presbyterian Church, factual, critical, and 
creative, is sought by study of pertinent historical developments, present 
organization and administration at all levels and especially at the parish level, 
and developing understanding and action relative to the national and world 
mission of the Church. Mr. Clyde 

801. Polity and Program of the United Presbyterian Church. An introduc- 
tion to the polity and program of the United Presbyterian Church, designed 
in part to help students to prepare for denominational examinations in that 
field. Mr. Clyde 

802. Methodist Polity. Required of Methodist students for graduation. 

Mr. Chamberlin 



Preaching 



810. The Great Ages of Preaching. A study will be made of the doctrinal 
and ethical content, literary style, homiletical method, historical and spiritual 
background of preaching from the days of the Apostles to the beginning of 
the 19th century. Mr. Scott 

811. Preaching in the Pastorate. A study of preaching in the specific con- 
text of the congregational ministry: the relation of pastoral preaching to 
liturgy, education, counseling and "prophetic proclamation"; the planning of 
preaching according to the Christian Year. 

Seniors only. Mr. Scott, Mr. Wilson 

812. The Theological Understanding of Preaching. A study of the theology 
of preaching from the Reformation to the present with special emphasis on 
contemporary positions held by representative proponents. The student will 
be introduced to the twentieth century context in which preaching takes 
place and its influence on the theology of preaching. Mr. Scott 

813. Preaching from the Parables. The course is two-fold: a study of the 
history of the interpretation of Parables, and the actual writing and classroom 
delivery of sermons from the Parables. Mr. Nicholson 

814. Homiletical Study of the Acts. The course is three-fold: a review of 
the historical-critical approach to Acts, the discovery of homiletical material, 
and the actual writing and classroom delivery of sermons. Mr. Nicholson 

69 



815. Preaching from the Catholic Epistles. A study, in terms of exegesis 
and theological context, of preaching from the Catholic Epistles, especially 
from Johannine and Petrine material. Consideration will be given to their 
historical as well as contemporary use. Sermons will be prepared and discussed. 
(Limited to 10 students.) Mr. Wilson 

816. Preaching from the Synoptic Gospels. A study, on the basis of Mark's 
Gospel, of homiletical treatment of the records of the birth, baptism, teaching, 
temptation, transfiguration, passion, resurrection and ascension of Christ; the 
calling and training of the Twelve; with the exegetical use of parallel and 
relevant passages in the other Gospels. Mr. Nicholson, Mr. Wilson 

81 7. Preaching the Old Testament to our Contemporaries. An examination 
of Old Testament themes in relation to the Gospel and to selected contem- 
porary intellectual and socio-cultural situations, leading to study of the 
hermeneutical and homiletical treatment of selected Old Testament books 
and passages. There will be sermon preparation, delivery, and class discussion. 

Mr. Wilson 

818. Preaching on the Psalms. Mr. Fribley 

819. The New Look of Roman Catholic Preaching. A study will be made 
of the new concept of preaching within the Roman Catholic Church with 
particular reference to the influence of the Biblical and Liturgical movements 
and their influence on the homily as an integral part of the Mass. 

Offered second semester. Mr. Scott 



Christian Education 

825. Creative Teaching. A course designed to give the student the opportu- 
nity to explore creative ways of teaching the Christian faith to children, youth, 
and adults within the program of the church. Observation, laboratory, expe- 
rience, demonstration, and guest lectures will be used throughout the course. 

Offered second semester. Miss Burrows 

826. Christian Education in the Local Church. Designed to give the student 
the opportunity to accumulate and evaluate resources in the administration 
of the local church program of Christian education, including all age groups. 
Special attention is given to the possibilities of organization and program for 
the Christian education of children and youth. 

Offered second semester. Miss Burrows 

831. Christian Education in Cultural Context. Church education theory 
has recognized the significance of theology and psychology, but insufficient 
attention has been given to the influence of the cultural factors in both the 
theory and practice of education in the churches. The relation of education 
and culture will be examined in the light of the major contributions of sociol- 
ogy and anthropology, and the implications of the findings for church educa- 
tion will be traced. Mr. Chamberlin 

70 



832. The Churches and Public Education. Significant new challenges con- 
front the churches in the growing inclusion of "religion" courses at all levels 
of public education. The historical relation between churches and public 
schools, the legal issues involved, the experience of religion in higher educa- 
tion, and present religion programs of State educational agencies— all these 
will be examined in preparation for understanding and designing what 
churches may do in this new situation. Mr. Chamberlin 

833. Appropriating the Christian Faith. An examination of various views 
about the relation of the Holy Spirit to human activity in the processes of 
appropriation of faith, and the problems this poses for the educator. Con- 
temporary learning theories will be studied in terms of their implications for 
a theological understanding of appropriation. Mr. Chamberlin 

834. The Minister of Christian Education. Patterns of local church staff 
responsibility for education, from the "Doctor" designated by Calvin, to the 
present time, will be reviewed. In the light of this history, the class will 
analyse problems of multiple-staff relationships and their implications for 
the complex processes of church education. An attempt will be made for 
each class member to clarify his own philosophy of educational administra- 
tion (whether Minister of Education, Associate Minister, or Director of 
Christian Education) in the light of his total seminary course. 

Mr. Chamberlin 

835. New Patterns of Christian Presence. An exploration of the many new 
forms of ministry being conducted experimentally both in this country and 
abroad; a review of studies by denominational agencies, particularly the World 
Council of Churches study of the missionary structure of the parish; and an 
examination of the implications of these developments for the parish and its 
educational ministry. Registration is limited. Mr. Chamberlin 

Pastoral Care 

840. Theology and Psychiatry. The metaphysical presuppositions, method, 
understanding of therapy, and some aspects of human nature will be compar- 
ed. An attempt will be made to define mutuality and discreteness between 
the two disciplines. An introduction to Freudian, Jungian, and other psychi- 
atric writings will be made. Mr. G. Jackson 

841. Seminar in Counseling. An advanced course utilizing the case work of 
students, drawing principles for both diagnosis and therapy out of the cases 
presented, and making evaluations. The role of the minister as counselor is 
carefully scrutinized. Mr. G. Jackson 

843. The Aging: Personality Formation and Pastoral Care. This seminar 
will look at the question of aging from three significant directions: the 
psychology of religion in specific relevance to the aging; socio-psychological 
patterns in the aging process; and the role of the church in ministering to 
the aging. Mr. Pay lor 

71 



844. Research in Pastoral Care. This course will investigate and develop 
criteria for pastoral counseling with in-patients and after-care patients having 
serious emotional illnesses. Methods of study will include readings, seminars, 
and clinical work at Woodville State Hospital. 
By invitation of the instructor. Mr. Paylor 

850. Changing Patterns in Christian World Mission. In a changing world 
demanding changing patterns of Christian mission, the nature of the changes 
and the reasons for them, their implications for the contemporary under- 
standing of the Gospel, and their possible effect upon the world extension of 
the Gospel in the present and the future, will constitute major themes for 
investigation. Mr. Clyde 

854. Comparative Religion. A study of the origin and development of 
religion, with special investigation of Primitive Religion, Hinduism, Bud- 
dhism, Confuciansim, and Islam, with regard to their bearing on Modern 
Missions. 

Offered on request. Mr. Clyde 

855. Major Sects. Jehovah's Witnesses, Mormonism, Christian Science and 
other groups compared with traditional Christianity. Resemblances and dif- 
ferences noted. Mr. Gerstner 

857. Christian Responsibility and the World Social Revolution. The course 
will explore the nature and technique of Christian world responsibility in 
view of the nature of the Gospel and the action of the Church as both con- 
front today's global revolution, with special attention given to the Christian 
approach to the non-Christian religions and to Communism. Mr. Clyde 

858. Contemporary Movements in Ecumenics. Through study of current 
ecumenical relations among churches resultant from such developments as 
Vatican II, the Consultation on Church Union, the Wheaton Conference of 
non-world Council churches, and selected denominational unions, effort will 
be made to prepare students for knowledgeable action in situations of ecu- 
menical significance. Mr. Clyde 

859. Seminar in Ecumenics. This course is offered at Duquesne University 
under a joint faculty including Duquesne professors, Pittsburgh Seminary 
professors, and others. It is open to qualified Pittsburgh Seminary students. 



Ethics 



870. The Theological Ethics of William Temple and Reinhold Niebuhr. A 
comparative study of the social thought of the late Archbishop of Canterbury 
and one of America's leading voices in the field of ethics in relation to their 
theological foundations. Mr. Bald 

72 



872. Research Seminar in Selected Social Problems. Students will elect 
specific areas of social concern in modern culture for investigation in which 
they will seek to relate them to the demands and insights of the Christian 
ethic. Prerequisite, 730. Mr. Bald 



Cultural Forms 

880. Christian Faith and Contemporary Literature. A study of the relation- 
ship between Christian faith and themes in contemporary literature. Works by 
a number of modern writers including Sartre, Updike, Greene, and Beckett 
will be read and discussed. Three class sessions per week will be scheduled. 

Mr. But trick 

885. Poetry, Poetics, and Christian Language. A study of contemporary 
poetry and poetics in relation to the use of religious metaphor and imagery. 
Long poems by one or two contemporary poets will be analyzed. Reading in 
modern literary criticism will be discussed. Mr. Buttrick 

890. Interpretative Reading. Oral interpretation of a varied selection of 
prose, poetry, and drama as a means of developing keener sensitivity to the 
written word and greater effectiveness in communicating it. The objective will 
be to mature the skills and principles already acquired in speech courses. Small 
sections, private conferences, recordings. 

One hour, first and second semesters, 1968-69. Mr. Hinds 

891. Christian Faith and Communication. A study of the dynamics of 
communication in relating the minister's message and the media of commu- 
nication available to him. Various means of communication other than preach- 
ing will be examined: public speaking, group discussion, mass media. Emphasis 
on understanding and skill in each toward developing a total strategy of 
communication. Mr. Hinds 

900. Music in the Church. A practical approach to the many problems 
arising in connection with church music with particular attention to the 
problems of the small congregation. Organizing the musical resources of the 
congregation, the music as a spiritual force in the church life, and the minister's 
relation to choir and choirmaster. Mr. Ralston 

901. Hymnology. An analytical and historical study of the great hymns 
and tunes of the Christian Church. Consideration of the qualities of a good 
hymn. Practical and effective use of the hymnal. Mr. Ralston 

902. Masterpieces of Religious Music. A study of the various forms of 
music through which men have expressed their faith. Demonstration of the 
power of music to illuminate Christian truth and to "give wings to words." 
This is primarily a "listening course" making use of records but with assigned 
background reading and class comment. The purpose is to give the student 
an appreciation of various forms of musical expression as well as some famil- 
iarity with specific works of musical art. Mr. Ralston 

73 



Elective Credit at the University of Pittsburgh 

Up to two courses may also be taken in the Graduate School of Public and 
International Affairs of the University of Pittsburgh. These elective courses 
would be primarily in urbanization, economics, and international affairs. 
Work may also be taken in several other departments and schools in the 
University. 

Field Education 

The broad objective of Field Education in Pittsburgh Theological Seminary 
is to complement the academic work of each student with experiences through 
which he may expand and deepen his understanding of contemporary culture 
and the life of the Church, both in its parish setting as well as in its specialized 
ministeries. During the Junior year the students are encouraged to participate 
in churches as laymen. Field assignments are coordinated with the courses in 
The Church in American Culture. A congregation is studied in its total context. 
Further investigation is made of Pittsburgh, specifically of its industry, law 
enforcement, political life and social services. Middlers are assigned to selected 
Teaching Churches so that they may learn about and participate in the ministry 
under the supervision of Teaching Pastors. This field experience provides the 
matrix for integrated discussion with studies at the Seminary, e.g., Psycholog- 
ical Foundations, Counseling, Homiletics and Liturgies. After the Middler 
year students may elect to participate in the Intern Program, an approved 
year of experience and study away from the Seminary. Seniors are encouraged 
to undertake specialization and/or experimentation. All field assignments are 
made through the Field Education Office. 

Every student is encouraged to spend one summer in field education, prefer- 
ably in some form of clinical training. Students who choose and qualify for 
clinical training in approved programs will be given two hours of elective 
credit for each six weeks of clinical training to a maximum of four credit 
hours. For students who do not choose or do not qualify for a clinical train- 
ing program a number of options without any elective credit are allowed 
(such as national park chaplaincies, Board of National Missions assignments, 
assistantships, etc.), upon consultation with and approval by the Field Educa- 
tion Office. 

Any student seeking a church-related position for the summer must counsel 
with the Field Education Office so that provision may be made for super- 
vision on the field. Summer pastorates for students who have completed only 
their Junior year are discouraged because such students will not have had the 
courses in Church and Ministry dealing with the preaching, teaching, and 
pastoral office. 



74 



5,44* 



The Master of Theology Degree 



(B.D.-Th.M. sequence and post-B.D.) 



A strong program of graduate education at the Master's level is offered in a 
variety of options: 



1. Students who enroll in the B.D. program may choose a four-year pro- 
gram in which they will receive both a B.D. and a Th.M. degree. Their third 
and fourth years will finish out eight hours of B.D. requirements, from two 
to four courses in the Th.M. program, elective offerings, and comprehensive 
exams or a thesis. The emphasis will be on independent study. 



2. Those already holding a B.D. degree or those graduating from other 
accredited seminaries may apply for admission directly into the Th.M. pro- 
gram in either the Generalization or the Specialization options. 



3. The Generalization option is designed to be largely independent study. 
A candidate needs to take only six hours total course work. The focus is 
on comprehensive examinations in the fields of Bible, history and theology, 
and church and ministry. He is supplied with bibliographical materials and 
sample questions. He is free to audit or take courses for credit as he wishes. 
He will work closely with his adviser to plan his program with the compre- 
hensive s in mind. 



4. The Specialization option may be taken in Biblical Studies, History 
and Theology, or Advanced Pastoral Studies. Four courses are required in 
any one of these areas as is an acceptable thesis. The student must pass an 
oral exam in the thesis area. The curriculum for each of the specializations 
appears on the following pages. 



All candidates must demonstrate a reading knowledge of at least one 
foreign language selected from: Hebrew, Greek, Latin, French, or German. 
Under the Specialization option additional languages may be required and 
those interested should check in the catalog description of those programs. 



The statute of limitations is four academic years from the date of matricula- 
tion for candidates entering the program at the beginning of the B.D. senior 
year, and three academic years from the date of matriculation for all other 
candidates. 

76 



These Master's programs are offered to benefit pastors who may wish to 
improve their ministry as well as to help prepare candidates for specialized 
ministries. The programs are designed for a learned, relevant ministry, what- 
ever form the ministry takes. 



Admission Requirements 

1. An average of C+ (1.5) or better during the junior and middler years for 
the B.D.-Th.M. sequence or C+ (1.5) or better for those holding a B.D. degree 
from an accredited seminary. 

2. The ability to handle English composition with competence. 

3. Final acceptance by the Curriculum Committee for the generalization 
option; and final acceptance by the specialization program faculty upon 
recommendation of the Curriculum Committee. 



Fees and Expenses 

Matriculation Fee, $35.00 for all not in the B.D.-Th.M. sequence. 

Tuition, $650.00 each for the third and fourth years in the B.D.-Th.M. se- 
quence, and $650.00 for the program for those holding a B.D. 

Library Fee, $20.00 per year. 

Graduation Fee, $10.00 



Applicants for this degree should apply to the Director of Admissions. 



77 



Master of Theology Degree Programs 



Biblical Studies 



The Master's degree in the Biblical Division covers both Testaments. While 
the thesis may concentrate on one Testament, the course work is deliberately 
designed to provide a certain degree of qualification in the whole field. 
The required number of courses is four. The program is as follows: 

1 . Course Requirements: Twelve hours of course work as follows: 

a. All candidates will take Selected Problems of Biblical Theology. 
Motifs which are woven through the Biblical literature are examined 
and discussed in detail. Study begins with the Biblical texts, but 
modern literature is also read and used. 

Six hours, three hours in each of two semesters. 

Mr. J. Jackson and Mr. Walther 

b. Candidates in Old Testament will take in addition: 

(1) History, Cultures, and Religions of the Ancient Near East. 

Offered first semester of each year, three hours. 

(2) Hebrew Exegesis. 

Offered second semester each year, three hours. 

c. Candidates in New Testament will take in addition: 

(1) Greek Exegesis. 

Offered first semester each year, three hours. 

(2) History and Literature of New Testament Times. 

Offered second semester each year, three hours. 



Language 

a. Candidates specializing in Old Testament Studies must demonstrate 
special proficiency in Hebrew and a more modest proficiency in Greek. 
Those who have such proficiency in Hebrew when they enter the pro- 
gram will be encouraged to study Aramaic. 

b. Candidates specializing in New Testament Studies must demonstrate 
special proficiency in Greek and a more modest proficiency in Hebrew. 
Those having such proficiency in Greek when they enter the program 
will be encouraged to do additional study in the Septuagint. 

c. The Biblical Studies faculty may require a reading knowledge of an 
additional language if, in its judgment, a candidate's study program or 
thesis preparation demands it. 



78 



History and Theology 

A total of four courses is required in this program, the courses to be selected 
by the student in consultation with his advisor from a list designated by the 
division each academic year. This list will include certain Ph.D. elective 
courses in strict accordance with the principles laid down by the American 
Association of Theological Schools for doctoral programs guaranteeing high 
excellence of graduate standards as well as certain B.D. advanced courses 
open to honor students. Where possible the program for each student is adapt- 
ed to his background, interests, and thesis orientation. To accomplish this 
tailor-made goal, an advisor is assigned to the candidate upon his acceptance 
by the Seminary. 

The History-Theology faculty may designate which language may be 
required and may require a reading knowledge of an additional language if 
the candidate's program of study and/or his thesis preparation demands it. 
Candidates will be advised in this matter upon entering the program. 



Advanced Pastoral Studies 

The Program for Advanced Pastoral Studies is designed to help students to 
know themselves better; to understand and become sensitive to interpersonal 
relationships; to be familiar with group process; to become involved in creative 
dialogue between theological studies and the social sciences; and to see more 
clearly the resources of the Christian church for health at the various levels. 

The faculty teaching in this program is composed of seminary personnel 
and members of several faculties of the University of Pittsburgh, including 
the Medical School, the Graduate School of Social Work, and the Depart- 
ment of Speech. The faculty includes Robert J. Shoemaker, M.D., Margaret 
B. McFarland, Ph.D., Rex A. Pittenger, M.D., Erma T. Meyerson, M.A.A.S.S., 
Jack Matthews, Ph.D., and Victor Freeman, M.D. 

1. Course Requirements: Four academic courses and three practica, as 
follows: 

Semester I Semester II 

Philosophical Issues in Psychotherapy 3 Theology and Psychology 3 

Developmental Theory of Personality 3 Socio-Cultural Environment 3 
Counseling Seminar _2_ Practicum with Children (Arsenal 

Child Study Center) 2 

Counseling Seminar _2_ 

10 

2. Language 

The A.P.S. faculty may designate which of the languages is to be required, or 
may require a reading knowledge of an additional language if the study pro- 
gram or thesis subject makes it necessary. 

3. Clinical Training 

A six weeks' course in an approved clinical training program will be required 
before graduation. It is recommended that it be taken previous to admission. 

79 



M600. Developmental Theory of Personality. The age span is traced from 
pre-natal influences and birth through the aging process, showing normal 
growth patterns, the abnormalities of neurotic and psychotic development, 
and the relation of the person to the social milieu. 

M601. Theology and Psychology. The material of the entire program is 
pulled together in dialogue between theology and the human sciences, espe- 
cially psychology and psychiatry. Such themes as God, man, sin, redemption 
are dealt with. Pastoral care, informed theologically and psychologically, be- 
comes the vantage-point for taking a hard look at church programming: its 
relevance, its resources, etc. A primary concern is to ask what the church can 
do in its supportive and preventive roles as well as in its redemptive and re- 
creative roles. 

M602. Philosophical Issues in Psychotherapy. Freudian thought and exist- 
ential analysis are studied from the biblical and theological perspective with 
regard to such issues as epistemology, ontology, anxiety, freedom, time, value 
theory. Process philosophy is posed as an alternative framework. 

M603. The Socio-cultural Environment. This course deals with the eco- 
logical and cultural factors which make functional and dysfunctional con- 
tributions to personality and community development. It will emphasize the 
role of institutions, (including the family) and power structures in their direct 
and indirect effect upon the individual. 

M604. Counseling Seminar. Each student is required to work with four 
counselees, under supervision, and to participate in the presentation of case 
material. 

M605. Counseling Seminar. Continuation of M604. 

M607. Practicum with Children. This practicum is conducted at the Arsenal 
Child Study Center. Interpretive seminars are held regularly. 



80 




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83 



A Joint Program Leading to BD - MSW Degree 



Theology and social work share many attributes in common. These include 
certain concerns and objectives, social values, and a mission to improve living. 
Historically, much that we call social work today had its beginnings in religion. 



Currently, clergymen are involving themselves and their churches in the 
improvement of the human condition to an extent, perhaps beyond any move- 
ment in this direction in the past. Interest in pastoral counseling and family 
education is high. Ministers of all denominations are involved actively in 
neighborhood and community work and are making notable contributions in 
civil rights and anti-poverty programs. Young clergymen and theological stu- 
dents want to be equipped to serve in the area of social work in addition to 
the more traditional church duties. 



In the past, a student with such a career interest had to enroll in a theological 
seminary and upon graduation then register in a school of social work; or 
some acquired social work degrees first and then succeeded to church work; 
others have been thwarted by the separateness of education for these two 
related fields, and did the best they could. To acquire both a BD and an MSW 
has usually taken five years. 



To encourage and to equip young people to engage in social work both 
in and out of the church, and to provide the opportunity for social work 
students who feel a call to practice within a church setting, the Pittsburgh 
Theological Seminary and the University of Pittsburgh Graduate School of 
Social Work have developed a program together to offer a joint degree, that is, 
aBD-MSW. 



This joint effort enables students to receive both the BD and the MSW in 
four years of post BA study instead of the usual five. The program provides 
alternate curriculum plans which allow students to integrate both courses of 
study throughout four years or to concentrate on theology in the first two 
years and on social work in the third and fourth years. 



A student at the Seminary wishing to pursue the four year integrated pro- 
gram must request it upon entering the Seminary. Should the student choose 
the other alternative curriculum plan he must so elect in his second year. 
Students in the School of Social Work must request the joint program by 
their second term in that school. The admission requirements to each institu- 
tion is the same as for other students. The student entering the joint program 
must be admitted by both institutions. 

84 



Under either plan, however, should a student elect to terminate at the end 
of two or three years and seek only one degree that student will be required 
to complete all of the work ordinarily required for that degree in the school 
which grants it. 



The joint program will provide the students in it with a full course of 
study in both theology and social work. This result is effected by equating 
certain courses now taught in both schools as equivalent, by allowing courses 
in one school to be taken as electives in the other, and where appropriate by 
developing specialized field placements. Field work opportunities will be 
arranged to meet best the interest of the student. 



In order to give breadth without sacrifice of depth, theological students in 
the joint program will have the opportunity to study two social work methods 
and in some instances to have field experiences in all three direct service 
approaches, i.e., social casework, social group work, and community work. 



Student tuition is the same as for other students enrolled in each school. 
Financial assistance for students who are enrolled full-time at the Seminary 
is the responsibility of the Seminary. 



The Pittsburgh Theological Seminary and the University of Pittsburgh 
Graduate School of Social Work are joining forces in order to better educate 
students whose interests lie in carrying out social work functions in and 
through the church and those who seek to introduce more spiritual focus in 
social work in the agency program in this nation and abroad. To this end, a 
joint program leading to a joint degree is being offered. The program will 
prepare students to serve people better. 



85 



A Joint Program with the School of Education 

Degree of Master of Education (M.Ed.) 

The M.Ed, course of study is designed as a one-year course for those who 
have an approved Bachelor's collegiate major in the fields of religion, Bible, 
or religious education, or their equivalent, to provide further depth, under- 
standing, and technical skills for work in local churches. 

This degree is offered jointly by the University of Pittsburgh and Pittsburgh 
Theological Seminary. It will be conferred by the University upon completion 
of a course of study which will include 18 hours taken in three trimesters at 
the University and 18 hours taken concurrently in two semesters at the 
Seminary. 



The University Requirements 

Ed. Psych. 271— Advanced Educational Psychology 2 hours 

Ed. Res. 200— Introduction to Research and Statistics 2 hours 

Fdns. Ed. 201— General Philosophy of Education 2 hours 

Fdns. Ed. 228-History of Modern Education 2 hours 

Department of Religious Education 10 hours 



18 hours 



The Seminary Requirements 

Biblical Studies 6 hours 

History of Doctrine 6 hours 

712 and 713-Christian Education 4 hours 

Field Education Practicum 2 hours 



18 hours 



Admission requirements, in addition to the "major," are those of the 
University and the Seminary. Housing will be provided by the admitting 
institution. 



Applicants for this degree may write to: 
Dr. David E. Engel 
Department of Religious Education 
University of Pittsburgh 
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15213 

or 
Director of Admissions 
Pittsburgh Theological Seminary 
616 N. Highland Avenue 
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15206 



86 



The University of Pittsburgh's Graduate School 

of Public and International Affairs 

and 

Pittsburgh Theological Seminary 



A cooperative educational program which will have special meaning for 
international service (ecumenical mission and relations), administration, and 
urbanization has been worked out with one of the world's outstanding 
graduate schools of public and international affairs. The areas of concentra- 
tion in this program are : 

General Pu blic A dm in is tra tion 
Administration of International Affairs 
Economic and Social Development 
Municipal-Metropolitan Affairs 
Community and Voluntary Organization Affairs 

It is the policy of the Graduate School of Public and International Affairs 
that half its students are from overseas. This provides for rich trans-cultural 
experience. Through this joint program Pittsburgh offers an exciting and 
exceptional opportunity for preparation for ecumenical mission and relations. 

Basic to the program are the M.P.I.A. degree, Master of Public and Inter- 
national Affairs, and the M.P.A. degree, Master of Public Administration. 
Qualified persons from overseas as well as the United States may enroll as 
regular or special students in these degree programs. Such students are subject 
to the exclusive academic control of the University and receive their Masters' 
degrees from the University. However, latitude is injected into these programs 
so that elective course work can be taken at the Seminary, credit to be applied 
to the university degrees. 

The program allows Bachelor of Divinity students to elect up to four hours 
from the offerings of the Graduate School of Public and International Affairs, 
the tuition differential being graciously financed from fellowship funds 
provided by the Heinz and Ford Foundations. This B.D. enrichment will be 
especially valuable to those students preparing to become fraternal workers, 
missionaries, Peace Corps volunteers, United Nation workers, etc. 



Inquiries should be directed to: 

The Graduate School of Public and International Affairs 

University of Pittsburgh 

Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15213 

or 
The Director of Admissions 
Pittsburgh Theological Seminary 
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15206 



87 



The Cooperative Graduate Program 
in the Study of Religion 

The University of Pittsburgh and Pittsburgh Theological Seminary 



The University of Pittsburgh and Pittsburgh Theological Seminary have a 
cooperative graduate program in the study of religion. This program, inter- 
disciplinary in scope, draws upon the resources of both institutions and will 
culminate in the awarding of a Ph.D. degree by the University of Pittsburgh. 

The purpose of this program is to engage and assist qualified students in a 
responsible and original academic research in religious source literature, his- 
tory, and theology ; to train them in the use of appropriate methods of special- 
ized study ; and to help them to prepare for teaching in colleges, universities, 
and seminaries; and to equip them for specialized and other vocational con- 
cerns. 

The program includes four fields: Old Testament, New Testament, Church 
History and History of Doctrine, and Theology. It will be expanded to include 
Ethics and History of Religions. Relevant fields offered by the University 
include Anthropology, Classics, History, Philosophy, Sociology, or others as 
approved by the program's administrative committee. This committee is com- 
posed of four from the seminary and five from the university. 

The program consists of a minimum of four terms of full residence. 

The student will take the equivalent of at least eight one term courses and 
one half term of dissertation research. The minimum eight courses will be 
distributed according to the following schema: 

1. Two special seminar courses, required of all students and taught by 
members of the Seminary and University faculties, one on some aspect 
of religion as a social phenomenon, and one on some aspect of religion 
as a system of thought. 

2. Two courses in a single University field. 

3. Two courses in the candidate's field of specialization, other than those 
satisfying requirement two. 

4. Two electives in either the field of specialization or any cognate field 
or fields. 

The faculty is drawn from the Seminary and from the University. Certain 
members of the Seminary faculty are recommended by the President of the 
Seminary to the University as adjunct professors in the University. Only an 
adjunct professor may direct dissertations. However, any member of the 
seminary faculty is eligible to teach a course in the program providing that 
course is in the area of his speciality and is needed by the program itself. 
Other faculty members may be used in the program from Duquesne Univer- 
sity as well as other schools in the area as they may be needed and are 
qualified. 



88 



A preliminary written examination will normally be taken before the end 
of the second term of residence. This examination, covering general back- 
ground at the B.D. level of competence, will include the following areas: 
Old Testament, New Testament, Church History, Theology, Ethics, and His- 
tory of Religions (or up to two university fields may be substituted with 
the approval of the Administrative Committee). Students who enter the pro- 
gram without a B.D. preparation, or its equivalent, should expect to spend 
more than the usual amount of time preparing for this examination. Further- 
more, all students will have to pass examinations in two modern foreign 
languages, normally French and German, before they are eligible to sit for 
the comprehensive examination. Additional examinations will be required in 
languages necessary as tools of research in fields of study in which primary 
materials are in those languages. 

When all course, language, and preliminary examination requirements have 
been met, the student will be admitted to the comprehensive examination, 
which will consist of both written and oral components. The comprehensive 
examination will measure competence in each of four fields, one of which 
will be the student's area of specialization. At least one field will be from 
each of the cooperating institutions. By "field" in this context is meant a 
university area of study such as Anthropology, or a theological area such as 
Church History offered at relevant intersections of the student's background, 
his focus of study, his courses in the program, etc. A dissertation and final 
oral examination will complete the requirements. 

A very significant aspect of this Ph.D. program is that the student will be 
encouraged to move into independent study in the area of his own specializa- 
tion and interest just as quickly as possible. There will be no great emphasis 
upon courses; rather, there will be a minimum of courses as indicated above. 
A very serious attempt will be made to pick up the student in his eagerness 
and allow him to go full speed ahead into his research and writing. His course 
of study will be tailored insofar as possible to his interests and especially his 
general dissertation area. 

The program itself will be kept small so that it can be of the highest quality 
possible. Admissions requirements will be those of the University which 
include the usual transcripts and letters of recommendations. Furthermore, 
the students will be required to provide scores on the Graduate Record Exam- 
ination or the Miller Analogies Test and will also be responsible for providing 
a seminar paper or other evidence of scholarly research experience. All stu- 
dents will matriculate in the University of Pittsburgh. Applications may be 
requested through writing to either institution, but preferably to the Univer- 
sity of Pittsburgh: 

Dean Walter H. Evert 

Faculty of Arts and Sciences 

University of Pittsburgh, Room 1028-H.C.L. 

Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15213 

Scholarships, fellowships, and other financial assistance are available for 
needy students. 



89 



This program will be extremely valuable to the Seminary not only in the 
area of the Ph.D. but also for the B.D. program itself. It will assist the 
Seminary in continuing to employ the very finest faculty available, providing 
that faculty with teaching and research experience at the doctoral level. Al- 
ready the Seminary library has earmarked large sums of money for the build- 
ing up of book collections in the fields in which the Doctorate will be offered. 
This, again, of course, will strengthen the Bachelor of Divinity program. 



Administrative Committee for Doctoral Program in Religious Studies 

Standing, left to right: Prof Robert D. Marshall, English; Prof. Nicholas Rescher, 

Philosophy; Prof Walter Wiest, Theology; Prof William Stanton, 

History; Prof Markus Barth, New Testament 

Seated: Dean Walter Evert; Dean Gordon Jackson 

Absent: Prof George P. Murdock, Anthropology ; Pro f Edward Farley , Theology 



Continuing 
Education 



i\luuini 



91 



Continuing Education 



Under the direction of the Graduate Education Committee continuing educa- 
tion is fast assuming a major place in the life of the Seminary. Over 300 
pastors in the Pittsburgh and Canton, Ohio, areas regularly participate in 
Eight Weeks Schools. A distinctive feature, and the catalyst that precipitates 
a truly vital learning experience, is the active participation of pastors from 
over a dozen denominations who make up a majority of those enrolled. 



The Eight Weeks Schools 

At the Seminary. For eight Tuesdays in October and November and again 
in February and March the regular faculty offers courses in a wide range of 
areas but always with particular relevance to ministry, whatever its forms 
(pastoral, administrative, etc.). For example, the following courses were 
offered last year: The Individual and the Community in New Testament 
Thought, New Testament Greek Refresher Seminar; Christianity as an His- 
torical Religion, The Problems of Guilt and Hostility, Roots of Vatican II 
in the Medieval Church, History of Negroes in the United States; and Intro- 
duction to the Problems of Old Testament Prophecy. 



Each class runs two hours, and a student may take up to three courses. 
Announcement of course offerings is made in Panorama, the quarterly bul- 
letin, as well as in folder form. The fee of $5.00 per course includes the use of 
the library. Inquiries should be directed to William P. Barker, Director of 
Continuing Education. 



At Canton, Ohio. Each fall the Seminary conducts an eight week session 
for pastors of this area, with the same format and courses as listed above. 
Other schools in other areas will be announced as they are developed. A 
special announcement and registration form may be secured from the Director 
of Continuing Education. 



At Loretto, Pa. The Seminary has begun an eight-weeks session for pastors 
in cooperation with St. Francis Roman Catholic Seminary. This school seeks 
to serve pastors and priests in the Blair-Cambria County area and, patterned 
after the Canton School, offers two courses. A special announcement and 
registration form may be secured from the Director of Continuing Education. 



A program of training and research in pastoral counseling is conducted 
each year in cooperation with St. Francis Community Mental Health Center 
and with the Woodville State Hospital. A limited number of pastors are 
admitted to this program which runs for thirty weeks. The St. Francis pro- 
gram seeks to train clergymen to discover and meet certain mental problems 

92 



before the necessity of hospitalization. The Woodville project is a training in 
the handling and transition of a person already committed to a mental hospital 
back to community life and the support that can be given as the person re- 
turns to his home. The schedule in both programs calls for a one hour seminar 
for case consultation and a one hour weekly presentation at the Seminary. 
Tuition for the St. Francis program is $50 and for the Woodville project $40. 



Spring and Summer Programs 

Seminar on preaching will be held on the campus June 3 through June 7, 1968, 
at which time a registrant may select from one of three sections: Church and 
Ministry, History-Theology, Biblical. The format of the program will involve 
a problem in one of these sections and consist of lectures and workshops. A 
fee of $50.00 will cover the cost of room, board and tuition. 



The School of Religion at Shady Side Academy, Pittsburgh, supported by 
the Pitcairn-Crabbe Foundation, each summer invites 150 ministers from 
within the Synod of Pennsylvania. The faculty is drawn from all over the 
United States as well as from the Seminary. The dates for the 1968 school 
are June 17-21. 



Audit Courses 

A limited number of auditors will be admitted to regular B.D. and M.R.E. 
courses. To protect the integrity of the degree programs the registrant must 
have the approval of both the Academic Dean and the professor for auditing. 
The cost for auditing is half the regular tuition fee plus half the library fee. 
While no grade is given or recorded, auditors are expected to be faithful in 
attendance and to do the required readings. Approximately fifty auditors a 
semester can be helped to continue their theological education through this 
program. Inquiries should be directed to the Registrar. 



Credit Courses 

A limited number of students already having the B.D. degree may be enrolled 
for regular Bachelor of Divinity courses. The purpose of this program is to 
help prepare those who wish to do graduate work but who need to buttress 
their seminary training, fill in gaps, or do additional prerequisite work toward 
specialization. A grade is given and recorded for transcript purposes. The cost 
is one-half the regular matriculation fee and full tuition. Application forms 
should be secured from the Director of Admissions. 

93 



The Alumni Association 



Officers 

President, Curtis J. Patterson, '37. 

Vice President, Gordon E. Boak '49 

Secretary, Harry W. Rankin '45 

Treasurer, Frank C. Black '27 

Director of Alumni Relations, William P. Barker '50 



The Alumni Association, now numbering more than 2,300 members, is com- 
posed of the former students, graduates and post-graduates of Pittsburgh 
Theological Seminary and its antecedent seminaries. The purposes of the 
Association are to deepen the friendships begun in seminary and to afford 
fellowship among all its graduates; to cooperate with the Seminary in enlisting 
young people for church vocations and recruiting prospective seminary candi- 
dates; to support actively the cause of theological education and of the 
Seminary in particular in its development to meet the demands of the future; 
and lastly, to have a sympathetic interest in the life and work of the Semi- 
nary's students and faculty. The Alumni Association sponsors several seminary 
convocations. 

The Annual Alumni Day will be held on May 13, 1968 and begin with an 
address by a major figure in the field of science. At noon there will be the 5 
year reunion luncheons and a general luncheon for all alumni. The afternoon 
program consists of a faculty panel to discuss the issues raised in the morning, 
a brief business session for election of officers, and a reception by President 
and Mrs. Donald Miller. This is followed by the alumni dinner, after which 
the graduating seniors are inducted into the Association. 

Regional meetings of alumni are held frequently, and a dinner at the annual 
meeting of The General Assembly is another highlight of the year's activities. 

Annual supplements to the Alumni Directory are published each summer 
and list changes of address and the newly received alumni. 

94 



Degrees Awarded, 1966-1967 
The Degree of Bachelor of Divinity 



David Blaine Cable, Belle Vernon, Pennsylvania 

B.S., California State College, 1963 
Donald George Campbell, Clairton, Pennsylvania 

B.A., Westminster College, 1964 
Andrew Cassells Chalmers, Basking Ridge, New Jersey 

B.A., Bloomfield College, 1964 
Robert Scott Collins, Tarkio, Missouri 

A.B., Tarkio College, 1960 
Rodger Lawson Cragun, Lewiston, New York 

A.A., Lincoln College, 1960 

B.A., Tusculum College, 1963 
James Eugene Cuppett, Bedford, Pennsylvania 

B.A., University of Pittsburgh, 1964 
Brent Fergus Davidson, Seattle, Washington 

B.A., Seattle Pacific College, 1964 
John James Dromazos, Hamburg, New York 

B.S., New York State University, 1961 
John Duncan Evans, III, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

A.B., Harvard College, 1961 

B.A., St. Peter's College, 1963 
John McMillan Fife, Titusville, Pennsylvania 

B.A., Washington and Jefferson College, 1962 
Robert Lee Finch, Peoria, Illinois 

A.B., Taylor University, 1964 
Kenneth Paul Gammons, Santa Barbara, California 

B.A., Whitworth College, 1964 
Clinton C. Glenn, Jr., Hyattsville, Maryland 

B.A., University of Maryland, 1964 
Daniel Clark Graham, Cuyahoga Falls, Ohio 

B.A., Westminster College, 1964 
Ruth Morton Griffiths, Columbus, Ohio 

B.A., The College of Wooster, 1960 

B.S., Columbia University, 1962 
Howard James Hansen, Bradford Woods, Pennsylvania 

B.A., University of Pittsburgh, 1952 
James William Hartley, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

B.A., The College of Wooster, 1964 



96 



Philip Marlowe Hazelton, Lancaster, Ohio 

B.S., Ohio State University, 1963 
Jon Louis James Hoadley, Seattle, Washington 

B.A., Seattle Pacific College, 1962 
Harvey Samuel Holtgraver, Jr., Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

B.A., Westminster College, 1963 
David Zanyana Howard, Monrovia, Liberia 

B.S., University of Liberia, 1960 
William Harry Hudson, Sharon, Pennsylvania 

B.A., Westminster College, 1964 
John Carroll Huff, Bowie, Maryland 

B.A., Davis & Elkins College, 1964 
Harry Holland Johns, HI, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

A.B., Geneva College, 1964 
JohnM. Johnson, Beloit, Wisconsin 

B.S., Wheaton College, 1964 
Timothy Charles Johnson, Harbor Beach, Michigan 

B.A., Alma College, 1964 
William M. Johnson, East Aurora, New York 

B.A., Monmouth College, 1964 
John Jones, Warren, Ohio 

A.B., University of North Carolina, 1948 

M.Ed., Kent State University, 1960 
David Conrad Kearns-Preston, Silver Spring, Maryland 

B.A., American University, 1964 
William John Kemp, Buffalo, New York 

B.A., Westminster College, 1964 
Festo Kivengere, Kabale, Uganda 

University of London Institute of Education, 1956-57 
William James Legge, Jr., Monroeville, Pennsylvania 

B.S., Indiana University of Pennsylvania, 1963 
J. Reynolds Lewis, Greensburg, Pennsylvania 

B.A., Bethany College, 1958 
Kenneth V. Mapstone, Hellam, Pennsylvania 

A.A., York Junior College, 1962 

A.B., Waynesburg College, 1964 
Charles Marks, Savannah, Georgia 

B.A., Knoxville College, 1964 
Harry Edward Martin, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

A.B., Miami University, 1949 

M.S., George Williams College, 1953 
Robert Harrison McClure, Jr., Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

B.A., Monmouth College, 1964 
Richard Barry McCune, Latrobe, Pennsylvania 

B.A., Westminster College, 1963 






97 



Dean Carlyle Mead, Portland, Oregon 

B.A., Lewis & Clark College, 1964 
Ralph W. Milligan, Augusta, Kansas 

B.A., Sterling College, 1961 
William Machain Morgan, Jr., Worthington, Pennsylvania 

B.S., Indiana University of Pennsylvania, 1963 
William Richard Myers, Oil City, Pennsylvania 

B.A., Westminster College, 1964 
Allen L. Nephew, Porcupine, South Dakota 

B.A., Huron College, 1964 
Bernard William Nord, Bessemer, Pennsylvania 

B.A., Pennsylvania State University, 1963 
Robert Alexander Orr, Jr., Mayfield, Kentucky 

B.A., Southwestern at Memphis, 1964 
Walter Radulovich, Westerville, Ohio 

B.S., University of Illinois, 1950 
Henry E. Robinson, III, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

B.A., Emory University, 1963 
Robert E. Singdahlsen, Euclid, Ohio 

B.A., Dickinson College, 1957 

M.A., Western Reserve University, 1961 
Milton Edward Skiff, Greenwich, New York 

B.S., Cornell University, 1957 
Michael Fleming Smathers, Big Lick, Tennessee 

B.A., The College of Wooster, 1963 
James Avery Smith, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 

B.S., Drexel Institute, 1958 
Theodore N. Tate, Troy, New York 

A.B., State University of New York, 1963 
William C. Weckerly, Butler, Pennsylvania 

B.S., Indiana University of Pennsylvania, 1959 
David Williams, Oak Park, Illinois 

B.A., Millikin University, 1963 
Donald Paul Wilson, Carmichaels, Pennsylvania 

A.B., Waynesburg College, 1964 
Louis H. Wollenberg, Orchard Park, New York 

B.A., The College of Wooster, 1952 
Hugh Stanley Zimmerman, Clyde, Ohio 

B.A., The College of Wooster, 1962 



June, 1967 

Arthur C. Broadwick, Somerdale, New Jersey 

B.S., Muhlenberg College, 1957 
Douglas O. James, Seattle, Washington 

B.A., Whitworth College, 1963 

98 



The Degree of Master of Religious Education 

Susan Jane Becker, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

B.A., Muskingum College, 1963 
Roxanna Ryman Coop, Severna Park, Maryland 

B.A., Smith College, 1955 
Margaret Elizabeth Papsch, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

B.S. in Ed., Slippery Rock State College, 1960 



The Degree of Master of Theology 

James Burton Bailey, Hanson, Massachusetts 

B.S.C., Ohio University, 1953 

B.D., Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary, 1959 
Day anand David Pitamber, Mainpuri, India 

M.A., Agra University, 1960 

B.D., Pittsburgh Theological Seminary, 1964 



Honors and Awards 

Magna Cum Laude 

Henry E. Robinson, III 
Michael Fleming Smathers 

Cum Laude 

David Blaine Cable 
Robert Scott Collins 
Roxanna Ryman Coop 
Daniel Clark Graham 
Philip Marlowe Hazelton 
Timothy Charles Johnson 
William John Kemp 

Graduating With Honors In Biblical Studies 

Robert Scott Collins 
Daniel Clark Graham 
Ruth Morton Griffiths 

History and Theology 

John James Dromazos 
Henry E. Robinson, III 
Michael Fleming Smathers 



99 






Church and Ministry 
William Richard Myers 

The Thomas Jamison Scholarship 

and 

The Sylvester S. Marvin Memorial Fellowship 

Michael Fleming Smathers 

The Jennie Rigg Barbour Memorial Prize 
Henry E. Robinson, III 

The Hugh Thomson Kerr Moderator Prize 
William Richard Myers 

The Michael Wilson Keith Memorial Homiletical Prize 
William Richard Myers 

The Robert A. Lee Church History Award 

Henry E. Robinson, III 
David Blaine Cable 

The Home Training Bible Class Award in Missions 
Robert Scott Collins 

The Chevy Chase Christian Education Award 
(Young People's Work) 

Charles Marks 

The William B. Watson Prize in Hebrew 
William C. Weckerly 

The John Watson Prize In New Testament Greek 
William John Kemp 

The First Presbyterian Church of 
McKeesport Preaching Prize 

John McMillan Fife 

The Henry A. Riddle Award 
For Graduate Study 

Henry E. Robinson, III 



100 



Middler Class Awards 

The Alice Myers Sigler Memorial Prize 
in History and Theology 

Robert L. Lowry 

The Walter P. and Anna L. McConkey 
Award in Homiletics 

Vaughn P. Purnell 



Junior Class Awards 

The James Purdy Scholarships 

Donald Crowe 
James Davison 
William Hoffman 
Robert Ralston 
Fred Roedger 
George Ward 

The Fred McFeely Rogers Prize in Biblical Studies 

James Davison 
William Hoffman 



101 



Register of Students, 1967-1968 
Senior Class 

Robert Herbert Barnes, Maple Heights, Ohio 

B.A., Park College, 1964 
Boyd A. Bell, Parker, Arizona 

B.S., Pennsylvania State University, 1942 
James Glen Bell, Grove City, Pennsylvania 

B.S., Grove City College, 1964 
Laszlo Berzeviczy, Ontario, California 

B.A., The College of Wooster, 1965 
W. Wilson Bradburn, Jr., Oakdale, Pennsylvania 

B.A., The College of Wooster, 1965 
Robert Ousley Brown, Weirton, West Virginia 

B.A., The College of Wooster, 1965 
Dennis Frank Butler, Fair Lawn, New Jersey 

B.A., Bloomfield College, 1964 
Arthur John Campbell, Jeannette, Pennsylvania 

B.A., Waynesburg College, 1965 
Edward Allen Campbell, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

B.A., Muskingum College, 1965 
Judith Evelyn Campbell, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

B.A., Westminster College, 1965 
J. Terry Carnahan, Beaver, Pennsylvania 

B.A., Westminster College, 1965 
Gary Glenmar Close, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

B.S., Norwich University, 1964 
Alice McGee Collins, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

B.A., Chatham College, 1957 
Lawrence Walter Corbet t, Harrisville, Ohio 

B.A., Muskingum College, 1965 
Patterson A. Deane, Grenada, West Indies 

B.D., Union Theological Seminary of Jamaica, 1958 
William Alan Doyle, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

B.A., Davis and Elkins College, 1965 
Carolyn Jane Easdale, Tilden, Illinois 

B.A., Monmouth College, 1965 
Madge B. Floyd, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

B.A., Emory University, 1958 
John Charles Free, Washington, District of Columbia 

B.A., Davis and Elkins College, 1965 
Clyde Henry Goff, Toledo, Ohio 

B.A., University of Toledo, 1959 
William Irvin Gracey, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

B.A., Waynesburg College, 1965 

102 



Arthur George Hampson, Seattle, Washington 

B.S., Seattle Pacific College, 1965 
Robert Alfred Harris, Jr., Kansas City, Missouri 

B.S., Missouri School of Mines, 1963 

/. Wallace Huber, Princeton, Indiana 
B.A., Muskingum College, 1963 

Robert Joseph Huck, Downers Grove, Illinois 

A.B., Wheaton College, 1965 
Jean Hyde Humason, Fairmont, West Virginia 

B.A., Davis and Elkins College, 1964 

Alexander Phillips Hurt, Towson, Maryland 

B.A., Norwich University, 1962 
Midhat Daoud Ibrahim, Tripoli, Lebanon 

Th.B., Near East School of Theology, 1964 

/. Warren Jacobs, Waynesburg, Pennsylvania 
A.B., Waynesburg College, 1965 

David Ralph Johnston, West Lafayette, Indiana 
B.S., Iowa State University, 1959 
M.S., Purdue University, 1965 

A. Boyd Keys, New Kensington, Pennsylvania 

B.S., Waynesburg College, 1939 
David S. King, Coraopolis, Pennsylvania 

B.A., Maryville College, 1965 

John Francis Kirkham, Canton, Ohio 

B.A., Malone College, 1964 
Timothy Aaron Koah, Carlton, Pennsylvania 

B.A., Westminster College, 1961 
Benjamin Peter Ksiazek, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

B.A., Butler University, 1965 

John D. Kutz, Grafton, North Dakota 

A.B., University of North Dakota, 1966 
Peter Church Leathersich, Hornell, New York 

A.B., Union College, 1965 
James Graham Lockhart, Butler, Pennsylvania 

B.A., Westminster College, 1965 
Robert Nicholas Lodwick, Sao Paulo, Brazil 

Institute Jose Manuel da Conceicao, 1963 

Robert Louis Lowry, West Chester, Pennsylvania 

B.S., University of Pennsylvania, 1955 

M.B.A., Temple University, 1965 
Joseph Leonard Luciana, Oakmont, Pennsylvania 

B.A., University of Pittsburgh, 1950 

L.L.B., University of Pittsburgh Law School, 1951 
Donald Drew Ludwig, Washington, District of Columbia 

B.A., The College of Wooster, 1965 

103 



Helsel Roland Marsh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

B.S., Westminster College, 1964 
James W. McDowell, Knoxville, Tennessee 

B.A., Knoxville College, 1959 
Paul Scott McQueen, West Middlesex, Pennsylvania 

A.B., Youngstown University, 1965 
Jack R. Moon, McKeesport, Pennsylvania 

B.S.M.E., Carnegie Institute of Technology, 1955 
Bearly Bruce Mounts, Washington, Pennsylvania 

B.A., Washington and Jefferson College, 1964 
/. Michael Mullin, Fredericktown, Ohio 

A.B.,Pikeville College, 1965. 
Kenneth Russell Newhams, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

B.A., The College of Wooster, 1965 
Dale T. O'Connell, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

B.A., Tarkio College, 1964 
Alan Van de Mark Pareis, Union, New Jersey 

A.B., Albright College, 1965 
Charles Neal Perrine, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

B.A., Grove City College, 1965 
George J. Peters, Joliet, Illinois 

B.S., West Virginia University, 1957 

John A. Pilutti, Irondale, Ohio 

B.A., Kent State University, 1965 
Bertrand C. Pitchford, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

B.A., Washington and Jefferson College, 1956 
Carol Rose Polivka, Bridgeport, Ohio 

A.B., Muskingum College, 1964 
Vaughn Paul Purnell, Glassport, Pennsylvania 

B.S., Grove City College, 1965 
Donald H. Ralston, Salineville, Ohio 

B.A., Monmouth College, 1950 
Vernon Clarke Rushing, Ellicott City, Maryland 

B.S., Brown University, 1964 

William Paul Saxman, West Mifflin, Pennsylvania 

B.S., Slippery Rock State College, 1961 
Peter David Schlichting, Arlington, New Jersey 

B.A., Bloomfield College, 1964 
George John Scoulas, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

Greek Theological Institute, 1950 
Jonathan Carl Siehl, Cincinnati, Ohio 

B.A., Muskingum College, 1964 
Douglas Earl Smith, Barrington, Rhode Island 

B.A., Barrington College, 1964 
Edward Eldon Spence, Los Alamos, New Mexico 

B.A., Hastings College, 1965 

104 



Gerald Floyd Stacy, Minneapolis, Minnesota 

B.A., Macalester College, 1962 
Kirk Patrick Swiss, Baltimore, Maryland 

B.A., Muskingum College, 1962 
Harvey Gibson Throop, Omaha, Nebraska 

B.A., Missouri Valley College, 1965 
Barry T. Vance, McMurray, Pennsylvania 

B.A., Bethany College, 1965 
Terry Conrad Waibel, Allison Park, Pennsylvania 

B.A., Colgate University, 1965 
Steven Hoodless Washburn, Monmouth, Illinois 

B.A., Monmouth College, 1963 
Kenneth James Watt, Spokane, Washington 

B.A., Whitworth College, 1965 
Colin Thomas Webster, Hamburg, New York 

B.B.A., University of Wisconsin, 1959 
Frederick Wayne Weiss, Hamburg, New York 

B.S., Cortland State Teachers College, 1958 
William Scott Wills, New Kensington, Pennsylvania 

A.B., Tarkio College, 1965 
Fred Joseph Wood, North Haledon, New Jersey 

B.A., Bloomfield College, 1964 
D. Darrell Woomer, Dayton, Ohio 

A.B., Juniata College, 1964 
Roland Clarence Wroten, Scranton, Pennsylvania 

B.S., University of Scranton, 1956 

M.A., University of Scranton, 1963 



Middler Class 

Michael Graham Anderson, Yakima, Washington 

B.A., Whitworth College, 1966 
Paul Edwin Anderson, Clinton, Massachusetts 

B.A., Trinity University, 1964 
Lance L. M. Brown, Niagara Falls, New York 

B.A., Buena Vista College, 1966 
Jon W. Clifton, Springfield, Ohio 

A.B., Harvard College, 1963 
Donald Davis Crowe, Eighty Four, Pennsylvania 

B.A., Asbury College, 1966 
James Edwin Davison, Glenshaw, Pennsylvania 

B.A., Westminster College, 1966 
James Torrence Dennison, Jr., Beaver Falls, Pennsylvania 

B.S. Geneva College, 1965 
Donald J. Dilley, II, Edmonds, Washington 

B.A., University of Washington, 1966 

105 



Robert Louis Eckard, Vero Beach, Florida 

B.A., Tusculum College, 1966 
Merritt Wayne Ednie, Vandergrift, Pennsylvania 

A.B., Indiana University of Pennsylvania, 1966 
David James Evans, El Paso, Texas 

B.A., Trinity University, 1966 
Robert Douglas Forsythe, Dundalk, Maryland 

B.S., University of Maryland, 1958 
David Quincy Hall, Muskegon, Michigan 

B.A., University of Michigan, 1966 
Lee Roy Hearn, Bethel Park, Pennsylvania 

B.M., Westminster Choir College, 1960 

M.M., Westminster Choir College, 1963 
Clarence Ernst Hoener, Jr., Pitcairn, Pennsylvania 

B.A., Lebanon Valley College, 1967 
William Edward Hoffman, Newark, New Jersey 

B.A., Bloomfield College, 1966 
William George Holliday, Conneaut, Ohio 

B.A., Westminster College, 1966 
Elinor Jane Hubert, Cincinnati, Ohio 

B.A., Muskingum College, 1966 
Paul Kabo, Jr., Hickory, Pennsylvania 

B.A., Waynesburg College, 1966 
William Albert Kramp, Normal, Illinois 

B.A., Beloit College, 1964 
Gerard Roland Kuyk, Fenton, Michigan 

B.A., Alma College, 1966 
John Robert Lane, Columbus, Ohio 

B.A., Capital University, 1966 
NealEvan Lloyd, Cambria, Wisconsin 

B.A., Macalester College, 1966 
James Edgar Long, Jr., Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

B.A., Westminster College, 1966 
Robert Vaughn Mathias, Rockville Centre, New York 

B.A., The College of Wooster, 1966 
John Wallace McCreight, Washington, Pennsylvania 

B.A., The College of Wooster, 1966 
W. Thomas Mecouch, Upper Darby, Pennsylvania 

B.A., Dickinson College, 1966 
Harold James Mills, Warren, Ohio 

B.A., Kent State University, 1966 
Homer Eugene Nye, Galion, Ohio 

A.B., Ohio University, 1966 
John William Orr, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

B.A., Muskingum College, 1966 



106 



Donald P. Owens, Jr., Arlington, Texas 

B.A., Trinity University, 1967 
Richard Irving Peters, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

B.A., Kenyon College, 1965 
Harold A. Rainey, Clifton, New Jersey 

B.A., Tusculum College, 1966 
Robert Everett Ralston, Canton, Ohio 

A.B., Malone College, 1966 
Mary Stossel Rishel, Indiana, Pennsylvania 

B.S., Indiana University of Pennsylvania, 1966 
Fred Edward Roedger, Jr., Cleveland, Ohio 

B.A., The College of Wooster, 1966 
Robert Edward Salmon, Cheswick, Pennsylvania 

B.A., Westminster College, 1966 
Kenneth Raymond Stahl, Ligonier, Pennsylvania 

B.A., Westminster College, 1966 
Thomas Richard Stout, Glenshaw, Pennsylvania 

A.B., Grove City College, 1966 
Samuel Greason Strohm, Uniontown, Pennsylvania 

B.A., Davis and Elkins College, 1965 
William LeRoy Thompson, East McKeesport, Pennsylvania 

A.B., Waynesburg College, 1965 
R. Eldon Trubee, Minerva, Ohio 

A.B., The College of Wooster, 1966 
George William Walker, III, Buffalo, New York 

A.B., Westminster College, 1966 
Douglas Robert Walters, Royal Oak, Michigan 

B.A., Waterloo Lutheran University, 1966 
George Newins Ward, HI, Walden, New York 

B.A., Williams College, 1966 
Lewis Clifton W eldon, Jr., Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

B.A., DePauw University, 1966 
Gary Lee Wolfer, Spokane, Washington 

B.A., Whitworth College, 1965 



B.D. Students Serving Internships 

David Harrison Foubert, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

B.A., Beloit College, 1965 
Milton Harold Ohlsen, Jr., Weaverville, North Carolina 

B.A., Muskingum College, 1965 
Ralph Carleton Stock, Kenmore, New York 

B.A., Grove City College, 1965 



107 



Junior Class 

William LeRoy Beckes, Tarentum, Pennsylvania 

B.A., Grove City College, 1967 
Robert J. Campbell, II, Wheeling, West Virginia 

A.B., West Liberty State College, 1967 
Eduardo O. C. Chaves, Sao Paulo, Brazil 

B.D., Campinas Presbyterian Theological Seminary, 1966 

/. Gregory Clark, Sioux City, Iowa 
B.A., Morningside College, 1967 

Gary B. Collins, Mount Lebanon, Pennsylvania 

B.A., Westminster College, 1967 
Joseph C. Cramer, III, Monroeville, Pennsylvania 

B.S., Pennsylvania State University, 1967 
Glenwood T. Davis, Jr., Perry opolis, Pennsylvania 

B.A., Waynesburg College, 1967 
FredH. deOliveira, Jr., Carlsbad, New Mexico 

B.A., Trinity University, 1967 
John C. Deupree, Marietta, Georgia 

B.S., University of Tennessee, 1960 
M. Dayle Dickey, Espyville Station, Pennsylvania 

B.A., Taylor University, 1967 
John F. Dietz, Canonsburg, Pennsylvania 

B.A., Muskingum College, 1966 
Frederick C. Doscher, Merrick, New York 

B.A., Maryville College, 1967 
Robert L. Emrich, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

B.A., Gettysburg College, 1967 
Carl R. Engstrom, Duquesne, Pennsylvania 

B.A., Geneva College, 1967 
Joan M. Fenner, Cedar Falls, Iowa 

B.A., State College of Iowa, 1966 
John S. Ferguson, Sydney, Australia 

B.A., University of Pittsburgh, 1966 
Ronald J. Forsythe, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

A.B., Wheaton College, 1967 
John C. Foster, Fraser, Michigan 

B.A., Alma College, 1967 
Warren L. Furnish, Indianapolis, Indiana 

B.A., Indiana University, 1967 
Gary A. Gard, Portland, Oregon 

B.S., University of Missouri, 1965 
Richard G. Goss, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

B.A., Muskingum College, 1967 
John A. Graham, Youngstown, Ohio 

B.A., Maryville College, 1967 

108 



John Robert Gray, Jr., New Kensington, Pennsylvania 

B.A., Juniata College, 1967 
Frank N. Gready, South Lyon, Michigan 

B.A., Maryville College, 1967 
Howard Paul Hoover, Pikeville, Kentucky 

B.A., Pikeville College, 1967 
Dale A. Hunter, Coraopolis, Pennsylvania 

B.A., Grove City College, 1967 
Scott J. Hunter, New Kensington, Pennsylvania 

B.S., Amherst College, 1967 
Curtis D. Illingworth, San Mateo, California 

A.B., Grove City College, 1967 
Milton Bruce Irwin, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

B.A., Westminster College, 1967 
Dennis W. Jones, Marietta, Ohio 

B.A., Ohio State University, 1967 
Alan D. Kern, Williamsport, Pennsylvania 

B.A., Lycoming College, 1967 

Keith R. Kivlin, Columbus, Ohio 

B.S., Ohio State University, 1967 
John R. Larson, Canton, Ohio 

B.A., Bowling Green State University, 1965 
David M. Liddle, Jr., Des Moines, Iowa 

B.A., Northwestern University, 1965 
Richard A. Markle, Franklin, Indiana 

A.B., Franklin College, 1966 
Charles A. Marriott, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

A.B., Shaw University, 1927 
Timothy M. McClenahan, Pitcairn, Pennsylvania 

B.A., Westminster College, 1967 
John E. McKune, Springfield, Ohio 

B.A., Kenyon College, 1952 
Thomas W. Millan, Tacoma, Washington 

B.A., Whitworth College, 1967 
Sherwood L. Morf, Laguna Beach, California 

B.A., Whittier College, 1962 
James R. Morrisey, Hagerstown, Maryland 

A.B., Dickinson College, 1967 

Elliott R. Oakes, Newburgh, New York 

B.A., Parsons College, 1967 
Albert Hughes Prichard, Mannington, West Virginia 

B.A., Davis and Elkins College, 1966 
William J. Rumsey, Dover, New Jersey 

B.A., Maryville College, 1967 
Mariellen Smith Schwentker, Baltimore, Maryland 

A.B., Bryn Mawr College, 1958 

109 



R. Lamar Seaton, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

B.A., Purdue University, 1967 
Delmar G. Sewall, New Wilmington, Pennsylvania 

B.A., Westminster College, 1966 
Douglas L. Shaffer, Harrisburg, Pennsylvania 

A.B., Lafayette College, 1967 
Richard D. Shorthouse, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

B.S., University of Pittsburgh, 1967 
Walter L. Siegel, Pottsville, Pennsylvania 

B.A., Susquehanna University, 1966 
John B. Simpson, Oakdale, Pennsylvania 

B.A., Davis and Elkins College, 1967 
James L. Smith, Butler, Pennsylvania 

B.A., Westminster College, 1967 
Edwin G. Steinmetz, Jr., East Stroudsburg, Pennsylvania 

B.A., Bloomfield College, 1967 
John R. Stevenson, Wichita, Kansas 

B.A., University of Tulsa, 1967 
Merle L. Stutzman, Johnstown, Pennsylvania 

B.S., Indiana University of Pennsylvania, 1967 
Dean E. Tapley, Hartford, Connecticut 

B.A., Trinity University, 1967 
Marilyn K. VanGelder, George, Iowa 

B.A., Sterling College, 1967 
Roselis E.M. Wachholz, Wuertt, West Germany 

B.D., Denkandorf Seminary, 1954 
Angus M. Watkins, Pemberville, Ohio 

B.A., Bowling Green State University, 1967 
Robert C. White, McMurray, Pennsylvania 

B.A., Bethany College, 1967 
Gary A. Wood, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

B.A., Westminster College, 1963 
Pamela-Rae Yeager, Bowling Green, Ohio 

B.S., Bowling Green State University, 1967 



110 



Candidates for The Degree of Master of Theology 

Biblical Studies 

Rev. Oscar L. Amal, Industry, Pennsylvania 

A.B., Thiel College, 1963 

B.D., Lutheran Theological Seminary, 1966 
Rev. Waldir Berndt, Blumenau, Brazil 

B.D., Campinas Presbyterian Theological Seminary, 1964 
Rev. In Soon Choi, Seoul, Korea 

B.A., Seoul National University, 1958 

B.D., Pittsburgh Theological Seminary, 1966 
Rev. Howard Eshbaugh, Coraopolis, Pennsylvania 

A.B., Grove City College, 1955 

B.D., Western Theological Seminary, 1956 
Rev. David F. Hartzfeld, Greensburg, Pennsylvania 

B.S., Nyack Missionary College, 1963 

B.D., Bethel Theological Seminary, 1967 
Rev. Philip M. Hastings, Sewickley, Pennsylvania 

B.E., Johns Hopkins University, 1953 

B.D., Western Theological Seminary, 1956 
Rev. Charles C. Hendricks, Fort Worth, Texas 

B.A., Austin College, 1961 

B.D., Austin Seminary, 1965 
Rev. A. Vanlier Hunter, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

A.B., Grove City College, 1961 

B.D., Pittsburgh Theological Seminary, 1964 
Rev. John W. Irwin, Grove City, Pennsylvania 

B.A., Sterling College, 1955 

B.D., Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary, 1958 
Rev. John Bavington McLaren, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

B.A., Westminster College, 1957 

B.D., Pittsburgh Theological Seminary, 1963 
Rev. David W. Philips, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

B.A., Muskingum College, 1959 

B.D., Pittsburgh Theological Seminary, 1963 
Rev. Jay C. Rochelle, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

B.A., Concordia College, 1961 

B.D., Concordia Seminary, 1965 



History and Theology 

Rev. Elias Abrahao, Campinas, Brazil 
B.D., Campinas Presbyterian Theological Seminary, 1965 



111 



Rev. Kenneth P. Alpers, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

B.A., Capital University, 1949 

B.D., Capital Theological Seminary, 1952 
Rev. Robert Bellingham, Plymouth, Ohio 

B.A., Bethel College, 1963 

B.D., Fuller Theological Seminary, 1966 

Rev. William Cheston Berlin, Johnstown, Pennsylvania 

B.A., Muskingum College, 1953 

B.D., Western Theological Seminary, 1956 
Rev. Benjamin T. Griffin, Mt. Pleasant, Pennsylvania 

B.A., Baylor University, 1961 

B.D., Andover Newton Theological Seminary, 1965 
Rev. Frederick Francis Haworth, Grove City, Pennsylvania 

B.S., University of Pittsburgh, 1944 

B.D., Virginia Theological Seminary, 1947 
Rev. DongSoo Kim, Seoul, Korea 

B.A., Union Christian College, 1959 

B.D., Pittsburgh Theological Seminary, 1965 
Rev. David E. Martin, Sewickley, Pennsylvania 

B.S., Kent State University, 1957 

B.D., Pittsburgh Theological Seminary, 1960 
Rev. Kerry Meier, Glenwillard, Pennsylvania 

A.B., Bloomfield College, 1957 

B.D., Pittsburgh Theological Seminary, 1960 
Rev. Robert M. A. L. Miller, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

B.A., Muhlenberg College, 1960 

B.D., Lutheran Theological Seminary, 1963 
Rev. Bernard Ernest Quick, Tarentum, Pennsylvania 

B.M., University of Colorado, 1948 

B.D., Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary, 1952 

Rev. Theodore Sideris, Ambridge, Pennsylvania 

B.Th., University of Athens Theological School (Greece), 1966 
Rev. John Robert Walchenbach, Apollo, Pennsylvania 

A.B., Hope College, 1957 

B.D., New Brunswick Theological Seminary, 1961 
Rev. Ralph K. Weber, Derry, Pennsylvania 

B.A., Bluffton College, 1951 

B.D., Bethany Biblical Seminary, 1954 

S.T.M., Biblical Seminary in New York, 1955 



Program for Advanced Pastoral Studies 

Rev. William Beech Ailes, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 
B.A., Ohio Wesleyan University, 1954 
B.D., Western Theological Seminary, 1957 



112 



Rev. Milton L. Bierman, Johnstown, Pennsylvania 
B.A., Carleton College, 1953 
B.D., Union Theological Seminary, 1958 

Rev. S. Hayden Britton, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 
B.S., University of Tennessee, 1955 
B.D., Western Theological Seminary, 1958 

Rev. Duncan Campbell, Argyll, Scotland 
M.A., St. Andrews University, 1952 
B.D., Austin Presbyterian Theological Seminary, 1956 

Rev. Wayne E. Faust, Waynesburg, Ohio 
A.B., University of Pittsburgh, 1957 
B.D., Pittsburgh Theological Seminary, 1960 

Rev. Robert Wayne Finertie, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 
B.S., Maryville College, 1957 
B.D., Princeton Theological Seminary, 1960 

Rev. Ernest J. Frederick, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 
B.S., University of Pittsburgh, 1955 
B.D., Biblical Seminary in New York, 1964 

Rev. D. M. Geconcillo, Pasay City, Philippines 
Th.B., Union Theological Seminary, Manila, 1953 
A.B., Philippine Christian College, 1964 

Rev. Ronald Ivan Glassman, Wilmington, Delaware 
B.A., City College of New York, 1952 
B.D., Western Theological Seminary, 1959 

Rev. William John Green, New Florence, Pennsylvania 
B.S.C.E., Carnegie Institute of Technology, 1954 
B.D., Pittsburgh Theological Seminary, 1962 

Rev. Edward S. Hammett, Irwin, Pennsylvania 
A.B., Washington and Jefferson College, 1950 
B.D., Pittsburgh Theological Seminary, 1964 

Rev. James William Hartley, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 
B.A., The College of Wooster, 1964 
B.D., Pittsburgh Theological Seminary, 1967 

Rev. Eduardo Hernandez, Matanzas, Cuba 
B.A., Instituto Segunda Ensenanza, 1938 
B.Th., Western Theological Seminary, 1947 

Rev. Richard C. Horn, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 
B.A., American University, 1957 
B.D., Colgate Rochester Divinity School, 1960 

Rev. J. Theodore Hunniford, Irwin, Pennsylvania 
B.S., Temple University, 1957 
B.D., Pittsburgh Theological Seminary, 1960 

Rev. Donald F. Hursh, Johnstown, Pennsylvania 
A.B., Elizabethtown College, 1950 
B.D., Bethany Theological Seminary, 1953 

113 



Rev. James Franklin Karcher, Imperial, Pennsylvania 

B.S., University of Pittsburgh, 1950 

B.D., Western Theological Seminary, 1953 
Rev. William P. Kearns, West Newton, Pennsylvania 

B.A., Bob Jones University, 1956 

M.A., Bob Jones University, 1957 

Ph.D., Bob Jones University, 1960 
Rev. Harry Donald Lash, Rector, Pennsylvania 

B.S., Clarion State College, 1960 

B.D., Pittsburgh Theological Seminary, 1964 
Rev. George Hallauer Lower, Edinboro, Pennsylvania 

B.S., Bucknell University, 1953 

B.D., Pittsburgh Theological Seminary, 1960 

M.A., Hartford Theological Seminary, 1961 
Rev. John Harvey MacLeod, Homestead, Pennsylvania 

A.B., The College of Wooster, 1945 

B.D., Princeton Theological Seminary, 1948 
Rev. David Matthews, Jr., Verona, Pennsylvania 

B.A., Thiel College, 1963 

B.D., Lutheran Theological Seminary, 1966 
Rev. Robert Edward Maynard, Brownsville, Pennsylvania 

B.A., Marshall University, 1960 

B.D., Methodist Theological School, 1963 
Rev. Richard Barry McCune, Beaver Falls, Pennsylvania 

B.A., Westminster College, 1963 

B.D., Pittsburgh Theological Seminary, 1967 
Rev. J. Robert Phillips, Knoxville, Tennessee 

B.S., University of Pittsburgh, 1954 

B.D., Western Theological Seminary, 1959 
Rev. John Paul Pro, Jeannette, Pennsylvania 

B.Ed., Duquesne University, 1949 

B.D., Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary, 1957 
Rev. William Jessie Redmon, Fairmont, West Virginia 

B.S., University of Baltimore, 1960 

B.D., Bexley Hall Divinity School, 1963 
Rev. Bruce Warner Reeves, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

B.A., The College of Wooster, 1955 

B.D., Union Theological Seminary, 1959 
Rev. FredM. Rogers, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

B.M. Rollins College, 1951 

B.D., Pittsburgh Theological Seminary, 1962 
Rev. Bertram H. Saunders, Independence, Pennsylvania 

A.B., University of California, 1949 

S.T.B., Biblical Seminary in New York, 1952 
Rev. John William Scott, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

A.B., Adrian College, 1952 

B.D., Western Theological Seminary, 1955 

114 



Rev. John A. Simpson, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 
B.A., University of Akron, 1961 
B.D., Pittsburgh Theological Seminary, 1965 

Rev. Robert Edward Thomas, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 
A.B., Thiel College, 1962 
B.D., Philadelphia Lutheran Seminary, 1965 

Rev. Judson Wiley, Bakerstown, Pennsylvania 
A.B., Washington and Jefferson College, 1950 
B.D., Western Theological Seminary, 1953 

Generalization 

Rev. Daniel Tin-Wo Chow, Hong Kong, China 

B.D., Gordon Divinity School, 1964 
Rev. Kenneth Earl Cramer, Bentleyville, Pennsylvania 

B.A., Washington and Jefferson College, 1955 

B.D., Western Theological Seminary, 1958 
Rev. David C. Williams, Pitcairn, Pennsylvania 

B.A., Millikin University, 1963 

B.D., Pittsburgh Theological Seminary, 1967 



Candidates for The Degree Doctor of Philosophy 

Rev. Edward P. Brennan, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

B.A., Borromeo College 

S.T.B., S.T.L., Gregorian University, Rome, Italy 
Rev. Charles Cameron Dickinson, III, Charleston, West Virginia 

B.A., Dartmouth College, 1958 

B.D., Pittsburgh Theological Seminary, 1965 
Rev. Winslow Hackley Galbraith, Tarry town, New York 

B.S., Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 1962 

B.D., Western Theological Seminary, 1965 
Sister Mary Michael Glenn, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

B.E., Duquesne University, 1951 

M.A., University of Notre Dame, 1956 
Rev. Paul F. Kokenda, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

B.A., Thiel College, 1961 

M.A., University of Pittsburgh, 1962 

B.D., Lutheran Theological Seminary, 1965 
Rev. Henry E. Robinson, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

B.A., Emory University, 1963 

B.D., Pittsburgh Theological Seminary, 1967 
Rev. Robert Dale Taylor, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

B.S., University of Pittsburgh, 1956 

B.D., Pittsburgh Theological Seminary, 1963 

115 



Rev. Robert Van Wyk, Clinton, Pennsylvania 

A.B., The College of Wooster, 1961 

B.D., Pittsburgh Theological Seminary, 1964 
Mr. Archibald M. Woodruff, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

A.B., George Washington University, 1963 

M.A., University of Pittsburgh, 1965 



Candidates for the Degree of 
Master of Religious Education 

Senior Class 

Ruth Emma Caldwell, Camp Hill, Pennsylvania 
B.M., Westminster Choir College, 1950 

Sally Hillman Childs, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 
B.A., Sarah Lawrence College, 1949 

Sookja Paik Kim, Seoul, Korea 
B.S., Seoul National University (Korea), 1964 

Rosalyn S. Kummer, Mars, Pennsylvania 
B.S., Pennsylvania State University, 1956 

Barbara Ann Rowden, Alton, Illinois 
B.A., Davis and Elkins College, 1966 

Junior Class 

Carol Ann Dilley, Edmonds, Washington 

B.A., University of Washington, 1967 
Clifford J. Ellis, Natal, South Africa 

B.A., Rhodes University, South Africa, 1958 

B.D., Natal University, South Africa, 1966 
Rosalie R. Glover, Hialeah, Florida 

B.S., Florida State University, 1967 
Cassandra Ann Greco, Aliquippa, Pennsylvania 

B.A., Mount Mercy College, 1965 
Jean Marian Oberlin, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

B.A., Kansas University, 1948 
Linda Lee Picklesimer, Bessemer, Pennsylvania 

B.M. Westminster College, 1966 
Ellen Ann Robinson, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

B.A., Emory University, 1964 
Mary S. Williams, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

B.A., Russell Sage College, 1937 

116 



Candidates for The Degree of Master of Education 

(to be granted by the University of Pittsburgh) 



Patricia Anne Allen, Grove City, Pennsylvania 

B.A., Grove City College, 1967 
Maxine E. Cole, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

B.S., Muskingum College, 1966 
Nancy Jeanne Kerr, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

A.B., Muskingum College, 1965 
Glendora Blanche Williams, Allahabad, India 

B.A., Nagpur University, 1959 



Special Students 

Thomas A sirvatham, Dindigul, India 
Norberto Berton, Uruguay 
Joseph R. Lemp, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 
Francix X. Malinowski, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 
Helga M. Rosemann, Goettinger, Germany 
Robert L. Veon, Grove City, Pennsylvania 

Summary of Attendance 

Bachelor of Divinity 

Juniors 62 

Middlers 47 

Seniors 78 

Interns 3 190 

Master of Religious Education Program 

Juniors 8 

Seniors 5 13 

Master of Education 4 

Master of Theology Program 63 

Doctoral Program 9 

Special Students 6 82 

Total Enrollment 285 



117 





t 



Board 

of 

Directors 



\dministration 



Proic 



Board of Directors 

Officers 

Rev. J. Hubert Henderson, D.D., President 

Rev. Howard C. Scharfe, D.D., LL.D., Vice President 

Mr. George D. Lockhart, Secretary 

Mr. J. Rowe Hinsey, Assistant Secretary 

Mr. Robert L. Becker, Treasurer 

Mr. John T. Logan, B.B.A., C.P. A., Assistant Treasurer 

Mr. Henry C. Herchenroether, Jr. Counsel 

Members 

Term Expires May 1968 

Rev. Charles C. Bray, Jr., Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

Pastor, Third Presbyterian Church 
Mr. Donald C. Burnham, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

President, Westinghouse Electric Corporation 
Rev. J. Hubert Henderson, D.D., Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

Paster, J. M. Wallace Memorial United Presbyterian Church 
Mr. William R. Jackson, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

President, Pittsburgh-Des Moines Steel Company 
Rev. John C. Lorimer, D.D., New Wilmington, Pennsylvania 

Retired 
Rev. Charles P. Robshaw, S.T.D., D.D., LL.D., Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

Pastor, East Liberty Presbyterian Church 
Mr. James H. Rogers, HH.D., Latrobe, Pennsylvania 

Chairman, Latrobe Die Casting Company 
Rev. Howard C. Scharfe, D.D., LL.D., Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

Pastor, Shadyside Presbyterian Church 
Mr. H. Parker Sharp, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

Vice President and General Counsel, Jones & Laughlin Steel Corporation 
Rev. Samuel C. Weir, D.D., Detroit, Michigan 

Minister of Visitation, Cherry Hill United Presbyterian Church, Dearborn 
Rev. W. Bruce Wilson, D.D., St. Petersburg, Florida 

Retired 
Mr. Ralph M. Wyman, Greenwich, Connecticut 

Vice President and Director, H. O. Canfield Company 

Term Expires May 1969 

Mr. A. C. Amsler, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

Retired— Westinghouse Electric Corporation 
Mr. Frank H. Davis, LL.D., Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

Retired 

120 



Rev. Robert H. French, D.D., LL.D., Des Moines, Iowa 

Synod Executive, Synod of Iowa 
Mr. Henry C. Her chenro ether, Jr., Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

Attorney, Alter, Wright, and Barron 
Mr. W. Kenneth Menke, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

President, Pittsburgh Chemical Company, a division of 

United States Steel Corporation 
Rev. Don P. Montgomery, D.D., Youngstown, Ohio 

Pastor, Pleasant Grove United Presbyterian Church 
Mr. William H. Rea, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

President, Oliver Tyrone Corporation 
Rev. Robert H. Stephens, D.D., Summit, New Jersey 

Pastor, Central Presbyterian Church 
Mr. James W. Vicary, Erie, Pennsylvania 

President, Ervite Corporation 
Rev. Robert R. Vogelsang, D.D., Latrobe, Pennsylvania 

Pastor, Latrobe United Presbyterian Church 
Rev. Walter R. Young, D.D., Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

Pastor, Second United Presbyterian Church of Wilkinsburg 

Term Expires May 1970 

Mr. Robert L. Becker, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

Retired-President, Wear-Ever Aluminum, Inc. 
Mr. John G. Buchanan, Jr., Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

Attorney, Buchanan, Ingersoll, Rodewald, Kyle and Buerger 
Mr. Earle M. Craig, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

Retired-Chairman of the Board, Valvoline Oil Company 
Mr. Max A. Lauffer, Ph.D., Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

Andrew Mellon Professor of Biophysics and Chairman, 

Department of Biophysics, University of Pittsburgh 
Mr. George D. Lockhart, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

Attorney, Kirkpatrick, Pomeroy, Lockhart and Johnson 
Rev. W. Paul Ludwig, Ph.D., Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

Pastor, Eastminster United Presbyterian Church 
Mr. John R. McCune, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

Vice President, Lockhart Iron and Steel Company 
Rev. David E. Molyneaux, Flint, Michigan 

Pastor, First Presbyterian Church 
Rev. Walter L. Moser, Ph.D., D.D., Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

Secretary-Treasurer, Johnson C. Smith University 
Mr. Alexander P. Reed, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

Attorney at Law 
Mr. Elmore A. Willets, Jr., Sewickley, Pennsylvania 

Oil, Investments and Banking 
Rev. C. T. R. Yeates, D.D., LL.D., Des Moines, Iowa 

Pastor, Westminster United Presbyterian Church 

121 



Administrative Staff 

The Rev. Donald G. Miller, Ph.D., LL.D., Litt.D. 
President 

The Rev. Gordon E. Jackson, Ph.D., D.D. 
Dean of the Seminary 

Mr. J. Rowe Hinsey, B.S. 
Director of Development 

Mr. William R. Atkins, B.S., M.R.E. 

Business Manager 

Mr. John T. Logan, B.B.A., C.P.A. 

Comptroller 

The Rev. Howard M. Jamieson, Jr., Ph.D., D.D. 
Dean of Students 

The Rev. John M. Bald, Th.D., D.D. 
Associate Dean 

Miss Bessie M. Burrows, M.A. 
Registrar 

Mr. Dikran Y. Hadidian, M.S., S.T.M. 
Librarian 

The Rev. Charles C. W. Idler, B.D. 
Director of Admissions 

The Rev. William P. Barker, B.D. 
Director of Continuing Education and Alumni Relations 



122 



Historical Roll of Professors 



Name 


Seminary of 


Period of 




Inauguration 


Service 


John Anderson 


Service 


1794-1819 


John Banks 


Philadelphia 


1820-1826 


James Ramsey 


Canonsburg 


1821-1842 


Joseph Kerr 


Pittsburgh 


1825-1829 


Jacob Jones Janeway 


Western 


1828-1829 


Mungo Dick 


Pittsburgh 


1829-1831 


Luther Halsey 


Western 


1829-1836 
1872-1880 


John Williamson Nevin 


Western 


1829-1840 


David Elliott 


Western 


1829-1874 


John Taylor Pressly 


Allegheny 


1832-1870 


David Carson 


Canonsburg 


1834-1834 


Thomas Beveridge 


Canonsburg 


1835-1871 


Moses Kerr 


Allegheny 


1835-1836 


Joseph Claybaugh 


Oxford 


1839-1855 


Samuel W. McCracken 


Oxford 


1839-1840 


Lewis Warner Green 


Western 


1840-1847 


James Martin 


Canonsburg 


1842-1846 


Alexander Taggart McGill 


Western 


1842-1854 


James Lemonte Dinwiddie 


Allegheny 


1843-1846 


Abraham Anderson 


Canonsburg 


1847-1855 


Alexander Downs Clark 


Allegheny 


1847-1884 


David Reynolds Kerr 


Allegheny 


1851-1887 


Melancthon Williams Jacobus 


Western 


1851-1876 


William Swan Plumer 


Western 


1854-1862 


Samuel Wilson 


Xenia 


1855-1875 


William Davidson 


Oxford 


1855-1858 


Alexander Young 


Oxford 


1855-1874 
1876-1891 


Samuel Jennings Wilson 


Western 


1857-1883 


John Scott 


Monmouth 


1858-1874 


Joseph Clokey 


Xenia 


1858-1873 


William Miller Paxton 


Western 


1860-1872 


Andrew Morrow Black 


Monmouth 


1864-1874 


Archibald Alexander Hodge 


Western 


1864-1877 


David Alexander Wallace 


Monmouth & Xenia 


1867-1870 
1883-1883 


James Harper 


Newburg 


1867-1899 


Joseph Tate Cooper 


Allegheny 


1871-1886 


William Bruce 


Xenia 


1871-1880 


William Henry Hornblower 


Western 


1871-1883 


James Gillespie Carson 


Xenia 


1873-1888 


William Gallogly Moorehead 


Xenia 


1873-1914 



123 



Jackson Burgess McMichael 

Samuel Thompson Lowrie 

Samuel Henry Kellogg 

William Hamilton Jeffers 

Benjamin Breckenbridge Warfield 

Thomas Hastings Robinson 

David MacDill 

David A. McClenahan 

Robert Dick Wilson 

James Alexander Grier 

John McNaugher 

Henry T. McClelland 

Matthew Brown Riddle 

Oliver Joseph Thatcher 

Wilbert Webster White 

Robert Christie 

John A. Wilson 

John Douds Irons 

James Anderson Kelso 

David Riddle Breed 

Joseph Kyle 

Jesse Johnson 

David Schley Schaff 

John Elliott Wishart 

David E. Cully 

William Riley Wilson 

Charles Frederick Wishart 

William Robertson Farmer 

John Hunter Webster 

James Henry Snowden 

Melvin Grove Kyle 

James Doig Rankin 

David Frazier McGill 

Frank Eakin 

James Gallaway Hunt 

Selby Frame Vance 

James Harper Grier 

Robert McNary Karr 

James Leon Kelso 

George Boone McCreary 

Robert Nathaniel Montgomery 

Donald Mackenzie 

Gaius Jackson Slosser 

Albert Henry Baldinger 

Clarence Joseph Williamson 

John Wick Bowman 

William F. Orr 

George Anderson Long 

Theophilus Mills Taylor 

Jarvis M. Cotton 



Xenia 


1873-1878 


Western 


1874-1877 


Western 


1877-1886 


Western 


1877-1914 


Western 


1878-1887 


Western 


1883-1906 


Xenia 


1884-1902 


Allegheny 
Western 


1885-1921 
1885-1900 


Allegheny 
Allegheny 
Western 


1886-1909 
1886-1943 
1886-1891 


Western 


1887-1916 


Allegheny 
Xenia 


1888-1892 
1889-1894 


Western 


1891-1923 


Allegheny 
Xenia 


1893-1915 
1895-1905 


Western 


1897-1944 


Western 


1898-1931 


Xenia 


1899-1921 


Xenia 


1903-1930 


Western 


1903-1926 


Xenia 


1905-1923 


Western 


1906-1948 


Allegheny 
Allegheny 
Western 


1907-1940 
1907-1914 
1907-1939 


Xenia 


1908-1933 


Western 


1911-1928 


Xenia 


1914-1930 


Pittsburgh 
Pittsburgh 
Western 


1914-1929 
1915-1931 
1915-1927 


Pittsburgh 
Western 


1920-1926 
1921-1935 


Pittsburgh 


1922-1926 


Xenia 


1922-1949 


Xenia 


1923-1963 


Xenia 


1924-1946 


Pittsburgh 
Western 


1926-1930 
1928-1933 


Western 


1928-1958 


Pittsburgh-Xenia 
Pittsburgh-Xenia 
Western 


1931-1947 
1932-1950 
1936-1944 


Western 


1936- 


Pittsburgh-Xenia 
Pittsburgh-Xenia 
Western 


1942-1955 
1942-1962 
1944-1961 



124 



Frank Dixon McCloy 


Western 


1944-1967 


Henry Alexander Riddle 


Western 


1944-1949 


J. Carter Swaim 


Western 


1944-1954 


Walter R. Clyde 


Western 


1945- 


Addison Hardie Leitch 


Pittsburgh-Xenia 


1946-1961 


Florence M. Lewis 


Pittsburgh-Xenia 


1947-1952 


H. Ray Shear 


Pittsburgh-Xenia 


1947-1959 


David Noel Freedman 


Western 


1948-1964 


Gordon Edmund Jackson 


Pittsburgh-Xenia 


1949- 


Ralph G. Turnbull 


Western 


1949-1954 


John H. Gerstner 


Pittsburgh-Xenia 


1950- 


Clifford E. Barbour 


Western 


1951-1962 


Bessie M. Burrows 


Pittsburgh-Xenia 


1953- 


James A. Walther 


Western 


1954- 


Sidney 0. Hills 


Western 


1954- 


Robert Lee Kelley, Jr. 


Pittsburgh-Xenia 


1955- 


Robert Clyde Johnson 


Western 


1955-1963 


Howard M. Jamieson, Jr. 


Pittsburgh-Xenia 


1955- 


John M. Bald 


Pittsburgh-Xenia 


1957- 


Elwyn Allen Smith 


Western 


1957-1966 


Walter E. Wiest 


Western 


1957- 


Malcolm S. Alexander 


Pittsburgh-Xenia 


1958-1966 


Harold E. Scott 


Pittsburgh-Xenia 


1959- 


Howard L. Ralston 


Western and Pittsburgh-Xenia 


1960- 


William A. Nicholson 


Western 


1960- 


James Sheppard Irvine 


Western 


1960-1966 


J. Gordon Chamberlin 


Pittsburgh 


1960- 


Gayraud S. Wilmore 


Pittsburgh 


1961-1965 


Arlan P. Dohrenburg 


Pittsburgh 


1961-1964 


Edward D. Grohman 


Pittsburgh 


1961-1964 


David G. Buttrick 


Pittsburgh 


1961- 


Donald G. Miller 


Pittsburgh 


1962- 


George H. Kehm 


Pittsburgh 


1962- 


Dietrich Ritschl 


Pittsburgh 


1963- 


Markus Barth 


Pittsburgh 


1963- 


Edward Farley 


Pittsburgh 


1963- 


Lynn Boyd Hinds 


Pittsburgh 


1963- 


Iain G. Wilson 


Pittsburgh 


1963- 


Douglas R. A. Hare 


Pittsburgh 


1964- 


Donald E. Gowan 


Pittsburgh 


1965- 


Jared J. Jackson 


Pittsburgh 


1965- 


Eberhard von Waldow 


Pittsburgh 


1966- 


Dikran Y. Hadididian 


Pittsburgh 


1966- 


Peter Fribley 


Pittsburgh 


1966- 


Robert S. Paul 


Pittsburgh 


1967- 


Ford Lewis Battles 


Pittsburgh 


1967- 


Paul W. Lapp 


Pittsburgh 


1968- 



125 



Donations and Bequests 



All donations or bequests to the Seminary should be made to "The Pittsburgh 
Theological Seminary of the United Presbyterian Church in the United States 
of America, located at 616 North Highland Avenue, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 
15206." The proper legal form for making a bequest is as follows. 

"I hereby give and bequeath to Pittsburgh Theological Seminary of the 
United Presbyterian Church in the United States of America, incorporated 
in the State of Pennsylvania, the following: ..." 

Care should be taken to use the corporate name as given above, and to have 
the bequest conform to the laws of the state governing it. 

The memorial idea may be carried out either in the erection of a building or 
in the endowment of any of the special funds of the Seminary. 



126 



Index 

Administrative Staff 122 

Admissions: College Requirements, Credentials, Procedure, etc 36-39 

Advanced Standing 50-51 

Alumni Association 94 

Attendance, Summary of 117 

Awards Granted, 1966-1967 99-101 

Awards, prizes, and graduate fellowships 43-46 

Bachelor of Divinity Degree . 50-53, 56-74, 87 

Board of Directors 120-122 

Buildings 23-28 

Calendar of Events, 1968-1969 4 

Campus 23-32 

Continuing Education 92-93 

Curriculum 49-90 

Degree Programs, Index to 49 

Degrees Awarded, 1966-1967 96-99 

Doctoral Program 88-90 

Donations and Bequests 126 

Emeriti 13 

Enrollment, Summary of 117 

Expenses 40-41 

Faculty 5-13 

Fees and Expenses 40-41 

Field Education 74 

Financial Assistance 42-43 

Foreign Students 39 

Four-year Program 53 

Graduation Honors and Awards 99-101 

History of Seminary 19 

Honors Program 51 

127 



Hospitalization Insurance 41 

Housing 26-27 

Insurance, Medical and Hospital 41 

Lectures, Special 14-15 

Library 24-26 

Loan Funds 42-43 

Married Student Apartment Fees 40 

Master of Education Degree 86 

Master of Public Administration Degree 87 

Master of Public and International Affairs Degree 87 

Master of Religious Education Degree 54-55, 58-73 

Master of Theology Degree 76-80 

Medical Insurance 41 

Museum, Bible Lands 29 

Music, Opportunities in 34 

Pittsburgh— Our Environment 21 

Pittsburgh, University of, programs with 83-90 

Pre-Seminary Studies 36-37 

Professors, Historical Roll of 123-125 

Register of Students, 1967-1968 95-117 

Scholarships, loans, etc 42-43 

Student Association 33 

Summer Field Education 74 

Transfer Students 38 

Worship 33 



128 



ITTSBURGH 

HEOLOGICAL 

EMINARY 



969-1970 




CATALOGUE ISSUE OF PERSPECTIVE 

Journal of Pittsburgh Theological Seminary Volume X, Spring 1969 



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The Annual Catalogue of 

The Pittsburgh 

Theological 

Seminary 



1969-1970 



A SEMINARY OF THE UNITED PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH 
IN THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, FOUNDED 1794. 
ACCREDITED BY THE AMERICAN ASSOCIATION OF 
THEOLOGICAL SCHOOLS. 



616 N. HIGHLAND AVENUE 
PITTSBURGH, PENNSYLVANIA 15206 



THE SEMINARY CALENDAR 

The celebration of the 175 th anniversary of the seminary which was begun at 
the 175th commencement (1969) will continue throughout the school year, 
1969- 1970. 

Summer Programs of Continuing Education 



1969 

15-20 June School of Religion, Shadyside Academy 

12-19 July Pastors-Wives' Seminar 

First Semester 

2-3 Sept. Junior Orientation and Registration 

3 Sept. Convocation, 1 1:00 a.m., and Community Luncheon 

4 Sept. Class Work Begins 

13 Sept. Junior Orientation Retreat 

7 Oct. Continuing Education Eight Weeks School Begins 

17 Oct. Last day for dropping courses 

20-25 Oct. Schaff Lecture Week (Professor Paul L. Lehmann, Lecturer) 

19 Nov. Semi-Annual Meeting, Board of Directors 

27 Nov. Thanksgiving Day (No classes) 

8-13 Dec. Reading Period 

15-18 Dec. Examination Period 

19Dec.-4Jan. Christmas Recess 

1970 

5-23 Jan. Intersession 

Second Semester 

26 Jan. Class Work Begins 

3 Feb. Continuing Education Eight Weeks School Begins 

6 Mar. Last day for dropping courses 

9-14 Mar. First Reading Period (Conference on Human Values in the 
21st Century) 

27 Mar. Good Friday (No classes) 

6-10 Apr. Second Reading Period (Pittsburgh Conference on the Gospels) 

27 Apr. Last Class day (Friday classes) 

30 Apr.- 1 May Examination Period for Seniors 

4-8 May Examination Week for Juniors and Middlers 

10 May Communion Service for Seniors, 4:00 p.m., and Buffet Supper 

1 1 May Dedication of the Chapel 

1 2 May Annual Meeting of the Board of Directors 

12 May Annual Meeting and Dinner of the Alumni Association 

12 May Commencement, 8:00 p.m. 



The 
acultv 



The Faculty 






Donald G. Miller, President. Greenville College, A.B.; 
The Biblical Seminary in N.Y., S.T.B. and S.T.M.; 
New York University, M.A. and Ph.D. 



William F. Orr, Professor of New Testament Litera- 
ture and Exegesis. Southwestern University, A.B.; 
Louisville Presbyterian Seminary, B.D. and Th.M.: 
Hartford Theological Seminary, Ph.D. 



Walter R. Clyde, Professor of Christian Mission. 
Muskingum College, A.B.; Omaha Theological Sem- 
inary, B.D.; Western Theological Seminary, S.T.M.; 
Hartford Seminary Foundation, Ph.D. 



Gordon E. Jackson, Dean of the Seminary and Hugh 
Thomson Kerr Professor of Pastoral Theology. Mon- 
mouth College, A.B.; Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological 
Seminary, Th.B. and Th.M.; University of Chicago, 
Ph.D. 




John H. Gerstner, Professor of Church History. West- 
minster College, A.B.; Westminster Theological Sem- 
inary, Th.B. and Th.M.; Harvard University, Ph.D. 



Bessie M. Burrows, Assistant Professor of Christian 
Education and Registrar. Geneva College, B.A.; Co- 
lumbia University, M.A. 



The Faculty 



James A. Walther, Associate Professor of New Testa- 
ment Literature and Exegesis. Grove City College, 
A.B.; Western Theological Seminary, S.T.B.; Em- 
manuel College, Victoria University, Toronto, Th.D. 



Sidney O. Hills, Associate Professor of Hebrew and 
Old Testament Literature. Northwestern University, 
B.A.; McCormick Theological Seminary, B.D.; Johns 
Hopkins University, Ph.D. 



Robert Lee Kelley, Jr., Associate Professor of Biblical 
Languages. University of Pittsburgh, A.B. ; Pittsburgh- 
Xenia Theological Seminary, B.D.; Princeton Theo- 
logical Seminary, Th.M.; Princeton University, M.A. 



Howard M. Jamieson, Jr., Associate Professor of New 
Testament and Dean of Students. Monmouth College, 
A.B.; Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary, Th.B.; 
University of Pittsburgh, M.A. and Ph.D. 



John M. Bald, Associate Professor of Christian Ethics 
and Associate Dean. Muskingum College, A.B.; Pitts- 
burgh-Xenia Theological Seminary, Th.B. and Th.M.; 
Emmanuel College, Victoria University, Toronto, 
Th.D. 





X 






Walter E. Wiest, Professor of Philosophy of Religion. 
Lafayette College, A.B.; Princeton Theological Semi- 
nary, Th.B.; Columbia University, Ph.D. 



The Faculty 



Harold E. Scott, Associate Professor of Homiletics 
and Director of Field Education. Sterling College, 
B.A.; Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary, B.D.; 
Princeton Theological Seminary, Th.D. 



Howard L. Ralston, Assistant Professor of Church 
Music. Muskingum College, Mus. B.; Curtis Institute 
of Music, A.A.G.O. 




William A. Nicholson, Assistant Professor of Homi- 
letics. Washington & Jefferson College, A.B.; West- 
ern Theological Seminary, S.T.B. 





J. Gordon Chamberlin, Professor of Education. Cor- 
nell College in Iowa, A.B.; Union Theological Semi- 
nary (N.Y.), B.D.; Columbia University, Ed.D. 



David G. Buttrick, Associate Professor in Church and 
Ministry. Haverford College, B.A.; Union Theologi- 
cal Seminary (N.Y.), B.D. 



George H. Kehm, Associate Professor in Theology. 
Queens College, B.S.; Princeton Theological Seminary, 
B.D. ; Harvard Divinity School, S.T.M. ; Harvard Univer- 
sity, Th.D. 

8 



The Faculty 



Dietrich Ritschl, Professor of History of Doctrine 
and Systematic Theology. University of Edinburgh, 
Ph.D. 



Markus Barth, Professor of New Testament. Univer- 
sity of Goettingen, Dr. Theol. 



Edward Farley, Professor of Systematic Theology. 
Centre College, A.B.; Louisville Presbyterian Theo- 
logical Seminary, B.D.; Columbia University, Ph.D. 



Lynn Boyd Hinds, Assistant Professor of Speech. Uni- 
versity of Akron, B.A.; Eastern Baptist Theological 
Seminary, B.D.; Temple University, M.A. 



Douglas R. A. Hare, Associate Professor of New Tes- 
tament. Victoria College, University of Toronto, B.A.; 
Emmanuel College, B.D.; Union Theological Semi- 
nary (N.Y.), S.T.M. and Th.D. 



Donald E. Gowan, Assistant Professor of Old Testa- 
ment. University of South Dakota, B.A.; Dubuque 
Theological Seminary, B.D.; University of Chicago, 
Ph.D. 







The Faculty 





Jared Judd Jackson, Assistant Professor of Old Testa- 
ment. Harvard College, A.B.; Episcopal Theological 
School (Cambridge, Mass.), B.D.; Union Theological 
Seminary (N.Y.), Th.D. 



H. Eberhard von Waldow, Associate Professor of Old 
Testament. Bonn University, Dr. Theol. 






\ 



Dikran Y. Hadidian, Librarian and Professor of 
Bibliography. American University of Beirut, B.A.; 
Hartford Theological Seminary, B.D.; Hartford School 
of Religious Education, M.A.; Hartford Theological 
Seminary, S.T.M.; Columbia University, M.S. 



Robert S. Paul, Professor of Modern Church History. 
Saint Catherine's (Oxford University), B.A. and M.A.; 
Mansfield College (Oxford University), Ph.D. 




** JflMi 



Ford Lewis Battles, Professor of Church History and 
History of Doctrine. West Virginia University, B.A.; 
Tufts College, M.A.; Hartford Seminary Foundation, 
Ph.D. 



Paul Wilbert Lapp, Professor of Old Testament and 
Archeology. Concordia College, B.A.; Washington 
University, M.A. in Education; University of California, 
Ph.D.; Harvard University, Th.D. 

10 



The Faculty 



Neil R. Paylor, Assistant Professor in Church and 
Ministry. Hanover College, B.A.; Princeton Theological 
Seminary, B.D.; Harvard University, Ph.D. 



Guest Professors 

PaulL. Harrison, Ph.D. (Yale) 

(Associate Professor of Religious Studies, Pennsyl- 
vania State University) 
Guest Professor in Church and Ministry, 1968-1969. 

Frederick Ferre, Ph.D. (St. Andrews, Scotland) 
(Professor of Philosophy, Dickinson College) 
Guest Professor in Theology, 1968-1969 

Clifford E. Davis, Ph.D. (Pennsylvania State) 
Lecturer in Christian Education 

Robert J. Shoemaker, M.D. (Pittsburgh) 

(Clinical Assistant Professor of Psychiatry, University 

of Pittsburgh School of Medicine) 

Lecturer and Consultant in Psychiatry 

Margaret B. McFarland, Ph.D. (Columbia) 

(Associate Professor of Psychology, University of 

Pittsburgh; Director, Arsenal Family and Children's 

Center) 

Lecturer, the Program for Advanced Pastoral Studies 

Rex A. Pittenger, M.D. (Minnesota) 
(Staunton Assistant Professor of Psychiatry, Univer- 
sity of Pittsburgh School of Medicine; Chief, Staun- 
ton Clinic) 
Lecturer, the Program for Advanced Pastoral Studies 

Erma T. Meyerson, B.S., M.A.A.S.S. (Pittsburgh) 
(Professor of Sociology and Social Work, College of 
Liberal Arts and Graduate School of Social Work, 
University of Pittsburgh) 
Lecturer, the Program for Advanced Pastoral Studies 

11 




Jack Matthews, M. A., Ph.D. (Ohio State) 

(Professor and Chairman, the Department of Speech, 

University of Pittsburgh) 

Lecturer, the Program for Advanced Pastoral Studies 

Victor Freeman, M.D. 

(University of Toronto, Canada) 

Lecturer, the Program for Advanced Pastoral Studies 

FredM. Rogers, B.D. (Pittsburgh) 
(Minister to Children, the Oakland Ministry, Pitts- 
burgh, and in Television) 
Guest Instructor in Church and Ministry 

Edith Warman Skinner, M.A. (Columbia) 

(Professor, Drama Department, Carnegie Institute of 

Technology) 

Guest Professor of Speech 

Robert L. Parks, B.F.A. (Carnegie Tech.) 
(Assistant Professor of Voice and Speech, Carnegie 
Institute of Technology) 
Guest Professor of Speech 

James B. Bloom field, M.S. W. (Pittsburgh) 

(Chief, Social Work Service, Veterans Administration 

Hospital) 

Lecturer, the Program for Advanced Pastoral Studies 

Margaret M. Wynne, M.S. W. (Pittsburgh) 
(Assistant Chief, Social Work Service, Veterans Ad- 
ministration Hospital) 
Lecturer, the Program for Advanced Pastoral Studies 

F. Ross Kinsler, Ph.D. (University of Edinburgh) 

(Professor, Evangelical Presbyterian Seminary of 

Guatemala) 

Guest Professor in Church and Ministry 

Rabbi Walter Jacob, Doctor of Hebrew Letters 
(Rabbi of Rodef Shalom Temple) 
Guest Professor in History and Theology 

Rex Speers, M.D., (Utah) 

(Associate Professor of Psychiatry) Lecturer, the Pro- 
gram for Advanced Pastoral Studies 

Theodore M. Finney, Mus.D., (Washington and Jeffer- 
son) 
Curator of the Warrington Collection on Hymnology 

12 



Precept Leaders in Field Education 
William M. Aber Paul H. Sampsell 

Carl E. Ericson Robert J. Stone 

David W. Malone Carl G. Stromee 

Teaching Pastors in Homiletics 

Ross Porter Charles Robshaw Robert Vogelsang 

Precept Leaders in Psychological Foundations of Ministry 
Martin Adler Alvan Bloch Don Gross 

Emeriti 

The Rev. Clifford Edward Barbour, Ph.D., D.D., L.L.D. 
President Emeritus 

The Rev. Robert McNary Karr, D.D. 

Emeritus Professor of Systematic and Biblical Theology 

The Rev. James Leon Kelso, A.M., Th.M., Th.D., 
D.D., LL.D. 

Emeritus Professor of Old Testament History and 
Biblical Archaeology 

The Rev. George Anderson Long, D.D., LL.D., LittD. 
President Emeritus and Emeritus Professor of English 
Bible 

The Rev. Henry A. Riddle, D.D., LL.D. 
President Emeritus 







Father Baum, Schaff Lecturer 

13 



SPECIAL LECTURERS- 1968-1969 

Donald C. Bumham 

President, Westinghouse Electric Corporation, Pitts- 
burgh, Pa. 

Charles Habib Malik 

Lebanese diplomat and former president of the 
United Nations General Assembly and United Nations 
Security Council. 

Dr. Harold Stahmer 

Department of Religion, Barnard College, Columbia 

University, New York 

Capt. T. David Parham 

Chaplain, Department of the Navy, Washington, D.C. 

Dr. John Coventry Smith 

Moderator, UPUSA, Larchmont, New York 

Dr. Earland I. Carlson 

President, Westminster College, New Wilmington, Pa. 

The Rev. Warren W. Ost 

Director, Christian Ministry in the National Parks, 

New York 

Dr. Jan M. Lochman 

Professor of Systematic Theology & Philosophy, 
Comenius-F acuity of Theology, Prague, Czechoslo- 
vakia 

Dr. Jean Jacques von Allmen 

Professor of Practical Theology, Theological Faculty, 

Universite de Nauchatel, Switzerland 

Fr. Gregory Baum 

Associate Professor of Theology at St. Michael's 

College, University of Toronto, Canada 

Dr. Milan Michovec 

Professor of Philosophy, Charles University, Prague, 

Czechoslovakia 

John Lynch 

Vice-President, Blair & Company, Pittsburgh, Pa. 



14 



Convocations in Black Culture 

Roy C. Nichols 

Bishop of the Pittsburgh Conference of the Method- 
ist Church 

Charles Wesley 

Association of Negro Life and History, Washington, 

D.C. 

Lucius Walker 

Inter-Religious Foundation for Community Organiza- 
tion, New York City 

Byrd Brown 

Attorney, and President of N.A.A.C.P. Pittsburgh 

Chapter 

Miss Ida Mary Lewis 

The University of Pittsburgh 

Mr. George E. Sawyer 

Attorney, Legal Aid Society, Indianapolis 

Mr. Harold Betters 

Jazz Musician, Pittsburgh 

The Reverend Mr. Lenton Gunn 
Pastor, St. Mark's United Presbyterian Church, Cleve- 
land 

Dr. Gayraud Wilmore 
Chairman, Division of Church and Race, 
United Presbyterian Church, U.S.A. 
New York City 

The Reverend Mr. Channing Phillips 
Washington, D.C. 



15 




Mr. Lucius Walker, speaking on Community Organization at a Convocation on Black 
Culture. 



16 



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Pittsburgh Seminary 
Our History 



The Pittsburgh Theological Seminary was created in 1959 by the consolida- 
tion of two institutions which had lived apart since 1825: Pittsburgh-Xenia 
Theological Seminary (United Presbyterian Church of North America) and 
Western Theological Seminary (Presbyterian Church, U.S.A.). 

Pittsburgh-Xenia Seminary was formed in 1930 by the union of Pittsburgh 
and Xenia Seminaries. The Xenia branch had been founded in 1794 in West- 
ern Pennsylvania but had spent most of its life in Ohio and Missouri. The 
Pittsburgh branch originated in 1825 in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. Both 
branches were later augmented by the resources of Newburgh Seminary which 
was founded in New York City in 1805 by John Mitchell Mason. 

Western Seminary, established legally in 1825 by the General Assembly of 
the Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.), began with classical academies founded by 
Joseph Smith (1785) and John McMillan (1787) in Washington, Pa. It was in- 
deed a "western" seminary in 1825, whose task was to furnish a ministry for 
the rapidly opening western territories along the Ohio River. 

The union in 1958 of the United Presbyterian Church of North America 
with the Presbyterian Church in the United States of America and the subse- 
quent merger of Pittsburgh-Xenia and Western Seminaries were possible be- 
cause of ancient bonds: the Bible, the reformers, and the Scottish experience 
of witness and suffering. Church divisions in Scotland were reproduced in 
America. Since 1800 the direction has been steadily toward common witness 
with a resulting joining of schools. Pittsburgh Theological Seminary is the 
issue of this growing fellowship in theological education. 

The purpose of the Seminary as defined in the Constitution is to educate 
suitable persons for the work of Christian ministry in its various forms at the 
highest possible level of educational competence. Set down in the midst of 
one of the key industrial centers of the nation, the Seminary experiments in 
the city about it, wrestles with the nature of the gospel, strives for eventful 
communication. The purpose of the Seminary is clearcut: to know our time, 
the gospel for the healing of our time, and the ministry for our time. 

19 



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Pittsburgh 
Our Environment 



Pittsburgh Seminary is located in the workshop of America. Together with 
the contiguous towns, Pittsburgh is one of the great industrial centers of 
the world. Its population includes people of every nationality, profession, 
and skill, and therefore it affords unexcelled opportunities for the study 
of social, economic, political, and racial problems. Pittsburgh Seminary has 
working relationships with community and social agencies, labor unions, 
business management, human development research centers, teaching hospitals, 
etc., whereby these agencies and organizations become further resources for 
the educating of theological students. 



The cultural and educational life of Pittsburgh is no less rich. Five major 
colleges and universities are located in Pittsburgh: The University of Pitts- 
burgh, Carnegie-Mellon University, Duquesne University, Chatham College, 
and Mt. Mercy College. Their facilities, programs, and libraries, plus the 
Carnegie free libraries, afford added resources to all students. 



For music and art there are the world-famous Pittsburgh Symphony Or- 
chestra; the Pittsburgh Opera Society; the Mendelssohn and Bach Choirs and 
other choral and concert groups; the Pittsburgh Playhouse, in its thirty-third 
year, which presents a total repertoire of plays; numerous art galleries includ- 
ing the Arts and Crafts Center and the Pittsburgh Plan for Art, both near the 
campus; and Carnegie Institute, which houses one of the largest contemporary 
art collections in the country, and which every third year presents the Pitts- 
burgh International Exhibition of Paintings and Sculpture. Begun in 1896, 
the Pittsburgh International is one of the most important exhibitions of 
contemporary art in the world. 



Churches of all types and denominations are to be found, ranging from the 
large urban congregation to the small rural or industrial mission. Pittsburgh 
Presbytery is one of the largest presbyteries in the United Presbyterian 
Church, U.S.A. Within its bounds are two hundred eleven churches with a 
total membership of about one hundred twenty-six thousand. Of these, about 
one-fifth have more than five hundred members each, and mission work is 
conducted in over twenty different places. 

21 



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The Campus 



Setting 

Pittsburgh Theological Seminary is ideally situated to symbolize by its very 
setting the church in the world. Located at the heart of a metropolitan center 
of two and a half million people, it is bordered on one side by an urban re- 
newal project, including business and apartment buildings, churches, and 
schools, and on the other side by a residential area housing people of many 
ethnic backgrounds. By looking out almost any window on campus, one sees 
not only the broad expanse of lawn and trees of a once lovely estate given to 
the Seminary in 1951 by the heirs of the late H. Lee Mason, Jr., but is re- 
minded also of the world in which the church lives and serves. 



Buildings 

New, modern buildings of American Colonial design, constructed of Hampton 
Court Colonial red brick trimmed with Indiana limestone and fireproof 
throughout, house the seminary activities. 

At the center of the campus stands The George A. Long Administration 
Building, which is the nerve center of campus life. Here classrooms, seminar 
rooms, faculty and administrative offices, a student center, a reception room, 
a Bible Lands Museum, a speech center, and the mail room all constitute a 
beehive of learning and social fellowship. 

The McCune Chapel, opening off the rotunda at the rear of the main build- 
ing, done in chaste Colonial style, is the place where the seminary community 
gathers for worship and the renewal of spiritual life. 




Anderson Hall 



23 



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The Clifford E. Barbour Library was built and furnished with funds provid- 
ed by the Sarah Mellon Scaife and Richard K. Mellon Foundations. The 
library is air-conditioned throughout. There is easy access to book resources 
located in four stack areas. One hundred and three desk carrels placed in and 
around the book stacks are available to all readers, in addition to which there 
are thirteen enclosed typing carrels which allow greater privacy for research 
work. Twenty research study rooms provide ideal conditions in which the 
faculty, visiting scholars and graduate students may pursue serious scholarly 
endeavors. Several study rooms and lounges, informally arranged, invite 
leisurely reading for more than 75 persons aside from many areas devoted to 
special purposes. Faculties are available for small seminar classes, conference 
and group study lessons, audio-visual work, music listening, microfilm read- 
ing, and hymnological and historical research. 

On display in the Main Floor exhibit area are the desk and chair of Dr. Karl 
Barth, Basel, Switzerland, presented to Pittsburgh Seminary by Dr. Barth 
in 1964. Accompanying the desk at which Dr. Barth wrote his theological 
treatises from 1922 is an autographed copy of his Kirchliche Dogmatik 1/1. 

The following special collections augment the book resources: 

The John M. Mason Memorial Collection 

The research area of the library contains this priceless collection of classical 
theological works dating from the Reformation period. 

The James Warrington Collection ofHymnology 

Several thousand valuable hymn and psalm books which came from the 
estate of James Warrington, Philadelphia, provide research materials for 
scholars of American and English hymnody. Mr. Warrington minutely ana- 
lyzed the works by composer, meter tune, place, author, title, etc. 

The Nina S. Brittain Collection 

Through the generosity of Frank J. Brittain, Esq., of Erie, Pennsylvania, the 
sum of $5000 was used for the purchase of theological and related works 
which are known as the Nina S. Brittain Collection. 

The Clarence J. Williamson Church History Collection 

In 1958 endowment funds were established, income of which is to be used 
for the purchase of books in Church History and closely related subjects. 
These books are in memory of Dr. Clarence J. Williamson, a graduate of 
Pittsburgh Seminary, for fifty-one years a minister in the United Presbyterian 
Church of North America, and for eighteen years Professor of Church History 
and Government in the Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary. 

Historical Collections 

A room of the library contains the Minutes and other records of Associate, 
Associate Reformed, and United Presbyterian congregations, presbyteries, 
synods, and General Assemblies. The library is also the depository for the 
Upper Ohio Valley Historical Society and Pittsburgh Presbytery of The 
United Presbyterian Church in the U.S.A. 

25 



Housing 

Single students are comfortably and commodiously housed in two buildings 
connected to the Administration Building by a covered passageway on both 
the first and second floor levels. The George C. Fisher Memorial Hall accom- 
modates 80 men in single rooms. Six apartments for employees and married 
students are also located on the ground floor in this building. The John 
McNaugher Memorial Hall provides for 63 men, with an additional wing 
which houses 25 women. The dormitories have student lounges on each floor 
in addition to a game room and a snack room on the ground floor. There 
are three dining rooms served by a cafeteria, the larger of which has a 
seating capacity of over 500; in addition, there are six guests rooms which 
complete the dormitory complex. 

Although student rooms are fully and comfortably furnished, students 
must supply their own sheets, pillowcases, blankets, and towels, and provide 
for their own laundering. Summer occupancy of dormitory rooms is available 
by special arrangement. 

Married students and their families are housed on campus in five apartment 
buildings and a number of duplex houses. 

The Highlander is a modern apartment building on Highland Avenue near 
the northwest corner of the campus. It contains seventeen one bedroom and 
six two bedroom units. Each apartment includes a living room, kitchen, bath, 
and storage locker. These apartments are unfurnished, although all kitchens 
are equipped with electric ranges and refrigerators. Laundry facilities (coin 
meter) are available in the basement. 

The Samuel A. Fulton Memorial Hall provides eighteen efficiency and 
twenty-one two-room apartments. Each unit includes a kitchenette, a bath, 
with a storage locker in the basement. These apartments are fully furnished 
with desk, bookcase, dining table, chairs, davenport-bed, a chest of drawers, 
wardrobe, electric stove and refrigerator. Students must provide bedding, 
linens, silverware, china, cooking utensils, curtains, lamps and rugs. Laundry 
facilities (coin meter type) are available in the basement. A six-room, fully 
furnished apartment for the housing of a missionary family on furlough is 
provided in Fulton Hall. It is made available through cooperation with the 
Commission on Ecumenical Mission and Relations, to missionaries seeking 
fuller preparation for service on return to their various fields. 

Anderson and McMillan Halls were completed for occupancy early in 1968 
and provide 31 unfurnished "town house type" apartments. The buildings 
form a quadrangle with the existing two wings of the Highlander. This may be 
used as an enclosed play area for children. Anderson Hall includes 6 two 
bedroom and 6 three bedroom apartments on three floors. A laundry and 
locker storage area is provided in the basement. 

McMillan Hall provides 19 apartments which include one four bedroom, 
three three bedroom, 12 two bedroom, and 3 one bedroom apartments. 
Again, there is a laundry (coin meter type) in the basement together 
with ample locker storage space. 

The apartments are unfurnished although a refrigerator and electric stove 
are provided. These appliances are a permanent part of the apartments and 
cannot be moved out to allow personal appliances. All windows are equipped 
with shades and traverse rods. The walls are an off-white neutral shade and the 

26 



floors are covered wall to wall with a wheat heather carpeting. On the 
ground level of McMillan Hall a large community room has been provided 
for use as a children's play-care room as well as a general activities room for 
the student community. 

The Sheridan Avenue Apartments are located on the campus at 519 
Sheridan Avenue. This three story building contains 6 unfurnished apartments 
for couples with children. Washers and dryers, (coin meter type), are 
installed in the basement. 

There are a limited number of unfurnished apartments on campus for 
students and families. Many of these houses will be eliminated as there is 
assurance of adequate housing in other seminary facilities. 

Life for married students and their families is as comfortable and efficient 
as is possible in student apartments. Rents are well below the commercial 
rates, shops and stores are within easy reach, public transportation is available 
right to the seminary gate, and good schools are nearby for children of school 
age. 




Student Apartment 



27 



The Bible Lands Museum 

Pittsburgh Theological Seminary has an outstanding list of accomplishments 
in archaeological research of Bible times in ancient Palestine. In conjunction 
with the American Schools of Oriental Research at Jerusalem, in Jordan, 
it conducted an exploration at Bab ed-Dra at the southern end of the 
Dead Sea in 1924. A series of joint excavations was made at Kirjath-Sepher 
in 1926, 1928, 1930 and 1932. Bethel became the site of research in 1934, 
1954, 1957 and 1960, and a significant project was carried out at New 
Testament Jericho and Nitla in 1950. In 1964 the Kyle-Kelso Fund for 
Archaeological Research in Jordan was established and joint projects with 
the American Schools of Oriental Research were carried on at Gibeah of 
Saul in the summer of 1964 and at Tell er Rumeith in 1967. This latter 
site may possibly be that of Old Testament Ramoth Gilead. 

In conjunction with Carnegie Museum and the Department of Antiquities 
of Israel, through the Holy Lands Exhibition Fund, Pittsburgh Theological 
Seminary conducted archaeological digs at the biblical site at Ashdod in 
1962, 1963 and 1965. Both students and faculty have participated in the 
1967 and 1968 Ashdod expeditions under the direction of Dr. James 
Swauger of Carnegie Museum. 

The archaeological work at Pittsburgh Theological Seminary was inaugu- 
rated by Professor M. G. Kyle and was then carried on by Professor James 
L. Kelso until his retirement in 1963. In the spring of 1964 Associate 
Professor Howard M. Jamieson, Jr. was appointed Faculty Administrator 
of the Kyle-Kelso Fund. By action of the Board of Directors in November, 
1968, the Kyle-Kelso Fund is established for the study of the peoples and 
culture of the Mediterranean Basin, with special reference to the Judeo- 
Christian heritage. 

With the coming of Dr. Paul W. Lapp to the faculty the archaeological 
program of Pittsburgh Theological Seminary has added a significant new 
dimension. Having been involved in field archaeology in the Middle East 
consistently since 1957, Dr. Lapp will direct future field projects of the 
Seminary, including the participation of Doctoral candidates, as well as 
B.D. students. 

Much of the Seminary's share of the antiquities excavated in the digs 
is now on exhibit in the Bible Lands Museum, which is located in the 
administration building. The museum is used as a teaching facility for the 
seminary program. The objects in the Bible Lands Museum illustrate the 
way of life of the people of Palestine and so become of great value for 
understanding and interpretation. Occasionally archaeological discoveries 
corroborate biblical statements, as in the case of the fragments of a royal 
inscription of Sargon II of Assyria, found at Ashdod, which relates to 
Isaiah 20:1. For the most part, however, archaeological excavations illumine 
the cultural, social, economic, political and religious background of the 
Bible, supplying much data for deeper understanding of the people and 
the land of the Bible. 



28 



Life on The Campus 

Community Life 

The social life of the campus is enhanced by the presence of single students, 
married couples, and families. It is greatly enriched by those students from 
the Orient, Europe, Africa, the Middle East, South America, etc., who 
come to study but also to share their cultures. 

Missionary families spending their furloughs on the campus for study bring 
to the community a sense of the Church ecumenical coupled with a sense 
of urgency. 

Admittedly, the emphasis in a theological seminary is not on social 
activities, but inter-personal relationships run deep and the socializing values 
are maintained by way of group get-togethers and periodical school functions. 
A beautiful contemporary student center provides a setting for community 
life on the campus. Located below the chapel wing of the administration 
building, it is a place for refreshment, campus movies, group or class 
parties, and just a good place to get together. 

The Women's Association, for all women on campus, provides opportunities 
for group participation in a varied program of study, community activity, 
and social concern. 




29 




A Faculty-Student Curriculum Committee 
Meeting 



Father Gregory Baum with students at lunch. 





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30 



Convocations and Worship 

Through the faculty-student Convocation and Worship Committee, out- 
standing people are brought to the campus. Each fall and spring there is a 
major lectureship in which a prominent person— theologian, Biblical scholar, 
psychiatrist, writer, social thinker, and planner, etc.— is heard by the seminary 
family. Every Tuesday a visiting scholar from some field of intellectual 
inquiry, or some service project is on campus to speak in the weekly 
convocation. A list of some of these speakers from 1968-1969 is on pages 
14 and 15 of this catalogue. Chapel worship is conducted under the direction 
of students three days a week. 



Church and Society 

Ministry is done as well as studied at the Seminary. The student body 
reaches out to the community through field education and various laboratory 
assignments. Through the direction of the faculty-student Church and 
Society Committee the entire Seminary community is informed about 
current social issues and channeled into useful service. Relations are main- 
tained with settlement houses, urban renewal and development offices, 
and with the churches of the city for work with street gangs, housing 
programs, community organization, etc. The committee sponsors a tutoring 
program for neighborhood school children and directs faculty and student 
involvement in direct social action in the city and elsewhere in the nation. 



The Student Association 

The Student Association provides the organization through which the 
students carry on a program of involvement in community life, determined 
only by the interest and concern of the students themselves. A student 
Curriculum Committee meets with the faculty Curriculum Committee and 
is called upon to offer counsel and initiate continuing curriculum evaluation. 
The Convocation and Worship Committee of the Student Association directs 
the chapel program and consults with the faculty Convocation and Worship 
Committee in the establishment of lecture series and the selection of 
Convocation speakers. The student Publication Committee shares in the 
publication of PERSPECTIVE, PANORAMA, and THE DIRECTORY. An 
all-student publication, UNOFFICIAL PERSPECTIVE, offers weekly oppor- 
tunity for the expression of opinion and the examination of issues. The 
student Church and Society Committee works with a similar faculty com- 
mittee in a study of current social problems. This joint committee also 
organizes student and faculty action when deemed necessary. A student 
Social Committee and a student Stewardship Committee direct activities in 
their respective areas of concern. 

The Executive Committee of the Student Association for the year 1968- 
1969 was led by William A. Kramp, President, and Robert E. Salmon, 
Secretary -Treasurer. 



31 



The Seminary Musical Program 

The Seminary has a Men's Choir and a Mixed Chorus, both under the direction 
of Mr. Howard L. Ralston, Assistant Professor of Church Music. Auditions 
for membership in the Men's Choir are held in September. This group, care- 
fully chosen and of limited number, sings for daily chapel services and re- 
presents the Seminary from time to time in churches within easy traveling 
distance. A more extensive tour is undertaken in the spring when the choir 
presents a varied program of sacred music in churches and colleges. 

The Mixed Chorus is maintained for all those of the seminary community 
who enjoy singing. This group meets on Tuesday evenings and presents a 
program at Christmas and in the spring, and sings at commencement. There 
are many opportunities throughout the year for soloists and instrumentalists. 

One of the highlights of the seminary year is the James H. Snowden 
Memorial Concert, established in 1964 by the late Dr. Roy R. Snowden in 
memory of his father, a longtime former professor in the Seminary. This annual 
event enriches the cultural life of the seminary community by bringing to the 
campus Metropolitan Opera stars and other concert artists of the highest rank. 




Dr. Roy H. Snowden 
1885-1968 



32 



\dmissions 
lees 




33 



Admission Requirements 



Pittsburgh Theological Seminary offers work on a graduate school level. This 
presupposes a B.A. or B.S. degree from a regionally accredited college or 
university, the degree work to have a substantial foundation in the liberal 
arts. It also assumes that the student is ready to approach theological edu- 
cation with an open, searching attitude. Pittsburgh Seminary seeks that man 
or woman who is committed to the Christian faith, emotionally suited for 
work in the Church and intellectually capable of the most rigorous kind of 
academic discipline. 



Pre-Seminary Studies 



College courses prior to theological seminary should provide the cultural 
and intellectual foundations essential to an effective theological education. 
They should issue in at least three broad kinds of attainment. 

1. The college work of a pre-seminary student should result in the ability to 
use certain tools of the educated man: 

(a) The ability to write and speak English clearly and correctly. This 
purpose should also be cultivated in all written work. 

(b) The ability to think clearly. In some persons, this ability is cultivated 
through courses in philosophy or specifically in logic. In others it is 
cultivated by the use of scientific method, or by dealing with critical 
problems in connection with literary and historical documents. 

(c) The ability to read at least one foreign language and in some circum- 
stances more than one. 

34 



2. The college work of a pre-seminary student should result in increased 
understanding of the world in which he lives: 

(a) The world of men and ideas. This includes knowledge of English 
literature, philosophy, and psychology. 

(b) The world of nature. This is provided by knowledge of the natural 
sciences, including laboratory work. 

(c) The world of human affairs. This is aided by knowledge of history 
and the social sciences. 

3. The college work of a pre-seminary student should result in a sense of 
achievement: 

(a) The ability to think, to see relationships, to follow out logical steps 
of an argument, to develop procedures for dealing with problems. 
This ability is achieved in part through independent study. 

(b) The degree of his mastery of his field of study is more important than 
the credits and grades which he accumulates. 

The American Association of Theological Schools has prepared a list of the 
fields of study with which the student should have acquaintance before begin- 
ning seminary work. The liberal arts background is felt to provide the best 
foundation for theological study. However, this in no way precludes seminary 
study for the student with a background in the sciences. 



Foreign language is a tool of scholarship. At least one of the following 
languages is important for scholarly research: Latin, Greek, Hebrew, German, 
French. If Greek is selected, it should be taken in the final year of 
college or preferably in the last two years. 

A college background in religious studies is desirable. Included in such a 
study should be a thorough knowledge of the content of the Bible. The 
pre-seminary student may well seek counsel of the seminary in order 
most profitably to use the resources of his college. 



Of the various possible areas of concentration, where areas of concentra- 
tion are required, English, philosophy and history are regarded as the most 
desirable, and, where the department is strong, religion. 

At the beginning of the first year of seminary students will take examina- 
tions in philosophy, Greek, speech, and basic English. Students showing a 
deficiency in English will be required to remedy such deficiency before 
graduation. The Greek, philosophy, and speech examinations are for the pur- 
pose of placement. 

35 



Procedure for Admission 

Candidates seeking degrees may apply any time after the Junior year is com- 
pleted and prior to June 1 preceding the September for which admission is 
sought. All correspondence concerning admission to the seminary should be 
addressed to the Director of Admissions. Applications are considered by the 
committee when the following credentials are submitted. 

(1) A formal application. 

(2) Application fee. A check or money order for $15.00 must accompany 
the application. This will be applied to the first semester's tuition. 
While the fee will be refunded if the application is rejected, it is not 
returnable if the application is withdrawn. 

(3) Mental capacity test. The Seminary normally will correspond with the 
applicant's college concerning a mental capacity test. If none is avail- 
able, the applicant must take one under seminary direction. 

(4) A personal interview with the Director of Admissions or another 
representative of the Seminary who may be designated by the Director 
of Admissions. 

(5) A medical report on a blank furnished by the Seminary. 

(6) An official transcript from the registrar of the college or university, 
showing grades for at least three years of college work. 

(7) A battery of psychological tests which will be forwarded to a proctor 
as soon as the application form is received. These are the same tests 
that Presbytery requires of all candidates. They need to be taken only 
once. 

(8) An extensive (500-1000 words) statement in the applicant's hand- 
writing describing his family, educational, and religious background, 
placing particular emphasis upon his motives for desiring to enter the 
Seminary and the ministry. 

After admission is granted and within thirty days of such notification, a 
$35 placement fee is required to assure the applicant of a place in the new 
class. This fee is applied on the student's tuition and is not returnable except 
under extreme hardship and at the discretion of the Admissions Committee. 
A certification of the student's "intention to enroll" must accompany this 
fee. 



Transfer Students 

A student transferring from another seminary is required to submit, in 
addition to the foregoing, a complete transcript of previous seminary work 
and a letter of dismissal from the Dean or President. A transfer student must 
be in residence at Pittsburgh Seminary for a minimum of one full academic 
year in order to become a candidate for the Bachelor of Divinity degree. 



36 



Foreign Students 

Qualified applicants from other countries are welcome as a part of the student 
body. Such applicants shall be required, in addition to the regular require- 
ments for admission, to give evidence of proficiency in the English language 
before their admission. TOEFL (Test of English as a Foreign Language) is 
the standard test used by the Commission on Ecumenical Mission and Rela- 
tions and the World Council of Churches. The test is arranged through the 
Seminary or the Commission on Ecumenical Mission and Relations of the 
United Presbyterian Church. 

Such applicants shall have endorsement either of a representative of the 
Commission on Ecumenical Mission and Relations (in those areas where the 
United Presbyterian Church in the U.S.A. has fraternal workers) or the World 
Council of Churches (in other areas). 

An applicant from another country is also asked to submit a letter from 
his bank stating that there are on deposit sufficient funds to assure his passage 
home after his period of study in this country. This saves possible embarrass- 
ment to both student and seminary at a later time. 



Matriculation 

A final transcript showing the degree and date of graduation of the applicant 
must be submitted to the registrar. 




Professor von Waldow with students in a faculty-student curriculum committee meeting. 

37 



Fees and Expenses* 

(for the academic year) 

$640.00 Tuition (incl. Intersession) (approx.)f 
650.00 Tuition B.D.-Th.M., (third and fourth years) 
550.00 Board (incl. Intersession) 
200.00 Room Fee (incl. Intersession) 
10.00 Library Fee (annual) 
7.00 Student Association Fee (annual) 
150.00 Books (approx.) 
36.00-160.00 Hospitalization Insurance (approx.) 
100.00-200.00 Incidentals 

25.00 Campus Facility Fee for Non-Resident Students 

Maticulation Fee- $35.00 payable at the time of registration. 
Tuition Fee- $20.00 per semester hour.f 

Late Registration Fee- A charge of $5.00 will be made to students registering 
later than the specified time. 

Graduation Fee- $10.00 

Transcript Fee-One copy of a student's academic record will be provided 
without charge. A fee of $1.00 will be charged for each additional transcript. 

*Subject to change. 

f Subject to change in view of the new curriculum 



Married Student Apartment Fees 

Off Campus Residents 

All students admitted to the Seminary are expected to live on campus, unless, 
in the judgment of the Seminary, circumstances make it necessary to live 
elsewhere. All students who live off campus are required to pay a $25 campus 
fee. Students choosing to live off campus without the approval of the 
Seminary will not be eligible for financial assistance from the Seminary. 

The Highlander 

Twenty-three unfurnished apartments, $75.00-$85.00 per month 

The Samuel A. Fulton Memorial Hall 

Thirty-nine furnished apartments, $55.00-$70.00 per month 

Anderson Hall 

Twelve unfurnished apartments, $90.00-$ 100.00 per month 

McMillan Hall 

Nineteen unfurnished apartments, $80.00-$ 120.00 per month 

Sheridan Avenue Apartments 

Six unfurnished apartments, $55.00-$70.00 per month 

38 



Duplexes 

Five unfurnished apartments, $5 5. 00-$ 70.00 per month 
All apartments include refrigerator, stove, and storage locker or area. 

Fees for apartment occupancy are payable monthly. A $5.00 assessment will 
be added to all accounts not paid by the tenth of the month. Applications 
for apartments should be made as early as possible. 

A deposit of $10 per married couple, payable at registration, is required 
of all those living in seminary apartments. The deposit will be returned after 
satisfactory inspection at the time the apartment is vacated. 



Payment of Fees 

All academic fees and expenses are payable in advance on the opening day 
of each semester. When necessary, arrangements for a payment plan to cover 
a semester's expenses may be made at the Business Office on the first day of 
each term, permitting (4) four equal payments: one-fourth on the first day 
of the term, and the balance due at the beginning of the fourth, eighth, and 
twelfth weeks respectively. There is a carrying charge of $5.00 for the defer- 
red payment plan. Failure to pay any deferred payment within ten days from 
the date due will incur a penalty of 1% of the amount due . 

Settlement of all seminary bills is required before registration for a new 
semester, and before graduation or the release of official transcripts. 



Seminary Meals 

Residents of the men's and women's dormitories are required to eat in the 
seminary dining hall. Board includes nineteen meals a week; only breakfast 
is served on Sunday. The dining hall is closed on holidays which are scheduled 
on the seminary calendar. No deduction is allowed for absence from individual 
meals, although special consideration is given to students who regularly do 
not eat in the dining hall due to job requirements. 



Tuition Refunds on Courses Dropped 

First week of semester, $1 .00 withheld for each credit hour; balance refunded. 
Second to seventh week, one half refunded. 
Seventh week on, no refund. 



Medical and Hospitalization Insurance 

Students are required to be insured by medical and hospitalization 
insurance acceptable to the Seminary. All students who are registered 
as full-time students are eligible for such insurance under a group student 
policy issued by Minister's Life and Casualty Company. Detailed information 
concerning premiums and benefits may be secured at the Business Office. 

39 



Total Cost 

The total cost for one academic year, based upon a survey of actual student 
expenditures at Pittsburgh Seminary, is approximately $2,100 for an un- 
married student and $3,000 to $3,250 for a married student without children, 
depending on the variation in rentals. The cost for a married student having 
children is correspondingly higher. These totals include expenses for clothing, 
laundering and cleaning, medical and dental care not covered by hospitaliza- 
tion insurance, incidentals and recreation, as well as tuition, fees (hospitaliza- 
tion insurance premiums included), board, room and books. Not included are 
automobile operating costs, payments on purchases, life insurance premiums, 
repayment of indebtedness, and expenses for travel to and from the Seminary. 

Student Financial Assistance 

Pittsburgh Seminary provides financial help from endowed and general funds 
for students who demonstrate that their resources from their own earnings 
and savings, their families, local congregations and presbyteries are not suf- 
ficient to meet their Seminary expenses. Several merit scholarships are offered 
to entering students who have excellent academic records in their pre-seminary 
work and who must have financial help. Scholarship aid is also given accord- 
ing to need to upperclassmen whose academic attainments in their seminary 
work are high. Loans, grants-in-aid and remunerative campus work are also 
available as a part of the Seminary's financial assistance program. Approx- 
imately fifty work opportunities are available to students in the library, 
dining hall, and student center, and as attendants for various campus facilities. 
The work is limited to ten hours per week and the remuneration is credited 
to the student's account or paid in cash. Once a student is admitted the 
Seminary makes every effort to see that he need not drop out for financial 
reasons. 

The Board of Christian Education of the United Presbyterian Church, 
through its office of Educational Loans and Scholarships, provides assistance 
for United Presbyterian seminary students who demonstrate financial need 
in two programs: (1) Loans ($100 to $1,000 in a given year) and (2) United 
Presbyterian Study Grants (up to $1,000 in a given year). 

Specific details concerning scholarships, grants-in-aid, work assistance, and 
loan funds, together with application forms for both seminary and Board of 
Christian Education programs, may be obtained from the Financial Aid 
Officer. 



Loan Funds 

James H. Snowden Memorial Loan Fund. A loan fund for students needing 
financial assistance to obtain a theological education was established in 1953 
by R. R. Snowden, M.D., Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, in memory of his father, 
Professor James H. Snowden, D.D., LL.D. Loans from this fund are made on 
notes with interest and without further endorsement. 

40 



Walter G. and Esther B. Comin Student Loan Fund. A loan fund for students 
who need financial assistance to continue their education was established in 
1955 by Mrs. Walter G. Comin, Pawnee City, Nebraska, Mr. and Mrs. Walter G. 
Comin, Jr., Wilkinsburg, Pa., and Mr. Myron C. Comin, Spokane, Washington, 
in memory of Rev. Walter G. Comin, D.D. Loans from this fund are made on 
notes at four percent interest and without further endorsement. 

Westphal Memorial Loan Fund. The session of the Reed Memorial United 
Presbyterian Church, Lyndhurst, New Jersey, established in 1956 the West- 
phal Memorial Loan Fund. Under certain conditions specified by the donors 
loans from this fund may be made on notes without interest or further 
endorsements, and are repayable within ten years. 

Albert G. Hamilton Memorial Loan Fund. A loan fund for students who need 
financial assistance during the seminary course was established in 1960 by 
Mrs. Albert G. Hamilton, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, in memory of her husband, 
Mr. Albert G. Hamilton. Loans from this fund may be made on notes at three 
percent interest without further endorsement. 

Dr. and Mrs. James D. Sands Memorial Loan Fund. A loan fund for seminary 
students was established in 1961 by Mrs. Albert G. Hamilton, Pittsburgh, 
Pennsylvania, in memory of her parents, Dr. and Mrs. James D. Sands. Loans 
from this fund may be made on notes at three percent interest without further 
endorsement. 

Walter A. Long Memorial Student Rotary Loan Fund Established in 1961 by 
the Estate of Emma Clark Long. Loans are not to exceed $100 to any one 
student in any one academic year and the amount borrowed is to be repaid 
not later than two years after graduation or not later than two years after the 
borrower would have graduated if he had progressed normally through the 
seminary to graduation in the event of failure to graduate. All loans are made 
without interest. 

The William G. Crow Memorial Loan Fund Established in November, 1961. 
Loans from this fund may be made on notes with three percent interest. 



Awards, Prizes, and Graduate Fellowships 



The Sylvester S. Marvin Memorial Fellowship 

The Sylvester S. Marvin Fellowship may be assigned upon graduation to that 
member of the Senior Class who is recommended by the faculty as having 
achieved the highest standard in all departments of the seminary curriculum, 
provided that his average be not below 85%. The faculty reserves the right to 
impose special tests and examinations in making this award. It is offered to 
those who take the entire course of three years in this institution. The 
recipient must pledge himself to a year of post-graduate study immediately 
following his graduation at some institution approved by the faculty. He is 
required to furnish quarterly reports of his progress. The money will be paid 

41 



in three equal installments, on the first day of October, January, and April. 
Prolonged absence from the classroom in the discharge of extra-seminary 
duties makes a student ineligible for the fellowship. 

The Thomas Jamison Scholarship 

The Thomas Jamison Scholarship, in memory of the late Thomas Jamison, 
Esq., of North Side, Pittsburgh, was established by Mrs. Jamison. The income 
of this endowment is given every year to the member of the Senior Class who 
has the highest average at the beginning of his final semester of study. 

The acceptance of this scholarship requires that the recipient spend a full 
academic year in study in any graduate institution approved by the faculty. 
He must further agree to make regular reports of the work he is doing and at 
the end of the year he will present a satisfactory thesis of not less than ten 
thousand words on some subject selected by the faculty or approved by the 
faculty. If for any reason the man who is first in the class does not accept 
the scholarship and its requirements the scholarship will be offered to the 
student next in rank. 

The Jennie Rigg Barbour Memorial Prize 

The Jennie Rigg Barbour Memorial Prize was established by Rev. Clifford E. 
Barbour, Ph.D., D.D., LL.D., President Emeritus of Pittsburgh Theological 
Seminary, as a memorial to his mother. The income from the endowment of 
this prize is assigned to that member of the graduating class who has taken 
his full course of instruction in this institution and who has achieved the 
second highest academic rank of his class, if in the judgment of the faculty he 
is worthy in all other respects. It is hoped that the student will use this 
income for further study either within an academic institution or by the 
enlargement of his own library. 

The Michael Wilson Keith Memorial Homiletical Prize 

This prize was founded in 1919 by the Keith Bible Class of the First Pres- 
byterian Church of Coraopolis, Pennsylvania, in memory of the Reverend 
Michael Wilson Keith, D.D., the founder of the class and pastor of the church 
from 1911 to 1917. The prize is awarded to a member of the Senior Class 
who has spent three years in this seminary and has taken the highest standing 
in the department of homiletics. The winner of the prize is expected to 
preach in the First Presbyterian Church of Coraopolis and teach the Keith 
Bible Class one Sunday after the award is made. 

The Joseph Watson Greek Entrance Prize 

The Joseph Watson Greek Prize was established in 1920 by Mrs. Robert A. 
Watson, Columbus, Ohio. The income will be awarded to the student who 
achieves the highest grade in an examination in classical Greek as he enters 
the Junior Class of the Seminary. 

The William B. Watson Prize in Hebrew 

The William B. Watson Prize in Hebrew was established in 1919 by Mrs. 
Robert A. Watson, Columbus, Ohio. The income will be awarded to that 

42 



member of the Senior Class who, having elected Hebrew, shall submit the 
best grammatical and exegetical treatment of an assigned portion of the 
Hebrew Old Testament. 

The John Watson Prize in New Testament Greek 

The John Watson Prize in New Testament Greek was established in 1919 by 
Mrs. Robert A. Watson, Columbus, Ohio. The income will be awarded to that 
member of the Senior Class who, having elected Greek Exegesis, shall submit 
the best grammatical and exegetical treatment of an assigned portion of the 
Greek New Testament. 

The Robert A. Lee Church History Award 

By bequest, in memory of her husband the late Mrs. Henrietta M. Lee, 
Oakmont, Pa., established the Robert A. Lee Church History Foundation, 
the annual income of which is to be awarded yearly to the students making 
first and second rank respectively in the Department of Church History. 

The Hugh Thomson Kerr Moderator Prize 

This prize was established in 1938 by the Men's Committee of the Shady- 
side Presbyterian Church, Pittsburgh. An annual contribution of fifty dollars 
was pledged to be used for the purchase of books. The prize is to be awarded 
to that member of the graduating class who has exhibited to the greatest 
degree, throughout the three years of the seminary course, leadership, origi- 
nality, and accomplishments beyond the normal requirements for graduation. 

The James Purdy Scholarship 

The James Purdy Scholarship was established in 1882. The income is appor- 
tioned equally each year to the six members of the Junior Class who attain 
the highest average of excellence in their seminary work. The distribution 
is made after the students return to the Seminary the following year. 

The Andrew Reed Scholarship 

The Andrew Reed Scholarship was established in 1914 by Miss Anna M. 
Reed, Cross Creek, Pennsylvania, the income being given to the student who, 
upon entering seminary, shall achieve the highest grade in a competitive 
examination in the English Bible. The successful competitor is to have the 
scholarship throughout the entire course of three years, provided that his 
general conduct and application to study shall continue to be satisfactory to 
the faculty. 

The Home Training Bible Class Award in Missions 

This is an award of $100 which was established in January, 1961, by the 
Home Training Bible Class of the Edgewood Presbyterian Church, Pittsburgh, 
Pa., in the name of the Rev. Walter L. Moser, Ph.D., D.D. The recipient will 
be that member of the graduating class who is deemed most deserving among 
those entering the foreign or home missionary field upon graduation. 

The Alice Myers Sigler Memorial Prize in History and Theology 

This award was established in 1962 by Robert M., John H., Richard E., and 
Alan B. Sigler in memory of their mother. The income from this endowed 

43 



fund is granted to the student who, in the judgment of the professors of the 
History and Theology Division, is most worthy of this award at the end of the 
Middler year. 

The Fred McFeely Rogers Prize in Biblical Studies 

The Fred McFeely Rogers Prize in Biblical Studies was established in 1962 
by Mr. and Mrs. James H. Rogers in honor of their son, a graduate in the 
Class of 1962. The income from this endowed fund is granted to the student 
who, in the judgment of the professors of the Biblical Division, is most 
worthy of this award at the end of the Junior year. 

The Henry A. Riddle Fund for Graduate Study 

This fund was established in 1966 by the family and friends of Dr. Henry A. 

Riddle, a former president of Pittsburgh Theological Seminary, to provide 

an annual award to a member of the graduating class designated by the 

faculty for assistance in post-graduate study, preferably in the field of New 

Testament. 

The Walter P. and Anna L. McConkey Award in Homiletics 
This award was established in 1964 by the Central Presbyterian Church in 
Washington, Pa., in honor of Dr. and Mrs. McConkey, who served that 
pastorate for many years. It is to be given to a student who, at the end of 
his Middler year has, in the judgment of the homiletics professors, demon- 
strated excellence in preaching. 




4> 

Professor Douglas Hare 



44 



45 



mm 



'pJTjpflj 



Degree Programs and 
Courses of Study 



Bachelor of Divinity 

Degree description pages 48-50 

Course descriptions pages 54-71 

Master of Religious Education 

Degree description pages 52-53 

Course descriptions pages 54-71 



Master of Theology 

Degree description pages 72-73 

Course descriptions pages 74-76 



Degree Relationships with University of Pittsburgh 

Master of Theology (APS)— Department of Psychiatry pages 75-76 

Master of Social Work-Bachelor of Divinity pages 80-81 

Master of Public Administration and Master of Urban 

and Regional Planning— Bachelor of Divinity pages 83-84 

Master of Education page 86 

Master of Library Science— Bachelor of Divinity page 88 

Doctor of Philosophy pages 90-91 



47 



The Bachelor of Divinity Curriculum 



While this catalog was in the press, the faculty adopted an elective curriculum. 
We were able to stop the presses to describe briefly the new curriculum, as 
well as the processes through which it was arrived at, but the course descrip- 
tions on pages 54-70 could not be changed in time. They should be viewed as 
containing the stuff for new descriptions but the course structuring will be 
different, radically so in many cases. 

The student and faculty curriculum committees were at work for months 
drawing up an elective curriculum. The definitive action of the faculty was 
itself the culmination of a lengthy process of discussion and debate. Even now 
detailed points are being hammered out. However, the main structure of the 
elective curriculum is clearly visible. 

A. The Curriculum Structure 

1. No course shall be more than three hours (a few courses, e.g., Greek 
reading, may be one hour). 

2. Total hours for graduation will be 78. 

3. Of the 78 hours, 45 are to be distributed according to the following 
formula: every student will take at least 15 hours in each of the three 
divisions, the selection of courses and professors to be that of the student 
in consultation with his adviser. 

4. A minimum requirement of three hours of Hebrew and three hours of 
Greek will be retained for every student. (These are the only two re- 
quired courses.) 

5. There will be no comprehensive examinations. 

B. Introductory and Advanced Courses 

1. The divisions will set up introductory (or A-level) courses to be dis- 
tinguished from advanced courses. While particular advanced courses 
may assume prerequisites, no general formula of prerequisites is desired 
by the faculty. 

2. It is probable that each division will offer at least four three-hour A-level 
courses each semester. A-level courses can be either one-semester courses 
or two-semester courses. It is also probable that these courses will be 
offered on a two-year cycle and announced in the catalog to help students 
plan their course of study. 

48 



C. Field Education 

Field education will no longer be a requirement for graduation. It, too, will 
be elective; and the field education office will continue to assist and super- 
vise students who wish to elect field education for non-credit. 

D. Student Load 

1. In a typical semester the student's load will be four three-hour courses. 
This will help the student focus in depth as well as breadth, avoid frag- 
mentation of time, and have the opportunity to be reflective in his 
intellectual endeavors. 

2. In any given semester, one audit course will be permitted over and above 
the four credit courses with permission of the instructor. Such audit 
courses will not count toward the 78 required hours. 

E. Faculty Advisers 

A system of faculty advisers will be set up to help the student plan his 
course of study and to assist him at all points in his academic work. 

Within this elective curriculum independent study will continue to be 
stressed. We intend to make as much use as possible of courses numbered 300, 
600, 900 and designated Independent Study. Students may request courses in 
their special interests and needs and pursue them at the truly graduate level by 
way of independent study. 

At this writing the three divisions of the faculty are at work re-thinking 
their divisional goals and their courses so that the elective curriculum will not 
be merely a renumbering of courses but will be a new structure at Pittsburgh 
Seminary to enable men and women to work more effectively in the ministry 
of Jesus Christ. 



49 



The Prescribed Course of Study 



While there are no required courses leading to the B.D. degree, except one 
semester each of Hebrew and Greek, the following listing of courses was taken 
from the old required curriculum for the purpose of indicating one example 
advisers and students might consult in planning a course of study. While none 
of these courses, as such, may be offered in 1969-70, or thereafter, there will 
be courses or a series of courses to cover the general contents indicated below, 
as well as many new elective s, from which students will chart their course of 
study. 



Junior Year 



Semester I Semester II 



Old Testament Introduction New Testament Introduction 

Greek Greek Exegesis 

Church History and History of Doctrine I Church History and History of Doctrine II 

The Church in American Culture: The Church in American Culture: 
Historical Perspective Sociological Perspective 



January Intersession 

Intertestamental Period 



Middler Year 



Hebrew Hebrew Exegesis 

Systematic Theology I Systematic Theology II 

Introduction to Homiletics Liturgies 

Psychological Foundations of Ministry Counseling Practicum 

Homiletics Practicum 



January Intersession 

Pastoral Care and Counseling 



Senior Year 



Ethics 

Christian Education 



50 



■ 

H 

_HRH 




The Master of Religious Education Curriculum 



The Master of Religious Education program, open to both men and women, 
is designed primarily to prepare them to serve the Church of Jesus Christ as 
directors or ministers of Christian education in local congregations, as curric- 
ulum writers and fraternal workers, as well as to provide them background 
for related professional and service vocations such as public school education, 
social work, nursing, and the nursery school. 

The Master of Religious Education curriculum is a two year program includ- 
ing both theory and practice among the disciplines of Bible, history, theology, 
and the teaching ministry. The requirement of one semester of Hebrew or Greek 
demonstrates the faculty's seriousness about this degree as it seeks to prepare 
students for the teaching office. That that office has fallen into disrepute and 
has come to be associated largely with methods is manifest. The recovery of 
the office will come through Biblical and theological competence coupled with 
the art and skills of communication. To know the Bible the student must enter 
into the world of the Bible and gain a "feel" for its idiom of thought, expression, 
practice. Language study is a primary tool for this incursion. Courses in 
church history, history of doctrine, and theology will also contribute to the 
needed competence. By taking the basic courses of theological education an 
M.R.E. candidate is prepared to work side by side with pastors, sharing a 
common understanding of the total ministry of which education is a part, 
and performing that ministry with professional competence. 

Within this program the teaching office is lifted up and emphasized for 
the M.R.E. candidate. The B.D. Church and Ministry courses are especially 
adapted so that the student whose vocational interest is Christian education 
can explore the philosophy and theology of, as well as develop method- 
ological and administrative skills in, that special ministry. Throughout the 
two year course the student will be involved in Christian education theory 
and practice. Field education practicum is offered each semester and is closely 
geared with class work. 

52 



The Prescribed Course of Study 



While there are no required courses leading to the M.R.E. degree, except 
one semester each of Hebrew or Greek, the following listing of courses was 
taken from the old required curriculum for the purpose of indicating one ex- 
ample advisers and students might consult in planning a course of study. While 
none of these courses, as such, may be offered in 1969-70, or thereafter, there 
will be courses or a series of courses to cover the general contents indicated 
below, as well as many new electives, from which students will chart their 
course of study. 



Junior Year 



Semester I Semester II 



Old Testament Introduction New Testament Introduction 

Hebrew or Greek Hebrew or Greek Exegesis 

Church History and History of Doctrine I Church History and History of Doctrine II 

Psychological Foundations Sociological Foundations 

January Intersession 

Intertestamental Period 

Senior Year 

Systematic Theology I Systematic Theology II 

Ethics Liturgies 

Christian Education Counseling Practicum 

January Intersession 

Pastoral Care and Counseling 

53 



Description of Courses of Instruction: 
B.D., M.R.E., M.Ed. 
The Biblical Division 

Mr. Barth 

Mr. Gowan Mr. J. Jackson Mr. Miller 

Mr. Hadidian Mr. Jamieson Mr. Orr 

Mr. Hare Mr. Kelley Mr. von Waldow 

Mr. Hills Mr. Lapp Mr. Walther 

Some course offerings which might be listed under the Biblical Division are correlated 
with Church and Ministry and are listed under that division. Moreover, most exegesis 
courses listed below are correlated with Church and Ministry (especially homiletics). 

Required Courses 

110. Old Testament Introduction. A survey of the books of the Old 
Testament with special attention to the formation of the literature and its 
religious significance. The history of Israel is traced from earliest times and 
set in the framework of Near Eastern civilization as recovered through 
archaeological research. The message and times of the prophets are surveyed, 
as well as the life and worship of the post-exilic community. The principal 
objective is mastery of the Biblical material. There are also assigned readings 
in current scholarly literature. 
Juniors, first semester, 5 hours credit. Mr. von Waldow 

115. The Intertestamental Period. A survey of the historical, literary, and 
religious background of the New Testament, concentrating on Palestinian 
Judaism from which Christianity was born, with some attention to the 
Hellenistic world in which it developed. 
Juniors, Intersession, 2 hours credit. Mr. Gowan 

120. Elementary Hebrew. A course designed to lead to an appreciative 
and competent use of Hebrew as one of the languages of Biblical revelation. 
From the outset the student learns inductively to read from the original 
language of the Old Testament. Emphasis is placed on the acquisition of a 
working vocabulary as the ground for further reading, and the illumination 
of key Biblical concepts. Instruction is in small, graded sections so that a 
maximum of individual attention and achievement is possible. 

Middlers, first semester, 3 hours credit. 

121. Elementary Hebrew. Continuation of 120 with instruction in graded 
sections. 

Middlers, second semester, 3 hours credit. 

210. New Testament Greek. A course designed to lead to a competent 
use of Greek as one of the languages of Biblical revelation. From the out- 
set the student learns inductively to read from the Greek New Testament, 
and unique study aids prepared by the Division are used. Instruction is in 

54 



small, graded sections. Students who have previously studied Greek will be 
assigned to special sections for their New Testament linguistic work. 
Juniors, first semester, 3 hours credit. 

21 1. New Testament Greek. Continuation of 210 with instruction in grad- 
ed sections. As much of the New Testament will be read as progress permits. 
Some attention will be given to textual criticism, and exegetical method and 
practice will be introduced. 
Juniors, second semester, 3 hours credit. 

213. New Testament Introduction. The purpose of this course is to con- 
vey a basic knowledge and enjoyment of, and respect for, each New Testa- 
ment book by preparation of careful exegesis of individual texts. Beginning 
from the background afforded by courses 110 and 115, the course faces 
the character and message, the diversity and unity of the New Testament 
books, as well as the open questions concerning authors, dates, places, and 
recipients. Some aspects of the manifold interpretations of the New Testa- 
ment are outlined together with its influence upon later church life and 
modern scholarly endeavor. 
Juniors, second semester, 5 hours credit. Mr. Barth 



Elect ives 

140. Hebrew Reading. Supervised reading of selected Old Testament pas- 
sages. 
Offered each semester, 1 hour credit. 

142. Hebrew Grammar. Introduction to the formal structure of the He- 
brew language, (phonetics, morphology, syntax) with special attention to 
its historical development and relation to other Semitic languages. 
Offered on request. Mr. Hills 

144. Hebrew Exegetical. A student with a B average in the Biblical field 
may elect to do independent study in the exegesis of an Old Testament 
passage under the supervision of a member of the Biblical Division. The 
exegetical paper, 30-40 pages in length, will be due on the first day of classes 
in September. 
Offered during the summer, two hours credit. 

146. Ugaritic. Northwest Semitic language and literature: I. Introduction 
to Ugaritic. Elements of syntax and grammer; translations of the Legend of 
King KRT, selections from the Ba'al cycle. 
Graduate and Honors Students. Mr. J. Jackson 

148. The Dead Sea Scrolls. Survey of the scrolls from the Dead Sea area, 
particularly Qumran. Archaeological background, analysis of contents, signif- 
icance for the text, history, and theology of the Old and New Testaments. 
Selected passages will be read in the original languages. 
Offered on request. Mr. Hills 

55 



152. Biblical Aramaic. Reading and the grammar of the Aramaic sections 
of the Old Testament. Additional material may be included from the fifth 
century B.C. Aramaic letters from Elephantine. 
Offered on request. Mr. Hills 

155. Sep tuagint Studies. Introduction to the Greek Old Testament, and 
problems of the Greek and Hebrew texts. Reading and comparative study of 
passages in Hebrew and Greek. 

Offered on request. Mr. Orr or Mr. Walther 

156. Hellenistic Greek Studies. Selected readings in Philo, Josephus, the 
Apostolic Fathers, and other Greek literature approximately contemporary 
with the New Testament period. First year students whose ability and expe- 
rience warrant may be assigned to this course in place of 210 or 21 1. 

Offered on request. Mr. Orr 

170. Old Testament Theology. Introduction to current methods of inter- 
pretation of the theology of the Old Testament, as exemplified by Eichrodt 
and von Rad. Students will investigate major motifs on biblical thought, such 
as myth and history, chaos and creation, first and last, time and eternity, 
election and covenant, king and priest, prophet and wise man, man and 
woman, father and son, master and servant. Mr. J. Jackson 

Courses 1 73, 1 74, and 1 75 will satisfy the three hours of Old Testament 
exegesis elective required of each student. 

173. The Old Testament: Pentateuch. Exegesis of passages from the He- 
brew text of the first five books of the Old Testament. 

Israel's cult and worship, offered first semester. Mr. von Waldow 

Exodus offered first semester. Mr. Lapp 

Deuteronomy offered second semester. Mr. von Waldow 

1 74. The Old Testament: Prophetic Books. Exegesis of passages from the 
Hebrew text of the "Former" and the "Latter" Prophets. 

Amos offered first semester. 

Ezekiel offered first semester. Mr. J. Jackson 

175. The Old Testament: Writings. Exegesis of passages from the Hebrew 
text of the "Writings" of the Old Testament canon. 

Selected Psalms offered first semester. Mr. von Waldow 

Selections from the Wisdom Literature offered second semester. 

Mr. Gowan 

180. Archaeology of Palestine. A study of archaeological method and the 
results of excavations of Near Eastern sites as they relate to the Old and New 
Testaments. Mr. Jamieson 

240. Greek Reading. Supervised reading of selected New Testament or 
Septuagint passages. 
Offered each semester, 1 hour credit. 

56 



242. Greek Grammar. Introduction to the formal structure of New Testa- 
ment Greek; systematic study of grammar and syntax, illustrated by specific 
New Testament passages. Mr. Kelley 

244. Greek Exegetical. A student with a B average in the Biblical field 
may elect to do independent study in the exegesis of a New Testament 
passage under the supervision of a member of the Biblical Division. The 
exegetical paper, 30-40 pages in length, will be due on the first day of classes 
in September. 
Offered during the summer, two hours credit. 

Courses numbering in the 250's will satisfy the three hours of New Testa- 
ment exegesis elective required of each student. 

250. The Gospels: 

Matthew: An examination of the presuppositions and problems of 

exegesis with particular reference to the discourses of the Gospel according 

to St. Matthew. Mr. Hare 

Mark: An exegetical study. Mr. Barth 

Luke: An inductive study of the purpose, structure, meaning, and 

contemporary significance of the third Gospel. Mr. Miller 

251. Galatians. A verse-by-verse study of the Greek text, together with 
study of its key words and themes, and of the literary elements and historical 
place of Paul. Finally, the main types of interpretation throughout the 
centuries are reviewed. In short, this is an attempt at a theological exegesis of 
the book. Mr. Barth 

252. First Peter. An exegetical seminar, including syntactical studies of 
I Peter 1:3-2:10, and word studies of the major theological words in the 
epistle. Stress on exegetical methodology. Requirement: weekly syntactical 
preparation and one major seminar paper. (Limited to 12 students.) Mr. Miller 

253. Christ, The Church, and The World in Ephesians and Colossians. 
An exegetical study. Mr. Barth 

254. Exegetical Seminar. A workshop course to study exegetical method 
and to develop habits of use by practice. New Testament passages represent- 
ing a variety of exegetical problems will be examined. Both oral and written 
work will be required. Mr. Walther 

255. Philippians. An exegetical study with special emphasis on 2:5-11. 

Mr. Jamieson 

256. Corinthian Letters. An exegetical study of selected chapters from I 
and II Corinthians. Mr. Jamieson 

260. New Testament Christology. The beliefs about Jesus as Messiah, Son 
of Man, Son of God, and his work as revealer of the Father, inaugurator of 
the Kingdom, and Savior of the human race. Mr. Barth 

57 



261. The Life of Jesus Christ. An examination of the Biblical materials 
supplemented by reference to the extra-Biblical sources and readings in the 
literature. The latter will include a survey of the critical study of the "Quest" 
in the last century and the "New Quest" from kerygma to history at the 
present time. Consideration will be given to the possibilities of writing a "life" 
today. Mr. Walther 

262. Eschatology in the New Testament. The New Testament materials 
will be studied in exegetical detail with supplementary reading in the twentieth 
century literature on the subject. Mr. Walther 

264. Biblical Theology. An introduction to current methods of interpreta- 
tion and to the terminology of Biblical Theology. Examination of major 
motifs of biblical thought with attention to the continuity and discontinuity 
of biblical themes in the Old and New Testaments. 

Mr. J. Jackson and Mr. Walther 

265. New Testament Theology. A course designed to acquaint students 
with the principal themes, the strands of thought, and the theological termi- 
nology of the New Testament. Attention will be given to the continuity of 
Biblical religion in Old and New Testaments. Lectures and discussion with 
reading and research in the literature. Mr. Hare and Mr. Walther 

266. Problems Pertaining to Christian Origins. A research seminar with 
primary emphasis on the bibliographical approach to the study of Christian 
Origins which raises many questions and problems— geographical, historical, 
literary and related problems. Requirement for the seminar is one major 
paper and weekly progress reports. Mr. Hadidian 

270. Practical Use of the Synoptic Gospels. An exegetical examination of 
selected portions of the first three Gospels with special reference to their 
meaning for preaching, teaching, worship, evangelism, and counseling. 

Offered second semester. Mr. Orr 

271. Practical Use of the Fourth Gospel and Revelation. (See Course 270.) 
Offered first semester. Mr. Orr 

272. Practical Use of the Pauline Epistle: Romans. (See Course 270.) 
Offered second semester. Mr. Orr 

273. Practical Use of the Pauline Epistles. Similar to 272, with special 
attention to the Corinthian correspondence. 

Offered first semester. Mr. Orr 

300. Independent Study in Bible. An advanced course in a defined area 
of Biblical studies, offered by members of the division for specified credit 

hours. 



Elective Credit at Pittsburgh Universities 

With the permission of the Dean up to two courses may be taken at the 
University of Pittsburgh, Carnegie-Mellon University, and Duquesne University 
in such fields as classics and philosophy, and elective credit transferred to the 

seminary. 

58 



The History and Theology Division 

Mr. Kehm, Chairman 
Mr. Battles Mr. Gerstner Mr. Ritschl 

Mr. Farley Mr. Paul Mr. Wiest 

Required and elective course offerings in the theology of church and ministry, theology 
of the sacraments, ethics, and American church history, customarily listed under the 
History and Theology Division, are correlated with Church and Ministry courses and are 
listed under that division. 

Required Courses 

410. Church History and History of Doctrine I. A composite course in 
church history and history of doctrine from the Apostolic Age to the twelfth 
century; an introduction to the context and development of theological dis- 
cussion during the period between Ignatius and John of Damascus (in the 
East) and Anselm (in the west). The mission and expansion of the church, 
offices and government, art and literature are covered. 

Juniors, first semester, 5 hours credit. History Staff 

411. Church History and History of Doctrine II. A composite course in 
church history and the history of doctrine from the thirteenth century to the 
present, exclusive of America. History of doctrine from the Scholastics 
through the Reformers to the 20th century is examined. 

Juniors, second semester, 5 hours credit. History Staff 

In order to meet the preparatory requirement in historical studies for 
Systematic Theology a Divisional Examination will be set at the end of 
Semester II on the course material covered in 410 and 41 1. The grade will be 
based 50% on course work; 50% on the Divisional Examination. 

While the Divisional Examination will expect a reasonable coverage of the 
whole material, opportunity will be given for the student to show the areas in 
which he has given independent thought and study. 

520. Systematic Theology I. Three areas of Christian doctrine are studied. 
A. The presuppositions and procedures of theology; revelation, scripture, 
faith and reason, philosophy and theology. The stress is placed on what is 
involved in theological thinking and inquiry. B. The being and attributes of 
God, including such "works" as election and creation. C. Man as sinner. The 
reading of major theological systems provides occasions for the student to do 
his own theological thinking and inquiry. 

Middlers, first semester, 5 hours credit. Theology Staff 

521. Systematic Theology II. The person and work of Jesus Christ, justifica- 
tion, sanctification, the Church and its mission, the sacraments, the ministry, 
and eschatology. 

Middlers, second semester, 5 hours credit. Theology Staff 

710. The Church in American Culture: Historical Perspective. (see Church 
and Ministry Division, p. 63) Mr. Paul 

59 



Electives 

434. Studies in Medieval Thought. Monasticism, Mysticism, Medieval Dis- 
sent, The Church; also the life and thought of a particular medieval church- 
man. Mr. Battles 

435. Seminar in Luther. This course is concerned with the writings of 
Luther in the period before 1525, with particular emphasis on "The Freedom 
of a Christian Man." Short papers will be required. Prerequisite: Course 411 
and 3 hours of Systematic Theology. Registration dependent upon interview 
with the professor. Mr. Ritschl 

436. Studies in John Calvin. An introductory course centering in the 1536 
Institutes and the other writings of the pre-Genevan and early Genevan 
Periods. Mr. Battles 

438. The History of Biblical Interpretation (Early Church). This lecture 
course deals with the history of Biblical interpretation from the time of the 
beginning of the second century to Augustine in the West and John of 
Damascus in the East. 

Prerequisites: History of the Early Church, one course in Old Testament 
and in New Testament Exegesis. Mr. Ritschl 

439. Biblical Interpretation from 1860 to 1960. This lecture course deals 
with the development of Old Testament and New Testament exegesis after 
Schleiermacher, with discussion of the positions of De Wette, F. S. Bauer 
and the subsequent historical-critical school, the history of religion school, 
and finally the hermeneutical positions up to Ernst Fuchs. 

Prerequisite: two exegesis courses, Reformation history. Mr. Ritschl 

440. The Problem of Unity in History and Theology. 

A. Prior to the Reformation Mr. Battles 

B. Since the Reformation Mr. Paul 

441. Christian Classics: Serapion to Thomas a Kempis. Mr. Battles 

442. Christian Classics from the Time of the Reformation. Mr. Paul 

443. Roman Catholicism at Trent and Later. The historico-theological 
development of modern Roman Catholicism. Especial study of the canon's 
of the Council of Trent. Mr. Gerstner 

444. The Documents of Vatican II in Historical Perspective. Emphasis will 
be placed on the shifts seen in the various drafts and their bearing on the 
ecumenical enterprise. Mr. Battles 

445. The Age of Orthodoxy. The Reformation after the Reformers. A 
study of seventeenth century continental Reformed Orthodoxy especially in 
Turretin's Theological Institutes with reference to German Lutheranism and 
English Puritanism. A knowledge of Latin not required. Mr. Gerstner 

446. The Rise of Puritansim: (A) England. (B) America. Mr. Paul 

455. Methodist History and Doctrine. Required of Methodist students for 
graduation ; elective for other students. 
Offered on alternate years, 3 hours credit. Mr. Chamberlin 

60 



460. History of Apologetics. The nature of the defense of Christian faith 
explored through an examination of a number of apologetic systems of the 
past and present. Mr. Bald 

462. American Theology through the 19th Century. Examination by pri- 
mary sources of Edwards' theology and the subsequent developments with 
special reference to Hopkins, Taylor, Bushnell, and the Princeton School. 
Offered second semester. Mr. Gerstner 

470. Advanced Reading and Research in Church History. Guided reading 
and research in sources of church history. Subjects for study will be deter- 
mined in conference with the instructor. Permission from the instructor is 
necessary for registration. Mr. Paul or Mr. Battles 

530. Theological Method. The investigation of one or several problems 
related to the doing of theology: theology and philosophy, the authority of 
Scripture, the status and use of tradition, the nature of theological statements, 
the problem of system, theology as analytic-synthetic, theoretical-practical. 

Mr. Farley or Mr. Wiest 

531. Major Theological Loci. The investigation of one or more doctrines, 
such as God, election, sin and fall, Jesus Christ, redemption, Holy Spirit, 
church, eschaton. 

Offered annually. Mr. Farley, Mr. Kehm, Mr. Wiest or Mr. Ritschl 

532. Controversial Theological Issues. The investigation of one theological 
problem through the study of the major "orthodox," "heretical," "hetero- 
dox," or sectarian formulations of that problem. The study of such controver- 
sial issues as the freedom of the will, the trinity, predestination, the status of 
natural theology, the two natures, demythologizing, issues of Faith and Order 
in the ecumenical movement. Mr. Farley and Mr. Kehm 

533. Major Christian Theologians. Intensive study of the works of one of 
the great theologians of the Church, such as Origen, Augustine, Aquinas, 
Luther, Calvin, Schleiermacher, Barth, and Tillich. 

Offered annually. Mr. Wiest, Mr. Ritschl, Mr. Farley, Mr. Kehm, Mr. Bald 

534. Twentieth Century Protestant Theology. A study of the development 
of one or more of the most influential theological movements in Protestantism 
in the twentieth century, such as fundamentalism and neoevangelicalism, 
liberalism, neo-Re formation theology, and the Bultmann school. 

Offered annually. Mr. Wiest and Mr. Kehm 

540. Contemporary Issues in Philosophical Theology I. An examination of 
the "philosophy of analysis" and the questions it raises for Christian belief 
and thought. Mr. Wiest 

541. Contemporary Issues in Philosophical Theology II. An examination of 
existentialism and phenomenology and their bearing upon the content and 
method of Christian theology. Mr. Wiest 

542. Theology and Science. The role of science in shaping the modern 
mind. Recent changes in our understanding of the nature of scientific knowl- 
edge. A survey of theological responses to modern science and of the possibili- 
ties for a "theology of nature" in contemporary protestant thought. Mr. Wiest 

61 



544. German Theology in the 19th Century. Study of the line of develop- 
ment in German Theology from Schleiermacher through Albrecht Ritschl and 
Wilhelm Herrmann, with special attention to the contributions of this "line" 
to the formation of the varieties of continental "neo-orthodoxy." 

Offered every other year. Mr. Kehm 

545. Christology and Anthropology. A study of the ways in which reflec- 
tion upon the humanity of Jesus Christ is related to their understanding of 
the nature of man in the theologies of Barth, Brunner, Bonhoeffer, and Tillich. 
Prerequisites, Courses 520 and 521. Mr. Kehm 

547. Studies in the History of Philosophical Theology. A study of selected 
philosophical works and systems of thought which have played a part in the 
history of theology and which continue to have significance for theological 
thinking. In a given semester the course will be devoted to the thinking of one 
or more philosophers such as Plato, Aristole, Kant, Leibniz, Hegel, Whitehead, 
and Heidegger. Mr. Wiest or Mr. Farley 

552. Advanced Reading in Philosophy of Religion. Guided reading and re- 
search. The subjects and areas pursued are determined by the needs and 
interests of the students. Permission from the instructor is necessary for 
registration. Mr. Wiest 

560. Theological Readings in Latin. A) The principal text is H. P. V. Nunn, 
An Introduction to Ecclesiastical Latin, 1951, together with the annotated 
Liturgical texts in M. Flad, Le Latin de VEglise, 1938. Readings in K. P. 
Harrington, Mediaeval Latin, 1962; The Penguin Book of Latin Verse, ed. 
by Frederick Brittain, 1962; Turretin, Institutio Theologiae Elencticae. B) 
Ecclesiastical Latin. 

Offered on request. Mr. Battles 

561. Theological Readings in German. Karl Barth's Die Christliche Lehre 
nach dem Heidelberger Katechismus and/or similar theological works. 

Offered annually. Mr. Gerstner or Mr. Kehm 

562. Theological Readings in French. Contemporary theological and his- 
torical literature: Etienne Gilson, Jacques Maritain, and others. 

Offered annually. 

600. Independent Study in History and Theology. An advanced course 
in a defined area of history and/or theology, offered by members of the 
division for specified credit hours. 



Elective Credit at Pittsburgh Universities 

With the permission of the Dean up to two courses may be taken at the 
University of Pittsburgh, Carnegie-Mellon University, and Duquesne University 
in such fields as philosophy, history, and anthropology, and elective credit 
transferred to the seminary. 



62 



The Church and Ministry Division 



Mr. Buttrick, Chairman 
Mr. Bald Mr. Hinds Mr. Rogers 

Miss Burrows Mr. G. Jackson Mr. Scott 

Mr. Chamberlin Mr. Nicholson 

Mr. Clyde Mr. Ralston 



Required Courses 



710. The Church in American Culture: Historical Perspective. The purpose 
of this course is to clarify to the student, through a study of American church 
and cultural history, his prospective situation as a minister (or other church 
professional) in the American environment. Church and culture are studied 
with emphasis on the history of the Calvinist groups, and the Church is viewed 
in specific relationship to urban and industrial life, racial and economic prob- 
lems, and growth and movement of population. Field trips are arranged. 

Juniors, first semester, 2 hours credit. Mr. Paul 

711. The Church in American Culture: Sociological Perspective. The pur- 
pose of this course is to acquaint the student with the social milieu of the 
Christian ministry through sociological study of the American environment. 
The problem of thinking ethically in a Christian context is discussed with 
particular emphasis on church-state relationship, Pittsburgh is utilized as an 
object of investigation and laboratory for student research. 

Juniors, second semester, 2 hours credit. 



713. Christian Education Seminar. Designed to give the student the oppor- 
tunity to accumulate and evaluate resources in major areas of concern in the 
teaching ministry of the local church: administration, curriculum, and age 
group aspects of programming. The framework is that of the local church 
director of Christian education. Observation is an integral part of the course. 
(For M.Ed, students an additional hour of practicum will be required.) 
M.R.E. and M.Ed., second semester, 2 hours credit. Miss Burrows 

720. Introduction to Homiletics. The course will investigate the Church's 
speaking in the twentieth century, and will instruct in methods of preaching 
and public address. Lectures on the functioning of the Church's language, 
on the hermeneutic problem, on communication and cultural assumptions, 
will be followed by discussion and analysis of general rhetorical and hom- 
iletical theory and practice. Workshop sessions in sermon preparation will be 
held as well as tutorial sessions. 
Middlers, first semester, 3 hours credit. Mr. Buttrick 

63 



721. Liturgies. A course that studies the history of Christian Worship 
from biblical times to the modern period of liturgical renewal, with atten- 
tion to theological issues, the nature of symbol, and the structuring of 
worship services. Theology of the Sacraments will be approached system- 
atically and historically. The music of the church at worship will be surveyed. 

Middlers, second semester, 2 hours credit. Mr. Buttrick 

722. Psychological Foundations of Ministry. The stages of human develop- 
ment are seen in depth to provide the psychological basis for ministry. 
Ways of coping with anxiety through the developmental stages are looked 
at. A theory of group process is set forth. Implications for ministry are 
traced. 

Middlers, first semester, 2 hours credit. Mr. G. Jackson 

723. Pastoral Care and Counseling. A course designed to equip the student 
for a ministry to particular human problems (grief, marital conflict, guilt, 
emotional crisis, etc.) with theological insight and psychological sensitivity. 
A supervised practicum continues throughout the second semester. 

Middlers, Intersession and second semester, 3 hours credit. Mr. G. Jackson 

Mr. Paylor 

725. Homiletics Practicum. Divided into small groups, students will pre- 
pare and practice preach two sermons during the semester. 
Middlers, second semester, 1 hour credit. Homiletics Faculty 

730. Ethics. With the foundation of previous studies of the Church, its 
ministry and mission, and its relations to society, an examination is now made 
of the responsibilities of Christians in the secular world. Students are required 
to read the important literature in Christian ethics, to inquire into the Biblical 
and theological framework within which ethical decisions may be made, and 
to make an ethical analysis of a problem in a particular field such as economics 
or politics. 
Seniors, first semester, 4 hours credit. Mr. Wiest 

732. Christian Education. The major emphasis in this unit of the Church 
and Ministry sequence will be upon the teaching ministry of the church. 
Assuming all seminary studies are background, this course will review the 
history of present educational patterns of the churches; will examine con- 
temporary philosophies of church education with particular attention to the 
relation of theology and education; will study various approaches to teaching 
doctrine, the Bible, and church history; and will develop skills in program 
planning, teaching, and administration in the framework of a broad under- 
standing of administration in contemporary Protestant churches. 
Seniors, first semester, 3 hours credit. Mr. Chamberlin 



64 



Electives 
Polity 



800. Life and Work of the United Presbyterian Church. Understanding of 
the life and work of the United Presbyterian Church, factual, critical, and 
creative, is sought by study of pertinent historical developments, present 
organization and administration at all levels and especially at the parish level, 
and developing understanding and action relative to the national and world 
mission of the Church. Mr. Clyde 

801. Polity and Program of the United Presbyterian Church. An introduc- 
tion to the polity and program of the United Presbyterian Church, designed 
in part to help students to prepare for denominational examinations in that 
field. Mr. Clyde 

802. Methodist Polity. Required of Methodist students for graduation. 

Mr. Chamberlin 



Preaching 



810. The History of Preaching. A study of preaching from a historical 
perspective. Preaching will be examined in particular periods by analyzing 
doctrinal and ethical content, homiletic methods, style, and cultural con- 
texts. Hermeneutic principles, liturgical setting, major forms will be con- 
sidered. 

The Great Ages of Preaching 

Transitions in Roman Catholic Preaching Mr. Scott 

811. Theology and Preaching. The course will examine various theological 
understandings of the church's speaking with special emphasis on positions 
held by contemporary proponents. Sermons by major theologians may be 
examined. Mr. Buttrick or Mr. Scott 

812. Preaching from the Old Testament. The course will study the prob- 
lem of preaching on Old Testament texts, the relation of such preaching to 
the New Testament and to contemporary thought-forms. A particular type of 
Old Testament literature-law, prophecy, wisdom-may be studied as it 
relates to speaking to today's world. Sermons will be prepared and, if 
possible, delivered. Mr. Hinds 

813. Preaching from the New Testament. An exegetical and homiletical 
study of New Testament literature will be conducted. Usually a particular 
type of New Testament passage will be discussed, such as miracle or parable, 

65 



or a specific book examined. 
Offered annually. 
Preaching from the Synoptic Gospels. 
Preaching from the Parables. 
Preaching from the Acts. Mr. Nicholson 

814. Interdisciplinary Studies in Homiletics. Courses will be offered by 
members of the homiletic faculty in cooperation with faculty from the 
other divisions. Such courses will relate communicative procedure and 
theory to content in history-theology, biblical studies, or disciplines within 
the scope of the Church and Ministry division. Interdisciplinary Faculty 

815. Advanced Problems in Homiletics. The course will study particular 
problems relating to contemporary homiletic theory, such as the problem of 
linguistic change, the hermeneutic discussion, the new Rhetoric, changing 
cultural meanings, etc. Mr. But trick 



Education 



825. Creative Teaching. A course designed to give the student the opportu- 
nity to explore creative ways of teaching the Christian faith to children, youth, 
and adults within the program of the church. Observation, laboratory, expe- 
rience, demonstration, and guest lectures will be used throughout the course. 

Offered second semester. Miss Burrows 

826. Christian Education in the Local Church. Designed to give the student 
the opportunity to accumulate and evaluate resources in the administration 
of the local church program of Christian education, including all age groups. 
Special attention is given to the possibilities of organization and program for 
the Christian education of children and youth. 

Offered second semester. Miss Burrows 

831. Christian Education in Cultural Context. Church education theory 
has recognized the significance of theology and psychology, but insufficient 
attention has been given to the influence of the cultural factors in both the 
theory and practice of education in the churches. The relation of education 
and culture will be examined in the light of the major contributions of sociol- 
ogy and anthropology, and the implications of the findings for church educa- 
tion will be traced. Mr. Chamberlin 

832. The Churches and Public Education. Significant new challenges con- 
front the churches as they attempt to adjust to the changes taking place 
in general education. The historical relation between churches and public 
schools, the legal issues involved, the study of religion in secular schools, 
and the present relation of churches to State Universities— all of these will 
be examined in preparation for understanding and designing what churches 
may do in the new situation. Mr. Chamberlin 

66 



833. Appropriating the Christian Faith. An examination of various views 
about the relation of the Holy Spirit to human activity in the processes of 
appropriation of faith, and the problems this poses for the educator. Con- 
temporary learning theories will be studied in terms of their implications for 
a theological understanding of appropriation. Mr. Chamberlin 

834. The Minister of Christian Education. Patterns of local church staff 
responsibility for education, from the "Doctor" designated by Calvin, to the 
present time, will be reviewed. In the light of this history, the class will 
analyse problems of multiple-staff relationships and their implications for 
the complex processes of church education. An attempt will be made for 
each class member to clarify his own philosophy of educational administra- 
tion (whether Minister of Education, Associate Minister, or Director of 
Christian Education) in the light of his total seminary course. 

Mr. Chamberlin 

835. New Patterns of Christian Presence. An exploration of the many new 
forms of ministry being conducted experimentally both in this country and 
abroad; a review of studies by denominational agencies, particularly the World 
Council of Churches study of the missionary structure of the parish; and an 
examination of the implications of these developments for the parish and its 
educational ministry. Registration is limited. Mr. Chamberlin 



Pastoral Care 



840. Theology and Psychiatry. The metaphysical presuppositions, method, 
understanding of therapy, and some aspects of human nature will be compar- 
ed. An attempt will be made to define mutuality and discreteness between 
the two disciplines. An introduction to Freudian, Jungian, and other psychi- 
atric writings will be made. Mr. G. Jackson 

841. Seminar in Counseling. An advanced course utilizing the case work of 
students, drawing principles for both diagnosis and therapy out of the cases 
presented, and making evaluations. The role of the minister as counselor is 
carefully scrutinized. Mr. G. Jackson 

843. The Aging: Personality Formation and Pastoral Care. This seminar 
will look at the question of aging from three significant directions: the 
psychology of religion in specific relevance to the aging; socio-psychological 
patterns in the aging process; and the role of the church in ministering to 
the aging. Mr. Pay lor 

844. Research in Pastoral Care. This course will investigate and develop 
criteria for pastoral counseling with in-patients and after-care patients having 
serious emotional illnesses. Methods of study will include readings, seminars, 
and clinical work at Woodville State Hospital. 

By invitation of the instructor. Mr. Paylor 

67 



World Mission 

850. Changing Patterns in Christian World Mission. In a changing world 
demanding changing patterns of Christian mission, the nature of the changes 
and the reasons for them, their implications for the contemporary under- 
standing of the Gospel, and their possible effect upon the world extension of 
the Gospel in the present and the future, will constitute major themes for 
investigation. Mr. Clyde 

854. Comparative Religion. A study of the origin and development of 
religion, with special investigation of Primitive Religion, Hinduism, Bud- 
dhism, Confuciansim, and Islam, with regard to their bearing on Modern 
Missions. 

Offered on request. Mr. Clyde 

855. Major Sects. Jehovah's Witnesses, Mormonism, Christian Science and 
other groups compared with traditional Christianity. Resemblances and dif- 
ferences noted. Mr. Gerstner 

857. Christian Responsibility and the World Social Revolution. The course 
will explore the nature and technique of Christian world responsibility in 
view of the nature of the Gospel and the action of the Church as both con- 
front today's global revolution, with special attention given to the Christian 
approach to the non-Christian religions and to Communism. Mr. Clyde 

858. Contemporary Movements in Ecumenics. Through study of current 
ecumenical relations among churches resultant from such developments as 
Vatican II, the Consultation on Church Union, the Wheaton Conference of 
non-world Council churches, and selected denominational unions, effort will 
be made to prepare students for knowledgeable action in situations of ecu- 
menical significance. Mr. Clyde 

859. Seminar in Ecumenics. This course is offered at Duquesne University 
under a joint faculty including Duquesne professors, Pittsburgh Seminary 
professors, and others. It is open to qualified Pittsburgh Seminary students. 



Ethics 

870. The Theological Ethics of William Temple and Reinhold Niebuhr. A 
comparative study of the social thought of the late Archbishop of Canterbury 
and one of America's leading voices in the field of ethics in relation to their 
theological foundations. Mr. Bald 



872. Research Seminar in Selected Social Problems. Students will elect 
specific areas of social concern in modern culture for investigation in which 
they will seek to relate them to the demands and insights of the Christian 
ethic. Prerequisite, 730. Mr. Bald 

68 



Cultural Forms 

880. Christian Faith and Contemporary Literature. A study of the relation- 
ship between Christian faith and themes in contemporary literature. Works by 
a number of modern writers including Sartre, Updike, Greene, and Beckett 
will be read and discussed. Three class sessions per week will be scheduled. 

Mr. Buttrick 

885. Poetry, Poetics, and Christian Language. A study of contemporary 
poetry and poetics in relation to the use of religious metaphor and imagery. 
Long poems by one or two contemporary poets will be analyzed. Reading in 
modern literary criticism will be discussed. Mr. Buttrick 

890. Interpretative Reading. Oral interpretation of a varied selection of 
prose, poetry, and drama as a means of developing keener sensitivity to the 
written word and greater effectiveness in communicating it. The objective will 
be to mature the skills and principles already acquired in speech courses. Small 
sections, private conferences, recordings. 

One hour, first and second semesters. Mr. Hinds 

891. Christian Faith and Communication. A study of the kinds of com- 
munication appropriate to the nature of the Church. Focus will be on 
the relationship of medium to message, the goal being the development of 
a total strategy of communication for the church. Mr. Hinds 

897. Music in the Church. A practical approach to the many problems 
arising in connection with church music with particular attention to the 
problems of the small congregation. Organizing the musical resources of the 
congregation, the music as a spiritual force in the church life, and the minister's 
relation to choir and choirmaster. Mr. Ralston 

898. Hymnology. An analytical and historical study of the great hymns 
and tunes of the Christian Church. Consideration of the qualities of a good 
hymn. Practical and effective use of the hymnal. Mr. Ralston 

899. Masterpieces of Religious Music. A study of the various forms of 
music through which men have expressed their faith. Demonstration of the 
power of music to illuminate Christian truth and to "give wings to words." 
This is primarily a "listening course" making use of records but with assigned 
background reading and class comment. The purpose is to give the student 
an appreciation of various forms of musical expression as well as some famil- 
iarity with specific works of musical art. Mr. Ralston 

900. Independent Study in Church and Ministry. An advanced course in 
a defined area of church and ministry, offered by members of the division 
for specified credit hours. 



69 



Elective Credit at Pittsburgh Universities 

With the permission of the Dean up to two courses may be taken at the 
University of Pittsburgh, Carnegie-Mellon University, and Duquesne University 
in such fields as Sociology, Psychology, Anthropology, Philosophy, Social 
Work, Urban Affairs, Administration, Speech, and elective credit transferred 
to the seminary. 



Field Education 

The broad objective of Field Education in Pittsburgh Theological Seminary 
is to complement the academic work of each student with experiences 
through which he may expand and deepen his understanding of contem- 
porary culture and the life of the Church, both in its parish setting as 
well as in its specialized ministries. During the Junior year the students 
are encouraged to participate in churches as laymen. Field assignments are 
coordinated with the courses in The Church in American Culture. A 
congregation is studied in its total context. Further investigation is made 
of Pittsburgh, specifically of its industry, law enforcement, political life 
and social services. Middlers are assigned to selected Teaching Churches so 
that they may learn about and participate in the ministry under the super- 
vision of Teaching Pastors. This field experience provides the matrix for 
integrated discussion with studies at the Seminary, e.g., Psychological 
Foundations, Counseling, Homiletics and Liturgies. After the Middler year 
students may elect to participate in the Intern Program, an approved year 
of experience and study away from the Seminary. Seniors are encouraged 
to undertake specialization and/or experimentation. All field assignments 
are made through the Field Education Office. 

The industrial, cultural, educational and religious environment of the 
Pittsburgh area makes possible the cooperative development of field edu- 
cation assignments to fit the needs of each seminarian. For example, a 
student serves as an assistant chaplain at the State Correctional Institution. 
Opportunity is given to initiate and administer coffee house programs. One 
student is an assistant hospital chaplain. Another works with the Public 
Defenders Office. Others are assigned to an ecumenical ministry designed to 
meet the needs of a large inner city area. A further cooperative program of 
six denominations provides student experience which focuses on urban 
problems related to an area which includes a ghetto, university community, 
high rise apartments and hospital complex. Students serve as "Friends of 
the Defendant" in City Court. A Community Agency that works with 
disturbed teenagers provides a learning opportunity. A student discovers 
urban problems as he serves with a Neighborhood Development organization 
in an inner city area. An assignment to the youth ministries division of the 
Pittsburgh Council of Churches offers opportunity for involvement with 
mass media. Churches representing every segment of the sociological and 
theological spectra are available. 

Every student is encouraged to spend one summer in field education, 
preferably in some form of clinical training. Students who choose and 
qualify for clinical training in approved programs will be given two hours 

70 



of elective credit for each six weeks of clinical training to a maximum of 
four credit hours. For students who do not choose or do not qualify for a 
clinical training program a number of options without any elective credit 
are allowed (such as national park chaplaincies, Board of National Missions 
assignments, assistantships, etc.), upon consultation with and approval by 
the Field Education Office. 

Any student seeking a church-related position for the summer must 
counsel with the Field Education Office so that provision may be made 
for supervision on the field. Summer pastorates for students who have 
completed only their Junior year are discouraged because such students 
will not have had the courses in Church and Ministry dealing with the 
preaching, teaching, and pastoral office. 




71 



The Master of Theology Degree 



The Th.M. degree represents a strong program of graduate education. The 
program is offered to benefit pastors who wish to deepen their ministry, 
as well as to help prepare candidates for specialized ministries. It is designed 
in the interest of developing an increasingly learned and relevant ministry. 
The degree is awarded upon the fulfillment of requirements under a 
variety of options. The program may be undertaken in sequence with the 
B.D. degree curriculum, or as a post B.D. option. 

The B.D.-Th.M. Sequence 

Students enrolled in the B.D. program at Pittsburgh Theological Seminary 
may, at the end of their middler (2nd) year, apply for admission as 
candidates for both a B.D. and a Th.M. degree. This sequence requires 
one year of study beyond the normal three year B.D. program, but candi- 
dates accepted for the program may utilize their third and fourth years as 
a unit within which to correlate the completion of the requirements of 
both the B.D. and the Th.M. degrees. The emphasis is upon independent 
study, and this program enables each candidate to work out his plan of 
study with a high degree of freedom and to adopt a sequence in his 
required and elective course work which best serves his interests. 

The Post-B.D. Course 

Those already holding a B.D. degree from an accredited seminary may apply 
for admission to the Th.M. degree program. It is possible for a candidate 
to fulfill the requirements for the degree in one to three years of study 
depending upon whether he undertakes his program on a full time or a part 
time basis. 

Th.M. Degree Optional Programs 

Candidates will choose one of the several options described below: 

1. The Generalization Option- 

This program is designed to enable the candidate to deepen his 
mastery of the theological disciplines as these are presented under the 
three divisions of the faculty: Biblical, Church and Ministry, History- 
Theology. Independent study is emphasized so that only six hours of 
elective course work (two courses) are required. Candidates must pass 
a comprehensive examination as the final requirement for the degree. 

2. The Specialization Options- 

Candidates desiring to follow a particular interest may choose one of 
three fields of study: Advanced Pastoral Studies, Biblical Studies (Old 
or New Testament), or History-Theology. Each candidate is required 
to take twelve hours of course work (four courses) as specified in the 

72 



curriculum of the specialization of his choice as described below. He 
must also submit an acceptable thesis and sustain an oral examination 
on it. 
A reading knowledge of at least one foreign language is required of 
candidates in all the Th.M. options. Candidates may choose the language 
on which they will be examined from among the following: Hebrew, 
Greek, Latin, French and German. The program faculties in the Speciali- 
zation Options may designate for a candidate which of these languages shall 
be required of him or may require an additional foreign language in view 
of his special interest or thesis topic. 

Candidates will be assigned appropriate faculty advisers who will be avail- 
able for consultation early in their programs. When a candidate in a 
Specialization Option is ready to begin his thesis work, a Thesis Committee 
will be appointed to provide counsel as he fulfills that requirement. 
The Statute of Limitations is four academic years from the date of matricu- 
lation for candidates entering the program at the beginning of the B.D. 
senior year, and three academic years from the date of matriculation for all 
other candidates. 

Admission Requirements 

1. Applicants for admission to the B.D.-Th.M. sequence must have 
achieved an average grade point ratio of 1.5 on the three point 
scale during the junior and middler years. 

2. Applicants for admission to the Th.M. program who hold B.D. 
degrees from accredited seminaries must have achieved that degree 
with an average grade point ratio of 1.5 on the three point scale 
or its equivalent. 

3. Applicants are admitted by action of the Curriculum Committee of 
the Faculty. Acceptance is not granted to an applicant for a Special- 
ization Option without the concurrence of the appropriate program 
faculty. 

4. A mastery of English composition. 

All applications for the Th.M. program should be made through the office 
of the Director of Admissions. 



Fees and Expenses 

Matriculation Fee, $35.00 for those not in the B.D.-Th.M. sequence. 

Tuition, $650.00 each for the third and fourth years in the B.D.-Th.M. 
sequence, and $650.00 for the program for those holding a B.D. Candidates 
in the Th.M. program may take as many courses as desired, either for 
credit or audit without additional tuition charge. 

Library Fee, $20.00 per year. 

Graduation Fee, $10.00. 

Fee for Binding and Microfilming the Thesis, $15.00. 

Applicants for this degree should apply to the Director of Admissions. 

73 



Master of Theology Degree Programs 

Generalization Option 

1. Course Requirements 

A total of six elective hours (two courses) is required. The candidate 
may choose these courses from among the total of elective offerings 
in the seminary curriculum, but it is required that his completed 
transcript (B.D. and Th.M.) shall include at least two Church and 
Ministry Division electives or their equivalents. 

2. Language 

Candidates must demonstrate by examination a reading knowledge 
of one of the foreign languages listed on page 73. 

3. Comprehensive Examination 

The examination consists of written and oral parts. It is set and 
evaluated by the three faculty divisions: Biblical, Church and Ministry 
and History-Theology. Candidates are provided with a prospectus of 
the examination containing sample questions and bibliographies for 
guidance in their independent study, course selection, and preparation 
for the examination itself. 



Specialization Options 

I. Biblical Studies 

The Master's degree in the Biblical Division covers both Testaments. 
While the thesis may concentrate on one Testament, the course work 
is deliberately designed to provide a certain degree of qualification in 
the whole field. The required number of courses is four. The program is as 
follows: 

1. Course Requirements: Twelve hours of course work as follows: 

a. All candidates will take M300 and M 301 Selected Problems of Biblical 
Theology. Motifs which are woven through the Biblical literature are 
examined and discussed in detail. Study begins with the Biblical texts, 
but modern literature is also read and used. 

Six hours, three hours in each of two semesters. 

b. Candidates in Old Testament will take in addition: 

( 1 ) M302 History, Cultures, and R eligions of the A ncien t Near East. 

Offered first semester of each year, three hours. 

(2) M303 Hebrew Exegesis. 

Offered second semester each year, three hours. 

c. Candidates in New Testament will take in addition: 

(1) M305 Greek Exegesis. 

Offered first semester each year, three hours. 

(2) M304 History and Literature of New Testament Times. 

Offered second semester each year, three hours. 

2. Language 

a. Candidates specializing in Old Testament Studies must demonstrate 
special proficiency in Hebrew and a more modest proficiency in Greek. 

74 



Those who have such proficiency in Hebrew when they enter the 
program will be encouraged to study Aramaic. 

b. Candidates specializing in New Testament Studies must demonstrate 
special proficiency in Greek and a more modest proficiency in Hebrew. 
Those having such proficiency in Greek when they enter the program 
will be encouraged to do additional study in the Septuagint. 

c. The Biblical Studies faculty may require a reading knowledge of an 
additional language if, in its judgment, a candidate's study program 
or thesis preparation demands it. 

3. Thesis 

A thesis on a subject approved by the program faculty is to be 
prepared and submitted. The candidate must also sustain an oral ex- 
amination on his thesis. 

II. History and Theology 

1. Course Requirements: A total of four courses is required in this pro- 
gram, the courses to be selected by the student from a list designated 
by the division each academic year. This list may include certain Ph.D. 
elective courses in strict accordance with the principles laid down by 
the American Association of Theological Schools for doctoral programs 
guaranteeing high excellence of graduate standards. Certain advanced 
B.D. courses open to honor students will also be included. Where 
possible the program for each student is adapted to his background, 
interests, and thesis orientation. It is suggested that each candidate plan 
his program in consultation with his faculty adviser. 

2. Language 

The History-Theology faculty may designate which language may be 
required and may require a reading knowledge of an additional language 
if the candidate's program of study and/or his thesis preparation demands 
it. Candidates will be advised in this matter upon entering the program. 

3. Thesis 

A thesis on a subject approved by the program faculty is to be 
prepared and submitted. The candidate must also sustain an oral ex- 
amination on his thesis. 

III. Advanced Pastoral Studies 

The Program for Advanced Pastoral Studies is designed to help students 
to know themselves better; to understand and become sensitive to inter- 
personal relationships; to be familiar with group process; to become in- 
volved in creative dialogue between theological studies and the social 
sciences; and to see more clearly the resources of the Christian church 
for health at the various levels. 

The faculty teaching in this program is composed of seminary personnel 
and members of several faculties of the University of Pittsburgh, including 
the Medical School, the Graduate School of Social Work, and the Depart- 
ment of Speech. The faculty includes Robert J. Shoemaker, M.D., Margaret 
B. McFarland, Ph.D., Rex A. Pittenger, M.D., Erma T. Meyerson, M.A.A.S.S., 
Jack Matthews, Ph.D., Victor Freeman, M.D., and Rex Speers, M.D. 

75 



1. Course Requirements: Four academic courses and three practica, as 
follows: 

Semester I Semester II 

M602 Philosophical Issues in M601 Theology and Psychology 3 

Psychotherapy 3 M603 Socio-Cultural Environment 3 

M600 Developmental Theory M607 Practicum with Children 

of Personality 3 (Arsenal Child Study Center) 2 

M604 Counseling Seminar _2 M605 Counseling Seminar 2 

8 10 

M600. Developmental Theory of Personality. The age span is traced from 
pre-natal influences and birth through the aging process, showing normal 
growth patterns, the abnormalities of neurotic and psychotic development, 
and the relation of the person to the social milieu. 

M601. Theology and Psychology. The material of the entire program is 
pulled together in dialogue between theology and the human sciences, 
especially psychology and psychiatry. Such themes as God, man, sin, 
redemption are dealt with. Pastoral care, informed theologically and psy- 
chologically, becomes the vantage-point for taking a hard look at church 
programming: its relevance, its resources, etc. A primary concern is to 
ask what the church can do in its supportive and preventive roles as well 
as in its redemptive and recreative roles. 

M602. Philosophical Issues in Psychotherapy. Freudian thought and exis- 
tential analysis are studied from the biblical and theological perspective 
with regard to such issues as epistemology, ontology, anxiety, freedom, 
time, value theory. Process philosophy is posed as an alternative framework. 

M603. The Socio-cultural Environment. This course deals with the eco- 
logical and cultural factors which make functional and dysfunctional con- 
tributions to personality and community development. It will emphasize 
the role of institutions, (including the family) and power structures in 
their direct and indirect effect upon the individual. 

M604. Counseling Seminar. Each student is required to work with four 
counselees, under supervision, and to participate in the presentation of 
case material. 

M605. Counseling Seminar. Continuation of M604. 

M607. Practicum with Children. This practicum is conducted at the 
Arsenal Child Study Center. Interpretive seminars are held regularly. 

2. Language 

The A.P.S. faculty may designate which of the languages is to be 
required, or may require a reading knowledge of an additional language 
if the study program or thesis subject makes it necessary. 

3. Clinical Training 

A six weeks' course in an approved clinical training program will be 
required before graduation. It is recommended that it be taken previous 
to admission. 

4. Thesis 

A thesis or research project on a subject approved by the program 
faculty is to be prepared and submitted. The candidate must also 
sustain an oral examination on his thesis or research project. 

76 



Henry Brosin, M.D.; Chairman, Department of Psychiatry, University of Pittsburgh 

The Department of Psychiatry through several of its professors and the Arsenal Child 
Study Center participates in the program of Advanced Pastoral Studies leading to the 
Th.M. degree (see p. 75). Furthermore, Dr. Brosin and several others in the department 
serve on the advisory committee for this program and for the Center for Pastoral 
Studies, a continuing education program (see p. 94). 



77 



79 



A Joint Program Leading to BD - MSW Degrees 

Theology and social work share many attributes in common. These include 
certain concerns and objectives, social values, and a mission to improve 
living. Historically, much that we call social work today had its beginnings 
in religion. Around the turn of the century the first settlement houses, the 
first "off the street" programs of foster child-care, etc. were milestones 
in the beginning of applied social diagnosis. In the methods for helping 
people overwhelmed by circumstance and inner need, they marked a mo- 
mentous transition— from indiscriminate "poor relief to programs of pre- 
vention and cure which attempt to go to the heart of a problem. At the 
center of these programs were to stand, eventually, the particular community 
need to be met, the specific group relationship to be fostered, and the 
individual troubled human being to be understood in all his uniqueness. 
These are the three concerns of social work today. 

In little more than half a century, social work has become a profession whose 
helpful intent is reinforced by highly developed skills. Its experience was 
forged in part from the crisis of two World Wars and a protracted depression. 
Its knowledge and methodology have expanded through its own research and 
through the findings of the social sciences, psychiatry, medicine, law— in short, 
through every discipline whose contributions help prevent breakdowns in 
social functioning. 

Today social casework, group work, and community work are practiced 
in dozens of settings where human needs come into focus; in hospitals, 
psychiatric clinics, family welfare agencies, schools, correctional institutions, 
youth development centers, housing projects, and community planning 
councils. (*) 

Currently, many clergymen are involving themselves and their churches in 
the improvement of the human condition along lines paralleling social work 
efforts. Interest in pastoral counseling and family education is high. Ministers 
of all denominations are involved actively in neighborhood and community 
work and are making notable contributions in civil rights and anti-poverty 
programs. Young clergymen and theological students want to be equipped 
to serve in the area of social work in addition to the more traditional church 
duties. 

In the past, a student with such a career interest had to enroll in a 
theological seminary and upon graduation then register in a school of 
social work; or some students acquired social work degrees first and then 
succeeded to church work; others have been thwarted by the separateness of 
education for these two related fields, and did the best they could. To acquire 
both a BD and an MSW has usually taken five years. 

To encourage and to equip young people to engage in social work both 
in and out of the church, and to provide the opportunity for social work 
students who feel a call to practice within a church setting, the Pittsburgh 
(*) Part of this write-up is taken from the Bulletin of the Graduate School of 
Social Work. 

80 



Theological Seminary and the University of Pittsburgh Graduate School of 
Social Work have developed a program offering a joint degree, that is, a 
BD-MSW. 

This joint effort enables students to receive both the BD and the MSW 
in four years of post BA study instead of the usual five. Nevertheless, the 
joint program will provide students with a full course of study in both 
theology and social work. This result is effected by equating certain courses 
now taught in both schools as equivalent, by allowing courses in one school 
to be taken as electives in the other, and where appropriate by developing 
specialized field placements. Field work opportunities will be arranged to 
meet best the interest of the student. The program allows students to 
concentrate on theology in the first two years and on social work in the 
third and fourth years. 

A student at the Seminary wishing to pursue the four year integrated 
program should request it by the end of his third term at the Seminary. 
Students in the School of Social Work must request the joint program by 
their second term in that school. The admission requirements to each 
institution is the same as for other students. The student entering the joint 
program must be admitted by both institutions. 

Should a student elect to terminate at the end of two or three years 
and seek only one degree that student will be required to complete all of the 
work ordinarily required for that degree in the school which grants it. 

In order to give breadth without sacrifice of depth, theological students 
in the joint program will have the opportunity to study two social work 
methods and in some instances to have field experiences in all three direct 
service approaches, i.e., social casework, social group work, and community 
work in the more than 100 community agencies that cooperate with the 
Graduate School of Social Work. 

Student tuition is the same as for other students enrolled in each school. 
Financial assistance for students who are enrolled full-time at the Seminary 
is the responsibility of the Seminary. 

The Pittsburgh Theological Seminary and the University of Pittsburgh 
Graduate School of Social Work are joining forces in order to better 
educate students whose interests lie in carrying out social work functions 
in and through the church and those who seek to introduce more spiritual 
focus in social work in the agency programs in this nation and abroad. To this 
end, a joint program leading to a joint degree is being offered. The program 
will prepare students to serve people better. 

Inquiries should be directed to: or: 

Mrs. Erma T. Meyerson Director of Admissions 

Graduate School of Social Work Pittsburgh Theological Seminary 

University of Pittsburgh 6 1 6 North Highland Avenue 

Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15213 Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15206 

81 




William H. McCullough, Ph.D.; Dean, Graduate School of Social Work, University of 
Pittsburgh 

Increasing numbers of students interested in theological education are also concerned 
with social work as a model for, and means of, service both in and out of the church. 
Some social work students are also interested in exploring the possibility of a more spiritual 
focus for social work. The seminary and the Graduate School of Social Work of the Uni- 
versity of Pittsburgh have devised a joint four— year program: B.D.-M.S.W. Dean McCullough 
has been a chief architect of this program. 

82 



A Joint Program Leading to the B.D. and M.P.A. 
or M.U.R.P. Degrees 



To prepare seminary students with insight into, and competence in, urban 
problems the Graduate School of Public and International Affairs of the 
University of Pittsburgh and Pittsburgh Seminary have established a joint 
program leading to both the Bachelor of Divinity degree and a Master's 
degree either in Public Administration or in Urban and Regional Planning. 
A student would take five terms of work in the Seminary. In his sixth 
semester he would embark upon 8 months of field work under the super- 
vision of GSPIA faculty in some urban professional area. During this 
term and through the summer he might take electives at either school, 
possibly as many as two courses at any one time. The fourth year he would 
spend all of his time in the Graduate School of Public and International 
Affairs in a three-term program. By way of some interchange of course 
credit he should be able to complete requirements for both his Bachelor 
of Divinity degree and his Master's degree in urban affairs in four years. 
Both degrees, when earned, would be conferred at the end of the total 
program. 

Students would elect this joint Master Degree program during their 
second year at the Seminary. It is expected that this joint program would 
help to train persons for the parish ministry with particular urban awareness 
and skills as well as to prepare students with specialization in urban 
problems. This program will also help those students who may want a 
specialized ministry instead of the more traditional parish ministry. 

In addition to the degree program seminary students may elect certain 
courses in the Graduate School of Public and International Affairs, and 
more especially in the Department of Urban Affairs, to increase their 
own sensitivity into the nature of urban problems and to obtain some 
understanding of their role and the role of the church in working with 
the problems of the city. When such courses are elected, the credit will be 
accepted by the Seminary as elective credit. Normally, students will need 
to have a B average in order to elect such courses. 

The Department of Urban Affairs, Graduate School of Public and Inter- 
national Affairs, offers programs leading to Master's degrees in the following 
fields: 

Urban and Regional Planning (M.U.R.P. degree) 

Community Policies Emphasis; 

Systems Analysis and Urban Behavior; 

Physical-Environmental Emphasis. 
Urban Development and Renewal (M.P.A. degree) 
Urban Community Development (M.P.A. dregree) 
Urban Executive Administration (M.P.A. degree) 
Metropolitan Studies (M.P.A. degree). 

These programs are all professional in character. The planning program, 
with three emphases to choose from, is recognized by the American 

83 



Institute of Planners. The four administration sequences emphasize im- 
plementation of plans and development of effective programs for urban 
change. Students in the joint program may choose to specialize in any 
one of these fields. (For further details, consult the G.S.P.I.A. Bulletin.) 



Inquiries should be directed to: 



or 



Dr. Clifford Ham 
Graduate School of Public 

and International Affairs 
University of Pittsburgh 
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15213 



Director of Admissions 
Pittsburgh Theological Seminary 
616 N. Highland Avenue 
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, 15206 




84 





Donald C. Stone, Ph.D.; Dean, Graduate School of Public and International Affairs, Uni- 
versity of Pittsburgh 

The many and complex urban problems require of the clergy some knowledge and com- 
petence to try to deal with them, and of some clergy a degree of specialization in urban 
affairs. The world-famous Graduate School of Public and International Affairs of the Uni- 
versity of Pittsburgh and the seminary have established a joint program in urban affairs lead- 
ing to a B.D. and Master's degree. Dean Stone has helped to create this new joint program. 



85 



A Cooperative Program 

with the School of Education 



Degree of Master of Education (M.Ed.) 

The M.Ed, course of study in religious education is designed for those 
students with an accredited Bachelor's degree and an undergraduate major 
in the fields of religion, philosophy, religious education, or their equivalent, 
to provide further depth, understanding and technical skills for work in 
local churches or religious agencies. 

This degree is offered by the School of Education of the University of 
Pittsburgh in cooperation with Pittsburgh Theological Seminary. It will be 
conferred by the University upon the completion of a course of study 
which will include approximately 36 hours of course work divided between 
the University and the Seminary, normally 18 hours at each institution, but 
not less than 12 hours at the Seminary. Students will be expected to meet 
the basic course requirements of the School of Education at the University 
of Pittsburgh. Course of study will be tailored to meet the student's 
individual vocational needs in the light of his previous academic experience. 

Ordinarily the student's University courses will include studies in the 
general history and philosophy of education, educational research and 
elective courses in religious education. In addition, students may take some 
course work in such areas as: urban education, comparative or international 
education, elementary or secondary education. At the Seminary the student 
may choose course work in the area of biblical studies, theology, church 
history, and christian education. 

Housing may be arranged at either institution. 

Applicants for this degree may write to: 

Dr. David E. Engel 

Department of Foundations of Education 

University of Pittsburgh 

Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15213 

or 

Director of Admissions 
Pittsburgh Theological Seminary 
616 North Highland Avenue 
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15206 



86 




David E. Engel, Ed.D.; Assistant Professor of Religion and Education in Department of 
Foundations of Education at University of Pittsburgh 

The School of Education, the University of Pittsburgh, offers in conjunction with seminary 
courses the M.Ed, degree especially for overseas students and young women with college 
majors in religion or education who desire greater depth or technical skills. Professor David 
Engel advises these students and tailors their programs to their needs and interests. 



87 



A Joint Program Leading to the BD - MLS Degrees 



The Graduate School of Library and Information Sciences of the University 
of Pittsburgh and Pittsburgh Seminary have initiated a joint program to 
train librarians in theological librarianship. The program, spread over three 
and one-half to four academic years, will culminate in two degrees: B.D. 
andM.L.S. 

The Seminary will accept 14 hours in elective credit from the M.L.S. 
degree toward the B.D. degree and the following courses will constitute 
those hours: 

LS 100— Introduction to Librarianship 2 hours 

LS 244— Resources in the Social Sciences 3 hours 

LS 245— Resources in the Sciences 3 hours 
LS 267— Languages for the Library and 

Information Sciences 3 hours 

Plus one course from the following three to be offered by the Seminary 

91 1— Resources in the Theological Library 3 hours 

266— Theological Bibliography 3 hours 

471— Critique of Sources 3 hours 

The Graduate School of Library and Information Sciences will accept 
toward its M.L.S. the two remaining courses to be taught at the Seminary 
and listed above. The total M.L.S. hours will be 29 at the University and 9 
at the Seminary. 

This will be a joint program in which a student opting for the program 
must finish the joint course of study before he is awarded either degree. 
In case he does not finish the program, he will be required to fulfill all 
of the B.D. program as outlined by the Seminary or all of the M.L.S. 
program as outlined by the University. 

Inquiries should be directed to: 

Dean Harold Lancour 

Graduate School of Library and Information Sciences 

University of Pittsburgh 

Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15213 

or 

Professor Dikran Y. Hadidian, Librarian 
616 North Highland Avenue 
Pittsburgh Theological Seminary 
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15206 



88 




V 



\ 






y 




Harold Lancour, Ed.D.; Dean of Graduate School of Library and Information Sciences, 
University of Pittsburgh 

To help provide competent and needed theological librarians the seminary and Graduate 
School of Library and Information Sciences, the University of Pittsburgh, have a joint 
program leading to the B.D.-M.L.S. degree. Dean Harold Lancour of Pitt and Professor 
Dikran Hadidian, seminary librarian, work together in the operation of this program. 



89 



The Cooperative Graduate Program 

in the Study of Religion 

The University of Pittsburgh 

and Pittsburgh Theological Seminary 



The University of Pittsburgh and the Pittsburgh Theological Seminary have 
a cooperative graduate program in the study of religion. Inter-disciplinary 
in character, the program draws upon the resources of both institutions 
and leads to the Ph.D. degree, awarded by the University of Pittsburgh. 

The aim of the program is to foster interdisciplinary and creative study 
in the biblical, historical, theological, and ethical fields broadly conceived. 
To this end, the student is encouraged to move beyond the necessary pre- 
liminary steps as quickly as possible to independent research in his own 
special area and to the writing of a dissertation which is deemed, both 
by the joint faculty and by an external examiner, to be a contribution 
to human knowledge. A second and no less important aim is to engage the 
student, if possible, in actual teaching and research assistance, under the 
direction of the faculty. The number of candidates will be deliberately 
limited to afford close supervision by the directing professors. 

Program 

A. Residence and courses 

Full residence for a minimum of four terms is required for the degree. 
In this time, a student will be expected to take at least eight one-term 
courses (or equivalent) and undertake one half term (or more) of dissertation 
research. The eight courses will be distributed as follows: 

1. Two interdisciplinary courses (taught by the seminary faculty and/or 
University of Pittsburgh faculty) required of all students; 

2. Two courses in a University field; 

3. Two courses in the candidate's field of specialization (other than 
those satisfying requirement 2); 

4. Two electives (either in the field of specialization or in cognate 
fields). 

B. Examinations 

1. Not later than the second term of matriculation and preferably at 
the beginning, preliminary examinations in biblical studies, church 
history and history of doctrine, theology, ethics and history of 

90 



religions will be required of each candidate who possesses a B.D. 
degree. (Two University fields may be substituted with the approval 
of the Administrative Committee.) 

2. Language examinations will normally be required in French and 
German, and in such other languages as necessary for research in 
the student's chosen field of specialization. Petitions to substitute 
other languages will be decided on the merits of each individual 
case. 

3. The comprehensive examination (taken at the completion of all 
prior examinations and course work) will be directed toward the 
field of the student's eventual specialization. Of the four fields 
covered, one will be in that specialization and one each in areas 
respectively appropriate to departments in the two cooperating 
institutions. 

C. The Dissertation 

Chief emphasis will be placed upon the dissertation itself and upon the 
preparation of the candidate for its writing. He will be under the direction 
of a working committee consisting of his thesis adviser and at least three other 
members representing related disciplines. The thesis will be defended orally 
by the candidate. 

Admission 

The program requires for admission either a Bachelor of Divinity or 
suitable master's degree or equivalent. Application forms for admission 
and financial aid may be obtained by writing to either institution, but 
preferably to the University of Pittsburgh: 

Dean Richard H. McCoy or Professor Ford Battles 

Faculty of Arts and Sciences Faculty Adviser, Ph.D. program 

University of Pittsburgh, Room 1028-H Pittsburgh Theological Seminary 

Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15213 Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

In addition to the usual transcripts and letters of recommendation, 
applicants will be expected to provide scores on (preferably) the Graduate 
Record Examination or (alternatively) the Miller Analogies Test, as well as 
a seminar paper or other evidence of scholarly research experience. 

Financial Aid 

Some financial assistance is available. Awards will be made on the basis 
of merit and need. Students desiring consideration for assistance may apply 
on a special form, furnished at their request, at the time of application for 
admission. 



91 





Richard H. McCoy, Ph.D.; Associate Dean of the Faculty of Arts and Sciences, University 
of Pittsburgh 

Dean Richard McCoy is chairman of the Administrative Committee for the Cooperative 
Graduate Program in the Study of Religion (Ph.D.). Other members of the committee are: 
(University) Professor Robert D. Marshall, English; Professor Nicholas Resher, Philosophy; 
Professor George P. Murdock, Anthropology; Professor William Stanton, History; (Semi- 
nary) Professor Walter Wiest, Systematic Theology and Ethics; Professor Markus Barth, 
New Testament; Professor Ford Battles, Church History; and Dean Gordon E. Jackson. 

92 



93 



Continuing Education 



Under the direction of the Graduate Education Committee continuing 
education is fast assuming a major place in the life of the Seminary. Over 
300 pastors in the Pittsburgh, Erie and Blair-Cambria Counties, Pennsylvania, 
and Canton, Ohio areas participate in Eight Weeks Schools. A distinctive 
feature, and the catalyst that precipitates a truly vital learning experience, 
is the active participation of pastors from over a dozen denominations who 
make up a majority of those enrolled. 

The Eight Weeks Schools 

At the Seminary. For eight Tuesdays in October and November, and again 
in February and March, the regular faculty offers courses in a wide range 
of areas but always with particular relevance to ministry, whatever its 
forms (pastoral, administrative, etc.). For example, the following courses 
were offered last fall: Church and Ministry and Problems of Church Union; 
New Testament Greek Refresher Seminar; and Main Themes and Problems of 
Ephesians. Frequently, outside faculty from the University of Pittsburgh and 
from other universities teach special courses, such as The Urban Community, 
taught last fall by a Professor from the Graduate School of Social Work 
at the University of Pittsburgh. Each class runs two hours and a registrant 
may take up to three courses. Announcement of course offerings is made 
in PANORAMA, the quarterly bulletin, as well as in brochure form. The 
fee of $5.00 per course includes the use of the library. Inquiries should 
be directed to William P. Barker, Director of Continuing Education. 

At Canton, Ohio. Each fall the Seminary conducts an eight week session 
for pastors of this area, with the same format and two courses as listed 
above. Other schools in other areas will be announced as they are developed. 
A special announcement and registration form may be secured from the 
Registrar of the Canton School of Theology, Christ U. P. Church, Canton, 
Ohio, or from the Director of Continuing Education at the Seminary. 

At Loretto, Pa. Each fall the Seminary also conducts an eight week ses- 
sion for pastors in cooperation with St. Francis Roman Catholic Seminary. 
This school seeks to serve pastors and priests in the Blair-Cambria County 
area and, patterned after the Canton School, offers two courses. A special 
announcement and registration form may be secured from the Director of 
Continuing Education. 

At Erie, Pa. The Seminary has begun an eight week session in the fall for 
pastors in Northwestern Pennsylvania, patterned after the schools at Canton 
and Loretto, also offering two courses. A special announcement and regis- 
tration form may be secured from the Director of Continuing Education. 

The Center for Pastoral Studies Training Program 

The Center for Pastoral Studies, a program of training, research and re- 
ferral for clergymen of all faiths, which opened September, 1968, offers 

94 



a training course which runs for thirty weeks. This program offers a limited 
number of clergymen the opportunity to acquire counseling experience in 
a supervised setting with individuals referred to the Center. Each week 
clergymen participating in the course attend a one hour teaching session, 
followed by an hour and a half seminar for case study with a psychiatric 
consultant and a pastoral consultant. Tuition for the training course is $50. 



The Woodville Project 

In addition to the thirty week training course of the Center for Pastoral 
Studies, the Seminary cooperates with Woodville State Hospital to sponsor 
a special project for five pastors. This project offers training in the handling 
and transition of a person already committed to a mental hospital back 
to community life and the support needed as such a person returns to 
his home. This project, running for thirty weeks also, uses a format similar 
to the training course for the Center for Pastoral Studies. Tuition for the 
Woodville Project is $40. 



Winter, Spring and Summer Programs 

A Lenten Preaching Seminar will be held on campus in January 1970, de- 
signed to give a limited number of pastors the opportunity to read and study 
with three from the faculty and staff of the Seminary. The cost for the week, 
including tuition, room, board and all fees, is $45. 

A Seminar for Pastors and Pastors' Wives will be held on campus from 
July 12 through July 19, 1969, which will provide lectures and seminars 
designed to provide a meaningful learning experience in the fields of 
Biblical materials, contemporary culture and personal relations. A fee of 
$45 per person will cover the cost of tuition, room and board. 

The School of Religion at Shady Side Academy, Pittsburgh, supported by 
the Pitcairn-Crabbe Foundation, each summer invites 150 ministers from 
within the Synod of Pennsylvania. The faculty is drawn from all over the 
United States as well as from the Seminary. The dates for the 1969 
school are June 15-20. 



Independent Study-in-Residence 

Many pastors find that study leaves can be spent most profitably by 
living on campus and pursuing an uninterrupted, personal study program. 
Those participating in Independent Study-in-Residence may select an on- 
campus faculty adviser who suggests readings and meets with the pastor. 
Private rooms are usually available in the dormitories for $1.50 per night; 
meals are served in the cafeteria. Tuition for Independent Study-in- 
Residence is $5.00 per week. Further information may be secured from the 
Director of Continuing Education. 

95 



The Alumni Association 



Officers 

President, Curtis J. Patterson, '37 

Vice President, Gordon E. Boak '49 

Secretary, Richard A. Davis, '39 

Treasurer, Merl L. Galusha, '64 

Director of Alumni Relations, William P. Barker '50 



The Alumni Association, now numbering more than 2,300 members, is com- 
posed of the former students, graduates and post-graduates of Pittsburgh 
Theological Seminary and its antecedent seminaries. The purposes of the 
Association are to deepen the friendships begun in seminary and to afford 
fellowship among all its graduates; to cooperate with the Seminary in enlisting 
young people for church vocations and recruiting prospective seminary candi- 
dates; to support actively the cause of theological education and of the 
Seminary in particular in its development to meet the demands of the future; 
and lastly, to have a sympathetic interest in the life and work of the Semi- 
nary's students and faculty. The Alumni Association sponsors several seminary 
convocations. 

The Annual Alumni Day will be held on May 12, 1969 and begin with an 
address by a major figure in the field of science. At noon there will be the 5 
year reunion luncheons and a general luncheon for all alumni. The afternoon 
program consists of a faculty panel to discuss the issues raised in the morning, 
a brief business session for election of officers, and a reception by President 
and Mrs. Donald Miller. This is followed by the alumni dinner, after which 
the graduating seniors are inducted into the Association. 

Regional meetings of alumni are held frequently, and a dinner at the annual 
meeting of The General Assembly is another highlight of the year's activities. 

Annual supplements to the Alumni Directory are published each summer 
and list changes of address and the newly received alumni. 

96 



Degrees Awarded, 1967-1968 



The Degree of Bachelor of Divinity 

Robert Herbert Barnes, Maple Heights, Ohio 

B.A., Park College, 1964 
Laszlo Berzeviczy, Ontario, California 

B.A., The College of Wooster, 1965 
Wilbur Wilson Bradbum, Jr., Oakdale, Pennsylvania 

B.A., The College of Wooster, 1965 
Arthur John Campbell, Jeannette, Pennsylvania 

B. A., Wayne sburg College, 1965 
Edward Allen Campbell, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

B. A., Muskingum College, 1965 
Judith Evelyn Campbell, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

B.A., Westminster College, 1965 
/. Terry Carnahan, Beaver, Pennsylvania 

B.A., Westminster College, 1965 
Gary Glenmar Close, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

B.S., Norwich University, 1964 
Lawrence W. Corbett, Harrisville, Ohio 

B.A., Muskingum College, 1965 
Patterson A. Deane, Barbados, West Indies 

B.D., Union Theological Seminary of Jamaica, 1958 
Carolyn Jane Easdale, Tilden, Illinois 

B.A., Monmouth College, 1965 
John Charles Free, Washington, District of Columbia 

B.A., Davis and Elkins College, 1965 
Clyde Henry Goff, Dayton, Ohio 

B.A., University of Toledo, 1959 
Robert A. Harris, Jr., Kansas City, Missouri 

B.S., Missouri School of Mines, 1963 
Jean Humason Henderson, Fairmont, West Virginia 

B.A., Davis and Elkins College, 1964 
J. Wallace Huber, Jr., Princeton, Indiana 

B.A., Muskingum College, 1963 
/. Warren Jacobs, Waynesburg, Pennsylvania 

A.B., Waynesburg College, 1965 
David Ralph Johnston, Jr., West Lafayette, Indiana 

B.S., Iowa State University, 1959 

M.S., Purdue University, 1965 
Timothy A. Koah, Mars, Pennsylvania 

B.A., Westminster College, 1961 
Benjamin Peter Ksiazek, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

B.A., Butler University, 1965 



98 



Peter Church Leathersich, Almond, New York 

A.B., Union College, 1965 
James Graham Lockhart, Butler, Pennsylvania 

B.A., Westminster College, 1965 
Robert Nicholas Lodwick, Sao Paulo, Brazil 

Institute Jose Manuel da Conceicao, 1963 
Robert Louis Lowry, West Chester, Pennsylvania 

B.S., University of Pennsylvania, 1955 

M.B.A., Temple University, 1965 
Joseph Leonard Luciana, Jr., Oakmont, Pennsylvania 

B.A., University of Pittsburgh, 1950 

L.L.B., University of Pittsburgh Law School, 1951 
HelselR. Marsh, Jr., Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

B.S., Westminster College, 1964 
James Warren McDowell, Knoxville, Tennessee 

B.A., Knoxville College, 1959 
Paul Scott McQueen, West Middlesex, Pennsylvania 

A.B., Youngstown University, 1965 
Jack R. Moon, McKeesport, Pennsylvania 

B.S.M.E., Carnegie Institute of Technology, 1955 
Bruce Mounts, Washington, Pennsylvania 

B.A., Washington and Jefferson College, 1964 
/. Michael Mullin, Fredericktown, Ohio 

A.B.,Pikeville College, 1965 
George J. Peters, Joliet, Illinois 

B.S., West Virginia University, 1957 
John A. Pilutti, Irondale, Ohio 

B.A., Kent State University, 1965 
Bertrand Custer Pitchford, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

B.A., Washington and Jefferson College, 1956 

Carol Rose Polivka, Bridgeport, Ohio 

A.B., Muskingum College, 1964 
Vaughn Paul Purnell, Glassport, Pennsylvania 

B.S., Grove City College, 1965 
D. Herbert Ralston, Salineville, Ohio 

B.A., Monmouth College, 1950 
Vernon C. Rushing, Amherst, New York 

B.S., Brown University, 1964 
Peter David Schlichting, North Arlington, New Jersey 

B.A., Bloomfield College, 1964 

George John Scoulas, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

Greek Theological Institute, 1950 
Jonathan Carl Siehl, Cincinnati, Ohio 

B.A., Muskingum College, 1964 
Edward Eldon Spence, Los Alamos, New Mexico 

B.A., Hastings College, 1965 

99 



Gerald F. Stacy, Minneapolis, Minnesota 

B.A., Macalester College, 1962 
Harvey Gibson Throop, Omaha, Nebraska 

B.A., Missouri Valley College, 1965 
Barry T. Vance, McMurray, Pennsylvania 

B.A., Bethany College, 1965 
Steven Hoodless Washburn, Flossmoor, Illinois 

B.A., Monmouth College, 1963 
Kenneth James Watt, Berkeley, California 

B.A., Whitworth College, 1965 
William Scott Wills, New Kensington, Pennsylvania 

A.B.,Tarkio College, 1965 
Fred Wood, North Haledon, New Jersey 

B.A., Bloomfield College, 1964 
Roland Clarence Wroten, Scranton, Pennsylvania 

B.S., University of Scranton, 1956 

M.A., University of Scranton, 1963 



The Degree of Master of Religious Education 

Ruth E. Caldwell, Middlesex, New Jersey 
B.M., Westminster Choir College, 1950 

Sookja Paik Kim, Seoul, Korea 
B.S., Seoul National University (Korea), 1964 

Barbara Ann Rowden, Alton, Illinois 
B.A., Davis and Elkins College, 1966 



The Degree of Master of Theology 

Rev. Samuel Hayden Britton, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

B.S., University of Tennessee, 1955 

B.D., Western Theological Seminary, 1958 
Rev. Howard Eshbaugh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

A.B., Grove City College, 1955 

B.D., Western Theological Seminary, 1956 
Rev. A. Vanlier Hunter, Jr., Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

A.B., Grove City College, 1961 

B.D., Pittsburgh Theological Seminary, 1964 
Rev. John W. Irwin, Grove City, Pennsylvania 

B.A., Sterling College, 1955 

B.D., Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary, 1958 
Rev. John Bavington McLaren, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

B.A., Westminster College, 1957 

B.D., Pittsburgh Theological Seminary, 1963 



100 






Rev. Jay C. Rochelle, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 
B.A., Concordia College, 1961 
B.D., Concordia Seminary, 1965 



Honors and Awards 



Cum Laude 

J. Warren Jacobs 
Robert Louis Lowry 
Joseph Leonard Luciana, Jr. 
Helsel R. Marsh, Jr. 
Carol Rose Polivka 
Vernon C. Rushing 
Jonathan Carl Siehl 
Edward Eldon Spence 

The Thomas Jamison Scholarship 

and 

The Sylvester S. Marvin Memorial Fellowship 

Robert Louis Lowry 
Helsel R. Marsh, Jr. 

The Jennie Rigg Barbour Memorial Prize 

Robert Louis Lowry 
Helsel R. Marsh, Jr. 

The Hugh Thomson Kerr Moderator Prize 
Vernon C. Rushing 

The Michael Wilson Keith Memorial Homiletical Prize 
Vaughn Paul Purnell 

The Robert A. Lee Church History Award 

David Ralph Johnston, Jr. 
Vernon C. Rushing 

The Home Training Bible Class Award in Missions 
James Warren McDowell 

The Henry A. Riddle Award for Graduate Study 
Helsel R. Marsh, Jr. 



101 



Middler Class Awards 

The A lice Myers Sigler Memorial Prize 
in History and Theology 

James Davison 

The Walter P. and Anna L. McConkey 
Award in Homiletics 

Robert L. Eckard 



Junior Class Awards 

The James Purdy Scholarships 

Eduardo 0. Chaves 
John F. Dietz 
Carol A. Dilley 
John E. McKune 
William J. Rumsey 
Mariellen Schwentker 
Delmar G. Sewall 

The Fred McFeely Rogers Prize in Biblical Studies 
Eduardo 0. Chaves 

The Joseph Watson Greek Entrance Prize 
John F. Dietz 



102 



Register of Students, 1968-1969 



Senior Class 

Paul Edwin Anderson, Clinton, Massachusetts 

B.A., Trinity University, 1964 
Boyd A. Bell, Parker, Arizona 

B.S., Pennsylvania State University, 1942 
James Glen Bell, Grove City, Pennsylvania 

B.S., Grove City College, 1964 
Lance L. M. Brown, Niagara Falls, New York 

B.A., Buena Vista College, 1966 
Robert Ousley Brown, Weirton, West Virignia 

B.A., The College of Wooster, 1965 
Dennis Frank Butler, Fair Lawn, New Jersey 

B.A., Bloomfield College, 1964 
Jon W. Clifton, Springfield, Ohio 

A.B., Harvard College, 1963 
Donald Davis Crowe, Eighty Four, Pennsylvania 

B.A., Asbury College, 1966 
James Edwin Davison, Glenshaw, Pennsylvania 

B.A., Westminster College, 1966 
James Torrence Dennison, Jr., Beaver Falls, Pennsylvania 

B.S., Geneva College, 1965 
Donald J. Dilley, II, Edmonds, Washington 

B.A., University of Washington, 1966 
William Alan Doyle, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

B.A., Davis and Elkins College, 1965 
Robert Louis Eckard, Vero Beach, Florida 

B.A., Tusculum College, 1966 
Merritt Wayne Ednie, Vandergrift, Pennsylvania 

A.B., Indiana University of Pennsylvania, 1966 
David James Evans, El Paso, Texas 

B.A., Trinity University, 1966 
Madge B. Floyd, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

B.A., Emory University, 1958 
David Harrison Foubert, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

B.A.,Beloit College, 1965 
Robert Douglas Forsythe, Dundalk, Maryland 

B.S., University of Maryland, 1958 
William Irvin Gracey, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

B.A., Waynesburg College, 1965 
David Quincy Hall, Muskegon, Michigan 

B.A., University of Michigan, 1966 



103 



Arthur George Hampson, Seattle, Washington 

B.S., Seattle Pacific College, 1965 
Lee Roy Hearn, Bethel Park, Pennsylvania 

B.M., Westminster Choir College, 1960 

M.M., Westminster Choir College, 1963 
Clarence Ernst Ho ener, Jr., Pitcairn, Pennsylvania 

B.A., Lebanon Valley College, 1967 
William Edward Hoffman, Newark, New Jersey 

B.A., Bloomfield College, 1966 
William George Holliday, Conneaut, Ohio 

B.A., Westminster College, 1966 
Robert Joseph Huck, Downers Grove, Illinois 

A.B.,Wheaton College, 1965 
Alexander Phillips Hurt, Towson, Maryland 

B.A., Norwich University, 1962 
Midhat Daoud Ibrahim, Tripoli, Lebanon 

Th.B., Near East School of Theology, 1964 
PaulKabo, Jr., Hickory, Pennsylvania 

B.A., Waynesburg College, 1966 
A. Boyd Keys, New Kensington, Pennsylvania 

B.S., Waynesburg College, 1939 
David S. King, Coraopolis, Pennsylvania 

B.A., Maryville College, 1965 
John Francis Kirkham, Canton, Ohio 

B.A., Malone College, 1964 
William Albert Kramp, Normal, Illinois 

B.A., Beloit College, 1964 
John D. Kutz, Grafton, North Dakota 

A.B., University of North Dakota, 1966 
John Robert Lane, Columbus, Ohio 

B.A., Capital University, 1966 
James Edgar Long, Jr., Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

B.A., Westminster College, 1966 
Donald Drew Ludwig, Washington, District of Columbia 

B.A., The College of Wooster, 1965 
Robert Vaughn Mathias, Rockville Centre, New York 

B.A., The College of Wooster, 1966 
John Wallace McCreight, Washington, Pennsylvania 

B.A., The College of Wooster, 1966 
W. Thomas Mecouch, Upper Darby, Pennsylvania 

B.A., Dickinson College, 1966 
Harold James Mills, Warren, Ohio 

B.A., Kent State University, 1966 
Kenneth Russell Newhams, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

B.A., The College of Wooster, 1965 



104 






Dale T. O'Connell, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 
B.A., Tarkio College, 1964 

Milton Harold Ohlsen, Jr., Weaverville, North Carolina 
B. A., Muskingum College, 1965 

John William Orr, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

B.A., Muskingum College, 1966 
Donald P. Owens, Jr., Arlington, Texas 

B.A., Trinity University, 1967 
Alan Van de Mark Pareis, Union, New Jersey 

A.B., Albright College, 1965 

Charles Neal Perrine, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

B.A., Grove City College, 1965 
Richard Irving Peters, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

B.A., Kenyon College, 1965 
Harold A. Rainey, Clifton, New Jersey 

B. A., Tusculum College, 1966 

Robert Everett Ralston, Canton, Ohio 

A.B., Malone College, 1966 
Mary Stossel Rishel, Indiana, Pennsylvania 

B.S., Indiana University of Pennsylvania, 1966 
Fred Edward Roedger, Jr., Cleveland, Ohio 

B.A., The College of Wooster, 1966 

Robert Edward Salmon, Cheswick, Pennsylvania 

B.A., Westminster College, 1966 
Thomas J. Sawyer, Sharon, Pennsylvania 

B.A., University of Pittsburgh, 1955 
William Paul Saxman, West Mifflin, Pennsylvania 

B.S., Slippery Rock State College, 1961 
Kenneth Raymond Stahl, Ligonier, Pennsylvania 

B.A., Westminster College, 1966 
Ralph Carleton Stock, Kenmore, New York 

B.A., Grove City College, 1965 
William LeRoy Thompson, East McKeesport, Pennsylvania 

A.B., Waynesburg College, 1965 
R. Eldon Trubee, Minerva, Ohio 

A.B., The College of Wooster, 1966 

RoselisE. M. Wachholz, Wuertt, West Germany 

B.D., Denkandorf Seminary, 1954 
George William Walker, III, Buffalo, New York 

A.B., Westminster College, 1966 
George Newins Ward, III, Walden, New York 

B.A., Williams College, 1966 
Colin Thomas Webster, Hamburg, New York 

B.B.A., University of Wisconsin, 1959 



105 



Frederick Wayne Weiss, Hamburg, New York 
B.S., Cortland State Teachers College, 1958 

Gary Lee Wolfer, Spokane, Washington 
B.A., Whitworth College, 1965 

D. Darrell Woomer, Dayton, Ohio 
A.B., Juniata College, 1964 



Middler Class 

William LeRoy Beckes, Tarentum, Pennsylvania 

B.A., Grove City College, 1967 
Robert J. Campbell, II, Wheeling, West Virginia 

A.B., West Liberty State College, 1967 
Eduardo O. C. Chaves, Sao Paulo, Brazil 

B.D., Campinas Presbyterian Theological Seminary, 1966 
/. Gregory Clark, Sioux City, Iowa 

B.A., Morningside College, 1967 
Gary B. Collins, Mount Lebanon, Pennsylvania 

B.A., Westminster College, 1967 
FredH. deOliveira, Jr., Carlsbad, New Mexico 

B.A., Trinity University, 1967 
M. Dayle Dickey, Espyville Station, Pennsylvania 

B.A., Taylor University, 1967 
John F. Dietz, Canonsburg, Pennsylvania 

B.A., Muskingum College, 1966 

Carol Ann Dilley, Edmonds, Washington 

B.A., University of Washington, 1967 
Frederick C. Doscher, Merrick, New York 

B.A.,Maryville College, 1967 
Robert L. Emrich, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

B.A., Gettysburg College, 1967 
CarlR. Engstrom, Duquesne, Pennsylvania 

B.A., Geneva College, 1967 
Joan M. Fenner, Cedar Falls, Iowa 

B.A., State College of Iowa, 1966 
John S. Ferguson, Sydney, Australia 

B.A., University of Pittsburgh, 1966 
John C. Foster, Fraser, Michigan 

B.A., Alma College, 1967 
Warren L. Furnish, Indianapolis, Indiana 

B. A., Indiana University, 1967 
Gary A. Gard, Portland, Oregon 

B.S., University of Missouri, 1965 
Richard G. Goss, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

B.A., Muskingum College, 1967 

106 



John A. Graham, Youngstown, Ohio 

B.A., Maryville College, 1967 
John Robert Gray, Jr., New Kensington, Pennsylvania 

B.A., Juniata College, 1967 
Frank N. Gready, South Lyon, Michigan 

B.A., Maryville College, 1967 
Howard Paul Hoover, Pikeville, Kentucky 

B.A., Pikeville College, 1967 
Dale A. Hunter, Coraopolis, Pennsylvania 

B.A., Grove City College, 1967 
Scott J. Hunter, New Kensington, Pennsylvania 

B.S., Amherst College, 1967 
Curtis D. Illingworth, San Mateo, California 

A.B., Grove City College, 1967 
Milton Bruce Irwin, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

B.A., Westminster College, 1967 
Dennis W. Jones, Marietta, Ohio 

B.A., Ohio State University, 1967 
Alan D. Kern, Williamsport, Pennsylvania 

B.A., Lycoming College, 1967 
Keith R. Kivlin, Columbus, Ohio 

B.S., Ohio State University, 1967 
David M. Liddle, Jr., Des Moines, Iowa 

B.A., Northwestern University, 1965 
Richard A. Markle, Franklin, Indiana 

A.B., Franklin College, 1966 
John E. McKune, Springfield, Ohio 

B.A.,Keny on College, 1952 
James R. Morrisey, Hagerstown, Maryland 

A.B., Dickinson College, 1967 
Albert Hughes Prichard, Mannington, West Virginia 

B.A., Davis and Elkins College, 1966 
William J. Rumsey, Dover, New Jersey 

B.A., Maryville College, 1967 
Mariellen Smith Schwentker, Baltimore, Maryland 

A.B., Bryn Mawr College, 1958 
Delmar G. Sewall, New Wilmington, Pennsylvania 

B. A., Westminster College, 1966 
Douglas L. Shaffer, Harrisburg, Pennsylvania 

A.B., Lafayette College, 1967 
Walter L. Siegel, Pottsville, Pennsylvania 

B.A., Susquehanna University, 1966 
John B. Simpson, Oakdale, Pennsylvania 

B.A., Davis and Elkins College, 1967 
James L. Smith, Butler, Pennsylvania 

B.A., Westminster College, 1967 

107 



Edwin G. Steinmetz, Jr., East Stroudsburg, Pennsylvania 

B.A., Bloomfield College, 1967 
John R. Stevenson, Wichita, Kansas 

B.A., University of Tulsa, 1967 
Dean E. Tapley, Hartford, Connecticut 

B.A., Trinity University, 1967 
Marilyn K. VanGelder, George, Iowa 

B.A., Sterling College, 1967 
Angus M. Watkins, Pemberville, Ohio 

B.A., Bowling Green State University, 1967 
Pamela-Rae Yeager, Bowling Green, Ohio 

B.S., Bowling Green State University, 1967 



B.D. Students Serving Internships 

Gerard R. Kuyk, Fenton, Michigan 

B.A., Alma College, 1966 
NealEvan Lloyd, Cambria, Wisconsin 

B.A., Macalester College, 1966 
Homer Eugene Nye, Galion, Ohio 

A.B., Ohio University, 1966 
Lewis Clifton Weldon, Jr., Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

B.A., DePauw University, 1966 



Junior Class 

Michael John Ader, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

B.A., Duquesne University, 1968 
Philip Bell, Jr., Detroit, Michigan 

B.A., Detroit Institute of Technology, 1965 
David Alan Black, Cedar Rapids, Iowa 

B.A.,Coe College, 1968 
James Edward Boos, Huron, Ohio 

B.S., Ohio State University, 1968 
Peter C. Bower, Tenafly, New Jersey 

B.A., Alfred University, 1968 
David MacDonald Brookman, Wellsville, Ohio 

B.A., The College of Wooster, 1967 
Curt L. Brown, Youngstown, Ohio 

B.S., Youngstown State College, 1967 
George Joseph Cottay, Jr., Traverse City, Michigan 

B.A., Alma College, 1968 
Gregory Allan Dana, Sherman, Texas 

B.A., Austin College, 1968 

108 



Ronald Ralph Davidson, Warrendale, Pennsylvania 

L.Th., University of Toronto, 1962 
William F. W. Davis, Dobbs Ferry, New York 

B.A., Marietta College, 1966 
Jack H. Dawson, Birmingham, Michigan 

B.S., Northwestern University, 1949 
Robert Clarence DeFazio, Niagara Falls, New York 

B.A., State University College at Potsdam, 1968 
Leo Renold DelPasqua, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

B.A., Cathedral College of the Immaculate Conception, 1967 
/. Samuel Diddle, Sharon, Pennsylvania 

B.A., University of Pittsburgh, 1968 
W. Glenn Doak, Eighty Four, Pennsylvania 

B.S., Sterling College, 1968 
Judson W. Dolphin, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 

A.B., Grove City College, 1967 
Brent J. Dugan, Waterford, Pennsylvania 

B.A., Edinboro College, 1968 
David W. Dyson, Mt. Lebanon, Pennsylvania 

B.A., Bethany College, 1968 
Edwin Elliott Evans, Coatesville, Pennsylvania 

A.B., Calvin College, 1968 
Donald Robert Ewing, Abington, Pennsylvania 

B.S., University of Pennsylvania, 1968 
Timothy Joseph Fairman, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

B.A., Westminster College, 1968 
David James Felts, Ashland, Ohio 

A.B., Ashland College, 1968 
Ray Howard Ford, New Brighton, Pennsylvania 

B.S., Geneva College, 1967 
Charles Ray Fosnight, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

B.A., Ottawa University, 1957 
Robert William Graham, Olean, New York 

B.A., Bloomfield College, 1968 
Joel Edward Grottenhaler, Harrisburg, Pennsylvania 

B.A., Westminster College, 1968 
William Harrison Hammann, Carlisle, Pennsylvania 

B.S., Shippensburg State College, 1968 
Wilbur Pierce Hawthorne, III, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

B.A., Duquesne University, 1968 
Harry Rollo Heidrich, New Kensington, Pennsylvania 

B.A., Westminster College, 1968 
Robert Grey Helfrich, Catonsville, Maryland 

B.S., Loyola College, 1968 
Paul A. Heller, Swissvale, Pennsylvania 

B.A., Gettysburg College, 1968 

109 



Richard James Henderson, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

B. A., Muskingum College, 1968 
Douglas Eric Holben, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

B.A., Baldwin-Wallace College, 1968 
Eldon Russell Holland, Little Rock, Arkansas 

B.A., Phillips University, 1968 
Lawrence Kenneth Hooten, Charleroi, Pennsylvania 

B.M., Grove City College, 1968 
Janet L. Hoyt, Johnstown, Pennsylvania 

B.S., University of Pittsburgh, 1967 
Thomas Van Johnson, Garard's Fort, Pennsylvania 

B.A., Alderson-Broaddus College, 1968 
David Mitchell Kilgore, Norco, Louisiana 

B.A., Southwestern at Memphis College, 1968 
William Henry Lane, Mt. Lebanon, Pennsylvania 

B.A., Westminster College, 1965 
Bill Norman Lawrence, Brockport, New York 

B.A., Missouri Valley College, 1968 
Wilmer Edward Lucas, III, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

B.S., California State College, 1966 
Patricia Anne Luetgert, Oberlin, Ohio 

A.B., Oberlin College, 1968 
George Taylor Lyon, Towson, Maryland 

B. A., Muskingum College, 1967 
George Louis Mason, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

A.B., Grove City College, 1968 
Daniel King McKeon, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

B.A., Kalamazoo College, 1968 
Rose Moehrke, Kirchgasse, Germany 

Seminar fur kirchlichen Dienst Hannover, 1951 
Robert Allen Morgart, Johnstown, Pennsylvania 

B.A., University of Pittsburgh, 1966 
Edward Bernard Newberry, Charlotte, North Carolina 

B.A., Knoxville College, 1968 
Howard Alfred Newman, Abington, Pennsylvania 

B.A., Maryville College, 1968 
W. Jack Noble, Newport Beach, California 

B.A., Southern California College, 1968 
Lutrelle Delano Rainey, Newport News, Virginia 

A.B., Virginia Union University, 1968 
John D. Rickloff, Hamburg, New York 

B.A., Grove City College, 1968 
David Edgar Rider, West Sunbury, Pennsylvania 

B.S., Westminster College, 1968 
Gerald Abram Rife, II, Erie, Pennsylvania 

B.A., University of Pittsburgh, 1968 

110 



Jay Alan Schrader, New Stanton, Pennsylvania 

A.B.,Waynesburg College, 1968 
Richard A. Sells, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

B.S., University of Pittsburgh, 1968 
Terry Lynn Singer, Tyrone, Pennsylvania 

B.A., Pennsylvania State University, 1968 
George Albert Staff a, Dundalk, Maryland 

B.A., Towson State College, 1968 
Eugene F. Stevens, Exeter, New Hampshire 

B.A., Boston University, 1967 
Moses Locatie Stith, Petersburg, Virginia 

B.A., Virginia Union University, 1968 
Dwight Ward Tawney, Jr., Rockledge, Florida 

B.A., Florida Presbyterian College, 1968 
Frank David Throop, Omaha, Nebraska 

B.A., Hastings College, 1968 
Douglas John Tracy, Bismarck, North Dakota 

B.A., Carroll College, 1968 



Candidates for The Degree 
of Master of Theology 



Biblical Studies 

Rev. Oscar L. Arnal, Industry, Pennsylvania 

A.B.,Theil College, 1963 

B.D., Lutheran Theological Seminary, 1966 
Rev. Waldir Berndt, Blumenau, Brazil 

B.D., Campinas Presbyterian Theological Seminary, 1964 
Rev. In Soon Choi, Seoul, Korea 

B.A., Seoul National University, 1958 

B.D., Pittsburgh Theological Seminary, 1966 
Rev. Gary G. Close, Evon Valley, Pennsylvania 

B.S., Norwich University, 1964 

B.D., Pittsburgh Theological Seminary, 1968 
Rev. George E. Espy, Beaver, Pennsylvania 

B.A., University of Pittsburgh, 1963 

B.D., Pittsburgh Theological Seminary, 1966 
Rev. David F. Hartzfeld, Greensburg, Pennsylvania 

B.S., Nyack Missionary College, 1963 

B.D., Bethel Theological Seminary, 1967 
Rev. Charles C. Hendricks, Fort Worth, Texas 

B.A., Austin College, 1961 

B.D., Austin Seminary, 1965 

111 



Rev. Gary Evans Huffman, Loves Park, Illinois 

A.B., Monmouth College, 1963 

B.D., Pittsburgh Theological Seminary, 1966 
Rev. Midhat D. Ibrahim, Tripoli, Lebanon 

Th.B., Near East School of Theology, 1964 
Rev. Benjamin Peter Ksiazek, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

B.A., Butler University, 1965 

B.D., Pittsburgh Theological Seminary, 1968 
Rev. David W. Philips, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

B. A., Muskingum College, 1959 

B.D., Pittsburgh Theological Seminary, 1963 
Rev. James Avery Smith, McKeesport, Pennsylvania 

B.S., Drexel Institute of Technology, 1958 

B.D., Pittsburgh Theological Seminary, 1967 
Rev. D. Darrell Woomer, Cleveland, Ohio 

A.B., Juniata College, 1964 
Rev. Roland Clarence Wroten, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

B.S., University of Scranton, 1956 

M.A., University of Scranton, 1963 

B.D., Pittsburgh Theological Seminary, 1968 



History and Theology 

Rev. Elias Ahrahao, Campinas, Brazil 

B.D., Campinas Presbyterian Theological Seminary, 1965 
Rev. Kenneth P. Alpers, Minneapolis, Minnesota 

B.A., Capital University, 1949 

B.D., Capital Theological Seminary, 1952 
Rev. Robert Bellingham, Plymouth, Ohio 

B.A., Bethel College, 1963 

B.D., Fuller Theological Seminary, 1966 
Rev. William Cheston Berlin, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

B.A., Muskingum College, 1953 

B.D., Western Theological Seminary, 1956 
Rev. Daniel Tin-Wo Chow, Hong Kong, China 

B.D., Gordon Divinity School, 1964 
Rev. Benjamin T. Griffin, Mt. Pleasant, Pennsylvania 

B.A., Baylor University, 1961 

B.D., Andover Newton Theological Seminary, 1965 
Rev. J. Warren Jacobs, Natrona, Pennsylvania 

A. B. , Waynesburg College, 1965 

B.D., Pittsburgh Theological Seminary, 1968 
Rev. Dong Soo Kim, Seoul, Korea 

B.A., Union Christian College, 1959 

B.D., Pittsburgh Theological Seminary, 1965 

112 



Rev. Kerry Meier, Glenwillard,. Pennsylvania 

A.B., Bloomfield College, 1957 

B.D., Pittsburgh Theological Seminary, 1960 
Rev. Robert M. A. L. Miller, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

B.A., Muhlenberg College, 1960 

B.D., Lutheran Theological Seminary, 1963 
Rev. Bernard Ernest Quick, Tarentum, Pennsylvania 

B.M., University of Colorado, 1948 

B.D., Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary, 1952 
Rev. Theodore Sideris, Ambridge, Pennsylvania 

B.Th., University of Athens Theological School (Greece), 1966 
Rev. John Robert Walchenbach, Apollo, Pennsylvania 

A.B., Hope College, 1957 

B.D., New Brunswick Theological Seminary, 1961 
Rev. Ralph K. Weber, Derry, Pennsylvania 

B.A., Bluffton College, 1951 

B.D., Bethany Biblical Seminary, 1954 

S.T.M., Biblical Seminary in New York, 1955 



Program for Advanced Pastoral Studies 

Rev. William Beech Ailes, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

B.A., Ohio Wesleyan University, 1954 

B.D., Western Theological Seminary, 1957 
Rev. Robert Herbert Barnes, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

B.A., Park College, 1964 

B.D., Pittsburgh Theological Seminary, 1968 
Rev. David E. Breckenridge, Springfield, Massachusetts 

B.S., Sterling College, 1959 

B.D., Pittsburgh Theological Seminary, 1963 
Rev. Robert Wayne Finertie, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

B.S., Maryville College, 1957 

B.D., Princeton Theological Seminary, 1960 
Rev. Ernest J. Frederick, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

B.S., University of Pittsburgh, 1955 

B.D., Biblical Seminary in New York, 1964 
Rev. D. M. Geconcillo, Pasay City, Philippines 

Th.B., Union Theological Seminary, Manila, 1953 

A.B., Philippine Christian College, 1964 
Rev. Ronald Ivan Glassman, Smock, Pennsylvania 

B.A., City College of New York, 1952 

B.D., Western Theological Seminary, 1959 
Rev. Robert H. Gnagy, Springdale, Pennsylvania 

A.B., Youngstown College, 1949 

B.D., Western Theological Seminary, 1959 

113 



Rev. Robert W. Gracey, Cowansville, Pennsylvania 
B.A., Davis and Elkins College, 1963 
B.D., Pittsburgh Theological Seminary, 1966 

Rev. William John Green, New Florence, Pennsylvania 
B.S.C.E., Carnegie Institute of Technology, 1954 
B.D., Pittsburgh Theological Seminary, 1962 

Rev. Edward S. Hammett, Irwin, Pennsylvania 
A.B., Washington and Jefferson College, 1950 
B.D., Pittsburgh Theological Seminary, 1964 

Rev. James William Hartley, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 
B.A., The College of Wooster, 1964 
B.D., Pittsburgh Theological Seminary, 1967 

Rev. Eduardo Hernandez, Ft. Worth, Texas 
B.A., Instituto Segunda Ensenanza, 1938 
B.Th., Western Theological Seminary, 1947 

Rev. J. Theodore Hunniford, Irwin, Pennsylvania 
B.S., Temple University, 1957 
B.D., Pittsburgh Theological Seminary, 1960 

Rev. Donald F. Hursh, Johnstown, Pennsylvania 
A.B., Elizabethtown College, 1950 
B.D., Bethany Theological Seminary, 1953 

Rev. James Franklin Karcher, Imperial, Pennsylvania 
B.S., University of Pittsburgh, 1950 
B.D., Western Theological Seminary, 1953 

Rev. William P. Kearns, West Newton, Pennsylvania 
B.A., Bob Jones University, 1956 
M.A., Bob Jones University, 1957 
Ph.D., Bob Jones University, 1960 

Rev. Harry Donald Lash, Monessen, Pennsylvania 
B.S., Clarion State College, 1960 
B.D., Pittsburgh Theological Seminary, 1964 

Rev. George Hallauer Lower, Edinboro, Pennsylvania 
B.S., Bucknell University, 1953 
B.D., Pittsburgh Theological Seminary, 1960 
M.A., Hartford Theological Seminary, 1961 

Rev. John Harvey MacLeod, Homestead, Pennsylvania 
A.B., The College of Wooster, 1945 
B.D., Princeton Theological Seminary, 1948 

Rev. David Matthews, Jr., Verona, Pennsylvania 
B.A.,Theil College, 1963 
B.D., Lutheran Theological Seminary, 1966 

Rev. Robert Edward Maynard, Brownsville, Pennsylvania 
B.A., Marshall University 
B.D., Methodist Theological School, 1963 

Ft. Isidor Ambrose McCarthy, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 
St. Joseph 
St. Charles Seminary, Carthagena, Ohio 



114 



Rev. Richard Barry McCune, Beaver Falls, Pennsylvania 

B.A., Westminster College, 1963 

B.D., Pittsburgh Theological Seminary, 1967 
Rev. William H. Morford, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

A.B., Dennison University, 1949 

B.D., Eastern Baptist Theological Seminary, 1952 
Rev. Donald William Musser, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

B.S., University of Pittsburgh, 1963 

B.D., Southern Baptist Theological Seminary, 1968 
Rev. J. Robert Phillips, Knoxville, Tennessee 

B.S., University of Pittsburgh, 1954 

B.D., Western Theological Seminary, 1959 
Rev. John Paul Pro, Jeannette, Pennsylvania 

B.Ed., Duquesne University, 1949 

B.D., Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary, 1957 
Rev. William Jessie Redmon, Fairmont, West Virginia 

B.S., University of Baltimore, 1960 

B.D., Bexley Hall Divinity School, 1963 
Rev. Bruce Warner Reeves, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

B.A., The College of Wooster, 1955 

B.D., Union Theological Seminary, 1959 
Rev. FredM. Rogers, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

B.M., Rollins College, 1951 

B.D., Pittsburgh Theological Seminary, 1962 
Rev. John William Scott, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

A.B., Adrian College, 1952 

B.D., Western Theological Seminary, 1955 
Rev. John A. Simpson, Waterford, Pennsylvania 

B.A., University of Akron, 1961 

B.D., Pittsburgh Theological Seminary, 1965 
Rev. Robert Edward Thomas, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

A.B.,Theil College, 1962 

B.D., Philadelphia Lutheran Seminary, 1965 
Rev. Judson Wiley, Bakerstown, Pennsylvania 

A.B., Washington and Jefferson College, 1950 

B.D., Western Theological Seminary, 1953 



Generalization 

Rev. Robert L. Lowry, West Chester, Pennsylvania 
B.S., University of Pennsylvania, 1955 
M.B.A., Temple University, 1965 
B.D., Pittsburgh Theological Seminary, 1968 

Rev. David C. Williams, Pitcairn, Pennsylvania 
B.A., Millikin University, 1963 
B.D., Pittsburgh Theological Seminary, 1967 



115 



Candidates for The Degree Doctor of Philosophy 



Rev. Waldir Berndt, Blumenau, Brazil 

B.D., Campinas Presbyterian Theological Seminary, 1964 
Rev. Edward P. Brennan, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

B.A., Borromeo College 

S.T.B., S.T.L., Gregorian University, Rome, Italy 

Rev. Charles Cameron Dickinson, HI, Charleston, West Virginia 

B.A., Dartmouth College, 1958 

B.D., Pittsburgh Theological Seminary, 1965 
Rev. Winslow Hackley Galbraith, Tarrytown, New York 

B.S., Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 1962 

B.D., Western Theological Seminary, 1965 
Sister Mary Michael Glenn, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

B.E., Duquesne University, 1951 

M.A., University of Notre Dame, 1956 
Rev. PaulF. Kokenda, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

B.A.,Thiel College, 1961 

M.A., University of Pittsburgh, 1962 

B.D., Lutheran Theological Seminary, 1965 
Rev. Wayne R. Spear, Roslyn, Pennsylvania 

B.A., Geneva College, 1957 

Diploma, Reformed Presbyterian Theological Seminary, 1960 
Rev. Robert Dale Taylor, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

B.S., University of Pittsburgh, 1956 

B.D., Pittsburgh Theological Seminary, 1963 
Rev. Robert Van Wyk, Clinton, Pennsylvania 

A.B., The College of Wooster, 1961 

B.D., Pittsburgh Theological Seminary, 1964 
Mr. Archibald M. Woodruff, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

A.B., George Washington University, 1963 

M.A., University of Pittsburgh, 1965 



Candidates for the Degree of 
Master of Religious Education 



Senior Class 

Sally Hillman Childs, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 
B.A., Sarah Lawrence College, 1949 

116 



Linda L. Evans, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

B.M., Westminster College, 1966 
Rosalie R. Glover, Hialeah, Florida 

B.S., Florida State University, 1967 
Jean Marian Oberlin, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

B.A., Kansas University, 1948 
HelgaM. Rosemann, Goettingen, Germany 

B.D., Burckhardt-Hans Seminary, 1954 
Ellen Ann Thompson, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

B.A., Emory University, 1964 



Junior Class 

Elizabeth Yuile Anderson, Haddonfield, New Jersey 

B.A.,Thiel College, 1968 
Mary Caroline Dana, Houston, Texas 

B.A., Austin University, 1968 
Mary S. Williams, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

B.A., Russell Sage College, 1937 



Candidates for The Degree of Master of Education 

(to be granted by the University of Pittsburgh) 



Patricia Anne Allen, Grove City, Pennsylvania 

B.A., Grove City College, 1967 
Rebecca A. Eifert, Danville, Pennsylvania 

B.A., Westminster College, 1968 
Nancy Jeanne Kerr, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

A.B., Muskingum College, 1965 
Ruth Blocher Rearic, Ellwood City, Pennsylvania 

B.A., Geneva College, 1964 



Special Students 

George Chalmers Browne, Brazil, South America 
David L. Heyser, Colville, Washington 
Elsie Kendall, Blairsville, Pennsylvania 
Frank Marshall, Natrona Heights, Pennsylvania 
Ann Sponsler, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 
Glendora Williams Paul, Allahabad, India 

117 



Summary of Attendance 

Bachelor of Divinity 

Juniors 64 

Middlers 47 

Seniors 67 

Interns 4 182 



Master of Religious Education 

Juniors 3 

Seniors 6 9 

Master of Education 4 

Master of Theology Program 65 

Doctoral Program 14 

Special Students __6 89 

Total Enrollment 280 






118 



119 



Board of Directors 

Officers 

Rev. J. Hubert Henderson, D.D., President 

Rev. Howard C. Scharfe, D.D., LL.D., Vice President 

Mr. George D. Lockhart, Secretary 

Mr. J. Rowe Hinsey , Assistant Secretary 

Mr. Robert L. Becker, Treasurer 

Mr. John T. Logan, B.B.A., C.P.A., Assistant Treasurer 

Mr. Henry C. Herchenroether, Jr. Counsel 

Members 

Term Expires May 1969 

Mr. A. C. Amsler, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

Retired— Westinghouse Electric Corporation 
Mr. Frank H. Davis, LL.D., Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

Retired 
Rev. Robert H. French, D.D., LL.D., Des Moines, Iowa 

Synod Executive, Synod of Iowa 
Mr. Henry C. Herchenroether, Jr., Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

Attorney, Alter, Wright, and Barron 
Rev. Yoder P. Leith, Cleveland Heights, Ohio 

Pastor, Forest Hills Presbyterian Church 

Mr. W. Kenneth Menke, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

President, Pittsburgh Chemical Company, a division of 

United States Steel Corporation 
Rev. Don P. Montgomery, D.D., Youngstown, Ohio 

Retired 
Mr. William H. Rea, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

President, Oliver Tyrone Corporation 
Rev. Robert H. Stephens, D.D., Summit, New Jersey 

Pastor, Central Presbyterian Church 
Mr. James W. Vicary, Erie, Pennsylvania 

President, Ervite Corporation 
Rev. Robert R. Vogelsang, D.D., Latrobe, Pennsylvania 

Pastor, Latrobe United Presbyterian Church 
Rev. Walter R. Young, D. D., Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

Pastor, Second United Presbyterian Church of Wilkinsburg 

Term Expires May 1970 

Mr. Robert L. Becker, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 
Retired— President, Wear-Ever Aluminum, Inc. 

Mr. John G. Buchanan, Jr., Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 
Attorney, Buchanan, Ingersoll, Rodewald, Kyle and Buerger 

Mr. EarleM. Craig, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 
Retired— Chairman of the Board, Valvoline Oil Company 

120 



Mr. Max A. Lauffer, Ph.D., Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

Andrew Mellon Professor of Biophysics and Chairman, 

Department of Biophysics, University of Pittsburgh 
Mr. George D. Lockhart, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

Attorney, Kirkpatrick, Pomeroy, Lockhart and Johnson 
Rev. W. Paul Ludwig, Ph.D., Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

Pastor, Eastminster United Presbyterian Church 
Mr. John R. McCune, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

Vice President, Lockhart Iron and Steel Company 
Rev. David E. Molyneaux, Flint, Michigan 

Pastor, First Presbyterian Church 
Rev. Walter L. Moser, Ph.D., D.D., Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

Secretary-Treasurer, Johnson C. Smith University 
Mr. Alexander P. Reed, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

Attorney at Law 
Mr. Elmore A. Willets, Jr., Sewickley, Pennsylvania 

Oil, Investments and Banking 
Rev. C.T.R. Yeates, D.D., LL.D., Des Moines, Iowa 

Pastor, Westminster United Presbyterian Church 

Term Expires May 1971 

Mr. Rollin D. Barnard, Littleton, Colorado 

President, Midland Federal Savings and Loan Association 
Rev. Charles C. Bray, Jr., Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

Pastor, Third Presbyterian Church 
Rev. J. Hubert Henderson, D.D., Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

Pastor, J. M. Wallace Memorial United Presbyterian Church 
Mr. William R. Jackson, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

President, Pittsburgh— Des Moines Steel Company 
Rev. John C. Lorimer, D.D., New Wilmington, Pennsylvania 

Retired 

Chaplain Thomas David Parham, Washington, D.C. 

Captain CHC, USN, Department of the Navy Bureau of Naval Personnel 
Rev. Charles P. Robshaw, S.T.D., D.D., LL.D., Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

Pastor, East Liberty Presbyterian Church 
Rev. Howard C. Scharfe, D.D., LL.D., Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

Pastor, Shadyside Presbyterian Church 
Mr. H. Parker Sharp, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

Retired— Vice President and General Counsel, Jones & Laughlin 

Steel Corporation 
Rev. Samuel C. Weir, D.D., Detroit, Michigan 

Minister of Visitation, Cherry Hill United Presbyterian Church, Dearborn 
Rev. W. Bruce Wilson, D.D., St. Petersburg, Florida 

Retired 
Mr. Ralph M. Wyman, Greenwich, Connecticut 

Vice Chairman of the Board, The Pantosote Company 

121 



Administrative Staff 

The Rev. Donald G. Miller, Ph.D., LL.D., Litt.D. 

President 

The Rev. Gordon E. Jackson, Ph.D., D.D. 
Dean of the Seminary 

Mr. J. Rowe Hinsey, B.S. 
Director of Development 

Mr. John T. Logan, B.B.A., C.P.A. 

Business Manager and Comptroller 

The Rev. Howard M. Jamieson, Jr., Ph.D., D.D. 
Dean of Students 

The Rev. John M. Bald, Th.D., D.D. 
Associate Dean 

Miss Bessie M. Burrows, M.A. 
Registrar 

Mr. Dikran Y. Hadidian, M.S., S.T.M. 
Librarian 

The Rev. Joseph D. Small, B.D. 
Director of Admissions 

The Rev. William P. Barker, B.D. 
Director of Continuing Education and Alumni Relations 



122 



Historical Roll of Professors 






Name 


Seminary of 


Period of 




Inauguration 


Service 


John Anderson 


Service 


1794-1819 


John Banks 


Philadelphia 


1820-1826 


James Ramsey 


Canonsburg 


1821-1842 


Joseph Kerr 


Pittsburgh 


1825-1829 


Jacob Jones Janeway 


Western 


1828-1829 


Mungo Dick 


Pittsburgh 


1829-1831 


Luther Halsey 


Western 


1829-1836 
1872-1880 


John Williamson Nevin 


Western 


1829-1840 


David Elliott 


Western 


1829-1874 


John Taylor Pressly 


Allegheny 


1832-1870 


David Carson 


Canonsburg 


1834-1834 


Thomas Beveridge 


Canonsburg 


1835-1871 


Moses Kerr 


Allegheny 


1835-1836 


Joseph Claybaugh 


Oxford 


1839-1855 


Samuel W. McCracken 


Oxford 


1839-1840 


Lewis Warner Green 


Western 


1840-1847 


James Martin 


Canonsburg 


1842-1846 


Alexander Taggart McGill 


Western 


1842-1854 


James Lemonte Dinwiddie 


Allegheny 


1843-1846 


Abraham Anderson 


Canonsburg 


1847-1855 


Alexander Downs Clark 


Allegheny 


1847-1884 


David Reynolds Kerr 


Allegheny 


1851-1887 


Melancthon Williams Jacobus 


Western 


1851-1876 


William Swan Plumer 


Western 


1854-1862 


Samuel Wilson 


Xenia 


1855-1875 


William Davidson 


Oxford 


1855-1858 


Alexander Young 


Oxford 


1855-1874 
1876-1891 


Samuel Jennings Wilson 


Western 


1857-1883 


John Scott 


Monmouth 


1858-1874 


Joseph Clokey 


Xenia 


1858-1873 


William Miller Paxton 


Western 


1860-1872 


Andrew Morrow Black 


Monmouth 


1864-1874 


Archibald Alexander Hodge 


Western 


1864-1877 


David Alexander Wallace 


Monmouth & Xenia 


1867-1870 
1883-1883 


James Harper 


Newburg 


1867-1899 


Joseph Tate Cooper 


Allegheny 


1871-1886 


William Bruce 


Xenia 


1871-1880 


William Henry Hornblower 


Western 


1871-1883 


James Gillespie Carson 


Xenia 


1873-1888 


William Gallogly Moorehead 


Xenia 


1873-1914 



123 



Jackson Burgess McMichael 


Xenia 


1873-1878 


Samuel Thompson Lowrie 


Western 


1874-1877 


Samuel Henry Kellogg 


Western 


1877-1886 


William Hamilton Jeffers 


Western 


1877-1914 


Benjamin Breckenbridge Warfield 


Western 


1878-1887 


Thomas Hastings Robinson 


Western 


1883-1906 


David MacDill 


Xenia 


1884-1902 


David A. McClenahan 


Allegheny 


1885-1921 


Robert Dick Wilson 


Western 


1885-1900 


James Alexander Grier 


Allegheny 


1886-1909 


John McNaugher 


Allegheny 


1886-1943 


Henry T. McClelland 


Western 


1886-1891 


Matthew Brown Riddle 


Western 


1887-1916 


Oliver Joseph Thatcher 


Allegheny 


1888-1892 


Wilbert Webster White 


Xenia 


1889-1894 


Robert Christie 


Western 


1891-1923 


John A. Wilson 


Allegheny 


1893-1915 


John Douds Irons 


Xenia 


1895-1905 


James Anderson Kelso 


Western 


1897-1944 


David Riddle Breed 


Western 


1898-1931 


Joseph Kyle 


Xenia 


1899-1921 


Jesse Johnson 


Xenia 


1903-1930 


David Schley Schaff 


Western 


1903-1926 


John Elliott Wishart 


Xenia 


1905-1923 


David E. Cully 


Western 


1906-1948 


William Riley Wilson 


Allegheny 


1907-1940 


Charles Frederick Wishart 


Allegheny 


1907-1914 


William Robertson Farmer 


Western 


1907-1939 


John Hunter Webster 


Xenia 


1908-1933 


James Henry Snowden 


Western 


1911-1929 


Melvin Grove Kyle 


Xenia 


1914-1930 


James Doig Rankin 


Pittsburgh 


1914-1929 


David Frazier McGill 


Pittsburgh 


1915-1931 


Frank Eakin 


Western 


1915-1927 


James Gallaway Hunt 


Pittsburgh 


1920-1926 


Selby Frame Vance 


Western 


1921-1935 


James Harper Grier 


Pittsburgh 


1922-1926 


Robert McNary Karr 


Xenia 


1922-1949 


James Leon Kelso 


Xenia 


1923-1963 


George Boone McCreary 


Xenia 


1924-1946 


Robert Nathaniel Montgomery 


Pittsburgh 


1926-1930 


Donald Mackenzie 


Western 


1928-1933 


Gaius Jackson Slosser 


Western 


1928-1958 


Albert Henry Baldinger 


Pittsburgh-Xenia 


1931-1947 


Clarence Joseph Williamson 


Pittsburgh-Xenia 


1932-1950 


John Wick Bowman 


Western 


1936-1944 


William F. Orr 


Western 


1936- 


George Anderson Long 


Pittsburgh-Xenia 


1942-1955 


Theophilus Mills Taylor 


Pittsburgh-Xenia 


1942-1962 


Jarvis M. Cotton 


Western 


1944-1961 



124 



Frank Dixon McCloy 


Western 


1944-1967 


Henry Alexander Riddle 


Western 


1944-1949 


J. Carter Swaim 


Western 


1944-1954 


Walter R. Clyde 


Western 


1945- 


Addison Hardie Leitch 


Pittsburgh-Xenia 


1946-1961 


Florence M. Lewis 


Pittsburgh-Xenia 


1947-1952 


H. Ray Shear 


Pittsburgh-Xenia 


1947-1959 


David Noel Freedman 


Western 


1948-1964 


Gordon Edmund Jackson 


Pittsburgh-Xenia 


1949- 


Ralph G. Turnbull 


Western 


1949-1954 


John H. Gerstner 


Pittsburgh-Xenia 


1950- 


Clifford E. Barbour 


Western 


1951-1962 


Bessie M. Burrows 


Pittsburgh-Xenia 


1953- 


James A. Walther 


Western 


1954- 


Sidney 0. Hills 


Western 


1954- 


Robert Lee Kelley, Jr. 


Pittsburgh-Xenia 


1955- 


Robert Clyde Johnson 


Western 


1955-1963 


Howard M. Jamieson, Jr. 


Pittsburgh-Xenia 


1955- 


John M. Bald 


Pittsburgh-Xenia 


1957- 


Elwyn Allen Smith 


Western 


1957-1966 


Walter E. Wiest 


Western 


1957- 


Malcolm S. Alexander 


Pittsburgh-Xenia 


1958-1966 


Harold E. Scott 


Pittsburgh-Xenia 


1959- 


Howard L. Ralston 


Western and Pittsburgh-Xenia 


1960- 


William A. Nicholson 


Western 


1960- 


James Sheppard Irvine 


Western 


1960-1966 


J. Gordon Chamberlin 


Pittsburgh 


1960- 


Gayraud S. Wilmore 


Pittsburgh 


1961-1965 


Arlan P. Dohrenburg 


Pittsburgh 


1961-1964 


Edward D. Grohman 


Pittsburgh 


1961-1964 


David G. Buttrick 


Pittsburgh 


1961- 


Donald G. Miller 


Pittsburgh 


1962- 


George H. Kehm 


Pittsburgh 


1962- 


Dietrich Ritschl 


Pittsburgh 


1963- 


Markus Barth 


Pittsburgh 


1963- 


Edward Farley 


Pittsburgh 


1963- 


Lynn Boyd Hinds 


Pittsburgh 


1963- 


Iain G. Wilson 


Pittsburgh 


1963-1968 


Douglas R. A. Hare 


Pittsburgh 


1964- 


Donald E. Gowan 


Pittsburgh 


1965- 


Jared J. Jackson 


Pittsburgh 


1965- 


Eberhard von Waldow 


Pittsburgh 


1966- 


Dikran Y. Hadidian 


Pittsburgh 


1966- 


Peter Fribley 


Pittsburgh 


1966- 


Robert S. Paul 


Pittsburgh 


1967- 


Ford Lewis Battles 


Pittsburgh 


1967- 


Paul W. Lapp 


Pittsburgh 


1968- 


Neil R. Paylor 


Pittsburgh 


1968- 



125 



Donations and Bequests 



All donations or bequests to the Seminary should be made to "The Pittsburgh 
Theological Seminary of the United Presbyterian Church in the United States 
of America, located at 616 North Highland Avenue, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 
15206." The proper legal form for making a bequest is as follows. 

"I hereby give and bequeath to Pittsburgh Theological Seminary of the 
United Presbyterian Church in the United States of America, incorporated 
in the State of Pennsylvania, the following: ..." 

Care should be taken to use the corporate name as given above, and to have 
the bequest conform to the laws of the state governing it. 

The memorial idea may be carried out either in the erection of a building or 
in the endowment of any of the special funds of the Seminary. 



126 



Index 

Administrative Staff 122 

Admissions: College Requirements, Credentials, Procedure, etc 33-37 

Alumni Association 96 

Attendance, Summary of 118 

Awards Granted, 1967-1968 101-102 

Awards, prizes, and graduate fellowships 41-44 

Bachelor of Divinity Degree 48-51, 54-71, 83 

Board of Directors 120-122 

Buildings 23-28 

Calendar of Events, 1969-1970 4 

Campus 23-32 

Continuing Education 94-95 

Curriculum 47-92 

Degree Programs, Index to 47 

Degrees Awarded, 1967-1968 98-102 

Doctoral Program 90-91 

Donations and Bequests 126 

Emeriti 13 

Enrollment, Summary of 118 

Expenses 38-40 

Faculty 5-13 

Fees and Expenses 38-40 

Field Education 70-71 

Financial Assistance 40-41 

Foreign Students 37 

Graduation Honors and Awards 101-102 

History of Seminary 19 

Hospitalization Insurance 39 

Housing 26-27 

Insurance, Medical and Hospital 39 

127 



Lectures, Special 14-15 

Library 24-26 

Loan Funds 40-41 

Married Student Apartment Fees 38-39 

Master of Education Degree 86 

Master of Public Administration Degree 83-84 

Master of Urban and Regional Planning Degree 83-84 

Master of Religious Education Degree 52-53, 54-71 

Master of Theology Degree 72-76 

Medical Insurance 39 

Museum, Bible Lands 29 

Music, Opportunities in 32 

Pittsburgh— Our Environment 21 

Pittsburgh, University of, programs with 75-91 

Pre-Seminary Studies 34-36 

Professors, Historical Roll of 123-125 

Register of Students, 1968-1969 97-118 

Scholarships, loans, etc 40-41 

Student Association 31 

Summer Field Education 70-71 

Transfer Students 36 

Worship 31 






128 






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