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Full text of "Annual city report, Berlin, New Hampshire"

. . . This Honor Roll is dedicated to the men 
and women of Berlin, New Hampshire, who 
are serving in this global war. . . . 




January 

31 

1944 

New Hampshire 



BERLIN 

MUNICIPAL ACTIVITIES 



1 Hami n 

Li. 
University of 

New 



19 4 4 

FORTY-SEVENTH 

ANNUAL REPORT 

OF THE 

RECEIPTS AND EXPENDITURES 
AND MUNICIPAL ACTIVITIES 

OF THE 

CITY OF BERLIN, N. H. 

FOR THE YEAR ENDING 

JANUARY 31, 1944 

TOGETHER WITH OTHER ANNUAL REPORTS AND PAPERS 
RELATING TO THE AFFAIRS OF THE CITY 




1944 

Smith & Town, Printers 

Berlin, N. H. 



35"2.07 
\<\4 



Index 



Inaugural Message 3 

Mayor's Report for Year .................... 4 

Executive Department Personnel 5-6 

Public Education 

Schools ... 7-8 

Public Library 8-9 

Public Protection 

Fire Department . 10 

Health Department 10-11 

Police Department 12-13 

Municipal Court 13 

Building Inspector 14 

Weights and Measures ....... 14 

Other Activities 

City Clerk IS 

Relief Department 15 

Public Service 

Public Works 16 

Water Board 17-25 

Parks and Playgrounds 25 

Public Finance 

Assessors .26 

Tax Collector 26-28 

Vital Statistics on City Finances for Last Ten Years 29 

Treasurer 30-34 

Auditor, Water Department 35-37 

Auditor, City of Berlin 37-42 



CITY OF BERLIN, N. H. 

INAUGURAL MESSAGE 

OF 

MAYOR CARL E. MOR1X 

DELIVERED 

TO THE PEOPLE OE RERLIN 

CITY HALL, MARCH, 1943 



Reverend Clergy, Honorable Ex-Mayors, Gentlemen of the 
Council, Citizens of Berlin and welcomed guests : 

• I want to take this opportunity to publicly acknowledge 
my thanks to Mr. Edmund Gonya, Commander of the 
American Legion, and also all those who cooperated with 
him in the short and appropriate patriotic program at the 
beginning of this inaugural meeting. 

Needless for me to tell you how honored I am to be 
standing here tonight and addressing you on such an oc- 
casion. I shall never forget the honor and the dignity of 
the office which I now hold and it shall always be foremost 
in all my words and actions. 

It is far easier for an administration which is succeed- 
ing itself to know much more about what will happen dur- 
ing the following year than it is for a new administration 
to predict the future in a like manner. Under the circum- 
stances, as President of the Council, I will instead give you 
assurances on the conduct of your affairs, on the conduct 
of the City Council and City departments, during the next 
twelve months, God permitting. 

My next statement which is about the City Council is 
an important one and I hasten to make it. Your City- 
Council is a Democratic Institution and for that reason it 
is my intention to deal with it as such, to use any talent, 
aptitude or experience in the Council for committee work- 
irrespective of political affiliations. I believe that equal 
representation should be given to all four wards on com- 
mittees when at all practical and beneficial. 

I shall urge cooperation among all the councilmen for 
the benefit of the city as a whole. It is a thing to be hoped 
for and I shall try to achieve this goal. 

Free expression of opinion by the members of the 
Council should be encouraged on any question where a 
difference of opinion is present. 

After appointments, the main item of interest is the 
matter of taxation. Every one realizes that the country is 
at war and that federal taxation is necessarily very much 
on the upgrade and every special effort should and will be 
made to keep expenses down and I am quite confident that 
you have elected a council which is willing to do everything 
in its power to help in this matter. 



I have in mind, however, one innovation in our City 
Government. It is my belief that our municipal government 
should be at least as progressive as private industrial em- 
ployers in labor policies. In recent years the New Hamp- 
shire Employer's Liability and Workmen's Compensation 
Act has been amended so as to permit municipalities to 
adopt its provisions for the benefit of municipal employees. 
This has never been done and I feel that the workingmen 
in the employ of the City should get the same benefits under 
this act that their fellow workers in the employ of the 
Brown Company have. A study of this matter will be made 
followed by a recommendation to the Council for action. 

I would like to say a few words about departments in 
general. Remote control is essentially wrong and tends to 
deteriorate morale. A department should be run by the 
Head of the department under the supervision of the Com- 
mittee assigned to do this work. Departmental heads should 
have some freedom of action, some freedom to bring out 
and encourage initiative. Until the Head of a department 
has proven himself unworthy of the trust given him by 
appointing him in the first place. I say leave him alone as 
much as possible. 

Digressing slightly from the above statement it is but 
a step to the question of appointments in which very many 
among you are interested. We, in the executive end of 
this administration, meaning the Council and myself, are 
responsible and vulnerable to the electorate. This vulner- 
ability is oftentimes increased by the type or quality of the 
appointments made. These appointees are in the public 
eye. They are the ones who come, in great part, into contact 
with the general public. These appointees never appear on 
the ballot and therefore are not subject to the voters' dis- 
approval. With that thought in mind we have endeavored 
to give you a slate which we know will be industrious, 
conscientious, considerate and courteous in their dealings 
with the public. We have deemed it right to renew two of 
the appointments made last year and being a little un- 
orthodox we have deviated slightly from the strict party 
lines for but one and only one reason. We do not believe 
that all the spoils belong to the victor. 

Thank you. 



Report of Mayor 

February 26, 1944 
To the Citizens of Berlin : 

I am happy for this opportunity to give you an overall account of your City Government's activities during the fiscal 
year just ended. 

We have deemed it advisable to continue the feature began last year with reference to the City finances entitled 
"Vital Statistics on City Finances for Last Ten Years" and we urge you all to carefully study this table for a quick 
appraisal and comparison of the several sets of figures therein. 

We are justly proud of our financial report faced as we were with equipment one year older and the shortage 
of help necessitating large disbursements for overtime work in the Public Works Department. 

During the past fiscal year the City net debt was reduced by $79,052.28, made up in part by a net reduction of 
$55,000.00 in the bond indebtedness and a net budget surplus of $23,036.27 ; incidentally this reduction in the City net 
debt is the largest in a great many years. 

We firmly agree with the recommendations of all periodicals on Municipal Finances that a healthy financial 
position will be of paramount importance in the post war era when possibly of necessity large borrowings may have 
to be made for public improvements in order to keep our people at work. 

In conjunction with this same thought we have earnestly and actively cooperated hand in hand with the Berlin 
Chamber of Commerce to encourage small new industries to establish in our City more particularly for the employ- 
ment of girls and women. At this writing there is one firm already operating in the N. Y. A. barracks and we are 
also preparing the N. Y. A. machine shop for another firm which has shown its intentions and good faith by de- 
positing a certified check for $750.00 in the hands of the City Treasurer. 

On public improvements $32,277.07 was expended consisting of street improvements, sidewalk construction, street 
grading, cemetery and sewer improvements. It may be well to state here that due to War Production Board rulings 
no new sidewalks could be laid but only replacements allowed where the sidewalk was old and dangerous. 

On the cover of this report there is a reproduction of our City's Honor Roll which was dedicated on Armistice 
Day as a temporary monument in honor of our Berlin men and women in the service of our Country. No doubt 
that after the war is over and won that a permanent monument will be erected. 

In regard to the municipal airport in Milan we have made several attempts to get additional Federal funds to 
carry on and complete the work necessary to make this field meet the future needs of air transportation. We are 
now well on the way to have this airport registered and reclassified so that Civilian Air Patrol planes may take off 
it and land thereon in the very near future. 

At this time I want to thank the entire council, all department heads and their employees for the cooperation 
and assistance accorded me in the fulfillment of my duties and they all have my assurance that my association with 
them will long be remembered. 

Respectfully submitted. 

CARL E. MORIN, 

Mayor. 



REPORTS OF DEPARTMENTS 



CITY GOVERNMENT 

BERLIN, N. H., 1043-1944 

EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENT 



CITY GOVERNMENT 

Mayor 

CARL E. MORIN, elected annually in March by the 
people. Salary $1,500 per year. 



City Council 

One Councilman elected annually for term of three years 
by the voters of each ward. Salary $6.00 for actual at- 
tendance at regular, special and adjourned meetings. Not 
to exceed $250.00 annually. 

Ward 1— JAMES H. BARNES 

ROLAND MORNEAU 

RENE J. GAGNON 
Ward 2— EDMUND CHALOUX 

W. H. METZE 

ARTHUR J. RUSSELL 
Ward 3— WILLIAM C. THOMAS 

OLAF M. NELSON 

ARTHUR BOULANGER 
Ward 4— BLAISE HEROUX 

EDMUND HAMEL 

ARTHUR GAUVIN 



Standing Committees 1943-1944 
Finance: MAYOR, Thomas, Metze, Chaloux, Barnes 
Public Works: METZE, Gagnon, Nelson, Hamel 
Relief: BOULANGER, Morneau, Russell, Hamel 
Accounts and Claims: NELSON, Russell, Heroux 
Salaries: CHALOUX, Boulanger, Heroux 
Fire Department: GAGNON, Barnes, Russell, Gauvin 
Public Buildings: BARNES, Thomas, Gauvin 
Engrossed Ordinances: HAMEL, Nelson, Chaloux 
Election Returns: RUSSELL, Nelson, Heroux, Morneau 
Public Health: RUSSELL, Morneau, Hamel 
Licenses: MORNEAU, Chaloux, Boulanger 
Printing: MORNEAU, Gagnon, Gauvin 
Ways and Means: GAUVIN, Barnes, Metze 
Electric Lights: HEROUX, Metze, Thomas 
Airport: THOMAS, Gagnon, Boulanger 



City Clerk 

GASTON A. COURNOYER, elected annually by the City 
Council. Also Clerk of City Council. Office in City Hall. 
Salary $2,016.00 per year and fees. 



Deputy City Clerk 

MARY E. MORGAN. 



City Treasurer 

EDWARD DELISLE. Salary $400.00 per year. 
City Auditor 

PEISCH & ANGELL, Hanover, N. H. Appointed an- 
nually by the Mayor and confirmed by the Council. Salary 
$1,000.00 per year. 



City Engineer — Street and Sewer Commissioner 

ROLAND BRIDEAU, appointed by the Mayor and con- 
firmed by the Council. Office, City Hall. Salary $2,938.00 
per year. 



Inspector of Buildings 

GEORGE RHEAUME, appointed annually by the Mayor 
and confirmed by the Council. Residence 253 High Street. 
Office, City Hall. Salary $264.00 per year. 



Sealer of Weights and Measures 

LEO MORIN, appointed annually by the Mayor and con- 
firmed by the Council. Residence 442 Grafton Street. 
Salary $300.00 per year. 



Collector of Taxes 

Ex\RLE A. YOUNG, appointed annually by the Mayor 
and confirmed by the Council. Salary $44.50 per week. 



City Solicitor 

*J. Ls. BLAIS, appointed annually by the Mayor and con- 
firmed by the Council. Office, Main Street and City Hall. 
Salary $660.00 per year. 
*Resigned — C. D. Hening appointed. 



Board of Assessors 

THOMAS BELLEFEUILLE, RALPH WILSON, AR- 
THUR LETTRE, one appointed annually by the Mayor 
and confirmed by the Council for a term of three years. 
Meet Assessors' Rooms second Tuesday evening of each 
month. Salary $500.00 each per year. 



Salary $1,840.00 per year. 



Overseer of the Poor 

EDGAR BOUTIN, appointed annually by the Mayor and 
confirmed by the Council. Salary $39.00 per week. 



CITY OF BERLIN, N. H. 



Board of Health 

L. P. BEAUDOIX. M. D., Chairman, term expires April 
1, 1946. 

GENEVA BERWICK, term expires April 1, 1944. 
MRS. ADELIXE REMILLARD, Secretary, term expires 
April 1, 1945. 

Official Staff 

CHARLES E. ROSS, Health Officer, Milk Inspector. 
MARIE V. RAMSEY. R. X., Public Health Xurse. 
LUCILLE H. RAMSEY. R. X., Parochial School Nurse. 
EMMA B. BIGELOW, R. X.. X. H. Tuberculosis Asso- 
ciation Xurse. 

LORRAINE O. LAXDRY, Clerk. Stenographer. 
Office and Laboratories, City Hall. 



Clinic Physicians, 1943 

J. E. LAROCHELLE. M. D., Venereal Diseases. 

L. P. BEAUDOIX, M. D., Prenatal, Infant, Pre-School. 

L. P. BEAUDOIX, M. D., Diphtheria, Smallpox. 

E. R. B. McGEE, M. D., Crippled Children's Services. 



Police Department 

Police Commissioners 

W. B. FARQUHARSOX, ARTHUR O. DUPOXT. SAM- 
UEL P. XEVIXS, one commissioner appointed annually 
by the Governor to serve for three years. Salary, Chair- 
man $150.00 per year ; other members $100.00 per year. 

City Marshal 

WALTER J. HYXES. 
Assistant City Marshals 

HERMAX OLESON. 
GEORGE OUELETTE 



Salary $52.40 per week. 

Salary $42.72 per week. 
Salary $42.72 per week. 



Municipal Court 

Justice 

ROBERT RICH, appointed by the Governor and Council. 
Office, Main Street. Salary $1,200.00 per year. 

Associate Justice 

MATTHEW J. RYAX. Office, Sheridan Building, Main 
Street. Salary $3.00 when presiding. 

Clerk of Court 

E. ARTHUR VALLIERES. Salary $400.00 per year. 



Department of Schools 

Board of Education 

MRS. ERXEST TOWX. Chairman, ALBERT MORRIS, 
THEODORE BROWX. elected for three years, one each 
year, by the City Council. Salary. Chairman, $100.00 per 
year; other members, $50.00 per year. 

Superintendent of Schools 

CALEB H. XILES. Residence. Prospect Street. Salary: 
City's share $2,800.00 per year; State's share $2,000.00 per 
year. 



Headmaster of High School 

DANIEL W. MacLEAN. Residence, 286 Church Street. 
Salary $4,200.00 per year. 



Public Library 

Trustees 

ALBERT DROUIX. Chairman, ETHEL C. BISSON, 
CHESTER H. GOLDSMITH, elected for three years, one 
each year, by the people. X T o salary. 

Librarian 

LOTTIE KAILEY SHERIDAN. Salary $1,431.27 per 
year. 

Assistant Librarian 

PHYLLIS HUDON. Salary $1,079.48 per year. 

Children's Librarian 

JULIA LAFFIN. Salary $1,300.82 per year. 



Fire Department 

City Engineer 

O. B. BERGQUIST, appointed annually by the Mayor 
and confirmed by the Council. Salary $50.00 per week. 

Assistant Engineers 

LEO HIXCHEY, GEORGE FRECHETTE. Salary $41.20 
per week. 



Ward Officers 

Moderators 

Ward 1— EDGAR J. ROY 
Ward 2— E. L. YANDOW 
Ward 3— HARRY BARTLETT 
Ward 4— RENE J. ROUTHIER 

Ward Clerks 
Ward l—O. A. DUSSAULT 
Ward 2— HAROLD McPHERSON 
Ward 3— OLAF NELSON 
Ward 4— LEO LEBLANC 



\\ 



Supervisors of the Check Lists 

r ,l 1—BERXARD COVIEO 

LLOYD BUDWAY 

ALCIDE VALLIERE 
\V.,rd 2— FRAXK TILTOX 

C. D. SMITH 

DOXALD W. HAGGART 
Ward 3— CHAS. L. PIXETTE 

FMAXUEL CHRISTIAXSON 

EVAN JOHNSON 
Ward 3— BERXARD ROY 

GEORGE E. BERGERON 

O. T. CAMPAGXA 



Board of Park Commissioners 

HENRIETTA MARSH KNAPP 
EMANUEL CHRISTIAXSON S. D. 



STORY 



REPORTS OF DEPARTMENTS 



Public Education 



Schools 

Herewith we submit a brief report of the Department 
of Public Schools for the fiscal year ending January 31, 
1944. A more detailed report is prepared at the end of the 
school year, and additional information may be obtained at 
the office of the Superintendent of Schools. 

During the past fiscal year (February 1. 1943 to January 
31. 1944) the total expenditures for the Berlin Public Schools 
were $174,128.38. This is a decrease of $8,508.92 from last 
year's expenditures, and was made possible by the closing 
of the King School and by the elimination of several teach- 
ing positions due to decreased enrollment. Of the total 
receipts, $166,440.16 was obtained from local tax receipts 
and $7,688.22 from other sources, chiefly from federal re- 
imbursements for the Defense Training Program and the 
George-Deen Home Economics Program and from tuition 
receipts for out-of-town pupils attending Berlin schools. 

The past year has seen important changes in Berlin 
schools. Due to decreased enrollment, as an economy 
measure, and as a contribution to our war program, the 
Board reluctantly voted to close the King School. In view 
of the fact that there seemed to be no educational loss to 
the pupils involved, and because of the savings effected, 
such a decision was inescapable. Pupils were transferred 
to the Marston School, and pupils of the first three grades 
are being transported. For the first time in many years, 
Berlin, like most cities, has experienced an unusually large 
teacher turnover. Many of our men teachers are in the 
armed services. Other teachers have left for more lucrative 
teaching or industrial positions, while others have retired 
because of marriage, health or other reasons. We have 
been fortunate indeed in securing well-trained, experienced 
teachers to replace those who have left us. 

Although salaries of teachers in Berlin have been in- 
creased somewhat in the past few years, they are still lower 
than salaries in many similar Xew England communities, 
and have not kept pace with the increased cost of living. 
Even with the recently authorized bonus, teachers' incomes 
are not comparable to incomes of other professions requir- 
ing the same training and effort. The first requirement of 
a good school is a good teacher, and it is to be hoped that 
Berlin schools will be able to maintain their present high 
standards by maintaining salaries at a level which will re- 
tain our better teachers. 

Undoubtedly there will be many changes in public school 
education during the next few years. The impact of the 
war on our every day life, the changes that will be necessary 
to keep step with technological advancement, and the ab- 
solute necessity for developing a social consciousness that 
will encompass world-wide situations, all these and other 
developments will demand our serious consideration. Now 
is the time for a critical reexamination of all our functions, 
for a true evaluation of our methods and of the results 
obtained, and for a thorough study of changes of policy in- 
dicated by problems of war and the coming peace. Cer- 
tainly there will be new demands on our schools in the years 



immediately ahead; demands for an extended vocational 
program, for the elimination of some classical or cultural 
subjects, demands for intensive short-cut courses such as 
the army pre-induction and defense training courses. While 
many of these courses have proved effective as emergency 
training for definite but limited objectives, and we should 
benefit by the experience gained from such instruction, 
it should be remembered that general education can have 
no such definite goals, and that worthwhile education with 
a background of cultural studies has proven itselt adaptable 
to almost every emergency. We must guard against the 
limited and sometimes blind-alley type of education which 
substitutes mere training for a broad type education. There 
will undoubtedly be demands for adult education, for kinder- 
gartens and nursery schools, for rehabilitation classes and 
other demands which are all desirable and many attainable. 
Berlin schools are dedicated to the task of giving your 
children the very best in education. Our task can be ac- 
complished only with the sympathetic understanding and 
mutual cooperation of pupils, teachers, parents and Berlin 
citizens generally. Berlin citizens have always supported 
and will continue to support generously the kind of schools 
which they desire for their children. 

Berlin schools are continuing to contribute in every way 
possible to the war effort. A major contribution at present, 
however, consists of helping our children to maintain poise 
and their faith in the American way of life and of helping 
them to realize that good citizenship founded on education 
and understanding, tolerance and cooperation is a real con- 
tribution to their country's welfare. 

We wish to express our sincere appreciation to the 
Mayor and members of the City Council and to other city 
departments who have given generously of their cooperation 
and support and to teachers and other employees and to 
the many others who in various ways have helped to make 
the past year a successful one. 

Respectfully submitted, 

HAZEL DYER TOWX. 

Chairman. 

THEODORE BROWN, 

ALBERT N. MORRIS. 

Board of Education. 

CALEB H. NILES, 

Superintendent of Schools. 



FINANCIAL STATEMENT 
BERLIN PUBLIC SCHOOLS 



Expended 
1943-1944 



CONTROL 

Salaries of District Officers $ 200.00 

Superintendent's excess salary 2,800.00 

Truant officer and census 1,751.57 

Expenses of administration 2.548.72 



$ 7,300.29 



INSTRUCTION 

Principals' and teachers' salaries 113.599.24 

Textbooks 2.540.79 

Supplies .. 4,322.41 

Flags and appurtenances 36.30 



CITY OF BERLIN, N. H. 



Other expenses of instruction 



1,371.64 



OPERATION AND MAINTENANCE 
OF SCHOOL PLANT 

Janitors' salaries $ 13,536.67 

Fuel 7,550.69 

Water, light and janitors' supplies 4,176.87 

Minor repairs and expenses 5,385.06 



$121,870.38 



AUXILIARY AGENCIES AND 
SPECIAL ACTIVITIES 

Health supervision 

Transportation of pupils 
Other special activities 



$ 30,649.29 



2,404.03 
5,810.00 
1,280.32 



FIXED CHARGES 

Tax for state-wide supervision $ 3,460.00 

Insurance and other fixed charges... 279.05 



$ 9,494.35 



OUTLAY FOR CONSTRUCTION 
AND EQUIPMENT 

Land and new buildings $ 0.00 

Alteration of old buildings . 96.63 

New equipment 978.39 

Total expenditures 

SUMMARY: 

City appropriation $170,000.00 

State of New Hampshire : 
George-Deen Home Economics 1,328.58 

National Defense 3,120.00 

O. S. Y. A. Program 40.00 

Tuition, (Dummer, Errol, Milan, Stark, 
Shelburne, Wentworth Location, 
Wilson's Mills) 2,800.76 

Dog licenses 655.59 

Miscellaneous 398.88 

Total Receipts 

Total Expenditures 

Balance 



$ 3,739.05 



$ 1,075.02 
$174,128.38 



$178,343.81 
$174,128.38 

$ 4,215.43 



Public Librarv 

Trustees 

ALBERT E. DROLTN, Chairman, ETHEL C. BISSON, 
CHESTER H. GOLDSMITH. Elected for three years, one 
each year, by the people. No salary. 



Librarian 

LOTTIE KAILEY SHERIDAN, 
year. 



Salary $1,500.00 per 



Assistant Librarian 

PHYLLIS M. HUDON. Salary $1,149.96 per year. 
Children's Librarian 

JULIA M. LAFFIN. Salary $1,370.00 per year. 

We, the Trustees of the Berlin Public Library, submit 
herewith the fiftieth annual report, together with the 
Treasurer's statement and the Librarian's statistics for 1943. 

Eleven regular meetings and one special meeting were 
held by the Trustees during the year 1943-1944. 

Circulation 

The circulation for the past year has not reached the 
peak of the previous year. This is due in part to the fact 
that many people have moved away, and that many are in 
the armed forces. However, the circulation has reached 
the figure of 88,712: 22,332 in the Juvenile Department and 
66,380 in the Adult Department. 

Nine hundred and eighteen new books have been pur- 
chased. The demand for mystery, western and light novels, 
still continues to be the popular demand. The policy of buy- 
ing two, and sometimes three, copies of the most popular 
books has been continued as in previous years. A few more 
French books have been added, and it is hoped that more 
French books may be purchased this coming year. 

Repairs and Improvements 

This year, the heavy door at the entrance to the Juven- 
ile Department was replaced by a new "fire traffic safety 
door" which complies with the request of the State Fire 
Commission. This door opens outward, by means of press- 
ing on a bar. 

The cement wall at the entrance to the Juvenile De- 
partment was repaired and built up, as cracks in the wall 
had made it a menace to the safety of children passing in 
and out. 

A new Kentile Linoleum floor had been planned, in 
figuring the budget for this year, but up to the present time 
it has been impossible to have our order filled; however, 
it is hoped that this will have been installed by March 1, 
1944. 

It has been necessary to repair or replace furnace parts 
in order to keep the heating system functioning. 

The water pipes in the washroom froze on three oc- 
casions, and it was suggested by the plumbers that these 
pipes be covered with asbestos to prevent further freezing. 

Personnel 

In December, Miss Phyllis Hudon, Assistant Librarian, 
enlisted in the Waves. Miss Germaine LeBlanc was ap- 
pointed to fill her position, until such time as Miss Hudon 
may return. Miss Fernande Blais was added to the regular 
staff, in Miss LeBlanc's position for the same length of time, 
with Miss Evelyn Stafford as regular substitute. 

In January, a raise of 754%, retroactive to December 
26, was made in all salaries. 

The Trustees wish to thank the members of the Library 
Staff for their splendid cooperation and fine work. 

Recommendations 

The roof of the Library, over the vestibule, is badly in 
need of repairs, but owing to the shortage of labor, it has 
not been taken care of this winter. 



REPORTS OF DEPARTMENTS 



The purchase of a new dictionary and stand is recom- 
mended for the coming year. This is one of the books 
which receives the heaviest use by the students, and is most 
necessary. 

A new card catalog file is needed, as the one now in 
use is too over-crowded. 

It is hoped that after the new linoleum floor is laid in 
the Juvenile Department, other needed repairs may be made 
in that department. 

ALBERT E. DROUIN, 
ETHEL C. BISSON, 
CHESTER H. GOLDSMITH, 
Library Trustees. 

Treasurer's Statement 

Balance February 1, 1943 $ 157.13 

Petty cash 13.00 

Receipts 

City of Berlin .. $ 9.035.00 

Fines and fees 518.50 



$ 9,553.50 
$ 9,723.63 



Disbursements 

Library salaries $ 5,054.82 

Substitutes' salaries 142.07 

Books 1,494.79 

Periodicals 244.71 

Library supplies 130.49 

Postage, express 18.70 

Furniture, equipment 402.81 

Janitor's service 610.89 

Binding 104.25 

Cleaning supplies 49.03 

Repairs 144.94 

Heat 370.89 

Light 342.26 

Telephone 43.79 

Miscellaneous 59.04 

Balance 

Petty cash 

Balance January 31, 1944 deposited Berlin 

City National Bank 

Victory Tax withheld for January, 1944 ., $42.62 



$ 9,213.48 

$ 510.15 
13.00 



497.15 



Respectfully submitted, 

ETHEL C. BISSON, 

Treasurer. 



Library Statistics 1943 

Circulation 

Adult Juvenile 
Fiction 52,163 19,051 



General ................. 28 

Philosophy 238 33 

Religion 118 98 

Social Science, etc. 774 478 

Philology 45 35 

Natural Science ... 309 132 

Useful Arts 889 559 

Fine Arts 518 253 

Literature 729 157 

History 1,829 145 

Travel . 1,106 237 

Biography 1,707 686 

French and Foreign 668 

Periodicals 5,259 468 



Total 66,380 22.332 

Percent 75 25 

Inter Library loan (Books) 
Inter Library loan (Records) 



Total 

71,214 

28 

271 

216 

1,252 

80 

441 

1,448 

771 

886 

1,974 

1,343 

2,393 

668 

5,727 

88,712 
100 
115 
100 



Accessions, Registrations, etc. 

Number of volumes in Library January 1, 1943 16,685 



Volumes purchased 1943 

Gifts to Library 

Lost and withdrawn 
Total volumes in Library 
Borrowers' cards in Library January 1, 
Books mended 

New registration 1943 

Withdrawals 



1943 



918 

80 
485 
17,198 
9,747 
330 
618 
689 
Total registration 9,676 

The following have presented the Library with gifts of 
magazines, flowers or books during 1943. 

Cooper, Mrs. J. W. 
Daley, Miss Helen 
Gaynor, Mrs. J. 
Linden, Mr. Frank 
Lockyer, Mr. S. S. 
Moffett, Miss Virginia 
Morris, Mrs. J. 
Goldsmith. Mr. C. 
Respectfully submitted, 
MRS. LOTTIE K. SHERIDAN, 

Librarian. 



Anderson, Mrs. John 
Berlin Chapter of Red Cross 
Brown, Mr. W. R. 
Buckley, Mrs. A. E. 
Cave, Miss Shirley 
Chapman, Mr. A. R. 
Clements. C. 
Cole, Mrs. O. 



10 



CITY OF BERLIN, N. H. 



Public Protection 



Expenditures 



Fire Department 



I herewith submit the annual report of the Fire Depart- 
ment of the City of Berlin for the year ending January 31, 
1944. 

During the year the Department answered 541 calls, in- 
cluding 1 call for assistance in the town of Milan, 2 calls for 
rescue squad, and S false alarms. The Department traveled 
640 miles, worked 204 hours and 23 minutes at fires and used, 
the following material: 10,570 ft. of 2 l / 2 inch fire hose and 
29,772 ft. of Y A inch booster hose, and 500 ft. V/ 2 inch hose; 
4,630 ft. of ladders, 11,646 gals, of water from booster tank. 
16 Indian pumps, and 5 pyrene extinguishers, 2 Foamite, 
4 soda acid. 

The fire loss for the year, the Department answered, 
was $10,659.00 on buildings, on contents was $7,667.79. 

Department not called, on buildings was $1,501.60; on 
contents $834.03, or a total of $20,662.42. 

The coming year I recommend that the fire apparatus 
and the fire alarm system be given a general overhauling, 
as new apparatus is not available and our present apparatus 
is getting old and out of date. 

In conclusion, I wish to express my appreciation to the 
Mayor, Fire Committee, City Council, and all departments 
of the City Government, and residents of the City of Berlin 
for the many favors shown me in the performance of my 
duties. 

Respectfully submitted, 

BERNARD BERGQUIST, 

Chief Engineer. 



Fire Department Expenditures for 1943 

Salaries, permanent men 

Call Department 
Cascade Department 

Medical attention 

Automotive machinery, supplies and repairs 

Laundry 

Telephone, telegraph and time service 
Lights and power 

Gas and oil 

Fuel and repairing stoker 

New equipment 

Fire alarm . 

Department supplies 

Electric supplies 

2% Assessment Firemen's Pension 

Total 

Appropriation $57,000.00 

Credits 1,267.30 



$ 50,054.05 
2,761.75 
205.00 
103.00 
257.87 
154.33 
403.59 
246.80 
193.50 
569.27 
882.32 
122.50 
428.30 
286.99 
696.92 

$ 57,366.19 



Balance unexpended 

Fire Loss for Year 1943 

Loss on buildings, Department called 

Loss on buildings, Department not called 



Loss on contents, Department called 
Loss on contents, Department not called 



Total loss on buildings and contents 



$ 57,366.19 

$ 901.01 

$ 10,659.00 
1,501.60 

$ 12,160.60 

$ 7,667.79 

834.03 

$ 8,501.82 

$ 20,662.42 



Health Department 



Personnel of the Health Department 
Members of the Board of Health: 

GENEVA BERWICK, Chairman 
Term expires April 1, 1944 

MRS. ADELINE REMILLARD 
Term expires April 1, 1945 

L. P. BEAUDOIN, M. D„ Secretary 
Term expires April 1, 1946 

Official Staff: 

CHARLES E. ROSS, B. S. 

Health Officer and Milk Inspector 

MARIE V. RAMSEY, R. N. 
Public Health Nurse 

LUCILLE H. RAMSEY, R. N. 
Parochial School Nurse 

EMMA B. BIGELOW, R. N. 

N. H. Tuberculosis Association Nurse 

LORRAINE O. LANDRY 

Clerk Stenographer 
Offices and Laboratory, City Hall 



Clinic Physicians: 

J. E. LAROCHELLE, M. 
Venereal Diseases 

H 



D. 



E. WILKINSON, M. D.* 
Infant, Pre-School 

P. BEAUDOIN, M. D. 
Infant, Pre-School 
Diphtheria, Smallpox 
*Moved away. 



L 



$ 58,267.30 



Health Officer 

I herewith respectfully submit the City's thirty-third 
annual report of Health Department activities for the year 
ending December 31, 1943. 



REPORTS OF DEPARTMENTS 



11 



Communicable Diseases 

Comment: There were 137 cases of communicable dis- 
eases reported to this department during 1943. 

Smallpox: Three smallpox clinics were held in June with 
a total of 107 being vaccinated. This is a sharp drop from 
1942 due to decreased population. 

Diphtheria: Two free toxoid clinics were held in January 
with a total of 271 receiving the single dose treatment of 
alum precipitated toxoid. 

Venereal Diseases: There were 11 cases of syphilis and 
3 cases of gonorrhea reported as new cases during 1943. The 
total number of cases under treatment at the St. Louis 
Hospital clinic was 22. There were 304 visits with total in- 
jections numbering 263 and 2 spinal punctures. There was 
one patient discharged as cured. 

Tuberculosis: The X. H. Tuberculosis Association con- 
ducted 3 clinics. Dr. Robert Kerr of Manchester was the 
examiner with Emma B. Bigelow, R. X., X. H. Tuberculosis 
Association Xurse for Coos County assisting. 

Communicable Diseases Reported 

• Chickenpox 1; Measles 48; Mumps 38; Scarlet Fever 5; 
Typhoid Fever 4 ; Tuberculosis 1 ; Whooping Cough 23 ; 
Gonorrhea 3; Syphilis 11; Other cases 3. 

Sanitation 

Water Supply: City and private water supply were bac- 
teriologically and chemically analyzed periodically to insure 
clean water for the City, both by the State Department of 
Health and its branch office, the District Sanitarian in 
Berlin. 

Milk: We issued 58 store dealers, 22 milk producers, 
and 19 milk dealers licenses. These expire on June 1, 1944. 
Periodical inspection of farms, dairies and analysis of the 
milk has been maintained to insure a clean milk supply. 

General Sanitation: Inspections were made in restau- 
rants, soda fountains, hotels, and all eating establishments 
along with bacteriological tests of eating and drinking uten- 
sils. All other buildings serving the public such as stores, 
barber shops, boarding homes, etc., were checked as to 
sanitary conditions. All complaints and nuisances were in- 



vestigated and when deemed justifiable were corrected as 
completely as possible. We wish to acknowledge the co- 
operat on of Mr. Russell Eckloff, District Sanitarian of the 
State Board of Health. 

Vital Statistics: 

Population: Again due to the draft and the migration 
of families to defense centers, it is impossible to obtain an 
accurate figure based on numerical methods, therefore, we 
are using the figure obtained from the number of people 
listed for rationing, which is approximately 14,600. 

Deaths: There were 158 resident deaths and 6 non- 
resident deaths, making a total of 164 deaths for 1943. 

Births and Stillbirths: There were 394 living births and 
14 stillbirths. The resident birth rate was 27.3 per 1,000. 
This figure does not include stillbirths. 

Infant Mortality: With 394 births and 21 deaths of in- 
fants under one year of age, there was an infant mortality 
rate of 5.39<- for this group. There were 14 deaths under 
one month of age. 

Maternal and Child Health Service: 

Monthly clinics are held in the Health Office for treat- 
ing crippled children. The weekly baby clinics and the pre- 
school clinics have been well attended and we wish to thank 
the Berlin Child Hygiene Association for making these 
clinics possible. 

The Berlin District Nursing Association: 

We wish to thank the District Xursing Association for 
the service being rendered to better the health of the citi- 
zens of Berlin. 

Respectfully submitted, 

CHARLES E. ROSS, 

Health Officer. 

Accepted and Approved : 

GENEVA A. BERWICK. Chairman. 
MRS. ADELIXE REMILLARD, 
L. P. BEAUDOIX, M. D., Secretary, 
Members of the Board of Health. 



12 



CITY OF BERLIN, N. H. 



Police Department 

We, the undersigned members of the Police Commission 
of the City, herewith submit our annual report for the 
Police Department, commencing February 1, 1943, and end- 
ing January 31, 1944. 

During the year, the Police Department lost two of its 
members, namely Officers Joseph Paquette and William E. 
Burgess who resigned from the Department, and these two 
patrolmen were replaced by Officers Arthur Lapointe and 
Roland J. Rousseau. 

In view of the widespread destructive acts committed in 
various parts of the City, particularly with reference to the 
breaking of over one hundred street lights at Hallowe'en, the 
breaking of windows in vacant properties and the stealing 
of gasoline coupons, the Commissioners deemed it advisable, 
during the month of November, 1943, to" hire two more 
patrolmen to give the Department the necessary men to 
endeavor to put a stop to these useless and wasteful acts 
which were causing worry and costs to the property owners 
and residents of the City. 

Officers Joseph M. Arsenault and Alfred J. Gauvin, two 
men who have been in the employ of the Brown Company, 
in the capacity of Police Guards for a period of twenty- 
three (23) months, were hired to replace Officers George 
Daniels and Samuel Hodgdon, two patrolmen who had re- 
signed from the Department during the year 1942, and had 
not been replaced by the Commission until then. 

The employment of these two new officers gave the 
Police Department the necessary officers to patrol at all 
times the Berlin Mills and the East Side Districts of the 
City, which Districts have been at times without patrolmen 
and police protection, in view of the fact that the Depart- 
ment did not have the necessary men to patrol all four (4) 
wards of the City at night as well as during the daytime. 

Mr. Samuel P. Nevins was appointed a member of the 
Police Commission to succeed Mr. J. Arthur Sullivan, 
whose term of office expired September 1, 1943. Mr. Nevins 
assumed his new duties as a member of the Commission on 
September 3, 1943. 

For activities of the Police Department we refer you to 
the City Marshal's Report, and to the financial report of 
the Department which are annexed to this Report. 

Dated at Berlin, New Hampshire, February 15, 1944. 
Respectfully submitted, 

W. B. FARQUHARSON, 

Chairman, 
ARTHUR O. DUPONT, 

Clerk, 
SAMUEL P. NEVINS, 

Member. 



Fuel 



759.85 



EXPENDITURES FOR THE YEAR ENDING 
JANUARY 31, 1944 
Personnel 

Salaries $ 41,629.54 

Supplies and expenses 819.30 

$ 42,448.84 

Headquarters 

Lights $ 322.47 



Office supplies 


129.50 






181.55 






8.87 




Miscellaneous 


86.92 




Telephone and Telegraph 


$ 
$ 


1,489.16 
1,365.03 


Automobile Expenses 


$ 302.78 






666.10 




Oil 


74.57 
553.07 
231.70 










Bicycles 

Plates and registrations 
Traffic 


$ 
$ 
$ 


1,828.22 
117.73 
165.73 


Prisoners' Expenses 

Conveying 

Doctors ............ 


.. .. $ 5.40 
3.00 
1.80 






102.10 










Commissioners 


$ 

350.00 

6.67 


112.30 


Miscellaneous 






$ 


356.67 



Total Expenditures $ 47,883.68 

Appropriation $ 47,410.52 

Credits 72.00 

Overdraft 401.16 



$ 47,883.68 



City Marshal 



I have the honor to submit for your consideration the 
yearly Report of the Police Department, commencing 
January 1, and ending December 31, 1943. 

Whole number of arrests 352 

Males 337 

Females 15 

Causes 

Abusing female child 1 

Abusive words 1 

Adultery 2 

Aggravated assault 1 

Assault 18 

Assault on officer 1 

Attempt statutory rape 1 

Automobile, Larceny 1 

Automobile, Leaving the scene of an accident 2 

Automobile, Operating with defective brakes 1 



REPORTS OF DEPARTMENTS 



13 



Automobile, Operating without lights 
Automobile, Operating unregistered car 
Automobile, Operating without a license 
Automobile, Operating while under influence of liquor 

Automobile, Parking 

Bastardy 

Breaking, entering and larceny 

Common drunkard 

Contempt proceedings 

Desertion 

Destroying property 

Disorderly conduct 

Disorderly person 

Disturbing the peace 

Drunkenness 

Embezzlement 

False pretenses 

Forgery 

For other Department 

Grand larceny 

Indecent exposure 

Keeping gambling machine .... 
Lewd and lascivious 

Loitering 

Neglecting children 

Noise and brawl ... 

Non-support 

On mittimus 

Obscene language 

Peddling without a license ... 

Petty larceny 

Surety to keep the peace 

Vagrancy 

Violation of Liquor law 
Sent to House of Correction 
Sent to Industrial School 



Miscellaneous 

Accidently shot and injured 

Army deserter for safe-keeping for military authorities 

Attempted breaks reported and investigated 

Automobile accidents reported 

Automobile accidents investigated 

Bicycles reported stolen 

Bicycles recovered 

Bodies taken to undertaker 

Bodies found in woods 

Bodies found in swimming hole 

Breaks reported and investigated 

Burglar alarm investigated 

Cars reported stolen 

Cars recovered 

Cats taken to incinerator plant 

Complaints reported and investigated 

Dogs taken to incinerator plant 

Draft dodger brought in 

Escort to bank 

Escort to Brown Company office 

Fatally injured, hunting 



1 
1 
4 
8 
1 
1 
2 
1 
2 
1 
2 
3 
2 
2 
232 
1 
1 
1 
4 
1 
3 
1 
1 
4 
1 



1 
1 
1 

IS 
1 
4 
2 

28 
2 

1 
2 

3 

85 
15 

16 

15 
4 
2 
1 

15 

1 

5 

5 

304 

747 

127 

1 

255 

7 

1 



Fatally injured, jumping over B. ^ M. bridge 1 

Fires reported, alarm given 3 

Gambling machine seized 1 

Glass reported broken 2 

Hold-up reported 1 

Horse killed by officer 1 

Juvenile for safe-keeping 3 

Lost children returned to parents Id 

Lost pocketbooks returned to owners 2 

Medical examiner notified 4 

Message delivered 16 

Money found by officer, returned to owner $39.00 

Persons brought in to be questioned 91 

Persons for lodging 

Persons for safe-keeping for drunkennejs 

Persons for safe-keeping for insanity 

Persons for safe-keeping for investigation 

Persons for safe-keeping for other departments 

Persons for safe-keeping for Sheriff's department 

Persons for safe-keeping for State Trooper 

Persons for safe-keeping for U. S. Marshal 

Persons injured in automobile accident 

Persons taken home 

Persons taken to hospital 

Persons taken to doctor's office 

Premises searched for gambling devices 

Premises searched for liquor 

Premises searched for stolen property 

Reprimanded 

R. R. Cars checked and found O. K. 

Reported lost in the woods and found 

Reported missing and found 

Stray dogs returned to owner 

Stray horse returned to owner 

Sudden death reported and investigated 

Visits to dance halls 

Visits to pool rooms 

Windows found open and closed 

Respectfully submitted. 

WALTER J. HYNES. 

City Marshal 



231 

450 
18 
19 

6 
? 



23 

57 

67 

12 

1 

1 

2 

60 

96 

2 

8 
9 
1 
4 

10 
2 

15 



Municipal Court 



I herewith submit my report as Clerk of the Municipal 
Court, for the year ending January 31, 1944. 
Amount received from February 1, 1943 to and in- 
cluding January 31. 1944 $ 2,068.85 
Amount paid, fines, fees and State 979.44 

Balance $ 1,089.41 

Amount paid to City Treasurer $ 1,089.41 

Respectfully submitted, 

E. ARTHUR VALLIERES. 

Clerk of Municipal Court. 



14 



CITY OF BERLIN, N. H. 



Haaififliiig Inspector 

I herewith submit my report as Inspector of Buildings 
for the year ending January 31, 1944. 

There were issued during the year, 55 permits, with a 
total estimated $11,502.50. These permits were divided as 
follows : 
42 Permits for repairs and alterations ... $ 9,147.50 

1 Permit for new residential building 600.00 

4 Permits for private garages 1,185.00 

8 Permits for sheds, henhouses, etc. 570.00 



$ 11,502.50 

I wish to express thanks to the City Clerk's office and 
the Commissioner of Public Works for their help and co- 
operation. 

Respectfully submitted, 

GEORGE RHEAUME. 

Building Inspector. 



Weights and Measures 

Submitted herewith is the annual report of the Sealer of 
Weights and Measures for the year, February 1, 1943 to 
January 31, 1944. 
Scales: 

Correct .. 213 

Adjusted .. 82 

Xot in use 2 

Condemned for repairs 5 



Avoirdupois Weights: 

Correct 

Adjusted 

Condemned for repairs 



Liquid Measures: 

Correct 
Not in use 



Automatic Gas Pumps: 

Correct 

Condemned for repairs 

Caution tag 

Idle tag 



Kerosene Pumps: 

Correct 
Caution tag 



302 

330 

1 
7 



338 

9 

1 



10 

47 
4 

20 
1 



72 

29 

1 



Grease Dispensers: 

Correct 
Caution tag 



Oil Bottles: 

Correct 



Package Reweighing: 

Correct 

Over 

Under 



Coal Reweighing: 

Correct 
Over 



Cart Bodies: 

Correct 
Incorrect 



Yard Sticks: 

Correct 



Warnings: 

Violations, etc. 



Out of Business: 



Miscellaneous: 

Correct 



34 
4 



38 

77 



77 

Tank Trucks: 

Condemned for repairs 2 

2 
Tank and Truck Meters: 

Correct 10 

Adjusted 2 

Not in use 1 

Condemned for repairs 2 



15 

2.260 

46 

131 

2,437 

5 
4 



3 

1 

4 
17 
17 
46 
46 
19 
19 

2 



30 



Property Owned by the Department: 

Complete equipment for Sealer of Weights and Measures. 
Total reports 270 

Respectfully submitted, 

LEO A. MORIN, 
Sealer of Weights and Measures. 



REPORTS OF DEPARTMENTS 



15 



Oilier Activities 



City Clerk 



I herewith submit my report as City Clerk for the year 
ending January 31, 1944. 

I have collected for the City of Berlin, and credited to 
the appropriate departments, the following sums : 

Automobile taxes $ 8,401.21 

Dog licenses 843.20 

City Hall 380.00 

City Hall rest rooms 184.30 

Public Works Department 4,154.39 

Fire Department 1,265.20 

Cemetery .. - 1,002.50 

20.00 

1,195.39 

792.00 

2.00 

9.00 

$ 18,249.19 
... $ 18,249.19 



Municipal Halls .... 

Tax deeds 

City Clerk's Department 

Miscellaneous 

Health Department ... . 



Paid City Treasurer 



Vital Statistics: 

The following tabulation shows the listing of births, 
deaths and marriages as recorded during the past five years : 

1939 1940 1941 1942 1943 

Births 391 437 417 

Deaths 222 205 171 

Marriages 139 169 174 

Respectfully submitted, 

G. A. COURNOYER, 

City Clerk. 



428 


404 


163 


201 


132 


82 



Itelief Depar Intent 

I herewith submit my report as Overseer of the Poor 
for the year ending January 31, 1944. 

The Relief Department was given an appropriation of 
$44,000.00 this year and spent the amount of $43,509.32 less 
refunds of $1,040.27, which left a balance of $2,130.95 unex- 
pended. 

The total number of cases aided during the year was 
248 families or 495 individuals. Our case load included 11 
Soldiers' Aid cases ; 10 Board and Care of Adult cases ; 9 
Board and Care of Children cases ; 86 Old Age Assistance 
cases; 114 Direct Relief cases. During the twelve months 
16 cases were transferred to the County after having re- 
ceived assistance from the City for five consecutive years. 

Due to an increase in the cost of food, it was deemed 
necessary this year to give recipients of grocery orders an 
increase of 20% over last year. 

I wish to thank His Honor, the Mayor, the members 
of the City Council, especially the Relief Committee and the 
Office Staff, for the splendid cooperation in helping me per- 
form my duties during the year. 

Respectfully submitted, 

EDGAR O. BOUTIN, 

Overseer of the Poor. 



FINANCIAL STATEMENT: 

Appropriation from the City $ 44,000.00 

Refunds 1,640.27 

Expenditures: 

Groceries $ 10,190.68 

Board and care 7,165.10 

Medical .. 5,930.95 

Old Age assistance 6,743.59 

Fuel 2,987.33 

Rents 2,157.03 

Footwear .. 211.72 

Clothing 170.83 

Miscellaneous 1,195.53 

Cash 315.19 

Mileage 243.76 

Salaries 5,336.50 

Office supplies and repairs 861.11 

Grand Total Expended 

Unexpended Balance 



45,640.27 



$ 43,509.32 



$ 2,130.95 



16 



CITY OF BERLIN, N. H. 



I'ublic Service 



Public Works 

Herewith I submit for your consideration the report of 
the Public Works Department for the year ending January 
31, 1944. 

Expenditures 

The net expenditures by this department during the 
fiscal year amounted to $132,532.64. It may be added that 
about $32,000.00 was spent on new improvements and that 
the balance of about $100,000.00 was used in general main- 
tenance costs. The normal street-cleaning and garbage 
collection services were carried on in the usual manner. 

Tarring and Patching Streets 

During the year we used over 7,000 gallons of tar for 
patching work which required, at some times, the use of 
twelve men and three trucks. There were 20,000 gallons 
of tar used on streets. Because of expansion joints and 
cracks on Main and Pleasant streets, it was necessary to 
use an asphalt fill. This work could not be entirely com- 
pleted because of war restrictions in the. purchase of addi- 
tional asphalt. It is hoped that this work can be completed 
this year. 

Sewers 

There were twelve new man-holes installed. Excavation 
for a new sewer and drain was started on Western Avenue. 
The usual sewer maintenance service was performed. 

Street Improvement 

Green Street from Pleasant Street to the Canadian 
National underpass has been scarafied and excavated to a 
new subgrade, regraded and tarred. This work required 
the removal of about 1,200 yards of the old surface and the 
spreading of about 300 yards of gravel for the new surface. 
Approximately 500 feet of Wight Street was scarafied, re- 
graded and resurfaced. 

Cemetery 

In addition to the regular maintenance of the cemeteries, 
approximately 10,000 yards of gravel was hauled for filling 
of a section of the new cemetery. This work was started 
early last spring because of the urgent need of additional 
lots. 



Sidewalks 

Under the War Production Board ruling, we were not 
allowed to build any new sidewalks, except in such cases 
where the old sidewalks were in such bad condition as to 
need replacement. Replacements during the past year were 
24,300 square feet of sidewalk. Town Road Aid : Under 
this aid approximately one-half mile of road on Cates Hill 
was patched and tarred. Enman Hill was regraded and 
stabilized with calcium of chloride. A section of Hillsboro 
Street which had been graded in previous years was re- 
graded and tarred. Some grading and patching was also 
done on Wight and Labossier streets. We were limited on 
the amount of work that could be done under Town Road 
Aid as the allowance in 1943 was $2,000 as against $4,000 in 
previous years. 

Recommendations 

I would recommend that the same effort made last year 
in the purchase of new trucks and equipment be continued 
until such time as the old and obsolete equipment has been 
replaced. Although the shortage of manpower was a handi- 
cap in getting work done, the most serious handicap was the 
bad condition of old trucks and equipment. I would also 
recommend the purchase of a closed-in garbage body to be 
mounted on a new truck purchased last fall. This body 
would have the advantage of making loading and unloading 
easier and would result in faster and cleaner collection of 
garbage. 

If men and materials are available, some effort should 
be made to improve the sewerage system. 

The incinerator plant should be enlarged and another 
destructor installed. This would eliminate the burning of 
garbage and refuse in the open and would correct a very 
unsanitary condition. Had a permit been obtained from the 
War Production Board last year this work would have been 
completed. It is hoped that such a permit will be possible 
this coming year. 

The tarring of streets should be kept up as much as 
possible since the life of the surface on many streets is 
almost gone. If tarring is done it will save the cost of 
having the streets scarafied and resurfaced. 

Thanks 

In conclusion, I wish to thank the Mayor, City Council, 
Public Works Committee and the public in general for the 
courtesies extended me in the performance of my duties. 
Respectfully submitted. 

ROLAND J. BRIDEAU, 
Commissioner Public Works. 



REPORTS OF DEPARTMENTS 



17 



Nineteenth Annual 
Report of the Berlin 
Water Works. 1943 



Members Who Have Served on the Board 

George F. Lovett 1935-1941 

Otto J. A. Dahl 1925-1939 

Thomas H. Samson 1925-1928 

J. J. O'Connell 1925-1931 

Henry G. Gosselin 1928- 

Ernest J. Gagnon 1932-1942 

Richard Christiansen 1939- 

Leroy J. Hughes 1941- 

Leo F. Frechette 1942- 

Mayors Who Have Served on the Board Ex-Officio 

Joseph A. Vaillancourt 1925-1926 

Eli J. King .... 1926-1928 

Edward R. B. McGee 1928-1931 

William E. Corbin 1931-1932 

0. J. Coulombe 1932-1934 

Daniel Feindel ... 1934-1935 

Arthur J. Bergeron 1935-1938 

Matthew J. Ryan 1938-1939 

Aime A. Tondreau 1939-1943 

Carl E. Morin 1943- 



Uerliu Water Board 

Chairman 

HENRY G. GOSSELIN 

Clerk 

LEROY J. HUGHES 

Members of the Board 

CARL E. MORIN, Mayor, Member Ex-Officio 
Henry G. Gosselin Term expires 1947 

Richard Christiansen Term expires 1945 

Leroy J. Hughes Term expires 1944 

Leo Frechette Term expires 1946 

Superintendent and Cashier 

ERNEST E. TANKARD 

Assistant Superintendent 

ALPHOXSE BISSOX, JR. 

February 1, 1944 
To His Honor, the Mayor, and City Council 
Berlin, N. H. 
Gentlemen : 

The present shortage of experienced man power, in- 
activity of building construction, and war curtailment of 
materials have postponed plans for further development of 



water works during the year. 

Although no extensive improvements have been made, 
it has been our policy to keep the system in first class con- 
dition and make all necessary repairs. 

Coagulating System 

The water purification system upon which some $40,000 
have already been invested, and now tied up for the dura- 
tion, has been carefully protected from frost and high water 
washouts. During the year, the wood staging which cost 
some $4,000, was sprayed with a creosote wood preservative 
in hope of prolonging its life until needed. 

Water Consumption to City Departments 

The total use of free water by City Departments is 
recorded in our books as $9,892.00. An additional amount 
valued at $1,955.00 is given to all churches and various 
private institutions throughout the City. 

During the year it was decided to discontinue the 
charges against the City for maintenance of fire hydrants. 
So, accordingly, the accumulated amount of $3,535.78 was 
charged off to hydrant maintenance. This sum having been 
carried on the books as an asset, accumulating for several 
years" and charged off this year, will cut extensively into 
the net profit for the year. 

The present period of inactivity in main construction 
will give us an opportunity to set aside funds to make needed 
reinforcements and complete work started before the war. 

At the present time, it is thought that the year immedi- 
ately following the end of the war will be the most critical 
from tin- employment standpoint. Many of our local resi- 
dents have moved to large defense plants. These war in- 
dustries will require much time to convert to peace time 
manufacturing. During this conversion period, it is expected 
many former residents will return and that much idle labor 
will be available. 

Unless plans are now made to provide for the expected 
unemployment situation, towns and cities not prepared may 
be faced with an acute labor problem. 

With sufficient time now available for constructive 
planning, our department has made plans so that actual con- 
struction may go ahead immediately after the war, and to 
a limited degree help in the anticipated labor situation. 

We look forward to the year 1944 confident that with 
the usual cooperation we will be able to discharge our re- 
sponsibilities in a satisfactory manner. 

For detailed activities we wish to refer you to our 
superintendent's report and for financial standing to the 
auditor's report. 

Respectfully submitted, 

CARL E. MORIN, 

Mayor, Member Ex-Officio. 
HENRY G. GOSSELIN, 

Chairman. 
LEROY J. HUGHES, 

Clerk. 
RICHARD CHRISTIANSEN, 

Commissioner. 
LEO F. FRECHETTE, 

Commissioner. 



18 



CITY OF BERLIN, N. H. 



Superintendent 



February 1, 1944 
Board of Water Commissioners 
Berlin, N. H. 
Gentlemen : 

I present herewith the annual report of activities for 
the year 1943. 

Three new services were added to the system, and 
fifteen old ones relaid. Seventeen meters were removed, 
seven changed to flat rate basis at request of the owner, 
and ten removed from vacant buildings. 

General 

The year as a whole has been an exceedingly busy one, 
although income and water consumption have both de- 
creased, maintenance work has increased. Commitments, 
due to vacancies, have been reduced by $2,729.00 or 3%, and 
consumption by 7j4%. 

The latter part of December 1943, a survey to ascertain 
the number of vacancies was made and it was found that 
one hundred twenty-eight houses were shut off at the 
street curb, and one hundred five additional rents sealed. 
About seventy-five percent of these were turned on and off 
several times during the course of the year and will prob- 
ably continue so for the duration. 

Godfrey Dam and Reservoir 

This has been the second year in which we have had the 
opportunity to experiment with the new sluice gate at God- 
frey dam. 

The temporary intake located above the reservoir to 
by-pass water needed in the City, was put into use during 
the month of October. During this period, sluice gates 
were opened and the reservoir allowed to empty its con- 
tents the quickest possible way. The gates were then 
closed, and when the basin again filled up, the operation 
was repeated. Excellent results have been attained, es- 
pecially in the basin bottom. Approximately four inches, 
or ninety percent, of all light silt, organic matter, and algae, 
which accumulates during the course of each year can be 
readily sluiced by this method. The remaining ten percent 
which clings to the sides of the reservoir is not entirely 
removed, due to the steep embankment of the basin. How- 
ever, the silt is bleached, washed out, and the algae growths 
killed by contact with the oxygen in the air. 

Ammonoosuc Pipe Line 

A thorough inspection of all air valves was conducted 
during the year and replacement parts installed wherever 
needed. All old valve boxes were replaced with new ones 
also. 

A topographical map of soil conditions, elevations, and 
general pipe line details is being prepared for our records. 

Chlorination of Water 

In early fall, the U. S. Public Health Service made a 
new ruling that water supplies in defense areas have bac- 
teriological analysis of water taken daily, instead of twice 
monthly. So accordingly, the State Board of Health pro- 
ceeded to do so. The results of the first month were not 
exceptionally satisfactory. Colon contamination was evi- 
dent in about thirty percent of the 10 c. c. inoculations, but 



not present in any of the 1 c. c. portions. It was therefore 
recommended that the chlorine residual be increased from 
.3 to .4 parts per million. This remedied the situation, but 
immediately caused many complaints from the public, 
relative to taste and odor in the drinking water. 

Taste and Odor 

Surveys of our water sheds show that numerous fam- 
ilies of beaver are present. Some attempt has been made 
by local trappers to remove them from the Success area 
and some cooperation received from the State Fish and 
Game Department, but many still remain. The Am- 
monoosuc area, our main supply, has not been molested for 
several years, and many beaver are present. Bacteriological 
tests show a large amount of animal contamination present. 
Although statistics show that this type of contamination is 
not injurious to the human system, exceedingly large 
amounts of chlorine are necessary to overcome the result- 
ing colon contamination which shows up as positive in bac- 
teriological samples. It is our hope to have this area 
opened next spring for a short period to a limited number 
of reliable trappers so that these animals can be eliminated. 

Distribution 

War Production Order P-46, under which all utilities 
work, prevents extension of water mains under nearly all 
circumstances. The War Production Board orders have 
also greatly reduced house construction so that we have 
had very little demand for new extensions. Accordingly, 
no new help has been needed and our regular crew has 
been able to carry on with the maintenance work. 

In order to conserve material, a number of old services, 
ordinarily replaced with new pipe, were cleaned out to the 
satisfaction of the customer by the use of our pipe clean- 
ing machine. 

The protective covering serving as a frost insulator 
surrounding the wood stave pipe line suspended underneath 
the Community Club bridge, and having been in service 
since 1930, was found to be completely rotted away, so was 
removed. Flow tests on velocity inside the pipe were made, 
and it was decided that a new covering was not necessary. 
However, careful observation will be made from time to 
time. 

Agitating System In Filter Tanks 

Filtering of our Ammonoosuc water supply has pro- 
gressed with excellent results from 1939, date of installa- 
tion, until spring of 1942. At that time the usual method of 
washing the beds began to fail and it became necessary to 
wash continually for 16-hour periods during the spring 
freshets and later in low water periods during the summer. 
When the brook flow returned to normal the filters seemed 
to function in the usual satisfactory manner. 

In the spring of 1943 the same trouble returned and it 
was found practically impossible to wash the filters suffici- 
ently to overcome the head loss, so it was decided to in- 
spect the filter material inside one of the tanks. About 
six inches of the fine anthrafilt on top of the filter ap- 
peared to be thoroughly clean, but below this depth, es- 
pecially on both sides, to a distance of about twelve inches 
from either side towards the center, the filter material was 
thickly caked with a solid mass of sludge through which 



REPORTS OF DEPARTMENTS 



19 



it was impossible for water to filter. It was thought that 
possibility a laxity in back washing had caused this con- 
dition, so several more thorough washings with water and 
air were given the bed, and an investigation showed that 
there was no improvement. A small amount of filter ma- 
terial was removed and observed through a microscope 
with the result that a heavy growth of algae covered each 
grain of anthrafilt upon which air and water had no effect. 

An overnight experiment showed that sodium hypo- 
chloride and water having a strength of 40 p. p.m. would 
dissolve the algae without chemical effect on the filter ma- 
terial. Therefore, the entire bed was given several treat- 
ments with this chemical, then thoroughly back washed in 
the usual manner with air and w'ater. Although chemical 
treatment killed the algae growth, investigation showed 
that it was still impossible to satisfactorily back wash the 
beds and remove the loose algae and sediment without in- 
creased agitation. 

As an experiment, a piping system perforated with 
7 04-inch holes at 12-inch intervals was constructed 
and set up inside one of the filter tanks, the purpose of 
which was to discharge a jet of water at a 45-degree angle 
directly into the solid mass around the tank. With a jet 
velocity of 107 f. p. s. and the backwashing of 440 feet of air 
p.m. an agitating movement was set up in the solid mass, 
breaking up the anthrafilt and sediment. Ffteen minutes 
of this type of agitation was used, after which agitation 
was continued for another fifteen minutes with air only, 
then the usual water wash method was used. Three similar 
treatments were given No. 1 filter, after which an investi- 
gation of the bed itself was made, and found to be as clean 
as the day it was first put into service. 

The experimental agitating system was then removed 
and systematically installed in each tank for a temporary 
washing. During the year, four tanks have been equipped 
with permanent agitating systems, and the other four are 
now under construction. 

Recommendations 

Only a few small leaks have occurred in the wooden 
transmission pipe lines during the year and they are apparent- 
ly in good condition. However, we do recommend the pur- 
chase of several hundred feet of 14-inch cast iron pipe for 
emergency repairs within the city limits. 

We wish to incorporate the following recommendations 
in this report for some future consideration. 

Auxiliary Supply to Supplement Ammonoosuc in 
Case of Break or Drought 

Ground water supply at Smith field and 10-inch 
main to City in accordance with the department 
plans and specifications $ 25,000.00 

That Centralized Quarters for Tools, Equipment 
and Storing Facilities Be Provided 

Water Power Generator Plant for Filter House$ 5,000.00 

Excerpts from 1938 Report of the National Board 

of Fire Underwriters (recommendations) 
Hillside Ave., Blanchard to High St., 800 ft. 10- 
inch pipe $ 4,000.00 

Hillside Ave., High to Prospect St., 500 ft. 8-inch 



pipe 1,900.00 

Prospect St., Hillside to Perkins Lane, 500 ft. 8- 

inch pipe 2,500.00 
Champlain St., Coos to Strafford St., 1,000 ft. 8- 

inch pipe 3,300.00 

Installing valves on remaining hydrants (Four) ... 400.00 



$ 12,100.00 



In closing, and on behalf of the department, I wish to 
express my appreciation for the hearty cooperation received 
from the Board during the year. 

Respectfully submitted, 

ERNEST E. TANKARD, 

Superintendent. 



Budget for 1944 

Cash in bank, January 1, 1944 $ 11,238.25 

U. S. Government Bund, 20,000.00 

Outstanding uncollected water bills 666.00 

1944 commitments (estimated) 82,000.00 

$113,904.25 

Estimated uncollected for year $ 500.00 

Abatements - 250.00 

Discounts 3,250.00 

Less 4.000.00 

Approximate Working Fund $109,904.25 

Expenses 

Gravity supply expense $ 2.000.00 

Purification expense 2,000.00 

Filter plant expense 700.00 

Repairs to mains 500.00 

Repairs to services 700.00 

Maintenance 4,000.00 

Meter department 400.00 

Meter reading 250.00 

Relaid services ... 150.00 

General office salary 1,700.00 

Thawing expense 100.00 

Insurance 650.00 

Stationery and printing 125.00 

Garage account .... 1,000.00 

Shop expense 300.00 

Superintendence and engineering 4,100.00 

Godfrey reservoir 100.00 

Kent Street pump 350.00 

Storehouse expense 350.00 

General expense 1,000.00 

Hydrant expense 500.00 

Commissioners' salaries 1.100.00 

Operating expenses ? 22.075.00 

Approximate working fund $109,904.25 

Operating expenses $ 22.075.00 

Miscellaneous improvements 500.00 



20 



CITY OF BERLIN, N. H. 



Bonds 

Interest, March 1st $ 175.00 

Bonds, April 1st . 20,000.00 

Interest, April 1st . . 9,350.00 

Bonds, September 1st 5,000.00 

Interest, September 1st 175.00 

Interest, October 1st 8,925.00 



$ 43,625.00 



Total Estimated Expenses 

Emergency Fund (ear marked) 

Balance for Improvements 
Water Department — Bonds 

1925 Water Bonds for purchase of plant 

@ V/2% : 
Outstanding balance 

on principal .. $440,000.00 
Interest paid 1925 to 

Dec. 31, 1943 $462,512.50 

Additional Int. to be 

be paid before retirement 173,187.50 



Interest 



$ 66,200.00 

$ 43,704.25 
10,000.00 

$ 33,704.25 

Principal 



$635,700.00 $700,000.00 
1931 Water Improvement Bonds (Ram- 
sey Hill Ext.) @ 4y 2 %: 
Interest paid before 
retirement, 1940 $ 6,750.00 



$ 6,750.00 $ 25,000.00 
1940 Water Purification Bonds @ 1%% : 
Outstanding balance 

on principal $ 20,000.00 

Interest paid 1940 to 

Dec. 31, 1943 ... $ 1,575.00 

Additional Int. to be 

paid before retirement .... 831.25 



$ 2,406.25 $ 35,000.00 



Water Bonds and Interest Payments 



Date 



March 

April 

April 

Sept. 

Sept. 

Oct. 

March 



Principal 
1944 $ 

1944 20,000.00 
1944 

1944 5,000.00 
1944 
1944 
1945 



Interest Issued Rate 

! 175.00 1940 1-H 

1925 4J4 

9,350.00 1925 414 

1940 m 

175.00 1940 ty 4 

8,925.00 1925 4*4 

131.25 1940 \y A 



Balance 

is 

420,000.00 
15.000.00 



April 

April 

Sept. 

Sept. 

Oct. 

March 

April 

April 

Sept. 

Sept. 

Oct. 

March 

April 

April 

Sept. 

Oct. 

April 

April 

Oct. 

April 

April 

Oct. 

April 

April 

Oct. 

April 

April 

Oct. 

April 

April 

Oct. 

April 

April 

Oct. 

April 

April 

Oct. 

April 

April 

Oct. 

April 

April 

Oct. 

April 

April 

Oct. 

April 

April 

Oct. 

April 

April 

Oct. 

April 



1945 

1945 

1945 

1945 

1945 

1946 

1946 

1946 

1946 

1946 

1946 

1947 

1947 

1947 

1947 

1947 

1948 

1948 

1948 

1949 

1949 

1949 

1950 

1950 

1950 

1951 

1951 

1951 

1952 

1952 

1952 

1953 

1953 

1953 

1954 

1954 

1954 

1955 

1955 

1955 

1956 

1956 

1956 

1957 

1957 

1957 

1958 

1958 

1958 

1959 

1959 

1959 

1960 



20,000.00 
5,000.00 

20,000.00 
5,000.00 

20,000.00 

5,000.00 

20,000.00 

20,000.00 

20,000.00 

30,000.00 

30,000.00 

30,000.00 

30,000.00 

30,000.00 

30,000.00 

30,000.00 

30,000.00 

30,000.00 

30,000.00 



8,925.00 

131.25 

8,500.00 

87.50 

8,500.00 

87.50 

8,075.00 

43.75 

8,075.00 

7,650.00 

7,650.00 
7,225.00 

7,225.00 
6,800.00 

6,800.00 
6.375.00 

6,375.00 
5,737.50 

5,737.50 
5,100.00 

5,100.00 
4,462.50 

4,462.50 
3,825.00 
3,825.00 

3,187.50 

3,187.50 
2,550.00 

2,550.00 
1,912.50 

1,912.50 
1,275.00 

1,275.00 
637.50 



1925 454 

1925 4J4 

1940 m 

1940 \y 4 

1925 454 

1940 \y 4 

1925 454 

1925 454 

1940 154 

1940 1J4 

1925 454 

1940 iy 4 

1925 4', 

1925 454 

1940 \y 4 

1925 454 

1925 454 

1925 454 

1925 454 

1925 454 

1925 454 

1925 454 

1925 454 

1925 454 

1925 454 

1925 454 

1925 454 

1925 454 

1925 454 

1925 454 

1925 454 

1925 454 

1925 454 

1925 454 

1925 454 

1925 454 

1925 454 

1925 454 

1925 454 

1925 454 

1925 454 

1925 454 

1925 454 

1925 454 

1925 4' i 

1925 454 

1925 454 

1925 454 

1925 454 

1925 454 

1925 454 

1925 454 

1925 454 



400,000.00 
10,000.00 

380,000.00 
5,000.00 

360,000.00 

340,000.00 

320,000.00 

300,000.00 

270,000.00 

240,000.00 

210,000.00 

180,000.00 

150,000.00 

120,000.00 

90,000.00 

60,000.00 

30,000.00 



CITY OF BERLIN, N. H. 

GATES SET 1943 



21 



Street 


Location 


Number 


Size 
6 inch 


Mechanic 


Near Pleasant 


1 



TOTAL DISTRIBUTION PIPES At 


nID GATES IN USE DECEMBER 31, 


1943 


Size 


Cast Iron 


Gal. Iron 


Wood Stave 


Cem. Lined 


Copper 


Gates 


1 yi in. and Smaller 




14,385 








67 


2 inch 




70,473 




2,440 


324 


153 


3 inch 


1,061 










4 


4 inch 


2,853 










4 


6 inch 


92,476 






952 




216 


8 inch 


24,899 










17 


10 inch 


10,478 










12 


12 inch 


10,389 




320 






14 


14 inch 


785 




5,379 






3 


16 inch 






7,500 








Total 


152,921 


84,858 


13,190 


3,392 


324 


490 



HYDRANTS WITHOUT VALVES 



Street 


Location 


Fourth 
Goebel 
Union 
Willard 


End of Street 


Corner Devens 


Near Buber's Mill 


West of Hillside Avenue 



METERS IN SERVICE DECEMBER 


31, 1943 








MAKE 


5-8 in. 


3-4 in. 


1 in. 


1% in. 


2 in. 


3 in. 


8 m. 


Total 


Artie 


6 


11 






1 






18 


Badger 


1 














1 


Empire 


43 


73 


2 


5 


10 


3 




136 


Gem 












1 


1 


2 


Hersey 


178 


10 












188 


Imo 


5 














5 


King 


1 




1 










2 


Lambert 


76 


6 


6 


3 


1 






92 


Lambert F. P. 


18 


2 


5 










25 


Nash 


3 














3 


Nilo 










1 






1 


Trident 


20 


17 


6 










43 


Worthington 


1 














1 


Total 


352 


119 


20 


8 


13 


4 


1 


517 



22 



CITY OF BERLIN, N. H. 



METERS IN STOCK DECEMBER 


31, 1943 




MAKE 


5-8 in. 


3-4 in. 
~~2 


1 in. 


I'A in. 


2 in. 


3 in. 


Total 


Artie 












2 


Empire 


11 


14 


3 


2 


3 


1 


34 
1 


Gem 










I 


Hersey 


18 
3 


2 






1 


21 
3 
1 

30 
3 
4 

99 


Imo 












King 










1 




Lambert 


9 


17 




1 


3 




Lambert F. P. 




2 


1 








Trident 


1 


3 










Total 


42 


40 


4 


3 


8 


2 



Location of Fire Hydrants 

No. Street Location 

Blanchard Corner Emery 

Burgess Corner Grafton 

Burgess Corner Mason 

Burgess Corner Strafford 

5 Burgess ..Corner Merrimack 

Burgess Corner Thomas 

Burgess Corner Berwick 

Bridge East of Verdun 

Bridge East of Hutchins 

10 Cascade Western Ave. ... 

Cascade Bridge St. and Wentworth Ave 

Cascade Corbin and Gordon Aves. 

Champlain Corner Alpha .. 

Champlain Near No. 388 

15 Champlain Corner Merrimack 

Cedar Near Prospect 123 



Static Pressure 

105 

103 

97 
95 



78 

82 

105 

95 

91 



Cedar Corner Summer 

Church Corner Hillside Ave. 

Church Near Holt Ave 



20 



St. 



Church West of Portland 

Church Hickey Hill 

Coos Corner Hutchins 

Coos Corner King 

Coos Beaudoin 

25 Coos Rockingham 

Coos Champlain 

Derrah East of Lancaster 

Derrah East of Beaudoin 

Denmark Between 7th and 8th Streets 

30 Denmark .. North of Eighth St 

Denmark Near No. 252 ... 

Exchange Front of City Garage 

First Ave. Corner Hill St. 

First Ave — Lower End 

35 First Ave. Corner Roderick- 

First Ave. South of Green St. 

First Ave. Corner of Clarke St. 

First Ave. Corner Laurel St. 

Fourth Upper End 

40 Forbush Ave. Corner Westcott 
Forbush Ave. Corner Beaudoin 
Forbush Ave. Corner Gendron 

Forbush Ave. East of Howland 

Glen Ave Glen Motor Sales 

45 Glen Ave. Top of Glen Hill 



83 



65 
80 
72 
55 

75 
85 
80 
63 
65 
65 
25 

115 
76 
74 
96 

100 

75 
75 
65 
57 
52 
85 
125 
130 



50 



55 



60 



65 



Glen Ave. 

Glen Ave. . . 

Glen Ave. 

Goebel 

Goebel 

( i' lebel 

( ii iebel 

Gorham Road 

Grafton 

Grafton 

Grafton 

Grafton 

Green 

Green 

Green 

Granite 

High 

High 

High 

High 

High 

High 

High 

High 
70 Hillsboro 

Hillside Ave. 

Hillside Ave. 

Hillside Ave. .. 

Hillside Ave. 

Hillside Ave. 

Hillside Ave. - 

Hillside Ave. 

I tinchey 

Hutchins 

Hutchins 

Hutchins 

Hutchins 

Hutchins 

Hutchins 

Jericho 

Jolbert 

Jolbert 

Kent 

Kent 
90 Madison Ave. 

Madison Ave. 



Opp. Miles residence 137 

Cross Machine Company 135 



Car Barn 
Corner Mason 
Corner Strafford .. 
. Corner Merrimack 
Corner Devens .. 
Opp. Corbin residence 

Corner Gendron 

Corner Lancaster 
Near Hutchins . 

Corner Sullivan 

Green Square 

City National Bank 

Near Underpass 

Near York 



137 

120 
120 
120 
120 
160 



118 
118 
115 
108 



75 



85 



Corner Pleasant 102 

East of School St 100 

Opp. Emery St 95 

Corner Hillside Ave. 85 

Opp. State St. 75 

Corner Portland St 65 

East of River St. 60 

West of River St. 60 

South of Merrimack 

Near Grand Trunk Crossing 115 

Corner Blanchard 

Corner Spring St. 

Corner Cedar St 90 

Opp. Poplar St 

Opp. Lincoln St. . 63 

North of Lincoln St. 43 

. Corner of Fourth Ave. 

Blanchard's Mill 

Corner Success Road 

Near Bean Brook crossing 

Opp. Horn St 68 

North of Bridge St 68 

Napert Village 

Incinerator plant 

Corner Second Ave. 

Corner Fourth Ave 72 

Corner Derrah 42 

Corner Coos 80 

Corner Hillside Ave 86 

Corner Pine 86 



REPORTS OF DEPARTMENTS 



23 



Madison Ave Corner Park 86 

Madison Ave. Corner River St. 185 

Madigan. Corner Third Ave. 100 

95 Madigan Corner Fourth Ave. 82 

Madigan Corner Sixth Ave. 65 
Main ...Corner Eleventh 

Main Corner Eighth 70 

Main Opp. Bridge St. 70 

100 Main Corner Seventh 70 

Main Corner Sixth 70 

Main Corner Fifth 70 

Main Opp. hay scales 68 

Main Opp. Brown Co. lab. 70 

105 Main Opp. Fourth 72 

Main Opp. Third 73 

Main Corner Second 73 

Main Corner First 73 

Main . Near Chamberlain bldg. 73 

110 Main . Opp. Cambridge 75 

Main Corner Success 

Main Corner Pleasant 100 

Main Near Boston Store 115 

Main Corner Mason . 120 

115 Main Opp. Newberry Store 120 

Main Opp. Brassard's Market 120 

Main Opp. Mullen Drug Store 120 

Maple War Brown Avenue 

Mason Corner Granite 108 

120 Mason Corner Cole 108 

Mason Corner Champlain 

Mason Corner Rockingham 93 

Mechanic Between Main and Pleasane 120 

Mechanic West of Pleasant 120 

125 Mechanic Opp. Wight bldg. lit) 

Mechanic Berlin Grain Company 120 

Milan Road W. S. (Bell ice house) 

Milan Road W. S. (near Smith farm) 

Milan Road W. S. (from Demers res.) 

130 Milan Road W. S. (near Twitchell farm) 

Milan Road W. S. (near Gibbons farm) 

Milan Road E. S. (Maynesboro farm) 58 

Milan Road E. S. (Thompson farm) 55 

Mt. Forist Near Western Ave. 100 
135 Mt. Forist Near Rouleau residence 

Napert Village Near Boston and Maine 

Ninth Corner Main 

Norway Opp. Sixth 

Norway Opp. 7th and 8th Sts. 

140 Norway North of Eighth 

Norway Opp. Ninth 

Norway Corner Tenth 

Oak Corner Willard 

Pershing Ave. East of Verdun .. ... 66 

145 Pershing Ave. . West of Verdun 81 

Pleasant Opp. Carpenter res. 98 

Pleasant Corner Mason . 

Pleasant Corner York 120 

Portland Corner Lincoln 

150 Portland Corner Willard 80 

Poplar East of Summer 72 

Poplar West of Summer 75 



Prospect .War Perkins Lane 58 

River ..Corner Willard 173 

155 School (orner Third 74 

School tier First 64 

School War Burgess School 

School Corner Church 97 

School Corner Washington 97 

160 School Corner Granite 99 

Second Ave. Corner Harding 80 

Second Ave. Corner Clarke 83 

Second Ave. Opp. Hamlin St. 85 

Second Ave Opp. Sessions St. 103 

165 Sixth Ave. Corner Labossiere 

Skating Rink Gilbert Street 

Spring West of Guilmette 

Success East of School St 85 

Success Corner Main 

170 Summer ..Corner Guilmette 120 

Summer East of Spruce 98 

Sweden Corner Seventh 

Sweden Corner Eighth 

Third Ave. Corner Mt. Forist 70 

175 Third Ave. St. Joseph School. 

Union Euber's Mill 115 

Watson Village Main Highway 

Watson Village On Flat 

Western Ave. South of Gerrish 100 

180 Western Ave. Opp. Glidden res. ... 95 

Western Ave. Opp. No. 694 

Western Ave. Opp. DeBlois res. 105 

Western Ave. Opp. Legassie res. 

Western Ave. Opp. Birch Street 

185 Western Ave. Corner William St. 

Wight Corner Third Ave. 

Wight Corner Boulay St. 97 

"Wight Opp. Cloutier res. 95 

Wight Near Duguay 93 

190 Wight City Barn 95 

Wight ..Front incinerator plant 

Willard Corner Emery 97 

Willard West of Hillside Ave 85 

Willard ... Corner State 84 

195 Willow Corner State 

Westcott Corner Marble 71 

York Front Hamel's 120 



Tools and Equipment 

Electric thawing machine. 

Gasoline thawing machine. 

Steam boiler. 

Hercules power engine. 

Worthington 105-foot gasoline driven air compressor. 

3-inch self-priming gasoline driven Yeager pump. 

3-inch self-priming gasoline driven pump. 

Smith tapping machine. 

Mueller tapping machine. 

Trailer. 

Pipe unloading crane. 

Sullivan jack hammer. 

Ingersoll jack hammer. 



24 



CITY OF BERLIN, N. H. 



2 


Ingersoll paving breakers. 


1 


Ingersoll tamper. 


1 


Myers force pump. 


2 


Diaphragm hand pumps. 


1 


Leadite burner. 


2 


Tripods. 


6 


Wheelbarrows. 


1 


Gasoline lantern. 


10 


Kerosene lanterns. 


1 


Grindstone. 


1 


lj-i-ton chain block. 


1 


Pair large chain tongs. 


1 


Pair small chain tongs. 


6 


24-inch pipe wrenches. 


2 


18-inch pipe wrenches. 


8 


14-inch pipe wrenches. 


2 


Vises. 


1 


Large pipe cutter. 


3 


Beaver die stocks. 


3 


Hack saw frames. 


1 


Lead melting pot. 


2 


Ladles. 


1 


Clark meter testing outfit. 


3 


Blasting chains. 


2 


Blasting batteries. 


4 


Pairs snowshoes. 


1 


Gasoline torch and soldering outfit. 


1 


Darley leak locator. 


1 


Darley pipe locator. 


25 


Picks. 


6 


Breaker points. 


12 


Hand drills. 


6 


Crow bars. 


6 


Snow shovels. 


5 


Square shovels. 


25 


Jack hammer drills. 


2 


Scythes. 


4 


Stone hammers. 


4 


Striking hammers. 


25 


Plug drills. 


6 


Pairs rubber boots. 


4 


Raincoats. 



SUMMARY OF STATISTICS 
For the Year Ending December 31, 1943 

BERLIN WATER WORKS 
Coos County, N. H. 

General Statistics 

Population as of January 1, 1940—19,084. 

Date of construction — Main construction, 1892. 

Source of Supply — Bean and Horn brooks, Ammonoosuc 

river 
Mode of supply — Gravity. 

Statistics Relating to Distribution System 

1 Kind of pipe — Cast iron, wrought iron, copper, cement 
lined and wooden stave. 

2 Sizes — Two to sixteen inch. 

3 Extended during year — none. 



4 Total now in use — 48 miles. 

5 Length of pipe less than 4 inches in diameter — 16 miles. 

6 Number of hydrants set during the year — none. 

7 Number of public hydrants — 197. 

8 Number of private hydrants — 97. 

9 Number of stop gates now in use — 493. 

10 Number of stop gates added during year — 1. 

11 Number of stop gates smaller than 4-inch — 223. 

12 Range of pressure in mains — 30 to 150 pounds. 

Statistics Relating to Services, Meters, Etc. 

1 Kind of pipe — Cast iron, wrought iron, brass, copper and 
cement lined. 

2 Sizes — J^-inch to 6-inch. 

3 New services added during year — 3. 

4 Total number of services now in use — 2,989. 



Meters 

1 Number of meters added for the year — 7. 

2 Number of meters now in use — 530. 

3 Number of meters changed during year — 66. 

4 Number of meters tested — 75. 

5 Percentage of services on meter — 16%. 

Booster Pumps 

1 Location — Corner Spring and Guilmette streets. 
Manufactured by DeLaval Steam Turbine Company. 
Description — Two single stage centrifugal pumps in series. 
Pumps from distribution system into a 40,000 gallon 
emergency storage tank on Hillside Avenue. (Pump to 
be used only in an emergency.) 

2 Location — Near junction of Kent Street and Forbush 
Avenue. 

Manufactured by DeLaval Steam Turbine Company. 
Description — Single stage centrifugal. Direct connected 
to the distribution mains. Pumps into a 20,000 gallon 
storage tank on Forbush Avenue. 

Purification Equipment 

1 Chloro-feeder unit, venturi controlled, in service on 
Ammonoosuc line. 

2 Chloro-feeder unit, meter controlled, in service on Horn 
brook supply line. 

3 Chloro-feeder unit, venturi controlled, in service on Bean 
brook supply line. 

4 Chloro-feeder (emergency unit) water meter operated, 
in stock. 

5 One manual controlled Wallace & Tiernan chlorinator, 
in stock. 

National Defense Equipment 

One 700-watt gasoline driven light plant. 



SCHEDULE OF WATER RATES 
Effective July 1, 1936 
Flat Rate 

For first family per year $ 9.90 

For second family per year 8.10 

For third family per year 7.20 

For fourth family per year .. 6.30 

Bath tubs, each 2.25 

Water closet, each 4.50 



REPORTS OF DEPARTMENTS 



25 



Wash basins, each 2.25 

Maximum rate covering private dwelling house oc- 
cupied by one family 22.50 

Offices and stores, faucet 9.00 

Stable 270 

Each additional animal 90 

Hose, to be used not more than two hours per day, 

May 1st to October 1st 3.60 

Fountains 

To be used not more than six hours per day from May 

1st to October 1st: 

For 1/16-inch jet or less $ 3.60 

For '4-inch jet 9.00 

All fountains having an orifice or discharge greater than 
5^-inch iii diameter, will be supplied with water by meter. 

Meter Rates 

Service charge $0.90 per quarter 

First 
Next 
Next 
Next 
Next 



1,500 feet 

3,500 feet 

5,000 feet 

10,000 feet 

20,000 feet 

Over 40,000 feet 
Minimum yearly meter charge 



; .27 

.20 
.16 
XZVi 
.11 
.09 
19.80 



Parks and Playgrounds 

The five playgrounds were opened in the summer of 
1943, with a full time instructor in charge of each, for a 
period of eight weeks. 

All playgrounds were active with very good attendance. 
A field day, with all playgrounds participating, was held 
and each playground held its own Hobby Day, Doll Show, 
Kite Exhibit, Poster Contest, and Pet Show in addition to 
routine sports and handcraft. Inter-playground baseball 
games were held. 

It is hoped that the City will see fit to continue the 
appropriation for this project. Playgrounds are essential at 
all times and especially so during war periods. 

Respectfully submitted, 

HENRIETTA E. KNAPP, 
EMMANUEL CHRISTIANSEN, 
S. D. STORY, 
Park and Playground Commissioners. 



26 



CITY OF BERLIN, N. H. 



Public Finance 



Assessors 

We submit herewith our report for the year .ending 
January 31, 1944, being the forty-seventh annual report of 
the City of Berlin. 

The following is the inventory of taxable property of 
the City of Berlin for the year 1943. 

Lands and buildings $9,569,070.00 

Neat stock 140.00 

Cows 6,680.00 

Oxen 40.00 

Hogs 190.00 

Fowls 2,980.00 

Horses 7,570.00 

Oil tanks 38,460.00 

Electric plants 372,920.00 

Stock in trade 1,739,792.00 

Mills and machinery 6,271,465.00 

$18,009,307.00 

Bank stock 1,260.63 

Poll taxes 17,120.00 

We wish to express our appreciation for the courtesies 
and assistance given us during the year by His Honor, the 
Mayor, City Council and other members of the City Govern- 
ment. 

Respectfully submitted, 

RALPH L. WILSON, 
THOMAS BELLEFEUILLE, 
ARTHUR LETTRE, 

Assessors. 



Tax Collector 

I submit herewith my report as Tax Collector for the 
year ending January 31, 1944. 

Levy of 1943 

Taxes committed to Collector $711,738.95 

Amount collected $674,009.07 

Abatements 2,176.29 



Discount allowed 2,747.67 

Total remittances to Treasurer 



$678,933.03 

Uncollected taxes as per Collector's list $ 32,805.92 

Collections not in original levy 

Added taxes: Property taxes $ 18.48 

Poll taxes 454.00 

Interest collected 125.19 

Total remittances to Treasurer $ 597.67 

Levy of 1942 

Uncollected taxes as of February 1, 1943 $ 41,271.88 

Amount collected $36,206.46 

Abatements 955.48 



Total remittances to Treasurer 

Uncollected taxes as per Collector's list 

Collections not in original levy 

Added taxes: Property taxes .... ... $ 

Poll taxes 

Interest collected 

Total remittances to Treasurer 



$ 37,161.94 
$ 4,109.94 



7.70 

180.00 

1,896.61 



$ 2,084.31 



Levy of 1941 

Uncollected taxes as of February 1, 1943 

Amount collected .. $ 

Abatements 

Total remittances to Treasurer 



$ 4,605.16 



376.97 
37.67 



$ 414.64 



Uncollected taxes as per Collector's list 
Collections not in original levy 

Added taxes: Poll taxes 

Interest collected 

Total remittances to Treasurer 

Levy of 1940 

Uncollected taxes as of February 1, 1943 

Amount collected $ 

Abatements 

Total remittances to Treasurer 

Uncollected taxes as per Collector's list 



$ 4,190.52 



$ 2.00 
63.14 



$ 65.14 



$ 3,013.79 



141.37 
6.00 



$ 147.37 
$ 2,866.42 



Interest collected — paid Treasurer 

Levy of 1939 

Uncollected taxes as of February 1, 1943 

Amount collected $ 

Abatements 

Total remittances to Treasurer 

Uncollected taxes as per Collector's list 
Collections not in original levy- 
Added taxes: Poll taxes $ 

Interest collected 

Total remittances to Treasurer 

Levy of 1938 

Uncollected taxes as of February 1, 1943 

Amount collected $ 

Abatements 

Total remittances to Treasurer 

Uncollected taxes as per Collector's list 



REPORTS OF DEPARTMENTS 27 

$ 12.73 Interest collected— paid Treasurer $ 13.74 

Levy of 1937 

Uncollected taxes as of February 1, 1943 $ 3,361.27 

ocoi ' Amount collected $ 2.00 

25.81 

Remittances to Treasurer $ 2.00 

<t 97 01 

Uncollected taxes as per Collector's list $ 3,359.27 

" 771771 Interest collected — paid Treasurer $ 1.08 

«p i,yyo.// 

Levy of 1936 

6.00 Uncollected taxes as of February 1, 1943 $ 4,821.24 

7.24 Amount collected $ 5.75 

Abatements 3,911.25 

$ 13.24 

Total remittances to Treasurer $ 3,917.00 

$ 5 530 99 Uncollected as per Collector's list $ 904.24 

3? 00 Interest collected — paid Treasurer $ 2.57 

12.75 

$ 44.75 
$ 5,486.24 



28 REPORTS OF DEPARTMENTS 



SUMMARY OF TAX SALES ACCOUNTS AS OF JANUARY 31, 1944 

Debit 

Tax Sale on account of levy of : 

1942 1941 1940 1939 1938 1937 1936 1934 

Taxes sold to City $ 7,152.36 $ 7,423.49 $ 5,047.75 $ 3,417.00 $ 2,022.33 $ 703.88 $ 100.63 $ 52.06 

Interest collected after sale 23.10 361.78 352.33 432.80 307.38 37.33 47.43 49.88 



Total Debits .. $ 7,175.46 $ 7,785.27 $ 5,400.08 $ 3,849.80 $ 2,329.71 $ 741.21 $ 148.06 $ 101.94 



Remittances to Treasurer 

during year $ 1,939.74 

Abatements 00.00 

Deeded to City 

during year 00.00 

Unredeemed Taxes at 

close of year 5,235.72 

Total Credits $ 7,175.40 



Credit 



$ 3,262.98 
00.00 


$ 


2,035.98 
41.91 


$ 


1,689.58 
13.29 


$ 


1,261.66 
13.23 


$ 


37.33 
36.91 


$ 


48.96 
19.78 


$ 


83.28 
0.00 


48.95 




62.79 




76.11 




71.76 




58.94 




25.01 




18.66 


4,473.34 




3,259.40 




2,070.82 




983.06 




608.03 




54.31 




0.00 


$ 7,785.27 


$ 


5,400.08 


$ 


3,849.80 


$ 


2,329.71 


$ 


741.21 


$ 


148.06 


$ 


101.94 














Respectfully submitted, 

EARLE A. YOUNG, 

Tax Collector. 





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30 



CITY OF BERLIN, N. H. 



Treasurer 



CITY OF BERLIN, N. H., 1943 REVENUES 









January 


3 


, 1944 










Anticipated 


Receipts 




Income 




Deficit 


Interest and Dividend tax 


$ 3,734.33 

152.00 

309.96 

16.49 


$ 2,800.00 
4,500.00 
1,300.00 
1,900.00 
6,000.00 
5,500.00 


$ 2,852.39 

4,612.86 

892.07 

1,900.00 

7,721.93 

4,179.80 


$ 


52.39 
112.86 

1,721.93 


$ 




Railroad tax 




Savings Bank tax 


407 93 


National Forest Land tax 




Motor Vehicle Permit fees 




Other Income 




Interest on taxes 




Milk licenses 








Less: Municipal Halls 


1,320.20 




Total Miscellaneous Revenues 


$ 22,000.00 

693,358.32 

1,260.63 

17,120.00 


$ 22,159.05 

665,100.44 

1,260.59 

12,572.00 

32,805.92 


$ 


1,887.18 


$ 


1,728.13 


Real Estate and Personal Property taxes 


Xational Bank Stock , 




Poll taxes 




Uncollected taxes 








Anticipated Revenue Surplus 


$733,738.95 
159.05 


$733,S98.00 


159.05 








$733,898.00 


$733,898.00 


$ 


1,887.18 


? 


1,887.18 



REPORTS OF DEPARTMENTS 



31 



CITY OF BERLIN, N. H., 1943 BUDGET 



January 31, 1944 



DEPARTMENT 



Airport 

Assessors' 

Bonds 

Cemetery 

City Clerk's 

City Hall Rest Rooms 

City Hall 

City Poor 

County Tax 

Civilian Defense 

Decoration Day 

Election Expenses 

Fire 

Forest Fires 

Health 

Insurance 

Interest on Bonds 

Interest — Notes Payable 

Interest Discount — Taxes 

Library 

Lighting Streets 

Miscellaneous 

Municipal Court 

Overlay 

Parks and Playgrounds 

Police 

Public Works 

Salaries 

Schools 

State Aid 

Tax Collector's 

Treasurer's 

Budget Fund Surplus 

Budget Fund Surplus 

Anticipated Revenue Surplus 



Appropriated Expended Credits Overdraft Unexpended 



$ 



800.00 

3,386.00 

91.000.00 

1.000.00 

4,983.80 

2.255.00 

5,201.40 

44,000.00 

106,300.00 

1.250.00 

100.00 

1.605.81 

57,000.00 

100.00 

7.619.60 

3,157.00 

16,311.25 

1,100.00 

2,600.00 

9,035.00 

16.000.00 

8,300.00 

1.200.00 

7.500.00 

1,350.00 

47,410.52 

108,113.57 

6,000.00 

170,000.00 

500.00 

S.9S0.00 

2.610.00 



$ 800.00 

3,277.02 

91,000.00 

2.002.50 

5,760.40 

2.468.69 

5,563.64 

43,509.32 

106,223.65 

1.250.00 

100.00 

1,910.06 

57,366.19 

2.25 

7.498.91 

2,662.97 

16,311.25 

816.72 

2,747.67 

9,035.00 

15,879.08 

4.557.97 

2,105.70 

7.226.56 

1,350.00 

47,883.68 

140,749.97 

5,980.00 

174.12S.38 

500.00 

5,717.23 

2,127.76 



1,002.50 
792.00 
190.94 
381.41 

1,640.27 

25.09 



1,267.20 



48.31 



33.25 



1,392.59 

1,089.41 

668.18 

72.00 
40,853.73 

8,343.81 

1.57 
7.73 



$733,738.95 $768,512.57 $ 57,809.99 



$ 23,036.37 
159.05 



2275 



304.25 



147.67 



401.16 



$ 875.83 
23,036.37 



$ 108.98 



15.40 

19.17 

2,130.95 

76.35 

25.09 



901.01 
97.75 

169.00 

494.03 
33.25 

283.28 



120.92 

5,134.62 

183.71 

941.62 



8,217.33 

20.00 

4,215.43 

234.34 
489.97 

$ 23,912.20 



$ 23,912.20 $ 23.912.20 



$ 23,195.42 



32 



CITY OF BERLIN, N. H. 



CITY OF BERLIN, N. H., BALANCE SHEET 



January 31, 1944 



Assets: 

Cash : 

Gen. Account— Berlin City Nat'l Bank $ 52,077.21 
National Shawmut Bank of Boston 36,343.21 

City Treasurer's petty cash 15.00 

City Clerk's change account 75.00 

Pledged Cash Funds : 

Recreational Fund Cash $ 325.00 

Withholding Tax Fund Cash .... 2,506.27 

War Bond Fund Cash 443.90 



$ 88,510.42 





$ 3,275.17 


Taxes Receivable : Property Poll 




1936 Levy ... $ 584.24 $ 320.00 $ 


904.24 


1937 Levy 749.27 2,610.00 


3,359.27 


1938 Levy .... 1.006.74 4.479.50 


5,486.24 


1939 Levy 1.27 1,995.50 


1,996.77 


1940 Levy 210.42 2,656.00 


2,866.42 


1941 Lew 326.52 3,864.00 


4,190.52 


1942 Levy . 549.94 3,560.00 


4,109.94 


1943 Levy 28,257.92 4,548.00 


32,805.92 


$ 31,686.32 $ 24,033.00 


$ 55,719.32 


Due from State : 




National Defense Program $. 


275.94 


Accounts Receivable 


1,977.70 2,253.64 


Other Assets : 




Tax Deeds $ 


3,099.39 


Tax Sales 


16,684.68 19,784.07 


Water Bonds Outstanding 


$460,000.00 


City Debt— Feb. 1, 1943 $454,795.91 




Less: Bonds paid $91,000.00 




Profit-Tax 




Deed Sales . 453.87 




Adj. of Tax 




Deed Account 112.91 




Checks charged off 213.98 




Checks issued, error 11.16 




Excess N. H. Forest 




Land Tax 1942 64.94 





Surplus— 1943 23,195.42 115,052.28 339,743.63 



Public Improvement Bonds 

issued Dec. 30, 1943 .....$ 36,000.00 

Net City Debt— Jan. 31, 1944 



$375,743.63 
$1,005,286.25 



Liabilities: 

Equipment Note Outstanding 
Bonds Outstanding 

February 1, 1943 . $565,000.00 
Notes Outstanding 

February 1, 1943 25,000.00 



$ 2,400.00 



$590,000.00 



Bonds paid in 1943 
Notes Paid in 1943 



$ 66,000.00 
.. 25,000.00 



91,000.00 



$499,000.00 
Public Imp. Bonds issued Dec. 30, 1943 36,000.00 



Water Bonds 

Pledged Cash Funds — Liab. : 

Recreational Fund 

Withholding Tax Fund 
War Bond Fund 

Dog licenses 

Public Improvement Fund J. 
Account Payable 



325.00 

2,506.27 

443.90 



535,000.00 
460,000.00 

3,275.17 

732.35 

3,722.93 

155.80 

$1,005,286.25 



REPORTS OF DEPARTMENTS 33 

CITY OF BERLIN, N. H., BONDED DEBT 

January 31, 1944 

City of Berlin— 4j4% Junior High School Bonds issued December 1, 192S; $10,000 maturing an- $175,000.00 $ 10,000.00 
nually to December 1, 1940; $5000 maturing annually to December 1, 1945. 

City of Berlin— 4}4% School Improvement Bonds issued July 1,1930; $10,000 maturing annually 200,000.00 70,000.00 
to July 1, 1950. 

City of Berlin— 3^% Public Improvement Bonds issued June 1, 1936; $6000 maturing annually 90,000.00 48,000.00 
to June 1, 1951. 

City of Berlin— 3V 2 % Public Improvement Bonds issued February 1, 1937; $3000 maturing an- 45,000.00 24,000.00 

nually to February 1, 1952. 

City of Berlin— ZYflo Public Improvement Bonds issued July 1, 1937; $10,000 maturing an- 100,000.00 40,000.00 
nually to July 1, 1947. 

City of Berlin— 37c Public Improvement Bonds issued December 1, 1937; $5000 maturing an- 75,000.00 45,000.00 
nually to December 1, 1952. 

City of Berlin— 2%% Public Improvement Bonds issued December 1, 1939; $6000 maturing an- 85,000.00 61,000.00 
nually to December 1, 1949; $5000 maturing annually to December 1, 1954. 

City of Berlin— XV 4 % Public Improvement Bonds issued November 1, 1940; $6000 maturing an- 85,000.00 67,000.00 
nually to November 1, 1950; $5000 maturing annually to November 1, 1955. 

City of Berlin— 2 l / 2 % Public Improvement Bonds issued December 1, 1941 : $6000 maturing an- 90,000.00 78,000.00 
nually to December 1, 1956. 

City of Berlin— 2^4% Public Improvement Bonds issued May 1, 1942; $4000 maturing annually 60,000.00 56,000.00 
to May 1, 1957. 

City of Berlin— XY^U Public Improvement Bonds issued December 30, 1943 ; $3000 maturing an- 36,000.00 36,000.00 
nually to December 30, 1955. 

Total Bonded Debt: $535,000.00 

CITY OF BERLIN, N. H., INDEBTEDNESS NOTES 

January 31, 1944 

Equipment Note 

City of Berlin— 294 Equipment Note issued January 26, 1944; payable $800.00 annually $ 2,400.00 $ 2,400.00 

Indebtedness 

Bonds Outstanding . $535,000.00 

Equipment Note 2,400.00 

Total Indebtedness $537,400.00 

Water Bonded Debt 

City of Berlin— 4%% Water Bonds issued April 1, 1925: $10,000 maturing annually to April 1,1930; $700,000.00 $440,000.00 
$15,000 maturing annually to April 1, 1940; $20,000 maturing annually to April 1, 1950; $30,000 
maturing annually to April 1, 1960. 

City of Berlin— Xy,% Water Bonds issued September 1, 1940; $5000 maturing annually to 35,000.00 20,000.00 

September 1, 1947. 

Total Water Bonded Debt $460,000.00 



34 CITY OF BERLIN, N. H. 



BOND RETIREMENT 

1944 $ 64,000.00 

1945 64,000.00 

1946 59,000.00 

1947 59,000.00 

1948 49,000.00 

1949 49,000.00 

1950 48,000.00 

1951 37,000.00 

1952 28,000.00 

1953 23,000.00 

1954 23,000.00 

1955 . 18,000.00 

1956 10,000.00 

1957 4,000.00 



$535,000.00 



E. L. DELISLE, 

City Treasurer. 



REPORT OF AUDITOR 



35 



Auditors' Water Department 

February 17, 1944 
Board of Water Commissioners 
Berlin Water Works 
Berlin, New Hampshire 
Gentlemen : 

In accordance with your instructions, we have examined 
the books and records of the Berlin Water Works for the 
year ended December 31, 1943. We have verified the assets 
and liabilities as disclosed by the General Ledger on that 
date and, without making a detailed audit of all transactions 
for the period, we have reviewed the income and expense 
accounts by methods and to the extent we deemed ap- 
propriate. 

In our opinion, the Exhibits and Schedules which follow 
fairly present the financial condition of the Berlin Water 
Works on December 31, 1943, and the results of its opera- 
tions for the year then ended, in conformity with generally 
accepted accounting principles applied throughout the period 
on a basis consistent with that of the preceding year. 
Respectfully submitted, 
PEISCH, ANGELL & COMPANY 



BERLIN WATER WORKS— EXHIBIT I 
Balance Sheet — December 31, 1943 

Assets 

Current Assets — 

Office Cash Fund $ 75.00 

Cash in Bank — 

Berlin National Bank 6,395.34 

Cash in Bank — Berlin Savings 

Bank & Trust Company 4,842.91 

$ 11,313.25 
United States Bonds . ... 20,000.00 

Accounts Receivable — 

Flat Rate $ 326.72 

Metered 339.64 

Miscellaneous 166.24 

832.60 
Materials and supplies 6,126.17 

Total Current Assets $ 38,272.02 

Fixed Assets — 

Land $ 4,150.00 

Godfrey Reservoir 69,211.87 

Plant and Equipment 

(Schedule 1) $990,025.61 

Less, reserve for depreciation 426,261.18 

563,764.43 

Total Fixed Assets 537,126.30 

Total Assets $675,398.32 



Liabilities 

Current Liabilities — 

Interest accrued— 414% Bonds $ 4,675.00 

Interest accrued — 1?4% Bonds 116.67 

Withholding Tax Liability 259.84 

Total Current Liabilities $ 5,051.51 

Bonded Debt- 
First Mortgage 4j/'s 1944/60 $440,000.00 
First Mortgage l&'s 1943/47 . 20,000.00 

Total Bonded Debt 460,000.00 

Contributions in aid of construction 58,397.31 

Municipal Investment — 

Balance, January 1, 1943 $145,240.01 

Add— 

Net profit from operations (Exhibit II) 9,064.89 
Net profit from sale of automobile 381.32 

$154,686.22 
Deduct — 
Hydrant expense for prior years charged 

to City of Berlin, now cancelled 2,736.72 

Balance, December 31, 1943 151,949.50 

Total Liabilities ... $675,398.32 

BERLIN WATER WORKS— EXHIBIT II 
Statement of Operations — Year Ended December 31, 1943 

Operating Income 

Commercial water — Flat rate $ 52,319.30 
Commercial water — Metered 25,102.72 



$ 77,422.02 



Industrial water — Flat rate 
Industrial water — Metered 



1,727.28 
6,065.70 



7,792.98 



Municipal Water — 

Sprinkling ......$ 135.00 

Hydrants 7,920.00 

Flat rate .. 201.54 

Metered 1,494.68 

Gross Income 

Operating Expense 

Water Supply — 

Gravity supply labor $ 1,213.15 
Gravity supply expense 759.94 
Purification supplies and ex- 
pense 1,979.92 
Repairs to mains 429.39 
Repairs to services 84.94 
Hydrant expense 799.06 
Superintendence and engineer- 
ing 3,800.00 



9,751.22 



94,966.22 



36 



CITY OF BERLIN, N. H. 



Maintenance labor 3,673.44 



Repairs to Y.M.C.A. pipe lines 221.72 



12,739.84 



Distribution — 

Meter department — Supplies 

and expense $ 375.70 

Repairs to services 663.52 

Commercial — 

Meter indexing salaries 

General — 

Office salaries $ 1,617.00 

Office expense 93.27 

General expense 739.17 



Miscellaneous Undistributed Expense — 

Commissioners' salaries $ 1,025.00 

Thawing account 162.66 

Insurance 212.28 

Stationery and printing 111.75 

Garage expense 1,014.67 

Shop expense 203.65 

Maintenance 284.73 

Filter plant expense 631.45 

Godfrey Dam sluice gate 50.00 

Kent Street pump 303.89 

Maple Street 16.49 

Storehouse expense 382.51 



1,039.22 



178.26 



2,449.44 



Total Operating Expense 

Income from Operations 

Other Income 

Discounts taken 

Bond interest received 



Other Expense 

Interest paid 4'/i% Bonds 
Interest paid l-)4% Bonds 

Abatements — Flat rate 

Abatements — Metered 
Discounts — Flat rate 
Discounts — Metered 



Income before Depreciation 
Depreciation (Schedule 1) 



Net Income for Year 



4,620.80 



21,027.56 



$ 73,938.66 



48.26 
175.00 



223.26 



$ 74,161.92 



18,912.50 
408.33 
8,839.81 
3,058.62 
2,204.68 
1,348.21 



34,772.15 

$ 39,389.77 
30,324.88 

$ 9,064.89 



REPORT OF AUDITOR 



37 



BERLIN WATER WORKS— SCHEDULE 1 
Plant Assets and Reserves for Depreciation 



Fixed Assets 



Transmission mains 
Distribution mains 

Hydrants 

Meters 

Water supply structures 
Water storage structures 
Pumps and pumping equipment 
Distribution System, structures 
General Office equipment 

Shop equipment 

Purification equipment .., 
Trucks and automobiles 

Services 

Regulator house and pipe line 

Filter plant 

Coagulating basin 

Filter agitators 



Balances 


Additions 


Deductions 




12-31-42 


During Year 


During Year 


12-31-43 


$266,122.65 


$ 


$ 


$266,122.65 


414,372.53 






414,372.53 


11,262.04 






11,262.04 


11,556.81 






11,556.81 


86,857.40 






86,857.40 


1,200.00 






1,200.00 


500.00 






500.00 


3,904.84 






3,904.84 


1,872.84 






1,872.84 


5,853.18 


35.00 




5,888.18 


6,607.93 






6,607.93 


2,334.35 


1,178.69 


857.95 


2,655.09 


79,106.92 


137.65 




79,244.57 


6,053.97 






6,053.97 


51,594.70 


15.61 




51,610.31 


39,067.74 


. 892.75 




39,960.49 


107.12 


248.84 




355.96 



Totals 



375.02 $ 2,508.54 



857.95 



025.61 



Reserves for Depreciation 

Transmission mains 

Distribution mains 

Hydrants 

Meters 

Water supply structures 
Water storage structures 
Pumps and pumping equipment 
Distribution System, structures 
General Office equipment 
Shop equipment 
Purification equipment 
Trucks and automobiles 

Services 

Regulator house and pipe line 

Filter plant 

Coagulating basin 



Totals 



$155,006.09 


$ 9,617.28 $ 


$164,623.37 


121,039.79 


9,222.24 


130,262.03 


2,915.14 


225.24 


3,140.38 


7,261.19 


577.80 


7,838.99 


43,624.61 


3,165.84 


46,790.45 


1,041.00 


60.00 


1,101.00 


434.98 


25.08 


460.06 


1,018.90 


78.12 


1,097.02 


1,254.09 


187.32 


1,441.41 


3,994.14 


583.32 


4,577.46 


5,749.45 


660.96 


6,410.41 


1,612.06 


636.60 789.17 1,459.39 


51,774.13 


3,231.64 


55,005.77 




121.08 


121.08 




1.152.00 


1,152.00 




780.36 


780.36 


$396,725.57 


$ 30,324.88 $ 789.27 $426,261.18 



Auditors' f ilv of Berlin 

w 

February 17, 1944 
To the Honorable Mayor and City Council 
Berlin, New Hampshire 
Gentlemen : 

In accordance with your instructions, we have audited 
the books and records of the City of Berlin for the year 
ended January 31, 1944. We have verified the assets and 
liabilities as disclosed by the general ledger on that date 
and, without making a detailed audit of all transactions for 



the period, we have reviewed the income and appropriation 
accounts by methods and to the extent we deemed advisable. 
In our opinion, the Exhibits and Schedules which follow 
fairly present the financial condition of the City of Berlin 
on January 31, 1944 and the results of its operations for the 
year then ended, in accordance with generally accepted ac- 
counting principles applied throughout the period under re- 
view on a basis consistent with that of the preceding year. 

Respectfully submitted, 
PEISCH. AXGELL & COMPANY 



38 



CITY OF BERLIN, N. H. 





EXHIBIT I 


—CITY 


OF BERLIN 




Assets 






Cash 










Berlin City National Bank 




$ 


52.077.21 


National Shawmut Bank 






36,343.21 


Petty Cash Fund 


— City Treasurer 




15.00 


Change Fund — Ci 


tv Clerk 
nds 






75.00 


Pledged Cash Ft 


$ 


Recreation Fund 


Cash 




$ 


325.00 


Withholding Tax 


Fund Cash 






2,506.27 


War Bond Fund 


Cash . 






443.90 


Taxes Receivable 


Property 


Poll 




Total 


Lew of 1936 


$ 5S4.24 $ 


320.00 


$ 


904.24 


Levy of 1937 


749.27 


2,610.00 




3,359.27 


Levy of 1938 


1.006.74 


4,479.50 




5,486.24 


Lew of 1939 


1.27 


1,995.50 




1,996.77 


Lew of 1940 


210.42 


2,656.00 




2,866.42 


Lew of 1941 


326.52 


3,864.00 




4,190.52 


Lew of 1942 


549.94 


3,560.00 




4,109.94 


Levy of 1943 


2H.2S7.92 


4,548.00 




32,805.92 




$ 31.686.32 $ 24,033.00 $ 55,719.32 


Due from State 










Bounties on animals 




$ 


77.70 


National Defense 


program 






275.94 


1943 State tax (estimated) 






1,900.00 



N. H. 



BALANCE SHEET, JANUARY 31, 1944 



Other Assets 

Tax sales . $ 16.6S4.68 

Tax deeds 3,099.39 

Water Works Bonds Outstanding 
City Net Debt (Exhibit II) 



1,510.42 



3,275.17 



2,253.64 



Total Assets and Net Debt 



19,784.07 
460,000.00 
375,743.63 

$1,005,286.25 



Accounts Payable 
General City Notes and 

Junior High School 4^' 
School Improvement 4}^ 
Public Improvement 3J/2 
Public Improvement 3 l /i 
Public Improvement 2}i 
Public Improvement 3's 
Public Improvement 2% 
Public Improvement \f^ 
Public Improvement 2!4 
Public Improvement 2 l / 2 
Public Improvement 1% ! 
Equipment Note 2% 



Liabilities 

Bonds 

1944-45 

1944-50 ... 

1944-51 

1944-52 

1944-47 

1944-53 .... 

1944-54 

1944-55 .. 

1944-57 

1944-58 

1944-55 

1-26-47 



Water Works Bonds 

Water Works 4H's 1944-60 

Water Works 1^'s 1944-47 



Pledged Cash Fund Liabilities 

Recreation Fund Liability 

Withholding Tax Fund Liability 
War Bond Tax Liability 



$ 155.80 



10,000.00 
70,000.00 
48,000.00 
24,000.00 
40,000.00 
45,000.00 
61,000.00 
67,000.00 
78,000.00 
56,000.00 
36,000.00 
2,400.00 



$440,000.00 
20,000.00 



325.00 

2,506.27 

443.90 



537,400.00 



460,000.00 



Other Liabilities 

Dog License Net Income — Due schools $ 
Public Improvement J 



732.35 
3,722.93 



3,275.17 



4,455.28 



Total Liabilities 



$1,005,286.25 



CITY OF BERLIN, NEW HAMPSHIRE— EXHIBIT II 
Analysis of City Net Debt 

Balance February 1, 1943 $454,795.91 

Add— 

Overdrafts of Appropriations $ 875.83 

Public Improvement Bonds (new issue) 36,000.00 



36,875.83 



$491,671.74 



Deduct — 

Net profit on sale of tax deeds for year$ 

Adjustment of tax deed account, sales 

of prior years 
City bonds paid during year 
Unpresented checks of prior years 
charged off 



453.87 

112.91 
91,000.00 

213.98 



Unexpended balances of appropriations 23,912.20 

Income realized in excess of estimates 159.05 

Checks issued in error 11.16 

Excess National Forest Land tax .... 64.94 



Balance January 31, 1944 



115,928.11 
$375,743.63 



CITY OF BERLIN, NEW HAMPSHIRE— EXHIBIT III 

Statement of Estimated Revenues and Receipts for the 

Year Ended January 31, 1944 



Estimated 
Revenue 

Automobile taxes $ 6,000.00 

Taxes Receivable 

State of N. H., 

Int. & Div. tax 2,800.00 



Realized 
Revenue 



Excess Unrealized 

7,721.93 $ 1,721.93 $ 



2,852.39 



52.39 



Railroad tax ... 4,500.00 4,612.86 

Savings bank tax 1,300.00 892.07 
National Forest 

Land tax 1,900.00 1,900.00* 

Other income 5,000.00 4,179.80 



REPORT OF AUDITOR 

112.86 1943 Tax Lew 711,738.95 678,933.03 
407.93 



1,3211.2(1 



22,000.00 $ 22,159.05 $ 1,887.18 $ 1,728.13 



39 
32,805.92 



Total Estimated 

Revenue $733,738.95 $701,092.08 $ 1,887.18 $ 34,534.05 
^Transferred to Accounts Receivable 1/31/44. 



CITY OF BERLIN, NEW HAMPSHIRE— EXHIBIT IV 
Statement of Appropriations and Expenditures for the Year Ended January 31, 1944 



Appropriations 

Airport $ 800.00 

Assessors' Department 3,386.00 

Bonds 91,000.00 

Cemetery 1.000.00 

City Clerk's Department 4,983.80 

City Hall 5,201.40 

City Hall Rest Rooms 2,253.00 

City Poor 44,000.00 

Civilian Defense 1,250.00 

County Tax 106,300.00 

Decoration Day 100.00 

Election Expense 1,605.81 

Fire Department 57,000.00 

Forest Fires 100.00 

Health Department 7,ol9.60 

Insurance 3,157.00 

Interest on Bonds 16,311.25 

Discount on Notes Payable .... 1,100.00 

Interest Discounts — Taxes 2,600.00 ' 

Library 9,035.00 

Lighting Streets .. .................... 16,000.00 

Miscellaneous 8,300.00 

Municipal Court 1,200.00 

Overlay 7,500.00 

Parks and Playgrounds 1,350.00 

Police Department 47,410.52 

Public Works 108,113.57 

Salaries 6,000.00 

Schools 170,000.00 

State Aid 500.00 

Tax Collector's Department 5,950.00 

Treasurer's Department 2,010.00 

Totals $733,738.95 

57,809.99 



Unexpended 



$791,548.94 
768,512.57 

$ 23,036.37 



5 Income Credits Expended 


Balance 


$ 


$ 800.00 


$ 




3.277.02 


108.98 




91,000.00 




1,002.50 


2,002.50 




792.00 


5,700.40 


15.40 


381.41 


5,563.64 


19.17 


190.94 


2,468.69 




1,640.27 


43,509.32 


2,130.95 


25.09 


1 .250.00 


25.09 




lOi ,,223.65 


76.35 




100.00 






1,910.06 




1,267.20 


57,366.19 


901.01 




2.25 


97.75 


48.31 


7.498.91 


169.00 




2,1,02.97 


494.03 


33.25 


16,311.25 


33.25 




816.72 


283.28 




2,747.67 






9,035.00 






15,879.08 


120.92 


1,392.59 


4,557.97 


5,134.62 


1.0S9.41 


2.105.70 


183.71 


668.18 


7,226.56 
1.350.00 


941.02 


72.00 


47,883.68 




40,853.73 


140.749.97 


8,217.33 




5.980.00 


20.00 


8,343.81 


174.128.38 
500.00 


4,215.43 


1.57 


5.717.23 


234.34 


7.73 


2.127.76 


489.97 


$ 57,809.99 


$708,512.57 


$ 23,912.20 
875.83 



22.75 



304.25 



147.67 



401.16 



875.83 



$ 23,036.37 



40 



CITY OF BERLIN, N. H. 



CITY OF BERLIN, NEW HAMPSHIRE— EXHIBIT V 
Statement of Cash Receipts and Disbursements for the Year 

Ended January 31, 1944 
Cash Balances, February 1, 1944 

Berlin City National Bank $ 73,998.13 

National Shawmut Bank 69,739.73 



$143,737.86 



Add Receipts 

Graziella Brooks, tax collector $ 23,480.66 

Gaston A. Cournoyer, tax collector 18,249.19 

J. W. Gonya, tax collector 40.00 

H. Schnare, tax collector 3.08 

Earle A. Young, tax collector 710,318.55 

Gaston A. Cournoyer. city clerk 459.66 

State of New Hampshire — Refunds and 

disbursements 7,237.13 

Public Works department 4,259.19 

City Poor department 1,640.27 

Health department 39.31 

Milk licenses 152.00 

Tax Collector's department 1.57 

Municipal Court 1,089.41 

School department 4,524.22 

City Hall rest rooms 6.64 

Miscellaneous income 894.59 

Unpresented checks charged off 237.00 

Edward J. Legassie, settlement 3.151.84 

Sale of tax anticipation notes 200,000.00 

City Treasurer's department 7.73 

Fire department 2.00 

Dolly Copp Wood, stumpage 500.00 

City" Hall 1.41 

State of New Hampshire — 

Interest and dividends tax 2,852.39 

Railroad tax 4,612.86 

Savings Bank tax 892.07 

Police Department — bicycle registration 72.00 
Civilian Defense — telephone reimburse- 
ment 25.09 
Public Improvement bonds 36,000.00 
Premium on bonds 309.96 
Accrued interest on bonds 33.25 
Notes Payable — For purchase of equip- 
ment ." .... 2,400.00 

Total Receipts $1,023,493.07 
Deduct Disbursements 

Airport expense $ 800.00 

Assessors' department 3,277.02 

Band concerts 300.00 

Bonds paid 91,000.00 

Cemetery 2,002.50 

Charged off checks paid 11.86 

City Clerk's department 5,760.40 

City Hall 5,563.64 

Citv Hall rest rooms 2,468.69 

City poor 43,509.32 

Civilian Defense .... 1,250.00 

County tax 106,223.65 

Decoration Day 100.00 



Fire department .. 57,366.19 

Forest fires ........ 2.25 

Health department 7,498.91 

Insurance 2,662.97 

Interest on bonds .... 16,311.25 

Interest Discounts — Notes payable 816.72 

Interest Discounts — Taxes 2,747.67 

Library 9,035.00 

Lighting streets 15,879.08 

Miscellaneous 4,257.97 

Municipal Court 2,105.70 

National Defense program 1,668.35 

Overlay 7,226.56 

Parks and playgrounds 1,350.00 

Police department 47,883.68 

Public Works department 140,749.97 

Salaries 5,980.00 

Schools ... 174,128.38 

State aid 500.00 

Tax sales 7,152.36 

Tax Collector's department 5,717.23 

Tax deeds 673.91 

Treasurer's department 1,971.96 

Municipal halls 36.49 

Election expense 1,910.06 

Auto tax expense 679.28 

Bounty on animals 77.70 

Dog licenses expense 137.71 

1942 taxes 5.85 

1943 taxes 10.23 
Notes paid 300,000.00 



Total Disbursements 



$1,078,810.51 



Cash Balances, January 31, 

Berlin City National Bank 
National Shawmut Bank . 



1944 



$ 52,077.21 
.. 36,343.21 



$ 88,420.42 



CITY OF BERLIN, NEW HAMPSHIRE— SCHEDULE 1 
Analysis of Changes in Tax Deeds 





Balances Additions 


Deductions Balances 




2-1-43 






1-31-44 


Berlin Heights Addition $ 29.94 $ 




$ $ 


29.94 




3.76* 


3.76 






Elwin Brown 


.... 202.87 




202.87 




Edward Baillargeon .. 


211.71 




211.71 




Rose O. Cloutier 


.... 31.73 






31.73 


Gladvs Dale 


50.51 






50.51 


Demers lots 


193.85 






193.85 


A. B. Forbush 


743.01 


74.35 


212.97 


604.39 


J. C. Footer . 


247.51 






247.51 


Patrick Furlong 


.... 45.80 






45.80 


Leo Frechette 


.... 25.44 






25.44 


Marie Harpin 


84.50 






84.50 


W. C. Hoxie 


18.92 






18.92 


William Hickev 


10.00* 


60.66 




50.66 


Wilfrel Hamel 


. 40.83 




40.83 




Carrie Johnson 


1.53* 


1.53 






Edward R. Marshall 


.... 64.35 






64.35 



REPORT OF AUDITOR 



41 



Vrthur Martin 26.02* 

George Mac Arthur 56.69 

\. X. McCready..... 158.93 

Elmer J. Noyes 63.66 
New England Land lots 258.04 

Kathleen Dawson 200.39 

Otis Perry lots 258.04 

Alphonse Roy 11.38* 
Hazen Smith .97* 

Ernest A. St. Hilaire 24.84* 

Estate of James Willey 71.36 

Edward Webb 14.33 

Bert Wood estate 00.18 
Frank E. Sloane 

Olie Gunnarson 

Olie Gunnarson 
Isaac Wedge .. 
Nils Gunnarson 
Albert F. Hamel 
Fred Arenburg 

Totals $3,054.09 $ 



26.02 



KJ5.su 



11.38 
.97 

63.75 



132.95 
101.10 
113.55 
46.69 
59.98 
69.22 
70.90 



3.00 



14.33 



56.69 
53.13 

258.04 
200.39 
258.04 



35.91 
71.36 

60.18 

132.95 

101.10 

113.55 

46.69 

59.98 

6022 

70.90 



836.81 $ 791.51 $3,099.39 



CITY OF BERLIN, NEW HAMPSHIRE— SCHEDULE 2 
Analysis of Changes in Tax Sales 



Year 

1934 
1936 
1937 
1938 
1939 
1940 
1941 
1942 



Balances 
2-1-43 

52.06 

100.63 
703.88 
2,022.32 
3,417.00 
5,047.75 
7,423.49 



Additions 
for Period 



7,152.36 



Deductions 
Abatements & 
Redemption 

$ 52.06 3 

46.32 

95.85 

1,039.27 

1.340.18 
1.788.35 
2,950.15 
1.916.64 



Balances 
1-3144 



54.31 

608.03 

983.06 

2,070.82 

3.250.40 
4,473.34 

5.235.72 



$ 18,767.14 $ 7.152.3o $ 'J,23A.^: $ 16,684.68 



SCHEDULE 3 
Tax Anticipation Notes Outstanding 

NONE 

CITY OF BERLIN, NEW HAMPSHIRE— SCHEDULE 4 
Analysis of Bonded Debt 



Balance 
2-1-43 



Paid During 
Year 



Balance 
1-31-44 



Jr. High School 4j4's 1943-45 $ 15,000.00 $ 5,000.00$ 10,000.00 

East Side School 

Fire Sta. and 

Voting Place .... 454's 1943 5.000.00 5,000.00 



School Imp. 4^'s 1943-50 80,000.00 

Public Imp. 3^'s 1943-51 54,000.00 

Public Imp. 3 'A's 1943-52 27,000.00 

Public Imp. . 2-;4's 1943-47 50,000.00 

Public Imp. 3's 1943-53 50,000.00 

Public Imp. 2J4's 1943-54 67,000.00 

Public Imp. 1,'4's 1943-55 73,000.00 

Public Imp. 2J4's 1943-57 84,000.00 

Public Imp. 2^'s 1943-58 60,000.00 

Pub. Imp. Xotes 2^'s 1943 25,000.00 

$590,000.00 

Bonds Issued During Year: 

Public Improvement l'/s 1944-55 

Bonded Debt— January 31, 1944 



1 ",000.00 
6,000.00 
3, 1.00 

10,000.00 
5,000.00 
6,000.00 
6,000.00 
6,000.00 
4,000.00 

25,000.00 



70,000.00 
48,000.00 
24,000.00 
40,000.00 
45.000.00 
61,000.00 
67.000.00 
78,000.00 
56,000.00 



91.000.00 $499,000.00 



36,000.00 



$535,000.00 



CITY OF BERLIN, NEW HAMPSHIRE— SCHEDULE 5 
Analysis of Changes in Cemetery Trust Funds 

Balances Income Expen- Balances 
2-1-43 ses 1-31-44 

Joseph A. Wagner Fund $ 550.98 $ 9.77 $ 5.00 $ 561.75 

Moses and Sophie Angel- 

owitz Fund 212.82 3.72 5.00 211.54 

Nellie Addleson Fund .... 109.15 1.91 111.06 

A. W. Walters Fund 344.97 6.05 3.00 348.02 

May W. Levy Fund 202.06 3.55 5.00 200.61 

Joe Vachon Fund 103.70 1.81 105.51 

George E. and Etta H. Kent 

Fund .. 306.05 5.3S 3.00 308.43 

A. M. & Hyman Stahl Fund 2.000.00 35.15 15.00 2.020.15 



Totals $3,835.73 $ 67.34 $ 36.00 $3,867.07 

CITY OF BERLIN, NEW HAMPSHIRE— SCHEDULE 6 
Municipal Court — Receipts and Disbursements 



February 

March 

April 

May 

June 

July 

August 

September 

October 

November 

December 

January 



$ 



Total 
Receipts 

114.74 

200.50 

100.80 

437.00 

83.10 

61.40 

113.99 

328.38 

302.92 

195.52 

64.90 

65.60 



Disbursements 
Expenses Paid to City 
Treasurer 



70.44 

131.20 
38.26 

133.92 
70.28 
17.11 
55.24 
34.13 

253.30 

124.60 
20.12 
52.S4 



44.30 
69.30 
62.54 

303.08 
12.82 
44.20 
60.75 

294.25 
49.62 
70.92 
44.78 
32.76 



Total Dis- 
bursements 

$ 114.74 

200.50 

100.80 

437.00 

83.10 

61.40 

113.99 

328.38 

302.92 

195.52 

64.90 

65.60 



Totals $ 2,068.85 $ 979.44 $ 1,089.41 $ 2,068.85 



42 



CITY OF BERLIN, N. H. 



CITY OF BERLIN, NEW HAMPSHIRE— SCHEDULE 7 
Receipts and Disbursements — Library Trustees 

Cash in Bank, February 1, 1943 $ 157.13 

Add Receipts — 

City Appropriations $ 9,035.00 

Fines 549.50 



Binding 104.25 

Furniture and equipment 401.61 







9,584.50 




$ 


9,741.63 


Deduct Disbursements — 






Salaries 


$ 5,353.47 




Books 


1,418.66 




Periodicals 


242.91 




Supplies 


125.99 




. Postage, freight and express 


15.87 




Janitor 


610.89 




Cleaning supplies 


49.03 




Repairs 


141.63 




Water, heat and lights 


680.84 




Telephone 


40.29 




Miscellaneous 


59.04 





Total Disbursements 9,244.48 

Cash in Bank, January 31, 1944 $ 497.15 

Schedule 8 — Surety Bonds 

Earle A. Young, tax collector, term beginning 

4-1-43 $ 35,000.00 

Earle A. Young, tax collector, term beginning 

7-20-43 5,000.00 

Gaston A. Cournoyer, city clerk, term beginning 

4-1-43 3,000.00 

Edward J. Delisle, city treasurer, term beginning 

3-30-43 30,000.00 

Graziella A. Brooks, assistant tax collector, term 

beginning 7-20-43 1.000.00 

Cecile Lessard Blanchette. clerk, tax collector's 

office, term beginning 7-20-43 1,000.00 

Oscar B. Bergquist. chief fire department, term 

beginning 6-22-43 5,000.00