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Full text of "Annual Catalogue of the Pittsburgh Theological Seminary"

CLIFFORD E. BARBOUR 
LIBRARY 



fmnm 




Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2012 with funding from 

LYRASIS Members and Sloan Foundation 



http://archive.org/details/annualcatalogue197071pitt 



The Annual Catalogue of 

The Pittsburgh 

Theological 

Seminary 




1970-1971 



A SEMINARY OF THE UNITED PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH 
IN THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, FOUNDED 1794. 
ACCREDITED BY THE AMERICAN ASSOCIATION OF 
THEOLOGICAL SCHOOLS. 



616 N. HIGHLAND AVENUE 
PITTSBURGH, PENNSYLVANIA 15206 






Contents: 



The Faculty 5 



The Seminary and its Environment 19 



Admissions, Fees, Scholarships, Financial Assistance 35 



Degree Programs 49 



Degree Relationships with University of Pittsburgh 85 



Continuing Education 95 



Degrees Awarded 99 



Board of Directors, Roll of Professors 121 



THE SEMINARY CALENDAR 



Summer Programs of Continuing Education 



1970 

24-29 May School of Religion, Pittsburgh Seminary Campus 
13-18 July Pastors-Wives' Seminar 

First Semester 

1-2 Sept. Junior Registration 
1-4 Sept. Junior Orientation 

2 Sept. Convocation, 11:00 a.m., and Community 

Luncheon 

3 Sept. Class Work Begins 

6 Oct. Continuing Education Eight Weeks School Begins 

16 Oct. Last day for dropping courses 

19-21 Oct. Schaff Lecture Series (Professor Delbert Hillers, 
Lecturer) 

1 8 Nov. Semi- Annual Meeting, Board of Directors 

26-27 Nov. Thanksgiving Recess 

8-18 Dec. Reading and Examination Period 

19 Dec-10 Jan. Christmas Recess 



1971 

Second Semester 

1 1 Jan. Class Work Begins 

2 Feb. Continuing Education Eight Weeks School Begins 

19 Feb. Last day for dropping courses 

4-11 April Holy Week (No classes) 

1 6 April Last Class day 

19-23 April Reading and Examination Period for Seniors 

19-30 April Reading and Examination Period for Juniors and 
Middlers 

2 May Communion Service for Seniors and Buffet Supper 

4 May Annual Meeting of the Board of Directors 

4 May Annual Meeting and Dinner of the Alumni 

Association 

4 May Commencement, 8:00 p.m. 



The Faculty 




Donald G. Miller, President. Greenville College, 
A.B.; The Biblical Seminary in N.Y., S.T.B. and 
S.T.M.; New York University, M.A. and Ph.D. 




William F. Orr, Professor of New Testament 
Literature and Exegesis. Southwestern Univer- 
sity, A.B.; Louisville Presbyterian Seminary, B.D. 
and Th.M.; Hartford Theological Seminary, Ph.D. 



Walter R. Clyde, Professor of Christian Mission. 
Muskingum College, A.B.; Omaha Theological 
Seminary, B.D.; Western Theological Seminary, 
S.T.M.; Hartford Seminary Foundation, Ph.D. 



Ap- 






Gordon E. Jackson, Hugh Thomson Kerr Profes- 
sor of Pastoral Theology. Monmouth College, 
A.B.; Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary, 
Th.B. and Th.M.; University of Chicago, Ph.D. 



John H. Gerstner, Professor of Church History. 
Westminster College, A.B.; Westminster Theo- 
logical Seminary, Th.B. and Th.M.; Harvard 
University, Ph.D. 



Bessie M. Burrows, Registrar and Assistant Pro- 
fessor of Christian Education. Geneva College, 
B.A.; Columbia University, M.A. 
6 



The Faculty 



James A. Walther, Associate Professor of New 
Testament Literature and Exegesis. Grove City 
College, A.B.; Western Theological Seminary, 
S.T.B.; Emmanuel College, Victoria University, 
Toronto, Th.D. 



Sidney O. Hills, Associate Professor of Hebrew 
and Old Testament Literature. Northwestern Uni- 
versity, B.A.; McCormick Theological Seminary, 
B.D.; Johns Hopkins University, Ph.D. 



Robert Lee Kelley, Jr., Associate Professor of 
Biblical Languages. University of Pittsburgh, 
A.B.; Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary, 
B.D.; Princeton Theological Seminary, Th.M.; 
Princeton University, M.A. 



Howard M. Jamie son, Jr., Acting Dean and As- 
sociate Professor of New Testament. Monmouth 
College, A.B.; Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Sem- 
inary, Th.B.; University of Pittsburgh, M.A. and 
Ph.D. 



John M. Bald, Associate Dean and Associate 
Professor of Christian Ethics. Muskingum Col- 
lege, A.B.; Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Semi- 
nary, Th.B. and Th.M.; Emmanuel College, Vic- 
toria University, Toronto, Th.D. 








Walter E. Wiest, Professor of Philosophy of Reli- 
gion. Lafayette College, A.B.; Princeton Theo- 
logical Seminary, Th.B.; Columbia University, 
Ph.D. 



The Faculty 



Harold E. Scott, Associate Professor of Homilet- 
ics and Director of Field Education. Sterling 
College, B.A.; Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Sem- 
inary, B.D.; Princeton Theological Seminary, 
Th.D. 



Howard L. Ralston, Assistant Professor of 
Church Music. Muskingum College, Mus. B.; 
Curtis Institute of Music, A.A.G O. 




William A. Nicholson, Assistant Professor of 
Homiletics. Washington & Jefferson College, 
A.B.; Western Theological Seminary, ST.B. 



/. Gordon Chamberlin, Professor of Education. 
Cornell College in Iowa, A.B.; Union Theological 
Seminary (N.Y.), B.D.; Columbia University, 
Ed.D. 



David G. Buttrick, Associate Professor in Church 
and Ministry. Haverford College, B.A.; Union 
Theological Seminary (N.Y.), B.D. 



George H. Kehm, Associate Professor in Theol- 
ogy. Queens College, B.S.; Princeton Theological 
Seminary, B.D.; Harvard Divinity School, S.T.M.; 
Harvard University, Th.D. 

8 



The Faculty 






Markus Barth, Errett M. Grable Professor of New 
Testament. University of Goettingen, Dr. Theol. 




Lynn Boyd Hinds, Assistant Professor of Speech. 
University of Akron, B.A.; Eastern Baptist Theo- 
logical Seminary, B.D.; Temple University, M.A. 



Douglas R. A. Hare, Associate Professor of New 
Testament. Victoria College, University of To 
ronto, B.A.; Emmanuel College, B.D.; Union 
Theological Seminary (N.Y.), ST.M. and Th.D. 



Donald E. Gowan, Associate Professor of Old 
Testament. University of South Dakota, B.A.; 
Dubuque Theological Seminary, B.D.; University 
of Chicago, Ph.D. 



,J< 





Jared Judd Jackson, Associate Professor of Old 
Testament. Harvard College, A.B.; Episcopal 
Theological School (Cambridge, Mass), B.D.; 
Union Theological Seminary (N. Y. ) , Th.D. 



H. Eberhard von Waldow, Associate Professor of 
Old Testament. Bonn University, Dr. Theol. 

9 




The Faculty 









Dikran Y. Hadidian, Librarian and Professor of 
Bibliography. American University of Beirut, 
B.A.; Hartford Theological Seminary, B.D.; 
Hartford School of Religious Education, M.A.; 
Hartford Theological Seminary, S.T.M.; Colum- 
bia University, M.S. 



Robert S. Paul, Professor of Modern Church His- 
tory. Saint Catherine's (Oxford University), 
B.A. and M.A.; Mansfield College (Oxford Uni- 
versity), Ph.D. 



Ford Lewis Battles, Professor of Church History 
and History of Doctrine. West Virginia Univer- 
sity, B.A.; Tufts College, M.A.; Hartford Semi- 
nary Foundation, Ph.D. 



Paul Wilbert Lapp, Professor of Old Testament 
and Archeology. Concordia Seminary, B.A.; 
Washington University, M.A. in Education; Uni- 
versity of California, Ph.D.; Harvard University, 
Th.D. 



Neil R. Pay lor. Assistant Professor in Church and 
Ministry. Hanover College, B.A.; Princeton The- 
ological Seminary, B.D.; Harvard University, 
Ph.D. 



Ronald H. Stone, Associate Professor of Ethics. 
Morningside College, B.A.; Union Theological 
Seminary, B.D.; Columbia University, Ph.D. 
10 



The Faculty 



Robert M. Ezzell, Associate Professor of Homi- 
letics and Lecturer in New Testament. Memphis 
State University, B.S.; Lexington Theological 
Seminary, B.D.; Yale Divinity School, S.T.M.; 
Yale University, M.A. 




Guest Professors 

Robert J. Shoemaker, M.D. (Pittsburgh) 
(Clinical Assistant Professor of Psychiatry, Uni- 
versity of Pittsburgh School of Medicine) 
Lecturer and Consultant in Psychiatry 



Margaret B. McFarland, Ph.D. (Columbia) 

(Associate Professor of Psychology, University of 

Pittsburgh; Director, Arsenal Family and 

Children's Center) 

Lecturer, the Program for Advanced Pastoral 

Studies 



Rex A. Pittenger, M.D. (Minnesota) 
(Staunton Assistant Professor of Psychiatry, Uni- 
versity of Pittsburgh School of Medicine; 
Chief, Staunton Clinic) 
Lecturer, the Program for Advanced Pastoral 
Studies 



Erma T. Meyerson, B.S., M.A.A.S.S. 

(Pittsburgh) 

(Professor of Sociology and Social Work, College 

of Liberal Arts and Graduate School of Social 

Work, University of Pittsburgh) 

Lecturer, the Program for Advanced Pastoral 

Studies 

11 



Jack Matthews, M.A., Ph.D. (Ohio State) 

(Professor and Chairman, the Department of 

Speech, University of Pittsburgh) 

Lecturer, the Program for Advanced Pastoral 

Studies 



Edith Warman Skinner, M.A. (Columbia) 

(Professor, Drama Department, Carnegie-Mellon 

University) 

Guest Professor of Speech 



Robert L. Parks, B.F.A. (Carnegie Tech) 
(Assistant Professor of Voice and Speech, Car- 
negie-Mellon University) 
Guest Professor of Speech 



Rabbi Walter Jacob, Doctor of Hebrew Letters 
(Rabbi of Rodef Shalom Temple) 
Guest Professor in History and Theology 



Rex Speers, M.D. (Utah) 

(Associate Professor of Psychiatry) 

Lecturer, the Program for Advanced Pastoral 

Studies 



H. Kenn Carmichael 

A member of the Commission on Ecumenical Mis- 
sion and Relations in the area of theater 
Guest Professor in Drama 



Norman R. Dixon, Associate Director, 
University-Community Educational Programs 
and Associate Professor of Education, 
University of Pittsburgh 
Guest Professor in Church and Ministry 



Robert Ruffin, Administrator, 
Pressley-Ridge School, Pressley Campus ; 
North Side, Pittsburgh 
Guest Professor in Church and Ministry 

12 



John Nelson, B.D. Pittsburgh Seminary 
Ph.D. Candidate University of Chicago 
Teaching Fellow in Theology 



Emeriti 

The Rev. Clifford Edward Barbour, Ph.D., D.D., 
LL.D. 

President Emeritus 



The Rev. James Leon Kelso, A.M., Th.M., Th.D., 
D.D., LL.D. 

Emeritus Professor of Old Testament History and 
Biblical Archaeology 




13 



SPECIAL LECTURERS 1969-1970 

Bishop Roy C. Nichols 

The United Methodist Church 

Pittsburgh Area 

Joseph Sittler 

Professor of Theology 

University of Chicago Divinity School 

Conference on Human Values in the 21st Century: 

Ralph Wendell Bur hoe 

Professor and Director for Advanced Study in 

Theology and the Sciences 

Meadville Theological School, Chicago, Illinois 

Langdon Gilkey 
Professor of Theology 
University of Chicago 

Robert Sinsheimer 

Professor of Biophysics and Chairman 

Division of Biology 

California Institute of Technology 

Harold K. Schilling 

Former Professor of Physics (1947-1964) and 
Dean of the Graduate School, now The University 
Professor, Pennsylvania State University 

Conference on the Gospels: 

Paul Minear 

Professor of New Testament, Yale University, 

New Haven, Connecticut 

C. F. D. Moule 

Professor of New Testament, Clare College, Uni- 
versity of Cambridge, England 

Albert Outler 

Professor of Theology, Perkins School of Theol- 
ogy, Southern Methodist University, Dallas, Texas 

Eduard Schweizer 

Professor of New Testament, University of 

Zurich, Zurich, Switzerland 

Xavier Leon- Duj our 

Faculty of Theology, Lyon, France 

14 



Gunther Bornkamm 

Professor of New Testament, University of Hei- 
delberg, Heidelberg, Germany 

William Farmer 

Professor of New Testament, Perkins School of 

Theology, Southern Methodist University, Dallas, 

Texas 

James Robinson 

Professor of New Testament, Claremont School 

of Theology, Claremont, California 

D. L. Dungan 

Professor of Religious Studies, University of 

Tennessee, Knoxville, Tennessee 

W. C. Van Unnik 

Professor of New Testament, University of 

Utrecht, Utrecht, Holland 

Joseph Fitzmyer 

Professor in the Department of Near Eastern 
Languages and Civilizations, University of Chi- 
cago, Chicago, Illinois 

Charles H. Talbert 

Professor of Religious Studies, University of 

North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 

Raymond Brown 

Professor of New Testament, St. Mary's Semi- 
nary, Baltimore, Maryland 

Rudolf Schnackenburg 

Professor of New Testament, University of Wiirz- 

burg, Wurzburg, Germany 

/. Louis Martyn 

Professor of New Testament, Union Theological 

Seminary, New York City, New York 

Roger Ortmayer 

Executive Director, Department of Church and 

Culture, National Council of the Churches of 

Christ 

Eric Voegelin 

Professor Emeritus of Political Science, University 

of Munich, Munich, Germany, and Distinguished 

Scholar 

15 



James M. Gustajson 

Professor of Christian Ethics, The Divinity School, 

Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut 

Robert W. Funk 

Professor of Religious Studies, University of Mon- 
tana, Missoula, Montana 

James Barr 

Professor of Semitic Languages and Literature, 

University of Manchester, Manchester, England 

Leander E. Keck 

Professor of New Testament, The Divinity School, 

Vanderbilt University, Nashville, Tennessee 

M. Jack Suggs 

Professor of New Testament, Brite Divinity School, 

Texas Christian University, Fort Worth, Texas 

Henry Chadwick 

Dean of Christ Church, Oxford University, Ox- 
ford, England 

Nikos A . Nissiotis 

Director of the Ecumenical Institute, Chateau de 

Bossey, Celigny, Switzerland, and Professor of the 

Theological Faculty, University of Athens, Athens, 

Greece 

Walter /, Burghardt, S. J. 

Professor of Historical Theology, Woodstock Col- 
lege, Woodstock, Maryland and New York, New 
York 

Mrs. Sallie TeSelle 

Editor of Soundings, an interdisciplinary journal 

published by The Society of Religion in Higher 

Education 

Charles Moeller 

Professor at the Faculty of Theology, University 

of Louvain, Louvain, Belgium 

Roland Mushat Frye 

Professor of English Literature, University of 

Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 

Walter J. Harrelson 

Dean and Professor of Old Testament, The Di- 
vinity School, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, 
Tennessee 

16 



David Daube 

Regius Professor of Civil Law, University of Ox- 
ford, Fellow of All Souls College, England 

Raymond Panikkar 

Professor at Benares Hindu University, and Visit- 
ing Professor, Center for the Study of World Re- 
ligions, The Divinity School, Harvard University, 
Cambridge, Massachusetts 

Bolajl Idowu 

Professor and Head of the Department of Reli- 
gious Studies, University of Ibadan, Ibadan, 
Nigeria 

William A . Bijlefeld 

Dean and Professor of Islamics, Hartford Semi- 
nary Foundation, Hartford, Connecticut 

Roland Murphy, O.D. 

Professor of Old Testament, Catholic University, 

Washington, D.C. 




17 






O 3 









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Pittsburgh Seminary 
Our History 



The Pittsburgh Theological Seminary was created in 1959 by the con- 
solidation of two institutions which had lived apart since 1825: 
Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary (United Presbyterian Church 
of North America) and Western Theological Seminary (Presbyterian 
Church, U.S.A.). 

Pittsburgh-Xenia Seminary was formed in 1930 by the union of 
Pittsburgh and Xenia Seminaries. The Xenia branch had been founded 
in 1794 in Western Pennsylvania but had spent most of its life in Ohio 
and Missouri. The Pittsburgh branch originated in 1825 in Pittsburgh, 
Pennsylvania. Both branches were later augmented by the resources of 
Newburgh Seminary which was founded in New York City in 1805 by 
John Mitchell Mason. 

Western Seminary, established legally in 1825 by the General As- 
sembly of the Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.), began with classical 
academies founded by Joseph Smith (1785) and John McMillan 
(1787) in Washington, Pa. It was indeed a "western" seminary in 1825, 
whose task was to furnish a ministry for the rapidly opening western 
territories along the Ohio River. 

The union in 1958 of the United Presbyterian Church of North 
America with the Presbyterian Church in the United States of America 
and the subsequent merger of Pittsburgh-Xenia and Western Seminaries 
were possible because of ancient bonds: the Bible, the reformers, and 
the Scottish experience of witness and suffering. Church divisions in 
Scotland were reproduced in America. Since 1800 the direction has been 
steadily toward common witness with a resulting joining of schools. 
Pittsburgh Theological Seminary is the issue of this growing fellowship 
in Theological education. 

The purpose of the Seminary as defined in the Constitution is to 
educate suitable persons for the work of Christian ministry in its various 
forms at the highest possible level of educational competence. Set down 
in the midst of one of the key industrial centers of the nation, the 
Seminary experiments in the city about it, wrestles with the nature of 
the gospel, strives for eventful communication. The purpose of the Semi- 
nary is clearcut: to know our time, the gospel for the healing of our 
time, and the ministry for our time. 

21 



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Pittsburgh 

Our Environment 

Pittsburgh Seminary is located in the workshop of America. Together 
with the contiguous towns, Pittsburgh is one of the great industrial 
centers of the world. Its population includes people of every nationality, 
professon, and skill, and therefore it affords unexcelled opportunities 
for the study of social, economic, political, and racial problems. Pitts- 
burgh Seminary has working relationships with community and social 
agencies, labor unions, business management, human development re- 
search centers, teaching hospitals, etc., whereby these agencies and 
organizations become further resources for the educating of theological 
students. 

The cultural and educational life of Pittsburgh is no less rich. Five 
major colleges and universities are located in Pittsburgh: The University 
of Pittsburgh, Carnegie-Mellon University, Duquesne University, Chat- 
ham College, and Carlow College. Their facilities, programs, and libraries, 
plus the Carnegie free libraries, afford added resources to all students. 

For music and art there are the world-famous Pittsburgh Symphony 
Orchestra; the Pittsburgh Opera Society; the Mendelssohn and Bach 
Choirs and other choral and concert groups; the Pittsburgh Playhouse, 
in its thirty-third year, which presents a total repertoire of plays; numer- 
ous art galleries including the Arts and Crafts Center and the Pittsburgh 
Plan for Art, both near the campus; and Carnegie Institute, which 
houses one of the largest contemporary art collections in the country, 
and which every third year presents the Pittsburgh International Ex- 
hibition of Paintings and Sculpture. Begun in 1896, the Pittsburgh 
International is one of the most important exhibitions of contemporary 
art in the world. 

Churches of all types and denominations are to be found, ranging 
from the large urban congregation to the small rural or industrial 
mission. Pittsburgh Presbytery is one of the largest presbyteries in the 
United Presbyterian Church, U.S.A. Within its bounds are two hundred 
eleven churches with a total membership of about one hundred twenty- 
six thousand. Of these, about one-fifth have more than five hundred 
members each, and mission work is conducted in over twenty different 
places. 

23 



The Campus 



Setting 

Pittsburgh Theological Seminary is ideally situated to symbolize by its 
very setting the church in the world. Located at the heart of a metro- 
politan center of two and a half million people, it is bordered on one 
side by an urban renewal project, including business and apartment 
buildings, churches, and schools, and on the other side by a residential 
area housing people of many ethnic backgrounds. By looking out almost 
any window on campus, one sees not only the broad expanse of lawn 
and trees of a once lovely estate given to the Seminary in 1951 by the 
heirs of the late H. Lee Mason, Jr., but is reminded also of the world 
in which the church lives and serves. 



Buildings 

New, modern buildings of American Colonial design, constructed of 
Hampton Court Colonial red brick trimmed with Indiana limestone 
and fireproof throughout, house the seminary activities. 

The George A. Long Administration Building is the nerve center of 
campus life. Here classrooms, seminar rooms, faculty and administrative 
offices, a student center, a reception room, a Bible Lands Museum, a 
speech center, and the mail room all constitute a beehive of learning and 
social fellowship. 

The Hicks Family Memorial Chapel, of pure Georgian design, stands 
at the center of the campus, where the seminary community gathers for 
worship and the renewal of spiritual life. It includes a large theater-type 
auditorium, a few faculty offices and choir facilities, in addition to the 
offices of the pastoral referral center. 




25 









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The Clifford E. Barbour Library was built and furnished with funds 
provided by the Sarah Mellon Scaife and Richard K. Mellon Founda- 
tions. The library is air-conditioned throughout. There is easy access 
to book resources located in four stack areas. One hundred and three 
desk carrels placed in and around the book stacks are available to all 
readers, in addition to which there are thirteen enclosed typing carrels 
which allow greater privacy for research work. Twenty research study 
rooms provide ideal conditions in which the faculty, visiting scholars 
and graduate students may pursue serious scholarly endeavors. Several 
study rooms and lounges, informally arranged, invite leisurely reading 
for more than 75 persons aside from many areas devoted to special 
purposes. Facilities are available for small seminar classes, conference 
and group study lessons, audio-visual work, music listening, microfilm 
reading, and hymnological and historical research. 

On display in the Main Floor exhibit area are the desk and chair of 
Dr. Karl Barth, Basel, Switzerland, presented to Pittsburgh Seminary 
by Dr. Barth in 1964. Accompanying the desk at which Dr. Barth 
wrote his theological treatises from 1922 is an autographed copy of his 
Kirchliche Dogmatik I/I. 

The following special collections augment the book resources : 

The John M. Mason Memorial Collection 

The research area of the library contains this priceless collection of 

classical theological works dating from the Reformation period. 

The James Warrington Collection of Hymnology 

Several thousand valuable hymn and psalm books which came from 
the estate of James Warrington, Philadelphia, provide research mate- 
rials for scholars of American and English hymnody. Mr. Warrington 
minutely analyzed the works by composer, meter tune, place, author, 
title, etc. 

The Nina S. Brittain Collection 

Through the generosity of Frank J. Brittain, Esq., of Erie, Pennsylvania, 
the sum of $5000 was used for the purchase of theological and related 
works which are known as the Nina S. Brittain Collection. 

The Clarence J. Williamson Church History Collection 
In 1958 endowment funds were established, income of which is to be 
used for the purchase of books in Church History and closely related 
subjects. These books are in memory of Dr. Clarence J. Williamson, 
a graduate of Pittsburgh Seminary, for fifty-one years a minister in the 
United Presbyterian Church of North America, and for eighteen years 
Professor of Church History and Government in the Pittsburgh-Xenia 
Theological Seminary. 

Historical Collections 

A room of the library contains the Minutes and other records of Asso- 
ciate, Associate Reformed, and United Presbyterian congregations, 

27 



presbyteries, synods, and General Assemblies. The library is also the 
depository for the Upper Ohio Valley Historical Society and Pitts- 
burgh Presbytery of The United Presbyterian Church in the U.S.A. 



Housing 

Single students are comfortably and commodiously housed in two 
buildings connected to the Administration Building by a covered pas- 
sageway on both the first and second floor levels. The George C. 
Fisher Memorial Hall accommodates 80 men in single rooms. Six 
apartments for employees and married students are also located on 
the ground floor in this building. The John McNaugher Memorial Hall 
provides for 63 men, with an additional wing which houses 25 women. 
The dormitories have student lounges on each floor in addition to a 
game room and a snack room on the ground floor. There are three 
dining rooms served by a cafeteria, the larger of which has a seating 
capacity of over 500; in addition, there are six guest rooms which 
complete the dormitory complex. 

Although student rooms are fully and comfortably furnished, students 
must supply their own sheets, pillowcases, blankets, and towels, and 
provide for their own laundering. Summer occupancy of dormitory 
rooms is available by special arrangement. 

Married students and their families are housed on campus in five 
apartment buildings and a number of duplex houses. 

The Highlander is a modern apartment building on Highland Avenue 
near the northwest corner of the campus. It contains seventeen one 
bedroom and six two bedroom units. Each apartment includes a living 
room, kitchen, bath, and storage locker. These apartments are unfur- 
nished, although all kitchens are equipped with electric ranges and 
refrigerators. Laundry facilities (coin meter) are available in the 
basement. 

The Samuel A. Fulton Memorial Hall provides eighteen efficiency 
and twenty-one two-room apartments. Each unit includes a kitchenette, 
a bath, with a storage locker in the basement. These apartments are 
fully furnished with desk, bookcase, dining table, chairs, davenport-bed, 
a chest of drawers, wardrobe, electric stove and refrigerator. Students 
must provide bedding, linens, silverware, china, cooking utensils, cur- 
tains, lamps and rugs. Laundry facilities (coin meter type) are available 
in the basement. A six-room, fully furnished apartment for the housing 
of a missionary family on furlough is provided in Fulton Hall. It is 
made available through cooperation with the Commission on Ecu- 
menical Mission and Relations, to missionaries seeking fuller prepara- 
tion for service on return to their various fields. 

Anderson and McMillan Halls were completed for occupancy early 
in 1968 and provide 31 unfurnished "town house type" apartments. 
The buildings form a quadrangle with the existing two wings of the 
Highlander. This may be used as an enclosed play area for children. 
Anderson Hall includes 6 two bedroom and 6 three bedroom apart- 

28 



ments on three floors. A laundry and locker storage area is provided 
in the basement. 

McMillan Hall provides 19 apartments which include one four bed- 
room, three three bedroom, 12 two bedroom, and 3 one bedroom 
apartments. Again, there is a laundry (coin meter type) in the base- 
ment together with ample locker storage space. 

The apartments are unfurnished although a refrigerator and electric 
stove are provided. These appliances are a permanent part of the 
apartments and cannot be moved out to allow personal appliances. 
All windows are equipped with shades and traverse rods. The walls 
are an off-white neutral shade and the floors are covered wall to wall 
with a wheat heather carpeting. On the ground level of McMillan Hall 
a large community room has been provided for use as a children's 
play-care room as well as a general activities room for the student 
community. 

The Sheridan Avenue Apartments are located on the campus at 519 
Sheridan Avenue. This three story building contains 6 unfurnished 
apartments for couples with children. Washers and dryers (coin meter 
type) are installed in the basement. 

There are a limited number of unfurnished apartments on campus 
for students and families. Many of these houses will be eliminated 
as there is assurance of adequate housing in other seminary facilities. 

Life for married students and their families is as comfortable and 
efficient as is possible in student apartments. Rents are well below the 
commercial rates, shops and stores are within easy reach, public 
transportation is available right to the seminary gate, and good schools 
are nearby for children of school age. 




29 



The Bible Lands Museum 

Pittsburgh Theological Seminary has an outstanding list of accomplish- 
ments in archaeological research of Bible times in ancient Palestine. In 
conjunction with the American Schools of Oriental Research at Jeru- 
salem, in Jordan, it conducted an exploration at Bab ed-Dra at the 
southern end of the Dead Sea in 1924. A series of joint excavations 
was made at Kirjath-Sepher in 1926, 1928, 1930 and 1932. Bethel 
became the site of research in 1934, 1954, 1957 and 1960, and a 
significant project was carried out at New Testament Jericho and Nitla 
in 1950. In 1964 the Kyle-Kelso Fund for Archaeological Research in 
Jordan was established and joint projects with the American Schools 
of Oriental Research were carried on at Gibeah of Saul in the summer 
of 1964 and at Tell er Rumeith in 1967. This latter site may possibly 
be that of Old Testament Ramoth Gilead. 

In conjunction with Carnegie Museum and the Department of Antiq- 
uities of Israel, through the Holy Lands Exhibition Fund, Pittsburgh 
Theological Seminary conducted archaeological digs at the biblical site 
at Ashdod in 1962, 1963 and 1965. Both students and faculty have 
participated in the 1967 and 1968 Ashdod expeditions under the di- 
rection of Dr. James Swauger of Carnegie Museum. 

The archaeological work at Pittsburgh Theological Seminary was 
inaugurated by Professor M. G. Kyle and was then carried on by Pro- 
fessor James L. Kelso until his retirement in 1963. In the spring of 
1964 Associate Professor Howard M. Jamieson, Jr., was appointed 
Faculty Administrator of the Kyle-Kelso Fund. By action of the Board 
of Directors in November, 1968, the Kyle-Kelso Fund is established 
for the study of the peoples and culture of the Mediterranean Basin, 
with special reference to he Judeo-Christian heritage. 

With the coming of Dr. Paul W. Lapp to the faculty the archaeo- 
logical program of Pittsburgh Theological Seminary has added a 
significant new dimension. Having been involved in field archaeology 
in the Middle East consistently since 1957, Dr. Lapp will direct future 
field projects of the Seminary, including the participation of Doctoral 
candidates, as well as B.D. students. 

Much of the Seminary's share of the antiquities excavated in the 
digs is now on exhibit in the Bible Lands Museum, which is located in 
the administration building. The museum is used as a teaching facility 
for the seminary program. The objects in the Bible Lands Museum 
illustrate the way of life of the people of Palestine and so become of 
great value for understanding and interpretation. Occasionally archae- 
ological discoveries corroborate biblical statements, as in the case of 
the fragments of a royal inscription of Sargon II of Assyria, found at 
Ashdod, which relates to Isaiah 20:1. For the most part, however, 
archaeological excavations illumine the cultural, social, economic, po- 
litical and religious background of the Bible, supplying much data 
for deeper understanding of the people and the land of the Bible. 



30 



Life on The Campus 



Community Life 

The social life of the campus is enhanced by the presence of single 
students, married couples, and families. It is greatly enriched by those 
students from the Orient, Europe, Africa, the Middle East, South Amer- 
ica, etc., who come to study but also to share their cultures. 

Missionary families spending their furloughs on the campus for study 
bring to the community a sense of the Church ecumenical coupled with 
a sense of urgency. 

Admittedly, the emphasis in a theological seminary is not on social 
activities, but interpersonal relationships run deep and the socializing 
values are maintained by way of group get-togethers and periodical 
school functions. A beautiful contemporary student center provides a 
setting for community life on the campus. Located on the ground floor 
of the administration building, it is a place for refreshment, campus 
movies, group or class parties, and just a good place to get together. 

The Women's Association, for all women on campus, provides op- 
portunities for group participation in a varied program of study, 
community activity, and social concern. 




31 



Convocations and Worship 

Through the faculty-student Convocation and Worship Committee, out- 
standing people are brought to the campus. Each fall and spring there 
is a major lectureship in which a prominent person — theologian, Biblical 
scholar, psychiatrist, writer, social thinker, and planner, etc. — is heard 
by the seminary family. A list of some of these speakers from 1969-1970 
is on pages 14 and 15 of this catalogue. 



Church and Society 

Ministry is done as well as studied at the Seminary. The student body 
reaches out to the community through field education and various 
laboratory assignments. Through the direction of the faculty-student 
Church and Society Committee the entire Seminary community is in- 
formed about current social issues and channeled into useful service. 
Relations are maintained with settlement houses, urban renewal and 
development offices, and with the churches of the city for work with 
street gangs, housing programs, community organization, etc. The com- 
mittee sponsors a tutoring program for neighborhood school children 
and directs faculty and student involvement in direct social action in the 
city and elsewhere in the nation. 



The Student Association 

The Student Association provides the organization through which the 
students carry on a program of involvement in community life, deter- 
mined only by the interest and concern of the students themselves. A 
student Curriculum Committee meets with the faculty Curriculum Com- 
mittee and is called upon to offer counsel and initiate continuing 
curriculum evaluation. The Convocation and Worship Committee of 
the Student Association directs the chapel program and consults with 
the faculty Convocation and Worship Committee in the establishment 
of lecture series and the selection of Convocation speakers. The student 
Publication Committee shares in the publication of PERSPECTIVE, 
PANORAMA, and THE DIRECTORY. An all-student publication, 
UNOFFICIAL PERSPECTIVE, offers opportunity for the expression of 
opinion and the examination of issues. The student Church and Society 
Committee works with a similar faculty committee in a study of current 
social problems. This joint committee also organizes student and faculty 
action when deemed necessary. A student Social Committee and a stu- 
dent Stewardship Committee direct activities in their respective areas of 
concern. 

The Executive Committee of the Student Association for the year 
1969-1970 was led by William J. Rumsey, President, and Elizabeth 
Y. Anderson, Secretary-Treasurer. 

33 



The Seminary Musical Program 

The Seminary has a Men's Choir and a Mixed Chorus, both under the 
direction of Mr. Howard L. Ralston, Assistant Professor of Church 
Music. Auditions for membership in the Men's Choir are held in Sep- 
tember. This group, carefully chosen and of limited number, sings for 
daily chapel services and represents the Seminary from time to time 
in churches within easy traveling distance. A more extensive tour is 
undertaken in the spring when the choir presents a varied program of 
sacred music in churches and colleges. 

The Mixed Chorus is maintained for all those of the seminary com- 
munity who enjoy singing. This group meets on Tuesday evenings and 
presents a program at Christmas and in the spring, and sings at 
commencement. There are many opportunities throughout the year for 
soloists and instrumentalists. 

One of the highlights of the seminary year is the James H. Snowden 
Memorial Concert, established in 1964 by the late Dr. Roy R. Snowden 
in memory of his father, a longtime former professor in the Seminary. 
This annual event enriches the cultural life of the seminary community 
by bringing to the campus Metropolitan Opera stars and other concert 
artists of the highest rank. 




34 



Admissions Requirements 



Pittsburgh Theological Seminary offers work on a graduate school level. 
This presupposes a B.A. or B.S. degree from a regionally accredited 
college or university, the degree work to have a substantial foundation 
in the liberal arts. It also assumes that the student is ready to approach 
theological education with an open, searching attitude. Pittsburgh Semi- 
nary seeks that man or woman who is committed to the Christian 
faith, emotionally suited for work in the Church and intellectually 
capable of the most rigorous kind of academic discipline. 



Pre-Seminary Studies 



College courses prior to theological seminary should provide the cul- 
tural and intellectual foundations essential to an effective theological 
education. They should issue in at least three broad kinds of attainment. 

1. The college work of a pre-seminary student should result in the 
ability to use certain tools of the educated man : 

(a) The ability to write and speak English clearly and correctly. 
This purpose should also be cultivated in all written work. 

(b) The ability to think clearly. In some persons, this ability is cul- 
tivated through courses in philosophy or specifically in logic. In 
others it is cultivated by the use of scientific method, or by 
dealing with critical problems in connection with literary and 
historical documents. 

(c) The ability to read at least one foreign language and in some 
circumstances more than one. 

36 



2. The college work of a pre-seminary student should result in increased 
understanding of the world in which he lives : 

(a) The world of men and ideas. This includes knowledge of Eng- 
lish literature, philosophy, and psychology. 

(b) The world of nature. This is provided by knowledge of the nat- 
ural sciences, including laboratory work. 

(c) The world of human affairs. This is aided by knowledge of his- 
tory and the social sciences. 

3. The college work of a pre-seminary student should result in a sense 
of achievement: 

(a) The ability to think, to see relationships, to follow out logical 
steps of an argument, to develop procedures for dealing with 
problems. This ability is achieved in part through independent 
study. 

(b) The degree of his mastery of his field of study is more important 
than the credits and grades which he accumulates. 

The American Association of Theological Schools has prepared a list 
of the fields of study with which the student should have acquaintance 
before beginning seminary work. The liberal arts background is felt to 
provide the best foundation for theological study. However, this in no 
way precludes seminary study for the student with a background in 
the sciences. 

Foreign language is a tool of scholarship. At least one of the fol- 
lowing languages is important for scholarly research: Latin, Greek, 
Hebrew, German, French. If Greek is selected, it should be taken in 
the final year of college or preferably in the last two years. 

A college background in religious studies is desirable. Included in 
such a study should be a thorough knowledge of the content of the 
Bible. The pre-seminary student may well seek counsel of the seminary 
in order most profitably to use the resources of his college. 

Of the various possible areas of concentration, where areas of con- 
centration are required, English, philosophy and history are regarded 
as the most desirable, and, where the department is strong, religion. 

At the beginning of the first year of seminary students will take 
examinations in Greek, and basic English. Students showing a deficiency 
in English will be required to remedy such deficiency before graduation. 
The Greek examination is for the purpose of placement. 

37 



Procedure for Admission 

Candidates seeking degrees may apply anytime after the junior year 
is completed. Applications for September entrance must be made prior 
to June 1; applications for January entrance must be made prior to 
December 1st. All correspondence concerning admission to the seminary 
should be addressed to the Director of Admissions. Applications are 
considered by the committee when the following credentials are sub- 
mitted : 

( 1 ) A formal application. 

(2) An official transcript from the registrar of the college or uni- 
versity, showing grades for at least three years of college work. 

(3) Mental capacity test. The Seminary normally will correspond 
with the applicant's college concerning a mental capacity test. 
If none is available, the applicant may be asked to take one 
under seminary direction. 

(4) An extensive (500-1000 words) statement in the applicant's 
handwriting describing his family, educational, and religious 
background, placing particular emphasis upon his motives for 
desiring to enter the Seminary and the ministry. 

(5) A personal interview with the Director of Admissions or another 
representative of the Seminary who may be designated by the 
Director of Admissions. 

(6) A battery of psychological tests which will be forwarded to a 
proctor as soon as the application form is received. These are 
the same tests that Presbytery requires of all candidates. They 
need to be taken only once. 

(7) A medical report on a blank furnished by the Seminary. 

(8) Application fee. A check or money order for $15.00 must 
accompany the application. This will be applied to the first 
semester's tuition. The application fee is not refundable. 

After admission is granted and within thirty days of such notification, 
a $35 placement fee is required to assure the applicant of a place in 
the new class. This fee is applied on the student's tuition and is not 
returnable except under extreme hardship and at the discretion of the 
Admissions Committee. A certification of the student's "intention to 
enroll" must accompany this fee. 

Transfer Students 

A student transferring from another seminary is required to submit, in 
addition to the foregoing, a complete transcript of previous seminary 
work and a letter of dismissal from the Dean or President. A transfer 
student must be in residence at Pittsburgh Seminary for a minimum of 
one full academic year in order to become a candidate for the Bachelor 
of Divinity degree. 

38 



Foreign Students 

Qualified applicants from other countries are welcome as a part of the 
student body. Such applicants shall be required, in addition to the 
regular requirements for admission, to give evidence of proficiency in 
the English language before their admission. TOEFL (Test of English 
as a Foreign Language) is the standard test used by the Commission 
on Ecumenical Mission and Relations and the World Council of 
Churches. The test is arranged through the Seminary or the Commis- 
sion on Ecumenical Mission and Relations of the United Presbyterian 
Church. 

Such applicants shall have endorsement either of a representative of 
the Commission on Ecumenical Mission and Relations (in those areas 
where the United Presbyterian Church in the U.S.A. has fraternal 
workers) or the World Council of Churches (in other areas). 

An applicant from another country is also asked to submit a letter 
from his bank stating that there are on deposit sufficient funds to assure 
his passage home after his period of study in this country. This saves 
possible embarrassment to both the student and seminary at a later 
time. 



Matriculation 

A final transcript showing the degree and date of graduation of the 
applicant must be submitted to the registrar. 




39 









W 



"S 




J 



Fees and Expenses' 1 ' 
(for the academic year) 

$600.00 Tuition (approx.) 

650.00 Tuition B.D.-Th.M., (third and fourth years) 

550.00 Board 

200.00 Room Fee 

10.00 Library Fee (annual) 

8.00 Student Association Fee (annual) 

150.00 Books (approx.) 

36.00-160.00 Hospitalization Insurance (approx.) 

100.00-200.00 Incidentals 

Matriculation Fee — $35.00 payable at the time of registration. 

Tuition Fee — $25.00 per semester hour (approx.) 

Late Registration Fee — A charge of $5.00 will be made to students 
registering later than the specified time. 

Graduation Fee— $10.00 

Transcript Fee — One copy of a student's academic record will be pro- 
vided without charge. A fee of $1.00 will be charged for each addi- 
tional transcript. 

* Subject to change. 



Married Student Apartment Fees 

Off Campus Residents 

All students admitted to the Seminary are expected to live on campus, 
unless, in the judgment of the Seminary, circumstances make it 
necessary to live elsewhere. Students choosing to live off campus without 
the approval of the Seminary will not be eligible for financial assistance 
from the Seminary. 

The Highlander 

Twenty- three unfurnished apartments, $7 5. 00-$ 8 5. 00 per month 

The Samuel A . Fulton Memorial Hall 

Thirty-nine furnished apartments, $55.0O-$70.00 per month 

Anderson Hall 

Twelve unfurnished apartments, $90.00-$ 100.00 per month 

McMillan Hall 

Nineteen unfurnished apartments, $80.00-$ 120.00 per month 

Sheridan Avenue Apartments 

Six unfurnished apartments, $55.00-$70.00 per month 

41 



Duplexes 

Five unfurnished apartments, $55.00-$70.00 per month 

All apartments include refrigerator, stove, and storage locker or area. 

Fees for apartment occupancy are payable monthly. A $5.00 assessment 
will be added to all accounts not paid by the tenth of the month. Ap- 
plications for apartments should be made as early as possible. 

A deposit of $50 per married couple, payable upon notification of as- 
signment, is required of all those living in seminary apartments. The de- 
posit will be returned after satisfactory inspection at the time the apart- 
ment is vacated. 

Payment of Fees 

All academic fees and expenses are payable in advance on the opening 
day of each semester. When necessary, arrangements for a payment 
plan to cover a semester's expenses may be made at the Business Office 
on the first day of each term, permitting four (4) equal payments: 
one-fourth on the first day of the term, and the balance due at the 
beginning of the fourth, eighth, and twelfth weeks respectively. There 
is a carrying charge of $5.00 for the deferred payment plan. Failure 
to pay any deferred payment within ten days from the date due will 
incur a penalty of 1 % of the amount due. 

Settlement of all seminary bills is required before registration for a 
new semester, and before graduation or the release of official transcripts. 

Seminary Meals 

Residents of the men's and women's dormitories are required to eat 
in the seminary dining hall. Board includes nineteen meals a week; only 
breakfast is served on Sunday. The dining hall is closed on holidays 
which are scheduled on the seminary calendar. No deduction is al- 
lowed for absence from individual meals, although special consideration 
is given to students who regularly do not eat in the dining hall due to 
job requirements. 

Tuition Refunds on Courses Dropped 

First week of semester, $1.00 withheld for each credit hour; balance 

refunded. 

Second to seventh week, one half refunded. 

Seventh week on, no refund. 

Medical and Hospitalization Insurance 

Students are required to be insured by medical and hospitalization in- 
surance acceptable to the Seminary. All students who are registered as 
full-time students are eligible for such insurance under a group student 
policy issued by Minister's Life and Casualty Company. Detailed in- 
formation concerning premiums and benefits may be secured at the 
Business Office. 

42 



Total Cost 

The total cost for one academic year, based upon a survey of actual 
student expenditures at Pittsburgh Seminary, is approximately $2,100 
for an unmarried student and $3,000 to $3,250 for a married student 
without children, depending on the variation in rentals. The cost for a 
married student having children is correspondingly higher. These 
totals include expenses for clothing, laundering and cleaning, medical 
and dental care not covered by hospitalization insurance, incidentals 
and recreation, as well as tuition, fees (hospitalization insurance pre- 
miums included), board, room and books. Not included are automobile 
operating costs, payments on purchases, life insurance premiums, re- 
payment of indebtedness, and expenses for travel to and from the 
Seminary. 

Student Financial Assistance 

Pittsburgh Seminary provides financial help from endowed and general 
funds for students who demonstrate that their resources from their own 
earnings and savings, their families, local congregations and presbyteries 
are not sufficient to meet their Seminary expenses. Several merit schol- 
arships are offered to entering students who have excellent academic 
records in their pre-seminary work and who must have financial help. 
Scholarship aid is also given according to need to upperclassmen whose 
academic attainments in their seminary work are high. Loans, grants- 
in-aid and remunerative campus work are also available as a part of 
the Seminary's financial assistance program. Approximately fifty work 
opportunities are available to students in the library, dining hall, and 
student center, and as attendants for various campus facilities. The work 
is limited to ten hours per week and the remuneration is credited to the 
student's account or paid in cash. Once a student is admitted the Sem- 
inary makes every effort to see that he need not drop out for financial 
reasons. 

The Board of Christian Education of the United Presbyterian Church, 
through its office of Educational Loans and Scholarships, provides as- 
sistance for United Presbyterian seminary students who demonstrate 
financial need in two programs: (1) Loans ($100 to $1,000 in a given 
year) and (2) United Presbyterian Study Grants (up to $1,000 in a 
given year ) . 

Specific details concerning scholarships, grants-in-aid, work assist- 
ance, and loan funds, together with application forms for both Seminary 
and Board of Christian Education programs, may be obtained from the 
Financial Aid Officer. 



Loan Funds 

James H. Snowden Memorial Loan Fund. A loan fund for students 
needing financial assistance to obtain a theological education was estab- 

43 



lished in 1953 by R. R. Snowden, M.D., Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, in 
memory of his father, Professor James H. Snowden, D.D., LL.D. Loans 
from this fund are made on notes with interest and without further 
endorsement. 



Walter G. and Esther B. Comin Student Loan Fund. A loan fund for 
students who need financial assistance to continue their education was 
established in 1955 by Mrs. Walter G. Comin, Pawnee City, Nebraska, 
Mr. and Mrs. Walter G. Comin, Jr., Wilkinsburg, Pa., and Mr. Myron 
C. Comin, Spokane, Washington, in memory of Rev. Walter G. Comin, 
D.D. Loans from this fund are made on notes at four percent interest 
and without further endorsement. 



Westphal Memorial Loan Fund. The session of the Reed Memorial 
United Presbyterian Church, Lyndhurst, New Jersey, established in 
1956 the Westphal Memorial Loan Fund. Under certain conditions 
specified by the donors loans from this fund may be made on notes 
without interest or further endorsements, and are repayable within ten 
years. 



Albert G. Hamilton Memorial Loan Fund. A loan fund for students 
who need financial assistance during the seminary course was estab- 
lished in 1960 by Mrs. Albert G. Hamilton, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, 
in memory of her husband, Mr. Albert G. Hamilton. Loans from this 
fund may be made on notes at three percent interest without further 
endorsement. 



Dr. and Mrs. James D. Sands Memorial Loan Fund. A loan fund for 
seminary students was established in 1961 by Mrs. Albert G. Hamilton, 
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, in memory of her parents, Dr. and Mrs. James 
D. Sands. Loans from this fund may be made on notes at three percent 
interest without further endorsement. 



Walter A. Long Memorial Student Rotary Loan Fund. Established in 
1961 by the Estate of Emma Clark Long. Loans are not to exceed $100 
to any one student in any one academic year and the amount borrowed 
is to be repaid not later than two years after graduation or not later 
than two years after the borrower would have graduated if he had pro- 
gressed normally through the seminary to graduation in the event of 
failure to graduate. All loans are made without interest. 



The William G. Crow Memorial Loan Fund. Established in November, 
1961. Loans from this fund may be made on notes with three percent 
interest. 

44 



Awards, Prizes, and Graduate Fellowships 



The Sylvester S. Marvin Memorial Fellowship 

The Sylvester S. Marvin Fellowship may be assigned upon graduation to 
that member of the Senior Class who is recommended by the faculty as 
having achieved the highest standard in all departments of the seminary 
curriculum, provided that his average is not below 85%. The faculty 
reserves the right to impose special tests and examinations in making 
this award. It is offered to those who take the entire course of three years 
in this institution. The recipient must pledge himself to a year of post- 
graduate study immediately following his graduation at some institution 
approved by the faculty. He is required to furnish quarterly reports of 
his progress. The money will be paid in three equal installments on the 
first day of October, January, and April. Prolonged absence from the 
classroom in the discharge of extra-seminary duties makes a student 
ineligible for the fellowship. 



The Thomas Jamison Scholarship 

The Thomas Jamison Scholarship, in memory of the late Thomas 
Jamison, Esq., of North Side, Pittsburgh, was established by Mrs. Jam- 
ison. The income of this endowment is given every year to the member 
of the Senior Class who has the highest average at the beginning of his 
final semester of study. 

The acceptance of this scholarship requires that the recipient spend a 
full academic year in study in any graduate institution approved by the 
faculty. If for any reason the man who is first in the class does not accept 
the scholarship and its requirements the scholarship will be offered to 
the student next in rank. 



The Jennie Rigg Barbour Memorial Prize 

The Jennie Rigg Barbour Memorial Prize was established by Rev. Clif- 
ford E. Barbour, Ph.D., D.D., LL.D., President Emeritus of Pittsburgh 
Theological Seminary, as a memorial to his mother. The income from 
the endowment of the prize is assigned to that member of the graduating 
class who has taken his full course of instruction in this institution and 
who has achieved the second highest academic rank of his class, if in the 
judgment of the faculty he is worthy in all other respects. It is hoped 
that the student will use this income for further study either within an 
academic institution or by the enlargement of his own library. 

45 



The Michael Wilson Keith Memorial Homiletical Prize 

This prize was founded in 1919 by the Keith Bible Class of the Mt. Cal- 
vary United Presbyterian Church, formerly First Presbyterian Church 
of Coraopolis, Pennsylvania, in memory of the Reverend Michael Wilson 
Keith, D.D., the founder of the class and pastor of the church from 1911 
to 1917. The prize is awarded to a member of the Senior Class who has 
spent three years in this seminary and has taken the highest standing in 
the department of homiletics. The winner of the prize is expected to 
preach in the Mt. Calvary Church of Coraopolis and teach the Keith 
Bible Class one Sunday after the award is made. 

The Joseph Watson Greek Entrance Prize 

The Joseph Watson Greek Prize was established in 1920 by Mrs. Robert 
A. Watson, Columbus, Ohio. The income will be awarded to the student 
who achieves the highest grade in an examination in classical Greek as 
he enters the Junior Class of the Seminary. 

The William B. Watson Prize in Hebrew 

The William B. Watson Prize in Hebrew was established in 1919 by 
Mrs. Robert A. Watson, Columbus, Ohio. The income will be awarded 
to that member of the Senior Class who, having elected Hebrew, shall 
submit the best grammatical and exegetical treatment of an assigned 
portion of the Hebrew Old Testament. 

The John Watson Prize in New Testament Greek 

The John Watson Prize in New Testament Greek was established in 
1919 by Mrs. Robert A. Watson, Columbus, Ohio. The income will be 
awarded to that member of the Senior Class who, having elected Greek 
Exegesis, shall submit the best grammatical and exegetical treatment of 
an assigned portion of the Greek New Testament. 

The Robert A. Lee Church History Award 

By bequest, in memory of her husband the late Mrs. Henrietta M. Lee, 
Oakmont, Pa., established the Robert A. Lee Church History Founda- 
tion, the annual income of which is to be awarded yearly to the students 
making first and second rank respectively in the Department of Church 
History. 

The Hugh Thomson Kerr Moderator Prize 

This prize was established in 1938 by the Men's Committee of the 
Shadyside Presbyterian Church, Pittsburgh. An annual contribution of 
fifty dollars was pledged to be used for the purchase of books. The prize 
is to be awarded to that member of the graduating class who has exhib- 
ited to the greatest degree, throughout the three years of the seminary 
course, leadership, originality, and accomplishments beyond the normal 
requirements for graduation. 

46 



The James Purdy Scholarship 

The James Purdy Scholarship was established in 1882. The income is 
apportioned equally each year to the six members of the Junior Class 
who attain the highest average of excellence in their seminary work. 
The distribution is made after the students return to the Seminary the 
following year. 

The Andrew Reed Scholarship 

The Andrew Reed Scholarship was established in 1914 by Miss Anna 
M. Reed, Cross Creek, Pennsylvania, the income being given to the 
student who, upon entering seminary, shall achieve the highest grade in 
a competitive examination in the English Bible. The successful competi- 
tor is to have the scholarship throughout the entire course of three years, 
provided that his general conduct and application to study shall continue 
to be satisfactory to the faculty. 

The Home Training Bible Class Award in Missions 

This is an award of $100 which was established in January, 1961, by 
the Home Training Bible Class of the Edgewood Presbyterian Church, 
Pittsburgh, Pa., in the name of the Rev. Walter L. Moser, Ph.D., D.D. 
The recipient will be that member of the graduating class who is deemed 
most deserving among those entering the foreign or home missionary 
field upon graduation. 

The Alice Myers Sigler Memorial Prize in History and Theology 

This award was established in 1962 by Robert M., John H., Richard E., 
and Alan B. Sigler in memory of their mother. The income from this 
endowed fund is granted to the student who, in the judgment of the 
professors of the History and Theology Division, is most worthy of this 
award at the end of the Middler year. 

The Fred McFeely Rogers Prize in Biblical Studies 

The Fred McFeely Rogers Prize in Biblical Studies was established in 
1962 by Mr. and Mrs. James H. Rogers in honor of their son, a grad- 
uate in the Class of 1962. The income from this endowed fund is granted 
to the student who, in the judgment of the professors of the Biblical 
Division, is most worthy of this award at the end of the Junior year. 

The Henry A . Riddle Fund for Graduate Study 

This fund was established in 1966 by the family and friends of Dr. Henry 
A. Riddle, a former president of Pittsburgh Theological Seminary, to 
provide an annual award to a member of the graduating class designated 
by the faculty for assistance in post-graduate study, preferably in the 
field of New Testament. 

47 



The Walter P. and Anna L. McConkey Award in Homiletics 

This award was established in 1964 by the Central Presbyterian Church 
in Washington, Pa., in honor of Dr. and Mrs. McConkey, who served 
that pastorate for many years. It is to be given to a student who, at the 
end of his Middler year has, in the judgment of the homiletics profes- 
sors, demonstrated excellence in preaching. 




48 



Degree Programs and 
Courses of Study 



Bachelor of Divinity 

Degree description pages 52-54 

Course descriptions pages 56-79 



Master of Religious Education 

Degree description page 56 

Course descriptions pages 56-79 



Master of Theology 

Degree description pages 80-81 

Course descriptions pages 82-84 



Degree Relationships with University of Pittsburgh 

Master of Theology (APS) -Department of Psychiatry. . pages 83-84 

Master of Social Work-Bachelor of Divinity pages 86-87 

Master of Public Administration and Master of Urban 

and Regional Planning-Bachelor of Divinity pages 88-89 

Master of Education page 90 

Master of Library Science-Bachelor of Divinity page 91 

Doctor of Philosophy pages 92-94 



51 



The Bachelor of Divinity Curriculum 



Free to Learn: the Curriculum at Pittsburgh Seminary 

Pittsburgh Seminary has a curriculum which gives each student free- 
dom to plan his studies in light of his own background and his own aims. 
The curriculum is a free elective plan. No courses are required, with the 
exception of Greek and Hebrew which are essential tools for theological 
work. Furthermore, there are no formal prerequisites, for this could be 
merelv another wav of regimenting studies. Each student is free to study 
what he needs to study when he wants to study it. 

About fifty courses are offered each semester. How can a student, 
particularly a first-year student, select four courses from such a wide 
choice? Two advisers, one faculty member and one senior student, assist 
each new student. The advisers are able to give him information about 
the courses offered, to guide him toward courses which may be taken 
for credit at area universities, and to assist him in the designing of his 
overall plan of studies. The final responsibility for course selection lies 
with the individual, however, and approval of the advisers is not required. 

Courses offered at Pittsburgh Seminary fall into three divisions: (1) 
biblical, which includes work in biblical history, literature, and theology, 
(2) history and theology, comprising study in church history, the his- 
tory of theology, and systematic theology, and (3) church and ministry 
which encompasses ethics, preaching, counseling, christian education, 
contemporary literature, drama and other fields. In order to insure that 
a student's work does not become too narrow, he must do at least fifteen 
hours of work (five three-hour courses) in each division. However, he 
is free to choose the courses he wishes to take within each division. 



Getting into the Curriculum 

The curriculum is designed so that a student can begin his studies in a 
given area, such as systematic theology, at more than one point. For 
example, in systematic theology four "introductory" level courses are 
offered each year. Each of these courses approaches theology from a 
different perspective. One course focuses on contemporary issues in 
theology, while a second deals with the resources and skills necessary to 
the theological discipline. Another course examines the presuppositions 
and structure of several theological systems, and still another deals with 
the ways in which theological concerns are brought to bear on contem- 
porary social and cultural concerns. There is no "one way" to start the 
study of theology. One of these approaches may be best for one student, 
but not for another. Only the student himself can decide. 

52 



Similar diversity is provided in each of the three divisions. Thus a 
student can begin his work in an area at the point which most concerns 
him. Furthermore, a student who has a special interest in one area of the 
curriculum is able to enter his graduate work at that place. For instance, 
a student who is deeply concerned with ethical problems is able to begin 
his theological studies in this field. 

Introductory level courses are offered, but are not formal prerequisites 
to advanced work. If a student has taken religious studies courses in 
college, there is no reason for him to repeat such work in seminary. He 
is free to build upon his undergraduate work by moving directly into 
more specialized study. However, if a student has done no previous aca- 
demic work in a given field, it may be wise for him to elect an introduc- 
tory course. 



Independent Study 

Independent study is encouraged at Pittsburgh Seminary, and may be 
undertaken as early as the first semester. Students are free at any time 
to work on issues which capture their interest. Independent study in- 
volves close tutorial work with a member of the faculty. In periodic 
meetings, the faculty member can guide, question and encourage the 
student. Independent study should not imply isolation, however. Inter- 
action with others, whether faculty or students, is vital. 

Seminars provide the occasion for students who are grappling with 
an issue to confront each other with challenges and new ideas. It is for 
this reason that seminars rather than lectures are the norm at Pittsburgh 
Seminary. Independent study and seminars are complementary ways 
of searching for answers to questions, and each student is free to de- 
termine which approach is best for him on a given issue. 



Non-Theological Study 

Pittsburgh Seminary offers a number of joint degree programs with the 
University of Pittsburgh in the fields of social work, urban affairs, edu- 
cation, and library science as well as the B.D./Th.M. sequence within 
the Seminary itself. The freedom of the Seminary's curriculum facilitates 
the operation of these programs. 

Students who do not wish to enter the joint degree program but do 
want to examine issues in politics, literature, sociology and other disci- 
plines may take graduate courses at several area colleges and universities 
for credit at the seminary. 

53 



You are Free to Learn 

You are an individual with your own background, interests and purpose. 
At Pittsburgh Seminary you are free to design your own program of 
studies. The entire range of course offerings is open to you, and you 
are able to engage in independent research and university study. Metro- 
politan Pittsburgh offers many field education opportunities from which 
you may choose in light of your concerns. Pittsburgh Seminary's curric- 
ulum sets you free to learn. 




54 





•*<% 



The Master of Religious Education Curriculum 

The Master of Religious Education program, open to both men and 
women, is designed primarily to prepare them to serve the Church of 
Jesus Christ as directors or ministers of Christian education in local 
congregations, as curriculum writers and fraternal workers, as well as to 
provide them background for related professional and service vocations 
such as public school education, social work, nursing and the nursery 
school. 

The Master of Religious Education curriculum is a two year program 
including both theory and practice among the disciplines of Bible, his- 
tory, theology, and the teaching ministry. That the office of teaching has 
fallen into disrepute and has come to be associated largely with methods 
is manifest. The recovery of the office will come through Biblical and 
theological competence coupled with the art and. skills of communi- 
cation. To know the Bible the student must enter into the world of the 
Bible and gain a "feel" for its idiom of thought, expression, practice. 
Courses in church history, history of doctrine, and theology will also 
contribute to the needed competence. By taking the basic courses of 
theological education an M.R.E. candidate is prepared to work side by 
side with pastors, sharing a common understanding of the total ministry 
of which education is a part, and performing that ministry with profes- 
sional competence. 

Within this program the teaching office is lifted up and emphasized 
for the M.R.E. candidate. The B.D. Church and Ministry courses are 
especially adapted so that the student whose vocational interest is 
Christian education can explore the philosophy and theology of, as well 
as develop methodological and administrative skills in, that special min- 
istry. Throughout the two year course the student will be involved in 
Christian Education theory and practice. Field education practicum is 
offered each semester and is closely geared with class work. 

The Master of Religious Education curriculum is elective except for 
one semester of Hebrew or Greek. A total of 48 hours is required for 
graduation based on a two-year, four semester program of 12 hours 
each term. Of these hours, 27 are to be distributed equally over the 
three divisions. Each candidate is recommended to take six hours at 
the University of Pittsburgh in education and these are credited to the 
48 needed for graduation. 

56 



Description of Courses of Instruction : 
The Biblical Division 

Mr. Orr, Chairman 
Mr. Barth Mr. Hills Mr. Lapp 

Mr. Gowan Mr. J. Jackson Mr. von Waldow 

Mr. Hadidian Mr. Jamieson Mr. Walther 

Mr. Hare Mr. Kelley 

Some exegesis courses listed below are correlated with Church and Ministry 
(especially homiletics). 

A-Level or Introduction-type courses: 

100. Old Testament Introduction. The history and theology of the 
historical books of the Old Testament with special attention to the for- 
mation of the literature and its religious significance. The history of 
Israel is traced from earliest times and set in the framework of Near 
Eastern civilization as recovered through archaelogical research. The 
principal objective is mastery of the Biblical material. There are also 
assigned readings in current scholarly literature. 

First semester, 1970-71. Mr. von Waldow 

101. Old Testament Introduction. The history of the Old Testament 
prophecy, the prophetic books, and basic elements of prophetic theology 
will be covered as will the Psalms, the problem "Psalms and Cult," and 
the theology of the Psalms. The course is concluded with considerations 
on major elements of the theology of wisdom. (Course 100 is not pre- 
requisite). 

Second semester, 1970-71. Mr. von Waldow 

103. The lntertestamental Period. A survey of the historical, literary, 
and religious background of the New Testament, concentrating on Palis- 
tinian Judaism from which Christianity was born, with some attention 
to the Hellenistic world in which it developed. 

Second semester, 1970-71. Mr. Gowan 

104. Introduction: Biblical Institutions. An introduction to Old and 
New Testament literature through an examination of selected passages 
bearing on the development of religious, political, social and economic 
institutions. 

First semester, 1970-71. Mr. Lapp and Mr. Orr 

200. New Testament Introduction: Gospels, Acts and Revelation. An 
introduction to the Synoptic Gospels, Acts and Johannine literature. At- 
tention will be given to the place of Jesus in Christian origins and to the 

57 



role of historical criticism in the search for the historical Jesus. The the- 
ology of the individual books will be examined. The course structure 
will include both lectures and seminars. 

First semester, 1970-71. Mr. Hare 

201. Introduction to New Testament Theology. A lecture course on 
the contents, character, intention, message and some problems of the 
Epistles of the New Testament. 

Second semester, 1970-71 Mr. Earth 



The Languages: 

110. Elementary Hebrew. A course designed to lead to an apprecia- 
tive and competent use of Hebrew as one of the languages of Biblical 
revelation. From the outset the student learns inductively to read from 
the original language of the Old Testament. Emphasis is placed on the 
acquisition of a working vocabulary as the ground for further reading, 
and the illumination of key Biblical concepts. Instruction is in small, 
graded sections so that a maximum of individual attention and achieve- 
ment is possible. 

Both semesters, 1970-71. 

111. Elementary Hebrew. Continuation of 110. with instruction in 
graded sections. 

Both semesters, 1970-71. 

112. Hebrew Reading. Supervised reading of selected Old Testament 
passages (one hour credit). 

Offered each semester, 1970-71. Mr. Hills or Mr. J. Jackson 

113. Hebrew Grammar. Introduction to the formal structure of the 
Hebrew language, (phonetics, morphology, syntax) with special atten- 
tion to its historical development and relation to other Semitic languages. 

Offered on request. Mr. Hills 

114. Hebrew Exegetical. A student with a B average in the Biblical 
field may elect to do independent study in the exegesis of an Old Testa- 
ment passage under the supervision of a member of the Biblical Division. 
The exegetical paper, 30-40 pages in length, will be due on the first day 
of classes in September. 

Offered during the summer, two hours credit. 

115. Ugaritic. Northwest Semitic language and literature: I. Intro- 
duction to Ugaritic. Elements of syntax and grammar; translations of 
the Legend of King KRT, selections from the Ba'al cycle. 

Graduate and qualified B.D. Students Mr. J. Jackson 

58 



116. Biblical Aramaic. Reading and the grammar of the Aramaic 
sections of the Old Testament. Additional material may be included 
from the fifth century B.C. Aramaic letters from Elephantine. 

Offered on request. Mr. Hills or Mr. Gowan 

117. The Dead Sea Scrolls. Survey of the scrolls from the Dead Sea 
area, particularly Qumran. Archaeological background, analysis of con- 
tents, significance for the text, history, and theology of the Old and 
New Testaments. Selected passages will be read in the original languages. 

Offered on request. Mr. Hills 

118. Septuagint Studies. Introduction to the Greek Old Testament, 
and problems of the Greek and Hebrew texts. Reading and comparative 
study of passages in Hebrew and Greek. 

Offered on request. Mr. Orr or Mr. Walther 

210. New Testament Greek. A course designed to lead to a competent 
use of Greek as one of the languages of Biblical revelation. From the 
outset the student learns inductively to read from the Greek New Tes- 
tament, and unique study aids prepared by the Division are used. In- 
struction is in small, graded sections. Students who have previously 
studied Greek will be assigned to special sections. 

Both semesters, 1970-71. 

211. New Testament Greek. Continuation of 210. with instruction in 
graded sections. As much of the New Testament will be read as progress 
permits. Some attention will be given to textual criticism, and exegetical 
method and practice will be introduced. 

Both semesters, 1970-71. 

212. Greek Reading. Supervised reading of selected New Testament 
or Septuagint passages (One hour credit). 

Offered each semester. Mr. Kelley 

213. Greek Grammar. Introduction to the formal structure of New 
Testament Greek; systematic study of grammar and syntax, illustrated 
by specific New Testament passages. 

Offered second semester, 1970-71. Mr. Kelley 

214. Greek Exegetical. A student with a B average in the Biblical 
field may elect to do independent study in the exegesis of a New Testa- 
ment passage under the supervision of a member of the Biblical Divi- 
sion. The exegetical paper, 30-40 pages in length, will be due on the 
first day of classes in September. 

Offered during the summer, two hours credit. 

215. Hellenistic Greek Studies. Selected readings in Philo, Josephus, 
the Apostolic Fathers, and other Greek literature approximately con- 

59 



temporary with the New Testament period. First year students whose 
ability and experience warrant may be assigned to this course in place 
of 210. or 211. 

Offered on request. Mr. Orr 

216. Advanced Greek Reading. This course is designed to make it 
possible for students who elect it continuously to read through the en- 
tire New Testament in Greek during their Seminary training. In addition 
to practice in reading and translating the student will be trained in 
grammar and principles of exegesis. Each semester approximately 1/6 
of the New Testament will be covered. Open to all students who have 
passed the basic Greek requirement of one semester. 

Offered both semesters, 1970-71. Mr. Orr 



Courses in Exegesis (1970-71): 

130. The Old Testament: Pentateuch. Exegesis of passages from the 
Hebrew text of the first five books of the Old Testament. 

Joshua, offered second semester. Mr. Lapp 

131. The Old Testament: Prophetic Books. Exegesis of passages from 
the Hebrew text of the "Former" and the "Latter" Prophets. 

Samuel. Designed for students with only one semester of Hebrew. 
First semester. Mr. J. Jackson 

Rosea. "The Meaning of Hosea today." 

Offered first semester. Mr. J. Jackson and Mr. Hinds 

Deutero-Isaiah. Exegesis of selected passages of Deutero-Isaiah to 
introduce the student into the understanding of the theological con- 
cept of this prophet. Mr. von Waldow 
Offered second semester. 

Jeremiah. Exegesis of selected poetic oracles of Jeremiah, including 
his Confessions. 
Offered second semester. Mr. Hills 

132. The Old Testament: Writings. Exegesis of passages from the 
Hebrew text of the "Writings" of the Old Testament canon. 

Selected Psalms, offered first semester. Mr. Hills 

Selections from the Wisdom Literature. In a given semester one or 
more themes such as the justice of God, the problem of suffering, death, 
or "Wisdom" itself will be studied. Students may choose to work largely 
either with the Hebrew or the English text. 

Offered first semester. Mr. Gowan 

230. The Gospels: The Passion Narratives. A lecture course based 
mainly on the account of Mark. Literary, historical, and theological 
problems of the trial of Jesus will be discussed on the ground of the 
Greek text and aided by secondary literature. A paper on an appro- 

60 



priate topic chosen by each student will be required. Some knowledge 
of Greek and Introduction problems is recommended, but not required. 

Offered second semester. Mr. Barth 

Luke. An exegetical study with special emphasis on the parables in 
the Third Gospel. 

Offered second semester. Mr. Kelley 

231. 11 Corinthians. 

Offered second semester. Mr. Jamieson 

232. Pastoral Epistles. An exegetical study of the text of I, II Timothy 
and Titus with a special emphasis upon the significance of these writings 
for our understanding of the sub-apostolic church. 

Offered first semester. Mr. Jamieson 

234. Ethics in I Peter. In this seminar-style course the Greek text of 
I Peter and English commentaries will be studied. Special attention will 
be given to the distinction and interrelation of the doctrine of Christ, 
Wisdom, the church and the order of conduct, also to issues related 
to the salvation of souls, suffering of the minority, and missionary re- 
sponsibility among non-Christian fellowmen and established institutions. 
Offered second semester. Mr. Barth 

236. Exegetical Seminar. A workshop course to study exegetical 
method and to develop habits of use by practice. New Testament pas- 
sages representing a variety of exegetical problems will be examined. 
Both oral and written work will be required. 

Offered first semester. Mr. Walther 

240. Practical Use of the New Testament: Corinthian Letters. We will 
cover the letters of Paul to Corinth in this course with special attention 
to the problems of ethics and of church life which are revealed in these 
letters so as to discover their bearing upon our religious and social 
situation today in the church. 

Offered first semester. Mr. Orr 

241 Practical Use of the New Testament: The Synoptic Gospels. In 
this course various segments of the teachings of Jesus and selected 
anecdotes from his life will be examined to discover what is the central 
religious meaning of his teaching for us and how we may use the Gospel 
stories in preaching and worship. 

Offered second semester. Mr. Orr 

NOTE: In all of the Practical Use courses students may enroll who 
wish to cover this material in Greek as well as those who can only deal 
with it in English. Those who take the Greek route will translate the ma- 
terial and do an exegesis in each semester. Those who take the English 
route will prepare a paper on a selected topic and will take an examina- 
tion on the contents of the material. 

61 



242. New Testament Passages: Passage Analysis (Identical to Course 
No. 811.) 

Offered second semester. Mr. Orr and Mr. Buttrick 

250. New Testament Textual Seminar. Qualified students will be in- 
troduced to and involved in critical study of the text of the Greek New 
Testament. After introductory lectures and reading, students will par- 
ticipate in real textual work in the microfilm laboratory. 

Both semesters. Mr. Walther 

ARCHAEOLOGY 

140. Archaeology of Hellenistic-Roman Palestine 

Offered first semester. Mr. Lapp and Mr. Jamieson 



300. Independent Study in Bible. An advanced course in a defined 
area of Biblical studies offered by members of the division for specified 
credit hours. 



Qualified B.D. students are permitted in the following Th.M. courses: 

M300 and M301 Selected Problems of Biblical Theology. Motifs 
which are woven through the Biblical literature are examined and dis- 
cussed in detail. Study begins with the Biblical texts, but modern liter- 
ature is also read and used. 

Six hours, three hours in each of the two semesters. 

Mr. Walther and Mr. Gowan 

M302 History, Cultures, and Religions of the Ancient Near East. 

Offered first semester. Mr. Lapp 

M303 Hebrew Exegesis. (Early Israelite Poetry). 

Offered second semester. Mr. J. Jackson 

M305 Greek Exegesis. (Hebrews) 

Offered first semester. Mr. Barth 

M304 History and Literature of New Testament Times. A research 
seminar with primary emphasis on the bibliographical approach to the 
study of Christian Origins which raises many questions and problems — 
geographical, historical, literary and related problems. Requirement for 
the seminar is one major paper and weekly progress reports. 

Offered second semester. Mr. Hadidian 

(Same as 266.— B.D.-M.L.S.) 



62 



The History and Theology Division 

Mr. Kehm, Chairman 
Mr. Battles Mr. Paul Mr. Wiest 

Mr. Gerstner 

Church History and History of Doctrine 

Our aim in teaching Church history is to help the student to understand 
the history of the Church and its thought in the context of the 20th 
century. The study of history is the study of roots whether we deal with 
the history of a nation, a race, or an idea. Since Christianity comes to a 
focus in certain historical events, its roots are firmly grounded in history. 
Its story is the account of the effect which those events have had in 
human society. This involves both the history of doctrine as the Church's 
attempt to understand the significance of the biblical revelation, and 
the history of the Church itself as the attempt of Christians to live in 
response to those events. 

But we recognize two kinds of interaction that are important for our 
understanding of the Church today. First, we recognize that there has 
always been a dialogue between the Church and the society within 
which it is placed. Secondly, there is an integral relationship between 
the doctrine that the Church professes and the forms that it takes as a 
human community. All the courses offered recognize these two kinds of 
continuing interaction. 

The history of the Church is divided into six main areas at the intro- 
ductory level: Patristics, the Medieval Church, the Reformation, the 
Post-Reformation Era (17th and 18th centuries), the Church in an 
Age of Revolution (19th and 20th centuries), and the Church in Amer- 
ica. It is hoped that in selecting several of these areas to be studied in 
depth (original documents wherever possible), the student will broaden 
the interest in and understanding of his Christian heritage. Other courses 
and seminars are offered which will enable him to pursue this history 
at a deeper level once his initial interest has been aroused. 

Systematic Theology 

The purpose of systematic theology is to try to achieve a reasoned 
understanding of the meaning and implications of Christian faith in 
relation to contemporary modes of thought. Theological thinking looks, 
on the one hand, to the original sources of Christian faith, the biblical 
writings, and to the whole range of Christian tradition which represents 
the church's attempts to understand its faith in previous periods of his- 
tory. On the other hand, theology looks to the practical tasks of 
responsible preaching, teaching, counseling, and the problems of ethical 
judgment and action in today's world. Thus, the courses in systematic 
theology aim not merely at confronting the student with the thought of 
other theologians, but to engage him in doing his own theological think- 

63 



ing. They will help him to come to terms with the historic traditions of 
the church as well as the sometimes bewildering but often exciting cur- 
rents in contemporary theology: the "death of God" theologies, calls 
for a "black theology," the "theology of hope," process theology, and 
the discussions in the ecumenical movement and renewed Protestant- 
Catholic relationships. They are designed to give the student ample 
opportunity and guidance in sorting out his own beliefs and developing 
a sound theological basis for future ministry. 

The offerings in systematic theology are divided into "A level" and 
"B level" courses. The "A level" courses are introductory in nature. 
They attempt to familiarize the student with the task of theology, theo- 
logical resources and method, and contemporary theological issues. The 
"B level" courses are designed to take the student into deeper levels of 
analysis of theological questions and to involve him in the work of con- 
structive reformulation of the content of the Christian faith. "A level" 
courses do not presuppose seminary courses in the biblical and historical 
fields. "B level" courses do presuppose knowledge such as is provided 
in introductory courses in those fields. It is recommended that students 
take at least one "A level" and two "B level" courses in systematic 
theology during their B.D. studies. 



I. Church History and History of Doctrine Offerings 

A-Level 

410. The History and Theology of the Patristic Era (to A.D. 451). An 
introduction to the institutional and dogmatic history of the Early 
Church beginning with the Sub-Apostolic age and closing with the 
Council of Chalcedon (A.D. 451) and the death of Augustine (A.D. 
430). 

First semester, 1971-72. Mr. Battles 

411. The History and Theology of the Middle Ages (to A.D. 
1500). An introduction to the institutional and dogmatic history of 
the Medieval Church from the fall of Rome to the eve of the Reforma- 
tion. 

First semester, 1970-71. Mr. Battles 

412. Introduction to the Reformation. An introduction to the history 
and thought of the Reformation in its broad aspects, i.e., the Lutheran 
and Swiss reformers, the Radical Reformation, and the reforms in 
England. 

Offered first semester each year. Mr. Paul and Mr. Battles 

413. The Post-Reformation Era. This course traces the 17th and 
18th century movements of Orthodoxy, Pietism, and Enlightenment. 

Mr. Gerstner 

64 



414. The Church in American Culture: Historical Perspective. This 
is an introductory course in the history of the American church. It 
approaches the history of the church through the various constituent 
elements in American society and tries to evaluate the church as an 
institution within this setting. 

Second semester, 1971-72. Mr. Paul 

415. The Church in an Age of Revolution. Introduction to the history 
of the Church and its thought during the 19th and 20th centuries. The 
course will trace the impact of the scientific, political, social, and cul- 
tural revolutions on Christianity, and the development of missionary, 
ecumenical, and social activity in the churches during this period. 

Mr. Paul 

B-Level 

434. Studies in Medieval Thought. The topic will be chosen from 
the following: monasticism, mysticism, Medieval dissent, the Church; 
also the life and thought of particular medieval churchmen. Mr. Battles 

435. Calvin's Institutes of the Christian Religion. In this seminar the 
entire Institutes will be read and discussed; students will be offered the 
opportunity to concentrate on special topics, with emphasis upon the 
historical matrix of Calvin's thought. 

Offered second semester each year. Mr. Battles 

436. Studies in John Calvin. An introductory course in Calvin the 
topic of which will be changed from year to year. Mr. Battles 

440 A. The Problem of Unity in History and Theology: prior to the 
Reformation. Mr. Battles 

440B. The Problem of Unity in History and Theology: after the 
Reformation. The divisions of the Church since the Reformation seen 
as problems both of doctrinal differences, and as non-theological and 
institutional. The stimulus to unity and movement towards a concept 
of unity and diversity in the Church. Mr. Paul 

441 A. Christian Classics: Serapion to Thomas a Kempis. With em- 
phasis upon the tradition of prayer and devotion, this course will treat, 
in seminar fashion, selected masterpieces of the early and medieval 
periods of the Church. Mr. Battles 

441B. Christian Classics: from the Reformation. Classical works of 
Christian thought and devotion from the time of Luther to Bonhoeffer. 
Each work will be examined historically to show its impact on its own 
time and the characteristics that have made it a "classic." 

Second semester, 1971-72. Mr. Paul 

65 



443. Roman Catholicism at Trent and Later. The historico- theo- 
logical development of modern Roman Catholicism. Especial study of 
the canons of the Council of Trent. Mr. Gerstner 

444. The Documents of Vatican II in Historical Perspective. This 
course will concentrate attention on the drafting, promulgation, and im- 
plementation of the dogmatic constitutions, declarations, and other 
utterances of Vatican II (1962-65). 

First semester, 1970-71. Mr. Battles 

446 A. The Rise of Puritanism: England. The rise of Puritanism 
and Separatist movements in England, and their 17th century develop- 
ment in Anglican, Presbyterian, Congregational and Baptist forms of 
church worship. 

First semester, 1971-72. Mr. Paul 

446B. The Rise of Puritanism: America. The causes that led to the 
Pilgrim and Puritan immigration in the early 17th century; the trans- 
plantation and development of Puritan thought and church styles in 
America. 

Second semester, 1971-72. Mr. Paul 

448. The Settlement of the Church in America. This course deals 
chronologically with the settlement of the Church in the American 
states, and with the origins of American pluralism. 

First semester, 1970-71 Mr. Paul 

455. United Methodist History, Doctrine, and Polity. Required of 
United Methodist students for graduation; elective for other students. 
Offered on alternate years. Mr. Chamberlin 

460. Major Sects. Jehovah's Witnesses, Mormonism, Christian Sci- 
ence and other groups compared with traditional Christianity. Re- 
semblances and differences noted. (Identical to Course No. 738.) 

Mr. Gerstner 

461. American Theology. The Puritan theology culminating in Ed- 
wards. Subsequent developments and reactions with special reference 
to Hopkinsianism, Taylorism, and the Princeton School. Twentieth 
century American thought from Rauschenbusch to the present. 

Mr. Gerstner 

462. American Christianity and Social Issues. Traces the social and 
political implications of the Church's message, and the involvement of 
the Church from the period of the Great Awakening to the present. 

Second semester, 1970-71. Mr. Gerstner 

463 A. Selected Problems of Modern Church History. A course or 
seminar that will take up a selected topic from the modern period, and 

66 



which will enable the instructor to explore the selected subject in depth. 
Topic to be announced at the beginning of the registration period. 

Mr. Paul 

463 B. Selected Problems in American Church History. Same pro- 
cedure as above in the specific field of American Church History. 

Mr. Paul 

464. Faith and Order Seminar. Selected problems in Faith and Order 
discussed in association with seminarians at St. Vincent (Roman Cath- 
olic) Seminary, at Latrobe, Pa. This seminar involves student work in 
small groups, and several plenary discussions at P.T.S. or St. Vincent. 
First semester, 1971-72. Mr. Paul and St. Vincent staff member. 

470. Advanced Reading and Research in Church History. Guided 
reading and research in sources of church history. Subjects for study 
will be determined in conference with the instructor. Permission of the 
instructor is necessary for registration. History Staff 

471. Critique of Sources. An introduction to external and internal 
critique of sources, critique of literature, interpretation, combination 
and the use of non-verbal sources. The course is designed primarily for 
advanced students. Mr. Battles 



II. Systematic Theology Offerings 

A-Level 

520. Introduction to Current Problems in Theology. Investigation of 
the fundamental problems under discussion in the literature referred 
to by such labels as "the new hermeneutic"; the "God is dead" theology; 
the "theology of hope"; "Black theology"; and "process theology." 

Offered annually. Theology staff 

521. Problems of Christian Belief. A course to help the student in 
thinking through some of the problems he may have with items of 
Christian belief ordinarily taken for granted as the presuppositions of 
theology. Such items may include arguments for belief in God (and 
what we mean by "God"), the centrality and uniqueness of Christ, the 
relation of faith to the church (in the light of current criticisms of in- 
stitutional churches), and the relation of faith to social and political 
issues. Since discussion of the bases for belief is inseparable from 
questions about the content of belief, the course will also serve as an 
introduction to theology. Mr. Wiest 

522. Major Theological Systems. Some of the most important ways 
of understanding the Christian faith, taken from different periods and 

67 



representing distinctive types of theological systems, will be examined 
(e.g., Aquinas, Calvin, and Barth; or Augustine, Luther and Tillich; 
or Origen, Calvin, and Schleiermacher; etc.). The aim of the course 
will be to uncover the fundamental concepts and distinctive organizing 
principles of these systems. 

Offered annually. Theology staff. 

B-Level 

530. Theological Method. Investigation of the grounds and pro- 
cedures of systematic theology, treating such themes as the nature of 
revelation; the knowledge of God; the authority of Scripture; the status 
and use of tradition; the nature of theological statements; the relation- 
ship of theology to philosophy, to the empirical sciences, and to ethics. 

Offered on alternate years. Theology staff. 

531. The Process of Understanding. A study of the problem of her- 
meneutics, aiming at the development of a general theory of "under- 
standing" and showing its applicability to theology. 

Offered on alternate years. Mr. Kehm 

532. Constructive Theology. An attempt to appropriate the findings 
of modern biblical research, as well as modern philosophy and sci- 
entific knowledge, into new ways of conceiving and formulating the 
various themes of Christian doctrine (God, creation, and providence; 
man and sin; Jesus Christ and redemption; faith and sanctification; 
the church and sacraments; eternal life and the kingdom of God). 

Rotation of themes so as to cover all of them within a four year 
cycle. Theology staff. 

533. The Path of Protestant Theology from Schleiermacher to 
Troeltsch. Attention will be focused upon Schleiermacher and his 
followers, and the impact of the rise of historical thought upon theology. 

Mr. Kehm 

534. The Path of Protestant Theology from Barth to Pannen- 
berg. The "neo-orthodox" reaction to the heritage of 19th century 
continental theology; the positive proposals of Barth, Tillich, and Bult- 
mann; the reappearance of problems connected with the theme, "faith 
and history"; and the proposals of Ebeling, Moltmann, Pannenberg 
and some American theologians with respect to these problems. 

Mr. Kehm 

535. Major Christian Theologians. Intensive study of the works of 
one of the great theologians of the Christian church, such as Origen, 
Augustine, Aquinas, Luther, Calvin, Schleiermacher, Barth, or Tillich. 

Theology staff. 

68 



536. Nominalism. A seminar designed to make a systematic investiga- 
tion of the issues in medieval nominalism or conceptualism with special 
reference to current theological discussions concerning language. A 
Ph.D. course, open to other students by permission of the instructor. 
Several minor papers required. 

540. Contemporary Issues in Philosophical Theology. Examination 
of various philosophical movements (such as analytic philosophy, ex- 
istentialism, phenomenology, naturalism, process philosophy) with 
respect to their bearing upon the content and method of Christian 
theology. Mr. Wiest and Mr. Kehm 

541. Theology and Science. The role of science in shaping the mod- 
ern mind. Recent changes in our understanding of the nature of scien- 
tific knowledge. Survey of theological responses to modern science and 
of the possibilities for a "theology of nature" in contemporary Prot- 
estant thought. Mr. Wiest 

550. Guided Reading and Research in Systematic Theology. Subjects for 
study will be determined in conference with the instructor in accord with 
the needs and interests of the student. Permission of the instructor is nec- 
essary for registration. Theology staff 

560. Theological Readings in Latin. After a brief review of Latin 
grammar (if necessary) the student will be permitted to choose texts 
from the early, medieval, or Reformation period of Church History, ac- 
cording to his interest or need. 

Offered on request. Mr. Battles 

561. Theological Readings in German. Readings in relatively recent 
German theological works, such as Karl Barth's Die Christliche Lehre 
nach dem Heidelberger Katechismus. 

Offered annually. Mr. Gerstner and Mr. Kehm 

562. Theological Readings in French. Contemporary theological and 
historical literature: Etienne Gilson, Jacques Maritain, and others. 

Offered on request. Mr. Gerstner and Mr. Battles 

600. Independent Study in History and Theology. An advanced 
course in a defined area of history and/or theology, offered by members 
of the division for specified credit hours. 

Elective Credit at Pittsburgh Universities 

With the permission of the Dean up to two courses may be taken at the 
University of Pittsburgh, Carnegie-Mellon University, and Duquesne 
University in such fields as philosophy, history, and anthropology, and 
elective credit transferred to the seminary. 

69 



The Church and Ministry Division 



Mr. Buttrick, Chairman 

Mr. Bald Mr. Ezzell Mr. Paylor 

Miss Burrows Mr. Hinds Mr. Ralston 

Mr. Chamberlin Mr. G. Jackson Mr. Scott 

Mr. Clyde Mr. Nicholson Mr. Stone 

Ethics 

700. Political Issues in Christian Perspective. An introduction to the 
study of social ethics through the analysis of contemporary political 
problems. Issues of the methodology of social ethics will be examined 
in the light of current struggles for power and justice. (Limit: 25) 

First semester, 1970-71. Mr. Stone 

701. Moral Issues in International Politics. The perennial problems 
of Christian ethics and international politics; the theory of international 
politics; the moral issues raised by nuclear armaments; particular case 
studies in United States foreign policy. (Limit: 25) 

Second semester, 1970-71. Mr. Stone 

702. The Ethics and Theology of H. R. Niebuhr. A consideration of 
the formative influences on the thought of H. R. Niebuhr, and an 
analysis of his major writings in ethics and theology. (Limit: 15) 

First semester, 1970-71. Mr. Stone 

703. Seminar in Contemporary Ethical Thought. Discussion of se- 
lected readings from contemporary Protestant and Roman Catholic 
ethicists, such as R. Niebuhr, K. Barth, E. Brunner, H. R. Niebuhr, R. 
Ramsey, P. Lehmann, D. Bonhoeffer, G. Winter, J. Gustafson, K. 
Rahner, B. Haering, J. Maritain, J. C Murray. 

(Limit: 20 students) Mr. Wiest 

705. The Problem of Violence in Christian Ethics. Violence as a so- 
cial phenomenon and violence as a means to an end. The implications 
of Christian ethical concepts of love, power and justice for the use of 
violent means in international and domestic situations. 

(Limit: 20) Mr. Wiest 

706. The Ideal Social Order. A seminar based upon an introductory 
investigation and critique of selected Christian and other forms of 
Utopianism, past and present, in relation to contemporary social change. 

Mr. Bald 

707. The Theological Ethics of William Temple and Reinhold Nie- 
buhr. A comparative study of the social thought of the late Arch- 

70 



bishop of Canterbury and one of America's leading voices in the field 
of ethics in relation to their theological functions. Mr. Bald 

708. The Social Teachings of the Christian Church. Study of selected 
positions in the history of the Church's social teaching from the New 
Testament to the present. Focus on the issues of Christ and culture: 
church and state; the Christian and war. Mr. Stone 



Faith and Culture 

720. Christian Faith and Contemporary Literature. A study of the 
relationship between Christian faith and themes in contemporary liter- 
ature. Works by a number of modern writers including Sartre, Updike, 
Greene, and Beckett will be read and discussed. (Limit: 24) 

First semester, 1970-71. Mr. Buttrick 

721. Poetry, Poetics, and Christian Language. A study of contem- 
porary poetry and poetics in relation to the use of religious metaphor 
and imagery. Long poems by one or two contemporary poets will be 
analyzed. Reading in modern literary criticism will be discussed. 

Mr. Buttrick 

723. The Sociology of Religion. An analysis of major theoretical ap- 
proaches to the relationship between religious values and social insti- 
tutions in readings from Durkheim, Malinowski, Marx, O'Dea, Tawney, 
Weber, and Winter. (Limit 25) 

Second semester, 1970-71. Mr. Stone 

724. The Rhetoric of Social and Political Issues. Studies in the 
rhetoric used by spokesmen for various positions in society in order to 
understand and interpret. 

First semester, 1970-71. Mr. Hinds 

725. Interpretative Reading. Oral interpretation of a varied selection 
of prose, poetry, and drama as a means of developing keener sensitivity 
to the written word and greater effectiveness in communicating it. The 
objective will be to mature the skills and principles already acquired 
in speech courses. Small sections, private conferences, recordings. 

One hour, first and second semesters. Mr. Hinds 

726. Christian Faith and Communication. A study of the kinds of 
communication appropriate to the nature of the Church. Focus will be 
on the relationship of medium to message, the goal being the develop- 
ment of a total strategy of communication for the church. Mr. Hinds 

727. Music in the Church. A practical approach to the many prob- 
lems arising in connection with church music with particular attention 
to the problems of the small congregation. Organizing the musical re- 

71 



sources of the congregation, the music as a spiritual force in the church 
life, and the minister's relation to choir and choirmaster. 

Second semester, 1970-71. Mr. Ralston 

728. Hymnology. An analytical and historical study of the great 
hymns and tunes of the Christian Church. Consideration of the qual- 
ities of a good hymn. Practical and effective use of the hymnal. 

First semester, 1970-71. Mr. Ralston 

729. Masterpieces of Religious Music. A study of the various forms 
of music through which men have expressed their faith. Demonstration 
of the power of music to illuminate Christian truth and to "give wings 
to words." This is primarily a "listening course" making use of records 
but with assigned background reading and class comment. The purpose 
is to give the student an appreciation of various forms of musical ex- 
pression as well as some familiarity with specific works of musical art. 

Mr. Ralston 

Church Mission and Order 

730. Images and Issues of Ministry. One's preparation for ministry 
depends upon one's view of ministry. This course, which is designed 
primarily for Juniors, provides an opportunity for a broad review of 
the varied forms of ministry which characterize contemporary Chris- 
tianity. In addition to re-examining the views among students, various 
members of the seminary faculty will share a series of dialogues on 
what ministry means to them, and several pastors engaged in diverse 
patterns of work will meet with the class. Through small seminar dis- 
cussions and reading in the current literature on ministry, the course 
may help each student to clarify the direction of his own preparation for 
the ministry. 

First semester, 1970-71. Mr. Chamberlin and other faculty 

731. Life and Work of the United Presbyterian Church. The course is 
designed to help those who serve in church vocations within the United 
Presbyterian Church, especially pastors and directors of Christian edu- 
cation. Attention is directed to the life and work of the United Pres- 
byterian Church as it appears through Presbyterian history, and as it 
appears today in United Presbyterian organization and administration 
at all levels, especially at the parish level. 

Second semester, 1970-71. Mr. Clyde 

732. The Polity and Program of the United Presbyterian Church. An 
introduction to the polity and program of the United Presbyterian 
Church, designed in part to help United Presbyterian students to pre- 
pare for denominational examinations in that field. 

First semester, 1970-71. Mr. Clyde 

733. Contemporary Movements in Ecumenics. Through study of cur- 
rent ecumenical relations among churches resultant from such de- 

72 



velopments as Vatican II, the Consultation on Church Union, the 
Wheaton Conference of non-World Council Churches, and selected 
denominational unions, effort will be made to prepare students for 
knowledgeable action in situations of ecumenical significance. 

Second semester, 1970-71. Mr. Clyde 

734. Christian Mission in Today's World: An Introduction. Designed 
to introduce today's Christian mission, the course will be largely de- 
termined by student concern. It is expected that study will be directed 
to the theology and practice of Christian mission both at home and 
abroad, especially relative to such contemporary concerns as new 
forms of ministry, the developing ecumenical movement, and the role 
of the institutional church, the ordained clergy, and the laity. Students 
will undertake field studies, and use will be made of audio-visuals as 
well as printed materials. 

First semester, 1970-71. Mr. Clyde 

735. Christian Responsibility and the World Social Revolution. The 
course will explore the nature and technique of Christian world respon- 
sibility in view of the nature of the Gospel and the action of the Church 
as both confront today's global revolution, with special attention given 
to the Christian approach to the non-Christian religions and to Com- 
munism. Mr. Clyde 

736. An Experimental Field Education Course. Students will conduct 
a careful study of a selected situation and on the basis of that study 
will work out a program and develop an evaluation procedure. The 
course will be conducted under close seminary supervision. Enrollment 
will be limited to six students. (3 hours credit will be given in either the 
fall or the spring semester for the year of field study. ) 

First semester, 1970-71. Mr. Scott, Class Co-ordinator 

737. Seminar in Ecumenics. This course is offered at Duquesne Uni- 
versity under a joint faculty including Duquesne professors, Pittsburgh 
Seminary professors, and others. It is open to qualified Pittsburgh Semi- 
nary students. 

738. Major Sects. Jehovah's Witnesses, Mormonism, Christian Sci- 
ence and other groups compared with traditional Christianity. Resem- 
blances and differences noted. (Identical to course No. 460.) 

Mr. Gerstner 

739. The Wider Ecumenism (Major World Religions). The course 
will study from major world religions (Primitive Religion, Hinduism, 
Buddhism, and Islam) with a view to: (1) a better self-understanding 
by Christians of their own faith; (2) a better understanding by Chris- 
tians of what should be the Christian witness to people of other faiths. 

Mr. Clyde 

Homiletics 

800. Homiletics: A General Introduction. The class will include lec- 
tures, discussion, and workshop sessions in which the task of preaching 

73 



will be examined as it relates to hermeneutic, theological, and cultural 
questions. The process of moving from text to sermon will be analyzed 
in depth with attention to structure and meaning, style, language sys- 
tems, etc. (Limit: 15) 

First semester, 1970-71. Mr. Ezzell 

801. Homiletics: A General Introduction. The class will include lec- 
tures, discussion, and workshop sessions in which the task of preaching 
will be examined, as it relates to hermeneutic, theological, and cultural 
questions. The process of moving from text to sermon will be analyzed 
in depth with attention to structure and meaning, style, language sys- 
tems, etc. 

Second semester, 1970-71. Mr. Buttrick 

802. Preaching from the Old Testament. The course will study the 
problem of preaching from Old Testament texts, the relation of such 
preaching to the New Testament and to contemporary thought-forms. 
A particular type of Old Testament literature — law, prophecy, wis- 
dom — may be studied as it relates to speaking in today's world. Ser- 
mons will be prepared and, if possible, delivered. This course may be 
taught in connection with an exegetical course from the Biblical Divi- 
sion. This year the course will consider Hosea. (Identical to course No. 
131). 

First semester, 1970-71. Mr. Hinds and Mr. J. Jackson 

803 Contexts of Preaching: An Introduction. Introduction to preach- 
ing in a variety of contexts. 

Second semester, 1970-71. Mr. Hinds 

804. A Pilot Program in Protestant-Roman Catholic Homiletics: In- 
troductory. This introductory course will be a cooperative class with 
St. Vincent's Roman Catholic Seminary at Latrobe, Pa. The class will 
meet at each Seminary on alternative weeks. The course will consider 
the theological understanding of preaching as well as the influence of 
its Biblical, liturgical, and cultural contexts. Students will be introduced 
to the workshop method of sermon preparation. Sermons will be written 
and preached for class criticism. (Limit: 10) 

First semester, 1970-71. Mr. Scott 

805. Homiletical Study of Acts. The course is three-fold: a review 
of the historical-critical approach to Acts, the discovery of homiletical 
material, and the actual writing and classroom delivery of sermons. 

Second semester, 1970-71. Mr. Nicholson 

806. Preaching from the Parables. The course is two-fold: a study of 
the history of interpretation of Parables, and the actual writing and 
classroom delivery of sermons from the Parables. 

First semester, 1970-71. Mr. Nicholson 

807. Preaching from the Old Testament: Ecclesiastes, Song of Solo- 
mon, and Job. Preparation of exegetical sermons from these books, 

74 



overlooked in most preaching, but remarkably reflective of the modern 
mood. (Limit: 15) 

Second semester, 1970-71. Mr. Ezzell 

808. Homiletics Practicum (One Hour). Students will prepare and 
preach two sermons. Classes will be sectioned and tutorial instruction 
will supplement class discussion. 

First semester, 1970-71. Homiletics Faculty 

809. Homiletics Practicum (One Hour). Students will prepare and 
preach two sermons. Classes will be sectioned and tutorial instruction 
will supplement class discussion. 

Second semester, 1970-71. Homiletics Faculty 

810. The History of Preaching. A study of preaching from a historical 
perspective. Preaching will be examined in particular periods by 
analyzing doctrinal and ethical content, homiletic methods, style, and 
cultural contexts. Hermeneutic principles, liturgical setting, major forms 
will be considered. 

The Great Ages of Preaching 

Transitions in Roman Catholic Preaching. Mr. Scott 

811. New Testament Passages. This interdivisional course will study 
various types of New Testament passages from an exegetical, homiletical 
and hermeneutical point of view. (Identical to Course No. 242). 

Second semester, 1970-71. Mr. Buttrick and Mr. Orr 

812. Advanced Problems in Homiletics. The course will study par- 
ticular problems relating to contemporary homiletic theory, such as the 
problem of linguistic change, the hermeneutic discussion, the new Rhe- 
toric, changing cultural meanings, etc. Mr. Buttrick 

813. The Preaching of the Black Church. An intensive analysis of the 
type of preaching and the role it plays in the Black church. This will be 
done on its own terms and in contrast to the predominantly white 
churches. Lectures and field trips to churches in the area. 

Second semester, 1970-71. Mr. Ezzell 

Education 

820. Church and Education. An introduction to the field of education 
and the basis of the concern Christians have for general as well as church 
education. The course assumes that students have a basic theological, 
Biblical and historical background so that attention can be given to 
clarifying how these relate to their future educational responsibilities. 
Special attention is given to present patterns of church education and 
how they are developed. Crucial educational issues are examined in 
helping each student to clarify and articulate his own philosophy of 
education. Readings, observations, and projects are incorporated in the 
semester's work. 

First semester, 1970-71. Mr. Chamberlin 

75 



821. Christian Education Programming. This course will examine the 
responsibilities of the Minister of Christian Education, or the Assistant 
Minister responsible for Christian Education, by reviewing patterns of 
local church staff relationships, the complex processes of church educa- 
tion with emphasis on the skills of evaluation, program planning, teacher 
development and administration within the framework of contemporary 
Protestant congregational structures. Students plan the specific content 
and sequence of the course. 

Second semester, 1970-71. Mr. Chamberlin 

823. The Churches and Public Education. Significant new challenges 
confront the churches as they attempt to adjust to the changes taking 
place in general education. The historical relation between churches and 
public schools, the legal issues involved, the study of religion in secular 
schools, and the present relation of churches to higher education — all of 
these will be examined in preparation for understanding and designing 
what churches may do in the new situation. 

Second semester, 1970-71. Mr. Chamberlin 

825. Creative Teaching. A course designed to give the student the 
opportunity to explore creative ways of teaching the Christian Faith to 
children, youth, and adults within the program of the church. Observa- 
tion, experimentation, and guest lecturers will be used in the course. 

Second semester, 1970-71. Miss Burrows 

826. Appropriating the Christian Faith. An examination of various 
views about the relation of the Holy Spirit to human activity in the 
processes of appropriation of faith, and the problems this poses for the 
educator. Contemporary learning theories will be studied in terms of 
their implications for a theological understanding of appropriation. 

Mr. Chamberlin 

827. New Patterns of Christian Presence. An exploration of the many 
new forms of ministry being conducted experimentally both in this 
country and abroad; a review of studies by denominational agencies, 
particularly the World Council of Churches study of the missionary 
structure of the parish; and an examination of the implications of these 
developments for the parish and its educational ministry. Registration 
is limited. Mr. Chamberlin 

829. The Child and Church Education. The course is designed to give 
the student the opportunity to explore the possibilities of church educa- 
tion for children through the 6th grade. It will be developed around in- 
dividual projects and concerns of the students enrolled. Miss Burrows 

Pastoral Care 

840. Theology and Psychiatry. The metaphysical presuppositions, 
method, understanding of therapy, and some aspects of human nature 
will be compared. An attempt will be made to define mutuality and dis- 

76 



creteness between the two disciplines. An introduction to Freudian, 
Jungian, and other psychiatric writings will be made. 

Not offered 1970-71. Mr. G. Jackson 

842. Psychological Foundations of Ministry. This course will trace 
human development along lines set forth by Freud and radically ex- 
panded by Erikson. With Erikson the transitional figure, the course will 
stress developments in ego psychology as especially helpful to the prac- 
tice of ministry. The third section of the course will analyze communal 
components, deal with group theory, and explore implications for min- 
istry. Theological material will be part of the data of the course, espe- 
cially process theology. 

Not offered 1970-71. Mr. G. Jackson 

843. Pastoral Care: An Introduction. The lecture portion of this course 
will focus attention upon two major topics: the nature of pastoral care 
and its various forms. In addition, small seminar sections of the course 
will give the student an opportunity to discuss particular pastoral prob- 
lems he is encountering and to receive supervision on his work with 
them. The course is limited to twenty students who are engaged in some 
type of field work. 

Second semester, 1970-71. Mr. Paylor 

844. Pastoral Theology: The Black Church. This course in pastoral 
theology is designed for black students. Enrollment will be limited. 

Mr. Pugh 

845. The Process of Internalization. This course, utilizing theological, 
psychological, and sociological insights, would try to get at the process 
of how values, models and objective reality in its many forms are inter- 
nalized as a basis for an attempt to discover how faith is internalized. 

Not offered, 1970-71. Mr. G. Jackson 

846. The Aging. Personality Formation and Pastoral Care. This sem- 
inar will look at the question of aging from three significant directions: 
the psychology of religion in specific relevance to the aging; socio- 
psychological patterns in the aging process; and the role of the church 
in ministering to the aging. Mr. Paylor 

847. Advanced Seminar in Pastoral Counseling. This course will deal 
with case material from the perspectives of developmental theory of 
personality, the dynamics of health and illness, certain essential skills in 
counseling and the role of the pastor as counselor. (Limit: 10) 

First semester, 1970-71. Mr. Paylor or Mr. G. Jackson 

848. Research in Pastoral Care. This course will investigate and de- 
velop criteria for pastoral counseling with in-patients and after-care 
patients having serious emotional illnesses. Methods of study will include 
readings, seminars, and clinical work at Woodville State Hospital. 

By invitation of the instructor. Mr. Paylor 

11 



Worship 

850. The Worship of the Church. The course will study the history of 
Christian worship, the doctrine of the Sacraments, as well as current 
forms of worship. Symbolism, architecture, theological issues, and the 
UPCUSA "Worshipbook" will be discussed. 

First semester, 1970-71. Mr. Buttrick 

851. Doing the Liturgy. Designed to provide practice in the conduct 
of worship. Includes basic principles of speech and interpretation. Small 
sections, audio and video recordings, conferences on individual problems. 

Second semester, 1970-71. Mr. Hinds 

900. Independent Study in Church and Ministry. An advanced course 
in a defined area of church and ministry, offered by members of the 
division for specified credit hours. 

Elective Credit at Pittsburgh Universities 

With the permission of the Dean up to two courses may be taken at 
the University of Pittsburgh, Carnegie-Mellon University, and Duquesne 
University in such fields as Sociology, Psychology, Anthropology, Phi- 
losophy, Social Work, Urban Affairs, Administration, Speech, and elec- 
tive credit transferred to the seminary. 

Field Education 

The broad objective of Field Education in Pittsburgh Theological Sem- 
inary is to complement the academic work of each student with experi- 
ences through which he may expand and deepen his understanding of 
contemporary culture and the life of the Church, both in its parish set- 
ting as well as in its specialized ministries. During the Junior year the 
students are encouraged to participate in churches as laymen. Middlers 
may elect field education. If so, they are assigned to selected Teaching 
Churches so that they may learn about and participate in the ministry 
under the supervision of Teaching Pastors. This field experience pro- 
vides the matrix for integrated discussion with studies at the Seminary, 
e.g., Psychological Foundations, Counseling, Homiletics and Liturgies. 
After the Middler year students may elect to participate in the Intern 
Program, an approved year of experience and study away from the Sem- 
inary. Seniors are encouraged to undertake specialization and/or experi- 
mentation. All field assignments are made through the Field Education 
Office. 

The industrial, cultural, educational and religious environment of the 
Pittsburgh area makes possible the cooperative development of field 
education assignments to fit the needs of each seminarian. For example, 
a student serves as an assistant chaplain at the State Correctional Insti- 
tution. Opportunity is given to initiate and administer coffee house pro- 
grams. One student is an assistant hospital chaplain. Another works with 
the Public Defenders Office. Others are assigned to an ecumenical min- 
istry designed to meet the needs of a large inner city area. A further co- 

78 



operative program of six denominations provides student experience 
which focuses on urban problems related to an area which includes a 
ghetto, university community, high rise apartments and hospital com- 
plex. Students serve as "Friends of the Defendant" in City Court. A 
Community Agency that works with disturbed teenagers provides a 
learning opportunity. A student discovers urban problems as he serves 
with a Neighborhood Development organization in an inner city area. 
An Assignment to the youth ministries division of the Pittsburgh Coun- 
cil of Churches offers opportunity for involvement with mass media. 
Churches representing every segment of the sociological and theological 
spectra are available. 

Every student is encouraged to spend one summer in field education, 
preferably in some form of clinical training. Students who choose and 
qualify for clinical training in approved programs will be given two 
hours of elective credit for each six weeks of clinical training to a maxi- 
mum of four credit hours. For students who do not choose or do not 
qualify for a clinical training program a number of options without any 
elective credit are allowed (such as national park chaplaincies, Board 
of National Missions assignments, assistantships, etc.), upon consulta- 
tion with and approval by the Field Education Office. 

Any student seeking a church-related position for the summer must 
counsel with the Field Education Office so that provision may be made 
for supervision on the field. Summer pastorates for students who have 
completed only their Junior year are discouraged because such students 
will not have had the courses in Church and Ministry dealing with the 
preaching, teaching, and pastoral office. 







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79 



The Master of Theology Degree 



The Th.M. degree represents a strong program of graduate education. 
The program is offered to benefit pastors who wish to deepen their 
ministry, as well as to help prepare candidates for specialized ministries. 
It is designed in the interest of developing an increasingly learned and 
relevant ministry. The degree is awarded upon the fulfillment of require- 
ments under a variety of options. The program may be undertaken in 
sequence with the B.D. degree curriculum, or as a post B.D. option. 

The B.D.-Th.M. Sequence 

Students enrolled in the B.D. program at Pittsburgh Theological Semi- 
nary may, at the end of their middler (2nd) year, apply for admission 
as candidates for both a B.D. and a Th.M. degree. This sequence requires 
one year of study beyond the normal three year B.D. program, but can- 
didates accepted for the program may utilize their third and fourth years 
as a unit within which to correlate the completion of the requirements of 
both the B.D. and the Th.M. degrees. The emphasis is upon independent 
study, and this program enables each candidate to work out his plan of 
study with a high degree of freedom and to adopt a sequence in his 
required and elective course work which best serves his interests. 

The Post-B.D. Course 

Those already holding a B.D. degree from an accredited seminary may 
apply for admission to the Th.M. degree program. It is possible for a 
candidate to fulfill the requirements for the degree in one to three years 
of study depending upon whether he undertakes his program on a full 
time or a part time basis. 

Th.M. Degree Optional Programs 

Candidates will choose one of the several options described below: 

1. The Generalization Option- 

This program is designed to enable the candidate to deepen his 
mastery of the theological disciplines as these are presented under the 
three divisions of the faculty: Biblical, Church and Ministry, History- 
Theology. Independent study is emphasized so that only six hours of 
elective course work (two courses) are required. Candidates must 
pass a comprehensive examination as the final requirement for the 
degree. 

2. The Specialization Options- 

Candidates desiring to follow a particular interest may choose one 
of three fields of study: Advanced Pastoral Studies, Biblical Studies 
(Old or New Testament), or History-Theology. Each candidate is 
required to take twelve hours of course work (four courses) as speci- 

80 



fied in the curriculum of the specialization of his choice as described 
below. He must also submit an acceptable thesis and sustain an oral 
examination on it. 
A reading knowledge of at least one foreign language is required of 
candidates in all the Th.M. options. Candidates may choose the language 
on which they will be examined from among the following: Hebrew, 
Greek, Latin, French and German. The program faculties in the Spe- 
cialization Options may designate for a candidate which of these lan- 
guages shall be required of him or may require an additional foreign 
language in view of his special interest or thesis topic. 

Candidates will be assigned appropriate faculty advisers who will be 
available for consultation early in their programs. When a candidate in 
a Specialization Option is ready to begin his thesis work, a Thesis Com- 
mittee will be appointed to provide counsel as he fulfills that requirement. 
The Statute of Limitations is four academic years from the date of 
matriculation for candidates entering the program at the beginning of 
the B.D. senior year, and three academic years from the date of matricu- 
lation for all other candidates. 



Admission Requirements 

1. Applicants for admission to the B.D. -Th.M. sequence must have 
achieved an average grade point ratio of 1.5 on the three point 
scale during the junior and middler years. 

2. Applicants for admission to the Th.M. program who hold B.D. 
degrees from accredited seminaries must have achieved that degree 
with an average grade point ratio of 1.5 on the three point scale 
or its equivalent. 

3. Applicants are admitted by action of the Curriculum Committee of 
the Faculty. Acceptance is not granted to an applicant for a Spe- 
cialization Option without the concurrence of the appropriate pro- 
gram faculty. 

4. A mastery of English composition. 

All applications for the Th.M. program should be made through the 
office of the Director of Admissions. 



Fees and Expenses 

Matriculation Fee, $35.00 for those not in the B.D.-Th.M. sequence. 

Tuition, $650.00 each for the third and fourth years in the B.D.-Th.M. 
sequence, and $650.00 for the program for those holding a B.D. Can- 
didates in the Th.M. program may take as many courses as desired, 
either for credit or audit without additional tuition charge. 

Graduation Fee, $10.00. 

Fee for Binding and Microfilming the Thesis, $15.00. 

Applicants for this degree should apply to the Director of Admissions. 

81 



Master of Theology Degree Programs 

Generalization Option 

1. Course Requirements 

A total of six elective hours (two courses) is required. The candi- 
date may choose these courses from among the total of elective 
offerings in the seminary curriculum, but it is required that his 
completed transcript (B.D. and Th.M.) shall include at least two 
Church and Ministry Division electives or their equivalents. 

2. Language 

Candidates must demonstrate by examination a reading knowledge 
of one of the foreign languages listed on page 8 1 . 

3. Comprehensive Examination 

The examination consists of written and oral parts. It is set and 
evaluated by the three faculty divisions: Biblical, Church, and Minis- 
try and History-Theology. Candidates are provided with a prospectus 
of the examination containing sample questions and bibliographies 
for guidance in their independent study, course selection, and prepa- 
ration for the examination itself. 

Specialization Options 

I. Biblical Studies 

The Master's degree in the Biblical Division covers both Testaments. 
While the thesis may concentrate on one Testament, the course work 
is deliberately designed to provide a certain degree of qualification in 
the whole field. The required number of courses is four. 

1. Course Requirements: Twelve hours of course work as follows: 

a. All candidates will take M300 and M301 Selected Problems of 
Biblical Theology. Motifs which are woven through the Biblical 
literature are examined and discussed in detail. Study begins with 
the Biblical texts, but modern literature is also read and used. 

Six hours, three hours in each of two semesters. 

b. Candidates in Old Testament will take in addition: 

(1) M302 History, Cultures, and Religions of the Ancient Near 
East. 

Offered first semester of each year, three hours. 

(2) M303 Hebrew Exegesis. 

Offered second semester each year, three hours. 

c. Candidates in New Testament will take in addition: 

( 1 ) M305 Greek Exegesis. 

Offered first semester each year, three hours. 

(2) M304 History and Literature of New Testament Times. 

Offered second semester each year, three hours. 

2. Language 

a. Candidates specializing in Old Testament Studies must demon- 
strate special proficiency in Hebrew and a more modest proficiency 
in Greek. Those who have such proficiency in Hebrew when they 
enter the program will be encouraged to study Aramaic. 

82 



b. Candidates specializing in New Testament Studies must demon- 
strate special proficiency in Greek and a more modest proficiency 
in Hebrew. Those having such proficiency in Greek when they 
enter the program will be encouraged to do additional study in 
the Septuagint. 

c. The Biblical Studies faculty may require a reading knowledge of 
an additional language if, in its judgment, a candidate's study 
program or thesis preparation demands it. 

3. Thesis 

A thesis on a subject approved by the program faculty is to be 
prepared and submitted. The candidate must also sustain an oral 
examination on his thesis. 

II. History and Theology 

1. Course Requirements : A total of four courses is required in this pro- 
gram, the courses to be selected by the student from a list designated 
by the division each academic year. This list may include certain 
Ph.D. elective courses in strict accordance with the principles laid 
down by the American Association of Theological Schools for doc- 
toral programs guaranteeing high excellence of graduate standards. 
Certain advanced B.D. courses will also be included. Where possible 
the program for each student is adapted to his background, interests, 
and thesis orientation. It is suggested that each candidate plan his 
program in consultation with his faculty adviser. 

2. Language 

The History-Theology faculty may designate which language may 
be required and may require a reading knowledge of an additional 
language if the candidate's program of study and/or his thesis prepa- 
ration demands it. Candidates will be advised in this matter upon 
entering the program. 

3. Thesis 

A thesis on a subject approved by the program faculty is to be 
prepared and submitted. The candidate must also sustain an oral 
examination on his thesis. 

III. Advanced Pastoral Studies 

The Program for Advanced Pastoral Studies is designed to help students 
to know themselves better; to understand and become sensitive to inter- 
personal relationships; to be familiar with group process; to become in- 
volved in creative dialogue between theological studies and the social 
sciences; and to see more clearly the resources of the Christian church 
for health at the various levels. 

The faculty teaching in this program is composed of seminary personnel 
and members of several faculties of the University of Pittsburgh, includ- 
ing the Medical School, the Graduate School of Social Work, and the 
Department of Speech. The faculty includes Robert J. Shoemaker, M.D., 
Margaret B. McFarland, Ph.D., Rex A. Pittenger, M.D., Erma T. Mey- 
erson, M.A.A.S.S., Jack Matthews, Ph.D., Victor Freeman, M.D., and 
Rex Speers, M.D. 

83 



1. Course Requirements : Four academic courses and three practica, as 
follows : 

Semester I Semester II 

M602 Group Process 3 M601 Theology and Psychology 3 

M600 Developmental Theory M603 Socio-Cultural Environment 3 

of Personality 3 M607 Practicum with Children 

M604 Counseling Seminar 2 (Arsenal Child Study Center) 2 

— M605 Counseling Seminar 2 

8 — 

10 

M600. Developmental Theory of Personality. The age span is traced 
from pre-natal influences and birth through the aging process, showing 
normal growth patterns, the abnormalities of neurotic and psychotic de- 
velopment, and the relation of the person to the social milieu. 

M601. Theology and Psychology. The material of the entire program 
is pulled together in dialogue between theology and the human sciences, 
especially psychology and psychiatry. Such themes as God, man, sin, 
redemption are dealt with. Pastoral care, informed theologically and psy- 
chologically, becomes the vantage-point for taking a hard look at church 
programming: its relevance, its resources, etc. A primary concern is to 
ask what the church can do in its supportive and preventive roles as 
well as in its redemptive and recreative roles. 

M602. Group Process. An examination of factors influencing com- 
munication in small groups. Through reading and discussion variables 
will be identified. Through group interaction the class will become a type 
of laboratory to experience some of the concepts of group process. 

M603. The Socio-cultural Environment. This course deals with the 
ecological and cultural factors which make functional and dysfunctional 
contributions to personality and community development. It will empha- 
size the role of institutions (including the family), and power structures 
in their direct and indirect effect upon the individual. 

M604. Counseling Seminar. Each student is required to work with 
four counselees, under supervision, and to participate in the presentation 
of case material. 

M605. Counseling Seminar. Continuation of M604. 

M607. Practicum with Children. This practicum is conducted at the 
Arsenal Child Study Center. Interpretive seminars are held regularly. 

2. Language 

The A.P.S. faculty may designate which of the languages is to be 
required, or may require a reading knowledge of an additional lan- 
guage if the study program or thesis subject makes it necessary. 

3. Clinical Training 

A six weeks' course in an approved clinical training program will 
be required before graduation. It is recommended that it be taken 
previous to admission. 

4. Thesis 

A thesis or research project on a subject approved by the program 
faculty is to be prepared and submitted. The candidate must also 
sustain an oral examination on his thesis or research project. 

84 



A Joint Program Leading to BD - MSW Degrees 

Theology and social work share many attributes in common. These 
include certain concerns and objectives, social values, and a mission to 
improve living. Historically, much that we call social work today had its 
beginnings in religion. Around the turn of the century the first settlement 
houses, the first "off the street" programs of foster child-care, etc. were 
milestones in the beginning of applied social diagnosis. In the methods 
for helping people overwhelmed by circumstance and inner need, they 
marked a momentous transition — from indiscriminate "poor relief" to 
programs of prevention and cure which attempt to go to the heart of a 
problem. At the center of these programs were to stand, eventually, the 
particular community need to be met, the specific group relationship to 
be fostered, and the individual troubled human being to be understood 
in all his uniqueness. These are the three concerns of social work today. 

In little more than half a century, social work has become a profes- 
sion whose helpful intent is reinforced by highly developed skills. Its ex- 
perience was forged in part from the crisis of two World Wars and a 
protracted depression. Its knowledge and methodology have expanded 
through its own research and through the findings of the social sciences, 
psychiatry, medicine, law — in short, through every discipline whose con- 
tributions help prevent breakdowns in social functioning. 

Today social casework, group work, and community work are prac- 
ticed in dozens of settings where human needs come into focus; in 
hospitals, psychiatric clinics, family welfare agencies, schools, correc- 
tional institutions, youth development centers, housing projects, and 
community planning councils. (*) 

Currently, many clergymen are involving themselves and their churches 
in the improvement of the human condition along lines paralleling social 
work efforts. Interest in pastoral counseling and family educaton is high. 
Ministers of all denominations are involved actively in neighborhood 
and community work and are making notable contributions in civil 
rights and anti-poverty programs. Young clergymen and theological 
students want to be equipped to serve in the area of social work in addi- 
tion to the more traditional church duties. 

In the past, a student with such a career interest had to enroll in a 
theological seminary and upon graduation then register in a school of 
social work; or some students acquired social work degrees first and 
then succeeded to church work; others have been thwarted by the sepa- 
rateness of education for these two related fields, and did the best they 
could. To acquire both a BD and an MSW has usually taken five years. 

To encourage and to equip young people to engage in social work 
both in and out of the church, and to provide the opportunity for social 

(*) Part of this write-up is taken from the Bulletin of the Graduate School of 
Social Work. 

86 



work students who feel a call to practice within a church setting, the 
Pittsburgh Theological Seminary and the University of Pittsburgh Grad- 
uate School of Social Work have developed a program offering a joint 
degree, that is, a BD-MSW. 

This joint effort enables students to receive both the BD and the 
MSW in four years of post BA study instead of the usual five. Neverthe- 
less, the joint program will provide students with a full course of study 
in both theology and social work. This result is effected by equating 
certain courses now taught in both schools as equivalent, by allowing 
courses in one school to be taken as electives in the other, and where 
appropriate by developing specialized field placements. Field work op- 
portunities will be arranged to meet best the interest of the student. The 
program allows students to concentrate on theology in the first two 
years and on social work in the third and fourth years. 

A student at the Seminary wishing to pursue the four year integrated 
program should request it by the end of his third term at the Seminary. 
Students in the School of Social Work must request the joint program 
by their second term in that school. The admission requirements to each 
institution are the same as for other students. The student entering the 
joint program must be admitted by both institutions. 

Should a student elect to terminate at the end of two or three years 
and seek only one degree that student will be required to complete all 
of the work ordinarily required for that degree in the school which 
grants it. 

In order to give breadth without sacrifice of depth, theological stu- 
dents in the joint program will have the opportunity to study two social 
work methods and in some instances to have field experiences in all 
three direct service approaches, i.e., social casework, social group work, 
and community work in the more than 100 community agencies that 
cooperate with the Graduate School of Social Work. 

Student tuition is the same as for other students enrolled in each 
school. Financial assistance for students who are enrolled full-time at 
the Seminary is the responsibility of the Seminary. 

The Pittsburgh Theological Seminary and the University of Pittsburgh 
Graduate School of Social Work are joining forces in order to better 
educate students whose interests lie in carrying out social work functions 
in and through the church and those who seek to introduce more spirit- 
ual focus in social work in the agency programs in this nation and 
abroad. To this end, a joint program leading to a joint degree is being 
offered. The program will prepare students to serve people better. 

Inquiries should be directed to: or: 

Mrs. Erma T. Meyerson Director of Admissions 

Graduate School of Social Work Pittsburgh Theological Seminary 

University of Pittsburgh 6 1 6 North Highland Avenue 

Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15213 Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15206 

87 



A Joint Program Leading to the B.D. and M.P.A. 
or M.U.R.P. Degrees 



To prepare seminary students with insight into, and competence in, 
urban problems the Graduate School of Public and International Affairs 
of the University of Pittsburgh and Pittsburgh Seminary have estab- 
lished a joint program leading to both the Bachelor of Divinity degree 
and a Master's degree either in Public Administration or in Urban and 
Regional Planning. A student would take five terms of work in the Semi- 
nary. In his sixth semester he would embark upon 8 months of field 
work under the supervision of GSPIA faculty in some urban profes- 
sional area. During this term and through the summer he might take 
electives at either school, possibly as many as two courses at any one 
time. The fourth year he would spend all of his time in the Graduate 
School of Public and International Affairs in a three-term program. By 
way of some interchange of course credit he should be able to complete 
requirements for both his Bachelor of Divinity degree and his Master's 
degree in urban affairs in four years. Both degrees, when earned, would 
be conferred at the end of the total program. 

Students would elect this joint Master Degree program during their 
second year at the Seminary. It is expected that this joint program would 
help to train persons for the parish ministry with particular urban 
awareness and skills as well as to prepare students with specialization in 
urban problems. This program will also help those students who may 
want a specialized ministry instead of the more traditional parish min- 
istry. 

In addition to the degree program seminary students may elect cer- 
tain courses in the Graduate School of Public and International Affairs, 
and more especially in the Department of Urban Affairs, to increase 
their own sensitivity into the nature of urban problems and to obtain 
some understanding of their role and the role of the church in working 
with the problems of the city. When such courses are elected, the credit 
will be accepted by the Seminary as elective credit. Normally, students 
will need to have a B average in order to elect such courses. 

The Department of Urban Affairs, Graduate School of Public and 
International Affairs, offers programs leading to Master's degrees in 
the following fields : 

Urban and Regional Planning (M.U.R.P. degree) 

Community Policies Emphasis; 

Systems Analysis and Urban Behavior; 

Physical-Environmental Emphasis. 
Urban Development and Renewal (M.P.A. degree) 
Urban Community Development (M.P.A. degree) 
Urban Executive Administration (M.P.A. degree) 
Metropolitan Studies (M.P.A. degree) 



These programs are all professional in character. The planning pro- 
gram, with three emphases to choose from, is recognized by the Amer- 
ican Institute of Planners. The four administration sequences emphasize 
implementation of plans and development of effective programs for 
urban change. Students in the joint program may choose to specialize 
in any one of these fields. (For further details, consult the G.S.P.I.A. 
Bulletin.) 



Inquiries should be directed to 



or. 



Dr. Clifford Ham 
Graduate School of Public 

and International Affairs 
University of Pittsburgh 
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15213 



Director of Admissions 
Pittsburgh Theological Seminary 
616 N. Highland Avenue 
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15206 




89 



A Cooperative Program 
with the School of Education 



Degree of Master of Education (M.Ed.) 

The M.Ed, course of study in religious education is designed for those 
students with an accredited Bachelor's degree and an undergraduate 
major in the fields of religion, philosophy, religious education, or their 
equivalent, to provide further depth, understanding and technical skills 
for work in local churches or religious agencies. 

This degree is offered by the School of Education of the University of 
Pittsburgh in cooperation with Pittsburgh Theological Seminary. It will 
be conferred by the University upon the completion of a course of study 
which will include approximately 36 hours of course work divided be- 
tween the University and the Seminary, normally 18 hours at each 
institution, but not less than 12 hours at the Seminary. Students will be 
expected to meet the basic course requirements of the School of Educa- 
tion at the University of Pittsburgh. Course of study will be tailored to 
meet the student's individual vocational needs in the light of his previous 
academic experience. 

Ordinarily the student's University courses will include studies in the 
general history and philosophy of education, educational research and 
elective courses in religious education. In addition, students may take 
some course work in such areas as: urban education, comparative or 
international education, elementary or secondary education. At the 
Seminary the student may choose course work in the area of biblical 
studies, theology, church history, and christian education. 

Housing may be arranged at either institution. 

Applicants for this degree may write to: 

Dr. David E. Engel 

Department of Foundations of Education 

University of Pittsburgh 

Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15213 

or 

Director of Admissions 
Pittsburgh Theological Seminary 
6 1 6 North Highland Avenue 
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15206 

90 



A Joint Program Leading to the 
BD-MLS Degrees 

The Graduate School of Library and Information Sciences of the Uni- 
versity of Pittsburgh and Pittsburgh Seminary have initiated a joint 
program to train librarians in theological librarianship. The program, 
spread over three and one-half to four academic years, will culminate in 
two degrees: B.D. and M.L.S. 

The Seminary will accept 14 hours in elective credit from the 
M.L.S. degree toward the B.D. degree and the following courses will 
constitute those hours: 

LS 100 — Introduction to Librarianship 2 hours 

LS 244 — Resources in the Social Sciences 3 hours 

LS 245 — Resources in the Sciences 3 hours 
LS 267 — Languages for the Library and 

Information Sciences 3 hours 

Plus one course from the following three to be offered by the Seminary: 

911 — Resources in the Theological Library 3 hours 

266 — Theological Bibliography 3 hours 

471 — Critique of Sources 3 hours 

The Graduate School of Library and Information Sciences will accept 
toward its M.L.S. the two remaining courses to be taught at the Semi- 
nary and listed above. The total M.L.S. hours will be 29 at the Uni- 
versity and 9 at the Seminary. 

This will be a joint program in which a student opting for the pro- 
gram must finish the joint course of study before he is awarded either 
degree. In case he does not finish the program, he will be required to 
fulfill all of the B.D. program as outlined by the Seminary or all of the 
M.L.S. program as outlined by the University. 

Inquiries should be directed to : 

Dean Harold Lancour 

Graduate School of Library and Information Sciences 

University of Pittsburgh 

Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15213 

or 

Professor Dikran Y. Hadidian, Librarian 
616 North Highland Avenue 
Pittsburgh Theological Seminary 
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15206 

91 



The Cooperative Graduate Program 

in the Study of Religion 

The University of Pittsburgh 

and Pittsburgh Theological Seminary 



The University of Pittsburgh and the Pittsburgh Theological Seminary 
have a cooperative graduate program in the study of religion. Inter- 
disciplinary in character, the program draws upon the resources of both 
institutions and leads to the Ph.D. degree, awarded by the University 
of Pittsburgh. 

The aim of the program is to foster interdisciplinary and creative 
study in the biblical, historical, theological, and ethical fields broadly 
conceived. To this end, the student is encouraged to move beyond the 
necessary preliminary steps as quickly as possible to independent re- 
search in his own special area and to the writing of a dissertation which 
is deemed, both by the joint faculty and by an external examiner, to be 
a contribution to human knowledge. A second and no less important 
aim is to engage the student, if possible, in actual teaching and research 
assistance, under the direction of the faculty. The number of candidates 
will be deliberately limited to afford close supervision by the directing 
professors. 

Program 

A. Residence and courses 

Full residence for a minimum of four terms is required for the degree. 
In this time, a student will be expected to take at least eight one-term 
courses (or equivalent) and undertake one half term (or more) of dis- 
sertation research. The eight courses will be distributed as follows: 

1. Two interdisciplinary courses (taught by the seminary faculty 
and/or University of Pittsburgh faculty) required of all students. 

2. Two courses in a University field; 

3. Two courses in the candidate's field of specialization (other 
than those satisfying requirement 2); 

4. Two electives (either in the field of specialization or in cognate 
fields). 

92 



B. Examinations 

1. Not later than the second term of matriculation and preferably 
at the beginning, preliminary examinations in biblical studies, 
church history and history of doctrine, theology, ethics and his- 
tory of religions will be required of each candidate who pos- 
sesses a B.D. degree. (Two University fields may be substituted 
with the approval of the Administrative Committee. ) 

2. Language examinations will normally be required in French and 
German, and in such other languages as necessary for research 
in the student's chosen field of specialization. Petitions to sub- 
stitute other languages will be decided on the merits of each 
individual case. 

3. The comprehensive examination (taken at the completion of 
all prior examinations and course work) will be directed to- 
ward the field of the student's eventual specialization. Of the 
four fields covered, one will be in that specialization and one 
each in areas respectively appropriate to departments in the 
two cooperating institutions. 

C. The Dissertation 

Chief emphasis will be placed upon the dissertation itself and upon 
the preparation of the candidate for its writing. He will be under the 
direction of a working committee consisting of his thesis adviser and at 
least three other members representing related disciplines. The thesis 
will be defended orally by the candidate. 

Admission 

The program requires for admission either a Bachelor of Divinity or 
suitable master's degree or equivalent. Application forms for admission 
and financial aid may be obtained by writing to either institution, but 
preferably to the University of Pittsburgh : 

Dean Richard H. McCoy or Professor Ford Battles 

Faculty of Arts and Sciences Faculty Adviser, Ph.D. program 

University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh Theological Seminary 

Room 1028-H 616 North Highland Avenue, 

Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15213 Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15206 

In addition to the usual transcripts and letters of recommendation, 
applicants will be expected to provide scores on (preferably) the Grad- 
uate Record Examination or (alternatively) the Miller Analogies Test, 
as well as a seminar paper or other evidence of scholarly research 
experience. 

93 



Financial Aid 

Some financial assistance is available. Awards will be made on the 
basis of merit and need. Students desiring consideration for assistance 
may apply on a special form, furnished at their request, at the time of 
application for admission. 



94 



Continuing Education 

Under the direction of the Graduate Education Committee continuing 
education is fast assuming a major place in the life of the Seminary. 
Over 300 pastors in the Pittsburgh, Erie and Blair-Cambria Counties, 
Pennsylvania, and Canton, Ohio areas participate in Eight Weeks 
Schools. A distinctive feature, and the catalyst that precipitates a truly 
vital learning experience, is the active participation of pastors from over 
a dozen denominations who make up a majority of those enrolled. 



The Eight Weeks Schools 

At the Seminary. For eight Tuesdays in October and November, and 
again in February and March, the regular faculty offers courses in a 
wide range of areas but always with particular relevance to ministry, 
whatever its forms (pastoral, administrative, etc.). For example, the 
following courses were offered last fall: New Testament Greek Refresher 
Seminar, Ideas in the Black Revolution, Preaching from the Great 
Literary-Existential Plots and Parish Pastor- Administrator: Specialized 
Form of Ministry. Frequently, outside faculty from the University of 
Pittsburgh and from other universities teach special courses. Each class 
runs one hour and fifteen minutes and a registrant may take up to three 
courses. Announcement of course offerings is made in PANORAMA, 
the quarterly bulletin, as well as in brochure form. The fee of $5.00 per 
course includes the use of the library. Inquiries should be directed to 
William P. Barker, Director of Continuing Education. 

At Canton, Ohio. Each fall the Seminary conducts an eight week session 
for pastors of this area, with the same format and two courses as listed 
above. Other schools in other areas will be announced as they are de- 
veloped. A special announcement and registration form may be secured 
from the Registrar of the Canton School of Theology, Christ U. P. 
Church, Canton, Ohio, or from the Director of Continuing Education 
at the Seminary. 

At Loretto, Pa. Each fall the Seminary also conducts an eight week 
session for pastors in cooperation with St. Francis Roman Catholic 
Seminary. This school seeks to serve pastors and priests in the Blair- 
Cambria County area and, patterned after the Canton School, offers 
two courses. A special announcement and registration form may be 
secured from the Director of Continuing Education. 

At Erie, Pa. The Seminary has begun an eight week session in the fall 
for pastors in Northwestern Pennsylvania, patterned after the schools 
at Canton and Loretto, also offering two courses. A special announce- 
ment and registration form may be secured from the Director of Con- 
tinuing Education. 

96 



The Center for Pastoral Studies Training Program 

The Center for Pastoral Studies, a program of training, research and 
referral for clergymen of all faiths, which opened September, 1968, 
offers a training course which runs for thirty weeks. This program 
offers a limited number of clergymen the opportunity to acquire coun- 
seling experience in a supervised setting with individuals referred to the 
Center. Each week clergymen participating in the course attend a one 
hour teaching session, followed by an hour and a half seminar for case 
study with a psychiatric consultant and a pastoral consultant. Tuition 
for the training course is $60. 

Ministry in After-care 

In addition to the thirty week training course of the Center for Pastoral 
Studies, the Seminary cooperates with Woodville State Hospital to 
sponsor a special project for five pastors. This project offers training in 
the handling and transition of a person already committed to a mental 
hospital back to community life and the support needed as such a person 
returns to his home. This project, running for thirty weeks also, uses 
a format similar to the training course for the Center for Pastoral 
Studies. Tuition for the Woodville Project is $35.00. 

Winter, Spring and Summer Programs 

Two Lenten Preaching Seminars will be held on campus in January, 
1971, designed to give a limited number of pastors the opportunity to 
read and study with three from the faculty and staff of the Seminary. 
The cost for the week, including tuition, room, board and all fees, is $45. 

A Seminar for Pastors and Pastors' Wives will be held on campus from 
July 12 through July 18, 1970, which will provide lectures and seminars 
designed to provide a meaningful learning experience in the fields of 
Biblical materials, contemporary culture and personal relations. A fee 
of $45 per person will cover the cost of tuition, room and board. 

The School of Religion, supported by the Pitcairn-Crabbe Foundation, 
each summer invites 150 ministers from within the Synod of Pennsyl- 
vania. The faculty is drawn from all over the United States as well as 
from the Seminary. The dates for the 1970 school are May 24-29. 

Independent Study-in-Residence 

Many pastors find that study leaves can be spent most profitably by 
living on campus and pursuing an uninterrupted, personal study pro- 
gram. Those participating in Independent Study-in-Residence may se- 
lect an on-campus faculty adviser who suggests readings and meets with 
the pastor. Private rooms are usually available in the dormitories for 
$1.50 per night; meals are served in the cafeteria. Tuition for Inde- 
pendent Study-in-Residence is $5.00 per week. Further information may 
be secured from the Director of Continuing Education. 

97 



The Alumni Association 



Officers 

President, Gordon E. Boak, '49 

Vice-President, Paul R. Graham, '52 

Secretary, Richard A. Davis, '39 

Treasurer, Merl L. Galusha, '64 

Director of Alumni Relations, William P. Barker, '50 



The Alumni Association, now numbering more than 2,300 members, is 
composed of the former students, graduates and post-graduates of 
Pittsburgh Theological Seminary and its antecedent seminaries. The 
purposes of the Association are to deepen the friendships begun in 
seminary and to afford fellowship among all its graduates; to cooperate 
with the Seminary in enlisting young people for church vocations and 
recruiting prospective seminary candidates; to support actively the cause 
of theological education and of the Seminary in particular in its de- 
velopment to meet the demands of the future; and lastly, to have a 
sympathetic interest in the life and work of the Seminary's students and 
faculty. The Alumni Association sponsors several seminary convocations. 

The Annual Alumni Day will be held on May 12, 1970 and begin 
with an address by a major figure. At noon there will be the 5-year 
reunion luncheons and a general luncheon for all alumni and a brief 
business session for election of officers. The afternoon program consists 
of a faculty panel to discuss the issues raised in the morning, a memo- 
rial service at which a distinguished Alumnus preaches, and a reception 
by President and Mrs. Donald Miller. This is followed by the Alumni 
Dinner, after which the graduating seniors are inducted into the 
Association. 

Regional meetings of alumni are held frequently, and a dinner at the 
annual meeting of the General Assembly is another highlight of the 
year's activities. 

Supplements to the Alumni Directory are published occasionally and 
list changes of address and the newly received alumni. 

98 



Degrees Awarded, 1968-1969 

The Degree of Bachelor of Divinity 

Paul Edwin Anderson, Clinton, Massachusetts 

B.A., Trinity University, 1964 
Boyd Anderson Bell, Blairsville, Pennsylvania 

B.S., Pennsylvania State University, 1942 
James G. Bell, Jr., Grove City, Pennsylvania 

B.S., Grove City College, 1964 
Lance Locke M. Brown, Niagara Falls, New York 

B.A., Buena Vista College, 1966 
Robert O. Brown, Weirton, West Virginia 

B.A., The College of Wooster, 1965 
Dennis F. Butler, Paterson, New Jersey 

B.A., Bloomfield College, 1964 
James Edwin Davison, Glenshaw, Pennsylvania 

B.A., Westminster College, 1966 
James T. Dennison, Jr., Beaver Falls, Pennsylvania 

B.S., Geneva College, 1965 
William A . Doyle, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

B.A., Davis and Elkins College, 1965 
Robert Louis Eckard, Vero Beach, Florida 

B.A., Tusculum College, 1966 
Merritt Wayne Ednie, Vandergrift, Pennsylvania 

A.B., Indiana University of Pennsylvania, 1966 
David James Evans, III, El Paso, Texas 

B.A., Trinity University, 1966 

Madge B. Floyd, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 
B.A., Emory University, 1958 

David Harrison Foubert, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 
B.A., Beloit College, 1965 

William I. Gracey, Pittsburgh Pennsylvania 
B.A., Waynesburg College, 1965 

Arthur George Hampson, Seattle, Washington 
B.S., Seattle Pacific College, 1965 

Clarence E. Hoener, Jr., Pitcairn, Pennsylvania 
B.A., Lebanon Valley College, 1967 

William George Holliday, North Springfield, Pennsylvania 
B.A., Westminster College, 1966 

Robert J. Huck, Xenia, Ohio 
A.B., Wheaton College, 1965 

A lexander Phillips Hurt, Towson, Maryland 
B.A., Norwich University, 1962 

100 



Midhat Daoud Ibrahim, Yazdiet-Hamdan, Safita, Syria 

Th.B., Near East School of Theology, 1964 
David Scott King, Coraopolis, Pennsylvania 

B.A., Maryville College, 1965 
John F. Kirkham, North Benton, Ohio 

B.A., Malone College, 1964 
William Albert Kramp, Normal, Illinois 

B.A., Beloit College, 1964 
John D. Kutz, Grafton, North Dakota 

A.B., University of North Dakota, 1966 
James E. Long, Jr., Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

B.A., Westminster College, 1966 
Donald D. Ludwig, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

B.A., The College of Wooster, 1965 
Robert Vaughn Mathias, Rockville Centre, New York 

B.A., The College of Wooster, 1966 
Harold James Mills, Jr., Warren, Ohio 

B.A., Kent State University, 1966 
Kenneth Russell Newhams, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

B.A., The College of Wooster, 1965 
Dale Thomas O'Connell, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

B.A., Tarkio College, 1964 

Milton Harold Ohlsen, Jr., Weaverville, North Carolina 
B.A., Muskingum College, 1965 

John W. Orr, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 
B.A. Muskingum College, 1966 

Donald P. Owens, Jr., Arlington, Texas 
B.A., Trinity University, 1967 

A Ian Van de Mark Pareis, Union, New Jersey 
A.B., Albright College, 1965 

Charles N. Perrine, Jr., Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 
B.A., Grove City College, 1965 

Richard Irving Peters, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 
B.A., Kenyon College, 1965 

Harold A. Rainey, Clifton, New Jersey 
B.A., Tusculum College, 1966 

Robert E. Ralston, Navarre, Ohio 
A.B., Malone College, 1966 

Fred E. Roedger, Jr., Cleveland, Ohio 
B.A., The College of Wooster, 1966 

Thomas Jason Sawyer, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 
B.A., University of Pittsburgh, 1955 

William P. Saxman, North Braddock, Pennsylvania 
B.S., Slippery Rock State College, 1961 

101 



Kenneth Raymond Stahl, Latrobe, Pennsylvania 

B.A., Westminster College, 1966 
R. Carleton Stock, Tonawanda, New York 

B.A., Grove City College, 1965 

R. Eldon Trubee, Delaware, Ohio 
A.B., The College of Wooster, 1966 

Roselis Wachholz, Stuttgart, West Germany 
B.D., Denkandorf Seminary, 1954 

George Newins Ward, 111, Middletown, New York 

B.A., Williams College, 1966 
Colin Thomas Webster, Madison, Wisconsin 

B.B.A., University of Wisconsin, 1959 
Frederick Wayne Weiss, Hamburg, New York 

B.S., Cortland State Teachers College, 1958 

Gary Lee Wolfer, Sumner, Washington 
B.A., Whitworth College, 1965 

D. Darrell Woomer, Dayton, Ohio 
A.B., Juniata College, 1964 

The Degree of Master of Religious Education 

Sally Hillman Childs, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 
B.A., Sarah Lawrence College, 1949 

Ellen Ann Thompson, Atlanta, Georgia 
B.A., Emory University, 1964 



The Degree of Master of Theology 

Rev. Oscar Leon Arnal, Industry, Pennsylvania 
A.B., Thiel College, 1963 
B.D., Lutheran Theological Seminary, 1966 

Rev. In Soon Choi, Seoul, Korea 

B.A., Seoul National University, 1958 
B.D., Pittsburgh Theological Seminary, 1966 

Rev. Daniel Tin-Wo Chow, Hong Kong, China 
B.D., Gordon Divinity School, 1964 

Rev. Joseph Warren Jacobs, Natrona, Pennsylvania 
A.B., Waynesburg College, 1965 
B.D., Pittsburgh Theological Seminary, 1968 

Rev. William Patrick Kearns, West Newton, Pennsylvania 
B.A., Bob Jones University, 1956 
M.A., Bob Jones University, 1957 
Ph.D., Bob Jones University, 1960 

102 



Rev. Robert L. Lowry, West Chester, Pennsylvania 
B.S., University of Pennsylvania, 1955 
M.B.A., Temple University, 1965 
B.D., Pittsburgh Theological Seminary, 1968 

Rev. David Wallace Philips, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia 
B.A., Muskingum College, 1959 
B.D., Pittsburgh Theological Seminary, 1963 

Rev. John Paul Pro, Jeannette, Pennsylvania 
B.Ed., Duquesne University, 1949 
B.D., Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary, 1957 

Rev. Bruce Warner Reeves, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 
B.A., The College of Wooster, 1955 
B.D., Union Theological Seminary, 1959 

Rev. John Robert Walchenbach, Apollo, Pennsylvania 
A.B., Hope College, 1957 
B.D., New Brunswick Theological Seminary, 1961 



Honors and Awards 

Summa Cum Laude 
James Edwin Davison 

Magna Cum Laude 
George Newins Ward, III 

Cum Laude 

Sally Hillman Childs 
Madge B. Floyd 
Arthur George Hampson 
Richard Irving Peters 
Fred E. Roedger, Jr. 
Ellen Ann Thompson 

The Thomas Jamison Scholarship 

and 

The Sylvester S. Marvin Memorial Fellowship 

James Edwin Davison 

The Jennie Rigg Barbour Memorial Prize 
George Newins Ward, III 

The Hugh Thomson Kerr Moderator Prize 
Lance Locke M. Brown 

103 



The Michael Wilson Keith Memorial Homiletical Prize 
John W. Orr 

The Robert A. Lee Church History Award 

James Edwin Davison 
George Newins Ward, III 

The Home Training Bible Class Award in Missions 
Gary Lee Wolfer 

The Henry A. Riddle Award for Graduate Study 
Fred E. Roedger, Jr. 

The William B. Watson Prize in Hebrew 
Dale Thomas O'Connell 

The John Watson Prize in New Testament Greek 
Fred E. Roedger, Jr. 

Middler Class Awards 

The A lice Myers Sigler Memorial Prize 
in History and Theology 

Eduardo O. Chaves 
Rose Moehrke 
Delmar G. Sewall 

The Walter P. and Anna L. McConkey 
Award in Ho mile tics 

Delmar G. Sewall 
Junior Class Awards 

The James Purdy Scholarships 

Gregory Allan Dana 
Mary Caroline Dana 
Edwin Elliott Evans 
Timothy Joseph Fairman 
David Mitchell Kilgore 
Rose Moehrke 

The Fred McFeely Rogers Prize in Biblical Studies 

Gregory Allan Dana 
Douglas John Tracy 

The Joseph Watson Greek Entrance Prize 
Robert J. Anderson, Jr. 

104 



The Student Body, 1969-1970 

Senior Class 

William LeRoy Beckes, Tarentum, Pennsylvania 

B.A., Grove City College, 1967 
Robert J. Campbell, II, Wheeling, West Virginia 

A.B., West Liberty State College, 1967 
Eduardo O. Chaves, Sao Paulo, Brazil 

B.D., Campinas Presbyterian Theological Seminary, 1966 

Jon William Clifton, Springfield, Ohio 

A.B., Harvard College, 1963 
Gary B. Collins, Mount Lebanon, Pennsylvania 

B.A., Westminster College, 1967 
Donald Davis Crowe, Eighty Four, Pennsylvania 

B.A., Asbury College, 1966 
M. Dayle Dickey, Espyville Station, Pennsylvania 

B.A., Taylor University, 1967 
John F. Dietz, Canonsburg, Pennsylvania 

B.A., Muskingum College, 1966 
Donald J. Dilley, II, Edmonds, Washington 

B.A., University of Washington, 1966 
Frederick C. Doscher, Merrick, New York 

B.A., Maryville College, 1967 
Robert L. Emrich, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

B.A., Gettysburg College, 1967 
Carl R. Engstrom, Duquesne, Pennsylvania 

B.A., Geneva College, 1967 
Joan M. Fenner, Cedar Falls, Iowa 

B.A., State College of Iowa, 1966 
John S. Ferguson, Sydney, Australia 

B.A., University of Pittsburgh, 1966 

Ray Howard Ford, New Brighton, Pennsylvania 
B.S., Geneva College, 1967 

Robert Douglas Forsythe, Dundalk, Maryland 
B.S., University of Maryland, 1958 

John C. Foster, Fraser, Michigan 
B.A., Alma College, 1967 

Warren L. Furnish, Indianapolis, Indiana 
B.A., Indiana University, 1967 

Gary A . Gard, Portland, Oregon 
B.S., University of Missouri, 1965 

Rosalie R. Glover, Hialeah, Florida 
B.S., Florida State University, 1967 

105 



Richard G. Goss, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

B.A., Muskingum College, 1967 
John A. Graham, Youngstown, Ohio 

B.A., Maryville College, 1967 
Frank N. Gready, South Lyon, Michigan 

B.A., Maryville College, 1967 
David Quincy Hall, Muskegon, Michigan 

B.A., University of Michigan, 1966 
Arlest B. Hall, Jr., Pasadena, California 

B.A., San Diego State College, 1956 
William Edward Hoffman, Newark, New Jersey 

B.A., Bloomfield College, 1966 
Howard Paul Hoover, Pikeville, Kentucky 

B.A., Pikeville College, 1967 
Elinor Hubert, Cincinnati, Ohio 

B.A., Muskingum College, 1966 
Dale A. Hunter, Coraopolis, Pennsylvania 

B.A., Grove City College, 1967 
Curtis D. Illingworth, San Mateo, California 

A.B., Grove City College, 1967 

Milton Bruce Irwin, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 
B.A., Westminster College, 1967 

Dennis W. Jones, Marietta, Ohio 
B.A., Ohio State University, 1967 

Paul Kabo, Jr., Hickory, Pennsylvania 
B.A., Waynesburg College, 1966 

A . Boyd Keys, New Kensington, Pennsylvania 
B.S., Waynesburg College, 1939 

Keith R. Kivlin, Columbus, Ohio 

B.S., Ohio State University, 1967 
Gerard R. Kuyk, Fenton, Michigan 

B.A., Alma College, 1966 

David M. Liddle, Jr., Des Moines, Iowa 

B.A., Northwestern University, 1965 
Neal Evan Lloyd, Cambria, Wisconsin 

B.A., Macalester College, 1966 
Richard A . Markle, Franklin, Indiana 

A.B., Franklin College, 1966 
John E. McKune, Springfield, Ohio 

B.A., Kenyon College, 1952 

W. Thomas Mecouch, Upper Darby, Pennsylvania 
B.A., Dickinson College, 1966 

James R. Morrisey, Hagerstown, Maryland 
A.B., Dickinson College, 1967 

106 



Homer Eugene Nye, Galion, Ohio 

A.B., Ohio University, 1966 
Helga M. Rosemann, Goettingen, Germany 

B.D., Burckhardt-Hans Seminary, 1954 
William J. Rumsey, Dover, New Jersey 

B.A., Maryville College, 1967 
Robert Edward Salmon, Cheswick, Pennsylvania 

B.A., Westminster College, 1966 
Delmar G. Sewall, New Wilmington, Pennsylvania 

B.A., Westminster College, 1966 
Douglas L. Shaffer, Harrisburg, Pennsylvania 

A.B., Lafayette College, 1967 
John B. Simpson, Oakdale, Pennsylvania 

B.A., Davis and Elkins College, 1967 
John R. Stevenson, Wichita, Kansas 

B.A., University of Tulsa, 1967 
Dean E. Tapley, Hartford, Connecticut 

B.A., Trinity University, 1967 
William LeRoy Thompson, East McKeesport, Pennsylvania 

A.B., Waynesburg College, 1965 
Marilyn K. VanGelder, George, Iowa 

B.A., Sterling College, 1967 
George William Walker, III, Buffalo, New York 

A.B., Westminster College, 1966 
Angus M. Watkins, Pemberville, Ohio 

B.A., Bowling Green State University, 1967 

B.D. Students Serving Internships 

/. Gregory Clark, Sioux City, Iowa 

B.A., Morningside College, 1967 
W. Glenn Doak, Eighty Four, Pennsylvania 

B.S., Sterling College, 1968 
John Robert Gray, Jr., New Kensington, Pennsylvania 

B.A. Juniata College, 1967 
Joel Edward Grottenthaler, Harrisburg, Pennsylvania 

B. A., Westminster College, 1968 
Paul A . Heller, Swissvale, Pennsylvania 

B.A., Gettysburg College, 1968 
Alan D. Kern, Williamsport, Pennsylvania 

B.A., Lycoming College, 1967 
Robert Allen Morgan, Johnstown, Pennsylvania 

B.A., University of Pittsburgh, 1966 
Walter L. Siegel, Pottsville, Pennsylvania 

B.A., Susquehanna University, 1966 

107 



James L. Smith, Butler, Pennsylvania 
B.A., Westminster College, 1967 

Edwin G. Steinmetz, Jr., East Stroudsburg, Pennsylvania 

B.A., Bloomfield College, 1967 
Pamela-Rae Y eager, Bowling Green, Ohio 

B.S., Bowling Green State University, 1967 

Middler Class 

Philip Bell, Jr., Detroit, Michigan 

B.A., Detroit Institute of Technology, 1965 
David Alan Black, Cedar Rapids, Iowa 

B.A., Coe College, 1968 
James Edward Boos, Huron, Ohio 

B.S., Ohio State University, 1968 
Peter C. Bower, Tenafly, New Jersey 

B.A., Alfred University, 1968 
David MacDonald Brookman, Wellsville, Ohio 

B.A., The College of Wooster, 1967 
Curt L. Brown, Youngstown, Ohio 

B.S., Youngstown State College, 1967 
Edward James Brown, Ferndale, Michigan 

B.A., Michigan State University, 1968 
George Joseph Cottay, Jr., Traverse City, Michigan 

B.A., Alma College, 1968 
Gregory Allan Dana, Sherman, Texas 

B.A., Austin College, 1968 
Jack H. Dawson, Birmingham, Michigan 

B.S., Northwestern University, 1949 
Robert Clarence DeFazio, Niagara Falls, New York 

B.A., State University College at Potsdam, 1968 
/. Samuel Diddle, Sharon, Pennsylvania 

B.A., University of Pittsburgh, 1968 
Carol Ann Dilley, Edmonds, Washington 

B.A., University of Washington, 1967 
Judson W. Dolphin, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 

A.B., Grove City College, 1967 
Brent J. Dugan, Waterford, Pennsylvania 

B.A., Edinboro College, 1968 
David W. Dyson, Mount Lebanon, Pennsylvania 

B. A., Bethany College, 1968 
Edwin Elliott Evans, Coatesville, Pennsylvania 

A.B., Calvin College, 1968 
Donald Robert Ewing, Abington, Pennsylvania 

B.S., University of Pennsylvania, 1968 

108 



Timothy Joseph Fairman, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

B.A., Westminster College, 1968 
David James Felts, Ashland, Ohio 

A.B., Ashland College, 1968 
Vincent Shaw Flack, Pelham, New York 

B.S., Columbia University, 1963 
William Harrison Hammann, Carlisle, Pennsylvania 

B.S., Shippensburg State College, 1968 
Wilbur Pierce Hawthorne, III, Pittsburgh Pennsylvania 

B.A., Duquesne University, 1968 
Harry Rollo Heidrich, New Kensington, Pennsylvania 

B.A., Westminster College, 1968 
Robert Grey Helfrich, Catonsville, Maryland 

B.S., Loyola College, 1968 
Richard James Henderson, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

B.A., Muskingum College, 1968 
Douglas Eric Holben, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

B.A., Baldwin-Wallace College, 1968 

Lawrence Kenneth Hooten, Charleroi, Pennsylvania 
B.M., Grove City College, 1968 

Janet L. Hoyt, Johnstown, Pennsylvania 
B.S., University of Pittsburgh, 1967 

Thomas Van Johnson, Garard's Fort, Pennsylvania 
B.A., Alderson-Broaddus College, 1968 

David Mitchell Kilgore, Norco, Louisiana 

B.A., Southwestern at Memphis College, 1968 

Bill Norman Lawrence, Brockport, New York 
B.A., Missouri Valley College, 1968 

Wilmer Edward Lucas, III, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 
B.S., California State College, 1966 

George Louis Mason, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 
A.B., Grove City College, 1968 

Rose Moehrke, Kirchgasse, Germany 

Seminar fur kirchlichen Dienst Hannover, 1951 

Edward Bernard Newberry, Charlotte, North Carolina 
B.A., Knoxville College, 1968 

Howard Alfred Newman, Abington, Pennsylvania 
B.A., Maryville College, 1968 

W. Jack Noble, Newport Beach, California 
B.A., Southern California College, 1968 

Lutrelle Delano Rainey, Newport News, Virginia 
A.B., Virginia Union University, 1968 

John D. Rickloff, Hamburg, New York 
B.A., Grove City College, 1968 

109 



David Edgar Rider, West Simbury, Pennsylvania 
B.S., Westminster College, 1968 

Gerald Abram Rife, II, Erie, Pennsylvania 
B.A., University of Pittsburgh, 1968 

Jay Alan Schrader, New Stanton, Pennsylvania 
A.B., Waynesburg College, 1968 

Richard A . Sells, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 
B.S., University of Pittsburgh, 1968 

Terry Lynn Singer, Tyrone, Pennsylvania 
B.A., Pennsylvania State University, 1968 

Terrence Richard Snyder, Wesleyville, Pennsylvania 
B.A., Taylor University, 1968 

George Albert Staff a, Dundalk, Maryland 
B.A., Towson State College, 1968 

Moses Locatie Stith, Petersburg, Virginia 
B.A., Virginia Union University, 1968 

Dwight Ward Tawney, Jr., Rockledge, Florida 
B.A., Florida Presbyterian College, 1968 

Frank David Throop, Omaha, Nebraska 
B.A., Hastings College, 1968 

Douglas John Tracy, Bismarck, North Dakota 
B.A., Carroll College, 1968 

Harvey Gilbert Walker, Duquesne, Pennsylvania 
B.S., Clarion State College, 1966 

Junior Class 

Michael Scott Allen, Cincinnati, Ohio 
B.A., The College of Wooster, 1969 

Robert James Anderson, Jr., Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 
B.A., Houghton College, 1969 

James Scott Annelin, Midland, Michigan 
B.A., University of Michigan, 1969 

Roger Arlo Applebee, Beallsville, Pennsylvania 

A.B., California State College, 1969 
Anthony Rudolph Barta, Orwell, Ohio 

B.A., Muskingum College, 1965 

John William Becker, Clyde, Ohio 
B.A., Alma College, 1969 

Robert Earle Bell, Rockville, Maryland 

B.A., Bloomfield College, 1969 
Charles W. Best, Spring Run, Pennsylvania 

B.A., Davis and Elkins College, 1969 

110 



William Lincoln Blye, Knoxville, Tennessee 

B.A., Knoxville College, 1967 
Nancy Jean Boylan, Grove City, Pennsylvania 

A.B., Grove City College, 1969 
David Richard Brewer, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

B.A., Bethany College, 1969 
Lawrence Lee Brown, Santa Ana, California 

B.A., California State College at Fullerton, 1969 
Michael Allen Brubaker, Catonsville, Maryland 

A.B., Westminster College, 1969 
Kenneth Brook Calebaugh, Parkersburg, West Virginia 

A.B., Marshall University, 1969 
David Anthony Clump, Coopersburg, Pennsylvania 

B.A., Salem College, 1969 
James Gordon Cramer, Prairie Village, Kansas 

B.A., Bethany College (Lindsborg, Kansas), 1969 
Glenwood Thomas Davis, Jr., Perryopolis, Pennsylvania 

B.A., Waynesburg College, 1967 

David George Dawson, Enon Valley, Pennsylvania 
B.A., Westminster College, 1969 

Lee Francis Dinsel, Cresson, Pennsylvania 
B.A., West Virginia Wesleyan College, 1969 

James Edward Dirks, Indianapolis, Indiana 
B. A., DePauw University, 1969 

David Alan Dorst, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 
B.A., University of Pittsburgh, 1969 

Leslie Hansen Drayer, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 
B.A., University of Pittsburgh, 1968 

James H. Foster, Valdosta, Georgia 
B.A., Morris Brown College, 1960 

Robert LeRoy Garrard, Gibsonia, Pennsylvania 
B.S., California State College, 1969 

James Gesner Goble, Anchorage, Kentucky 
A.B., Hanover College, 1969 

Marc Howard Hall, Guthrie, Oklahoma 
B.A., Trinity University, 1969 

Frank Edwin Heller, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 
B.S., Juniata College, 1969 

Robert Philip Henry, Big Run, Pennsylvania 
B.A., Drew University, 1969 

Edwin Alfred Hilbert, Jr., Wayne, Pennsylvania 
B.A., Juniata College, 1969 

Carl Thomas Holt, Maumee, Ohio 
B.A., University of Toledo, 1969 

111 



Duane Lee Houser, Canton, Ohio 

B.A., The College of Wooster, 1969 
Richard Lee Houtz, Oil City, Pennsylvania 

B.S., Allegheny College, 1969 
Alan Paul Hutchison, Minerva, Ohio 

B.S., Ohio State University, 1969 
David Edmund Jackson, Glenshaw, Pennsylvania 

B.A., Hanover College, 1969 
Kenneth Fredric Jasbeck, Cleveland, Ohio 

A.B., John Carroll University, 1969 
Robert Murray Johnston, III, Seattle, Washington 

B.S., Arizona State University, 1965 
George Armstead Langhorne, Jr., Richmond, Virginia 

A.B., Virginia Union University, 1969 
Andrew Hudson Mann, Jr., Levittown, Pennsylvania 

A.B., Bucknell University, 1969 
Donald Keith McClelland, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

B.A., Midland College, 1969 
Daniel Robert McConachie, Haysville, Kansas 

B.A., Kansas State University, 1967 

M.A., Wichita State University, 1968 
David Warren McCreery, Sterling, Kansas 

B.A., Sterling College, 1969 
Joseph Andrew McMahon, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

B.A., University of Pittsburgh, 1969 
William Douglas Mitchell, Birmingham, Alabama 

B. A., Auburn University, 1969 
Charles James Nash, Middlefield, Ohio 

A.B., Waynesburg College, 1966 
John Wendell Neely, Washington, Pennsylvania 

B.M., Duquesne University, 1967 
Robert Pickering Orr, Bellevue, Pennsylvania 

B.A., Southwestern at Memphis College, 1969 
Gordon Edwin Parke, Spokane, Washington 

B.A., University of Washington, 1969 
K. Eric Perrin, Butler, Pennsylvania 

B.A., Westminster College, 1969 
David Gordon Persons, Grand Rapids, Michigan 

B.A., Bob Jones University, 1965 

Charles R. Pleasant, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 
B.A., Youngstown State College, 1951 

Franklin Joseph Provance, Claysville, Pennsylvania 
B. A., Bethany College (West Virginia), 1969 

Theron Dale Provance, Mount Lebanon, Pennsylvania 
B.A., Ohio University, 1969 

112 



Howard Gillijord Russell, Jr., Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

B.A., Otterbein College, 1965 
C. Ross Safford, Vassar, Michigan 

A.B., University of Michigan, 1969 
Raymond W. Saunders, Homestead, Pennsylvania 

B.A., Pennsylvania State University, 1966 

Paul Gilbert Schneider, Linglestown, Pennsylvania 

A.B., Davidson College, 1969 
R. Bruce Shannon, Jr., Kittanning, Pennsylvania 

B.A., Florida Presbyterian College, 1969 

William Lewis Steele, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 
B.A., West Virginia Wesleyan College, 1969 

Charles Guy Tayler, Crown Point, Indiana 
B.A., Manchester College, 1968 

Richard Harmon Thames, Huntsville, Alabama 
B.A., Southwestern at Memphis College, 1969 

Willard Samuel Thomas, Jr., Kenmore, New York 
B.A., University of Pittsburgh, 1968 

Mark R. Wilds, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 
B.S., Pennsylvania State University, 1969 

Wallace Franklin Wilson, Collingswood, New Jersey 
B.A., Maryville College, 1969 

JohnR. Winegar, Hamburg, New York 
B.A., Purdue University, 1963 

Kenneth Harold Yount, Ford City, Pennsylvania 
B.A., Alderson-Broaddus College, 1969 

Candidates for the Degree 
of Master of Theology 

Biblical Studies 

Rev. Waldir Berndt, Blumenau, Brazil 

B.D., Campinas Presbyterian Theological Seminary, 1964 

Rev. Gary G. Close, Enon Valley, Pennsylvania 
B.S., Norwich University, 1964 
B.D., Pittsburgh Theological Seminary, 1968 

Rev. George E. Espy, Beaver, Pennsylvania 
B.A., University of Pittsburgh, 1963 
B.D., Pittsburgh Theological Seminary, 1966 

Rev. David James Evans, 111, Allison Park, Pennsylvania 
B.A., Trinity University, 1966 
B.D., Pittsburgh Theological Seminary, 1969 

113 



Rev. Charles C. Hendricks, Fort Worth, Texas 

B.A., Austin College, 1961 

B.D., Austin Seminary, 1965 
Rev. Joseph A. Hill, Beaver Falls, Pennsylvania 

A.B., Geneva College, 1947 

B.D., Reformed Presbyterian Theological Seminary, 1950 
Rev. Clarence E. Hoener, Jr., Pitcairn, Pennsylvania 

B.A., Lebanon Valley College, 1967 

B.D., Pittsburgh Theological Seminary, 1969 
Rev. Gary Evans Huffman, Loves Park, Illinois 

A.B., Monmouth College, 1963 

B.D., Pittsburgh Theological Seminary, 1966 
Rev. Midhat Daoud Ibrahim, Yazdiet-Hamdan, Safita, Syria 

Th.B., Near East School of Theology, 1964 

B.D., Pittsburgh Theological Seminary, 1969 
Rev. Benjamin Peter Ksiazek, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

B.A., Butler University, 1965 

B.D., Pittsburgh Theological Seminary, 1968 
Rev. James Avery Smith, McKeesport, Pennsylvania 

B.S., Drexel Institute of Technology, 1958 

B.D., Pittsburgh Theological Seminary, 1967 
Rev. Gale E. Tymeson, Maine, New York 

B.A., University of Rochester, 1950 

B.D., Union Theological Seminary, 1953 
Rev. D. Darrell Woomer, Dayton, Ohio 

A.B., Juniata College, 1964 

B.D., Pittsburgh Theological Seminary, 1969 

History and Theology 

Rev. Elias Abrahao, Campinas, Brazil 

B.D., Campinas Presbyterian Theological Seminary, 1965 
Rev. Kenneth P. Alpers, Minneapolis, Minnesota 

B.A., Capital University, 1949 

B.D., Capital Theological Seminary, 1952 
Rev. Robert Bellingham, Plymouth, Ohio 

B.A., Bethel College, 1963 

B.D., Fuller Theological Seminary, 1966 
Rev. James T. Dennison, Jr., Beaver Falls, Pennsylvania 

B.S., Geneva College, 1965 

B.D., Pittsburgh Theological Seminary, 1969 
Rev. Dong Soo Kim, Seoul, Korea 

B.A., Union Christian College, 1959 

B.D., Pittsburgh Theological Seminary, 1965 
Rev. Kerry Meier, Glenwillard, Pennsylvania 

A.B., Bloomfield College, 1957 

B.D., Pittsburgh Theological Seminary, 1960 

114 



Rev. Robert M. A.L. Miller, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

B.A., Muhlenberg College, 1960 

B.D., Lutheran Theological Seminary, 1963 
Rev. Bernard Ernest Quick, Tarentum, Pennsylvania 

B.M., University of Colorado, 1948 

B.D., Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary, 1952 
Rev. Robert E. Ralston, Navarre, Ohio 

A.B., Malone College, 1966 

B.D., Pittsburgh Theological Seminary, 1969 

Rev. Theodore Sideris, Ambridge, Pennsylvania 

B.Th., University of Athens Theological School (Greece), 1966 
Rev. Clifford Eugene Stollings, Meadville, Pennsylvania 

A.B., Berea College, 1945 

B.D., Union Theological Seminary, 1949 

Program for Advanced Pastoral Studies 

Rev. William Beech Ailes, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

B.A., Ohio Wesleyan University, 1954 

B.D., Western Theological Seminary, 1957 
Rev. Robert Herbert Barnes, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

B.A., Park College, 1964 

B.D., Pittsburgh Theological Seminary, 1968 
Rev. David E. Breckenridge , Springfield, Massachusetts 

B.S., Sterling College, 1959 

B.D., Pittsburgh Theological Seminary, 1963 
Rev. Robert O. Brown, Weirton, West Virginia 

B.A., The College of Wooster, 1965 

B.D., Pittsburgh Theological Seminary, 1969 
Rev. Robert Wayne Finertie, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

B.S., Maryville College, 1957 

B.D., Princeton Theological Seminary, 1960 
Rev. Madge B. Floyd, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

B.A., Emory University, 1958 

B.D., Pittsburgh Theological Seminary, 1969 
Rev. Ernest J. Frederick, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

B.S., University of Pittsburgh, 1955 

B.D., Biblical Seminary in New York, 1964 
Rev. David M. Geconcillo, Pasay City, Philippines 

Th.B., Union Theological Seminary, Manila, 1953 

A.B., Philippine Christian College, 1964 
Rev. Ronald Ivan Glassman, Smock, Pennsylvania 

B.A., City College of New York, 1952 

B.D., Western Theological Seminary, 1959 
Rev. Robert H. Gnagy, Springdale, Pennsylvania 

A.B., Youngstown College, 1949 

B.D., Western Theological Seminary, 1959 

115 



Rev. Robert W. Gracey, Cowansville, Pennsylvania 
B.A., Davis and Elkins College, 1963 
B.D., Pittsburgh Theological Seminary, 1966 

Rev. William John Green, New Florence, Pennsylvania 
B.S.C.E., Carnegie Institute of Technology, 1954 
B.D., Pittsburgh Theological Seminary, 1962 

Rev. Edward S. Hammett, Irwin, Pennsylvania 
A.B., Washington and Jefferson College, 1950 
B.D., Pittsburgh Theological Seminary, 1964 

Rev. James William Hartley, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 
B.A., The College of Wooster, 1964 
B.D., Pittsburgh Theological Seminary, 1967 

Rev. Eduardo Hernandez, Los Angeles, California 
B.A., Instituto Segunda Ensenanza, 1938 
B.Th., Western Theological Seminary, 1947 

Rev. Richard C. Horn, Columbus, Ohio 
B. A., American University, 1957 
B.D., Colgate Rochester Divinity School, 1960 

Rev. J. Theodore Hunniford, Irwin, Pennsylvania 
B.S., Temple University, 1957 
B.D., Pittsburgh Theological Seminary, 1960 

Rev. James Franklin Karcher, Imperial, Pennsylvania 
B.S., University of Pittsburgh, 1950 
B.D., Western Theological Seminary, 1953 

Rev. Raymond F. Kersting, Taos, New Mexico 
B.A., Hanover College, 1955 
B.D., San Francisco Theological Seminary, 1960 

Rev. Harry Donald Lash, Monessen, Pennsylvania 
B.S., Clarion State College, 1960 
B.D., Pittsburgh Theological Seminary, 1964 

Rev. George Hallauer Lower, Edinboro, Pennsylvania 
B.S., Bucknell University, 1953 
B.D., Pittsburgh Theological Seminary, 1960 
M.A., Hartford Theological Seminary, 1961 

Rev. Donald D. Ludwig, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 
B.A., The College of Wooster, 1965 
B.D., Pittsburgh Theological Seminary, 1969 

Rev. John Harvey MacLeod, Homestead, Pennsylvania 
A.B., The College of Wooster, 1945 
B.D., Princeton Theological Seminary, 1948 

Rev. David Matthews, Jr., Verona, Pennsylvania 
B.A., Thiel College, 1963 
B.D., Lutheran Theological Seminary, 1966 

Rev. Robert Edward Maynard, Brownsville, Pennsylvania 
B.A., Marshall University, 1960 
B.D., Methodist Theological School, 1963 

116 



Fr. Isidore Ambrose McCarthy, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

St. Joseph College, Rensselaer, Indiana 

St. Charles Seminary, Carthagena, Ohio 
Rev. Richard Barry McCune, Beaver Falls, Pennsylvania 

B.A., Westminster College, 1963 

B.D., Pittsburgh Theological Seminary, 1967 

Rev. R. Carl Menkens, Verona, Pennsylvania 
B.A., Tusculum College, 1958 
B.D., Pittsburgh Theological Seminary, 1961 

Rev. William Harold Morford, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 
A. B., Dennison University, 1949 
B.D., Eastern Baptist Theological Seminary, 1952 

Rev. Donald William Musser, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 
B.S., University of Pittsburgh, 1963 
B.D., Southern Baptist Theological Seminary, 1968 

Rev. Stuart C. Nutter, Independence, Pennsylvania 
B.A., Pasadena College, 1964 
B.D., Andover Newton Theological Seminary, 1968 

Rev. William Jessie Redmon, Fairmont, West Virginia 
B.S., University of Baltimore, 1960 
B.D., Bexley Hall Divinity School, 1963 

Rev. John A. Simpson, Waterford, Pennsylvania 
B.A., University of Akron, 1961 
B.D., Pittsburgh Theological Seminary, 1965 

Rev. William Farnum Sutherland, Irwin, Pennsylvania 
B.A., The CoUege of Wooster, 1954 
B.D., Bloomfield Seminary, 1958 

Rev. Robert Edward Thomas, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 
A.B., Thiel College, 1962 
B.D., Philadelphia Lutheran Seminary, 1965 

Rev. Judson Wiley, Bakerstown, Pennsylvania 
A.B., Washington and Jefferson College, 1950 
B.D., Western Theological Seminary, 1953 



Generalization 

Rev. Lance Locke M. Brown, Niagara Falls, New York 
B.A., Buena Vista College, 1966 
B.D., Pittsburgh Theological Seminary, 1969 

Rev. Jack M. Chisholm, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 
B.A., University of Pittsburgh, 1961 
B.D., Pittsburgh Theological Seminary, 1965 

Fr. Francis Louis Ginocchi, New Kensington, Pennsylvania 
St. Vincent College and Seminary, 1945 

117 



Rev. Thomas Fisher Matthews, Washington, Pennsylvania 

B.A., Monmouth College, 1961 

B.D., Union Theological Seminary, 1964 
Rev. Fred E. Roedger, Jr., Cleveland, Ohio 

B.A., The College of Wooster, 1966 

B.D., Pittsburgh Theological Seminary, 1969 
Rev. David C. Williams, Pitcairn, Pennsylvania 

B.A., Millikin University, 1963 

B.D., Pittsburgh Theological Seminary, 1967 

Candidates for The Degree Doctor of Philosophy 
(to be granted by the University of Pittsburgh) 

Fr. Edward P. Brennan, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

B.A., Borromeo College 

S.T.B., S.T.L., Gregorian University, Rome, Italy 
Fr. Donald Conroy, Greensburg, Pennsylvania 

B.A., St. Vincent College 

S.T.B., S.T.L., Gregorian University, Rome, Italy 
Mr. Joseph M. DiCarlo, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

B.A., St. Vincent College 

S.T.B., S.T.L., St. Mary's Seminary 
Rev. Charles Cameron Dickinson, HI, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

B.A., Dartmouth College, 1958 

B.D., Pittsburgh Theological Seminary, 1965 
Mr. Frank P. Diulus, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

B.A., Athenaeum College, 1966 

M.A., St. Vincent Seminary, 1969 
Rev. Walter E. Ellis, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

B.A., University of Alberta, 1956 

M.A., University of British Columbia, 1959 

B.D., McMaster University, 1962 
Rev. Winslow Hackley Galbraith, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

B.S., Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 1962 

B.D., Western Theological Seminary, 1965 
Sr. Mary Michael Glenn, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

B.E., Duquesne University, 1951 

M.A., University of Notre Dame, 1956 
Mr. Thomas Schaub, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

B.A., M.A., Aquinas Institute, River Forest, Illinois 

S.T.L., Immaculate Conception, Washington, D.C. 

S.S.L., Pontifical Biblical Commission, Rome 
Ecole Biblique et Archeologique, Jerusalem 
Rev. Wayne R. Spear, Gibsonia, Pennsylvania 

B.A., Geneva College, 1957 

Diploma, Reformed Presbyterian Theological Seminary, 1960 

118 



Rev. Robert Dale Taylor, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 
B.S., University of Pittsburgh, 1956 
B.D., Pittsburgh Theological Seminary, 1963 

Rev. Robert Van Wyk, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 
A.B., The College of Wooster, 1961 
B.D., Pittsburgh Theological Seminary, 1964 

Rev. John R. Walchenbach, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 
A.B., Hope College, 1957 

B.D., New Brunswick Theological Seminary, 1961 
Th.M., Pittsburgh Theological Seminary, 1969 

Mr. Archibald M. Woodruff, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 
A.B., George Washington University, 1963 
M.A., University of Pittsburgh, 1965 



Candidate for the Degree of 
Master of Religious Education 

Senior Class 

Elizabeth Yuile Anderson, Haddonfield, New Jersey 

B.A., Thiel College, 1968 
Gary R. Bender, Landisville, Pennsylvania 

A.B., Findlay College, 1968 
Mary Caroline Dana, Houston, Texas 

B.A., Austin University, 1968 
Linda L. Evans, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

B.M., Westminster College, 1966 
Lee Roy Hearn, Bethel Park, Pennsylvania 

B.M., Westminster Choir College, 1960 

M.M., Westminster Choir College, 1963 
Rosalyn Sammons Kummer, Mars, Pennsylvania 

B.S., Pennsylvania State University, 1956 
Jean Marian Oberlin, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

B.A., Kansas University, 1948 

Junior Class 

Mary Barbara Burnham, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

B.A., Hanover College, 1969 
Emily Ann Hum, Fairview, Oregon 

B.A., Whitworth College, 1969 
Linda Joyce Rider, Perrysville, Pennsylvania 

B.A., Westminster College, 1969 

119 



Mary E. Rindlaub, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 
B.S., University of Pittsburgh, 1966 

Anne Elsey Sponsler, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 
A.B., Wilson College, 1940 

Mary S. Williams, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 
B.A., Russell Sage College, 1937 



Candidates for The Degree of Master of Education 
(to be granted by the University of Pittsburgh) 

Rebecca Esther Byerly, Canfield, Ohio 

B.A., Westminster College, 1967 
Ruth Claudette Rambo, Bedford, Pennsylvania 

B.S., Nyack Missionary College, 1960 
Karen Evans Riecks, Cincinnati, Ohio 

B.A., Westminster College, 1967 

Special Students 

William F. W. Davis, Dobbs Ferry, New York 
Bennie Eugene Goodwin, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 
Joseph Robert Lickwar, McKeesport, Pennsylvania 
Mary Lou Martinac, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 
Jacob Seleky, Ambon, Indonesia 
Hein Sapulete, Maluccas, Indonesia 

Summary of Students 

Bachelor of Divinity 

Juniors 65 

Middlers 52 

Seniors 55 

Interns 11 183 

Master of Religious Education 

Juniors 6 

Seniors 7 13 

Master of Education 3 

Master of Theology Program 67 

Doctoral Program 14 

Special Students 6 90 

Total Enrollment 286 

120 



Board of Directors 



Officers 



Rev. Howard C. Scharfe, D.D., LL.D., President 

Rev. J. Hubert Henderson, D.D., Vice President 

Mr. George D. Lockhart, Secretary 

Mr. J. Rowe Hinsey, Assistant Secretary 

Mr. Robert L. Becker, Treasurer 

Mr. John T. Logan, B.B.A., C.P.A., Assistant Treasurer 

Mr. Henry C. Herchenroether, Jr., Counsel 

Members 

Term Expires May 1969-1970 

Mr. A. C. Amsler, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

Retired — Westinghouse Electric Corporation 
Mr. Frank H. Davis, LL.D., Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

Retired 
Rev. Robert H. French, D.D., LL.D., Des Moines, Iowa 

Synod Executive, Synod of Iowa 
Mr. Henry C. Herchenroether, Jr., Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

Attorney, Alter, Wright, and Barron 
Rev. Yoder P. Leith, Cleveland Heights, Ohio 

Pastor, Forest Hills Presbyterian Church 
Mr. W. Kenneth Menke, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

President, Pittsburgh Chemical Company, a division of 

United States Steel Corporation 

Rev. Don P. Montgomery, D.D., Youngstown, Ohio 
Retired 

Mr. William H. Rea, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 
President, Oliver Tyrone Corporation 

Rev. Robert H. Stephens, D.D., Summit, New Jersey 
Pastor, Central Presbyterian Church 

Mr. James W. Vicary, Erie, Pennsylvania 
President, Ervite Corporation 

Rev. Robert R. Vogelsang, D.D., Latrobe, Pennsylvania 
Pastor, Latrobe United Presbyterian Church 

Rev. Walter R. Young, D.D., Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

Pastor, Second United Presbyterian Church of Wilkinsburg 

Term Expires May 1970 

Mr. Robert L. Becker, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 
Retired — President, Wear-Ever Aluminum, Inc. 

122 



Mr. John G. Buchanan, Jr., Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

Attorney, Buchanan, Ingersoll, Rorewald, Kyle and Buerger 

Mr. Earle M. Craig, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

Retired — Chairman of the Board, Valvoline Oil Company 

Mr. Max A. Lauffer, Ph.D., Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 
Andrew Mellon Professor of Biophysics and Chairman, 
Department of Biophysics, University of Pittsburgh 

Mr. George D. Lockhart, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

Attorney, Kirkpatrick, Pomeroy, Lockhart and Johnson 

Rev. W. Paul Ludwig, Ph.D., Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 
Pastor, Eastminster United Presbyterian Church 

Mr. John R. McCune, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 
Vice President, Lockhart Iron and Steel Company 

Rev. David E. Molyneaux, Flint, Michigan 
Pastor, First Presbyterian Church 

Rev. Walter L. Moser, Ph.D., D.D., Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 
Secretary-Treasurer, Johnson C. Smith University 

Mr. Alexander P. Reed, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 
Attorney at Law 

Mr. Elmore A. Willets, Jr., Sewickley, Pennsylvania 
Oil, Investments and Banking 

Rev. C. T. R. Yeates, D.D., LL.D., Des Moines, Iowa 
Pastor, Westminster United Presbyterian Church 

Term Expires May 1971 

Mr. Rollin D. Barnard, Littleton, Colorado 

President, Midland Federal Savings and Loan Association 

Rev. Charles C. Bray, Jr., Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 
Pastor, Third Presbyterian Church 

Rev. J. Hubert Henderson, D.D., Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 
Pastor, J. M. Wallace Memorial United Presbyterian Church 

Mr. William R. Jackson, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

President, Pittsburgh-Des Moines Steel Company 
Chaplain Thomas David Parham, Washington, D.C. 

Captain CHC, USN, Department of the Navy Bureau of Naval 

Personnel 

Rev. Charles P. Robshaw, S.T.D., D.D., LL.D., Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 
Pastor, East Liberty Presbyterian Church 

Rev. Howard C. Scharfe, D.D., LL.D., Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

Pastor, Shadyside Presbyterian Church 
Mr. H. Parker Sharp, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

Retired — Vice President and General Counsel, Jones & Laughlin 

Steel Corporation 

123 



Rev. Samuel C. Weir, D.D., Detroit, Michigan 

Minister of Visitation, Cherry Hill United Presbyterian Church, 

Dearborn 
Rev. W. Bruce Wilson, D.D., St. Petersburg, Florida 

Retired 

Mr. Ralph M. Wyman, Greenwich, Connecticut 

Vice Chairman of the Board, The Pantosote Company 



Administrative Staff 

The Rev. Donald G. Miller, Ph.D., LL.D., Litt.D. 

President 

The Rev. Howard M. Jamieson, Jr., Ph.D., D.D. 
Acting Dean 

The Rev. John M. Bald, Th.D., D.D. 
Associate Dean 

Mr. John T. Logan, B.B.A., C.P.A. 

Business Manager and Comptroller 

Miss Bessie M. Burrows, M.A . 
Registrar 

Mr. Dikran Y. Hadidian, M.S., S.T.M. 
Librarian 

The Rev. Joseph D. Small, B.D. 
Director of Admissions 

The Rev. William P. Barker, B.D. 

Director of Continuing Education and Alumni Relations 



124 



Historical Roll of Professors 



Name 

John Anderson 
John Banks 
James Ramsey 
Joseph Kerr 
Jacob Jones Janeway 
Mungo Dick 
Luther Halsey 

John Williamson Nevin 
David Elliott 
John Taylor Pressly 
David Carson 
Thomas Beveridge 
Moses Kerr 
Joseph Claybaugh 
Samuel W. McCracken 
Lewis Warner Green 
James Martin 
Alexander Taggart McGill 
James Lemonte Dinwiddie 
Abraham Anderson 
Alexander Downs Clark 
David Reynolds Kerr 
Melancthon Williams Jacobus 
William Swan Plumer 
Samuel Wilson 
William Davidson 
Alexander Young 

Samuel Jennings Wilson 
John Scott 
Joseph Clokey 
William Miller Paxton 
Andrew Morrow Black 
Archibald Alexander Hodge 
David Alexander Wallace 

James Harper 

Joseph Tate Cooper 

William Bruce 

William Henry Hornblower 

James Gillespie Carson 



Seminary of 


Period of 


Inauguration 


Service 


Service 


1794-1819 


Philadelphia 
Canonsburg 
Pittsburgh 
Western 


1820-1826 
1821-1842 
1825-1829 
1828-1829 


Pittsburgh 


1829-1831 


Western 


1829-1836 




1872-1880 


Western 


1829-1840 


Western 


1829-1874 


Allegheny 
Canonsburg 


1832-1870 
1834-1834 


Canonsburg 

Allegheny 

Oxford 


1835-1871 
1835-1836 
1839-1855 


Oxford 


1839-1840 


Western 


1840-1847 


Canonsburg 
Western 


1842-1846 
1842-1854 


Allegheny 

Canonsburg 

Allegheny 

Allegheny 

Western 


1843-1846 
1847-1855 
1847-1884 
1851-1887 
1851-1876 


Western 


1854-1862 


Xenia 


1855-1875 


Oxford 


1855-1858 


Oxford 


1855-1874 




1876-1891 


Western 


1857-1883 


Monmouth 


1858-1874 


Xenia 


1858-1873 


Western 


1860-1872 


Monmouth 


1864-1874 


Western 


1864-1877 


Monmouth & Xenia 


1867-1870 




1883-1883 


Newburg 


1867-1899 


Allegheny 
Western 


1871-1886 
1871-1880 


Xenia 


1871-1883 


Xenia 


1873-1888 



125 



William Gallogly Moorehead 
Jackson Burgess McMichael 
Samuel Thompson Lowrie 
Samuel Henry Kellogg 
William Hamilton Jeffers 
Benjamin Breckenbridge 

Warfield 
Thomas Hastings Robinson 
David MacDill 
David A. McClenahan 
Robert Dick Wilson 
James Alexander Grier 
John McNaugher 
Henry T. McCleUand 
Matthew Brown Riddle 
Oliver Joseph Thatcher 
Wilbert Webster White 
Robert Christie 
John A. Wilson 
John Douds Irons 
James Anderson Kelso 
David Riddle Breed 
Joseph Kyle 
Jesse Johnson 
David Schley Schaff 
John Elliott Wishart 
David E. Cully 
William Riley Wilson 
Charles Frederick Wishart 
William Robertson Farmer 
John Hunter Webster 
James Henry Snowden 
Melvin Grove Kyle 
James Doig Rankin 
David Frazier McGill 
Frank Eakin 
James Gallaway Hunt 
Selby Frame Vance 
James Harper Grier 
Robert McNary Karr 
James Leon Kelso 
George Boone McCreary 
Robert Nathaniel Montgomery 
Donald Mackenzie 
Gaius Jackson Slosser 
Albert Henry Baldinger 
Clarence Joseph Williamson 
John Wick Bowman 



Xenia 


1873-1914 


Xenia 


1873-1878 


Western 


1874-1877 


Western 


1877-1886 


Western 


1877-1914 


Western 


1878-1887 


Western 


1883-1906 


Xenia 


1884-1902 


Allegheny 


1885-1921 


Western 


1885-1900 


Allegheny 


1886-1909 


Allegheny 


1886-1943 


Western 


1886-1891 


Western 


1887-1916 


Allegheny 
Xenia 


1888-1892 
1889-1894 


Western 


1891-1923 


Allegheny 
Xenia 


1893-1915 
1895-1905 


Western 


1897-1944 


Western 


1898-1931 


Xenia 


1899-1921 


Xenia 


1903-1930 


Western 


1903-1926 


Xenia 


1905-1923 


Western 


1906-1948 


Allegheny 
Allegheny 
Western 


1907-1940 
1907-1914 
1907-1939 


Xenia 


1908-1933 


Western 


1911-1929 


Xenia 


1914-1930 


Pittsburgh 


1914-1929 


Pittsburgh 


1915-1931 


Western 


1915-1927 


Pittsburgh 


1920-1926 


Western 


1921-1935 


Pittsburgh 


1922-1926 


Xenia 


1922-1949 


Xenia 


1923-1963 


Xenia 


1924-1946 


Pittsburgh 


1926-1930 


Western 


1928-1933 


Western 


1928-1958 


Pittsburgh-Xenia 


1931-1947 


Pittsburgh-Xenia 
Western 


1932-1950 
1936-1944 



126 



William F. Orr 
George Anderson Long 
Theophilus Mills Taylor 
Jarvis M. Cotton 
Frank Dixon McCloy 
Henry Alexander Riddle 
J. Carter Swaim 
Walter R. Clyde 
Addison Hardie Leitch 
Florence M. Lewis 
H. Ray Shear 
David Noel Freedman 
Gordon Edmund Jackson 
Ralph G. Turnbull 
John H. Gerstner 
Clifford E. Barbour 
Bessie M. Burrows 
James A. Walther 
Sidney O. Hills 
Robert Lee Kelley, Jr. 
Robert Clyde Johnson 
Howard M. Jamieson, Jr. 
John M. Bald 
Elwyn Allen Smith 
Walter E. Wiest 
Malcolm S. Alexander 
Harold E. Scott 
Howard L. Ralston 

William A. Nicholson 
James Sheppard Irvine 
J. Gordon Chamberlin 
Gayraud S. Wilmore 
Arlan P. Dohrenburg 
Edward D. Grohman 
David G. Buttrick 
Donald G. Miller 
George H. Kehm 
Dietrich Ritschl 
Markus Barth 
Edward Farley 
Lynn Boyd Hinds 
Iain G. Wilson 
Douglas R. A. Hare 
Donald E. Gowan 
Jared J. Jackson 
Eberhard von Waldow 
Dikran Y. Hadidian 



Western 


1936- 


Pittsburgh-Xenia 
Pittsburgh-Xenia 
Western 


1942-1955 
1942-1962 
1944-1961 


Western 


1944-1967 


Western 


1944_1949 


Western 


1944_1954 


Western 


1945- 


Pittsburgh-Xenia 
Pittsburgh-Xenia 
Pittsburgh-Xenia 
Western 


1946-1961 
1947-1952 
1947-1959 
1948-1964 


Pittsburgh-Xenia 
Western 


1949- 
1949-1954 


Pittsburgh-Xenia 
Western 


1950- 
1951-1962 


Pittsburgh-Xenia 
Western 


1953- 
1954- 


Western 


1954- 


Pittsburgh-Xenia 
Western 


1955- 
1955-1963 


Pittsburgh-Xenia 
Pittsburgh-Xenia 


1955- 
1957- 


Western 


1957-1966 


Western 


1957- 


Pittsburgh-Xenia 
Pittsburgh-Xenia 
Western and 


1958-1966 
1959- 


Pittsburgh-Xenia 
Western 


1960- 
1960- 


Western 


1960-1966 


Pittsburgh 
Pittsburgh 


1960- 
1961-1965 


Pittsburgh 
Pittsburgh 
Pittsburgh 
Pittsburgh 
Pittsburgh 
Pittsburgh 
Pittsburgh 
Pittsburgh 


1961-1964 

1961-1964 

1961- 

1962- 

1962- 

1963-1970 

1963- 

1963-1969 


Pittsburgh 


1963- 


Pittsburgh 


1963-1968 


Pittsburgh 
Pittsburgh 


1964- 
1965- 


Pittsburgh 
Pittsburgh 
Pittsburgh 


1965- 
1966- 
1966- 



127 



Peter Fribley 
Robert S. Paul 
Ford Lewis Battles 
Paul W. Lapp 
Neil R. Paylor 
Robert M. Ezzell 
Ronald H. Stone 



Pittsburgh 
Pittsburgh 
Pittsburgh 


1966-1970 

1967- 

1967- 


Pittsburgh 


1968- 


Pittsburgh 


1968- 


Pittsburgh 
Pittsburgh 


1969- 
1969- 


mmgw&MB i 




128 






Donations and Bequests 



All donations or bequests to the Seminary should be made to "The 
Pittsburgh Theological Seminary of the United Presbyterian Church in 
the United States of America, located at 616 North Highland Avenue, 
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15206." The proper legal form for making a 
bequest is as follows : 

"I hereby give and bequeath to Pittsburgh Theological Seminary of 
the United Presbyterian Church in the United States of America, incor- 
porated in the State of Pennsylvania, the following: ..." 

Care shoud be taken to use the corporate name as given above, and 
to have the bequest conform to the laws of the state governing it. 

The memorial idea may be carried out either in the erection of a 
building or in the endowment of any of the special funds of the Seminary. 

129 



Index 

Administrative Staff 124 

Admissions: College Requirements, Credentials, 

Procedure, etc 35-39 

Alumni Association 98 

Attendance, Summary of 120 

Awards Granted, 1968-1969 103-104 

Awards, prizes, and graduate fellowships 45-48 

Bachelor of Divinity Degree 52-54, 57-79, 88 

Board of Directors 122-124 

Buildings 25-30 

Calendar of Events, 1970-1971 4 

Campus 25-34 

Continuing Education 96-97 

Curriculum 51-94 

Degree Programs, Index to 51 

Degrees Awarded, 1968-1969 100-104 

Doctoral Program 92-94 

Donations and Bequests 129 

Emeriti 13 

Enrollment, Summary of 120 

Expenses 41-43 

Faculty 5-13 

Fees and Expenses 41-43 

Field Education 78-79 

Financial Assistance 43-44 

Foreign Students 39 

Graduation Honors and Awards 103-104 

History of Seminary 21 

Hospitalization Insurance 42 

Housing 28-29 

Insurance, Medical and Hospital 42 

130 



Lectures, Special 14-17 

Library 26-27 

Loan Funds 43-44 

Married Student Apartment Fees 41-42 

Master of Education Degree 90 

Master of Public Administration Degree 88-89 

Master of Urban and Regional Planning Degree 88-89 

Master of Religious Education Degree 56-79 

Master of Theology Degree 80-84 

Medical Insurance 42 

Museum, Bible Lands 31 

Music, Opportunities in 34 

Pittsburgh — Our Environment 23 

Pittsburgh, University of, programs with 83-94 

Pre-Seminary Studies 36-38 

Professors, Historical Roll of 125-128 

Scholarships, loans, etc 43-44 

Student Association 33 

Summer Field Education 78-79 

The Student Body, 1969-1970 99-120 

Transfer Students 38 

Worship 33 



131 




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