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Full text of "Annual catalogue of the Indiana Normal School of Pennsylvania"

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Digitized by tine Internet Arciiive 

in 2009 with funding from 

Lyrasis IVIembers and Sloan Foundation 



http://www.archive.org/details/annualcatalogueo1892indi 



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)eOGnfGGr\il7 aAnnual (^afalo^ue 



OF THE 



INDIANA 



Normal School, 



OF 



PE^NNSYL^VANIA, 
J^IJ^TH NORMflLi SCHOOL! DISTf^ICT. 



iplDIJ\NA, I|llDIAWi\ dOOjlTY, pEWW^YLVApIlA. 



IS91— 1892. 




I'llTSBURGH : 
MYERS, SHINKLE * CO., PRINTERS AND STAMONERS. 

1892. 



aw^KlVES' 



H 
CI 



Library 
State College 
Indiana. Penna.' 



189: 



Calendar. 



1893- 



FALL TERM, FIFTEEN 'WEEKS. 

Opens, Monday, Sei)teniber 12tli, 1892. 
Closes, Thursday, December 22nd, 1892. 
Holiday Vacation, one week. 

WINTER TERM, THIRTEEN WEEKS. 

Opens, Monday, January 2nd, 1892. 
Junior Exhibition, Friday, March 25th, 1893. 
Closes, Thursday, March 31st, 1893. 
Spring Vacation, one week. 

SPRING AND SUMMER TERM, FOURTEEN WEEKS. 

Opens, Tuesday, April 3rd, 1893. 

Erodelphian Aniversary, Friday, May 25th, 1893. 



COMMENCEMENT WEEK. 

Baccalaureate Sermon, Sabbath, July 1st, 1893. 
Commencement Concert, Tuesday, July 3rd, 1893. 
Class Day Exercises, Wednesday, July 4th, 1893. 
Commencement, Thursday, July 5th, 1893. 
Alumni Anniversary, Thursday evening, July 5th, 1893. 



STATE NORMAL SCHOOL. 



Board of Trustees. 



REPRESEXTLXG THE STOCKHOLDERS. 



James R. Daugherty, 
Hon. Harry White, 
W. B. Marshall, 
J. M. Guthrie, 

A. T. MOORHEAD, 

Samuel A. Smith, 

Thomas Sutton, 

Edward Rowe, 

J. Wood Clark, 

Rev. Wm. S. Owens, D. D., 

Hon. Jno. P. Elkin, . 

A. W. Wilson, 



Indiaua. 1 






Term expires in 1894. 



Term expires in 1895. 



- Term expires iii 1893. 



REPRESENTING THE STATE. 



W. J. Mitchell, 
John W. Sutton, 

S. M. Jack, 

Rev. a. C. Ehrenfeld, 

A. W. Kimmell, 
Hon. Geo. F. Huff, 



Indiana. ) 

4< . V Term expires in 1894. 

1 
,, V Term expires in 1895. 

Greensburg. j Term expires in 1893. 



Officers of the Board. 



A. W. WILSON. 

President. 

THOMAS SUTTON, 

Secretary. 



Dr. WM. S. OWENS, 

Vice-Preaident. 

JAMES M. WATT, 

Treasurer. 



INDIANA, PA. 



Standing Committees. 



INSTRUCTION AND DISCIPLINE. 

Harry White, William S. Owens, J. Wood Clark, 

S. M. Jack, AV. J. Mitchell. 

EMPLOYMENT OF TEACHERS ADVERTISING AND PRINTINCx. 

Chas. W. Deane, A. W. Wilson, Wm. S. Owens. 

Thomas Sutton, John P. Elkiu. 

FINANCE. 

W. J. Mitchell, J. M. Guthrie, J. R. Daugherty. 

Geo. F. Huff, Harry White. 

ACCOUNTS AND CLAIMS, 
W. B. Marshall, Thomas Sutton, Samuel A. Smith. 

EXPENDITURES AND SUPPLIES. 
J. P. Elkin, Thomas Sutton, A. T. Moorhead. 

AI'l'ARATUS, HOUSE AND SCHOOL FURNITURE. 

John W. Sutton, James R. Daugherty, Edward Rowe. 

A. W. Kimmell, Samuel A. Smith. 

BUILDINGS AND GROUNDS. 

Thomas Sutton, A. T. Moorhead, W. B. Marshall. 

Edward Rowe, A. W. Kimmell. 

LIBRARY. 

William S. Owens, A. C. Ehrenfield, S. M. Jack. 

J. M. Guthrie, George F. Huff. 

CARE OF HOSPITAL AND SICK. 
A. T. Moorhead, John P. Elkin, J. Wood Clark. 

AUDITORS. 

A. C. Ehrenfield, Thomas Sutton, W. B. Marshall. 

W. J. Mitchell. 



STATE NORMAL SCHOOL, 



Faculty. 



CHAS. W. DEANE, Ph. D. Principal, 

Psychology and Pedagogics. 

JANE E. LEONARD, Preceptress, 

General History, Higher English and School Economy. 

ANNA A. KIMBER, 

Principal Model School and Methods. 

EDITH MANSFIELD, 

Critic Teacher in Model. 

ELVIRA MARQUIS, M. E., 

Geography and U. S. History. 

J. C. McMICHAEL, A. M., 

Mathematics. 

W. H. SPROULL, M. S. 

Associate Professor of Mathematics, 

SADIE M. GALLAHER, M. S., 

Associate Professor of English. 

RENA M. WILLS, 

Supt. Musical Department, Vocal Culture and Piano. 

SAMUEL C. SCHMUCKER, M. S., A. M., 

Natural Sciences. 

C. E. CHASE, 

Supt. Commercial Department, Penmanship and Drawing 

A. S. GUFFEY, A. B., 
Latin and Greek. 



INDIANA, PA. 



Faculty. 



MRS. C. M. SCHMUCKER, 

Piano. 

GEO. P. BIBLE, B. O., 

Elocution, Physical Training and Military Tactics. 

EDITH DUDLEY, 

English Grammar. 

GEORGE ROBBINS, 

Manual Training and Drawing, 

ROSE WEAVER, B. S., 

Grammar and Composition. 

LISLE APPLE, 

Vocalist. 



MRS. ELLEN A. LAWRY, 

Matron. 

MRS. ELLEN M. DOUTHITT, 

Librarian. 



McCLAIN DAVIS, 

Steward. 

ALBERT CARTER. 

Landscape Gardener. 



STATE NORMAL SCHOOL, 



Catalogue of Students. 









SCIENTIFIC. 








Name. 


Post Office. 


County. 1 


State, 


w 


eaver, 


Eose B. 


Irwiu, 


Westmoreland, 


, Pa. 



Elder, Maud W. 
Martiu, Georgia L. 



POST GRADUATES. 

Elder's Ridge. 
Horton, 



Indiana, 



Normal Department. 



Name. 

Bash, I'earl 
Calhoun, Clara 
Carter, Lucile 
Clark, Charlotte 
Coder. Ada C. 
Cooper, Ella 
Dickie, Loretta 
Dunwiddie, Mame 
Dyer, Eleanor 
Dyess, Mertwyn 
Elder, ^Nlarguerete 
P'oster, ]M()iIie 
Gessler, Carrie 
Gibson, Kosana H. 
Hammond, .Jennie 
Haney, Alberta 
Jiay, Minnie 



Seniors. 

LADIES. 

Post Office. 
Indiana, 
Monongahela, 
Ingram, 
Indiana, 
TJrsina, 
Johnstown, 
Black Lick, 
Philipsburg, 
Pittsburg, 
Leechburg, 
Apollo, 
Hillside, 
Indiana, 
Bellevue, 
Allegheny, 
]McKeesport, 
Allegheny, 



County. 


State 


Indiana, 


Pa. 


Washington, 


it 


Allegheny, 


li 


Indiana, 


a 


Somerset, 


(< 


Caml^ria, 


a 


Indiana, 


11 


Centre, 


a 


Allegheny, 


a 


Armstrong, 


a 


n 


a 


Westmoreland, 


a 


Indiana, 


a 


Allegheny, 


a 


u 


a 


It 


(( 


It 


a 





INDIANA, PA. 




9 


Namk. 


I'dst Office. 


CilNTV. S 


■1 AIK. 


Hazlett, Anua :\r: 


Ijatrobe, 


Westmoreland, 


n 


Hile, Coruelia E. — 


Hoboken, 


Allegheny, 


u 


Hill, Jennie A. - 


Freeport, 


Armstrong, 


n 


Hurst, Emma E. - 


Allegheny, 


Allegheny, 


u 


Krebs, Matilda — 


Johnstown, 


Camljria, 


a 


Lee, Anna - 


Hulton, 


Allegheny, 


a 


Lupton, ("lara B. — 


Cheyenne, 


Laramie, V 


k'yo. 


Lynn, Emma - 


McKeesport, 


Allegheny, 


Wx. 


Lytle, Verde ' 


Indiana, 


Indiana, 


n 


McCorniick, Jennie — 


u 


a 


a 


McMullen, Eliza 


Apollo, 


Armstrong, 


(i 


Mitchell, Jennie ^ 


New Washington, 


Clearfield, 


u 


Moorehead, Clara — 


Indiana, 


Indiana, 


(t 


Morrow, Eleanor* '^ 


Allegheny, 


Allegheny, 


>( 


Nugent, Sallie 


Grant, 


Indiana, 


(( 


Parsons, Martha- 


Ingram, 


Allegheny, 


u 


Patterson, Elvira 


Beaver Falls, 


Beaver, 


(1 


Paj'ue, Alrayra 


Coal Valley, 


Allegheny, 


u 


Potter, Florence 


E. E. Pittsburg, 


u 


(( 


Purrington, ^largarette 


Indiana, 


Indiana, 


a 


Smith, Velma B. 


Allegheny, 


Allegheny, 


a 


Smith, ^larie E. 


Pittsburg, 


(( 


u 


Taylor, Grace 


Indiana, 


Indiana, 


(t 


Tiffany, Buth 


Indiana, 


Indiana. 


a 


Trimble, lora M. 


Allegheny, 


Allegheny, 


a 


Walker, Idella 


u 


a 


a 


Watkius, Lucy 


Beaver, 


Beaver, 


a 


"Weiss, Katherine 


L at robe, 


Westmoreland, 


a 


Williams, Fannie 


Indiana, 


Indiana, 


a 


Williamson, Margaret 


Verona, 


Allegheny, 


a 


Wilson, Helen C. 


Greensburg, 


Westmoreland, 


a 


Work, Mary - 


Georgeville, 


Indiana, 


t( 




GENTLEMEN. 






* 

Carter, Albert F. 


Arch Springs, 


Blair, 


Pa. 


Condron, Harry D. 


Home, 


Indiana, 


u 


Fiscus, I. L. 


Indiana, 


i( 


a 


Leiper, J. D. 


Beaver, 


Beaver, 




McDermott, Joseph 


Pittsburg, 


Allegheny, 


u 


Tarr, Harry :M. 


Hollidays Cove, 


Hancock, W 


.Va. 


Thomas, D. A. 


Indiana, 


Indiana, 


Pa. 


Trees, Joe C. 


New Texas, 


Allegheny, 


ti 



10 



STATE NORMAL SCHOOL. 



Juniors. 



LADIES. 



Name. 

Adair, Margie T. 
Adair, Ruth 
Adams, Flora 
Adams, Nora 
Allebrand, Louise 
Altman, Lulu 
Allen, Edith 
Allison, Blanche 
Anderson, Minda 
Anderson, Alice 
Andrews, Dora 
Azdell, Belle 
Bach, Lizzie 
Baker, I. Corrie 
Bambrey, Mary E. 
Barker, Laura 
Barker, Maud 
Barnes, Blanche E. 
Barnett, Ella M. 
Barnett, Mamie K. 
Barry, Rose 
Bash, Laura 
Bible, Mrs. Geo. P. 
Black, Dora 
Black, .Tennie C, 
Blauey, Ellen 
Bloom, Grace E. 
Blough, Frances 
Books, Mabel 
Brallier, Lou V. 
Brass, Anna B. 
Brown, Maude 
Bruce, Etta 
Brownlee, ^Nlabel 
Bryan, Lottie 
Butler, Elzora 
Butterbaugh, M. Olive 
Carothers, Elizabeth 
Carson, Lizzie 
Carson, Nannie H. 
Chase, Mrs. Nellie 
Cheesman, Bertha 



Post Office. 


COINTY. 


State 


Indiana, 


Indiana, 


Pa. 


ii 


ti 




Roaring Springs, 


Blair, 


• 


Indiana, 


Indiana, 




McKeesport, 


Allegheny, 




Blairsville, 


Indiana, 




Wattsburgh, 


Erie, 




Crete, 


Indiana, 




Indiana, 


tt 




Venice, 


Washington, 




East Liverpool, 


Columbiana, Ohio, 


a . li 


it 


a 


Indiana, 


Indiana, 


Pa. 


n 


it 


(( 


Scottdale, 


Westmoreland 


1 tt 


Coalport, 


Clearfield, 


tl 


a 


it 


tt 


Johnstown, 


Cambria, 


tt 


ti 


ti 


tt 


it 


tt 


it 


Pittsburg, 


Allegheny, 


tt 


Indiana, 


Indiana, 


n 


u 


ti 


u 


El Dorado, 


Blair, 


il 


Wilmore, 


Cambria, 


tt 


Whitesburg, 


Armstrong, 


l( 


Cuiwensville, 


Clearfield, 


tt 


Indiana, 


Indiana. 


tt 


a 


11 


il 


ti 


tt 


it 


Hulton, 


Allegheny, 


it 


Indiana, 


Indiana, 


it 


it 


11 


it 


it 


it 


il 


It 


it 


tl 


Blairsville, 


tt 


.1 


Cookport, 


tt 


it 


West Newton, 


Westmoreland, 


1 it 


Charleroi, 


AVashington, 


it 


Saltsburg, 


Indiana, 


tl 


Indiana, 


Indiana, 


it 


Library, 


Allegheny, 


il 





INDIANA. PA. 


1 


I 


Name. 


Post Office. 


Count T. ?tatf. 


Clark, Jessie 


Pittsburg, 


Allegheny, P. 


\. 


Clark, Mary 


Indiana, 


Indiana, ^ 




Clark, Annie 


a 


a ( 




Clark, Sayde - 


Pittsburg, 


Allegheny, ^ 




Clawson, Cora - 


a 


a < 




Clayton, Edith 


Beayer Falls, 


Beaver, < 




Clement, Bertha B. 


Verona, 


Allegheny, < 




X^chran, Jessie 


Elderton, 


Armstrong, ^ 




Coho, E. Pearl 


Indiana, 


Indiana, ^ 




Coleman, Reve M. 


u 


li I 




Conkle, Emma 


Coraopolis, 


Allegheny, < 




Cort, Mabel 


Latrobe, 


Westmoreland, < 




Costello, Alice 


Summer Hill, 


Cambria, < 




Covode, Anna B, 


Ligonier, 


Westmoreland, < 




Cowley, Bessie B. 


Allegheny, 


Allegheny, ^ 




Coyle, Kate J. 


Tunnelton, 


Butler, 




Craven, Nettie 


Sniathers, 


Indiana, < 




Cunningham, Gertrude 


Indiana, 


a i 




Dean, Daisy 


AVilliamsburg, 


Blair, < 




Deemar, Jennie M. 


Manorville, 


Armstrong, < 




Dei trick, Florence 


New Brighton, 


Beaver, j 




Douthitt, Zannibel 


McKeesport, 


Allegheny, 




Duff, Katherine C. 


Leechburg, 


Armstrong, ' 




Duff, Millie 


White Ash, 


Allegheny, ' 




Duff, Arena B. 


Epton,' 


(1 K 


Dudley, Helen M. 


Riverside, 


Hamilton, Ohio. 


Drenning, Esther 


Homer City, 


Indiana, Pa. 


Eberhart, Margaret 


Wooster, 


Wayne, Ohio. 


Ekas, Clementine 


Ekastown, 


Butler, Pa. 


Elder, Maud W. 


Elder's Ridge, 


Indiana, ' 




Ellis, Mary 


"West Newton, 


Westmoreland, ' 




Ellis, Nellie 


Indiana, 


Indiana, ' 




Ehvood, Lizzie M. 


Apollo, 


Armstrong, ' 




Evans, Lida 


New Stanton, 


Westmoreland, ' 




Evans. Lulu 


U ik 


U ( 




Fair, Ida 


Indiana, 


Indiana, ' 




Ferguson, Margaret J. 


Youngstown, 


Westmoreland, ' 




Fiscus, Clara 


Indiana, 


Indiana, ' 




Fisher, Effle 


Irwin, 


Westmoreland, ' 




Fleisher, Lottie G. 


Newport, 


Perry, 




Foster, Mary 


Indiana, 


Indiana, * 




Fowler, Marie 


Penn Run, 


U 1 




Gallagher, Rose M. 


Apollo, 


Armstrong, . ' 




Gallaher, Ada 


New Washington, 


Clearfield, ' 




Garman, Edna 


Indiana, 


Indiana ' 




Gibson, Addie M. 


McKeesport, 


Allegheny, ' 





12 



STATE NORMAL SCHOOL, 



Namk. 


Post Office. 


County. i 


51 ATE. 


Gibson, JJelle 


Creekslde, 


Indiana, 


a 


Gifford, Nell B. 


C'urwensville, 


Clearfield, 


i I 


Gillespie, Bessie 


Bennett, 


Allegheny, 


( i 


Gilmore, Jennie E. 


Kent, 


Indiana, 


u 


Gilmore, Minnie G. 


Uniontown, 


Fayette, 


t\ 


Grannis, Lillie 


Indiana,, 


Indiana, 


( i 


Grieb, Anna K. 


Kittanning, 


Armstrong, 


u 


Hancock, Mattie F. 


West Lebanon, 


Indiana, 


u 


Harbi>*on, Belle 


Crete, 


K 


41 


Harper, Carrie 


Allegheny, 


Allegheny, 


i 4 


Harrison, Mary E. 


McKeesport, 


ti 


i i 


Hawk, Anna L. 


Wisconisco, 


Dauphin, 


u 


Hawthorne, Camille 


Braddock, 


Allegheny, 


a 


Hay den. Flora 


Indiana, 


Indiana, 


u 


Hayes, Ida 


u 


ti 


u 


Highberger, Lida 


Penn, 


Westmoreland, 


t ( 


Hill, Kate E. 


Free port. 


Armstrong, 


u 


Hitchens, Emily P. 


JNIcKeesport, 


Allegheny, 


u 


Hood, Pearl 


Johnstown, 


Cambria, 


u 


House, Lizzie 


Gill Hall, 


Allegheny, 


i i 


Howells, Mattie 


Johnstown, 


Cambria, 


(1 


Hunter, Edith 


Tipton, 


Blair, 


It 


Hutchinson, Queen E. 


McKeesport, 


Allegheny, 


i 1 


Inskeep, Lyde B. 


u 


(1 


u 


Jackson, Bessie 


Indiana, 


Indiana, 


( i 


Johnson, Jennie F. 


Pittsburg, 


Allegheny, 


i i 


Johnston, Fannie 


Edei, 


Indiana, 


it 


Johnston, Ida 


Indiana, 


u 


u 


Johnston, Irene 


Shelocta, 


(< 


(1 


Johnston, Jessie 


u 


a 


li 


Johnston, Olive R. 


Indiana, 


(1 


II 


Jones, Gwennie 


u 


(( 


a 


Jones, Sadie M. 


u 


(< 


II 


Kaufman, Blanche 


Kent, 


(1 


II 


Kallenbaugh, JMarie 


Bellvue, 


Allegheny, 


II ' 


Kittleberger, Louise 


Curwensville, 


Clearfield, 


II 


Kirkendall, Nannie 


tSaltsburg, 


Indiana, 


II 


Klingensmith, Mary 


Dime, 


Armstrong, 


11 


Knappenberger, Vinnie 


Greensburg, 


Westmoreland, 


II 


Laing, Ella 


Curwensville, 


Clearfield, 


11 


Laughlin, p:ilzabeth 


Kent, 


Indiana, 


II 


Lewis, Hope 


Indiana, 


u 


II 


Lewis, Mabel 


Turtle Creek, 


Allegheny, 


11 


Lifshitz, Rose 


Berdsjcrew, 


Russia. 


TJnnan, .Julia 


Kittanning, 


Armstrong, 


Pa. 


Ijloyd, Margaret A. 


Johnstown, 


Cambria, 


a 





INDIANA, PA. 




13 


Name. 


Tost Officr. 


COtNIY. s 


1 ATE. 


Logan, Anna M. 


Logansport, 


Armstrong, 


Pa. 


Lohr, Bertha 


Johnstown, 


Cambria, 




Loueks, Abbie C. 


Scottdale, 


Westmoreland, 




Lowry, Florence 


Indiana, 


Indiana, 




Lucas, Annie B, 


u 


(( 




Lucas, Belle 


Tannery, 


(( 




Lucas, Metta 


Fleming, , 


Centre, 




Ludwick, Florence 


Manor Station, 


Westmoreland, 




Lutz, Edna 


Fayette City, 


Fayette, 




Lydic, Edna C. 


Indiana, 


Indiana, 




Lytle, Lulu 


Shelocta, 


u 




McAdoo, Maude Z. 


West Lebanon, 


(( 




McCall, Celia 


Ambrose, 


It 




McComish, Jennie 


Brush Valley, 


u 




McCormick, Cora 


Indiana, 


l( 




McCormick, Ella 


11 


<l 




McCune, :Martha E. 


McKeesport, 


Allegheny, 




McDowell, Ella 


Sharon, 


Mercer, 




McEnrue, May A. 


Washington, 


Washington, 




McFadden, Grace 


Indiana, 


Indiana, 




McGee, Belle 


McGee's Mills, 


Clearfield, 




McJunkin, Iva 


Ebenezer, 


Indiana, 




McKee, Margie C. 


Castle Shannon, 


Allegheny, 




McKee, Maude 


Shousetown, 


11 




McKennon, Maude 


East Liverpool, 


Columbiana, Ohio. 


]McKibbin, Janet M. 


Frankfort Springs, 


Beaver, 


Pa. 


McMaster, Margaret T. 


B rough ton, 


Allegheny, 




McMaster, Margarete 


Shirland, 


11 




]McNall, Olive P. 


Imperial, 


11 




Magill, Annie M. 


Sharpsburg, 


11 




Martin, Georgia L. 


Horton's, 


Indiana, 




Meals, Emma 


North Hope, 


Butler, 




]\Iestrezat, Alline A. 


Connellsville, 


Fayette, 




Michael, Flora B. 


Blairsville, 


Indiana, 




Miller, Louise B. 


Indiana, 


11 




Miller, Lydia D. 


u 


u 




Miller, May B. 


Stewart Station, 


Westmoreland, 




Mitchell, :Mabel 


Hamilton, 


.TefTerson, 




^Moore, Maud A. 


Corsica^ 


11 




Munshower, Jennie 


Indiana, 


Indiana, 




Murdock, :Nryra P. 


Sewickley, 


Allegheny, 




Murry, Mintie 


]Murraysville, 


West moreland , 




Nelson, Evelyn* 


Ford City, 


Armstrong, 




2sesbitt, Lida 


Irwin, 


Westmoreland, 




Nichol, Eda 


Indiana, 


Indiana, 





•4 



STATE NORMAL SCHOOL, 



Name. 


Post Office. 


COU.NTV. ! 


vl'ATE 


Noble, Bess 


Homestead, 


Allegheny, 


Pa. 


Noble, Sarah 


u 


11 




Nowry, Ivine 


Indiana, 


Indiana, 




O'Connor, Bertha, 


Connor, 


Somerset, 




Owens, Bessie 


Indiana, 


Indiana, • 




Owens, Gretta 


a 


u 




Pantall, Minta 


Punxsutawney, 


Jefferson, 


'' 


Parker, Bianca 


Ripley, 


Brown, Ohio. 


Patterson, Evelyn 


Beaver, 


Beaver, 


Pa. 


Patterson, Maude, 


Murraysville, 


Westmoreland, 


K 


Patterson, Rose M. 


Williamsburg, 


Blair, 


11 


Pattlson, Belle 


Home, 


Indiana, 


11 


Pollock, Ray E. 


Hamill, 


<< 


It 


Printer, Annie 


Pittsburg, 


Allegheny, 


11 


Purrington, Lila 


Indiana, 


Indiana, 


11 


Rankin, Ida M. 


Elderton, 


Armstrong, 


11 


Rankin, June 


Linesville, 


Crawford, 


11 


Rankin, Maud 


Brockwayville, 


Jefferson, 


11 


Reed, Jennie 


West Lebanon, 


Indiana, 


11 


Reed, Myrtle 


Latrobe, 


Westmoreland, 


11 


Reitzkat, Mary 


Grace ton. 


Indiana, 


11 


Renfrew, Tossie 


Kittanning, 


Armstrong, 


(1 


Reno, Ada J. 


Pittsburg, 


Allegheny, 


11 


Reno, Stella 


Ingram, 


(I 


11 


Richey, Alice L. 


Sunville, 


Venango, 


11 


Rider, Laura J. 


Harrisburg, 


Dauphin, 


It 


Rink, Florence 


Indiana, 


Indiana, 


11 


Rodkey, Edith 


Mahaffey, 


Clearfield, 


11 


Rodkey, Ida 


a 


(( 


<1 


Rose, Nanie 


Saltsburg, 


Indiana, 


11 


Ross, May V. 


Ross ton. 


Armstrong, 


H 


Rowe, Jean D. 


Indiana, 


Indiana, 


11 


Rude, Lucy 


Seward, 


Westmoreland, 


11 


Rutledge, Olive R. 


Livermore, 


K 


It 


Sabin, Belle L. 


Wattsburgh, 


Erie, 


it 


Sansona, Edna M. 


Indiana, 


Indiana, 


It 


St. Clair, Virginia 


u 


11 


If 


Schell, Ida E. 


West Freedom, 


Clarion, 


11 


Shrack, Nellie 


Dickenson Run, 


Fayette, 


11 


Sehreckengost, Lottie 


Plumville, 


Indiana, 


11 


Schurr, Lizzie 


Indiana, 


(( 


n 


Scott, Ida B. 


Ursina, 


Somerset, 


1 1 


Seaman, Cora A. 


Summer Hill, 


Cambria, 


1 1 


Seanor, Myra L. 


Indiana, 


Indiana, 


11 


Sechler, Miram 


Altoona, 


Blair, 


<f 


Shaw, ]\Iargaret E. 


McKeesport, 


Allegheny, 


11 





INDIANA, PA. 




IS 


Name. 


Post Office. 


(,'iiUNiv. State. 


Shields, Ruby 


Marion Centre, 


Indiana, 


Pa. 


Shupe, Abbie F. 


Saltsburg, 


It 


K 


Hickman, Elizabeth R. 


Gill Hall, 


Allegheny, 


(( 


Simkins, Alberta C. 


Corsica, 


Jetterson, 


11 


Sipe, Annie 


Jenuer's X Roads, 


Somerset, 


it 


Sloan, Anna C. 


Indiana, 


Indiana, 


li 


Sloan, Kate B. 


a 


ii 


11 


Smith, Clara 


Pittsburg, 


Allegheny, 


H 


Smith, Edith M. 


Indiana, 


Indiana, 


li 


Smith, Isie 


Derry Station, 


Westmoreland, 


u 


Smith, Margaret H. 


Indiana, 


Indiana, 


il 


Smith, Mattie J. 


li 


(( 


li 


Smitten, Belle 


March and. 


ii 


11 


Snider, Ella M. 


Uniontown, 


Fayette, 


It 


Snyder, Anna E. 


Southwest, 


Westmoreland, 


tt 


Spencer, Alberta 


Manorville, 


Armstrong, 


It 


Srader, Ella M. 


Freeport, 


a 


11 


Stevens, Juliet 


Chicago, 


Cook, 


III, 


Stevenson, Luella M. 


Braddock, 


Allegheny, 


Pa. 


Stewart, Annabel 


Kittanning, 


Armstrong, 


it 


Stewart, Hope 


Indiana, 


Indiana, 


11 


Storey, Grace E. 


11 


ii 


It 


Stuchul, Josephine, 


Plumville, 


li 


11 


Stumpf, Violet 


Indiana, 


It 


11 


Sturgeon, Ella M. 


Elderton, 


Armstrong, 


11 


Swartz, Belle 


Indiana, 


Indiana, 


li 


Sweeney, Mattie 


11 


ii 


li 


Sweeney, Margaret 


(( 


li 


a 


Teter, Maude 


McKeesport, 


Allegheny, 


ti 


Thomas, Fannie 


Indiana, 


Indiana, 


u 


Thompson, Mabel, 


a 


11 


il 


Thompson, Mildred 


(< 


11 


<( 


Thompson, Ruecetta C. 


ti 


li 


(( 


Tucker, Asenath 


Tarentum, 


Allegheny, 


it 


Turner, Ni'llie 


Tidioute, 


Warren, 


It 


Walp, Edith 


Jeanette, 


Westmoreland, 


ti 


Ward, Emma 


Conneautville, 


Crawford, 


11 


Wassell, Clara F. 


Pittsburg, 


Allegheny, 


li 


Watson, Helen 


Indiana, 


Indiana, 


11 


Weaver, Flora 


Grant, 


(( 


a 


Weaver, Rose B. 


Irwin, 


Westmoreland, 


11 


Weaver, Sarah M. 


Pittsburg, 


Allegheny, 


li 


Westerman, May 


Hultou, 


11 


ii 


Wilkinson, Jettie 


Chicago, 


Cook, 


111 



i6 



STATE NORMAL SCHOOL, 



Namk. 


PuiT Okfice. 


County. State. 


AVilliams, Ida 


Grisemore, 


Indiana, 


Pa. 


Willson, Eleanor 


Braddock, 


Allegheny, 


11 


Wilson, Anna Maude 


Rodi, 


it 


li 


"Wilson, Bessie M. 


Indiana, 


Indiana, 


11 


Wilson, Estella 


Johnstown, 


Cambria, 


11 


"Wilson, Jennie 


Indiana, 


Indiana, 


i( 


Wilson, Kate 


Tipton, 


Blair, 


11 


Wilson, Mary 


Blairsville, 


Indiana, 


11 


Wilson, Sadie R. 


Manor Dale, 


Westmoreland, 


u 


Wineman, Sadie E. 


Homer City, 


Indiana, 


u 


Woods, Jeanette 


Allegheny, 


Allegheny, 


11 


Work, Jean X. 


Marion Centre, 


Indiana, 


11 


Work, Zetta M, 


Indiana, 


11 


It 




Juniors. 








GENTLEMEN. 






Name. 


Post Office. 


COVNTV. S 


State. 


Alexander, Clinton B. 


Madera, 


Clearfield, 


Pa. 


Arbaugh, F. N. 


Johnstown, 


Cambria, 


ti 


Bach, E. E. 


Indiana, 


Indiana, 


a 


Baker, W. S. 


Newry, 


Blair, 


a 


Banks, Chas. W. 


West Bridgewater, 


Beaver, 


it 


Barnes, Jos. F., Jr. 


Indiana, 


Indiana, 


it 


Barnhart, Frank P. 


Johnstown, 


Cambria, 


ti 


Bell, C. D. 


Salina, 


Westmoreland, 


a 


Bell, William 


DeLancey, 


JefTerson, 


li 


Beistel, H. C. 


Weaver's Old Stand, 


Westmoreland, 


a 


Bender, H. S. 


Ralix, 


Cambria, 


li 


Beyer, R. B. Hayes 


Tipton, 


Blair, 


11 


Bierer, S. W. 


Greensburg, 


Westmoreland, 


It 


Blaney, Frank 


Whitesburg, 


Armstrong, 


11 


Bolam, J no. 


Irwin, 


Westmoreland, 


11 


Boles, R. N. 


Allegheny, 


Allegheny, 


a 


Boland, Elmer 


Indiana, 


Indiana, 


11 


Bowman, Steele 


DuBois, 


Clearfield, 


II 


Bradley, Robert T. 


Bellefonte, 


Centre, 


a 


Brewer, Harry 


Punxsutawney, 


Jefferson, 


11 


Brownlee, P. V. 


Indiana, 


Indiana, 


11 


liutler, T. F. 


Kay lor. 


Armstrong, 


a 





INDIANA, PA. 




': 


Name. 


Post Office, 


County. S- 


I'AIF 


Cameron, B. C. 


Penn Run, 


Indiana, 


Pa 


Campbell, H. F. 


Hhelocta, 


(( 


(( 


Carson, Harry J. 


Indiana, 


ti 


11 


Carson, John S. 


It 


u 


It 


Chapman, Jas. F.-^ 


George ville. 


(( 


11 


Cochran, I. L. 


Elderton, 


Armstrong, 


it 


Cope, Jas. H. 


Greoisburg, 


Westmoreland, 


ti 


Coulter, John AV. 


Crawford's Corners, 


Venango, 


it 


Coyle, W. S. 


Indiana, 


Indiana, 


ti 


Cramer, Bruce D. 


Cramer, 


It 


11 


Craig, H. N. 


Park wood. 


11 


ti 


Criley, Wilbert 


Indiana, 


11 


ti 


Croushore, W. B. 


Jeanette, 


Westmoreland, 


a 


Davis, E. W. 


Horatio, 


Jefferson, 


it 


Davis, Moutell 


Pendleton, 


Cambria, 


it 


Davis, M. A. 


it 


(( 


it 


Denning, "NVm. B. 


Indiana, 


Indiana, 


. 11 


Douds, D. W, 


Pluniville, 


tt 


tt 


Dunsmore, J. C. 


Glen Richey, 


Clearfield, 


ti 


Dyer, W. J. 


Pittsburg, 


Allegheny, 


a 


Eichenser, W. R. 


Elton, 


Cambria, 


it 


Emigh, Frank 


INIorrisdale Mines, 


Clearfield, 


ti 


Eselman, Jacob 


Coal port. 


it 


it 


Fairman, W. S. 


Creekside, 


Indiana, 


It 


Fetterhoof, Jno. A. 


Tyrone, 


Blair, 


tt 


Fiscus, W. E. 


Indiana, 


Indiana, 


it 


Fleming, H. A. 


Atwood, 


Armstrong, 


tt 


Gallagher, J. Ellis 


Apollo, 


a 


i( 


Getty, Chas. W. 


Chambersville, 


Indiana, 


11 


Gilkerson, W. T. 


Saltsburgi, 


(( 


it 


Gilkerson, Laird 


It 


(( 


it 


Glasgow, J. T. 


Conemaugh, 


Cambria, 


it 


Gorman, S. Clark 


Horton's, 


Indiana, 


a 


Guffey, Harry 


Pittsburg, 


Allegheny, 


a 


Hammers, Geo. M. 


Indiana, 


Indiana, 


i< 


Hancock, J. F. 


Smathers, 


it 


11 


Hanna, W. H. 


Harnedsville, 


Somerset, 


ti 


Harrington, Fay C. 


Titusville, 


Crawford, 


ti 


Harrington, W. O. 


It 


it 


it 


Hastings, S. H. 


Fairchance, 


Fayette, 


it 


Hazlett, W. T. 


Altoona, 


Blair, 


a 


Hensal, S. V. 


Madera, 


Clearfield, 


a 


Hilberry, H. K. 


Indiana, 


Indiana, 


It 


Hill, Don J. 


it 


It 


11 


Hodge, H. Herbert, 


Blairsville, 


11 


ti 



i8 



STATE NORMAL SCHOOL, 



Name. 


Post Ofeice. 


County. State. 


Hoeh, D. B. 


Punxsutawney, 


Jefferson, Pa. 


Hood, Augustus 


Indiana, 


Indiana, ,< 


Hughes, S. H. 


ii 


a ii 


Isett, Richard W. 


Spruce Creek, 


Blair, ,< 


Jack, Alonzo 


Summerville, 


Jefferson, << 


Jack, Wm. T. 


New Alexandria, 


Westmoreland, ^^ 


Jackson, H. A. 


Saulsburg, 


Huntingdon, <, 


Jacob, H. H. 


Pittsburg, 


Allegheny, ,< 


Johnston, C. C. 


Lock Haveu, 


Clinton, . ^ 


Johnston, J. C. Reed 


Bennett, 


Allegheny, ^, 


Johnston, W. M. 


Advance, 


Indiana, << 


Jones, Evan L. 


Indiana, 


ii ii 


Joyce, Joseph 


Pittsburg, 


Allegheny, ,, 


Joyce, Martin E. 


u 


ii ii 


Kaufman, Edward 


Indiana, 


Indiana, ^^ 


Kaufman, H. E. 


Kent, 


i i( 


Keck, J. E. 


Greensburg, 


Westmoreland, ,( 


Kettering, Wm. A. 


Plumville, 


Indiana, ^ 


Laughlin, E. J. 


Indiana, 


11 (1 


Lee, Alfred M. 


Hulton, 


Allegheny, ^, 


Lewis, John K. 


Indiana, 


Indiana, ^^ 


Lewis, E. Budd 


ii 


a 11 


Lloyd, Jerry 


Ebensburg, 


Cambria, ^^ 


Loughry, Edward 


Indiana, 


Indiana, ^^ 


Loughry, J. W. 


Johnstown, 


Cambria, ^^ 


Lowman, J. G. 


Kent, 


Indiana, ,, 


Lowry, Alfred 


Indiana, 


ii 11 


Lytle, Leonard J. 


Glen Richey, 


Clearfield, 


McComish, Chas. D. 


Indiana, 


Indiana, ,, 


McCracken, Harry 


Rock Spring, 


Centre, ,, 


McCracken, J. W. 


Murray, 


Clearfield, 


McCullough, Harry C. 


Butler, 


Butler, „ 


McGaughey, Chas. 


Indiana, 


Indiana, „ 


Mack, Jas. W. 


(( 


iC it 


Mack, Jos. P. 


ii 




McKown, Robert C. 


Oakland X Roads, 


Westmoreland, „ 


ISfcLaren, J. Defoe 


Indiana, 


Indiana, „ 


McMeen, W. A. 


Thonipsontown, 


Juniata, 


^Marietta, Edward 


Connellsville, 


Fayette, ,., 


Marshall, "Ben nie 


Indiana, 


Indiana, ,. 


Marshall, Harrj^ 


t( 


ii , / 


Mildren, Edward J., Jr. 


Queenstown, 


Armstrong, , 


Keal, A. L. 


Trade City, 


Indiana, ,, 


ISTichol, Chas. A. 


Indiana, 


it ii 


Nowry, J. I. 


Clarksburg, 


it ii 


O'Connor, P. J. 


Connor, 


Somerset, ^^ 





INDIANA, PA. 




19 


Name. 


Post Office. 


County. State. 


Ott, F. B. 


Johnstown, 


Cambria, 




Peternian, J. A. 


Advance, 


Indiana, 




Peternian, J. L. 


Indiana, 


a 




Porter, W. E. 


Lindsey, 


JefIer.son, 




Plotzer, J. A. 


Indiana, 


Indiana, 




Plummer, O. G. 


Summer Hill, 


Cambria, 




Pool, N. Hale 


Irwin, 


Westmoreland, 




Rankin, Chas. F. 


Willet, 


Indiana, 




Ray, M. W. 


Indiana, 


a 




Renfrew, M. Q. 


N. Buffalo, 


Armstrong, 




Rink, C. E. 


Indiana, 


Indiana, 




Rink, I. C. 


ti 


a 




Rose, N. G. 


Saltsburg, 


i< 




Rugh, M. Jas. 


Penn Run, 


li 




Russell, Chas. H. 


Indiana, 


11 




Rynder, T. Lee 


Houtzdale, 


Clearfield, 




Sandels, C. C. 


Greensburg, 


Westmoreland, 




Sansom, J. B. 


Indiana, 


Indiana, 




Scofield, Albert F. 


E. Brisbin, 


Clearfield, 




Scott, Jas. F. 


Ursina, 


Somerset, 




Seaman, R. G. 


Summer Hill, 


Cambria, 




Settlemeyer, C. T. 


Wilmore, 


u 




Shields, Swift 


Delmont, 


Westmoreland, 




Smith, Sherman 


Latrobe, 


a 




Stanton, Jno. A. 


New Stanton, 


(( 




St. Clair, Thomas 


Homer City, 


Indiana, 




Steitz, W. H. 


Allegheny, 


Allegheny-, 




Stewart, W. B. 


Indiana, 


Indiana, 




Stull, Howard W. 


Johnstown, 


Cambria, 




Sutton, Edward H. 


Indiana, 


Indiana, 




Taylor, Royden J, 


u 


ii 




Thomas, Richard 


Greensburg, 


Westmoreland, 




Thompson, Hal E. 


Marion Centre, 


Indiana, 




Tudor, D. C. 


Ebensburg, 


Cambria, 




Vannear, Fred. T. 


Somerset, 


Somerset, 




Warfel, B. F. 


Culp, 


Blair, 




Wills, Jas. F. 


Belleville, 


Mifflin, 




Willson, John T. 


li 


(< 




Wilson, J. T. 


Menno, 


(( 




Wilson, John IST. 


« 


(( 




Wolfendale, Charles 


Allegheny, 


Allegheny, 




Work, Wm. C. 


Marion Centre, 


Indiana, 




Young, Harry H. 


Belleville, 


Mifflin, 





20 



STATE NORMAL SCHOOL, 



Commercial Department. 



Azdell, Belle 
J t Baker, I. Corrie 
J Banks, Charles 
Beyer, R. B. Hayes 
jt Bloom, Grace E. 
j Boles, Robert IS". 
J Bradley, R. T. 
i Brewer, Harry M. 
t Butler, T. F. 
j Cameron, B. C. 
j Carson, Lizzie 
tCope, James H. 
jCoyle, W. S. 
JtCriley, Wilbert L. 
tCroushore, W. B. 
j*Davis, E. W. 
J Davis, M. A. 
Jt Denning, William 
tDunsmore, J. C. 
tEkas, Clementine 
Elwood, M. Lizzie 
tfFair, Ida 
Fiscus, W. R. 
Fowler, Marie 
Gall, J. J. 

Gilkerson, William T. 
^Harrington, W. O. 
JtHilberry, Howard 
tHill, Don J. 
fHill, Katie E. 
*Hodge, H. H. 
J House, Lizzie M. 
Jack, W. T. 
i Jacob, Harry 
:t Johnston, Irene 



Joyce, Martin 

Kittleberger, Louise 

Lewis, L. Belle 

Lovelace, Frank 
JLowry, Florence 
t Marquis, Elvira 
jMack, J. P. 
tiMcCormick, Ella 

McGaughey, Chas. 

McMeeu, Andrew 
JNeal, A. L. 
tPlotzer, John 
JPlummer, Oliver 
Jt*Ray, M. W. 
t Renfrew, Tossie B. 

Rose, Annie 

Rugh, James 
jRutledge, Olive 
transom, James B. 
tSchell, Ida 
tSehrack, Nellie 
ItSchurr, Lizzie 
J Scott, James F. 

Seanor, Mrs. Mary L. 
tfSloan, Kate B. 
j Stanton, J. A. 
jt Stewart, W. B. 
tt*Stull, W. H. 

Thomas, Mrs. A. M. 

Thompson, H. E. 
t Tudor, I). C. 
JVaunear, F. T. 

Wassam, P^lla 

Wilson, Mary M. 
jWolfendale, C. T. 



* Commercial Graduate. 
t Short-haiul. 
I Tj'pe-writing. 






;^1?^r^ 






* *'^"^». »| III iipi jSJ^J^ 






INDIANA SCENERY. 



INDIANA, PA. 



21 



College Preparatory. 



Helen M. Dudley, 
Jennie Watson, 



SENIOR^. 



Bessie Cowley, 
Paul Brownlee. 



Edna Nicliol, 
Fanny Thomas, 
Alonzo Jack, 



JUNIOF^. 



H. E. Kaufman, 
J. W. Mack. 



The lower grades are not separated from Normal students. 




22 



STATE NORMAL SCHOOL, 



Model Department, 



FIRST GRADE. 



Bath, Leonard 
Cassidy, Annie 
Davis, Joe 
Dean, Mabel 
Dean, Muriel 
Getty, Boyd 
Gray, Bessie 
Gray, Marion 
Gilbert, Florence 
Hays, Mary 
Hammers, Willie 
Johnson, Virginia 
Klingersmith, Bessie 
Lear, Ethel 
Longwill, Adella 
Lowry, Arthur 
Lowry, Clay 



McCurdy, Frank 
McGi'egor, Frank 
McXutt, Judson 
McXutt, Bertha 
Moorehead, Mary 
Owens, Willie 
Palmer, Floy 
Eager, Roy 
Eager, Robert 
Eow, Grace 
Smith, Paul 
Sutton, Mary 
'Stumpf, Eva 
Watson, Anna 
White, Vernie 
White, Torrence 
young, Helen 



SECOND GRADE. 



Clawson, Tommy 
Feit, Eddie 
Hammers, ;Mary 
Irwin, Orpha 
Kuhn, Edna 
Martin, Frank 



Moorehead, Jessie 
Eager, Owen 
Smith, Irwin 
Watson, Herman 
Wilson, Custis 



THIRD GRADE. 



Clawson. George 
Jackson, Eeed 
Longwill, Leathie 
Lutz, Letta 
Marlin, George 
Euffner, Eddie 



lUi filler, Huldah 
Sweeny, Carrie 
AVatsou, Maidee 
AVoolsey, Vivian 
Zigler, Paul 



INDIANA, PA. 



23 



Bath, Claude 
Beatty, Thomas 
Coleman, ]Mary 
Davis, Chella 
Gray, Earl 
Irwin, Annie 
Jack, Willie 
Jackson, John 



Allen, Charlie 
Clark, Annie 
Davis, Pearl 
Hammers, Pearl 
Irwin, Alice 
McXutt, Garey 



FOURTH GRADE. 

Klingersmith, Willie 
Lear, Bessie 
Moorehead, Bert 
Moorehead, Jessie 
Xead, Hugh 
Smith, Marie 
Thompson, Ella 



FIFTH GRADE. 

Owens, Gretta 
Sloan, Grace 
Sutton, Kemper 
Watson, Helen 
Woolsey, Enid 



SIXTH GRADE. 



Blongh, Sarah 
Clark, Harold 
Clawson, Gertie 
Detwiler, Lottie 
Gray, Nellie 
Johnson, Lawrence 
Long, Herbert 



Lydic, Clark 
Malcolm, James 
Malcolm, Maude 
Ruffner, James 
Swauey, Nannie 
Sloan, Hope 
Watson, Mark 



SEVENTH GRADE. 



Earhart, Harry 
Gra^-, Myrtle 
Hammers, May 
Hammers, Carrie 
Johnson, ^label 
Klingersmith, Grace 
Marlin, Jessie 



McGregor, Annie 
Xagle, Carrie 
Nagle, Stella 
Pershing, Xellie 
Sloan, James 
Sloan, Geneva 
Watson, Richard 



24 



STATE NORMAL SCHOOL, 



Music Department. 



Allebrand, Louise 
Azdell, Belle 
Bach, Lizzie 
Bible, Mrs. Geprge P. 
Bloom, Grace 
Books, Mabel 
Bowers, Tirzah 
Brallier, Lulu 
Brown, Maud 
Brownlee, Mabel 
Carter, Lueile 
Chase, Mrs. C. E. 
Clark, Mary 
Clayton, Edith 
Clement, Bei'tha 
Coder, Ada 
Cort, Mabel 

Cunningham, Gertrude 
Drenuing, Esther 
Ellis, Nellie 
Evans, Lulu 
Ferguson, Margaret 
Fiscus, Clara 
Fiscus, W. R. 
Gallagher, Rose 
Haney, Alberta 
Hay den, Flora 
Kitchens, Emily 
Hood, Augustus 
House, Lizzie 
Jones, Sarah 
Jackson, Bessie 
Kallenbaugh, Marie 
Kittleberger, Louise 
Laughlin, KUa 
Lydic, Edna 
Lytle, Lulu 



. McAdoo, Maud 
McEnrue, Maj' 
McFadden, Grace 
McGee, Belle 
^Marshall, Harry 
Martin, Georgia 
Michael, Flora 
Miller, Lydia 
Mitchell, ^Nlabel 
Moore, Maud 
Nelson, Eva 
Owens, Bessie 
Owens, Gretta 
Pantall, Minta 
Parker, Bianca 
Parsons, Mattie 
Payne, Allie 
Purrington, Lila 
Richie, Lulu 
Rute, Lucy 
Schreckengost, Lottie 
Shupe, Abbie 
Smith, Clara 
Smith, Edith 
Smith, Isie 
Stewart, Hope 
Stumpf, Violet 
Thompson, Rue C. 
Tudor, Cyrus 
Watson, Helen 
Westerman, May 
"Williams, Ida 
Wilson, Bessie 
Wilson, Jennie 
Wineman, Sadie 
Work, Mary 



library "^ 

State College Indiana, pa. 25 

Indiana. P- ? 



Summary of Attendance. 



- 


Term Attendance. 

(EXCLUSIVE OF MODEL DEPARTME^•T.) 






Gentlemen. Ladies. 


Total. 


Fall Term, - 


96 198 


294 


Winter Term, 


- 92 202 


294 


Spring Term, 


134 271 


405 


Total, 


- 


- 



Scientific Department. 



Ladies, 



Post Graduates. 



Ladies, 



993 



Elementary Department. 




SENIORS. 




Ladies, ------- 


49 


Gentlemen, ------ 


8 


JUNIORS. 




Ladies, ------- 


283 


Gentlemen, ------ 


- 156 


Total in Normal Department, 


- 



57 



496 



Model Department. 

Boys, -------- 46 

Girls, -------- 64 



Total in Model Department, - - 110 



Grand Total of Different Students in Attendance, €6^ 



26 STATE NORMAL SCHOOL, 



Courses of Study. 



'HE law prescribes two courses of study for the Normal Schools 
of Pennsylvania — an Elementary and a Scientific course. 
Upon the completion of either, an examination is held by a State 
Committee and a diploma awarded. Tliis diploma empowers the 
holder to teach in the State of Pennsylvania without further 
examination. 



Elementary Course. 

The object of the Elementary Course is to prepare teachers 
for common school work. It requires a preparation in the common 
branches, together with other subjects closely related to them, 
wiiich it is necessary that a teacher should know. It requires pro- 
fessional training — theoretical and practical. The theoretical 
embraces Psychology, History of Education, School Management, 
and Methods of Teaching. The Practical requires, at least, twenty- 
one weeks' teaciiing in the Training Department. 



INDIANA, PA. 



27 



Schedule of Studies. 





Preparatory. 




F. 


E. 


D. 


Reading, 


Elocution, 




Writing, 




Drawing, 


Grammar, 


Grammar, 


Grammar, 


Spelling, 


Composition, 


Composition, 


Ax'ithmetic, 


Arithmetic, 


Arithmetic, 
Physiology, 


Geography. 


Geography. 


Geography, 




k 


History. 


Junior. 


C. 


B. 


A. 


Elocution, 




Vocal Music, 


Drawing, 


Manual Training, 


Book Keeping, 


School Management, 


Junior Methods, 


r Psychology and 




Grammar, 


t Observation, 


Composition, 


Arithmetic, 


Comjwsition, 


Algebra, 


Algebra, 


Algebra, 


Phys. f Geography, 




Elementary Science, 


History. 


Government, 






Latin. 


Latin. 


Senior. 


Fall. 


Winter. 


Spring. 




f Methods and 
\ Psychology, 




Methods, 


Psychology, 


Practice, 


Practice, 


Practice, 


Rhetoric, 


Classics, 


Literature, 
f History of 
\ Education. 


Geometry, 


Geometiy, 


Manual Training, 




Manual Training, 


Physics. 


Physics, 
Csesar. 


Botany. 



28 STATE NORMAL SCHOOL, 

Post-Graduate Course, 

[One Year.] 



Mathematics : — 

Solid Geometry, Plane Trigonometry and Surveying. 

Latin : — 

Tliree Books of Csesar and three books of Virgils' ^neid. 

Pedagogy : — 

Advanced Psychology, Moral Philosophy, Logic, Practice in 
Teaching, a careful reading of Quick's Educational Re- 
formers, Fitch's Lectures on Teaching and Payne's Contri- 
butions to the Science of Education, with written notes 
and criticisms. 

Natural Science: — 

Chemistry, Zoology and Astronomy. 

History and Literature : — 

General History, History of English and American Litera- 
ture, with written notes and criticisms, and a course of general 
reading. 



The Scientific Course. 



Tiie Scientific Course is intended to prej)are teachers for 
higher grades of work in the common schools — for principalships, 
chairs in high schools, etc., etc. 

Many graduates in the Elementary Course are desirous of 
obtaining knowledge of some of the higher branches, and of 
deepening and intensifying that metal culture whicli they aj)pre- 
ciate as only begun. There is a demand for those who take this 
course. 



INDIANA, PA. 29 



Scientific Course as Revised. 

Pedagogics : — 

Moral Philosophy. 
Logic. 

Philosophy of Education. 

Course of Professional Reading with abstracts, notes, and 
criticisms, to be submitted to Board of Examiners. 

Language : — 

Latin — six books of Virgil ; four orations of Cicero ; the Ger- 
mania of Tacitus, or a full equivalent; an equivalent of 
Greek, French or German will be accepted for Spherical 
Trigonometry, Analytical Geometry, Calculus, Natural 
Philosophy and Mathematical Astronomy; Literature. 

Mathematics : — 

Higher Algebra. 

Solid Geometry. 

Plane and Sj)herical Trigonometry. 

Surveying, with use of Instruments. 

Analytical Geometry. 

Differential and Integral Calculus. 

Natural Sciences : — 

Natural Philosophy, as much as in Snell's Olmstead. 

Astronomy — Descriptive and Mathematical. 

Chemistry. 

Geology and Mineralogy. 

Zoology. 

History : — 

Genei'al History. 



30 STATE NORMAL SCHOOL, 



Model School Course, 



Tliis comju-ises the following branches: Reading, Spelling, 
Writing, Arithmetic, Geogra])hy, History, Plant and Animal 
Lessons, Language, Form and Drawing, Vocal Music, Occupations 
of Kindergarten, Manual Training. 

These are outlined in seven grades corresponding in division 
to most approved city grading. 



College Preparatory Course. 



English. — English Grammar; Englisii Composition; Eng- 
lish Classics; Geography; U. S. History. 

Matliematics. — Arithmetic, including metric system ; Alge- 
bra through quadratic equations ; Plane Geometry. 

Language. — Latin — Latin Lessons and Reader; Csesar's 
Commentaries (four books) ; Virgil's iEneid (six books) ; Cor- 
nelius Nepos ; Cicero's Orations (six); Sallust (Cataline); Collar's 
Practical Latin Composition. 

Greek. — Xenophon's Anabasis (four books) ; Homer's Iliad 
(two books) ; Jones' Greek Prose Com|)osition, 

This course meets the requirements for entrance to the lead- 
ing colleges. The student may, if he desire, fit himself for classes 
higher than the Freshman. The course may, moreover, be varied 
to meet the requirements of the college the student expects to enter. 

Stress is placed on the j)repai'ation in English, the weak 
point of mariy applicants for admission to college. 



o 
5 . 



-^ 






o 

9 

c 
f 




INDIANA, PA. • 31 



Classical Course. 



First Year. 

Language. — English Grammar, English Composition, Col- 
lar and Daniell's Beginner's Latin, Cfesar (one hook). 
Mathematics. — Arithmetic, Algebra. 
Science. — History, Geography. 

Second Year. 

Language. — Csesar completed, Ijatin Prose, Cicero's Ora- 
tions, Greek Lessons, Greek Grammar, Anabasis (Book 1), Eno- 
lish Grammar, English Composition 

Mathematics. — Arithmetic, Algebra, Science, Chemistry, 
Physical Geography. 

Third Year. 

Language. — Rhetoric, English Classics, Sullnst's Cataline, 
Latin Prose, A^irgil, Cornelius Nepos, Anabasis, Homer's Iliad, 
Greek Prose Composition. 

Mathematics. — Geometry. 

Science. — Physics, Botimy. 



Industrial Traininor. 



I. Kindergarten : 

1. i^orm— Blocks— Clay. 2. y^Aa;)^— Tablets— Paper. 3. 
Designing — Stick laying — Parquetry Drawing. 4. Color- Work 
— Experiments with liquids — Coloring forms and designs. 5. 
Size — inch, foot, yard, etc. 6. Seed Planting and Observations. 
7. Preparing Specimens. 8. Seicing — Cards, Cloth. 



32 STATE NORMAL SCHOOL, 



II. Slojd or Sloyd : 

1. Kindergarten Pointers. 2. Parcel Carrier. 3. Pencil 

holder. 4. Thread Winder. 5. Garden Dibble. 6. t lower-pot 

Stand. 7. Paper Knife. 8. Penn Tray. 9. Spoon. 10. Scoop. 

II. Footstool. 12. iac/?e. 13. ^fc. 

III. Manual Training : 

1. Wood — a. Carving — embracing ten lessons in design. 
h. Turning — Care and use of lathe and tools. Cylinders, cones, 
inverted cones, table leg, goblet, chuck work (four lessons), 
Sj)liere. c. Joinery — Care and use of tools, half-lap joint, open 
mortise, and tenon joint, mitre joint, half dovetailed joint, dove- 
tailed joint with single tongue, rafter joint, false dovetailed joint. 

2. Metal — a. Tin — solder two })ieces together, groove and 
solder a seam, make plain pipe joint and solder, rectangular pan, 
right-angled elbow, tin cup. b. Copper — Geometric shapes and 
forms, c. Cast Iron — Ciiipping, filing and fitting, a square 
prism, angle piece, wrench, riveting two pieces, anvil, open slot- 
piece callipers, comj)ass, try-square. 



Musical Course. 



We wish to call attention to the advantages gained by com- 
ing to Indiana for the study of the art of music. 

After graduating here a pn{)il can finish in one or two years 
the course of any conservatory in the country, and thus save 
money. 

The best methods of instruction are used, and great care is 
taken to cultivate the musical taste of each pupil. 

There is another advantage in the opportunity the pupil has 
to study other sulyects. A musical education alone does not give 
the culture demanded at the present day. 

For terms, see " Expenses at Indiana." 



INDIANA, PA. 33 



Piano. 

FIRST YEAR. 
1 — Preparatory Exercises. 2 — lioeschorn Opus 65. 3 — 
Sonatines l)y Clementi and Kulilau. 4 — Twelve Little Preludes 
aud Fugue.>-Bach. 5 — Practice in major and minor scales. 

SECOND YEAR. 

1 — Loeschorn Opus 6Q. 2 — Heller Opus 47. 3 — Krause — 

Left Hand Studies. 4 — Mozart Sonatas. 5 — Mendelssohn's 

Songs without words. 6 — Easy Classical Selections. 7 — An easy 

and Comprehensive Method of Octave j)laying, by A. D. Turner. 

THIRD YEAR. 
1 — Jensen's Melodious Studies. 2 — Bach's Two-voiced In- 
ventions. 3 — Cramer's Studies. Continuation of Octave Studies. 

FOURTH YEAR, 

1 — Moscheles Opus 70. 2 — Beethoven and Schubert So- 
nates. 3 — Gradus Clementi. 4 — Study of Chords aud Octave 
Studies, by Kullak. 5. A careful selection of pieces throughout 
the entire course, from the best composers of the Old and Modern 
Schools. 

During the course one year in Harmony is required; also one 
year in Musical History, Biography and Form. Both Class and 
Private lessons are given in Harmony. 

Classes for beginners, numbering three in class, will be 
formed in piano-forte work. Attention is called especially to 
class teaching, because it very much lessens the expense, creates 
interest by hearing others play, and gives young pupils confidence. 
The plan is to meet each class three times a week, thus giving tlie 
inexperienced pupil the benefit of the teacher's instruction so fre- 
quently that he can always practice with a thorough understand- 
ing of his work. 

Vocal. 
FIRST YEAR. 

1 — Concone 50 Lecons, parts 1st and 2d. 2 — Concone 25 
Lecons. 3 — Technical Studies from Boualdi and Marchesi. 4 
Special attention given to the formation of tone and breathing. 



34 



STATE NORMAL SCHOOL, 



SECOND YEAR. 

1 — Exercises from Paiiofka and Bordogni with a continua- 
tion of the major and minor scales. 2 — Stacato and Legato 
Singing. 

THIRD YEAR. 

1 — Exercises of Bardomen. 2 — Study of the Oratorio. 3 — 
German and Italian Songs. 4 — Advanced Technical Studies 
given to produce various Timbre of the voice. 

The metliod is the Old Italian Method. That the tones 
may be taken with ease, there must be a thorough development 
and training of the organs which produce them. 




INDIANA, PA. 35 



DEPARTMENTS 



Professional Department. 



^TRADES aud ])rofessions are tlistingnished by skill and profi- 
^^ cieiicy in definite lines of work. These are acquired only 
by thorough training. The lawyer, the physician, and the minis- 
ter each prepares for his work by a special course of training. 
The business of the country is carried on by those who by special 
training have been moulded to fit the places they fill. If teach- 
ing is to be a profession, and no one now doubts it, those who 
succeed in the calling must make a special ])reparation for it. 
Normal Schools are established for the express purpose of giving 
this professional training. 

The Academic work is outlined with a view to the needs of 
the elementary teacher. Each branch is studied from the teach- 
er's standpoint. 

The Pedae'og-ical work includes : 

I. Theory of Teaching, a study of the relations of knowl- 
edge : 

1. The relations of faculty to knowledge and knowledge 
to the development of faculty ; Applied Psychology, Methods of 
Instruction and Elementary Science. 

2. Relations of feelings to activity, motives to emotions;. 
Scl\ool Management and Moral Training. 

3. Relations of natural conditions and environment to 
accomplishment ; School Equipment, School Hygiene, and Physi- 
cal Culture. 

II. History of Education. 

III. Practice of Teaching. This means the teaching of 
classes in the Model School, a school composed of seven grades of 
such pupils as are ordinarily found in graded public schools. 



36 STATE NORMAL SCHOOL, 

Tlie students first observe the teaching of expert teachers for one 
term, after which they take charge of classes for whose progress 
they are held responsible. All the work is under the supervision 
of efficient training teachers. To this feature of our work we 
give especial prominence. In order to receive a diploma from 
•this school, the student must do practice work of a high character. 



English Departments. 



ENGLISH GRAMMAR. 



F. Elementary graded language lessons involving study of 
syllables, words, sentences, enlarging to composition in paragraphs 
with drills in cajjitalization and punctuation. 

E. Modification of parts of speech ; infinitives, participles ; 
clauses ; construction of sentences ; parsing and analysis. 

D. Thorough discussion of the principles of grammar from 
outlines ; the grammars of Whitney, March, Brown, Williams, 
Reed and Kellogg, Maxwell and others, are used for reference ; 
constant practical work. 

B. Further study of verb, conjunction, and preposition ; 
analysis and parsing in classics ; etymology of words. 



Junior Composition. 

K. Capitalization ; punctuation ; the structure of the sen- 
fence ; the discussion and the structure of the paragraph ; outlines 
and reproduction of stories, sketches and poems; original com- 
positions on subjects within the range of the student's personal 
■observation and experience. 

D. Principles of expression ; the more common figures of 
speech ; para])hrasing and the use of synonyms ; abstracts ; ani- 
l)lification ; brief original compositions, mainly narrative and 
<Jesci"iptive ; letter- wri.tijig. 



INDIANA, PA. 37 



C. Abbott's " How to Write Clearly ; " reconstruction of 
faulty sentences from conversation, composition and newspapers ; 
discussion of the title, subject and theme of a composition ; ori- 
ginal compositions on narrative, descrij)tive and abstract subjects. 

A. Brief History of the Language ; full discussion of 
figures of speech ; original compositions ; the debate. 

In every composition class a judicious use of classics is made 
for the purpose of acquainting the student with the works of the 
best writers of English. Science is also used as a basis for com- 
position. 



Senior Year. 

Theory, Example, Practice — these are the three features of 
the Englisii work, and they are made to go hand in hand. 

In theorv an endeavor is made to master the fundamental 
principle of style and invention. 

In invention special attention is paid to the ordering of 
material, the determination ot" the theme, and the construction of 
the plan of the discourse. 

The laws of Description, Narration, Exposition, Augmenta- 
tion and Persuasion are studied. 

This theory is constantly given concrete application, and the 
student is taught to solve from the masterpieces of the language 
the laws and princii)les of Rhetoric. 

An attempt is made to sharpen his vision by compelling his 
attention to the details of expression, to make his English a 
valuable mental discipline by leading him to discover for himself 
from models of good writing what constitutes clearness, purity, 
strength, or felicity of style. Tiirough the year his writing is 
kept up; thus he is given actual practice in subduing the de- 
tailed requisites of expression until they become the ready ser- 
vants of his own thought. 

A critical class study and interpretation of one of Shakes- 
peare's plays is given during the second term. 

During the last term the students study biographies of the 
authors who have contributed to the historical development of 
our language, with the best criticisms upon these authors and the 
best ])assages from their works. 



38 STATE NORMAL SCHOOL, 



Mathematical Department. 



ARITHMETIC, 

The work in Arithmetic is divided into four classes, suited 
to the varied degrees of advancement of" those who enter. In 
order to enter one of the higher grades, tlie student must pass 
satisfactory examination in the work of each lower grade. 

The work of the grades is as follows : 

F Grade. Fundamental Rules: Elementary Work in Com- 
mon and Decimal Fi-actions ; Denominate Numbers and Measure- 
ments ; Analysis ; Simple Interest. 

E Grade. Practice Problems in G. C. D. and L. CM.; 
Comnion and Decimal Fractions ; Denominate Numbers and 
JMeasurement ; Analysis ; Simple Interest ; Discount ; Annual 
and Compound Interest ; Longitude and Time. 

D Grade. Percentage and Applications. 

B Grade. Comj)lete Arithmetic. 

y\LQEBRA. 

Two courses in Algebra are prescribed : 1, that required in 
the Elementary Course of Study ; 2, that required in the Scientific 
Course of Study. 

The first, which is outlined for the C, Band A grades, is com- 
plete in the subjects usually presented in Elementary algebra. The 
C grade gives a primary course, embracing the subject to 
radicals. It is its purpose to lay the foundation for a 
more ])hilosophical treatment of the same and subsequent topics in 
the more advanced grades. It aims : (1) to be an easy transition 
from the notation of common arithmetic to the literal notation of 
algebra by the inductive method; (2) to develop the subject with 
sufficient fullness to be a practical course in itself; (3) to intro- 
duce enough sight-drills and practical problems to insure ease and 
accuracy in methods of operation. 



INDIANA, PA. 39 



Elementary algebra is completed in the B and A grades, 
The work is as follows : 

B Grade. — All topics as far as Theory of Indices. 

A Grade. — Theory of Indices, Radicals, Qnadratics, Eatio, 
Proportion and Series. 

Thoroughness is demanded at each step. Students are re- 
quired to discuss topics, to state principles and definitions in good 
language, and to demonstrate and illustrate every proposition. 
The entire course aims at the development of the reasoning powers 
rather than at mere training in methods of operation. 

The work required in the Scientific Course is substantially 
the same as that outlined in Olney's University Algebra, Part III. 

GEOMETRY. 

The work in Geometry in the Elementary Course consists of 
two terms. The object is to develop power in mathematical 
reasoning. To obtain this the inductive method is used and suflfi- 
cient work is done to cover the ground of Wentworth's Plane 
Geometry. One term's work in Solid Geometry and Conic Sec- 
tions is required in the Scientific Course. 

TRIGONOMETRY AND SURVEYING. 

These subjects constitute one term's work in the Scientific. 
The modern methods of treating these subjects are used. The 
latter part of the term is devoted almost entirely to field work and 
use of surveyors' instruments. 

The Senior year's work in Mathematics of the Scientific 
Course consists of three terms. The subjects taken up are Ana- 
lytical Geometry and Differential and Integral Calculus, Spherical 
Trigonometry. One term is devoted to each. 



40 STATE NORMAL SCHOOL, 



Geographical and Historical 
Department. 



Geography and History are taught in their relation to eacli 
other. It is a study o^ man in his home. In geographic teaching 
the aim is to build up in the mind of the pupil clear notions of the 
earth as the home of man. Clear notions of the objects of nature, 
of the forces of nature, of man, and the relation of earth, force and 
man to society. Historic teaching is building up in the mind of 
pupils clear pictures or notions of the deeds of man — not only 
deeds in reference to time and place, but in their relation to each 
other. 

Teaching these subjects from such a standpoint results in 
development of thought power, in culture and practical informa- 
tion. There is not a power of the mind that is not strengthened. 

There are, three classes in History and Government: 

D Grade. — Through the Revolutionary War. 

C Grade. — The Administrations. 

B Grade. — Civil Government, jMunicipal and International 
Law. 

There are three classes in Geography : 

F Grade. — Elementary study of the entire subject. 

E Grade. — Detailed study of North America, United States, 
Europe and South America. 

D Grade. — Detailed study of Asia, Africa and Oceania ; 
review of E Grade. 

C Grade. — Physical Geography. See Scientific Department. 



General History. 



In the course in General History it is aimed to give the 
student the benefits of the "Seminary Method," first employed in 
Germany, and of late introduced into our own leading colleges. 



INDIANA, PA. 41 



By this means the student is placed in the position of an inde- 
pendent investigator, original material is given him, his interest is 
awakeneJ, thought is aroused, he is taught to discuss, reason, dis- 
criminate, his observation, judgnient and inference are stimulated 
and history is seen by him to be a far different thing than the 
mere memorizing of other people's thoughts. 

The results of the individual work of the pupils are subjected 
to the criticism and discussion of the class room and the acce})ted 
results are arranged in compact and logical order and fixed in the 
memory. In short our purpose is to obtain some of the advan- 
tages which students in the natural sciences acquire from woi'k in 
laboratories, instead of that mere memorizing of words which too 
often prevents the assimilation of facts and clogs the processes of 
reflection and private judgment. 



Science Department. 

It is the object of this de])artment to secure to the })U[)il the 
distinctive advantages which result from correct science study. 
These we believe to be the power to observe quickly, clearly and 
comprehensively, and the ability to deduce legitimate conclusions 
from the observations thus made. With these ends in view, it is 
the aim never to tell the pupil what he can find out for himself 
by observation or experiment. Beginning with 

PHYSIOLOGY, 
the student is taught the i)rincipal facts of his own anatomy^ 
together with the functions of his organs and the circumstances 
most favorable to their proper action. The teaching is enforced 
here by means of skeletons, both human and lower mammalian, 
by microscopic slides, by lantern projections, and by actual dissec- 
tion of some lower mammal. 'J'he student is now ready to begin 

PHYSICAL GEOGRAPHY. 
In this work, taking for granted a knowledge of general 
political and descriptive geography, our gi»eat aim is to impart 
broad ideas of the structure of the globe, and the relation of each 
part to the whole, and, after working down tothe details, to return 
again and end with the whole globe. 



42 STATE NORMAL SCHOOL, 

ELEMENTARY SCIENCE. 

The work in this branch is intended to teach the pupil how 
to study nature. No attempt at classified Botany, Zoology or 
Mineralogy is made or desired. The pupils, seated about wo)"k 
tables examine, compare and describe the specimens placed in their 
hands. They are taught to see accurately, and to infer habit from 
structure. Those who wish to do so, may substitute Elementary 
Chemistry for this branch. 

In the senior year the study of 

PHYSICS 

is taken up. By this time considerable observational power and 
fair maturity of mind may be j)resupposed. Accordingly here the 
aim is not so restricted as before. The endeavor is made to have 
each deduction founded on a larger number and broader range of 
experiments, and to determine in many cases, not only the general 
law, but to decide quantitively the exact result and the extent of 
the limitations by surrounding circumstances. 

As a final studv in the elementary course comes 

BOTANY, 

Here an amount of text book work sufficient to acquire the 
necessary technical terms is demanded. But the greater part of 
the work consists in the collection, pre])aration, dissection and 
mounting of a large number of plants. Special attention is paid 
to structure and function as eSected by environment, and to the 
interrelations of the animal and the plant worlds. 



In the Scientific course all work is individual. Each pupil 
does everything liiniself under the supervision of the teacher. In 

ZOOLOGY 
€ach pu[)il makes his own dissections, mounts his own microscopic 
slides and prepares his own mounted specimens. In 

ADVANCED CHEMISTRY 
€ach pupil has his own stall, witli its equipment of apparatus and 
reagents, and he conducts eacli experiment for himself. The prin- 
ciples of photogra))hic chemistry are j)ractically taught. But the 



INDIANA, PA. 43 



\voi'k here is cliiefly analytical, and such attention is paid to blow- 
pipe work as {)repares the pupil for the later work in 

GEOLOGY, 

which is carried out on the same lines as have i>een already indi- 
cated — much field work being required. 

The Science depaitment is provided with an outfit of excel- 
lent apparatus. Our equipment is continually being increased, 
and now includes many pieces of great value. The Laboratory 
has been completely refurnished durii)g the last year. Work 
tables with room for eacii pupil have been introduced, and lecture 
chairs with tablet arms have replaced the benches. 



Elocutipnary Department. 



The natural mediums God has given us for the expression of 
thought, are speech and gesture. It is right and proi)er, therefore, 
that these mediums should be thoroughly cultivated and 
developed, so that we may be able to express our 
thoughts, or those of the author, in a clear, forcible and 
intelligent manner. Along with the acquisition of thought, or 
knowledge, should be cultivated the power to express it. 

The object of this department is to enable students to com- 
])rehend, to appreciate and comminiicate thougld in the most 
natural and effective manner. 



Voice Culture. 



The first thing essential for a good and pleasing style of read- 
ing is the proper cultivation of the voice. A harsh tone of voice 
not only grates upon the sensitive ear, but is not susceptible to 
pleasant changes and modulations so necessary to the correct 
rendition of any selection. The gesture may be perfect, the ex- 
pression of the face faultless, and the conception of the thought 
correct; yet if the tones of the voice be harsh, unnatural, or weak, 
the force of the production is in a measure lost. 



44 STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 



Daily drills, in exercises especially adaj)ted to the cultivation 
of the voice are given, embracing. Breathing Exercises, Vocal' 
G9/mnastics, aud Physical Culture; the object in view being to 
(\eye\ope power, JlexibiUty, resonance am] purity of tone. 



Articulation and Pronunciation. 

Drill exercises in the elementary sounds of the language, to- 
gether with difficult combinations, for the purpose of strengthen- 
ing the organs of articulation, and to give a clear and distinct 
enunciation and a correct pronunciation, are practiced. Phonetic 
Analysis, Syllabication, Accent, etc., are features of our daily 
work. 



Gesture. 

The first eflfort ol the child to be understood is not through 
articulate speech, but by gesture. It is the universal language of 
all nations. It is the silent, though no less powerful medium for 
the expression of thought. By gesture we reveal that which 
speech is powerless to express. By a wave of the hand we com- 
mand, entreat, invite, repel, etc. 

In treating this most im})ortant subject, we avoid any out- 
landish mannerisms which tend toward artificiality, thus making 
the pupil unnatural, and detracting from the true merits of the 
piece. Our aim is to teach the guidivg principles, with extensive 
practice, so that the movements will be natural, easy and graceful. 



Outline of Work. 

FIRST TERM.- 

. . (a) Breathing Exercises. 

1. Cultivation or \ n\ -^t i tt' 

[b) Vocal xL/xercises. 



the Voice. 



(c) Calisthenics. 
'(«) Study of Elementary Sounds. 



„ A . 1 . ' (&) Phonetic Analysis. 

2. Articulation, J ,^ ^,. . . , ,r 'i 

'i (c) Diacritical MarUs. 

L(cZ) Pronunciation. 



o 
'J. 



Daily Practice in Reading. 







-«r>9 ^4ikk?^l 



^■^^ ' 







I A i 







•INDIANA, PA. 45 



SECOND TERM. 

1. Voice Culture continued. 

f{a) Analysis of Selections. 

_ . I (6) Modulations of the Voice. 

iLxpression, i / n t»- i t-i m- c.^^ ^ 

^ ' ^ (c) Pitch, Force, Time, Slides or 

Inflections, Emphasis, Pauses. 

(a) Position. 
Gesture, -^ (6) Movements of the Body.' 

(c) Facial Expression. 
Platform Recitations and Sight Reading. 

THIRD TERM. 

f{a) Analysis of Shakesperian Selec- 

1. Advanced Read- J tions and Reading one Play, 
ings & Recitations, i (6) Humorous and Pathetic Readings 

L and Recitations. 

2. Practical Principles of Delsarte System. 

3. Rhetorical, Platform and Sight Reading. 



Manual Training Department. 



Education means a training of all the powers — the hand, the 
head, the heart. The co-ordination of the muscles gives steadiness 
to tlie body. A co-ordination of the hand, head and heart gives 
steadiness to human action. The hand is an instrument of ex- 
pression. The three forms of expression in whicii it is usually 
trained are writing, drawing and mahing. Training the hand is 
training it to work in conformity with the mind. Writing is 
drawing the picture of words, behind which there are ideas; 
drawing is making lines, behind which are ideas ; making is con- 
structing something behind which there are ideas. So the maxim, 
" Ideas before loords, lines or constructions.'^ Drawing may be 
divided as follows: 1, Perceptive, drawing with object in hand; 



46 STATE NORMAL SCHOOL, 

2, Conceptive, drawing when the object is absent from mental 
picture ; imaginative, drawing from specifications — where con- 
struction and modification of mental elements are necessary. 

For information concerning different kinds of work in con- 
struction, see Manual Training under course of study. 



Classical Department. 



LATIN 

The ''Roman" pronunciation is used. 

In the Junior year two terms are spent on Collar and Daniell's 
" Beginner's Latin Book." It is here the aim to thoroughly 
ground the student in the forms and inflections in the general 
principles of Latin syntax. It; is desired that the student have a 
good knowledge of English before taking up this branch, since 
the idioms of the two languages are constantly compared. 

By constant practice, oral and written, from English into 
Latin, and Latin into English, familiarity with the Latin idioms 
and proficiency in translation is acquired. 

In the Senior year the Helvetian War from Ceasar's Gallic 
War is read. Here, in addition to the literal and free translation of 
the text, there is constant drill in the us9 and force of the cases, 
of the moods and tenses, of the principles of indirect discourse, of 
the gerund and gerundive constructions, of the ablative absolute, 
in the derivation of words, and in the analysis of sentences. 

The Scientific course continues with one term on books II, 
IIL and IV. of Cfesar, two terms on Virgil's ^neid (Books I- 
VL) one term on the Orations of Cicero, and one term on the 
" Gertnania" of Tacitus. In connection, Collar's Practical Latin 
Comj)osition is used. 

In reading poetry, sufl&cient attention is given to the laws of 
versification to enable the student to scan the j)oetry he reads. 



INDIANA, PA. 47 



GREEK. 

Frost's Greek Primer is the text book first used in this course. 
Its method approaches the inductive. It is the aim not only to 
imphint a thorougli knowledge of" the forms and principles of 
syntax, but also, by means of" reading at sight and other exercises, 
to enable the student to use the language in a practical way. In 
this way the student comes to look upon Greek not as a " dead " 
language, made up of a mass of forms and rules, but as the legacy 
of a cultured people. By the arrangement cf the exercises the 
student is familiarized with the idioms of the language, and 
acquires a vocabulary of some five hundred of the more common 
words used by the Greek autliors. 

The reading of the Greek authors inckides Xenaphon's An- 
abasis and Homer's Iliad. If desired, other authors may be 
studied. In connection with these, the history and customs of 
the Greek people are taken up. Exercise in writing Greek is 
kept up by the use of Jones' Greek Prose Composition. 



Commercial Department. 

Successful men and women of every calling in life recognize 
the advantages of a thorough business education. To those who 
intend pursuing an active business career, this is absolutely neces- 
sary ; and to any one it is a valuable aid. For this reason several 
years ago the Commercial Department was added to our School. 
Its object is to instruct young men and women in the laws, cus- 
toms and forms of business; to cultivate in them habits of naat- 
ness, accuracy and thoroughness of work; to familiarize them 
with practical business problems, and in every way possible to pre- 
pare them for successful business lives. The teachers are of the 
regular School Faculty, and are specialists in their several lines. 
The following is the 

Course of Study : 

WRITING. 

Daily drills are given in "Writing, with special regard to 
legibility, speed and neatness of work. 



48 STATE NORMAL SCHOOL, 

BOOVt^EEPINS. 

This may be -called the backbone of a business education, for 
unless one understands the keeping of accounts in an intelligent 
manner he is certainly weak as a business man. Our aim is to 
develoj) independence of thought and work in the writing up of 
the different sets, and to so train students that they can readily 
keep the books of any business. The work includes Retail and 
Wholesale Business, Corporations, Manufacturing and Banking. 

ARITHMETIC. 

The Arithmetic required for the completion of the Commer- 
cial Course is that of the " D " grade. This includes a review of 
fractious and denominate numbers and a thorough drill in the 
principles and application of percentage. 

COMPOSITION. 

While the Commercial Course does not aim to give students 
literary finish, yet careful attention is given to the writing of 
"plain English." The work required of students in this depart- 
ment is the work of the " Junior " E " and " D " classes, and in- 
cludes the following : Punctuation, the structure of sentences, 
paragraphing, letter- writing. 

GRAIvlMAR. 

To assist the student in tlie correct use of both spoksn and 
written English, two terms' work in Grammar are required. The 
first includes both the analysis of sentences prepared and the con- 
struction of similar sentences by th'e pupils themselves. The sec- 
ond is a technical study of the various parts of speech, their use 
and relations and something of the history of the names and their 
signification. Drill is given in the explanation of all common 
constructions. 

HISTORICAL AND CIVIL GOVERNMENT. 

The History as scheduled for the " B " and " C " Divisions 
of the Normal Course together with the work in Civil Govern- 
ment must be completed by the student graduating from the 
Commercial Department, 



INDIANA, I'A. • 49 



COMMERCIAL LAW. 

This includes the discussion of Contracts, Negotiable Pai)er, 
Baihinent, Carriage of Freight and Passengers, Agency and other 
topics of importance to business men. 

SPELLING AND ELOCUTION. 

Tlie ability to express our thoughts, or those of the author, 
accurately and forcibly, both orally and written, cannot be over- 
estimated. It is to all a most desirable accomplishment; to- the 
book-keeper and clerk iudispensible. Your knowledge of the 
principles of book-keeping may be fair, your penmanship artistic 
and beautiful, but if your spelling is faulty and your ex • 
pression poor your usefulness in a business way is greatly weak- 
ened. In Elocution the course aims especially to give a thorough 
drill in the elements of vocal expression, voice and manner, artic- 
ulation and pronunciation. The study of the elementary sounds 
and phonetic analysis is absolutely necessary, especially for those 
who contemplate taking a course in Sliorthand. All pupils are 
required to take spelling or satisfy the teacher in charge by 
special examination that they are able to spell correctly the more 
common words, and particularly words relating to commercial 
and business forms. 

SHORT-HAND AND TYPE-WRITING. 

As a profession, or as a stepping-stone to other professions, 
the ])ractice of short-hand and type-writing forms one of the most 
profitable, pleasant and pi-ogressive of occupations. New rooms 
have lately been furnished especially for the teaching of these 
subjects. No extra charge is made to commercial students. 

BUSINESS PRACTICE. 

Part of each term is spent in " Business Practice." The busi- 
ness of a city, on a small scale, is hei-e carried on, with its stores, 
offices and banks. Each student enters business with a certain 
capital ; buys and sells; draws drafts and checks; writes receipts, 
notes and other business papers ; gains or losses, and at last retires 
from business with a handsome profit or insolvent, as the case may 
be. The benefit of this work is great in that it combines theory 
with practice, and thus fixes the principles of book-keeping. 



50 STATE NORMAL SCHOOL, 

III addition to the advantages of the department, Cwninieroial 
stndents have all the privileges of the large library and reading 
room, literary societies and debating clnbs, athletic association, 
Christian association, socials, lectures and other entertainments of 
the School. 

The time required to complete the Commercial Course varies 
with the ability, previous training and application of the student. 
Those who enter the "E" classes will i)robably require th^ee 
terms, while others who are further advanced can finish it in a 
shorter time. As the instruction is largely individual, each stu- 
dent may progress as fast as he is able and finish the work as soon 
as possible. 

Having finished the prescribed Course, and passed the exam- 
inations satisfactorily, the student is granted an elegant diploma. 
The charge for the diploma is one dollar. 



Athletic Department. 

We believe in the German adage, " A sound mind in a sound 
body is the best thing we can wish for ourselves." The highest 
intellectual culture and development demands a strong physical 
support. We make provision for this demand : 

1. By systematic Gymnastics in Chapel daily throughout the 
confining parts of the year. 

2. Work is now progressing upon a Gymnasium Hall, 
which will be thoroughly equijiped with all modern appliances. 

3. This will be in charge of a competent instructor in 
Physical Culture, and will be open at different paits of the day to 
each of the sexes. 

4. Parts of our large campus are given up to field sports. 
Croquet grounds, four excellent Tennis Courts, a Foot Ball field, 
a Base Ball diamond, two Hand Ball alleys. 

5. We have a hundred guns, furnished by the State, and u 
comi)etent instructor in Military Tactics. 



INDIANA, PA. 51 



Government. 



ELF-GOVERNMENT is the true type of government. It 
is the only kind of government capable of developing high 
character. The teacher should possess this higii type of character. 
Hence the constant aim of this school is to develop self control 
and to cultivate sucii a sentiment as will render discij)Iine unne- 
cessary. Activity is the law of development; hence self-govern- 
ment makes the student strong and fits iiim for life; while coer- 
cion, or government from without, renders him unfit for life's 
work. 

Therefore, a preparation for teaching in the high sense must 
contain the element of self-control. The student's regulative 
power must be developed. He who cannot govern himself is 
unfit to govern others. He who is not obedient cannot stimulate 
obedience in others. Physical training, intellectual training, pro- 
fessional training, all receive their attention; so does moral train- 
ing. A continual eftbrt is made to develoj) a high sense of honor 
in the students by having them act honorably. 

We have but few regulations; but that we may all live 
liaj)pily in so large a community as we have, it is necessary that 
there be some. A printed copy of the regulations may be had on 
application. 



Building, Location, Grounds, Etc. 



Building. 

Favorable surroundings and comfortable apartments are very 
important factors in successful student life. "Our environment" 
is a powerful educator, and, other things being equal, he can suc- 
ceed best whose workshoj) and tools are most nearly what they 
ought to be. The building occupied by the Indiana Normal 
Sciiool is one of the best arranged buildings for school purposes 
in this or any other State. 



52 STATE NORMAL SCHOOL, 

Situated on a gentle eminence with a lovely outlook and in 
the midst of delightful grounds, it includes a liberal share of those 
arrangements which go to render student life pleasant and attrac- 
tive. The entire building is heated by steam and lighted by arti- 
ficial gas. An elev^ator will be added this summer which will 
remove all objections to upstairs rooms. 

Students who have been compelled to carry coal up two or 
three flights of stairs, kindle their own fires, and carry their ashes 
to the back yard, or who have been annoyed with the dirt and 
inconvenience which must result from the use of coal and oil, will 
surely appreciate these conveniences. Every floor is supplied with 
an abundance of hot and cold water, bath rooms, lavatories and 
water closets of the most approved patterns. 

Danger in case of fire is reduced to a minimum by our 
method of heating and lighting as well as by the ample arrange- 
ments for extinguishing a fire should one occur, also by fire escapes 
abundantly provided for each floor. 

In brief, this immense building is planned and furnished 
throughout for the convenience, safety and success of its inmates. 

The rooms have all been refurnished. Each room has a new 
suit of oak furniture. It comprises a bedstead, with spring, a 
bureau, a washstand, two chairs, a study table, and a neat case of 
book shelves. The rooms are all carpeted. 

A steam laundry has been fitted up, wdiich does very fine 
work. The kitchen has also been refurnished with new cooking: 
apparatus. All cooking is done by steam. In short, our building 
is fitted up with the most modern machinery and appliances. 



Location and Railroad Connections. 

The character and location of Indiana are such as to render it 
especially desirable as a site for a Normal School. 

Near the mountains, it is entirely removed from all malaria, 
and has an atmosphere of great purity and healthfulness. The 
health record of the school, as a consequence, has always been re- 
markably good. 

The moral and intellectual character of the citizens, an item 
of no small importance to those away from home and among 



INDIANA, PA. 53 



strangers, is of a high order, as has been shown in an unmistaka- 
ble manner by the creation and liberal support of a State Normal 
School. 

Being on a branch line of railroad and at its terminus, 
Indiana is almost entirely Iree from tramps and other rough char- 
acters so abundant in railroad towns. 

Another fact of no small importance is the entire absence of 
saloons. There is no place within the county where liquor can be 
sold l)y the drink legally. 

But Indiana, with its high moral tone, its sobriety, its beau- 
tiful scenery and its salubrious climate, is far from being isolated 
or inconvenient of access. 



Railroad Accommodations. 

The Indiana Branch connects at Blairsville with the "West 
Penn, and at Blairsville Intersection with the Pennsylvania Cen- 
tral, and as a consequence, Indiana is easily reached from any 
portion of the State. 

There are three mails each way every day, and telegraphic 
communication with all the leadino; cities and towns. 

Taken all in all, it would be hard to find a town safer or 
more convenient for the citizens of Western Pennsvlvania. 



Grounds. 

The grounds contain about twenty-three acres. They contain 
a beautiful forest grove of about three acres. The remainder con- 
tains many trees. A comj)etent gardener is employed to keep the 
grounds about the buildings in order. The buildings are sur- 
rounded by beautiful beds of foliage plants and blooming flowers. 



54 STATE NORMAL SCHOOL, 



Miscellaneous. 



EXAMINATIONS. 



Examination for Graduation. 



1. No one can be graduated from a Pennsylvania State 
Normal School who has not attended the school at least one-half 
of a school year. 

2. Candidates for graduation are examined by the Faculty, 
and, if found qualified, are recommended to the Board of Ex- 
aminers. 

3. The State Superintendent or his deputy shall be President 
of this Board, and in conjunction with two Principals of Normal 
Schools, and two County, City, or Borough Superintendents, shall 
constitute the Board of Examiners. 

4. At the examination for graduation, a paper stating that 
the candidates have completed the course of study for Normal 
Schools, have taught the required time in the Model School, and 
liavebeen examined and approved by the Faculty, shall be presented 
by the Principal to the Board of Examiners. 

5. A thesis of not less than six folio pages of manuscript, 
upon some educational subject is required from each candidate, as 
part of the examination. 

6. The Board of Examiners test the knowledge of the can- 
didates upon all branches of study in the course in which they are 
examined, special attention being given to the Science and Art of 
of Teaching. 

7. Great stress will be laid upon the character of the work 
done in the Model School, and no one will be graduated who has 
not acquired a good degree of skill and success as a teacher. 

8. Candidates if found j)roficient by the State Committee, 
will receive diplomas enumerating all the branches of the Elemen- 
tary Course, and declaring them competent to teach in the public 
schools of the State without further examination. 



INDIANA, PA. 55 



9. 'J'lii.s diploma will constitute the holder " Bachelor of the 
Elements." 

10. Graduates in the Elementary Course who have con- 
tinued their studies two years subsequent to graduation, and who 
have taught successfully in tlie common schools of the State for 
two full annual terms, of not less than six months each, shall, upon 
presentation of proper credentials, receive a second diploma, con- 
stituting them " Master of the Elements." 

11. The candidate for " Master's Degree," must present to 
the State Committee a certificate signed by the President and Sec- 
retary of his school board, and contersigned by the Superintendent 
of Public Schools. This certificate must vouch for the excellence 
of his moral ciiaracter, and also for his success in teaching. 



'^Plan for Junior Examinations. 

1. Admission to the Senior class shall be determined by the 
State Board of Examiners at the annual examination by tlie Board. 
Only such Juniors to be examined as are recommended bv the 
Faculty. 

3. In order to be admitted into the Senior class, students 
must be qualified in the studies of the Junior course, with the ex- 
ception of Pedagogics, the examination in which shall be deferred 
to the Senior year. Such examination in the studies of the Junior 
course to be final. 

3. A certificate, setting forth the passing of the Junior 
Course, shall be prepared by the Department of Public Instruc- 
tion, and each one issued shall be signed by the Board, and shall 
entitle the holder thereof to admission into the Senior class of any 
State Normal School of Pennsylvania at the beginning of any 
school year. 

4. It is ex})ected that those admitted to the Senior class will 
be able to complete the work of the course in one year. 



•In order to further the ends sought in the Junior examination, no student 
■will be permitted to take both the Junior and Senior examination before the same 
committee. 

The fall examiiuitions for admission to the Senior class have been abolished. 



56 STATE NORMAL SlHUOL, 

Examination of Practical Teachers. 

The Normal School law makes it the duty of the State 
Board of Examiners to grant Diplomas or State Certificates to 
actual teachers of common schools, without their having attended 
the Normal Schools as students upon the following conditions : 

1. The a})plicant must be twenty-one years of age, of food 
moral character, and must have taught successfully in common 
schools of this State during three consecutive annual terms imme- 
diately preceding the examination. The proof of good moral 
character and satisfactory teaching for the required time, must be 
a certificate from the proper Board or Boards of Directors, signed 
by the President and Secretary, and countersigned by the proper 
Superintendent or Suj>erintendents. 

2. The examination may be in either the Elementary or 
Scientific Course, as the applicant may select according to the list 
of studies as j)rinted in the circulars of State Normal Schools and 
approved by the State Superintendent, or in such other studies as 
may, by the Board of Examiners, be deemed equivalent. 

3. Each applicant is required to prepare and })resent to the 
State Board of Examiners an original thesis of not less than six 
folio j)ages of manuscript, on some professional subject, which 
thesis is to be retained at the school where the examination takes 
place. 

4. The examination and certificate are without expense to 
the apj)licant, and the certificate is full evidence of qualification 
to teach the branches therein named, in any part of the State 
without further examination. 

5. Practical teachers, attending examinations at the Slate 
Normal Schools for the ])urpose of procuring State Certificates, 
are examined sepai-ately from the regular students, and both the 
State Board of Examiners and the Faculty of the School at 
which the examination is held, take part in the examination, all 
being required to sign the certificate. 



(^ £^ f"' 




INDIANA. I'A. 



57 



Expenses at Indiana. 

There is an impression in the minds of some that Indiana is 
an expensive school. Those who are preparing for attendance at 
some school, but who have not fully made up their minds as to 
the school of their choice, sometimes say : 

" We would prefer to go to Indiana, but it costs so much that 
we cannot afford it." 

We wish to reply to all such parties that when our rates are 
FAIRLY COMPARED with thosc of rival schools, there will be 
found to be very little difference. 

Under the imj)ression that it would be the fairest course to 
pursue and the one that would give the greatest degree of satis- 
faction to our patrons, we have been accustomed to aggregate all 
expenses except those for books and stationery, thus leaving no 
EXTRA BILES for room rent, washing, light, fuel, etc., to be sent 
when unexpected, as is often the case. 

We give below a statement of expenses : 





Fan Term, 
15 Weeks. 


Winter 

Term, 

13 Weeks. 


oring 
Term, 
14 Weeks. 


Less than 

a Term, 

Per Week. 


Boarding Students. 








For tuition, board, furnished room 










light, heat and washing 


875 00 


§65 00 


$70 00 


St ^^ 


Day Students. 




For tuition 


21 00 


18 00 


19 00 


1 50 


Model School Students. 


For board, furnished room, light, 










heat and washiue 


75 00 


65 00 


70 00 


X OS; 




_o 


Extras. 










For Piano, Organ, Voice Culture 










or Private Lessons in Harmony 










for two Lessons per week 


15 00 


13 00 


14 00 


1 20 


For one lesson per week 


9 00 


7 80 


8 40 


60 


For use of instruments for two 










practice periods per day 


2 00 


2 00 


2 00 





Vacation Board — For board during the Holidjiy and Spring vaca- 
tions, §3.50 per week. 

Transient Board — By the week, $4.00 ; l)y the day, 75 cents. 



c;8 STATE NORMAL SCHOOL, 



Boarders paying by the terra and who have been in attendance 
for three consecutive terms will, on making their last pay- 
ment, receive a reduction of ten dollars, thns bringing their ex- 
penses down to $200 per year. Day students will receive a re- 
duction of eight dollars, making tuition $50 per year. 

Those wiio desire to practice still further economy, will find 
opportunity for self-boarding or club-boarding at as low rates as 
can be obtained anywhere. 

Again, since the Indiana Normal is within five minutes 
walk of the station, all hack bills in traveling to and from the 
station are avoided as well as the ride itself, which, in unpleasant 
weather is so disagreeable. 



Rooms. 

Extra Rooms — Each room is intended to accommodate two 
boarders, and the scale of prices, given above, is arranged accord- 
ingly. An exception is made in the case of a few of the smaller 
rooms, but usually where a student occupies a room alone, an 
extra charge will be made, and must be prepaid before taking 
the room. 

Washing — Each student is entitled to the washing of ten 
plain pieces in addition to towels and napkins. 

All articles sent to the laundry must be plainly marked, 
with the name of the owner written in some indelible form. 

Students are expected to provide themselves with towels, 
table napkins, soap and other needful toilet articles. 

Since in case of sickness, meals are sent to the rooms, each 
student should provide himself with knife, fork and spoon, as 
silver will not be sent out of the dining room. 



Choice of Rooms. 



Students in actual attendance at the close of one term, are 
entitled to preference in the choice of rooms for the next term. 
All other students are entitled to choice of rooms in the order of 
the reception of their applications. 



INDIANA, PA. 59 



No rooms, selected by or for students, will be held for them 
beyond the first Wednesday of the term, except upon special 
arrangement to that effect, and charge will, in all cases, be made 
for rooms thus held. 



Deductions. 



For absence two consecutive weeks or more, on account 
of personal sickness, one-half the usual charge for board and 
tuition. 

No deduction is made for absence the first two or last two 
weeks of the term, except by previous arrangement with the 
Principal. 



State Appropriations to Students. 

In accordance with the Act of the Legislature, the following 
apj)ropriations are made to Normal students and Normal 
graduates : 

1. Each student over seventeen years of age, who shall sign 
^ paper declaring his intention to teach in the common schools of 
the State, shall receive the sum of fifty cents _per week, or such 
part thereof as shall actually be paid by the State as aid to under- 
graduates. 

2. Each student over seventeen years of age, who has been 
disabled in the military or naval service of the United States, or of 
Pennsylvania, or whose /a/Aer lost his life in said service, and 
who shall sign a paper as above, shall receive the sum of one 
DOLLAR per weeZ;, or such part thereof as shall actually be paid 
by the State. 

3. Each student who, upon graduating, shall sign an agree- 
ment to teach in the common schools of the State two full school 
years, shall receive the sum of fifty dollars. 

4. Any student to secure the benefit of these appropriations, 
must attend the school at least twelve consecutive weeks, and re- 
ceive instruction in the Theoiv of Teaching. 



6o 



STATE NORMAL SCHOOL, 



Payment of Bills. 

Bills for board and tuition are payable, the one-baif at the 
opening of the term and the remainder at the middle of the term. 

Students desiring to leave school before the close of the term 
must report to the principal and settle any unpaid account; and 
in all cases bills for board and tuition will be made out for the 
entire term unless notice of leaving is given at the time of leaving, 
or, in case this is impossible, immediately thereafter. 

These payments must be made, or satisfactorily provided for, 
before students are assigned to classes. 

All bills are payable to the Princi'pal. 



Text Books. 

Stationery and text booksused in the Institution can be pur- 
chased at the book room in the building at the regular 
])rices; or the text books can be rented at reasonable rates by those 
who do not wish to purchase. The following is the list in use: 



Potter's Geography, 

Warren's Physical Geography, 

Lockwood's Composition, 

Abbott's How to Write Clearly, 

Reed & Kellogg's Lessons in English, 

Patterson's Grammar, 

Genung's Rhetoric, 

Collar and Daniell's Beginners' Latin 
Book, 

Allen and Greenough's Latin Gram- 
mar, 

Csesar's Commentaries, Harper &T0I- 
man, 

Virgil, Allen & Greenongh, 

Cicero, " " 

Tacitus, Chase & Stewart, 

Goodwin's Greek Grammar, 

Worman's German Giammar, 

Wentwortli's Geometry, 

Avery's Natural Philosophy, 

Avery's Chemistry, 

Walker's Physiology, 

Gray's Botany, 

Barnes' History of the United States, 



Ridpath's History of the United States, 
Johnson's " " 

Sheldon's General History, 
Palmer's Choral Union, 
R:i Id win's School Management, 
Cliase's Book-keeping, 
Spencerian System of Penmanship, 
Carhart's Commercial Law, 
McLeland's Applied Psychology, 
Siilley's Handbook of Psychology, 
Wenlworth's Trigonometry and Survey- 
ing, 
Olney's Analytical Geometry and Cal- 
culus. 
Olmstead's Mechanics, 
Young's Astronomy, 
Orton's Zoology, 
Janet's Elements of Morals, 
Jevon's Logic, 

Painter's History of Education, 
Kosekranz's Philosophy of Education, 
Brook's & Appleton's Arithmetics, 
Sensenig's, Bradbury & Emory's and Ol- 
ney's Algebras. 



INDIANA, PA. 



6i 



Library and Reading Room. 

A good reference library is accessible every day to all stu- 
dents. In this are found the leading encyclopredias, dictionaries 
and otlier standard reference books, historical charts, maps and 
other conveniences, so essential to successful student life. 

There is also a large library of choice works of history, biog- 
raphy and literature free to all students. 

It is not the aim to mass books merely for the sake of mak- 
ing a large library ; but we do aim to have every usable book and 
periodical. 

In connection with the liijrary is u reading room, sni)j)lied 
with periodicals and newspa{)ei's as follows : 



Youth's Companion, 

Education, 

X. Y. School Journal, 

Forum, 

Public Opinion, 



Harper's Magazine, 
Harper's Bazaar, 
Harper's AVeekly, 
Century, 
St. Nicholas, 



Journal of Education, (Toronto,) X. A. Review, 



X. Y. Independent, 

Philadelphia Press, (Daily,) 

Werner's Voice, 

Educational Review, 

American Teacher, 

Pittsburg Dispatch, (Daily,) 

S. W. Journal of Education, 

Puelx, 

Penman's Art Journal, 

Popular Educator, 

Wide Awake, 

Journal of Education, (Boston,) 



Christian Statesman, 

Sunday School Times, 

Chatauquan, 

Musical Herald, 

Ladies' Home Journal, 

Arena, 

Cosmopolitan, 

Geographical ^lagazine. 

Quarterly View of Current History, 

Book Xews, 

X. Y. Tribune, (Weekly,) 

Review of Reviews, 



ScieutificAmerican& Supplement, Historical Magazine, 
The Contemporary Review, American Xaturalist, 

Christian Union, Etude, 

Popular Science Monthly, Golden Rule, 

The Musical Record. 



We thank the publishers for donating the following publica- 



tions : 

The Accountant, 
The Alleghenian, 
Presbyterian Banner, 
Butler Citizen, 



Christian Advocate, 
The Latrobe Advance, 
Camp Xews, 
The Xew Castle Courant, 



62 



STATE NORMAL SCHOOL, 



The Indiana Democrat, 

The Ligonier Echo, 

National Educator, 

Indiana Gazette, 

The Gymnasium, 

Pacific Educational Journal, 

Mt. Pleasant Journal, 

Western School Journal. 

Indiana Messenger, 

The Local News, (Homestead,) 

Indiana Progress, 

Armstrong Republican, 

Indiana Times, 

The Public Spirit, (Clearfield,) 



The Westmoreland Democrat, 

Physical Education, 

Lancaster Examiner, 

Graphic, 

Raftsman's Journal, 

Student's Journal, 

School Journal, 

Virginia School Journal, 

Indiana News, 

United Presbyterian, 

Clearfield Republican, 

Tribune & Herald, (Greensburg,) 

The Workman, 

Grant Record, 



Societies. 

Two literary .societies, the " Erodelphiau" and " Huyglie- 
nian " are well sustained, each having its library and private room. 

Each of these has, as a subordinate i)art, two lycenms or de- 
bating clubs, the one con)posed of" ladies and the other of gentle- 
men. 

These societies, which are in excellent working condition, 
have become marked features of school life at Indiana. 



Religious Influences. 

In the behalf that moral and religious culture forms a most 
essential part of the {)reparation for the teachers' work, a society 
has been organized called the " Normal School Christian Asso- 
ciation." The purpose of this society is to aid in the religious 
culture of all whose homes are in this Institution. 

Under the fostering care of this association, Bible classes, 
ample in number for all who attend, meet every Sabbath morn- 
ing. Prayer meetings are held eveiy Sabbath and Thursday 
evenings, and an endeavor is made to promote Sabbath observ- 
ance. 

Students are thus encouraged to become Ciiristian woikers, 
and school life is made to minister to the elevation of Christian 
life rather than to its depression, ^-s is often the case. 




INDIANA. PA. 63 



Tills association luitnbei-s a large i)i'Oi)orti()n of our sUulents. 

Besides tlis a.ssocitit(ijii, there are varijus others of a prac- 
tical type and n a highly j)rosperous condition, among them the 
Y. W. C. T. : . the King's Daugliters and the King's Sons. 

The chu'i'hes repiesented by congregations at Indiana are 
Methodist Epi-copal, Pj .^|byterian, United Presbyterian, Catholic, 
Luthera 1, Bapiist, Episo.)pal, German Lutheran. 



Ad/ice to Prospective Students. 



COME EAF^LY. 

Success demands that you shall be here early. Tardiness in 
the commencement of a term, or irregularity of attendance after 
the commencement has been made, are very serious hindrances to 
success. Be here and ready for work on the very fiist day and the 
very first hour of the term. 



Give Yourself Time for Thorough Work. 

It often happens that an ambitious young man or woman, 
limited in means, and (iesirous of commencing life's active labors 
as soon as possible, determines to try to do two years' work in 
one, or that of three in two. 

Such a course is scarcely ever advisable. One essential ele- 
ment iu the teacher's preparation is time. Solid attainment is 
never a mnshioom growth. Two years' work demands two years 
in which to do it icell; and unless work is well done, the result will 
prove a source of regret through many years of mistakes, which 
might have been avoided had more thorough preparation been 
made. If you need more than a year for your work, and have 
only the means at command for one year's expense at school, come 
for the year, and then by remaining out of school for a time, make 



64 . STATE NORMAL SCHOOL, 



it possible to return and complete your <jourse. It is not an abso- 
lute necessity that you graduate at a certain fixed time ; it is abso- 
lutely esssential to your true success that [i/ou make thorough p-epa- 
tion. 

-^ 1 

A High Standard. 

Tlie Indiana Normal School prop<?ises to maintain a high 
standard of excellence, both as to scholarship and as to attainments 
in model school work. \ 

Our inquiry is, and will remain, not how many can we grad-. 
uate, but how many, and who, are thoroughly prepared for grad- 
uation ? 

For the sake of those who shall employ our teachers, a;id for 
the sake of the teachers themselves <ve desire to make our diplomas 
valuable and to preserve to them, their value. 

Students can readily appreciate the increased value which 
will thus come to them, and we trust they will also appreciate the 
fact that they must themselves contribute to so desirable an end. 



Books of Reference. 

While the student will find many books of reference here, 
still it is advisable for him to bring such as he may have, that he 
may make personal and daily use of them. The habit of such use 
is of incalculable im[)ortance, and school life should ever minister 
to the formation of such habits as will lead to a successful life. 
Bring your books with you; place them where you can conven- 
iently use them, and by their use form a habit, the value of whicli 
you can never overestimate. 



Make Few if Any Visits Av/ay From School. 

Success demands concentration of thought. This is prevented 
by frequent visits at home or elsewhere, and usually time thus 
spent subtracts materially from the progress of the student. 



INDIANA, PA. 



Alumni Officers. 



J. B. Woodruff, - . . . President. 

T. L. Gibson, ..... Vice-President. 

TiLLlE Leezer, - - - - - Secretary. 

EosE B. Weaver, ..... Treasurer. 



Alumni Directory. 



So far as the addresses of our Alumni were known, or could readily be 
obtained, they are given. There are still many omissions and our friends will 
confer a favor by furnishing any information by means of which our directory 
may be made more complete in a future catalogue. In almost all cases the 
home address has been given. 

We often have calls for teachers that we are unable to fill. We request our 
alumni who are desirous of obtaining better positions, to keep us informed of 
their addresses and desires. 



CLASS OF 1876. 



McCurdy Irwin P., D.^ D. Litt. D., Ph. D. Sc. D., 723 South 20th street, Phila- 
delphia — Pastor Southwestern Presbyterian Church. 
Smith, Hiram R., Fort Collins, Col. — Teacher. 
Trent, S. U., 98 Diamond street, Pittsburgh, Pa. — Lawyer. 
AVhitehili, Stewart H., Brookville. — Lawyer. 

CLASS OF 1877. 

Fair, R. Willis, Scientific, Saltsburg, Pa. — Principal Kiskiminetas Springs Col- 
lege Preparatory School. 

Christy, Maud A. — Elementary, Deceased. 

Gwynn, Caroline S. 

Grumbling, Sarah, Kansas. — Teacher. 

Martin Clara (Mrs. Kelley), Scott Haven, Westmoreland Co., Pa. 

Pollock, Emma M. (Mrs. Schupe), Can )nsbiirg, Wash. Co., Pa. 

McCreery, James W., Greeley, Col. — Lawyer. 



66 STATE NORMAL SCHOOL, 



CLASS OF 1878. 

Andrews, James E., La Crosse, Kansas. — Lawyer. 

Berkey, Jacob M., Berlin, Somerset Co., Pa. — County Superintendent Public 
Schools. 

Elrich, Charles, Conemaugh, Pa. — Teacher. 

McCurdy, Joseph A., Greensburg, Pa. — Lawyer. 

Mitchell, Margaret F. (Mrs. S. M. Jack), Indiana, Pa. 

St. Clair, Robert J., 916 Mound street, Atchison, Kan. — Teacher. 

Tomb, D. Harbison, Indiana, Pa. — Lawyer. 

Wenner, Theo. L. — Deceased. 

CLASS OF 1S79. 
Brooks, Eliza, — Deceased. 

Christy, Louisa H. (Mrs. H. H. McCreeryJ, Wilmar, Minn. 
McDivitt, Martha M.— Deceased. 

Nalej', Sarali L., 2013 X. College avenue, Philadelphia, Pa. — Stenographer. 
Patterson, Jennie B. (Mrs. Monteith), Cedar Rapids, Iowa. 
Pinkerton, Augusta C. Blairsville, Pa. — Teacher. 
St. Clair, Jennie, 6758 Sherman street, Cliicago, 111. — Teaclier. 
Scott, Jennie M. (Mrs. Wm. Lapsley), Braddock, Pa. 
Uncapher, Lizzie, 4306 Butler street, Pittsburgh, Pa. — Physician. 
"Woods, Margaret E. (Mrs. D. Heath), Piedmont, Kansas. 
Davis, Samuel M., 365 Temple Court, Minneapolis, Minn. — Lawyer. 
Dill, Anson J., Oakdale, Pa. — Principal of Preparatory School. 
Hanna, John C, Fort Collins, Col. — Lawyer. 
Johnson, Edward P., 93 Fremont street, Allegheny, Pa. — Principal 11th Ward 

Schools, Pittsburgh. 
McGrew, Butler, Washington, Pa., Insurance and Real Estate Agent. 
Miller, J. J., 408 Grant street, Pittsburgh, Pa. — Lawyer. 
Nissley, Issac O., Middletown, Daupliin Co., Pa. — Editor and Publislier. 
Shane, Samuel, McDonald, Washington Co., Pa. — Merchant. 
Statler, George T., Greely, Col.— Merchant. 

CLASS OF 1880. 

Hunter, Annie A., Mt. Pleasant, Pa. 

Loucks, Amanda, Scottdale, Pa. — Teacher. 

Morrison, Alice, 1845 Ogden street, Denver, Col. — Teaclier. 

Prestley, Margaret A — Deceased. 

Sampson, Emma F. (Mrs. Smith), Butler, I'a. 

Brinkey, Ga.'iper C. — Deceased. 

Brown, Cliarles J. — Deceased. 

CaUler, Joiin R., 1861 Parkwood avenue, Toledo, Ohio. — Lawyer. 

Cochran, William A., Johnstown, Pa. — Business. 

Doty, Daniel W., 1708 Marshall avenue, St. Paul, Minn. — Lawyer. 

Duffey, William E., Brooklyn, N. Y. — Teacher in Browne's Business College. 

Elkin, John P., Indiana, Pa. — Lawyer. 

Keefer, John S., Madison, Westmoreland Co., Pa. — Business. 

Lewis, Samuel T., Osceola Mills, Pa. — Minister. 



INDIANA, PA. 67 



Maclay, William B., Belleville, Mifflin Co.^Pa. — Farmer. 
Newlon, George H., Buena Vnta, Allegheny Co,, Pa. — Farmer. 
Pierce, David, 4900 Penn avenue, Pittsburgh, Pa. — Physician. 

CLASS OF 1881. 

Cameron, Martha A., (Mrs. R. W. Guss,) Greeley, Col. 

Greene, S. Ella D., New Castle, Pa. — Teacher. 

Hamilton, Ada F. — Deceased. 

Harrison, Jennie B., McKeesport, Pa. — Teacher. 

Jones, Harriet E. (ifrs. E. E. Boggs), 22 Breckbridge street, Ft. Wayne, Ind. 

Kemp, ^Irs. Harriet, University avenue, Allegheny, Pa. — Teaching. 

Martin, Mary Adda, Avalon, Allegheny Co., Pa. — Teacher. 

Taylor, Alice (Mrs. Geo. Hart). — Deceased. 

Allison J. Lewis, Punxsutawney, Jefferson Co., Pa. — Editor and Teacher. 

Fair, George H., Dakota City, Neb. — Lawyer. 

Guss, Roland W. — Greeley, Col. — Teacher Natural Sciences in Normal School. 

Hamill, Franklin. — Deceased. 

Musselraan, Harvey C. — Deceased. 

Pierce, John H., Indiana, Pa. — Lawyer. 

Kiddle, Charles A., Pittsburgh, Pa. — Lawyer. 

Smith, Alfred L., Indiana, Pa. — Business. 

Snodgrass, John, Bellevue, Allegheny Co., Pa. 

Strickler, Hiram B., Colfax, Washington. — City Engineer. 

CLASS OF 1882. 

Agney, May E.,.44 Eggers street, Allegheny, Pa. — Teacher. 

Esterline, Anna C, 52 Franklin street, Allegheny, Pa. — Teacher. 

Ford, Eva B. — Deceased. 

Garman, Malvina (Mrs. Charles A. Riddle), Indiana, Pa. 

Given, Margaret P., 286 Sandusky street, Allegheny, Pa. — Teacher. 

Hildebrand, Gertrude (Mrs. Dr. Keepers), Indiana, Pa. 

Lewis, Cornelia P., 656 Ashland avenue, St. Paul, Minn. — Teacher. 

Marshall, Katherine, 12 Greenwood street, Allegheny, Pa. — Teacher. 

McElwain, Lizzie, 93 Jackson street, Allegheny, Pa. — Teacher. 

McFadden. Annie M. (Mrs. D. B. Taylor), Indiana, Pa. 

Miller, Alice J., 171 46ih street, Pittsburgh, Pa. — Stenographer. 

Pattison, Margaret J., 719 Western avenue, Topeka, Kan. — Teacher. 

Porter, Ida M., State Alms House, Tewksbury, Mass. — Physician. 

Eowe, Sadie (Mrs. Harry Christy), Indiana, Pa. 

Sandels, Annie E. (Mrs. Reynolds), Greensburg, Pa. 

Shaw, Bethella, 80 Lincoln avenue, Allegheny, Pa. — Teacher. 

Shonts, Emma, Evansburg, Crawford Co., Pa. — Teacher. 

Simpson, Nora M. (Mrs. Fatton), Indiana, Pa. 

Smith, Jessie B., Jeannette, Westmoreland Co., Pa. — Teacher. 

Stephenson, Florence, Ashville, N. C. — Principal of Home Industrial School. 

Wilkins Mary B. (Mrs. ) Bellevue, Pa. 

Allison, R. Wilson, Wilkinsburg, Pa. — Physician. 



68 STATE NORMAL SCHOOL, 



Barton, Humphrey, St. Paul, Minn.-r-Lawyer. 
Harnish, Wm. B., Lancaster, Pa. — Law Student. 

Hickman, Edward D., 728 Homewood avenue, Pittsburgh, Pa. — Principal of 
Horaewood Schools. 

Langham, Jonathan N., Indiana, Pa. — Postmaster. 

McCartney, John W. — Deceased. 

Maclay, Wra. P., Cadet, Washington Co., Mo. — Merchant. 

McGrew, Nathan N., Scott Haven, Westmoreland Co., Pa. — Teacher. 

Miller, Lorenzo D., Atwood, Armstrong Co. Pa. — Teacher. 

Ralph, J. Lincoln, 110 Diamond street, Pittsburgh, Pa. — Lawyer. 

Reese, William P., Johnstown, Pa. — Lawyer. 

Shane, John P., McDonald, Washington Co., Pa. — Merchant. 

Sutor, Silas A. — Deceased. 

Williams, David, Milton, Van Buren, Iowa. — Principal Public School. 

CLASS OF 1883. 

Allen, Annie E. (Mrs. Evans), Ingram, Allegheny Co., Pa. 

Brown, Lizzie M., Seattle, Washington. — Teacher. 

Brown Marion L., 180 Irwin avenue, Allegheny, Pa. — Teacher. 

Bragdon, Carrie L., 229 Juniata street, Allegheny, Pa. — Teacher. 

Cochran, Etta M. (Mrs. Samuel Ritchie), 79 Hazel wood ave., Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Davis, Margaret C, Avalon, Allegheny Co., Pa. — Teacher. 

Davis, Emma E., Plumville, Indiana Co., Pa. — Teacher. 

Ford, Mary E., 49 Stockton avenue, Allegheny, Pa — Teacher. 

Gregg, Mary J. — Deceased. 

Hamilton. Margaret C, Altoona, Pa. — Teacher. 

Klingensmith, Annie, Madison, South Dakota. — Principal of Training School 
in State Normal School. 

Knight, Lulu N. (Mrs. John Reeves), Beaver Falls, Pa. 

Leslie, Mary E., 34 Ledlie street, Allegheny, Pa. — Teacher. 

Moore, Amy E. Marlboro, Chester Co., Pa. 

McClaren, Birdie (Mrs. Frank Keener), Indiana, Pa. 

Pierce, Mary J., Elderton, Pa. — Teacher. 

Rowand, Katherine, 80 Fremont street, Allegheny, Pa. — Teacher. 

Ruff, Elma, — Teacher Literature and History Normal School, Greeley, Col. 

Rugli, Aggie (Mrs. Richard Epley), Altoona, Pa. 

Sansom, Bessie G. (Mrs. A. W. Wilson, Jr.), Saltsburg, Pa. 

St. Clair, M. Agnes, 6758 Sherman street, Chicago, 111. — Teacher. 

Barbor, W. W., St. Mary's, Elk Co., Pa.— Lawyer. 

Harnish, Lewis C, Lancaster, Pa. — Theological Student. 

Saxman, S. A. — Deceased. 

CLASS OF 1884. 

Allison, Annie N. (Mrs. Henry Turk), Parker's Landing, Armstrong Co., Pa. 

Bothell, Clara E., Blockley Hospital, Philadelphia, Pa — Nurse. 

Brown, M. Jennie, 106 Arch street, Allegheny, Pa. 

Eccles, Lida (Mrs. John W. Grove), 95 Fremont street, Allegheny, Pa. 



INDIANA, PA. 69 



Enipfielu, Ella E. (Mrs. Eev. D. C. Pattee), Boise City, Idaho. 

Edie, M. Leanna, Beaver, Pa. — Teaclier in Youngstown, Ohio. 

Galbraitli, M. Marion, Tarentuni, Pa. 

Gallaher, Sadie M., Indiana, Pa — See Class of 1888. 

Hays, Flora B., 117 ShefBeld street, Allegheny, Pa.— Teaching Private School. 

Jeffrey, Jennie. — Deceased. 

McElveen, Jennie, 179 Sheffield street, Allegheny, Pa. — Teacher. 

Painter, Eva (Mrs. Hellman), Irvona, Clearfield Co., Pa. 

Reel, Belle D., 11 Church avenue, Allegheny, Pa. — Teacher. 

Reynolds, Virginia, Farmville, Va. — Principal Practice Department, State 

Female Normal School. 
Rigby, Annie E., Beaver Falls, Pa. — Teacher. 
Ritchie, Lizzie, 210 Washington avenue, Allegheny, Pa. — Teacher. 
Scott, M. Josephine, 287 Robinson street, Allegheny, Pa. — Teacher. 
Walker, Florence C, 178 Chartiers street, Allegheny, Pa.— Member of Faculty 

in Sliippinsburg Normal School. 
Ague, John B., Beaver Falls, Pa. — Physician and Surgeon. 
McAllister, Ralph C, 86 and 88 Michigan street, Milwaukee, Wis.— Insurance 
Matthews, W. Edgar, Johnstown, Pa — Physician. 
Nesbit, Harry N.— See Class of 1888. 
Ulerich, W. W., Latrobe, Pa. — Principal Public Schools. 
Williams, William, Johnstown, Pa. — Attorney-at-Law. 

CLASS OF 1885 

Angus, Mary A. (Mrs. Lyman Walker). — Deceased. 

Adair, Jennie M. (Mrs. Rev. Belsey), Dayton, Ohio. 

Cochrane, Laura C, Greensburg, Pa. — Teacher. 

Carney, Alice B., 97 Monterey street, Allegheny, Pa. — Teacher. 

Cawley, Nan. L., 202 Franklin street, Allegheny, Pa. — Teacher. 

Cooper, Blanche, Denver, Col. — Book-keeper. 

Davis, Laiira Maud, Indiana, Pa. 

Elliott, Adda M., 820 Seventh avenue, Beaver Falls, Pa.— Teacher. 

Fair, May C, Black Lick, Pa. 

Given, Annie F., India. — Missionary. 

Getty, Mary, 1335 Tenth street, Philadelphia, Pa. — Physician. 

Graham, Annie M., Baldwin, Butler Co., Pa. 

Hays, Carrie D., Maysville, Kentucky. — Teacher. 

Horrocks, Sallie, 298 Cottage Hill, Johnstown, Pa.— High School Teacher. 

Hays, Fannie L., Maysville, Kentucky. — Teacher. 

Lemon, Emma R., Kittanning, Pa. — Teacher. 

Lytle, Katherine M., Braddock, Pa. — Teacher. 

Marshall, Adah L., Banksvilie, Allegheny Co., Pa. — Teacher. 

Marshal], Anna P. (Mrs. Wm. McCracken), Aiken avenue, E. E., Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Marshall, Jean, 12 Greenwood street, .\llegheny. Pa. — Teacher. 

McMullen, Jennie, Brush Valley, Indiana Co., Pa. — Teacher. 

McCall, Agnes M., 341 California avenue, Allegheny, Pa. — Teacher. 

Mc'^adden, Jane R., Indiana, Pa. — Teacher. 

McCain, Margaret (Mrs. E. L. Peterson), .\lpine avenue, Allegheny, Pa. 



70 STATE NORMAL SCHOOL, 



McGraw, Josie, McKeesport, Pa. — Teaclier. 

McEllianey, Jennie, Indiana, Pa. — Teacher. 

McClatchey, Rose Z., Alleglieny, Pa. — Teaclier. 

Muse, Minnie E. (Mrs. Jones), McKeesport, Pa. 

Moon, Lottie, 145 Fayette street, Allegheny, Pa. — Teacher. 

Needy, Annette, 33 Boyle street, Allegheny, Pa. — Teacher. 

Oliver, A. Mattie, Latrobe, Pa. — Teacher. 

Kichards, Carrie E., 299 Franklin street, Allegheny, Pa. — Teacher. 

Smith, Minnie E., 220 Bingham street, Pittsburgh, Pa.— Teacher. 

Turner, Jennie P., 4402 Butler street, Pittsburgh. — Teacher. 

Vanard, Eva U., Beaver Falls, Pa. — Primary Teacher. 

Warren, Jennie S. (Mrs. J. E. Copeland), Parnassus, Westmoreland Co., Pa. 

Angney, Allan B., 44 Eggers street, Allegheny, Pa. — Lawyer, 161 Fifth avenue, 
Pittsburgh. 

Gordon, M. C— See Class of 1888. 

Hickman, E. L., Wilmerding, Allegheny Co., Pa. — Minister. 

Hutton, Frank, Clearfield, Pa. — Lawyer. 

Itell, Thomas J., Johnstown, Pa. — Principal of Iron Street School. 

Mahoney, M. J., New Maysville, Pa. — Commercial Traveler. 

Muse, Frank D., New Whatcom, Washington. — Minister. 

Eobb, J. Irwin, Bryn Mawr. — Superintendent Public Schools, Lower Merion 
Township, Pa. 

Shields, W F., Drexel, Mo.— Minister. 

Sproull, W. H., Indiana, Pa.— See Class of 1888. 

Simpson, Eobert S., New Whatcom, Washington. — Real Estate and Insurance. 

WiLson, James M., Belleville, Pa. — Law Student. 

Warnock, O H., Larimer Station, Westmoreland Co., Pa. — Business. 

Woodruff, J. B., Blairsviile, Pa. — Book-keeper. 

CLASS OF i886. 

Barnes, Blanche A., Pittsburgh, Pa. — Stenographer. 

Breniser, Cynthia (Mrs. John L. Thomas), Whatcom, Washington. 

Banfield, Margaret S. (Mrs. Frank Parshall), Franklin, Pa. 

Birkman, Sarah, Pittsburgh P'emale College, Eighth street. — Teacher. 

Bruce, Laura, Punxsutawney, Pa. — Teacher. 

Calhoun, Jennie N., 22 Arch street, Allegheny, Pa. 

Cannon, Mary W., corner Franklin & Fulton streets, Allegheny, Pa. — Teacher. 

Crawford, Ella E. (Mrs. Clark), Allegheny, Pa. 

Case, Gertrude S., 357 River avenue, Pittsburgh, Pa. — Teacher of Drawing. 

Crider, Annie M., 172 Jackson street, Allegheny, Pa. — Teacher. 

Fleming, I^ulu S., IS Palo Alto street, Alleglieny, Pa. 

Freeman, Sarah J. — Deceased. 

Gilfillan, Sarah A., Upper Si. Clair. Allegheny Co., Pa. 

Hamill, Jennie, Indiana, Pa. — Teacher. 

Hayden, Margaret B., 45 Fayette street, Allegheny, Pa. — Teacher. 

Hazlett, Annie S., Indiana, Pa. — Teacher in Cliicagf>. 

Henderson, Mary, McKeesport, Pa. 

Hodge, M. Grace, Greensburg, Pa. — Teaclier. 



INDIANA, PA. 71 



Jones, Mary Margaret. — Deceased. • 

Laughry, Anna S. (Mrs. M, L. Iniler), Cramer, Pa. 

Leard, Emma L., Livermore, Pa. — Teaclier. 

Macrum, Jessie G., New Rochelle, New York. 

Marion, Catlierine C, 177 Market street, AUeglieny, Pa. — Teacher. 

Martin, Eleanor V., Dayton, Armstrong Co., Pa. — Teacher. 

Marquis, Bird E., Indiana, Pa. — Member of Faculty in S. N. School. 

Maxwell, Mary A., Baldwin City, Butler Co., Pa. — Teacher. 

McFadden, Elizabeth E., Buena Vista, Allegheny Co., Pa. 

McKibben, Mary C, Park street, McKeesport, Pa. — Teacher. 

McMunn, Anna M., 109 Market street, Allegheny, Pa. — Teacher. 

Muse, Blanche, McKeesport, Pa. — Teacher. 

McCorniick, Mary, Blairsville, Pa. — Teacher. 

McCowan, Ermine, corner Maple avenue & Mclntyre street, Allegheny, Pa. 

McKee, Annie L. — Deceased. 

Morrow, Agnes. — See Class of 1888. 

Murry, Belle, Murraysville, Westmoreland Co., Pa. — Teacher. 

Purdy, Stella M., 187 Sandusky street, Allegheny, Pa. — Teacher. 

Potts, Emma E, , Natrona, Allegheny Co., Pa. — Teacher. 

Riiffner, Emma J., Purchase Line, Indiana Co., Pa. — Teacher. 

Shaw, Emily, 20 Sheffield street, Allegheny, Pa. — Teacher. 

Slater, Emma C, Canonsburg, Pa. — Teacher. 

Shaw, Henrietta S., 420 W. Tenth street, Pueblo, Col.— Teacher. 

Startz, Lou E., 77 Sedgwick street, Allegheny, Pa. 

Sholes, Katharine (Mrs. A. C Latimer), 55 Montgomery avenue, Allegheny, Pa. 

Storey, Ida B. (Mrs. O. H. Warnock), Larimer Station, Westmoreland Co., Pa. 

Stevenson, Sarah L. (Mrs. Ralph W. Carroll), corner Forbes and Dithridge 
streets, Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Tiffany, Mary L., Indiana, Pa. — Compositor. 

Cramer, W. Justin. — Deceased. 

Fisher, Harry H., Greensburg, Pa. — Law Student. 

Fisher, John S., Indiana, Pa. — Principle Public Schools. 

Jackson, Walter H., Indiana, Pa. — Business. 

Smith, E. Walker, Indiana, Pa. — Lawyer. 

Wilson, Robert M.—See Class of 1888. 

CLASS OF 18S7. 

Bryan, ^linnie J., Indiana, Pa. — Teacher. 

Campbell, S. Flora, Indiana, Pa. — Teacher. 

Clark, Annie M., Indiana, Pa. 

Cameron, Clara, (Mrs. J. Langham), Indiana, Pa. 

Chisholm, Mary L., 31 Esplanade street, Allegheny, Pa. — Teacher. 

Clingerman, Mara B., Altoona, Pa. — Teacher. 

Dalby, Lucy, Craig street, Bellfield, Pittsburgh, Pa. — Teacher of Private Pupils 

Dain, Hannah K., 212 North avenue, Allegheny, Pa. 

Dav, EUa R., Norfolk, Va. — Teacher in Mission College. 

Emptield, Kate E., Penn Run, Pa. — Teacher. 



72 STATE NORMAL SCHOOL, 

Edwards, Ella C, Johnstown, Pa. — Teacher. 

Eckman, Kena S., Ft. Collins, Col. — ^Teacher. 

Ellis, Sarah E., 34 Hemlock street, Allegheny, Pa — Teacher. 

Frazer, Lizzie C, Wellsville, Ohio. — Teacher. 

Goodell, Nellie, Indiana, Pa. — Teacher. 

Galbraith, M. Etta, Putnam, Allegheny Co., Pa. — Teacher. 

Griffith, Alice F., Ft. Collins, Col.— Teacher. 

Hutchinson, Margaret J., 246 Federal street, Allegheny, Pa. — Teacher. 

Hahn, Edith, 1408 Main street, Sharpsburg, Pa. 

Kennedy, Mary R., New Brighton, Beaver Co., Pa. — Teacher. 

Knox, Anna (Mrs. E. E. Cary), Lincoln Nebraska. 

Krebs, Jennie. — Deceased. 

Kimple, Lottie C, Chambersville, Indiana Co., Pa. — Teacher. 

Loncks, Dortha M., Scottdale, Pa. — Teacher. 

Lawrence, Katlierine, 181 Perry street, Salem, Ohio. — Teacher. 

McConneil, Jennie, 356 Edwin street, Pittsburgh, Pa. — Teacher. 

Miller, Jennie M., Pennsville, Fayette Co., Pa. — Book-keeper. 

Miller, VV'inilVed W., Swissvale, Pa. — Teacher. 

Montgomery, Anna B., Mt. Washington, Pittsburgh, Pa. — Teacher. 

Martin, Georgia, Horton, Indiana Co., Pa. — Pot-Graduate Student in Normal 
School. 

Perkins, Anna M. (Mrs. Dr. Hays), Los Angelos, California. 

Eice, Kate J., Indiana, Pa. — Teacher. 

Reineke, Sophie C, 210 Beaver avenue, Allegheny, Pa. — Teacher. 

Eummell, Lida E. (Mrs. G. A. Helman), Manor Station, Westmoreland Co., Pa. 

Scanlon, Mary E., Indiana, Pa.— Teacher. 

Storey, Sarah Georgie, Indiana, Pa. — Teacher. 

Taylor, Laura, Fort Collins, Col.— Teacher. 

Welfer, Kate B., Greenfield avenue, Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Williams, Mary I., Atlanta, Ga.— Missionary. 

Work, Mary E., Cairo, Egypt. — Missionary. 

Blue, John, Cleveland, O. — Assistant Editor " Hebrew Observer." 

Carroll, J. G., Johnstown, Pa. — Prin. Academic Department, Morrell Institute. 

Cramer, John W., Johnstown, Pa. — Clerk for C. I. Co. 

Fiscus, J. J., Indiana, Pa. — Teacher. 

Hamill, Q. A., Indiana, Pa. — College Student. 

Hammond, James B., Bolivar, Pa. — Of Reese, Hammond & Co., Fire Brick Mfrs. 

Jack, William M., Princton, N. J. — Tlieological Students. 

Johnson, Harry P., Blairsville, Pa. — Principal Public Schools. 

Kuntz, J. S., Johnstown, Pa. — Physician. 

Longwill, A. L., Irvona, Clearfield, Co., Pa. — Clerk. 

Parks, E. B., Leechburg, Armstrong Co., Pa. — Teacher. 

Rush, J. K., with John M. Gresham & Co., 1218 & 1220 Filbert St., Philadelphia. 

Small, Geo. G., Turtle Creek, Pa.— Auditing Clerk, P. R. R. 

Simpson, James A., IndiMna, Pa. — Farmer. 

Scanlon, Benjamin F., Indiana, Pa. — Law Student, Hart Mich. 

Whitten, Charles, Merwin, Westmoreland Co. Pa. — Law Student. 



INDIANA, PA. 73 



CLASS OF 1888. 

Scientific : 
Gallaher, Sadie M., Indiana, Pa. — Member of Faculty, S. Normal School. 
Morrow, Agnes (Mrs. K. B. Scandrett), Imbre avenue, Allegheny, Pa. 
Gordon, M. C, Principal Public Schools, Irwin, Pa. 
Nesbit, Harry, Clarksburg, Pa. — Theological Student. 
Sproull, W. H., Indiana, I'a.— Member of Faculty, S. Normal School. 
Wilson, Robert M., Indiana, Pa. — Law Student. 

Elementary : 

Bradshaw, Mattie, 153 Irwin avenue, Allegheny, Pa. — Teacher. 

Boyle, Mary C, Erasworth, Allegheny Co., Pa. — Teacher. 

Campbell, Aliee L., Indiana, Pa. 

Caulfield, Mary G., Enon Valley, Lawrence Co., Pa. — Teacher. 

Chisholm, Liilie A., 31 Esplanade street, Allegheny, Pa. — Teacher. 

Christy, Kate S., Indiana, Pa. 

Cordier, Anita (Mrs. R. A. McDonald). 52 North avenue, Allegheny, Pa. 

Cluly, Ivy, 18 Marion avenue, Allegheny Pa. — Teacher. 

Cooper, Mary, Johnstown, Pa.— Teacher. 

Cheeseman, Anna, Library, Allegheny Co., Pa. — Teacher. 

Evans, Jessie, 601 Smithfield street Pittsburgh, Pa. — Teacher. 

Ekas, Agnes E., Sarversville, Butler Co., Pa. — Teacher. 

Fairley, Lizzie D., 167 Jackson street, Allegheny, Pa. — Teacher. 

Fetzer, Ella, corner Main and Butler streets, Pittsburgh, Pa. — Teacher. 

Fielding, Frdnie S., McDonald, Washington Co., Pa. 

Fix, Rebecca, Wilkinsburg, Pa — Teacher. 

Fiscus, Blanche, Kittanning, Pa.^ — Reading Medicine. 

Gilmore, Margery Mary, 59 Western avenue, Allegheny, Pa. — Teacher. 

Grassel, Annie M. 81 Fayette street, Allegheny, Pa. — Teacher. 

Hadley, Edith O. (Mrs. Leslie), 76 Boyle street, Allegheny, Pa. 

Harrison, Elizabeth IVf., (Mrs. W- E. Newlin), McKeesport, Pa. 

Harris, Minnie R., Wilkinsburg, Pa. — Teacher. 

Hay, Alberta, 62 Fremont street, Allegheny, Pa. — Teacher. 

Harrington, Beatrice (Mrs. James W.Gray), 39 Palo .\lto street, Allegheny, Pa. 

Hamilton, Lizzie E., Sandy Lake, Mercer Co., Pa — Teacher. 

Hine, Nannie J., lOlder's Ridge, Indiana Co., Pa — Teacher. 

Herriott, Emma J., Federal, Allegiieny Co., Pa. — Teacher. 

Jones, Esther A., McKeesport, Pa. — Teacher. 

Jones, S. Mayes, Washington, Pa — Teacher. 

Jones, Roberta L., Richmond, Indiana. 

McFarland, Mary, Bangkok, Siani. 

McGarey, Mollie D., 1908 Sidney street, S. S., Pittsburgh, Pa.— Teacher. 

Miller, Luella, McDonald, W^ashington Co., Pa. — Teacher. 

McKee, Ella P. (Mrs. Sam'l Kraeer), Shefheld, Pa. 

Menke, Emma C, Homestead, Pa., Box 178. — Principal First Ward Schools. 

Myers, Lillian M., 7 Marquis street, Allegheny — Teacher. 

Price, Frances C, Chicago. 



74 STATE NORMAL SCHOOL, 

Koliinson Atabel, Butler, Pa. — Teacher. 

Rose, Sopliia K., 194 Sandusky street, Allegheny, Pa. — Teacher. 

Rowe, M. Etta, 167 Forty-second street, Pittsburgh, Pa. — Teacher. 

Riddle, Rebecca A., Riddle's X Roads, Butler Co., Pa. — Teacher. 

^irapson L. Belle, Indiana, Pa. — Teacher. 

Stout, Olive A., Indiana, Pa. 

Swan, Mary A., 256 Allegheny avenue, Allegheny, Pa. — Teacher. 

Swariwood, Margaret, Hulton, Pa. 

Stevenson, Bessie, W., 147 Grant street, Allegheny, Pa. 

Trimble, Martha, Harvard, Neb. — Teacher. 

Vanard, Flora M., Beaver Falls, Pa. — Teacher. 

Walker, Eva Y., 178 Chartiers street, Allegheny, Pa. — Teacher. 

Allison, D. B., Blairsville, Pa. — Real Estate and Insjrance. 

Biter, R. H., Portage, Cambria Co., Pa. — Teacher. 

Durling, Willis T., 1814 Linden avenue, Baltimore, Md. 

Ely, Selden M., 903 3d street, N. W., Washington, D. C— Principal Van Buren 
Annex School. 

Gibson, Frank Z., Pittsburgh, Pa.— Physician Mercy Hospital. 

Ramaley, M. C, 1615 Broadway, Cleveland, Ohio. — Dentistry. 

Shupe, Geo. B., Scottdale, Pa. — News Editor of "Independent." 

Stewart, J. T., Brush Valley, Indiana Co., Pa.— Teacher. 

Wachob, John H., Indiana, Pa. — Principal Public Schools. 

Weddell, F. N., 134 Fitth avenue, Pittsburgh, Pa.— Attorney at Law. 

W^iley, J. P., Oakland X Roads, Pa. — Vice Principal Connellsville Pub. Schools. 

CLASS OF 1889. 

Allen, Janney, (Mrs. T. A. Keer), 31 Monterey street, Allegheny, Pa. — Teacher. 

Anderson, Vina, 4114 Grant avenue, Omaha Neb. — Teacher. 

Andrews, Mary E., Liverpool, Ohio. — Teacher. 

Booth, Tillle M., 127 S. Canal street, Allegheny, Pa.— Teacher. 

Bradt, Jennie, Parnassus, Westmoreland Co., Pa. — Teacher. 

Brownlee, Mabel, Indiana, Pa. — Teacher. 

Caldwell, Olive, 1905 Sidney street, Pittsburgh, Pa.— Teacher. 

Cameron, Christina, Houtzdale, Clearfield Co., Pa.— Teacher. 

Carnahan, Thetta (Mrs. E. G. Orr), Indiana, Pa. 

Chester, Delia M., McKeesporl, Pa. — Teacher. 

Clark, Mary, (Bodine), Indiana, Pa. — Teacher. 

Cullers, Leltie B., 64 Western avenue, Allegheny, Pa. — Teacher. 

Ewing, Annie, Oakdale Station, Allegheny Co., Pa. — Teacher. 

Fiscus, Clara, Indiana, Pa. — Teacher. 

Hamill, M. Josephine, Indiana, Pa. — Teacher. 

Hemphill, Gertrude, (Mrs. ) Bellevue, Pa. 

Hill, Maggie B., Freeport, Pa. — Teacher. 

Hardie, Jessie, 726 McKee Place, Pittsburgh, Pa. — Teacher. 

Harr, Lottie, Latrobe, Pa. — Teacher. 

Hutchinson Kate, 134 Ninth avenue, McKeesport, Pa. — Teacher. 

Lyons, Anna, 243 Western avenue, Allegheny, Pa. — Teacher. 

McFeatters, Calista, Harmaisville, Allegheny Co., Pa. — Teacher. 



INDIANA. PA. 75 



Morrow, Alice, Irabre avenue, Allegheny, Pa. — Teacher. 
McPherson, Anna, 408 Penn avenue, Pittflnirgli, Pa. — Teacher. 
North, Emma, Covode, Indiana Co., Pa. — Teacher. 
Ray, Jennie, Irwin, Pa. — Teacher. 

Slater, Ella, Canonsburg, Washington Co., Pa. — Teacher. 
Sloan, Ada, Beaver, Pa. — Teacher. 

Turner, Minnie, 4402 Butler street, Pittsburgh, Pa. — Teacher. 
Wetherell, Carolyn, 25 Morgan street, Allegheny, Pa. — Reporter. 
DeVinney, W. M., Edinboro, Pa. — Teacher. 
Dickson, W. J., Duke Centre, Pa.— School Principal. 
Fleck, F. Enrl, Madison, Pa. — Clerk. 

Grimm, P. H,, Turtle Creek, Allegheny Co., Pa. -Principal Public Schools. 
Gordon, A. C, Jeannette, Pa. — Principal of Public Schools. 
Jack, J. E., New Alexandria, "Westmoreland Co., Pa. — Teacher. 
Johnson, Joe E., Upper Union Mills, Pittsburgh, Pa. — Clerk. 
Keener, J. A., Indiana, Pa. — Theological Student. 
Keener, J. B., Indiana, Pa. — Law Student. 

Lukehardt, W. D., Plumville, Indiana, Co., Pa.— Law Student at Ann Arl>or. 
Miuteer, W. A. DeHaven, Plumville, Indiana Co., Pa.— Bus^iness. 
Rowe, D. Irwin, Pittsburgh, Pa. — Teacher in Curry University. 
Whittield, Wm. H., 4787 Cypress avenue. Sixteenth ward, Pittsburgh, Pa.- 
Coliege Student. 

CLASS OF 1890. 

Ansley, Mabel, Saltsburg, Pa. — Teacher. 

Bowman, Agnes S., Kittanning, Armstrong Co., Pa. — Teacher. 
Barry, Mary L., Johnstown, Cambria Co., J'a. — Teacher. 
Blair, Emma, Blair Station, Allegheny Co., Pa. — Teacher. 
Chalfant, Mary I., Turtle Creek, Allegheny Co., Pa. — Teacher. 
Chalfant, Martha, Turtle Creek, Allegheny Co., Pa. — Teacher. 
Carter, Blanche M., Ingram, Allegheny Co., Pa. — Teacher. 
Corey, Maude E., Dravosburg, Allegheny Co., Pa. — Teacher. 
Coffin, Edith N., Highland avenue, Pittsburgh, Pa. 
Caven, Agnes, Bottsville, Westmoreland Co., Pa. — Teacher. 
Duncafl, Mary O., 44 Resaca street, Allegheny, Pa. — Teacher. 
Delamater, Lillian, Barnharl's Mills, Butler Co., Pa. — Teacher. 
Davis, Annie, Indiana, Pa. — Teacher. 

Elder, Maude W., Elder's Ridge, Indiana Co , Pa. — Teacher. 
Fullerton, Ella, McKeesport, Pa. — Teacher. 
Ferguson, Lydia, 66 Jackson street, .\llegheny, Pa. 
Gilmore, Etta, 59 Western avenue, Allegheny, Pa. — Teacher. 
Hawthorne, Martha, 19 Windsor street, Allegheny, Pa. — Teacher. 
Hoskinson, Delia, Bolivar, Westmoreland Co., Pa. — Teacher. 
Johnson, Mary, Avonmore, Indiana Co., Pa. — Teacher. 
Johnson, Kate W., 257 Fisk street, Pittsburgh, Pa. — Teacher. 
Jack, .Anna M., New Alexandria, Westmoreland Co., Pa. — Teacher. 
Leezer, Tillie, 19 Fifth avenue, McKeesport, Pa. — Teacher. 
McHattie, Lyde, New Brighton, Beaver CV., Pa. — Teacher. 



76 STATE NORMAL SCHOOL, 

McGarvey, Lizzie S., Camden, Allegheny Co., Pa. — Teacher. 

Murdock, Estelle, 24 Juniata street, Allegheny, Pa. — Teacher. 

North, Maud, Covode, Indiana Co., Pa. — Teacher. 

Owens, Sadie, Indiana, Pa. — Teacher. 

Piper, Mary, Beaver Falls, Pa. — Teacher. 

Stevenson, Mae E. 147 Grant avenue, Allegheny, Pa. — Teacher. 

Stitt, Lelia, Wilkinsburg, Pa. 

Stoner, Mame, 72 Beech street, Allegheny, Pa. — Teacher. 

Van Eman, Hattie, Canonsburg, Washington Co., Pa. — Teacher. 

Vogel, Ella King, Somerset, Pa. — Teacher. 

Weaver, Rose B., Irwin, Pa. — Scientific Student in N. S. 

Elkin, W. F., Smicksburg, Indiana Co., Pa. — Teacher. 

Freed, B. F., Stauffer, Westmoreland Co., Pa.— Teacher. 

Feit, George J., Indiana, Pa. — Teacher. 

Gibson, T. L., Elderton, Indiana Co., Pa. — Teacher. 

Mahan, W. M., Indiana, Pa. — Teacher. 

Radcliffe, J. N., Horton, Indiana Co., Pa. 

Thompson, Guy C. — Deceased. 

Wiggins, Hubert, Blairsville, Pa. — Proprietor Job Printing OflBce. 

AVeamer, Frank, Pluraville, Indiana Co., Pa. — Teaciier. 

Work, C. T., RedclifF, Greeley, Col.— Teacher in Manual Training in Normal 
School. 

CLASS OF 1891. 

LADIES. 

Amberg, Nora, 209 Chartiers street, Allegheny. — Teacher. 

Ayres, Clara, Sharpsburg. — Teacher. 

Brown, Hattie G., Perrysville, Allegheny Co. — Teacher. 

Boardman, Lde M , 372 Ridge avenue, Allegheny, Pa. — Teacher. 

Books, Mabel, Indiana. — Teacher. 

Baird, Mary M., Horton, Pa. — Teacher. 

Black, Sarah, 235 E. Pearl st., Butler, Pa.— Teacher. 

Cameron, Annie R., Houtzdale, Pa. — Teacher, 

Cameron, Kate, Houtzdale, Pa. — Teacher. 

Coleman, Ada, Clarksburg, Indiana Co. — Teacher. 

Chester, Edna F., 321 Ninth avenue, McKeesport, Pa. — Teacher. 

Crosier, Mary, Shady Side, Pittsburgh. 

Ferguson, Ada., Youngstown, Westmoreland Co., Pa. — Teacher. 

Goodell, Jennie, Indiana, Pa. — Teacher. 

Gorman, Ida, (Mrs. I. 1. Palmer.) Indiana, Pa. 

Gallaher, Sue B., Greensburg, Pa. — Teacher. 

Hamilton, Delia, Emlenton, Pa. — Teaciier. 

Hood, Ida, Kittanning, Pa. — Teacher. 

Hartley, Marge, 850 Carson street, W. E. Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Hazlett, Frances, Bellevue, Allegheny Co., Pa. — Teacher. 

Johnston, .^nna Bird, Apollo, Pa. — Teacher. 

Jenkins, Mary, Sahsburg, Pa. — Ttacher. 

Kendig, Mary, Irwin, Pa., Teacher. 



INDIANA, PA. 77 



Knox, Maria P., Allegheny, Pa. — Teacher. 

Mooreliead, Maggie, Indiana, Pa. — Teacher. 

McNall, Blanche, Imperial, Pa. 

McCorniJck, Martha E., Mt. Lebanon, Allegheny Co., Pa. — Teacher 

Matthews, Annie P., 337 Wylie avenue, Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Porter, Madge, Perrysville avenue, Allegheny, Pa. — Teacher. 

Reesraan, Mary C, Curwinsville, Clearfield Co., Pa. — Teacher. 

Russell, Minnie, Indiana, Pa. — Teacher. 

Steinmetz, Dillie, Braddock, Pa. — Teacher. 

Shane, Jennie M., Braddock, Allegheny Co., Pa. — Teacher. 

Warren, Annie M., 376 Rebecca St., Allegheny. — Teacher. 

Wyse, Lettie, McKee's Rocks, P. O., Allegheny Co., Pa. — -Teacher. 

5:^ GENTLEMEN. 

Ayres, J. Douglas, Sharpsburg. — Clerk. 

Fiscus, N. S., Indiana. — Teacher. 

Hershey, Harry D., Irwin. — Civil Engineer. 

Hall, Loyal Freeman, North Hope, Butler Co., Pa. — Teacher, 

Mabon, Alexander S., Indiana, Pa. — Teacher. 

Rush, Simeon A., Greensburg, Pa. — Teacher. 

Urey, John, Clearfield, Pa.— Teacher. 

Voolage, William, Blairsville, Indiana Co., Pa. — Teacher. 




Contents. 



Page. 

Calendar 3 

Board of Trustees and Officers 4 

Standing Committees . . 5 

Faculty 6 

Catalogue op Students : 

Scientific • ...... 8 

Tost-Graduates 8 

Normal Department •. 8 

Commercial Department 20 

College Preparatory 21 

Model Department 22 

Music Department 24 

Summary of Attendance 2.5 

Courses of Study: 

Elementary Course 26 

Schedule of Studies 27 

Post Graduate Course 28 

Scientific Course 28 

Scientific Course as Revised 29 

Model School Course 30 

College Preparatory Course 13 

Classical Course 31 

Industrial Training 31 

Musical Course 32 

Departments : 

Professional Department 35 

English Department ■ 36 

Mathematical Department ."58 

Geographical and Historical Department 40 

Science Department .41 

Elocutionary Department 43 

Manual Training Department 4.') 

Classical Department 46 

Commercial Department 47 

Course of Study 47 

Athletic Department 50 

Goverment 51 



Contents. — Continued. 



Buildings, Location, Grounds, Ktc: 

Building 51 

Location and Uiiilroad Connections ; ... 52 

Railroad Accommodations 53 

Grounds 53 

Miscellaneous : 

Examinations 54 

Examinations for Graduation 54 

Plan for Junior Kxaminations 55 

Examinations of Practical Teachers 59 

Expenses at Indiana : 

Rooms 58 

Choice of Rooms 58 

Deductions .59 

State Appropiations to Students .59 

Payment of Bills 60 

Text Books 60 

Library and Reading Room 61 

Societies 62 

Religious Influences 62 

Advice to Prospective Students 63 

Alumni Officers and Directory 65 



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