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Full text of "Annual city report, Berlin, New Hampshire"

i90: 



fifth Hnnual Report 

City of Berlin 



JS^cw RampsbCre 



^ february 15, tgoi /^ 



university of New Hampshire 
Library 




FRED M. CLEMENT, Mayor. 



FIFTH ANNUAL REPORT 

OF THE 

RECEIPTS AND EXPENDITURES 

OF THE 



rr 



FOR THE YEAR ENDING 

FEBRUARY 15, 1902, 

TOGETHER WITH OTHER ANNUAL REPORTS AND 

PAPERS RELATING TO THE AFFAIRS 

CF THE CITY. 




BEKI.IX N. H.: 

TH E INDEPENDENT PRESS, 
1902. 



352,07 



City Government, 

Berlin, N. H. 

1901-1902. 



EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENT. 



riayor, 

FRED M. CLEMENT, 
Elected annually in March by the i^eople. Salary $200 per annum. 



City Council. 

One Councilman elected annually for term of three years by the 
voters of each ward. No salary. 

Ward l.—J. M. LAVIN. 

Wm. M. HOFFSES. 
THOMAS H. FLATLEY. 

Ward 2.—D. T. LEFEBVRE. 

DANIEL J. DALEY. 
EDWARD TOUSSAINT. 

Ward 5.— FRED R. OLESON. 
J. B. PAUQUETTE. 
E. F. BAILEY. 



City Clerk. 

Elected annually by the City Council. Salary $200 per annum with 
fees as provided by law. Also Clerk of City Council. 

Wm. W. BURLINGAME. 

Office, 52 Main Street. 



CITY OF BERLIN. 



Deputy City CSerk. 

Elected by the Citj^ Council. No salary. 
LENA A. CLARKE. 



Standing Committees of the City Counci!. 

Accounts and Claims.— l.avin, Bailey and Toussaint. 
-Engrossed Ordinances.— Daley, Pauijuette and Flatley. 
Election JReturns.—Olemn, Flatley and Lefebvre. 
Eire Department. — Lavin, Lefebvre and Pauquetie. 
Einance.— The Mayor, Daley, Hoffl-es aiid Bailey. 
Eiiblic Buildinr/s.— Flatley, Olepon and Toui-;saint. 
Public Instruction. — Bailey, Daley and Lavin. 
Police and Electric Lic/hts.—B.oiTt'efi, Bailey and Daley. 
Printing.— Fauquetie, Lefebvre and Hofii^es. 
Boads and Bridges.— Hoffi-ies, Lefebvre and Ole^on. 
Seivers and Water.— Toui^mmt, Pauquette and Flatley. 
Salaries. — Lefebvre, Toussaiut and Olej^on. 



City Tteasurer. 

ALBERT LI EA.STMAN. 

Elected annually by the City Council. Salary ?oO per annum. 

Oflflce, Berlin National Bank. 



City Auditor. 

NATHANIEL G. CRAM. 

Elected annually by the City Council. Salary $.50 per annum. 



City Engineer. 

EDWIN S. BRYANT. 

Elected annually by the City Council. Salary 50 ceats per hour. 

Office, City Building. 



Inspector of Buildings. 

ROBERT SNODGRASS. 

Elected annually by the City Council. 

OUtice, Oak Street. 



CITY GOVERNMENT. 5 

Collector of Taxes. 

WILSON A. PINGREE. 

Elected annually by the City Council. Salary |600 per annum. 
Office, City Clerk's Office. 



City Solicitor. 

WILLIAM H. PAINE. 

Elected annually by the City Council. Salary $400 per annum. 
Office, National Bank Block. 



City Physician. 

A. LAVALLEE, M. D. 

Elected annually by the City Council. Salary $250 per annum. 
Office and Residence, Pleasant Street. 



Board of Assessors. 

Ward 7.— MOSES HODGDON. 
Ward ^.— WINBORN A. BOOTHBY. 
Ward J.— JOHN C. W^EST. 

Elected annually by the City Council, one from each vrard. 

Salary $75 per annum. 

Council Rooms, the second Thursday of each month. 



Street Commissioner. 

H. CHRISTIAN JOHNSON. 

Elected annually by the City Council. Salary $600 per annum] 
Residence, Berlin Mills. 



Sewer Commissioner. 

ANDERSON G. ANDERSON. 

Elected annually by the City Council. Salary $75 per annum. 
Residence, Berlin Mills. 



6 CITY OF BERLIN. 

Overseer of the Poor. 

A. B. FOKBUSH. 

Elected annually by the City Council. Salary $200 per annum. 
Office, Forbush's Jewelry Store, No. 50 Main Street. 



Board of Health. 

Elected annually by the City Council. Salary $50 per annum 
for each member. 

Chairman, JAMES MOFFET. 

Residence, Western Avenue. 
Dr. D. J. McCABE. 

Office, Wilson Block, Main Street. 
FELIX BLAIS. 

Residence, Berlin Mills. 



DEPARTMENT OF SCHOOLS. 



Board of Education. 

Salary, |100 per annum for Chairman. ^50 per annum for other 

members. 

Chairman, DR. J. J. COBB. 
DR. H. WARREN JOHNSON. 
COLUMBUS P. KIMBALL. 



Principal of High 5chool. 

Salary $1200 per annum. 

H. G. DIBBLE. 

Residence, Pleasant Street. 

Assistants, MISS GRACE E. BURROUGHS, 
MISS MARGARET BREED. 



CITY GOVERNMENT. 

PUBLiC LIBRARY. 



Trustees. 

Elected for three years, one each year by the City Council. 

DR. H. WARREN JOHNSON, Chairman. 

F. M. CLEMENT. 

REV. WILLIAM P. LADD. 



Librarian. 

HATTIE L. JOHNSON. 
Elected annually by the City Council, Salary, $200 per annum. 



POLICE DEPARTMENT. 



City Marshal. 

JOHN T. YOUNGCLI8S. 

Elected annually by the City Council. Salary, f2.50 per day. 
Police Station, City Building, Mechanic Street. 



A5sistant City Harshal. 

NARCISSE MORIN. 

Elected annually by the City Council. Salary, |2.25 per day. 
Police Station, City Building, Mechanic Street. 



Police Officers. 

M. CHRISTIANSON. 
PETER BARBIN. 
EUGENE LEFEBVRE. 
LEWIS N. CLARK. 
ROBERT L. KIRKPATRICK. 

Elected annually by the City Council. Salary, J|!2.00 per day 
for actual service. 



CITY OF BERLIN. 



Special Police Officers. 

ANTON NELSON, 
CHliLSTIAN CHEIRTIANWON, 
ALEX McEACHERN, 
ALBERT F. HOLMICS, 
FRANK X. McHALE, 
ADELARD MORIN, 
JAY ALEXANDER, 
HENRY RAMSEY, 
C. R. DICKINSON, 
CALEB WIGHT, 
ROBERT L. KIRKPATRICK, 
JOSEPH INIoKINNON, 
SIGUARD INI. ANDERSON, 
GEO. S. WILSON, 
E. E. DECKER, 
H. D. SHEA, 
ALPHONSE RODERICK, 

Elected by the City Council. Salary, ^l.lo per day for actual ser- 

\ ice. 



T. W. MAGUIRE, 
JOHN COTE, 
RUEL McGOWN, 
L. D. BROWN, 
JOSEPH LECLERC, 
EDWARD ROUTHIER, 
JOSEPH WALSH, 
CLOPHAS LABONTE, 
C. E. CLARK, 
STEPHEN MALONEY, 
EDWARD BLODGETT, 
A. N. CORD WELL, 
EVAN ANDERSON, 
ARTHUR OUILETTE, 
W. A. BOOTHBY, 
JOHN W. GREEN, 
BARNEY GUNN. 



Constable. , 

JOHN T. YOINGCLISS. 

Elected annually by the City Council. Otfice Police Station, City 
Building, Mechanic Street. 



POUCE COURT. 



Justice. 

geor(tE f. rich. 

Appointed by Governor and Council. Salary, $400 jier ainunn. 
Ottice, Wertheini Building, ^lahi Street. 



Associate Justice. 

IRVING STEARNS. 

Appointed by liovernor and Council. Salary, §^2.00 per day for 

actual service. 



CITV GOVERNMPJNT. 

FIRE DEPARTMENT. 



Chief Engineer. 

\V. L EVANS. 

Elected aniuuilly by the City Council. Salary, $150 per annum, 
liesidence, Western Avenue. 



First Assistant Engineer. 

GEORGE E. KENT. 
Elected annually by the City Council. Salary, $100 per annum. 



Second Assistant Engineer. 

JOHN Q. FARRINGTON. 

Elected annually by the City Council. Salary, $100 per annum. 



WARD OFFICERS. 



Moderators. 

Ward i.— FREDERICK BARROWS. 
Ward i^.— ALPHA B. FORRUSH. 
Ward J.— FREMONT D. BARTLET^r. 

Elected bi-ennially by the people. 



Ward Clerks. 

Ward l.—F. X. McHALE. 

Ward ^.—WILLIAM W. BURLINGAME. 

Ward ,^.— W. J. OLESON. 

Elected annually by the people. 



lO CITY OF BERLIN. 

Supervisors of the Check Lists. 

Ward 7.— LOUIS RODERICK. 
JOHN B. NO YES. 
JAMES M. LAVIN. 

Ward 5.— JOSEPH LAMBERT. 
GEORGE F. RICH. 
JOHN M. DRESSER. 

Ward .5.— FRED R. OLESON. 
E. E. PIERCE. 
JOHN B. LANGIS. 
Elected bi-ennially by the people. 



Inaugural Address. 



Delivered by the Mayor, Hon. Fred M. Clement, 
March 25, 1901. 



Gentlemen of the City Council: 

Another year has drawn to a close. Its events and experiences, 
its labors and pleasures, its joys and its sorrows are added to the re- 
alities of the inexorable past, and have become subjects of un- 
changeable history. We are constantly enacting our Berlin history. 
Each municipal year, as time passes, contributes a brief page, and 
then the leaf turns for those Avho follow. The progress of that his- 
tory is ever onward, substantially the same, while the enactors of 
it are ra^jidly changing. 

It was long ago said that as man growls older, each succeeding 
year seems shorter than its predecessor. But, probably, everyone 
is slow to admit, even to himself, that such is the fact in his own 
case ; and yet, sooner or later, the truth comes home to him, and 
he realizes that his life is shortening, not only in its years, but in 
the rapidity with which those years are passing away. 

The evolution of time has brought us to the threshold of another 
municipal year, and it is my privilege to address you briefly on 
matters pertaining to the welfare and government of our city. It 
is not necessary for me to take any considerable time because the 
reports of the various departments have been printed, and these 
reports in detail give all the necessary information. 

I Invite you to carefully consider and examine these reports, 
hoping you may make such suggestions for improvejnents as may 
occur to you. From time to time new questions will constantly be 
coming up for our consideration, and new responsibilities will have 
to be assumed, but we have confidence that they will be met and 
determined with the same care and attention as heretofore. 



12 CITY OF BERLIN. 

A high standard has been maintained in onrpnblie school system. 
We are confronted by the same important question now as we were 
one year ago, that is, additional school room. Altliough two rooms 
\\ ere added to the Higli school building the past year, the increase 
in the number of school children makes it necessary for us to solve 
this additional problem of so vital importance to the welfare of the 
pupils of our city. 

I recommend that we apjiropriate !?2000 for the use of the schools 
in additition to the amount reconnuended by the finance commit- 
tee, as I consider good schools the gieatest monumeivt of civiliza- 
tion. 

With the exception of the street department, I do not think it 
necessary to call particular attention to the other branches of the 
city government; but in order to continue the work already com.- 
meuced and build new streets that public convenience of our rap- 
idly growing city demands, I would recommend that we ai:»propri- 
ate i?2000 more than is recommended l)y the finance committee. 
Whatever is done by this dei)artnient should be done in a thorough 
manner, using the best material obtainable and the construction 
made with the object of endurance and permanence. Uentlemeu, 
this I think is good economy and money well expended. 

A question which demands our careful consideration is the finan- 
cial condition of the city. Every citizen is interested in the prob- 
lem of how best to keep down expenditures and the burden of 
taxation. 

How to meet the requirements of the city government and at the 
same time reduce expenses is a problem which requires exceeding 
care to solve. I desire to give particular attention to our floating 
indebtedness and to have it reduced as much as jiossible, and insti- 
tuting a system that will steadily reduce this indebtedness. If ithis 
can be accomplished I shall consider that our labors have been of 
service to our constituents. 

The thanks of the city are due to the retiring officers for their 
painstaking and conscientious service. 

In consideration of the liljrary trustees' request, as noted in their 
report, I would earnestly reconnnend that some innnediate action 
relative thereto be taken. In my judgment the time for action has 
now come. I was surprised at, and regret that the finance commit- 
tee advised cutting down the ajjpropriation for the library S150. I 
would rather increase it than decrease that amount as this is a step 



IXAUGUKAL ADDRESS. 13 

backward, having, as we do, the reputatioii among our sister cities, 
of iieing the most progressive city in New England, aud I consider 
the library a very important branch of our facilities for education. 

(Jentlemen, the labors of your office Avill be very often difiicult, 
but it is best you should cheerfully perform them. I regret that I 
am not able to bring to their discharge ri]ier years and inore ex- 
tended experience. Of my qualifications, those of you who elected 
me are the judges; the responsibility in that regard is with you. 
For the faithful discharge of my duties the responsibility is with 
me. My sincere desire and earnest effort will be to fulhl my obli- 
gation in every detail. I a\ ill study carefully to base my actions 
upon sound princijjles, and will endeavor not to deviate therefiom 
from any motive of policy or consideration of friendship. I ^\•ill en- 
deavor to )je cautious and conservative; but however well the (Uities 
of one year may be performed, the retunung year brings with it 
duties as important and indispensable. In nodei:)artment of labor 
is this trite sentiment more applicable than in our munici])al govern- 
ment. 

It is fortunate for our city, that you, u])on whom rests in a large 
degree the responsibility for its ]nosperity*or adversity, have not 
grown weary of its routine of labor, but are even more ready than 
before to devote your time and labor for the i)romotion of its inter- 
ests. I aslv that ^\ith a spirit of chaiity for me, you carefully sciu- 
tinize and thoroughly review my reconnnendations for I do net 
desire to be sustained in any error. 

In concluding, I wish to express my confidence that the ensuing 
year will be one of continued jirospeiity for our city and people. 
This can be attained only by faithful attentiou to our duties, a 
conscientious regard of our ol)ligations, and your harmonious co- 
oi)eration, in a manner that will be to our credit aud to our constit- 
uents' whose servants we are. 



The City Charter. 



STATE OF NEW HAMPSHIRE. 

In the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and ninety- 
seven. 

AN ACT 

To establish the City of Berlin. 

Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives in 
General Court convened. 

Section 1. The inhabitants of tlie town of Berlin in the county 
of Coos shall continue to be a body corporate and politic under the 
name of the City of Berlin. 

Section 2. Said city of Berlin is hereby divided into three 
wards, which shall be constituted as follows, namely : 

Ward one shall include all that part of said Berlin lying souther- 
ly and westerly of the following described line: beginning on the 
town line between the town of Berlin and the township of Suc- 
cess, where said line is intersected by the range line between 
ranges nine and ten; thence running westerly on said range line 
to its intersection with the center line of the location of the Con- 
cord and Montreal railroad; thence in a direct Hue to the center of 
Dead river where it empties into the Androscoggm river; thence 
up the center of Dead river to the range line between ranges seven 
and eight; thence westerly on said range line to its intersection 
with the town line between the town of Berlin and the township 
of Kilkenny. 

Ward two shall include all that part of said Berlin lying norther- 
ly and easterly of the line above described and the following de- 
scribed line: 

Beginning on the town line between the town of Berlin* and the 
township of Success where said line is intersected by the range 
line between ranges eight and nine; thence westerly on said range 
line to the point where it intersects the established land line between 



16 CITY OF BERLIN. 

the (ileu .Manufacturing roni))au.y and the Berlin Falls Filne 
Comj)any; thence on said land line to the west bank of tlie An- 
droscoggin river; thence in a direct line to the southerly line of 
lands now owned and occupied by Philip St. I^aurent; thence 
on the line of said St. Laurent laud to School street; thence across 
School street to the center of Prospect street; thence on the center 
line of Prospect street as far as it is occupied; thence on the same 
course as Prospect street to the check line between lots numbered 
four and five; thence southerly on said check line to the center 
line of the location of the Grand Trunk liailway; thence on said 
llailway line to the range line between ranges three and four; 
thence on said range line to the town line between the town of 
Berlin and the township of Kilkenny. 

Ward three shall include all that ]>ortion of said Berlin not em- 
braced in ward one and two as herein constituted. 

Section .H. The administration of all the fiscal, prudential 
and municipal affairs of said city and the government thereof, 
shall be vested in one principal ofticer to be called the mayor, and 
one board consisting of nine members to be called the council, the 
members whereof shall be called councilmen. The mayor and 
council shall sit and act together and compose one body, and in 
their joint capacity be called the city council. 

Section 4. The mayor and council created I »y this act shall have 
all the powers, and do and perform in reference to each other, 
or otherwise, all the duties which mayors, boards of aldermen and 
common councils of cities are by law^ authorized or recjuired to do 
or perform, either seinirately or otherwise; and all jirovisionsof the 
statutes pertaining to the duties or i^owers of aldermen and com- 
mon councils of cities, separately or otherwise, shall be construed 
to apply to said city council unless a contrary intention api)ears. 

Section 5. Said city shall constitute one school district, and 
the administration of all fiscal, ])rudential and district affairs of 
said district shall be vested in a city council, except such as shall 
hereinafter be vested in the school board. 

Section 0. All projjerty of said town of Berlin, or of the school 
district of said town, shall be vested in said city, and all debts of 
said town and said school district shall be considered for all ]»ur- 
poses as the debts of said city. 

Section 7. Each ward shall elect one representative to the 
General Court until such time as any or all of said wards shall, by 



CITY CHARTER. 1? 

virtue of their constitutional rights, be entitled to a greater 
number. 

Section 8. Each ward shall at each state biennial election 
choose by ballot a moderator and three supervisors of check lists, 
\\ ho shall hold office for two years and until their successors are 
elected and ciualitied, and shall receive for their services only such 
compensation as the City Council may vote. 

Said Supervisors shall perform all the duties required by law of 
selectmen of wards in cities and supervisors of check lists in towns, 
and for all purposes requiring such officers, shall be considered 
selectmen of said wards. 

The present board of supervisors of said town of Berlin shall act 
as supervisors and selectmen of each of said Mards until supervisors 
are chosen by each of said wards at the next biennial election as 
herein provided. They shall detail one of their number to attend 
each meeting in each of said wards at which supervisors arc re- 
quired by law to be present, and such supervisor while in attend- 
ance on such meeting, shall have the jiowers and perform the 
duties of the full board. 

Section 9. Said supervisors in regulating and posting check 
lists, shall be governed by the law applying to the supervisors of 
towns, their respective wards being considered as a town for such 
purposes. 

Section 10. The annual meeting of each ward shall be held 
on the second Tuesday of March in each year, at such place in said 
city as may be fixed by said City Council. The first meeting of 
said w aids shall be called by the present supervisors of the town of 
Berlin, at such place as they may select, and said board of super- 
visors shall prepare a check list for each w'ard for use at such meet- 
ings. 

Section 11. Each ward at its annual meeting shall elect a 
Councilman who shall serve for three years, and a ward clerk who 
shall serve for one year, except that at the first election in each 
ward there shall be elected one Councilman to serve for one year, 
one for two years, and one for three years. 

Section 12. The Mayor of said city shall be chosen annually, 
and shall have a negative upon all the acts of the Council to which 
his veto power would extend had the city government herein con- 
stituted provided for a board of aldermen and such veto power 



18 CITY OF BERLIN. 

Hhall extend t» individual items of appropriation. He shall preside 
in all meetings of the City Council, but shall have no vote except 
in case of an equal division. In his absence the Council may elect 
one of their number chairman, who shall have all the powers and 
perform all the duties of ]Mayor during his absence or disability, or 
during the vacancy in said office from any cause. The Mayor shall 
receive for his services an annual salary of two hundred dollars, 
payable semi-annually, which shall be in full for all services of 
every kind rendered by him in said office. 

Section 13. The INIayor and Council shall annually, on the last 
Monday of March meet for the purpose of taking their respective 
oaths, and shall elect a City Clerk who shall be Clerk of the City 
Council and have a salaiy of two hundred dollars per annum. 

Section 14. Said Council shall also, within one week of said 
annual meeting, appoint a board of three assessors, one from each 
ward, who shall receive for their services seventy-five dollars each 
per annum; and said Council shall also ^\ ithin thirty days of said 
annual meeting, appoint a Board of Jiealth of not more than three 
persons, a City Treasurer, who shall also serve as Treasurer of the 
Board of Education and receive as compensation fifty dollars per 
annum; a City Auditor; a Collector of Taxes, a City Solicitor, a 
City Marshal and Police Officers, a Highway Commissioner, a 
Chief Engineer and Assistant Engineers o|" the fire department, 
and may create such other governmental departments and elect 
or appoint such other officers or agents as are necessary for the 
good government of the city, not otherwise provided for. 

The term of such officers shall be for one year and until their suc- 
cessors are elected and qualified, unless sooner removed; but all 
officers and agents shall be subject to removal by the City Council. 
The compensation of officers and agents whose salaries are not fixed 
shall be only such as ma,y be fixed by the City Council. 

Section 15. The general management and control of the pub- 
lic schools and of the buildings and property pertahiing thereto, 
shall be vested in a Board of Education cousistmg of three mem- 
bers, who shall be elected by the City Council until such time as 
the city may vote to elect them at their annual ward meetings, or 
at special meetings called for the purpose. They shall hold office 
for three years and until their successors are elected and qualified, 
except the terms of tho:<e first ele(^ted shall be for one, two and 
three years respectively. They shall receive such compensation as 
may be fixed by the Council and their terms of office shall begin on 



CITY CHARTJEK. 10 

the first Monday in April of each year. Couueilmen; shall be inel- 
igible to election as members of the Board of Education. 

Section 16. The appropriations for schools shall be vested in 
the City Council and the School Board shall be accountable to the 
City Council for its expenditures. 

Section 17. The Police Court of the town of Berlin as hereto- 
fore existing and constituted, is hereby constituted and established 
as the Police Court of the City of Berlin, and all precepts, civil and 
criminal, which by law are made returnable to, or which have 
been instituted and were pending before the said Police Court of 
the town of Berlin, when the act establishing the City of Berlin 
shall go into eflect, shall be heard and administered in said Court 
under the name of the Police Court of the City of Berlin. The sal- 
ary of the Justice of said Police Court shall be the sum heretofore 
fixed by the town of Berlin. The Justice of said Court may appoint 
a Clerk of the Court if provision is made by the City Council of 
said city for his compensation ; but until such provision is made, 
the Justice, or in his absence, the special Justice shall be Clerk as 
to all business before them respectively transacted in the Court, 
and such Clerk or Justice shall keep a full record of all proceedings. 
The fees and costs imposed by said Court shall be for the use of the 
City of Berlin, and shall be paid over to the City Treasurer, by any 
person collecting the same. 

Section 18. All vacancies in the Board of Education, and in 
all ward offices shall be filled by the City Council. 

Section 19. The general provisions of the statutes relating to 
state biennial elections shall apply to all elections for city and ward 
offices. 

Section 20. The Supervisors of said town shall seasonably post 
check lists and warrants for said first annual ward meetings, and 
shall seasonably appoint a Moderator and Clerk for each of said 
wards, from the legal voters thereof, who shall, after being duly 
sworn, have the powers and perform the duties of their respective 
offices at the first annual election under this act, and until others 
are elected and qualified. The returns of votes provided by law to 
be made to the City Clerk shall, at said first annual election, be 
made to said town Supervisors, who shall forthwith perform all 
the duties in relation thereto, which are by law assigned to the 
Mayor and Council and City Clerk respectively. Said Supervisors 
shall also select and provide a suitable place for the first meeting of 



20 CiTY OF BERL±N. 

the (.'ity Council, and seasonably notify the members thereof of the 
place so selected. 

Section 21. This act shall take eflect on the 20th day of Feb- 
ruary, 1897, provided the town shall before that date have adopted 
the same at a legal meeting called for that puri)ose. 

If at any meeting this act shall fail of adoption, it may at the 
expiration of three months from such meeting and prior to January 
1, 1900, be again submitted for adoption. 

It shall be the duty of the selectmen to call a meeting of the town 
to act on said question of adoption in accordance witli the foregoing- 
provision upon the petition of ten or more voters of said town. 



Ordinances. 



An Ordinance iu relatiou to geueral provisions of the City of 
Berlin. 

Be it ordained by the City Council of the C'lty of Berlin asfolloivs: 

Skction 1. All by-laws passed by the City Council shall be 
termed ordinances, and the enacting style which shall be but once 
recited in each ordinance shall be: "Be it ordained );>y the City 
t'ouncil of the City of Berlin as follows:" 

8kcti()N 2. AH ordinances which shall be passed by the City 
Council of the City of Berlin shall be endorsed and recorded by 
the (^ity Clerk in a fair and legible hand, without interlineation or 
erasure, and in the order in which they shall be passed, in a book 
to be kept for that purpose, nuide of strong linen paper, strongly 
bound, with a proper margin and index, and to be lettered, 
" Record of Ordinances of the City of Berlin," which book shall 
be preserved in the oflfice of the City Clerk, subject to the inspec- 
tion of the citizens of said city. 

Section ?>. All ordinances of the <'ity Council, and such reso- 
lutions and orders as the City Council may direct, shall be pub- 
lished iu one or more newspapers printed and published in the 
city as the City Council shall from time to time designate. 

Skction 4. It shall be the duty of the City Clerk to iireserve 
four copies of the ordinances and resolutions hereafter adopted by 
the City Council by cutting the same from the newspapers iu 
which they were printed from time to time, and pasting them into 
blank leaves of the revised ordinances, preserving the numbers 
thereof and making reference thereto in the index of said ordin- 
ances, as recorded in the city records, one copy thereof for the use 
of the iSIayor, another copy for the use of the Council, the third 
thereof foi- the use of the City Clerk's office, and the fourth copy 
thereof for the use of the City Solicitor. 

Section 5. First. — The repeal of an ordinance shall not revive 
any ordinraice in force before, or at the time the ordinance repealed 
took effect. 



22 CITY OF BERLIN. 

8ecoud. The repeal of an ordinaut-e shall not affect any i»uui.sh- 
inent or penalty incurred before the repeal took effect, or any suit, 
prosecution or proceeding, pending at the time of the repeal, for 
an offence committed under the ordinance repealed. 

City Seal. 

Section 1. The seal of the city shall he circular in form. 
Finances and Accountability for Expenditures. 

Section 1. There shall be appointed at the commencement of 
each municipal year a standing committee on accounts and claims 
to consist of three members of the City Council, which committee 
shall meet at least once in each month and carefully examine and 
audit all clauns and accounts against the city which shall be laid 
before them, approved as shall be provided in the following sec- 
tion, and shall allow and pass the same if found to be correct and 
justly due. 

iSection 2. No account or claim against the city except judg- 
ments of judicial courts shall be received or acted ujion by the 
committee on accounts and claims, unless such account or claim 
shall be accompanied with the approval of the officer, committee 
or agent authorized in behalf of the city, to make the contract or 
cause the expenditure to be made. 

Section 3. The City Clerk shall receive all accounts and claims 
from persons having claims against the city which shall have 
been approved as provided in the foregoing section. 

He shall carefully examine all such accounts and claims and 
see that they are correctly cast, and present the same, folded, filed 
and numbered, to the committee on accounts and claims. 

He shall keep a book in such fomi and manner as the committee 
shall direct, wherein he shall enter the date and amount of every 
account and claim against the city as finally corrected and allowed 
by said committee, and also the name of the person to whom the 
same has been allowed, designating the fund of appropriation 
from which the same shall be paid. 

Section 4. The City Clerk shall also, under the direction of the 
committee on accounts and claims, keep a book or ledger in ^^ hich 
he shall enter the various appropriations made by the City Council, 
each under its appiojiiiate head, and charge to each the different 
payments and expenditures w hich shall from time to time be made 



CITY ORDINANCES. 23 

therefrom. Whenever an appropriation shall be expended, tlie 
City Clerk shall give notice to the Mayor, the City Council and to 
said committee on accounts and claims, and said committee shall 
pass no claim or account chargeable to any appropriation which 
has been expended until the City Council shall have provided the 
means of paying the same. The City Clerk shall open an account 
w ith the City Treasurer, charging him with the amount of loans 
to the city and all sums of money paid to huu on behalf of said 
city, by the collector or other officer or agent of the city, or by 
any person in any way indebted to the city, and also with all 
notes, bonds, mortgages or other securities in the hands of the 
Treasurer, or which may pass hito his hands, belonging to the 
city, to the end that the amount and value thereof may at any 
time be seen on his books. 

Section 5. No money shall be drawn out of the City Treasury 
except upon the written order of the INlayor, addressed to the 
Treasurer, and countersigned by the City Clejk, and numbered so 
as to correspond with the account or claim it shall be drawn to 
pay; and no account or claim against tlie city, arising from any 
contract or agreement for labor, or for the purchase or sale of any 
goods, wares or merchandise in which any member of the City 
Council, or any officer or agent appointed by the City Council, or 
either branch thereof, has been directly or indirectly interested iu 
a private <apacity, shall be appro\'ed by the committee, nor shall 
any order therefor be drawn upon or jiaid by the (,'ity Treasurer 
unless such contract ;or agreement shall have been authorized or 
ratified by the City Council ; but such restriction shall not \)e con- 
strued to ])re\'ent the purchase of ordinary supjilies from members 
of the City Council who may be engaged in trade, nor the employ- 
ment of tlie members of the City Council in their ordinary voca- 
tion by duly authorized heads of departments; and no account or 
claim for the hire of horses or carriages, or for any other thing 
where the credit of the city has been used, shall be allowed unless 
incurred by the authority of the City Council, or with the ap]noval 
of the jNIayor, nor unless proper vouchers therefor shall be pre- 
sented by the jierson incurring the debt. 

Section (>. In all bills agahist the city which shall be presented 
for payment etu-h item shall be specifically set forth, and no claim 
exceeding ten dollars in amount shall be alloM ed and paid unless 
approved by the City Council. The Mayor is hereby authorized 
to draw oiders on the Treasurer for the payment of all accounts 
and claims allowed, as provided in this chapter, but he shall not 



24 CITY OF BERLIN. 

draw an order in payment of any services rendered or any material 
furnished for any department beyond the sum specially appropri- 
ated therefor by the City Council. 

Section 7. Any sum of money ^^■hieh shall have been especially 
appropriated for the payment of principal or interest due on any 
note or other security of the city, or for the state and county taxes, 
may be drawn from the treasury and paid to the order of the 
Mayor, for the purpose for which it w as appropriated, without any 
action on the part of the committee on accounts and claims; and 
whenever it shall be necessary to pay money in advance on con- 
tracts made, or for \\ork begun but not completed, the Mayor, 
upon being satisfied of such necessity, may draw his order upon 
the Treasurer for a sum not exceeding !?oOO at any one tiiue, taking 
security for the same. 

Section 8. Whenever any money shall be drawn from the 
treasury for the purpose specified in the preceding section the City 
Clerk shall report the same and the amount thereof to the com- 
mittee on accounts and claims at their next meeting, and shall 
charge the same under the appropriate lieadof expenditures. 

Section 9. All city officers who shall in their official capacity 
receive any money on behalf of the city, shall pay the Treasurer 
the amount in their hands, once in three months, or oftener if re- 
quired. All other persons who shall at any time have money in 
their hands belonging to the city shall forthwith pay the same to 
the Treasurer. 

Section 10. In all cases of the payment of money to the City 
Treasurer, he shall give his receipt to the person giving the same, 
which receipt shall be delivered to the City Clerk and filed in his 
office, and the City Clerk shall give to the person paying a certifi- 
cate as evidence of such payment. 

All city ofiicers and agents leceiving money in behalf of said 
city shall deliver to the City Clerk, once in three months, a report 
of the amount received, and what disposition had been made 
thereof, exce]:)t in cases otherwise provided. 

Section 11. The City Treasurer shall keep in a book provided 
a true account of all his receipts and payments for the city, mak- 
ing the same conform in mode of entry as near as may be with 
the accounts kept by the City Clerk. 

He shall not pay any money out of the treasury except upon 
orders of the Mayor thaw n in the form prescribed in the filth 



CITY OEDTNANCES. 25 

sei'tiou. He shall, at the eud of each six months, certify to the 
City Clerk all amounts by him paid for maturing bonds, interest, 
state and county taxes, or any other purpose for which he has not 
received an order countersigned by the City Clerk, and the City 
Clerk shall enter each of said amounts in the ledger under its 
approj^riate head as provided in section four. 

He shall, when required, lay before the City Council a statement 
of the condition of the treasury and of all moneys received and 
paid by him on city account. Whenever he is authorized by the 
City Ck^uncil to borrow money on the credit of the city, all notes 
and certificates of indebtedness given therefor shall be signed by 
the ]\Iayor and the City Treasurer, and countersigned by the City 
Clerk, and all such notes and certificates shall be registered in 
books kept for that purpose in the offices of the City Treasurer and 
City Clerk respectively. Such registers should describe such notes 
and certificates by number, date and amount, the name of the per- 
son to whom payable, where payable, and the rate of interest, and 
the date of ordinance or resolution authorizuig the same. 

Section 12. There shall be appointed at the commencement of 
each municijoal year a committee on finance, consisting of the 
Mayor and two members of the Council, which committee shall 
negotiate all loans to the city w hich shall be authorized by the 
City Council, and shall report the same to the City Treasurer. 

Section 13. The committee on finance shall at the close of each 
financial year prepare and lay before the City Council an estimate 
of the amount of money necessary to be raised for the ensuing 
financial year, under the various heads of appropriations, and the 
ways and means of raising the same, and shall also at the close of 
each financial year prepare and lay before the council a statement 
of all the receipts and expenditures of the pieceeding financial 
year, and in detail the amount of appropriation and expenditure 
for each department ; and said committee on finance at the close 
of each financial year, and before making their annual report of 
receipts and expenditures, are hereby authorized to transfer from 
any unexpended balances of appropriations so much thereof as 
shall be recjuired to supply such deficiencies as have been created 
by the necessary overdrawing of the other appropriations of the 
same financial year, and said statement shall be accompanied 
v,ith a schedule of the property, real and personal, belonging to 
the city, and the value thereof and the amount of the city debt. 

Section 14. The Committee on Finance shall, at the close of 
each financial year, and as much oftener as they shall deem it ex- 



26 CITY OF BERLIX. 

pedieiit, examine and audit the accounts of the City Treasurer, 
and lor that purpose sliall have access to all the books and vouch- 
ers in possession of the City Clerk or any other officer of the city. 
Said committee shall not only compare said accounts with the 
vouchers thereof, but shall ascertain whether all moneys due the 
city have been collected and accounted for. They shall also ex- 
amine all bonds, notes and securities in the treasurer's hands, 
belonging to the city, and make report thereof to the City Council. 

Skction 15. The City Treasurer shall make up his accounts on 
the fifteenth day of February, and the financial year shall begin 
on the fifteenth day of February in each year. 

City Clerk. 

BfXTiON 1. In addition to his duties prescribed b.y law, the 
Cit.y Clerk shall perform such duties in connection with his office 
as the City Council shall from time to time fix and determine. 

City Solicitor. 

Section 1. The City Solicitor shall act as attorney for the city 
in all criminal and civil cases in which the cit.y is interested. He 
shall, when required by the Mayor and Council, or an.y officer of 
the city, advise them on any question of law relating to their 
business. ' 

He shall receive for his services as such officer such salary as the 
Cit.y Council shall from time to time fix and determine. In all 
cases where his attendance may be required out of the city, 
reasonable travelling expenses shall be allowed him. 

Overseer of the Poor. 

Section 1. The Overseer of the Poor shall perform the same 
duties, and be subject to the same liabilities, as are now prescribed 
for and incumbent on Overseers of the Poor of towns, and perform 
such other duties as the City Council may prescribe. He shall re- 
ceive such comjiensation or salary for his services as the City 
Council may from time to time fix and determine. 

Highway Commissioner. 

Section 1. The duties and liabilities of the Highway (Com- 
missioner shall be such as prescribed by law for highway agent 
of towns, and such other duties as the Mayor and Council may 
from time to time require. 

Section 2. The Highwa.y Commissioner shall receive such com- 
pensation for his services as the City Council may fix and deter- 
mine. 



C'LTY ORDINANCES. 27 

City Civil Engineer. 

Section 1. The City Civil Engineer shall be under the direc- 
tion of the City Council. He shall have charge of all plans of 
public grounds, streets, sewers, and main drains of the city, except 
such as pertain to the city system of sewerage. He shall, by 
himself or assistants, for whom he shall be responsible, make all 
surveys, estimates, measurements and levels, and perform such* 
other duties as may be required of him by the (-ity Council. All 
books and papers containing tiles, notes and other memoranda 
shall be the property of the city. 

Section 2. The said Engineer shall receive such salary as the 
City Council may fix and determine. 

Board of Health. 

Section 1. The Board of Health shall have and exercise all 
the powers vested in, and shall perform all the duties prescribed 
for health officers of towns as provided by law. 

Section 2. The Board of Health shall receive such compen- 
sation for their services as the City Council may from time to 
time fix and determine. 

Collector of Taxes. 

Section 1. The duties of the Collector of Taxes shall be such 
as are prescribed by law for the collector of taxes in towns, and 
his compensation shall be such as the Mayor and City Council 
may from time to time determine. 

Sewers. 

Section 1. The present system of house sewerage, together 
with any additions to the system which may hereafter be made, 
shall be under the general charge of an officer to be elected annu- 
ally by the City Council, to be known as Sewer Commissioner. 
The said Sewer Commissioner shall be under the direction and 
control of the City Council in all matters pertaining to the con- 
struction, care and management of the system of house sewerage 
of the city. He shall perform such duties connected with his 
office as the council shall from time to time fix and prescribe. He 
may make such rules and regulations as to the use of said sewers 
as he shall deem proper, subject to the approval of the City 
Council. 

Section 2. He shall receive for his services such salary or 
compensation as the City Council may determine. 



28 CITY OF BERLIN. 

City Marsha! and Police. 

Hection 1. The City Marshal shall give bouds in the sum of 
three hundred dollars (.^SOO.OO) satisfactory to the City Council, for 
the faithful performance of the duties of his office. 

Section 2. The City INiarshal shall perform such duties as are 
prescribed by law and such further duties as the Mayor and 
Council may from time to time require. He shall observe all 
wants and defects of the highways and streets and give immedi- 
ate notice thereof to the Highway Commissioner, to the end that 
they may be amended. 

He shall lay before the ^Nlayor and Council once a month, a 
statement of all offences against the laws of the state and the 
ordinances of the city and the result thereof. 

Section 3. The Marshall and other police officers and watch- 
men, when on duty, shall wear such badge of their office as the 
Mayor and Council shall prescribe. 

Section 4. It shall be the duty of the City Marshal, in addition 
to his other duties, to ascertain the circumstances of all accidents 
happening in which the city may have an interest, and all other 
matters of a similar nature when so directed by tlie Mayor, and to 
make a report to the Mayor and City Solicitor of his investigation 
in each case. 

Section o. Should any police officer or watchman fail to com- 
ply with his instructions or be otherwise remiss in his otticial 
duties, the City Marshal, at his discretion, temporarily, may sus- 
pend such delinquent, and he shall report the facts in any such 
case to the City Council, and the matter shall, if in their judgment 
the interest of the city require it, investigate the same without 
delay, and reprimand or remove from office any police officer or 
watchman who may be found guilty of such neglect. 

Regulating Billiard Saloons. 

Section 1. No person shall keep a billiard table, pool table, 
nor bowling alley in the city of Berlin, except for private use, un- 
less a license therefor in writing, specifying the place in which 
it is to be kept, shall first be obtained from the City Clerk, subject 
to the approval of the City Council. 

Section 2. Eveiy person sliall pay for such license, for the use 
of the city, the sum of live dollars on each billiard table, pool 
table and bowling alley, on or before the first day of May annually. 



CITY ORDINANCES. 29 

and Buc'h license shall be revoked or annulled at the pleasure of 
the iSIayor and Council, and shall be forfeited upon the conviction 
of the violation of any of the provisions of this chapter. Huch 
license may also, on application, be issued for six months from the 
first day of May, on payment of live dollars subject to the provis- 
ions of this ordinance. 

StXTioN 3. No keeper of a billiard table shall allow or permit 
any minor to play at billiards or any other game in his saloon, or 
to remain therein, or in any rooiu connected therewith, except 
with the written consent of the father or guardian of such minor. 

Section 4. The violation of any of the provisions of this chap- 
ter shall be punished by a fine not exceeding ten dollars, and such 
an ofi[ender shall forfeit his license and be required to keep the 
jjeace, and be of good behavior. 

Section 5. It shall be the duty of the City Marshal to see that 
the provisions of this chapter are enforced. The fees for license 
for the current year shall be immediately due and payable. 

Passed April 21, 1897. Approved, 

H. F. Marston, 3fa>/or. 
Attest: 

J. A. Letourneau, Cifi/ Clerk. 

An Ordinance to regulate the admission of children into the 
public schools of the city of Berlhi. 

Be it ordained by the City Council of the City of Berlin asfolloivs: 

That pupils who are five years old and upwards shall be admit- 
ted to the primary schools only during the tirst and second weeks 
of the fall and spring terms; but pupils who are qualified to enter 
existing classes may be admitted at any time during the school 
year by applying to the Secretary of the Board of Education. 
Passed May 11, 1897. Approved, 

H. F. Marston, 3fayor. 
Attest: 

J. A. Letourneau, City Clerk. 



An Ordinance relating to the Fire Department. 

Be it ordained by the City Council of the City of Berlin asfolloivs: 

Section 1. The Fire Department shall consist of the Chief En- 
ghieer and Assistant Engineer, to be denominated First and Second 
Engineer, and suitable number of hose men, not less than twelve 



no ICII^Y Oi^ BERLIN. 

or more than eighteen, to form a hose company, and a suitable 
number of liook and ladder men, not less than eight or more 
than filteen to form a company. 

Section 2. The Board of Councihxien shall, in case of a vacancy 
in the Board of Engineers, till such vacancies by apiiointmeut, and 
said engineer shall constitute the Board of Engineers, and shall 
perform the duties and exercise the power of a fire ward. 

Section 3. Every Hose Company shall have attached thereto 
a Foreman and Assistant Foreman, also the hook and ladder com- 
pany shall have attached thereto a Foreman and Assistant Fore- 
man who must be acceptable to the Board of Engineers. 

Section 4. No member of the Fire Department shall hold the 
office of Marshal, Assistant Marshal or Police Officer. 

Section 5. In case of fire the Chief Engineer shall have the 
sole and absolute control and command over the x\ssistant Engi- 
neer and all other officers of the Fire Department. 

Section 6. In the absence of the Chief Engineer the Assistant 
Engineer next in rank who may be present shall hav^e all the 
power and perform the duties of the Chief Engineer. 

Section 7. The foreman of each hose company and the fore- 
man of the hook and ladder company shall at least twice in each 
month, and also in addition thereto, within twenty-four hours 
after every fire, see that such fire apparatus as they may have 
charge of has been operated and examined minutely and carefully 
and report the condition thereof to the Chief Engineer. 

Section 8. It shall be the duty of the members of the Fire 
Department upon an alarm of fiie to repair to their respective 
places, place themselves under the Captain in command and obey 
his orders; and upon receiving his permission, return the fire ap- 
paratus to their appropriate places in a quiet and orderly manner. 

Section 9. The foreman of each hose company and hook and 
ladder^company shall cause the fire apparatus entrusted to their 
care, respectively, to be thoroughly cleaned, oiled, washed, and 
securely housed. 

Section 10. All species of gaming or playhig of games of 
chance, and all disorderly conduct in any hose house, or hook and 
ladder house, or any room connected therewith, at any and all 
times,. is forbidden; and all assembling of persons on the Sabbath 
in any of the said houses, or rooms, except for the purpose of doing 



CITY ORDINANCES. 31 

necessary Avork on the fire apparatus belonging to such house, 
or room, or of accompaning such fire apparatus to a place of fire 
or of returning with the same, is also expressly forbidden, and it 
shall ))e the duty of the Chief Engineer or the City Marshal to see 
that the ])rovisions of this section are enforced. 

SECTrox 11. No hose or hook and ladder carriage shall be taken 
to a fire out of the city without permission of an Engineer, nor 
shall any apparatus of the Fire Department be taken from the 
city except in case of fire, w ithout permission of the Mayor. 

Section 12. The Board of Engineers shall examine into shops 
and other places m here shavings and other combustible materials 
may be deposited or collected, and at all times be vigilant Iti the 
removal of same, whenever in their opinion the same may be dan- 
gerous to the security of the city from fires, and direct the owners, 
tenants, or occupants of said shop or other places to remove the 
same and in case of such owner, tenant or occupant's refusal or 
neglect to do so, such person shall be liable to a penalty not exceed- 
ing ten dollars (iplO) for such neglect or refusal; and whenever, in 
the opinion of the Board of Kngineers, any chimney, hearth, oven, 
stove-i)ipe, flue or other fixtures, or any explosive or inflammable 
fluid or other material, or whatever else may give just cause 
of alarm, shall be altered, repaired or removed, they the said 
Engineers, shall forthwith notify and direct the owner, tenant or 
occupant of the premises upon which the same are situated to 
alter, repair or remove the same, as the said Engineer shall direct, 
and in case such tenant, owner or occupant shall refuse or neglect 
to do so, the person so refusing or neglecting shall also be liable to 
a penalty not exceeding ten dollars. Any person who shall ob- 
struct the Engineer, or his assistants, in carrying out the provis- 
ions of this section, shall be liable to a penalty not exceeding ten 
dollars. 

Sp:ction 13. If any person shall wilfully or maliciously injure 
any of the apparatus owned by the city or shall ride or drive any 
animal or carriage across any hose or other apparatus when in use 
at any fire or any trial thereof he shall be fined not less than five 
dollars nor more than twenty dollars and shall be required to pay 
all damages by him caused. 

Section 14. All factories, hotels, tenement houses, public halls, 
school-houses and other buildings used as places of public resort m 
the city shall be provided with ample means of escape in case of 
fire, and adequate facilities for entrance and exit on all occasions 
and be so erected as to not endanger the health and safety of per- 
sons who may occupy them. 



32 CITY OF BERLIN. 

Sec'TTON lo. The Fire Engineers shall constitute a Board for 
the inspection of the buildings and halls mentioned in tlie preced- 
ing section and sliall from time to time inspect the same and after 
notifying and hearing all parties interested may thereupon direct 
such alterations in any building or hall as may be necessary by the 
provisions of said section, and may order such building or hall to 
be closed until such alterations are made. 

Section 16. Every person aggrieved l)y any decision of such 
inspectors may apj^eal therefrom as provided in section 5, of Cliaj)- 
ter 116, of the Public Statutes. 

Section 17. Any person ^vlio sliall let or use any building for 
the purposes specified in section 14 of this Chapter, after sucli 
building shall have been ordered closed or altered, as provided in 
section 15 of this Chapter, until such order has been complied with, 
or reversed, shall be punished as provided in section 6, of Chapter 
IKi, of the Public »Statutes. 

Section 18. For each al)sence from fire, or neglect of duty, the 
Chief Engineer and Assistant Engineers shall be fined one dollar 
(11.00) each, and others who are members of the department, fifty 
(50) cents each; provided, however, that any fireman liable as 
above may in case of temporaiy absence or sickness have power of 
substitution by giving notice, each Assistant Engineer to tlie Chief, 
each Captain to an Engineer, and each other member to the Cap- 
tain of his company. 

l*assed Augusts, 1897. Approved, 

H. F. Makston, Mayor. 
Attest: 

J. A. LETOTRNEAt', Chrk. 



Sewers. 

An Ordinance relating to sewers. 

Be it ordained hij the City CoiowU of the City of Berlin as follows: 

Section 1. The word "drain," wlien used in ordinances, shall 
be construed to mean a pijieor conduit for the conveyance of storm 
or ground water; and the word "sewer" when so used, sliall be 
construed to mean a pipe or conduit for the conveyance of sewer- 
age of buildings only. 

Section 2. To the committee on sewerage, under the direction 
of the City Council, sliall be intrusted the general management 



CITY ORDINANCES. 33 

and supervision of the public sewers which are now or may here- 
after be constructed and owned by the city, or which may be per- 
mitted to be' constructed or opened by its authority. The appro- 
priations for sewers shall be expended under their direction and 
they shall have full power to make all necessary repairs, exten- 
sions or improvements on said sewers, to procure new sewer pipes, 
and all other necessary materials, and to make all necessary con- 
tracts in connection therewith; but}, they shall make no contracts 
nor do any work in excess of the approjoriation. 

Section 3. All coimections of house sewers, drains and plumb- 
ing work with the sewer system of the city of Berlin shall be made 
in accordance with these rules and regulations; and no plumbing, 
house drainage or connection with the sewer shall be made by any 
person not licensed to do such work by the sewer committee. 



Application for Licenses. 



Section 4. Any person desiring to do business as a plumber in 
connection with the Sanitary Sewer System in the city of Berlin, 
shall file in the office of the Superintendent of Sewers a petition 
giving the name of the individual and place of business, and ask- 
ing to be licensed as a plumber. Said petition must be signed by 
two responsible citizens of the city of Berlin, vouching for his 
business capacity and reputation and that he is willing to be gov- 
erned in all respects by the rules and regulations which are now 
or may be adopted by tlie city. No license shall be granted for 
more than one year, and all licenses shall be granted to expire on 
the first day of April. The fee shall be two dollars for each 
license. 

Section 5. Application for permits to connect with the sewer 
system or do plumbing work to be connected therewith, must be 
made in writing by the owner of the property or his authorized 
agent. Permits to make connection with the sewer system will 
be issued only when the plumbing in the house or building to be 
connected is in accordance with the rules for plumbing hereafter 
prescribed; and all work done shall be subject to the inspection of 
the Superintendent of Sewers, and no alteration shall be made in 
any plan or in any work without a special permit in writing from 
him. 



84 . CITY OP feERLtN, 

Statement of Work. 

Section 0. A plumber shall, on the eojiipletion of the work ^ 
tile hi the office of the >Sui)eriutendent of Sewers, on blanks fur- 
nished for the purpose, a correct statement of the work done 
under the perniit. 

Cesspools. 

Section 7. No open gutter, cesspool or privy vault shall be 
connected with any sewer or drain. 

Injury to Sewers. 

Section 8. No person, iirm or corporation shall injure, break, 
or remove any portion of any man-hole, fiush-tank or any part of 
the sewer system; or throw or deposit, or cause to be thrown or 
deposited in any sewer opening or receptacle connected with the 
sewer system, any garbage, otial or dead animals, ashes, cinders 
or any other thing whatsoever, except fyeees, urine, the necessary 
water-closet paper, liquid house slops, also roof and cellar Avater 
by special permit. 

Water or Gas Pipes. 

Section 9. Any person. Arm or corporation desiring to lay pipe 
for water, gas, steam, or any purpose in any street, alley or property 
upon which sewers are laid shall give at least twenty-four hours' 
notice to the Superintendent of Sewers, and the manner of exca- 
vating, laying and backfilling shall be subject to the approval of 
the Superintendent. All such work shall be planned and executed 
so that no injury shall occur to any public sewer or drain, or to 
any house sewer or drain connected therewith. 

Obstructions. 

Section 10. The Superintendent shall have the power to stop 
and prevent from discharging into the sewer system any private 
sewer or drain through which substances are discharged which are 
liable to injure the sewer or obstruct the flow of the sewerage. 
Before any private drain or sewer shall be connected with the sys- 
tem, the owner of the private drain or sewer shall prove to the 
satisfaction of the Superintendent that it conforms in every re- 
spect to the rules and regulations. 



CITY ORDINANCES. 36 

Plumbing Rules. 

Section 11. Each and every connection with the public sewer 
shall be first quality, salt-glazed, vitrified pipe not less than four 
inches internal diameter, which may extend from the sewer to 
within three feet of the house; and from thence the house drain 
shall be of cast iron i)ipe satisfactory to the Superintendent of 
Sewers, and shall extend upwards full size so that its upper termi- 
nus shall communicate directly with the open air in a manner 
which shall secure perfect ventilation. 

No brick, sheet metal, earthenware or chimney flue shall be 
used as a sewer ventilator, nor to ventilate any trap, drain soil or 
waste pipe. 

Every Fixture Shall be Effectually Trapped. 

Section 12. No trap or any manner of obstruction to the free 
flow of air through the whole course of the drain and soil pipe 
will be allowed. Every fixture shall be effectually trapped. Traps 
to be as near fixtures as possible, and no trap shall be more than 
three (3) feet from the fixture which it is to serve. 

Every fixture having a waste pipe shall be furnished with a 
Sanitas Anti-Syphon trap or be vented by special air pipe, (of size 
not less than the waste pipe when there is more than six (6) feet 
of said pipe) between trap and said pipe. Star or Battle traps and 
four (4) inch water-closet traps may be used without venting. If 
placed on pipe extending through roof if not more than six (6) feet 
away. 

All vent pipes from the inside of the roof must be at least four 
(4) inches in diameter. No pan closet to be allowed, and all water 
closets must have a seat vent of not less than two (2) inches into 
the kitchen chimney when practicable. 

Section 13. All soil and waste pipes shall be as direct as possi- 
ble, and all parts of the work shall be so arranged that they may 
be at all times readily examined and repaired. When necessarily 
placed within partitions or in the recesses of walls, soil and waste 
pipes must be covered with wood-work so fastened with screws aa 
to be readily removed. 

Section 14. All joints in iron drain pipes, except when screw 
joints are used, must be so filled with oakum and lead and hand 
caulked as to make them gas tight. All connections of lead pipes 



36 CITY OF BERLIN'. 

with iron pipes must be made with a brass or lead sleeve, or fer- 
ruled as large or larger than the lead pipe put in the hub of the 
branch of the iron pijje and caulked with oakum and lead. The 
lead pipe must be attached to the ferrule by a wiped or overcast 
joint. 

Section 15. The least inclination that can be allowed for the 
house drahis is one (1) in sixty (60) without the written permission 
of the Superintendent of Sewers. The ends of all pipes not to be 
immediately connected must be securely closed, water tight, with 
imperishable material. The inside of every drain after it is laid 
must be left smooth and clean throughout its entire length. 

Section 16. The backfilling over drains must be puddled or 
rammed, all water and gas pipes i)rotected from injury or settling 
and the surface of the street made good a\ ithin forty-eight hours 
after the completion of that part of the drain lying within the 
public way. 

Section 17. Any person violating any of the provisions of 
these rules and regulations shall, upon conviction thereof, be fined 
not exceeding twenty-live ($2-5) dollars for the use of the city of 
Berhn, and any plumber or drain layer violating these rules and 
regulations shall forfeit his license. 

Section 18. The above rules and regulations shall take effect 
when adopted by the city of Berlin. 

Passed September 7, 1897. Approved, 

H. F. Marston, Mayor. 
Attest: 
J. A. Letourneau, City Clerk. 



An Ordinance in relation to the inspection of buildings. 

Be it. ordained by the City Council of the City of Berlin asfoUoivs: 

Section 1. The Inspector shall examine all buildings in the 
course of erection or alteration as often as practicable and make a 
record of all violations of the law s herein. 

Section 2. Hereafter in the city of Berlin no public building 
damaged by tire or other casualty shall be repaired or restored to 
its former condition, and no work which impairs the strength or 
increases the lire risk of any m all, structure or building shall be 
done except upon a permit from the inspector. 



CITY ORDINANCES. 37 

Section 3. No woodwork will be allowed to be put withiu one 
iuch of aiiy ehiniuey. 

Section 4. All buildings over twenty feet high shall have per- 
maneut means of access to the roof from the inside. 

The opening shall not be less than eighteen inches by thirty 
inches. 

Sp:cti()N 5. Any building which by defect, accident or decay 
or overloading is unsafe shall be vacated forthwith if and when 
the insj^ctor shall so order. 

Section 6. No smoke pipe in any building with wooden or 
combustible floors or ceiling shall hereafter enter any flue unless 
the said pipe shall be at least twelve (12) inches from either the 
floor or ceiling and in all cases where smoke pijjes pass through 
stud or wooden partitions of any kind, whether the same be plas- 
tered or not, they shall be guarded by either a double collar of 
metal with air space or by at least four (4) inches of brick between 
pipe and wood. 

Section 7. Every structure and part thereof ; and appurtenan- 
ces thereto within the city of Berlin shall be so constructed and 
maintained in such repair as not to be dangerous, and tlie owners 
of any premises within the said city upon notice from the insi)ector 
that such premises are dangerous, shall forthwith remedy the 
cause of danger by removal or repair. 

Section 8. No shanties or cheap buildings will be allowed to 
be built or moved on to any lot in any of the principal streets of 
the city of Berlin without a permit from the inspector. 

Section 9. No chimney shall be started or built upon any floor 
or beam, and in no case ^\here the breast of a chimney shall pro- 
ject more than four (4) inches shall it be commenced in any wall, 
but shall be started from the foundation. No chimney in build- 
ings already erected or hereafter to be built shall be cut off below 
or in part and supported by wood, but shall be wholly supported 
by stone, brick or iron. 

Section 10. The City Council may by ordinance at any time 
make such re juirements in addition to these contained in this 
act, as they may deem expedient in relation to the erection and 
alteration of buildings. 



38 CITY OF BERLIN. 

Section 11. Any person who shall build or alter any building 
or other structure or part thereof in violation of any provisions of 
this act or who shall after twenty -four hours' notice from the In- 
spector, maintain or use any such building or other structure or 
part thereof so built or altered as shall violate any provisions of 
any of this act, shall be punished by a fine not exceeding one hun- 
dred dollars, to be paid into the treasury of the city of Berlin. 

Passed August 2, 1898. Approved, 

H. F. Marston, Maijor. 
Attest: 
Wm. W. Burlinqame, City Clerk. 



An Ordinance relating to Police Regulations. 

Be it ordained by the City Council of the City of Berlin, as follows: 

Section 1. All saloons, billiard, and pool rooms and bowling 
alleys, shall be closed at the hour of 9.30 of the clock at night of 
each week day. 

Section 2. No saloon, billiard and pool rooms and bowling 
alleys, shall be kept open for any purpose on Sunday, commonly 
called the Lord's day. 

Section 3. No person shall stand or loaf upon any bridge, 
street comer, sidewalk or other public way to the annoyance of 
others. 

Passed May 2, 1899. Approved, 

John B. Noves, Mayor, 
Attest: 
Wm. W. Burlingame, City Clerk. 



An Ordinance to regulate the use of teams on the business streets 
of the City of Berlin. 

Be it ordained by the City Council of the City of Berlin as follows: 

No truck team, hack, carriage or other team or vehicle shall be 
placed or left on any business street in said city by any person 
longer than is necessary to accomplish the work the owner or 
driver thereof is at the time engaged in. 



CITY ORDINANCES. 39 

Any violation of the foregoing ordinance shall be punished by 
a tine not exceeding twenty dollars. 
Passed May 1, 1900. Approved, 

Frank L. Wilson, Mayor-. 
Attest: 
Wm. W. Burling ame. City Clerk. 



An Ordinance prohibiting the deposit of waste materials iji the 
streets of the City of Berlin. 

Be it ordained hy the City Council of the City of Berlin as follows: 

No person shall place or leave on any street in said city any ani- 
mal or vegetable matter, any wooden or metallic substance, or 
other waste material in any foriu whatever. 

Any violation of the foregoing ordinance shall be punished by a 
fine not exceeding twenty dollars. 

Passed May 1, 1900. Approved, 

Frank L. Wilson, 3Iayor. 
Attest: 
Wm. W. Burlingame, City Clerk. 



An Ordinance to prohil)it the improper use of the public streets 
and ^\ ays of the City of Berlin. 

Be it ordained by the City Council of the City of Berlin as follows: 

SiocTioN 1. No person or corporation shall dig up any public 
street, public way or public ground in said City of Berlin, for the 
purpose of laying water pipes, sewer })ipes, or other structures 
therein, or for the purpose of repairing the same, without first ob- 
taining the consent of the Mayor and City Council of said city. 

Section '1. In case any person or corporation, after having 
obtained tlie consent of tlie Mayor and City Council as aforesaid, 
shall dig up any jnib lie street, public way or public ground for any 
of the purposes mentioned in Hection 1 of this ordinance, he or 
it shall restore the same to the same order and condition in which 
the premi;-es were in before said digging was commenced, without 
unnecessary delay, and shall take all necessary precautions to pro- 
tect the public from injury by their acts. 



40 CITY OF BEKIJN 

Section 3, Nothing herein contained shall be construed in such 
manner as to relieve any person or corporation from liability for 
damages resulting, in the performance of any work herein men- 
tioned, for which they are by law liable. 

Passed August 9, 1900. Approved, 

Fkank L. Wilson, Mayor. 

Attest: 

Wm. W. Buri.ingame, C'//(/ Clerk. 



An Ordinance regulating Hackney Carriages and Job Teams. 

Be it ordained hi/ the City Council of the City of Berlin asfolloivs: 

Section 1. The City Council may from time to time, at their 
discretion, grant licenses upon such terms and to such persons as 
they may deem expedient, to set up, employ, or use hackney car- 
riages, or other vehicles for the conveyance of persons, for hire, 
from place to place within the limits of the city, which license may 
be revoked at any time for any violation of the provisions of this 
ordinance; and a record of such licenses shall be kept by the City 
Clerk. 

Section 2. No person or persons shall set up, employ, or use 
any hackney coach, cab, or other vehicle for the conveyance of pas- 
sengers, for hire, from jilace to place within the limits of the city, 
without a license from the City Council. 

Section 3. Every carriage licensed as aforesaid shall be con- 
spicuously marked with the number assigned to it by the City 
Council iu metallic figures, not less than one and a half inches 
long, and the name of the owner, the number of the carriage, and 
the rates of fare duly established, shall be conspicuously posted on 
a printed card in every such carriage. 

Section 4. No license shall be sold, transferred, or assigned, 
without the consent of the City Council, and no carriage shall be 
driven by a minor under the age of eighteen years, unless he be 
especially licensed by the City Council. 

Section 5. Every person licensed according to the provisions of 
this chapter shall give bonds, with sutficient surety or sureties, to 
be approved by the City Council, in such sum as they may order, 
conditioned for the safe conveyance of passengers and their bag- 
gage, according to the provi-^ions of this chapter. 



CITY ORDINANCES. 41 

Section 6. No license granted as aforesaid shall apply to any 
carriage, owner or driver, except the particular one designated 
therein by its number, or otherwise made certain. 

Section 7. The City Council may establish' the fare for the con- 
veyance of passengers in any such hackney carriage, and revise or 
change the same at pleasure; and every such license shall expire 
on the first day of April next after the date thereof, unless pre- 
viously revoked. 

Section 8. No owner, driver or other person having charge of 
any hackney carriage, for the conveyance of passengers, licensed 
as aforesaid, shall demand or receive a higher rate of fare than that 
established by the City Council. 

Section 9. Every person licensed agreeable to the provisions of 
this ordinance shall pay for said license the sum of one dollar. 

Section 10. Every owner of carriages licensed as aforesaid 
shall be responsible for the acts of the driver thereof, and any per- 
son licensed as aforesaid who shall violate any of the provisions of 
this ordinance, or any person who shall set up, employ or use hack- 
ney carriages for the conveyance of persons, for hire, from place to 
place, within the limits of the city, without license shall be fined 
not exceeding twenty dollars or be imprisoned not exceeding thirty 
days. 

Section U. No person or persons shall set up, employ, 
or use any job team, wagon, or other vehicle for the conveyance of 
goods, wares, merchandise or other personal property, for hire, from 
place to place within the limits of the city without first obtain- 
ing, for each vehicle so used, a license from the City Council, who 
shall at their discretion grant such license upon application, under 
such restrictions and regulations as they may prescribe, and they 
shall assign to each vehicle so licensed a number, and a record of 
such license shall be kept Ijy the City Clerk. Every person obtain- 
ing such a license shall pay therefor the sum of fifty cents for the 
use of the city. Such license may lie revoked at any time by the 
City Council for any violation of the provisions of this section or 
of the rules and regulations prescribed by the City Council. Eveiy 
wagon or other vehicle so licensed shall be conspicuously mark- 
ed with the number assigned to it by the City Council in metal- 
lic or painted figures, and the name of the owner shall be plainly 
displayed on the wagon or other vehicle. 



42 CITY OF BERLIN. 

Section 12. Auy peif^oii who shall set up, employ, or use any 
job team, wagon or other vehii^-le as aforesaid without oljtaining a 
license as aforesaid, and any person so licensed who shall violate 
auy i:»rovision of section eleven of this Chapter shall be lined not 
exceeding ten dollars. 

Passed November 6, 1901. Approved, 

F. M, Cl,ement, Mayor. 
Attest: 
Wm. W. Burlingame, Citij Clerk. 



An Ordinance relating to Junk Dealers. 

Be it ordained by the City Council of the City of Berlin as follows: 

Section 1. The provisions of sections 1, 2, 3 and 4 of Cha])ter 
124 of the Public Statutes of New Hamj^shire are hereby adopted 
to be in force in the City of Berlin. 

Section 2. The following sections are added thereto: 

"Section 5. Every person to whoni a license has been granted 
shall apply for the same to the City Clerk. Every license shall be 
conspicuously displayed upon the hat of the licensee. 

"Section 6. The City Clerk, after every issuance of a license, 
shall send a record of the same to the City Marshal containing the 
name, residence, and number of the licensee. 

"Section 7. The fee for each license shall be one dollar per year, 
or in same proportion for any fractional part thereof." 

Section 3. This ordinance shall take eflect upon its passage. 
Passed November 6, 1901. Approved, 

F. M. Clement, Mayor. 
Attest: 
Wm. W. Bureing}AME, City Clerk. 



An Ordinance relating to Pawnbrokers. 

Beit ordained l>y the City Council of th< City of Berlin asfollou.'s: 

Section 1. No person shall carry on the business of a pawn- 
broker, within the City of Berlin, unless he is duly licensed there- 
for l)y the City Council. Said City Council shall, upon ap]^lication. 



CITY ORDINANCES. 43 

issue licenses to do business as jjawnbrokers to such persons as said 
board deem jiroper; and sucli licenses shall be for one year from 
their issue, but may be revoked at any time by said City Council, 
■whenever in their opinion the public good requires. Such licenses 
shall designate the place where the person licensed may carry on 
his business, and he shall not carry on said business at any other 
place within the city; and the fee for such license shall be ten dol- 
lars per year. 

Section 2. Every person licensed as aforesaid shall keep a book 
or record at his place of business in which he shall enter in English 
at the time of receiving the same a minute description of any arti- 
cle left for pawn, particularly mentioning any prominent or des- 
criptive marks on the same, with the name, age and residence, 
giving the street and number where possible, of the person from 
whom he received it; noting also the day and hour of receiving the 
property, and the amount paid or loaned thereon; and such book 
or record and the articles left for pawn shall at all times be open to 
the inspection of the C-ity Marshal, or of any person authorized by 
him. No person licensed as aforesaid shall directly or indirectly 
receive any article hi pa\sn from any minor, knowing or having 
reasonable cause to believe him to be such, without the consent 
in writing of the parent or guardian of such minor. And all per- 
sons so licensed when requested to do so Iiy the City Marshal, shall 
make a daily statement to him of the articles left with them for 
pawn. 

Section 3. If any person shall do Ijusiness as a pawnbroker 
without obtaining such license, or if any jierson licensed as afore- 
said shall violate the other provisions of this ordinance or any of 
them, he shall be punished therefor by a fine not exceeding ten 
dollars for each offence. 

Section 4. This ordinance shall take effect upon its passage. 
Passed November 6, 1!)01. Approved, 

F. M. Clement, Mayor. 
Attest: 
AVm. W. Burlingame, CU// Clerk. 



An Ordinance relating to Sidewalks. 

Be it ordained hy the City Cou)uil of the City of Berlin, asfotfoa-.s: 

Section 1. Whenever any owner or owners of land abutting 
upon any street or highw ay in the compact part of the City of Ber- 



44 CITY OF BERLIN. 

lin shall make application to the City Council for new sidewalkB to 
be built in front of or adjoining t^aid land, and the City Council 
vote to construct same, then the said City Council shall forthwith 
proceed to complete said sidewalk, and assess upon the abutting 
owner or owners, a sum equal toone-third the entire expense of con- 
structing said sidewalk or sidewalks, and any assessment thus 
made shall be valid and binding upon the owners of such laud, and 
shall be a lien thereon for one year after the same shall have been 
made and notice thereof given to the person assessed, and said 
lands may be sold for non-payment thereof as in case of non-pay- 
ment of taxes on resident lands. The land owner shall have the 
same right of appeal, with the same procedure, as in other cases. 

Section 2. Said petitioner or petitioners shall, as a condition 
to the granting thereof of their application, consider their signa- 
tures to said petition as a contract with the City to pay their as- 
sessment of one-third the cost for building and maintaining such 
sidewalks. 

Section 8. All sidewalks in the compact part of the City shall 
be kept free from snow, ice and dirt, l)y the abutting owners or oc- 
cupants of the land adjoining said sidewalks. 

Section 4. Nothing in this Chapter shall be construed as mak- 
ing it obligatory on the part of the City Councils or any committee 
or agent thereof, to furnish and build such sidewalks; and no pe- 
tition shall be granted unless the appropriation for such purposes 
is sufficient to warrant the expense incident thereto. 

Passed January 7, 1902. Approved, 

Daniel J. Daley, Chairman Pro Tern. 

Attest: 

Wm. W. BuBLiNGAME,';(7/7,y Clerk. 



Rules and Regulations. 



Section 1. The Mayor shall take the chair precisely at the 
hour appointed for the meeting and call the members to order. If 
a quorum be present, he shall cause the journal of the previous 
meeting to be read, and if no objection be made, it shall stand 
approved. 

Section 2. The Mayor shall preserve due order and decorum; 
he may speak to points of order in preference to other members, 
and shall decide all questions of order, subject to an appeal to the 
Council. 

Section 3. The Mayor shall rise to put a question, but may 
state or read it sitting. 

Section 4. In the absence of the Mayor, the City Clerk shall 
call for the nomination of a chairman pro tem, who being elected, 
shall preside until the Mayor arrives, or during that meeting and 
no longer. 

Section 5. The order of business shall be as follows: 

1. Reading the journal of the previous meetmg. 

2. Communications from the Mayor. 

3. Presentation of petitions, and disposal thereof by reference to 
committee or otherwise. 

4. Reports of committees. 

5. Such nominations, appointments, and elections as may be in 
order. 

6. The orders of the day — meaning by the orders of the day the 
unlinished business of the previous meeting. 

7. New business, which may be introduced by any member. 

Section 6. The Mayor shall consider a motion to adjourn as 
always in order, (except an immediate repetition); the time of the 
next meeting having been agreed upon and the Council having had 
proper notice, the motion to adjourn shall be decided without de- 
bate. 



46 CITY OP BERLIN. 

Skction 7. The previous question shall be put In the following 
form: "Bhall the main question be now put?" and all amendments 
or further debates of the main question shall be suspended until 
the previous question be decided. 

Skction 8. Every member, when about to speak, shall rise in 
his place and resi)ectfully address the presiding officer; shall con- 
fine himself to the question under debate and avoid personalties. 
No member shall be interrupted while speaking, but by a call to 
order, or for the correction of a mistake; there shall be Jio conversa- 
tion among the members while a paper is being read, or a que.s- 
tion stated from the chair. 

Spx'TIOn 9. No member in del )ate shall mention another mem- 
ber by his name, but may descril )e him by the ^\ ard he represents 
or such other designation as may be intelligible and respectful. 

Section 10. Every member present when the question is stated, 
when he is not excluded by interest, shall give his vote; unless the 
City Council for special reasons excuse him. Application to be so 
excused shall be made before the calling of the yeas and nays, 
accom]mnied by a brief statement of the reasons, and shall be de- 
cided without debate. 

Section 11. Any member may call for a division when the sub- 
ject will admit of it; and the yeas and nays shall be taken when 
demanded by any member of the Council. 

Section 12. When a motion is made and seconded it shall be 
considered by the Council and not otherwise. 

Section 13. When any question is under debate, no motion 
shall be received, but first to adjourn; second to lay on the table; 
third, for the previous question; fourth, to jiostpone to a certain 
day; fifth, to commit; and sixth, to amend; which several mo- 
tions shall have precedence in the order in w hich they are arrang- 
ed. Motions to adjourn, to lay on the table, and take from the 
table shall be decided without debate. 

Section 14. No vote shall be reconsidered unless the motion 
for reconsideration shall be made by a member who voted A\ith 
the majority, or unless notice be given at the meeting at which the 
vote passed , in which case the motion shall be made at the next 
regular meeting succeeding; only one motion for the reconsidera- 
tion of any vote shall be permitted. 

Section 15. Every motion shall be reduced to writing if the 
chair shall so direct. 



fetlLEs AND Regulations 4? 

Section 10. The council may resolve itself into a committee 
of the whole at any time upon the motion of a member made for 
that pur]3ose; and in forming a committee of the whole the Mayor 
may leave the chair, and a chairman to preside in committee of a 
whole shall be appointed by him. When the committee of the 
whole have gone through w ith the subject referred to them, they 
shall rise, and the chairman shall rejjort their proceedings to the 
council. 

Section 17. Standing committees shall be appointed on 
Finance, Accounts and Claims, Public Instruction, Roads and 
Bridges, Parks and Commons, Fire Department, Lighting Streets, 
Elections and Returns, Engrossed Ordinances, Police and Electric 
Lights, Sewers and Water, and Salaries. 

Section 18. No committee shall sit during a session of the City 
Council without special leave. 

Section 19. No rejwrt shall be received from any committee 
unless agreed to in connuittee actually assembled, and all reports 
shall be made in writing. 

Section 20. Every committee to whom any sulyect is referred 
shall report at the next regular meeting or ask for further time. 

Section 21. Every ordinance, order or resolution, shall have 
three several readings before it shall be considered as having re- 
ceived the final action of the City Council. A first reading for 
information, and if not rejected or otherwise disposed of, the ques- 
tion shall be, "Shall it be read a second time?" and when read a 
second time shall be referred to a committee by the chair, unless 
otherwise ordered by the council; third reading when reported by 
the committtee, and passage to be engrossed. 

Section 22. No ordinance, order or resolution shall be amend- 
ed after its second reading. 

Section 23. No ordinance, order or resolution imposing penal- 
ties, or authorizing the expenditure of money, shall have more 
than two readings on the same day. 

Section 24. The foregoing rules and order of business shall be 
observed in all cases, unless suspended by a vote of two thirds of 
the members present for a specific purpose. 



Resolutions. 



A Resolution to raise money in anticipation of taxes for tlie year 
ISOl. 

Resolved by the City Council of the City of Berlin cis follows: 

That the sum of two thousand dollars ($2000) be raised in antici- 
pation of taxes for the year 1901, to defray the expenses of the sev- 
eral dejiartments of the city, and that the City Treasurer be and 
hereby is authorized to give the note or notes of the city for that 
amovmt. 

Passed, March 5, 1901. Approved, 

F. M, Clement, Mayor. 
Attest : 
Wm. W. Burlingame, City Clerk. 



A Resolution to raise the sum of five thousand dollars (15000) in 
anticipation of taxes for the year 1901. 

Resolved by the City Council of the City of Berlin as follows: 

That the sum of five thousand dollars ($5000) be raised in antici- 
pation of taxes for the year 1901, to defray the expenses of the sev- 
eral departments of the city. 

That the City Treasurer be and hereby is authorized to give the 
note or notes of the city for that amount. 

Passed, April 2, 1901. Approved, 

F. M. Clement, Mayor. 
Attest: 
Wm. W. Burlingame, City Clerk. 



A Resolution raising money and making api^ropriations for the 
year ending February 15, 1902. 

Resolved by the City Council of the City of Berlin as follows: 

That the sum of $76,202.97 be raised for the use of the city for 
the year ending February 15, 1902, by tax on the polls and estates 



KESOLUTIONS. 49 

liable to be taxed therein, which, together with such other unap- 
propriated money which may now be in the treasury, or may here- 
after come into it, shall be appropriated as follows, which appropri- 
ations shall be in full for all expenditures in each department. 

City Engineering § 500 00 

City Poor 1,600 00 

CJounty Tax 10,214 47 

Election Expenses 250 00 

Fire Department 3,500 00 

Grand Army of the Republic 100 00 

Hydrants 2,500 00 

Interest 6,000 00 

Insurance 400 00 

Lighting Streets 2,700 00 

Miscellaneous 1,000 00 

New Streets 2,000 00 

Printing and Stationery 500 00 

Police Department 5,000 00 

Public Library 650 00 

Public Reading Room 100 00 

Sanitary 400 00 

Salaries 2,500 00 

Schools 14,000 00 

School Bond 1,000 00 

Berlin Brass Band for Concerts 400 00 

Sewers 2,500 00 

Sinking Fund 6,000 00 

State Tax 4,088 50 

Streets and Sidewalks 8,000 00 

Sprinkling Streets 300 00 

$76,202 97 
Passed, April 9, 1901. Approved, 

F. M. Clement, Mayor. 
Attest: 
Wm. W. Burlingame, City Clerk. 



A Resolution to raise six thousand dollars ($6000) in anticipation 
of taxes for the year 1901. 

Resolved by the City Council of the City of Berlin asfolloivs: 

That the sum of $6000 be raised in anticipation of taxes for the 
year 1901, to defray the expenses of the several departments of the 



50 CITY OF ^EELt^^ 

city and that the City Treasurer be and hereby is authorized to give 
the note or notes of the eitj' for that amount. 
Passed, May 17, 1901. Approved, 

F. M. Clement, Mayor. 
Attest: 
Wm. W. Burlingame, City Clerk. 



A Resolution to raise six thousand dollars ($6000) in anticipation 
of taxes for the year 1901. 

Resolved by the City Cotmcil of the City of Berlin asfollotvs: 

That the sum of 86000 be raised in anticipation of taxes for the 
year 1901, to defray the expenses of the several departments of the 
city, and that the City Treasurer be and hereby is authorized to 
give the note or notes of the city for that amount. 

Passed, June 4, 1901. Approved, 

F. M. ('lement. Mayor. 
Attest: 
Wm. W. Burlingame, City Clerk. 



A Resolution to raise money for additional Miscellaneous city 
charges. 

Resolved by the City Council of the City of Berlin as follows.- 

That the sum of sixteen hundred dollars ($1600) be and is hereby 
appropriated for the purpose of paying miscellaneous city charg- 
es, to be raised by taxation for the year 1901 and included in the 
present year's assessment. 

Passed, JuneS, 1901. Approved, 

F. M. Clement, Mayor. 
Attest: 
Lena A. Clarke, Depviy City Clerk. 



A Resolution to raise eight thousand dollars ($8000) in anticipa- 
tion of taxes for the year 1901. 
Resolved by the City Council of the City of Berlin as follows: 

That the sum of $8000 be raised in anticipation of taxes for the 
year 1901, to defray the expenses of the several departments of the 



ttfeSOtUTtONS. 51 

city and that the City Treasurer be and hereby is authorized to 
give the note or notes of the city for that amount. 
Passed, July 5, 1901. Approved, 

F. M. Clement, Mayor. 
Attest: 
Wm. W. Burlingame, City Clerk. 



A Resolution relating to the duties of Police Officers. 

Resolved by the City Council of the City of Berlin as follows: 

Section 1. That the City Marshal of said city be,, and he is 
hereby instructed to divide the city into beats, and detail one po- 
lice officer for patrol duty on each beat. 

Section 2. That not more than one police officer shall be al- 
lowed on a beat while discharging patrol duty. 

Section 3. Police officers shall not loiter on their beats, or 
spend their time in or about saloons or other places of business, 
except in the discharge of their duty. 

Section 4. Police officers shall not smoke, or fool, or play with 
any person or persons on their respective beats while on duty. 

Passed, July 5, 1901. Approved, 

F. M. Clement, Mayor. 
Attest: 
Wm. W. Burlingame, City Clerk. 



A Resolution to raise six thousand dollars ($6000) in anticipation 
of taxes for the year 1901. 

Besolved by the City Council of the City of Berlin as follows: 

That the sum of $6000 be raised in anticipation of taxes for the 
year 1901, to defray the expenses of the several departments of the 
city, and that the City Treasurer be and hereby is authorized to 
give the note or notes of the city for that amount. 

Passed, August 6, 1901. Approved, 

F, M. Clement, Mayor, 
Attest: 
Wm. W. Burlingame, City Clerk. 



62 CITY OF BERLIN 

A Resolution to raise five thousand dollars (|5000) in anticipa- 
tion of taxes for the year 1901. 

Besolved by the City Council of the City of Berlin as follous: 

That the sum of §^5000 be raised in anticipation of taxes for the 
year 1901, to defray the exjieuses of the several departments of the 
city, and that the City Treasurer be and hereby is authorized to 
give the note or notes of the city for that amount. 

Passed, September 10, 1901. Approved, 

F. M. Clement, Mayor. 
Attest: 
AVm. W. Burlingame, City Clerk. 



A Resolution to raise four thousand dollars ($4000) in anticipa- 
tion of taxes for the year 1901. 

Resolved by the City Council of the City of Berlin as follows: 

That the sum of $4000 be raised in anticipation of taxes for the 
year 1901, to defray the expenses of the several departments of the 
city, and that the City Treasurer be and hereby is authorized to 
give the note or notes of the city for that amount. ^ 

Passed, October 1, 1901. Approved, 

F. M. Clement, Mayor. 
Attest: 
Wm. W. Burlingajie, City Clerk. 



A Resolution to raise six thousand dollars (§6000) in anticipation 
of taxes for the year 1901. 

Resolved by the City Council of the City of Berlin as follows: 

That the sum of $8000 be raised in anticipation of taxes for the 
year 1901, to defray the expenses of the several departments of the 
city, and that the City Treasurer be and hereby is authorized to 
give the note or notes of the city for that amount. 

Passed, November 6, 1901. Approved, 

F. M. Clement, Metyor. 
Attest: 
Wm. W. Burlingame, City Clerk. 



RESOLUTIONS. 53 

A Resolution to exempt Ezra M. Cross from additional taxation 
on his Machine Shop and Foundry. 

Resolved b\j the City Council of the City of Berlin asfolloivs: 

That the City of Berlin exempt from taxation all improvements 
and additions and the capital used in operating the same, of the 
foundry, machine shop and manufacturing business of Ezra M. 
Cross in said city, the assessed value of said foundry, machine 
shop and manufacturing business to be no greater than that of the 
year 1901, for a period of ten years. And if during said term the 
same shall be for any cause, lessened in value, a reduction in the 
valuation of the same for the purpose of taxation shall be made. 

Passed, December 11, 1901. Approved, 

F. M. Clement, Mayor. 
Attest: 
Wm. W. Burling ame. City Clerk. 



iResolution. 

A Resolution of <;hikk at the death of President 

McKlNLEY. 

Whekeas, William McKiiiley, the late President of the 
T^uited states died on Saturday last from injuries inflicted by 
an assassin: 

Thekekoke, we, the ^Nlayor and City Council of Berlin, de- 
siring to i)Ut on record our sentiments on this occasion, do 
resolve: — 

1. That in the death of our late President we suffer a great 
personal loss. 

2. That in all the relations of life, both public and private, 
he was cons])icious, not only for his intellectual ability, his 
statesmanship, his power as a leader of men but, also as a 
Christian (Gentlemen, i)ure, hone-t, afTeetionate and loyal; 
that during the last trying hours of his life he has enshrined 
himself as never before in the love and admiration of the 
American People. 

8. That we sympathize deeply with the family of our 
late beloved and martyred President and \\ e mourn w ith 
them in this the hour of their great affliction. 

4. Bfsolved that these Resolutions be recorded at length 
in the City Jlecords. 

Thus done in Board of Mayor and City Council this 18th 
day of September, 1901. 

(Signed), 

F. M. Clement, Mayor. 

James M. Lavin, \ 

E. F. Bailey, | 

Donald T. Lefebvbe, / 

Edward Toussaixt, ^fJber, 

Thomas H. Flatley, , ^,. ^•^^, ., 

Fred R. Oleson, \ -^ 

Daniel J. Daley, | 

J. B. Pauquette, / 

Attest: 

William W. Burling ame, City Glerk. 



DEPARTMENT REPORTS. 



Department of Highways. 



REPORT OF HIGHWAY COMHISSIONER. 



Berlin, N. H., February 15, 1902. 
To His Honor iha Mayor, and City Council of the City of Berlin: 

In submitting ray annual report as Commissioner of Highways, 
T will touch briefly upon the work accomplished during the past 
year. 

In the month of April the principal work was done on the West 
Milan or Jericho road, and on upper Main street on both sides of 
the river. The \a ork was of a general repair nature and breaking 
out the ditches, etc. The cost for this was 8060.80. 

A lo-inch culvert drain in front of Berlin Mills store was also 
laid to care for a large amount of surface water coming from the 
head of Brown and ]Maple streets. A catch-basin was built on the 
corner of Main and Brown streets to take the water from the ditch- 
es in that vicinity. 

In May a great deal of work was done at the City ledge. The 
stone crusher was set up and run the entire month, breaking macad- 
am for resurfacing the streets. In June the crusher was run about 
two weeks. About eighty loads of crushed rock was the dailj^ out- 
put, and it was all used on Main street, from Post Office square to 
the Narrows, aljout .3000 feet. The street was heavily covered ^\ith 
a layer of stone, averaging a foot in depth, and along ]Main street 
from the NarroA\ s to Berlin Mills store the street was raised in the 
most needed places. The use of this crushed rock I believe to be of 
great value in the repairing and grading of the highways about 
the city. The center of the street can be built higher or crowned 
making the surface water remain in its proper channels, the ditch- 
es. Also, the surface, after a short time becomes very smooth and 
compact, making a good foothold for horses, easy traction and free- 
ing the streets of the mud, etc. 

A surface drain of .360 feet of lo-inch pipe was laid on Sixth 
street, Berlin INIills, to take away the surface water from Norwegian 



])EPARTMENT OF HIGHWAYS. 57 

street. A driveway culvert was also laid in front of the Congrega- 
tional church at Berlin Mills. 

The road from the "Paine" bridge to the top of the hill near Lav- 
ertu's was raised and rebuilt for the accommodation of the many 
teams using this road. 0\ving to the fact that this was the princi- 
pal thoroughfare to the cemeteries there is a great deal of travel. 

An 18-inch culvert-diain was rebuilt from First avenue near the 
iSIethodist church to Western avenue, being about 300 feet long, re- 
placing the 10-inch. 

The Jericho road was patched and rei)aired with gravel from 
West INIilan to Broad street during June. 

In July, the bridges across Dead river at the foot of Hillside ave- 
nue were replauked and repaired. A large number of culverts 
were cleaned and replanked also during this month. 

The hill from the Glen crossing to Post Office square was repaired 
with gravel. 

A large number of loads of coal-cinders were also used In this 
month for patching and raising grades. Owing to the difficulty in 
getting first-class gravel the use of coal-cinders is much more eco- 
nomical. 

A street called Denmark was built at Berlin Mills, from Seventh 
to Eighth streets at a cost of $180. 7o. 

In August the principal work was relaying the surface drain at 
the foot of Emery street, taking up the 10-iuch pipe and relaying 
with 20-inch. Also blasting a ditch from the end of the pipe to 
Dead river, changing the course of the water from down Granite 
street, direct to Dead river, which had been long a source of great 
annoyance to the residents in St. Giles. 

Forist street in St. Giles was also rebuilt and drained, increasing 
considerably the value of the land in that vicinity. 

A large amount of repair work was done on Hillside avenue from 
the bridge to Rams^ey's, also on Church and Willard streets. Fifth 
avenue was built and extended from Madigan street, easterly. 

At the Milan road, during the latter part of August and in Sep- 
tember, a large crew was engaged in building a breakwater or pro- 
tecting wall on the Milan road opposite property of Frank Lord, 
Frank Witham and Jesse Tuttle. The road for quite a strip was 
l)adly washed out and undermined by the river water and logjams, 
and it was necessary to rebuild very thoroughly to prevent its or- 
curring again. A log boom has also been ordered for a further pre- 
ventative. This whole thing has cost in the vicinity of $1600.00. 

In October the principal work was general repairing on Pleas- 
ant, School and Main streets. All the culverts on the Jericho road 
were replanked, also the bridges on upper Jericho road. The cul- 



So CITY OF BERLIN. 

verts on the east side were rebuilt witli stoue and replanked this 
month. 

On Fourth avenue a rebuilding of the street, a much needed job, 
was finished up. 

The bridge on Mam street opposite Gerrish's store was taken up 
and a four-foot stone culvert put in its place. This will save the 
city's patching and replanking this bridge every year. The total 
expense was $268.35. 

The general work during year has been in investigating the worse 
])laces and doing such work as was most needed. Whenever there 
has been a bad place called to my notice I have attended to it in 
such a manner as to be the most profitable to the city. In the 
winter months the department has been engaged in clearing streets 
from the snow and ice, sanding sidewalks and opening up the 
ditches and culverts. Owing to the early fall of snow and the 
large number of thaws and rains it has been necessary to prepare 
for the drainage of the streets constantly. 

The bridge across the river known as the Paine bridge is at this 
writing being extensively repaired with kyanized spruc6 lumber, 
the work being in charge of W. A. Pingree. 

Principal New Surface Drains and Culverts. 

•SOO feet of 18-inch pipe from First avenue opposite ISIethodist 
church to Western Avenue at Junction of Gerrish street. 

School street, 210 feet of 12-inch pipe from Church street to opi»o- 
site the driveway of Ste. Anne church. 

Lower Emery street, 300 feet of 20-inch pipe, put in rejjlacing 
drain of 10-inch pipe, found to be inadecjuate. Also a surface ditch 
from end of pipe to Dead Kiver, about 500 feet. 

Large stone culvert replacing the "Gerrish" bridge on ^lain 
street. 

On East side, new stone culvert on Goebel street. 

Upper Main street, a 50-foot culvert of 10-iuch i)ipe opposite Mc- 
Cann's residence, also an 8-inch culvert laid opposite the Congrega- 
tionalist church under driveway. 

Surface drain opposite Berlin Mills store, 90 feet of 15-iuch \A\)e 
and 37 feet of 8-inch pipe. Catch basin and grate. 

On Sixth street Berlin Mills, was built a surface drain to take off 
the water from Norwegian street, 360 feet of 15-inch pipe. 

Principal Repairs to Culverts and Surface Drains. 

The surface water drain on Green street was found to be full of 
grtiv'el and dirt and had to be cleaned and flushed the \^ hole length. 



DEPARTMENT OF HIGHWAYS. 59 

All the catch basiua were also cleaned out and put in working or- 
der. A new grate was also placed near the shoe factory. 

All the principal culverts and surface drains were cleaned and 
where it was needed they were rebuilt. 

Streets on which the Principal Repair Work Was Done. 

iNIain street from Post-Office square to the Narrows, Avas macad- 
amized, and in many places regraded. Over 3,000 feet long from 
So to 40 feet wide and averaging one foot in depth. Main ;street 
from the Narrows to Berlin Mills was also repaired with cnished 
rock in the wet places and where the surface had become worn 
away. 

Upper Main street (Milan road) on both sides of river, Jericho 
road from West Milan to Broad street, gravel, etc. 

Willard street from crossing at School street to Marston school. 

High street from Emery to Portland. 

Emery street from High street to Hemlock. 

Church street from H. I. Goss' to G. O. Holt's. 

Hillside avenue from Dead River bridge to Ramsey's. 

Spring street from School to top of hill. 

School street from Willard to Third streets. 

Norwegian street from Fifth to Seventh streets. 

Fifth street,whole length, coal cinders. 

Maple street, whole length, coal cinders. 

Seventh street from Main to Norwegian, coal cinders. 

Mt. Forist street from First avenue to Third avenue, coal cin- 
ders. 

Clarke street from First avenue to residence of C. S. Clarke. 

Jlrst avenue from Mt. Forist street to residence of R. McGown. 

Third avenue from Mt. Forist street to Jolbert street. 

Jolbert street from Second Avenue to Third avenue. 

Gorham road in worst places, about seven carloads of coal cin- 
ders. 

Nearly every street in the city has had some work done on it, 
either with gravel, or when it was cheaper, coal cinders were used. 

New Streets Built. 

Denmark street from Seventh to Eigth. 

Fifth avenue from Madigan street about two luiudred feet east- 
erly. 
StrOBjt running fromPiftl^ ^ venue as petitioned for. 
^General rebuilding' of Forist street in St. Giles. 



60 CITY OF BERLIN. 

New Crossings. 

Stone crossing walk across High street opposite the Baptist 
cluirch. 

Principal Sidewalks Built or Repaired. 

School street from High street to First street. A new five-foot 
side-walk was built. 

In tlie Narrows ou Main street the sidewalk was widened and 
graded for a))out 400 feet. 

Measurements for Break=Waters on ililan Road. 

There was built from Jesse Tuttle's to Blake's, a stone l>reak-wa- 
ter 200 feet in length averaging five feet wide and eleven 
feet high, besides filling of gravel and stone. Also a rough protect- 
ing wall one hundred and twenty feet long at the end next to 
Blake. 

In front of Frank Witham's the breakwater averages ten feet 
high, six feet wide and 180 feet in length besides filling. 

Between Coffin's and Lord's also was built 80 feet of break-wa- 
ter averaging ten feet liigh and about three feet wide. 

Total amount of wall was 900 cubic yards. 



The above lists are given merely to sho\^' where the principal 
work has been accomplished. It would be very difficult to give 
in detail where secondaiy items were performed. And the general 
work of this department has been about the same as in prec^eding 
years. 

In the principal items of expense are noted the macadamizing of 
Main street, the building of tlie break-water on the jNIilan road, 
the surface drain on lower Emery street, the largeamount of repair 
work on tlie Jericho road, the raising of the road from the "Paine" 
bridge to the Milan road on the east side of the river, the surface 
drains on Sixth street and in front of Berlin Mills store and the 
stone culvert replacing the "Gerrish" l)ridge, also the replanking of 
Dead River bridge, on fates' hill, breaking the roads and repair- 
ing all the roads. 

In the sanding of the sidewalks at various times about 1000 
bushels of sand have been used. 

A large number of driveways have been re]:)lanked. 



It has been a precedent in giving the Commissioner's rejiort each 
year, to suggest such -work that seems to lie the most needed for 



biEPARTMENT OP HIGHWAYS. 61 

the coining year. The prhicipal large jol) that has been brought to 
my attention is the building of a surl'ace drain on High street to 
carry ott'the large amount of surface Mater from this portion of the 
city. The large number of steep grades that enter High street are 
a constant source of a large ainouut of surface water entering this 
street in the spring and during rains, whereas if a good surface drain 
was built having branches lunningup the side streets, all this drain- 
age could be confined and thereby, abating this nuisance to a great 
extent. 

The cleaning of the sidewalks and also the building of new side- 
walks will be materially a less expense to the city during the com- 
ing years, owing to the new "Sidewalk" ordinance passed last fall. 

The bridge over Dead river at the foot of Hillside avenue could 
be shortened by filling up one of the water courses, thereby lessen- 
ing the cost of maintenance each year. 

The bridge across Main street by Stahl Brothers could also be re- 
arched and built to do aMay with the replanking that is now 
found to he necessaiy every year. 

It has been the object for this department to proportion the gen- 
eral repair work about the city equally and without partiality. 
The most important, large expenditures have been made in such 
localities as to be the most beneficial to the public in general. 

In conclusion I wish to express my gratification to the members 
of the ('ouncil for their kind assistance and helpful suggestions in 
the many difficult problems we have endeavored to contend with. 
Respectfully submitted, 

H. Chbistian Johnson, Street Commissioner. 



Inventory of Property of Street Department. 

One stone crusher $500 00 

One steam enghie 600 00 

One road machine 200 00 

One iron roller 50 00 

One street sprinkler 325 00 

Two sidewalk snow plows 130 00 

Six sprinkling stand pipes 25 00 

.Two tool boxes 5 00 

Seven wooden snow shovels, @ 25e 1 75 

Three wooden snow shovels, @ 15c 45 

Five iron rakes 1 20 

One iron rake 50 

Twenty-two steel shovels 11 00 



6^ CITV oP BfiRLt?s\ 

Fourteen iron snow shovels 7 OO 

Five hoes 3 00 

Four coal shovels 2 00 

Ten picks and handles 5 00 

Four axes 2 00 

Two axes 1 50 

Hix pick handles 1 50 

One wheelbarrow (new). 2 50 

One long handled shovel 50 

One ice chisel 50 

One set road machine runners 50 00 

One large snow jjlough 25 00 

One crusher jaw 12 00 

One cross-cut saw 2 00 

P^our stone hammers 3 50 

Four grub hoes and handles 2 00 

Fifty-one feet steel drills 10 00 

Three striking hammers 2 25 

One hand drill hamaner 50 

Two augers and bits 3 50 

One hand saw 10 

One cant-dog 50 

Four iron bars, one crow bar 4 50 

Two long and three small wrenches 3 00 

Three lanterns 1 50 

One bush scythe 25 

One sickle 35 

Twenty-seven feet of fuse 50 

Four It) s dynamite 1 00 

One set of blocks and rope 10 00 

Four oil cans 2 00 

Twelve hand drills 3 00 

One cold chisel 20 

One iron spoon 10 

Two lanterns at crusher 60 

Ten lbs cotton waste at crusher 80 

One basket 25 

Three hundred bushels sand 6 00 

One 75 

Three oil cans 75 

Two new augei-s and cranks 3 25 

Total value 12,024 55 



Sewer Department. 



REPORT OF SEWER COMMISSIONER. 



Berlin, N. H., February 15, 1902. 
To His Honor the Mayor , and City Council of the City of Berlin: 

The work done in this department during the past year, has 
cleared up some of the most important and worst places in the 
city. Three very luuch needed new sewers were built, and a 
good deal of repairing and relaying of old sewers has also been 
done. 

The first sewer built was the extension of the Hillside avenue sewer 
running from near Prospect street to the top of the hill, a distance 
of eleven hundred (1100) feet, of 6-inch pipe. There was no ledge 
and therefore the work was done quickly and cheaply, the total 
cost being but $!2l9.3o, or twenty cents a foot. This sewer will ac- 
commodate from fifteen to twenty houses, now, and branches may 
be put in, in time so as many more may be accommodated. 

On Forist and Granite streets (St. Giles) a very much needed 
sewer has been built, consisting of 580 feet of 8-inch and 700 feet 
of 6-iuch pipes. About twenty houses are accommodated by this 
sewer and nearly all have already connected into it. By sugges- 
tion from the Board of Health a short branch of about one hun- 
dred and fifty (150) feet was built westerly on Granite street, so as 
to assist the families at that end in connecting. Also the old Fur- 
bish drain on lower Emery street was changed from its course to 
Dead river to this sewer. There was a great deal of ledge to be 
gone through in the construction of this sewer, in some places from 
five to six feet in depth, was blasted out, making quite au increase 
in its cost. 

A sewer on Madigan street and Fourth avenue was built in July 
and August, of which two hundred and twenty (220) feet was 
8-inch pipe and nine hundred and fifty (950) of 6-iuch pipe. This 
sewer was built through 600 feet of ledge and rock, and consequent- 
ly was quite costly. It was much needed, however, owing to 



g4 , CITV of BEELiK. 

there being no sewers in the vicinity and will care for the sewer- 
age of twelve houses, at the present time. 

In addition to the above sewers, there were built as follows: 

High street, 580 feet of 8-inch pipe. 

East side river, 4(>0 feet of 6-inch and 240 feet of 5-inch sewer. 

Second avenue, 110 feet of 6-inch pipe. 

Denmark street, 100 feet of 6-inch pipe. 

( 'iiurch street, 100 feet of 6-inc'li pipe. 

Main street, near High street, 120 feet of 6-iuch pipe. 

Main street, near convent, 80 feet of 6-inch and 60 feet of 5-ineh 
pipe. 

Two flush-tanks and three man-holes have been rebuilt and put 
in good condition, besides a good many repairs to the sewers, the 
principal ones being at upper JMain street in Berlin Mills and the 
main sewer and outlet near Cross' machine shop. 

It seems to be essential to build the sewers deep enough to con- 
nect all the houses on the street and also so that it will be possible 
to run from the cellars to the sewers. The more fall that can be 
obtained from the house to the sewer the much more satisfactory 
is the drainage. Of course in some cases, where the land slopes 
rapidly away on one side, it will not always be possible to do this, 
but it seems to be much preferable to build as low or deep as the 
basements of the abutting buildhigs. 

There should also be passed in the Council an ordinance enforc- 
ing the payment of a sewer permit, an especial tax for the privi- 
lege of connecting the house to the sewer. The amount of money 
necessary for the care and maintenance of the sewers must be 
raised in some way, and if raised wholly by appropriation, imposes 
a tax on a great many persons who receive no direct benefit from 
the sewers. 

The Board of Health should also have special instruc- 
tions to make a thorough canvass of this city and enter ui a book 
the location of all buildings not already connected with the sewer, 
in whicli the plumbingor sanitary arrangements are such as would 
endanger, not only the health of the occupants, but of neighbors 
and persons passing on the street, and that they be further in- 
structed to send to the owners of sucli buildings an order to connect 
with the sewer, if the building is situated on a street through 
which a sewer has been built. 

It is a known fact that even on Main street tliere are a large 
number of residences and stores not connected with the sewer, 
which are a constant source of danger to the i)ublic. 

All the man-holes and flush-tanks in the city should be thorough- 
ly examined and placed in good condition at regular intervals. If 



SEWER t)Ei*AIlTMfiNf , 65 

this work was done each j'^ear, it would guarantee the perfect work- 
ing of all the sewers, and prevent any liability to stopping up, etc. 

There are still a good many petitions before the council asking 
for new sewers or extensions of the old ones, and a good deal of 
work will need to be done the coming year. 

This year there has been built the total distance of five thousand 
three hundred and ten (5,810) feet, or a little over a mile, which, I 
think, will compare very favorably with the work done in former 
years. Every new sewer has been carefully located with respect 
to its position in the street, distance from the houses, etc., so that 
it may be easily found at any time for the purpose of connecting. 
It is to be regretted that a good many of the sewers that have been 
built in the past, were not recorded or located in some manner and 
there are a large number that can only be found by guess work, 
which is always a costly experiment. The sewer-book shows, 
however, the location of nearly all of the sewers that were survey- 
ed or laid out, and together with the positions of the ys, manholes 
and flush-tanks proves a valuable assistant in a good many cases. 

In closing I wish to express thanks to the sewer committee and 
Council in general, for their co-operation with my efforts to satis- 
factorily conduct the business of this department. 
Kespectfully submitted, 

Anderson G. Anderson, Sewer Commissioner. 



Inventory of City Property. 

One tool box |2 50 

One axe 1 00 

Six picks 2 50 

One B stone hammer 1 00 

Six shovels 3 00 

Thirty-eight feet drill steel 24 00 

Two striking hammers 2 00 

One battery and wire 27 00 

One derrick 10 00 

Two 5-8 cable chains, 18 feet 11 00 

One hand-drill hammer 50 

Five hand drills 2 00 

One dipper 10 

Two pick handles 50 

One chain, 3-8 thick, 8 feet 1 75 

One blasting spoon 55 

Two drill cranks 2 50 



66 t;iTY OF fiERLliC. 

Two dogs for the derricks 

One 4x6 reducer 

Six 8-iuch bauds 

Oue,8x8T 

Eight 4 x 12 ys 

Seveu 4 x 10 ys 

One 4-inch band 

One 10-inch band 

Six lengths 8-inch pipe 

One 8-10 reducer 

One length 6-inch pipe 

Two 15-inch bands 

One 10-18 y 

One 12-14 y 

Three flush tank cisterns 

Total fl«^ "0 



1 


50 




25 


2 


40 


1 


20 


9 


00 


C 


M 




28 




56 


3 


38 




90 




22 


2 


37 


1 


85 


1 


55 


40 00 



Engineer's Department, 



REPORT OF CITY ENGINEER. 



Berlin, N. H., February 15, 1902. 

To His Honor the Mayor, and O'dij Council of the City of Berlin: 

I have the honor to suljmit the annual report of the City Engi- 
}ieer's department. 

Principal Work. 

The priuci]3al work of this department is to assist the Sewer and 
Street Commissioners in their duties where the services of an engi- 
neer are required. 

During the summer months careful attention was paid to the 
sewers then being built. These were all laid out and constructed 
to an established grade, and at the same tune the survey was made 
comprehensive enough to locate all the buildings, etc., abutting on 
the streets so that at any time the pipe may be easily located with 
reference to its position from respective buildings. These sur- 
veys are all drawn in the Sewer Book for the use of the Sewer 
Commissioner with a duplicate map of the same for this offlce. 
Copies of these maps may be seen at the end of this report. 

The streets, where the running out was faulty, or the bounds 
under dispute have been established when needed by the street de- 
l)artment. There is, Iiowever, a large number of the streets where 
the bounds were formerly wooden hubs, that should be more per- 
manently located, and established. It would be much more eco- 
nomical to do it now than to wait till trouble arises. 

Bounds of riain Street. 

The bounds of Main street from Cross' machine shop to Berlin 
Mills ha\'e been run out and drawn up, as this was the principal 
street it was the most important to have correctly recorded. To- 
gether with jMain street there has been work done on all the streets 
wliere the sewers were being built. Also a large number of sur- 



68 CITY OF BERLIN. 

veys have been made where the location was most urgent. The 
notes and recortls of these are to be had at this office. 

New Streets. 

Only one (1) new street v>as laid out, namely, running between 
High and Church streets. I have placed the record of the laying 
out, together with a complete plan, with the City Clerk. It is 
deemed advisable, in the future, to annex a plan of any new street 
that may be built, to the records of the same, to assist in relocating 
it. Also, at the same time, as the survey is made, to establish all 
intersecting lines and angles in a durable manner, and to estab- 
lish a grade whenever possible. 

Location of Street Lines. 

Street lines, too long neglected, are liable to involve the city in 
legal difficulties, and cause it considerable expense, as many cities 
are finding out, if reports from these cities are true. It is one of 
the curious features of municipal government that street lines and 
grades are rarely fixed on a comprehensive, well digested plan at a 
time when the property concerned is of small value. Generally 
nothing is done until the land is so well built up that the problem 
cannot be solved without damages to some parties, which material- 
ly increases the cost. 

Other Surveys and Maps. 

Besides the work of surs^eying and mapping of the sewers and 
streets, there has also been a number of other jobs done from this 
office. A survey has been made locating the bounds of the City 
building lot on Mechanic street, of the High school lot on School 
street, the bounds of the Marston school lot on Willard street, and 
the City's four lots in the Narrows were located and a plan made. 
A survey was also made of the Pest house lot on Jericho road, and 
the deeds and a plan made out. I also drew plans for the new 
additions that were made to the Marston school and the rebuild- 
ing of the Pest house. The plans of the Berlin cemetery have 
been redrawn and all the lot owners designated. Three plans were 
made, one to file at Lancaster, one for the use of tlie City Clerk, 
and the third will be kept in this office. 

City and Assessors' flaps. 

In the fall and during the winter months a great deal of work 
has been done toward the making of a new map or plan of Berlin, 
and it is at this time well under way. Owing to the size, there 



engineer's department. 69 

■will ))e four sheets, showing all property owners, streets, etc., etc. 
These sheets will then be numbered and named consecutively, the 
whole compiling a city map that has been much needed. 

Map for Use of Post Office. 

There can be no doubt, but what on the completion of this map 
or sheets, and after notifying the owners of the lots, what numljers 
have been assigned to them, that we shall be able to obtain a free 
delivery here. This map, I understand, has been the main thing 
lacking, in not having had a better condition of postal facilities. 
The accuratel.y obtaining of a complete list of all the property 
owners will materially assist the assessors in their duties, making 
their work much easier and doing away with the annual house to 
house canvass. The assessors' map is to be drawn on a larger scale 
and will consist of cloth-backed sheets about 24x80 inches, that 
will be bound together in a book. This book will be kejjt in the 
City Clerk's office, and will be of a style similar to the one now in 
force by the Fire Insurance companies. The first ma]) of the 
whole city, I have drawn prhicipally as a preliminary map, to ob- 
tain a basis for the best arrangements to be made for the assessors. 
It is reasonably correct, and will answer all the purposes for mark- 
ing the lot owners and numbering the streets. The bound boolv of 
sheets, is intended to be absolutely complete in all details, and will 
be made from recent surveys. It is, perhaps, possible to obtain a 
good part of the cost of making these maps by selUng reproduc- 
tions of them t(j ])roperly owners liere. 

There is no doui)t but what such maps have long been needed, and 
there has been a steady call for them for some time. The assessors 
have advocate;! a map, or system of sheets for the use of their de- 
partment for about four years. 

Township Map. 

I have also started making a map of the whole township of Ber- 
lin, but, owing to lack of material and the existence of a large 
number of discrepances found hi the lot and range lines, the map 
was dropped for the present. When the lines between Berlin and 
tlie adjoining towns are run, it is hoped that time will be taken to 
measure the same, and a good deal of valuable data may be ob- 
tained which will assist greatly in the making up of this map. 

Running of the Town Lines Needed. 

These to\\u lines are sujiposed to be run at least once every seven 
years; but it has not been done, with the exception of the Milan 
line, which was partially traversed in 1897. 



<U Cn'Y OF BEKLIN. 

Street Record Book. 

A book that has been much needed, has been gotten up during 
the past year, namely, a street record book, the purpose of whicli 
is to avoid the former delays and trouble in getting at the record of 
any street. All the streets in the city that have been laid out or 
established, are recorded in this one book, givi)ig reference to the 
original laying out so that it may be found if needed. These street 
records are all indexed so that any person may find at a moment's 
notice anythiiig recorded about any of the city's streets. This does 
away with searching through five or six uniudexed books, to find 
whether or not a certain street was ever laid out, etc., etc. 

Itemized Records. 

A complete itemized record of all the Mork done during the past 
year may be seen at this office, together ^\ith a list of what things 
are most needed to be done next year. A copy of all the deeds of 
the City's property are also on file here. There has been (juite a 
number of small items that it does not seem necessary to put in 
this report, such as locating poles on the streets, lines for new side- 
walks and the establishing of short portions of street lines for the 
assistance of i)eople impioving their property. 

Electric Road. 

The establishing of the grade and the location of the tracks and 
poles for the electric road will take (juite a little time this spring, 
but it is work that will need to be done to avoid misunderstandings. 

It is also hoped that the work on the maps for the use of the as- 
sessors and the public will be continued until completion. 

Suggestions for Sewer Department. 

Suggestions for the sewer department are made under that head, 
but a few points inight be brought up, properly here. There 
should be a thorough flushing and cleansing of the entire sewer 
system. All the flush-tanks should be examined and a record made 
of their condition. There are seventeen (17) flush-tanks in place 
about the city, and there is no record of their being examined, for 
a long time. Some are running and others are shut off. Those 
that are needed, should be put in good order, and the rest of them 
ouglit to be replaced where they would do the most good. At the 
same time the manholes should be looked into and cleaned out, 
those that are below the level of the street built up, and a record of 
the location of everyone made, together with the date it was ex- 
amined. This work on the flush-tanks and manholes, I believe, 



enginker's department. 71 

ought U> be the first work done the coining year, as it will guaran- 
tee the city against ever becoming liable, in case a sewer stops up, 
to a very large expense. 

Clerk for Committees. 

It would also be well, perhaps, to have the City Engineer made 
a clerk of the Committee on Sewers, and also of the Committee on 
Streets, to make a record of the action taken on all the petitions 
l)resented to them and to keep them all on file. There need be no 
salary attached to this clerkship, as there will be but a small 
amount of work, but at the same time, it will be of a good deal of 
assistance to the City Council to be able at any time, to tell what 
work should be acted on first. A good many people present peti- 
tions to the Council that are referred to the above Committees, and 
at the end of a month or two they are brought up and acted on. If 
some record, outside of the one kept by the City Clerk, could be 
made, there would be some recourse in the cas-e of the petitions 
being mislaid, or the question of the order of their being handed 
In for action was in dispute. 

Work Needed will be Brought Up. 

It does not seem imperative to fill out the department reports 
with suggestions, etc., for the coming year. When the work, most 
urgent, is brought to notice, a report may be presented to the Coun- 
cil at its next meeting. 

I wish to respectfully tender my acknowledgments to His 
Honor the Mayor, and the various committees of the City Council, 
tor the support which they have given. 

liespectfuUy submitted, 

Edwin S. Bryant, Ciiy Engineer. 



Police Department, 



REPORT OF CITY MAR5HAL. 



Berlin, N. H., February 15, 1902. 

To His Honor the Mayor, and City Council of the City of Berlin: 

I have the honor to submit for your consideration the fifth 
annual report of the Police Department commencing February 16, 
1901, and ending February 15, 1902. 

Arrest and Causes. 

Arrests, males 64.*^ 

" females 9 

Whole number of arrests 652 

Drunkenness 277 

Keeping for sale, spirituous liquors 88 

Keeping for sale, malt liquor.. 183 

Common seller of spirituous liquor 16 

Assault 17 

Larceny 11 

Keeping a gambling place 4 

Gambling 10 

Nou payment of tax 5 

Resisting police officer 2 

Malicious injury 1 

Brealving and entering 2 

Adultery 1 

Fornication 1 

Forgery 1 

Aggravated assault 2 

Embezzlement 1 

Overdriving a horse 3 

Keeping unlicensed pool table 2 

To find sureties of the peace 4 



80 CITY OF BEKLIN. 

Nou support 2 

Usiug obscene language 2 

Firing pistol in city limits 2 

Disorderly conduct 1 

Exposure of person 1 

Street walking 2 

Concealing smallpox 1 

Brawl and tumult 2 

Insanity 1 

Peddling without a license 2 

Hlidiug on jntblic street — 3 

Stubborn children 2 



Whole number of persons furnished lodging 1B2 

Complaints investigated 139 

Disturbances quelled without arrest 95 

Fast driving stopped 15 

Lost children restored to parents ;.... 9 

Stores found not secured 3 

Testsof fire alarm 730 

Nuisance reported to board of health 12 

Notices served to owners of unlicensed dogs 75 



Amount of property reported lost and stolen *7(i 00 

Amount of property recovered 54 00 

Organization. 

The organization of the department at present is as follows; 
{'ity Marshal, Assistant Marshal, four Patrolmen, and thirty 
special reserve oflicers. I have only words of praise for the mem- 
bers of the reserve force, who have rendered much valuable assist- 
ance, especially about the locality in which they live, and other- 
wise assisting the regular officers. 

By reference to the detailed report of arrests it Mill be seen that 
no crime of a very serious nature has been committed in the city 
during the past year. 

T wish to extend my thanks to His Honor, the ]\Iayor, and to 
the members of the City Council, who have in any way assisted 
me, also the police department for the efficient manner in which 
they have discharged their several duties. I would acknowledge 
my obligations to City Clerk Wm. W. Burlingame, Judge George 



POJ.ICE DEPARTMPJXT. 



81 



F. Rich and to City Solicitor \Vm. H. Paine, wliose wise counsel 
has been of great value to me. 

Respectfully submitted, 

John T. Youngcliss, City Mamhul. 



Inventory of City Property. 

(Including Furniture in City Building, 

Four desks 

Twenty-five chairs 

Two tables 

Thirty-two curtains 

Twelve Yale locks 

Twenty-four keys 

Twenty-eight pairs hand-cuffs 

Thirty nickel plated badges 

Ten revolvers 

One rogues' cabinet 

Ten mattresses 

Two rugs 

Four electric flash lights 

Two blankets 

Four pairs twisters 

Three settees 

One clock 

Hix spreads 

Six buckets 

Four police calls 

Four lamps 

Three safes 

One coil half-inch rope 

One lile cabinet 

Total value 

Less 50 per cent 



%m 00 


50 00 


20 00 


16 00 


24 00 


7 00 


112 00 


40 00 


60 00 


6 50 


20 00 


3 00 


18 00 


1 50 


2 00 


9 00 


3 50 


6 00 


6 00 


2 00 


2 75 


850 00 


7 00 


20 00 


1852 25 


426 12 



Report of Police Court. 



Berlin, N. H., February 15, 1902. 

I'd His Honor the Mayor, and City Council of the Citjf of Berlin: 

Herewith I beg to submit a report of the Police Court of the City 
of Berlin for the year ending February loth, 1902. 

Number of civil cases entered 174 

Number of complaints entered 584 

For the following offenses, viz.: 

Adultery 1 

Assault 10 

Assault on officer 2 

Aggravated assault 2 

Assault with intent to kill 1 

Burglary 1 

Brawl and tumult 2 

Cheating by false pretences 1 

Conversion of property 1 

Challenge for duel 1 

Discharging fire-arms on street 1 

Disorderly conduct 1 

Drunkenness 244 

Fast driving on Streets 1 

Fornication 2 

Gambling 2 

Indecent exposure, 1 

Keeping unlicensed dog 1 

Keeping gambling house 2 

Larceny 8 

Malicious injury 1 

Overdriving horse 1 

Peddling without license 2 

Running pool table without license 2 

Sliding on public street 1 

Stubborn child 2 

To find sureties of the peace 4 



POLICE COURT. 83 

t^sing obscene language 1 

r^ing abusive language 1 

Violation of impounding law 1 

Violation of order of Board of health 2 

Violation of liquor law 274 

Wanton and lascivious person 1 

Total, 584 

These complaints were disposed of as follows: 

Not prosecuted to judgment 64 

Tried and acquitted 31 

Held to answer to Superior Court 20 

Discharged on payment of costs 32 

Sentenced to House of Correction 19 

Appeal to Superior Court 8 

Released on promise of good behavior 41 

Committed to jail in default of bail 1 

Sentence suspended while resjDondent remains out of 45 

city 45 

Paid fines 240 

Amount of fines and costs received by Justice ^5,421 90 

Amount deposited by Justice with City Treasurer 5,421 90 

Respectfully submitted, 

George F. Rich, Justice and Clerk. 



Fire Department. 



REPORT OF CHIEF ENGINEER. 



Berlin, N. H., February 15, 1902. 
To His Honor the Mayor ^ and City Council of the City of Berlin: 

In accordance with the law governing this department, I have 
the honor herewith to submit my annual report for tlie year end- 
ing February 15, 1902, giving in detail the list of fires, the amount 
of insurance paid and the amount of loss. 

There have been during the year 19 alarms; 7 false, 4 needless and 
8 fires. 

Box 15, March 15, D. A. Belland. Loss on building, '^}2A'M, insur- 
ance paid, $2407. Damage to contents, $900; insurance paid, $840. 

Box 26, March 26, J. A. Hodgdon. Loss on building, $2336; insur- 
ance paid, $2336. Damage to contents, $732.58; insurance paid, 
$732.58. 

BoxSl, May 23, Twitchell & Holt, Mead Manufacturing Com- 
pany. Loss on building, $1.60; insurance paid, $1.60. Damage to 
contents, $1500; insurance paid, $1500. 

Box 25, August 10, F. X. Demars. Loss on building, $3500; in- 
surance paid, $3500. Damage to contents, $1172; insurance paid, 
$1172. 

Box 34, October 9, Nathan Abramson. Loss on building, $109; 
insurance paid, $109. Damage to contents, $675; insurance paid, 
$675. 

Box 25, October 10, F. ¥. Bisbee. Loss on building, $2742.66; in- 
surance paid, $2742.66. Damage to contents, $575; insurance paid, 
$575. 

Box 31, November 14, H. Harrisburg. Loss on building, $826.90; 
insurance paid, $826.90. Damage to contents, $175; insurance paid, 
$175. 

Box 13, January 23, Anton Davidson. Loss on building, $1420.50; 
insurance paid, $1420,50. Damage to contents, $785.47; insurance 
paid, $785.47. 



PiRk l)KlMRTMKi\T. 8b 

^I*he department consists of 48 men organized as follows: 

W. L. Evans, Chief Engineer. 

Geo. E. Kent, First Assistant Engineer, 

J. Q. Farrington, Second Assistant Engineer. 

J. P. DuBEY, Care of Fire Alarm System. 

M. Frost, Captain Hose Company No. 1. 

Olaf Oleson, C'aptain Hose Company No. 2. 

J. N. Record, Captain Hose Company 3. 

John Gullison, Captain Hook and Ladder No. 1. 

I wonld respectfully recommend that the city purchase a chem- 
ical engine to be placed in No. 2 hose house to take the place of 
hose cart and purchase two horses, one for chemical and one for 
Hook and Ladder company Avith two regular men, one by night 
and one by day. The change to No. 2 hose house would be but 
very little expense to the city and would strengthen the department 
in many ways, especially on east side and outskirts of the city, 
where we have no hydrants and have to lay from three to four 
thousand feet of hose, as we have in the past year. This is where a 
chemical would do better work and save more property than can 
be done under the present situation and be of less expense to the 
city. 

The cost of the Are department for the year , ending February 15 
1902, will be found in the report of the city. 

In behalf of the Board of Engineers 1 will take this opportunity 
to extend our sincere thanks to all the members of the fire depart- 
ment for the promptness with which they have discharged their du- 
ties during the past year. 

We would also thank the members of the city government for 
their kind assistance rendered this department during the past 
year. 

Respectfully submitted, 

W. li. Evans, Chief Engineer. 



Inventory of Property. 

Three modern hose wagons f850 00 

One ladder truck and new ladder 700 00 

One life saving net 50 00 

Thirty -five hundred feet of 2;> inch lined rubber hose... 1,700 00 

Three perfection nozzles and holders 105 00 

Four Underwriters' nozzles 40 00 

Three brass branches 00 00 



86 CtTY O*' BERLIis*. 

Ten fire axes 

Four sets Berry collars and hames with harness 

Forty-seven rubber coats 

Forty-seven firemen badges 

Sixty hose spanners 

Six Perkins life belts 

Fifteen hose straps 

Thirty-six fire hats 

Six hydrant wrenches 

Fourteen alann boxes 

Two W. E. Decrow machines 

Two whistles 

Six sets of hose expanders 

Sixteen set of hose couplings 

Four Berry patent harness hangers and maps 

One Miller smoke protector 

F'our sets detachable runners 

Samuel Eastman deluge set 

Four nozzles 

Two whistle valves 

New whistle machine building, fire proof. 

Total value $6,422 00 



29 00 


180 00 


175 50 


53 00 


25 CO 


42 00 


5 00 


70 00 


1 50 


700 00 


850 00 


150 00 


10 00 


48 00 


44 00 


5 00 


260 00 


125 00 


14 00 


55 00 


75 00 



Sanitary Department. 



REPORT OF BOARD OF HEALTH. 



To His Honor the Mayor, and City Council of the City of Berlin: 

In submitting the fiftti annual report of the Board of Health of 
Berlin, N. H., for the year ending February 15, 1902, we are sor- 
ry to state that it will be impossible for us to present you with an 
itemized account of the expenditures of this department owing to 
the fact that when the small pox epidemic started in our city the 
duties of the officers of this Board was taken from them to a cer- 
tain extent and carried on by His Honor, Mayor Clement and a 
special squad appointed by him. This special squad contracted 
bills which were not presented to the Board of Health for their ap- 
proval, but were paid by the city, therefore for the expense of car- 
rying on this department you are referred to the financial report of 
the City Clerk. 

Our expenditures have mostly arisen from the small pox epi- 
demic, which necessitated the building of an emergency hospital 
and fitting same for the accommodation of about 50 patients, also 
the disinfecting of houses that contained contagious diseases. 

For some special remarks and recommendations we wiah to in- 
vite your attention to the following subjects. 

From investigation made during the year we found quite a num- 
ber of houses that were inot connected with the city sewers and 
were within 100 feet of same. The owners of the above named 
places were served with notices and forced to connect. We also 
wish to call your attention to the sewers put in on recommenda- 
tion of the Board of Health, 600 feet put in on the East side ac- 
commodating about twenty houses, also about 700 feet in St. Giles, 
running from Granite Street connecting with main sewer, giving 
connections to about twenty houses. 

Plumbing. 

In regard to condition of the plumbing we wish to say that 
there are plenty of chances to make improvements, as we have 



»» CITY OF BERLIN". 

found ill the past year many houses where the regulations govern- 
ing this department have not been comphed with, and we again 
call your attention to the fact that there should be a plumbing in- 
spector aji pointed. 

InspectSon of Milk. 

We understand that the State has established a pathological 
laboratory where milk and other foods may be analized free of 
cost to the city. This being the case we think it advisable that the 
city appoint a milk inspector, as it may help to keep sickness from 
our city. 

Dumping Station. 

In regard to the dumping station, we \\ ill say, that it has been 
kept open all winter at a small cost. We find it much cheaper to 
have someone to look after it at all times than allow it to get lilled 
in so it would be impossible for teams to get near so they can dump 
clean. 

Contagious Diseases Reported. 

Xo. of case?. No. of deaths 

Small pox 70 8 

Diphtheria 11 1 

Scarlet fever 9 

Measles 5 

Number of houses forced to connect with city sewer, 77. 
Respectfully submitted, 

Jamks Moffett, 
D. J, McCabe, 
Feeix Blais, 

Board of Tlealth. 



Department of Poor. 



REPORT OF OVERSEER OF POOR. 



Berlin, N. H., February 15, 1902. 

To His Honor the Mayor, and City Couneil of the City of Berlin: 

I herewith submit my report as Overseer of the Poor for the 
year ending February 15, 1902. During the year there has been very- 
little sickness and only one death, yet the bills, as usual, are more 
than for the year preceding. And, although I have been able to 
keep them down near the appropriation, they will go still higher 
in the year 1908. 

The pauper list is constantly increasing, not so many in number, 
but small cases that will be expensive. 

At present there are two families who are supported wholly by 
the city, and, owing to sickness of the mothers, it is necessary to 
supply girls to do the housework. In each family there are chil- 
dren old enough to do the housework, but that would necessi- 
tate taking them from school. This, I have not done, because I 
believe these children are entitled to the same privileges as those 
who are more fortunate. 

During the year, the family of Francois Couture, consisting of two 
quite old people, applied for assistance. I recommended their 
property to be deeded to the city and a bond given them for their 
maintenance. This was done by authority of the Council, and the 
property, which consisted of a small, three-tenement house on 
First street, Berlin ISIills, was placed in my hands to manage for 
the city. One of the tenements is occupied by Francois Couture 
and one is rented at f^S.OO per month. The house was in a very bad 
condition, and I have shingled it and put in two flush closets. 

During the summer it was damaged by fire and has since been 
put in repair. Below is a statement given on this property: 



^ CITY OF BERLIN. 

Cash received from Insurance Co. , damage $50 00 

" " two mouths' rent to Feb. 1 12 00 

$62 00 

Paid for cleaning up rent $2 00 

" L. Buber, repair bill 40 85 $42 85 

Cash on hand $19 15 

One of the most expensive cases duriug the winter has been the 
family of L. Gaisson. While under the influence of liquor, Cais- 
son broke his wife's arm and abandoned his family. I succeeded, 
after several months, in locating him and he was brought home, 
and is now supporting his family. 

Michael Mclsaac Avas sent to the County farm and is boarded 
there at the expense of the city. 

The only recommendation I would make at this time, is, that 
the coming year, an appropriation of $2000 be made for the depart- 
ment of C'ity Poor. It will not be possible to get along with any- 
thing short of this, as those on our hands at present will require 
that amount, and in addition to this, there will be new cases. 

I desire to thank the present members of the city government 
for courtesies shown me in the discharge of the duties of this office 
and all citizens who have taken interest in particular cases. 
Respectfully submitted, 

A. B. FoKBUSH, Overseer of the Poor. 



Tax Collector's Report. 



Berlin, N. H., February 15, 1902. 
To His Honor the Mayor, and City Council of the City of Berlin: 

I hereby submit my report as Tax Collector for the years 1900 and 
1901, which is as follows: 

Amount due the city February 15, 1901 $14,748 57 

Amount collected on same $10,945 78 

Amount of taxes bid in by city 1,305 10 

12,250 83 

Amount due the city $2,497 74 

Amount of taxes for 1901 committed for collection $78,677 05 

Amount collected on same 60,544 03 

Amount due the city February 15, 1902 $18,133 02 

Amount of interest collected 72 36 

Respectfully submitted, 

WiLSOX A, PiNGKEE, Tax Collector. 



Report of City Clerk. 



Berlin, N. PI., February 15, 1902. 

To His Honor the Mayor, and City Council of the City of Berlin: 

The following is an aeeouiit of the money collected by me for 
the City of Berlin for the year ending February 1-5, 1902: 

Dog Licenses. 

One hundred and thirty-six male dogs (a^: ^2.00 8272 00 

Seven female dogs @ !?o.00 85 00 

Amount paid City Treasurer .^807 00 

Billiard Hall Licenses. 

Billiardhall licenses collected *50 00 

Amount paid City Treasurer ?50 00 

Dirt, crushed rock, etc., sold ?46 30 

Paid City Treasurer $;46 30 

1900 Taxes, Costs and Interest. 

Thomas Tardiff'. $16 59 

Estate of W. W. Mason 122 59 

Estate of M. B. Hutchins 176 58 

Allen Henley 13 18 

Joseph Fortier 29 40 

Berlin Building & Loan association 107 91 

Lizzie Sheridan 5 63 

Octave Laflamme 12 50 

Sterling McLaughlin 4 06 

C. L. Sanborn 4 27 

S!492 66 

Paid City Treasurer $492 66 

Respectfully submitted, 

Wm. W. Buklixgaimk, City Clerk. 



Report of City Physician. 



Berlin, N. H., F'ebiuaiy 15, 1902. 
To Ills Honor the 3Iayor, and City Council of the City .of Berlin: 

I have not this year treated, in my capacity as City Physician, 
any case of scarlet fever or diphtheria. My work was confined to 
Vaccination, of which there were seven hundred cases. 

As the circumstances were urgent and the School Board requested 
the work be done witliin a few days, I found it necessary to em- 
]il<)y the assistance of other physicians, vaccinating the school chil- 
dren. 

I liope that the next Council will define and establish the duties 
of the City Physician — a request that I have hitherto made in 
vain. • 

A. Lavallke, Cit>/ Physician. 



of City SoHci 



Berlin, N. H., February 15, 1902. 
To His Honor the Mayor, and City Council of the City of Berlin: 

In presenting my fourth aunual report there is little to say. The 
report of the City Marshal shows plainly what has been done dur- 
ing the past year. There are but two suits now pending, Mhich 
have not be*n adjusted, that of Martin Rasmusson and H. C. 
Johnson, for damages caused by the changing of the grade of the 
highway and the manner of carrying off the surface water. Eight 
cases are now in Court where temporary injunctions have been 
granted for nuisance. 

Complaint has been filed with the Railroad Commissioners, upon 
vote of the City Council, asking for a change in the situation of 
the Grand Trunk depot and the tracks about it and to widen and 
straighten the underpass on Green street. A hearing upon the 
same is set for March 19, 1902. 

I desire to thank the Judge of Police Court and the officers of 
the Police Department for their courtesy and kindness during the 
past year. 

Respectfully submitted, 

W. H. Paine, City Solicitor. 



Assessors' Recommendations. 



Berlin, N. H., February 15, 1902. 
To His Honor the Mayor, and City Council of the City of Berlin: 

For four years we have come to you urging the necessity of a set 
of maps containing the property lotted properly, more for the 
sake of checking and obtaining the owners' names, than for the 
idea of saving labor, and we are glad to see that the City Engineer 
has made a start in that line. The maps now in progress of con- 
struction are simply preliminary, but will aid in the work. The 
checking of the property, to see that none has been omitted, and 
that the owner's correct name has been given, will be some of the 
advantages, but a greater benefit than either of these is, that a ref- 
erence in the valuation book to these maps, will be sufficient to en- 
able the tax collector to give a legal and valid deed that will com- 
ply with the present law regarding description, bovmds, etc. If 
the city had possessed such maps, as we have often described, in 
1896 or 1897, much of the difficulty in locating taxed property 
might have been avoided. We Avould recommend the passing of 
an ordinance by your honorable body, compelling a notification of 
all transfers of ownership of real estate at this or the City Clerk's 
office, so that a complete and perfect record of ownership may al- 
ways be on file and at the disposal of the assessors. 

We have adopted the past year a new system for the tax collect- 
or's books, which he claims is of great benefit; and that is of plac- 
ing the residence of all poll tax payers upon his pocket tax book. 
It requires much extra labor, but the benefit is in excess of all 
cost. 

We all know that the earlier the tax book is committed to the 
collector the better it is for the city, and last spring if there had 
been no delay on account of the extra assessment caused by the 
epidemic of small-jiox, the books would have been in the collect- 
or's hands before the City Council could have accepted his bonds. 

Had there been no extra assessment or hea\'y expense at that 
time the tax rate could easily have been kept down to ^2.45, but it 
was deemed best by the city fathers to keep the rate at |2,50 and 
help pay the bills which were unavoidable. 



96 CITY OF BERLIN. 

It is to be regretted that more of our citizens are not iiublie spir- 
ited enough, or in ])]aiuer language, say, lionest enough to give tlie 
assessors a correct statement of their money at interest. The idea 
that the citizens of tliis city liave only §3,400 of money at interest, 
more than they are paying interest on, is as ridiculous as it is im- 
probable. We took more pains in enquiring on this point than any 
other one, with the above result. 

The system established on Main street, of valuing the land and 
buildings separately, should be extended as fast as possible, and 
will be a great preventative against undervaluation. 

We heartily thank his honor, the Mayor, the membei-s of the 
City Council, and the City Engineer for valuable assistance in our 
work. 

Respecti'ully submitted , 

MoSKS HoDC^DON, 

W. A. Booth BY, 
John C. West. 

Asyctisors for f/ie C'd)j of Baiin. 



Forestry Department. 



REPORT OF TREE WARDEN. 



Berlin, N. H., February 15, 1902. 
To His Honor the Mai/or, and City Council of the City of Berlin: 

Owing to the lateness of iny ap])lic'ation and appointment as 
Tree Warden of the city of Berlin by your honorable body, it was 
impiactieable to attempt anything in the line of my future duties 
beyond looking over the territory in my charge. 

I find in looking over this territory that there are about twelve 
hundred (1200) shade trees, the greater part of which may be acquired 
by a very reasonable outlay. It will be necessaiy to order about 
two thousand (2000) tree marks from the Secretary of State and to 
appropriate a moderate sum for the beginning of a much needed 
embellishment of our city. 

Respectfully submitte d, ' u \o 

Bernard Gunn, Tree Warden, 



SIXTEENTH ANNUAL REPORT 



OF THE 



BOARD OF EDUCATION 



OF THE 



, N. H„ 



FOR THE FISCAL YEAR ENDING 



FEBRUARY 15, 1902. 




Organization. 

Joseph J. Cobb, M. D., Chairman, . Term expires March, 1902 
Columbus P. Kimball, . . . Term expires March, 1903 
Henry W. Johnson, M. D., . . Term expires March, 1904 



jReport of Board of Education. 

Berlin^, N. H., February lo, 1902. 

To His Honor the Mayor, and City Council of the City of Berlin: 

The Board of Education have the honor to submit the following- 
report of the ychool department: 

From February 15, 1901, to February 15, 1902, the High school 
and the Eighth and Ninth grades have been in session thirty-six 
weeks. All the other schools have been in session thirty-four 
weeks. 

Expenditures. 

The total expenditures for the year, including the cost of new 
buildings, are ^17,770.13. The items of expense are as follows : 

Salaries of teachers 19,765 23 

Care of rooms 983 19 

Text books 730 52 

School paper and other supplies 373 28 

Fuel 1,334 73 

Water 212 70 

Incidentals 832 96 

Repairs 212 41 

New buildings (Marston addition) 3,325 11 

The cost of the Marston School Addition was not provided for in 
the school approjiriation. 

Early in the year the School Board met His Honor, the Mayor, 
and the finance committee of the City Council and carefully con- 
sidered the different appropriations for the year. The School 
Board asked for an appropriation of $10,300.00 to meet the exj^ense 
of new buildings and of maintaining the schools, including tw o 
new rooms. It was suggested by a member of the finance com- 
mittee that only a portion of the cost of new buildings be included 
in the school appropriation for the year, and that the balance be 
met by the City Council upon a loan. It was stated that at least 
oue-litth the cost must by law be included in the appropriation and 
that four-flfths could be provided for upon a loan. 



102 CITY OP BERLIN. 

With this arrangement the school appropriation was made 
$14,000.00. The addition was completed by the building commit- 
tee which consisted of Mr. C. P. Kimball, representing the Board 
of Education, and Mr. James M. Laviu the City Council. The 
entire cost was $8,325.11. The bills for the same have all been 
paid and are charged against the school appropriation. 

The "overdraw" of the school department represents about the 
amount of the cost of new buildings not provided for in the ap- 
propriation. 

Some items of expenditures are of necessity larger than ever 
before. The cost of fuel for the year ending February 15, 1901, 
was ^1,073.13, and for the last year is ^1,334.73. This increase in 
fuel expense is due to the larger number of rooms in use since ad- 
ditions have been made to the High School and Marston School 
buildings. 

The average membership of pupils iu the public schools has in- 
creased from 668 for the year 1900, to 771 for the year 1901, conse- 
quently the cost of text-books and other supplies has increased cor- 
respondingly. This increase in the number of pupils has called for 
an increased number of rooms and teachers, making a necessary 
increase in the items of cost for teachers' salaries and the cure of 

rooms. 

Excluding the cost of new buildings the total current expenses 
for the year are $14, 445.02. The average membership for the fall 
term, 1901, was 804. The cost per pupil, using the average num- 
ber for the fall term as a basis, is $17.90. 

The total cost of text-books and supplies is $1,103.80. The aver- 
age cost per pupil is $1.37. 

Buildings. 

Number of schoolhouses, February, 1902 6 

Number of occupied rooms, February, 1902 24 

Number of unoccupied rooms, February, 1902 none 

Number of sittings, February, 1902 949 

The total value of buildings and furniture is estimated at $39,- 
700.00, as follows: 

High school, land and furniture $13,900 00 

Marston school, land and furniture 15,300 00 

Cole school, land and furniture 5,000 00 

Brown school, land and furniture 3,000 00 

Sessions school, land and furniture 2,000 00 

Wheeler school, land and furniture 500 00 

$39,700 00 



"""iatifr"***?' ?f§g 




u 



£ 
W 



O 






REPORT OP BOARD OF EDUCATION. lOS 

The school property, with few exceptions, is In good condition. 
Some permanent improvements are needed. The steps leading to 
the High school are badly decayed and will have to be repaired or 
entirely rebuilt in the near future. 

The grounds around the Marston school are unsightly as they 
still remain ungraded. These repairs and improvements ought to 
be made during the coming year. The Marston school building has 
had only one coat of paint. To preserve that and the good appear- 
ance of this building another coat should be applied this year. 
The Cole school building and also the High school building will 
soon need painting. 

During last summer vacation repairs were made in the Wheeler 
schoolhouse. The interior of the building was unfit for modern 
school purposes. The plastering of both walls and ceiling was 
black and dirty with smoke, cracked and dropping off in naany 
places. The blackboards made upon the plastered walls were 
broken and unfit for use. All broken plastering was removed, the 
surfaces replastered, the walls and ceiling tinted, and new black- 
boards painted upon the new plastered walls. The room is now 
more respectable, but it is not a modern schoolroom. New seats 
should be added. It seems necessary to continue the use of this 
building for school, and also for other purposes to accommodate 
the people in this section. As all taxpayers have to pay their 
proportion of the cost of new buildings in the city our friends up 
river are entitled to a more modern schoolroom. 

In accordance with the recommendation of the School Board last 
year an addition was made to the Marston building 36x40 feet. It 
contains two new schoolrooms now used for the Second and Fifth 
grades, and accommodates 48 pupils in the Second grade and 49 in 
the Fifth. 

The entire cost of the addition was $3,325.11. The separate items 
of expense are as follows: 

Foundation 1212 50 

Materials, labor and blackboards 2,392 11 

Seats 291 98 

Freight 38 63 

Furniture 37 29 

Heating and Plumbing 302 60 

Miscellaneous 50 00 

$3,325 11 

The closets and flushing apparatus for this building are not satis- 
factory. There is nothing unsanitary in its arrangement, but the 



104 ClTY OF BERLt^. 

amount of water used for flushing purposes is simply enormous as 
can be seen by an examination of the water bills. 

For the year the %\ ater bill for the 

High school building is |36 50 

Brown school building is 36 08 

Cole school building is 29 36 

Marston school building is 183 27 

The Berlin Water company very generously reduced this last 
item from $183.27 to 188.99, a discount of $94.28, for which the 
School Board desire to express their appreciation. 

Accommodations. 

It is a pleasure to report that no new buildings will be needed 
during the coming year, as we have sutticient accommodations for 
all the pupils who will attend the public schools another year so 
far as we can now estimate. 

We take this opportunity to express to tlie Mayor and tlie City 
Council our thanks and appreciation for their yearly resjionding in 
tlie past to our request for additional money for new buildings ; 
and especially for the way in which they made it possible to obtain 
an addition this year to the Marston building, which was absolute- 
ly necessary to accommodate nearly one hundred puj)ils. 

Text Books. 

Books in use Febmary 1, 1901 5,403 

Books purchased during the .year 2,426 

and are as follows: 

Geographies 249 Eeaders 174 

Mathematics 135 English 293 

Dictionaries 101 Histories 62 

Music 1,246 French 67 

Greek 11 Science 32 

Latin 56 

Many books are worn out and must be discarded another year. 
A large number of reading books must be purchased. Dictionaries 
have been supplied in all the rooms needing them. The geogra- 
phies have been changed by introducing the Tarr and McISIurry 
series into the Third, Fourth and Fifth grades. Another year the 
more advanced geographies of this series should be introduced 
into the Sixth and Seventh grades. These geographies are 
published in five parts, one i)art for each year ; and are arranged 
for the grades from the Third to the Seventh grades, inclusive. 



REPORT OP BOARD OP EDUCATION. 105 

They are especially arranged for graded schools, are up to date and 
meet the present demands for a school geography, 

A text book in U. S. history has been introduced into the Sixth 
grade. The book selected is "The Beginner's American History," 
by 1). It. JNIontgoniery. 

School Census. 

April 1899 1900 1901 

Population of City of Berlin 8,021 9,131 9,135 

Boys between 5 and 16 years of age 901 1,176 1,211 

Girls between 5 and 16 years of age 847 1,011 1,119 

Total 1,748 2,187 2,330 

Boys in public schools 317 340 c'90 

(iHrls in public schools 283 310 363 

Total 600 650 753 

Boys in parochial school 310 441 410 

Girls in parochial school 286 358 393 

Total 596 799 803 

Boys not attending any school 271 334 411 

Girls not attending any school 277 343 363 

Total 548 677 774 

Boys working contrary to law 24 73 20 

Girls working contrary to law 12 50 4 

Total 36 123 24 

Children working contrary to law who can- 
not read and write 17 10 

Grading and Promotion. 

The grading and promotion of pupils j^resent rather a difficult 
problem to solve to the satisfaction of teacher, pupils and parents. 

Each grade as now arranged has one year's studies. On this 
basis it is impossible to place all pupils in a grade wliere each can 



106 CITY OF BERLIN. 

work to his best advantage. In every grade there are pupils who 
are not fully ])repared to do well the work where they are placed, 
and yet who are advanced too much to do profitable work in the 
grade one year below. 

On the other hand in every grade are pupils who are able to do 
more work than their grade but are not fitted to do the work of the 
grade one year in advance. Both classes of pupils so placed are 
working at a disadvantage. If it were possible to sub-divide the 
grades of our schools so that each division would contain a half 
year's ^^ork this difficulty A\()u Id be largely remedied. Many pu- 
pils could be either promoted or placed back a half year with more 
satisfactory results. 

To meet this defect in our present system of grading we suggest 
that it may be found feasible to make in the middle grades two 
sections in each, an a and J) section, letting a section advance fast- 
er than h section is able. After following this ])lan for a year in sev- 
eral middle grades the result would be this : section a, grade iv 
would be about a half year in advance of section b of the same 
grade, and a half year behind section b grade v. Section a grade 
v would be a half year in advance of section b of same grade and a 
half year behind section b grade vi, and so on through all the 
grades to the Eighth. 

With this system of grading section a of each grade could be 
held up sharp to the work of the grade, but section b would occu- 
py a middle ])osition between the n sections. At the end of the 
year each pupil could receive a promotion ; and no pupil attending 
school through the year would be uiade to feel that he was losing 
a year's time by not getting any jnomotion. 

We recommend that at the end of the present year all pupils be 
promoted to section a or section b of the next grade according to 
scholarship. 

Teachers and Teaching, 

There w'as a time in our educational progress when the chief 
qualifications of the teacher were thought to consist of a good edu- 
cation together with the executive ability to manage or discipline 
a school. Later it was acknowledged by all thinking friends of 
education that the teacher, to be well equipped for her duties, must 
receive a special training in methods of instruction. Consecjuently 
there has been a general demand for teachers who are graduates 
of Normal or other training schools. 

It was then thought that the educated teacher, trained in the 
correct methods of instruction and school management, possessed 
an adequate preparation for her work. This idea is still common 



REPOKT OF BOARD OF EDUCATION. 107 

in the minds of many well informed people. Even school otticers 
and trained teachers themselves have not all advanced beyond 
these acknowledged reqnirements. 

It is, however, not enough for the teacher to know the subject 
matter to be taught together with the correct methods of teaching 
it. tShe must, to be the most efficient, take another advanced step 
in iiedagogic study. She must know that which she wishes to 
educate and train. She must understand the structure of a child's 
mind. She must be a student of mind, and understand the laws 
of mental growth. She should study well mental philosophy and 
know how the mind grows and develops by the natural, unaided 
jirocesses. 

No artist can paint a masterpiece until he has within his own 
mind the picture of his finished painting. No carpenter can erect 
a building of beautiful architecture by simply understanding the 
materials from which the building is to be constructed, together 
with the possession of skill in the use of his tools. He must first 
be furnished with the drawing or picture of the completed struc- 
ture. 

So the most efficient trained teacher must know the mental 
structure of her finished production. She should enlarge her 
knowledge of physiology by the study of the anatomy of the brain. 
She should then acquire a good knowledge of mental philosophy 
and ]>sycIiology. She must know the difference between mental 
growth and mind cramming. 

Following out these lines of study the trained teacher becomes 
the ideal teacher of the present and future. 

Ideals demand an adequate compensation. This leads us to re- 
mark that our best trained and niost efficient teachers in our pub- 
lic schools are receiving in salary a smaller compensation for the 
training and skill rendered than workers in many other occupa- 
tions. 

All are working most earnestly and with ]3raiseworthy success. 
There are no failures and no poor schools. There are many rooms 
in the work of which we feel a large degree of pride. 

Teachers' Monthly Meetings. 

For the j^urpose of further study in methods of school manage- 
ment and school work in general, naonthly teachers' meetings have 
been established. These meetings have been attended regularly 
V)y nearly all our teachers and by the members of the School 
Board. Papers upon different to]>ics have been read, followed by 
general discussion. These meetings have proved very helpful in 



108 CITY OF BKRLIN. 

many ways. Teachers have become better acqimiuted with each 
other. The social pleasures have been enjoyed and appreciated by 
all. Teachers have been enabled to compare with each other 
ideas and methods. Much credit is due them for making these 
meetings a pleasant entertainment and very helpful in the daily 
school work. 

Some of the subjects upon which papers have been prepared 
during the ])ast year are the following : 

"The Ranking System." 

"Nature Study. "^ 

"Reading." 

"Ventilation and Temperature in Schoolrooms." 

"The Grading and Promotion of Pu)jils." 

"School Work and the Development of Character. " 

Papers upon the relation lietween school Avork and the develop- 
ment of character were presented at our last meeting, January 24, 
by the jiriucipal of the Brown school and by the principal of the 
^larstou school. 

To illustrate the quality of the work done in this way these pa- 
pers are given a place iu this report. 



How the School Develops Character. 

In the construction of an edifue, the foundation must first be 
considered. 

The careful carpenter sees that it is strong and well formed, that 
it may prove a sure support to the parts which are yet to be erect- 
ed. He is to see that the material is of the best kind, the work- 
men well skilled, so there shall be no mistakes in the completion of 
the building. 

But few people, comparatively speaking, build houses, yet every 
one must build, to a certain extent, a character for him or her self, 
while the school is the principal factor helping to convert the ma- 
terial into jjroper form and shape. 

Character is an element of growth, unlike the gourd it will not 
spring uj) in a single night. Its foundation must be laid in earlier 
years, when the mind of the child is in its plastic state. It is then 
in a condition to receive impressions never to be effaced. 

The greater part of a child's life is spent in the schoolroom. 
Here he learns the first elements of reading, writing, spelling, etc 
Here he first learns to reason, to think for a }»urpose. He is taught 
that punctuality means something, that neatness and dispatch are 
uecessary to success, that deceit in any form w ill not be tolerated, 



REPORT OF BOARD OF EDUCATION. 109 

that it is best to be honest, not from policy, but because it is right 
to be honest. 

Here the teacher and pujjil are brought into the closest relation- 
ship, and, if the teacher be neat and orderly in the arrangements 
of the schoolroom and, among the many things, if her books 
and papers are laid carefully by themselves on her desk, her per- 
sonal ai)pearance neat and attractive, her treatment of the children 
kindly considerate, her aim to impart to them that "True worth is 
being, not seeming" has a right to expect that the character of her 
children is being builded along these lines for "Not for school but 
for life we learn." 

As the years succeed one another, something is being added to 
strengthen or weaken the building of a noble character, but in no 
l)eriod is there such an opportunity for growth in mental and physi- 
cal culture as in youth and we may, indeed, say, that the school is 
a great quarry, out of which may be moulded and chiseled a com- 
plete character. Luis L. TWITQHKLL,. 



Character Building. 

All nature reflects the idea that life exists for life. We have all 
recognized the fact that certain higher forms destroy and devour 
the lower, but perhaps we have frequently failed to observe some 
things far more instructive and interesting that some species per- 
form service not only to those of its own kind, but even to those of 
another s];ecies. 

C'ertain })lant forms render aid to otliers by furnishing shade and 
])rotection and by stortng up moisture. 

A student of natural history recently reported tlie following in- 
.stance sho\^ ing w here one s]iecies i)erforms service for another 
without receiving any in return. 

"A little bird called Troc-hilus renders two forms of service to the 
crocodile on the banks of the Nile ; it enters his mouth and de- 
spatches the worms and leeches which trouble him, and when the 
ichneumon, which is an enemy to the crocodile, approaches, the 
bird flies away, giving vent to a peculiar cry whicli apprises his 
friend of the danger. The only service which the crocodile renders 
in return is the shaking of his tail when he wishes to close his 
mouth, thus giving the bird warning." 

Darwin has pointed out that before the age of man societies of 
animals ajid birds existed in in fnute. numbers^, in; which, a great, 
variety of mutual servic3 wis renders;!. • •. • . .^ '•... . '. 

This altruistic principle which is so beautifully illustrated in plant 



110 CITY OF BERLIN. 

and auimal life has made its way in human society only slowly. 
Individual excellence has been marked while social advancement 
has been lacking. Both Greece and Rome permitted a few to 
gain wealth, luxury and learning, while the massefe were poor and 
ignorant. 

The new education of these later years really began its work 
when the great Teacher summoned the world to a life of service. 
He said "Whosoever among you will be great, let him be your 
minister, and Avhosoever of you will be chiefest, let him be servant 
of all, for the Son of man came not to be ministered unto but to 
minister." This was the announcement of a fundamental princi- 
ple of life and action and not a theory to be preached about on 
Sunday. Christianity and Socialism are becoming synonomous 
terms. We are coming to see that "Man liveth not to himself 
alone," but that in an important sense he is "his brother's keeper, " 
and that he will be held responsible for his welfare. 

If education is to do its best work it must adaj)t itself to those 
conditions and requirements which exist at any given period. To 
meet the needs of the passing years education has become more 
and more progressive, changing not only in its aims and ideals, but 
in its methods and apjjliances. Formerly education was for the 
individual alone, now it exists for the individual in his relation to 
society. We agree with Kant and Plato that education is the pro- 
cess of giving to the individual all the perfection of which he is ca- 
pable and assert that personal character is best developed when re- 
lated to and trained in social service. 

With society constituted as it is today the home stands first as 
educational factor : first, because the child spends here his most 
impressible years; and second, because as a type of a social com- 
munity its relations are exceedingly close and influential. No one 
can estimate the influence of a good home in shaping the life of 
a child and fitting him for the service which he may be called 
upon to render. 

When the child leaves the home for the school he enters an insti- 
tution which, like the home, is a form of social life, but which, in 
a broader way, fits him to take his place in society and to ren- 
der the best service of which he is capable. He may be proficient 
in this or that study, he may be prepared to be a good workman 
or a successful practitioner in some profession, but unless he knows 
what it is to be a true man in its broadest sense his education has 
failed. In the ideal school pupils are interested not only in mak- 
ing la,ws and obeying them, but in having others do the same so 
tlitat tlje etiftmeya^'pt of Ujm- is j^e^iiiretl by the co'o^'eut a^d apfiroV- 



KEPOKT OF BOARD OF KDUCATIOX. Ill 

al of the school. Judividuals are seen to be considerate of each 
other and courtesy is the chief mark of all conduct. 

No good results in the building up of character can be obtained 
excejit through the spontaneous willingness on the part of young 
people to help others do the same. The trouble has often been that 
school discipline has been so organized as to prevent the free 
growth of high motives. Teachers forget that when a child is 
taught to control his will in the interest of the school he is calling 
into ])lay those elements w hich tend to give nobility of character. 
Such organizations as debating clubs, literary societies and athlet- 
tic associations afford large opportunities for training young people 
to conduct affairs and at the same time to govern themselves. 
Even in Grammar schools there have been instances where, in 
the absence of the teacher, the exercises of the school have been 
carried through the day by the pnpils with little to mar the occa- 
sion. 

The teacher w ho cannot leave the room or turn his back upon 
his pupils without causing unseemly conduct, has before him a se- 
rious problem and one to which he can well afford to devote him- 
self. The best results are not attained in any school until all the 
teachers are enlisted in the enterprise and pujiils are led up to the 
necessary moral altitude by regular and easy steps. 

Another feature of school life which may greatly affect the mor- 
al character of the pupil is the recitation. This is the most vital 
element in the school life. The showing made by pupils deter- 
mines their standing in the class and, to a great extent, their stand- 
ing with the teacher. As conducted today do the recitations of 
our classes tend to the highest good of all, or do they often promote 
a selfish and unsocial attitude on the part of some? Do we not 
often allow a few naturally brilliant pupils to do all the work, and 
that, too, with an air of superiorty which is in the highest degree 
harmful? We sometimes feel satisfied with our work, not realizing 
that we have miserably failed in not reaching those pupils who 
most need and most deserve our attention. Our ability as teachers 
is not determined by the work of those who are our brightest schol- 
ars and who probably would do excellent work with any teacher, 
l)ut by the work of those at the other end of the class, those Mhoni 
we often willfully neglect. The recitation gives a grand opjjortu- 
nity for co-operation and mutual help. Every pupil should i)artic- 
il)ate and be treated courteously. The selfish desire of pupils to 
excel, which is in itself not to be condemned, often tends to a kind 
of competition which, as we see it in matured men, gives us these 
monopolies and trusts, w hich are such a menace to the welfare of 



112 CITY OF BERLIN. 

the peo])]e. Do we not often nrse pupils on in the ))ra('tk-e of 
competition by paying tributes of ])raise to briMiant [jerfo nuances 
and possibly casting a slur u])on slow, incapable pupils? How can 
we expect society to be freed from those practices which tend to 
make the talented more arrogant, the rich more selfish, and the 
condition of the poor more helpless and discouraging, as long as 
the school fosters selfish interests. If character building is the aim 
of education the governing principle of the recitation should be 
co-operation, not competition. 

Again the studies of the school contribute to the high aim of ed- 
ucation. 

The study of history may be made ver\^ imjiiessive. It shows 
how goodness and error have ever been struggling for the mastery; 
liow men and women liave fought and toiled to achieve what we 
now enjoy. History reveals the supremacy of right ideas and right 
princijiles. 

In its literature the school brings the pupils into touch with the 
lives and experiences of others who have lived. Thus he is thrilled 
and inspired with ambition to do only what is true and right. 

The sciences discipline the mind and accustom the youth io over- 
come ditHculties leading him to realize that the ])ath of life may 
not always be smooth and much etfbrt is often necessary to reacli 
our goal. 

Art and music of all studies contrilnite most largely to the de- 
velopment of those higher tastes which refine the character. In 
juany instances the school becomes transfigured through the up- 
lifting iufluence of song and the \\ orks of great masters when in- 
terjireted by the sympathetic and inspiring teacher. 

Mathematics in its exact analyses furnishes the power for deliber- 
ate thought and accurate statement and to speak the truth is one 
of the most valualile qualities a person can possess. Uossi]!, flat- 
tery, slander, deceit, all spring fjom a slovenly mind that has not 
been trained hi the power of a truthful statement. 

Enough has been said to suggest that all school studies and ex- 
ercises are capable of being applied to the development of character 
if riglitly used. 

How often in the school ^\■e teachers are blind to the significance 
of small things in our zeal to accomplish some great thing. Dean 
Hodges once said: "There seems at first to be but little connec- 
tion between yiaving stones and prayer books, "but it is plain, when 
we come to think about it, that the condition of the street afi^ects 
the character of the childien who play in it. Dirt and disorder 
touch first the liody and then the soul. Clean people are de- 
ivered out of many temj)tations. Courage, and hope, and Indus- 



KKPORT OF BOAKD OF EDUCATION. 113 

try and (Uligeiice and the Chribtiaii religion prefer clean houses^. 
How often we have noticed that where chiklren and the school- 
room and perhaps the teacher is untidy all good graces appear to 
he discouraged. In no other place is neatness so important as in 
the school. Dean Hodges well says that it is not without reason 
that we are taught that in the ideal city, the Heavenly Jerusalem, 
there will he clean streets jiaved with gold. 

Thus it is in respect to all the commoii place thhigs of life. In 
the school seemingly small matters have a far reaching intluence. 
All of us who have to deal with children, wliether those of the rich 
or the poor, the promising or the unpromising, need to find that 
method of approach that touches the heart, kindles the feeUngs, 
enlightens the mind, arouses ambition and finally strengthens the 
w ill and establishes a new life. 

Those of us who labor in the school have much to do with the 
courses of study, books, appliances, and methods of every sort, but 
all these count for Init little in comparison Mith the very great im- 
jiortance of social contact and social experience. It has been said 
by eminent authority that 8-5 ijer cent, of the value of the school 
lies in the i)ersonality of the teacher, leaving only 1-5 per cent, for 
all other means and appliances. 

Huch being the position of the teacher in relation to his pupils, 
what are some of the positive obligations which he is called upon 
to fuUil? Holding to tlie idea as universally accepted that char- 
acter is the highest aim of individual training it becomes true that 
the forming of good habits is perhaps the most practical, if not the 
most imi)ortant end. Modern pedagogy recognizes the fact that 
gradually the life of tVie individual becomes mechanized so that 
three fourths and more of the things we do are done automatically. 
Although many children have formed l»ad habits of conduct and 
feeling Ijefore they enter school, still the teacher is working upon 
plastic material and it is possible for him to initiate a large num- 
ber of activities which, if persisted in, will make it easier for the 
cliild to become an efficient, self-controlled and useful member of 
society. 

Then there are those s])e( iul habits so important in tlie jiersonal 
life which relate to such things as cleanliness, punctuality, neat- 
ness, i)erseverance, self-control, obedience, ix)litene-'s, attention, 
diligence and unselfishness, and Avhen there has been established 
in the constitution of any young person a chain of habits reaching 
u]) to tliat highest of all phases of character, unseliishuess, he may 
)>e said to have attained the goal, for he has not only concpiered 
liimself, but he is ready to reach out and help others. This is the 
climax of all moral training and a scliool in which the members arc 
uusellish is ideal, F. B. Wight. 



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REPORT OF BOARD OF EDUCATION. 115 

The Grades and the Normal Age of Pupils. 

AH parents having pupils in tlie upjier grades and especially in 
the High school are earnestly recpiesteil to study carefully the pre- 
ceeding table which sho\\ s the distribution of pui^ls bj^ ages and 
grades. 

It \\ ill be noticed that the child enters the first grade at five years 
of age and reaches the senior class in the High school at the age of 

15 years. This is the present system of grading for our complete 
course of study in the public schools. 

This provides for two years of school work below the second 
grade. A few pupils are able to prepare for the second grade in 
one year. Therefore, taking the work in our schools year by year 
without any double i)roniotions the members of the senior class 
ought to be 18 or at the least 17 years of age. 

According to this table pupils entering the High school as fresh- 
men ought to be 15 or at the minimum 14 years of age. It must 
be remembered that some pupils mature even more slowly, and 
that for them the normal age is one year older. 

We believe, however, that this table represents the average nor- 
mal or proper age of pupils to do their best work in the different 
grades and do it well without overwork. It shows four members 
in the senior class, one 18 years of age which is the average normal 
age, two 17 years of age, tlie minimum normal age, and one 1(> 
years of age which is one year under the minimum normal age. 
In the junior class tliere are fifteen pupils; t^\ o are 17 years of age, 
the average normal age, seven are 16 years of age, the minimum 
normal age, four are one year and one is two years under the min- 
imum normal age. In the sophomore class there are seven pupils 

16 years of age, three pupils 15 years which is the minimum normal 
age, and one pupil one year under age. In the freshman class 
there are three pupils wlio are 13 years old, or two years under the 
average normal age. 

Many times parents have complained that their children were 
overworking, being obliged to study too late at night in order to do 
the work assigned and maintain a good standing in the school. 
Either the courses of study or the requirements of the teachers 
have been criticised. We contend that this is an unjust criticism 
and made without fully considering all the facts. 

We believe and admit that there have been and now are pupils 
in the High school who are overworked. Is it reasonable to sup- 
pose that pupils one and two years under age can perform their 
assigned tasks without over working? 



116 CITY OP BERLIN. 

One parent remarked that it seemed to her that the work of her 
boy was too hard for such a httle fellow. True it is. The record 
shows that he is two years under age for his class in the High school. 
Another parent said, "The High school is overworking the boys 
and girls and injuring their health." One or two instances were 
cited. The records show both giils under age. 

There are two remedies: — 

J^Mrst. Let all parents and teachers see that the pupils are not 
advanced by double ])romotion beyond the limit of the proper 
grade work for the normal age. 

Second. Let the school year in the grades above the Seventh ))e 
at least 38 weeks. 

The course of study in the High school is arranged to meet the 
requirements of Dartmouth college, and is approved by Dartmouth 
and the State Superintendent. 

Recommendations. 

For the school department another year we reconuuend the fol- 
lowing appropriations : 

Teachers' salaries $11,000 00 

Oareof rooms 1,000 0) 

Books and supplies 1,200 00 

Fuel 1,400 00 

Water i^OO 00 

Repairs 500 00 

Incidentals 1,200 00 

Total 116,500 00 

Amount expected from State 1,500 00 

I'alance to be raised by taxation S^lOjOOO 00 

lves])ectfuliy submitted, 

.losEPfr J. CoHK, M. D. 
(". P. Kimball, 
Henkv W. Johnson, M. D. 
Board of Education. 



APPENDIX. 







'71 

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SiT 



IROLL OF HONOR. 



Pupils ueither absent nor tardy for the year ending May 31, 1901. 

High School, 
Verne J. York. 

Grade IX. 

Joseph Kankin. 

Grade VII. 

Leo Gerrish. 

Grade V. 

Rayhern McKay. 

Grade IV. 

John Anderson. 

Henrietta Elstead. 

Edward Fancy. 

Julia Halvorsen. 

Mary Lehner. 

Carl Paulson. 

Grade III. 

Elizabeth Beckwith. 

Dora Campbell. 

Grade II. 

Dorothea Gerrish. 



GRADUATING EXERCISES, 1901 



The graduating exercises of the Class of 1901, occurred June 7. 
The programme was given at the High School building. The 
class numbered three members, as follow: 

Classical Course. 

Lafayette Ray Chamberlin, 

Latin-Scientific Course. 

Mabel Elizabeth Dooley. 

CoRiLLA Caroline Eggleston. 

The programme was as follows: 

Prayer. 

Singing. Soldiers' Chorus from Gounod's, "Faust," 

High Department. 

Essay, "Milton's Message," Miss Dooley. 

Essay, "Are Athletics Essential in High School Work?" 

Mr. Chamberlin. 

Singing, "Come, Gentle Spring," From Haydn's "Seasons," 

High Department. 

Honor Essay. "Sand," Miss Eggleston. 

Intermission. 

Class Prophecy. A Sketch in two scenes. Scene 1 — Time, present. 
Place, Post Office square. 

Scene 2 — Time, twenty years later. Place, Parlor of Murray 
Hill Hotel, New York. Written by INIiss Eggleston. 

Class History. Miss Dooley. 

Singing. "Good Night," Zimmerman, "O'er the Meadows," Smith. 

High Department. 

Presentation Address, Mr. Chamberlin. 

Presentation of Diplomas. Chairman of the School Board. 

Singing. "The Heavens are Telling," from Haydn's "Creation." 

Benediction. 



GRAMMAR SCHOOL GRADUATES, JUNE, i90l. 



Amitfed to High School in September. 
Abbott, George. 
Addelson, Archie. 
Anderson, Dagna. 
burbank, russ. 
Chesney, Mabelle 
DooiiEY, Willie. 
Button, Bessie. 
Fancy, Lillie. 
Hutchinson, Ernest. 
Johnson, Hilda. 
Johnson, Osmond. 
Lowe, Alice. 
Murray, Gertrude. 
Paulson, Charlotte. 
Rankin. Joseph. 
ROWELL, Rena. 
Sprowl, Laura. 
Studd, Teresa. 
Teare, Nellie. 
Tucker, Nellie. 
Wheelpjr, Harry. 
Wight, Stella, 






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Courses of Instruction. 

BERLIN HIGH SCHOOL. 



The Berlin High School offers to its students three courses lead- 
ing to a diploma: 

The Classical Course for college-preparatory students Avho have 
in view the study of advanced literature; 

The Latin-Scientific Course for the preparation for college of stu- 
dents who do not wish to present Greek; 

The English-Scientific Course to meet the requirements of ad- 
mission to scientific schools. 

As a general course for students not intending to enter college, 
the English-Scieutfic is recommended. 

An excellent public lil)rary is of easy access to the students and 
a considerable amount of supplementary reading is required for all 
courses. 

A well-equipped laboratory, with individual desks and sets of ap- 
paratus is provided for the use of students of science. 

A student who attains a rank of 85 in any subject will be granted 
a certificate of proper preparation in that subject for admission to 
any college which admits by certificate. 



CLASSICAL C0UR5E. 



Freshman Year (19). 

LATIN (o): Continuation of Grammar School course. Collar and 
Daniell's Beginner's Latin; D'Ooge's Sight Translation; Special 
attention given to composition and sight translation. 

MATHEMATICS (o):Continuation of Grammar School course. Milne's 
High School Algebra through Quadratics; Thorough drill in 
Factoring and in the Statement of Problems. 

HISTORY (8): (ireek History. Botsford's History of Greece com- 
l)lete; Outline Maps; Four theses; Parallel reading from sourc- 
es in public library; Systematic practice in taking notes from 
Lectures. 



REPORT OF BOARD OF EDUCATION. 125 

SCIENCE (1): Physiology. Comparative anatomy; Foods; Individ- 
ual habits; Careful preparation for the intelUgeut understand- 
ing of the laws of Hygiene; Laboratory experimentation; Mi- 
croscope analysis; Collateral reading. 

ENGLISH (o): Reading and Discussion; Masterpieces of American 
Ijiterature; Rhetoric; Good Use, Sentence Structure, Punct- 
uation; Daily Themes; Scott and Denney's Elementary Eng- 
lish Composition. 

Sophomore Year (18). 

LATIN (5): 20 Lessons in Sight Translation from D'Ooge's Fables of 
Mythology; Ciesar's Gallic War, Books I-IV; Special atten- 
tion to syntax; Composition throughout the year; Sallust's Cat- 
iline. 

GREEK (5): White's Beginner's Greek Book; Hogues's Greek Verbs; 
Composition; Translation of easy jiassages at sight; Anabasis, 
Book I, omitting Chapter IX. 

MATHEMATICS (o): Milne's Plane Geometry, Books I-VI; Daily 
drill in original demonstration of Corollaries and solution of 
Prolilenis, aiid in the accurate construction of figures. 

ENGLISH (n): Hill's Foundation of Rhetoric; Buehler's Exercises in 
English; Julius C;esar, Ivanhoe, Vicar of Wakefield, Vision of 
Sir Launfal; Daily Themes, original, and based on literature 
read; Analysis and criticism. 

Junior Year (21). 

LATIN (5): Cicero, Orations against Catiliue, Archias, Ligarius, 
Manilian Law, ISIarcellus; Further study of construction; 
Composition throughout the year; Ovid, 2000 lines at sight; 
Mythology. 

GREEK (5): Anabasis, Books I-V; Special attention to Indirect 
Discourse; Hogue's Greek Verbs; Composition throughout the 
year; Sight translation from the Hellenica. 

MATHEMATICS (4): Solid Geometry, 1st half-year; Milne, Books 
VII-X; Constant drill in the demonstration of Corollaries and 
the solution of Problems, and in the construction of figures 
according to the rules of perspective. Trigonometry, 2d hall" 
year; Wentworth's Plane Trigonometry; Practical application 
to fundamental principles of vSurveying, and of Astronomical 
calculations. 



126 CITY OF BERLIN. 

HISTORY (3): Romau History; Botsford's History of Rome complete; 

Outline Maps; Four theses; Parallel reading; Practice in taking 

notes from Lectures. 
ENGLISH (4): Pope's Hiad, Books, I, VI, XXII, XXIV, Sir Roger 

de Coverly Papers, Merchant of Venice, The Princess, Ancient 

Mariner; 75 Themes; Two essays each term. 

Senior Year (21). 

LATIN (5): Virgil, iEneid, Books I-VI,- Ten Eclogues at sight; 
iSpecial attention to Versification and Mythology; Cicero de 
Senectute; Composition third term. 

GREEK (4): Iliad, Books I-IV; Mythology; Special attention to 
Homeric foixas and Prosody; Odyssej^, Books I-IV at sight; 
Short review of Composition. 

MATHEMATICS (3): Algebra, 1st term; Review beginning with Fac- 
toring; Properties of Quadratics, Proportion, Progressions, 
Imaginary Quantities, Indeterminates, Binomial theorem for 
any exponent, Theory of Equations. 

Geometry, 2d term: Review of Plane and Solid, based en- 
tirely on original solution and demonstration of Problems 
(Milne, pages 365-382); Required demonstration of all refer- 
ences used. 

Arithmetic, 3d term; Review of Denominate Numbers and 
Percentage. 

FRENCH (5): Eraser and Squair's French Grammar; Composition; 
Dictation; Conversation; Super's French Reader; Souvestre's 
Le Mari de Mme. Solange; Halevy's L'Abbe Constantin; 
Fontaine's Fables; Memorizing of poetical selections. 

ENGLISH (4): Careful study of Burke's Conciliation, Milton's Minor 
poems, Macaulay's Essaj^s on Milton and Addison, Shake- 
speare's Macbeth; Reading of Silas Marner and Essay on 
Burns; Ra})id review of other books in College Entrance Re- 
quirements; Lectures on History of English Literature; 50 
Themes; Three essays a term; Review of the fundamentals of 
English Grammar; Metcalf's English Grammar. 

RHETORICALS: Three prose selections each of first two tenns; Two 
orations, 3d term; Choice of oration or essay at Graduation. 



LATIN=5CIENTIFIC COURSE. 

Freshman Year (19). 
Same as in Classical Course. 



REPORT OF BOARD OF EDUCATION, 127 

Sophomore Year (16). 

LATIN (o): Same as for Classical Sophomores, 
MATHEMATICS (5): Same as for Classical Sophomores. 
HISTORY (8): Same as for Classical Juniors, 
ENGLISH (o): Same as for Classical Sophomores, 

Junior Year (23). 

LATIN (5): Same as for Classical Juniors. 

MATHEMATICS (4): Same as for Classical Juniors. 

FRENCH (5): Same as for Classical Seniors. 

HISTORY (3) Counts (.5): (Optional with Chemistry. See note page 
8.) Detailed study of period in United States History from 1830 
to 1860 with special reference to the Slavery Question; Recita- 
tions based on Wilson's Division and Reunion; Preparation 
from sources in public library; Outline maps showing Devel- 
ojuxient of Union and Growth of Slavery in Union; Constitu- 
tional History; Written discussions. Three Theses: I, Biogra- 
rapy; II, Some Phase of Slave Life; JIT, Constitutional 
discussion; Lectures. 

Some other period 'in United States History may be substi- 
tuted at the option of the instructor. 

(English Plistory as outlined for English-Scientific students 
may be substituted for this course.) 

SCIENCE (5): (Optional with History. See note.) 

Chemistry: Williams' Elements of Chemistry, and Laboratory 
Manual of Inorganic Chemistry; Chemical Properties treated 
as of paramount importance; Special attention given to the 
subjects of Valence, Union by Weight, Equations, Union by 
Volume, and the Laws of | Combination; Discussion of Natural 
Phenomena as related to the laws of Chemistry; Two techni- 
cal essays a term from sources in the public library. The 
course includes a series of 100 experiments by the student, and 
in addition to the regular recitations, from three to five hours 
a week laboratory work is required. Students are instructed 
in the use of the compound microscope. 

ENGLISH (4): Same as for Classical Juniors. 

Senior Year (20). 

LATIN (o): Same as for Classical Seniors. 
MATHEMATICS (3): Same as for Classical Seniors, 



128 CITY OF BERLIN. 

FRENCH (3): Conversation, Eecitation conducted in French; Dic- 
tation; Composition; Blouet's French Primer; Memorizing of 
poetical selections, JNIoliere's L'iVvare; yarcey's Le 8iege du 
Paris; Lamartine's Scenes de la Revolution Fraucaise; Cor- 
neille's Le Cid. Translation is entirely at sight. 

SCIENCE (o) : Optional with History. See note.) 

Physics: Gage's Elements of Physics, and Physical Experi- 
ments; Careful training in exactness of Measurement, in ac- 
curacy of Observation and in correctness of Inference; Appli- 
cation of the laws of Physics to Natural Phenomena. The 
course provides for 100 experiments l)y the student, and for 
the construction, unaided, of a piece of well-built illustrative 
apparatus each term. From two to six hours a week labora- 
tory work is required. The course covers Mechanics, Hydro- 
statics, Pneumatics, Properties of Matter, Heat, Acoustics, 
Optics, Magnetism, and Static and Dynamic Electricity. 

HISTORY (;',) Counts (")): (Optional with Physics. See note.) 
English History as outlined in English-Scieutitic Course. 

ENGLISH (4): Same as for Classical Seniors. 

RHETORICALS: Same as for Classical Seniors. 



ENQLISH=SCIENTIFIC COURSE. 



Freshman Year (19). 

Same as in Classical Course. 

Sophomore Year (16). 

FRENCH (5): Same as for Classical Seniors. 
MATHEMATICS (o): Same as for Classical Sophomores. 
HISTORY (o): Same as for Classical Juniors. 
ENGLISH (3): Same as for Classical Sophomores. 

Junior Year (21). * 

FRENCH (3): Same as for Latin-Scientific Seniors. 
MATHEMATICS (4): Same as for Classical Juniors. 
HISTORY (3) Counts (o): Same as for Latin-Scientific Juniors. 
SCIENCE (o): Same as for Latin-Scientific Juniors. 
ENGLISH (4): Same as for Classical Juniors. 



REPORT OF BOARD OF EDUCATION. 129 

Senior Year (20). 

FRENCH (S): Conversation, Recitation eondueted in P^rench; Dicta- 
tion; Memorizing of iioetical selections; French oration; Com- 
position, paraphrasing; ^loliere's Le Misanthrope: Racine's 
Athalie; Gautier's Voyage en Espagne; Hugo's Ruy Bias; 
Vigny's Cinq Mars. 
(Sophomore Latin may be substituted.) 

MATHEMATICS (3): Same as for Classical Seniors. 

HISTORY (o) Counts (5): English History: From the earliest times 
to the Victorian era; Special study of the rise of pojjular gov- 
ernment and j.growth of the English parliament; Territorial 
expansion; Three theses of not less than 2000 words each, 
during the year; Collateral work in the library throughout 
the course; Coman and Kendall's History of England. 

SCIENCE (o): Same as for Latin-Scientiflc Seniors. 

ENGLISH (4): Same as for Classical Seniors. 

RHETORICALS: Same as for Classical Seniors. 



Note. — A Latin-Scientiflc student may elect to take either 
United States History or English History, and either Chemistry 
or Physics, or he may elect to take ( 'hemistry and Physics to the 
exclusion of both History courses, but lie may not exclude both 
Chemistry and Pliysics. 



Numerals refer to the number of recitations a week. 

Recitations are 50 minutes in length except on Friday after- 
noons, when they are shortened, and the last half hour is devoted 
to the discussion of Current Topics, and of Social, Commercial, 
and Scientific problems. 

One hour a week is occupied in Music, under the direction of 
a special instructor. 

Hours of session are from 8:30 to 12:00 and from 1:30 to 3:10; Lab- 
oratory periods from 3:30 to 5:30. Students who complete their 
class-work in the morning and whose standing permits, are ex- 
cused from attendance at afternoon session. 



Suggested Courses. 



Report of the Committee on a Uniform Course of Study 
for the High Schools of New Hampshire. 



Your committee respectfully submit the following report: 

In entering upon tlieir duties the committee deemed it advisable 
to collect all the information possible relating to the courses of study 
now pursued in the New Hampshire high schools and academies. 
Circulars were sent to all such institutions in the state, and replies 
were received from about thirty, representing cities, small towns, 
and academies. Many programs were also procured from schools 
in other states for comparison. 

From a study of this material it appears that the cities and large 
towns of New Hampshire, for the most part, have excellently ar- 
ranged courses of study. In the small towns, however, the situa- 
tion is difTerent. Many of these small schools with limited means 
and teaching force are trying to teach too many subjects. Subjects 
that should occupy a full year are crowded into a term or two. 
Many of the schools are using antiquated text books. 

The subjects found on the programs of New Hampshire high 
schools and academies include the following: History (Greek, Rom- 
an, English, American, General, Mediaeval, and Modern), Civics, 
English (including Reading, Spelling, Rhetoric, Composition, and 
Literature), Greek, Latin, French, German, Italian, Arithmetic, 
Algebra, Plane and Solid Geonretry, Plane Trigonometry, Survey- 
ing, Bookkeeping, Commercial I^aw, Stenography, Ty]^ewriting, 
Botany, ^oology. Biology, Physics, Chemistry, Astronomy, Geolo- 
gy, Physical Geography, Political Economy, Elocution, Political 
Geography, Physiology, Psycology, Moral Philosophy, Drawing, 
Painting, and INIusic. In addition to these subjects some of the 
larger schools either have introduced or are contemplating the in- 
troduction of manual training and some form of systematic drill 
in Physii-al Training, a movement Avhich meets the hearty approv- 
al of the committee. 

It is evident that none but the largest and best equipped schools 
can hope to provide adequate instruction in all of the above sub- 



REPORT OF BOARD OF EDUCATION. 131 

jects. The smaller schools must be content with a more modest 
program, and the recent legal deliuition of a high school marks 
the limits of such program with considerable precision. In order 
to meet the reciuirements of this definition a high school must pro- 
vide at least one four years' course which will prepare for college, 
technical, and normal schools. For the small high school, then, 
the subject and amount of each are already prescribed by the re- 
(juirements for admission to those institutions. 

The reciuirements for admission to Dartmouth College are as fol- 
lows: 

Classical Course— Four years of Latin, three years of Greek, 

Greek and Roman History (one year each), at least three years of 
Mathematics, and an amount of English which in the opinion of 
the committee will require at least three recitations per week for 
four years. 

Latin-Scientiflc Course— Latin, Greek and Eoman History, or 
English and American History, Mathematics and English the same 
as for the Classical course; two or three years of French or Gennan 
and one year of Chemistry, Physics, or Biology (Botany and Zool- 
ogy)- 

Chandler-Scientific Course— English, History, French or German 

the same. as for the Latin-Scientific course, either an extra year in 
Mathematics (including Advanced Algebra, Solid Geometry, and 
Plane Trigonometry), or two years of a second modern language or 
Latin; and two of the three sciences, Chemistry, Physics, Biology 
(Botany and Zoology), 

The reciuirements for admission to the New Hampshire College 
of Agriculture and the Mechanic Arts are as follows: Three years 
of Mathematics (Arithmetic, Algebra, Plane and Solid Geometry); 
Physics, Botany, Physical Geography; American, Greek, and 
Roman Hisiory; two years of French or German; English as re- 
quired by the New England colleges. 

The program of the small high school must therefore be based 
on the following subjects: English, Greek, Latin, French, German; 
Greek History, Roman History, English History, American His- 
tory, Algebra, Geometry, Trigonometry; Chemistry, Physics, Biol- 
ogy (Botany and Zoology). 

From the above data the committee have arranged the following 
courses, of which the first admits to the Classical Course of Dart- 
mouth College, the second to the Latin-Scientific Course, and eith- 
er the third or fourth to the Chandler-Scientific Course. Any one 
of the second, third, or fourth courses admits to the New Hamp- 
shire College of Agriculture and the Mechanic Arts. With slight 
changes these courses will also prepare for corresponding courses 



l32 CttY Ot' BERttN, 

in other colleges. Any one of them will prepare for the State Nor- 
mal School. 

If it seems to any one that too much stress has been laid on the 
preparation for higher institutions, whereas comparatively few at- 
tend such institutions, a little reflection will show that these sub- 
jects are such as by common consent are best adapted to give the 
student a thorough and well-rounded training. Moreover, the 
above-mentioned definition of a high school leaves no option. 



lO iC CO CO CO 



iC lC CO CO CO 



CO ■* iC CO lO 



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a 


a 


man, 
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tory, 


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iology (B 
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an 40 minu 


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l34 CITY OF BfiRLIN, 

The committee have assumed that twenty recitation periods per 
week are not too many for the average pupil. The above courses 
provide for nineteen, leaving one period per week to be devoted to 
such general exercises as may seem desirable. 

In schools where the teaching force and equipment are sufficient 
to allow several courses, the committee would recommend the 
elective system with certain restrictions. It is believed that certain 
fundamental subjects should be required of all, but that beyond 
these requirements considerable latitude should be allowed stu- 
dents in the choice of subjects. Experience has shown that most 
students appreciate this privilege and devote a great deal of 
thought to the selection of their studies. The interest of the stu- 
dent is stimulated, and when properly guided by the advice of 
parents and instructors, he may avoid the disadvantage of pursu- 
ing studies in which he has no interest and for which he is ill 
adapted, without sacrificing the advantages of a well-rounded 
course. The following will suggest one way in which such a pro- 
gram may be arranged: 



Suggested Courses of Study. 



FIRST YEAR. 







-d . 








n . 




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tj y 


0) tn 


ci . 


0) OJ 


oj m 






aSS 


oi S 




5 "3 


P 


c 


1 






P-^ PRESCRIBED. 


0) QJ 


1^ 


£-^ ELECTIVE. 

O 






4 Algebra 


4 


1 


4 


Latin, 


4 


1 


2 English, 


2 


1 


2 


Physical Geography, 
Bookkeeping and 


2 


1 


2 Greek History. 


2 


1 


4 














Com. Law, 


4 


1 








1 


Drawing, 




2 








1 


Music, 




2 






SECOND YEAR, 






3 Geometry, 


3 


1 


4 


Latin, 


4 


1 


2 English, 


2 


1 


4 


Greek, 


4 


1 


2 Roman History, 


2 


1 


4 


French or German, 


3 


1 








4 


Biology, 


3 


2 








1 


Drawing, 




2 








1 


Music, 




2 






THIRD YEAR. 






3 Physics, 


2 


2 


4 


Latin, 


4 


1 


2 English, 


2 


1 


4 


GreeK. 


4 


1 








3 


French or German, 


3 


1 








3 


Geometry and Alg., 


3 


1 








2 


Arithmetic, 


2 










2 


English History, 


2 


1 








2 


Physiology, 


2 


1 








1 


Drawing, 




2 








1 


Music, 




2 






FOURTH 


YEAR. 






2 English, 


2 


I 


4 
4 
3 
3 
3 


Latin, 

Greek, 

French or German, 

Mathematics, 

American History, 


4 

4 
3 
3 
3 


1 

1 
1 
1 
1 








4 


Chemistry, 


3 


2 








4 


Stenography and 
Typewriting, 


3 


2 








1 


Drawing, 




2 








1 


Music, 




2 



136 CITY OP B13RLIN. 

The above arrangement is merely suggestive. It is believed, 
however, tliat the prescribed studies should include Euglisli 
throughout the course, two years of History, two years of Mathe- 
matics, and at least one science. The electives may be increased 
or diminished according to the conditions prevailing in the school. 
The numbers under "Diploma Value" hidicate the number of 
credits to be allowed for the successful completion of each year's 
work in each subject. The number of credits required for gradua- 
tion according to the above program would be sixty. Such other 
conditions can be required as seem wise to the management of the 
school. 

Many towns in the state that are trying to maintain small high 
schools will doubtless be unable to meet the requirements of the 
new law without greatly increasing their equipment and teaching 
force. It is recommended that measures be taken to secure such a 
modification of the law as will allow the state superintendent to 
approve a portion of a course. 

Respectfully submitted, 

MELVILLE C. SMART, 
FRED P. EMERY, 
LORIN WEBSTER, 
CHANNING FOLSOM, 

Comm ittee. 



NINTH ANNUAL REPORT 

OF THE TRUSTEES OF THE 

PUBLIC LIBRARY 



OF THE 



CITY OF BERLIN, N. H., 

FOR THE FISCAL YEAR ENDING 

FEBRUARY 15, 1902. 




Organization. 

Fred M. Clement, Chairman, . Term expires March, 1902 

Henry W. Johnson, A, B., M. D., . Term expires March, 1903 
William P. Ladd, A. M., B. D., . Term expires March, 1904 

Hattie L. Johnson, Librarian. 

Helen Denning, Delivery Clerk. 



Trustees' Report. 



Berlin, N. H,, February 15, 1902. 
To His Honor the Mayor, and City Council of the City of Berlin: 

The trustees of the Public Library herewith submit their ninth 
annual report, being that for the year ending February 1.5, 1902. 
For statistics of circulation, etc., we refer you to the report of the 
Librarian, which is appended. 

The financial status is as follows: 

Receipts. 

City of Ilerlin |650 00 

Fines, etc., received from Librarian 16 69 

Popular Subscription, amount expended 40 00 

Expenditures. 

Hattie L. Johnson, Librarian 200 00 

F. M. Clement, rent of rooms 175 00 

De Wolfe, PMske & Co., books, 168 02 

Berlin Electric Light Co., eleven lights, (from January 

1, 1901) 63 17 

D. Appleton & Co., books 40 00 

H. W. Wilson, books 20 00 

Library Bureau, supplies 14 33 

John J. Bell, nunil)ering-stamp 12 15 

Express and freight bills 7 14 

F. L. Saunders, binding 7 is 

E. J. Barney, printing ,3 50 

J. L. Hammett Co., books 3 H 

E. A. Burbank, hardware 2 75 

Independent Press, printing 2 50 

Berlin ]\[ills Co., covering-paper 2 00 

H. W. Johnson, cash paid subscription to "Bookman" 2 00 

H, W. Johnson cash paid box rent - 7,5 

724 50 



140 CITY OF BERLIN. 

We are glad to be able to report a continuance of the good work 
of the library along all its usual lines, — among the students in the 
schools, members of study clubs, individual students working on 
special subjects, and the great body of readers, who read for enter- 
tainment alone, including, as it does, a large proportion of the 
younger element in the city, who, when thus employed, are not 
on the street, or in doubtful company. This last fact alone, is, in 
our opinion, sufficient reason why our library should be well sup- 
ported by the citizens, and excejjting the public schools, there 
is no dejiartment of our city government which comes more closely 
home to the life of the peojile, or has so great an influence on the 
future and well-being of the coming generation. We say this in 
full cognizance of the fact that the librarian reports that 73 per 
cent, of the books borrowed from the library are novels in same 
form. There was a time when to read a novel was considered not 
only a waste of time, but worse than that, a species of dissipation, 
to be classed with gambling, drunkenness and kindred evils. Hap- 
pily, that day is past, and familiarity with the standard novel is 
considered a part of one's education. The requirements in Eng- 
lish for admission to college include the study of selected novels by 
Dickens, Cooper, (ieorge Eliot, Hawthorne, and otiiers. For the 
reading of good fiction is something more than mere entertain- 
ment. It is a study of one of the great forms of creative literature, 
and one of the most potent agencies w hereljy the sympathies may 
be (juickened, the horizon enlarged, higher interests aroused, and 
culture attained, ^\'e have forever ]iassed the da,y when thoughtful 
people condemn the reading of fiction as such; we have cometo un- 
derstand that the best novels are among the best books there are, 
notwithstanding Ave discountenance the reading of the shallow 
and sensational sorts, which serve only to give false and distorted 
ideas of truth, fill the mind with discontent and longing for 
an impossible and artiflcal sort of existence, and rob one of all use- 
ful aims and purposes. That there is an abundance of stories of 
this sort is too evident to require proof. It is a kind which is indis- 
putably bad, in every way, the perusal of which does incalculable 
harm. We endeavor, by all practicable means, to keep such stutt" 
out of the library. Further, it is the aim of the librarian to pre- 
vent, as far as possible, without seeming intrusive, the reading of 
fiction to the exclusion of everything else — or in other words, to re- 
duce the percentage of fiction as much as is desirable. This must 
be done carefully. Half these novel readers would cease reading 
entirely, if they could not get what they wanted, and it is certain- 
ly better to read good no^'els exclusively, than not to read at all, 
since the exercise of the reading habit in any form tends to bring 



PUBLIC LIBRARY, 141 

about a gradual elevation of literary taste, if the reader be proper- 
ly managed, and incited to something broader and better. It re- 
quires tact to ajjply this sort of incitement without ruffling the 
temper of the subject of the operation. 

How to deal with the late novels, or rather how to deal with pa- 
trons in connection with novels of this class is a difficult jiroblem 
to meet. Without experience at the delivery desk, one has no idea 
of the pressure of the demand for the latest jwpular story. No libra- 
ry unless heavily endowed, can afford to meet this demand even 
half-way. To do this, even in our own library, would require the 
purchase of at least 50 copies of each popular work as soon as it be- 
gan to acquire its popularity. Of course this is not to be thought 
of, nor is it desirable. For it generally happens that a story which 
has a phenomenal circulation this season, will hardly be called for 
at all next season, and gathers dust, lying on its shelf, for the fol- 
lowing years. The demand for such fiction cannot legitimately be 
met by any public library. A library should strive to place upon 
its shelves only books of permanent value. And in a year the real 
value of a book can be ascertained. If it is in demand after that 
time has elapsed, it is likely to be of lasting quality, rather than 
transitory. The call for a novel within a few months after publi- 
cation is simply because it is new, often not because of any inherent 
goodness known to the applicant. Consequently, it has been 
urged that libraries should buy no work of fiction until a year after 
publication. This would be an excellent plan, but would un- 
doubtedly raise a great outcry, though the loss to the jniblic would 
be more imaginary than real. Take such a novel as "The Crisis" 
for example. Fifty copies would have been necessary to supply 
the demand. To have bought these, a\ ith the absolute certainty 
that next year they would be consigned to the top shelf to gather 
dust for all time, \s ould have been a procedure richly deserving 
sharp criticism. And yet, in the case of this particular novel, 
hundreds left the li'orary in disgust, unable to obtain it, and refus- 
ing to be comforted with anything else. 

There is one feasible way out of this difliculty. A new depart- 
ment might be opened — New Fiction — buying enough books to 
meet the demand, and making a charge for their use. If it is ob- 
jected that this a free library', and therefore all its ser\'ices must be 
gratuitous, we may say that this i^arlicular service is impossible 
unless it be made self-supporting. The fee-charge could be very 
small and yet it is believed that by means of it, the books in this 
department would pay for themselves. One cent a day would be 



142 CITY OF BERLIN. 

enough for this purpose, and the plau would have the further ad- 
vantage of accelerating the circulation of each book. At the end 
of six months, a book will have paid for itself, it will have served 
perhaps fifty families, at no cost to the library, and it can be put in 
"cold storage" with good conscience. 

The need of larger quarters and better accommodations is felt 
more strongly at i^resent than ever before. The waiting room is 
often crowded to such an extent that there is vexatious delay in 
exchanging books, mistakes arise, and cause much seemingly 
needless aimoyance to our patrons, and especially to the librarian. 
The reading room is always crowded, in seasonable hours, bej'oud 
all reason and comfort, and to such an extent that its objects are 
M'ell nigh defeated. The walls of this room are lined with shelves, 
and these are already filled with works of reference and such other 
books as, not in constant demand, can be spared from the book- 
room proper, to give space to others in more active circulation. 
But books have to find a place outside, for lack of room, and it is a 
question how long this state of things must be tolerated. It in- 
creases the work of the librarian, fetters the usefulness of the libra- 
ry, and vetoes, in a most exasperating way, many plans for ex- 
tending the work of the institution, and keeping it up to date and 
abreast with other libraries of its size. 

We referred to this subject in our last report, but owing to the 
extra expense thrust upon the city by the outbreak of small pox, 
we did not feel like urging the matter at that time. At present, 
with no schoolhouses to build and furnish, it would seem that suit- 
able accommodations for the library might be provided. In fact, 
if this cannot be done, it would be perhaps better to close the read- 
ing room to the public, rather than have it so crowded that it de- 
feats its own object, while adding so much to the care and respon- 
sibility of the librarian. This room could be used for addi- 
tional shelving, but there would be no place then for the 
hundreds who use the library as a place for study, when they 
wish U) consult several books on the same subject — a class ever 
increasing, who put the library to its highest use. Thus the pres- 
ent conditions threaten a state of afiairs which must ignore the 
needs of the best class of our patrons. We hope this subject will 
receive consideration. 

For the ensuing year, we recommend that the following sums 
be raised by taxation: 

Rent of rooms $175 00 

Services 200 00 



PUBLIC LIBRARY. 143 

Books 200 00 

Lights 50 00 

lueidentals 50 00 

Total $675 00 

In closing we wish to express our obligations to the librarian for 
her faithfulness and interest, and to many others who have assist- 
ed in bringing our library up to its present standard of efficiency. 

Fred M. Clement, 
Henry W. Johnson, [■ Trustees. 
William P. Ladd, 



Librarian's Report. 



Berlin, N. H., February 15, 1902. 

To the Board of Trustees of the Berlin Pablic Lil/reiry. 

Gentlemen: — I herewith respectfully submit my ninth annual 
report, showing the Mork for the year, 1901. The statistics are 
as follows: 

Accessions. 

Number of volumes, February 1, 1901 3,235 

Increase by purchase 283 

Increase by gift 89 

Total increase 372 



Number of volumes, February 1, 1902 • 3,607 

Number of vol umes missing 2 

Number of volumes lost and paid for by the loser 1 

Number of volumes worn out and withdrawn 1 

Circulation. 

Number of volumes delivered for home use 19,499 

Largest number in one day, February 23, 1901 217 

Largest number in one month, January, 1902 2,193 

Number of days open to the public 297 

Average circulation per day 66 

Number of borrowers registered during the year 287 

Whole number of borrowers since new registration, 

July 1, 1898, 1,273 

Nou-flctiou cards in use i 105 

Circulation by Classes. 

Fiction 14,257 Social Science 320 

History 1,467 Fine Arts 179 

General Literature 682 Religion 133 

Magazines 644 Useful Arts 107 

Travels 579 Satire and Humour 92 



KlBLIC LIBRARY. 145 



Biography 513 Philology 

Natural .Science 360 Philosophy.. 

Total 19,499 

Number of books rebound 

Financial. 

Amount received for fines 

Amount received for book damaged 



Expended. 

Cleaning 

Sundries 

Paid to the trustees 



79 


42 


120 39 


2 25 


$22 64 


$5 00 


95 


16 69 



$22 64 

Valuation of books $3,600 00 

Valuation of fixtures 285 00 

Total valuation $3,885 00 

Books have been donated as follows: 

Dr. H. W. Johnson 39 

Bev. W. P. Ladd 9 

U. S. Government 9 

State of New Hampshire 8 

Mr. F. B. Wight 2 

Mrs. John H. Wilson 2 

Mrs. E. B. Jewell 2 

Miss Ethel Gray 2 

Miss Hattie Johnson 

Dr. A. Lavallee 

Miss Sara H. Duke 

Mrs. Walter E. Taft 

Master Leslie Wertheim 

Miss Gussie Wertheim 

Master Paul Denning 

Miss Helen Denning 

Dr. C. H. Bowker 

Ex-Gov. Frank W. Rollins 

Mrs. Moody Currier 

Mr. Thomas Willing Balch 

Harvard University 

State of Massachusetts 

State of Connecticut 



146 CITY OF BERLIN. 

Back numbers of magazines have been given by Rev. W. P. 
Ladd, Mrs. Charles Denning, Mrs. J. D. Holt, Mr. Thomas Fur- 
bush, and INIiss Gussie Wertheim. jNIr. H. ('. Rowell still kindly 
gives the Scientific American regularly each week. These old 
magazines are much desired, and are gratefully received at the 
libraiy. They will be called for, if donors will advise us that they 
can be had by that means. 

There is a gratifying increase in the circulation this year over 
that of last year. In our last report, we registered a loan of 1.5,944 
volumes. This year there is an increase of o,lo5, while that of last 
year was 2,178. The proportion of fiction borrowed this year is 
about 73 per cent of the entire amount, which will be considered a 
good showing by experienced librarians. Last year it was 76 per 
cent, showing a decrease since then of 3 per cent. Of course this 
means a corresponding increase in the amount read in books other 
than fiction, as travels, history, biography, etc. Every librarian 
tries to encourage, in all possible ways, the reading of non-fiction, 
as it is felt that the library's widest usefulness lies in that direction. 
To that end, patrons are allowed two cards each, on one of wlrich 
a work of fiction can be borrowed, on tire other only a work of 
some other kind can be taken. How much this has helped to in- 
crease the non-fiction circulation is uncertain, but there is no doubt 
that it has largely contributed to this result. Then, too, no record 
is kept of books that circulate within the library — consulted at the 
tables, and then returned to the shelves — but it is estimated that the 
number so used is about three times the number taken out. In 
considering the usefulness of the library, this circulation should 
not be overlooked. Of course, most of this "local" or inside circu- 
lation is among the pupils from the public schools, but nearly 
as much is among local clubs and individuals, who resort to the 
library for materials for papers, and for purposes of study along the 
hues of their work. This class of library users is steadily, though 
slowly, increasing, and it is unfortunate that we have no statistics 
with which to measure this increase, but to record each book used 
inside the library would entail so much extra labor, that a regular 
assistant would be necessary for the purpose. 

The ever-present problem of how to deal with "late fiction" 
presses more strongly for solution eveiy year. As the number of 
borrowers increases, so does the call for the latest popular novel 
become louder and louder, and when two hundred people are all 
clamoring for a book like the "Crisis," life is no more 
pleasant for the librarian than for those who are 
calling for it in vain. The library cannot afford to buy 



PUBLIC LIBRARY. 14'? 

duplicate copies, as the large libraries do (the Chicago library puts 
fifty copies of such a book ou its shelves) and the only way at pre- 
sent is to limit the time allowance on such books to even less than 
the seven-day restriction now in vogue. I hope the trustees will 
consider this problem and arrive at some practical solution of it be- 
fore life at the delivery desk becomes intolerable. 

There is an interesting evolution going on in the reading-room. 
In the beginning it was used only as a resort where boys and men 
could pass an hour in reading, wliich would otherwise be spent on 
the street. Gradually these people have been actually crowded 
out by students who use the room for the study and consulting of 
books found in the library. It is far too small for such purposes, 
and its distance from the delivery desk, and its usual crowded 
condition make it difficult to maintain that degree of quiet 
desirable. Patrons pursue their work under difficulties 
which are irremovable, nevertheless, so long as the library occupies 
the cramped quarters now allotted to it. Meantime, let us be 
thankful that, if readers are crowded out, there is another read- 
room, excellently managed, and particularly adapted to their 
needs, on Post Office Square, where there is a plenty of room and 
good reading matter, accessible at all times. Thus, from a room in 
which idlers could profitably spend an hour reading what they 
might find at hand, our little apartment has become a place for 
students and others engaged in earnest thought and investigation; 
were it not that the working-men's room is provided for the former 
class, ^\ e should deplore this evolution. Under the circumstances, 
we should be pleased at the change, not because the former class 
are unwelcome, but because, being provided for, they can yield 
the library to m^ore legitimate uses. 

Only 42 books have been rebound the past year. This is because 
of careful and assiduous attention to the repairing of books done at 
the library. Every book returned is scrutinized for loose leaves, 
breaks in binding, etc., before it is placed on the shelves. In 
this way, the life of a book is often doubled. This is a part of the 
drudgeiy of the library, but nevertheless must be faithfully per- 
foi-med. Of course, this work increases very fast with the age of 
the library, almost in geometrical progression. Thus the work of 
the librarian increases in the same ratio year by year. The time 
long since went by when the work required at the library could be 
done at odd moments during library hours, even on stormy days. 
I find it necessary to spend many hours there when the library is 
closed, in order to keep tlie machinery in smoothly running order. 

The number of small children using the library has increased 



148 CITY OF BERLIN. 

during the past year. lu a new building, a special room should 
be assigned them, with a special attendant. 

Lists of new books added have been j^rinted in the local papers, 
for whose kindness I wish to make acknowledgment. A new cat- 
alogue, or at least a new appendix to the one already printed is al- 
most a necessity. Over 1.500 volumes have been added since the 
last one was issued. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Hattie L. Johnson, Librarian. 



FINANCIAL REPORTS. 



VALUATION. 



Polls, 2,162 , $ 216,200 00 

Improved and unimproved Lands and Buildings 1,424,693 00 

Horses, 732, 22,492 00 

Cows, 274, 5,248 00 

Other Neat Stock, 9, 107 00 

Sheep, 15, ,40 00 

Hogs, 40, 212 00 

Carriages 2,985 00 

Stock in Banks 44,900 00 

Money on hand, at interest, or on deposit 3,400 00 

Stock in trade » 347,929 00 

Mills and Machinery 1,074,525 00 

Total valuation $3,14-2,731 00 



Appropriation^. 



City Engineemig | 500 00 

City Poor 1,600 00 

(Jounty Tax 10,214 47 

Election Expenses lioO 00 

Fire Department 3,500 00 

Grand Army of the Republic 100 00 

Hydrants 2,500 00 

Interest 6,000 00 

Insurance 400 00 

Lighting Streets 2,700 00 

Miscellaneous 1,000 00 

New Streets 2,000 00 

Printing and Stationery 500 00 

Police Department 5,000 00 

Public Library 650 00 

Public Reading Room 100 00 

Sanitary 400 00 

Salaries 2,500 00 

Schools 14,000 00 

School Bond 1,000 00 

Berlin Brass Band for Concerts 400 00 

Sewers 2,500 00 

Sinking Fund 6,000 00 

State Tax 4,088 50 

Streets and Sidewalks 8,000 00 

Sprinkling Streets 300 00 

$76,202 97 



INVENTORY OF CITY PROPERTY. 



Wheeler school house, land and furniture, $ 500 00 

Brown school house, land and furniture 3,000 00 

High school house, land and furniture 13,900 00 

Cole school house, land and furniture 5,000 00 

Sessions school house, laud and furniture 2,000 00 

Marston school house, land and furniture 15,300 00 

City building, and lot 5,000 00 

Hose house No. 1 and lot 500 00 

Hose house No. 2 and lot 700 00 

Hose house No. 3 and lot 700 00 

Shoe factory and lot 16,000 00 

Land in the Narrows 1,000 00 

Detention Hospital and land 2,000 00 

Equity in Couture house 900 00 

Total valuation |66,500 00 



Personal Property. 

Highway mventory 2,024 55 

Fire department inventory 6,422 00 

Sewer department inventory 163 70 

Police department inventory 426 12 

Hearse 150 00 

Cost of Sewer system 56,694 69 

Total inventory of personal property $,5,381 06 



POLICE DEPARTMENT. 



Appropriation 15,000 00 

Transferred from Police Court 2,672 96 

5)7,672 96 

Pay-roll, policemen §446 88 

Philip Lepage, teams 8 00 

Philip Lepage, burying dogs 4 00 

D. P. Mitchell, witness fee 77 

C. II. Dickinson, assistance 1 00 

Francois Nadeau, assistance 50 

Arthur Lavigue, assistance 1 00 

George F. Rich, police justice, 1 mo 83 33 

Mrs. Carrie M. Hobart, meals for prisoners 5 00 

Christian Christianson, killing dogs 9 00 

F. G. Jackson, witness fee 77 

J. E. King, witness fee 77 

J. G. Marier, witness fee 77 

M. F. Eagan, witness fee 3 08 

F. X. McHale, witness fee 1 54 

E. A. Gilbert, witness fee 77 

Thomas McMann, witness fee 2 31 

A. S. Palmer, witnessfee 1 54 

Peter Gunn, witness fee 2 13 

T. A. Ouelette, assistance 1 00 

E.fi. Bryant, witnessfee 77 

John T. Youngcliss, killing dogs 7 00 

L. D. Brown, assistance 1 00 

Alphonse Roderick, assistance 1 00 

Ferdina Nadeau, assistance 1 00 

Pay-roll, policemen 410 25 

W. A. Boothby, assistance 1 00 

Berlin Water Supply Co., water city building 18 39 

Joseph Sanschagrin, assistance 1 00 

John Paquette, assistance 1 00 

The Wilson Pharmacy, toilet paper 1 20 

Independent Press, notices 3 00 

W. Winchester, cleaning city building 00 



POLICE DEPABTMENT. 155 

E. J. Baruey, printing warrants 

George F. Rich, police justice, 1 mo 

W. Winchiester, cleaning city building 

Philip Lepage, teams 

P. W. McHugh, toilet paper 

Mrs. C. Hobart, meals for prisoners 

Fred Bell, assistance 

Patrick Hashey, assistance 

Christian Christiansou, killing dogs 

A. B. Forbush, assistance 

A. Roderick, assistance 

John King, assistance 

Edward Gosselin, assistance 

Pay-roll, policemen 

C. S. Clarke, sujiplies 

Fred Bell, assistance 

Archie Gregoire, assistance 

Arthur Langis, assistance 

E. A. Burbank, assistance 

Felix Shorey, assistance 

Wm. Boudreau, assistance 

Pay-roll, policemen 

Philip Lepage, assistance with teams 

Philip Lepage, burying dog 

Christian Christiansou, killing dog 

John T. Youngcliss, killing dog 

Sam Mercier, assistance , 

W. H. Winchester, cleaning city building 

Thomas Roderick, assistance 

Berlin E. L. Co., lights city building, 1 mo 

Philip Lepage, burying dog 

Philip Lepage, teams 

Willie Winchester, cleaning city building 

Independent Press, legal notices 

Berlin E. L. Co., lights city building, 1 mo 

Wm. Beaudoin, assistance 

Mrs. C'arrie M. Hobart, meals for prisoners 

Mrs. Carrie M. Hobart, meals for prisoners 

E. A. Burbank, revolver 

Peter Gagne, assistance 

J. A. Letourneau, assistance 

George F. Rich, police justice, 2 mo 

C. H. Dennish, assistance 

Pay-roll, policemen 382 25 



) 12 85 


33 33 


5 00 


4 00 


75 


6 00 


1 00 


1 00 


4 00 


1 00 


1 00 


1 00 


1 00 


509 25 


40 28 


50 


1 00 


2 00 


1 00 


1 00 


1 00 


435 63 


18 00 


3 00 


2 00 


4 00 


1 00 


6 00 


1 00 


12 50 


1 00 


14 00 


7 00 


9 25 


12 50 


2 00 


2 25 


5 25 


5 00 


1 00 


1 00 


66 66 


1 00 



156 CITY OF BERIjIN. 

Pay-roll, special police officers 

Philip Lepage, burying dog w. 

Mrs. T. Valliere, meals for prisoners 

John H. Johnson, hauling beer 

Joseph Markee, burying dog 

George F. Kich, police justice, 1 rao 

Philij) Lepage, assistance 

Joseph Letounieau, assistance 

The Berlin Reporter, notice to sportsmen 

Fred N. Wheeler, conveying prisoners to jail 

W. H. Winchester, cleaning citj^ building 

The Hodgdon Hardware Co., supplies 

Pay-roll, policemen 

Arthur Ramsay, assistance 

E. J. Barney, complaints and warrants 

Thomas Sanschagrin, assistance 

Tellis Bergeron, assistance 

L. D. Brown, assistance 

E. A. Burbank, cleaning furnace, city building 

Wm. Beaudoin, mattresses and puffs, police station 

Berlin E. L. Co., lights city building, 1 mo 

VV. H. Winchester, cleaning city building 

G. Arsenault, assistance 

P. Lepage, burying dog 

jS". Martel, assistance 

Fred Perry, assistance 

J. W. Amburg, assLstanee 

J. T. Youngcliss, assistance 

Pat Hinchey, assistance 

John Burke, assistance 

J. T. Youngcliss, killing dog 

Caleb Wight, assistance 

G. S. Wilson, salary as prosecuting agent, 1 mo 

F. Valliere, meals for prisoners 

Pay-roll , policemen 

E. C. Eastman, jniblic statutes 

G. F. Rich, police justice, 1 mo 

P. Lepage, assistance 

Geo. S. Wilson, salary as prosecuting agent and trip 

to Lancaster 81 50 

William Ferrari, witness fee / 77 

Felix Shorey, assistance 1 00 

John Nadeau, assistance 2 00 

John T. Youngcliss, killing dog 1 00 



; 84 90 


1 00 


5 00 


1 00 


1 00 


33 33 


4 00 


1 00 


8 75 


260 22 


10 00 


26 80 


429 88 


1 00 


23 60 


2 00 


1 00 


1 00 


1 50 


18 00 


12 50 


5 00 


1 00 


1 00 


1 00 


1 00 


1 00 


1 00 


1 00 


1 00 


1 00 


10 00 


60 00 


7 00 


400 51 


6 00 


33 3a 


6 75 



POLICE DEPARTMENT. 157 



Berlin Water Co., ^yater city building 

Joseph King, assistance 

M. A. Hastings, copies of injunctions 

M. A. Hastings, copies of injunctions 

Marli Steinfeld, witness fee 

Kobert Marchand, witness fee 

The Independent Press, printing 

Caleb White, assistance 

John T. Youngcliss, inspection 

Eugene Bean, expense of trip to Lancaster 

C. Brooks, coal, city building 

John T. Youngcliss, expense of triji to Lancaster. 

Berlin Water Co., waterreutal 

John T. Youngcliss, assistance 

Philip Lepage, burying dog 

Philip Lepage, assistance 

John T. Youngcliss, inspection 

Pay-roll, policemen 

John W. Green, assistance 

Mrs. Felix Valliere, meals for prisoners 

Osmond Fernald, hauling liquor 

W. H. Winchester, cleaning city building 

11. C'. Denison, M. D., medical assistance 

Willie Chin, washing towels 

Geo. F'. Rich, police justice, 1 mo 

Foss T. McNally, witness fee 

M. A. Hastings, copies of injunctions 

N. Morin, serving notices 

W. H. Paine, iietition for injunctions 

(*. IST. Hodgdon, wood for city building 

C". N. Hodgdon, wood for city building 

Gilbert & Parent, merchandise 

Frank Bachelor, sawing wood 

George S. Wilson, witness fees 

Mrs. Carrie M. Hobart, meals for prisoners 

Pay-roll, policemen, 

Pay-rol 1 , policemen 

B. Fecteau, assistance 

E. B. Angell, analysis of beer 

Frank Bachelor, cleaning council room 

R uel INIcGo wn , trucking 

Pliilip Lepage, use of team 

E. A. Burbank, repairs in city building 

Mrs. Carrie Hobart, meals for prisoners 



$ 8 47 


1 00 


28 00 


25 60 


1 54 


77 


4 00 


6 00 


51 20 


5 95 


262 85 


7 95 


50 


1 00 


1 00 


1 00 


22 68 


431 39 


5 00 


2 25 


50 


8 00 


1 00 


1 30 


33 33 


77 


41 60 


5 92 


33 22 


2 25 


2 25 


16 85 


85 


2 31 


9 00 


210 38 


412 50 


1 00 


30 00 


50 


50 


1 00 


4 90 


10 50 



158 CITY OF BERLIN. 

Thomas Lydon, repairs in city buildiug 

George F. Rich, salarj'^ as poHce justice, 1 mo. 

Hodgdon Hardware Co, supplies 

Hodgdon Hardware Co., supplies 

Charles S. Clarke, supplies 

George F. Ricli, police justice, 1 mo 

Theophlie Vermette, assistance 

Joseph King, assistance 

Joseph Lambert, assistance 

Tobis Bergeron, assistance 

Napoleon Nolin, assistance 

('. R. Dickinson, assistance 

Alphonse Jolin, assistance 

Fred N. Wheeler, conveying prisoners to jail.. 

S. G. Youngcliss, labor on city building 

Mary Parance, cleaning city building 

Thomas Sanschagrin, assistance , 

Celina Demelle, cleaning city building 

8am Lee, washing towels 

Tlieophile Belanger, assistance 

Edward Wiler, assistance 

Fred King, assistance 

William Coyle, assistance 

E. A. Burbank, supplies 

Manuel Cummings, assistance 

A. A. Fancy, repairs 

Albert Bolduc, assistance 

Robert Kirkpatrick, assistance 

Philip Lepage, assistance 

Carrie M. Hobart, meals for prisoners 

W. A. Boothby, assistance 

Pay-roll, policemen 

The Berlin Rei)orter, publishing dog notice 

Alfred Bolduc, team 

Manuel Cummings, hauling beer 

Napoleon Aubin, hauling beer 

Sam Mercier, assistance 

M. J. Millette, assistance 

Fred Bell, assistance 

Philip Lepage, assistance 

The Independent Press, printing notices 

Sandy Youngcliss, labor on city buildiug 

Thomas Thibaut, witness fee 

George-F. Rich, police justice, 1 mo 



$ 1 


93 


33 


33 


4 60 


1 


50 


128 49 


33 83 


1 


00 


1 


00 


1 


00 


1 


00 


1 


00 


1 


GO 


1 


00 


136 


00 


9 96 


7 


00 


1 


00 


2 50 




15 


1 


00 


1 


00 


] 


00 


1 


00 




80 


1 


00 


1 


75 


1 


00 


1 


00 


7 


50 


11 


50 


1 


00 


427 


63 


4 50 




60 


9 


00 


1 


00 


1 


00 


1 


00 


1 


00 


17 


50 


13 


00 


12 


95 




77 


33 


33 



POLICE DEPARTMENT, 159 



Alex. Leclerc, assistance 

Lumina Demelle, cleaning city building 

William Cojie, witness fee 

Gilbert & Parent, supplies 

Fred Bell, burj-ing dog 

Carrie M. Hobart, meals for prisoners 

John T. Youugcliss, killing dog 

Joseph King, assistance 

John T. Youngcliss, expenses to Groveton 

Mrs. Felix Valliere, meals for prisoners 

Frank Bernier, assistance 

Philip Lepage, assistance 

Archie Gregoire, assistance 

Pay-roll, policemen 

City Supply Co., hack hire 

George F. Rich, salary police justice.. 

Berlin E. L. Co., lighting city building 

VV. H. Winchester, cleaning 

J. W. Green, witness fees 

George S. Wilson, salary prosecuting agent 

Independent Press, police court blanks 

Philip Lepage, assistance 

Gilbert & Parent, revolvers, etc., 

Rob. Kirkpatrick, killing dog 

Fred R. Oleson, witness and expenses to Lancaster. 

E. A.- Burbank, repairs to boiler 

Pay-roll, policemen 

Berlin E. L. Co., lighting city building 



.? 4 00 


4 00 




77 


13 


75 


1 


00 


7 


75 


1 


00 


1 


00 


7 


50 


1 


25 


2 


00 


7 


00 


1 


00 


425 


51 


3 


00 


66 


70 


25 


00 


5 00 


1 


77 


77 


50 


14 


00 


4 


00 


23 


23 


1 


00 


10 00 


12 


02 


200 


£0 


6 


25 



$ 7,672 96 



SCHOOL DEPARTMENT. 



Appropriation ^4,000 00 

Savings Bank tax 939 64 

Ijiterary fund 475 32 

Dog licenses 307 00 

Billiard hall licenses 50 00 

Overdrawn 3.000 00 

$18,771 96 

Pay-roll, teachers S'o28 05 

G. O. Cordwell 41 00 

Northern Telephone & Telegraph Co. , school telephones 6 00 

C. N. Hodgdon, coal 228 80 

C. N. Hodgdon, coal 14 03 

J. L. Hammett & Co., supplies 12 50 

C. N.Hodgdon, coal 22 23 

E. E. Babb & Co., supplies 63 96 

Isaac Aubin, salary as janitor, J month 29 18 

Silver, Burdett & Co., music 42 10 

C.N. Hodgdon, coal 15 84 

C. S. Green, conveying scholars 48 00 

G. P. Putmau & Sous, books 28 00 

Silver, Burdett & Co., supplies 12 96 

H. W. Johnson, express, etc 7 27 

E. E. Babb & Co., supplies 24 28 

Berlin Mills Co., supplies 16 25 

Harvey E. Smith, wood 4 00 

Northern Tel. & Tel. Co., telephone rentals 6 00 

D. C. Heath & Co., supplies 1 14 

J. L. Hammett & Co., supplies 33 76 

Houghton, Mifflin & Co., paper, etc 8 84 

Ginn & Co., books 3 75 

Pay-roll, teachers 1,056 08 

Pay-roll, teachers, 1,056 08 

Independent Press, enumeration cards 3 50 

John C. West, wood 10 00 

Houghton, Mifflin & Co., books, 3 13 

C. N.Hodgdon, coal 10 37 



SCHOOL DEPARTMENT. 



161 



C N. Hodgdon, coal $ 7 ol 

C. N. Hodgdon, coal 8 48 

Independent Press, printing and binding school report. 17 50 

C. N. Hodgdon, coal 13 60 

E. E. Babb & Co., supplies 21 20 

J. L. Hammett & Co., books 8 23 

Ginn & C'o., books 7 50 

Isaac Aubin, janitor, two months 116 66 

Eddie Davis, janitor 8 25 

J. J. Cobb, express 2 80 

jSVjrtbfini Tel. & Tel. Co , telephone rental 8 15 

Silver, Burdett & Co., books 10 80 

Silver, Burdett & Co., books 13 60 

H. W. Johnson, express 4 51 

Anton Nelson, services as janitor 54 00 

C. S. Thompson, taking census of scholars 69 90 

Howard & Brown, diplomas 2 25 

Silver, Burdett & Co., books 10 50 

Isaac Aubin, janitor one month 58 33 

Berlin Mills Co., supplies (5 86 

Ginn & Co., books 29 22 

E. D. Cole, clocks 9 00 

Eddie Davis, janitor, Wheeler school, 5 00 

Gilbert & Parent, supplies 16 74 

Northern Tel. & Tel. Co., telephone rentals 7 50 

C.N. Hodgdon, coal 9 20 

C. N. Hodgdon, coal 10 37 

J. L. Hammett & Co., books 36 75 

D. C. Heath & Co., books 3 35 

Edward E. Babb & Co., ink 6 00 

Pay-roll, teachers 1,031 22 

L. Desilets, labor, etc 20 75 

J. J. Cobb, express, etc 1 28 

Northern Tel. «feTel. Co., telephone rentals 7 85 

John Stewart, labor on Marston school 150 00 

Mrs. Ina C. Holt, express, 70 

J. J. Cobb, balance Miss Whittum's salary 9 70 

]Miss Marietta Stanley, balance of salary 20 50 

E. J. Barney, programs and blanks, 15 45 

Berlin Mills Co., supplies 15 00 

C. P. Kimball, balance Miss Wilson's salary 19 50 

H. W. Johnson, express, etc 13 80 

Isaac Aubin, janitor, one month 58 33 

Robert Snodgrass, on account INIarston school addition 300 00 



162 



CITY OF BERLIN, 



H. W. Johuson, six mos. salary Board of Education.... $ 25 00 

R. Snodgrass, on account contract Marstou school 800 00 

C. P. Kimball, freight 17 38 

Berlin Water Co., water for schools 16 91 

Berlin Water-Co., water for schools 20 75 

Berlin Water Co. , water for schools 56 83 

H. W. Johnson, freight 21 25 

Berlin Water Co., water for schools 14 81 

Berlin Water Co., water for schools.. 18 8G 

M. Lamoureux, oil 1 80 

Northern Tel. & Tel. Co., telephone rentals 7 50 

Isaac Aubin, janitor, one month ,58 33 

S. Stahl, coal 928 65 

Isaac Aubin, janitor, one month 58 37 

H. C. Rowell, labor and material 20 18 

Robert Snodgrass, account Marston school 700 00 

J. J. Cobb, express and postage 4 75 

J. J. Cobb, six months salary Board of Education 50 00 

E. A, Burbank, materials 22 11 

Felix Guilmette, labor on grounds 61 75 

Geo. W. Gordon, naaterials 6 25 

Northern Tel. & Tel. Co., telephone rentals 7 50 

Hollis Davis, labor on Wheeler school 5 00 

Robert Snodgrass, balance contract on Marston school, 292 11 

C. P. Kimball, six mos. salary Board of Education 25 00 

Robert Curry, services as janitor 27 00 

Robert Snodgrass, materials 13 02 

Isaac Aubin, janitor one month, 50 00 

Rand, McNally & Co., maps 13 00 

Stahl Brothers, supplies 48 

J, L. Hammett & Co., supplies 26 00 

Edward E. Babb & Co., books, etc 69 36 

Edwajd E. Babb & Co., books, etc 37 06 

Edward E. Babb & Cd., books, etc 135 33 

J. J. Cobb, express 7 20 

Loring, Short & Harmon, books 56 50 

Berlin Mills Co., supplies 302 60 

George W, Gordon, window shades 22 00 

Duncan Haggart, labor on Marston school 7 25 

Northern Tel. & Tel. Co.. telephone rentals 7 50 

John Stewart, material for foundation Marston school 62 50 

Pay-roll, teachers 866 04 

Northern Tel. & Tel. Co., telephone rentals 7 50 

IJtCo., supplies 55 24 



School department, 1G3 

J. J. Cobb, freight, etc I 15 60 

Edward E. Babb & Co., books 34 21 

Edward E. Babb & Co., books 75 90 

Pay-roll, teachers 1,432 40 

Illinois Refrigerator Co. . desks and freight 291 98 

Isaac Aubin, janitor one month 58 33 

Silver, Burdett & Co., supplies 10 50 

Robert Curry, janitor one month, 45 00 

J. L. Hamraett & Co., supplies 8 46 

Silver, Burdett & Co., books 12 10 

C. P. Kunball, freight 99 

D. C. Heath & Co., books 16 88 

E. F. Osgood, pictures 4 00 

Glnu «fe Company, books 14 77 

Felix Guilmette, labor on grounds 15 00 

Peter Levasseur, labor 7 75 

J. J. Cobb, express 1 75 

Peter Levasseur, labor 2 00 

Gerrish Comjoany, supplies 87 29 

Berlin Mills Co., repairs 26 16 

J. L. Hammett & Co., supplies 28 94 

J. J. Cobb, freight 4 38 

Pay-roll, teachers 1,159 12 

E. J. Barney, printing cards 4 95 

Northern Tel. & Tel. Co., telephone rental 7 50 

Isaac Aubin, janitor, one month, 58 33 

Robert Curry, janitor, one month 36 00 

Pay-roll, teachers 866 04 

Berlin Mills Co., wood and supplies 17 38 

Edward E. Babb & Co., supplies 28 48 

Houghton, Mifflin & Co. supplies 3 06 

E. M. Cross, supplies 1 22 

Robert Curry, janitor, one mouth 45 00 

Isaac Aubin, janitor, one month 58 33 

Ginn & Company, books 10 49 

Hollis Davis, labor, Wheeler school 8 35 

The Gerrish Company, office chairs 2 00 

Thomjison, Brown & Co , books 5 96 

Northern Tel. & Tel. Co., telephone rental 7 50 

Berlin Mills Co., supplies 10 58 

C. N.Hodgdon, coal 8 50 

Berhn Electric Light Co., lights 6 16 

E. J. Barney, printing 7 00 

White River Paper Co., toilet paper 4 50 



]G4 CITY OF BERLIN. 

Berlin Electric Light Co., labor and materials I 60 00 

H. C Rowell, cement and bricks 3 00 

Pay-roll, teachers 1,160 00 

Robert Curry, janitor 38 00 

Isaac Aubin, janitor 58 33 

E. J. Barney, printing 6 25 

Albert Tondreau, hauling wood 3 00 

D. C. Heath & Co., books 1 12 

Edward E. Babb & Co., supplies 34 38 

Pierre Gagnon, hauling wood 4 00 

J. J. Cobb, salary, board of education 50 00 

H. W. Johnson, balance of salary 25 00 

C. P. Kimball, balance of salary 25 00 

J. J. Cobb, freight, telephone, etc 5 23 

Northern Tel. & Tel. Co., telephone rentals 7 50 

Gilbert & Parent, supplies 11 38 

Ziegler Electric Co., electrical apparatus 107 21 

Whitcomb Brotheis, two clocks 7 00 

Pay-roll, teachers 580 00 

Isaac Aubin, janitor, one-half month 29 17 

J. L. Hammett Co., supplies 58 73 

Berlin Water Co., water in schools 32 16 

Berlin Water Co., water in schools 12 45 

Berlin Water Co., water in schools 15 75 

Berlin Water Co., water in schools 2 91 

Berlin Water Co., water in schools 21 27 

Robert Curry, janitor one-half month 18 00 

Transferred from sewer department 300 00 

Transferred to interest department 702 02 

Transferred to City poor 26 40 

Transferred to miscellaneous 275 85 

^18,771 96 



SMALL POX ACCOUNT. 



Charles Labreeque, watchiug houses $14 75 

James Bergeron, watchhig houses 9 63 

Robert Suodgrass, labor on pest house 38 16 

E. Goulette, watching houses 14 88 

Leon Barbin, watching houses 21 00 

Harry W. Walsh, labor 1 75 

James Moffett, spraying outfit 8 00 

Willie Moffett, labor 1 75 

Walter Dyer, watchiug houses 12 25 

William Gherou, watchiug houses 7 00 

Thomas Lydon, supplies for pest house 3 20 

E. Hiuchey, teams 31 75 

Nick Decilla, watching houses 3 50 

C. N. Hodgdou, wood 6 75 

Henry J. Smith, watching houses 6 13 

W. A. Lemire, watching houses 2 63 

Mrs. Carrie M. Hobart, meals for people in Green bl'k 25 00 

Joseph King, watching houses 1 75 

Fred Spencer watching houses 21 88 

Joseph Gendron, labor 2 25 

M. H. Chamberliu, supplies for pest house 99 20 

C, Mullins, watching houses 9 63 

George A. Morrison, watchhig houses 10 50 

Auguste Rputhier, watching houses 10 50 

W. A. Lemire, watching houses 9 63 

C. H. Bowker, labor 12 00 

Charles Lebrecque, watching houses 5 25 

Wilfred Duquette, watching houses 1 75 

J. A. Wagner, supplies for pest house 7 40 

Pat Bagley, watching houses 3 50 

John D. Moffett, supplies for pest house 53 50 

Fred Picard, watching houses 26 25 

Henry Smith, watching houses 7 00 

Fred Spencer, watchiug houses 1 75 

C. J. O'Brion, supplies for pest house 6 50 

Jay Alexander, watchiug houses 15 75 

Mrs. Joseph Nolin care Mrs. Jos. Barbin..., 15 75 



166 



CITY OF BERLIN. 



Moses Stapleton, watching houses $ 21 00 

Nadeau & Leclerc, conveying patients to and from pest 

house 32 50 

Edward J. Smith, watchmg liouses 15 75 

M. H. Cliamberlin, sui^plies for the pest house 37 50 

M. H. Chamberliu, supplies for pest house 31 60 

Berlin Dry Goods Co., supplies for pest house 24 71 

Philip Lepage, teams 8 00 

Mary Lemire, board 2 50 

Hodgdon Hardware Co., supplies for pest house 40 19 

E. A. Burbauk, supplies for pest house 65 96 

D. J. McCabe, M. D., professional services 315 00 

Gilbert & Parent, supplies for pest house 5 45 

A.N.Gilbert, constructing pest house 108 67 

Jesse Cummings, watching houses 2 63 

Evelin Fournier, care Mrs. J. Therier 12 00 

Alfred Catellier, M. D., care Thibeault 25 00 

C. N. Hodgdon, wood 2 25 

Alfred Catellier, M. D., vaccinating, 33 20 

Alex Leclerc, conveying patients to pest house 41 50 

Felix Blais, fumigating 15 00 

R. W. McGowu, labor 3 00 

Mrs. William Lemrise. labor as nurse, S. Thibeault 19 00 

Frank Shortney, watching houses 2 62 

Nelson Collette, watching houses 3 50 

Charles Lee, watching houses 37 62 

James Pickford, watching houses 8 75 

M. Lamoureux, supplies for pest house 37 92 

R. C. Denison, M. D., vaccinations 105 20 

Fred Spencer, watching houses 5 25 

Pay-roll, men on pest house, etc 170 60 

C. H. Bowker, M. D., vaccinations 128 00 

James Moffett, fumigating 48 50 

C. Brooks, chemicals, etc 15 75 

C. Brooks, cliemicals, etc 96 15 

C. N. Hodgdon, wood 6 75 

C. N. Hodgdon, wood 1 25 

L. B. Marcou, M. D. vaccinations 66 00 

J. J. Cobb, M. D., vaccinations 21 20 

H. C. Wayland, M. I)., vaccinations 37 60 

T. Mullin, watching houses 49 00 

T. Mullin, watching houses 12 25 

Rob. Kilpatrick, watching houses 8 75 

D. J. McCabe, M. D., professional services 300 00 



SMALL POX ACCOtfNT. 167 

L. B. Maroou, M. D. vaccinations 1139 60 

Alfred Catellier, M. D., vaccinations 83 20 

Philip Lepage, teams 7 00 

H. S. Shorey, tinielieeper, etc 72 50 

Parent & Gilbert, supplies for pest house 2 44 

Parent & Gilbert, supplies for pest house 3 26 

Leon Barbiu, watching houses 3 50 

The Gerrish Co., supplies for pest house 9 79 

Parent & Gilbert, supplies for pest house 2 61 

Mrs. Cora Marey, nurse at pest house 205 00 

Frank Lizotte, watching houses 1 75 

Thomas Mullins, watching houses 12 00 

Felix Shorey, watching houses 5 69 

Mrs. David Walsh, one table 5 50 

C. J. O'Brion, distributing notices 10 00 

Edward Frenette, watching houses 29 75 

J. A. MofTett, supplies for pest house 117 56 

Rob. Kilpatrick, watching houses 1 75 

P. F. Chandler, watching houses 117 15 

Mrs. Wm. Lemrise, nurse 18 00 

D. C. Moouey, supplies for pest house 9 25 

S. H. Shorey, labor 7 50 

A. ('aouette, nurse 51 00 

E. Morin, watching houses 7 00 

Mrs. Z. Kiely, supplies for pest house 11 39 

Gilbert & Parent, supplies for pest house 38 40 

H. L. Steinfeld, supplies for pest house 6 86 

Berlin Mills Co., lumber for pest house 301 31 

James Bockman , watching houses 4 37 

Albert Crotteau, teams 6 12 

J. D. MofTett, supplies for pest house 11 18 

The Berlin Reporter, publishing notices 1 50 

J. F. Bell, teams 12 00 

M. J. Millette, teams 9 00 

John Nadeau, watching houses 28 75 

Northern Tel. & Tel. Co., telephone to Manchester 1 30 

Stahl Brothers, supplies for pest house 4 79 

P. Govhi, labor 7 50 

Benjamin Jolicoeur, labor 26 25 

John Goebel & Co., hay and grain 4 60 

Louis Wood, trucking 25 

Horace Maye, watching at pest house 81 00 

C, N, Hodgdon, wood •. 6 72 

P. W. McHugh, chemicals 52 10 



168 CITY OP BERLIN. 

E. A. Burbank, supplies for pest house 

Berlin Dry Goods Co., supplies for pest house 

J. E. Gouya, supplies for pest house 

Louis Roderick, trucking 

Peter Brideau, labor at pest house 

H. Wertheim, supplies for pest house 

Edwin Bryant, plans for pest house 

Berlin Dry Goods Co., supplies for pest house 

H. C. Wayland, M. D., vaccinations 

Thomas Mullins, watching at pest house 

A. Crotteau, watching houses 

L. B. Marcou, professional services 

J. F. Bell, teams, ice, etc 

B. E. Mason, watching at pest house 

D. J. McCabe, professional services 

Benjamin Jolicoeur, labor at pest house 

James Mofl'ett, labor at pest house 

Brinton & Buber, labor at pest house 

J. F. Bell, teams 

E. A. Burbank, supplies for pest house 

A. Lemire, labor on pest house 

Mrs. Peter Larochelle, board of Mrs. Dion 

H. Li. Steinfeld, supplies for pest house 

C. R. Denning, supplies for pest house 

Wm. DeWolfe, supplies for pest house 

Nadeau & Leclerc, teams 

Alex King, labor 

L. S. Green, labor, 

Benjamin Jolicoeur, labor at pest house 

H. L. Steinfeld, supplies for pest house 

James Moffett, fumigating 

Brinton & Buber, labor on pest house 

T. J. Pickford, supplies for pest house 

A. Lemire, laboron pest house 

Brinton & Buber, balance labor on pest house 

L. W. Evans, painting pest house 

The Hodgdon Hardware Co., supplies for pest house. 
The Hodgdon Hardware Co., supplies for pest house. 

E. A. Burbank, supplies for pest house 

A. Lavallee, vaccinations 

R, W. McGown, labor as watcliman 

Ovid Rouleau, stone work on pest house 



$ -40 


13 83 


5 66 


7 00 


4 00 


24 99 


16 50 


50 00 


4 40 


5 25 


15 75 


35 00 


16 50 


44 58 


310 00 


15 32 


40 50 


300 00 


8 00 


8 35 


17 19 


7 00 


15 39 


79 48 


79 96 


20 00 


8 00 


16 60 


3 75 


8 09 


23 00 


300 00 


6 31 


7 82 


245 00 


15 50 


6 19 


13 06 


1 03 


89 40 


122 25 


110 00 



5,364 78 



STREET DEPARTMENT. 



Appropriation ?!8,000 00 

Error iu bills 25 41 

Ashes sold 18 30 

Dirt sold 23 00 

Ashes sold 5 00 

Crushed rock sold 21 00 

Transferred from new streets 2,000 00 

Transferred from Police Court 1,619 48 

5^11,712 19 

A. B. Black, snow plow and runners |115 00 

Pay-roll, men 74 00 

Jeremiah Coffey, express and freight 75 

Berlin Mills Co., supplies 2 49 

Pay-roll, teams 46 75 

Gilbert & Parent, supplies 20 79 

A. A. Fancy, sui3plies 10 10 

Pay-roll, men 328 78 

S. E. Paine, storing sprinkler 5 00 

E. E. Fletcher, labor 3 50 

John Goebel & Co., salt 1 00 

Robert Graves, labor 80 

Frank Bisson, labor 3 00 

Gilbert & Parent, supplies 1 70 

Frank Whitham, labor 9 00 

William Hickey, labor 1 35 

A. A. Fancy, repairing tools 13 20 

Joseph Hickey, labor 3 95 

Pay-roll, teams 152 85 

John C. West, horses on streets 1 58 

Pay-roll, men 447 75 

Pay-roll, teams 152 10 

R. Walker, repairs to tools 4 46 

E. Hamel, labor 35 56 

John H. Johnson, supplies 2 00 

Frank Bisson, labor 8 00 

Adelard Bouchard, labor 10 50 



170 



CITY OF BERLIN, 



Ij. Bisson, land damage Cates' bill road 

Berlin Mills Co., materials 

Frank Whitham, labor 

A. A. Fancy, repairs to tools 

N. Fournier, labor 

C. Brooks, coal for crusber 

Fi. A. Burbank, supplies 

Cbarles Lacasse, labor 

('. Hamel, labor 

Alpbonse Lecteau, damage to land 

H. C. Johnson, salary, Commissioner, one month.. 

Hodgdon Hardware Co., supplies 

Charles S. Clarke, supplies 

Pay-roll , teams 

Pay-roll, men 

C. N. Hodgdon, coal for crusher 

Wm. Courrier, labor 

A. A. Fancy, supplies 

John H. Johnson, supplies 

H. C. Johnson, salary. Commissioner, one month.. 

Philip Lepage, labor with team 

Arthur Haley, labor 

H. C. Johnson, salary. Commissioner, one month. 

John King labor 

Pitre Brideau, labor 

Pay-roll, teams 

Berlin Mills Co. supplies 

J. Fred Bell, labor with team 

Berlin Water Sujiply Co., water lor crusher 

Berlin Water Co., repairs 

E. A. Burbank, suj^plies 

E. A. Burbank, supplies 

Joe. Eabishaw, labor 

Daniel Campbell, labor 

Pat Hickey, labor 

Burgess Sulphite Fibre Co., cinders 

Frank Whitham, labor 

Frank Whitham. labor 

Thomas Rouleau, labor 

A. A. Fancy, repairs to tools 

Berlin Mills Co., supplies 

Pay-roll teams 

John Stewart, curbing ■. 

Berlin Mills Co., lumber 



9* 6 


00 


49 46 


4 


95 


a 95 


8 38 


47 


29 


47 


99 


1 


87 


55 


49 


4 00 


50 00 


4 


64 


1 


65 


641 


05 


.103 


39 


7 


65 


30 


00 


31 


91 


1 


68 


50 00 


3 00 


2 


03 


50 00 


13 


80 


13 


50 


615 


69 


in 


08 


25 


00 


10 oa 


1 


61 


284 


23 




40 


15 


00 


5 


25 


12 


00 


20 


00 


■5 


10 


r/i> 


50 


10 


81 


13 


76 


o7 


41 


295 


30 


16 


50 


110 


79 



STREET DBPART3IENT. 



171 



Biir;?ess Suli)hite Fibre Co. cinders $ 40 00 

8. Deeoteau, labor 10 00 

A. King, labor IS 80 

E. M. Cross, repairs 97 88 

H. C. Johnson, salary. Commissioner, one month 50 00 

A. A. Fancy, repairs to tools (> 45 

A, A. Fancy, repairs to tools 7 50 

E. A. Burbank, supplies, 192 52 

Pay-roll, men 350 31 

Bt. Kierans' Church, concreting 16 00 

A. Billensby, labor 11 85 

John Carson, labor 14 25 

Pay-roll, teams 188 15 

Fr^d Lavoie, labor ]1 25 

Pay-roll, men 491 95 

Pay-roll, teams' 330 25 

Burgess Sulphite Fibre Co., cinders (i5 00 

P'rank Whitham, labor with teams 44 50 

J. F. Bell, labor with teams 14 00 

Berlin Mills Co., supplies 15 22 

Berlin Mills Co., supplies 7 85 

August Johnson, labor 7 50 

Karl Steinberg, labor 7 50 

Grand Trunk Railroad, cinders 30 00 

H. C. Bowell, cement 3 00 

Bret JNIason , gravel 3 68 

H. C. Johnson, salary, Commissioner, one month 50 00 

Berlin Mills Co., supplies 25 76 

Giles Holt, gravel 15 00 

Hecla powder Co., dynamite 13 50 

Herman Anderson, labor 13 50 

John H. .Johnson, labor 11 40 

Ed. Hamell, labor 44 75 

Hecla Powder Co., dynamite 13 50 

E. A. Burbank, suppliea 15 96 

E. A. Burbank, repairs to sprinkler 40 

Burgess Sulphite Fibre Co., cinders 15 00 

Mrs. CotTin, gravel 4 80 

G. O. Holt, gravel 13 70 

John Stewart, labor on crossing 23 00 

E. A. Burbank, supplies 1 60 

A. A. Fancy, supplies 14 98 

G. A. Blanchard, labor with team „ 24 00 

Pay-roll, men 568 21 



172 



CITY OF BERLIN. 



Tom Rancour, labor $ 2 00 

Berlin Mills ('o., supplies 43 11 

H. C Johnson, salary, Commissioner, onemonth 50 00 

Pay— roll, teams 411 35 

Berlin Mills Co., supplies 30 11 

Pay-roll, teams 315 30 

Pay-roll, men 299 97 

A. A. Fancy, repairs to tools 5 85 

E.M.Cross, supplies 8 43 

G. O. Holt, to correct error in September bills 21 50 

H. C. Johnson, salary. Commissioner, onemonth 50 00 

H. C. Jolmson, salary, Commissioner, one month 50 00 

Pay-roll, teams 199 15 

Berlin Mills Co., supplies 53 42 

F. Whitham, gravel 5 40 

J. C. West lantern broken 1 00 

E. Hamel, labor 28 50 

George Halverson, sign boards 5 25 

Mrs. Frank Lord, gravel 3 20 

Pay-roll, men 354 17 

Berlin Mills Co., supplies 19 56 

A. A. Fancy, repairs to tools 5 25 

Charles Jolbert, cement 3 25 

H. C. Johnson, sand 12 00 

E. A. Burbank, tools 6 8B 

James Sheridan, building drahi 7 00 

Berlin Water Co., labor and material 25 75 

P'rancis Bisson, labor with team 10 10 

Karl Steinberg, labor 15 75 

Pay-roll, men. 272 12 

H. C. Johnson, seat on snow plow 2 50 

Pay-roll teams 168 65 

H. C. Johnson, supplies 1 62 

H. C. Johnson, salary. Commissioner, onemonth 50 00 

Gilbert & Parent, supplies 28 39 

E. S. Bryant, street work 20 25 

E. S. Bryant, records and reports 32 50 

H. C. Johnson, labor 25 

Carl Steinberg, labor 28 50 

Pay-roll, teams 101 75 

Pay-roll, men 206 28 

A. A. P^'ancy, repairs to tools.. 8 60 

Berlin Mills Co., lumber for bridges 30 05 

H. C. Johnson, one month's salary commissioner 50 00 



STREET DEPARTMENT. 173 



Edwin S. Bryant, surveyiug 

Pay-roll, men 

Carl Steinberg, labor on street 

E. A. Burbank, materials 

E. M. Cross, materials 

George Halvorson, labor 

John H. Oswell, filing sewer 

Pay-roll, teams 

Berlin Mills Co.. snow shovels, etc 

A. A. Fancy, repairs 

Transferred from city engineering department. 



1 11 00 


134 89 


18 00 


40 


4 80 


2 75 


1 50 


70 50 


8 20 


5 42 


202 50 



$11,712 19 



FIRE DEPARTHENT. 



A PI >i() pria tioii 

Transferred from hydrants account 

Transferred from sanitary department. 

Transferred from Police Court 

Transferred from hydrants 

Transferred from pubUc reading itsoiu. 



E. E. Fletcher, care of hydrants 

P. E. St. Laurent, useof horses > ..>; 

BerUn Mills Co., lights in hose house v .» ii)i-.-.-.-.:n 

E. E. Fletcher, care of hydrants. .>.>.... i. .....;.;... 

J. H. Coyle, leathering nozzle>...v...... 

Tte Independent Pres.«, tnstiUetion cards 

W. L. Evans, salary as chief engineer 

W. L. Evans, salary as chief engineer 

E. A. Burbank, supplies 

Berlin Mills Co., supplies 

A. A. Fancy, repairs to hooks and ladders 

M. J. Millette, use of horses 

E. A. Hinchey, useof horses 

E. A. Hinchey, useof horses 

Pay-roll, Hose Co. No. 3 

Pay-roll, Hose Co. No. 2 

Pay-roll, Hose Co. No. 1 

Eureka Fibre Hose Co., 600 feet hose 

Berlin Electric Light Co., lights in hose house 

Berlin Mills Co., supplies 

M. C. Frost, trucking 

W. L. Evans, on account salary chief engineer 

John Q. Farringion, on account salary 2d assistant 

Union Electric Mfg. Co., supplies 

Pay-roll, Hook and Ladder Co 

W. L. Evans, on account salary chief of department... 

A. R. Leighton, repairs 

Berlin Water Supply Co., liydrant rental six months)... 
Berlin Watei Supply Co., water for hos3 house 



$3,500 00 


2,250 00 


22 00 


51 m 


250 00 


22 52 


16,096 08 


35 00 


811 50 


i 50 


38 75 


2 15 


7 50 


2'> 00 


25 00 


6 05 


2 62 


4 50 


22 50 


22 00 


7 00 


174 00 


160 50 


181 50 


345 00 


21 33 


4 35 


50 


13 80 


25 00 


56 00 


114 00 


25 00 


6 00 


1,100 00 


50 



I'IKE DEPARTMENT. 175 

Berliu Water Supply Co., water for hose house ^ 9 .50 

^I. J. ]V[illette, use of horses 16 00 

K. A. Hiuchey, use of horses 22 00 

Henry A. St.Laurent, use of horses 10 50 

A. R. Leighton, repairs 2 75 

^i^. ^\\^&ii^', Jabtor 2 50 

W. L. Evailis, OiJ ttdCi;*Uiiit sagJary I'i 50 

Frank Magee, labor 2 50 

George E. Kent, salary, 1st assistant engineer 50 00 

W. L. Ev'ans, on account salary chief of department... 12 50 

J. F. Rell, teams (5 00 

Joiiii (I. F>»r»M>8;ton, on account salary 2d assistant 25 00 

Pay-roll, Hose Co. 1^'^. 2 151 00 

Pay-roll, Hose Co. No. .^ 114 00 

Pay-roll, Hook and Ladder Co. No. 1 100 00 

Pay-roll, Hose Co. No. 1 18(3 75 

Alfred Campagna, damage to garden, Demers fire 7 00 

tJprliu Electric Light Co., lights in hose houses 4 HO 

J. P. Dubey, care or fire alarm system 50 00 

Berlin Mills Co\, alarm boxes 14 00 

W. E. Decrow, supplies' 1 20 

H. A. St.Lanrent, use of hors'es 6 50 

E. A. Hinehey, use of horses 29 50 

Berlin Mills Co., Lights in hose house 1 50 

Eureka Fire Hose Co., rubber coats 70 80 

Berlin Mills Co., supplies 1 50 

W. L. Evans, salary, freight, etc 45 85 

James Moflett, fumigating 23 00 

A. A. Fancy, repairing 11 50 

C. Brooks, damage to window by hose trials 14 90 

Pay-roll, Hose Co. No. 1 162 00 

Pay-roll, Hose Co. No. 2 148 00 

Pay-roll, Hose Co. No. 8 223 00 

Pay-roll, Hook and Ladder Co. No. 1 186 00 

Independent Press, instruction cards 12 50 

AVm. Rix, labor 2 00 

Simon Stahl, wood for hose houses 9 00 

J. Q. Farrington, account of salary 2d assistant 25 00 

G. E. Kent, account salary, 1st assistant 25 00 

Thomas Lj'don, supplies 61 01 

Berlin Mills Co., use of horses. 16 00 

Berlin Mills Co., lights in hose house 1 50 

J. H. Coyle, collar for horse 50 

P. W. McHugh, revolver cartridges 5 60 



•176 CITY OF BERLIN. 

J. H. Coyle, straps f 3 60 

Heury K. Barnes, ladders 84 00 

E. A. Hiuchey, use of horses 4 00 

W. L. Evans, !ou account of salary 25 00 

Berlin Mills Co., supplies 7 61 

A. R. Leightou, repairs 1 25 

Berlin Water Co., Hydrant rental 1,140 00 

Berlin Water Co., water in hose houses 7 00 

Thomas Sweeney, care of hydrants 14 37 

Berlin Water Co., repairs to hydrants 2 25 

Berlin Water Co., repairs to hydrants 2 50 

Berlin Water Co., repairs to hydrants 6 65 

Eureka Fire Hose Co., supplies 14 40 

A. H. Finley, rubber coat 4 00 

Berlin Electric Light Co., lights in hose houses 5 00 

Berlin Electric Light Co., lights in hose houses 34 60 

Pay-roll, Hose Co. No. 2 72 00 

Geo. E. Kent, salary 3 months 25 00 

Pay-roll, Hose Co. No. 3 48 00 

Pay-roll, Hose Co. No. 1 95 00 

Berlin Electric Light Co., light in hose house 50 

John Q. Farrington, salary 3 months 25 00 

H. C.Johnson, labor with team 2 00 

Pay-roll, Hook and Ladder Co. No. 1 40 00 

Berlin Mills Co., use of horses 4 00 

Thomas Lydon, repairs • 6 47 

Augustus Evans, care of hydrants 26 25 

Thomas Sweeney, labor on hydrants 3 75 

W. E. Decrow, Mageuts for fire alarm system 13 00 

E. M, Cross, repairs to fire ala.iin 32 69 

Gilbert & Parent, repairs to hose house 16 30 

W. E. Decrow, repairs to fire alarm system 57 38 

J. P. Dubey, care of fire alarm system 50 00 

$6,096 08 



CitY POOR. 



Appropriation !!;i,600 00 

Transferred to Salary account 150 00 

Money returned by Overseer of Poor 73 50 

Transferred from tSchools '. 26 40 

|;i,849 90 

Ragna Olesou, labor, Mrs. Nelson S 7 14 

C. N. Hodgdon, wood, Mrs. Chamberlin 3 15 

C. ]Sr. Hodgdon, wood, H. Woodly 3 15 

C. N. Hodgdon, wood, N. Woodly 3 15 

Dorah Rasniussen, labor, Mrs. Oleson 8 00 

Agnette Anderson, labor, Mrs. Nelson 6 67 

PI. Christian Johnson, goods, Mrs. Oleson 16 00 

Oliver Lambert, board, (". Jjambert children 12 00 

Dorah Rasmussen, labor, Mrs. Oleson 8 00 

H. Christian Johnson, goods, Mrs. Oleson 17 71 

Frank H. Cross, goods, Mrs. Chamberlin 19 50 

O. Lambert, board, C. Lambert children 12 00 

Berlin Mills Co., goods, J. Rouleau 10 04 

C. N. Hodgdon, wood, Mrs. Chamberlin 3 15 

C. N. Hodgdon, wood, Mrs. Chamberlin 3 15 

Mrs. Agnette Anderson, rent and m.ilk, Mrs. Nelson... 5 93 

Berlin Mills Co., goods, Mrs. Nelson 12 28 

A. B. Forbush, taking children to Orphans' Home 42 08 

A. Parent, rent, J. Rouleau 20 00 

A. S. Twitchell, rent, Mrs. Oleson 18 00 

Ragna Oleson, labor, Mrs. Nelson 8 85 

Parent & Lambert, goods, B. Royer 3 00 

Uorah Rasmussen, labor, Mrs. Oleson 10 00 

Ragna Oleson, labor, Mrs. Nelson 10 00 

H. Christian Johnson, goods, Mrs. Oleson 17 14 

Berlin Mills Co., merchandise 8 83 

Mrs. Agnette Anderson, labor, Mrs. Nelson 5 90 

Joseph Chatiguy, rent, Mrs. Chamberlin 7 50 

M. Lamoureux, goods, Mrs. Morin 20 00 

Oliver Lambert, care C. Lambert children 12 00 

Ragna Oleson, labor, Mrs. Oleson 8 00 



178 CITY OF BERLIN. 

H. Chiistiau Johnson, goods, Mrs. (Jleson $ 17 71 

A. B. Foibiish, salary as Overseer of the Poor, three 

months 

The Gerrish Co., goods, H. Woodly 

Oliver Lambert, care C. Lambert children 

Berlin Mills Co., goods, J. Rouleau 

Aguette Anderson, rent, Mrs. Nelson 

Dorah Rasmussen, labor, Mrs. Oleson 

Berlin Mills Co., merchandise 

J. A. Vaillancourt, insurance on Couture house 

H. Christian Johnson, goods, Mrs. Oleson , 

Ragna Oleson, labor, Mrs. Nelson 

Berlin Building & Loan Association, R. Wheeler, rent 

Olivier Lambert, care C. Ijambert children 

C. N. Hodgdon, wood 

Mrs. Agnette Anderson, rent, Mrs. Nelson 

Dorah Rasmussen, labor, Mrs. Oleson 

A. B. Forbush, rent, etc 

A. B. Forbush, county farm bill 

A. B. Forbush, 6 months' salary, overseer of the poor.. 

J. E. Gonya, groceries, J. Gaynor 

Ragna Oleson, labor, Mrs. Nelson 

H. C. Johnson, goods, Mrs. Oleson 

M. Lamoureux, goods, Mrs. Cantin 

M. Lamoureux, goods, Mrs. ISIorin 

A. Anderson, rent, Mrs. Nelson 

A. Parent, rent, James Rouleau 

Berlin Mills Co., merchandise 

The Gerrish Co., merchandise 

Louis Couture, wood 

Olivier Lambert, hoard, C. Lambert children 

Olivier Lambert, board, C. Lambert children 

Rev. E. D. Mackey, board of orphan 

Mrs. James Pickford, board of P. Bagley 

A. H. Eley, rent, Mr. Whalen 

P. E. Beaudoin, shoes, P. Morin 

W. E. Corbin, rent, Mrs. Wheeler 

H. Christian Johnson, goods, Mrs. Oleson 

Roga Oleson, labor, Mrs. Nelson 

A. Parent, rent, J. Rouleau 

William DeWolfe, supplies 

Berlin Mills Co., merchandise 

Mrs. Aguette Anderson, rent, Mrs. Nelson 

Z. Kiely, merchandise 



50 00 


8 00 


12 00 


10 95 


5 98 


8 00 


7 72 


27 50 


17 14 


8 00 


24 00 


12 00 


3 15 


5 90 


2 28 


nc) 15 


39 00 


100 00 


12 00 


10 00 


17 71 


14 00 


18 00 


5 93 


20 00 


11 30 


3 00 


1 50 


12 00 


12 00 


30 00 


6 00 


24 00 


1 35 


5 69 


17 71 


8 00 


5 00 


19 11 


2 76 


5 93 


7 98 



CTTY POOR. l79 

Independent Press, printing notices I 3 50 

M. Ijumoureux, goods, L. Cantin 12 00 

M. Lamoureux, goods, Mr. Morin 18 00 

Zelia Kiely, goods, F. Cantin 10 42 

Ragna Oleson, labor, Mrs. Nelson 8 00 

H. Christian Johnson, goods, Mrs. Oleson 17 14 

Mrs. Agnette Anderson, rent, Mrs. Nelson 5 90 

Mrs. Anderson, labor, Mrs. Oleson 4 00 

Erick Eriekson, wood , Mrs. Nelson 2 00 

Olivier Lambert, board of C. Lambert children 12 00 

H. Christian Johnson, goods for Mrs. Oleson 17 71 

Z. Kiely, goods, F. Couture 10 12 

Olivier Lambert, board, C. Lambert children 12 00 

Z. Kiely, goods, F, Couture 10 21 

A. B. Forbush, board, Hayes children 25 00 

Charles Lessard, rent, P. Morin 3 42 

Dagua Oleson, labor, Mrs. Nelson 10 00 

Dorah Rasmussen, labor, Mrs. Oleson 4 GO 

Berlin Mills Co., goods, J. Rouleau 24 83 

Berlin Mills Co., supplies 9 05 

Berlin Mills Co., goods, J. Rouleau 7 75 

Berlin Mills Co., wood, Mrs. Nelson 4 50 

Z. Kiely, goods, Mrs. Guilmette 12 50 

Mrs. James Pickford, board of P. Bagley 14 00 

Mrs. Agnette Anderson, rent, Mrs. Nelson 5 93 

Mrs. C. Labrecque, washing, Mrs. Giasson 2 63 

A. B. Forbush, wood, Mrs. Giasson 9 00 

Olivier Lambert, board, C. Lambert children 12 00 

Dorah Rasmussen, labor, Mrs. Oleson 4 00 

H. C. Johnson, goods, Mrs. Oleson 17 14 

Dagna Oleson, labor, Mrs. Nelson 8 00 

Mrs. A.Anderson, rent, Mrs. Nelson 5 90 

Mrs. C. Nilson, washing, Mrs. Nilson 3 00 

Z. Kiely, goods, F. Couture 12 27 

F. H. Cross, goods, INIrs. Morin 21 00 

Coos County Farm, board of Michael Mclsaac 39 00 

Peter Rouleau, rent, J. Rouleau 00 

Simon Stahl, coal, Mrs. Nilson 11 25 

M. Lamoureux, goods, Mrs. INIoriu 21 00 

Dancoes & Bouchard, goods, Mrs. Giasson 30 00 

A. B. Forbush, Mood, Mrs. Giasson 14 25 

Olivier Lambert, board, C. Lambert children 12 00 

Agnette Anderson, rent, Mrs. Nilson 5 93 

H. Chi'istiau Johnson, goods, Mrs. Christiansou 11 01 



180 CITY OF BERLIN. 

Berlin ]Mills Co., supplies 

S. Cross & Co., provisions 

Dorah Rasniussen, labor, Mrs. Oleson 

H. Christian Johnson, goods, Mrs. Oleson 

Miss Dagna Oleson, labor, Mrs. Nilson 

Berlin Mills Co., goods, J. Rouleau 

A. B. Forbush, expense to Manchester, James Dunn 

family 

Peter Rouleau, board of Jos. Rouleau 

A. B. Forbush, wood 

Mrs. Agnette Anderson, rent, Mrs. Nelson 

Miss Dagna Oleson, labor for Mrs. A. Nelson 

John H. Johnson, goods for Mrs. M. G. Oleson 

Miss Dorah Rasmussen, work for Mrs. M. G. Oleson... 

H. C. Johnson, goods, Mrs. Oleson 

Olivier Lambert, board C. Lambert children 

Benjamin Lessard, rent P. Morin 

Berlin Mills Co., goods, Mrs. A. Oleson 

Dagna Oleson, labor for Mrs M. Oleson 

Mrs. Agnette Anderson, rent Mrs. A. Oleson 

H. C. Johnson, goods for Mrs M. G. Oleson 

H. C. Johnson, goods for Mrs. M. Christianson 

Carrigan & King, goods delivered on order Overseer.... 

T. E. Malloy, milk for Mrs. L. Giasson 

Theophile Vermette, rent for Mrs. L. Giasson 

C. N. Hodgdon, wood for Mrs. Giasson 



$ 1 88 


6 00 


4 00 


17 71 


8 00 


19 15 


100 00 


6 00 


9 00 


5 93 


10 00 


9 08 


1 00 


17 71 


12 00 


80 00 


4 00 


4 00 


2 95 


8 .^7 


4 00 


21 90 


6 64 


16 80 


5 50 



$1,849 90 



STATE TAX. 

Appropriation $4,088 50 

Paid State of New Hampshire $4,088 50 



COUNTY TAX. 

Appropriation $10,214 47 

Paid County of Coos $10,214 47 



BAND CONCERTS. 

Appropriation $400 00 

Paid Berlin Brass Band $400 00 



GRAND ARilY OF THE REPUBLIC. 

Appropriation $100 00 

Paid J. T. Chapman, quartermaster $100 00 



INSURANCE. 



Appropriation 

Traiisfened from Police Court. 



W. W. Burlingame, builder's risk 

W. W. Burlingame, Marston school aud pest house. 
Wheeler & Woodward, library, and school building. 
W. W. Burlingame, city building and hose houses... 
W. W. Burlingame, hose house and alarm system... 

Wheeler & Woodward, school houses 

Wheeler & Woodward, Greenlaw school house 

W. W. Burlingame, shoe factory 

Bickford & Vaillancourt, shoe factory 

Wheeler & Woodward, hose house No. 2 

Wheeler & Woodward, shoe factory 

W. W. Burlingame, school houses 



1400 00 


519 81 


f;919 81 


$28 00 


230 58 


36 50 


105 .38 


64 00 


198 00 


10 00 


125 00 


37 50 


12 50 


37 50 


34 85 



S919 81 



5ALARY DEPARTMENT, 



Appropriation 12,500 00 

Transferred from miscellaneous 20 60 

$2,520 60 

Herbert I. Goss, assistant City Solicitor $16 66 

E.J. Noyes, drawing jurors 7 00 

John B. Langis, drawing jurors 3 00 

Joseph Lambert, drawing jurors 3 00 

Anton Nelson, 3 00 

W. J. Oleson, drawing jurors 7 00 

W. W. Burlingame, city clerk, two mouths 33 33 

W. W. Burlingame, drawing jurors 7 00 

W. W, Burlingame, drawing jurors 7 00 

W. W. Burlingame, city clerk, one month 16 66 

John B. Noyes, drawing jurors 3 00 

E. E. Pierce, drawing jurors 3 00 

W. H. Paine, three months' salary, city solicitor 100 00 

W. W. Burlingame, salary, one month, 16 67 

Joseph Lambert, drawing jurors 3 00 

W. J. Oleson, drawing jurors 7 00 

N. G. Cram, account of salary, city auditor 25 00 

F. X. McHale, drawing jurors 7 00 

W. A. Boothby, salary, assessor 200 00 

W, W. Burlingame, city clerk, one month 16 66 

W. H. Paine, salary city solicitor, two months 66 66 

W. H. Paine, salary city solicitor, one month 33 33 

Louis Roderick, drawing jurors 6 00 

John C. West, salary as assessor 175 00 

W. W. Burlingame, city clerk, one month 16 67 

F. M. Clement, account salary, mayor 100 00 

A. Lavallee, account salary, city physician 125 00 

W. W. Burlingame, city clerk, one mouth, 16 67 

Moses Hodgdon, salary as assessor 125 00 

N. G. Cram, on account city auditor 25 00 

W. H. Paine, city solicitor, two months 66 66 

W. W. Burlingame, city clerk, one month 16 67 

W. W. Burlingame, city clerk, one month 16 66 



184 CITY OP BfeRLTN. 

W. W. Burlingame, drawing jurors 

\V. H. Paine, on account, city solicitor 

W. W. Burlingame, city clerk, one month 

J. B. Langis, drawing jurors 

J. M. Dresser, drawing jurors 

W. J. Oleson, drawing jurors 

Joseph Lambert, drawing jurors 

W. H. Paine, on account salary city solicitor.... 

J. M. Lavin, drawing jurors 

F. X, McHale, drawing jurors 

W. W. Burlingame, city clerk, one month 

E. E. Pierce, drawing jurors 

John B. Noyes, drawing jurors . 

A. B. Forbush, on account, overseer of the poor. 

W. H. Paine, city solicitor, one month 

W. VV. Burlingame, city clerk, one month 

W. A. Pingree, salary as tax collector, one year.. 

Dr. A. Lavallee, city physician 

Wm. H. Paine, city solicitor 

A. H. Eastman, city treasurer 

N. G. Cram, city auditor 

Transferred from city poor account 



f 7 00 


33 33 


16 67 


3 00 


9 00 


7 00 


3 00 


33 33 


18 00 


7 00 


16 66 


3 00 


6 00 


50 00 


33 33 


16 65 


600 00 


125 00 


33 83 


50 00 


25 00 


150 00 



$2,520 60 



INTEREST DEPARTMENT. 



Appropriation $ 6,000 00 

Interest on taxes 72 36 

Interest on city bonds 45 00 

Interest on sinking fund, Berlin Savings Bank & Trust 

Company 578 13 

Interest on sinking fund, Berlin National Bank 540 00 

Interest on taxes, 1900 21 76 

Interest on taxes, 1900 61 94 

Interest on taxes, 189G 7 50 

Transferred from school account 702 02 

I 8,028 71 

National Bank of Commonwealth, on 150,000 bonds.... |1,000 00 

First National Bank, on $7, 000 note 140 00 

National Bank of Commonwealth, on $70,000 bonds.... 1,575 00 

Berlin Savings Bank & Trust Co., note No. 51 180 00 

Berlin Savings Bank & Trust Co., city note 287 33 

Mrs. J. E. Converse, note No. 3 120 00 

Fanners' and Traders' National Bank, city note 120 00 

Littleton, N. H. Savings Bank, city note 290 00 

Mrs. A. P. Merrill, city note 66 40 

Berlin Savings Bank & Trust Co., city note 150 00 

Berlin Savings Bank & Trust Co., city note 100 00 

First National Bank, Portland, |7,000 school bond 140 00 

National Bank of Commonwealth, on $70,000 bonds.... 1,575 00 

E. C. Collin, city note 106 67 

Colebrook Granite Savings Bank, city note 337 22 

D. S. Currier, city note - 57 22 

Littleton Savings Bank, city note 100 00 

Berlin National Bank, city note 293 34 

North Conway Loan and Banking Co., city note 100 00 

Littleton Savings Bank, city note 190 00 

Arvilla P. Merrill, city note 33 20 

Berlin National bank, city note 13 33 

Interest on $50,000 bonds 1,000 00 

Interest on city note 54 00 

$ 8,028 71 



LIGHTING STREETS. 



Appropriation $2,700 00 

Overdrawn 128 51 

$2,828 51 

Berlin Electric Light Co., street lights 1118 67 

" " " " " " 235 34 

" " " " " " 236 09 

" " " " " " 235 34 

" " " " " " 235 34 

II 11 II (1 II 1 1 Ogc OA 

(< .. u II II II 235 34 

" " " " " " 235 94 

" " " " " " 235 34 

u 11 It II 11 II 905 34 

" " " " " '• 470 68 

" " " " " " 119 75 

$3,828 51 



SPRINKLING STREETS. 



Appropriation 

Transferred from Police Court... 
Transferred from miscellaneous. 



W. J. Stafford, season 1901. 



Berlin Water Co., water for sprinkling. 



$300 00 


03 


99 97 


$400 00 


$60 00 


GO 00 


60 00 


60 00 


60 00 


100 00 



$400 00 



PRINTING AND STATIONERY. 



Appropriation 

Transferred from Police Court 



The Independent Press, city reports for 1901. 

E. J. Barney, blanks 

W. W. Burlingame, envelopes, etc 

The Independent Press, city blanks 

The Independent Press, city blanks 

The Independent Press, city blanks 

E. A. Seavey & Co., inventory books 

The Berlin Reporter, iniblishing notices 

The Berlin Reporter, pnblishing notices 

The Independent Press, city blanks 

C. iS. Clarke, stationery, etc 

The Independent Press, city blanks 

The Independent Press, city blanks 

The Independent Press, city blanks 

The Berlin Reporter, publishing notices 

E.J. Barney, printing 

The Barney Press, blanks 



SCHOOL BOND. 



$500 00 


84 30 


$584 30 


1395 50 


3 00 


16 20 


7 00 


13 25 


4 25 


58 85 


2 50 


3 00 


22 50 


6 00 


3 00 


3 00 


31 50 


1 50 


5 00 


8 25 



$ 584 30 



Apppropriation $1,000 00 

Expended $1,000 00 



MISCELLANEOUS. 



Appropriiitiou !?:2,60O 00 

Railroad tax 134 17 

Transferred from School departmeut 275 85 

Transferred from Public Library 34 80 

Transferred from City Engineering 189 41 

.?3,234 33 

W. W. Eurllngame, recording births, marriages and 

deaths § 14 35 

Berlin Electric Light Co., lights ^ month 6 25 

E. A. Burbank, heating city building 225 00 

C. D. Hening, 3 com;plaints and warrants 3 00 

C. N. Hodgdou, coal, city building 33 48 

A. H. Eastman, 1897 taxes 56 08 

American Express Co., ex])ress 25 

Berlin Electric I^ight Co., lights 1 month city building 12 fJO 

Independent Press, tax notices 1 50 

W. W. Burlingame, express 3 25 

W. W. Burlingame, express and office supplies 6 03 

Sandy G. Youngcliss, labor on city building 11 10 

New England Telephone & Telegraph Co., telephone, 

city clerk's office 1 CO 

11. C. Denison, returns of births and deaths 2 25 

A. Provost, returns of births and deaths 9 25 

■C. H. Ik)\vker, returns of births and deaths 7 00 

W. W. Burlingame, recording births, deaths and mar- 
riages 19 35 

Rev. Isabella MacdufI', returning marriages 1 75 

The Hodgdon Hardware Co., supplies, city building.... 12 72 
The Berlin Electric Ijight Co., lights, city building 1 

month 12 50 

National Bank Commonwealth, coupons on bonds 2 00 

J. D. Holt, returns of births and deaths 2 00 

J. D. Holt, returns of births and deaths 11 50 

W. W. Burlingame, recording births, deaths and mar- 
riages 13 80 

John B. Langis, drawingjurors 3 00 



MISCELLANEOUS. 



189 



A. Catellier, returus of births and deaths 

E. E. Pierce, drawing jurors 

John B. Noyes, drawing jurors 

Anton Nelson , drawing jurors 

National Bank Commonwealth, coupons 

Berlin Electric Light Co., lights, city building 

H. W. Johnson, vaccinating children 

C. H. Bow^ker, vaccinating children 

H. C. Wayland, returns of births and deaths 

L. B. Marcou, returns of births and deaths 

W. W. Burlingame, fees on dog licenses 

Charles S. Clarke, supplies 

Berlin Electric Light Co., lights, city building 1 month 

Charles S. C'larke, supplies 

E. C. Eastman, tax collectors books 

VV. A. Pingree, | cost of bond 

Berlin Water Co., Couture house, water 

J. Robichand, labor on Couture house 

Mrs. Z. Kiely, groceries, F. Couture 

W. W. Burlingame, recording births, marriages and 
deaths 

E. C. Eastman, tax collectors book 

Berlin Electric Light Co., lights city building 1 mouth 

Philip Lepage, use of team 

Mrs. David Walsh, damage to house 

George Halverson, repairs to Couture house 

Nadeau & Leclerc, team to Milan 

Berliu Mills Co., plumbing Couture house 

The Berliu Independent, assessors notice 

Johu F. Lee, sup])lies, city clerk's office 

Mike Erickson, labor on Couture house 

Ed. Toussaint, bread, F. Couture 

W. W. Burlingame, express and telegrams 

^V. W. Burlingame, recording births, deaths and mar- 
riages 

J. A. Wagner, supplies 

Chamberlin & Rich, damage to Covieo house 

C. B. Gitlbrd, damage by water 

J'neuinatic Hand Stam{i Co., rubber stamps, city 
clerk's offic3 

The Independent Press, supplies 

Berlin Cigar Co., damage b\^ water 

Ella F. Beattie, damage by water 

Wm. W. Burlingame, freight 



$ 9 25 


3 00 


3 00 


3 00 


2 00 


12 50 


33 60 


23 50 


2 75 


6 00 


27 60 


12 80 


12 50 


1 47 


4 33 


30 00 


12 00 


4 00 


38 95 


7 50 


3 57 


12 50 


1 50 


19 00 


16 88 


3 CO 


45 00 


1 50 


5 50 


14 63 


6 00 


3 70 


22 80 


8 15 


175 00 


100 00 


14 15 


11 15 


300 00 


50 00 


53 



TOO CITY OF BERLIN. 

W. Wood, returns of marriages $ 2 50 

Berlin Mills Co., supplies, Couture house 80 84 

E. J. Barney, McKiuley memorial cards 8 00 

Yaurman Erve Mfg. Co. , filing cabinet 18 00 

15erliu Mills Co. , supplies Couture house 5 09 

C. Brooks, supplies, city physician 16 90 

W, W. Burlingame, recording births, marriages and 

deaths 62 70 

W. \V. Burlingame, recording births, marriages and 

deaths 

Berlin Electric Light Co., lights, city building 1 month 

Dr. A. Catellier, returns of births and deaths 

tSt. Kierans church, on acct for sewer built 

A. H. Eastman, telegram 

\V. W. Bmlingame, stamped envelopes 

W. W. Burlingame, expressage and postage 

St. Kierans church, returns of marriages 

Berlin Mills Co., supplies. Couture house 

J. J. Cobb, returns of births and deaths 

W. F. Audrus, publishing ordinance 

W. F. Andrus, publishing ordinance 

Bowker & Dennison, returns of births and deaths 

Alf. Catellier, returns of births and deaths 

A. Lavallee, returns of births and deaths 

The Independent Press, publishing notices 

Independent Press, publishing notices 

Mrs. Anderson, returns of births 

F. M. Clement, rent of reading room 

C. S. Clarke, supplies * 

Independent Press, publishing notices 

\V. W. Burlingame, records of births, marriages and 

d eaths 

(Jrand Trunk R. R. Co., land rents 

A. S. Stowell, returns of marriages 

W. W. Burlingame, supplies, etc 

D. J. McCabe, returns of births and deaths 

C. Brooks, medicine at order 

1j. J. Cote, of city physician 

Transferred to lighting streets 

'J'ransferred to sanitary 

Transferred to election expense 

Transferred to salaries 

Transferred to sprinkling streets 

Unexpended 

$ 3,234 33 



20 Oo 


13 


00 


6 


75 


100 00 




81 


10 90 


6 


00 


2 


00 


2 


25 


7 


75 


15 


00 


4 


50 


10 


25 


13 


50 


50 


00 


10 


00 


1 


50 




75 


75 


00 


6 


80 


6 


75 


14 


75 


4 


00 


1 


50 


25 


00 


4 


00 


6 


75 


6 50 


128 


51 


269 04 


14 


05 


20 


60 


99 


97 


596 


58 



5EWER DEPARTMENT. 



Appropriation $2,500 00 

Trail inferred to Schools 300 00 

Transferred from Police Court 473 96 

$3,273 96 

Pay-roll, men |14 00 

Gilbert & Parent, supplies 13 14 

E. A. Burbank, supplies 50 

Harry Edburg, labor 12 37 

E. A. Burbank, supplies 49 

Berlin Mills Co., brick 2 50 

Gust. Anderson, labor 21 25 

Edwin Hansen, labor 7 12 

A. Anderson, labor 7 87 

Edwin Farnham, trucking 10 50 

John H. Johnson, supplies 48 

A. G. Jordan, supplies 13 80 

Pay-roll, men 290 07 

A. G. Jordan, supplies 3 60 

C. N. Hodgdon, coal 8 50 

E. A. Burbank, supplies 198 19 

Pay-roll, men 314 74 

A. A. Fancy, repairs to tools 33 79 

Frank Brousseau, labor 17 25 

W. F. Farnham, labor 5 75 

Hilaire Plourde, labor 17 25 

Carl Oleson, labor 16 12 

Peder Jansen, labor 16 12 

Sam Blueberry, labor 23 25 

E. A. Burbank, supplies 51 29 

J. F. Bell, labor with teams 11 26 

Berlin Mills Co., use of pump 1 00 

Heela Powder Co., dynamite 46 50 

Olaf Mason, labor 18 00 

Ed. Hanson, labor 23 62 

Carl Hanson, labor 29 63 

Pay-roll, men 378 04 



192 CITY OF BERLIN. 

Berlin Mills Co., materials $ lo 04 

A. A. Faucy, repairs to tools 

E. A. Burbauk, sewer pipe 

G. P. Biekford, gravel 

Hecia Powder Co., dynamite 

Edwin Famham, labor 

Pay-roll, men 

T. Bergeron, materials 

Sam Blaeberry, labor 

E. A. Burbank, materials 

Louis Roderick, use of battery 

G. P. Biekford, sand 

H. Christian Johnson, oil 

Joseph Ouelette, labor 

Robert Suodgrass, Marston school 

A. Transtani, labor 

Eugene Lavoie, labor 

Adolph Anderson, labor 

E. A. Burbank, supplies 

Berlin Mills Co., supplies 

Velson Martell, supplies 

Mrs. Mason, gravel 

Pay-roll, men 

Tel. Bergeron, labor with team 

Pay-roll, men 

E. M. (h-oss, repairs 

E. A. Burbank, supplies 

A. G. Jordan repairs to tools 

A. Gregoire, labor 

Pay-roll, men 

E. Anderson, labor 

A. C. Jordan, repairs to tools 

E. A. Burbank, supplies 

Gust. Anderson, eight months' salary 

Gabriel Rouleau, labor 

Edwin S. Bryant, sewer records 

A. A. Fancy, repairs to tools 

I\[. Christianson, labor 

E. S. Bryant, reiiorts and records 

Burgess Suljihite Fibre Co., cinders 

E. S. Bryant, surveying 

Gust. Anderson, salary sewer commissioner 

Transferred from engineering department 

$3,273 96 



14 


34 


249 


84 


8 


30 


16 50 


11 


00 


159 88 


3 


50 


13 


50 


117 


96 


3 00 


4 


80 




60 


27 


75 


300 00 


15 


00 


6 


75 


21 


00 


87 


79 




81 


2 


16 


4 


00 


94 


50 


3 


25 


39 05 


2 


50 


22 


51 


9 


75 




75 


36 


75 


10 


50 


2 50 


31 


07 


50 


00 


3 


75 


17 


50 


1 


77 


o 


00 


20 


50 


4 


no 


13 


00 


25 


00 


190 


50 



LIBRARY DEPARTMENT. 



Appropriation $6o0 00 

DeWolfe, P'iske & Co., books ^ 1 11 

Hattie L. Johnson, salary as librarian 25 00 

The Independent Press, printing 2 50 

H. W. Wilson, books 17 00 

Hattie L. Johnson, salary as librarian 16 66 

F. M. Clement, rent 25 00 

Berlin Electric Light company, lights 22 95 

Hattie L. Johnson, salary as librarian 16 66 

E. J. Bamej% book labels 3 50 

J. L. HammettCo., book labels, 3 11 

Hattie L. Johnson, salary as librarian 16 66 

H. W. Johnson, Bookman, one year 2 00 

DeWolfe, Fiske & Co., books 26 74 

DeWolfe, Fiske & Co., books 62 18 

F. M. Clement, rent 25 00 

Hattie L. Johnson, salary as librarian 16 66 

Berlin Mills Co., paper " 1 00 

John J. Bell, numbering machine 12 15 

E. A. Burbank, lock 2 75 

Hattie L. Johnson, salarj' as librarian 16 66 

Hattie L. Johnson, salary as librarian 33 33 

Berlin Mills Co., covering paper 1 00 

Frank L. Saunders, binding, etc 7 18 

DeWolfe, Fiske & Co., books 40 75 

Library Bureaus, cards 14 33 

Hattie L. Johnson, salary as librarian one month 16 66 

H. W. Wilson, books 3 00 

DeWolfe, Fiske ct Co., books 37 24 

F. .M. Clement, rent 25 00 

H. VV. Johnson, P. O. box rent 75 

Hattie L. Johnson, salary as librarian, one month 16 66 

Berlin Electric Lighl Co., lights 33 33 

F. M. Clement, rent, three months 25 00 

Hattie L. Johnson, salary as librarian 25 05 



194 CITY OF BERLIN. 

Berlin Electrio Light Co., lights 

H. \V. .Johnson, freight, etc 

W. H. Paine, exiienses to Colebrook 

Transferred to miscellaneous 



$ 6 89 


7 14 


6 50 


34 90 



50 00 



SANITARY DEPARTMENT. 



A ppropriation 

Transferred to small pox expenses 

Transferred from Public Reading room. 
Transferred from Miscellaneous 



Dr. J. J. Cobb, medical services 

J. F. Bell, team to pest house 

C. R. Denning, chemicals 

Parent & Gilbert, groceries to pest house 

F. Blais, six months' salary 

Dr. J. J. Cobb, consultation 

C. Brooks, medicines 

The Barney Press, printing cards 

P. W. McHugh, supplies 

Dr. D. J. McCabe, six mouths' salary 

James Moffett, six months' salary and labor. 

Benjamin Jolicoeur, labor on dump 

Benjamin Jolicoeur, labor on dump 

Dr. L. B. Marcou, fumigating 

C. Brooks, chemicals 

The Barney Press, notices 

The Independent Press, notices 

Benjamin Jolicoeur, labor 

H. J. Morrison, labor 

Benjamin Jolicoeur, labor on dump , 

T, Vermette, labor on dump 

C. N. Hodgdou, wood 

James Moffett, fumigating 

Cote & Marchand, supplies 

Cote & Marchand, supplies 

Benjamin Jolicoeur, labor, , 

Fred Spencer, labor 

Mrs. Carrie M. Hobart, meals 

Cote & Marchand, supplies 

Berlin Mills Co., supplies 

Berlin Mills Co., supplies 



$400 00 


200 00 


77 48 


269 04 


$946 52 


$3 00 


1 00 


14 or, 


2 69 


25 00 


2 00 


3 50 


2 25 


5 24 


30 00 


40 00 


4 00 


$6 75 


8 00 


26 00 


3 50 


3 50 


31 50 


10 50 


40 50 


3 50 


1 75 


56 00 


3 75 


3 65 


25 00 


8 25 


2 50 


2 75 


2 52 


11 38 



196 CITY OF BERLIN. 

Parent & Lambert, supplies 

Mrs. C. Lebrecque, nurse 

Philip Lepage, removing dead dogs from river.. 

James Moffett, labor 

Benjamin Jolicoeur, labor on dump 

A. Leiuire, labor 

Joseph Beguin, labor on dump 

Henry St.Laurent, casket 

The Gerrish Co., groceries 

Benjamin Jolicoeur, labor on dump 

Felix Blais, salary, board of health 

Benjamin Jolicoeur, labor on dump 

Joseph Bergeron, burying dog 

Benjamin Jolicoeur, watchman 

Mrs. Steward Gilbert, nurse 

Henry A. St.Laurent, casket 

Mrs. Ella E. Wiswell, nurse 

Robert M. Smith, nurse 

Dr. I). J. McCabe, salary, etc., board of health. 

Benjamin Jolicoeur, labor on dump 

James MofTett, salarj^, board of health 

Benjamin Jolicoeur, labor, watchman 

H. L. Steinfeld, supplies 

Williamson & Ames, supplies 

J. E. Bell, teams 

Benjamin Jolicoeur, labor on dump 

Alexander & Morrison, provisions 

E. A, Burbank, supplies 

H. F. Marston, land for pest house 

P. W, McHugh, supplies 

F. H. Cross & Co., supplies 

James MofTett, fumigating 

Benjamin Jolicoeur, labor on dump 

E. A. Hinchey, teams 

Transferred from Fire department 



$ 1 40 


9 72 


25 00 


o4 00 


9 00 


1 25 


1 00 


6 00 


7 54 


9 00 


25 00 


8 00 


3 00 


15 00 


4 00 


15 00 


7 71 


10 00 


32 00 


8 00 


25 00 


88 


2 59 


1 22 


7 00 


4 00 


2 65 


92 


200 00 


7 75 


2 11 


15 00 


4 00 


9 75 


22 00 



1946 52 



ELECTION EXPENSES. 

Appropriation |250 00 

Transferred from miscellaneous 14 05 



?264 05 



The Independent Press, printing check ists $15 00 

The Independent Press, ballots and cheek lists 25 00 

Pay-roll, ward two officers 

J. M. Lavin, supervisor 

Pay-roll, officials, ward one 

Pay-roll, officials, ward three. 

John B. Langis, supervisor 

The Berlin Reporter, publishing ballots 

W. W. Burlingame, ballots, etc 

Anton Nelson, supervisor 

Joseph Lambert, supervisor 

Philip Lepage, distributing ballots 

George F. Rich, supervisor 

W. W. Burlingame, ward clerk, ward two 

R. N. Chamberlin, moderator, ward two 

J. M. Dresser, supervisor 

Berlin Mills Co., polling place 

John B. Noyes, supervisor 

E. E. Pierce, supervisor 

Louis Roderick, supervisor 

Berlin Mills Co., supplies 

Felix Blais, ballot clerk 

?264 05 



18 00 


12 00 


19 00 


22 00 


12 00 


15 00 


18 85 


12 00 


9 00 


1 00 


12 00 


4 00 


12 00 


6 00 


1 50 


12 00 


12 00 


12 00 


10 70 


3 00 



ENGINEER'S DEPARTHENT. 



Appropriation 

Transferred to street department. 
Transferred to sewer department. 



E. S. Bryant, salary. 
" labor... 



E 



labor, etc. 



one half telephone rent, 
labor, etc 



surveying, etc. 



labor, etc 

surveying, etc. 



" letterheads 

Ernest F. Osgood, views 

S. Bryant, sewers records 

' " street records 

' " drafting 

' " street location , etc 

■ " surveying, etc 

J. Barney, letterheads 

S. Bryant, city maps 

S. Bryant, city maps 

S. Bryant, labor on assessor's maj). 



Transferred to miscellaneous. 



$ 500 


00 


202 50 


190 50 


$ 893 00 


$ 20 00 


62 


00 


30 


50 


13 00 


1 


00 


33 


75 


45 00 


25 


75 


12 


00 


1 


00 


43 


75 


22 


25 


12 


50 


19 


25 


20 


50 


15 


00 


13 50 


1 


25 


4 


05 


11 


00 


10 00 


31 


50 


51 


50 


100 54 


o 


00 


38 


50 


52 


00 


20 50 


184 41 



$ 893 00 



CITY TREASURER'S REPORT. 



Berlin, N. H., February 15, 1902. 
To His Honor the Mayor, and City Council of the City of Berlin: 

I have the honor to submit the fifth aunual report of the Treas- 
urer of the City of Berlin, for the fiscal year ending February 1.5> 
1902, as follows: 

Receipts. 

Cash on hand February 15, 1901 12,742 41 

Taxes, 1897 31 85 

Taxes, 1898... 75 71 

Taxes, 1899 129 58 

Taxes, 1900 12,250 83 

L. W. Jackson, taxes 1900 26 50 

City Clerk, taxes 1900 470 90 

Taxes, 1901 60,544 03 

Interest on taxes 163 56 

Interest on city bond 45 00 

Interest on sinking fund, Berlin Savings Bank & T. Co 578 13 

Interest on sinking fund, Berlin National Bank 540 00 

Police Court 5,421 90 

Railroad tax 134 17 

Savings Banktax 939 64 

Literary Fund 475 32 

City notes issued 48,000 00 

Carload of ashes sold 5 00 

Dirt from street sold 23 00 

Dog licenses 307 00 

Billiard hall licenses 50 00 

Money returned by A, B. Forbush account city poor... 73 50 

Bills credited back, error on pay roll 25 41 

Crushed rock sold 21 00 

Old junk sold 18 30 

$133,092 74 



200 CtTY OF BERLIN. 

Disbursements. 

State tax $4,088 50 

County tax 10,314 47 

Sinking fund 6,000 00 

School bond 1,000 00 

Notes paid 34,500 00 

Band concerts 400 00 

Sprinkling streets 400 00 

Police department 7,672 96 

Fire department 6,096 08 

Sanitary 924 52 

Election expenses 264 05 

Printing and stationery 584 30 

Insurance 919 81 

City Poor 1,849 90 

Streets and sidewalks 11,509 69 

Public Library 615 10 

Lighting streets 2,828 51 

Salaries 2,370 60 

Interest 8,028 71 

Sewers 3,083 26 

City engineering 703 59 

Miscellaneous 2,105 58 

Schools 17,459 19 

Smallpox 6,164 78 

Tax sales, 1900 1,305 10 

Rebateson taxes, 1898 21 07 

Rebates on taxes, 1899 181 67 

Rebates an taxes, 1900 87 52 

Francis D. Green post, G. A. P 100 00 

Cashon hand 1,613 78 

1133,092 74 
Respectfully submitted, 

A. H. Eastman, City Treasinx-r. 



FINANCIAL CONDITION. 



Bonded Debt. 

School bonds 4 percent $6,000 00 

Town of Berlin bonds, 4 1-2 per cent 70,000 00 

City of Berlin bonds, 4 per cent 50,000 00 

$126,000 00 

Floating Debt. 

City notes outstanding $51,660 00 

$51,660 00 

$177,660 00 
Resources. 

Due from W. A. Pingree, collector 1901 $18,133 02 

Due from W. A. Pingree, collector 1900 2,497 74 

Due from J. E. Gonya, collector 1899 897 24 

Due from J. E. Gonya, collector 1898 109 48 

Due from C. L. Doe, collector 1895 16 28 

Due from Berlin Aqueduct Co., one half of 

sewer on Madigan street 551 62 

Due from L. J. Cote, widening street 100 00 

Sinking fund 41,725 00 

Cash on hand 1,613 78 

$65,644 16 

Net indebtedness, February 15, 1902 $112,015 84 

Net indebtedness, February 15, 1901 107,357 11 

Net increase $4,658 73 



OUTSTANDING NOTES. 



No. 21, for Mai-ston school, to Littleton Savings Bank, 

4 per cent $5,000 00 

No, 22, for City Building, to Littleton Savings Bank, 

4 per cent 3,500 00 

No. 26, for lot on Main street, to Arvilla P. Merrill, at 

4 percent 1,000 00 

No. 27, for Marston school, to Littleton Savings Bank 

4 percent 6,000 00 

No. 28, for City building, Arvilla P. Merrill, 4 per cent 660 00 

No. 50, for taxes 1901, Berlin Savings Bank & Trust Co 5,000 00 

No. 51, " " Berlin National Bank 6,000 00 

No. 52, " " Colebrook Guarantee S'gsB'k... 2,500 00 

No. 54, " " " " " " .... 1,000 00 

No. 55, " " " " " " .... 5,000 00 

No. 56, " " " " " " .... 3,000 00 

No. 58, " " Gorham 5c Savings Bank 3,000 00 

No. 61, " " Colebrook Guarantee S'gs Bank 4,000 00 

No. 62, " " American National Bank 6,000 00 

Total $51,660 00 

All notes at 4 per cent. 



AUDITOR'S REPORT. 



Berlin, N. H., February 15, 1902. 
To His Honor the Mayor ^ and Qity Council of the City of Berlin: 

I have examined carefully the accounts of the several officers for 
the year ending February 15, 1902, and find the same correctly 
kept, and properly vouched for. 

I would make the following suggestions to the future City Coun- 
cil. 

1st. That the order, (at my suggestion, passed by the last City 
Council that the City Clerk turn over what ever cash he may have 
on hand to the City Treasurer at least once a quarter), be enforced. 

2d. The accounts of your collector for 1896 and 1897 appear ap- 
parently closed, but upon examination I find 1371.73, interest 
money collected, which he still holds, but which belongs to the 
city, and some action should be taken towards having it turned 
over to the City Treasurer. 

3d. That the Collector be paid a reasonable salarj^ and that he 
stand his own abatements, (barring errors). Am satisfied that in 
such case, the abatements would be very small. 

4th. That some action should be taken in regard to having your 
ex-collectors attend more strictly to business. 
Respectfully submitted, 

N. G. Ckam, City Auditor. 



NEW STREETS. 



Appropriation ^2,000 00 

Transferred to .Streets accoimt 12,000 00 



SINKING FUND. 



Appropriation $6,000 00 

Deposited at North Conway Loan & Banking Co $6,000 00 



HYDRANTS ACCOUNTS. 

Appropriation $2,500 00 

Transferred from Fire Department $2,250 00 

Transferred to Fire Department 250 00 

$2,500 00 



PUBLIC READING ROOM. 



Appropriation $100 00 

Taansferred to Fire Departmeut $22 52 

Transferred to Sanitary Department 77 48 

$100 00 



TAX SALES. 



Paid to W. A. Pingree, collector, for the followiug taxes: 

Fred N. Jordan I 16 76 

Granite State Provident Assn 31 77 

HeirsofW. W. Mason 118 94 

F. W. Dresser H 20 

William Arseneau 9 24 

Fred Ashaw 5 32 

BurgeB. Bickford 5 32 

Hannah E. Bickford 3 69 

Mrs. John Boulle 15 03 

Louis Blanchard 13 18 

Charles Blanchette 13 17 

Lazarre Bisson 19 61 

Andrew P. Bergqvst 29 47 

Sullivan T. Bickford 27 51 

Joseph Coryea 4 00 

Wiliaiii Charbouneau 42 07 

Louis Crotteau 11 87 

Matthais Christiansen 23 06 

George Croteau 3 93 

Nazaire Croteau 5 33 

Oscar Davidson 7 95 

John A. Dahlmau 21 65 

Anton Davidson 26 83 

Peter Demers 6 07 

Frank Demers 21 07 

Nils Erickson 25 20 

Frank Eckler 31 62 

Mrs. Hannah J. Fernald 107 25 

Samuel Fortier 6 63 

Joseph Fortier 32 67 

Andrew Falarie 4 01 

Edward Friehette 14 82 

Edward Gregoire 7 94 

Mrs. Felix Guilmette 10 58 

Fermin Gosselin 15 82 

Ovid Gregoire 11 78 



TAX SALES. 209 



Etienne Goulette 

Mrs. C. E. Green 

Edmund Houle 

Allen Henley 

John A. Hodgdon 

Gust Halverson 

Mrs. M. B. Hutchins.. 

Anton Justard 

John Justard 

L. W. Jewett 

Mrs. A. J. Lord 

Octave Laflamine 

Mrs. Lena Labrecque 

Mitchell Long 

Frank Lemieux 

James Legacy 

Sterling McLaughlin.. 

Ernest McC. Macy 

Philip McCarty 

Joseph Morrill 

George E. Oswell 

I. F. Reynolds 

Alex Reed 

Alphouse Roderick 

Frank E. Sloan 

Mrs. Kate Sheridan.... 

C. L. Sanborn 

INIrs. Lizzie Sheridan... 

Solomon Terrien 

Thomas Tardifl" 

Erick Vincent 

Caleb Wight 



1 9 


22 


18 


22 


15 


88 


18 


18 


14 


01 


31 


01 


166 54 


18 


18 


4 


08 


11 


87 


10 40 


11 


58 


1 


32 


18 


18 


2 69 


6 62 


4 


06 


107 


74 


7 


97 


3 


34 


28 


85 


8 


99 


44 


71 


5 


96 


13 


18 


45 


92 


4 


27 


5 32 


6 64 


15 


88 


2'> 


88 


16 30 



$ 1,443 86 



REPORT OF FINANCE COfiniTTEE. 



Berlin, N. H., February 15, 1902. 
To His Honor the Mayor, and City Council of the City of Berlin: 

The books of the City Treasurer have been examined and com- 
l)ared with those of the City Clerk by your Committee on Pluance, 
and all accounts are found to be correctly kept and vouchers are 
on file for all payments. 

The sources from which the income of the past year have been 
derived have also been examined, and the City Treasurer has 
charged himself with the amount received, and has made a cor- 
rect statement of the same in detail. 

The balance of cash in the hands of the City Treasurer is 
11,613.78. 

The Treasurer's report is annexed to and made a part of this 
report, as required by the city ordinances. We herewith submit 
an estimate of the amount of money necessary to be raised for the 
ensuing year, under the various heads of appropriations. 

City engineering f^ 500 00 

City poor 2,000 00 

County tax 10,214 47 

Election expenses 250 00 

Fire department 3,500 00 

G. A. K 100 GO 

Hydrants 2,500 00 

Interest 5,000 00 

Insurance -100 00 

Lighting streets 2,800 00 

Miscellaneous 1,500 00 

New streets 2,000 00 

Printing and stationery ... 600 00 

Police department 4,000 00 

Public library 650 00 

Sanitary 500 00 

Salaries 2,500 00 

Schools 15,000 00 

School bond 1,000 00 

Sewers 2,500 00 



REPORT OF FINANCE COMMITTEE. 211 

Sinking fund $ G,000 00 

State tax 4,088 50 

Streets and sidewalks 8,000 00 

Sprinkling streets 400 00 

Reading room 100 00 

$76,102 97 
Daniel, J. Daley, 
E. F. Bailey, 

For the CommUt3e. 



APPENDIX. 



Tables of Vital Statistics. 



u 

• ■mm 

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o 

0\ 



PC 

u 

X! 

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03 

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02 



Birthplace of Birthphice of 
Father. Mother. 


Canada 

Bangoi-, Me . 
(Janada 

Portland, Me 
Canada 

Ireland 
Berlin, N. H. 
Canada 

Xorwich, Conu., 
Canada 

Russia 
Canada 


Canada 

Ellsworth. Me 
Canada 

Milan, X. H. 
Canada 
Berlin, N. H. 
Canada 
Berlin, N. H. 
Gorhani, N. H. 
Canada 

Groveton, X. H. 
Canada 

Russia 
Canada 


o 

i'i 


Papermaker 
L;i borer 
l'\)rem'nL'b'ug 
Clerk 
Laborer 

Papermaker 

Laborer 

Hrakeman 

LaTiorer 

Cashier 

Civil Engin'r 

Clerk 

I^aborer 

Papeiniaker 

Foreman 

Laborer 

Railroad liand 

Carpenter 

Mercliant 

Laborer 


23 O 


Berlin 

Cop'tville 
Berlin 


'jO|Of) 


•aim.w IIV 1 


£ 

p ° 
'so 


Ludwidge Sevigny 
Julia Frenette 
Annie McCann 
Angeline Mercier 
Celestine Hamel 
Albina Dion 
Marie Roberg-i 
Annie (ireeley 
Minnie Marshall 
Marie Richard 
Delina Lafontaine 
Delia Devine 
Clara L Wardwell 
Rose Cadieux 
Lea Roy 

Kate McCormick 
Alphonsine Pageau 
Elise Couture 
Mary Cyr 
Emmn Behind 
Celia Spiik 

Phil'm'neThibaudeau 
Delvina T-ang 
Cedulie Ruais 


0/ 

34-1 
O 

y, 


William Cailler 
Henri Boisvert 
William Laffin 
Alph. ('hamberliu 
Francis Houle 
Elie Tremblay 
Andre Pelchat 
H S. Hayward 
Louis Blanchard 
Pitre St. Hiliare 
Louis Pelchat 
William J. Oloson 
Charles B. Gifford 
Frank Bourbean 
Theoiihile Rover 
Willie K. McCanu 
Henry Nolette 
Kemi' Lambert 
Joseph Perron 
Kmile Boisselle 
Victor Finkel-Perl 
.N'aiKileon Villeueuve 
Frank Albert 
Elisee Ruais 


.luioo 


■81!>^A\ IIV 


•puno 

.JO ox- 

njoqiniS 
JO SnjAiq 


'^^.o;-c-.-o,7.c-.^c^-H^-,o^^-o=r.-r.~-o^ 


Living 


•xas; 


g^p^»,«v-p^p.-^^pps^sp£ca""p 1 


o 5 


Joseph Emile Thos. 

Marie Emilia 

Robert Latlin 

M. A. Juliette 

M. Emilia 

Marie Anne Laura 

Marie Malvina 

John 

Marie Alice Minnie 

.1 Emery 

M. Stella Lillianne 

Annie 

Margaret Chase 

J. Amos Rrospere 

Napoleon 

William Harold 

M Eva Alphonsine 

J. Remi Leopold 

J. Octave Alphonse 
Jacob 

(ieorge Raoul 
M. Cora Celanire 
Edward 


•qi-tfa JO ajua 





Birthplace of 
Mother. 


N. B. 

(!anada 

Berlin, N. H. 

E. Charlestou, Vt. 

Canada 

Norton Mills, Vt. 

Canada 

Berlin, N. H. 

Canada 

Norway 
Canada 

N. B. 

Lancaster, N. H. 
Canada 

Ireland 
Canada 

Germany 
Canada 


Birthplace of 
Father. 


N. B. 

Canada 

Island Pond, Vt 

Old Town, Me. 

Canada 

Phillips, Me. 

Canada 

Sweden 
Canada 

Prenchville, Me. 

Philadelphia 

Canada 

Ireland 
Canada 

Germany 
Canada 


o 
afe 

U 

o 
C 


Mill man 

Laborer 

Hardware Clk 

Bookkeeper 

Clerk 

Millright 

Papermaker 

Laborer 

Millband 

Engineer 

Laborer 

Millwright 
Laborer 
Lawyer 
Laborer 

Fireman 

Laborer 

Millwright 

Papermaker 

Labo'er 

Laborer 

Farmer 

Laborer 

Shoemaker 

Laborer 

Papermaker 
Laborer 


a n 

•- s 


Berlin 


•.lofoa 


•aiiilAV IIV 1 


Maiden Name of 
Mother. 


Ethel Craig 
Peggie Tremblay 
Sadie Forist 
Kathleen Barney 
Rose Patry 
Addie J. Webster 
Mary Lahousse 
Falardeau ( Kegina) 
Eugenie Breandeau 
Mary Venilleux 
Agnes Larsen 
Aze'ie Houchard 
Jennie Caron 
Deliua Bosse 
Mabel Thompson 
Elniire Labarge 
Lea Leduc 
Charlotte Spiers 
Eugenie I'oirier 
Bridgett Mooney 
(ieorgiana Bedard 
Emma Dion 
Be'nudette Gongnou 
Ellen F')urnler 
Ledwidgo Paradis 
Lina Lavallee 
Anna Lachance 
Anna Lachance 
Emilie Mahl 
Kate Arsenault 


o 

Ol 


Sterling McLaughlin 
Joseph Perry 
Fred Steady 
Peter McCrystal 
Alphonse (Jinmoud 
Arthur T. Viuing 
Alex Rivard 
Napoleon Couture 
Bill Arsenault 
Peter Demers 
August Janseu 
Hoiiore Bouchard 
George McCarthy 
Arthur Ouellette 
Crawford D. Heniug 
John Audet 
Pierre Gagnon 
Frank Sloaue 
Louis Belanger 
Charles Pinette 
Antonio Girard 
Louis Rheaume 
Charles (xodfroid 
Charles Lacasse 
Leon Laliberte 
Joseph Labrecque 
Pettr Turcotte 
Peter Turcotte 
Gustave Kissel 
Gilbert Arsenault 


•joioo 


•aiiqAV IIV 


■piino 

jo-OM 


OCOCOC^^OfH-TflCCOiCOOCr. -l'l-CW'^CC'30OC*,-IO5'Mr-Cit^,-tC-i??«^ 


•njoqiiiis 
JO auiAiq 


Living 


•xas 


1 •"*-sasS'"'"aSE-Saa"-'"-*'""S""as—- s-^a-" 1 


tin . 

<" a 

O OS 

3 


» 
Marv Isabell 
Mary Edith Fortin 
Jemeria 
John 

J. Leon Edward 
Thomas Walter 
Marie Almeria 
M. Anna Hattio 
Francois Jacques 
Joseph Albert 
Philip Ephrim 
\lma 

Eugene Joseph 
.\rthur 

M. Emma Laura 
Mildred Victory 
M. Leontine Alice 
M. PMrie Mina 
AntoinoJos.Adelard 
Laura Marie 
Ernest 

Arthur J. Charles 
.\I. Lydia Eva 

J. Romeo Svlvie 
M. Emilie Juliette 
Gustave Henry 
Mary Marguerite 


■qiaia JO a^BQ 


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= ■3 w — -3 w'C^-U -C-S 3 .= ■:; 
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t.3-K: „-'-E='K3tL!3 C-. 30^:3 

X.:^ 0- o cfi- a.;,ft:^ >f:j;f/'.o 


Birthplace of 
Father. 


Norway 
Canada 

P. E. I. 

Canada 

Syria 
Canada 

Albert. N. B. 
Canada 

Fort Kent, Me. 
(^auada 
Warren, N. II, 
Norway 
Cauada 


o 

ftoS 
3Ph 

,3? 


I'ulpmaker 
Laborer 

Shoe Sliop 

Millman 

Laboier 

Koi'eman 

.Merchant 

ContracLor 

Papeiniaker 

Sup. Water Co 

Cariienter 

Millhand 

Laborer 

Millwright 

Laborer 

l>a))ei maker 

Carpenter 

L'lborer 

Fireman 

Laborer 

Wood-man 

Woodehopper 

Carpenter 

Merchant 

I'apermakcr 

Laborer 


Residence 
of Parents, 


Berlin 

Percv.N.H 
Berlin 


moid;) 


■-^iiq.w liv 


o 

0) 

c: a; 
3 O 


Elise Anderson 
Delvina Lefevre 
Filixiue Faucher 
Alice Morrison 
Alice Morrison 
Ida M. Ross 
Maggie Galvin 
Leocard Le.-sard 
l.ada George 
Savah Gillevide 
Oliveue Roy 
Annie Moirison 
Laure Gosselin 
Ivatherine White 
KImina Gasne 
'>pmeiise Nairon 
Susie Whitman 
E. Turcot te 
Odelie 1 apointo 
Alphonsine Jolin 
iielvina Douvile 
Mary Dion 
.Mane Ruse Moudore 
Zedlia Boviii 
Sophie Mor;'au 
.Annie Dubois 
Elizabeth Kellv 
AlmaF. Walch 
Valborv Paulson 
Attola Morin 


Name of Father. 


Otho Pearson 
ijouis Rousseau 
Dvrille Filion 
George Li eke 
ueorge Locke 
Wm. Calbac 
Win I^emerica 
Joseph Ramsay 
Joseph Ghvs 
A- N. Gilbert 
.loseph Moore 
Wallace Graves 
George Martin 
Patrick Adams 
Edoward Danis 
Felix Cote 
Herbert .Vinburg 
Telesphore Vlger 
Philias Nadeau 
Alexandre Dubreuil 
Krnest Carrier 
Nnvis Fccteau 
.\lphone Lavoie 
ii.u«ard Thibeanlt 
Florand Marquis 
Henry Carter 
Wei ling ton McGivne\ 
Fred .A. fUement 
C"arl David^-ou 
Ioscpli A. Carrier 


•loio;-) 


sim.W IlY 


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JO ox 


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•ujoqiins 
JO auiArj 


Living 

St'llb'n 
Livinj! 

St'llb'n 
Living 


•xas 


'-e-3 3--=SE-3-£3==-="-E E=^=-- S-=-»- a---'" 


2 
5 >. 

o = 

•tnjta JO ainQ 


J. Severin Emilia 
M. Antoinette W. 

fessie Agnes 

I. Henri Alphousa 

.Alexander 

Doris 

L Jules Wilfred 

Lila Annie 

Thomas James 
r. L. Alfred 
Marie Hermina 

''farie Anne 
Joseph Alfred 
1. Eugene J. H. 

M. Claire Dorothee 

1. Ed. Alexandre 
Anna Alice Marie 
-lorida Kva 
Mary Agues 
ieftige i^.verett 
^llevine ('oustancf 
\I..\nna Delima 


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Papermak 

Bookkeept 

Laborer 

Carpenter 

Laborer 

Woodsmai 

Laborer 

Machinist 

storekeepc 

Laborer 

•Steamtitte 

Blacksmit 

Farmer 

rulpmake 

Banker 

Shoemulce 

Carpenter 

Laborer 

Butcher 

Laborer 

Barber 

Foreman 

Laborer 

Brick Mast 
Laborer 




Residence 
.of Parents. 




Berlin 


I 


OTO;") 


■•ui'Lw ri V 


1 
1 


o 

£ ^" 
= o 

"3 

1^ 




^ ^ '-' -. "S ^ s 

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o ii 5 =— oj E =.- c S:;:^ i* s)~ =55-- <" o '-•£ * o— ~ = ^ o 




o 
a 




Leon Larochelle 
Hoiner E. Williams 
Philippe Renaud 
Peter Rivi.rd 
\lfred Bern.ird 
Jos \'aillaiicourt 
Henrv Soucv 
A. J. Crot.au 
Win. ])jryhei-ty 
Wni. Morrison 
lohn Lemers 
George Morrison 
George L brun 
T. E. Cloutier 
Luc .Mo'in 
Albert H. Eastman 
Nelson Mosso, Jr. 
Hvpolite Ouelette 
Frank P.Clark 
Samuel Duinont 
(xeorge Frodette 
Odilon Bouchard 
Gedeon Fortier 
Patrick Muiphy 
Win McShea 
Thomas Girard 
Laurent Giassou 
Joe E Lang 
Alexandre DuMellue 
Michael Bourassa 


1 


•.loiuol 

•pHno! 

JO -ojsi! 


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•n.ioqiniS 
.lo SuiArj 


Living 
Living 

-iL'lib'ii 
Living 


j 




■xasi 


*-"-="££££■*" -E = =--'*-'"-£^SB £•"-■" E'""-"^"" 




?, 




Alex G^'denn 
.lo.~r|.h Henri 
Jos \iiselme Benoil 
Joseph A;::irie Louis 
y\. .V'UIiiui Rosanua 

Hen ry 

M. L'?ocade Helene 
At. Eugenie Alice . 
Helen IJIlian 
Etta May 
Joseph Louis 
Kathleen .lanette 
Edward Emile 
Jos. Dieudonne 
Ferdinand Phideme 
Mai ie Josephine 
M. Ivonue Adora 
Josephine 
Joe omer 
Marie Agnes C. 
M. Emilia Ivonue 
Beatrice Mabel 
M. I. Eleonore 


i 


•m.no: JO a;T?a 


• C :r; :^ l^ CV r: — n -^i C? - -" -H X Ol — T-( CC CC CO rp CO O O — ' CI -M :C Ct lO 

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in 

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o 

o 



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o 

o . 

.a o 


1 

i 


Canada 
Canada 

.V. B. Canada 
Ripley, Me. 
Canada 

New Hampshire 
Norway 
Berlin, N. H. 
Canada 


Canada 
Bethel, Me. 
Canada 

N. B Canada 

Canada 

Russia 

Canada 

Germany 




o 

O U 

M 




Canada 

England 

Canada 

Canada 

N. B. Canada 

Gorham, N. H. 

Canada 

Provinces 
Norway 

Colebrook, N. H. 
Canada 


England 

Canada 

N. B. Canada 

Canada 

Russia 

Canada 

Germany 




Occupation of 
Father. 


Laborer 
Millman 
Farmer 
Pattern Maker 
Laborer 

Shoemaker 
Laborer 

Millwright 
Laborer 
Carpenter 
Laborer 


Steamfitter 

R.R.V'dmaster 

Laborer 

Engineer 
Laborer 
Merchant 
Laborer 




PJ o 


Berlin 

Holvoke 
Berlin 


............ 




1 


100 


•aiiqAV ijv 




Maiden Name of 
Mother. 


Marie Goupil 
Mary Frazer 
Ann'ie Rousseau 
Florida Lefevre 
Clarina Nadeau 
Alvinis Poirier 
.Minnie Woodcock 
Emilie Lacombe 
Anna Demers 
Emma Lemeliu 
Emma Ljmeliu 
Eva Cote 
Marie Delogo 
Houora D;iley 
Alice .Mc('raw 
Marv Hansen 
Ellen Roy 
.\uzelie Boulette 


Mathilde McLean 
Mary J. .Sullivau 
Marie Geudron 
Ora May Swan 
L'ida Gilbert 
Lucie Gregoiie 
Evariua Lallier 
Jane Henry 
Cediilie Lessard 
Eunice Block 
Victoria Goudreau 
Lena Martin 




Name of Father. 


Adolphe Demers 
James Mooiiy 
Elzear Frechette 
Leonidas Hoiile 
K ranee Leclerc 
Angus Boucher 
Frank Corliss 
.\lphonse Roy 
Alfred Tondreau 
Edward Beruier 
Edward Beruier 
Jos. Lambert 
Alex Demers 
Joseph Uoulauger 
Edward Kennan 
Theodore Arneson 
WilliamCharbouueau 
Ludger Morin 


Thorn IS Lemieu,^ 
Herbert C. Gilmau 
Pitro Carrier 
David Ilizzurd 
Teles. Montmegny 
David Les-aid 
Napoleon Ruel 
Lewis Boyle 
Polycarpe MorIn 
Louis L Freedmau 
Arthur Girard 
John Betz 




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Living 

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T. Adolphe Augustin 

Loretta 

M. Emma Liziana 

M. Eugenia An re 

J. William Francois 

M. E. Lenft 

Joe Arthur 

M. Rose Lena 

J.Silvio 

J llomeo 

.fos. Oscar Leou 

M. Alexina 

Mary Ethel Foley 

FraiikVictor H'rm'n 

Victor Albert 
J. Lndzer Arthur 


Ro.sa 

Florence Mav 

M. Alice 

M. Leonide 

Marie Eva 

Agnes Anna 

Jns. Willie (leorge 

Josephine May 

Josi^ph 

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Birthplace of 
Mother. 


Canada 

Ireland 

Russia 

Groveton, N. H. 

Berlin, N. H. 

Canada 

Russia 

Canada 

Maine 

Canada 

Guildhall, Vt. 
Russia 
Berlin, N. H. 
Madison, N. H. 


Birthplace of 
Father. 


Canada 

N. B. Canada 

Canada 

Ireland 
Russia 

Gorham,N. H. 
Canada 

Russia 
Canada 
Lagrange, Me. 
Canada 

N. B. Canada 
P. E. I. 
Russia 
Sweden 
Colebrook, N. H. 


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Stonemason 

Carpenter 

Papermaker 

Steamfltter 

Laborer 

Stoueraason 

Laborer 

Barber 

Carpenter 

Baker 

Laborer 

Peddler 

Banker 

Laborer 

Millwright 

Peddler 

Carpenter 

Foremau 

Laborer 

Millwright 
Laborer 

Peddler 

INIachinist 
Laborer 


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Berlin 


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Celemire Bouchard 
JIary Roy 
Ann'ie Markley 
Anna Benoit 
Mary Dubey 
Alphonsine Couture 
Ad?le DeChamplaiu 
Alphonsine Nadeau 
Mary Legend re 
Alexina Drouin 
Amanda Dominique 
Elise Lepage 
Georgina Frechette 
Emma Letourueau 
Julia Lydou 
Ester Shapiro 
Nellie Hayes 
Lumina Dumas 
Anua Martel 
(iertie Spark 
Zoe Lafrance 
Hattic M. Waite 
Angelina Mercier 
Z.'lia Nolette 
Catherine Monserol 
Katie Dice 
Nellie Bailey 
Flora Saiman 
Julia Johnson 
Cora Harriman 


Name of Father. 


Phidime Simard 
George Lafleur 
Jiimes R. Travis 
Fidele Leblanc 
Narcisse Caouette 
Charles Chrisman 
,\uguste Corneau 
Joseph Lemieux 
Tames Treamer 
Edward Dolisle 
I- N. Doucet 
Ferdinand Michaud 
Elzear Rousseau 
Amede Langlois 
Tliomas Walch 
Ijouis Block 
.rohn J Bell 
Piti'e Collette 
Fred Ouellette 
Harry Harrieburg 
Magloire Roberge 
E. E. Decker 
Klzear Bouchard 
George Laflarame 
George Ouellette 
Thomas Fitzgerald 
Mark Murry 
Nathan Abramson 
Gustave Anderson 
Warren Hicks 


MOIOO 


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Oliva Silvia 
Rose May 
Marsruerite May 
Joe Leo Raoul 
M. Ivoune 
Alphonsine 
Eugenie 
M. Rose Anna 
Esther Marguerite 
Joe Leo Adrien 

Joe F. Arthur 
M. Emma Annette 
J. Nap. Lucien 
William 
William 
Leonora 

Jos. Arthur 
Fannie 
J.Albert Omer 

Eugene Telesphore 
.M. Dora Alberta 
Ivoune 

Robert 
Theodore G. 
William 


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Birttrplace of 
Mother. 


Madison, N. H. 
Canada 

Canada 
Berlin, N. H. 
Canada 
Rockland, Me, 
Omada 

Norway, Europe 
Canada 

Hnited States 
Berlin, N. H. 
Milan, N. H. 
Canada 

Norway. Europe 
Canada 


Birthplace of 
Father. 


Colebrook, N. H. 
Canada 

Island Pond, Vt. 

Canada 

Island Pond, Vt. 

Canada 

Langham, Eng. 

Canada 

Norway, Europe 

Canada 

Bath, Me. 
Canada 

Cumberland, Me. 
Canada 


Occupation of 
Father. 


Laborer 

Clerk 

a borer 
Teamster 
Laborer 

Jeweler 

P;ipermaker 

Truckman 

Laborer 

Ins. Agent 

Laborer 

Clerk 
Laborer 

Clerk 

Paper Cutter 

Laborer 

Clerk 

I'ulpmaker 

Baker 

L-iborer 

(Carpenter 

Millwright 

Laborer 


Residence 
of Parents 


Berlin 


1 'joioo 


■aiHiAV MV 1 


Maiden Name of 
Mother. 


Cora Harriman 
Marie Micliaud 
Rose Roy 
Anna Therien 

.Jennie .McCxrthy 
Sara Couture 
.Mnrie Bern.'ird 
Eusenie Lemieux 
.Mary F. Danfovth 
Marie Lnnglois 
LiU'ia L'iM-ecqufl 
Philomeiie Fournier 
Jennie M. Ramsay 
Elmire Landry 
Georgie Davidson 
P rud e 11 ci.i. Com eau 
Genevieve Savoi'y 
.Fosephine Gilbert 
Olivine Roy 
Clara Dale 
Suzanne Hamel 
Clara Johnson 
iosei)hine (Jloutier 
Julia Guay 
Leocade Robitaille 
Elise Bouchard 
Kridsett Clorrigau 
.Marie Lemieu.x 
Marie Guilmette 


Name of Father. 


Warren Hicks 
Samuel Tnibault 
Arthur Lavigne 
Eugene Lett re 
Odule Routhier 
Thomas Thompson 
Zenon Conillard 
Telesphore Beruard 
Honore Renillard 
I<;imer N. Whitcomb 
Gracien Leborgne 
Joseph Bergeron 
Joseph 'Therien 
X. Horace Eley 
Adelard Morin 
August Hansen 
Fred Routhier 
Sebasticn Vantour 
Alfred Dion 
.foseph Lessard 
l<:verett W. Pratt 
.Vlphonse Chabotte 
Johnny E. Thoits 
John Noletto 
Edward Toussaiut 
Xavier Labarre 
I'hidime Goudreau 
Solomon H. Smith 
Napoleon Leveque 
Ludger Treniblay 


••I 01 00 


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Living 

St'llb'u 
Living 


1 "xas 


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Name of Child 
(if any). 


Bert 

M. Anna Alberta 

Joe Willie Dewey 

M. Anna Flora 

Jos .\iiiedee 

Mabel Mary 

.\Iarie Lina 

.Marie Alice 

r. Ed. Arvllo 

Leota M. 

Joseph Alphonse T. 

Louis Francis 
Ivonne Jeanne 
Wiiifried Bertram 
M .\lberta Adrieune 
George Oiiesime 
Malviua Eva Marie 
.M. Bella Ivonne 
Melvin San ford 
Joseph Arthur* 
Wiilter Henry 
M LuminaJos'phlne 
Eddie Joseph Chas. 
Jos. Edward 
.M.AlexineBern'd'th 
Joseph (Mement 
Joseph Thos. Omer 
Lillian MarieLouise 


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Canada 


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Sweden 

Canada 

Milltown 

Canada 

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Canada 




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Norway, Europe 

Canada 

N. B. Canada 

Canada 


N. B. Canada 
Norway, Europe 
Chicago, 111. 
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Canada 

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Russia 

N, B. Canada 

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Shoemaker 

Laborer 

1 apermaker 

Tailor 
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Millhand 
Laborer 
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Clerk 

Carpenter 

Laborer 

Clerk 

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Laborer 

Finisher 
Laborer 

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Laborer 




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1 •antl.W IIV 1 


Minnie Spark 
Lagathe Lawson 
p:mma Billodeau 
Annie B. Wallace 
MarieLouiseRodriq'e 


Victaline Lamoureux 
Julie Cxodien 
Gertie Anderson 
Eveline Souci 
.Maggie Gntterow 
Anna Bedard 
Anna Legasseo 
May Mullins 
Melanie Ayotte 
Louise Tellier 
Claudia Beaudoin 
Emma Lepage 
Josephine Lamont 
Emma Laverturo 
Octavie Faucher 
Imelda Couture 
Lea Lambert 
Lumiua Pouliol 
Marie Couture 
Rosie Mineberg 
Lillian Stevens 
.^rfm'se Toussignant 


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Abraham Klayman 
Oscar Davidson 
Thomas Fortier 
Herbert Sullivan 
Alfred ."-t Pierre 
Tliomas Paquette 
Wilfred Poirier 
Edward Anderson 
Joe Bouchard 
Edward Hinchey 
William I^arrivee 
Jos Routhier 
Joseph. \. Vaillancourt 
Joseph Gauthier 
John Crisman 
Wilfred Pepin 
Eddie Garneau 
Alphonse Blanchettc 
William Gelina 
Fred Routhier 
Medorro Forteyth 
Btienne Roberge 
Joe Cloutier 
Vlphonse Couture 
Joseph Weuer 
Robert Graves 
Henry Gagne 
Thomas Doucet 
Pitre Morel J 
Alex Labrie 


■aiin.W IIV 1 


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M. Azelie Addie 
Oscar Adolf 
Marie Rosanna 
Eleanor Loretta 
J. Thomas Lorenzo 
Joseph Pierre Eddie 
Marie Janette 
M. Rose A nna 
M. L. Ludivine 
Joseph Wilfred A. 
M. Eugenie 
Florida 

M. Ida Florence 
Jos. Arthur Wilfred 
M.Ella 
Marie Helena 

Milton Roy 
Robert Elmer 
M. E. Rosilda 
Marie Lena 


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Birthplace of 
Mother. 


Canada 
Maine 
Can Ida 

Strafford, N. H. 
Canada 

Norway, Europe 
West Paris, Me. 
Canada 

Frne, Wis. 

Finland 

Canada 

Berlin, N. H. 

Canada 

Cliristiaua 

Canada 

Berlin, N.H. 

Canada 

Berlin, N.H. 

Canada 


o 

— 2 

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.^^ 
S 

1 


Canada 

Baltimore, Md. 
Canada 
Denmark 
Greenwood, Me 
Canada 

Goodhue Co., Minn. 

Finland 

Canada 

Riga, Norway 
Canada 

Old Town, Me. 
Canada 


Occupation of 
Father. 


Millwright 
Laborer 

Teamster 

I'apermaker 

Laborer 

Shoemaker 
Laborer 

Teamster 

Clergyman 

Laborer 

Carpenter 

Laborer 

Restaurant 

Laborer 

Shoemaker 

Machinist 

Laborer 

Steamfltter 
Laborer 


Si 

a a 
2 5 


Berlin 


•joioo 


■'»J!qA\iiv 1 


o 
a oj 

a o 
|S 
3 


Delia L'Etoile 
Ida May Moore 
Valine Allard 
Rosie Carrier 
Adelina Roberge 
Suzie P. Neilson 
Belzimire Giguere 
Annie M. Oleson 
Minnie A. Richards 
Mary E lie 
Delia Toussaint 
Virginie Behind 
Marie Fontaine 
Carle Kins 
Mary Erickson 
Victoria Campagna 
Addie Charest 
Mary Crotly 
Olga Swensen 
Celina Gregoire 
Emma Nolin 
Jennie Noliu 
Marie Louise Bibarre 
Emma Larochelle 
Delphine Pelchat 
Lizzie Murphy 
Rose Garaache 
Alphonsine Lessard 
Zedina Hamel 
Elmire Martin 


fa 
o 

s 

OS 


Gedeon Morin 
Edward Corbett 
.\rthur Olivier 
Joseph P. Gagne 
Louis Gagnon 
Howard Anderson 
Jimmie Auger 
Alfred Morteuson 
Charles A. Willey 
Charles Oailler 
Pierre Rouleau 
Napoleon Provencher 
Oelestin Lacasse 
Theodore Hursett 
Herman Kll)erg 
Deriier A. Belaud 
Eloi Frechette 
Edward MeGivuey 
Cave Halnist.-ul 
Charles Belanger 
Willie Boily 
Louis Martin 
Alphonse Ferland 
Fardinad Nadeau 
Louis Gregoire 
Peter Kelley 
Joseph Oueilette 
Francois Sylvain 
Frank Viger 
John Crawford 


•joioo 


•-JMMAV II V 


•PI?M0 
JO -ON 


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Living 


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M. M. Diana 

Mary 

Jos. Elzear Louis 

Archie 

M. A Delima 

Joseph James 

I^eroy 

Marie Annie 
Marie Dora 
M. Emma 
Maiie Eva Palmira 
Maurice Beruhard 
Ida Erene 
Marie Ivonne 
M. Eugenie 
Harold Richard 

M. Angeline 
Jos. Oscar 
Annette 
Marie Louise 
Marie Louise 
Jos. Ovila 
Madeline 
Marie Rose 
Antonio Joseph 
Amedee Arcade 
Marie Alice 


•q}jia joe!)Ba 


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< Canada 
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( 'anada 
Norway 
Canada 

Berlin. N. H. 

Norway 

Canada 


United States 
Levis, P. Q. 
Canada 

Norway 

N. B. Canada 

Canada 

Vermont 
Paris, Me. 
Cauada 

Amesbury, Mass. 
N. B. Canada 
Lewiston, Me. 
Norway 




o 

5 


Maine 

Canada 

.New York 

Canada 

Norv/ay 

Canada 

Norway 
Canada 


Norway 
Berlin, N. H. 
Canada 

Vermont 
New York 
Cauada 

Jefferson, N. H. 
Cauada 

Norway 




o 

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Carpenter 

Papermaker 
Laborer 

Merchant 

Clerk 

Barber 

Grocer 

Printer 

Laborer 


Fireman 
Laborer 

Plumber 

Broker 

Clerk 

Insurance 
Foreman 
Millright 
Laborer 




S2 

a a 


Berlin 

Liv'm'eFl's 
Berlin 


................ 




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MA\ 11 V 




Maiden Name of 
Mother. 


Mary A Hard 
Delma Beauregard 
Lillian Pickford 
Philomene Coulombe 
Mary Gehode 
Delia Diiclos 
Mary Gosselin 
Lizzie McHugh 
M. Virginie Moulin 
Valida Bergeron 
Etta Wilson 
.Agatha Dahlman 
.Angeline Faucher 
Lumina Demelle 


Maria Nolin 
Odela Nolette 
Mathilda Seems 
Km ma L:iflamme 
Annie Erickson 
F.dwina Campbell 
Delphine Desbien 
Emma Savard 
Mary Grady 
Lula Buck 
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Name, Residence 
and Official Sta- 
tion of Person by 
whom Married. 


Rev.L.M.Laplante, 
Berlin, N. H. 

Rev. L. Bergeron, 
Biddeford, Me. 

Rev. A. S. Stowell, 
Berlin, N. H. 

Rev. E. D. Mackev, 
Berlin, N. H. 


Rev. A.S. Stowe'l, 
Berlin, N.H. 

Rev.L M.Laplante, 
Berlin, N. H. 

W.W.Burlingame, 
J.P. Berlin, N. H. 


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Occupation. 


Farmer 

Dead 

Dead 

None 

Farmer 

Housewife 

Laborer 

Housewifa 

Lutiorer 

Housewife 

Laborer 

Housewife 

Dead 

Housewife 


Sailmaker 

Housewife 

Farmer 

Housewife 

Farmer 

Dead 

Laborer 

Housewife 

Baggage M'st'r 

Housewife 

Engineer 

Housewife 

Farmer 

Dead 

Laborer 

Housewife 


o 

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Canada 

Biddeford, Me 
P. E. I. 

Ireland 


St. John.N. B. 
Germany 
I\E. I. 

Canada 
So.Auburn,Me. 


N. B. Canada 


Name of Parents. 


Philias Roberge 
Rosalie Croteau 
Oliver Frechette 
Marie Pilteru 
Leon Sylvain 
M. Louise Dioune 
Elzear Filteau 
.Marie Bergeron 
David Enman 
Jane Miller 
J. M. McDougall 
Elizabeth Shaw 
James Morgan 
Nora O'Neil 
.^ngus Steele 
Maggie Beaton 
Robert Bartlett 
C. B. Swatka 
Alexander Watt 
Elizabetli 
Wilfred Ganvin 
Aub'line Belanger 
Ludger Lemieux 
Emma Lemieux 
Peter Langley 
Elizabeth 
Andrew J. Royal 
Susie 

Owen Gilbert 
Ruth Eals 
Charles White 
Elizabeth Oxford 


Place of Birth 
of each. 


Canada 

Biddeford, Me. 
P. E. I. 

N. B. Canada 
P. E. I. 


St. John, N. B. 
C'mbelt'n.N.B. 
Canada 

Peabody, Ms. 
Auburn, Me. 


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.\t home 


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Berlin 

Biddeford, Me. 
Berlin 


St. John, N. B. 
Camb'lt'n,N.B 
Berlin 

Lewiston, Me. 
Auburn, Me. 


a 

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George Roberge 
Pabiola Mercier 
Joseph Sylvain 
Amelia Filteau 
Daniel J. Enman 
N. A. McDougall 
John T. Morgan 
Mary Steele 


Clarence Bartlett 
Christina A. Watt 
Elzear Ganvin 
Marie Lemieux 
Fred L. Langly 
I lorence R. Royal 


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W W Burlingame 
J P Berlin N H 

John E Benton 
JP Berlin NH 

Rev L M Laplante 
Berlin N H 

Rev E D Mackey 
Berlin N H 


Geo F Rich JP 

Berlin N H 

Rev JW Wilson 
Portland Me 


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Housewife 
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Sag 


Birthplace of 
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Canada 

Maine 

PEI 
N B 
Canada 

Newport N H 


E Hebron Me 

Standish Me 
Ellsworth Me 
Nova Scotia 
Rockport Ms 


03 
03 


03 

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Joseph Landry 
Emilie Billeveau 
Michel Couture 
Anestonia Ayotte 
Ire Gould 
Sartha Tohev 
Donald White 
Addie Osbin 
Wilfred T Aubin 
Marie Jolie 
Telesphore Hogue 
Clothide Brochu 
Joseph Moff ett 
Marv Quinn 
J Page 
Ellen Dudley 
Frank Pike 
Carrie Ramsdell 
George Wliitnev 
Lilli'n Sturtevatit 
Gardener (' Paine 
Eliza A McGown 
William Green 
Elizabeth Pitter 
David LRice 
Lydia L Fields 
York 

Betsy Bennett 
Calixte St Cyr 
Julie Vaclion 
Chas Labrecque 


5 

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Maine 

N B Canada 

Canada 

Island P'ndVt 
Charleston Vt 


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Berlin 
Portland Me 


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Lewiston Me 
Auburn Me 
Berlin 


Auburn Me 

Berlin 
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Name and Surname of 
Groom and Bride. 


Fred Landry 
Celina Couture 
Orin Gould 
Clara White 
George H Aubin 
Blanche Hogue 
William C Moftett 
Ella D Page 


Leon N Pike 
Abbie Whitney 
Deane S Paine 
Julia W Green 


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Rosie Marquis 
Mary Nelson 
Mary McCaffrey 
Helena S Smellgrove 
Delia Dion 


Minnie Marchand 
Matilda S Fernald 

Celia A Chandler 
Emilie Cadorette 

Kate Comby 

Marie L imbert 
Harrie' Grant 
Josephine Russt'U 
F^xilia St Pierre 
Margar <t 
Annie (rlespill 
Florida Lafevre 
Sarah Pickford 
Adeliua Theriea 
Jennie Hamel 
Odelie Lipoiute 

Rose Patry 
Mary Betz 


Name of Father. 


Edmoud Schambfer 
Velson Johusou 
John ISIcGee 
William Wood 
Al3c Correau 


Louis Blanchard 
J A Hodgdon 

Cyron Twitchell 
William Baker 

Stephen Lydon 
Augnstin Stone 
Theophile Gosselin 
Abner H Herricks 
Joseph Taylor 
Napoleon Morin 
L->uis Valliere 
John McConuell 
Leonidas Houle 
Wm Kelly 
Joseph Walsh 
Joseph Gagne 
Philuis Nadeau 
Mkrcoux 

Alphonse Guimand 
Lernhart Lshnert 


Birthplace of 
Mother. 


St Patrick P Q 

Sweden 

Cannda 

M B Canada 

('auada 


Berlin 

Milan . 
Canada 

Ireland 

Lewiston Me 
Greenwo'd Me 
Cauada 

BlackvilleNB 
Canada 
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Canada 

Germany 


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Halifax N S 

Sweden 

Canada 

England 

Cauada 


Milan 

Canada 

St John N B 

Canada 
Greenwo'd Me 
Canada 

»lackville NB 
Canada 
Province N S 

Canada 

Germany 


a 
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a 
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Child 

Farmer 

None 


Laborer 
None 

Brakeman 
Hotel keeper 
Housewife 

None 

Retired M'hut 

None 

Brakeman 

None 

Housewife 

None 

Domestic 
None 

Bar keeper 
None 


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Canada 

Milan 

Canada 

Englaud 

Gorham 

Canada 

Berlin 

Lock's M"ls Me 

Berlin 

Milan N H 
Gorham N H 
Berlin 

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Mabel Ames Sobambier 
Albert Nelson 
Isabel McGee Dwyer 
Paul Wood 
Oscar Correau 
Louis Couture 
Mary Alice M Blanchard 
Emmous Hodgdon 
George Michalson 
Solomon Daignault 
Mrs Josephine Renard 
viyra Jordan 
Liura Jane Baker 
John Collins 
Fohnnie I^ydou 
Tom Stone 
Theophile Gosselin 
Linnie Green 
'iose A Taylor 
A'.ilda ;\Iorin 
Emma Velliere 
\^'-thur McConuell 
^.Ifretl Houle 
Charles Henry Kelley 
loseph Walsh" 
Joseph Gagne 
Vlfred Joseph Xadeau 
Narcisse A Marconx 
Joseph L E Guimoud 
Lehnert 


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Amanda Dominique 
Elizabeth Lfleur 
Demerise Neroa 
Rosa Matton 
Mary Hansen 
Marie Birou 

M A Daiguault 
Catherine Monserol 
Emma Guay 
Cora Harriman 
Regina Falardeau 
Adelie Pouliot 
Lucia Labrecque 
Mathilda McNeil 
Caroline Sylvain 
Josephine Gilbert 
Mary Jane Gillman 
Georgine Davidson 
Flora M Tholts 
Laure Gosselin 
Marie Gondreau 
Edith Nadau 
Elm ire Landry 
Philo'ne Thibaudeau 
Olivine Gaguon 
Angeline Remillard 
Julie Gadin 

Ce'ia .Spark 


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Annie A. Silby 
Eugenia Jolicoeur 
Marie Bomin 
Lepa Caron 
Virginie Loignore 
viarie Arnold 
Celina Cyr 
Albina Nourry 
Annie C. (lilson 
V'ictoria Beaulieu 
Suzanne Hamel 
I.agarthe Jensen 
Marie Jolin 
Joephiue (joulette 
Isabelle Moffett 
Henrietta Thibadeau 

Mary E. McCarthy 


Josephine Peach 
Marie Dube 
Bridgett 
Julia E. Lydon 

Cora Harriman 
Anna Pier 

Mary 

Anna Bedard 


Name of Father. 


N. A. Alexander 
Edw ard McCJallagher 
Edmond Thibault 
Joseph Cantin 
Philias Gagnou 
Pierre A. Lemire 
Joseph Perron 
Martin Levasseur 
William H. Jewell 
Napoleon Morisette 
Alphonse Chabot 
Oscar Davidson 
A. Rov 

Arthur Tafdif 
Thomas H. Sheridan 
James Arsenault 
Danis Croteau 
J. M. Monahan 


John Ortlett 
Narcisse Caouette 
Thomas Hollaud 
Thomas Walsh. 

Warren Hicks 
Michael Murphy 
lames H. White 
Danisl McljHUghlin 
William Larrivee 


Birthplace of 
Mother. 


Canada 

SherbrookeTQ 
New York 
Fort Kent Me 
Norway E'r'pe 
N BCauada 

Berlin 

N B Canada 


Austria 
Canada 
Ireland 

United States 
Stoneham P Q 

St John N B 
Canada 




Birthplace of 
Father. 


Canada 

Bangor Me 
Canada 

Norway Eu'pc 
Canada 

Lancaster NH 
N B Canada 


Austria 
Canada 
Ireland 

United States 
Stoneham PQ 

St John N B 
Canada 


S 
Is 

3 
o 

O 


None 

Laborer 

None 

Laborer 

Housewife 

None 

Hotel keeper 

None 

Housewife 

None 

Laborer 

Papermaker 
None 


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Portland Me 
Berlin 

(-opperville 
Berlin 

Canada 
Berlin 


.Austria 

Berlin 

Ireland 

Berlin 

Canada 

Berlin 

Stoueham P Q 

St John, N B 
Berlin 


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Name and Surname of 
the Deceased. 


Vance Alexander 
Edward McGal higher 
Edmond Thibault 
Napoleon Cantin 
Baby Gagnou 
Joseph W. L-3mire 
Edmond Perron 
Annie M. Levasseur 
Lottie Hates Jewell 
Leo Joseph Morisette 
Arthur Cliabot 
Lillian J. Davidson 
Juliette Rov 
Marie Blanche Ivonne T. 
Louise Shei idan 
Phillipe Arseuault 
Louis Croteau 
.M. A. Lona Monahan 


Arthur G. Parker 
Albertine Ortelt 
Marie Caouette 
Mark J. Holland 
Wm. E. Walsh 
Mrs Bridgett Gagne 
Annie Beauregard 
William Hicks 
John S. Murphy 
Wilfred White 
I. K. McLaughlin 
Lorenzo Larrivee 


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Index. 



Address Page 1 1 

Appropriations 152 

Assessors' Recommendations 95 

Assets 201 

Auditor 208 

Baud Concerts 181 

Board of Education 99 

Board of Healtti 87 

Bonded Debt 201 

Bills Payable 202 

City Charter 15 

Clerk 92 

Council o 

Engineer 67 

Engineer, Financial 198 

G'overnmen t o 

Marshal 73 

Ordinances 21 

O vei S3er of Poor 89 

Poor, Financial., 177 

Resolutions 48 

Physician 93 

Police Cou rt 83 

Tax Collector 91 

Treasurer 199 

Sewers 63 

Sewers, Financial 1 91 

Solicitor 94 

County Tax 181 

Election Expenses 197 

Fire Department 84 

Fire Department, Financial 174 

Financial Condition 201 

Finance Committee 210 

Floating Debt 201 

Forestry Dej)artment , 97 



272 CITY OF :berhN. 

G. A. R 181 

Hydrants 206 

Highways, Commissiouer 56 

Highways, Financial 169 

Interest , 185 

Inventory 153 

Insnrance 182 

Libraiy, Trustees 137 

Library, Librarian 144 

Library, Financial 193 

Lighting Streets 186 

Miscellaneous 188 

New Highways, Financial 204 

Outstanding Notes 202 

Police Department, Financial 154 

Printing and Stationery 187 

Public Reading Room 207 

Recapitulation 201 

Rules and Regulations 45 

Sanitary, Finance 195 

Small Pox 166 

Schools, Financial 160 

Sprinkling Streets 186 

State Tax 181 

Sinking Fund 205 

School Bond 187 

Salaries 183 

Tax Sales 208 

Valuation 151