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Full text of "Annual record of North Adams and its people showing their particular and social history"

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LIBRARY OF CONGRESS. 



Shelf. ._.to-F& 

UNITED STATES OF AMERICA. 



NORTH ADAMS 

I5S5 
ANNUAL RECORD 







CLOTHING 



:>^«<c 



<1L0NERGAN Sc BISSAILLON.^- 



>>«<c 



We l)eg to aniionnee that oiir various fall and 
WINTER STYLES are now ready for inspection. Our 
FINE LINE OF men's AND YOUTiis' SUITS is verv attract- 
ive, and our assortment of boys' winter suits, both 
in price and style, will surpass anything to be found 
in town. We would call attention of parents to our 
well selected line of boys' school suits, strong and 
durable, with extra pants to match, and a large as- 
sortment of boys' knee pants, heavy and strong, for 
school wear, at 50 cents. 

Fall st}les of stiff and soft hats, and men's, 
youths' and boys' caps and overcoats will be re- 
ceived in due time, unsurpassed in style and quality, 
and at prices that defy competition. Don't fail to see 
our full assortment of trunks and bags of various 
styles and materials, at prices low for strong and 
good articles. 

LONERGAN & BISSAILLON. 

NO. 72 MAIN STREET. 



ALFRED L. BOND, 

45 CENTRE STREET, 

LIVERY, SALE h BOARDING STABLES. 

Single and double teams and large wagons and sleighs 

for excursion parties and for visitors to 

Grey lock at short notice. 

Good and Kind Care of Horses Taken on Board. 



J. A. TWING, 
Pharmacist and Druggist, 

39 EAGLE STREET, 

ki:eps a full line of 

DRUGS, MEDICINES AND TOILET PREPARATIONS. 

PURE WINES AND LIQUORS 

FOR MEDICAL USE. 

<1PHYSICIANS' PRESCRIPTIONS CAREFULLY COMPOUNDEDt> 

AND 

NIGHT CALLS CHEERFULLY ANSWERED. 



TROY & BOSTON RAILROAD. 



The shortest Passenger and Freight Route between 

NEW ENGLAND AND THE WEST! 

The most convenient route for travel to 

New York, by Day or Night Boat or by Railroad! 

and the best route for 

T:El.A."\rEI^ TO nS/^OlSTTI^EA-HL. 

VIA ST. ALBANS. 

Rates always as low and time as quick as by any other route. For time of arri- 
val and departure of trains, see the Xorth Adams papers. 

C. A. NIMMO, General Passenger Agent. 
J. CRANDALL, Superintendent. 

CITIZENS' STEAMBOAT COMPANY. 



STEAMERS 

"City of Troy" and "Saratoga." 

RUN-NING BETWEEN 

In connection with Troy & Boston and connecting railroads, 

DAILY, SATURDAYS EXCEPTED, 

Leaving Troy (foot of Broadway) on arrival of Troy & Boston trains, arriving in New 
York in time to connect with all trains South and East. 

Leave New York from Pier 44, N. R., foot of Christopher street, arriving in Troy in 
time for all trains North, East and West. 

Baggage taken free to and from cars and boats at Troy. 

For freight or passage apply on board, or at office, foot of Broadway, Troy, N. Y. 
GEO. W. HORTON, General Agent, Troy, N. Y. 

GEO. \V. GIBSON, General Passenger Agent, Troy, N. Y". 



M. O. LARKIN, 
PIANO TUNER i REPAIRER. 

SATISKACTION OLT^^RANXKHD 

-AND 

All Orders Will Receive Prompt Attention ! 

lyMv services can be secured by leaving 
order at F. L. Tilton's News Room, North 
Adams, at Mole & Co.'s Drug Store, Adams, 
or by addressing postal to 

M. 0. LARKIN. 

No. 43 Eacile Street, 
North Adams, Mass. 

FRANK L. TILTON, 

Main Street, Corner Holden, 

Book, Stationery and Variety Store. 

AIvBI_JN/rS AND SCRAF^ BOOKS. 
BLANK BOOKS, MAGAZINES, 

AND 

NEW PANGY AI^TIGLBS. 

Confectionery, Cutlery, Jewelry, Photographs. 

LOW PRICES SELL GOODS. 



^AMK, N. E^.., 



No. 1 BURIvINOAi\/[K BIvOCK:, 

OPPOSITE THE WILSON HOUSE. 

[ESTABLISHED 20 YEAKS.] 
DEALER IN 



Boots, Shoes, Hats, Caps, Furs, Gloves 



ROBES OF EVERY DESCRIPTION! 

IN FACT, EVERY ARTICLE OF 

HEAD AND FOOT WEAR! 

in CYcrv variety of style, taste and quality, can be found in the 

extensive assortment contained in this, by far the largest 

stock of Head and Foot Wear in North Adams. 

LADIES' SEAL SACQUES AND FINE DRESS FURS ! 

are a special feature of the st(3ck, at prices as low as 
sucii costly goods can be offered. 

S:PE0I.A.X. .A^TTEISTTIOISr 

is paid to fine stock in the BOCTI AND SHOE DP:PART- 
]\1KNT, and full lines of tlie most celebrated makes are always 
to l)e found, including E. C. Burt's, J. L. Joyce & Son's, Burt 
& Mears', James J. Grover's, J. C Bennett & Barnard's, 
Couch & Wisner's and others. The stock of ladies', misses' 
and children's wear is i)articularly line, and includes all kinds 
of boots, bootees and slippers, rubber goods and fine kid work 
in all their numerous shapes and styles. Mk. Ray also carries 
full lines of 

Trunks, Traveling Bags, Umbrellas, Canes, Etc. 

He controls so large a trade that he is able to buy all 
goods from manufacturers, thus saving to consumers the job- 
bers' profit. 

KRANK N. RAY, 

OPPOSITE WILSON HOUSE. 

lySIGN OE THE GOLDEN BOOT AND HAT.,,^* 



L, W. WHITE, ■ 

[ESTAIU.IBIIEI) 1S-.6.] 
DEALER IN 

Watclies, CloGls, Jewelry, SilYerware, 

EYE-GLASSES, Sl^ECTACLES, ETC. 

No. 80 Main Street, North Adams, Mass. 

Sole Ag-ent in North Adams and Vicinity for the Celebrated 

<1R0CKF0RD QUICK TRAIN WATCH.[> 

HE ALSO SELLS 

WALTHAM, ELGIN ^f OTHER AMERICAN #^ SWISS WATCHES. 
A distinct specialty is made of 

KINE WATCH REPAIRINO! 

for which the T>est facilities are had and 

Perfect Satisfaction is Guaranteed! 

Having increased my stock with a choice and desirable selec- 
tion of goods for the 

wonld ])e pleased to have all examine goods before purchasing 

elsewhere. 

L. W. W^HITE, SO K/Lciir\ Street. 






MEi. L. 1. NICH04 

6 BANK STREET, 

Ladies' and CMldren's Furnishings! 

AND 

Il>TF.A.lSrTS' OXJTFITS. 

Ladies will find a complete assortment of first-qnality 
Ready-Made Underwear, Infants' Slips and Children's White 
Dresses, Collars and Cnffs, Hosiery and Clloves, Handker- 
chiefs, Corsets, P^tc. 

A small bnt very choice selection of Fancy Articles. 

Shonlder Capes, Slippers, Infants' Bootees, Fascinators, 
Etc., in worsted, made to order. 

Everything in stock will be fonnd well made and of good 
snbstantial qnality. An examination respectfnlly solicited. 



MRS. F. M. CLARK, 

In Same Store, NO. 6 BANK STREET, 

Has always the Latest Styles of 

FASHIONABLE HATS AND BONNETS ! 



<]MILL!NERY AND HAIR GOODS> 

COME EARLY AND MAKE SELECTIONS! 

ly Satisfaction gnaranteed on all onr goods. ,^| 
MRS. F. M. CLARK. MRS. L. E. NICHOLS. 



C. I. CITTrai k CO. 

(Established 1870.) 

MEN'S, BOYS' AND CHILDREN'S 

i CLOTHING!! 

FURNISHING GOODS, 

HATS, TRUKKS, ROBES, BLAffiETS, h 



AT 



Vv^HOLESALE AND RETAIL! 



LARGEST ASSORTMENT 



IN 



BERKSHIRE COUNTY 



6 & 8 STATE STREET, 



ANNUAL RECORD 



OF 



NORTH ADAMS 

AND ITS PEOPLE 

SHOWING 

THBIR PARTICUl.AR AND SOCIAL 

HISTORY 

AND THE MOST INTERESTING EVENTS 

DURING THE YEAR ^^"^ 

1885 

INCLUDING BRAYTONVILLE, GREYLOCK, BLACKINTON. 

WILLIAMSTOWN, FLORIDA, CLARKSBURG, 

STAMFORD. READSBORO, SC. 



VOLtMEL^ ;0CT11U 



COMriLr:D AND PUnt.tSMET) liV 

F. H. FLEMING, 



CONTENTS. 



Introduction. 
Historic Record. 
Government and State Officers. 
Record of County Officers. 
Record of the Town Government. 
Water Supply and Prudential Committee. 
Record of Fires and Fire Department. 
Numbers and Location of Fire Alarm Boxes. 
Record of Police Department and Arrests. 
Record of Births, montlily. 
Record of Marriages, monthly. 
Record of Deaths, monthly. 
Record of Interesting Events, montlily. 
Record of Business Men, referring to advertisements. 
Record of Manufactories and Corporations. 
Record of Churches and Religious Societies. 
Record of Societies, Benevolent, Musical, Literary, 
Militarv, Social, Etc. 



'OI'VKKJTTT 1886 F. U. ?"I.KMIN(; 



INTRODUCTION 



>>*<<: 



Many years in the future, the posterity of the inhabi- 
tants of North Adams, wherever they may be, living here 
or scattered abroad in other and newer states, will look 
back with pride and family interest to the Annual Records 
of its people and their industries, arts, manufactories, 
public institutions, social interests and strident enterprise, 
of which record this book is only the first volume. The sec- 
ond will include 1886, and it is expected that subsequent 
volumes will be issued annually and continuously. Each 
volume will be interesting and valual)le in itself, and they 
will increase in interest as in serial number. 

In this town there is scarcely one family in which at 

least ONE interesting event or one birth, marriage or death 

has not occurred within the year, or one or more of the 

names of that family are not mentioned in the Annual 

Record in connection with some social, benevolent or 

Inisiness enterprise. Such a record will l)e of peculiar 

interest in the future, and will be valued in every family. 

It will serve in place of the neglected "family record" 

that is never kept posted up in the family Bible as 

it sliould he. In these volumes they will find the record 

of their own family, as well as of every other family in 

town. The back volumes will be frequently consulted, 

and the further i.ack the more interesting they ]>ecome. 



A copy of the present volume should ))e secured while 
it can be had, as less tlmn a thousand have been printed. 
It cootaing more facts abont North Adams than ever 
before have lieen printed in any one lujok, and for each 
sneceeding volume we may justly make tiie same pretenr 
sion. It is handsomely bound, to lay on the cewtre table 
of the parlor or the living room for frequent reference or 
for topics for conversation of friends. Malf-l)oimd copies 
at a lower price may be procured by those who prefer them. 

It is not claimed that this Record is absolutely perfect 
or complete, but that it is as nearly so as was possible in 
procuring the facts from authentic sources^ Kvery year 
some few births, marriages and deaths of our townspeople 
occur outside of oin* limits and reports. Where tliesc 
have not been traced out and recorded, they will, if made 
known to the publisher by postal card, be included in the 
next edition of the book, as well as the correction of 
names omitted or recorded erroneously or misspelled » 
The aim of the compiler of this volume is to make it 
complete and correct. A notice of omission or error will 
receive prompt attention. It is earnestly requested that 
pet names and nicknames and other ridiculous prefixes will 
not be presented for official registration by clergymen, 
physicians or private individuals in so serious and impor- 
tant a book as the An?hUal Record. 

North Adams has always been remarked for the enter- 
prise of its people. Under the Record of Business Men 
in this book will be found the names and business of 
those of the present time most noted for their enterprise 
in supplying the wants and requirements of a thriving 
and ever-growing community. The origin of some of 
these establishments dates back many v(»ars. 



HISTORIC RECORD. 



3>@<C 



^TORTH ADAMS is situated in the northern part of 
\ Berkshire, the western county of Massachusetts, in 
latitude 42 deg. 40 min. N. and longitude 3 deg. 53 min. 
E. It is of perfectly rectangular form, 5 miles east and 
west and 3 1-2 miles north and south. Its meridian lines 
run due north and south, and its parallels of latitude east 
and west. It is bounded north by Clarksburg, east by 
Florida and Savoy, south by Adams and west by Wil- 
liamstown. Originally included in the township of Adams, 
which was first known as East Hoosac, its early history is 
that of Adams from the first exploration of the wilderness 
and survey of the land in 1749 to the date of its separa- 
tion from the old town. Adams was incorporated as a 
township Octo])er 15, 1778. Just one hundred years 
after (lacking only six months), on April 15, 1878, the 
town was divided into two equal parts, the new line 
between them running. east and west. The southern half 
retained the old name of Adams, Init the northern half 
took that of North Adams, which had always lieen the 
name of the village situated in the centre of the new 
town and "near the junction of the north and south 
branches of the Hoosac River. 

The history of North Adams has been traced with gi'eat 
particularity and completeness, from its very earliest set- 



HISTORIC UECOHI), 



tlement, in 1749, up to the present year, by Mr. \V. F. 
Si)ear, for many years in the Post-Office, and now local 
editor of the Transcript. It is the only correct account 
of North Adams ever published, and bears witness to the 
untiring industry and ability of the author. The Annijat. 
Record is ])ut a continuation of Spear's history in a 
different form, and the compiler of this Rkcoro has freely 
taken "a word here, a sentence there, facts and statistics 
everywhere" from that very valuable and most interesting 
work. It was necessary to do so in order to make fair 
starting points for the variou? departments of the Annual 
Record— -a continuous history of North Adams and Its 
People in the future, of whom the author of ''Taghcomie" 
says : 

"But I think bright, busy, bustling, dashing North 
Adams, with its lively streets and peculiar surroundings, 
will show off well in this cool, clear atmospliere. To my 
mind, the most notable thing in this fine old town, or its 
bright village, is the people ; not to disparage some very 
noble scenery, or, perhaps, the most remarkable natural 
curiosity in the commonwealth ; and, least of all to speak 
lightly of, the grand tunnel. But North Adams is, I 
verily believe, the smartest village in the smartest nation 
in all creation ; the concentrated essential oil of Yankee- 
dom. As you pass tbrough its streets you see evidence 
of this great truth everywhere ; in the shops, in the man- 
ufactories, in the hotels, and if these do not convince you, 
there will be no room for doubt when you come to tlie 
Hoosac Tunnel." 

The area covered by the town is in some places exceed- 
ing rough and hilly, so that one has here the advantage 
(and disadvantage) of im.mediate hill, cliff and mountain, 
mul nlso fine views of maii'nificent mountain soenorv- Th« 



HISTORIC RllCORD. 



village is well protected rtgiiinst loss by fires, having an 
unsurpassed water supply and an excellent fire depart- 
ment, the Fire District having l)een incorporated February 
4, 1845. 

Blackinton is a small nud pretty village and nuriuifac- 
turing centre, located in the northwestern part of the 
town, on the boundary line of Williamstown. It has a 
good free library and a fine union church and school. 
The library was established in 1859, by the formation of 
a society with Mr. O, A. Archer as president, under 
whose influence and exertions a library of now nearly 
2,000 volumes has been a free library since 1878. 

Bravtokville is a small village on the Hoosac River, 
about midway between Nortli Adams village and Blaek- 
iiiton. 

C4REYL0CK, a thrifty hamlet between P)lackinton and 
Braytonville, is the seat of the Greylock mills, who.se 
operatives are its only inhabitants. 

HowLANDs was the name of a settlement composed of 
the factories and operatives in xylonite (a chemical 
compound reseml)ling celluloid). It was commenced 
about three years ago, a sliort distance south of the line • 
between tliis town and Adams. The place is really a 
suburb of North Adams, most of its working i)eople 
residing here. Houses for them are being rapidly built 
near the factories, and a good temperance hotel is pro- 
jected, in reality it will be an extensive boarding house. 
The place assumes already the importance of a village, 
with a blacksmitli shop, a bi'ickyai-d and a post-office, 
officially known as Zvlonite. 

The census of 1885 shows the population of North 
Adams to he 12,540, of whicli B,059 are males and f>,481 



HISTOKIC IJEOUKI). 



feiimles. Adains 1ms 8,2'83 people, Clarksburg 708, 
Florida 487, Williamstowu 3,729 and Pittsfield 14,466. 
The county of Berksliire has 73,828 and the state of Mas- 
sachusetts 1,942,141 inhabitants. 

P>om the assessors' books we find there are in the town 
726 horses, 700 cows, 231 sheep and 56 swine ; an 
increase over last year of 138 horses, 144 cows, 50 swine, 
and a decrease of 50 sheep the past year. The polls have 
increased 625, being 3632, and 126 new houses have 
been erected, makino- a total of 1658. 



GOVERNMENT OFFICERS. 



GROVER CLEVELAND, President of the United States.^ 

Wm. H. Hendkicks, Vice-President. Died Nov. '2b, IH^o. 

Henky L. Dawes, Massachusetts Senator in Congress. 

Francis W. Rockwell, Berkshire Representative in Con- 
gress. 

John B. Tyler, Postmaster. 

U. S. CoViedor of Internal Eevenne. — p:dward L. iniker. 
Resioned October l", 18'S5, and the office was removed ])y F. 
J Pratt (appointed Collector) to Greenfield. Chief Deputy 
Collector John E. Drew retains his family residence ni North 
Adams. 

NORTH ADAMS POSTMASTERS. 

YEAR OF APPOINTMENT. 

IlenrvWilmarth, - - - LS52 
Abel'Wetherbee, - - 1853 
Edwin Roo-ers, - - - 1861 



Nathan Putnam, - - - 1H14 
William Waterman, - 18 lo 
William E. Bravton, - - 1826 
Edward R. Tinker, - 1849 



John B. Tyler, - - - 1879 



STATE OFFICERS. 



GEORGE D. ROBINSON, Governor of JMassachusetts. 

Oliver Ames, Lieutenant-Governor. 

S. Proctor Thayer, of North Adams, State Senator for 
North Berkshire District. , 

I^IosEs B. Darling, of North Adams, Representative to Gen- 
eral Court. 1 rt 4- 

JoHN Adams, of Adams, Representative to General Court. 

BusHNELL Danforth, Representative for Williamstown and 
Clarksburg. 



COUNTY AND TOWN OFFICEPvS. 



COUNTY OFFICERS. 



County Commissioners. — Ashley B. AYrigbt of North Adams, 
J. B. Hall of Stockbridge, L^nnau Payne of Hinsdale. 

Judge of Probate and Insolvency. — James T. Robinson of 
North Adams. 

Reqister of Probate and Insolvency. — E. T. Sloenm of Pitts- 
field.' 

District Attorneii. — A. J. AYaterman of Pittsfield. 

r/rr/r o/"///r (\/,irts.—\W\\v\ W. Taft. Office at Pittsfield. 

Ilc<jisti'r of iJi^cd.s, etc., of North BerlsJn're. — P^arl E. INier- 
chant. Office at Adams. 

High /Sltcrif of BerA-shire Comity. — H. B. Wellington. 

Local Deputy Sheriffs. — Wm. Hodskin, Wm. H. Bixby. 

District Mediccd Examiner. — Dr. O. J. Brown. 

District Court of Northern Berhshire at Adams and North 
Adams. — Jurisdiction in the towns of North Adams, Florida, 
Savoy, iVdams and Cheshire. Standing Justice, Jarvis Rock- 
well. Special Justice, Henry J. Bliss of Adams. Civil busi- 
ness in North Adams every Tuesday. Criminal l)usiness daily. 

Judge Rockwell died May 14. George P. Lawrence was 
appointed Standing Justice T^Iay 27. 

(Uerhofthe District ( ^ourts. — William IJower of Nortli Adams. 

TKIAL .JrSTlCKS OV 11! E I'EACE. 

DATES AS KNOWN. 

Israel Jones, - - - - 1<S()() AbelWetherbee, - - 

Dr. James Cummings, Andrew A. Riclnnond, - 1S;")4 

Jeremiah Colgrove, - - Joel Bacon, - - - - IS.');") 

Ezra D. Whitaker, - Jarvis Rockwell, - - - 1<S70 

George P. Lawrence, l<S<sr). 



TOWN OFFICERS. 

ELEC'lMiP APRIL 7, 188:>. 



Selectmen. — Simeon H. Horton, Frank TL Goodrich, James 
M. Chace. H. Clav Bliss, Clerk. 



TOAYN OFKICERS WATER AND FIKE DEPARTMENT. 

Assefisors. — F. P. Browu, IM. B. Darling, E. 1). Tvler. 

Collector. — A. G. Potter. 

Toivn Clerk. — AVillinin Bower. 

Treasurer. — Arthur D. Cady. 

Touii. Agent. — A. W. Preston. 

Board of HeaUh. — Shepherd Thaver, Dr. C. J. Ciirran, W. 
H. Bixl)y." 

Totcn Physician. — Dr. Homer Bushnell. 

Supt. of Town Farm. — William H. Smith. (Appointed.) 

Medical Examiner. — Dr. O. J. Brown. (Appointed.) 

Anditors. — K. S. Wilkinson, W. P^urton, A. W. Hodge. 

Consta])les.—(<:. E. Shultis, P. AVhite, J. H. Krum, H. C. 
Rand, J. Kelly, J. F. C'oughlin, Robert Smith, T. G. Mallory, 
J. H. Flagg, Jacob Coon, Tliomas Ryan, M. Gorman, R. B. 
Harvie. 

Field Drivers. — A. J. Cliilson, S. A. Kemp, Willard Ballon. 

Insiwctors of Lumber. — S. B. Di])])le, G. B. Perry, L. S. 
Drown, E. A. Richardson. 

Town Sexton. — John H. Orr. 

Measwrers of Wood and Bark.— 1\. M. Mills, D. J. Barl^er, 
E. A. Richardson, F. A. Brooks, E. A. Rand. 

Fence Viewers. — Timothy Collins, Jerome l'liillii)s, R.Tol)in. 

Sealer of Weir/hts and Measures. — T. W. Richmond. 



WATER AND FIRE DEPARTMENT. 



Prndential Committee. — A. C. Houghton, D. J. Barber, J. C. 
Goodrich, William INIartin, T. AV. Sykes, A. E. Riclnnond. 
AVilliam J^. P>rown. 

Clerk and Treasurer. — F. S. Richardson. 

Su2)erinfendent of Fire District. — John J. ^larsh. 

Chief Engineer of Fire Dejxirtnient. — R. B. Harvie. 

First Assistant Engineer. — AYarren B. Chase. 

Second A.ssistant Engineer. — Albert E. James. 

Third Assisfaiit Engineer. — James H. Mallory. 

Hose Company No. 1. — F. AY. Pinkham, P'oreman. 

Hose Company No. 2. — Jacob Coon, Foreman. 



POLICE DEPARTMENT FIRE-ALARM BOXES. 



POLICE DEPARTMENT, 



Chief of Police. — Charles Slmltis. 

Patrohnen. — Captain, James Congiilin ; Henry C. Rand. 
James Kelly, Rodolphus White, Robert Smith, Nathan A. 
Smith. 

Justice of Police Court. — George P. Lawrence. 



Numbers and Locations of Fire- Alarm Boxes. 



No. 2, Corner Main and Marshall streets. 
" 3, " Main and Holden streets. 
" 4, " State and Snmmer streets. 
" 5, " Chnreh and Main streets. 
" 6, " Center and Eagle streets. 
" 7, '' Qnincy and Chnreh streets. 
" 8, " Ashland and Cliestnnt streets. 
" 9, " Ashland and Washington ayenne. 
" 12, " Chnreh and Washington ayenne. 
'' 13, " Jolinson's :\Iill. 
" 14, Corner l^iyer and lirooklyn streets. 
"15, '' Riyer and Eagle streets. 
'' 16, Unicm street — at Tannery. 
" 17, Union street — Stroud's store. 
" 21, Corner East Qnincy and Pleasant streets. 
"31, " Eagle and Wesley an streets. 
"41, " Hudson and Prospect streets. 
"51, " Jirooklyn and East Brooklyn streets. 
"61, " Riyer and Veazie streets. 
" 71, Lower end of Holden street. 
" HI, Corner Lincoln nnd (irant sti'eets. 

In case of fire unlock the box, turn the crMuk, then listen 
for o})erator's yoice ; then giye number of box aud h)catiou of 
life, holding tv'leplione close to the moutii. 



STREETS AND AVENUES. 



:>>^c 



Arnold Place, east of 14 Church. 

Ashhiiid street, from Summer southeast to village Hmits. 

Bank street, from ^lain south to Summer. 

Beaver street, a continuation of Union above Glen mill. 

Bradley street, from South Church east. 

Brooklyn street, from River north to Houghton. 

Brown street, from Main north to River. 

Beacon street, from 36 Prospect east to Summit. 

Bethel street, from 5 Franklin south. 

Braytonville, located at west end of Main. 

Briggs' avenue, from 66 Church east. 

Bryant street, from 38 Houghton west. 

Burdickville, a small colony of houses on the side of a hill north- 
west of Johnson Manufacturing Company's mills. 

Central avenue, from 10 P^ranklin north. 

Centre street, from Eagle west to INIarshall. 

Centre street alley, from Centre street. 

Clnirch Place, from Main to Summer, next to Congregational 
Church. 

Church street, from tlie Soldiers' Monument south to village 
limits. 

Cherry street, from 21 Pleasant east to Wall. 

Chestnut street, from Spring west to Hoosac river. 

Congress street, south from Main street. (Kempville.) 

East Quincy street, from 7 Pleasant east to Congress. 

Eagle street, from Main north to Franklin. 

East Weslevan street, from Weslevan west to Summit. 



STREETS AND AVENUES. 



East Brooklyn street, from 41 Brooklyn east to village limits. 

Elm street, from Grant south. 

Eurnace street, from Main south. 

Eranklin street, from junction of Eagle and Liberty northeast 

to Wells avenue. 
Fuller street, from 46 Houghton west. 
Eretlerick street, from 29 Houghton west. 
Grant street, from Lincoln west to Elm. 
Hall street, west from 123 Eagle. 
Harmony street, from Main south. 
High street, from Pine south. 
Ilolbrook street, from Wall east to Meadow. 
Holden street, from Main north to River. 
Hudson street, from 120 Eagle east to Prospect. 
Houghton street, from Brooklyn north to town limits. 
Johnson street, from River north to Frederick. 
Jackson street, from 112 Eagle east to Prospect. 
Kemp street, north from 210 Main. 
Lincoln street, from Centre north to River. 
Liberty street, from 35 Brooklyn east to 135 Eagle. 
Main street, from Five Points west to Bray ton ville. 
Meadow street, from Briggs' avenue north. 
Marshall street, from Main north to River. 
Marietta street, from 8 Franklin north. 
Montgomery street, from 25 Prospect east. 
Morris street, from Summer south. 
Moulton Hill, continued from AYalnut. 
North street, from 41 Brooklyn west to Johnson. 
North Eagle street, from 143 Eagle at Franklin northeast. 
Northern Lights avenue, from 22 Franklin nortli. 
Pearl street, from 25 Main south. 
Pine street, from Harmony west. 
Pleasant street, from East Main soutli to 48 Church. 
Porter street, from 67 Church west to 83 Ashland. 



STREETS AND AVENUES. 



Prospect street, from 98 Eagle eust and north to Franklin. 

Qnincy street, from Church west to Morris. 

Ray street, from 11 Franklin south. 

River street, from 1)3 Eagle west to Brown. 

South street, from Church west to Spring. 

Spring street, from Church southwest to Washington avenue. 

State street, from IMain south to village limits. 

Summer street, from 7 Church w^est to State. 

Summit avenue, from East Main south (Kempville). 

Summit street, from Beacon north to AVells' avenue. 

Tremont street, from Prospect north to Franklin. 

Union street, from 68 P^agle east to Glen mill. 

Veazie street, north from 56 River. 

Vincent avenue, from 207 Main south to P^ast Quincy. 

Wall street, from East Quincy south to Cherry. 

Walnut street, from 117 State to Moulton Hill. 

Washington avenue, from Church west to Ashland. 

Wells' avenue, from Sunnnit north. 

Wesleyan street, from 186 p:agle east to p:ast Wesleyan. 

Willow dell, from 17 Union south. 



ARRESTS DURING THE YEAR. 



>J^c 



The total number of arrests 
year was 327, as follows : 

Dnmkeuness, 1st offense, 
" 2nd " 

" 3d '' 

Common drunkard, 

Assault and battery, 

Disturl)ing the peace, 

Larceny, 

Assault on officer, 

Vagrancy, 

Neglect to support family, 

Keeping unlicensed dog. 

False pretence, 

Carrying dangerous weapon, 1 

False imprisonment, 1 

Threatening to kill, 2 

Trespass, 1 



made by the police during the 



186 

11 

9 

7 
38 
16 
10 



4 

6 
1 

2 



Robbery, 

Night-walker, 

Breaking and entering. 

Open shop on Sunday, 

Evading railroad fare, 

Stubborn child. 

Liquor nuisance. 

Concealing birth of child. 

Lewdness, 

Breaking glass, 

Malicious mischief, 

Adultery, 

Peddling without license. 

Embezzlement, 

Total, 



MISCELLANEOUS. 

Number of persons lodged, 

Buildings found open at night, 

Number of lost children cared for. 

Number of fires discovered and alarms given. 

Number of stray teams taken care of, 

Accidents reported and assistance rendered, - 

Cases and coniplaints investigated, 

Defects in streets and sidewalks reported. 

Number of sick and disabled persons cared for, • 

Value of stolen pro[)erty recovei'ed, - 

\'alue of proi)erty left out of stores and cai'cd for 



1 
2 
1 
2 
1 
1 
4 
1 
5 
2 
2 
3 
1 
1 

327 



816 
;)() 
18 
3 
34 
24 

100 



- oO 

$40"). 00 

600.00 



RECORD OF MARRIAGES. 
1885. 



JANUARY. 



1. Alfred A. Taylor of Northampton. 
Lizzie M. Thayer of Williamsburg. 

4. Albert C. Temple of North Adams. 
Ellen Carson of North Adams. 

13. Michael Dougherty of North Adams. 
Mary F. Sherry of North Adams. 

15. Pxlward P. Fuller of North Adams. 
Flora E. Goodell of South Norwalk, Conn. 

29. Edward D. McGraw of North Adams. 
Maggie Larkins of North Adams. 

FEBRUARY. 

8. Herbert A. Moon of Williamstown. 
Florence E. Goodrich of Williamstown. 

14. John P. Eagan of North Adams. 
Mary C. Foster of North Adams. 

16. Thomas Casey of North Adams. 
Barbara Payne of North Adams. 

16. Frank Gonyea of North Adams. 
Amelia Blow of North Adams. 



MARRIAGES IN FEBRUARY AND MARCH, 



17. William Mead of Williamstowiu 
Marv J. Needham, North Adams. 

17. Edward H. Morrison, North Adams. 
Zelphia P. Wilkinson, '' . '' 

19. William H. Vol)b, '' '' 

Jessie F. Holcombe, Chester, Mass. 

21. David A. Sykes, North Adams. 
CLara E. Darling, '^ '' 

21. Charles Ray, New York. 
Jenny Hinds, '' '^ 

22. Daniel F. Barry, North Adams. 
Maria E. Hogan, " '■'■ 

24. John R. Jones, '' '^ 
Rowena E. Raymond, *- ' "■ 

25. John Jones, '' '" 
Lizzie Raymond, '■' "" 

26. Emery Prefontain, " '^ 
Florence Chaugniere, " "■ 

MARCH. 

{). Joseph Geddes, North Adams. 
Maggie Watt, 

10. Jolm J. Griffin, 

Lillie Trotter. ''' '' 

11. George B. King, '^ '" 
Annie Rock, '' 

12. Frank E. Eaton, " '' 
Hattie A. Follett, '' 

18. Louis J. Gardner, Williamstown. 
Sarah E. Scriven, North Adams. 



MAKRIAGES IN MARCH AND APRIL. 



23. Gideon Watts, of North Adams. 
Mary Jane Burford, " 

26. 
26. 



James Williams, 






Cornelia Lowell, 






Daniel J. Luther, 






Fanny Belle Preo, 






Sabatino Dicini, 






Louisa Sawyer, 







APRIL. 

6. Mark W. Boynton, North Adams. 
AU^ertina Splatt, " " 

8. Peter Sorell, " " 

Alfreda Goolah, 

10. James Murphy, " '' 

Lizzie Toner, " " 

14. Albert A. Damon, " " 
Sylvia M. Rider, " '' 

16. Frank Gonyea, 

Amelia Blow, " " 

16. Richard A, Winterbourne, Williamstown. 
Margaret M. Evans, North Adams. 

16. Arcibiale Paradis, " " 

Emma Grichon, " " 

15. Charles E. Stevens, '' '' 
Nettie Yj. Thatcher, Charlemont. 

18. Albert Hoffman, North Adams. 
Paulina Tscholtszh, " " 

21. Frank J. Sprague, formerly of North Adams, 
Mary Harned, New Orleans. 



MARRIAGES IN APRIL, MAY AND JUNE. 


24. 


John H. Murray of North Adams. 


. 


Sadie Brierly, " " 


22. 


C. Fred. Schram, now of Wahoo, Neb. 




Ella C. Tllley of Hyde Park, Mass. 




MAY. 


6. 


Levi Clement of North Adams. 




Sarah Laval, '' '' 


13. 


William D. Alexander, Milford, Neb. 




Jessie M. Taylor, formerly of North Adams. 


13. 


Jesse A. Twing, North Adams. 




Martha Harriet Potter, North Adams. 


14. 


Venclose Beloin, North Adams. 




Catharine Surprenant, North Adams. 


21. 


Edwin Wilcox, " '' 




Anne Mitchell, " " 


24. 


Engene O'Neil, *' 




Mary Ann Conway, " ^' 


25. 


Theophile Cote, '' '' 




Exilda Sorell, '' 


30. 


James P. Davis, '^ '' 




Eva J. Harwood, '' '' 




JUNE. 


3. 


Oliver H. Wood, Pittsfield. 




Fanny 0. Burnap, North Adams. 


4. 


Charles O. Wardwell, '' 




Minnie Hall, "■ '* 


9. 


Monroe Hall, Cheshire. 




Jennie Cousin, North Adams. 



MARRIAGES IN JUNE AND JULY. 



16. James A. O'Hearn, of North Adams. 
Katie Reagan, of Williamstown. 

17. John W. Neels, North Adams. 
Annie L. vSears, " " 

22. Michael C. O'Niel, " '' 
Susan Carroll, " " 

23. Alba G. Fay, Readsboro. 
Sophia Harrington, Readsboro. 

24. Delancy G. Burbank, North Adams. 
Mary F. Bixby, " " 

24. Alonzo B. TNder, Adams. 
Clara E. Jenkins, " 

JULY. 

9. Thomas J. Kelley, Adams. 
Sarah S. Manning, Pittsfield. 

13. Distie LaPlant, Adams. 
Rose McCue, " 

13. Philisau Tromblay, Adams. 
Alfonsine Duffenae, '' 

14. Peter Demarras, '' 
Veterite Bonlee, '' 

15. Edward Mason, Cheshire. 
Mrs. Elizabeth Root, Adams. 

19. Charles E. Goldwaite, " 
Cora F. Randall, Westfield. 

21. James O'Connell, North Adams. 
Levina Horn, " " 



MARRIAGES IN JULY, AUGUST AND SEPTEMBER. 


'2-2. 


Frederick W. Crawford, of North Adams. 
Marv F. Kelly, " 


23. 


Charles H. Houston, '' u 
Hattie J. Tracey, . "- '' 


23. 


Wmiiam J. Burke, 

Josephine Tripp, '' ^^ 


23. 


Edward A. Evans, Troy. 
Ida M. Kellogg, Adams. 


30. 


John Shean, Adams. 
Mary A. Burke, '' 




AUGUST. 


3. 

* 


William Leab of Adams. 
Catherine Seine, '' 


9. 


Stephen Gokay, Adams. 

Mary A. Hawley, North Adams. 


13. 


James A. Hern, " " 
Katlierine O'Connell, '' '' 


Ifi. 


George F. Scott, '' '^ 
Anna L. James, ^' '^ 


22. 


James Furlong, " " 
Eliza Doyle, " '' 


24. 


Charles F. Richardson, North Adams. 
Marcia F. Stevens, Colebrook, N. H. 


29. 


Emmett Finch, Williamstown. 
Mary E. Smitli, 




SEPTEMBER. 


! 

1 


Clarence J. Cole, Williamstown. 
Cliarlotte J. Ford, '' 



MARRIAGES IN SEPTEMBP:R. 


5. 


Jolm Hughes, of North Adams. 




Johanna Kearns, " " 


6. 


John Hughes, " " 




Marv Guion, '' " 


8. 


Patrick Haley, " " 




JNIargaret Skuce, " " 


8. 


Eugene B. Blake, " " 




p]mma B. Mason, Hartwellville. 


8. 


William W. Parce, Deland, Florida. 




Mary Lea Holbrook, formerly of North Adams. 


9. 


AYilliam I. Andrews, Adams. 




Emma Kay, " 


15. 


James PL Shields, " 




Margaret Nimmons, " 


21. 


Vitel Robore, North Adams. 




Mary Pope, " " 


22. 


James H. MuUany, " " 




j\Iary Fj. Joyce, " " 


28. 


Eldoras Foote, '' " 




Minnie Robinson, " " 


23. 


Robert Hardenburg, North Adams. 




Katie Power, " " 


23. 


Edwin H. Robinson, Adams. 




Jennie Hamilton, " 


23. 


George Sweeley, Albany. 




Ellen Hennessey, North Adams. j 


28. 


John Cunningham, " " 




INIargaret Hourahan, " " 



MARRIAGES IN SEPTEMBER AND OCTOBER. 


28. 


Edwin G. Ingrabam of Adams. 




Emeline M. Bray or, '' 


29. 


Clifford F. Wood, 




Hattie Bennett, Cheshire. 


29. 


Nelson D. Giroux, Adams. 




Octavie Bordeleaii, North Adams. 


30. 


John W. Morse, Illinois. 




Mary P. Foskett, Athol. 




OCTOBER. 


1. 


George W. Snyder, North Adams. 




Florence A. Sutton, Searsbnrg. 


6. 


David M. Sheridan, Lowville, N. Y. 




Annie McGrath, North Adams. 


8. 


Will H. Buck, East Abington. 




Alice L. Carey, North Adams. 


9. 


Peter Aloard, '' "- 




Julia A. Goodman, " " 


12. 


Joel Fountain, '' " 




Adeline Vezina, " '^ 


13. 


Richard Dinn, " '' 




Johanna Larkin, " " 


15. 


Lewis F. Chapin, '' '' 




J. Ada Foster, " '' 


19. 


John Louis, " " 




Margaret McNamara, North Adams. 


21. 


Edward C. Ripley, '' " 




Minnie L. Darling, " " 


21. 


William N. Gove, " " 




Hattie Utman, '' '* 



MARRIAGES IN OCTOBER AND NOVEISIBER. 



21. Joseph Clement of North Adams. 
Sarah Parrow, " '' 

27. William R. Stuart, Pittsfield. 

Lillian M. Ames, North Adams. 



28. George T. Tanner of North Adams. 
Grace A. Stevens, " " 

28. Frank B. Watson, '' " 

Nellie A. Kimball, " " 

28. David M. Mann, Boston. 
Idilla Bratton, vStamford. 

29. Arthur H. Darling, North Adams. 
Lenora James, " " 

31. Richard Ruff, " " 

Mary E. H. Ruif, Huntington. 

31. Melvin Spalti, Adams. 
Paulina Hanke, " 



NOVEMBER. 

3. William O'Niel, North Adams. 

Margaret McNamara, North Adams. 

3. Glark R. Smith, " '' 

Stella L. Pierce, Westminster. 

3. George E. Carpenter, Adams. 
Nellie P. Lamb, " 

4. Peter Roehme, " 
Paulina Hilbut. ^' 

6. John McDonald, North Adams. 
Anna Downing, " " 



MARRIAGES IN NOVEMBER. 



7. Charles A. Pixley of Troy. 
Mary Keller, Troy. 

7. Joseph F. Kelly, Brighton. 

Annie McMahon, Williarastowu. 

15. Charles A. Lovejoy, Pittsfield. 
Minnie B. Fairfield, Cheshire. 

15. Alexander Groves, Adams. 
Clara V. Sherman, " 

16. Fred. Bezine, North Adams. 
LillieHovey, '^ " 

16. Alexander Boliver, North Adams. 
Josephine Cmnmings, '' '' 

16. Gilbert Gregory, '' "■ 
Mary Bambille, '' 

17. Henry 8. Bnrrington, Stamford. 
Sarah Gnrney, North Adams. 

18. Charles Briggs, '' " 
Bertha Darling, '' " 

18. lulward Dowling, '' " 

Margaret Goff, '' '' 

18. Thomas S. Morse, '^ '' 

Cora H. Boardman, Nortli Adams. 

1 9 . Prescott W . Eaton , '' " 
Florence Bnrrington, u u 

19. Michael F. Snllivan, '' '' 

Ellen F. Welch, 

21. Dr. Charles L. Clark, Chicago. 

Frances J. Ray, Janesville, Wis., formerly of North 
Adams. 



MARRIAGES IN NOVEMBER AND DECEMBER. 



25. Frank Perry of North Adams. 
Maria ^. Nicholson, Cheshire. 

26. P^ugene H. Wells, North Adams. 
p]valena B. Clegiiorn, North Adams. 

28. Frederick W. Miller, " '' 

Katie Cummings, Clarksburg. 



DECEMBER. 



1. Charles Pitt of North Adams. 
Jennie Robare, " '' 

2. Clarence W. Gallup, North Adams. 
Eugenia M. A¥alden, " " 

2. Merritt W. Whitney, " '' 

Hattie H. Estes, '' " 

5. Elmer H. Russell, Williamstown. 
Anna B. Bowler, Poultney, Vt. 

8. Silas R. Mills, North Adams. 
Caroline M. Hungerford, Adams. 

9. Francis A. Cady, North Adams. 
Hattie M. Graves, Ashfield. 

10. George Washburne, North Adams. 
Amelia J. Thames, " " 

10. Joseph Perry, " '' 

Emma Lytle, " " 

15. Charles E. Stewart, " '' 

Adah Ann P>ans, " " 

15. John Moore, Red Cloud, 111. 

Jessie B. Briggs, North Adams. 



MARRIAGES IN DECEMBER. 



16. Frederick McCormick of North Adams. 
Anna Maria Sbultzan, *"' '' » 

21. William Orton, '' '^ 

Adella D. Cary, '<• '<- 

23. AYilbiir J. Starks, Savoy. 
Cora Mason, Plainfield. 

24. Herbert Stone, Savoy. 
Edith VanDnsen, Cheshire. 

24. Jonathan Whitaker, North Adams. 
Anna B. Simonds, '^ '' 

25. Thomas F. Noon, Adams. 
Catherine O'Leary, '^ 

28. Franz Ruprecht, *' 
Paulina Wittig, '' 

29. George W. Bnrmaker, Wahoo, Neb. 

Lncy Belle Schram, formerly of North Adanu 

30. Henry W. Scott, North Adams. 
Nellie J. Montague, " " 

31. Frank E. Wardwell, " '<- 
Cora Hewett, "- " 

31. Charles F. Briggs, Adams. 
Emma Martin, '' 



i 

i 

1 
i 


RECORD OF BIRTHS. 






1885. 




(Abbreviations: d. for daughter of; s. for son of.) 




BIRTHS IN JANUARY. 


2. 


Bessie Mallery, 


d. Warren L. Mallery and Alice Bogart. 


2. 


Theodore Eobar, 


s. Frank E. Robar and Eugenia Benoir. \ 


4. 


Margie Estelle Quimby 


d. Frank Quimby and Nellie Whitney, 


5. 


Philip Yonng, 


s. Philip Young and Amelia Merriam. • 


5. 


Frank Howard Jones, 


s. Benj. F. Jones and Sarah Grove. 


6. 


Jesse Andrew Niles, 


s. Andrew Niles and Rhoda Bates. 


7. 


William James Geddis, 


s. James Geddis and Mary Trimble. \ 


9. 


Alfred Gregory, 


s. Vedos Gregory and Amelia Tatro. ' 


9. 


Margaretta M. Darling, 


d. Oliver Darling and Alvira Metcalf. 


10. 


Matilda Dudley, 


d. Albert Dudley and Matilda Plant. 


10. 


Rosa Malloy, 


d. Patrick Malloy and Elizabeth Lilly. 


12. 


Regina Baker, 


d. Archie Baker and Malvina Giroux. j 


14. 


Mabel Doyle, 


d. John H. Doyle and Alice Holland. [ 


14. 


Annie Morrison Smith, 


d. John Smith and Alice Kenyon. j 


15. 


Olive Bonprey, 


d. Ciprio and Adeline Marcott, | 


15. 


George Bernard Boland 


, s. Patrick J. Boland and Delia Clesham. 


16. 


Mary Knuckey, 


d. Thomas K. and Mary Barnicoat. ! 


16. 


George Gregson, 


s. George Gregson and Emma Tinney. 


16. 


Agnes F. Gilrain, 


d. James Gilrain and Bridget McAulev. * 


16. 


Sarah Maud Henderson, d. Andrew Henderson and Annie Peat. | 


17. 


Mary Doherty, 


d. Daniel and Mary Doherty. 


17. 


Elizabeth Doherty, 


d. John Doherty and Elizabeth McManus. 


i IS- 


Charles HofPman, 


s. Charles Hoffman and Bertha Elgerman. 


IS. 


Marion Etta Carson, 


d. Thomas Carson and Emma Brock, 


18. 


William Henry Kezback,s. William H. Kezback and Mary Queen, ! 


19. 


George Albert Gregory, 


s. Dennis Gregory and Lydia Peevey. ' 



BIRTHS IN JANUARY AND FEBEUAEY. 


20. 


Sarah Fay Clark, 


d. William A. Clark and Eva D. Moore. 


21. 


William Joseph Benack, s. Wm. H. Benack. | 


21. 


Gertrade May Darling, 


d. 0. M. Darlmg and A. M. Metcalf. 


22. 


Edward John Maloney, 


s. John E. Maloney and Margaret Macksey. 


24. 


Thomas Smith, 


s. Thomas Smith and Sophia Delehanty. 


24. 


Margaret Remington, 


d. Frank R. and Margaret Bowler. 


24. 


George Everett Martin, 


6. George Martin and Nellie Stoddart. 


26. 


Eva Dabuke, 


d. Arthur Dabuke and Louisa Cushing. 


26. 


Stefano Corinna, 


s. Louis Corinna and Louisa Galloupa. 


28. 


George Albert, 


8. George Loungway and Eva Estey. 


29. 


Charles Williams, 


s. Charles Williams and Nellie Casey. 


31. 


Maria Champayne, 


d. Geo. Champayne and Alfonsine Ouimet. 

FEBRUARY. 


2. 


Philip Durivage, 


s. Samuel Durivage and Angelique BiBsaillon, 


3. 


Henry Morin, 


s. Alfonse Morin and Agnes Roy. 


4. Jotm A. Adams, 


s. John H. Adams and Julia F. Loomis. 


4. 


Norman Pelkey, 


8. Charles H. Pelkey and Libby Ransford. 


5. 


Mary Riley, 


d. James Riley and Catherine Casey.. 


6. 


Joseph A. Lanoue, 


8. Antoine L. and Adelia Biscalon. 


7. 


Fanny Douglas, 


d. Thos. H. Douglas and Frances Boyington. 


7. 


Grace R. Whitaker, 


d. T. P. Whitaker and S. F. Crowell, in R. I. 


9. 


Eugene Clairmont, 


s. Napoleon Clairmont and Josefine Returna. 


10. 


Thomas White, 


8. Thos. White and Clarinda Katzeback. 


11. 


John Murray, 


8. John Murray and Bridget Gulley. 


12. 


Gertrude E. Lyons, 


d. Thomas Jones and Hannah Garner. 


13. 


Frank C. Underwood, 


8. Orloc Underwood and Nellie E. Congdon. 


13. 


Edward Smith, 


8. L. Smith and Kate Cannain in Coleraine. 


14. 


Hattie F. Chalmers, 


d. C. Chalmers and J. Wade in Petersb'g, N. Y. 


17. 


Helen Jane Stewart, 


d. Charles Stewart and Corinna Montgomery. 


,18. 


Harry Jones Moon, 


8. Lewis Moon and Cassie Harkins. 


'20. 


Rosa Little, 


d. Nelson Little and Malvina Brossou. 


22. 


George W. Hewitt, 


8. Elmer Hewitt and Alice Deming. 


22. 


Anna Sanford, 


d. Wm. Sanford and Annie Conroy. 


22. 


Emma Dudley, 


d. Samuel Dudley and Emma Marsh. 


22. 


Anna Curley, 


d. John Curley and Ann Reagan. 


23. 


Frank Bebdlle, 


8. Frank Belville and Emma Gatling. 


23. 


Serepta Ashton, 


d. Walter Ashton and Serepta Orlo. 


23. 


Victoria Dandelin, 


d. Samuel Dandelin and Emma Gamache. 





BIRTHS 


IN FEBRUARY AND MARCH. 


24. 


Mary Murray, 


! 

d. Patrick Murray and Mary GuUey. 


24. 


Elsie May Houstan, 


d. Anson Houstan and Emily Crackle. 


27. 


Rosa Beaver, 


d. E. Beaver and Bridget Haher in N. Pownal. 


27. 


Adelina Gainley, 


d. F. Gainley and Alice Laport, in Canada. 


28. 


Elizabeth U. Downs, 


d. Mathias Downs and Mary A. Reynolds. 

MARCH. 


1. 


Henry McArthur, 


s. Frank H. Whitney and Anna D. Norton. 


1. 


Ursuline Lanone, 


d. John Lanoue and Lucy Fakey. 


1. 


Joseph Netherwood, 


s. J. Netherwood and S. Hazlet in Wmstown^ 


2. 


Venice A. Mallory, 


d. James H. Mallory and and Ellen St. Clair. 


2. 


Elizabeth N. Venard, 


d. James Venard and Mary Clark. 


3. 


Selina Lavalle, 


d. Louis Lavalle and Almira Goodrow. 


4. 


Michael Horrigan, 


s. Michael Horrigan and Maggie O'Brien. 


4. 


Sanford A. Stewart, 


s. Burdick Stewart and Mary Hoag. 


6. 


Edward J. Giiiltman, 


s. John Guiltman and Catharine Read. 


7. 


Mary Coates, 


d. John Coates and Christina Cameron. 


6. 
6. 


Evan Beedles, ) m -^ 
Willie Beedles, S 


sons of Evan Beedles and Eliza Pilot. 


10. 


Augusta Boulger, 


d. Thomas Boulger and Sarah Glynn. 


10. 


Aline King, 


d. Corliss King and Ada Durant. 


11. 


Joseph Belval, 


s. Frank Belval and Emma Guerlin. 


15. 


Augustus Amito, 


s. Frank Amito and Amelia Hoffman. 


15. 


Lena Govern, 


d. James Covem and Lena Richards. 


16. 


Jane Kerr, 


d. Robert Kerr and Jane Montgomery. 


16. 


Eosa Jane Sannee, 


d. Leander Sannee and Adelia Demar. 


17. 


Patrick Shea, 


8. Patrick Shea and Emma Holbrook. 


19. 


Christine J. Taylor, 


d. W. J. Taylor and Jane Crichton. 


21. 


William Garlick, 


s. William B. Garlick and Lizzie Lestler. 


21. 


Margaret A. Cosgrove, 


d. Thomas Cosgrove and Eliza Kennady. 


23. 


John Dolan, 


s, Michael Dolan and NelKe Fitzgerald. 


23. 


Frances Jones, 


d. Frank Jones and Lillie Clark. 


25. 


Harry A. Saxton, 


s. Edward C. Saxton and Lottie Capel. 


25. 


Anna Smith, 


d. John Smith and Anna Higley. 


26. 


William Vallatto, 


s. Wm. Vallatte and Nellie Vallatte. 


26. 


Vtctoria Alley, 


d. Wm. Alley and Caroline Rollins. 


26. 


William Louis Laplant, 


s. Julius F. Laplant and Rosa Lanoue. 


27. 


Lena Mixer, 


d. Herbert Mixer and Mary White. 


28. 


Wmie Godfrey, 


s. E. J. Godfrey and Annie Conley. 



BIRTHS IN MARCH AND APRIL. 



29. Andrew Garello, 

29. Willie Veins, 

30. Ernest Swain, 

31. George Francis Rivers, 



s. Peter Garello and Rosa Bertona. 

s. Arthur Veins and Selina Cardinal. 

s. Samuel Swain and Jane Davis. 

s. Edward Rivers and Ella Brothers. 



1. Rosanna Little, 

2. Michael Craven, 

3. Mary Blanchard, 

4. Anna L. Casey, 

5. Sarah Saunders, 
5. Rhetta Canady, 
5. Archie Young, 

8. Sarah H. Basto, 
8. Wilfred Cardanay, 

10. Emily C. Lucey, 

11, Roy Hocking, 

13. Vera Pearl Darling, 

14. Susanna Burke, 

15. Infant Herzig, 

16. E. Mary Delisle, 

18. Lizzie Landry, 

19. Thomas Stewart, 

19. Eva Edna Brothers, 

20. John O'Neil, 

22. Bertha A. Whitmore, 

24. Amiel Barschtorf, 

25. James Hart, 

25. Bernard Burns, 

26. Margaret Toomey, 

26. Helen H. Hardenberg, 
26. Mary M. Brothers, 
26. Clouds L. Gelineau, 

29. Mary Gordon, 

30. Peter Colony, 
30. Edward Phillips, 



APRIL. 

d. N. Little and M. Broson, 
s. Michael Craven and Mary Conlon. 
d. Nelson Blanchard and Exilda Bashaw, 
d. Wm. Casey and Ella Burke. 

d. Clarence Saunders and Butterfield. 

d. Ernest Canady and Sarah Walker. 

s. Nelson Young and Adeline Tatro. 

d. George and Sarah A. Basto, 

s. Eli Cardanay and Alfonsine Bissette. 

d. Timothy Lucey and Eliza Curran. 

s. Edward Hocking and Emma Carr. 

d. Adelbert Darling and Ada Saunders. 

d. Thomas Burke and Lizzie Brackley. 

s. R. Herzig and Maria Fellman. 

d. Gaspore Delisle and Exylda Rougon. 

d. Henry Landry and Lizzie Armstrong. 

s. Wm. Stewart and Johanna Ahcon. 

d, A. L. Brothers and Jennie Chaille. 

s. John and Mary O'Neil. 

d. Charles Whitmore and Alice Joy. 

s. Adolph Barschtorf and Annie Schnell. 

s. James Hart and Mary Granger. 

s. Michael Burns and Nora Magrath. 

d, Margaret Toomey. 

d. James W. Hardenberg and Ellen Schenck. 

d, Joseph Brothers and Louise Gordon, 

s. Achille Gelineau and Mary Bordeleau. 

d. Arthur Gordon and Elizabeth Carboneau. 

s, Peter and Lizzie Colony, 

s. Edward Phillips and Ida Marsh. 



BIKTHS IN MAY. j 






\ 
MAY- 


1. 


Mary Shea, 


d. Con J. Shea and Maggie Hindley. 


1. 


Louis LaPierre, 


s. Napoleon and Mary LaPierre. * | 


2. 


Francis Benack, 


s. Frank Benack and Mary Daniel. ; 


4. 


Sadie Maud Wade, 


d. John Wade and Mary Wilder. 


5. 


Garrett Mead, 


s. Thomas Mead and Hannah Foley. ' 


6. 


Edgar Noel, 


s. Charles Noel and Mary Bacon. 


6. 


Mary Maloney, 


d. Thomas Maloney and Mary Carley. 


7. 


Albert Bates, 


s. John S. Bates and Bridget Horton. I 


7. 


Myron H. Benton, 


s. Wm. H. Benton and Mary Noble. | 


7. 


Mary Ella Malloy, 


d. Martin Malloy and Mary Mc Graw. 


7. 


Eldrick Beaulieu, 


s. A. Beaulieu and Angeline Laderbush. • 


n 
1. 


Michael Kelly, 


s. Michael Kelly and Maggie McNelly. i 


8. 


Mary Anna Barbeau, 


d. J. B. Barbeau and Adele Langlois. 


8. 


May Yaw Barber, 


d. John Barber and Jennie Chapel. 


14. 


Walter A. Noel, 


s. Charles and Emma Noel. 


14. 


Thomas Kelly, 


s. Thomas and Lizzie Kelly. 


15. 


John Henry Rice, 


s. John A. Rice and Martha C. Wright. 


15. 


James Service, 


s. Russell Service and Nellie Lane. 


17. 


Louise Goodrow, 


■ d. Napoleon Goodrow and Louise Jeff. 


17. 


William D. Keam, 


s. Wm. Keam and Louise Denio. 


18. 


Ernest Kean, 


s. Wm. Kean and Louisa L. Davis. 


19. 


Catherme Flaherty, 


d. John Flaherty and Kate Finegan. 


19. 


Mary Waters, 


d. B. J. Waters and Mary Kelly. 


20. 


Mary Louise Rock, 


d. Henry Rock and Marcelina Benoit. 


20. 


Lucv G. Somers, 


d. Joseph Somers and Helen O'Brien. 


20. 


Lizzie May Hocking, 


d. Thomas Hocking and Phillippa May. 


21. 


James Brasso, 


d. Jerry Brasso and Julia Savaney. 


21. 


Harry Edward Pratt, 


s. John T. Pratt and Phoebe E. McClatchey. 


22. 


EUery W. Morrison, 


s. David Morrison and Anna T. Thomas. 


23. 


Mary Martin, 


d. Martha Martin. i 


23. 


Margaret E. Brown, 


d. Wm. E. Brown and Lillie Readio, ' 


24. 


Samuel Gould, 


s. Robert Gould and Kate Sculley. 


25, 


Thomas F. McCloskey, 


s. Owen McCloskey and Nellie Donahue. 


27. 


Mary Harrington, 


d. Peter Harrington and Julia Hampston. 


28. 


Mary Crawford, 


d. Charles Crawford and Minnie Bowen. 


28 


Willie W. Horrigan, 


s. Michael Horrigan and Margaret O'Brien. 


28 


Infant Sheldon, 


s. Albert Sheldon and Helen Hodskin. 



BIRTHS IN MAY AND JUNE. 



28. Elizabeth Moore, 

29. Annie Diiggan, 
29. Thomas Lanahan, 

29. Mary Boynton, 

30. Mary Brennan, 

31. James Fitzsimmons, 



1. Maud M. Chilson, 


d. 


1. Arthur Labout, 


s. 


1. John Dennis Brackley, 


s. 


1. Martha Fitzpatrick, 


d. 


3. Margaret Boss, 


d. 


3. Mary Louise Roy, 


d. 


4. Millard, 


d. 


4. George Devoe, 


8. 


6. John Sullivan, 


S. 


6. Ida Mennard, 


d. 


10. Thomas White, 


S. 


14- Wm. Henry Goodell, 


s. 


15. Kate Julian, 


d. 


15. Ethel M. Carpenter, 


d. 


16. EUa Wheeler, 


d. 


17. Belvia E. Everingham, 


d. 


17. Ellen Roach, 


d. 


19. Lilian A. WiUard, 


d. 


21. Edith A. Hollenbeck, 


d. 


22. Louisa D. Reid, 


d. 


24. Thomas Burgess, 


s. 


26. Leah Tower Curtis, 


d. 


26. James Hourahan, 


s. 


27. Jennie E. Murdock, 


d. 


27. Emma Gil more. 


d. 


27. Eva May Belmont, 


d. 


27. Patrick Mahoney, 


d. 


28. Blanche A. Smith, 


d. 


29. Dewitt E. Harris, 


s. 


29. Nellie Landry, 


d. 



d. Patrick Moore and Mary Craven, 
d. Patrick Duggan and Mary Reagan. 
s. Wm. Lanahan and Mary A. Horn, 
d. Mark Boynton and Tinney Splatt. 
d. John Brennan and Anna Calahan. 
d. James and Margaret Fitzsimmons. 

JUNE. 

Warren Chilson and Phebe Pay. 
Avilla Labout and Agnes Dupree. 
John Brackley and Catharine Kelly. 
. James Fitzpatrick and Maggie Reagan. 
, Thomas and Maggie Boss. 
Oliver Roy and Christie Rascoe. 
P. W. Millard and NelHe Millard. 
John Devoe and Mary Johnson. 
J. Sullfvan and M. Mahoney, in Wmstown. 
Eugene Mennard and Adaline SorrelL 
Thomas White and Clara Kezbach. 
Lewis C. Goodell and Blanche Goodrich. 
T. Julian and Mary Mango. 
Peter Carpenter and Alma Kilburn. 
E. E. and Ella Wheeler. 
Clawson Everingham and Ella M. Flynn. 
Peter Roach and Kate Hayden. 
George WiUard and Lizzie Tolland. 
E.Hollenbeck and Carrie Chapel, Pittsfield- 
Charles D. Reid and Maud N. Newell. 
Thomas and Mary Burgess. 
Frank E. Curtis and Angle T. Tower. 
James Hourahan and Annie Duso. 
Geo. A. Murdock and Nora M. Flynn. 
Edward Gilmore and Rhoda Green. 
David Belmont and Mary A. Rider. 
P. Mahony and Mary Cavanaugh, Wmst'n 
Walter M. Smith and Janette Cook. 
Wm. A. Harris and Isabel F. Cole. 
Joseph Landry and Kate Frawley. 



BIRTHS IN JULY. 



9. 
10. 
10. 
12. 
13. 
U. 

15. 
15. 
16. 
17. 

18. 
19. 
20. 
21. 
22. 
22. 
22. 
23. 
24. 
25. 
27. 
27. 
27. 
29. 
29. 
30. 
30. 
30. 



Lizzie Hutchinson, 
Joseph Benoit, 
WiUie Cooper, 
Rosanna Conley, 
Willie Taylor, (colored) 
Timothy Haley, 
Julia McNamara, 
Ellen Louisa Kelly, 
Charles Cheesbro, 
James Garlick, 
CeciHa Bradley, 
Nellie McQueen, 
Annie T. Fischler, 
Mary E. Harwood, 
Arthur F. E. Ducharme 
Mary Scully, 
Albert Hocking, 
James Longway, 
Mary Mullen, 
Agnes Dana, 
Guy Pratt, 
Cordelia Gamach, 
Elmer M. Abbott, 
Fanny Belle Lanfair, 
Charlotte Lanfair, 
Wilfred Contoe, 
James Kentfield, 
Lizzie Ida McMillin, 
Sarah J. Thomas, 
Lida Gagnon, 
Henry Supress, 
James A. Bascott, 
Lawrence Woodhead, 
Wm. Henry Marshall, 
Catharine Austin, 
Anna Rickard, 
Mary E. Mason, 



JULY. 

d. John Hutchinson and Lizzie Home. 
s. Joseph and Surcilia Benoit. 
B. Peter Cooper and Mary Axtell. 
d. Patrick Conley and Rosa Curley, 
s. Anthony Taylor and Jenny Cooper. 
s. Dennis Haley and Mary A. Hanlon, 
d. Robert McNamara and Julia Gavener, 
d. James Kelly Jr. and Mary Welch. 
s. Charles F. Cheesbro and Minerva Grant. 
s. Arthur Garlick and Abby Leonard, 
d. Wm. Bradley and Anna Rogers. 
d. Thomas McQueen and Nelly Maginley. 
d. Clement Fischler and Anselina Badman. 
d. Edw. Harwood and Mary Tyrrell. 
, s. Mark Ducharme and Matilda Germain, 
d. Thomas Scully and Statia Cady. 
s. Lester Hocking and Anna Spry. 
s. John Longway and Emma Sansoucie. 
d. James Mullen and Mary Luther, 
d. Jacob Dana and Mary Knettall. 
s. Frank Pratt and Ada Burlingham. 
d. Joseph Gammach and Mary Dupree. 
8. John M. Abbott and Caroline Goodrich. 

Jj' i Oscar Lanfair and Charlotte Allen. 

s, Gilbert Contoe and Minnie Bolger. 
s. B. and Julia Kentfield. 
d. Edward A. and Anna W. McMillin. 
d. John Thomas and Mary Mason. 

d. Gagnon and Clara Rascoe. 

s. David Supress and Natalie Gretto. 

s. Henry O. Bascott and Sarah C. Joy. 

s. Wm. H. Woodhead an I Margaret Walters. 

s. Wm. H. Marshall and Delphine Lagrant. 

d. Harry Austin and Katie Mansfield. 

d. Frank Rickard and Anna Pitt. 

d. John Mason and Hattie Fuller. 



BIRTHS IN AUGUST. 



8. 

9. 

9. 
10. 
10. 
10. 
13. 
13. 
14 
15. 
16. 
17. 
18. 
18. 
20. 
20. 
21. 
21. 
22. 
22. 
28. 
24. 
24. 



Ellen Hopper, 
Margaret Traquire, 
Sarah Tinmay, 
Bessie Helen Stevens, 
Minnie I. Illingworth, 
Florence May Allen, 
George Pero, 
Rosa Eddy, 

Edward Henry Mooney, 
Lorena Demarrais, 
Ethel M. Beer, 
Earl Frank Hastings, 
Anna Belle Loftus, 
Willie Honrahan, 
Catharine Larkin. 
Leon Sullivan, 
Herbert E. Pritchard, 
Rosa Domen, 
Pauline Brown, 
Millard H. Thompson, 
Elizabeth Benedict, 
Charles E. Demorris, 
George M. Douglas, 
Eva Jane Bradley, 
Mary A. Edmunds, 
Anne Russell, 
Timothy Fitzgerald, 
Lizzie Coates, 
John Drout, 
Engene Cummings, 
Walter L. Rich, 
Anna Davis Pike, 
Claude E. Potter, 
Helena Windrow, 
Mary Gregory, 
John Henry Jacobs, 
Flora Roberts, 
Susie Irene Kelly, 



AUGUST. 

d. John Hopper and Ellen O'Grady. 

d. Wm. Traquire and Margaret Kerr. 

d. John Tinmay and Sarah Eckerell. 

d. Samuel Stevens and Mary H. Hunter. 

d. John lUingworth and Minerva Booth. 

d. Hector Allen and Mary Bullet. 

s. Alfred Pero and Kate E. Barth. 

d. Albert Eddy and Jenny Lee. 

s. John Mooney and Anna Madden. 

d. Joseph T. Demarrais and Carrie Reeves. 

d. Enoch H. Beer, and Celestia Burrington. 

s. George Hastings and Addie Chapel. 

d. Thomas F. Loftus and Mary Ryan. 

s. Patrick Hourahan and Honora Collins. 

d. James T. Larkin and Mary A. Sullivan. 

s. John Sullivan and Fanny Manley. 

s. Wm. H. Pritchard and Sarah L. Shaver. 

d. James D. and Rosa Hoher, Williamstown. 

d. Wm. L. Brown and Fanny Pomeroy. 

s. George Thompson and Sarah Conklin. 

d. Paul Benedict and Lizzie Strang. 

s. Edmund Demorris and Adeline Perry. 

s. Geo. M. Douglas and Mary James. 

d. Peter O. Bradley and Jane E Small. 

d. John P. Edmonds and Mary T. Simpson. 

d. Elmer H. Russell and Ann R. Bowler, 

s. Timothy Fitzgerald and Nellie McSweeny. 

d. Jacob Coates and Mary Shay. 

s. John and Mary Drout. 

s. Wm. H. Cummings and Adelia Collins. 

s. Lemuel Rich and Mary Scofield. 

d. James Pike and Salina Tower. 

s. Warren B. Potter and Carrie B. Elliott. 

d. George Wmdrow and Helena H. Powell. 

d. Solomon Gregory and Rosa M anion. 

s. John H. Jacobs and Mary A. Lewis. 

d. Moses Roberts and Julia Fuller. 

d. James Kelley and Mary Hanley. 



BIRTHS IN AUGUST AND SEPTEMBEE. 



25. James B. Smith, s. 

26. Geo. Fleming, s. 
26. Wm. H. Penniman, s. 

26. Elizabeth Moon, d. 

27. Juliette A. Hogeboom, d. 
27. Harry Wm. Ingraham, s. 

27. Peter Carroll, s. 

28. Willie Turner, s. 
30. Anna Timmany, d. 

30. Caroline AYilkinson, d. 

31. Arthur Duane Sprague, s. 



James Smith and Mary O'Kourke. 
Geo. H. Fleming and Melissa E. Bratton. 
Wm. H. Penniman and Lizzie Holt. 
Milo Moon and Lizzie Bates, N. Bennington 
Paul F. Hogeboom and Ahdna Baker, 
Wm. H. Ingraham and Zella Swan. 
Peter Carroll and Grace Foley, Clarksburg. 
Charles Turner and Anna Nugent. 
John Timmany and Sarah Ecclesby. 
John Wilkinson and Carrie Bristol. 
Herbert Sprague and Ella Morgan. 



1. Jacob Morin, 

1. Emma Harrington, 

3. Hattie May Boj^iiton, 

4. Angelo GetTery, 

4. Margaret Sherman, 

5. Annie Cubly, 

6. Jessie Grant Smith, 

7. Mary Whitney, 

7. James E. Cummings, 

8. Frank P. Haggerfcy, 
8. Joseph LeSage, 

8. Clarence M. Ballou, 
6. Mary Kennedy, 

9. Domino Gammach, 
9. Agnes Bussette, 

12. James Domen, 

13. Benjamin AVestgate 

14. Leslie Allen Bacon, 
17. Lottie L3a Bardick, 
17. Georgie E. Horrosks, 
17. John Loring, 

17. Eugene Henry Kano, 

18. Arnum, 

18. Agatha Kyan, 

19. Jacob Jondreau, 



SEPTEMBER. 

s. Jacob Morin and Celeste Chaudonnet. 

d. Reuben Harrington and Emma Reynolds. 

d. George BojTiton and Mary Gardner. 

s. G. B. and Louise GefPery. 

d. Homer Sherman and Maggie Short. 

s. Henry Cubly and Ellen Whalen. 

d. Warren Smith and Lizzie Jewett. 

d. Susan Whitney and Mary Bryant./ 

s. John Cummings and Mary J. McCloskey. 

s. John P. Haggarty and Maggie Hannon. 

s. Peter Lesage and i\jinie Dubee. 

s. Wm. A. Ballou and Fanny M. Carpenter, 

d. Peter and Mary Kennedy, 

s. Nelson Gammach and Phebe Francelot. 

d. Albert Bussette and Agnes Boperdus. 

s. John Domen and Lucy Gainsbury. 

s. Israel F. Hathaway and Lizzie Nuttall. 

s. Alvin and Lizzie M. Bacon of Spencer. 

d. Alpheus Burdick an I Josie A. Clark. 

d. Geo. Horro^ks and Estella de Maranville. 

s. Nelson Loring and Matilda Bonche. 

s. Lsmusl R3n3 ani Adelia D3ro3hea. 

s. Charles Arnum and Myra Jones. 

d. Lawrence Ryan and Mary Beehan. 

s. Joseph Jondreau and Sarah Richards. 



BIRTHS IN SEPTEMBER AND OCTOBER. 



19. Ellen Darant, 

20. Cathsrine Ryan, 
22. Margaret O'Brien, 

22. vSophia White, 

23. Frank Arthur Rand, 
23. Edward LaDam, 

25. Clara Irene Parkhurst, 
28. William Hocking, 
28. Emma E. Coon, 
27. Howard W. Sykes, 
27. George Harold Braman, 

27. James Henry Weeks, 

28. Catharine Griffith, 

29. Leander Dnrant, 

29. Maiy Ellen Jones, 

30. James Casey, 
30. Louis Laron, 



Napoleon Durant and Ellen Geriau. 

Patrick and Kate Ryan. 

Timothy O'Brien and Maggie Hogan. 

Levi White and Sophia Goodrich. 

Frank Rand and Julia Hover. 

Frank LaDam and Catherine MoOago. 

Chas. J. Parkhurst ani Mary J. Johnson. 

Wm. Hoeking and Zina Francher. 

William Coon and Amanda White. 

Robert H. Sykas ani Miry E. Robinson, 

Geo. O. Braman and Lydia A. Terry. 

Frank H. Weeks and Hattie Wilkinson. 

John and Kate Griffith. 

Napoleon Darant and Helen Gerue. 

John Jones and Sarah E. Burns. 

James Casey and Maria Nurey. 

Peter Laron and Sarah Gilbert. 



1. Mary Lois Scofield, 

2. Johanna Murphy, 

2. Delia Burbank, 

3. Ralph Arthur Selby, 

3. Mary Hewes, 

4. Charles Henry Lewis, 

5. Arthur Alton Pratt, 
5. Felix Gonyea, 

7. Fred James Dawson, 

7. Agnes Hindley, 

8. Frank Leon Swan, 
10. Mary Newman, 
10. Joseph Newman, 
10. Mary E. McGivney, 
12. James Pierce, 

12. John Pierce, 
12. Fred Augustus Turner. 
12. Lillian Alma Pero, 
12. Ella Jane Devoe, 



OCTOBER. 

d. John L. Seolield and Marie Baker. 

d. Stephen and Margaret Murphy. 

d. Joseph Burbank and Cslia Martin. 

s. Ralph Selby and Maria Bratt. 

s. John Hewes and Mary Jones. 

s. Charles H. Lewis and Amanda Brown. 

s. Arthur L. Pratt and Julia E. Wilder. 

s. Antoine Gonyea and Lizzie Rusett, 

s. Henry Dawson and Lizzie Cropper. 

d. John Hindley and Mary Wright. 

s. Classon "E. Swan and Ruth A. Murphy. 

{ Joseph Newman and Mary Raycrof t. 



d. Bernard McGivney and Maggie Fitzgerald 

^* ( Wm. H. Pierce and Louise A. Lyons. 
s. ) 

s. Fred A. Turner and Emma A. Sherman. 

d. Geo. Pero and Alma Gaudette. 

d. Adolphus Devoe aud Adele Woodcock. 



i 

BIETHS IN OCTOBEE AND NOVEMBER. 1 

1 


14. 


William Harvey Davis, 


s. Geo. Davis and Mary Jane Jones. I 


14 


Mary Soscoe, 


d. Cero Soscoe and Katie LeBarbier. i 


15. 


Joseph Morrow, 


s. Jacob Morrow and Sarah Field. 


16. 


Katie Larkin, 


d. John Larkin and Ann McDunna. ! 


16. 


Levv'is Andrew Jackson, 


s. Joseph Jackson and Mary M. Parsons. 


16. 


Harry Elliott Phillips, 


s. George E. Phillips and Ida May Jones. 


17. 


Patsey McDonough, 


s. James McDonough and Mary Doherty. 


18. 


NeUie E. Horton, 


d. James Horton and Sarah Lawton. 


19. 


Mary Lorrimer, 


d. Jacob Lorrimer and Mary Graham. 


19. 


Wilfred Bnrbank, 


s. Frank Burbank and Matilda Houle. 


19. 


Dora Groshier, 


d. Joseph Groshier and Mary Tatro. 


19. 


Mary Louise Belaire, 


d. Fred Belaire and Mary L. Beliveau. 


20. 


Abigail Wild. 


d. G. Wild and Abbie Newton in Stamford. 


21. 


Minnie Elma Cheesbro 


, d. James Cheesbro and Cora J. Chilson. 


21. 


Mary Straw, 


d. Joseph and Mary Straw. 


22. 


Mary Kee, 


d. Morris Kee and Ella Hanafin. 


23. 


Sarah L. Dyson, 


d. Wm. H. Dyson and Sarah Stearns. 


24 


Anna Grace Durant, 


d. Joseph Durant and Annie Bishop. 


25. 


Frank Pratt, 


s. F. Pratt and Alice Clark in Clarksburg. 


26. 


Stewart Nash 8chonler, 


s. Kobert E. Schouler and Nellie M. Shephard 


26. 


Abila A, Lanoue, 


s. Eli Lanoue and Phcsbe Berard. 


27. 


Wilham Barry, 


s. Daniel Barry and Maria Hogan. 


27. 


Clinton Kately, 


s. Arthur Kately and Mary A. Burdick. 


28. 


James McGraw, 


s. Edward McGraw and Bridget Larkin. 


28. 


Patrick Doherty, 


s. John Doherty and Mary Ryan. 


28. 


Michael Cummings, 


s. Pierce Cummings and Mary O'Brien. 


29. 


Arthur Graham, 


s. William Graham and Eliza Nichols. 


29. 


Frank A. Eoach, 


s. Peter Roach and Catherine Fagan. 


30. 


Delpheus M. Noel, 


s. Charles Noel and Rosa Carmel. 


31. 


Ellen E. Moon, 


d. Charles Moon and Sarah Bryant. 


31. 


Jennie Arnold Bond, 


d. Alfred Bond and Emma Bunting. 

NOVEMBER. 


1. 


Olavine Lestage, 


d. Vital Lestage and Alfonsine DeMarne. 


3. 


George Herbert Hall, 


s. George W Hall and Jennie Jones. 


5. 


Willie Durant, 


s. Joseph Durant and Mary AUard. 


5. 


John Conner, 


s. John Conner and Minnie Young. ^ 


6, 


Grace Edna Haslam, 


d. Albert Haslam and Nellie M. Boothe. 



BIKTHS IN NOVEMBEK AND DECEMBER. 



6. Wm. Francis Jones, 

7. Ella Eosa White, 

8. Mary Casey, 

9. Julius Duquette, 

10. Peter Edward Dunn, 

11. Frank Marlow, 

12. Arthur A Chilson, 

12. Christina B. King, 

13. Ada May Stone, 

13. Ethel May Morrison, 

14. Malvina McCarthy, 

14. Joseph George Bovar, 

15. Georgiana Foote, 

16. William Henry Sharpe, 

17. David Hakes, 

17. Eva Lablieu,, 

18. Mary E. Burpee, 

19. Willie Gokay, 

19. David Wm. Armstrong, 

20. Mary Heaverty, 

21. Mary E. Sullivan, 

22. Edward A. Damon, 

23. Maud Idella Burdick, 

24. Nettie G. Mabbett, 

25. Mary E. Tragon, 

26. Walter Kating, 

26. Anna Kelly, 

27. Eugenia Belliveau, 

28. Frank Harris Bay, 
30. Malvina Varaien, 
30. Albina Varaien, 
30. Vioia C. Scott, 

30. Sarah E. Lewis, 



1. Julia Lyman, 

2. Henry Elmer Peck, 
2. Bessie Louise Price, 



s. Frank Jones and Mary O'Brien 

d. Wm. White and Fanny Young. 

d. Thomas Casey and Barbara Payne. 

s. Julius Duquette and Lizzie Mosher. 

s. John Dunn and Kate Higgins. 

s. Frank Marlow and Minnie Clements. 

s. Homer A. Chilson and Susan Crawford. 

d. Wm. King and Charlotte Bonner. 

d. Alfred W. Stone and Johanna Eeagan. 

d. Edward H. Morrison and Zilph Wilkinson. 

d. Charles McCarthy and Mehdna Cadron. 

s. Joseph Bovar and Ann Gill. 

d. Oliver Foote and Selina Fisher. 

s. Frank Sharpe and Lizzie M. Evans. 

s. Nathan Hakes and Patience Hughes. 

d. Frank Lablieu and Angeline Gokay. 

d. Wm. Burpee and Mary Fortune. 

s. Feliz Gokay and Valerie Gauthier. 

s. David Armstrong and Leah Busiere. 

d. Thomas Heaverty and Mary Conners. 

d. Da^TLd Sullivan and Susan O'Neil. 

s. Albert A. Damon and Sylvia M. Eider. 

d. James E Burdick and Idella Bennett. 

d. John H. Mabbett and Sarah Fulton. 

d. Henry Tragon and Mary Norton. 

s. Daniel Kating and Ellen Lahey. 

d. Perry Kelly and Johanna C. Heme. 

d. Edmond Belliveau and Olivena Lorrin. 

s. Frank N. Bay and Julia A. Wetherbee. 

^* I Andrew Varaien, and Mary Bolger. 

d. Henry Scott and Grace Wilcox. 
d. Edward Lewis and Mary L. Boyd. 



DECEMBER. 

d. Fred S. Lyman and Julia G. Gridley, 
s. Elmer Peck and Sarah Cheesbro. 
d. Emory J. Price and Mary Sweet. 



BIETHS IN DECEMBER. 



3. Amy Belle vStiles, d. 

4. Joseph Beanpore, s. 
6. Winfred C. Davis, s. 
6. Daniel Wells, s. 

6. Earl D. Bardwell, s. 

7. Helen E. Blake, d. 
7. Anna King, d. 

7. AlansonCady, s. 

8. Frank G. Bordeleaii, s. 

9. Mary F. Brace, d. 

10. Mary Ellen Keardon, d. 

11. Frank Ed^in Blanslion, s. 
11. John Eagan, s. 
11. Bertha E. Clark, d. 
11. Willie John Gettis, s. 
11. Michael F. Daily, s. 
11. Christina Eagan, d. 

11. Betsey Carden, d. 

12. Charles Gilbert, s. 

13. Charles Henry Granger, s. 

14. Anna Maud McCarty, d. 

15. Frank Edwin Washburn, s. 

16. Alice Wright, d. 
19. Owen Phillips Dean, s. 
19. Jacqes CartierKichards, s. 

19. Peter Francis Follett. s. 

20. Florence M. Eeed, d. 
22. Marv Frances Curran, d. 

22. Anna Evans, d. 

23. James Nagle, s. 

26. George Messier, s. 

27. Kobert Eugene Cobb, s: 

28. Helen Chase, d. 
28. Rosa Brosseau, d. 
28. Sarah Hume, d. 

28. Caroline Church, d. 

29. Alexander Gainly, s. 
29. Nellie Bingham, d. 



Or^dlle M. Stiles and Mary A. Whiteman. 
Thomas Beaupore and Eosa LaClare. 
Charles Davis and Alvina Hewitt. 
Daniel M. Wells and Anna Ingraham. 
Frederick Bardwell and Ann E. Ware. 
Harry E. Blake and Mary V. Bro^Ti. 
George King and Anna Rock. 
Edwin B. Cady and Josephine Bedford. 
George Bordeleau and Mary Olin. 
John N. Bruce and Mary Sweet. 
Timothy F. Reardon and Maggie McElroy. 
George Blanshon and Ida Atwood. 
John and Rose Eagan. 
Herbert W. Clark and EUa M. Brayton. 
Joseph Gettis and Margaret Watt. 
Michael Daily and Anna Harkley. 
John P. Eagan and and Mary Ann Foster. 
Joseph Carden and Exilda Liborty. 
Frank Gilbert and Angeline Basson. 
Moses Granger and Eliza Hill. 
Charles McCarty and Mary Cadron. 
Madison Washburn and Mary J. Soule. 
John Wright and Mary A, Chase. 
Thomas J. Dean and Lillaoe O. Philips. 
Joseph and Exilda Richards. 
Edward Follett and Susie Duboise. 
Fred W. Reed and Anna W. Himter. 
Dr. C. J. Curran and Katie Lally. 
Walter Evans and Jennie Rollans. 
James Nagle and Kate Flynn. 
George Messier and Aurelia Duval. 
Robinson L. Cobb and Emma Johnson. 
Warren Chase and Jennie Bunting. 
Frank Brosseau and Adelie Benoit. 
Joseph Hume and Sarah Clark. 
Eugene Church and Carrie Alford. 
Alex Gainly and Amanda Burnaice. 
Thomas Bingham and Nellie Kimball. 



BIRTHS IN DECEMBER. 



29. Mary Magnet, 
29. Alfred Langlois, 

29. Ellen Allen, 

30. Katie A. Martin, 
30. Mary A. Nichols, 

30. Helen Quinn, 

31. Elizabeth La WBCMX, 



d. Arthur and Phebe Magnet. 

s. Alfred Langlois and Phebe Rainey. 

d. Squire W. Allen and Nellie Kimball. 

d. Joseph Martin and Maggie Hughes. 

d. Charles H. Nichols and Ida S. Burdick. 

d. Patrick Quin and Helen Tobin. 

d. James K. Lawson and Lizzie Fragier. 



I 

1 


RECORD OF DEATHS. 






1885. 


Abbreviations: y. for years; 


m. for mor ths; ds. for days; s. for son of; d. for dangh- 




ter of 


w. for wife of; wid. for widow. 
DEATHS IN JANUARY. 


1. 


Mrs. Mary Doivani, 


85 y., wid.; and d. Hugh Loughey. 


3. 


Katie Cavanaiigh, 


— d. Michael and Hanorah Cavanaugh. 


6. 


Emily Lonisa Jane 


3 m., d. Louis and Victoria Dalmaso. 


7. 


Charles Henry Roy, 


1 m., s. Frank and Harriet Roy. 


8. 


Helen May Anderson, 


8 y., d. William and Helen Anderson. 


8. 


Lonis C. Dubue, 


2 y., s. Arthur and Margaret Dubue, 


9. 


William Perrotti, 


45 y.; from Italy. Pneumonia. 


10. 


Mrs. Mary Heap, 


86 y., wid. Abraham Heap, from England. 


11. 


Mrs. Henrietta Gaudette, 49 y., w. Alfred C. Gaudette, and mother of 






19 children. 


11. 


Patrick Haggerty, 


32 y., miner, killed by railroad accident. 


11. 


Sarah C. Da\ds, 


19 y., d. Henry and Clara Davis, Clarksburg. 


12. 


Engene Couchene, 


3 y., s. Charles and Fredoline Couchene. 


12. 


Jessie Davis, 


6 y., d. Frederick and Mary Davis. 


12. 


Mrs. Mary Arsino, 


29 y., d. Joseph Gaudette. 


13. 


Bnddie Jandran, 


3 y., s. Darwick and Delia Jandran. 


14. 


Mrs. Rosa Aubie, 


37 y., d. Pierre Lapoint. 


15. 


Exzilla Eddy, 


6 y., d. Frank J. and Delia Eddy. 


15. 


Albert Witherell, 


77 y. Pneumonia. 


15. 


Michael Cavanaugh, 


81 y.; of Pittsfield. Paralysis. 


15. 


Thomas Cavanaugh, 


8 y., s. Thomas Cavanaugh. 


16. 


Mrs. Sarah Bradford Harrison, 88 y., wid. Clement Harrison, of this 






town, died at Manchester Vt. 


16. 


Clara Lanoue, 


3 y., d. Nelson and Matilda Lanoue. 


16. 


Mrs. Rosa Tatro, 


27 y., w. Octave Tatro and d. Win. St. John. 


16. 


Mrs. Mary Welch, 


58 y., d. Edward Sanders. 

! 





DEATHS ] 


N JANUAEY AND FEBEUARY. 


19. 


Henry A. Joy, 


2 m., s. Henry A. and Alice Joy. 


19. 


James King, 


83 y., of paralysis; from Ireland. 


20. 


Mrs. Frances 0. Bodley, 


wid. Chas. S. and mother of Rev. H. I. Bod- 
ley, died at St. Louis, Mo. 


22. 


Sumner Sonthworth, 


86 y., at W'mstown; the oldest manufacturer. 


22. 


Isaac Orcutt, 


73 y. Heart disease. 


i 23. 


Virginia Lanoue, 


1 y., d. Nelson and Matilda Lanoue. 


! 24. 


Charles H. Gregson, 


8 ds., s. George Gregson. 


. 25. 


Mrs. Sarah A. Hamblen, 58 y., w. Jacob Hamblen. | 


' 25. 


Rosa A. Lanoue, 


3 y., d. Adolphus and Victoria Lanoue. 


: 25. 


Llewellyn Swain, 


1 y., s. Samuel and Jane Swain. 


l25. 


Cardelia Beaver, 


2 y„ d. Joseph Beaver. Diphtheria. 


27. 


Marie Louise Prudeau, 


7 y., d. Oliver Prudeau. Diphtheria. 


1 30. 


Robert Doherty, 


3 y., s. John and Mary Doherty. Diphtheria. 


1 31. 


Richard Crowley, 


7 m., s. John F. Crowley. Scarlet fever. 

FEBRUARY. 


2. 


Lizzie Fleming, 


5 y., d. Richard Fleming, Blackinton. 


2. 


Ada Vian, 


50 y., in Rowe, Mass. 


3. 


Rev. Lemuel Covell, 


81 y. Eighth pastor of the Baptist church. 


4. 


Oscar E. Thayer, 


^5 y., s. Oscar Thayer, Readsboro. 


4. 


Mrs. Bridget McCauley, 40 y. Cancer. | 


8. 


Mary Labloue, 


3 y., d. Francis Labloue. Convulsions. 


12. 


Mrs. Fanny C. James, 


30 y. w. John E. James. Consumption. 


14. 


Lillie Kinsley, 


3 y., d. Edwd. Kinsley of Blackinton. 


15. 


William A. Dyson, 


3 m., s. Wm. Dyson. Diarrhoea. 


15. 


George Preston, 


83 y.; at Halifax, Vt, 


15. 


Mrs. Chester Sampson, 


64 y. ; wid. ; at S. Williamstown. 


16. 


Albert Bryant, 


37 y.; consumption; at Worcester. 


16. 


Anna B. Rannev, 


13 y., d. Horace Ranney, Clarksburg. 


20. 


Mrs. Myrtie A. Gallup, 


20 y., d. George W. Dodge. 


20. 


Lydia Chamberlain, 


4 y., d. Clifford Chamberlain of Wmstown. 


25. 


Mrs. Caroline Butler, 


65 y. wid. Abial P. Butler and d. John Witt. 


24. 


Frank Fowler, 


42 y.; consumption; at Williamstown. 


25. 


Mrs. Julia A. Ripley, 


66 y.; at Granville, N. Y. 


26. 


Geo, Wright of Pownal 


, — killed by walking on railroad. 


27. 


Patrick Costello, 


76 y.; mason, from Ireland. 


26. 


Rectus Clarkin, 


85 y.; at Stamford, Vt. 


30. 


Joseph Sherman, 


— at Williamstown. 



DEATHS IN MABCH AND APRIL. 


1 

1 




t 

1 

MARCH. j 


: 2. 


Alice Deyo, 


2 y., d. William Deyo. Diphtheria. 


1 5. 


Mrs. Julia A Day, 


71 y., d. Benj. Crandall. Cancer. 


i 5. 


Dallas J. Dean, 


69 y. A valued citizen of Adams. 


i '' 


Patrick W. Crowley. 


10 y., s. John Crowley. Croup. 


\ 8. 


Charles H. Adriance, 


46 y. Consumption. 


i 9. 


Patrick Murphy, 


23 y., s. Cornelius Murphy. Consumption. 


i 9. 


Kate Murphy, 


24 y., d. Mrs. C. Murphy. 


1 11- 


Georg-e H. Williams, 


3 y., d. John and Kate Williams. 


11. 


Sarah E. Morris, 


1 y„ d. Walter E. and Mary J. Morris. 


14. 


Aclaline A. Harris, 


53 y. 


15. 


Nellie Lableau, 


7 y., d. Francis and Angeline Lableau. 


16. 


Emily Foot, 


3 m. d. Francis N. Foot. 


i ^^' 


Isaac S. Brown, 


3 y., s. Isaac S. and Lizzie A. Brown. 


\ 17. 


Michael Scully, 


33 y.; from Ireland. Railroad accident. 


! 17. 


Beade E. Goldthwaite, 


1 y., d. P. and E. L. Goldthwaite. 


jl8. 


Melinda Folget, 


6 y., d. Jerry and Alma Folget. Diphtheria. 


22. 


Sarlock, 


— d. Wm. B. and Lizzie Sarlock. 


22. 


Roger M. Collins, 


1 y., s. John Collins. 


22. 


Charles Smith, 


8 y. s. Thomas and Ellen Smith. 


1 23. 


Albert Gonyea, 


1 y. s. Antoine and Elizabeth Gonyea. 


24. 


Walter A. Childs, 


22 y. s. Luther Childs. Suicide. 


25. 


John AVilcox, 


13 y. Rheumatic fever. 


25. 


Mrs. Catherine Kingsley, 73 y. w. Elisha Kingsley. | 


27. 


Louis Makant, 


2 m., s. Joseph Makant. 


28. 


Harvey Curtis, . 


68 y. Cancer. 


28. 


Owen Clough, 


71 y. Of Stamford, Vt. 


29. 


Lumina L. Vadner, 


4 m., d. Edward and Roseline Vadner. 


29. 


Cherie H. Clark, 


11 m. d. E. A. and Emma B. Clark. 


29. 


Fred Davis, 


3 y., s. Fred and Mary A. Da-v^is. 

APRIL. 


2. 


Mrs. Lucy Benoir, 


40 y. At Clarksburg. Suicide. 


3. 


Mrs. Susan Hathaway, 


76 y.; wid.; d. Dan'l Martin, 


5. 


John Sullivan, 


56 y. In Stamford, Vt. 


6. 


Mary Fitzgerald, 


18 y., d. Wm. and Ellen Fitzgerald, 


7. 


Mrs.Eva Brown Downin 


g — by railroad accident in Arizona. 



DEATHS IN APRIL AND MAY. 



10. Mrs. Eva H. Millard, 

11. Mrs. Mary Marsh, 

12. Mrs. Merrillah Walker, 

13. Ediiise Labelle, 

14. Mrs. Mary Lee, 
17. Mrs. Fidelia Clark, 

17. Mrs. Clorinda Lindsay, 
19. Delia Thibeau, 

19. John Z. Goodrich, 

20. Mrs. Ann Eliza Crandall 

20. Infant Bover, 

21. Mary Dee, 

22. Mrs. Florence Pratt, 

23. Wm. Clark, 

23. Franklin Mason, 

28. Dr. John C. Moloney, 

24. Lorenzo Catalia, 
24. Frederick Cann, 

26. Mrs. Jane P. Eouse, 

27. Mrs. Catherine Slattery, 

27. Infant Blodgett, 

28. Wells Stafford, 
28. Edgar P. Church, 

28. Eugenia Gregoire, 

29. Eoy P. Blackinton, 

29. Dennis McGrath, 

30. Patrick Quinn, 



26 y., w. Chas. K. Millard; d. George French, 

at Denver, Col., of consumption. 
77 y., d. Walker Baldwin; at Adams. 
50 y. At Williamstown, 

1 y., s. Edward Labelle; diphtheria. 
39 y., w. James Lee. 

70 y., w. Sam'l Clark; d. Da^ad Darling. 
68 y., wid. John Lindsay; d. S. Loveland. 

2 y., -d. Peter Thibeau. 

81 y. Of Stockbridge, Mass. 

72 y. Step-mothsr A. B, Crandall. 

1 day. Child of Paul and Maggie Bover, 
10 y., d. James and Anastasia Dee. 

27 y., w. Arthur Pratt, d. Wm. Joy. 
65^y. Williamstown. Suicide. 

2 y., s. Frank B. Mason. 

32 y. At Madiera, Cal. Dipsomania. 
— killed by blast at Readsboro. 
7 m., s. Henry and Mary Cann. 
61 y., w. Ashbel W. Rouse, d. Mason White. 
37 y., d. Thomas McCormick. 

2 ds., d. W. H. and Flora Blodgett. 

3 y., s, F. J. and F. H. Stafford, Stamford. 
1 y.. s. E. D. and Ellen Church. 

22 y., d. Hubert Gregoire, Canada. 
13 y., s. Edward W. Blackinton. 
47 y. From Ireland. Consumption. 
31 V. At Williamstown. 



MAY- 



2. Rosa Stone, 

2. Annie Coates, 

2. Arthur L. Jeffers, 

2. Rev. Rufus Starks, 

4. Francis Gallup, 

4. Mrs. Maria Broderick, 

6. Zedan Blanchard, 

6. Rose Laundry, 

7. Richard Shea, 



10 m., d. Edward and Mary Stone. 

2 m., d. John and Christina Coates. 
4 y., s. Eldredge Jeffers, Clarksburg. 

73 y. In Savoy; of old age. 

3 y. 7 m., s. Wm. Arthur and Harriet Gallup. 
47 y., d John Boland. 

2 m., d. Nelson and Zedan Blanchard. 
2 m., d. Frank and Josephine Laundry. 
1 y., s. Patrick Shea. 



DEATHS IN MAY AND JUNE. 



7. Mary Murphy, 94 y., 

7. Isaac Latham, 91 y. 

9. Edward Fields, 58 y., 

11. John F. Foley, ' 4 y., 

11. Mrs. Abigail Witherell, 78 y., 

12. Mrs. Marcetta Whitman, 79 y., 

12. David Bnshnell, 97 y. 

13. Mrs. Maria Dihvorth, 82 y., 

14. Jarvis Rockwell, 56 y. 

16. A. 0. Tatro, 62 y. 

17. Mrs. Mary A. Moloney, 28 y., 

19. Frank F. Fitzgerald, 6 y. 

20. Jessie Dennison, 12 y., 
20. Clara Loud, 16 y., 

20. White, 65 y. 

20. Elizabeth McEown, 18 y., 
22. Mrs. Elizabeth Hurlburt,47 y., 

24. Owen Byron, 5 m. 

25. Mrs. Naomi Allen, 67 y. 
28. Lelia E. Swan, 1 y., 
80. Joseph Boseley, 3 m. 
31. Lucena Van Zandt. 55 y., 



d. Wm. Murphy; from Ireland. 

In Williamstown; of old age. 
s. Clessen Fields, 
s. James Foley. 

wid. Albert Witherell. Consumption, 
w Reuben Whitman; d. Wm. Loveland. 

In Pownal, Vt.; of old age. 
wid. Jeremiah Dil worth; d. Peter Estes 

Judge of District Court. 

Of Canada; consumption, 
w. T. C. Moloney; d. John Connolly. 

Of Williamstown. 
d. A. E* Dennison of Williamsto^m. 
d. James Loud; consumption. 

Of Stamford, Vt. 
d. John and Elizabeth McEown. 
d. John Downs. 
, s. Peter Byron; consumption. 

From Readsboro. Tumor, 
d, Olesen E. and Ruth E Swan. 
, s. Joseph and Annie Boseley. 
wid. J. Van Zandt; d. Joshua Sprague. 



1. James White, 

1. Mrs. Matilda Richardson, 

1. Joseph Mixer, 

2. Ellen Stack, 

2. Cora E. Cronk, 

2. Stephen Goodwin, 

3. Wm. J. McCarthy, 
8. Julia Harney, 

8. Mrs. Blood, 

9. Mrs. Mary Gumey, 
12. Infant Sherry, 

16. Maturin Ballon, 
21. Mrs. Mary A. Smith, 

21. Mrs Mary Benack, 

22. James Cody, 



JUNE. 

49 y. From Scotland. Rheumatic fever. 
35 y., d. Chauncey Shipply. 

87 y. Farmer of Clarksburg. 
7 y., d. James Stack, Blackinton. 
6 y., d. Dwight Cronk, in Williamstown. 

50 y. Hoosac Tunnel. Heart Disease. 

19 y., s. Wm. McCarthy, Windsor Locks, Ct. 
9 m., d. James Harney; pneumonia. 

70 y. At Stamford, Vt. 

73 y. At Poughkeepsie, formerly of this to^\Ti 

1 day, s. Michael Sherry, 
68 y. Heart disease. 

76 y., w. Alpheus Smith, at Pittstown, N. Y. 
30 y., d. Johnson Daniels. 

71 V. From Ireland. Heart disease. 



DEATHS IN JUNE AND JULY. 


23. Dora Wright, 


3 y., d. Charles Wright of Clarksburg. 


24. James Gaddis, 


40 y., s. Wm. Gaddis; from Ireland. 


1 26. Dennison Eugene Conrad, 2 y., s. Harry and Kitty Conrad; in Troy. | 


26. Josephine A. Sly, 


43 y., d. Benj. Walden. Death from burns. 


27. James Foley, 


37 y. From New York. Inflam. bowels. 


27. John McKenna, 


41 y. Consumption. 


27. Annie Duggan, 


1 m., d. Patrick Duggan. Inflammation. 


29. Mrs. Helen Phelps, 


36 y., w. Henry Phelps; d. Richard Potter. 


1 29. Rose E. Lawson, 


9 y., d. M. and D, Lawson. 


30. Mrs. Anna L. Conners, 


29 y., d. James Nolan. 


1 


JULY. 


! 

1. Maurice Collins, 


90 y. Williamstown. 


2. Eva Gerrard, 


11 m., d. Henry Gerrard. 


3. Fred Beebe, 


8 m., s. George Beebe. 


; 4. George Pero, 


2 ds., s. Alfred and Catharine Pero. 


1 5. Lorenzo Bowen, 


70 y. In Readsboro, Vt. 


: 12. Rev. Calvm D. Noble, 


44 y. Brother of Mrs. F. E. Swift of North 




Adams. Died in California. 


13. Elizabeth R. Rose, 


6 y., d. Richard and Lizzie Rose. 


13. Wm. D. Bradley, 


5 y., s. Charles A. Bradley. 


15. Annie Macksey, 


3 y., d. John Macksey. 


17. Harry S. Bradley, 


1 y., s. Charles A. Bradley. 


17. Albert E. Bradley, 


3 y., s. Charles A. Bradley. 


17. Katie Macksey, 


1 y., d. John Macksey. 


18. Infant Lashaway, 


3 ds., s. Joseph and Emma Lashaway. 


19. Mary A. Chilson, 


53 y. Of Clarksburg. 


20. Johanna O'Brien, 


l,y., d. Michael O'Brien. 


21. Adeline Gilbert, 


10 m., d. George Gilbert. 


24. Sanford Blackinton, 


88 y. Oldest manufacturer in North Adams. 


25. Norman J. Pelkey, 


5 m., s. Charles Pelkey. 


27. Lulu Mary Crawford, 


2 m., d. Charles E. Crawford. 


28. Mrs. Sarah E. Arnold, 


44 y., w. Oliver Arnold, d. Dr. S. W. Briggs. 


28. Elmer Crosier, 


1 y., s. D. H. Crosier, Stamford, Vt. 


29. Bernard Burns, 


3 m., s. Michael Burns. 


29. James O'Brien, 


21 ds., s. John O'Brien. 


30. James H. Ireson, 


8 m., s. Joseph Ireson. 


30. Mrs. Margaret Gigault, 


69 y., d. James West. 


31. Clmton Trotter, 


4 in., s. Joseph Trotter. 



■ ( 

DEATHS IN AUGUST AND SEPTEMBEB. j 




i 
1 

AUGUST. j 


1. Mrs. Mary Jane Billings, 43 y., w. Geo. Billings; d. John Crandall. j 


1. George A. Loimgway, 


7 m., d. Geo. and Eva Loungway. 


2. Mary E. Goggin, 


23 y., d. Wm. and Bridget Goggin. 


4. Mrs. Bridget Kiggins, 


43 y., w. James Kiggins. 


5. George Pero, 


2 ds., s. Alfred and Catharine Pero. 


7. Walter F. Scott, 


44 y. Farmer, of Stamford, Vt. 


7. Mary J. O'Brien, 


16 y., d. James and Johanna O'Brien. 


9. Infant Cheesbro, 


5 ds., s. Charles and Mary Cheesbro. 


9. Mrs. Fanny Brooks, 


73 y.; wid.; d. Dennis Stebbins. 


13. Havena Arnum, 


5 y., d. Charles H. Arnum. 


13. Mrs. Elizabeth Horton, 


23 y., d. George Coughlin. 


13. James Fitzgerald, 


73 y. From Ireland; old age. 


14. Mrs. Bridget E. Madden 


, 53 y., w. John Madden. 


16. Eliza Briggs, 


76 y. In North Pownal. 


17. Michael Barden, 


73 y. In Stamford, Vt. 


22. George Clark, 


30 y. Of Williamstown. 


25. Mary J. McAviney. 


6 y., d. James and Wiimie McAviney. 


25. Teresa Mullen, 


1 m., d. James Mullen. 


27. Mrs. Josie Darrow, 


32 y., w. George Darrow. 


31. Susan E. Carson, 


18 y., d. Sarah Carson. 




SEPTEMBER. 


1. Arthur St. John, 


9 m., 8. Alfred and Zoe St. John. 


2. Harland A. Baker. 


19 y., s. A. 0. Baker, Stamford. 


3. Mary Chase, 


24 y., d. Rev. Walter Chase, Stamford. 


, 4. Lizzie M alone. 


16 y., d. Joseph Malone. ; 


5. Maggie Hanrahan, 


17 y., d. Michael Hanrahan. 


7. Mrs. H. Jennie Jones, 


28 y. Consumption. 


9. Mary P. Trayon, 


2 y., d. Stephen Trayon. 


10. Mrs. Jenny Spry, 


26 y., w. Alfred Spry; d. Lewis Cheesbro. 


11. Mrs. Phoebe M. Wi]liams,81 y., wid. Albert WiUiams. 


11. Mrs. Mary Reagan, 


69 y., d. Patrick ScuUy. 


12..EdwmDevin, 


20 y., s. Edward and Johanna Devin. 


12. John Whalen, 


22 y. Laborer; born in Ireland. 


13. Mrs. Catharine D.Brown,27 y., w. John Brown. | 


13. Jennie Houston, 


7 y., d. Ancel T. and Emily Houston. 


13. Mrs. C>Tithia Myers, 


72 y., d. Ahab Hill. 



DEATHS I 


N SEPTSMBEE AND OCTOBEE. 


- 

13. John Cassidy, 


7 y., s. Frank and Annie Cassidy. 


15. John W. Green, 


11 m., s. Samuel and Harriet Groen. 


1 16. Achsah Noroross, 


1 day. Clarksburg. 


! 17. Mrs. Lucinda Eaton, 


70 y., d. Eufus Herrick. 


17. Michael Eenn, 


2 ds., s. Jerry Eenn. 


18. Willie Drout, 


15 ds., s. John and Mary. Drout of Lee. 


i 19. Mrs. Mary C. Eoberts, 


84 y., wid.; bom in Vermont. 


19. John W. Mansfield, 


22 y., s. John Mansfield. 


' 23. Mrs. Esther Caswell, 


76 y., wid. Alexander Caswell. 


24. Ashbel W. Konss, 


61 y. G. A. E. Dro^oied at New Ashford. 


25. George H. Sears, 


41 y. From Barre, Mass. 


25. Ellery W. Morrison, 


4 m., s. D. T and Amiie Morrison. 


26. George Lemm, 


39 y., s. Thomas Lemm. 


26. Infant Hocking, 


1 day, s. William H. and Jena Hocking. 


29. Marv S. Manville, 


1 y., d. Norbert Manville. 




OCTOBER. 


2. J. L. Brimhall, 


67 v.. from Wardsboro, Vt.; broken limb. 


3. Mabel Shepard, 


1 day, d. George L. and Fanny Shepherd. 


3. Mrs. Lorena Hazen, 


74 y. 7 m., wid. Eev. Wright Hazen, d. John 

Witt. 
12 v., So Terrenee and Margaret Farley. 


4. Terrence F. Farley, 


7. Clark M. Percy, 


77 y. Farmer; Hoosick Fails. 


9. Thomas Lyons, 


73 y. Dropsy; born in Ireland. 


10. William J. Goggin, 


20 y., s. Wm. and Bridget Goggin. 


11. Harry W. Bishop, 


— Student Williams college, from Lenox. 


14. Mabel Doyle, 


.9 m., d. John and Alice Doyle. 


14. Fanny Belle Lanfair, 


— d. Oscar and Annie Lanfair. 


14. William Dooley, 


24 y., s. Patrick and Catharine Dooley. 


15. Mrs. Margaret Haynes, 


41 y., d. Eobert Hunter. 


15. Herbert J. Aldrich, 


31 v., s. Stephen and Alice Aldrich. 


16. Thomas B. Lanfair, 


3 m., s. Oscar and Annie Lanfair. 


19. A^ugnsta C. Amato, 


6 y., d. Frank and Amelia Amato. 


20. Fred E. Benoit, 


3 m., s. Joseph and Amelia Benoit. 


21. Mrs. Ellen Gould, 


72 y. Born in Hancock. 


22. Henry Sylvester Walker, 13 y. Snicido at WiUiamstown. 


23. Alexander Pratt, 


18 ds., s. A. L. and J. E. Pratt, Shelburne Falls. 



DEATHS IN OCTOBES, NOVEMBER AND DECEMBER. 



26. Mrs. Honora Cowliey, 

27. Rhoda Morey, 
27. Minnie Cavan, 



49 v., d. Daniel Enwright. 
G9 v., d. Ahab and Rhoda Morey. 
3 v., d. Adolphus and Mary Cavan. 



1. Maurice Casey, 

3. A. J. Holland, 

4. Lizzie Belle Cavan, 
6. George Hindley, 

8. Owen McOusker, 
13. Mrs. Augusta TigMman, 

13. Da^dd S." Clegg, 

14. Mrs. Candace Bridges, 

18. Edward P. Cady, . 

19. John E. Haley, 
19. Eva Welcome, 

19. Mrs. Almyra Wise, 

19. Mrs. Viargaret Dailey, 

20. Mrs. Julia Cummings, 
23. William Wilkinson, 

26. Katharine E. Cassidy, 

27. Alice J. Boynton, 



NOVEMBER. 

48 y., s. James Casey, Ireland. 
3 m., s. A. J. and E. Holland. 
16 m., d. Adolphns and Mary Cavan. 
66 J., s. Samuel Hindley. 
61 y. Fever; from Ireland. 

— Suicide; of Adams. 
58 y., s. James Clegg. 

78 y., w. Caleb Bridges of Savoy. 
74 y. Farmer; Windsor, Ct. 

— s. W. H. and M. Haley. 

1 y., d. Joseph and Josephine Welcome. 
24 y., wid. Frank Wise; d. Frank Little. 
54 y., d. Patrick O'Brien. 
56 y.; nee Chagnon. 

79 y.; boi^ in England. 

18 y., d. Peter and Margaret Cassidy. 
31 V. At Hartwelhdlle. Yt. 



DECEMBER. 



3. 



12. 
12. 
13. 
13. 
14. 
14. 
16. 



Mrs. Johanna O'Brien, 73 y., 

Charles A. Haskius, 48 y. 

George C. Parker, 60 y. 

Gerald B. Fitzgerald, 39 y. 

NeUio Crowley, 7 y., 

Jeremiah Stone, 69 y. 

Freddie Rivers, 1 y., 

Mrs. Abigail Arnum, 45 y., 

Mrs. Isabella Conners, 38 y., 

Mrs. Bridget Shehey, 67 y. 

Garrett Meade, 7 m 

James Bullock, 59 v. 



d. Maurice Collins. 

In Sou'h Williamstown. 

Born in England. 

Born in Ireland, 
d. John F. and Mary Crowley. 

Born in Wilmington, Vt. 
s. M. and Mary Rivers, 
w. Geo. Arnum; d. Chris. Johnson, 
d. Charles Short, 
wid. Bom in Ireland. 
, s. Thomas and Hannah Meade. 

In Zoar. 



DEATHS IN DECEMBER. 



24 Mrs. Frances A. Card, 

27. Adelle Varm, 

28. Elizabeth McMurray, 
31. Margaret Brown, 

31. John Wilbur, 

31. George D. Arniim, 

31. Mrs. Dundon, 

31. Thomas Smith, 



42 y., w. Martin Card, d. David Ives. 

2 y., d. Andrew and Mary Varin. 

7 m., d. Robert and Julia McMurray. 

7 m., d. Wm. E. and Lillie Brown. 
67 y., s. James Wilbur. Cancer 
47 y,, s. Franklin Arnum. 
70 y. Born in Ireland. 
12 y., s. Thomas and Ellen Smith. 




BERKSHIRE MONUMENTAL WORKS 

Manufactures and Deals in Native and Foreign Granite and 
IMahble. Carved work, Statuary and Drapery a specialty. 

TT. K. LOKTUS, Prop. 



Yard and shop No. 19 Eagle Street, 



North Adams, Mass. 



RECORD OF INTERESTING EVENTS. 

1885. 

THESE are mostly of local interest, though many matters 
relating to our County of Berkshire are included. Many 
occurrences in Adams, so lately a part of this very town, are 
interesting to our citizens and are recorded here. Other events 
of that "south village" (as it was formerly calleed), including 
the births, deaths, marriages, officers, statistics, etc., will be 
found in a Record of Adams, similar to this, that will include 
Cheshire, New Ashford, Lanesboro and Savoy. 

JANUARY. 

1. Charity ball for l)enefit of Hospital closed at 5 a. m. Net 

profits $1,424. 

2. Fire in the Glen mills. Loss $100,000 ; fully insured. 
Oueco Lodge of Odd Fellows installed newly-elected 

officers. 

3. Earthquake shocks in many of the States and in Spain. 

4. Sunday. Services in our "seven churches." 
7. Massachusetts Legislature organized. 

Installation of officers of Camp Lincoln (Sons of Vet- 
erans) and of Knights and Ladies of Honor. 
9. Weavers strike at Johnson's mills. 

11. Sunday. 

12. Fire District meeting voted to borrow $30,000. 

14. J. Hunter & Son's foundry and machine shop started 
again on full time. 



RECORD OF INTERESTING EVENTS. 



16. County Treasurer reports dog damages in 1884 at $2,234. 

18. Sunday. 

20. Charles H. Ingalls resigned, on account of ill-liealth, and 
Arthur D. Cady appointed cashier of Berkshire Na- 
tional Bank. 

22. Disastrous dynamite explosions in Parliament House and 
Tower of London. 

25. Sunday. 

26. Weavers' strike over at Johnson's mills. 

27. Small strike at Sampson shoe factory. 

29. Town Clerk Arthur S. Alford resigned from illness, and 

William Bower appointed till next town meeting by the 
Selectmen. 

30. AYelcome B. Cook, Amanda M. Cook and Charles J. 

Parkhurst indicted for conspiracy, etc., and trial con- 
tinued to July tei'm of court. 

FEBRUARY. 

1. Sunday. 

2. Levi L. Brown's $10,000 greenhouse in Adams burned. 

Insured for $5,000. 
5. St. Jean Baptiste Society had anniversary ball and supper. 
8. Sunday. 
10. Eighty-third anniversary of birthday of IVIark Hopkins, 
D. D., LL.D., ex-President of AVilliams College, cele- 
brated by reception to the faculty and senior class of 
college. 
12. Caboose railroad accident cases on trial collapsed because 
one juror had an opinion. 
New P^ngland concert and supper by the young people of 
the Baptist Church. 

14. St. Valentine's Day. 

15. Sunday. 

16. Terrific storm of wind and snow in Western Massachu- 

setts and New York State caused local interruption of 



RECORD OF INTERESTING EVENTS. 



business, delayed trains and suffering travellers in 
every direction, overturned teams, prostrated trees, 
blew in windows and doors, etc. Two North Adams 
young women operatives lost in drift trying to walk 
home from Howlands, but found again. Country roads 
closed by drift and a wec'ding delayed two days. 
18. Ash Wednesday. Lent commences with solemn services 
and fasting in the Catholic and Episcopal churches. 

21 . Dedication of the colossal Washington monument, 550 feet 

high. The tallest edifice in the world. 

22. Sunday. Washington's Birthday. 

26. F. S. Richardson, committee, paid INIrs. N. L. Millard, 

treasurer of the Charity Hospital Board, $1,424.34, the 
exact profits of the charity ball on New Year's eve. 

27. Primarv schools close. 



MARCH. 



1. Sunday. Salvation army came ; brief stay ; no use. 

2. Charity Hospital opened for public inspection and dedi- 

cated witli religious ceremonies by nearly all the clergy. 

Tiie building, with 30 surrounding acres, represents an 

expenditure of $19,900, all of which except $600 has 

been raised. 
The town of Adams paupers leave the North Adams town 

house. 
William Smith, tlie newly-appointed keeper of tlie town 

farm house takes charge. 

3. Superintendent C. S. Peach of Freeman cotton mills re- 

signed. William Cleghorn is his successor. 

4. G rover Cleveland inaugurated President of the United 

States and William H. Hendricks Vice-President. 

5. The old twine mill on River street leased by the Arnold 

Print AVorks Company for a brewery. 
North Adams Manufacturing Company started mills on 
full time. 



RECORD OF INTERESTING EVENTS. 



5. Legislature passed an act to a])olish unnecessary engine 

screeching, bowling and whistling. 

6. The High school and grammar schools close. 
8. Sunday. Mid-Lent. 

12. Judge Bnlkley of Williamstown courts resigns. 

Baptist annual meeting elected officers. Treasurer reports 
receipts for the year $5,057. Expended $463 more. 
Benevolent Committee and Missionary Society collected 
and expended $2,126. Increase of 50 members in 
church and 94 in the Sunday School, which has a library 
of more than 800 volumes. 

14. Annual town meeting of Williamstown. " Report and elec- 

tion of town officers. 

15. Sunday. Rev. Gideon Aubin resigned French Evangel- 

ical Mission here for a call at Lowell. 

16. Annular eclipse of sun, visible in United States. Weather 

very good for observations in this section. 
19. The IMiennerclior Musical Association formed. 

22. Sunday. 

23. Public schools reopened. 

Revolt of half breeds in British N. W. Territory led by 
Louis Riel. 

The Village Improvement Society, formed in 1875, held 
its first meeting for seven years and closed its career by 
giving the balance of its funds, just $100, to the 
Charity Hospital Board of Control to be used exclusive- 
ly in beautifying the grounds and liills aliout the liospi- 
tal building. The Society had numerous meetings in 
the summer of 1876, but effected no improvements 
except planting the Centennial Elm Tree in the centre 
of what is now called Monument Square. This was 
dona with imposing ceremonies and most appropriately 
l)y the hand of our distinguished and lamented fellow- 
citizen, Benjamin Dix Frost, the talented, devoted and 



RECORD OF INTERESTING EVENTS. 



indefatigable State Engineer, cliief constrneting engi- 
neer of the Hoosac Tunnel. This elm tree is of his- 
toric and monuniental interest, inasmuch as it marks 
the point of intersection of the old highway of travel to 
and from the West over the Hoosac mountain and the 
old "East road" (now Church street) leading to the 
great Iloosac Tunnel, four and three-quarters miles 
long, piercing said mountain and affording a convenient 
and cheaper avenue of travel and traffic between the 
great West and the New England Atlantic sea ports. 
The Centennial Elm Tree will, in the distant future, be 
a long-enduring monument of the Hoosac Tunnel, tlie 
construction of which gave a great start in the grow^th 
and prosperity of North Adams from 1869 to 1876, 
which, with the enterprise and energy of its people, will 
make the lively little village of 1876 the future metrop- 
olis of Western Massachusetts. 

24. AV alter A. Childs committed suicide w^ith pistol. 

26. Beckwith, tlie Berkshire murderer, handed over to the 
United States officers. 

29. Palm Sunday. 

;30. Town meeting in Adams witli usual election of town 
officers and appropriations. The vote was in favor of 
licensing the free sale of liquors, though six benevolent 
ladies, w^earing badges, were present all day at the 
polls urgently canvassing for temperance votes. 

31. Keyes Danforth appointed judge at AVilliamstown. 
Annual Report of the Public Schools published. 



1. All Fool's Day. 

2. Fast Day. In law, but not in fact. 

3. Good Friday. Solemn services in Episcopal and Catliolic 

churches. 



RECORD OF INTERESTING EVENTS. 



5. Easter Sunday. Special services in all the clmrches and 
union temperance meeting in evening at Methodist 
church. 
Free seats in future at Universalist church. 

7. Annual town meeting. 

8. Selectmen reappointed the present police force. 

9. Engineer F. S. Smith completed survey of town lines be- 

tween Williamstown and Adams and North Adams, and 

staked it out for future monuments. 
Adams Selectmen bougiit the Ira Richmond place for a 

town farm for $6,500. 
10. Election of St. Paul Commandery, Knights Templar. 

Cantata "Belshazzar" by amateurs for benefit of Charity 

Hospital netted $260. 

12. Sunday. 

13. Vestrymen of St. Jolm's church formally accepted the 

liell presented by Rev. Harry I. and Mrs. Bodley and 
elected officers. 

Keyes Danfortli qualified as judge of courts at Williams- 
town. 

Adjourned town meeting. 

14. Fire District meeting. 

17. Selectmen notified by Secretary of State that all liquor 
selling must be stopped between 11 p. m. and 6. a. m. 
Fair to benefit St. Francis' church continued twenty 
evenings. 

19. Sunday. 

20. Board of Health organized. 

First appearance of the street sprinkler. 
23. All swine forbidden by Board of Health within limits of 

Fire District. 
Patrick Quinn murdered. Shot at Williamstown going 

home from wake. 
Tenement house of North Adams Manufacturing Com- 



RECORD OF INTERESTING EVENTS. 



paiiy at Braytonville burned. Insurance $700. 
24. Omnibus line estal)lished ])y Henry A. Tower between 
Grey lock, via Braytonville, to Briggsville, connecting 
with Houglitonville. 

26. Sunday. 

27. Notice posted through the mills of Renfrew Manufactur- 

ing Company of reduction of wages on May 1. 

28. Sixty-sixth anniversary of Independent Order of Odd 

Fellows in America celebrated by Oneco Lodge with 
grand concert, sui)per and ball. 

29. Second anniversary of Good Templars celebrated. 

30. North Adams Savings Bank building finally completed 

and occupied. The most elegant and commodious 
banking rooms in Western Massachusetts. 
Every Senator and Representative of Berkshire county 
wlio voted opposed the weekly payment act. 

MAY. 

1. Annual visit of Legislators and State officers to North 
Adams to inspect the dark tunnel made dazzling by 
electric light. 

3. Sunday. Services in all the churches. 

4. First surgical operation at Charity Hospital. Excision of 

large tumor by Dr. Putnam, assisted by Drs. Simpson 
and Stafford. 
Arnold Print Works closed for one week to repair floors 
and boilers. 

6. Collector Tinker's successor chosen. 

7. Renfrew mills in Adams closed ; 1,000 strikers. 

8. Elizabeth Granger of Pittsfield 100 years old this day. 
10. Sunday. 

12. In Supreme Court, fifteen Berkshire divorces granted. 

13. Fair of St. Francis' church closed. Made about $5,000. 

14. Ascension Day. Services in Episcopal and other Catholic 

churches. 



RECORD OF INTERESTING EVENTS. 



14. Judge Jarvis Rockwell died after short illness, aged 56 

years. 
17. Sunday. 
22. Victor Hugo died, aged 83 years. 

24. Whitsunday. Memorial service and sermon at Congrega- 

tional church by Rev. T. T. Hunger . 

25. John J. Marsh elected Superintendent of Water Works ])y 

the Prndential Committee. 

27. George P. Lawrence appointed l)y the Governor Judge of 

the District Court. 

28. Mary Sullivan fell ont window forty feet from ground 

and received no injury. 

29. Grand concert of war songs by the INIiPnnerchor for the 

Grand Army Post in honor of Memorial Day. 

30. Processions, bearing floral tributes to the cemeteries, in 

Readsboro, Blackinton, Adams and North Adams. In 
this village, addresses to the Grand Army and citizens 
by Comrade Dr. George L. Rice and Rev. F. H. Row- 
ley. The graves of 87 soldiers w^ere decorated with 
memorial wreaths by their snrviAing conn-ades. A vast 
number of citizens, with their wives and cliildren, re- 
paired to the cemeteries, where they were joined by the 
organized procession, conducted by the marshal of the 
day (Comrade H. J. Millard), all kincly nniting with 
the G. A. R. Post to do honor and respect to the memo- 
ry of the departed citizen-soldiers who offered tlieir 
lives to save the republic from disunion. 

31. Trinity Sunday. Memorial sermons in several churches. 

JUNE. 

1. Renfrew mills started. Strike ended. Employers won. 
5. Animal convention of Berkshire teachers at Pittstield. 
7. Sunday. Hosi)ital day at all the churches, with sermons 
and liberal contributions for the Charity Hospital. 



RECORD OF INTERESTING EVENTS. 



8. New Chinese luuiidry started at 31 Eagle street hy Quong 

Wing Wall. 

9. Judge George C. Lawrence presided for the first time in 

District Court. 
Father Mathew Cadets re-elected Captain H. M. Lyons, 
Lieutenants Bowes and Gunning and First Sergeant 
Jolni Cassidy. 

11. Enlargement of the Transcript to forty columns of twenty- 

eight inches. 

12. Copper deposits are found along the bed of the Hoosac 

river near the Vermont line. 
14. Floral Sunday, with special services for the children at 
the churches. 

16. Handsome granite monument has been erected over the 

grave of the late Father Lynch in the yard of St. Fran- 
cis' church. 

17. The immense colossal statue of Liberty, a present from 

France, arrived in New York. 

18. Maturin Ballon died. A prominent citizen, noted for en- 

terprise and generosity. Born in 1817 in Monroe. 

19. Public rhetorical exercises of the public schools. 

The Marquis of Salisbury succeeds Mr. Gladstone as 
Prime INIinister of England. 

21. Sunday. Services in all the churches. 

22. Superior Court opened with prayer and the first colored 

juryman. Rev. W. Cloyd of Lee. 

23. Oral examinations of High school classes in history, 

mathematics, Greek, Latin, etc. 

24. National encampment of the Grand Army of the Repul)lic 

at Portland, INIaine. 

25. Connnencement week begins at Williams College. 
Closing of the public town schools for seven weeks. 

28. Sunday. Services in all the churches. 

30. U. S. Internal Revenue Collector Edward R. Tinker hav- 



RECORD OF INTERESTING EVENTS. 



iiig resigned, his successor has established the office at 
Greenfield. 



JULY. 



1. Commencement day at Williams College. Degrees con- 

ferred ]\v Governor Ro])inson on three A. B.'s, thirteen 
A. M.'s, two D. D.'s, and one LL.D. 

2. Picnic of St. John's church (Episcopal) Sunday School 

held this year at Adams. 

4. Independence Day. Public holiday. No pul)lic celebra- 

tion in North Adams, but patriotism prompted plentiful 
private powder-noise and poppings pyrotechnic. 
Celebrated at Readsboro by^ opening the railroad to east 
end of Hoosac Tunnel. 

5. Sunday. Rev. Alfred T. Perry, a North Adams boy, 

preached morning and evening at Congregational 
church. 
8. Spire of the new French church (Notre Dame) completed. 
Position picturesque and in line with eastern extension 
of Main street, of good altitude, with the Hoosac moun- 
tain in background landscape. 

12. Sunday. 

13. Richard Dowd of Monterey died. Weight 375 pounds. 
IT). Universalist Sunday School went to picnic at Williams- 

tow^n. 
19. Sunday. 

21. John Stiles (Savoy run-a-muck man shooter) sent to state 

prison for four years. 

22. One hundredtli anniversary of Masonry celebrated at 

Williamstown. 

23. General Grant, ex-President of the United States, died, 

aged 63. 

24. Sanford Blackinton, oldest manufacturer, died, aged 88. 



RECORD OF INTERESTING EVENTS. 



26. Sunda}^ Union memorial services at Methodist clmreli 

in honor of Grant. 

27. Verdict of guilty against Mr. and Mrs. Cook and Park- 

hurst. 
Funeral service of Mr. Blackinton at Baptist church. 
Stores closed and business suspended in the afternoon. 

28. Caboose railroad accident compromised by State pay- 

ing $25,000. 

AUGUST. 

1. Watch factory started at AYilliamstown. Capital $300,000. 

2. /Sunday Exiwess newspaper started by John H. Mabbett 

& Co. 
6. A large party ascended Greylock from Blackinton. 

8. Memorial services and processions in honor of General 

Grant in almost every place of importance in all the 
Eastern, Middle, Northern, Western and -Northwestern 
States and in London, Paris and Berlin. 

North Adams memorial obsequies to Grant under direc- 
tion of the Grand Army Post. 

Similar services at Adams and Williamstown. 

9, Sunday. Sermons eulogistic of Grant at most of the 

churches. 
10. Mrs. Jennie L. Spry died at Hospital from burns caused 

by ligliting stove with kerosene. 
12. F. A. Wilcoxson, cotton broker, received from Bryan, 

Texas, the first bale of this year's cotton shipped to 

the North. It was sold to Arnold Print Works. 

14. North Adams Directory published by Dillon & Co. of 

All)any. 

15. Prof. Mowbray and F. P. Pearson, from chemical analy- 

sis, report remarkable purity of the artesian well 
water. 

16. Sunday. Dr. A. C. Osborn, late pastor of the Baptist 



RECORD OF INTERESTING EVENTS. 



chnrcli, preached to a fail attendance of his brethren. 
21. Coffee party and l)azaar entertainment at Wilson Hall for 
benefit of Charity Hospital, given by the ladies of 
Greylock Hall and North Adams, realized $1,360. 

23. Sunday. Bears were observed on Florida mountain. One 

killed a sheep in George Phelps' yard in broad daylight. 

24. Bicycle Club reorganized. Rev. H. I. Bodley, president. 
\york commenced on the excursionists' road to Greylock 

mountain. 

25. History of North Adams by W. F. Spear announced. 

26. Thank-offering tea party given at the Hospital to the 

ladies of Greylock Hall for the liberality and success of 
tlie recent coffee party at Wilson Hall. 

27. A considerable leak discovered in the bottom of the small 

reservoir. 

28. Crowded audience to lecture by Mr. Trevallick on the 

"Rights and Wrongs of Labor." 

30. Sunday. Services in most of the churches. 

31. Public schools opened. 

New trial granted to Lawyer Parkhurst and Mr. Cook and 
wife. 

SEPTEMBER. 

5. Hector Allen fell from roof of Baptist church, thirty-five 

feet, to ground. No injury. 

6. Sunday. Eucharistic services inaugurated at Congrega- 

tional church, Adams. 
]\Iajor Aaron Stafford died in his 99th year. The last 
surviving ofHcer of the war of LSI 2. Was born in 
Cheshire, then a part of this town (Adams). Died in 
Oneida county, N. Y. 

7. Corner-stone laid for new Episcopal stone ciiurch at 

Lenox. 
10. Invitation nuisical ev^ening ])y Mjcnnerclior to Greenfield 
and North Adams company. 



RECORD OF INTERESTING EVENTS. 



10. JMrs. Jennie Spry, so badW burned August 22 by kindling- 

fire with kerosene, died at the Hospital. 

11. Invitation concert at Readsboro by Maennerclior. Claimed 

to be the greatest musical treat ever in that town. 

13. Sunday. Services in all the churches. 

14. Pittstield Choral Society organized. 

liishop O'Reilly confirmed 250 young persons at St. 
Francis' church. 

15. The Puritan, Yankee yacht, beats the Genesta, English 

cutter yacht, in ocean sailing contest near New York. 

16. Mammoth elephant Jumbo killed in Canada by railroad. 

17. Estate of late Sanford Blackiuton inventories over 

$500,000. 

18. A French school opened in rear of Notre Dame church. 
20. Sunday. 

22. First day of cattle show and fair of Hoosac Valley Agri- 
cultural Society. Continues three days. 

25. Tlie recent French Catholic fair realized over $3,600 of 
profits. 

27. Sunday. 

30. Theebau, King of Burmah, surrendered to the British 
general after a decisive battle. 

OCTOBER. 

1. Letter delivery by carrier from post-office tried and failed 

in a few days. 

2. Annual parade and inspection of Fire Department in after- 

noon. Alert Hose Company of Adams and Hose Com- 
pany No. 2 of North Adams contested. Both teams 
ran 40 rods, laid down 300 feet of hose and put the 
main pipe on with three full turns in exactly 50 seconds, 
thus beating the best previous time on record by several 
seconds. 

3. Real Estate Record started (four pages, monthly) by 

Arthur S. Alford. 



RECORD OF INTERESTING EVENTS. 



3. Mrs. Lorena Hazen, widow of first Methodist minister 

who settled liere, died. She bequeathed $500 to that 
church. 

4. Sunday. Bishop Paddock confirmed five persons in St. 

John's church in evening. 

5. Adams National Bank declared dividend of 3 per cent, for 

last six months. 

6. Thomas Talbot, ex-Governor of Massachusetts, died, 

aged 67 years. 

7. First American cardinal, John McCloske}", died in New 

York, aged 75 years. 

8. Fire extinguishing system tested at Zylouite by an acci- 

dental alarm. "In four seconds 500 people were out- 
side the factory and every man at his post and the 
lines of hose ready to throw water. There was no 
fire." 

10. Three hundred thousand pounds of dynamite exploded to 

blow up Hell Gate, near New York, with success. 

11. Sunday. 

12. Electric lights put in all the Zylonite works. 

Mrs. Mary Newman of Hoosac Tunnel gave birth to a 
girl and a boy. Third pair of twins in six years. 

15. Two men, slaters, fell from roof of P'rench Catholic 
church (70 feet) to the ground. Hem-y J. Aldrich was 
killed. William Chapman seriously injured. 

18. Sunday. 

21. Very full meeting of Kniglits of Labor to hear lecture by 
A. A. Carlton. 

23. Official inspection b}^ Governor and Council of Hoosac 

Tunnel and Troy & Greenfield Railioad, from Green- 
field to Hoosick Falls. 

24. Hoosac Valley JVeivs (weekly) chnnged its form to eight 

pages, with fifty-six columns of twenty-one inches, 
printed on new press. 



RECORD OF INTERESTING EVENTS. 



24. He HIT W. Shaw ("Josh Billings"), auctioneer and pro- 

verbial philosopher, buried at his native place, Lanes- 
boro. 

25. Sunday. The Universalist society call A. W. Hammett. 

29. General George H. McClellan died, aged 59 years. 

30. Work commenced on Baptist church at Monroe. 

House warming by Fire Department of new hose house in 
Union street. 

NOVEMBER. 

1. Sunday. 

3. Election day. George D. Robinson re-elected Governor. 

Seven Democratic Representatives were elected in 
Berkshire countv. North Adams and Adams together 
elected Alexander W. Fulton (Rep.) and George H. 
Kearns (Dem.) Representatives, and E. D. G. Jones 
was elected Senator for Northern Berkshire. 
Grey lock Lodge of Freemasons elected officers. 

4. Composite Royal Arch Chapter elected officers. 
Reliance Lodge of Good Templars elected officers. 
David Carey's meat market burned in Ashland street. 

6. New road from North Adams to top of Greylock com- 

pleted. 

7. Nelson Duprez of Florida nearly killed his wife ])y beat- 

ing her. 
First annual meeting of ladies of Board of Control of the 
Charity Hospital. Report receipts $5,970 ; expended 
$4,980. 

8. Sunday. Very heavy rain storm. Damages highways 

and railroads. 
11. Burmah declares war against England. 

13. Servia declares war against Bulgaria. 

14. Maennerchor musical entertainment by invitation. 

15. Sunday. Rev. T. T. Munger's farewell sermon at Con- 

gregational church. 



IlECORD OF INTERESTING EVENTS. 



16. Trial of Beckwith. Sentenced to be hanged Jaunary 

7, 1886. 

17. Lonis David Riel hanged in Canada for treason. 
Cantata "Esther" by 100 children of Methodist church. 

22. Sunday. William Wilkinson of Blackinton died, aged 79. 

23. St. Cecilia festival by amateurs of the society at St. 

John's church. 

25. Yice-Presideifl Hendricks died. 

26. Thanksgiving Day. Services in Episcopal church and 

union service at Baptist church. 

29. Advent Sunday. 

30. Democratic postmasters appointed at Lenox, Hancock 

and Stockbridge. 

DECEMBER. 

3. FiA^e thousand operatives out of work at Brockton. Forty- 

two large shoe factories, with weekly pay-rolls of 
$80,000, are shut down. 

4. Naomi Chapter, Order Eastern Star, elected officers. 

' 'Richelieu" played by amateurs at Wilson Hall. A 
success. 

5. G. A. R. fair opened. Continued to 12th. Net proceeds 

about $800. 
8. William H. Vander])ilt died in New York worth $350,- 
000,000. Left it all., 
Pomeroy mill in Pittsiield burned. Loss $25,600. 
11. Fire in one of Barber's tenements near tlie tannery in 

Union street. 
13. Sunday. Methodist church debt reduced from $13,800 to 
$9,000. 

15. Annual election of St. John's Guild. 

16. Annual charity ball for Hospital. 
20. Sunday. 

22. Five thousand Brockton striking shoemakers succeeded and 
returned to work. 



IJECOKD OF INTERESTING EVENTS. 



23. Sleighing, first tlav this winter. 

24. Sleighing, second day find last time this month. 

2L Christmas-Eve, services at St. John's church, beautifully 
decorated with evergreen ; Christmas carols sung by the 
Sunday school children. 

24. Santa Clans made his customary visits about midnight to 
all the good children who had hung up stockings. 

2."). Christmas-Day. Public holiday. Celebrated by all 
children and by festival services in the Episcopal and 
Catholic churches. Festivities hy St. John's Sunday 
school childi'en with supper and Christinas operetta 
performance at Odd Fellows' hall in evening. 

2(). Christmas-tide festivities generally continued. 

27. Sunday. Nativity services in three of the churches. 

21). National debt reported officially $1,382,817,229.00. 

30. Toboggan club organized with Engineer A. W. Locke 
president, and preparing to build chute from hill between 

Church and Ashland streets. 
32. Ferdinand Ward, swindling broker in New York city, 
age 33, sent to state prison for ten years. His stealings 
amount to over four millions. 

31. F. P. r>rown, Esq.", with the purest tenor voice in town, 

resigned by physicians order, as chorister of the Bap- 
tist church choir, in which he has been singing for 
nineteen years past. 

31. Annual ball of the Knights of Labor, who with their 
Ladies danced the old year out and the new year in. 
This w^as the largest social gathering of the season. 

31. Last day of 1885. North Adams has advanced in every 
department of social, moral and business progress, and 
made a good record for the year, as shown by the 
reports of the selectmen, of the public schools, of the 
free public library and of the charity hospital from 
which are gathered the following particulars. 



PUBLIC SCHOOLS. 



PUBLIC SCHOOLS. 



The public schools of North Adams under the administration 
of Messrs. Fred P. Brown, Oscar A. Archer and 8. Proctor 
Thayer, school committee, and the able management of Mr. 
Anson D. Miner, superintendent, have maintained their high re- 
putation for excellence and have enjoyed, as shown bv the 
superintendent's official report, another 3'ear of earnest, suc- 
cessful work. The organization and grading of all the schools 
is at present better than ever before. Of fifty-five regular 
teachers forty-three have taught tliroughout the year. The 
secret of good schools is to secure good teachers and keep 
them. A few of the best have been drawn by larger pay to 
other fields ; marriage, too, has taken some. By reference to 
statistics for the year it will be seen* that gratifying gains have 
])een made in nearly every particular ; in numl)ers enrolled, 
average attendance, percentage of attendance, etc. Enforced 
vaccination and the prevalence of measels have seriously in- 
terfered with attendance. As regards percentage of attend- 
ance by groups of schools, Drury Academy stands first ; 
Blackinton schools, second ; Veazie, third ; l^nion, fourth ; 
Separate Primary, fifth. Tlie course of study is nine years for 
the primary and grammar grades and four years for tlie Iligli 
school. Several rooms have had l)ut one class each during the 
past term. No room save the High school has had more than 
two classes at the same time during the year. The grading of 
several of the other schools has l)een improved. The change 
from an eight to a nine years' course in the Primary and gram- 
mar grades, which occurred a few years ago has heen produc- 
tive of good results. Since that time the standard of 
scholarship has been constantly advancing. 'I'he pupils are 
not overcrowded. The classes for admission to tlie High school 
have a lietter preparation. Tlie disci[)line of most of the 



PUBLIC SCHOOLS. 



schools Ims l)een excellent tliroughout the ^^ear. No suspen- 
sions or expulsions have occurred, and but comparatively few 
eases of corporal punishment. 

The instruction is that which leads pupils to think for them- 
selves, which sharpens and develops the faculties of the mind 
and leads to good habits of study and to a desire for knowledge 
from the pleasure of acquiring. To this end teachers are urged 
to avoid the cramming process by emancipating themselves, as 
far as possil)le, from tlie thraldom of text-books, and by teach- 
ing clearly and patiently, by apt and original illustration ; not 
assuming that what seems easy to the teacher will necessarily 
be readily grasped and retained by the pupil without repetition, 
but to make sure of a thorough and successful work, by sharp, 
searching and persistent questioning, by occasional reviews and 
by properly conducted written tests. Care has ])een taken in 
regard to the introduction of so-called reforms into our schools. 
Those of unquestioned merit have been adopted. None of the 
new methods of instruction which have real value can greatly 
lesson the necessity for work on the part of the pupil. It is as 
true now as in the past that there is no royal road to know- 
ledge. The advantages of the new methods consist, in brief, 
of their better adaptal)ility to the powers and capacities of the 
pupil, in the better interest and mental activity awakened, and 
in giving better power of thought and expression. 

In arithmetic the work of the year shows decided progress. 
Large drill has been given in practical operations, outside of 
text-books, in reckoning money, in ])uying and selling, in rapid 
and accurate use of numl)ei-s, involving every variety of com- 
bination and separation. In language, also, including speech 
and its expression upon the written page the results have been 
very gratifying. The work in the Training school has been 
exceptionally good, especially in penmanship. Tliis may be 



punLic SCHOOLS. 



due in part to the fact that the larger teaching force enables 
the pupils to derive more individual criticism and assistance. 
As required by the new law, physiology has been taught in all 
the schools, with special reference to stimulants and narcotics. 
The pupils have exhibited much interest in the study, even in 
the Primary schools, and the examinations at the close of the 
year gave evidence of thorough instruction. In primary schools 
this teaching is oral, suitable text-books having l)een provided 
for the teachers. A good beginning has been made in carrying 
out the spirit of the law, the teachers evidently being in hearty 
sympathy with it. 

Valuation of school houses and property, - $134, 000 

Population of North Adams (1885), - - 12,r)40 
Number of children between 5 and 15 years of age. 

May, 1885, - - . . . 9,705 
Pupils enrolled during the year: Boys, 1,281; 

girls 1,309, ----- 2,590 

Increase from last year, - . . 59 

Pupils enrolled between 8 and 14 years of age, - 1,289 

Average number belonging to schools, - - 1,922 

Increase from last year, - - - - 16 

Average attendance, - - - - 1,766 

Increase from last year, - - - - 21 

Per cent, of attendance, - ' - - 92 

Number belonging at the end of the year, - - ] ,S04 



PUBLIC LIBRARY. 



In 1859 tlie North Adams Libraiy Association was formed. 
The first meeting was held in the stone office, corner of ^Main 
and Bank streets, then occnpied by Dawes & Porter. Charles 
H. Williams, tlien a student in the office, was elected the first 
president, Frank 8hep]]ard first librariai^ and A. G. Potter first 
clerk of the association. The first object of the association was 
to form a reading-room in connection with the library, but this 
idea was given up after a time. When the building containing 
the library was burned, on the 9th of February, 1867, tlie 
l)ooks of the library were all saved by members of the associa- 
tion. A room was immediately engaged in the old Burlingame 
block, and Charles I). Sanford became librarian. He took 
great interest in the work, classified and arranged the books, 
and issued the first catalogue. Tlie organization became very 
prosperous, having at one time several hundred members. The 
library remained here until al)out 1870, when it was removed to 
a room in Martin's ])lock, against consideral)le opposition from 
the older members. It prospered and flourished here until 
al)out 1880, when the subject of a free public library and read- 
ing-room was talked of , and during the winter of 1883-4 the 
the present quartei;s were engaged, and the books of the old 
association moved in. In the spring of 1884, at the annual 
meeting of the town, the li])rary was accepted by the town as a 
gift from the association and a sum appropriated for its main- 
tenance. The wisdom of this course was very apparent the 
first year, as will be seen from the following facts taken from 
the report of the manager at the end of the first year of the 
maintenance of the first public library in town. The number of 
persons registered as takers of books up to the first of March, 
188a, was 2629. The number of books drawn during the year, 
as shown by the records of the librarian, was 42^562 ; an 
average of 3547 per month, or 136 per day, allowing 26 days to 
the month. At this time there were but 4000 volumes belonging 



PUBLIC LIBRARY. 



to the circulating department, and tlie above figures would indi- 
cate that books equal in number to the whole numlier of vol- 
umes admitted to circulation were drawn once in each month. of 
the 3^ear. This fact is of importance, not only in showing the 
demand upon the library, but as disclosing also, to some extent, 
the labor, the constant care and watchfulness of the librarians, 
in keeping proper records of the books drawn and retiu'ned and 
in seeing that none were lost or destroyed. Tiie librarians who 
have had charge of the books at different times, as near as can 
be ascertained, are Frank Shephard, Charles D. Sanford, E. 8. 
Wilkinson, A. B. Wright, S. H. Fairfield, E. A. Wright, E. D. 
Tyler and Arthur Witlierell. All these before the library l)e- 
came free ; after this Miss C. Augusta Dunton was placed in 
charge, and so still continues, most ably assisted by Miss An- 
gela M. Veazie. On the first of March, 188;"), the lil)rary con- 
tained 4750 volumes, of which 4129 were for circulation and 
621 for reference. Of these 988 were purchased from the re- 
ceipts of a fair for the benefit of the library, and 787 were pur- 
chased with money appropriated by the town. During the first 
year were some donations of books — one of special value by 
William L. Brown comprised 77 bound volumes of the ^^London 
Illustrated News" and 133 volumes of the "London Quarterly 
Review." 

The ])enefits of a reading room, so far as they go, are essentially 
the same as those of a lil)rary. As now conducted, the reading 
room is a source of little expense aside from the cost of reading- 
matter and lights. It has been orderly, well kept, frequented 
by large numbers of people in the day time and evening, and 
furnishes a kind and variety of reading not easily obtained 
elsewhere. That the library and reading room are held in high 
esteem by the voters of the town is evinced from the fact that 
at the town meeting in 1885, $3000 was appropriated for its 
maintenance. 



PUBLIC HOSPITAL. 



From tlie earliest settlement of the village, the men were 
noted for their enterprise and liberality and the women for 
their hospitality and l^enevolence. Charital)le acts from ready 
hands and kind hearts, quietly bestowed, are said to be not 
Avithout tlieir reAvard and are recorded where, we trust, they 
may cover a multitude of sins. But, by far the most interest- 
ing event in this town Record of 1885, is one which, though 
a truly noble charity, is from its nature so open, free and 
general in its 1)enefits that history may justly and proudly 
record it as the great event of the year. 

On March 2, 18s5. the Noktii Adams Hospital was opened 
to the public, its benehence extended to the afflicted, and the 
care of the edifice formally turned over l)y the building com- 
mittee to the Board of control. ^Experienced nurses having 
been engaged from New York, all requisites were provided for 
work, as was supposed, in the most complete manner. On the 
opening day, it w^as estimated, fully fifteen hundred people 
visited the building, where appropriate exercises were con- 
ducted by the local clergymen. The first officers were : 

President — Mrs. Mary AVilliams. 
Vice-Presidents — Mrs. Helen A. Archer, Mrs. Anna W. Rich- 
mond, Mrs. Harriet E. Gallup. 
Treasurer — ]\[rs. Isal)el S. Millard; Assistant, Mrs. Ella E. 

Hunter. 
Secretary — Mrs. Agusta P. Foster; Assistant, Mrs. Louise B. 

Tyler. 
Directors — Mrs. Delia Poland, IMrs. Celia Armstrong, Mrs. 
Bridget O'Brien, Mrs. Ellen D. Hodge, Mrs. Sarah C. Reed, 
Mrs. Fanny P. Brown, Mrs. Fanny J. Tinker, Mrs. Jane E. 
Lawrence, Mrs. Elizabeth D. Thayer, Mrs. Frances E. Swift, 
Mrs. Julia Sampson, Mrs. Harriet A. Thayer, Mrs. Frances 



PUBLIC HOSPITAL. 



M. Bravtou, Mrs. Riitli E. Millard, Mrs. Delia J. Houghton, 
Mrs. Carolyn B. Wright. 

Clerk — Mrs. Hattie Ballon Cady. 
Legal Adviser — Judge Jarvis Rockwell. 

The first annual report of its organization and usefulness 
was made November 7, 1885, by the Board of Control. From 
their report are compiled facts of great interest to the "gen- 
erous minded citizens" as they are characterized by the worthy 
president of the board, which, it is proper here to state, is 
composed entirely of ladies who kindly and bravely, but with 
"no small anxieties entered upon the untried work with no 
funds in the treasury and no experience to greet them." 

These ladies, the representatives of themselves and one hun- 
dred and fifteen other most excellent women, were members of 
the original corporation. They compose the several standing 
committees of finance, admission, supply, furnishing, nursery 
service, inspection and auditing, necessary for the government 
and successful operation of the hospital. The officers for 
1885, as stated in the report of that year were : 

President, 

Mrs. Charles H. Williams. 

Vice-Presidents, 

Mrs. Albert Richmond, Mrs. Foster E.Swift, Mrs. Wm. A. 

Gallup. 

Secretary — Mrs. Agusta P. Foster. 

Assistant Secretary — Mrs. Edward D. Tyler. 

Treasurer — Mrs. Norman L. Millard. 

Assistant Treasurer — Mrs. Andrew Hunter. 

Clerk— Mrs. Wm. Cady. 

Leo'al Adviser — Jarvis Rockwell. 



PUBLIC HOSPITAL. 



Board of Control. 
Mrs. W. L. Brown, Mrs. P. J. Boland, 

'^ 8. W. Ingalls, " A. B. Wright, 

" H. J. INIillard, " Edward Blackinton, 

" J.B. Tyler, " S. Thayer, 

" A. W. Hodge, '^ C. T. Sampson, 

" William O'Brien, " Jane Lawrence, 

" William H. Whitman, " A. M. Tinker, 

" 8. W. Bray ton, " Cynthia Lewis, 

" M. Owens, " A. C. Houghton, 

" J. H. A. Matte, " Wm. Armstrong. 

" C. H. Read, 

Matron — Miss Mary Meikle ; Assistant, Miss Church. 
Medical and Surgical Board for 1885. 
Dk. O. J. BifowN, Dr. H. Bcshnell, * 

Dk. N. S. 1>abbitt, Dr. C. J. Curran, 

Dr. H. M. Stafi'ori), Dr. T. J. Putnam, 

Dr. G. F. Simpson, Dr. W. S. Carr, 

Dr. H. J. Millard, • Dr. J. H. A. Matte. 

For several years, especially during the construction of the 
great Hoosac Tunnel, the need of a hospital in this village was 
very evident, but the movement to establish an institution "for 
the care and treatment of the sick and disabled" first took 
definite form immediately after the terrible accident in the 
Troy & Greenfield Railroad yard, October 21, 1882, generally 
known as the "caboose accident." The nrcessity for a suitable 
building for the purpose named was then most apparent, and 
the same day a paper was circulated among our citizens for 
subscriptions for the establishment of a liospital, Messrs. W. 
L. Brown and W. 8. Johnson giving their personal attention 
to the matter. 

The manufacturers and their employees, mercliants and citi- 
zens of North Adams generally, and friends, not residents. 



PUBLIC HOSPITAL. 



' but interested in its welfare, responded liberally ^to the call, 
and the subscriptions, large and small, aggregrated some 
twelve thousand dollars, and a call for a meeting of the sub- 
scribers soon appeared in our local papers. 

TJiis meeting, in the parlors of the Wilson house, P'ebruary 
16, 1883, appointed a committee of live, comprising W. L. 
Brown, C. T. Sampson, H. G. B. Fisher, W. vS. Johnson and 
^y. A. Gallup, witli ''full power to proceed, not only in obtain- 
ing plans and purchasing a lot, ])ut also in the erection of the 
Hospital." 

This committee met for the first time at the Wilson House, 
Friday evening, March 2, 1883, and organized. They decided 
that the Evenal Estes lot, situated north of Li1)erty street be 
considered as to its desirability as a site, as this property was 
then advertised for sale ; at which sale, March 3, 1883, a 
member of the committee, bidding thirty-four hundred doUaj-s, 
secured the property. The plot of land thus bought contained 
about thirty acres, improved and unirtiproved, lying north of 
Liberty street, and extending from North Eagle street to 
Houghtonville. It was deeded to the committee by J. Rockwell, 
as executor. 

An architect was engaged to submit plans for a suitable 
])uilding, and prominent New York hospital physicians were 
consulted, the architect being present, as to the desirable feat- 
ures to be embodied in such a structure. After much delibera- 
tion plans were settled upon, and the plans and specifications 
submitted to several first-class builders for estimates. It was 
decided at this time to build only the main and central portions 
of the proposed Hospital, and the contract was awarded to 
Bartlett Bros, of East Whately, Mass., the lowest bidders. 
This action was taken August 13, 1883, and the contractors 
l)egan work at once. 



PUBLIC HOSPITAL. 



Tlie eoriier-stone of the building' was laid October 27, 188o,- 
public, exercises of an ai)pi'opriate character ])eing held, Judge 
J. Rockwell and Rev. H. I. Bodley delivering addresses, and 
Rev. Di's. McKean and Osborn also taking part in the exercises, 
with vocal music under the direction of Mr. David Roberts. 
That the public was deeply interested in the project was 
attested by the large attendance and deep interest shown. 

The l)uilding was soon closed and the work of finishing went 
on during the winter and spring niontlis, and late in the follow- 
ing tall water, gas and sewerage connections were made with 
the town systems. 

^Meantime an agreeujent of association had been signed l)y 
tile members of the committee, and also by some seventy ladies 
of the town, representing the various religious organizations, 
and api)lication was made to the state authorities for the incor- 
poration of tiie North Adams Hospital under the general 
statute for tlie incorporation of religious and cluiritable societies, 
wliich ai)plication was granted and a charter issued under date 
of l)eceml)er 29, 1884. 

The Hospital was opened to the inspection of the public, 
with brief dedicatory exercises, iNIarch 2, 1885. 

The building, unfurnished, with land, represented at that 
time an investment of nineteen thousand dollars, and the cor- 
poration was possessed of same by deed from committee. 

The Treasurer's report shows tlie expenses of furnishing and 
surgical instruments was $1,923, and alterations, repairs and 
other expenses $748, with the current expenses of maintaining 
the Hospital were $2,308. But there have been received from : 

Annual dues, - - - - $ 405 00 

Mr. Stimpson, - - - -^00 



PUBLIC HOSPITAL. 







234 


08 


142 


84 


7 


00 


500 


00 


40 


15 


100 


80 


791 


85 


392 


30 


1,444 


44 


75 


00 


253 


61 


1,312 


29 


150 


00 


50 


00 


- 61 


82 


4 


16— $5,970 24 



Coral Workers, - - 
Harry Wads worth Clnb, 
Blackintoii Sewing Society, 
Brown, Wood & Kingman, of New York, 
Kempville Home Circle, - - _ 

Village Improvement Society, 
Chnrch Collections, - - - 

Patients, . _ . . 

Annual Ball, - _ _ . 

Ladies* Aid Sewing society entertainment, 
Mr. Yj. a. Tower's ^'Belsliazzer,'* 
Coffee Party, _ _ . 

Free bed, American Zylonite Company, 
Life member, . _ - - 

Alms-box, - - - - 

Sundry small receipts, - - - 

Leaving a balance on hand of upwards of nine liundred and 
ninety dollars. Besides which tliere had been liberal donations 
of money, furniture, books, engravings, paintings, bed-linen, 
old linen, counterpanes, comfortables, pillows, blankets, towels, 
and groceries, wood, gas, clothing, fruit delicacies, printers* 
])ills receipted and supplies of every description. 

This in brief covers the salient points in the history of this 
worthy and charitable enterprise to the time of the occupancy 
of the hospital Imildings. 

The general public and friends of patients are admitted on 
Wednesdays and Saturdays from 2 to 5 p. m., unless they 
reside out of tow^n and cannot come at these times, in which 
case the Matron will admit tliem at her discretion. 

In case of serious illness, the friends of patients will be 
notified at once. 



PUBLIC HOSPITAL. 



Patients are to l)e admitted on recommendation of one of the 
"Committee of Admission," provided such recommendation be 
endorsed by one of the Board of Physicians and Surgeons. 

Accidental cases may be taken directly to the Hospital. 

No person with contagious disease will be admitted to the 
Hospital. 

Patients applying from out of town must send with their 
application a certificate from their pln'sician, stating the nature 
of their disease and its stage. 

Patients are received without reference to religious denomi- 
nation, and the pastor of any patient is welcome alwa^^s to visit 
the Hospital. 

A charge of $4.00 per week will be made to such patients, 
residents of North Adams, as are able to pay, and $5.00 per 
w^eek for out-of-town patients. 

There are no fees to the Physicians and Surgeons, who give 
their services to the Hospital. 



TOWN AFFAIRS. 



By the report of the Selectmen, the expenditures on account 
of the town during the fiscal year of 1885 (ending in March, 
1886) were one hundred and seventy-two thousand one hundred 
and ten dollars and forty cents ; of which the schools cost 
somewliat more than thirty thousand dollars, the highways, 
sidewalks and bridges nearlv fifteen thousand dollars, the town 



TOWN AFFAIRS. 



farm and paupers sixty-five liuiidred dollars, the police patrol 
and watch nearly fifty-six hundred dollars, the town officers' 
salaries twenty-five hundred dollars. There was paid on town 
debt and interest thirty-four thousand five lunidred and eleven 
dollars ; for the public librai-y tln-ee thousand dollars, and for 
state and county taxes and non-i'esident bank tax twenty-two 
twousand dollars. 



To pay all the al)ove the town treasurer liad : 

In treasury March 1885, 
Received for liquor licenses, 

" for other licenses, _ _ _ 

" for rents, . _ . 

" from loans, _ _ _ 

" A. G. Potter, collector of taxes, 

" from town farm, 

" from sidewalk abutters, 

'' for police fees from county, 

" for old materials sold, 

" for state aid reimbursed by commonw^ealth 

" for sewer permits, 



Cemetery lots sold, etc., 
Four items on page 62, 
State paupers. 
Other paupers, etc., 



$ 4,104 


03 


12,925 


00 


148 


50 


475 


00 


40,000 


00 


104,063 


05 


608 


38 


227 


48 


785 


75 


45 


12 


th, 999 


00 


563 


20 


$165,034 


61 


1,801 


59 


4,623 


13 


187 


91 


463 


16 


$172,110 


40 



Tlie amount required to ])e raised ])y taxes in 1885 was 
$105,752, which was nearly all paid being at the rate of twenty 
dollars on every one thousand dollars of valuation of real 



TOWN AFFAIRS. 



property ainountinii' to $3,707,4o0, and personal property 
amounting to $1,270,464, besides a poll tax of $2 each on 
3,007 polls. 

The lial)ilities of the town of North Adams was in 1885 
$114,066.08, which was this town's share (two-thirds) of the 
funded del)t of tlie old town of Adams. 

The resources were the town farm property, $13,014 60 

Unpaid taxes and assessments, . - - 5,049 35 

Sundry small dues, - _ . - 1,546 87 

Real estate, 5,000 00 

Cash in treasury, 4,91198 



;29,522 80 



The Board of Health, Messrs. Thayer, W. H. Bixby and 
Dr. C'. J. C'urran, report unusual good health having prevailed 
throughout our community for the past year ; and that we have 
experienced no contagions disease of a serious character. 

There has been reported during the year a number of cases 
of scarlet fever, which were mostly of a very mild type, and 
only one case of which proved fatal. 

Typiioid fever has not prevailed to any extent ; proving 
fatal in one case only. 

Measles lias been the prevailing disease throughout the 
town, mostly among the very young and school children, though 
there were several cases among the older people. There have 
been three deaths from the disease, two of which were persons 
of advanced years. 

Diphtheria has been less prevalent the past year than during 
the year 1884, Init of a more malignant type. It broke out in 



rOWN AFFAIRS. 



the south part of the village at one time to an alarming extent, 
from which six deaths followed, one after another, in quick 
succession. By persistent and well-directed efforts they suc- 
ceeded in confining the contagion to the locality where it first 
made its appearance. From careful investigation they were led 
to believe that the same was In-ought from abroad in wearing 
apparel or otherwise, rather than caused by the surroundings. 

The small-pox, coming very near us, led them immediately to 
take somewhat extreme measures in requiring all classes of 
inhal^itants to he vaccinated. This caused some ill-feeling at 
the time ; notwithstanding, without much tronl)le, we succeeded 
in getting a very thorough vaccination throughout the town. 
This was attended with considerable expense, but they thought 
it better to incur the expense rather than take any risk in the^ 
matter. Thanks to the manufacturers and citizens generally 
for their efficient co-operation in this work. 

The impression seems to have gone abroad that this is an 
unhealthy locality. This impression is not warrented by the 
facts in the case. Having had their attention called to this 
matter for the last four or five years, the Board can 
honestly assert, and is prepared to prove beyond controversy, 
that this town is as free from typhoid and malarial fevers, and 
diseases of all kinds of a serious contagious character, as any 
town of its size in the commonwealth. Mucli good has been 
done the past year by filling up wet and unhealthy places. 
The Boston & Albany Railroad Company has abated, or nearly 
so, one great nuisance south of their round-house. In order to 
do this successfully the selectmen were called upon to change 
the Chesnut street sewer. Tliis they did as soon as possi])le, 
at quite a large expense. 



Commendable improvements have been made in a sanitary 
point of view in that part of tlie village south of ^lain street. 



TOWN AFFAIRS. 



Filling iu lias been done where necessaiw, cellars have ])een 
properly cleaned and whitewashed, and premises have l)een 
kept more tidy and clean, so that at the present time that part 
of the village is in a mnch more healthy and better condition. 
North of Main street, also, people have taken more pains in 
cleaning np their premises and keeping them clear of all decay- 
ing and deleterious matter. 

Notwithstanding all this, mucli greater sanitary results should 
bo accomplished the present year by the timely removal of all 
waste matter ; by discarding the use of well water as far as 
p()ssil)le ; by connecting all dwellings and out houses with the 
sewers, as far as practicable ; by a stringent enforcement of 
the laws relating to contagious diseases, and being alive and 
vigilant to every requirement pertaining to manly vigor and 
good health. 

In the early season the Board of Health ordered all swine to 
])e removed beyond the limits of the Fire District. This called 
forth some severe comment, but the hog had to go just the 
same. From this nuisance, the village has been quite free 
through the hot weather at least. As all can appreciate the 
In-eathiug of pure and wholesome air uncontaminated by the 
hog pen stenches, tiiose who want to keep hogs, will see the 
propriety of keeping them beyond the limits of the Fire 
District. 

The Board earnestly recommends that at the next annual 
meeting of the town a more liberal appropriation of money l>e 
made for the building of sewers. This is a very important 
matter and should be so considered. Many people are o])liged 
to use cess-pools, ])ecause they have no sewers to carry off tlie 
waste. 

Cess-pools are a vervgi-oat nuisance, the receptacles of soap- 



I 

i TOWN AFFAIRS. 



suds, drainage and filth, from wlncli foul stenches and noxious 
gases generate and arise, which render the air we breath im- 
pure, and thus causes malignant diseases and death. - 

The sewer at the lower end of IMain street should he en- 
larged, sufficient to receive the surface water and discharge the 
same below Hodge's dam. Tiie sewer should be extended up 
East Quincy street so as to accommodate all people possible in 
tliat neighborhood. Other streets there are in the village over 
which sewers should be extended, so as to accommodate the 
citizens. 

The good health of our conunriuitv is to a great degree our 
prosperity and happiness. We sliould, therefore, use great 
foresight, untiring energy' and liberal expenditure of mone\ to 
accomplish this end. 

The Board of Health also recommends that all persons 
throughout the fire district use the hydrant water as far as pos- 
sible, rather than water taken from their wells. Well water is 
more or less impregnated with impurities of all kinds running 
in fnmi tlie surface, rendering it unwholesome and dangerous 
to healtli, wliile tiie reservoir water and water frou.i the driven 
wells has been pronounced by Messrs. Mowbrav and Pierson to 
be pure, or nearly so, and free from vegetable or deleterious 
matter, and in eveiy way suitable for domestic use. These 
chemists made a very careful and thorough analysis of water 
from the reservoir and driven wells free of expense to th.e town 
(thanks to their generosity for so doing), and gave the results 
of their investigation as afore stated. 

The Board of Health received during the year one hnndred \ 

and tliirty complaints, and gave each of tiiem, as soon as pos- { 

sible, such attention as the nature of the case required, viewing | 
all pai'ts of the village and looking after the general welfare of 



TOWN AFFAIR 



the people, l)y advising and directing in sncli matters as seemed 
to ])e needful to a good sanitary condition of their premises. 

The importance of having the ])ridges kept in safe repair 
shonld be among the first considerations on the part of the town 
officers. Nearly a dozen intersect the different streets. Over 
these bridges water and gas pipes were carried. It was found 
that the vibrations and shocks caused by travel were the cause 
of constant leakage, and the gas thns set free contaminated 
the atmosphere, rendering it unfit for breathing anywhere in 
tlie ueighborJiood of such leakage. This has been remedied to 
a great extent ]\y passing the gas and water pipes over or under 
little iron bridges separate from and independent of the public 
bridges near them, insuring the purity of the atmosphere and 
preventing the waste of water. 

For vrhat they iiave done, and recommend to be done for the 
ensuing year, the grateful thanks of the people of North Adams 
are due to the gentlemen of the Board of Health, and are now 
fully expressed and Recorded. 



PUBLIC PARK. 



The Park Commissioners have expended the three hundred 
dollars appropriated for improvements in the Park to the best 
advantage, 1\v building such walls as were necessary to prevent 
former improvements from being washed away, and in repair- 
ing the road to and inside of the inclosure. They have filled 
in and graded the ground, ])uilt a good stone aqueduct to take 
the water from the west side and covered the same with grass. 
The grounds begin to assume a pnrk-like appearance, and the 



TOWN AFFAIRS. 



fine views it affords of the valley and mountains compensate for 
the trouble of reaching it. 

Tliis Park is a delightful place of resort for .young people, 
and in fine weather lias many visitors on Sunday afternoons and 
evenings. It is utilized for picnics on a small scale by chil- 
dren on Saturdays, and on a large scale by certain societies on 
some public holidays. All the visitors seem to appreciate it 
and try to keep it in good order. 



CEMETERIES. 



The Selectmen recommend that, inasmuch as there are no 
more desirable lots in the cemetery to sell, it is necessary to 
provide more land for burial purposes without delay. The sale 
of lots last year amounted to nearly fifteen hundred dollars. 
There was paid to Mr. Orr, the superintendent, for labor and 
care of the cemeteries, $1,095, including $300 voted him l)y 
the town for the previous year. 

There should be a strong. and high picket fence constructed 
on top of the low wall on tlie north side, which separates the 
grave yard from tlie railroad, but does not guard it from tress- 
passers in the daytime, who jump over it to make a short cut 
through the cemetery to reach the main road, nor from tramps 
and worse characters who, In^ tlie same easy and unobserved 
approach, infest and desecrate the grounds during the summer 
ni«hts. 



RECORD OF CORPORATIONS. 



TROY & greenfip:ld r. r. and hogs AC tunnp:l. 

This is the property of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, 
forming the toll-gate for the most practicable lines of railroad 
travel and transport between the great West and the New 
England Atlantic seaports. A. W. I^ocke, Chief Engineer and 
Manager ; Austin Bpnd, Treasurer. Office in Union Passen- 
ger Station. 

HOOSAC VALLEY AGRICULTURAL SOCIETY. 

President, William L. Brown, North Adams ; Vice-PresidentG, 
J. M. Waterman, Williamstowu, D. R. Smith, Adams ; Treas- 
urer, S. B. Dibble, North Adams ; Secretary, H. Clay Bliss, 
North Adams ; Auditor, John B. Tyler, North Adams ; Dele- 
gate to State Board, Daniel Upton, Adams. Held annual Cat- 
tle Show and Fair September 22, 23 and 24. The address was 
by Hon. II. L. Dawes, U. S. Senator. 

NORTH ADAMS GAS LIGHT COMPANY. 

Capital $50,000. Incorporated 1864. Reorganized April 1, 
187<S. President, W. L. Brown ; Treasurer and Manager, 
Frank S. Richardson ; Directors, W. L. Brown, E. A. Rich- 
ardson, A. E. Riclimond, Jolni Bracewell, W. H. Gaylord ; 
Clerk, A. D. Cady. The quality of gas furnished by this com- 
pany is first-class, being of 18 candle-power, made only from 
Pennsylvania coal. They furnish for sale also a considerable 
amount annually of coke, largely used in furnaces and for do- 
mestic fuel. Mr. Richardson, the Treasurer, at his office oppo- 
site tiie post office, is agent for the Luhgren Regenerative Gas 
Lamp, tiie best illuminator introduced for stores and large 
apartments, an agreea])le light with.out the dazzle or flicker of 
electricity. Also ao-ent for o-as stoves. 



RECORD OF CORPORATIONS. 



JOHNSON MANUFACTURING COMPANY. 

Incorporated 1847. President, William S. Johnson ; Secre- 
tary, A. M. Tinker; Treasurer, D. D. Parmly ; Superintend- 
ent, Thomas E. BroY/n. Make fine book-fold ginghams and 
dress goods, Scotch ginghams and seersuckers. Give em- 
ployment to 375 hands and produce 225,000 yards per montli. 

FREEMAN MANUFACTURING COMPANY. 

Incorporated 1874. President L. L. Brown ; Treasurer, W. 
L. Brown ; Agent, John Bracewell ; Superintendent of Mills, 
AYilliam W. Cleghorn ; Superintendent of Print Works, F. P. 
Pearson. This company employs several hundred hands, mak- 
ing print cloths as well as prints, and is this year greatly en- 
larging its capacity, . both in extent and in the modern 
machinery for the finest prints. All these improvements have 
been devised and planned by Mr. Bracewell, who lias invested 
largely in the works, and is devoting his energetic mind to con- 
struct a complete print works. 

S. BLACKINTON WOOLEN COIMPANY. 

Incorporated 1876. President, Sanford Blackinton ; Treas- 
urer, O. A. Archer ; Agent, L. Pomeroy. iVIanufactures fancy 
cassimeres, emplo^nng 350 hands, producing 60,000 yards per 
month . 

ARNOLD PRINT WORKS. 

Incorporated 1876. President, A. C. Houghton; Treasurer 
and Clerk, William Arthur Gallup ; Directors, A. C. Hough- 
ton, C. G. Evans, William Arthur Gallup. This is the leading 
manufacturing establislnnent in North Adams, producing every 
week a large amount of different styles of calico prints and 
other goods. The wx^ekly capacity is 750,000 yards, and em- 
ployment is given to nearly five hundred h.ands. 



KECOKD OF COKPOKATIONS. 



NORTH ADAMS MANUFACTURING COMPANY, 

Braytonville. Incorporated 1877. President, H. G. B. Fisher; 
Treasurer, E. B. Penniman ; Superintendent, Tiiomas W. 
Skives. Make fine, fancy cassimeres and worsted goods, turn- 
ing out 35,000 yards per month and employing 175 hands. 

C. T. SAIMPSON MANUFACTURING COMPANY. 

JManufacturers of women's, misses' and children's shoes. 
President, C. T. Sampson ; Treasurer and Clerk, George W. 
Chase. Gives employment to 300 hands, making from 2500 to 
3000 pairs of shoes per day, which are sold largely in the West 
and South. 

GLEN WOOLEN COMPANY. 

Incorporated 1880. President, Sanford Blackinton ; Treas- 
urer, Frank A. Walker. Employs 100 liands, making 20,000 
yards per month of all-wool fancy cassimeres and Scotch 
clieviots. 

THE GREYLOCK MILLS. 

Incorporated 1880. President and Treasurer, Wellington 
Smith. JNIanufactures fancy French and Scotch ginghams, 
seersuckers and staple ginghams, i)roducing 250,000 yards per 
month. 

THE PHa:NIX MILLS 
Were estaV)lished in 18G0 by M. D. & A. W. Hodge, who are 
among the most extensive flour manufacturers in this state. 

THE BEAVER MILLS, 

Owned by Galhip & Houghton, employs 150 liands and turn 
out 1250 pieces of print cloth per week. 

THE ECLIPSE IMILL, 

Now owned by the Arnold Print Works manufactures 300,000 
yards of print cloth per month, employing 200 hands. 



RECORD OF CORPORATIONS. 



JAMES HUNTER & SON, 
Iron founders and machinists, are the manufacturers of ''Hun- 
ter's Improved French Rotary Fulling Mill" and cloth washers, 
steam engines and feed pumps for steam engines. 

LINWOOD WOOLEN COINIPANY. 

Incorporated 1884. Manufacturers of fancy cassimeres. 
President, Stephen AY. Barker ; Treasurer, George E. Kun- 
hardt ; Superintendent, John M. Leish., 

NORMAN L. MILLARD, 

Manufacturer of women's and misses' fine sewed, standard and 
pegged shoes. Daily product, 1500 pair. 

H. T. CADY 

Makes 1000 pairs per day of machine-sewed, cable-w^ire and 
pegged shoes for women, children and misses' wear. 

W. G. CADY & CO. (S. H. Fairfield) 
Manufacture boys', youths', women's, misses' and children's 
standard screw, machine sewed and pegged shoes . 

AYHITMAN, CANEDY & CO. (W. J. Wilkinson) 
Manufacture men's, hoys', youths', women's, misses' and cliil- 
/Iren's shoes — standard screwed, sewed and tagged. 

NORTH ADAMS ELECTRIC LIGHT AND POWER CO. 

Incorporated 188;"). President, George j\L Darl)y ; Treas- 
urer, E. Barnard. 



HISTORIC RECORD OF CHURCHES, 

1885. 



D^«4C 



NORTH ADAMS is justly famed for its fine church edifices 
clustered cosily together in the centre of the village, in 
keeping with the harmony of Christian fellowship that prevails 
among the mem])ers. 

THE BAPTIST CHURCH SOCIETY, 

the oldest in town, was organized in 1808 by Polder Calvin Keyes. 
It now has a membership of 820, with about 700 in the Sunday 
School. Rev. F. H. Rowley is Pastor ; Jeremiah Wilbur, C. 
T. Sampson, Fred. P. Brown, Samuel Keyes, James M. 
Canedy and George M. Darby, Deacons ; Sanford Blackinton, 
Calvin P. Sampson and E. S. Wilkinson, Trustees ; L. D. INIar- 
cellus, Clerk; E. S. Wilkinson, Treasurer; J. M. Canedy, 
Superintendent of Sunday School ; John L. Howes, Organist ; 
F. P. Brown, Chorister. 

THE METHODIST EPISCOPAL CHURCH 

in this village dates back to 1823. Rev. J. W. Thompson is 
Pastor. The Stewards are L. C. Rand, D. B. Bingham, John 
E. Drew, J. H. Buck, W. H. Pritchard, C. M. Sprague, H. C. 
Tower, M. V. N. Brainan, E. A. Rand. Trustees : A. C. 
Houghton, A. B. Wright, E. H. Arnold, B. G. Olds, H. A. 
Tower, J. H. Adams, W. H. Sperry. Leaders : E. T. Clark, 
P. Bibbins, D. S. Clegg, H. A. Tower, W. Wilkinson, J. V. 
Ashman. Sunday School Superintendent, W. H. Sperry. 



HISTORIC RECORD OF CHURCHES. 



Organist : E. A. Tower. Church members, 650 ; Sunday 
School, 400. 

THE CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH SOCIETY 

was organized in 1827. Rev. Theodore T. Munger, the last 
Pastor, resigned November 4. James Hunter, M. C. Jewett, 
A. F. Davenport, George B. Perry, George S. French and J. 
H. Wylie are the Deacons ; George W. Chase, James E. Hun- 
ter, D. J. Barber and F. S. Smith, Church Committee ; C. H. 
Cutting, W. H. Bixby, John Bracewell, Trustees ; Clerks, E. 
Barnard and Alex. Creswell ; Treasurer, W. W. Butler ; Super- 
intendent of Sunday School, W. W. Butler ; Organist, Francis 
McCormick. It has 438 members and nearly 300 in Sunday 
School. 

TPIE UNIVERSALIST SOCIETY 

of this village was organized in 1842 ])y Rev. William Wilcox, 
who began to preach here in 1841. The present building will 
seat nearly 500 people. The Pastor is Rev. J. AV. Hammett. 
Trustees, A. W. Hodge, William G. Cady, Willard Ballon ; 
Clerk, A. M. Sheldon ; Treasurer, Leonard Thayer ; Sunday 
School Superintendent, Dr. O. J. Brown ; Organist, Miss Linda 
Tower. 

THE UNION CHURCH, 

located at Blackinton, was organized by Rev. Jolui Alden in 
1843 with twenty members. The present church building, 
erected in 1871 ])y Sanford Blackinton and donated to the vil- 
lage, seats about 300 persons. It has 150 mem])ers and a 
Sunday School, the i)ulj)it ])eing supplied ]>y the Baptist, Con- 
gregational and lAIethodist churches. Church Committee, W. 
A. Hopkins, J. H. Wylie, T. C. Phelps, ^V . Wilkinscm, C. B. 
C'ook ; Superintendeut of Sunday School, (). A. Archer; Clerk 
and Tj-easurer, A. N. Smith ; Organist, Mrs. Elhi McGregory. 



HTSTOKIC KF.COKD OF CHUKCIIES. 



ST. John's ciiukch, EriscorAL. 

The Parish was organized December 11, 18;');"), Rev. AVil- 
liam M. AVilliaii being appointed l)y the Board of Missions to 
take chai-ge as Rector. Senior Warden, Gen. Andrew A. 
Richmond, and Junior Warden, William P. lirayton ; Vestry- 
men, J. O. Tucker, Robert A. Willian, William Tatlock, G. W. 
Adams, William W. Pratt, John Lidford. In 1859 the very 
beautiful stone church was finished and dedicated as St. John's 
Church. It was the gift of Mrs. Elizabeth M. Sibley of 
Rochester, N. Y. The present Rector is Rev. Harry I. Bod- 
ley, Charles H. Read and Anson D. Miner being Wardens, and 
William Arthur Gallup, William L. lirown, Joseph Bentley, 
Samuel Mabbett, F. A. Wilcoxson, Henry Duckworth and 
JohnEmmott, Vestrymen; AVilliam Arthur Gallup, Clerk ; F. 
A. Wilcoxson, Treasurer ; Superintendent of Sunday School, 
William Arthur Gallup ; and Organist and Chorister, David 
Roberts. It is a living church with 170 comnuniicants and a 
good attendance of worshippers. The Sunday School has 190 
scholars, oflicers and teachers, and a good li])rary. 

ST. FKANCIS' CHURCH, ROMAN CATHOLIC. 

The corner-stone of the spacious edifice on Eagle street was 
laid in the summer of 1867, and the church was completed and 
dedicated in July, 1869. The first church was built on Center 
street, prior to 1860, at which time Father Edward II. Purcell 
succeeded 'to the pastorate at Pittsfield and attended to the 
mission in North Adams. In the same year Rev. Charles 
Lynch was appointed assistant at North Adams. "In less 
than two years the Roman Catholic poi)ulation had so 
increased that Father Lynch was appointed Pastor here, with 
missions in South Adams, Williamstown and at the east end of 
the Hoosac Tunnel. From whicii time till the 28th of May, 
1883, he lal)ored assiduously in his charge, when he was stricken 
with paralysis, and died at 53 years of age, after 21 years of 



HISTORIC RECORT) OF CHURCHES. 



service in this town." B}^ his efforts the Roman Catholic 
churches in South Adams and AYilliamstown were also founded. 
He was succeeded by Father Charles E. Burke, the present 
pastor, whose flock of 3500 English speaking Roman Catholics 
all worship in St. Francis' Church. 

THE CHURCH OF OITl LADY OF THE SACRED HEART. 

The French Canadian people here, who had up to 1870 wor- 
shipped with the other Catholics at St. Francis' Church, were 
in that year allowed to have a pastor of their own nationality. 
Rev. Charles Crevier took charge of the congregation in Jan- 
uary, 1871, and rented the old chape-1 on Center street. After 
four years this chapel was abandoned for the basement of the 
new and elegant church this congregation has now nearly com- 
pleted in a sightly location on East Main street. Rev. Father 
Charles Crevier, to whose untiring labor, energy and enterprise 
this success is chiefly due still continues the pastor, and has in 
his congregation upward of 1000 persons — families of industri- 
ous mechanics and factory operatives, law-abiding and frugal, 
not one individual of them all being connected with the sale of 
spirituous liquors or any other disreputable or nefarious occu- 
pation. 

A MISSION OF FRENCH CANADIAN PROTESTANTS 

lias regular services in a convenient room assigned to them on 
Eagle street, in a part of the extensive structure belonging to 
the Baptist Church, through the liberality of that society, which 
also sustains two other missions in conjunction with the Con- 
gregational Church. 



RECORD OF BENEVOLENT SOCIETIES. 



>^c 



THE MASONIC ORDHR. 

COMPOSITE CHAPTER. ROYAL ARCH MASONS. 

Meets first Wednesday of each month at Masonic Hall. 

High Priest — Richard E. Lidford. 

King — Jesse A. Twing. 

Scribe — Daniel Luther. 

Captain of Hosts — Arthur C. Porter. 

P. Sojourne — John G. Loomis. 

R. A. Captain — William Blythe. 

Master 1st Vail — P^. A. Rand. 

" 2nd Vail—L. A. Burdick. 

'' 3d Vail— George H. Patrick. 
Treasurer. — L. W. White. 
Secretary. — Junius B. Temple. 
Chaplain— W. H. Bixby. 
Tyler.— O. P. Lewis. 

LAFAYETTE LODGE. F. AND A. MASONS. 

Meets on Monday, on or before the full of the moon, at Masonic Hall. 

W. M.—li. B. Harvie. 
S. W.—R. F. Gary. 
J. W.—F. P:. White. 
Treasurer. — Jonn Rouse. 
Secretary. — Sidney A. Plumb. 



RECORD OF BENEVOLENT SOCIETIES. 



Cliai^lain — A. W. Fulton. 
MarsJml — Samuel Mabbett. 
S. D.~E. L. Averell. 
J. D. — A. E. James. 
S. S.—A. Worthington. 
J. S. — Daniel Hoag. 
/. S. — Henry Turner. 
Tyler. — J. G. Loomis. 

Finance Committee — H A. Rand, L. W. Woodward, C. E. 
Ketchum, George Mabl)ett. 

GREYLOCK LODGE. F. AND A. MASONS. 

Meets second Tuesday of each month at Masonic Halh 

W. M.—Yyq(\ W. Reed. 

S. M. — Jesse A. Twing. 

J. W.— Frank N. Blake. 

Treasurer — Horace A. Tower. 

Secretary — Alexander Craswell. 

ChaplaiM — John H. Orr. 

jS. i>.— William Blythe. 

J. /).— Merrill H. Whitney. 

S. S. — ^^Joseph ]\Iakant. 

J. S.~A. M. Hubbard. 

KNIGHTS TEMPLAR. ST. PAUL COMMANDERY. 

Regular Conclave, second Friday evening of each month at Masonic Hall. 

Eminent Commander — Daniel Upton. 
Generalismno — Benjamin G. Olds. 
Captain- Oeneral — .John E. Drew. 
Prelate — George French. 
Senior Warden — Hobart C. Tower. 
Junior Warden — Jesse A. Twing. 
Treasurer — Geoi'ge II. Patrick. 
Recorder. — George F. Miller. 



RECORD OF BENEVOLENT SOCIETIES. 



Standard-Bearer — Richard E. Lidford. 
Sword-Bearer — Thomas W. Sykes. 
Warder — Edwin Barnard . 

Guards — L. L. Scott, A. C. Porter, J. C. Anthony. 
Sentinel— Sohw G. Loomis. 

Trustees of Masonic Bodies — George French, George H. 
Patrick, George Mabbett, A. B. Wright, Dr. H. J. Millard. 

NAOMI CHAPTER.— ORDER OF THE EASTERN STAR. 

Worthy Patron — Alexander W. Fulton. 
Worthy Matron — Mrs. A. F. Marsden. 
Assistant Worthy Matron.— Mv^. S. F. Kimball. 
Secretary— Y. E. White. 
Treasurer — Mrs. James Benson. 
Conductress— Myb. William Bower. 
Assistant Conductress— Mrs. A. N. Hicks. 
Warden— W\ss Byrne . 
Sentinel— S. F. Kimball. 
Adah— Mrs. F. D. White. 
Ruth — Miss Nettie Mabbett. 
Esther— Mrs. Edwin Welch. 
Martha — Miss Plumb. 
Electa— Mrs. W. F. Carev. 



GRAND ARNIY OK TTHK REPUBLIC 

CHARLES D. SANFORD POST. 

No. 79 OF THE Department of Mas.sachusetts, 
[Chartered 1869.] 

Meets in Grand Armj' Hall every Friday evening. 

Commander— Alexander W. Fulton. 
Senior F/ce- Comma nf?e?-— Lewis F. Amidon. 



RECORD OF BENEVOLENT SOCIETIES. 



Junior Vice-Commander— YA^^v& Vinton. 
Clmplain—'DQ^iQV V. Harrington. 
Surgeon-V^tQV Post. 
Adjutant— K. A. Lee. 
Quartermaster— l^^nvy Tower. 
Sergeant-Major—YvQ^ J. Lyons. 

Q. M. Sergeant— George O. Germaine. 

Officer of the Da?/— Chad. B. Cheesbro. 

Officer of the Gucml—Jsime^ Benjamin. 

SONS OF VETERANS.— CAMP LINCOLN, 

No. 9 OF THE District of Massachusetts. 

[Charteretl 1882.] 

MeetB in Grand Army Hall every Wednesday evening. 

Captain— W. C. Harriman. 

First Lieutenant— A. H. Hurlbnrt. 

Second Lieutenant— li. A. Stewart. 

Chcqdain—J. H. Mulaney. 

Quartermaster-Sergeant—C. H. Stewart. 

Sergeant of the Guard— ¥.. W. StockweU. 

Corporal of the Guard— ^. Weeks. 

Orderly Sergecmt—Arthm Lee. 

Trustees— ¥. H. Johnson, C Fisher, A. P. Lewis. 

ladies' relief corps. (Cx. a. r.) 

[Chartered 1883.] 
MeetP Tuesday evenings at Grand Army Hall. 

Preside7it—MineY\ii lllingworth . 
Seyiior Vice-President— Churlotte Oliver. 
Ju7iior Vice-Presidejit--^^ncy McAdoo. 
Secretary— Mi\,Yy Hicks. 

Treasurer Talmaclge. 

Chaplain— Mary Fife. 

Conductress— Curolme Peck . 

Guard— AiU Slade. 



RECORD OF BENEVOLENT SOCIETIES. 



XEIVLPERANCK SOCIKTIES. 

FATHER :\IATIIEW TOTAL ABSTINENCE SOCIETY. 

[Organized 1868.] 

iS2nritncd Director— J^ey. Charles ¥.. Burke. 

President— Yeter Keefe. 

Vice- Pr eside7it-- AY iWiam Dineen . 

Trectsurer—fl ohu Larkiii. 

Corresponding Secretary/— J ohn F. Bowes. 

Financial Secretary— ^James, Flaherty. 

Sergeant-at-Arms—.lnmes Calahan . 

Librarian and Jarn'tor—T. H. Hines. 

FATHER MATIIEW CADETS OF TEMPERANCE. 

INDEPENDENT MILITARY COMPANY. 

Caj^tain— Henry JNI. Lyons. 
First Lieutenant— John Bowes. 
Second Lieutenant— Vatvick Gunning. 
First Sergeant— John Cassidy. 
Second Sergeant— James Calahan. 
Ma n ager— James A . Bradley . 

ladies' aid society. 

President — P^liza Macksey. 

Vice-President — Elsy McCarthy . 

Secretaries— 'Mary Duso and Mary Flaherty. 

Treasurer— J A\ey McCormick. 

Book-keej^er— Mary Murphy. 

During this year tlie society has organized a charity fund to 
assist worthy persons ])rought to want and distress by intem- 
perance. A kind, Cln-istian work for noble-hearted women. 

independent order of good templars. 

RELIANCE LODGE, NO. 21. 



Deimty Grand Chief Ternpiar— Henry W. Lara]>ee. \ 

Worthy Chief Tewrplar— James INlitchell. 



IlECOIU) OF BENEVOLENT SOCIETIE 



Worthy Vice- Temj^Iar—MvB. Hosford. 

Worth}/ Secretary— George ,1. Tanner. 

Worthy Treasurer — F. N. Blake. 

Worthy Financial Secretary— l^eitxe INIabbett. 

Worthy Chaplain — Charles Perry. 

GtKArd—QeXiii IMcLanolilin. 

Sentinel— John Cousins. 

Ifarshal—'RoheYt I. Stewart. 

Captain of Cadet Corps— Hurry I\. Kins,'. 



SAINT JKAN BAPTISTE SOCIKTY 

r.ENEVOLENT, FOR MUTUAL SUCCOK. 
Meetings first and tliird Sundays of each month in room roar of French Church. 

President— F. A. Sicard. 
Vice-President— George Felix. 
Secretary— Jiohert Gautier. 
Financial Secretary— ,lose\^h Beleveau. 
Assistant Finaiici(d Secretary— J . A. IVnoit. 
7yeasn rer— Antome Lonion. 
Marsh(d—'S orhert INIandeville . 
Ch((2>lain—li\ey. C. Crevier. 



ANCIENT ORDER OE HIBERNIANS 

Meets in Lodge on first and third Sundays of each month. 

President— John E. IMaloney. 
Vice-President— ¥. J. Ashe. 
Financial Secretary— Denis Cronin. 
Recording Secret((,ry—W\\\'n\m J. IMcCnrtliy. 
Treasvrer—JvimeB Fitzgerald. 



IlECOKD OF r.KXIlYOLENT SOCIETIES. 



KNIOHTS OK HONOR, NO. 4:87, 

Past Dictator— Gooro^e 11. Lidford. 

Dictator— ^y\\\\ilm 11. Reagan. 

Vice- Dictator— Orson Dalr vniple . 

Assistant Dictator— H^muel Mal^bett. 

Reporter— C. A. Will)iir. 

Finance Rejwrter—J . Ti. Chippendale. 

Treas}(rer—T)i\ H. Bnshnell. 

Cha2:>Iain—lvii Liiidsey. 

(7// /r7^— William Richards. 

Examining Physician— Dr. H. Bnshnell. 

Gn((r(Jia)i— John Adams. 

Sentinel— V. O. IMillot. 



KNIOHTTS AND LADIKS OF HONOR 

Protector — G eorge Lidf ord . 
Vice-Protector — Mrs. Dr. Bnslniell. 
Chaplain — Mrs. Henry Mason. 
G H ide — James Ilargraves . 
GvarrJian — Mrs. George Lid ford. 
Sentinel — George Slade . 
Hecording Secretary — C. A. Willinr. 
Financial Secretary— ¥ . B. Tefft. 
Treasnrer — William Bardwell. 



I. O. OK O. K. 

ON ECO LODGE (NO. 100). 

[Instituted Dec. 19, 1845. Re-instituted Jan. 8, 1873.] 

Regular Meetings at Odd Fellows' Hall on Tuesday evenings. 

Noble Grand — Preseott W. Eaton. 
Vice-Grand — William S. Billino-s. 



RECORD OF BENEVOLENT SOCIETIES. 



Secretary — Nathan B. Flood. 
Recording Secretary — Dr. C. I. Soule. 
Treasurer — Georae G. Welton. 



©" 



WELLS EiNX'AMPMENl' (nO. 28). 
Meets second and fourth Fridays of each montli at Odd Fellows' Hall. 

Chief Patriarch — Warren Chase. 
High Priest — Perry M. Farley. 
Sriiior Warden — Frank R. Smitli. 
Jiniior Warden — Prescott W. Eaton. 
Secretary — Fernando L. Pand. 
Treasurer — AVilliam C. Ellis. 
0. S. — George Welton. 
/. S. — Oscar F. Nichols. 



j ROYAIv ARCANUN4. 

i 

I Berkshire Council 839. 

I 

Meets in Odd Fellows' Tlalj on the lirst and third Mondays of each month. 

llegeiit — C. W. Purcell. 
Vice- Regent — W. II. Draper. 
Past Regent — John E. Drew. 
Chaplain — AYilliani Bower. 
Orator— F. L. Tilton. 
Secretary — W. F. Spear. 
Treasurer — Harry C. Bliss. 
Collector — Warren L. Potter. 
Guide — John M. Pinkham. 

I Warden — W. C. Ames. 

i 
I 

I 



1, 1. WEISHT 






DEALER IN 



FLOUR, GROCRRIES, 

AND 

FAMILY SUPPLIES. 

A CHOICE STOCK OF 

TEAS, COFFEE, SPICES, CANNED GOODS, 

Kruits and Vegetables, 
CREAMERY BUTTER, CHEESE, ETC., 

all at Lowest IMarket Prices, and Satisfaetion Guaranteed. 
ITBLBPHONB 60NNBGTI0N. 



Brick Block, ii Bank Street, North Adams. 



W. H. eillOEP, 



DEALER IN 



DRESS GOODS! 

GLOVES, HOSIERY, ETC. 



ALSO TRIMMINGS IN 



Sills, Velvets, Pliisies and Novelty Goods 



IN ALL SHADES FOR 



KALL AND W^INTER W^KAR 



ALSO AN ELEGANT LINE OF 



LADIES' AND MISSES' CLOAKS ! 
DRESS SUITINGS FOR FALL AND WINTER COSTUMES! 



WITH A FULL LINE OF 



LADIES' #■= MISSES' HOSE p.^^ UNDERWEAR 



SUITABLE FOR THE SEASON. 



Opposite Wilson House, NORTH ADAMS, MASS. 



CHAS. M. HOWARD, 

RICHN/IOND HOUSE 

SHAVING .^^ HAIR DRESSING PARLOR. 



CHILDREN'S HAIR CUTTING DONE NICELY, 

COR. OF MAIN AND STATE STREETS, 

RAMSDELL'S 99 CENT STORE, 



H EA.DOTJ ARTERS 



FOR- 



FANCY AND HOUSEKEEPING GOODS! 

Jewelry, 5 and 10 Cent Goods, Etc., Etc. 

^PICTURE FRAMING A SPECIALTY^ 



No. 6 Wilson Block, NORTH ADAMS. 



MILLARD & JONES, 

HOTEL AND HOUSE ANNUNCIATORS ! 

Electric Call Bells of all I'inds, Burglar Alarins, 
Electric Gas Lighling, Speaking Tubes. 

Electric Watchman System for Mills, Etc., 

A SPECIALTY. 

o<| REPAIRING PROMPTLY ATTENDED TO.t> 

LOCK BOX 98. NORTH ADAMS, MASS. 

George C. Millard. Arthur H. Jones. 



JAMES F. NAGLE, 

4:8 EAOLE STREET, 

Ladies' Hair Dresser and Cutter! 



MAKES A SPDCIALTY OF 



CUTTING CHILDREN'S HAIR! 



IN GOOD TASTE AND STYLE. 



CARD (^F 



DR. A. K. DAVKNPORT, 

DENTIST, 

89 MAIN STJIEET (Davenport 1'.uildin(0, 

NORTH ADAMS, MASS. 

150 WES1' FOIITY-FIFTH STREET (Near Fifth Avenue), 

NEW YORK CITY. 



THE HOOSAC SAVINGS BANK, 

lOO rvIAIN STREET. 

[INCORPOEATED 1S71.] 

DEPOSITS RECEIVED FROM 10 CENTS TO $1,000. 

Deposits draw interest from the first of every quarter, and is 
paid or credited on amount in bank on June 1st and December 
1st of each year. 

OPPIGEI^S: 

President — O. A. Archer. 

Vice-Presidents — II. P. Briggs, James E. Ilnnter, S. T. 
Mather. 

Treasurer — W. W. I>ntler. 

Trustees — A. E. Richmond, Keyes Danfortli, James E. Hnn- 
ter, J. M. Chace, C. H. Ingalls, Samuel T. Mather, Joel Bacon, 
H. P. Briggs, E. B. Cady, George B. Perry, Timothy Collins, 
James Hunter, J. H. Elagg, E. A. Walker", D. J. Barber, E. 
B. Penniman, H. G. B. Eislier, Pev. Cliarles Crevier. 



L. M. MENEi 



f 



-I>EAT.Erv IX- 



DIAMONDS, JEWELRY, WATCHES, 

S I L V B R W A R E , 

TABLE-KI^IVES, FORKS, SPOONS, SPECTACLES, Etc., Etc. 

Peo[)le whose time is of any partieirlar aceoimt want good 
watL'heSy (ind invst hare fheiii . The l)est watch now to lie had 
is the 

and we keep a good assortment for hidies and gentlemen of 
goUl and silver. 
Fresh invoices of goods in all the aln^ive specified lines 
constantly arriving, among them some 

Choice Gems Especially Selected for the 
Holiday Trade! 

ly Don't make a selection till you have seen my stock. 



ALSO A FINE STOCK OF 

SIVIITH'S 

AMERICAN PIANOS AND ORGANS! 

and other Musical Instruments for Band and Parlor use, 
and an extensive stock of 

SHEET MUSIC, SONGS and INSTRUCTION BOOKS 

FOK ANY INSTUl^METsT. 

WATCH REPAIRING A SPTXIAETY 

AT THE OLD STAND. 

5 Wilson House Block, NORTH ADAMS. 



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